The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02417

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Uewislli Floriclian
Combifllog THE JEWISH UHttY and Tiff JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 22
Miami, Florida Friday, May 30, 1975
tuc by Man Two Sections Price 25 rent*
SENATORS URGE ISRAEL SUPPORT
Mideast Boils Up
As Ford, Sadat
Set for Parley
Rabbi Tries to Divert
Immigrants
By The Jewish Floridian
Events in the Middle East
began to reach fever pitch this
week in just about all the coun-
tries involved in the Israel-
Arab confrontation: Egypt, Syr-
ia, Saudi-Arabia and Lebanon.
And, depending upon point of
view, all seemed designed to
have their effect on the meet-
ing between Presidents Ford
and Sadat in Salzburg. Austria,
on June 1 and 2.
ON THE one hand, there was
the improbable and conciliatory
Saudi Arabian statement which,
for the first tim;, promised
that the Saudis wiuld recog-
nize the existence of Israel pro-
vided the Israelis vacated the
Arab occupied territories.
On the other hand, the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
determined to make iWelf
known by challenging the exist-
ence of the "conservative"
Government of Lebanon again
and again, the PLO obviously
bearing in mind the campaign
they waged in 1971 in Jordan
to topple the rule of King Hus-
sein.
The PLO move in Lebanon
was particularly noteworthy
because, since his triumphant
appearance before the United
Nations at the opening of the
current UN session. PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat has been unable to
on
make any impact at all
world affairs.
IT IS true that the interna-
tional campaign for a "Pales-
tine" state on the West Bank
continues to occupy a good deal
of the propagandists ploys by
the Arab nations, but Arafat
has not been able to gather up
a meaningful storm of assist-
Continued on Pagt 2-A
KING KHALED
Are Gulf Oil Funds Going
For Arab Propaganda?
WASHINGTON (JTA) Congressional investi-
gators probing bribes and other payoffs abroad by com-
panies Lased in the United States expect the Gulf Oil
Corporation's chairman, Bob R. Dorsey, to supply more
details on the company's secret contributions to an Arab
fund used to propagandize Americans.
Dorsey testified before the Senate Subcommittee
Continued on Page 9-A
From Soviet
JERUSALEM (JTA) Viennese disciples of the
anti-Zionist Satmer Rebbe have approached Austrian au-
thorities tor permission to contact Soviet Jewish immigrants
passing through Austria with the intention of diverting them
to countries other than Israel, it was disclossed here.
Rabbi Mordechai Kirschblum, associate director of the
Jewish Agency's Immigration Department who recently re-
turned from Vienna, told a meeting of the Jewish Agency
Executive that he had learned of the Satmer approaches
from Austrian Interior Minister Otto Roesch.
ACCORDING TO Kirschblum.
the Satmer Hasidim complain-
ed that Jewish Agency officials
in Viena were aiding Soviet
Jews immigrating to Israel and
said they wanted the opportuni-
ty to help them go elsewhere.
Roesch told them that the
Austrian government would
continue its present arrange-
ment with the Jewish Agency,
Kirschblum reported.
The Satmer Rebbe, Rabbi
Joel Teitelbaum, originally
from Transylvania, has his
headquarters in the Williams-
Continued on Pajf 10A
Ghorbal Story Given Confirmation
As Columnists Evans, Novak Hit

.
AGRANAT COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION
Zeevi Gets Appointment
As Intelligence Advisor
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin told
the Cabinet that he would
appoint Gen. (Res.) Reha-
vam Zeevi as his intelligence
advisor following a rec-
ommendation by the Agra-
nat Commission calling for
the establishment of such a
post.
Rabin said Zeevi would
continue in his present role
as advisor on "special" af-
fairs, understood to mean
coordinator of anti-terrorist
activities. Zeevi's new ap-
pointment took effect May
25.
THE PREMIER'* announce-
ment came in response to a
question from Tourism Minis-
ter Moshe Kol regarding the
disposition of this recommen-
dation by the Agranat commis-
sion.
Last Friday, in an interview
in Maariv, commission mem-
ber Yigael Yadin sharply criti-
cized the government for not
having implemented the recom-
mendation. But the official Cab-
inet communique pointedly not-
ed that Krol had raised the
point last week before the Ya-
din interview.
Rabin has in the past ex-
pressed reservations over the
recommendation, but has now
apparently reconciled himself
to it.
CABINET SECRETARY Ger-
Continurd on Page MM
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A senior Israeli diplomat told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that he has no doubts that
Ashraf Ghorbal, Egypt's Ambassador to the United States(
did advocate the extermination of all traces of Judaism in
the Mideast in an interview published earlier this year in
Marchar, a rightwing pe-iodical published in Buenos Aires.
Aba Gefen, a former Consul in Argentina and presently
the director of cultural affairs at the Israel Foreign Ministry
in Jerusalem, said that "Ghorbal was only echoing the view
of his boss, President Anwar Sadat."
ACCORDING TO Gefen. Sadat
Capital
Cools Off
Schlesinger
Statement
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Defense Secretary James R.
Schlesinger's warnings that the
United States ,-conceivably"
might employ "military meas-
ures in response" to another
Arab oil embargo engendered
angry reactions in Egypt and
Jordan which the White House
sought to mollify.
Schlesinger. who emphasized
that U.S. military action was
"very improbable" made al-
most identical remarks on the
Continued on Page 9-A
declared last year in Al Hassin
mos'.'e in Cairo, on the oc-
casion of Mohammed's birthday,
views bacicallv similar to that
which Ghorbal expresed in
Marchar.
Sadat's remarks. Gefen said,
included the statement: "The
most splendid thing that the
Prophet Mohammed did was to
drive the Jews out of the Ara-
bian peninsula Jerusalem
is our property. We shall re-
trieve it from the hands of those
of whom it is written in the
Koran: They will be brought
low and made wretched ."
The Ghoroal Interview in
Marchar, which was conducted
by the magazine's senior. Pa-
Continued on Page 11-A
REP. ABZUG
CONGRlSSWOMAN SAYS Of HONIIS OWED SOVIETS
'Chutzpah' for U.S. to Pay Egypt's Bill
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rep. Bella Abzug (D., N.Y.)
urged that before President
Ford meets Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat in Salz-
burg, Austria, Ford should
announce his support for the
$2.5 billicn in aid Israel has
requested from the United
States.
She told the annual meet-
ing of the New York Chap-
ter of the American Jewish
Committee at the Plaza Ho-
tel that this must be done to
convince Egypt that the U.S.
is not wavering in its sup-
port for Israel.
NOTING NEWS reports that
Sadat plans to ask Ford for
funds to pay off Egypt's 47 bil-
lion debt to the Soviet Union.
Ms. Abzug said if this was true
it would be "a new delinition of
chutzpah."
She said before the American
people will provide any aid for
Egypt that country must "make
s-rious concessions for the state
of peace."
Ms. Abzug charged that ths
Ford Administration has label-
Continued on Page 3-A


Page 2-A
> Jen isl ficrfJiar
Friday, May 30, 1975
James Abourezk., (D.. SD.
Mideast Boils as Ford, Sadat Set to Meet *i&&%sl?2z
Continued from Pa2e 1-A
ance with himself at the cen-
ter of a liberation movement"
designed to achieve the Pales-
tinian dream.
One reason for this is that
Arafat, as is well known, does
penuibety represent the
majority of the Arab leader-
ships intentions for the refu-
gees. Nor does he represent the
desires of the majority of the
refugees themseU c. -
AND SO. the civil war he
has been attempting to wage in
Lebanon is uesigned to tell the
world: "Hey. remember me?"
It is a significant question
on the eve of the Ford-Sadat
talks in Salzburg.
ISRAEL
For two days in succession at
the beginning of the week. Is-
raeli troops crossed the border
of Lebanon to attack the south-
ern village of Aita al-Chaab.
In Tel Aviv, military author-
ities denied the raid, but the
Lebanese Defense Ministry said
a 100-man force clashed with
Lebanese troops in the village.
IN ANY event, there was no
question about the first raid on
Sunday, which was sharply
criticized by the Israeli press,
which called attention to the
deaths of two Israeli soldiers
in the operation and the 10
Lebanese killed.
The timine was unfortunate
because right now the Lebanese
army faces the possibility of a
showdown with the same ter-
rorists who trouble Israel." said
the Labor newspaper, Davar.
the collapse on Monday of the
fr-daj -old regime of Prime
Minister Xuredcin RJ1
The 76-year-old general had
been called out of retirement
the Friday before in an effort
to deal with the Palestinian ter-
rorist insurgents challenging
the Lebanese government rule.
PRESIDENT Suleiman Fran-
gieh accepted Gen. Rifai's res-
ignation along with the resigna-
tion of Rifai's eight-man cab-
inet, most if not all of them
former military men.
The Lebanese, torn between
civil strife with the terrorists
and their dislike of a quasi-
military government, met the
collapse of riifai s brief rule
with horn-biowing in the streets
of Beirut, where a general
strike had been taking place.
The struggle in Lebanon has
been largely divided between
the former Christian majority
and the currently emerging
Moslem majority, which tends
to side with the Palestinian
movement.
LEBANON
The accuracy of the Davar
criticism was underscored by
SAUDI ARABIA
Perhaps the sharpest break
with traditional Arab politics
came from Riyadh in Saudi
Arabia, where King Khaled said
over the weekend that he
would accept Israel's right to
exist if Israel returns to her
pre-1967 borders.
HIS REMARKS were made in
his first formal interview since
he assumed the throne on Mar.
25 following the assassination
of his brother. King Faisal.
Khaled was forthright in his
support of a Palestinian state
when and if Israel withdraws
from the West Bank of Jordan.
But the 61-year-old monarch
did not say that his acceptance
of Israel would mean diploma-
Rocky To Head Ball
WASHLNGTON (JTA) Vice President Nelson Rockefel-
ler is chairman of the honorary committee for the Israel Inde-
pendence Ball in celebration of Israel's 27th anniversary to be
held at the Washington Hilton Hotel June 15.
The committee for the black tie affair also includes Speaker
of the House Carl Albert, Supreme Court Justice William O.
Douglas, six Cabinet members led by Treasury Secretary William
Simon, the leaders of the Democratic and Republican Parties in
the House and Senate, Maryland Governor Marvin Mandel, Dis-
trict of Columbia delegate in the Congress, Walter E. Fountroy.
and Washington's Mayor Walter E. Washington.
The celebration will take place two days after Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin meets with President Ford on June 11 and 12 at
the White House.
Temple Adath Yeshurun To
Wei
come Mew Rabbi Sunday
The Men's Club of Temple
Adath Yeshurun is sponsoring
its first annual "Dedication
Dinner-Dance" Sunday at 6
pm. It is now one year sine
the dedication of the new
sanctuary.
At the dinner, the congrega-
tion will welcome its new rabbi.
Simcha Freedman and his wife,
anna, who come to the congre-
gation from Philadelphia, Pa.
Rabbi Freedman has been in
the rabbinate since 1962, hav-
ing trained at thi Rabbi Isaac
El-Hanan Theological Seminary.
He has been serving as the
spiritual leader of Adath Zion
Congregation in Philadelphia.
A member of the Rabbinical
Council of America, Rabbi
Freedman was president of the
Philadelphia Rabbinical Council,
Philadelphia Region, chaplain
of the Albert Einstein Hospital.
Northern Division, coordinator
of the Philadelphia Rabbinical
Council Beth Din and Rabbin-
ical Advisor to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
Rabbi Freedman and his wife,
the former Anna Wasser, have
two sons, Samuel. 11. and Ben-
jamin. 4.
"Temple. Adath Yeshurun i*
indeed fortunate that a rabbi
of such good background and
credits has come to be their
spiritual leader," commented
Alan Renzer. the temple's execu-
tive director.

Ik recognition and the norrna--
1N FACT, Saudi officials
made it clear thi Rrouid
not accep: forms r.ition
of Israel.
Just as the Arafat role in
Lebanon's civil strife is clear.
so is Khaled's pronouncement
on acceptance of Israel Kl
would like to see a downplaying
of the role of the Soviet L'nior.
in the Middle East.
In his interview the mon-
arch called on the United State?
"to ;.nn Egypt and Syria" in
the same way that it arms Is-
rael, thus putting an end to the
dependence of those countries
on the Soviet Union
AMONG OTHER thines. all
designed to impress the United
States on the eve of the Ford-
Sadat meeting. King Khaled
also:
Said that if the U.S. arms
the Arabs, that would stop the
"unfortunate" flow of billions
of petrodollars.tc the Cqmrruia-
ist citadel in Moscow, .. .
- Reminded the U.S. that
whether or not the Arabs re-
sume their oil embargo will be
determined by the stance
America takes in attempting to
bring peace to the Middle East:
Warned that in the event
of war with Israel. Saudi Arabi-
an troops would take part;
Called attention to the
fact that he is absolutely be-
hind another Henry Kissinger
"step-by-step" diplomatic drive
to achieve peace:
Made it clear that he was
cool on the resumption of
another round of talks at
Geneva, which he called "not
an end as such but a means to
a goal."
rael in the .'e .
current
policv in -
AMONG THE 24 "ho
did d
Percy (F '
year called on
to recognize the ->' of
Yasir Ararat as leader of the
Palestine movement
The resolution was ci c
in the S.rnte by Sen. '
Javits (K.. NY. I and Sen ;
ry Jackson 'D.. tt'a>h taking
the lead with the assistance of
1" others.
In addition to Percv. follow-
ing is a list of senators who re-
fused to sign:
Be'.Imon (R., Okla.;. Qiu
Burdick i D Byrd
Jr. I:'-- ''; Car! Curtis R,
'.-. ..-- K isttend 'D
Miss.:. Paul I-'annin (R.. Ariz.).
hob.- <: Lffin (R.. Mich Clif-
ford Hansen (R-, Wyo.), '
;: itfi W, K.. Ore. i. Je.->-j Helms
(R, N.C). Ernest Holling-
S.C.i. J. Benn?tt Johnsto-
(D., La.). Russell Long (D., La. I,
Jonn MciieU in I. Ark >. Jame*
McClure Man-fi'--!d (D.. Mont.). William
Scott R Va.), .'ohn Sparl-
(D.. Ala). John Stennis (D.,
. an- Milton Young
N.D ).
Fifty democrats and 25 Re-
publicans did sign. Florida Sens.
Lawton Chiles and Richard
Stone both signed.
4 U .<
MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT
104 N.L 1st STREET-PHONE 373-8432
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE INSURANCE
A DIYtSIOM OP
Tnebica/n

III
"i5.*C( COKi*r
WASHINGTON
Meanwhile, as President Ford
prepared for his meeting in
Austria June 1 and 2 with
Egypt's President Sadat. "5
Senators signed a letter to the
President demanding that the
U.S. reaffirm its strong support
of Israel.
THIS WAS the strongest out-
pouring of congressional sup-
port of Israel since 1970. At that
time, 73 senators signed a reso-
lution to then-Secretary of State
William Rogers, author of the
Rogers plan, which except for
"minor border rectifications."
called on Israel to withdraw be-
kind her 1967 borders.
In part, the letter declared:
"Within the next several weeks,
the Congress expects to receive
your foreign aid requests for
fiscal year 1976. We trust that
your recommendations will be
responsive to Israel's urgent
military and economic needs.
We urge you to make it clear,
as we do. that the United States
acting in its own natioml in-
terests stands firmlv with Is-
SYSTEMS FOR SECURITY, Inc.
BURGLAR & FIRE
^*^K ALARM SYSTEMS(g
JACK SCHENKMAN. Pres.dent
24 HOUR CENTRAL STATION
PROTECTION
24 HOUR SERVICE
RADIO DISPATCHt0
Ul APPROVED GRADE A CENTRAL STATION
FM ANO FIA APPROVED FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS
Wt HtOVIOt AIL CERTIFICATION REQUIRED
BY TOUR INSURANCE ACENCf ami THEIR UNDERWRITERS
DAM: 634-3581
BROWARD: 522-7776
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc. r-"ur>er.i, Directors
M1AMIBEACH 1920 Alton Road at '.9th Street
NORMANDY ISL.F. 125 N dyOi n
531-1151
NO MIAMI BEACH 16480NE 19th Aw
MIAMI &. CORAL c iABLES L> IS W 17th Street
HOLLWOOD 581 >1 Hoik/wood Blvd.
Broward Tel. 920-1010
Ri:ers'deafco(trues :; MerropoJiianareaititfiC'aoekin
Manhattan. TneBronx. Broi inFarnacka jn.
" Rubtn.F.Q.
Israel's situation is desperate
and has made it more depend-
ent on Israel Bonds and
C.J.A. Israel Emergency Fund.
BUY AND GIVE!
Mayskie Friedber*
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
Mi-30-75
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther. 635-0554 and
let me quo'e vou rats. Also
loea' rrovino & lorn rJ;r.-a
moving anywhere in the U.S.
or overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
M 30-75

t><*".>'


Friday, May 30, 1975
* Jewish nwkfcui
Page 3-A
OONewHousingUnits Going Up in Ophira
JERUSALEM(JTA) Pre-
Imier Yitzhak Rabin declared
that the government fully in-
tended to complete 200 civilian
housing units at Ophira, the Is-
raeli name given to Sharm el-
Sheikh, the strategic outpost on
the southeastern tip of the Si-
[nai peninsula.
He told the Cabinet that the
iject would be completed by
iprll. 19-7. and would be im-
plemented by the Housing Min-
istry. Housing Minister Avra-
ham Ofer said his Ministry
would execute the building
plans.
THE QUESTION was raised
after Ofer made a statement in
a radio interview from Sharm
el-Sheikh 10 days ago question-
ing the wisdom of establishing
a civilian settlement there.
Ofer observed that Moses had
striven to take the Jewish peo-
ple way from the Sinai wilder-
nes. His remarks aroused the
wrath of the Likud opposition
as well as "hawks" -ind middle-
roaders inside his own Labor
Party.
Minister-Without-Portfolio Is-
rael Galili, who is chairman of
the ministerial committee for
new settlements, said Friday
that he was surprised by Ofer's
statement that the development
of Sharm el-Sheikh was at the
bottom of his ministry's priori-
ties list because the government
has not yet drawn up a master
plan for the region.
GALILI, A veteran Labor
Party leader of "hawkish" views
who was a close confidant of
former President Golda Meir,
insisted that the government
would carry out its housing plan
at ODhira.
He said his committee decid-
ed in December. 1972, to build
1,000 units at the outpost and
that decision was still valid.
Sharm el-Sheikh nevertheless
remains a potential obstacle to
an eventual peace settlement
with Egypt. The Egyptians are
not considered likely to re-
nounce their claim to the spot
and the Israelis are expected
to insist on retaining a military
presence there because it com-
mands the Straits of Tiran link-
ing the Gulf of Aqaba with the
Red Sea.
Some observers point out,
however, that from a purely
military standpoint there are
strong arguments against a
civilian settlement there be-
cause it would pose defense
problems for the army.
MEANWHILE, Defense Min-
ister Shimon Peres assured the
Egyptians tint they had nothing
to fe*r from Israel when the
Su>7 Canal is reopened official-
Iv next month.
In a radio interview, Peres
said the reopening of the water
was was assumed at the time of
the first separation of forces
agreement with Egypt in No-
vember, 1973. immediately af-
ter the Yom Kippur War.
He said the January, 1974
disengagement agreement with
Egypt contained clauses guaran-
teeing the safety of the canal.
"ONCE"THE canal is opened.
Israel will surely do whatever
it can to ensure that navigation
will be free without any dis-
turbances or threats," Peres
said.
He stated that Israel in fact
welcomed the move to improve
Egypt's economy which would
indicate a retreat from the war
option.
Peres said Israel's only de-
mand was "the right ot a client
to go through the canal. We
shall behave like a most respon-
sible neighbor. If I were an
Egyptian, 1 wouldn't be wor-
ried about it."
Abzug Says 'Chutzpah'
To Pay Egyptian Bills
Continued from Page 1-A
led Israel as intransigent and
declared that it is time the Ad-
ministration began pressuring
Egypt to take steps toward
peace.
SHE SAID support for Israel
is strong in the Congress and
among the American people but
an educational campaign must
continue.
Some 200 people attended the
luncheon at which the AJCom-
mittee chapter presented its
Stanley M. Isaacs Human Rela-
tions Award to Manhattan
Borough President Percy Sut-
ton and Irving M. Engel, the
AJCommittee's honorary presi-
dent. *|
Peter J. Straus, a New York
attorney, was elected chapter
president succeeding Daniel S.
Shapiro.
,i
Your savings at Dade Federal
does make a difference
..
Join the Dade Federal Savers Club and
receive substantial cash discounts on
the fun things in life...not just once...
but dayafterdayafterdayafterday...
The Dade Federal Savers Club makes the big difference
365 days a year. Attend local movies, theatres, sports,
cultural events and other special attractions, at
substantially reduced admissions. Dine at selected
local restaurants and enjoy member discounts.
Purchase special brand name merchandise at low
club prices.
The DFS Savers Club costs you nothing! No
membership fees no dues no meetings to attend.
Simply open and maintain a Dade Federal Savings
account of $ 1,000 or more.
Members receive a complimentary subscription to
the Savers Club quarterly publication, which details
the many exciting ways you can save money through
your club membership.
The more vou use your Savers Club Card the more
you save... an d these savings are just like earning
additional interest on your savings account. ^it^
r DFS to be different!
pays you
~v
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS
MAIN OFFICE: 101 EAST FLAGLER
m, .cu/,nhtt CutlwRMM-10808 Caribbean Boulevard Tamiaml: 1901 S.W.SIhSt. Allapattah: 1400 N.W. 36th St. MM Center: 5800 N.W. 7th Ave. North Miami: 12600 N W 7th Ave
r 13975 NW(67thAve. Skylak.: 18300 N.E. 19th Ave. Miami Beach: 16900 Collins Ave. Miramar: 6860 Miramar Parkway (Broward) Oakland Piaja: 4850 W. Oakland Park Blvd. (Laude.dale Lakes)


Page 4-A
*Mi$t FkrkJiair
Friday, May 30, 1975
King Khaleda Turnabout
On its face, the King Khaled statement that Saudi
Arabia is prepared to "accept" the existence of Israel
is a stunner.
King Faisal, his brother who was assassinated last
March, would never have made such a statement.
"All" Khaled demands of Israel is that she withdraw
to her pre-196" borders. Particularly for Saudi Arabia,
this seems "reasonable" enough.
The trouble is that Khaled is rather vague by what
he means when he uses the word "accept."
One thing, however, it does mean is that the
monarch is NOT prepared to open normal diplomatic
relations with Israel. Under these circumstances, were
not quite sure what the Saudi Arabian turnabout can
contribute to peace in the long run.
A Brilliant Diplomatic Ploy
As we oprne in a Front Page story this week, Khaled
seems more realistic than Faisal ever did. But more
likely at issue is his fear of the growing strength of the
Soviet Union in the Middle East.
"Accepting" Israel on the eve of the Ford-Sadat
talks is a brilliant diplomatic ploy. It gives further im-
petus to President Ford, in his reassessment of U.S. for-
eign policy in the Middle East to give the palm to the
Arabs.
It encourages Forjijio apply more bargaining pres-
sure on Israel than ever.
So that what Khaled has done is to extend an olive
branch seemingly unlike Yasir Arafat's olive branch
used as a shroud for a gun.
The danger in all this is that President Ford and
Secretary of State Kissinger will interpret it as a big
"breakthrough."
But so long as the Saudis reject the notion of nor-
mal diplomatic relations, what can "acceptance" mean?
If fact, it was this very same deal offered by the Egyp-
tians that Israel rejected on Kissinger's last shuttle
train to peace.
A Vagary and an Abstraction
The resolution signed by 75 U.S. Senators demand-
ing that President Ford reaffirm this nation's ties to
Israel should, we hope, be reason enough for President
Ford at Salzburg not to take King Khaled's offer too
seriously and not to repeat the Ford-Kissinger as-
sertion that Israel is the culprit in refusing a "good
deal" in the Middle East.
Until the Arabs are willing to normalize relations
with Israel, "acceptance" of Israel is still a vagary and
an abstraction. 7.
American Mizrachi Women
Today, American Mizrachi Women are organized
into more than 350 chapters in 37 states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia.
Composed of career and professional women, house-
wives and community leaders of all ages, Mizrachi main-
tains a network of schools, children's villages, commu-
nity centers, settlement houses and other child-care and
social welfare institutions in Israel.
On Sunday, May 25, South Florida chapters of the
organization joined Mizrachi across the nation in a
Youth Aliya rally as a prologue to Mizrachi Women's
50th jubilee year.
American Mizrachi Women is the authorized Youth
Aliya agency of Israel since 1934 and has helped to
rescue, rehabilitate and restore the youngest victims of
hardship, terror and persecution.
Mizrachi's latest efforts are directed toward the
children coming most recently from the Soviet Union.
Mizrachi Women's organization deserves our con-
gratulations.
""Jewish Floridiian
FPICE AND PLANT 120 N.E. 6th STREET TELEPHONE J73-4M
P.O. Box 01-2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN
Associate Editor
EELMA M. THOMPSON
Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Ftorioran Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Flurldlan
Second-Class Postace Paid at Miami. Fla.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly,
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American As.
oclation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On* Year 10.00 Two Years tW-M
Out of Town Upon Request
_
Volume 48
Friday, May 30,1975
Number 22
20 SIV4N 5735
Garden of Eden Intoxication
LLOYD HARBOUR. NY. I
come here more and more often
because it is the only Garden
of Eden on earth I know.
On a number of occasions. I
thought I had found others
in Switzerland, in Italy.
Greece, even once in Wales.
BUT AFTER a while.
struck me that they were
'foreign,'" which is to say that
it struck others thar I was
"foreign'' an outsider who
really didn't belong.
And for all the politeness ex-
in
It
Mindlin
tended to me in these plao
there was always the expcta-
tion in others that at some fu
ture time, and shortly, not too
far off either, I'd be leaving.
Besides, there was something
about the politeness in those
"foreign" places. It was not so
much politeness extended to me
as a look of curiosity. Ther
must have been a quaintne_,
about methe native's interest
in me as exotic and from a f,
wav off.
ONCE THE curiosity was al-
layed, or if I overstayed beyond
what was expected would be a
'normal" traveler's stay, which
is perhaps really the same
thing, since overstaying no
longer made me a curiosity but
perhaps a bloody American
bore, then the politeness over-
stayed, too.
A cool distance would settle
in between me and the "na-
tives" in the Garden of Eden ol
theirs I had discovered, and
soon it would be time for me to
be on my way.
That is the nature of Gardenf
^f Eden. Urn- are always se-
duced into them, given a mo-
ment of pleasure and then
evicted.
BUT HERE in Lloyd Harbour
I have found LI think) another
kind of Eden. Since here I am
not exotic, there is no curi
osity about me disguised as po-
liteness which, predictably
must run out, giving way to in-
difference, coolness, sometimes
even hostility until I get the
message and move on.
In this Eden, I am not i
foreigner."
In fact, I feel more American
here at the rim of New England
than anywhere else; that is
Continued on Page 9-A
U.S. Must Draw Harsh Lessons
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
For an America which suffer-
ed from a number of severe il-
lusions, all of which contributed
to the setback in Southeast
Asia, there are some harsh les-
sons to be drawn.
There was the illusion
that America is a map-keeper,
with the function of keeping the
world map stable. But world
maps change and will continue
to change. What was once Sai-
gon is now Ho Chi Minn City,
and is likely to stay that way for
a long time. When a map chang-
es, even in an important area,
it isn't the end of history-
There was the illusion
that history can somehow be
tricked by a show of arms, and
that if it doesn't work there is
always the hope of using a "po-
litical settlement." Conceivably
there might have been such a
settlement between the two
Vietnams if the United States
had not intervened with arms.
But once it did the political
route was shut off.
THE REASON is clear
enough. Because communism is
a historical world movement, it
has patience and continuity, and
an outwait the national democ-
racies, which must get quick
and visible results.
For the Communists the two
basic tacticsfignting and ne-
gotiatingare part of the same
continuing spectrum. Both are
temporary way stations on the
road to final power.
ONCE THE United States in-
tervened it became a matter of
high Communist policy to carry
the war on to a triumphant con-
clusion. The insistence of un-
conditional surrender at the
very end, after the brief spell
when it looked as if Hanoi might
accept a Dove regime under
Gen. "Big" Minn, was less a way
of humiliating the South Viet-
namese than of humiliating the
LERNER
vaunted power of the United
States.
There was the illusion
that a Communist Southeast
Asia would spell a victory for
either China or Russia. Actually
Cambodia's Khmer Rouge seems
totally in China's sphere, while
Vietnam seems to be moving
strongly toward Russia, with
some hope of becoming an
Asian power of its own.
The Russians blundered on
Cambodia, and the Chinese on
Vietnam. The Americans were
not alone in their blundering.
THIS IS scant consolation for
the Americans. But it is a good
lesson to learn that world com-
munism is still split between the
two giant Communist powers,
and that there may be a chance
for some mobility in the cracks
between the twomobility both
for the new regimes, for the
other Asian governments and
even for the United States.
There was the illusion,
especially on the part of Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger,
that a clever foreign policy
could either overcome or con-
ceal the blunders made earliec
The blunders of getting into
the war were under Presidents
Dwight Eisenhower, John Ken-
nedy and Lyndon Johnson, and
were not of Kissinger's making.
But once they had been made
no diplomatic cleverness was
adequate to undo them.
rr IS a harsh lesson to leant
But Kissinger's current view-
that the United States must be
very careful about making aid
commitments and very deter-
mined about honoring them
when madeshows that he. too,
has learned one of the basic les-
sons of recent American his-
tory.
There was the illusion
that Hanoi might hold its fire^
and put off the final surrender*
push, long enough for the giant
U.S. airlift to rescue most of the
endangered South Vietnamese.
To some extent the airlift
operations succeeded effec-
tively for the U.S. personnel,
only tolerably for the larger
operation. But the reality in the
end was that Hanoi closed down
on everything, for two reasons.
It didn't want to lose too
many skilled Vietnamese
"brothers" who will be useful in
rebuilding the new Vietnam.
And it didn't want the Unitec.
States to have even a minor
prestige triumph which might
repair the larger humiliation.
BEYOND THE illusions an
the lessons there is a brooding,1
nightmarish vision wM
emerges from the last days
Saigon. It is the surmise
what might happen in the Mid-
dle East if the Israelis were en-
circled, and slowlyor quickly
w.ere pushed toward the sea,
with all the escape routes clos-
ed, as they were so speedily
closed around Saigon.
No two world scenarios are
alike, and there are crucial dif-
ferences between these two situ-
ations. The nightmare vision
not likely to happen. But it reisv-
forces the wisdom of the gen-J
eral proposition I mentioner
earlierthat the United Sta
should be careful about mak.
commitments and be determin
ed to honor them. >tv

=3
*>*
5?


Friday, May 30, 1975
""Jen/st FUvrSdUan
Page 5-A
Water Gets Hotter for Banker
By EDWIN EYTAN
GENEVA (JTA) Tibor
Roscnbaum, head of the Inter-
national Credit Ran'", was pre-
sented before a Geneva remand
court where the state prose-
cutor is asking that he be kept
in preventive detention on
charges of fraud and misuse of
public funds.
With him appeared Abraham
Rimmer, a director of the bank.
The two men were arrested at
Geneva Airport as they were
: to leave the country for
Paris.
LEGAL SOURCES in Geneva
b li fve that, as a result of these
arrests and of the report of the
official liquidators of the Inter-
national Credit Bank, the bank
will go into bankruptcy later
this month.
Robert Pennone, a spokesman
for the liquidators. Deloitte.
Haskins and Sons, said here that
his firm will present a final
report by the middle of the
month.
Sources close to the liquida-
tors' firm believe that the assets
of the bank are far smaller than
had originally been thought and
will not cover the bank's lia-
bilities, estimated at over 500
million Swiss Francs (about
S200 million).
ROSENBAUM, a prominent
figure in world Jewish organiza-
tions, was interrogated all day
by the Geneva investigating
magistrate, Pierre Moriaud.
Rimmer and their attorneys
were present.
Legal sources in Geneva b*-
lieve that Rosenbaum was v.v-
listed after he failed to supply
the Geneva trade court and the
liquidators with documents and
the assets of the company he
controlled in Vaduz. Lichten-
stein.
The director-general of the
Israel Corporation, Israel Galed,
and two of the Corporation's
legal advisors visited Geneva
prior to Rosenbaum's arrest and
reportedly met with Swiss judi-
cial authorities.
The two men reportedly hand-
ed to the Swiss authorities a
copy of the charge sheet used
against the Corporation's for-
mer director general, Michael
Tzar, in which Rosenbaum was
mentioned as an alleged accom-
plice. ____
M
WBANKHAS
SOMETHING FOR
NOIHINGFOR
&ON.
FREE CHECKING:
We give free checking to everyone over 60.
We give free checking to everyone under 60.
There is no service charge. Never.
No charge for checks. Ever.
And no minimum balance required. None.
Now you don't have to be a wizard in math
to realize that free is a lot better than $5 a month or
$2 a month, or anything at all a month.
A checking account at the Bank of Miami Beach.
It's free for all. Just stop by. Or phone 534-1577.
THATS Mf DANK
DANK OF
miami q&ch:
930 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33139. Member fdic
Bank Hours: Monday through Friday
Ma1nLobb9..n,-2p.nv Wrik-upTelkr,8a.n,-9a.m.Kl2P.m.-5P.m. Dnve-.nTeller,8a.m.-5p.m.


Page 6-A
* lew *#> Thrkliar
Friday, May 30, 19:5
45 RABBMKAl ASSOCIATION PRtXY
Rabbi Kingsley Will
Be Installed To
A Second Term
The annual installation lunch-
eon of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami will be
held on Wednesday. June 4. at
the Fontainebleau Hotel.
For the first time, the cere-
mony will witness the installa-
tion of a president to a second
consecutive term.
It will also witness the launch-
ing of the bicentennial celebra-
tion of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami.
RABBI RALPH P. Kingsley.
of Temple Sinai of North Dade.
who has served as president
since June, 1974, will be install-
ed for a second terra.
For the bicentennial launch-
ing ,the Association has invited
for its resident Kallah scholar
Dr. Samuel Proctor, Distinguish-
ed Service Urofessor at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Prof Proctor will survey the
History of the Jewish Com-
munity of Florida." Following
the presentation and discussion.
the Association will formulate
plans for a major program year
for the bicentennial in three
major areas: community-syna-
gogue, education (youth and
adult), and interfaith.
Other officers to be Installed
are Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. of
Temple Israel of Mirimar. vice
president; Rabbi Michael B.
Eisens'at. of Temple Judea. sec-
retary; nd Rabbi Victor D.
Zwelling, t* Congregation B'nai
Raphael, treasurer.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff. direct-
or of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's chaplaincy, serves
as the executive vice president
Black Paper Urges
Support for Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) The Amsterdam News has
urged American Blacks not to sit by while a new form of
anti-Semitism is being promoted m the United States and
elsewhere.
In an editorial last week the
leading black newspaper noted
that "During the turbulent civil
n.'hts marches of ths sixties.
Jewish rabbis. Jewish politicians.
Jewish scholars and Jewish lay
men marched side by side with
Blacks in the face of snarline
dogs, howling lunch mobs and
club swinging sheriffs."
THE NEWSPAPER noted that
Jews could have assumed a "be-
nign neutrality" but didn't, and
it urged Blacks not to be neutral
in tnc face of anti-Semitism.
It said the anti-Semitism of the
1970s is conducted by blaming
"the Jewish people for the dis
mal poverty-ridden mess which
our nation faces, and to first
make Jews the targets of hatred
sn that they can once more be
(!i-posed of by the millions with-
out too manv outcries from Wash-
ington or Rome."
THE AMSTERDAM News said
Blacks can remain neutral and
allow Jews to become the "scape-
goat for something which they
clearly did not do or roll up
their sleeves and join the Jewish
people in fighting against a des-
picable confDiracy. which, if suc-
cessful, will not only destroy
Jews, but will end up with blacks
as the leading candidates to be
the next victims."
The newspaper urged blacks
to fight on the side of Jews and
to start un participating in yes-
terdays "Solidary Sunday for
Soviet Jews."
Chess Body Studies
Israel as Play Site
COPENHAGEN (JTA) The International Chess Fed-
eration (FIDE) is canvassing its members over the possibility
of holding the 1976 chess olympiad in Israel.
The Israeli Chess Federation has agreed to host the tour-
nament and pay the participants expenses, it was learned here.
SWEDEN, WHICH was first on the list of possible host
countries, agreed to organize the games but would not pay
the expenses.
The Swedish Federation said, however, that it would par-
ticipate in the tournament if it is held in Israel. Iran, the only
other Middle East country on the list, has refused to organize
the games.
RABBI KINGSLEY
Few Firms
Bow To
Arab Boycott
BOSTON (JTA) Only
a small amount of United
States firms have complied
with the law that they file
reports detailing the efforts
of the Arabs to enforce the
boycott.
It was reported in the
Christian Science Monitor
that during the first three
months of 1975, only 21 U.S.
exporters submitted the le-
gally required descriptions
of Arab interference in trade
transactions.
FEDERAL LAW demands
that any United States company
requested to adhere to a boy-
cott report the fact to the Com-
merce Department.
The department asks, but
does not necessitate tint the
firms delate how they responded
to the boycott.
The submitted reports de-
scribe 140 transactions and a.-
though 29 per c*:nt admitted to
compliance, 71 ner cent did not
answer the question.
ALMOST ALL the boycott re-
quests asked the firms to guar-
antee that their goods neither
originated in Israel nor consist-
ed of Israeli-made materials.
The replies to the Federal law-
have shown a steady drop in
recent years, although exports
to Arab countries have risen.
Jewish Communities
To Aid Refugees
NEW YORK(JTA)Jewish communities throughout
the United States will participate in the resettlement of 123
of the 1.000 Cambodian refugees arriving in this country
within the next several days, according to Gaynor I. Jacob-
son, executive vice president of United HIAS Service,
To date, a number of Jewish communities, including
New York City, Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, TulsajH
Atlanta, New Haven and Des Moines have agreed to par-''
ticipate in this humanitarian program. Others are expect
to join shortly, Jacobson said.
HIAS. along with Catholic, Protestant and non-sectarian
voluntary agencies, is taking part in tne resettlement of |
Cambodians at the request of the U.S. State Department.
As the worldwide Jewish migration agency. HIAS will|
seek the cooperation of local Jewish communities in ac-1
cepting families for resettlement.
Participation in tne resettlement of non-Jewish refugees
is not new to HIAS. In 1972, the agency resettled several
hundred Moslem and Hindu Asian Ugandans, expelled from
Uganda by President Idi Amin. The Cambodian refugees an
mainlv Buddhists and Catholics.
nossmoor
3 COCONUT CREEK
Ihe master planned
adnll condominium
community;
from $18*800,..
no hind lease
no recreation lease.
r
Take Turnpike exit 24.
West on Rte. 814 Phone (3G5) 971-3510.
From Miam. TOLL FREE (305) 947-9905.
-
convenience
Washington
(Federal
SAVINGS ANO LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BfACH
ASSETS EXCEED $450 MILLION.
NOW IN BAY HARBOR ISLANDS AT
1160 KANE CONCOURSE "
PHONE: 865-4344
7 CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU IN
Mi,oT?5/iF.H.r BAY HA"BOR ISLANDS
NORTH MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD
BOCA RATON
JACK 0 CORDON ARTHUR H C01RSN0N
T\
WE
PROVIDE IT
Where we live, work, send our
children to school, vacation, travel
... all must satisfy the primary re-
quirement of convenience. Savings
is no exception. Surveys reveal con-
venience ranks high in the choice of
where to save. With 7 offices in
South Florida, Washington Federal
offers you convenience ... and
friendly personal service.
Washington Federal's new Bay
Harbor Islands office is con-
veniently located at 1160 Kane
Concourse. A convenient place to
put your money to work earning
more money for you.
k Pitititnl
QHumin tl M| $al,t
G>

,~.' "f
*&
*


Friday, May 30, 1975
+Je*istnaridiar)
Page 7-A
Israel Not Worried Ford Meets Sadat First
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Officials here said that they
were not concerned by the
fact that President Ford's
meeting with Egyptian Pres-
ident Anwar Sadat next
month will precede his meet-
ing with Premier Yitzhak
Rabin or that Rabin has
been invited to come to
Washington while Ford will
meet the Egyptian leader in
Salzburg, Austria neutral
pound. They recalled that
most past meetings between
American Presidents and Is-
raeli Prime Ministers have
been held in Washington.
The Rabin Ford meeting
c.r June 11 and 12 was con-
firmed by simultaneous an-
nouncements in Jerusalem
i.nd Washington. The White
House announcement said
that Ford had invited R;>in
*'for discussions of matters
of mutual interest and in
order to strengthen the
friendly ties between the
two countries." The official
announcement of the Ford-
Sadat meeting in Salzburg
June 1 and 2 was made by
the White House last Friday.
OFFICIALS here said, how-
ever, that Israel had been in-
formed in aihancc of that an-
nouncement that President
Ford intended to meet with
Sadat and Rabin. The officials
would give no details of Premier
Rabin's schedule dining his
two-day \isit to Washington or
whether he would meet with
President Ford more than once.
They said they firmly believed
that the U.S. would adopt no
final positions before Ford's
meeting with Rabin.
The officials said the Cabinet
would schedule its "political
debate" as close as possible to
Rabin's departure date for
Washington. That indicated that
the debate would be held after
the Ford-Sadat meeting in Salz-
burg.
Ford's meetings with the
heads of the governments of
the two principal antagonists in
the Middle East conflict are
viewed by observers here and
in the U.S. as an indication that
the United States was renew-
ing its diplomatic efforts to ob-
tain some sort of second-stage
accord between Israel and
Egypt belore the Mideast peace
conference is reconvened in
Geneva,
THOSE EFFORTS broke down
when the bilateral talks con-
ducted by Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger were sus-
pended last March 22, prompt-
ing President Ford to order a
reassessment of U.S. Middle
East policy. It was regarded as
significant that the President,
not the Secretary of State, will
spearhead the new initiative.
Ford was to fly to Europe
this week to participate in a
meeting of NATO government
chiefs to be held in Brussels
Thurs. and Friday. He was also
to meet with Austrian Chief
Bruno Kreisky in Salzburg. The
President will be accompanied
on his trip by Mrs. Ford.
PLO Misses First Chance
To Take Part at UN Meet
> PlfflBB FRIEDUXGER
VIENNA (JTAI The Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
mussed its first opportunity to
participate in a United Nations
Conference. The PLO, granted
observer status by tlie UN Gen-
eral Assembly last year, was au-
tomatically invited to attend the
UN Legal Conference. But no
PLO delegates showed up. "Per-
haps they win snow up later or
perhaps they are not interested
in a conference devoted to tech-
nical legal questions," a UN
spokesman said.
The invitation extended to the
PLO was sent to all so-enlled
"liberation" organizations that
hold observer status with the
UN. The only one to attend wai
the Pan-African Congress of
Tanzania. Austrian officials said
the liberation movement dele-
gates were entitled to "function-
al immunity" even if Austria
does not recognize their parent
organizations. Austria has ne>
ti. s with the PLO, but last
year, the head of the Austria!*
Foreign Ministry's political de-
partment, August Steiner, con-
ferred with a PLO representa-
tive.
a
FIRST IN THE NATION
MATIC
ILL PAYING SERVICE
Free new Bill-O-Matic bill paying service a new PLUS Account
customer feature. Just phone us, tell us who to pay, the amount to be
paid and when to pay it and we'll do just that. We'll take funds from
your existing savings PLUS Account and pay any or all of your personal
or family bills. Each month a statement will be mailed listing the amount
of each transaction. You save postage, cost of checks and precious time.
We do it all at no charge. And your funds earn attractive interest at
the rate of blA% a year, compounded daily, all the time they're with us.
For full information, visit any one of our nine convenient Hollywood
Federal offices in Broward or Dade Counties. A courteous Bill-O-Matic
representative will be pleased to explain this unique free service to you.
Get more for your money and more out of life with Hollywood
Federal's new lifestyle PLUS Account. Minimum balance $10.
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL
^Ky^/SAVINGS
Other plUS Account Services ^^^^
+ Free telephone transfer of funds from your Hollywood Federal savings account to your mortgage account.
? Free direct deposit system for social security benefits. + Free money orders. + Free Cook travelers cheques.
+ Free special occasion and holiday gift folders. + Movie theatre tickets at discounts up to 50 percent.
+ Free telephone transfer of funds from your Hollywood Federal savings account to your bank checking account.
+ Free notary service and witnessing. + Statements (monthly on active accounts; quarterly on inactive accounts).
We reserve the right to change, modify or withdraw services without notice.
Downtown Hollywood: 1909 Tyler Street 925-8111 West Hollywood: 5950 Washington Street 981-2000 Dania: 140 South Federal Highway 923-8241 -o^i-,^
Davie: 6100 Griffin Road 584-5000 Hallandale: 2101 East Hallandale Beach Boulevard 920-1616 Emerald Hills: 4555 Sheridan Street 966-9900 ESLIC
Miramar: 3110 University Drive 962-7323 Sunrise: 7880 West Oakland Park Boulevard 484-4220 North Biscayne: 20091 Biscayne Bouievaro 932-1533


Paee 8-A
+Je*ist fkridiftri
Friday, May 30, 1975
Furore Still Raging Over Eban Statement
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A furore is continuing to
rage in Israel over former
Foreign Minister Abba
Eban's assertion that Israel
was to blame for the break-
down of the bilateral Israeli-
Egyptian talks conducted by-
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger in March.
Eban, who only recently
was one of the prominent Is-
raeli personalities who vol-
unteered to go abroad to ex-
plain Israel's position at
public forums, blasted the
Rabin government in an in-
terview published in Maariv
for harboring "unrealistic
expectations" and making
demands on Egypt for non-
belligerency which it should
have known Egypt would
not accept.
HE MAINTAINED that "even
though the final version" of the
proposed second-stage agree-
ment that Kissinger urged Is-
rael to accept "was bad. the
government should have accept-
ed it and not forced the nego-
tiations to collapse."
Eban said that Israel should
have followed that course if only
out of consideration for its bi-
lateral relations with the United
States and to keep up the mo-
mentum of peace negotiations.
There was no official reaction
to Eban's remarks from govern-
ment sources. But the former
Foreign Minister and Labor
MK was bitterly assailed by
Meir Zarmi, secretary general
of the Labor Party, and Leon
Dulzin, Jewish Agency Treasur-
er and a leader of the opposition
Likud.
Zarmi said he found Eban's
behavior "unsuitable to the re-
sponsibility of his standing and
position."
DULZIN TOLD the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Eban's
Maariv interview "was actually
i
American Israeli
$ All Religious Articlts x>
For Synagogues Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVL
JE 1-7772 $. Schworfi
RELIGIOUS GOODS
FOR HOME, SCHOOL
& HOUSE OF WORSHIP
IMPORTED CRYSTALWARE
HIGH QUALITY LOW PRICED
RELGO I CRYSTAL, INC
1507 Washington Avenue
PHONE 532-5912
National Hebrew
ISKAUI GIFT CENT** INC.
Bar Mftzvoh Sots
Religious Articles Gifts
949 Washington Ave. 532-2210
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
HAS EVERYTHING FOR
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
and Jewish Homes. Free Gift
with Every Bar AAitzvah Outfit
4T7 Washington Art. 672-7077
W'WWWV.
i*rt*a0*S***
Wvjxnffi
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
072-730*
-
945 MKHIMN AVL, WUAH OfACN
:-----------
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
' .
a gift he gave to (Egyptian
President Anwar) Sadat and all
our adversaries in the world."
Dulzin. who just returned
from a World Jewish Congress
meeting in London, said the
Eban interview presented "an
informational problem" for Is-
rael abroad.
Zarmi noted that the Labor
Party Central Committee had
passed a resolution endorsing
the government's position in the
Kissinger talks which placed
full responsibility on Egypt for
their collapse.
HE SAID that if Eban had
reservations about the govern-
ment's position he should have
expressed his views within the
party's forums.
Eban told Mariv that he had
always opposed attempts for an
interim settlement with Egypt
because he felt that the dispo-
sition of such vital strategic as-
sets as the Mitle and Cidi
Passes and the Abu Rodeis oil
fields in Sinai should be nego-
tiated only within the context
of an overall peace settlement.
But once the government had
decided to go along with Kis-
singer's step-by-step approach
it should have accepted the ac-
cord proposed by Kissinger
rather than foil the talks and
cause a crisis in Jerusalem-
Washington relations.
"THE NEGOTIATIONS under
the mediation of Dr. Kissinger
began on the wrong foot." Eban
said in the interview. "The (Is-
raeli) government had unreal-
istic expectations that Egypt
would agree to end its state of
belligerency, something Egypt
could not agree to, and thus it
was not possible at the end of
the negotiations to reach an
agreement," Eban was quoted as
saying.
The agreement may have
been "poorly drafted" but it
could have been accepted with
its imperfections and compen-
sated for in the context of U.S.-
Israeli relations, Eban said.
EBAN COMPARED the pres-
ent government's diplomatic
record, which he termed stag-
nant with that of the previous
government in which he had
served as Foreign Minister.
He said the latter's perform-
ance between November. 1973
and May. 1974. during which
time cease-fire agreements and
disengagement accords were
concluded with Egypt and Syria
ending the Yom Kippur War,
was a "golden period" in Israeli
diplomacy, replete with agree-
ments and political movement.
Eban warned the government
that it was mistakenly playing
down the current rift with
Washington which he viewed as
a grave matter.
HE OBSERVED that during
his tenure as Foreign Minister,
relations had been such that
when America sought to sell
arms to Jordan it first sought
Israel's approval and under-
standing.
In contrast, he said, the U.S.
arms deal with Jordan last week
had followed no such prior con-
sultation with Israel. He was re-
ferring to the disclosure last
week that the U.S. has agreed
to sell Jordan a S100 million
"Hawk" anti-aircraft missile de-
fense System arid' other weap-
ons.
Israel lodged a formal protest.
Eban said that similar to the
arms deal with Jordan, the ;
meeting between President Ford
and President Anwar Sadat
June 1 will not be preceded, by
all accounts, by prior U.S.-Is-
raeli consultations.
OBSERVERS HERE noted
that immediately after the
breakdown of the Kissineer
Eban expressed views
quite opposite to those he ad-
vanced in the Maariv interview.
At that time, he firmly blamed
Egypt for the collapse of the
negotiations and said the Israeli
government had no option but
to reject the final Egyptian pro-1
posals transmitted by Kissinger.
Asked how he could logically
have accented the government's
request that he travel to the
U.S. and Europe to "explain" a
policy that he opposed. Eban
said:
"I told those who made the
request that I would not say
things I didn't believe in ... I
argued that in matters of na-
tional security of Israel the
final sovereign decision must
rest with the Israel government.
I also stressed that the hoped-
for interim agreement would not
have been so important as to
merit the melancholy and anger
which its non-attainment occa-
sioned. Even had it been att
ed. the resumption ol
would have soon followed."
EBAN SAID he had stressed
that argument at his meeting
with Kissinger and had urged
the Secretary to look to the
months ahead, not the weeks
that had passed.
He said he also warned that
any rift or semblance of a rift
between Israel and the U.S.
would encourage Arab intransi-
gence and adventurism. He said
the government apparently felt
that it was worth calling on his
services even though he did not
entirely endorse its position.
Eban refused to be drawn by
Maariv into commenting on his
personal political ambitions. The
time was not ripe and the lead-
ership is not presently up for
contest, he said.
But observers here neverthe-
less viewed the tone and content
of his remarks to Maariv as a
direct challenge to Premier
Yitzhak Rabin for national and
Labor Party leadership.
Anti-Giscard Demonstration
PARIS (JTA) About 5.000 people demonstrated on the
Champs Elysees against President Valery Giscard d'Estaing's
decision to stop all French celebrations of the World War II
Allied victory over Nazi Germany. The marchers were led by
four former deportees, wearing the striped uniforms of the
Nazi camps. A number of deputies and political leaders were
among the demonstrators. French Jewish organizations pro-
tested the presidential decision early last week.
GIVE TO ISRAEL
AND ISRAEL
WILL GIVE TO YOU!
2
9.5/

3J
z
3J
31
a:
Desalination Experts
Expected in Israel
mrauDh me HISTADRUT
ANNUITY TRUST
which will help finance the
11100,000,0011
HISTADRUT MORTGAGE FUND
for
HOMES IN THE HOMELAND
for I
Israel's Army Veterans and their families 1
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
team of American desalination
experts were due in Israel to
examine prospects for erecting
a sea-water-sweetening plant at
Ashdod.
The team is being sent under
the terms of the new economic
agreement signed by U.S. Treas-
ury Secretary William Simon
and Israel Finance Minister Ye-
hoshua Rabinowitz in Washing-
ton last Tuesday.
The U.S. undertook in that
accord to contribute $20 million
to a desalination plant at Ash-
dod with the Israeli government
putting up an equivalent sum.
FINANCE MINISTRY Direc-
tor General, Avraham Agmon,
who announced the team's im-
minent arrival, said that Simon
and Rabinowitz would meet
again in Jerusalem in October
as part of their intention to
hold regular ammal meetings in
the wake of the economic ac-
cord.
Describing some other im-
portant elements of the accord,
Agmon said it had been agreed
that Israel could buy strategic
raw materials directly from U.S.
government stockpiles at favor-
able credit terms.
Also, Israel would present a
long-range order for basic food-
stuffs such as soya which
would protect her against any
possible recurrence of food em-
bargos, such as that imposed by
America on soya exports two.
years ago.
AGMON SAID the U.S. had
not yet arranged for 10 top busi
nessmen to join a joint pan >1
designed to promote trade with
and investment in Israel.
But Simon had promised Ra-
binowitz that he personally
would undertake to expedite
this matter. (There have been
reports that Arab pressures
have disuaded certain possible
members of such a joint panel
from putting forward their
names.)
GIVE TO ISRAEL
AND ISRAEL WILL GIVE
TO YOU
...9.5% in cash
...100% in satisfaction
For further particulars, please contact:
Israel Hisladrut Foundation, Inc.
I 420 Lincoln Kood, Miami Beach, Flo. 33139
Room 389 Telephone 531-8702
Gentlemen:
Please contact me with further Information about
I the 9.5% Histadrut Annuity Jrust.
name-
3
3
11
i i
3
*>>*>


Friday, May 30, 1975
=
*Jewlsti Fhridia/r)
Page 9-A
-
LEO MINPLIN
Search for Garden of Eden Intoxicating
Continued from Page 4-A
say, I feel more American in a
positive sense, and furthermore
I take greater satisfaction in
that feeling than I ever imagin-
ed possible.
HERE, IN the winding hills
and sleepy villages nestling
along the waters, I can hear
Walt Whitman singing his song
of America, for it is here that
he lived and heard that song
himself in the great final cre-
scendo of his life.
I can hear Rachmaninoff, for
he too discovered this Eden; al-
though surely, he suffered the
sorrow of the outsider much as
I suffer it in "foreign" Edens,
especially Rachmaninoff, be-
cause he was a stranger even
in his beloved pre-revolution
Petersburg, a stranger to him-
self, and that is the song I hear
Hill Softens Sclilesinger Words
Continued from Page 1-A
subject of an Arab oil embargo
in an interview published in
U.S. News and World Report
and on an ABC television "Is-
sues and Answers" program.
WHITE HOUSE Press Secre-
tary Ron Nessen said that
Schlesinger had said no more
than state the position outlined
by President Ford last year
that the use of force in the
etfcnf "6T aTTew' Ifideast oil cri-
sis was theoretical and could
not even be considered unless
the industrialized nations were
at the point of "strangulation."
Ford also said at the time
that the threat of a new oil em-
bargo could create a stalemate
in the Middle East peace proc-
ess.
Schlesinger was quoted in
the magazine interview as say-
ing that "I think we are less
likely to be tolerant of a re-
newed embargo than we were
of the initial one in 1973" dur-
ing the Yom Kjppur War.,
HE SAID, "I am not going
to indicate any prospective re-
action other than point out
there are economic, political or
Gulf Oil Funds
Going for Arab
Propaganda
Continued from Page 1-A
on Multinational Corporations which is making the in-
vestigation.
WHEN THE subcommittee sought more information
from him on the payments to the Arab fund, Dorsey
said he would supply it. Dorsey, who also admitted May
16 to having made illegal political donations in Korea
and Bolivia, said his company secretly helped finance
an Arab public relations campaign in the U.S.
While claiming he had few details of the pro-Arab
"public education" campaign, he said Gulf paid $50,000
secretly to it through the First National City Bank in
Beirut in 1970.
He said he had a general impression the payment
was made after a request was made in the Middle East
because the Arab viewpoint "was not understood in the
United States."
Kodak
BUSMSS OPPOHTUHITM _
DISTRIBUTOR ""
WANTED 'OLARO.D
^lified Individual Male or Female needed to distribute
world famous Kodak film and other photo products
through company established locations. "NO SELLING
OR SOLICITING REQUIRED." Make this year your year
for Independence. J499S.00 investment. Guaranteed 12
month repurchase agreement.
CALL Mr. Morrii: (Toll Free) 1-800-848-1970
or Collect A414-228-1751 -
Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. EOT
Of WfilFirtioo PhoiognprnFi'Miont Buitoing-sinct it
IM N V SI Columttul.CMOM'> _________
All-in
Hearing Aid
(Custom Fit)
fiUdf*
EicoptHow
Much Betttr
Yon Heir
leoney-BkK'G uihtiK
licensed* The State of FU.
FREE AT HOME HEARW6 TEST
STARKEY HEARING MDS 947-
17070 Collins Aw. 7301
Miami Beach
conceivably military measures
in response."
On the television program,
he said, "Just precisely what
measures we might take would
remain for the circumstances,
but I do not expect those cir-
cumstances to arise."
He added, "we regard" U.S.
military action "as a very im-
probable event in the first place
and it certainly is not an option
that is attractive on its face,
save in desperate circum-
stances."
AN EGYPTIAN "government
source" in Cairo described
Schlesinger as saber-rattling,
and a Jordanian newspaper in
Amman said his remarks con-
tributed to Israel's "arrogance."
The White House response
did not go beyond the asser-
tion that Schlesinger was sim-
ply stating what Ford had said
months ago.
But there was apparent con-
cern in official circles here
that the Defense Secretary's
remarks could affect the meet-
ing between President Ford
and Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat in Salzburg next week.
Ford himself said in a re-
cent nationwide foreign policy
address that another Arab-Is-
raeli war would almost certain-
ly lead to a new Arab oil em-
bargo, but he did not disclose
what action if any the U.S.
would take in such a situation.
in the music he composed here
in the winding hills and sleepy
villages still echoing his an-
guish.
(There are men I have met
here who still swear they heard
him practicing through the
windows of his neighboring es-
tate, or saw his great sad, mo-
rose figure, curved in upon it-
self, walking the woods and hol-
lows.)
AND THERE is more, so
much more in this newest and
so far longest lasting of my
Edens, where I love to come
when the human machine wears
thin in the fatigue of its exile
from original grace.
The Garden is lush. It is filled
with dogwood, chestnut, maple,
elm, nine, willow, birch, a riot
of green and dark brown and
silver bark, and flowering leaves
that are pink and white and
orange and yellow and, in fact,
every conceivable color.
I walk in the woods, imagin-
ing that precisely here, where
I stand, Rachmaninoff must
have stood, or Whitman, or the
philosopher John Dewey, who
also lived and worked in these
woods among the squirrels and
raccoons and the exquisitely de-
signed pheasant in their pano-
ply of tail feathers splayed in
streaks like a painter's palette.
MIAMI IS far awaynot in
miles but in emotion and spirit,
light years away. In the cold
grey weather and light of
Lloyd Harbour's wooded walks,
Miami's sun-scorched concrete
and pathetic dots of burned
grass lawns struggling to sur-
vive in the heat of a human hell
made more hellish by human
greed seems a nightmare to tell
me that though this Eden, un-
like my past Edens, is real, and
I am happily no longer a strang-
er to it, still I must leave it,
and very soon now.
But it is I who do the leav-
ing. I am not evicted from it.
I can return.
The walk in the woods must
end now, at least for the mo-
ment. The human machine
winds up again.
FORD PRESSES in upon me,
and Kissinger, the meeting next
week with Anwar Sadat at a
palace with elevators rather
than stairways exclusively' (Sa-
dat dislikes walkinghe would
hear nothing, feel nothing, see
nothing in my Eden anyway),
the struggle in Lebanon all
the horrors on earth to which
Edenless men are heir.
In fact, the walk does end.
But I shall return.
Complete
Window Service
KtPAISS
REPLACING REGLAZING
Fair Service Free Csfimofes
PHONE 666-3339
ALL WINDOW REPAIR
7813 BIRD ROAD
"OCEAN AND INTERC0ASTAL VIEW"
WALK TO BEACH
LUXURIOUS 2 BEDRM. 2 BATH APTS IN LOW DENSITY 35
UNIT BLDG. ONLY 5 UNITS PER FLOOR, COMPLETELY
SCREENED BALCONIES, PANORAMIC VIEW OF INTERC0AST
AL WATERWAY AND OCEAN, REC. FACILITIES AND SECURITY
T.V. AND TEL SYSTEM. EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FOR
BEACH LOVERS TO PURCHASE A BEAUTIFUL APARTMENT
ONLY 3 BLOCKS FROM THE OCEAN.
"BEST BUY ON FT. LAUDERDALE BEACH"
ASSUME MTGE. NO CLOSING COSTS,
SMALL DOWN PAYMENT,
COME SEE US NOW.
PHONE FOR AN APPT. ANY DAY
"NAUTICAL TOWERS"
720 Bayshore Dr., Ft Lauderdale .
1-426-0333 or 1-565-6339
W DANK IS
GaNGTOHAVABABY:
RIGHT ON THOORNR
OF ALTON RDANDIO^STRfiet"
This July, Bank of Miami Beach will open its
new drive-in banking center on the corner of
Alton and 10th. Its one more way to give you
better service.
The new office will look like a little bank.
But it'll have all our strength behind it.
It's going to be a beautiful baby.
THAT5
Mr/BANK.
DANKOF
miami dg*ch:
930 Washington Ave Miami Beach, 33139
Phone: 534-1577
Member FD1C.


Page 10-A
+Jewish norictian
Friday. May 30, 1975
Intermarriage Seen a Major
Danger to Jewish Survival
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: pwnmiiiinmi
I take issue with the views
expressed in your issue of Mar.
14 by Dr. Blanche Serwer en-
titled, "Intermarriage Doesn't
Mean the End of Judaism,-'
which are contradictory to the
real facts.
The many Jewish families
that have been wrecked and di-
vided, and the manv desertions
by our young people from our
faith attest to the disastrous re-
sults caused by the rapid in-
crease of Intermarriages.
FOLLOWING THE age of the
ghetto, there ensued a period
of enlightenment and religious
and social freedom. But, in our
desire to fully acquire the bene-
fits of our new-found society,
we have forfeited our principles
of Judaism for their approval
and acceptance, resulting in
apathy to our intermarriage
crisis, indifference to the syna-
gogue and a complete lack of
concern for Judaism. We must
make a dramatic change in our
way of living.
We must remind ourselves of
the vital and important role the
synagogue plays in our lives and
the lives of our family. We must
set an example by bringing our
children to synagogue regularly.
Also, many children are sent to
Religious School, but they are
disillusioned upon their return
to their homes, to find a com-
plete absence of the covenants
and traditions they were taught,
nor do they see any observance
of our Jewish religion.
THERE MUST be a sharp
awakening and self-analysis for
;'i
OUR
READERS
WRITE
'Let Thy Words Be Brier
Koheleth (Ecclcsiastes)
I hi., i
I
each of us. We must have a re-
vival of the observant family,
whether Orthodox, Conservative
or Reform. We must revive to
survive.
Let us make the synagogue
the object of our affection and
our devotion, thus transmitting
Judaism from generation to
generation.
SAM L. SEZZIN
Hollywood
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The prevailing mood in Ismel
appears to be that of the two
alternativesthe "step-by-step"
diplomacy of Dr. Henry Kissin-
ger and the Geneva Conference.
The latter is the lesser of two
evils.
The consensus is that the
crux of the problem is not how
far Israel is ready to retreat in
Sinai and what concessions it is
willing to make to the Arab
neighbors in exchange for a true
peace, but the fact that Egypt
together with the other 19 mem-
bers of the Arab League are not
willing to reconcile themselves
to the existence of Israel and
are still bent on its elimination
from the Middle East.
HERE ARE but a few proofs
of the above Arab stance: The
Egyptian Foreign Minister Is-
mail Fahmy has still not chang-
ed one of his conditions for a
"peace" with Israel, which he
has just restated namely, a
ban on immigration to Israel,
acceptance by Israel of the 1947
partition plan and payment of
compensation to the Arab coun-
tries for damages incurred dur-
ing Israel's aggressive wars"
against them.
Also, the Arab Khartoum
resolution of 1967, demanding
no recognition, no peace and
no negotiations with Israel, still
remains in force.
None of the Arab leaders has
as yet accepted publicly the part
of the UN Pis. 242 resolution
requiring ". termination of
claims of state of belligerency
and respect for and acknowl-
edgment of the sovereignty, ter-
ritorial integrity and political
independence of every state in
the area."
It is incumbent upon American
Jewry in this fateful hour for
Israel to present Israel's case
before the forum of the
American public opinion in the
proper light and perspective.
DR. REUBEN EFRON
Jerusalem, Israel
Russians Send Two to Siberia
NEW YORK(JTA) Mark
Nashpitz and Boris Tsitlionok.
the Moscow activists who each
were sentenced last March to
five years exile after demon-
strating last February near the
Kremlin, have been sent to Si-
beria, it was reported by the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry.
Nashpitz, 27, was sent to
Chita near the Chinese border,
Tsitlionok, 31, was sent to Kras-
noyarsk.
THE SSSJ also reported that
Leningrad activist Lev Zhigun,
a nuclear physicist, has been
threatened with trial under an
unpublished edict of Dec. 25,
1972, banning activities "against
state interests."
A SSSJ spokesman said he
feared that this edict, used re-
cently in Odessa against Lev
Roitbard and in Tbilisi against
the Goldstein brothers, "will
now be used against Jews in
many Soviet cities who seek to
leave."
In another development, the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported that Igor
Abramovich, a Moscow "refus-
nik," was arrested in his home
and taken to the militia where
he was threatened with charges
of parasitism.
Abramovich, a radio engi-
neer, who has been trying to
emigrate to Israel for almost
two years, was told that he
would be given a job as a truck
loader and that if he refused,
he would be tried and sentenced
to one year in exile.
STANLEY H. LOWELL, NCSJ
chairman, said that there seems
to be a stepped-up trend to-
ward picking up selected "refus-
niks" and threatening them with
charges of parasitism, while at
the same time offering them
work which is out of their field.
Meanwhile, scores of protest-
orsincluding an actress with
Israel's Habima Theaterstaged
a demonstration at the Bijou
Theater in New York to de-
nounce the Soviet Union's
"stepped-up campaign of per-
secution against Soviet Jews."
The demonstration, coordinat-
ed by the Greater New York
Conference of Soviet Jewry,
took place on the final day of
the Soviet Film Festival at the
Bijour. The film shown yester-
day was "Crime and Punish-
ment."
The protesters included mem-
bers of constituent agencies of
the Greater New York Confer-
ence, including the Oceanfront
Council on Soviet Jewry.
THE ACTRESS who took part
is Dina Roitkop Podriachik.
She and her husband, Eliezer,
were permitted to emigrate from
the Soviet Union to Israel in
1971, but were forced to leave
their son, Uri, 26, behind.
Uri is still in Riga, where the
family had lived for more than
30 years. He has been repeated-
ly denied a visa and has been
subjected to severe harassment.
His mother is in the U.S. to call
attention here to the plight of
her son, as well as that of the
vast numbers of Soviet Jews
who want to emigrate from the
USSR.
Malcolm Hoenlein, GNYCSJ
executive director, said that "it
is quite fitting that the demon-
stration was held during the
showing of 'Crime and Punish-
ment.' He said "crime and
punishment are the watchwords
as far as the Soviets' attitude
toward Jews is concerned."
Rabbi Diverts Emigres
AGED BEEF Of EN HEARTH
NAMO 10UNCE
Always .Hm fTMvy MWftJt
f twa 9 <" ii comkoj
7*k Strett Coeway, Miami Beach
AMERICAN EXPRESS DINERS ClUI
ED ZEILER, Your Host
758-5581
Continued from Page 1-A
burgh section of Brooklyn, New
York.
HE IS bitterly opposed to
Zionism and Israel on theolog-
ical grounds and is known to
have close ties with the anti-
Israel Neturei Karta sect in
Jerusalem's Mea Shearim quar-
ter.
Kirschblum reported that
other sections of the Jewish
community in Vienna were in-
censed by the Satmer approach
to the Austrian authorities.
Shoni Labowitz, local artist, stands beside her sculpture
of the martyrs of the holocaust which was dedicated at
recent services in Temple Beth Israel in Fort Lauderdale.
Out of the flames of the holocaust the piece depicts the
fact that Israel will live. The artist was commissioned by
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Brodzki of Fort Lauderdale.
Rabin Picks Zeevi
To Take Job As
Intelligence Aide
Continued from Page 1-A
shon Avner said there was no
discussion of the precise func-
tions of Zeevi in his new post
but recalled that the Agranat
Commission itself had delineat-
ed the functions it thought nec-
essary.
Avner volunteered a run-
down of the other Agranat rec-
ommendations and a checklist
of their implementation.
They include a clearer defi-
nition of the roles of the Cabi-
net, the Premier, the Defense
Minister and the Chief of Staff.
Avner said that had been the
subject of an extensive report
by a ministerial committee un-
der Justice Minister Haim Za-
dok and the report was "on the
Cabinets anemia."
AVNER SAID the Zadok com-
mittee also approved the Agra-
nat recommendation to estab-
lish a special Ministerial De-
fense Committee. He said the
Cabinet approved it in princi-
ple and agreed to a member-
ship of 11 out of the 20 Cabi-
net ministers.
Hitherto, the entire Cabinet
has functioned, when required.
as a ministerial security com-
mittee whose deliberations
were conducted in closed ses-
sion and classified secret.
Avner said the problem still
remained of selecting the min-
isters for the Defense Commit-
tee because each political fac-
tion in the government de-
mands representation.
AVNER SAID that the estab-
lishment of a small "war cabi-
net" to function in the event of
war was also under considera-
tion. He stated that the
strengthening of the Foreign
Ministry's research department,
recommended by the Agranat
panel, has been implemented
by the creation of a new "cen
ter for political research and
planning" which now operates
within the Ministry.
Avner said Kabin reported
that improved methods of dis-
seminating raw intelligence
data have been put into effect
along with changes in the
structure oi the military intel-
ligence corps and the establish-
ment of a unit for assessing in-
formation within the "Mossad,"
the secret service.
tfW
tS^*$***
c

nv
to*

*i. A
^^tm WORLD RENOWNED
671 Washington Ava., Miami Beach
OPEN YEAR ROUND AT 4 PJL
JEIISH-ROUMANIAN-
roho.. AMERICAN CUISINE
The Lero*JHAT MAKES THE FAMOUS
The Zuckermaas BANQUET FACILITIES
It Larry tinkler
537-3987
t
....,-----------J
JO-0-*UtI 3
&>
e*'


riday. 'ay 30, 1975
+Jewish fhrfdfom
Page 11-A
jR&])iii, Peres Disagree on Jordan Buildup
l-AVIV (JTA)
Yitzhak Rabin ap-
K> be at odds with De-
liuister Shimon Peres
emphasis the latter
Fplaced on the massing
Jordanian troops and ar-
near Israel's eastern
lers.
jile the fact of the Jor-
military build up, the
fcf its kind since 1970,
I in doubt, there are
fcces of opinion with-
He government over
r the matter should
Been given the promi-
Hit was by Peres when
Bed Jordan Valley set-
Its last week.
RABIN A.\D Foreign Minister
V'ual Alton are said to have pre-
ferred that the matter be play-
ed down both for diplomatic
meas'in- and to avoid increas-
ing tension in Israel.
A tour of the Jordan Valley
by Israeli military correspond-
ents was called off on orders
from the Premier .
Government officials, Peres
included, have said that the
Jordanian intentions are un-
clear.
PERES LINKED the build-up
to tho recent announcement of
"cooperation'' between Amman
and Damascus but reported no
evidence that Syrian forces have
entered Jordan a move the
Jordanians would not be likely
to welcome.
Rabin reportedly believes that
Israel's adversaries, including
Egypt and Jordan, were inter-
ested in heightening tension in
the Middle East before Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat's meeting
with President Ford in Salz-
burg June 1 and 2. thereby hop-
ing to gain a political advan-
tage.
Sadat visited Jordan last week
and King Hussein's intention
may have been to impress him
with the fact that Jordan is
ready to participate in a new
war with Israel. Meanwhile
their fortification work and
troop build-ups are continuing.
BUT ISRAELI security forces
were most active last week
Diplomat Confirms Ghorbal Story
Hnued from Page 1-A According to Gefen, Kelly was
' in those'years in close contact
Vvith' the 'Egyptian 'Embassy in
W
Celly, has been repudi-
the Egyptian Ambas-
iind by Alejandro Orfilla,
fgentipa Ambassador to
Bit*l States who introdii.--
Hrbal to Kelly in Washing-
Bhere the interview took
place.
RBAL HAS aserted that
^ervicv occurred and that
tand Kelly met for only two
Hes. Kelly, in his article
Kined that the two men
ffor 90 minutes.
Kn contended that the in-
Hv is a "fact which cannot
Bnied.' He said that he had
Line interview in Spanish
^d he knows Kelly person-
Bo the days he served as
tin I in Argentina between
S7.
think
four
BS, Bar Milzvahs, and
Mj receive the special touch
It Miami Beach's newest hotel,
trictly kosher catering prepared
inder Rabbinical supervision and
>mpletely flexible facilities for
^n group. For more infor-
Hvcdll Murray Skup, Dir-
ictor of Catering, at 865-1500.
KONCH'BJHOTH.
[HYATT MIAMI BEACH
ront, 54th to 55th Streets
Argentina and with Hussein Tri-
ki, the Arab League representa-
tive who was later expelled from
Argentina for fomenting public
disorder with his anti-Jewish
activities.
GEFEN, who was one of the
leaders of Brichah and came to
Palestine a few months before
the creation of the Jewish State,
and is currently in the U.S. on
a lecture tour'as part of Israel's
effort to gain public support for
its policies, said that collabora-
tion between Arabs and local
anti-Semites in Argentina is
presently very much under way.
He identified Kelly as one of the
local anti-Semites.
"I believe that the Egyptian
Embassy in Buenos Aires had
arranged the Kelly-Ghorbal in-
ter iew," Gefen said, adding:
"This sort of interview is
very good stuff for Argentina, a
place where anti-Semitism is en
the rise. As long as the content
of this interview was kept with-
in Argentina no denial was is-
sued.
"BUT AT the moment
the
m
SCHECHTER'S
mam
MMstrictly kosher
MM! H0TEL GLATT
i Reduced Summer Rates!
100; Air Conditioned
Olympic Site Swimming Pool
Private Sandy Beach & Patio
Free Parking. Entertainment
Occjnfroiit Synagogue
TV & Radio In All Rooms
Cliildrens Day Camp
Sog.i', Sj!: & Fat Free Diets .-
DIKING ROOM OPEN
TO THE PUBUC
For (teervofionj or information
PHONE 531-0061
Entire Occarvfront Block
37th to 38tn St.. Miami Beach
Sam Schech tar. Owner Mgr.
Hans H. Marcuseg
Louis Witkin
To assure you of a !
superb social event
Bar Mitzvah, Wedding 3
Anniversary Party.
at the all new
Jewish Telegraphic Agency pub-
lished in the United States and
elsrvhe*e. Ghorfcel probably
reBUze^.thatihis. rAuua^KSi.WiW'ii:
be seen in the broad context of
Arab propaganda which has
adopted the Nazi propaganda
style and ether methods of Na-
zism as demonstrated by the ne-
farious acts of the Palestinian
murderers."
Gefen also had harsh words
to say about the nationally syn-
dicated columnists, Rowland
Evans and Robert Novak, who
charged last month that the JTA
and the world Jewish press was
engaged in what amounted to a
conspiracy to defame Ghorbal.
"Evans' and Novak's charges
are part of Arab propaganda."
Gefen said. "There is no doubt
in my mind that they distorted
the facts deliberately. Their at-
tack .on JTA put them in line
with all those elements, diverse
as can be, held together by their
hatred of Jews under the guise
of anti-Zionism."
Explosion
Not Due
To Bombing
TEL AVIV (JTA) Is-,
raeli security sources have
ruled out sabotage as the
cause of an explosion that
destroyed a Defense Minis-
try munitions plant and
warehouse northeast of Tel
Aviv Friday night.
Twenty-five people were
slightly injured by glass
splinters and two were
treated for shock and con-
cussion.
THE BLAST, which sent a
black mushroom cloud soaring
thousands of feet over the Sha-
ron Valley, shattered windows
and cracked walls in nearby
buildings and broke windows in
the towns of Hod. Hasharon,
HeiY.lia and Ramat Hasharon.
The blast was heard as far
north as Nathanya and as far
south as Jaffa.
A preliminary investigation
indicated that the explosion was
the result of spontaneous com-
bustion of chemicals stored in
the plant or an electrical mal-
function that caused a short cir-
cuit.
The factory was closed at the
time because of the Shavuot
holiday and no employees were
hurt.
THE TERRORIST ne-vs agen-
cy, 'A'afa. In Beirut, disregard-
ed tr fact in a report claiming
that Palestinian guerrillas blew
Up a heavy rocket fuel factory
killing and-injuring hundreds of
li troops and technicians.
The identitv of the plint and
the.nature of the material man-
ufactured and stored there was
not disclosed .
along the Lebanese frontier in
the north. Extensive precau-
tionary measures were taken in
Upper Galilee to prevent pos-
sible terorist assaults on the oc-
casion of the 27th anniversary
of Israel's independence and
the Shavuot holiday that fol-
lowed.
A broad security belt was es-
tablished parallel to the Leba-
nese border, and Israeli units,
supplied with lists of suspected
terrorists and terrorist collabo-
rators, combed the region on
both sides of the border.
EIGHT SUSPECTS were
brought into Israel last week
for questioning, but all have
since been released and return-
ed to Lebanon.
The security measures are
creditd with having kept the
northern regions quiet over the
holidays.
An Israeli patrol shot and
killed a man observed cutting
throagh a security fence on the
border He was identified as an
Israeli Arab who was apparently
trying to enter Lebanon.
adult
from
Condominium
residence
$17,990
The Meadows
370 S. STATE ROAD 7 (441)
MARGATE, FLORIDA 33068
.
(305-974-8686) ';./.' '
HI fiitft'"1*' '_________'____________
O
u
vim our Htsmt
STUDIO. FAMOUS All
ova rut wono"
isr.ifjs
cP>S^
one of the
largest and
most beautiful
selections at
moderate prices
only one
studio for
your personal
attention
CLOSED
MONDAYS
Most Major
Credit Cards
Honored
UNIQUE FREE FORM 14
AND 18 KARAT FLOWING
GOLD JEWELRY TO PLEASE
YOUR PERSONALITY
11*30 M.I. 2 AVI.
NORTH MIAMI
757-3145
BBB

JM
$5.95
q ^Yj y\c *vD- c.rtm out

^,.5000
fl.oad.
35


i
Fndaj. Mar M 197M
You are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
Tat 19 1 ml fcirr KaxSsa dar mW s i-v
- vr .aaimmwan fetat
t pi-. -.
2>eaMie af -&e ad mm 1I e CKMfwc=Jt* wwa -- a -< -Je
vr Wc asssex tac reaaat
a> Bat Itmii cast *c aalc af <
laf i>ttdK
O .-,-* -..... -
r\i 1 '.- : 1
-.-.
: --
"/.' {.* '.** _-.* 'v V. '//. ;
BW*
t'*t '_'*:' *-. V. .* -" "* '-
*'* .'. '*','..
mm mM tmbmt j*ar y.*tiw stne* at ML
1. The onij tore wtt STEEL
fc' S!*Wffl 4VM
ore jrorec&on.
2. *::r : :::?:; : s-r!
;~ a!** is- "> "-" t-a:
i"?T" :. i'?t ;.s"'?s-r' "I"
Total Three lares of steet
beneatk the tread
3. '....- :rr :_-: r hen
"-* : ::::r-^ re -
y :: : : v 3eac
.':.-: '* t:::-: .?-*$s
4. i fi'r- ::-:.? :r: re:
treat
But. boil it all down *nd
you've got three basic
tire trpes to consider.
1 BIAS
2 BLLTID 3 RADIAL
I BIAS TIBE.S
Ki' t' i'
it* '>*'- '
uyr. '. :.
2. BELTED TIBXS
Vaajl>toto* W* a emm *at
r art se*; af *** 3* r-ar la -eat "*J uiatot; tot vanaa
vu-M weal sttbati asarei
'u'.M
3 RADIAL TIBES
0"** f .- :-> '**
r-* -' ''.- :':". ,-.: .".-. < "
tread t % lassssj ''. W mm MB o attend
k.1 cos! per "*e i >r
Buying tires U tough enough
You almost need an engineer s education v
understand tire advertwing these day* There
are bias and betted and radial types F-7g ,
and FR-7S and 7 75 s all of which tit the
tame car And nylon and rayon and polyester
nd fiberglass and steel And plies on phev
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
S'NC 1924
TIRE CO
MRVICI
The tttwgiH radial is an aD-sted radial.
The 1.1-1. is the maty aB-sted radial
asoomoMse tire.
I// ec:*J*a. ao-ca. co vee: :iu,\ p.- %:ctL
. v-t r*r ti- -. -t^z aarj '.- c .
*;'-': -:' : i- jscC -2^
BhtBaaal B> SUhaasI The caareaiiaaai steel
radial tire is aart a ued-betled radsaL Tais is
inaartaM fa) uaderstaadaag tae superiiitt of
aa Lll AU-Steei Radial
A' .1 '. s
;.--.-. --.'.' ; i sa .' .
'. T i .
-.: -ike i.-e -.."ie I I
. > bb -; Dpoiaci -
- .'h.'. alao red
..! agk ostsc of
1 K -ea'
A third barrier c fabric'p- FCMe* -'.-berglass etc _sed m the
sjdeuails of ai! other automobile tires The
aajafli s 100 per cent steet strength and
protection
Rated Load Range D.
I R I AU-Stee! Radials toc go.err.ment stand-
ards eq.;.aler.: :o i.- e-.gh:-piy rating and it's
stamped on the side of esers I R 1 :ire Most
passenger tires escn steel-belted radials
earn only a B or four-ply rating Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for at! vehicles even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles station wagons or pick-ups
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I R I All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us Each cable is wound of seven strands of
BUDGET 7M5 AVAtlABU
CENTRAL MIAMISIS* N W *7th Ave U4-IS34
CORAL GABLESBlr4 Douslu Road144-1141
NORTH MIAMI1U44 K.W. Till Av441-SS41
N. MIAMI BEACH17*4 N E. 1U 8L*S-7Si4
MIAMI BEACH 14S4 Alton RoadS72-SU1
SOUTH OAOE-l*)l 8 Dixtt Hwy 7-T7S
HIALEAH PALM SPRINGS MILE117' 4>lh 8t tit->?
CUTLER RIDOE2WM S Dixie Hwr -tM-SMl
WEST MIAMIBird A Galloway Rda SSS-SSSi
HOMESTEAD S4144 8 Federal H-y 247-U*2
W. HOLLYWOOD47 8. S'.ale Hd 7-**7-MS4
tr.-ee-" i-^eat -e Tr_-1 a iota oo<
i-e- r .- ..- : >c: BBS
UttmgA ;v>ea>stlk The
res* .->.-.< :ie
The new year-round tread.
: -r.-e- -ie* ;-t-z :-saJ :. r.f f.-a-
-- :: -^i r.r- _>e
rthestn fee I R I ^ -Srer.
i rfstec
t-eac aesi^r. : d road-hoic |
perfor- *r;e -'
s *". or i n
The I.R.I, is an ail-weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't beard about I.R.I.
All-Steel Radials tillnoss.
pared th the giants :' the tire indostrj
IRI isareii c r.'.pzr.y We
aiajjsieaddj -^ nrlri hi bmiIh
Pan no* reaching j- cat] Fi-e rears
ago. a* aM ou: to produce a tire thai was as
good as the finest imported tire available
Because ut had no conventional tire-maki-.g
I *e were tree to try anything
Vie did And came up with a totally new ioea
that produced a tire even tietter than the one
we had set out to make The 1 R I All-Steel
Radial has been tested and re-tested. Subjected
to literally millions of miles of road-handling
experience Sow it s available here Backed by
a 50.000-mile guarantee Sold and senicedoalji
b\ proven leaders in the business
I.R.I.
WTUcMATKHUl RUMU mDUSTtttS, UK
Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles.
The finest tire you can buy. The MM.
AU-Stee! Radial.
'.."no* :o KitawjfOBS 'C*
ft !t Store Mearest You C.II 6334635
OB',4. '*((} IftOfj %
]SiTSfaCt1fj4laUBUrmfDf
4ee*5f.v

BF Omid rich
.* "


;
ORT Award
Presented To [ ^e WlSll FlOlT idl]L8ljr*
Eric Potlock
Eric Potlock was the recipient
of the Career Awareness A ward
presented by Southeastern Flor-
ida Region Women's Americ.n
ORT (Organization for Rehabili-
itlon through Training) at th;
22nd annual "Honor Roll
Luncheon" neld at the Hyatt
House i !C ntly.
The award was presn'-;J in
recognition of Mr. Pollock's
contribution in furthering ca-
re r awareness and t-chnical
edi'C4tiit) in Da.de County.
D'iring the past year Mr.
Potlock has Fined as the per-
r-an'rnt *iost of Woman's
American ORT's Southeastern
Florida Regim radio program
that presented a complete por-
of a different trade each
week. "So You Want To Be,"
aired on VVKAT. will return in
the fall.
Mr. Potlock is an associate
pre ducer with educational TV
Channel; 2 and 17.
s"ta
Miami. Florida Friday, May 30, 1975
Section B
Arnold Lasky Chairman Of
Cash Mobilization Month
Mia-ni Beach attorney Arnold
Lasky has been appointed
chairman cf Cash Mobilization
Month. Robert L. Siege!, gen-
eral campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ation, has announced.
The appointment was made
last week following a personal
message via telephone hook-up
from Israel's Prime Ministei
Yitzhak Rabin to more than
100 of Miami's community lead-
e's.

: i. \r>4 me La-sicr Awarei ess Awa d to Eric Pollock
I iora Sc nn \an, honor roll cna rman (left) and
C; ntl ia Kroriish, chairman of the executive com-
Tcehiuoi] Wem^as Division
Rans Convention Oct. 25-29
The N". tion'd Bienni < in-
vention 'i Woman's D'vision
will b? hld at t:ie Amaricans
Hotel Oct. 26 to 29. Mrs. Milt >n
Sir! in. president of the South
ids Region of IV tmen's Di-
-..- d if t*i A-neri an v-"<" stj
tor Technion, h s enn-rancad.
Technion v "en f'om a"osj
the nation will b- convening to
participate in v.-"'shop" and
seminars pertaining to s-ho'ar-
shirs spon=oshi^s of st'id its
and the exciting Medical Engi-
neering Project w'lich is one of
the most unique in the world.
Many prominent national and
international figures in the
scientific and engineering com-
munity have been invited to
particinate.
The Women's Division of the
American Technion Society ox-
tends a cordial invitation to any-
one interested. For further in-
formation please call the local
ATS office.
The Tec'mion-Israel Institute
of Technology, founded in 1924
is the oldest Institute of higher
learning in the State of Israel
now celebrating its 51st year of
operation.
Technjon is best known for
its accomplishments in the es-
tablishment of Israel as a leader
in the fields of aeronautical en-
gineering and water desalina-
tion.
Rabbi Allan Minis To Conduct
Services At JWV's Convention
Rabbi Allan Mirvis will con-
duct Sabbath evening services
at the 29th annual convention
RABBI ALLAN MIRVIS
of the Department of Florida,
jl'Jewish War Veterans of the
! U.S.A. and Ladies Auxiliary, in
the Doral Hotel. 4833 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach. Friday, June
6, at 8:30 p.m.
Prior to coming to Miami to
serve as Jewish chaplain at the
VA Hospital. Rabbi Minis was
spiritual leader at B"nai Israel
Synagogue in Hampton, Va.. for
32 years.
A native of Baltimore. Md.,
Rabbi Mirvis received a B.A.
degree from Yeshiva University
in New York, and was later or-
dained at Yeshiva University's
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary.
Rabbi Mirvis is a member of
the Rabbinical Council of
America., and was cited by the
National Conference of Syna-
gogue Youth for a quarter cen-
tury of service to Jewish youth
in Virginia.
Cantor Manny Mandel ot
North Miami Beach, who will
chant the Sabbath evening
prayers at the JWV-JWVA con-
vention, is a past state JWV
commander and has served as
National Cantor for the Jewish
War Veterans.
Rabin declared. "The condi-
tion and health Oi our economy
holds the keys to our ability
dent Ford next month, stated
that from the beginning of Is-
rael's existence 27 years ago,
"we have learned from experi-
ence that economic stability is
a vital and indispensable part
of our security, hi our capacity
to orotcct ourselves and pre-
serve our independence."
n the prest nt circumstances,
he added, Isra 1 turns "to you,
to the Jewish communities, to
h 'l;1 us m;.t our difficult fi-
nancial situation "
Prime Minister Rabin lauded
the Israel Bond OrganiMtti n as
"the bulwark of our economic
lopment program for a
Continued on Page 2-B
MWUMlli'WN"' in i..!.......... -------
Rabbi Jay Miller
Guest Speaker
For Adult Forum
Rabbi Jay Miller will be the
guest speaker at Temple Zion
Adult Fomm immediately fol-
lowing the sen ices Friday eve-
ning.
Rabbi Miller's discussion is
one of a series of monthly pro-
grams featuring prominent
;:uest speakers discussing con-
temporary Jewish issues. The
topic, "The Image of the Jew
in American Fiction," v. ill deal
with how various authois por-
tray the Jew in his struggles to
live in our c.implex scci?ty to-
day.
Among the many books to be
discussed will be "The Appren-
ticeship of Duddy Kravetz,"
"Good bye Columbus," and
"Portnoy's Complaint."
Rabbi Miller. Hillel Director
at Florida International Univer-
sity in Miami, is a graduate of
the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion, ".here
he earned his Bachelor oi Arts
in Hebrew Letters. He has also
worked actively in youth pro-
grama in California and has
spent a gveai deal cf time rii-
recting various aspects of camp
prog ims f'i" (he Union of
rean Hebrew I nj a-
ti n
ARNOLD LASKY
to d f 'nd ou s Ives as well as
.,. abilitj achieve a sound
and fail p ics settlement," in
I ;ing his point to the forty-
eig'U communitiss across the
United States participating in
the Phone hjok-up.
The Pi--. ..mister, who is
luled t-> m st with Presi-
Members of the Hotel-Motel Division of tin- 1975 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal isruel Emergency Fund are cur-
rently involved in active support of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's campaign for Jewish survival. Divi-
sion Chairman Joe! Cray (center) of t';e Doral, recent-
ly ga'hered his colleagues at the Federation for an im-
portant divisional assignment meeting. With him were
Division Cocliairmen J :rry Sussman (left) of RSM Man-
agement and Harvey Weinberg of the Montmartre.
CJA Mobilization
Drive Continues
Mrs. Rose Banner is serv-
ing ner third term as pres-
ident of the Temple Me-
n or ah Sisterhood. The
1975-76 officers and direc-
tors of the Sisterhood were
installed during luncheon
ceremonies at the Barce-
lona Hotel recently.
In a recent statement, Sidney
Lefcourt, chairman of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federations
1975 Cash Mobilization Drive,
highlighted three important
points.
"First," he said, "consider
that Israel was reborn 27 years
ago so that Jewish people could
become masters of their own
Chiles, Ruedebusch Honorees
At June 21 Awards Banquet
U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles and
John W. Ruedeb'isch, vice presi-
dent of Labor Relations at Walt
Disney World, will be honored
June 21 at the second annual
Flori '.. Trade Union Council for
Histadrut awards banquet at
The Dutch Inn. Lake Buena Vis-
ta, Orlando.
Announcement of their selec-
tion as honorees was made by
Art Hallgren. executive vice
president of the Florida AFL-
CIO and Irving Gordon, south-
eastern regional director of the
American Trade Union Council
for Histadrut. Th- dinner is
sponsored by the Florida Trade
Union Council for Histadrut on
behalf of the Histadrut Scholar-
ship Fund in Israel.
Sen. Chiles has long ad,-o-
cated American mo--al and fi-
nancial assistance to Israel, real*
i7ing Israel's impo--tanc to the
United States as th on'- dem-
ocracy in the Middle East.
Ever since his early davs at
Lakeland High and the Univer-
sity of Florida College of Law.
Sen. Chiles has been involved in
furthering the education of un-
derprivileged youth. In 1973 he
received the "Outstanding
Continued on Page 2-B
destiny. Second, consider that
in the last 27 years, the Jew-
ish people proved that we real-
ly can do the impossible. Third,
consider that after 27 years, we
are still in dangsr."
LOOKING BACKWARD
und^rstan-H'-i! what is ahead of
usLefco'"- is certain that we,
as one people, will listen to the
facts aiH understand our re-
sponsibility, so that we will
ncer have to say to ourselves
and our chil 'ren "if only we
did a little bit more."
"Historv ic lotWna n"on the
,Twih r>nr|<\" T/>fco'i'"t de-
clared. "For the fi-st He the
d"stinv of o-- people is in Jew-
ish hands Th-? action! we must
take to secure o'T future are
clea*\ !? co-ms down to very
practical dollars and cents
terms hre I" Miami and in
Israel," he said.
In Mia-'ii. it costs S100 to
provide on full year of edu-
cational and recreational activi-
ties for an elderly couple at the
South Rach Activities Center.
IN MIAMI, it costs $120 to
provide a scholarship to sum-
mer camp at the Jewish Com-
Continued on Page 2-B


Pe?r 1-3
*Jriir-FkrfJfor
Fnd- 30. 1975
i
kC
Dr. MeJwn Greeii-tein To
Serve 5th Term Al Academr
t .--
I
-.
1
I
.
'..' -
aid ii t hew
-eater lto
Federartsaa.

:* laboratory Jfr-
liiaaiiil a ion affics It is io-
catad or. three ar-e* of bad
at UM1 SW -fi"X*eB
rs i two acre arhlfflr
fieid.
It has been a my satisfy-
aar. csBeneace to hare beer
of an nipinn that has
tlas school grow in jont
six Tears to become die laraest
Indian Faifcrh aD dny school
in the Soatbwest." Dr. Gccea-
--


-
.
CJA Mobilization
Drive Continues
ML XIELVW GMZNSTEIN"
n.tj"
-Be? erpaasioc it itself if
onry an uahratign of a soccess-
tu'. nhuafwail mtmsje. h;
conbaaed 'A qnanty prodact
is what one must strive for. This
ws recently ittastratcd in oar
Hebrew ihpwtm ". r. three of
our students represenbag the
itate of Florida m the finals of
the Nation*! Bibii Contest held
in Se* York City
This quality product is a'.*
illustrated in our English d
-!e* by e*idece of oo-
cfcudren averaging in the top
par <.z-: in toe National
-. eaacOl Tests re-
froai Pa?e !-B
~ac-.tr ;:- : ---
ot -aather moat worti
year of vocataoual tram-
nag for a need? Jew at as ORT
scsooL
In Israel it costs COO to rro-
a year's hajh school rus-
CV kOAML r. costs S550 to
provide the aabsady for one
qaaaaeater of haah school staff
m Israe-: throagh the High
School in IsiucL
la Ifwui H costs S105C to
provide aaain.: care to the
agent paoect at
Medical Center
in Israel a costs S1500 to
settle an iiuaagiaat faanh hi
a new apartsaeat with a tew pos-
In Israel it
provide for the
S3.00G to
of
aa ooercrowor:
IN ISRAEL, a coats S210QC
-T-.3t That saaae fansBy
tz BBBjajaaai
in Israel, it costs $53,000 tc
provide total absorption for an
entire !,! aa family
These costs would be pro-
hftiliie whhoct or ...:'. tc
Ike Greater sfiasa Jewish Fed-
eration's Combined Jewish Ap-
ptl Israe'. Emergency Fund."
Lefcourt declared.
"And these ser-.-ices car only
continue wtrh peyraerrt of : -1
pledges to the campaign.
THE PEOPLE of Israel need
the cash to ''if*'"* these hu-
manitarian programs Asking ns
to pay our pledget to the eaa>
pfltCB IS atflfclltf f^fthyfTwikg tuBt
is possible for aD of cs to do
Do we dare say no'-
Par tout pledge to the 19*5
CJA-EEF today.
Chiles, Ruedebusch Honoree*
At June 21 Awards Banquet
PRESIDENTDr. William M.
LjC?on. Jr.. of Jacksonville
-reded Dr. Matthew H
Bradley, a Maori Brach cardi-
o:og: as president of the
Florida Heart Association Sun-
. -,:n annual assemjlv
in the Fontdi.ijbifau HoteL
HELD OVERThe play. "The
Dybc- .en open:*! at
Foreman's North Miami Play-
: Hay 1". is Oiir-; held
Ml throug'i the month of June
with perfumances scheduled
Friday through Sunday eve-
nings at 8 p.m. and Sunday
r~'f,~t~.ra at 2 p.m.
Continaed from Page IB
Amencan of Florida Awa'd*"
which was followed by the Flor-
ida Conservationst Award, pres-
H- Tlorida Auduboa
Society in 19"!
Gershwin Lodge Honoring
Pest Choncellor Commander
George Gershwin Lodge.
Knights of Pythias, will honor
Max Kaminsky. its past chan-
cellor corr.r-.ander. and his wife,
Maniy-. a- its l*th annual af-
fair in the Stariight Room of the
Doral Hotel Sunday beeir.r -2
at 7 p.m. The 800 lodge mem-
bers and many members of the
LVies Auxiliary' are expected
to attend.
Chancellor Commander Fred
Zeiger, and District Deputy
Grand Chancellor Coman dr
Morris Silver are in charge of
Arnold Lasky Chairman Of
Cash Mobilization Month
Continued from Page IB
quarter of a century.
' in industiy. in agriculture.
in trade everywhere Bond
man^y has provided the foun-
datijn for growth. From year
ar Israel Bonds have sup-
pleid a large share of our de-
\elopment Budget," he pointed
out.
"This year it is my hope that
the Israel Bond campaign will
pro' ide most of this budget to
sustain our economy, promote
exports, create jobs for new
immigrants, and give us the
economic strength to achieve
a real peace."
Immediately after the call,
Miami's leaders took their stand
in answer to the Arab boycott
through Robert L. Siegel. g?n-
eral campcisn chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization, who pledged two
million dollars as an immediate
gal for Miami.
Lasky. a member of the Ad-
visory Committee of the Great-
er Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, is a graduate of Brooklyn
Law School, and a member of
the Florida Bar Association.
John W Ruedebusch. labor
rehttVns manaaer at Wait Dis-
ney World is responsible for
labor relations involving 2f
unions. A graduate of Stout I'ni-
versiry in Wisconsin, he was
employed as a supervisor and
instructor of apprentices for
Westmghouse Electric while
working on his Master's degree
at the University of Pittsburgh
Among his many chairmanships
Ruedebusch served as chair-
man of the Brotherhood Weer
of the National Conference 0'
Christians and Jewi
In presenting Ruedebusc''
with the highest award a slat?
agency can bestow upon a pri-
vate citizen, former Gov Hay-
don Burns stated. This awa'r5
is presented in recognition of
his efforts to promote, assist
and encourage the maintenance
of mutually satisfactory employ-
er-employee relations in Flor-
ida."
The Florida Trade Union
Council for Histadmt is one ot
40 State Trade Union Councils
for Histadmt organized by
American Trade Union leader-
ship as a means of actively
projecting their support for Is-
rael through its Federation of
Labor, the Histadrut.
Art Hallgreen, who will als<-
serve as dinner chairman
stated. The funds realized fro-
the June 21 awards banquet
have been earmarked to estab-
lish the Sen. Lawton Chiles-
John W. Ruedebusch perpetua'
scholarship fund, for under-
privileged children of all de-
nominations in IsraeL"
Those desiring further infor-
mation may contact Leon Pat-
rick, president of the Orlando
Central Labor Council at 82C
Vlrgina Dr.. Orlando; in Miami,
call Irving Gordon.
in .:."- odat is one 0' the featui
- Pan -. Israel-Iran tour.
Pan Am'8 World Offers
22-Dav Israel. Iran Tour
This yt^r. Par. A*i Wo-JJ
zntd s f'-nt'^ti:
both I-'-; am
israe; with air travel ban
Hev York to Tehran via Iran
*cr
i
fare will provide ~r. aanaaaBy
-estine 27-day top to
countries nch in Jewish ht-
to?y. The tour includes 6-
and first class acoom-iodarTr-
wrtfc rrivate bix\ Amuntma
I nrAw
-.Z -T-ers --'
-. b of
irters-?:
.^iso included are Pal A~ >
Wor;i Brc-j> f- .-:-
Pea A- World FVghi Baf I
free rolls of Fotomat c
firm, speaa". navel a '.'. 1
:ags and wuh rr
card and a free oapy c'
Ami World Guide.
friend)* toward? I?ra^l. ani
; Ki-tory contains muc1- of
r-t-"!a' intere?* to Je
isaoaHan
The trac
of Bether ani Mord^ca
Kiaiaju a or.r h:?h spot on
tour itinera-". 1- Uaa
Bather '.- the fcaiali ail
Ahacue! (\er\e-' who. with
her i"v-le Mordecir. ahfei
the right for the Jewish peo-
rl? to settle peacefully ir.
?*r--.-r. empire.
fttr n:n? right? '. -
'-- toor tantfaam to Tel A
is nrl e
and aea arr 1 Is-
rael provide g-:';-i contrasl
tc h tors, aha the
ancient fort-e-- Masada.
n in the tilt* D?3d Sea,
m the Dead Sea Scrolls, risij
Y.r.z Darid's To-^b and the
: Cteea on the
itinerary also jachale Beer-
thaba, Jerusalem and Haifa.
The modem c*jntn. of For additional information
Iran, knowr. ba ancimt t.-.-s about the 22-day Iran Israel
as Persia, is one of the few tour consult VOW lx^jl travel
countries in the mid-E-is: agent or Pa-, aaj
CATCR1KG TO YOU ... IS OUR BUSINESS
OUR CATERIr.G WILL BE YOUR PLEASURE
Evervthing from a Wed dine Party of 2 to a Banquet of 200 -
2,000 or 2 million Your home office ... or wherever
HOUSE OF HORS D'OEUVRES 687-0853
LFT BOB HARRIS CATER TO VOU
4&
Lose Weight Naturally ...
Vacation With U$
ORANGE GROVE
HEALTH RANCH
HOW THAN A DSC AM Of SUCCESS
FRESH PURIFIED WATER PURE UNPOLLUTED AIR
VEGETARIAN ORGANIC
Supervised Exercises ... Sun Bathing Health lectures
. Social Activities Shopping Tours Surf Bathing
. Regular Tours of Arcadia, Sarasota, Punta Gorda and
Port Charlotte.
LOW SUMMER RATES NOW HI IFFKJ
Come for A Day A Week or a lifetime
FOR BROCHURE BY RETURN MAIL WRITE
OfcGANIC GROVES, INC
RT. 4, BOX 316, ARCADIA. FLOR DA 33021
or PHONE 813-494-4844
^
<>"


Friday, May 30, 1975
fJenisfi thrikMam
Page 3-B
Mrs. Milton Green Reelected
By Pioneer Women Council
Harriet (Mrs. Milton) Green
has been reelected president of
the Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida. She is president
(il the South Florida Zionist
Federation, the umbrella agen-
cy of American Zionist organi-
zations and is former national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation.
Mrs. Green is a member of
the board of directors of the
Florida Committee for Bar-Ilan
University and of the National
Bar-Ilan board. She also serves
on the national executive com-
mittee of Pioneer Women,
which will celebrate its 50th
anniversary this October during
a Golden Jubilee convention in
Miami Beach.
Other officers reelected to
lead the 2.500 members of the
Pioneer Women, Women's La-
bor Zionist Organization of
America, in Dade and Broward
counti.es include three vice
presidents. They are Mrs. Ber-
Thrift Shop
Opens Drive
For Support
The Thrift Shop of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged has launched its sum-
mer acquisition drive by call-
ing on all friends of Miami's
leading geriatric facility to con-
tact the Thrift Shop to arrange
for free pick up of any new and
used household items that are
no longer needed around the
house.
"Although we also deal in
large lots of merchandise, we'd
like people to have a look
around their homes and if they
see any furniture, appliances or
old clothes that are in the way,
or perhaps just not indispens-
able, to call us so that we can
give them a new life and pur-
pose," explained Aaron Kra-
vitz, MJHHA president and
chairman of the Thrift Shop
Committee.
All Thrift Shop earnings are
used to cover operating costs at
Douglas Gardens. Last year, the
medical supplies used at the
Home were also paid for.
"Donating merchandise to the
Thrift Shop is a direct way ot
supporting Douglas Gardens,
and is a gesture much appre-
ciated by our 227 residents,"
Mr. Kravitz said._______
Wfcakirf* OimnVrters *
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
Processors osril fxporirt
f the fiaost U.S. Govt. Inspected
KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
MRS. MILTON GREEN
tha N. Liebmann of Miami
Beach and Mrs. Victor Cohen
and Mrs. Siegfried Cutter of
North Miami Beach.
UU i by
Also elected were Mrs.
Bertha Miller, recording secre-
tary; Mrs. Sam Davis, financial
secretary; Mrs. Nathan Berg-
thal, treasurer; and Mrs. Flor-
ence Becker, corresponding sec-
retary.
Pioneer Women provide, in
cooperation with Moetzet Hapo-
alot. the Working Women's
Council of Israel, 53 per cent
of social services in 1,500 in-
stallations in Israel where near-
ly 50,000 women, youths and
children are educated yearly
for constructive citizenship.
Pioneer Women operates a
nationwide network of day care
centers, orphanages and other
welfare agencies in Israel which
have had to greatly increase
their services since the Jewish
state's heavy casualties in the
Yom Kippur War of 1973.
Pioneer Women has acceler-
ated its travel program for 1975-
76 to help the State of Israel's
urgent request for increased
tourism activities on the part of
American Jewish organizations.
A regional headquarters for
the Pioneer Women travel pro-
gram has been opened in Suite
600 of the 605 Lincoln Road
Bldg., Miami Beach.
A greatly expanded schedule
of tours from .MUiru. Inte.rna-.
tional Airport to Israel and re-
turn to Miami has been intro-
duced.
The new tourist promotion is
a feature of the Pioneer Wom-
en's celebration of its 50th an-
niversary, to be highlighted by
a Golden Jubilee convention in
Miami-Beach in October, 1975.
"Foot Health Week" in Dade County was proclaimed by
Metropolitan Dade County Mayor Stephen P. Clark, (cen-
ter) for the week beginning May 9. At left is Dr. Daryl J.
Saperstein, chairman of the Dade County Podiatry Assn.
Foot Health Week; Dr. Morton I. Atlman, president of the
Dade County Podiatry Assn., is at right.
HURRICANE SEASON
Be Prepared!!
STORM SHUTTERS INSTALLED .
......J' ALL WINDOWS REPAIRED
ALL DOORS REPAIRED
DON'T DELAY
CALL AFTER 6:00 P.M. 531-701 8
SCHULMAN WINDOW, DOOR
AND SCREEN REPAIR CO.
SWISS KNIGH
"SWISS HOUIMY"
SWEEPSTAKES a
76 chances to win!
-GRAND PRIZE
GENEVA
SWITZERLAND \ACATION FOR TWO
LONDON
NEW
YORK
You jet via
Pan Am from
New York to London with stopover privileges, then
via connecting jet to Geneva. Plus 6 nights for 2 in
romantic Swiss hotels. Plus $300 cash for expenses.
25
2nd Prizes
Hamilton Electronic Watches
50
3rd Prizes
Gift Box
Assortments,
a delicious variety
of Swiss Knight*Cheese
SWISS KNIGHT
YES, SWISS SAYS CHEESE.
SWISS KNIGHT' SAYS IT ALL.
Take your family on a taste trip
they'll never forget, with unfor-
gettable taste from Switzerland
with Swiss Knight Gruyere.
Enjoy Swiss Knight Gruyere
from the 6 pack of foil-wrapped
portions of plain, assorted fla-
vors and slices for snacks,
parties, picnics and desserts.
And for entertaining, serve
Swiss Knight Fonduea classic
recipe of Gruyere and Emmen-
tal cheeses, white wine and
Kirsch. Who could possibly
expect anything more!
Gerbcr International Koodf, Inc.
Stamford, Cnnn. 16983
SWISS KNIGHT
fWnrlnl New Oattt S>m<
Enter as often as you like/No Purchase Necessary
OFFICIAL RULES
1. Use entry blank (at your grocer's) or write your name and
address clearly on a plain piece ol 3" x 5" paper.
2. Enclose your entry in an envelope with the label from any
package of Swiss Knight Cheese OR with the words Swiss
Knight printed in block letters on a piece of 3" x 5" paper.
3. Mail 10: Swiss Knight Swiss Holiday Sweepstakes
Box 3600. Grand Central Station
New York. NY. 10017
4. Enter as often as you wish but mail each entry in a separate
envelope.
5. All entries must be postmarked not later than midnight. Sep-
tember 30,1975 and received not later than October 7,1975.
6. Winners of prizes will be selected by blindfold drawing and
will be promptly notified by mail Vacation via Pan Am must
be taken within one year of notification.
7. Sweepstakes open to residents of the United States except
in Idaho. Georgia. Missouri, Washington and wherever pro-
hibited by law Employees and families of employees of the
Gerber International Foods. Inc.. its affiliates, its advertising
agencies, the judging staff and their families are not eligible.
8. Transportation to airport of departure and any liability for
federal, state and local taxes will be the responsibility of
tre winner.
9. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.



Page 4-B
>Jfe*/$f/Jbr**/7
Friday, May 30, 1975
Bernard Cherrick Friends of the Hebrew University's Scopus Award to
Harry A. -Rap' Levy while Rabbi lrvir.g Lehrman and
Levy's wife. Davida, look on.
Scopus Award Presentation
Highlights Hi Dinner Here
PTA Planning A
Toast To Hiller
Lunch Tuesday
Tie PTA cf the Hillel Com-
munity Day School cordially in-
vites the pabtfc to oii with
them for "A Toa-t ta Hi!!?!'" at
the annual !
ion show Tu^-ia:" a: 11 10 a m
in the Diplomat Hotel H
w xkL
Mrs Leon Roth, chain
and Mrs
man. and their cotamittee
comrleted plans for a 9)
will co-11""
with champagne ccokttils ani
an art showing by Hilda Rin-
ii m> of Hiliandale.
Throughoul the afternoon
the e: sts i;l be entertained
The Hillel Choir, under the di-
rection of Cantor Han Alpern.
w.I! also pres.nt a musical se-
lection.
Supporters of the Am
Friends of the Hebrew U-
sity participated >n a ce'.
tion ff th^ Israeli Dl
50th birthday last week at a gala
dinner at the Fontaineblev.'
Hotel. highlighted by the p*e*
entatMfl ** the Scoro1; Award
1 to Jewish leader Harry A
"Hap"" Levy.
PaT'cipating in the evning's
activities were Gov. Reubin
Askew. Hebrew University
Vic-^ President Bernini Chrrick
(substituting for a hospitalised
Avraha-i Har"vi). Rabbis Le-
on Kronish. Irving lehrman and
Mayer Abrvnow'R. dinner
chairman Arthur Horowitz, na-
tional chairman of the American
Frier.ds of the Hebrew Univer-
sity Max Kampelman and a host
of prominent Miami leaders of
the Jewish community.
Delta Piny en Resin
Auditioning Friday
Delta Players, Inc. is now in
the process of enlarging both
cast and production of Gilbert
and Sulli an's H.M.S. Pinafore
in Yiddish. Previous response
and continued requests assure
an increased number of per-
formances.
Auditions will start Friday
for vocalists and musicians,
amateur and professionals,
inals and female, including sen-
ior citizens. Please call George
B. Ticktin. M.D. of Hollywood
from 5-6 p.m.
The broad rang* of p
d the Scopus Award
bratioa indrat s th->t the
ival of the Heb-ew diver-
sity is a matter of vital con-
cern to Jews everywhere." ob-
served chairman Horowitz.
"Behind all of the veatofc*. Fwkd.
abundant merrymaking, this
one theme was paramountthat
a first rate educational institu-
tion such as the Hebrew Uni-
versity is an absolute necessity
to the continued well being of
the State of Israel."
Reservations for the lunch-
eon nay be made by calling
the school office.
This luncheon culminates tue
fund raising efforts of the Hil-
lel PTA for this school yea".
Proceeds from the PTA fjne-
H~n go to the Scholarship
Dessert Cord Party Monday
To Benefit Fresh Air Fond
Gaul Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hv a
dessert card party Monday
noon -* the Washington FM-
era! Bl'g.. 633 NE 167th St.,
Noth Miami Beach.
The proceeds will benefit the
"Fresh Air Fund" in Israel for
underprivileged children. Gues*
are in'HtH. Ann Stern is pro
gram chairman.
Trwnk You Luncheon' June 3
The officers of the Parent
Teachers Association of fh
Yeshiva Day School are hold-
ing a "Thank You Luncheon"
Sunday, June 8. at 12:30 p.m.
in the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Joel Heyman. 871 NW 172nd
Terr., in order to show thanks
and appreciation to the volun-
teers who helped with PTA
throughout the year.
The PTA has already begun
the task of raising funds for
the coming school year with
the sale of a beautiful selection
of personalized Jewish New
Year Cards under the chair-
manship of Mrs. Pauline Unger.
Firtels Announce Formation
Of law Fi*m Partnership
Irving Firtel and Leon M.
Firtel have announced the for-
mation of a oartnership for th
practice of law, under the firm
name of F-t',, F**el.
Irving rirtei is oresilent of
the Hebrew Academy; his son
Leon, is a grad'.i it* of the Acad-
emy. The firm is l-cated in the
Barnett Bon'- Building, 420 Lin-
coln Rd. Mall.
PWP Chcn'e- Meets Friday
Miami Beach Chapter of
Parents Without Partners wfl*
meet Friday at 8:30 p.m. in th
Washington Federal at 1133
Normandy Dr., Miani Beach.
Ir'-jn? Wcvnick will -moderate
the discussion of "After th
M--ria" En's." A social wH1
follow the program. Admissio--
is tree: refr shments a-e served.
Rabbi Alexander Gross Elected
South Atlantic Regional Chairman
Rabbi Alexander Gross, prin- grade the security and tenure
cipai of the Greater Miami H_- of teaching and admi -
brew Academy, was elected personnel, to obtain the
South Atlantic St3tes Regional
Chairman of th- "Xatnn.il Con-
:' Yeshi a Principals
- <^
of 474
KM :
day ar-
:. v.
A) nit 450 educM m and
minittratora representing He-
brew day schools, offe ing i
combined progran of Hebrew
and Gen-ral btudies in som"
170 communiti-s attended the
Hebrew day school educators'
four-day concntion. The Na-
tional Conference of Yeshiva
Principals is an affiliate cf
Torah Urnesorah, the National
Society for Hebrew Day
Schools.
Leading de?r.s of th"""lctgical
seminaries, psychiat i tt and
psychologists joined scholars
and educators in assessing a
host of educational problems
and projecting plans for the fu-
fj> One such plan for the
next quarter century called for
the establishment of a Hebrew
day school in every city with a
Jewish population of 5.000 and
less and for a total student pop-
ulation of 150.000.
Delegat;s to the convention
also pledged themselves to up-
kAB.ii ALEXANDER GROSS
needed fr scholarships from
Jewish philanthropic groups
and to maintain the ideobgi:a!
integrity and independence ol
the Hebrew day school.
A"xording to Torah Urne-
sorah. the National Society for
i. u.-.w Day schools, there are
n w 471 Hebrew day schools
in 51 itatos and five Canadian
pro inciS and a student popu-
lati .n of 9:.000 students. In the
United Sttes there are 232
elementary schools and 140
high schools.
TOirjing Ita|iai\sty|e is as
easyas JUef cBais,...Wltlt
t\e|p fron\JDhef 'Boy-ar-dee
Spaghetti Sauff
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee'
to cook for you when you
want a taste of real Italian
ta'am. With the Chefs home-style
Meatless or Mushroom Spaghetti Sauce
on hand, you'll have a delicious dish
1 -2-3. Perfect as a tangy sauce for roasts
or ground meat, both styles of the Chef's
sauce go equally well with chicken,
fish and omelets. Of course, they're ideal
for pouring over any kind of lukshen-
spaghetti, linguine. lasagna, even egg
noodles. Be sure you always have enough
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Sauce in your cupboard.
For easy, quick, delicious dining.
*
My husband's
a "perked coffee" May vin.
He insists on Maxim."
a
Maxim tastes like fresh
perked coffee because
Maxim starts with fresh
perked coffee. Then it's
f reeze-dried into big dark
chunkschunks of real
perked coffee. That's
Maxim. Fantastic flavor
by the cup or the potful.

K CERTIFIED KOSHER ^?
'
MAXIM. The May vin's favorite for fine coffee flavor.


ti
'
V

- w
.<>'


Friday, May 30, 1975
*Jcfisfi fhridhktr
Page SB
Local Religious Leader To
Receive Honorary Degree
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
of Temple Beth Am will receive
an honorary Doctor of Divinity
degree from the Hebrew Union
RABBI HERBERT BAUMGARD
- CoHeg^- Jewi^insMufe of Re-
ligion at the co nm n : n snl
exercises held by thu n*tiW-
Hon of Reform Judaism. Sun lay
morning. Jims 8, at T.mple
Ernanu-El in Now York Cit;-.
Rabbi B'umbard. who r^ i"-
eo hi? d srr-> from Dr. A!f,-ed
Gottsc^lV, President of ti
HUC-.'IR. was ordained from
the Col'-'-Institute in 1950.
jh* ciftion reads:
"'Dedicated rabbi loyal
and distinguish -d altim-
nils whos^ devotion and
b^-nin^; have made his
min'stn' ta his Tong'v-
gants'and his servic to
p-'v'm .iiiri ils*Ti singu-
larly blessedwho as a
s\ifc-,sfi'i cowmMot "d
Mtor found n;\v ways
oi reaching all ,zg nems
of his commi nitv."
A: t' t'':'ri;--s five notel
pers tnaliti \s will receie hon-
d agrees as D)ct;'"s of
Humane Letters. They are Sam-
uel Atlas. Professor Emeritus
of he .New York School HUC-
JIR; Jan- Evans, executive di-
rector of the National Fed '
tion cf Temple Pistsrhoo Is;
Solomon Grayzel, Prof^sor of
History. Drooste Uni-erslty;
Hebrew Educators Alliance Plans
Final Meeting Of School Year
All Hebrew teachers are in-
vited to att:n1 the final meet-
ing of the school year of the
Hebrew Educators Alliance Sun-
day. June 8, at 8 p.m. in the
Cafetorium of the Hebrew
Academy Girls High School at
2400 Pine Tree Dr., Miami
Beach.
Honoiwg !/ l(j?n
Famous feys
in Am?m an'Histor\
SEND FOR BOOKLET
HONORING 1776 AND
FAMOUS JEWS IN
AMERICAN HISTORY
belting occmhH J*wlsb -
trioH in Hit crMtNNi ** thaahMj
f Mm notion. VatMbM rtWhte ior
II mm. SOW 50c (NO STAMM
PLUM) TO. ;-.'lh Potri.H, Sox
rwd T. 10017.
A short business meeting
with year end reports of the
treasurer, secretary and chair-
man of the Teachers Loan
Fund will be held. Mrs. Zehava
Sukenik, president, announced.
The Board of License of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education will confer teaching
certificates on all teachers who
have passed certification this
year.
In addition, teachers who
have served in the Greater Mi-
ami area for more than 10
years will be honored and will
receive special recognition and
commendation. Principals of the
respective schools will confer
the special awards.
The Hebrew Educators Alli-
.>nr- was founded 19 years ago
for the joint purposes of rais-
ing the level of Jewish Educa-
tion and enhancing the status of
the Hebrew teacher. The Alli-
ance serves to protect the
rights of its members and im-
prove their professional status_
This year, the membership of
the Alliance is at its highest
lev 1. with almost every teacher
in the Hebrew schools of the
area a member of the orgamza-
1 Officers in the Alliance in-
clude Gladys Diamond and
Sholem Epelbaara, vice presi-
dents; Simla Ben-David, secre-
tary, and Chaya Porush, treas-
urer.
Meyer Levin, author; and Hans
Morgenthau, political scientist.
Six colleagues of Rabbi
BaumbardRabbis Earl Groll-
man. Belmont, Mass.; Jacob
Lantz, Norwalk, Conn.; Robel
A. Adao, Wantigh. N.Y.; Israel
Renov, Bronx. N.Y.; Arnold M.
Shevlin. Kingston. Pa., and Mir
ton L. Shulman. Broomall, Pa.
will aho receive honorary de-
grees at the commi-neement
exercis s Seventeen n.w R .-
form rabbis will he ordtinsd
and tinea canto s invested.
Durin the 35 yea s sin is
ordani u in, Rabbi 1.1 '
h is ved i' :'l I nai !s. i si,
El 'icp.t. N.Y.. an 1 :i is
i\: ,;i el '- ith Flo i I I
eration ;ii K -form Svn igog les
of the Union of American H -
brew Congregations a w '*; as (
hclaing the pest m in in the Dj:'a.t-"m of'Rfliglan
i the UnJtrp''3ity :diauawvd'uanvd his lOoctorat s
ia H-"' -a Letters tr^m tho
HUC-.IIR.
Currently regional vice-pres-
id nt t tae Anti-Defamation
League "t B'n i B'nth and a
i-b of the Board of Gover-
nors of t'i* Great's* Miami Jew-
ish Federation. Kabbi Baumbard
also is a mamber of thq Execu-
tive Committee of the South
Florida, Council of the UAHC.
He is past-president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami and the South Florida
Int '-faith Agency for Social
Justice. -
Other community activities
include service, as a M"fo rep-
resentative on-*" the Economic
OpnortunitiBS -Program. In:.
Hoard of DTde Countv; tV
Youth Advisory Committee of
the City'of Miami, anl th>
Citizens Advisory Boa-.1 ta i'n
City of Miami. For fi-e yrT-
Rabbi Baumgard h>a been 't
the executive bwd of the Com-
munity Relations Board.
Dr. Baumbard is the author
of the "book. "Judaism and
Prayer: Grcwin;; Towards Go '."
publishedJ>y tV UAHC and has
written numerous pamphlets.
Rabbi Baumbard has appeal-
ed on the national television
program. "Church of the Air,"
and he has spoken on the na-
tional radio program, "Message
of Israel." In Miami, he has ap-
peared regularly on the televi-
sion program, "Still Small
Voice" and served on the weak-
ly "Man to Man," local inter-
faith program.
Rabbi BaumRard ana* his
wife, the former Selnm Geller.
have three children, Jonathan.
Shi-a and Dari 1.
The HUC-JIR. Reform Juda-
ism's institution of higher learn-
ing, will observe its Centennial
anniversary this fall as the old-
est Rabbinic school in North
America. The School, which
maintains campuses in Cincin-
nati, New York, Los Angeles,
and Jerusalem, train-, rabbis,
cantors, communal sen ice pro-
fessionals and prepares gradu-
ate and post-graduate students
ror academic careers.
Temple Ner Tamid Annual
Installation Of Officers
Shown with the Man of the Year, Mr. Alb it V. Kosenoerg, is Rabbi Eugene Labo-
vitz at the Installation Breakfast. From le t to right seated are: Mrs. Murray A. Shaw,
Past President of Sisterhood, Mr. Louis S chman, I'res. of Congregation, Mrs. Louis
Suchman, Mrs. Albert V. Rosenberg, Mr. Albert V. Rosenberg, Man of the Year and
Mrs. Fannie Rest, President of Sisterhno i, standing is Dr. Eugene Labovitz, Rabbi.
Only smiles from Mrs. Louis Cohen, outgo.ng President of Sisterhood as she presents
a check from the Sisterhood of the Temple, to help support Ner Tamid Religious
School. Shown in the photo from left to ri^ht standing back row Mr. Louis
Cohen, outgoing President of the Congregation, Dr. Eugene Labovitz, Rabbi and Mrs.
Louis (Goldie) Cohen, outgoing President of Sisterhood. Seated are Mrs. Fannie
Rest, President of Sisterhood, Mrs. Eugene Labovitz, wife of the Rabbi, Mr. Jack
Greenberg, President of the Men's Club.
Past Presidents of Temple Ner Tamid seated at the dais of Installation Breakfast
with Mr. Jos. Silverman, who was also cited for his many years of service to the
Synagogue. Seated are from left to right Mr. Chas. Goldstein, Past President
of Congregation, Mrs. Chas. Goldstein, M rs. Wm. J. Harris, Col. Wm. J. Harris, Past
President of Congregation and Mr. Jos. S ilverman, one of the honcrees.
ADV.


Psse 6-B
Jmisti HorkMam
Friday, May 30, 1975
Be'r.u-.: (.. xtma right), chairman of Temple Beth
Arr.'s Israel Bond campaign, finalizes arrangements with
V.'.LiuiTTi Su :.' of Temple Beth Am, for the pur-
chase of 5190/Ki0 worth of Israel Bonds by the Temple.
Tne\r generous financial investment through this acquisi-
tion sen-es to further -trengthen the economic develop-
ment of Israel.
Rabbi Azulav To Present
Awards And Diplomas June 5
Levine Appointed
Marketing V-P
Re: r Levins has been ap-
r 4nted ::- "in chares
of m \ :>t Haroli B
Bader and Asodates, Inc.. Mi-
ami-based advertising pu'iiic
relations and marketing firm,
according to Harold Bad.-r.
president.
Mr. I.e'ine was forr.
preside-: and ace
sor Le'in-e Associat -s
of Boston. Mass.. a let
-i. real
tii -
Haroli Bader a-
Inc. is a full service org.:
tion offering ti-orough ma
Ir.2 research and planning as
prim and broadcast pro-
duction facilities.
The agency, which has been
effective in deriving success for
a growing list of clients, re
sents international resorts.
dominium communities, land de-
velopers, retail and restaurant
chains, financial institutions
and numerous other enterprises.
Rabbi Shimon Azulav, asso-
ciate principal of the Olga and
Margaret Weishaus High School
for Girls, will present awards
and diplomas during the Miami
Beach school's annual gradua-
tion ceremonies Thursday. June
5. at p.m. in the Hebrew
Academy Auditorium.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the high school
which is affiliated with the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy, will give the graduation
address.
Students willjiresent an origi-
nal playlet. "Eschet Chail A
Woman of Valor." under the di-
rection of Jacques Donnet.
former musical director of the
Deauville Hotel.
Sharon Greenspan has been
named valedictorian and Mali
Daum will serve as salutatorian.
Other honor graduates include
Marci Deutsch. Sarah Leah
Stauber. Gerty Burstyn. Ivy
Fask. Sheila Bastaky, Judy
Glixman. Bonnie
Esther Bannis.
Ram and
The Weishaus graduates each
will receive a gift from Joseph
Weishaus. founder of the girls
high school .and from Mrs.
Leonard Adler. who will make
presentations in behalf of the
Hebrew Academy Women which
she serves as president.
The Weishaus High School for
Girts is housed in the Hebrew
Academy's new Merwitzer
Building, and provides Jewish
and general studies for girls
from the 10th through the 12th
grades.
Miami Beach Elks Lodge To
Award Four Scholarships
Some 788 scholarships, worth
in excess of one-half million
dollars will be awarded by the
B.P.O.E. this year, with Miami
Beach Elks Lodge No. 1601,
awarding at least four of them
to worthy, deserving children of
this area, according to an an-
nouncement made by Aaron
Bookspan, exalted ruler of the
lodge, and Stanley Fisher, chair-
man of the Scholarship Commit-
tee.
These awards will be made
within the next week or two
The committee choosing the
awardees also includes Richard
Bernard.
Comedy, Music Featured
Comedian Hy Davis and mu-
sician David Labell will be fe-
tured on the program of the
17th annual donor dinner spon-
sored by the Sisterhood of
Young Israel Sunday evening
in the synagogue's social hall,
according to an announcement
made by Ray Gruen, president.
Marilyn (Mrs. Carl) Rubin is
donor chairlady for the 100
member group.
Aliyah Conference Sunday
The All-Florida Aliyah Con-
ference Sunday at the Airport
Lakes Holiday Inn, 1101 NW
57th Ave., will feature one of
Israel's distinguished public
servants. Ehud Avriel, Consul
General of Chicago.
The 9.30 a.m. till 4:30 p.m.
conference will include plenary
and small intensive discussion
sessions. Additional informa-
tion may be secured from the
Israel Aliyah Center. 4700 Bis-
cayne Blvd.
Hebrew Academv Installing
Judge Norman Ciment Sunday
This is a living room in one of the resi-
dences at Rossmoor Coconut Creek, the
master-planned, adults-only condominium
community being developed at exit 24,
Florida Turnpike, and State Road 814,
Pompano. Prices for residences, available
in five floor plans, range from $18,800 to
$42,000, with no recreation or land lease,
and all deposits escrowed in interest-
bearing accounts.
Rabbi Bernard Golder.berg of
York, national vice presi-
of the Council of
ate of the Hebrew Acad
:nd
.;.
JIDGE NORMAN CIMENT
Privr> Education, .vill be the
installing officer and guest
speaker a: the annual installa-
tion dinnex of the Greater Mi-
ami Hebrew Academy Sunday
at 6 D.m.
Judge Norman Ciment. form-
er Miami Beach city councilman
and member of the Tourist De-
velopment Authority, will be
sworn in as president. He is the
first president of the Hebrew
Academy, largest Hebrew day
school in the South, to have
children enrolled in the school
at the time of his election.
N'athanie'. Zem;l. a member
of the Academy board of di-
rectors who will sen" as din-
ner chairman, is a 1955 gradu-
heads his own cons'j;
neering firm. A graduate
Universirj of Miami, he e
a masters degree in sai
engineering at New York Uni-
ity. Zemd is a t
the
Hieh School of Miami |
and a member cf the
the Talmudic College of Flor-
ida.
who
with RaV-i Gold

da; sdi i ie
Uni:
catioi Rabbi I
tiated the Hebrew A:
.--
sion for Tor?.'. Umesorah
Other officer- who e
office Sunday night includ-
ing Firtel. president enu
I. H. Abrams. chairman of the
executive co-nmi'tee; George
Kimmel. chairman of the b
and Samuel Reinhard. 0car B.
Schapiro and Oscar Mamber,
senior vice presidents.
Rabbi Goldenberg. associate
national director of Torah Ume-
sorah. is <. member of the na-
tional board of directors of the
Education Commission of the
States, and serves on the execu-
tive committee of the Rabbini-
cal Council of America. He is a
former national vice president
of the Rabbinical Alliance of
America.
Reservations for the dinner
may be made at the Hebrew
Academy office.
,iiiiTTniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiinnniiri
MOMS-Am-OfFKfS-rACMn
DRAPERIES
Custom Mode
Mtt WR MUFUIES
NOW AT A ||\ USCtURT
****
AuosHOAumcm
WlttOOW SMMtKS, imSHKA&S
fMUKS, SUKOWBfS, 9P*0lSTi*Y
FURNITURE, NEW
CtPPETSAlL
20% OVER WHCLESALl

J\ay C/n/eriors
1730 MNCEDE ICON IlVD
CORAL CABLES
443-7293 smuim
**
L^UJLLJ liASJLBJUU 1SX i g. 8.B SJULSJJ.SJl.mjiA W^J SJjJ
colder 75
race course/post Mm* 1*5
For information & reservations call toll free:
Dade: 625-1311 Broward: 523-4324
West Palm Beach: 833-4016
/
Sorry, no one under 18 admitcd.
! M
i*r\e**


Friday, May 30, 1975
rJenisti tturMtot)
Page 7-B
Volunteers
Beth Torah Students To Present
One of the most successful, ongoing efforts of the Fed-
eration's Women's Division 1975 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal Israel Emergency Fund is its annual "Phon-O-
Thon." Ltd by Mrs. Sam Shinensky (seated, left) and
Mrs. Ceil Greenspon (seated, right), volunteers including
Mrs. Philip Gould (standing, left) and Mrs. Margaret
Katzen man the Federation phones every day of the week
with outstanding results gathering the support of
the Jewish women for the life saving cause of CJA-IEF.
ALVIN FLEISCHMAN
JEROME S. MANN
Seagram, Calvert Announce
Two Top Level Appointments
Avin Fleischman, president
of Calvert Distillers Company
since 1970. has been appointed
president of Seagram Distillers
Company. His appointment was
announced by Jack Yogman
president of Joseph E. Seagram
& Sons Inc. the parent company.
Mr. Yogman also announced
that Jerome S. Mann of Larch-
mont N.Y., will succeed Mr.
Fleischman as president of Cal-
vert Distillers Company. Mr.
Mann has been executive vice
president of Seagram Distillers
Company for the past year.
Mr. Fleischman has been em-
ployed since 1951 by Calvert
land affiliated sales divisions in
'the U.S. and Canada. Initially
ihe was a sales representative
'for Seagram Distillers. Follow-
ing a series of promotions in
the Seagram company, he joined
Calvert in 1962 as Western divi-
sion manager.
In 1967 Mr. Fleischman was
named executive vice president-
marketing of The House of Sea-
gram Ltd in Canada. He return-
ed to the US. in 1970 as execu-
tive vice president of Four
Roses Distillers Company and
shortly thereafter was named
president of Calvert.
Mr. Fleischman. a resident of
Ihite Plains, NY., graduated
Dm Penn State University with
LB. degree. He also attended
iWharton Scheol of th* Uni-
jity of Pennsylvania.
Mr. Mann, a graduate of the
University of Ohio, joined
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc.,
ir. 1959 as a field analyst. Sub-
sequently, he joined Seagram
Distillers Company as sales
promotion manager in Metro
Chicago, held a number of in-
creasingly important state man-
ager posts culminating in 1970
with his appointment as as-
sistant Eastern division man-
ager.
In 1971 Mr. Mann was named
vice president and general sales
manager of Summit Marketing,
and the following year was
named president of Summit. In
1973 he rejoined Seagram Dis-
tillers as vice president and gen-
eral sales manager and was
promoted aoon after to senior
vice president-sales.
B'nai Israel Synagogue
Installing New Officers
B'nai Israel and Greater Mi-
ami Youth Synagogue plans its
annual installation dinner at
9:30 p.m. Saturday in the syna-
gogue with Rabbi Ralph Z.
Glixman serving as installation
officer.
Rabbi Glixman will install
Judge Ralph Fisch as president,
succeeding Joseph Murray. Co-
ordinators of the affair are Jer-
ry Greenberg and Murray Sche-
inthaL Mrs. Scheinthal U ac-
cepting reservations.
Needed At Cantata 'An Eternal La nip" Sunday
Hebrew Home
Mrs. Dorothy Singer, director
of Volunteer Services at the
Miami Beach Hebrew Home for
the Aged. 320 Collins Ave., has
issued an urgent cnll for more
feeders and ot!ii"\; to join the
circle of volunteers at the
home.
Mrs. Singer said the need for
more volunteer help, both days
and evenings, is great. While the
paramount need now is for
feeders during the dinner hour
from 4 to 6 p.m.. volunteers are
needed for many necessary
tasks and can be of any age
from teens to senior citizens,
both male and female.
In addition to feeding the in-
firm, volunteers are needed to
escort the residents outside, act
at friendly visitors to the aged,
read to them and help with let-
ter writing and social activities.
Volunteers are also sought
for other activities which bring
entertainment to the residents
and heln them fill their days in
rewarding programs embracing
various workshops and cultural
pursuits.
In short, Mrs. Singer said,
understanding, warmhearted
persons are invited to act as
substitute families and to help
meet the social and psycho-
logical needs of many of the
aged men .and women at the
Miami Beach Hebrew Home for
the Aged.
David Collins Honored At
May 10 Scholarship Event
The South Florida Osteopathic
Scholarship Foundation, Inc
honored David Collins, adminis-
trator of Osteopathic General
Hospital, for his dedication and
support of the Foundation and
the osteopathic profession at its
third annual banquet. May 10 in
the Miami Shores Country Club.
The scholarship fund was ini-
tiated to raise funds for osteo-
pathic medical students in fi-
nancial need. The ultimate
goal is to provide scholarships
to those students who will be
attending the proposed osteo-
pathic medical school in South
Florid* ,. i
Thirty-f'e students of Bnb
Torah's Harold VVolk Religious
i ;1 will mark their Hebrew
Pohool g "adu tti >n i iday at n
a.m. in the main y oi
rorah Ci tion
t ti students II n gra lual i '
from the Hebrew High School
of Beth rorah.
The students will present a
cantata entitled, "An Eternal
Lamp." according te Dr. Mix A.
I.ipscl.it:-.. spiritual leader ol the
congreg 'tion.
Sy Rosen and Hy Kate, presi-
dent and executive vice presi-
dent of the Congraation, will
evtend greetings. Eugene Lip-
man, vice president of education
an dRabbi Norman Mussman,
educational director, will pre-
sent awards and diplomas.
Mrs. A. Drazin. Miss A. A^ika.
Mrs. N. Green". M*"8. A Mint/.
Mrs. R. Mela"i"d. Mr. T. Trim.
and Mrs. F. Wildsfin. who are
the instructors, will also parti-
cipate in the exercises.
Among the awards to b "re-
sented will be The Abe Schorr
Memorial Award endowed bv
the Men's Club for Outstanding
Service to th< Religious School;
The George Bialeck and Jacob
Augenstein Memorial Award for
Outstanding and Creative Class
Proiects.
Also. The Harold Wolk Mem-
orial Award for Excellence in
ScholarsHin; The Molle Kahaner
! A? ard for Excellence
tudy of Humosh; The
Hinda an I Zysi i Pressman
M ->'>'>'' Excellence
in th<; Stu !i : swish Hi rt i y
and i Frank Burg Memorial
Award for Outstanding Syna-
l Attendance.
V .. ['..., -ij ,., school
gradual s are M ire Aifcen, E'is-
ct Amster. Pteven Bav, Alan
P Iv Min I" Fl rfssig, Alan
Or>Mii' pair?. BmH Schonwetter and
Lisa Winton.
Graduation diolomaa wii! also
be presented to Gregs Abel
Suzette Adouth, Mitchell Butter,
Howard Blechman. Nal O'din,
Franklin Cohen. Brian Cole,
.i<>m>s D-m^iger, Robert Fein
Da'id Fmnman. ^erri Fried,
Golda ftinsbnrg, Mitchell Click-
man. Michell" Gre-mhut. Ilene
Howard. Daniella Ifrah, Susan
Isicoff. Susan I=snberg, Rita
Karlan Bradley Kaufman. Mit-
chell Kauf-nan. Charles Roller,
MitcrHl KonHman. Mark Le-
vine. Brett Mufson. Jose Oleks-
r-'^ns'i Louis P^nanon. Rich-
ard Salmon Aileen Schecter,
p^mf) Sh-"-*vn. I.tQr Taks,
Laurence Ungar. David Wein-
b"rg. Donna Winton and Karen
Zedeck.
Muriel Tisroff
Exhibit Opens At
Temple Beth Am
Temple Beth Am. 5950 N.
Kendall Dr.. will welcome Mu-
riel Turoff as its guest exhibit-
ing artist Friday evening follow-
ing services at 9:30 p.m.
Ms. Turoff's fine arts training
included Art Students League
and Pratt Institute in New York,
University of Colorado, metal-
smithing at the Tobe Pascher
Workshop of the Jewish Musem
of New York, and private ce-
ramics and enambelling studies.
She has exhibited at local gal-
leries and museums as well as
the Museum of Modern Art in
New York City, Cooper Union
Museum, National Design Cen-
ter, and the Syracuse Museum
of Art.
Listed in "Who's Who in
American Women" and the "In-
ternational Who's Who in Arts
and Antiques," Ms. Turoff is the
author of "Pottery and Other
Ceramic Ware."
Currently teaching at the Mi-
ami Art Center, her work is
represented in the national trav-
elling shows of the American
Association of University Wom-
en and the American Federation
of the Arts, and is in the per-
manent collection of the Jewish
Museum in New York City and
the National Portrait Gallery of
the Smithsonian Institute, Wash-
ington. D.C.
In 1974, Ms. Turoff was com-
missioned by St. James Evan-
gelical Lutheran Church in Coral
Gables to create several enamel
ecclesiastical artifacts.
JCC Announces Camp Program At
Adath Yeshurun For Ages 9-14
has been experienced in temnies
throughout the Jewish commu-
nity in South Florida .
Another Israeli on the stnff
cf the JCC's will be Yacov Ncy,
who is well kn^wn fnr his .-.ok
in the show "From Israel with
Love" and his one man show at
Dade County Auditorium.
Mr. Noy is a world fa-nous
pantomimist whose talent is
capably transmitted to those
who will identifv with the cre-
ativity of motion and communi-
cation.
All thos" interested in the
Creative Arts Center programs
for ages 9-14 this summer
should contact Vivian Becker
at the North Dade JCC office,
20400 NE 24th Ave., N^rth Mi-
ami Beach.
The Jewish Community ('li-
ters of South Flo""Ma pnn*""'' 's
a camping service in North
Dade to be known as the Cre-
ative Art Center.
The art center a' T nn'
Adath Yeshurun. 1025 NE Mi-
ami Gardens Dr.. will be un
the supervision of Roz Champs.
Featured in the art center
and other camming programs of
the JCC's in North Dade and
South Broward will be Dany
Amihud who. due to his Jewish-
Israeli background, has develop-
ed a colorful variety of English.
Hebrew and Jewish songs
which the children will learn.
Mr. Amihud has nine years of
professional experience behind
him and his teaching capacity
Record Number Of Students
To Receive Certificates
Dr. Irving Lehman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach, will present certificates
of completion to a record num-
ber of students comrlcting nur-
sery and kindergarten classes
of the Lehrman Day School this
we*k.
Graduation ceremonies are
scheduled Friday at 10 a.m. in
the Friedland Ballroom. Stu-
dents will present an original
skit. "Come Fly With Us on Our
Magic Carpet." according to
Mrs. Naomi Brandeis. super-
visor of nursery and kindergar-
ten classes for the Lehrman
Day School.
Roval Palm 0RT To Install
Royal Palm Chapter. Women's
American ORT. will install its
officers for the 1975-76 year at j
a luncheon Tuesday in The;
Betsy Restaurant. 5875 Collins |
Ave. The installation will be- j
gin at 11:00 a.m. ^^^^ |
Cantor, Young, Prominent,
Available for Hiqh Holiriayi.
Would consider permanent position.
Experienced with larqe conareqa.
tions. Available for audition.
Renlv Cantor C.Y.
P.O. Box 0t -?973
Miami 33101
SEXTON BAL KOftEH
For Modern Traditional
Synagogue.
Phone 858-6334 for
appointment.
EXCELLENT BAL SHACHRIS
WANTED FOR
HIGH HOLIDAYS
in Orthodox Congregation.
Write H.H. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101
CANTOR
Renowned, magnificent voice
credentials. Experienced in all
areas, desires modern conserv.
Synagogue. Write Cantor R.M.
P.O. Box 012973
1 BEDROOM UNFURN SHED
lake front Condo Re Mont
South Green For Rent or
Sale. 7% Mtgage. or Yearly
Lease.
864-9374
CONSERVATIVE
Synagogue needs a spiritual
leader to conduct High Holy
Day Services.
PLEASE CALL 864-1740
DELRAY BEACH -Al A
INTRACOASTAL CONDO
Prestige Bldg. Ocean View,
large Terrace. Very Large
2 bedroom 2 bath. Finest
Drapes, Carpets, Applianc-
es, Wall Paper. Covered
Parking. Top Area. For Lux-
ury Living Call 947-3843.
In Delray area call 391-8601
week days.


-
Paee S-B
* imist- fhrHtor
Friday, May 30, 1975
!
#V ^ H mm J J
n
Elliott Snttr>, who received
his Bachelor uf Science d
from Duke Mr
graduated from Georg Wash-
ington 0 -,-- me a
of Scie^
Man n R'Mta --.'
He is a Budget and Man**^merrt
B
of General Se^ i-es Adminislia-
.,. .. ( pr0.,-j
parent' are Mr. and M-* B?mv
(Ttot") Sutta. of 1335 Sc
Ave.. Coral Ga > a-e *lc->
:-h the'- langater *s>
dy' ftiw record in he' hinitr
year at Enwv Ui A-
as b*~n -
hi A v D?an's List anJ
e honors.
The University of MMH
School of Medicine i= awarding
M.D. degrees to 145 "-en an i
worsen in its 'Oth com~.en~:-
ment exercise A~inn graduates will be Wsnrd A.
Do- .n^n- ,,.'-. "--
well Daner, of 5500 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach. Y>ung i)r Dmt\
was social cMi'-man of P'"1*
Delra Epsflotl mdfcal l*att!#**
for twi vcars *nd a nwnbe* : ">'
four He was class editor '.
- from 1971-
173. md as ~ '" "' th?
Student A -
sociatii n. He 3S
decree in el ical en
with a biomedical engin
option. Dr. E
O WH
ated the medical student loan
fund at the L'M School of Med-
icine. His aprriaHwd interests
are radiology and bir-medicai
engineering.
-'7
Dorothy (Mrs. William) Car-
mel. outgoing president ot the
Opti-Mcs Club of Miami Beach,
subpoenaed" all her officers
and board members to attend a
unique party in the form of a
jury :-;j! at the Jockey Club.
11111 Biscayne Blvd., Tuesday
i original sc-ipt in song
was mitten by .".Irs. CanneL
Officers an'. imarO members
Mrs. Srjphanie Cooper,
M-. Five Miller, Mrs. Charlotte
Chei-. Mrs. Edith Leibowitr.
I s Cele Masln, M's. Norma
I*ni?. Mrs. Harrr-t Segal. Mrs.
Esther Steiner, Mrs. Syd:lle
Blatt, Mrs. Claire Brotman. Mrs.
Bunny Baron, Mrs. Anita Chaii-
nas, Mrs. Betty Gottlieb, Mrs.
Bea hirsch, Mrs. Iris HuHen.
Mrs. Beverly Hornreich, Mrs.
Sum.) Howard, M-s. Koslyn
Hurwitz, Mrs. Helene Jackson.
Mrs. Mildren Interess, Mrs. Bet-
tv Krs.o. Mrs. Cnrol Levenon,
Mrs. Dorthy M'll-', Mrs. Slma
Nankin, Mrs. teff Olkin. M-s.
Mollie Peal, Mrs. I-eoe Piker,
Mrs. Ann; Plnee, Mrs. Helen
!, M-s. Mickey Sonnett,
Ms. Mlmi Suerliw, mis.
Pv. Sussmn, Mi, ,; -rniee
Tr i ". M >. MHs*e Webster, md
Mrs. Muriel Weton.
City of Miami Mayor Maurice A. Ferre, (center) partici-
pated in a not ion-wide campaign in which President
Ford, as well as governors and mayors purchased the
new Bicentennial-design Series E Savings Bond recently
issued by the U.S. Treasury Department in honor of the
nation's forthcoming 200th birthday. With Mayor Ferre
are Jack White, (left; 1975 Take Stock in America Bond
cnalrman, and Carl Blake, Area Manager of the U.S.
Savings Bond office in Miami.
bernie Goldberger (center) and his wife, Olga, hosted a
champagne party for the newly formed David Ben-
Gurion Lodge, B'nai B'rith, in the Aquarius' Cascade
Room as part of their 54th wedding anniversary cele-
bration. At the microphone is Abe Cohen, president of
the lodge; with them is Ed Mass, honorary president.
Some 200 persons attended; 20 new members were added
to the lodge list, bringing the membership to 110.
Tiferelh Jacob
Sisterhood's ^Seic
Officers Elected
The Sisterhood cf Temple
Tifereth Jacob has announce J
th- election of its new slate of
officers, and plans for social
an.: religious programs for
senior cititens, a beautification
program fo.- the temple and e-
organization of youth activities
for all Jewish children in the
Hialeah-Miami Springs area.
Mrs. Ida Bisenman was elect-
ed president. Serving with her
will be three vice presidents
Mrs. Anna McCullers. member-
snip, Mrs. Larry Wolfson. youth
and culture, and Mrs. Sydei
Levitcb. program; Mrs. David
Goldberg. treasurer; Mrs.
George Gali1-. financial secre-
tary-; Miss Fay Shein. record-
ing secretary, Mrs. Leon Silver-
man, corresponding secretary,
and Mrs. Richard Grossman,
parliamentarian.
Mrs. Felice Lowell has been
appointed ways and m
chairman. Mrs. Dian; Kurt/,
publicity and public relations
chairman and Mrs. MflUt Fox,
cochairman of publicity an:l
public relations. M.s. Oscar
Mescon will serve a chairm m
of special event! th Mrs. A'
'.-; as her cochairman
Jewish the a'ea
terested in s ;
acthiti j cf
i
I
DCAI C in tails
'75-76 Dirt ctors
: i
fv R"t in-
board Sir
for 1973-7
president: Nars Charles (An
p-a~'b'\ fi-st vie -r.-ij--;
fa-"uel Brenn-r. s.'?ind nee
president; Jo- Garcia, tr
er; Henry W Id. sscretary and
Lawrence Tiener, immediats
past nreci' ?nt
Mmbers -f the board of d:-
rctors include no Plotkin,
Flonda ARC pr-silent; Joaquin
J. Cosllo, J-., D:?t ict I chair-
man; Ms. M iy Epstein, District
II chai-"~-!>n; Tei J. Palas';e.
District IV ohai">n: M'ss S>ie
fimon. Yo.uh ARC president;
y.rs. Dorothy W. Adside, Walter
Anders. Hardv R. Beacham,
Seth Becker. Dmald B. Frank.
Mrs. Dmn's Heidberg, N'iberto
Moreno. ?>Irs. Sylvester Mo-row,
Mrs, Gn2 Smith. Marvin
Stin. M'-.. Frank Costa and
Gene R. LaNier.
Executive director of
So<-j-.tion is Samuel Ka-
C.S.W.
and ;> in
- ::; tilanH ant .",.... Krc : a..'
er i. me \ Utdin i
.
< the a id hi ird c and his I
ily had negun a fast n?- the fifth anniversary of their ..;-
pi a;... : to emigrate to Lrae.. tiu ing i
. uu .:.. .': : end i i
i to an International Hunger Strike for :
Slepaks and o:h:r Jews unable to iea\c the Soviet U\
witn participaa/s of all faiths, in 16 cities and four
eign countries. The denial group has "adopted" the
paks through the South Florida Conference en S.
Jewry, and provides the family with moral suppor:
contact ir../i :he Jewish community.
.f th- as- j 0 VjC
vaminsky, ;' t
Secson Ending With Party
Reth Ja'-nb cist^rhood will
hold its e^-of-the-s'-ason party
Sunday, June 1, at 12:i0 n.m.
with Esther Waller, president,
presiding. Refreshments and ^
professional entertainment will
be feature I.
Social Evening For Singles
T^ No-th Dado J-wish Com-
munity '"enters of South Flor-
ida annonn'-es q Social F."ening
for Singh Adults Ases 25-55 in
th- Washington Federal p.t 633
NE 163rd St. at *:00 p.m. Tues-
day. There will be records and
refreshments for everyone.
experts will sell
COffFErVTS OF HOME ;
apartment or estate.'
If you dispose of your 'u'"'Sh
ingv On premises sale
brings greatest
CASH RETURN
we handle all detatts
No fuss or bother On
your part.
INTERIOR HOME SALES
a d.vision of
Equipment & Product Sains
Licensed Mercantile Brokers
P.O.BOK2385.MB.. FL. 33140
868 3000 Anytime 279 1300
Young adults all over Bade County are joining in the
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund effort
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults
Division. A recent South Miami meeting was hosted by
Mr, and Mrs. Ira Zager !right), with guests including Mr.
and Mrs. Stewart Mirmelli. Mr. Mirmelli is chairman of
the Division.
>


Friday. May 30, 1975 .....
'Jen1st fhrMi^r
Page 9-B
Ellen Rein And Carl L. Morin
Married In Sunday Ceremony

Ellen Rein and Carl L. Morin
were married Sunday, May 25,
in a 5 p.m. ceremony conducted
MRS. CARL L MORIN
by Rabbi Mwv ;11 Berg^r at the
DeaitviN^ HoH. A recertion in
hon'v of th" OUple followed in
the hotel's Napoleon Room.
Th" bncK da-ghtsr of Mr.
and M>-s. Bernard Rein. 74S0
SVV 125th St., is a student at
Miami DaJe Community Col-
lege South, where she is taking
courses leading towards em-
ployment as a bgal sec-.-tvy.
Her husband, the son of Mrs.
Carol Baker, 1S250 N\V <>r i
Ave.. and Louis L. Morin. is
also a student at M-DCC South.
where his field is architecture.
The bride selected a w'li"
lace dress with a rose motif
and a cathedral length veil; h sr
bouquet was a bridal arrans -
ment of white rosis. Mrs.
Midge Seiavitch served as "v
tron of honor; the bridesmxl ta
included Laura Morin. Cathy
Morin, Susie Goldstein, Brigitte
Marsinack and Rosane Runge.
Sandy Gerbone was the bride-
groom's h.^st man; Jerry Rein,
Bruce Rein. Lonni? Seiavitch,
Bob Piersol and Gerrard Gen-
pas ushered.
After a week-long honeymoon
vacation at the -p'avboy Ciub
in Jamaica, Mr. and Mrs. Morin
will live in South Miami.
Josic Burson, elected "American Mother
of the Year," is surrounded by her family
at induction ceremonies at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel in New York. Left to right
are daughter, Linda, and fiance; husband,
Memphis lawyer, Leo R.. Burson; daugh-,
ter-in-law and son, Charles. Mrs. Burson,
a national board member of Hadassah,
was sponsored by the Hadassah Chapter
of Memphis. She plans to focus on th&
promotion of the Young Mother's Pro-
gram, which prepares study guides and
encourages the broadest development of
women at home and in the community.
Gov. heubin Askew at the
recent Scopus Award Dinner are partici-
pants in the upcoming summer tour of Is-
rael sponsored by the American Friends
of the Hebrew University. Pictured from
left to right are Mrs. Lillian Dubarry,
Mrs. Rose Hochstim, Gov. Askew, Mrs.
Robert Allen Taft, Mrs. Florence Feld-
man, director of the Women's Division of
t'\e American Friends and tour director,
Mrs. Harry Becker, Mrs. Charles Char-
cowsky and Leon Kronheim.
>
Leah Exseuman, (left) past president of the Ladies Aux-
iliary of South Dade Post No. 778, Jewish War Veterans,
Dr 'and Mrs. Rov Cohen, and Evelyn Clein, president,
serve at an Oneg Shabbat in the Homestead Air Force
Base Chapel in honor of the naming of a son born to
the Cohen,. Rabbi Sol Landau, Base Chaplain, conducted
the service. Co-sponsors were the Ladies Auxiliary of
Point East Post No. 698 and special guests were mem-
bers of the Naranja-HomesteadPost
Temple Zamora Men's Club And
Sisterhood Slates To Be Installed
Temple Zamora Sisterhood
and M,n s Club will install the
new slau of officers at the Fri-
day evening services, it has
b^en announced.
The Men's Club officers in-
clude Herman Douglass, presi-
dent; Jack Rubin, religious vice
president; Irving Klein, fund
raising vice president; Joseph
Ostrie, treasurer; Jerry Lieber-
man, corresponding secretary,
and Jack Rosin, recording sec-
retary.
Serving on the board of di-
rectors will be Jack Sapphire,
Harry Nissel, Jack Kapner.
Nathan Goldv, Max Marko, Isa-
dore Frankel, Louis Fried, An-
drew Tibor, Louis Charter and
Harry Pines.
Rabbi Maurice Klein, install-
ing officer, will also administer
the oath of office to the 1975-
76 Sisterhood slate, including
Mrs. Florence Boss, president;
Mrs. Rose Davidow, fund rais-
ing vice president; Mrs. Rose
Galton, cultural vice president;
Mrs. Jack Scheer, youth vice
president; Mrs. Louis Fried, re-
cording secretary; Mrs. Lillian
Kerish, corresponding secreta-
ry; Mrs. Selma Davidow, finan-
cial secretary, and Mrs. William
Millman. treasurer.
The new Sisterhood board is
comprised of Mrs. Hilda Flaum,
Mrs. Ike Gordon, Mrs. Alex
Greenwald, Mrs. Jerry Lieber-
man, Mrs. Jack Magun, Mrs.
Estelle Moskowitz. Mrs. Joseph
Ostrie, Mrs. Jack Rubin, Mrs.
Jack Sar>i*'lre, Mrs. Jack
Scheer, Mrs. Shirley Sv.eeney
and Mrs. Anne Weisbrot.
Following the combined in-
stallation, to which the com-
munity is invited, a gala recep-
tion will b'j held.
Jor JRat Special CvenL. ,
10"."i N.E. 171 Terrace
NOMh Miami Beaih. Florida 33162
We Are Here.'... MIAMI BEACH'S FIRST
The KOSHER STEAK
HOUSE
Carve Your Own Turkey, What You Don't lot You
Take Home. Served From 3 to 10 fM.
FREE Decorated Cake for Each Mother
to Take Home, One to a Family
STEAK HOUSE MENU
SUN. THRU THURS
5-10 P.M.
iv goers who know have been using
Billy Bctlack's Orchestra lor their festive
occasions. i>>p grade Music Makers for
cnlwU'nmerU and dancing.
Florida's Finest Music "FIORIDIAN"
and his
Boca Raton Hotel & Club
Orchestra
r~ Mw.MttW HiascH a im. nathan goooman
iMtf. nmm 531-4114 538-5631
0 Th. Ocn IM St. KIAM' BiACM
M..ii.th.8-0mHol1
'Featuring Society. Latin. Rock and Folk Music
Singing Master of Ceremonies
Phone (305) 651-2503


Page 10-B
*Jeisr flcr/fJiatn
Friday, May 30, 1975
Mrs. Stephanie Cooper New
Opti-Mrs. Club President
Mrs. Stephanie Fisher Coop-
er of Miami Beach has been
elected president of Opti-Mrs.
MRS. STEPHANIE COOPER
Clu* of Miami Beach. The an-
nul installation luncheon will
bs neld at the Embers Restau-
rant. Wednesday, June 11. at
11T80 a.m.
Lloyd Cooper, past lieutenant
governor and presently the Zon-
ing and Boundaries chairman
for the Florida District Op-
timists, (Mrs. Cooper's hus-
band) will be her installing of-
ficer. Mrs. Jeff Olkin. a past
president, will be chairman for
the day. An original musical
skit will be written by Past Pres-
idents, Mrs. Mickey Sonnett and
Mrs. Bernice Troop.
Mrs. Cooper has been an ac-
tive member of many organiza-
tion! for the past 12H years.
She is recording secretary of
South Shore Hospital's Wom-
en's Auxiliary, a founding mem-
ber and past vice president of
Beth Jov Chapter of B'nai
B'rith -Women, founding presi-
dent of the Democratic Profes-
sional Women's Club of Dade
bounty, former national repre-
sentative of the Dade County-
Chapter of the National Asso-
ciation of Legal Secretaries,
former City Council Represen-
tative of Beta Sigma Phi Inter-
national Sorority and Area Co-
ordinator for Channel Two Auc-
tion tor the past several years.
In addition. Mrs. Cooper is a
member of th-j minty
Grand Jury Association, the
Dade County Democratic
en's Club, the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Sholom. the
Brooklyn College Alumni -\ o-
ciation. and the PTAs of North
Beach Elementary School. Nau-
tilus Junior High School and
Miami Beach Senior High
School.
Mrs. Cooper has been very
active in Opti-Mrs.; she served
as its corresponding secretary,
bulletin editor for the past two
years, and first vice president
for the past year. She was also
chairman of the club's most re-
cent fundraising dinner-auction.
Other officers elected were
Mrs. Bea Hirsch. Mrs. Dorothy
Miller and Mrs. Mimi Sperling,
vice presidents; Mrs. Charlotte
Chester, recording secretary,
Mrs. Edith Leibowitz, corres-
ponding secretary, Mrs. Cele
Masin. treasurer, and Mrs.
Norma Henig. Mrs. Estelle Ren-
koff and Mrs. Esther Steiner,
social secretaries.
The b^rd of directors for
the coming year will include
Mrs. Bunny Baron, Mrs. Sydelle
Blatt. Mrs. Claire Brotman. Mrs.
Dorothy Carmel, Mrs. Anita
Charnas. Mrs. Betty Gottlieb,
Mrs. Iris Holden. Mrs. Beverly
Hornreich Mrs. Sunny Howard,
Mrs. Roslyn Hurwitz, Mrs. Mil-
dred Intvese, Mrs. Helene
Jackson. Mrs. Betty Kram. Mrs.
Carol Levenson. Mrs. Faye Mill-
er. Mrs. Jeff Olkin. Mrs. Lillian
Olkin, Mrs. Irene Pilzer. Mrs.
Anne Pines. Mrs. Harriet Se-
gal. Mrs. Helen Segal, Mrs.
Mickey Sonnett, Mrs. Bernice
Troop, Mrs. Mitzie Webster and
Mrs. Muriel Weston.
The Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami
Beach maintains scholarships
for emotionally disturbed chil-
dren at the Montanari Clinical
School and at the Grant Center,
and provides needed items for
the children at these schools
and at Alpha House (a county
school for emotionally disturbed
children.
2 Sets Of Encyclopaedia Judaica
Purchased For Academy's Library
The Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy and the Florida Com-
mittee for The Encyclopaedia
Judaica this week launched a
jointly sponsored project de-
Signed to offer the Miami Beach
school's nearly 1.000 students
special services provided by
what has been acclaimed as the
greatest work of Jewish scholar-
ship in the 20th century.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy, arranged special asemblies
to show new motion pictures
describing the 16-volume ency-
clopaedia and its use in both in-
' school and at-home research.
Two complete sets of The En-
cyclopaedia Judaica have been
purchased for the Hebrew Acad-
emy library, with yearbooks
bringing the fully illustrated
volumes up to date, Rabbi Gross
said.
Arrangements have been
completed for parents of Acad-
emy students to purchase the Is-
raeli-printed and produced en-
cyclopaedia at special prices,
and on an installment-payment
program.
In addition, arrangements
have been completed for the
purchase of the bookswhich
contain more than 12 million
words and 8.000 illustrations m
12,000 pageswith State of Is-
rael Bonds.
Rabbi Gross said the Hebrew
Academy will utilize the avail-
ability of The Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica during the 1975-76 aca-
demic year in courses in Bibli-
cal History, Jewish History and
in a new course covering cur-
rent Jewish events in the United
States, Israel and throughout the
world.
"I agree completely with the
statement of the late David
Ben-Gurion that a set of The
Encyclopaedia Judaica belongs
in every Jewish home," Rabbi
Gross said.
The Florida Committee for
The Encyclodaedia Judaica has
established offices in the 420
Lincoln Rd. Building in Miami
Beach, with Michael Becher
serving as executive vice chair-
man.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
spiritual leader of Temple Me-
norah and a native of Jerusa-
lem, is one of the cochairmen of
the committee which plans to
work with synagogues, day
schools and numerous Jewish
organizations in distributing the
books to both organizational
and home libraries.
"This is the first comprehen-
sive description of the saga of
the Jewish people published in
English since the momentous
events of the first and second
World Wars and the creation of
a modern State of Israel It is
a mandatory foundation for any
Jewish library or~ collection of
books," Rabbi Gross said.
Temple Or Olom
lias 22-Mernber
Graduating Class
"As the runner ignites the
torch to initiate the advent of
the Olympic games. Rabbi Da-
vid Baron and Rosalyn Chames,
r;int principal of Temple
Or Olom's religious school, and
Mrs. Linda Hornlk, Education
\ice president, have passed on
spark of Judaic culture,
spirit and ethical Talmudic
teachings to the graduating
class of 1975." declares Diana
Seide, vice president of pubiic
affairs.
On June 1. the students of
the Dated class will receive
their diplomas.
The graduating class, which
will further their education for
an additional two years lead-
ing to confirmation, include
Cheryl Berger, Guy Davis, Lyn
Feigenbaum, Mark Fertig, Ger-
ald Flachner, Brian Harris, Jef-
frey Kahn, Adam Klein, Charles
Lehman, Andy Levine, Scott
Lubow, Arthur Pearl, David
Ramras, Amy Rosenberg. Mar-
jorie Rosenberg. David Rubin,
Helen Spil, Scott Turick. Paul
Isgar. Harry Mayer, Gerald
Holzer and Marc Stolzenberg.
There will be nine confir-
mands, including Janet Feigen-
baum, Charles Fistel. Sandra
Guterman, Audrey Komfeld,
Mary Misrahi, Marion Rauch-
werger. Dori Seltman. Howard
Shifke and Joseph Weiner.
Hi-Rise Tikvah
Installation Set
Hi Rise Tikvah Chapter of
Pioneer Women will hold its an-
nual installation of officers
Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. in the
card room of Forte Towers. 1200
West Ave., Miami Beach.
Mrs. Milton Green, president
of the Pioneer Women Council
of South Florida, will officiate
at the ceremonies. Refresh-
ments will be served, and ad-
mission is free and open to the
general public according to Mrs.
Pauline Finkelstein, chapter-
president.
Hi Rise Tikvah will hold a
card party to raise funds for the
Day Care Centers operated by
Pioneer Women in Israel in the
Forte Towers card room, at
12:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 10.
Mrs. Minnie Aarons is chairman
of the affair,, at which refresh-
ments will be served. The event
is open to the public
Donor Weekend Scheduled
By Miami Hadassah Chapter
Members of the Miami Chap-
ter of Hadassah who have earn-
ed their donor week-end will
enjoy their reward at the
Americana Hotel Saturday and
Sunday.
Harriet Adler and Rose
Schwartz, co chairpersons,
working with Sunny Hirschbein
over all donor chairperson,
have planned a dinner dance,
complete with entertainment,
Saturday evening. Festive cock-
tail parties are being planned
by many of the 27 individual
groups.
Culture Corner
Yiddish Culture Corner meet-
ings take place every second
Tuesday of the month at 10:30
a.m. at Agudath Israel Institute.
Programs include lectures, mu-
sic, folk songs and recitations
in Yiddish. Marcus Meisel, 8233
Harding Ave., is in charge of
information.
Religious Services
MIAMI
Ah A VAT SMmLOM CONGREGA.
T.ON %5 SW 67th Ave. O-thodox
Car.tor Aron B-n Aroi..
AN SHE EMES 2*33 SW 19 th Ave.
Con.eryatiye. Cantor Sol Pakow^
3ETH AM (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall
Dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Hc
bert M Baumgard. Associate RactJ'
Barry Altman.
SETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Cantor William Lioson.
4-A
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi !>oi
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
SETH KODESH~1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern T/yfitional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
3ETH TOV ,Temple'.. 6438 SW Sth
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel._______________
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GriATER
MIAMI YCUTH SS-NAGOGUT 9600
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi "'P
Glixman. 8-A
ISRAEL (Temple) OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th 6t. Reform.
Rabbi ./oseph R. Narot. 10
ISRAELITE ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
Oft OLOM (Tempi") 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative Rabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. IS
TEMPLE ISRAEL-SOUTH (Formerly
Beth Tikva) 9 Rabbi Joseph R. 'Narot. 13-A
SA-MU-S-. (Temple) 89C0 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 306. .Rabbi Maxwell
Berger I
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Se.mour Hinkes.
riON (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
serva'.ive. Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Herfman. V.
UlAUAH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathar. Zolondek. 15
N0MH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. C.inservative.
F.abbi Joseph Gorfinkel. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. 35
MIAMI BiACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
BETH EL. *400 Pine Tree Dr.
Orthodox 5
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
IETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef.
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHOLOM (Temple). 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisn.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
TEMPLE BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde-
cai Yardeini. 21-A
ETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. 22
Three Being Confirmed
Three students will be con-
firmed and participate in tha
Friday evening service in Tem-
ple Beth Tov this weekend.
They are Michael Weiss, Hen-
ry Rand and Ronald Goldberg.
The confirmands will be hon-
ored at the Oneg Shabbat fol-
lowing the services. The public
ia invited to attend.
BETH VOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
B'NAI 2ION (Temple). 200-173th St.,
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham
I. Jacobson 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
1242 Washinqton Av. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
GREGAT!ON. 715 Washington Ave.
Rabbi Meir Masliah Melamed 23-A
6MANU-EL (Temple). 1701 Washing-
ton Ave. Conservative, Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Or Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross, 28
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern.
Cantor Meyer Enoel. 26
KNESETH ISRAEL 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. Zt
MENORAH (Temple). 6'0 75th St.
Conservative. Ron> Msver Abram-
owitx Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
NER TAMID (Temple*. 79th St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eugene Lafcovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber,
man. .
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1542
44 Washington Ave. S2
*ORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th 8t. Causeway,
v --, Bay Village. Conservative.
Can'or Murray Vavneh S2-A
WMH MIAMI BIACH
'^V.?.^?, ACH,M NUSACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo-
""* V.m
A-pATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1029
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Cantor Ian Alpern. St
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Keligious Community Center. 19256
NE 3rd Ave. Orthadox. 33-A
8 71 'r,ORAh- 1M1 N. Miami Beach
Blvd Conservative. R.hbi Max Lip-
chita. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson.
B'NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabb. Victor D. Zwel-
ing. Canto' Jack Leiner.
SINAI (Temple) 0> NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabb.
Ralpn Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. ______ 3'
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 19151 f'E
loth Ave. Orthadox. Rabbi Dov
Bidnirk ____________ 38
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml
AMI 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox
Rabbi Zev Leff
CORAL 6ASUS
JUCEA (Temp'f\ !>550 Granada Blvd.
Reform Rabb: Michael B. Eisen.
stat. Cantor ^i?a Shore. 40
ZAMORA iTompiO). 44 Zamnra Ave.
Conserv-.ve. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
SURfSlDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave Orthodox. Rabb*
Isaac D. Vine &P
FORT lAUDCRDAU
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 W.
Oak'and ParK Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Partt
Blvd. Re-form. Kabbi Arthur J.
Abrama. Cantor Jerome Klement. 4S
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION. Reform. 3501 Univer.
eity Dr. Rabbi Max Weitr. 44
TARC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
NW 67lh St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Stirling Rd. 86
P0MPAN0 BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER 6101
NW 9th St. MB
SHOLOM (Tempie). '3? BE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Ya-v .-,.- o
HALLANDALt
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
HOLLYWOOD
BETH El (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel iffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvev M. Rosenfeld 48
BETH fHALOM Temple). 460' Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabb, Mortos
Malavskv Cantor Irving GolH a|
S I \ I (Temple 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate RabDi Cha'tn S. L'stfield.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Corservitive.
o.r. ex., c-.. a,,.. Hollywood. F.*bbl
David Rosen field. 47-B
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road.
Plantation.
Friday s p m.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41.0
MIR AM All
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW 15-h St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. D'azin.
Cantor Abraham Kester 48
H0MHTIAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CfcN "ER.
183 NE 8th St. Con-rv,ative. 51
IEGAL rfOTICE
IN THE CIPC. T rOUIT OF THE
ELEVENTH UO C't CIRCUIT
OF FLORir-a %' a > D FOR
DACE COUNTY
PROBATE DIV SION
PRr BATE \0 7j HZ2
In RE: R H
MARRY s,\ T
,1,, .
NOT CE TO CREDITORS
'P.. All Crpoiti i \m Persona
Having Claims or Demands Against
Sapl Estate
You re hervhv notified and re-
Qlilred in present anv claims and de-
manda which you may have attains!
the estate of HARRY SALTER de-
ceased late of Dadi County. Florida,
to the Circuit Juturea of Dade Coun-
and filo th.- sami. in duplicate
and as itr.ivulc-i! 111 S.rlion 7:::! It,
Florida Btatutes, In their offices in
the County Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within four r-alendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same will
be barred.
Filed hi .Miami. Florida, this 28th
day "f Hay. a D., 1975
Fl AOBHJP FIRST NATIONAL
HANK' OF MIAMI BEACH
l\ : CHAIUJi.s D. UI.XO
HAKI'.V IS SMITH
As Executors
rirst publication of this notice on
the 3i>tii day of May, 1971
SMITH. MANDI.EK. SMITH.
I'AKKKK & WKHNEK
By: SAMUEL S SMITH
Attorney for Executors
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
3/30 6/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-16979
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriasre of
PATRICK) A. RAMIREZ.
Petitioner/Husliaiai
and
ANNE UEI.PHINE RAMIREZ.
Reapond-nt Wife.
TO: ANNE IiEI.I'IUNE RAMIREZ
245 Cambridge Street
Uuriimri..ii Massachusetts nig03
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against you
in the above cause, and vou are re-
uuired to serve a copy of your An-
swer to the Petition on the Petition-
er's Attorney. BI.ITSTKIN & MO-
1.ANS. 1440 NW. Hili Avenue. Miami.
Horida S31i5 and. file the original
Answer In the office of the I'lerk of
'he Circuit Court on or before the
7th day of July. 1975: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou.
DATED at Miami. Florida this 28th
day of May. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINK'ER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Miami. Dade County, Florida -r.
By BEVERLY LfPPS
Deputy Clerk
_ 6/30 S/S-1I-20
'1
It
.J

**


lay, May 30, 1975
*Jmidh ficridftor
Page 11-B
h>
^aMmtual flag*
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Uoschifz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues re.evant to Jewish life past and present
By
FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor,
|Encyclopaedia Judaica
lhal d mean?
I Hebrew word for
tut" means (1) the coming
|ws t> the L-.tnd of bra 1
lim" for permanent resi-
(2) the Jews coming
a particular country or
or during a particular
i, for this purpose, e.g.,
'Polish aliyah, the First
lh.
cording to the authorita-
> Encyclopaedia Judaica,
ever. Aliyah means more
immigration: it is a major
1 of Zionism and the pri-
W means for its realization.
Kplies personal participation
he rebuilding of the Jew-
Homeland and the elevation
Phe individual to a higher
of self-fulfillment as a
^ber of the renascent na-
In the earlier years the
prity of the olim were
red by idealistic motives
and even during the period of
aliyah, when the main
dri ing fi
and distr ... many were
inic yearnings
an -i 1 always a leaven-
ing of ideali it .
Aliyah has been an almost
uninterrupted process ever
- ics the crushing of Jewish
resistance by the Romans, but,
says the Encyclopaedia Judaica,
the term has been used parti-
cularly in connection with the
modern Jewish return to the
Land of Israel. Five major
waves have been distinguished
during the period of Zionist n--
settlement.
The First Aliyah, 1882-1903,
consisted of individuals and
small groups. Some 25,000
mostly from Bast Europe
came in during the period.
The Second Aliyah, 1904-14,
consisted mainly of pioneers
from East Europe. The influx,
which totaled about 40,000 was
interrupted by the outbreak of
World War I.
The Third Aliyah, 1919-23,
issues And Answers..
Our Rabbis' Views
imunity Needs Unity
By RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
irector of Chaplaincy, Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Shall the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America
from the Synagogue Council of America?"
lis question has been a burning one during the past year
the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America
^to re-examine its relationship to the Synagogue Council of
pa and possibly withdraw from it.
R} help understand the implication of this-we should know
king about the nature of these organizations. The Synagogue
:il of America is considered the religious umbrella of the
srican Jewish community comprising the national rabbinical
klay organizations of the orthodox, conservative and reform
(fements. The UOJCA is the lay orthodox organization, the rab-
ll body being the Rabbinical Council of America. The con-
Jive lay group is the United Synagogue of America and the
iical group is the Rabbinical Assembly. The reform lay group
Union of American Hebrew Congregations and the rabbinical
is the Central Conference of American Rabbis.
lie cause of the re-examination was primarily due to the
lets in Israel between the orthodox and the non-orthodox con-
Ig the personal status of the individual; such as, who is a
Ivho shall have the right to perform conversions and other
[matters.
Fli addition, there has been and continues to be a philosophical
fersy within the orthodox community as to whether or not
jelon to organizations in which conservative and reform be-
|. Those who are against belonging feel that by belonging they
endorsement to the validity of these groups, thereby showing
conservative and reform Judaism are acceptable alternatives
1 orthodox Judaism.
I am extremely pleased that the UOJCA at its last national
[convention voted to remain in the Synagogue Council of America.
I believe that there has never been a time in Jewish history
the Jewish community needed "achadut"unitymore than
at the present time.
(With the critical threat to Israel's survival, with the threat of
Tlpon of 3,000,000 Jews in the Soviet Union, and with the
Jrability of American Jewry, the best insurance for over-
fa these problems is the strength that we draw from each
other. One need not compromise his beliefs and values by joining
with others of like minds to work on the manifold areas of com-
mon concern. We have our concern for Israel, our concern for the
Storing of a positive Jewish identity among our youth, our con-
Hfor the strengthening of our local Jewish community, our
Bncern for the promotion of the synagogue as a central oasis for
^rnTng and commitment.
It is only through the strength which each Jew gives to and
j from every other Jew that we will see a dynamic and vibrant
Irish community here and abroad that will perpetuate with pride
^r great Jewish heritage. ._.
lai
DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
which started immediately after
the War, contained many young
pioneers (halutzim). Over 35,000
arrived during this period.
The Fourth Aliyah. 1924-28,
which totaled some 67,000, con-
tained many middle-class olim,
over half of them from Poland.
Some four-fifths settled in the
main cities.
The Fifth Aliyah, 1929-39,
brought in over 250,000 Jews
and transformed the character
of the yishuv. A prominent part
was played by refugees from
Nazi Germany.
Aliyah continued during and
after World War II, totaling
about 100,000 in 1940-48. Un-
der British rule (1918-48) aliyah
was regulated by the Govern-
ment of Palestine. The official
criterion for the numbers ad-
mittea was, in normal periods,
the country's "economic absorp-
tive capacity," on which the
British authorities and the Jew-
ish leaders did not agree, but
in periods of crisis aliyah was
often halted or severely re-
stricted on nolitical grounds.
Between 1934 and 1948, some
115,000 olim were brought into
the country in defiance of Brit-
ish restrictions. While another
51,500 were interned by the au-
thorities in Cyprus and ad-
mitted only after the achieve-
ment of independence. This in
flux was described by the Brit-
ish as "illegal" immigration and
by the Jews as Aliyah Bet or
hapalah, the Judaica relates.
Independent Israel imme-
diately removed all restrictions
on aliyah and enacted the Law
of Return (1950), which guaran-
teed every Jew the right to
come in as an oleh and to be-
come a citizen immediately on
arrival.
The mass aliyah that follow-
ed the establishment of the
State assumed the character of
kibbutz galuyyot ("the ingath-
ering of the exiles"), almost en-
tire Jewish communities, such
as those of Bulgaria, Yemen,
and Iraq, being transferred to
Israel. Mass aliyah mainly
from eastern and central Eu-
rope, North Africa, and the
Middle Eastbrought in over
a million and a quarter in Is-
rael's first two decades, the in-
flux rising to its greatest
heights in 1948-51 684.000),
1955-57 (161,000) and 1961-64
(220,000). After the Six-Day
War of 1967 there was a con-
siderable increase in "volun-
tary" aliyah from Western Eu-
rope and the Americas, con-
cludes the Judaica.
9
CANDlELiGHTING TIME
20 SIVAN 7:47
GREAT JiWiSH PmONAWlS
Theodor Herzl: A Man
Who Dared To Dream
By RABBI ROBERT ORKAND
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
; Herd is ven (rated
by Jews th worl
modern Jewi
hood. Each y sar thousands ol
visitors to Israel climb up to
id stand by Herri's
tomb, from which on be
all that several generations of
Israelis have accomplished in
i land for which Herzl
dedicated the best years of his
life.
Amos Elon, the brilliant Is-
raeli journalist and author, re-
cently wrote a biography of this
modern Jewish hero.
How strange it is that we
should honor Herzl so. By tem-
perament he was an aristocrat,
but yet he became a populist
rouser of the masses.
By conviction he was a con-
servative, yet he initiated the
greatest Jewish heresy of the
19th century. He was con-
temptuous of democracy, yet he
const-ucted a Jewish parlia-
ment.
He was a profoundly pesimis-
tic man. yet he helped to mold
Eastern European Israeli pio-
neers into a movement of in-
curable optimists, fired by a
messianic dream of a new world.
Herzl was all of these things.
And, he was more. Elon. per-
haps for the first time, gives us
a glimpse of a sick and troubled
man who had a dream. His weak-
nesses make his achievements
that much greater. Almost sin-
glehandedly he built and sus-
tained a movement which, with-
in half a century, through a
modern migration of outcasts
and idealists, led to the estab-
lishment of the modern state of
Israel.
Herzl did not invent Zionism.
Others had done that before
him. What he did, however, was
to forge the instruments that
would put Zionism into practice,
for. as Herzl said, politics is the
development of power. From
nothing he created first an illu-
sion of that power, and then the
power itself later made it pos-
sible for he return of the Jews
to Palestine.
To understand Herzl one must
understand the age in which he
lived. It not easy today to con-
vey a correct impression of what
it really meant to be a Jew in
the 19th century-
In our own days the Nazi
holocaust has driven most Jews
to a kind of militant self-asser-
tion. In the late 1880's the op-
posite was true.
In Germany and Austria bare-
ly two decades had passed since
the Jewish emancipation. Hav-
ing just emerged from the se-
clusion of the ghetto, many
emancipated Jews were ex-
tremely self-conscious and un-
easy, like prisoners who had
suddenly emerged into broad
daylight after years in a dun-
geon.
Gentiles displayed an almost
RABBI ORKAND
the most intimate details of Jew-
ish life. Everywhere in the West
in the 1880's there was suddenly
talk of a Jewish "problem." It
was invented by those who
opposed the emancipation of
Jews on "moral" and "racial"
grounds.
The assimilated Jew like Herzl
was psychologically troubled be-
cause, having lost his Jewish
links, he was still denied the
equality he felt he deserved.
Jews were baffled and shocked
by the obsession with the "Jew-
ish problem." Should they react
to the attacks or ignore them?
Was it something they had
done? Herzl himself wrote that
if he were not such a coward
he would have converted to
Christianity.
For Herzl, the infamous Drey-
fus trial became the needed
"last straw." At first, like most,
Herzl thought Dreyfus guilty.
As he watched the growing
demonstrations directed against
Dreyfus, he suddenly sensed
that the whole of Western
Europe was being seized by a
wave of anti-Semitism. He final-
ly made up his mind to lead a
world-wide action on behalf of
the Jews.
Herzl's ultimate achievements
were amazing, considering the
man. Suffering from heart dis-
ease and venereal disease,
plagued by an impossible mar-
riage and an unnatural devotion
to his parents. Herzl was indeed
a tragic figure.
Bu' Herd had the audacitv to
become a statesman without a
country and without a people.
He walked a tightrope between
charlatanism and genius. In his
necotiations with kings, emper-
ors, and ministers of state he
took great risks: he had to con-
jure up an entire world of make
believe in piace of the real
power he lacked.
As we read of the life of this
troubled genius we realize that
Herzl epitomized nearly all the
ideal and dubious qualities often
attributed to the modern Jew:
imagination, showmanship, van-
it), irritability, relentless drive.
Utopian yearnings for the just
society, alienation, snobbery,
pride in Judaism, and Jewish
self-hat red.
He was all of these things.
And he was more. He was a
man who dared to dream and
who had the courage to work
pornographic curiosity about for the fulfillment of his dreams.


Page 12-B
-Jmisti fhrHktn
Friday, May 30, 1975
Bob Mifyualt
SCOTT SNYDER
Scon Andrew, son of Mrs.
Barbara Snyder and Sheldon
Snyder, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day, May 31, at Temple Emanu-
ilii.
The celebrant is a student at
Nautilus Junior High School,
where he is in the seventh
grade. An all-Star ice hockey
player in White Plains. N.Y.. fo-
two years. e-*ott is a msmb"
of the NnuHl'is ttn^is te im an I
was runn>-i;p in Dade Coun'v
tourti : doubles competi-
tion.
Sp^ci-i! pi .^>s sharing in t'i
festivities will include M\ and
Mrs. Marvin ResHn, Dr. n l
Mrs. Jack KupferbeT?. M"1-".
Boi is Rfss. Mm, Nat Con*'!
and Mrs H^roil BV in. D ',
Waife. Mr. and Mrs. Roh-t
SandW art'JiT-i-'mv. and Mr.
Sand Mrs. Morten Father.
6 tr it
RICHARD UNGER
Dr. and Mrs. Hush Uts^
will cdebrat- a doubl" Simcha
this wekenH. Their daughter,
Adrinn" w;M oheervo her p^t
Mitzvah Friday, May 30. during
the 8 p.m. sen'ios, and their
son, Richird, will be called to
the Torah ns a Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Mav 31, during the
8:30 a.m. Shabbit s-n-ices.
Adrienne and Richard are
students in Bth Torah's H*<-.
old Wolk Religious Scbml.
where thev are members of t'i->
Pre-Confirmation Class. Ad i-
enne is an eieVh grid" hon^r
roll student at John F. Kenn^dv
Junior High Schoil: Richard is
a seventh gr->de stuient thre
and a .member of the Boy
Scouts.
Dr. and Mr-q. Uneer will host
the On-s Sr">bb-tt Frid^' nis'n
and the Kid lush Saturday
mornin in honor of th" occa-
sion. Amonft the honored guests
will be Dr. and Mrs. Lo"is
Unger, Ms. Yvett" Ei-^ev of Mi-
ami. ani Mr. and Mrs. Elliot
Faller of Wood-nere. N'.Y.
.'r it -h
EVAN KINGSLEY
Evan ^'os'ie. son of Rabbi
and Mr. Ralnh P. Kingsley. will
be ca'ied to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturdav morning. Mav
31. at Temple Sinai of North
Dade.
A student in the Synagogue
School of Temple Sinai. Evan
is a seventh grader ?at John F.
Kennedy Junior High School,
where he has been on the prin-
cipal's honor roll and was re-
cently elected into the Junior
Honor Society.
The celebrant will conduct
the entire morning service. He
will chant the Torah portion as
well as the selection from the
Haftarah. His father, in addition
to being the rabbi of Temple
Sinai, is beginning a second
term as president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami and is secretary-treasur-
er of the Southeast Association
of Reform Rabbis.
Special gusts at the Bar
Mitzvah will be the celebrant's
grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Kingsley of Fort Lauder-
dale, and Mr. and Mrs. David
Schiffman of Longboat Key, and
his uncle and aunt, Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Schiffman of Res-
ton, Va. Members of Temple
Sinai have been invited to share
in the Kiddush hosted by Rabbi
and Mrs. Kingsley after the
service.
TODD MITCHELL
Todd Marlowe, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Melvin Mitchell, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah at Beth David
Congregation Saturday, May 31.
fhe celebrant is a seventh
grade student at Cutler Ridge
Junior High School, where he
is a member of the band and
the track team. He also swins
for the Shuler Winton Swim
Club.
-to SHEPARD EDELSTEIN
Sheoard. the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Edelstein. will b s
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday. May 31, at
Temple Menorah.
A seventh grade stvident :;t
the Heb'-ew Academy of Gre:"
Miami, the cehb-snt is captain
of the Safety PMrol.
'" 'pard's parents wi'l h.,>< >
..i-'-'vi n reception foil i
r' e j -\ ic 9 Saturday at Te
pie '' no .' '" are giving
him a special g;ft of a fin :
Tsrael th's summer in cekbra-
tion of th? oceasion.
D<\VID EISENMAN
David Samuel, son of M"-. al !
Mrs. Abraham H. Eisenman,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, May 31, at Temple
Beth Am.
David attends Palmetto .Juni-v
High School, where he has par-
ticipated in dramatic Dresen-
t^tions. A graduate of Beth
Am's Primarv Dav School, he
attends its religious school and
Hebrew School and is a member
of the "Beth Americans," a sing-
ing youth groun at the temple,
and has served as Cantor arH
as organist during Friday night
children's services. An accom-
plished organist, having studied
since he was seven, he is alsr
a member of Beth Am's Boy
Scout Troop No. 502.
The celebrant's parpnts will
host a Kiddush and luncheon
after the services Saturdav ir
the Grand Ballroom of King
Bay Countrv Club, featurin0
music by Billy Bellak and hi'
group.
Among the honored guestr
will be his cousins, Dr. and M
Fred Slater of San Jose. Calif.:
aunts and uncles Mrs. Ed Masci
and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rosin
Wilmington, Del.; Mr. and Mrs.
' :r Siisnnn and Mr, and Mrs
Sandy Susman, Miami: Mrs.
Joseph Kripke and family of
Birmingham, Mich.
a
ERIC PIVNIK
The 11:15 a.m. worship serv-
ices at Temple Judea Saturday,
May<31. will include the Bar
Mitzvah of Eric C, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Sheldon I. Pivnik.
& &
MITCHELL JAY KAUFFMAN
Saturday morning. May 31,
Mitchell Jay, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Buddy Kauffman, will be
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Ner
Tamid, in the main sanctuary at
8:45 a.m.
Mitchell is a student of Ner
Tamid Religious School and at-
tends Nautilus Junior High
School.
A Kiddush will follow the
services and a reception in
Mitchell's honor will be held at
the Embers Restaurant Satur-
day. Out of town guests will in-
clude his uncles Dr. and Mrs.
Sheldon Fruitman. David Fruit-
man and great uncle Abraham
Fruchtman. of Toronto. Canada.
6 if 4
The 10:45 a.m. worship serv-
ANDREW DIAMOND
ices at Temple Beth Sholom
Saturday, May 31. will include
the Bar Mitzvah of Andrew, son
Of Mrs. Ronnie Diamond and
J. Leonard Diamond.
6 a -fc.
ALAN PERLMAN
Alan, the son,of Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Perlman, will conduct the
11 a.m. Worship service and
read from the Torah Saturday,
May 31, at Temple Beth El, Hol-
Scott Snyder
Evan Kingsley Shepard Edelstein David Eisenman
lvwood. ing the Friday evening service
Pulpit honors will be accord-
ed Mr. and Mrs. Perlman dur-
to mark the occasion, and Mrs.
Perlman will bless the Sab^'-i
Al. ivauffman
tapers. The Oneg Shabbat ar.
flowers will be sponsored I
the celebrant's parents.
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern Given
Year-Lomr Sabbatical Le
in accordance with ;" 8
ment made with Rabbi
H. St'jrn, t'1 "" of
Jacob C. Cohen Co-mi
S; nagogue has voted ti
hi n a vear of Sabbatical I
Dining his SabVrti :al. Rabbi
St-ni who r^cert'v observed
his 7-sr'i v ; in .t'i rabbjn it -
and his 20th v as ,-\>!ii"i
Beach spiritud t~T<->-. w'l L- -
tyre in Jerusalem at .an in: >-i
national scholastic enclave to
which 50 schol'-s hv* be?n in-
vited. They will deliberate on
matters of Jewish survival.
"Jming bis stay in Fsral,
Rabbi Stern will serve as the
rabbi of Congregation Star of
Jacob, which was found-d s~---
erl years ago bv Jacob C.
Cohen and Simon Ha nan.
A prolific writer. Rabbi StQ'i
will prepare his fifth and sixth
are
volums if Pp'.ponsum in 11.1a-
chi during '-i- Snbtoti il. -
viii be his 15th :>nj in'i b- '
ca Jewish philosophy and i
Th rabv,i v'"1 v ......"w '! in
r' ..... V--i nc \*iqni
pos which i:v"l in ri'-
binic jurisprudence '" "er the
co"r'-v nn in C n' "al A-" 'i'-,
wns invited to set up Ci*r
Rabbinic courts in Ccnt-l '
American counfies and train
th i^r->i -obis in complical id
religious laws.
Rabbi Stern will re*" m f> ';
nulpit here for thf High Hob'
Days, it was reported, and Ins
arranged for quaiifid rabbis to
substitute for !,im in the svm-
gogue and his other rabbinic
functions, including Kashruth
supenisions. during his ab-
sence.
Florida's Gov. Reubin Askew congratulates Rabbi and
Mrs. Mayer Abramowitz after Mrs. Abramowitz received
her Doctorate of Arts at the University of Miami com-
mencement. Dr. Abramowitz's major field is Soviet area
studies in which she has both a Master's of Art and Dip-
lomate Degree. Rabbi Abramowitz is spiritual leader of
Temple Menorah, Miami Beach.
JWV Post Participating In Friday Evening Services
In commemoration of Mem- NE 8th St.. Homestead,
orial Day Homestead Naranja
Post No. 384, Jewish War Vet-
erans of the United States of
America, will participate in the
8 p.m. Friday services at the
Homestead Jewish Center, 183
Past National Commandci
Jewish War Veterans Ainslee R.
Ferdie will be the guest speaker
His subject will be "Lest We
Forget.'' Xhe Oneg Shabat will
be hosted by Post No. 384:
I MARINE SCIENCE
CO-ED 13-18
SCUBA SNORKELING LAB SESSIONS
SAILING ARTS & CRAFTS CANOEING
UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY
Scwntisls frcm leading Oceancgfopbk Univ., Gov't. Agen-
ties, and Industries parlicipote. Compeis explore Atlantic
CXeon and Gulf ol Mexico.
located en Big Pine Key, Flei:oV
Accredited by the AVnetken CompH>g Acoc.
Wmtl: SFACAMT CAIU
7JCN. 3.tS.M*,. florid.33J3*. (30S)751U0
RABBI TIBOR H. STERN
Democratic Club Meeting
The Democratic club o. Mi-
ami Beach will meet Wednes-
day at 8 p.m. in the Zodiac
Room of the Delano Hotel. The
program will feature Apne
Meyer, hostess of a Sunday
night radio show, and Al Good-
man, the "Warlock Wizard." A
question and answer period
will be moderated by the club'sJ
president. W-dlv Cluck. '
Y.
sp
wi
iat
at*
i
~?vi
r
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
I
Nationally Known
Manufacturer!...
MNE DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER B4.FNOS.
DORWIN'S
1572 WASHINGTON AVI
532-4061

".**


:
be End, Dietetics Seem to be Just as Important as H omiletics
IS so much about unemployment, crime,
I. in Ihe papers. We searched the other day to
could find something positive and cheering,
long search, we found a sentence, strangely
F>in a story about military arms. It told of Is-
(king its own first jet plane, built on the
an model with improvements of their own,
the sentence which gave us a lift said that it
^uill at half the cost of the American jet plane.
[This is really the first great blow at inflation
heard of. To be sure, it is perhaps to be
tthat Israel should have exceptional success
pr dealing with things in tne air. Was it not
first predicted that man would rise like
|on wings? And re we not supposed to be
eople?
zyLJrt via
<~5ch w
artz
BLT IF the cost of jet planes can be cut in half,
who knows maybe Israel can go further and perhaps
cut the cost of a sandwich the same way.
The sandwich is named after Lord Sandwich, a
British peer of the 18th century who loved his cards
so much, he had his lunch brought to him in the
form of a piece of meat between two slices of bread,
to spare him the need of stopping his card game. But
Jews were the first in "fast foods" with matzos.
THE BIBLE tells us of their origin. Pharoah had
given the Israelites a promise that they might leave,
but the Israelite1! then as today didn't take much
stock on Egypt's promises.
They knew that if they didn't get out at once, the
Egyptians would change their minds, the United Na-
tions would back them up and their cause was hope-
less. If they stopped to make bread, thov were lost.
So thev made mat/.o which required little baking.
JEWISH WOMEN could become rabbis and per-
haps it would be as well if they did, but that is not
to say it would be more important. We think the
Purim Hamantashen convey the message of that holi-
day as well as the rabbi's sermon. Dietetics is as im-
portant as homiletics.

^Ctlloi
i Calls Jews
Endangered Species
G Orthodox rabbi, describing Jews as an endangered
| has "proposed that every Jewish couple have be-
pnd five children "not only to maintain our num-
Ho increase our numbers."
fc-o^osal was made bv Rabbi Norman Lamm of New
m > Mr*sfl to *n mstifte on the changing Jewish family
[,bv the Jewish Family and Chilcfren's Service in Mil-
>*mntad in a telephone interview with the Jew-
ipNc Asency.
LAMM also diseased, both in Mt1w*nVee and at
i. the owlfattve n*cts of Jewish Hfe Anm
" t a hm^hon of th Commission on Synagogue
f* New Yo-v Federation of Jewish Philanthropes.
ft""'1 <-t~r>s n e-,n ...- ncded for "S r<^-> hi 'nation
K-p'ion of the shaky, fractured Jewish family."
-' *ist dfmooranhrs qln','" olac* at f.l children
a ,v-" Btmhw needed to maintain a grotio. He said
Hples should have between two and three children to
H>' Jewish nonulation and another one or two chil-
-e Its increase.
E present time, he declared. American Jews ha"e
only 7ero nonulstjor| oro'vth but > ^"mo^ranhic
Irhich places our future under a miagtinn mark."
be young Jews have argued that "if we preach pop-
rol to the rest of the world, then we are morally
an example by limiting our own families."
)-t"-d that argument, asserting tb-it it isnored "an-
il :-^f),fjvp of far more compelling urency." the
vHrU "tH^t "11 sn*dw should be pr^s^^'ed and
to vanish." If the United States is committeed to
tr*"n of th American buffalo and the American
"'sail!, why not "to important groups in the human
FROM "a purely universal humanistic lieitnectlve."
ht0d. "w are nnHr femenlnus ohliw-ition to oreser"e
mk Tw>"^i for <-;- Pi-rnHnn that can be done only by in-
itpg our rorulation growth."
ftl....., tr.\* ?, pHrarion NaoHuhM tnRt "'n tn ***"
E femilv ]jf o- -(n ihnt w. woiiM like it to be." there must b th<* ele-
f lo<-. n commitment "to a transcendntal ideal:" a
prtion r' ts.. f,.ai;iv'r.o rol bv "arents;" and grandparents
will be honored and cherished."
SAID the American Jewish familv "desneratelv ned"
i r>* part of the family to sere as "living *-M*b
^H*' He call-d unfortunate th" fact that, in or-sent-div
parents generally live far frorri children and grand-
-ing ur> in the presence of grandoarents does some-
... consciously but powerfully for voung peoDle." he as-
"It gives them a sense of continuity. They are unconsci-
jjressed with the awareness that the world was not
with their parents or with them, but that they are
t-,latest link in a long chain extended way back into his-
ORTHODOX scholar said a home in which grandpar-
: loved, honored and respected is one in which, "more
. not, parents will succeed in winning the respect and
frown children." The stability of the American family.
Ti for expanding it beyond a two-genertion home
least a three-generation home."
>.tional Jewish family, he decalred. it is Judaism
Fthe set of "goals, values nd ideals that transcends
members of the fmily." and which inckicates in
&f"duties over rights and self-restraint over self-
y-.'./, iy7.s f.jmitfnrridliiaHn P??? 13-3
rdebert
K^cactl
Israel, India Relations
Are Not Very Good at AH
RUMBS OF comfort are hard to find for the
14,000 Jews of India now that Prime Min-
ister Indira Gandhi has granted full diplomatic
status to Yasir Arafat's Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The diminutive size of the Jewish commu-
nity of India gives that minority group no hope
at all for diluting the new courtship of India
by the PLO. Indeed, India's press, inclined to
liberalism because of the nation's long and
galling fight to shake free of British domina-
tion, has generally praised the alliance.
AND ARABS everywhere are taking heart
from the new partnership, marking the first
time a non-Arab and non-Communist govern-
mnt has granted diplomatic recognition to Ara-
fat's band of marauders.
Only when India went out of her way to bar
Israel from participating in a top-flight inter-
national table tennis tournament did the press
show annoyance about deterioration in India's
relations with Israel.
For India's government to stoop so low as
to politicize a sports event proved too much
for tne Hindustan standard of Calcutta: "Why
slam the uoor on Israel?" the editor asked,
acutely aware of the fact that New Delhi con-
tinued to maintain trade relations with Israel.
AMERICA'S NEW ambassador to India, the
unpredictable William B. Saxbe, pointedly ex-
pressed his astonishment at Prime Minister
Gandhi s shocking grant of recognition to Ara-
s,
euntottr
V

XiU
man
1 RONALD J. MOORE, a Jesuit, undertook to
explore the religious thought of Martin
Buber and its significance for modern religious
institutions in "Martin Buber: Prophet of Re-
ligious Secularism" (Philadelphia, Jewish Pub-
lication Society, $6.00, 284 pages).
Buber is known by most as a devotee of
Hasioism. the philosophy of I and Thou, and
the merning of Judaism. The central theme of
Buber's thought is the essential oneness of
the Thou spoken between man and man and
the Thou spoken between man and God. Jesuit
Moore was a pupil of Maurice Friedman, the
outstanding expositor of Buber's writings.
FRIEDMAN, in the foreword, advances two
reasons for the importance of the book. First,
it represents an advance in Jewish-Christian
ecumenical dialogue with originally initiated
Buber's revolutionary influence on Christian
thought which Christianized his philosophy in
the process by having Jesus become the Thou
instead of the non-anthromorphic God of Ju-
daism.
Second, Moore, instead of appropriating
Buber for Christianity, reversed the former
process of "baptizing" Buber ar.J lets his
Christianity h; modified by Buber.....
"QUMRAN STUDIES." by Chaira Rabin of
fat. The people of India have "no better friend
in the world than the Jewish community in the
United States," Ambassador Saxbe said. "I
know this for a fact. But this romance with
the PLO is going to turn off a lot of them."
Mr. Saxbe, an old friend of Mrs. Gandhi,
has characterized relationships between Wash-
ington and New Delhi as a grudging mutual
respect at best.
Leaving India recently before Mr. Saxbe
took over, Pat Moynihan touched on yet an-
other aspect of India's new position in a world
of bristling rivalries and heavy armaments:
Having just last year become the sixth mem-
ber of the circle of nations boasting nuclear
power, India is in stronger stance than many
realize.
NUCLEAR ENERGY, then, is expected to
become India's paramount strength. Monozite
sand, source of the ore of thorium, is one of
the huge nation's richest resources. Now at
center stage because it is radioactive, thorium
is extremely valuable to India as the nations
of the world gamble for highest stakes in the
race to advance the nuclear reactor process.
Although Canada and Brazil both are rich in
Thorium. India boasts 60 percent of the world's
supply. And at a time when fissionable mate-
rial is of primary importance, thorium-rich
India can play rough games in the planet's
race to what may prove total destruction.
Some Jewish Sources,
Philosophy and Mitzvot
the Hebrew University, (New York, Schocken
books, a>3.9;5, 151 pag.-s) is a series of essays
delivered in England. The thread that holds
them together is the attempt to test an alter-
native to the theory that the Dead Sea Scrolls
emanate from the Essene community.
The author connects the Scrolls with Pha-
riseeism and, in the course of doing so, he
distinguishes between Phariseeism and Rab-
binic Judaism as represented by Tannaitic lit-
erature
Rabin's thesis also embraces the theory that
the Qumran community continued the "ha-
burah" of the first century B.C.E. He also dis-
cusses Islam and the Qumran sect. The book
is scholarly and important. .
"THE MITZVOT: Ihe Commandments and
their Rationale," by Abraham Chill (New York,
Bloch Publishing Co., n.p., 503 pages) is a
necessary addition for every Jewish home.
Kaboi Chill has taken the mitzvot contained in
the Pentateuch and supplied digests of the
leading commentaries and sources in which
they are discussed.
Tlie following is an abbreviated illustra-
tion: "Lending Money to the Needy."
First there are the four sources in Exodus
and Deuteronomy. These are followed by ex-
tions of the thoughts contained in the
s iuk
...



fmm :
+ jFi$tnrrr*&r
Friday, May 30, 19-5
Obituaries

-
-
frtcnosvMp..
~ .". Z '. A ~.~S~Z- ~ 1 A 0
-: ;*;? ::.s- =_:= ;*
-. = .=-- ..ss :~ : s
: :-: -i: ": *
; : r : "-> r ia
mcl.- :n :- *= '-,c
... ..
:
k i>
PAXMEj)?
IMOflUKXT COMPA.VY i 1
4444T2I 4444R2


*
. -
' -

IW

- .
-
- -x -
it-
. ji -

IKAl laOTtCI
S-~ CE OF ACTION
-;..-=. .-.- E = .'CE
.. PROPERTY
.. '. s '. COt RT or TH|
_."- ILOlCIAL C RCUIT
. '.: pop
dade ::.-'
t *'-" ''-
;- -.. for 0 .-',--
gr w*p= ACE
7 "H
-
address
-
-
- --
-
-, ; ted




GELB
MONUMENTS INC
past Ever; Bay Cases' Saaaatt
J40 SW 57rh Aveaawe
PKoo- 266-2SM
-

Ok* ..<; y
- art
- ia i
- -
-
A
: A
'. .
M-i= 3. .- r ------"
---
LEVITT
Memorial Chapel
s
LOCAL AND O'jT 0#* aTATB
s -~e c c. cc-jirr 0* thi
e_e.es-- .z : -. =:. -
~.--~-,-z- c : =
c> D e ::_.-
= = : = i- -. ;
. S* O. i::-: =
proba-f nc rj :__
949-6315
TOM W 0*1 HWY, N W
&ZtgmS6fy*S
865-2353
73a &>> f* >
.'- ce c- :>-;
THE S-a-e OF f,_c Da
- .
si &
-tsw to b*
'-' f sa. 4
- '.". :! *-_ _r>>-
'-"- *-4 C-.rt T>. ar* autuy
V-* -
asoa-.hs frosc tie date if Hm
-
fc aa*4 Cvur* erW sr -.-* -:_.-
you ca avr.,i6 'A ia-9 '*
----..-.
tsessid ts,: iu4 u-.-
. I CkJuVt
B ~
i
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SCHWARTZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13335 We* D.x> Highway
In New York:
f212. 263-7600
Queens Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hittf,N.Y.
LEfsAA KOTKE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUEMOAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR OAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 7S-1SSW
In re the oanut of
MA (UK BBMSEH
FUiatKf
BTAM.BY KKM8EM
and
KB\T.KL.T ZEIXu
D>rxtentii.
NOTICE Or ACTION
TO: STANIJJT REM3KN
RBSJUKNCK i;-.k:. Y'it; ARC NOTIPTEO THAT a Pt-
Utloa f' > n filed concernfna your marriar*
and roo ra reaulrd to serve a >-'.i/T
of vour written reon*- or 'l-f-rie.
If aay. to nald Petition on Attorney
K''-i eviil who Blr4
!(' .!. P.O. i'-'ii M7SM. Miami I
Ida MISS, on or tx
and fn> the orlafcnal wl'h *r>e 'nerlt
Of thla Court effhar I
i '.nr'>, attorney or mm-ll-
. thereafter: otherwiw; a default
will b entered for the r'-:.ef demand'
ed in the Petition.
d aaal ot
thin Com -:-
RICHARXJ P i
An i
By NED
An Dei>ui > hark
S/3* 1'6-13-M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Or FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 75-33M
In Re Estate of
ALBERT 8TRABBEBO
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To A'.I Onatttora and Al! Peron
Harinc Claim* or Demand* Acair.'-t
BbM Batata:
Y'/o are herehr notified and re ed to urerent any r!a:m and de-
mand* whirjr you m^v have ara %-:
toe estate of AI^ERT STRASBERn
daceaaad late of Dad* Coanty. Flor-
ida, to th< Clf u t Judee* of Dade
COaartr. and file the iluoli-
'ate a- TSS.K.
Btatatea. In th*:r <'fi(-e In
COHTtlMNttM
Florida, within n
fr m the tin
ion hereof, or \- ame will
'< harr^d
ai Miami. V
!.-,% May a f. 1*71
VIROINIA
A BXi I!
.,
'.. i'.uxkin
! -' atria
M7 Lil i: I ,
/
-
-

* ~-E C'RCk. "c:.=tofthe
-?.=-- --C : *_ C RCL "
OF F.OP'DA s t.",z FOR
DAOE CCS-
P03A- o :
probate no 74.ms7 p-.?-
;a ~-
HOf IE BF S'E-.T:OS TQ
< A = =. CAT ON FOR
C ITR .- ON xso F'NAL
D'SC"ARGE
'-:--
^- -:--.--, ... f,, ..
lec*ed
'- -aae. 1TS.
r-.tr a Ckxaat
- Plonda -
Ruaort i.-rl I -
'--'"-' a hanre as
A :nmtrair.i eMate of the
This ZStk day
' Mai
iATH-U --orfSRTS MOSIJJCH
PBTLO? ..:?;:. Attorney
. loPonr : .
S-M '(-13-M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUO'C'AL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-tttW
NOTICE OF PLBLICATION
IK RE The Mirrr of
rtEf>RVK MINTL'BX.
Petitioner,
and
MARIE D MINTL'R-V.
TO: MARIE D MINTUBJ*
iji Madieoa Avenue
amira. New York :mi
TOC ARE HEREBY .VOTIFTED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed aaalnst voa
and you are required to serve a coot
of v.tir writi^n defeie .t any. to it
on liROVEK CIMENT WEINSTELt
.vi.'BER PA attorney* for P.-
-r. to the attesttor. of EDWARD
M K(jCH ESQ of said law firm, oe
or before the 1st day of Juiv. 1STS:
otherwise a default win b* entered
aaalnst vou for Die relief demanded
in the Pet.:
Thin notice nhall be Dublished onee
each week for four weeks
JEWISH FLORID1AN
WIT hard and 'eal of
-'urt at Miam. n this
day of Hay i7S
HARD P BRINKEB

1 i
A'
'
S'STEIX
BBR PA.
-' AI Hoad
Miam I
-
' '' M KOCH
rot the Una
S/tt C<-l!.2a
S ~tZ t RCL T COU RT Of-E
E-E.E-.-- .U0 C *. C RCL ~
CF FLORIDA IN AND FO"
DADE COUNTY
PCBATE DVSXN
PROBATE NO. 72J9
'iM Er%are c'.
ttt-
NOTICE OF HJsTENT ON TO
W"E A=e>LiCA- OS FOR
z s"= 2_- os asd final
d ;:**pge
S -~ E -r that T
I -- P-:.-
- '. t -
t :ate of
I
r
w.B XBtiy -4 H
."adr- Dade o;
' said Mini
.-.-. rae a*
i*tau
decedent This ISCk lav -;
--
- '
IMN'T STEINsTEIX
P A
-
-' Art -- Ifrei riad
v: -,~
- .:
s --E C'RCUIT COURT OF ThE
ELEVENTH JUO'C'AL C'RC. T
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COLSTV
PROBATE D'V'SiON
JOSEPH NESB'TT
PROBATE NO- 75-133-*
[AX I IEBERMA N'
MOT CE TO CREDITORS
As Acafnat
E--ate:
-
..... ml it-
H
dereaJH I ate f --
'.x -" u. la --- -
Florida 81
i"
rfthir x --alendar
- front thi nm. thi flral
- hereof, or the same -a:!I
n Miam F nda tl _"--.
I :. .--
H' 'WARD D \N
DOKAXD LIEBERMA.N
Al Ei- u
J f this notice on
'. II tl
r... ott Harris
I-ooe* ic Hams
Attorney f..r Executsrs
Suite :). Roberts Huiidinr
Z! West Flaaler Street. Miami. Kfta,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN' that
uraed. drsinne to enrage
In busir.ess under the fictitious name
KRAFTT I_\DY at 7S95 S.W. T.lrd
Miami intends to reeister said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
' Bf Dade Countv. Florida
BARBARA ZOHLJIAN
5 34 '6-13-20
STATE OF FLORIDA
__DEPARTMENT OF STATE
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
m The Nisne And By The Authority
Of The State Of Plorida
.11 AJ-L. TO WHOM THESE PRE-
SENTS SHALL COIE. GREETINGS
A r.erea>.
MARX M FABER
ABE RT.-DXER M,Ai!I- FLOBJDA
HELEN WEIXTRAV1^1- F^RiDA
a.a .... MIAMI. FI.OR1DA
did on the th dav of January. AD.
i2 cause to be incorporated under
f7-%^*i .f.it* Sta,e "' Florida SIX
S:rrA-NS? >KPORATIOX a cor-
poratioi. with ita arlndoaJ place of
'h, St* -- "f. f 1 whereas
TTJoratir:. e ,:th .
.use to be
Denartaaaat
Florida. ;he
required un-
la Statutea.
- f such ..or-
rv of State
aat be .- rausfled that the re.
have beet? co5-
hand and the
Slat. Pi. rida.
iDital. this
- ate
-la)
UwAl MOTia
-

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATP
PRELIMINARY CERTiFICA-c
CORPORATE D SSOLi
In The ?. e A'd B Tn* Au:---
Of The State Of W
TO ALL TO *OM TME5E Po
SEN'S SHALL COME. GREE~
MI.'
MIAM."
MIAM
--
-


r .* dlsab .


ouir r
. .--..'.aasee. th-
:, V,-. A :
?MJ
-etary of 8
I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
OF BULK TRANSFER
Pursuant V FV-r..: ". s.
.
be trade a: Law Offieea
HITE ian AJfr-i I
M >mi Plonda
Rr.FA IN
- 75
eror. < hose Uswisim sc
i .-,.--..- ;ti Str:
y : \-
-:-:ph f k
I anners
-
Florida
- [ to
-
they fn

.?
H
haPont Bui
- before June >.
Dated at Miami. Plonda. t.1- -
-:ph f kolb
. si sferee

. -
RT P. v.'HITE
il BanM -.
-da 331JI
OF
' 't \ I "
01 1''
1 '' EJ ?
1 I <
1
?
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF "-E
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCL OF
FLORIDA IN A.NO FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO T4-4111
IN P.E Estate
.ann:
notice of intention tc
make application for
distribution and final
d'scharge
-al Report and p-
and Final Dssthai

:-: DB OfOVAXXl
at on the list day .->f lull
lOPhr to the Honorable i
- of Dade Countv. Florida r
approval of said
and final discharr- <
: i.oedent This -
f Mai
PH DE John Adntnleti
EB a 8CHREIBER
Barry D Schreiber
' rney
- K. iO-Ird Street
Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
Tel: :-;-;-.:
5 30 S/f-11-SO
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
I herehv cvrtify that BEl'I' IN "
araa on the 5th dav of JULY
cornoratad under the uasri
State of Florida, with Ita or
olnce of business at MIAMI BEACH
1 further rerllfr that the abov
noration filed in this office on the
20th day of .MAY. 1975. No-
Intent to Voluntarily Dissolve under
Section r.OS.27. Florida Statutes.
GIVEN under mv hand and the
Qreal Seal of the State of Fliri is.
at Tallahassee, the Capital, this
the 20th dav of MAY
HRlVE A SMATHERS
Secretary of State
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
(Seal of the State of Florida)
5/30/75
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
J. GWYNN PARKER
PROBATE NO. 75-3452
In RE: Estate of
IRMA ASHER.
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Havirur Claims or Demands Aaainst
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
auired la present anv claims and de-
mands which you mav have against
the estate of IRMA ASHER. de-
ceased late of Dade Countv. Florida,
to the Circuit .Tudres of Dade Coun-
tv. and file the same in duplicate and
as provided in Section 733 16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in th i"oun-
irthouse in Dado County Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
f- r the same will be barred
Filed al Miami. Florida, this 17111
day of May. AD.
I.EO AI V1N ASHER JR
JAYNK W ASHER
A- l.v. ntora
r irst publication of this noti"' "i
the 3-'th dav of Mav 1J75
SPARBER. ZEMEU
BROXXER IXD KARP. P.l
\ecutors ,
Suite 3151. 1 SB M Ave .
Miami. Fla. 33131
*-

I
tt^
0


IFriday, May 30, 1975
*Jm idi Fkridictn
Page 15-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
XdTICB is HEREBY GIVEN that
., U||d ring to engage in
us name '
,. i VCTORY Bt 1406 \V. 41-ih
Hialeah Intendi to register said
niii, the Clerk of the Circuit
, i ,,!' | lade 'ounty, Florida.
INTERNATIOXA1 FRAME
\\|i MOLDING d 'RPl 'RATION
5 16-21-10 6
'in THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-15311
NOTICE BY PUBLICATON
|\ i:i: THE MARRIAGE OF
BiLEXA a i-'i ENTES FKEOBAU.
Petll loner.
|l(i IBERT FKEGEAU.
K.-SllOllllCI.I.
VOl' Respondent. rtOBERT PRE-
.;i:.M ARE HEREBY NOTrFIED
Til FILE > our Written ri-siion.se to
his .<. : i 11 for dissolution of nwrl-
witli the Clerk of thn above
Court, and serve, a copy uuon Peti-
Attorneys. VON ZAMFT &
I SMITH, Sim.- MO, 1320 South Dixie
Highway, Coral Cables, Florida 33146.
or before the 2Ulh day of June.
-;'.. else the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage "Hi he taken as con-
fessed.
DATED: -MAY 13. 1D76
ItlCHARD P. DRINKER
By: H F Ml'SCOHELLA
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
5'16-23-30 C/
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3302
J. GWYNN PARKER
In RE: Estate of
S Ml.UI KTfRTZ
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Bavins c-i.ms or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are herehv notified and re-
Quired to present any claims and de-
mand* which you may have against
lie estate ..f SARAH KI'RTZ deeeas-
. cl late of Hade County. Florida, to'
i In Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and
.,- provided in Section 733 16. Florida
Siatutes. in their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
lime of the firs' publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 21st
da.V of May. AD. 197.'..
LOUIS I'OI.STEIN
As Administrator
First publication of this notice on
'. the 28rd day of Mav. 1975.
\ Alan I'inkwasser
uiorncv for Administrator of the
Cstate of Sarah Kurtz
::47l S.W !>7th Court. Miami.
Florida 3:1176
6/30 6/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-3288
In HE: Estate of
Herman Medow *
11, .,.,.((
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims nr Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are herebv notified and re-
onired to present snv claims and de-
mands uhich vou mav have against
Hie estate of Herman Medow de-
ceased lite of Dade County. Florida.
to the Circuit Judges of Dade Coun-
tv. and f'lp the same In .'mllos"> and
as provided in Section 733.16. Florida
Siatutes. in their offices in the Ooun-
iv Courthouse In Dade County. Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 21st
.day of May. AD. 1975.
DR. AARON MEDOW
As Executor
[First publication of this notice on
""th day of Mav. 1975.
lidln, Kothenberg. Kogan It
Kornblrrm
Zev W Kogan
Itnrnev for Pr. Aaron Medow
|n Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach. Fla.
5/30 6/6
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
In the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit
of flor'da. in and for
dade county
civil action no. 75-16r?0
.4eral jurisdiction division
action for dissolution
of marriage
IV l!E- The Marriaire of
DUERT R. RITTER.
Pet It loner /Husband
and
DELE K HITTER.
Respondent 'Wife
: ADEI.E K. RITTER
209 Carlisle Pike
, Me. hanicsburg. Pennsylvania
17055 _
ARE HEREBV NOTIFIED
,. action for Dissolution of Mar-
has been filed against vou and
i required to serve a copy of
Itten defenses. If any. to It on
. M. GONSHAK. attorney for
.ner, whose address is 1497
Ith Street. Miami. Florida 3312a.
Be the original with the clerk
i above si vied court on or be-
Ulv 7. 1975: otherwise a default
ft- entered against rou for the
[demanded In the complaint or
notice shall be published once
veek for four consecutive weeks
rE JEWISH FI.ORID1AN.
TNESS mv hand and the seal of
"court at Miami. Florida on this
[dav of Mav. 1975. _
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B. J. FOY
As Denutv Clerk
cuii Court Seal)
X> M nn.NSHAK _
EW. 7th Street ^
Jk Florida 33125- 642-0722
Mtornev for Petitioner
6/30 6/6-13-20
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE no. 74-4758
IN RE: Estate of
LILLIAN Hi IOVER
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBU-
TION AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given thai I have
(tied a Final Report and Petition for
and Final Dlscha
Exi .,'. -.....-state of i.n LIAN
it"" i \ ER, -id i .i-i-i. and thai on the
21rd day of June. 1975, will apply to
thi Honorable Circuit Judges of Dade
County, Florida, for approval of said
Final Report and for distribution and
final discharge as Exi utor ol the
estate of the above-named decedent.
Tins 38rd day of May. 1975.
CILRERT G MARBEY. EXECUTOR
I AW OFFICES IF
Kl'RT WELLI8CH
161 Almerla Avenue, Bult< i
Cora! Gables, Florida 33134
Attorney
.-. _':i-.'!0 6 ''-13
No. 445-70.'.4__________ ____________
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in I'usiiu-ss under the ftotltlous name
of Aquarius Cleaner Service at STB
E 49th St.. Suite No. 2. Hialeah, Fla.
intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
JOSE GARCIA50*
JOSE PADRON50-;i
Harvev I>. Rogers
11.4 N.W. 17th Avi.. Miami
Attorney for Applicant
_________________ 5/23-30 6'6-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Vaughn's Professional Services at
1K522 SW 1"2 Ave.. Miami Intend to
register said name with the Clerk ol
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Ronald and Frances Vaughn
5/23-30__ I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-16014
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IV RE: THE MABRIAOE OF
PAMELA LYNN CARTY.
Petitioner.
GLENN CHRISTOPHER CARTY.
Respondent.
VOl' Respondent. GLENN CHRIS-
TOPHER CARTY ARE HEREBY' NO-
TIFIED TO FILE your written re-
sponse to this uotlon for dissolution
of marriage, with the Clerk of the
above Court, and serve a copy upon
Petitioner's Attorneys. VON ZAMFT
A SMITH. 1320. Suite 850 South Dixie
Highway. Coral Gables. Florida 33146.
on or before the 27th day of June.
1975. else the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage will be taken as con-
fessed.
HATED: MAY 18. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: H. F. MI'SCORELLA
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
_______________________l/M-at 6'6-13
IN THE CIRCUIT. COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-1570$
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
lii Re The Marriage Or
MARIA T. ARTEAGA. wife
and SOCRATES A, ARTEAGA,
husband.
TO: SOCRATES A ARTEAGA
Carmen No. 175 Entre Suoos
v Heredla
Vlbora. .Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against vou and vou
are hereby required to serve a copy or
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition on -he Wife's Attorney. LET-
TER ROGERS, whose address is 1454
N W 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida 33125.
and file the original with the Clerk
of the above styled Court on or before
this 27th day of June. 1975. or a De-
fault will be entered against you.
DATED this tstb dav '-. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By B. J. FOY
Deputy Clerk
_______ 6/23-30 6/6-1*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
INSCO INSURANCE AGENCY at 5820
SW 13th Street. Miami. Florida intends
to register said-name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dado County.
Florida. _____
ZAC LOCIO
6820 S.W. 13th Street. Miami. Florldu
6/16-23-30 /
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-3137
In RE: Estate of
ANNA MAIZUS A/K/A
ANNA AI.PERT
deceased.
NOTICE TO'CREOITORS
To All Creditors* and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and reouir-
ed to present anV claims and de-
mands which vou may have against
the .state of ANNA MAIZUS A/K/A
ANNA AI.PERT deceased late of
Dade Countv. Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade Countv. and file the
same in duplicate and as provided In
Section 733.16. Florida Statutes. In
their offices In the- County Courthouse
in Dade County. Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida .this 21st
dav of May. A.D, 1-975.
JACK 11 SAPPHIRE
As Adminstrator
First publication of this notice on
the 23rd day of Mav. 1975.
UW OFFICES OF
AINSLEE R FERDIE
Attorney for Estate
717 Pence de Leon Blvd./Suite 215
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
5/23-30
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JL'D'CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISO CTIPS' DIVISION
- CASE NO: 75-16199
IN RE: Tl Mi
P GAMMON,
l
vs.
J( IYCE IRENE 0 VMMON,
Ream nd< I
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
11 li I CE IRENE GAMMON
181u Jay Circle, Al artment "A"
.i-
VOl ARE HEREBY notified that
an a :. for l>: solution of Marriage
n filed against vou and you
i .i ed to i en r opy of s our
defei -. if any, to ii on
MARV \ A SHEPPARD, Attorney*
for JAMES P HA tl IN IN, Pel
address i.- 9130 S.W. "-Till Ave
nui. .-ii ti li::. Miami. Florldu .
and lil< th.....Iginal with the Clerk
..: ove at) led i 'ourt on or before
7iii dav oI June. 1973; othera Iss
b Default "ill i.....ntered agalnsl w>u
for the relief demanded In the cona-
i
hi ii. e shall be published once
a week for 14) consecutive weeks in
the Jewish Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
Court at Miami. Florida, this 20th
dav of May, 1975,
RICHARD BRINKER.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bl BEVERLY LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
(Court ;,eal)
HERBERT 7. MARVIN, for the firm
Ol Marvin & Sheppard
9150 E W *7th Avenue. Suite 101
Miami. Florida 33176
Phone: 279-0730
3. i:t-an 6/6-13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE .COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURSDICTIOn' DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-16162
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
Will IE J HARDEN, husband
and PATRICIA ANN HARDEN, wife
TO: PATRICIA ANN HARDEN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Pv.ttlon for Dissolution of Mammce
has been filed against vou and you
are hereby required to serve a copv
of your answer or other pleading to
the Petition on the husbands Attor-
ney. ARTHUR W KARI.ICK, whose
address is 1454 N.W. 17 Avenue. Mi
ami Florida 3312.'.. and file the original
with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 27th dav of
June. 197". or a I'.-fault will he en-
tered against you.
DATED 'his 20th day of Mav. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By NED ROSFViiERi-j
5/23-30 6/6-1S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION-
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-3201
In RE: Estate of
LOUIS MEYERS
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
ouired to present any claims and de-
mands which vou may have against
the estate of IXJUIS MEYERS decc :.s-
ed late of Dade Countv. Florida, to
the Circuit Judges of Dade Countv.
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.16. Florida
Statutes. In their offices in the Comitv
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from tha
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 19th
dav of May. A.D. 1975.
MURRAY MEYERS
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 23rd dav of Mav. 197".
SHAPIRO. FRIED, WEIL &
BCHBER
Attorneys for Estate of
I OUIS MEYER. Deceased
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach. Florida 13111
:, _'::-:io
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOHN R. BLANTON
PROBATE NO. 75-3202
In RE: Estate of
ADOII'H H SCHATTMAN a'k/a,
A. H. SCHATTMAN
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are herehv notified and re-
aulred to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of AUOLPH H. SCHATT-
MAN a/k/H A. H. SCHATTMAN de-
ceased late of Dade County. Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate and as
provided In Section 733 16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida.
v.ithin four calendar mtmths from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred .
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 19th
dav of Mav. A.D. 1976.
SONY A S. SCHATTMAN
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the Wrd day of May. 1978
HARRY ZUKERNICK
Attorney for Executrix
4-> fll.ineoln Road. Miami Beach. H.
.-./23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Nt'TK E IS HKREI1Y GIVEN that
the undi-rsiKiied. desiring to engaue in
business under the fictitious name of
AUTO-KARE al JOOOO So. Dixie High-
way. Homestead. Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
nun Court of I'.oio County,
Florida.
FIX IT. INC.
Mac Mermell
1320 So. Dixie Highway. Coral Gables
Attorney for ADOlicant
i,23-30 6/6-13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIPCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COL'NTY. FLORIDA
NC 7! 'J'"
GENERAI JUR'SD'CT-ON DIVISION
NOT CE BY PUBLICATION
IN" RE: The marriage oi
Ji 'Si. iTK \, ,. .- i i .i,.
\\r-
and
JUS "BSTER.
Husband,
to ior w F.npTi i
den. unknown, are ge/iulred to file
v ii an ioii.. i. i,.... i. ;
lution of mar hk< \.. 11 the Cli I
the abo-. Courl and copy
upon HERMAN o (HEX, Esq .
622 S.\Y. '1st Strei m
33110, :ii irnej foi lie : met
wife, on or iiifoio June 10, 1375. or
elsi petition uill bi confe
Dat-d: May 8. I
RICHARD 1- BRINKER
Clerk, i In uii Coui I
By \\ II.I.IK BRADSHAW
Deput) Clerk
5 1-16-23-10
CIRCUIT COURT 1ITH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-14224
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: Till-' M VRR1 '':'- OF:
ALRERTE JENKINS.
RICHARD MAE DANIEL JENKINS
|-""'rcHARD MAI DANE1 JEN.
KINS RESIDENCE UNKNOWN, are
notified to serve -. conv ol
your Al -v-! 10 Iii I' BaOlUtll n of
Marriage filed agalnsl vou, upon
v. ornev, GEORGE NICHO-
,.!. \ \V 12th Avi nue.
I ,,, pim-lds 33116, and file original
A-ilh Clei I Jrl or 1 -i- -lime
, ii,, i u i ib. Petltli ii will
I.......'essi A b> vou
i, .: ii,.. .-ii day of May. 197a.
RICHARD I' BRINKER, I BRh
r.v : MARION NEWMAN
|..-pui\ Clerk
E/9-16-21-SA
NOTICE UNDLrl
FICTITIOUS NAME LW
NOTICE IS HEREB1 GIVEN that
the underslirned, deslr'.nn t-- enmure In
business under tlie rictllfous nnme of
PICKWICK BAR at 5S2S N.E. 2nd
Avenue. Miami, iui.-mis to reglsicr
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Cuiiiv. Florida.
DAVID HINDERAKER
S K-l(-2S-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCJIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNT/, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-14051
NOTICE OF SUIT FOR
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: IN THK ..lvt-^i' n
THE ADOPTION OF ELI MATA.
a Minor
TO: GAOTPew MAYA.^* ^-------
c o sara sisi 40| OCEAN
FRONT
VENICE. CALIFORNIA
VOU. OASTON MAYA, are hereby
notified that a Petition t...- Adontion
has been liled. and you are renutred
to serve a copy of your Answer or
Pleading to sai.i Petition for Adop-
tion on the Petitioners attorn.- Ron*
aid I. Da-vis, I..-.,. I'. ti: Riscayne
Building 1!' W Plurler Street, Mi-
am' Florida 21110 Phone: 379 8151,
and file the original Answer or Plead-
..._ n> ne ..in. e ,\ ib..- Cler.: of the
Circuit Court on or before ".he Ilth
rt-.*- i>f .iiir--. 197 If vou fall to do so.
judgment by default will be taken
against vou for the relief demanded in
to- Petition for Adoption.
THIS NOTICE shall be published
once each week for four I4> conecu-
eeks hi the JEWISH FI.ORI-
DIAN.
i.n.xE AND ORDERED al Miami.
Florida, this 12th dav of May. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court
l>a'l" Countv. Florida
Bv: B. J. FOY
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Curt Seal!
D <>-lfi-23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY CLOPIO*
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE Nu. 7S-1?8'0
NOTICE OF SUIT
EDGAR COVINGTON and LUE
J. COVINGTON. his wife.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
TERRY COVINGTON and
EVERGREEN CEMETERY.
Defendants
TO: TERRY COVINGTON
902 Sheridan Street
Hvatlville. Maryland
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Injunction and
other relief has been filed against you
and you are reouireil i. serve <>''
of x..fir- Rxltten defenses, if anv. to It
on JOSEPH J. C.ERSTEN. Attorney
for Plain'Iff", whose address is lOBfl
Spring Garden Road. Miami. Florida
1111(1, and file the original with the
Clerk of the ib. yled Court on or
before June 6. !.*76: otherwise a judg-
ment max- be .-ntpfed aea tist vop fm
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS m? hand and viie seal
ol said i 'ourt Mav -. 197:
IMCHAl.O P. HI!.NICER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By S JAFFE
Deputy Clerk
o 9-K-M-80
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCIVE vE VICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA in ND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-14197
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
CAROL I.YNNE ELLIOTT.
Petitioner.
and
\\ I1.I.IA.M RICHARD ELLIOTT.
P>- -.on,l...,|
TO: Mr. William Richard Elliott
lno:: Taylor Avenue
Richmond. Virginia 2322S
TOi; ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you an.I
you an- required to serve a conv of
our written de'enses. if any. to It on
DAVID E STONE attorney for Pe-
titioner, whos.- adslress is 191 N.W.
12 Avenue. Miami. Florida lull's (SOU
224-4655. and file the original with
the clerk of the above stvled court
on or before June IS, 1975: otherwise a
default "ill be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
nlaint or petition.
This notl.-e shall be published once
each we.-k for 'our consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDiAN.
\\ ITNESS mv hsnd anil the seal of
said courl Ht Mi -oi. Florida on this
Sth dav of Mav. 197?.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade Ci.univ Florida
Bv A. D. WADE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David E. Stone. Esuulre
sum.-. Boatchln Koaa, p.A.
101 N W. 11 Avenue
Miami. Florida HUM f!24-4
Attorney for Petitioner
5/9-'6-23 30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS N..ME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN :hat
the in di reigned, di slrlna lo MtaRi in
business under the fictitious nam< ol
PROPERTIES MAINTENANCE SER-
VICE al -1 Baa! '-"d sii.it. Hialeah.
In intend register said name
with the Cler* << the < m-uit tourl
of Hade County, Florida
i: \\\'.c\.> I. CIJDMENT, JR.
TIMOTHY F. WYANT
HERBERT SEIDEL
Atlornev for Applicants
S212 Bis. aviu- Boulevard
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAV
NOTICE IS 1IEHEHY GIVE.-7 that
Hi. undersigned. deJOrlng to-MiKago
in business und.-r tH fictitniusEname
of \ernon Rainev Trucking at 101 It
S W 66th Street. Miami, intends to
register said name with the Clcr'i ol
ih.- Circuit Court of Dade Coun.y.
Florida. ___ i
VERNO.N RA1NEY
Daniel M. Kell '
Attorney for Applicant
(12 Ainsl.-v Bldg.
Miami. Fla .13132 ^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBV 'HVE.N HUM
I he undersigned, desiring to engage la
business under the lie'Ulous name of
SIMONE CREATIONS at P.O. Bp
540076. Ninth Miami Beach. Fla.
33164 intends to register said name
With the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
J. SIMON
A K A JEAN BROCKMAN
5/9-16 23-39
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTV.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-15312
NOTICE BY PUBLICATOM
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
THERESA WIJTH FL.YNN
Petitioner.
RICHARD EDWARD FLYNN.
Resiiondent.
YOU RICHARD EDWARD FLYNN.
Respondent ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
TO PILE vour written response to
this action for dissolution of marri-
age, with the Clerk of the above
Court, and serve a copy untm Peti-
tioner's Attorneys. VON ZAMFT &
SMITH. Suite 850. 1320 South Dixie
Highway. Coral Gables. Florida 3:1146.
on or before the 20th day of Juno.
107",. else the Petition for DlKsolutloa,
of Marriage will be taken as con-
fessed.
HATED: MAY 13. 1975.
RICHARD P. BHINKBJt
By: BEVERLY 1JPPS
Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
5/15-li-M NOTICE UNDFR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ib, undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of EX Ei TTIVE'S PIJVYMATK at
r.s Florida intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
l'ERol A. INC.. a Florida Corporation
By: RONAI D I, DAVIS.
See'v-Treasurer
Ronald l. Davis
Attorney for Perola. In--
6/23-30 6/6-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 71-17961 iKsurkl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
MOTION TO MODIFY FINAL
JUDGMENT
IN HE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
LILLIAN RIVERS.
Petitioner.
HOWARD C. R1VFTI8.
Respondent.
TO: Mr. Howard C. Rivers
Residence Unknown
YOB ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thst a MOTION TO MODIFY FINAL
TUC.MENT previously entered her.ln
b is been filed and a hearing has boon
scheduled for Wednesday. June 11.
l!'7r.. at 2:4.'. P.M.. before the Honer-
abl-. Judge Francis X Knuck. Dade
County Courthouse. 7.1 W. Flaffle*
Street, Miami. Florida. You arc re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on DAVID E.
STONE. ESQl'IRE. Stone. Sostchln A
Koaa, I'.A.. 101 N.W. 12 Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida 13128, (305) 324-4555. At.
t. rnev for Petitioner, and file the
original with the Clerk of the above
stvled Court on or before June 16.
i:i?:.. otherwise a Default Will be en-
tered agalnsl vou for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
This notice shall be published once
i-a.h weeh for four cu/isecocJve
in THE JEWISH Pl.OIUDaAN.
WITNESS mi ban.I and the seal of
said Court at Miami. Florida, on this
Mb day Of .Mav. I!17."..
RICHARD H BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By; (si 11. ROSENSTEIN
As Deputy Clerk
5/16-23-30 6/1


Page l^B
+Jtwistfkr**k*>
Friday, May 30, lj
SAVE 3 WAY$ IONUS SPECIALS!..HONEST VALUES!-PLUS MEtCMANTS GKEEN STAMPS!
SHOP FOOD FAIR FOR
Money Saving Values all Week Long!
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A' FRESH ICED
FRYER
QTRS.
LEG OR
BREAST
M'Ik '-b
U.S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK
UNDER BLADE POT ROAST
U.S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK
SHOULDER POT ROAST BNLS.
U S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK
SHOULDER STEAK BONELESS
NUTRITIOUS
SLICED BEEF LIVER..........................
U.S. GOVT. INSPECTED FARMER GRAY-8ASTED GRADE A
I ^^ wj^^y QU'CK FROZEN
TURKEYS.:::.:.:".:.::""
99'
59
e
FIRST OF THE SEASON
(PICK THE BEST!)
r tr\j i \_ : ink J.ajvh ^ r i *_ r\ i f it u t J l .
Rip Peaches 4
c
Artichokes
................4 FO. S1
Romaine Lettuce 33
OS" itS
Fresh Scallions 2.-c^39c
'ISHii IUS3
Cheese Q's 3S 58c
Dtl.C OUS -
Fresh Okra........................ 59e
Fiour r.:.. 5& 89"-
Fiesta Paper Towels X,\ 5GJ
Meat Franks I Us Cal Yogurt
COPE LAND
-*. S Mi AT O* Mff
Sliced Bologna
9N
FAt
AU FLAVORS
4ooc| ~ 59c -m
-oz
-Oi
Sliced Livemurst.........kC
69e
79
PARTY PAK
OPELANDS "V^^C
SLICED g ^P PKG.
KOSHER PICKLES
73e
SEASHORE S
BARREL
CURED
QUART
JAR
KEISCnMANS V-NSAl'EC irtlf
Margarine Quarters =."' 79c
Gouda or Edam Cheese SS 79c
Sour Cream....................<.' 55c
Orange Juke
nb-suN'
IN OUR
DAiR* |
CASE
0. CC.1> STIAKS
A-1 Steak Sauce
53<
s-oz
Baked Beans 32? 67
Coffeemate
QUART
CONTS
CARNATION
IGlKA GAIL* CHI
22-DZ.
MR
LANC O MOST -AU VAMTItS SKID
Smoked Meets 2 ',89*
3C4MANS UtPOTtO o5* s
Sliced Swiss Cheese
saohto mscowsm
-or
mg
,
KAHNS MIDGET
aunschweiger
59'
l-OZ.
CHUS
73*
2.: 79e
43'
Vinegar Wine Sff 47'
4NTASTW IA$T
Spray Cleaner 2 99c
Peanut Butter
MA XO
Cream Cheese
-OZ
-MG
AF
CREAMY
American Singles
Moat Bologna.....-...........'& 99*
oa Mfvtnc _j.
laaish Salami...............o** 95e
feeflologia S3 89*
Salami or Bologna
AMERICAN $ 09 | j-oz. CHU
KOSHER I mw
.WWMUJJiiMUJUj
.( DM' noM hc til. ci coo'in
BOROENS
COLORED
CHEESE FOOO
MA600

1
$W*T A WAS*
Soil Stain Remover
MJMuruAi pack
Cracker Jacks 5% 89
Monarella Cheese.......... 79*
Cottage Cheese 2 $1"
Margarine
MRS FILBERTS
GOLDEN
QUARTERS
.a CAl ?? FAT 'tf
Preserves
PARADISE
PURE
STRAABERRY
Wi Paper 37c
Waffle Syrup ~< 79e
Canadian Smelts
$115
1
u-ot
*g
49=
WONOOtFOl I AXED MOOS
rURKEY ROLL caW*
MEAT UgF J^
teBnriBMi .? *9 Slt Free Breod
...r a* 50*
nnc lahy Series Cheese
Ui.
LOAF
FRESH SEAFOOD KPT.
,,R[ OH1 T SlOtIS HAVING
mnci w*ooo coonum
YELLOWTAIL
$|19
HOBDA
CAUGHT
IB.
Florida Mackerel ^55
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
PRICES EFFECTIVE FROM DATE OF
PUBLICATION THRU SUNDAY JUNE Il
AT All FOOD FAIR STORES
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKET!

"*" Ipo, ....
-WTHODai
** UClOrw
. Afl ^Waia
M

Atl CWN03
Mb.
CAN
CRISCO
mrNu
24-OZ.
WMM^-r^OYHH
Of I WOkli
Prune Juice..
' r HANO
Bartlett Pears
.. STL.
H or.
Del Monte Catsui
nht piwi ntoN
Broccoli Spears........... '"
TNOMAtnOON
English Meffins
-o:
H).
391
41
pp.
BRAND
FROZEN
ium nraiiM
Whipped Topping
..MO
5i
Pound Cake
drisse:
FROZEN
tiBMTKBCHTtCUT&--ffa *-OK>^TYK>A*H<*<;TOC0A^<.T^CEM0ISAW0*CTl0C0MtO>< MX SOU> TO MAUM.
Ir
nv- .aV
_


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EM2G6QJ8E_NAUT7M INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T02:46:57Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02417
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES