The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02423

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
were Jerusalem police slow in responding?
Israelis in Massive Retaliation
3-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) One
of the largest manhunts in Is-
rael's history was underway
this week for the terrorists who
planted an empty refrigerator
wired to deadly mortar shells
in Jerusalem's Zion Square
which exploded last Friday
morning killing 14 persons and
injuring 73.
More than 300 Arabs have
been rounded up for question-
ing so far. The Jordan River
bridges were closed to all but
bona fide tourists as security
authorities pieced together
evidence which indicated that
the mortar shelisone of 120
mm. and the other 81 mm.
were smuggled into Israel from
Jordan, possibly by a "summer
visitor" and that the infernal
machine was assembled at a
terrorist hideout in the Hebron
hills, not far from Jerusalem.
POLICE ARE trying to trace
the vehicle that brought the
seemingly innocent ice box, an
Amkor-10 refrigerator of Is-
raeli manufacture, to the heart
of Jerusalem and deposited it
in the street crowded with pre-
Continued on Page 8-A
^Jewish Floridian
1 =
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEIKLY
Volume 46 iNumi er 25
Aliami. Florida Friday. July 11, 1975
sec by Man Two Sections
Price 25 rents
...
OFFERS NO DETAILS
Peres Proposes
Federation For
Jordan W. Bank
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM(JTA)Defense Minister Shimon Peres
has proposed a plan for a federation between Israel and the
West Bank which he hopes the Labor Alignment will begin
discussing.
AMBASSADOR DINITZ
reports back
Peres has long been a
supporter of the federation
idea but he did not present
any details on implementing
it until this weekend in an
interview with Davar's po-
litical correspondent Hagai
Eshed.
PERES SAID the plan should
be promoted both on a national
and and international level and
the government should adopt
the federation plan perhaps
during the negotiations for an
overall settlement of the Mid-
east dispute.
Peres' plan would give Arabs
Continued on Page 3-A
Jewish Underprivileged
Struggle Against N.Y. Odds
By M1NDY YOCHELSON
NEW YORK (JTA)
Jerome Becker, president of
the Metropolitan New York
Coordinating Council on
Jewish Poverty (MNYCC-
JP), issued a sharp condem-
nation here of Human Re-
sources Administration
(HRA) Commissioner James
R. Dumpson over his recom-
mended cut in funding of
programs for poor Jewish
and other white ethnic
groups.
The, slash would amount
Senate Bears Down
On Boycott Efforts
WASHINGTON(JTA)The Arab financial boycott of
certain American businesses has resulted in the formula-
tion of Senate legislation that would require disclosure and
authorize control of foreign investment in American com-
panies.
The Senate Subcommittee on securities drafted the
legislation which has received "unanimous approval" from
its members, the Subcommittee's chairman, Sen. Harrison
A. Williams, Jr. (D., N.J.), said in a statement here.
THE MEASURE is now be-
fore the group's parent com-
mittee on Banking, Housing and
Urban Affairs, which is expect-
ed to have another of its sub-
committee, the panel on inter-
national finance, give it addi-
tional consideration.
According to the Williams
statement, "the bill would re-
quire disclosure of the bene-
to $261,250 (or 55 per cent)
of the current $475,000 now
being allocated by the HRA
for the city's 400,000 Jewish
poor.
THE HRA money, which con-
sists of matching federal and
city funds, is used by the MNY-
CCJP for funding, staffing and
directing local Jewish commu-
nity councils that provide serv-
ices to the Jewish poor in 10
neighborhoods in New York
City.
During a meeting for pro-
gram leaders that serve various
poor white ethnic groups.
Continued on Page 13 A
Continued on Page lt-A
U.S. Pressure
Being Firmly
Closed Out
Rabin Talks to Ford ... 8-A
Warning on Passes 14-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEMThe Israel
Cabinet decided Sunday not
to decideyetwhether to
conclude the interim settle-
ment with Egypt. Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinitz, who had
been called in for consulta-
tions, was sent back to Wash-
ington to elicit further in-
formation from Secretary
Kissinger on Egypt's settle-
ment terms.
The cabinet ministers felt
they still did not possess all
the details they wanted be-
fore buckling down to their
fateful task: deciding wheth-
er to accept or reject the
Egyptian terms, which have
been heavily endorsed both
by the Secretary and by
President Ford himself.
BUT THE final decision will
not be deferred for long. On
Tuesday Premier Yitzhak Rabin
left for Germany for a four-day
official visit, returning before
the weekend. Possibly, officials
said, he would extend his stay
Continued on Page 2-A
Well Still Support UN
WASHINGTON(JTA)President Ford said that
the United States will continue to be a "determined sup-
porter" of the United Nations but "will firmly resist ef-
forts by any group of countries to exploit the machinery
of the UN for narrow political interests or for parlia-
mentary manipulation."
The President made that statement at the swearing
Continued on Page 14-A
Protest Makarios Alliance With Qaddaf i
JERUSALEM The (JTA)
The Israeli government has
protested sharply against Cyp-
riot "President Archbishop
Makarios for joining President
Muammar Qaddafi of Libya in
a virulently anti-Israel state-
ment.
The joint communique con-
demning Israel was issued in
Libya where Makarios was on
a state visit.
THE ISRAELI statement ex-
pressed "great regret" that
Makarios lent his name to an
extremist statement which, in
effect, negated Israel's right to
exist.
"Cyprus' own bitter experi-
ence has once more proved the
dangers inherent in internation-
al incitement and violence and
the need to settle disputes
peacefully and with mutual
respect," the Israeli statement
said.
"Col. Qaddafi spurns such
ways as far as the Israel-Arab
conflict is concerned." the state-
ment continued, adding that "Is-
rael seeks friendship with the
people of Cyprus."
UNNECESSARY FEAR
Erosion Of
Support
Eyed Here
On the other Hand
13-A
NEW YORK (JTA)
The American Jewish com-
munity was urged not to
"overwhelm itself with
fears" of an erosion of
American public support for
Israel.
Albert D. Chernin, newly-
elected executive vice chair-
man of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advis-
ory Council, also disputed
the apprehensions of some
Jewish communal leaders
and groups that anti-Jewish
sentiment was gaining seri-
ous ground in America.
ADDRESSING THE Council's
450 delegates at a session of its
annual plenary installing him in
office, Chernin argued that "the
greater danger is not in failing
to see new problems threaten-
ing Jewish life, but in failing
to recognize the new status en-
joyed by the American Jewish
community.
Continued on Page 2-A
PRESIDENT QADDAFI
virulent statement


Page 2-A
vJenist Fkrkfian
Friday, July u j
Israel Resistance to U.S. Pressure Firm
Continued from Page 1-A
for a day or so to meet win Dr.
Kissinger, who was also due in
Lurope this week.
On Sunuay. the Cabinet will
meet again, and fay then the
required additional information
is expected to be inand the
decision-making process will
b-gin in cam,..:.
The "basic problem facing
the Cabinet.'" a highly placed
source here explained this
week, is whether to enter into
"sharp confrontation'' with the
U.S. now, or whether to post-
pone the cor.- ontarion for two
or three years.
The confrontation, the high
source said, was ultimately un-
avoidable b.*cause the U.S.
had consistently opposed, and
still opposed. Israel's demands
for substantial bordei changes
in an overall peace.
IF THERE is no interim
agreement with Egypt now.
then the U.S. will call, together
with the Soviet Union, for a
resumption of the Geneva Peace
Conference, and will present
there its own overall peace
plan. This has been made
abundantly clear to Israel by
both Ford and Kissinger.
Israel knows enough of what
the overall U.S. peace plan will
entail to have extr -m- misgiv-
ings over its presentation.
The thrust of Israel's dialogue
with the U.S. in connection
with the interim settlement ne-
gotiations has been aimed at
ensuring that Washington will
not go ahead, once the interim
settlement has been concluded,
and draw up an overall settle-
ment plan "without coordina-
tion" with Jerusalem.
ISRAEL HAS sought assur
ances that, at least for the dura-
tion of the interim agreement
(understood to be a period of
three years), there will be no
pressures from Washington to
conclude a similar agreement
with Syria, and no attempt to
piutnoM uQ mei'ail settlement
at Geneva without prior and on-
going "coordination" with Is-
rael.
What are the arguments in
favor of delaying the confronta-
tion, if it is in any event ulti-
mately inevitable? Basically, the
highly-placed source explained,
these arguments hinge on the
broad American perception of
the current opportunity for the
U.S. to enhance its role and
position in Egypt.
WASHINGTON FEELS the in-
terim settlement approach of-
fers an historic opportunity for
Egypt to be encouraged to con-
tinue and accelerate its swing
away from the Soviet orbit of
influence and toward the U.S.-
Westem orbit.
Following an interim agree-
Jews Should Not Fear
Erosion of American Support
Continued from Page 1-A
"The greater danger is in bas-
ing our behavior and proera'"?
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on the belief that American
Jews are struggling to achieve
their goals in a sea of hostility,"
he declared.
Chernin said that polls and
studies since 194" have shown
"a steady growth of positive
feelings" among Americans to-
ward Israel. He proposed that
American-Israeli relations be in-
terpreted "in long term perspec-
tive rather than in the imme-
diate focus of each days head-
lines, gossip and rumor."
"A LITTLE paranoia is a
realistic perception of Jewish
history and essential to our sur-
vival." Chernin said.
But a "blind attitude" by
American Jews to their "hospit-
able conditions'* could lead to
"postures that elicit the very
antagonisms they seek to pre-
vent. They can become a self-
fulfilling prophecy threatening
our survival." he warned.
Chernin's speech was seen as
reacting to concerns expressed
by some Jewish elements that
the Ford Administration's Mid-
dle East reassessment, the
threat of another Arab oil em-
bargo and the economic po-
litical impacts of newly-rich
Arab states, along with intensi-
fied Arab propaganda are cre-
ating diminished American pub-
lic support for Israel and height-
ening the potentials for anti-
Jewish attitudes.
THE NEW NJCRAC execu-
tive, who succeeded Isaiah M
Minkoff. is a -T-year-old inter-
group relations specialist who
haa directed the Jewish Com-
munitv Relations Council of
Greater Philadelphia for the
past seven years.
Previously he was a member
of the council staff for 11 years.
Minkoff was honored at a spe-
cial tribute" dinner marking
his retirement.
He became the chief execu-
tive of NJCRAC at its founding
in 1941 and guided it through
its first 31 years.
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U-l 11 71
ment. the Egyptian government,
with American and other West-
ern aid. would hopefully devote
more of its energies to its in-
ternal economic and social
problems. At the same time, the
process of ... "-normalization"
would continue in the Canal
Zone, also contributing to a
further pacification of the area.
The Soviet influence, and
flow of Soviet weaponry to
Egypt, would concomittantly
wane, according to this thesis,
and Egypt would gradually lose
some of the intensity of its war
drive.
ISRAEL, THE highly-placed
source said, did not disnute the
broad American contention that
an enbnrd American role and
presence in Egypt and the Mid-
east would be to Israel's long-
term benefit.
But Israel was striving to en-
sure that the price it was being
asked to pay in order to facili-
tate U.S. policv-aims in Egypt
was not too high and did not
leave Israel weakened and
therefore susceptible to step-
ned-up pressures in the near
future.
The U.S. role in compensat-
ing Israel for the territorial-
strategic price to be paid was
to make long-term arms and
economic aid commitments. This
was one important subject in
the current negotiations, the
source indicated.
CLEARLY IF Israel rejected
the settlement package, this
would directlv and adversely
affect the level of U.S. aid to
her. though one could not pre-
dict to what extent.
The parallel and ongoing Is-
rael-Egypt bargaining was in-
tended to give Israel at least
some remaining foothold in the
vital passes areawith particu-
lar reference to the electronic
surveillance stations on the
heights overlooking the passes.
The source indicated that a
proposal for U.S. personnel to
man these stations had been
made and that it formed part
ofjhe entire negotiation com.
SOME POLICY maker, .
army officers are^**
have sharp misgivings over thi.
proposal. They point out that
when, ;/ter the August 197Q
ceasefire, Egypt advanced its
Soviet missiles on the canal
front. American intelligence de
liberatdy turned a blind eve
both to the evidence and to Is-
raeli protestations.
The- Israeli line of retreat and
the fate of the surveillance sta-
tions was now the sole remain-
ing point still at issue the
sm'/-ce indicated Though not all
was resolved on the other com-
ponents of the prospective set-
tlement, it was highly unlikely
that the talks would now found-
er over any other of these is-
sues.
The issue of "duration*'
which had earlier played a
major role in the talks had ef-
fectively been resolved. Egypt
had now agreed to a secret un-
dertaking for a three-year dura-
tion periodand there would
also be an initial implements-J,
tion period of a half-year or so.
THE FORMAL agreement
would state that both sides saw
this agreement as effective till
superseded by a subsequent
agreement, and that both sides
agreed to renew the UNEF man-
date for one year-
The secret proposal would
contiin undertakings to renew
UNEF for two further annual
extensions: three years in all.
As regards the line and the
surveillance stationsthe Israel
cabinet was still not satisfied
that it knew precisely what
Egvpt was demanding.
EGYPT HAD clearly reiected
the Israeli proposal as submit-
ted by Rabin in Washington,
but had not yet responded with
a definitive proposal of its own.
defini such key words as
"passes." "entrances to passes,"
"slope*," and others.
The source said he expected
top-level U.S.-Egyptian contacts
during this week which would
enable Washington to transmit
to Jerusalem the information
the Cabinet still required in
order to take its final decision.

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^f Friday, July 11, 1975
+Jewisti fhrk/ian
Page 3-A
Israel Strikes at Terrorists in Lebanon
i
TEL AVIV(JTA) Israeli
land, sea and air forces struck
at terrorist targets along the
southern Lebanese coastal strip
in a series of raids this week
that began shortly after mid-
night and continued until dawn.
All Israeli forces returned
safely to their bases after de-
stroying numerous terrorist
buildings, boats and vehicles
and inflicting an undisclosed
number of casualties on the ter-
rorists.
SEVERAL ISRAELI units en-
gaged terrorists in close range
firefights, and others came un-
der terrorist artillery fire which
was silenced by Israeli artil-
_jry. No Israeli casualties were
reported in any of the en-
counters.
The Israeli raids, which con-
centrated on the region north
and south of Tyre and on the
big Rashidiyeh refugee camp,
were apparently carried out in
retaliation for last Friday's ter-
Peres
Proposes
Federation
Continued from Page 1-A
both in Israel and the adminis-
tered territories a free choice
of citizenship, with those ac-
cepting Israeli citizenship being
able to vote for the Knesset.
Peres said the problem of en-
suring a Jewish majority could
be solved by using what he
called the "Canadian system"
in which a ratio of two-thirds
Jewish votes and one-third Arab
votes could be maintained un-
til the area was stabilized.
HE ALSO suggested a high
degree of autonomy for the resi-
dents of the occupied territories
both on a local and a regional
basis.
The Defense Minister has no
illusions that his plan can be
achieved quickly, but suggested
implementing it in stages.
"Nobody dreamed a European
Common Market was possible in
the thirties, and yet it became
a European reality in the fif-
ties," he said. Eventually a fed-
erated parliament could be
created, similar to the European
parliament, he said.
rorist bombing in Jerusalem
that claimed the lives of 14
Jews and Arabs.
The terrorists struck back
during the forenoon hours with
volleys of Katyusha rocket fire
aimed at Safad, some 12 miles
from the Lebanese border". Kib-
butz Iron, and the coastal city
of Nahariya. No casualties or
damage was reported.
MOST OF the rockets explod-
ed in open fields. The Rosh
Haniqra border post on the Is-
rael-Lebanon border was clos-
ed down, and no one, including
United Nations observers, was
permitted to cross.
Shooting was heard in south-
ern Lebanon long after Israeli
forces had departed, apparent-
ly between terrorists and Leb-
anese Army regulars.
According to an army spokes-
man, Israeli infantry units
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crossed into Lebanon shortly
after midnight and, at about
the same time. Israeli comman-
dos were landed on the Leba-
nese beaches north and south
of Tyre by navy craft which
shelled terrorist targets ashore.
" Israel Air Force planes 'flew
over the target areas dropping
flares and later strafed terror-
ist strongholds as Israeli in-
fantry patrols systematically
demolished terrorist command
posts and buildings.
THE ISRAELI forces attacked
three targets in Tyre, two to
the south of it and two to the
north. Houses were demolished
on the fringes of the Rashidiyeh
camp, and boats were destroyed
in the Rashidiyeh anchorage, a
jumping-off place for terrorist
sea-borne assaults on Israel.
Large fires were seen in the
camp. A Lebanese communique
confirmed the attack but gave
no details of damage or casual-
ties. The terrorist radio station
in Beirut reported a fire in the
Rashidiyeh camp and said four
terrorists were killed.
Police and border patrols
were strengthened in northern
Israel in anticipation of pos-
sible terrorist attempts at sabo-
tage in civilian centers.
TIGHTENED SECURITY was
maintained on the Jordan River
bridges across which, it is be-
lieved, "summer visitors"
smuggled the explosives used
in Friday's fatal bombing in
Jerusalem.
Israeli security sources con-
cede that the summer visitors'
policy provides opportunities
for smuggling explosives and
the infiltration of hostile ele-
ments into Israel despite strict
control and thorough searches.
Miami Lakes B.B.
Lodge Breakfast
The newly formed B'nai
B'rith Lodge for the residents
of Miami Lakes, Country Club
of Miami and Hialeah will hold
its charter membership break-
fast Sunday at 10 a.m. in the
Miami Lakes Athletic Club (lo-
cated east of Lake Katherine
Shopping Center).
Dom Di Stefano has made
special arrangements for use of
the dining room.
"Nova, lox, bagels, cream
cheese plus other delicacies
will be the bill of fare," Morris
Greenstein, menu chairman,
said.
Alfred Golden, a current Hil-
lel Foundation Commissioner
and past National Commission-
er of the ADL. will speak .
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4-A
Frt^Joly 11 19?s
A ^ orthwhile \J arning -
Albert Cherain. the ucoU-elected executive nee
chairman at the National Jewish CocnanBnty Relations
Advisory ronncfl. tssaed a ninety warning when he
urged the American Jewish < mni" not to
Female Sexism Brings Equality
over-
m
feferrmg both to a fear of
,Aencaa,pahte oggipns ibbuiii at-fanel as
a fear of a deteriorating oumhtioo for American Jews
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American Jews A Unie pi wrai a a rnahtrn percep-
twe of Jewish history and essential to oar survival."" he
said But, he wamec 2 Man1 a~rude" hv Aaencac
Jean bj then- -hospital teaMhrwan OHM iead to ~a setf-
The new NJCRAC official was utwwsi
to fears eapt eased smce the Yoat Kjppnr *a"i
.--. -. ------
However, the rhow most Americans sap-
-- :- -.= -. -
T\ Jump* the Gun
^HAKSTfL\K ink of the
*~ faar sex that 'man's eves
. They are the books, the
arts, the orartemes That show.
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r:r*.i ere frec-er.:
terrr*:-- ::' tic ~ = ri ~ A=er;i
We do Dot doubt that sack as agreesnrat but be a:
-~~ s vsszt with Secretary
of Kate Henry Kasmger at Kissingers vacation spot
.-. tr-; rz-- 1- -T-- :er.i.-.;. .^iderscored tic amount
of pressure the Fir.: ^:~ :r.ftr "**iyt*as oa Israel
:: arrtiira-- :-;- in amal bbI hvajety :r F-r.-pt-i.-.
* "tii" placed a special plane at
r ms trip to the Virgc: > lands a^o
tear. Fonfs recent statezvettt that :
hi the Middle East toward the
z IsraeLi-Arah accord, temporary or
otherwise
Our Nation"? Fear?
-;-: M
?. ill ::' :r_i St-its :r. .-^nr.a ^: li_-r
on the Amrncar Jewish corr.r---
Aa we have ahead* noted. tie newly-ejected execu-
tive vice president of the National Jewish ConaBnauty
Rlsoons Advisory Council is on record as havtag warned
Jews act to be cwerwhehsed by fears that American
pahbc opamoc is swaying agamst both Israel and
American Jewry.
The ponv. is iut tbere is a GEXEKAL fear is
today, not ;nst a Jewish fear, abowt .\rab latea-
dae ahddk> East-
It can not be Jerjec that a good deal o( this fear
ts based oe Arab oil pnhcirs
10 a "gift',J"* pan of this has to do with the
araaaaj eoncerz thai i. aa a_- Cm aaaaTi
J
TOWARD COOTE p,^
said of womaB- "Tier every "one
is mmic'a own./Like those of
rrorniiu? birds. 'And soTiething
rvore than melody Dwells even
in her worda.**
i/'^iSy PP^ ^Drj[i declard
'fhafv*'Ah U\\fA lIleeTi in'wom-
an's form."
And who does not know
CoJt^.oo's paeans of praise to
his beloved, which have surely
served as a model for every
vml since the Song
of Song=" was first uttered"-
ALL OF this insriri-
<*-uica in the hearts anj
of van has flown free
conceivable culture.
:- been
be finlw;d. 1
m vrmter. < Kbber
dearth of aah
where on this drearv
a-ei -re taaal
?r sex.
She is. after alL the bt
rf the rac; Her 1
rare .::'e arl to inspire '.
as e!l
WHO HAS no*, at or.-
o- a- wondered what
- -.wild be hie if women
were is *u highest place a no)
- yea if women occupied the
of eo-.^em-nentai snd
- : paa BC not the::
Bee -.ates?
Aggression would disar
----- -a -wnen five 1^'e they
would never be inclined t(
-e Isaiah vision would be
f-jlfilled there would be ni
no more
Of course, when I ask who
Cf.mli
m Page I!-A
Mafia Gangster and Poet Auden
1
ast wiH not find the VS. zsvorved auhtartly as a has
been m. the past.
Agonizing Need for Peaee
In the end. Aaenca today is m no naood for
aantary adventures. Xot even israe s repeated
ances that m the event of a new war. s wockj never
come to that, hate aiawm effectrre.
Tins s whv the aef ii over the weekend were so
cuacc tc report what has vet to occur k was a snnar
of :=patient public semzjertt ts soO their fears.
BaL ajeez wtth Chernm. n s our hopeful view that
Mi -^- c-.r tese BBBa :' e^r-^i tbensserrea
as hoanaty either toward Aaaencan Jews or Israel
rr show what the TV reports sfcewec
Aaaencan aeec far peace.
By M.a LELMJt
Los Aa$*l*s T=aes STTjiscsre
\T* ;::7:--r Mvi the
aews aooc JoBa Ros*e_ rrtag
to atv c-ad 1 poes= by W H.
Johs Rosses h of
the Mara fawester =>
a rnz^ -T^r* oo jp-
Teared >efjre r Sessati jorr-
eBTm oa the CIA naai sach
sjcrecT tnat the papers
the paerc-e^ taey
rje^wish Flo24dian
Alec* wa the
ec aarr fiaa->~i-.i ? >ee=a to
hav warkod oa ^e Castro s-
pkx Ae eorir
a plan to peaaoa Cas-
pc*e je n
FOtt SOME
bacz Aad=* pos* coSed
1939.' whack
thaw. 1as vex of the
anet Oa 52ad Street As
hopes expire Of a
decode'
i=ae a aow ,^aitrm fek aboot
BM 30a. wkacs hod aaapame'
ha* aeneraaoa mzh sweh fire
ad hope, and vh^ct es^^ed
wrr a secacc acic -- 5---
a- _rri mo; kani >^= bbb-
:~ aaoa: rje >> ic.
wrrses aooac ^te
"j* a BBB
*"tjr T-ian tae ao espe-
kdaj pcocoaaz now is Thar ^e
of Wi i onf Gbob-
d of the CIA orKo

LEAVER
ofi^n tJ discnrninate between
the tnv.si and crucial, its lack
of any basic interpretive theme.
E*err couple of generations
rvooe puts together an "Our
Ts it>~ chronicle
AMOVE WHO has tned to
- :- -Ti-.-r-.i.-.s which mvohBa
s-jrae kt wledge of what hap-
peaeo i- aaBBBB ui the 30t,
+3s bbJ 50s. en the etfs.
kBOws how innocent the stu-
dents are of -
Thar Knowledge starts some-
Bhani ^ the middle or late
"60s. If there nan a paperback
versa an of the Manchester book
I vo*Ud make it mandatory for
e-e: school and college
stoden:^nd for their teachers
as ell
Then .re CBBBl start equallv
frorn the same point, and fight
oboat our interpretations
MANCHESTER begins w.th
the Bonus Army, encamped m
"ashmgtoo in 193^. and ends
with Nixno victorious in 1J-;
facaig the Watergate scandal
scarcety a 40-year ivii*\)
f &\* 1 :;tic like The Glory
and the Dream" to it One could
^ "The C!or\ and
t.Te Nightmare.-
1 nq :s:> eacaaoi r a 1
g**f an don
.1 .:
v> aad
a!*i our frustratfoas a-
nments
Ml the*e crjoal
-o-r.etrung in each of -
to birth, and then we die 1
'm eawi di.-4llu.-
For Auden and for C Day
Lewie and .-trphen Spe:
Span was b^th hope and grief,
-r.j Munich was death
ONE HAY naming the dec-
ades is I suppose, by the Pi
den: who dominated them Thus
we have had the Roosevelt
years, the Truman years the
Eisenhower years, the Kennedy
and Johnson years, the Nixon
years
The 30s were the decade of
confidence, which curiously be-
gin with the Great Depression
and ended with Pear! Harbor
THE '4BS were years of war
in which the natioa found some
unity, but they -ware followed
by a bad peace and the start
of a strident cold war The 50s
were dominated by the shadow
of nuclear weapons and the stir-
rings of the Third World.
Y.'t compared with what fol-
laaed, they. too. seem now 11
age of niminn illusion?
The "oOs started with the politics
of promise, aaeapd on to a tangle
ot socaai Ptaflnhoot and got
mired eMweftdUaVowa~ P of an
endless war
The ~0* beaan badly, with
WanajaB and the oil cartel,
aal seem ifcaiiiaeli d now by
the iare questions of disinte-
gration and survival
BACK IN 1W9. Auden was as
somber as we are today De-
fenceless, under the night
Our world in stupor lies"
Yet be abo saw some "ironic
pomrs of hint' flashing out
from "the Just
He ends "Baa I. composed
like them Of Eros and of
dust Beleaguered br the same/
stion and despair Show an
affirming flame-"* _,
are uses that may-sound
eat for our decade, but
- them.


.'-
.
Friday, July -11, 197S
+ k*isi fkrtoiar
uO^i-uki
Page 5-A
j Russian Jew Pleads for Daughter's Life
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridiaa:
We address an people all over
the world to help our friends,
Prof. Mark. Asbel, his wife
Lydia* aijd, daughter, Julia,.We
have known them since we were
children, and last saw them ten
months ago when we were al-
lowed to leave Russia.
Just a few days before we
left. Mark and Lydia went out
for a walk as Julia slept in the
care of a friend. Suddenly the
door burst open to admit four
KGB men.
THEY RAN through the house
tearing things from closets and
drawers, searching for they
knew not what, and making a
terrible noise. The child awoke
screaming in horror. This was
a repetition of a scene present-
ed too many times before. Julia
has become a child who is ter-
ribly afraid and disturbed by
the cruelty perpetrated on her
family.
READERS
WRIH
"Let Thy Words Be BrieT
KohcUth (Ecclesuutet)
'^MnrauiiiiMnMiMnBiMMMHntMnHMnniiiuviiiuuu'
She doesn't sleep, she has no
playmates, and her parents fear
for her mental health. Imagine
the thoughts of a five-year-old
who loves her father. Perhaps
she gives thought to the fact
that if everyone is against her
father, he must be bad. But
how can he be bad when she
loves him so. She is torn be-
tween terribly mixed feelings.
THE RUSSIAN government
prefers, that Prof. Asbel remain
in Russia as a prisoner in his
own. home, without' WtfrVltr
friends, under constant harrass-
ment, but still in Russia without
permission to leave. He is not
allowed to work, but he desires
to continue his research as a
theoretical physicist.
He has recently begun to hold
monthly seminars in his home.
He meets with other men in his
field to discuss new ideas.
The KGB has stepped up the
harassment because they fear
that Prof. Asbel is working
against them politically at these
meetings, but he is holding the
seminars in order to continue
his work and maintain his and
his colleagues' professional
awareness in their respective
fields.
WHEN WE were given per-
"''T to |*w Ruci- M^rk
and Lydia asked us to try te
help them. They told us that if'
the situation were to get worse
they would ask us to take their
child. They do.not want to send
their daughter away from them,
but in such a situation they
have no other choice.
The fact that they may never
see her again is not as impor-
tant as the fact that the child
must have a normal life. We
appeal to all the people of the
world to help us to get Julia to
Israel to live with us until the
time when her family can re-
claim her.
We are ready to be her
parents and give her everything
she needs, and to continue to
fight at her side to get her
parents out of Russia and home
to Israel.
RECENTLY, WE received a
letter smuggled out of Russia
from Lydia, which in part begs
us: "Help my child return to
her childhood. More and more
frequently, Jufia asks why the
militia and other unknown peo-
ple visit our flat and only our
flat, why the other children M-
longer play with her, why thejr
do not invite her to visit or
come to visit her, why she it
always alone .
"Last> vear,~~iniy husband,
Mark, was arrested for his par-
ticipation in the international
Science Seminar. The arrest
took place before Julia's eyes.
Her father was followed by un-
known men who pushed higt
into a car without allowing him
to wish us farewell. I am not
sure that Lydia will ever forget
it .
"I ask you because I be-
lieve that regardless of our po-
sition, you can not remain in-
different to the fate of a child,
who though she is injured, can
yet be saved."
DR. TALA ZLATKIS
Cardiologist
PROF. LEONID ZLATKIS
Neurologist
Safad, Israel
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13W*N.W.67thAve.


Page 6-A
+Jenisl> fhridian
Friday, July ^
1975J
Mandel Savs Reds Sensitive About Exits
r
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Gov.
Marvin Mandel of Maryland,
who was one of eight governors
who visited the Soviet Union in
May, said that it must be im-
pressed upon the Soviet govern-
ment that the issue of Jewish
emigration is a human not a
political problem and that the
American people support the
right of Soviet Jews to leave
the USSR.
He said that PreiJtnt Ford
and Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger should make the
Souet leaders aware that all
the people of this country are
concerned about the problem.
SPEAKING at a press con-
ference sponsored by the -Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry at the offices of the
American Jewish Congress.
Mandel said that the governors,
who were on an official State
Department-sponsored exchange
visit met with Soviet President
Nikolai V. Podgorny and other
Soviet officials and were treated
with extreme courtesy except
when the emigration issue was
raised.
He noted that the Soviets ap-
Hell Urge
Ford To
Provide Aid
TEL AVIV (JTA) Sen.
James L. Buckley said on his
arrival here that he would urge
President Ford to provide Israel
with greater than average mili-
tary assistance and expressed ,
concern over the Ford Adminis-
tration^ current reassessment
of American Middle East policy.!
"This is no time to re-evaluate
our policy towards Israelit is
a time to reaffirm it,"* the New
York Republican Conservative
said.
BUCKLEY declined to com-
ment on the latest developments
which included a reported Ford
ultimatum to Israel to soften its
position on an interim agree-
ment with Egypt.
The Senator met with Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin. Defense
Minister Shimon Peres and
other government officials dur-
ing his stay in Israel.
Buckley said he was concern-
ed over Portugal"s refusal to
allow U.S. trans7orts to use
Azores airfields for an arms
airlift to Israel in the event of
another Middle East war.
FOR THAT reason, he said.
Ford should consider the need
to provide Israel with larger
than average stores of military
equipment, spare parts, combat
consumables, up-to-date air-
craft, surface-to-surface mis-
siles and related materials
needed to meet the military
threat to Israel's survival.
Buckley said this war mate-
riel should be stored in several
parts of the world, including
the Middle East.
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peared to be much more sensi-
tive on this than they were
when he visited the USSR three
years ago.
The Russians said that there
was no problem and that the
issue was being raised by out-
side forces. Mandel said.
HE SAID they also declared
it was an internal issue. Man-
del reported that the governors
in turn tried to point out th?;
this was not a political prob-
lem, but one of human beings
who wished to join their fami-
lies.
The Maryland governor said
that in every hotel lobby there
were leaflets and brochures at-
tacking the emigration issue.
He said one had a report
from a Pravda correspondent in
New York who claimed to have
visited Russian immigrants in
the Brighton Beach section of
New York who were unhappy
with their life in the United
States.
MANDEL stressed that the
emigration issue is a major
problem for the Soviets. "They
have a great problem explain-
ing to the people of the country
why anyone wants to leave
when they spend 365 days a
year telling how good it is," he
said.
He added that the Russians
also fear that if Jews are al-
lowed to leave. Ukrainians and
other national groups will seek
exit visas.
Mandel said he talked with
a woman who has been refused
an exist visa for herself and
her two small children even
though her husband is now a
violist with the Baltimore
Symphony Orchestra.
He said he also met with ac-
tivists such as Valery Rubin.
Vladimir Slepak and Alexander
Lerner.
THEY FEEL that the Jack-
son-Vanik Admendment has
helped them because the har.^
ment no longer takes a violent
form since the Russians know
the woild is watching. .Mandel
said.
He said he was told that about
15 percent of Soviet Jews would
emigrate if they could. This
would be about 450.000 persons.
.\l.indel said the Soviet Jews
told him the best form of pres-
sure on the USSR would be for
educators and scientists tc
speak out. both in the United
States and especially when they
are in the Soviet Union.
STANLEY H. LOWELL, chair-
man of the NCSJ. who intro-
duced Mandel. said while the
governors in their May visit
and a group of U.S. Senators
who are in the USSR now. have
expressed concern about the
plight of Soviet Jews, "regret-
tably, the President and Secre-
tary of State appeared to have
placed the issue of freedom for
Soviet Jews on the back burn-
er'."'
He said this has been inter-
preted by the USSR "to in-
J repression of J
Lowell called upon Ford J
use the weight and pres.il
his office in beha.fPr0efStvi;
Jewish Prisoners of CtmJL,
so that they may be al&
emigrate, and further that
the best American tradition
call on the leaders of the I
viet government to put an en
to all discrimination and
pression of Soviet J,
He also urged Congress *J
undertake a legislative
of Soviet violation
rights."
inquin
of humai
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Chairman ol tha Board
- I [ f
A new chapter in
Pwrific air travel
from the people who
wrote the book.
When Pan Am opened the
Pacific to air travel in the 1930s, we
offered the traveler the fastest and
most convenient way to get there.

