The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02424

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"(Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 29
Miami, Florida Friday, July 18, 1975
sue by Man Two Sections
Price 25 "enta
Rally for Soviet Jews Marks Lift- Off at Cape
Lights for Freedom 10-A
The launch of the Apollo-Soyuz test proj-
ect at Cape Canaveral Tuesday was an occa-
sion for a mass rally urging cooperation be-
tween the United States and the Soviet Union
not only in .he exploration of space but in the
human area of easing emigration restrictions
against Soviet Jews.
The rally was sponsored by the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, a commit-
tee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
community relations committee, jointly with
the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Central Florida.
IT WAS held at the Kennedy Space Center
just before the 4 p.m. launch of the American
Iron Guard Chief
Faces Loss Of His
U.S. Citizenship
DETROIT (JTA) The United States Attorney in
Detroit has filed juit to revoke the citizenship of Rumanian
Orthodox Bishop Valari&a D. Trifa of Grass Lakes, Mich.,
on grounds 'hat he falsely denied his membership in the
Rumanian Fascist 'Iron Guard" and participation in po-
groms against Rumanian Jews in 1941 when he applied
for naturalization.
VALARIAN TRIFA
falsely denied charges
Apollo for a link-up in orbit with the Soviet
Soyuz space vehicle. Congressional and civic
leaders from various parts of the country in
attendance saw the rally and protest.
The rally was the occasion for releasing
a letter addressed to the Soviet and American
Continued on Page 3-A
PREMItR RABIN WARNS
It May Take
Two Days -- Or
Half a Year
Trifa, 61, was granted Amer-
ican citizenship in 1957.
THE CLERIC, a one time
leader of the Rumanian Chris-
tian Students which the govern-
ment, in its suit described as
"a section of the Iron Guard."
has 60 days to reply to the
charges which were served for-
mally two days ago.
The government's action
against him was the culmina-
tion of an extensive review by
the U.S. Immigration and Natu-
ralization Service that followed
allegations that Trifa had mis-
represented his activities in
Rumania in the early years of
World War II.
Members of the "Iron
Continued on Page 8-A
/- V Heads
Consider
Changes
WASHINGTON(JTA)Sen.
Abraham Ribicoff, one of the
leading co-sponsors of the
Jackson Amendment, indicated
July 8 that he and other co-
sponsors were prepared to con-
sider changes in the measure
if that would lead to an im-
provement in U.S.-Soviet trade
relations and an increase in
emigration for Soviet Jews.
The Connecticut Democrat,
one of a 17-man Senate delega-
tion that returned from a visit
to the Soviet Union July 7, also
implied that the Jackson
Amendment has not worked the
way its supporters had hoped.
"IF A policy fails ... I don't
think you should stick forever
with it," Ribicoff told a press
conference here.
He added, however, that it
appeared, from the Senate
groups' contacts with Soviet of-
ficials, that the Russians now
Continued on Page 3-A
SENATE RESOLUTION
Eye Arms to Jordan
WASHINGTON fJTA) Sen. Clifford Case (R.
N.J.) announced that he has introduced a concurrent reso-
lution calling lor hearings on the proposed sale of a $350
million U.S. air defense system to Jordan.
Case said in his announcement, "My objective in of-
fering this resolution is to permit hearings before the For-
eign Relations Committee concerning these proposed sales
of equipment.
"WHILE I do not myself have a final view as to
Continued on Page 7-A
UN Charged Responsible
For Jerusalem Terrorism
Police Continue Manhunt 2-A
JERUSALEM(JTA)The Israeli government has bitterly
condemned the United Nations for giving its "official seal of
approval" to the terrorists responsible for the bomb in Jerusalem
that took 14 lives and wounded 73.
A statement issued by the Foreign Ministry in the aftermath-
of the tragedy referred to the UN's acceptance of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in its various forums as a legitimate
non-governmental body, and said:
Continued on Page 5-A
We Decide 6-A
Basic Threat 10-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin, who return-
ed to Israel before dawn Sun-
day, was closeted with his
Cabinet late in the afternoon to
report on his talks with Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kissinger
in Bonn over the weekend.
Prior to the Cabinet session,
Rabin briefed Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon and Defense Min-
ister Shimon Pereshis fellow
members of Israel's negotiating
team on the outcome of his
talks with Kissinger.
MOST OBSERVERS here did
not believe that any final de-
cision would emerge from the
Cabinet meeting with regard to
an interim agreement with
Egyot.
The Premier told reporters at
Ben Gurion Airport that he was
now more optimistic than before
that progress toward an interim
settlement could be achieved.
But he stressed that the ne-
gotiations could continue for a
long time. "It may take two
days, it may take half a year,"
the Premier said.
Rabin told newsmen that
there were some indications
that Egypt was prepared to shift
some of its positions but it re-
mained unclear whether its new
Continued on Page 10-A
BUT...
Opposition
Yields To
Pressure
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV _(JTA) Is-
raeli military leaders and
important political figures
within the governing Labor
Alignment and, surprisingly,
the Likud opposition, appear
to be succumbing to relent-
less American pressure on
Israel to accept Egypt's
terms for an interim agree-
mentmeaning withdrawal
from the strategic Mitla and
Gidi Passes in Sinai.
The military leaders who
have been charged with the
task of preparing for pres-
entation to the Cabinet a de-
tailed assessment of Israel's
options from the purely de-
fense point of view, are ap-
parently concentrating on
Continued on Page 2-A
KISSINGER TELLS THIRD WORLD
We 'd Quit UN If Israel Out
MILWAUKEE, Wis. Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger warned here that
the United States will consider quitting
the United Nations if the UN decides to
oust Israel from membership when it
meets again for sessions beginning some
six weeks from now.
Addressing the Institute of World Af-
fair of the University of Wisconsin, Kis-
singer declared that "The coerced (in the
United Nations) are under no compulsion
to submit. To the contrary, they are given
all too many incentives simply to depart
th: scene."
KISSINGER SAID, speaking from a
Continued on Page 10-A
GEN. WEIZMAN
military implications


Page 2-A
fJkvlst fkridfiati
Friday, July is, 1975
Opposition Yields to Pressure
Continued from Page 1-A
the military implication-
a pull-back from the pusses.
They are reportedly try-
ing to determine how to
make the. rvst *>f,' situation
that would leave Israel's de-
fense line without the vital
topographical anchors pro-
vided by the Sinai passes
and how to ensure proper
survrilk-riL-c and an advance
warning system against an
EevpTian attack on new Is-
raeli lines spread over the
flat desert that extends from
the passes to Israel's pre-
Juno, 1967 borders.
RELIABLE SOURCES said
that th T;r;ij militn-v team
cannot help but take into con-
sideration th? military implica-
tions of a confrontation with the
United States and the gap in Is-
raeli-U.S. relations which, from
the military point of view could
mean a drastic curtailment of
the U.S. weapons flow to Israel.
The sources noted that
American pressure on Israel >s
no longer limited to expressions
of impatience and barely veiled
threats of non-support at a re-
convened Geneva conference.
It has already taken material
form in th- delay in supplies of
various items of military hard-
ware rhat Israel has requested
and could alv soon affect items
th-* are b-ing supplied auto-
matically under previous agree-
ments, the sources said.
This must be taken into ac-
count by the senior officers pre-
u! their military assessment
f'- the Cabinet.
IN POLITICAL circles, mean-
while, more voices are being
rai<-.d in favor of accepting
American demands if only be-
cause Israel vitally n-eds U.S.
friendship and support at a time
when it is struygHng not only
to maintain tin 1 pea
sible defense posture but to put
to nyhts a sagging economy and
deal with serious internal prob-
lems.
Former Foreign Minister Ab-
ba ESan 'and" Tfim'ak Navon,
chairman of the Knesset's pow-
erful defense and foreign affairs
committee, have already made
it clear that they favor com-
pliance with American wishes.
Former Information Minister
Aharon Yariv, a military man
who was one? chief of Israel's
army int.iliyence. added his
s'ipport to that view several
davs ago.
A BIG surprise came when
former Air Force Commander
Gen. E:'.er Weizman. a leader of
the Likud opposition and a well-
known "hawk." stated flatly
several days ago that he sup-
ported the idea of an interim
agreement with Egypt on the
terms the U.S. is urging Israel
to accept.
Addressing the agricultural
faculty at the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem. Weizman said
that what Israel needed most
n" ell to re-
. its internal difficulties.
He said that what he feared
most was that American p
sure would bj everted aver
Judaea-Samaria regions (West
Bank) and i"'-t Jerusalem, Is-
sues that would inevitably arise
when the Geneva conference is
reconvened.
THAI PRESSURE. Wei
said, would be far harder than
the present squeeze on Israel
for r. settlement in Sinai, and if
it finds Israel unprepared in-
ternally, as it is now. "we shall
not be able to stand up to it."
Weizman stressed that Israel
needs time to improve the duali-
ty of life at home, straighten
out its ec momv and strengthen
the shaky labor-management re-
lations.
He said there were also im-
provements to be made in the
army.
When these primary tasks are
accomplished, Weizman said, a
n-"w nition-d leadership should
take the helm that would be
able to face up to American
pressure.
Security Forces
In Giant Manhunt
JERUSALEM iJTA) Is-
raeli security forces are con-
tinuing their manhunt for the
perpetrators of the violence
that led to the bombing deaths
of 14 persons here.
Hundreds 01 vehicles were
stopped and searched and
scores of West Bank and East
Jerusalem residents were de-
tained for questioning.
ACCORDING TO police, how
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A special police team was set
up to investigate the tragedy
which occurrtd when a booby-
trapped ice-oox blew up in Zion
Square spreading carnage
among crowds of pre-Sabbath
shoppers.
Several of tne 73 persons
wounded remain in hospitals
for treatment of what was de-
scribed as "severe" injuries.
POLICE ARE circulating
drawings based on eyewitness
descriptions of two Arabs who
may have deposited the infer-
nal machine on the busy street.
The drawings were distrib-
uted tj police manning road-
blocks in the Jerusalem area. !
Police ha' e not released any
description of the suspects.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin has
told the Knesset that the ter-
rorist ca.nage reenforces Is-
rael's decision to adhere to its
policy "of r.ot entering into any
negotiations with the terrorist
organisations. The only lan-
guage they understand is that
of the sword, a'id it is in that
language that we shall talk to
. ::i. '
HE ALSO asserted that the
government of Israel "is deter-
oed to continue, with even
si. ._:-: ..... operation
against terrorism by preven-
uii. utt.ition and punishment'
against the terrorist organize-!
tions wherever we can reach
Ciic -
Rabin urged the inte-nation-
al to immediately
and unconditionally condemn
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Friday, July 18, 1975
+Jewisti Flcricflan
Page 3-A
Rally for Soviet Jews Marks Cape Lift-Off
Continued from Page 1-A
astronauts from the Moscow
Jewish scientist, Alexander
Druck.
The letter claims that in view
of the open exchange of space
technology between the Soviet
Union and the U.S., there is no
longer any pretext for the So-
viet authorities to deny emigra-
tion vjsas to Jewish scientists
who had worked on the space
project on the grounds of
""DRUCK'S LETTER calls on
the American astronauts and
Soviet cosmonauts to "use your
influence for the triumph of
justice and humanity."
A new "Freedom Flag" of
Soviet Jewry, consisting of a
white Star of David on a sky-
blue field, was unfurled for the
first time at the rally. The flag
is a presentation to the free
world from Soviet Jews harass-
ed by Soviet officials and de-
nied visas.
It was raised secretly in Mos-
cow and was smuggled out of
Jackson-Vanik Leaders
Considering Possible Changes
B
Continued from Page 1-A
understand the strong Congres-
sional interest and support for
free emigration and that "Con-
gress will not move until people
can fjet out."
Ribicoff said that another
major cosponsor of the Jackson
Amendment, Sen. Jacob K.
Javits (R-. N.Y.), also favored
some chanues.
THE JACKSON-Vanik Amend-
ment was incorporated into the_
1T4 Trade Reform Act with
overwhelming support in both
houses of Congress. The meas-
ure was named for Sen. Henry
M. Jackson (D., Wash.), its
principal author and advocate
in the Senate, and Rep. Charles
A Vanik (D., Ohio) author of
an identical measure in the
House.
The amendment was strongly
opposed by the White House
and Secretary of State Henry
A Kissinger who argued that
"quiet diplomacy" was more ef-
fective means of achieving the
free emigration aims of the
amendment's supporters.
Adoption of the Jackson
Amendment last year and a re-
lated measure authored by Sen.
Adlai Stevenson (D., Ill), which
put a $300 million ceilins on Ex-
port Import Bank credits to the
Soviet Union, was believed re-
sponsible for Moscow's repudia-
tion of its 1973 trade pact with
the U.S.
SINCE THEN emigration
from the USSR, which reached
a peak of 35.000 in 1973. drop-
ped to an annual rate of 13,000
this year, according to the State
Department.
The Administration, mean-
while, has reportedly renewed
its efforts to modify the Jack-
son Amendment. Kissinger dis-
cussed the issue with the Sen-
ators who had just returned
from Moscow.
Several Senators said after-
wards that they had discussed
the possibility of changes in the
Jackson and Stevenson amend-
ments.
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that country by Dr. Morton
Freiman, of Miami and his wife,
Tina, on their return from a
visit to the USSR.
SPOKESMEN FOR the Jew-
ish organizations stressed that
the rally was not aimed against
the joint space project but
against the treatment of Jews
in the Soviet Unionboth those
remaining there and those seek-
ing exit visas.
Three buses departed from
the Federation and Temple Sinai
at 7 a.m. Tuesday, headed for
Cape Canaveral, where they
were met by others from the
Orlando area. The protest,
originally scheduled for the
grounds of the Kennedy Space
Center, was staged on the out-
skirts of Titusville near the
Cape because of NASA's re-
ported refusal to grant permis-
sion for the rally, according to
a spokesman from the Soviet
Jewry Committee.
In New York, meanwhile, Dr
Jack Cohen, of the National In-
stitute of Health in Bethesda,
Md., and Dr. H. Eugene Stan-
ley, of the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology, national
co-chairmen of the Committee
of Concerned Scientists, releas-
ed a statement on the joint
space flight and the situation of
Soviet Jews.
IT NOTED that "While the
astronauts link up in space,
minute details of technology
which made the rendezvous
possible, will be read by mil-
lions of people all over the
world, but on earth, Soviet
space scientist Alexander Druck
is still denied permission to emi-
grate on the pretext that his
space knowledge is 'secret.' "
The statement also observed
that "Cooperation in space
should be matched by coopera-
tion on earth and as long as
Soviet scientists cannot deal
freely with Western colleagues,
and while Soviet abuse of
science and scientists increases,
we can have no faith in the ex-
pectations raised by the empha-
sis on detente."
He's Bar Mitzvah at 82
JERUSALEM (JTA) It is never too late to
celebrate one's Bar Mitzvah, not even at 82. When
Benjamin Swig, of Taunton, Mass. reached 13 in 1906,
he could not celebrate his Bar Mitzvah because the
small Massachusetts town had only eight Jews and no
rabbi.
However, he never gave up the idea of celebrating
his Bar Mitzvah, and so he did, at 82, with a simple
ceremony at the Western Wall.
Now a well known San Francisco philanthropist.
Swig could afford to waive the rights for a Bar Mitzvah
present, and contributed instead a $150,000 gift to the
Jerusalem Foundation for a unique archaeological gar-
den to be created in the city.
The gift was handed to Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek, who is also chairman of the Jerusalem Founda-
tion.
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Page 4 A
+Je*ist Hcrididn
Friday, July 18< 197s;
Clarifications Needed
It seems to us that clarifications are needed when
U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger returns to
Washington with the guarded promise that there is more
hope than before for an interim agreement between
Israel and Egypt.
At the same time. Premier Yitzhak Rabin, inter-
viewed in Bonn, declares that Israel and Egypt are "by-
no means" anywhere near rapprochement.
Clarifications are especially important because Kis-
singer's and Rabin's statements were made immediately
following their meeting last week in West Germany.
What did Kissinger deduce from his meeting with
Rabin that Rabin did not deduce from his meeting with
Kissinger?
On the one hand, it is perfectly logical to assume
that neither leader wants to go on record with respect to
what really passed between them although we would
be safe in drawing fairly accurate conclusions about
what in fact they did say to one another.
On the other hand, even the diplomatic decision to
be publicly vague and non-commital is a far cry from
Dr. Kissinger's expression of hope, however guarded.
#
*
Precedent in the Past
One reason for suggesting that clarifications are
needed is that the difference between Kissinger's and
Rabin's assessments of their talks pats Israel into an
even more firmly entrenched image of the recalcitrant
bargainer.
This may be exactly what Dr. Kissinger wants, but
the point is that it is dishonest.
For those who may call this an "unfair" and even
"political" conclusion, there certainly is precedent in
the way in which Dr Kissinger has conducted the State
Department's affairs to argue that he has deliberately
overdrawn his bargaining "successes" in the past. Why
not now?
In any case, Dr. Kissinger can certainly set the
whole problem aside. All he needs to do is to make some
clarifications.
The Bicentennial Year
On July 4, our nation launched its celebration of
the American bicentennial year.
Throughout the coming year, there will be contin-
uous events to mark our entry into the third century
of U.S. independence.
Our history as a free people is, of course, dotted
with the participation of Jewish heroes in the cause of
freedom.
From the days of the American Revolution and the
pivotal role Hayim Salomon played in its success to
our own generation and the contribution of Albert Ein-
stein to the winning allied effort in World War II, Jews
have been unique beyond their numbers in the great
pages of our nation's history.
American Jews in communities across the land will
join in the many bicentennial celebrations during the
months ahead. Jewish participation in South Florida bi-
centennial functions are already being planned.
In a world and at a time especially trying for all
Americans, the bicentennial is a welcome release and
a reaffirmation of our allegiance to our land.
Anti-Zionism in Mexico
By adopting a resolution which calls for the elimi-
nation of Zionism.'' the United Nations Conference on
Women debased the very purpose of its gathering in
Mexico City. This linking of Zionism with colonialism,
neo-colonialism. racial discrimination and apartheid in
the "Declaraton of Mexico 1975" means that the im-
portant things in the Declaration for women will be lost.
The political issues overshadowed the efforts to im-
prove the lot of women throughout the world.
ewisli Floridian
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Out of Town Upon Request
Ex-Hunters Now Red Cronies
-yHE SUNDAY paper trumpet-
ed in a headline, "Space
Race It's to End in a Tie.''
I notice no tie in space be-
tween the United States and
the Soviet Union. It is this na-
tion that made it to the moon
in a trot like Foolish Pleasure
over Ruffian.
The Soviet contender was a
cripple and still is a cripple.
The Soviet contender still
hasn't made it.
IT IS the Soviets who will
Mindlin
benefit from a close-up study ofl
our space technoiogv, not wj
from theirs. Then what "tie" i,
there, and why, indeed, should
we tie up with them at alP
The clearest example of th'i
was when three Soviet cosmoi
nauts were killed in space J
ostensibly from a faulty p-eT"
sure door lock, a "minor" tech-l
nological matter.
But within months.
United States quiet; |
Soviets four space suits, an in|
dication that that is v
technological gap
situated and an indication!
of just how primii
space technology wa
ly at the time.
SEN. WILLIAM Proj
declaration of concern ;.
er week over the CO j
poor record of Soyuz in fiightl
docking, and the immediJ
acy with which the
tion moved to squelcl
ator's statements, both -
that nothing much ha- .
When it comes to
adequacies, whether it
space or growing gra
during automobile- for horael
consumption, we can nol
the White House or
Hill to tell us anythi:.
truth.
And the truth is that the
won't end, the Sunday paper
headline notwithstanding, nor
will it be a tie. The Apollo-
Soyuz link-up will be just the
beginning.
IF THAT seems absurd, con-
sider the final days of World]
War II in the European Thea-
tre. Then, too, there was a race,]
Then, too, we decided it woullj
Continued on Page 9-A
Major Political Parties Shifting
Volume 48
Friday, July 18, 1975
Number 29
10 AB 5735
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
In Gerald Ford's unsurprising
announcement that he will run
for the Presidency in 1976, the
dog beneath the skin is the fact
that the major political parties
are shifting, and that Mr. Ford
is counting on the shift to elect
him.
We call these shifts party
realignments, as if they were
autos whose wheels have to be
brought back in line. Actually,
parties are part of the social
organism.
They have largely lost touch
with the directing centers of
ideas and interests in the
brain and heart of the society
which usually tell them what
they are there for. and what to
do. They have to get back in
touch again.
THE LAST great shift of this
sort came with Franklin Roose-
velt in 1932. and it elected him.
Harry Truman renewed FDR's
insight in 1948. Nixon was the
first Republican to see what was
happening, in 1968, but he tried
to force a change by sheer
bludgeoning, instead of going
with the organism.
Gerald Ford means to use
what is happening, but is quiet-
er about it. The Democrats, of
course, must have seen what is
happening by now, but they act
as if they were still wrapped in
a dream from which they can-
not awaken.
The point is that the old class
systemthe owning and mana-
gerial rich, the middle class, the
industrial proletariathas dis-
solved.
A NEW system is emerging
partly class and ethnic groups
(white collar, blue collar, the
blacks, the ethnics, the welfare
poor), partly geographic
(Northeast, the two-party South,
the Heartland, the Mountain
States, the Southwest, the Pa-
cific), partly functional and age
LERNER
groups (knowledge industries,
managers, campus elite, media
and other professional elites, po-
litically conscious women, the
ins. the voting).
Most of these are unhappv
with the party system and their
place in it. Hence the confused,
shifting situation.
If the elections were held
next week or next month
enough of these old and new-
groups would coalesce uneasilv
around Gerald Ford to elect
him. He would beat any of the
three Democratic front-runners
Kennedy. Wallace or Jack-
son.
THREE MONTHS ago it was-
n't so, and three months from
now it may not be so. Fifteen
months from now anything can
happen.
But right now it is so
despite Watergate and the Nix-
on carry-over and the traumatic
pardon and the inflation-depres-
sion and the energy crisis and
Mr. Ford's own unglamorous
image. It was a combination
which everyone expected to
doom Mr. Ford. It hasn't.
The crazy part of it is that
the underlying changes which
have produced the party shifts
should logically be favoring the
Democrats. This is true of the
voting strength of the blacks
and that of the welfare poor,
the cutting of Democrats into
the Heartland and Mountain
States and Southwest, their
dominance on the Pacific Coast,
their influence with the your.j:
and with the women's move-
ment, their skill in using not
machine volunteers In car.-
paiens.
BUT MOSTLY it la the
ture of the knowledge
tries and media elite
should largely be shaping 6
political climate.
Yel the fact is that the Derr.o-
crats haven't known how to
manage their political
The'.' pushed everything
cess In the McGo'
paign they developed a quota
image and a new :
the left which frightened ofl
many of their natural a
They seemed to be abandon-
ing the traditional value
and as a result they
blue-collar groups and the eth-
nics more than they had J
scared the formerly Democratic
South more than they had to.
went further with their -r*^'
ing economy and welfare t0
image than was reasonahle. '
lowed- the people i*' identify
them too strongly with campus
and media power.
THEY ALIENATED man?
whom they could have held
won over, and allowed a porw
lism of the right to be strength;
ened in the Wallace wing
their own party and to emerge
in the Reagan wing of the Re-
publicans.
That is where we stand to-
day. If anv Democratic leaders
(I exclude Wallace herd under-
stand what is happeneng they
don't seem to have the courapj
to take a stand against it'
for Gerald Ford, he was W**>
in announcing he would ru^
mainly because his irniJ|f
firmer, his vetoes have hem ai
he is counting on the D*
Continued on Page 9-A
ol


Friday, July 18, 1975
gjjgljig nrridltor,
Page 5-A
At 60, Dayan is Embittered
By UZl BENZIMAX
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Some weens ago, knesseter
Moshe Dayan celebrated his
60th birthday. A group of
his friends in the Knesset"
arranged a small party.
Dayan seemed moved by
the gesture, but he asked
his friends to refrain from
praising him.
They agreed. But when
the assembled company
raised their glasses in a
toast, one of them told
Dayan: "We want you to
know that you have more
friends than you believe."
THIS REMARK reflected
Dayan's own feeling that he
had been abandoned by most of
his friends and supporters
when he left the government a
year earlier. By chance, the
birthday party took place dur-
ing the week that marked Yit-
zhak Rabin's first year in the
Premiership.
It was, of course, the estab-
lishment of the Rabin Cabinet
which brought about Dayan's
replacement after seven years
at the Defense Ministry.
A year later, Dayan is a pas-
sive Knesseter. He attends the
House regularly, but does not
sit on any of its committees. He
busies himself with writing his
autobiography and giving lec-
tures in Israel and abroad.
DESPITE THESE calm and
tranquil occupations, which
could create an impression of
near indifference to current
litics, Dayan in fact contin-
to follow the political sit-
uation keenly and closely.
He expresses his ideas will-
ingly and is still a most popular
subject of newsmen's atten-
tions. When he speaks, the
whole country listens. The po-
litical community is constantly
referring to him, to his poten-
tial moves and to his ideas.
A year after leaving office,
B'NAI ISRAEL"
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GEN. MOSHE DAYAN
Dayan is a bitter man. and still,
as always, a human enigma
and an intensely political ani-
mal.
SOME OBSERVERS believe
that Dayan still commands the
latent power to bring down the
Rabin Cabinet. Dayan could
still call on his ex-Rafi col-
leagues to back him against
the government's policy. In
that case. Rabin might lose his
majority in the Knesset.
But on several occasions dur-
ing the past year. Dayan's sup-
porters have made it clear that
he has no intention of doing
this.
Dayan's devotees maintained
that he was quite satisfied with
his new occupations and that
he reali/cd that he had lost
much of the popularity he had
had before the war
THEY ALSO claimed that
Dayan would not want to chal-
lenge Rabin's Premiership on
personal "rounds. Dayan, they
said, would continue to express
his political ideas but had no
intention of returning to active
political leadership.
Recently, Dayan in what
seemed to be a frank and can-
did Interview to this reporter-
spoke at length of his feelings
after the Yom Kippur War and
of his political future. He seem-
ed to confirm what his friends
had been saying.
Dayan believes that the
'change of guard'" of the na-
tion's leadership level is a posi-
tive process which will not now
change its course. He defined
himself as belonging to the
previous generation which left
the key posts in the national
administration making way for
a new generation.
AT THE same time, he em-
phasized his ongoing interest
in politics. He said he does not
yet know whether he will be a
candidate in the next Knesset
elections.
"I don't know if I want it."
he said. "I don't know if the
party wants me; I don't know
if I could recommend the vot-
ers to support the party's plat-
form or its leadership."
Dayan added another un-
known factor: "I don't know
when the next election will
take place."
WHILE THE last sentence
seems innocent enough, politi-
cal observers believe it has a
profound significance. They
claim that Dayan's emphasis of
the uncertainty of the date of
the next election may indicate
something of his true political
ambitions. (Under the law,
elections must take place every
four years; the next poll must
Be "before 1977.)
Dayan believes those com-
mentators who say that exter-
nal pressures may cause a po-
litical crisis in Israel, causing
the Rabin government to resign.
ALTHOUGH during the last
year Dayan has, on the whole,
not been active in politics, he
demonstratively signed the Li-
kud petition against returning
the West Bank to "foreign con-
trol."
Dayan's supporters claim that
this move clearly expressed his
intention to raise his voice
against any possibility of ced-
ing Judaea and Samaria. His
political rivals claim that he
does not in fact care so much
about the future of the West
Bank, but is adopting this sen-
sitive and controversial issue in
order to promote his political
ambitions.
In our Interview, Dayan con-
firmed that he cannot accept
the present verdict of the pub-
lic regarding the role he play-
ed in the Yom Kippur War: "I
have been mistreated," he said.
L'iV at Fault
For Tenor
In Jerusalem
Continued from Page 1-A
"THIS ABOMINABLE deed is
once more the work of ;'
same persons who have been
adoptedtheir aims and meth-
ods stamped with the official
seal of approvalby the various
organizations of the United Na-
tions whose original mission, it
will be recalled, was to render
assistance and support to hu-
manity."
The statement continued:
"Now these murderers, in addi-
tion to their other demands,
wish to participate in the UN
conference on the prevention of
crime due to take place in To-
ronto. Canada, and their request
has apparently fallen on sympa-
thetic ears.
"Such participation will con-
stitute yet another phase in the
moral bankruptcy of the United
Nations organization." the state-
ment said.
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GOLDMANN IN TALK
Expect Bonn Okay
On Final Settlement
GENEVA (JTA) Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president
of the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, told the
organization's board of trustees holding its annual meeting
here that he expected the West German government to sign
an agreement for a final monetary settlement of claims
arising out of the Nazi era some time in October.
He said the agreement, which had been negotiated and
shaped over a number of months, would come into force
in April, 1976.
CHANCELLOR HELMUTH Schmidt, and the govern-
ment as a whole, including the two major political parties
in West Germany, were in favor of the agreement, Dr. Gold-
mann reported. The new body which will handle the in-
demnification claims would eventually have 12 representa-
tives on the Jewish side and eight representatives on the
German side, not necessarily all Germans.
The governments of Israel and West Germany would
also be represented on this body, Dr. Goldmann said. He
also stated that Israel had agreed to accept this agreement
as a final monetary figure. The sum involved was DM 600
million.
The meeting also adopted the budget for next year.
Allocations totalling $1,800,000 were made for the year
1975-76. Dr. Goldmann was reelected president.
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Page 6-A
+Je*l$t ncrktian
Friday, July i8 19?s
Only We Have Right to Decide Rabin
BONN (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin said here
that because Israel must defend itself alone, "we have the
elementary right to decide for ourselves what we can risk
and what we dare not risk as we work to achieve peace
with oUr neighbors."
Rabin, the first Israeli Premier to visit West Germany
in an official capacity, spoke at a dinner given in his honor
here by Chancellor Helmut Schmidt.
HIS REMARKS that Israel
will determine what risks it can
afford seemed to be at least
partly in response to West Ger-
many's urging of Israel to be
more flexible in current nego-
tiations for an interim agree-
ment with Egypt.
In Rabin's three-hour meeting
with Schmidt, which govern-
ment spokesman Klaus Boelling
described as "frank and re-
laxed," the West German Chan-
cellor reportedly told his guest
that the right time for an in-
terim agreement should not be
missed.
Boelling did not indicate
whether Schmidt meant that the
right time was the present.
But Schmidt, who listened to
Rabin's views on the Middle
East, expressed great interest in
an interim settlement without
which he felt there was little
hope for progress or results
from a reconvened Geneva
peace conference.
AT A press conference in
peace, Rabin said: "I would ad
vise the representatives of tho
United States to call upon both
sides to take risks for peace
"We are prepared ,0 take
Israel was ready to seek a se- JggJ**"lin8 ,rO0p
. t_ witnuiawais, the loss of
cure, just and honest peace but ^ flnd ,he j g^**
Rodeis. All we are going to get
West Berlin, Rabin stressed that
Top British Jews Being Guarded
By MARK SEGAL
LONDON (JTA) Police are guarding prominent
British Jews after the discovery last week of a plot to kill
or kidnap them.
The Jews were included in a list of top people found
together with an arms cache in a West London flat. The
arms cache was said to be the property of a South American
named "Carlos Martinez."
Police and forensic experts are looking for more clues
in the Bayswater apartment where the arms were found.
MEANWHILE, security for
the Marks and Spencer family
was stepped up because of a
possible link with the 1973
shooting of its president, J. Ed-
ward Sieff.
One of the guns discovered
in the arms haul was a nine
millimeter pistol the same
caliber as that used by the man
who burst into Sieff's home and
shot him in the face. Sieff, 69.
recovered, but his assailant was
not caught.
A Marks and Spencer offi-
cial would not comment about
the possibility of "Carlos'' be-
ing the man who shot ti
Mdent. But he said all mem-
bers of the family were aware
of the security situation.
IT WAS recalled that the ter-
rorist. Leila Khaled, warned in
a BBC television documentary
on terrorism that Arab gangs
had "a list of prominent J
in the diaspora "which did not
just include the Sieffs and the
Rothschilds.''
ding figures in the enter-
tainment world were mystified
when they found out that their
names were on the "death lust.'
Impresario Sir Bernard Del-
font said "It seems strange to
me. I can't understand it at ter.
all." Conductor Norman Del
Mar said: "I can't imagine what
this is about I have no political I
activities at all. and it can't
have to do with Jews, because
I*m Church of England myself."
YEHUDI MENUHIN, contro-
versial figure in the Jewish
community here due to his fre-
quent statements supporting
the Arabs and his recent re-
fusal to sign protests of lead-
ing artists and intellectuals
.nst the exclusion of Israel
from UNESCO said: "I am n I
1. Lists of this sort ap-
pear from time to time
A for British n
nil told 1 .11 A: "There ha'e
been attacks on Jewish people
in Britaii :id one has
to lace the realities of the pos-
sibility of more attacks on
Jews ... All one can do is be
Uant and cooperate with the
police.''
.Martin Savin, chairman ol
the defense and group rela-
tions committee of the Board
of Deputies of British Jews,
told the JTA that he had been
in touch with the appropriate,
police authorities on this mat-
U.S. Envoy Toon
Comes to New Post
TEL AVIV (JTA) Malcolm Toon, the new
United States Ambassador to Israel, has arrived in Is-
rael with his wife and daughter to take up his new
position.
He said he brought no special message from Presi-
dent Ford but did bring the best wishes of the President
and Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger for the Israeli
nation and its government.
TOON, A career foreign service diplomat who has
had no experience in Middle East countries, told re-
porters that like all Americans, he shared sympathy
for Israel and its problems.
He added: "I think that all Americans place a very
great value on the ties between Israel and the U.S. and
on every effort feasible to maintain and keep these ties."
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"THEY ADVISED me that
the matter is being taktn care
of, and suitable investigations
are being puisued. II further
action concerning the Jewish
community he,-e is necessary.
they will advise me and keep
me informed," he said.
When asked whether any
special instructions for partic-
ular precautionary measures
had been issued to communal
institutions and organizations,
he replied in the negative.
not at any price. He said his
country was seeking ways to
lessen the danger of hostilities
by cease-fire and troop disen-
gagement agreements but want-
ed comparable concessions from
Pt.
He denied press reports of rc-
cM d*v8 that an interi*" accord
with Egypt was virtually con-
cluded in principle and said
that three "key Issues" remain-
ed outstanding: the duration of
an accord, the lino of Israeli
withdrawal, and the fate of the
advance warning system in Si-
nai.
Rabin stressed that without
agreement on those points and
concessions on both sides. "I
doubt whether such an agree-
ment will be Achieved."
REGARDING REPORTS that
the U.S. would supervise the
surveillance posts after an Is-
raeli with Irawal, Rabin remark-
ed that "No one could run them
better than Israelis. Nor would
any third party be better for
Egypt than Egyptians."
Apparently referring to Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's s; it >ment on ABC-TV
urging Israel to take risks for
in eveh-mge is at best words.
AT THE dinner in his honor
Rabin stressed that Israel, "from
the day of our Independence we
have had to defend ourselves by
ourselves at great cost and sac-
rifice. We shall continue to de-
fend ourselves alone and be-
ei n of that we have I
mentary ritht to decide for
ourselves what we can risk and
what we dare not r
work to achieve peace with our
neighbors."
He sail that Western Eu-
rope's greatest contribution to-
ward peace would be to encour-
Bge those directly involved to
n gotiate a settlement of their
nc: terference. "No one can erve
as a substitute." he said
RABIN AND his delegation
earlier visited the site of the
former Bergen-Belsen concen-
tration ca dp near Hanover and
later attended a reception in
W st Berlin hosted by Mayor
Klaus SchuetZ and Jewish lead-
ers.
West R?rlin has a strong Jew-
ish community and the
is an outspoken friend n! Nrael.
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1
Friday, July 18, 1975
vjewisl) fhridOknti
Page 7-A
Fulbright Beating His Old Drum Again
WASHINGTON (JTA) Former Sen. J. William
Fulbright, linking American interests in the Middle East to
a continuing, assured supply of oil, especially from Saudi
Arabia, and the avoidance of a new war that would precipi-
late another oil embargo and possibly a confrontation with
ihe Soviet Union, has endorsed Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's view of the situation and his policies in an arti-
published in the Washington Post last week. (The Miami
Herald published the same article on SundayEd.)
The Arkansas Democrat, whe
lerly headed the Senate
Foreign R litions Committee.
declared that "having returned
, an extended tour of the
Middle East, I am filled with a
strong sense of both the import
and urgency of the Secretary's
..nations. Time is working
nst us and against our in-
- rests."
FULBRIGHT SAID that his
it to the Middle East eon-
.need him that "the principal
.! i countries including
.. Syria, Jordan and Saudi
abia are all led by niod-
ate and responsibl men" who
are united in a consensus for
making peace with Israel on th.3
basis of the 1967 borders.
"All of them say explicitly
and without qualification, ard
' i( head of the Palestine Lib-
J. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT
drastic measures
eration Organization. Yassi;
Arafat, says so. guardedly and
by indirection, but to my eat-
unmistakably," I-'ulbright wrote.
He viewed "this consensus
for the acceptance of Israel as
the most important and promis-
ing development in the Arab
world since the 1967 war." but
warned that it would soon dis-
sipate if no progress were made
for peace.
"The continued occupation o'
Arab lands is a threat not only
to Arab moderation but to the
moderate leaders themselves,"
the former senator said.
HE SAID that for the United
States, "logic suggests that if
we are to give all out support
to current Israeli policy we
should be taking drastic meas-
ures of energy conservation
linsl the inevitable embar-
goes, or if we are to allow our
d -pendency on Persian Gulf oil
to continue to increase at its
present rate, it would be pru-
dent to draw hack from our fi-
nancial and political support of
continued Israeli occupation of
Arab lands."
Fulbright stressed the im-
portance of the American rela-
tionship with Saudi Arabia and
Censor OKs Book on Negotiations
insisted that the two mi n is-
sues the supply of oil and its
price, are related to the Arab
Israeli conflict.
"A settlement could not be
expected to result in an imme-
diate sizable price rollback," he
said.
BUT IT would, however,
"eliminate tho only outstanding
issue between the United States
and Saudi Arabia especially
if provisions were made for the
restoration of East Jerusalem
to one form or another of Arab,
sovereignty."
Fulbright argued that Israel's
only security in the long run
lies in a return to its 1967 bor-
ders "with insubstantial chang-
e ." because the only secure
borders are those accepted by
one's neighbors.
He warned that Israel's qual-
itative and technological ad-
vantage over its foes is "tran-
sient" as the Arabs are "ad-
vancing rapidly in education
and. technological skills, and
when these are added to their
vastly greater numbers and
wealth, the balance of power
will swing in their favor."
FULBRIGHT ASSERTED that
"except from Israel herself,
there is a virtual world con-
sensus" that a solution of the
Middle East conflict requires a
return to the 1967 lines, the
establishment of a Palestinian
state on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip with demilitarized
zones manned by the United
Nations and firm guarantees
from the United States and the
So\iet Union.
According to Fulbright, the
Soviets are prepared to offer
Israel the stiictest guarantees
under an appropriate agree-
ment but the U.S. cannot "count
on the Sot lets to renew their
offer to cooperate if we do not
hold them to it now."
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Israeli military censor has re-
eased for publication a revised
sion of Matti Golan's book
en the negotiations conducted
197-1 b.tw-en Secretary of
: Henry A. Kissinger and
l< aders that led to the
. ..!:, agreements and the
. ngagement agreements with
and Syria.
le oi v.:-. in was
red b> the l us .
ths a o and the I
all pertinsnt notes w i
jd, rai ing a fui
it li joui nali ts and others
RELEASE of tin
- anr lunced by the author
! istilj c< nvem d
. rence here Golan, a pc-
correspondent ol H
aid he had lea < nly
lier of !'' -
decision and wa
to lodge another protest
r the dp|*".
He said that when he sub-
rael is a free, democratic coun-
try which exercises freedom of
speech, though I had some res-
ervations about the banning of
the book and the way it was
don.-.'' G 'Ian told his fellow
journalists.
HE DENIED that he had ap-
plied any pressure on :'k cen
.u to n as the b tok or that
,'-. id contemplated at an:
time ioli ting Isra< li law.
: i als del .: .'
pit United Si it
; i bai >ubli< i :
icli has ties
! i t."
n of the book
ican
that it
I el
i of ] convi
;-.t'.. ;. Premiei Golda
and Ki during
which th latter allegedly made
indiscreet remarks aoout other
I s mentioned. The word
"Ford' was not mentioned in
the book, neither as a car nor
as a President," Golan said.
Golan said the book dealt
with the political neg .nations
l-.iv. en Oci 6, 1973, the day
th Yom Kippur War broke out,
.-. .5!. 1974, i'u day the .
disen ; i at was
ith Syria.
H '..' it had parts de-
sci ..'ii! i the Ante ca airlift.
ire, the Kilo
! ii g : itions and the six-
:i, the Geneva
ment
nl with I the
ria.
THE BOOK will be publ shed
by th cken Press,
nwnt '
Golai aid h had a contract
with in the U.S.
sh publication
il they can match the
Ivst offer he recefr i
If you're going
to have an affair,
make sure people
talk about it.
There you are hosting an .ill.iir
iit ihi' beautiful Deauville Hotel
(where $2,000,000 has Just
been spenl on brand-new
luxury and elegant i! I
And flftei it's all over, what \ >u
thought u wild be jusl <> simple
catered affaii has lurned out to
be the so ial e\ eni "(the year.
Call Al Sicherer.
at 865-8511 and start
having an affair everyone
u ill talk about.
Deaimile
On the ocean al 67th Street. Miami Beach
d his revised version last woiid leader
he was promised a deci- GOLAN declared here. "None
within a week. o{- these statements appear in
"I believe today, as 1 my book and I don't know if
have always believed, that Is- Kissinger ir>;e any of the re-
Slop PLO Delegation
MONTREAL (JTA) The Canada-Israel Commit-
tee sent telegrams to Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
..nd Foreign Secretary Allan McEachen demanding that the
povernment stop or withdraw its permission for a delega-
tion of the PLO to come to Toronto for a United Nations
conference.
The telegrams, signed by Rabbi W. Gunther Plaut, act-
ing chairman of the Committee, urged the government to
-.event the PLO entry in the aftermath of the July 4 bomb-
.ng in Jerusalem. The government is scheduled soon to an-
nounce whether the PLO group will be admitted to Canada.
Senate Resolution on Arms
Continued from Page 1-A
whether these weapons sales should ultimately be permitted,
there are many grave unanswered questions Congress
should consider."
Case noted that under Senate rules, the committee has
f nly 20 days "to enact such a concurrent resolution object-
ing to such an offer of sale."
He said the hearings would cover three weapons sys-
tems: the "Hawk" surface-to-air missile; the "Vulcan anti-
aircraft, self-propelled 20 mm. gun; and the Redeye
shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile.
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Members:
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Federal Reserve System Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


Page 8-A
+Jen iff fkrrafidr
Friday, July 18. 1975
Kahin. Kissinger Meet for Talks in Bonn
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin met with
pretary of State Henry A
Kissinger in Germany last
week.
Sources here said the Pre-
mier had hoped to hear from
Kissinger Egypt's response* to
Israel's latest set of questions
transmitted through Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinit?.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT of
the meeting, a subject of specu-
lation here for some time, coin-
cided with a shift in Jerusalem
toumrds a noticeably more up-
beat atmosphere in the last few
days.
The feeling of crisis and im-
minent confrontation with the
U.S. has perceptibly abated and
there is, in addition, a wide-
.
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
spread feeling that an interim
settlement with Egypt will ulti-
mately be achieved.
The Likud opposition, in con-
junction with the "Emunim"
bloc, held a mass rally in Tel
Aviv against withdrawing from
the Sinai passes and the Abu
Rodeis oil fields.
But Likud politicians admit-
ted privately that it seemed the
government vas now inclined to
conclude the agreement with
the oilfields to be ceded in toto
and only a marginal Israeli
presence at the passes' eastern
entrances.
THE FOREIGN Ministry,
meanwhile, has "vigorously de-
nied'' a BBC report by its Jeru-
salem correspondent. Michael
Elkins. th.at an agreement with
Egypt has already been con-
cluded in principle.
Elkins' report spoke of an Is-
raeli presence at the eastern
ends of the Mitla and Gidi Pass-
es and said that American per-
sonnel would man the electronic
advance warning system on the
heights overlooking the passes
once an interim agreement was
achieved
According to Elkins. the al-
leged agreement in principle
called for .nn Egyptian civilian
administration in the areas
evacuated by Israel and a mod-
eration of Egypt's economic
bovcelt and diplomatic warfare
against Israel.
But a Foreign Ministry
spokesman declared that the re-
port was "mistaken as regards
both its overall content and
many of its details."
THE SPOKESMAN stressed
that the talks were "still in the
stage of clarifications" and "an
agreement is under no circum-
stances to be viewed as a fait
accompli."
In Washington. State Depart-
ment spokesman Robert Ander-
son declined to comment on the
report that Americans would
man the Sinai surveillance
Merchants Strike to Protest High Taxes
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA)
About 40,000 merchants and
shopkeepers all over Israel
staged a one-day strike to
protest rising taxes and the
government's economic pol-
icies.
Jerusalem alone of all Is-
rael's larger cities and
towns continued business as
usual.
Ex-Former Iron Guard Chief
Faces Loss of Citizenship
Continued from Page 1-A
Guard.'" the Rumanian equiva-
lent of Hitler's Storm Troopers
during the Fascist regime of
Ion Antonescu. were automat-
ically excluded from the U.S.
at the time Tnfa arrived in this
country claiming status as a
displaced person.
ACCORDING TO the govern-
ment's suit. Trifa "did advo-
cate the killings of Jews and
Masons and did participate in
the activities commencing on
or about Jan. 21, 1941 which
resuked in the murder of Jews
and destruction of property."
American Israeli
Q All Religious Article! vj
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RELGO ft CRYSTAL, INC
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PHONE 532-5912
The incident referred to was
a violent iron Guard" upris-
ing in Bucharest during which
several score Jews wave mur-
dered in a mock ritual kosher
slaughter in a slaughterhouse.
The government has obtain-
ed eye-witness accounts of the
rampage of looting, raping and
murder in the Jewish cjuartt:
from persons in the U.S.. France
and Israel. All of the witness*
place Trifa. whose given name
then was Viorel, at the scene
of the \iolence.
THE FORMAL proceedings
against Trifa will not move intu
judicial chambers before next
fall and a prolonged and com-
plex case is expected that might
continue for years.
The defendant is expected to
appeal if the verdict is denatu-
ralization and even if the gov-
ernment wins its case it will
have to initiate separate pro-
ceedings to secure Trifa's de-
portation.
The merchants there de-
cided against joining the
strike because they are in
the midst of negotiations
with Mayor Teddy Kollek
for a significant reduction
of municipal taxes.
BUT IN TH Aviv. Ramat Gan.
Haifa and Nahariya and most
oth?r urbnn centers, virtually
all business establishments were
closed, creating a Sabbath-like
atmosphere in midweek.
The strike was joined by
grocers, clothing and shoe
stores, hardware and florist
shops, furniture and appliance
showrooms and other empori-
ums.
In Tel Aviv and Haifa, only
the consumer cooperatives and
supermarkets were open for
business.
A few cafes remained open as
well and some street vendors
continued to hawk their wares.
THE MERCHANTS Associa-
tion claimed that new taxes, es-
pecially municipal levies were
"suffocating" them and were
aimed at nationalizing com-
merce.
The Farmers Association
warned meanwhile that if the
government adopted the tax re-
forms proposed by the Ben
Shahar committee which in-
clude a tax on revenue realized
in land sales, farmers from all
over the country would demon-
strate at the Knesset and else-
where.
A spokesman for the farmers
said the measure would force
farmers to pay 50 per cent of
the income realized from the
sale of land which they had
worked for many years.
HISTADRUT. which original-
ly had welcomed the tax re-
forms recommended by the
committee headed by Tel Aviv
University president Haim Ben
Shahar. a leading economist,
apparently has had some second
thoughts.
A detailed study of the pro-
posals now before the Knesset
has convinced the trade union
federation that the reforms will
fall hardest on the wage-earners
and that employers may even
get more of a tax break than
hitherto, despite the plugging of
loopholes and abolition of many
exemptions.
Yeruham Meshel. secretary
general of Histadrut. warned
that Histadrut would oppose
implementation of the reforms
if they affect wage-earners only
at first and not the entire popu-
lation simultaneously. He also
criticized the government for
lacking plans for economic
growth or to fight unemploy-
ment.
posts. As for the BBC broad-
en Anderson noted the Israeli
denial and Said "we agree with
In Cairo. Foreign Minister Is-
mail Fahmy denied the BBC re-
port and insisted that El
position had not changed
INFORMED SOURCES in
Jerusalem said Israel had in fact
urged Kissinger, in the
exchange through Dinitz. l0
seek Egypt's agreement to some
Israeli presence in the tasrern
ends of the passes and to a
satisfactory arrangement on the
problem of the surveillance sta-
tions which, they said, would
include American personnel in
at least some of the advance-
warning posts.
These sources felt that if Kis-
singer presented positive re-
sponses from Egypt to Rabin,
the Premier would have little
difficulty in winning Cabinet ap-
proval for the settlement terms
as now defined.
If. however, the Egyptians re-
mained adamantly insistent on
their demand for Israel's com-
plete and total evacuation of the
passes, the sources said, then
the issue was by no means cer-
tain in the Cabinet and Israel
might still reject the settlement
terms.
PRIOR TO his departure for
West Germany on the first of-
ficial visit ever made to that
country by an incumbent Is-
raeli Premier. Rabin cautioned
newsmen not to speculate that
an agreement was close at hand
and said it was not yet certain
that one could be achieved
Rabin also convened the spe-
cial ministerial team that is con-
ducting negotiations for an in-
terim agreement with the US.
serving as intermediary.
Foreign Minister Yiga!
reported on the meeting ;n
Washington between Israeli Am-
bassador Simcha Dinit.: and
Kissinger immediately on the
envojTa return to the U.S. fi
Israel
IN BRIEF remarl
boarding the plane, th ;
said: "I am leaving toi
Germany with mixed
As a Jew and an Israel
aware of the horrible tragedy
that overtook our Jewish peo-
ple, a trag.-dv for wHch Nazi
Germany was responsible
"Yet I a"l >>- that bri
have ti h bi idf! *d over the
past so that the future would B
Rabin was seen off by
inet members, the Chief of Si
Chief of Police and other of-
ficials.
National Hebrew
ISKAIU GIFT CfNTW IHC.
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UN Body Votes (Again)
To Keep Israel Out
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) The United Nations
Preparatory Conference on Human Settlement (Habitat)
which concluded its meeting in Teheran last weekend,
adopted a recommendation to exclude Israel from its
forthcoming conference in Vancouver, it was learned
here.
According to a report released by the UN, the rec-
ommendation to exclude Israel was made on the grounds
that "Israel always acted contrary to the spirit of 'Habi-
tat' and for Israel's alleged responsibility for the "in-
voluntary migration of two-million Palestinian Arabs
and for the destruction of thousands of their homes
and villages."
The five-day conference in Teheran was attended
by the representatives of 27 Asian and Pacific area na-
tions. Eleven of them voted for the resolution to exclude
Israel from the Vancouver conference.
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The LerncraJHAT MAKES THE


Friday, July 18, 1975
+Jewish Work/ian
Page 9-A
LEO MINDLIN
Former Red-Hunters Note Their Best Pals
Continued from Page 4-A
be a "tie" that we would tie
up with them.
And so we slowed our drive
on Berlin to wait for the Rus-
sian link-up.
The cold war that followed
the link-up speaks for itself. So
does the Iron Curtain, behind
which the Soviets gobbled up
Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Lithu-
ania, Hungary. Czechoslovakia
and what later became East
Germany.
To talk about linking up in
space with the Soviets is to re-
main deaf and dumb to past ex-
pedience with them, and blind
to the consequences of their
role in Korea, Vietnam and now
the Middle East.
THIS IS being written one
day before the launch (Tues-
day), three days before the
scheduled link-up (Thursday),
and so there is no way of know-
i g just how successful the
whole exercise was.
But success or failure is an
Irrelevancy. What is relevant,
what strikes at the very heart
of our nation is the fact that
some American joker conceiv-
ed it. thrust it upon us and
brought it to life.
What is relevant is that a
largely captive press hailed it
as a celebrated exercise in hu-
man relations.
I DO not hail it. I do not
celebrate it. I charge it with
being in its own way as trai-
torous as the first grain deal
with Russia, which defied the
people's best interests and sent
our food prices skyrocketing
and now the second grain deal,
which President Ford vows will
not increase these prices a sec-
ond time "substantially."
What does substantially"
mean for a man with a brand
new swimming pool in his
house "privately'' paid for?
Or for that other Yeshiva
bocher, Earl Butz, the former
Ralston Purina executive, now
our Secretary of Agriculture,
and his new dining room, pub-
licly paid for?
NOT ENOUGH of us are
listening to Alexandre Solzhe-
nitsyn, who in recent major ad-
dresses in Washington and New
York warned that too many of
us keep worrying about World
War III.
World War III. Solzhenitsyn
>ays, and rightly, has already
been waged and lost. The So-
viets are the victors, and we
are the vanquished in all those
European countries I listed be-
fore, and in Southeast Asia, as
v. .:!.
What we've got to watch out
for, Solzhenitsyn says, is the
next war the war in the
Middle East going on at this
LERNER:
Party Shift
Continued from Page 4-A
cratic Congress to keep helping
him by its own image.
Mr. Ford can still make
blunders. There can still be a
runaway inflation of gasoline
prices which will drown him.
THE MIDEAST could explode
and engulf him in trouble. These
are the risks of being President.
But there are counteracting
advantages. A President keeps
the center of the stage. He
"speaks with a single voice,
where the opposition speaks
with many. Most of all, Mr. Ford
and his advisers seem to know
what the shifting currents of
party change are doing.
The Democrats either don't
know, or don't care, or can't
summon the grit to take com-
mand of the changes.
very moment, and which at this
very moment we are losing
again in the name of detente.
TO THIS, I add the war in
space, which the Sunday paper
reported to us is a "race," and
which it trumpets will end in a
"tie."
No, we do not listen to Sol-
zhenitsyn, who certainly knows
more about these things than
Earl Butz. the grain lobbyist,
or President Ford.
Indeed. Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger only last week
cautioned President Ford not
to meet with Solzhenitsyn
even as a courtesy to one of
the nation's most distinguished
guests and the luing symbol of
the struggle against Soviet
Communist oppression.
FORD MIST not meet with
Solzhenitsyn. Kissinger said,
because that would be bad for
detente a noteworthy ass^s<
ment of affairs by an ostrich
ilomat, who hasn't had one
success yet except by giving in
to our nation's enemies at
every conceivable opportunity
All of this brings to mind
the witch-hunting days of the
McCarthy-Nixon era. The "pa
triotic" Americans who saw
Communists under every rug
found a few bugs here and
there.
These numbered some movie
actors, screen writers, on a
more exalted level the minor
State Department official, Al-
ger Hiss, and the Rosenbergs!
among them.
THE FEAR, the divisiveness.
the suspicion, the establishment
of secret surveillance as an
American way of life, and the
helter skelter destruction of
personal careers these "pa-
triots" wrought in the name of
their trivial campaigns of self-
aggrandizement constituted a
lethal \iolation of our society's
rights and freedoms compared
to the few they prosecuted and
to the fact that almost never
did they have rendered a clear-
cut decision with respect to
guilt or innocence.
One could never tell whether
prosecution wasn't really per-
secution based on flimsy evi-
dence, as the Rosenberg chil-
dren, for example, are contend-
ing in their proposed study of
the governmental papers used
in the case against their par-
ents that may be made avail-
able to them by new federal
law.
THE POINT here is that
those very Communist-hunters
of the McCarthy-Nixon heyday
are now' the Communists'great-
est pals.
i well remember one publish-
er who once pilloried me in his
mtionally syndicated column
for being critical of President
Nixon or. the basis that I could
not forgive Nixon for his role
in the Alger Hiss case, when
the truth is that Hiss had never
even entered my mind.
Now this very publisher is
right up there with the rest of
the nals.
DETENTE REEKS with their
opportunistic stench. The mon-
opolistic industrialists oil.
food, arms supported by
pious administration statements
en ;nt.'rn?uional amity, are in-
flicting more divisive and in
id traitorous ruin on our na-
tion than the miserable handful
of culprits and their political
hack henchmen uncovered in
their "patriotic" witch hunt
days.
They respect no flag and no
nation, least of all their own.
ey have no allegiance and
are motivated by nothing but
profit and their personal greed.
What will another sale of grain
to the Russians get them?
That's what counts not what
it will mean to the average
American shopping at the su-
permarket.
IN THE name of their grow-
ing power, which is based on
an American society being
slowly crushed by spiralling
costs of living, inflation, unem-
ployment and growing despair,
we are meant to forget the So-
viet empire in Eastern Europe,
the Soviet-assisted humiliations
of the U.S. in Southeast Assia,
So\ ict war of attrition in
the Middle East.
In the name of their treach-
ery, we are meant to celebrate
Anollo-Soyuz link-up. But
for me. that is what the Apoilo-
Soyuz link-up is treachery.
I .-an not celebrate it. I will not.
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Page 10-A
>Jcisrfkrkfi3f?
Friday, July lg, 19,s
VS. Will Quit if Israel is Booted Out-Dr. Kissinger
Continued from Page 1-A
prepared text, that the United States is
tired of how the UN has been acting dur-
ing the past few years.
Specifically, he pointed to the punish-
ing of Israel by the United Nations Scien-
tific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO1,
for '"altering the historical features of Je-
rusalem as well as ousting Israel from
UNESCO's regional European section.
But he also meant tht in which
the Third World nations have become to
politici7t the peace and hi
forum
IF THEY continue to act this
said Kissinger, the I S mil simply "have
done with the Dretei all out
It :n understood that the reopening of
the UN's sea in-
spired K r to put -r'e organizal
varnmg.
"Those who seek to manipulate the
UN membership by procedural abuse may
well inherit an empty shell." the Secre-
tary of State declared.
Kissinger also said that "Numerical
majorities have insisted /) their will and
objectives" in recent years, "even when
in population and financial contributions
they were a small proportion of the mem-
bership."
AS A RESULT, he said, "In the proc-
a forum for accommodation has been
-formed into a setting for confronta-
Arguing that this "solid bloc is
paradoxically, the ent of the non-
ned." Kissinger told the Institute of
d Affairs, that, ironically, "It is the
smaller members of the organization, who
would lose the most.
"They are more in need of the UN
than the larger powers such as the United
States which can prosper within or out-
side the institution."
Kissinger also declared in his address
here that President Ford "is determined
to help bring about a negotiated solution
in the .Middle East, "because not jo. reach
cne could result in a third world war and
"with modern weapons, there would not
be a fourth."
He warned that 'the world has dealt
with the Middle East and other local con-
flicts "as if it were possible to contain
conflict perpetually," but "such tolerance
temp-- [ i nflagration."
Kissinger left Washington earlier fur
a two-di ..king tour in the Mil
kVesI .:hout meeting with Ford, as had
been e> to report on his talks witl
n in Bonn last wee
with Soviet Foreign Minister And:.
o in Geneva last Friday.
r was expected to meet with
Israel Ambassador Simcha Dinitz i
Wednesday back in Washington.
'Take Chance'-Dr. Kissinger's
Biggest Threat So Far
3y JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
In telling Israel it "must
take a chance" and gamble
its security on what he en-
ons as United States po-
litical purposes, observers
here believe Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger
has made his most basic
cat yet in a public state-
ment to Israel and has open-
ly challenged Congress in an
effort to convince the Amer-
ican people on his policy for
the Jewish State, observers
here note.
Kissinger, in an interview
televised on ABC-TV urged
Israel to "take a chance" on
territorial concessions in
the effort to reach a second-
stage interim agreement
with Egypt and indicated
that the degree of American
support depended on what
concessions were made.
ADMITTING that Israel has
a difficult choice ahead since
whatever decision they make
is going to have problems."
Kissinger said the U.S. sym-
pa-hizes with Israel's problems
an! understands its fear about
relinquishing territory.
But we also feel that they
must take a chance on making
pn>gress towards peace, be-
cause any other approach is go-
ing to lead to a war sooner or
later which is going to have
serious consequences above all
for the people of Israel." Kis-
singer said.
But," he added, "the United
St.-.tt-s will stand behind them
in conditions in which we can
reasonably say to our people
that progress is being made."
Asked about reports that he
would meet Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Kabin when both are
in Europe this week. Kissinger
said this would depend if any
further clarification was need-
ed from the I'.S.
KISSINGFR'S remarks were
taped less than 24 hours after
a terrorist bomb killed 14 peo-
ple and injured 73 in Jerusalem.
it ai-'i cat m two day.- after
h* m.t with Israeli Ambassador
Simchc. Dinitz in the Virgin Is-
lands. Kissiri not asked
about the Jerusalem bombing
in the ABC interview. Neither
he nor the State Department
have commented on it.
Observers saw Kissinger's re-
marks as corroborating reports
in Jerusalem that the Ford Ad-
ministration has accepted
Egypt's demands that a second-
stage agreement requires an Is-
raeli withdrawal from the Gidi
and Mitla passes and the Sinai
oilfields.
If a second-stage agreement
is not reached. Kissinger ap-
parently believes, war will fol-
low that is the Arabs will
attack Israel again.
KISSINGER'S remarks com-
ing a day before the Israeli
Cabinet was to meet had a tri-
ple significance, according to
observers. First, it may mean
Kissinger feels the Israeli Cab-
inet will not accede to his views
without additional public pres-
sure.
Secondly, it means that if the
Israelis refuse to accept the
Egyptian demands, he and pre-
sumably Ford, who control the
flow of arms to Israel, will
stand aloof when the Arabs try
again to destroy Israel. Thirdly,
Kissinger will ask the Amer-
ican people to back his policy.
Since the end of the Yom
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Kippur War. observers here
noted. Kissinger has sought to
win the friendship of Cairo
even if it is at the expense of
Israel.
KISSINGERS CHALLENGE
to Congress in speeches and ln-
ten lews have come since 76
Senators signed a letter to Ford
urging c A nerican sup-
port to Israel.
Since then, certain
comment; tors lite
House and State Department
policyn;. ave attained the
Senate. Zionism and "the Jew-
ish lobby "
U.S. Jews W ere Urged
To Light Up the Sky
NEW YORK iJTA- The Student Sttu....>:<.
Soviet Jewry has urged all concerned American-
keep a light for freedom shining at their window
linked American and Soviet spaceships fly over North
America on the nigh' of July 17.
The Soviet and the U.S. astronauts are slated
come toeether that day for a joint space mission.
"Light will be :: mbol of hope for the free*
of Soviet Jews." a SSSJ spokesman stated, "and per!
it is not a coincidence that Thursday evening, July 1" .-
the cl -- i f Tisha B'Av fast day which mourns tht
struct; n of the Holy Temple.
We hope that the astronauts will see lights
across America, and our message will penetrate
hearts of the Kremlin' rulers. From the Soviet destl
tion of Russian Jewry we pray for a redemption."
Two Days or Six Months-Rabin
Continued from Page 1-A
positions would be acceptable
to Israel.
MEANWHILE, it was learn-
ed that Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz. who flew back with Ra-
bin from Bonn, would return to
Washington this week with new
instructions from the negotiating
team.
Contacts will now proceed
through Washington, and if they
are successful, Kissinger may
resume the "shuttle" diplomacy
he suspended last March to
wrap up an accord, sources
here said.
In a television interview
taped in Bonn after his talks
with Kissinger and broadcast
here. Rabin said that Israel's
primary aim was to reach an
"understanding" with the U.S.
HE SAID it was unrealistic
to imagine that American aid
to Israel was not linked to the
political relationshi een
Washington and Jerusalem
Without the establishment of
a political understanding with
the I' S. in the future, there
would be "no point" to an in-
terim agreement. Rabin said.
He said that Israel would
need an agreement with the I'.S.
to ease the economic burdens of
a new pullback in Sinai
He referred to an American
undertaking to supply Israel
with oil to compensate for the
TH FAMILY JACOBS'
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HE SAID that while il
;-.n exaggeration to say tl
r lei would nave to build a com-
plete new airfield to rep-
one at Rifidim from whi
would withdraw, the redeploy-
ment ot Israeli forces wo
. and Ami rican help
be needed to finance it.
Rumors circulating in
ington this week suggested that
the- VS. had offered Israel Si i
billion in projected aid if Israel
would begin the pullback
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On theOcean at 67th Street.
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Write lor Iree color brochure
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from $200 per person^


iYidav, July 13, 1975
* Pni $#: Thrkttan
i*age 11-A
e Menorah
The Temple Family

. ,: to thi TVmnl < Ii
I ral n a o f M
I mi tal hi Find Ra -
\i..-1mow Iti i H l-
ii on in tsrai thev
KabU'i : i
I I Nob FMb ha\
I rl far to Van oe. F n
b irsn Pres
i Pried i 9 en
. .: trln to i i
lent Herman and
man
.> continue through the
| with Jtv Sussraan and
|i rgson aubatitntlna f..r Rabbi
1 intor The business
> ngaared In renew ln men -
r>R, alarnlnsT uii new membere
rramrlnv for Holiday si il
nd -..I rearistrallons
CONGRATULATIONS AND MA-
|ZE- TCV '.. .>ur IsesSMf -'uilentK
i elebra tine I ew milestones
Rol rtt i Knn Dorf daughter
I. i" tnd Mrs Victor Dorf on her
Ir i >. to in Thomaa O. Van
j!:-i irk: i" Jimmie Soble Km of
I.'.' tnd M'">- Joseph Soble on his
p irthcnmlneT mirriurn to Rebe.-a
Is ipiro and to Qtna Scbeaffer.
Ill luehter of Mr and Mm. Edward
Is haffer M her forth.'nmin* Au-
|iiu-i weddimi to Richard Rush.
IT'S A BOY for Phil and Marilvn
I' T A!;in> brother welaThed in at
I nine rx>unris And a new
rii Mauirhter for lint' and Dorothv
horn to Carol and Sidnev
"ertno>
A SPEEDY RECOVERY AND RS-
|turn to oood health is wlah-
I t i Jeff We'ner, Samuel Mark*.
.^\ K'peht. Bella Mevers, Jamea
I miro, Ethel Preaa, Soohle 0 Id
Rauer, Rltchard \Y.iiim:inn.
SINCERE CONDOLENCES
Sucher on The rl**th -
ind i" Mr.- Bnrlaue Slnarer
drain of her QrandfMher
o=." \DER OF SPECIAL FUNDS
TEMPLE MENORAH:
knov
wn h have been ra-
, i -t Isnu
.......f v
r.:PL FUND
i later
m o'v of hla
. "r and .
". k -i
i f Aaron Berarer:
I
Mm iiuia Wertlii b and Mr and
Mrs Abi .:.. | hual nd iverv. I ;n
honor ol rra uddaush-
In honoi
Hi- 7Bth birthday i t Ooldie Rlnaer
by Mr. and Mrs. JuIIuk Fink, Hi
1 h i and the Tun Famllv,
PLAYER BOOK FUND
Si eel in honor of his wife. Pearl:
i" i .urn in mi ii' v .i her hut -
Mr and Mrs Sidney StlUei
in memoi ^ Aaron Berarer
DAY SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP
FUND ... in honor "f the Golden
Anniversary of Mr and Mrs Sam
K iow akl > I eo and Elaine Kaul
nun. Reva and Al Friedman. Carl
'ii.l Mln ii isenbera, Irvine? and Ida
Cvners, Cantor and tfora F-Mman.
P ml and I lien la K i di n Ala.....>n-
tributlona by Paul and Olenda Kas-
dei in honor of Phil and Marilvn
Israi l'i new ion In honor ..f their
h anniversary. In nwmon if Bill
Bucher'a sister, and ill mftiiorv of
B m- Potash
THE HOWARD KATZEN MEMO-
RIAL YOUTH FUND In mem-
ory of Beasle GoldoerK by Mr. and
Mm I. Rabat. Mr and Mrs L.
Pbtff and Kill* Katz-n
SENIOR FUND to heln needv
Jewish Kldi-rlv neonlc The Rubel
Kitnih H Steiner. N. Sosenskv. I.
Cantor. M Schlesinirer. I. Cherlov.
U Kaon. R Ferdi- I Shalom. F.
ghats. A Qoldsteln
CHAPEL MEMOR'AL FUND .
.Mr Jack !-h > In memorv of his
mother; Mr Morris Zacarlas In
memory Of his ifraniininther: Mrs.
Mori iss ii memorv of har
brother; Mr Mi Kav In anemorv
f ins father; Mrs Sydney Or..... -
n mem >rv if her father: Mrs
i> r>>thv Berkelhamer in memorv of
' 11her St> Edward l il
mother: Mr. Bd-
Schui mi mi>rv '
v ra i Mlndlln in mem -
- muel Pa -
...... her: Mr.
v m .* \ Cohei ''his
M MeiUoruim
Aaron Bcrger

ii ".,,.,., >ii i,. ,i --
-
lemple Menorah notes with
sorrow the passing of Aaron
Berger, who was a devoted
member for more than twenty
years. He served on the Board
of Directors for most of that
time and could always be called
upon to lead Chapel services in
the absence of the Sexton.
The Congregation extends
heartfelt sympathy to his de-
voted sisters, Essie Wolf and
Sydney Hanfling.
In accordance with his be-
quest to the Temple, the Bima
of the Chapel will be dedicated
in his memory.
in addition to
SHELTER,
FOOD an.
CLOTHING
man needs
SPIRITUAL
NOURISHMENT
If you are net affiliated
with a Temple .
7Ve invite you
TO JOIN
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th Street, Miami Beach
FOR THE ADULT

FOR THE CHILD
Day School
Sundoy Scnool
Hebrew School
Bar i 3a, _-.aS Class
Confirmal'Oi
Teen Age Program
ScmI O'l ;t
Pfton. OK *-2;s
Inspiring Prayers
Adult Education
Sisterhood Men's Club
P7 A. SociolClub
Yorg Married
Ttmpl, OH,,,
P.- UNe-0211
MENORAH DAY SCHOOL
KIM>EKOARTEIV-5th GRADE
GENERAL STUDIES
ENGU5H. READING. AND COMPOSITION
SOCIAL STUDIES
ARITHMETIC
SPANISH
CITIZENSHIP
JEWISH EOUCATION
HEBREW. READING Ar.0 ."."EHENSI0N
PRAYERS
HOLIDAYS AND CEREMONIES
BIBLE ANJ HISTORY
* *
AIR CONOIT'ONEO ClMPOOM3 CULTURAL ACTIVITIES
QUALtf i0 LICENSED TtACMEW
REASONABLE TUI1 '* Mu-r
Weff-aa'anceflT Hot lunches DRAMA
Transportotion AvallaM* m,mscc fioeiOA sii*

Temple Menorah Religious Services
SATURDAY MORNING, .ILLY 19, AT 9 A.M.
Sermon and Torah Lesson to be given by Mr. Je
Sussinan. Mr. Ily Bergson will c
SATURDAY MORNING, JULY 26. AT 9 A.M.
Sermon and Torah Lessen to be given by Mr. J
Sussman. Mr. Hy Bergson will chant the Liturgy.
Friday Evening Sen ices at 6:30 P.M.
Light the Sabbath Candles Friday. July 18 at 7:54 P.M.
Friday. July 25 at 7:52 P.M.

.
TKMPLE MENORAH
620 T.'.th S.. Miami BaMsl, Fla. SJ141
Tel. 866-0221
Affiliated with United Synagogue of America
DR. MAYER ABRAMOWITZ.............................................. Rabbi
NICO FELDMAN ............................................................... Cantor
MIRA FRAENKEL ....................................... Educational Director
IRVING SHALOM ........................................ Chapel Director
ROBERT L. SIEGEL ................................ Chairman of the Board
CARL ROSENBERG ............................................. President
MRS. ROSE BANNER .......................... Sisterhood President
MRS. NORMAN C. LIKRMAN ................ PTA President
PAUL KASDEN ...................... Couples Club President
NESTER GORFINKEL ................................. USY President
\ewh Installed Officers Plan New Year
Ai uie recent Annual Congregation Election Supper
Meeting, Officers and Board Members are installed in
impressive ceremony by Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
Shown discussing the plans for the coming year are:
: (J Kasden, Vice-President; Carl Rosenberg, re-elect-
presidenl and Isidore Wollowick, Treasurer.
Presidium To Head Parents Of .Menorah
in a unique experiment, the Parents group of Temple
Menorah will be directed by three women who will
each encentrate her efforts on a d \ group.
Shown fro tare Mrs. Sam (A ta) Burstyn,
Pre-Sch ol and Day School Chaii rs. Herbert
(Jill) Stern, Hebre m; and
s. Ramon {Mercedes) Baktdchuk, Teen-Age Activi-
ties C hairman.


Page 12-A
+Jei$l>ncrid&r
Fr'day, Ju|v
within
-s>
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_J


eJe wish Floiridiam
Kami, Florida Friday, July 18, 1975
Section B
I'nai B'rith Lecture Program
lated To Feature 38 Speakers
WASHINGTON A B'nai
J'rith lecture program that be-
12 years ago with a single
fcpeaker and seven bookings is
scheduling 3S prominent Jew-
lish personalities for the coming
eason.
Eaitors and authors, archae-
ologists, literary critics, sociol-
logists, Yiddishists, Biblical
I scholars and a popular actor
[ are among the current roster of
lecturers available through
1'. nii Biith's adult Jewish edu-
[cati n department.
THEIR 1HEMES range from
I Jewish literature, art and phi-
losophy to the American bicen-
tennial, ^mail-town Jewry and
[combatting Arab propaganda.
Advance bookings for the
coming year at Jewish cen-
ters, synagogues, on college
campuses and at B'nai B'rith
lodges and women's chapters
and other local club groups
already cover more than 200
communities, reports Lily Edel-
man, B'nai B'rith's adult educa-
tion director and administrator
of the lecture bureau.
Many are illustrat-'d lectures,
such as those presented by Ro-
man Vishniac, a photographer
and wiiter on East Europe Jew-
ry; archa.-ologist Mag?n Broshi,
curator of Israel Museum's
Shrills of the Book; and Col.
Itzhak Itzhaki, retired chief of
the Israel Defense Force's edu-
cation branch, who lectures on
BiDlical history in the context
of contemporary Israel.
The actor, whose tectern ap-
pearances include readings
from Jcwi.". works, is Joseph
Wiseman, familiar to television
viewers, as well as stage and
screen auaiences. Wiseman
played the leading role in the
recent TV adaptation of Elie
Wiesel's play "The Madness of
God."
WIESEL, A best-selling au-
thor, also joins this year's
B'nai B'rith's lecture circuit, as
Dr. Joseph Lookstein Returning
From Two-Month Mission To Israel
Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein,
chancellor of P.ar-Ilan Univer-
.!' an l*'e in Miami Beach
-. k aft?r a two-month
n to Israel
n iwly elected national
nl of the Svna: )ga !
Council of America umbrella
ag i' v of Orthodox, Con*erva-
and R (form Judaism in the
United Stateswill meet here
v ith leaders of the Florida Com-
mittee for Bar-Ilan University.
Mayor Harold Rosen of Mi-
ami Rjach is cochairman of the
I lorida Committee for Bar-Ilan.
which is located in Ramat Gan.
Miami Beach's official sister
t\tv in Israel.
Dr. Lookstein, who maintains
a vear-round residence in both
Miami Beach and New York, is
senior rabbi of Congregation
Kehilath Jeshurun in Manhat-
tan one of the nation's foremost
congregations.
While in Israel this summer,
he presided at graduation cere-
monies which helped celebrate
the 20th anniversary of the
founding of Bar-Ilan University.
More than 7,000 students now
attend the only American
chartered university in Israel,
which includes schools of law
and education.
Gerald Schwartz of Miami
Beach is executive vice chair-
man of the Florida Committe I
for Bar-Ilan University, named
in memory of the late Rabbi
Meir Bar-Ilan, Zionist and Is-
raeli leader.
Dr. Lookstein is former pres-
ident of the New York Board
of Rabbis and founder of the
famed Ramaz school.
he has in the past years.
Others among this year's
group of lecturers available
through B'nai B'rith are Israeli
novelist Amos Oz, whose "My
Michael" won the 1973 B'nai
B'rith Book .-.ward; philosoph-
er, Emil Fackenheim; Dr. David
Patterson, director of Oxford
University's center for post-
graduate Hebrew studies: so-
Continued on Page 12-B
Emanu-El
Forum Series
National attention is focusing
on the recently-announced Tem-
ple Emanu El Presidential
Forum, a series of meetings at
the Miami Beach synagogue
scheduled to take place during
the 10 weeks prior to the Mar.
9 Democratic and Republican
Presidential preferential pri-
maries.
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas
and Rep. Morris Udall of Ari-
zona, two of the four Demo-
cratic contenders who already
have qualified for Federal
matching funds, both have
formally accepted bids accord-
ing to Judge Frederick N.
Farad, president of Temple
Emanu-El.
The Presidential Forum will
be a highlight of the congrega-
tion's observance of the Bicen-
tennial in 1976, and arrange-
ments are being made for as
many as 2,000 persons to hear
the candidateseach of whom
is being given an individual
Sunday morning for a presenta-
tion and a question-and-answer
session.
Dade Schools Participate In
Jewish Awareness Programs
Almost 100 administrators
arid public school teachers of
the Dade County School sys-
tem participated in the recent
Teacher Workday Study Ses-
sion sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
The purpose of the confer-
ence was to share with public

NCJW Launches Program
For Adult Education
Commitment to the principle
that Jewish learning is a life-
time activity is the touchstone
for a new National Council of
Jewish Women project in adult
Jewish education being launch-
ed locally by the Greater Mi-
ami Section, Judy M. Gilbert,
president, announced.
The program began last week
at the Council office in the Fed-
eration building.
"This project, entitled the
Jewish Experience: A Study
Program, is designed for Coun-
cil women and their families,"
she said, "in line with our deep-
ly felt concern for the quality
and continuity of Jewish life in
America."
She also cited the NCJW na-
tional resolution which urges
South Dade Auxiliary 778,
Plans Auction And Dinner
South Dade Auxiliary 778,
Jewish War Veterans, plans an
auction later this year under
the chairmanship of Jackie Rose
and Sylvia Dubbin. Lillian
Brown has been placed in
charge of its Aug. 16 swim-
covered dish dinner in Kendale
Lakes, according to an an-
nouncement made by Evelyn
Clein, president.
Mrs. Clein was reappointed
Serviceman's Service chairman
at the recent JWV quarterly
Department meeting in Miami
Beach, Leah Eisenman. newly-
elected Department treasurer,
reported; Sylvia Dubbin was re-
appointed Guard. Mrs. Eisen-
man will represent the Auxili-
ary at the National Convention
in Las Vegas next month.
J. Bernard Shumate, 1975 Campaign Chairman of the
United Way and president of the Southeast First Na-
tional Bank of Miami, has appointed Robert Russel
(left), president of Russell-Anaconda Aluminum Inc., to
head the Pillars Club, an organization composed of com-
munity leaders who make substantial personal contribu-
tions to the United Way. Also appointed was Jf"Mc;
Mutton, vice president of Knight-Ridder Newspapers
Inc., as chairman of the United Wafs; Campaign Unit A
which is responsible for raising contributions among ma-
jor corporations within Dade County, and Willum.i S.
Ruben, president of Jordan Marsh Florida, as chairman
of Unit B, in charge of campaign contributions from all
Dade County retailers.
school personnel information
on the Holocaust and Human
Rights in the Soviet Union for
public school curriculum usage.
Social Studies and Language
Arts teachers, librarians and
curriculum personnel in the
junior and senior high schools
were invited to hear Prof.
Helen Fagin of the University
of Miami speak on "The World
Slept While 6 Million Died," a
presentation on the Holocaust,
and Abraham Gittelson, Asso-
ciate Director of CAJE, present-
ing a paper on "Human Rights
in Soviet Russia Today."
Lillian Ross. Community
Continued on Page 12-B
Lehman Appoints
Four to Academy
Congressman William Leh-
man (D-Fla.) has appointed
four young men from Florida's
13th Congressional District to
the U.S. service academies.
Accepting appointment to the
Air Force Academy is Mark
Joseph Donahue, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Theodore R. Donahue
of Miami Shores.
Accepting appointments to
the Naval Academy are Starr
Wyatt Horton, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Starr Watson Horton of
Miami Shores; Thomas B. Lew-
is, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks
Lewis of North Miami Beach;
and Robert James Rubin, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold J. Ru-
bin of North Miami Beach.
Council women to "fa ter the
lifelong study of Judaism and
Jewish culture as a primary
channel for transmitting their
shared heritage."
The Jewish Experience pro-
gram is a series of university-
level courses of Jewish study,
presenting an historical con-
tinuum from Biblical times to
the present, she sai-.
Each syllabus is designed by
a prominent scholar of Judaic
thought. The title of the first
syllabus was "Defining Juda-
ism," by Dr. Jacob Neusner.
Nanci Goldstein, Betsy Sing-
er and Evelyn Cohan, cochair-
women. expressed hope that
the Jewish Experience Study
Program "will make a signifi-
cant contribution to the field of
adult Jewish learning."
The course will be offered
again this Fall.
Agudath Israel's
24th Anniversary
Agudath Israel Hebrew In-
stitute will celebrate its 24th
anniversary Saturday, it has
been announced.
The synagogue opened its ex-
tensive program of religious
services and social activities
under the leadership of Rabbi
Dr. Isaac Hirsh Ever Aug. 17,
1941.
The synagogue is currently
under the spiritual leadership
of the founder's son. Rabbi
Sheldon N. Ever, who at 18 was
the youngest ordained rabbi in
America after he graduated
from Hebron Rabbinical Col-
lege of Jerusalem, Israel.
Responding to questions raised by Prof. Helen Fagin of
the University of Miami at the Public School Teachers
Study Session held at the Central Agency For Jewish
Education are Roberta Pepino of Miami Beach Senior
High School, Lillian Romero of the Dade County Board
of Public Instruction, Mildred Margolees of Miami Nor-
land Senior High School and Lillian Ross of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Pallot Set To Speak At
Lodge's Annual Installation
B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge will
hold its annual installation of
officers Sunday noon at a lunch-
E. ALBERT PALLOT
eon in the Ramada Inn, 16805
NW 12th Ave.
Guest speaker E. Albert Pal-
lot will discuss "Brotherhood
and the Humanitarian Approach
in the Year 2000."
Pallot is national chairman of
the fraternal order's Commis-
sion on Community- Volunteer
Service which conducts aid to
older adult projects, develops
crime-prevention and aid pro-
grams for veterans, youth and
handicapped and assists in dis-
aster relief, the fight against
world hunger and drug abuse.
Pallot. president of the Bis-
cavne Federal Savings and
Loan Association, is a well-
known speaker and world
traveler. He has been the chair-
man of Miami's Committee on
Ecology and Beautification for
the past 12 years.
Joseph Sokoloff. tennis pro at
Rivergate Racquet Club, will be
installed as lodge president,
succeeding Edward Weiner in
the post. Robert S. Cohen, Max
Meyers, Stan Lerner and Mur-
ray Weil. Jr., will also take of-
fice as vice presidents.
Lou Wollman, Herbert Aron-
son and Sokoloff head the Res-
ervations Committee.


Page 2-B
vJcnist fkradfistr
Friday, July 18, 197^
U.S. Could Not Accept Women's
Declaration in Mexico-Abzug
Emanu-El Holy Day Services
Set for Convention Hall N.
By MINDY YOCHELSON
NEW YORK (JTA)
The United States voted
against the United Nations
Conference on Women's
"Declaration of Mexico,
1975," which called for die
elimination of Zionism, be-
cause "we could never ac-
cept a resolution that talks
about wiping out another
nation."
This was stated by Rep.
Bella Atzug (D., N.Y.) in an
exclusive interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
in her New York office. The
Congresswoman was ap-
pointed by House Speaker
Carl Albert (D., Okla.) as
one of the non-voting Con-
gressional advisors for the
U.S. at the conference in
Mexico City which ended
recently.
THE "DECLARATION," which
onlv the U.S. and Israel vot-yi
against, contained the statement
that women should "struggle
against colonialism, neo-coloni-
alism. Zionism, racial discrimi-
nation and apartheid."
All delegations from other
countries vot*d for or abstained
on the resolution which was
pushed through committee by
t*ie Arab Soviet bloc Third
World countries.
Denmark originally voted
with the U.S. and Israel but
later decided to change its vote
and abstained.
Abzug told the JTA that while
the "Declaration" was still in
committee, Israel made a mo-
tion to eliminate the word Zion-
ism from the text but was voted
down 59-19 with 19 abstentions.
ANOTHER MOTION to elimi-
nate the word came up for a full
vote at the general session, but
this was also rejected by a vote
of 63-25, with 25 abstentions.
The Congresswoman said she
advised the women at the con-
ference to vote against the en-
tire "Declaration" if "we were
3 South Florida
Schools Offering
Judaism Courses
For the fi"st time three South
Flr;'a Institutions of higher
l?a,-nins are simultaneously of-
fering courses in Judaism un-
der the sponsorship of the J w-
ish Chautauqia Soci.'ty and
tie National Federation of Tem-
ple Brotherhoods, according to
an announcement made by Al-
bart Roth, president of the
South Florida Federation of
Tempi-' Brotnerhods.
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel of
Tempi-' Beth fcJ, Boca Raton,
v.iil teach a four-credit course
er.t't!;d "Jewish Thought"
(Philosophy 498) at Florida At-
lantic University starting Mon-
day. Sept. 22. at 7 p.m.
Courses in Judaism will also
be given by Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard of Temple Beth Am
at th; University of Miami and
by Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe of
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, at!
Broward Community College.
"Religious freedom was guar-
anteed by our founding fathers '
and is celebrated in our Bicen-
tennial Year," said Mr. Roth in
his announcement. "Education
is the key to better understand- ,
ing and our Jewish Chau-
tauqua Society is promoting a
spirit of brotherhood through,
interfaith education."
unsuccessful in convincing them
to change the language." But
when a motion was made to ac-
cent the entire "Declaration"
only Israel and the U.S. voted
against it. with approximately
18 abstentions. Abzug said.
She stated that "much nego-
tiating" took place before the
actual vote occurred to "con-
vince the dplgates not to put
the word 'Zionism' into the
'Declaration.' "
Most of tha delegates, she
said, particularly those from
Western Europe and Latin
America, were opposed to the
wording. However, manv did
not vote against the resolution
because of what they felt were
other positive items in the reso-
h'tion. including a change in
global economics.
"Everyon0 I spoke to felt this
should not have happened," Ab-
zug said.
ALTHOUGH THE Congress-
woman said she considered the
"Declaration" was "totally im-
proper" because of the attack
on Zionism, she stressed that it
was not a major document and
that there were no special plans
to implement it.
Nevertheless, noting that the
terrorist bombing in Jerusalem
two days after the conference
ended, in which 14 Israelis were
killed and 73 wounded, Abzug
stated the "Declaration" and
similar actions "perpetuate an
atmosphere which encourages
terrorism."
The major plan to come out
of the conference was the
"World Plan of Action," a docu-
ment Abzug said "could be
abided^by alienations."
She "said she felt many of the
governments "manipulated"
thei-- delegates at the con-
ference.
SHE FELT that nis was par-
ticrlavly true of the 77-nation.
Arab-Soviet-Third World bloc
where, she said, the status of
women is "minimal."
"Many of the governments
instructed their del^gafs how
to vote," Abzug said. "But I feel
the women regretted finding
themselves in this position.
There were many who wanted
to deal independently with
women's issues rather than with
world political affairs.
For example, she said that
of the women she spoke to at
the Tribune, the non-govern-
mental, independent conference
on the other side of the city
that was being held simultane-
ously with the official conclave,
attended by 5,000 "interested"
women, all told her that they
would not have walked out on
Mrs. Leah Rabin.
ABZUG WAS referring to the
incident when the Arab-Soviet-
Third World delegates walked
out of the conference hall when
the wife of the Israeli Premier
started to address the conven-
tion.
Referring again to the "Dec-
laration." Abzug condemned it
as "UN politics as usual" and
as "more or the usual UN po-
litical rhetoric."
She praised the American
delegates for having voted
against the "Declaration."
After IS consecutive years of
conducting Hih Holv Day serv-
ices in the Miami Beach Audi-
SamtH N. Friedland, ck,
'an ol the board of Vfe
F --mi-El. who announced flu
shift to the Convention Ha|]
No'th, s parity will permit the c ogrt\
gati-m to make
available for both members and1
non-m^mbes.
F'-i dland sH th- "amiI
B?<-ch architect Morris i. ipidus
a member of th? Tempi Emanu>
El hoard, has designed a sane,
tuary to b' constructed
the Con'-"ntion H'11 complex
for th hoildivs "which will be
completely fitting with the
solemnity of the occasion, but
also will nrovid- fc the cele-
bration of the New Year."
Cantor Z1 i Adler will assist
Dr Leh^nan. assisted by the
Temple Emanu-El Choir -rider |
the direction of Israeli compos-
er Shmuel Fershko.
SAMUEL N. FRIEDLAND
torium. Temple Emanu-El will
move to the Miami Beach Con-
vention Hall North for its 1975
observance of the most sacred
days on the Jewish calendar.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will pre-
side at the High Holy Day serv-
ices, which begin at sundown
Sept. 5.
THIS WILL be the 33rd year
that the rabbi, who moved to
Miami Beach in 1943, will con-
duct the High Holv Dav serv-
ices for Temple Emanu-El.
BBW Is Getting Ready
To Book It To You!
Hard-cover and pap^-hack
b'voks an* now bein solicited
by the Miami Council of B'nai
B'rith Women for their annual
boo1-- sala scheduled for October
in the Midway Mall.
This sah is one of the najor
f'lnd raising nrojects. accord-
ing to Mrs. Phil Marks, pres-
ident of the Council, with the
profits going to support many
local and nitional community
service protects conducted by
th- seven chapters in this area.
Becher Elected Vice Chairman Of
Committee For Encyclopaedia
Michael Becher of Miami
Beach has been elected vice
chairman of the Florida Com-
mittee for the Encyclopaedia
Judaica. He is regional director
for the Southeastern United
States for Keter Publishing
House Jerusalem Ltd., which
prints and publishes the 16-
volume Judaica in Israel.
Becher will work closely with
Rabbis Herbert Baumgard.
Alexander Gross and Mayer
Abramowitz. The three spiritual
leaders are cochairmen of the
Florida Committee for the En-
cyclopaedia Judaica, an organi-
zation formed to aid in the
wider use and distribution of
the most widely acclaimed work
ol Jewish scholarship in the
20th century.
Becher, a graduate of Brook-
lyn College, studied for two
years at the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem. His main fields
include economics and Con-
temporary Jewish History.
Formerly the New York sales
manager for Encyclodaedia Ju-
daica. Becher became involved
in the monumental Jewish edu-
cational effort while a student
at the Hebrew University.
He has opened offices for the
Florida Committee in th 420
Lincoln Road Building in Miami
Beach.
'Dining Ita|iai\sty(e is as U
easyasJ/Uef cBais.,..WitI\,
l\ejp froniJChef cBoyardee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
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or even a late-night snack. If you
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Cheese Ravioli Bite-size, chock
full of tangy Italian-style cheese,
simmered in rich hearty tomato sau<
that's seasoned with even more
cheese. And. all you do is heat-and
enjoy For a thrifty, meatless
mechayeh you couldn't do better!
SUMMER CAMP AT SEA
"On The Happy Ship"
$m MM^m Join Vur K,di a' "camp" on an.
. H^jB^^jH educa,lonal Commodore vacation cruise
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Kr -matr Only $99 (or each child under 12 occupying
parents'stateroom, or 50% oft the regular rate (or children over 12
Program fully supervised by hip's youth counselor Includes
beach party visits to leading museums handicrafts demonstration
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T*l (SOS) 373 5SC2


rriday, July 18, 1975
* Jen isti fforidHdn
Page 3-B
'A Still Small Voice" is
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association and is a
left are Sen. Gale McGee (D., Wyo.),
member of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, and Israel Ambassador Sim-
cna Dinitz, who will address the opening
plenary session of the 61st annual na-
tional convention of Hadassah at the San
Francisco Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Aug.
17. Dr. Aaron Wildavsky, (second from
right), dean, Graduate School, Public Pol-
icy, bniversity of California at Berkeley,
is speaker at the American Affairs plen-
ary, Mon., Aug. 18. Right is Beate Klars-
feld, famed Nazi-hunter, who will address
the convention banquet Tuesday night,
Aug. 19. ^
Klarsfeld
McGee, Dinitz, Beate
t Hadassah National Conclave
NEW YORKSen. Gale Mc-
Gee (D., Wyo.) and Simcha
Dinitz, Israel Ambassador to the
L'nited States, will address the
opening plenary of Hadassah's
61st annual national convention
or. Sunday, Aug. 17, 8:30 p.m.,
a* the San Francisco Hilton
. Rose E. Matzkin, national
president of Hadassah, an-
nounced here.
"We are especially pleased to
have Sen. McGee with us at
this time." Mrs. Matzkin said,
' because he serves on the
i .reign Relations Committee,
ar.J he is an expert on the Mid-
die East."
AMBASSADOR DINITZ was
former political advisor and di-
rector general of Premier Golda
Meir's office.
Beate Klarsfeld and Annushka
Freiman will address the con-
vention banquet Tuesday night,
A ig. 19. Mrs. Klarsfeld is the
famed hunter., of Nazi war
inals who has been both
decorated and imprisoned in the
course of her relentless pur-
suits.
Mrs. Freiman, a survivor of
concentration camps, recently
re v.vsented Israel in a delega-
tion of the survivors of Bergen-
Belsen to a 30th anniversary
memorial ceremony organized
by the West German govern-
ment.
About 2,500 delegates, repre-
senting some 335,000 members
throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico will attend the
four-dav convention set for Aug.
17 to 20.
In addition to receiving re-
ports, projecting plans, and par-
ticipating in seminars and work-
shops, the delegates will hear
addresses by government lead-
ers and international authorities
in the fields of Hadassah's ac-
tivities.
*totg^*
Wb.l.ifll.
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHB* K>tHTKY
nd
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* tfct fteest U.S. vt. \ntptH4
K0ME8 MEATS and P0UIT1Y
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Miami, Fla.
!hon.. 324-1855
EXPERTS WHO will address
the various plenaries and
workshops include Aaron
Rosenbaum. research director,
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee. Washington, D.C.;
Joseph Klarman, World Head,
Youth Aliyah, Israel; Dr. At*ron
Wildavsky, dean. Graduate
School, Public Policy, Universi-.
ty of California at Berkeley; Dr. j
Kalman J. Mann, director-gen-
eral, Hadassah Medical Or-i
% mization, Jerusalem; and
Rabbi Harold Schulweis, spirit-
ual leader of Valley Beth Sha-
lom, Encino, Calif.
The new Hadassah Fashion
Show from Israel will be pre-
miered on opening day before!
it tours the country. The col-1
lection, designed and executed
by students at the Hadassah
Se'.igsberg Brandeis Compre-
hensive High School in Jerusa-
lem, features elaborate beaded,
sequined and embroidered eve-
nir.ii wear, reflecting the color
and styles of the Middle East,
chic day-time dresses, and un-
usual sports attire.
Some of the fabrics are
loomed by the students. The
show will be produced and ac-
cessorized by I. Magnin under
the direction of Genevieve:
Knowles.
TWO FILMS will also be pre-
viewed: a half-hour documen-
tary by prize-winning director-
producer Harold Mayer, on
Hadassah's dramatic return to
Mount Scopus and the reopen-j
ing of its hospital here in Oc-|
tober; and a bi-centennial film!
strip, "To America, with Love," |
about the contribution of
American Jewish women and
narrated by Bess Myerson.
Founded in 1912, Hadassah is
the largest women's voluntary
organization in the country. It
is also the largest Zionist bloc
in the world today and spends
more than $20 million annually
for its health, educational, vo-
cational, social welfare and
land redemption programs in Is-
rael and for its education and
youth programs in the United
States.
Neonatal Unit
At Variety Open
Variety Children's Hospital,
recently designated as a Neo-
natal Intensive Care Unit, has1
completed construction and
moved into newly furbished
quarters to accommodate in-
fants and children.
Patient referrals from hos-
pitals throughout South Flor-
ida and beyond are being ac-
cepted.
The Neonatal Unit, under the
supervision of Dr. Carol Hersh,
uses the most sophisticated
equipment to preserve infants'
lives.
The hospital also has its own
helipad and is receiving chil-
dren transported by Homestead
xj,. py,,.-? Bi--- Medi-vac ta-"s.
Douglas Gardens Executive Staff
To Appear On WCKT-Ch. 7 Sunday
Miami's Jewish Sunday morn-
ing show. "A Still Small Voice."
will host members of the execu-
tive staff of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
this coming Sunday.
Fred Hirt. executive director;
Judge Irving Cypen, chairman
of the board; Dr. Jeffrey Solo-
mon, director of Social Serv-
ices, and Charles Beber, di-
rector of Medical Services, will
discuss a variety of topics rang-
ing from the complex problems
of old people attempting to sur-
vive in society to the contro-
versies surrounding many
American nursing homes.
"We especially want to deal
with the area of proper com-
munity responses to the chal-
lenges presented by a large
geriatric population," said Judge
Cypen.
"Our appearance on Still
Small Voice and the airing this
week of our new public service
commercial series, 'Senior Citi-
zens Update,' is an indicator of
just how active we plan to be
this year in terms of reaching
the public with something posi-
tive to say about aging and old
people," he added._______
JUDGE IRVING CYPEN
public sen-ice of.WCKT-Ch. 7.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff is the host
for this Sunday's show and the
producer is WCKT Public Serv-
ice Director Wilson Griffeth.
t
^ Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
AARON LOPEZ 1731-1782
Merchant Community Leader Revolutionary Leader
Today, if you go to Newport, Rhode
Island, you can visit the place called
"Lopez Dock," named after Aaron
Lopez, a power in Newport in the years
just preceding the Revolution and owner of
many trading ships.
Known for religious liberalism. Newport had
become the home of a substantial number of
capable, well-educated Jews, among the most
affluent in the Colonies.
In 1752, from Portugal, came Aaron Lopez,
described later by Ezra Styles, President of
Yale University, as "a merchant of first emi-
nence; for honor and extent of commerce prob-
ably surpassed by no merchant in America." In
addition, Lopez was known as an active force
in cementing friendly relations between faiths.
He earned the respect of Christians, as well as
Jews, and no ship ever left his dock on either's
Sabbath. Lopez himself laid the first corner-
stone of Newport's famous Touro Synagogue
in 1759.
In strong sympathy with Revolutionary patriots,
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Lopez was forced to flee Newport to Massa-
chusetts when the British attacked.
During the War. the city suffered such heavy
losses that it never recovered. Neither did
Lopez who lost virtually ail he had acquired
during his years of successful trading. When
attempting to return to Newport after inde-
pendence was won, he was tragically drowned
in a freak accident.
Ezra Styles eulogized him .. ."He did business
with the greatest ease and clearness; always
carried about him a sweetness of behavior, a
calm urbanity, an agreeable and unaffected
politeness of manners."
A fitting tribute to Aaron Lopezone of many
Jewish-American patriots worthy of remem-
brance.
Wngl/76aod
interns f'v
""cnun'Historv
4 Good to the LaslOrofP 1 .JIjUll

CO*.
ilHIU. 'QOOfc
k
SEND FOR
:excitinc
BOOKLET
Honoring 1776
and Famous
Jews in
; American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the tactnating stones in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in America' the profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
Otll nation Send name and address with 50* to:
JEWISH-AMERH AN PATRIOTS
B.x 1488. Grand Central Station
Mew York, N.Y, 10017


Page 4-B
JcnisfflDrMtor
Friday, July 18, 1975
Harriet Green Appointed As
Jubilee Convention Chairman
Appointment of Mrs. Harriet
Green, South Florida civic and
religious leader, as national
chairman of the Pioneer Wom-
en's Golden Jubilee Convention
was announced this week by
Mrs. Charlotte Stein of New
York, national president of Pio-
neer Women.
The 50th anniversary con-
clave will be held at the Deau-
ville Hotel in Miami Beach Oct.
19-22 with top leaders of the
Government of Israel and of
American Jewry participating.
Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's first
woman prime minister, served
as executive director of Pio-
neer Women in the United
States during its early years.
Mrs. Green is the founding
president of the South Florida
Zionist Federation, an organi-
zation with more than 30,000
members in Dade and Broward
Counties. She is former nation-
al vice president and currently
is a member of the national
board of directors of the Amer-
ican Zionist Federation.
A graduate of Roosevelt Uni-
versity in Chicago, she attend-
ed Indiana University and has
taken postgraduate courses at
the University of Miami, in-
cluding a special seminar on
Middle East Studies.
Mrs. Green is president of
the Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida, embracing 18
Dade and Broward chapters of
the Women's Labor Zionist Or-
ganization of America. She has
held the office for 10 years.
Former vice president of the
Women's Division of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation,
Mrs. Green was the recipient
of the GMJF Young Leadership
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL
YOU ISRAEL HEADQUARTERS
ANNOUNCES:
3 Special Israel Tours
ESCORTED FROM MIAMI
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SEPT. 18 SINGLES
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Widest ChoiceLowest Prices
Studying plans for the national Golden Jubilee 50th An-
niversary convention of the Pioneer Women, to be held
in Miami Beach this October, are these leaders of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer Women (from left) Mrs.
Victor Cohen, vice president; Mrs. George Liebmann.
vice president; Mrs. Nathan Bergthal, treasurer; Mrs.
Harriet Green, president and national convention chair-
man; and Mrs. Sam Davis, financial secretary. Mrs.
Cohen is also president of Aviva Chapter and Mrs. Davis
is president of the Sharon Chapter of the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America.
Award in 1967. She played a
key role in the Israel Emer-
gency Fund Drive which fol-
lowed the Six-Day War of June.
1967.
Mrs. Green also has received
the coveted Woman of Valor
and Masada Awards from State
of Israel Bonds. She is former
chairman of both the Pioneer
Women and the Labor Zionist
divisions of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization.
A member of the Florida and
national boards of the Amer-
ican Committee for Bar-Ilan
University in Israel, Mrs. Green
serves on the board of the Jew-
ish Historical Society of South
Florida and has been an rea
coordinator for the United Way
of Greater Miami.
She is a member of the Fed-
eration speakers bureau and is
resource person for the Mid-
east Subcommittee for the
Community Relations Council
of Federation. Mrs. Green also
is on the Federation's commit-
tee on Foundations and Jewish
Philanthropies. She was active
in adult Girl Scouting.
Mrs. Green was community
relations committee chairman
for Beth David Sisterhood, and
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TABLES
vraftwaod
(ftrmtrU A.M. Cone Wood frtivcH]
Phone 446-7262 .
for the past several years has
coordinated the annual Israel
Independence Day (Yom Haatz-
maut) observances in the Mi-
ami Beach Convention Center.
More than 2,000 women from
throughout the country are ex-
pected to take part in the Gold-
en Jubilee Convention marking
the 50th anniversary of the
founding of Pioneer Women
sister organization of Israel's
famed Moetzet Hapoalot (Work-
ing Women's Council).
B'nai Israel's
Softball Team \
Tops Beth Israel
The B'nai Israel and Greater
Miami Youth Svnagosjue softb-l!
team recently beat the Beth Is-
rael Congregation team 11-9 in
a Sunday morning match.
The Youth Synagogue's ta*n
is coached by Rick Morris, and
the team captain is Gary' Golin.
The Beth Israel team's coach is
Rabbi Tuvii Torem; the team
captain is Robert Herskowitz.
The softball league is open
to all Jewish boys between the
ages of 13 and 18.
The NCSY League softball
program was founded by Rabbi
Torem who is youth director
for Beth Israel Congregation
and also holds the position as
national advisor for NCSY.
The League's spiritual guid?
is Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman, of
B'nai Israel and Greater Miami
Youth Synagogue. Bill Hirsch
is youth activities chairman at
B'nai Israel.
Temple Adath Yeshurun Welcomes
Rabbi and Mrs. Simcha Freedmcn
Temple Adath Yeshurun. a
Consr*-vative Congregation lo-
cated at 1025 NE Miami Gardens
Dr.. North Miami Beach, wel-
comes its new spiritual leader.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
his wife. Anna, wbo a-riv-d in
town this \vek from Philadel-
fTfflT -Pa. where he was'TH"
."trit'Ml leader of Adath Zior.
Congregation.
Rabbi Freedman ha be.n in
the Ra'^bimt.' since W-. hav-
ing trained at the Rabbi Isaac
n-Fanan TVol^gicai Se-ni-." '
II is a member of tV Rab-
binital Council of America
Rabbi Freed-^-m who I
as pmident of the Philadel-
phia Rabbim-al Coun<*M wtt
chaplain ^f the Albert Einstein
Hospital. Northern Di'ision. co-
ordinator of the Philad l-hia
Rabbinical Council Beth Din
and rabbinical advisor to the
Jewish National Fund.
The Freedmans are r'- par.
ents of two sons. Samuel u
and Benjamin, 4.
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
Lodge Installs Phillip Coller
George Gershwin Lodge 196,
Knights of Pythias, installed
Phillip Laurence Coller as its
chancellor commander at a re-
cent meeting in the Surfside
Community Center.
Coller is a graduate of Miami
Beach Senior Hih School, the
University of Miami and the
University of Tulsa College of
Law. where .he received his
Juris Doctor degree in 1963.
He is an active member of
the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity
at Miami, the Phi Alpha Delta
Law fraternity at Tulsa. where
he served as president, and the
Florida. Dade and American
Bar Assns. He is also active in
the B'nai B'rith.
Coller, who will serve until
July 1, 1976, was installed by-
Morris Silver and Oscar Kantor.
Calder Stakes Race Set
The $24,000 Rough'N Tumble
Stakes. 6 furlongs for Florida
bred two-year-olds, is the week-
end feature at Calder Race
Course. Gates open at 11 am
on weekdays and 10:30 am on
weekends. Post time for the first
of 10 races is at 1:15 p.m. No
racing Tuesdays and Sundays.
fINl ANTIQUES BOUGHT AMD SOU)
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2 Weeks Israel Plus 4 Nights Istanbul, Turkey
3 Nights Athens, Greece
Miami to Miami $1549.00
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Includes DE LUXE accommodation throughout trip, full
Israeli breakfasts and dinners in Israel; Continental break-
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Friday, July 18, 1975
Klggteg Fkrknan
Page S-B
Temple Samu-El Installing
New Officers, Board Members
The American Lung Association along
with the Florida Lung Association and
the rad^-Monroe Lung Association have
awarded research grants and fellowships
toialing $45,000 to four Mount Sinai Med-
ical Center doctors and a medical student
for continued research and training in the
Medical Center's Division of Pulmonary
Diseases. Shown here (left to riiht) are .-,
n.^ixiii aliment John Cassel, recipient of
a sumnu r scholarship; Adam Wanner,
M.D. and Edward Michaelson, M.D., re-
cipients of research grants, and Fellows
Bruce Ytigin, M.D., and Jack Bell, M.D.
The awards are funded by monies raised
during the annual national and local
Chris:mas Seal campaigns.
The newly elected officers
and board members of Temple
Samu El will be^jnstalled by
Rabbi Maxwell Berger. spiritual
leader of South Dade's new
Conservative synagogue at its
annual congregational dinner in
the Fontaineblcau Hotel Satur-
day evening.
Also taking the oath of of-
fice will be the officers of its
Sisterhood and Men's Club.
Serving the temple for the
coming year will be Maurice
Donsky, president; Ira Zager
and Bernard Zitofsky, vice
presidents; Steven Tiktin, treas-
urer; Leonard Shubitz, financial
secretary; Rhea Wilson, record-
ing secretary, and Judy Reis,
corresponding secretary.
Board members for 1975-76
include Richard Essen, Dr.
Stephen Fain, Peter Fixler. Skip
Gross. Jaek Miller, Mel Weiss,
Marvin Baida. Jack Brenner,
David Cann, Ira Dorchen.
Chuck Kantor and Howard
Katz.
Temple Samu-El's High Holy
Days services will be held at
Miami-Dade Community College
South. Children's services are
planned for both Rosh Hasha-
nah and Yom Kippur, and pro-
fessionally supervised nursery
facilities will be provided for
children too young to attend
services.
The temple's religious school
provides instruction in Sunday
School and mid-week classes for
children from five years old up;
a nursery school will be added
in the near future, it was re-
ported.
Membership applications, re-
ligious school. Bar Bat Mitzvah
and Confirmation Class regis-
tration, and reservations for the
High Holidays are currently be-
ing accepted at Temple Samu-
El, located on the upper floor
of the Capital -Bank of Kendale,
8900 SW 107th Ave.
Grandmother Joins BBYO Israel Walk
WASHINGTON Led by t
grandmother in her 70s, a B n ti
Frith Youth Orginization
"Walk for Israel" raised a
record S41.000 here.
The annual event, trimmed
this year from 25 miles to 25
kilometers (16 miles), brought
out 1.0S8 walkers, including 200
BBYO members.
MRS. MIMI Cornfield, who
has 12 grandchildren, set her-
self a stroller*! pace, complMei
six kil^metsrs. and raised $500.
more than '"any other entrant.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
Busin-'ssi^n ;nJ others in
t'io conimunity "sponsored'' thQ
walkers. agre"ng ti cont ibute
a set amount each complet-
ed ilomcter.
About 1,000 of the walkers
a dog a"ioru themcomplet-
ed the 25-'rilomet;r course in
perfect weather. The dog.
named Blu:bcll Whitman, rais-
ed $10.50.
RARE* BAW?V r'!Sr. **-
ing his first 0'itins. and ccott
Phil'ins an1 Scott Randolph,
BBYO f^n-neers who finished
first last year. wre this year's
three-way-tie winners. Their
time: two hours flat.
J"ff Roth. BBYO Assistant
regional director for Wisconsin,
arranged for kosher snacks at
six checkpoints along the route.
A full luncheon, the food con-
tvibuted. was available at the
halfway point.
Fou- podiatrists, located stra-
tegically along the route, treat-
ed those who suffered blisters
and aching muscles.
Fi-e walks have been held
since 1971, raising more than
SI 15,000.
JWB Confab Set
For Las Vegas
Singles Limited Dance Set
"Singles Limited" (20's and
30's> of Temple Beth Am will
have a dance with a live band
.' tinday at 8:30 p.m. in the tem-
pi^ social hall. 5950 N. Ken-
dall Dr.
LAS VEGAS, Nev. Deputy
Secretary of Defense William P.
Clements. Jr., will deliver the
keynote address at the opening
session of the 80th annual na-
tional convention of the Jewish
War Veterans of the U.S.A. at
the Frontier Hotel on Aug. 4
through 10.
Judge Paul Ribner, of Phila-
delphia, national commander of
the oldest U.S. veterans organi-
zation, announced that Clements
will speak on Wednesday. Aug.
6. at the first session for all
delegates, who will be coming
from almost every state in the
nation.
MAJ. GEN. Avraham Adan,
IDF. Defense Attache. Embassy
of Israel, will be guest speaker
at the national executive com-
mittee session on Tuesday, Aug.
5.
Other speakers include Hartfc
Greenspun. editor and publish*
er, Las Vegas Sun; Col. Jack
Marshall, honorary national
commander, JWV, of Canada;
Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, Jr., Com-.
mander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet,
U.S. Navy; and Yeheskil Sahar*
Israel War Veterans League.
The National Policy Commit-
tee opens the convention on,
Monday. Aug. 4.
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Miami Beach Bank
Appoints Sr. V-P
Ronald D. Blumstein has
been appointed senior vice
president of the Bank of Miami
Beach, according to the bank's
chairman of the board, Ben-
jamin I. Shulman.
Blumstein, who will be in
charg.* of the commercial loans
di\ision of Bank of Miami
Beach, has served for the past
three years as \ice president of
the InterNational Bank of Mi-
ami.
His previous financial expe-
rience includes service with
Security National Bank of Hunt-
ington. N.Y., ana with First Na-
tional City Bank of New York.
Blumstein, a product of
Queens College in New York,
graduated from the American
Institute of Banking institute
for bank officers. He is a vet-
eran of the United States Army.
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Page 6-B
+Jmlsl> fhridRar
Friday, July 1, 197c
New Perfume is Far Out in Space
TEL AVIV The American
Revlon Cosmetics Company's Is-
raeli plant and the Soviet Xova-
ja Zaria I,erfurnary in Moscow
have jointly produced a new-
scent known as "Epas," an
acronym for "Experimental
Project Apollo-Soyuz." to com-
memorate this week's joint
space program by American and
Soviet astronauts.
The new fragrance was intro-
duced Monday at a reception
held by Revlon which was at-
tended by American. Rumanian
and Finnish diplomat?the lat-
ter representing tbe interests of
the Soviet Union which has no
diplomatic ties with Israel.
IT WAS described as a com-
bination of American and Soviet
technology and. although in a
field far removed from space
exploration, it symbolizes "the
sweet smell of success'* that
hopefully attended this week's
joint flight and link up of Rus-
sian and American space
vehicles.
& it
Judge Rebuked
BONNA retired judge who
claimed that the crematoriums
at Auschwitz were used for
baking bread, not exterminating
people, was strongly rebuked by
a panel of magistrates in Ham-
burg and penalized by having
his pension reduced 20 per cent
for the next five years.
The special disciplinary com-
mittee of his peers acted in the
case of Wilhelm Staeglich. 55,
a former official of the neo-
Nazi National Democratic Party
(NPD), who resigned from the
Bench two years ago.
They found that an article
written by Stieglich in an ex-
treme right-wing magazine sev-
eral years ago while he was still
presiding as a judge infringed
on the regulations governing
the conduct of public officials
and constituted an attempt to
re-write history.
Staeglich claimed in the ar-
ticle that when he visited
Auschwitz in 1944 he found that
the inmates lived "a comfort-
able camp life" undr the watch-
ful eyes of "considerate SS
guards." He denied that prison-
ers were gassed and cremated.
it -ft
Hospital Charged with Bias
NEW YORK Beth Israel
Hospital of Boston has been
charged in federal court with
discriminating against an Ortho-
dox Jewish social worker, ac-
cording to Sidney Kwestel,
president of the National Jew-
ish Commission on Law and
Public Affairs.
The complainant, Judith Ra-
falowicz, is being represented
by Nathan Lewin, a COLPA vice
president. Kwestel said that ac-
cording to a complaint filed in
federal court in Boston, an of-
fer of employment in the hos-
pital's social service department
was withdrawn after the social
worker, when she was offered
a job, informed hospital offi-
cials she could not work on
Jewish holidays.
The reason given by the hos-
pital for withdrawing its job of-
fer was that Ms. Rafalowicz
"withheld information prior to
being offered the position,"
Kwestel said.
Burial Caves Unearthed
JERUSALEMA team of Is-
raeli archaeologists has un-
earthed a family tomb 27 cen-
turies old on the site where the
B'nai B'rith Jerusalem Garden
is being developed.
The skeletal remains of some
20 bodies were found in a seal-
ed, two-chamber burial cave on
the slope that fronts the west-
ern side of Jerusalem's Old City
Wall, between the Jaffa Gate
and Mt. Zion.
The area, once a "no-man's
land" that divided Jerusalem
into Israeli and Jordanian sec-
tors before the Six-Day War, is
being redeveloped by the mu-
nicipality, with B'nai B'rith
sponsorship, into a landscaped
park.
Clay jugs and a Hebrew seal
bearing the name, "Chaniehl for
Chamiehl): bat Menachem,"
were also found in the sealed
cave. Anthropological tests indi-
Manischewitz Prices Cut
The B. Manischewitz Compa-
ny has announced a reduction
in price on a variety of their
matzo products.
These reductions were made
possible by the recent drop in
the cost of raw materials, par-
ticularly flour, and Manische-
witz is passing this saving on to
the consumer.
The products covered by the
reductions, which range ap-
proximately from 7 to 10 per
cent, include Matzos, Matzo
Thins. Thin Salted Matzos. Thin
Tea Matzos, Egg n' Onion Matzo,
American Matzo, Vege-Matzo
and Honey and Spice Matzo.
In The Spirit of '76
AAiomi Beach's European-Style Residence Hotel
Complete'/ Redecorated in Red White & Blue
ENJOY ALL THIS
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Models open 9am 7 pm. Daily
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4300 Collins A ve Phorve 534-4194
I AJcnt to MM FsnUliuWse,* A BarMtofM Hi
cated that the burials were
members of the same family and
had taken place during the
seventh century B.C.E.
ft
MFN for Rumania
WASHINGTON The Senate
Finance Committee has unani-
mously approved President
Ford's request for most favored
nation trade treatment of Ru-
mania.
It was followed by a 14-2 vote
in a House trade subcommittee
in favor of MFN for Rumania.
Most Favored Nation status
will allow Rumania tariff rates
50 per cent below those levied
on other Communist countries
except Poland and Yugoslavia.
The Senate and House actions
followed information provided
by government officials that
Rumania has eased its emigra-
tion restrictions on Jews and
others.
it it ij
Facilities Called Inadequate
MONTREAL The outgoing
president of the Allied Jewish
Community Services. Charles
Bronfman, has questioned in his
annual report how much longer j
existing communal facilities for .
the Jewish elderly would be
adequate as the number of such
Montreal Jews continued to
grow.
A combined tenth annual
meeting of the AJCS and Com-
munity Conference was told that
almost 14,000 of Montreal's
115.000 Jews are in the age
group of 65 and over, the high-
est proportion of aged of any
ethnic group in Quebec.
While few firm resolutions
came out of the meeting of the
600 delegates, there was general
agreement that to meet the
needs of the ever-growing num-
ber of elderlv Jews. Jewish
community services "need to be
radically reviewed."
The Relegates were told that
the number of Jewish elderly
residents in Montreal had in-
creased 67 per cent since 1961.
Rabbinical Advisorv Council
NEW YORK Rabbi Melvin
L. Libman, former spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth El-
Keser Israel, of New Haven,'
Conn., has been appointed di-
rector of the Rabbinical Advis- i
ory Council of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, Frank R. Lauten-
berg, UJA general chairman,
has announced.
Rabbi Libman succeeds Rabbi
Earl A. Jordan, who will be-
come executive director of the
Jewish Community Council of
Metropolitan Houston.
A it it
Boycott May Spread
WASHINGTON Rep. Eliza-
beth Holtzman (D., N.Y.) warn-
ed here that the Arab boycott
of American firms having Jew-
ish or Israeli connections could
have a "multiplier effect"
spreading more discrimination
throughout American business.
She testified before the House
Judiciary Committee's subcom-
mittee on monopolies and com-
mercial law which is holding
hearings on legislation to coun-
ter the Arab boycott in the U.S.
Ms. Holtzman noted that "in,
recent months we have heard.
many reports of Arab economic
blackmail aimed at American,
firms which trade with Israel j
or are owned by or employ
Jews." '
Bntain Blocks Resolution
PARIS A resolution before
the European Common Market
Parliament which condemns the
terrorist bombing that took 14
lives in Jerusalem and cites the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion as a threat to world peace,
was blocked here by British
representatives who compared
the Jerusalem outras? to the as-
sassination of Lord Moyne by
two members of the Jewish jn-
derground Stern group in Cairo
jn 1944.
As a result, a vote on the
draft submitted by Socialist.
Christian Democrat and Liberal
members was postponed.
Peter Kirk, a Conservative
MP who heads the British dele-
gation to the Common Market
Parliament in session in Strass-
i\
bourg. argued that it was a m
take to try to make distinction]
between individual act* of te
ror. He said the Jerusalem blast
and the assassination of Loni
Moyne were essentially
same acts.
* a a
1>L Leader Fineti
NEW YORKRussel Kelneri
national coordinator of the Jew!
i-;h Defense League, was fined
SI,000 and put on four years
probation for threatening to kill
Palestine Liberation o
tion leader Yassir An
Federal Judge R, |
Owens, who also gave K- !r.er a|
one-year suspended jail sen-
tence, said he was giving the!
JDL official the benefit of thef
doubt since he did not mc to|
carrv out the threat.
The threat was made at a
press conference iust prior to]
Arafat's United Nations apj
pea ranee.
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From Miami Beach only $13.00 Complete
(Wednesday & Saturday Matinees) ,.
Includes round-trip door-to-door motor coat h transportation, complete I.unchi'' I
at SCAMPS. THE TAURUS, or MONTY TRAINERS BAYSHORE RESTAI
RANT. (Entree. Salad. Dessert, and choice of beverage), enjoy shopping am: a
leisurely stroll through picturesque Coconut Grove, and see EQUUS from a good
Orchestra Section seat (Tax included; gratuity at restaurant extra.) Call LEBLANo
TOURS at 865-0341 at least one day ahead lor reservations.
Dinner/Theatre Packageonly $13.00
(Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday & Sunday Evenings)
Complete Dinner at CAFE BRASSERIE in the Coconut Grove Hotel, BLAC h
CAESARS. THE HASTA. THE TAURUS. MONTY TRAINERS BAYSHORt
RESTAURANT. SCAMPS, or VINTONS TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT en-
ireec u"?' de5Sert and choice of beverage) PLUS a good Orchestra Section sea'
tor EQUUS. On sale now at the Box Office only (Tax included; gratuity al restau'-
ant extra. Transportation not included.)
ItM
For idults and students 'over 18) only
Information: 444-9831
Low Group Rates: 253-5566
I


Fixer' Director Now at the Helm of Trench Connection IF Screening
[OHN l'RANKHENHEIMER, a towering young man
0 made himself a name as director of such
Lotion pictures as Bernard Malamud's "The Fixer."'
g with the plight of a Jew in pogrom-ridden
tussia; "The Train." an expose of the Ger-
[ occupation of Paris in World W ir II: arid the'
I lental filmization of O'Neill's "The Iceman
i". was at the helm of "The French Connec-
tion 11" a sequel to the earlier adventures of real-
[. \c\v York detective Eddie Eganbut one de-
ed as a fictitious account dealing with the same
t ai___b continuing their treK in Marseilles.
WRITTEN BY Robert and Laurie Dillon in col-
liboration with Alexander Jacobs, the veraciously
by Mr. Frankenheimer, it stars once more
Hackman as the morose, rather uneducated
I n. unable to communicate in French, who
les through the back alleys and dry-docks of
X.,ft
Marseilles like an elephant in a porcelain shop break-
ing everything and everyone in a desperate attempt
to detect the link to an illicit dope traffic on two
continents and a connection between the processing
plants of unrefined heroin from Turkey and the sale
of the extremely potent drug in the U.S.
Alain Charnier. portrayed by Fernando Rev. is
such a merchant of death who escaped the police
dragnet in the streets of Manhattan in the original
film, "The French Connection," directed by William
Friedl in. who then moved on to the sensational suc-
cess of "The Exorcist."
FRANKENHEIMER SAYS that the first edition
of "The French Connection" is one of the best films
he had ever seen. This is the reason he attempts to
continue the adventures of narcotics detective Pop-
eye Doyle with a very different yarn, in no way a
rip-otf of the Bill Friedkin film he had admired
so much. .
Mrs. I.ion Feuchtwanger, widow of the play-
wright-novelist who fought the Nazis with the pov er
of his pen. showed at the American Film Institute a
copy of the motion picture "Goya," made by the
East German Defa (formerly Ufa) in collaboration
with Len-Film of Leningrad.
Feuchtwanger wrote the biographical novel in
exile during 1948 to 1950.
A- c-bci
StJ
...
About Learning
From French
)IR OLD alli.s. the French, proved in 1954 they knew when
he time had come to admit they were wrong. Trounced at
lienphu, they pulled out of Vietnam after nine years of
costly war fought to salvage their Asiatic propertv and
ie long, painful, demanding process of dealing with
.ill and economic problems at home.
Now in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the world's
rph over Adolf Hitler, France's President. Valerv Giscard
)'Est.iing lias shown the French may still have the right idea.
..KITING TO Chancellor Helmut Schmidt of West Germany
lers of Europe's other seven Common Market countries,
1 -!aii: said, in effect, "we've done enough cele-
te end oi an old war; let's begin celebrating the prog-
B Common Market, an idea whose time came in 1958."
the doers and movers in Washington demonstrate that
learn from the French leaders? "Lets get Watergate
us,' we were screaming not long ago.
WE CLOSED out that sordid affair but not before we took
' inscribe in our history books the bitter lessons learned.
get Vietnam behind us." we are thundering today.
And we are out of Vietnam. But whom shall w_ trust to
n our minds and history books the wisdom garnered from
hat tragic adventure, costing 56,000 American lives?
SOME OF us note sadly that all that a strong portion of
ngton officialdom seems to be advocating is that we keep
tding world opinion that we have the marines, the air
Orce, and the will it takes (regardless of cost) to go thunder-
to retrieve any ship of ours falling into the hands of any
[D bumblers. Keep strong! Keep strong! And pull all our
into a circle to let the whole planet know we shall over-
ome the new wave of neo-isolationism.
Does it follow, then, that those who demand the immediate
knd enlightened tackling of issues including recession, unem-
ployment, the near-bankruptcy of big cities, and the rape of
pe American consumer are not patriotic?
IS IT really more important to avenge the wrong done to
the Mayaguez (and wrong it was) than to insist that Washing-
ton do a great deal more to get the wheels of industry turning
po that the jobless can obtain decent labor and the ill-housed
car. locate in homes more worthy of an enormously wealthy
Men in high places who kept kidding us into thinking the
!" glow at tunnel's end in Vietnam was the fireworks of
irtctory bob up in news freshly recalled now, sounding pretty
Silly: 1951: Harry Truman says, "The Communist assault in
lina has been checked." 1953: Dwight Eisenhower de-
lares. "Communist efforts to dominate South Vietnam have en-
trely failed."
1964: ROBERT McNAMARA asserts "We have stopped los-
ing the war." 1967^ Gen. EarleC. Wheeler assures us with "The
nerry's chance for a military victory is gone." 1972: Henry
Kissinger proclaims "Peace is at hand."
The unedited works of people at the helm now yield dozens
of such verbal mirages by which we were conned into believing
we were saving President Thieu's hide.
YES WE will remember next time around. We will recollect
that men served by the keenest military' intelligence modern
spy units and communications equipment can supply mis-
judged or deliberately twisted the reports and, in their zeal,
to prove we were right, lied to us.
If President Ford reallv intends to regain and keep the
respect and confidence of our old allies, he will move fast to
grant unconditional amnestv to Americans who find it much
more difficult to get back into the United States than do some
Vietnamese who took more than their share of loot while duck-
ing out on military service in their homeland.
Carl
cAL
'pert
Pase 7-B rJcnisti fkrtfiar Friday, July 18. 1975
Haifa
'THE ISRAEL national anthem, "Hatikva"
went on public trial here not long ago. A
panel of distinguished personalities debated the
pros and cons of the hymn, and when they had
finished, the audience in the radio station
studio voted as jury to determine whether, in
their opinion, the time had come to change the
anthem in favor of a better hymn.
The charges against "Hatikva" are formi-
dable and far-ranging. First of all, the melody
is not Jewish. It is based on a Czechoslovakian
folk-song which the composer, Smetana, had
incorporated in his symphonic poem, the
Moldau.
FURTHERMORE, because of its theme,
which expresses a Zionist longing and the spirit
of a Jewish heart, it is alien to that minority
in the State of Israel who are Arabs. A true
national anthem should be acceptable to all
citizens.
This argument came from Uri Avneri.
maverick ex-member of the Knesset, and editor
of a popular magazine. Avneri went further.
The whole tone of the poem, as well as the
music, are European, Ashkenazi, he said, and
hence foreign to the spirit or the Sephardi Jews
who constitute more than 50 per cent of the
Jewish population.
"Hatikva" may be fine for world Jewry,
he added. Let the Zionists of the Diaspora sing
it. but Israel should have something more fit-
tingas for example, Jerusalem of Gold.
Trio of Books
For Many Tastes
rTINDI DIAMOND'S "Your Name in the News"
(So. Miami. Jewel Books, $2.95, 92 pp.)
should appeal to many Miamians and organiza-
tional public relations chairpersons.
The subtitle describes the theme of the
book, "How to Get Free Publicity." The author
is an experienced journalist and photographer.
Mrs. Diamond supplies not only the method-
ology to secure organizational publicity but
also the methods for gathering the relevant
material, to utilize photos, and "the care and
feeding of editors" .
"WHY NATIONS Go to War," by John G.
Stoessinger (New York, St. Martin's Press, n.p.,
230 pp.) is an analysis of the causes for World
War I, Hitler's attack on Russia, Vietnam,
which the author terms a Greek tragedy in five
acts, the India wars for Kashmir and its battles
with Pakistan and Bangladesh, and the four
wars by the Arabs against Israel.
There are a few, errors in the last named.
The author fails to understand that Jews were
attached to the Holy Land prior to Herzl and
that Jews have resided there uninterruptedly
for 3,500 years.
HE MAKES two cogent remarks: Israel
'Halikvalf Goes on Trial
-And Beats the
THE LEGALIST on the panel carefully
pointed out that whereas the Knesset had
formally designated both the official flag and
the official seal of the State, no similar status
had been afforded "Hatikva." which therefore
had no more standing than a folk song.
Indeed, though it had been sung for years.
it was not until 1933 that the Zionist Congress
formally accepted it as the Zionist hymn.
Much has happened since then, and just
as Canada. Russia, Italv and other countries
had changed their anthems so the time had
come for Israel to seel: a song which more
truly reflects the national spirit.
LITTLE MENTION was made of the fact
that the author of most of the words. Naphtali
Herz Imber. was a vagabond poet with no claim
to literary standing, and best remembered by
his contemporaries as one who drank too freely.
Despite all the criticism, despite its lack
of legal status, "Hatikva" has survived. There
have been other anthems, sung by various par-
ties and groups in the Zionist movement, hut
"Hatikva," by the very fact of its continuing
popular acceptance, has vindicated itself as
being in the spirit of the Jewish peoplea
spirit in which we express an unfailing hope, of
two thousand years duration, to be a free
people in our own land.
The argumentation was completed, and the
judge rapped his gavel. The studio jury was
polled, and bv overwhelming vote it was decid-
ed that there was no cause to make a change
in the national anthem.
*J>ci/moit>* ^A).
^JL^JeDntan
failed to understand the pain and anguish of
the vanquished in 1967 and that the Arabs
were unable to cope with the terrible reality
"and took refuge in their fantasies" .
"The World and Ideas of Ernst Freund."
by Oscar Kraines (University of Alabama
Press, $3.50, 251 pp.) is a notable work by a
scholar who resides in our midst.
DR. KRAINES is a former lecturer in the
Graduate School at NYU and director of
the Judiciary budget of New York State.
He presents Freund's philosophy of ad-
ministrative law and his battle for the estab-
lishment of standards of legality in the spheres
of civil liberty rights and uniform laws on
marriage, divorce and working conditions, with
lucidity for the layman. Kraines has created a
fitting monument to the memory of Freund .
DAGOBERT D. RUNES, the perennial mix-
er of fact and opinion with a touch of hysteria
and historical exaggeration and error, contin-
ues his muddled style in "Let My People Live"
(New York, Philosophical Library. $5.. 70 pp.).
It is billed as an analysis of anti-Semitism. The
book is o\er-priced and confuses more than
it clarifies.
.
. :


Page 8-B
Mwirf fkrkJtor
Friday, July ig, 197s
Aaron and Myra Farr of Farr
Tours and Travel returned re-
cently from an extra special
seven day cruise on the "TSS
Fairwind." It was their ship
which picked up the now fa-
mous newly married Australian
couple who had been ship-
wrecked off the coast of Haiti
and been in their rubber raft
for three and one-half days.
The rescued couple became
the celebrities of the passenger
list and were crowned "King"
and "Queen" during the ship's
Carnival night. Each of them
gained 10 pounds before the
ship docked in Port Everglades.
6 New members joining Kings
Bay Yacht and Country Club in-
clude Marvin and Anne Amos
and children Joanne, Mark,
Judv and Steven; Carl and
Esther Griswold and children
Gregory and Julia; Charles and
Rhoda Nathan and daughter
Cathy Sue; Fred and Sharon
Skaggs and children Elaine and
Robert; Dr. Firth Spiegel, wife
Edith and children Firth, Adam
and Kelly; Joel and Deena
Wynne and children Eric and
Matthew.
A Ceil Zucker, president of the
Department of Florida. Ladies
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans,
hosted a swim-brunch for her
officers and chairwomen at her
home July 13. These officers
and chairwomen represented 22
Auxiliaries throughout Florida.
Mrs. Zucker also attended the
July 4 Naturalization Cere-
monies at Bayfront Park with
Senior Vice President Belle
Swam, Patriotic Instructress
Mae Schreiber. Chaplain and
Americanism Chi i r w o m a n
Elayne Uhr, Auxiliary presidents
Rae Feinstein and Shirley Mor-
ton and Auxiliary member Alice
Brunner. The Department pre-
sented each new citizen with a
card on "What it Means to be
an American."
-tr -ir ii
Brooklyn, N. Y., residents
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wald, who
have alternated their summer
visits between Israel and Miami
Beach for many years, are back
at the Sterling Hotel for their
annual vacation. Mrs. Wald,
honorary national vice president
of American Mizrachi Women,
has traveled extensively
throughout the country address-
ing Mizrachi groups. Mr. Wald
is a member of the national
executive of Mizrachi -Hapoel
Haraizrachi.
b ir -Cr
Four dedicated women got to-
gether in the fall of 1956 to dis-
cuss how they could help Viz-
caya. The Vizcayans, end result
of that meeting nearly 20 years
ago, today number 2,100 mem-
bers and have raised more than
a half-million dollars towards
restoring much of the palatial
Italian palazzo along Biscayne
Bay.
The four women, all still
very active in the Vizcayans,
are Mrs. Lydta Mlkell, Mrs.
Julias Alexander, Mrs. Carroll
Latiroer and Mrs. Arthur Fried-
man, who enlisted the immedi-
ate support of a close friend,
Mrs. Charles D. Leffler, to help
breathe life into the infant Viz-
cayans organization.
Today, an estimated 260,000
persons a year stroll the 10
acres of formal gardens and
browse through the 72-room
mansion containing exquisite
furnishings and works of art
from the Renaissance to the
19th Centurv. Much of the
charm and elegance of the for-
mer home of James Deering,
founder of the International
Harvester Company and one of
America's wealthiest art con-
noisseurs, is due to the Viz-
cayans. who help preserve this
priceless legacy.
Many Vizcayans serve as
volunteer guides. They conduct
colorful tours, not only in Eng-
lish, but in Spanish and French.
In fact, the Volunteer Guides
are just one of several auxiliary
groups benefiting Vizcaya. They
work closely with the Dade
County School Board in con-
ducting tours for school chil-
dren, prepare slide programs,
maintain a reference library,
and do research for both the
museum and the Vizcaya Res-
toration Committee.
When heirs of the late James
Deering agreed to sell Vizcaya
to Dade County in 1952, it was
stipulated that no tax monies
would be used to maintain it.
So the Vizcivans. through vari-
ous fund-raising activities, pro-
vide for the care, maintenance,
support, continuance and suc-
cess of Vizcaya. The Vizcayans
were chartered for this purpose
as a non-profit group by the
State ot Florida in April, 1957.
Largest fund-raising function
of the year for the Vizcayans is
its Festa dei Medici Ball during
November.
The Vizcayans employ a high-
ly tilentd Cuban craftsman
and his wifePlacido and Gena
Quesada on a year-round
basis. While she restores many
of the delicate fabrics, such as
the tapestries, upholstery and
bed coverings, he painstakingly
preserves the intricate gold-leaf
designs on the ceilings and
walls.
Among those who join with
the Vizcayans in their dedica-
tion are The Villagers, the Dade
County Federation of Garden
Clubs. Tropical Rose Society,
the Miami Chapter of the
American Guild of Organists,
UM School of Music and the
National Society of Interior
Designers.
Naemi Group Of Hodassah
Plans Lecture, Swim Party
Naomi Group. Miami Chapter
of Hadassah, will meet in the
recreation room of the Summit
Apartments. 9099 SW 77th Ave..
Monday at 8:30 p.m. Dr. Shel-
don H. Schneider will give a
free lecture on "The Pathways
of the Subconscious Mind."
The group will hold its annual
swim-bridge and man Jong"
luncheon Wednesday at 10:30
a.m. Members and guests are
welcome; a donation is re-
quired.
Low Group Rotes Offered
By ton Voyage Travel, Inc.
Cruises at low group rates
are being offered by Bon Voy-
age Travel. Inc., and its Cruise
Reservation Service, located in
North Miami Beach.
Caribbean cruises aboard the
TSS Mardi Gras will depart Aug.
30, Nov. 29. Dec 6 and Dec. 13.
Three special tours to Israel are
scheduled to leave Miami this
fall. A Sept. 18 departure date
has been set for the singles
tour. Two tours will leave Oct.
15. Folders with complete de-
tails are available upon request.
B'NAI ISRAEL*
4 Or Miami Vavth $yn. (irth*d.)
Mf OjOOf Urmu wM m-* ttly:
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
t: Club d las tminioi
((rm.rly VM-rWH A i
500 S.W. 8th St.
tkttti atOai hf rOUt *nmu,n
Rw mttmfim, 274-9556
Lee Collins (center), attache at the Amer-
ican Embassy in Israel, attends dedica-
tion of highly sophisticated X-Ray ma-
chine purchased from American AID
grant to the Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion in Jerusalem. Others (from left) are
Dr. Amln Schwartz, head of Diagnostic
Radiology, Hodassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center; Rose E. Matzkin, nation-
al president of Hadassah; Dr. Kalman J.
Mann, director-general, HMO; and Faye
L. Schenk, chairman, HMO.
Million's Worth Of X-Ray Gear
Donated To Hadassah By AID
JERUSALEMA million dol-
lars worth of X-Ray equipment,
purchased with U.S. funds, were
dedicated at the Hadassah-He-
brew University Medical Center
here by the president of Ha-
dassah, Rose E. Matzkin, and
Lee Collins, the commercial at-
tache of the American Embassy.
The money is from a total
grant of $4.4 million made by
the Agency for International De-
velopment to Hadassah for the
expansion of the Medical Cen-
ter of Ein Karem and the re-
building of the Hebrew Univer-
sity Hospital on Mount Scopus.
MRS. MATZKIN stressed the
traditional help given by the
American Government to Israel.
Dr. Kalman J. Mann, director-
general of the Hadassah Med-
ical Organization, siid that
these benefits of modern med-
ical science were not enjoyed
only by Israelis, but by people
from Kuwait, Jordan. Iran.
Turkey, Cyprus and Greece who
are treated at Hadassah.
Speaking for the American
Government. Collins said that
the equipment symbolized the
deeo and enduring friendship
between the American and Is-
raeli peoples
"I am delighted that the
equipment will be used without
thought of race, religion or
creed, for the healing of all
who came to Hadassah for
help." he said.
DR. AMTN Schwirfr. h- the Department of Diagnostic
Radiology, s^i J that the equip-
ment is a-iong the best in the
world and has revolutionized
th work in his department.
Some of the pictures are tak-
en at such a high s^-ed100
frames a secondthat it is pos-
sible to study orgins in motion.
Thus "'>s--*'<:ion cm be mvJe
of swallowing, or of various
o.g ns ii" e the kidneys at work.
Due to t*M '"ia'1 powsr of th'
Den r-achin;s. the exposure
tine can b* substantially re-
duced. Blurrng d'ie M mnv -
ment of b-eathing is eliminated.
A RAPID sequence of ex-
posures (how* the flow of blood
in o-ain< sue*, as t,e b--ain.
kidneys, spleen anJ bowels.
He added that four portable
machines had proved invaluable
during the Yom Kippur War.
when Hadassah worked as a
casualty clearing station.
DR. SCHWARTZ said. We
have also received thre new
d !veioping machines which re-
duce the developing time to 90
seconds, sa\ ing a lot of time and
eniblin^ nore pictures to ba
developed."
He said that a soecial exam-
ination room is being prepared
for new.angiography equipment.
ANGtOCRAPHY, which is the
r-d sels, is a h''"ly sophisticate J
oroc< n which contnst nn-
t*'ial is hvected into the ar-
ts; i is or "etns and a rapid se-
quence of -xposures is made to
organs such as the brain
neys, spleen, bowels and so on
In ord r to house the new
equipment, the department has
increased its premises.
Ha added: "It is not only :ne
equipment that counts hut the
men behind the machines, Our
department has for years car-
ried out special X-Ray examina-
tions for highly specialr.-j de-
partments in the hospital, such
as those dealing with braia
cardiac, urological anJ vessel
surgery.
According to statistics made
in U.S. and European univer-
sity hospitals, these special pro-
cedures ta>* up to 25 per cent
of the X-Ray Department's
wor'.c, including, time, rooms,
equipment, radiologists, while
the number of patients involved
is only three oer cent. Hadas-
sah falls into this category
So, in spite of our new fa-
cilities, our staff is under great-
er pressure than ever.
"IN THE near future.' he
concluded, "we want to add
special equipment for the radi-
ological examination of the ves-
sels of the legs, and this will
complete our department. Of
course. X-Ray machines wear
out and should be replaced
every seven years.
"ALso, we will have to keep
pac^ witn new developments-
For the more distant future. we
are already planning to install
now equipment for the radio-
logical examination of the uri-
nary tract."
Come Celebrate at The SEVILLE
WEDDINGS
ANNIVERSARIES
BIRTHDAYS
BANQUETS
BAUTIZO
SWEET 15
ENGAGEMENT
PARTIES
__>evilie hotel
FachVes for 75 Mm.mum to 1.000 Guests Ample Parkmg For 200 Cars
2901 cb,n$ a- THuUHl %>C4cA
Reserve Now for Your Festive Occasion!
MANNY ALV, FOOD A BEVERAGE DIRECTOR PHONE S32-2S11, EXT. CS2S


Friday, July 18, 1975
+Jmlsi! Itorkllain
Page 9-B
Adena Skop's
Engagement
Announced
Rabbi and Mrs. Morris A.
Skop of Temple Sholom, Pom-
pa^o Beach, announce the en-
gagement of their youngest
daughter, Adena Ziona, to Bruce
Konigsburg, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Konigsburg, of Pom-
pano Beach.
The Tenayim Engagement will
be held at the Temple Sholom
Sunday noon, with Rabbi Skop
and past presidents of the tem-
ple offichting at the unique and
traditional ceremony. The wed-
ding date has been set for Dec.
28. 1975.
Adena is a graduate of the
University of Miami School of
Education and has been em-
ployed by the Broward Board
of Education in Pompano Beach
for the past six years. Bruce, a
graduate engineer, was educat-
ed at the Uni"ersity of Flor-
ida in Gainesville and is cur-
rently employed by the Rinker
Corporation.
Kerrin Flamm,
Dr. Witkin Wed
Sunday, July 13
Kerrin Flamm and Dr. Fred-
ric Jay Witkin were married
Sunday. July 13, in Benton
Harbor. Mich.
Mrs. Witkin, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Seymour Flamm. of
Benton Harbor, received her
Bachelor's degree at Michigan
State University.
Dr. Witkin. the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Witkin, 1551 NE
167th St., North Miami Beach,
attended the University of Mi-
ami and is a recent graduate of
Emory University, where he ob-
tained his Doctor of Dental
Surgery degree.
Following their honeymoon
trip, the couple will live in
Boston, Mass., where Dr. Wit-
kin will complete his studies
in Periodontics at Boston Uni-
versity.
Gina Scheaf f er Engaged
To Richard Pearce Russ
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Scheaffer of
Miami Beach announce the engagement of
their daughter, Gina Patrice, to Richard
Pearce Russ, son of Dr. and Mrs. Norman
Russ of Miami Beach.
The bride-to-be, a senior at Brown Uni-
versity, Providence, Rhode Island, is a Po-
litical Science major having interned in
Senator Birch Bayh's office in Washington,
D.C.
Mr. Russ graduated from the Univer-
sity of Alabama, where he was a member
of Zeta Beta Tau. He is president of Piercing
Pagoda, Inc., a chain of stores in shopping
centers throughout Florida.
'Equus' A Record Breaker;
Run Extended Through Aug. 3
"Equus." the bizarre psycho-
thrilier by Peter Shaffer and
the 1975 Tony Award winner
for the best play, has broken all
existing money making records
and put the Coconut Grove
Playhouse over the $1,250,000
mark for the first 40 weeks of
this current season.
DurinR the nine weeks it has
played at the Grove, over 60,000
people have jammed into the
playhouse's 1100 seats, includ-
ing the 44 unusual amphi-
LECTURE "Hypnosis in
Your Child's Education" will be
the topic of a lecture by H. J.
Reizisi. Ph.D. at the monthly
public meeting of the American
Hypnosis Association and A.A.-
E.H. Chapter 9, at 2750 Coral
Way, Thursday, July 24, at 8
p.m.
tr & PROMOTION Anne Alder-
man-Hunt has been appointed
Comptroller at City National
Bank of MiaV Her promotion
from assistant vice president
was announced by Michael J.
Franco, chairman of the board
ot directors.
,fc -Cr ir
PROMOTED Leonard L.
Abess Jr. has been elected a
vice president at City National
Bank of Miami. Abess, a gradu-
ate of Wharton School of Busi-
ness at the University of Penn-
sylvania, was promoted from as-
sistant vice president.
theatre bleacher seats which
face the audience.
In Miami, tickets are sold at
the Jordan Marsh downtown, in
Dadeland and the 163rd Street
Shopping Center; they are also
available at Leblang Tours, Mi-
ami Beach Radio, Neiman-Mar-
cus and Saks Fifth Avenue.
Several restaurants offer a
dinner theatre combination
package, which provides a full-
course meal and an "Equus"
ticket but can only be purchas-
ed at the box office.
"Equus." which has already I
extended its schedule twice, will
be running until Aug. 3.
Weekend Singles
Convention Set
Five Atlanta, Ga., Jewish
singles clubs have joined forc-
es to host a weekend singles
convention there Aug. 1-3, with
a low package price covering
the entire cost.
Hundreds of single men and
women in their twenties,
thirties, forties and fifties are
expected to attend from cities
in Florida. Georgia. Alabama,
South Carolina, North Carolina,
Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, In-
diana and other states in the
South and East, according te
an announcement made by Ber-
nie Friedman, a Georgia real
estate broker.
Reservations must be made
in advance. Contact Mr. Fried-
man at P.O. Box 5247, Colum-
bus. Ga., 31906.
Music
by
"Weddings 4
Bar Mitzvahs
our Specialty"
s
At Greenway Village South. A condominium community located in the Palm
Beaches newest, planned and completed community of single family homes and
condominiums. With two Mark Mahannah golf courses and lighted tennis courts.
Free Country Club membership. Play golf for free for one year on two. champion-
ship 18-hole layouts. And tennis too. On eight lighted courts. Relax, enjoy a friendly
game or the warm Florida sun around your private pool or in your private recreation
center.
Free Maintenance. For the first year you live at Greenway Village South. Water,
electricity, care of your lawn and shrubs and electric service for your recreation
center, public areas and other common expenses are all free.
Your new home has the conveniences. Making life at Greenway Village South a
joy. Air conditioning and heating, wall-to-wall carpeting, all electric kitchen,
including stove, refrigerator-freezer, garbage disposal, automatic dish-
washer and your own. screened patio-terrace. Ready for you to live in
right away.
Greenway VHSage Sooth. Where some of the palm trees are
taller than the buildings. Our prices end at $31.550 and begin
at $24,740. They will never be lower and the value will
never be greater.
Be our guest See this completed community with
its own community services, landscaped
greenery and championship golf courses.
Just 11 miles from the azure blue At-
lantic Ocean and the special charm
and grace of the Palm Beaches.
Please fill out the coupon
and drop it in the mail
and we'll get back to
you with details of
how you can be
our guest.
Q> at $24.
v
Herb Kaplan,
President,
Royal Palm Beach
Colony, Inc.
FROM:
s
:<*,
NAME.
%
ADDRESS.
'
CITY & STATE.
ZIP.
PHONE (AC).

Ml
Thanks Herb. Please let me know how we can join you at happy
Greenway Village South. Mail to Herb Kaplan. Greenway Village South,
30 Royal Palm Beach Boulevard, Royal Palm Beach Village, Florida 33411. A013429
Ths dots not constitute an offering m states where ny ot the property described herein is not registered tor sate.


Page 10-B
* 3eistTkrUktr
Friday, Jbly lw, i9/$
Best's kosher Products Now
Sold From Coast To Coast
Not too man'- businesses that
e founded in the HOO's ten
still run by the same family that
founded them.
t ceptian ii vauss
been a sausage maker, brought
his old, wo.JJ know-rjow and
U dreams to the heart
of a growing America.
moved down the
Ohio River, they --topptd off at
Cincinnati to provision them-
es lor thir trek to the west.
A great fa-orite with them was
Oscheiv-tz kosher sausages,
fame of his products spread
throughout the midwest.
ration after generation
has carried on the business. To-
day, the fourth generation of
the Oschfrwir? family is now
actively engaged in the manage-
ment of the company.
About 1925 the Oscherwitz
family opened another kosher
t packing plant in Chicago
which packed products under
the Best's Kosher label.
Approximately 30 years later s
the two companies were merged
and combined their production
and headquarters in Chicago.
Today, they continue to produce
kosher beef products under
both labels ... the Oscherwitz
kosher brand and the Best
Kosher Sausage Company label.
e Levi Ftrauss. The Best
Kosher Sausage Co. eventually
found its way to California. To-
day. Bests Kosher products are
sold from coast-to-coast
from Los Angeles to Washing-
ton. D.C and from Milwaukee
to Miami.
Isaac Oscherwitz would never
have dreamed that one day his
company would feed 15 million
American families each year.
Jewish New Year Activities
In High Gear for Ciments
ISAAC OSCHERWITZ
& Co., manufacturers of the
famous blue denim jeans. Levi's.
As a Bavarian immigrant. Levi
found his fame and fortune in
the gold rush fields of Cali-
fornia.
Another unusual case is the
Best Kosher Sausage Company,
founded by Isaac Oscherwitz in
1-6 in die river town of Cin-
cinnati, Ohio.
Oscherwitz. who emigrated
from Germany where he had
The Jewish New Year doesn't
begin until sundown Sept. 5.
but planning activities foi the
year are already in high gear
at the home of Judge and Mrs.
Norman Ciment, of Miami
Beach.
Beth Norman and his wife.
Joan, were elected as presi-
dent of important Jewish or-
gani atiors tor the upcoming
year, climaxing their years of
\irtually total involvement in
general and Jewish community
activities since their marriage.
The Ciments celebrated their
10th anniversary July 4.
JUST REMODELED
Efficiencies 1 Bedroom & 2 Bedrooms
at Rents you can afford.
Overlooking the Bay with Pool.
Furnished or unfurnished.
Air-Cond. No Children or Pets.
Yearly Leases only. Fabulous Location.
Call Sid Howard at
SAXON MANOR APTS.
6800 Indian Creek Dr. Miami Beach
866-6831
BLrKKSTONE
KOSHER HOTEL
3 STRICTLY KOSHER MEALS
( Special Diets Observed )
Planned
Entertainment
Card Room* Color
TV Lounge
24 Hour Phone
Service
Maid Service
Mashfiacha
SynafOfueon
Premises
Near Famous Lincoln
Road
Oceanview Rooms
I
YEARLY RATE ^oofl ZT
INCtUOfS 3iMHiR MUIS T*aW OOUBlf OCCUPANCY
SMSONAl Mm iVi'lABl! JPON *IU
foi AJflitionol Irtormo'ion Col'538-1 811
COO WASHINGTON AVE MIAMI BkACM
JUDGE CIMENT is the new
president of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy. Joan is the
new president cf the Gulf-
stream Chapter of Women's
American ORT. which has some
250 members and aids in the
education and rehabilitation of
Jews in Israel and around the
world.
Mrs. Ciment has been active
in ORT for nine years. She also
finds time to serve on the
boards of Beth Israel Sister-
hood and the Mizrachi Women's
Organization and to be an ac-
tive member of Hadassah. the
Temple Emanu-El PTA and of
the Hebrew Academy Women
and the Hebrew Academy PTA.
JUDGE CIMENT, a former
Miami Beach city councilman
who resigned from the council
to become Judge of the Florida
Industrial Claims Court, now is
a member of the Tourist Devel-
opment Authority of the City of
Miami Beach. He is a partner
in a Miami Beach law firm, and
is active in Beth Israel Congre-
gation and numerous non-sec-
tarian, Jewish and legal organi-
zations.
The Ciments have three chil-
dren Ivan, 9; Jason, 6, and
Avi, 4 but the boys are so
busy with their studies at the
Hebrew Academy and at home
that Joan also has time to be a
registered real estate salesman.
She specializes in finding homes
and apartments for Orthodox
Jewish families who desire to
live within walking distance of
synagogues.
MRS. CIMENTS ORT chap-
ter is geared to young women
in their 20's and 30's, and she
finds that "Gulfstream members
are just as eager In their sup-
port of Judaism and Israel as
their mothers and grandmoth-
ers."
She was a second grade
teacher in the Dade public
school system and also has
served on the faculties at both
the Hebrew Academy and Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
Both Joan and Norman are
graduates of Miami Beach Sen-
ior High School and of the
University of Miami.
ONE-MAN SHOW
English or Yiddish
"THE LIFE AND TIMES
OF PAUL MUNI"
(Muni Weisenfreund)
Condos, Organizations, etc.
YUSKATOF- 1-421-2196
or writ* him
c/o Box 012973, Miami 33101
A new line of bee] products that have a lower fat content
are now being offered in Philadelphia. Originally intro-
duced by the Best Kosher Sausage Co. in Chicago in 1970
as the "Diet Hot Dog," the line has grown to five prod-
ucts: frankfurters, knackwurst, salami chub, sliced sala-
mi and sliced bologna, with no more than a 20% fat
content. Best's Kosher r.ower Fat products have 33%
less fat than the maximum fat allowed. Since lower fat
means less calories, Weight Watcher groups around the
naion are leading the demand for this unique product
line.
International Residence Hotel
Reopened In Miami Beaeh
One of Miami Beach's oldest
hotels, the International at
4300 Collins Ave., was reopen-
ed during the Fourth of July
weekend.
Now under the same owner-
ship as the Barcelona and Ven-
dome Hotels, across the street,
the stately Spanish structure, a
Miami Beach landmark, is being
completely renovated, redec-
orated and refurbished. Its 105
units are currently being leas-
ed for September occupancy.
Built in the 1920s, the In-
ternational Hotel features large
reception rooms, wide hallways
and broad verandas. Units are
available on a weekly, monthly,
annual or seasonal basis.
Models are open daily from 9
a.m. to 7 p.m.
Included in the rental are
parking and utilities, as well as
new color TV sets and portable
refrigerators; units feature
large walk-in closets, and color-
coordinated carpeting, bed-
spreads and drapes.
Plans call for gourmet restau-
rant with access from both the
lobby and outside. The location
of the International puts resi-
dents in minutes' walking dis-
tance of synagogues, churches,
buses and shopping.
With the acquisition or the
International, the firm now
holds a full block on Collins
Avenue from Indian Creek to
the ocean. The Barcelona con-
s'-^- of 476 rooms on the ocean;
the Vendome apartments con-
tain 40 units and the Interna-
tional 105 units, with extensive
parking facilities for all three
holdings.
Arthur Bant, managing direc-
tor of the Barcelona who is
overseeing the initial operation?
of the International, served five
years on f a Board of the Mi-
ami Beach Tourist D?velTvnent
Authority and was m :v; it
the Sea isle for 1") years before
becoming associated with
Barcelona.
ADVERTISED SALESMAN
D = t>e_ BBOWARD
and/o- Po*h.
Send resume to ST.,
Box 012973, Miami 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
Telephone, Personal Contact,
RABBI. Yeshiva University
instructor. Musical Baal Tfilah.
Speaker. Korah Vetukeah.
Seeks position for the high
Holidays. Write Rabbi (308)
Hotel Breakwater
940 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach 33135
CONSERVATIVE CANTOR
Available for High Holidays,
also all year round.
Experience 25 years.
Nice Nusach. Phone 864-9397
500 HIGH HOLIDAY ADLER
P'vor Books for sale. Good
Condition. Very reasonable.
All or part. -221-9131.
5 ft. Baby Grand Piano
FOR SALE
$1000.00
Weber, Walnut finish
new keys A hammers
PHONE 279-3757
DATE SINCERE AND
INTERESTING PEOPLE
SSS DATING/MARRIAGE
SERVICE
ESTABLISHED 1968
947-5594
T0RAH FOR SALE
by Owner, East European,
good condition, white skins,
29 inches wide.
Phone 1-721-6823 Pompano


Friday, July 18, 1975
* Unisi fJk>ridUnr
Vaee 11-B
%ty
^abMmcal l$n%t
co-ordinated b/ the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. L'oschifz *au;bi Robert J. Crkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
What is a "Kibbutz"?
The Kibbutz, or kevuzah
iplural: kibbutzim, kevuzot) is
a voluntary collective communi-
ty, mainly agricultural, in which
there is no private wealth and
which is responsible for the
of the members and their
families. According to the au-
thoritative Encyclopaedia Ju-
. the kibbutz movement in
Israel in 19ft9 numbered 93.000
people in 231 kibbutzim and
kevuzot organized in several
federations according to social,
political and religious outlook.
The first kevuzah was found-
ed in 1909 at Deganyah by a
group of pioneers, who under-
took collective responsibility
for the working of the farm.
Another group, which started
work at Kinneret in the same
vear. became an independent
kevuzah in 1913. By 1914 there
11 kevuzot established on
Jewish National Fund land un-
der the responsibility of the
Zionist Organization, and the
number grew to 29 by the end
oi 1918.
The early kevuzot had small
memberships based upon the
idea that the community should
be small enough to constitute
a kind of enlarged family. Dur-
ing the Third Aliyah. after
World War I, when larger num-
bers of pioneering settlers (ha-
Intzim) arrived, large, self-suf-
ficient villages, combining agri-
culture with industry, for which
the name "kibbutz" was used
were established. The first of
this tvpe was En Harod. found-
ed in 1921, and many others fol-
lowed.
The Kibbutzim, says the En-
cyclopaedia Judaica. received
their manpower mainly from the
pioneering youth movements
abroad and. in their turn, pro-
vided the movements with a
practical ideal of pioneering
settlement on the land in order
to make a major contribution to
the building of the Jewish Na-
tional Home and create a model
and a basis for the socialist
society of the future. They play-
ed an important part in ex-
panding the map of Jewish set-
Issues And Answers..
Our Rabbis' Views
Shall We Fight 'Em
Or Join "Em?
By RABBI MORRIS SKOP. Temple Sholom, Pompano Beach
Something new and unusual is happening in our area which
- been arousing much discussion and controversy. New temples
and synagogues are springing up, like mushrooms, in every
condominium comnleu subdivision an I summit lins communities.
High Holv Davs Services are being Planned for Palm Aire. r>- er*
field Beach Roca Raton. Margate, Oriole Gardens, Tamarac and
Century Villi
Some of thest grouos will develop into full-grown, responsible
congregations, with professional and trained and ordained leader-
ship Others will oneratc only for the High Holv Days. Some will
"retired" rabbis and cantors who will officiate part-ti
Others will close down after the Yomim N'orayim and the Torahs
will be returned or stored for next year.
Organized and established temples and congregations are
beginning to feel this drain on membership and needed support.
Shall we fight this new development, or ignore the situation?
Most of the rabbis in established temples have been against
encouraging this dissipation of support and unity of the Jewish
community. A few rabbis, Including the director of the United
Synagogue in this area, feel that this rapid growth of our area
and large influx of older Jewish residents, require a realistic
approach.
Many residents of these high rise condominium developments,
in which hundreds of Jewish people reside, and do not want to
ride to a temple, prefer to have services on condominium grounds.
Builders are also encouraging this bv offering social halls and
special rooms for services ;:nd meetings.
Since these developments are new in our expanding Jewish
communities, it is urgent that we take a stand on this prolifera-
tion. We cannot interfere with another congregation hiring a fu'l-
time rabbi and establishing a permanent temple, but we should
have some control over the condominium, once-a-vear assemblies
which should be satellite groups, meeting under the auspices of
a recognized congregation in the area.
These groups should certainlv NOT be encouraged by the
United Synagogue in any other way. by offering part-time rahWa,
cantors and prayer books which siphon off hundreds of worship-
pers from established congregations who netd ALL YEAR support
for their facilities, Hebrew Schools, faculty and programs ...
many in expanded sanctuaries with added financial responsibilities.
We know that any ten Jews can pray anv time, anywhere
but isn't it better to BELONG to the organized Jewish com-
munity with permanent status and leadership?
What do you think?
tlement and safeguarding the
growing community.
The kibbutz is a unique prod-
uct of the Zionist labor move-
ment and the Jewish national
revival. It was developed by
Jewish workers inspired by
ideas of social justice as an in-
tegral part of the Zionist effort
to resettle the homeland. Ever
since its inception, the kibbutz
movement has played a pioneer
ing role in the economic, po-
litical, cultural and security ac-
tivities required to carry out
that purpose.
The kibbutz movement has
been, and still is. a major factor
in the activities of the Zionist
movement and the State of Is-
rael. Its influence has been both
moral and practical, ranging
from settlement and security
functions (including settling new
areas since the Six-Day War"),
to the absorption of immigrants
and Youth Aliyah children, and
the provision of leading per-
sonnel for Zionist and govern-
ment service.
The number of kibbutz mem-
bers in the Knesset and among
army officers is far beyond
their proportion of the popula-
tion. This influence is indicated
by such diverse statistics as the
fact that its production ac-
counts for 12 per cent of Israel's
gross national product, and that
more than 20 members of the
Knesset are kibbutz members.
In recent years, the move-
ment has been increasing in
size at the rate of about 2-3 per
cent a year. Although it has
become an established institu-
tion, it has demonstrated a ca-
pacity of changing with the
times, the Judaica concludes.
Religious Services
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALCM CONGREGA.
TlON 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Rapharlv. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron. 1
OHEV SHALOM 7055 Bonita Or.
Orthodox. Rabci Phineas A. Weber-
ma n. 36
SEt'HARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rabbi S-fii Nahmias. 31
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Cantor Scl Pakowitz
2
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1642
44 Washington Ave. 32
SETH AM i-mpl8). 5950 N. Kendall
Dr So Msanit. Reform. Rabbi H
bert M Baumoard. Associate Rabbi
Barry Altman. 3
CONGREGATION BET BREIRA. 107.
55 S.W 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
BETH DAVIC 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lipson. 4-A
----------a----------
8ETH DAV D SOUTH 7=.00 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor Will am Lipson. 4 B
9ETH KODESH 1101 SW 11th Ave.
Modern Traf't.onal. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Seaal. Rev. Alex
Siahl. Rev Mendel Cutterman. 6
3ETH TOV (Tamol**- 6438 SW Pth
St. Conservative. Ratbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
VORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Villaoe. Conservative.
Can'or Murray Vavneh 32-A
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
*GUDAS ACHIM Nl'^ACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St.
Orthodox Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo-
vits. V>- a
\OATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1028
N.E. M:am Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Cantor tar Alpern. 31
9'NAI ISRAEL AND GKEATER
MIAMI YCOTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. 8-A
'SRAEL (Temple! OF GREATER
MIAMI, 137 NE 19-.:. St. Reform.
Rabbi oseoh R. Narot. 10
SRAELITE ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
11
OR OLOM (Tempi*) 6755 SW 16th
St. Conservative. Habbi David M.
8aror. Cantor Stanley Rich. IS
TEMPLE ISRAEL-SOUTH (Formerly
Beth Tikva' 90.5 Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
rteligious Con-munity Center. 19258
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TORAH. 1C51 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conservative Rahbi Max Lip.
schttz. Canter Jacob B. Mendelson.
34
B NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Habbi Victor D. Zwel.
ing. Cantur Jar* Ler.ter. 38
SINAI (Tempiei OF NORTH DADE
I38C1 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralpn ". Kingsley. Cantor Irving;
Shulkes. 37
SKV LAKE SVNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
BiOnick. 38
-
8AM U -. Temple) 89C0 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 306. Raobi Maxwell
Beraer 9
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI,
AMI 990 NE 171st SL Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Lrff.
CORAL GABLES
JUC.EA (Temple'. 5550 Granada Blvd.
netorm Kaob- Michael B.
stai. Cantor ^'ta Shore.
Eisen-
49
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Stewart H. Sv'.ner 14
--------------
'ON iTemrel 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
serva'ive Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Cantor Erroi HeHman. 1'
HiAlEAH
i'IFERETH JACOB 'Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan Zolonue*. 15
rJORiH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CCN GR EGAT'ON.
2225 N E. 121st St. C- nservative.
Ral-Oi Dr. Daniel J. Finqerer. Can.
tor Yehuda Bmvamin. 35
MIAMI BEACH
XGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodcx P ll b Sheldon N. Ever. 17
8ETH EL. *400 Pir-e Tree Dr.
Orthodox. 5
BETH ISRAEL. 77J 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai S'i3piro. 18
ZAMORA i~ ample), 44 2amora Ave.
Conserv ..>. Habbi Maurice Klein,
41
UMSIOE
MOGAN DWID CONGREGATION
934.' Hardinq Ave Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
(OPT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRABL (Temple). 7100 W.
Oakand Par* Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Lahowitz Cantor Maurice Nets. 42
-e
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Ekd. Refo.-m. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment. 43
CO-AL SPKINGS HEBRtW CON-
CREGATION. Reform. 3501 Univer-
s.ty Or. Rab'-i Max Weitz. 44
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why does Jewish law
prohibit one Jew from tak-
ing interest on a loan he
made to a fellow Jew?
This prohibition is a Biblical
one (Exodus 22:24) (Leviticus
25:37) (Deuteronomy 23:20).
Some commentaries explain this
prohibition as a means of pre-
venting the loss of the borrow-
ers' total holdings.
Another opinion states that
one who loans money on usury
displays his lack of faith both
in God and in his fellow man.
By insisting upon interest he
shows that he loans money, not
because he has any faith in his
fellow man but because he
wants the interest.
Others claim that usury is
prohibited because wealth is a
gift from the Almighty. The
lender is thus taking a gift from
the Lord and using it for ex-
ploiting the poor who are also
the children of the Almighty.
The borrower is also guilty if
he pays interest because he
shows himself to be perpetuat-
ing and promoting a system of
business which would eventual-
ly exploit others, and eventual-
ly even himself.
Loans between fellow Jews
are supposed to be based on
mutual confidence and not on
selfish interest. Even third
parties, like witnesses, scribes
and brokers are condemned in
3ETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shn.aryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Mai-r.'e Mamchcs.
19
3ETH RAPHAEL Tcmplel 1545 J>f-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winoqrad. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
8ETH SHOLOM iTemp'e). 4114 Chase
Ave. Liberal Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
'IMPLf BETH SOLOMON. 1C31
Lincoln Rd Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mcrde
rai Yardeim. 21-A
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, 9108
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 2?91 Stirling Rd. 58
MMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 61T
>u\M 9th St. 4-
SHOLOM (Tempei. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Raobi Morris A. Skop,
Car-tor Yaacov Renzer. *
HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER,
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Canz.aer. 12
HOLLYWOOD
BETH El (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist.
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfelt" 4
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 178th St.,
M'lmi Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jaeobson. 22- B
EETH fHALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar.
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Center Irving Gold, 48
CUBAN HEBREW CONGKFfiATmN
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHAROIC HEBREW CON.
GREGAT:ON 715 Wa*hint,ton Ave.
Rabbi Meir Masliah Melamed. 23-A
SI \ I (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
EMANU-EL (Templet. 1701 Washing,
ton Ave. Conse. vative. Rahbi Irvina
Lehrman, Cantor Zvi Adler 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Raobi Alexander S
Gross. 25
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rahbi Tibnr H. Stern.
Cantor Mever Enael. 26
KNESETH ISRAEL. '-S Euclid Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
David Rosenfield. 47. S
TEMPLE SOLEL ,Lihenal) 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-0)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE.
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams.
MIRAMAH
ISMAEL (Tempiei. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative Rabbi Avron. Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 48
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 MF 8th St. Conservative. 61
MENORAH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Raool Maver Abram-
ow tz Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
NER TAMID iTemple). 79tn St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Ixgene Labnyitz. Canter FdwaM
. _.__._.__
ffl fs-i av oi J JMM1 DKMHOniiaNTO S


Page 12-B
Jei*ncr*fc*n
Friday, July 18,1975
Dade Schools Participate In
Jewish Aivareness Programs
Continued from Page 1-B
Service Director for CAJE, who
services the Dade County Pub-
be Schools with educational
materials, has arranged a series
of study sessions in response
to the needs of the schools for
various types of source mate-
rials which CAJE has develop-
ed. New teacher aids are con-
stantly being fashioned by
CAJE on diverse subjects for
classroom use.
Other subjects explored for
school staff use have been Is-
rael Life Styles. Mideast Af-
fairs and U.S. Foreign Policy,
the Jew in American Litera-
ture and the American Jewish
Experience in the Bicentennial.
Since all students in Dade
Coumy High Schools are re-
quited to c*n:plete one quin
mester on Totalitarianism.
CAJE has undertaken to supply
teachers and schools with ma
terials and speakers on Soviet
Jewry. Holocaust study is also
being introduced in greater
, numbers of public schools on
the junior and high school
levels.
These courses, sometimes en-
titled, "Minority Literature" or
"Value Systems" or "Man's In-
ner Struggle" or "Propaganda"
are all designed to incorporate
Holocaust educational materials.
Teachers participating in the
all day session qualified for
Professional Incentive Program
(PIP) Credit through the co-
operation of CAJE and Staff
Development of the School
Board of Dade County.
Zvi Berger. executive (.'irec-
CANTOR WANTED
Small Conservative synagogue
in SW Miami requires serv-
ices of Cantor or Baal TTila
for the Holidays.
Phone 266-2400
tor of CAJE, announced that
plans are being made to pro-
vide all public and private
schools with current material,
so that these subjects can be
presented in depth to all Dade
County students.
80 Students To
Go On AH yah
During 1975
NEW YORK, N.Y.Some 80
American Jewish students who
are going on Aliyah (immigrat-
ing to Israel) during 1975 ware
the guests of honor at a recent
reception hosted by the Student
Mobilization for Israel (SMI) in
New York City. Among the stu-
dents, who come from all over
the United States, and are all
members of the Aliyah Corps of
SMI, were Earl Gass of Holly-
wood, Sergio Waksman of
Tampa, and T. Schinsky of 999
NE 167th St., North Miami
Beach.
SMI is an organization which
was established last fall in order
to actively help Israel and re-
spond to crises in the Jewish
community. One of their major
goals is to promote and en-
courage Aliyah. The Aliyah
Corps is a group within SMI
comprised of people who are
planning to immigrate to Israel.
Those leaving are the first
group of students from SMI to
go on Aliyah. and will be settl-
ing throughout Israel, a large
number of them in Jerusalem.
It is SMI's goal to assist its
members in adapting to Israel
life. SMI students plan to ac-
tively work within the Israeli
society not only in easing the
path for new immigrants but to
get involved in social services
and volunteer work wherever
needed.
The students who are immi-
grating to Israel this year will
be either studying at Israeli uni-
versities, attending intensive
Hebrew language classes (Ul-
panim) or obtaining permanent
employment. __:
Gerontology Experts Declare
Retirement Should be Flexible
By GREER FAY CASHMAN
JERUSALEMIsraeli experts
in gerontology, the scientific
studv of old age and its diseas-
Ben Zion Ginsburg has
been elected to the Na-
tional Board of Trustees of
the Asthmatic Children's
Foundation, as a represent-
ative of the Asthmatic Chil-
dren's Foundation of Flor-
ida, Inc. Ginsburg was a
founder and vice president
of the Florida Foundation
established in 1964 which
maintains a residential
treatment center in North
Miami Beach.
MAIMONIDES SCHOOL
BROOKLINE, MASS.
invites candidates for Executive Director, with respon-
sibilities in office and building management, fundraising,
public relations and administration, to submit their
applications. "'**'
Maimdmdes School, founded by Rabbi Joseph B. Solo-
veitchik, is New England's oldest and largest Orthodox
Hebrew Day School, offering an integrated curriculum
of religious and secular studies from kindergarten
through high school.
Send resumes to Search Committee, Maimonides School,
Philbrook Road, Brookline, Mass. 02146.________
CHANGE Of ADDRESS?
Please use this form to notify THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN of
any change in your subscription address. Please allow two
weeks for changes.
Name
OtD ADDRESS
Please attach mailing label
from this issue here
NEW ADDRESS
Street
City..........-----------
Effective date -
MAIL TO:
State-
____Apt. No.
____ Zip.........
PLEASE USE THIS FORM
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. BOX 012973
MIAMI, HA. 33101
-
Dade County Purchasing
Agent John A. Berger, a
founding member of the
Florida Association of Gov-
er n mental Purchasing
Agents, is the recipient of
that organization's highest
honor. At its recent an-
nual meeting, he was nam-
ed president emeritus. A
Miami Beach resident, Mr.
Berger set up the county's
purchasing office in 1957
when the Home Rule Chart-
er was adopted, and con-
tinues to direct its activi-
ties.
B'nai B'rith Lecture Program
To Feature 38 Speakers
Continued from Page 1-B
ciologist, Leon Ginsberg, an au-
thority on small-town Jewry;
Yiddishist, Ruth Wisse, of the
University of Toronto; Israeli
writer and scholar, A. B. Yeho-
shua; editor and critic, Irving
Howe, winner of B'nai B'rith's
1974 Jewish Heritage Award;
and Dr. Leon Jick, director of
Brandeis University's Lown
Graduate School for contem-
porary Jewish studies.
The lecture season begins in
October and continues through
April.
es. have recommended that re-
tirement age should not be fixed
at 60 for a woman and 65 for
a man, but should be flexible
depending on the capabilities of
the individual.
The recommendation was
voiced al the conclusion of the
10th International Gerontology-
Conference, the largest gather-
ing of its kind in Israel this
year. Three-thousand partici-
pants representing 35 countries
attended.
THROUGH THE cooperation
of the Ministry of Education,
classes on aging were conduct-
ed in schools right across the
country, and children were en-
couraged to paint or draw their
own concepts of aged people.
Some of the drawings were
later used on post cards dis-
tributed at the conference.
In the week before and dur-
ing the conference, communities
throughout Israel were en-
couraged to honor their senior
citizens. Reports received by
the conference indicated that
"this was a very successful
social experiment."
The major benefit of the con-
ference was the opportunity af-
forded to highly-skilled profes-
sionals to learn more about old
age beyond their own particular
spheres of specialization.
THEY LEARNED, for in-
stance, that there is now enough
knowledge about the causes of
the dreaded Parkinsons D^ease
to be able to work out a pre-
ventative.
The most common of all old
age diseases is loss of bone
which occurs in everyone but
is more common to females
than to males.
From a psychological point of
view, participants were made
aware of how important it ; to
give the elderly a role to play
in society. The Israeli attitude
was that actinty keeps rv-ople
young, and thev should either
take up a seCmd career or do
volunteer work.
Society can still benefit creat-
1v Irom the emrgv of the aped.
Most of this is lost, because
society at large prefers to put
the ag'od out to pasture.
Wander
HORSE SHOE, NORTH CAROLINA
OPEN ADMISSIONS POLICY
A residential Camp ior Boys and Girls Ages 7-16
OFFERS YOU A WIDE SELECTION OF ACTIVITIES
AND TIMES TO FIT EVERY VACATION PLAN
WITH 2-WEEK SESSIONS
JULY 26 AUG. 9 V AUG. 9 AUG. 23
4-WeEK SESSION JULY 26 AUG. 23
and a week of popular FAMILY CAMPING AUG. 24 30
Camp Highlander makes full use of 170 acres of North C
lina mountainside country and our gymnasium to prefect
New Intense Majors Programs in GYMNASTICS AND DAN'E,
TENNIS, ADVANCED RIDING. ARTS AND CRAFTS, ADVANCED
CAMPING and H.A.WK., as well as the traditional progra-s
in these and other activities including water skiing, canoe ng,
swimming, riflery, archer/, naiure study, hiking, gymnasi^Ti
and land sports.
Contact Fred Lawman, PINE CREST SCHOOL
1501 NE. 62nd ST., FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 33334
PHONE: 772-6550
Horse Shoe, North Carolina
OFFERS
A WEEK OF FAMILY CAMPING
August 24 August 30
Enjoy a week of popular Family Camping on CAMP HIGH-
LANDER'S 170 acres of North Carolina mountainside
country.
Activities include tennis, swimming, hiking, canoeing, rock
sliding, ruby-mining, basketball and Softball. Horseback
riding and golf are also available nearby.
Indian Council Campfires, movies, Bingo, sightseeing and
picnicking add to a family vacation that has almost every-
thing ... and at a very reasonable price!
Cabins for 2 at $150. For each additional family member
over 3 years of age: $50. Prices include breakfast and
dinner.
For reservations: Call Fred Lawman, Pine Crest School
1501 N.E. 62nd Street, Ft. Lauderdale. Phone: 772-6550


Friday. July 18, 1975
>Jewistncridian
13-B
The Lorber Chapter of the National Asth-
ma Center recently installed their 1975-
76 officers and board members. Mrs. Nat
Cynamon (left) took her president's oath
under Dr. A. Freund. Also shown from
left to right are Mrs. Sam Ofgang, Mrs.
Robert Garvett, Mrs. Leonard Rappaport,
Mrs. J. Kaiser, and Mrs. Robert Biren-
baum, a parent whose child was treated
at NAC.
Soviet Jews Threatened
With Arrest And Trial
LEGAL NOTICE
NEW YORK(JTA)Rafael
Nudelman and Ilya Rubin, two
Jewish activists who have con-
tributed to the underground
p -wspaper "Jews in the USSR,"
also known as "Samizdat" (By
Ourselves), have been threaten-
ed with trial, the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry report-
ed.
According to the NCSJ. an-
other activist. Mark Azbel. has
been told that he would be
called as a witness against
Nudelman and Rubin.
THE UNDERGROUND news-
paper was established several
years ago by the Soviet Jewish
scientist Alerander Voronel who
has since emigrated to Israel.
The NCSJ also reported that
Lev Roitburd. of Odessa, who
attempted last week to go to
Moscow to meet with the visit-
ing American Senators, was
beaten and arrested.
His wife reported that she
was summoned to Moscow and
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
1 hercl>y certify that AKCIO HARD-
WAKK. INC. was on the 26th dav of
April. 1954. incorporated under the
..... ,-u u_ w._ u...w__j ...:n laws of the State of Florida, with
was told that her husband will ita principal olace of business at mi-
be brought to trial for "resist- ami ing arrest," an Offense for 1 further certify that the above cor-
which he can be sentenced to ""ration filed In this office on the
wnicn ne can oe sentenced to ,, ,lav of Julv m- Notice of ,ntellt
to Voluntarily Dissolve under Section
808.27. Florida Statutes.
GIVEN under mv hand and the
Ureat Seal of the State of Florida,
at Tallahassee, the Capital, this
the Sth day of Julv. 1975.
BRUCE A. SMATHERS
SECRETARY OF STATE
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
7/18/75
1 to 5 years in prison.
In another development, the
NCSJ said that the Jewish
cemetery in Odessa was recent-
ly desecrated. The local police
are reportedly investigating.
Congregation Both Tfilah
Engages Cantor Lantos IN the circuit court of the
Pnncrreoation Reth Tfilah has ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Congregation etn inian nas OF Florida IN AND FOR
engaged the services of Cantor bade county
Abraham Lantos to conduct the JrouatI no?7*.m
High Holy Day services. At one in re: Estate of
time Cantor Lantos conducted ajjublbchwaBW
services in the largest congre- th(. ^ot.ce^probat.
gation in Israel. to all persons interested
Rabbi I. M. Tropper, spiritual in the estate of said
leader of the congregation, will 1
officiate.
LEGAL NOTICE
LECAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3403
JOSEPH NESBITT
11 i-: Estate ot
|.V \\ C1I >LD
i...eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All Creditor* IM All Persons
[Having Clalmi or Demands Against
|s, I Estate:
u ir.- her.-l.v notified and renuir-
[ Dresenl anv claims ami demands
I which \ou mav have against the es-
ltate >f MAX OOl D.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4421
JOSEPH NESBITT
In BE: Estate of
FATE TUP1.ER OILI-MAN.
i k Pave Tuoler
il...-..-i -*!
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Persons
To All Creditors and All
Having Claims or Demands Airainst 4117 Lincoln Road
Said Estate: Miami Beach. Fla. 3.1139
Vou are herehv notified and reouir- First publication of this notice on
h.I to -(resent anv claims and demand! the 18th dav of Julv. 197.'..
which vou mav have airainst the es- 7/18-25 8/1-8
tatC of FAYE TUPLER OILL-
MAN aka Fave Tupler deceased
lite of Dade Countv. Florida, to the
Circuit Judites of Dade Countv. and
fil.- the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16. Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in th
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
1 hereby certify that B-I. INC.. was
Countv on the 29th dav of May. 1989. Incor-
d.ceased Courthouse In Dade Countv. Florida. IK>rated under the laws of the State
I Dade County Florida, to the within four calendar months from the ,,f Florida, with its principal Place of
Ifir.-uit Judges of Dade Countv. and time of the first publication hereor. business at Miami (Dade Countv)
Ifil- the v.me In duplicate and as nro- or the same will be barred. Florida.
Kldedl'n^Jetton TMuS. fTortda Stat- Filed at Miami. Florida, this llth 1 further certify that the above cor-
|u In th.ir offices in the Countv day OfJulV. A.D. 1*JS.
poratlon flleil in this office on the
Form Law Association
Edward A. Sirkin and David
S. VVieder announce their asso-
ciation for the practice of law
and the relocation of their of-
fices to Suite 503, Security
LEGAL NOTICE
Ave., Miami.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
.. FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
,N'"TI.CK l.i JUv.KEI'.V.'iiVKX Uiat
the underalfltned, deslrlns to engage
in business under th* fictitious name
of ABLE RESUME. BERVICE8 at
838 N.E. 1 7th Street. Suite SX. North
Miami Beach, intends to register said
name with th. clerk of the circuit
Court of Dad.- County. Florida.
11 B OOULDBN
7/18-21 8/1-S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-19882
Trust Building. 700 Brickell general jurisdiction division
ACTION FOrt DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE I >F:
MONROE HANSON. Petition, r
and
MAGGIE MAE MAN SON, PesnondenJ
T< I; Mrs Maggie Mai MYthson
uU Ji'vslitvnio Unknown! t > >-.
FOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Diaaolutlon ot M.ir-
liam has iM.-n ftled aKalnal vou and
vou are reoulred to nrve a cony ol
vour written defense* if anv. to It
on GLADYS GERSON. ESQUIRE.
attorney for Petitioner, whose addreaa
is mi \ \\ 12 Avenue. Miami Flor-
ida 32128. (3A-.) 824-4555. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
st vied court on or before August 1st.
LOTS: otherwise a default will be en-
tered airainst vou for the relief de-
manded In the comnlaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive w.-.ka
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21th dav of June. 1975.
RICHARD c BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By S PARRISM
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal*
Gladys Gerson. ESaauire
Stone. Sostchin & Koss. PA.
101 N.W. 12 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128 (124-4555)
Attorney for Petitioner
727 7'4-U-lS
NOTICE UNLttR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of SANS BOUCI MANOR at 190n Sans
Souci Boulevard. North Miami. Florida
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ISPANAPE. INC
Rv Marcos Perelman.
Manager and Altornev-in-Fact \
TRIFINANCE. INC.
Itv Mordco Peicher.
Manager and Attornev-in-Fact
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for IsnnnaDe. Inc. and
Triflnance. Inc.
1201 Rlscavne Building
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
tin- undersigned, desirina to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of POTS N KNOTS at 6171 8.W. 7'Jlh
Street, South Miami. Fla. .1.1143 intend
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
K. HEATHER MOI.AN'S
REV A I) HERMAN
BLIT8TEIN & MOI.ans
Attorneys for K Heather Molans
and Iteva D. Herman
d/b/a Pots 'N Knots.
7/18-25 8/1-8
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 75-22390
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF
HELEN NAPOLITANO.
Petitioner/Wife
and
FRANK SAPOLITA.NO.
Respondent/Husband
TO: FRANK NAPOLITANO
856 Willoughbv Avenue
Brooklyn. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of
.Marriage has been filed against vou
and vou are required to serve a oodv
of vour written defenses, if anv. to
the Petition on the Petitioner/Wife's
attorneys. Male And Bloom, whose
address Is 1401 Brickell Avenue. Suite wB*flaSsr^ST**
I mi. Miami. Florida 32131. on or he- M'"ml- \r!T'.lJa ,;,:"30
fore August 22. 1975. and file the
original with the Clerk of the Court
either before service on Petitioner'
Wife's attornevs. Male And Bloom,
or Immediately thereafter: otherwise,
a default will be held against vou
Phone: 374-3116
7/4-11-18-25
You are hereby notified that a writ-
ten instrument purporting to be the
last will ami testament of said dece-
dent has been admitted to probate In
said Court. You are hereby command-
ed within six calendar months from
the date of the first publication of
this notice to appear In said Court and
show cause, if anv vou can. whv the
action of said Court In admitting said
will to probate should not stand un-
revoked.
FRANK H. BOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By MIRIAM H HENDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
Attorney
ESTHER <: SCHIFF
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
for the relief demanded in the Petl- the undersigned, desiring to engage
""" in business under the fictitious name
DATED at Miami. Dade Countv. f CORHE CLEANERS AND LAUN-
Florlda. this 11th dav of Julv. 1975. DRY at 6310 NE. 2nd Ave.. Miami.
RICHARD P. BRINKER Florida intends to regster said name
Clerk. Circuit Court
Bv: L BARNARD
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
7/18-2S
ROSE COLD SPARBER. ZEMEI. ""SKJN. D .
As Executrix HEILBRONNER AND KARP. PA.
Kir>t publication of this notice on Attorneys for Executors
lh 18th dav of Julv. 1975. Suite 3050. 1 S.E 3d_ Avenue
Kin Heller Miami. Florida 33131
Itornev for Executrix i N W ;th Avenue No. 202.
Intnl. Fla. 33169 ----.------------------------------------------------
_________7/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THe
1'TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
5NERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-22851
NOTICE OF ACTION
"HI'H LEE MANl'EL and
I A MAE MANUEL, his wife.
Plaintiffs.
vs.
[ 'V T. CARVER, and
ANETTE M. CARVER, his wife.
Defendants.
Harry T Carver and
Janette M. Carver, his wife.
et al.
Residence Unknown
VOU Al'E HEREBY NOTIFIED
B)al in action to remove a cloud on ro,riced in tWs court and vou
|l"e to the following described nroo- reoui-ed to serve n copv of vour Wjy-
rtv in Dnde Countv. Florida:
Lol 10. Block of CRESTWOOD.
'ding to the plat thereof re-
eirded in Plat Book 8. Page 7 of
'he Public Records of Dade Coun-
tv Florida.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7S-??H9
GENPRAI JURISDICTION nlVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IV l>P-
ARNCI FO TOMAS LAJES
and
ABRI IVA IA/O I ATES
TO ABE' 'NA I A**"1 AJWJ_____
VOU A*E HEPEBV NOTIFIED
thqt a netlHon 'or Dlswlntion of vour
Mnrrlage hn been filed and enm-
the 8th dav of July, 1975.
BRUCE A. SMATHERS
SECRETARY OF STATE
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
____________________________7/18/75
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 75-22016
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(with Prooertv)
CHARI ES BROWN.
as Administrator
of the Estate of
NATHAN A BROWN.
Deceased.
Plaintiff.
FLORENCE MARIE BROWN, et al.
Defendants.
TO: FI.ORENCE MARIE BROWN.
if alive: or if dead, the
unknown snouse. heirs.
devisees, grantees, assignees
creditors, legatees and all other
parties claiming bv. through.
under or against her.
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Declaratory Judgment
to determine ownership of certain
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
th.- undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of INI.AND TOWERS at 207f. N E.
164 Street. North Miami Reach. Flor-
ida, intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
ISPANAPE. INC
By: -Marcos Perelman. Manager and
Attornev-in-Fnct
TRIFINANCE. INC.
Bv: Mordco Peicher. Manager and
Attornev-in-Fact
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for Isnanape. Inc. and
Triflnance. Inc.
1/27 7/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2958
JUDGE DOWLING
In RE: Estate of
IUIS M. COVELL.
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are herehv notified and reouir-
ed to present anv claims and demands
which vou may have against the es-
tate of I-OUIS M. COVELL deceased
late of Dade Countv. Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade Countv. and
file the same in duplicate and as nro-
wlth the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade Countv. Florida.
It A. PILOTO. INC.
Eugene I^mllch
8/1-8 Attorney for R. A. Piloto. Inc.
------ 270,1 yy piagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
7'11-18-25 8/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigner. desiring to eniuure
in business under the fictitious name ot
ROBERT E. HIRSCHFIELD. D.D.3.
at BJ50 Bird Road. Miami. Florida in-
tends to reaiater said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad*
Countv. Florida.
ROBERT E. HIRSCHFIELD.
D.D.S.. PA
By ROBERT E. HIRSCHFIELD.
D.D.8 PRESIDENT
Kelvin S Weinstein. Eso.
Fromherg. Fromberg & Roth. PA.
19 W. Flagler St.. Miami. Florida
Attorneys for
Robert E. Hirschfield. D.D.S PA.
7 11-18-25 8/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 75-21483
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
JULIE GERALD. Wife and
ARTHUR B. GERALD. Husband
TO: ARTHUR B. GERALD
c/o Bernie Oerald
Route 2. Box 66B
Ravmond. Mississippi 39154
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
vided in Section 733 16. rlorida Stnt- h;ls |.,.n fl|e,| aKai,|8t vou and vou
utes. In their offices In the < ountv ar,. hereby reouired to serve a copy
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 14th
dav of Julv. AD 1975.
Ronald I. Davis, attorney for
Gloria Weinstein. Administratrix
Cum Testnmento Annexo
First publication of this notice on
the 18th dav of Julv. 1975.
Ronald L. Davll
Attorney for Estate
4'7 Biscavne Building19 W Flagler
Street
7/18-M
ten rtefensei. 'f "" to It on M -
BERT I, CARRIGARTE. PA fltlor.
r.v fcw Petitioner, whoss address is
2441 V W 7th Street. Miami. Florida.
and file the original with the Ci'k
of the above tvled court on or be- United States Savings Bonds. Series
been filed against vou and vou fore \ug"t 52. 1975: otherwise a E. was commenced against vou hv
reouired to serve a copv of vour rlefn'dt wi'l he entered against vou the above-named Plaintiff in the
ritten defenses If anv to It on for the relief nraved for In the com- al.ov.-stvied Court on Julv 9th. 1975.
'nuel B Peariman. plaintiffs at- nlntn. or netltlon. ^ou are reouired to serve a copy of ,
-ney. whose address Is 407 Lincoln This notice shall be published on. e writ ten defenses, if any. with the rriarge as Executor of the estate of
"d Suite 7-K. Miami Bench. F'or- each week for four coneentiye weeks Clerk of the above-styled Court and H,1S1. Saltsburir. deceased: and that
I" t, on r before the 22nd dav in TME JEWISH FIORIDIAN &* ^K ,herV'f r>',H,n ,",P,K\ "" '" -:,ri1 '' I"'v ,:'7''- ,vi"
e orlglnsl WITNESS mv hand and the seal of NORTON. Attorney for Plaintiff 1201 am,iv ,n tn,. Honpi ible Countv Judges
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTV. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
NO. 73-7588
IN RE Estate of
ROSE SALTSBURO
Deceaned
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that we
nave filed our Final Itenort ami Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
vUgUSt. '975. and file the orlglnsl Wl
>0 the Clerk of this Court either snid
rvice on plaintiffs' attorney loth
pourt at Miami. Florida on this Hiscavne Building. 19 West Flagler
I" niroe.llatelv thereafter: otherwise
I de mlt will be.entered against you
fc'.n Ttef demanded In the Com-
......'ESS mv hand and the eal ot
r; ourt on the 16th dnv of Ju'v. CCircit Court Seal*
M BERT i-AIMUfAP-TE. PA.
dav of Julv. 197'.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Flo--: I 1
Rv Q P COPE! AND
\ 1 lenurv Clerk
Richard P BRINKER
> 1 lerk of 'be Court
Rv M KI IMINSKI
As Denutv Clerk
7/18-"-.
3/1-8
A'tnr-
w -th a
...
ne-
7/18-21
1/1-J
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. on or
before August !.". 187}: otherwise
default ludgmenl will be entered
against vou for the relief reoueated
In th.- Complaint.
DATED Julv 9th 1975. at Miami
I lade Countv. Flnrl la
RICHARD P BRINKER
. clerk of the Circuit Court
i lade 1 founts Plorl 1 1
B\ i. BARNARD
uti Clerk
T U-18-85 8'1
of Dade Countv Florida, for aonrnval
of said Final Report and f"r Dlatribn-
tion and final discharge as Executor
of the eatate cf the above-n
decedent Thi- 1*78
JEFFERSON NATIONAL HANK
I F MIAMI BEACH
Bv STUART .1 Mil I Kit
TRAOER AND 8CHV1 ARTZ
I Road
/27 7 I -1! -1 S
of vour answer or other pleading to
the Petition on th.' Wife's Attorney.
LESTER ROGERS, whose address is
1154 N.W. 17th Avenue. Miami. Florida
3312:.. and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court on or
before this lfith dav ..( August. 1975.
or a Default will be entered against
\..n
DATED this 3rd day of July. 1975.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv L, BARNARD
7 11-18-25 8/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-15312
RE-NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
IN HE: THEMAKHIJI'.K OF
THERESA WITH FI.YNN.
Petitioner.
\ -
RICHARD EDWARD FLYNN.
Respondent.
VOU RICHARD EDWARD FI.VN'N.
Respondent. Residence Unknown ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED To FILE vour
written response to this action for
dissolution of marriage, with the Clerk
of the above Court and serve a copy
upon Petitioner's Attornevs. VON
ZAMFT SMITH. Suite 850. 1320
Dixie Highway. Coral Cables.
Florida 88148 on or before the 15th
d i^ of August 1 the Petition
f..r Dissolution of Marriage will be
onfessed
DATED Julv 8. I '
RICHARD P BRINKER

il.-'Hl' '
(Ciriu
7 11-18-26 81


Page 14-B
+Je*ist ncridliatn
Friday, July 18, 1975
Philanthropist Jess Ward
Dies In Jerusalem at Age 74
NEW YORK. NY. Funeral
services were held here July 2
for Jess Ward of New York City.
a noted philanthropist and Jew-
ish communal leader who died
June 29 in Jerusalem, Israel, at
the age of 74.
Mr. and Mrs. Ward were in
Israel to dedicate the amphi-
theatre which they had donated
to the Kfar Batya children's vil-
lage, a project of American
Micrachi Women.
Born in New York City, Mr.
Ward was active in many Jew-
ish organizations and was the
recipient of the Kether Shem
Toy Award of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America for his contributions
and communal activities on be-
half of Orthodox Jewry.
He was a trustee of Ramaz
School and former president of
its Parents Council, vice presi-
dent of Yeshiva Beth Abraham
in Jerusalem, and past presi-
dent of the Hebrew Free Burial
Society. He was also active in
the United Jewish Appeal and
Israel Bonds.
Surviving are his wife. Li-
nore, who is chairwoman of the
national board of American
Mizrachi Women; his sons,
Sanford M., of Hewlett, L.I., and
Raymond M., of New York City;
a sister, Mrs. Celia Stebbins, of
New York City; and two broth-
ers, Harry, of New York City,
and Louis, of Hallandale. and
one grandchild.
SCHNEIDER. Carol? of
North Miami Beach Newman.
TEITEI.BAFM. Sophie. 90. of
Miami Beach Gordon.
YCSI.M BerntC*. 67. of Hallandale.
Riverside.
FI'.KEDMAN. Nam-v Hanna. .!. of
Miami Riverside. Interment Mt.
Nebo CemeteTV,
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open [very Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57h Avenue
Phone 266-2888
LEVITT
emorial Chapel
"JEWISH fUNlKAl DWfCTOW"
M
*
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATE
ARRANGEMENT!
949-6315
?3385 W. DIXIE MWV.. N.M.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Srinj the learish Community unee ISM
0RIH000X
CONSERVATIVE
_____ REFORM SERVICES
Emjnutl Gordon (1946) IktGarMn
Harry Gordon (1964' lin.es B Gordon
_______Telephone 858-5566____,
PALMER'S
IAMl MONUMENT COMPANY/1
ffnSONAXIZED MEMORIAL*
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-692I-4444U2
3279 S.W. Sir ST.. MIAMI
JEFFER
^^FLNCRAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS:
lrwin Jeffer
Medwin Jelfer Alvin Jeffer
188-11 HILLSIDE AVF.. HOLUS. LI.
J283 CONEY ISLAND AVE..BKLYN.
212/77B-8100
13385 W.DIXIE HWY..MIAMI
305/947-1185
Represented by: Sonsy Levitt. F. -
625 S.OtlVE AVE .W.PALM BEACH
305/833-4413
Represented by fhSp rfcsntsia, F.O.
Services available in all
communities in New York and
throughout the Miami
W. Palm Beach areas
Rep*!
gutxHUV/uipel
tmmm all n itat
AMTU MMUHS M THI UAi
865-2353
730 Smntr Rnf StrI
4 OtMUATIOMS O* JltVlCI
t
1
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, f.0.
In New York:
(212) 263-7600
Queens Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hills, N.Y.
Louis Kraft,
Ex-JWB
Chief, Dead
At Age 84
NEW YORK Louis Kraft,
former executive director of the
National Jewish Welfare Board,
died Friday afternoon, July 11.
at his home, 225 Central Park
West. He was 84 years of age.
In 1953, Mr. Kraft was invited
by the Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Ger-
many and the Joint Distribution
Committee to direct the plan-
ning of reconstruction and de-
velopment of the surviving
Jewish communities in Europe.
THE TASK involved the re-
establishment of Jewish com-
munity organizations and the
construction of many institu-
tionssynagogues. Jewish Com-
munity Centers, Jewish schools,
homes for the aged, summer
camps and hospitals in 14
European countries.
He first became associated
with the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board in 1917, as director
of activities in military camps
and communities during World
War I, after having served for
three years as executive di-
rector of the Bronx YM-YWHA.
In 1921, he was named di-
rector of Jewish Community
Center Activities, continuing in
that post until 1938, when he
was named to the top executive
post of JWB. a position which
he held until October 1. 1947.
BORN IN Moscow, Russia, on
January 2. 1891. Mr. Kraft was
graduated from the College of
the City of New York in 1912.
He received the Townsend Har-
ris Medal for notable achieve-
ment from City College Alumni
Association in February. 1972.
His wife, the former Pauline
Roman, son Steven, daughter
Barbara and several grandchil-
dren survive.
SHAPIRO
i;... .i. of Bay Harl
'
aw J"v J ,IOK
Ulneaa. Mrs Bhanlro li survived bv
her sons. Edward Shaoiro ornsld i
of Mount g v ,i of Boston, and her daughter.
etvn Chernls: of Boston scry..-**
were held Wednesday. Julv I a
Btanetsky Sehloesbers s.domon
,nel in Rrookline. Muss with lo-
cal arrangements Wider the llrec-
tion Of NVwman Funeral Horn-.
BERBER Florence Bertha, of Miami
DAT. I.ibbv. 86. of Miami Beach.
Riverside ,
FINK KI.STEIN. Sonhie U. of
Miami Beach. I-evitt.
ilELLER. Joseph. S4. of
North Miami Reach Riverside.
KAI.T. Morris. 89. of Miami Beach.
Riverside
LAWRENCE. Alex. 78. of
North Miami Reach Riverside.
ROSTACHER. Isidore 83. of
North Miami Riverside
SEAMAN. Adele. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
t'LIl'S. Jacob. 83. of Miami. Levitt.
WtU.IAMS. Reva R of
Miami Beach Riverside.
DUBIN. Herman. 75. of
Miami Beach Levitt.
GREENFIELD. Solomon. 72. of
North Miami Beach Newman.
JITRMAN. Annette. 48. of
North Bav Villare. I/evttt
Rl BIN. Ann. 73. of Miami Beach.
Newman.
TEPLANSKY. Yolanda. 83. of
Miami Beach. Riverside.
CHAIT. Felice. 90, of Miami.
Riverside.
MAITLES. Adolf. 74. of
Miami Beach. Gordon
BASKIND. Isidore. 71. of
Miami Beach Levitt
BEROER. Aaron, of Miami Beach.
Riverside
BERMAN. Mever. 62. of
Oak Park. Mich. Riverside.
HIRNICKEL. Sonhie. 88. of
Miami Beach. Gordon
KIREY. Maurice. 72. of
Miami Beach Newman
LEGAL NOTItt
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
li business under the fictitious name
ol NOTARY BOND t'NDERWRTT-
it number 990 S W 1st
In the '"ilv <>f Miami Florida. In-
tends to Register the said nam- with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade I'nuniv. Florida.
1 al Miami. Florida, this 11th
JI-I.Y.
B< i N DING C< > R Pi) RA TIO N
OF AMERICA
a Florida corporation
Bv SAM SEITL1N. I'r.-sident
MARVIN H. GILI.JMAN
Attorney for AddII
Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
7 11-18-23 8/1
IN TH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 75-21897
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
\;.n.\ LEON.
,.,,.. \. WALDO I.EnN
H NZALO LEON.
LEON ANOGON-
2ALO LEON '
are "herehv i epmolalnt
-I deed has been filed against
the following described DroDertv. to-
W'l'ot 18. Block 30 of NORWOOD
3RD ADDITION SECTION 1.
rdine to the Plat thereof.
recorded in Plat Book 57. Pate
2''. of the POMIC Records of Dade
Conn W PI irlda,
ar. I mi ire reouir. '1 to file vour an-
swer to ti:e complaint to cancel 'teed
with the Clerk of the above Court
and nerve a 0 rDV thereof upon plain-
tiff's attorney, Herman Cohen. Es-
auire til 8 W Lai Street Miami.
Florida 33130. on or before August
11, '7ri or else complaint will be
confessed.
Dated: July 18 19,V M__
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk, Cln u,; Court
Bv; It LTPPS
Deputv Clerk
7 11-18-25 8/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE Ifl HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
In business under the fictitious name
of Scone Industry-- at get] N W
Street Marat. Florida IHW Intel Is
to r-gister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Eon I i _.._
SCOPE CONSTRUCTION. INC.
Harvev !> Rogers
1454 N W l.th Avenue
Miami Florida
Attorney for Applicant
7 11-:- : 1/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA N AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLINO
PROBATE NO. 75-3623
In RE Estate Of
HANNAH B WITKIN.
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Pereons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Axaluat Bald
Ssi its
You are hereto notified an l renu I
to present an) Claim* and den.
which roil nn\ havt asa st the es-
tate of HANNAH B WITKIN deceas-
ed la e if I >ade I' iua< i Plorld i. to
Ol- Circuit Judges >f Dade County.
and file the e ,me m duoDcate and u
Ided Se tloi 733.16 Pl< n d.
Statutei h the i off es In the Coun-
ty Courth >u D ide '' iunu Flo-
rida, wltl foil endai
from thi tin of the flrel :>u
hereof, or I me will be b
File i |] ti this 7th
dav of Ju: \ : : 176
PHILIP i i:w
As El
Firs- DUblii i notice on
lai f Juh
Komm ; H ier> I i A Shi .man
Bv ALAN R LORBER
for Bxei m
4." Lit oie Road
Miami Beach Fla. 33139
7/11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
i'. undersigned, desiring t-.
in business und r the
ii.line of 'oniiii. ntal I.......
Ith SI Miami. Florida :,
Mister MM ,
:. uit i!oun
untV. Fiond.i
m- SCHIGIBL
- U-ll-lS v 1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
NO. 75-17979
General Jurisdiction Division
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
BUFFALO SAVINGS BANK.
., New York banking corporation.
Plaintiff.
THOMAS A CASH and ANNIE St.
'ASH. his wife, et al .
residence unknown, if living; un-
known spouses, if remarried, and II
de.nl. then unknown Spouses, if re-
married, all unknown heirs, del
grantees, assignees, lienors .-red
trustees, or otherwise ( Miming by,
through, under or against the |
Thomas A Cash, and Annie M
Cash, his wife and against all other
having, or claiming to have
anv right, title or ipterest in or
to the nroiiertv herein described.
.1 mi-
ll THOMAS A. CASH and AN'
M i ASH his wife.
residence unknown, if Hying; un-
known snouaes if remarried i
if dead, then unknown SOOU
if remarried, all unknown he -,
devisees, grantees, assign- -
lienors, creditors, trustees or
otherwise claiming bv. through,
under or asrainat the said
Thomas A. Cash and Ar
M Cash, his wife, and against
nil other persons having or
claiming to have anv right,
title or interest, in or to the
property herein descrlb- d
VOr ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED th-u
a -uit to foreclose mortgage ,c
aid personal property has
i irainai you In the abevi
Plaintiff. Buffalo tlavii u
The property sough* t" be
i follow! :
Lot 12 Block 9 LAKE I.CCERNE
SECTION TWO. according to
Plat thereof, recorded in P
Bool. 71 mi-. ^4 of the Public
Records o' Dade County. Florid,
Voi ARE REQUIRED to serve a
>f %--ur answer or otI .
irsr on PlaJntuTs Attorney. MALCOLM
II FRIEDMAN t.m Douglas R I
Ctabll Florida I I fil
the o thi office of the '
of the \'. \. Court, on or hi
day "f Ausrust. 1975 In d<
of wl imnlainl will be i
is teased ssalnsl vou for the r-
eaui ted i.....
I (Irigs
; \ "E-' this 7th day of Ju'v I97
RICHARD !' BKINKER
the Cli till Court of
i note '' ii- 'v Florida
S A MEWfiTT

::' SEA LI
- 11-18 .' '1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK 8. DOWLING
PROBATE NO 75-4169
In RE: Estate of
Bessie Barnett Ohefitz
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Cri All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Dem.n-I- Asralnsl Sa I
Bst Ll
You are hereby notified and r.-uuir-
ed to Dreaenl anv claims and den-
which you may have against the
tate .,f Hess:,- Barnett Cl eflts d> eas-
ed iat f Dada County, Florida
the Circuit Judc-s of Dade County
and file the same in lunlb.-.te and as
provided in Section 733 Tv Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade Countv. Flo-
rida, within four calendar months
f.-om the time of the first publication
here,? or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 7th
dav of Julv. AD 1975
BLANCHE QBRSHBN
As Executor
First Publication of this notice on
the 11th dav of Julv. 1975.
I-aw Offices of
George J Tallanoff
Attorney for Estate
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach Florida 33139
7'11-lg
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-4182
In REi Estate of
CLARA COOK
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors! and All Persons- Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are herebv notlfiefl and requir-
ed to present anv claims and demand?
which vou mav have against the
estate of CLARA COOK deceased late
of Dade Countv. Florida to the Cir-
cuit Judges of Dade County, and file
the same in duplicate and as provided
In Section 733 IB. Florida Statutes
in their offices in the Countv Court-
In Dad.- County, Florida within
ilendar months from the time of
the first publicatiin hereof, or the
same will be barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 2nd
dav uf Julv. A.I). 1975
Rl'D'M.I'H Q. COOK
a/k/a JACK COOK
As Executor
First publication of thjg notice on
the 11 tli dav of Julv. 1975.
Edward K Levlnson. Eso.
Myers Kaplan, Levlnson & Kenin"
Attorney for Executor
Suite 7''0. 1428 Hrii-kcll Avenue
Miami, Florida 33131
7/11-lf
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2843
of
- < : BCHATZ.
I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
\ Creditoi ind /
ir I -navel- t Bail k
v-u are hereby notlf
ai i ilaims usd len
I you may have asralnsl thi
tate of JOSEPH M BCH \T/ li
Cook C 'unt\ mil -
Circuit Judges of Dade C
and file the same in dunlica'. .
or .vided in Section 733 lh. PI
81 itutes, in their offices in the Coun-
tv Courthouse in Dade County. FIo
rid i. Ithln four calendar months
from the time of the first publication
f. or the same will be barred
Filed at Miami Florida, this 2nd
dav of Julv. A D 1975
GEORGE J T vi.l \NOFF
As Ancillary Admlnistr.
First publication of this noti e on
the llth dav of Julv. 1975
1 AW OFFICES OF
GEORGE J TAI.1ANOFF
Bv Terrence Schwartz
Attorney for
An.-llhirv Administrator CT.A.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
7 11-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Civil Action No. -5-21332
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAOE OF:
JOSEPH PCGLIO. Petitioner
ROSE PTGI.IO Respondent
To ROSE PI'OI JO
110 Rose Lane Ant
Rome. New York, 18440
VOI' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED th*\
an action for Dissolution of Marriaei"
has been filed against vou and vou
are required to serve a copy of vour
written defenses, if anv. to it n
HYMAN P GALBTJT. Esouire '
c.AI BI'T eV GALBITT attorne
Petitioner, whose address Is 721 Wash-
ington Ave Miami. Beach. Fla and
file the original with the clerk Of '"'
above styled court on or before Aug-
ust 11, 1S7.'.. Otherwise a default Will
li.- entered against vou for the
demanded in the complaint or petition
This notic shall be published
ach week for four cops, utlvi '
In THE JEWISH FI-ORII'IAN .
witness my band and the
said court at Miami, Florida, on this
2nd dav of Julv. 1175
RICHARD P.. BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv I. BNEEDEN
DeoutV Clerk
(Circuit c.-uit Seal'
CAI.RCT & CALBUT.
Attorneys at Law
721 Washington Avenue
M 'ini B< ach, Florida 33139
072 -31 HO
Attorney for Petitioner #rt


Friday, July 18, 1975
+Jml$t> Meridian
Page 15-B
IEGAL NOTKr
LEGAL NOTKF
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
i i. is HEREBY GIVEN that
iersurned. deairliuf to engage
i I,-,ii.- under the Fictitious name
I.A JARl'UI 'EN \ at 1348 N.E I
Mlam 88132 Intend! i<> register
......f the ''! rte of the Circuit
Dade Countv. Florida
MAZAL JEWELRY, INC
7 I II 1
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NoTH E IS IIKKKBY- GIVEN Ihnl
I understated. desiring to uigaae
:--t..ss under the fi' litmus ii..in.-
,i i i..tin ib, M l al '.''.'.
("dillin Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
Intend* to register said name with
, ..I the Circuit Court of
County. Florida
- ci. menle Ramos, M.D. I'.A.
A F a Corn.
Office*
i Frankel
j.., Mncoln Rd Suite ":'
7 4.11-18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-20732
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
in RE:
FI.XEST YVEEKE8.
HCSBAND
.ilul
i RNICE WEEKES.
,. IFE
bek.xicb wkkkks.
.. Lincoln Place Aol IB,
llrook'vn Neu Vork
Vtil" ARE NOTIFIED that a Petl-
(ot Dlayolution of vour Marriage
l I., n filed and vou are rcauir.d
servo :> codv "f vour written de-
il anv. to It on RICHARD
WC HirHAllD. Attn: MEI.VI.X J
i i HARD, attorney for Petlttonei
' -.- address la ''-' Lincoln Itouri.
Miami Beach. Florida .3313!'. und file
original with th- clerk of the
:,i. vt >t>le u-t IflTS: otherwM a default will
),. entered aaainsl vou for lh<- relief
.. n.andi d lii the petition
VYTNE88 inv hand and the Real of
s, .! i "urt at Miami. Florida on this
ill l dav of June. 1975,
KCHAkD I' BRINKER.
\- Clerk. Clrcull Court
I lade Countv. Florida
Pa I SNEEDEN
\- I lenutv Clerk
uit Court Seal)
7/4-11-IS-SS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NoTTi E IS liEBEId GIVEN that
ii undersigned, desiring to eraaKe
liaineal under the fictltloua names
A PIECE OF SAXDKI BAK Urll-
'. g al P.O Box 890161. Miami
I ... ; Floi da 18)81 intends to regla-
ti Kaid iramea with the Clerk of the
Circuit 'iuri of Dad, County, Flor-
Randal Klrahen
5 ax R S
Alt' rn< i tor SAK Orhfinall
! Ainsl. > Itulldinc
M m Florida SSTS1
6/27 7 4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice is hereby given that
lii -Mii'-iLin-'1, dealruifll to eiigaac In
ties* Mini, *he fictitious name of
> V.XN' THF BEST at 114!' S.V
:7th Avenue, No 104, .\linnii. Fla In-
i< : register laid name with th>
f the Circuit Court of Dad.
uno Florida
MANTEL HERRERA
7 18-88 I l-l
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
t.EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY
CIVIL iVCTION NO 75211RO
ACTION FOR D'SSOLUTtON
OF MARRIAGE
" IK
in laae oi
. \MHERT.
Petit!
v I AMRERT.
- V LAMBERT
I an,
horn \V Jei re\ flSWO
R BP.1 v. .' Kl ':!>
I Hssolutlon of Mar.
' i t filed .iii.iInal *ou and
.......ill ed to si i -. ., com of
ttei defeni e-. If iin\. to it mi
ii.kw TOBIN, attorney for Peii-
In addj -. s i 4"7 I Incoln
A i ith th, cl. rk ol the
'< il ji' on oi before Aug
0 hem IsC a def.iu't will
l in-* veil for 111.
the ,m>ilit"it .,r oeiilion
'' d :.t Miami. Florida on 1st il;n
"17-.
''.!' P BRINKER.
1 C'eri Clreul' I
' '. i *KI"tv !'.
RV M R"l rM'NRKI
I '. UIIM Clerk
Court 8
____ 7 4-11 ..--:::,
'NTHE t.RCUIT COURT OF THE
1_T" -UDICIAL C'RCU'T IN AND
FOR DAOi COUNTY..FLORIDA
rc,_~ CASE NO. 75 21185
lE^E AL 'ORISDICTION DIVSION
NOT'CE-BY PUBLICATION
. \[ Th. J rlae. mi
'' 'II......' llu-l and.
ami
S ArlTA A I'A.\ |,a |,|-; Miwoa.
e-'-oii.'..,,: Wife
O- MAHTA AliAXDA DE MUNOZ
! dene* I'Mkiniwn
. ''' -MK KEIiEBY NOTIFIBJD
1 tlnn (or rMraolullon of Mar-
Jt* '..- been filed ukmiiisi vou. and
' reouired to rerve a cony of
'Ui Answer ..r uleadlnir to the Pe-
m,; ~,.,.' "' band> attorn. <
. "'N OOor>MAN. BSQt'TRK.
, .ivne BuM.liiiK. IS Weal
" M.ami. Florida SSfRn.
"the orielnaJ Anawer or nlead-
,'i In the office n1 the Clerk of the
: t < nun on or before the 8th
of Aujru.t. |75 If vou fall io do
etault JudKiueni will be taken
. ivl^r th~ ""* 1. nanded
',kI:,k.xV ('"iEHi:r> al Ml. t .
l.K HA' I. Rni'-Kpn. ,-,erk
Cir.-ult Court
I'ade Countv Florida
Bv; R J KOY
! fCI ..,. "U,N Clerk
'" ui- Court Seal I
7/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEhEBY GIVEN that
the undersigned deairlna lu iikiikc
in bualneas under the fl. tltlou* name
o GRAN PARIS BAKERY al 328
^ Tin Si Miami. Fla. 33128 In-
f.n.i. to real t. r xald name with the
1 lerK i f lh. i ii. ,n: c,,,|. 0f i,.,,!,.
Count v. Florida
SUPERIOR cam: INC.
7 4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
F CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underslKimd dealnna m enaase m
buslneai under the fictitioua name "f
Sou hern Freiaht Forwarding Co at
S.W 132nd Street, Miami. KJor-
ida 381SC Intend! to reerlater Raid name
With the Cl. rk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida
INI lED STATES BRAKE
LINING CORP. Owner
i. -7 7 4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-20C-?7
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
MGIC MORTGAGE COIU'OKATION
Plaintiff.
TED R ROWLING and CAROLYN
BOWLING, his wife.
i ol, ii..- unknown, it living: un-
known snouse*. if reniaiiicd. and if
read, than unknown Rflouaea. if re-
married: all unknown heirs, devlaeaa.
grantee*, aaalameea. llAora. creditors.
uusiees. or otherwise claiminic by.
ihiuuith. under or i.k-aliisi ilu said
T.-d l< Itowlinic and Carolvn liowlna.
his wife
and against all other Beraons havlna .
or .-talmina to have anv richl. lille or
interest in or to the property
herein described
DafendatUi
TO: Ted R. Bowlina and Carolvi.
Bowllna. his wife, residence un-
known. If living, unknown
Mnouaa*. If remarried and If
(lend, then unknown spouses. If
remarried: ull unknown heirs,
devisees, irranteea. asaisneea.
Ilenors. creditors, trustees, or
otherwise ulainiinK bv. throuBh.
under or iiirainst the -anl Ted R
Bowlina and Carolvn Kowllna
hip wife, and against all other
persons having of .laimina to
have anv right, title or intereib
in or to the property herein
described
Yor ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foieclns.. mortgagn
airainst real and personal urnofriv
has been filed aaainsl you In the
above Court bv th- Plaintiff. MGIC'
.Mortgage C^rDOTH'lon,
Th.- properU1 aouglu to be foreclosed
IS as follow r
Lot 1. Hlock 84. FIRST AfPlTION
TO CAROL CITY OARDENS ac-
cordinir to the I'lat ihercof. re-
corded in Plat Book 68, page 31. of
the Public Rscordi ol bade Coun-
ty Florida
Yor ARE ItrXTIKKP to serve a
COI v of vour answer or other plead-
ing on Plaintiffs Attorney. MAI.-
COI..M II FRIEDMAN, son Pnuela
Road. Coral Cables Florida SS1S4. and
' the original in Ilu- offl.-e of the
Clerk of the above Court, on or be-
fore th. Mh dav of August. I!i7.'.. In
delimit of which the eomidainl will be
taken as confessed against von f..
the reiiei requested In Plaintiff's root.
plaint and pleadings.
1'ATEI' this 2nd dav of Julv. 1978
RICHARD P RRINKER
Clerk of ih,- Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida
H\ N A HEWETT
Denutv clerk
fCOI.'RT SEAI.l
7/4-11-18-85
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INQ PROPERTY)
IN THE CfRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT'ON NO 75?1-?T
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAC.E
IN RE The Uarrlare of
ROIMU l--ci (JOMEZ
Huahi i.il
Did
ROSA I '_' \ COMF.Z,
W :.
Tl I: R tSAI HA Ot l.MEZ
RESIDEN*E I'NKNOWN
VOF ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
;hat an action for i lull "i if M. -
Cage has been filed BBS 'I-1 VOU "ui
Mm are reouired to -i\. a eoov of
\' in nrltten defense .i ai v. to it on
: Ol'lS R BK1 I Kit attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 42" I.in-
Road, Miami Reach. !'l.i and
file the original with the clerk of ">-
above styled court on nr before Ain--
ui j I! v o( h. ... i d. fanll ''
I.. iiien-d agiiipsi vou for 'he relief
demanded n the i-onvlaini or Detltlon.
The- otloe shall b, Published o].....
i h w h foi foil. eon-, .u'ive vv. i I.s
in THE JKW1SII Fl.iKllllAN.
\v IJ-NESS m\ hand an.i the seal of
.nil -ourt at Mlam Florida on this
1st dav of July. 1975
RICHARD P RHINKER
A "'el-k 'm Ull Court
le.wle Count v I-"...... la
By M Kl I MINSK!
As Denutv Clerk
i i. un Court Seal'
I ouis i: II, Her ICso
t:'n i Incoln Ro d
Miami Beach, Florida 33189
Aito: nev for Petition, r
7 4-ll-ls.::.
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUD'CIAL
C'RCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JUR'SD'CT on DIVISION
NO. 75-20097
IN RE: THF. MARI'IAOE i '!"
MAR'A I its .A I AMPKEA MARVO.
Petitioner-Vflfe
j
l.i 'BERT M.ARVO
Ii, ^....|n| m.flusband
NOT'CF "V PUBLICATION
You. Rt'llERT MARVO. RESI-
DENCE I'NKNOW N'. are hereby no-
tified to sen, n mil ol vour Answer
to the Dissolution of Marriage filed
aiainsi v.ii upon wfes attorney.
GEORGE NICHOl AS ESO.. h''2 K.W.
18th Avtnue. Miami. Florida 38138.
and file original with Clerk of Court
on nr before Aug 1 IW* oiherwie
the Petition wil' be confessed hv vou.
Dat-d th's :'rtrd day of .Tune. 1S75.
PCHAPD P BRNKER ri ERK
Hv: W11"P'"".....'AW JR.
Deuutv Clerk
t, ., 7/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ui.dei sign, .1. desirlna to enaaa*.
business under th.- fi, tltloua name of
SWAN IMPORTS al 118 S.W. 87th
Ave.. Miami Intend! to register Raid
nnm. with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court ol Dad. County, Florida.
STEVEN C< hikv
7 1845 > 1*8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4260
JOHN R. BLANTON
In RE; Estate of
WILLIAM WHITEHORN
dei eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
llaxing Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
Ymi are hereby notified and reouir-
ed t" present anv claims and demands
which vou may have aaainsl the es-
tat. of William Whitehom, deceased
late ol Hail.. County, Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade Countv. and
file the same in dunliiate and as pro-
vided in Section 733 16, Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in ih, Countv
Courthouse in Dade Countv. Florida.
Mithin four calendar mouths from the
time of the firvt publication hereof.
or the same v. i!l he harrnl.
Filed at Miami Florida, this 9th
dav of Julv. A.n 1878
Isidore Ira Hlltt
.Tud'th H'itt
\s Bxeoutors
Firsl I'uhli.ation of this notice on
th. 1Mb dav of Julv. 1975.
I o Plotkln
Attnrnev for Executors
8979 S.W. 4th St.
7-18-23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3660
JOHN R BLANTON
In RE: Estate of
MI'RIKL GAITER
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
HaytlM Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You ar. hereby notified and reouir-
.-.I to present anv claims and demands
which vou mav have against the es-
tate of MURIEL GAITER. Deceased
hit,- ol Had, County, Florida, to the
Clrcull Judges of Dade Countv. and
I ile the same in dunli.-ate and as Pro-
vided in Section 788.16. Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the Countv
Courthouse ill Dade Countv. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
lime of the first publication hereof.
or the sam*' vi ill be barred.
Filed at Miami Florida, this 10th
dav of Julv. A D 1976.
Bldnev Efronson
618 Ainalev Hii'lding
Miami. Fla. 88188
Ar Executor
First publication of this notice on
th, lSih dav of Julv. 1P7."..
Alan I. Weisbera:
Attorney for Estate
812 Ain-I.v Kuilding.
Miami. .Fla. 831S1!
7/18.85
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO 75-21671
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVIS'ON
notlqk of publicaton
raktox Havings and
loan association.
Plaintiff.
MORTIMER H, WILLIAMS
Knd MYRTl K WILLIAMS, his
wife, and FARMERS BANK OF THE
ST iTi: i IF DELAWARE.
Defi n.i.nii-
T< : Farmers Hank of the
State of I lelav ai
loth and Market Streets.
\\ llmington. D.iaw are
ytiP ARE HEREBY ROTIF1BD that
i suit I,- foreeli se mortgage aeninst
real and perjM>pal Drpneru has been
filed acnlnsl iou In tin abov. Court
i.i ihe l'i. Intlff
Tin nion.-i'i sought to he foreclos-
. ,l ,i- follow.
RntflnnltiK Al a I'oiin 168 81 feel
v.., : wardlt of and 168 feel w. t -
n ai .Hi of the Soutl a-i corner of
Ihe XK', of ih. SWVi of ih, S\\''.,
of the si: .-.ei.ui J4, Towns-hln
53 South, Range l' RJast: thence
Southwardly narallel to the West-
,-ii line of (he si'1, of Beat Ion :t4.
...s.i a a distance of ULJfi feet:
.>n. Westw'ardly alotut a line
parallel i. and :'". feel measured
Northward!* at rjahl ai|Kles irom
the Southern line ol th. \K', of
Ihe S\\ ', of Ihe SWC of the SE1,
Section -it. aforei aid r distance
of 75 feel: thence NorUtwacdly
along a line parallel Io the West-
erly line of the SK'. Of Section
:t4. aforesaid a distance of 141.88
(eel thence Easiwardlv a distance
Of 7R fe.t to the point of begin-
ning The al'oi. described land be-
ing also known as Lot 16 of cer-
tain unrecorded nlat entitled GL'-
DR'AN si'liMVlslCN
AND ALSO
Tl' w.st ",.i feel of the Fast
18108 fe-t of Ihe .South 101 21 feet
of Ihe X1- ol the SW'. of the
SWV "f the SE'i. leas the South
,et of Se< tlon .it. Townshlo 18
South. Ranae -ti Fast, the above
ii- icribed land also beirflt known
., ih. W. M B3 feel of lot l of ii
certain unrecorded plat .-milled
.r cum ax SCRDIVISION.
YOC ARE REOI'IKED t" sen, a
,-,M,v of lour answer or other plead-
ing on Plaintiffs attorney, Malcolm
ll Fi ledm in. M"> ftoturlat Boat.
Coral Cables Florida S8|fl. and file
ih. original in the office of the Clerk
of th' above Court, on or before the
l.Mh d,n of August 1878, in default of
Which the m'daint iiill be taken as
n-l V0M tor the relief
r. nil. st, d in I'lSintlff's Comi'liiint and
ol, .tilings
:' .' .v of .luiv. I!-:-.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Cl ERK OF THE CIRCUIT POI'RT
IF DADE C"I"N"'"V FI .'KIDA
1 i I BARNARD
Deoutv C rk
7 18-25 8/1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
NO. 73-1173
IN RE: K-t.r- of
IRVING RILI.IG.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOH DISTn.it i ibrt
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is he-hi iven thai we
hale filed our Final Report and peti-
tion foi Distribution and Final DIs-
- iia'<-. ;.s i :>.-. utor of th"1 .- itiite ..f
IRVING BILUCI. deceased...... thai
on the 84th dai nf Julv, I97.'i will
iii'iilv to th, Honorable Countv Judsret
of iiadi Countv. Florida, for annroval
nf -it:.! Final Report and for Distribu-
tion and final discharge a? K\e< utor
of tl). estate of the above-named
decedent. This l'I'i-.i dav ol June.
.11:FFI-:R80X X ATin\ VI. I:A XK
i IF MIAMI HE "It
llv STCAItT J. m.ii.i i:f:
TRAUER AND SCHWARTZ
At lorn.-v
:t"i Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida
. 27 7 1-11-18
IN THE CIRCUII COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3353 tNebitt)
In RE Estate of
IRVING si'HU ARTZ
di i < as, i|
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To AH Creditors and All Person* Hav-
ing Claims or Demand! Against Slid
Estate:
Vou are herein notified and re-
nuiieil to pre.-ent anv claims and de
man.Is which vou mav have against
the estate of IRVIXI7 SCHWARTZ
deceased lale of Dade Countv, Florida
to the Circuit Judges of Dade Countv,
and file tlu same ill. duplicate and as
provided In Section 788.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices In Ihe C'nuntv
Courthouse in Dade Countv. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof.
or the same will be barrel.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 260)
dav of June, AD 1!'7.Y
ESTHER 8CHIFF
As. Executrix
First publication of this notice on
Ihe 1th dav of Julv 1875
ESTHER G SCHJFF
Attorney for. Executrix
4f7 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach. Florida 83138
7 4-11
NOT'CE UNDER
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 75-20308
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MAKRIACE >F
.' 'Si: I" ..Mix \I" IR BAZA.X.
I'etii loner.
MARIA CRISTINA ttlBEIRO BAZAN,
.....HO lit.
Vf MARIA CRISTINA R1BEIRO
l;.\/ \.\. Vtiau. i H-c'J. Co.
nacaf .. / Kio d. Js n. ro, I It a -
I. ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO
FILE lour ui !"".-. to this
Hctlon tor dlsi olui Ion "t mat
iv 11 Ii the Clerk of the al nve Court i d
\ a < ,-i'i unon Pi r'* '' i":*-
II.. \ ON /AMI-'" ,\- .-.Mini suite
v. 1320 soutl Dixie Highway, Coral
(iabl. 16. on or b.
. ol luani i" i Pe-
tition i"i Dissolution of Mnrriaa. will
I., lakei ai conf. aa. d
DATED .11 NE 84. 197.'.
RICHARD I' BRINKER
r.. B J FOV
I o'.iiv Cl.i-k
fClr. uit urt S.
G 27 7 1-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTtTICUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
G.E.W ENTERPRISES. INCORPO-
RATED. ...siniiki to ejnreae In busl-
lie Ufl I. 1 the flctltlOUH lliill!'- "f LEE
AND ASS' I ATI-:.- il r.44 ii.st n,:nli Terrace, iliami. Florida
Int. n.!- .,. :, aister said name
with the I loik of the Circuit Court of
I no.. County. Florida
B\: JEROl i' II ItElcm i:i; BSQ.
. AW OFFICES OF BI'RXS .v
ARNOVJTZ
A'lorin-vs tin l.K .W Enternrises. Inc.
IJ" I .in. "in r.oad. Suite 4i"
Miami Beach. Florida 88131'
c, E W EXTElll'UISKS
INCORPORATEt)
in UEKA1 D F. WENUERT.
PRESIDENT
. .87 7 4-11-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7520492
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
in RE: Th. marruure ot:
QRADY BECKHAM.
Petit loner.
FI. \vc'ks ELIZABETH HALL
BECKHAM.
Rest on.lent
T": FRANCES ELIZABETH HALL
BECKHAM
Route (the (I I
M.-rshon. Qeonrla
Vnc ARE HEREBY NOTIFlEt
Ii..i an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riaae has been filed against vou and
vou are reouired to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to it on
LAW OFFICES OF Bl'RNS AR-
N.'VITZ. atiorncv for -Petitioner,
whose address is 826 Lincoln Road
Suite 4.'.". Miami Beach: Florida-MW.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above atvled rourl "n or before
AukuhI : 1978: ottierwjse default
Sill be entered asainsJ vou (or the
relict demanded In the comnlalnt or
p. i ion
This notice shall be published once
each week foi four consecutive ueeks
in THE JEWISH Fl.nlUDlAX
\\ ITNBSS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
_".".!Ii dav ol .Ititn 1973
LCHARD P BRINKER.
A- l 'let k Cu euii 'i.....t
I Hole Countv. Florida
Bv I. SXEEDEN
As Denutv ci.-,k
..Circuit '""ini Seali
' Ai. IFF CES OF IU'RXS &
IRNl IV1TZ
4L" I li. nlll Road, Suite 4"-a
Mlam :, ach. Florida SS1S9
\ '. tin Pal it loner
. ir.'
7 l-ll-IR-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVl$ION
NO. 74.8049
in RE: Estate of
EMAXI'KI. L DAVIS a k a
H.MA.Xl'F.L DAVIS a k a
MAX.XIE DAVIS
I'. ceased.
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE OF SAID DECEDENT
You are hereby notified that a
written Instalment uuroortina to im
tin last iiill aid testament Of said
il.-ce.l. ni I... b. el admil ted to nm-
hale In said Court. You .>r<' hereby
commanded within bIx calendar
months from the date of the firs!
nubllcatlon of this notice to aonear
in said Court and slum cause, if anv
i"u can, iiin Ih. action ol aald court
In admittlna -aid u ill to nrobi te
BilOUld net s|i(iic| unieioked
FliAXK B DiiWI.I.X.;
Circull Judire
RICHAKD I' BRINKER
Clerk
Ki MIRIAM B HBNDWCKSON
I nnutv Clerk
SHAPIRO. PRIED \\EIL& SCHEER
Altorinis for Est.it'
4'." i incoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
First publication of this notice on
the ^7ih dav ol June. 1975.
(Circuit Court Seal.
8/87 7 4-11-18
NOT'CE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERV'CE
INO PROPERTY"
IN THF C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
I ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT
OF FLOR'D'A IN AND POR
DnFCOUNTV
CIV'L ACT'ON NO 7S-'",r:it
GENERAL Jl'R'SDICTION DIVSION
ACTION F"lt DISS"" UTtON
OF MARR'AGE
IX HF Th. Mi. i.......
ALK'E '"' >X IM. Petit I.
a ml
PBTF IM !' -......I. ii'
To PRTER I IM
, i-:,,.. C'ini Ri i \ot i:
Himil Xei' V..-I. I'M.;
Yd' \i'i-: HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai .^'i action ''or Dlsaolut*on of
rVurriaee has been filed attains! vou
and you are reouired to serve I cony
of VOUr l>-ltten defen..... if 11IIV. to
it en HART AN STIiFKT r A at-
toi...... Petitioner whore addrew
i! 1 '7i'" Itiscavne Blv .1 Suite 4Hi
.Xorth Miami. Florida 88181, and Me
Ih.- original with the clerk of 'h-
above atvtr-d i-ourt on or before sih
Alltll't 7".. otherwise I default will
n. entered pgalnsl you for the re-
iiei .1. in.inilid ill the oiioliiiiit or
Del I tlon
This notice shall be published once
each ii. ek foi tour conaectltlve weeks
in THE .I'-\\ISH FIORID1AN
WITNESS mi hand and the *eal of
m I rourl -it Miami. Florida on this
Pth dav of June. 197"
RCH ^ I'M P BRINKER.
\ i let' '" 'nit Coin t
Dad. Countv Florid.
Li MARION NEWMAN
i : '.'"i C|,-rk
(Circuit I'nu't Seal!
HAItl \x STREET. P A
:-.'7n.' B in '! -n-'e (in
Xorth Miami Florida "31 SI
A'torn, i : I Petitioner
881-6861
7 4-11-18-2*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTjOF THE
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-1989S
IX HE: THF MARR1AOE I F
\\ n ia.M II KING, .Ii: .
P. t it loner,
i
\ RtilNIA C KING.
I. six ndeni
YOC VIRGINIA c KINK. 99 East
_' Street, Apartment No B88. Misires-
town, New Jersey 980S7 ARE HERE-
BY NOTFIED TO FII E your written
. r-nns. lo Ihln lion for qlssolul Ion
of marriage, with Ihe ClerV of the
iih' i Court, and serve a Qodv upon
Petitioner's attorneys VOS ZAMFT
A. smith. Suit. 1820 South Dixie
M gl was cm al : iblea. Floflda 88146.
on it before be Isl dai of August,
I! J5 .-is. th. P. in en for Dissolution
ol Marriage will he taken a.- ii-
n VTED June 80, l!7.1
RICHARD P IMiXKKi;
i.i b J FOY
L. ui' Cterk
i. 'ii -ii i i 'oini Seali
.' 27 T Lll-18
IN THE CIRCL'IT COURT OF THE
EIFVFNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO ?!).?'674
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOT CE OF AC'ION
S s !R( 'S> IlKA I TV.
P
l. T c"i I) and Ni IRA m |l "
i it. 'i is \ ash n:\ nil
in' ADE1 A V \SII.IF.VICH. his wife.
Defenflanl -
Ttl. I. T OOID and
NORA GOl D. his v .i.
Itl.Ute Xo
i leveland (I oi
YOC ARE NOTIFIED thai an ac-
tion to for. oho. and .nuiial'le lien on
th. following luoi'erti In Dnde C.un-
i Florida:
I oi i U k 18. "ih ADDITII "N
M' GREENHAVEN Sfl'BDIVI-
SION. according to the Pis' there-
of, recorded in Plat Book 82. nage
78. of ih.- Public Recorda of Dade
Countv Florida
i.,- been filed aaainsl you and vou are
reouired to serve ., com of vour wrlt-
efei If anv. lo it on Mai. nlm
H Friedman. Plaintiffs Attorney.
...i.ii. is "n p.iutl.is Road.
.oral Gables. Fioridn 38184, on or be-
fore August F I87R and file the
,,i ii ith the Clerk ol thl* Court
' Ni.....i Ice "ii Plaintiff's
attorney, or Irajnediatelv thereafter:
ivise n default will h.- entered
-t iou for th.- reii.-f demanded
ino'amt or petition.
WP'fJESS nn hand and the s.al of
Un- i'. urt on June 26. 1978
RCH M(l> P BRINKER.
\s ci. rk of the Court
l.v C P Ci iPELAND
As I>. i uti Clerk
7 4-11-18-tS


Page 16-B
+Jewtstifk>r*Aai7
Friday, July 18| 19?J
FOOD
FAIR
(GOOD TASTE & GREAT SAVINGS
GO TOGETHER AT FOOD FAIR
We give you quality and variety.you can depend en it!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SUNDAY. JUIY 20*.
AT All FOOO FAIR STORES EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS.
IN OUR DAIRY CASE!
FLO-SUN
Orange
Juice
3 QUART ?
CONTS.
FRESH
Seafood Dept.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT STORES
WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
FLORIDA CAUGHT
Mackerel
55
is.
BONUS
SPECIAL!
SAVE 18'
PRUNE JUICE
c
FOOD
FAIR
DEL
MONTE
WONDERFUL
Baked Goods
MAM WITH PURE
VEGETABLE SHORTENING
URNY IROS. BAVARIAN
Cream
Cake
15-OZ.
we.
*i
45
40-OZ. BTL.
LIMIT ONE ITL. PLEASE. WITH $7.50 PURCHASE OR MORE. EXCIUDINC CIGARETTES
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
ERA LIQUID
C
BONUS
SPECIAL!
SAVE 18'
14-OZ.
BOTTLE
LIMIT ONE BTL. PLEASE WITH $7 50 PURCHASE OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
HUDSON DECORATED
PAPER TOWELS
WE If MEM
llllllllllll
|FEDERAL FOOD
STAMPS
BONUS
SPECIAL!
SAVE 47'
ON 3 ROILS
JUMBO
ROLLS
*l
LIMIT 3 ROLLS. PLEASE. WITH S7.50 PURCHASE OR MORE. EXCIUDINC CIGARETTES
99% FAT FREE-ALL FLAVORS
Les Cal Yogurt
P.P. BRAND-FROZEN
Grapefruit Juice
AORDEN'S CREAMED AM*
Cottage Cheese............... 99*
ORDEN'S PINEAPPLE-OUVE PIMIENTO-PIMINETO
Cheese Spread.................. 39*
MRS. FILBERTS (TWO B-OZ. CUPS) f% r f
Soft Margarine..................! 65*
5ARGINTO IMPORTED FINLAND _
Sliced Swiss Cheese XI 79*
AxiiROOs sour mm a
Half ft Half 3? 45*
HTGRADI S BALL PARK MEAT OR BEEF ^ -
Franks or Knocks.............S& $1M
SINAI "" SLICED ...
Kosher Corned Beef 5S M09
ETTY ANN'S PIK NIK _
Potato Salad.....................3F 99*
HEBREW NATIONAL KOSHER MIDGET e __
Salami ft Bologna...........289lm
COPILANO Alk.
Meat Franks S 89*
12-OZ.
CAN
LAND O FROST ALL VARIETIES SLICED
Smoked Meats
3-OZ.
PKGS.
IRDS EYE _
Frozen Cool Whip............%t 75*
STOUFFER'S FROZEN -_
French Crumb Cake J 99c
BIROS IYI mt m-
Frozen Tasti Fries 3 & $1
VRON FROZEN ...
B-B-Que Sandwich..........l^'M4'
FARMER CHEESE
AXELROD'S ^9^9 LB"
FRESHLY SMOKED _.
Large Whitefish....................*V
RICH'S WHITE MIAT
Turkey Roll.........................E" 55*
AMERICAN KOSHER
Salami or Bologna...........T 89*
HYGRADE S GERMAN STYLE
Wide Bologna v 89
TOP QUALITY
Salad Pli ves
10-OZ.
JAR
BIG G
Sandwich kahns
Spread..
MIDGET
-OZ. CHUI
29
Cheerios.............................!?*t5'
RIVAL RATION
Dog Food............................SSf 69*
Phase UT
Bath Soap
5-OZ.
...BAR
39
SUPERMARKETS
SOUTHERN
PEACHES
LUSCIOUS
39
LB.
fUll Of JUICE AND FLAVOR
Nectarines............, 59c
FIRM HEADS ^
Green Cabbage.....................a. 10'
YOUNO AND CRISP ^ O O L
Scallions.......................Z bunches J9
GARDEN FRESH ..
Romaine Lettuce................wad 29
FOR SLICING AND FRYING ..
Fresh Eggplant .Z9 |
FRYER
QUARTERS
FLORIDA
OR SHIPPED
GRADE A
FRESH ICED
NUTRITIOUS
69
tREASTS
I*. cs
Sliced Beef Liver............... 99c
FLA OR SHIPPED GRADE A FRESH ICED ,..-
Fryer Parts i.si09
WHOLE IIOJ THiOHS DRUMSTICKS WHOll MIASTS Ml
BEEF ROUND BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST
;USDA(
(CHOICE)
WESTERN
*l
69
LB.
P.P. BRAND-WHOLE
Calif. Tomatoes
16-OZ.
CANS
VAN CAMP'S
Brown Sugar Beans.........V* 39
KEllOGG'S
Corn Flakes....................IS 53
MICHIGAN MADE t* tit
Purple Plums....................SB* f
Sunshine aqc
Squash........"c:07
P.P. BRAND REGULAR OR FRENCH
Cut Green Beans
15%-OZ.
CANS
WE RESERVE THE RiCHT TO HM.T QUANTITIES. AH CLERICAL. TYPOGRAPHIC. PHOTOGRAPHIC ANO PRINTING ERRORS ARE SUBJECT TO CORRECTION. NONE SOLO TO DEALERS.


Full Text
riday, July 18, 1975
Jen isti rhoridli&n
Page 3-B
Douglas Gardens Executive Staff
To Appear On WCKT-Ch. 7 Sunday
Left are Sen. Gale McGee (D., Wyo.),
member of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, and Israel Ambassador Sim-
cka Dinitz, who will address the opening
plenary session of the 61st annual na-
tional convention of Hadassah at the San
Francisco Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Aug.
11. Dr. Aaron Wildavsky, (second from
right), dean, Graduate School, Public Pol-
icy. University of California at Berkeley,
is speaker at the American Affairs plen-
ary, Mon., Aug. 18. Right is Beate Klars-
feld, famed Nazi-hunter, who will address
the convention banquet Tuesday night,
Aug. 19.
\McGee, Dinitz, Beate Klarsfeld
t Hadassah National Conclave
NEW YORKSen. Gale Mc-
Gee (D., Wyo.) and Simcha
Dinitz, Israel Ambassador to the
United States, will address the
opening plenary of Hadassah's
it annual national convention
>n Sunday, Aug. 17, 8:30 p.m.,
| at the San Francisco Hilton
lotel, Rose E. Matzkin, national
jresident of Hadassah. an-
lounced here.
"We are especially pleased to
lave Sen. McGee with us at
khis time." Mrs. Matzkin said,
"because he serves on the
"oreign Relations Committee,
ind he is an expert on the Mid-
lie East."
AMBASSADOR DINITZ was
'former political advisor and di-
rector general of Premier Golda
Meir's office.
Beate Klarsfeld and Annushka
Freiman will address the con-
jvention banquet Tuesday night,
[Aug. 19. Mrs. Klarsfeld is the
famed hunter., of Nazi war
crir.'.inals who has been both
[decorated and imprisoned in the
course of her relentless pur-
suits.
Mrs. Freiman, a survivor of
[concentration camps, recently
represented Israel in a delega-
tion of the survivors of Bergen-
n to a 30th anniversary
memorial ceremony organized
by the West German govern-
ment.
About 2,500 delegates, repre-
senting some 335,000 members
throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico will attend the
four-dav convention set for Aug.
17 to 20.
In addition to receiving re-
ports, projecting plans, and par-
ticipating in seminars and work-
shops, the delegates will hear
addresses by government lead-
ers and international authorities
in the fields of Hadassah's ac-
tivities.

QURN RIMER
KOSHWf K>WTItY
nd
Processors and txport-r*
f the finest U.S. Govt. Inspct
KOSHER MEAT* ond POUITIV
1717 N.W. 7* Av.
Miami, Fla.
fhom; 324-1855
EXPERTS WHO will address
the various plenaries and
workshops include Aaron
Rosenbaum, research director,
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee. Washington, D.C.;
Joseph Klarman, World Head,
Youth Aliyah. Israel; Dr. Aeron
Wildavsky, dean. Graduate
School. Public Policy. Universi-
ty of California at Berkeley; Dr.
Kalman J. Mann, director-gen-
eral, Hadassah Medical Or-
ganization, Jerusalem; and
Rabbi Harold Schulweis, spirit-
ual leader of Valley Beth Sha-
lom. Encino, Calif.
The new Hadassah Fashion
Show from Israel will be pre-
miered on opening day before!
it tours the country. The col- j
lection, designed and executed
by students at the Hadassah
Seligsberg Brandeis Compre-,
hensive High School in Jerusa-
lem, features elaborate beaded,,
sequined and embroidered eve-'
nir.i; wear, reflecting the color
and styles of the Middle East,
chic day-time dresses, and un-;
usual sports attire.
Some of the fabrics are
loomed by the students. The;
show will be produced and ac-
cessorized by I. Magnin under
the direction of Genevieve:
Knowles.
TWO FILMS will also be pre-
viewed: a half-hour documen-
tary by prize-winning director-
producer Harold Mayer, on
Hadassah's dramatic return to
Mount Scopus and the reopen-
ing of its hospital here in Oc- j
tober; and a bi-centennial film
strip, "To America, with Love," i
about the contribution ofj
American Jewish women and
narrated by Bess Myerson.
Founded in 1912, Hadassah is
the largest women's voluntary
organization in the country. It
is also the largest Zionist bloc
in the world today and spends
more than $20 million annually
for its health, educational, vo-
cational, social welfare and
land redemption programs in Is-
rael and for its education and
youth programs in the United
States.
Neonatal Unit
At Variety Opfen
Variety Children's Hospital,
recently designated as a Neo-
natal Intensive Care Unit, has
completed construction and
moved into newly furbished
quarters to accommodate- in-
fants and children.
Patient referrals from hos-
pitals throughout South Flor-
ida and beyond are being ac-
cepted.
The Neonatal Unit, under tne
supervision of Dr. Carol Hersh,
uses the most sophisticated
equipment to preserve infants'
lives.
The hospital also has its own
helipad and is receiving chil-
dren transported by Homestead
\i- Foro* Bl9e Medi-VtC ?a"ns.
Miami's Jewish Sunday morn-
ing show, "A Still Small Voice."
will host members of the execu-
tive staff of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
this coming Sunday.
Fred Hirt, executive director;
Judge Irving Cypen, chairman
of the board; Dr. Jeffrey Solo-
mon, director of Social Serv-
ices, and Charles Beber, di-
rector of Medical Services, will
discuss a variety of topics rang-
ing from the complex problems
of old people attempting to sur-
vive in society to the contro-
versies surrounding many
American nursing homes.
"We especially want to deal
with the area of proper com-
munity responses to the chal-
lenges presented by a large
geriatric population," said Judge
Cypen.
"Our appearance on Still
Small Voice and the airing this
week of our new public service
commercial series, 'Senior Citi-
zens Update,' is an indicator of
just how active we plan to be
this year in terms of reaching
the public with something posi-
tive to say about aging and old
people," he added.
"A Still Small Voice" is
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association and is a
JUDGE IRVING CYPEN
public sen-ice of.WCKT-Ch. 7.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff is the host
for this Sunday's show and the
producer is WCKT Public Serv-
ice Director Wilson Griffeth.
r
i
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
t
AARON LOPEZ 1731-1782
Merchant Community Leader Revolutionary Leader
T:
|oday, if you go to Newport. Rhode
Island, you can visit the place called
'Lopez Dock," named after Aaron
Lopez, a power in Newport in the years
just preceding the Revolution and owner of
many trading ships.
Known for religious liberalism, Newport had
become the home of a substantial number of
capable, well-educated Jews, among the most
affluent in the Colonies.
In 1752, from Portugal, came Aaron Lopez,
described later by Ezra Styles, President ol
Yale University, as "a merchant of first emi-
nence; for honor and extent of commerce prob-
ably surpassed by no merchant in America." In
addition, Lopez was known as an active force
in cementing friendly relations between faiths.
He earned the respect of Christians, as well as
Jews, and no ship ever left his dock on eithef's
Sabbath. Lopez himself laid the first corner-
stone of Newport's famous Touro Synagogue
in 1759.
In strong sympathy with Revolutionary patriots.
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Lopez was forced to flee Newport to Massa-
chusetts when the British attacked.
During the War, the city suffered such heavy
losses that it never recovered. Neither did
Lopez who lost virtually ail he had acquired
during his years of successful trading. When
attempting to return to Newport after inde-
pendence was won, he was tragically drowned
in a freak accident.
Ezra Styles eulogized him .. ."He did business
with the greatest ease and clearness; always
carried about him a sweetness of behavior, a
calm urbanity, an agreeable and unaffected
politeness of manners."
A fitting tribute to Aaron Lopezone of many
Jewish-American patriots worthy of remem-
brance.
. ramous I v
,n 4-*nun'Historv
4 Good toihe Last Drop v -jlllil HE 3


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Honoring 1776
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our nation Send name and .iddresswith 50* to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Bux HH8. Cirand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017


Page 6-A
+Jelst fkrkf&n
Only We Have Right to Decide Rabin
BONN (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin said here
that because Israel must defend itself alone, "we have the
elementary right to decide for ourselves what we can risk
and what we dare not i;sk as we work to achieve peace
with our neighbors."
Rabin, the first Israeli Premier to visit West Germany
in an official capacity, spoke at a dinner given in his honor
here by Chancellor Helmut Schmidt.
HIS REMARKS that Israel
will determine what risks it can
afford seemed to be at least
partly in response to West Ger-
many's urging of Israel to be
more flexible in current nego-
tiations for an interim agree-
ment with Egypt.
In Rabin's three-hour meeting
with Schmidt, which govern-
ment spokesman Klaus Boelling
described as "frank and re-
laxed." the West German Chan-
cellor reportedly told his guest
that the right time for an in-
terim agreement should not be
missed.
Boelling did not indicate
whether Schmidt meant that the
right time was the present.
But Schmidt, who listened to
Rabin's views on the Middle
East, expressed great interest in
an interim settlement without
which he felt there was little
hope for progress or results
from a reconvened Geneva
peace conference.
AT A press conference in
Top British Jews Being Guarded
By MARK SEGAL
LONDON (JTA) Police are guarding prominent
British Jews after the discovery last week of a plot to kill
or kidnap them.
The Jews were included in a list of top people found
together with an arms cache in a West London flat. The
arms cache was said to be the property of a South American
named "Carlos Martinez."
Police and forensic experts are looking for more clues
in the Bayswater apartment where the arms were found.
MEANWHILE, security for
the Marks and Spencer family
was stepped up because of a
possible link with the 1973
s-hooting of its president. J. Ed-
ward Sieff.
One of the guns discovered
in the arms haul was a nine
millimeter pistol the same
caliber as that used by the man
who burst into Sieffs home and
shot him in the face Sieff, 69.
recovered, but his assailant was
not caught.
A Marks and Spencer offi-
would not comment about
the possibility of 'Carlos be-
ing the man who shot thur
-ident. But he said all r
of the family were aware
of the secuir
IT WAS recalled that the ter-
rorist. Leila K! D in
t. Bbc television docu
on terrorism that A
had "a list of prom Dent
i:.i not
include the Sieffs and the
Rothschii
-ling figures in the enter-
tainment world were mystified
when they found out that their
names were on the "death li>t.
Impresario Sir Bernard Del-
lont said "It seems strange to
me. I can't understand it at
all." Conductor Norman Del
Mar said: i can't imagine what
this is about I have no political
activities at all. and it can't
have to do with Jews, because
I'm Church of England myself."
VEHIDI MENL'HIN, contro-
versial figure in the Jewish
community here due to his fre-
quent statements supporting
the Arabs and his recent re-
fusal to s;im protests of lead-
ing artists and intellectuals
inst the .sclusion of Israel
from UNESCO said: "I am not
Lists of this soit ap-
from time to time."
lor British He-
J i A: "There I
been attacks on Jewish people
in ,nd one has
' i -Iities of the pos-
.:;. ol more attacks on
... All one can do is be
iant and cooperate with
itt, chairman of
the defense and group rela-
tions committee of the Board
of Deputies of British Jews,
told JTA that he had been
in touch with the appropriate
police authorities on this mat-
ter.
U.S. Envoy Toon
Comes to New Post
TEL AVIV (JTA) Malcolm Toon, the new
United States Ambassador to Israel, has arrived in Is-
rael with his wife and daughter to take up his new
position.
He said he brought no special message from Presi-
dent Ford but did bring the best wishes of the President
and Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger for the Israeli
nation and its government.
TOON, A career foreign service diplomat who has
had no experience in Middle East countries, told re-
porters that like all Americans, he shared sympathy
for Israel and its problems.
He added: "I think that all Americans place a very
great value on the ties between Israel and the U.S. and
on every effort feasible to maintain and keep these ties."
TWIN CITY GLASS CO.
CUAKANTUD MJMNNK JTOtf ftONTS fURMTUKt TOM
ANTIQUt AMD ft AMID MinWIS
Plate & Window Glass Replacements
T220 l&th St., MB Visit our Showroom 473 2**7
(Corner 16th Alton)
YOU cm a* SUKt of the BtST of -
T odd's BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
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ukum a sifts
114 VAlfNCIA AVL, COtAL CABLES Ttl. 44* 5215
"THEY ADVISED me that
the matter is beins taken care
of. and suitable investigations
are bein^ puisued. II further
action concerning the Jewish
community here is necessary.
they will advise me and keep
me informed," he said.
When asked whether any-
special instructions for partic-
ular precautionary measures
had been issued to communal
institutions and organizations,
he replied in the negative
West Berlin. Rabin stressed that
Israel was ready to seek a se-
cure, just and honest peace but
not at any price. He said his
country was seeking ways to
lessen the danger of hostilities
by cease-fire and troop disen-
gagement agreements but want-
ed comparable concessions from
Egypt.
He denied press reports of re-
cent dvs that an interim accord
with Egypt was virtually con-
cluded in principle and said
that three "key Issues" remain-
ed outstanding: the duration of
an accord, the lino of Israeli
withdrawal, and the fate of the
advance warning system in Si-
nai.
Rabin stressed that without
agreement on those points and
concessions on both sides. "I
doubt such an sg
ment will be achieved."
REGARDING REPORTS that
the U.S would supervise the
surveillance posts niter an Is-
rael: wil il. Rabin rents
ed that "No one could run them
better than Israelis. Nor would
any third party be better for
Egypt than Egyptians."
Apparently r iferring to Sec-
retary of State Henry A Kis-
singer's statement on ABC-TV
ing Israel to take risks for
Friday, July ig 197j
peace. Rabin said: "I wou,d .
vise the representatives of th*
United States to call upon both
sides to take risks for peace
"We are prepared to take
tangible risks including troon
withdrawals, the loss of terri
tory and the oil fields at Abu
Rodeis. All we are going to get
in pvch-mge is at best words"
AT THE dinner in his honor
Rabin stressed that Israel, -from
the day of our independence we
have had to defend ourselves by
ourselves at great com and sac-
riric". We shall continue to de.
fend ourselves alone and be-
cm of that we have the ele-
'for
ourselves what we can risk and
what we dare not i
work to a 'hieve peace th our
neighbors."
H" sail that W u.
rope's greatest contribution to-
pea would be to encour-
age those directly involved to
r 'np ite a settlement of their
without outsi
rence. "No one
as a Substitute." be said
K'RIN" AND his delegation
earlier visited the site of the
former Bergen-Belsen omcen-
>n ca up near Hanover and
later attended a reception in
W >sl Berlin hosted by Mayor
Klaus Schoets and Jewish lead-
ers.
West B srlin has a strong Jew-
ish community and the
i- an outspoken friend ol Israel.
A$ot A
Casino Capers
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Fabulous
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I 'An TianjpoMalion
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ON GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
El Casino
is the most lavish casino in the Western
World You'll find fast-paced action.
This fascinating package includes
* 2 drmks and dp at El Casino's standup bar.
* Floor show, 2 drinks and tip at Kasbah
Celebrity Room.
* Evening snack at Cate Aladdin
* Air transportation is comphmeMrv.
Leave Miami International Airport nightly 7:30 p.m.
Leave Freeport/Lucaya at approximately
2:30 a.m. same evening.
'Pre* incJudot Door atom. 4 coc*la*i NigM Owl mac*
A transportation compfcmontary Pnoo doao nat nc
ground transportation o dapartura taxaa.


Page 2-B
*Jmist FkriJiar
Friday, July 18_ jgJI
U.S. Could Not Accept Women's
Declaration in Mexico-Abzug
Emanu-El Holy Day Services
Set for Convention Hall X.
By M1NDY YOCHELSON
NEW YORK (XT A)
The United States voted
against the United Nations
Conference on Women's
"Declaration of Mexico,
1975," which called for ihe
elimination of Zionism, be-
cause "we could never ac-
cept a resolution that talks
about wiping out another
nation."
This was stated by Rep.
Bella Arzug (D., NY.) in an
exclusive interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
in her New York office. The
Congresswoman was ap-
pointed by House Speaker
Carl Albert (D.. Okla.) as
one of the non-voting Con-
gressional advisors for the
U.S. at the conference in
Mexico City which ended
recently.
THE "DECLARATION," which
onlv the U.S. and Israel vofyi
against, contained the statement
that women should "struggle
against colonialism, neo-coloni-
alism, Zionism, racial discrimi-
nation and apartheid."
All delegations from other
countries vot*d for or abstained
on the resolution which was
pushed through committee by
t^e Arab Soviet bloc Third
World countries.
Denmark originally voted
with the U.S. and Israel but
later decided to change its vote
and abstained.
Abzug told the JTA that while
the "Declaration" was still in
committee, Israel made a mo-
tion to eliminate the word Zion-
ism from the text but was voted
down 59-19 with 19 abstentions.
ANOTHER MOTION to elimi-
nate the word came up for a full
vote at the general session, but
this was also rejected by a vote
of 63-25. with 25 abstentions.
The Congresswoman said she
advised the women at the con-
ference to vote against the en-
tire "Declaration" if "we were
3 South Florida
Schools Offering
Judaism Courses
For the fist ti-ne three South
Fh 'a Institutions of higher
lja'ning are simultaneously of-
fering courses in Judaism un-
der the sponsorship of the J Av-
is : Chautauqja Soci.'ty and
the X hi rul Federation of Tem-
r-! Protherhocxis, according to
an announcement made by Al-
bert KotY president of the
- ; T.-mrl-' Brotnerhods.
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel of
Temri.- Beth K\, Boca Raton,
v.iil teach a four-credit course
entitled "Jewish Thought"
(Philosophy 498) at Florida At-
lantic University starting Mon-
day. Sept. 22. at 7 p.m.
Co-jrses in Judaism will also
be given by Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard of Temple Beth Am
at the University of Miami and
by Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe of
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, at
Broward Community College.
"Religious freedom was guar-
anteed by our founding fathers
and is celebrated in our Bicen-
tennial Year." said Mr. Roth in
.his announcement. "Education
is the key to better understand-
ing and our Jewish Chau-
tauqua Society is promoting a
spirit of brotherhood through
interfaith education."
unsuccessful in convincing them
to change the language." But
when a motion was made to ac-
cept the entire "Declaration"
only Israel and the U.S. voted
against it. with approximately
18 abstentions. Abzug said.
She stated that "much nego-
tiating" took place before the
actual vote occurred to "con-
vince the dfhgates not to put
the word 'Zionism' into the
'Declaration.' "
Most of th said, particularly those from
V'etii E'irope and Latin
America, were opposed to the
wording. However, manv did
not vote against the resolution
because of what they felt were
other positive items in the reso-
h'tion. including a change in
global economics.
"Everyone I sooke to felt this
should not have happened." Ab-
zug said.
ALTHOUGH THE Congress-
woman said she considered the
"Declaration" was "totally im-
proper" because of the attack
on Zionism, she stressed that it
was not a major document and
that there were no special plans
to implement it.
Nevertheless, noting that the
terrorist bombing in Jerusalem
two davs after the conference
ended, in which 14 Israelis were
killed and 73 wounded, Abzug
stated the "Declaration" and
similar actions "perpetuate an
atmosphere which encourages
terrorism."
The major plan to come out
of the conference was the
"World Plan of Action," a docu-
ment Abzug said "could be
abided by allegations." _
She "said sne felt many of the
governments "manipulated"
Thei*- delegates at the con-
ference.
SHE FELT that fiis was par-
ticularly true of the 77-nation.
Arab-Soviet-Third World bloc
where, she said, the status of
women is "minimal."
"Many of the governments
instructed their del"gat"s how
to vote," Abzug said. "But I feel
the women regretted finding
themselves in this position.
There were many who wanted
to deal independently with
women's issues rather than with
world political affairs.
For example, she said that
of the women she spoke to at
the Tribune, the non-govern-
mental, independent conference
on the other side of the city
that was being held simultane-
ously with the official conclave,
attended by 5.000 "interested"
women, all told her that they
would not have walked out on
Mrs. Leah Rabin.
ABZUG WAS referring to the
incident when the Arab-Soviet-
Third World delegates walked
out of the conference hall when
the wife of the Israeli Premier
started to address the conven-
tion.
Referring again to the "Dec-
laration." Abzug condemned it
as "UN politics as usual" and
as "more or the usual UN po-
litical rhetoric."
She praised the American
delegates for having voted
against the "Declaration."
After 18 consecutive y^-ars of
conducting Hi-.- i Holv Day serv-
ices in the Miami Beach Audi-
Sa"ni>l N, Priedland, ~w
~nn of th board of
F--nu-El. who announc dt
shift to the Convemhn HaI1
No-th, s-id the inc >
parity will permit t -,,,'J
gafi-m to make ,\.,1
available for both members and1
non-m^mbers.
F*"' -dland s Bench architect Mori
a membe>- of th i Tempi E-nantk
El hoard, has designed ,' -inc.
tuary to b1 constructed lithin
,s,. Con'-ntion H'll c -nlex
for th b^lid^'s "which ill be
completely fitting with the
snlemnitv of the occasion, but
also will nrovid" for the cele-
bration of the Nev,
C'rtntor Z< i Adler will ,-ssist
D*- Lelr-man. assisted by the
Temple Emanu-El Choir mderj
the direction of Israeli c:-r.pos-.
er Shmuel Fershko.
SAMUEL N. FRIEDLAND
torium. Temple Emanu-El will
move to the Miami Beach Con-
vention Hall North for its 1975
observance of the most sacred
days on the Jewish calendar.
Dr. Irving Lehman will pre-
side at the High Holy Day serv-
ices, which begin at sundown
Sept. 5.
THIS WILL be the 33rd year
that the rabbi, who moved to
Miami Beach in 1943. will con-
duct the High Holy Dav serv-
ices for Temple Emanu-El.
BBW Is Getting Ready
To Book It To You!
Hard-cover and par-'-hack
b'>oks an* now bein hv the Miami Council rf B'nai
B'rith Women for their annual
honV- sah scheduled for October
in the Midway Mall.
This sah is one of the "lajor
fond raising projects, .-.ccord-
ing to Mrs. Phil Marks, pres-
ident of the Council, with the
profits going to support many
local and nitional corn-unity
srvic" projects condr--: d by
th seven chapters in this area.
Becher Elected Vice Chairman Of
Committee For Encyclopaedia
Michael Becher of Miami
Reach has been elected vice
chairman of the Florida Com-
mittee for the Encyclopaedia
Judaica. He is regional director
for the Southeastern United
States for Keter Publishing
House Jerusalem Ltd.. which
prints and publishes the 16-
volume Judaica in Israel.
Becher will work closely with
Rabbis Herbert Baumgard.
Alexander Gross and Mayer
Abramowitz. The three spiritual
leaders are cochairmen of the
Florida Committee for the En-
cyclopaedia Judaica. an organi-
zation formed to aid in the
wider use and distribution of
the most widely acclaimed work
oi Jewish scholarship in the
20th century.
Becher, a graduate of Brook-
lyn College, studied for two
years at the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem. His main fields
include economics and Con-
temporary Jewish History.
Formerly the New York sales
manager for Encyclodaedia Ju-
daica. Becher became involved
in the monumental Jewish edu-
cational effort while a student
at the Hebrew University.
He has opened offices for the
Florida Committee in th" 420
Lincoln Road Building in Miami
Beach.
'Dining Ita(iai\sty(e is as U
easyas^Uef ^ais.'.Witl^
t|e|p fron^Chef cBoy-ardee
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to ccok for you when
you long for a delicious meatless
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full of tangy Italian-style cheese,
simmered in rich hearty tomatc sa: c
that s seasoned with even more
cheese. And. all you do is heat-r.-.t
enjoy For a thrifty, meatless
mechayeh you couldn't do bette'1
SUMMER CAMP AT SEA
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T.I I JOS) J7JSS02


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FILES


Friday, July 18, 1975
*Jcn>isti fhridknn
Page 7-A
Fulbright Beating His Old Drum Again
WASHINGTON (JTA) Former Sen. J. William
Fulbright, linking American interests in the Middle East to
a continuing, assured supply of oii, especially from Saudi
Arabia, and the avoidance of a new war that would precipi-
tate another oil embargo and possibly a confrontation with
the Soviet Union, has endorsed Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's view of the situation and his policies in an arti-
published in the Washington Post last week. (The Miami
:li raid published the same article on SundayEd.)
rhe Arkansas Democrat, whc
formerly headed the Senate
oreign R slations Committee,
declared that "having returned
from an extended tour of the
Middle East, I am filled with a
strong sense of both thj import
,:-.,: urgency of the Secretary b
.nations. Time is working
nsl us and against our in-
rests."
FULBRIGHT SAID that his
it to the Middle Fast con-
inced him that "the principal
ib countries including
;;. Syria, Jordan and Saudi
abia are all led by mod-
erate and responsible men" who
, re "united in a consensus for
making peace with Israel on '! i
basis of the 1967 borders.
"All of them say explicitly
d without qualification, ard
tie head of the Palestine Lib-
J. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT
drastic measures
eration Organization. Yassi;
Arafat, says so. guardedly and
by indirection, but to my ear
unmistakably," Fulbright wrote.
He viewed "this consensus
for the acceptance of Israel as
the most important and promis-
ing development in the Arab
world since the 1967 war," but
warned that it would soon dis-
sipate if no progress were made
for peace.
"The continued occupation of
Arab lands is a threat not only
to Arab moderation but to the
moderate leaders themselves,"
the former senator said.
HE SAID that for the United
States, "logic suggests that if
we are to give ail out support
to current Israeli policy we
should be taking drastic meas-
ures of energy conservation
insl the inevitable embar-
go.:-, or if we are to allow our
ci 'pendency on Persian Gull oil
to continue to increase at its
present rate, it would be pru-
dent to draw back from our fi-
nancial and political support of
continued Israeli occupation of
Arab lands."
Fulbright stressed the im-
portance of the American rela-
tionship with Saudi Arabia and
Censor OKs Book on Negotiations
insisted that the two m.i n is-
sues the supply of oil and its
price, are related to the Arab
Israeli conflict.
"A settlement could not be
expected to result in an imme-
diate sizable price rollback," he
said.
BUT IT would, however.
"eliminate the only outstanding
issue between the United States
and Saudi Arabia especially
if provisions were made for the
restoration of East Jerusalem
to one form or another of Arab
sovereignty."
Fulbright argued that Israel's
only security in the long run
lies in a return to its 1967 bor-
ders "with insubstantial chang-
because the only secure
borders are those accepted by
one's neighbors.
He warned that Israel's qual-
itative and technological ad-
vantage over its foes is "tran-
sient" as the Arabs are "ad-
vancing rapidly in education
an I technological skills, and
when these are added to their
vastly greater numbers and
wealth, the balance of power
will swing in their favor."
FULBRIGHT ASSERTED that
"except from Israel herself,
there is a virtual world con-
sensus" that a solution of the
Middle East conflict requires a
return to the 1967 lines, the
establishment of a Palestinian
state on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip with demilitarized
zones manned by the United
Nations and firm guarantees
from the United States and the
Soviet Union.
According to Fulbright, the
Soviets are prepared to offer
Israel the stiictest guarantees
under an appropriate agree-
ment but the U.S. cannot "count
on the Soviets to renew their
offer to cooperate if we do not
hold them to it now."
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Israeli military censor has re-
eased lor publication a revised
sion of Matti Golan's book
n the negotiations conducted
:: 197-1 b.tw -en Secretary of
Henry A. Kissinger and
li iders that led to the
. fire agreements and the
cis ngagement agreements with
and Sv ria.
.
ed b> :!i c tns .
ago and th
peitin.nt notes were
;d, rai ing a fui on
i i mi n di ts and others
RELEASE of th b i
- announced by the thor
.' a hastily convem d pres
r :: here Golan, a pc-
correspondent >i H
11 onl)
ea 'lier of the (
- decision and v. ict,
to lodgi another
ier the del*".
He said that when he sub-
' sd his rev ised version last
he was promised a deci-
within a week.
"I believe todav. as I
rael is a free, democratic coun-
try which, exercises freedom of
speech, though I had some res-
ervations about the banning of
the bo .' and the way it was
done," G Jan t rid his fellow
journalists.
hf DENIED that he had ap-
plied any pressure on the cen-
release the i1 iok or that
ha h id contemplated at any
time ioL ting Isra< li law.
11 als dei ed tl I th re was
pressure ; nited Stati
publicati
is wo tentai e ties
e:.. i :i .' ition"
. .
t."
W ;n th ng of the book
public, A
repi ted that it
i of ] con .
i m.v Pron .. > lolda
, ir and Kissinger durhi :
which tl ly made
indiscreet remarks aeon; other
world leader .
GOLAN declared here, "None
of these statements appear in
my book and I don't know if
I s mentioned. The word
'Ford' was not mentioned in
the book, neither as a car nor
as a Pi. ident," Golan said.
Golan said the book dealt
with the political negotiations
betwi en Oct 6, 1973, the day
the Yom Kippur War broke out,
ly 31, 1974, the day the
disen it agreement was
ith Syria.
ha six parts
sci ibin | the Amer can airlift
the cease fire, the Kilo
101 n. g ti itiona and the six-
H agi jem nt, the Gt neva
leni
nt md the
ria.
THE ROOK will be published
by the Schocken Press,
owns iretz.
Golan said he had a contract
with Bantam Bool s in the U.S.
-h publication
they can match the
lv.-t offer he receives.
If you're going
to have an affair,
make sure people
talk about it.
1 hen? you hostlno an affair
ai (he beautiful Deauvllle I lotel
(where $2,000,000 has )usl
been spent on brand-neu
luxury aiul elegance!)
And aftei it's .il! o er, u'hal | m
thought would be just > simple
catered affaii has turned oul t<>
be the sot i.il e\ enl <>f the yi ar.
Call AI Sicherer.
at 865-8511 and start
having an affair everyone
uill talk about.
Deau
On the ocean at <>~tli Sin et, Miami Beach
have always believed, that Is- Kissinger r." ;e any of the re-
Stop PLO Delegation
MONTREAL (JTA) The Canada-Israel Commit-
tee sent telegrams to Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
nd Foreign Secretary Allan McEachen demanding that the
government stop or withdraw its permission for a delega-
tion of the PLO to come to Toronto for a United Nations
conference.
The telegrams, signed by Rabbi W. Gunthcr Plaut, act-
ing chairman of the Committee, urged the government to
prevent the PLO entry in the aftermath of the July 4 bomb-
ng in Jerusalem. The government is scheduled soon to an-
ounce whether the PLO group will be admitted to Canada.
Senate Resolution on Arms
Continued from Page 1-A
whether these weapons sales should ultimately be permitted,
there are many grave unanswered questions Congress
should consider."
Case noted that under Senate rules, the committee has
t nly 20 days "to enact such a concurrent resolution object-
ing to such an offer of sale."
He said the hearings would cover three weapons sys-
tems: the "Hawk" surface-to-air missile; the "Vulcan" anti-
aircraft, self-propelled 20 mm. gun; and the "Redeye"
shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile.
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