The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02409

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
reJewish Floridian
,c 48 Number 14
Combining TOE JfWfffl WOT end THE JEWISH MEM
Miami, Florida Friday, April 4, 1975
ic by Mail Two Sections Price 25 <-onts
eace Impossible At Geneva Dinitz
-
\nvoy Denies His
reddling Words
.'.!.;:..'. (JTA) Daniel Nestor, the economic
Commercial attache at the I nited Stales Consulate in
| Jerusalem, denied to the Jewish Telegraphic A|
had made remarks disparaging to Israel at a recent
jng with West Bank Arab businessmen in Ramallah.
According to press reports here, Neston said at a Ra-
^h Chamber of Commerce meeting that the Wesl Bank-
roll will not need Israeli permits to conduct business
iuse Israel will have nothing to say in these matters."
NESTOR ALSO allegedly advised the Arab merchants
business directly with American firms rather than
|gh Israeli or Jordanian firms and suggested that they
I their own office in the U.S. to encourage American
tments on the West Bank.
Jestor told the JTA that he had said nothing of a
;al nature to the Ramallah Chamber of Commerce.
.am
IS Vows Action Against
-Nazis Living in b.S.
WASHINGTON(JTA)The head of the U.S Immigra-
iid Naturalization Service pledged here that he would
1st the number of Department of Justice investigators
jig the 33 Nazis still living in America,
letired Gen. Leonard Chapman had testified about the
lo 12 million illegal aliens in the United States when
Is asked by Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D Pa.) about the
leaders who fled from Germany as World War II was
FlLBERG, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman (D., N.Y.) and
s in Congress have been urging a thorough investiga-
Bf the Nazis believed to be in the United States.
Eilberg is chairman of the subcommittee on immigra-
( ontiniicil on Page 18-A
fom Commits Suicide
JEL AVIVJTA)The massacre of 11 Israeli O'.ym-
Ihletes in Munich in 1972 had a tragic echo here over
leekend when the mother of one of the victims took
tnvn life.
Police disclosed the suicide of Mrs. Iliriya Romano
vhose son, Yosef Romano, a member of the Israeli
it-lifting team, was murdered by Palestinian terrorists
lunich two and a half years ago.
ISince the tragedy, Mrs. Romano suffered from severe
lessions and had several mental breakdowns that re-
bd hospitalization.
AMBASSADOR DINITZ
in TV Interview
CBS Apology Asked
For Program on Syria
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
VV YORK (JTAI The
C immittee for the Rescue of
Syrian Jewry has demanded that
( ,s News make a "public cor-
rection of all the misrepresenta-
tions and distortions" on the con-
ditions of Syrian Jews which the
group said was made during the
"60 Minutes" program on Feb.
16.
In a letter to CBS News Presi-
dent Richard Salant, Babbi Jo-
seph Harari. the committee's ex-
ecutive director, said the "erron-
Reassessment for Everyone 8-A
Jerusalem Mum on Ford Rage li-A; l".'-A
Official Statements k-.v
Final Hour-,; Tearful I'ai.'wlls 15-A
WASHINGTON (JTA) Israeli Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz said here thai the Geneva conference was "not a
place lor making peace" and expressed hope that the Amer-
ican initiative for a .Middle East settlement will be renewed
"in one way or another" despite the suspension of nego-
tiations for a second-stage Israeli-Egyptian agreement in
Sinai.
Dinitz, who was interviewed by Bruce Morton and
Hughes Rudd on the CBS-TV's "Morning News," said, "We
have never said that we are afraid to go to Geneva, al-
though we were always mindful that out of Geneva nothing
substantial can come. Geneva is nothing but a mini-UN. It's
a place for declarations, not a place for making peace."
DINITZ MADE those remarks
only hours alter Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin had told the
Knesset in Jerusalem that Is-
rael was prepared lo seek peace
through any possible means "in-
cluding through the Geneva con-
ference."
Dinitz said <>" 'be CBS inter-
view, "We still believe that the
besl prospeel for peace is to re-
new the American initiative in
one way or another. We believe
that the Americans are the only
ones who can push the cause of
peace because they are the only
ones who really have" the nec-
essary Influence "on Israel and
Egypt in order to advance to-
ward peace."
He said that while Israel owes
much to the United States "and
we value and appreciate very
much the efforts of the Secre-
cous report" by Mike Wallace,
"has justified Syrian brutality,
intensified the agony of the Jews
in Syria and jeopardized the lives
of these helpless people."
ROBERT CHANDLER, ORS
vice president for public affairs
broadcasts, told the Jewish Tele
graphic Agency that the "60
Minutes" report was based on
first-hand reporting in Syria dur-
ing January-February.
He said CBS had a researcher
in Damascus for four weeks, and
Continued on I'age 9-A
Continued on Page 3-A
Rabbi Miller Praises Israel Stand;
Cites Vietnam as Major Precedent
NEW YORK (JTA) Charg-
ing thai the Arab world's refusal
to accept Israel's right to exist
was responsible for the failure of
Secretary ul State Henry A. Kis-
i s latest peace efforts in
the Middle East, Rabbi Israel
Miller declared here that the wis-
dom of Israel's insistence on tan-
peace moves by Egypt be-
fore relinquishing further terri-
tory in Sinai "is confirmed by
what is happening today In Viet-
nam."
Rabbi Miller, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, drew the Middle East-
Vietnam parallel in a statement
issued here.
"THERE TOO, Secretary Kls-
singer served as mediator among
the local parties to the conflict.'
and "there too, pledges of peace-
ful intentions were offered but
without the necessary safeguards
to make sure the promises would
not be broken," Rabbi Miller said
referring to the 1973 Paris peace
accords.
"The agony of Vietnam today
is a price that is being paid for
the failure to insist on such vital
safeguards. Israel has learned the
Continued on Page 6-A
BABBI .MILLER
responsibility elsewhere
\harleston Jews Seek to Bar Kuwaiti Project
CHARLESTON, S.C.(JTA)The Jewish
riunity here has asked the Charleston
ity Council to deny a Kuwaiti company
[its American subsidiares permission to
pop Kiawah Island off the South Carolina
as long as Kuwait continues its blacklist
Boycott of American firms.
lie Council was scheduled, to hold a public
jg on rezoning the island. The Commu-
lelations Committee, an arm of the Jew-
ish Welfare Fund, announced that it would hold
a protest rally in advance of the hearings at
Marion Square in the center of downtown
Charleston.
KIAWAH IS one of a chain of undeveloped,
sparsely inhabited "sea islands" in the Atlantic
south of Carolina. Last year it was purchased
from its owner, a South Carolina businessman,
by the Kuwait Investment Co.
The latter established American subsid-
iaries, the Kiawah Beach Co. and Coastal
Shores Inc., to develop and promote the island
as an exclusive resort and residential commu-
nity for wealthy Americans.
The Community Relations Committee said
it will demand, as a condition of further de-
velopment "that the Arab boycott and black-
list shall not be implemented or enforced in
Charleston County and the United States of
America."


- >
Page 2-A
+Jmisti fkrktian
Friday, Apr*
Reassessment Needed by Every one-Rabin
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALExM(JTA)Premier Yitzhak Rabin said here all the parties involved
would now want to reassess their positions before decisions were taken on future moves
towards a Mideast settlement. The Premier declined to predict what such future moves
mir'ht be. He "hoped" a "renewal of the present efforts lies ahead of us," but he im-
plied that no arrangements had been made for Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger's
imminent return to the region.
The Premier spoke at a news conference in Jerusalem
after seeing oit the Secietary 12 hours after it was an-
nounced here that the shuttle mission had been "suspended."
Rabin paid "special tribute" to American efforts to promote
a settlement and he expressed his faith that friendship Be-
tween the U.S. and Israel was "deep-rooted" and could
weaiher "ups and downs."
HE CONFIRMED press re-
pents here that he had received
last week from President Ford
f. letter regarding the negotia-
( but refused to divulge its
it. explaining that such
c respondence was a part of the
"special relationship" between
the two -tates and could not be
I Ished.
The two evening newspapers
and the radio reported that the
letter from Ford had been
couched in extremely tough lan-
g a je t'-.at had left the Cabinet
ihock.
Ratin at his press conference
ned that press descriptions
let ter had been exag-
gerated and distorted. But inside
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sources have revealed privately
thai the letter aid indeed give
Israel's Cabinet during its mara-
thon meetings much bitter food
for thought.
Ford reportedly suggested
that Is:;iei. by its intransigence,
was jeopardizing the security of
the world and t^-at the American
people would not supi>ort such a
position.
RABIN CONCEDKf) that the
"special relationship" between
Washington and Jerusalem had
indeed been a major factor in
Israel's de'iberatis>n. "I do not
want to speculate as to the out-
come of the present situation,"
he said, queried as to the effect
of the breakdow n of Kissinger's
e:'fo: ts on the relationship.
R-.:t I tend to believe that
our friendship is deep-rooted and
\ can survive ups and downs."
The friendship, said Rabin.
i was based on common interests,
a common heiitage and mutual
understanding. Israel, he con-
tin ied. held a special place in
the hearts of the American peo-
ple. Congress, Ford and Kissin-
ger. He went out of his way to
praise Ford as well as Kissin-
ger for their "unbelievable ef-
forts and risks" in the effort to
attain a settlement.
Rabin stressed that Israel had
always sought to separate po-
litical developments from im-
mediate military developments.
Israel would respect the two
disengagement accords and the
ceasefires with Jordan and Leb-
anon provided such respect
were mutual.
HE REFUSED to be drawn
on whether the collapse of the
talks inevitably increased the
threat of war or actual state of
military tension in the region,
and tended to play down reports
of war-readiness on both sides
of the disengagement lines,
north and south.
Lodge Honors Outstanding
Women In Its Auxiliary
George Gershwin Lodge 136.
Knights of Pythias, will honor
the outstanding women in it
Auxiliary Mondav. April 7. at 8
p.m. in the Surf-ide Cnmmunitv
Center. 9301 Collins Ave. M-
Francis Gan an Mrs. Abraham
Finverman form the Auxiliary's
presidium.
The Auxiliary Plans a Ca'd
Partv in th? 100 Lincoln Rd.
Recreation Room Sunday. April
97, at 7:30 p.m. Th party will
be under the chairmanship of
Vr- Phil will be Mrs. Herbert Resnick.
The drama of the deadlock
and collapse of the talks un-
folded in Jerusalem over the
weekend, but IT "ParTie as no sur-
prise to |X)licy makers here who
had been making gloomy prog-
nostications.
Egypt the Premier said, re-
fused the "elements of non-bel-
ligerency" and refused to agree
to a lengthy term, agreeing only
to extend the UNEF mandate
for a year and then have it
renewed by the UN Security
Council for a further year.
EGYPTIAN President Anwar
Sadat rejected, too. Isiael's pro-
posal for mixed patro's of the
buffer /.one whicn Israel saw as
a meai.ingf.il cnannei of on-
going contact letween the two
sides. Egypt would coat^
only a revival of the
armistice erhrnissioni
UNEF auspices.
No- did Kgypt accept ths-J
ritorial demands, it p^*
\_-__ ''*! withdraw to %
dtatttnre -enst--*f th pas*
that Kgyptian forces would S
up positions a similar kiT1
west of them, with the,:-5j
force in between. It ,ie,"J.
too, most of the Suez Gulf cc
line well past Abu Rudsjai
the way to A-Tur.
"The., wanted all tb/f.^e,
fere I in retain to, .-,v
state of warand*,^\|_
pie. ared to offer less than J
thi beginning of the ei
state of war." Rabin said.
The Israel Cabinet saw th
Egyptian proposal as a ^
-: le I withdrawal and not as
step towards peace"and th
fore rejected it.
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ing income.
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for resale at the Thrift Shop?
Do you have furniture, appliances, bedding, cameras
clothing, sporting goods cr any other saleable mer
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Do you know someone, a friend or a neighbor, wh *
redecorating? Perhaps c hotel, an apartment louse.
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lApril 4, 1975
+Jeist Fhridfiair
Page 3-A
n\
hbi Solomon Schiff (left), director of the Greater
imi Jewish Federation's Community Chaplaincy Serv-
and executive vice president of the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, spoke recently to a large
gathering of residents of Miami Beach's Victorian Plaza
on behalf of the 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. Chairman Philip Zuckerman (left) and
Mrs. Arthur Friedman (center) were among the leaders
who helped garner support for Jewish survival through
generous commitments to the 1975 Campaign.
Israelis Behind
Gov't's Decision
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Is-
raelis of all political persua-
sions appeared here to stand
fully behind Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin's government's
refusal to agree to major
territorial withdrawals in
Sinai without a formal dec-
laration of non-belligerency
by Egypt.
Histadrut, Israel's power-
labor federation, issued
ifatement pledging its full-
It support of the govern-
ment's policy.
lsE< RETARY General Yehu-
ram Meshei said Israeli work-
er- hack the government's de-
cisi n. and although they ardent-
ly desire peace, they understand
that the Kgyptian attitude made
it impossible for Premier Rabin
to accept Cairo's territorial de-
mands.
N'aftali Feder, political sec-
ret r.y of Mapam. said that
a member of Rabin's La-
Uignment, support-; the gov-
ernment's decision although it
y regrets the failure to
a second-stage accord with
t. Mapam urged continued
Efforts to seek a peace settle-
tent.
The Civil Rights Movement,
eaded by Shulamit Aloni, also
Beciared its support for the deci-
|Uon but at the same time ac-
cused the Rabin government of
misrepresenting Israel's case,
both internally and abroad.
TZVI BERNSTEIN, secretary
general of the National Religi-
oua Party, a member of Rabin's
coalition, said the latest de-)
velopments made it all the more
urgent to establish a govern-
i ment of national unity.
He said this was now possible
as a result of the "rapproche-
nent" between Rabin and Likud
der Menachem Beigin. He
referring to the fact that
bin telephoned Beigin to re-
5rt the situation to him and
ersonally briefed Beigin and
Bther Likud leaders on Satur-
day.
If Israelis generally did not
hold their own government to
blame for the collapse of the
second-stage peace talks, and
put the onus squarely on the
Egyptians, there was also bit-
terness against the two super-
powers expressed in editorials
in the country's two mass cir-
culation evening newspapers.
MAARIV acknowledged the dan-
| ger of a serious erosion of Amer-
ican-Israeli relations and said
the delay in inviting Israeli
pilots to train on the new F-15
jets was symptomatic of the
American attitude even before
the failure of Kissinger's talks.
The paper added that while
Israel has no desire to split with
the U.S., it must be prepared
for such an eventuality and must
mobilize for a vast political and
propaganda campaign in the
international arena and espe-
cially in the U.S.
Yediot Achronot suggested
that Egypt's tough stand may
well have resulted from behind
the scenes maneuvers by the
Soviet Union and also by the
collapse of the American strate-
gic position in the Far East.
WHATEVER, the case. Kis-
singer should have realized
where his "Chambeiiainian" line
(appeasementI would lead his
own country and the entire free
world, the newspaper said, ad-
ding that Kissinger's failure in
the Middle East should sound
the alarm for a change of Amer-
ican policy in general.
Random samplings of public
opinion included the view that
the United States was blaming
Israel for denying it a much
needed diplomatic triumph in
the Middle East at a time when
its policies in Indo-China are in
shambles and its Western alli-
ance is endangered by the sharp
leftist swing in Portugal, a
NATO member.
Some Israelis expressed the
view that the U.S. had pressed
Israel hard for concessions and
was now attempting to hold the
weaker party responsible for its
diplomatic failure. Others dis-
agreed and claimed that was not
the genuine American attitude.
Yiddish Culture Wincle's
'Day Of Remembrance' Set
The Yidish Culture Wincle will
hold a "Day of Remembrance"
marking the 32nd anniversary
of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Agu-
dath Israel, 7801 Carlyle Ave.
S. Glasman, lecturer, research-
er and authority on Yiddish his-
tory, will speak on the signifi-
cance of the Uprising in Jewish
history. Sarah and Chaim Fersh-
ko will offer a program of songs
and piano selections. Marcus
Meisel will recite poems on the
"Holocaust" by Kazenelson Suz-
Kewer and Gladstein. L. Segal
will eulogize. Bena Ockberg, sur-
vivor from Nazi camps, will light
the six symbolic candles.
No Peace at Geneva Rabin
Continued from Pane 1-A
tan of State and the American
government." F:<;ypt also "re-
ceived tremendously from th
United States ... in the last sev-
en months, more than tney re-
ceived from the Russians in the
seven years that preceded the
war. So there Ls no reason why
Egypt too should not help us to-
gether to divide the initiatives
and we are standing ready at
any point to continue our march
to peace."
The Ambassador said he did
not know yet "how to interpret"
President Ford's order for a ma-
jor formal reassessment of U.S.
foreign policy in the Middle
East.
He said that if the President
means a general reassessment,
"that is not only legitimate, but
Is absolutely expected alter a
setback Mat was caused by
t's refusal for the negotia-
tions."
he ADDEb. however, "If the
meaning of it is that this re-
assessment is vis-a-vis Israel
which I don't believe that
this is the meaning of it then,
of course, we don't feel that we
should be the one to be singled
out for the failure of the nego-
tiations after we have made
generous proposals absolutely
rejected by Egypt."
Dinitz said he was "very en-
couraged by the words of the
President that America will
continue to search for ways and
means to advance the cause of
i iis "." He also said he did not
believe the role oi Kissinger his
I, although "maybe the
shuttle diplomacy is ended for a
while, maybe new ways sh I
he found."
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Page4-A
*Jm1st n-oridlair
Friday, April 4, 1975
1
Reassessment For Whom?
In the light of the failure of Dr. Kissinger's Middle
Eastern mission, the statement he has made at a press
conference and references to the so-called light at the
end of the tunnel, the time has come for a reassessment
on the part of the Jewish community in tune with de-
veloping events.
I* is shortsighted and of no value to detach Israel
from the rest of the world. The situation in the Middle
East is part of global developments in Vietnam,
Cambodia, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Ethiopia
and the oil cartel.
Kissinger's statement that South Vietnam requires
a program of three-year support is vapid in the face of
a similar reassessment going on vis-a-vis Israel and the
Middle East.
It ignores domestic considerations and a distaste
for an unpopular war. However, Kissinger does not of-
fer an even-handed three-year program of support for
Israei. He confesses: "We are committed to Israel's sur-
vival."
But survival needs definition, and the nature of
that definition can best come from Israel.
We Hove to Look Forward
Kissinger also referred to the dangers of "radicali-
zation" in the Middle East without specifying their na-
ture. Did he have in mind the assassination of King
Faisal, or did he have in mind what Edmund Stillman,
director of the Hudson Institute, said in his Op-Ed
article of the New York Times on Mar. 26: "Trouble is
bound to come in the region within the next ten years.
Political take-overs and paiace revolutions by imported
mercenaries and 'craftsmen-slaves' is one of the oldest
themes of Middle Eastern history."
Obviously, far-sighted statesmen have to look for-
ward. But not with blindness. The view has to be total.
Even Kissinger had to admit events elsewhere in
the world had their effect on the failed attempt at un-
tying the Middle East tangle. Perhaps then, it would be
best, as so many more Israelis are now saying, for the
peace negotiations to take place in Geneva.
There, under global spotlight, the world will be
able to see what is going on. No executive sessions as
here, or if there is a behind-the-scenes dealing, it will
have to come to light in the public debate.
The Soviet Union, not immune to world pressure,
and just as aware of developments in the Middle East
potentially inimical to its interests, will have half the
responsibility. It will not be able to take pot shots, as it
has been doing, when it haa no responsibility.
A Mutuality of Respect
The return of the Orthodox branch of Judaism to
the Synagogue Council of America is welcome after
so long a disaffection.
But the return carries with it the Orthodox
branch's stipulation that it still does not recognize the
legitimacy of either the Conservative or Reform
branches.
Under these circumstances, it may be hard to see
what the Orthodox move means in terms of healing the
breach among the various religious affiliations of Amer-
ican Jewry.
For one thing, the return itself at least heals the
schism on the surface, and that is a good thing.
For another, it affords an opportunity for those in
the Orthodox branch who may be more moderate on
this question to engage in active dialogue with members
of the Conservative and Reform movements.
The issue here is not to challenge Orthodoxy to
argue that the return is meaningless if it is not accom-
panied by statements of accreditation to the others.
Rather, the issue is that perhaps a beginning has
been made toward a mutuality of respect in the name
of total Judaism.
"Jewish Floridllan
OFFICE AND PLANT 1M N E. Sth STREKT TELEPHONE S7J-4
P.O. Box U-OTS, Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K PHOCHET
Editor nr.d Publisher
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SKI.MA M. THOMPSON
AnUlanl to Publisher
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Of The Merchandiee Advertieed In Ita Columne
PoMUbcd every Friday flrre 19J7 hv The Jwish F.oridlan
Second-Clas* Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
The Jewiah Floridian haa abaorbed the Jewiah Unity and tre Jewiah Weekly.
Member of the Jewiah Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arta Feature Syndi-
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aociation of Engliah-Jewiah Newapapera. and the Florida Praaa Aaaociation.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: iL;-al Area) One vear $10.00 Two Yeara $1-0
Cut of Town Upon Regueat
Israel Should Shun Geneva
"SUPPOSE they gave a war.
and nobody attended?" is a bit-
ter sentimentalism from the darK-
est days of our Vietnam agony.
Everywhere, it evoked philo-
sophical- smiles.
It epitomized the secret dreams
of men who dared to believe that
they can control their own des-
Uny without leaving it to the
selfish hearts and minds of the
political hacks and shysters they
periodically elect to office.
I CAN think of no more apt
time to resurrect this dream than
now.
Mindlin
Suppose they set the stage for
another Geneva conference, as
surely is occurring behind the
drawn curtain of international
duplicity at this very mom:,
and Israel didn't attend?
On its face, it seems absurd.
But what is the compulsion to go
to Geneva?
WHO BESIDES the fat cats, by
whose rules the game will be
played at Geneva and who are
the predestined winners at Gene-
va, conceive of Geneva as the
only alternative to the current
Mideast condition?
7"so one. except the I
State*. And Israel, of cour-
Israel is by no one's def:
a fat-cat. Still, consider the
tions.
The United States would
preferred to avoid Gene i
cause the resumption o:
I >va talks will give the S
Union a co-chairman's r
Soviet prestige in the M
East is already at the d.
point.
as FOB Israel, well a; Gen
she will have to reckon with
full panoply of world poisoi
rected against her. Had Hi
's diplomacy succei
ahe would have had to swall
only a drop at a time. J
The po:::t is thai v
ceptions are exceptions all g .
but for entirely diffei
sons.
For Israel, Geneva m
start execution at the hands of
the Russians and the A
minimally, she cannot re- -
the Kissinger formula there And
that seems doubtful, indeed.
For the United States. Geneva
no longer means pursuit of the
Kissinger formula, which :s to
Continued on Page 12-A
a ^^- -* ^ LaaaV'*^ ^^**aa!
V^/-^
*
-r------
jaaj
~--.%.-
.
COMMENT
Volume 48
Friday, April 4. 1975
Number 14
23 NISAN 5
Henry Kissinger is learning
how difficult it is to be on top.
And to be a Jew.
The first Jewish Secretary of
State in American history, he is
beginning to take form as the
quintessential interstitial man
the historic Jewish role.
IT IS no mrorise that liberals
find him not to their liking He
nae not onlv sp-v^d as the foreign
policy-maker for two recent con-
BMv*uve presidents but his phi-
losophy of oower br.>krii'* is not
accotabie o tho-:e who continue
to have a less jaundiced view of
the world.
But conservatives are now turn-
ing on him. Sen. Jesse Helms, a
Republican so far to the right he
makes Barry Goldwater look lib
eral. has called his usefulness at
an end. Democrat Henry Jackson
known until recently for hi)
hawkishness >u;t joined with the
likes of liberal Senators Kenned)
Tunney. Mondale and PhiliD Hart
to urse Kissinger to ex^'ude
Chile from his clanned visit I >
Latin America this month so as
not to grant legitimacy to the
military regime which he helped
establish.
Thf mail thi week a!=o
brousht a reminder that H't'er
effectively used the myth that a
tab in the back" Ion V-
War I for Germany, pii
responsibility for that on th
itieians and the Jews. Addr*~e1
"To All Jews," and ur-
tinillBlllifll'd. it went on to state:
"DR. HENRY A I
a Jew. ho* rRATT >3
to i:
nd re]
in his dealings between Israel and
the Arab nations Dr. Kissinger
is a modern day HAMMAN" (red
ink. capital letters and spelling
belong to the unknown author).
Furthermore, the piece went
on. not only has Kissinger been
labelled a SOVIET AGENT but
"Vice-President Nelson A. Rocke
fel'.er has been unmasked as an
active COMMUNIST." as well,
which takes care of that non
sense.
BUT I have learned over many
years not to treat a reoort by the
London Jewish Chronicle lightly
and when one of its correspond
ents writes from Israel in th?
March 21 is=ue that "An imn'ied
threat that the United States
m iht drop Israel for the Arab*
was convey d to [wae'i leaders
by Or Renrv Kissinger" and that
irther told 'hem that "Amj
"America now re?;; that a po
litico-military tie-up between
Washington, Cairo ar.d Riadh
would be no less efficient in
thwarting a Soviet incursion into
the Middle East" (auoting the
Chronicle!, then one has o take
a look again at the attemot to
scapegoat Jewish opposition i
Vietnam for 'he present ten
between the U.S. and Israel.
To blame liberals (and mo-*
American Jews) who refu*e to
see a parallel in C
I into the trap hid
by the Pentagon ar.d the State
Depa:
- Hv their ov
ns. The Gen.
Brown has admitted that U
not Israel the Pentagon
ly JU| V
! U S.
pur '
Dv EDWARD COHEN
an operation against the acl
ment of Soviet aims."
A LEADING expert has just
written that Israel fits into the
Persian Gulf military and politi-
cal question exactly nowhere. Oil
is the issue and Israel has no oil.
So while Kissinger is "making
peace between Israel and Egypt.
he's pu ling off Gulf moves (all
those billions in arms, supplying
of mercenaries, military advisors,
etc.). What does this mean for
Israel? It's too early to Uf*
but there is a'ready speculation
about a joint U.S.-USSR Mideast
carveup sometime in the future
and when that comes, by-bye Is-
rael." And I would not call the
writer a friend of I-rael.
Instead of being so liberal, it
h3s been said in certain Jewish
quarters, we ou.>ht to work for a
"marriage of convenience be-
tween American Jews and mill-
tari-tv"
What a mixed marriage result-
in" in th- loss of Jewish identity
that would be! Despite some hos-
tility on the far left, which has
been distorted by the same em-
ecrated fear shown in the "COM-
MUNIST" (red ink) jocumeo\.
reality is that the most consistent
supporters of the State of Israel
f-->m its inception has been the
liberal communitv in America.
Beca"se. to the liberal. Israel is
a challenge to the moral con-
science of the world and not like
Vietnam and Cambodia just an-
other geopolitical pawn in the
r struggle between the US
ft. When Hen:
er learns that he n
ve the honor of being libel-
lei a '.',
m
M a a 7


Friday, April 4, 1975
+Jewist> fhridian
Page 5-A
Mil- -I '


i i nt"
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t. BIAS 2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
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Two. four or sometimes even more plies (or
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3
BFGoodrich


i
Page 6-A
+Jeist fkrkfiar
Friday, April 4.
197!
Rabbi Miller Supports Decision
Herfv: Zvi Berger, exec:.::vc director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, receives the coveted Ram-
bam Award from Pearl Schwartz, scholarship chairman
cf the Florida Council of Americcn Mizrachi Women at
the March 9 Scholarship and Special Gifts Luncheon in
the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Continued from Pa;e 1-A
tnanl. and bot:
.-can people and the caus-
o: peace are the gainers," Rabbi
Miller observed.
He sa:d "It is clear now that
by its refusal to renounce bellig-
Israel. Egypt and
'-.rab .vorid are not yet ready
to accept :-: right to exist
a> a ite and permanent
political entity in the Middle
East
RABBI MII.I.ER oledged 'unl-
erith Israel in
her tor peace and se-
" He said that
lapse of secretary Kissinger's
peac-r
not fatal. Far worse for Israel's
security, for America*! strategic
cause of
I ;eace would have been Is-
. m to Egyptian in-
transigence.
"For that would only have
whetted the Arabs' appetite for
tie goal that they have not yet
abandoned the destruction of
Israel."
Rabbi Mi
is the time for Israel to
fast u I rtaj cool. F .
friends -jntry it is a
moment to spei larity
with the Jewish Sta*e. recogniz-
ing that peace cannot be achieved
irrender r.or security bfl
- I
IN RELATED
ish crcanira'ions called
Ford if firm til Admini
tion's con. I*S *>
'>'
Dr. Joseph P St ?res-
ider.t of 'he Z.
of A Ford to
"make ki a Admir.
lion's support for I-
.on and that
I
j
Arab iiilieMijiiii i
....-. tot E .'
moderation.
Adelson, -
the United Zionist
America, n .-
'
A Secreta

made
era made th
tins F .
Tormenting Rectal Pain And Itch
Of Hemorrhoidal Tissues
Promptly Relieved
Jerusalem Mum on Ford Anger
In many cases Preparation H
gives prompt, temporary relief
from such pain and itching
and actually helps shrink
welling of hemorrhoidal tis-
sues caused by inflammation.
Tests by doctors on hun-
dreds of patients showed this'
to be true in many cases. In
fact, many doctors, them-
selves, use Preparation // or
recommend it for their fam-
ilies. Preparation H ointment
or suppositories.
By DAVID LAXDAU
JERUSALEM fJTA)
Official sources here were
careful not to react to news
of President Ford*s inter-
view in Hearst newspapers
in which he blamed Israeli
intransigence for the failure
of Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger's latest ilideast
effort.
Privately, officials tended
to hope that Kissinger's news
conference last Wednesday
in Washington in which he
carefully avoided apportion-
ing blame represented a
more up-to-date and more
balanced U.S. official posi-
tion.
Yeshiva Itwicmte
Go To New York
The student body of the Ye
Gdolah of Greater II
F. rida'S Lubavitch rabbinicai
college, left last weak for New
York, a here they will help cele-
Lnbavitcber Rebbe's.
: M. M. Schnee:
I also be a part
of Chabad Passover activi*
According to Rabbi Sho'.om
Lipskar. dean of the Landow Ye-
shiva Center of which the Ye-
shiva Gdolah is a pan. the j
men will return with a nationally
coordinated program of J
community activities, which they
will supervise.
Besides offerina degrees in the
rabbinate, the Yeshiva Gdolah.
housed in the Landow Yeshiva
Center. Miami Beach, has special
programs and classes in Judaic-
for all interested participants.
THEY NOTED that Ford
had given his interview Mar.
24. before Kissinger's press
conference and when the
President was reportedly
highly angered and upset by
the failure of the shuttle ef-
fort. They ventured to hope
privately that Washing-
ton might since then have
cooled its wrath.
Some weii piaced sources
here saidagain in private
briefings that Geneva is
not necessarily the sole av-
ailable option at this stage.
They mentioned "proximity
talks'" as a possible alter-
native, noting that when
during the Kissinger shuttle
the prospect of failure was
aired, the possibility of
'proximity talks" was rais-
ed.
DR. F. BERGMAN
OPTOMETRIST, P.A.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION
OF HIS PRACTICE TO:
SANS SOUC PLAZA
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Surf side Women's League
Honoring New Members
The Surfside Women's League,
Inc. will hold its next meeting
Monday. April 14. at 12:30 p.m.
in the Lanai Room of the Com-
munity Center.
This meeting will be dedicated
to honoring new members. Plans
for the annual Send-A-Kid-To-
Camp Card Party will also be
made and refreshments served.
All members are urged to attend.
Lodge Meeting Tuesday
George Gershwin Lodge,
Knights of Pythias, will meet at
7:30 p.m. Monday in the Surf-
side Community Center, with
Chancellor Commander Max
Kaminsky presidine. Refresh-
ments will be served.
per annum,
4 YEAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES
$1,000 MINIMUM
Other S1.000 minimum savings certificates pay yields of 5.92b to 6.98 on 3
month to 30 month maturities.
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Your savings at Washington Federal are now insured to $40,000 by an agen-
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$100,000 savings certificates available. Interest rates and maturities upon request.
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Phone 391-8903


, April 4,
1975
* knlsti ftorHKhm
Page 7-A
twists Charge Reds With Trying for 'Final Solution'
e\V YORK (JTA)
Eh activists in Moscow
.. accused the Soviet au-
Ities of trying to achieve
[rial solution" of the Jew-
[emigration problem by
tng visas to selected ac-
but denying them to
rs who are regularly
sed, threatened with
fcuti'on or actually ar-
and held for trial
nspecified or dubious
fees.
The accusation was made
by a group of 15 Jewish ac-
tivists who met with West-
ern journalists in Moscow,
according to the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
THKY INDICATED that the
strategy apparently is aimed at
BpHttlng the hard-core activists
and intimidating other Jews
from seeking exit visas. A state-
ment distributed to foreign
newsmen cited the cases of two
activists, Mark Nashpitz and
Boris Tsitlionok who were
Chess Body Eyes
Israel's Expulsion
TEL AVIV(JTA)A decision by the World Chess
federation that would exclude Israel from considera-
bn as a possible site for the 1976 International Chess
vrr.nad, has been protested by the Israel Chess Fed-
li"on- ^ ..
| The Israeli group said it wrote to the Federation,
feting in Holland this week, pointing out that Israel
:hc only country so far to submit an offer for next
ar's contest but was ruled out on the basis of the po-
(tical situation in the Middle East.
"On the basis of purely chess interests we have
nth the right and the resources to host the 1976 Olym-
he situation in Israel is far from being a war
Dne." the letter said.
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among seven ilemonstators ar-
rested outside the I.enin Library
in Moscow Feb. L'4 for protest-
ing the denial of visas.
While the others were either
released or given brief jail terms
for "hooliganism," Nashpitz and
Tsitlionok were held for trial.
The charges against them were
unspecified until last week when
they were formall/ charged un-
der Art. 190-3 of the Soviet
Penal Code for "the organiza-
tion or active participation in
group actions disturbing public
order."
They face prison terms of up
to three years.
AT THE same time, however,
exit visas were granted to 10
"hard core" activists. They were
identified as Mikhail Polotsk,
Vladimir Davidov. Yaacov
Schwart/man and Mikhail Agur-
sky, all of Moscow; Anatoly
Schwart/man and other activ-
ist, surnamed Valin of Kishinev; \
Leonid Lotvin and Yacov Vin-
kovetsky, of Leningrad; Valery
BuikO, of Riga; and Yull Blind,
of Kharkov, who was Just re-
leased from a labor camp.
The Moscow activists said in
their statement that the selec-'
tion of these men for visas was
8 smoke screen" thrown up by '
the Soviet authorities to conceal |
their repression of other Jews.
THE STATEMENT disclosed
thai three other activists were
summoned to KGB isecret po-'
lice) headquarters in Moscow
this week and warned thai they
faced arrest and trial.
One of them. Prof. Alexander
Luntz, a scientist, were threat-
ened with prosecution under Art..
04 of the Penal Code which re-,
lates to treason and carries the '
5
Hans H. Marcuse;
Louis Witkin
To assure you of a ]
superb social event 5
Bar Mitzvah. Wedding
Anniversary Party.
at the all new
iAMI
jaw*
maximum penalty of death. The
other two, Anatoly Sharansky
and Leonid Tsipin, were advised
that they might he charged un-
der Aits. 19J and 70 respective-
ly.
The latter covers anti-Soviet
agitation. A KGB official al-
legedly told them: "We can do
what we like; the West no long-
er supports you," the NCSJ re-
Armed Forces on Alert
TEL AVIV(JTA)Israeli forces have been placed
on a high alert on both the Egyptian and Syrian fronts fol-
lowing the collapse of second-stage talks with Egypt.
According to reliable sources, Israeli forces are keep-
ing a close watch on troop movements behind the Syrian
and Egyptian lines.
EVEN BEFORE the negotiations broke down, Israeli
military sources had expressed serious concern over the
massive military build-ups by Egypt and Syria and the
large-scale war exercises conducted by both countries just
behind the ceasefire lines.
The war atmosphere was increased by a statement by
the Egyptian Chief of Staff that Egyptian forces must be
prepared to complete the mission started on October 6,
1973the day Egypt and Syria attacked Israel launching
the Yom Kippur War.
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AND ISRAEL
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Page 8-A
fJewist fktridfiaf?
Friday, April 4, 1975 J
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Israeli Statement
* On Breakdown
JERUSALEM(JTA)"The talks that were intended
to initiate a movement toward a peaceful settlement be-
tween Israel and Egypt have been suspended. From the
early stages of the negotiations, Israel stated its readiness
to evacuate the Gidi and Mitla Passes and the Abu Rodeis
oil fields in return for a renunciation of the state of war
by Egypt. Egypt refused to renounce the state of war and
insisted that it continue.
"Nevertheless, Israel offered, in return for a less bind-
ing political undertaking, to withdraw its forces from the
present disengagement lines, including the western part
of the strategic passes, the Mitla and the Gidi, and to trans-
fer them to United Nations control. Israel also offered to
transfer the oil fields to Egyptian administration. This of-
fer was rejected as well by Egypt. This rejection by Egypt
led to the suspension of the talks.
"Israel remains ready as always to persevere in its efforts to-
ward a settlement with Kgypt and will continue to maintain the
closest contacts with the U.S. government toward this end. Israel
extends its deeo gratitude to the U.S. government and particularly
to Secretary of State Kissinger for his untiring efforts in the cause
of peace."

State Department Statement
JERUSALEM(JTA)State Department spokesman Robert
Anderson issued the following statement on behalf of Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissingei:
"We have been seeking In response to the desires <>f the parties
to help them achieve a further step towards a peace settlement.
We believe both sides have made serious efforts to reach a success-
ful outcome. Unfortunately, the differences on a number of key
issues have proven Irreconcilable. We therefore believe a i>eriod of
reassi is needed so that nil concerned can consider how best
to proceed towards a lasting peace.
"Secretary Kissinger lias accordingly informed the parties that
he is suspending his present efforts and returning to Washington
to report to the President and the Congress on the negotiations.
He will remain in close touch with the parties and the cochairman
of the Geneva conference during the period ahead."
Ford is 'Regretful'
WASHINGTON(JTA)"The President regrets the suspen-
sion of the talks that have been taking place over the past two
weeks in the Middle East. While the parties were unable to reach
sufficient agreement to permit a further step toward an overall
settlement, the President appreciates the sincere efforts of all con-
cerned.
"He reaffirms the commitment of the United States to con-
tinue its efforts to assist the parties in reaching a just and lasting
peace. The President also wishes to express his deep gratitude and
personal admiration for Secretary Kissinger's skill and tireless
dedication in these latest negotiations. He looks forward to meet-
ing with him upon his return to review the situation."
Sadat Admits He's
Receiving Arms
WASHINGTON(JTA)President Anwar Sadat has
confirmed for the first time that Egypt has received highly
sophisticated MIG-23 jet fighters and other weapons from
the Soviet Union, as well as 25 French-built Mirage jets
purchased for Egypt by Saudi Arabia.
The Egyptian leader made the disclosures in an inter-
view published in the Lebanese weekly Al Hawadith, ac-
cording to reports received here.
HE DID not say how many of the MIG-23s Egypt has
gotten but Western intelligence sources have said that the
first group of six was ferried to Cairo earlier this year.
The MIG-23 is reputed to be a higher flying and faster com-
bat aircraft than any in the U.S. Air Force.
The six, said to have been delivered to Egypt in Jan-
uary, were described as part of the first Soviet arms ship-
ments to that country since the October, 1973 war.
Sadat reportedly told the Lebanese publication that the
25 Mirages obtained through Saudi Arabia were replace-
ments for 25 Mirages loaned to Egypt by Libya a year ago
and since returned at the country's demand.
Sadat also revealed that Saudi Arabia is footing the
bill for aircraft factories to be built in Egypt by Britain's
Hawker Siddeley firm, manufacturer of the Hawk training
aircraft, and the Westland Co., which makes the Lynx heli-
copter.
CBS News Apology Demanded
Continued from Page 1-A
the producer of the program wa.%
there for two weeks. He said the
show pointed out that Wallace
was accompanied by Syrian
agents during an interview with
a Jewish family.
"Obviously, we can't be sun-"
that all of the things CBS was
told is true," Chandler admitted.
Rabbi Harari has demanded
that CBS name the four Syrian
Jews who were allegedly exe-
cuted for espionage in 1969. ac-
cording to the CBS report.
Chandler said the information
came from the Syrian Jewish
community, and CBS could not
corroborate it by any newspaper
reports.
RABBI HARARI said that Wal-
lace reported that Syrian Jew*
are kept under close surveillance
because they are "suspect in
Syria as a possible fifth col-
umn."
The rabbi said. "The Syrian
authorities are obviously aware
that their Jewish citizens are in-
nocent scapegoats and that their
only crime is being Jewish."
Chandler in a letter to the com-.
mittee noted that Wallace "re-
ported in some detail on the dis-
criminatory restrictions against
Syrian Jews > .r. '(',0 Minutes.' He
Was not trying to justify Syrian
brutality !./ -e im-
pression that Syrian Jev
pect as a possible fifth column j
in Syria. He was reporting that
this is the belief of many Syrian
officials."
Chandler's letter sent Mar. 11
was an answer to n complaint
from the committee. But the
committee did not accept his ex
planation. and on Mar. 19 Iinbhi
Harari sent Salant a letter de-
claring that "We hold CBS News
responsible to retract the esplo
nage statement and to disnsso
elate itself from the other di.i
tortions on the above program
which were based on misinforma
tion by advising the public that
this does not represent the views
Of CBS News."
Rabbi Harari oncluded that
"This erroneous report has al
ready intensified the agony of
the Jews in Syria and jeopar-
dized the lives of those helpless
people."
MEANWHILE THE London
Daily Telegraph reported that
gangs of young Syrians invaded
the Jewish quarter of Damascus
last week and ransacked Jewish
homes. The Telegraph said that
eye-witnesses who returned to
Europe said they saw several
people injured and the contents
oi Jewish homes thrown into the
street. Syrian police were pres
ent but did not intervene to pro-
tect the victims of what was
called a "mini-pogrom."
Rahamim Sultan, a spokesman
for the Committee for Rescue of
Syrian Jewry, told the JTA that
this incident proves the harmful
effects of the distortion of the
"60 Minutes" show and demon-
strates once again that Jews are
not free and continue to be per-
secuted.
In another development, the
New York City Council has unan-
imously adopted a resolution urg-
ing Mayor Abraham Beame to
proclaim the week of Apr. 13 a*
"Rescue Syrian Jewry Week."
Meanwhile, the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations is continu-
ing its drive to gain one million
signatures on a petition urging
President Ford to intervene on
behalf of Syria's 4,500 Jews to
convince Syria to cease the
persecution of Jews and to al-
low them to emigrate.

Opti-Mrs. Club
.ent
-ion
J
Lunch Tuesday 4 ,
The Opti-Mrs Club of Miami
Beach will nold its monthly
luncheon meeting at noon Tues-
day at Oby's, 1850-79th Street
Cswy., North Bay Village.
Mrs. Jim Levenson, programW-'T
chairman, has planned an enter-
taining afternoon featuring the
"Musical Floridians." Their per-
formance will be narrated by
Mrs. Kaminsky.
The Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami
Beach raises funds to maintain
scholarships for emotionally dis-
turbed children. Mrs. William
Carmel is president.
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Cliliimin tl tht Stilt _
Everyone enjoys saving. But did
you ever think that saving is one of
life's more important duties? The
act of saving symbolizes putting
aside a part of one's own substance
for the future. And the future is
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Thrift is one of the sturdy virtues
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friends saving every day. One of
life's pleasantest duties. Open or
add to your account today. Put a
down payment on the future.
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*

i

/
*a
1
Friday, April 4, 1975
+Jewlst noridfiar
Page 9-A'
AT CJF QUARTERLY MEETING IN ATLANTA
Floridian Columnist Receives Nat'l. Award
ATLANTAJewish Floridian columnist Leo Mindlin
received the Boris Smolar Award for excellence in North
American Jewish Journalism in 1974 at special ceremonies
here.
Presentation was made at a banquet session of the
spring quarterly board of the Council of Jewish Federations
^lfare Funds.
re award to Mindlin was in the category for editorials
-sonal columns,
reiving awards in two
categories were Robert A.
Cohen, editor-in-chief of the St.
Louis Jewish Light; Gary Rosen-
blatt, assistant editor of the
Baltimore Jewish Times; and
Max W. Jacobs, international
correspondent for the Buffalo
Jewish Review.
ADDRESSING THE banquet
session here at the Fairmont Ho-
tel was Dr. Robert Pipes, of
Harvard University.
The CJF is the association of
central community organizations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in the
United States and Canada.
It aids these communities to
mobilize maximum support for
the UJA and other overseas agen-
cies as well as for major na-
tional and local services involv-
ing financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural .educational, community re-
tural, educational, community re-
fitting all residents.
In scheduling its quarterly
meetings in Atlanta, the CJF's
more than 40 nlanning sessions
were geared to provide particu-
larly for increased Involvement
on the part of a wider number of
communities in CJF's actions and
deliberations.
PARTICIPATING WERE more
than 200 representatives from
some 65 Jewish communities
throughout the United States and
Canada, with a large contingent
from the Southern region.
One highlight of the meet-
ings was a report on the present
status of community federated
campaigns which, as of the end of
February, raised almost S230 mil-
lion for local, national and world-
wide Jewish needs. A special
meeting of the Campaign Serv-
ices Committee focused on ex-
tending maximum momentum and
progress during the mid-season
phase cf the 1975 campaigns.
On two maior issues of deep
Federation concern considered by
the Community Planning Com-
mittee, the following actions
were taken: in the matter of
"Local Resettlement of Soviet
LEO .MINDLIN
Jews," the creation of a broad-
based national committee to in-
volve local Federation leadership
with key agencies (such as United
Hias Service, Jewish Welfare
Board, United Jewish Appeal.
Jewish Occupational Council. Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women)
was approved to coordinate serv-
ices, costs and staff, mobilize
volunteers, help in shaping com-
munity understanding: as well as
to refine the process of matching
job skills with local placements
for the newcomers, and to start
a process of "interpreting the
American and general Jewish
community" to them before they
leave Europe.
IN ITS review of the "Impact
of the Recession on Jewish Com-
munal Sei vices." Federations
were urged to seek out fresh
funding sources, in particular
governmental, and to be open to
more intensified service needs,
new clients and to maintain an
ongoing review of their agency's
programs.
Under the auspices of the Na-
tional Endowment Fund Com-
mittee, progress in finalizing the
Jewish Federation Pooled Income
Fund for long, range financing
was reported to community
leaders.
At the meeting of the Overseas
Services Committee. Max M.
Fisher, chairman ot the Jewish
Agency, Inc.. and I. L. Kenen.
chairman of the American Jew
i
I
Foreign Aid Bill
Includes Funds
For Israel Needs
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate Appropria
tions Committee approved a foreign aid bill, including
the Administration's request for $324.5 million in aid to
Israel after voting to restore the full $100 million spe-
cial fund to be used for Syria in the event of a new
agreement with Israel.
The Senate committee also restored a $366 million
cut from the total program by the House of Representa-
tives which approved a foreign aid bill on Mar. 13. The
cut did not affect aid to Israel.
THE COMMITTEE'S foreign operations subcommit-
tee had recommended $25 million for the program for
Syria, a recommendation the full committee rejected.
Many Senators said such a cut might be misinter-
preted as lack of support for Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's current Middle East mision.
The bill also provides $300 million in military aid
for Israel, of which $200 million is in credits. The com-
mittee also cut $15 million from the $40 million approv-
ed by the House to help Soviet Jewish refugees settle
in Israel. Included in the measure is $250 million in
economic aid for Egypt and $77 million for Jordan.
ish Public Affairs Committee, re-
viewed recent developments in
Jerusalem and Washington, with
Fisher reporting that the Agen-
cy's budget has had to be cut
from $750 million to $500 mil-
lion; also, the establishment of
a long-range planning committee
to evaluate its operations.
CONGRESSIONAL SUPPORT
for Israel remained "high," ac-
cording to Kenen. as well among
the general population; although
the attraction of business leader
to petrodollars and the power of
oil would continue to make it-
self felt.
The work of the Israel Task
Force of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council in making available posi-
tion papers, polls, media features,
radio and film materials, was
recognized as highlighting the
need for the continuation of such
an emergency program to serve
communities.
Other areas covered during the
four davs. inclusive 0f meetmgs
to deal with the special needs of
large, intermediate and small
cities, public relations, and Wom-
en's Communal Service, were:
A review of community ex-
periences and their response to
the draft guidelines by the CJF
Task Force on Federation-Syna-
gogue Relations was made; with
pilot liaison programs in the
area of youth services and family
counseling and the setting up of
local task forces being recom-
mended.
The Committee on Federa-
tion Planning for Jewish Educa-
tion, in its analysis of recently-
issued figures of Federation allo-
cations in the field in 1973. noted
that 93 communities reDorted a
high of $16 million in allocations
a 127 per cent increase since
1967. and a 12'.. per cent in-
crease over the Drior year; the
rate of increased allocations for
Jewish education running much
higher than for all local purpos-
es: and that a majority of its
subsidy funds are allocated to
day schools. Further progress in
shaping draft guidelines for Fed-
eration support of congregational
schools, was also made.
The role of fund-raising in
developing communal leaders,
plans for an international youth
leadership seminar in Israel this
summer and community experi-
ence in the use of a recent 'com-
mittee manual on Jewish identity
were among the agenda items at
the Committee on Leadership
Development session; capped
that evening with its traditional
dinner andservices, "Shabbaton,"
hosted by the Atlanta Federation
for nearly 100 delegates.
The rising number of ap-
plicants some 600 in 1974 as
against 200 at the outset in 1971
the current status of recruit-
ment, student field Dlacements,
standards and rising tuition
costs, in the CJF's widely ac-
claimed Federation Executive
Recruitment md Education Pro-
gram (FEREP) were the focus
of the Committee on Personnel
Services; also the development
of pension plan standards for
Federations.
HIGHLIGHTING THE Satur.
day evening board meeting pre-
ceding the award banquet were
project inns from Dr. David Si-
dorskv, professor of Philosophy,
Columbia, on "The American
Jewish CommunityIssues and
(>pportunities."
C1975 a J. Reynolds Tobacco Co

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oro
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Real tasteand real pleasure
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Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
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(FtC R'epwi OCT. '4 |


aJLjcivicl
Set,
wartz
You Can't Ignore That
Old Muscovite Joke
"|Y|Y FRIEND. Joe Shmatteh, said to me the
other day, "You know the Russian govern-
ment really loves the Jews. That is why they
don't want to allow them to emigrate. If they
didn't love them, why would they want them to
stay""
"Joe," I said, "you are a real statesman. You
have a real analytical mind. You should be Sec-
retary of State."
I GOT to thinking maybe there was some-
thing in it. though I tried to laugh it off at first.
In the course of history Jews have often
been denied admission to countries and have as
often been expelled. The most famous expulsion
was from Spain in 1492, the time when Columbus
left to discover America and a good many Jews
went to Brazil, and then to the land which
Columbus discovered.
When the Dutch were driven out from Bra-
zil the Jews also were expelled from that coun
try. They were expelled from other countries.
Russia is the only land outside of Egypt
which did not want the Jews to leave, but in
Egypt the Jews were slaves, so the opposition
was understandable, but in Russia the Jews are
not slaves.
IS MR. SHMATTEH right in his view that
the reason is that Russia loves the Jews too much
to see them leave?
There is another reason and it was given by
James P. Clarity, a New York newspaperman who
is now in Moscow. He tells what he calls is "the
CUrrenI joke in Moscow." to wit:
Mr. Brezhnev said to Mr. Rosy-gin, "If emi-
gration is relaxed as Jews demand, there won't
be anvone left in the country but you and me,
Alexie Nikolaevich," and 'Mr.' Kftsygln replied,
"Don't count on me, Leonid Ilyitch."
Russia fears if she permits Jews to emigrate,
other Russians will demand equal rights.
THIS LEADS to the question: Why is Russia
so afraid of people emigrating? Most countries
are worried about people coming in about
immigration, not emigration.
England didn't want to admit the Jews. Then
Manaiseh ben Israel came to Cromwell and point-
ed out to him that the Redemption, according to
the Bible, couldn't take place until Jews were
scattered all over the world and since there were
no Jews in England, by the denial of admission
to Jews, they were frustrating the coming of the
Ifogdantc neriod. So Cromwell admitted the Jews.
WHEN THE Quakers came to Massachusetts,
several of them were hung. When the first Jew-
ish settlers landed at New Amsterdam. Peter
Stuwesant, the Dutch governor, wanted to de-
port them and if he could have had his way, he
would also have deported the English.
Beniamin Franklin was a liberal man, and
he wanted an increased population but he was
very worried about the large German influx in
Pennsylvania.
Even today in America, many are worried
about hundreds of thousands of illegal immi-
grants entering the United States.
The worry is always about immigration
not emigration.
In Russia, the reverse seems to be true. We
have heard of no thousands trying to enter Rus-
sia. Russia is worried about departures.
What is the explanation? Does Russia fear
that little Israel may force it to some liberalizing?
You can't ignor the Moscow joke.
i?
,/
^Alrscrt

Jerusalem Puls (he Brakes
On Those Giant Bulldozers
Haifa
T^HIS IS "Historic Monuments Year" in Europe,
and a major campaign is under way seeking
to preserve old buildings because of their his-
toric, artistic or cultural value before the bull-
dozers of progress gobble up the old landmarks.
Jerusalem is one step ahead. The municipal
town planning department has drawn up a list
of 108 structures which have been marked for
preservation. In Israel there is already legislation
which adequately protects ancient sites.
INDEED EVEN the faintest suggestion that
antiquities have been found is sufficient cause to
bring about a halt to new construction or to
ploughing of a field. But what of structures whose
importance dates from more modern times?
The Jerusalem list constitutes almost a guide
book to little known sites of interest in the
capital city. The great majority of structures
have been chosen because of their unique archi-
tecture, though most of their glories are today
hidden behind clothes lines or unpruned trees.
ONLY THREE have been listed for historic
reasons alone: the wooden hut at 17 Alharizi St.,
which was the home of the second President,
Yitzhak Ben Zvi, and serves as Israel's counter-
part to the "log cabin": the building at 28 Ein
Geddi St., Talpiot, where Eliezer Ben Yehuda
lived during the period when he almost single-
handed brought about the revival of Hebrew as
a spoken tongue; the monument marking Gen.
Allenby's entrance into Jerusalem in 1917.
Some of the buildings slated for preservation
are well known and certainly in no immediate
danger of being razed. Among these are the
Rockefeller Museum, the Jewish Agency com-
pound. King David Hotel, the YMCA, Augusta
Victoria Hospital, the Hadassah Hospital on
Mount Scopus, and Hechal Shlomo, seat of the
Chief Rabbinate.
THERE IS marked contrast between the orig-
inal functions of the older buildings and the use
to which they are being put today. Does the staff
of the Israel Broadcasting Service ever consider
that the stone walls of their offices once looked
down upon the Empress of Ethiopia?
The neo-classical structure on Queen Helena
Street was put up in the 1930's to house the
Empress when she and Haile Selassie were refu-
gees from Italian conquest.
The three-story building at 28 Shivtei Israel St.
resembles the ancient palace in Florence, with
its neo-renaissance style. For many years it was
the Italian Hospital.
The German-style building at 42 Street of the
Prophets has an historic claim, in addition to its
architecture, in that it was here that Kaiser Wil-
helm met Theodor Herzl in 1898. Today it is an
ORT School.
Friday, April 4, 1975 lenisti ftorkllar) Page 10-A
J3cn
K-jallob
n
Jews Get
Synagogue
>]
Street
rpHE 87 JEWS, military and civilian, stationed on tiny Kwajalein
1 in the Marshall Islands, have acquired a synagogue. Their house ^
of worship, according to Chaplain John J. Rosenblatt, is a "^Kf Miami
trailer, with air conditioning, a kosher kitchen, three classrA monthly
and a chapel area with 55 seats. ^oon Tues-
Rabbi Rosenblatt serves as supervisory chaplain of the Kv
jalein Missile Range Jewish Center, in addition to his duties as
Armed Forces Jewish Chaplain for the Mid-Pacific.
CHAPLAIN ROSENBLATT is stationed in Hawaii. Kwajalein,
site of savage fighting in the Pacific theater of World War II, is
currently a ballistic missile testing site under direction of the U.S.
Army.
The chaplain, in a report issued by the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board, said engineers and scientists come with their families
to the tiny atoll for contract tours that can last as long as ten years.
Currently, he reported, the Kwajalein Jews take part in Sabbath
evening worship, religious school for their children and adult edu-
cation programs for themselves.
HE REPORTED that, for many years, the Kwajalein Jewish
contingent lacked a center. The one chapel on the atoll was built
as a church for Christian worship. The KMR Jewish Center was
the dream of Melvin Winderman, a Jewish military lay leader ac-
credited by the JWB.
The chaplain reported that the dream was born three years
ago when he conducted Kwajalein'? first Bar Mitzvah. That was
followed by a traditional wedding of an Israel couple, who asked
that the ceremony be done completely in Hebrew.
IN THE absence of a synagogue, the ceremony was held out-
doors, as was the traditional wedding meal. The chupah. made from
palm branches, was later used for a communal sukkah.
The chaplain reported that, since the dedication of the KMR
Jewish Center, many non-Jewish residents on the atoll have at-
tended Jewish functions to sec for the first time in their lives,
how their Jewish co-workers celebrate their religious traditions.
He al?o said many of the non-Jews helped to decorate and fix up
the Jewish Center.
Chaplain Rosenblatt said he felt that the future of Jewish life
and of the KMR Jewish community depended on the quality of its
lay leadership.
HE REPORTED it took him more than a year to f;nd Wind-
erman, an X-ray technician, to be the Jewish "community's" lay
leader. He added that he had recognized in Winderimn "a pro-
found respect for the office of the rabbi and a desire no4 M play
the role of rabbi."
He credited the success of the KMR Jewish program to the
maintenance of "a clear channel of communication b 't'v n the
lay leader and the military' rabbi." separated by the mire than
3.000 miles between Kwajalein and Hawaii.
The chaplain contended that every Jewish la !<9d
such unusual circumstances as Kwajalein. c<
story" if he was willing to start his work ,ith >
educational programs for Jews both yottn*! I..... I,
HE REPORTED that Winderma". < talented
young Jews, who brought with them to Kwai 1 ;" | o I bai ker >unds
from their home communities, and put them ta work as teachers
and program resource people.
The chaplain also reported that, in addition to providing pro-
gram materials, the JWB gave the Kwajalein program its endorse-
ment, which made the work of the Jewish group official in the
eyes of the military, which is accustomed to work with an organ-
ized group that takes responsibility for religious leadership.
WINDERMAN, in a letter to the JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, described the structure of the tiny community. He
said he had organized an advisory committee with a president,
secretary and treasurer and planning and education committees.
He has designated congregation members for specific duties,
such as an Oneg chairman and a Hebrew teacher. Stan Krieger, the
president, is well educated in Hebrew and teaches beginning He-
brew to older children and adults, according to Winderman.
HE REPORTED that a Sunday school was being organized
for the young children where older girls will teach Jewish culture
to the young. He has a welcome committee, which welcomes Jew-
ish newcomers to the atoll and invites them to join the community.
e~en in
" > 'iccess
format of


.
Goldie Hawn Stars in Chronology Detailing Decadence of Our Time
Hollywood
QOLDIE HAWN, a nice Jewish girl from Washing-
ton, D.C., who made her debut in television's
"Laugh-In" and won an Academy Award for her very
first feature screen role, "Cactus Flower," renders a
down to-earth performance as a precocious youngster
in the current Warren Beatty movie, "Shampoo," look-
ing like a 17-year-old though she is past 29.
Goldie is the only humanly warm character in a
picture filled to the brim with caricatures.
"Shampoo'' is a chronology of decadence in today's
society and a unique summary of obscenities reflecting
the complete breakdown of morality among the idle
rich and their hangers-on in Hollywood and elsewhere.
WARREN BEATTY, the star, triples as co-author
and producer, and portrays the central character of a
JCuft
**T~- *' '^\

n
Beverly Hills beautician, a virile type among a motley
crowd of sissies in the trite atmosphere of a mundane
hair dressing salon favored by show biz personalities.
We are on the eve of the presidential election of
1968, and the shenanigans among the mortals in front
of the cameras, their banalities, and flippant platitudes,
are matched, if not outdone, by pompous victory state-
ments of Messrs. Nixon and Agnew popping out from
the TV set on screen.
THE SATIRICAL yarn, written by Robert Towne
in collaboration with Beatty, culminates with a "bistro"
election campaign party, highlighted by Julie Christie's
crawling under the dinner table for some naughty off-
screen manipulations.
( Towne, whom we interviewed for JTA when
Chinatown" opened in Los Angeles, meanwhile was
nominated for an Academy Award for that earlier
movie.
There are two fine performers in "Shampoo" who
also happen to be Jewish. Jack Warden and Lee Grant
who appear as husband and wife constantly at each
others throats, somehow.as a grim reminder not to
get married.
n
(
ier

n
.ecli
presid
Revii
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ly, April 4, 1975
*Jenisti nurUBafl
Page 11-A
[Kissinger
Needs
revaluation
J-OR^ThJi Jewish, Floridian:
|ere has been a great deal of
and extravagant praise lav-
Shed upon Dr. Kissinger. History
|ay have to wait before passing
[it on his accomplish-
must not forget thai
legacy of ex-President
i'ho-" administration was
st corrupt and costly in
rican history. During all the
Is and tribulations of that ad
stration Dr. Kissinger kept
mouth shut.
was recently learned that Dr.
fcinaer acted as head of the
bmmitter of 40" which con-
lied the activities of the CIA.
tHIS COMMITTEE is being
responsible for disorganiz-
[ the Chile government and the
rder of President Allende.
MM
WBWBfCTBHMW
I OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Tliy Worit Be Brief
KoheUth (EccletUuta)
ncm .:
iraaoiou
singer is certainly not entitled
Ian accolade for this outrage-
Is act which has resulted in an
ressive. dictatorial govern-
Int in Chile.
Sissinger claims credit for
nging "peace" to Vietnam,
now know that this is not
le. Fighting continues in that
Ifortunate country.
Vietnam is a war that won't go
lay. It was and still is a civil
ai ten thousand miles from our
ores. It cost our nation the
es of 50,000 young men and
0.000 injured, at an expense of
liSO billion.
[KISSINGER ALSO succeeded
: establishing a detente between
ussia and the U.S. There are
iany indications now that this
letente is only a sham and a
noc-kery.
In the Yom Kippur War, Gen.
baron's division turned what
oked like a horrible defeat for
rael into a victory by complete-
surrounding the Egyptian
kird Army of 20,000 soldiers.
js clearing 'he road to Damas-
b and Cairo. This might have
lilted in the capture of these
capitals ending in favorable
otiations and perhaps the end
lthe war.
The pressure on Israel to ac-
bt a ceasefire by the unscrupu-
bs dictator Brehzncv. our high-
[praised Secretary of State Kis-
iger, and our besmirched ex-
fesident Nixon, will go down in
Jierican history as a disgrace-
f, reprehensible betrayal of Is-
fel by men devoid of ethics, in-
brity and morality.
DR. KANNON SHEINMAN
Miami Beach
ft ft ft
JMTOR, The Jewish Floridian:
fl wa_s happy to note that Rabbi
ephen S. Wise was featured in
he "Great Jewish Personalities"
iumn of The Jewish Floridian
^Mar. 14.
[l read the article, written by
bbi Barry Altman, of Temple
eth Am, with great interest.
|ut 1 was taken aback to find no
pention of Rabbi Wise's invofve-
Bent with the American Jewish
ongress and World Jewish Con-
fess.
Rabbi Wise was proud to have
en the founder of these or-
inizations, and they were the
licle through which his be-
and principles were trans-
^ into action programs.
MYRIAM WOLF, President
Florida Women's Division
American Jewish Congress
A GIFT FOR OUR SUBSCRIBERS
ENJOY THIS SPECIAL GIFT OFFER
FROM THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
I Current Subscriber:
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one of the original "Seven Dead Sea Scrolls"
exhibited in the "Shrine of the Book" Museum,
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L,
J


Page 12-A
<*Je*ishnuridic*ri
Friday, April 4, 1975
c
h
t<
h
r<
w
Y
Pi
G>
lh
LEO MINDLIN
What If Israel Shunned Talks at Geneva?

,1
Continue*! from PistfeM-A''
say poisoning of Israel drop by
drop, to avoid the participation
of the meddlesome Russians.
FOR THE United States. Gene-
va now means the reality of the
meddlesome Russians ridine at
full tilt toward greater influence
in the Middle East.
As we Dursue our own interests
at Geneva, the Israelis will have
to keer> asking themselves how
they can avoid execution there
of whatever brandor whether
the Americans, finally weary of
the whole camoai^n. will eive in
to the ex-cut loners al'ogether as
they arc doing in Southeast Asia.
The only way for Israel to out-
wit her obvious fate at Geneva
is by simply refusing to attend
in the same wav that she avoided
the iethM possibilities of the Kis-
singer formula by simply saying
"no" to i
WHAT IT comes down to is
the reaction of the United States.
Take Gerald Ford, that incalcul-
ably valuable UJA and Israel
Bond performer of two years ago.
He has already let us know in
no uncertain terms that his pa-
tience is running short with the
"intransigent" Israelis.
And where did he get his im-
patience fr:>m? Well. NBC-TV
newsman Richard Valeriani un-
nslv let the cat out of the
bag following Dr. Kissina'T's
pre-s conference at the State De-
partment, la=t week.
Opined Valeriani: One would
think that the problems still out-
standing between Israel and the
Arabs the Arab refugees, the
role of the Palestine Liberation
Organisation in the drive toward
establishing still r.nother Arab
state, the status of Jerusalem
all these are "easily" capable-of
reconciliation given the will to
reconcile them.
BUT, CONCLUDED Valeriani,
the Israelis were "stubborn."
Over a few kilometers of Sinai
sand, meaning whether they with-
drew from Gidi and Mitla accord-
ing to Plan A rather than Plan
B. the I-raelis sank Dr. Kissin-
ger's effort, and hence all hopes
for peace in the Middle East
based on moderation.
In Valeriani s view, then, the
Kissinger mission failed because
of Israel's undiminished need to
dictate her boundary linesnot
because of Egypt s refusal to dis-
avow bt-lliserency.
But Valeriani was on the Kis-
singer plane returning from the
Middle East, and on that unhap-
py flight Kissinger raved and
ranted, according to private but
well-founded reports, about Is-
raeli "intransigence" and "trucu-
lence." (The "few lousy kilom-
eters" theme, which except for
the "lousy," Valeriani harped
upon in his post-news conference
analysis, bears the Kissinger
thumprint from the days imme-
diately following the Yom Kip-
pur War. when Egyptian and Is-
raeli officers were locked in ne-
gotiations in a tent at Km. 101,
and Kissinger was critical of Is-
rael's slew pace.)
SO THAT it wasn't Valeriani
saying what he said after the Kis-
sincer press conference. It was
Valeriani saying what Kissinger
sai! on the plane back from Jeru-
salem.
Ditto for Gerald Ford, that wit,
(that savant, whose impatience
a'.so is Kissinger's.
Add to this Nelson Rockefel
lcr, interviewed on Air force
- Two on hls'WtUrn flight fromtfce
Faisal funeral and the Vice
President's talks with Anwar
Sadat.
The Arabs, he was surprised to
discover, were not as pessimistic
as he expected despite those
nasty old Israelis. They were still
hopeful, the petrobillionaire
would have us know in a message
from his fellow-petrobillionaires.
THEN TO retuoi to the origi-
nal thesis: Suppose they gave
Geneva, and Israel didn't attend?
After all, the Ford-Kissinger
impatience with an "intransi-
gent" and "stubborn" Israel is all
the scenario the Russians and
Arabs need to be stubborn and
intransigent in equal and oppo-
site directions. Why should Is-
rael attend?
Would the United States join
the Soviets, the only bargainer
that really counts, in punishing
Israel? That depends upon what
one means by punishment.
Even given the growing sense
of isolationism seizir.T the
American Congress, and particu-
larly with respect to Israel the
palpable development of anti-Is- i
rael feeling based on the real-1
politik of oil and expressed in
classical anti-Semitic terms. I can
not conceive of a cut-off imposed
on Israel in the same way that
the Congress is imposing a cut-
off on Southeast Asia.
MOST PEOPLE may not under-
stand- the -subtle distinction be-
tween Maoism and Muscovite
Communism, but they know as a
practical matter that what is at
stake in the Middle East is the
ascendancy of the latter, not the
former.
(That is why we are abandon-
ing Southeast Asia, which is fall-
ing victim to the formerthe Ma-
oists. Not only do we not popu-
larly understand that each is
equally dangerous, but in fact the
legacy of the Nixon years is that
we have come to regard the Ma-
oists as the latter-day Noble Sav-
age undeserving of the reserve
between ourselves and the Mus-
covites. In fact, detente with th"
Maoists is part of what the Ford
administration sees as unfinished
business to which he must get
down quickly if only those
damned Israelis would do just
exactly what Kissinger tells them
to.)
Furthermore, a diminished and
mortally-threatened Israel would
be a greater danger to Europe
)
than any single selfish inwardly-
turned European nation, includ-
ing the elegant French, can pos-
sibly imagine at this time.
AND ALTHOUGH some Euro-
peans may prefer to see the U.S.
out of Europe, it is a matter of
American-security that at least
some U.S. presence in Europe
NOT be killed. Israel is a major
factor in this regard. f
There is, of course, always the*
tax-exempt status of UJA against uy
which the Congress can turn, but a be
that kind of blackmail would ara
work in too many non-Jewish di- e-
rcctions as well, and could hard-
ly get off the ground short of the .^
emergence of a frank, selective
political American anti-Semitism.
In sum, for America to join
Ri> ia in punishing Israel under
any circumstances would be for
America to punish America, as
well, although that viewpoint may
not be eminently clear in the be-
fogged American congressional
consciousness yet.
Hence, Israel might well con-
ceive of ignoring Geneva. The
Romans may have already staked -
out the arena, and may indeed
have their well-oiled lions at the
ready, but at least for the mo-
ment the necessity for Israel t
submit to being eaten is less ur- y
gent than we may think. |,
mm
660 N.W. 119th STREET
MARTHA E. BARNES
688-0663 or 688-8000
SALCS AND SERVICE
% Ford Sent Sharp
!# Letter to Rabin
JERUSALEM(JTA)Israeli.
newspapers reported here that
President Ford sent a sharp let-
ter to Premier Yitzhak Rabin in
which he rebuked Israel for tak-
ing too hard a line in the nego-
tiations with Egypt being con-
ducted by Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissing-r and warned
that the U.S. would hold Israel
responsible for failure of the
talks and would have to recon
sider its relations with Israel.
Rabin acknowledged that he
had recived a letter from Ford
but refused to divulce it= con-
tent* on the basis of the "spc-b!
relationship" between the U.S.
and Israel.
HOWEVER. Rabin insisted a*
a press confrence here that
description* of t^e let'er bv th"
news media were exaggerated
and distorted.
According to I raeli news-
paper*. Ford's not", reived d-ir-
ing 15 hours of n-arathon de'ib |
erations bv the Cabinet, shocked
and angered th? ministers.
The newspapers alleged that
the Presidential note was dis-
patched to Jerusalem at the sne '
cific reoue-t of Kissingr after
the latter reported to Ford on
the hard line takn bv President!
Anwar Sadat at Aswan.
Kissineer admitted that he had
initiated the President's note. |
but the text of it a-o8renMv was
rtronaer than he had anti<-^atd.
tb* Twil1 nom-nqner' claimed, j
THE WHITE House has refus-
ed to confirm or d"nv t*" report i
that R>'n slron'v ureed |
by th" White Ho-se to <-how more
flexibility in dealing with the ao-
proaeh to the second-stage ne-
gotiatjp" effort.
A White Houe spokesman
said that "we don't normally dis-
cuss diplomatic exchanges."
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[April 4, 1975
+Jewist fh>ridi&n
Page 13-A
'EC Paying Mag for Favorable Articles?
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
VSHLNGTON(JTA) The Organization of Petrole-
kporting Countries (OPEC) is'considering paying
fs Digest to publish sympathetic articles and accept-
'cold turkey1*" Offer from a New York "advertising
to bring OPEC's "message" to "the American peo-
Iccording to Business Week.
editorial entitled A_, _
OPhC document were strictly
paid advertising, not editorial
material.
ONE OF the Digest repres-
litza, is quoted by Business,
Veek as Saying the Digest team
an
t Backlash in Con-
5usiness Week said that
stration officials fear
painting anti-Arab senti-
ICongress will make new
lor legislation dealing
de or foreign investment
L'nited States."
entatives at the Vienna session,
European director John D. Pa-
nit
\V.
went to great lengths to explain
\k\c> difference between adver-
tising and editorial content to
the OPKC group.
"If the oil group is confused
about what is or is not paid ad-
vertising, it is not apparent from
the rest of the report," Business
Week emphasized. Part of the
report discusses a letter re-
ceived by OPEC from PKL Ad-
vertising inc.. New York, whkh
proposed an advertising cam-
paign in television, news week-
lies, newspapers- and radio, that,
the agent was q'jo'ed by Busi-
ness Week as saying, "guaran-
tees that the campaign will
reach 95 per cent of adult Amer-
icans over and over again
throughout 1975."
THE LETTER suggested,
Business Week reported, that
mounting the campaign would
cost less than fl| Jntllion."
John Shims, PKL's president,
the magazine said, had confirm-
ed he wrote to OPEC "cold
turkey" to offer his services.
(.>Pt.C will consider the offers
at its June meeting in Gabon.
IRS Aiming at Ex-Nazis
Continued from Page 1-A
MAGAZINE pointed out
nemlments are sprouting
commercial deals with tlQn of the Hcuse Judiciary Committee. Chapman replied
Is that participate against that of 89 cases that the INS had begun, 33 remain on the
knpanies vith Jewish in- .:. i j ., v. .. ,,
active list and 'we have it at the highest priority.
o\> Senate aide is quoted
When Eilberg noted that more than a year has passed
usinesa Week editorial since more active investigation had been urged in Con-
that "people are real.y _., 7 ,
brer the blacklist. gi'ess, Chapman promised he would put more investigators j
to work on the cases.
|s the Arabs renounce
uist, pressure for Con-
il repi Isal may grow ir-
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although "State and
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pe best way to handle
p!em is through quiet
news article on OPKC
n Improve Its Image In
Business Week report-
Mar. 24 issue that an
Iport it obtained showed
ee editorial and adver-
representatives from
Digest met OPKC of-
Vienna Jan. 17 to dis-
canipaign.
a^old chief M. O. Feyide,
sup's secretary general,
fom Nigeria," the maga-
that "a suitable pro
kuld cost anywhere from
Illion to $4.58 million,
on the length of the
Hid the number of in-
iw York, according to
Week, the managing
Readers Digest. Ed-
riiom: son. said that tie
mentioned in the
nners Announced
yee Art Exhibit
inners in the first Wash-
deral cmDloyce art ex-
at the savinfs and loan
i's North Miami Beach
ere Pasillio S. Munoz,
for ab tract oil paint-
hael Krasner, second
photography, and Bar-
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act design.
were selected from
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Addreii.
City-------
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Page 14-A
fJenist n-cricfiar
II
Friday, April 4, 1975
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL N0TIC8
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 74-35213
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
IN KK
The Matter of the Adootlon of
JASON GREGORY RURSTEIN
TO: John Doe
Residence unknown
gAddrest unknon "
You. th- unnamed father of a white
male Infant born out of wedUn-i to
JULIE l.YNN McGOI.DRICK at Doc-
tor's Hospital in Lakew.....I, Loa An-
geles. California on the i"iii day of
November. 1974 are hereby notified
that a Decree of Adoption will be
finalized In the above i "curl :liul
Petitioners. JACK BVRSTE1N and
GILA* Rl'RSTIN. his wife Will be
awarded permanent ustodv of said
minor child and the adoption finalised
unless you present. In writing an An-
swer or objections to show cause why
said Petition should not be granted,
on ROBERT H. BURNS, ESQUIRE
attorney for Petitioners, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Bond. Suite 450.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139. and file
the original in the office of the Clerk
Of the Circuit Court in and for Dade
County. Florida, on or before the 23
day of April. 1975
HEKIN FAIL NOT or a Default will
be entered against vou.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and official seal
of said Court this 17th dav of March.
1975. at Dade County. Florida.
RICHARD BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv L. SNEEDEN
As Denutv Clerk
ROBERT H. BURNS BSOl IKE
420 LJncoln Road. Suite 450
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioners
3/21-28 4/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of CHARLIES Al'TO PARTS at 7070
S.W. 12th Street. Miami. Florida 33144
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv Florida.
Charlie's Auto Parts & Service Co..
A Florida corporation bv J. Posner.
President
Nelson & Feldman
1135 Kane Concourse. Miami. Fla.
Attorneys for Applicant
3/14-21-28 4/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
lamed, desiring to engage
i ,-. under the flctlUous name
I rft 16400 N.W. l"th
Avenue. Miami. Florida Intends to
i. ,- ,ii aaiu names >t.'i the c'-rk "t
thi Circuit Court of Dads County,
la.
Fontaala im-
Bv: Jack W I'.eiff
VU e I'leMiie.ili
ri v i. u E'ss
Attorney for Fontaala. Inc.
.1 14-21-28 4/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-35849
CENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GEORGE ALCE.
Husband. Petitioner
MERITTA AI-CINNA ALCE.
Wife. Respondent
TO: MERITTA A LOIN A ALCE
(residence unknown I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reauired to serve a coov of
vour written defenses If any. to It on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1005 Congresa
Building. Ill N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33132. and file the original
with the clerk of the above stvled
court on or before April 18. 197.">:
Otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the comnlaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.OR1DIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami Florida on flits
II dav of March. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv C. P. COPELAND
na Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES
DANIEL BETTER
I(i02-l"(i5 Congress. Building
III N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33132
Attorney for Petitioner
3/14-21-28 4/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-7491
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONARD M. FISCHER.
Husband-Petitioner
and
ESTA FISCHER.
WI f e-Respondent
TO: ESTA FISCHER
59 Preston Road
Colonia. New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of voui
Marriage has been filed and com-
menced in this Court, and vou are
reoulred to serve a copy of your writ-
ten answer and defenses, if any. to
it on ROGER (I 8TANWAT, Attorney
for the Husband-Petitioner, at 2640
Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood.
Florida, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above stvled Court on or
before April 18th. 1975: otherwise a
default will be entered for the relief
prayed for in said Petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in the JEWISH FU1KIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court In Miami. Florida, on this
6th dav of March. 1975.
CLERK OP CIRl I IT COURT
Dade Countv. Florida
l.v: MARION NEWMAN
AS DEPUTY CLERK
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROGERG 8TANWAT. ESQ.
Attorney for Husband
204(1 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 18090
92:>-3358
3'14-21-28 4-'4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COUIT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-7442
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
N RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
RICHARD GIBSON. Petitioner.
and
SHIRLEY ANN GIBSON. Respondent.
TO: Mrs. Shirley Ann Gibson
12886 Fielding Street
Detroit. Michigan
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reauired to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to it on
DAVID E. STONE, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is l"l N.W. LI
. Avenue Miami. Florida .MIL'S. (3051
324-4555. and file the original with th
clerk of the above stvled court on or
before 18th April. 1975: otherwise a
default will he entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand arid the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on thia
6th dav of March. 197?
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florid.,
Bv MARION NEWMAN
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David E. Stone, Esouire
101 N.W. 12 Avenue
Miami Florida 33128 (324-4555)
Attorney for Petitioner
i 14-n-n 4/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Hector Auto Paint at 4499 E. 10th
Ave.. Hlaleah. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv Florida.
Hector C. Bergnes
8/21-28 4/4-11
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-8066
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
AUGUSTO DOMINGO CASAMAY'OR
Pet l 'oner-Husband,
vs.
ZUCEL CHACON REY'ES
CASAMAYOR
Respondent-Wife.
You. ZUCEL CHACON REYES CA-
SAMAY'OR. are hereby notified to
serve a coov of vour Answer to the
Dissolution of Marriage filed against
vou. unon husband's attorney. GEOR-
GE NICHOLAS ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136. and
file original with Clerk of Court on or
before April 18. 1975: otherwise the
Petition will be confessed bv vou
Dated this 12'h dav of March. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER CLERK
By: MARION NEWMAN
Denutv Clerk
8/14-21-88 4'4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
ii- aa under the fictitious name of
I.A.T, a< B800 South Dadeland Blvd..
Bulte 217. Miami. Florida 88166 in-
tends i i register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County Florida.
Oscar Ivan Pezet, Owner
88 4/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the flctitioua name of
AARoN WINDOW A; SCREEN COM-
PANY at Bulte 512 480 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach 33139 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
NORMAN .1. SCHUI MAN.
SI ILE OWNER
PAUL KWITNEY
Itl rncv for Annlicant
Kwltnev, Kroop & Schelnberg. PA
480 Lincoln (load, Miami Reach .13139
8/21-28 4/4-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-8153
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
.MARIA ANTONIA BONILLA.
Wife
and
It/tKCtMJ RON1LI.A
Husband
To MARCIAL BONILLA
Residence and Address
Unknown _
You ark HEREBY WOTIFTED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
vou are reauired to serve u coov of
vour written defenses. If anv. to it
on IXH'IS R. HELLER, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road. Miami Beach Florida
33139. and file the original with the
clerk of the above stvled court on or
before April 25. 1975; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
Witness mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
12th dav of March. 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk. Cirrcuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv A D. WADB
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court 8eal>
LOUIS R. BELLER. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
3/21-28 4/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious names
Of Magazine. Bulletin CONTACTO,
Revista. Boletin CONTACTO at 2480
N W. 7th Street. Miami. Florida 33125
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Rev. Martin Anorga
8/81-'a 4/4-H
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 757261
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE MATTER OF THE
ADOPTION BY:
ROBERT EDWARD HIRSCHFIELD.
TO: SHELDON ZILBERT
a/k/a SHELDON R. ZILBERT
Number One Gold Street
Hartford. Connecticut.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition For Adontion has
been filed and vou are hereby reauir-
ed to serve a codv of vour answer if
any. to the Petition on the Petition-
er's Attorney. GEORGE J. TALIA-
NOFF. 420 Lincoln Road. Miami
Beach. Florida. 33139. on or before
the 16th dav of AdHI 1975 and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on the Pe-
titioner's Attorney or immediately
thereafter: otherwise a iudgmem will
be entered granting the adoption
WITNESS mv hand and the seal ,.f
said Court at Miami. Bade County.
Florida, on this 5 dav of March. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
Bv: I. SNEEDEN
Deuutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
3/14-21-28
4/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTH'E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Jewel J at 16400 N.W. 15th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida.
William Schneider Inc
Bv: Merman .1 Ranoanort
Vice President
ROY I. WEISS
Attorney for William Schneider Inc.
.'! 14-21-28 4/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the flctitioua name ,f
PRODUCTOS MORA at 8828 N.W.
22th Avenue Miami. Florida 88142 in-
tends to legist.-t said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Lountv. Florida
F A Mora
3 81-88 4/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engaire :n
business under the fictitious name ,,f
FRANK CASH AND ASSOCIATES at
11461 South Dixie Highway. Miami.
Florida intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida
y.wcy mae ENTERPRISES, inc.
MARVIN & SHEPPARD
Attorneys for Applicant
9160 S W *7th Avenue. Suite 103
Miami Florida 33176
3/21-28 4/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Angel Auto Repair at 1014 West
23rd Si Hlaleah 88010 intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the circuit Court of Dado County.
Florida.
Angel Gutlerre*
owner
_________________ 3 28 4/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NuTire IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the untlersigireA. dVslrlng : to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of CUNICA VETER1NARIA 1-ATINA
at 72IH S W. Mh Street. Miami in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
JUAN B. BROUWER D.V.M. M.D.
3/28 4/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of Zena Optical. Inc. & D'luxe Op-
tical at 8738 S.W. 24th Street. Miami.
Florida 33165 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ERNESTO LOPEZ
ZENALDA LOPEZ
Owners
___________________3/28 4/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Montero Furniture at 4703 S.W.
8th Street. Miami 33134 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Rigoberto Montero
Owner
________________ 3 2S 4/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PRODUCTOS "MORA" at 8886
N.W. 22nd Avenue. AptO, Four. Miami.
Florida 33142 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court "I Made Countv. Florida.
Dr Francisco Antonio Mora y Mendes
Owner
___________________8 /28 4/4 -11 -1S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-948
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage t >f
VEBERT PHILISTIM. husband
and RAYMONDE JEAN-BAPTISTE.
PHILISTIM. wife.
TO: RAYMONDE JEAN-BAPTISTE
PHILISTIM
P.O. Box 2465
Freeport. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marrtag*
has been filed against you and you
are hereby reuuired to serve a copy
of your answer or other pleading to
the Petition on the husband's Attor-
ney. LESTER ROGERS, whose ad-
dress is 1454 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami
Florida 33125. and file the original
with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 2nd day of
May. 1975, or a Default will be en-
tered against you.
DATED this 24th day of March.
1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv S JAFPE
______________3 88 __4/4-11-18
NOTICE U,*DER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY 01VEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS &
ELECTRONICS, INC at 2780 s w
26th Street, Miami. Florida 13186 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Julie Fernandes
B W 86th St Miami Fla -3I35
3 88 4 4-11-1S
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-9478
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Maniac,, of
JESUS 'ABALLBRO,
Husband.
CARMEN M. CA BALI.FRO.
\\ He
To: CARMEN M CA BA I.I.ERO
mis West End Avenue. Ant. 908
New York. New York 10025
YOV ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reuuired to aerve a copy of
your written defenses. If any to It on
JERRY A. BURNS, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 908 City
National Bank Building Miami. Flor-
ida 33130 and file the original with
the clerk of the above stvled court on
or before May 2. 1975-: otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeka
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
24th dav of March. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WILLIE BRADSHAW. JR.
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JERRY A. BURNS
908 City National Bank Building
25 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
3/28 4/4-11-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE.
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-9204
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PHILIP 8PARACIO.
Petitioner.
and
VIRGINIA SPARACIO.
Respondent.
TO: Virginia Snaracio
25 Wheatfleld Lane
Commack. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reauired to serve a cony of
your written defenses, if any to It on.
Zeiger. Leef & Zeiger. Esas.. Att:
Mitchell S. Zeiger. Esq.. attorney for
Petitioner whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before April 28. 1975: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published on.ee
each week for four consecutive weeka
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
20th dav of March 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By R. E. SHEA
As Denutv Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
Zeiger, Leef & Zeiger. Esas.
Mitchell S Zeiger, Baa.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitlo
3 25 4/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to em:.,,;,,
in business under tin- fli titious name
of Sam Pan Take >ut at 6504 N.W,
72nd Av, nue, Miami F a I 1166 In-
;. .i- to register laid i ante with the
Clerl the < '.: ult Court of Dade
Countv, Florida
Willie ii Chin owner
Leoi ,"i ii Wolf, o Wolf &
Schoi Inger
9300 So, Dadeland Blvd.. Miami 33156
Attorney for Applicant
4/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-7509
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
! Re The Miu-1-iage Of
YOLMABIE FERNANDEZ. Wife
and CTRO A. FERNANDEZ.
Husband
TO: CIRC A. FERNANDEZ
Carrera 52 No. 79-111
Ant 4A
Barranouilla. Colombia.
South America
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against >ou and vou are
hereby reauired to serve a coov of
vour answer or other Dleading to the
Petition on the Wife's Attorney LES-
TER ROGERS, whose address is 1454
N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida J3125.
and file the original with the Clerk of
the above stvled Court on or before
this 18th dav of April. 1975. or a De-
fault will be entered against vou.
DATED this 6th ijav of March. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By MARION NEWMAN
3/14-21-28 4/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL ClHCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-7737
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARTHA L. GITTER
Deceased,
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID
DECEDENT.
You are hereby notified that a writ-
ten instrument purporting to be the
last will and testament of said dece-
dent has been admitted to probate
in said Court. You are hereby com-
manded within six calendar months
from the date of the first publication
of this notice to appear in said Court
and show cause. If anv vou can. why
the action of said Court in admitting
said will to probate should not stand
unrevoked.
JOSEPH NESBITT
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
Bv CHARLOTTE W. GIRARD
Denutv Clerk
MELVIN E. WEINSTEIN. Esaulre
Attorney for the Estate of Martha
L. (litter. Deceased
FROM BERG. FROMBERG
& ROTH. PA.
2100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Suite 301
Hallandale. Florida 33009
First publication of this notice
the 14 dav of March. 1975.
(Circuit Court Seal)
8/14-21-28 4/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-9524
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOSEPH RAIJ?H BRANDON,
Husband,
and
TAMALA JEAN BRANDON.
Wife.
TO: TAMALA JEAN BRANDON
745 Walnut Street
Waukegan. Illinois
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has "been filed against vou and
you are reauired to serve a copy of
SiiTiJiC1.1!!" defenses, if any to it on
FRANKLIN D. KRBUTER attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 3041
"cm ,th,sJ.reet T Suite 10 Miami.
','KldtV 331,5\ an^ "e lhe original
with the clerk of the above stvled
court on or before May 2. 1975: other-
wise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive veeki
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
24th dav of March. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By A D. WADE
._. As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
e!.$u,Kre'N d kreutzer.
.' **.*& 7th StreetSuite 100
Miami. Florida 33126
-At.,orney for Petitioner
(305) 541-2506
1/28 4/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-9658
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Maniac,. ,,f:
WILLIAM BOBO Petitioner.
and
MARIA DuLE8 NIEVESA
HERNANDEZ BOBO,
Respondent,
TO: .MARIA DuLES NIEVESA
HERNANDEZ BOBO
Celle 17. Central Casa 030
Zone No. 1
P llama City, Panama
Central Amerli a
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
tli tl Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
rlage has been filed against you and
you are reauired to m i opy of
your written defense to it. If any.
ui.n STEPHEN L RASKIN, 7200
Bud Road. Miami. Florida 33155 aa
attorney for the Petition, on or before
May 8, 1976, and file the original with
the Clerk of (his Court either before
on Petitioner'! attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
V\ II N ESS mv hand and seal of thia
Court on March 25. 1973
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of Said Court
Bv C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
______________3,28 4/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE DIVISION
No. 75-1883
J. GWYNN PARKER
In RE: Estate of
JUAN F. MBNA
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
i'. late
You are hereby notified and re-
auired to present anv claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of Juan F. Mena deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
Circuit Court of Dade County, and file
the same in duplicate and as provided
in Section 733.16 Florida Statutes, tn
their offices in the County Courthouse
In Dade County. Florida, within four
calendar months from the time ot the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 21st
dav of March. A.D. 1975.
VIRGINIA SANTOS
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice on
the 28th day of March. 1975.
ALAN HODIN
Attorney for Petitioner & Estate
101 N.W. 12th Avenue. Miami FL
3'28 4/4
i
)
D


March 28, 1975
*Jmisti fhridiar
Page IS-A
>w Dr. K. Waited for Israel's Decision
ERUSALEMNow it can
fold. The final fateful
rs before Dr. Henry Ris-
er's step-by-step diplo-
for a Middle East peace
Jte down were spent by
in his sixth floor suite
[the King David Hotel
Sting the outcome of an
kel Cabinet meeting.
No substantive informa-
was available to news-
beyond the clear indica-
from top Israeli sources
the last ideas and
josals that Kissinger
jght back from President
lat could "not serve as
basis of a settlement."
PECULATION was rife
\\y, observers and newsmen
that Kissinger had pro-
some kind of compromise
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
Y' iinirf
formula of his own and was
seeking Israel's consent before
broaching it to Sadat.
But if that was the case, there
was no inkling when Kissinger
left of the contents of the pro-
posals he was taking to Egypt.
Some sources believed the
Cabinet abandoned hope of a
"broad" settlement involving an
Egyptian renunciation of bel-
ligerency and was casting around
for some alternative scenario
either its original "modest" pro-
posal for a 30-50 kilometer pull-
back in Sinai without relinquish-
ing the strategic passes or the
oilfields, or some intermediate
configuration that would rescue
the current talks.
THERE WAS speculation, too,
that differences of opinion be-
tween the Ministers or between
the Israeli and American nego-
tiators accounted for the in-
ordinately long deliberations.
A brief statement issued did
little to dispel the cloudy of un-
certainty. The statement said
the Cabinet has "decided to au-
thorize the negotiating team to
continue the talks with the Sec-
retary of State in accordance
with the decisions of the Cabi-
net, striving for a positive con-
clusion to the negotiations on
the attainment of an interim
settlement between Israel and
Egypt."
It was learnew that apart
ears Marked Final Farewell
TEL AVIV(JTA)Secretary of State Henry A Kis-
ser could scarcely hold back his tears as he bid Premier
zhak Rabin a somber farewell at Ben Gurion Airport.
I he Secretary was returning to Washington after his
days of tireless "shuttle" diplomacy failed to achieve
lecond-stage agreement between Israel and Egypt in Sinai.
(was Kissinger's first acknowledged diplomatic failure in
Middle East.
His voice choked, as he told the Premier, before re-
rters and television cameras, that today was a sad day
the United States which has invested so much effort
hope in moving the Middle East closer to peace; and
kad day for Israel which needs and wants peace so very
Ich.
lABIN SHOOK Kissinger's
and told the Secretary that
va convinced that he had
more than any human being
Id do toward bringing peace
tiis region.
le said he was sorry the ef-
ts did not yield the wished for
ults and that the talks between
lei and Egypt have been sus-
|ded.
le added that he hoped and
leved that despite this set-
relations between Israel
the United States, based on
lany elements of friendship
common interests, will re-
in unharmed.
ISSINGER, in return, thank-
tabin for the hospitality ex-
led to him. He noted that the
American and Israeli negotiators
worked together for the past two
weeks in their traditional spirit
of friendship.
He said the goal of bringing
peace will not oe eiven up, and
the U.S. will continue to con-
tribute to a just and lasting
peace in the area, to give the
young people here the right to
live without war.
Kissinger praised Rabin's wis-
dom in conducting the talks and
his dedication toward the goal of
peace.
Before going to the airnort for
his final leave-taking. Kissinger
paid a courtesy visit on former
Premier Golda Meir at her Tel
Aviv home. After 65 minutes of
private talks with Israel's elder
stateswoman. Kissinger emerged
from h<>r flat smiling.
MRS. MEIR told reporters
later that she and Kissinger
talked as friends, as they always
have. She said that after listen-
ing to his report of the past two
weeks of negotiations she fully
backed the Rabin government's
decision not to yield to Egyptian
demands.
Most Israelis seemed to share
Mrs. Meir's view, at least for the
time being. They learned of the
collapse of the talks in the wee
hours of the morning.
The weather was hot and stifl-
ing, one of the warmest prc-
Passover nights on record. Doors
and windows were open all over
Tel Aviv and radio and television
sets were on. RlOStlv broadcasting
pop music from Europe.
It was well past midnight when
a news flash interrupted the reg
ular programs to announce the
failure of the negotiations.
ISRAELIS WERE told that
their government had bpen pre-
pared to give up important po-
sitions to the Egyptians if only
the latter would formally re
nounce belligerency. They were
told that as an alternative. Israel
had offered a smaller withdrawal
in Sinai for a less far-reaching
political undertaking.
But Cairo rejected all. If Is-
raelis were saddened and dis-
mayed by the ominous turn of
events, they were, "doves" and
hawks" alike, solidly behind
their government's decision
TTh^
miami's outstanding
(unge & restaurant
cntrnninmrnt
& darning nijjlnb
open for lunch and dinner
mon. through sal.
ckrll.vr.lui.il miami 358-9100
ROYAL HUNGARIAKHBH f?ESTAH?A^T
731 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
Phone 538-5401
SWING THE MOST DELICIOUS FOOD
Wishing Everyone A Happy Passover
from the non-belligerency issue,
the two sides were deeply divided
over the time factor of a second-
stage accord, as well as over the
central "components" of non-
belligerency.
ISRAEL'S fundamental con-
cern, basic to all of its demands,
was to establish whether there
was any chance to effect a basic
change in Egypt's attitude to-
ward its conflict with Israel
meaning its willingness to ac-
cept the existence of a Jewish
State as a permament feature
in the Middle East.
Evidence of such a change
was finally not visible.
Israel, therefore, did not per-
mit itselt to be seen as the cause
for the failure of Kissinger's
mission. On the other hand, all
of the government's leaders
agreed that Israel could not
retreat from their basic demand
that any far-reaching accord
with Egyptone involving sub-
stantial territorial withdrawals
including the Mitle and Gidi
passes and the Abu Rodeis oil
fieldsmust include a funda-
mental turning |M)int in rela-
tions between Israel and Egypt.
ISRAELI proposals that Kis-
singer took to Egypt before
the end embodied a certain soft-
ening of Israeli demands on the
non-belligerency issue.
A well-placed source said af-
ter Kissinger's departure that
Israel had given Egypt a num-
ber of options which linked
greater or lesser concessions on
its part to greater or lesser ful-
fillment of Israel's demand for
the practical continents of non-
belligerency.
Mapam ministers and some
others favored greater conces-
sions than the majority would
accept.
Premier Rabin and Defense
Minister Peres stood with the
majority. They said there was
little prospect that the narrow
scenario of a very limited Is-
raeli withdrawal in Sinai would
be revised inasmuch as Egypt
had totally rejected it.
Bui as far as Israel was con-
cerned, there were still options
midway between the limited
scenario and a broader one, un-
til the very end.
<_..
BUOY A NI6KT IN "JERUSALEM AT THE
jeRusfuem
restaurant
C&iC STWCTirKOSHER T2
173 SUNNY ISLE BOUIEVHRD
NORTH MIWMI BEHCH-949-5210
A RESTAURANT W THOUT COMPARISON!
Traditional Kosher, Israeli and Near East Meals at low
prices Soothing, haunting "Israeli" music helps
moke your food a unique and memorable experience
in gourmet eating!
ENTERTAINMENT ST'M) \V
"JMUSAIEM" is much more than a Restnurrnt!
U0SED DURING TNI HOURS Of THE SHABBAT!
Under personal supervision of
Rabbi Dr. Abraham Jacobson.
Open Daily from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. except
CLOSED FRIDAY and REOPEN SAT. AFTER DARK
K0T DELICATESSEN SANDWICHES & PLATES
FUND RAISING TIME
is .YOU at the
Wonderful World of
lANQUETS PARTIES
LUNCHEONS
MEETINGS
Wahulous Dining Facilities
tPrivatc Areas & Gardens
American Menu at All Times
''thentic Native Show
South d&\fic
TAURANT and 6AR0ENS
' JUSI NOtTM Of GUL'STtf AM n
Hi 94S-64S7 BROWARD WA3-242I
WORLD RENOWNED
^71*** RESTAURANT
67? Washington Ave., Miami Beach
OPEN YEAR ROUND AT 4 P.M.
JEWISH-ROUMANIAN-
AMERICAN CUISINE
n0eUrLheO,n"'s.THAT MAKES THE FAMOUS
The Zuckermans BANQUET FACILITIES
* L*"y W'nkl" 531.3987
FAMOUS
if JfW&fifi
Restaurant-Bar-Cocktail Lounge
Famous Chinese Cuisine
"A beautiful restaurant with a
friendly oriental atmosphere"
0h* f Imk* mi Dinner TAKE OUT OtDBC
SM..1kHS.llt3tai-U:45pai dAA*TlT
fri. ( Sat. 11:30am 12:45pm "t"t"i"A# I /
2860 Coral Way 444-9285



Page 16-A
+Jenist tkridfor
Friday_April 4> J9_s
How would you talk about death to a child?
Today, even the most sheltered of
Children are frequently confronted with the fact
of death in their families, their neighborhood,
or by watching television.
i As a resu It, they are apt to ask the kind of
searching questions for which children seem
to have a special knack.
Our booklet. "Helping Children
Understand Death" by noted psychologist
Dr. William D. Nelson can help parents answer
these questions as well as provide them with
practical insights to assist their children
1
to cope with this difficult time.
Just send us your name, address and
zip code and we'll send you a copy free of chargft
RIVERSIDE
Memonai Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
1*20 Alton Meed. Ifcemi Seec*. FT*. 53139/5311151
Other Riverside Chapels in Miami, No, Miami Maori,
Hollywood, Sunrise
Murray K. Rubin, FiX
r*


iUfewislti FlloHidiair*
.liami, Florida Friday, April 4, 1975
Suction li
Lehrman Day School Holding
Scholarship Ball Saturday
Miami Beach business and civ-
. lera Samuel N. Friedland
Matthew Kosenhaus and
e County Judge Frederick
\ Barad have been named non-
ary chairmen of the Lehrman
Day School Scholarship Ball
which will be held in Temple
Kmanu-El's Friedland Ballroom,
Saturday at 9 p.m.
Arrointments of Fried' nd,
Kosenhaus and Judge ad
were announced by Carol Green-
lerg, general chairman of the
Scholarship Ball, and by Judge
Herbert S. Shapiro, associate
chairman of the board of Tem-
;le Emanu El. Friedland is
chairman of the board, Judge
Barad is president and Rosen-
haus is a trustee of Temple
Emanu-HI.
Working with the chairman
and honorary chairmen are Bar-
ten S. Goldberg and Lawrence
M. Schantz, Ball cochairmen.
Designated to serve as a Past
Chairmen's Council are Kobert
L. Blum. Irving Cowan. Harry
A. Levy, Stephen Muss, Murry
Koretzky and Leonard Zilbert.
Grecnbcrg said Dr. Irving
%* man, in whose honor the
suth's largest Conservative He-
lew day school was renamed
l\ years ago, will be the only
peaker Saturday night, 'line
asis will be on dining and
dancing to the music of Jerry
Marshal] and his society orches-
tra.
Froceeds from the Scholarship
fell at which there will lie no
raising go to provide
rship assistance for a ma-
the 320 students of the
-ehi iran Day School, which
.: i.. quality Jewish an.i gen-
( rdui itlon from kindergar-
Ltc:i ;..: :gh the ninth grade.
^A f .v r! 21 I .-.'.!;.rsl-.i. s llSS
ihed for the Ball,
to Dr. Lehrman,
re fee', completely justified
ti... ii toe e.iti e commu-
( tl school ivliich re-
financlal assistance
the ( JA-IEF, Gn ater Mi-
ewish Federal on or any
othei tside a ;ency although
hall ol our students
. n tea which are nol
of Temple Emanu-El,"
Shapiro said.
Mrp. Grcenberg, Mrs. Goid-
bi anl Mr*. Schantz are work-
ing with their husr-ands to in-
sure ip success of Saturday
i event
Mrs. Greenberg, a past presi-
dent of the Lehrman Day School
and Temule Emanu-El P.T.A.,
has headed the entertainment,
decorations and arrangements
committees for the event.
and Mrs. Daniel Neal Heller
have arranged for a hostess
committee to greet arriving
guests as Temple Emanu-El
stage? the highlight of its 35th
anniversary celebration Satur-
Mrs. Goldberg, Mrs. Schantz day night.
MESSAGE FROM CIA IEF
Perilous Times
Demand Action
On Three Fronts
Daily newspapers headlines,
television and radio news reports
indicate that this is a time of
great peril for Israel and the
Jewish people everywhere in the
world.
It is also a time of unprece-
dented opportunity to show our
solidarity with the people of Is-
rael and our strength to the
United States government in our
conviction that Israel will survive
as a free, democratic State.
The people of Israel want
peace. To obtain this, they have
sacrificed generations of young
men, security for their homes and
families, and stability of their
economy. The memory of the
most recent sacrifice is all too
fresh in our minds.
THE VERY least that we, as
Jews in Miami, can do is to
demonstrate our solidarity with
the Jews of Israel. And, we must
continue to help in a number of
tremendously important ways:
FIRST -- we can send a
message that says that despite
the breakdown in the Kissinger
negotiations and despite the ali-
enation of Israel on the world
scene, that the Jews of Miami
have not forgotten and that the
Jews of Miami will remember.
SECOND we can let it
be known to our own legislators
that the continued survival of the
Jewish homeland is a key con-
cern of ours and, indeed, in
the national interest of the
United States and of all other
democracies in the world.
THIRD we can provide
the humanitarian services in Is-
rael that are needed more than
ever but which Israel's gov-
ernment is unable to afford to
provide: hew and adequate hous-
ing, absorption of immigrants,
new development towns.
Being a member of the Jewish
community of the world calls
for sacrifice and dedication. It
isn't always the easiest thing in
the world. But it may be the most
rewarding.
^^4
Chairman,
1975 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund
Historical Society Collecting
Data On Early Florida Settlers
Dr. Seymour Lietman, presi-
dent of the Jewish Historial So-
ciety of South Florida, has an-
nounced fl project undeitaken
by the Ladies Auxiliarv of Con-
gregation B'nai Zion, Key West,
to taj.e int.'; views with older
Jewish residents of Key West
for the archives of the Society.
Since Key West was the point
ADi^ AjComm. Condemn
Egypt's Belligerency
In a joint statement here Dr.
Charles R. Beber, president. Mi-
. a Chapter, Anie: ican Jewish
mitt e, and Richard Essen,
mar. of the Executive Com-
. the Anti-Defamation
tue, h;.vc condemned the re-
fusal I t" Doake a \nMw
m of non-belligerency,
despite Israel's willingness to
withdraw from the Sinai passes
so vital to its defense and to
since it did not acknowledge the
right of Israel to exist within
secure an.l recognized bounda-
ries.
"Clearly, Egypt tears full re-
jponsil I II tor the failure of
the Kissinger mission by refus-
ing to deliver a pledge that it
would not resort to violence
against Israel even if Israel
Should make further concessions
of entry for many of the earlier
Jews settling in Florida and was
the community from which
many prominent Miami families
came, the recording of Jewish
life in the early years of settle-
ment wi'l be a welcome addition
to the Oral History Library of
the Society.
The Jewish Historical Society,
of South Florida was organized
in 1971 for the purpose of col-
lecting and preserving historical
data of the Jewish community,
to encourage interest and re-
search on South Florida Jews
and to publish material related
to such history.
The Jewish istorical Society,
funded in part by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, has a
membership of over 100 persons
at the present time; member-
ship is open to all interested
persons.
Officers of the Society are Dr.
Simon Brody and Mrs. Lee Aber-
nian, vice presidents; Mrs. Mar-
jorie Land, secretary, and Mrs.
which would surely affect its
^up'th^Ata ^.Toii'Viel-ls. ability to survive in the face of gne |*ja. s=ry.
The offer by Sadat of a weak another ****""**- Membe ()f the Boa
and vague pledge against resort- The Ant
Board of Di-
Fascell Cosponsoring Bill
Requiring Full Disclosure
In his continued effort to re-
store the confidence of the
American people in their govern-
ment. Congressman Dante Fas-
cell (D., Fl i i has joined la spon-
soring legislation in the U.S.
House of Representatives which
would require th" full disclosure
of personal finances by all of-
ficials and employees of the fed-
eral government who earn more
than $25,000 a year.
The bill would apply equally
to all incumbent elected officials,
from the President on down, can-
didates for nomination or elec-
tion to federal office, and top
level personnel with policy-mak-
ing positions in the legislative,
military, executive and judicial
branches of government.
It would require that each in-
dividual disclose the source of
each item of income or reim-
bursement and of any gift receiv-
ed by an individual, either solely
or jointly with a spouse; by the
spouse alone, or by his or her
dependents from outside the im-
mediate family having a value in
excess of $100, together with fees
and honorariums for speeches,
articles or attendance at conven-
tions or other assemblies.
In addition, the individual
would be required to disclose the
REP. DANTE FASCELL
value of assets and liabilities
held either In his own name, by
him and his spouse jointly, or
by his spouse or DV his de-
pendents.
All dealings in securities, com-
modities or real property would
also have to be reported and
made available for public inspec-
tion.
By MIAMI BEACH TECHNION CHAPTER
Miriam Sirkin Designated
As First 'Woman Of The Year'
Miriam (Mrs. Milton) Sirkin,
one of Miami's well known lead-
ers in Jewish and civic causes,
will be honored by the Miami
Beach Chapter of Women's Divi-
sion, American Technion Society
Thursday, April 10. She has been
designated as the first "Woman
of the Year" at a luncheon in her
honor to be held at the Seville
Hotel.
Mrs. Belle Stein, president of
the Chapter, said the choice of
Mrs. Sirkin was based on "her
lifetime of dedicated service and
participation in all causes-com-
munal, Jewish and Israeli."
Mrs. Sirkin served with dis-
tinction as president of the Mi-
ami Beach Chapter for many
years, and was recently elected
first regional president of the
South Florida Region. Women's
Division of Technion.
A resident of South Florida
since 1938, she has worked tire-
lessly in United Fund. Com-
munity Chest. National Confer
ence of Christian and Jews. USO-
Jcwish Welfare Board Service
Center, Israel Bonds, Mt. Sinai
Hospital and Temple F.manu Kl
Sisterhood.
Mrs. Sirkin served as fir>t
president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of Hadassah and as vice
MRS. MILTON SIRKIN
president of the Florida Region.
In addition she is a Dast presi-
dent of Women's Division of Jew-
ish Federation and YMHA/
YWHA.
For further details concerning
the Woman of the Year Lunch-
eon, contact Mrs. Beverly Can-
tor, chairman of the event.
Hebrew Academy Girls Distribute
Passover Food Packages To Needy
peaceful co-existence, tions agencies
Fulfilling the commandment of
"Gmilut Hasadim"deeds of lov-
ing kindness, was the goal of the
students of the Girls High School
of the Hebrew Academy of Great-
er Miami when, under the direc-
tion of their principal, Rabbi
Shimon Azulay, they distributed
food packages for the festival of
Passover to aged, sick and iso-
lated Jews in Miami Beach, dur-
ing the days immediately pro-
ceeding the holiday.
Following a tradition of help-
ing unfortunate senior citizens
for each of the Jewish holidays,
the girls had supplied food and
other gifts this year for Chanu-
kah and Purim.
For Passover, they had raised
almost $1,000, on their own, and
were able to supply matzoh, wine.
fish, vegetables and other foods
to enable the recipients to prop-
erly observe the festival. In ad-
dition, they were able to supplv
limited amounts of money for
these older Jewish individuals to
purchase oih?r supplies for the
holiday.
On the Sundav nrereedinfi
Passover, the girls devoted a
good part o; ihc day tn distribut-
ing food packages in cooperation
with the South Beach Activity
Center in the South Beach sec-
tion.
In addition to the distribution
of food, the girls have presented
various programs for groups at
the South Beach Activity Cen-
ter, at nursing homes In the area,
and for the nutritional lunch pro-
grams conducted hv the Jewish
Community Center of South Flor-
ida and the Jewish Vocational
service.
By providing the food for the
Passover holiday, the girls fulfill-
ed the word" said at the begin-
ning of the Seder"Let he who
is hungry come and eat and
he who is in need, join in ob-
serving the Passover."


11
Vczt 2-B
MHitf fkrkfiir
Friday. Apr:! 4. 19-fi
South Florida Observing
Yom Hashoa Next Tuesd
Ob
A"
:
} T
,- n u II
(I
| I -~
cj I* i '
?-H
war
At 1
v ,....,.
n.
Rabbi Alex*]
8 Cr -
I 'f ,v" r
a-----, for .1.-. 11 h rj !:
Dad* Counti I
until 2 am.
-\\'t. call tbii a 'earn-in. =o
that 1
minded of 11 nf '*i*
a^.-l of to be
ed from it.' Rabbi Gros=
|
Some of the American GI's who
he o<-d liberate uiHK*ntiatJM
- 30 pean sto will be r>n
hand to daaulfat file ev-nt- le4-
ir-> -jo to ami fefiwniin the iH
,,...- 0f ronditioni at the con-
ation camps.
All uch serviceman in South
Florida, as well a th wrf sur-
vived the concentration camDs.
av
(-
E

I
I
I
_'>.-'- ('--



Theme I
B r '' "
bo*h
I
- -i ;.". i-- -
rr\r,r

n- ^..m in tiialanl r,i i|-t>
ktnv'f w<--ch~-'- Wh Schoo'
f-r Q KWUi-er -*"-
jHent nf th Lnui Mer"Mx"f
V-.-ti I SOl '' B*w =
and Da< of
v fr->ro^- Academy Junior
:' -. School
Special readings from the
works of Elie Wieael and Ifoshe
-r will b" a hl?h'iieht of the
six hour session Wiesel. recipi-
ent of the Hebrew Academv
Service Award '.ook Dart in the'
re'errt 2^th Anniversarv Scholar
?hip dinner of the Sooth's lar2"-t
Hebrew day school and is a fre-
ouent Miami Bea^h vfittof.
MKLl \ J.\< OBi
!;( HARD ii i.u N
Jacobs, McEwen
Named By Bur dines
Melvin Jacobs. president "f
B :' ines, has been named chair-
man and chief execi/rive officer
a-A Richard W. McEwen. Bur-
dines executive vice president.
) .! etn named president. Fed-
erated Department Stores. Inc.
has announced.
Mr. Jacobs succeeds Thomas
C. Wasmuth. who died March
11. Mr. Wasmutn had been with
l,u; dines for 10 yeais. and had
served as chairman for the last
seven years.
Mr. Jacobs. 48, has been with
Fer!e;ated for 28 years, starting
as an executive trainee at
Bloomintjdales in 1947. In three
years he was made buyer, and
in 1955 became general manager
Of Cue basement stores.
In 1960. at the age of 34. Mr.
Jacobs was named merchandis-
ing vice jiresident and in 1969.
I era me senior vice president
and fpeneral merchandise man-
ager. Ttt-o years later he was
promoted to executive vice presi-
dent and general merchandise
managi r.
In 1972. Mr. Jacobs wa.s trans-
ferred from Bloomingdales td
become president of Burdines.
Mr. McEwen, 34. has been
Irftft rf i dines for nine years. A
graduate of the University of
To edo. be rec-ived his earl, de-
partment store training at R. H.
Mac in that city.
Prior to joining Burdines as
vice president-finance in 1963.
Mr. McEwen was treasurer of
Sibley, Lindsa/, Curr A Co. de-
partment stores in Rochester.
N.Y.. where he spent much of
his professional life.
At Burdines. he was promoted
to executive vice president of
finance and service in 1900. In
addition to being chief financial
officer, Mr. McEwen was also
responsible for operation, store
planning, construction and ^DP.
Burdines has 11 stores in
Florida. It recently added a sec-
ond store ir Orlando and will
soon open another store in Clear- ;
water.
R '.. Bl MIX \MER GROSS
Barry College
REAL ESTATE COURSE I
PEOPLES I PRACTICES
APkll 8-MAY 22
TUESDAY & THURSDAY 7 to 10 p.m.
REGISTER NOW!
Monday friday Library Room 42?
9 a.m. 2 p.m. Phone: 7S7-S072
Small Classes Secure Campus
11300 FV.E. 2nd AVENUE, MIAMI SHORES

ABRAHAM G1TTELSON
^ ROMAN PUB
1774 N.W. IMffJ ST. MIAMI 6ARIERS IR.
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ALL ENTREES INCLUDE
ANTIPASTO SUPREME
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toll P.M.
4*3
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4* SV. 614-3614
JIW5 i THINGS
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FRI. SAT. t MON.
APRIL 4-5-7
OilS MitROR AIT CUSTOM METAL
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20105 mscayne bivd. 932-4282
MONOAT TMU UTUI0AT 10 AM TO 5 H
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**m
Ha

COMMUNITY HEBREW ULPAN CLASSES
BEGINNING WEEK OF APRIL 14. T975 TO JUVE 12, 1975
North Dade-South Dade Miami Beach
ADVANCED INTERMEDIATES BEG'NNERS LEVEL CLASSES
Temple Sinai of N. Dade
183C1 N.E. 22nd Ave., NMB
Beth Torah Congregation
1051 Interama Blvd., NMB
Temple Beth Sholom
4144 Chase Ave., M.B.
Temple Beth Am
5950 N. Kendall Dr
Eeq-lnt-Adv Mon. & Wed. morn 9:45 A.M. 11:45
Beg-lnt Tues. & Thurs. eve 7:30 P.M. 9:30 P.M.
Beg-lnf-Adv Mon. & Wed. morn 10:00 A.M. 12:00 P.M.
Eeg-lnt-Adv Mon & Wed. eve 7:30 P.M. 9:30 P.M.
Mon. & Wed. morn 9:45 A.M. 11:45 A.M.
Temple Zion
8000 Miller Pd. (S.W. 56 St.)
Inf.
Beg-lnt rues. & Thurs. eve 7:30 P.M. 9:30 P.M.
Experienced, Certified Ulpan Hebrew Teachers-Hebrew Language and CuHure
Conducted in cooperation with Miami Oade Community Collage
2 sessions a weak : 2 hours par sassi >n : 9 weeks i 36 hours of instruction
TUITON FEES: AGE 65 AND U $20 : BEIOW 65 $25
Co-Sponsored by THE AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE OF THE WZ0
CENTRAL AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION OF GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
for information and registration call the
CENTRAL AGtNCY fOR JEWISH EDUCATION 576-4030


Friday, April 4, 1975
+Jewist fforiafjair
Page 3-B
JNF Foundation Brunch And
Seminar Scheduled Sunday
The JNF Foundation Brunch
Seminar will be held on Sunday
at the Fontainebleau Hotel, Abra-
ham Grunhut, president of the
Jewish National Fund of Great-
er Miami, and Dr. Irving Lehr-
man, JNF Foundation Chairman,
have announced.
Special guest will be Dr. Aron
Weinberger, head of the Founda-
tion Department and assistant na-
tional executive vice president of
the Jewish National Fund of
America.
"Dr. Weinberger is a promi-
nent legal mind, able adminis-
trator, dedicated servant of Zion,
a man of great vision and far-
sightedness," said Dr. Lehrman.
"Under his leadership, the Jew-
ish National Fund Foundation
has grown to greater heights and
the portfolio of Wills and Be-
quests amounting to tens of mil-
lions of dollars."
The Jewish National Fund has
a Foundation Department that
deals with wills, bequests, assign-
ment of insurance policies and
Foundation endowments.
"Special mention will be given
to Herman Medow, Mayshie
Friedberg and Miriam Press,"
said Mr. Grunhut.
The Foundation Department
is the future of any institution,"
continued Mr. Grunhut. "and it is
a source of vast amounts of large
sums of monies, that will contin-
ue to flow and at the same time
will ensure the continuity of the
Jewish people in the redemption,
reclamation and afforestation of
the land of Israel."
The musical program will be
presented by Shmuel Fershko,
and an exciting and beautifu.
Yemenite singer.
Mental Health Community Day To
Be Held At Coral Gables Sr. High
The annual Mental Health
Community Day of the Mental
Health Association of Dade Coun-
ty, sponsored this year jointly
with the Office of Health and
Physical Education of the Dade
County Public Schools, will take
place Thursday, April 10. from
9 a.m.3:15 p.m. at the Coral
Gables Senior High School, Le
Jeune and Bird Roads.
Forty-six panels, four in Span-
ish, will include, "The Battered
Child," "Conflict of Cultures," in
Spanish, "The Black Child in a
White School," "Modern Wom-
an." "Living and Dying," and
"Bio-Feedback."
There will also be displays of
special interest on mental health
topics.
In addition this vear there will
be a series of four conversation
hcurs for those who would like
to speak with a professional. Any-
one may speak about anything.
There will be no charge for
Mental Health Association mem-
bers, students and senior citi-
zens. For all others there will be
a small program fee. Lunch will
be served in the school cafeteria
at cost.
For further particulars call the
Mental Health Association of-
fices.
Pinski Club Ending Season
Friday With Oneg Shabbos
The "End of the Season"
Oneg Shabbos of the David
Pinski Club is scheduled Friday
at 8:00 p.m.. in the Ida Fisher
School Cafeteria, 1424 Drexel
Ave., Miami Biach.
The literary and musical pro-
gram will feature L. Lasavia
author and lecturer, whose sub-
ject will be "Abraham Golomb,
to his 85th Anniversary"; Re-
gina Bailin, soprano, accompani-
ed by Paul Yanovsky on the
mandolin, entertaining with a
group of Yiddish and Hebrew
songs, and Israel Goldberg read-
ing from a selection of Yiddish
classics. Refreshments are serv-
ed and the public is invited.
Art Exhibit, Concert Set
The public is invited to at-
tend the North Miami Beach
Artist's Guild's free annual art
exhibit in conjunction with the
North Miami Beach Symphony
Orchestra concert in the main
Auditorium ot the Civic Center,
17011 NE 19th Ave.. North Mi-
ami Beach. Time of viewing will
be from 6:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m.
Monday. April 21.
Teitelbaum Guest Speaker
Arthur Teitelbaum. executive
director of the Florida regional
office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. will be
the guest speaker at Temple
Emanu-El of Miami Beach, 1701
Washington Ave., Friday night
during the 8:30 p.m. service.
Zuckerman on Radio Program
The 32nd anniversary of tne
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, ob-
served by Jews throughout the
world, will be commemorated by
Joseph P. Zuckerman Sunday
at 9 a.m. on Radio Station
WBUS-FM, during the Jewish
Radio Hour program.
New Booklet Honors Jewish
Patriots In American History
Who was the first Jewish patriot to be killed in the War
of Independence?
"Without his aid they could not have carried on the (Rev-
olutionary) cause." What U.S. president said this about what
great Jewish American?
What Jewish commander led the legendary "Jewish Le-
gion"?
Whom did the British call a "very great rebel"?
These and many other accounts are recorded in the new
booklet entitled: "Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In Amer-
ican History," published in commemoration of the Bicentennial
Year.
Who was the first known Jewish settler in the New World
and when did he arrive? In 1750. 1704, 1677, 1654?
Who was America's original "women's libber"?
Which Jewish officer reached the Navy'; highest rank and
for what law does his name rest in U.S. history?
Whose fleet of ships were critical in the colonies' ability to
wage the War of Independence?
Every Jewish child and parent will feel pride in reading
about the heroic Jewish Americans who helped to create the
nation and shape its growth from the earliest years. Page after
page will be exciting, especially for those who are used to
thinking of most Jtewish contributions to America as beginning
with the great migrations at the turn of the 20th Century.
Copies of "Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In American
History" may be obtained by mail. Send 50c for each copy
desired to: "Jewish Patriots,' Box 4488 Grand Central Station,
New York, N.Y. 10017.
Kinneret Chapter Meeting April 13 Includes Election
Pioneer Women, Kinneret
Chapter, will hold its regular
meeting at 1 p.m. Sunday, April
13, at Washington Federal Bank,
1133 Normandy Drive. The pro-
gram will feature a play entitled
"Butterflies Are Free" based on
the book "The Diary of Anne
Frank," in commemoration of
the loss of six million souls: en-
acted by "The Esther Rich-
monds Players."
Also on the program will be
the annual election of officers
and a Boutique Sale. Refresh-
ments will be served. Members
and friends are cordially invited
to attend.
J\ll we are trying to say is that all
hunch offices ofDFS stay open to
430 pm daily, with once a wee!{
evening hours. Come on in.
We make the time to serve you.
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS
MAIN OFFICE: 101 EAST FLAGLER
Business Hours: 9 AM-5 PM Daily
Kendall- US 1 at S W 104th St Cutler Ridge: 10808 Caribbean Boulevard Tamlaml: 1901 S W 8th St Allapattah: 1400 N W 36th SI.
EdonVerier 5800 N W 7th Ave North Miami: 12600 N W 7th Ave Miami Lakes: 13975 N W 67th Ave Skylake: 18300 N E 19th Ave
Miami Beach: 16900 Coll.ns Ave Miramar: 6860 Miramar Parkway (Broward) Oakland Plaia:4850 W. Oakland Park Blvd (Lauderdale Lakes)


1 ?
Page 4-B
+Je**H}ncrHk*r
Friday, April 4, 1975
Art Works Of War Victim To
Be Exhibited At Beth Sholom
A imllwiBiiiii exhibition of the
last works of David Erez. a tooej
Israeli artist of considerable
promise, who lost his life in the
Yom Kippur War on the Sue*
front. wlH go on exhibition on
Friday evening after seme?
9:30 p-m at the Lowe-Levinsbn
Art Gallery of Temple Beth Sto-
lon of Greater Miami. 4144 Chase
Ave. Miami Beach.
David Erez w among the
many Israel:* wbo lift tbeir stud
ie* the first aaon-.ent they beard
that brad was once again in
danger.
Mr. Erez was born fn Jerusa-
lem in 1942 He was
from the Yavneh Yeshiva in Je-
rusalem, the Bar-Han
Scho Beza>:
.- Jemci
his an u K
dio S'hcol of '-
Fron 1983 ".^3 Mr. Era
e In
"
Train
the Hebrew University, and then
worked as a licensed tourist guide
in Israel. In October. 1971. he
came U the United Stales to
study art pnnunj? techniques
Mr Erez was associated with
the art life, both in Australia and
Israel, and took part in mnl
excavations in Israel He partici-
pated bl many grouo shows, such
as the Australian Jewish Society
of Arts, the B nai B"rith Travel-
ling Exhibition :n Australia, the
Museum of Modern An and De-
sign. Melbourne Australia: The
Contemporary Art Sor.ety of
Australia, and the Australian
Bealist Group.
When the V par War
broke
at it73
-*
GiY. ft i
.-crush
Fr.d- 900 a.r:
ard 5undav>
will be on %.?
April 4-April 20
Flakier Federal Announces
Program For S.S. Recipients
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association has created a
new program designed especially
for Social Security recipients.
The "VS.P. Club Account" 'for
Very Special People) offers
numerous services to individuals
who participate in Flagler Fed-
eral's direct deposit of social se-
curity program.
Al Garcia, assistant vice presi-
dent and marketing officer, said
the idea behind the program is
'to give social securitv reciDients
a whole package of benefits to
make their savings transactions
easier, faster, and more conveni-
ent.
"We respect what social se-
curity represents. It's more than
a once-a month check. It repre-
sents a lifo-time of haH work
and discipline. Our VS.P. Club
gives customers receiving social
securitv the special reeo*r
thev deserve."
The club will offer, a-non?
other services, free travelers
cheques, free monev orders, tree
notary nublic. free Dhotostatic
copies, free cashier's cheques.
JERUSALEM APARTMENT
for rent 6 wks. to 4 mos.
start May, 3 bdrms. kosher
kitchen, l1^ bath. Reason-
able.
Call 531-5865
free save-by-mail envelopes, a
free $2.00 courtesy savings ac-
count and a V.S.P Club mem-
bership card. Additional benefits
will be added to the program as
they are developed.
There are many advantages to'
participating in the direct de-
posit program. 'The most obvi-
ous." says Al Garcia, "is avoid-
ing the risk of theft. Another is
that the monev will be earning
5'i per cent interest from the
day we receive it."
In addition to becomine eli-
gible for VS.P Club benefits, in
dividuals who sign uo for the
Drogram need never worrv about
lost or misplaced checks. WMH
in long lines to deoosit checks
will be a thing of the nast.
The direct deposit proeram is
a voluntary plan It enables in-
dividuals to have thir socia' se
curity check mailed directlv from
the Treasurv Department to
Flagler Federal, where it will be
depo=ited into their account.
Authorisation forms for par-
ticipation in the direct deport
program can be obtained at any
of Flagler Federal's nine offices.
Savings counselors will also be
available to answer questions
about the program. ____'
Victory Cancer I'nit
Program On Skin Care
Victory Cancer Unit will have
a general meeting at 10:30 a.m..
Monday, on the mezzanine of the
Washington Federal Bide at 633
NE 167th St. Coffee and cake wii!
be served.
The program for the dav is
"How to Care for Your Skin."
Ms. Patty Volpe. regional branch
representative under the auspices
of Conti Milano. Regional Di-
rector of Field Creation*, will
show bow to care for one's ssnn
in sonny Florida.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
BOUVIER CATERERS
Authentk Kosher Style food of Most Reasonable Prices
ALL BAKING DOSE OS PREMISES
7285 N.W. 25th STREET 592-3468
q)iqing Ita^anjsty^ is as
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l\e\p fron\Chef 6Boy-ar-dee
spaghetti Sauc*
-. tc Chef Boy-Ar-Dee'
- for you when you
te of real Italian
--1~ .'. Bi the Chef's home-style
: Mushroom Spaghet: Saoce
v hand ... haveadefic lous: s 1
1-2-3 Perfect a
Chef's
i cMcketi
Is V course ftej re dea
for:. en
spagheti -~
Be sure)
Chef = :..-- -Dee Sauce nyourcupM
Fore: k.delic :-sdining.
Smart mothers give them
the natural treat-
ready to eat-from Sunsweet!
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Manufacturers...
HNE DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER BUNDS,
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You will too. if you know a mychel when you taste one
Naturally delicious Sunsweet prunes are chock full of
the vitamins, minerals and iron your family needs for
energy. And they're sweet and satisfying, too. Always
fresh, moist and tender because more people eat
Sunsweet than any other prunes. Treat your family to
something good that's good for
them Sunsweet prunesthe smart
mother's choice.
8
Abi gezunt with
lKu/Su>*
m$cm* prunes
n I ol tf.em as ..tamms with wrinkles
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
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PRUNES
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QUEEN ESTHER
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and
Processors and ixportirs
f tat fi'.est U.S. Gorf. fasaoctatf
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1717 N.W. 7th Ava.
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Phone 324-1355.
*
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INDOOR OUTDOOR FURNITURE
YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO KNOW
WHAT dtiexamUt'^ IS DOING......
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/
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with 4 arm chairs......................... $219.00
v^fexqiK/eft's Sofia'^U'umlnum ^u/uiitune uMfej. Co.
7341 N.W. 32nd AVENUE
SHOWROOM OPEN 9:30AM-5:30PM
TEL. 693-5451


Friday, April 4, 1975
+Jeni$ti ncridFiam
Page 5-B
David Blumberg Speaker At
B'nai B'rith Installation
David M. Blumberg. president Blumber" is a long-time resi'
of Bnie*?riih international, will f*nVoftl6oxAlktf T!e*'i\\ and is
be the guest speaker at the an- a former member of its City
Council. An insurance executive
affiliated with the Massachusetts
Mutual Life Insurance Co., he is
former president of the 80,000
member National Association of
Life Underwriters.
Active in Knoxv:lle's civic .'
fairs for many \ears. Blumber;
was cited in 1961 by the Chamb-r
of Commerce as that city's "Man
of the Year."
Tickets for the April 13 instal-
lation brunch are available from
any B'nai B'rith lodge president
in Dade County, or by calling the
B'nai B'rith office.
April Meetings Scheduled By Mizraehi Women
April meetings have been
scheduled by the various chapters
of American Mizraehi Women as
well as its Florida Council.
A Florida Council meeting is
scheduled Tuesday at headquar-
ters, 420 Lincoln Rd., suite 402.
All presidents of chapters and
activity chairmen are expected to
attend at 10 a.m. Jeanne Finkel-
Stein is chairman and Francine
Katz, ochairman.
it it it
Shoshana Chapter "Mothers-ill-
Israel" are invited to a festive
luncheon in the home of Mrs.
Fthel H. Brainson, 5151 Collins
Ave., Tuesday noon, according to
Mrs. Ro-ie Shaoiro. president of
the chapter. Mrs. Nellie Boyer.
Mother in-Isruel chairman, said,
"When a woman becomes a
Mother-in-Israel she symbolically
adopts a child thereby giving new
life and a new outlook to under-
privileged and deprived children
in Israel."
... & &
>J OaUl'-Chapt*r wifl-nrwt Bt the
Washington Federal, 633 NE
167th St. Monday at 12:30 p.m.
Kitty Levi, book reviewer, has
chosen 'The House of the Roths-
childs." Anne Stern is program
chairman; presidium consists of
Eva Fuchs and Bess Kurzban. Til
lie Cohen is sponsoring the after-
noon. Husbands and friends are
welcome.
it it it
Roslyn Paul, president of Shal-
vah Chapter, announces Miss
Barbara Bessey will conduct an
exercise and health session at its
meeting at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday
in the home of Charlotte Perlin,
2350 Prairie Ave.
Miami Beach Chapter president
Rachel Katz invites all to its
meeting Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the
Washington Federal at 1234
Washington..Ayjj.,,,, '
B & P Chapter will meet at
1:30 p.m. Sunday, April 13, at the
home of Rose Shapiro, 1905
Calais Dr., for a spring luncheon.
Shirley Lipsitz, president, invites
all to come.
& it it
Shalom Chapter will meet at
1 p.m. Tuesday in the club room
of 100 Lincoln Rd. Rea Krieger
is president.
it it ft
Freda Oster. president of
Geula Chapter, has scheduled her
meeting in keeping with Israel
Independence Day at 8 p.m. Wed-
nesday in Beth Israel Congrega-
tion, 770 West 40th St.
; DAVID BLUMBERG
nual installation of officers of the
South Florida Council of B'nai
B'rith Lodges, according to in-
stallation chairman Mel Feigeles.
Thr brunch will be held Sunday
rning, April 13, at the Ameri
cana Hotel.
ghteen officers will be in-
- ;-. Florida Council, the gov,
crninc body of Dade County's 38
R rith lodges.
To be installed are Barry T.
Garland, president; Louis Hyrn-
president-elect; Harry Mar-
Joseph Sussman. Mel Feige-
Col. Nathaniel Stitcher, vice
idents; Kenneth Hoffman,
surer; Sid Schwarzbach. sec-
retary, and Ge.irge Kotin, Matt-
'ichlman, Jack Sloan. Jack
. n, Sid Ritter. Sol Klein
K?"9. Herman Nudelman.
ri Feingold. and Dr. M.
!baum, trustees. Fred Sny-
di is immediate past president,
imberg is the 19th president
of B'nai B'rith. He was elected
by acclamation in Octob-r. 1971
;it a B'nai B'rith triennial con-
on in Philadelphia, and was
rerlected to a three-year term in
November. 1974 at a convention
in Israel. He has been a member
' I B'nai B'rith for over 40 years
and has served in many major
leadership posts.
Former national commission
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization. Blumberg
served two three-year terms as an
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith. representing District
7, a seven-state Southern region
which he previously Served as
president.
Blumberg also was chairman of
the board of the Leo N. Levi Hos-
pital in Hot Springs. Ark., a med-
ical center founded by B'nai
B'rith for research in and treat-
ment of arthritic and kindred dis-
eases.
Dade Chapter of SCORE
Marks 10th Anniversary
Next Wednesday the,. Dade
County Chapterjpf SCOB*--pS"
ice Corp of Retired Executives)
will celebrate its 10th Anniver-
sary with a luncheon at the Sea-
coast East. In addition to the mem-
bers and their wives, guests will be
Tom Butler, head of the Small
ida; Andrew Boyce. SCORE'co-
ordinator and supervisor; Harry
Perrin and Jack Geiss, SCORE
coordinators.
SCORE is 73 men strong, all
retired from their own business-
es or executives of large corpora-
tions, who want to continue to
lead productive lives in helping
the small business community of
Dade County. Started under
President Kennedy, it operates
under the jurisdiction of the Fed-
eral government. There are chap-
ters all over the country, and
175,000 businesses received
assistance in 1073.
If your social security
check was ever lost,
misplaced or stolen:
join the club.
The V.S.P. Club Account.
It's for "very special people." People receiving social security.
Free membership includes some very special privileges.
Under the authorization of the U.S. 'IVeasury Department, you
may now have your social security checks deposited directly into
your Flagler Federal savings account.
This insures that you will always receive it. Safe and sound. And
collect 5' \"' interest on your check from the day we receive it. You
don't lose a cent of interest this way. And no more lost, misplaced
or stolen checks either. Or waiting in line to deposit it.
Participation in the Direct Deposit is voluntary. Just fill out the
authorization form at any convenient Flagler Federal office. That
automatically makes you a-"very special person." With these other
"very special privileges," within normal limits, of course:
FREE 1st National City
Traveler's Checks
FREE Money Orders
FREE Notary Public
FREE Photostatic Copies
FREE Cashiers Checks
FREE Save-By-Mail Envelopes
FREE $2.00 Courtesy
Savings Account or Bonus
5V4% Interest on your check
from the day we receive it.
very special people
is a member in good sanding and is entitled to
all the club benefits.
Flagler Federal
Flagler Federal
Savings insured up to $40,000 by FSLIC
Himj\ne Shopping Plaza North Miami Beich Hollywood -Westchestcr Mall
l6501 N.E. 15th Avenue 101 Hollywood Fashion Center*8686 Coral Way
Downtown Miami
101 N. t. Fust Avcnucw570 N.t. 81st Street
Kings Bay m Miami Beach .Coconut Creek North Bay Village
J4499 South Dixie Highway 1050 Alton Road 4301 Coconut Creek Parkway* 1712-79th Street


Page 6-B
* Mmisti forSdlian
Friday, April 4, 1975
Wednesday Meetings Scheduled
By Local Divisions Of NCJW
A number of Divisions of the
Greater Miami Section. National
Council of Jewish Women will
meet next Wednesday:
Bay Harbor's yearly awards
meeting and luncheon will be
held at the 163rd Street Jordan
Marsh Auditorium at 11:30 a.m.
Isabel Sider will review the book
"The Woman He Loved." by
Ralph G. Martin. Birdie Lefko-
wits will preside.
Coral's president, Mimi Abel,
announces a luncheon meeting at
the First Federal Savings Bldg..
2750 Coral Way. All proceeds to
the lsraci.Emergency Fund. Res-
ervations necessary; call Evelyn
Herman. Program reports and
slides on the Second Summit Con-
ference in Israel and the Nation-
al Convention in San Francisco.
Indian Islands president. Mit-
*i darfield. announces they will
honor all paid up members at a
gala gourmet luncheon at the Al-
giers Hotel at noon. Award Cer-
tificates will be presented. There
will be fun and pri?e. For res
ervations call Rose Hurwiti no
later than Monday.
IntraCOastal ,vill hold a lunch-
eon and card party at noon in
Lam's Chinese Restaurant. 180th
St and Biscayne Blvd. Come and
iring a guest. For reservations
11 Stella Kraft. Florence RatMl
is the president.
Lakes president, Mildred Wei-
Cher, announces t FUN Dayno
business al the Washington Fed
era! 1!' I : 833 HE IWlll St at
noon. The usual genial "coffee
hour" is planned. Billy DeShara
and his guitar will entertain
Lincoln will nold its luncheon
meeting al the Delano Hotel al
11 30 a ra Franci Fahrer, presL
dent, anr Ihat the yearly
auction will be held al this meet-
ing.
Normandy ;s havlna their
awards m< "''' NV:I"
ton Fedei il Bl I I ,-i Norm md>
Isle .,t 11:30 i m Mancl Gold
recordin i secretary of the
t Mi in Secti in will spe ik
U.S. Committee
Sports For Israel
Launches Drive
Poel and philanthropist Jordan
Davidson has been named honor-
ary chairman for the membership
drive initiated b) the l"nite s Committee-Sports For Is-
rael Inc which will hold its Uek
off meeting al 8 p.m Wednesday
^pi | 16, al Town Hall. 655 36th
S: Baj Harbour.
The major thrust I the new
tion will be to organise,
outfit transport and maintain an
American team of athletes who
will compete In the World Mac-
cabiah Games to be held in Is-
rael
Banker E Albert Pallot. Flor-
ida Regional chairman, wiH ad-
dress thi | and a ftl
pre\
Kbt Ft ''
presidenl of the Sports For '
prog side and
Mr Davk
support.
Voters Inc. Meets Tuesday
Voters Incorporated will
hire
11 man) O. WeJnsttin, TDA Di-
rector Hal Cohen and chic activ-
ist Joseph Abelow as guaal
- : at Ita B p.m.
in the Washington Fed-
al 1234 Washington .v..
mod-
erate t
t
fYrWrV (lit ft Speofcer
ona)
\ ; oast oreside
T a anH be the eues*

Shab ajr a* ItM
> : arill be "Ul
t.-
on "The History of Community
Services in Council." Flo alar-.
miol, president, invites you to be
their guest for dessert and cof-
fee. KSVP Francis Hait.
Ocean View president, Rose
Naiman. invites you to be a guest
at a paid-up membership petit
luncheon and fun time, with
handwriting analyst Charlotte
Leibel, at the Seacoast Towers
West at 11:30 a.m. For reserva-
tions, call Jerri Fields by Satur-
day.
Shores meets at 9:30 a.m. at
the Jockey Club. Reservations re-
quired: call Susan Roth. Martin
Rubenstein. director of Support
Programs in Dade County will
discuss Dade County's year round
schools "The Quinmester Pro-
gram." Joyce Julian is the presi-
dent
Key Biscayne will meet Tues-
day at 8:00 p.m. at the Towers of
Key Biscayne for a wine and
cheese party, plus a surprise pro-
gram. Rosalie Podall is president.
South Dade will meet Wednes-
day. April 16. at 9:30 a.m. in the
home of Evelyn Cohan. 10300 SW
60th PI. Service awards will be
presented. A "pica-plant picnic"
is planned. Refreshmentschick-
en in a basket RSVP Marissa Ty-
tell. Judy Palgon is president.
Sen. Frank Church Keynoter
At Yom Haatzmaut Celebration
VS. Sen. Frank Church of
Idaho, who heads the nation-
wide investigation of the Arab
boycott, has accepted an invita-
tion to serve as keynote speak-
er for the April 15 celebration
Of Yom Haatzmaut (Israel In-
deiHMidenee Day* in the Miami
Beach Convention Hall.
Announcement of Senator
Church's acceptance was made
by Mrs. Milton Green, president
Of the South Florida Zionist
Federation which is sponsoring
the observance of the state of
Israel's 27th anniversary of in-
deiwndence.
Tickets for the community-
wide Rally for Israelat which
Israel Ambassador to the United
Nations Ovadia Softer will rep-
resent his government may
be secured at the Miami Beach
Auditorium box office or at the
offices of any Zionist organiza-
tion.
Dr. Irving Lehrman. honorary
national president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America and
national vice president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
will speak at the tribute to
the Jewish state's founding in
SEN. FRANK OHUBCH
1948.
A special musical presentation
by the Israel Indeiiendence Play-
ers, under the direction of Is-
raeli composer and pianist
Shmuel Fershko, will highlight
the evening.
A planning meefng of lead-
ers of Hadassah. Pioneer Wom-
en. Mizrachi, Labor Zionist Al-
liance. ZOA. B'nai Zion. Amer-
ican Jewish League for Is
and Zionist youth groups will 1*
held Friday to complete plans
for the rally.
Seymour B. Liebman, national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation, said the Mi.
ami Beach rally will be the larg-
est celebration of Yom Haatz-
maut in the United States to be
held on Israel Independence
Day.
Sen. Church, chairman of the
Senate Subcommittee on Multi-
national Corporations, spear-
headed the investigations in the
1974 energy crisis that exposed
the tax and anti-trust conces-
sions granted to the big oil com-
panies, as well as their bloated
i rofits.
His subcommittee now is
thoroughly investigating charg-
es that the Arab boycott is aim-
ed not only against American
companies doing business in or.
with Israel, but also against
American firms owned, managed
by or even employing Jews.
Tickets for the rally at
which there will be no fund
raising may be secured at
the American Zionist Federa-
tion office. 605 Lincoln Rd.
ELECT
Sonny Dansyear
your coral gables commissioner
For strengthening the economy in Coral Gables
For greater efficiency, economy and dignity in city government
For creative planning for the growth of the city, based on tradition
For self-determination but working with Metro in areas of common interest
For new approaches in financing to relieve the ever-increasing tax burden
For a full time commissioner (available daily to meet with citizens: scuss your needs)
J
BACKGROUND
Resident of Coral Gables 25 .
Served as County Commissi senting District 6
Coral Gables: Miami south of Flaglei Si I
Former member. Development Committee. Miami
Chamber of Comme: e
Served as neighborhood commiss ;. Scouts of America
One of the auth rs S nth Florida Building Code
Member, Coral Gables Country Club
Member.Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce
Member,Coral Gables Elks
Member. Board of Din tors S ithvw si YMCA
Member. KRvanis Clul I National Association
of Association Execul
Member. St. James Lutheran Church
Professional Trade .Association Executive: consultant to
trade associations
Married to Margaret Dansyear: two married children
Sonny Dansyear
VOTE APRIL 8.. PULL LEVER 4-A
Pd. Pol. Adv.


I
Faday, April 4, 1975
m
*Jen1st fhridiani
Page 7-B
Nat Winokur Recipient Of
Coral Gables Javcees Award
The Coral Gables Jaycees hon-
ored Nat Winokur at a recent
Chamber of Commerce break-
fast meeting, presenting him
with the David Hendricks Me-
morial Award, named after the
former mayor and awarded to
outstanding citizens over 35
years of age in recognition of
their work to better the commu-
nity.
"Nat Winokur is one of the
behind the scenes workers for
the City Beautiful," a local pa-
per editorialized. "His various
achievements may seem small,
but collectively they represent
exemplary dedication on the
part of a citizen."
Born in the "Citv of Brotherly
Love," (Philadelphia) Nat Wi-
nokur transplanted his phil-
osophy as well as his family
to Coral Gables in 1949. Ever
since that time, the City Beau-
tiful has been the beneficiary of
his efforts as well as his belief
in brotherly love. 'You can never
do a kindness too soon," he says,
"for you never know when it
r^will be too late."
W'hen asked recently what he
considered his greatest achieve-
ment, the Nat Winokur Park,
his successful business or his 57
years of association with the
I Scouts, Mr. Winokur re-
plied unhesitatingly, -.My 40
- of marriage to the great-
est woman in tfce world."
GenAaTly consfotrfer -xtfiy
conservative," ?,.vs. Winokur
betrayed her pjide in her hus-
band's' accomplishments when
their son, Stanley, moved out
and wmt on his own. She con-
verted Stanley's room into a
testimonial of Nat's "labors of
love," putting bis large number
of citations and awards on dis-
pla...
K member of B'nai B'rith. the
People to People Program, Tem-
ple Judea, the Temple Judea
Brotherhood, Rotary Club of
Coral Gables and Miracle Lodge
No. 321, Winokur's awards in-
clude his temple's State of Is-
rael Masada Award for 1974, the
Cooper Taylor Memoiial Award
for Public Safety, the Man of
the Year Award presented by
the South Dixie Highway Te-
nants and a Certificate of Ap-
preciation from the Planning
Advisory Board. He also received
the Campaign Award from the
Combined Jewish Appeal three
times, and was presented with
the Key to the City of Coral
Gables.
Seen ui the eighth annual Golden Build-
ers' Luncheon of the Florida Women's
Division, American Jewish Congress, at
the Diplomat Hotel are (from left to right)
Judith Tepper, national vice president;
Myriam Wolf, president, Florida Women's
Division; Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, presi-
dent, South Florida Council; Florence
Baumritter, benefactor; Anna Miller,
benefactor; Mildred Berlin, vice president
and chairman of special events.
Hebrew Academy Women Honoring
Lewis Cohens on Ere oi Departure
Annette (Mrs. Eugene) Labo-
vitz. wife of the rabbi of Temple
Ner Tamid of .Miami Beach, will
review the book, "The Agunah,"
by Chaim Grade during next
Wednesday's Hebrew Academy
Women luncheon at the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy. 2400
Pine Tree Dr., Miami Beach.
The noon event is open to the
public, according to Mrs. Leonard
Adler, president of the Hebrew
Academy Women.
Hostesses for the event include
Mrs. Hyman Chabner, Mrs. Jay
Dermer, Mrs. Irving Firtel. Mrs.
George Goldbloom, Mrs. Steven
Gurland. Mrs. Mollie Horn. Mrs.
Rubin Jacobs and Mrs. Morris
Zellner.
Lewis and Anne Cohen, leaders
of the Hebrew Academy, will be
honored at the luncheon on the
eve of their der.ii dire to live per-
manently in Israel.
Special awards will be pre-
sented to Julius Sand and to Lou-
Introducing
First Americount
"Now with this one account,you not only
earn 5%t> per year interest but also get a
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Anita Bryant
0
MRS. EUGENE I.ABOVIT/.
is
Cohen, (no relation to the
honorees) by Rabbi Alexander:
S. Gross, principal of the South'.-.
largest Hebrew day school.
The luncheon guests also will
map plans for the annual Binyan-
Brick luncheon to be held May
21. Mrs. Adler said.
Jewish Theological Seminary To
Honor 63 Rabbis At Convocation
^.'-::\v YORK, N.Y. Sixty-
*. e rabbis from large and
^. ill communities in the United
States. Mexico and Canada, both
congregational and organization-
al leaders, will be honored by
The Jewish Theological Sem-
inary of America at a conven-
tion to be held on April 20 at
Grossingers, New York.
Dr. Gerson D. Cohen, Sem-
inary Chancellor, will confer the
degree of Doctor of Divinity,
honoris causa, on the rabbis, in-
cluding Rabbi Rudolph J. Adler
of Congregation Ohev Shalom.
Orlando, at the special academic
convocation which will open the
73th anniversary convention of
* *the Rabbinical Assembly, later-
" *.onal association of Conserva-
W' rabbis. In addition, eight
rabbis from the West Coast wi'.i
receive their degree at the Uni-
versity of Judaism Commence-
ment in June.
The degrees are being confer-
red in recognition of rabbis
v.. m careers have, in the words
of Dr. Cohen, "brought honor
upon the Rabbinical Assembly,
the Seminary, and the Conserva-
tive Movement.' Included in the
group are 34 rabbis who were
ordained at the Seminary.
Of the 29 others, a number re-
ropean institutions as the Jewish
'ordination at such Eu-
cal Seminary of Bres-
i and the Ecole Rabbinique de
France; others received ordina-
tion from such American institu-
tions as the Jewish Institute of
Religion and Hebrew Theological
College.
In conferring the degrees
upon these rabbis, the Seminary
is at once honoring their person-
al achievements, and paying
tribute to the Rabbinical As-
sembly, of which they are all
members.
The candidates have been
selected on the basis of sen-ice
to their congregations, their
communities, and the Seminary,
which is the academic and spirit-
ual center of the Conservative
Movement in American Judaism.
In addition to training rabbis,
cantors, teachcis, and scholars,
the Seminary conducts several
nationwide programs for Jewish
youth, among them, the Ramah
camps. Its library has the most
extensive collection of Hebraica
and Judaica outside of Israel,
and its Jewish Museum is a
treasure house of Jewish cere-
monial objects from every era.
and almost every corner of the
world.
The Seminary conducts re-
ligious and educational programs
in Israel as well as in the United
States and Canada, and its In-
stitute for Religious and Social
Studies has pioneered in the
field of interg-oup relations.
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Free Money Orders
whenever you want to pay
a bill, no fee charged. And,
free First Federal checks
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Where people come first

^kwvaa^-^. j


1.
Page 8-B
* Jen isf floridiafi
Friday, April 4, 1975 -
Rosemary's Thvme
By ROSEMARY FIRMAN
When Miami can have two
sucji offerings as The Man in the
Glass Booth and Ernst Lubitsch's
To Be or Not To Be in the same
week, and have both films
heavily attended, then perhaps
we all can breathe a sigh of re-
lief about Miami.
Glass Booth, of course, was
part of the American Film The-
atre productions, but To Be or
Not To Be played in Conl Ga-
bles' Cinematheque Theater.
Cinematheque Theatre is dedi-
cated to showing old film clas-
sics. It ij located at Ivan Kivitt's
Merry G; Round Playhouse and
is open in the evenings from
Mondav to Friday.
THIS SMALL theatre seats
perhaps SO oeople. and from what
I saw !a=t Wedne-day evening,
it's mostly the beard and sandal
set with a few ponchos
thrown in.
But th" oacVed house at the
Gables' Glass Booth production
should have gone the next night
to see Jack Benny and Car"'"
Lombard in To Be or Not To Be
because this black comedy, made
in 1942. deali with the same sub-
ject as Robert Shaw's olav: the
horrors of Nazism, and deals with
it with th comic madnss that
Mel B-ooks always promises and
nevpr delivers.
No wonder that To Be or Not
To Be is Peter Bogdanovichs
choice for one of the ten best
movies ever made. It is better
than Glass Booth, and that movie
is marvelous.
The consensus at the Gables
Theatre, at least among the
people I spoke to. was that it
was the best offering of The
American Film Theatre. And
word had obviously gotten
around because, as I stood in
front of the theatre, waiting for
a friend, it seemed that everyone
I knew, or once knew, or wanted
to know was there.
SOME NAMES, in ordr of
aopearance: Naomi and Marty
Feldman. Ruth Hrckerling and
Elsa Greenberg; Deena (Mrs.
Bob) Pirent, Sophie Markov itch.
Sue and Dick Helfman. Sheila
Golden (Mrs. Howard). Bernard
Tumarkin. Leila Marcus. Helen
Morton. Lucille Friedson (whose
daughter is working hard on the
Farm Worker's Fiesta to be held
at Watson Island in April).
Jwry and Roberta Lurie and
Carole Sharkstrin and Martin
Oherentz (chairman of the En-
glish Department at Miami
Springs High School).
The hero of Man in a Glass
Booth is ridden with guilt to the
point of psychosis, for having
survived the Nazi concentration
camps. We never are quite sure
if he is Jewish or not. but we
know he suffers the anguish of
hell for not having perished, as
his father did.
In light of the recent diplo-
matic debacle in the Mid East,
the thoughts of American Jews
often turn to our coreligionists
in t"at part of the world.
AND AS WE sit in Coral
Gables movie theatres, or in
front of our TVs. we are the
survivors, watching fellow Jews
perish. Our guilt must be a part
of us.
Not the least of Jewish Fed-
eration's value is that, by giving
money, we may be kept from
being quite as guilt ridden as that
man in the glass booth.
Democratic Club Meetinq
Wednesday Open To Public
The Democratic Club meeting
at 8 o.m. Wednesday in the Zodi-
ac Room of the Delano Hotel is
open to the public, according to
Wally Gluck. president, who will
moderate the question and an-
swer periods following each pres-
entation.
The program will feature Mi-
ami Beach Councilman Hal W.
Soaet in a discussion of "The
Progress of Miami Beach Its
Past. Present and Future"; Larry
M. Shoot, president of the Asso-
ciation and American EmDloyees,
speaking on "The New Tax Re-
form Law and How It Can Be
Used." and "The Pros and Cons
of Legalized Gambling." by for-
mer state legislator Ted Cohen.
THE VOODE\ CHALET
YOUR PASSPORT TO INTERNATIONAL DINING
introducing yew to
OLD STYLE GERMAN SAUERRRATEN
VEAL CORDON BLEU
feral tastes ti
-Nil "
IfaJM
I HI
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
PRESENTS
Diplomatic Correspondent for CBS Television
and Radio
Author of "Kissinger1*
MARVIN KALB
An insight into American Foreign Policy
SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 13, 1975-8:30 P.M.
BETH DAVID AUDITORIUM 2625 S.W. 3 Avenue, Miami
Ticket prices ... all seats reserved front orch. $10.00 .
front and middle orch. $7.50 rear orch. $5.00. Mail orders
to Beth David Congregation, 2625 S.W. 3 Avenue, Miami.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 854-3911
Terry and Jules Bagdan, Chairmen
All seats are reserved mail your check today to .
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 Southwest 3 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33129
Enclosed check for .........___.......... _
Send..........._____
Name .....______
Address
Telephone
tickets at .
each.
Miami Beach
Hadassah
Calendar
A number of Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah Groups
have regular meetings or lunch-
eons scheduled for the first two
weeks of April.
Southgate Group will sponsor
an Oneg Shabbat in the North
Building's Terrace Room Friday
honoring actress-producer Dolly
Kramer, who will be presenting
a minstrci show for the group
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Shirley Ros-
enberg will preside.
Morton Towers Group plans a
ha/aar at the American Legion
Hall. 1828 Alton Rd., from noon I
to 5 p.m. Sunday. Fanny Houtz |
will preside at its regular meet-
ing Monday. April 14. in the
American Savings Bank. 1200
Lincoln Rd. Eiiezer Kroll. direc-
tor of Miami's Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter, will be the guest speaker.
Kodima Group will meet Mon-
day at the Singapore Hotel with
Leona Meisel presiding.
I .mm;' Lazarus Group's Kye
Bank Luncheon is scheduled
Monday with Henrietta Fine
presiding.
Israeli Group's Eye Bank
Luncheon Monday will feature
entertainment by Patricia Gayle.
The film "A Part of Them is
Me" will be shown at noon Mon-
day. April 14. at the Algiers
Hotel, with Esther Meyer presid-
ing.
Hanna Senesch Group will
meet Monday noon at the De-
lano Hotel. Inez Townsend will
preside. Probate lawyer Herb-
ert Zemel will be guest speaker
and there will be a musical pro-
gram.
Hatikvah Group's Eye Bank
Luncheon will be held in the
Eden Roc Hotel Wednesday noon
with Sadie Herman presiding.
Halm Yessky Group will meet
Wednesday noon at Byron Hall.
Bertha Kohansov will preside.
Forte Towers Group will fea-
ture a review of the book "My
Rabbi Does Not Make House
Calls" by Elsie Rubin at its
meeting in the 1200 West Ave.
Auditorium Monday, April 14. at
noon. Pauline Lesstm will pre-
side.
shaloma Group will meet
Tuesday noon in the Shore
Club Hotel with Edith Shapiro
presiding and Barton Goldberg,
president of Jefferson National
Bank as guest speaker.
Emit Cohen
Entertainer
At Sky Lake
Emil Cohen, one ot the out-
standing performers on the
American entertainment scene,
will be the special guest at the
1975 Sky Lake Country Club -
Israel Dinner of State Thursday
evening, April 10. dinner chair-
man Herbert Henschel and hon-
orary chairman Robert Sugar-
man have announced. Music for
dancing will be provided by the
Stu Granger Society Orchestra.
The Israel Bonds dinner-dance
will honor Mr. and Mrs. Steve
Legakis. recipients-elect of the
State of Israel Masada Award.
Legakis is the golf professional
at Sky Lake Country Club.
Cohen, a native of Wilming-
ton. Del., presents a program
originating in both American
and Yiddish cultures. Since es-
tablishing himself as a top hL-
morist. vocalist and raconteur,
he has appeared in many hotels,
theaters and television programs
throughout the country.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Israel Bonds office.
A recent meeting held on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's Division was co-hosted by
(seated, left to right) Mrs. Armando Gerstel, Mrs. David
Goihman and Mrs. Martin Gelb, all of Miami Beach, at
the home of Mrs. Goihman. Helping inspire the guests
to support the women's 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund effort was guest speaker Mrs.
Leah Harris (standing).
ar.V*
The Towers of Key Biscayne was the scene of a recent
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division
meeting hosted by Mrs. Theodore Kreuter, (left) Mrs.
Herbert Praver and Mrs. Morton Hill on behalf of the
women's 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund effort. Guest speaker Jeanne Daman (right)
appeared to help inspire the generous support of the
life-saving campaign by all who attended.
West Miami Post And Auxiliary
Plan Joint Installation April 6 \
The West Miami Post and
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans, No. 223, will have
a joint installation Sunday, April
6. at 11:30 a.m. at the Miami Sky-
ways Motel. 2373 NW Le Jeune
Rd.. according to Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Achttnan. installation
chairmen.
Mrs. Evelyn Ferdie. president
of tba Department of Florida-
Lac.es Auxiliary, accompanied by
her officers, will be the installing
officer.
Mrs. Ferdie will first retire the
present president. Mrs. Arthur
Bartlett and her staff, and then
install the new president and her
officers for the year 1975-76. in-
cluding Mrs. Murray Mittler.
president; Mrs. Abe Isgar, senior
vice president; Mrs. Elaine
Youneentob. junior vice presi-
dent; Mrs. David Burrows, treas-
urer: Mrs. Henry Noretsky, con-
ductress: Mrs. Marvin Herman,
chaplaia: Mrs. Sidney Potluck.
patriotic instructor: Mrs. Howard
Gurlar.d. historian, and Mrs. Eva
Koch guard.
Mrs. Joseph Achtraan, Mrs.
Stanley Gold, and Mrs. Michael
Marks are trusties for a term of
one year.
Commander Harold Uhr of the
Department of Florida. Jewish
War Veteran*.will retire the of-
ficers for the term of 1974-75 and
then install the officers for tt
year of 1975-76, including Sidney
Pollock. commander; Ralph
Stern, senior vice commander,
Stanley Gold, first junior vice
commander; Lester Rosenberg,
second junior vice commander;
Morris Epstein, quartermaster;
John Saks, adjutant: Louis Tuck,
judge advocate; Abe Sussman.
trustee for three years; Leonard
Silver, trustee for two years, and
David Burrows, trustee lor one
year. Commander Harold Uhr
will be accompanied by his staff
of officers.
The Poet spenwrs a Bey Scout*
Troop for the mentally ret^'
with Lester Rosenberg a> ]
master and Frank Glatter, as-
sistant Scoutmaster.
Past department president. Lee
Rubin, and past department com-
mander, Leo Shlaoter. will serve
as mistress and master of cere-
monies. Refreshments will be
served.
Garage Sole To Aid School
A Garage Sale to benefit the
Temple Menorah Day School will
be held Sunday from 10 a.m. until
4 p.m. at the Adams home, l**4
Daytonia Rd., Biscayne Point. For
information on what items are
needed for the 'Garage Sale,' call
the Temple Menorah-office.
*mel '


^
-^Fi
riday, April 4, 1975
One of the truly outstanding parlor meetings of the year,
held on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division, was hosted recently by Mrs. Marvin
Cooper (standing, left) of Miami Beach. Among Mrs.
Cooper's guests, expressing their personal commitments
to the women's 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund effort, were Mrs. Harold Vinik (stand-
ing, right) and Mrs. A. B. Wiener (seated, left) and Mrs.
Harold Zinn.
Guest speaker Gerda Klein (left) inspired enthusiastic
commitments to the Greater Miami .Jewish Federation
Women's Division 1975 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund at a Miami Beach parlor meeting
hosted recently by Mrs. Morris Fruchtman (second
from left). Taking part in the event were Mrs. Gerald
Traktman, president of the S.E. Florida Region of Wom-
en's American ORT; and Mrs. Donald Lefton (right)
Women's Division Miami Beach Campaign Coordinator.
South Shore Hospital Auxiliary
Plans Spring Luncheon April 10
i
The Eden Roc Hotel will be
the setting for the annual Spring
Luncheon of the South Shore
Hospital Women's Auxiliary.
(Mrs. Seymour Fine is presi-
dent) Thursday, April 10. at
noon.
w. Mrs. Henrietta Fine, chairman
"'of the day, Mrs. James Todd.
i cochairman, and Mrs. Clair Bu-
pont Paul, program chairman,
have arranged a varied program,
with music by Bill Lewin and
A highlight of the afternoon
will be the appearance of Tony
Simone, operatic tenor of inter-
national renown.
Under tho extiert guidance of
Steve-Anna Bernard, well-known
fashion coordinator, South Shore
Hospital auxilians will model
clothes by Wilma of New York.
For reservations, call Mrs.
Lloyd Cooper, ticket chairman.
^'OsceofajCabS,
mi
IN THE COOL AND SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
Finest Jewish American Cuisine
SWIMMING POOL 'GOLF 'TENNIS
HORSEBACK HIOING 'BOATING -FISHING
SUPERVISED CHILDREN'S PROGRAM
ENTERTAINMENT -INFORMAL
UVntr fnr Brochure or Phone MIAMI C
AU.iude 2500 'eei
,omSl Juu Daily
Per person, dble occ
Including Breakfast.
Lunch and Dinner.
Resort Hotel on Beautiful Lake Osceola
HENDERSONVILLc. North Carolina 28739
*Jenistfk>rldton
Sonny Dansyear
Candidate For
C. G. Commission
Veteran association executive
Sonny Dansyear, a candidate for
the Coral Gables Commission.
says the major problem facing
Coral Gables is "strengtheninf;
the economy."
"Cur main goal should be pro-
viding greater efficiency and
economy in our city government,
and seeking new approaches in
financing to relieve the ever-in-
creasing tax burden,"' Dansyear
said.
I
"I believe that there is enough
waste and duplication to cut
costs," Dansyear said. "I would
definitely oppose new taxes, but
instead would rely on better
management and more progres-
sive financing to cut inflationary
costs currently being absorbed by
homeowners."
If elected in Tuesday's Coral
Gables election, Dansyear said he
would devote full time to being
a commissioner.
A former Metro commissioner.
Dansyear has been a resident of
Coral Gables for 25 years, and a '
resident of Dade County since
1941. He is one of the authors of
the South Florida Building Code,
and has been a member of the |
Development Committee of the |
Miami Chamber of Commerce.,
He has served as a neighborhood
commissioner of the Boy Scouts
of America, and is a long-time
director f the Southwest YMCA. I
Dansyear started his career as
a social worker while attending
Columbia University. He was;
recognized as a Chartered As-
sociation Executive by the
American Society of Association
Executives in Washington. D.C..
after completion of courses at
Yale University, and has served
as a professional trade associa-
tion executive for over a quarter
of a century.
JHHA Auxiliary
Donor Luncheon
The Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary, Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged (Douglas
Gardens) wiil hold its annual
donor luncheon Sunday, April
13, at noon ;.- ihe Fontaineblnau
Hotel.
This luncheon will be honor-
ing the new life members as well
as the life trustees. Auxiliary
President Mrs. Lavrence Silver- j
man and Mrs. S.I Silverman, j
honorary life president, will,
share the dais. The invocation |
will be given by Mrs. Rose Roth,
donor journal chairman.
Mrs. Louis Makovsky, pro-
gram chairman, will introduce
Tony Simone, international sing-
ing star, with Aida Yaslo at the
piano.
Page 9-H
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
SEA VIEW INDUSTRIES
1677 W. 31st Place, Hialeah Phone 822-1200
PLAY MIAMI'S NEWEST COURSE
KENDALE LAKES WEST
North Kendall Drive & 151 Ave.
Executive Golf Course
3700 Yards e Par 60
Mi MB ft SHIP AVAILABLl
WEDNESDAY
SENIOR CITIZEN DAY
$3.00 GREEK FEES
'1.00 DISCOUNT OFF REGULAR
*3.75 GREENS FEE WITH THIS AD
LIMIT ONE PER PLAYER
*iav

interlocked
Hillsboro Upper Village. N.H.
International Camp
Imaginative summer program located on a peaceful
lake in a 1000 aoe wilderness preset boys and girls, ages 10 !5 '<: with ot'iers from
around the world Community' centered individual
programming with opportunities in athletics orts,
Vfo'eifionl and e>iten>.ive wilderness camping.
Travel Camp
Small groups ol bo/; and g"ls, ags 13 'i 5 plus an
adi.lt mar lied leaching couple. Bicycling hiking,
exploring mountains and lakes ol Appa'achia,
Canoda New England.
Crossroads
International group of ten boys and girls ages 14-
18. living ond learning together, camping, hiking,
bicycling ond exploring on:
CROSSROADS AMERICA with Appalachian
Mountain families, migrant and community
development woikers. Grand leton mountaineers,
Texas ranchers, American Indians
CROSSROADS BRITAIN with Walsh cool miners,
Irish diddicais, lancashiie cotton spinners, canal
bargees
CROSSROADS FRANCE with Basques in the
Pyrenees, Breton fishermen, young Parisians, people
of Provence
CROSSROADS SCANDINAVIA with Nomadic
Laplanders, Danish craftsmen. Norwegian
trawlermen, Swedish farmers
CROSSROADS JAPAN/KOREA with Kabuki acfori,
coastal fishermen, Hachiio pearl divers. Buddhist
monks, Gifu villagers, students of Seoul ond Tokyo.
Send for additional details arid please specify which
program interests you.
Open Hews* 2-4 P.M. April 6
Mrs. Linda Steinberg Miami, Fla.
8 5 20 S.W. 89 Ave. Tel. 271 -8697
cfor iffiai Special CvenL.
TIP:
1055 N.E. 171 Terrace
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Party gers who know have been using
Billy Bellack's Orchestra for their festive
occasions. Top grade Music Makers
entertainment and dancings
Florida's Finest Music "Floridian"
for
and his
Boca Raton Hotel & Club
Orchestra
Featuring Society, Latin. Rock and Folk Music
Singing Master of Ceremonies
Phone (305) 651-26*1 j


Page 10 B
* #ph Friday, April 4, 1975
Religious Services
MIAMI
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Happenings ^X) J ^ I
TOl'RNEY Morp than 400 O W
A r. A V A T !>HLOM CONGREGA. ^GLTAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEFARO
T'.ON *95 SW 67ih Ave. P-thodox. CONGHEGATION. 707 5th St.
Cantor Aron Brn Aroi.. 1 Orthodox Rabbi Mnrdecai Chaimo-
-------a------- .
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW ,1th Ave. AOATH YESHURUN (Temo'e). 1026
Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz. NE. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
2 tive. Cantor Ian Aloern. 33
BETH AM (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Hem
bert M. Baumqard. Associate Rabbi
Barrv Altman. 3
Keligicun Community Center. 19256
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lioson. 4-A
BETH TORAh. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blva. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lio-
schitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson.
34
l2h V?&jES!m R2bb. Sol BNAI APHaII."i47i NW ,83rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Victor O. Zwel-
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4 B
ing. Cantor Jack Lerner.
36
Kd^T^Sttt wYVlEi Ma* ShT SINAI Mcdrrr 18801 N 22nd Av.. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kmgsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman.
BETH TOV (Temple). 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 19151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
Bidnick. 38
I'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. 8-A
ISRAEL (Temsjle) OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. netorm.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10
ISRAELITE ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
11
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. 3*
CORAL GdBlfS
JUOEA (Templet. 9550 Granada Blvd.
Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Eisen-
atat. Cantor Hita Shore. 40
OR OLOM (Tempi*) 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative. Habbi David M.
Baror. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
TEMPLE ISRAEL-SOUTH (Formerly
Beth Tikva) 90?5 Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
AMU EL. (Temple) 8900 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 3C6. Rabbi Maxwell
Beraer 9
ZAMORA (Temple). 44 2amora Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
SURfSIDC
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 60
FORT lAUOtROAlt
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 W.
Oak and Par* Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz Cantor Maurice Neu. 42
TIFERETH ISRAEL (TempieV 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Se. mour Hin: -s
ZION (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
serva'ive. Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Herman. 1f
MALI AH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Corjervative. Rabbi
Nathar. Zolondek. 15
N0RIH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative.
Rabbi Joseph Gorfinkel. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. 35
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
--------------
BETH EL. 2400 Pino Trao Dr.
Orthodox. 5
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. habbi Arthur J.
Abiams. Cantor Jerome Klement. 43
Cr.ilL SPHINuS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Reform. 3501 Univer-
sity Dr. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Avo.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamchea.
1t
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 154! Jef-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
_______ 20
BETH SHOLOM (Temple). 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Loon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
TAMARAC JrZWISH CENTER. 9100
NW 57th St. Conservative, p.abbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNC ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3891 Stirling Rd. S3
P0MPAN0 BtACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER 6101
NW 9th Pt. MB
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Raubi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
HALLANDAlt
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
HOLLYWOOD
BETH El (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Avo.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfeld 40
BETH FHALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar-
thur St. Consorvativa. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 48
S I \ I (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW 62nd Avo.. Hollywood. F.abbl
David Rosenfield. 47-B
TEMPLE BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde-
cai Yardeini. 21-A
IETH TFILAH. 935
Orthodox.
Euclid
Avo.
22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-C
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 48
HOMtiTfAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 81
TOURNEY More than 400
golfers will tee off in the name
of charity Monday, May 5, at the
Doral Country Club, as the Foot-
lighters stage their 13th annual
golf tournament. Leading profes-
sionals and amateurs will com-
pete. Both men and women will
play.'.Ma* Meyers a'rifl Ed Mel-
niker will co-ordinate the fun
and games.
it it a
NAMED Woody Sudbrink,
owner and president of Sudbrink
Broadcasting, has named Norm
Feuer corporate vice president of
Sudbrink. He will assume addi-
tional responsibilities as vice
president and general manager
of WLAK Radio in Chicago along
with his current duties as vice
president and general manager
of WLYF Radio in Miami. Kathy
Seipp, formerly sales manager of
WLYF, has been named station
manager. She becomes the first
female station manager of a
major property in the Miami
market.
it it it
AUDITIONS Annual auditions
for music scholarships offered by
the music department of Miami-
Dade Community College, South
Campus, will be held Wednesday
at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts build-
ing. Room 51C8. Scholarships will
be available to qualifying stu-
dents who intend to enroll at
M DCC South, Students who play
Instruments or take voice are
eligible.
it it ir
CONVENTION Miami will
host over 3.000 art educators
from all parts of the United
States when the National Art
Education Association opens at
the Deauvllle Hotel Friday. This
14th annual convention will run
through April 9.
it it
RE-ELECTED Jesse Weiss, a
pioneer resident of Miami Beach,
has been re-elected chairman of
the Miami Beach Tourist De-
velopment Authority. Ben Z.
Grenald was named vice chair-
man, succeeding Hans H. Mar-
cus*, who served for three years.
ir ir *
CONFERENCE The Small
Business Administration and
SCORE (Service Corps of Retired
Executives) will conduct their
monthly conference for small
businessmen Tuesday from 8:30
to 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 of the
Federal Office Bldg.. 51 SW First
Ave. The conference is free and
will cover financing, record keep-
ing, breakeven point, organiza-
tion, credit and collections, mer-
chandising, etc. The conference
is limited to the first 50 persons;
reservations are necessary.
I'.lumi ntlial
B'NAI ZION (Temple). 200-178th St..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham
i. Jacobaon 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
1242 Washington Av*. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CQN-
GREGAT:ON. 715 Washington Ave.
Rabbi Meir Masltsh Melamed. 23-A
Memorial Tribute To Six Million
Being Presented Sunday Evening
A memorial tribute to the six
million Jews who died during the
German holocaust, will be given
EMANU-EL (Temple). 1701 Waehlng-
ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler, 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. 25
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern. !
Cantor Meyer Enael. 26
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1416 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MENORAH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Racoi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
NER TAMID (Temple). 79th St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eup;ene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. 30
7:30 p.m., it was announced by
Jack Filisof, president.
A program symbolizing the
martyrdom of the 6,000,000 will
be enacted by the lighting of
candles and the reading of poems
in their honor by six members
of the branch.
Moshe Fisher will read the
poem "In Remembrance": and
Cantor Mordecai Yardeini will
chant the Prayers for the Dead.
Sarah Fershko, internationally
known soprano, will be accom-
panied by her pianist husband
Hayim, in her performance of
special musical selections for this
event. A Kaddush by the entire
group will conclude the me-
morial.
Friends are asked to brin?
their friends. There Is no admi*
sion charge, and the public is
invited to attend.
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1542
44 Washington Ave. 32
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Yavneh 32-A
JACK FILISOF
by the Bialik-Ben Gurion Branch
No. 290, at the Washington Fed-
eral Savings Bank Auditorium,
1234 Washington Ave., Sunday at
Pre-Registration Underway
Pre-registration for the Temple
Menorah Day School is now in
progress. For full information on
grades one through five and the
individualized instruction pro-
gram, call Mrs. Weiner.
Ainslee K. Ferdie, immediate
Past National Commander of
the Jevvuu ar veteiaus, par-
ticipated in the National i'dii-
vention of the National Assoeia-
tion of Concerned Veterans i"
Dallas last week. The Concerned
Veterans is predominantly a
Viet Nam era group. Mr. Ferdie,
who participated with other Na-
tional Veteran Leaders in con-
ducting a workshop on "Educate
to Legislate," has just returned
from the Convocation of Jewish
War Veterans in Israel, where
he accompanied National Com-
mander Paul Kilmer in meeting
with Prime Minister Yitzhak
ICal in and Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres. Meetings were also
held with the Israeli Veteran's
League and its president, Gen-
eral iliiim Laacov; they also at-
tended dedication ceremonies at
the Soldiers Rest Home at Beer-
sheba.
ft Tfr it
Men like I. D. Blumenthul do
not come off the assembly line.
This was the theme of a series
of events honoring him recently
in a belated celebration of his
80th birthday at a banquet in
the ballroom of the Sheraton
Center. Charlotte, N.C. Hlumen-
thal received over 700 11 i- nds
and relatives
at a reception
prior to the
dinner; among
them were
Mr. and Mrs.
.Morton Kraft
Of Miami.
Speaker for
the evening
was Maurice
Weinstein, lo-
cal attorney
and long-time
friend and as-
sociate in some of Blumenthal's
civic projects. "It is not often,"
Weinstein said, "that a company
observes its 50th anniversary
and the 80th birthday of its
founding president in the same
year, but 1974 marked both of
these events for Radiator Spe-
cialty Company.
The observance of Blumen-
thal's 80th birthday was delayed
from last September until the
first weekend in March because
of the death of his wife, Mrs. Ma
dolyn C. BlumenthaL last July.
A human relations activist.
Blume.nthal is perhaps best
known for his Wildacres retreat
near Little Switzerland, where
thousands have gathered during
the past 28 years for conferences
and workshops. He originated
the Circuit Riding Rabbi pro-
gram, the Civitan Youth Con-
ferences in Good Citizenship,
and the B'nai B'rith Institute of
Judaism. He is a prime mover
in the North Carolina Jewish
Home for the Aged in Clem-
mons, to which many have made
contributions in honor of his
birthday.
A message from Mayor John
Belk was read in his absence by
City Councilman Milton Short,
who bestowed upon Blumenthal
the title "Knight of the Queen
City." In addition to the verbal
tributes, there were congratu-
latory telegrams and letters
from President Gerald Ford. Dr.
Norman Vincent Peale, retired
N.C. Chief Justice William Bob-
bin, Lt. Gov. Jim Hunt, Attor-
ney General Rufus Edmisten,
Congressman James Martin,
President of Civitan Interna-
tional M. M. Richards. Mecklen-
burg County Commission Chair-
man Mrs. Elisabeth Hair, and
M ;. Gladys Tillett, long-time
women's rights activist.
* a it
Milton Gordon of Miami
Beach, former reg.onal attorney
for the Federal Housing Ad-
ministration and attorney ad-
visor for the Department of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment, has been awarded the
Alumni Citation of the Univer-
sity of Chicago Alumni Associa-
tion. The Citation will be pre-
o wn
sente I at the annual Alumni
ion Luncheon at the uni-
versity Saturday, June 7. He and
his v ate >uii be honored g iests
at V..e luncheon and a reception
that day.
it it it
Tuinnil sue Lelbewtts of New
York, 11 year old sirring star,
apr,T"ed at Temple Beth Solo-
mon services Friday at 8 p.m.
She sang 'Eili, Eili" and other
Jewish selections. Rabbi David
Raab conducted the Services and
Cantor Mordecai Yardeini chant-
ed the liturgy.
Tammi, the granddaughter of
Mr. aid Mrs. Edward Shapiro
of Morton Towers, Miami Beach,
started singing at the age of
seven and won many talent show
contests. She was the main solo-
ist at a recent Midnight Mass
at Guardian Angel Church in
New York, and also appeared on
WNEW-TV, Ch. 5, in New York.
tfr ir *
Iris Cutler recently placed a
new Interpretive portrait of Al-
bert Einstein on view at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art.
formerly known as the Miami Art
Center, on North Kendall Drive.
The painting, done in acrylic, is
par! of the Artists' Equity of
Florida Show, to which the pub-
lic is invited at no charge. The
juried show will hang through
Anril 10. and includes the work
ef other Equity Artists such as
Herman F'sher. Fn/n Gallo.
Porothv B^sco. Kachd Briefer,
V:re!nia Samples, H. Silver.
F>-anCes WoIf*n, Ethel Blake,
CharVs Jacobson, Shirley I.
Green and Greta Carmen.
Iris plans to accompany her
husband. Budd, to New Orleans
the latter part of April and will
visit Xavier University's research
program in "Art Theranv" while
he attends the American 'W As-
sociation meeting o' v":ial
Health Lawyers on h-h-" or the
Comprehensive H'lt,, Planning
Council of South Florida.
it it it
Mrs. Evel'n T. *** ^t r0ral
Gables, president o." fie De- art,
ment of Florida-] a:i"s Auxiliary
of the Je- ish Var Veterans, and
Mrs. Irene '' in'r-min of Miami
Bear"1, national historian of the
Ladies A odUary Of the Jewish
War Veterans, will attend a
meeting of the Executive Com-
mittee and a Constitutional Con-
vention of the National Ladies
Auxiliary of the Jewish War
Veterans from Monday. April 11,
through Sunday. April 13, at the
Warwick Hotel, in New York
City.
-eV ir ir
**
Hal Liberman, newly elected
commodore of the Yacht Club at
Kings Biv. has arranged a spe-
cial meeting for members Wed-
nesday with the Heart Associa-
tion of Greater Miami conducting
a course in cardio-pulmonary
resuscitation. The Sunfish World
Championship races will be held
from Apr. 26 through May 5. This
will be the first time the inter-
national sailing event will be
held in the United States. Kings
Bay will be host.
it it it
Miami artist Tibor David
whose work has been favorably
compared with that of Marc
Chagall and Walt Disney, will
have a one-man showing of his
paintings at Kings Bay Yacht
and Country Club during the
month of April.
it it it
SELECTEDThe Heller Build-
ing, a four story office building
at 4500 Biscayne Blvd. has been
selected as "Building of the
Month" by Miami's Committee on
Ecclogy man E. Albert Pallot said. The
citation will be awarded at tms -
Committee's April 11 luncheon
in the Columbus Hotel.
.' i
p.m. His topic win oe
Israel "
xjpuair


*
Friday, April 4, 1975
. knisti tkrMbr,
Page 11-B
I)e
jEabhtwcal flage
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-ditors
Dr. Max A. Lioschitz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
By Dr. Frederick I.arhman
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
What is the status of Jews
in Turkey?
In 1969, says the authoritative
Encyciop&.-dia Judaica, there
were 35-40,000 Jews in Turkey,
nearly all Sephardim, of whom
30,000 lived in Istanbul. Ashken-
azim. called 'Poles" by the Turks
because of the 17th and 18th
century immigration from Po-
land, accounted for 3-5 per cent
of the Jews. German-speaking
Ashkenazim who arrived later
from Austria formed the elite of
the community, and the Great
Synagogue built by them became
known as the "Austrian Temple.'
After the death of the last of-
ficiating Rabbi (1944), the con-
gregation went into a decline and
was in danger of complete dis-
integration.
The older generation of Seph-
ardic Jews continued to speak
Ladino. In The 1955 census, 64
per cent among the Jews declar-
ed that their mother tongue was
Yahudice (Ladino) compared
with 84 per cent in 1927. but
knowledge of Ladino is decreas-
ing There are about 200 Karaite
families (1.000 people) living in
a suburb of Istanbul whose fore-
fathers settled in the city in
Byzantine times, ot recognizing
the Talmudic-Ra'ihinnical tradi-
tion, they established their own
synagogue and cemetery and are
completely separated from the
rest of the community.
The peace treaty of Lausanne
ctica
(July 24. 1923) followed by the
abolition of the caliphate, assur-
ed the minorities living in Tur-
key their personal status as pro-
vided by their religious canons.
The Turkish republic was declar-
ed a secular state, and Kemal
Ataturk. its founder, attempted
to erase all signs of the religious-
institutional influence of Islam
and also to maintain equality of
Christianity and Judaism in pub-
lic life. The wearing of a "cler-
ical garb." for example, was pro-
hibited. For Jews the prohibition
on teaching Hebrew in schools
was a hard blow. After Ataturk's
death in 1938, many of the pro-
hibited. For Jews, the prohibition
eased, but the general attitude
toward the religious minorities
remained unchanged.
Nevertheless, says the E/J,
Jews remained second-class citi-
zens in Turkey, like Greeks and
the Armenians. This was demon-
strated during World War II. as
Hitler's propaganda gained
ground and it seemed that the
Axis Powers were moving toward
victory. To meet wartime needs
in neutral Turkey, a capital tax
was approved (1942). and it soon
became apparent that the tax-
payer's assessment was based on
his religion and nationality. In
fact, the poorest among the non-
Muslims, especially Jewish arti-
sans and wage earners, were tax-
ed at rates wildly beyond their
ability to pay. Through the
spring and summer of 1943 the
continuing arrests, seizures, and
deportations were almost all of
non-Muslims, th'.' majority of
Issues And Answers...
Our Rabbis' Views
Your Yiddishkeit Shows
By RABBI HAROLD RICHTER, Jewish Chaplain of Broward
A few months ago. Dr. Eugene Borowitz, noted Jewish educa-
'tor, writer and lecturer wrote a book entitled, The Masks Jews
Wear." In it, the author states his belief that most of us are really
nore Jewish than we would be willing to admit. It is a "new twist"
to the American Jew's dilemma and a theme that came to mind
when I thought of a strange visit to a Jewish patient in a Broward
County hospital.
In the incident which I am about to relate, the patient, after
my brief introduction, graciously extended his hand and exclaimed,
"Rabbi, I will say hello, and that's it." I am not here to intrude
upon an individual's privacy, and would have graciously taken leave
as there are numerous Jewish patients where I can expect a heartier
welcome. However, a Talmudic injunction came to mind at this
point: "Follow every request your host makes except the one in
which he says "go." Intuitively, I sensed there was more to come
and so I graciously sat down, and strangely, he did too.
The man then spewed forth: "I am angry with God!" (he spoke
mostly Yiddish). Perhaps he saw I was not taken aback with his
outburst.
I The shtotl Jew says: "If God would have lived in the shtetl, they
would have broken his windows!" In these days it is good to see
a Jew who is not indifferent to God, but has some feelings for him
pro or con.
He then changed his theme and tone and spoke of how Jewish
his son was and how in his work he often has occasion to act as
a lay rabbi. He went on to say how he looked forward to Passover,
for then his "Jewish" son would come to visit and lead a real tradi-
tional seder.
The conversation continued and he told me that at the delicate
age of 11, God has taken his father from him and that he was
rti]] very angry. Since then he has very rarely entered any syna-
e I explained to him that he may have missed a great many
Bpiritoal Joys and warm opportunities for friendship because he
had estranged himself.
I wonder how many of us are like my slightly-confused patient
^tonlv denving our closeness with Judaism, but actually missing
l its mans goodies because of some frozen anger or other
excuse.
To put it in terms of the book, I mentioned, 'The Masks Jews
Wear," it's time to doff our masks as Jews.
whom were Jews. With the de-
cline of German power, a law
was passed (1944) releasing all
defaulters still detained and can-
celling all amounts still unpaid.
After the end of the war. the
Judaica relates, the general situ-
ation improved. In 1968 the eco-
nomic situation of Turkish Jewry
was good. There were few under-
privileged since most of the
needy had settled in Israel soon
after its establishment. Minor
persecutions of Jews in Istanbul
occurred, however, through ten-
sion between Turkey and Cyprus,
during the anti-Greek riots in
1955 and 1964. and during the
Six-Day War. The Turkish gov-
ernment, having established dip-
lomatic relations with Israel, tried
to quell mob violence. Anti-Sem-
itism though prohibited by law,
has not been erased and is dis-
guised as anti-communism.
How were the Danish Jews
rescued during the Holo-
caust?
For almost three and a half
years, from the day of Denmark's
occupation by Nazi Germany on
April 9, 1940, the nearly 10.000
Danish Jews and Jewish refugees
were not molested. The Danes,
while collaborating with the Ger-
mans in the so-called policy of
negotiation, simultaneously ex-
tended full political, social, juri-
dical, and personal protection to
the Jews and their property. The
behaviour of the Danish authori-
ties and the population was so
steadfast that the Germans did
not think it profitable to injure
the Danish Jewish nopulation. the
Encyclopaedia Judaica stales.
Things changed when Ger-
many, on Aubusl 28.1943, abo
ed the Danish-German agree-
ment, In Septemb r 1943 martial
law was declared. The represeu
tative of the German Reich, the
Nazi, Werner Best, advocated
u>ing this opportunity to deport
the Jews. The attache for ship-
ping affairs, F. G. Dukwitz, who
maintained good relations with
leading Danish Social Democrats,
informed them of the impending
danger for the Jews. His warning
was quickly spread by Danish
citizens, organizations and by the
Jews themselves, and overnight
a rescue organization sprung up
that helped 7.200 Jews and about
700 non-Jewish relatives escape
to Sweden in less than three
weeks. Danish caotains and fish-
ermen carried out this operation.
What began as a spontaneous
popular movement was developed
into an organized action by the
Danish resistance movement. The
cost of the transfer amounted to
about 12 million Danish crowns,
of which trie Jews themselves
paid approximately 6'j to 7 mil-
lion. The rest was provided out
of private and public Danish con-
tributions.
During '.he night of the per-
IV Programs
SUNDAY, APRIL 6
"The Still Small Voice"
WCKT-TV, Ch. 7, 10 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Temple Sinai of
North Dade
Guest-:
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe
Temple Beth El
Hollywood
Rabbi Avrom Drazin
Temple Israel of Miramar
Topic:
"The Jewish Community
and Rabbis of
South Broward"
sedition (October 1-2. 1943) and
following it. less than 500 Jews
were seized by the Germans.
They were sent to Theresienstadt
and remained there until the
spring of 1945. when they too
were brought to Sweden by the
action of the Swedish Red Cross
headed by Count Bernadotte.
I'pon their return from Sweden
to Denmark at the end of the
war, most of the Jews found their
property intact, the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica says.
It may be estimated that ap-
proximately 120 people perished
because of the persecution: about
50 in Theresienstadt and a few
more in other camps. Close to the
same number committed suicide
or were drowned on their way to
Sweden. Less than 2 per cent of
the Jewish population of Den-
mark perished.
Denmark, during the Holocaust,
was a beacon that the rest of
Europe should have followed .
but did not so that the Holocaust
came to represent the European
attitude toward Jews and the
humane love of the Dane for
their fellowmen was simply a
benevolent postscript in a brutal
and inhuman time.
Great Jewish Personalities
The Lion Of Safed, Isaac Luria
By DR. MAXWELL BERGER
Temple Kamn-EI
Safed is the northern most
city in Israel and the highest.
It sits atop the mountain range
of upper Galilee, 2.700 feet above
sea level,
In the century following the
Jewish Expulsion from Spain
this little town became the seat.
an i fountain-head of the Kab-
b lists, a small but potenl
ol pious scholars who iV
themselves to the rei n<
of the Jewish ( n lition,
and delved into esoteric
trines and soughl to fathom oc-
cult ore and Interpret Jewish
mystici n.
One nl the key figures who
I thi ;e tend ies was
i iria, who was re-
ed as the founder ol the
school "i pratical Kabbala.
His brief life of on j 3S years
(1534-15721 is encrusted with
layers of legend. Hi was dedi-
cati d to the pursuit >>:' the spirit-
ual ami his students and dis-
es revered him as the
of spirituality. They .ailed him
Adonenu, Our Master.
The letter A," ana the Initials
of Rabbi Isa.u- form the word
ari. which is the Hebrew for
"Lion." He was thus known as
The Lion" and his students
were known as the "Gurei H'ari
The Young Lions." The letter
"H" was added to his name to
stand for "Ha-Elohi the di-
unc." and he has since been
known as Ha-Ari.
In the heart of Safed stands
the Ha-Ari Synagogue as a liv-
ing shrine where one can visual-
ize this saintly scholai surround-
ed by his disciples gathering for
prayer and engaging in mystical
discourses on the secrets of God
and His hidden meanings.
Isaac Luria was born in Jeru-
salem in 1534. His father, Solo-
mon Ashkenazi, who had emi-
grated from Germany, died at
a very early age and Isaac was
sent to Cairo to be brought up
by an uncle. He was a brilliant
student and became a Talmudic
authority in his teens. Although
he was groomed to engage in
his uncle's pepper and grain
business, the nsing trend of
mystic studies intrigued him.
When he was about 22, he
withdrew to a small island in
the Nile near Cairo. There he
lived alone for the next 13 years
visiting his family only on Sab-
hat hs and holidays. He was en-
grossed In the study of all con-
temporary Kabbalists, with par-
ticular emphasis on the Zohar
which had then just recently
be n publi
Zohar, as a comment
on the inner and hldd<
oi the Bible, has been de-
I as a mixture of theo-
Sophlc theology, mystical psy-
chology, myth and poetry. Old
gnostic doctrines, mystical tradi-
tions.- theurgic speculations, pop-
ular superstitions and mytho-
logical motifs d veil side by side
with echoes of Neo-Platonic and
Aristotelian philosophic theories
about the nature of the Cosmos
and about the relationship be-
tween a transcendant God and
a finite world.
Long periods of .seclusion and
contemplation nurtured his flex-
ible ima ;inai i m and he began
to believe that he had commu
nication with Elijah, who on
numerous occasions explained to
him the difficult passages In the
Zohar.
11, believed al In his sleep
his soul engage I In I-
with the ancient Talmudic Sages
in Heaven. His disciples attrib-
uted to him supernatural knowl-
edge, thi ol pei I nTning
mirai lea ability to ex ri Ise
demons, and a knowledge of the
languages of the trees, the birds
and the ange -
In 1569, Luria responding to a
-divine call" settled in Safed
which had become a center of
(Cabbalistic mysticism. Instantly
he was surrounded by a coterie
of disciples and colleagues who
eagerly awaited his lectures and
Interpretations. Among them
were Solomon Aikabctz, Joseph
Caro, Moses Cordevero. Hayim
Vital, Moses Zacuto and .Moses
Hayim Luzatto.
Although Luria himself wrote
virtually nothing save for a few
poems and Sabbath hymns in
Aramaic, most of his theoretical
Kabbala was published by His
students as notes taken from his
lectures and discourses.
These ideas spread throughout
every country of the Diaspora,
their cosmic drama of Exile and
Redemption caught the imagina-
tion of the mas~es as well as the
scholars. Elements of the Lu-
rianic Kabbala lay behind the
messianic claims of Shabbetai
Zevi in the 17th century, and
behind Chassidism, the revival-
ist movement stemming from
Israel Ben Eliezer, Baal Shem
Ten, in the 18th century.
Ilabbi Isaac I.uria, Ha-Ari
The Lionthe legendary giant
in Jewish tradition and Jewish
literature, died in Safed in 1574.
He was buriedalong with Rab-
bi Joseph Caro, and the other
Talmudic luminaries of the 16th
century, in the cemetery on the
slop.' below the Ari Synagogue,
facing Moron, the shrine of Rab-
bi Shimon Bar Yochai, the au-
thor of the Zohar.
!
------1
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
23 NISAN 7:19 j


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Page 12-B
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Friday, April 4, 1975
JOSEPH HEIN
IRVING WALTMAN
f 'Nights In Israel' Set At
Rolling Green, New Horizon
Two "Nights in Israel" on be-
half of the 25th anniversary of
State of Israel Bonds will be held
in North Miami Beach during the
next two weeks, Alan B. Kessler,
executive committee chairman of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization, has announced.
Rolling Green Building "C"
will hold its event next Wednes-
day evening in the fourth floor
auditorium. Slated as special
guest is renowned American
Jewish folk humorist Eddie
Schaffer. Moe Wagenfeld is
chairman of the Rolling Green
"Night in Israel"; William Kahn
is cochairman.
Wednesday evening, April 16.
the co-owners ..f New Horizon
will cDonsor a "Night in Israel"
in tribute to Josenh Hein and
Irving Waltman. recipients-elect
of the State of Israel Bonds
Scroll of Honor.
Hein, an active member of the
American Jewish Congress, the
American Red Mogen David for
Israel and the American Techni-
on Society, is affiliated with the
B'nai B'rith Sinai Lodge at New
Horizon. In Westchester, NY., he
was one of four men who or-
ganized Temple Beth El.
Waltman, who is also active
in the B'nai B'rith Sinai Lodge,
has served as vice president of
the New Horizon Community Cen-
ter since its inception four years
ago. In the Bronx, N.Y., he was a
member of the Workmen's Circle
for over 45 years.
Serving as chairman of the
New Horizon Israel Bonds event
is Arthur F. Schloss. Special
guest will be humorist Eddi?
Schaffer.
Gerald Schwartz Speaker At Friday's
B'nai B'rith Luncheon Club Meeting
Gerald Schwartz, executive vice
chairman of the Florida Commit-
tee for Bar-Ilan University in
Israel, will speak on the Middle
East crisis before members of
the B'nai B'rith Luncheon Club
Friday at 12:30 p.m. at the 100
Lincoln Road Bldg., Miami Beach.
Gershon Miller, Miami Beach
attorney who has served as chair-
man of the luncheon club for 26
years, said the session is free and
open to the general Dublic. fol-
lowing a Dutch Treat luncheon
across Lincoln Road in the Di-
Lido Hotel at noon. Nat Gillman
is president of the Miami Beach
Lodge of B'nai B'rith which
sponsors the luncheon club.
Schwartz, a past president of
the Miami Beach Lodge and
former president of the South
Florida Zionist Federation, is a
member of the national board of
the American Zionist Federation
and heads a Miami Beach Dublic
relations, advertising and fund
raisng agency.
He will discuss the implica-
tions of Egypt's agreement to ex-
tend the first-round disengage-
ment for three months, of Secre
tary of State Kissinger's failure
in step-by-steo negotiations, and
the outlook for resumption of
peace talks in Geneva.
All local and visiting members
of B'nai B'rith. largest Jewish
fraternal organization in the
world, are invited to attend the
meeting. Miller said.
Dr. Joseph Lookstein To Meet With
Florida Supporters Of Bar-llan l).
H Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein, first
vice president of the Synagogue
Council of America and chancel-
J> lor of Bar-Ilan University in Is-
rael, will arrive in Miami Beach
Sunday for a series of meetings
with Florida supporters of the
Israeli university.
| Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach, state cochairman for
Bar-Ilan University, said Dr.
Lookstein will review the latest
developments in higher educa-
tion in Israel in the face of the
growing economic crisis con-
I fronting the Jewish state.
| Judge J. David Liebman, vice
chairman of the Florida Com-
I mittee, pointed out that Bar-
! Ban's current record enroll-
: ment of 7,000 students some
I 1,000 from the United States
and Canada has placed a se-
1 vere financial strain on the only
American-chartered university
in Israel.
I
f Located in Ranat Can. a Tel
| Aviv suburb which is the sister
i city of Miami Beach in Israel,
j BaMIan University will eele-
, krmte the 20th anniversary of
DR. JOSEPH LOOKSTEIN
its founding this year.
Dr. Lookstein, who will take
office this fall as president of
the Synagogue Council, is sen-
ior rabbi of Kehilath Jeshurun
Congregation in New York City,
one of the nation's largest and
most prominent synagogues. He
is past president of the New
York Board of Rabbis and for-
mer president of the Rabbinical
Council of America.-
AZF, CAJE, Aliyah Center f\
Sponsoring Ulpan Classes
Community Ulpan Hebrew
classes for beginning, interme-
diate and advanced level stu-
dents, under the joint sponsor-
ship of the American Zionist Fed-
eration, the Israel Aliyah Center,
and the Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education, will begin during
the week of April 14, in locations
in North Dade; South Dade and
Miami Beach. Herbert Zvi Berg-
er, executive director of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, announced.
The Ulpan Hebrew Centers are
part of a national program or-
ganized by the Department of
Education and Culture of the
World Zionist Organization,
which is under the direction of
Dr. Abraham Gannes.
In the North Dade area, class-
es will be held at Temple Sinai
of North Dade, 18801 NE 22nd
Ave., Mondays and Wednesdays
from 9:45-11:45 a.m. and at Beth
Torah Congregation Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 7:30-9:30 p.m.,
for all levels.
The location of the Miami
Beach classes will be at Temple
Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave.,
Mondays and Wednesdays from
10:00 a.m. to noon, and 7:30-9:30
p.m.
In the South Dade area, classes
will be held at Temple Zion. 8000
Miller Rd., Tuesdavs and Thurs-
days, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. and at
Temple Beth Am, 5950 N. Ken-
dall Dr., Mondays and Wednes-
days from 9:30-11:30 a.m.
The Ulpan Hebrew classes will
be conducted in cooperation with
Miami Dade Community College.
Classes will meet for two hours
each session, twice a week, for
nine weeks.
In addition to the Hebrew
language learning in the Ulpan
classes. Israeli culture is also in-
troduced. Classes discuss recent
happenings in Israel, and learn
Hebrew songs and dances. In ad-
dition, there are parties and
meals together, with the entire
menus and ordering in Hebrew.
Instructors for the classes are
especially trained teachers who
have been involved in in-service
study in the methodology of
teaching Ulpan Hebrew. They
concentrate on spoken Hebrew
u
with the Israeli accent so as to
provide a good speech model for
me students.
Serving on the Hebrew Ulpan
Committee are Harriet Greene,
director of the American Zionist
Federation; Eliezer Kroll, di-
rector of the Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter; Herbert Zvi Berger and
Abraham J. Gittclson, executive
and associate directors of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation; Levi Soshuk. prominent
Hebrew educator, and Rita Gold,
coordinator of the Ulpan pro-
gram.
Additional information about
the classes may be secured from
the office of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Local Political Scientist
To Speak At Temple Menorah
Bake Sale, Entertainment
A bake sale and entertainment
is planned by the Marsha Wolf-
stein Chapter. Histadrut Women's
Council, Wednesday noon in the
Barcelona Hotel, Miami Beach.
For reservations, call Mrs. Mor-
ris Kogan, Mrs. Tessie Kirson or
the Histadrut office. Mrs. Philip
Sahl is president of the group,
which sponsors scholarships for
indigent students in Israel.
Dr. Martin H. Greenberg, di-
rector of the International Rela-
tions program and associate
professor of Political Science at
Florida International Universi-
ty, will lecture on "The Military
Posture of Israel" Monday at 8
p.m. in the second of a three-
lecture series entitled "The
Challenge of the 70's" at Temple
Menorah.
Dr. Greenberg, former chair-
man of the Political Science De-
partment at the University of
Wisconsin-Green Bay, was chair-
man of F.I.U.'s Political Science
Department until last yea;- when
the International Relations pro-
gram was initiated.
A graduate of the University
of Miami, Dr. Greenberg receiv-
ed his Master's and Ph.D. de-
grees in Political Science from
the University of Connecticut.
He is listed in "American Men
and Women of Science." "Con-
temporary Authors," and "Who's
Who in Science Fiction," and is
a member of the International
Institute for Strategic Studies,
American Political Science As-
sociation, the Science Fiction
Writers of America, and many
other related organizations.
Dr. Greenberg has lectured
extensively throughout the South
Florida area during the past
three years. An author of note,
his books inciude "Bureaucracy
and Development: A Mexican
Case Study." "The Israeli Mili-
tary Reader" (forthcoming),
"International Relations: Yes-
terday, Today and Tomorrow,"
and "Science Fiction: the Myths
of Technological Man."
The first lecturer in the Tem-
ple Menoi ah series was Rabbi
Philip Spectre, president of the
I ael Region of the Rabbinical
Assembly of Conservative P.ab-
I is, whose topic was "The Sta-
tes of Religion in Israel." The
scries will conclude Monday,
April 28, with a presentation by
Dr. Allen Rutchik, clinical psy-
chologist.
The lectures are open to the
public; for tickets call the Tem-
ple Menorah office.
Ohere are many condominiums in
SOUGH FOXlDA that halt
garden apartments, spacious floor plans,
million dollar recreation centers, ideal
locations, courtesy 6uses,and lori prices.
ZBut only one is recommended ^endorsed
% the JEWISH COUNCIL
JEWISH OEZCHEXS ZSSOC,
SHOMKIM JEWISH PO&CE,
and 39 other organizations.
Come join us today. }jou are Ury
Welcome here. S7*\ rr r
It&mbkwood
POST OFFICE BOX 8340 CORAl SPRINGS FLORIDA 33065
Call ut for more information at 752 2400
Toll Free from Miami 949-3810
B nc,. an out..** ca/jjTrrSa^bE lolmtl p,OH-cu- NY4,3


4,1975
+Jmt&! n-oridH^n
Page 13-B
^posits Explained
of the Social Security
ration were to be on
lie Bank of Miami Beach
fchington Ave., from 9
i! 2 p.m. Thursdiv, Fri-
Monday to explain |e-
[the new Federal direct
'system for Social S
kecks which went into ef-
week, Benjamin I. Shul-
lairman of the board of
|k of Miami Beach, said.
IMMEOTIIci
JTICE OF ACTION
iTRUCTIVE SERVICE
|NO PROPERTY)
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Bl_ORIPA IN AND FOR
I DADE COUNTY
||_ ACTION NO. 75-9847
Kp Marriairp of
UNA FERNANDEZ,
,> FERNANDEZ,
kid
)N FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
)i'i if.DO FERNANDEZ
pfferaon Avenue
rimenl ", 4
tli, New Jersey
IRE HEREBY NOTIFtED
,,11 for involution ''."
, n riled RgatflBl you
required to serve a
itefen ies, if ny t
HEI.I.ER, nttoi i
address li 420
i i Bench, Florida, 9o i <
. orlfi Inal with the "'
', "I enurl on of '
ntherwl I ruH
:'/,-ains! you for thi C "
the complaint pe
shall l"- published
ur 11 m ul Ive
IJRWISH PI.OR'DIAN,
PS tny hand and the seal of
f- ni Miami, Florida on this
March, 1975
i HARD P. BRINKER
1 'lerk, Circuit Court
I' : County, Florida
By I. BNEBDEN
v- Deputy Clerk
'--urt Spall
BEIXBR, ESQ.
bin Road
ch, Fla. 331311
y for Petitioner
4/4-11-18-15
10TICE OF ACTION
4STRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
"LORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
IL ACTON NO. 75-9711
'I',' Marriage of
dONZALBZ,
:'Hr.
li I
F'> GONZALEZ,
bndent.
ION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
III I AM i GONZALEZ
|ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
'<>r Dissolution of Mar-
.....n filed against you and
reiiulred to terve a oopj of
IJien defenses, if any to i< on
INZAI EZ, JR., E8Q attorney
r whose address Is 1 nI
} \ niie. Miami, El. ,: I2S
the original with the rlerk
styled court on or before
1975; otherwise a default will
l ncainsl you for the reliif
the ci mplaint or petl-
' shall !> published once
w fur tour con -i' utli i
^JEWISH FI OR'D'AN
ES my hnnd and the seal of
t at .Miami, Flor|da on this
pf Mar, h, 1!'T",
fHAKl) P, BRINKER
C :'<. circuit Ci urt
Cm tity, !-"o- rla
M ION NEWMAN
: rv uty clerk
Seal)
EZ, ,n: ESQ.
:h Avenue
' rtZ4-4S66)
for IVtitloner
4/4-11-18-25
rt
;iP.CU i COURT OF THE
ITH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT
-ORIDA IN AND FOR
1 > DE COUNTS
"BATE DIvS'ON
)BATE NO 74-7551
(NESBITT)
ate of
[ICE TO

CREDITORS
and All Persons
Pemanils Airainst
1 > notified and reciuir-
ttit at y claims and demands
m iy have against ihe es-
IORA I EW18 d-
|fle County, Florid i, to
L4udi'es ,,( liade t_'oun*y.
I aann- in ilupll, ate and as
Section ":i.'l If;. Florida
their offices in the County
in Dade County. Florid
i alendar months fn m 'l-
lie first publication I
e will I,,- barred.
Mlpml. Florida, this 25th
rch A l). |97s.
HI r.lA.N l:|(.>l>\
IATHa.N BRADY
As Execul
HloAtlon of this notice on
|y 01 April, Hi?.",.
KL'MM.E
gn i:,\,-, utora
RoaM, Miami Beach,
4/4-11
[NOTICE UNDER
TlTIOUS NAME LAW
J Id HEREBY GIVEN that
failed desiring to engage it:
Vnier the rictitlous name of
COMMERCIAL MEM 9
.W, 13th Street Mlam .
to reflatcr said mime
erk of the Circuit Com t
unty, Florida.
z v i.i-cio
yth street Miami Florida
4/4-11-18-25



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^JD/l THOUSAND.
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Introducing the AmeriCAN DO account from American Savings Open an account for $2,000 or
more with us at any cf our offices and have your picture taken...so you can get your own personal
AmeriCAN DO card. The moment you present it at an American Savings Office, or anywhere, your
AmeriCAN DO card is living proof that you have at least $2,000 in a savings account with us. (How's that
for being taken at face value?) The AmeriCAN DO card with your own picture on it is the most positive
means of identification you can carry.
All things considered, the AmeriCAN DO account is probably the most complete financial
package offered anywhere. As far as we know, it's the first time so many improved services have been
offered in one single account. And at American Savings, there is no monthly charge for this account.
Its free.
Here's a list of the things you can do or get with your AmeriCAN DO card.
3. Itemized monthly statement describing each
and every transaction.
1. DIRECT DEPOSIT OF SOCIAL
SECURITY CHECKS, insurance benefit
checks and stock dividend checks.
Your Social Security check can be mailed
directly to American Savings for deposit in
your account. Your check is completely safe.
Your check can never be stolen. And your
check will start earning interest at once.
This new service is available to all regular
savings account depositors as well as
AmeriCAN DO account holders.
2. Transfer to or from your checking account by
telephone at any time. 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. (Only $50 minimum on non-business
accounts!)
4. Traveler's checks, free of service charge.
5 Teller's checks, free of service charge.
6. Money orders, free of service charge.
7. U.S. Savings Bonds, free of service charge.
8. Free notary public.
9. Free save-by-mail service.
10. Free bond coupon collection.
11. Free collection of securities.
12. Free photocopies on a limited basis.
13. Automatic transfer of interest from your
savings or certificate account to your
AmeriCAN DO account.
14. Automatic transfer of interest from your
AmeriCAN DO account to anyone you des
lb. Highest legal interest rates on your savings.
16. Maximum Federal Insurance on your savings.
17. Last, but not least, your own personal
Savings Counselor.
If you want an AmeriCAN DO card, but don't havp an account will is. all you have tod
deposit of $2,000 or more at any Amem mSaving; ifhce, li I ition ami have >
deposit
iken
The AmeriCAN DO account. Anything you can do, now you can do better at American Savings.
MERICAN SAVINGS
S. Loan Association of Florida
Shepard Broad Morris N. Broad
Chairman President
In Dade Phone 673-5566 In Broward Phone 564-8547.
OCEANSI0E (MAIN) OFFICE: BAYSIDE: NORTH SHORE i BAY HARBOR ISL*N0S:
Ame-cj-Savings Piaza 1200Lincoln Road Man 200 71stSl'eet UOOKantCoocoii
(Comer ot Lincoln and Washington) (Cornerof Alton Road) (Corner of Collins Avenue' j" Broad Causeway)
Miami 8-jci Miami Beach Miami Beach BayHarbor Islands
PLUS FOUR OFFICES IN BROWARD COUNTY TO SERVE YOU.
*
FSLK
1=J


(
Page 14-B
fJenisli fhridiair
Friday, April 4, 1975
Obituaries
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKl
*
GILLETTE
JCI.ES. 77 of Mil. passed awav
Thursday. March 27 Cam* h.-re 18
yean ago from N.Y. survived by his
Aclrivnii.' MB. 2 daughters,
Suzanne Collins. NMB. Mrs.
. Atriela Parker Pallas. Tex., arand-
chtldren. l.aurle ami Jodv Collins and
Leslie I.ynn Parker. He was a mem-
ber of Temple Israel since 1939.
founder of the Men's Fashion Oulld
of Mil. founding" member of the BUB
of Mil. member of Kiwanls and con-
tributor to Mt. Slnal Hospital. Fu-
neral services were held Friday Mar.
28 B< Temple Israel with arrange-
ments by Riverside Chapels
MARTON
JOSEPH. Phllli. 81. "f Miami Heach,
Gordon.
LEBOVITZ, Lena. 7". of North Miami
Beach. Blasberg.
LEVENSON Rose, 89, of Miami
Beach Blaaberg.
ORCHow. Qllda, 55, "1 Miami Beach.
Cordon.
SPRINZ. John, 73. of North Miami
BSJaPnT* BIWi slde.~-
WEINEK. Sidney, 53. of North Miami
Beach. Levitt.
Atr.ASK. Mollie P., of Miami Heach
Hiasberg.
BRILL, Benjamin. 79, of Miami
Beach. Hiasberg.
KAPI AN, Emanuel. IS, of North
Miami. Levitt
KAPI AN. Rose. 59. of North Miami.
Levitt
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engaee
In business under the fictitious name
of CUBAN ASSOCIATION OF ART-
ISTS AND MUSICIANS IN EXILE.
ASOCIACION CIHANA DE ARTIS-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-1969
Etfu r8icos~BN ei'; ExVhii. %g}fSaamnm
at 23S1 West Flagler Street. Miami deceased rPFniTORS
intends to register said name with NOTICE TO CREDlTOW> samPAS ESO
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Pade To All Creditors and AD E%noi Hay; GEORGE SAMPAs^ksu
County. Florida. ing Claims or
LUCIANO DE PAZOS Estate: ., ,
3'28____4/4_-11^18 yu are hereby notified and re-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersianed. deslrlna to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of MICRO! iRAPHICS at 4-9 North Hi-
biscus Drive. Miami Beach. Florida
y.tiny Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Pade County. Florida^
Pemands Against Said Attorney for M^ROGRAPHICS
4/4
BARBARA R.. 66. of MB passed
away Wednesday. March 26. Came
here 12 years ago from Pittsburgh.
Pa. Survived by her daughter, Carol
Ross, Ft. Laud, and brother, Alec
Javor, Phila.. Pa. She was a mem-
ber of the Hadassah Lincoln Chap-
ter, the Cerman-American Social
Club, Papanicoiau Cancer Society,
KUSBSth Hungarian Club. Funeral
services wore held Friday. March
28 at Riverside Chapels. Interment
followed at Lakeside Cemetery.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEVITT
Memorial Chape
"JiWISH fUNEKAL DltfCTOIS"
*
LOCAL AND OUT Or STATE
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
13385 W. DIXIE HWY.. N.M.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-9705
N RE: The Marriage of
LUIS MAROOLLES.
Petitioner,
and
EI.SA MAROOLLES.
Respondent.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
T' i EI.SA MAROOLLES
Ban Miguel 9n
Havana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIER
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses. If any. to it on
ROY GONZALEZ, JR.. ESO. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 101
N W 12th Avenue. Miami. PL 33128.
and tile the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
May 9th 1975: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion
This notice shall be published once
ea< h week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIP1AN
WITNESS my hand anil the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
2tith day of March. 197S
RICHARP P BRINKBR
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Pade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROY GONZALEZ, JR.. ESQ.
101 N.W. I2th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33128 (324-4555)
Attorney for Petitioner
4/4-11-18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH.JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-1574
In RE: Estate of
I.CLA HART
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and reauir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of LULA HART deceased late
of Sebastion County. Arkansas,
to the Circuit Judges of Pade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16. Florida
Statutes. In their offices lr. the Coun-
ty Courthouse In Pade County, Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be bnrred.
Filed at Miami. Florida this 20th
day of March. AD. 1975.
ROSA MAE STATON
As Ancillary Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the _sth day of March. 1975.
DAVID M C.ONSHAK
Attorney for Estate
1497 N.W 7th Street. Miami. Florida
3/28 4/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 75-134
In RE: Estate of
IMRE KALMAR
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
qttlred to present any claims
and demands which you may
have against the estate of JU-
LIl'S SCHNEIDER deceased late of
Dade County. Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided In
s. -.urn 73?.16, Florida Statutes, In
their offices in the County Court-
house in Dade County, Florida, within
four calendar months from the time
of the first publication hereof, or the
same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 31st
day of March. AD. 1975.
REUBEN M. SCHNEIDER
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 4th day of April. 1975
A BRA MS. ANTON, KOBBINS.
RBSNICK AND SCHNEIDER. PA.
Attorneys for Executor
7th Floor. Home Federal Tower
1720 Harrison Street
Hollywood, Florida 33020
4/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOH
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-5807
In HE: Estate of
Augusta H. Crummins
""NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors ard All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate: .
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of Augusta H. Crummins de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-32124
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of .__ ,,
OLGA Q. HERNANDEZ, wife.
ESTEBAN HERNANDEZ, husband.
TO ESTEBAN HERNANDEZ
5152 NW 1 Street
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Pissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reaulred to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
Arthur H. Lloson. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1980 So.
Ocean Prlve Hallandale. Florida 33009.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above stvled court on or before
April 16 1975; otherwise a default
will be entered against vou for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition
WITNESS mv hand and the seal or
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5 dav of March. 1975.
RICHARP P. BHINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Pade C-untv. Florida
Bv I- SNEEDEN
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal. ^^
4/4

tnvim au so statw
AAifLI PAJUUrU} IN THI IlAI
itrtWO. srlrTf!>.
HOMW fwu: (.tret ou Aiat,
KM
865-2353
720 Serenfy Fint Street
Incfen Oni Dr.'n
4 MNf IATIOH1 0* lUVICt
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Strumi tilt Itwish Community Since 111!
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_______________r REFORM SERVICES
Smjnurl Gordon (19-16, Ikr Gtrnltn
HanyGou)on(l964) limn B Ciiooo
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOHN R. BLANTON
PROBATE NO. 75-2007
. In RE: Estate of
ing" Claims or Demands Against Said and me tne same |n duplicate and as Irving aka Isadore Shapiro
fc You'are Hereby notified and reoulr- BggjgJ ^J^tlJVL- VSSSi ""nOT.CE TO CREDITORS
ed .0 present anv claims and demands gggS-S SV*> CfcuntyV nSSSS To A.I Creditors and A,, Persona
within four calendar months from the Having Claims or Pemands Aga.nst
hereof. Said Estate: .. ,
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of Irving aka Isadore Shapiro de-
ceased late of Pade County, Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Pade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in Lne County
Courthouse In Pade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 25th
day of March. A.O 1975
MARILYN BRAIOER
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the 4th day of April. 1975.
KWITNEY KROOP & SCHEINBERU
PA.
Attorneys for Executrix
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Fla.
4/4-11
PALMER'S .
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/J
M
MMONAUZED MEMORIALS
471WTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
44442|. 4444*22
3279 SW. ftth ST.. MIAMI
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13385 West Dixfe Highway
Repreiented by 5. Levitt, f D.
In New York:
(212)263-7600
Queens Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hills, N.Y.
which you may have against the es-
tate of IMRE KAI.MAR deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to
the Circuit Judges of Hade County.
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade County. Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida this 20th
day of March. A.D. 197S
ELIZABETH MILLS
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the 28th dav of March. 1975.
Malcolm H. Friedman
Attorney for Executrix
SOU DouKlas Road. Coral Gables.
Florida 3S134
_____________________________3/28 4/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-1715
in RE: Estate of
SAMUEL MAIMAN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Daman*!* laralnst said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and reuuir-
ed to present anv claims and demands
which you nay have against the us-
tate of SAMUEL MAIMAN 'I.....ased
late of Had,- County, Florida, to
the Circuit Judges "i Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate and as
provided In (section ::::: 1. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County, Flor-
ida, within four calendar months fr.,m
lilt- tune of the first oublii
of, .>!" the sam< \\ :ii >, ban
Filed al Miami, Florida this 2 '!>
day of Mar, h. A l> l"li
HAZEI. ESSEN
\- Exei utrlx
Flrsl publlcatl......i tins notice on
the !8th dav of M I 1878
ESSEN AND ESSEN
.\ >rney for Executrix
1208 Ainsles Bids Miami. Fla.
____________________ 1 4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-1843
in RE: Estate of
Mil DRED LEAH LEVENSON
deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
t.i All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
Ing claims or Demands Against Bald
Estate:
You are hereby notified -.ml reaulr-
ed to present any claims and demauds
which vou mav have against the es-
tate of Mil DRED LEAH LEVENSON
deceased late of Dade County. Florida
the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
time of the first publication
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 25th
day of March A.D. 1975.
Eleanor C. Shrago
Adele Tel tell
As Executors
First publication of this notice on
the 4th day of April. 1975.
Edwin M. Ginsburg. Esq.
Myers. Kaplan Levinson & Kenin
Attorneys for Co-Executrices
1428 Brickell Avenue, Miami, Fla.
4/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-470 (Nesbitt)
In RE: Estate of
FREDA MEDVIN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Aeainst
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and o.'mands
wlii.-h you may have against the es.
late of FREDA MEDVIN de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida.
to the Circuit Judges ,if Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate and as
provided In Bet tlon 733. HI. Florida
Statutes, in their offices In the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or !h- same w III be barred
Filed at Miami. F.....Ida, this 28th
: Mar. : A l>. 1975.
PHILIP MEDVIN
As Executor
1 publi. ition 1 :' th a notice on
' Ith dai 01 April, 1975
PHII.II' MEDVIN
1
S, Mi.mii. Fla.
131
__________________________________ 4 111
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
..r Lane Publishing ..1 p.O Box 114857
I' the City of Miami Beach, Florida
,1"HI intends to register the -aid name
with the Clerk ,,i" the Clrcull Court
01 Dade County Florida
Dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this
Lath day ,,f March 1975.
GEORGE LANE
_____ 4/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to enga
In business under the fictitious name
Ball Bonds at Bin N W 12
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUN TY
PROBATE DIVlS'ON
j GWYNN PARKER
PROBATE NO. 75-1992
In RK: Etnt* nf
JEAN COMENSKY
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T0 All Creditors a"d All Persons
Hovln Calms or Del \iralnnt
Said Estate:
You are hereby n..'if"d and re.-iuir-
,',1 to ores nt any cl m a 1 d fl< mands
'i m ha>.....rs nsl ihe es-
tate nf JEAN COMENSKY de-
ceased late of Dade Countv, Florida,
to the Clrcull Judges County,
and file the same In duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.Ifi. Florida
Bl itufea theli off!. the I'. imiv
use I Dade C >unty, Florida,"
within f-.iir calendar months from the
time of ,11 hereof.
o-- 'he 1 me u i'l be 1.....'ed
Filed at .Miami. Florida, this 2fith
da} Ol Mar. h 11 '"
Flagship Fir.-t National Rank
of Miami Beach
As Executor
Flrsl nublicatlon of 'his notice on
the nil day ..f April, 1975.
carl e. Westman, ECi 1
Myers, Kanlan levinson & Kenin
Attorney for Executor
Suite 700, 1428 Brickell Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
305/371-9041
4/4-11
that
anu uie me same in uui.li.-aic and as Avei.n. \n7n,V t-i 1 ,,-"" "
provided In Section 7SS.16. Florida ,,',',M,dn'; Florida. 33136 intends
Statutes. In their offices In the Coun- ., s,f Sil1'' numt' wi,h the n,.rk
ty Courthouse In Dade County, Flor- V.. lr ida. within four calendar months fr..m ''rid..
the time of the first publication" here-
Of, or tlie same will be barred
Filed al Miami. Florida Has 20th
lay of March, A I> 1975
BERNARD 1: LEVENSON
As Executor
HAROLD JACK SIEGEL
._________ 4/4-11-18-25
.Flrsl publication of this notice
' -mi, day of Marcl
'AXTER, FRIEDMAN, ROBBINS
the
BAX1
1SCHER
Attorney f.,r Estate
1875 N K I68rd Streel
North Miami Reach. Florida
pn
th
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOHN R. BLANTON
PROBATE NO. 75-2002
In RE Batata of
MABEL PERKINS 1 OOK
deceased
_ NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All Creditors and All Persons
aims or Demands Aeainst
} buslneas^un^rthe^tlm^'Sm.
to register
-
4/4
NOTICE UNDER
.^'CT'TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTK E is HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, deairlna to engage
"!" under the'fictitious name
of TheFlaia Restaurant at 4101 Pine-
tree Drive. Miami Beach Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
Fl id- CU CoUrt "f Dade County.
H. I) Mollnarl Ine a
Florida Corporation by Helen D
Molinari. Prea I lie
Nelson, Feldm in .t- l>..\ id
1135 Kane Con ,ml 33154
Attorneys for applicant
3/28 4/4-11-li
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice IS HEREBY nrvani ,v., H"vi* Clal
e undersiK^ed.''d.s,ir',,:',fE!:n^e Said Estate:
Ion are hereby notified and renulr-
o.i to present any claims and .1. mantis
Which you may have against the es-
tate of mahei. PERKINS LOOK de-
ceased late f Dai.....ounty. Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dado County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
Provided In Section 73415, Florida
Statutes. In their offices In the County
''"'"'house In Dade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time ,,f the first publication hereof,
"r ',,0.sme will be barred.
lay of March AD 1976,
Christopher Stetson Look, Sr.
-,, As Executor
the 4?i, ?ubli7,J"n "f ,hls notlce on
I 111 v d.ay of Apr"' '"5.
IKItlty A. BURNS
said names with the cierk of th, c'r-
CUlt Court of Dade County Floridi
OSPE CORPORATIONf ^
Eugene i.emii. h
Attorney for OSPE CORPORATION
._____ 4/4-11-18-JS
NOTICE UNDER
v,^J;'?T,Tl0us NAME LAW
,.NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEV
^K."^"f."-? ??-'ring '.VoEen
of bDUeS'nAecoU5der, th" "tJoVnn,a"m.
to'^lste'r3'^,- EAft fnte^dl
,,f ii ,-, "'"' ,l;lm" w' FlorhJa1-'^1"1 Court of Dad SoSS. ^^lor'1t ' Olldenorti, Owner^ ^ t&S^OSSW'^^'
4/4-11


k April 4, 1975
+Jmi$t Meridian
Page 15-B
m
MR. AND .MRS. M -VKK MEHRMAN
[)iithgate Towers Hosting
Night In Israel' Tuesday
(tents of Southgate Tow-
pami Beach, will rally on
of the 25th anniversary
(founding of StSate of Is-
jnds Tuesday evening at
it in Isiael" honoring Mr.
, Meyer Mehrman, Rob-
Siegel, general campaign
in of the Greater Miami
Bond Organisation, has
Seed.
Mehrmans will receive
to of Isiael Bonds Scroll
lor "for exceptional serv-
participation in the Is-
knds i rogram as It cele-
Jts 25th year of providing
tiancial tesources for the
jc development of the
9f Isiael."
Mehrman, an active member
of B'nai B'rith and the Jewish
War Veterans, is affiliated with
the Masons and the F.lks Club
and is an associate of Hadassah.
He was one of the organizers of
Temple Beth E\ in Allcntown,
Pa., where the Mehrmans lived
hefoie moving to Miami Beach.
Special guest entertainer at
the Southgate Towers Israel
Bonds event will be Danny
Tadmore, internationally ac-
claimed Israeli personality.
Sei \ ing as chairman of the
"Night in Israel" is Julius Le-
vine. Cochairmen are Henry
Brown, Sam Feuerstein, Henry
Kramer, Irving Krasnor and
....... :y Lake Country Club Hosting
I April 10 Israel Bonds Dinner
Lake Country Club golf
pional Steve Legakis and his
eniice will be honored by

tana. yi'tiVK l.e;<;akis
If Israel Bonds at an Is-
iner of State Thursday,
10. dinner chairman Her-
enschel and honorary
Robert Sugarman an-
fcefft.
^Bracl Bonds dinner-dance
(teld at the club. Mr. and
akis will receive the
State of Israel Masada Award
in recognition of their leadership
and service "in creating better
understanding among all men
and women and for their sup-
1'nii of Israel's economic de-
velopment as a sister democ-
racy."
Legakis, who began his golf-
ing career at the age of 14. is
former golf professional at Tim-
ber Point, Shelter Hock, and
Glen Head Country Clubs and
;it lakland Golf Club, all on
Long Island. He was a touring
pm during the 1950's.
Legakis has been at Sky Lake
since 1971 and is golf director
oi the annual Israel Histadrut
Pro-Am Golf Tournament held
at Sky Lake.
Members of the dinner com-
mittee are: Ben and Grace Mor-
pan-oth. Jack Green (Azure
Lake); Irving Volk, Bill Miller,
Mori is and Ann Weston (Can-
nongate); Philip and Dorothy
Platt, Arthur and Beatrice Kram-
er (Lake Park); Abner Freund-
lich, Sylvia Schor, Belle Meyers
(Royal Oaks), Sam Don, Al Ellis
(Sky Lake Lodge).
Reservations may be made by
calling the Israel Bonds office.
>bi Richard Davis To Present
tfs Lecture At Temple Judea
Judea's College of
Ing Jewish Kducation
Bent its next lecture in
Bag of "Parent Effect! ve-
Judaism" Sunday morn-
[ Richard A. Davis will
philosophy of Martin
its relationihip with
sm and Zen Buddhism.
Davis is director of Hil-
sh Student Center, at
the University of Miami, in Co-
ral Gables.
Ordained at Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion, Rabbi Davis has served
many congregations before com-
ing to the Miami area. He has
also directed youth programs,
camps, conclaves ai.d retreats.
This breakfast-lecture will be-
in at 10:30 a.m. ir. the Yiiith
Lounge.
Outstanding Commander Of
JWV Post Being Selected
Michael Schecliter, president
of the Commanders' Club, Jewish
War Veterans of the United
- ?ta!('s-. I>epar^mi.*nt of Elqrjda,
announces thai an award will be
presented to the Outstanding
Commander in the Department of
Flotilla for work done from June
1. 1974 to May 1. 1975. In addi-
tion, a year's membership In the
Commanders' Club will also be
given.
Bach Post in the Department
is invited to submit the name of
their Comm.vidor. (letters must
be in triplicate) to Samuel
FranzblaH, chairman of the Com-
manders' Club Award Committee
by May 15. The presentation will
take place at the Department
Convention in June.
Bar Mitzvah
Hill Herman David itosenicld Daniel Minkes
Mark
l.iiidpnlierg
'Israel And The Diaspora'
Topic Of Final Meeting
"Israel and the Diaspora" a
wide-ranging subject, will he
the topic of discussion at the
season's final Great Jewish
Books Discussion Group meeting
Thursday, April 10, at 1:30 p.m.
in the Miami Beach Public Li-
brary. 2100 Collins Ave., led by
Max Goodman.
Mr. Goodman, a winter resi-
dent of Miami Beach, is a Judaic
scholar and educator, and with
Samuel Reiser, co-ordinates the
Great Jewish Books Project. The
public is invited free of charge.
Laura Stein Named By
Biscayne Medical Center
Laura J. Stein has been nam-
ed director of Community Rela-
tions for Biscayne Medical Cen-
ter, the new <158-bed acute care
general community hospital on
Biscayne Boulevard at 209th
Street. Micha^' H. Sussman, the
Hospital's Administrator, an-
nounced this week.
Miss Stein, a resident of Fort
I.auderdale. was formerly a news
reporter in the Broward Bureau
of the Miami Herald and was
the Broward Correspondent for
the New York Times. She previ-
ously served as a feature writer
for the St. Petersburg Times.
BII,!. HERMAN
Bill, son of Mr. and Mrs. Har-
lan Herman, will observe his
Bar Mitzvah at Beth Torah i !on-
ation Saturday morning,
Apiil 5.
Bi'l is a seventh grade student
at John I'". Kennedy Junior High
School and a member ol the 4th
grade class of the Beth Torah
liaio.d Vvolk Religious School.
In Bill's honor, his parents
will s|>onsor the Kiddush fol-
lowing the services. The guests
will include his grandparents,
Mr. and Mis. Sidney G!id< of
West Palm Beach and Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Herman of Miami
Beach.
fr "fr #
MARK LINDK\BKK<;
Mark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Lindcnbeig, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday.
April 5. at Temple i'.manu-F.l.
The celebrant is an Honor
Roll Student at Lehrman Day
School where i.. .s in the eighth
grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Lindenberg will
host a reception Sunday at the
Voisin Restaurant.
Special guests will include
Mayer Lustig, Florence. Italy;
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fe lor. Ant-
werp, Belgium; Mr. and Mrs.
Benjamin Lindenl>erg of New
York; and Mr. and Mrs. Adolph
Namerv of New Jersey.
JFCS Women's Committee Plan,
April 29 Bruneheon- Installation
The Women's Committee of
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is announcing plans lor
its annual bruneheon and instal-
lation of Officers to be held on
April 29 Jt Ml a.m. at the Seville
Hotel on Miami Beach.
The Women's Committee, an
auxiliary of JFCS. works alose-
ly with the agency in an active
program to educate the public
to the functions of the agency.
The Committee also fulfills vol-
unteer functions, offering aid
and assistance to the agency.
that has been done throughout
the program year.
.Mrs. Morton Weinberger is
p-esident of the Women's Com-
mil ee; Mrs Sam Rosen is chair-
man of the day.
A unique musical program will
be presented by three genera-
tions of the family of Judfre
Theodore Ne!son, who will be
the narrator. The Nelsons have
recently been in Israel where
they collected new songs about
Israel which will be included in
their presentation.
The Annual Installation JFCS is a mem! er agency of
Bruneheon is the highlight of the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
the year's activities, expressing eration and the United Way of
recognition for the good work Dade County.
Beth Jacob Congregation Elects
Daniel Roth As 1975 President
At the annual meeting of
Beth Jacob Congregation, the
traditional synagogue in Miami
Beach. Daniel Roth, business-
man and civic leader, was elect-
ed president.
Serving with him are Judge
Bernard Frank, Rabbi Abraham
J. Safra. Morris Krevat and Abe
Schoenfeld, vice presidents; Sol
Krevat, treasuier, and Harvey
Tendler, secretary.
rabbi S. T Swirsky is spirit-
ual leader of the congregation.
Mr. Roth, one of the founders
of Beth Jacob, has been active
in various elected offices for the
past 40 years. He has devoted a
good deal of effort on behalf of
Israel Bonds and is identified
with numerous Jewish causes.
Chairman of the Miami Beach
Boxing Commission, past Kxalt-
ed Ruler of the Miami Beach
Klks Lodge ami past Chaplain
of the American Legion and
Jewish War Veterans. Mr. Roth
seived in the U.S. Navy for four
years during World War II and
was the only Kxalted Ruler
seiving in the Armed Forces.
AZF Names Bernice Stander
NKW YORKBernice Stand-
er has been named Regional Di-
rector of the New York-New
Jersey >rea of the American
Z'onist Federal, m Mrs. Faye
Soherk, president rf the AZF.
has announced. ______
Kit IIAKI) WASSEMTEIN
Richard, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Wasserslein, will become
a Bar Mitzvah at Temple Men-
orah, Saturday morning, April
5.
Richard Is a seventh grade
student at Nautilus Junior High
School.
There will be a Kiddush fol-
low in- services In the Crimson
Loom of Temple Monorail. The
celebrant will also be honored
with a reception and dinner at
the Eden Roc Hotel.
fr & &
DAVID ROSENFELD
David, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Rosenfeld. will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, April 5, at Temple
Beth Sholom.
The celebrant is a student in
the temple's Confirmation Class
of 5737.
it Ht -ir
JAMIE SINGERMAN
Jamie, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ronald G, Singerman. will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah Satur-
day. April 5. during the 11:15
a.m. worship services at Temple
Judea of Coral Gables.
DANIEL MINKES
Daniel Craig. son of Dr. and
Mi". Jules Q. Minkes. will be
ca'led to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, April 5. at Beth
David Congregation.
The celebrant is attending
Palmetto Junior High School,
where he is in the seventh grade.
He is in the band, where he plays
first chair. French horn, is vice
president of the Student Council,
and plays baseball with the How-
ard Palmetto Khoury I-eague. A
student in the Daled class at Beth
David Religious School. Daniel is
actve in Kadimah and is a mem-
he;- of the Cantor's Club.
Dr and Mrs. Minkes will host
the Kiddush following the serv-
ices in honor of the occasion.
Soeclal guests will include his
ftrandparerts, Mrs. Jearr Minkes
and Mr. and Mrs. Mendel Cohen;
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Friedman
and Mrs. Cynthia Novack of New
York; Mrs. Esther Millman. Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Fine and Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Linhart of St.
Touts. Mo.
UGAl HOTICI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. COWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-1*02
In RB: F>tate of
HAIIHY QHHSTBN
riecea*ed _._ w*
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T.. AM Creditor* mid All Pereona ""y-
Inn Claims or Demand* AR-alnst bald
Yoll are hereby notified and re-
oiilred lo present any claim* and de-
mands which ynu may tnive aKalnst
.he ,-state of HAKRY OERKTF..\ de-
,.,, ,.l late of Had.- County. Florida,
to the Clreull Judaea of Dude County.
ami tile the mime In duplicate and as
provided In Section t:i:i i. F'lorida
Statute*, In their office* In the Coun-
iv Courthouse In Dade County, Flor-
ida within tour calendar months from
Hie lima of the first publication here-
of, or the same will he haired.
Filed at .Miami. Florida, this 31 t
das "f March, A.n. 1975.
RB88IE QERSTBN
Ah Executrix
F'lrst puhli.atlon of this notice on
Ih. 4th day of April, li*7S.
CTPHN NKVIN8
Attorneys for FIstate of
Harry Cersten. deceased
RSI Arthur Godfrey Koad.
.Miami Beach, Florida 31140 1/4.11
c
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Full Text
iOfewish Floridian
[iami, Florida Friday, April 4, 1975
Section li
Lehrman Day School Holding
Scholarship Ball Saturday
Miami Beach business and civ-
lera Samuel N. Friedland
Matthew Kosenhaus and
County Judge Frederick
N. Barad have been named hon-
chairmen of the Lehrman
Day School Scholarship Ball
l will be held in Temple
I menu-El's Friedland Ballroom,
day at 9 p.m.
Arr'nlrnents of Friedland,
F.osenhaus and Judge Barad
wen announced by Carol Green-
! i g, general chairman of the
arship Ball, and by Judge
: crt S. Shapiro, associate
cr airman of the board of Tem-
; :e Emanu El. Friedland is
chairman of the board. Judge
Farad is president and Rosen-
is a trustee of Temple
Emanu-El.
Working with the chairman
and honorary chairmen are Bar-
^ r. S. Goldberg and Lawrence
.-'chant/.. Ball cochairmen.
Designated to serve as a Past
Chairmen's Council are Robert
L. Blum. Irving Cowan. Harry
A. I-evy, Stephen Muss, Murry
tzky and Leonard Zilbert.
Grecn'oorg said Dr. Irving
Le :..an. in whose honor the
I argest Conservative He-
pw day school was renamed
ago, will be the only
_pake, Saturday night. The
will be on dining and
Ing lo the music of Jerry
ha : and his society orches-
tra.
Proceeds from the Scholarship
at which there will lie no
raising go to provide
[ larshi? assistance for a ma-
of the 320 students of the
Day School, which
: :.: quality Jewish and gqn-
ication from kindergar-
; n th:o igh the ninth grade.
A < of 20 a holarshirs as
established for the Ball,
in to Dr. Lehrman.
' V.'e fee', completely jjstified
i i cne e ti commu-
ter this send i wliich re-
.: financial assistance
the CJA-IEF, Greater Ml-
. ewish Federation or any
tsl e a ;ency although
:.. half of oar studi
fi milies which are not
e : of Temple Emanu-El,"
Shaj Ira said.
Grcenherg, Mrs. Gold-
berg anl Mis. Schantz are work-
ing with their hus'ands to lo-
in t e s.xcess of Saturday
t's event
Mrs. Greenberg, a past presi-
denl of tie Lihrman Day School
and Ten!.ik- Emanu-El P.T.A.,
has headed the entertainment.
decorations and arrangements
committees for the event.
and Mrs. Daniel Neal Heller
have arranged for a hostess
committee to greet arriving
g tests as Temple Emanu-El
stage? the highlight of its 35th
anniversary celebration Satur-
Mrs. Goldberg, Mis. Schantz day nicht.
MESSAGE FROM CJA IEF
Perilous Times
Demand Action
On Three Fronts
Daily newspapers headlines,
television and radio news reports
indicate that this is a time of
great peril for Israel and the
Jewish people everywhere in the
world.
It is also a time of unprece-
dented opportunity to show our
solidarity with the people of Is-
rael and our strength to the
United States government in our
conviction that Israel will survive
as a free, democratic State.
The people of Israel want
peace. To obtain this, they have
sacrificed generations of young
men. security for their homes and
lamilies. and stability of their
economy. The memory of the
most recent sacrifice is all too
fresh in our minds.
THE VERY least that we, as
Jews in Miami, can do is to
demonstrate our solidarity with
the Jews of Israel. And. we must
continue to help in a number of
tremendously important ways:
FIRST we can send a
message that says that despite
the breakdown in the Kissinger
negotiations and despite the ali-
enation of Israel on the world
scene, that the Jews of Miami
have not forgotten and that the
Jews of Miami will remember.
SECOND we can let it
be known to our own legislators
that the continued survival of the
Jewish homeland is a key con-
cern of ours and, indeed, in
the national interest of the
United States and of all other
democracies in the world.
THIRD we can provide
the humanitarian services in Is-
rael that are needed more than
ever but which Israel's gov-
ernment is unable to afford to
provide: hew and adequate hous-
ing, absorption of immigrants,
new development towns.
Being a member of the Jewish
community of the world calls
for sacrifice and dedication. It
isn't always the easiest thing in
the world. But it may be the most
rewarding.
^/M7
airman,
1975 Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund
Historical Society Collecting
Data On Early Florida Settlers
Dr. Seymour Uetman, presi-
dent of the Jewish Historial So-
,i.i of South Florida, has an-
nounced a project undei taken
by the Ladies Auxiliary of Con-
gregatlon B'nal Zion, Key West,
to tape interviews with older
Jewish residents of Key West
for the archives of the Society.
Since Key West was the point
AJ5L, ^JComm. Condemn
Egypt's Belligerency
a joint statement here Dr.
C'-a:!es R. Beber, president, Mi
. i; i '::.. ter, American Jewish
mitl ie, and Richard Essen,
i of the Executive Com-
e of the Anti-Defamntion
[Ue, have condemned the re-
t to make a public
i or non-belligerency,
ite Israel's willingness to
withdraw from the Sinai passes
so vital to its defense and to
give u;> the Abu Rodeis oil fields.
'The offer by Sadat of a weak
and va<*ue pledge against resort-
ing to force" said Beber and
Essen, "could not be interpreted
as a significant movement to-
wards peaceful co-existence,
since it did noi acknowledge the
right of Israel to exist within
secure and recognized bounda-
ries.
"Clear1;, Egypt tears ful1 re'
sponsibility for the failure of
the Kissinger mission by refus-
ing to deliver a pledge that it
would not resorl to violence
against Israel even if Israel
should make further concessions
which would -surely affect its
ability to survive in the face of
another Egyptian attack."
The Anti-Defamation League
and the American Jewish Com-
mittee are two of the nation's
oldest and largest human rela-
tions agencies.
of entry for many of the earlier
Jews settling in Florida and was
the community from which
many prominent Miami families
came, the recording of Jewish
life in the early years of settle-
ment will be a welcome addition
to the Oral History Library of
the Society.
The Jewish Historical Society,
of South Florida was organized
in 1971 for the purpose of col-
lecting and preserving historical
data of the Jewish community,
to encourage interest and re-
search on South Florida Jews
and to publish material related
to such history.
The Jewish istorical Society,
funded in part by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, has a
membership of over 100 persons
at the present time; member-
ship is open to all interested
persons.
Officers of the Society are Dr.
Simon Brody and Mrs. Lee Aber-
man, vice presidents; Mrs. Mar-
jorie Land, secretary, and Mrs.
Siegel, treasurer.
Members of the Board of Di-
rectors include Rabbi Dr. Max
Lifschutz, Theodore Nelson,
Harold Tanen. Bart Udell. Dr.
Julian Weinkle and Dr. Walter
Fascell Cosponsoring Bill
Requiring Full Disclosure
In his continued effort to re-
store the confidence of the
American people in their govern-
ment, Congressman Dante Fas-
ceil (D., Fli.) hao joined in spon-
soring legislation in the U.S.
House of Representatives which
would require the full di-cl uiv
of personal finani es by all of
flcials and employees of the fed-
eral government who earn more
than $25,000 a year.
The bill would apply equally
to all incumbent elected officials,
from the President on down, can-
didates for nomination or elec-
tion to federal office, and top
level personnel with policy-mak-
ing positions in the legislative,
military, executive and judicial
branches of government.
It would require that each in-
dividual disclose the source of
each item of income or reim-
bursement and of any gift receiv-
ed by an individual, either solely
or jointly with a spouse; by the
spouse alone, or by his or her
dependents from outside the im-
mediate family having a value in
excess of $100, together with fees
and honorariums for speeches,
articles or attendance at conven-
tions or other assemblies.
In addition, the individual
would be required to disclose the
REP. DANTE FASCELL
value of assets and liabilities
held either In his own name, by
him and his spouse jointly, or
by his spouse or by his de-
pendents.
All dealings in securities, com-
modities or real property would
also have to be reported and
made available for public inspec-
tion.
BY MIAMI BEACH TECHNION CHAPTER
Miriam Sirkin Designated
As First 'Woman Of The Year'
Miriam (Mrs. Milton) Sirkin,
one of Miami's well known lead-
ers in Jewish and civic causes,
will be honored by the Miami
Beach Chapter of Women's Divi-
sion, American Technion Society
Thursday. April 10. She has been
designated as the first "Woman
of the Year" at a luncheon in her
honor to be held at the Seville
Hotel.
Mrs. Belle Stein, president of
the Chapter, said the choice of
Mrs. Sirkin was based on "her
lifetime of dedicated service and
participation in all causescom-
munal, Jewish and Israeli."
Mrs. Sirkin served with dis-
tinction as president of the Mi-
ami Beach Chapter for many
years, and was recently elected
first regional president of the
South Florida Region. Women's
Division of Technion.
A resident of South Florida
since 1938. she has worked tire-
lessly in United Fund. Com-
munity Chest. National Confer
ence of Christian and Jews. USO-
Jewish Welfare Board Service
Center, Israel Bonds, Mt. Sinai
Hospital and Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood.
Mrs. Sirkin served as first
president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of Hadassah and as vice
HJmJhmk
Bl . pp*'
jfe %

MRS. MILTON SIRKIN
president of the Florida Region.
In addition she is a oast presi-
dent of Women's Division of Jew-
ish Federation and YMHA/
YWHA.
For further details concerning
the Woman of the Year Lunch-
eon, contact Mrs. Beverly Can-
tor, chairman of the event.
Hebrew Academy Girls Distribute
Passover Food Packages To Needy
Fulfilling the commandment of
"Gmilut Hasadim"deeds of lov
ing kindness, was the goal of the
students of the Girls High School
of the Hebrew Academy of Great
er Miami when, under the direc-
tion of their principal. Rabbi
Shimon Azulay, they distributed
food packages for the festival of
Passover to aged, sick and iso-
lated Jews in Miami Beach, dur-
ing the days immediately pro-
ceeding the holiday.
Following a tradition of help-
ing unfortunate senior citizens
for each of the Jewish holidays,
the girls had supplied food and
other gifts this year for Chanu-
kah and Purim.
For Passover, they had raised
almost $1,000, on their own, and
were able to supply matzoh, wine.
fish, vegetables and other foods
to enable the recipients to prop-
erly observe the festival. In ad-
dition, they were able to supplv
limited amounts of money for
these older Jewish individuals to
purchase other supplies for the
holiday.
On the Sundav preeeeding
Passover, the girls devoted a
good part or ihe day to distribut-
ing food packages in cooperation
with the South Beach Activity
Center in the South Beach sec-
tion.
In addition to the distribution
of food, the girls have nresented
various program for groups at
the South Beach Activity Cen-
ter, at nursing hones In the area,
and for the nutritional lunch pro-
grams conducted by the Jewish
Community Center of South Flor-
ida and the Jewish Vocational
service.
By providing the food for the
Passover holiday, the girls fulfill-
ed the word-- said at the begin-
ning of the Seder"Let he whi
is hungry come and eat and
he who is in need, join in ob-
serving the Passover."


I
Page 16-A
fJcnisfi tkrSdiar
Friday, April 4, 1975
How would you talk about death to a chilW?
Today, even the most sheltered of
children are frequently confronted with the fact
of death in their families, their neighborhood,
or by watching television.
As a result, they are apt to ask the kind of
Searching questions for which children seem
to have a special knack.
Our booklet, "Helping Children
Understand Death" by noted psychologist
Dr. William D. Nelson can help parents answer
these questions as well as provide them with
practical insights to assist their children
r
to cope with this difficult time.
ope witn tms difficult time.
Just send us your name, addrjjfs and
zip code and we'll send you a copy free of charge.
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./Funeral Directors
1920 After* Road, Miami Beech, Hi 33139/531-1151
Other Riverside Chapels In Miami, No. Miami Beech,
Hollywood, Sunrise
Murray N. Rubin, FOX


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