1935
1975

It only took three and a half days
to get to Manila.
Of course, the flight was weekly
instead of daily. And instead of being
non-stop, we stopped off at just about
every available island along the way.
Things haven't changed much
in 40 years. Pan Am still offers the
fastest, most convenient way to travel
the Pacific.
Except that now we leave every
day. With 747s to just about every
place in the Pacific.
All told, we have more flights
from the U.S. to more places in the
Pacific and the Orient than any other
airline.
For example, we have 25 flights
a week to Hong Kong alone. Three
daily 747s to Tokyo, including both
morning and evening departures.
Daily flights to Sydney. Plus flights
to 13 different Orient destinations
and 7 places in the South Pacific
from 5 U.S. cities.
The flights include 5 a week/to
Auckland and to Melbourne, more
service to Okinawa than any other
airline, and direct service to
Singapore and to Osaka. And like
1935, direct flights to Manila
(except they've been shortened by
some 68 hours).
So the next time you want to go
to the Pacific, instead of wasting
time figuring out which airline goes
where, spend it deciding where you
want to go on Pan Am.
The Spirit of 75.
Set your travel agent.


fiday, July 11, 1975
*Jmhtt fici kli&n
Pace 7-A
'.S. Universities Pull Out of Aid Program for Saudis
NEW YORK(JTA)A consortium of five state uni-
|ersities in the Middle West has suspended participation in
evaluation project for the University of Riyadh in Saudi
Irabia following the refusal of government authorities there
grant a visa to a Jewish professqr.
The suspension marks the first time' an' American
liversity or group of educational institutions has halted
aid program abroad on grounds of anti-Jewish dis-
hmination, according to the American Jewish Congress,
lich made public the details of the action.
| THE MIDWEST University
bnsoitium for International Ac-
nties, Inc., acted at its regular
rjnthly meeting in Chicago last
jk.
I The suspension was hailed by
lil Baum, associate executive
Irector of the American Jew-
Congress, as "an eloquent
tmonstration that the importa-
on of foreign religious prej-
Uces to our shores is rejected
the American academic com-
munity."
[The consortium is composed
Indiana University, Michigan
(ate University and the Uni-
ersities of Illinois. Wisconsin
id Minnesota.
FOUNDED in 1964, it has pro-
kded evaluation and other serv-
kes to institutions of higher
education in Indonesia, Ethio-
pia. Somalia, Thailand and other
countries.
Under an agreement with the
University of Riyadh, the con-
sortium sent a team of 10 ex-
perts to Saudi Arabia in May
and June to evaluate the univer-
sity's programs in agriculture,
education, engineering, medi-
cine and other subjects.
Earlier, however, the faculty
committee on international pro-
grams at Michigan State Uni-
versity had voted not to par-
ticipate in the project without
assurances of non-discrimina-
tion from the Saudis.
DR. CLIFTON Wharton, presi-
dent of Michigan State, wrote
in March to the University of
Hausner Hits Austrian*
For Non-Compensation
VIENNA (JTA) Gideon Hausner, Israeli Minister -
rithout-Portfolio, criticized Austria for its refusal to com-
ensate Jews for the loss of property confiscated by the
fazis and for failing to prosecute Nazi war criminals.
"Israel's claim for compensation is all the more justi-
jd in a time of economic difficulties," Hausner told a
eeting of the Austro-Israel Society.
HAUSNER, A leader of Is-
ears of foreign statesmen."
However, at a news confer-
ence, he said he welcomed
Kreisky's efforts to bring about
a meeting between Israeli and
Egyptian Socialists. Hausner
pel's Independent Liberal Par-
and the man who prosecuted
dolf Eichmann, said Israelis
shocked" that Austria ra-
ises to try Nazi war criminals.
pa intend to give?" he asked.
|The Israeli minister also said
jael was prepared to give
kek territory "for the sake of
ace," but declared "Israel
y not negotiate with repre-
ntatives of the Palestine Lib-
ation Organization (PLO)
hose aim is to extinguish the
raeli State."
I NOTING THAT Austrian
iiancellor Bruno Kreisky said
Iriier this year that he has
lamed from Arab officials that
}e PLO is ready to unofficially
ecognize the existence of Is-
lel. Hausner said:
I "We must stick to official
atements and not to what
pie Arabs whisper into the
THE FAMILY JACOBS'

f(/0Kir KOSHER
totto*Ai* oauHtom Horn
fvwy Uooti WofarviaW Cohr TV.
R' jerofo' Aaudant Mashgioch.
Sfrt Dwftry low* Synooogua
Sugar Salt fr Dim P90I mftm
Chouas Complete Soeiol Prooromi
RtSfcRVtNOW!
HIGH HOIY DAYS
Egypti
discuss the Mideast situation.
MEANWHILE, in Tel Aviv,
the United States Immigration
and Naturalization Service has
asked the Israel police's special
branch for the investigation of
Nazi war crimes to collect evi-
dence against 70 naturalized
American citizens who are un-
der investigation in the U.S. for
having committed war crimes
in Nazi-occupied Europe dur-
ing World War II.
Requests for information
have been placed in Israeli
newspapers and Supt. Gershon
Langsfeld, head of the special
branch, said evidence has al-
ready been collected on 10 of
the 70.
The INS probe began after
complaints by Holocaust sur-
vivors living in the U.S. and
several Congressmen that the
suspected war criminals lied
about their past in applying for
U.S. citizenship.
Riyadh requesting an invitation
for Dr. Ralph Smukler, dean of
international programs at Mich-
igan State, to make an on-site
review of the program. Dr.
Smukler, who is Jewish and a
member of the consortium's
board of directors, applied for
a visa to Saudi Arabia in April.
Despite repeated letters and
cables, no response was ever
received from the University of
Riyadh, Dr. Smukler told the
AJCongress.
Earlier this month, he said,
"I was informed that after nu-
merous visits to the Saudi Ara-
bian Embassy, the travel service
in Washington which had for-
warded my visa application
received a letter from the em-
bassy stating that the necessary
'certificate of no objection' had
not been received from Saudi
Arabia and that the visa officer
did not think they would ever
receive one due to the fact that
I am of the Jewish faith."
DR. SMUKLER said he had
listed his religion as Jewish on
the visa application form and
had supplied a letter from his
rabbi attesting to his religion.
In response to this refusal,
the consortium adopted a reso-
lution declaring: "The exclu-
sion of persons of Jewish faith
from Saudi Arabia, as demon-
First Group of Americans
Off for Life in Israel
By SHERYL ANNE GURA
NEW YORK(JTA)The first group of 90 American
Jews will soon depart for Israel under the coordination and
guidance of the Student Mobilization for Israel (SMI). The
goal of SMI is "to change the nature of aliya from a per-
sonal choice to a community obligation," Barry Topf told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in an interview during a
reception held for the group several days ago at 515 Park
Ave.
Topf is a new immigrant and the director of the SMI's
Jerusalem branch which will open July 17 under the aus-
pices of the Jewish Agency's Aliya Department.
YEHOSHUA YADLIN, direc-
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Sept 5 Sept. 16
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tor of the Aliya Department of
t^e Jewish Agency in the
United States, in a short address
to the gathering, echoed Topf s
sentiments. He remarked, "to
decided to make aliya, it is not
necessarv to ask what you can
do for Israel; rather see what
Israel can offer youa chal-
lenge, a feeling of being need-
ed, motivation or a personal
identit;. "
All the prospective olim inter-
viewed by the JTA concurred
in their reasons for making
aliya. They expressed the simi-
lar belief that they could only
lead a "meaningful, inspiring
and rewarding life" in Israel.
Marc Schulman, the founder
and chairman of the SMI, is a
20-year-old New Yorker and
graduate of Columbia Univer-
sity.
HE LEAVES for Israel July
10 and until his November in-
duction in the Israeli army will
assist other olim in the SMI
center in Jerusalem. When
asked to explain his decision to
make aliya, he replied: "There
are two reasons, ideological and
personal. Ideologically, I believe
that the only place for a Jew
to live is in Israel; personally,
I love the country and could
not live any place else."
Sam Marcus, a 21-year-old
New Yorker and graduate of
City College of New York, has
already lived in Israel one year
attending Yeshiva Hakotel.
He returned for a visit with
his family before his entrance
into the army.
He stated, in response to why
SCHECHTER'S
rnv junior year abroad at the
yeshiva, I definitely decided
that I prefer to help build and
work for a Jewish country
rather than an American one."
HE ADDED, "My reasons are
purely emotional, not religious."
A 50-year-old widow and
mother of two daughters, one
16 and the other 26, who has
been residing in Israel for the
past two years, one of the few
adult members of the group,
confronts her more difficult
problem of adjustment realis-
tically and happily.
The widow, who asked that
her name be withheld, said: "I
want to live in Israel no matter
how hard it is for me to adjust
to the new way of life. I love
the feeling of being among my
own peonle and belonging to
the land.''
When asked how she expect-
ed to resolve the more practical
aspects of resettlement, such as
the financial, she replied, "I
work in New York; why can't I
work just as well in Israel."
ANOTHER MAJOR factor in
her choice to go on aliya is, as
she expressed it, "I want my
daughter to grow up there. It
is an incomparably better life
than one she can have in New
York."
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project."
Dr. David B. Johnson, Dean
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ect would be resumed.
"If not," he said, "the con-
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IN WELCOMING the action,
Baum called on Secretary of the
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all projects initiated under the
auspices of the U.S.-Saudi
Arabian Joint Commission on
Economic Cooperation will be
free from both the fact and the
threat of religious discrimina-
tion."
The suspension of the con-
sortium^ programs in Saudi
Arabia follows the breakdown
last month of negotiations be-
tween the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology and Saudi
Arabia over a guarantee for the
entry of Jews to work on a wa-
ter resources project.
The negotiations collapsed
when Prince Mohammed ibn
Faisal, chairman of the Saline
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viding that Saudi Arabia would
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ber of the work staff or aca-
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Page 8-A
+Jmistifk>rk*m
Friday, July ^
Were Jerusalem Police Slow to Respond?
Caattaae4 from Pafe 1-A
Sabbath shoppers.
Police are alsn trying to main-
tain calm in this ihocaad and
stunned city waere crowds of
infuriated Israeli youths riocad
Friday night, demanding venge-
ance for the terrorists' carnage.
Young Jews from the Mus-
rara quarter, which borders the
Arab section of the city, hurled
stones at Arab buildings and
tried to storm the Old City but
were held back by riot police.
ARAB merchants evacuated
the city's watermelon market,
and their stalls were later burn-
ed to ashes by firebrands buri-
ed by Jews. Police enlisted
youths from the Merkaz Harav
Kook Yeshiva and the Yeshiva
Hakotel. both near the scene
of the Mast, to patrol the streets
to prevent violence between
Jews and Arabs.
Despite the tension, most
Arab workers later snowed up
There's No Way to Tell
Which Road for Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA;The position Premier Yitzhak
Rabin takes on Egypt's proposals for a new interim settle-
mentwhich the U.S. is openly urging Israel to accept to
keep negotiations aliveprobably wilr be decisive in shap-
ing the Cabinet's fateful decision.
But Rabin's views are still unclear and the subject
of fierce speculation in political circles here.
THE PREMIER addressed a
J&KTSLSJStaiS *"*,0We*G"m"",hi5
Tuesday. As they emerged |______.______________:___________
from the meeting, the Labor
"hawks" said Rabin was lean-
ing toward their position that
Israel's retention of the stra-
tegic Sinai passes was preferable
to an accommodation with
Washington.
Labor "doves." on the other
hand, said they detected an
Inclination by the Premier to
the view that a confrontation
with Washington must be avoid-
ed at all costs, even at the ex-
pense of the passes.
All who attended the meet-
ing agreed that Rabin presented
detailed arguments for and
against accepting Eeypt's terms
withdrawal from the Gidi and
Mitla Passes and the Abu Ro-
deis oilfieldsthat was a mas-
terpiece of cautious and cir-
cumspect formulation.
BUT HE did not commit him-
self one way or the other.
The Premier reportedly
stressed to his Alignment col-
leagues the risks of saying "no"
to Washington. He mentioned
specifically the issue of arms
supplies and the prospect that,
failing an interim accord, the
U.S. would go to Geneva and
there present an overall plan
of its own without prior co-
ordination with Israel.
Rabin also apparently took
President Ford at his word when
the latter denied that he had
delivered an "ultimatum" to Is-
rael.
The Premier said that while
there certainly were differences
with the U.S., it was over-
dramatic to speak of a "crisis."
DEFENSE MINISTER Shimon
Peres, addressing the same
meeting, clearly seemed to ad-
vocate rejection of the Egyptian
terms.
On the other hand, former
Minister of Information and
former chief of military intel-
ligence Gen. Aharon Yariv
urged "territorial flexibility" en
the issue of the passes, while
at the same time declaring that
Israel must stand firm in Its
demands for meaningful po-
litical concessions from Egypt
In the form of "components of
non-belligerency "
The Labor Alignment meet-
bif was called for an exchange
of views and information rather
than to make decisions.
THE PREMIER suggested
that the Labor Party and Mapam
forums meet separately to de-
cide their positions. He did not
say whether these meetings
would take place before or after
a Cabinet session. A complicat-
ing factor was Rabin's sched-
for their jobs in the Jewish sec-
tions of Jerusalem.
An elderly Arab sat outsid*
a coffee shop near toe Damas-
cus gate, his Israeli identity
card in hand.
"As long as we have this
card, which we did not ask for.
we expect the Israeli govern-
ment to protect us," he told a
passer-by.
POLICE seeking to cool hot
tempers tried to explain to Is-
raeli youth that counter-
violence against Arabs would
only play into hands of the ter-
rorists who wanted to demon-
strate that Jews and Arabs can-
not co-exist peacefully in a
united Jerusalem.
But one youth declared. "All
very well, but we want death
for the terrorists." Another
said, "Let the Arabs suffer just
as we Jews suffer from them."
POLICE, meanwhile, have re-
jected complaints from angry
citizens that they did not act
fast enough to prevent the fatal
blast. The police said they re-
ceived word of a possibly boo-
by-trapped refrigerator at 9:58
a.m. Friday, and that a patrol
car was just 50 yards away
when the explosion occurred.
But eye-witnesses said the ic
box stood on the street for a
least a half hour before the ex-
plosion and that passers-by
whose suspicions were aroused
were unable to reach the police
until minutes before the blast
because the telephone lines
were busy.
Police headquarters are a
five-minute walk from Zion
Square, but apparently no one
took the trouble to go there to
i cport their suspicions.
OTHER eye-witnesses agreed
that police were on the scene
within moments after the ex-
plosion and cordoned off the
area. But som<* charged (hat
the Red Magen David m.
lances were late arnl ?*
that when they6 Eg}
scene there was *
medical personnel on ?"
rect the evacuanon11;?^
Jeru-
wounded. All three of
salem's main hospitals were ,
on an emergency basis.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin m
Defense- Minler ShimonV"
joined senior police officials^
the blast site. Rabin, grim-fa J
would say nothing to reported'
Police Minister Shiomo H1U.1
described the blast as one 5
the wjrst tjrrorist attacks m
Jerusil.-m's htst.ry but appeal
ed to the populace to remain
calm and eschew any act10n3
that might disrupt the normal
life ot the city.
Effort to Free Nazi
AMSTERDAM(JTA)Lawyers for Nazi war crim-
inal Joseph Kotaella will summon Dutch Justice Minis-
ter Andnes van Ag: to suspend Kotaella's life sentence
for heakh reasons
Kotaeila, one of the three Nazi war criminals re-
maining in Dutch jails, suffered a cerebral hemorrhage
three years ago and several lesser attacks since then.
Kotaella's lawyers said the Justice Minister should
have exercised his privilege to interrupt sentences for
reasons of ailing health long ago. The summoning will
take nlace before The Haeue court on July 22.
Why you should replace all
your passbooks with one statement
that reports every transaction.
* First Federal
of Miami

SAVINGS ACCOUNT ST*TiST
f ACCOtWT ITBKWLa ; StATXMCHT MlT
?-Ot2I*M-7 JUN 9C |9.'5
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AMP
vtrovti MiDnr f
*KD OTOtS CaUXTS j
152*00
1.100.00
lAUNCE
i/Ooc.:.-
1,15?..
i.on.o-
IVfff.OO
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MATURITY
JU" 90 7*
btC II 9a
JUH 90 74
1.000. 00
2*1.2*
It.*7f
19,000
IS,000
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.8*
,0J
00
OJ
Savings Account makes saving
own personal bookkeeper
All your regular and certificate accounts
under one title can now be consolidated in a
single statement. And whether you have one
account or several, you'll benefit from the added
convenience of our new Statement Savings system.
Each month you make a transaction, you'll
receive a consolidated financial statement by mail.
Showing deposits, withdrawals, and interest paid
on all your accounts... regular or certificate.
When no transactions occur, statements will be
mailed quarterly.
(4>, First Federal
'*' ofMiami
It's like having your own personal bookkeeper.
And there are no monthly service charges.
Every time you make a transaction, all you'll
have to do is show your wallet-sized First Federal
Prestige Card. It's a personal identification card
that only you can use.
So stop by the First Federal of Miami oRce
nearest you. Make the switch to Statement
Savings today. And Teplace all those old,
inconvenient passbooks with one convenient way
to save-a Statement Savings Account
ofMiami
Wnf psopia coma first
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pniww.ww;wwiinwni.fnwni|iiwi, m......./ fmjt-MM N rwk~- m^rTTT.I^S^- ***v "0 Untfm,, HWWLD.I.....
wmt**


Friday, July 11, 1975
*Jowls* ncrxf&n
Page 9-A
t i -

u



. .~ ^^-.
A MESSAGE FROM...
DR. JOSEPH FREEMAN
PRESIDENT OF THE MEDICAL STAFF
CEDARS OF LEBANON
HEALTH CARE CENTER
An editorial in The Miami Herald of June 5.1975,
impugns the integrity of physicians on the Medical Staff of
Cedars of Lebanon Health ('are Center when it suggests that
doctors could "pile patients into the 750 beds and keep them
there until their money runs out: over utilize every medical
facility in the institution .. ."
The Suggestion by The Herald is totally contrary to the
high ethical standards established by members of the Medical
Staff, and we tind it regrettable that this distinguished
newspaper deemed it necessary, in support of its editorial
stance, to suggest that the Medical Staff of Cedars corrupt their
integrity u the price for preserving the hospital. Such an
editorial, we feel, is not worthy of The Miami Herald.
It also should be noteii that the new Cedars hospital will
be utilizing 500 beds, not 750 as mentioned in The Herald.
The members of the active Medical Staff support the
continued operation of Cedars of Lebanon Health Care Center
for one reason only: It is a community health care center
providing patient care of unquestioned excellence. We are
convinced that this community cannot afford to lose Cedars as
an autonomous, not-for-profit institution.
The stunning disclosure, in March 1971. of fiscal distress
and administrative wrong doing at Cedars, had catxstrophic
implieations for the Medical Staff. The blow could have been
disastrous. Although a few doctors did choose to leave the
Medical Staff of the stricken hospital, most remained and were
determined to keep the hospital open. Even when the hospital
started proceedings to reorganize under the Bankruptcy Laws,
the doctors did not weaken in their resolve that Cedars should
not fail.
Those traumatic events now are past. Yesterday is
history. Today there is a new Cedars!
A new management team has demonstrated its
competency by guiding the hospital from the brink of financial
collapse to a position of viability and professional growth. A
plan has been submitted to the Bankruptcy Court which
provides for payment in full to all creditors. Based on careful
analysis, there is every reason to believe that fiscal recovery is
assured.
The fall of Cedars was well chronicled in The Miami
Herald. The amazing story of its rise has been all but ignored.
That story is one of uncompromising commitment to a
concept of health care for this community; of determination to
succeed despite numerous rebuffs: and of a medical staff that
persevered against almost overwhelming odds. It is a story that
deserves to be told.
Instead, The Miami Herald, in a continuing series of
editorials, has maligned Cedars of Lebanon and its medical
staff. The doctors have reacted with justifiable indignation. We
resent the constant barrage of innuendos and half truths, and
frankly, we are puzzled as to why the editors of The Herald
continue this apparent vendetta against Cedars of Lebanon.
Despite all of the negative publicity, the new Cedars of
Lebanon Health Care Center will succeed-not because the
doctors want it. but because the community needs it.
Construction of Cedars' new physical plant will be
completed within six weeks, after which equipment will be
installed. The new facility will be available to the community for
patient occupancy this October.
The Cedars Medical Staff has demonstrated its ability to
practice the highest quality medicine through the years, and
has evidenced its dedication to Cedars through troubled times.
The employees of the hospital also have shown their dedication
in providing the highest quality of patient care.
As President of the Medical Staff. I want to share with
residents of Hade County and South Florida my enthusiasm and
confidence in the future of Cedars of Lebanon as an outstanding
health care center.
Joseph Frivman. M.I).
/'resident. Medical Staff
Cedars cf Lebanon
Health (areCenter
-*?<,

Sponsorship of this message was authorized by a unanimous vote
of the Medical Staff of the Cedars of Lebanon Health Care Center
at the quarterly meeting on June 10,1975.
1974-75 MEDICAL BOARD
Cedars of Lebanon Health Care Center
Joseph Freeman, M.D., President and Chief of Staff
Arthur Kaufman, M.D.. President Fleet
Charles Iteber, M.D., Secretary Treasurer
RK. Broadaway, M.D.. Past President
N. Joel Ehrenkram. M.D., Chief of Medicine
Victor Dem brow, M.I).. Chief of Surgery
Wayne 8 Rogers, M.D., Chief of ObstetriesGynecology
Robert Feltman, M.D. Chief of Radiology
Daniel L Seekinger. M.D. Chief of Pathology
Mario Vukmnowic, M.D. Chief of Radiotherapy
Leonard Steiner. M.D, Chief of Anesthestology
Pad Wasserman, M.D., Member at Large Mediant
Jack Sloane. M.D.. Member at Large-Surgery
This message paid for by the Medical Staff of Cedars ofilebtmo*
Health CareCenter, Miami. Florida. -"


,
...-.--
-

.............
-
-.


Page 10-A
fJmistt thrkfiar
Friday, July 11, 1975
Senate Pulls U. S. Out of ILO
INVESTIGATION ATTEMPTED
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The House of Represen-
tatives has withdrawn the
United States government
from" participation in the In-
ternational Labor Organiza-
tion because the ILO gave
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization status in that
United Nations affiliate as
an observer.
Supporting the position of
the AFL-CIO, the House vot.
ed to delete from appropria-
tions to the State Depart-
ment the funds to pay into
the ILO. The cutoff is ef-
fective as of last June 12.
Rep. John Slack (D., W. Va.)
and John Murtha (D., Pa.) led
the fight to delete the funds.
They were opposed by Reps. El-
ford Cederberg (R.. Mich) and
Millicent Fenwick (R., N.J.).
Slack, who introduced the
deletion legislation, pointed out
that while observer ..status is
non-voting and non-paying, it
permits the PLO representation
in ILO proceedings.
Slack pointed out that when
the ILO admitted the PLO, the
U.S. delegation, made up of
representatives of government,
labor and management walked
out.
The labor group said it would
not return to that session. The
U.S. funds 23 percent of the
ILO budget.
THE HOUSE vote was 21-8,
less than a quorum. But since
no member raised the point of
the absence of a quorum or
entered an objection, the ILO
amendment was adopted.
Caution Urged
Iu Ties to U.S.
TEL AVIV(JTA) Mapam leaders are urging the
government to proceed very cautiously in its relations
with the United States. Their attitude is that security is
dependent on more than topography.
Mapam's political secretary, Naftali Feder, warned
that Israel must be very careful not to be maneuvered
into an open confrontation with the U.S. because an
understanding with the U.S.which means a continuing
arms supply, economic aid and political support is
more important to Israel than topography.
That view is apparently shared by Mapam Cabinet
ministers and by the faction's members in the Knesset
foreign affairs and defense committee.
Feder said various signs indicated it was possible
that Israel could retain a foothold on the eastern ap-
proaches to the strategic Sinai passes and therefore
every effort should be made to continue negotiations
with the Americans. Meir Talmi, Mapam secretary gen-
eral, said here last week that the negotiations should
be concluded in a positive way.
Cederberg argued he has
"never been a real fan" of the
ILO, but Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and others.
in the State Department ex-
plained to him that suspending
U.S. funds to the ILO "at this
time when we are carrying out
these negotiations (in the Mid-
dle East) just adds another
problem that we really do not
need at this time."
Cederberg made much of Is-
rael's remaining in the ILO,
saying "the reason" is that the
Israelis "figure they can do
more good within the organiza-
tion rather than moving out-
side."
COUNTERING Cederberg,
Murtha said "Congress has to
exert itself" because the PLO
should be condemned "especial-
ly after allegedly participating
in the Munich massacre and
proudly displaying this type of
support for that type of action."
He said he hoped the House
action would not "upset the
delicate balance of negotiations
(in the Middle East) but for too
long we have delayed action
and allowed the State Depart-
ment to dictate to us what we
should do. We control the funds.
The only ability we have to
condemn this organization is by
cutting off the funds."
ASKED TO comment on the
House action, the State Depart-
ment said it "regrets" the action
since the ILO "is a highly use-
ful organization." Spokesman
Robert Anderson noted that the
U.S. had voted in the ILO
against observer status for the
PLO.
The ILO. he observed, is for
government, worker and em-
ployer representatives, and the
PLO "has no government or
recognized worker or employer
groups" and "Tias no business
to be taken up in the ILO."
Who Decided
To Bring Back
Stemist Remains?
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Observers here are .attempt-
ing to find out, so far with-
out success, who decided to
hold a state funeral for
Eliahu Hakim and Eliahu
Beit Tzuri, the Sternists
hanged in Egypt 30 years
ago and reburied on Mt.
Herzl with full military
honors. Official sources said
it was not a Cabinet deci-
sion.
Circles close to Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon inti-
mated that he had not been
involved in the decision-
making, although he, along
with Premier Yitzhak Rabin,
were among the thousands
of Israelis who paid their
respects before the two cof-
fins prior to the funeral and
President Ephraim Katzir
sent a wreath.
THE MEN, known in Israel
as "the two EUahus," were sent
to Cairo in 1944 to assassinate
Lord Moyne. the then British
Resident Minister in the Mid-
dle East who opposed Jewish
immigration into Palestine.
They were caught, sentenced
to death and hanged in 1945
and were buried in the Jewish
cemetery in Cairo. Last week,
Israel released 20 convicted ter-
rorists to Egypt in exchange for
their remains.
The British Ambassador, Sir
Bernard Ledwidge, telephoned
the Foreign Ministry here to
deliver his government's ex-
pression of regret on behalf of
Foreign Secretary James Cal-
laghan over the decision to hold
,a state funeral for Moyne's as-
sassins.
THE MESSAGE expressed
"regret that the government of
Israel has seen fit to treat in
this way the bodies of two con-
victed assassins" at a time when
Britain, Israel and other states
were making efforts to combat
international terrorism.
The message is understood to
have referred to the fact that
the Jewish community in Pales-
tine and the world Jewish lead-
ership had condemned the as-
sassination at the time and
strongly dissociated themselves
from it.
Israel is expected to deliver
a formal reply to Britain
through its Embassy in London.
THE BOARD of Deputies of
British Jews and Lord Roths-
child have also deplored Israel's
decision to give the Sternists a
heroes' burial.
Israeli circles indicated last
week that the decision was a
gesture in the interests of na-
tional unity and an indication
that the bitter controversy that
divided Israelis in the latter
years of the Palestine Mandate
and the early years of State-
hood over the violent tactics of
groups like the Stern;,:ts has
now been healed.
Sisterhood Meeting Sunday
The Sisterhood of Temple |
Tifereth Jacob will meet at the
Hialeah home of Jenny Kelly,
8046 W. 12th Lane, Sunday at 10
a.m. to discuss community serv-
ice projects. All Jewish women
of Hialeah and Miami Springs
are invited to attend.
B'NAI ISRAEL"
a Or. Miami Youth Syn. (onhod.)
" HtMty itrrkn in4v Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
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8500 S.W. 8th St.
RUM <:.// by rOUt *n,ttn
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Israel Histadrut Foundation
Proudly Announces
HISTADRUT SOLIDARITY CONFERENCE
IN ISRAEL
November 10-13, 1975
TEL AVIV HILTON
Under the High Patronage of the Honorable GOLD A MEIR
With the participation of:
Former Prime Minister GOLDA MEIR
Prime Minister ITZHAK RABIN
YERUHAM MESHEL. Secretary General of Histadrut
... And other prominent Israeli and American personalities
CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS:
Festive Opening and Closing Dinners
Salute to Israel's Defense Forces
Reception by Secretary General of
Histadrut
Special Breakfast and Luncheon
Sessions
Tour of Army Camp and Histadrut
Housing Protects for Returning Israeli
Veterans
Israeli Folklore, Entertainment
NOVEMBER 13-19, 1975
6-DAY OPTIONAL EXTENSIONS
FOR DELEGATES AND SPOUSES,
at either one of the following:
Tel Aviv Hilton, Jerusalem Hilton,
or Dead Sea Health Spa, Hotel Moria
(fOrmtth l lotel)
Unbelievably low totes ft Delegates and Spouses
Other rt Post CemV.nce Travel Options Also Available
Details end ratal upon reaaesl.
CALL MIAMI IEACH OfFICI 531-8702 SO. MOWARD 927 1654


lay, July 11, 1975
*Jn*isti fkridlickri
rage 11-A
7
est German President Cites Morgenthau
With Order of Merit Award
NEW YORK(JTA) The
[President of the Federal Re-
public of Germany, Walter
cheel, has bestowed upon Dr.
ans-Joachim Morgenthau the
jmmanders Cross of the Ger-
an Order of Merit.
The insignia of this high dis-
Inction was presented to Dr.
lorgenthau by Count Harald
>n Posadowsky-Wehner, the
erman Consul General in New
fork City.
DR. MORGENTHAU w a s
>rn in Coburg, Germany. Feb-
uary 17, 1904. He studied law
li the University of Berlin and
fceived degrees from the Uni-
=rsity of Munich (magna cum
ludej and the University of
mkfurt (summa cum laude).
He holds honorary degrees
rom many institutions, includ-
Clark University, the Uni-
versity of Denver. Ripon Col-
?ge and Western Reserve Uni-
;rsitv.
The maior portion of his ca-
eer has been devoted to po-
litical science. Dr. Morgenthau
) has been an attorney in
e United States and Germany,
one time, he was acting
sresident of the Frankfort Labor
-aw Court.
rector of The -Center for Study
of American Foreign and Mili-
tary Policy at the University of
Chicago.
Dr. Morgenthau has taught at
Berkeley. Columbia. Harvard,
Northwestern and Yale.
HE ALSO has guest-lectured
at several military institutes, in-
cluding the NATO Defense Col-
lege.
He was the Albert A. Michel-
son""' Distinguished Service Pro-
fessor at the University of Chi-
cago and the Leonard Davis
Distinguished Professor at the
City College of New York
In 1958, he worked at the re-
nowned Institute for Advanced
Study at Princeton University.
Besides his professional aca-
demic career, he has contribut-
ed to the shaping of public
opinion on issues of major im-
portance through his writings
and usage of the mass media.
HIS WORKS reflect his phi-
losophy toward foreign policy
and his positive attitude ipward
Europe and the Federal Re-
public of Germany.
His views have been sought
by successive presidential ad-
ministrations, and he has serv-
ed as a consultant to the United
States Departments of State and
Defense.
HANS MORGENTHAU
DR. MORGENTHAU came
to the United States in 1937.
and he became a United States
citizen in 1943. After having
been an instructor of political
science and a professor at
Brooklyn College in New York
City for two years, he went to
the University of Kansas City.
Mo., to teach history, law and
political science.
In 1950. he was appointed di-
M\\ XAfilLA
^SS Sunny Isles
MIAMI BEACH

tl-vcl
DINNER SERVED 7 p.r
tf/i/teftyeis
EGGPLANT SALAD 1.75
GEFILTE FISH 1.75
HUMMUS ALA SABRE 1.75
TEHINA 1.75
FELAFEL IN PITA BREAD 1,75
Ex-Nazi War Criminal
Now Living in Argentina
VIENNA(JTA)A former
officer now living in Argen-
la was responsible for the
cecution of 20 Polish univer-
professors in Poland dur-
Ig World War II, Nazi-hunter
Inion Wiesenthal said here.
Wiesenthal, director of the
swish Documentation Center,
aid former SS officer Walter
Jutschmann, 61, is now living
Buenos Aires as an Argen-
e citizen under the name of
edro Ricardo Olmo.
HE IS a leading executive of
sram Argentina, a subsidiary
the West German Osram
gctrical Company.
Kutschmann was responsible
tt the execution of 20 Polish
Jiverity professors and 18 of
:ir relatives on July 4, 1941.
the former Polish, now So-
Jet, town of Lwow (Lemburg).
This war crime had been at-
ributed to former West Ger-
Minister Theodor Ober-
kender, Wiesenthal said.
Oberlaender, minister for dis-
llaced persons under Chancel-
)r Konrad Adenauer from 1953
1960, was sentenced to life
lprisonment in absentia by
East German court in 1960.
e is now living in Bonn.
OBERLAENDER was a first
ieutenant in the German wehr-
nacht, but the crime was com-
'.itted by the SS." Wiesenthal
id. "The Wehrmacht had no
art in it and Oberlaender is
illy rehabilitated," he added.
Wiesenthal, who tracked down
Idolf Eichmann, said his repre-
untative in Buenos Aires sub-
ntted to the police photographs
fcnd fingerprints proving
Cutschmann's identity.
He said the state prosecutor
West Berlin turned down his
request to demand Kutsch-
lann's extradition, "because
iiere is no chance to get him
fcxtradited."
WIESENTHAL said the trial
inst Oberlaender was organ-
zed by the East Germans at the
height of the cold war to dis-
credit the anti-communist West
?rman government of Ade-
auer.
||'We hope Kutschmann will be
rrested by the Argentine po-
Wiesenthal said.
;Acordjng to conflicting re-
Drts from Buenos Aires,
Kutschmann was believed to
have been arrested by Argen-
tine authorities, but at the same
time was thought to have left
the city after being detained
briefly by police for an identity
check. His whereabouts are not
immediately known.
SOUP OF THE DAY ISRAELI STYLE
SPmtuh
COMPLEMENTARY SELF SERVICE SALAD BAR
1 LAMB SHISH KABOB 7.95
2 BEEF SHISH KABOB 7.95
3 TURKEY SHISH KABOB 7.95
4 GROUND BEEF KABOB 7.95
5 ISRAELI STEAK. BROILED TENDERLOIN 7.95
6 ROCK CORNISH HEN 7.95
7 RED SNAPPER ISRAELI STYLE 7.95
ALL ENTREES SERVED WITH SOUP El SALAD.
CHOICE OF TWO
SLICED EGGPLANT. ISRAELI FRIED POTATOES. MIXED VEGETABLES.
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closed mondays
to 11 p.m. SUPPER SERVED 11 p.m. to 5 a.m.
PINEAPPLE or ORANGE SHERBET 1.50
BAKLAVA 1 50
Layers of thin dough filled with pistacho nuts,
baked and glazed with pure honey.
KATAIFI 1 50
Served with pistacho shortening.
COFFEE HAVA NAGILA .75
COFFEE TEA SA\KA .50
We serve non-dairy Milk
IMPORTED BEER 1.50
MILLER ON TAP 1.00
ASK YOUR WAITRESS FOR YOUR FAVORITE COCKTAIL
SPmjk/U* 11 Pm. to 5a.m.
A TEHINA 1.75
B HUMMUS ALA SABRE 1.75
C FELAFEL IN PITA BREAD 1.75
D CORNED BEEF SANDWICH 3.25
E PASTRAMI SANDWICH 3.25
F STEAK SANDWICH 3.25
G SHISH KABOB. LAMB OR BEEF 3.95
H BAGEL, LOX AND CREAM CHEESE 3.25
PHONE 945-4353 FOR RESERVATIONS
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12-A
Friday, July n ^
m pi
Women's Sexism Brings Them Equality
i*
I
4-A
w* at one rinse or another,
vast dan. I expose
myself to the wrath of. say. the
Germaxne Greers and Kate
MiHetts of the liberation mon-
meot
TTfEY WOVLD argue that
such ipi rniafii are sexist.
male mamrfactored imannii
ostemabry designed to
omento pat them
op on a pedestal and woiahip
their beauty, to protect them
from a cruel and hostile world,
to shield the bfe-gjver from the
heartless hfe-taker
But. the Green and the Mil-
ieus would argue, man's real
purpose in thinking this way is
otherwise.
It is in fact a disguise to en-
slave women, to expsott them as
housekeepers, servants, nurses,
scullery maids and. mainly, as
unpaid pi 'jati lutes
AND, for aD of their alleged
romanticism, there has never
been a dearth of men on this
side of the fence, either, and
well before women's liberation
ever got off the ground offi-
cially in oar time
At a Cambridge commence-
ment in 1714, Laurence Eusden
declared: "A woman's work,
grave sirs, is never done *
But today's women's libbers,
shoring up the Greer-VGIlett
aroDery. could also quote from
Aaron Hill on women: X'se 'em
kindly, they --ebel. But be
rough as nutmeg-graters. And
the logues obey you well
Or from that chronic mal-
content, Jonathan Swift, who
growled: "She her clothes as if they were
thrown on with a pitchfork'
and "She 'woman) watches him
(man; as a cat would a mouse."
ALL OF which is by way of
making comment on what per-
haps requires little comment at
all. since the two items I have
in mind speak for themselves,
or just about. _____
tmerican Israeli)
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MM Immk L l*ck*mky
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M mcmtun avl, mum maoi
GmShf as Prime 1 saer of f JULltl I whom?
the i we m the
India shooid have t> the ftd- end is thai a woman's confer
eace to disniss ys of acfaarv-
dream a woman hi the seat of am ** r m a sexist world.
power over one af the lv*est nx-ai ed or not. couldnt
and poteaoafiy powerful in the world. CTCO ^^mm up with a I ii li re*o!ut;on
P.T it was Mme Gandhi who.
through a deception, brought
the atom bomb to India last
year, when rt is food and medi-
cine and education she ought
to bring there
AND NOW it is Gandhi who
has imprisoned all of her op-
ponents by crashing Jayapra-
kash Narayan. the most out-
spoken of them all. and by out-
lawing the political party sys-
tem and. in fact, India s "Bill
of Rights." which guarantees
freedom of speech, press and
assembly.
Dictator Gandhi has made a
macAery of the philosophy of
"satyagraha." the principle be-
hind the practice of the force
of love rather than the force of
state power, as enunciated by
Mohandas Karaw-hand Gandhi
'no relation to Indira Gandhi),
who first brought India its in-
dependence from colonial rule
How is that for the nurturing
woman?
OR TAKE the United Nations
conference in Mexico City, os-
tensibly the first international
meeting of women for the pur-
pose of examining their role in
a mate-dominated, sexist so-
ciety
The conference concluded
last week with a resolution con-
demning Zionism. What coold
be more irrelevant or, indeed,
more absurd?
Of course, one should not
have expected much more than
politicking at a UN-sponsored
function, because the UN to-
day is a Third World-dominated
mishmash of Arab petrodollars
and African nations foolish
enough to believe in Arab clap-
trap about Arab revolution and
Arab hberation.
BUT EVEN on its own terms.
the anti-Zionist resolution is an
absurdity. Compare the status
of women in Israel to the status
of women in the Third World,
and one is forced to ask in a
burst of bitter laughter: who is
Senate
Eves Boycott
Continued from Page 1-A
ficial ownership of all publicly
traded U.S. corporatipns. there-
by assuring effective monitor-
ing of foreign investment in
business.
"It would also require prior
notification to the Securities
and Exchange Commission when
any foreign investor seeks to
acquire five percent or more
of a U.S. company. The Presi-
dent could prohibit sucn a
transaction if he deemed it toj
be injurious to the national'
terest.
"THE ARAB financial boy-
cott and the record of the hear-
ings we held on this legislation
in March make dear that at
least certain foreign investors \
are willing to exploit their in-
fluence and manipulate our j
economy and citizenry to
achieve political gains," WiK
liams said.
He also pointed oat that the
need for the legislation is -n-
derscored by reports that "the
newly rich Mideast oil coun-
tries have invested far more
money in the United States
than the government officially
acknowledges by ftrnnetiing bil-
lions of dollars through the
anonymity of Swiss
It coold walk out as Leah
Rabin, wife of the Israeli Prime
Minister, rose to address the as-
sembly And ft could condemn
Zionism both purely political
acts
BIT IT could not manage to
carry out the central business
of the conference a conse-
quence not one iota different
from the sexist, male-dominated
manner and business carried
out at the UN in New York it-
self.
In this unique and clownish
failure, the conference appears
to have shown itself to be what
the Green and Milletts say of
women: that they are indeed
slaves of a male-dominated
world, parrots of their male
masters, incapable of thinking
and sneaking for themselves.
In these two unrelated cir-
cumstances. Gandhi and the
women's conference, the myth
dies hard, but die dm*. hat
womcw are he gentler sax, that
they are the nurturers, that in
their hands the world would
know war no more
IN FACT, women are very
much like men.
Very much a man himself.
Lord Byron once declared:
"Sweet is revenge especially
to women."
And the poetess. Letitia
Elizabeth Landon. who lived to
barely 36 years of age she
died in 183*was nevertheless
wise enough to have surmised
about women that, "As beautiful
as woman's blush" is so is it
"As evanescent, too."
These were disappoint^}
to revolt, showing women eta.
Die of human emotion m
necessarily related to the rmr!
turing earth-mother, but $tin
different as in the past In trm,
news, wssnan is suddenly nxm
hateful than. man.
MY OWN feelings that,it..u
sad. but nevertheless It is tnj
that women can be as crod
bigoted and ignorant aa the men
with whom they share thii
earth.
If this be sexism, a.*, son*
might declare it. what does ft
matter? At Mexico City, who
cared about sexism? At Mexico
Citv. actions spoke louder than
words. And in New Deih:. who
could possibly mistake Dictator
Gandhi for a man?
Women aie equal, a!', right,
whatever some romantic*. di$.
appointed or otherwise may
once have said to the contrary.
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fact, many doctors, them-
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Leave Freeport Lucaya at approximately
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- i
i
4

-. i

'


riday, July 11, 1975

Page 13-A
.-*v
j''
Rabin Off on State Visit to W.
-BONN(JTA) Yitzhak Ra-
.jtii Tuesday began a first, his-
Itoric visit to post-war Germany
an Israeli Prime Minister.
i itinerary included tne fbrm-
i*er fcergeti-Belsen CbftCeptraHon
I Camp and the iewSh comrinini-
ky id'West Bermi, before talks
[began in Bonn with government
[leaders on Wednesday.
West Germany believes the
[two countries have a more nat-
lural relationship on which to
build. With the past in mind,
the two countries should look
to the future in their trilateral
relations. These relations have
made enormous progress since
diplomatic ties were opened ten
years ago.
;----iTHEKE IS now a well-marked
growth* iff'Kconttfficr'toleWtifTc,
technological, cultural and
youth exchanges.
Chancellor Schmidt expected
a detailed briefing from Rabin
on latest Israeli Cabinet think-
ing on the Middle East. West
Community Agencies Warn
Against New Anti-Semitism
Germany is deeply concerned,
for more reasons than oil, that
the stagr-ant Mideast situation
can explode into new hostilities.
A government spokesman
stressed the "importance of any
positive move"in'the right 'ftro-
Bonn sees a chance of prog-
ress in Arab flexibility, and feels
Jerusalem should respond and
take a calculated risk.
WHILE NO doubt subscrib-
ing to U.S. views on Israel's
flexibility, West Germany claims
primarily only to speak in uni-
son with its eight EEC partners.
It believes that the EEC Middle
East resolution of November,
1973, which was sharply criti-
cized in Israel for its pro-Arab
content, still provides a good
platform for EEC Middle East
policy.
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Prime Minister Rabin was ex-
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to exercise a moderating in-
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NEW YORK (JTA)
[Jewish community relations
lagencies, warning that a
[continuing rise in unem-
ployment could 'accentuate
(polarization and hostility be-
Itween groups," have called
for a federal budget in
kvhich "human needs" take
priority over concerns about
Ihe size of the budget defi-
cit.
A policy statement, adopted
I at the annual meeting of the
National Jewish Community Re-
lations Advisory Council, criti-
cal of both the Administration
for its vetoes of "vital social
measures" and Congress
for its "piecemeal approach,"
urged an increase of one million
! public service jobs, accelerated
| public works, comprehensive na-
tional health insurance, expan-
sions in work-study program*
and other measures to combat
N.Y. Poor
Hit Back
Against Odds
Continued from Page 1-A
Becker announced that a dem-
onstration would be held in
front of the HRA offices to pro-
test the cutback.
DUMPSON TOLD the JTA
that in view of the city's eco-
nomic crisis the reduction in
funds for the ethnic programs
would have less drastic effects
than had the cuts been made
in other programs in his de-
partment. These include staff
salaries, day care and senior
citizim centers.
At the meeting, Becker also
announced that a suit would be
brought against the New York
City Council Against Poverty
(CAP), a channeling group that
distributes federal and state
funds for poverty areas.
He charged that CAP has
"systematically excluded" the
Jewish poor by the use of cer-
| tain criteria for establishing
i poverty areas that receive fund-
ing. He said that the use of
these criteria, such as the num-
ber of live births and the inci-
dence of juvenile delinquency
are unfair to the Jewish poor,
who are mainly elderly.
BECKER NOTED that CAP,
of whose $42 million budget
only eigh tenth of one per
cent goes to the Jewish poor,
was given only a 10 to 15 per
cent cut while his group re-
ceived a 55 per cent slash.
"Programs for the white
ethnic poor cannot be dismem-
bered while CAP-funded proj-
ects are allowed to absorb only
minimal cuts," Becker said.
Dumpson said, however, that
the mayor had "earmarked"
S912.000 for CAP and that he
had no choice as to whom it
was given. Dumpson also said
he saw no evidence of any dis-
crimination in CAP's funding.
unemployment, housing short-
ages, health-care needs and
other social ills.
THE 450 delegates, represent-
ing the nine national organiza-
tions and 98 local councils that
comprise NJCRAC, also elected
Lewis D. Cole, of Louisville, to |
a third one-year term as chair-
man. The Jewish Community !
Council of El Paso, Tex., was '
elected to membership in the I
coordinating agency.
The NJCRAC policy state-
ment contended that the nation
"can afford a larger budget
deficit to win the war against
economic recession, social dis-
ruption and human misery."
It added: "Beyond our con-
cern for justice and equity is
the fact that competition for
scarceties accentuates polariza-
tion and hostility between
groups, increasing susceptibility
to demagoguery. scapegoating
and anti-Semitism."
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Other $1,000 minimum savings certificates pay yields of 5.92% to 6.98% on 3
month to 30 month maturities.
2. MAXIMUM INSURED SAFETY
Your savings at Washington Federal are now insured to $40,000 by an agen-
cy of the Federal government.
3. INSTANT LIQUIDITY
Your Washington Federal savings account is an investment you can turn into
cash instantly if you need it. Early certificate withdrawal requires a substan-
tial interest penalty. But your principal the amount you invested is
always immediately available to you.
4. NEARBY CONVENIENCE
There are 7 conveniently located Washington Federal offices to serve you
from Miami Beach to Boca Raton. You don't have to send your money far
away, you never lose earnings while your money is tied up in transit, you
never pay any fees or commissions that reduce earnings.
PASSBOOK SAVINGS PAYS 51/4% (5.39% ANNUAL YIELD)-NO WITH-
DRAWAL PENALTY. $50 minimum required to earn interest.
INTEREST COMPOUNDED DAILY FROM DATE OF DEPOSIT TO DATE
OF WITHDRAWAL ON ALL ABOVE ACCOUNTS.
$100,000 savings certificates available. Interest rates and maturities upon request.
: Washington Federal
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
AMCTS EaJCECO S4M.M0.0M
JACK 0 G0R00N. PreiieeaJ ARTHU A H. C0MSH0N. Chairman Ibt liH
7 Convenient Offices to Serve You in
'
LlNOl"
Miami Beach:

1701 Meridian Avenue
234 Washington
1133 Normand



1234 Washington Avenue
33 Normandv 0'ive 11
Phone 673 3333
North Miami Beach: Hollywood:
6 Kane.Concourse 633 N.E. I_6_7_th Street 460 Ho"vq^l^,qjl
Bay Harbor Islands:
ne Concourse 633 N.E. 167th Sxrt
hone 865-4344 Phone 673 3333
Boca Raton:
899 E Palmetto Park Road
Phone 391-8903


Page 14-A
+Jeist fhrHiir
Friday, July 11, 1975
Soviet's 30% Tax on Foreign
to Hnrt Jews
MOSCOW The Soviet gov-
ernment's new 30 per cent tax
on all money Soviet citizens re-
ceive from abroad is expected
to impose a hardship on Jewish
activists, according to the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
But the Conference did not
knew how bad a hardship since
it is not known if the tax will
be in addition to or instead of
the existing 30 per cent bank
hatdling charge Soviet citizens
now pay on money received
from abroad. A Conference
spokesman said it is also not
known if the tax will include
ruMe certificates which can be
sent to Soviet citizens to buy
goods in stores and which pur-
chase three times as much as
money does.
Maiy Jews who have lost jobs
after applying for emigration
visas are dependent on funds
from abroad.
& &
Urge Argentine Act Against
Nazi
BUENOS AIRES Interior
Minister Alberto Rocamora has
been asked by the Association
of Jewish Survivors of Nazi Per-
secution to take action against
the Nazi war criminal, Walter
Kutscbmann. who has been liv-
ing in Argentina since 1947 un-
der the alias of Pedro Ricardo
Olmos.
Kutschmann was questioned
by the federal police for six
hours after Nazi-hunter Simon
Wiesenthal said he was the SS
officer responsible for the exe-
cution of 20 Polish Jewish uni-
versity professors and their
families in Lwow on July 4,
1941.
Wiesenthal, who heads the
Nazi war crimes documentation
center in Vienna, said he was
asking this public prosecutor in
West Germany to seek to extra-
dite Kutschmann. He said the
full dossier on Kutschmann
would be handed over to Ar-
gentine authorities
Cutback for Jewish Poor
NEW YORKA recommenda-
tion to cut S261.250 in programs
for the city's poor Jewish and
other white ethnic groups has
been criticized by Jerome Beck-
er, president of the Metropoli-
tan New York Coordinating
Council on Jewish Poverty.
He said the recommendation
by city Human Resources Ad-
ministrator Commission James
R. Dumspon would cut 5 per
cent out of the current $475,000
now being allocated by the HRA
for the city's 400.000 Jewish
poor.
Becker also said a suit would
be brought against the New
York City Council Against
Poverty (CAP), which dis-
tributes federal and state funds
for poverty areas, "systematic-
ally'' excluding the Jewish poor
by establishing certain criteria
which are unfair to the mainly
elderly Jewish poor.
A *> ir
Last Day at UN
UNITED NATIONS Israeli
Ambassador Yosef Tekoah, who
is leaving the UN to take up his
new duties as president of the
Ben Gurion University in Beer-
sheba, spent his last day here
by meeting with Undersecretary
Robert Gruyer to discuss the
problems of Soviet and Syrian
Jewry.
The new ambassador, Gen.
Haim Herzog, will take up his
post sometime in August In the
interim, the Israeli Ambassador
will be Pinhas Eliav who is the
new deputv head of the Israeli
Mission in New York.
Rabbi Korn Elevated
PHILADELPHIARabbi Bert
Korn. who serves as national
chaplain for the Jewish War
Veterans of USA has become
the first Jewish Chaplain to be-
come a rear admiral.
Rabbi Korn, who is the
spiritual leader at Keneseth Is-
rael in Philadelphia, was ele-
vated to the two-star rank at
11 a.m.. on Tuesday. July 1, at
the Philadelphia Naval Base.
& Scotland Yard Searching
LONDONScotland Yard is
searching for a "Carlos Mar-
tinez" suspected of being an
Arab terrorist operating in Lon-
don and Paris However, police
here believe he may have fled
the country.
Police found a cache of arms
and explosives and a book con-
taining the addresses of promi-
nent British personalities in a
flat in the West London district
in which many Arabs and other
foreign nationals live.
Peres Warns Against
Giving Up Passes
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV(JTA)Defense Minister Shimon Peres de-
clared here that if Israel was to give in to Egypt's demands
that she evacuate the Mitla and Gidi Passes, Israel would
be left without a defense line in the Sinai.
"As long as Egypt does not end the state of war with
Israel we cannot evacuate further than the line which goes
through the eastern side of the Passes," Peres said in an
interview with Maariv.
"THESE PASSES are the anchor to which the Israeli
Array's" defense is attached, he stressed.
Peres said that Israel wants in return for an evacuation
of the western part of the Passes an agreement by Egypt
that she would not go to war for a certain period of time.
The aim of this agreement would be for Egypt to con-
centrate on her internal economic and social affairs rather
than on war with Israel.
Chief of Staff Gen. Mordechai Gut said that the Passes
were important for both Egypt and Israel. But he said that
Egypt's insistence that Israel evacuate the Passes entirely
may indicate that Egypt is planning some offensive action.
GUR NOTED that if Israel holds the eastern section of
the Passes it would not be a military threat to the Suez
Canal.
Peres, in the newspaper interview, said it would be ad-
visable to reach an agreement also with Syria or with the
United States over Syria. But he said because of the Golan
Heights topography there can be no withdrawal on the
Golan as in the Sinai.
The address book contained
the names of several members
of the Sieff family; the Jewish
impressario Sir Bernard Del-
font: the opposinon deputy lead-
er Sir Keith Joseph; Yehudi
Menuhin, violinist; playwright,
John Osborne, and his wife,
among others.
French nolice have also been
examining the findings as part
of their hunt for an escaped
terrorist involved in a Paris
shoot-out in which two counter-
espionage agents and their
prisoner, a Lebanese known as
Michel Moukarbel. possibly the
founder of an Arab terrorist or-
ganization, were killed.
6 3- -Cr
Histadrut Conference in Israel
NEW YORK With Golda
Meir serving as patron, the Is-
rael Histadn.it Foundation is
planning to bring hundreds of
Americans and Canadians to Is-
rael in November to attend a
three-day Histadrut Solidarity
Conference, according to Wil-
liam H. Sylk, conference chair-
man.
Featured on the conference
program, in addition to Mrs.
Meir. who will address the
opening session at the Tel Aviv
Hilton, are Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin. Minister of Defense
Shimon Peres, and Histadrut
Secretarv-General Yeruham Me-
shel.
Dr. Sol Stein, noted econo-
mist and Labor Zionist leader,
who established the Foundation
15 years ago and is its current
president, stressed that in
"times like these, it is impera-
tive that grass-roots American
Jews assist in strengthening the
economy of Israel and its social
structure.
"The Israel Histradrut Foun-
dation does this by enabling
even modest-income individuals
to make substantial gifts
through the Histadrut Annuity
Trusts, which give the donor 9.5
per cent annually for life."
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion, a .component of the Na-
tional Committee for Labor Is-
rael, has raised nearly S40 mil-
lion for long-range health, edu-
cational and social welfare pro-
grams of Histadrut in Israel.
G &
Soviets Harm Israel's Interests
TEL AVIV Gen. Benjamin
Telem, Commander of Israel's
Amphibian Forces, told news-
men at a press conference here
that Israel's sea defenses have
been substantially strengthened
rince the Yom Kippur War and
that they are ready for any con-
tingency including a blockade
of Bab-el-Mandab.
Gen. Telem also declared
that in the struggle against ter-
rorists access from the sea is
even more difficult than in the
past, but that it is a virtual Im-
possibility to seal it off alto-
gether.
In commend ng on the aid giv-
en to the Arabs by the Soviets,
Telem said that a Soviet spy
ship is operating near the ter-
ritorial waters of Israel and
causing much harm to Israel's
security.
According to Telem, the spy
ship is monitoring and inter-
cepting every radio transmis-
sion and every telephone call
both within Israel and between
Israel and other countries.
-Cr tr Dr. Kissinger in Quandary
WASHINGTONDuring one
of the working meetings be-
tween President Ford and Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin, the prob-
lem of the Golan Heights arose.
Congressman Wayne Heiss. who
was participating in this ses-
sion, expressed the view that
"If I were an Israeli, I would
charge any Premier with crimi-
nal neglect who agreed to a
withdrawal from the Golan
Heights."
At this point. President Ford
remarked that no one expects
Israel to withdraw from the
Golan Heights. Both President
Ford and Rabin looked in Dr.
Kissinger's direction waiting for
his reaction, but the Secre-
tary of State found himself in
a bind and remained silent.
According to reliable inform-
ants, the White House was in-
terested in keeping this inci-
dent quiet, but was not success-
ful.
tr & tr
Hebrew University Honored
JERUSALEM Hebrew Uni-
versity President Avraham Har-
man will receive an honorary
degree from Pepperdine Uni-
versit yin California as a ges-
ture of tribute to the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem on the
occasion of its 50th anniver-
sary.
Harman was informed of this
honor by Dr. Donald R. Sime.
vice president of Pepperdine
University, and Prof. Harold
Shire of the same university
who called on him this week to
convey the congratulations of
their university to the Hebrew
University's Jubilee.
The announcement of the
conferment of the degree on
Harman was made by Dr. Wil-
liam Banowsky, president of
Pepperdine University.
^ -Cz
Israeli Diplomat on Tour
NEW YORKThe JWB Lec-
ture Bureau will bring Walter
Eytan, Israeli diplomat and
former Ambassador to France,
to the United States for a series
of lectures during the month of
November.
He will be available to lecture
in local communities on topics
dealing with prospects of peace
in the Middle East, Israel-Arab
relations, and Israel and the
Soviet Union.
Eytan, the first director-gen-
eral of the Ministry for Foreign
Affairs under Moshe Sharett
and later under Golda Meir. was
the head of the Israeli delega-
tion which negotiated the first
armistice agreement with Egypt
at Rhodes.
From 1960 to 1970. he served
as Israel's Ambassador to
France during the DeGaulle and
Pompidou regimes, and he is
currently the chairman of the
Israel Broadcasting Authority.
Old Fiscal Year's End
Leaves \*S orkers Unsettled
By YITZHAK SH ARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Thou-
sands of Israeli wage earners,
salaried employes, businessmen
and professionals were left in
a state of uncertainty as the
old fiscal year ended without
the settlement of any of the
major fiscal matters that affect
their everydav lives.
Normally, the last day of June
terminates existing labor agree-
ments and cost-of-living allow-
ances. But the labor agreements
have not been officially extend-
ed or renewed and the COL
scale has not been recalculated,
nor was there any decision as
to what portion of the allow-
ance for higher living costs will
be tax freeif any.
THE NEW tax retorm meas-
ures were supposed to go
into effect here with the start
of the new fiscal year. But thev
are still in the Knesset Finance
Committee undergoing prepara-
tion for final reading before
the full Knesset.
Treasury officials said that
since July salaries are usually
paid at the end of the month,
the new tax regulations would
be applied provided the Knes-
set approves them by July 12.
Otherwise, they will not take
effect until September. Although
the tax reforms greatly reduce
the rate of taxation, virtually
all exemptions have been
abolished and loopholes closed.
MEANWHILE, Histadrut and
the Treasury have agreed ten-
tatively to continue existing la-
bor contracts on a day-to-day
basis until the tax reforms are
tioned its agreement on post-
ponement of the projected
added value tax from its pres-
ent October deadline to some-
time next year.
Histadrut is also insisting on
maintainting the COL allow-
ances tax free as the on a
means to protect workers
against nsing Drices.
Finance Minister Yehoshua
Rabinowitz, Minister of Com-
merce and Industry' Haim Bar-
lev, and Labor Minister Moshe
Baram came to Pel Aviv for a
meeting with the Histadrut
Executive to persuade the trade
union leaders to accept the gov-
ernment's request that they
extend the old labor contracts,
agree to modification of the
COL allowances and minimize
new wage demands.
RABINOWI17 warned that
without an extension ef the old
contracts the economic situa-
tion would deteriorate further.
He told the Histadrut Execu-
tive that new COL allowances,
coupled with the tax reforms,
would pour billions of Pounds
into the economy that could
touch off a new round of infla-
non leading to economic catas-
trophe.
Barlev argued that to pay full
compensation for price hikes
would cost IL 700 million which
neither Histadrut nor two-
thirds of the nation's businesses
could afford.
HISTADRUT officials were
not particularly worried about
the de'-ay in reaching new
agreements. It is commonplace
for negotiations to continue
long after the expiration dates.
We'll Support UN
Continued from Page 1-A
m ceremonies for Daniel P. Moynihan as the new United
States Permanent Representative to the UN.
MOYNIHAN, wno succeeds Ambassador John Scali
in the post, said he concurred fully with the President's
remarks.
Ford said that, "We have been determined support-
ers of the UN and we will continue to be so in the fu-
ture. There is no other course consistent with our ad-
vocacy of peace with justice for all humanity."


Friday, July 11, 1975
rjenisti fhridfiar
Page 15-A
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-19882
TENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOH DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MONROE manson. Petitioner
M\c;i;i M.\K MANSON. Respondent
TO- Mrs. Maggie Mac Man-cm
Reldenrc I'nknown
YOV ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dlaaolution of Mar-
rlagi has been Hied against you and
you ara reoulred i<> aarva a cony of
vour written defensee. if any. to it
n Ol APYS OER80N. ESoriRE.
Ittorney for Petitioner, whose address
, id] N W" I- Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida 33128. 1305) s?4-4'.:..-.. and fjle the
i rlgtnal with the clerk of the above
. d court on or before August Int.
1975 otherwise a default will be en-
! against VOU tot the relief de-
manded in the complaint or netltlon.
This notice shall he published onre
t uii week for lour consecutive weekt
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
court at .Miami. Florida on thin
i.ih dav of* JOne. 1975.
RICHARD P MIIIXKKR.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv S. PAHRISH
An Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit c.*ir4--ttaO
Gladys (! rson. Esouire
Si. Tie. Sostcllln ft Kmk. PA.
ldl N W 12 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33129 <324-4Rr.a>
Attorney? for Petitioner
/27 7/4-11-18
______________________l--------------------------------------------------------------1--------------
NOTICE UNutfl
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IF HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious nams
Soucl I'.oulevfcrd. North Miami. Florida
intend to register said name with the
( -k of th4- Circuit Court of Hade
C< ut.P. Florida.
IflPANAPE. INC
Itv Marcos Perelman.
Manager* and Attorney-in-Fact
TRIFINANCE IN(
Bv Mordro Pelcher.
Manager and Attornev-ln-Fact
RT NORTON
i fur Ispatiape. Inc. and
" i ..!..-. In.
I its< avnp Huilding
I! Flagler Street
M ami. ForHIa 331.10
n. ::T4-311fi
7 4-U-1S-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Vi-TICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
it underalftajatU desiring to engage
busineaa under (he fictitious name
...HUE CLEANERS AND LAUN-
DRY at 6310 N.E. 2nd An Miami.
Fli rida intends to reester said name
with the nepk of the Circuit Court
< I >ade County. Florida
R. A PII.OTO. INC.
Eue< ii' l, Altorni i for R A Plloto. Inc.
l7.<> W Flajrler street
.. ami. Florida 33135
7 11-1S-35 I'l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice is hereby oivkm that
underslaner. desiring to engage
u- in-- in der (he fictitious name of
K HIRSCHFIRI .!>. DPS.
-' Bird Road, Miami. Florida in-
i.c.s 10 register said name With the
(he, Circuit Court ol Dade
U It Florida.
ROBERT E. HIRSCHFIEI.U.
D.D.8.. I'A
IS\ ROBERT E HIKSf HFlEi.D.
OS. PRESIDENT
rivin E Weinsteln, Beu,
niberr. t rnmbrm & Roih. I'a.
W, Flagler St, Miami. Florida
It i i.i \ s (or
i. n i: Hlrach field. H.us. pa.
t ll-U-25 *'i
n the circuit court of the
Eleventh judicial circuit
in and fob dade county.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 75-21483
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
R< The Marri ti-. I 1
. i:\lJJ. Wife and
THIH II iIKIiai i'. rusband
kill ml. I! QBRAI.D
! .a., i ieraid
I., in. j. it.x MB
iiiond. .UisM.-Miun 39131
1 W.E HWRRRY notified thai a
in Dleasrattori of Marriage
filed avail si vou and > "U
i.\ required 10 serve a copy
voui anawer or other pleading u>
|i>. Petition on the wife's Attorney,
>TER ROGERS, whose addreei la
t N W 17(h Avenue. Miami. Florida
nd nil the orUrinal with the
ierk oi ih above styled Coupi on or
f'.re (his 1 ; iLi day at August. 1K75.
Default? will lie entered against
DATED thi 3rd dav of July. 1S7H
KICHAKD I' BRINKER
Clerk of il.e Cintiit tnurt
By I. BARNARD
T/11-18-2fi 8/1
N THE ClrTCUIT COUrTT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOrVDADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURtSDICTION DIVISION
CASPNtT 75-15312
RE NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
I THE MARSTjQE OF
IEKESA WITH Fi.YNN.
Petllli i.
\-
H \l.. I'^WAIlli FI.YNN.
'' sDondent.
I'M i......W(l> EDW'AKH FI.YNN.
indenl Residence I'nknown ARK
p EREBY NOTIFIED TO Fill-: voor
Ivvritun reaDonaa to this action for
1 lution o| nutrrtaae. with the t'ler*
' II,. above Court snd serve a ooiiV
I', titioner'a Attoraeva, V'l IN
F & SMITH. Suit.- MO 1320
f u' I'm. Hlahwav, Coral Gables.
da .3146. on or before 'he 15th
day of Auirusi IMS. elae the Petition
'or DiaeolutlOn of Marrluxe will be
! .i- onfeeaed
HATEIi Juh 3. 1975.
MICHARD V BRINKER
I NED Id I8ENBERG
Deputy Clerk
KirculS Court Seal)
7/11-18-25 8 1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underaUrned, dealrine tt. eni;m;e
in buatneaa under (he fii-tidous name
of Midtown Medical Laboratories at
333 Arthur Godfrey Road Miami
Beach intends to register said name
With (h. Clerk of the Circuit Court
Of Dade Countv. Florida.
Automated Medical I a I,oratories. Inc.
by: Raphael B. shouaer
Myers. Kanlan. Levlnaon : Keuln
Brlckell Executive Tower. 1428
lliii'kili Avc. Mriiml-
Attorney! for Anniicant
______________________6 ;n-L'7 7 4-n
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersiKiied. desiring to enitaue In
business under the fiitltloiia name of
A B.C. SITTERS SERVICE at 728
N.W 123rd Street. Miami. Pla. 331KS
ml. nils to redater said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Hade
County, Florida.
FRANCES M BHICE Owner
'20-L'7 7 4-11
NOTICE OK ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUI1
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-19334
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RK: THE MARRIAGE OF
RORNO JEAN.
Husband. Petitioner
and
NINA YVONNE WILLIAMS JEAN.
Wife. Respondent.
To: NINA YVONNE
WII.IJAMB JEAN
YOU ARE .HEIiEBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mai-
naici has been filed aitainst vou and
vou are reouir.nl to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to It on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney fox Pe-
titioner, whose address is 1005 Con-
gress Bulldina. Ill N.E 2nd Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida and file the
oMKinai with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Julv 25.
1M70. otherwise a default will be en-
tered aaainst vou for (he relief de-
manded in the coinnlaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four ronsecutive weeks
in THE IEWISH FIX1RIDIAN
WITNESS m> hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
16th dav of June. 1:75.
RICHARD P. BRINK Kit.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv, Florida
By WILIJE BRADSHAW JR.
As DeDUtV Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
DANIEL RETTER. ESUIIRE
1005 Congress Building
111 N.E. Second Avenue
Miami. Florida 33132
Phone 36&-COM
Attorney for Petttlonrr
6/20-27 7/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-20308
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
rOSE DOMINADOR BAZAN.
Petitioner.
vs.
MARIA CR1STI.NA RIBEIRO BAZAN".
Reeoondent,
YOV MARIA CRI8TINA RIBEIRO
BAZAN. Leouoldo Mlkuei 44-7M. Co-
Dac&hana 2C07. Rio de Janeiro. Bra-
zil. ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO
KILE v.'Ui written response to this
action it dissolution of marriage.
wuh the Clerk of the above court and
serve a codj upon Petitioner's Attor-
neys, VON ZAMFT ft SMITH. Suite
K.-.O. 1310 South Dixie Hhrhway. Coral
Gable*. Florida ,13146. on or before the
l-l da> of August. 1!'7'.. else (he Pe-
tition for Dtaeolutlon of Marrhnre will
i.i- taken as confi aaed.
DATED: JUNE :M 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Bs l! .1 TOY
Deoutv ci^rk
(Circuit Court Seall
G 87 7 4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
G.E.W ENTERPRISES. INCORPO-
RATED, d. siting t,. eneace In busi-
neaa under the fictitious name of LEE
AND ASSOCIATES at .44" North-
west | nth Terrace. .Miami. Florida
intends to register said name
with Ho Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade CounlN. Florida
0\ JBRO' D H REU'HI :.': ESQ.
I AW IFFICES OF BIKNS ft
arnovitz
\ttii! ii.-ys for G E W Enterorlaee. Inc.
ltd 1 mi. ..In Road. Suite t"'11
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
G K W ENTERPRISES.
INCORPORATED
Bv GERA1 D E W ENGERT,
(RESIDENT
C/17 7/4-11-IS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JJJDICAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE D'VSION
NO. 74-'M49
in RE- Eslate of
EMANI'EI D DAVIS a ka
aMAM'Bl. DAVIS a k a
NANNIE DAVIS
11, i eased,
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE i'l' FLORIDA.
TO Ml PERSONS INTERESTED IX
THE ESTATE OF SAID DECEDENT
You are hereby notified that a
written instrument purporting to he
th. last will ar.d tc-taimnt of aald
decedent has been admitted to pro-
bate in saiil Court You are herwhv
commanded within sl i-aiTtd.ir
months from the date of the first
iiiililn-aiion of this police to appear
In said CoUrl and sho cause. If any
vou can. wh\ th. action of said Court
In admitting said Will to probate
should not stand mtrevol.. d
FRANK B DOWMNG
a 'in ini Judge
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk
B] MIRIAM B HENDRICKSON
DeDUtV t'lerk
SHAPIRO. PRIED WF.ll.K- SCHEER
Attorneys for Batata
lo? Lincoln Road
Miami Beach Florida 33139
(.-- publication of |Ms notice on
the L'7th dav of June. lf"T"
ICMM Court *. T/MJ#l|
NOT'CE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-19333
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAOE oE
JOSEPH FORTINE. a/k/a
JACK MIX.MS.
Husband. Petitioner '-'
MARlNETTE MIT' IfELL MINNIS".
Wife, Respondent
TO: MARlNETTE MITCHELL
M I N NI s
TOD ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed auainst you and
you are r.iiuired to serve a copy of
vour written defenses if anv. to it on
DANIEL RETTER attorney for Pe-
titioner. whose addreaa is Inn.', Con-
gress Building. Ill N.E. Second Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida 3313:. and file the
original with the olerk of the above
styled court on or before Julv 25.
I9T6: otherwise a default will he en-
tered against you for (he relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIIHAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal nf
said court at Miami Florida on thie
16th dav of June. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv WILLIE BRADSHAW JR.
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. "ESQUIRE
111 N.E. Second Avenue
1005 Congress Ituiioing
Miami. Florida 33132
Phone: 3.".8-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
6/aa-a? 7/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-19431
NOTICE OF SUIT
HAROLD JOHN EBY.
Plaintiff.
vs.
LENNY SCTTON AND
Defendants.
TO: LENNY SL'TTON and
J I.LI A BUTTON
J611 Centinella Avenue
Apartment "B"
Santa Monica. California. 90405
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Suit has been filed in the above
styled Court to foreclose (hat certain
mortgage given by LENNY BUTTON
and JC1.IA SUTTON to HAROLD
JOHN EBY. dated June 17. 1!'74. re-
'-orded June 19. r.-74. In Official Rec-
ord! 1707, at Page 361. of the Public
ke. ords of n.oie Ciiuhiv. Florida.
acainst the following described prop-
el t\. lying and being in Dal. Count v.
Florida, to-wic.
Lot J8. less the North SO feet and
less the West 10 feel. ORANGE
POUNDS SUBDIVISION, accora-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 3. at Page 34. of the
Public Records. Dade County.
Florida, a k/a SOTS and SOT? Or-
ange Street. Miami. Coeonut
Orove. Florida Together with all
Improvements- thereon.
You are reoulred to serve a copy of
your answer or pleading on tho Plain-
tiffs attorney. Robert R white.
10S2 ilul'ont Building. 1 rta East Flag-
l.r Street. Miami. Florida, and file
the original answer In the office of the
Clerk ..f the Circuit Court op or
I..(ore (he '.'.".th dav of Julv. 1!'7.'..
Otherwise. (he allegations of said
Complaint will be taken as confe.-.-ed
li\ vou.
DATED at Miami. Florida, this 17th
dat of June. IOTI
RICHARD P, BRINKER
Clerk
By MARION NEWMAN
DePUtV Clerk
d/80-27 7/4-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-14588
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN re: The Marriage or
MARIE CLAUDETTE 1NL.LCS
BURKE
and
ARTHl'R BURKE.
TO: ARTHUR BURKE,
Residence I rnknow n
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mai-
nare hue been filed against vou and
vou are reuuired lo serve a CODY of
your written defenses, if any. lo it on
JOAN A. BERK. ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is mi n u
l.'ili Av.nue. Miami. Florida 33128, and
I lie the original With the clerk of the.
above sty'ted court on or before Julv
SSrd. 1976: otherwise a default will he
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded' In the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
eaeli week lor four conuecutlve weeks
in THE JEWISH FLOR1DIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said ..mil at .Miami. Florida on this
IWh dav of June, 1975.
Richard p Blinker
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Hade Countv Florida
Bj 8. JAFFE
As |i. ohm Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Joan A. Berk. Kso
101 N.W. l^th Avenue
Miami. Florida' 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
6/20-"7 7'4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-3749
In RE: Estate of
EPSON H HARTFORD.
deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DSCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that I
have filed my Final Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executrix of the estate of
EPSON H. HARTFORD, deceased
and that op the lMh dav of July.
t! 7.".. will apply to the Honorable Cir-
cuit Judges of Daiie Countv. Florida.
for approval of said Final Report and
for distribution and final discharge as
Executrix of the eslate of the above-
named decedent This *>th dav of June.
IMS,
RACHEL HAMEL. Executrix
HENRY NORTON. Attornev
ljit] Biacayne Bulldlnc
19 Weal Flaglcr SIreet
Miami. Florida 33130
Phone 374-3116
8/20-^7 7 4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-19480
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE .MARRIAOE OF
NESTOR MACHIN.
1.(11.....el.
ys
VVETTE GOMEZ .MACHIN.
Reaoondeni
Yo| VVBTTE UOMEZ MACHIN.
...... \. -i [36 Street, Aul 3H, Xi u
Vork. n.w York I::l ARE HEREBY
NO"! IFIED 'K FILL youi written r. -
spon-e to tins action for dlaaolution of
marriage, with the Clerk of the ajeave
uri. and serve a op\ uuoii IVii-
v ...... \ iv / \| |."r .
SMITH. Suite 850. 1320 South Dixie
on or before the SSth riaor of Julv.
1975. else the Petition f of Marriage will be- taken as cn-
lesse.l
DATED; H-l*-7y,
RICHARD P, BRINKER
II' S JAFK-E-
Pi nutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
'. BO-M 7. 4-1!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-19R98
IN RE THE MARRIAOE OF
WILLIAM H KINO, JR..
Petitioner.
VIKO'NIA c KINO,
Reanondeni
YOl VIRGINIA C KINO. 99 Baal
J Street. Anaiiment No BSS. MnOfO"-
town. New .I.i sev ftt057 ARK HERE-
BY Ni.Tl'IKP To HE vour written
resnonsc to this a. lion for dissolution
of marriage, with the nerk of the
above Court, and serve a coov upon
IviKioper's Attorneys, VON ZAMFT
a. SMITH. Suite RS0, I3S0 South Dixie
Highway. Coral Oablea. Florida 33146.
on or in for. the 1st day of August.
r::.. elae the Petition tor Dlaaolution
of Marrlaita will be taken as con-

DATED: June 10. 1975,
R1CHARI P BRINKER
I B. J FOY
i K nut) Clerk
|C.r, u:t Court SeaP
t S7 7/4-11-18
LEGAL NOTICE
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-19479
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARH1A4JE OF
BADEER YA.MI.NI i IIIA.
I", tltioner,
vs.
I.asip FELIPE CHUA
Ri HDondent.
YOL RASIP REI.IPE CIIIM Resi-
de!,. unknown ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED TO PILE Vour written response,
lo (his n.-lion for dissolution of mar-
rlage. with the Clerk of the aimve
Cuii. and serve a copy upon Peti-
tioner's Attorney*. VON ZAMFT &
smith. Suit.- 850. 1320 south Dixie
Highway. Coral Oablea, Florida 33146.
on or before ili, .'.'.th das Ol Julv.
1:7". els,- the Petition for Dlaaolution
of Marriage will be taken as con-
tossed
DATED: 6-18,75,
RK'HAliP P. BRINKER
B\ S JAFFE
Deoutv Clerk
fC'n ult Court Seall
I :!-- 7/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fi. tilious name
of IAJ4A (7ALLI PIZZA a: 1HHH!' S
Dixie Highway Miami. Dade County.
Florida intend t reirinter said name
with IMS Clerk of the Circuit Court of
pade Counu. Florida
Natation Oalli
Aurora tialli.
Marvin A.- SheoDard
Attorneys for Applicant
9150 S \ ..... Suite 103
Miami. Fla. 33176
6/20-17 4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
MOTH E is HEREBY tSIVEN 'hat
'the undei signed, desiring to engugt*-
In business under the fictitious name
of NEPTUNE S GARDENS at uj
Soutliwest 18th Terrace. Miami. Flor-
ida 331C9 intends to recistei said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Pade County. Florida.
UEOROE SA.MPAS. ESOI'IRE
Utorne\ tor Treasure Island
Enternnises. Inc.
4i"0 Linuoui Ro.oi. Miami Reach.
Flornla
H 20-'.'7 7 4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-20674
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
s 8 GROSS REALTY.
I'laiiitilf.
vs
I T II*I P and NORA OOI p.
hi: u it.. and BORIS VASHJEVICH
and ADKI A VASILIHVICH. his wRe,
I iel>ndanis.
Ti I I. T, HOLD and
N( ii:.\ .....j i. ins wife
Lout. No :;
i .evwiHiiii H.....ma MMHI
VOL' ARE NOTIFIED thai an ac.
lion lo foreclose and .Hiiiialde lien on
the following property in Pade Onun-
i\. Florida:.
l.oi i. Bllick 16. "th ADDITION
'in GREENHAVBN SUBDIVI-
SION according to the Plat there-
of, recorded la Flat Book It, page
79. Of the !> "le Ite.ol.ls o( pade
County. Florida.
ha- I..... lino ... .list \ou and vou are
reoulred lo ierv a copy of vour writ-
ten defenses, if anv. to i( on Mah-olm
h Friedman. Plaintiff* Attornev.
whose address is. S0 l'oudas Road.
Coral Qablei Florida*XB341 on or be-
fore August 8. 1975. and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attornev. or immediately (herenftei :
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the reh.t demanded
in the eemnlafnl or netltlon.
WITNESS m> hand and ihe seal of
this Court on June _ii. 1975
kCHARD P 1IRIN-KER.
As i il l l< Ol the Court
l.v i r ,'i .PKI AND
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-19424
ACTION FR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
N RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALFREDO PAHUi ARCIA,
Petitioner,
and
eriNCEPOTON AHCIA. Respondent.
TO: Mrs Oonaention Arcla
1817-136 Street
Richmond Hill. NY 1141'
VOl' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reuuired to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
GLADYS GEKSON. ESOI'IRE. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose address
is 101 N VV II Avenue Miami. Florida
:t31iS. (3051 XM-4SI5. and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above
stvled court on r.r before Juh 35, 1975:
otherwise a default will be entered
against vou for th. relief demanded
in the lomolaint or Petition
This noli. shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE IEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
17th dav of June. 1975
RICHARD P RR1NKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
BV Ii J FOY
As peoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Gladys Gerson. Estiuire
stone. Soatchln A.- Koaa. P A.
Ml N W 12 Avenue
Miami. FC Sttit 1334-45551
Attorney for Petitioner
6/SO-27 7.4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
NO. 73-7588
IN RE: Estate of
R08E SAI.TSI'.IRG
Deceased
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given thai we
have filed our Pifal Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Die-
charge as Executor of the eatate of
Roue Saltnbnrg. deceaaed: and (hat
on the i.lrd dav of Julv. 1975. will
appIV to th. Honorable County Judges
of Pade Countv. Florida for approval
of rind Fiflal Report and for Pistribu-
tion and final discharge as Executor
of tin estate of the above-named
decedent This 1Mb da> of June 1975.
JEFFEMSON NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH
Bv STVAHrr J MILLER
TRACER ANP SCHWARTZ
Attorney
:i'il Arthur ObdfreV Road
Miami Beach. Florid,.
"27 7,4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No 75-18193
AMENDED
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In IN Th. Marriafe Of
GHKTIIA DORrSEOND wife
and JEAN i:i. IE I" iRISMOND.
husband.
TO JEAN BLIB l" 'RISMOND
Ru< du oa> number -".'S
Foil t|i Grape. 972
.Maltinioue
VOI' ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition (or Diaaelution of Mariiaare
has 1*. en filed against vou and you
.Wf herebs aeoulreJ to serve a copy
"' \'.ui anawer or other Pleading to
th. Petition on iln- Wife's Attorney.
LESTER ROGERS whose address Is
1454 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida
JR125, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above stvled Court on or
before the 25th da> ol Juh. 197'.. or a
Default will h. entered against vou
DATED tint 1Mb day of June. IK75.
RICHARD P HRLNKER
Clerk of the.Circuit Court
Hv S JAFFE
6.'20-i7 7 4-11
\- Petiutx Clerk
T 4-11-18-38
NOTICE UNueR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERT5BV GI\EN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LA CAS \ DEL HUM.I ANTE Bl MM
Coiims Avenue, Miami. Fla. Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of ihe Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
HENRY VENTURA owner
Kwiui.\ Kroop a- Schelnberg, PA.
Suite 513. ISO i ln oln Road. M B
Attorneys for Applicant
I (0.(7 7.4-11
IN THE-CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
NO. 73-1173
IN RE: Estate ot
IRVING KILI.IG.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is herb\ given that we
have filed our Final Report and Peti-
tion for Pisirihutloii ami Final Dis-
charge as Executor of the estate of
IRVING pli.i.iG. deceased: and that
on ihe :Mt)i d.i\ of Julv. 1975. will
BPPh to (hi Hi lOJUble Count* Judges
of Pad. Countv Florida, for approval
of said Final Report and for Diatrlbu-
iii.n and final discharge as Eveeutor
of ih' estate of (he above-named
decedent This 33rd das of June. 1975.
JEFFERSt N N \tional HANK
i IP MIAMI BEACH
Itv STUART .1 MILLER
TR m:i:i: AND SCHWARTZ
Alton v
301 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami lii Ii. Florida
t a 7/4-11-18


Page 16-A
-An i*t fkrMian
Friday, July Ui J
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Two. four or sometimes even more plies (of
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SOUTH DAOE9001 S Dixie Hwy.7-7575
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BFGoudrich



leaders Act on JDL, Emigration, Human Needs
Miami Delegates Among Those
Attending NJCRAC Conference
Key members of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
Community Relations Commit-
tee were among 450 delegates
from around the country at-
tending the annual Plenary
Meeting of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council recently.
Community Relations Com-
mittee members Edward Cohen
and Ainslee Ferdie and the
Federation's Director of Com-
munity Relations, Edward Ros-
enthal, represented Miami's
Jewish community during the
sessions at which major actions
and policies were determined.
In addition, Bernard S. Mand-
ler, immediate past chairman
of the CRC, was reelected as
a member of NJCRAC's Execu-
tive Committee at the Confer-
ence.
Among the proposals set by
NJCRAC's memoership was the
rejection of a request for mem-
bership from the Jewish De-
fense League. Member agencies
of the national organization
cited in a formal statement
JDL's "history of encouraging
Continued on Page 12-B
^Jewish Floridian
Miami. Florida Friday, July 11, 1975
Section B
Principals in the annual election meeting of the Syna-
gogue Council of America, umbrella agency of Reform,
Conservative and Orthodox Judaism in the United States,
include (from left) Rabbi Henry Siegman, executive vice
president; Rabbi lrwin Blank, outgoing national president,
and Dr. Irving Lehrman of Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach, honorary president. Dr. Lehrman presented Rabbi
Blank with a special award in appreciation of his two
years' service as head of the Synagogue Council. Dr.
Joseph H. Lookstein of New York and Miami Beach,
chancellor of Bar-Ilan University of Israel, succeeded
Rabbi Blank as national president of the Synagogue
Council.
Rabbi Eisenstat Appointed To
Board Of Alumni Overseers
Rabbi Michael B. Ehenstat
of Co; el Gables has been ap-
pointed a member of the
RABBI M. B. EISENSTAT
Rabbinic Board of Alumni
Overseers of the Hebrew Union
CollcKt-.lewish Institute of Re-
ligion.
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, presi-
dent of the Colleg .--Institute,
announced Rabbi Eisenstat's
appointment.
"Rabbi Eisenstat's experience
in the Jewish and general com-
munities win prove to be an
excellent resource in assisting
our school in its plann'ng to
meet the religious and intel-
lectual challenges of the fu-
ture, especially this year as we
observe our Centennial mile-
stone.' said Dr. Gottschalk.
Rabbi Eisenstat is presently
spiritual leader at Temple Ju-
dea in Coral Gables. In the
past, he has served at Temple
B'nai Sholom in Huntsville,
Ala.; as an Air Force Chaplain
and as an Auxiliary Chaplain
at the Redstone Arsenal.
Rabbi Eisenstat also served
as president of the Greater
hums iile Ministers' Associa-
tion in 1972.
Rabbi Eisenstat is the secre-
tary cf the Greater Miami Rab-
binical Assocation, a member
of the Ameiican Jewish Con-
gress, and the Cleigy Dialogue
of the National Conference of
Christian and Jews. He is also
a board member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Com-
mittee on Individual Services,
and the Dade County Youth Ad-
\ l.sory Board.
Rabbi Eisenstat was ordained
by the College-Institute in 1967.
Among the many honors and
awards he has received are the
rolhman Prize in Human Rela-
tions; the Marks Travel Grant
for Study in Israel, and a spe- "allot JNanied IO
cial Air Force Commendation T _,, ,
Meda, JNew Bnai B nth
The Hebrew Union College- Leadership Post
Jewish Institute of Religion.
which will observe its Centen-
nial Anniversary beginning this
fall, maintains campuses in
Cincinnati. New York, Los
Angeles and Jerusalem, and
trains Reform rabbis, educators,
cantors, communal service pro-
fessionals and prepares graduate
and post-graduate students for
academic careers.
Arab-Sponsored Gotham Bank
Must Pledge No Discrimination
NEW YORKAn Arab-spon-
sored bank that plans to open
soon in New York will be re-
quired to give a pledge of non-
discrimination before it re-
ceives a charter from the State
Banking Department, the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress was in-
formed this week by Ernest
Kohn, Acting Superintendent of
the Department.
In a letter to the Congress
and in a meeting with repre-
sentatives of the organization,
Acting Superintendent Kohn
voiced "the firm conviction of
this Department that discrimi-
natory practices or policies not
only would be inconsistent with
the anti-discrimination laws cur-
rently in effect but. are in-
compatible with the public serv-
ice function of banking institu-
tions in this state."
MR. KOHN wrote to the
American Jewish Congress in
response to a letter from Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, its national
president, following reports that
J. Bernard Shumate, United Way's 1975 general campaign
chairman, has announced the appointment of Edmund D.
Ansin, (left) president and general manager of Sunbeam
Television Corp., Joyce Beber of Beber, Silverstein and
Kilpatrick Advertising, Inc., and Al Wolfe, director of
communications for Norwegian Caribbean Lines, as co-
chairmen of United Way's Public Information Committee.
The committee is responsible for creation of campaign
'promotional.materials, including literature, films and
commercials.
E. Albert Pallot of Miami,
who hns held major leadership
roles in B'nai B'rith for almost
two decades, has been named
a member of the Jewish serv-
ice organization's International
Council.
The council is a coordinating
body for education, youth and
social service programs con-
ducted by B'nai B'rith through
its units in 39 countries outside
the United States. It is also the
research arm of the 500.000-
member organization on inter-
national political and social is-
sues affecting Jewish commu-
nities throughout the world.
Pallot, a banker and attorney
who was appointed by David M.
Blumberg, president of B'nai
B'rith for a two-year term on
the council, recently completed
two three-year terms as nation-
al chairman of B'nai B'rith's
commission on volunteer serv-
ices, the planning and policy
body for the organization's
widespread civic, community
and veterans programming in
this country.
He also served as an interna-
tional vice president and is a
past president of B'nai B'rith
District 5, covering the South-
eastern area from Maryland to
Florida.
Pallot, who serves as chair-
man of the Greater Miami
Mayor's Committee on Beauti-
fication and Ecology, is presi-
dent of Biscayoe Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association.
four American banks were ap-
plying to the State Banking
Commission for permission to
establish a new financial institu-
tion to be known as the 'United
Bank, Arab and French, New
York."
The four American banks are
the Bankers Trust Company of
New York, First National Bank
of Chicago, Security Pacific
Bank of California and Texas
Commerce Bancshares of Hous-
ton, Texas.
More than 20 Arab banks and
several from Europe would re-
portedly be associated with the
Ameiican banks in the founing
of UBAF-N.Y., and an estimated
40 per cent of the bank's initial
525-million capital will come
from Arab sources, news re:
ports said.
HOWEVER, no formal appli-
cation from the United Bank
has been received. Kohn told
Phil Baum, associate executive
director of AJCongress. at a
meeting in John's office.
Baum was accompanied by
Gottlieb Hammer, the former
executive vice president of the
United Jewish Appeal wiio is
serving as a volunteer consult-
ant to the Congress in this mat-
ter.
In his letter to Acting Super-
intendent Kohn, Rabbi Hertz-
berg noted that "many Arab
commercial interests, especial-
ly within the financial com-
munity, have publicly an-
nounced their intention to carry
out the boycott objectives of
the Arab League."
Accordingly, he continued.
"we believe it appropriate that
your Department, as a precon-
dition to the issuance of a char-
ter, receive assurances that the
business affairs of this new-
banking institution will be con-
ducted fully in conformity with
the letter and spirit of our laws
and with the national policy of
this country as expressed both
in the statements of our Gov-
ernment and the enactments of
our Legislature."
IN REPLY, Acting Superin-
tendent Kohn wrote that "the
Banking Department has long
required that any banking or-
ganization making application
to this Department, whether
for a branch, for a new bank
or whatever, make a specific
written pledge that in its opera-
tion it will not discriminate in
any manner on the basis of
race, creed, color or national
origin.
"We require that this assur-
ance be given by all bank ap-
plicants; we make no excep-
tions of any kind."
$5722 Granted To
28 Appiieants
When Dr. Louis Schwartz-
man retired as executive direc-
tor of the Bureau of Jewish
Education several years ago,
the board of directors estab-
lished a scholarship fund in his
honor.
The trust agreement, executed
Oct. 31. 1972. provides scholar-
ships for cha.itable, literary or
educational purposes.
Jacob Katzman. chairman of
the trust, reports that during
the years 1973. 74 and '75. the
Loin's Schwart/.man Scholarship
Fund granted $5,722.50 in schol-
arships to 28 applicants.
The trustees favor qualified
individuals who through incen-
tive slants for study, would be
able to make a more effective
contribution to Jewish educa-
tion in our community.
Discussing the new Encyclopaedia Judaica in front of a
display at the Miami Beach dinner celebrating the Golden
Jubilee of Israel's oldest university promoting the 16-
volume collection of Jewish scholarship are (left to right)
Gov. Reubin O'D Askew, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Greenberg
and Dr. Max M. Kampclman.


Page 2-B
*-JeHitfkridi^r
Friday, July n, 19?5
NCJW and Pioneer Women Hit
Mexico City Confab Resolution
NEW YORKIt was the best
time; it was the worst time. It with nonsense resolutions link-
was a success; it was -failure. mf* Bionism and apai thei J.'i.
the Conference 'so perverted NCJW Tribune delegate from
Middlesex County. 1 see two
thing9 aboiit Jewish women in
Everyone attending the Inter-
national Women's Year Con-
ference in Mexico City had a
separate point of view and in-
terpretation of what occurred:
what was the perspective of
three American Jewish women
attending?
Ann Kobison. International
Affairs leader of the National
Council of Jewish Women, at-
tended the official U.S. gather-
ing called the Conference, as a
delegate from the International
Council of Jewish Women.
-I FOUND little comfort,"
she said, "either as an Ameri-
can or as a Jew. What we anti-
cipated actually happened, that
some repreentatives of UN
members turned the conference
into a political arena. A political
arena which expressed strong
ami-U.S. and anti-Israel senti-
ments. It disturbed me deeply
to see the original purposes of
The Tribune, the non-govern-
mental gathering across town
from the conference, was gen-
erally characterized by squab-
bling and chaos.
DENESE MANN, of Hartford,
Conn.. NCJW leader and Trib-
une delegate, said that "there
was enormous polarization be-
tween the American feminists
and the women who demanded
a 'new economic order.'
"Strictly speaking, the issues
of women's rights were lost in
the shuffle. And regardless of
the pious statements from the
developing nations that full
equality tor women will come
with economic development,
1 in still concerned with the
problems of Jewish women in
those countries, who suffer on
two counts."
What ultimately is the mes-
sage for Jewish women?
Said Rose Fishkin, another
Remove Bias Restrictions
Before U.S. Loans are Granted
WASHINGTON If the gov-
ernment of Syria is serious in
its recent efforts to obtain in-
creased American trade, in-
vestment and tourism, it should
remove the discriminatory re-
strictions currently enforced
on the 4.500 Jews still living in
Syria, a well known expert on
the Middle East told the House
Committee on International Re-
lations.
Dr. George E. Gruen, direc-
tor of Middle East Affairs for
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, in testimony before the
Special Subcommittee on Inves-
tigations, stated that despite
token actions to improve the
public image of Syria in 'the
United States, the Syrian gov-
ernment continues to impose
heavy restrictions on its Jew-
ish community.
SYRIAN JEWS, he said, are
restricted in their right to trav-
el, to attend universities, and
to sell or inherit property. The
word "Musawi" of the faith of
Moses) is stamped prominently
on their \ itai documents, in-
cluding bank accounts, drivers'
licenses, and even certificates
of membership in the medical
guild, he added.
Dr. Gruen made his state-
ments in connection with an
investigation concerning an Ad-
ministration plan to grant Syria
long term, low interest loans
totaling SS8 million.
"I believe that the United
States should continue to seek
to improve relations with Syria,
but this must be a two-way
street," Dr. Gruen declared.
"IF THE Syrians wish in-
creased American trade, invest-
ment and tourism, as they say
they do, then it is manifestly in
their own self interest to do
something to convince the
American public that Syria is
a country governed by the rule
of law and not a police state
subject to the arbitrary whim
of the Muhabarat (intelligence
or secret police)."
Dr. Gruen emphasized that
Americans are concerned with
FREE CLASSMusic analyst
Lawrence Budmen will present
a free class in music apprecia-
tion every Tuesday evening
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Ida
Fisher Junior High School.
14th and Drexel Avenue, Miami
Beach.
the rights or Syrian Jews "as
a basic humanitarian issue, and
not as part of the Arab-Israel
displute.
IN DECLARING that "Syria
is the only Arab country' that
totally refuses to allow its Jews
to emigrate," he pointed out
that the government's policy
was "inconsistent with Arab
practice, and indeed contradicts
the official Arab propaganda
line, which allegedly draws a
distinction between Israel,
which it opposes for political
reasons, and Jews, which it
respects as members of a
monotheistic faith."
Observe
Family Purity
-Schneerson
NEW YORKThe Lubavitch-
er Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M.
Schneerson, has called upon
Jewish women all over the
world to carefully observe the
laws of "Taharat Hamishpocho"
the laws which govern Jewish
marital life, and the laws per-
taining to Kashrut.
In an unscheduled public ad-
dress at Lubavitch world head-
quarters in New York, which
was heard live in Lubavitch
Centers around the world, the
rabbi said that the spiritual and
physical well-being of Jewish
children, and the Jewish people
as a whole, is deDendent upon
the meticulous observance of
Taharat Hamishpocho and Kash-
rut.
THE RABBI further stated
that he was addressing himself
to the women "because in Jew*
Ish family life it is primarily
th- roW* of the woman to en.
sure the strict observance of
these two important mitzvot."
The laws of "Taharat Hamish-
pocho," or family purity, guidt
the relationship between hus-
band and wife, which includes
the necessary periods of ab
stinence at certain times from
sexual relationship and even
physical contact between hus-
band and wife, and use of the
Mikveh at the proper time.
The laws of Kashrut refine
the ty-Des of food permissible
for a Jew to eat, as well as the
separation of meat and dairy
foods. These laws should be ad-
hered to both at home and when
away from home.
this respect. The first is that
where human rights are con-
cerned. Jewish women will
inevitably be leaders. It's part
of the way we have acted tradi-
tionally and will continue to
act.
"But the other thing, which
really struck me at this gather-
ing, is that Jewish women must
also look to their own special
needs, their own special prob-
lems, and their solidarity with
Jewish women all over the
world."
THE THREE women agreed
that for long-range results, only
nitty-gritty work would be suc-
cessful. They pointed to NCJW's
advocacy role in support of the
ERA and Title IX, which prohib-
its sex discrimination in educa-
tion, and commented that the
U.S. Women's Agenda recently
passed by the Women's Action
Alliance would probably have
the most impact in the next few
years.
The 100,000 members of the
NCJW are committed to a broad
program of education, commu-
nity service and citizen action.
Among its current priorities are
Women's Issues, the NCJW Re-
search Institute for Innovation
in Education in Jerusalem.
Also reacting to the confer-
ence's condemnation of Zion-
ism. Charlotte Stein, national
president of Pioneer Women,
called the vote a further at-
tempt by developing countries
to isolate Israel from the world
community.
"I AM surprised not with-
standing past resolutions adopt-
ed by United Nations' commit-
tees," she said.
"Of all the nations repre-
sented, Israel has been a cham-
pion of women's right to work,
day-care centers for their chil-
dren and a leader in legislation
closing the economic and so-
ciological gap between the
sexes which is so prevalent in
many countries today.
"Our sister organization in
Israel, Moetzet Hapoalot (Work-
ing Women's Council), serves
ail Israeli womenArab and
Druze as well as Jewishand
I am sorely disappointed that
the women of developing coun-
tries could not transcend the
narrowness of political expedi-
ency."
THE POLITICAL document
entitled the "Declaration of
Mexico" was adopted over the
opposition of the United States
and Israel delegations. The
wide-ranging resolution called
for a change in global econom-
ics, urging the elimination of
colonialism, Zionism and apart-
heid. Pushed through commit-;
tee by Third World and Soviet- \
bloc countries, observers felt
that the lack of votes against!
the resolution by many indus-1
tnalized countries was due to
their fear of Arab oil-producers
who were among the resolu-
tion's backers.
"I applaud the United States
stand," Mrs. Stein added.
"OUR DELEGATION has
stood up against this outrageous
act and unlike many represen-
tatives has taken a moral and
ethical position."
Pioneer Women works close-
ly with its sister organization in
Israel, Moetzet Hapoalot, and
the 12 other Pioneer Women
organizations around the world,
in maintaining a network cf
social service and educational
programs for women, youth
and children of Israel.
On the /imerican scene it
support social action and edu-
cational and youth programs
for the enrichment of Jewish
life.
In recognition of dedicated public service, Mayor Harold
Rosen of the City of Miami Beach presents the city's
medallion to Gussie Mentz. Recipients are selected for
distinguished achievement in areas that involve the public
good. Her concern and efforts on behalf of people and
their welfare earned Mrs. Mentz her award.
f SHOE
I
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I
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Friday, July 11, 1975
* Je isti rkrkJiain
Page 3-B
Douglas Gardens Launches
'Senior Citizen Update'
NOV. 10-13 IN TEL AVIV
An innovative new public
service program will be launch-
ed this week by the Miami Jew-
- *+.'**&&
FRED H1RT
ish Home and Hospital for the
Aged in conjunction with Mi-
ami's four commercial televi-
sion stations.
Called "Senior Citizen Up-
date," the uniaue project con-
sists of an ongoing series of 30-
second commercials which will
provide South Florida's large
senior adult community with
valuable information pertaining
Gary Etsenberg has been
named director of Group
Activities at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami. He will
take charge of the religious
retreat program conducted
at the Sidney and Zenia
Meyer Religious Retreat,
and will also direct the
religious, cultural, social
and educational program at
Temple Israel for senior
high school and college stu-
dents.
Hogs***
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
Prcei*r m4 tap***"*
f thf fir.,t U.S. &**. Inspect**
hOSMHt MiATS mi MWTRT
1717 N.W. 7Hi Ave,
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
to a variety of issues that are
relevant to living in today's
complex and fast moving so-
ciety.
The initial package of com-
mercials will cove-4he reas
of available federal monetary
benefits, new support and ac-
tivity programs in the com-
munity and guidelines for those
shopping for a nursing home.
Douglas Gardens Executive
Director Fred D. Hirt, who ap-
pears in each of the spots, had
high praise for those respon-
sible for the creation of this
unique geriatric information
service.
"This project would not have
been possible without the sen-
sitivity and special cooperation
of the public service directors
of TV stations WTVJ and WCKT
Cele Cauvigne at Ch. 4 and
Wilson Griffeth and Susan Las-
ky at Ch. 7. The senior citizens
of Dade County owe them a debt
of gratitude," Mr. Hirt said.
Histadrufs Extraordinary
Solidarity Conference Set
An extraordinary, Histadrut
Solidarity Conference in Israel,
under the High Patronage of
the Hon. Golda Meir, will be
held by the Israel Histadrut
Foundation Nov. 10-13 at the
Tel Aviv Hilton, according to
an announcement made by Dr.
Sol Stein, national president of
the Histadrut Foundation.
Moe Levin, national vice
president and chairman of the
Florida Advisory Board of the
Foundation, is the chairman of
the Florida Committee of the
Histadrut Solidarity Conference
in Israel.
More than 1.000 Americans
and Canadians are expected to
attend this conclave. To qualify
as delegates, each person must
subscribe a minimum of $2,500
to the 9.5 per cent Histadrut
Fuel Price Control Proviso
Should be Implemented
The Administration's energy
program, including recent in-
crease in the excise taxes on im-
ported petroleum and proposed
decontrol of domestic crude oil
prices, could cost 40,000 air-
line jobs, ground 400 airplanes
and curtail service to many
communities, an official of the
Air Transport Association of
America said this week.
Layoffs of 40,000 airline em-
ployees would mean that one
out of every seven men and
women in the industry would
lose their jobs.
"GROUNDING 400 airliners
would take out of service one
out of every five airline air-
craft," he saio.
"The Administration's fuel
program, unless its impact is
alleviated, is likely to add an-
other $1.08 billion to the air-
lines' annual fuel bill. That fuel
bill has already soared too
drastically. The airlines fuel
costs in 1974 were $1 billion
over what they were in 1973,
despite airline conservation
measures that enabled the car-
riers to consume a billion gal-
lons less fuel in 1974 than in
the year before.
"Even before announcement
of the Administration's plans
for decontrol of oil prices, air-
line fuel costs continued to rise
in 1975by about $2 million a
day over what they were in
1974."
The official, who declined to
be quoted by name, noted that
"jet fuel, which cost 12 cents
a gallon in mid-1973, has more
than doubled in domestic op-
erations and has tripled in in-
ternational operations.
'IT WOULD rise to 44 cents
a gallon under the Administra-
tion's proposed program, and
this does not take into account
further increases in imported
crude oil costs now threatened
by the Organization of Petro-
leum Exporting Countries.
"Congress is now considering
new legislation on energy
policy. The House Interstate
and Foreign Commerce Com-
mittee has recommended pas-
sage of H.R. 7014, with an
amendment by Rep. Eckhardt
implementing price control pro-
visions of existing law. The
Committee's bill takes a gradual
approach to changing price
levels on domestic crude, there-
by establishing more reason-
able prices for domestic crude
than under the Administration's
program. The bill proposed by
the Committee should be en-
acted."
MOE LEVIN
Annuity Trust, which will help
provide homes for Israeli Vet-
erans and young couples
through the IL 100,000,000 Mort-
gage Fund which the Histadrut
is seeking to raise.
"Thus, the Histadrut Solidar-
ity Conference will be a his-
toric event," stated Dr. Stein
in making his announcement,
"bringing not only prayers and
good wishes, but a tangible ex-
pression of our solidarity in
the form of a substantial con-
tribution that will alleviate the
housing problems of the young
Israelis."
Besides Mrs. Meir, the con-
ference will be addressed by
his Excellency Itzhak Rabin,
Prime Minister of Israel; Yeru-
ham Meshel, Secretary General
of Histadrut. who will host the
conference; the Hon. Shimon
Peres, Defense Minister; as
well as other prominent Israeli
and American personalities.
Conference highlights will in-
clude:
Festive Opening and Clos-
ing Dinners.
Salute to Israel's Defense
Forces.
Reception by the Secre-
tary General of Histadrut.
Special Breakfast and
Luncheon Sessions.
Tour of Army Camp and
Housing Projects for Returning
Israeli Veterans.
Israeli Folklore and Enter-
tainment.
Mr. Levin has pointed out
that due to the incredibly low
rates offered to delegates and
spouses, and because of the ex-
cellent program arranged, as
well as the many pre and post
conference travel options avail-
able, a great deal of interest
has been aroused in the com-
munity.
"Since we have been allotted
a quota of only 250 delegates
for the Greater Miami area,
reservations will be on a first
come, first serve basis," Mr.
Levin stated.
Details and rates are avail-
able upon request by calling the
Histadrut Foundation Offices,
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 389.
fining Ita|iai\sty|e is as
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Everything's right there
Pizza flour mix, the Che*:- special
savory sauce, reai Italian cheese
and easy directions. J ist 20 minutes
in your oven and vo- II have a
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A sizzling, tangy pizza to set
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Page 4 B
Jmisti FhrMfibrr



Bet Breira Opens
On Note of Faith
Friday, July \\t ,975
ByNORMA OROVJji
The ebiifttapttrafy -antiYradi-
- tional were combined Friday
night in the opening service of
Congregation Bet Breira. The
philosophy of Reform Judaism
is adapted, adopted and altered
by this new. basically hereto-
fore unaffiliated group.
The congregation's initial in-
tention was to modify or reform
Reform .Judaism as practiced by
the larger, established congre-
gations in the community.
BET BREIRA is comfortable,
being a Liberal congregation
with an "I remember when I
was young" "hamishah" touch,
and an innovative "fre^-to-be-
you-and-me" flavor, as well. Do
what you do, as a Jewthose
things that enrich your Jew-
ish ness.
So, although Bet Breira bears
the label of "Liberal." the Re-
form aspect is not the classical
Reform as described in Ger-
many more than a century ago.
And the 60 member-families
and their guests who gathered
for the inaugural Sabbath serv-
ice seemed to like it just fine.
THE CONGREGATION, whose
spiritual leader is Rabbi Barry
Tabachnikoff. formerly associate
rabbi of Temple Israel of Great-
er Miami, displayed an infec-
tious pioneer spirit of cama-
raderie.
These families symbolized
their forefathers' achievements
in creating a new congregation
whose formal inception appro-1
priately commenced on the
fourth of July.
No firecrackers or hot dogs
were necessary for this Inde-
pendence D a v celebration.
Housed in Killian Pines Metho-
dist Church Auditorium. Bet
Breira joined with Rabbi Ta-
bachnikoff to celebrate being
Jews in America, free to prac-
tice their religion in a peace-
able manner without incum-
brance*
The presence of a Jewish
congregation within the con-
fines of a church bespeaks the
true magnanimous. American
spirit.
BOTH AMERICAN and Judaic
heritages were purposefully
blended for this first service.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Elinoff
read excerpts from the United
States Constitution and tradi-
tional prayers responsively.
The Rabbi led singing of
"God Bless America." as well
as Hebrew chants and Israeli
folksongs, one for which he
wrote the lyrics. He also ex-
plained that Bet Breira is "Re-
form, not Reformed."
"Thereby, the name of the
congregation will become its
modus opcrandi. Breira, or
choice, of rituals will be deter- '-
mined by the participants,"
Rabbi Tabachnikoff declared.
Participation in Friday night's
service was facilitated by the
informal nhysical setting. It was ;
the Rabbi's intention, he said,
"to bring the physical service
directlv into th midst of the
congregation." Rows of chairs!
formed a nulpit in the lound.
A TABLE used for the Kid-
dush and Torah reading was ac-
cessible, as was another table,
placed between two seating sec-
tions, where Dr. and Mrs.
.Lawrence Stein and daughters
led the candlelighting ritual.
The church auditorium lent
itself to open shirts Israeli-
style, and young children cume
forward to share in the Kid-
dush. That wary mnwct is what
attracted th Jack Dresner
family to become founding
members.
Their inclination is toward
Refoim. but according to Mri
n-r, "we wanted the intim-
acy afforded bv a small consre-
M BJ .4 9H IS '
gation with young families."
They like the idea, she said, of
growing along with their rabbi.
RABBI TABACHNIKOFF is a
voung. family man. He and Mrs.
Tabachnikoff have two sons,
Jonathan, 6, and Adam. 3.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Consnmtin
came to the service "somewhat
out of curiositv.'' They had been
guests at a wedding at which
Rabbi Tabachnikoff officiated
ind have frequently hard him
over radio station WTMI.
One n'v cmgregint admitted
to initnllv being "neutral, if not
pessimistic about the need for
or success of Bet Breira. But
the excitement was contagious
and rofreshing."
THE KEYSTONE on which
the congregation hopes to build
is one of continuing informality
and participation.
Rabbi Tabachnikoff under-
scores that asnect bv emnha-
si'i"q the particinatorv respon-
sibilities expected of new mem-
bers. This will be n activist
conerention,~ h*- exclained.
Qualified members will teach
in the religious school, and
there will be an adult program,
as well.
RABBI TABACHNIKOFF fore-
warned the group of the diffi-
culties inherent in being pio-
neers. But under the direction
of Nina Meyer, founding nresi
o>nt. enthusiasm and participa-
tion caused Bet Breira to "self-
actualize."
Her husband. Lewis Meyer
N*
s>
and Lucky Roscoe built an ark
to house the feood-will gift
Torah presented by Price Hill
Congregation of Cincinnati.
Rabbi Tabachnikoff comment-
ed that "the antiquity of this
SO-ygar-oW Torah is significant
because it's so old and we're so
new. It's meaningful that we're
.parting with this old'Torah. so
..that it's not..in a-wiunotmi cast."
FAITH MESNEKOFF joined
her husband. David, and the
Rabbi in the unique Torah
ritual. Torah srvjcs a>*e usual-
ly read on Saturday morning,
assisted hv men in traditional
congregations and onlv rarely
by women in progessive
temples.
At Bet Breira. there is no dis-
tmct'en ;n ritual rol-s. And
rituals will be observed where
deemed annrnnvjif... TV Torah
was re-'-olHd to n<<""it Rabbi
Taba<*hni''off to m^rf. the por-
tion normallv b"eun on Fimchat
Torah. "Tn r* b^aifm'nq "
was a svmbolic. as wll at lit-
eral no-tjr>n on Fri Hv evening.
IN A rvn'vl of dlficolt so-
cial and econ^m'e fl'iffiation.
r>e founders of Bet Brira are
striving to m-iV- a concrete re-
'ty of their id~as -n 1 ideals.
Th*a have fimnchllv commit-
ted membershin and Mve nhvs-
i>njlv arranq-d their affairs
for the coming year.
fhey will contin-ie their wor-
iMn services in K'lHan Pines,
will have classes at Mia-m-Dade
SnMth C*"onns nrH Hi?h Holi-
fj-v c--i/"c in jS'. r|o\v GUS-
man Hall at the University of
Miami.
Bet Breira began as an ab-
straction. Rabbi Tabachnikoff
and the congregation are de-
termined and enthusiastic about
its concrete success.
Now thru July 20
ir"BEST\.
% PLAY \
V1975J
Gotham Rabbi to Offer
Sexual Revolution Review
A new voice will be added to
the often lively, if confusing,
forum of the sexual revolution
on Monday, night at,the Hebrew
Academy, AwUtoi;ium,,240 flW
Tree Dr.. Miami Beach.
If the voice is new, then the
message is old. for the evening,
which is being organiw^J bv
Orthodox members of Miami's
Jewish commu.i.ty. will pr<.sjpt
traditional Jewish \ i ws o.i
marriage.
IDE PRINCIPAL sneaker wfil
be Rabbi bte" en Kis in a na-
tionally prominent rabbi and
lecturer Who, ivsiti.s b.ing
spiritual leader of N*w York's
Lincoln Square Jewish Center,
is a well-Known ejucatoi' and
counsellor.
Rabbi Riskin specializes In
problems ot mjtiiag: a.id mar-
ital relati >ns.
"As the sexual revoluti n
continues to scale t'ie barri-
cades, another phen jrnenon is
also occningthat of wilJly
escilating divorce rat -s, dis-
satisfying extra marital adven-
tures on a .vide spread seal,'
and a general diminishing of
the quality of life in the home,
obs *rved Rabbi Riskin.
"We believe that on of the
cans s of this distressing situa-
tion is confusion and insecurity
as to the true role of sexuality
in our lives."
RABRI RISKIN made a cloar
distinction b tween th' Jewish
view of sevualitv and the edicts
of Puritanism, "which underlie
the sexual repression thit is a
target of the sexual revolution."
"Judaism concurs with mod-
ern psychologists who state
that people should not repress
their instinctive drives. How-
ever, it also believes in a man-
ner that makes this irivi more
meaningful and in :hc end
truly fulfilling." .^
-nn-Th*. .Mondays-night- workshop
will consist of a bt;;t address
by Rabbi Riskin and will then
b^ opened for free discussion.
Rabbi Abraham Kort. regional
(H'octor of the Chabad Luha-
> it -h .Movement, sa;J the "The
- rning is f -ee of any charge
aitl the public is invited to at-
t ni"
Ghis Leave For
Camp Gan Israel
As in previous years, < |
House is again sponsoring its
SU^imer camp nrogn n.
A^nroviTiat"ly 6') chi |
<-'ll he att -nding the Camp Gan
Ivael in Linden. Mich., which
is in affiliate of t^1 Lubv itch
m-T'ement in the Midwest
The first comingHH of ?5 prls
1 >ft last Sunday for Detroit the
--^nd rontingent of 25 boys
,,i'l be la"ing itV*fer* w
Th camn has all the facilities
H"hid f->nhall, private lake horseback
ri ';rig. ap-1 other activities
Rabbi Abraham Korf f''-nHHC]
Lohavitch Regional Director,
suited th^t this nmgra^
t^e npportun'tv to the children
M f-'-o->te>- Miami to hvj a
summer of recreational activi-
tis in the framework of ;i true
Jewish environment
Camp Gan Israel is part of
the international network of
Lubavitch Camps located in
Australia. Brazil, England, Italy,
C-mada and numerous other
cities in the United States.
JUST REMODELED
Efficiencies 1 Bedroom & 2 Bedrooms
at Rents you can afford.
Overlooking the Bay with Pool
Furnished or unfurnished.
Aif-Cond. No ChHdren or Pets.
Yearly Leases only. Fabulous location.
Call Sid Howard at
SAXON MANOR APTS.
6800 Indian Creek Dr. Miami Beach
866-6831
How to get tickets
IN PERSON ON MIAMI BEACH:
Jordan Marsh (163rd St. Shopping
Ctr. N. Miami Beach). Lrblang Tours
(71st St. & Collins Ave), Miami Beach
Radio (Lincoln Rd. Mall). Neiman
Marcus (Bal Harbour). Saks Fifth
Avenue (Lincoln Rd. Mall).
BY MAIL: Specify number ol seats,
date. time, price, orchestra or mez-
zanine section: enclose local check or
money order and self-addressed
stamped envelope: Mail to Coconut
Grove Playhouse. P.O. Box 330646.
Miami. Fla. 33133.
TIMES PUCES: Tues-Thurs. Eves
at 8:30. Sat. Matinee at 2. Sun. Eve. at
7:30: $8 50, 7.50. 6.50. 5 50, 4 50 In
Sat. Eves, at 8:30: $9.50. 8.50. 7.50.
630. 530 Wed. Matinee at 2: $7.50.
6 50. 5 50. 4 50. 3.50 Show* start
promptly: no la. .'comers seated!
DIAL-A-TICKET: Charge your guar-
anteed exact seat locations by phone
to Master Charge or BankAmericard.
Cat! 444-9831.
Luncheon/Theatre Package
From Miami Beach only $13.00 Complete
(Wednesday ft Saturday Matinees)
Includes round-trip door-to-door motor coach transportation, complete Luncheon
at SCAMPS. THE TAURUS, or MONTY TRAINERS BAYSHORE RESTAU-
RANT. (Entree. Salad. Dessert, and choice of beverage), enjoy shopping and a
leisurely stroll through picturesque Coconut Grove, and see EQUUS from a good
Orchestra Section seat (Tax included, gratuity al restaurant extra.) Call LEBLANG
TOURS at 865-0341 at least one day ahead for reservations.
Dinner/Theatre Packageonly $13.00
(Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday A Sunday Evenings)
Complete Dinner at CAFE BRASSERIE in the Coconut Grove Hotel. BLACK
CAESAR'S. THE HASTA. THE TAURUS. MONTY TRAINER'S BAYSHORE
RESTAURANT. SCAMPS, or VINTON'S TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT (en-
tree, salad, dessert, and choice of beverage) PLUS a good Orchestra Section seat
for EQUUS. On sale now at the Box Office only (Tax included: gratuity at restaur-
ant extra. Transportation not included.)_______________________
For adults and students 'over 1J*> onh
Information: 444-9831
Low Group Rates: 253-5566
arllMfe ^s
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00 WASHINGTON AVE.. MIAMI BtACH
i'


Friday, July 11, 1975
+Je#ish fhrkHatr
Page 5-8
Rumania Confirms Huge Drop
In Emigration Visas for Jews
Question Box
NEW YORK A Rumanian
government ,"t>ffirtat"4ia8' icon-
firmed a drastic drop in Jew-
ish emigration so far this year,
but attrirvted it to "a technical
situation" and assured a visit-
ing Anti-D?famation League of
B'nai B'rith delegation that
there has been no change iu
his country! policy.
Meeting with ADL leaders in
Bucharest, Vasile CJliga. Deputy
Minister of Foreign Affairs, not-
ed that some 350.000 Rumanian
Jews have been permitted to
emic "> to Israel since the es-
tablishment of the Jewish state
and sai.' that the recent drop
in numbers should not be read
as a cnanse in Rumania's lib-
eral "reunification of families"
policy.
"YOU WILL see this veri-
fied," he said, "by our actions
in the next few week- "
The League delegitmn. led bv
Benjamin R. Epstein, nation l
director, and made up of 33 in-
dividuals from 11 stat 's and
Canada, were in Rumaniathe
only Communist Hoc country
that maintains diplomatic an 1
trade relatiors with Israelfor
four days of meetings with 9V"
ernment and Jewish community
leaden
Gligs told the American
group tha in his vi w the coun-
try's emigration policy and of-
ficial rrroval and supno-t of
a multitude of Jeyvish relic'^'s
and cultural inst-t'-ions Qualify
it for U & Jsigna: m as a most-
f.iv.ii v-f'm (M" VI in foreign
trade, SuCt status, which lnw*rs
(,,,'i \- ;^,-S- j<* hung sought
by Rumania to offset its bahnc?
of trade deficit with this coun-
try
EPSTEIN, CALLING the Gli^
statement "most welcome." went
on to point out to the demity
ministi l that under the Jack-
son-Mills-Vanik Amendment,
one year after MKN status is
granted. "Congress has the re-
sponsibility of reviewing emi-
gration policy to ascertain
whether the flow of emigration
is continuing at a meaningful
level."
He added that Americans,
while taking into consideration
the fact that there is a smaller
reservoir for emigration than
in the past, would be examin-
ing the actual emigration figures
rather than the amount of visas
issued.
Other Rumanian government
officials also attributed the rc-

duetlon of emigration during
-'the-'Hrst' five- myntths *' this
year to technicalities.
SOME BLAMED the govern-
ment's preoccupation last fall
with the Communist Party Con-
gress and the national elections
for slowing the bureaucratic
machine.
United States representatives
>0 Rumania told the ADL group
that in addition to the slowdown
in permitting Rumanian Jews to
emigrate to Israel, exit permits
to go to the United States have
also fallen off.
They said it was difficult to
ascertain a precise reason but
speculated that it was due "to
some unknown domestic situa-
tion" and not Soviet pressure.
Epstein said it was learned
that while Rumania has open
diplomatic and trade relations
with Israelpublicly welcoming
<-olda Meir when she was Prime
Minister and Foreign Minister
Yisal Allon several weeks ago
it is also one of the most out-
spoken supporters of the Pales-
tiu Lib-ration Organization,
which has an office in Bucha-
rest, and the Palestinian move-
ment for "self-determination."
Rumania, while not depend-
ent on Arab oil for domestic
energy, has become a center for
pet;o-chemic 1 processing and
needs Arab, oil in order to in-
crease its industrial develop-
ment and expoit capacity.
RA^T MQTO Ros-n to'd
th- Rrfllin th "t Hirim his 27
vr-a -s as Rumania's C^W R\bbi,
he Md b**en 'i"5tru'*v,nr*l in the
emigration of thr 3S0.000 Jws
apornvjT.it 'h> 80 nm* cnt of
the ti.tal Jewish community._
TSis "T4e,-ation an 1 Roverm
ment support of viable Jewish
institutions in Rumania, he d*
rla-'ed. are evidence of the dif-
ff-nc-' between the treatment
of Rumanian Jews and those in
the Soviet Union.
He cited such community i
projects, as a Talmud Torah, a j
Jewish youth movement, com-
munal kosher kitchen facilities,
kosher meals-on-wheels and
housi'i't facilities for the elderly
and infirm, dm'-'l and medical
clinics, a bi-weekly Rumanian-
Jewish-Hebrew newspaper, pub-
lication of Yiddish books, and
synagogues in 18 of the 70 of-
ficially-recognized Jewish com-
munities.
FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY
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Phones: 377-8646; 374-24S*; 374-613
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300 599 799 1899
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WT 1 ^^ i^L ^J
In addtinn, he said, Rumanian
Jews hve''freedbm"bf "contact
with world Jewry.
RABBI ROSEiN, noting that
1,000 passports and exit visas
have been granted so far this
year, said he was optimistic
that emig ation to Israel by the
end of 19TS will closely match
the figures for the two previous
years.
As an Indication of his free-
dom to monitor the official
figures, the rabbi said he was
conducting a census in each
synagogu" pf individuals whn
have applied for evlt "isis an
the rate ot government process I
ing.
The cl?-q"-n po'nt-H 0"t
.ow-""*- that ms concern w is
not i"rt fo- 'bos? who want to
leave Rumania hot al-o fo>- tbn
thousands of Jews who would
regain, eith-'" for resins of
their o"ti o- b-'**'''-, *iir *-'
tivity in essmtil in'u^tr" or
in what th a"tv""*iti 'w' 'v'
to be "sec-et" enterprises
would preclude them from emi-
grating.
IN A m >et'"i .vith Ghoorsjhe
Nencill nroirT>n' nf t*> H
partn.-mt for Culture and Cults.
the ADL sj*0'n wa<; to'd that
the Rumanian ernment "long
ago d'C'd >d that one can de-
stroy a b'lildim with tanks, anJ
guns, b'.'t it Is impossible to f"
move fii'h f*m the hea-ts of
individuals by fore: of arms."
Thi is whv the Hi~;->l sal I
the g-v .-.in-'-nt tntet*s ^ni
respects religion and religious
beliefs ,->lhough it does not ad-
vocate either.
Why have the rabbis or-
dained a fijted text. fa-
prayer instead of letting
everyone pray in his own
way?'
The rabbis ordained a fix?.!
text for prayer because com-
munication is an art and w: are
not always able to find the
words with which to express
ourselves.
Some write thit in orayer
man achieves s-'f-diagnosis ani
is able to dtfine his ned*
whfch is mens of achieving
then 'eeiflg the approach oi
tht disnersi^n. as wm! as the
posfiilitv of confusion, ^e
nhh;-. midf a mi^ed t"-1 f?--
man to use as a channel of self
expression.
ruitheuno/e. a fixed text
makes communal prayer pos-
sible. Communal prayer re-
quires a common text for all
Also, the fixed text of prayer
h-s ben a unifying factor be-
tween. Jews ..all, over- the world.
Both the common language
(Hebrew) and the common text
feel they have something in
make Jews all over the world
common.
Sisterhood Meeting Sunday
The sisterhood of Temple
Tifercth Jacob will meet at the
Hialeah home of Jenny Kelly.
8046 W. 12th Lan^. Sunday at 10
a.m. to discuss community serv-
ice projects. All Jewish women
of Hialeah a;id Miami Springs
are in ited to attend.
<
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OPEN MON. THRU SAT. TO 6 P.M.
ALL SALES FINAL


Page 6-B
+Jfnlsf Flerid/ton
Friday, July n, 197s
Arab, Jewish Youth Meet In
Jerusalem to Talk of Peace
Douglas Gardens Resident
Named 'Ms. Dade County'
JERUSALEMMrs. Anwar el
Sadat refused to" talk to Mrs.
Yitzhak Rabin at the Women's
International Year Conference
in Mexico City last week, but
in the heart of Israel's capital
other Arabs and Jews are talk-
ing, debating peace plans and
even living together.
At the Louise Waterman Wise
Youth Hostel in Jerusalem,
built and maintained by the
American Jewish Congress
Women's Division, a group of
75 teenagers from two trade
high schools recently ended a
three-day seminar devoted to
Arab-Jewish relations today and
what the future may be like
tomorrow.
HALF OF the participants
were Jewish students from Ha-
dera; half were Arab youngsters
from the village of Tybe. All
were citizens of Israel. And
despite the widely divergent
viewpoints that marked their
discussions, they left Jerusalem
exchanging addresses, promis-
iSg to write and planning visits.
The seminarwhich also in-
cluded tours of Jerusalem and
dancing and singing in the
Hostel's Steinberg Pavillion
revived a project initiated sev-
eral year ago by the Hostel in
cooperation with the Israeli
Ministry of Education, the Gov-
ernment Information Office and
Mstadrut to foster better un-
derstanding between Jews and
Arabs.
In the immediate wake of the
Yom Kippur War. the series
was suspended. But the success
of the recent meeting has en-
couraged the Hostel to set up
additional meetings between
young Jewish and Arab Israelis
later this year.
THE CONVERSATIONS began
in a tense atmosphere. There
was some suspicion, even hos-
tility at first. Many of the
youngsters hesitated to speak
out. Bat it was not long before
the initial strain lesened and a
frank exchange developed.
Most of the Arab students
thought the creation of a Pales-
tinian state was essential, but
they were divided over whether
it should be an independent
West Bank State or federated
with Jordan.
Some of those who defended
the idea of an independent
Palestinian slate expressed ap-
prehension about the role of
Yasir Arafat and of the terror-
ist methods of the various PLO
factions.
Others among the Arab par-
ticipants openly advocated
State of Israel as outlined in
"Greater Palestine." a euphem-
ism for the annihilation of the
Yasir Arafat's speech to the UN
General Assembly.
BUT WHEN asked if they
would move from Israel to a
Palestinian state, only a few
answered in the affirmative;
most of them replied that they
would remain in their home
towns as Israeli citizens.
The Jewish students, too. ex-
pressed a wide variety of opin-
ions. Some fervently defended
the claim to a "Greater Israel,"
the slogan of groups calling for
retention of the West Bank as
a permanent part of Israel.
Others supported return of the
occupied territories as a price
they were willing to pay in ex-
change :or peace.
The husband-and-wife team
of David -nd Gena Frishman,
directors of the Youth Hostel,
believe the experiment in un-
derstanding is worth doing
and repeating.
"These young Israelis. Arab
and Jewish, must come to know
each other if there is to be
peace in our countryand in
the Middle East." David Frish-
man says. And Gena Frishman
adds:
"Even the 'hardliners' on
both sides managed to develop
friendships with one another.
Let the peacemakers take no-
tice."
IS etc ATS Chapter President
Names Board Members
Murray M. Friedman, presi-
dent-designate of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the American
Technion Society announced
the board members of the new
group.
Included are Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, Mrs. Joan G.
Arbuse, Meyer A. Baskin,
George Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Bernstein, Shepard Broad,
Mrs. Marion DeJur, Gerald
Engel, Morton Fellman, May-
shie Friedberg, Norman Gor-
son, Abraham Grunhut, Abel
Holtz. Moses Hornstein, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Katzman, George
Kessell. Samuel Kosman and
Rabbi Sol Landau.
Also Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
Ralph Levitz, Joseph Lieber-
man, Fred Lighte, Sidney Mank,
Martin Margulies, Mrs. Joan C.
Miller, George Mover, Joseph
Raylson. Jacob Rifkin, Hon.
Harold Rosen, Arthur Rosichan,
Paul Ruthfield, Herbert Sha-
piro, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Sir-
kin, Hon. Richard B. Stone,
Mrs. Zelda Thau, Sam Topf,
Irving Weisman, Allan Wilson
and presidents of the Women's
Division Chapters: Mrs. Louis
Lavin. Mrs. Joseph Lieberman,
Money Needed For Blood Bank
Operated By Magen David Adoni
Reacting to PLO leader Yasir ing to Florida state president
Arafat's declaration that Arab David Coleman of Miami Beach,
terrorists are stepping up their is money for the Israel national
blood bank operated by the
Magen David Adorn, Israel's of-
ficial Red Cross and Civil De-
fense service.
The American Red Magen
David for Israel also is seeking
additional ambulances, blood-
mobiles and cardiac rescue
units from Jews throughout
Florida.
The local chapters of the Red
Magen David have sent eight
rescue vehicles to Israel from
Florida this summer, according
to state chairman Samuel Rein-
hard, also of Miami Beach.
Florida headquarters of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel, the only agency author-
ized to solicit and accept funds
for the Israeli Red Cross, have
been established at the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy, 2400
Pone Tree Drive.
Joseph Handelman of Miami
Beach. Sol Drescher of Miami
Beach and Mark D. Soroko of
Bal Harbour have been reelect-
ed to the national board along
with Coleman and Reinhard.
Howard Kaufman of Miami
Beach ii president of the Great-
er Miami Chapter.
Mrs. Joseph Raylson and Mrs.
Belle Stein.
"This group is, in effect, a
charter board of directors,"
Mr. Friedman stated, "since
they are the first group of the
new Chapter to meet on busi-
ness concerning Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology, in Mi-
ami.
"It is important to note that
the new board is composed of
persons who have voluntarily
lent their support, and sub-
scribed to the aims of this new
venture.
"It gives us great encourage-
ment about the future execu-
tion of plans which we have
developed for the betterment
of the Technion here in South
Florida."
Sen. Gordon Appointed To
State Planning Council
Sen. Jack Gordon has been
appointed a member of the State
Planning Council for Post High
School Education and the Uni-
versity Research and Service
Council. The appointments were
made by Senate President
Dempsey Barron.
Sen. Gordon, who will be the
member representing the Sen-
ate on both bodies, is chairman
of the Senate Health and Re-
habilitative Services Committee,
and also serves as vice chair-
man of the Senate Education
Committee.
Mrs. Lillian Cowen. 79,
crowned last week as the Queen
of Douglas Gardens for her
grace and inner beauty, ox-
tended her reign Monday as
she was named Ms. Dade Coun-
ty in the Florida Nursing
Home's Association's District 1
competition.
"Mrs. Cowen, who accepted
her regal responsibilities with
a mixture of stately charm and
wide eyed awe. will now go on
to the state finals in Orlando
where the senior adult repre-
sentative for the State of Flor-
ida will be chosen and sent on
to the national finals for the
Ms. America contest the
world's first inner beauty
queen," Fred Hirt. the home's
executive director, reported.
"Although I confess to feel-
ing like a young girl today, the
important thing is for people to
understand that beauty does not
wither in a human beingit
grows." was the Queen's first
royal proclamation.
Th hundreds of quests who
gathered at the Villa Maria
Nursing Home this week for
the unique occasion were
treated to all the good natured
hoopla that accompanies any
beauty contest.
Mrs. Cowen and the runner
up contestant, 79-year-old Mrs.
Eva Larkin of Heritage House,
were accompanied to the stage
with great fanfare by their S-
corts. Lewis Jacobs and j[m
Francis.
While the judges, wrvj
newscaster Jim Bro^emer
North Miami City Manager Lar-
ry Casey, Second National Sank
of North Miami Vice President
John Huttoe and Judge John
Harkness agonized over their
difficult ueci-ion. 95-vear-old
violinist Nathan Brill of DougUa
Gardens entertained with ,,,-
favorites.
Mrs. Cowen's advice to other
would be senior adult beauty
queens'
"Just remember that experi-
ence, wisdom, an appreciation
for lifethis is what mar-.- you
beautiful."
Night To Remember Planned
By W. Miami Post, Auxiliary
West Miami Post 22.? and
Auxiliary, Jewish War Veterans,
will hold a Night to Remember
Saturday at 3 p.m. in the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Marks
6416 SW 14th St. Members wili
participate in the "Mock Wed-
ding" of Ida No Whodunit to
Hugh Gottabekiddin. and dinner
will be served after the cere
mony."
Proceeds will go to the Amni-
otic Lab of the Chaim Sheba
Medical Center in Israel. Co-
chairmen are Mrs. Marks. Mrs.
David Burrows. Ralph Stern
and Marvin Herman.
NAL 'No Frills' Program
An 'Unqualified Success'
National Airlines has describ-
ed its "No Frills" program as an
"unqualified success," with 133,-
000 passengers flying the low-
fare service during the initial
phase.
The 35 per cent fare reduc-
tions created a new air travel
market by generating 56 per
cent passengers who otherwise
would not have flown, J. Dan
Brock, vice president market-
ing, announced at a press con-
ference here.
He said the airline estimates
that it more than doubled the
actual number of passengers re-
quired to offset any revenue
dilution caused by their switch-
ing from various fares to "No
Frills."
The one-way fares were lower
than bus or train rates between
mrst cities where they were in
effect.
"No Frills" passengers were
attracted especially to long-
haul flights, according to Brock.
Noting that average trip length
was 1,421 miles against the
normal average of 869 miles,
he said that Florida-California
flights, as an example, were
"immensely popular" with "No
Frills" riders.
The fares were in effect Mon-
days through Thursdays from
April 14 through June 30. "No
Frills" will resume Sept 3 and
continue until Dec. 16. It was
reported.
Friends Unlimited Program
Friends Unlimited invites
singles between the ages of 30
and 50 to join them Friday at
9:30 p.m. in the Do Drop Inn
at Temple Beth Am for a pro-
gram including a film on France
and tasting of French wines and
cheeses. Donations are made
at the door.
Eve ready
6E
Polaroid
DISTRIBUTOR
WANTED
Qualified individual Malt or Female needed te
distribute world famous film and other photo products
through company tstablished locations. "NO
SELLING OR SOLICITING REQUIRED." Make ttm
year your year for independence. MtfS.M investmeet.
Guaranteed 12-month roourchast aarooment.
CALL Mr. Davis (Toll Free)] l-eoo-ta-itTO
orCollectAtl4-228-17Sl
Monday to Friday,* a.m. tea p.m. EOT
Or WriM F Ir iio* PltoHy #". FlrMltn* tw DOMAR KITCHEN CABINETS
DAVID COLEMAN
attacks on Israel's civilian popu-
lation, the American Red Magen
David for Israel has issued an
urgent appeal for additional
supplies and funds.
Particularly needed, accord-
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** Ml Hi I
-
'
Carl
^TI pert
Friday. Jul> 11, 1975 *Jeist fkrSdliair, Page 7-B
Some are Different, Some Are
The Same as 100 Years Ago
Haifa
A BSORBED THOUGH we are by the diffi-
culties and problems which surround us,
I was led to ponder recently what might have
been happening here in 1875. one hundred
years ago. I dipped into my library, and came
up with some fascinating material.
It was a great year. Sir Moses Montefiore.
already 91 years old. was paying his seventh
and what was to be his last visit to the Holy
Land. He was received with honors, was show-
ered with requests for help, and had his share
of complaints as well.
THE JEWISH community of the time was
quite different from the one we know today.
One document which Montefiore had before
him told that the education given by the
Sephardim to their children was considerably
superior to that among the Ashkenazim.
The latter were also depicted as being for
the most part poverty-stricken beggars, unable
or unwilling to engage in manual labor, in con-
trast to the noble Sephardim who were hard-
working and sought to improve their status in
life by hard work and education.
Sir Moses got an earful in reply from the
leaders of the Ashkenazi community, who be-
secched hinl to visit the modern and com-
fortable housing quarter, recently erected, and
known as the Meah Shearim Estate.
THOSE IN 1975 who maintain that the
Kupat Cholim system of free medical care leads
to malingering and hypochondria, should know
that little has changed. Sir Moses' informants
reported to him that the hospitals in Jerusalem
showed a total of 66,000 visits per annum, or
an average of about five visits per year for
every Jewish soul in the Holy City.
The inference is that since medical care
is free, why not take it? Indeed, it was charged
that some of the "so-called patients attend at
the hospital for pastime."
Montefiore took seriously every aspect of
his inspection tour. Delegates of a free Soup
Kitchen brought him samples of the food
which they gave to the poor, and the visitor
recorded: "We all tasted several of the dishes
and found them to be very good, so much so,
that I begged the ladies to send me some more
of it for my own dinner."
THE FOLLOWING Shabbat the ladies came
around again and brought him dishes of
"Khameen," known to the West as "Tcholnt."
Sir Moses and all his party cheerfully partook.
Alas, the following morning he records:
"I passed a most uncomfortable night: I suf-
fered from indisposition occasioned by the
change of diet and had to remain confined to
mv chamber."
J2f *ft
VcL
rt
kJeW
Portugal -- Europe's New Testing
(iround for a Free Society
OOTII THE United States and Israel have
dgp oqneern now regarding the immediate
and lon^-range future of Portugal: Washington
slowly recovering from its long, hairy involve-
ment in Vietnam, fears the potential loss of a
NATO ally in Lisbon and more intensive Mos-
cow penetration into the Portuguese political
and military tangle.
Israel, hearing rumbles of the proffer of
S400 million by Saudi Arabia and other Arab
powers to Portugal for a greater share of de-
cision-making there, has to add new trends in
Lisbon to its long list of situations to worry
over.
FOR BOTH Washington and Israel, there
is anxiety over the fate of air bases in the
Azores, especially when it is recalled that dur-
ing the Yom Kippur War of 1973, these Portu-
guese refueling zones made it possible to ex-
pedite the flow of American aid to beleaguered
Israel.
An the eve of Portugal's decisive constitu-
tional assembly elections in late April. Lisbon
let Washington know that no refueling of
American planes to assist Israel in case of re-
newal of Middle East hostilities will be per-
mitted.
Time and technological advance may soften
the blow of that threat, however. American
v'1 ;
planes can be refueled in midair; and other
emergency steps are available to the Pentagon
to solve that problem.
BUT FREE men everywhere in the
United States, in Israel, on the European Con-
tinent, in scores of other nationshave reason
to look upon the shifting tide of events and
conditions in Portugal with apprehension. For
anv people in the modern world, shaking itself
loose from even a moderate dictatorship (the
36-year rule of Antonio Salazar) and finding
the military filling the vacuum as the nation's
decisive force, is obliged to scratch for se-
curity.
The April elections in Portugal consti-
tuted a defeat for Communist forces there. Only
13 per cent of the vote went to the Red forces
headed by Alvaro Cunhal while Portuguese
Socialists, well paced by Mario Soares. scored
38 per cent, and the Popular Democrats came
off with 26 per cent of the ballots.
THESE MOVES towards the center em-
body hope for Portugal's immediate future.
Forced to fashion new political and economic
structures after 500 years as a colonizing mem-
ber of the family of nations. Portugal can
easily become a new testing ground for ex-
treme right and extreme left factions.
.jr.ii !.ii ia,i u:- in! .............ni.....i mi.....ia.iu'111 iniiiiii.iiaiiiUii.uii...........iwiuiiuiuri
Ren
sD
L*fal/&b
Orthodox
*iu
J HL STLLP rise in the rate of divorces among Americans
and American Jews has become, for the first time, a major
problem even among deeply Orthodox Jews, including mem-
bers of Hasidic sects, according to an official of an Orthodox
rabbinical court (Beth Din) in New York.
Rabbi Nachum Josephy, executive vice president of the
Rabbinical Alliance of America and secretary of its Beth Din
reported that during the eight months of the current Jewish
year, there had been a 50 per cent increase in Jewish divorces
(Gitten) granted by the Beth Din.
RABBI JOSEPHY told the Jewish Telegraphic Agencv that
the Rabbinical Alliance Beth Din had granted 341 Gitten since
the start of the current Jewish year last September and that
it was expected an additional 80 Gitten plus would be approved
by the end of the Jewish year next September, for an estimated
total of 420 Jewish divorces.
During the prior Jewish year, he said, the Beth Din had
approved a total of 232 Gitten. He said 22 Gitten had been
handed down during April, the highest monthly total since
he became Beth Din secretary.
HE SAID the majority of the couples coming to the Beth
Din for a Get are between 19 and 28 years of age and that
many are clearly not ready for the responsibilities of marriage
though all, in accordance with Orthodox family practices, al-
ready have children.
Of Orthodox Jews applying for Gitten, he said, 75 per cent
are from yeshiva and Hasidic backgrounds and 25 per cent of
less Orthodox commitment.
Rabbi Josephy and Rabbi Isaac Liebes, supreme judge of
the Reth Din. placed much of the blame for the surge of
divorces among New York Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews
on the parents.
RABBI JOSEPHY, noting that many marriages in the Ortho-
dox and Hasidic communities are still arranged, said that
parent! therefore still exercise substantial control over de-
cisions of their children and could seek to conciliate conflicts
between their married children and spouses but that, in fact,
they generally back their children in such disputes and tend
to worsen the conflict.
He said the squabbles often are over trivial issues, involv-
ing material matters. He suggested that even ultra-Orthodox
Jews are accepting the materialistic values of secular America.
HE SAID that among the reasons for the rapid rise in
applications for Jewish divorces might be, in addition to the
failure of parents to act as conciliators in marital squabbles
of their children, the current recession and a change in life-
styles, in which young Orthodox Jewish males are leaving the
family home to live by themselves as singles, something new in
ultra-Orthodox patterns.
When a request for a Get is received by the Beth Din,
the applicant is asked if he or she has obtained a civil divorce.
An effort is then made to determine whether the contending
parties would agree to a conciliation effort under Beth Din
auspices. Rabbi Josephy said this usually involves a meeting
of the couple with parents for both sides but that such sessions
usually end up with the parental pairs shouting at each other.
HE DECLARED that the record of growing Jewish family
dissolutions recorded in New York was important because New
York Jewry is the mirror for the Orthodox world in America.
He said the Beth Din, which was organized in 1968 by
Rabbi Abraham Gross, Rabbinical Alliance president, and Rabbi
David Hollander, then first vice president and later president,
makes every possible effort to persuade the contending couples
to work their differences out and avoid a divorce but that even
those who agree to try a reconciliation usually return to the
Beth Din to go ahead with divorce proceedings.
View of American Zionism from the Days of Herzl to the Holocaust
rpHAT JEWS have been the objects of history
and rarely the subjects of history is a
cliche. Jewish history after Masada is too con-
cerned with martyrology, the genealogy of
rabbis, and esoteric pieces of synthesis.
Few Jews throughout our history have
maintained diaries and few Jewish communi-
ties recorded the events of their development
and the events that affected them. If not for
non-Jews, both philo- and anti-Semitic, much
of Jewish history from 135 to 1800 might have
passed unrecorded into limbo.
SOME MODERN Jews have changed this
pattern of disregard of historical developments.
Weizman, Herzl and Ben Gurion are notable
examples of the new trend. Without deprecat-
ing the importance of autobiographies, no his-
torian takes the totality of such works without
a generous dose of salt.
The leaders of American Zionism from
s.
eumour
3-
xa
man
Gottheil to Abba Hillel Silver have not pre-
served for us in their own words the Zionist
history in which they were participants. There
are a few exceptions, as for example. Louis
Lipsky. Julius Haber, and others, but we
haven't the memoirs of Louis Brandeis, Julian
Mack, Zvi Hirsch Masliansky, Baruch Zucker-
man, Wolf Berlin, Hayim Greenberg and nu-
merous others.
MELVIN I. UROFSKY, a professor of his-
tory, interviewed many of those yet alive and
pored over documents in archives that have
been accumulated over the years. He attempted
an almost impossible task in writing the history
of "American Zionism from Herzl to the Holo-
caust" (New York, Anchor Press of Doubleday,
$12.50. 538 pp.).
That there are shortcomings in the book
and that some events should have been
elaborated to a greater extent are the opinion
of this and other reviewers.
We regret that the Biltmore Conference
of 1943 and the walkout by Proskauer and his
three co-delegates, and the method of select-
ing and electing the 500 delegates to this con-
ference receives cursory mention.
HOWEVER, THESE comments do not de-
tract from the importance of the book and the
author's success in achieving so much in one
volume.
Urofsky has outlined American Jewish
history and the role of Zionism in it without
having either appear as if in a vacuum.


Page 8-B
* ki*t FhrkU^r
Friday,
Weizmanii Institute Researcher
Studies Antibody 'Captures'
REKOVOTA new
to .
co-: been
I
De-
partn un-
do:

I
inrat ir
for
bodv.
SI PPORTFI) BV a e
the Vo'.' Foundal
the Fed of Ger-
many. Dr. Pecht and his :o-
the biologic-
cornbining sites or
I varieties of
be*.
te aid of rated
tech-
'
'.'...- n and L Da
of fie "pocket '
: an' hold a la
ser cf closely related, but
rent substanc -
BY VARYING his evnerimen-
I cu! in a controlled.
wise fashion. Dr. Pecht
K 0 m d J
Ben Kutcher
President Ben Kutcher of the
Roney Plaza Singles Club was
guest of honor at a surprise
birthday par-
t y SafJ.day
evening. July
5. at the
Roney Plaza
Pud. host id
by the club's
officers and
joard of di-
rectors. The
party was the
first aaani
nononng a n
i n d i v i d ual
member of the
club since the nrginization was
founded Bee years ago
The party was afsai V-
Sally Holmes: F.mamiel Guher-
man sc-ved as master of eve-
monies for the occasion M-
Guberman read a po?m which
he and his wife, HIMa, h.1
composed Hi a tribute t-)
Kutcher; Etta Susswein also
read a poem which she h *J
composed extolling the quaii-
ol the club's presiden*
As Mrthdev ?>f er received from the club mem-
bers a plaque and a set of
ticket! for all of the con' I
by the Miami Bearh Symphoi
for this season. H? evnr"ssJ
his gratitude to the eroun an-f
for the i
Club for n* "t season.
Kutcher has been ore*dni r"
the organization since its in:ep
tion.
Dinner war bv d3-,~-
ing at Luigi's. Among [hot* >
attended *h vnt were HMdl
and Embnnel r.nhrrmn. UDHm
and Martin Wes, Sflb -ml
Irving Fins'*'-. Kt *nd W
Pritzerd, Son1'* StWsVv. lu'1"*
Kohansky. Marie Karens, Boo
o vv"
Tishman. Gertrude Seff;rs, Rae
Cuba, E:ta Susswein, Rose
Let en.-, Jennie Appelroth, Lil-
lian Haut. Estelle Diaz, Lillian
Haut, Estelle Diaz, Lillian
Schaffer a.iJ Sally Holmes.
Ronald Jay Berlinsr. a senior
student at Coral Gables Hig'i
School, w n the secund place
awaid *n th! international talent
contest ac the Key Club Interni-
tional con"'r*i : m New Or-
leans June 30
The honor achieved by Ron-
ald, the son of Mr. and Airs. .kl.
Jay Berliner of Coral Gables,
marked the first time in 32
years of compettaon that Coral
Gables High School has won an
award. His portrayal of an
eiderly man reminiscing about
the past during the early years
of the twsntieth century was
conside cd a n outstanding
drama effort,
ft
J-*~v Mo, director of tennis
p K'-^n R->v n) h-"1 prof _<:-
'onal at the cl'ib. will olay in
tV National Jun'OT Veterans
Toii-n-,-*,",nt f* tins .Tu'v 31.
PI w II b- at th? ^h'tr Roc':
fi,,s ; .... York, for men 3S an 1
eve*
Judge and Mrs. Irving Cypan
recently returned from Cam-
br.de-*. Maes., where they at-
tended Ihe graduation of their
son Wayne from Harvard I-aw
School. Attending the gradua-
tion with Judge and Mrs. Cvnen
were their son Tad and Steve
and AHyn Cypen, their son and
daughter-in-law. Upon admis-
sion to the Florida Bar. Wayne
plans to practice law in Miami
Beach with his father and
brother. Steve.
tin. Nor ma Moss of Miami Beach, area winner in the
Sabra Recipe Promotion Contest, receives her prize, a
Sabra Mini Chalice gift set, from Fred K. Shochet, pub-
lisher of The Jewish Floridian. Her entry is also eligible
for the grand prize, for which the judging will be done
by Gourmet Magazine, as well as one of the 40 other
prizes offered by Sabra International.
could deduce significant facts
about : .ica! na-
ture of the combining site, as
Kit the conformation-
al changes in the antib
triggered b\ ant: iing.
This approach, termed "kin-
: -napping." scientists
i stud) structural features of
pr< I they exist in the
body, in solutions rather than
as isolated crystalline product.-
In other investigations. Dr
Pecr.t has studied a group of
proteins r nown as oxidases
which mediate energy conver-
sion in the body via electron
transport and are important in
a li\ing organism's oxygen me-
tabolism.
THE TEAM was able to trace
the tortuous path of electrons
through the copner-ccntaining
enzyme ceruioplasmin and the
researchers identified sites on
the protein where the electrons
momentarily rest.
This finding solved the rid-
dle of how electrons can reach
a copper site in the enzyme
which is tucked away in the in-
terior of the molecule and is
inaccescible to straightforward
chemical attack.
Proper levels of ceruioplas-
min in blood serum is essential
to health; insufficient produc-
tion of the protein has been as-
sociated with the fatal metabolic
disorder known as Wilson's
Disease.
B'nai Israel Has
Open Door Poliey
.Mrs. ..Jni>n -scobs has
been -lected president of the
: k>terhood of B'nai Israel and
Greater Miami Youth Syna-
gogue, and Dr. Theodore Fried-
man will serve as president of
its Men's Club, according to an
announcement made by Rabbi
Ralph Z. Glixman, spiritual
leader of the congregation
which meets at 9500 Sunset Dr.
Dr. Friedman, a Fellow of
the American Academy of Am-
bulatory Foot Surgeons, is a
member of th: Ameii jr. Podia-
try Assn., West Miami Post No.
2479, B.P.O.E., anJ Knights of
Pythias.
The synagog le. which has an
open door policy enabling any-
one to join regardless of their
financial situation, -dso features
a daily Minyan. rtli^ious serv-
ices morning and evening and
a complete prog am fir youth
as well ij adults.
In Keeping with it* tradition.
High Holiday tickets will be
pro*, ided to those making a
donation; there is do set amount
required.
JCC Program To
Murk Destruction
()f First Temple
Donald J. Reiff, president of
JCC's of .S i inda, invites
the community a Meats to
observe the ci"m' a of
the d st-'jction of the "i: .. Jew-
ish temple.
The l.oOO children in the
camping programs of tbj JCC's
in North Dade. South Dade and
South Brouard will rebuild a
symbol of the Western Wall at
Haulover Beach Wednesday at
11 a.m. Senior citizens in the
JCC programs at the South
Beach Activity Center will also
participate.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff will of-
ficiate in his capacity as reli-
gious ad\isor to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; Metro
Mayor Steve Clark will be pres-
ent as host. Other dignitaries
representing the county, the
city and the state will join.
BARBAK. STONE
Barbara Stone,
Alan hiptiis To
Wed In September
Mr. an' M-s. William Stone
of Noith Mia"m B"-~h announce
the engagement of t^eir daugh-
ter. Barbara, to -Vnn Ki-mis.
son of M n M Thro I
Kipnis of Mijmi Beach.
Miss Ston gradual 'd cu-n
laud-e fro-- th- University of
Florida where she was a mem-
ber of Phi Kappa Phi Honor So-
ciety. She sr>ent th summ- of
h-r junior vear srudyins, Span-
ish ?t the University of Valen-
cia in Spain ind i rtifrentiv at-
ten 'in School of Law.
Vr Ki"-p;s. w*n ni gqntlv
pr?-ric ~ 1 m in Hlani. is a
iraBhnf of ts^ ri^rars Miaaaurl and trra Unr-e-^tv of
Miami SchoH ot I.iu H i
a mt-tiot an I t*wt rvf ijd m of
7 ta Ben TVi fr^tsrarity at the
Unfwrsitv -t "-<;'! i. Wh'l- a
stuHcnt ?r tV U-,;-'*-,:v <<{ Mi-
nj He sr n* a i......... stu^-
in>j ''W at Oxford University
in Englan I.
The wedding will take pi
in Septemb
Jacob. Anna MUr$
Celebrate HOth
At A viva Meetino
AV'Va Pmn-
Women will he- *
the rate Salman j
W dn- Bday durin
at the Wtahin
him, 633 :.!
Mr an:! Ktn
y. ..v- ,.:. ;
life will (
armivers
to the general publ
be hoata for refres
M". Mar-- has b
member of the F- ,and and
Labor Zionist Alliance nee his
youth, anH his wife rrna. has
been a member of I'
en for mor- than '. < She
is one of the found ,
Chapter in North Mi i : Beach.
Plans will also b de for
th- 1 ioneer Women (k>ldea
.' iHIa SOth Ann,' try na-
i r'l convention whi 'aill be
b*\ *p Miami B"acu "ctober,
according f> Mrs. Etti Seiden,
prog-i-n ch-nirman Mrs Rae
PandePmm is pre- -j
M Gis. la Gutter
chairperson
\*&A (r>s"ronce Aqent
Attends Sfl'es Semincr
.' -t :: 1 ife
ag nt rharl W So i resi-
d**nt i Cor,--' Gables. i- a^iorg
th- 3.VW nbers ie Mil-
li^" Dolla' Round Table
(MDP^1 attfnding exeh-
si 'if instsranjoa 11 orssa-
l'ati*n*s an" al aemini .?. San
Pran iaao l'. month
T^ MDKT is an : vr.dent
a so i t'-n aer ing t than
I -1 no -i}vts |ron 15 coua
; j -ach of who" is sold
-'0 than SI millior life a-
m ->' during thr : year.
Members from a: ;nd the
world mett each j il their
own expens i to sh i ;deas
and t chniques duri- ; rhal is
recognized n the ir/ -i itional
"sales foni"^ nar eve nee"
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Saporm of 1790 79tM St. were awarded
Flagler Federal's spat i u Grand Prigj at the nev ' Bay Village office, according to Lavern Fletcher. Sorth
Bay Village branch manager. The North Bay Village of-
fice, located in the White Star Stopping Center, 1712 79th
Street, is Flagler Federal's ninth branch facility to open
since its beginning in I95S. The Association, now enter-
ing its 20th year, is backed by 266 million dollars m
assets and provides full services, including a variety of
savings plans, residential and commercial loans. A high-
ly qualified staff of officers and employees serve,; both
Dade and Broward Counties


hday, July 11, 1975
+Jwist f*>rkttati
Page 9-B
Rally For Soviet Jews Set
At July 15 Space Launch
'SHAKESPEARE BY THE SEA' PRODUCTION
Mimli Forcr Starring As
Rosalind In 'As You Like It'
A mass rally urging further
Cooperation b : veen the United
States :>.v.A the Soviel Union in
easing emigration restrictions
m Hussion Jew- will be held
at the Kenne !y Space Center
luring the July 15 launch of
t, Apollo-Soyuz Test Proji ct
it lias been anoouncsd.
Tuesday's rally, sponsored
lointly by South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, a com-
nittee of the Greater Miami
bewish Federation's Community
delations Committee, and ths
|>i>' iet Jewr. Committee of tha
Jewish Community Council of
Central Florida, will take place
tin the hours before orbital take-
loff hich is scheduled for 4
|m: EDT.
1 he rally will be held outside
jCate No. 3 of t'ie Kennedy
Space Center, at the end of
Kiveredge Road, along th:
north sicl^ of Highway 405 lead-
ing to the Cape Canaveral site.
Congressional and civic lead-
ers from throughout the coun-
try will attend the rally. Also.
la letter addressed to the Rus-
sian and American spacemen
from Moscow sci ?ntist Alexan-
der Druck will be released at
I the rally.
In this remarkable document.
[Druck explains that the Soviet
I'nion has denied emigration to
[him and many other Jewish
scientists on the pretext that
they had worked in the space
program. Now that there is an
open exchange of space in-
formation between the USA and
the USSR. Druck claims this
excuse is no longer valid. He
calls upon the Astronauts and
Cosmonauts to "use your in-
fluence for the triumph of
justice and humanity."
In addition, the new "Free-
dom" Flag of Soviet Jewry will
be unfurled for the first time.
In a recent ceremony at t'ie
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Dr. Morton Freiman pre-
sented the Freedom" Flag to
the free world as a gift from
Russian Jews who have been
d< nied v isas to Israel, fired from
their [obs, and who are con-
stantly watched and harassed
by Soviet officials.
The f'.ag. which displays a
white Star of David on a deep
sky-blue background, was se-
cetiv raised in Moscow, and
earned out of the USSR by Dr.
Freiman and his wife. Tina, on
their return from a visit to the
Soviet Union
In accepting the flag. Dr.
Robert Wolf, chairman of the
South Florida Conference oa-
Soviet Jewry stated. "We sup-
port Soviet-American coopera-
tion in space. But, at the same
time, we must remind Hie So-
viet government of its commit-
ment to freedom of emigration
for Jews to join their families
in l*raeL"
Spokesmen in Miami and
Central Florida emphasize th it
tha rallv is not in prot isi ol n
space hunch, but rather the
treatment of Jews behind the
Iron Curtain. They appeal as
well for religious freedom for
t^ose Jews remaining in the
USSR. Rally sponsors endorse
fu.ther communication betw I m
the two nations, r. ,d extension
.f scientific connection to joint
humanitarian efforts.
In th future, other "Free-
dom" Flags will be flown across
t*>r> country at every event in-
volving representatives of th">
Soviet government, because
"wherever the Russians are, we -
will appear to speak for the
Soviet Jews who cannot sneak
for themselves." said Dr. Wolf.
Hopes of the free world were
raised during last year's trade
negotiations with Russia, in
which special considerations
were offered to the USSR in ex-
change for increased emigra-
tion rights for Soviet citizens,
as already granted in the United
Nations Declaration of Human
Rights.
But last January, the Soviet
Union rejected the trade agree-
ment, primarily oecausc of debt
limits, experts feel, rather than
the emigration issue. Now. Sec-
retary of the Treasury William
Simon has ann "meed that he
and the Ford administration are
anxious to negotiate a new
trade deal with the Soviets, with
un'imited credit and no emi-
gration ties.
Observers note that since
January, the USSR has pursued
a course of increased pressure
on its citizens who apply for
emigration visas. The number
of ewH visas issued is down from
2.*Q0 a month in 1973, to about
f00 la?t month, the lowest
figure since emigration to Is-
rael began.
Communications between So-
i i t Jews and their supporters
in the West arc becoming a'-
roost impossible. Threats an i
harassment are increasing. Bla-
tant anti-Semitic actions, offi-
cially approved, are occurring at
an alarming rate, according to
reports by Russian Jews.
During the past six months.
there have been a number of
"show trials," closed trials of
Jews on questionable charges,
followed by severe sentences or
incarceration in mental institu-
tions. In almost every case, the
charged person had applied for
an exit visa to Israel or was
active in ths Jewish freedom
movement.
It is felt by observers that
tVse fills are being staged to
discourage other Soviet Jews
from apolving for emigration.
The public will also be alert-
ed to a new Soviet tax provi-
sion, sicned May 23 by Russian
President Podgornv, which
would impose a high duty on
money received from abroad by
Soviet citizens. The provision
appears to be aimed at dis-
couraging financial aid sent
from the West to help Soviet
.Tws who have lost their jobs
after applications for visas were
submitted.
Carol S. Traeger
Engaged To Wed
Harry M. Roisman
Mr. and Mrs. David Traeger,
337 Mendoza Ave., Coral Gables,
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Carol Sandra, to
Harry Mark Roisman. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Roisman,
3921 NW 2nd Terr., and honor-
ed the couple at a family brunch
in their home Sunday.
The bride-elect, a graduate of
Coral Gables High School, at-
tended the University of Ha-
waii and obtained her B.A. de-
gree in mathematics from the
University of Miami. She has
been teaching at Kinloch Park
Junior High School for the past
five years, and has taught Sun-
day school at Temple Zamora
for eight years.
Mr. Roisman, an honor grad-
uate of Miami High School, won
the Silver Knight mathematics
award and attended Georgia In-
stitute of Technology and the
University of Florida on schol-
arships, obtaining his B.S. de-
gree in engineering at U-F. He i
was employed by IBM Defense
Division as a programmer-
analyst in Philadelphia, Pa., and
Morris Plains. N.J., and served
as regional sales manager for
an automotive manufacturer in
Metropolitan New York, before
enrolling at Florida Internation-
al University, where he is cur-
rently completing his work for
a degree in accounting and will
sit for the CPA examination.
The wedding is scheduled to
take place in Temple Or Olom
Oct. 4.
Mindi Forcr, daughter of na-
tive Miamians Ida Forer and the
late Meyer Mike Forer. will por-
tray Rosalind, the leading lady
of "As You Like It." the Shake-
speare By the Sea production
Mindi Lea Forer as Rosa-
lind, and Lou Gallo as Or-
lando in Shakespeare's "As
You Like It."
beginning Saturday at 8 p.m.
in the North Shore Community
Center. 7150 Collins Ave., Mi-
ami Beach.
The performance is being
sponsored by the Miami Beach
Tourist Development Authority.
Miss Forer, also a native
Miamian. has been in the the-
atrical field since childhood.
She appeared for six years on
WTVJ-Ch. 4 with the Skipper
Chuck programs, and has ap-
peared at Merry Go Round
Playhouse for many years in
the children's productions as
well as adult theatre.
A graduate of Syracuse Uni-
versity where she majored in
drama and appeared in the
Shakespeare Repertory Theatre
Group, Miss Forer has appear-
ed many times at the University
of Miami Ring Theatre in their
productions. She portrayed Mae
in "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof."
For the past five years Miss
Forer has been living in Rome.
Italy, where she has been do-
ing movies and TV commer-
cials. She has appeared in
Italian movies speaking the
native language and appeared in
three movies shown in American
theatres: "Johnny Ears and
Deaf Smith," starring Anthony
Quinn; "The Western," star-
ring Clint Eastwood, and "The
Driver's Seat," starring Eliza-
beth Taylor, which has not ar-
rived in the states as yet.
Miss Forer will be appearing
as the leading lady in the pro-
duction. "The Devils," at the
Merry-Go-Round Playhouse in
August. The play has to do with
Exorcism, and hers is a heavy
dramatic role.
Recently Miss Forcr appeared
in the leading role of "Lysi-
trata," the Greek women's lib
comedy, and a Broadway show
at the Rhodes Brothers Night
Club.
South Dade JWV Post 778
And Auxiliary Plans Set
Evelyn Clein, President of
the Jewish War Veterans Aux-
iliary, South Dade 778, an-
nounces that the newly elected
Department chairman and of-
ficers will attend a swim-break-
fast Sunday at 10 a.m. in the
home of Ceil Zucker, newly
elected Department president.
Those attending will be Evelyn
Clein, Servicemen's Service
chairman, Leah Eisenman, De-
partment treasurer, and Sylvia
Dubbin, Department color
bearer.
A fund raising committee
meeting and pancake breakfast
at the Clein residence, 6971 SW
134th St.. will be held jointly
with the Post Sunday morning.
July 20, with Arnold Novins.
senior vice commander, in
charge.
KOL SIMCHA ORCHESTRA
MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS
WEDDINGS 'BARMITZVAH 'SOCIALS
Now Accepting Bookings For September
FREILACH AND POPULAR MUSIC
EVENING:
(305) 264 9326
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Feldheim, residents of Douglas Gar-
dens for ten years, will be married 70 years on July 16.
Their anniversary will be celebrated with a party at the
home July 23.
Come Celebrate at The SEVILLE
WEDDINGS BIRTHDAYS
ANNIVERSARIES
r\
V
BANQUETS
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Reserve Now for Your Festive Occasion!
MANNY ALY, FOOD & BEVERAGE OIRECTOR PHONE 532-2511, EXT. 6S25


Page 10-B
tvi*tncridi&r
Friday, July 11, i97.
Jews, Catholics Find Common
Ground on Abortion Problems
'|NEW YORK A conference
Jewish religious represen'ativcs
on the problem of abortion in
America repeals important dif-
ferences between th faith
groups, but also provides com-
mon ground for further meet-
ings and possible joint activi-
ties.
Official hieh-lvH deleeitions
representing the National Con-
ference of Catholic Bishops in
the U S.A. and the Synagogue
Cmmcil of America, the um-
brella agency of Conservative.
Orthodox, and Reform congre-
-gational and rabbinic bodies,
met here all day at the House
of Living Judaism in New York
to explore "The Sanctity of
"Human Lif** "
THE MEETING tvis designed
'as an informal, preliminary in-
ierreligious consultation. As a
"result, no formal statement was
Issued bv the participants in the
consultation.
In his introduction. Rabbi
Henry Siegman, executive vice
president of the Synagogue
-Council commented, "even Jews
who are most liberal in their
religious attitudes toward abor-
tion share with Roman Catho-
lics a profo-md concern about
the practical consequences for
the sanctity of human life of a
policy that admits of no moral
restraints."
Rabbi Siegman added that the
Jewish community must con-
cern itself with issues of cen-
tral concern to the Christian
faiths.
"Jews have asked Christians
to understand our passion for
Israel's survival. The Catholic
Church has a right to expect a
serious hearing on issues that
itcconsiders of prime concern.
This sensitivity to our respec-
tive deepest anvieties is not a
question of quid pro quo but
constitutes the very heart of
dialogue."
SPEAKING FOR the Catholic
delegation. Bishop Bernard Law,
of Springfield-Cape Girardeau.
Mo., said. "Jews and Catholics
are at one in their affirmation
of human life's sanctity, based
on the human person's creation
by God in His image and like-
ness."
While the distinction between
actual life and potential life in
the Jewish tradition is signifi-
cantly different from the Chris-
tian position, "this difference
does not exclude the possibility
of certain common positions on
questions of public policy."
Bishop Law. a member of the
National Conference of Catholic
Bishops Committee on Ecumen-
ical and Interreligious Affairs,
suggested that this first con-
DATE SINCERE AND
INTERESTING PEOPLE
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SERV'CE
ESTABLISHED 1968
947-5594
500 HIGH HOLIDAY ADLER
Prlyer Books for sale. Good
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ti'i'NAI ISRAEL'*
a Or. Miami tmwr. Syn. (*rthod.)
/If* N*H4wy Urrktl w* U t*4*4 if:
Rabbi Ralph Z. GHxmon
fl Club dm loi America*
(crmrly YM-TWMA)
500 S.W. 8th St.
Mtn *** h, roui j*mtbn
r.r m4fwmt^ 274-9556
sultation co lid be followed by
nirtML'f 8P"JuTfr>n "9R tW
meaning of potential human
life in the Jewish tradition and
whether civil rights can be
predicated on such a potential
life; a discussion of the Catho-
lic position that human life
exists from the moment of con-
ception; an analysis of the Su-
preme Court's decisions on
abortion and their impact on our
society.
AFTER THE three preced-
ing points had been discussed.
Bishop Law stated, "we should
turn to models for possible
Catholic Jewish action in this
area."
Msgr. James T. McHugh, di-
rector of the National Confer-
ence of Catholic Bishops Com-
mittee for Pro-Life Activities
said. "The U.S. Supreme Court's
abortion decisions of January,
1973. have established an at-
mosphere of permissive abor-
tion in the United States.
'"This has prompted the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Bishops to take a strong stand
in favor of a constitutional
amendment which would pro-
vide legal restrictions on the
practice of abortion."
Msgr. McHugh urged that all
moral and religious leaders
should speak with one another
and in public to further the
sanctity of human life.
Father John Connery, profes-
sor of theology, Jesuit School of
Theology in Chicago, traced the
histor) of the Catholic position
on abortion to early Church
teaching and practice.
"In continuity with the Jew-
ish tradition, theologians and
Church authorities have taught
from earliest Christian times
that abortion is a moral evil."
RABBI WALTER Wurzburger,
visiting professor of philosophy
at Yeshiva University in New
York, told the group that in
Jewish tradition, the sanctity of
life is independent of all utili-
tarian considerations. "Jewish
tradition cannot condone meas-
ures which, although designed
to improve the quality of life,
ac'.-ially contribute to the de-
valuation of life itself and to
the diminution of human dig-
nity."
Supporting this view, Dr.
David M. Feldman, Rabbi of Bay
Ridge Jewish Center, Brooklyn,
and author of "Birth Control in
Jewish Law," noted that "the
humaneness of Jewish tradition
which declares the life of the
fetus to be secondary to the life
of the mother has led some to
believe that abortion for casual
and less-than-grave reasons is
sanctioned in Judaism.
"If our theological differences
with Catholicism remains, and
we cannot support the constitu-
tional amendment proposed by
the Catholic Church, we can
however speak in a common
-TbiCT TTith- LJlllUlki UtUMl.ll
casualness and a cheapening of
attitudes towards potential life. .
We have common ground in
affirming the sanctity of life
and opposing abortion on de-
maud."
RABBI BALFOL'R Brickner.
director of the Department of
Interfaith Activities of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, expressed strong
opposition to any legislation or
constitutional amendment that
would interfere with the right
of the mother to decide whether
or not to abort a pregnancy.
He declared that the danger
to the sanctity of human life is
posed not by abortion but "by
our callousness to war and our
worship of materialism.-'
Participating on behalf of the
Synagogue Council of America
were Rabbi Saul Berman. Stern
College; Rabbi Wayne Dosick,
Synagogue Council of America:
Annette D u a m Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions; Rabbi David Panitz. Tem-
ple Emanuel. Paterson. New
Jersey; Rabbi David Seligson,
Central Synagogue. New York;
Albert Vorspan. Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and Dr. Michael Wysho-
grod. Baruch College.
Gordon Announces Cabinet
Approval Of City Funding
Sen. Jack Gordon has an-
nounced approval by the Florida
State Cabinet of additional fund-
ing to the City of Miami Beach
for the development of North
Shore Oceanfront Park.
The Governor and Cabinet, as
Head of the Department of Na-
tural Resources, has approved
additional financial assistance
from the Land and Water Con-
servation Fund to the City of
Miami Beach for second stage
development of North Shore
Oceanfront Park.
CONSERVATIVE TEMPLE
seeks Cantor for High
Holidays. Call Monday -
Wednesday Friday
9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
751-6791
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DADE BROWARD
and/or Both.
Send resume to S.T.,
Bex 012973, Miami 33101
AIL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
Telephone, Penenal Contact,
New Beach At Bal Harbour
Residents of the Village of
Bal Harbour will have a brand
new beach in September. The
Bal Harbour Beach restoration
project which started in May
1973 will restore the beach
stretching from 96th Street
north to Bakers Haulover Cut
inlet. The project will add 200
feet of new beach to the luxury
Kenilworth condominium prop-
erty, presently under construc-
tion and scheduled for comple-
tion in December.
A YOUNG COUPLE
from Israel, students, with a
new-born baby needs some
furniture for moving to an
unfurnished apartment. If you
have any, please call 949-4328.
(Shlomo)
bal shachris
Wanted
for High Holidays
in Orthodox Congregation
Write WBS, Box 012973
Miami, Florida 33101
Obviously pleased at the establishment of an annual Full
Tuition Scholarship by Bank Leumi Le-Israel B.M. at the
Greater Miami Hebrew Academy are these principals in
ceremonies held this week. From left are 1. H. Abrams,
chairman of the executive committee of the Hebrew Acad-
emy; Judah H. Kurtzbard, director of the Miami Beach
regional office of Bank Leumi; Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Academy; and Judge Norman
Ciment, president of the Miami Beach school. The Bank
Leumi offices in the 407 Lincoln Road Building were
expanded last month.
Bank Leumi Donates Annual
Full Tuition Scholarship
Bank Leumi Le-Israel B. M..
largest bank in the State of
Israel, has donated an annual
Full Tuition Scholarship to the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy. Judge Norman Ciment.
president of the Miami Beach
school, announced this week.
First payment on the yearlv
contribution to the Souths
largest Hebrew day school waa
turned over by Judah H. Kurtz-
bard, director of the Bank
Leumi representative office in
the 407 Lincoln Road Building.
Also particrpatine in the cere-
monies were Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross, principal, and I. H.
Abrams. chairman of the execu-
tive committee of the Hebrew
Academy.
Established in 1902 by the
British Zionist Movement. Bank
Leumi has grown to one of the
world's major banks with assets
of well over three billion dol-
lars and branches in New York,
London. Toronto and represen-
tative offices around the globe.
Kurtzbard said that the part-
nership between Miami Reach
Jewry and the State of Israel
"is a two-way street, and par-
ticularly in the area of Jewish
education w> must h art-
ners. The Hebrew :-y.
founded at the same time as
modern Israel, i- zed
throughout the State ;.- DC of
the foremost educatn-. insti-
tutions in the Diasp
Judge Ciment lauded Rank
Leumi for its suppov I*
comes at a time when i-vreas-
ins costs for facui' "i.
utilities and other i ting
taxes seriously afL-1 dg-
et and planning for t S*
76 academic year
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(Return October 8, 1975)
2 Weeks Israel Plus 4 Nights Istanbul, Turkey
3 Nights Athens, Greece
Miami to Miami $1549.00
ALL INC EL AL ISRAEL AIRLINES
Includes DE LUXE accommodation throughout trip, full
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May' July n>1975
+Jn*ist noridUar
Page lt-B
ft>
^abMwtal flag*
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lioschitz Rabbi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Samuel Ha-Nagid: Rabbi,
PoeU Statesman* General
Religious Services
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION 995 SW 87th Awe. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron. 1
By RABBI MARVIN ROSE
Beth David South
Could you imagine a Jewish
president of the United States?
Well, maybe.
But could you imagine a
Jewish president of the United
States who would put on Tefillin
and daven each morning, eat
only kosher food, observe Shab-
bat and the other mitzvot of
Halachic Judaism, write He-
brew poetry and books on He-
brew grammar and even be the
author of an introduction to the
Talmud in Hebrew?
Now, that's another story!
Would you believe that there
was such a head of statethat
he lived in Spain almost 1.000
years ago, that his poetry still
survives and that his "Introduc-
tion to the Talmud" is found at
the beginning of every copy of
the Talmud in use today?
His name was Samuel, the
son of Joseph. In Arabic, he
was called Samuel ibn Nagdela.
But to Jews, he was known as
Samuel ha-Nagid. Samuel the
Prince, Vizier (Prime Minister)
of Granada, General of its
armies and. for a number of
years, for all intent and pur-
poses King of that Arab mon-
archy.
Samuel was an extraordinary
man. but he also lived in extra-
ordinary times.
Spain was ruled by Arab-Mos-
lems called Moors. The Moors,
like many other Moslems, saw a
great deal of similarity between
their religion and Judaism. Both
believed uncompromisingly in
pure monotheism; both were
concerned not only with a set
of beliefs, but a total way of
life; both had a Written and
Oral Law that explained that
way of life, and both recognized
the importance of scholarship
in secular as well as religious
realms in order to make life
more pleasant and more mean-
ingful.
There was a great deal of
mutual respect between Mos-
lems and Jews. The latter were
not only permitted, but en-
couraged by the Moslems to live
by the Laws of the Torah.
In the middle of the 10th
century the Caliph (Moslem
ruler) appointed a Jew, Hasdai
ibn Shaprut, as his personal
physician. He used his influence
and wealth to found a Yeshiva
a Talmudic Academy in
Spain.
The Yeshiva flourished and.
under the guidance of Hasdai
and Rabbi Moses, the Jewish
community of Spain became the
iocs And Answers..
Our Rabbis' Views
|No Vacation From God?
By RABBI DAVID ROSENFELD
I believe that synagogues truly take a vacation from God
during the summer months. With the spiritual leaders on well-
deserved vacations, and lay leadership as well, it becomes diffi-
cult to introduce a positive summer program.
However, a synagogue with a day camp program can organize
Jewish summer living for campers. Stimulating discussions, He-
brew songs, opening and closing prayers, can stress the true
beauty of our Torah and permeate the atmosphere with the spirit
of our faith generally, to create a positive Jewish atmosphere in
which Jewish observance is woven into the fabric of Jewish
living. Torah-living can be fun. recreational and enjoyable.
Judaism is not an austere religion, and joy and enthusiasm
can be imbued within the child at this time. The rabbi should
become an integral part of the summer camp program when he
is in the city.
Students in the Hebrew School should also receive remedial
classes to prepare them to enter their regular sessions in Sep-
tember. Here is a grand opportunity for the weaker, less motivated
children to receive special training during the so-called leisure
mer months.
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
2
most cultured and highly edu-
cated center of Jewish life in
the world. Almost every Jew
was conversant with secular
knowledge, Jewish Law, Hebrew congregation bet breira. 107.
55 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
3ETH AM (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall
Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M Baumgard. Ataociate Rabbi
Barry Altman. 3
Barrv Tab-u"''-ff
3-A
ETH DAVil iot$ SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lioson. 4-A
not only Vizier, but General of
the Armies.
Samuel had great political
power, but he never forgot his
Judaism with all the responsi-
bilities of his position. He con-
tinued to find time for the study
of Torah.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich.
TEMPLE ISRAEL-SOUTH (Formerly
Both Tikva) 9025 Sunaet Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joieph R. Narot. 13-A
SAMU EL. (Tomolo) 8900 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 306 Rabbi Maxwell
Berger 9
BETH EL.
Orthodox.
*400 Pino Tree
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro.
Dr.
9
18
SETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swiraky. Cantor Maurice Mamchea.
19
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
feraon Ave. Conservative Rabbi
Elliot Winoarad. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
this sentiment in his poetry-
But never did Samuel become
a bitter man or a vengeful war-
rior-statesman. He was too im-
bued with the teachings of the
Torah to lose the sense of com-
passion that Torah teaches.
One day, we are told, the king
heard an Arab curse Samuel, seth israel. zto *oth st. orthodox.
The King ordered that the
man's tongue be cut out, but
the Vizier countermanded the
order. He spoke to the man and
found that he had suffered many
misfortunes in his life. He re-
alized that the curses were only
an expression of the poor man's
r ._.; InctonH nf niinish- SETH SHOLOM (Temple). 4144 Chase
frustration Instead 01 punisn Ave Liberal_ Rabbj Leon Kroni,n.
ing him. Samuel gave him ex-
pensive gifts and sent him home
to his family.
Some time later. Samuel and
the King rode together in a
roval carriage. They spotted the
man walking in the street. He
looked up at them and shouted.
"Blessed be our King and his
noble Vizier."
When the King asked Samuel
whv he had not cut out the
man's tongue as he had com-
manded, Samuel replied. 'I did
exactly as you ordered. You
ordered that this man's wicked
tongue be removed. I have done
Cantor David Conviser
21
TEMPLE" BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde
rai Yardeini. 21-A
ETH TFILAH.
Orthodox.
935 Euclid
Ave.
22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE-
GATION. 843 Mer.ri.an Ave. 22-A
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 178th St..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson. 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox
haobi lo Hozencwalg. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 715 Washington Ave.
Rabbi Meir Masl:->h Melamed. 23-A
and now he has a kind cmanu-el (Tempie>. 1701 washing.
ton Ave. Conse. vative. Rabbi Irving
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. 30
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM
44 Washington Ave.
1S42
St
grammar and poetry.
This was the environment in-
to which Samuel was born in
Cordova in 933. As soon as he
was old enough, Samuel became
a student at the Yeshiva.
When civil war broke out
among the Arabs, Samuel fled
to Granada. We don't know ex-
actly how the tuture statesman beth tov (Temoie). 6438 sw 8th
-. ... _c St. Conservative. RaDbi Charles Ru-
first came to the attention of
the Vizier of Granada. Legend
has it that he was a professional
scribe who used to write court
documents.
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Yavneh 32-A
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AGUDAS ACHIM Nt'^ACH SEFARp
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo-
vits *-
BETH DAVID SOUTH 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
SETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Pabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
bel.
B'NAI ISRAEL ANO GREATER
MIAMI YCUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Sunaet Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Gnxman. 8-A
VOATH YESHURUN (Temple). 102B
NE. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Cantor lar Alpern. 31
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Keligious Community Center. 19751
NE 3rd Ave Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conaervative Rahbi Max cp-
chitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson.
34
B'NAI RAPHAEL 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Victor D. Zwel-
ing. Cantor Jack Ler.ier. 3t
ISRAEL (Temple) OF OREATEH
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform.
Rabbi oseDh R. Narot. 10
In any case, we do know that
the Vizier became so enamour-
ed of the young Samuel that be-
fore the Vizier died, he recom-
mended Samuel as his success-
or. The king soon appointed him or olom (Tmpm 8755 sw *Mi
St. Conservative. Rabbi David M.
13
ISRAELITE ENTER. 3176 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
11
SINAI (Temple) OF NORTH DADS
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralpn P. Kingsley. Cantor Irvin.
Shulkea.
37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
Bianick S9
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MS,
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox
Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
C0KAL GABIES
JUDEA (Temple). 5550 Granada Blvd.
Reform. Rabb' Michael B. Eisen-
stat. Cantor R'ta Shore. 49
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Stewart H. Sytner 14
As General he often sensed {ion (Temple), sooo MHtar Rd. Con-
in the enemy troops a certain ^S^^S^ST ""'n
jealousy in seeing a Jew as hiauah
commander of the Annies of dfereth jacob . 951 c.
Granada and he often expressed tg^i^ST"*** """is
NOR Iff MIAMI
SETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121lt St. Conservative.
Rabbi Joseph Oorfinkal. Cantor
Yehuaa Binyamin. 95
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
ZAMORA iTemple). 44 Zamoca Ave.
Conservative Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
MKaW
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave Orthodox. Rabb*
Isaac D. Vine. 9P
fCPT lAUDfRDAll
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Nee). 41
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Blvd Reform. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment. 41
CORAL SPHINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Reform. 3501 JJniver-
eity L)r. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
NW 57th St. Conservative. Pabbf
Milton J. Gross 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Stirling Rd. St
MtMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 61 MMI 9th 8t. W-4>
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Raubi Morris A. Skop,
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
HAUANDAlt
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 11
HOLLYWOOD
BETH Ei. 'Temple). 1351 S. 14fh Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfelf
tongue in its place."
When the King died, his son
took over. But the latter was a
playboy who did not live up to
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler.
24
state.
Summer weekend retreats for the laymen have also proven
to be quite successful in various communities. This affords the
lay leadership an opportunity to discuss svnagogue problems and
future plans in a relaxed vacation atmosphere instead of around playDo>
the Board Room table. A program of study can also be included his responsibility .s header
during these week-end retreats.
Upon the return of the rabbi from his vacation, he should also
encourage his membership to take advantage of the little extra
time that he has during the summer months for counselling and
consultation.
In* other words, summer months need not be lean and arid
spiritually or intellectually. The synagogue is not really closed
for the summer.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S
Gross. 29
C COHEN COMMUNITY
AGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibr H. Stern.
Cantor Meyer Engel. 26
While the young man occu- KNESETH israel. 1415 EucMd Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
BETH FHALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar.
thur St Conservative. Rabbi Morto*
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 44
------------------
S I N <\ I (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW 62nd Ave Hollywood. F.?.bbl
D.ivid Rosenfield 47-fJ
TEMPLE SOLEL iLibeml) 5100 Sher-
id.in St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 4;-0
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams.
MIRAMAX
ISRAEL (Temple) 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 49
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St Conservative. 61
pied the throne as a figurehead,
Samuel ha-Nagid ruled Grana-
da, as he continued to study
Torah, write on the Talmud and
Hebrew grammar and compose
volume after volume of poetry
in the language of his people.
MENORAH (Temoie). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Raool Mayer Abram-
owitz. Csntor Nico Feldman. 28
NER TAMID (Temple). 79th St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eugene Labovit*. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29

CANDIEI:GHTING TIM!
3 AB 7:57
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12*
Mil.
M IC H L S
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1 Miami Delegates Among Those
Attending NCJR AC Conference
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apanji onli of *!. nip i
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vatac gem and spaces For-a into bafts abacs 1 men m tt-
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bb*e>abaai4f
*-jd tee* act hgbt foods. Fla1 r and
: -. m am otafcej djai
FLW. VDE* CREOLE
2 .-.-.
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green pepper
4 B. a-shiws, sbeed
: .-.
drained
: -. -;
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1 bay leaf
-.? tap. pepper sane
'optional./
: tap tail
I ft Ommtm flki
Meat margarine is a large skillet; add canon and green
peppe- Coat until tender Add Bsushrooma Cook 3 minutes
Add tomatoea. lemon juice, tarragon bay leaf, pepper satict
ami t.u Simmer 20 iranate*, then add fVwnder and
MWr. Sonmer 10 rm/urtes or until fish flakes easily when
rested wi'h a for* Sere*. f'Xir
CHAWGf Of ADMISS?
F***e i ;-"- hi notify the jEWISH aOfiiDiAN of
-.- .-,' *ve-.*- P-*e all^w '"^
wee*-. ?e*.

OLD ADDRESS
PI**** attach mailing label
from thi* iesw* here
NEW ADDRESS
'.-.:'
'.t4t
Aot rte.
Z.p
Eff'S'.'./e date
MAIL TO:
PLEASE USE THIS FORM
THE JEWISH FLOftlDIAN
P.O. BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLA. 13101
J
amc r
ga-i r m mmmanmm TS~
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endorsement of :?
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SH.XJC1 WASSy3L\.\
Jrf.*i QmI "*** fan. -J!;
a,'.iy: *. -J^e Terao ***&
Ser-.-d*?. M3 11 ar
Beta Dcnii :,rgrrga>en
the Bath Dane i Hay chtsa ami
asBVJQi Kzsscaca mbw isgn,
Schaet v^ere she viB be tab
:-::
Smoil* Elected
Vice President
-rt rneetfasj BVt bat :
of director; of WaafcxngTQQ Fed-
i-ivcn and Loan Assort
Don elected Arthur H. ron>
nee presadenL
'.' ~' ~ -~ i
-. : .-.---.-.:
-.. v v r-.~i-- :
cpomabar Waathngtoo
Other vice ;
by the board
cir. hharny
H.ar;.i il hfl
M e "jeered
--. a.-:
y/w^
er
Retinrtrs Gravp Planning
General Meeting inly 18
A genera! meeting of I
Dade-3roviard Chapter of the
Retinim Pigznectosa Founda-
tion will be held at 8:00 p.m.
Friday. July 1. at the First
Federal Savings and Loan As-
sociation. 18301 Bucayne Blvd..
North Miami Beach.
Joe Croghan, sports directoi
of Ch. 10 and host of -The Don
Shula Show.' ill be present.
All members and interested
parties are urged to attend. For
further information contact Joy
Scherer or Al Stollberg
Nine Stokes Races Set
During Colder Session
The classic division is in the
sportslight as Calder Race
Course swings into its 41 ses-
sion summer meeting. Nine
stakes races will be contested
during the meeting, which
comes to a climax on Labor
Day with the S40.000 added
Stephen A. Calder Handicap.
The summer season also con-
tinues the 5 day each week
schedule. Sundays and Tues-
days are non racing days. All
other programs call for 10 races
with first post at 1:15 p.m.
Horse Shoe North Carolina
OFFERS
A WEEK OF FAMILY CAMPING
August 24 August 30
f popuLr Family Camping on C VMP HIGH-
lNDKR'S 1"0 k : North Carolina m ..r.:a:nside
"v
Delude tennis swimming, I \ ^
ruby-mining baa d softbai: Horsebai
and golf are u lilabte nearby
Indian Council Campfires movies, Bmgo
add to a family vacation iha: has .
and at a very reas nable price!
bina for at S150. F each additional U l >*"
over 3 years of age $50 Prices include bit
dinner
For reservations: Call Fred Lawman. Pine Cre i s
1501 N E 62nd Street. Ft Lauderdale. Phone "'2-6550
HORSE SHOE, NORTH CAROLINA
OPEN ADMISSIONS POLICY
A residential Camp for Boys and Girls Ages 7-16
OFFERS YOU A WIDE SELECTION OF ACTIVITIES
AND TIMES TO FIT EVERY VACATION PLAN
WITH 2-WEEK SESSIONS
JULY 26 AUG. 9 AUG. 9 AUG 23
4-WeEK SESSION JULY 26 AUG 23
and a weak of popular FAMILY CAMPING AUG. 24 30
Ca~-D Highlander m.akes Full use of 170 acres of North Caro-
lina r-oonta.-s.de country and our gymnasium to Present
Now in-ense Majors Program in GYMNAST.CS AND DANCE,
H5 ^DVAND RIDING. ARTS AND CRAFTS. ADVANCED
CAMPING and H.A.W K as well as the traditional programs
mese and other activities including water skiing, canoeing,
swirnm.ng. nflery. archery, nature study, hiking, gymnasium
and land sports.
Contact Fred Lawman, PINE CREST SCHOOL
1501 N.E. 62nd ST., FT. LAUDHtDAlE, FLA. 33334
HONE: 772-6550


L July 11, 1975
+Jmisi>ncridiari
13-B
*
nearing completion,..




THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a sacred
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not like to think about it, the time
to arrange for it is long before
the need, when your mind is
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the altematives.The perfect
alternative is Mount Nebo's
Garden Mausoleum...a sanctuary
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COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
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BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
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Sir:
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MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY-
NAME
STREET
CITY
ZIP
TELEPHONE
J


Page 14-B
+Je*ist fkrkUan
Friday,
July n
bituaries
SIEGINDORF
PHILLIPS
CAPT .'. JAMES J miB!
Jab) 4. at
| ,.,]
n 5 ith tr.e Miami
!.: Bon
Pa.-i;i S .' be HUM the
earl) ml ei < (
Tenv B-EL Hlbiscu Ms-.
Iy.dec. M.ami Beach Elks I/xIn 1601
and thi L'ivlc I.eaitue Su-v vort ir-
< !u J.ioyd and Clrcu C eft Judtre
Arde three dauahtere.
Elena. Yvette and Snail Iff low
tare, Mrs Lena Mercer. Mm. Rom
Left Mrs Bobu 1. lean
G, ;d i', ddauar.ter. Ser-
i el \- .v mas Pai
How
HELLER
STANLEY -' of Miami Reach
ridai .
4! '" m Patecavx N J.
H Dlf Ui
of the Blka
Clafa i MB, orranized and first
president of the Citv of Hen*. mejn-
bar | pm lie-
IBM attorney A eraduate Ir the firt
I of the I" of M l.iw School.
Survived bv his former wife. Sonia.
on. Ivan. M B.. dauahter Mrs.
Smione Richardson. MB. rrandsons.
I'.a oh ., ,|.,.- (tatara.
Ensien. Fairlawn. N J.. and
Krai' Price San Diem >'alif.
brothers. Samuel and David. Miami.
Funeral servi, e* were held at River-
side Chapels with interment in Ml.
Slnal Cemetery.
I.EX' '!:!". Weiiandi 60. passed sway
.'ulv I BlM i- -urvived
by bar aoni Jonas Welland. Bay
Hari-or Island: daush'ir- Fern
Ziaefer. Mir.imar and M Smith
of Miami. 5 rrandrhildren and a
sister Birdta Sklar Services were
held Bundav at Rlvereide ChaDei.
with interment la Mt. Nebo Ceme-
terv.
WEHEH Howard S.. 76. of Miami
Hivtrsnl. Interment Mount Nebo
I'eraeterv
BLUMSTEIN Harrv. 74. of Miami
ll-aj h K.v.rside
KISHBEIN. Fannie. 68. of North
Mlajm Blasbent.
JACOPSON Kuth. of North Miami
Beat'h Levitt.
jAHEfT Arthur. 68. of Miami Beach.
Blaabera
KAPtAN. Harrr. of North Miami
Bearh. Kiveraide.
KAHCH. Mildred C. of Bal Harbour.
Riverside.
GOLD
MK.V 67. 10 year resident of N.
Heath, formerlv of Chels. a.
died suddenlv Monday. Julv
San Dleao. Calif Husband
late Ida Finkelstein. devoted
of Lillian Oarlit! of North
Miami
Mass .
7. at
of the
father
Miami
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
0pn fyerjr Doy Closed Sobbaffi
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
h and Jordan Gold of Peabodv.
Mass : brother of Abe Gold and
nele of Sheryl Gold, of Koslindale.
Ma.-s Grandfather of Ivv and Jav
Garlitz of North Miami Beach: also
survive-! by his kuiiI, Ida Roseenber*.
and cousins *IPP3 PUB uaaoH s*.>ukjji
Atkins, all of I>ie Anreles. A member
of Skylake Synaroaue. North Miami
Beach. Mr. Gold was a member of
tht National Bottlers Association.
Services were to be held at Torf
Funeral Chapel. 151 Washington
Avenue Chelsea. Mass. Thursday. July
10 at 12 noon with interment at Lvnn.
Mas*. Shiva is beina observed at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gold.
92 Goodale Street. W. Peabodv. Mass
Contributions in his memory should,
be made to the Hadassah Hospital In
Jerusalem or the Heart Fund.
tllADSHAW. Jack. 66 of Miami
Beach. Newman
WPI-AN. Harrr. 88. of Miami Beach.
Riverside
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Stntlflf mt If .jh Community j.nce IIM
ORTHODOX
CONSCRVsTIVE
worm services
Ike Gcraon
JameiS CorCon
r* i.i'SMiTH Ham M i f
HALPERIN Mlriai
' M i.i in
KANNER San u<
Mian
rment Mom
RH CARDI, Joseph, of Mian;
\. .. man .
BOXER Mary. 51 of Miami Baacp.
Riv,
Interment Moui I Nils Li met* IT,
COOPEH.MAN
North Miami Bead Rlvei
Inlermenl Mouni N< b, i m<
PERKIN Clara 41
Kei Btei a_vn< Leviti
WELNSTBIN Yetta B i f
Miami Beach I
Interment Mourn Nabt I emi
ZEII'NEK. PI
North Mutmt Beai h Ulasberr.
BARA8CH. Clara. -
North Miami Beach Rlvaralde.
BERNSTEIN. Anna, of
Newman.
BROWN. Rose 7t. of
Miami Beach I
COHEN. Abraham ''. of
n rth Miami Beai h 1.. vitt
FIRMAN Oil. 70. of
North Miami Beach. Riverside.
OINANDES Freda T8 "f
Miami Beach Ulasberr.
PEAKL Dora. IS. of
North Miami Beach. Riverside.
interm.ni Mounl Nab" Ometan
STOPCK. Saul U f Miami Beach.
Riverside.
BINDER. David of Mian Beai h
Riverside.
HI.AIR. Samuel. 71. of
Miami Reach Riverside
D'AMMSIO Albirto. 77. of
1.EV1NE. Hermon. C7 of
Miami Gordon Interment
Mount Nebo Cemeter\
North Miami Beach. Riverside.
JACOBS. Arthur. 51. of Miami
Riverside
KRANZE. Daisv W.. 72. of
Miami Riverside
PEACOCK. Leon A 94. of
Coconut Grove Riverside.
SCHWAHTZBKRG Samuel 86.
of Miami Beach Levitt
FRIEDMAN. Sarah. 87. of
North Miami Beach Riverside.
G01J)STE1N. Abraham. 85. of
North Miami Beach Riverside.
RAFF Minnie Keller 83. of
Miami Beach. Riverside
ZEISMAN. Samuel. 77. of
Miami Beach Riverside.
BOSCO. Katie F of Miami Bearh
Newman
ISRAEL, Adele. 5S. of Miami Beach
Newman.
PALAY. Ida. 72 of
North Miami Beai h Riverside.
SCHRECK Nathan 73 of
Miami Beach. Riverside
SPIEGEL. Rose V. 83. of
Miami Beach. Riverside
arstark. Meyer, of
Miami Sorincs. Levitt.
GKEENKERG. Jack. 75. of
North Miami Beach Leviti
IFFLA. David. 77, of Miami Beach
Levitt
LANDESBBRO. Abraham 73. of
Miami Beach Riverside
I.KBAII. Henrietta F. 65. of
Miami. Gordon.
LEVY. Edward A 74. of
Surfside Rlasb.rir
UEBBRMAN Melvin. 65. of
North Miami Beach 1^-vitt
STERO. Bernice. 61. of Miami.
Levitt
CASTLE Rebei f Miami.
Onrrinn Interment Mounl Nebi
Cemetery.
JAi on.-.. Mvman !:. of Miami
Levitt
Kl KIN. Rena. 74 of North Miami
LevRt
ROl HWARG. Dora. 85. of
North Bay Vlllaae Riverside
STARR. Frederick 97. of Surfsld.
Riverside
ANDREWS. Peter. 34. of Miami
v., n Orsdel.
interment Mount Nebo Cemetery
LEVITT
Jilemorial Chape
"jnvfSN, uMKAi owiaotr
*
LOCAL AND OUT Of STATE
ARRANGE*ENTt
949-6315
1SMJ W. DIXIE MVVY.. N.M.

L
865-2353
790 Smnnty F.rlf Stntl
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Repiuented by S. Levitt. F.O.
In New York:
(212) 263-7600
Queens Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hills, N.Y.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 75-22016
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(with Prooerty)
CHARLES BBOWN,
-ir Administrator
f 'he Batate of
NATHAN A. BROWN
Deceased.
Plaintiff,
vn
FliORENCE MARIE BROWN, e! al.
Defendants
TO: PIORENCK HARIB DROWN.
if ;illve: or If dead, the
unknown sin.use heirs,
devisees. KTajlteeB, asslanees.
ereditors. legatees and all other
nartles rlaimina hv throuah.
under or aaainst In r
Residence Unknown
"OU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED lhat
n action for Dec'aratnrv .ludement
to determine nwm rshio of certain
united State* BJavimta Bonds. Series
B. u^s commenced ajraJoai you bi
the ilKive-n.imed Plaintiff in the
ibove-slvled Court on Julv 9th. 1975
You are reouired to serve a < onv of
written defenses, if anv with Hi,
t.lerk of the above-slvled fourt anil
to serve a COPT there,,f Un,,ri H|;\"KY
viiRTON. Attorney for Plaintiff. 12^1
RiKcavne Buildinir. 19 West Flaa'er
Street. Miami Florida 3.11.10. on or
before Aui-um 15. 1975: otherwise >
default htditment will he entered
trsinst vou for the relief reouested
'n the ( omnlaint
DATED Julv 9th 197.5. at Miami
Dade County. Florida
RICHARD P DRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade Count v. Florida
Bv I, RARNAKI)
Deoutv Clerk
7'11-18-JS 8/1
LEGAL NOTItt
"GAL NOTKt
toad
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desirine to eneaee
In business under the fictitious name
of NOTARY BOND UNDBRWRTT-
l-.KS al number 99<> S \\ 1st Street
In the City of Miami. Florida. Ih-
tenii: to Reelste- the ., ,i ,,::m w '
the Clerk Of rru|, Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated al Miami, .-.orida. this 11th
dav of JI'I.Y. 1!7 ,
BONDINfl riini'ORATION
OF AM KitH'A
fl irldi rtvoratlon
Hv SAM BBIT1 l.v. l^esident
MARVIN II cii.i.mAN
Attorney for Aonlieant
MM Bh* inn Boulevard
Minrnl. Florida 11117
7 11-18-tt 8/1
IN TH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO 73-21897
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE BV PLBLICATION
117 ILBA BON.
!- -tiff.
LEON
K MZAD0 LEON.
IOON.
y xl ,, i | ui known.
ar.

foil, ivlna to-
roop
Kl. ADDITION SECTION I.
rdlna I tht Plai thereof.
led In Plat, B.,k 57. Paae
I th. Pui I"""
County. rTorlda
and vou are rectui" vour an-
to th coraolalnt I 'leed
with 'he Clerk of the above Court
and serve a COBV Ihereol ut>n olain-
tiff- attorney Hem n Coheo.
mire HI SW 1 M-ami.
(.,,,, r I eforr Auaust
12. 1975. or el* MBOlallll will he
.. ,!
Dated Julv Is l7l
RICHARD !' l'RINKEB
Clerk i'ir uii i'< uit
Hv 1 I.IF1S
l^enu'v I'lerk
7 11-18-25 8/1
NOTICE
.L'*DElf
FICTITIOUS Nil"?" ^1
the u- di 'EX.wl

ISAAi

3 1,1
IN THE
ELE
o
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the uademianed. desirma to enaaae
in business under the fictitious name
of Scope Indu.slrav- a? s033 N W tCUl
Street. Mami. Florida S3168 intends
to reaister said nm. with the Clerk
of the Ctrcult 'ourt of Dade County.
Florida.
BCOn Harvey D. Roeers
1454 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida
Attorney for Applicant
7'11-18-JS 1/1
HE CIRCUIT C0i,BT.
VENTH JUDrCiA,TC,TH,
F FLORIDA A JLCl^T
DADE COUNTY *
. NO 75.1797J '
General Junid.ction n,u
. NOTICE OF PLB. ,C.Te"
BUFFALO s.vv INt;s baxk Cl1
Pikinnp^
known spouses, it i
dead, then an know ,.u
married: all unkn,
arantees. ;.,Mri,
trustees, or oth. mm.T?*
throuifh. uioi.r oi
Thomas A Cash ,,""
Caah. his w
persons havinr
anv naht. tltl.
to the oronertv I .-
Defendant*
TO. THOMAS A I \SH ,,-d i\' 1
M. CASH, his wife ^
4nda
residence unki
known RKMiaej I remamlii 2
If dead.
if remarried
notice on
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA N AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-3623
In RE: Estate of
HANNAH R W1TKIN.
lit ''HP***!
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To ah Creditor! and All Peraai Hav-
ing Claim or Demandi Aralnet Raid
le:
Yon are herebv iw.iifie.l and reauired
10 |,resent sn\ claim! and demandi
v\iii,h vou nirtv have aaralnal the es-
tate of HANNAH l: WITKIN de.-eas-
e,i li'. t 11 ide i u- i Florida, to
the Circuit Jndarei ol bade I'ountv.
and file the nune m duollcate and as
provided In Section TU.1I Florida
Btatntea. In thi re in the Conn-
t] Conrthotiw in Dadi County, Bio-
ihI.i within foui ilendai naontlia
from the time ,,f the flral nubhi atlon
of. or thi Mine will be barred
l-iie.i at Miami. Florida thi! 7th
cl.tv Ol Julv \ 1 '
PHIUP LEVY
\ Ex< uni
Flrel nubli. ati. n ol
llth das ,,; JU i
Kommel. Roa-rs. l.orbei A Shrnknmn
H- MAN R :.. Rl
\ rni-v for E\i utor
4-'" Lincoln Road
Miami Reach i
7/11-It
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B DOWLING
i t. PROBATE N 75-4169
in RE Batate d!
Beaate Harnett I'hefitz
deceaied
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To AllCredltgrs and UI Persons ll.iv-
\n* I .aims or D< mandi U i m Bald
You are herebv notified and reoulr-
Kl,"hDre"BJ nv, "'" li.....emends
which yoj mv hav. aealnai the es-
e'.t iil 7',' h" -1"
i late of Dad. County. Florida to
the Crcuu JU4!,.,, I(Mdp (,i(un|v
or',,, a K"'.'' "' dunllcale and as
nrov.d.d In S.,,, ;;,., ,,; K1r(ll
tuta. in th. ,n ,n, ,,oun*
ti ourthouae in Dade I ountv FVi-
rtdl a-Rhln four c|..dar rrs.nths
from the time of the firs, nubheal on
F.I! h '"" "vt, **" u,li b' bnired
'-':;?Ju,iv.Mn,,-,^"nd"- ,hl* 7,h
BLANCHE UBRSHBN
... .. As Executor
th n,k"!Jhl,,a'1"" ol -Ins
tn. nth dav of Julv. l^7r,
Law I Ifflces ,.(
Oeonre J Tnllanoff
Attorney for Batate
BO Lincoln Road
Miami lleacli. Florida 3.1139
remarry ail
then ui -i-me/l
devisees, aranti t. ,.. J
Uenora. creditor- tru-'.f.f i t
otherwise rialmini bv tr'n-u* I
under or aeaii.-' he ^i I
Thomas A '.,-( ,nd \nn:
M Cash, his wife and anna
all other persons havincot
rlaiBilna to have anv rurti
title or interest, i "r te ni,
uruwerty herein .Us^nhed
Tt>D ARE HEREBY NnTIFimi
a suit to foreclose mortcui atatl
real and personal nrooertv kit t filed aaalnst vou In thi _-l
by the Plaintiff. Huff-. -,i -.i- Hut|
The oropertv souehr |. ;(>l
closed i! as fo||i,w ^
It If. Bio, k '. I.AKK
SECTION TWl i .
Plat thereol. | ,-
Hook 71. Mure It of ihe PakHc
Records ,,f Dadi i '-''nil
YOT ARE RBUI' ..r,M]
copy of vour insw...... :.eid. 1
in ,.n Plaintiff" Attorrev MaI.'-DI
II FRIEDMAN > Douclu tM.{
Coral OaJMea l I
the oriainal in the ..... .i j
of the above Court I
15th day of Auru-
of which the comn
as confessed Id 'l
lief reouested in 1*1.. ntiff r-i.jtj
and nleadliurs
MVTEI) this 7th rt; Jul) la|
RICHARD H BKINI
Clerk of the Circuit '
Deck Count] Rl
Bv N A HKvVETT
Deoutv i'lerk
it'oPRT SEAM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DViSION
PROBATE NO "5-2843
It RE Estate ol
JOSEPH M Si HAT'/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and \ |
inn Clalmi or Demi
i late:
Y,,u arr herebv m '-alljl1
to or.s,.nt am itrBisti
vrhich vou mav ha\ !* e>j
tate of JOSEPH M
ed late -f <",-,k C uni lllii '-'I
the Clr.-uit Judai
and file the aame li *JJjj
Drovlded In Bectlon I' ^lr" J
Statutes, in their office- 'h^OMJ-l
Iv Courthouse In Dadi Counti '>l
i ids within four -
from the time of H i a""J
h< renf. or th. --li"'
Piled at Miami r" lh" a
dav of Julv AH IS"!
OEOROE J TAI.lANt'"
As Anclllan I In
First nublicatlon of tins notice
the llth dav of luh
I AW OFFICES OF
UEoROKJ TALIAM
Hv Terrence Schwa' '
Attorney for
Ancillary Adminlstiai. I x
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach. Fkirlda
notice on
7/U-ll
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EVl7T;o.iUD,CIAL CIRCUIT"of
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
__OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
J^NK B. DOWLING
In HE fcjiute of
<-l-ARA COOK
deceased
NOTICE TO-CIISDITORS
il .. r,^Mor and All Persona Hav.
You are herebv notified and renuir
rpdoijj'h a (T^,K
/k/a JACK Cook
... As Executor
Flrel publication of this no,k.e OB
,'.' lit dav of Julv. 1975
,;":l"K l-v,ns.,. Rsn.
,,,"" K" "Vlneon A Kenln
'"""o > f. r Executor
1 Brlckell Avenue
illaml. Florida Sill]
7/ll-H
NOT.'CE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCU'T COURT OF TH'
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT Of |
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVIS'ON
Civil Action No. 75-213K
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRI U'K "F
JOSEPH ITHI.Io P"
and
HOSE IM Clio Reaoondei t
TO: ROSE PI'OIJO
lie Rose Lane Ant
Rome. New York 1344fi .
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED^
an action f,.r Dhantatloi l ,
has been filed aaainst vou i'myoar
are reuulreil to serve \ on
written defenses, if nv ,
HYMAN P OAI BIJT. &*>" (or
(jai hit <:ai ni'T ''1::'";v.^.
Petitioner, whose addr.s- -' ^
inrton Aye Miami. Beai h. m ,h,
file the oriainal with th. clera _
above stvted court on or o< r wlj
ust 11. H7.-, otherwise "'ST JM
be ..nter.l aaainst vou '' "' ,i,|on.
demand, ,1 in the i i tnola i ;" ,,,<
This notice ahall be oul
each week for four ,,.n-. '
in the Jewish floripj v^s,,,1 0i
WITNEsi mv hand snd l,r" on Utta
said c,,url at Miami. Florida. "
2nd dav of Julv. IMS ,..
RICH A' P V HHIMvf.lt.
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. FTorWi
in I BNEEPEN
I...... iv Clerk
(Circuit Oourl Beall
C.AI.HPT A OAI HIT.
Attorneys at I BV*
721 Waehinati n Kv< nue
Mi im< Reach. Florida SS139
72-3H"i
Attorney for PetitiM
L


July 11, 1975
+Jmfelh Meridian
Page 15-B
UGAl NOTKI
LEGAL NOTKF
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
IT.TIOUS NAME LAW
,.- HEREBY GIVEN that
"
hi fli tilioui n in..'
EXA at tit* N I". 1
i dj to res
< the Circuit
i mntv, l'li"-iila.
U.AL JEW ELRY. IXC
.
NOTICE UNDER
;TiTiOUS NAME LAW
|K IS HEitEUl QIV'EN that
... encage
..-- under tin fli tltlous name
. PAKI8 BAKEKY at S02S
h m.. Miami, Fla 33 lit
tar Mid name with the
i i ircult ourt nt ii.nl.'
tiOH CAKE INC.
i 1-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
[iCTlTIOUS NAME LAW
lej ii r.i.i.i i;. > i ..< thai
i. desiring to engage In
hi 11- iilous. name ot'
T- tangle 1i vota al JJ6 N u
i .Miami. Florida Intenda
...l name a itli the lei k
iircuit Court ..i lude County.
1:, ingle Autu inter. Inc.
I: David M. Sinn. President
fii ea of George J raJlanott
lot Triangle Autu
hi.
Dili Road. Mtanu Heath
[3313
I 20-27 7/4-11
IE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
7ENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
,.IL ACTION NO. 75-20732
ETION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ST WEEKES.
JSRAND
>id
CE WEEKES.
?&.
.1CE WEEKES.
I.m.'i'ln Place. Ant. 3B.
lofc'yn. New York.
ARE NOTIFIED that a Petl-
Dissolution of vour Marrlaire
i died and vou are reuuired
,s conv of vour written de-
il anv. to It on KICHAKD
tlL'HAHD. Attn: MELVIN J
ID. attorney for Petitioner.
iJdreaa Is 927 Lincoln Koad.
lea h. Florida 33139. and file
flgmal with the clerk ol the
puled court on or before Aug-
197E; otherwise a default will
i igainal vou for the relief
il In the petition.
i'iSS 'i.c hand and the seal .(
Il Miami. Florida on this
une. ItTt.
: I \,.I) P illtl.VKKK.
\- Clerk. Circuit Court
. County. Florida
*\ I. SNBEDBN
\. ii..-,'in Clerk
jrt Seal)
7 -ll-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
"CTITIOUS NAME LAW
[ICE IS HEREBY OIVEN th.it
bdaraufflMHt. desiring to engng*
be ess under the fictitious name
|ando C. Kum *. .M IV at 6805
Avenue. Miami Bench. Florida
to register .-aid name with
-k oi the Circuit Court of
"j::-i Florida
nente hamos. M.D. P.A.
A Fla. Corn.
>" -
' I': inkel
. >ln l.n Suite IM
7/4-11-18-25
[ElNTri JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Or
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
IVIL ACTION NO. 75-2113"
2TI0N FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
arrlase
?" \ I.AMBEKT.
I er.

Alt BERT.
i.-nr
|AI.LY LAMBERT
: nne
M ihngh.r... New Jersey 08048
A HE HE) EH ".
m for Dissolution of Mar.
II is bean filed aKainsi vou and
mired to >.-r\ a lino l)f
defense*, if anv. to II in
law TuitiN. attornes r..r pen-
whos.- address is 4'>7 Lincoln
I -A wnh She clerk of 'he
..urt on or before A'lir-
otherwise a default '\ill
> i against vou for the re'ief
i ie I in the comnlaint or oetltl in.
'I it Miami. Florida on 1st day
"
RCHAPD P BRINKBR
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I' ide i ountv. Florida
BY: M KUMIN8KJ
As Denutv i'1,..k
pit Court Seal)
7/4-11 18-23
HE C.RCUIT COURT OF THE
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-21188
l"AL JURISDICTION DIV'SION
OTICE BY PUBLICATION
Th" V --elm-.. r>-
'El. JESUS MIINOZ.
Hitioner/Husband.
d
A AKAXDA DE MUNpZ.
p-oondent "Wife
MARTA ARAXDA DE Ml'NOZ
I R-xIden-c Unknown
' APE HERETTT-- NOTIFIED
Petition for Dissolution of Mar--
his been filed against vou. and
?re renulred to serve a coot of
Answer OK Pleading to the Pe-
n the hand's attorn e/ft
ro\ p OOOT>MAN. ESOl'tUE
'-'>. Biscavne Hulldlng. 19 West
er Street. Miami. Florida 88110.
file the original Answer or nlead-
|ii the. office of the Clerk of the
lit Court on or before the 8th
f August. 1975. If vou fall to do
Default Judgment will be taken
list vou for the relief di Jianded
Petition.
K AND OKI 'E'-l-'D at u'8|!,
Circuit Court
Daili. Countv, K'orida
n> B J POY
Denutv Clerk
lit Court Seal)
7/1-11-18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DATE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-4033 (Lake)
GENERAL JURISDICTION
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
rrlaere "f
ANDRES R< INNER CTD.
llu-band
CYNTHIA I> 'Mli
Re Dondi nt u i.
Ti I: CYNTHIA 1 'ID
419 Soi h so: no St reel
Oreai siiorn, Noi Hi Carolina
YOU. CYNTHIA D CID. are here-
i.v notified to flli vour defensive
oleadlnn t.' this suit i..r dissolution
f man lace wit I Clark of the
1 '"in i hi.i .-.i \ p......\ on the i'-ti-
- vi..in,-. ICIKIAR MILLER.
"t the iu in ..f MII.I Kit v v 11
KrssKM. 1401 Alnslev Building. Mi-
ami. Kin. ..ii or before the
28rd dm of Jul 1975. or a default
will be entered against \"u
l (-12-78
Itl'-HAUD P, BRINKER
As C i. .f the 'Ircult Court
Circuit Court <.-al.
Hv: s JAFFB
Denun Cl.-rk
.; 2d.|7 7 4-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA JN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-18<54
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK
STEFAN EYDON.
Petitioner/Husband
and
FREDA ZYIM)N.
Kesnond en t.' W i f e
TO: FREDA ZYDON
4 Remseu
Ridgefield. New Jersey 07fi."i7
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reuuired to serve a CODV of
vour written defenses. If any. to It on
DAVID M CONSHAK. attorney for
Petitioner, whose addrea* is 1497 N W.
7th Street. .Miami. Florida 33123. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Julv
IBtl 187* otherwise a default will be
entered :u.i inat vou for the relief de-
manded in the comnlaint or netltlnn
This notice shall be Dubliahed once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
aid iurt at Miami. Florida on this
i:th ii.iv of June. 1975
Richard P Hrinker
A-- Clerk, I'ircuit Court
Had. CountV. Florida
Hv It l.ll'l-s
As Denutv Clerk
f Circuit ''iiur' -
DAV'D M GONSHAR
i 197 M W ::ii Btreel
Miami. Flo 1.la 331 "S
Atlorn.'V for Petitioner
6 20-27 7/4-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-18957
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MAHY KACHMACIEJ.
Petitioner/Wife
PRANK RACHjMACIBJ.
Kc-Domlent/ Husband
TC: FRANK RACHMAC1EJ
102 East 7th Street
N'ew York City. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riarc lias been filed against vou and
vou are reuuired to serve a eouv of
\..ur written defenses, if anv. to it on
DAVID M flONSHAK. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 14H7 N W
7'h Street Miami. Florida 33125. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above itvled .ourt on or before Julv
25th !:'".">: otherwtae a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded .ti the comnlnlnl or net It ion
Tiiis notice shall he published
week for four consecutive Weak!
in THE JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said our- il Miann. Florida on tins
12th dav of June. 197
Richard 1* Hrinker
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade i'ountv. Flarida
f.\ It I.IPPS
As I)enut\ Clerk
(Clrcu't Cou't Seal I
DAVID M. 'IONSHAK
1491 N W 7th Stre,'
Miami F'ornia 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
fi/20-27 7'4-ll
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH -,1'DICIAL CIRCUIT
OF Fl ^o.^a ... a'o FOR
DADE COUNTY
Pn.u.iE u. VISION
PROBATE NO. 74-3256 (Dowlino.)
IN RE' I"
\ IU it;v. ITZ
ii. ,.. a
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO IV A K F
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
' I 'TH E i- hen hi Blv ii that I I
filed ms l-'ii al R< noi I and Pc mi Ion fur
l 'Istr bul ii and Final l dsoJiarai
in. : tin i ll' "I ItOBA .
WITZ, .i.....ti !. and ihai on the 28th
lav of -fnIv. 1975. v 111 anpl) I
Honorabli Cireu i Judgi ( I lade
i 'ountv. Plot dii for annrovni sa i
Final itenon and for distribution I
filial .il chai .i- Executor Of the
estate of the ntwve-nnmed decedent.
This IBtl of June,
lli:.\li> \"l;!'.\ (Executorl
HENRY NORTON. Atl'.rnev
12m lti~. aj ne Buildina
Mi..mi. Florida
87 7/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-19414
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re Th- Marriage (if
VIVIAN McDEKMoTT.
Wife a- d
ANDREW M. McDERMOTT.
Husband.
Tt): Mr. Andrew M McDermott
^1:' Weal Bind Street
New York. N.Y. 10023
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution "f Marriage
has been filed against vou and vou
are hereby required to serve a conv
of vour answer or other pleading to
the Petition on' the Wife's Attorney.
LESTER KOCEHS. whose address is
1454 N.W 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida
33125, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled court on or
before this 25th dav of July. 1975. or
a Default will be entered against vou.
DATED this 17th dav of June. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv MARION NEWMAN
fi/20-27 7/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HIRERV OIVEN hat
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of ID! Automotive. IDI Construction
at ftni NW IU Street. Miami. Florida
Intends to register said names with
. w.ora ot ii.a Circuit Court of Dade
County. Flori. a.
DAVID HAYIOCK
V80-27 7/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of A PIECE OF SANDKI. SAK Ort'-
OINALS at P.O. Box 390361. Miami
Reach. Florida 33139 intends' to regis-
ter said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit C-ittrt of Dade County. Flor-
ida.
S:indei Kirshen
Max R Silver
Attorney for SAK Originals
.40* Ains1e\ TluiMIng
Miami. Florida S3132
6/27 7/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-17820
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
BARTON SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTOINE POYAfr" and
CIaAIRE POYAU. his wife.
et al
residence unknown, if living:
unknown sdouscs. if remarried, and
If dead, then unknown soouse*. u
remarried: all unknown heirs, devi-
s.-.-s. grantees, assignees, lienors.
creditors, trustees, or otherwise
claiming by. through, under tn
against the said Antolne Povau and
Claire Poyau. his wife, and against
all other persona having or claiming
to have anv right, title or interest
in or to the nronertv herein described.
Defendants.
TO: Antoine Poyau and Claire
Poyau. his wife, residenoe
unknown. If living: unknown
snouses. if remarried, and if
dead, then unknown snouses if
remarried, all unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claiming
bv. through, under or against
|l... *:,:,l Sr.t....... P--..... I
Claire Povau. his wife, and
against ,.ll other n.rsoiis Having
or claiming to have n'- -'-ht.
title or Interest, in or to the
nionertv herein described.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foreclose mortgage
against real and Dersonal Dronertv has
1.....n fi!"il auainst vou In the above
Court bv the Plaintiff. Barton Savings
and Loan Association.
The nionertv sought tp be foreclosed
la as follows:
Lot-3. ajd North of I.ot 2, Rlock
11. of VENETIAN GARDENS.
according to the Plat thereof, re-
corded In Plat Hook 17. nage 87.
of the p.'h"" Records of Dade
County. Florida.
YOC AKn .. copy of vour answer or other Olead-
in on Plaintiff's Attorney. MALCOLM
H. FRIEDMAN. X'lO Douglas Road.
Coral Oables. Florida. U134. and file
the original In the office of the Clerk
oi the above Court, on or before the
1Mb day ot July. 1975. In default
of which the comnlaint will be taken
a- cmleased against you for the relief
reouested In Plaintiff's complaint and
mendings.
DATED this 12th day of June. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Count v. Florida
Bv: S. JAFFE
Deouty Clerk
(Court Seal)
6/20-27 7/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
F CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under rhe fictitious name of
Southern Freight Forwarding Co. at
~7iil S.W. 132nd Street. Miami. Flor-
ida JI31B6 Intenda to register said name
with the Clerk hf the Circuit Court of
Dade ("ountv. Florida
UNITED STATES BRAKE
I.INIMi CORP. Owner
i/27 ?'4-TI-18
NOTrCE UMDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE, IS HFI'.EHY CIVKN that
the underalgned. i.eslnnr ro engage In,
business un.l. r the fictitious name of
OATtCTA BARBER SHOP at 280
West 10th Avenue Hialeah. Fla. 33010
intends to reartator said name with
.1, cierk "f 'e Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
JUAN A. GARCIA Owner
1/20-27 7/4-11
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JUmiS"1'"' ^N DIVISION
NO. 75-20097
IN RE; THE *tAm.I.IVE OF-
MAiMA 1.1 ISA LAMPitEA MARVO.
Petitioner-Wife
VS.
ROBERT MARVO.
Resnondent -Husband
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
You. ROBERT MARVO. RESI-
DENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby no*
titled to serve a conv of vour Answer
to the Dissolution of Marring., filed
against vuu. unon Wife's attorney.
UFORCB NICHOLAS. ESC. '".12 NW
18th mui. Miami. Florida M1.16.
and tih original with Cl on or before Aug. 1. 1^75: otherwise
the Petition will be confessed bv vuu
bated this JJrd dav ,if June. ,n7S.
RCHARD P HHNKER. CLERK
By: WILLIE I1RADSHAW JR.
Denutv Clerk
6/27 7/4-11-18
NOTICE UNOEr>
FICTITIOUS NAKc. L/W
S'OTIll OIVEN that
in bu r tin
S'.E
114 St reel S
nd n i : n with
u i u of D
Countv, i
i l'K INC
By:
Alt i
IFINANCE ''
Bj : Moi dco Peji !.. 1
\ .... .
11 KNI.N NORTON
. i: and
Trlflnance, Inc.
.: 7 4-1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-P0027
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
MOIC > ORTOAOE CORPORATION.
Plaintiff.
TED R BOWLING and CAROLYN
BOWLING, his wife.
residence unknown, if living: un-
know :i Doui reman ed ai 'i -.f
dead, then unknown mouses, if re-
manied; all unknown heirs, deviseea.
grantees, assignees, lienors. creditors.
trustees or otherwise claiming bv.
through, under or against the said
T.-d R. Howling and Carolvn Rowing
Ills W ife
and against all other nersons having
or claiming to have anv right, title or
interest in or lo the nronertv
herein describ.-d.
Defendants
TO: Ted R. Bowling and Carolvn
Bowling, his wife, residence un-
known, if living: unknown
snouses. it remarried, and if
dead, then unknown sDouses. If
remarried; all unknown he'.ra.
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors. creditor.-, trustees, or
otherwise claiming bv. through,
under or against the said Ted B
Rowling and Carolvn Rowling
his wife, and against all other
nersons having or claiming to
have, anv right, title or interest
in or to the nronertv herein
described.
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foreclose mortgage
against real and nersnna! nronertv
has been filed against vou in the
above Court bv 'h Plain'i::. UQIC
Mortgage C The nronertv sought to be foreclosed
is as follows:
IjoI 1. Rlock 24. FIRST AUDITION
TO CAROL CITY GARDENS, ac-
cording t.. the Plat thereof, re-
corded in Plat Book M. nag. "' of
the Public l.ecords of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Yoc ARE REOCIRED to serve a
.,;i\ of vour answer or other plead-
ing .m Plni i/ffs Attornev. MAL-
COLM II FI..EI 'MAX. gOO D"Ugla
Koad. Coral Oables. Florida .13134. and
" the o-ig|nal In the office of the
Clerk of the above Court, on or be
lore the Mh dav ot August. 197". in
default "f which the comnlaint will be
taken as confessed against vou for
the relief reoues'ed in Plaintiffs com-
nlaint and nb-adiiigs
DATED this 2nd dav of Julv. 1975
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv Florida
Bv N A HEWETT
Denutv Clerk
(COCRT SEAL!
7 I.I1-1S-26
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO 75-?'2?7
ACTION FOR D'SSOLUTlON
OF MARRIAGE
IN KE: The Ma-rlage of
RODOI Fo OOMEZ
HusJbsnd
and
ROSAI S OOMEZ,
Wife
TO: Rl is.\! HA GOMEZ
RESIDENCE I"NKNOWN
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has be.oi filed ag.iinsr vou and
vou are reauired to se^ve a conv of
vour wri'ten defenses, if anv. to It on
i oris R BE! I Fit. attorney for
Petitioner u!:>.*.' address i^ 42'1 I II -
. "In R..... Miami Beach. F!t and
file the original with th.- clerk of th~
above stvied court on or before Auv-
ual TT': on..r..-.-,. :, default wRi
he entered against vou for the relief
demanded in the comnlaint or petition
This lotlce shall be nub<'shed
each -.-'k for fo-ir ronseeutlve weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said .ourt at Miami Florida m this
1st dav of Ju'v. 1<7S
RICHARD BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
D nle Countv. Flnr<(U
Rv M K' 1MINSKI
As Denutv Clerk
icircuit Court Seali
I^iuls R. Reller. E.-n.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florids 331M
Attornev for Ptitloner
7/4-ll-H-r,
IN THjE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVIS'ON
PROBATE NO. 75-3593
In RE Fsfnte of
MAX JIOSCHEL
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREO'TORS
To All Creditors and AM Persons
Havln" C'l'mii or Demands Against
Said Estate:
Toil are hereby notified and re-
nulred ha .^resent anv claims.and de-
mands which Von mav have against
the estat- of MAX M'lSCHF'. de-
caaaad late < Cook Count v. Illinois,
to the Circuit Judges of Hole Oottjirv.
and file the same in dun'lcate and as
nrovlded In Section 733 IS. FlomLi
Statutes. In their offices in the Coun-
tv Ccu^'bouse In Dade Countv. Flor-
ida, within four calendar months
from the t.me of the first nuhlicatlnn
hereof, or the same -'ll be Ici'-'-.-d
Filed at Miam'. F'"Hda. this 30th
dav of June. A.D. 1976.
MARLENE F HECKTMAN
As Ancillary Executrix
Flrsr nublicatlnn of "tla notice on
the 4th dav of Julv. 197S
I.lovd I. Rusk in
Attornev for Ancillary Executrix
4117 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. '"
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT CCLRT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COLNTV
PROBATE DiVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-7342
IN Rl ,.|
. M, MAi: "I 'S
1 ... :
N^TICE CF INTENT'ON TO MAKE
APPL'CAT'ON FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
have
nd 1
:. nd I
tl Clara M
...
ly of August 975, at 2:4 I'M.
H ile '' : uit
Count \ f. .r
1 i f..r
u f'nal is
r ... i,-.,.- ,,f 11 .. esta te of tl
nt. This 16th .I iv .if
June.
HERMAN MAR' ..
Hen 1 1
I
Irl ui Oodfre> R
Miam ch. Kl rids 83140
: i-ii-is-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT
OF FLOR'DA IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3353 (Nesbitt)
In '" Batata of
IRVING SCHWARTZ
,,, H ...I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To A'l Creditor* and All Persons Hav-
'aims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
OUired to nr.-sent anv .-laim* aqd de-
mands which v..u mav have against
the estate of IRVINO SCHWARTZ
de eased late of Dade Countv. Flo/lda,
In the Circuit Judges of Dade Countv.
and file the same in duoDcnta iqd as
nrovlded In Section 733 16. Florida
Statutes in their offices In 'he Countv
Courthouse in Dade Countv. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
t;me of the first DubTtcatlon hereof.
or the same wall be barred.
Filed at Miami Florida, this 25th
dav of June. AD 197fi
ESTHBR G. IjCHIFF
As Executrix"
First nubllcMiori of this notice on
the 4'h dav of .!- 197R
ESTHER <. SCHIFB
A" irr.ev for Executrix
4"7 I.iin oln Hoad
Miami Beach Florida 33139
7/4-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
'NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLOR'DA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 75-?04(>2
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARR'AGE
iv RJ). Th mc-'iue of:
GRADV BECKHAM.
Petitioner.
FRANCES EI.IZARETH HALL
Hill 'CHAM.
::, Donnenl
T" FRANCES ELIZABETH, HALL
BECKHAM
1'i.u'e One .(!>
M-.-sh '! Georgl i
YOC ARE HF"E"V NOTIFlffrt
2S that an action for Dissolution of N%r-
- riage has been filed against vou iH)d
vou are epnuir. d to serve "\ conv of
vnur w't'e.n defenea. If any, to it on
I AW OFFICES OF lil'HNS & AR-
NOvTTZ. cb.-nev for "T-titioner.
whose address is WO t incln. Road
Suite IM Miami Reach. F'.irida. 33139.
and file the original with the. clerk
. f the above atvled court on or before
Amrost i". "'' nthern se 1 default
n l| he entered againet vou for the
1 m inded in the comolajnt or
netltlon
This notice si: ill lie DUOliahed once
eacl week for four consecutive weeks
111 ^IIK JEWISH '' I'R'titAN
\\!""NKSS m\ h nd md the, seal of
-.,,1 courl al Miam1 Florida on this
25th : 11 of June. IJ75
I'i'll M'P P BRTNKER.
.\ < 1 ...: 1 -. u 'ourt
Dade iu"l
nv I SNBEDBN
\- :......v ci.-rk
fl n 1 1 v ,-> ;..-.' 1
' A\^' OB-F'CES OF PIRNS A
PN" "/ITZ
420 I Incoln R ind BuRe <"'>
Ml imi Beach. Floelda 331.19
I f .. -v for Petitioner
44:1
74-11-18-2V
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERJ/'CE
(NO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT
OF FLOR'DA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACT'PN NO. 75-20BVI
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE"?
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALICE FOX LIM. Petitioner
and
PETER I IM. Resnondent.
TO: PKT-KR I IM
23(5 East Gunbill Road. Ant G-3
Bronx. New Vnek 104B7
TOO ARE HEREBV NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
I.'arrlage has been filed against vou
and vou are renuired to serve n conv
of vour written d.-fanses. If anv. to
it in HAR'AN STREET. PA. at-
tornev for Petitioner, whose address
Is 12300 Bis. avne BlF.fl Suite 410.
North Miami. Florida 331H1. and fila
the original with the clerk of the
above stvll courl on or before 8th
August. 1!'7S: otherwise a default will
be entered against vou for the re-
lief demanded In the comnlaint or
neJ it'on.
Ths notice shall be ouhlished once
each week for four consecutive weeka
in THE JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miam'. Florida on this
27th dav of June. 1
I'd! Mil) P BRINKER.
\^ 1 'lerk 'ircult Court
Dade CountV. Florida
Bj MARK 'N NEWMAN
A nm"v Clerk
(CIrcut* ('ouri Seal)
II a HI AN STREET P \
1 'Ton Biscavne Rlvd u'te 410
North Miami Florida 13181
A'lornev fur Petitioner
W1MM 7/4-1,-18-2*.


Page 16-B
* Jen 1st fUrktlan
Friday, July n, l9?
SAVE 3 WAYS I BONUS SPECIALS HONEST VALUES!..PIUS MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS I
SHOP FOOD FAIR FOR
Money Saving Values all Week Long!
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A FRESH ICED
FRYER
QTRS.
LEG OR
BREAST
GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN
TURKEY
PARTS
WINGS
DRUMSTICKS
HINDQUARTERS
uiao
FRISM GROUND (-U. PKG. O* MOWJ
BEEF LIVER 99c BEEF CHUCK
C
LB.
99V
FULL OF JUICE AND FLAVOR _
Nectarines .59
FIERY RED SWEET EATING
ntPil nil/ Jiitti i.-ir?%*
Watermelon ,10c
PRISM TMMMIO
Boston Lettuce **, 29c
SNAPPY PUSH
String Beans 39c
LARCf ANO LUSCIOUS
Blueberries u9
,ltMAM0 Facial Tissues m 49
Fresh Carrots 2 L 49c mImSmr Foil 75c
Stokely G otorade
LEMON LIME ^BBJ OR ORANGE BJJAb L m 32 OZ
CAMfUIA WWII
Smoked Meats I LesCal Yogurt 1 Tomato Sauce
SLICED
ALL
VARIETIES
LANDO FROST
X 89e
99*. FAT
FREE
ALL FLAVORS
4 99
pp
BRAND
58-OZ OOC
cans !
FOOD
FAIR

SUPERMARKETS
PRICES EFFECTIVE FROM DATE Of
PUBLICATION THRU SUNDAY. JULY 13th.
AT AU FOOD FAIR STORES
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS


$ACRAAlCNro
TOMATO
JUICE
'46-OZ.
CAN
lii._ _

K ANN'S MIOGIT
Braunschweiger............'. 63e
MACKPOtiST
Kielbasi pico1 $1M
RiUIIN S Of II PASTRAMI 01
89'
Sliced Corned Betf
J-OZ
PKO.
KAHN'S
Sandwich Spread
OZ.
CHUB
39
OYAL TAJTI fWINI OR CIIAWD
Herring Fillets *5? *V
DAK IMPORT! D DANISH
Smoked Salami om 1
Salami or Bologna
AMERICAN
KOSHER
MIDGET)
Lox Tld-Blts
DfllCIOUS
u-oz.
SIASMORS S IARRIL CUMD
Kosher Pickles
QUART
MR
73
SERVICE APPETIZER DIPT.
I A. A ABU ONI A! STOR(\ HAVING St RviCt 'ObN'l^
II IUNCH MIATS AHO CMICVI sucio to QtOff
BABY SWISS CHEESE
99c
Turkey Breast...............um 79*
HIMIW NATIONAl OSMf R OUARTIi BE
Salami or Bologna.........u. 55c
SSmTw'sSSm. ST 59*
COOKED SALAMI
M
NoawiciAN
IMPORTID
JAR1SIIPG
RICH S CATERING
I LI
65<
bV
FRIENDSHIP CHAMiO
Cottage Cheese............c"p
MIAKSTONI1
Sour Cream...................com.
IOR01N S PIMENTO PINf APPti OR OllVI I PIMtNTO
Cheese Spread 3f 39e
American Singles
COLORED
BORDENS
(CHEESE FOOD]
MRS HUM* (TWO l-OZ CUPS) (
Soft Margarine...............fm, 65
Mozzarella Cheese m 79c
WISCONSIN RAir
Gouda or Edam Cheese --.o 79c
Citrus Punch
FLORIDA
ORANGE
BLOSSOM
4boz AOc
CONTS H^pY
P P MANO
Half and Half tam
US CAl ??* PAT Hit OI
Cottage Cheese cup
P.P. MANO
Whipping Cream
PINT
MAlf
PINT
43c
49*
49
Cream Cheese
p.p.
BRAND
AXIIROO s SOUR
Half a Half
u-oz.
.. CUP
45<
WONDERFUL BAKED GOODS
vim wi'm run
English Muffins
PKKWIOC ^p ?
CAKIMASTil MOMIUOAR-MAKJ
IMMK-WIM 'f^1- Silt
MAXIM
Freeze Dried Coffee
SANKA
Freeze Dried Coffee
-o:
JAR
AOL
JAR
SI 3*
S147
Spaghetti Sauce
MICHELINA
55*
PtANTATION PRIDi
Sweet Relish
PITH PAN
Peanut Batter
u-oz.
Ml
U-OZ
Ml
59'
69
Spaghettini
PASTA
ROMANO
P.P. HAND
Catsup...................
McVITTIIS TAUI ,
Water Crackers 'pro
U-OZ
IOTTLI
39(
48<
Iced Tea Mix
pp
BRAND
PKO.
OF 10
85
P.P. HAND
Waste Bags..............
FtliZI OHIO
Sanka Coffee E? $2"
FRESH SEAFOOD DEPT.
AVAHANI ONIt Al S'ORIS HAVING
SIRvlCI SIAIOOO COuNIIRS
MACKEREL
55*
flORlOA
CAUGHT
l
. PKC.
FLORIDA CAUCNT
ToNoertail.......................... *V
SKINLESS I IONIIISS FRESH CUT
Haddock FriJets................u. M"
lOAvn I
7*
HaUbtft Steaks
. i
.....*, *v
2 1"
GOLDEN
CORN
16-02.
CAN
IM| J CANt ""
- ^ COARITTIS
OZ
CAN
PP HAND
Plain Bread Crumbs
KRAFT'S
Deluxe Dinners...............o
35
UOZ gQ:
Instant Dry Milk
p.p. 19 qua*. $ V 69
BRAND II PKG
PINOISCOT FIOZIN AU VARIETIES
Baked Potatoes...............Wo
HOWARO JOHNSON'S FROZEN
Blueberry Toastees.........m.
uoz eg.
55
Orange Juice
FROZEN
P.P
BRAND
12 OZ
CAN
II OZ
49
SIAIIOOKS PIOZIN
Broccoli Florets.............W
P.P. HAND Oflc
Frozen Waffles...........2 wo*. 39
PP MANO PIOZIN W)1 -_e
Cut Green Beam.............. J'
GREEN GIANT EOc
Frozen Baby Limas..........mo. W
Pound Cake
P.P MANO TMM
SBoed Bread
Afflerlo.......................^
WI IWftvt THI RIGHT TO UMIT OUANTITRM. All ONKX TVPOGIAPHIC. PHOTOCtAPPK AN IWNTINC HROM-AH SUWKT TO COrMCTON. NOK SCHO TO MAIN*.
Coffee Rich
RIC.i S
fROZLN
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INGEST IEID EG87NDTX3_8VL7PT INGEST_TIME 2013-06-10T23:04:44Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02423
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES