The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02414

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
I .
Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UN/TIT end THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 19
Miami, Florida Friday, May 9, 1975
ue by Man Tniee Sections
Price 25 cents
QUESTIONS ASKED
Leaders
Meet With
Sisco in D.C.
Schlesinger-Dinitz 2-A
Sparkman Warns 3-A
Dayan Critical 11-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The concerns of the
American Jewish commu-
nity over the current status
of U.S.-Israeli relations were
expressed here in a two-
hour exchange of questions
and answers between 40
American Jewish leaders
representing virtually every
major national Jewish or-
ganization and two top level
State Department officials.
The officials, Joseph J.
Sisco, Undersecretary of
State for Political Affairs,
and Alfred E. Atherton, As-
sistant Secretary of State in
charge of Middle Eastern
Affairs, met with the group
at the request of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions.
THE GROUP included the
American Jewish Committee
which is not a member of the
Conference of Presidents.
Rabbi Israel Miller, chairman
of the Presidents Conference,
who spoke to reporters in the
State Department lobby after
the meeting, said that as a re-
sult of the exchange, he person-
ally believed that the "climate
Continued on Page 10-A
UNDERSECRETARY SISCO
Gov't. Scandals Report
Sends Israel Spinning
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has mobilized for all-out war, not against a foreign
foe, but against the internal enemy of corruption said to be gnawing at the very vitals
of the government and society.
It will not be a preemptive strike but, according to the 1,000-page annual report just
issued by State Comptroller Dr. E. Ernst Yizhak Nebelzahl, a long overdue campaign to
root out private greed, misconduct and mismanagement that allegedly flourishes in vir-
tually every government ministry, branch and agency, not excluding the armed forces.
NEbiiNZAHL, a man of im-
Blast Destroys Paris Synagogue
As French Chiefs Meet With Alton
ATTEMPTED SUICIDE OVER WEEKEND
Protter Has Long Record
Of Mental Problems
Red Carpet 6-A
By EDWIN EYPTAN
PARIS(JTA)A pre dawn
blast virtually destroyed a syna-
gogue in central Paris. French
Interior Minister Michel Ponia-
towski, in a telegram to Jewish
community leaders, expressed
indignation over the attack and
said he had ordered the police
department to do everything
possible to find and bring to
justice the perpetrators "of this
criminal attack."
The powerful explosion also
destroyed three parked cars,
tore a huge hole in the street
and shattered every window in
the immediate vicinity. A four-
year-old girl was slightly in-
jured by flying glass. Sleeping
neighbors were literally thrown
from their beds.
ALEXANDER Klein, presi-
dent of the synagogue, told tha
Continued on Page 12-A
police omciM warhs:
PLO Eyed Olympic Site
MONTREAL(JTA)A Montreal police official lid '-) \
22 that security measures for the 1976 Olympic games
had been changed aftt "as leaked that seve
Liberation Organization members visited Monl
and had a good look at the site of the games here.
Normand Toupin. sistant director of tl Pouss
Force, in issuing a warning to newsmen to .
ing information on security measures for the 1976
said "We have learned enough from the Munich tragidy S3 tna.
Continued on Page 3-A
By ADELE BERNSTEIN
JOHANNESBURG (JTA)
David Protter, who took the Is-
raeli Consulate here, is a 24-
year old mentally disturbed
South African Jew who was dis-
charged from the Israel Army
three years ago as unfit for
service.
Protter surrendered to au-
thorities 19 hours after he
seized hostages at the offices of
the Consulate and went on a
shooting rampage that resulted
in the deaths of four persons
and the wounding of 32.
THE LAST of the hostages,
who numbered about 20, and
included tnree children and
several women, were released
shortly before Protter emerged
from the building and gave him-
self up.
As it turned out the de-
mented security s$uard was de-
manding an audience with
r Rabin to "advise" him
hr
a
As the hostages were being
released at Intervals in Jotvin-
Fewish Telegraphic
Ag>ncy in Tel Aviv began to
gathsr information on Procter's
b c und.
According to official records,
he ii St came to Israel from
South Africa in 1936, at the age
of 16, on a Jewish Agency study
program.
BUT HE was unable to ad-
just and was dismissed from the
program the following year.
While on a bus to Lod Airport
he stabbed himself with a scout
knife. He was hospitalized and
Continued on Page 10-A
peccable integrity, great com-
petence and apparently no
political axes to grind, takes a
dim view of the outcome. Un-
less drastic changes are made
in the nation's "nnancial sys-
tem" which, his report claims,
breeds and nourishes corrup-
tion, it "will damage the very
existence of the State and might
even destroy her and our exist-
ence as a society," he said at
a press conference in Jerusalem
last week.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin an-
nounced a week ago that his
government was taking the of-
fensive against corruption in the
civil service and would spare no
one regardless of position.
"Something is 'low beseder' "
(out of order) the Premier said
on a televised interview.
HE ACKNOWLEDGED that it
was not a matter of just a few
exceptional cases but a wide-
Continued on Page 11-A
STRUGGLE IN AMERICA
We're Losing Info
Battle to Arabs-Yariv
SAN FRANCISCO(JTA)
Gen. Aharon Yariv, Is-
rael's former Minister of In-
formation, said here that Is-
rael was losing the informa-
tion battle in America and
i ha"ule Israeli political .. .__. e___
.,?i., elsewhere to its Arab foes.
Speaking bluntly, in an
interview published in the
Jewish Bulletin, the former
Cabinet Minister and former
chief of Israeli Army intel-
ligence, said, "I would have
to say that Israel is taking



CJA-IEF LEADERS VOICE THEIR CONCERN HEtt
the U.S. for granted. And
this includes Jews and non-
Jews. I don't think many
American Jews understand
the situation in Israel. They
don't know the facts and
must have them explained
in a basic sense."
YARIV, who won internation-
al prominence when he nego-
tiated the Kilometer 101 cease-
tiro agreement with Egypt after
the Yom Kippur Wa said he
placed the greatest emphasis on
reaching American public opin-
ion because Watagate and the
Vietnam debacle have weakened
Continued on Page 8-A
Israel
is Facing Str
"The escalating costs of defending themselves and
the worldwide economic crisis have forced the people
of Israel to adopt austerity measures of such magnitude
that it has sent shock waves throughout the whole coun-
try," said 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund Vice Chairman Stephen Muss.
"Aside from the fact that the Israeli pound has been
devalued 43 per cent," he said, "the cost of basic foods
on the world market has increased, Israel has placed a
aggie for Survival
six-month ban on many imports, and there have been
emergency reductions in government spending for pub-
lic services."
MUSS FURTHER accentuated the hardships now
being experienced by the people of Israel by pointing
out that in 1975 alone, the cost of living could increase
34 per cent with the impact of new taxes and the intro-
Continued on Page 7-A
GEN. YARIV


Page 2-A
Friday, May 9, 1975
NO DtTAILS D/JClOSfD
Ford Has Cordial
Sehlesinger Meets With Dinitz -jj- r^ ffussem
/n White House
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Defense Secretary James H.
Sehlesinger and Israeli Ambas-
sador Simcha Dinitz conferred
privately for nearly two hours
at the Pentagon.
No details of their talk were
disclosed but both American
and Israeli sources indicated to
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
later that there seemed to be no
change in the cool attitude the
US. has adopted toward Israel
since the break-down of the
Israeli-Egyptian bilateral nego-
tiations conducted by Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger last
month.
A HIGH U.S. official described
as an "over-statement" a re-
port published in the Now York
Times that Sehlesinger had as-
sured Israel that the Ford Ad-
ministrafon's reassessment of
Middle East policies will, not
diminish continuing Ame'rican
support for Israel's "seolrity."
U.S. officials, referring to the
Schlesinger-Dinitz meeting, said
the Defense Secretary only re-
peated to the Israeli envoy his
previously stated position tha"
America continues to have as its
objective the provision of IsraJ
with a defense capability that
will maintain the balance of
power in the Middle East and
assure it against destruction as
a state. The officials referre::
back to Schlesinger's remarks
on a CBS television interview
two weeks ago that "The U.S
continues to have as an objec-
tive the security of Israel."
AN ISRAELI source, assess
ing the Dinitz-Schlesinger meet-
ing against the background of
Israeli Foreign Minister Yigal
Alton's three-hour session with
Kissinger here Apr. 21, told the
JTA that it was still too early
to say whether there has been
an easing of the strained at-
mosphere between Washington
and Jerusalem.
However, the Israeli source
described the Pentaeon meeting
as a "good one" held in a "very
friendly atmosphere" and said
that Sehlesinger showed under-
standing of the points Dinitz
expressed to him.
THEY SAID the two men had
discussed developments of the
past month and "bilateral mat-
ters" but the sources refused to
comment or speculate on the
actual content of their talks and
d vlined to say on whose initia-
tive the Dinitz-Schlesinger meet-
ing was arranged.
Thry said it was "a routine
meeting" within the framework
of Dinitz's_ambassadorial duuj*s.
American sources were even
more reticent, observing that
'there were just the two men
in there."
They were unable to "confirm
published reports that Schlesin-
ger's remarks "eases" Israel's
concern on arms."
THE U.S. has held up the de-
livery of the "Lance" ground-to-
ground missile to Israel, a weap-
on with a 40-mile range, despite
previous assurances of delivery.
It has also informed Israel
that it was not prepared at
present to deliver the new F-15
jet fighters, it is understood
here.
The slowdown in weapons
deliveries to Israel is viewed
here part of the reassessment
of Middle East policies ordered
by Ford after the breakdown of
the Kissinger talks. The reas-
sessment and other develop-
ments and comments by U.S.
officials are seen by friends of
Israel here to be. in the words
of former Israeli Defense Minis-
ter Moshe Dayan who visited
Kissinger qn,Apc 22, both an
American warning and chal-
lenge to Israel.
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Ford, preoccu-
pied with the Vietnam crisis, met for an hour at the White
House with Jordan's King Hussein between urgent sessions
with Cabinet members and Congressional leaders on Indo-
china problems.
Afterwards, the White House said the President reaf-
firmed the U.S. continued and active support for the Jor-
danian government's efforts toward economic development
and the importance the U.S. attaches to a strong stable and
friendly Jordan."
The President also said that "the U.S. remains commit-
ted to working for a just and lasting peace in the Middle
East."
THE WARMLY worded communique was observed as
being in sharp contrast to the stand-off statements recently
made by the President and Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer regarding U.S. relations with Israel. Hussein was
here on an "unofficial" visit and was to receive honorary
degrees from several colleges; mchiding Florida: State Uni-
versity.
Israel,
Brazil
To Trade
TEL AVIV (JTA) Isra >
and Brazil have *igned an agree-
ment opening the way for the
export of Israeli-Polished d: i
monds to Brazil and other Latin
American countries.
The deal was disclosed here
by Moshe Scfanitzer, president
of the Israeli Diamond
change, who just returned :
Rio de Janeiro where he si
the agreement with the Br
ian Minister of Finance. H
Simonson.
UNDER THE agreement. Is-
rael will help set up the fir<>
Diamond Exchange in Bra^i1
and the latter country will
exempt Israeli finished dia-
monds from custom duties.
Brazil is an exporter of rough
diamonds.
Schnitzer said the agreement
had far-reaching consequences
for Israel's diamond industry
which has been seeking new
markets in Latin America be-
cause of its difficulties in the
Far Eastern market. He anti-
cipated that Israel would export
$50 million worth of finished
diamonds to Brazil during the
first two years of the agree-
ment, about ten percent of Is-
rael's diamond exports.


JOIN RABBI IRVING LEHRMAN
AND R4BBI LEON KRONISH
In Honoring One Of Miami's
Favorite Sons
HARRY A. -HAP" LEVY
SV1SDAY EJEMVG. MAY 18 ...
HOTEL FONTAINEBLEAU
HAKKV -HAP LEV Y
^409011 "dOSfflQ" tOTtCltwOfl
Set By Technion Chapter
The closing meeting of the
American Technion Society
Women's Division. Miami
Beach Chapter, was to be a
Thursday noon luncheon at the
Montemartre Hotel.
The entertainment will fea-
ture The Musical Floridians.
The public is invited to attend.
For reservations call Mrs. Belle
Stein, president.
SCOPLS AWARD LAUREATE
Harry A. "Hap*' Levy, President
Greater Miami Chapter, Americau
Friends of Hebrew University
HOJSORED GUESTS: ,j
Governor Reubin CD. Askew,
Honorary Chairman, Florida Golden
Jubilee Committee, American
Friends of Hebrew University
1
Hon. Avraham Harman, President
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Dr. Max M. Kanipelman, President
American Friends of Hebrew University
FOR DINNER RESERVATIONS
PLEASE PHONE 532-1707

MM -a '-
M5/,7s
M5/9/75
M//7S


Friday, May 9, 1975
^Jenist fkiridlian
Page 3-A
plo Sends Delegation Sparkman: We Mustn't Falter
To Eye Olympic Site
Continued from Page 1-A
under no circumstances will that kind of thing be repeated
here."
Eleven Israeli athletes were murdered in an Arab terrorist
attack during the 1972 Olympic games in Munich. According
to the news report, the presence of the PLO members had been
detected by Montreal police.
The PLO members left the city after their actions had
been recorded by police security forces, Toupin said. He said
the entire security system "is going to be changed following
these indiscretions."
No Decision Yet on Aid
WASHINGTON(JTA)The State Department has cate-
gorically denied that a decision has been made, under the
President's reassessment of U.S. Mideast policy, to reduce U.S.
assistance to Israel.
Recent contradictory reports have indicated both that U.S.
aid will not be cut or that it will be slashed. The Israelis are
understood to have asked for $1.5 billion in military assistance
and $1 billion in economic aid.
DEPARTMENT spokesman Robert Anderson said Friday
that the question of aid to Israel has not yet been reached. "It
is still on the technical level," Anderson stressed. "It is still
being,studied. No decision has been made."
When a reporter suggested that a recommendation has
been made to hold U.S. aid to Israel to $1 billion, Anderson
said he had not heard of it and pointed out, "There has been
no recommendation to the Secretary on this subject."
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States increases
"the risk of open conflict" in the Middle East if it falters
in giving continued aid to Israel, Sen. John Sparkman (D.,
Ala.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,
said here.
Sparkman told the annual meeting of B'nai B'rith's
commission on community volunteer services that any un-
certainty about U.S. assistance "will invite uncertainty and
indecision in the Arab states. We would create a psycho-
logical and material vacuum that will be filled by the Soviet
Union," he said.
SPARKMAN and Sen. Richard
Stone (D., Fla.), who addressed
the meeting earlier, agreed that
Congressional support for Israel
remains strong. Stone, however,
said he detected "a possible
weakening in support by the
White House."
He added: "Congress will ap-
prove any request for assistance
to Israel President Ford asks.
The problem is to get a decent
request out of the White House."
Stone called the Administra-
tion's current reassessment of
its Middle East policies as an
"indication that U.S. foreign
policy is bankrupt."
BUT SPARKMAN saw "no
conflict" in the Administration's
"examining the options" follow-
ing the failure of the Kissinger
shuttle and simultaneously as-
suring "as much as we can that
Israel's security and economic
needs are satisfied."
Continuing, he said, "It may
well be that Israel, Egypt and
the State Department erred in
judging what was possible" and
that "the time is not ripe" for
Egypt to sign a non-belligerency
agreement, or for Israel to with-
draw from strategic territory."
Sparkman added: "There is
time to try again and even to
refocus the effort. Perhaps both
states will have to live in the
context of a balance of power
in the area for the time being."
A MIDDLE East peace settle-
ment "will take a long time,"
he observed.
"What the United States can
do, or hope to do as a friend of
Israel, is to make the passage
to a real and lasting peace less
painful," he added.
Blacks Join in Israel Support
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK(JTA.1The formation of a newly organ-
ized group, the Committee of Black Americans Supporting
Israel (BASI) was announced at the first meeting of the
group here.
At a reception at the house of Dr. Robert Gilmore,
treasurer of the A. Philip Randolph Educational Fund, it
was disclosed that more than 100 prominent Black leaders
have already agreed to join the committee, which was
initiated by 86-year-old A. Philip Randolph, who is the presi-
dent of the Randolph Educational Fund (REF).
"WE ARE here to express our
support for the State of Israel,"
Bayard Rustin, executive direc-
tor of REF, said.
"Whenever minorities seek
justice, they have to defend
democracy. We seek to defend
democracy in the Mideast and
therefore we support Israel,"
he stated.
Rustin explained that "our
support of Israel does not mean
that we do not support self-
determination for the Palestin-
ians," but, he added, "We are
not for the self-determination of
the Palestinians if they are
dedicated to the destruction of
another people."
PLANNING
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Call me. Either, 635*554 and
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local moving A long distance
moving anywhere In the U.S.
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A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
RUSTIN WAS also critical of
the "Arabs attempting to bring
discrimination to the United
States by their boycott" and
promised that the American
Black community was not going
"to sit idly" in the face of "im-
ported Arab discrimination."
He noted the Blacks in Amer-
ica have struggled for a long
time against discrimination and
that "we will continue our strug-
gle and support of fundamental
principles."
Randolph, who noted that
American Jewry always support-
ed the rights of Blacks here,
said: "I would like to see the
Blacks of America register their
support for the State of Israel.
It will be a crime for anyone,
and especially for Blacks, not to
support the just cause of Is-
rael."
ACCORDING to Rustin, BASI
activities will include organized
tours of Blacks to Israel. The
first will be a group of 20 disc
jockeys who will leave for Is-
rael in a few weeks.
Representing Israel at the re-
ception which included report-
ers from both the Black and
Jewish media, were Ambassador
David Rivlin, Consul General
of Israel in New York, Moshe
Bitan, former Israeli Ambassa-
dor to Ghana and presently di-
rector general of Paz, the Is-
raeli Oil Corporation, and Con-
sul Yakov Levi, of the Consulate
in New York.
ADDRESSING the meeting on
the issue of the Arab oil boycott,
Bitan observed that "it is super-
ficial to believe that if Israel
gives in, the price of oil will
go down."
He said that the Arab oil pro-
ducers will reduce production to
get higher prices. Bitan arrived
here for a two week lecture
tour throughout the United
States.
Israel's situation is desperate
and has made it more depend-
ent on Israel Bonds and
C.J.A. Israel Emergency Fund.
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ARTHUR H COURSHON
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Page 4-A
+JmistfhrkMar
Friday, May 9, 1975
Honors To Dr. Xarot
South Florida joins Temple Israel in its celebration
of Dr. Joseph R. Narot's 25 years as spiritual leader of
the Temple.
Temple Israel has come to be one of the leading
Reform Jewish congregations in the nation, and this can
ce directly attributed to the zeal, the intellectual will-
power and the inspired spiritual leadership of Dr. Xarot.
With his steady hand at the helm of Temple Israel.
Dr. N'arot has seen his congregation multiply many-fold
in numbers, in facilities, in programs dedicated to Jew-
ish enlightenment, in participation in religious and gen-
eral community affairs. One can go en and on.
The important thing here is the man the man
even more than the marvelous things he has wrought
for his congregation and for the community.
In the truest sense of the word. Dr. Narot is a Jew-
ish scholar. He combines into an exciting amalgam his
awareness of the present with his studious understand-
ing of the ancient Jewish past.
Those who benefit are not only members of Temple
Israel. The South Florida community benefits as well.
The Shock of Corruption
The Nebenzahl report en corruption in the highest
levels of Israels governmental affairs is a shocker. It is
the kind of thing no one ever anticipated in a Jewish
State.
Some of Nebenzahl's charges are against practices
long observed by students of Israeli affairs both in that
country and abroad.
But little, or only joking significance, was attached
to them.
Why, for example, did the Israelis continue furiously
to dig in at phenomenal economic cost at Gidi and Mitla,
fortifying these points beyond all realistic need (or so it
seemed), when Israel has repeatedly declared she is
prepared to give up the passes for suitable Egyptian
guarantees?
Similarly with Abu Rodeis, where only last week
Premier Yitzhak Rabin told workers that Israel "would
spare nothing to develop the fields," at the same time
that he said withdrawal from Abu Rodeis is an eventual
fact of life Israelis must come to accept given the right
Egyptian guarantees of non-belligerency, whether they
like it or not.
Students of Israeli affairs have marked up such ex-
cesses to the "government's way" of dealing with the
need to keep people employed.
That has sounded good enough for the old Roose-
veltian minds around the world who recall the good old
days of "pump priming" to revitalize a nation's econ-
omy." in this case Israel's after the disastrous Yom Kip-
pur War.
Unhappily, that is not what the 1,000-page Neben-
zahl report is all about.
Enemv Never Gives Lp
Sen. Dick Stone has introduced a Sense of the Sen-
ate Resolution to oppose relaxation of the trade embargo
against Communist Cuba.
Certainly, this is good news to the active, vocal and
materially-potent Cuban community, Jewish and ncn-
Jewish, living in South Florida.
What the administration has in mind in its move to
relax the trade embargo and to propose U.S. recognition
of Castro Cuba is the proliferation of detente with Com-
munist nations throughout the world.
Vietnam, more than anything else, has demonstrat-
ed that the American people are tired of war war
on the battlefield and war in ideological terms.
Sen. Stone's resolution, however, reminds the ad-
ministration that a matter of principle is at stake. The
proliferation of detente in the end means the prolifera-
tion of Communism.
Jewish Floridian
tmCE A.NP PLANT 120 N.E. 6th STREET TELEFHONE J7J-I
P.O. Box 01-T3. Miami, Florida I
FRED K SHOCHKT
r and Publisher
LEO M1NM.TN
Asisociat* Editor
SELMA M THOMPSON
AMcUlbi ti- PuM.fcr
The Jewish Fioriorjn Doe* Not Guarantee The Kathruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published *TfT Friday since 1:7 by The Jirwlah F:crtd:an
Secnnd-Clafi P^sta** Paid at JI.roi. Fa.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and tfe Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Festure Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspaper*, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One vear lic.OC Two Years lit,!
Out of Town Uoon Request
Yahoos Vote Their Mediocrity
VOL" MIGHT say with more
than a tinge of bittern--55
tha: it was their religious con-
victions that caused Dick Ren-
ic!-; and Vernon HoDoway of
the Dade delegation in Tal-
lahassee to vote against the
Equal Rights Amendment.
B'Jt thai would be a liberal
Jewish viewpoint gone 1
on the presumption that of
- J< are t.-adin
-.en i* comes u .he
cosrr.: involving boaum-
ity.
IT SIMPLY isn't so. The L-t-
: Orthodox Rabbi Phineas
Webennaa to the editor of last
Friday morning's Tageblaft lays
Mindlin
that assamptj m to rest with
the face of its own bigotry.
-''- pray that Renick's
end HoHoway s vote, the only
ia the Dade delegation.


L fYKP U*
are remembered next E n
Day. I also pray that the:
omng was better than
Weberman's: somehow a-
not.
The Rabbi delighted -e
ERA defeat, and to
his delight, he deck
"Tha nun expressed thei
appointment with wore 1
the women with tears."
I SUPPOSE this means that
e'en among those who su]
ed ERA and were disap;
by irs defeat, the reacti
the defeat according t -.x
demonstrate in and of
selves the absurdity of E
The men reacted with j.-ds
which is to say that t
logically.
But the women react..: jrJi
tears, which is to say thai
could do no more than be
en hysterical.
Logic vs. hysteria
Weberman's sui generis ~
superiority oi male
tie and, apparently, r
' ord on the issue.
I SUPPOSE this is a-
::on for Rabbi Wet
to take as any other, whi
doubtsdly subscribes to
proof" for God's existenc.
proof there need be) in onto-
logical terms.
That is to say. we begin
the assertion that the "order"
of the universe defies under-
standing unless we subscribe to
its creation by an infinitely su-
perior and logical being
Since there is no doubt of the
existence of creation (other-
wise we would have to doubt
our own existence), the infinite-
ly superior and logical being is
therefore a necessarily existing
being. Ergo. He (God) exists.
TO RECAPITULATE: Wom-
en are not equal to men bcause
women are hysterical, and me".
ate logical. Ergo, even if
not polite to say that women
are necessarily inferior.
Continued on Page L8-A
Too Many Questions Plague U.S
Volume 48
Friday, May 9, 1975
2X
Number 19
28 IYAR 5735
By MAX LERNER
L:s Angsles rimes Syndicate
NEW YORK CITY!We suf-
fer fro* a plague of question-
naires. What three people do I
?"*mire mt*t in all the world?
are the five most impor-
tant woTien in the United
Srtt*c? Were L-e Harvev Os-
wald. James Earl Rav and Sir-
han Sirhan alon in killing their
respective targets? What a-e
the worst disas'e-s ahad fo"
the ne-t 10 years? Ditto the
n-t 25?
It is a mild form of idiocy.
It swells the momma mail,
seems based on the loonv
theory that you can sot out
h'torv in rank orders and de-
cide the truth of an issue by
using the oost officv
THE U.S. News and World Re-
port, which rarely prints non-
sense, breaks its rule once a
year with the results of a ques-
tionnaire to a thousand "men
and women of distinction," on
"Who Runs America?"
It gives the first and second
team, of 10 each. Gerry Ford
comes first and House Speaker
Carl Albert 10th ; on the first
Mam. raising the question
whether either man runs his
respective domain or is run bv
it
Secretan,- of State Henry Kis-
singer, of course, is second.
Then come the two economic
czars. Arthur Burns and George
Meany. who presumablv run
money and labor, then Nelson
Rockefeller, followed by Chiei
Justice Warren Burger, who
runs his majority on the Su-
preme Court.
THEN COME Sens Ted Ken-
nedy and Mike Mansfield, and
then Walter Cronkite. who
doesn't run anything except the
LERNER
porfui CBS News program.
The way Cronkite sticks out
from the rest suggests what i:
wrong with the list as a whole.
The other nine men exercise
varying degrees of power, while
people like Cronkite exert in-
fluences.
1-olitical and economic deci-
sions may be made by people
sitting in the covert as well as
overt seats of the mighty. But
you can't get at them by ques-
tionnaires and straw votes
only by a tough research which
asks who decides what. when,
how and with whom.
We are on better territory ii
we ask not who runs the coun-
try but who forms the climate
which influences what the de-
cisions will be and whether tiny
wiU work. One way to look for
them is to single out the great
currents of thought and opinion
and try to track down who has
helped shape them.
AVOIDING the obvious ques-
tion of who in the past in-
fluenced the American foreign
policies, take as an instance the
legal currents of today.
The Supreme Court majority
t'lat Chief Justie? Burg;:
rrnds must reckon with "
peat movements of tac-
tile law schools, on ca
punishment, on abortion n
r">raog -aphy. on executive
il-g*. There are a half-.:
!nea! scholars, notably the late
Al ^ander Bickel, without v
Critic*! scrutiny of past courts
ani dec;sions the present trend
tnwwri a l?gal centrism would
b? imnossible.
YBT WHEN President Ford,
sroa' Ing at tne Yale law school,
promised a crackdown on the
punishment of serious cri
he met a cool reception. His
audience was skeptical of deter-
rence theories, whether by the
death penalty or imprisonment.
Take two other areas There
are no blacks and no women
on the U.S. News list, yet what
happens in the thinking of black
movements and women's move-
ments may set the climate for
another decade like the turbu-
lent sixties.
THERE IS considerable fer-
ment among black intellectuals
today in the battle between
separatism and integration, be-
tween hard-core and soft-core
revolution. There is a somewhat
similar struggle in the women's
movements, between the sep
ratists and the humanists.
When Susan Saxe announced,
after her years in the weather
Underground and her recent
arrest in Philadelphia, "I am a
lesbian, I am a feminist. 1 am
an amazon." it was clearly
meant for quotation in the fu-
ture. But one asks what intel-
lectual influences in the imme-
diate past and present can ac-
count for the shaping of so
bleak a militancy?


Friday, May 9, 1975
+Jelsti fksifPtr
Page S-A
Shavuot (The Season of
the Giving of OurTorah)
commemorates that day,
centuries ago, when
Moses proclaimed theTen
Commandments to the
Children of Israel and all
mankind. It is the Ethic
upon which Western
Civilization is based. It
established the Faith,
character and destiny of
the Jews as a free people.
Shavuot asserts the
God-given principle that
man was made free.That he was endowed with
a unique personality to be fashioned and
developed in accordance with his own will and
power of selection.
It is this fundamental concept which provides
meaning and purpose to the Laws given on that
day in the Sinai.Desert. It gives testament to the
principle that man-made laws, unless they are
"rooted in*higftfcr moral discipline, are no
-guarantee-of freedom. For without due concern
for the legitimate needs and aspirations of its
individual members, a
healthy society cannot
be established.
Today, when individual
freedom is threatened in
Israel and is being abridged
in the Soviet Union, Syria
and other areas of the
world, it is fitting that on
Shavuot we, who value
our freedom, reaffirm our
resolve to stand together
to help our less fortunate
brothers and sisters
elsewhere realize their
destiny to be free.This is the significance of the
Faith of the Jewish people. This is our great
legacy to mankind.
RIVERSIDE&fEliS?opSUnc-
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton Road at 19th Street
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250 Normandy Drive
MIAMI & CORAL GABLES: Douglas Road
at S.W. 17th Street
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
HOLLYWOOD: 5801 Hollywood Blvd.
SUNRISE: 1171 Northeast 61st Avenue
Murray N. Rubin. KD.
THE DAY
OUR DESTINY WAS
REVEALED.

\


^f
Page 6-A
-Jcnisl- fhrkBar
Friday, May 9, 19""5
French Rolled Out Red Carpet for Allon
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARISJT A Israeli For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon's ar-
rived in Paris for a three-day
official visit during which he
conferred with President Valery
Giscard d'Estaing. Prime Minis-
ter Jacques Chirac and Foreign
Sinister Jean Sauvagnargues.
ij was the first official visit to
Prance by an Israeli leader
Even former Premier David
Ben-Gurion's visits, his recep-
tions at the Elysee Palace by
President de Ganlle. were con-
sidered private by French offi-
cials.
THIS TIME it was all open
and in the clear. As one weary
Israeli diplomat here said: Un-
fortunately, we now have noth-
ing more to hide."
JWfft Rabbi Aryeh Lei-
Dead in Gotham at 62
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
AUon arrived at a time when
the Franco-Israeli crisis is over
The anger, the animosity and
even the sulking have faded
away, eroded by time and other
problems.
All the old problems, the
arms, the Mirages, the betrayal.
the embargo have given place
to an era of normalization.
NEW YORK Rabbi Aryeh
Lev. director of the Commis-
sion on Jewish Chaplaincy of
the National Jewish Welfare
Board fJWBj since 1945. died
last Friday morning at Univer-
sity Hospital after a brief ill-
ness. He was 62.
In 1972. Rabbi Lev received
the Legion of Merit the na-
tion's second highest award for
non-combat service for his
"outstanding service" while
serving with the 314th Infan-
try- ^e Office of the Chief of
Chaplains, the Office of the
Firs; U.S. Army Chaplain, and
the U.S. Army Chaplains
School, on various overseas as-
signments and. "as the key mil-
itary Religious Consultant to
the Chiefs of Chaplains on all
Jewish denominational mat-
ters
THE JWB Commission is the
sole accrediting agency for all
military Jewish Chaplains. It is
composed of the Rabbinical
Council of America (Orthodox),
the Rabbinical Assembly (Con-
servative), and the Centra!
Conference of American Rab-
bis (Reform).
Rabbi Lev came to JWB im-
mediately after World War II.
During the war. he was an
army chaplain serving as the
assistant to the Chief of Chap-
lains in the War Department.
His specialty was plans and
training as well as logistics.
Throughout the war, Rabbi
Lev served as liaison between i
the army and JWB on chap-
laincy matters and then con-
tinued in the Army Reserves in
the rank of Colonel until his
retirement from the Army in
1972
Born in Jerusalem, on June
6. 1912, Rabbi Lev arrived in
the U.S. in 1917. He received
his BS degree from Columbia
University and was ordained
by Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion in
1937.
In 1954, he was awarded an
honorary Doctor of Divinity
from his alma mater. After
serving as Rabbi in Lebanon,
Pa., from 1937 to 1939. he be-
came national director of Young
Judea in 1940. It was from this
post that he entered the chap-
laincy and from there came to
JWB.
HE WAS national chaplain of
the Jewish War Veterans from
1948 to 1950 and president of
the New York Chapter, Military'
Chaplains Association from 1950
to 1952.
Rabbi Lev, at his death, was
on the Advisory Board of the
Chief of Chaplains of the Air
Force and of the Veterans Ad-
ministration. He was chairman
of the Rabbinical Pension
Board, a board member of the
Jewish Family Service, a mem-
ber of the Joint Advisory Com-
mittee of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, and a member of the
U.S. Committee for UNICEF.
There are no major problems
to be solved, no outstanding
conflicts to be discussed. .As one
senior French official told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
"We are just two countries on
opposite shores of the Mediter-
ranean which have to put up
with each other.
THIS normalization does not
mean, however, lessening of
French interest. The new French
Administration sees Israel not
only as a major political factor
in the Middle East but also as
an important influence on the
international board.
The stabilitv of the Middle
East has not only a direct in-
fluence on East-West relations
and the relaxation of world ten-
sions but also provides for
Europe's economic situation
after the oil embargo.
The new French Administra-
tion concentrates mainly on
internal economic and social af-
fairs and believes that its own
well-being and prosperity de-
pend on peace in the Mideast
Giscard d'Estaing, with whom
Allon meet Apr. 29, tried his
best, according to French sour-
ces, to assure Israel that its
own security and stability are
important for Western Europe
as a whole.
FOR ISRAEL, France re-
mains an important factor in
international affairs in spite of
their relative lack of bilateral
ties. Paris continues to influence
Western Europe's attitude to-
wards Israel, carries diplomatic
weight in Washington and has
privileged ties with both Mos-
cow and Peking.
A friendly or at least an
understanding France can be
an important asset to Israel's
diplomacy.
Though neither the Israelis
nor the French intend to dis-
cuss French arms sales to Is-
rael, both sides, and especially
the Israelis, certainly bear in
mind that France is the world's
third largest arms exporting
country and that French planes
and military technology are
practically on a par with those
of the Sonet Union and the
United States.
The Israelis are trying to open
a far off potentiality and the
French will no doubt try to pre-
serve a possible future market.
THE FACT that the visit is
Allon's first ministerial trip to
France and the Giscard d'Es-
taing has not yet met a
Israeli leader also facilitated
their contacts.
Both men started with a c'.ean
slate and this is probably tht
symbolic importance o: the
visit. After the three passionate
former chapters in Frar.co-
Israeli tiesthe alliance the
cooling off and the open ani-
mositya fourth, that of norm-
alization, is about to (tart
JNFs Bikurim
Celebration Set
The traditional Jewish Na-
tional Fund annual Bikurim
celebration, to be held 3: the
Fontainebleau Hotel May H at
":30 p.m.. will pay tribute to
the deserving leaders and v.ork-
ers who labored endlessly on
behalf of JNF's progra. of
Land redemption, reclamation
and afforestation
Honorees will include Mrs
Eva Baxt, Mrs. Ida Cooper. Irv-
ing H. Greene. Mrs. Sophie Has-
pel. Mrs. Fanny Houtz. Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Kube! and Mr. ar.d
Mrs Joseph Nadler. A program
of entertainment will be pre-
sented and a Kosher Dairy des-
sert will be served in the spirit
of the Shavuotfa holiday.
MY DANK PAYS
TOP DOLIAR.
7/2% IN"KRST ON
DPOSITSOF
HOOO OR MOR
[COMPOUNDD
OMLY779%
On certificates of Jt: gingfromSl
$100,000 from anyu here from one month I
- hieh a rate of interes
law allows for banks.
Example No. 1 We paj

compounded daily and payable annually
>f deposit for $1,000 or more left on dep -
with us for
I sample No. 2.We now paj 7-1 -4" on certifi-
cates of deposit starting as low as $1,000. \nd left
on deposit with us for four years. Daily compound-
ing means you actually collect 7. ^J % interest
payable annually
F.xample No. 3. If you leave SI.000or more in
certificates of deposit w ith us for three years, we'll
pay you interest at the rate of 6-1/2%. Compounded
daily, that comes to 6.71 payable annually
Example No. 4. A one year certificate of deposit
-
6. If
v ..

you want it Ofcours sa substantial
rlj withdra
j to leave l Ions
as \ou can.
these
" \-COl : .... :, .';,
es:C leal
men D leathei wallet fbrntem:
tote bag? Plus men
are limited Minimum SS.OOt
ait required for tote buj
Wen Ik best examples in banking.
For all the details, just stop by. Or phone 534-1577.
THAT'S MY BANK.
DANKOFMIAMI BttH
"fr 9
FD1C.


Friday, May 9, 1975
*Jewist> fkridian
Page 7-A
Israel Facing Struggle for Sheer Survival
Continued from Page 1-A
duction of the new exchange
rate for the Israeli pound.
"There could also be a se-
rious chain reaction causing
even greater hardship," added
CJA-IEF Vice Chairman Eli Ti-
moner. "The escalating costs of
raw materials means more ex-
pensive bread, milk, eggs and
meat. And the doubling of oil
prices means higher prices for
manufactured goods.
Voters Incorporated
Meeting Set Tuesday
Voters incorporated will have
an "open to the public" meeting
Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the audi-
torium of the Washington Fed-
eral at 1234 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach.
i
Harry Levy, president, will
moderate. The guest speakers
are Miami Beach Mayor Harold
Rosen and Miami Herald Po-
litical Writer John McDermott.
The public is invited; there is
no admittance fee.
"The people of Israel," he
said, "are the victims of a
struggle for their economic
survival. The immediate effect
is a huge burden on every Is-
raeli family. But those who suf-
fer most are the aged, the dis-
abled, the infirm and the new
immigrantsall of whom must
depend on public assistance of
some kind for their very exist-
ence!"
BOTH LEADERS noted that
social welfare and humanitarian
programs in Israel are made
possible largely through the
support of campaigns like the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's 1975 CJA-IEF. They
pointed out that "since the Is-
raeli people's belt-tightening
and sacrifice is increasing, so is
-!.' ''-'
loctors
recommend
for patients in pain?
There are many medications a
fihvsician or dentist can prescribe
or pain. But there's one pain re-
liever physicians and dentists dis-
ftnse again and again: Anacin.
ach vear, doctors give out over
60,000.000 Anacin tablets for
everything from toothache and
headache pain to the minor pains
of arthritis. And millions take
Anacin without stomach upset
When vou're in pain, take the
tablet a doctor might give you in
his own office. Take Anacin.
lAmerican Israeli
x AH Religious Article* $
For Synagogues Schools Homtt
13S7 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-77M S. Sehwortx
RELIGIOUS GOODS
FOR HOME, SCHOOL
& HOUSE OF WORSHIP
IMPORTED CRYSTALWARE
HIGH QUALITY LOW PRICED
REIG0 A CRYSTAL, INC.
1507 Washington Avenuo
PHONE 532-5912
National Hebrew
ISBAM CfrT CENTER INC.
Bar Mifzvah Sets
949 Washington Ave. 532-2210
Religious Articles GUtt
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
HAS EVERYTHING FOR
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
and Jewish Homes. Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
417 Washington Ave. 672-70J7
W jr^ntgrtira
'pvimpn *H* v am*
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone 672-7306
945 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
MARVIN AHRINGER
UNLIMITED
Prompt Efficient
Service of Process
642-9429 642-5633
MUSS
the responsibility of the Amer-
ican Jewish community."
"These economic pressures
increase the people's vulnera-
bility," said Timoner. "Israel
must adopt such severe austeri-
ty to prevent massive unem-
ployment. How would it be if
new immigrants from the Soviet
Union were competing with
long-established residents of Is-
raelfor non-existent jobs?"
"AND HOW can the Boldiers
often children of immigrant
tamiUesbe expected to defend
their homeland if there is only
deprivation, anu no wages to bo
earned back homjf" asked
Muss.
What, exactly, will be needed
immediately?
"More day care centers, for
instance," they said, "as more
and more mothers go to work
to supplement family incomes.
More dormitories and schools
for youth. More absorption cen-
ters and apartments to replace
the miserable rented facilities
now inhabited by thousands of
immigrants."
"THE PEOPLE of Israel are
already the world's most heavi-
ly taxed people," said Timoner.
It we, here in Greater Miami,
really believe that all Jews are
responsible for each otherthat
we are one then we cannot,
and must not denv our respon-
sibility to CJA-IEF right now."
"The fight for economic sur-
vival is as serious and imme-
diate as the prospect of a vio-
lent enemy attack," said Muss.
"And it is just as threatening to
the security of the Jewish
homeland.
"This is part of the challenge
that we face as one people in
1975." he added. "You may ask
yourself if you can afford to
make a meaningful CJA-IEP
commitment right now. But I
ask vou, quite frankly, if you
can afford NOT to?"
-
liU* -
If your social security
check was ever lost,
misplaced or stolen:
join the club.
The V.S.P. Club Account.
It's for "very special people." People receiving social security.
Free membership includes some very special privileges.
Under (he authorization of the U.S. Treasury Department, you
may now have your social security checks deposited directly into
your Flagler Federal savings account.
This insures that you will always receive it. Safe and sound. And
collect 5'\> interest on your check from the day we receive it. You
don't lose a cent of interest this way. And no more lost, misplaced
or stolen checks either. Or waiting in line to deposit it.
Participation in the Direct Deposit is voluntary. Just fill out the
authorization form at any convenient Flagler Federal office. That
automatically makes you a "very special person." With these other
"very special privileges," within normal limits, of course:
FREE 1st National City f ..^ r very special people
Traveler*s Checks
FREE Money Orders
FREE Notary Public
FREE Photostatic Copies
FREE Cashiers Checks
FREE Save-By-Mail Envelopes
FREE $2.00 Courtesy
Savings Account or Bonus
54% Interest on your check
from the day we receive it.
is .i member in good standing and is entitled to
jll the cluh benefits.
Flayer Federal
Savings insured up to $-10,000 by FSLIC
Downtown Miami
.BKcayne Shopping Plaza-North Miami Beach
. Hollywood
-Westchestci II
INI I Avenue#570 NJ el l6501 N.E. 15th Avenue 101 Hollywood Fashion Center 8686 Coral Way
KirmBay -Miami Beach m Coconut Creek #Nortll
144W South Di\ie Highway* lo50 Alton Read 4301 Coconut Creek Parkway 1712-79th Street
V


Page 8-A
+ k-mst fhrklinr
Friday, May 9, 1975
!

COMMUNITY JOINS IN MtK-LONG SALUTt TO SPIRITUAL LEADIR
Temple Israel Celebrates Dr. Narot's 25th Year Here
Celebrating the 25th anni-
versary of the affiliation of
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot with
Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami, the community and mem-
bers of the congregation will
observe the occasion with a
series of events over a period
of two weeks.
A dinner-dance at the Hyatt
House on Miami Beach on May
17 will follow a Sabbath serv-
ice on Friday, May 9. and will
be followed by the annual con-
gregational meeting and open
house reception on Sunday,
May 18, beginning at 3:30 in
the afternoon at the Temple.
DR. ALFRED Gottschalk,
president of the Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of
Religion, will give a tribute to
Dr. Narot at the dinner.
Rabbi Steven B. Jacobs, from
Temple Judea in California,
will return to Temple Israel to
preach the sermon for the May
9 Friday night service in honor
of Dr. Narot.
The annual meeting on Sun-
day will be' the congregation's
53rd. The reception afterwards
will be open to all members of
the congregation.
Dr. Narot came to Temple
Israel in 1950, after a period of
ten years as rabbi of Temple
Beth Israel in Atlantic City. He
holds the earned degree of
Doctor of Hebrew Letters from
Hebrew Union College Jew-
ish Institute of Religion, and
was ordained a rabbi there in
1940.
He is a member of Phi Beta
Kappa and was graduated from
Western Reserve University.
The rabbinic college has also
awarded him an honorary de-
gree of Doctor of Divinity. He
is currently in office as chair-
man of the Board of Alumni
Overseers of the seminary.
.WELL-KNOWN in this com-
munity and throughout the na-
tion for his services to other
agencies as well as to his own
congregation and for his forth-
right stands on moral issues,
Dr. Narot has received such
honors as the Award for Distin-
guished Services in Advancing
the Cause of Human Relations
from the American Jewish
Committee, the Award for Pro-
moting Intergroup Understand-
ing from the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, and the
first annual Humanitarian
Award presented by the Great-
er Miami chapter of the Urban
League.
Dr. Narot is the author of
several books and compilations
of his sermons, lectures and
letters. Titles now include: "The
Lost Honesty," "What I Believe
About God," "Letters to the
Now Generation," "Why I Am a
Jew," "From Whom the Rabbi
Speaks," "A Preface to Well-
Being," "An Introduction to a
Faith," and "A Primer for
Temple Life."
DR. CHARLTON Tebeau, in
his general history of Temple
Israel entitled "Synagogue in
the Central City," says of the
rabbi's sermon topics and his
attitudes towards his work,
"The themes of most of his
sermons are entirely contem-
porary, but the content is deep-
ly rooted in Hebrew scriptures,
history and tradition. He aims
to show that the teachings of
Judaism are universal, that
they provide a viable approach
to the questions and problems
of the day. It is here in his
approach that" he interprets Re-
form principles to demonstrate
a rational, changing, adaptable
religion, as vital today as ever,
an old religion in new forms.
"If the members of the Tem-
ple Israel congregation hope to
be soothed and reassured and
made comfortable by his
preachments, thev are likely to;
be disappointed. He preaches
fervently the beauty and the j
vitality and the contempora-
neousness of the ancient faith.
"But at the same time, he is
likely to jolt them out of any
complacency they might feel;
to tell them there is work to
be done; to call them to arms
against ignorance, superstition,
hypocrisy, prejudice, discrimi-
nation, social injustice, and
violence; and to reaffirm their
faith in the dignity and worth
of the individual."
PHYSICALLY AND in ad-
ministrative matters as well,
Temple Israel has greatly ex- '
panded under Dr". Narot's lead-i
ership. The one building has
become a complex on a plaza in
downtown Miami which has'
won awards for outstanding ar-
chitecture and design.
A cantor and two associate
rabbis have been added to the'
Yariv Warns Israel
Losing Info War
To Arabs in U.S.
Contlnawd from Page 1-A
the White House, "the Adminis-
tration is much more dependent
on Congress and Congress is
more alert to public opinion."
He said that "especially in
times of economic crisis, if we
want important aid we have to
convince public opinion that it
is justified and necessary. Not
enough of an effort is being
made in respect to dealing with
the public."
YARIV, who resigned from
the government of Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin last month with a
blast at Israel's information set-
up generally and a recommen-
dation (which Rabin adopted)
to abolish the Information
Ministry because it could not
function properly under the
conditions that prevailed, main-
tained that "Israel is capable of
competing with increased Arab
propaganda," at least in the U.S.
if not on a world-wide country-
by-country basis.
He said "Information should '
be handled on a much more mas-;
sive and intense scale." He said
he would make much more and !
better use of Israeli officials
abroad and see to it that they'
covered wider territory and
were "never idle" in their ef- j
forts to disseminate informa-
tion on Israeli's position.
YARIV said he would also do'
his best "to coordinate all the .
Jewish organizations in the U.S." :
because "they can play a very
important role in giving out in-
formation rather than just re-
ceiving it. These organizations
all have public relations outlets
and they're not being used ef-
fectively right now.
"We should also take a much
more concerted effort in terms
of media as well, especially in
Israel itselfthat's most impor-
tant."
DR. JOSEPH R. NAROT
uarter-century service
staff to serve what is now the
largest Reform Congregation in
the Southeast. High holidays
find the congregation's 1900
families worshipping in total
numbers of more than 5000
people in the Convention Hall
of the City of Miami Beach.
Several young rabbis owe
their inspiration to enter or to
strengthen the nature of their
services to this profession to
Dr. Narot's direct influence. In
some cases, these young men
got all their early religious edu-
cation in Temple Israel under
his direction and that of Can-
tor Jacob Bornstein. who has
served with Rabbi Narot and
shared in his achievements
since 1952.
RABBI JACOBS served as an
assistant rabbi here for three
years before taking the Cali-
fornia post. Rabbi Allen Freeh-
ling, of Toledo, Oh., was on the
staff of the Temple as an ex-
ecutive secretary before he de-
cided to change his profession
to study for the rabbinate.
The present associate and
assistant rabbis are Rabbi Bar-
ry Tabachnikoff and Rabbi
Robert Orkand. Also influenced
in their careers by their brief
acquaintance with Dr. Narot as
associates- here.are Rabbi Eli-
jah Palnick of Little Rock, Ark.,
and Rabbi Nicholas Behrmann,
of Framingham. Mass.
Rabbi Stanley Ringler, Hillel
director at the University of
Miami, and Rabbi Gerald Serot-
ta. Hillel director at the City
College of New York, will ap-
pear on the pulpit with Rabbi
Jacobs at the Friday night
service in Rabbi Narot's honor
THESE TWO young men, as
well as Rabbi Freehling and
Scott Saulson, who is now in
his final year before ordination
at Hebrew Union Colleg:, are
confirmands and graduates of
the Temple Israel Religious
School.
The issues in which Dr. N'ar-
ot has concerned himself and
by his example also many mem-
bers of his congregation, are
many. In education, he favored
desegregation and Black civil
rights long before many other
Florida citizens understood this
cause.
He is deeply concerned that
education for Jews should not
stop with Bar and Bat Mitzvah
and confirmation, but should
continue and become a lifelong
activity. Women's rights and
those of many other lesser-
known minorities, have been
increasingly important to him.
He understands and sympa-
thizes deeply with the plight of
the Russian Jews, having been
born in Vilna himself and re-
calling an early childhood that
included personal knowledge of
that nation's history of bigotry.
HE HAS visited Israel re-
peatedly and his children have
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Friday, May 9, 1975
+Jmist> tkrkUtvi
Page 9-A
i
id
1
1
JL
Author fAron Passes in Paris
a
i? an honorary degree of Doctor Divinity from the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1965 on
the occasion of his 25th year as a Rabbi. The presenta-
tion is being made by the late Dr. Nelson Glueck, who
was president of HUC-JIR. Looking on is Dr. Ezra
Spicohandler, head of the Reform Jewish seminary's
Jerusalem scfrooL %.
PARIS (JTA)- French Jew-
ish author and historian. Robert
Aron, died of a heart attack at
the age of 76. in his Paris home.
The historian was to be re-
ceived into the prestigious
French Academy on Apr. 24. He
had received his ceremonial
sw.ird last Tuesday.
ARON WAS known for his his-
torical works concerning France
under the German occuoation
tnA Al.ies.
We was a winner of th
Femirr\-Vacaresco Prize in 1961.
and had been honored with two ;
('ecoratnns: the French Legion;
of Honor and the Croix de'
Guerre.
Robert Aron was cheerful and ,
in aDDarent good health when he
received his sword last week, and
had told friends that he was plan-
ning to write his memoirs.
THE PARIS press mourned the
disappearance of the future mem-1
ber of the Academy.
France-Soir called him "one of
the most remarkable writers,"
and L'Aurora wrote that "hW life
will remain an example and his
memory will not be forgotten."
The evening newspaper, Le
Monde, paid tribute to the writer
who "came from an old Yisrael-
ite bourgeois family" who was
"open to Christian spirituality
and gravely curious about all,
which in the modem world, can
translate a need for the eternal
and a searching for the sacred."
LE FIGARO wrote: "you work-
ed. Robert Aron. for justice,
which you never separated from
truth."
Truth, or "emeth." is the He-
brew inscription engraved on his
ceremonial sword.
Dr. Narot's 25th Year Celebrated
!L
\
Continued from Preceding Page
lived and studied there. He is
strongly supportive of the sur-
vival and progress of that
country. He does not fail to
admonish his congregation how-
ever that a strong American
Jewry, committed to its own
ideals and culture as well, is
needed if Israel is to survive
at all.
In Reform Judaism national-
ly his is also a well-known
name,, not only for his work in
the" administration of the Board
of Alumni Overseers of the rab-
binic college, but as chairman
for two years of the liturgy
committee of the Central Con-,
ference of American Rabbis
from 1965 to 1967. where he
had a hand in shaping some of
the plans for the new Union
Prayer Book soon to be avail-
able throughout the country.
HE HAS edited the CCAR
Journal," completing that work
this year, and has served on
the CCAR board as well as on
the board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
In "The Lost Honesty," the
rabbi writes, "Here is the very
essence of our faith, and the
response that ought to be ours
in doing all we can to deny the
callousness of human nature,
to confirm the compassion we
feel for the agony of others, to
insist that day by day and
Howard Neu Guest Speaker
Howard Neu will be the guest
speaker Friday at the 8:15 p.m.
Sabbath Service at Temple Beth
Moshe according to an an-
nouncement made by Herbert
S. Lelchuk, president of the
Congregation and Rabbi Joseph
A. Gorfinkel. Mr. Neu's topic
will be "Behind the Scene in the
Mid-East." The community is
invited. .
ounce by ounce of strength we
must do all we can."
Individually as counselor and
friend of many and through
such organizations as the Dade
County Community Relations
Board, which he chaired from
1964 to 1968, the Dade County
Economic Opportunities Board,
the Dade County Welfare Plan-
ning Council and the Interfaith
Agency for Social Justice, he
has acted "out the prescription
he has written for others.
He was a founder and served
as chairman in 1970 and 1971
of the Interfaith Agency for
Social Justice.and also served
as president of the Dade Coun-
ty Welfare Planning Council
from 1961 to 1962 and of the
American Jewish Committee in
1968 and 1969.
DR. NAROT is married to the
former Helene Rubin Berg,
who is known to the congrega-
tion by the rabbi's special
name for her, "Lany."
He and his wife share an in-
terest in art and music and are
both active and on the board
of the Mental Health Society
of Miami. Mrs. Narot is a child
psychologist and is continuing
her education with studies at
Barry College.
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See your travel agent.


Page 10-A
(hmtaft nnrkttftn
Friday, May 9,
Top Jewish Leaders Meet With Sisco in D.C.
Continued from Page 1-A
is better now" between the U.S.
and Israel than it was last Mar.
22 when the second-stage talks
between Israel and Egypt con-
ducted by Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger, were sus-
pended.
But, Miller cautioned, "we
are in for a long difficult pe-
riod" in the U.S.-Israeli relation-
ship.
Miller told reporters that the
bulk of the questions at the
meeting and Sisco's responses
were related to "the malaise of
the Jewish communityindeed
of the entire American commu-
nityover the pressures being
put on Israel by overt and off-
the-record remarks" by Admin-
istration sources, the climate
treated by these remarks and
the linkage of military equip-
ment to the Administration's
reassessment of its Middle East
policies "which we felt ought
not to be."
HE OBSERVED that there
have not been "many positive
words regarding Israel in re-
ent weeks by Administration
pokesmen."
Miller sgjg than he jtate De-
partment l^ci^fc^ittrtWlng^Pe
netting had said "certain things
that encouraged us" but also
left "some question marks."
He said the positive aspects
were the reiwation of the U.S.
commitment to Israel's security
end the special relationship be-
tween Israel and U.S. Less posi-
tive was the outcome of the
reassessment and the failure to
state the quantities of aid Israel
would receive from the U.S.
ACCORDING to Miller. Sisco.
who is chairman of the group
conducting the policy review
ordered by President Ford,
stressed that the U.S. is com-
mitted to Israel's security and
survival and that he understood
the sensitivity among Israel's
sympathizers here when the Ad-
ministration speaks only of Is-
rael's survival without mention-
ing security.
Miller said that Sisco told the
group that while the U.S. would
like to return to the step-by-
step negotiating process, it look-
ed as if the option will be the
Geneva conference. No date was
mentioned. Sisco warned, ac-
cording to Miller, that a flash-
point will occur in the Middle
East this July when the newly
extended mandates for the
United Nations peace keeping
forces expire.
THE MANDATE for the
Protter
Has Mental
Problems
Continued from Page 1-A
eventually returned to South
Africa.
He turned up in Israel again
in 1970 and two years later
joined the army. But he was
discharged within three months
for mental reasons and a psy-
chiatric team found him unfit
even for reserve duties.
Shortly afterwards, Protter
was arrested for impersonating
an Israeli paratroop captain.
He persisted in his impersona-
tion and was rearrested several
times and served short prison
terms before he was finally de-
ported to South Africa.
HIS RECORD was apparently
unknown to the Israeli Con-
sulate in Johannesburg when
he was employed as a security
assistant.
There were no indications of
what triggered his violent be-
havior. Some sources said his
actions were premeditated re-
venge for being ousted from Is-
rael. Others said simply that he
went berserk.
Early this week, he attempted
suicide twice in his cell.
United Nations Emergency
Force (UNEF) on the Egyptian
front was evtended for three
months and that of the Disen-
gagement Observers Force (UN-
DOF) on the Svrian front for
...... _. -.,*_-=aning ?hit they
will both expire at about the
same time.
Another flashpoint will
August unless there is soim
progress toward a peace settle-
ment, not necessarily at Geneva
but in terms of some kind of de-
velopment, Sisco said, according
to Miller.
1975

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.".;
lay, May 9, 1975
+Jewl$t> meridiem
Page 11-A
EVEN ARMY TOUCHED BY CORRUPTION
Terrorist Bombs Explode
Scandals Leave Israelis Reeling ln Jerusalem Apartments

(
Continued from Page 1-A
^and serious phenome-
, Rabin spoke out only a
days before the release of
Comptroller's report, and
t appeared to some that he
was trying to head off criticism
his government and lay the
blame on the previous regime.
Even beio.-e Rabin's remarks
I the Nebcnzahl report, Is-
etts were siiocked to learn
that at least eight senior De-
be Ministry officials and two
Mr high ranking Air Force
(leers had been either re-
ihded in custody or were out
^pending prosecution on
of bribery, fraud and
Ion.
IHElft ALLEGED offenses
involved collusion with private
manufacturers leading to vvaste-
1 or unneeded purchases for
I armed forces at the e:<-
) of Israel's heavily bur-
ened taxpayers.
The Comptrollers report cit-
ed far more serious manifes-
tations. It claimed that tens of
millions of Pounds had been
spent on fortifications on the
Golan Heights prior to the dis-
engagement agreement with
Syria that rl>i not conform to
the army's specifications.
It found that the Defense
Ministry overpaid local vehicle
assembly firms millions of
Pounds because of the faulty
supervision cf an IL 120 mil-
lion contract. It found that mi-
litary industries were paid to
stockpile supplies as directed
by the any; but when the Yom
Kippur War broke out the
needed supplies were net avail-
able.
ACCORDING TO rite report,
dock workers at tne port of
Ashdod were paid unlimited
overtime for unloading ammu-
nition on the Sabbath. Workers
netted as much as IL 3000 for
eight hours of work which
Dayan: 'Reassessment'
Is Really Warning to Us
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Former Israeli Defense Minis-
ter Moshe Dayan criticized the
|J.S. connection of its military
id to Israel with its negotiating
efforts in the Middle F.ast and
emphasized Israel must remain
Strong to negotiate agreements.
"Unless Israel is ready to
ive another war, we will have
accept a dictate," he said to
reporte:- who met him at the
tate Department shortly be-,
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fore he began his second private
meeting in two weeks with Sec-
retary of State Henry' A. Kis-
singer.
DAYAN SAID the U.S. link-
age of military assistance to the
negotiating progress under cov-
er of "reassessment'' of policy
is "a warning and a challenge
that unless you do what we
want, we won't provide weap-
ons."
He said 'It's not a reassess-
ment; its a suspension." While
Isral would be in a "very bad
position" if it does not receive
U.S. arms, he said, Israel does
not have to diminish its na-
tional purposes because of
American policy.
"We have lived for 4.000
years," he said, indicating that
Israel will continue to try to be
its own master.
were counted as 300 hours.
The Housing Ministry does not
know how many units it has
built at any given time or
whether tt expenditures match
the available judget, the Comp-
troller's report charged.
It said that after the Yom
Kippur War, Treasury loans to
universities ware reduced by
IL 15.8 million because of the
country's severe economic
straits but in actuality the uni-
versities received IL 26.2 mil-
lion more than they were en-
titled to.
NEBENZAHL CALLED for
the appointment of a "young,
dynamic and politically and
publicly supported minister"
charged with the task of com-
pletely revamping public ad-
ministration in the country. He
pledged to keep plugging away
at every case of corruption or
mismanagement until the prob-
lems ars solved.
Defense Minister Shimon Pe-
enr investigation nad been un-
earthed by his Ministry's own
internal control and supervi-
sory bodies.
THE NEBEMAHL report,
along with recently exposed in-
stances of police orutaiity and
incompetence; a series of scan-
dals in the private business
s.ctor; the impending trial of
Michael Tsur, former general
manager of the Israel Corpora-
tion and chairman of the Zim
Lines on charges of embezzle-
ment and fraud, are all expect-
ed to produce livelv debate in
the Knesset whicv began its
summer session this week.
But the a1 alanche of corrup-
tion reports had made many Is-
raelis cynical. Doubts have
been expressed that any maior
reforms or effective corrective
measures will oe taken once
the smoke clears.
N sbenzahl himself professed
not to be surprised by his find-
ings. He noted that those who
were aware of similar going-on
in the past, including the Ne-
tivei Neft oil scandal, "cannct
be surprised today."
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM(JTA) Ter-
rorist bombs exploded in a West
Jerusalem apartment building
early Sunday morning injuring
three adults and an 18-month-
old child.
Yaacov Beja, 37, who was on
his way to work when the
oombs exploded in the build-
ing's stairwell at 7 a.m. local
time, suffered severe burns.
Geula Zartzi, 28, was treated
for lsser burns, and Simone
Musayoff, 28, and her baby
daughter Galli were released
from Shaare Zedek Hospital
later afte- treatment for minor
injuries. Three flats in the build-
ing were damaged.
THE LATEST terrorist as-
sault came a little more than 24
hours after terrorists fired two
Katyusha rocket shells into
West Jerusalem early Saturday.
At about 4 a.m., local time,
one shell burst in the vicinity
of the Hebrew University shat-
tering windows in a nearby
apartment building and uproot-
ing a telephone cable. No in-
juries were reported.
Seconds later, a second Katy-
usha rocket whistled over the
city but apparently landed in an
open field Police were unable
to find the spent shell. Police
believe that at least one of the
rockets had been aimed at the
Knesset building.
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Page 12-A
+Jmlsti Fhrkfiar
LEO MINDLIN

Tallahassee Yahoos Vote Their Mediocrity
Continued from Page 4-A
can at least say of them that
they are "different" and cer-
tainly not equal.
Hence, the end of ERA for
Rabbi Weberman, and reason
enough for him to applaud
Renick and Holloway.
Bui look at the word, "hys-
terical." It c mes from a Greek
word me ining ing in the
womb." The male chauvi
\... of un<
( ili ies is I by <
femi '
position based on its presump-
tion is fir late,
si RELY, ONE would think
that men (males) have coi
long way baby since then, but
apparently not so as Renick,
Holloway, Weberman & Co.
demonstrate.
We have not, in fact, come
very far at all from the "Wom-
an of Valor" accolade that te'ls
you precisely how valuable
women arc but not why, except
perhaps in womb terms, the
womb also including the kitch
t !1.
But il her nee is in
w can it be that
her inferiority is there, too?
! AM reminded of Simone de
o has just won the
Jerusalem Prize for her litera-
ture.
Forget the de Beauvoir who
generated the revolutionary
philosophical notion of a "sec-
ond sex" (women) as alien in
the universe reckoned in fraud-
ulen. male ontological terms.
(Woman is after all the Di-
vine aftcrthough wrought fjr
Adam's pleasure.)
FORGET THE do Beau
who electrified the 20th c^n-
in her vital relationship
with the i ti tialist Jean
Sartre, which took the pes
mism of human purpoi
out of the hands of the phi!os
phers of indeterminacy and ag-
nosticism.
I think n. the Simone de
Beauvoir who was awarded the
Jerusalem Prize for her con-
tribution "to the freedom of the
indhiduai."
I think of the Simone de
Beauvoir of whom Premier
Yiuhak. K?bin said, "She dis-
plays great courage in the fight
Friday, May 9, 1975
... for equality and freedom
with nations among nations"
and that "she is the symbol of
a writer fulfilling her mission."
AGAINST THIS prestigious
array of acco'.ades to her life,
no less than to her literature. I
behoid a soil of Yahoo Dick
Renick and Vernon Holloway
sitting there in Tallahassee vot-
ing against ERA.
/\nd Kabbi Weberman, who
by his cv\n all-too-frequently
heralded accounts, takes his
"pru uri-u" more proudly and
seriously than anyone I know.
'75
J
.V-'Vc* !r
Sy
nagogue is
Bombed in Paris
Continued from Page 1-A
Jewish Tgjggraphic Agency he
' had received no threats. Police
' investigating the blast found no
' messages or inscriptions from
' the vandals. It was felt the at-
' tack might be connected with
' the visit to Paris by Israeli
' Foreign Minister Yigal Allon,
' but there was no immediate
claim of responsibility by any
' terrorist group.
Chief Rabbi Jacob Kaplan of
' France visited the synagogue,
accompani""* h" /"~:- ""' -
' child, president of the Consis-
tory, and Jean Rosentnal, picai-
dent of the Representative Coun-
cil of French Jewish Institu-
te*-
-Rothschild told the JTA he
Was greatly disturbed that such
incidents occur in France.
<*-SJBLON, who arrived here the
day before the blast on a three-
day official visit, had two work-
ing sessions with French For-
.eign Minister *"" Snnniff""r-
gues.
The two diplomats later, at a
dinner in Alton's honor, ex-
pressed differing views on how
to bring about a settlement in
the Middle East. The French
diplomat stressed that Israel's
security must be assured in any
settlement.
bauvagnnrgurs said that the
French government continued to
believe that three conditions
had t o be fulfilled to' bring
peace in the Middle Hast He
said these weje Israeli exacau-
tion of the occupied areas, tak-
ing into consideration the right
of the Palestinians to a national
homeland, and mutual recogni-
tion of all states In the area and
the granting of very serious
guarantees to ensure the se-
curity of their borders. .
GOING TO RUSSIA?
MEET SOVIET JEWS!
MAINTAIN THE WEIM
CALL 5764330
SOUTH FLORIDA CONFERENCE ON SOVIET JEWRY
P.O. BOX 1056, NORTH MIAMI, 33161
LIMITED OFFER
*l
/c
on deposits cf
or more
for period of one year
MIAMI
NATIONAL
BANK
MEMBER FDIC
ASSETS OVER $100,000,000
Biscaynt Blvd.
at 81tt St.
Phont:
757-2481

THE FRENCH Foreign Min-!
ister concluded his toast with
an expression of h>'*. "re-.
spect and friendship" for Israel '
In his response, Allon said
peace could be achieved only by
mutual honorable concession^
which would satisfy Israel's se-
curity needs and the political
aspirations of the Arab states.
Alton's second dav in Pari-
was marked bv a visit to th
Tomb of the Unknown Jewish
Martyr, accompanied by Sau-
vagnarmies who, visiblv move!
knelt briefly and placed a tri-
color wreath on the crypt.
French army buglers Bounded
taps as several hundred Paris-
ian .lews fathered at the me-,
norial in the heart of the o>'1
Jewish onarter. looked on an<'
later cheered the Israeli minis-
ter.
EARLIER, Allon breakfasted
with three leaders of the French
Jewish community; the Chief
Rabbi; Rosenthal; and Baron de
Rothschild. Allon discussed Is
rael's political stand and urge:'
them to continue their work or
behalf of Russian nnd Syrian
Jews.
Later, the poreiqn Minister
received 80 members of the
local Jewish community, ren
resenting most Jewish organiza
tions in Paris.
The da's tough meeting came
when Allon called on Franc*1
Premier Jacques Chirac. Fo<
about one hour Chirac as'-.ed Al-
lon pointed and sometimes
slightly aggressive question;
such as why doesn't Israel nego-
tiate with the Palestinians?
Why does Israel refuse to even
recognize them?
In spite of this interrogation
French and Israeli official cir-
cles said the meeting wad cor
though it also was out-
spoken and frank.
MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT
104 kt 1st STREET;'PHONE 373-8432
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE INSURANCE
A DIVISION OP
TITLE
V itiumici cottMwr
,
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/ The Lord made a Covenant with Abram ....
i Genesis XV. 18 >]'
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MAKE YOUR SOLEMN COVENANT WITH ^
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Israel Histadrut Foundalion, Inc.
1420 Lincoln Ra.. Miami Beach, Fla. 33139, Room 389
Telephone: 531-8702
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T/t*>; to inform you that I plan to include in my WILL a
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f
ly, May 9, 1975
+Jmisl> noridiain
Page 13-A
Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
.AUGURAL PRESIDENTIAL TRIBUTE DINNER TO LEADERSHIP & PRESIDENT

*%"*' IS RAJ
i
meft to right: Judge Zev Vv. Kogan, Pres. jNr southern Region; Mr.
I Samuels, JNF Vice-Pres., and Chairman, JNF in Point East; Mrs.
nfz, Chairman, Women jor JNF; Mrs. Abraham Grunhut, Mr. Abra-
^mrunhut, President JNF of Greater Miami; Mrs. Irving Lehrman,
Mlrving Lehrman, JNF Foundation Chairman; Mr. Moe Levin, JNF
mres. and Big Gifts Chairman; Mrs. Moe Levin, Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
^thairman, JNF Executive Board.
town Queen and Princesses from left to fight: Princess Martha Rosen,
Queen Esther, Cclia Rosenblatt, Princess Etta Aronson.
Seated left to right: Mrs. Victor Roskin, Mrs. Paul Unger, Mr. Paul Unger,
: Max Hecht, Mrs. Max Hecht. Standing left to right: Mr. Victor Roskin,
Dorothy Kaminetzky, Mr. George Kotin, Mrs. George Kotin, Mrs.
Schuster, Mr. Leon Schuster.
rJted left in right: Mr. Igor Schultz. Mrs. Igor Schultz, Mrs. Lou Aronson,
C. Lou Aronson. Standing left to right: Mr. Samuel Mirenberg, Mr. Her-
on Kass. Mrs. Herman Kass. Mr. Joseph Hill, Mrs. Freida Tobey, guest of
Mrs. Freida Tobey.
left to right: Mr. Morris Putter, Mrs. Morris Putter, Mr. Ben
Talewsky Mr Meyer Sicgel. Standing left to right: Mr. Bernard Katz, guest
Bernard Katz, Mrs. Florence Minov, Mr. Isidore J. Riffkin, Mrs. /si-
Riffkin, Mrs. Celia Rosenblatt.
beaxea
atewsi
mttMr.
*%lore J.
Seated left to right: Mr. Abraham Grossman, JNF Ambassador to Point
Mrs Abraham Grossman, Mr. Leon Buda, Mrs. Leon Buda, Mr. Mor-
is Kusnetz Mrs. Morris Kusnetz. Standing left to right: Mr. Arthur Miller,
Irs. Arthur Miller, Mrs. Annie Ackerman, Mrs. Ben Pearlson, Mr. Ben
tarlson.
STRENGTHEN THE JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
From left to right: Judge Zev W. Kogan, President JNF Southern Region;
Mr. Abraham Grunhut, President JNF of Greater Miami; Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, JNF Foundation Chairman; Rabbi Morton Malavsky, JNF Chair-
man, Broward County; Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, JNF Chairman Exec. Bd.
Seated left to right: Mr. Mayshie Friedberg, Miss Susan Weinberger,
Mrs. Aron Weinberger, Dr. Aron Weinberger, National Foundation Direc-
tor, Assistant Executive Vice President of the JNF of America; Mr. Abra-
ham Grunhut, President JNF of Greater Miami; Mrs. Miriam Press, Treas-
urer. Standing left to right: Mr. George Brodie, Mrs. Geoige Brodie, Re-
cording Secretary; Mrs. Ida Wessel, Comptroller; Mr. Herman Medow,
Foundation Champion (deceased); Mr. Emanuel Mentz, JNF Morton Tow-
ers Chairman; Mr. Abraham Grossman, JNF Ambassador to Pt. East;
Mrs. Peter Heller, Recording Secretary; Mr. Peter Heller, Publicity Di-
rector; Cantor Saul H. Breeh, Chairman, JNF Hi-Rise Apts.; Judge Zev
W. Kogan, JNF President, Southern Region.
Seated left to right: Mrs. Lester Bigelman, Mrs. Lillian Dubowy, guest of
Mrs. Lillian Dubowy, Mrs. Moe Reiffen. Standing left to right: Mr. Lester
Bigelman, Mr. Simon Tetenbaum, Mrs. Simon Tetenbaum, Mr. Sam Pascoe,
Mrs. Sam Pascoe, Mr. Moe Reiffen.
Seated left to right: Mrs. George Brodie, Recording Secretary; Mr. George
Brodie, Mrs. Fannie Barard, Miss Elizabeth Zentler. Standing left to right:
Mr. Frank Brickman, Mrs. Frank Brickman, Mrs. Miriam Press, Treasurer;
Mrs. Ida Wessel, Comptroller; guest of Mrs. Ida Wessel.
Seated left to right: Mr. Isaac Jacobowitz, Mrs. Isaac Jacobowitz, Mrs. Tobv
Schachter, Mrs. Harry Feldman. Standing left to right: Mrs. Malka Shklair,
Mr. Simon Berstein, Mrs. Simon Berstein, Mrs. Joshua Z. Stadlan, Mr.
Joshua Z. Stadlan. Pd. Adv.


Page 14-A
+Jew 1st ftcridiar
Friday, May 9,
IIGAL NOTICE
IEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVIC8
I (NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-30870
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EVELIO L OLIVERA,
and
MAHEHUNISA K. OUVERA,
TO: Maherunisa K. Olivera
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage haii been filed aBainst yon and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
Adolfo Koss. Esquire, attorney fr
Petitioner, whose address Is 101 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33130.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled, court on or before
llay 30. 1975; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
ill THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21st day of April. 1975.
(Circuit Court Sell
RICHARI> P. ItRINKBli.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Ry A I). WADE
As Deputy Clerk
Adolfo Koss. Esquire
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
_ ___________________*/ 5/2-9-1C
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-12479
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
JACOR Al.LEN STERN,
Petitioner/Husband
and
PATRICIA ANN JELLEY STERN
Respondent/Wife
TO: PATRICIA ANN JELLEY
STERN
15 Mendowlark Drive
Hudson. New Hampshire
YOU ARE HEHERY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to it on
THEODORE M. TFUSHIN LAW OF-
FICES attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 42" Lincoln Road Mall,
Suite 600. Miami Reach. Florida 33139.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 28. 1975; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
IB THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on this
18th day of April, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
4/25 5/2-9-18
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 72-1319
In RE: Estate of
MICHAEL KETCHEL
i leceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that we
have filed our Final Report and Pe-
tition for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executors of the estate of
MICHAEL KETCHEL. deceased, and
that on the 27th day of May, 1975.
will apply to the Honorable Circuit
Judges of Dade County. Florida, for
approval of said Final Report and for
distribution and final discharge aa
Executors of the estate of the above-
named decedent. This 22 day of April.
1J75.
ELFREDA KETCHEL
FLAGSHIP FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI REACH
By WARREN KOHN
Sparber. Zemel. Roskln
Heilbronner and Karp. P.A.
Attorneys
1 S.E 3rd Ave. Suite 3050
Miami. Florida JS131
4/25 6/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTTIOU6 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Karate World at 6914 Biscay nc Blvd.,
Miami Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Of EVN MKHLMAN .
STEVE MISHKIN
5/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to' engage in
business under the fictitious name of
ORIGIN A1, ORANGE BLOSSOM
CLOGGERS at 1Pr.r. 8.W. 168 Street.
Slami. Florida 33155 Intend to ren-
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
/ NORMAN N. NAIRN
/ CAROLYN L NAIRN
______________________________5/2-9-16-23
NOT'CE UNDER
FICTIT CMS NAME LAW
NOTICE 1.- HEREBY GIVEN that
the unduraU siring to engage
in business i e fictitious name
of Auto Ait cs at 595 NW 54
Street, Mlanv rla Intends* to re-
gister saiil Ii the Clerk of
the Circui Dade County,
Florida.
An era, Inc.
By: D President
QERALD
Attorney f '>
4/25 6/2-9-lt
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(-40 PROPERTY)
IN THE CfRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-12210
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
/N RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CAROL DENISE MEDINA, Petitioner.
and
GARY MEDINA, Respondent.
TO: Mr Gary Medina
3550 Overton Road. No 2187
Dallas, Texas ___
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
iage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
DAVID E. STONE, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 101 N.W.
12 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33128;
(305) 324-4555. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 30th. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLOKIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
17th day of April. 1973.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID E STONE, ESQUIRE
Stone, Sostchln & Koss, P.A.
101 N.W. 12 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128 (324-4555)
Attorney for Petitioner
4/26 5/2-8-16
NOTICE-UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of TROJAN PARK INVESTMENTS
at 5385 Palm Avenue. Hialeah intend
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
ALAN KURZWEIL
SUETELLE KURZWEIL
MARTIN KURZWEILL
SHIRLEY KURZWEIL
KING RICH
SHERYL RICH
Morton Belgel
Attorney for Applicant
4/25 5/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-12388
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUZ PEREZ.
and
ALVARO A. PEREZ.
TO: Alvaro A. Perez
Barrio Pugnado Afuera
Granya Estaceon
Hcga Vaja, Puerto Rico 00763
YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a cony of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Antonio J. Pineiro, Jr., Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose address
is 101 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami.
Florida 33128, and file the original
with the clerk of the above stv'ed
court on or before May 30th, 1975;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
18th day of April. 1976,
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
_ As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Sean
ANTONIO J PINEIRO. JR.. ESQ.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. FL 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
4/25 6/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-397M
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROBIN C. S MOLITOR,
husband
and
JUANITA MOLITOR.
wife
TO: JUANITA MOLITOR
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition, for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and. com-
menced in this court and yon are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to II on ROBIN
C. 8. MOLITOR, Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 31T4 S.W. 23 Ter.. Ml! ml and
file the original with the cle-'' of the
above styled court on or be'< -e May
23. 1975; otherwise a defau' will be
entered against you for th-< relief
prayed for In the complalr' or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be pub! i<< once
each week for four consecu weeks
In The Jewish Florldlan
WITNESS my hand and cal of
said court at Miami, Flor' i this
18th day of April. 1975.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRIN1
As Clerk, Circuit ('
Dade County. BTo-
By A. WAI.SI
As Deputy Clerk, Clri i irt
'Circuit Court Seal)
4/2". '2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CADE COUNTY ____
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-12945
NOTICE TO DEFEND
In Re: The Marriage of '.,'
MAKIPOI. GONZALEZ. Wife
And. Dorgy Gonzalez, Husband.
You. Dr. Dorgy Gonzalez. M.D., Ca-
ll. C entre 3a. y 4a., Reparto Virginia,
Santa Clara. Las Villas. Cuba, are
hereby notified that Marlsol Gonzalez,
has filed a suit for marriage dissolu-
tion in this Court, and that you have
until June 6, 1975. to file your answer
with this Court, and to send a copy
thereof to JOSEPH C. LAUSSEL,
9959 N.W. 7th Avenue. Miami. Florida
33150, her attorney; otherwise a .De-
fault will be entered against you. in
accordance with the law.
Dated: 23 April. 1975. at Miami.
Florida.
Richard P. Brtnker.
Circuit Court Clerk,
By: WILLIE RRADSHAW, JR.
4/25 5/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-11990
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of:
HOWARD BODDEN,
Petitioner,
and
JANET BODDEN.
Respondent.
TO: JANET BODDEN.
10620 Shore Front Parkway.
No. 12th
Rockway Beach Park (Queens),
New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that ana0tloji for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
LAW OFFICES OK BURNS & AR-
NOVITZ, attorneys for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 460, Miami Beaoh, Florida 33139,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
May 21. 1975: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
15th day of April, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFFICES OF BURNS
& ARNOVITZ
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 450
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone (305) 538-4421
Attorney for Petitioner
4/18-25 6/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of SUPERIOR PHARMACAL at 1924
N.E. 151st Street, North Miami Beach
Florida intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GULFCOAST DRUG SUPPLY. INC.
by: Robert Pollack, President
Martin Starr
Attorney for Applicant
420 Lincoln Ri ad
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
4/18-25 r '2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Directions Publication at 2417 Bis-
cavne Blvd.. Miami intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Allen and Rhoda Gadol
4/18-25 5/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of INTERNATIONAL GENERAL
MERCHANDISE INC. d/b/a IGM at
931 Northeast 79th Street, Miami,
Florida 33138 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
531-6417
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 211
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
4/16-26 6/2-9
IN THE CrRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTV,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-122*2
NOTICE OF SUIT
In Re: The Marriage of
FRANCO PAU. Husband
and
PAULINE PAU. Wife
TO: PAULINE LONG PAU
" 2 Denholme Hnsrt. W 9
Ixmdon. England'
YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been fited against you, and
you are required to serve a-ropy of
your written defenses. If any to the
Petition on the husband's attorney.
MURRAY P. YANKS. ESQ.. CAIDIN,
ROTHENBEUG. KniiAX, KORN-
BLUM & BENJAMIN, 19 West Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida. U.S.A.
33130. and to file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled court
on or before the "th day of May,
1975, otherwise tlj .-in.-nt by default
will be taken against you for the re-
lief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Coitt on this nih day of April
1975.
RICHARD P BRINK
Clerk. Circuit I
Dade County. Florida
By c r d IPB
Deput> Cl
4 1/2-6-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names or
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of
Greater Hollywood; The Jewish rlor-
MUan at Greater Fort I,auderdale. The
Jewish FToridian of Palm Beach Coun-
ty at Uio N.E. 6th Street, Miami, Flor-
ida 33132 intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Fred K. Shochet Owner
___4/18-25 5/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-6817 (Parker)
IN RE: Estate of
AARON SWADOS,
Deceased. ,s__
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that I
have filed my Final Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executor of the estate of
AARON SWADOS. deceased. nd
that on the 23rd day f May. 1975.
will apply to the Honorable Circuit
Judges of Dade County. Florida, for
approval of said Final Report and
for distribution and final discharge
as Executor of the estate of the
above-named decedent. This 16'.h day
of April, 1975.
IRVING SOLOMON
PHILIP MEDVIN
Attorney
1032 duPont Building
Miami. Florida 33131
Te,: 379-7615 4/18J*_ _6/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE iS HEREBY GIVEN that
Uie undersigned, desiring to engage
in ljsln** under the fictitious nam
rt PAN PAN SUB TAKE OUT at
5504 N.W 72nl Avenue, Medley, Flor-
ida. 33166 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of -be Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
FORSYTHE I'-ALL INC.
4/25 5/2-9-H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GiVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Structural Coatings Company at
5601 NW 78 Avenue, Miami. Florida
intends to register said name with the
Clara of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Parliament Builders of South
Florida. Inc.
By: Jack Scott. President
GERALD SILVERMAN
Attorney for Applicant
4/36 6/2-9-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of J..M INVESTMENTS at 10500 Bis-
cayne Boulevard, Miami Shores. Fla.
33138 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
JOHN R. MARINO 50<&
ANOBLO J MARINO 50%
Elliot Miller
Attorney for Anpllcants
621 N.E 51st Street
Miami. Fla. 33137
4/18-25 5/8-6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Or
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-11775
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA RODRIGUEZ SOTO.
Wif i,
and
LEONARDO SOTO.
TO: LEONARDO SOTO
427 Shelton Street
Bridgeport. Connecticut 066O2
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIES,
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 2491
N.W. 7th Street, Miami, Florida 33125.
and ftle the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
May 30, 1975; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FIX>RIT>IAN.
WITNESS my hand and.the seal ol
said court at Miami. Florida on this
14th day of April. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clenk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L, CARRICARTE. P.A.
249! N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone No. 649-7917
^______________4/16-25 5/2-s
CIRCUIT COURT, tTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO 76-12017
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MARRIONKT MlhTNlS.
Wife.
VI
JACK MINNIS.
Husband
You. JACK MINNIS, RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN, are hereby notified to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Dissolution of Marriage filed against
you, upon Wife's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33136, and file
original with Clerk of Court on or
before June 6th, 1975; otherwise the
Petition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 15th day of April, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, CLERK
By: MARION NEWMAN
Deputy Clerk
4/18-25 6/2-9
notice of Action
constructive service
(no property)
in the circuit court of th
eleventh judicial circuit
of florida. in and for
oade county
civil action no. 75-11596
general jurisdiction
action for dissolution
of marriage
in re: the marriage of
angel o. castaneda.
Petitioner.
and
I
MADELINE P. CASTANEDA.
Respondent. .____
TO: MADELINE P. CASTANEDA
Residence. Unknown ______
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIES
that an action for Dissolution pf
Marriage bas been filed against yow
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If any; W
it on Antonio J. Pineiro, Jr.', Esq.. at>
torney for Petitioner, whose addrea*
is 101 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami,
Florida, 33128, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 30. 1975; oth-
ethcrwi.se a default will be entered
agairu-t you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published one*
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 11th day of April, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L AYALA
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ANTONIO J. PINEIRO. JR. ESQ.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 3312S
(305) 324-4555
Attorney for Petitioner
4/18-86 6/2-6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHl"
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 7421892
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of /
MICHELINE I ECI.ERC MORNO
wife and EDWARD MORNO.
husband
TO: EDWARD MORNO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are hereby required to serve a copy of
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Wife's Attorney, LES-
TER ROGERS, whose address Is 1464
N.W. 17 Avenue, Miami. Florida 33126,
and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or before
this 23rd day of May. 1975, or a De-
fault will be entered aaginst you.
DATED this 17th day ..f April, 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By A WAI.SH
Deputy Clerk .
4/25 5/2-9-H-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-141
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUISA ORTIZ.
Petitioner.
OUILI.EKMO ORTIZ.
Respondent.
TO: C.I'll LERMO ORTIZ
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed aealnst you and
you are required to serve a copy of
jrour written defenses, if Bnjr, to It on
ADOLFO KOSS. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose addri'ss Is 101 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami Florida, 33128. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before May
30th. 1975; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall he oublished once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at .Miami. Florida, on this
25th day of April. i:-7r.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. IIEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ADOLFO KOSS
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
324-4555 .
Attorney for Petitioner
5/2-8-16-26
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THB
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-6126
In re the Marriage of:
KAREN MARIE MASSARO.
Wife, /
and /
ENIO G. MASSARO,
Husband.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BNIO G. MASSARO
26 Highland Avenue
Everett. Massachusetts 03146
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTDfTB
that a Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defense to it, if any,
uron STEPHEN I. RASKIN. Peti-
tioner's Attorney, whose address is
7-uO Bird Road, Mlam F'.orida, 38166,
on or before May 23. '976, and file
the original with the C'erk of this
Court either before sc-vlce on Pe-
titioner's attorney .mmediately
thereafter; otherwise a i-fault will be
entered for the re -rounded In
the Petition.
WITNESS my han i seal of thlfl
Court on 16 April II "
RICHARD 1 KER
As Clerk i I -art
By a kl.SH
As Deo,: k
!S 6/2-9
I
1
M5/9/75
5/9/75
M6/9/75


w to Treat Aged Grows into One of Our Major National Concerns
* -lOVi
i 'th*
RANDAL over the treatment of the aged in
mot the private Jewish nursing homes
Bw a subject of public hearings by a Senate
leehas brought to the forefront the entire
Hit of aged Jews in this country, whose number
is growing with every year.
The Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Is has long been studying this problem. Its demo-
raphic population study has established that about
If Mtnt of all the Jews in this country are now
65 years of age. This would make a total of more
700,000 Jews, a large proportion of whom are
r and lonely.
FEDERATIONS IN cities where private profit-
Jewish nursing homes exist recognize their
existence
'Five years ago there were about 80 Jewish
for the aged maintained by Federations in
Jy+*u
Ovtwt
ar
various cities. There were about 20,000 residents in
these institutions, 65 per cent of whom were over
the age of 80.
SINCE THEN, the number of Federation-main-
tained institutions for the aged has increased, and
so did the number of residents. But this is not enough
to meet the needs of the growing number of elderly
Jews who must be taken care of.
New methods of care for such Jews have there-
fore been introduced recently in a number of com-
munities by the local Federations. Considering care
for the elderly as of top priority among local obliga-
tions, leaders in these communities have formed
Councils for Jewish Elderly, or Community Councils
on the Aging, with a broad range of services.
A good example of what can be done for elderly
Jews in need is the comprehensive program now de-
veloped by the recently-established Council for Jew-
ish Elderly in Chicago.
LEADERS OF this new Jewish communal agency
consider homes for the aged and nursing homes es-
sential to the total care for some Jewish aged, but
only in situations where such care is appropriate,
and never a total answer to the problems of aging.
In the course of one year, the Council has given
service to more than 5,000 different older people in
a target community which is estimated to have about
7,000 aged Jews.
,. m::< iiiillliH
:
GOTEIN is one of the world's renowned
authorities on "Jews and Arabs" (New
rk, Schocken Books, third revised edition,
L95, 263 pp.). The sub-title. "Their Con-
acts Through the Ages," describes the theme
Of this classic work.
Many members of the "fourth estate,"
rfter readmit this book, would not have columns
filled with myths and the air saturated with
inaccuracies
THE HEBREW University professor emeri-
tus proves that Islam is closer to Judaism than
it is to Christianity, and then he explodes some
yths. Hebrew is a Hamite language and there
never was a Semitic race.
Semite applies only to a language, that of
Arabs. There is no Biblical source for the
rtion that Ishmael is the progenitor of the
ibs. Therefore Jews and Arabs are not
ins.
"Ishmaeli." as found in our Scriptures, is
a common noun denoting a desert people of
camel breeders.
GOTEIN QUOTES a 13" statement of Ibn
Khaldun. the Tunisian Moslem nhilosonher of
history that "The realm of the Arabs has been
wiped out completely, the power now rests in
the hand of non-Arabs .
Gotein adds that this state of affairs re
raained unchanged until this century and that
Books About Jews,
Arabs and Poetry
at the beginning of World War I "not a single
Arab state existed independently."
"THE ZIRDS of Granada." by Andrew
Handler (University of Miami Press, S10, 224
pp.) is an account of the North African Zird
princes who ruled Moslem Spain in the 11th
century. It was during this period that Jews
rose to the high office of vizier.
The author is a professor of history at the
University of Miami. He reports that Granada
wis known as "the City of the Jews" and
"OtRtiad* "f the Jews." The book's principal
theme is the Moslem rule, but intersoers d
throughout it are the interactions between the
Mosl?"'s and Jews.
WHILE THERE was only one real nogrom
during the reign of the Zirds, the ani:
against the Jews spread from Granada to -laen.
The Naghrallas, Ismail and his son, Yusuf. both
noted Jews, played important roles in this little
known period of Jewish history.
ACCOLADES ARE due to the Jewish Publi-
cation Society of Philadelphia for the reprint-
ing of 2 classics or Hebrew literature: "Thfl
Selected Poems of Jehuda Haievi" (edited by
H. Brody, $3.95, 193 pp.) and "Selected Re-
ligious Poems of Solomon ibn Gabirol" (edited
by Israel Davidson. $3.95, 247 pp.). Both books
have the original Hebrew verses on pages fac-
ng the English translation.
Germany and Israel: In
the Turbulent Years Between
Haifa
T'EN YEARS ago. on May M. 1965, diplomatic
relations were formally established between
Israel and Germany. In his letter confirming
the understanding Prime Minister Levx Eshkol
pointed out that the decision had been taken
"against o sombre historical background and
a 'Wormy political one."
.Only a few years earlier who in the wild-
est Stretch of his imagination would ever have
_ to predict such a step? Yet the fact that
t>is couM be done, and that the relations could
svelop as.they have in the decade that has
Jlowed. constitute an optimistic ray of hope
1th respect to ultimate resumption of normal
itions with our Arab neighbors once the
hurdles are overcome.
HISTORY- TEACHES us that a dense fog
-.national animosities, no matter how vicious
and bitter at the time of conflict, tends to dissi-
under the warm sun of neighborly human
relations.
In a period of 70 years, France and Ger-
many foufcht three bitter wars against each
Kher during which expressions of mutual ha-
tred were unbridled. Yet each time the estab-
lishment of peace restored friendships. The
same story is repeated after almost every war.
NO MATTER what may be said now, the
truth is that there has been little history of
antagonism between the two Semitic people.
[foe Jews and the Arabs. In a recent book Un-
ease in Zion," Prof. Shmuel Hugo Berg-nan,
the Heb University, writes: "Anyone who
from the Old Cit" of Jerusalem
alter the war of June, 1967, when the gatjs
were opened and they poured in by the thou-
sands to 'V Western part of the city to see
their Jewish neighbors, embrace them and kiss
them, cannot believe that the roots of hatred
run deep."
THE EGYPTIAN woman journalist. Sana
Hassan, was asked about Arab hatred of Is-
raelis during a public dialogue which she and
the Israeli, Amos Elon, conducted before nu-
merous audiences in the United States.
In a new book "Between Enemies," which
expands on thit dialogue, she replies: "Anti-
Semitism is only a kind of war-time racism in
the Arab world. It's the kind that Allied propa-
ganda generated about the Germans in World
War II. and the Americans about the Japanese,
to mobilize popular emotion at home. It is in-
tense and vicious. I don't deny that, but it's not
endemic and it will burn out once the conflict is
over."
The Israelis' hex of hatred for Arabs is
well known, and occasional bursts of reaction
after a terrorist atrocity are highly volatile.
THREE MONTHS ago Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon paid a state visit to Germany. Ger-
man government officials had previously been
received here. If this has been possible with
Germany
Cd
en
Wrestler To
Return For
Olympic Try
* h Hiti
I "' r ii i
^a "f*
Tel Aviv
'T'HE ISRAEL Sports Federation here has been advised by
Freddy Oberland, Montreal, that Victor Silberman, contro-
versial wrestler who "jumped" to Canada recently, will be re-
turning to Israel to complete arrangements for his training pro-
gram nrior to the 1976 Olympics.
Apparently there was quite a mix-up, in the whole set of
afnirs and as matters stand here at this noint. it aonears that
,c'ibrrman is on the way back and all is well and he is forgiven.
He can still continue his training program as well as for his
teacHne srhedul".
THE ISRAELIS were quite unset o-er his sudden denarture
since it appears extremely likely that Silberman is a eool choice
fir I'"ael's first Olvmnic medal in international competition at
that level. Conseouentlv. the papers here played up his de-
part"-" to extreme lengths. .
The Israel National Basketball Team, now in the States,
started off its invasion with an easv victory in Rochester. New
York over St. John Fisher, 86-73. If the two-week tour, which
will see the bovs plaving a total of eight gamess. ends up 4-4,
the Israelis will have done quite well since competition this year,
as compared to last year's opposition, is much tougher. With
such t-ams as Houston. United States Naval Academy, Villinova
and Siena on the schedule, it is hard to envision a clean sweep
for tv,e National team.
p?iOR TO departine for the States the Israeli squad played
an exhibition game against the Israel Sabras. a professional
t~am. in the European Professional Basketball League, in the
Yad EHvahu Stadium.
?n-e 5.000 screaming fans looked on as the nros handled
t<*- v-.*;.nic .:?'! co'nnarative eas". on-'e thev Sol|*ed the zone
defense Coach Hemmo imposed. At one time the Sabras lead by
c'ocp t-i io "runts Vint Coach Herb Brown of the horn" pros keDt
ok seennd team in for the greater "art of the second half.
The ';--i qw how -.! a difference of 21 noints. .
T"ir car'OS -ti't'd their seapon verv slowlv in Israel
----,.i.. i. -.,,,, tnav nnirt"H on the ri->d rp, w II" "I'd off
in their first four games. Once they got horn to Tel A^ iv they
y, ,..,,, ;-i.,,. .1, i, -I ctnable of disnlRvfng and auickly
b"7n7> to overshadow the opposition. At the latest ;tan Mr
**- ,v,d ir the league two and on; half games be-
hin n '"">".
Switzerland is third. Germany is fourth and th" Spanish
fi- e Is at hp bottom of 'ho hean. All Hva clubs are employing
prr-fstpnall from the NBA and ABA, players who are either
on th way uo or the way down.
THE TYPE of basketball Israelis are toeing was described
by on? writer as "basketball out of this world." By comparison
t". the amateur brand of ball that exists in Europe and the Middle
East, the professionals are much quicker and have better skills
so that the difference in habits is discernable to those who un-
derstand basketball there.
As a matter of fact, two few of the writers covering the
basketball beat have seen enough top flite ball to appreciate the
execution of the Sabras and their opponents in the games which
have been played in Israel thus far.
""lT WILL take quite a while for professional basketball to
catch on here, but once it does it can take off since, basically,
the people here enjoy the game.
In addition, due to the late start of the Sabras it was diffi-
cult to coordinate the schedule of the professionals; with that of
the amateurs so that at one point here recently in a period of
ten days some nine games were played. Obviously; no city, in-
cluding New York, can afford to support each game heavily so
that, unfortunately, all parties involved suffered to some extent.
Reports from California reaching hack here indicate that
Brtia Roth, the Israeli female sprinter, is unhappy with her
training program at San Diego and consequently is moving up
to Los Angeles where she hopes to find conditions more to her
liking.
hwrtAi
tfMT r 1.1-fllWIWIIIIiWi*^ *<*"**'
mini......miiii.-ibnnintaMiMiiHi -
Friday. May 9, 1975
**# sf tkjridinr
Page 15-A


Fridav. Mav 9. 1973
+Mmiit fkrrBzr
rmm
lfou are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times.
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m the jaw eat ac aex -_ie af dm a-g fraat ary
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ore %5r-.a; a as jure yo. -Lai taes*
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But. boil h ad] down and
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1 BUS
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ar.d FR-" I
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MOESTEAJ>-M.4 5 FeAcr*; B*T-MMC!
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three -*- .re Tiu: f a iota, of 21 strong
wee : i-*-- each carae Ye. -::ha-~
sccng-^ :r^i_- IbbbVc as s^is Tbe
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be The 11
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Ju-iairiVaViiinni;
~
c'.yjUffniA


*cTewisli Floridian
Uiami, Florida Friday, May 9, 1975
Section B
ov. Askew, Harman to Keynote
leopus Award Dinner May 18
Gov. Reuben Askew of
iFlorida will keynote the Hc-
[brew University gala Sun-
day evening, May 18, at the
IFontainebleau Hotel.
Harry "Hap" Levy will be
honored at the gala, and
Arthur Horowitz is chair-
man.
THE FUNCTION will take
the form of a Golden Jubi-
lee, marking the 50th anni-
versary of the founding of
Hebrew University on Mount
Scopus in Jerusalem.
*


' !
Talking over plans for the 1975-76 administration of
Temple Emanu-El are these leaders of the Miami Beach
congregation which recently completed the observance
of its 35th anniversary; (r~om left) Judge Frederick N.
Barad, president of Temple Emanu-El; Mrs. Richard
(Kathy) Schwarz, president of Sisterhood; Mrs. Irving
Lehrman and Dr. Lehrman, rabbi of the synagogue for
more than 31 years.
Gov. Askew has played an ac-
tive part in the Scopus Award
Dinner eclehration. "Il is a great
honor for me to participate in
this tribute to 'Hap.' who has
devoted so much effort on be-
half of the well-being of the
people of Florida," Askew de-
clared.
Joining Gov. Askew as key-
noter, will be Avraham Harman,
president of the Hebrew Uni-
versity and former Israel Am-
bassador to the United States.
GOV. ASKEW noted that the
Heb-c significant contributions to our
stat" in the fields of agriculture
and other areas of vital re-
search."
In 1967, Hebrew University
provided researchers at the
University of Florida with ap-
ple seedlings that have display-
ed an ability to grow in climates
such as Florida's. Preliminary
results have indicated that a
new fruit industry is about to
blossom in the state.
Harman has served as presi-
dent of the Hebrew University
since 1968 and has been respon-
sible for maintaining its world-
acclaini"d standards of excel-
lence while steering a difficult
course through Israel's dual
Continued on Page 11-B
1
-
O
1 **
1 ,^0H^_
ptajfl Lt^ 1 a '' 1 ~" ^9% k*??%
'
r

Prior to Abba Eban's recent appearance
at Beth David Synagogue he was enter-
tained at a dinner party hosted by
Charles and Cynthia Rosenberg. Pictured
here with the host and hostess are (from
left) Rabbi Sol Landau, spiritual leader
of the congregation; Terry Bagdan, Mr.
Eban, Mr. Rosenberg, Mrs. Landau, Mrs.
Rosenberg and Jules Bagdan, chairman of
the Beth David Forum Series, of which
Mr. Eban's address was a part.
[Wieii, Lipoff Named For Major
Federation Leadership Awards
' Nancy B. Lipoff of South Mi-
ami and Leonard A. Wien, Jr.
of Coral Gables have been
selected to receive the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's 1975
Presidents' Leadership Award.
Both Mrs. Lipoff and Mr.
Wien were to be recognized for
their achievements, and hon-
ored with the 1975 Presidents
Leadership Award at the 37th
annual meeting of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation,
Thursday evening at the Doral
Country Club.
Both recipients' names will
ddd to be permanent
CoatfaMMd on Page 2 B
f^eg^^tMsmmi^t^gagamx^gBgtteag
AVRAHAM HARMAN
ARTHUR HOROWITZ
Heritage Dinner Is
Scheduled May 22
Dr. Emanuel Rackman, an
outstanding educator and spiri-
tual leader, will be a guest
DR. EMANUEL RACKMAN
speaker at the Florida Friends
ot Yeshiva University's annual
Heritage Dinner Thursday, May
22, at 6 p.m., in the Eden Roc
Hotel, according to the Hon.
Jay Dermer, former Mayor of
Miami Beach, dinner chairman.
Dr. Rackman is professor of
Judaic studies at the City Uni-
versity of New York and serves
as spiritual leader of the Fifth
Avenue Synagogue in New York
City. He served on the faculty
and as an administrator of
Yeshiva University for more
than 20 years and is nationally
known through his writings,
community work and service in
Jewish organizational life.
The Heritage Dinner is among
the most important annual pro-
grams sponsored by the Florida
Friends of Yeshiva University,
an organization of area indus-
trialists, educators, professional
leaders, parents of students and
alumni who identify with and
support the goals of the institu-
tion. More than 200 prominent
local residents are serving with
the chairmen on committees in
charge of coordinating the
event.
The campaign chairman is
Peter Goldring. The dinner co-
chairmen are Joseph M. Drex-
ler, Moses J. Grundwerg, Wil-
liam Lancia, Steven D. Robinson
and Leonard Zi'.bert. Honorary
chairmen are Miami Beach
Mayor Harold Rosen and Vice-
Mayor Murray Meyerson.
The Rabbinical Committee is
cv'inosed of Rabbis Mayer
Abramov. itz, Jonah Caplan,
Alexander S. Gross. Leon Kron-
ish, Eugene Labovitz. So! Lan-
dau, Zev Leff. David Lehrfield,
Irving Lehrman. Max Lipschitz,
Allen Mm is. Joseph Rackovsky,
Solomon Schiff, Mordecai Sha-
piro, Tibor Stern. S. T. Swirsky
and Max Tropper.
Dr. Rackman, a past president
of the Rabbinical Council of
America and the New York
Board of Rabbis, holds affilia-
tions with the Jewish Agency
and the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, where he is a member
of the executive, and with the
National United Jewish Appeal's
Advisory Board, B'nai B'rith
Commission for Adult Educa-
tion, the Commission of Law
and Social Action, and Jewish
Affairs of the American Jewish
Congress. He is a former presi-
dent of the Beth Din of Amei 1 -i
and a past vice president of the
Religious Zionists of America.
The author of several books,
including Israel's Emerging
Constitution.'' and "One Mans
Judaism." his essays have ap-
peared in scholarly journals in
the United States and Israel.
Yeshiva University, in its 89th
year, has grown from a tene-
ment school on New York's
Lower East Side into a major
national center of higher educa-
tion, research and community
service, and as the Western
hemisphere's largest center of
Jewish learning.
Und**- the leadership of Dr.
Samuel Belkin for more than 30
years, the institution is today
made up of more than 7,000 stu-
dents at four campuses in New
York City, a faculty of 1,200,
five undergraduate and eight
graduate divisions, and such in-
ternationally acclaimed schools
as the Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Belfer Graduate
School of Science. Ferkauf
Graduate School of Humanities
and Social Sciences, Wurzweiler
School of Social Work and Rab-
bi Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary.
Pallot Guest Speaker Tuesday
At B.B. Lodges' Joint Meet
Local banking executive and
civic leader E. Albert Pallot will
be guest speaker at a joint meet-
ing of five B'nai B'rith lodges
Tuesday at 8 p.m., at the Israel-
ite Center, 3175 SW 25th St.,
Miami.
/ Mr. Pallot, who will speak on
the topic: "A Century of Hu-
manitarian Service," tracing the
social, educational, and welfare
programs conducted by B'nai
B'rith in the United States for
more than 100 years, has held
the second highest office in the
fraternal order, international
vice president, and is presently
national chairman of the Com-
NANCY LIPOFF
LEONARD A. WIEN, JR. 0 Continued on Page 2-B
E. ALBERT PALLOT


Page 2-B
+Jelsi>rkridBatr
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*
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Wien, Lipoff Named For Major
Federation Leadership Awards
Continued from Page 1-B
tion, 4200 Bbcayne Blvd., Mi-
ami.
The Award was established
in 1957 and is presented an-
nually to tnose young people oi
outstanding ptomise who have
snown active interest in the
Federation, its campaign and
its family of agencies. It is
geared toward exceptional sen-
ice rendered, to pro>ue greater
insight and to stimulate farther
achievements in Jewish com-
munal service.
Nancy B. Lipoff is currently
entering nei second year as me
Federation Women's Division
Vice President for Education.
She has presented a highly suc-
cessful series of "icain-ins"
throughout the year, offering
free courses in Jewish culture
and history to Women's Divi-
sion -leaders and she has or-
'gannfed numerous important
SpecKM* edtreational events.
Mrs. Lipoff formerly served
as a South Dade area chairman
for the Women's Division as
well as Campaign Coordinator.
In her current position she has
helped plan local agency bus
tours, women's participation in
missions to Israel, and training
for campaign workers and
speakers. The wife of Federa-
tion Vice President Norman
Lipoff, Nancy is the mother of
two daughters and has resided
in South Miami for five years.
A resident of Coral Gables,
Leonard A. Wien, Jr. has been
active in the Federation s
Young Adults Division as its
program chairman, as well as
the national United Jewish Ap-
peal's Young Leadership Cabi-
net. He is chairman of the Per-
son-to-Person program of the
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee and a member
of its Speakers Bureau.
A board member of Temple
Or Olom, Mr. Wi.-n is also ac-
tive in Federation's Leadership
Development program, a mem-
Detective Guest Speaker
Gift of Lit Uhaj t.r of Na-
tional Asthma Center will fea-
ture Lee Schwartz, chief of de-
tectives at the South Miami
Police Department, as its guest
speaker at 8 p.m. Tuesday. May
13. in the Dade Federal at Ken-
dall Drive and U.S. 1. Mr.
Schwartz will discuss how to
protect oneself against crime.
Refreshments will be served;
ber of the Executive Commit-
tee of the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, and a
member ol" the Natijna! Gov-
erning Council of American
Jewish Congress. Mr. Wien and
his wife, Carole, are the parents
ot two children.
'Nights In Israel Planned In
Hialeah Synagogue. Laneelot Hall
Events en behalf of the 25th
anniversary of fat tte ol brae!
Bonds will be held net week
at Lancelot Hall and at temple
Tifereth Jacob, according to
Robert L. Siegel, general cam-
paign chairman of the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion.
Congregants of Temple Tife-
reth Jacob in Hialeah will
gather to pay tribute to
Gertrude Beck net Tuesday at
a "Night in Israel" at the tem-
ple. Mrs. Beck will i ecei-.e^ihe
State of Israel Bonds Scr
Honor in recognition
voted service to Israel's"
nomic development.
Special guest at the Temple
Tifereth Jacob "Night in Israel"
will be American Jewish folk
humoiist Eddie Schaffer. Sydel
Lev itch is chairperson of the
Israel Bonds event. Goldie
Green and Anna McCullers are
cochairpersons.
Rabbi Nathan Zolondek is
spi-itaal leader of the Hialeah
congi'i gation.
Wedn sday evening, residents
of Laneelot Hal!, Bay Harbor
Islands, will rally on behalf of
Israel Bonds at a "Night in Is-
rael." Comedian Eddit Schaffer
will provide a program of folk
humor.
rsrael -Bonds r-hairrmm at-
Lancelot Hall is Eric Zwerling.
David Fried. Mrs. Philip Gert-
ner. and Henry Roth are co-
chairmen.
Many Israeli families living in the Miami area are help-
ing gather support for the 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion President Harry B. Smith (standing, center) and
GMJF Women's Division President Mrs. Smith (seated
center) spoke at one of the recent meetings, cohostei
by Shaul Rabia (standing, right) and Mrs. Rabia (seated,
right) and Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Richman at the Rabia
home.
Pallot Guest Speaker Tuesday
*
At B.B. Lodges' Joint Meet
Buiiiiee Taft Dedicates New Wing
Of Hebrew University Law Seliool
Mrs. Bunnee Taft of Hollywood
and Westport. Conn., returned to
the United States last week after
MRS. BUNNEE TAFT
dedicating a new student lounge
and cafeteria in the Faculty of
Law of the Hebrew University.
at its historic Mount Scopus
campus
Tile striking new facilities were
erected in memorv of her late
hu>band and son. New York at
urneys A.Ln Robert Taft and
Jarre? Gordon Taft and are 1j-
cated on the site where th He-
brew I'nher ity was founded ex-
act y 50 years ago
''n'v.T-itv President V-r^sn
Barman chaired th? ceremony at
tended by members of the Taft
family and too level representa-
tives of the University. President
Harman spoke of the legal tra-
dition m the Taft family which
made it anprooriate that their
loved ones be perpetuated i:i a
school of law.
Citing the Tafts' devotion to
hTntnletir co"crri<. Harman re-
called that the late Alien Robert
laii had been an original found-
er of the National Conference of
Christians anl Jews and of the
America';rae! Culture' Founda-
tion, .lame-: Gordon Taft h3d
been a nrominent th'atrical
lavw.'r Reth had been dvuted
to Israel, the ''wish neno'e and
education Harmon pointed out |
Upon returnms to her South
Florida home. Mrs. Taft reflected
on the Hebrew University's cur
rent rr 'dicam mt of attempting t
maintain its status as one of the
world's leading universities while
having to ad.iust to the au'tere
realities of a wartime society
where r**oney is scarce and stu
dents liable to he called uo for
military service at any time.
"Although the Jubilee Ann;
versary is an occasion fer joy
and celebration.' said Mrs, Tatt
"it is a sober reminder that even
after 50 years of d dlcated serv
ice to b >th th" Jewish oeoo'.e and
the wor'd, Hebrew University i-
sti 1 engaged In a desperate strua
t' .. *n :i'|*v)ve "
Continued from Page 1-B
mission on Community and Vet-
erans' Services.
Mr. Pallot has also been presi-
dent of the 5th District Grand
Lodge No. 5, the State Associa-
tion, the South Florida Council,
and Sholem Lodge No 1024 of
B'nai B'lith.
Mr. Pallot, president and
board chairman of Biscayne
Fed >ral Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation, which has eight offices
in Dade, Broward, and Palm
Beach counti *s. is senior partner
in the law firm of Pallot. Pop-
pell. Goodman & Slotnick in
Miami.
A memb of th? Judicial
Council of Florida, a director
and first vice president of the
Poniienlao'i Cancer Research
Institute of Miami, chairman of
the Miami Committee on
Ecology and Beautification, and
director and secretary of The
Florida Bar Foundation. Mr'
Pallot is a member of the Presi-I
dent's Committee on Employ-.
ment of the Handicapped, and j
a director of United States Go
mittee Sports for Israel. Inc.,
Florida (sponsor of Maccabiahj
Games).
A former law lecturer at the'
University of Miami and iorra
Assistant Attorney General fojl
the State of Florida, Mr. Paltot]
has been active in public life a j
Florida for some 40 yean a.-.lj
is widely known .is a platform!
sneaker, world traveller, and hu-
manitarian.
Over 300 members and guests
of five B'r.ai B'lith lodges,]
(Coral Gables. Dadeland, Balkin, |
Sholem, and Tzedukahl are ex-1
pected to attend the May 13
meeting.'
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PHONE 538-5401 ,
A Royal Treat to MotkesU! A Large Variety of Our
Delicious Meals at Reasonable Prices. We are Proud
to serve the Community for our 30th Mother's Day!
MSERVATrONS NOT NKISSARY
We Are Here I... MIAMI BEACH'S FIRST
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COMPLETE GLATT KOSHER TURKEY DINNER
Corve Your Own Turkey, Whnt You Don't Eat You
Take Home. Served From 3 to 10 P.M.
FREE Decorated Cake for Each Mother
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Jay, May 9, 1975
+Jenist fkridfon
Page 3-B
ADL Urges President Ford
o Separate Policy-Aid Issues
EW YORK, N.Y. The
final chairman of the Anti-
nation League of B'nai
. has called upon Presi-
Gerald Ford to separate
(reassessment of America's
lie East policy from mili-
laid to Israel.
a letter to the White
ke, Seymour Graubard de-
id, "the linking of these
[matters creates the impres-
I that the resumption of mil-
aid to Israel depends upon
der concessions by the Is-
Js."
Iressing that "peace cannot
Obtained at the price of Is-
Fs security," Mr. Graubard
fed the President to seek a
nitment from the Arab na-
to "publicly recognize the
. of Israel and conclude a
jianent peace within all the
ks of U.N. Resolution 242
1338."
r. Graubard expressed con-
that the relationship be-
&n Israel and the United
es "based on deep mutual
jidship born of mutual in-
|sts" is being imperiled by
government's simultaneous
louncement of policy reas-
ment and suspension of
|tary aid.
a'.ling Israel the "only pro-
Btern democracy" in the
|die East, he said the coun-
is "a bulwark supporting
interests in that part of
I v orld."
|e also pointed out that the
jltaneous announcements
^forced Egypt's reasoning
refusing a declaration of
l-belligerency in exchange
Jan Israeli withdrawal from
|nificant territories" in the
ei Desert.
Recording to Mr. Graubard.
reasons for Egypt's recal-
hnce are now clear. Presi-
ni Sadat read signs of weak-
Is in America's domestic
pblems (inflation and reces-
and in our world position
Indochina situation) and
fed to capitalize on them, to
Bsure the United States into
Israel to make substan-
unilateral concessions.
(Linking a suspension of
ns aid to 'reassessment' of
lerican Middle East policy,"
[added, "makes it appear, at
V, that Mr. Sadat reasoned
rectly."
llr. Graubard asserted that
Is basically wrong to expect
Bel to relinquish defensible
Ider positions while not re-
I simultaneous Arab com-
Iments to end the seemingly
| I war against Israel,
contrary position, he went
"would underwrite contin-
Wholesale DUtrlftuton !

ued Arab intransigence in
peace efforts, would invite an-
other Arab-precipitated war and
encourage Arab hopes for Is-
rael's demise."
Mr. Graubard pointed out
that Egypt selectively used
Security Council Resolution 242
for its own purposes by insist-
ing on a section calling for
"withdrawal of Israeli armed
forces from territories occu-
pied" but ignoring the section
requiring "termination of all
claims of belligerency and re-
spect for the sovereignty,
territorial integrity and politi-
cal independence of every state
in the area and their right to
live in peace within secure and
recognized boundaries free
from threats or acts of force."
He said Egypt was also un-
faithful to Security Council
Resolution 338 which requires
"negotiations aimed at es-
tablishing a just and durable
peace." Instead, he said, Egypt
refused to consider the political
necessities inherent in those
words and insisted on "transi-
tory military disengagement."
Urging that the U.S. main-
tain its "commitment" of assur-
ing a military balance in the
Middle East by continuing to
supply Israel with the arms it
needs, Mr. Graubard said "this
supply must be continued dur-
ing the reassessment."
He asked that the American
government continue to work
toward bringing Israel and
Egypt together in a realistic
and conciliatory dialogue for
"the achievement of peace in
this generation.'
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
M-
j Procesiori end lxprrif
Hi* r,it 0.$. 0ot. lnieH4
BOSNER MEATS mm* POUITBY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave,
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
The Haven School for the Re-
tarded, a facility for the retard-
ed of all ages, held a dinner-
dance last Friday evening at the
Rhodes Brothers Club. At that
time it was announced that Ron
Hunter, of WPLG-TV Channel
10, will be serving on the Board
of Directors.
Bob "Big Daddy" Napp
brought several members of the
Miami Dolphins as guests. They
joined others including Dr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Stein, Evelyn
and Irving Denmark, the How-
ard Sokols and Marjorie and
Leonard Wein.
Myrna and Saul Cohen were
also there, she's president of the
Suburban League and the Hav-
en School is the League's major
fund raising project.
Others in attendance were the
Marvin Weiners. Phyllis and
Murray Grcenber^'. Frances and
Michael Shores, Barbara and
Garry Greenberg, and Denise
and Roy Miller Roy is pres-
ident of the board of directors.
Arthur VVillens is the exee.i-
tive director of The Haven
School. He and I took some
graduate courses together sev-
eral years aco at the University
of Miami, where he Impressed
his fellow classmate' with the
qualify of hi;; work. He's w
ing*"*:-i as hard now and
has '-I'd any groups looking
U>v ;i truly wo organiza-
tion t> help Hav n school. It
would appreciate any effort, he
said.
Art and hi., Sis are looking
forward to a trip to Germany
to visit their son, Barney, who
is an M.D. in the Air Force sta-
tioned at Ramstein Base Clinic.
His wife. Barbara, is with him.
* ^ ^r ,
Do you have a high school
student at home? Would you
like to have an Internationa!
Cultural Exchange student stay
with you for one or two months,
or for six months or one year?
If the answer is yes, Marilyn
(John) Weil would love to hear
from you. The ICXchange has
its international headquarters in
Ann Arbor, Mich., and has been
designated by the U.S. Depart-
ment of State as a sponsor of
exchange-visitor programs.
Marilyn has quite a few high
school students between the
ages of 14 and 19 to be placed
by the middle of July. These
students will be here for one oi
two semesters and there
are lots of students who will be
here next summer.
Families who are accepted as
hosts are chosen for their abili-
ty and desire to provide a home
atmosphere of interest, under-
standing anu affection lor a new
family member of a different
background.
There is no mutual obligation
involved in this program. Your
child need not participate in an
exchange situation. The stu-
dents involved are from Latin
America and Europe.
If you've never had a foreign
student in your home you could
be missing a most stimulating
experience. We had two young
men from Yugoslavia at oui
home for a while this year and
thoroughly enjoyed our short-
time family members. If you'd
like details please call Marilyn
Weil or drop her a note at 6611
Riviera Dr., Coral Gables.
Used Book Sale May 7-17
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will be con-
ducting its used books sale at
Midway Mall, 7901 W. Flagler
St.. May 7 through May 17, and
is offering books on art, travel,
history, biography, foreign lan-
guages and many other cate-
gories, such as reference books,
children's books, fiction and
cook books. Hours are 10 a.m.
to 9:30 p.m. weekdays and
noon to 6 p.m. Sundays. Book
donations are tax deductible.
hmiih Lodge Meeting
Isaiah Lodge, B'nai B'rith,
will hold a general meeting
Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Amer-
ican Savings, 1200 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach. Burnett Roth will
speak on current activities on
the Anti-Defamation League.
The public is invited.
Pictured at the Installation of the officers of the Louis D.
Brandeis Group of Hadassah are (from left to right) Past
President Mrs. Irving Tagrin, Rabbi Eugene Labowitz,
President Mrs. William Saffir, and Past President Mrs.
Philip Thau. The installation was held at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel Monday, April 14.
During a short visit to the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood
last week Major General Chaim Herzog (right), newly
appointed United Nations Ambassador from Israel found
time in his busy schedule for a chat with Bernard Res-
nick, vice president and general manager of the famed
Hollywood resort complex.
fining Itajiai\sty\e is as
easyas^ef 'Bais'.'.Witlv,
l\e(p fron\Chef 'Boyar-dee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee*
to cook for you when
you want to serve a real
treat! For lunch, a light bite or as a
side dish with dinner. Anytime at all,
the Chef's Shells in Tomato Sauce are
truly a macaroni mechayeh! They're
bite-sized, made of firm, tender
macaroni and come in the Chef's own
savory tomato sauce. All you do,
is heat and eat! Nice and easy.
Nutritious and economical. Next time
you want to dine, Italian-style,
try Shells in Tomato Sauce from
ChefBoy-Ar-Dee!
The
Natural Nosh
Delicious, natural Sun Maid
raisins are a nosher's delight!
Naturally sweet, full of energy straight
from the sun, they're good to eat anytime. Instead
of candy, as a between-meal snack, while watching TV or
as a lunchbox treat. Be good to your favorite noshers. Give
them Sun Maid raisins ... in the little red box. And don't
forget to buy the big red box for all your cooking and
baking needs!
SUN-MAID' RAISINS
K CERTIFIED KOSHER


Page 4-B
* Jm isii noridffan
Friday, May 9, 1975:
Rossmoor Coconut Creek Starts J.
Construction Of Nassau Village
Off-site construction for Nas-
sau Village, the second phase at
Rossmoor Coconut Creek, the
adults-only community being de-
veloped near Pompano Beach
has already started, and founda-
tions for the first units will be
poured starting next week, ac-
cording to Orion Smith, direc-
tor of construction.
Rossmoor's first phase, Ba-
hamas Village, with 304 resi-
dential units, is now completed.
All 20 of the two-story villas
in Bahama Village are now oc-
cupied, and most of the 304 units
have been sold, according to
Larry Uchin, Rossmoor sales
and marketing vice president.
Ninety units in Nassau Village
15,000
Respond To
Lehman Quiz
WASHINGTON Fifteen-
thousand persons have mailed
in responses to Congressman
William Lehman's latest Con-
gressional questionnaire.
"This overwhelming response
reflects the very high degree of
concern felt by the people of
the 13th District about the ma-
jor issues confronting America
today," Lehman said.
LEHMAN ASKED 12 ques-
tions dealing with the economy-
energy, the environment, health
care and foreign policy. Space
was provided for additional
comments and suggestions.
"I was particularly impressed
by the quality and thoughtful-
ness of the comments which
many persons included with
their answers," said Lehman.
"Unfortunately, it is not pos-
sible for me to respond indi-
vidually to everyone who took
the time and trouble to answer
the questions and add their com-
ments, but I wish to thank
ereryone who wrote in."
"Both the poll results and the
comments will help provide me
with a sense of priorities for the
needs of the 13th District." he
added.
LARRY UCHIN
Lave also been sold, v;e-con-
struction. Uchin said.
Off-site construction includes
all underground workwiring,
sewage, water lines, drainage
systems, and communication
cables for the community's com-
puterized security system.
Nassau Village will have 276
units in 19 villas, and the units
will be offered in seven floor
plans, ranging from a studio
apartment to three bedrooms,
two baths.
Construction at Coconut Creek
was begun in March 1974 by
the Rossmoor Corp., one of the
nation's best-known and most
successful community planner-
developers. Construction costs
at the lavisly landscaped de-
velopment now exceed $22 mil-
lion.
In addition to Bahama Village,
Rossmoor's completed construc-
tion includes Clubhouse One,
the $2 million social and recrea-
tional complex; an 18-hole golf
course, plus shuffleboard courts,
private streets, 45 acres of
lakes, canals, lagoons and water-
ways, bicycle trails and many
other facilities.
Rossmoor residents have a
24-hour security system, with
Pinkerton Security Service per-
sonnel on duty around the
clock. The system will also in-
clude computerized monitoring
of alarm signals in each resi-
dence every six seconds.
The adult section is being en-
closed within a 5*4 mile privacy
and security wall. Admission is
by invitation-identification only.
Other services include 24-
hour health nursing service,
building and grounds mainten-
ance, extensive entertainment
and social programs, a commu-
nity transportation system, a-
ble television and water, trash
and sewer service.
There is no recreation lease,
no ground lease at Rossmoor
Coconut Creek, and 100 percent
of all deposits is escrowed and
bears interest to the buyer at
the current passbook rate.
At Temple Judca of Coral Gables, during the Friday eve-
ning Service of April 25, the first adult Bat Mitzvah class
of Temple Judea was called to the Torah. Pictured from
left to right are Ray Berman, Lynne Schwab, Rosalind
Lazar, Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat, Barbara Bulbin, Kala
Norton and Lillian Newmark.
Committee members planning Beth Sholom Sisterhood's
Spring Luncheon included (left to right) Anna Miller,
Anne Drecksler, Blanche Nevel, Judy Drucker, Doreen
Marx and Beverly Stein.
Good Afternoon!
So. Dade Group
Plans American
Heritage Festival
A ixijor Bicentennial event is
being planned for South Dade
"by a volunteer citizens group
under the leadership of L. Rus-
sell Norton, Perrine banker.
In making the announcement
of the formation of the South
Dade Citizens Bicentennial Com-
mittee, Norton disclosed that
plans are already underway to
stage a gala one-day festival in
South Dade stressing the roles
played by ethnic groups in the
birth and heritage of the United
States.
"Plans call for The American
Heritage Festival to be held
sometime this summer at a
South Dade location large
enough to accommodate hun-
dreds of exhibits, a stage for
musical and dance presenta-
tions and thousands of attend-
ants," Mr. Morton said.
"We have assembled a com-
mittee of interested South Dade
citizens who are eager to see
an event of this caliber take i
place in our part of the county."
Members of the Committee 1
include Catherine Conduitte.
Larry' Cold. Marie Summers.
Chappy Pro. Jere Caswall, Ger-
ry Crosby, James C. Lee, Cap-'
tain James Ross, Terri Cooper,
Julie Jackson, Richard Schwartz,
Charles E Cooper. Addie Tea-
garden and Eileen Warford.
And good tasting. Spread that famous
Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese flavor all over a crispy matzoh for
your tea time snack. One bite will tell you-it's fresh and creamy and smooth.
Satisfaction is guaranteed, or your money back from Kraft.
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
.0]
'allot
- I
C 1 01 a' Krft Cmtf***


>7-.
Friday, May 9, 1975
bnl$t> fkrirtirnr
Page SB
'Israel Defending Western World' Herzog Says
NEW YORK, N.Y.Israel is
"the front line defending the
Western world asainst Soviet
imperialism." ac-ording to
Chaim HenroR. newly-appointed
Israeli ambassador to the Unit-
ed Nations, who also said that
by warding off the assaults
from her Russian-supplied Arab
neighbors, "Israel has been do-
ing a job for the United Stal
the whole free world.''
CALLING DETENTE "one-
sided," General Herzog said
"the Russians are not missing
any tricks. They're moving
rapidly both in the Middle East
and in the Persian Gulf."
In an exclusive interview by
Arnold Forster, associate direc-
tor of the Anti Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, for the
agency's "Dateline Israel" tele-
vision series. General Herzog
charged that the liSSR has used
the Mideast as a testing ground
for its military hardware.
"IT HAS BEEN supplying
Arab countries with advanced,
ophisticatcd equipment which
in short supply even in the
let Union, and has certainly
been given to its satellites
Eastern Europe." he said.
Tie interview and on-location
footage of outposts in the Sinai
and the Golan Heights, make up
"Boundaries Against War." one
of three new films in the "Date-
line Israel" series.
THE OTHER two are "Pal-
estinians and the PLO," in
which Mr. Forster interviews
Joseph lekoah, Israel's former
UN envoy, and "The Jerusalem
Dig," in which Moron Benven-
isti, Jerusalem's city planner,
and Benjamin Mazar, professor
of Archeology at Hebrew Uni-
versity, refute accusations by
the United Nations Educational,
ral and Scientific Organi-
n (UNESCO) that Israel is
roving the character of the
ient city.
The "Dateline Israel" TV
series is filmed semi-annually
in Israel and distributed by
ADL to some 200 stations.
GEN. HERZOG, who served
as Israel's first military gover-
nor in the West Bank following
the 1967 war, said Israel is will-
ing to give back both the Golan
Heights and the Sinai Peninsula j
in return for peace and demili-
tari ation."
\y e asl ine, for in re-
lum is not territory but just
normal relations such as exist;
throughout the world between
self respecting countries," he J
said.
THE GENERAL countered |
.. that Israel had no right
^pcupy tha Sinai by stating:
'Israel didn't move in and sit
m someone's land. Egypt used
the terrain in the Sinai Penin-
sula as a jumping-off ground to
attack Israel three times in the
last 27 years.
"It is not a question of Israel
taking someone's land, the
l.
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question is the land being used
to invade Israel."
HE SAID Israel today is in
the best defense position since
its founding in 1948. Referring
to the Golan Heights, General
Herzog. noted that Syrian artil-
lery and machine guns were
once free to fire on Jewish set-
tlements in the valley below,
but since the 1967 war. "th -.
villages have lived, compara-
tively, in neace."
THE REASON is not that
modern weapons can't hit that
distance, ho said, but that the
Israelis can now adequately
deal with Syrian gunners, and
are themselves within artillery
range of Damascus.
By its Dresenc in the Golan,
he continued, Israel is prevent-
ing destruction.
"THE SYRIANS are aware to-
day that anv attemnt by them
to use missiles against Israeli
d"Hitl nomilntmrf wo-ild prob-
ably be met with retaliation on
the part of Israel against Da-
mascus and other cntrs ot
Syrian population. And that. 1
believe, is the main dtcr"nt."
Gen. Herro'i added that for as
long as war is not rhflounc''>d '
bv the A-ab nations, th" Sinai.
the Golan Hie"its and !' West
Bank r*tioin strategically im-
portant because their frontiers
allow IsnH snffici mt nntifi'-<-
tion li'"e in the event of attack.
WITHOUT THESE t?*ritoti .
lie pointed out, "Israel c I 1
1..... hen in a very power! >9S
situation'' when it was attac
in 1973.
He maintained that Israel had
learned from the surprise attack
and warned that the Arabs
would b? making "a very seri-
ous mistake to delude them-
selves into thinking that they
could achieve surprise again."
IN "PALESTINIANS and the
PLO," Ambassador Tekoah pre-
dicted that Israel's continued
refusal to recognize the terror-
ist group would lead to a re-
emergence of King Hussein and
the Jordanian governaient as
Palestinian spokesmen. "Then,"
he said, "the prospects of peace
between Israel and its eastern
neighbor would increase."
ACCORDING TO the Ambas-
sador, a PLO foothold in anv
part of Palestine would mean
the establishment of a Soviet-
dominated base. The next stage.
he said, could be the free world
negotiating for oil supplies
"with the Politburo in the
Kremlin."
Discussing Palestinian Arabs.
Mr. Tekoait said Israel believe
that they have the right to de-
termine their future whether
they live on me West Bank or
the East Bank.
"THE ISSUE," he said, "is
not the right of the Palestinian
Arabs to self determination.
They have had that throughout
the years within the framework
of the Jordanian Palestinian
state. The real issue today is
whether the Jewish people
should also have the right of
self determination, the same
right as all other nations pos-
sess."
Pointing out that the Anns
on the West Bank are Jordanian
citizens. Ambassador Teko->!i
said "we nhvays felt that l/i !
ultimate political solution would
have to wait for peace n :)' i-
tions with our eastern nigh-
b"'-s. the Jordanian-Palestinian
state."
THE PALESTINE Lib?rati>n
Organization is the umbrella
organization of various mur
erouns" an I not the true repre-S
sentative of Palestinian Arabs,
he added
Ambassador Tekoah rejected
the notion that the PLO is a
liberation movement akin to
anti-colonial movements in Afri-
ca and Asia. "Unlike the other
national liberation movements,"'
he said, "the PLO's real objec-1
tive is to deny the Jewish peo-
ple its rights to freedom, self-
determination, independence
and sovereignty."
CALLING THE PLO "an anti-
liberation movement," he said
that Yasir Arafat's declared
goal ot a secular state means
the destruction of Israel an 1
that he did not think the PLO
coald mature into becoming a
responsive leader
. >,". !'. Vrbassad >r
said, "that the world, especially
the Arab world, will reali'.e that
the PLO is dangerous to the
cause ot pear.1 and that th
Arabs will agree to negotiate
with Israel, pot through a mur-
der organization.
IN "THE Jerusalem Dig."
Mi. Benvenisti and Professor
Mazar demonstrated that exca-
vation in th Old City is not
threatening Moslem holy sites.
as is contended by UNESCO.
Mr. Benvenisti, filmed over-
looking the scene of destruction
of the Jewish Quarter which oc-
curred during 19 years of Arab
occupation, told Mr. Forster
t"-?t th- UNESCO charge is
"hypocritical"
THE DOCUMENTARY also
includes excerpts from a report
by Raymond LeMaire, a
UNESCO consultant who after
visiting the scne called criti-
cisms ot the methods used in
the excavations "groundlea."
> ations "groundless."
Mr. I -M lire-: report said, is
"extremely attentive to all as-
pects and to all periods of
which remains have been
found on the site."
ACCORDING TO Professor
i r, the digs he supervises
have never endangered the El
Aksa mosque, Islam's revered
shrine. On the contrary, he said.
' we are living with the Moslems
for seven years, and this prob-
lem has never arisenit doesn't
exist."
Addressing himself to the
charge that the face of Jerusa-
lem is changing. Prof. Mazar
stated. "Instead of heaps of
destroyed buildings, we are re-
building the buildings them-
selves. Which is wonderful .
exactly what everybody who is
interested in Jerusalem likes to
see."
THE SCHOLAR noted that
not only is Jewish history be-
ing pursued in his work, but
"every period is of great inter-
est for us without exception.
we are studying the history of
Jerusalem through the ages.
That is all we are doing."
The "Dateline Israel" films,
in addition to being distributed
to television stations, are* avail-
able for group showing from the
League's Audio-Visual Depart-
ment. 315 Lexington Ave., New
York, N.Y. 10016, or from any
of the agency's regional offices.
adult
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Page 6-B
*JeuisilUrkKan
Friday, May 9, 197
Pan Ant's Cosmopolitan Tour
Includes Amsterdam, Paris
Among the wide variety of
"Trend-Setter" vacations of-
fered by Pan Am from April
through October this year, is the
15-day "Cosmopolitan" tour to
Holland, France and England.
For as little as S229 plus air
fare, travellers will enioy ac-
commodations with private bath
or shower, airport hotel trans-
fers, dailv continental break-
fasts, sightseeing tours of
Amsterdam. Paris and London
plus the many other Pan Am
World Bonus features all Trend-
Setter vacations piwide
Included are discounts of ur
to 50 percent on lunches tn-i
dinner, a co-nnlimenrary Pan
Am World F.icrrt Rap puidf
books, shopping r r bofli ? aad
maps. 2 free rolls of Fnrnma:
color film, and casino and
private club ne-nb?rsh:r in
London. Its an ideal :r.r hi
those who wish the freedo- at
independent travel as well as
the benefits of savings on air
fare and hotels.
The first stop on the "Cos-
mopolitan" tour is Amsterdam,
a city with many sites of par-
ticular interest to Jewish trav-
ellers. After a half-day tour to
introduce you to the main fea-
tures of the city, you'll be free
to explore on your own during
your remaining 3'j days there.
Facing the remains of the Old
Ashkenazic Synagogues, in
what was once the Jewish quar-
ter, you'll see the impressive
Portuguese synagogue, built in
the l'th century. It is one of
the world's most famous syna-
gogues and can seat 2.000 peo-
ple. Fortunately, it was saved
during World War II because it
has been declared a national
monument by the Dutch.
Art lovers will enjoy a visit
to the National Gallery (Rijks-
museuml to see Rembrandt's
paintings, including two of his
most famous worksa portrait
of Dr. Ephraim Bueno. noted
Jewish doctor, and the canvas
entitled. "The Jewish Bride."
Other famous Rembrandt
works are on display at Rem-
brandt House, the painter's
borne in the Jewish quarter.
Of course, no visit to Amster-
dam would be complete without
a stop at the Anne Frank House
on the lovely Keizersgracht. It
was here that Anne's famous
diary was found by her father
when ne returned to Amsterdam
after liberation as the sole sur-
vivor of the family.
As you leave Holland for
Paris on the 6th day of the "Cos-
mopolitan" tour you'll be ready
to explore the many more inter-
esting Jewish historical sites
you'll discover in Paris and
later, in London.
For additional information
about the "Cosmopolitan" tour
and other tours available from
Pan Am. contact your local
travel agent or Pan Am. With
all Pan Am's World Tours, trav-
ellera get a certificate of guaran-
tee to insure they receive every-
thing that's promised.
39 To Be Confirmed May 15 In
Temple Beth Sholom Ceremonies
Thirty nine boys and girls
will be confirmed at Temple
Beth Sholom. 4144 Chase Ave.,
Miami Beach. Thursday, May
15, at 7:30 p.m., according to
an announcement by Mrs.
David Miller and Dr. Solomon
Lichter. cochairmen of the tem-
ple's Board of Education. They
will receive their Bibles and
diplomas at a special "Shabbat
Siyum Service" this Friday.
Participating In the service will
be the following Confirmanda: Mi-
chelle Cholodofsky. Amy Fredel. Val-
rie Hendel. Andrew Knvler. Susie
Kushner. David Roitenatein. Harry
Schner. Cindv Sltuel. and Warren
Stamm
Jame* Knopke. president of the
confrrefratlnn. Harold B. Vlnlk.
Urc.therhood president; Mrs. Irvine
Mill**r. Sistt-rh Mrs. Miller and Dr. I.lchter. will
aiso participate in the service.
"he Confirmation service will have
as Us theme: "The Holocaust Said:
X"' We Say: Yes!"
Beth Shoiom Confirmands S735
IMS Include David Alschuler. Seth I
fired Daltuch. Andrew John Bau-
mann. Blizalx-th iU-teler. Frederick '
M. Brownau :o, Michelle Chnlodof-
sky, Jacqueline C. Cohen. Leonard
Esformaa, Amy FTedel. Daniel S
(lelber. Cindy Cruder and Steven 1
N. Halpert.
Also Vaierie Hope Hendel. Scott I
David Hurwich. c-i-aiK Koss Kodtsh. .
Andrew M. Kovler. Susie Kushner. I
Toby Jane Lefkowitz. Abby Sue
Meiselman. Jack A. Morris, David A.
Hi.s.nstein. rrei:erlcK William Sail.
Larry E. Schner. Lisa Jan Schwedel.
and Cindy Siesel.
Also Jeff Silverman. Warren J. '
Stamm. Richard L Slander. Ruth
Ellen Stone. Geri Sue Straus. Jo- j
seph J. Sivt ne, Steven Teplis. Bar- |
ry X. Tritt. Mark Tumpson. Edward I
Walsh, Mark H. Welnberjr. Peter '
Weisaman and Benjamin P. Zvenia.
Sisters United After 63
Years in Miami Festivities
"I couldn't think of a better
Mother's Day present for Min-
nie Albert than bringing her
sister, Margit, here to Miami
for the occasion."
So said Mrs. Leonard J. Yes-
ner, of 5500 SW 20th Ter.,
Miami.
MRS. ALBERT is Mrs. (Sel-
ma) Yesner's mother, with
whom Mrs. Albert stayed and
convalesced after breaking her
hip and having surgery last No-
vember.
While Minnie was convalesc-
ing, she had her mail forwarded
to Miami from her own home,
and among the letters was one
from her sister, Margit, who
lives in Sweden.
"The two sisters haven't seen
one another in 63 years," ex-
plained Mrs. Y"sner.
"MY MOTHER left her home-
town in Hungary when she was
a little girl."
She also left her parents and
ten brothers and sisters there.
"Hitler came along and ex-
terminated all but two younger
sisters." said Mrs. Yesner.
"with Margit surviving the Nazi
atrocities in Sweden."
Well, Monday, May 5, was a
tearful and a thrilling and a
happy day, all rolled into one.
Because on Monday, Margie
arrived in Miami from Sweden
on a six-week visitor's visa.
TO MAKE the reunion even
more splendid, if possible, the
Yesners' daughter, Rita, an RN
on duty in Orthopedic Charge
at South Miami Hospital, will
be married on May 18 at the
Barcelona Hotel.
Sunday, May 11, is Mother's
Day. Almost a week will have
passed since Minnie and Mar-
git were reunited after 63 years.
And then, they've got the
glorious week of last-minute
feverish arrangements to see
through for Rita's wedding.
All to be followed by another
month of happy family reunion
festivities.
THE ONE sadness:
There is another sister alive
that Minnie and Margit have.
But she is living in Czechoslo-
vakiabehind the Russian Iron
Curtain. She won't be able to
attend. .
Youth Symphony
Concert May 11
Sunday evening (Mother's
Day) at 8:00 p.m.. The Carmen
Nappo Youth Symphony will
present its last concert of the
1974-75 season xt North Miami
Beach Auditorium, 17011 NE
19th Ave.
The conductors have chosen
several members of the con-
ducting class to direct some of
the numbers on this program.
Scholarship winners for this
season will be announced at the
concert; actual scholarships will
be presented to them at the an-
nual Awards Banquet May 25 at
the Miami Shores Country Club.
The music for this occasion
is provided by a grant from the
Music Performance Trust Funds
(Kenneth E. Raine, Trustee), a
public service organization cre-
ated and financed by the Re-
cording Industries under agree-
ments with the American Fed-
eration of Musicians.
Stakes Race At Biscayne
First stakes race of the sea-
son is under way at Biscayne
Dog Track which opened last
Thursday. Two first-round elim-
inations in the Marathon Invi-
tational were run last Friday
and Monday; the final two are
scheduled Friday and Saturday
nights.
The Greater Miami BBYO
Council, which encompasses 24
local chapters of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organisation, has just
contributed to the library of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, a sizeable number of new
non-fiction and fiction books.
The books were selected by
Aleph Zadik Aleph and B'nai
B'rith Girls, all teenagers, to
establish a shelf of books for
teenage interest. They represent
a variety of subjects to include
a cross section of current
American Jewish concerns in
society in the United States, Is-
rael, the Mid-East, and the is-
sue of human rights of Soviet
Jewry.
Mrs. Lillian Ross, director of
libraries for the Central Agency,
who supervised the book selec-
tion, reported "We are pleased
to have the Jewish teenage pop-
ulation of Our community share
and enjoy our facilities. The
books of the Michael A. Coplon
BBYO Memorial Library will be
read by youth and adults. So
much of being a Jew depends
i>non knowledge and reading.
Wie hope more readers will be
drawn to our new books."
Inspiration for the unusual
project derived from a desire on
Greater Miami BBYO Donate*
Books To CAJE Library Here
the part of BBYO leadership,
pe.'oetuate 'he menio-v
Michael A. Coplon. 17, presid
of his AZA (Aleph Zadik A5
Chapter who was accident
killed two years ago. His lov
for learning, books; and thin
for knowledge, was the motiva
mg force behind the BBYO !
brary.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cq1
and Michael's sister and b-oti
ers, as well as friends and fan
ily, locally and in various pan
of the country, joined force
with BBYO to establish ftj
teenage library. Funds coi
tributed have gone to purchas
books, book plates and relate
programs.
Stu Schaffer and Sue Andi
man, past Council presidem
and Ari Kedem, BBYO Prograt
Assistant participated in tta
project.
Sponsors of the BBYO ar
B'nai B'rith Men and B'ni
B'rith Women. Membership i
Smith Florida is 900. in a fi
of 38 chapters.
Alan M. Freedma"
Florida Region Direct
offices in the Greater
Jewish Federation Bii'.iTSq
Girt Bossak is Assistant Tw
rector.

Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
AARON LOPEZ 1731-1782
Merchant Community Leader Revolutionary Leader
Today, if you go to Newport, Rhode
Island, you can visit the place called
"Lopez Dock," named after Aaron
I.opcz, a power in Newport in the years
just preceding the Revolution and owner of
many trading ships.
Known for religious liberalism, Newport had
become the home of a substantial number of
capable, well-educated Jews, among the most
affluent in the Colonies.
In 1752, from Portugal, came Aaron Lopez,
described later by Ezra Styles, President of
Yale University, as "a merchant of first emi-
nence; for honor and extent of commerce prob-
ably surpassed by no merchant in America." In
addition, Lopez was known as an active force
in cementing friendly relations between faiths.
He earned the respect of Christians, as well as
Jews, and no ship ever left his dock on either's
Sabbath. Lopez himself laid the first corner-
stone of Newport's famous Touro .Synagogue
in 1759. 88
In strong sympathy with Revolutionary patriots,
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Lopez was forced to flee Newport to Massa-
chusetts when the British attacked.
During the War, the city suffered such heaw
losses that it never recovered. Neither did
Lopez who lost virtually all he had acquired
during his years of successful trading. When
attempting to return to Newport after ind
pendence was won, he was tragically drownea
in a freak accident.
Ezra Styles eulogized him .. ."He did business
with the greatest ease and clearness; always
carried about him a sweetness of behavior, a
calm urbanity, an agreeable and unaffected
politeness of manners."
A fitting tribute to Aaron Lopezone of many
Jewish-American patriots worthy of remem-
brance.
1
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 1776
ind Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
four Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send name and address with 50* to:
JEW ISH-AMKRICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4-188, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017
. ^
1


r
Friday, May 9, 1975
Kkniitfkrkifjr
Page 7-B
I>
Empire Kosher Products Adhere
Strictly to Ancient Jewish Law
' "What is the state of 'Kash-
ruth* today?"
This question has been asked
time and again since the first
' laws of "Kosher" were promul-
gated thousands of years ago.
Each generation seems to re-
discover an awareness of its
Jewishness. and inquires into
the intricacies of the basic Jew-
ish precepts, heritage, tradition
' and customs.
Since the laws of Kashruth*'
pervade the daily life of the
Jew, this subject is the focus of
interest by not only religious
leaders, but lay population as
wellJews and, increasingly to-
day, non-Jews.
AS POULTRY and poultry
products are such an important
part of our modern diet and
menu, a perspective on "Kosher
poultry" from a leading sup-
' plier, Empire Kosher Poultry,
Inc., of Mifflintown, Pa., has
been sought.
Empire processes close to 50
items of Kosher poultry, which
are distributed nationally and
internationally. Empire has
specialized in Kosher poultry
for over 40 years. Only Kosher
poultry is processed in the Em-
pire plant.
A staff of "Mashgichim," who
are qualified Kabbis trained in
the ritual Orthodox Kosher
slaughter and inspection of
poult/y, supervises all produc-
tion in Empire*s all-Kosher fa-
cilities.
MURRAY L. KATZ, president
of Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc.,
notes that "The heritage of the
Jewish people stems back, not
only to the Ten Command-
ments, but long before then,
and continues up to the present.
We, at Emmre Kosher Poultry,
believe in this heritage and
tradition, and in the Jewish Di-
etary Laws created for and by
the Jewish people.
Some of the most distinguished residents of Bay Harbor
Islands met recently at Blair House to honor Samuel
H. Pokrass (second from left) for his years of service to
the Jewish community. Former Miss Israel Rina Kishon
(second from right) spoke on behalf of the 1975 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund. Honorary
CJA IEF Chairman for Bay Harbor, Shepard Broad
(left) presented a plaque to Mr. Pokrass, who was also
honored at the event by Bay Harbor Mayor Stanley G.
Tate (right).
Mrs. Edyth Geiger (left) of North Bay Village, who re-
sides in Israel and Miami, spoke last week on behalf of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's Divi-
sion 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund. Among the guests who heard Mrs. Geiger were
Mrs. Bernard Mandler, president of the Miami Chapter
of Hadassah, Mrs. Marvin Sheldon and Mrs. hen Abrams
(right).
rael's budgetary difficulties and austerity measures
ZTediscJed at a March 13 luncheon in the nations
nvital by Washington and Israeli officials. Guests in-
TJli (from left) Eitan Raff, Economic Counselor for
theEmZsyof Lei in Washington DC, Ze'ev Sher
. vrZtular Officer in New York; Arnon Gafm, Di-
S c^Z^r'the State oflsr^l; Sen. Richard
Stone cj Florida and Sen. Gale McGee. ^
"We have dedicated our-
selves to serving the Jewish
people a total Kosher product,
under supervision by the most
pious Jewish organization of our
time.
"THE JEWISH Dietary Laws
regirJing the process ot Kosher
poultry, created and passed
down from generation to gen-
eration, have been and always
will be accepted and obeyed bv
our company.
"There are many steps taken
in the process of Empire Kosh-
er Poultry to assure us a prod-
uct which is totally Kosher
without reservation."
"Empire processing of Kosh-
er poultry has been accepted
by the most pious Jews because
we adhere to the following pro-
cedures:
All poultry is hand held
bv the Rabbi at the moment of
slaughter so that the Rabbi has
complete control of the bird to
assure the most perfect and hu-
mane cut that qualifies the
chicken as Kosher according to
Jewish law;
No hot or heated water is
used in the removal of feathers.
Only cold water is acceptable
in the processing of Kosher
poultry by the organization su-
pervising our Kashruth;
Each and every bird is
checked for wholesomeness by
United States Government in-
spectors. However, many birds
which may pass this Govern-
ment inspection are still found
to b" unacceptable under Jew-
ish Dietary Laws when checked
by our Rabbinical supervisors;
Correct and precisely-lo-
cated incisions are made in each
chicken wing and neck so that
the blood will be fully drained
during soaking and salting.
Each bird is soaked and sub-
merged completely in running
tap water for no less than one-
half hour to loosen all blood
particles, and then is hung on
a drip line to free it of water
prior to salting. Birds are then
hand-salted internally and ex-
ternally, and stacked correctly
to drain for no less than one
hour so that the salt loosens
and absorbs any remaining
blood;
Atter salting, the chick-
en is rinsed in three separate
vats of running cold water so
as to remove the salt and
cleanse the bird;
All poultry is chilled to
under 40 degrees before pack-
ing in order to longer retain its
freshness and quality.
ALL POULTRY and the en-
tire plant and equipment are
under the supervision of The
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America United
and The United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
All of the above procedures
are done according to the Jew-
ish Dietary Laws and the Laws
of the United States Department
of Agriculture, producing a
most pure Kosher chicken,
wholesome, plump, juicy and
tender, guaranteed Kosher, and
of the finest quality for com-
plete satisfaction to the con-
sumer.
"Our products,' explains
Katz, "are guaranteed not to
come in contact with any heat-
ed or hot water in de-feathering
or in any other stages of pro-
cessing. It is our guarantee that
all Empire Kosher products
comply with the strict stand-
ards set up by the United States
Government and the Jewish Di-
etary Laws.
"WE FEEL that people desir-
ing Kosher poultry, due to their
religious convictions, must be
guaranteed that the poultry
they are buying is truly Kosher
as represented."
Myriam Wolf, (left) president of the Florida Women's
Division; Mildred Berlin, chairman of the Golden Build-
ers' Luncheon; Yosef Yanich, executive director of the
American Jewish Congress, and Sylvia Silvers, cochair-
man of the luncheon, are pictured at the eighth annual
Golden Builders Luncheon in the Diplomat Hotel where
over 350 guests were honored for their devotion and
financial assistance to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth
Hostel in Jerusalem which was built by and is maintain-
ed by the Women's Division, American Jewish Congress.
Olivia Byron, a member of the management training
staff of American Savings, displays her engraved trophy
after winning the Dade County and Florida Speech Con-
test sponsored by the Institute of Financial Education.
Pictured with Ms. Byron are Morris N. Broad, president
of American Savings; Gloria Miller, vice president and
Regional Coordinator; and Shepard Broad, chairman of
the board of American Savings. This was the second year
in a row for a staff member of American Savings to win
the Dade County Contest. In addition to the engraved
silver bowl Ms. Byron received a $100 cash gift and will
be given the Gagenshatz-Sobel Award at a Presentation
Ceremony May 31. For winning the State of Florida Con-
test she takes possession of an engraved plaque and re-
ceives a $200 gift.
Julius Darsky, outgoing president of the Founders of
Mount Sinai Medical Center congratulates Max Cogen,
the new president of thz philanthropic organization
which during its 20-year history has contributed over
$28 million to the Medical Center. Cogen has been active
in the Founders organization for 16 years, serving on all
its committees and recently holding the position of vice-
president. In addition he is a Life Trustee of the Medical
Center. Vice presidents of the organization for 1975-7 f>
are Harry Barnett, Ted Baumritter, Mrs. Max "Irene'
Cogen, Jerry Goodman, Bing Kossoff, Maury Koven, Syd-
ney Levison, and Arthur Pearlman. ..


IWPaaHHdMMB


Page 8-B
Mrs. Carol Roberts, niece of E. Albert Pallot (left)
achieved an all-time political "first" upon her recent
election as City Commissioner of West Palm Beach, the
first woman to ever attain the honor. Pallot, president of
Biscayne Federal Savings and Loan Association, is seen
with Carol's husband, Dr. Hy Roberts, as they visited
Biscayne Federal's Palm Beach branch on Worth Avenue.
The first meeting of residents of Waterway Plaza, 7900
Tatum Waterway Dr., for the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund had excellent results. Chairman
Milton Kartzmer (right) and Cochairmen Herman Esgar
(left) and Herman Remland welcomed guest speaker
Edyth Geiger, who inspired tremendous commitments to
Jewish survival in 1975 from Waterway Plaza residents.
' ?, -.
. >">,.= 1,
ifia I
The Jewish War Veterans are supporting the 1975 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund with gen-
erous contributions by Miami chapters to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Federation representative
Michael Meyer (center) accepted one recent contribu-
tion from Ralph Rosofsky of South Miami (left), JWV
Past National Adjutant, and JWV Commander Alex
Greenwald of Miami.
A recent concert at Miami Beach Auditorium featured
the Miami Beach Community Singers, who have support-
ed the 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund with a portion of the concert's proceeds. Among
the group's leaders who joined to make this generous
contribution were (left to right) Philip Katzen, Nathan
Auerbach, president of the group, Debbie Raichlin, Louis
T. Levin and Joseph Mooney, director.
+Jmlslincricffor>
Friday, May 9,
Orthodox
Union Will
Honor Ten
NEW YORKThe Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America will honor ten na-
tionally prominent Jewish lead-
ers from Orthodox communities
throughout the United States,
at its 77th anniversary nation-
al dinner Sunday at the New
York Hilton.
The list of the ten recipients
of the UOJCA's Presidents
Award at the gala event was re-
leased by the chairman of the
dinner committee, Bernard Lev-
more, and UOJCA president,
Harold M. Jacobs.
IT INCLUDES Abraham Dere,
of Congregation Kol Ernes,
Richmon, Va.; Shelley Goren,
of Great Neck (N.Y.) Synago-
gue, David Grossman, of Con-
gregation Beth iholom, Roches-
ter, N.Y.; David H. Hill, of
Young Israel of Queens Valley,
N.Y.; Alfred Kahn, of Congrega-
tion Anshe chesed, Linden,
N.J.; Dr. Joseph Parker, of Ba-
ron Hirsch Congregation, Mem-
phis. Tenn.; Emanuel B. Quint,
of Young Israel of Flafbush,
Brooklyn, N.Y.; Joseph Russak,
of Bikur Cholim Machzikeh
Hadath Congregation, Seattle,
Washington; and Henry Wimpf-
h 'imer, of Congregation K'hal
Adath Jeshurun. of New York,
N.Y.
THE UOJCA Israel Award
will be presented to Josef Te-
koah, permanent ambassador of
the State of Israel to the United
Nations, at the dinner, in
recognition of his dedicated
service on behalf of the State
of Israel.
Rabbi Dr. Leo Jung will also
be honored at the dinner with
the UOJCA Distinguished Lead-
ership Award.
Douglas Gardens
Mother's Day
Party Sunday
Greater Miami Women's Aux-
iliary. Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged, will hold its
annual Mother's Day party at
Douglas Gardens. 151 NE 52nd
St., Sunday at 2 p.m.
For many years this party
was hosted by the late Jenny
Grossinger, nationally known
philanthropist and humanitari-
an. This year, in her memory,
the. Grossinger family will host
this special day.
Shari (Mrs. Lawrence) Sii-
verman. president of the Aux-
iliary, will give the message of
welcome.
A musical program has been
arranged by Mrs. Louis Makov-
sky, program chairman, featur-
ing the Morton Rcid and his
orchestra.
The public is invited; refresh-
ments will be served.
Ruth Berber On
Staff Of Camp
Ruth Berger of Biscayne Point
will leave June 17 for (
Mountain Lake, Hendersonville,
N.C., where she will be in
charge of Girls' Hill for the
second consecutive year. Going
with her to camp are her four
children, Randi, 11, Robert. P'j.
Ronald, 6, and Rochelle, 5.
Ruth joined the camp staff in
1974 as an office worker in Mi-
ami; she continued in that ca-
pacity after she and her fa
went to camp.
A kindergarten worker I
volunteer at Biscayne 1
tary, Mrs. Berger taught fourth
grade there 1960-61 and third
grade in New Orleans from
1961-66. She is a past vice pres-
ident of the PTA at Biscayne
Elementary and has served as
chairman of its school volunteer
program.
Religious Services
MIAMI
A K A V A T SM-LOM CONCREOA-
T'.ON .-95 SW 67th Ave. O-thodox.
Cantor Aron Ben Arol..
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
3ETH AM (Temple). S950 N. Kendall
Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Ho*
bert M. Baumgard. Associate Rabbi
Barry Altman. 3
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lipson. 4-A
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
BETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
|ETH TOV (Temple). 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel._______________8
B'NAI ISRAEL AND 0*6ATER
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE 9600
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman.
8-A
ISRAEL (Temple) OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10
ISRAELITE i ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnasa
BETH TORAh. 1091 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Max -ip-
schitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelton.
B'NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Victor D. Zwel-
ing. Cantor Jar* Lemer. 38
SINAI (Temple) OF NORTH DADE.
188C1 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngsley. Cantor Irvina
Shulkes. 3'
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 19151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
Bidnick. _______ M
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. '
CORAL GABIES
JL'DEA (Templet 550 Granada Blvd.
fcr'orm. Rabb' Michael B. Eisen-
stat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
ZAMORA (Temple). 44 Zamora Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 60
FORT LAUDlRDAlt
BETH ISRAliL (Temple). 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Nev. 42
SAMU I'm, (Temple) 8900 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 306. Rabbi Maxwell
Berger 9
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Tempie). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Se.mour Hinkea.
iiON (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
ierva'ive. Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Cantor Errol HeWman. 1'
HIM AH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan Zolondek. 15
NCRlH MIAMI
3ETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative.
Rabbi Joseph Gorfinkel, Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. 35
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
BETH EL.
Orthodox.
*400 Pine Tree
Dr.
5
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
-----------
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirtky. Cantor Maurice Mamchea.
__ 19
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHOLOM (Temple). 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
TEMPLF BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conse-vative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde-
cai Yardeini. 21-A
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. 22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
8'NAI ZION (Temple). 200-173th St.,
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham
i. Jacobson 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGRF'-.ATinM
1242 Washington Av. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 715 Wa*hir-vm Ave.
Rabbi Meir Maslish Mel.imed. 23-A
EMANUEL (Temple). 1711 Washing,
ton Ave. Conservative. Pahbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
-- *-----
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. 25
------------
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibnr H. Stern.
Cantor Meyer Engel. 26
------------
KNESETH ISRAEL. 115 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham S-if. 27
------------
MEMORAH ITemple:. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Racn> Mayer Abram-
owitz fintor Nico Feldman. 28
vER TAMID iTemple). 79tn St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. 3Q
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collina Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1542
44 Washington Ave. 32
vORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Yavneh 32.a
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AGUDAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo.
"' 3'.8
ADATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1028
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Cantor Ian Alpern. JJ
-------------
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19258
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. S3.A
OR OLOM (Temple) 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative Habbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
TEMPLE ISRAEL-SOUTH (Formerly
Beth Tikva) 90>5 Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Rerorm. Habbi Arthur J.
Abrams. Cantor Jerome Klement. 43
CORAL SPHINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Reform. 3501 Univer-
sity Dr. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
TAMARAP ..JEWISH. CENTER. 9100
NW 57th St. Conservative. Pabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Stirling Rd. S3
P0MPAN0 BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St. 4-B
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
HALLANDAU
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
H0LIW00D
BETH El (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Roaenfeld 46
BETH fHALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar.
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 46
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Corservatlva.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywono. F.abbl
David Rosenfield. 47-B
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 51CC Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-0
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabb' Avrorr, Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 48
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 61
PLANTAT TN JE.. jr. CONGRE-
GATION. -TO Sou'h Nob Hill Road,
Plantation.
i
George N. Kotin, honorary
life president of Maccabee
Lodge, B'nai B'rith, and
past vice president and
trustee of the South Flor-
ida Council of B'nai B'rith
Lodges, was the recipient
of the "President's Cup of
Fulfillment" at the recent
Council installation where
International President Da-
vid Blumberg was guest
speaker.
CANDlELlGHTMG TIME
28 IYAR 7:36


Friday, May 9, 1975
*Jenist ftcridian
Page 9-B
*%
^Rabiriwcal flags
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lioschirz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Great Jewish Personalities
Nachmanides Medieval Scholar
I
By RABBI H. M. ROSENFELD
Temple Beth El, Hollywood
If diversification and depth
are adequate measures of a rab-
binic scholar's contribution to
Jewish learning, Nachmanides is
worthy of high praise. His writ-
ings span a wide spectrum of
scholarship; he served his peo-
ple as a philosopher, kabbalist,
biblical commentator, poet, and
physician.
Nachmanides varied and
unique contribution to rabbinic
literature was the result of roots
extending into Jewish commu-
nities in different parts of the
world. He gained expertise in
Talmud from the teachers of
northern France, while his
knowledge of philosophy and
mysticism originated from the
learning centers in Provence
and Spain. The wide and varied
worldview of this Spanish rabbi
enabled him to play a remark-
able role in the history of the
Jews.
IN THE REALM of philosophy,
Nachmanides is remembered as
a compromiser in the contro-
versy over Moses Maimonides'
Gnide to the Perplexed. Maim-
onides' great work aroused a
philosophical war in the Jewish
community. The ambiguity in-
herent in Maimonides' book led
rabbinic scholars to disagree
heatedly over its precise mean-
ing.
Many commentators argued
that Maimonides had presented
a heretical, but concealed, phil-
osophical doctrine. Though the
Guide contained many tradition-
al expressions of Jewish belief,
they contended that Maimonides
had interwoven in a covert man-
ner the doctrines of Aristotelean
philosophy. In their eyes,
Maimonides was undermining
the foundations of Judaism.
The Torah was filled with al-
legories. Thus, creation repre-
sented a parable of how men
began to think. Adam and Eve
symbolized the Greek ideas of
matter and form. The Garden
of Eden represented the phil-
osophical mind, and the Tree
of Knowledge stood for logically
deduced truths.
If these interpretations were
correct, Maimonides' Guide to
the Perplexed challenged the ac-
curacy of Jewish history and
belief as interpreted for cen-
turies.
THEREFORE, it is not sur-
prising that two camps de-
veloped in the Jewish commu-
nity. One stood squarely on
traditional grounds asserting
the historicity of the Bible and
the absolute truth of all tradi-
tional Jewish doctrines. The
other was more flexible, and
reinterpreted many Jewish sym-
bols with the ideas of current
medieval philosophy.
Nachmanides attempted to
bridge the gap between the
extremists in both camps, bid-
ing with the traditionalists, he
argued that every event in the
Torah occurred.
At the same time, he con-
tended that the events in the
Torah were symbolic of other
religious, philosophical and
mvstical ideas. Since he em-
braced both the accuracy of the
Bible and the importance of
philosophy, he served as a
potential mediator.
just as a symbol can stand
mid-way between the UteraJ
Sterprctation of the Torah and
an allegorical rendition, so
Nachmanides strove to walk the
Urrow ridge between the hos
tile factions in the dispute over
The Guide to The Perplexed.
Ultimately, his compromise
failed because the positions in
each faction had become polar-
ized.
LIKE OTHER rabbis during
the medieval period. Nachma-
nides was involved in theologi-
cal discussions between the
Jewish and Gentile commu-
nities. In 1263 King James con-
vinced him to engage in a de-
bate in Barcelona with Pablo
Christiani, a Jewish convert to
Catholicism.
Ultimately, the king congratu-
lated him for his defense of
Judaism. However, when he ex-
pressed his arguments in writ-
ten form, the Dominicans sought
to bring him to trial for attack-
ing Christianity. Nachmanides
escaped from Spain and moved
to Israel.
Nachmanides is also noted as
a Biblical commentator. His
commentaries to the first three
books of the Torah have recent-
ly been translated into English.
Nachmanides' use of symbols is
evident here as in his phil-
osophy. The stories of the
Bible are more than history,
they point to events of the fu-
ture.
THE CREATION reflects the
history of mankind. The Sab-
bath indicates the coming of the
Messiah. The lives of the
partriarchs represent the his-
tory of the Jewish people.
Nachmanides was a scholar of
Jewish Law. In his discussion of
several tractates of the Talmud,
he balances French and Spanish
methodologies. He is concerned
with the many strands of Tal-
mudic argument as well as the
practical necessity of deducing
the legal responsibilities of the
Jew.
Inside
Judaica
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor,
Encyclopaedia Judaica
Who is the Nazi-Hunter Si-
mon Wiesenthal?
Simon Wiesenthal was born
in Buczacz, in Galicia. He join-
ed the underground there and
passed through fourteen con-
centration camps before his lib-
eration from the "death bar-
racks" in Mauthausen. He was
successively head of the Center
of Jewish Camp Survivors and
Displaced Persons in the U.S.
occupied zone of Austria; di-
rector of the Jewish Community
in Linz, the capital of Upper
Austria, and of the Joint's pro-
fessional training in Austria;
leader of a group which he or-
ganized at the Council of the
Jewish Community in Vienna,
head of the Documentation Cen-
ter. An effective hunter of Nazis
from 1945, Wiesenthal also head-
ed the Organization of Camp
Survivors and Nazi Victims. In
1956, his archives were donated
to Yad Yashem.
Information concerning his
part in the capture of Adolf
Eichmann may be found in his
book, Ich jagte Eichmann: Tat-
sachenbericht (1961).
Wicsenthal's Documentation
Center in Vienna, the authori-
tative Encyclopaedia Judaica
states, has traced more than
1 000 hidden Nazi criminals. In
initiating his work, he has acted
as a Private citizen, his Center
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do some Sephardic
communities observe
special festivities on the
Sabbath before Shavuoth,
calling this Sabbath by the
special name of "Shabbat
Kallah?"
Generally speaking, in times
of old any Sabbath before a holi-
day was treated with special re-
gard. It was on such a Sabbath
that the laws and customs of the
holiday were explained and de-
scribed. The Sabbath before
Shavuoth would, therefore, be
no exception.
Among the Sephardic com-
munities this Sabbath before
Shavuoth was regarded as
"Shabbat Kallah," the "Sabbath
of the Bride." because Shavuoth
symbolized the covenantal mar-
riage between the Almighty and
the people Israel since the Rev-
elation took place on the date
of Shavuoth.
The Sabbath before the mar-
riage is the cause for a special
celebration in the Sephardic
community. Neighbors visit the
home of the bride, they are
shown the wedding clothes and
the gifts already received, and
great festivity ensures. (In the
Occidental community the
groom has special ceremonies
at the synagogue.)
Thus, since the Sabbath be-
fore Shavuoth is the Sabbath
before the wedding of the Lord
and his people, special festivi-
ties are deemed to be in order.
Why is it customary to
decorate the synagogue
with greens and flowers on
the holiday of Shavuoth?
Some people even do so to
the home as well. On the other
hand the famous Gaon of Vilna
objected to this custom. Never-
theless, the custom persisted,
especially among the Hasidim.
Several reasons are cited for
this practice. Some say that it
symbolizes the season in which
the festival takes place the
late spring when greens and
flowers are in full bloom.
Others claim that Shavuoth
is about the date when Moses
was placed among the bullrush-
es along the river's edge. Thus
the greens represent the reeds
which grow along the river.
There are those who claim
that this practice symbolizes the
mountain of Sinai which bloom-
ed forth in greenery at the time
of the Revelation at Sinai which
took place on the date we cele-
brate as Shavuoth.
It is also claimed that decor-
ating the synagogue with greens
and flowers reminds us of the
Bikkurim (the offering of the
first fruits of the produce of the
fields) which were brought to
the temple of old at this holi-
day.
Issues And Answers..
Our Rabbis' Views
Chaplain Brings Concern
being financed only by contribu-
tions from individuals through-
out the world and his own earn-
ings from lectures and publica-
tions.
Wiesenthal still has more than
300 cases of wanted Nazi mur-
derers on file, in various stages
of investigation. He was award-
ed an honorary doctorate by the
Hebrew-Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion in 1973.
By RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
Director Community Chaplaincy Service of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
How does the patient teel when the chaplain visits? Does it
provoke anxiety, fearing that perhaps last rites are going to be
recited? These are some of the questions I am asked from time
to time by Jew and non-Jew concerning the Chaplaincy.
To answer this, one must know what the Chaplaincy is. The
Chaplaincy was established in 1966 Dy-thcOreater Miami Jewish
Federation in association with the Rabbinical Association of Great-
er Miami. The program which is funded by the Federation pro-
vides visitation and religious services to the non-affiliated who are
confined to hospitals, nursing homes, prisons and homes for the
retarded. The program is based on a most important and revered
'mitzvahbikkur cholimvisiting and comforting the ill and in-
firmed. It is among the few mitzvahs listed in a special prayer
recited daily. The prayer states. "AYLU DEVORIM SHE AYN
LOHEM SHIUR'"these are the things for which there are no
limits"their value is unlimited.
PERHAPS THE best description of the function of the chap-
lain is provided by the rabbis of the Talmud who state, "one who
visits the sick, takes away one sixtieth of his illness." The only
part of the illness you can take away is the emotional partthe
fear, anxiety, loneliness, and despair. These weigh as heavily and
are often as disabling as the illness itself. The chaplain provides
comfort, reassurance, concern and hope. He also serves in a refer-
ral capacity, making the patient aware of the many community
resources available to help in various problems he may have.
Since there is no concept of 'last rites' in Judaism, the chap-
lain's visit could hardly bring anxiety to the patient. Where, how-
ever, the patient is in a critical or terminal state, it is usually the
rabbi whom he calls for to bring the peace of mind and strength
needed as perhaps never before.
The chaplain's visit is not only a visit from an individual, but
since he represents the community, he brings also the concern of
a community that cares.
Report Of Rabbinical Assn.
Meeting Held April 16,1975
In an effort to share our concerns with the Greater Miami
Jewish community and in the hope that the following might be
of interest to our readership, we will begin the practice of re-
porting on those issues that came before the regular monthly
meeting of the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami.
Of particular interest are two Resolutions which were passed
upon and which we share witn you. The first expressed its sup-
port of efforts within our community on behalf of Soviet Jewry
as follows:
The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami ex-
presses its unanimous support of Drs. Krop, Blank. Brandt
and Marks in their fast on behalf of Vladimir Slepak, his
wife Maria and their son Alexander. We offer our pray-
ers on behalf of the Slepaks, and on behalf of all op-
pressed Soviet Jews, pledging our continued and unflag-
ging solidarity with them and promising to work for that
day when all Russian Refusiks will be permitted to live
as Jews or to leave as Jews.
The second, a statement in support of the cause of Migrant
Farm Workers, will appear on this page next week.
By the time the above Resolution appears, Rabbi Ralph P.
Kingsley, president of the Rabbinical Association of Greater Mi-
ami, will have represented the Rabbis at a "Fiesta'' given in be-
half of Caesar Chavez and the Farm Workers and will have joined
with a representative of the Archdiocese of Greater Miami and
the Metropolitan Council of Churches in voicing interfaith sup-
port for the rights of the farm workers to unionize and to achieve
a level of dignity for themselves.
Further reports of "Rabbinic concerns" will be forthcoming in
future issues.


Page 10-B
*Jeniiti ftoricfiairr
Friday, May 9, 1975
Obituaries
Mrs. Kupferstein
Buried April SO
iecai Nona
LEGAL NOTKE
BRESSON, Michael. 77 r.r North
Miami Beach. Riverside.
CHIIKX. Jack, II, of Miami Beach.
Klasberir
I \X. Minnie. 79. of Miami Beach.
Riverside. '
1 KISS, nenjnmlii. sit, of Miami Beach.
Blaaber;.
I'mTTS. Bather, IS, of Miami.
N.-wman
ROOATZ, Hen. 77. of Miami. Levltl
RV8KIN, Reuben, II. ot Miami Beach.
Riverside, Interment mi. Nebo
Cemeten
si'MM.it. Henry I., W, of HI iml
Baach. Newman
BiROl ER, David, IS, ol .Miami Beach,
Blasberg.
KIKKIN. Harry, 19, of Miami Beach,
Riverside. Interment Mi. Nebo
i 'emetei)
Si'l.TA. Samuel, 10, ot Miami Beach
I -\ in.
I!! KIKIt. Bldney, II, Of Miami Beach.
. vilt
i-i iURVILLE, Victor, 19, of Miami
at h Rlversidi
:' K'SENSTEIN. Joseph, 16, Of Miami
Reai h. Riverside,
ii.u ski:. Jerome, 72, of North
.Miami Riverside,
KOPPEI.E. Irving, 71, of North Miami
Deai h. Levltl
LONDON, Lola, 58, of North Miami
Beat h, Levitt.
ROTNER, Abraham, 74, of Miami
lieai h, Riverside,
COOPER, Morris, 71. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
FRIEDMAN, Helen S. W, of Xorlh
Miami Beach. Riverside.
_ CI-AI'DMAN. Maury J.. 61. of Miami.
Riverside.
Grossman. Henrietta. 18. of Miami
Beach. Levitt.
I,KVIXH. Samuel. 90. of Miami Beach.
Levitt.
MALI.Kit. Abraham. 74. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
MENDOZA, Martin J 7... of Miami.
Rlveralde. Interment .Mi. Nebo
i 'emeAery.
KORRIti, Robert, 80, of .Miami
Beach, Riverside.
RATTJST, Bistelle, 62, of Xorth
.Miami Beach Levitt
Bl HNEIH. Knim.i. of i.Mami Beach.
Blasberg,
SCHWARTZ. Jack, 71. of Miami
ueach, Blasberg,
JIaRON. Benjamin. 76, of North
.Miami Beach. UorUOU.
BoLOTIN, Howard s. IS, "t North
Miami Beach, Riverside.
&OSEM, Rachel, 7", ol .Miami Beach,
ttlverslde.
DI'BIN. Martin, 58, of Miami Beach.
c sabers,
GOODMAN, Joseph, 7'.'. "I Miami
i lea* h. Riverside.
GREENFIELD, -Max. 76, of Miami
Beach. Blasberg.
Hl'RWITZ, Florence, 74. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
t.m.w. Joseph, 80, of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
VkEBEK, Minnie, 79, of Miami Beach.
.\ Mman
w EINSTEIN, Francine, 62, of Miami.
Riverside,
V ;.!S.MA.\. Rose i; X7. Of Miami.
Uordon. Interment ML Nebo
i ^emetury.
H'llMK. luiVf of North .Miami.
I.eVltt.*
DAVID. Fannie. 84. of Miami Reach.
Newman,
[DEITCH. Uussle, 83. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
KATZ, Samuel, nf Xorth .Miami
Beach. Blasberg.
I I.er.vek. Paula, Bl, *< Miami Beach,
i llasberg.
XATHAX. William, 73. of North
Miami Beach, Newman.
NEWMAN, Lap. 7S. of North Miami.
ORMOND, l.iilinn. 81, of Miami
Bea< h Riverside
8IDOH8KY, Herman, of North Miami
Beach, Levitt
TIERMAN, Max. 77. of Miami.
lordon,
H E1S8MAN, Moe. of North Miami
Beach. Levitt.
BAER, Jennie. II, of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
Miami Beach Levitt.
Bl r.MKXTHAi.. Ben, 19, Of North
COHEN. Sarah, 83, of Miami Beach,
Riverside
GINSBERG, .Saul. 82, of Xorth* Miami.
Kn erslde
URBENF131 D, Milton, 64, of .Miami
lie.oil Levitt
IIAIIIIS llaim II.. S.l. of .Miami Beach.
Riverside.
JACOBSON, Irene. ?:,. of Miami.
Rlveralde Interment Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
KALMCS, Gertrude, of Miami.
Riverside
WEISENBURQ. Gertrude, of .Miami.
Cordon
Ithl i l-.N. Elsie. 78, oi Miami Beach.
Lev il I
E8KREI8, Leo, 7:', Ol Coral Cables.
Riverside
FI8HER, Charles. 72. of .Miami Beach.
New man.
HOLZBERO, Julius. IS, of .North
.Miami Beach. I^evitt
I.EHNKK. David, bo, of Xorth Miami
Beach. Riverside
PASTEI.NICK, Louis, 77. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
SMITH. Barney, 74, Of Miami Beach.
Blasberg
FISHER. Harry, 74. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
Gi.cn i.i.it. Evelyn, SB. of .North
Miami B.a.h. Riverside.
JAFFEE. Pauline 78, Of Miami Beach.
Blasberg.
Kl I'n.i,, Sarah, s:,. of Miami Beach.
Riverside. Interment Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
I b\ c. ...ay. of Miami. Blasberg.
LINKER. Ja.ques. of .Miami.
Riverside.
8HL1VEK, E. Alan, 50, of Miami.
Rlvt rside. #
SIDhOn. Uorothy. of Surf.side.
Riverside.
SPATZ, Mi...1.1. ;r,. ol Miami I.each
i: i \ erslde
\v Al i mi..X, Milton, 71. of Miami.
Blasberg.
ZBRIGER, I -i h, :.. r.; Miami
B.ach. Riverside.
BORTNICK kbrahi m, SS, of Miami
i leai ic Riverside.
BRANDEJ8, Tauba 7. 78. Of Miami
Beach Graveside services, Mt Nebo
i 'emetery, Riverside
BRODY, Prank, 75. of Miami Beach.
'''> her* rntermenl Mt. Nebo
i em, '.,ijgi
DECESAi.E, August, 94, Of Miami.
Newman.
Dl'CHON. Samuel. 73. of Miami
Hea.h Riverside. Interment Ml.
Nebo i Ymeicr.v.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-13202
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IX UK:
held Wednesday .April 30, in BETTY J. BARRAB, Wife,
the Woodlawn Park Cemetery. .,,,-;< MAKRA8. nu!iband.
Mrs. Kupferstein died lues- TO: vwsiev r. ltarras
day in her Miami Beach home. y Mrs. ^nrie Barras
She came here from Peekskill, Syracuse, New York
Ylir ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
Services for Mrs. Bertha
Kupferstein, 89, a 50-year resi-
dent of South Florida, were
N.Y., and was a member of the
Beth David Synagogue and the
Eastern Star.
She is survived by a daugh-
ter, Mrs. Walter Fall; two sons,
Nat H. and Leo R. Kupper; five
granddren and five great-grand-
children.
Gordon Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open fvery Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Ktprtienled by 5. Uvilt, F.O.
In New York:
(2121263-7600
Queens Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hills, N.Y.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Serving the Jewish Community since 1931
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
______ REFORM SERVICES
Emjnuel Goieon (1946) IM Gordon
Main; Goidon 11964) Jomes I Goidon
Telephone 858.5564_____
PALMERS
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY.
i
ELKIN
flMONAUZED MEMORIAL!
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUK WORKJMOP
4444921 -4440922
3279 S.W. It* ST.. MIAMI
LEVITT
Memorial Chapel
"ltWISH fUNlRAl DIMCTOffS"
A
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATE
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
13385 W. DIXIE MWY.. N.M.
thai ;in action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage haa been filed j.-musi yon and
you are required to serve a eopt "'
viiur written defenses, if any, to It on
Arthur H. Upaon, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 1980 So,
Ocean Drive, HaUandale, Florida
33009, am" file the original with the
clerk .if *.' above styled court "n or
before June I, 1975: Mherwlsa s de-
fault "ill be entered asainsl you f"r
ih,- ri'ii.'f demanded in the complaint
>r petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal ol
sani court at Miami, Florida, on this
28th day of April, I9TS
KK'IIAKP P. BRISKER
As Clark, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By a 11 WA1 E
a- Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Baal)
_________ S 2-P-I6-2S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
viF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-13690
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN J*K: IUK MAKK1AOE OF:
LOURDB8 R MAltTIXEZ. Petitioner
anil
CASTOR MARTINEZ. ResDondent.
TO: Mr. Castor Martinez
Resilience I'nknown
YOU ARE HEKEUV NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has bean filed against you ami
you arc required to serve copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
DAVID E. STONE, attorney for Pe-
tltloner, whose address is 1"1 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida :1312S
tSii.M :I2I !".:.", and file the original
with the clerk of (he above styled
court on or before June (ith. 197.1;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complalnl or petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THK JEWI8H FLORIDIAS
WTTNE88 my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
|lh day of April. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dnde County. Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As r>e|iui> Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID B. STONE, ESQUIRE
Stone, Sostchln & Kosgj P.A.
101 N.W. 12 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128 (324-4655)
Attorney for Petitioner
I 2-9-IC-23
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIFOU T IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORID*
NO. 75-11155
GENERAL JURISDICTION n'V'SION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
In re the nvirrlnge of:
lioi'iiTHY I.EE BARD" '.
Petitioner.
FRANK MARCO SARDO.
Respondent
TO: FRANK MARCO SAllTO
Residence Unknow-n ___
yOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
j-ou are required to serve copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
LOUIS ci.A/.Kl:. attorney for Peii-
tloner, whose address is 11711 nis-
cayne Boulevard, North Miami. Flor-
ida, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled court on or
before June 4. in?:.: otherwise Judg-
ment ma> be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition, ,
\\ ITNES8 mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on this
::.ili day of April. 1975.
RICHARD P. ISRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By; I.. BNBBDEN
\- Deputy clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) B/..,.la.M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-7423
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN HE: The M'arHage of!
QARY s I'RTMAN.
.I'usband ...... .
ana
KATHLEEN S. ORTMAN.
Wife,
To: KATHLEEN S. ORTMAN
lii'.il s th Avenue.
Apt, No. F 105 "T
Miami. Florida SJ158
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and comenc-
ed in the court and you are required
to serve .i copy of your written de-
fenses, if any. to it on MARTIN
ROTH, Attorney for Petitioner, mi
Alnsley Building. Miami. Florida
5313*, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before June 3rd. 107^; otherwise a
default will lie entered against you
for the relief prayed for In the peti-
tion.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In the JEWISH FL0R1DIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the leal
of said Court al Miami. Florida on
tl ii 3IUl day of April. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINK ER.
Al Clerk, Circuit Court
I lade County. Florida
By: N, A Hi wet!
A- Deputy Clerk
-,'2-9-l-23
%
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-11S9
in RE: Estate of
BDW ARD SHAPIRO
dec,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All rerson*
:. t lalms or Demande Ae.im.--t
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and requir-
ed to presenl any claim* and de-
ma nde h lilt ti you in:.- have
the mute of IS] >\v AR11 SHAPIRO
. .| late ot Dade 'ountj.
to tin i 'in ui: Judgi
i County, and flit the name in
duplicate and aa pri \ Ided in Si
733.16. Florida Statutes, In their of-
fice* in i he i 'ounty i 'ourlhoui
i ...- County, Florida, within four
: ir months from the time
.
i il Florida, this 1st
.
in LAN .1. Kl H'T
Ah Vdmlnli tn tor
Cum publication of this notice on
i, nth day of Mi
IYLAN Ii. KOUT
n nlstral ir
ii oln Ri ad
... m Beach, Flo
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF Fl.ORIOA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2174
In RE: Estate of
Ai.ni: TERRY
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or lajiniuds AnainM Saul
Estate:
Vou an- hereby notified and requir-
ed to present anj lalms and >ii mandi
which you may have against the es-
tat..... ALICE TERRY deceased late
ol Hade County, Florida, to the Cir-
cuit Judges of I lade County, and file
tlie same in duplicate and a* provided
:n Section 7JJ.16, Florida Statue
their Offices in the County Courthouse
In Dade County, Florida, within four
aiendar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be barrel.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 23rd
day of April. AD. 1H75.
DAVID C.II.HKRT
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of May. 1975.
Louis H. Stallman
Attorney for executor
407 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach
5/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2438
In RE: Estate of
David U Edgerton
deceased,
To All creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or Demande Aga nsl Sa I
Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and requir-
ed tu present any claims and di mands
which you may have agali
i;nr of I lavld l. Edgei i.. ai ed
late of Dade County, Florida, I i :1 ie
circuit Judges of Dade Counts I
file the same In duplicate
provided in Section 73*
Statutes, hi their offli Ii the Coun-
ts '.in thouse in Dade l' >ut tj
Ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publ
of, or the same will be ba
!' ed i m iml, Flot i. -I b
day of April, a 11. 1973
MARlt INETTA E. MAI.LOY
' d I
tl 'i of I on
the L'lni daj ol May,
Goldman, G ft Pa
Attornoj
fikIi r Street, M am Fl i
NOTJCE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE --ERVICE
(NO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADF CO'-NTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-13517
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE M VRRIAOE t F
Al BERT A. II ANN A.
and
VERA MAE HANNA,
TO: VERA MAE HANNA
! North 16th Street
Philadelphia. Pennsyh
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thm an action for Dissolution ol Mar-
riage I been filed against u
you are required to serve n copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
MICHAEL P CHASE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 16924
N.E. 19th Avenue. North Miami
Beach, Florida 53191, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June 6th
Otherwise a default will be en-
tered agalnal you for the relli I de-
manded in the complaint or o
This notice shall be pubiishl
eai h Week for four consecutive Weeks
In THE JEWI8H PLORTDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said t-ourt at Miami. Florida on this
.'9th day of April. IMS,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
,/>. ~Ab Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MICHAEL P. CHASE
16H24 N.E. lth Avenue
North Miami Reach. Florida 33162
Attorney fur Petitioner
------- 5/2-9-16-23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TH1
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-1992
IX RE: ESTATE OF
JEAN COMENSK V
l leceased.
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THK STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO M I. PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID
DECEDENT,
Vou are hereby notified that a writ-
ten instrument purporting to be the
lasl vvill and testament "f said dece-
dent has been admitted to probate i'j
sani Court, Vo'^are her.-hy command-
ed within six calendar months from
Ihi di te of the first publication f
itli t to apnear in said I iou i
and show cause. i( any you can, why
U i| nald Court In admitting
to probate should not stand
ui v iked
Ir uit Court Judtre
J, >;u VNN PARKER
RICHARD P BRINKER, Clerk
By NADINE S JENNINGS
I ii oul) i Ilerk
: itmai Esq.
I i vlnaoi .v- Kenln
; Avenue
1
P .,,41
'
;
iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OS- THE
ELlVENTH JUOifiA '-----: ,T
OF FLOR.OA IN AND FO-I
DADE COUNT-
PROBATE DIVISli- s
PROBATE NO. 75 .
HERMAN MINTZER
on
-i- ,h"ICE TO CREDITORS
'" irei itors arid All pi
I m .- ., t
will be barred
,;,;" :;";:' ,!:."" *
DA) in m MINTZER
B LNCHE RUBIN
i. "" ( n-Kx*'cuirix
. ftublleation of this notice en
ith daj of May, 19767
SIMON. HAYS ftQRCNDWBRQ
Attorn, f01 gnecutora
II9 Alnsley BWg.
5/9-16
NOTICE UNDER
... FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
lk*OTICB is HEREBY CIVEN that
'he undersigned, desiring to engage In
' under -be flcUtlOU. name of
at -', s \v"' Ki,HK'--T SERVICE
d -.;.t'--S U- 8 Avenue. Miami. Flor-
wiit, hi ,'"," to. reni.t*r said name
.UW "'. ,h? Circuit Court
......... SERVICE
d-i'ci -- 8 Avenue. Miami. Flor-
o rulalu ...,i ,,.,,
of Dade CunVy. iiof*t.V,,,," CUrt
8/ RICHARD S. WALTON
B/2-9-16-
ay
)f The
i. Mr
Presi-1
Ttploy-
1 and I
1 sOT-
. Inc., I
cabiahl
;i
at the 1
i
|-al for
Pailotj
lifeii(
- a:: I
itforml
idhu-l
?iesa
xlges,
alkin, j
eex-
,y 13
f


Friday, May 9, 1975
+Jewlst> BbrMtor
Page 11-B
50 Years Of Hebrew University Progress
*

In 1925, when Lord Balfour
proclaimed the Hebrew Univer-
sity open before a crowd of
thousands, including dignitaries
froni tin' Vis'* iv. the Diaspora,
foreign ,-ic identic institutions
and governments, it was the
realization of an idea born years
earlier.
The dream of a university as
the cultural and spiritual toe :-
of the Jewish people's national
reawakenin; to sovereignty was
put forth in 1882, given full ex-
pression by Dr. Chaim Weiz-
j mann in ll>02. and made con-
crete with the laying of founda-
tion -torus in 1918an act of
faith in a land still at war.
BLT ITS opening in 1925. the
university was composed of
three research institutes
ehe"'i'trv, microbiology and
Jewish studiesand the nucle-
us of the Jewish National and
University Library. Three years
later, three new institutes had
been added, and teaching be-
gan. The first Master of Arts
degrees were awarded in 1931,
and the first Ph.D. in 1936.
By 1947, the Hebrew Univer-
fity of Jerusalem had grown to
the stature of a large and well
established research and teach-
ing institution. It had Faculties
and Humanities and Science, a
Pre Faculty of Medicine, a
School of Agriculture (with its
own campus in Rehovot), a De-
partment of Education, the Li-
brary, a University Press an!
an Adult Education Center. Stu-
dent enrollment topped 1.000
Typical sight at the Hebrew Univer-
sitya soldier-student wends his way
on the Givat Ram campus in Jeru-
salem from one class to the next.
Gov. Askew, Harmaii To Keynote
Scopus Award Dinner May 18
Continued from Page 1-B
problem areas of war and eco-
nomic hardship.
STUDENTS ARE currently
struggling to complete their
rigorous study programs while
fulfilling military service re-
quirements. Due to the scarcity
of education funds, the univer-
sity has found it necessary to
release some of its younger pro-
fessors, creating a situation that
can have serious repercussions
in the future.
"Because of men like Hap
Levy," declared Herman, "the
Hebrew University has succeed-
ed in meeting its academic
goals, enabling it to perform
vital services on behalf of the
State of Israel and world Jewry.
It is that kind of support which
gives us the confidence to meet
our immense challenges in the
future."
HOROWITZ, who has accept-
ed chairmanship of the Scopus
Award dinner, is a member of
the board of directors of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, chairman of its Public Re-
lations Committee, member of
the CJA-IEF s Campaign Steer-
ing Committee and Pacesetter
Committee.
He is also chairman of the
Large City Public Relations Ad-
visory Committee of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds.
Horowitz is a prominent res-
taurateur.
Veterans Eligible For Increase In Study Benefits
Veterans in need of financial
aid to coo,... e oi Biii e I .<
are elisiUe for inci eased Lene-
fits under t: e Veterans Admin-
istration's \ gram. Administrator of Veterans
Afiairs Uicnu.u L. Roudebush
noted.
A December 3 law 'PL 93-
Bb). inerc as-d the amount vet-
erans can earn in the program
to a maximum of S6-3 per sem-
ester or full time students who
agree to work 250 hours for He
agency.
Prior to Deccm'.er. VA could
provide a maximum of only $250
a fiscal year I i a limited i
ber of selected veterans for lOJ
hours of service.
From April 1937. when the
orl ,*iogram started.
through last December, 27,157
veterans received nearly S6.6
million in giants for 2.6 million
ho trs of work, the VA official
tevealel
". rans Interested in "work
" were urged to apply to
VA i -: nal offi sea whi< .1 main-
records.
Easier For Vets To Qualify For Housing Loans
The Veterans Administration
has reminded married veterans
that it is easier than ever be-
fore to qualify for housing as-
sistance.
Administrator of Veterans
Affairs Richard L. Roudebush
noted the ag:ncy now accords
full recognition to incomes and
expenses of both veteran and
spouse in determining ability to
repay loan ooligations.
Roudebush said VA is requir-
ed by law to determine if con-
templated terms of repayment
bear a proper relation to the
veteran's anticipated income
and expenses before approving
the loan.
"But while the spouse's in-
come has always been consid-
ered," Roudebush explained,
"local rules sometimes had the
effect of discounting the
spouse's income.
"Now, however, no such local
ils are imposed, and the
spouse's income is given full
consideration."
VA guarantees 60 per cent
of GI loans (maximum 517,500)
private lenders make to mili-
tary service personnel, veterans
and eligible spouses of World
War II Korean and poat-Ko-
rean conflicts and the Viet-
nam-era.
As Chairman Of
Al Ossip Named
Templet Membership Committee
r^^j^s i
Al Ossip, Miami Beach civic
and religious leader, has been
named chairman of the mem-
bership committee of Temple
Emanu-El. His appointment was
announced Wednesday by
Judge Frederick N. Barad,
president, and Samuel N. Fried-
land, chairman of the board of
the Miami Beach congregation.
Ossip, associate recording
secretary of Temple Emanu-El.
is past vice president of the
Mens Club. He is a former
ptesident of the Bureau of Jew-
ish Education of Greater Miami
and past commander of Miami
Beach Post No. 330 of the Jew-
ish War Veterans of the United
State?
A 'ice president of the Dou-
glas hardens Jewish Home and
;tal for the Aged, Ossip
has served for many years on
tire board of governors of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and was chairman of the
insurance division of the CJA-
IEF campaign.
President of Ossip Insurance
Agency, he is vice president of
the Florida Association of Mut-
ual Insurance Agents and presi-
dent of the Dais County Asso-
ciation of Mutual Insurance
Agents.
and there were some 200 mem-
bers of faculty.
THE WAR of Independence
saw the State bornan iccess
to Mount Scopus cut off in de-
fiance of all international agree-
ments. When the new nation's
need was greatest, the univer-
sity had no home. But studies
ted, in dozens of buildi
widely scattered around Jerusa-
lem.
Under these immense diffi-
culties, two new facultieslaw
and medicinewere inaugurat-
ed for trained men and women
were to he a prime guarantee of
the young State's viability.
A few years later, the Facul-
ties of Social Sciencss and Den-
tal \Tedicin and the School of
Pharmacy opened a further
move towards providing an in-
d'a^nous leidcshio to cone
with the problems of an lnmi-
p-ant society fighting for its
life.
THROUGHOUT THO^E diffi-
cult yea*"s with makeshift orem-
ises and insufficient equipment.
the university operated with the
attitude that the situation was
temnorarv. A return to Mount
Scopus was expected.
When it became obvious that
there was no end in sight to this
"temporary" state of affairs,
land was acquired on Givat Ram
in western Jerusalem and build-
ing of a new campus began
there in 1953.
Givat Ram was official!'/ ded-
icated in 1953, part of Israel's
tenth anniversary celebrations,
even as the university was turn-
ing its attention outwards and
setting up branches, destined
for ultimate independence, in
Tel Aviv. Haifa and Beersheba.
The new Medical Center in
Ein Kerem. built at the same
time as Givat Ram, was by then
also in use.
BUT MOUNT Scopus remain-
was never abandoned.
At the height of the fighting
during the Six-Day War. this
dream was realized in a reunit-
ed Jerusalem. The 50th anni-
versary, in 1968. of the laying
of the cornerstones was cele-
brated with the laying of foun-
dation stones for a n w Uni-
versity City to arise on Mount
Sconus.
Enrollment has sine- reached
1S.000. There arc todav seven
faculties and eisht schools on
th university's four campuses.
Faculties include Humanities,
c<-inci. Social ^H 'nets Law,
/Vo.-jepif.-,. Medicine and Den-
tal Medicine, and Schools of
rv-orsong 9tud m=. Applied
Science and Technoloev, Educa-
.; ... Phar-nacv Social Work,
Business Ad'"'"'sttiop. Nutri-
tion?! and ir' 's'ic Science,
and the Graduate Library
School.
Nearly 60 000 Bachelors,
*it"-s nd D"-t->val degrees
have been awarded to date.
A CENTER for P--Academic
Studies has. since 1963, served
as a last-change program to
combat cultural disadvantage
among Israel's immigrant
vo.ith. t*"* School fo- Overseas
Students has. since 1970! accom-
modated youn; people from
around the wo-ld who come to
study in the University of the.
Jewish PeooH.
This Jubilee Year opened
with the planting on Mount
Scoput of a memorial forest for
the students, teachers and work-
ers who have fa'l*n in Israel's
warsincluding 124 in the Yom
Kippur War.
The challenges of rehabilitat-
ing wounded students, making
up study time lost bv students
on long stints of reserve duty,
and continuing to maintain its
high standards thror uncertainty and world inflation
are the focuses of the Hebrew
University's efforts in this 50th
anniversary year,
ed the heart of the university,
and the faith in a return there
Mrs. Ceil Ross BIock, (left) outgoing president of the
Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach, is shown with
Mrs. Harry Dworkm, the new president at the installa-
tion ceremonies held at the Fontainebleau Hotel This
organization has raised over half a million dollars for
Mount Sinai Medical Center's cancer research and treat-
ment program.
-.388 i
Smith Shore Hospital Women's Auiliary held its Spring
Luncheon recently at the Eden Roc Hotel. Serving as
ticket chairman was Mrs. Lloyd Cooper (left), Mrs. Hen-
rietta Fine was chairman of the day. Mrs. James Todd is
the auxiliary's ways and means chairman; Mrs. Olive
Delahxmt (right) is treasurer.


Page 12-B
vJmistincriJiftt?
Friday, May 9, 197S
)
Me is a good Temple member, lives an exempl ary life, is a devoted husband and father.
But he is neglecting an important moral obligation.
He has not yet made his cemetery arrangements. Like other
moral and spiritual obligations, these arrangements must
not be forgotten. By planning ahead, decisions can be made
calmly. They can be made without emotional pressure.
hi mm rov re sr ooi mom/ himomius mr
MASTSM CMAfTSMM IN SILVUt AMD UtONU
They can be made wisely, and they can be made together
as a family. If you have not yet fulfilled this obligation to
your family, we urge you to do so now. In this way, you
can be certain that your family will not suffer needlessly.
ii
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street


"eFewish Floiridliain
Miami, Florida Friday, May 9, 1975
Section C
Sen. Stone Main Speaker At
Memorial Day Patriotic Rally
U.S. Senator Richard "Dick"
Stone will be the main speaker
at this year's Memorial Day
Weekend Patriotic Rally and
Concert.
The rally, which is presented
by the Miami Beach B'nai B'rith
Lodge 1591 and sponsored by
Chase Federal Savings and Loan
Association as a public service
will be h?ld at the Miami Beach
Convention Center, May 24, at
7:30 p.m. Admission is free.
Sen. Ston?'s patriotic message
will be concerned with the need
for patriotism in a time of great
turmoil here and abroad.
oen. Stone, who served as
Florida's Secretary of State and
as a State Senator, is currently
co-authoring an energy legisla-
tion which would put a ceiling
on Arab oil prices and author-
ing legislation which will allo-
cate more Federal funds to
Florida through a more current
population census figure.
Sen. Stone is currently a com-
mittee member in the Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Fores-
try, the Department c* Interior
and Insular Affairs and the De-
partment of \eterans Affairs.
The Barnett.Breeskin Concert
Orchestra will entertain with
Torah Fund
Luncheon Is
Wednesday
Ruth (Ms. I-vin?) Firtel has
been named chairman of th.>
annual Torah Fund Luncheon
of the Temple Emanu-El Sisl h -
hoL>:t. H:r aopointment was an-
nounced by Mrs. Ri*wrd
Schwarz, president of Sister-
hood.
Th? yn.lv event of the Mi-
ami Beaci cong-edition, which
supports the Mathil le Schechter
Reeidenc? Hall and rV Torah
Fund of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America will bs
held Tuesday at 11 a.m. in the
North Bay Road home of Fran
(Mrs. Norman) Schindbr.
D.\ In in Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El who rec ived
both his earned and honorary
doctorates from the Jewish
Theological Seminary, will be
the guest speaker.
Reservations may be made at
the Temple Emanu-El Sister-
hood office. .
two individual concerts (Brec-
skin is director of the Miami
Beach Symphony). Also, musi-
cal selections by well-known vo-
calists Anne E"ans and Allen
Gildersleeve will be a part of
this year's musical segment.
In addition, there will be a
Presentation of Colors by Honor
Guards from Homestead Air
Force Base and the Naval Re-
serve Center in Miami, directed
by Harold Uhr, Department
Commander of the State of Flor-
ida Jewish War Veterans
(USA).
Dignitaries taking pal in the
program include the Hon.
Maurice Ftrre, Mayor of Mi-
ami; the Hon. Steve Clark,
Mayor of Metropolitan Dade
County; the Hon. Harold Rosen,
Mayor of Miami Beach; Rev.
Garth R. Thompson of the Mi-
ami Beach Community Church;
Dr. David Raab, rabbi of Tem-
ple Beth Solomon; Malcolm
Frombcrg, second vice presi-
dent. District Five of the B'nai
B'rith. and Barton Goldberg,
director and past president of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce.
Also on the :i.nis will be Barry
Gurland, president of the B'nai
B'rith Council of South Florida
Lodges; Robert Hoffman, presi-
dent of the Broward/Palm
Beach Council; Dr. Mike Teitel-
baum. president, Florida State
Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges, and Col. Phil Cohen,
regional director of lodge semi-
nars, B'nai B'rith.
"atriotie Rally committee
members include Samuel Pas-
coe. chairman, Nat Gillman,
Larry Shuman and Moe Reif-
fen. More than 60 B'nai B'rith
Lodges and 37 women's B'nai
B'rith chapters will be cooperat-
ing with Miami Beach Lodge
1591 in the presentation of the
event.
Chase Federal Savings and
Loan Association will be repre-
sented by Harry' Schellhammer,
vice president.
Mrs Rachel Abramowitz is congratulated by University
of Miami President Henry King Stanford on receiving a
Doctorate of Arts degree at the V-M graduation cere-
monies With them is Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual
leader of Temple Menorah, who gave the clo?:ng bene-
diction In her doctoral thesis Dr. Rachel Abramowitz
wrote "The Jews Under the Tsars and the Commissars"
in which she developed a teaching curriculum and his-
torical background of Soviet Jewry on a collegiate level.
nv wvhm next Wednesday's Torah Fund luncheon
of theSempllErLnu-El Sisterhood at the North Bay
ZJd home of Mrs. Norman Schindler, are these five vice
rtideZc0 Sisterhood (from W^J*^
Mrs. Albert Levy, Mrs. Jerome Uffner, Mrs. Ted houo
end Mrs. Morris Fruchiman._______________________
Women's Guild Ends Season
The Women's Guild of the
Miami Philharmonic Society
held their tenth annual end-of-
meetiag and lunch-
eon at the Doral Hotel's Star-
light Roof Friday. Outgoing
president, Mrs. G. Thomas Sa-
martino, introduced Mrs. Crut-
cher Field Harrison as presi-
dent.
Planning the Memorial Day Patriotic Rally and Concert
are (seated) Rally Chairman Samuel Pascoe, and Harry
Schellhammer, (right) vice president of Chase Federal
Savings and Loan Association. Standing are Larry Shu-
man, (left) past president of the B'nai B'rith Lodge of
Miami Beach; Nat Gillman, current lodge president; and
Moe Reiffen, also a past president.
HONORING DAWS OUTSTANDING CITIZENS
Premack Featured Speaker
At 28th Annual Luncheon
M.B. C Of C To
Honor Pomcrance
The Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce will hold its an-
nual dinner dance Monday,
.Inn- 2, Chamber president Bart
Goldberg, and executive vice
president Leonard A. "Doc"
Baker have announced.
This year's fund-raising af-
fair honoring Miami Beach's
Chief of Police, Rocky Pomer-
ance, will be the first function
of its kind in the new Miami
Beach Convention Complex
wraparound-
Entertainment chairman Lar-
ry Aberman reports that Jerry
Marshall and his orchestra will
provide the music for dancing
and entertainment.
Tickets and reservations for
the black tie event can be ob-
tained by calling the Chamber
office.
Motivational researcher Irwin
J. Premack, president of Pre-
mack Research Corp. in St.
Petersburg, was to be the fea-
tured speaker at the 28th an-
nual Dade County Outstanding
Citizens Awards Luncheon
Thursday at the Four Ambas-
sadors Hotel. The topic of his
discussion was to be "Florida's
Coming Boom."
Two persons have been se-
lected from a distinguished list
of candidates as Dade County's
Man and Woman of the Year.
The awards recognize two
peonle who have met stringent
qualifications by performing the
most outstanding single func-
tion for the good and welfare of
Dade County for the year 1974.
Past award recipients comprise
the committee, whose chairman
is Melvin J. Haber and cochair-
man Ronald Shapo.
The nominees included Jo-
seph Aumiller, Carolyn Belin.
Dr. Bernardo Benes, Harry I'.
Cain, Milton Gordon, Rose Gor-
don. Marshall S. Harris, Henry
Howard. Dr. Edward B. Jaffe,
Mimi Klein. Seema Lefkowitz,
and Malvina Liebman.
Also Sevmour B. Liebman,
Dr. Elizabe'th L. Metcalf. Sylvan
Meyer. Phoebe E. Morse, Bar-
bara Nelson,. Dorothy Oppen-
heim, Frank J. Pepper, Jr.,
Archie (Terrv) Roberts, Blanka
Rosenstiel, William Sanes, Sam
J. Sitt. Archie Stone. Pearl
Weinstein and Irving J- Whit-
man.
The awards arc sponsored by
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024,
and the event's patron is Joseph
M. Lipton, chairman of the
board, Dade Federal Savings
and Loan Association.
Permanent judges are George
Beebe. associate publisher of
the Miami Herald; Ralph Ren-
ick, vice president, WTVJ, and
Fred Shochet, editor and pub-
Mini-Course In Folk Dance
A four week mini-course on
Hebrew folk dancing for begin-
ners and intermediates, spon-
sored by the Hillel Student Cen-
ter, University of Miami, was to
start Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
room No. 237 of the Student
Union, University of Miami. A
' similar course, sponsored by
Temple Beth Sholom, will take
place Tuesdays at 8 p.m. at the
temple, 4144 Chase Ave., Miami
Beach.
lisher of The Jewish Floridian.
Chester Leiter served as ticket
chairman.
IRWIN J. PREMACK
Barry College will confer
an honorary Doctor of
Laws degree on Shepard
Broad, a member of its
board of trustees since
1970 and chairman of that
board for the past three
years, at the afternoon
Commencement ceremony
Sunday. Mr. Broad, a bank-
er, attorney and civic lead-
er, has been involved in
the growth and develop-
ment of South Florida for
many years. >


Page 2-C
9-Jewist fkrktfan
Friday, May 9, 1975
Diane Simon
Johanna Coonin
Douglas Jacobs
WAYNE MEREIN
Wavne Ira. son of Mr. anJ
Mrs. Jerry Merein. 10031 SW
14th Terr., will become Bar
Mitzvah. Saturday, May 10, at
Temple Or Olom.
The eel'brant is a student at
Rodvvay Junior High where he
is *< th seventh grade.
Wayne's parents will host a
luncheon in the Green Dolphin
Room of the Miamarina in hon-
or of the occasion.
Special guests will include
grandparents. Mr. and ^^rs.
Louis Stern. Mr. and Mrs. Jonas
Merein; Godfather, Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Bill; great aunts and un-
cles. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Stern,
Long Beach, NY.; Mr. and Mrs.
N-> Rrv"nzwaig. Atlantic Beach,
N.Y.; Mrs. Jean Miller, Strat-
Tonn.; cousins. Jeffrey
Beals, Long Beach, N.Y.; Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Stern. Franklin
Souare, N.Y.; Mrs. Rose Winter
and Mrs. Jean Lipp, North Port
Charlotte, Fla.
DIANE SIMON
Dhne Irene, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Stevan S. Simon, will
b" called to the Torah as a Bat
?'it7vah Saturday, May 10. dur-
ing the 9 a.m. services at Beth
D^-'d Concregation.
The celebrant is a seventh
g-ade student in the Hebrew
Academv of Greater Miami,
where she is active in the He-
b-ew Academy Junior Choir.
Sh is also a member of the
Beth David Junior Choir.
M-. and Mrs. Simon will host
the Kiddush in Diane's hon s-"<-ial guests will include Mrs.
Recha Goudsmit, Roermond,
H^ll-'nd: Mrs. Eith~r Lhminn,
San Francisco. Calif.; Mr. and
M-s. Eric Simon. Houston. Tex.;
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Kramer. Ja-
r*etei N'Y; nni M-. and Mrs.
AHn Kraut. David. Leslie ani
>i -hv>] of Bavside, Long Is-
land. NY.
DOUGLAS JACOBS
Do-uhs J.. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Jacobs, will b- rail-
ed to the Torah as a Bar Mirz-
vah Saturday. May 10. during
T*ie 9 a.m services at Temple
Mo"i-ah.
Douglas is a student at Nauti-
lus Junior Hi*h School where
he is in th? seventh erad**. He
also attends Temple Menorah's
R'itrious School.
Jn honor of the occasion, Mr.
and Mrs. Jacobs will host the
Kiddush following the services,
and a reception at J.D.'s 1800
R-stnurant.
CAROL CAMNER
Carol Beth, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward I. Camner,
uill celebrate her Bat Mitzvah
Friday evening. May 9, at Tem-
ple Zion. Carol is in the seventh
grade at Palmetto Junior High
School.
Mr. and Mrs. Camner will
host the Oneg Shabbat follow-
ing services, and a buffet in
Carol's honor will be held Satur-
div at Kings Bay Yacht and
Country Club.
Sharing in the festivities will
be' Carol's grandmother.- Mrs.
Archie Puldy; her uncle and
aunt. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Puldy. and Mr. and Mrs. Shel-
don Blattner, all of Jacksonville.
t: Or
LORI DAVID
Lori, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Roger David, will become
Bat Mitzvah Saturday morning.
May 10. during the 10:30 a.m.
services at Temple Sinai of
North Dade.
Lori is a seventh grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Junior
High School and attends the
congregation's religious school.
CINDY PACTOR
Saturday morning worshio
services at Temple Sinai of
North Dade will include the Bat
Mitzvah of Cindy, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Pactor.
Cindy is a student in Temple
Sinai's Religious School and at-
tends John F. Kennedy Junior
High School, where she is in the
seventh grade.
tt & -if
RICHARD JOBLOVE
Richard Paul, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Loi'is Joblove. will con-
duct th 11 a.m. worship service
and read from the Torah Satur-
day, May 10, at Temple Beth El,
Hollywood.
The celebrant is a seventh
grade student at Nova Middle
School, where he is a member
of the school band.
Ricky's parents will sponsor
the Onee Shabbat and flowers in
honor of the occasion. Among
the guests will be his maternal
great grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Isaac Weisblatt of Holly-
wood: grandparents Dr. and
M". Alb*-r Klsg-oan of New
Rochelle. N.Y.. and Mrs. Nicho
las Joblove of Hallandale; Dr.
and Mrs. Leo Stull. Westport.
Conn.; Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Feffer. Delray Beach: Mr. and
Mrs. Victor Rubinstein and the
Irwin Ravin family, Fort Laud-
erdale; Steven Joblove and
VicHe Joblove. Beechhurst.
OleQai/agcs
^XouLixtotiri. X-iotlte
OH PRIVATE OSCeOLA LAKE. HeNOENSOMVILLC. MOUTH C4HCLIW* 2*739
2S0 BOYS GILS ACE 5-1S
MATURE. EXPERIENCED STAPF, 1 PER CAMPERS
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SKIING CANOE'NG. SAILING. SWIMMING.
TENNIS, HORSEBACK RIDING. LAND SPORTS,
CRAFTS. OVERNIGHT CAMPING. TRIP*.
SABBATH SERVICES
DOCTORS AND RNS IN RESIDENCY
N.Y.; the Paul Feffer family,
New York City; Mr. and Mrs.
Leo Jaffe, North Miami Beach,
and Mrs. Ted Sirkin, Miami.
Cr ir #
JOHANNA COONIN
Johanna Coonin will read
from the Torah during her Bat
Mitzvah at Temple Judea of
Corsl Gables Saturday, May 10,
at 11:15 a.m.
Daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Coonin, Johanna is an
eighth grade student at Palmet-
to Junior High School, whsre
she is on the honor roll, and
also plays the flute in the Con-
ceit Band. She is also a gradu-
ate of Temple Jiidsa's Hebrew
School, and will continue her
religious education through
Confirmation.
Sharing her simcha will bj
her grandfather, Abraham So-
bel from New York, and other
friends and relatives from New
York.
it
BLANQLI EGOZI
Blanqui E.. daughter of Mr
and Mrs. David Egozi will ob-
serve her Bat Mitzvah at the
Beth Torah Congregation, Fri-
day evening. May 9.
Blanqiu.is now an honor roll
student in the seventh grade at
John F. Kennedy Juntos-High
School, where she is a member
of the Tennis team. She was
previously a student of the He-
brew Academy.
In Blanqui's honor, her par-
ents will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following the sen-ice.
The guests will include Mr. and
Mrs. David Zeligman and Mrs.
Blanca Egozi of Miami Beach.
BRETT MUFSON
Brett, son ol Rochelle Muf-
son and Seymour Mufson, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah dur-
ing the 8:30 a.m. Shabbat sen-
ices. Saturday. May 10, at Beth
Torah Congregation.
Brett is a seventh grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Ju-
nior High School and attends,
Beth Torah s Harold Wolk Reli-
gious School where he is in the
fifth grade class.
In his honor, Brett's parents
will sponsor the Kiddush fol-
lowing the senices. Guests will
include his maternal grand-
mother. Mrs. Anne Greenberg
of New York.
-V ft ft
JEFFREY SOROTA
Jeffrey Scott, son of Natalie
and Samuel Sorota, will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah Saturdav. May 10 at Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
The celebrant is a student at
Nautilus Junior High School
where he is in the seventh
grade.
Special guests will include
Jeffrey's grandmother, Mrs.
Dora Sorota.
ft ft ft
MARC WINNER
Saturday morning. May 10.
at 8:45 a.m., Marc Jay Winner,
son of Ms. Gail Winner of Mi-
ami Beach will be Bar Mitzvah
in the main sanctuary of Tem-
ple Ner Tamid.
Marc is a student at Nautilus
Junior High School and Ner
Tamid Religious School. He is
a member of the Little Guys
Basketball. Little League Base-
ball, plays trombone in school.
is in a bowling league, and has
played Little League Football.
A Kiddi-sh will follow the
services, and a reception in
Marc's honor will be held at
his home. Out-of-town guests
will include Harold Jack Win-
ner, uncle and aunt Jackie, of
Forest Park. Ga.; great unjl.\
Harry Wernick, of Philadelphia,
Pa.; and cousin Trudy King, of
New \rk City.
STUART COLLINS
Stuart, son of Mr. z ;d Mrs.
Shelton Cjllins. will be called
to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, May 10. at Young Is-
rael of Greater Miami.
Mr. and Mrs. Collins will
host the Kiudush following the
services in honor of the occa-
sion.
W ft ft
ROBERT SPIELER
Robeit. the son of Mrs. Eve-
lyn Spit.er. will be called to
the To>ah as Bar Mitzvah Sun-
dav May 11, at Young brae) of
Greater Miami.
Mrs. Spi-I.'r will host the
Kid-.lush following the senices
in h-mr of the occasion.
Schreiber To Chair May 13
Temple Judea Bonds Dinner
JOIN US FOR A
FUN-FILLED
AND MEANINGFUL
CAMPING
EXPERIENCE!
AL & NANETTE SAVAGE
LMUTED OFCNIKGS (1 305*66- 3M5 CAU TODAY
Sol Schreiber will sene as
chairman of the 1975 Temple
Jud?a Israel Dinner of State
Sunday, May 18, Dr. Clifford
Marks, president of the Coral
Gables congregation, has an-
nounced.
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat,
spiritual leader of Temple Judea,
will receive the State of Israel
Bonds 25th Anniversary Award
at the Israel Bonds dinnar-
' dance
A member of the Israel
Prime Minister's Club and the
advisory committee of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization, Schreiber has been
instrumental in the success of
the Israel Bonds campaigns for
many years. He received the
Jerusalem Peace Award in
197C.
Schreiber has also distin-
guished himself as a leader in
the community, having served
as president of B'nai B'rith
Coral Gables Lodge and the
Coral Gables Optimist Club. A
former vice president of Hill 1
at the University of Miami, he
is active in the Anti-D'fama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith. the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
and the President's Club.
Resenations for the Israel
Bonds dinner dance honoring
Rabbi Eisenstat may be made
by calling the Temple Judea
office.
Ma*
SOL SCHREIBER
W
Menuydm t& tatf)w &fefime/..
OVER 70 SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by a
'well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on our own
private nine hole course! Riding on seven miles of trails spread
over 525 acres of breathtakmgly beautiful scenery! A childrens
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing,
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery,
photography and gymnastics are just some of the many fascinating
activities available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance.
OUR 40TH YEAR!
under Wemberg family direction
Dietary Laws Observed Nationwide Enrollment
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Announcing; limited openings in the Miami area.
Contact Directors 758 9464 or Miami Representative
Mrs. Jack (Nancy) Davis 11042 Paradella Ave., Coral Gables.
Telephone: 665 7923 or 665-9147
Separate camps ot distinction for Boys and Girls on beautiful Reflection
Lake .n the picturesque Pocono Mountains ot N.E. Pennsylvania.
WINTER OFFICE: 6528 Castor Avenue. MMstjfelj Pennsylvania 19149
Phone: 1215) 533-1557
Pocono Highland Camps will sponsor a Florida Backgammon
Club Children's Tournament on Sunday May 4th at Pips
Gammon Crab at the Fontainehleao Hotel starting at 3 P-M-
Allchildren between the ages of *-l are invited. Trophies,
prizes, refreshments. Please register at I'M P.M. A compH-
mentary lesson will be *iven to all children wtoa desire to
learn the game.


Friday, May 9, 1975
+JmisHl*rldiian
Page 3-C
Tradition was broken with recently at the installation of
officers of the South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
Lodges when the President's Cup of Fulfillment, recog-
nizing the year's outstanding lodge president, was pre-
sented to three lodge presidents. Pictured with the prized
cup, which will rotate alphabetically every four months,
are (from left): Maurice Mehlman, Maimonides Lodge;
Irving Levy, Israel Lodge, and George Kotin, Maccabee
Lodge. The South Florida Council represents 38 lodges
in Dade County.
Malcolm Fromberg (right), second vice president of
B'nai B'rith District Five, presents a special award to
Fred Snyder at the recent installation of officers of the
South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges. Snyder was
honored for his exceptional service as president this past
year of the Council serving Dade County's 38 lodges.
Mayor Harold Rosen (right) presents keys to the City of
Miami Beach to international B'nai B'rith president
David M. Blumberg (right) and Barry T. Gurland at the
, recent installation of officers of the South Fonda Court-
I cil otB'nal-B'rtth Lodges. Gurland was installed as presi-
dent of the South Florida Council, which has some 9,000
members in Dade County. Blumberg was guest speaker
at the event. .________
1VCJW Presents 'Women and Law'
The evening division of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will have Roberta Ful-
ton Fox, Esq. as its guest speak-
er Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. She will
discuss "Women and the Law."
The Council's evening divi-
sion provides an opportunity for
women who work or do npt
have the time during the day,
to become more involved in
community affairs.
The meeting will take place
- the Greater Miami Jewish
jon Building, 4200" Bis-
cayne Blvd., Miami. The build-
ing is well-lit with security and
free parking.
Diabetes Week May 11-18
The annual drive for the Ju-
venile Diabetes Research Foun-
dation will be held the week
of May 11-18. Diabetes Week,
which has been proclaimed by
Governor Askew in Florida, is
the Foundation's last major
fund raising function of the
year.
Elks Lodge Dance
For Mothers Day
Saturday Evening
Aaron Bookspan, newly
elected exalted Ruler of the
Miami Beach Elks Lodge No.
1601, announces that the lodge
will celebrate Mother's Day
with a dinner and dance Satur-
day evening. May 10, at the
clubhouse, 720 West Ave.
Ho; s d'Oeuvrea will be served
from 7 to 8 p.m., and a full
course dinner from 8 p.m., with
a live band for dancing. The
evening will include presenta-
tions to the oldest and young-
est mother attending the affair.
Serving on t;ie committee
with Mr. Bookspan are Mayor
Harold Rosen. Councilmen
Leonard Weinstein and Phil
Sahl.
Onlv 200 reservations are
available.
Floridians Given Assignments For
Men's Club Convention July 27-31
NEW YORK Men's Club
leaders from the Florida Region
have been assigned roles in con-
TV Programs
" SUNDAY,'MATf-11'
WPLG-TV Ch. 10, 9:30 a.m.
"The Jewish Worship
Hour"
Host: Rabbi David Raab
Temple Beth Solomon
EDWARD ROSENFELD
nection with the 46th annual
convention, of the National Fed-
eration of Jewish Men's Clubs,
to be held July 27-31 at the
Concord Hotel, Kiamesha Lake,
N.Y.
The organization is composed
of 375 Brotherhoods affiliated
with Conservative synagogues
in the United States and Can-
ada.
Chairman Max M. Goldberg
announced that among those
expected to participate in con-
vention planning are Edward I.
Rosenfeld of North Miami, pres-
ident of the Florida Region;
Milton Berger of Bal Harbour,
past national president; Jack
Chaiken of North Miami Beach,
and Ralph Fistel of Miami.
A highlight of the convention
will be the presentation of the
organization's Distinguished
Service Award to Dr. Joel S.
Geffen of New York.
Rabbi Geffen will be honored
for 30 years' service as the Fed-
eration's spiritual advisor, for
his work in behalf of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America and for his broad serv-
ice to the cause of Judaism in
this country and abroad.
I. Murray Jacobs of Birming-
ham, Mich, is president of the
Federation which is affiliated
with the Jewish Theological
Seminary and the United Syna-
gogue of America.
Garden Club Installation
The Surfside Garden Club will
hold its annual installation and
paid-up membership luncheon.
Holiday Inn, 8701 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach. Guests welcome.
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Page 4-C
+JmistFkrkffar
Friday, May 9, 19-5
Ruth Greenfield Recipient Of
Governor s Award For The Arts
Ruth \V. Greenfield, daus;
of Fn owsky. who origi-
BMM and coordinates the
.'ntime Lively Arts Series
of Concerts at Miami Dade
RITH GREENPIELD
Community CollegeDowntown
Campus, has received the Gov-
ernor's award for the Arts.
In presenting the award in
Tallahassee, Gov. Reubin As-
kew said. "Prof. Greenfield
exemplifies the highest caliber
of service rendered to the State
of Florida in creating and de-
veloping the idea of free noon-
time concerts in downtown Mi-
ami.
"In the past three years since
their conception, she has pre-
sented 6" concerts weekly at
nojn. featuring both the young
artist and the seasoned per-
former, to over 46.000 delighted
students, workers, visitors and
residents of the downtown area.
"They have been presented
within easy walking distance
from the center of Miami, at the
Downtown Campus, in the mid-
dle of Flagler Street, on the
Courthouse steps. Gusman Hall
and in Bayfront Park. Versa-
tility truly reflects the creative
arts in these concerts, plays,
the dance and art."
S. Dade Hebrew Academy To
Honor Two Local Librarians
The Parents and Teachers As-
sociation of the South Dade
Hebrew Academy have chosen
a Spring Luncheon to honor two
local librarians: Miss Sarah
Kratish. librarian at Leroy Fein-
berg Elementary School and
Mrs. Muriel Efron. librarian at
Florida International Univer-
sity, who are to be feted for
their untiring efforts in initiat-
ing and maintaining the Acad-
emy's library.
All proceeds from the lunch-
eon will go towards the support
of the Glen Greenstein Memori-
al Library. The public is invited
to attend the benefit affair
Tuesday noon at the home of
Mrs. Rubin Offenbach, 8440
S\V lC4th St.
The South Dade Hebrew
Academy, located at 11801 S\V
74th Ave.. encon.passes pre-
school through fonior high
school and is a beneficiary
agency of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Its principal.
Dr. Erwin Marshall, and He-
brew director Dror Zadok. have
expressed pride and apprecia-
tion to these ladies for creating
such a thorough library.
"The highlight of the after-
noon will be a talk by Abraham
Gittelson, Assistant Executive
Director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, according to Mrs. Gale
McCabe, chairlady for the
event.
Mr. Gittelson has chosen as
his topic, "The Power of the
Book."
Reservations and information
regarding the luncheon or the
school may be obtained by call-
ing the Academy Office.
Present at the ceremony where Friday,
May 9, was proclaimed "Temple Samu-El
Day" by Dade County Mayor Steve Clark
were (jrcm left) Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Ras-
kin, William Raskin, Rabbi Mawell B
Mayor Clark, Sid Goldner, Maurice Den-
sky and Bob Wild.
Temple Zamora To
Honor Mothers
Friday Evening
Temple Zamora of Coral
Gables will hold a special Sab-
bath Service Friday night pay-
ing tribute to the mothers. The
pulpit will be adoYned by the
ladies selected by the Sister-
hood President, Mrs. Florence
Boss
Participating in the reading
of the parts of the service will
be the Mcsdames Florence Boss,
Faye Chartor. Rose Davidow,
Selma Davidow. Rose Galton.
Rebecca Goldy. Millie Grand,
Dorothy Leff, Libby Leiberman,
Ona Lowe. Helinda Mandelkern.
Miriam Millman. Sally Pinesick.
Esther Sapphire. Shirley Swee-
ney and Ann Weisbrot.
Sally Pinesick v.ill be in
charge of the introduction.
Mrs. Boss will address the
ladies on "An Understanding
Heart."
A gala reception will be given
by the children and grand-
children in honor of the moth-
ers. A "Mother of the Year" will
also be designated.
Mavor Clark Proclaims Mav 9 As
'Temple Samn-El Day" In Dade
WTMI Broadcast Extended
Radio Station \VTMJ-FM will
extend the broadcast time of
services for Temple Israel of
Greater Miami Friday evening
in order to bring the entire spe-
cial program to Temple Israel's
radio audience.
Temple Beth Shalom
NURSERY & KINDERGARTEN
ATTENTION PARENTS OF YOUNG CHILDREN 2': 5 YEARS
"COME TO THE SCHOOL WHERE CHILDREN LOVE TO LEARN"
reading writing numbers science gardening pet care
I trips cooking art music Hebrew sharing & caring
Attend Our
OPEN HOUSE
WEDNESDAY, MAY 14th 1975 12:30 P.M.
SCHOOL AUDITORIUM R.S.Y.P. 538-7231
ENROLL NOW FOR SEPTEMBER CLASSES
* THE ONLY NURSERY/KINDERGARTEN IN MIAMI BEACH
*T WITH A DAILY PROGRAM IN THE FINE ARTS
MUSIC Singing, Dance, Instruments, Body Movement, Rhythms
ART Printing, Painting, Ceramics, Collage, Graphics
"GilE US THE OPPORTUNITY TO ENRICH
THE LIVES OF YOUR CHILDREN
ANITA KOPELE, Director
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
4144 CHASE AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Mayor Steve P. Clark has de-
clared Friday May 9. as "Tem-
ple Samu-El Day'' in Dade Coun-
ty-
Temple Samu-El will have an
original consecration service
written by Rabbi Maxwell Berg-
er especially for this occasion
Friday night in honor of its new
name. The temple was formerly
known as the Conservative Con-
Sheryl Press
One Of Three
Award Recipients
Among graduates of Miami-
Dade Community College who
were recipients of a special
scholarship award at the re-
cent commencement programs
held simultaneously by the
three campuses was Sheryl
Press, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Morton Press of North Miami.
Miss Press, a North Campus
student, is majoring in foreign
languagesspecifically Spanish
and French and earned a
straight A (4.0 grade point)
average. She was one of three
M-DCC students who received
the Alfred L. McCarthy Scholar-
ship Awards valued at S1.000
each.
E-tablished three years ago
by District Board of Trustees
vice chairman Alfred L. Mc-
Carthy, the awards are made in
recognition of high scholastic
achievement.
Miss Press, who will continue
her studies at Florida Atlantic
University, is a member of Phi
Theta Kappa, national scholas-
tic honorary.
gregation of Kendale Lakes
Temple Samu-El was started
by a small, dedicated group a<
little over a year ago. Arrange-
ments were made recently with
Miami Dade Community Col-
lege to use their facilities for
the high holiday services. One
of the fastest growing and
youngest temples in Dade
County, Temple Samu-El pres-
ently has some 200 members.
Present at the proclamation
ceremonies were Rabbi Max-
well Berger, William Raskin,
Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Raskin. Sid
Goldner, Maurice Donskv and
Bob Wild.
Temple Samu-El is presently
accepting reservations for its
high holiday services as well
as applications for its Sunday
school, religious school. Bar and
Bat Mitzvah preparation and*,)
its pre confirmation and con-
firmation classes.
APT. IN TEL-AVIV
Furnished 3 Bedroom apt. in
Ramat-Aviv (Tel-Aviv). From
Aug. 1 For 1 Year or Less.
CALL 538-6539 UNTIL 5 P.M.
RABBI about to accept a post
in Canada wishes to meet a
refined and finacially secure
lady, with view to marriage.
Aged 65 75. Rabbi A. T.
BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLA. 33101
CONSERVATIVE
Synagogue needs a spiritual
leader to conduct High Holy
Day Services.
PLEASE CALL 864-1740
1 Bedroom Unfurnished
Condo Ro-Mont South. For
Rent or for Sale. 7= Mortg.
or Yearly Lease.
940-1823 -947-1762
WOMAN TO SLEEP IN
WITH ELDERLY LADY.
Not needed during day.
Call 858-3573
ELDERLY OR RETIREE, Room
and Board in Nurse's private
home. Personal attention.
Well Balanced Meals, Doctor
on Call. No stairs.
PHONE 983-3980
CONDOMINIUM
IN NORTH MIAMI
Desires Cantor and Torih
Reader. Mutt blow Shofar for
the High Holidays.
Call after 6 P.M. -891-7632
BAL SACHRAS and
BAL SHOFAR WANTED
for the High Holidays.
Preferably North Miami Beach
resident.
PLEASE PHONE 931-4709
CONSERVATIVE CANTOR
Available for High Holidays,
also all year round.
Experience 25 years.
Nice Nusach. Phone 864-9397
APT. IN JERUSALEM
Beautifully furnished, 3 bed-
room; near school, shop and
buses. From July for one year.
CALL 538-6539 UNTIL 5 P.M.
INTRODUCTIONS for Componionship
or Marriage. All Ages. WMID
WIDE SERVICE. Call (305) 4914020
or write for information: lEVl
DICK ENTERPRISES, 2501 E. Con
mcrcial Blvd., Ft. Lauderdalt*


Friday, May 9, 1975
* kvvist ftcridRar;
Page 5-C
Hosting a reception for Dr. Sol Stein, national president
of the Israel Histadrut Foundation, and discussing plans
for a seminar and luncheon devoted to "Women's Eco-
nomics 1975" which the Histadrut Foundation will hold
May 28 at the Fontainebleau Hotel, is chairman, Lillian
(Mrs. Leon) Kronish (left) with several members of her
committee (from left) Mrs. Else Bonem, Mrs. Irving
Ackerman, Dr. Sol Stein and Mrs. Alfred Stone.
Histadrut Foundation Plans
Special Women's Day May 28
"Women's Economics 1975"
is the very timely and informa-
tive theme of, a seminar to be
MRS. LEON KRONISH
featured at the special Israel
Histadrut Foundation Women's
Day which will be held Wednes-
day, May 28, beginning at 10:30
a.m., at the Fontainebleau Ho-
tel.
The day's activities will cul-
minate with a festive luncheon
immediately following the semi-
nar. The Hon. Ehud Lador, Con-
sul General representing the
State of Israel in Texas, will
speak on the topic "The Quest
for Peace in the Middle East."
Lillian (Mrs. Leon) Kronish is
serving as chairman of the ar-
rangements committee.
Sam Shulsky, nationally syn-
dicated financial columnist and
author of the daily column "In-
vestors Guide," will head a
panel of experts at the seminar.
Sharing the platform with
Mr. Shulsky will be Dr. Sol
Stein, president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation, an econ-
omist, radio commentator, and
expert in personal financial
planning, and Judge Herbert S.
Shapiro, well-known Miami at-
torney and communal leader
who specializes in estate plan-
ning and taxes
The 'topics to be discussed
are: .
The Search for Financial
Security.
Managing One's Savings.
The Lure of Wall Street.
Estate and Tax Problems
of the Modern Woman.
The Women's Will Power.
Mrs. Kronish, wife of the
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Sholom of Miami Beach, who
heads a committee of promi-
nent women active in many
phases of community life in
Miami Beach, made the an-
nouncement of the special
Woman's Day at a breakfast
meeting she hosted in her home
honoring Dr. Sol Stein, upon his
return from Israel.
Presently chairman of the
Women's Division of the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity, Mrs. Kronish is also
active in the United Jewish Ap-
peal, Bonds for Israel, Hadas-
sah, Women's Organization of
Brandeis University, and the
American Jewish Congress. She
has been active in the Histad-
rut Foundation since its incep-
tion, and has visited Israel
many times, together with her
husband, on missions to His-
tadrut leaders and institutions.
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion supports the vast network
of Histadrut Social Service In-
stitutions in Israel, such as hos-
pitals, clinics, cultural centers,
old age homes and children's
villages. It is currently direc-
ting its major effort to a Mort-
gage Fund to provide low-cost
housing for Israeli veterans, to
be funded through its 9.5 per-
cent Annuitv Trust Fund.
The program on May 28 is
being presented for the benefit
of its benefactors, including a
large number of women in the
Greater Miami area.
Mrs. Kronish has announced
that Anne (Mrs. Irving) Acker-
man, a noted book-reviewer
and civic and communal lead-
er, who is a member of the
Committee, will moderate the
panel on Woman's Economics.
Mrs. Alfred Lilly Stone,
mother of Florida's Junior
Senator, The Hon. Richard
Stone, and a national leader of
Mizrachi Women, will preside
at the luncheon session which
will begin at 12:30 p.m.
Tickets for the luncheon and
seminar may be bought from
committee members or at the
Histadrut Foundation Offices,
420 Lincoln Rd., Room 389.
8th Air Force Vets Invited
The Eighth Air Force His-
torical Society was officially
formed last month. A member-
ship meeting is to be held at
the Marco Polo Resort Motel,
19201 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach, Thursday, May 15, at
8:00 p.m. All veterans of the
8th Air Force, interested in re
joining "The Mighty Eighth,"
are invited to attend, according
to John H. Woolnough, execu-
tive director, pro tern-
Coral Gables ORT
Chapter Officers
To Be Installed
The installation ceremony
themed "Services to our Com-
munity" of the Coral Gables
Chapter of Womens American
ORT will be held Wednesday
noon at a luncheon at the Tien
Kue Restaurant, 2800 Coral
Way.
Mrs. Donald Martin, vice
president and education chair-
man of the Southeastern Flor-
ida Region of Women's Amer-
ican ORT, installing officer,
will retire the outgoing presi-
dent, Mrs. Isidore Berman and
her dedicated officers and in-
stall the officers for 1975-76
including Mrs. Estelle Stein,
president; Mrs. Isidore Berman,
Mrs. Max Deakter, Mrs. Dan
Fiertel, Mrs. Rubin Imber and
Mrs. Sophie Lurie, vice presi-
dents; Mrs. Harold Jacobson,
recording secretary; Mrs. David
Mestelman. corresponding sec-
retary; Mrs. Claire Baker,
treasurer; and Mrs. Edgar
Dressier, financial secretary.
The Coral Gables Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
have a dessert-card party Wed-
nesday, May 21, at 1 p.m. in
the DeSoto Room of the First
Federal Sa\ings Bank, 2750
Coral Way, Mrs. Samuel Rogers
and Mrs. Harry Green are
chairmen of the arrangements
committee.
Shabbos Candle
Kits Distributed
By Chabad House
bi M. M. Schneerson, has initi-
ated a new campaign that all
Jewish girls and women light
candles every Friday for Shab-
bos. -
"Not only isn't it enough that
the mother light candles for
Shabbos, but each individual
Jewish girl must also," stated
the Rebbe in a recent public
address.
"Chabad House, the Florida
home of Lubavitch, has inaug-
urated a campaign to reach
every Jewish family in Dade
County," reports Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf, Lubavitch Regional
Director.
The Chabad Women's League
will be calling every Jewish
family in Greater Miami urging
the women to light candles.
Shabbos candle kits are being
distributed throughout the
county. Over 5,000 kits have al
ready been distributed by mail,
school visitation and other
means.
Sisterhood Mother's Day
Celebration Thursday
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Raphael was to celebrate
Mother's Day Thursday at 7:30
p.m. at the temple, 1545 Jeffer-
son Ave., Miami Beach, with
Faye Brucker presiding.
Mrs. Rose Ginsberg and Mrs.
Sarah Burkin will be honored
as Mothers of the Year. Mary
Gerstman, program director, is
presenting the Three Melodies
Isabelle Heller, Sadye Padden
and Jan Rosenbergin a novel
musical sketch. Rose Shaw and
Kate Cramer will present trib-
utes to the Mothers. Members
and friends are invited
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Louis Hoberman Rceleeted By
Brandeis Zionist District
Louis Hoberman, Miami
Beach and Surfside Civic Lead-
er who was recently reelected
for a fifth term by the Brandeis
Zionist District, Zionist Organ-
ization of America, will be in-
stalled at a luncheon to be held
Sunday, May 18 at noon, in the
Plaza Restaurant of Tower
Forty One on Arthur Godfrey
Road, Miami Beach.
Jay Dermer, former Mayor
of Miami Beach and president
of the Jewish National Fund,
will serve as installing officer.
Rose Shapiro is chairman of
the installation committee.
Musical entertainment will
be furnished by the "Musical
Floridians," whose members in-
clude Sylvia Ross, soprano;
Fran Goldberg, Florence Shunin,
Aileen De Nino, violinists; Ber-
nice Simone, accordionist; Es-
telle Hoberman, clavieta; and
Judy Kaminsky, narrator.
Mr. Hoberman has been ac-
tive in Greater Miami Zionist
and Israeli causes since 1945,
and has served as president of
the Dade Chapter, American
Jewish Congress; Miami Beach
Music and Arts League Surfside
Music Society; Chancellor Com-
mander of the George Gersh-
win Lodge. Knights of Pythias;
and vice president of the Surf-
side Civic Association.
Mr. Hoberman, who served
for ten years as Vice Mayor
and Councilman of Surfside.
has twice been nominated for
the Dade County "Outstanding
Citizen Award."
Other officers to be installed
include Ezra Finegold, honor-
ary president; Gil Rappaport,
Wolf Rosenblum, Bernard Katz,
Albert Shuiman, vice presi-
dents; Albert V. Rosenberg,
treasurer; Fannie Rest, record-
ins secretary; and Estelle Hob-
erman, correspondent secre-
LOLIS HOBERMAN
tary.
Directors include Theresa
Ausuhel, Richard Bergman,
Philip Drexler, Alex Eig,
Nathan Greek, Albert Gross-
man, Harry Jawitz, Louis Ran-
ter, Pearl Kanter, Joseph Kahn,
Leo Nudelman, George Ossip,
Wax Raskin, K( se Shapiro, Nat
Rue. Charlotte Shalcm, Irving
Shalom, Thelma Sheckter, Sam-
uel Toll, Esther Tyson. Jennie
Zaretzky, Helen Zuckerbraun
and Edith Zuckerman.
Yitzhak Rischin (right), managing director of Keter Pub-
lishing House in Israel, met recently with a group of South
Florida Jewish communal leaders to discuss Encyclo-
paedia Judaica, ihe 16-volume Jewish encyclopedia pub-
lished in Jerusalem by Keter. Pictured reviewing an
Encyclopaedia Judaica display at the luncheon meeting
are (from left): Gideon Nachmani, vice president of
Keter, Inc., Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual leader of
Temple Menorah; and Rischin. Encyclopaedia Judaica is
the first Jewish reference source of its kind to appear in
over 70 years.
PHONE 672-3773
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Fage 6-C
+Jeisli Fk>rkHan
rC ts u a J ,
o H n
Ceil and Leon Pepler gave a
most enjoyable farewell party
at their home Friday evening,
May 2, for Miriam and Nathan
Auerbach, who are going to
spend the summer in Montreal,
Canada. A number of other
friends were invited to attend
and partake of an elaborate
and delicious spread of refresh-
ments; and the Peplers ar-
ranged a gay evening including
music by mandolinist Albert
Mendelow and accordionist Es-
telle Hoherman. Everybody
"sang along," which was most
fitting, due to the fact that Mr.
Auerbach is the president of
the Miami Beach Community
Singers Choral Group, of which
Mrs. Auerbach is a member.
Mrs. Auerbach, who is a very
fine and talented singer, con-
tributed much to the enjoyment
of the evening. Mrs. Hober-
man's husband. Louis Hober-
man, president of the Louis D.
Brandeis Zionist Group in Mi-
ami Beach was also present.
ft ft ft
The home of Mr. and Mrs.
Peter Goldring was the setting
for the Beth Israel Sisterhood
' Torah Box Luncheon, held on
Lag Bomer, April 29. Lydia
Goldring was a charming hos-
tess and over 60 ladies feasted
on her delicious culinary deli-
cacies.
Mrs. Harry Rosenberg of the
"Living Things" shop donated
beautiful plant centerpieces.
Chairladies Mrs. Jerry Schech-
ter and Mrs. Norman Ciment ar-
ranged for delightful entertain-
ment. Because Mrs. Goldring
sponsored this luncheon, the en-
tire proceeds will be used for
the furthering of Beth Israel
Sisterhood projects.
ft ft ft
Tribute to a "distinguished
o wn
physician, but an even better
human being," was paid to the
late Harold Rand, M.D., by Rab-
bi Irving Lehrman last week as
180 friends and supporters gath-
ered at Miami Heart Institute
to dedicate the annual Harold
Rand Memorial Lecture Series
which will honor Dr. Rand's be-
lief that continuing education is
of vital importance to an in-
formed medical community. As
a continuing memorial, the fund
will support the appearance of
a prominent guest lecturer
each year.
Honoring Dr. Rand at the
dedication were many past col-
leagues at Miami Heart Insti-
tute, including William C. Phil-
lips, M.D., Chief of Professional
Services; Eugene Sayfie, M.D.,
Chief of Medicine; Burton D.
Levin, M.D., Richard A. Elias,
M.D., Development Fund chair-
man, Osmer S. Deming, presi-
dent, and Robert S. Summers,
administrator.
Dr. Sayfie dedicated the lec-
ture series as a tribute to Dr.
Rand. Dr. Levin read the me-
morial plaque inscription, "Ded-
icated to the memory of Harold
Rand, M.D., in recognition of his
devoted support of education
and whose unswerving loyalty
to the high principle of medical
care will always be remembered
at Miami Heart Institute." Dr.
Elias made the surprise an-
nouncement that the Board of
Trustees had agreed to name
the medical staff lounge as the
"Harold Rand Physicians'
Lounge."
Mrs. Harold Rand, looking
fragile and elegant in a black
silk dress, expressed her thanks
to Miami Heart Institute for the
warm and moving tribute to her
husband.
KAREN ARONOVITZ
Karen Aronovitz
Plans To Marry
Brian Shonson
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M.
Aronovitz announce the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Karen May, to Brian Neal Shon-
son, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam-
uel V. Shonson, of Atlanta, Ga.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of pioneer Floridian
Charles Aronovitz of Key West,
and the late Ethel H. Aronovitz.
is currently attending the Uni-
versity of Georgia where she
will receive her degree in Ele-
mentary Education in Decem-
ber. She is a member of Sigma
Telta Tau sorority and has serv-
ed as its president.
Mr. Shonson graduated from
Orvid Hills Senior High School,
Atlanta, Ga., and received a
degree in Accounting from the
University of Georgia where
he was a member of Alpha Ep-
silon Pi fraternity in June,
1973. He is presently associated
with Zim Chemical Company of
Atlanta.
The couple is planning a late
summer wedding.
Pictured at a recent committee meeting
for the May 25 Rededication Israel Dinner
of State honoring Miami Beach Mayor
Harold Rosen are (from left) dinner vice-
chairman Harold J. Segal; Leonard Luria,
chairman of the advisory committee of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond Organ-
ization; Robert L. Siegel, Miami Israel
Bonds campaign chairman; Mayor Rosen,
and vice chairmen Allen Goldberg, Milton
M. Gaynor and Michael B. Goldstein.
Vice Chairmen Named For Drama Students
May 25 Rededication Dinner ese in& a^
J The Dublic is invited to a
Fourteen distinguished Jew-
ish communal leaders have
been selected as vice chairmen
of the Tribute Committee for
the May 25 Rededication Israel
Dinner of State honoring Miami
Beach Mayor Harold Rosen,
dinner chairman Sidney Poland
and Robert L. Siegel, general
campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization, have announced.
Actively involved in the plan-
ning for the gala Israel Bonds
testimonial are Larry Aberman,
Milton M. Gaynor, Allen Gold-
berg, Michael B. Goldstein, Mo-
reno Habif, Murry Koretzky
Seymour Liebman, Ernest Man-
del, Leon A. Manner, Nat Po-
tamkin, Harold J. Segal, Frank
Spence, Benjamin I. Shulman,
and Miami Bach Councilman
Leonard Weinstein.
At the Rededication Israel
Dinner of State, which will be
held at the Hyatt Hotel Sun-
day, May 25, Mayor Rosen will
receive the coveted Israel
Prime Minister's Medal for dis-
tinguished service in advancing
Israel's economic development.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Israel Bonds office.
National Hospital Week
South Florida Hospitals are
observing 1975 National Hospi-
tal Week May 11-17, Ivan O.
Harrah, executive director,
South Florida Hospital Associa-
tion, has announced. This year's
theme is "a constant concern
for a healthy community."
Friday, May 9, 1975
1
=i
Sharlane Kotler To
Marry Kenneth Packar
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Kotler of
Bay Harbor Islands announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Sharlane Myra, to Kenneth
Mark Packar, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Packar of North
Miami Beach, and grandson of
Mrs. Eva Packar of Miami
Beach.
Sharlane attended >he Univer-
sity of Tennessee and is a grad-
uate of the University of Miami.
She is presently affiliated with
M. Kotler, Realtors, in Surfside.
Kenneth is a graduate of Miami
Dade Community College. He
served three years with the U.S.
Navy, and is presently in the
wholesale cosmetic business.
The wedding is planned for
late December.
'J
SHARLANE KOTLER
19+$L
;,,
Mrs. Melvyne Scmmers wds honored with an award pre-
sented by Mrs. A. J. Cristol, treasurer, on behalf of the
Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach for her out-
standing contribution and service. The Women's Cancer
League contributes to the support of the Tumor Clinic
of the Mt. Sinai Medical Center.
The public is invited to at-
tend "Annie Get Your Gun," a
major production of the Beth
Torah Youth Department in the
auditorium at 1051 Interama
Blvd., North Miami Beach, Sat-
urday, at 9:00 p.m. or Sunday
at 7:30 p.m.
Students participating in the
Youth Drama Workshop are
from the fifth to twelfth grades.
Mrs. Myrna Loman, well known
for her many theatrical pro-
ductions, is director and coor-
dinator.
Proceeds from the play will
go towards the numerous civic
and charitable endeavors of
the Youth Department
Dr. Moshe Rivlin (center), Director General of the Jew-
ish Agency in Israel, spoke last week to the annual din-
ner of the Builders and Allied Trades Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Cochairmen of the
Division Herbert Sadkin (at left with Mrs. Sadkin) and
Samuel I. Adler (at right with Mrs. Adlerj reported a
most enthusiastic response from the builders assembled
on behalf of the 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
The State of Israel Bonds ?5th Anniversary Award was
presented recently to Mr. and Mrs. Steve Legakis at an
Israel Bonds dinner-dance at the Sky Lake Country Club.
Pictured during the presentation are (from left) enter-
tainer Emil Cohen, cochairrnan Grace Morganroth, Mr.
and Mrs. Legakis, and dinner chairman Herbert Hen-
schel.
IE*
m


Friday, May 9, 1975
+Jelst>ncrkUa,n
JNF Pays Tribute
To New Prexy
Abraham Grunhut
Page 7-C
if
An inaugural tribute paid
honor to Abraham Grunhut as
the newly-elected president of
the Jewish National Fund ot
Greater Miami at a recent func-
tion at the Fontainebleau Ho-
tel.
Addresses of congratulations
were offered by Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, chairman of the JNF
Foundation; Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, chairman of the
JNF Executive Board; and
Judge Zev W. Kogan, president,
JNF Southern Region.
THEY EMPHASIZED Grun-
hut's "dedicated service to Is-
rael, the Jewish National Fund
and many other humanitarian
causes."
The program also took note
of the role of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund "which has done
so much throughout the years,
and especially since the Yom
Kippur War, to strengthen fur-
Kippur War, to strengthen and
further develop all JNF proj-
ects to unprecedented levels."
SINGLED OUT for commen-
dation were Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz "for his untiring ef-
forts in behalf of Greater Mi-
ami's JNF." Rabbi Morton Ma-
lavsky was welcomed as the new
JNF chairman for Broward
County.
Also commended were Moe
Levin, JNF vice president and
Big Gifts chairman; Ernest
Samuels, JNF vice president
and chairman of Point East
JNF; Mrs. Miriam Press, treas-
urer; Mrs. Beulah Brodie and
Mrs. Martha Heller, secretaries;
and Mrs. Ida Wesscl, comptrol-
ler.
Among women leaders, Mrs.
Martha Rosen and Mrs. Celia
Rosenblatt received special
commendation.
Among those attending the
event honoring Grunhut were
K.iMii Mayer Abramowitz. Mr. and
Mr. IrvinK Aekerman, Mr. and Mrs.
l.'iu Aronson. Mrs. Kannle Barad.
Mr. and Mrs. Simon llerstein. Prof,
and Mrs. Andre S. Uialolenkl. Mr.
and Mrs. Laater RlRtdmun. Cantor
ami Mrs. Saul H. Breeh. Mr. anil
Mrs. Krank Briokman. Mr. and Mrs.
Loon Hilda.
Mr. and Mrs. (leorK'- Brodto, Mrs,
Lillian Dubowy, Mr. and Mrs. Kimn
Fallr and mother. Mr. and Mrs.
Harry I'YIdman. Prof, and Mrs.
Shmui-I FershkO, Mr. and Mrs. Kzra
PlnCROtd, Mayshie l-Yi,-,lborir. Mr
and Mrs. Abraham Grossman.
Mrs. Sonhie Hasnel. Mr. and Mrs.
Mux Huht. Mr. and Mrs. Poter
Heller, Joseph Hill. Mr. and Ui-
Isaai- tacobowlts. Mr. and Mr* nV-
man Kass. Bernard Katz. Judire '/,<
W. Komn, Mr. Hiid Mrs aeonce
Kotin. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kusnetz.
Mr and Mrs Moe Levin, Rabbi
David l.ehrfield. Habbi and Mrs.
Irving Lehrman, Uabbl and Mrs.
Morton Malavaky, Mr. and Mrs.
Bmanuel Mentx, Mr. and Mrs Ar-
lluir Miller. Mrs. Florence Minoy.
Samuel Mlranberff
Mi- and Sirs Sam Pascoe, Mr. and
Mrs. Bon Pearlaon, Mrs. Miriam
Pros*, Mr. an I Mrs. Morris Putter.
Mr. and Mrs. Reiffon, Mr. and Mrs
Isidore Itiffkin. Mrs. Martha Rosen,
Mrs. Celia Rosenblatt. Mr. and Mrs.
Morrli Roaaeln, Mr, and Mrs Birneal
Samuels. Mr. and Mrs. l^nr Kchiiiiz.
Mr. and Mrs. I.eon SchUStOT,
Mrs, Toby Schachter. Mrs. Mallei
Shklair, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Slecel.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Z. Stadlan. Mr. and
.Mrs. Simon Tetenbaum, Mr. and
Mrs Abraham Tltkin, Hen TalOW-
sky. Mrs. Freida Tobey. Mrs. Ida
Weasel, Miss Kliz.il>.th Zentli-r.
Six Artists To Be Featured
Iii Great Artists9 Series
Six phenomenal artists will
constitute Temple Beth Sho-
lom's Great Artists Series for
the 1975-76 Bicentennial Year,
according to an announcement
by Judy Drucker, chairman of
the series.
Opening the series on Thurs-
day, Nov. 13, is the great Metro-
politan mezzo-soprano. Marilyn
Home, who will be followed by
Itzhak Perlman. internationally
famous Israeli violist, Saturday,
Dec. 27.
Both of these outstanding
musicians will appear at Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami,
4144 Chase Ave., Miami Beach
Isaac Stern, violinist, cultural
and civic leader, and friend of
young artists all over the world,
is scheduled to appear on Mon-
day, Feb. 2.
By popular demand, Beverly
Sills, the "world's greatest col-
oratura soprano" will appear
again on the Great Artists
Series, Thursday, Feb. 19. Mis*
Sills will be accompanied by the
Fort Lauderdale Symphony un-
der the baton of Emerson Buck-
ley.
Mstislav Rostropvich, cellist
who was recently appointed
musical director of the Wash-
ington. D.C., National Sympho-
ny, will be featured Thursday.
Feb. 26.
Vladimir Ashkenazy, interna
tionally renowned pianist, will
Hose the series Wednesday,
March 24.
Both Rostospovich and Ash-
kenazy defected from Russia, in
protest against Russian restric-
tions against artistic freedom.
The last four artists will ap-
pear at the New Theatre of the
Performing Arts (formerly Mi-
ami Beach Auditorium).
Subscriptions for the series
are being sold now at the tem-
ple office. Ticket chairmen are
Millie Ser, Sheila Slotnick and
Jean Prescott.
The temple's president.
James S. Knopke, is cochairman
of the series.
Pictured at the 29th Annual Installation of Miami Beach
nS R'rifh Lode No 1591 in the Seville Hotel are
M*rW) ol going interim President, Laurence Shu
' iILL President Nat Gillman; Installing Of-
S2" D David ^alrabbi of Temple Beth Solomon
STmueT Pascoe, master of ceremonies and past prejjaen
Florida State Association of B'nai B'nth Lodges. The Mi
.Beach Lodge is the oldest on the Beach,^ rf
Officers Chosen Track And Field Meet For
B'nai B'rith Youth May 18 By South Eastern
Zionist Region
New officers of the South-
eastern Zionist Region, chosen
at the regional conference in
Atlanta, include Charles Kim-
erling. Birmingham, Ala., pres-
ident; Ed Krick, Atlanta; Jack
Becker, Jacksonville, and Sam
Perry, Hollywood, vice presi-
dents: Arthur Geduldig, Atlan-
ta, secretary; Judge Nelan
Sweet, Miami Beach, treasurer;
and Sidney Raymond, Miami
Beach, assistant treasurer.
Selected to serve on the Na-
tional Zionist Executive Com-
mittee were Maurice Pilsk,
Nashville; Michael Greenwald,
Memphis; and Harold Marcus,
Atlanta.
Named to the regional exec-
utive committee were Alex Kit
tenbaum, Birmingham; Harry
Wilensky, Augusta; Mel Reiser,
Hollywood; Al Berger, Augusta;
Michael Greenwald, Memphis;
Nat Katz, Atlanta; Robert Tra-
vis, Atlanta; Louis Hoberman,
Miami Beach; Michael Adel-
man, Savannah; Gcrsen Bush,
Knoxville; and Mrs. Rose Sha-
piro, Miami Beach.
Rho Pi Phi Alums
To Hold Seminar
The South Florida alumni
chapter of Rho Pi Phi Interna-
tional Pharmaceutical Fraterni-
ty is holding a four hour ac-
credited seminar Sunday at the
Washington Federal Savings
and Loan, 633 NE 167th St..
North Miami Beach.
Registration and continental
breakfast are from 8 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. The lectures are from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All Flo-
ridian pharmacists and visiting
pharmacists are invited.
The speakers and their topics
are as follows: Dr. Jonas
Kays "Drugs and Behaviors
Influencing and Affecting Mem-
ory"; Dr. Wilbur J. Blechman
"Drugs Indicated and Latest De-
velopment in Arthritis"; Dr. Is-
rael Feldman "Diagnosis and
Treatment of Common Skin Dis-
orders" and John White"Na-
tional Legislation Affecting
Pharmacy Introduced and Sup-
ported by N.A.R.D. and Other
Efforts in Legislation."
.J
Some 400 youngsters from
Broward and Dade Counties are
expected to compete in the third
annual Junior Maccabiah track
and field meet Sunday after-
noon, May 18, at Miami-Dade
Community College, South Cam-
pus, National B'nai B'rith Youth
Commissioner Joseph T. Mur-
ray, has announced.
Sponsored by various area
B'nai B'rith lodges, the Junior
Maccabiah will be held from
1:30-5:30 p.m. and is open to
the public.
Boys and girls from the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization in
both counties will participate in
the Mav 18 track and field
meet. BBYO ii the largest Jew-
ish youth service organization
in the world.
The Junior Maccabiah will
follow an AAU format. Partici-
pants placing within limits es-
tablished at the 1974 Macca-
biah Games in Israel will be
eligible to qualify for the next
Maccabiah in Israel.
Among the events for AZA
members (boys) are: 50, 100
and 220 yard dashes, 880 and
mile relays, high and broad
jumps, shot put and discus.
BBG's (girls) will compete in
50 and 100 yard dashes, 880 re-
lay, high jump and standard
broad jump.
Trophies and awards for tha
May 18 events are courtesy of
Biscayne Federal Savings &
Loan Association, E. Albert Pal-
lot, president.
For further information about
the Junior Maccabiah, contact
the B'nai B'rith office. ,
^^^^ ,
Send-A-Kid-To-Camp Party I
Surfside Women's League,
Inc. will hold its annual "Send-
A-Kid-To-Camp" card party
Wednesday, at 12:30 p.m. in
the Surfside Community Cen-
ter Auditorium. Refreshments
will be served.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
Popiel Religious Sehool
2225 N.E. 121st STREET, NORTH MIAMI
HEBREW SCHOOL CLASSES
SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASSES
PRE-CONFIRMATION CLASSES
CONFIRMATION CLASSES
Licensed Teachers Outstanding Religious School
We Endeavor
To Forge Closer Links with our Judaic Heritage
To Learn the History of our People
To Build a Strong, Proud Jewish Identity
"VIA"
RELIGION ETHICS
BIBLE HISTORY
SYNAGOGUE SKILLS ISRAEL
HEBREW MUSIC
CUSTOMS AND CEREMONIES
CONGREGATIONAL MEMBERSHIP INVITED
TELEPHONE 891-5508
JULES EINHORN HERBERT LELCHUK
Education Director President

GIVE MOM OR DAD A GIFT
THAT LASTS ALL YEAR
(Every day of the year is Mom and Dad Day) JJ
ENROLL MOM as a
MOTHER-IN-ISRAEL
OR DAD as a
FATHER-IN-ISRAEL
Your gift of $54 three times "Chai" symbolically adopts a child in Israel, "i
helping him to a better life and education in the tradition of Torah. _^:.
and
MOM receives a beautiful Charm
DAD an attractive Marble Paperweight
Every day in Israel is American Mizrachi Woman's day educating young people; caring
for Youth Aliyah children; training students for careers and productive employment; arrang-
ing social services and adult welfare programs.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI WOMEN FLORIDA COUNCIL
420 LINCOLN ROAD SUITE 402
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 33139
TELEPHONE 531-7996
~ ATTACHED IS OUR GIFT OF $54 WITH WHICH WE
SYMBOLICALLY ADOPT A CHILD IN THE NAME OF:
NAME ____
ADDRESS ...
MOTHER-IN-ISRAEL D
YOUR GIFT IS TAX DEDUCTIBLE
FATHER-IN-ISRAEL D
WOVUN



Page 8-C
fJeHlstflcridtor
Friday, May 9, 1973
===== .
American Savings To Purchase
$4 Million In Israeli Notes
American Savings and Loan
Association of Florida will pur-
chase S4 million in United
States government-backed notes
from the State of Israel through
the Wall Street investment
banking firm of Loeb, Rhoades
and Company.
The purchase will be made
May 29, according to an an-
nouncement made by Shepard
Broad, chairman of the board
of directors.
The S4 million purchase is
pan of S300 million that Israel
has been borrowing in the
United States through an un-
usual issue of securities guaran-
teed by the U.S. government.
This is the first time such an
Israel offering is being handled
by an investment firm.
These new securities, differ-
ent than the Israeli bonds sold
for general fund-raising in the
Jewish community, are ear-
marked for special purposes
and carry the full faith and
credit of the U.S. government.
The securities, which will be
sold to American Savings in
eight notes of $500,000 each,
come due in 1994.
American Savings, with as-
sets of almost $400,000,000, has
nine offices in Dade and Brow-
ard Counties. According to the
United States League of Sav-
ings Associations, it ranks as
the 123rd largest of the 5,000
sa\ings and loan associations
in the United States.
Each holding a plaque presented to them by the Greater
Miami Hebrew Aacdemy and the school's PTA are these
five teachers, each of whom has served on the faculty
for 18 or more years. Awards were presented by Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross principal to Mrs. Shoshanah Spector,
Mrs. Marjorie Ent, Mrs. Ruth Becker, Mrs. Joshua Stad-
lan and Mrs. Zahav Sukenik. Presentations were made at
a special assembly marking Yom Hamoreh, Teachers
Day, in the Hebrew Academy auditorium.
Landow Yeshiva Center Names
Special Enrollment Committee
A special committee has been
named to direct the Landow
Yeshiva Center's upcoming
summer enrollment drive, ac-
cording to the Center's presi-
dent, Jack Burstyn.
Committee members named
by Burstyn include, chairman
of the board Melvin S. Landow,
Mel Feit, Gerald Gordon,
Michael Jackobovitz, Hebrew
principal Zalman Wolshansky
and Dean Rabbi Sholom Lips-
kar.
The Landow Yeshiva Center
is comprised of four inter-
related schools: a pre-school
nursery, the Ohotei Torah
School for Boys, the Beth
Chana School for Girls and the
Yeshiva Gdolah Rabbinical
Seminary. The Center is a part
of the world wide Lubavitch
Hassidic movement.
The completion of this year's
academic term will mark the
school's first year in its new
$2,000,000 home at 1140 Alton
Rd., Miami Beach. It boasts a
complete program of tradition-
al Jewish studies along with a
secular educational system that
is equipped with the latest in
educational technology and
equipment.
According to Rabbi Lipskar,
the summer enrollment drive
will seek to spread awareness
of the schools services to a
maximum number of Dade and
Broward Jews.
"As is the case with all Luba-
vitch institutions, the Center
will accept each and every Jew-
ish child, rgardlss of thir ability
to pay," explained Melvin Lan-
dow, committee member.
JWV Convention
Appointments
Are Announced
Michael Schechter, chairman
ot the Convention Committee of
the Department of Florida. Jew-
ish War Veterans of the U.S.A.
and Ladies Auxiliary, has an-
nounced committee appoint-
ments for the June 6-8 conven-
tion at the Doral Hotel. Miami
Beach.
Mr. Schechter appointed
Howard Melinson of Pompano
Beach, senior vice commander
of the Department of Florida, as
chairman of the convention
journal committee; Irvin Stein-
berg of North Miami Beach, a
member of JWV's National
Executive Committee, was nar.v
ed banquet chairman.
Marcia Koslow of North Mi-
ami Beach, a past national pres-
ident of the Ladies Auxiliary,
will serve as convention co-
chairman. Other appointments
include M. Jay Berliner and
Evelyn Clein, publicity; Norton
I.ff, treasurer; and Marvin
Duke, registration.
Harold C. Uhr of North Mi-
ami Beach, state commander,
and Evelyn Ferdie, state JWVA
president, will be honored at a
joint banquet on Jtine 7.
Jewish Studies
Institute Offers
Judaic Courses
Chabad House has announc-
ed the establishment of the
Jewish Studies Institute, which,
according to Rabbi Abraham
Korf, Chabad Lubavitch Re-
gional Director, will serve as a
medium for many young Jews
to explore and experience their
heritage.
Courses will be offered in all
facets of Judaism Talmud.
Jewish philosophy, history, Bi-
ble, Mishna, Hebrew, Prayer,
Law, and similar topics.
Classes will be held Sunday
through Thursday in Chabad
House, 1401 Alton Rd. Teach-
ers include Rabbis Webermen,
Korf. Kaplan, Lipskar, Shapiro,
Brusawankin, Marcus, and Reb-
betzin Korf.
This program is part of Cha-
bad-Lubavitch national effort in
the area of Torah Study. Such
projects have been initiated
throughout the country in such
places as Seattle, Austin, Mont-
real, San Diego, Ann Arbor,
and many other Chabad cen-
ters.
For more information call
Rabbi Blank at Chabad House.
Democratic Club Speaker
Is Dr. Murray Greenwald
Biscayne Democratic Club
will feature Dr. Murray
Greenwald as its guest speaker
Monday at 8 p.m. in the audi-
torium of the Washington Fed-
eral at 1234 Washington Ave.
Dr. Greenwald will discuss
Acupuncture, with a question
and answer period to follow,
according to Larry Taylor,
president. Bill Schusel, Bank of
Miami Beach vice president
will be master of ceremonies.
The public is invited.
>*|f tmmm
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* #WI"
*" I* i
The completion of this year's academy
term will mark the end of the Landow
Leaders of D'nai B'rith lodges from throughout the South
Florida Council are working continuously for the cause
of Jewish survival through the 1975 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Among those now donat-
ing their services to the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's annual campaign, with special credit due to South
Florida Council President Barry T. Gurland (standing,
left) and Florida State Association of B'nai B'rith Lodges
President Dr. Mike Teitelbaum (standing, right) are
George N. Kotin (seated, left), honorary life president of
Maccabee Lodge and Sam Pascoe, past president of the
Florida State Association of B'nai B'rith Lodges. Mr.
Kotin and Mr. Pascoe are cochairmen of the telephone
effort for CJA-IEF.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz congratulates Mr. and Mrs. Isidor
Deemar on the occasion of the establishment of the Isidor
and Sarah Deemar Foundation. The interest accrued
from the Foundation will be utilized to alleviate some of
the synagogue's financial burdens.
Spring Luncheon At Beth Shalom
To Be Themed 'Portrait Of A Lady
Yeshiva Center's first year in its $2 mil-
lion home at 1140 Alton Rd., Miami Beach.
The annual Spring Luncheon
of the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami
will feature a mother-daughter
fashion show entitled "Portrait
of a Lady," Wednesday, May
21, according to an announce-
ment by Shirley Miller, Sister-
hood president.
The luncheon, which will be
held in the Sisterhood Lounge
and auditorium of the temple,
4144 Chase Ave., Miami Beach,
is scheduled to begin at 11:30
a.m.
thers and daughters and
daughtsra-in*law, too, are be-
ginning their "briefings" as
models, under the guidance of
model chairman Carolee Hart-
ley.
The script for the "Portrait
of a Lady" is being written by
Blanche Neve] and it will be
narrated by Doreen Marx. The
"mothers" clothes are from
The Bagatelle; "children's"
clothes are from Youngland
Fashions.
Heading the committee in
charge of the function are Jear
Hershey and Beverly Stein; as-
sisting them are Anna Miller,
Anne Drecksler, Frances Ka_-
dan, Elaine Pehr, Rae Gruber,
Lenore Gaynor and Arlene AN
bin.
The luncheon is open to the
general public and reservations
may be made by calling the
temple office.
Hunter Alumni Installing
South Florida Chapter of
Hunter College Alumni will
hold its installation bruncheon
Saturday noon at the Barcelona
Hotel. This is the seajunsJast
meeting; for reservations call
Minne Gornick or Pearl Wen-
dell
I
e
,d
la
v I
AM
a-
or
for
12
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ship
AID
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ion:
derdal


Bay, May 9, 1975
*Jenist fitridfian
Page 9-C
lamp Mountain Lake Staff
'repared For 1973 Season
I
mature, professional staff
Highly experienced in
ping will again keynote the
ram for Camp Mountain
take as preparations are being
.completed for the 1975 season,
Ifrding to Alvin and Nanette
avage, owners and operators of
popular North Carolina
fip for boys and girls.
m staff ratio is one staff
Iber for every four campeis
le over-all count; however,
closer to one counselor for
[campers in the younger age
kps. Each specialty counsel-
fho instructs in any of the
ity areas is certified and
ftrienced to teach his/her
foliar activity program to
ppers. .
fountain Lake provides the
fort and security of resi-
camp doctors and regis-
nurses to care for the 250
and girls (ages 5-16) who
rid camp each summer.
0uth Berger, long time resi-
of Miami Beach and form-
fteacher at Biscayne Elemen-
School, will again head the
s' Hill division. Most of the
Is' staff will also be return-
^B fr another summer.
eal Schneider, guidance
anseior and coach at a local
lie school, will be returning
pMountain Lake for his fourth
rimer with wife, Myrna, and
daughters. Neal will again
the Specialty Activities
Bh are so important to the
program of athletic sports.
ria keeps the camp office
ing smoothly.
Larry and Larraine Dial,
hers from Georgia, will be
ling for their ninth sum-
fr at Mountain Lake with
ir two children, the younger
hphich was born three sum-
f%!ers ago at Hendersonville.
I^Larry heads up the important
r**Tts and Crafts Dept. and will
^B doing some administrative
work in the general camp this
Htarnmer. I.any and Camp Mom
* 4*rraine will be supervising the
' iBoys' Hill to assure parental
' guidance in addition to the
' -cabin counselors.
Aunt Millie Singman, former
Top House Mother in Gaines-
ville, will be back as the Girls'
Hill Camp Mom for her third
summer and will also be in
charge of the Canteen store.
Sylvia and Milton Lieberman.
long time South Florida resi-
dents and retired teachers, will
be back tor their fourth sum-
mer as Decoupage Specialists.
Don Nottingham, star Dolphin
fullback, will be escorting
Mountain Lake campers on
their flight from Miami to North
Carolina in June and will hold
a sports clinic for basketball,
softball and football.
Chef Ernest Brown, formerly
of the Gaines Steak House and
now the Tep Fraternity in
Gainesville, will be back for his
fourth season to feed the camp-
ers and staff. Baker Ben Lip-
shutz will also be back for his
fifth season.
Mountain Lake is graded 'A'
by the North Carolina Board of
Health. Recognized as one of
the leading camps in the coun-
ty, Camp Mountain Lake is a
favorite of South Florida camp-
ers, as well as campers from 12
other states and three foreign
countries, who enjoy the unpol-
luted, cool mountain air in Hen-
dersonville, N.C.
The area is ideal for camp-
ingthe main activities being
water skiing and boating on
privately owned 55 acre Lake
Osceola: tennis and all land-
sports, horseback riding, swim-
ming in 2 pools, gymnastics,
scuba diving, crafts, hiking and
overnight camping, plus many
other fun and learning activi-
ties.
Limited openings remain for
the 1975 season which begins
June 24. Mountain Lake is ac-
credited by the American Camp-
ing Association and the Savages
are both active members in the
organization; serving as mem-
bers of the Standards Commit-
tee to visit other camps for ac-
creditation. Al is chairman of
the Private Independent Camp
Committee for the Southeastern
Section of the U.S.A.
^rs. Mortimer Schaffer was installed as president of the
^omen's Committee of Jewish Family and Children's
trvice at the organization's annual installation April 29
I the Seville Hotel. Pictured with Mrs. Schaffer are Mrs.
forton Weinberger, (right) outgoing President, and Mrs.
Vn Rosen, chairman of the day.
JFCS Women's Committee
Installs Its New Officers
.he Women's Committee of
Wsh Family and Children's
Vice held its annual instal-
Bon bruncheon April 29.
jfficers and board members
serve for the year ending
_y, 1976, were installed.
JThe new officers include
Mrs. Mortimer Schaffer, presi-
dent; Mrs. Leonard Beldner,
education vice president; Mrs.
Robert Russell, special projects
r-vice president; Mrs. Stanley
Gilbert, treasurer; Mrs. Arnold
[l. Stern, recording secretary;
kand Mrs. Bernard Nemeroff,
^Tesponding secretary.
irary vice presidents are
Mrs. Eugene R. Katz, Mrs. Sol
Goldstein, Mrs. Edwin B. Op-
penheim and Mrs. Morton
Weinberger.
The Womens Committee of
JFCS engages in an active pro-
pretation of the services and
pretation of th srvices and
benefits of the agency, raises
funds in support of special
agency programs and activities,
and provides volunteer services
to selected agency clientele.
JFCS is supported by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and the United Way of
Dade County.
Meetings Set By
5 Chapters Of
Mizraehi Women
Geula Chapter of American
Mizraehi Women will have as
its guest speaker Rabbi Milton
Simon, whose topic will be "The
Ten Commandments Then
and Now," Wednesday at H p.m.
at Beth Israel Congregation, 770
40th St.. Miami Beach. Prog
vice president is Gertrude Es-
terman; president is Freda Os-
ter. The public is invited,
w
Ruth Zellner, Hatikvah Chap-
ter president pro tern, announc-
es a Strawberry Festival to be
held Thursday, May 22, at
12:45 p.m. at Kneseth Israel.
1415 Euclid Ave. The guest of
honor will be Lena Roth. This
will be the closing meeting of
the season and election of of-
ficers will take place. Rose
Lunger is program chairman.
it
it
Tamara Chapter bade fare-
well to its Canadian members,
who were leaving for the north
until next season, at a luncheon
last week in the Hallandale
home of Minna Yulish, honor-
ary president and executive
vice president.
Frances Glazerman is now
president. The activity chair-
men and officers include Ann
Berkowitz, vice president and
fund-raising; Erna Lazard. re-
cording secretary; (Helen Hass,
Erna's mother, is a charter
member of the chapter) Dora
Leftik, treasurer; Ann Fried-
man, corresponding secretary;
Rosalind Ward, social secre-
tary, and Shirley Yulish, pub-
licity chairman. Frieda Scott,
Libby Goldberg, Esther Wold,
Esther Haupt and Ann Flax are
all active members.
Bea Young, national vice
president, and Elaine Klein,
Florida Council field repre-
sentative, were the guest speak-
ers.
& ir it
Hadar Chapter will meet
Tuesday at 12:30 at the New
City Hall on Bay Harbor Ter-
race, off 96th St. President is
Lillian Chabner.
The Mother-In-Israel Lunch-
eon sponsored by the Hadar
chapter will take place at the
Eden Roc Hotel at noon Thurs-
day, May 22. Helen Zaiis is
chairman.
Jamboree Picnic
Featuring Groups
Of Folk Dancers
An International Folk Dance
Jamboree Picnic will take place
Sunday, May 25, from noon un-
til sunset at Morningside Park,
750 NE 55th Terr. Miami.
All those interested in danc-
ing and those wishing to learn
International Folk Dances are
invited. There will be dancers
from Balkan and Mid-East coun-
tries. Greece, Ireland, Israel,
Turkey, and the Ukraine.
Folk dance groups sponsoring .
this jamboree include Interna
tional Folk Dancers and Israel
Folk Dancers, in cooperation
with the American Jewish Con-
gress.
This jamboree picnic is open
to the public at no charge.
Bring your own food and drinks
and enjoy an afternoon dancing.
Justine Chapter Installs
Justine Chapter, American
Jewish Congress, Florida Wom-
en's Division was to install its
officers Thursday, noon at a
luncheon in the Delano Hotel,
with Judith Tepper, a Member
of AJCongress' National Execu-
tive Committee and Past Pres-
ident Florida Women's Division
as the installing officer.
Pocono Highland Camps Sponsor
Children's Backgammon Tourney
Everyone it seems, is playing backgammon. The craze has
hit Florida to such an extent that new clubs are being formed
daily, in hotels, restaurants and private clubs.
It is a game that children
pick up quicker than any-
one; easy to learn, it is
faster than chess or Mo-
nopoly and pure logic to a
child's mind.
The newly formed Flor-
ida Backgammon Club is
very aware of the large
amount of interest shown
by children in the game and
has arranged special events
for junior members.
Pocono Highland Camps,
located in the Pocono
Mountains of Pennsylvania,
have always been innovat-
ors and with 40 years of the
same Weinberg family man-
agement, the rustic beauty
of true camping tradition i
have been blended with all that is new in the social arts. So
it was natural that when the Florida Backgammonlub an^
nounced a spedal*childreh's tournament last Sunday at Pips
Gammon Club in the Fontainebleau Hotel's Main Lobby that
they invited the campers and friends of the Pocono Highlands
to participate.
The afternoon was a sparkling one for children. There
was the tournament, lessons for those wishing to learn the
game, a slide show, refreshments and of course, trophies and
prizes sponsored and presented by Louis Weinberg, director
of Pocono Highland Camps.
Winners in the 8-12 age group were Adam Kasha, first
place; Amy Beth Weiss, second place, and Laurie Traktman,
third place. In the 13-16 age group winners were Lysa Kasha,
first place; Joe Swedroe. second place, and Gail Golden, third
place.
The totirnarnent and lessons were supervised by Ms.
Jacqueline Perrin. president of Gammon Master Inc. and the
Florida Backgammon Club.
The name of the game is backgammon and Florida is fast
becoming the name of the place for the game that is sweeping
the world. ST
Backgammon tournament
winners Amy Beth Weiss
and Adam Kasha, repre-
senting the 8-12 age group
are pictured with Louis
Weinberg, director of Po-
cono Highland Camps, who
sponsored and presented
the prizes.
Music And Arts League To Install
New Officers, Board Wednesday
Miami Beach Music and Arts
League will hold its installation
dinner dance Wednesday at
5:00 p.m. at the Seville Hotel
under the chairmanship of Fan-
ny Silvcrman.
At that time, Mayor Rosen of
Miami Beach will officially in-
stall into office both the new
members of the board of direc-
tors and the new desk officers
for the league's silver anniver-
sary year, 1975 to 1976. The
new officers are Lou Cutner,
president; Max Brick. Sol Lis-
kin, Milton Jablons, vice pres-
idents; Essie Siegeltuch, record-
ing secretary; Evelyn Jablons,
corresponding secretary and
Hyman Cleon, financial secre-
tary.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by several performers
from the Miami Opera Guild,
in addition to an orchestra.
Seating capacity is limited to
250 members and their friends.
The Miami Beach Music and
Arts League, a recipient of
grants from the National En-
dowment for the Arts, the Fine
Arts Council of Florida and the
Miami Beach Council, is a non-
profit organization providing
its subscribers with a season of
programs including symphony,
classic opera, musicals, dance
groups, piano recital and the
Talent Showcase scholarship
competition.
Tickets for the installation
dinner-dance may be obtained
by writing or calling the
League's offices at 8701 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach.
Osceola Lake Inn Reopening
For Its 35th Season June 5
Rubin's Osceola Lake Inn, lo-
cated in the cool and scenic Blue
Ridge Mountains on Lake Osceo
la in Hendersonville. N.C. is re-
opening June 5 for its 35th sea-
son.
There are some new additions
this year, including new guest
rooms, dining room and recrea-
tional area.
Popular with lovers of the great
outdoors as well as with those
who simply want to relax, the
Inn features a host of activities.
Horseback riding, pool, boating,
fishing, tennis courts, putting
green, shuffleboard. horseshoes,
ping pong, volleyball, badminton
are all being offered.
Specially supervised programs
are available for children. In ad-
dition, two magnificent 18-hole
Championship Golf Courses are
nearbv.
The Osceola Lake Inn location
boasts some of the most scenic
mountain areas in the Eastern
United States. Situated at a height
of 2500 feet, the resort has ac-
commodations for up to 125
guests. Attire is informal at all
times.
Featuring American Plan, the
cuisine is Jewish-American Style.
Fresh baked breads and pastries
have become synonymous with
Osceola Lake Inn. and are pre-
pared by Arthur Rubin, a gradu-
ate of the Culinary Institute of
America.
Owner manager- host Stuart
Rubin, now entering his 16th
year of operation, took over its
manaeement from the late Joe
Rubin, who founded the Inn in
1941.
A color brochure and rates are
available by writing to Rubin's
Osceola Lake Inn. Henderson-
ville. N.C, or by phoning Stuart
Rubin in Miami.


k*
Page 12-C
rJmlsti fhrktlar}
Friday, May 9, 1975
______^ZZJ SAVE 3 WAYS! BONUS SPECIALSI..HONEST VALUESI..PLUS MEHCHANTS GREEN STAMPS!
; Wl HEOiEl
=' FtMftll
= FMO STMPS
Food Fair has the Finest Quality Foods
IN THE GREATEST VARIETY AND AT THE MOST REASONABLE PRICES!
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A' FRESH ICED
FRYER
QTRS.
LEG OR
BREAST
U.S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK
UNPER BLADE POT ROAST
U.S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK
SHOULDER POT ROAST BNLS.
U.S. CHOICEWESTERN BEEF CHUCK *. AO
SHOULDER STEAK BONELESS lb. *1*
NUTRITIOUS .Wk.fi, j
SLICED BEEF LIVER............................... 99e
U.S. GOVT. INSP. -FARMER CRAY- BASTED
GRADE "A" YOUNG
TURKEYS
1214 LBS.AVG.
QUICK FROZEN
59
FRESH & TENDER JOO* ^BgjL
Broccoli *Q&
Sunkist Lemons..........8 *. 59
IO SLICING AND HYING
Egg Plant u.29
CHERRY _
Red Rhubarb...........................* 49
Green Cucumbers......2 ,o> 33
Bat hTi ssue
CORONET BJ ULTRA FOUR. 1 I.'
rs 5 '> rolls
COlORFUl
Assorted Mums
COHONIT
Studio Print Towels JOIST
* INCH S *> 79 OUAKIR STATE WHOLI 01
'* Sliced Mushrooms
J'.-OZ.
..CAN
49*
35c
Les Cai Yogurt | Beef Franks
! BORDEN S 4H ^O^ ^Rfe
ALL |l IM|C
LAVORS Bf| CUPS JP7 ^y
copelanW
.i-yj. -.,
PKG..
: "'r 4 | *." 1
CORONET O-OF -1
COPILANO 5
Sliced Meat Bologna & 5I
COPIIAND'S r~
Meat Franks 89*
Franks or Knocks
^ -
FRIfNOSH IF PINEAPPil -p.
Cottage Cheese 34* 65*
AKiltOD'S *
Natural Plain Yogurt ft. 43'
Tl. PUMPIUN'CKII OH tHOt HACK
Iversen's Breads..............3tff 43c
Soft Margarine
MRS. FILBERT'S .
TWIN PACK
2-8-OZ. CUPS
Salami or Bologna
Sliced Swiss Cheese Hi: 73* Sandwich Spread
Florida ...
Orange Citrus Punch 2 mm. Z9
SIA SNACK MA*
Shrimp Cocktail................52? 39
i. $109
LIBBT SlICID
Beets in Glass..................38f 45*
NUTIItlOUS
Libby's Sliced Beets SSf 35c
american
"kosher
SINAI 41 KOSHU MIOG1I
12-OZ.
PK'G.
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKTS
PRICES EFFECTIVE FROM DATE OF
PUBLICATION THRU SUNDAY. MAY 11th
AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
WCKTAU
mAZ '6-oz. S'
^5^ CANS W
1 C|CAtrr(s
BLUE BOY
IAGU ALL VARIETIES
IJ-OZ. <1
..CHUI I
GORMAN'S IMPOHIID AUSTRIAN
l-OZ.
CHUB
SI*
53
Smoked Meats
LAND O' FROST
" SLICED
Spaghetti Sauce SSTfr
KLIINiX ,,
Assort. Facial Tissue oTmo 54
oisposaiii diapers ^
Daytime Kimbies...............8% $235
OISPOSAIII DIAPERS
Overnight Kimbies 8% $125
25-OZ.
JAR
lSaSiis
tM^^^n^A7
ETl8gN?
49-OZ.
PKG.
"Mir ON( pkc ^^^~
Eggo Waffles
American Singles
All
VARIETIES
BORDEN'S
COLORED
CHEESE FOOD"
OtOfN'S LITI-LINI
Neufchatel Cheese 8S 45*
SAIGINTO SLICIO ,-
Variety Pak Cheese JS 79*
GOOD tOt DIPS ...
Axelrod's Sour Cream.....&. 59*
LES CAI CREAMED
COTTAGE
CHEESE
IJ-OZ.
.. CUf
49
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT.
Kahn's Braunschweiger 03
Sliced Dutch Loaf...........XI 99*
Vita Herring
CREAMED
GOOD WITH HOI DOOJ |, J
Willy's Sauerkraut .!34r 43*
WONDERFULL BAKED FOODS
MADE WITH PURE VFCETAtLE SHORTENING
Whol OTo motors
1 BRAND 'awey-44 1C ft-02 r CAN _,
!

FROZEN
11 OZ.
PKG.
SIAIIOOK PMW ip.
Creamed Spinach............c. 45
H. iriNO ALL VAintHS ^
Frozen Beach Bagels 3 "" I
Daytime Toddler
KIM1IIS
Overnight Toddler
PKG. $035
...............OF M
-kg SI43
Of II
f23
V
FRESH SEAFOOD DIPT
AVAIIAWE ONLY AI STORES HAVING .
SEAfOOO SERVICE COUNTERS
P.P. tRAND ALL VARIITIIS n m. .
Meat Pot Pies 4 SSt 99^
Barbecue Sauce
AVAilABlE ON1Y AT STORES WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
All LUNCH MEATS I CHEESE SlICCO TO ORDER
SWISS CHEESE
98'
DORMAN'S
ICELAND
BABY
HALF
LB.
AUGUST BROS.
FRENCH BREAD
SS! 49e !^
ThiTsiiced Bread Xb 35*
MACKEREL
S12S
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GRANDMA'S
BRAND
20-OZ.
BOTTLE
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
EANCY IRISHWATIR
Rainbow Trout
PMSHIT sucro
Kingfish Steaks......................99*
Halibut Steaks......................^M"
Rod Snapper Fillet...............M"
wt ttjeivt thi MM to luatt ouANTiTies. Ml cuwcai, ttpx>capmic photcx^apwc and printing i**o*i a* suwkt to comection. none sold to ocmem.
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COOKING SPRAY
PAN PAL 99'
|C 13-OZ.
SPRAY CAN
Hill's Dog Food
A a cans iJBap
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