The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02378

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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"(Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 47 Number 35
Miami, Florida Friday, August 30, 1374
Two bectior.s
Prica z5 cents
Ford Hussein
Stand Leaves
Israel Stunned
No More Withdrawals 7-A
U.S. 'Malaise' Under Fire 13-A
Cancer of Mideast' 14-A
'Shuttle Diplomacy' Out 15-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The joint statement by President Ford
lasd King Hussein of Jordan promising early American-Jordanian
OS toward an Israeli-Jordanian disengagement agreement
came as something of a surprise to Israel.
The Israeli government, it was reliably learned, was told in
advance that the United States-Jordanian communique issued in
Washington would refer to the disengagement talks especially not in
: rable terms.
XING HUSStIN
loser tokes some
OUR CYPRUS STAND AT /SSl/F
Anti Semitic
Tide Rising
In Greece
LONDON iJTA) A cli-
mate hostile to Israel with clear
inti-Sei Itic overtones has de-
veloped in Greece as a result of
BEIGIH DEBATES
Likud Bloc
(-rack Seen
Widening
Bj DAVID LANDAU
\I.i;\I_ (JTAi The
week ended a
isions on
icy on the cru-
e and foreign
b
The i- issi ins were held in
[he : anizing the dif-
- of Likud into a
in ti md harmonious
I
Howi only bro i len < l
ned the c a that
ave been in evidence l
Continued en Page 9-A
IN ADDITION, Foreign Min-
ister Jfigal Allon left Washington
two weeks ago convinced that
Secretary- of State Henry A. Kis-
singer would dissuade Hussein
from the disengagement
which the Israeli government
had rejected.
The communique issued by
Ford and Hussein at the en .
H issein's three-day visit to
Washington noted that a "con-
structive contribution" had been
made in the consultations toward
the next stage in the Middle East
peace negotiations and declared
that consultations between Wash-
ington an 1 Amman "will con-
tinue with a view to addressing
at an appropriately early date
the issues of particular concern
to Jordan, including a Jordanian-
Israeli disengagement agree-
ment."
Israel responded promptly to
the communique with Foreign
Minister Gideon Saguy declaring
in an official statement that the
communique had "not changed
Continued on Page 7-A
Kissinger May Ask
For New Concessions
My Relatives are Soap' 8-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State Henry A Kis-
singer told the American Legion Convent,on in Miami Beach that
the United States will continue to help Arabs and Israelis toward
a resolution of their conflict and the achievement of a lasting peace
in the Middle East.
According to the official text
the Cy| rua crisis an I the feeling
in Athens that U.S. Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger's poli-
cies have betrayed Greece.
The anti-American resentment
throughout Greece has a Jewish
e Ige to it. and at least one lead-
ing Athens daily repeatedly re-
fers to Kissinger as "The German
Jew Kissinger."
THESE DEVELOPMENTS
were describe I to the Jew
Telegraphic Agency by a Jewish
reporter who is a specialist on
Greek affairs and has just re-
I irne I here f m a prolonged
visit to Greece.
The re who aske i to re-
n anoi s. ss iro :'.e-
ter of the prevailing mood was
provided in an editorial publish-
Continued on Page 11-A
of his remarks made available
here, Kissinger said, "For the
Arabs there can be no peace
without a recovery of territory
and the redress of grievances of
a displaced people. For Israel,
peace requires both security and
recognition by its neighbors of
its legitimacy as a nation."
Hi: \l)!)KI>: "Our Arab and
Israeli friends have, with our
he er the past six months.
the first' difficult steps
ie roa I toward fulfillment
Continued on Page 3 A
Rockefeller Assessed As
Friend of Jewish Causes
Nomination Greeted
5A
Former Moscow Envoy Attacks
'Jewish Emigration' at Hearing
WASl N (JTAl
e !'. Kennan, former U.S.
) et Uni 'ti
r ing American ex-
iirs. attai ed
n ressi inal
' ise S i it.....stric-
ration and specifi-
I I any use of this
Inethoil to help Soviet Jews in
[ '' fforts to emigrate.
Kennan made his remarks be-
I Senate Foreign Rela-
| i Committee.
While cautioning against pit-
Mis in Soviet-American trade re-
| Kennan declared he has
npathy" for denying most
^ d nation treatment to the
Union to bring about "an
1 'n"0l Soviet policy "with
' to the emigration from
f of Its Jewish citizens."
M LEGISLATION, he
d, is not a "suitable or desir-
po-e means of exercising pres-
I1"1 on another government."
!i" also found it "difficult" to
pJemand why the U.S. should
make "exit visas to Soviet citi-
zens of Jewish origin the touch-
stone of our entire commercial
policy towards that country."
In this connection he question-
ed "why we should suddenly"
now make it a "major issue"
when Soviet practice, "especially
with relation to Jews is greatly
more liberal than it has been for
decades in the past."
Kennan said he v
a, t that ti:'. rest
ed to exert pear to re-
late specifically to people of one
sin ethnii us back-
groun :.
I AM sure that we do not wish
to convey the impression that
our concern for persons restrict-
Continued on Page 6-A
WASHINGTON (JTA'
Former New York Governor Nel-
son A. Rockefeller, nominated by-
President Ford to be Vice Pres-
ident, Is considered a friend of
the Jewish people and has I ng
been firmly, committed to the
irity and survival of Israel.
At a White House press con-
fe:'-- ; iw ing his nominati
Rockefeller did not discuss in-
. matters except to -
that he forward to effoi ts
"t ) lace the tough realities in
country and in the world."
hi: told newsmen that pro-
tocol dictated that lie not lisc ss
Ess as before appearing before
the Congressional committees
which will eon luct hearings on
. dnation.
Both the Senate and I
- approve Ford's nomination
of Rockefeller.
Rockefeller did not respond t >
a question as to whether he had
discussed his nomination with
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer, widely considered to be a
political protege of tiie 66-year-
ol I former governor.
Kissinger was for a long time
Continued on Page 8-A
PBtSIDEVT NIXON
a startling silence
J
AFTER THE SHOW, NOT A WORD ABOUT ISRAEL
Nixon Was Enigma to the Bitter End
By SAIL MANN
London Chronicle Syndicate
Whatever history may say
about the presidency of Richard
Nixon. Israel will always recall
with gratitude that it was his
personal intervention which
brought the massive airlift of
weapons, ammunition and spare
parts which helped turn the tide
of the Yom Kippur War and
stave off the threat of near-an-
nihilation.
Israelis have never stopped
publicly to ask themselves wheth-
er the Arabs would have risked
that war at all had it not been
for America's preoccupation with
Watergate.
THEY ARE aware primarily
that their leaders of the time
hitched their fortunes to the
President's personal commit-
ment to their security and that,
at the moment of greatest need,
he did not let them down.
Israel's relationship with the
Nixon Administration was not
always as close and rewarding
as the events of October and the
week- Immediately thereafl
suggest.
Indeed. Nixon's first term was
marked by intense strains be-
tween Jerusalem and Washing-
ton.
It was not long after taking
office that he pledged "a new
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A
+Jelst>ffcrJdfor
Friday, August
Nixon Was Enigma to the End
civilization will not become its Of Israel, there ,,
wa not
grave.
word.
Continued from Page 1-A
policy on the part of the United
States in assuming the initia-
tive" in the Middle East.
This took the form, first, of
Four Power and Two Power
talks, of renewed support for UN
mediation efforts through Dr.
Gunnar Jarring and, at the end
oi 1S69. the launching of the
"Rogers* Plan."
THIS WAS a proposal by the
then U.S. Secretary of State.
William Rogers, requiring al-
most total Israeli withdrawal
from the territories occupied in
the 1967 war. a shared adminis-
tration of Jerusalem with Jor-
dan and large-scale repatriation
of the Arab refugees in re-
turn for an Arab commitment to
accept Israel's right to exist in
the Middle Kast.
The adoption of this plan by
Dr. Jarring as a UN working
paper and its rejection by Israel
brought the UN' peace-seeking
mission to an end. This was fol-
lowed by a further massive rein-
forcement of the Egyptian and
Syrian armed forces by the Rus-
sians.
President Nixon's response to
repeated and urgent Israeli re-
quests for supersonic aircraft
and other weaponry with which
to counter the Soviet build-up
was both prevaricatory and ad-
monitory.
THE ISRAELIS were con-
stantly assured that their re-
quests were under consideration
and, at the same time, urged to
go along with tiie Rogers' initia-
tive.
It was only when the Russians
sent in their own personnel to
fly aircraft and operate SAM
missile bases along the Suez Ca-
nal in support of President Nas-
ser's war of attrition that the
Americans responded positively
on an adequate scale to Israel's
requests.
This marked the turning point
in the relationship between the
two countries and when, late in
1971. Israel's Prime Minister,
Mrs. Golds Meir, went to Wash-
ington she found an American
President more sympathetic to
Israel's needs than any previous
incumbent of the White House.
There spiang up between
them a close and warm relation-
Doomed Bulgarian
Is Suddenly Freed
ship which, when it came to
Nixon's campaign for relection
in 1972, brought some Democrat-
ic allegations that at least, as
far as American Jewry was con-
cerned "the Nixon campaign
is being run from the Israeli Em-
bassy."
THERE WAS no mistaking
the relief with which the Israeli |
Government welcomed Nixon's
landslide victory at that election,
an emotion only slightly temper-
ed with caution as he embarked
on his policy of seeking detente
with the Soviet Union.
The protracted search for
Eat-Wes1 understanding and!
the lengthening shadows of Wa-
tergate eased most of the Amer-
ican pressure on Israel to seek
an early accommodation with her
neighbors and helped promote |
the state of euphoria so cruelly
shattered by the Yom Kippur
War.
That Nixon "saved" Israel by
cutting through the rivalries
which paralyzed the State and |
Defense Departments and or-
dering the emergency airlift of [
weapons and ammunition is ac-
cepted history in Jerusalem.
AND IT was in Jerusalem.
only two months ago, that {
i
JERUSALEM i JTA t Dr.
Heinrieh Spetter. the Bulgarian
Jewish economist, who arrived in
Israel suddenly, said this week
he did not know why Bulgarian
authorities had decided to release
him after first rejecting his plea
for amnesty in the death sen-
tence against him.
Discussing the events that
took him from a death cell in
Sofia to a Tel Aviv apartment.
Spetter said he believed he owed
his release to the intensive pub-
lic campaign in his behalf.
ON' HIS arrival. Spetter's only
comment was: "I was born
anew."
Spetter was arrested in Sofia
in November, 1973. and was
charged with spying. A Sofia
municipal court sentenced him to
death on July 1>
He api>ealed to the Supreme
Court, but that court approved
the lower court's sentence.
He then appealed to the peo-
ple's council and as-ked for am-
nesty, but before his case was
reviewed, he was told he would
be released and he could go to1
Israel.
"While in prison I had verj
little hope that I would be sav-
ed." he said.
"AT .MOST. I thought my
death sentence would be replaced
by a 20-year imprisonment, when
.suddenly the;, told me I was to
be releai I could leave for
Israel in two days."
Spetter said he would stay in
Isreel, as a new immigrant. He
had been in the country for a
visit in April. 1972. thus
probably ca
since he had not asked for per-
mission.
"it is i. tact that thai trip was

n comi li'in he -
Spetter wh< : in the
United Nations as a re sei
tive of the B rn-
mi nt, did iv i k- ivhy i
When ask
he
preferred not to answer. He
stressed that he was not tortured
in prison.
SPETTER'S WIFE, mother
and son remain tor the time be-
ing in Bulgaria. The son is serv-
ing in the Bulgarian army.
In reaction to a question about
a statement in which his wife
condemned his activities. Spetter
said it was obvious that his wife
would ask for a divorce. He said
that according to Bulgarian cus-
tom, when a man is charged with
such severe charges as he was,
the wife usually asks to divorce
him.
"Now she can cancel the re-
quest." he said. He said he hoped
his family would join him. He
had seen his wife only once since
his arrest.
despite the new links being
forged with Egypt and, more
tentatively, with SyriaNixon
reaffirmed his strong personal
commitment to the support of
Israel.
In the long run, the Israelis
comforted themselves, it was this
commitment they could rely
upon to temper the more ex-
treme demands which might be
made of them by America's
strongman Secretary of State, i
Dr. Henry Kissinger.
But, at the very moment of his
departure. Nixon left even sym- i
pathetic Israelis with a last nag-1
ging doubt. In his enigmatic val-'
edictory address to the American I
I>eople, Nixon said this:
"IN THE Middle East. 100
million people in the Arab coun-
tries, many of whom have con-
sidered us their enemy for nearly
20 years, now look on us as their 1
friends.
"We must continue to build on
that friendship so that peace can
settle at last over the Middle
East and so that the cradle of
HELP DOUGLAS GARDENS
WITHOUT SPENDING A DIME!
Funds earned by the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged Thrift Shop at 7300 NW 27th Avenue
in Miami, are an important part of the Home's oaerat'.
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Won't you help the Home today by contributing items
for resale at the Thrift Shop?
Do you have furniture, appliances, bedding, cameras
clothing, sporting goods or any other saleable mer'
chandise which you no longer need or can use?
Do you know someone, a friend or a neighbor, who is
redecorating? Perhaps a hotel, an apartment house. I
Tell them about our Thrift Shop.
Douglas Gardens has serious financial needs since 65 :
of its 222 residents are public welfare recipients. With
increased operating costs, and public assistance pay.
mer.ts in Florida the lowest of ail states, the Home
urgently reeds your help to maintain its high quality I
care. May we court on your support?
Just phone 66-2101 and arrange for our truck to pick
i'P your merchandise.
And remember contributions to the Thrift Shop <
are tax deductible.
The Douglas Gardens family residents. Board and
staff thank you.
AARON KRAVITZ
MJHHA Vice President
Chairman
Thrift Shoo Committee
MIAMI JEWISH HOME AND
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Formerly known as JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED
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30, 1974
+Jeist fkrldlan
Page 3-A
tate Dep't Mum on Arab Offer to Portugal
IsHINGTON The State
I irted outright con-
I i of presi re-
". :. mecl Arab |
red Poi vt.^\
,, dehy land!

ift
| ( tugal in
ive.
its were at-
[' ntagon intelligence
.ie Department
- Anderson said
k had Independ-
l reports on the
[, nd saiil it was
L. : ther information
| Embassy in Lis-
m Kippur War.
i and leased air
, in t lie Azores was
refueling station
nary transports
equipment to

. i riM BelMWS
Kol Israel ha
k(| ii,, [ rise release of
[Zalmanson, who had been
Ceil to 10 years in prison
Ion cl ;es of attempting
L-k a Russian aircraft.
I nd also it had
i*' allowed to
\ soon. Only
,:, se) h Zalman-
r ad been given
petition for
i Sylvia, incarcerated
torious Potma
id l?en rejected
Si viet.
| ailed Riga, the
: Soviel Latvia, in an
i i btain details on the
petition. A neigh-
[srael reporter
fathei had been called
lOvir immigration office
kci. where he was told
|; o_u1 -
tious Leaders Involved
Yi iRK President
I Ford lias !>een asked to
inns leaders and to
|thc teachings of the great
developing the process
and machinery which would
U t | artlal amnesty for t'-
ing i c< pit who reft.sed to
fight in the Vietnam War.
In a communication to the
Pr sident, the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations, na-
tienal congregational body rep-
resenting 715 Reform synagogues
and 1.1 million members in the
United States and Canada,
lauded Foid for his "courageous"
statement on amnesty last week
before the Veterans of Foreign
Wars m Chicago.
The letter was signed by Rabbi
Balfour Brickner, co-director of
i ie Union of American Hebrew
Congregation's Department of
Sociai Act.cn.
V ? -*-
FR.vjit Fires Missile
TEL AVIV Egypt fired a
SAM-7 anti-aircraft missile at an
Iataeli fighter plane on Aug. _l
while it was on a routine i
sion along the Sinai disengage-
::ient line. The I lain was not hit.
The Incident was diseJosed af-
ter the Israeli liaison officer with
the United Nations Emergency
Force (UNEF) lodged a com-
plaint.
Israel said its plane was on a
routine patrol flight and had not
crossed the disengagement line.
According to the Israeli com-
plaint, the Russian-made mis-
sile, known as the "Strella," was
fired from the direction of Egyp-
tian forces on the east bank of
the Suez Canal.
Education Bill Signed
WASHINGTON In a cere-
Kissinger Leaning
oimrd New Concessions
p'linued from Page 1A
itlons. We have a
btance yet to travel, but
1 and hard work we
bplete the journey. The
lof the Middle East V
and i ho peace of the
emnnds it."
DO i.ow- elements were
M in Kissinger's remarks,
bservers here questioned
his juxtaposition of
hi Israeli claims indicated
US believes that Israel
etum territory and re-
ances of the Pal-
11 it hopes to obtain
and recognition from
Bis.
Imust create in the Mid-
It a lasting peace, not just
l'"e." the Secretary said.
Is throughout that tragic-
fn area have convinced
|ne essential fact above all
[flie people of the Middle
'hey Arab or Jew, have
l"sh of bloodshed. They
for peace and peace can
"" If they an.l we have the
patience to achieve it."
PS 3,800-word text, which
referred to turmoil in many
parts of the world, such as the
current situation in Cyprus, Kis-
singer said the American attitude
would be "that we cannot be the
world's policeman but that we
will always use our influence for .
peace and conciliation. We will j
not yield to pressure groups but j
we will always listen to reason. ]
We will act in foreign policy as
trustee of the future, conscious
that we w;ll be judged on how
well we ouilt an enduring peace
and not how often we bowed to
the emotional demands of the
moment."
His latter remark was inter- I
preted here as a reference to the
demonstration by more than |
20,000 Greek Americans at the
White House on Aug. 18 and the
assassination Aug. 19 of U.S.
Ambassador Rodger Davies in
Cyprus.
It was also seen as a further
indication of Kissinger's opposi-
tion to popular demand in Con-
gress that the U.S. insist that the
Soviet government change its
emigration policies before grant-
ing trade concessions to the So-
viet Union.
mony attended by Rep. William
Lehman (D., Fa.), President
Ford signed H.R. 69, the Educa-
n Amendments of 1974. The
tthi laea $25 billion through
fiscal year 1978 for a series of
important education programs,
Hiding t!-.e new Community
Act.
i e ation pro- -
-isions in H.F 69 are the ret
of .-' of Rep. Lehmi
who had introduced the amend-:
menl to | iov.de Federal I
' r community schools when H.R.'
69 was being considered by I
Education and Labor Committee. |
Rep, Lehman had been person-
ally invited, by P:esi.'ent Ford to
attend the signing.
Lei man was given credit for
breaking a deadlock in the Sen-
ate-House Conference Committee
that threatened to stop the bill.
The bill, the nwsl far-reaching
piece of federal education legis-
lation to become law, will in-1
ciease Florida's share of federal
education funds by (i per cent.
In Dacic and Broward County,
fuil funding of the bill will gen-
erate ovei $11 million extra next
year.
Israel Itond ( 'onferenee
TRIAL The interna-
tiona] Fall leadership conference
on i ... St I 6, through Sun-
Sept. 8, v. ill launch an in-
ified program to provide im-
mediate large-scale economic aid
t tnd of the year to meet Israel's
cial economic development
needs, it was announced by Sam
Rothberg, general chairman, and
Michael Arnon, president and
chief executive officer of the Is-
rael Bond Organization.
Together with Allan Bronl-
man, president of the Israel Bond I
drive in Canada, they emphasized
that the conference will be tak-
ing place against a background
of extraordinary economic prob-
lems facing Israel as a result of
the Yom Kippur War, and the
sharply increased financial bur-
dens on the people of Israel un-
der the government's new eco-
nomic policy of austerity.
Shimon Peres, Israel's Minis- ,
ter of Defense, who is making a
special trip to Montreal to partic-
ipate in the conference, will be
the principal speaker and guest
of honor.
* & *
HadtiMuih Convention
ATLANTA Sen. H nry M.
Jackson (D., Wash.), Israel Am-
bassador to the U.S. Simcha
T>ir,.l7, and Jerusalem Mayor
ddy Kollek aie among leaders
figures who will address Ha.las-
annual national con-
vention at the Marriott Motor
Hotel in Atlanta, Sept 8 to 11. Ing.
Jackson and Dinitz will speak
at opening plenary. Kollek will
receive the Henrietta Szold
Award at a banquet on Tuesday.
Over 2,500 delegates will at-
tend seminars and workshops on
health, education, foreign and
American affairs, fund raising,
membership and leadership train-
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. August 30, 1974
Jrwisti fhridman
Page S-A
Jewish Leaders Greet
President's Nomination
Of Nelson Rockfeller
U- yuRK(JTA)Jewish
Irs greeted with enthusiasm
[ nominal i. mi of Nelson A.
taller as Vice President.
Lj Israel Miller, chai-man
L Conference of Presidents
[ajor American Jewish Or-
Ltions. told a press confer-
hponsored by his organiza-
Ljiat Rockefeller has cordial
Jfrienlly relations with the
Lean Jew ish community and
I. ami expressed the hope
|hee wo ild continue.
ri\(. that Secretary of
Henrj A. Kissinger has
[dor Burr
\ue for Stay
In Israel
LsALEM -(JTA) The
[popular TV star in Israel,
lira's Raymond Burr (Com-
Ironside), is due in Is-
Lpt. i ,. [uesl of honor at
fce-daj Israel Film Festival
opens at Safed Sept. 2 un-
burism Ministry auspices.
h- will i>e accompanied by
lusty ai le Sgt Ed Brown
|aci Don Galloway.
iONG THE items scheduled
lei: visit a tour around
plem in a police squad car
hisil to the Alyn Home for
Id Children, where many
patients are youngsters
to wheelchairs tor the
Li their lives.
hide's ilarifj in Israel
treat and widespread that
lis think twice before call-
fcch other l>etwecn 9 and 10
Saturday night, for fear of
rbine th> viewing.
0\
Who gives a
1 Birthday Party
|fou couldn't hold
I candle to?
Call: i
-aterinq Manager
377-1966
aheraion-
ir Ambassador
'U'riBAYSHORt DltlV AMI
Everybody'a
biking IbouU.,
CMe
(45-M|f
Coraiiu Kratf
worked with Rockefeller, Rabbi
Miller expressed the view that a
continuity of foreign policy is ex-
liected to be implemented by the
Vice President designate.
Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein,
president of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, in lauding the
nomination, cited Rockefeller's
life-long support for the cause
of Zionism," his "genuine under-
standing for Israel's needs," and
"consistent and outstanding ef-
forts to ensure Israel's welfare
and security."
Rabbi Sternstein also expressed
the hope that during Rockefel-
ler's term as Vice President, "the
de facto alliance between our na-
tion and Israel will be strength-
ened," and that the U.S. govern-
ment "will continue to insist that
all Middle East negotiations
must be based on the genuine in-
tent of all parties concerned to
seek real and lasting peace.*
THE NOMINATION was also
lauded by Agudath Israel as "a
wise step in helping bring the
American nation together again."
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, executive
president, called the nominee "a
man of unim|>eachable integrity
and endowed with a sense of
goodwill towards all people."
Citing Rockefeller's records as
New York governor, the Ortho-
dox Jewish leader added that the
nominee "has a proven record of
commitment to all causes dear
to the heart of the Jewish com-
munity."
Michael Krop Dr. Broadaway
: /
David Brillhart
I. N. Daws
Kay Goode
Petw Masiko
United Way Appointments
Announced By Chairman
United W-/ of Dade County's
1974 General Campaign chair-
man, James W. McLamore,
(chairman of the board of Burg-
er King Corporation) has ap-
pointed E. Herbert Daws, Dis-
trict Manager/Postmaster, U.S.
Post Office, as cochairman of
Unit K for 1974.
This is Mr. Daws' third year of
responsibility for soliciting Unit-
ed Way contributions from fed-
eral, state, and local governmen-
tal agencies and employees.
Dr. Michael Krop and Dr.
Rufus K. .Broadaway have been
appointed cochairmen of the
United Way's Unit L. They will
be soliciting United Way contrib-
utions from Dade County's hos-
pitals, nursing homes, doctors,
dentists, and professional medi-
cal organizations.
David W. Brillhart, executive
vice president of the First Na-
tional Bank of Miami, has been
appointed cochairman of the
United Way's Unit F.
This is Mr. Brillhart's first
year of top leadership responsi-
bility with the United Way. He
has responsibility for soliciting
United Way contributions from
Dade County's banks, stock brok-
ers, accountants, lawyers and fi-
nance companies.
R. Ray Goode, Metropolitan
Dade County Manager, has been
appointed 'cochairman of the
United Way's Unit K.
Mr. Goode, who has served the
United Way for several years in
this top campaign leadership po-
sition, will have responsibility for
soliciting United Way contribu-
tions from federal, state, and lo-
cal governmental agencies and
employees.
Dr. Peter Masiko, Jr., presi-
dent of Miami-Dade Community
College, has been appointed
chairman of the United Way's
Unit J.
Dr. Masiko has served in nu-
merous volunteer positions with-
in the United Way in past years.
He will now have responsibility
for soliciting United Way con-
tributions from Dade County's
public and private schools, col-
leges, and non-profit agencies.
S. Dade Post To Meet Monday Eve.
The monthly meeting of the
South Dade Post Jewish War
Veterans, will be held Monday,
Sept. 9. at 8 p.m. at the Dade
Federal Savings and Loan Ass"n,
10830 S. Dixie Hwy All eligible
men are cordially invited to at-
tend the meeting.
Abe Eisenman, Commander,
will discuss the upcoming quar-
terly convention to be held in
Clearwater, Oct. 5-7. Mr. Eisen-
man, Herbert Dubbin, Alvin Rose
and Sol Adyr will attend.
Charles Simon, second vice
president, will report on the re-
cent National Jewish War Vet-
erans Convention in Philadelphia,
Pa.
j~daaeland 163rd street hollywood fort lauderdale pompano west palm beach orlando merritt island aitamonte springs
miami


Page 6-A
vJenisti fhoridiair
Jackson Urged to Press for Red 'Minimum'
Friday, August 30, 197
NEW YORK (JTA) Prof.
Alexander Luntz, a well-known
Soviet mathematician and one of
the major Jewish activists, has
urged Sen. Henry M. Jackson
(D., Wash.) to insist on "mini-
mum demands" to which the
Soviet Union must agree in cur-
rent negotiations on U.S.-USSR
trade, according to the text of a
letter from Prof. Luntz to Jack-
son released by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
The "minimum demands" in-
cludes 30.000 exit visas annual-
ly, the cessation of the continual
harassment of visa applicants,
the lifting of refusals on the
grounds of so-called security, and
the immediate release of all pris-
oners of conscience.
PROF. LUNTZ noted in his
letter to Jackson: "Our hopes to
live as a free people in our home-
land (Israel* have been ignited
by the continuous and sensitive
support you and your colleagues
have shown our cause. It is for
that reason that we wish to ex-
press to you our concern at the
present time.
"Our friends have informed us
that the Soviet government may
wish to enter into a new stage
of negotiations and compromise
with your government. We wel-
negotiations, and
minimum den.a
inclu.i
Former Envoy Hits 'Jewish Emigration'
Continued from Page 1-A
ed in the freedom to leave their
country of origin is in some way
racially conditioned, and that the
treatment of others than Jews in
this respect would leave us indif-
ferent."
The Jackson Amendment to
the trade bill pending in the Sen-
ate does not mention "Jew" or
"Jewish" in any aspect. It spe-
cifically refers to all Soviet citi-
zens.

Syria Jews Debated
By British MP's
LONDON (JTA) Conservative MP MichaH FidJer said
he was stiM not satisfied with a Foreign Office explanation that
the British Ambassador in Damascus did not make a statement
supporting the Syrian government's claim that Jews in Syria are
not being mistreated.
In response to a letter from David Ennals, Minister of State
at the Foreign Office, which said that Ambassador David Rob-
erts did not make the statement attributed to him in news-
papers, Fidler said: "Would it not be better if we had some offi-
cial statemeat from our Ambassador, repudiating the view as-
cribed to him?"
Fidler noted that until Roberts makes such a statement
"what he is reported to have said has caused a lot of concern
among a great many people" in and out of England.
Eluine Bloom Suggests Lobbyist
For Senior Citizens In Capitol
Elaine 1 Bloom, candidate for
Florida's House of Representa-
tives, (District 100. Democrat),
is campaigning with an unusually
meaningful platform that con-
tains at least one innovative con-
cept.
Ms. Bloom proposes that Flor-
ida should hire a full-time profes-
sional lobbyist to go to Wash-
ington exclusively for the pur-
pose of representating Florida's
Senior Citizens.
An idea that was mentioned
almost casually in her brochure,
the concept has begun attract-
ing interest and support not only
from Senior Citizens, but pre-re-
tirement people as well. Ms.
Bloom recently discussed the
concept on Ch. 2. in her appear-
ance in the "Candidates "74" Se-
ries.
"Our seniors come from all
over the country to retire or
semi-retire in Florida," explains
the candidate, "and while our
state certainly can't afford to
fund the needs of all 1.000.000;
Senior Citizens, we eel tainly owe '
Um m something in the way of
direct meaningful action, rather
than a bunch of empty, impotenl
re lutioas."
The lobbyist she pro|
"could represent our Si iti ".
Sen ors In all their manj
of interest! from such imanlfir
or as the Kennedy-Grif-
fiths Bill to elimination of the
inequities and inadequacies in
our Social Security system," ac-
lions and millions of dol-
lars are being withheld" from
Social Security recipients
whose wives predeceased them,
as an example of the inequities.
She said that the Social Security
laws do not provide for a wom-
an's benefits to be passed on to
her husband or children, as they
do for a man's, should he die
first. She claimed that "around
500 million dollars" of a total
remale-paid sum of two billion
would come to Florida if the law
were adjusted.
However, comments on the
Jackson Amendment, usually re-
fer to Jewish emigration even
though Sen. Henry Jackson (D.,
Wash.) himself, in speeches, has
pointed out the legislation bear-
ing his name is intended to help
Rep. Bill Lehman
Seeks Reelection
William "Bill" Lehman, who
. was elected, in 1972 as a Rep-
resentative of the 13th Congres-
sional District, is seeking reelec-
tion to that post, which was
formed after the 1970 census.
During his two years in Con-
gress, Lehman introduced the
"Community Education Bill,"
which was included in the "Ele-
mentary and Secondary Educa-
tion Act of 1974" and was invited
by President Ford to attend the
formal signing of the measure in
the White House last week.
Lehman also obtained House
approval of a new intern pro-
gram which gives government
teachers a chance to spend two
months in Washington as "Lyn-
don B. Johnson Interns" parti-
cipating in the nation's political
system before teaching young-
sters about it.
Professor To Lecture
The Miami Beach Art Club,
Inc., holds an art forum the sec-
ond Friday of each month in the
Washington Federal Auditorium.
1234 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach. Prof. Pat DeLong of the
Miami-Dade Community College
Art Department, will be the lec-
turer Friday, Sept. 13. at 8 p.m.,
discussing "Great Art in His-
tory," and illustrating with col-
ored films.
A KEY BANKER
YOU CAN BANK ON!
... CANDIDATES' B A L L Y
Democratic candidates for all of-
fices will speak at the rally spon-
sored by the Democratic Club of
Miami Beach in the Carillon
Hotel Wednesday at 8 p.m. Wally
Cluck, club president, will
moderate. Entertainment will be
provided by "The Miraculous
Djyan."
IS hwaitz. Executive V
'
v.
Up : .
ill Kl Y
aKI ': ,nk. he was still man
'' in li 5ti id of personal I he's spent

lyof
; But he works for oth
.-: ergi Opt
Put h.m to v.-'. with KEY
THE "BANK
County National Bank
01 NE Mm STHHT MONTH MIAMI MAC* 6517110
MAISSMSSIMM tC-0Q1'OfliN$ijloroMooooYFOlt
any Soviet citizen to emigrate
without harassment.
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger, who was to have
testified three weeks ago on this
and other elements of Soviet-
American detente, is still expect-
ed to appear before the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee in
the near future. Jackson also
is expected to testify in what is
described as a "debate on de-
tente."
come such
lieve that
(should be made.)
Continuing, Prof. Lunt
Jackson: "You must also rem;
ber a matter which is verv
portant. We fear for the tut
of all Soviet Jews
those who have not app
exit permits.
"WE ARE witnessing the b'
generation of eaucated jew
the USSR. The numbers erf je
accepted in Soviet universitl
has dropped drastically \
example. 20 years ago 30
cent of the mathematics depa
ment of Moscow University v
Jewish. Today the figure is
half of one percent. The numtj
of Soviet Jews given job advan,
ment has lessened radically,
"Jews living in remote an
are in a state of terror, fea;
not only poor employment
deportation to the east. Mj
deportation, perhaps beginn
with a shift of areas of empl
ment for Jews, could becorrujS
tactic in the Soviet government
campaign against us. Rememb|
this in your agreement witt t!,
Soviet government"
ELAINE BLOOM
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 10ODEMOCRAT
ELAINE BLOOM
GETS THINGS
DONE!
iTppBITu 3TTO pOTQ rOT hy IM
Committee to Beet Elaine Bloom
f.
.Ralph
Poston
DEMOCRAT
FOR THE SENATE
DISTRICT 38
(DADE-MONROE COUNTIES)
HELP REDUCE
THE FUEL SURCHARGE
Ni< tor If Piston Cjmji|n. Kent Enfrt. ffHNM


Friday. August 30, 1974
*Jewisti fkrkMaMTi
Page 7-A
Ford-Hussein Statement Stuns Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
Israeli policy," which is to reject
Jordan's demand lor an Israeli
pulltack from the Jordan River.
;s:al is ready, as it has re-
peatedly s'-ited, to strive for
peace with Jordan," Saguy's
statement said.
But Israel has rejected and
continues to reject the Jordanian
demand for an Israc withdraw-
al along the Jordan River in the
context of what the Jordanian
government cal's a disengage-
ment agreement'."
HOWEVER, WELL placed
sources here maintained today
that the Ford-Hussein commu-
nique was not to be seen chiefly
Pig Skin Gets OK
For Surgical Grafts
JFRl'SAI.EM (JTA) Israeli rabbis have approved the
use of dried pig skin in grafts for persons who have suffered
seven burns. The relatively new method, developed in the
United States, has been used successfully on Israeli soldiers
h-.irned during the Yom Kippur War.
The rabbis who were consulted said the method was aceept-
ab'e because it involved "piku.ih nefesh" the principle that
law may be violated to save a human life.
URGE QUANTITIES of pig skin dried by a special process
permits storage, have been sent to Israel from the U.S.
lie war. last October. A report on its use will be presented
hi the fiflS international congress of the Transplant Society to
be held here soon.
I Ni.'ium Ben Hur. of Shaare Zedek Hospital, one of the
> who introduced the system to Israel, told a press con-
! pig skin proved to be '.he best skin graft. About 10
if I-raeTs war wounded suffered from burns necessitat-
ing skin grafts.
Rabin Forestalls
Any Further Talk
tf Disengagement
ByTJTt SEDAN
JERUSA! (JTA)
! Rabin has made
it clea the theme of
ii nth to Washing-
i aiore disen
tei :-."
\' dm 2,000 Nahal
in declared:
i iienl agn e-
lel Egypt and
ned, .-ii',l
i d -. : ement
ie next Btagi
:... nl
x i THE ..<> H -., Rabin did
' th possibility of
e to go to war,
iu that we
.: ; ea till .
met bj o ir neigh
1
noted that the
en talk i out in
iroad i* not the
. ea< i Isi iel i.s uiii-
i ei i.
ech was Interpret-
ed ar message to
States that Israel is
I not t.) join American
inlan efforts for disen-
talks betw.en Israel
ill :'iior to an overall
ment or prior to
nued negotiations with
Syria.
I State Henr. A
e his annoi,n,o.
mental press conference with
e vine Israel's
10 Habin wil] meet with Presi-
lent Pord before Egyptian Pre*
""" Anwar Sada1 does. Israel
that Sadat go to
n first
S&ABL nio announce in the
past that she was ready for a
settlement with Jordan,
'his did not mean, it is
t"sed here, that she would
"Kree for a one-sided Israeli
Withdrawal.
nrSS*1* in Jersalem also ex-
i resfed reservatiins over the wav
vv ishing on announced the date
01 Kab,n s visit to the U.S
However, Tt was laid here,
since Ford wants to tee Rabin
in September, the Premier will
probably irr Ihere at that time.
S; i ian Peaajgn Minister Ab-
dul Hftlim Kadam was due in
Washington rast weeks
POLITICAL ANALYSTS in Is
explained that Kissinger ,
see ns to te in a nurry to deal
with the Mi.I.Me East, di spite the
t isis.
fee -. according to
e ine is. thai the sit ..it on
in i is deteriorating and
the best way to stabilize the
j sent i liel if to accelerate the
eei in I etv een Mid-'
en and himsi
. ( : isis an i Ford's
nal ii al Inten si In iuick suc-
reted as fac-
: s wish to S| eed
up the Mideast iisengagemenl
it is therefore believe I here
ill toil ti e new Ad-
ministration that talks with
Egj I precede talks with
Ji rdan a in e any pro jress in
net vvith Egypt may
change the atmosphere betw< (n
.. an.
1\ addition, continued ne-
goti.it: na with Egypt will post
I one lit decisions
on 't will also
postpoi fulfilling the Labor
hold general
i'V : ins i- the govern-
ment will have to tiei Ide on giv-
.iii pan of Judea or Samaria,
sitl >:i leaders, however,
are nol going to wait until Rabin
, to Washington to voice
their opii iske I for .i
i ,n on the
joint American-Jordanian ci
munique in which Ford and Kii
Hi ssein agreed to work toward
Israeli-Jordanian dlsengagemenl
negotiations.
Rabin's si each at Zemah on
Lake Tiberias was to members
of 17 Nahal groups, military |
units which spend part of then-
service time working in agricul-
tural settlements.
The youths cheered him call-
ing him "Gingy," his nickname
when he served in the Palmach.
as a move against Israel but
rather as an American effort to
bolster Hussein in the Arab
world with which he is at logger-
heads over the question of Pales-
tinian representation.
Washington, Amman and Jeru-
salem all share an overwhelming
prefeienee for the King over the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion as the arbiter of the future
of the West Bank and of its Pal-
estinian inhabitants.
The communique, it is thought
here, provided Hussein with just
the kind of political clout he
needed at this juncture.
The sources further noted that
the communique did not express-
ly endorse Jordan's position on
a disengagement but merely re-
ferred to it in the context of the
need for future negotiations. At
the same time, no one here is
denying that the communique
Jarred Jerusrlem.
A PBOMP'f reply was requir-
ed, it was felt, both to give no-
tice to the new U.S. President
and his Arab guests, and to as-
s.ire the public at home, that the
government's position on a West
Bank interim agreement has not
changed or weakened.
Israel had suggested a "fune-
tional disengagement" whereby
Jordan would re-assume civilian
administration of much of the
West Bank without Israeli troops
being withdrawn from any part
of it. Hussein rejected this no-
tion as an insult.
INFORMED observers here
saw the Israeli statement as in-
tended, too. to preempt any crit-
ic ism of Allon in the light of the
U.S.-Jordan communique.
Allon has already been taken
to task by columnists and oppo-
sition politicians for saying too
much in Washington, for present-1
ing his "private views" such as j
the "Allon Plan" and thereby
creating the impression that the
government as a whole was pre-
paid to be more flexible than it
is in fact.
Allon himself has denied the
accusations though he has not
denied that he examined "various
scenarios" with Kissinger, nor
that ne discussed the "Allon
Plan," stressing always that it
had not been adopted as Cabinet
policy.
THE ALLON visit and its im-
mediate aftermath, moreover,
raised m ch uncertainty here as
to whether Israel was prepared
to consider a partial settlement
with Jordan.
Only a month ago top ranking
officials were asserting that if
there was to be a negotiation
with Jordan it would have to bo
over a final settlement.
Allon himself maintains that
he stressed to Kissinger tl.at
Premier Yitzhak Rabin's govern-
ment wanted to go to the elec-
torate as it has solemnly
pledgedonly with a final, over-
all territorial settlement and not
with a partial plan which would
. niy postpone the final decision
ior another date.
NEVERTHELESS, reports
from Wasnington during his vis-
it and from well plared sources
here on his return indicated that
Kissinger virtually ruled out the
practicability of an overall set-
tlement at this time and sought
to press towards a partial ac-
cord and that Allon seemed to
respond positively to this.
The uncertainty thereby en-
gendered weakened Allon inter-
nally, especially since the Cabi-
ret debate last month on the
Palestinian question seemed to
show up slight differences be-
tween him and Rabin on the
West Bank question. The Israel
statement was designed in part
to strengthen Allon and to coun-
ter any idea that he has wavered
or performed weakly during his
talks in Washington.
ELECTJOE
ffsrrrnTj
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 109 DEMOCRAT
REFORM OF THE
PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION
Allowing the People
To Have More of a Say
on Utilities and Fuel
Surcharges
pd. pol. adv.
NEW APPROACHES
TO OLD PROBLEMS

get ready to register..
New areas of study... new ways to learn.
It's all beginning this Fall. Call now
for course and registration information.
fall registration begins
August 28
11300 n. e. 2nd ave.
miami shores


Page 8-A
fJenist FJcricff^r
**ay. August 30, 1974
'What the Hell are They Putting Out?-My
Relatives are Soap,'Dr. K Said
By RICHARD YAFFE
London Chronicle Syndicate
Was there a "Jewish dimen-
sion" in Henry Kissinger"s career
under President Nixon, both ar
presidential assistant and head of
the National Security Council,
and now also as Secretary ol
State? To what extent, if any,
has his "Jewishness" played a
role in his decision-making?
Has he "leaned over back-
wards." a* co manv American
Jews feared he would when he
was appointed, not to allow
whatever Jewish instincts he had
to influence his dealings with
Arab loaders?
What did he "pav," if any-
thing, for Sadat's embraces and
lor being actuated into the pal-
aces of King Faisal of Saudi Ara-
bia where no Jew ever trod be-
fore?
KISSINGER HIMSELF, of
course, will not talk about what
it means to be a Jew in the office
in which he finds himself, with
power second only to the Presi-
dent's and prestige far beyond.
However, nowhere in any of the
"miracles" Kissinger has wrought
in the Middle East is there a sug-
gestion that they were the result
of "leaning over backwards" or
at the expense of Israel.
If anything, he did what no
other American official before
him was able to do. He showed
that it was possil e to be a
strong ally of Israel without be-
ing an enemy of the Arabs.
He could Irink a "le'chaim"
and laugh v> a Meirand
then he bussed and was called
"my friend Henry" by Anwar
Sadat.
BIT RE did fnrse things, not
as a Jew he is a Jew,
is the Ameri 1 n
f Si ... riting
the .1 rests I the ; 'n te I States.
In a series of articles in
New Jfork I men-
feld return- again and again to
Kissinger's roots In G and
his Jev
ica as he traces the Secretary's
path from h
Kiss tiger himself insists that
what happened in Germany did
not happen to him. The beatings
he got as a bo.* came from other
boys, not from jack-booted Nazis.
What happened to the Jews aft-
er 1938. he says, was a tragedy
but it did not happen to him.
MEN WHO knew him well
don't believe him. One of them,
Carl Friedrich. a retired Harvard
professor and a non-Jew, said he
thought Henry regretted the
conflict the Nazis created be-
tween Jews and Germans. He did
not want to carry the burden of
this frightful heritage. And psy-
chic self-suffering you don't
want to put that out before
journalists."
The "man who discovered Kis-
singer." Fritz Kraemer, Prussian-
born Pentagon advisor and also a
non-Jew. said that what the
Nazis "did to these people is un-
speakable. You can do damage to
the soul of a man and never
touch his body. For five years,
the most formative years, from
10 to 15. Henry had to undergo
this honor. And the real horror
is the breakdown of the world.
Imagine what it means when
your father, who was your au-
thority, the father you admire, is
suddenly frightened into a little
mouse."
Kissinger's e.y erience was so
traumatic, thinks Kraemer, still
a friend, that he literally cannot
talk about it. For any outsi,
he said. Kissinger's silence can
be measured only when it Is brok-
en, and this has happened twice
since he came into the public
eye in 1969.
ONCE WAS at Yad Vashem
last December, when a corre-
spondent asked him to describe
his emotions. Enraged, he told
One of the first acts of President Ford was to announce that
the Secretary of State, Dr. Henry Kissinger, probably the big-
gest success in the Nixon Administraton, will be staying on
to serve him in the same position. How Jewish is Dr. Kis-
singer under the skin, and has his background influenced his
decisions in public office?
OR. KISSINGER
her that this was a private visit,
and he wanted no more questions
about it.
The other time was when he
was on an Official visit to Bonn
several years ago. The German
; ess officer said in a release
that Kissinger would visit rela-
tives while in Germany. Kissin-
ger 1 xplodt il. "What the hell are
they putting out?" he demanded
to know. "My relatives are s
Kissinger was 1-1 and his
. Walter, 15, when their
parents brought them to New-
York in June, 1938. The father,
who was 50, had l>een a school
teachei in Fuerth. In America,
he was to take a low
a bookkeeper, and the
mother, 13 years his junior.
work with a cate
whom she prepared and served
hors d'oeuvres at private parties.
THE FUTURE Secretary of
State quickly learned one aspect
of America: "I had to face the
problem of earning a living." He
got a job squeezing moisture
from bristles for a shaving brush
manufacturer, at $10 a week. He
v.o.-ked there from 1939 to 1943,
while going to high school and
then university.
"I ended up making 15 a
week." he recalls. His height of
ambition: "To be an accountant."
Six long years lay ahead. Kis-
singer went through training as
8 combat infantryman, and it
was at Camp Claiborne, La., that
he first met Frit/ Kraemer.
Kraemer, who was then 35,
had had to leave Germany when
Hitler took power because of his
vigorous opposition to the Nazis.
H 8 job in the army was to tour
the camps and lecture on what
V ism was all about.
KISSINOEB was Impressed,
and wrote a note to Kraemer
telling him so. Kraemer respond-
ed, he recalls, by guiding "my lit-
tle Jew" into counter intelli-
gence am' post-war military gov-
. nment in Germany. In later
v. ars, be "pointed" hi n I wards
Harvard,
Kissinger was demobilized and
came home from the war in E 1
in L94t. H no longei want-
ed to be an accountant but want-
ed the academic life that Har-
vard offered.
Between terms, in an Orthodox
ceremony at his parents' apart-
ment in Washington Heights,
Kissinger married Ann Fleischer
on February 6, 1949. They had
two children, Elizabeth and
David.
Ralph Blumenfeld notes, as
others have done, that Kissinger
has not seen the inside of a syn-
agogue in 30 years. But Leo Hex-
ter, his former youth group lead-
er from Fuerth, said, "I can tell
you that until he went into the
army, Henry was very religious.
He put on tefilin every morning
and went to synagogue regular-
ly-"
But the last time he was seen
in a synagogue was in 1943, prior
to sailing for the war in Europe.
(He attended the Bar Mitzvah
of his son, David, last Aug. 17 in
Waltham, Mass.. just one week
after the resignation of President
Nixon and the elevation to the
presidency of Gerald Ford.ed.)
KISSINGER WAS asKed how
he felt when he returned to Nazi
Germany as an American soldier.
Was it exultation? Did he seek
vengeance? "Not vengeance." he
replied. "1 felt, to the dismay of
my family, that if racial discrim-
ination was Lad vis-a-vis the
Jews, it was bad vis-a-vis the
1. 1 mans. I mean, you can't
blame a whole people."
Ralph W. Farris, Jr.. a war-
time friend, said that Kissinger's
resentments were directed
against his fellow Jewish refu-
gees in the counterintelligence
service who could not contain
their hatred for the Nazis.
He saiii: "I remember one oc-
casion ne of these refu-
gee interviewers wee being
e to a civilan couple. The
e were not under Investiga-
tion They v. re J 1st being a
Rocky Friend o f Jewish Causes
Continued from Page IV
an advisor on foreign affairs t0
kefefler, and since Fi I's
first act on becoming President
1 s to announce that Kissinger
would remain as Secretary of
State, it is assumed that Ford
anil Rockefeller are in full agree-
ment on U.S. foreign policy.
THIS WOULD mean, observ-
ers noted, that Rockefeller can
be expected to support fully the
Administration's policy in ne-
gotiating a peace settlement in
the Middle East on the lines cur-
rently being pursued by Kis-
singer and Ford.
However, Rockefeller pointed
out to newsmen that his role as
Vice President depends entirely
on the President.
For the 15 years he was gov-
ernor of New York prior to his
resignation in December, 1973,
Rockefeller received a great deal
of support in hi* election bids
n the Jew munity.
was a str< ti ter of
Jewish 1 ises in Ken York and
throughout the nation and a firm
defender of Israel.
HE was a long-time support-
er Of the United Jewish Appeal
campaign in New York and was
founder and first chairman of
the Non-Sectarian Community
Committee for the UJA in 1946-
47.
He assumed chairmanship of
committee again in 1958. He said
of the committee's work at one
time that it "demonstrated our
conviction that all civilized men
shared the duty of redressing the
outrage committed against the
Jewish iieople."
At the end of World War II,
Rockefeller was active in helping
to relocate those in DP camps in
Europe and supporting the es-
tablishment of the State of Is-
rael.
* Ties to Europe Need
Strengthening, MK's Told
JERUSALEM (JTA) Foreign Minister Yigal Al!on
told seven Israeli ambassadors that Israel would make a special
effort to improve relations with Europe.
He said there were good pi wpects to achieve that improve-
ment Allon spoke at the beginning of a three-dav seminar by
the Foreign Ministry senior staff discussing Israel's relations
with Europe.
FINANCE MINISTER Yeh^shua Rabinowitz told the seminar
that the trade deficit between Israel and Europe would be this
>car some^IL 1.5 billion compared to IL 1 billion last year.
He called on the ambassadors to examine the possibilities
of bridging the growing gap between Israel's export and import
with Europe.
Bank of Israel Governor Moshe Zanbar called for minimiz-
ing dependence of Israel's economy on foreign countries The
seven envoys will meet with Premier Yitzhak Rabin. Defense
Minister Shimon Peres, and military intelligence chief fhlomo
Gazit for further discussions on this topic.
HIS 8C1 PORT for the Jewish
51 has continued, and he vis-
ited Israel several times, the
t in the summer of 1972.
During the Six Day War,
Rockefeller declared that the
US. "must support whatever ac-
tion is necessary to maintain the
integrity of Israel ... to restore
peace and to remove the long
festering conditions of conflict
that torment the Middle East."
In a speech on Israel's 20th an-
niversary in 1968, Rockefeller
noted that "it is well to recall
that during this 20-year period
almost a million-and-a-half down-
trodden people have found a
haven and a Home in Israel made
up of survivors of the Holocaust
and victims of oppression in
many countries of the world."
HE SAID this was "the largest
and finest example of humani-
tarian rescue in the history of
mankind."
Noting that the U.S. was the
first country to recognize Israel
as a State, Rockefeller said it
continues its "interest in the
growth and development of Is-
rael as the only true example of
democracy in the Middle East."
Rockefeller also stressed at
the time that peace in the Mid-
cast "still hinges on the accep-
tance of realities. Once Israel is
accepted as a fact of life
then permanent peace can come
. and that day when Israel's
nationhood will be recognized by
its neighbors must come as soon
ossible. the United States
should do everything in its pow-
er to advance that objective."
SPEAKING to the America-
Israel Chamber of Cbmmei
May 1S.73. Rockefeller paid trib-
ute to Israel's "triumph and
courage ovr Incredible ob-
stacles," adding: "We are all
deeply and understandably Im-
pressed by the courage of Israeli
for information. Henrv h*
yelling at the questioners: "
lived here under the Nazis. You
know how abusive they *,f
Now how can you turn around
and abuse these peoP,e ,hc^
ANOTHER professor rv-
Friedrich, now retired, said tha
Kissinger did not try to hide his
background. He remembers 1
cocktail party he gave in t,
1940's when Kissinger was still1
student, bod "he asked me if he
could invite his parents, and
then he made a great point of
introducing me to them. I ]ikp
the fact that he did that"
Friedrich said that it was lw
sible that Harvard's "casual ami-
Semitism" may have made Kis
singer wary. "It is not invitine
here for a boy to be pro-Israel *
he said. He also recalls that his
own pro Zionist views we-e
strongly opposed by Kissinger
who thought "it was all wi
for America."
During the negotiations |
American withdrawal from Y
nam. both Nixon and Kissii
feared a rightist uproar if
U.S.A. withdrew, and Kissii
a State Department counsi
said, also had another lea J
that the scapegoat might be the
Jewish refugee himself."
ROC.Elf MORRIS, who
humanitarian policy studies .
the Carnegie Endowment :
ternational Peace, wrote rect I
in the Columbia Journal-
view that despite Kissin
"awesome success, he seer
remain so self-consciously
German Jewish immigrant,
an 1 tsidei In the Americi n :
eign policy establishment."
The questions asked at the re-
ginning of this article hav (still
not been answered.
Sti
. i
1

. withSenata H.,trt
*?
nth D. ..i:i0"J
Rep Cohi


Friday. Aug"31 30' 1974
JmlMi) fk rectify in
Page 9-A
Likud Beginning to Show Signs of Wear
Continued from Page 1-A
time [.tween the various fac-
tions and within the factions
themselves.
AFTER THE first of the dis-
( uJon sessions, where widely
divergent views were voiced and
the divergencies were immedi-
ately highlighted in the press,
Likud leader Menachem Beigin
gave orders that the subsequent
ns were to be held in utter
secrecy.
1 .1 enough has leaked out
i;, i the later sessions, too, to
, that Likud faces real dan-
,., of splitting at the seams as
moment of truth" ap-
hts: the moment when Is-
\ill open its long-delayed
, ue with Jordan on the fu-
i re the West Bank.
Sharon, architect of the
I ; ; leaded at the final dis-
( -. n session for unity. He
: the "hawks"* to marshal
persuasive i>owe:-s in an
, ; i eonvlnee the "dovw" of
i ror <>f their ways,
I in: RABIN go\e-nnicr.t was
parliamentarily, and,
re, morally, Sharon de-
i [t would ni't i Hussein concessions if the
] .d forcefully and unitedly
ised .n> such concessions.
i in in his views on "the in-
I t, .if the land of Israe
i'm : it as uncompromising as
ind hla Herul stalwarts
ing Knesseter and ex-Ji >
Minister Bin amin Halevy
leclai ed *.ii poi t for a tar-
. m proi ise and a deal
tl Palestinians maki
a\e ick in 'he 1
ranks). But Sharon by no means
typifies in this the rank-and-file
of his own Liberal Party.
LAST WEEK, a political re-
porter in Maai iv attributed a de-
tailed and markedly doveish (by
Likud standards) plan for a
"functional settlement" of the
West Bank issue with Jordan to
Literal leader I-'limelech Rimalt.
Rimalt was said to advocate
a Zahal presence and unlimited
settlement rights for Jews
throughout the West Bank
but alongside this Jordanian
civil administration and Jor-
danian citizenship for those West
Bankers who wished it.
This, however, is hardly an
idea which Beigin could embrace,
since Beigin and Herut demand
the outright annexation of the
whole West Bank by Israel.
The divisions w or fundamental
policy, coming on top of person-
ality differences. Uneaten to
break apart the four-man Free
ei fat tii.n which is ; as t of
Likud.
Its chairman, Shmuel Tamir,
long-time political adversary of
Beigin, Insisted d ing the dis-
i issi m sessions that the Yom
ir War had changed a
dea and Likud must redraft its
policies with a view t:> com-
: es to a< c n modate
tl ese i nan I rcumsl inces.
TAMIR I by one Free
er Knesseter, Akiva Nof
.' bile the two, Elieier
Shostak and Ehud Olmart, favor
ii mo e orthodox taning
line.
em es In I me and stress
of the four-man State List fac-
tion at the Likud parleys.
There were rumors this week,
too, of Liberal Party-inspired
overtures to Premier Yitzhak
Rabin to head for a unity govern-
ment. Herut leaders, including
Beigin, vociferously opposed the
idea.
BUT CERTAIN Liberal Knes-
seters are understood to have
suggested to their Labor Party
friends that Rabin could well
bring in the whole Likud now,
and when the crunch with Jor-
dan came, some, like Herut,
would leave again while others,
like many Liberals, or like Ta-
mir, would stay in.
A lot of these calcul? lions are
still in '.he realm of speculation
rather than reality. A lot will de-
pend on Hussein and how he re-
acts to Israel's various pro-
posals. But the discussions which
were intended to plaster over
cracks in Likud seem to have
succeeded in widening them.
Mobilization Move
Called a Success
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel*s mobilization exercise ended
,T nday earlier than the 24 hours scheduled for the test as top
officials called it a success.
Defense Minister Shimm Peres, who visited the assembly
points, decided to shorten the exercise in view of the excellent
response by reservists.
Chief of Staff Gen. Mordeehai Gur also said that the exercise
was a success.
IIF. SAID many units had 100 percent of their men report.
while otiiers came ciosc to the target. He praised the public
which helped transmit news of the call-up and helped those mo-
bilized reach their posts.
Israel's military command will now study the results of the
mobilization.
The scene throughout Israel Monday was reminiscent of war.
Shops closed down in the main cities with the owners putting up
notices, "clo cd because of the exercise."
Brandeis Zionist
District Slate
To Be Installed
<
The Brandeis Zionist District
of Miami Beach, Zionist Organi-
zation of America, will hold its
annual installation of officers
and directors for 1974-75 Monday
at 8:00 p.m. in the Washington
Federal Savings and Loan Audi-
torium, 1133 Normandy Dr., Mi-
ami Beach. Ted Cohen will be
guest speaker and installing of-
ficer.
Louis Hoberman, former vice
mayor of Surfside, will be in-
stalled for a/fourth term as pres-
ident; other officers to be instal-
led include Ezra Finegold, hon-
orary president; Albert M. Shul-
man, Wolfe Rosenblum, Bernard
Katz. vice presidents; Helen
Zuckerhraun. treasurer; Fannie
Rest, recording secretary; Elsie
Rattner, corresponding secretary,
and Albert V. Rosenberg, finan-
cial secretary.
Directors to be installed in-
c'ude: Theresa Ausubel, Richard
Bergman. Philip Drexler. Alex T.
F.ic;. Nathan Greek, Albert Gross-
man. F. Vile Hoberman. Harry
Jawitz. Joseph Kahn, Louis Kan-
ter, Leo Nudelman. George Os-
sio, Gil Rappaport. Max Raskin,
Rose Shapiro. Charlotte Shalom,
Irving Shalom, Thehna Sheckter,
Adolphe Stattner, Samuel Toll,
Esther Tyson. Nat Rue and Jen-
nie Zaretzky.
Estelle Hoberman will enter-
ta.n with piano selections. Rose
Shapiro will be hostess of the
refreshments which will honor
the 5Cth anniversary of Mr. and
Mr.- Leon Pcpler. The public is
im ih d.
DEMOCRAT
Representative TCCf
as worked for you

-
PLATFORM
,.with Don Shula at the signing
of the Dolphin Expressway
Bill co-sponsored by Rep. Cohen
... citation is presented by the late
Mayor Chuck Hall
",.
^
airman Larry O'Brien
*IC
VENTIQ
...Rep. Cohen with Governor Askew at the 1972 Democrat Convention
*a bill with a fellow
I H
mi
egislator
...with Rep Claude Pepper
INCREASED AID TO SENIOR CITIZENS
CONTROL RATE HIKES BY PUBLIC
SERVICE COMMISSION
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LAWS TO
PROTECT THE PUBLIC
TAX REFORM TO AID CONSUMER
AND HOMEOWNER
PROMOTE "CLEAN'' INDUSTRY
TO SPUR THE ECONOMY
INSURE FLORIDA AS "THE TOURIST
CAPITOL OF THE WORLD''
STRENGTHEN CONSUMER LAWS TO PROTECT
AGAINST MISLEADING ADVERTISING
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
MASS TRANSIT FOR HEAVILY
POPULATED AREAS
CUT COSTS OF GOVERNMENT BY
REDUCING SIZE OF LEGISLATURE
LAWS TO IMPROVE LANDLORD-
TENANT RELATIONSHIPS
REFORM OUR PRISON SYSTEM
"THE MAIN JOB OF
THE LEGISLATURE SHOULD BE
TO PROVIDE AN ACTION PROGRAM'
FOR THE STATE
TO AID ITS CITIZENS
IN FIGHTING INFLATION
AND IMPROVING THE ECONOMY*'
FAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT


Pag* 10-A
+Jt*iiinc*idian
Friday, August 30, 1974
Pat Tornillo Recalls the Old Dictum: Keep Hands Off the Press
J>AT TORNILLO may try again
to tell Lee Hills how to run
his newspaper. But he will get
nowhere. By unanimous vote, the
United States Supreme Court
has seen to that.
Pat Tornillo is a Florida teach-
ers' union official. Lee Hills is
publisher of The Miami Herald.
When Pat ran for the Florida
fKoverl
_____J
legislature in 1972, two editorials
about him printed by Lee"s news-
paper infuriated Pat.
SO HE dusted off a 60-year-old
Florida law and insisted that The
Herald print what he had to say
about the paper and its edi-
. tprials. Rebuffed, he demanded
that the courts enforce the 1913
law.
The Circuit Court in Dade
County refused. Mr. Tornillo car-
ried his fight to the State Sup-
reme Court. There he succeeded.
But now, in a most significant
Nazism, Communism, Anti-Semitism
JOACHIM C. FEST, a German journalist, has
written a book that will be the definitive bi-
ography of Hitler for many decades (New York,
Hai court Brace Jovanovich, $15., 844 pages I.
The translation from the German by
Richard and Clara Winston is most felicitous.
The book is more than a biography and more
than a {isychological analysis of the founder of
National Socialism.
THE riiOLOtil'E is a masterpiece of his-
toriography. The author discusses Hitler and his
times against world events. The maniacal hatred
of Jews is traced to the years in Vienna, and
some of the explanations are Freudian.
The pathological drive for historical great-
ness and the sense of the theatrical, especially
the dramatic, are explained. Fest succeeds in
bringing Hitler to life and then analyzes him as
if Fest were a surgeon, and Hitler were under a
microscope.
Previous works and theories of other authors
are studied, and Fest then makes his own judg-
ment*. Several myths are exploded, including
the death-wish to bring utter destruction. We
note two faults; the index is most incomplete,
nd we take issue with the statement that
Nazism died with Hitler. There are some excel-
lent photographs .
"THE LAST EXODUS," by Leonard Schroe-
ter (New York, Universe Books, $10.93, tss
pages), is an account of Russian Jewry and their
lawyer and libertarian, traces connections be-
tween the Soviet Jewish movement and that of
other dissident movements and then notes the
differences.
nit- uuthor defines not only the remarkable
resurgence of Jewish nationalism as expressed
in Zionism but also the unquenchable desire for
freedom.
The author shows the difference in the quali-
ty of religious observance between the Georgian
and Haiti" slate Jews and those of Leningrad,
.Moscow and Kiev. Russian anti-Semitism turned
manv. especially the youth, into Zionists. This
raises the question, "Is anti-Semitism necessary
iw, me )/ie.i'i \ation of Jewry?"' .
-THE HISTORY of Anti-Semitism." by Leon
Poliakov, translated from the French by Richard
Howard (New York, Schocken Books, 13.95,
352 pages'*, is the paperback edition of the hook
that first appeared in 1965.
The period covered by the author is from
the time of Jesus to the day of the Court Jew.
Poliakov contends that the 14th century wit-
nessed the birth of the modern classical form of
anti-Semitism. Poliakov does not discuss Islamic
anti-Semitism.
decision, the highest court in the
land has ruled the Florida right-
to-reply law unconstitutional.
IN EFFECT, Chief Justice
Burger, speaking for the Su-
preme Court, said that you can't
have "government regulations of
this crucial process" and still
keep the First Amendment invio-
late, as modern Americans re-
gard that precious barrier to
government interference.
In a concurring opinion. Jus-
tice Byron R. White insisted that
the First Amendment "erects a
virtually insurmountable barrier
between government and the
print media so far as government
tampering, in advance of pub-
lication, with news and editorial
content, is concerned."
SO WE have come a long way
with press freedom since 1952
when a Georgia judge sentenced
two newspaper editors to jail for
refusing to print material which
he furnished when he objected to
published attacks on procedure
in his court.
We can thank the Miami
Herald for putting up this memo-
rable fight. And we can go way
back a couple of hundred years
to thank John Peter Zenger for

<=Ua via <3cA w
artz
Israeli Ship Hailed by the Turks
\\H\i WOULD Her/1 think of it? We mean the
story in the papers abo it an Israeli boat
ing the lives oi 42 Turkish soldiers. The Turkish
B Hers hailed with joy the boat with the Isiaeii
I .
Maybe Herd up there showed the newspaper
to the old Suitan of Turkey. Those 42 B ould
r. e Iving if not for the boat with the Israeli
flag which Herzl brought into being. Turkey was
Herri's ;<:cat problem.
PALESTINE WAS part of the Turkish em-
pire, and Herri's plan was t" buy Palestine from
Turkey. Is a country a suit of clothes or a piece
of furniture that you can buy?
Jefferson bought the Louisiana territory
about 30 times the size of Palestine. Sew aid bought
Alaska, at least ten times as large.
Herzl knew that Turkey was in dee? financial
difficulties. He : ed to raise a fund to heip
with Its debt. He went to see the wealthy Jews _
Rothschild, Baron Hirsch, but nowhere
HE THOUGHT of applying to a non-Jew \n.
over the United States. Ait, r all, the Jews are "the
. le "I the Hook."
Getting to see the Sultan was a problem. Herzl
had met the Emperor of Go: many. Kaiser Wil-
helm, who oddly enough thought well of Herri's
! Ian. 'What do you want me to say to the Sultan?"
the Emperor asked Herzl.
Another who helped was Vamherry. a friend of
Herzl. a non-Jew who taught lancuages. and one of
those pupils was a sister of the Sultan.
OSCAK sTKAls, a Jew, was then American
Ambassador to Turkey, and he advisees Hcizl to sec
the Sultan himself, and Herzl finally got to see him.
but the Sultan was evasive. He had no desire
i art with Palestine.
to
owning up the trail to pressTz
dom in America. **
Publisher of an 18th century
newspaper sternly oppose,! to th
New York colonial government*
Zenger was prosecuted in his da
for seditious libel. y
He wrote a few things that
King George's deputies in thil
country disliked. They arbitrarily
ordered Zenger to be done with
his criticism. Thanks to tht brij
liant efforts of Alexander Hamill
ton. Zenger's lawyer, an acquit!
tal was won on the revolut., nary
grounds that truth is no libe]
EDITORS AND some ther
Americans who have said Hunt
things through the years hav
helped to keep the nation
guard against the kind of
strictions imposed by the
and Sedition act of 1798. the l".
Espionage Act of 1917, anl _I
in our own time the o\
for press curbs raised by the Joe
McCarthy cult of true belie\ers.
Indeed, one of the bene: j
staving out of a war is the
ance of the inevitable ;, ,r
hysteria inevitably gene
wild demands for outspoken peo-
;-!e to keep quiet and Outspoken
irs to cool their presses.
e
1 n
re-
Ahen
r ",'."
-M I
New Book Gives Details
About Long History of JD(

rpm: JOINT Distribution Com-
mittee which is now in its
60th year of existence has
been ;a:t and parcel of Jewish
history ever since it was founded
in 1914. There is no country In
the world where the JDC has
not, at one time or another, come
tn the aid of the local Jewish
ilation.
a number of books reflecting
the history of the JDC have ap-
peared during the years but none
of them dealt fully and in depth
With the period prior to World
War II.
THIS IS probably because the
authors had little opportunit; I
study closely the JDC archives of
i years
As it I ap| ened, the JDC work
during the first quarter of a cen
I if its existence was no less
in the n habl it i-
' mdrt nstruction ol Jew in
life than in the years following
iVar ii. espec allj In ;
' "'.....< [re it : a ority
0,000 Jews depended
on aid fi ei lean Jev ry.
.
' ed at the end ol
World War I. It was also em-
. i-.ti-
Semitism which had no eq
' years when Po-
land was a art of CzarlSt RUS-
THE JDC had a tremendous job
to do there in restoring Jewish

nomic, cultural and communal
back to comparative nor-
malcy. It carried out its mission
successfully to a point of being
ready to hand it .over .to. lh> local
Jewish, leadership in 1959. But
then the Nazis marched into
P ilan and the Holocaust peri d
-'..ted.
In the course of the fi.
t its existence, the JDC
hat thro igh .t.-- affiliate i< wn
as Agrojoint helped to re, n>
stitute also the life of ton i
000 Jews in the Soviet \'r. i n by
settling them on land In < B
id m the Ukraine; and by train
of them as i ti
The Communist regime 1
classified then as foi mei 3
l Ived them of all :.-hts,
iding the right to woi k, to
to dwellings, to
a care an I to ndii
I to state si do .-.
..-,' undertook to
dstenci adaptable to
S< del nditlons of life. It
m to re
> converting them into
tive elements fai ;
ii
THE last years of th< t
a century ol the JDC
., i ; also the eat
e >l the Jews in Gei '
I war did nol I eak t
till Sent. l. 1939. but Hitler's war
German Jewry stai U I -'
lly with the very first t
his coming to power in 19
If Nixon Had a Rosh Hashonah Experience, He Might Still be Prexy
MB
TCTHEN WE t In our synagogues during the holy
i, it will oc< ;: t.i many ol a thay if Richard
Nixon had undergone what we experience on
mah and Yom Kippur he might still be Pres-
ident
The bizarre Watergate episode was almost an il-
lustration of the High Holy Day theme which, simply
stated, is: we are all subject to error, but we have
been endowed with the ability to overcome it pro-
viding that we me humble enough to admit our of-
fenses and make a determined effort to change for
the better.
so, in a sense, each of us is a Nixon. And the
glory of our annual rendezvous with our conscience
is that it provides us with an opportunity to avoid
the disgrace which unprecedented persistence in
wrongdoing can bring.

tern which can lead to destruction.
PERHAPS Tin: tn two take the H
Days "for granted," and regard the process of re::

lnst< ad
. ... <:....... J... i!i i, .': ...i -- .,,.::' |
-. ..........
W ith the starkness of the convulsive moral up-
heaval of Watergate behind us. let us now sit In
judgment not upon the Nixons of the world but ut.on
ourselves.
And let us recognize the validity of the Holy
Day syndrome. Sages and psychologists agree that un-
interrupted acts of selfishness and greed form .
J-. ... .._ .:..._..... .
as a bore or a chore.
we ac ime it as medicine v
II, therapy when we are disoriented, and co
when we are perplexed.
Perhaps we can dramatize the situation with re-
lelves, and five extra meaning to whs
do, if we imagine ourselves traversing the Nixonian
les.
MI< ii was said about recordings. We know
well that everything we do is also recorded, in our
mind.
With the candor which the -hofar evokes, we can
itemize all the "dirty tricks" which we have perpe-
trated.
.-


Friday, August 30, 1974
Cyprus War
Spurs Greek
Hate Feelings
Continued from Page 1-A
ed in the Aug. 16 edition of the
daiiy, "Athenaiki." which accus-
ed the U.S. of having treated
the Greek government and peo-
ple as "serfs."
The editorial declared, "We
want to stop being tiny pawns i
in the hands of ruthless Metter-
nichs," a reference to Kissinger. |
and "We no longer want to be'
the sole means of survival" for
any more Israels."
The latter, the reporter point-
ed out, was a reference to former
President Nixon's comment last
year on the role played by the
U.S. naval bases in Greece in the
American arms airlift to Israel
during the Yom Kippur War.
THE REPORTER noted that
"Athenaiki" was one of the
newspapers forced to suspend
publication during the seven-year
regime of Greece's military junta
which was overthrown last
month. He said the paper repre-
sented the Greek Center Union
Party, one of whose leaders is
the current Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Foreign Minister of
Greece, Georbe Mavros.
The reporter noted further
that Greece traditionally has had
friendly relations with the Arab
countries which even the Athens
Airport massacre by Arab ter-
rorists failed to shake. Expres-
sions of sympathy for Turkey in
the Israeli press after the Greek
junta coup that deposed Arch-
bishop Makarios' regime in Cy-
prus were seized upon by pro-
Arab papers in Greece to gen-
erate hostility toward Israel.
This was further exacerbated
by the arrest of the Greek Cath-
olic Archbishop Hillarion Capucci
in Jerusalem on suspicion of es-
pionage and aiding terrorist ac-
t./ities, the reporter said.
ACCORDING TO the reporter,
the anti-Israel sentiments in
Greece may bring about a re-
vival of latent anti-Semitism
which has deep roots dating back
to the early 19tfi century when
it was alleged that the Jews were
allied with Turkey during
Greece's struggle for independ-
ence.
Such allegations were wide-
spread war in 1821 when it was claimed .
that the Turks, after hanging!
the Greek Patriarch, handed
over his body to the "Jewish
mob" in Constantinople which'
de tli streets.
THAT TALE, and other fabri-
cations, resulted in the murder
of Jews by Greek rebels under
the command of the Greek na-
li inal hero Kolokotronis. There
are already indications of an at-
tempi to revive these ancient
"I od libels" using Kissinger as
a symbol tor the Jewish people
and dea r.S. policy as
Ing Jewish interests, the re-
i orter said.
I, however, that at the
theie is no ca ise for
i Inasmuch as Greece I
iii matters t" attend to ,
' its relations with Israel or l
i! with Jews.
ACCOUNTING CLERK
MUST BE GOOD
TYPIST
5-DAY WEEK $125
H.W., Box 01-2973
Miami, Fla. 33101
+Jmisi> ncridffar
Page 11-A
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.


Page 12-A
Jenis*1 fhrkfinr
Friday, August 30, 1974
High Holiday Israel Bonds
Effort Focused On Needs
"The approaching i>erio Hish Holidays, which comes in
an atmosphere of heightened
hope for peace, will focus on Is-
rael's increased need for Israel
Bond resources to carry forward
its postwar economic recovery,
its urgent development programs
and the creating of jobs for new
immigrants from the Soviet
UnkMI and other countries." says
Robert L. Siege), general chair-
man of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization.
The High Holiday program will
take place on the first anniver-
sary of the Yom Kippur War.
and will have the participation
of Greater Miami synagogues.
To commemorate the yahrzeit
of the war." Siegel declared, "we
are urging the Jewish community
to forge new and stronger links
of economic supix>rt for Israel
through the Israel Bond effort of
the congregations in our city."
On Yom Kippur members of
congregations will be called upon
to enroll as "Shomrei Yisrael"
(Guardians of Israeli through
the purchase of $1,000 or more
in Israel Bonds to strengthen and
preserve the State of Israel. A
special memorial tribute will be
paid to the Israeli soldiers who
lost their lives in the Yom Kip-
pur War.
Synagogues participating in
the High Holiday Israel Bond
program which are responsible
for sales in excess of $25,000 will
receive a Torah mantle made in
Israel as a token of appreciation
and as a memorial to the almost
3.000 Israelis who died in the
October War.
Congregations and their rabbis
have traditionally made the High
Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur the occasion for spe-
cial involvement on behalf of the
MOGAN DAVID
CONGREGATION
9348 HARDING AYE.
RABB/ f. 0. VINE
Surfside 865-9714
American Israeli
j All Religious ArticUt $
For Synagogues Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-7722 S. Schworti
National Hebrew
ISRAEU GIFT CENTER INC.
Bar Mifzvah Sett
Religious Articles Gifts
04* Wash inn ton Ave. 532-2210
RELIGIOUS GOODS
FOR HOME, SCHOOL
& HOUSE OF WORSHIP
IMPORTED CRYSTALWARE
HIGH QUALITY LOW PRICED
REIG0 & CRYSTAL, INC.
1507 Washington Avenue
PHONE 532-5912
Vv vW Vt tr^
tptmifvm *S* tpi< am
ftobbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone 672-7306
45 MICHIGAN AVL, MIAMI BEACH
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
N4S IVtHYTHINC fOK
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
and Jewish Homes. Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
417 Wmihhgtom Are. 672-7017
Israel Bond campaign. The be-
ginning of the Jewish New Year
of 5735 will be observed on Tues-
day and Wednesday, September
17th and 18th. The Yom Kippur
observance will take place on
Thursday, September 26th.
Emphasizing the urgency of
speeding Israel's economic re-
habilitation from the effects of
the October War, Siegel asserted,
"one of the firmest foundations
for a lasting peace is a sound
economy.
"Israel today is faced with the
gravest financial problems in its
history. And until a peace settle-
ment is achieved, the people of
Israel will continue to bear an
overwhelming burden of defense
which leaves them in no position
to maintain and expand their
economy and to create jobs for
the new immigiants that con-
tinue to come in from the Soviet
Union and other countries. The
current defense budget of $3.5
billion represents 40 per cent of
Israel's gross national product.
"The burdens that Israel must
carry have been made lighter in
the knowledge that the Jewish
community of the world has
shown understanding and soli-
darity," Siegel explained.
"Our participation in the Is-
rael Bond drive on a maximum
scale represents a responsibility
and an obligation of the highest
order in assuring a future of
peace and security for the peo-
ple of Israel," Siegel said, adding
that the Israel Bond effort rep-
resents a key factor in the over-
all drive to assure the success
of the current SI Billion Recon-
struction and Development Issue
of Israel Bonds.
'The most meaningful way to
extend our New Year greetings
to the heroic people of Israel is
through the purchase of Israel
Bonds," he concluded.
Defense Minister To Address
Fall Leadership Conference
Israel's Minister of Defense.
Shimon Peres, will be the princi-
pal speaker at the 1974 Fall
Leadership Conference to inau-
gurate a campaign to provide im-
mediate and large-scale economic
aid to Israel through the Israel
Bonds program.
The weekend conference, to
begin Fiiday. Sept. 6 in Mon-
treal, will bring together prom-
inent Jewish community leaders
from all over the United States
and Canada to plan intensified
activities for a maximum sale of
Israel Bonds during the most
productive months of the year.
A joint-delegation of 15 com-
munity leaders from Florida and
Puerto Rico will hear Peres' up-
to-the-minute report on the situ-
ation in Israel with regard to de-
fense requirements, economic
and social problems and creation
of employment op[x>rtunities for
new immigrants.
The conferees will consider
ways and means to accelerate
the pace of the campaign in com-
ing months. Particular stress will
Le placed on the sj>ecial efforts
to enroll Shomrei Yisrael fam-
ilies through the purchase of
$1,000 or more in Israel Bonds
during the observance of Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur in
RESERVE NOW
HIGH HOLY DAYS
KOSHER
commemoration of those who
fell in the Yom Kippur War.
The International Leadership
Conference in Montreal will take
its cue from the new economic
policy adopted by the Israeli
Government in recent weeks
which has placed additional
heavy burdens on the people of
Israel.
KOSHER "BT
C 13s
2 in a Room
75 of 225 Rooms
to Sept. I
INCLUDES 2 MEALS DAILY
RESERVE NOW
FOR THE
HIGH HOLY DAYS
All. ROOMS AIR CONDITIONED
WITH TV ICE WATER
FREE PARKING CHAISE tOUNGES
RESIDENT MASHGIACH
FREE SAUNA BATHS!
KOBEPtT JACOBS. 0WNER-MCMNI.
IN THE HEART OF MIAMI BEACH
ON THE OCEAN AT 1 91h STREET
Once Again
The
Renowned Cantor
JACOB
JEROSOLOMSKI
Will Officiate at the

Wwt-
HIGH HOLY DAYS
at the
FHI REAL HEIEN RfSNICK IS HIRI
Ocfjn n 17 St.. Miami Beach fla.
$-|r) co-'y per person howto
I double occupancy sit. i
6 OF! b ROOMS
KITCHENETTE AVAIlAKf
iwcl, I BM| Rttiis lay
CALL NOW
538-5711
&gsy
ewtce
PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS
USHION CENTER Of THE SOUTH
Largeet Selection ,n LatMt Stylet
for Man and Women
FREE PARKING SPACE IN
RIAR CONVENIENT TO BUSES
72* LINCOLN ftOAD
(On the Mall)
Oculist*' P^eaeriptlona Fllle*
CONTACT LENSES
Located on the Ocean
at 2'-.t St Miami Beach
PLANNED1 ENTERTAINMENT
FREE PARKING
FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
Stone Offers Solutions For
Problem Of U.S. Inflation
Richard (Dick) Stone, Democ-
ratic candidate for the United
States Senate, has suggested
some answers and solutions to
the problem of inflation.
"I have offered these proposals
since announcing my candidacy
last January, and I believe they
will work," he declares.
"First, we must PRODUCE
our way out of high prices. When
the supply of goods is increased,
prices go down. To bring this
about, we must stop tax breaks
which encourage the oil com-
panies to produce more oil for
foreign countries, and we must
provide them with reasonable in-
ducements to produce more for
America.
"At the same time, we must
get rid of the government reg-
ulation which pay American
farmers not to grow food. In
short, Congress must clear the
way so that industry and agri-
culture produce more for Amer-
ica. When supplies go up, prices
will go down.
"Second. Congress must bal-
ance the national budget now.
Members of Congress must vote
NO on any requests to raise the
national debt ceiling. Our na-
tional government must stop
spending money that it does not
have. American citizens are re-
quired to live on balanced budg-
ets. They are asked to tighten
their belts. Congress also should.
"As long as we continue to in-
crease the national debt, con-
tinue to borrow and s|>end money
ve do not have, the value of
America's dollar will continue to
drop. |
'Third, to help balance the |
budget I propose a one-half to
one per cent holdback on what i
all federal agencies are allowed j
to spend the rest of this year.
Florida's Governor and Cabinet |
did this over three years ago!
with good success. We finished i
________ _________
SUMMER SPECIAL!
17
PER PERSON
00UBIE OCCUPANCY
70 Of 145 ROOMS
JUNE 27 TO AUG 30
INCLUDES 2 SUPERLATIVE
MEALS DAILY CHILDREN'S
COUNSELLOR-ARTS & CRAFTS
I
l:K:t'H,'|.WU
DAVID ROSNERS
1007b AIR CONDITIONED
IttlM
HOTtl'POOl'CAMKAfF
Dietary Laws Strictly Observed
COLOR TV IN EACH ROOM
Or the Ocean at 67th Strett,
Miami Beach, Flirida 33141
Call 866-8831
CONSTANT RASSINICAl SUPERVISION
MASHCIACH ON PREMISES
ALSO ANNOUNCING
OPENING FOR THE
HIGH HOLY DAYS
from Sept. 16 to Sept. 27
12 DAYS & 11 NIGHTS
from *200 Per Person
Double Occupancy
Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meals
RICHARD STONE
that year with a surplus. Na-
tional government can take a
lesson from Florida.
' Fourth, interest rates must )
lowered. Then businessmen can
afford to increase product!'
and Americans can buy home-
again at decent interest rates. It
is very unfair to make Amei
cans pay interest rates from '..'
to 14 per cent while our nation i
government loans money to Sovi-
et Russia at 6 per cent. One of
the most important answers t >
beating inflation is to put Amei
icans first for a change.
"To those who claim that the
high iuteiest rate cools the ec-
onomy, I say that while it mighl
restrict demand, it also restricts
supply even more and prices still
rise." Stone explains. "You i .
not alter the basic law of sup-
ply anil demand."
^jhe KOSHER
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Cmaletrlr An CeneeH
Miami Beach's
Number ONE
KOSHER HOTEL
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Private Beach Pool
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For Reservations CALL
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Finest KOSHER cuisine terved
in our Ocaantront dinine, room
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3 Meals Served ea
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TO FAMILY JACOBS
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latUIBES WEALS
NEWEST MJAMI MACH
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RESERVE HOW
ft the HIGH HOIY DAYS
nationally known cantor
11 night-12 day package
from $185.00 pp dble. occ.
Every room Waterview. Color TV. Being.
Air Cond. 2 Me.lt Daily. 3 AAeals Shabboe
Synegogie. Self. Sugar, Fat Free Diets.
ajjggj 53*4721 Fra* Ch"- <"* Fol. Cemp *roprams. Strict Dietary Supervision.
7SM12S retort.
Now to Nov. 1'


Friday, August 30, 1974
* ImM fhridtot)
Page 13-A
-

Archbishop Arrest
Embarrassing To
Vatican Officials
'Malaise' Under Rabbinic Fire
ROME (JTA) Vatican circlet are visibly "emtoar-
ssed" by the arrest of Greek Catholic Archbishop Hillarion Ca-
pucci accused by Israeli police of having helped the Fatah ter-
-t organizations.
THE VATICAN has refused to officially comment on the
arrest, but Catholic circles here deplore the fact that they had
teen taken by surprise and not been informed by Israel of the
ictioti it planned to take.
These circles add that though the Pope has publicly af-
ed his support for "the legitimate aspirations of the Pales-
. :i people," he has on numerous occasions condemned ter-
rorism in all its forms.
The latest public condemnation of terrorism took place 10
- a d after a bomb exploded aboard an Italian train killing
_ o ipTc and injuring 30 more.
The Greek Catholic church recogn zes the Pope as its head.
COHEN: Falashas Perfect
Subject for Safe Article
Continued from Page 4-A
med in the Jewish State.
Falashas there is no
and no program of re-
tipn such as that mounted
dan or Syrian Jewry
5 are more religious than the
and, though not physical-
p rseruted, possibly not less
ntaged than the latter.
he distinction be only one
lor? _______
"MEANWHILE," the Chron-
artiele concludes, "until sal
s in the farm of an
,i. aid organizations
only oflfe
\o bring what su c
trv to raise the
1 of living of this 1 ng
..; i ! hool children In
i ,'', >ni cai th: I
i: i era o
. | has a
r^nple Ner Tamid
Vfcaiu Conducting
()\cv\'\o\s Services
Can-

,.y ;ec -
an
i -.
Main Sane
! ibovitz. spirit
. : .1 'i and Cantor Edward
I cind'ict the regular
K"ioea in the Main Sanctuary,
i '(} by the professional Ner
I Choir.
overflow services have
an integral part of the
Holiday program of Ner
T m i heeai's? of the new fam-1
oving into the North part
I ''. imi Beach.*' reported Rabbi
' bM barber, a native Miami-
si, is presently a rabbinical stu-
* < f the theological Semi-
of America. Cantor Fein
f! -ham the major portion
il:'h Holiday liturgy, bai
this capacity for the
Mrs.
temple offioe is open
w -.-.- ffcopi 9 a.m. to 5 p.m..
" '!.:> from 9 a.m. to noon.
Irtercstcd persons are invited to
KH the office for further infor-
mation.
rity segment of an historic
rity.
By YITZHAK RAM
NEW YORK (JTA) Rab-
bi Israel Miller, chairman of the
Conference oj **>reidfiits of-.
Major Amerfcan Jewish Organi-
zations, has indicated his dis-
satisfaction with recent develop-
ments in America's Mideast pol-
icy.
Addressing a press conference,
Rabbi Miller said that he has
feelings of "malaise" and "un-
easiness" over U.S. policy in the
Mideast, especially about the
way it has been developing since
the beginning of this month.
CITING THE use of the term
Lsengagement" in President
Ford's and King Hussein's com-
munique which promised early
action toward an agreement be-
tween Israel and Jordan, Rabbi
Miller said It was the wrong
word to use.
He also expressed anxiety
itout a! out ihe manner in which
i ssein and Egyptian Foreign
nister Ismail Fahmj were re-
ceived in Washington. There
were indications that the U.S.
is being "too friendly" to the
Arabs, Rabbi Miller said, noting
that American statements after
the meetings with the two Arab
lei lers went "beyond good
friendship."
RABBI r.IILLRR said, how-
ever, that he "takes Kissinger at
his word" and believes his state-
ment that the U.S. won't decide
on if urtheii steps in the Mideast
until talks have been held"with
all representatives for the area.
But Rabbi Miller did not ex-
clude a situation in the future in
which his organization would
have to undertake a campaign
against U.S. policy in the Mid-
east.
But, Rabbi Miller emphasized,
"the Presidents Conference has
not noticed any shift ,n U.S.
policy" in regard to Israel and
any campaign ui this time
acainst U.S. pollc/ in the Mid-
east "might not be merited and
even harmful."
The only differences with Kis-
singer, he said, is that "we do
not accept his assumption that
war will be catastrophic for Is-
rael. There are no differences on
actions that have been taken up
to date."
REFERRING TO lessons of
the Cyprus crisis an l its implica-
tions for Israel. Rabbi Miller
pointed out that events in the
war-torn island have shown "the
impotence of the UN" and the
fact that "the U.S. is not omnip-
otent."
"It causes us concern," he
said, pointing out that the mys-
tique of Kissinger has worn off
and that the nation with military
power presents facts as Tur-
key has tlofce and the WOJ id
accepts itt "l
The lesloff of Cyprus is that
the U.S. has to strengthen Israel
militarily, economically and dip-
lomatically, Kabbi Miller said.
He also expressed concern over
the massive supply of Soviet
arms to Syria.
ON THE issue of Soviet Jewry
emigration, Rabbi Miller reiter-
ated thut "substantial progress"
has been achieved. Although he
Declined to give details on the
progress made in discussions be-
tween Kissinger and Senators
Henrv M, Jackson 'D., Wash.i.
Jacob K. .lav-its (R., N.Y.i and
Abraham Ribicoff (D.. Conn.i.
Rabbi Miller noted that much of
those discussions are centered
around the definition of "harass-
ment" and on what happens to
Jews In tie Soviet Union after
they apply for exist visas.
"We told them we are in-
terested in free emigration,"
Kabbi Miller said, commenting
mi the Presidents Conferences
part in the discussions conducted
by the Senators.
'Ine only restriction on emi-
gration thai we accept is 'for
nritv reasons.' which also
should be defined," he said.
J
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
i *
HE$bvteeiGtjs
Country Club Condominiums
Apartments at Kendale Lakes
OVERLOOKING THE BEAUTIFUL
KENDALE LAKES GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
2 & 3 bedroom apartments. Minimum 1,340
square feet of luxury and comfort, from $38,490.
(Approx. $28.72 per square foot)
Sales Offi< eon premises: 274-9727* 274-5
5.W. 147th. \ve., just aft Sunset Drive
Directions: "fete? n! KENDALL DRIVI to 142nd. \
i, |f-< ..,- I then left to rhe s< >\ i Rl l<
c-

o
a.
o
Sunset Drive
N -.dalt Drive
C/O c/>


Page 14-A
+3e*4stfhrkBar)
Friday, August 30, 1974
LEO MINDLIN
A New Director Revitalizes the Art Center
Continued from Page 4 A
-
:
i
at
: bet-
lti
a
The
boms i ex-
' I
j. i..... me
"Create-1 Hit! and
ethi the
inter'-' of a u i public Ul
to be tempc bj a
sacchai ir.e
brings and low IQ talk sfa
ai:- a year ago.
01 R < ITV
oi l el.
0 Q .-... another
If nted sue!.
picl re oi Mlai I thei h I I
Dl I an take the job0
An.-
Mitt ." in
the ration I te a

center. The ha
him.
bot.'I THE Bast and the
e ai tte," he ol
"I h;te to make the Miami Art
Center as active a comm .;..';
undertaking ai potato .<
Toward this end. Dr. Lehman
envisions scheduling a major se-
ries of exhibitions of "only fust
quality" he emphasizes these
Dk ARNOLD LIHMAN
accepts the challenge

:' local
artist '. oi"::. mb as I al
.e hoties not as be:
outside the director's office, the
uh ama-
te i :: :- a lozen diflerent
. inge i In-
With re-
a] artists is it too
,; :. .. ai-
IN vmi.TIO.V Dr. I-ehman is
I dance and music
h they properly be-
ll nsj."
Again, be emphasizes his
v ords. demonstrating a careful
itivity for the notion of com-
munity awareness and coopera-
tion. He is here, he wants you to
Israel Declared
'Cancer' During Hot
Debate at UNations
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
A statement by Ambassador
Jacob Barmore. Israel's observer
to tne Sub-Commission on Pre-
vention of Discrimination and
Protection of Minorities, could
not be completed here when the
meeting refused to grant him
"one or two" more minutes to
complete his statement.
Speaking about the plight of
Soviet Jewry and the persecution
of Syrian Jewry, the Israeli dip-
lomat was interrupted many
times by the Soviet and Arab
representatives.
Israel is not a member of the
sub-committee. Rudolph Carter,
of the VS. Mission, also objected
that Barmore's time could not
be extended because only a cer-
tain time had Leen allotted for
observers.
ISRAEL, WAS sharply at-
tacked after Barmore"s state-
ment by the Arab and Soviet
representatives. Egypt called Is-
rael a "cancer in the Mideast"
and said a day would come when
"Israel will pay" the Arabs for
al. it has taken from them.
The Soviet Union said that
Israel talks about the plight of
Syrian Jewry to avert attention

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from its treatment of Arabs in
the occupied territories. Barmore
was not granted a right to an-
swer.
During his presentation on the
plight of Syrian Jewry, Barmore
said: "The Jewish community of
Syria, now numbering about
4,500, has. for many years, been
victim of humiliating persecution
and oppression in every sphere
of life.
"Discriminatory restrictions,
arbitrary arrests, tortures and
even mysterious murders all
make the existence of members
of this beleaguered community
unbearable. But above all these
helpless people have been held
for years as virtual hostages de-
prived of their fundamental
rights to depart from Syria."
I>1S< I SSING THE plight of
Soviet Jews, Barmore observed:
The harassment and intimida-
tion of Jews in the USSR seek-
ing to apply for exist visas con-
tinues and indeed has been in-
tensified and those vwth a higher
education its special irget,"
The Israeli Ambassador de-
clared that "in spite of the elab
orate procedure ..f intimidation,
more than I.'JK.IKK) applicants
await their permits."
He added, "There are at least
1 5 K) Soviet Jews whose appli-
cations to leave the Soviet Union
iael have been continuously
md the applicants have
ted to repeated har-
nt."
t to de-
I
THEN THESE n and
and the en
-
"In the Isl
never exceeded are
_ -.\ 6-week sessi ..- a
year for 37 classes
dents in a variety ol media
can
xcept perhaps archi-
tect n :raftir.g."
And there's a waiting list for
enrollment in some classes, Dr.
Lehman declares. It's all direct-
ed toward the concept of creativ-
ity and the process of <-
a:x rather than toward a finished
; ict."
THE NOTION Is both good
: self-serving. The more peo-
ple you can teach to ap;
aetthetj t-men!. the more
people you have who require ex-
hibitions ': great aesthetic per-
formance.
Still, despite the "modest"
aims of the school, artist "pro-
ducers" of finished "products"
are v e:Represented on the fac-
ulty, such as J -anita May. na-
I.< nelly-known reramist who was
filling in as Miami Art Center
director until Dr. Lehman arriv-
ed to fiii the pest, and noted pho-
tographer Klara Farkas.
Also, to appeal to a broa ;
: 'he community's art inten
Lr. Lehman is keeping a shrewd
eye on its huge ethnic popula-
tions, particularly Latin and Jew-
ish, and their particular aesthe-
tic interests.
FOR EXAMPLE, the Miami
Art Center will be holding a
Judaica show of Jewish ceremo-
nial objects culled from private
collections, antique and contem-
porary, tentatively scheduled foi
'-
: n a pr:-
.
. i :... ipon its
- ita ui I philan-
e to re-
Answer: Dr. Lai man
ol his
'.' ... Jacobs, pres-
E Leonard
Abes*, David
T' Gasman. U.S.
. iam Lehman
iiman, Mrs. Louis
Rosenstiel, Mrs. Nicholas
SchencK Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson.
ALL ARE persons of social
and financial clout in the \:t/.
at Dr. Lehman seems to be
e.-talking on a cam-
raroua art salesman*
With his credentials, it
'ion that he may
ceed. Not to menl
with whom he lives in
.-
C iconut Grove
Nicholas, 3, ami Z? .
1.
PAMELA'S FATHER was
hard Gimbel. founder o: R
aid?, and one of the Gimbel Bro.
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SAM BURSTYN, Executive Director


Friday. August 30. 1974
+Je#istt fkrfaKkun
Page 15-A
Those Old Vice Pres. Jokes Need Changing
By MAX LEBNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
v Vt >RK CITY We shall
ha'.e t. change all the old jokes
bout Vice Presidents as ciphers.
A Vice President today should
not tx' just an afterthought on
a |vi,:i!> contrived ticket. He is
j in Toy in a time of tumult
ie unoxiected.
;, te that in the last 30 years,
stut.tu' with Harry Truman in
: car Vice Presidents reach-
ed the Presidency by aeath
an and Johnson', by later
:: (Nixon), by resignation
PRESIDENT FORD'S choice
of Nelson Rockefeller strikes
r Americans as a good one
_ the right Vice President in a
time. Yet the scrutiny is
MAX lERNtR
bound to be thorough. Here are
some comments on the issues
that will be canvas.se I.
On his age: What's wrong
with being 6t>? Winston
Churchill, Konrad Adenauer,
Charles rie Gaulle. Mao Tse-tung
were creative at an age beyond
that. Harry Truman was oldish
for a President, but he was a
good one. Richard Nixon was 47
when he made his first try for
the White House and 56 when
he got there. But his relative
youth didn't keep him from mak-
ing blunders.
IT is stupid to make a cult
of eithe ryouth or age. Vigor and
imaginativeness may not be lost
with the years, and wisdom may
not come with them. Everything
depends on how much the man
learns from his experience.
On his wealth: One good
thing about it (the cynics will
say i is that he won't be putting
his iiand int'i the till. It is better
for a man to go into national
office with wealth than to come
out with wealth.
The new press conference
questions like "How much are
you worth?" are zombie ques-
tions. There will be a to-do when
Rockefeller discloses his fi-
nancial assets to Congress, but a
man's worth lies elsewhere in
his personality, mind and char-
acter.
IT IS foolish to be dazzled by
wealth, as Ulysses Grant and
Dwight Eisenhower were, but
also foolish to feel threatened by
it, whether in a Harriman, a
Kennedy or a Rockefeller. It
promises well lor President Ford
that he felt neither dazzled not
threatened by the Rockefeller
money.
On his divorce: This counts
for less now than in the past.
More 'Shuttle Diplomacy9 Out-Kissinger
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
lec ared here that there was little chance that he would en-
in "shuttle diplomacy" in the near future.
. .- statement came less than a day after observers here pre-
d:-t i that Kissinger would go to the Middle Fast to -s-'ek a dis-
;ement agreement ixitvveen Israel and Jordan,
ering questions at an lin-
es ected news conference devot-
e I gely to the Qprus crisis,
said a foreign govern-
ist not expect that vvhen-
,. there is a crisis he "must
ru3h in" to help settle it.
BTT UK said if "an especially
. situation arises he would
e in a brief shuttle dip*
. ." but not in "extended
: imacy"
Kissinger was asked to explain
> statement in the joint com-
munique issued by President
Ford and King Husseni of Jordan
at the end of Hussein's visit to
Washington in which the two
countries said that Israeli-Jor-
danian disengagement talks on
the West Bank of the Jordan
River should be hei i at an early
date.
This was a major element of
the comnunique and indicated
that Jordan's request for an ls-
aeii withdawal fom the West
Bank would be the next element
in the negotiations fo a Middle
East [>eaee.
'THERE ARE many vesions of
disengagement schemes." be-
tween Isael and Jodan, Kissinger
explained, but the U.S. "did not
imply any particular scheme" in
the communiq >,
Kissinger a jam reiterated that
the next American move in the
search for a Mideast |>eace settle-
ment will not be decided until
completion of the current round
of discussions between the U.S.
and the countries involved.
He pointed out that he was
scheduled to meet with the Syr-
ian Foreign Minister in Wash-
ington and the Saudi Arabian
Foreign Minister this week.
He said that Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin has been invited
to come to Washington for talks
MEMORIAL FOUNDATION FOR JEWISH CULTURE
How German Funds are Used
Bv SAUL MANN
London Chronicle Syndicate
It i< now ten years since the
ence >-n Jewish Material
i Against Germany estab-
- ed the Memorial Foundation
wish Culture.
Sin e the Foundation's mon*es
trom the global resti-
t payments made t" the
nference by the West
1 i in Govei nment. it was
oper that the founda-
; ithers declare that its al-
I "go principally
i needs of Nazi victims."
Mil i ADDED a rider,
6 -;. e Jewish blStitUt OfiS Ol
I leai ning which the Nazis
iyed had supplied world
with rabUs, scholars.
te s and communal officers
s Jewish culture and
e e victims of Nazi
' n, "the Foundation will be
' d to grant allocations
Jewish cultural and educa-
tes, the beneficiaries
may not necessarily be
: tims."
irs later, the major
1 ace no longer Nazi
v though aspects of theii
feature largely in the
nd publications wholly
illy funded by the
n and which this year
m for almost half of
ne million pound ap-
I expenditure.
THERE ARK. nevertheless,
ties which suggest that the
ive a lowed themselves
' ler far from their basic
' j IStification is there.
for example, in a grant to Tel
Aviv University for a study of
}ne attitude of Left-wing circles
ln Lngland towards the Zionist
ni)vement?
Does the wealthy South Afri-
can community have a call on
F
\ .
1
Foundation funds for a socio-
demographic study of itself or
the Synagogue Council of Amer-
ica for 515.000 towards an in-
\estigation of the synagogue in
changing urban America?
BINGE THE Foundation in-
sists on meeting in private for
the allocation of public funds, it
is impossible to establish the
modes by which the allocations
an made.
Its membership consists of 23
organi al ons w I i h wore mem-
I ers of the Claims Conference
plus 24 others admitted on the
vote of the boa I ol din cl
All of them | a. SI. I K) a for the pri< liege ol bavin: a say
in the al cations which fre-
quently are male to bodies in
which they themselves have a
direct inten st
At the most recent meeting ol
the Foundation in Geneva, Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, the presidenl
of the American Jewish Con-
gress, is understood to have pro-
posed the establishment of an al-
locations' board independent ol
the diiettinate but he was
down.
AX ARGUMENT produced bj
it< opponents was that m t
could a number of personalities
be found who were sufficiently
disinterested.
f |] e< insequence of
this private h a ing I >; -
is that "ai i a:e made
between members with vol
rights to tra e supi ort for their
own tavorit s. Some to their
, lit. have thia
system.
But there are others, especially
among the Orthodox religious
groups, who vote automatically
with each other on proposed al-
locations, regardless of the mer-
its.
There is no question that, in
some areas, the Foundation's al
locations have been of inesti-
mable benefit in advancing
Jewish culture. Jewish studies
programs in Bi itish universities
owe much to Foundation help.
University College has receive.
more than EL68.000. Oxford has
picked up EL25.000, Warwick
EL7.875 and Glasgow I 1,1.830.
IT IS much more difficult i<
assess the efficacy of Founda-
tion assistance at grassroots
level where allocations are
made to Institutions for tin
training of rabbis, teachers am
youth and con leaders.
The bare facts made ava
even to the 1 ustee
do not establish ji -; how- man;.
ol any of these have been pro-
duced by the Gateshea i Ye I I
(which iias '- lived a total
EL13.430 Institute <>:
Higher Rabbinii SI lies, also it
Gateshead, w is been al-
located EL9.7
Institutions in Britain havi
ceived a total i t just ovei
1.000 for their training
grams. They ill Ie Jew -' I
ELJ 1,000; Leo B
EL10.300; Ju U1 ly Monte-
lime. EL9.40 : Ass rial on foi
Jewish Youth, EL2.500; the Cen-
tei for Advanced Rabl Ini -
EL1.500 and I
IT WILL re possible tC
tain whether the Fo
tii n : its I ncti
the best In-
e ant'
ation until It i eases to re-
gard Itsell as a inding
organkati m s a recent
rial:
"The Foundation is a public
body responsible to the Jewish
people. It is duty bound to expose
its discussions and decisions to
the widest public scrutiny."
with Ford during the first half
of September.
HUSSEIN AND Egyptian For-
eign Minister Ismail Fahmy were
here last week and Israeli For-
eign Minister Yigi AI Ion was in
Washington two weeics ago.
Kissinger was asKe.: whether,
in view of the Greek-Turkish dis-
pute over Cyprus, the U.S. would
reassess its capability to limit
wars between small state*.
This implied the question of
how would the U.S. react to a
new Israeli-Arab conflict. Kis-
singer replied that the U.S. "has
never claimed that it could stop
local wars wherever they occur."
The United States cannot be
asked to restore any balance of
power by its own military force,
he asserted. But he cautioned
that it is "not fair to generalize
from this event" in Cyprus to a
global basis.
DURING TH press conference
Kissinger also said that he hopes
further and good progress will be
made this week in the discus-
sions for solution of the Soviet
emigration issue.
Kissinger's comments agreed
with the statement three Sena-
tors made last Thursday that
good progress" has been made
in negotiations.
Actually President Ford's wife,
Betty, was a divorcee, and to
make it worse she was a dancer
In Martha Graham's company.
The President's mother was also
divorced when he was a young
child.
We have grown up a bit and
take such things in our stride
now, far better than when Adlai
Stevenson and Rockefeller were
hobbled in their presidential
campaigns by the fact of their
divorces.
On his recent political
stands: The far right hates
Rockefeller, &s evidenced by the
effort to undercut him with the
weird Hamilton Long dirty-
tricks story while President Ford
was reaching his decision.
SOME LIBERALS, on the
other hand, feel that his New
York measure on drug offenders
was a deliberate play to make
himself palatable to conserva-
tives.
My own feeling Is that he is
a moderate, on some measures
ias on New York abortion law)
a little left of center, on others
a little tight.
Thi< is now true of President
Fo d atsn. as witness his plea
for att "earned re-entry" Into -
ciety for draft resisters, along
with his refusal to push price ami
wage controls. Rockefeller was
overcagey In his comments on
Watergate, but so was Mr. Ford.
I n his influence: He has the
experience to take on more im-
portant presidential assignments
than any Vice President except
Hubert Humohrev. Even more,
his range of friendships will
serve as a sluice tnrough which
new men and abilities will flow
into the Administration's serv-
ice.
A8 FOR the rusk that his per-
sonality might overshadow the
President's, it was one that came
with the choice, and Mr. Ford
had the courage to make the
choice and take the risk.
The fact that Rockefeller and
Henry Kissinger have worked
closely in the past will make the
three men President. Vice
President, Secretary of State
the most striking threesome in
high office in our time.
I have left the weightiest
factor to the end the oniy-a-
heartbeat-away factor. The fact
of the three men working to-
gether should give us confidence
if the heartbeat ever happened.
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M
jomi, Florida Friday, August 30, 1974
Section B
Jackson, Dinitz To Address
Hadassah's National Conclave
Sen Henry M. Jackson (D.,
I and Simcha Dinitz, Is-
rael's Ambassador to the Unite.!
States, will address the opening
plenary of Hadassah's 60th an-
nual national convention Sun-
dav, Sept. 8, at 8:30 p.m. at the
Marriott Motor Hotel in Atlanta.
Ga. Mrs. Kmanuel Mentz presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Chap-
ter of Hadassah, announced.
About 2.500 delegates, rep-
resenting 325,000 members
ghout the United States
and Puerto Rico will attend the
f >ur day convention Sept. 8 to 11.
The theme of the convention will
e Years of Challenge Years
of Achievement."
Founded in 1912, Hadassah is
irgest women's voluntary
ization in the country. It is
the largest Zionist bloc in
the world today, spending more
than $-'0 million annually in
welfare and land rederr.p-
programs in Israel and for
. at ion and youth programs
e United states.
Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy Kol-
!ek will be given Hadassah's
highest honor, the Henrietta
Szold Award at the Convention
Banquet on Tuesday. Last year
the honor was given to the Dutch
people and the government of the
Netherlands.
The award, established in 1949,
has usually been conferred upon
distinguished personalities such
as the late David Ben-Gurion,
Harry S. Truman. Eleanor Roose-
velt and the Rothchilds.
Experts on medicine, educa-
tion and political affairs will ad-
dress the plenaries anil work-
shops. Dr. Rashi Fein, Professor
of Economics of Medicine at
Harvard School of Medicine and
Public Health; Dr. Jack Karpas
Associate Director General
Hadassah Medical Organization
in Israel; I. L. Kenen. chairman
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee and editor of the
Near East Report; Rabbi Morde-
chai Waxman. leader of Temple
Israel in Great Neck. N.Y.. and
many other famous coordinators
and directors of vocational guid-
anc3 and research and educa-
tion will address the sessions.
A fashion show, designed and
executed by students at the
Hadassah Seligsberg Brandeis
High School in Jerusalem, will
feature elaborate beaded, se-
quined and embroidered evening
clothes, reflecting the color and
styles of the Middle East.
Two films will also be pre-
viewed: "Part Of Them Is Me."
a film about a music teacher who
works with disadvantaged teen-
agers, and "Moscow Doesn't An-
swer," and Israeli documentary
about Soviet Jews.
Qov. and Mrs. Jimmy Carter
will be guests at the pro-conven-
tion Shabbat dinner of the Na-
tional Board Friday. Sept. 5. The
Governor will extend greetings
to Hadassah.
Mrs. Mentz will attend the
convention with over 40 del-
egates.
MORTON SIIBHMAN
DAVID 8. FUEMAN
Miami Beach Group Watches
Hebrew University Ceremony
By Special Report
JERUSALEM A hall in the
Faculty of Law on the Hebrew
University's Mount Scopus cam-
pin was dedicated this month in
imes of Mrs. Ruth Yablick
and Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold Good-
man of Miami Beach.
Present at the dedication cere-
mony were Mr. and Mrs. Good-
Hebrew University Presi-
Avraham Harman. Prof.
l Yaron of the Law Fac-
other representatives of the
and a delegation of
Goodman's fi How-members
officers of Temple Beth
of Miami B<>ach. led by
and Mrs. Leoi. Kronish.
A luncheon Honoring Mr. an 1
Goodman, who are active in
Miami Beach chapter of the
Friends of the Hebrev
rsity, was held in the Uni-
- Belgium House Faculty
''hairing the proceedings.
President Harman presented an
absorbing account of the ways
the university must cope with
the special problems created by
the post-war period.
"Enormous new pressures," he
said, "face both students and
teachers, as a result of unpre-
cedented length of military' call-
ups interrupting studies. In addi-
tion, the economic burden of the
country's defense, with world in-
flation pushing up the cost of
armaments, is-cutting deeply into
the government's ability to sup-
port higher education.
But without educating for the
skills and the values that keep
the nation alive." Mr. Horman
continued, "there would be no
el worth defending."
Greeting Jerry and Jane Good-
man. Mr. Harman said they rep-
i e on? the new generation of
leadershio in American Jewry.
ready to face the future challeng-
es of our people's struggle for
Rosen Elected To Serve Out
Chuck HalVs Term As Mayor
irney Harold Rosen, who
I !>en serving as Miami
'a vice mayor, was elected
by his fellow councilmen last
week to fill the vacancy created
death of Mayor Charles
:." Hall.
inted to the City Council
years ago to fill a vacancy.
~ ear-old lawyer will hold
"' top post for 15 months
he is free to run for a
oar term in his own right.
1 ouncilmen were unable to
in a new vice mayor or on
the method of his selection at
last week's stormy session. They
deferred both decisions until
r.ext Wednesday.
Rosen's record shows he be-
lieves in capital improvements,
Public purchase of private prop-
frty and legalized casino gambl- MArOB HAJtOtD tOSBI
,ng- He said last week that proj- .. t hp hones
*ts to promote tourism will be next month, and that he hones
g'ven the highest priority after to make Miami Beacn a v
_tne council approves a budget gressive c.ty.
freedom and peace.
Jerry Goodman responded to
the president's tribute with a
moving appeal to his friends to
increase their support for Israel.
A dormitory' on the Univer-
sity's Givat Ram campus was es-
tablished in 1971 by Jerrold
Goodman's mother. Ruth Yablick.
in memory of her late husband.
Herman Yablick.
Rabbi Kronish added a tribute
to Avraham Harman from whom,
he declared, came the inspiration
for much of what the Florida
community has done for the Uni-
versity and the State. Referring
to the "interlocking destiny of
the Jewish people." he said
what is dor.e in F'.orida is mean-
ingless if Israel does not sur-
\ Ive,
Following luncheon, the group
proceeded to Mount Scopus,
where Mrs. Goodman unveiled
the plaque reading "The Mrs.
Ruth Yablick and Mr. and Mrs.
Jerrold Goodman Hall" in the
entrance to the Law Faculty. The
hall is in the entry of a building
named for the late Baron de-
Hirsch Meyer of Miami Beach.
Included in the Florida group,
which was in Israel for the sec-
ond annual Temple Beth Sholom
Israel Bonds Study Mission, were
Temple President and Mrs James
Knopke: Mrs. Anna Miller and
Dr. and Mrs. Sol Lichter. vice
presidents: board members Phil-
ip Postelnik and Phil Davis and
their wives: Mrs. David M.iskat.
and Mrs David Drucker. director
of cultural activities.
Mrs. Kronish Is president of
the Women's Division of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University in Miami Beach.
Offices of the American
Friends are at 605 Lincoln Rd..
Miami Beach; Albert A. Dorner
is regional director.
Dick Stone Guest Speaker
Florida's Secretary of State.
Richard "Dick" Stone, will be
the guest spei.ker Thursday,
Sept. 5, at the 10 a.m. Spinoza
Forum in the Washington Fed-
eral Auditorium, 1234 Washing-
ton Ave., Miami Beach.
AT FEDERATIONS 36th AWWUA1 WBTW8
Fleeman, Silberman
To Be Honorees
Two of the Jewish community's
most distinguished leaders, uavid
B. Fleeman and Morton Silber-
man, will be honored at the 36th
annual meeting of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Thurs-
day evening, Sept. 19, at the
Carillon Hotel.
Fleeman, who has served as
Federation president during the
1973-1974 year, has occupied
many high leadership positions
throughout tha Jewish com-
munity for over ten years. He is
a former president of the Home
Builders Association of South
Florida, former chairman of Fed-
eration's Community Relations
Commilfe. and served as a Fed-
eiation vice president.
Silberman, currently a Federa-
tion vice president, served as
chairman of the 1974 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emerger,
Fund, the most successful annual
campaign ever conducted by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. He is a founder and past
president of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach, and served
for many years as a national
speaker for United Jewish Ap-
peal.
Silberman ha; Held manv Fed-
eration positions, including that
of treasurer. Community Re]
tions Committee chairman, and
Planning and Budget Commit
chairman.
Both nn demonstrated out-
standing dedication to Jc
survival during their terms in
the past year, As 1973-1374 pres-
Metro Mayor Ed Fogg has
announced the appointment
cf George On, brother of th*
late mayor, as chairman of
h i s election campaign.
George Orr, an assistant
state attorney in the office of
State Attorney Richard Ger-
stein, says he will confine
his campaign work to eve-
nings and. weekends, doing
it on his own time.
Ident and 1074 Campaign Chair-
man, Fleeman and Silberman
have presided over some of the
most difficult times faced in
many years by the Jewish com-
munity beginning with a dev-
astating war in Israel, which
increased Jewish needs many
times over. Their efforts have
contributed in an integral way
to the response with which this
Jewish community has met those
needs.
Heading the Arrangements
Committee for the meeting and
dinner honoring Fleeman and Sil-
berman is Mrs. Leonard Fried-
land, who has herself assumed
several major community leader-
ship roles.
For information and reserva-
ir.s, phone the Federation of-
fice.
Mrs. Mancller To
Lead Delegates
To Convention
Mrs. Bernard Mandler, presi-
dent of the Miami Chapter of
Hadassah. will lead a large del-
egation from the chapter to
Hadassah's 60th annual national
convention in Atlanta's Marriott
Motor Hotel Sept. 8-11.
Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D.,
Wash.) and Simcha Dinitz. Is-
3, |or I i the lited
. .. o] sning
nary s n S la 3 ipt. 8.

pie ised to
ha.e Sen. lt
. ..- : his : ni irt-
te -i lei '
and h ;
sai I Mrs R i
:; kin lent of
Hadassah.
About 2.500 delegates repre-
senting 325.000 member a
throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico are expected to
attend the four- i! : "*
which has as ita theme Yeara
of ChallengeYears f A hievo-
ment."
Beth Israel Youth Program
To Include Special Groups
Y ith Program '' 5Y )
0f Temole Beth Israel Fort
;.;.'.; ill ->n:v '
panded >f -' >"' "-"
ports v i drn m
Temple Youth >n
In addition to the regular
weekly program; for 9th through
12th grades. nn:l bi-weekly pro-
grams for 7th and 8th grades,
there will be a wide range of
special interest groups including
basketball, photography, needle-
point, Israeli dancing, study
groups, and a very special dra-
matics and singing group, "B'nai
Bet Yisrael," the Children of the
House of Israel.


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LUXUBCUS dining
EUGANT FRENCH CUISINE
hm >.-* -- '-*' ?-: I -ii- CXr V.a- *v-
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2I7a iX 123rd ST?EJT i*0AB CAOSI^AY
CASr*A SHC-SC CEN-
MOtTH AAJUW P.CX-CA 3


tfgff, August 30. 1974
*Jen1st fk>ridian
Page 3-B
Rabbi Mirvis Jewish Chaplain At
Veterans Administration Hospital
Rabbi Allan Mirvis has been
tinted Jewish Chaplain at the
Veterans Administration Hospital
inMiami -.?
Rabbi Minis served as spirit-, ,
nil leader of the vS'nai Israel Syn-
L'Jue in Hampton. Va.. since
ll942 Wnile at the HamPton
Isnutfogue, he was Jewish Chap-
bin' n the Hampton Veterans
luimnistration Center and at
Iki-tern State Hospital in Wil-
Lmsburg: Auxiliary Jewish
Iciaplain at Langley Air Force
lBase and Fort Eustis.
Rabbi Mirvis is a member of
V>z Rabbinical Council of Amer-
('! 3nd was formerly a member
Lf t(,e Tidewater Board of Rab-
fe; Board of Education of the
I itta Kurzer Hebrew Acad-
,roy an(j the National Conference
p' Christiana and Jews. He was
tj^d bv the National Conference
I- ..jo.'ue Youth (NCSY) re-
ISeii. Winn Seeks
Reelection To
iFlorida's Senate
Sherman Winn (Dem.. District
fo, 34) has qualified for reelec-
the Florida Senate. Sen.
I as elected to the Florida
[ se in 1970 and in 1972 was
ei to the Florida Senate.
Winn, who resides in
Dade with his wife and
has lived in Dade County
! past IS years. He's held
-ition of vice president-
leral Manager of the Bal-
liotel for the past 16
fears
I his service in the Flor-
| : ise and Senate, Sen. Winn
ed many consumer pro-
; in bills, including security
I deposits: juror's bill; bi-
I nial no tax bill; comi>ensa-
1 & ; r innocent victims of vio-
t irimes, licensing of motor
[ \\W.e repair dealers, and
I I ,,.'ot motor -vehicle repair
t. trge practices.
[a strong believer in "full dis-
Dsure" and 'government in the
Inshine," he has s|>onsored bills
I it ng to conflict of interest
public officials and em-
loyees; is co-sponsor of full dis-
bsure; and siwnsored a bill
taking bank charter applications
I >ank examiner reports pub-
i vianents.
[Sen. Winn also sponsored and/
ipoftsdred bills, in the 1974
BSioD, for collective bargaining;
1st of -living; unemployment
Impensation; additional help for
ster children and an increase
homestead exemption for the
in1: ly and disabled.
ictive in community affairs,
in Winn founded the Sherman
'inn scholarship fund in 1966
hieh extends scholarships
|rough the various universities
deserving young men and
Dnvn in the State of Florida.
tiile serving in the Florida
ause. Sherman Winn was hon-
I with a concurrent resolution
Dm both the Florida House and
brida Senate for his outstand-
\l service to higher education
the State of Florida.
cently "for devoting more than a
quarter of a century in helpipg
teach and train two generations
of Virginia Jewish Youth."
Upon his departure from his
position at Langley Air Force
Base, he was presented a testi-
monial of Service by the Chief of
Chaplains, United States Air
Force, "for spiritual and moral
leadership rendered to USAF
personnel." The Veterans Admin-
istration in Hampton awarded
him a Certificate of Commenda-
tion "for faithful and outstand-
ing service as Jewish Chaplain."
Rabbi Mirvis was educated in
the public schools of his native
Baltimore, Md., received a B.A.
degree from Yeshiva University,
New York City, and was ordain-
ed at Yeshiva University's Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Theological Sem-
inary.
He and his wife, the former
Lena Sear of Hampton, have two
sons: Dr. David Mirvis, chief res-
ident at Gaston Hospital in Mem-
phis, Tenn.; and Theodore, a sec-
ond year student at Harvard Law
School and a member of the
Harvard Law Review.
Rabbi Minis succeeds Rabbi
Alfred Waxman, who recently re-
tired after 18 years as Chaplain
at the VA Hospital.
New Sephardic
Congregation
Formed Here
Under the leadership of Dr.
Leon Suissa, a new Sephardic
Congre g a t Ion "The B'nai
Sephardim Of Greater Miami"
lias been formed in North Dade.
This is a young Jewish group
with a diversified and colorful
background. Most of the mem-
bers came to this country from
former French and Spanish Colo-
nies as well as from Turkey,
Egypt, Syria and Israel.
This truly international group
holds monthly meetings, picnics
and social dinners featuring
dance, music and food of each
ethnic group. At these events
one can hear French and Spanish
as well as Arabic intermingled
with English.
In keeping with the Sephardic
tradition, High Holiday Services
will be held at Victory Park
Civic Center. 17011 NE 19th
Ave.. N. Miami Beach, according
to Henriette Abeckjerr and Shir-
ley Hershberg.
Rabbi Stern
Returns From
Israel Tour
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern spiritual
leader of the Jacob C. Cohen
Community Synagogue has re-
turned from an extensive tour of
the State of Israel, where he con-
ferred with the highest rabbinic
authorities to implement a full
program of rabbinic legal func-
tions between the Religious
Courts of Israel and the Beth
Din of Greater Miami. As a re-
sult, all rabbinic legal matters
will be channeled through the
local Beth Din to the various rab-
binic courts in Israel in the fu-
ture.
While in Jerusalem, Rabbi
Stern lectured at various rabbini-
cal colleges, and addressed the
Congregation of the Hf'"hal
Shlomo the Seat of the Chief
Rabbinate of Israel at the Sao-
bath service.
"I found among the people in
Israel a great deal of inner
search for genuine truths that
leads to a mass return to reli-
gious life." Rabbi Stern reports.
"This is evident in the smaller
settlements since the Yom Kip-
pur War."
Rabbi Stern will give a full re-
port on his visit during High
Holiday services at the Jacob C.
Cohen Community Synagogue.
Four Local CARIH Chapters
Four Greater Miami area chap-
ters won awards at the 67th An-
nual Convention of Auxiliaries of
CARIH National Asthma Cen-
ter at Denver which concluded
July 31.
The four chapters Lorber.
Breath of Life. Gift of Life and
Point East won the coveted
Fannie E Lorber Award, sym-
bolic of having achieved the high-
est fund raising incomes for
1973-1974. This award is named
for CARIH's founder and mother
of president Arthur B. Lorber.
OHOLEITORAH DAY SCHOOL
THRIFT STORE
MUDS YOUR GOOD, VStD
FURN/TUK, CLOTHING, APPUAHOS
DISHIS, POTS AND PAHS,
BRIC-A-BRAC AND WHAT HAVt YOUI
FOR OUIK PICK UP CALL
Rabbi Mandelcorn, Cantor Hinkes
To Conduct Traditional Services
Rabbi Ephraim F. Mandelcorn
and Cantor Seymour Hinkes will
conduct traditional High Holiday
services at Temple Tifereth Is-
rael.
Rabbi Mandelcorn was ordain-
ed at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America and was for
many years spiritual leader of
Temple Emanu-El in New York
City. He also served as chaplain,
with the rank of Captain in the
Canadian Army.
Recently he was on special as-
signment from the Rabbinical As-
sembly as spiritual leader of Con-
gregation Moriah of Haifa, Israel.
He also holds the position of pro-
gram director of the Association
of Americans and Canadians in
Israel.
Rabbi Mandelcorn holds a de-
gree of Bachelor of Arts magna
cum laude from Yeshiva Univer-
sity and Master and Doctor of
Hebrew Literature degrees from
the Jewish Theological Seminary.
Cantor Hinkes, a graduate of
the University of Miami and a
certified math and science teach-
er on the high-school level, has
studied voice and liturgical music
with Cantor Kwartin and Cantor
Kyrr. He has served as Cantor in
several temples in the Miami
area and also teaches Hebrew
and Bar and Bat Mitzvas to stu-
dents.
Lila and Hy After are in
charge of assisting members in
their seat selection at the tem-
ple office.
759-4936
All Donations Tax Dedixtibte
ELAINE BLOOM
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
aSTRICTlOO-t^AXRAT
ELAINE BLOOM
GETS THINGS
DONE!
Prepared and paid for by the
Committee to Elect Elaine Bloom
r
DAIRY, MEAL
TREAT!
bravol bravo! bravlssimol Italian-stylel
CHEF BOY-AR-DEE*
BITE SIZE MACARONI PIES FRIED WITH CHEESE
THE MARVELOUS
MEATLESS
MEAL
THAT'S READY TO
HEAT 'N' EATL
For your family, your guests...for your
very next dairy lunch or supper... famed
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee has captured a veal
Italian flavor in this new Cheese Ravioli
feast! Just heat...and here's what you
serve! Italian-tasting tender little macaroni
pies filled with tangy cheese ... lavished
with savory tomato sauce, simmered with
mushrooms and cheese, and seasoned to
perfection in the real Italian way.
What a treat to serve...tastier and
easier than the frozen kind. And so much
thriftier, too. Costs only about 18c a serv-
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today* .


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Friday, August 30, 1974
"Jfwlst fhrirficir
Page 5-B
B'nai Israel Officers And Board
Members Elected And Installed
""under the direction of Rabbi
Ra!:>h Z. Glixman, B'nai Israel
-nd Greater Miami Youth Syna-
gogue has elected new officers
I np|i|inl year of growth.
Located at 9600 Sunset Dr.,
with traditional services con-
ducted in a modern orthodox
manner, it is attracting many
young Jewish singles as well as
couples who are searching for
positive Jewish experiences and
the best Jewish education for
themselves and their children.
The officers, who were recent-
h installed, include Joseph Mur-
ray, president; Joseph Coplon.
executive vice president; Sidney
Jndpn. Marjorie Scheinthal,
M u rr y Scheinthal. Frank
Abrams and Jerry Greenberg,
uc, presidents; Rochelie Green-
icording secretary; Beth
.- i-erg. corresponding sec-
retary: Barry Gubernick, fi-
ndneial treasurer, and Max
\ omovfc, treasurer.
The loard of directors for the
coming year is comprised of War-
ren Berney, Rosalind Goodman,
< Gubernick, Howard Hol-
Hobert Matloff. Harold
Alan Schulberg, I^rry
Stein and Murray Valkowitz.
Joseph Murray, the newly
eo.teci president, is presently a
nat;< nal B'nai B'rlth youth com*
lust vice president of
t Slate Association of
Hi Lodge*, past presi-
de Coral Gables Lodge
the 1- ,.:ida State B'nai
| Youth adult board of di-
board member of the
th .] ade Hebrew Academy.
I ,:: a ixil'.aiy police officer
the Virginia Gardens Police
i irtnw nt.
Mr. Murray has announced
thai be intends to encourage
tion amongst all Jews,
ess "f their affiliation, in
. ogue'a religious and
Wanted: RETIRED I'RIM I
PAL OR ". HOOL ADMINIS-
TRATOR to direct Sunday
School program. PImm submit
quallflrationa Immediately to
K. P.. Box 01-S9T8. Miami 33101
JOStPH MURRAY
cultural event! so that all may
enjoy modem orthodox experi-
ences.
Daily morning and evening
services are open to all. Throurh
a unique o; en door policy, per-
mitting a person to belong and
contribute according to his abil-
ity, the synagogue hopes to at-
tract man; new members this
year.
High iioiv Day services will be
conducted bj Rabbi Glixman at
the YMHA building. 8500 SW 8th
St Services will also be held at
its present facilities at 9<500
Sunset !
Community Singers Plan
The la!l reunion ard first
weekly rehearsal of the Miami
Pv-ach Community Singers has
been set for Thursday, Sept. 12.
at 7:30 p.m. in the bandroom,
(Room 125) of the Ida Tishcr
Junior High School, 1420 Drexel
Ave., Miami Beach, under the
continued direction of Joseph
Uooney.
This is the 22nd year of exist-
ence of this gr< up Singers in all
categories are needed. Contact
Nathan Auerbacn, or Louis T.
Levin for information.
Mizrachi Women
Begin New Season
1 .. ida Council, American Miz-
rachi Women, will hold its first
meeting of the new season Tues-
day at 10 a.m. ai Council Head-
quarters, 420 Lincoln Rd., suite
402. All members of the execu-
tive board, all chapter presidents
and activity chairmen are invited
to attend this planning session
for the forthcoming year.
& fc fc
Galil Chapter invites all mem-
bers to attend the opening meet-
ing. Sept. 5. at 12:30 p.m. in the
Washington Federal Savings &
Loan Bldg.. 633 NF. 167th St.,
North Miami Beach. Installation
of officers and a very special
film, entitled "Award to a Great
Lady" (Golria Meiri, and refresh-
ments will be featured. Presi-
dium is Eva Fuchs and Bess
Kurzban.
ft -tr *
Geula Chapter president Fmia
Cster announces a membership
party at the home of Mrs. Ed-
ward Staubcr Wednesday eve
ning, Sept. 11. at 830 o'clock. An
interesting program has been
planned and refreshments will be
served.
ft ft ft
Vered Chapter. North Miami
Beach, recently elected its new
officers. Including Mrs. Judi Bid-
nick, 'wife of labbi Dov Bidnick
of Sky Lake Synagogue) presi-
dent: Mrs. Adeline Caller, Mrs.
Saundin Rothenberg, Mrs.
Miriam Weissman and Mrs. Mar-
lene Kalchman, vice presidents;
Mis. Brenda Levinson, chairman
of the board; Mrs. Miriam Hal-
pern and Mrs. Roberta Lieber-
man. corresponding secretaries;
Mrs. Sylvia Travis, tinancial sec-
retary, and Mrs. Susan Singer,
treasurer. Mrs. Judy Zemel was
outgoing president.
Andrew Davis To Conduct
Israel Philharmonic Concert
Andrew Davis, brilliant young
English conductor, will conduct
the Israel Philharmonic when
this outstanding group of musi-
cians appears at the Miami Beach
Auditorium Oct. 3, under the
aegis of the Great Artists Series
of Temple Beth Sholom of Great-
er Miami, according to an an-
nouncement made by Judy
B-rucker, director of the temple's
cultural program.
"We were thrilled to learn that
this greatly talented young artist
will join the Israel Philharmonic
for its first performance in our
area." staled Mrs. Drucker.
"In Israel, he has become a
popular guest of the Philharmon-
ic and we are fortunate, indeed,
that his schedule permits him to
come to Miami Beach with the
Israel Philharmonic on Oct. 3."
Andrew Davis made his debut
at the Royal Festival Hall in
November, 1970. In February
1973. he was appointed Associate
Conductor of the New Philhar-
monic with whom he now ar>
pears regularly in Britain and
abroad.
"The Israel Philharmonic ap-
pearance will mark just one year
since the Yom Kippur War. In-
asmuch a Rabbi Leon Kronish
and Temple Beth Sholom are so
committed to the State of Israel,
we feel signally honored that
they will be apj>earing under our
auspices.
"To make an auspicious occa-
sion doubly meaningful." Mrs.
Drucker added, "the great Met-
ropolitan Opera Tenor. Richard
Tucker, has offered his services
as guest soloist, as a gift to the
State of Israel."
Tickets are available at the
temple office, the Allegro Music
House in Coral Gables, Miami
Beach Radio Co., Photo Centers
of Dadeland and 163rd St., and
Al's Camera Shop.
Mrs. Julius Ser is tickets chair-
man.
ELAINE BIOOM FOR
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DISTRICT 10ODEMOCRAT
E1MNEBIDOMSHE
GETS THINGS
DONE!
Prepared dp dforbythe
ed laine Bloom
Judge Goodman Endorsed wmww^www*vwvww%wvwwi
Circuit Court Judge Murray
Goodman's campaign for reelec-
tion has received the endorse-
ment of the Greek American
Political Club of Dade County.
EXPERIENCED ISRAELI
PAPERHAMJER AND PAINTER.
for ten rell jtbt. One roll free, no
:hcoe. Reafonable orices. 24 Hour
Answering: 8ol-6689.
CLERK TYPIST
$125.00
FIVE DAY WEEK
DOWNTOWN LOCATION
Ail Replies Confidential
WRITE MR. C.T.,
BOX 01-2973
MIAMI 33101
LIVE ON MIAMI BEACH
FOR ^2e/90 DOWN
NO CLOS'NG C?STS e NO GROUND LEASE
NO RECREATION LEASE
MAGNIFICENT WATER FRONT
CONDOMINIUMS
S2Z990 to s40,99O
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
KING'S POINT IMPERIAL
159th ST. \i BLOCK WEST OF COLLINS AVE.
OPEN DAILY 10-6 PHONE 947-9378
GREATER MIAMI REALTY INC.
eg/ EN .
ISRAEL & VIENNA
19 DAYS-OCT. 10
13 NIGHTS ISRAEL
4 NIGHTS VIENNA
Pe-sonally escorted by
HARRIET HORWITZ
$1259 per person dbl.occ.
plus S20 tax and gratuities
* Miami Miami
* deluxe hotels
* full breakfast daily
* full sightseeing
8 DAYS IN ISRAEL
2 DAYS IN VIENNA
Globe Travel Inc.
1613 N.E. 163rd St.. NMB
(305) 949-2527
YOU CAN LEARN
UNTERIOR DECORATING
for
PROFIT or PLEASURE
ENROLL NOW
Ciowes Btgln Week 0/
October 7th
Morning* and Evening*
Dade and Broward County
THE SCHOOL FOR
INTERIOR DECORATION ant* BESIfii
st. 1962
9719 N.E 2 Ave. Miami Shore*
Ph.757-5717x
ANITA PRIEST, DIRECTOR
Largest Manufacturer of Quality
Girls' Dresses in America
END CF SEASON
Savings to 50 %
Back to School
Sleeveless
Short Sleeve
Long Sleeve
Pageant & Special
Occasion Dresses
TODDLERS' 2T TO 4T 3 6X 7 TO H
SALE STARTS 9:30 A.M. MONDAY


rcce 5-3
Fndcy, Aagaat 3C, 1974
Miami Beach Hadasmh Groups Meet
:.i
taiu. Tie staaaat zx bbb
T **- "Ve>ines-
- ;- ? ma Hi--. Mrs.
Hiaku >i ne MraiJBj !
j i" "._
r -
- ^- -,--: i. ;->----,i_- ;-t-
LdKte GrmpMai
? > 1. '. e trie
-
2 "i~i*.>=- --T"" ':c? Mrs.
i ; :-
Ft* Tw*r^ C-r^np MoB-
:.= -. -. ^r i" "-"! --- -'--
a ?j-
H-enetta S Gr '-
d*jr awe. SapC. = a* "n* Store
- Ctmira A -.
j **c Cgf cat .y*ter;
- ** peaaahsr
,H|iy M. Wtm Gr*epMon-
- Bj Ho-
;:i -: r-e rrese:
Histadrut Chapter Reded*
Mildred Sahl A* President

:
-
-
]
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Phuu w-rhra. f-
Li_-
. r-
Imbbbbi Ma
Bcrr :r-
Cotes, proc-ir
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Mrs H-errraa Weimirii. da
-*-n. an: Mat Jtea <:-=.
AiijTi :oatd Baaea bb
- ~~ -~~ ~ 7j;**"
? -r 7-ve:. wm '<: se B I
-

-
-

JTTY Ladie> To
Meet Sept. 9
Ai-c'-ary TS I heM at t blb.
Mjrij- t > :" the office of
D-. I*er Recerres AwaH
i r-
7 T if -
:- Cum
-

-
- '_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Jvstke Jae Uy4 CmiidmU
Ff ReeJectiaa Te C*irt
-
-

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I 1_7
a aari
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1
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J\S V A Calendar
For Coming \Seek
. e
- "
*sa meetisj at P.
- I
- --- -
'- Pt^adeJpcBa. espet
y y t -la*-s changes.
"i- the A:t
MT perty
- -.
Sept ; oc i
\
I
-

i
lor B* members tad a.;.u-
-ers Interesta
:- *aay Wiliig pre*..
*'1 '' *>*-*> n
;
CoiMoe Ave. Mefnabrac
aat earge- Cart pr
yjw =napiro -
I*nHI Craae. Man n |
- 5 at tta
i caadie- :.g
3ny. Esther M
-' -
Mrtoo Tr\ Gr*ap .' n.
vr. |a>t. I
- iir o( the American -
Ea-
- =p*aker mn'.. he e
-
PU*a M* Graap
gq ------ -
rra Ethe! La.' i

Eaoe^e<; IMTRO01KT1OWS FOR
COMPAKKWSHIP AM
MARRIAGE
Ail cq**. Re Cxir Service is World 'A'.ce.
A FREE GIFT to dl *%
wrile or cell icr i=ic :=.
LEW DICK BfrtRPRISES
(Dtt IwtfdtKtiuii
34iC N.W. 72ad RBECT
TAMARAC. FLOrULA ::::3
-. :
"2. SS30 or "
""1
T0 : k SU fk< MiT f -
Ttttltl'* BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
gASXiTS i
IUVMMKMAK CS*JL SlUB fct*tVm!
TWIN UTY GLASS CO
X.1-C! i: :i.: f trots
Plate & Window Glass Replacements
sec last ** v"-*^ **r s**rT# ":
C^* "* i *-"
Mew FHi
Hi.-i
1T.C V
- :a aeeac '.r-
- .
cr-r ae

.-areator
v-_ aneai.
SaooBH rnut a IImbM-
:: Ti i : -' t
I :r^<-
-
-
.

- V: I-r-acdoal ^
7 i_n Sanaa] s. '. ?'iri
' B *:>:. HxLLa
___________________________ -. "'- _::--:.-:
Mnat, 7-v-
N: 1 Pirvvay T>aa, CMaJ
i ?'_i N: ::
ir: jo- -Btju Me TV Heal
:: Uaaah :-i-~^i' u -? -or.:
i -i-j- i- -Jw M
ana aad z-ta A^eaM.
>to*r/ro Theatres
BEN ZION BAKERY
AT :>: MJ 163rd STtffT
SOiTri MiAAAi KACH R.OR>OA
= .mder :^ "ee sar^an ; Babe Tc : :
; ;- .; -f : BJOQUC : see :.' : = -i;-5_J" OrC
aowb) r:r^ CAU"947-4092.
I'ce': re >:rc-e-c .- r r;. Sec* *?*~
r_-i*;i FCM -.. ::ii; ONS
.e^.-----c ; r?-.e C c<: :- Sr^cccs.
Trtf tSKAOm CENTER TEMttf
3'75 S W 25 STIEET MUMi ROttOA
PtOUtXY ANNOUNCI3 THAT
RABBI SOiOMON H. WAiDNfRG
HAS BEEfi ENGAGED AS SP RlTUAl LEAOfJt
We Corduay i|.>i* Yo to Worship Wrfh Us. Member o
Aboxjtiopj re Ovr Tempf Famiry > Now Being Acctat-
ed. Ho-ca-. Seats AvaiUWe.
CAU 445-*52 FO INFOAUTrO.
"3


Mstra *vrjs.
Temple Tiferetli Israel
C5CC S M AMJ AV ENUE MiAAU
HIGH HOLIDAY SMKtS
SUCHCS SEFTIMBB 7
ROSH H4SH0NAH SEPH^SR !7 I U
Mi KIPPUR SEPTEMBER 25 & 26
Cond<*sd b*
tAB5;EaH**.' V- VANDP.CG^N
Ca.'0? SCVMOOi K'SICB
-- ;-: i s=o aai cs :a.. -:. ofV :e
751^791 7S-73oO
Er>oe invited to Soc.a.: He^r orexedijtg SfidMS Services.
afresh 'en's served


Friday, August 30. 1974
HAniift fhjrMfon
Page 7-B
Mtt. 64r SCHWARTZ
MRS. NELSON fERREIRA
MRS. NED /. PRICE
Sch imrtz-Trau rig
i
King's Hay Yacht and Country
i :.' was the setting for the 8
, | Saturday, Aug. 24. rites
ted I.ori Jovce Traurig
Schwartz in marriage,
i Herbert M. Baumgaid
i : ei; a recaption honoring
llj, |e followed in the club's
, oom.
Ie, daughter of Mr. and
;; Philip Singer. 6980 SW
i;-- St., graduated in 1971 from
I tti Senior High School and
.. I the Florida Slate I'ni-
,ei seaa Study Center in
y ie, Italy, (an honors pro-
,u .ut and history) from
December, 1973.
receive her B.S. degree
ting and communica-
. March from the L'ni-
: Flori 'a.
-.. [room, son >>f Mr.
i Irs. Gerald Schwartz, 7320
Ird St.. graduated from
Senior High School in
] ;rad lated with honors
1 the University of Florida in
| Is currehtly enrolled in
Sity <>f Florida School
i. ational Paychology,
will receive his Mas-
t- ..v aexX December.
I'm [Own was an orig-
iign m ...;> .-atin-faced
. he fitted I "dice featun d
; neckline and long sleev-
es rich y beaded. The A-line
skirl fell into an extra long ca-
l i train. A picture hat of
mat lc with a large silk
leted the ensemble. Her
i et was a bridal arrange-
; white roses, stephanotis,
babj breath and Ivy.
' bridal party included the
1 e's sisters. Laine Traurig,
i of honor, and Mrs. Harvey
L
(A/eddina ^Tjclls rCina
Muskat, matron of honor: I^or-
ralne Mint/, the bridegroom's
sister, Wend;/ Schwartz, and Mrs.
Robert Arnold, bridesmaids;
Gregg Schwartz, brother of the
bridegroom, best man. and
Steven Hale, Robert King, Steven
Sharbe and Allan Zamren,
" s.
Mr, and Mrs. Schwartz will
make their home in Gainesville
alter a honeymoon in Paradise
island. Bahamas.
Ferreira-Toth
Cheryl Pam Toth and Nelson
Ferreira exchanged vows before
Rabbi Emmett Frank Saturday,
Aug. 24, at 7 p.m. in the Diplo-
mat Country Club. A reception
tor the newlyweds followed the
i e emony.
The bride, a graduate of the
University of South Florida.
where she received a Bachelor of
Arts degree and was a cheer-
leader, is the daughter of Mi-
chael and Gerri Toth. 1182 NE
17tfth Ten., and granddaughter
Of Harry Levy, president of Vot-
ers. Incorporated, District Depu-
ty, i Florida i Free Sons of Israel,
and past president of Greater
Miami's American Jewish Con-
gress.
The bridegroom's parents are
Mrs. Luisa Ferreira, 1063 Michi-
gan Ave Miami Reach, and
Richard Ferreira of South Amer-
ica. He graduated from Broward
Junior College on a baseball
IS THERE A CONDOMINIUM OR APARTMENT HOUSE WHICH
WOULD LIKE ITS OWN RABBI? IF SO, PLEASE LET ME KNOW.
Write
RABBI S.C., P.O. BOX 2973, MIAMI, FLA. 33101
"5735" HIGH "5735"
HOLY DAY SERVICES
Conducted by RABBI RALPH Z. GLIXMAN
of B'NAI ISRAEL
at the
Club of the Americas Pan American Room
8500 SW. 8th STREET MIAMI, FLA.
(former Y.M.H.A. facilities)
FOR TICKETS or INFORMATION CALL
TEMPLE OFFICE: 274-9556 274-8421
or RABBI'S RESIDENCE 264-6488
* All Tickets by Donation
fcS
S^
2*s?C.
v 1
Tou are cordially invited
fo view the exhibit
USA MORALES
Venezuelan Artist
SEPTEMBER 3-13, 1974
Weekday! 9,00 a.m. to 30 p.m.
^Admission JfrM
BACARDI ART GALLERY
JtOO Bieceynt Blvd.. Miimt. Florida.
scholarship and is presently em-
ployed as a recreat'on director
by the Citv of Miami Beach.
The new Mrs. Ferreira selected
a gown of white silk organza
with appliques of Viennese lace
scattered over the front, back,
veil and the entire bodice. The
lace appliques were ompletely
beaded in seed pearls by the
bride's grandmother, Mrs. Harry
Levy. Her bouquet was an ar-
rangement >)f white roses sur-
rounding a single white orchid
covering a small white Bible
given to her when she became
Bat Mitzvah.
The bridal party included Jane
Bailes, maid of honor; Mindy
Hoffman, Judy Roberts, Vicky
Miller. Julie Ferreira, l.yn Nor-
i is and Libby Pollock, brides-
maids; Richard Ferreiru, best
man; Victor Valiente, David
Toth, Robert Diaz. Louis Diaz,
Pablo Gonzalez and Max Ubide,
ushei s.
Mr. and Mrs. Ferreira will live
at lb.".'! Michigan Ave., Miami
Beach, after a motor tiip
through North Carolina.
Price-Multz
Roberta Malt/, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Morton Malt/, 7360
Gary Ave., Miami Beach, and
Ned I. Price, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Price of Jacksonville, were
married Sunday, Aug. 25, in the
Voisin Restaurant, Seacoast Tow-
ers.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz of-
ficiated at the 11:30 a.m. rites.
The couple was fetod at a recep-
tion in the restaurant following
the ceremony.
The bride WOK i traditional
gown of ivory pe.au de soie and
lace and carried a Bible covered
with a cascade of white orchids.
She was attended by Carole
Maltz, maid of honor.
Michael Price served the
bridegroom as best man; ushers
were Jack Schemer and Jei'f
Morris.
The new Mrs. Price graduated
from Miami Beach Senior High
School, where she was editor of
the yearbook and won the Bay-
shore < 'ptimist Girl of the Month
Award, and is presently in her
senior year at the University of
ith Florida, where she is an
active number )f tl.e Public Re-
lation Student Society of Amer-
ica. Mr. Price graduate l in 1&70
from Bailes School, Jacksonvi
and is a senior at the University
oi Florida. He plans )> continue
his education in law
The newlyweds will live In
Tampa after a honeymoon in Ja-
a.
FOR SAIE: 300 Hinh Holiday prayer-
boks, Morris Silberman tuition for
Conservative Svnaqoaoes, In good
condition, Reasonably priced, All
interested parties plfcse coll Con-
qreqatien 0h?v Shalom, Orlando,
Ha, 298-4650.
MRS. WAYNE 0. RODRIGUEZ
Roflriguez-Ofiron
Sharry Hope Ogron became
the bride of Wayne Dennis Ro-
driguez Sunday. Aug. 25 at the
Doral Country Club. Rabbi E.
Frank officiated at the 3 p.m.
double-ring ceremony; a recep-
tion followed in the club's Mira-
doral Room.
The bride, daughter of Mr. and
Mis. Yale Ogron, 12135 N. Mi-
ami Ave., graduated from North
Miami Senior High School and
Florida State University, where
she received a B.S. degree in
criminology. She was a member
of Gamma Phi Beta sorority and
was a Phi Gamma Delta (FISI)
Little Sister.
The bridegroom, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernardo Rodriguez,
1180 NE 205th Terr.. North Mi-
ami Beach, graduated from Mi-
ami Norland Senior High School
and Florida State University, and
has enrolled at the University of
Florida Medical School. He is a
member of Phi Gamma Delta
(FISI) fraternity.
For her wedding, the new Mrs.
Rodriguez selected a gown of
satin organza with attached chap-
el tram sheer illusion neckline.
peau d'ange appliques, full bish-
op sleeves and lace bordering the
hem. Her Juliet cap of recm-
I roidered Alencon lace was trim-
med with pearls and crystals and
held a bouffant veil. Orange blos-
soms worn by her great-grand-
mother on her wedding day more
than S5 years ago were sewed
into her headpiece and she car-
ried a bouquet of white orchids
and stephanotis.
Mrs. Nancy B. Benyon served
as matron of honor. Janet Ogron.
Paula Steadman and E. Klayne
Bowman were the bridesmaids.
The bridegroom's brother, Gary
Rodriguez, was his best man. Jef-
frey Ogron, Carlos Garcia. Jr.,
Robert Cardenas and Kevin Ro-
driguez ushered.
The wedding party also includ-
ed grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
Anthony Bielecki and Mrs. Ani-
cia Rodriguez, Mr. and Mrs. Karl
Ogron, Mr. and Mrs. Zeymour
Ogron, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Ogron and Mr. and Mrs. Andrew
Bielecki.
The couple will live in Alumni
Village. Tallahassee, after a
week-long honeymoon in Ochos
Bios, Jamaica.
Kurzner-Sussman
Mr. an I Mrs. Maurice Sussman.
Coral Gables, announce the mar-
MRS. MITCHELL KURZNER
riace of their daughter, Adrienne
Ruth, to Mitchell Eric Kurzner,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Kurz-
ner, Spring Valley, N.Y., Thurs-
day. Aug. 22.
The 7 p.m. ceremony and re-
ception was held in the Cotillion
Riiom of the Kden Roc Hotel.
Rabbi Hairy Jolt of Temple Beth
Sholom officiated at the nuptials.
Miss Kathi Simon served as the
bride's maid of honor and Roy
Wayne was best man. The brides-
ma .- included tli,- groom's sis-
ters. Marcia Kurzner and Ellen
Kurzner, Wendy Quartin and
Carol Sokolow. The bridegroom's
attendants included the bride's
brother, Steve Sussman. Sieve
Garber, Larry Mack and Stan
Walker.
The bride selected a candle-
lighl satin organza gown trimmed
with seed pearls and Alencon
lace by Milady Her bridal bou-
quet consiste I of white tea roses
and white baby's breath.
The couple will live in Gua-
dalajara, Mexico, where the
groom is presently enrolled in
medical school.
Levy-Alper
Sherri Lynn Alper became Mrs.
Robert Howard Levy Sunday.
Aug. 18. Rabbi Falke conducted
the 6 p.m. ceremony in "The
Temple" in Nashville, Tcnn. A
reception followed in the Nash-
ville home of the bride's parents,
Dr. and Mrs. Ben Alper.
The bride graduated with h u-
ors from the University of Flor-
ida, where she majored in sec-
ondary education and is a mem-
ber of Alpha Kpsilon Phi soror-
ity. Her husband, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Leroy Levy. 1020 NTS
179th St.. North Miami Bea-h,
majored in advertising at the
University of Florida.
The new Mrs. Levy chose a
gown of white silk orgam.a
trimmed in white Cluny lace for
her wedding. Her hat was trim-
med in white illusion, seed pearls
and Venise lace, and she carried
a cascade of stephanotis and lily-
of-the-valley.
Denise Alper was maid of hon-
or; bridesmaids included Donna
Levy, Terry Rich, Vicki Ross and
Eve Bernow. Norman Levy serv-
ed the bridegroom as best man;
Glenn W'ichinsky. Richard Levy,
Michael Levy and Albert Kahn
ushered.
Mr. and Mrs. I/.-vy plan to live
in Oklahoma City while Mr. Ley
attends the University of Okla-
homa School of Law.
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE
of 1815! N.E. l?th Avenue, North Miami Beach, Florida
wishes everyone a K'siva V'chasimaSi Tova.
HAPPY NEW YEAR
We are accepting memberships for the coming year.
Call 945-8712 to join the fastest growing congregation in
the Miami area, or contact Rabbi Dov BiaY.ick 949-4963
directly for more information.
We would I'ke to welcome to our North Miami Beack
community are newest colleague Rabbi & Mrs. lev Left.


Page 8-B
*> Jk*#<#> fkrxnat
Friday, August 30,
1974
Religious
Serri
ices
KHAAV
A M A V A T tHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. WS SW 7Mi An Orthodca
Cantor Arc Ben Aron.
NOR'H BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER 17S0 7tr. St Ciixniy.
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murrjv >avnch J2-A
ANSHC EMfcS 2SI '.W
ervative. Cantor Sol
Ave
RaKowita.
2
AGLDAS ACH.M NUSACM BC^ARD
CONGREGATION TI7 5th St. Mi.
a- Beech Orthodox. Rabbi Mor-
Mci Charmcv ts S2-B
IC'f AM (Tcmsai 5M N. Kendall
Or S M.ami Re'orm Race Hee-
b*t W Baumaar*. Ateocate Rabbi
Barry Altfman. 1
KTH DAVID S42S SW Srd
Coipviut Rabbi Sal Lanaae.
Cantor Wlham Lipson 4
*o*th mAW UACH
ADATM VESHLRUN (TamohH. W1
NE fcliam G.'Ofni Or. Ccnwill v
Rabbi Milton Schltnsfcy. Cantor Ian
Alpem. 33
BKTM EL. see SvV t7Th A>e. Ortho-
eon. Rabbi H. Rethmi-,.
BE"n KODESH 111 SW 12th *.
Moaarr Traditional. Rabbi Ma She-
c -c Canto, Lajaa Sega Rev. Atei
Sh. Re* Menoal Gwttcrman. (
AGUOATH ACHIM Srd Avt. Hebrew
Rel'flioes Comrrvnrty Canter. i254
NE Sr Avt Orthodcx. S3-A
BETH -opah 106- N M.ami Beach
Btvd Censervat-ve Rabeji Max lib-
achita. Cantor Jacob B. MandcHjon.
94
BETH TOV Tcrrole MM SW 9th
St Cerservative. Rabbi Charlei
Rebe.. S
I'NAI RAPHAEL 1401 NW 1SSrd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Victor D. Zwel-
mg. Cantor Jack Lamer. St
B NAI 'SRAEL ANC GREATER
MIAMI VOliTM SVNAGOGLE. *44C
Su-sti Dr.ve. Ortho-ox. Rabbi
Ra'Bh Glixman. S-A
,INAI Temole OF NORTH DAOE
1880' NE 2.-nd Ave. Refo'm. Rabbi
Ra'eh R. K.nge.ey Cantor Irvma
Shu'kee 37
CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
OF KENDALE LAKES 'SOS S.W.
85th Ave. Rabbi Maxwell Berger. 9
SKY LAKE SVNAGCGL-f -151 NE
lth Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
B Or c. 38
ISRAEL Tep't' OF GREATER Ml-
AW ".!7 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi
joeech R. Nrrot. 10
YOUNG 'SRAEL CF GREATER ML
AMI. 9*0 NE 171t St. Ort.*dsx
flatbi Zev Left. 3
ISRAELIIb. CENTER. 3175 SW 2Sth
St. Cc-'dervative. Raoo< Solomon
Wa'deneero Cantor Nathan Parnase
11
OR ClO* .1 en-ple' BOO SW Hth
St Cnae-v.tive Rabbi David M.
Earcn. Canter Star ey Ricn. 13
TEMPLE SRAEL-SO_rH Formerly
Betn Takwaj) M2S Sone: Dr. Reform.
Fare -cieph R. Narot. 13-A
} "." m
i _, -; -..
erari".
T"'FEFE">- 'SRAEL. 6xX) N.
Ae. Cc-se-.ative.
M ami
14
riCN Tempi*). 8C-:C M.ller Rrt. Ccn-
t*-.a-. ve Ra2E. Nc-T-ar. Shapiro.
Canto.- E-rc r-eifn-an. :4
.OtAi 6ASUS
jLDEA ,Tei"0ii. 5550 Granada Blvd.
Refcrrr Pact Vicnael B. E.aen.
tt*t. Can-.or Rita Snore. 40
-------
ZavoRA 1 rempie> 44 Zamora Ave.
Cone-tat ve. Rabr. Maurice Kle.n
41
tmWHmT'
VCGAN EAVID CONGREGATION
iZ*6 r-a-fl-ng Ave. Orthcdor. Rabbi
>taa: D. Vne. Cantor Liebele
Lev no. 50
F0KT lAUDUDALl
BE--1 :SRAEL "emplei. 7100 W.
Cal*-a fax B'va Raobi Philip A.
LaBewrta Ca-::- MfMricd Neu. 2
-
-
-
AitVM
T'CEFETH JACOB TeipU). 95" E.
*:- Ave. Consematve. Rab^i Na-
the- Z. crdek. 15
MOUTH MIAMI
BETH MOS-E CONGREGATION. 2225
NE ;: St. Contervat.ve. Rabbi
.etep" GeefinkeL Canter Yehuda
B n>a 35
mtAMI UACH
ACLOi"" ISRAEL.'801 Car'yle Ave.
C-t-:ec. Rabbi Shelden N. Ever. '7
EVAN...EL 8243 W. Oakland Park
B'vC Re'orm Rabb. Arthur J.
Aorarr.s. Cantor Jerome Kiemert. 43
COPAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGAT ON Liberal 35C- Ln>.
ve-a.ty Dr. RaSoi Max V eitz. 44
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 8753
N.W. 57th St. iCenervativei Ra=-
bi Miltcn J. Gross.
PCPAS0 UACH
MAPGATE JEWISH CCNTER 8101
NW 9*.h St
BE"- 5ci. ~: *Ct- St. Orthodox.
Race V;rdeca. Shap ro. 18
6HCLOM Temcie "32 Sl 11th Ave.
Cerse-vat.ve. Rabt Vom A. Skop.
Can:cr Vaarcv Henztr. 49
6E" -ACOB 3C' Waahingtcn Ave.
Otheocx RsdS Shmaryahu T. Swr-
ky. Cantor Maunce Vamche. '9
BE"- Rap-ael Temate), "M5 ^e'-
fe-c- Ave. Certjrvat.ve. Raboi
E ;t .'. -:s-ae. Carter Saul B.-ee"
20
BE-- SHOLOM. Temaet Chae
Ae. Lcs.-a.. Racs. Leen Kren eh,
Cam:- Oavid ; --. ter 21
F '
]
-
I -
I
HZ II AND Alt
HA'.LANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Coneervativev 416 NE 8th Ave.
Rac: Hj--, E. Schwartx. Cantor
.'acoc Ci-r ger. 12
-
- ; -
.
TEMPLE BETH .-CLOVCN. =:' --
S : ,:-|i'.r'. V! "it-
c Dav = Rail 2' -A
HOUf.tOOD
BE*" EL -e-rp.. -;5" S '4th v.
- Bj:- ;-u- .a"e Atl j;.
a-t nVsbc -i-.i, V R-5--feid 45

I a -

Registration Is
In Progress At
Beth Torah
Rabb: Norman Mussman. edu-
cational director of Beth Torah
Congregation. North Miami
Beach, has announced that regis-
tration is in progress for the
Synagogue's Nursery. Sunday.
Hebrew and Hebrew High
Schools. Re registration is neces-
sary for students who have at-
tended the school previously.
The Nursery School program,
which accepts children from 2'j
to 5 years of age. has been re-
evaluated and revised to meet
the needs of pre-schoo! children
who have been exposed to fine
educational television. The cur-
riculum includes reading readi-
ness activities, an introduction to
simple mathematical concepts
and field trips.
Emphasis will be placed on
teaching basic Hebrew vocabu-
lary as well as the customs and
ceremonies pertaining to the Jew-
ish festivals Mrs Carl Zwemer
is head teacher of the Nursery
School, which is under the su-
pervision of Rabbi Mussman.
Be:h Torah's Sunday School
offers religious instruction to
children in first and second
grades. This program acquaints
youngsters with Bib'.e stories.
the synagogue, the Jewish home.
Israel, holidays, as well a- ar-.
crafts and music. In addition, a
special ore-Hebrew program.
"Hebrew through Fun.'
offered to first and second Trad-
ers as part of their Sunday morn-
.: program
An innovative course of 'tudies
is being scheduled for the He-
S.hool. for children in
grades 3 through High School
New text booki and methods will
be implemented for a meaning-
relevant, reheious education,
with electives being offered, for
the first time, to both Junior and
Senior High students.
A post-coniiimation c'.s--
also being scheduled, which will
be taught by Itabbi Max A.
For details of my phase of
Beth Torah's educational depart-
ment, or to :-r re-re; -
ter your child, contact Rabbi
Sfassman -\ the B
'. office.
EE"- ~r LAM. -:: ElK 3 Avt. Or-
12
BE-- SHALOM ~ pie 4*C' Ar.
--.- SI Ceaaervativ* Rah* Mar.
tor "a 3.!-.. Center i -a SoM. *4
*-- vese CON ORE-
G*- ON -: Mer e ar A>.e.
-------_-----
C- = i". -E!dEa CONGREGATION
;-; vVae" -;:" --' C--:;:
S'N AI TemoU ;; Johnaen St.
Rabt r^av d S-a- -
Attoc ate a-' c-* S _-.'--
L Hi c-au-. 47
C.Ei'. SEPHA = C C HEBREW C:S-
BREG A T s 7* S .-.-> i -1: -.-
att v- va- a- Mltaimd 2J-A
-----------a-----------
EV4S.-EL TeaaaM 1701 .:-<.-'-
-. Ceaaarvatnre DJ:r Inrlnfl
-f-------a- C- -'-' Z. *:-- 24
-
-
_E'-'"-E BETH AHM Cenaarvatlve
S.\ Bind Ave., H y*::: Par-
Dav ; =:?- t Canter Hr-y
= "-" 47- B
TEVP.ES'.E. L -'-a S1S1 Bhar,
5: .,::: =arc Rece-t
F-ai Cantor Michae Kyrr. 47.C
VOLNG 5-iEw :' -"._ A COO
' Stirling Rd. 53

mtAt*
S--E_ Temple saa S ,v 3!-- st
-** Rac 8 4 rem Dai -
Canter Abraham -?-.- xg
rtEORCW AC--" -- Tree
-.-------;;, Rast a ei-;r S
--------a-------
CON GREGAT NELL 2-a-:-
e* -?r-ew i->:
- ; -
- -------
:chii cov -
- ve.
C Pab Tber S:?--
Ca-- aj
KNE^E"- ; = JE. --: Eu: :
' -.
ter At -a-a- S- Z?
MffetSTUI
Zi-=*~ EM SH CEN'ER
'--" C-ir-.a: |1
^rVNrVNNr v^ ^r> *v^w^yww
CANDLL!GHT!NG TIME I
S ELW [
At****.* a ,,. ^ *^ m-AAJL
CNOtAH -- -- c-
: : ---. a- ,~.
c. t*. Civ:- s ec ;;
f.r= TAH -- ; it a-a
_sta NfataraMy Cenaerval
Raet Engi! Labevitz. Canter Ed-
aro K
OMI ~-t _: 7CJ6J = -a D- Cr.
Mk I -'?aA .-. e ; i a -
::
---------e--------
BE=- = Z JEWISH CES~E= o*5
Co 'i A.e Race Saa Na-r- ai 3"
CONGRE5-- ;. E~Z C-A V
44 Waanrgtjn Ave.
42.
12
Rothschj'd To Be Hono-ed
-
i
,'iand.
I board of
r.ner to be held
t 19 at the Arrer-
the
Roeenkranz To
Lead Oct. :-17
Tour To Israel
Sam
-
. -'
-.
:-
-
nkranz.
' i
err : |
H- -red
a
So'ah Ke!!er To Enteric-n
At Opewiriq Meetinj Sept. 9

i
'
card pa: te*
sk --.s daaatman, &
Her-r.ar as coc;-
a as ear
- and K
Israel Ed ^catrunaJ Services.
Vieic From Jerusalem
By RABBI LEON KROXISH
Temple Beth Sholom
I was in Jerusalem looking
out toward the 'Old City" and
The Wall" when Americans
were experiencing the trauma of
Richard Nixon's resignation as
of Israel? or there ,
mystique in the Jrearr, of ArrM
ica that is linked to the ,.,,
glow of Golden Jerusalem?
Is the hyp^risy of the natin
as manifested in their fai]UI,
and the frag-
i.e peace of
the Eastern
M e d i t e r -
ranean was
shattered as
the fighting
resumed on
nearby Cy-
prus.
The view of
the East"
: the eternal
Jerusalem
is in sharp contrast to the rumfcl-
;:-._ fn m the West."
JerussJetTJ tooka so j^oacefui:
Car. these ea: th-shakine. shalom-
shatteriag ewsati mellji smash
the promise of the "City of
Peace?"
Wa- Nixon the sat
Pres dent S,a"d UP fr the in,^:ty^
LLTX^aJT ^-prus is this hyprocrii ,
to the fragile
f ofcai Kreriita
threat m mc iragne cease'ri
that creates the illusion of p^
as one watches the sun rise ov
tne aacieo ^ty, knowing thatu
this season of the year no storm
will shatter that golden glow*
It's not that I was untaan
of the harsh reality \ ,i(
threatening storm from. th# j
North and that every prttlem
which Israel specifically -_ an|j |
the Jewish people generaly _
has faced, every problem ? mag-
nified many times over'
Is there something ipeciaj ^
something sustaining sbi .! via*,
:r.c America and the
Jerusalem?
Or are we just blin
ten glow and .;..,,,
rnj rtjqo of the Eternal :-."
Bar Mitzvah
STl ART HYMSON
Saturda- ces at
Beth Torah Coi .-.. Au_-
3:.
of Stuart, the son o: Mr and Mr-
Louis Hymson.
^:u^r; a recent Brad :
Beth Torah' W k
- '. of

and a m*i Scouti
H- has re I Chi-
Phvsical
-
'

'
U !- ill RNANDEZ
I .
!
-
v Ml]
DANA IFV|\>\
l
fflroel lefrrfir.'d
Mrs Martin LeTinsar. x .
brate h:s Bar Mittvah ]
Beth Ana Saturday. Aug 31
The cr'.ebrant is
Palmetto Junior H:5r -
Dana's grandpas .-:|
Hn Isidor Miaai
ill be present I
ebrate the occa-ior;
lrSBOeat J.EHRI II IP
V..-: -e Tank -
morning./
i
r.t
11
' 3



n
-..
-
.
M -
Mrs i
' -
I

i
Neu Headmaster At Ransom School
-
-
- i -

ra!t tor the
as ieported.


-
'
JWVA Elects New Vtofctf

-
nt of i
At S
en)
tion in Philadelphia. Pa.
-,-,-v:


Friday. August 30, 1974
+Je*ist Moricftur
Page 9-B
Manuel Mendoza, (left) who teaches political science at
Dade Community College and Florida Iternaiional Uni-
versity, has accepted the post as campaign coordinator for
Joe M. Gersten, 27, candidate for the state legislature (Dis-
trict 109*. Mendoza said he becam? active in the Gersten
campaign because of the need for "sincere and intelligent
young people to take an active role in seeking public of-
fice." Gersten, a Democrat, is the grandson of former Circuit
Judge, the late J. N. Morris. His uncle and father have also
served in judicial capacities in Dade County.
Dade-Monroe Sen. Ralph Poston (center) receives a plague
from the Florida Institute ef Dale Carnegie for his efforts in
getting legislation passed setting up a board to control ethics
for post-secondary schools. Poston, working with Fred Karl
oi Daytona Beach, was credited with passage of the ethics
bill. Making the presentation are (left) Ike Cahill. Dade
County Dale Carnegie leader, and (right) Hugh Mclllwain,
sponsor of the Florida Institute of Dale Carnegie. Poston him-
self taught Dale Carnegie classes for 18 years.
Two Recipes With Lots Of Ta'am
Using Planter's Peanut Oil
The lightest and most delicate
of today's vegetable oils
Planter's Peanut Oil belongs
on every clever homemaker's
shelf. Because Planter's lets the
true taste of gourmet delights
cone through every time! And,
the smart homemaker knows
that Planter's is both kosher and
\ as well as polyunsatu-
ratej.
Here are two new recipes from
Planter*! that we think you'll en-
joy.
PEPPER STEAK
2 lbs. flanken. sliced thin
3 tablesiK>ons Planter's
Peanut Oil
3 sliced t'ieen ;?'>;
i chopped onions
2 chopped garlic cloves
S It --< r,.i pepper to taste
1 teaspoon powdered ^ir.^er
l'j tablespoons corn
1 | .->Ty
V4 cup broth "^M
I ;.' frozen snow pegs,
thawed
Cut meat into jlh ; '
Solid.
SC5S&-
t V>, si' ^ *
.%* Take stock in America.
~*7 Buvl'.S. Savings Bonds.
Sponsored by Concerned Citizens____________|__
v. K
Brim's Richer, Decaffeinated
LEGAL NOTICE
Get ready for the holidays by
stocking up on deliciously rich
Brim the decaffeinated coffee
that's as full of flavor as regular
coffee. Bum's the one that's
richer in choice Colombian beans
so it's bound to taste better.
Smart lUJStBBSes serve Brim at
:-r>ers. when gi esta stop
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-4587
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Copyr ght Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Why i it that in the cere-
mony which greets th* new
moon it is customary for
eii'-h of the people to refer
to their fellow worshipper
and bid him peace by say-
in? "Shalom Aleichem?"
in and all through the year. And
tie., know their friends and fam-
ilies can enjoy Brim cup after
cup, without worrying about los- '" Jr5;J!,,'?.','/,.,..,
, ,._ MINN IK ->' i:Irrr.t\
in? sleep, because its Oi per cent ,|. .
caffein-free notice to creditors
T All Creditor* i I Ail Pel kmii
Now you can et Brim in a Having Claims uc_Demi ilnaf
special grind For electric percs, and ,-,.-
as ".ell as in regular and drip '' '" ''
XIE 3' de-
lved ie Cou Ploi Ida,
III ._ if Dad
i same in du; I ite and as
''''
.-I., u the < itui-
. haver.'; I et. Lade Counl Flor-
itiuiin 4 months from
itlon here-
i III be barred.
Pl.ed at Ml ml I-'. Ida, thla 23rd
day of August, A D 1974,
MILT) N SCHI1 ."iCK
A I".:.. UUt ir
) til if ti i.- notice on
of August, 1974.
Ka !. Levlnaon
St Kenln
.. Cai i! H iq,
Attorni v for Exe or
Suit.- T'i'i. 142* all Avenue
s,:io 9-i
grind. And, of course, freeze-
-t the
5 for a quick li k-i p any-
time at a"..
make a New Year I n
you'll find easy to keep serve
Brim all yea*- 'round for a taste
of real goodness.
LEGAL NOTICE
Some claim (Maharil) this is
because when one beholds the
new moon one beholds the pres-
ence of God. At such a happy
NOTICE uncer
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREI1Y OIV'EN that
undersigned deslrli g I gage
iuiIn al 9921 N ', > mue,
Bi j l". Hlalenh I irdei Fl irl I i un-
da...... fictitious name of HERRICK
MTSRCHANDISINO Intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit r"nurt of Dade Count; Florida
CRAIG ENTERPRISE IM I
SHAPIRO, FRIED. WEIL ft SCHEER
Attorneys ;ir Law
4"T Lincoln RoadSuite '
Miami Beach, Florida MISS
J/lS-23-31 9 5
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
ANNUAL REPORT
tiim Annual reoort of the private
foundation FRANK & anna QOLD-
meetine people bid each other man foundation, inc required
or more accuratelv, to beflled^der section nB$ Internal
Ki'Vi'nur i ndf. is available tor nubile
"peace.
wish each other that the glory of
God should rest on each other.
Actually, the word "Shalom"
inspection at its principal office, IIS!
Tlai St.. Miami Be. h, P r da 38141
for Inspection on Bu avs Be-
tween in mi am and 4 PM by any
en upon remi' das
which is usu.illv translated after the date of thla publication.
"peace" happens "to represent ^ci^Manw?
one of the names of the Al- Dale of Publication August SO. 1974.
mighty. When we use it in a con- tN THE circuit court of the
to\t of "Shalom Aleichem" it is "th judicial circuit in and
- .. r-j pOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
tantamount to saying May God case no. 74.24300
be with you." If the presence of general jurisdiction
God appears with the arrival of CHARLES prkckant u i
the new moon, it is most fitting SHERRY PREOEANT, hii fe,
to wish each other that His pres- P,alv,
ence shine over each and every WILLIAM a. LOCASCin and
one. his wife, if main,.!, an 1 all
persona claiming by, through.
A second reason is offered bv under, or "tains! I m
other sources saying that the notice of suit
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit of
Florida, in and for
dade county
probate division
john r. blanton
probate no. 74-5373
In RE: Estate of
HV.MAN .1 KITAIN
deceased
notice to creditors
Tn All dltors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Esl 1;
fou are hereby n itlfled and re-
quired i" presenl any lalma and de-
la which 1 u mai ive tgainst
. estate of iivman J KITAIN
deceased late of Dade County, Flor-
ida. :! the 1 'In u,t Judge if I >ad
County, .< -: 1 file th lunlii ita
and as provided in Section 733.18.
Florida Statutes, In thi ea in
the Counts Courth us. D 1 .< Soun-
ty. Florida, within four calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, >r the same will be
barred.
Piled at Miami. Florida, this 21st
daj oi August. LD M
ZKV W KOGAN
As Executor
First pub otloe on
the 80th day of August, 1974
Rothenberg, Rogan &
Kornblum
By: Z,-v W, Kogan
.v for ev W Rogan Executor
4.. Lincoln R*, Miami Beach. Fhv
8/30 9-6
preetins; of poace from one wor- TOi WILJJAM a m ^.\s^!;) and
shipper to another is used be- wi.v if married
cause it follows a quotation from uwi'KSck t^NOWH
the Bible which has just been ^<' V'.i.iam a l-h a|CTq ^
recited asking that th" fr'eht wife, it married and all oeraoni
and tremor of punishment be felt S&hl'm~'*2& notPn^fl' that
by the evil nations. This has a^s^t.^j-rtig. hj^bjen
been followed by the bidding ot described property, to-wit;
I^.t 3, Blo.k <. of ENCHANT-
ED LAKE SECTION Font,
according to the Plat thereof
aa re.-,,rded in Plat Book 88 at
Page 87. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida;
ami you arc r,.iiu!r,-il to serve a copy
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice is herebt given that
the undersigned, deslr i i to -..tiee iiy
business under the fictitious name of
BY QEORGE at 508 West :3rd Street,
YOC. Wll.l-IAM A LOCA8CIO and Hl,i;,.,lh. piorida IS0M Intends to re-
ister aaM name with the I'lerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
CESAR FASHIONS OF MIAMI. INC
N 18-23-a" 9/8
NOTICE UNDCR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KDTTCB IS HERIWY iiivkN that
the undersigned, de^rlng to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
KING DIVF.HSIFliATlONS; KINO
DEO 'KATORS; KINO MA I U
KINGSlt PltODI'CTS: KINOSU IN-
f your Answer or Pleading to the VESTORS at Da*!- County, intend to
frozen meat is easier to cut).
Heat the Planter's Oil in a fry-
ing pan and place the meat in it
Stir-fry for 3 minutes. Remove
to a plate.
Place the ?reen peppers,
onions, and garlic in the pan and
saute for 2 minutes, continuing
to stir. Add salt, pepper, ginger,
cornstarch, and sherry to the
broth, mix well, and pour over
the vegetables. Place the meat
and snow peas in the pan and
bring to a boll. Serves six.
MUSHBOOMfi WITH CELERY
2 tablespoons Planter's
Peanut Oil
'j lb. mushrooms, sli 1
3 cups celery, sliced
2 i-; in'-.- ,y sauce
Salt to taste
l te lsi ood a ig ir
licit the Planter's Oil in a pan
over high heat. Put ir. m ish-
ims and celery, stir-fry f'
minutes. Add soy -1 ice salt and
rnr ana oeok for 2 more min-
utes, Serves
peace so that each worshipper
turns to his neighbor saying in
effect "that this curse was not
meant for you to you I wish
peace."
A third exolanation is offered
by some authors who claim that Bgggre. gm Haca^ne nggtag-g *;
the bidding of peace stems from phone: ^7'i-:s:,i ana file the original
the original reason for which the Anawer^orJtf%&*&2?2i %
moon is a softer light, only ap- ,,efore lnc 4lh ,iliv of October. 187.
pearing at night. The moon was if you fan to do ao. ju.igrnent by a*- ELEVENTH JUDiCial circuit of
i L u_j -i-;mj fi>"'1 '" '"' taken againat you ror Florida in and FOR
punished because it had claimed Uu, NNe| demanded in the Complaint ninF county
Complaint to Quiet Title on the
Plaintiffs' attorney, Ronald Oavis.
register said names with tin
the Circuit Court of Dade
Florida.
S. SHOCHET
F SHOCHET
8/23-30
Clerk ot
County.
9/6-13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
that there was no need for the tojgjWTlttj ^ be ^^ once
sun to be illuminated since tne ,>.. w,.ek f0r fur u> consecutive
moon could shed enough light w*fi thk ^|gg&
without the sun because they ,.-,,,ri,la ,ni.< gtnd day of Augwat.
were originally of equal radi- m% RI(.HARP P ruinker.
ance. This unwillingness to share
led to friction between the moon
and the sun. Thus the moon was
punished by having its radiance
reduced. .
Clerk. Circuit Court
i ,.i.- County '
Bv i" P Ci iPEl AND
Penutv Clerk
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-4567
in RE: Estate ,.f
MILTON F1NKELBTBIN, (
also know n as
MII-TI'N M FIXKEIJSTKIV
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona
Having Ciaima or Demands Against
Saiil Estate: .
You are hereby r; titled and_ re-
Seeins the arrival of the new
moon and remembering the fric-
tion between the two luminaries.
Jews wish each other peace and
harmony hoping that they will RORE<
never come to -uch a disparity.
CASE NO 87-7033
MADE1 INK ORENIl
Petit
PERNAND ORENIER and
4U CANDIDATES AGREE-
ZIP CODE SPEEDS
HOLIDAY MAIL
AMENDED NOTICE OF SUIT
T< I FERNV ND ''
211 H< IN PARTEI
I AVAL I
v. \-TRE \ 'AN \DA
T"- Ri i9E ORENIER
^RD
In (tupll ate and ,i- 01 I "-'-
: Fl, rlda Statutea In their
the Counts d url use in
Dad. O tit" .Florid tour
ha from the I me of tne
or the s.mie
will be uai red
r la, thla l'.'iii
\-.. LI "i
\\ A I I ACE N MAER.
Ai Exei
i-.. notice on
' I
VVA1 l Ai E > '
nsr
i
9-6
you,
cops
'

V II"
V Flaglei Btr

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L1W
S '
Ihe undei :'':"
II ICA
I
CT0-
P" ""' -',.'.
TMK N'OTl
once each w. for ;,-
OR-
DONE AND
.'/Tl
i.;, :er.
ill Court
I ,,in i' iunv Fli i i
By C P '' 'PELAND
Deouty Clerk
(Clr u.t Court ,.
8/30 9 6-13-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 9 HEREB' IIVEN thart
,. .. ,i, rf 1 -:.(te
ua n mie
, E,
j.Mh St., H
I. of
u Court of i' ide County,
" ,-Hnu .,.
S 30 9/6-13-20


Poge 1.V3
oJmish FkrffFir
Friday, August 30, 1974
IKAl H9TXI
LfGAl NOTKI
lkai Nona
IWAl Nona
IN THE CIWl'T COURT OF -Ml
E.EVEMTH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT OF
FLOfllOA. IN ANO FOU
DADE COUNTY
MOBATE D'V'SOS
FRANK B DO<*LlNG
PROBATE NO "4.SAM
X Eaiate of
iffUS bKMCBXBAXD lii
7.K JAXKIEi.
v MOISBS *NT
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Al ->e*tor* A3* Ai
P~a*aris A Fa last
.-
ar* hereby t, *if*e& ad -
"> *
-
said Oart Too are hereby a-
1 V .
Bat 1
IN THI CIRCUIT COURT OP THE W THE CIRCUIT COURTM OF THE IN JJ* ^IRCLIT COURTM OF TM
ELEVENTH -CO C'AL CIRCUIT ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ELEVENTH .JUDICIAL. _CIRCU IT OF
OF FLOR'OA IN ANO FOR FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COllTV OADE COUNTY
PROBATE OIVIS'ON PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO T*-""3i PROBATE NO 74.4573
,'JLDCE DOWLING,
LILLIAN H >-. ta Re: Eocate of
r-wnl WTLLLAM CHALEK.
NOT'CE OF PROBATE mllll
THE S'A^E OF FLORIDA _____ NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL TNTEP.ESTED T- Al Ch*W urf All Ptrvns Hn.
N THE ESTATE I SAID :c CSaaaa I I--..- Iff u-.--1 I
NT aWBatt
. :j: a ai;i Y:a ar hereby notified and requir-
I MI I li pin TIM i minrtl wfalcfe yu may have arainst the e-
.aat wiT and -.eataaaeat erf a*>d aoc*>- ahx* y:a sla?have arair- ta:- of ROSE KK'CHTMAN de-
raaata Ja iau :xv CHALEK. de- ceased late of Dad* County. Florida.
-****-! ia:* of fade County. Florida, to the Cin-U'l Juda-.-s of Dade County.
IN
El
FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-52M
- of
ROSE FKl'HTMAN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All Peraona Hav-
-r CSalBM or Demand* Arainst Said
E-:ate:
Tom are aarabr notified and r.*:u:r-
ed to [>rent any < La:ms and demand*
I THE CIRCUIT 0URT~rT7~r^
LEVENTH JUDICIAL CiRCUl/ft1
AND FOR DADE COUNTY '"
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CABS NO. 74.23*04
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN HK THE MARRIA.;"c
\ EKNON DAVIS. fc
Petitioner.
M
NANCY DAVIS.
Respondent
T<> NANCY DAVI8
e rnknown
V.I- NANCY DAVIS.
ARE HEREBY MOT
aw. aay yaa cae.
- a : =
araaata sfcoaM a*
a-re.-***
*XT >
- Ooajrt ."pire
- N
"= -~ey a*. I-oa-
_ .. rT
IUjaS
-
'. A -.<---- -E
------4
-A
.--
Jpdre*
-
-
ur *ier..iar so
*
-
Aim-'
- oa
-

"---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------N --E C RCt- T COURT OF THE
.. -_c ; o;_ ::.^T Of --E -EVENTM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OT
E-EVEN'H JUO C *- C PC. T FUOR 0 ". a N Z PQR
jc c_c= : N s: c-= DADE CO. N"'
:i:e :r.s-N rrcbate r v s on
C*SE NO 74-28BI JOSEPH vi =
NOT CE -: TE^END PRORATE NT -i-J^f

... ;.:
- .- .-.
"* 1* -AT'- f.
- THERESA ? -
... I r*.
. --
, _.(. iittrtrnzf- : air -*i mtr.r:
S ANISFELX)
r the I HM b harr-d TTth da: 4 ...
p unl PlorMa. thi K'.h tition lar DiKaohitk.n of Mai
' Ac :>:"
. tfc CVvait jidYe? of Iwde I '- JJ"^** '
aa4 fije -Jie nmt in dapticate and at
ptvr>dd la S*ctioa TJJ :. F
u- -y
T-ale Cawaty. Florida.
- s foar calendar atoaUi
Ub>* of pabtlcal
er tbe saoe ii: l-
..: Mtaaai. PV-r
iaj '. ABF*t .-. -"'
LEE -HA..EK
Al A
lb* 3rd day rf au.
. I
Fj V SE5 ;
i T A
' A
'
-
row wrtttaa rtMw
BaarrbAct
HTON K"KN
iti -
Y ... on
t^e ;3rd da\ of Aufust. I9T4

I

be taken as mnfenred
DATKD: At,-;
RICHARD P 1
B) T D DE
i- mm
.1 .j.
Ian
. -/ c-_.- -.
n -_-

-
- '

F --
Da :-
N --E C =:. COURT OF 'HE
E-E.ENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLC= :* N AND FOR
DADE CO.NTY
POOBATE D B'ON
pp.CSa-E SC -i-i.Z~i
p*pER,
NATHAN A BROWN
-
NO* CE -0 CRED'-ORS
T
l*-zxw .*. A

-

N I THAN A
NOT'CE LNDEP.
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
- : .'EX I
ns -
u- :>)ri-
.":> :-: "A-t-
9 -
;.me aiU
ut Coatl Dad*
i -
JAi K B RiJTINl
ANDELL
rj-w -:j
NOTICE LNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
EI-Y 'IIVEN that
ta**
.
CLfB at 41'* a W '
la I
- will Clerk of
Cot
I
-
n --e : =:. COURT :- ~-e
e eventh joO'C-al :=:.- s
a N Z F ; p z D E C :v N .
-.:= :a
0ENE= a L .i$:ct OS
o = :n
nc n~znt\
SC'CE B1- P'.Si. CATION
--. .'
E
-
BQnEKa.
-
__ c
i-<
NOT :E L'NDCR
c : :.s name law
- A" -
. r. : -.- : -. 1 -. -
F -
Ma 4S ._a -.*.--.
i4f V*: N- Tork ar* nawii tl
. -- --irer I Hm aaty. War ii
' -r aiaaoaitioe of aaarr.are EN
'o-. and
- -
.-aaa Ccte?. a;:, a-:
M am- Ftor- to*- K-*ru DaaU r
-r-
a* coaiiaul ------------------r--..,- ^...---------
^ Aacu-'- NOT CE .NDER
FICTITIOUS NAME a
-rjrajre l
; -- ''':;-.-- '.
;" t-r- (
. .: Mtaxn.
-__-
' N
A- -
-
"4
. "
-
s ~~- -'-- ~ COURT OF THE
"~- --- Z 4- C RCI. OF
florida in ano for
::e :d.s'>
genep4_ jub sc :~ cs
Z* S -N
N Z M ;
NOT :e OP P.B- CA- CS
S- FOR SSOLUT ON
OF M; RRI4GE
'
-

I .- SZKAL.
DASTKAL
a"'
-~r Park v. .
11TH JUDICIAL C:CL N a\i
FOh D*lJE COUNTY. F^qp Da
IN PPOBATE
No 74-i955
In Rl
NOT'CE TO CPED.-0P$
V'. A
-
Asa : te

- aiv etalnms : .
> u ma f '.a\e r
Circuit JuJr-- I :-' a
f:l* tha duplira:-
B "" I i .
Ut**. !i
in Dade toil
.''..- a -'..-. r
nal aak>B>
or the same ;'.: b* r.t-
Dated Mam: F ...r
day : Auruft. AD "'

-.
'-.-
I .. Da
.
-r
1* W
sc" ce '.nder
fic t:ols name law
S H
of a:
;.- a- '- '- V -' V .rr ': h
iaac
.
INC
EY IT] HLD
Pre!

i .- -:s

NOTICE OF ACT'CS
CONS*R-CTIVE SERV'CE
NO PPOPERTv
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF --E
ELEVENTH ..DiCiA. C RCt "OF
Florida, in and for
oade cou.n-
c act on no. 74.?;:::
ac~'on fop d ssolut ; ,
of mapr age
: the maRP.:..
.:_ :e .ndep
F CTiT.OLS NAME LAW
V T.
- er exft W

ii :
H u -
FRANC""-!?
.-" ii
-ZKK
MEYER ANT
-:: -: |
; : KRK

J
fN
NOT CE :- ACT rs
CONSTRUCT SE=. CE
*C "=:=:-*
n --e c rc. c:.p- : ~-e
Eleventh ..o c a_ c >:. of
F_C-Ca S4N0PCP
::e cols-v
c.-ac-:-. sc a
AC ON FOR D'SSOLUT ON
OF w 4 p a j. o, E
OF
van:
:-:.- i-1
i-1
LKMBO?
-
Y:*
.- HEREBY NOTIFIED
'-.
-'- uraia*. yoa ar.d
I M 'i aairi t u- err* a ooar a*
: -
z~.y- a -- --. :
"ax. aaar'ju :- tt*
r.ia.rta faatHiaa. a w**: PtacSer
rw.nx: Vila ta* c*ark of ta
-
a: Sit: '-...:.* Are- : *" i P-
-' '- Mama.
- yo. x-
- i- A:.-
-a:.' r":-r>da. r E^* '
:nc --
RE-
. TH ES 1 BOTH. PVi A K A HADDAD. DD ir THE JEWISH L\
FA ICK. DOS.' and WITNESS
aB* it tht <4Ttc* : O*
' -* v rt-.h
NOTICE UNDER
F CTiTiOLS NAME LAW
S EN that
v nraatr m
y-
ARE hereby
teat an act _
nttt I :..- i and
you are r^juirvd *o aanra a eooy A
y
at addre** la >?$ C .-- -
111 XX 4
FV.rda 33131. and I
- -1 I
"4 ik.
laali l
:1
-
'..a- al .... t : u: 4
M-airu. Fteoda SUM
EaE.E-.-- JUO CIAL C-RC..IT
OF FLOROA IN AND FOR
DACE COLNTY
CIVIL AC" CS NO -t-C22-
ACT ON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF V4RP AGE
T JAN -
at- c i.

r of Ma--
i Ti ii~"'-i **
-
IT *-
-aar aw pad--*jp
:ta Boac. Sa.:- X3 Mtaaai
: as* faV ta
>-- -
:t-a-v i <
NOT CE CF ACTION
CONSTR ""- SE SERV'CE
s d "="= (M>a|rr> DA ET' M.irs Pa rl;
N --E C PC. COURT OF THE ***
: HAPDAr D M r an al
- M aai F au.-ai-:
' S K E -

l rwvti.e aaal W
ta THE JEWISH rLOBIDLAN
hairf aad -aW aekl oT "S*1 "]? ** ^*a
at- a; art oa or af:* -. :.
Aar "* *'*! ail a* oa.
BJCHaBD P BRTNKjaat ^ ajaaJ yaa Scr ta* rtQtf oo-
A* Ork. Orcaa: Coart
Dad* CeaaiTy. PtornSa ~"
By WTLLiX BRAItffiAW JR. *i """
---.-. caark
' au: Car WITNESS xa; aaad aa4 IB* aaal of
*V7EU'. A AL] aa.-e aar) at M
r^JCMr SlroM BR1NKER
Mtaaa. Patrhta JT.Sa a> Or*. Ctrraat Cvatn
hard r bbinkkr,
- Ill
!
By W1LUE .A .T.
: -rs

:- 'r Su :e :^*
- '
________________
NOTXE OF ACTION
Z : -.5- = C- E SERVICE
NO PROPER--
* THE C RCUIT COURT OF THE
E-E.E*.-- ..C C 4_ CIRCUIT OF
f_C Da n and for
Cace couom
C'V AC- ON NO 74-0*1)
AC CN FOR DiSSOL.TiON
CP wapp AGE
I !
ark :v- :
la
K HAPPAP P : S .
A 1 -
r, p 5 p.. i. .
MBER'I FR' MBEHG a- !;.'-H.
T a
IAMBS KS / IRE
ant
.
% i-:;-s<. <
l">ad Ooaatr. Ft. -
:. M EISSEE
Al !-:_-> lerk
!
-.. : 4
Miam. F-.--ndA V.K
A:'.
--
M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY*
IN Ta. C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
Eleventh judicial circuit
of florida in ano for
dade county
civil action no. 74.j3s5
act,on for dissolution
of marriage
.rriaobof
ier
.-
I *
aaty. PV-r-. la
Bj H BERN AN
A Daaatr CVt*
of ABCO bRaraataaaal Coraorataoa of
H-xax. a: Sa.:. ..' 444 J- a- 4,..
-" : --: NZALSZ U .'riZZ
aad
IRIS B 04NZ...IJEZ 1/--PEZ
.VZ.CJ2 L.-PEZ
ARE HEREBY N^ttptcT
.- actioa for Dtmamia of Ma--
-ar- na* bo*a f*Jod acaiaai yoa and
am are 'taaa.i to oerr* a (*t
FVinaa oa tfeat roar a-nttea aefeaoea if any tf it on roar written defenaea, if anv i
DIAMOND
\ SMITH ROI
HA SMITH ROSIER
Mark s -*et
Kat PuM n 'le-->r;
A--
an a i
riAfe has
> are re-juired to serve a rap) I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRC. OF
FLORIDA. IN ANO FOR
DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO *4.;;>:-
ACTION FOR OISSOLa." ON
OF MARRIAGE
S KHAN.
H.An-i. p: : er.

HBLKN KHaN
-o.^nl*Til.
HE1 BN KHAN
S*l Kirur Jam* Pr*r*
ra..a ARE HEKKIY N
:-..

N:~CE -NDER
FrCTTTIOUt NAME LAW
***.*"* -it* lb* CM ft -r. XOTICB 18 HEREFT QIVKS that
i a! Coa~ of Dod> Coaaty FVoda. the aaotfaatAHd aaatriraT to oaaaaa
ia kaaiaio. aader tat
By PAl-L SHIFM.AN Miaaa FJor-
- ^^.3!**'*} :i """ r aaal aaaat ,:h --a- .- <-v
CKx SSSK.""0 "WAH of tfc* CknsBB Ooart AD -
aad KORXBUrx Dad> Coarty PV- v, .
Attoracra for PTNaNaIaL MIAMI Fi"oma'**
-TATB^ yg^.Wl i ,,
tfc* orariaaJ a-iik the clerk of
a*o>* rty>ed ooart oa or txfota Sop
teaahrr r :*T othoraia* a '
alB a* oatored aaaiaat yoa for tn*
rehef diaaaaffi il ia the i i aanliii I or
:-"
Th*a aetieo ar.ai: he mBBil once
oa<* oa*** for foar oaaaocativ* ae*L>
TUB JBWL an
WTTNES cy hand aad the aeal of
ad ooart at Mtaaa. Pior.Aa oa
Mh day of Aacaot :
r B.1INKKR
" Dade Onaaty. Florida
By C P CV>P
At Z-:-m:~ CVrk
. .- .ia.a.. aaaii ai .--- / Xt
lRE HEREBY NVTIFIED ,h,t ,n ; ''"-" '-" '' i
x,,'r. r.ajtr ha* Seen filed axain- ;
oeen fi.e.1 aa-atn.t v,-i ,r.i >" *r* rexjuirod to serve a f
yoar arltten defenaea if ^
DANIRL RETTER. \
a-h.-xw addr*v cr*J
t 111 N E Ind A Miaa*
In R.>ad78Miulo"M.aB ad file
!h* Boi _rd nir the ,h th* '*rK of '-
I tha ak~, SrtT*^/;^1^]
era-is. ., dofaall
'
i .t-is-s: c
P BRINKER
u- u-:
Dade Coa' -
By H HERMAN
" u I" art Seali
N M IMAM'
U JI1S.
A.t, r Prlii
*
iv
a- Daaata
l'.I N E S
Ploihai SJ1JS
I
NT Pet:-
I

auaAiai v.;-


Friday. August 30, 1974
MmM n^ridffur
Page Il-B
Pioneer Women
ipen New Season
Lnai Chapter of Pioneer Worn-
Lr will H"!d its opening meeting
bf the season Tuesday at 12:30
in the American Savi:;.;s
Sank, 1-00 Lincoln Rd- Pro^ram
nclude entertainment and
| merits, according to Ida
',".,, Is ky. president, and Bertha
Killer, financial secretary. Mem-
y.'s are urgad to bring prospec-
-embers.
Beba Molson Chapter will hold
L feting of the season
L Washington Fede.al Sav-
[ ,nk, L133 Normandy Dr..
ten, at noon, Wednes-
11. Miriam GingoM
past and future
I lie Gibson, piesident,
. ict the meeting.
> Chapter has schei-
I its I -i meeting of the sea-
Sept. 8. at 1 ;'.m. in
I ihington Federal at 1133
Dr.. according to
Y i '.,..>!. president. Harriet
incil president, win of-
ite al the installation of of-
Re reshments will I b
'-'embers and frien !3.
lis.eihocd Social For All
- " oli, HialesJl, has is-
::.. itatlon to al! ;>ersons
|: Jewish faith to join them
i social gathering in the
1 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
games ami refresh-
lents prior to the traditional
Jeachos service, which begins at
Dances Sponsored By
Dade-Broward Singles
The Young Professionals and
Professionals II are cosponsoring
a discotheque at The Lion's
Share. 18230 flW 2nd Ave.,
Noh_Miami Beach. Sunday at 8
p.m. and a live-band dance at
TJ.s, 3079 E. Commercial Blvd..
Fort I.aundcrdalj, Monday at
the same time.
The groups serve Dade and
Broward Counties singles in
their twenties, thirties and for-
ties. Marty Listowsky serves as
president.
Original Play Featured
An original play ca'led "The
Medic." starring The C.ada-
bouts" will be featured at the
opening meeting of t'-.e Sister-
hood of Temple Menorst) Tues-
ilay. Sept. 10. at l p.m. Members
i prospective members are in-
vited, according to Rose Banner,
president
Trent Art Forum Speaker
Jeffrey A. Tien', an explorer
of ait in nature" .-.ill be the
guest speaker at the monthly art
forum "f the Miami .'{each Art
Club, Inc., Tuesday. Sept 10. in
the Rotunda Room Of the Miami
Beach Public Library. Mr. Trent,
whose lecture begins at 7 m .
ires nit "A Visual Ai t F.x-
IKrier.i-e."
Accursio Seeks Election
Jos ; h Accursio, 54, a Home-
stead businessman who Ls run-
ning tor election to the School
Bua'.d. District 4. says he is
against forced busing. He is for
neighborhood schools and more
discipline In them and thinks it
aslble to o .t school taxes by
paring the school budget.
UCAl NOTKI
U6AL NOTKI
UGAl NOTKE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 74-5573
In RE: Estate ot
"TT' p MACUN
I'"''.......
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T>> All Creditor! and All Peraoni
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
Y'U ,ir.- hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may have against
the Mate of OTTO MACON, de-
eased late of Dade County, Florida,
t' the Circuit Judges of Dade County.
and file the same in duplicate an I as
provided iii Section 7SS.1S, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the CoUn-
urthouae In Dads Cob ntj Flor-
ida, within 4 calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
the ss me a 111 be barred,
IM I at Miami. Florida this 28th
da) of August. A.D. 1974
BANFORD B PAUNCB
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
da] of Augu.-t. IS74,
FAl'NCE FINK & FORMAN
\ ejrs for Executor and the Estate
s Building.
Miami, :':., .. il 12
S SO 9-6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 7422977
fN Ri: THE MAltltlage of
..
IN RZ: THE MAItKIAtiE OF
A,iriiKi(To .in.ii. fkiOn:. .....
Petition.:.
JCANA MARIA HIDAIvGO FRIOXI,
Kes,K>ndent.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TOD JUANA MARIA HIDA1AJO
FRIONI. Respondent, Alvarei Jonte
1278, Dept IC. Rueno!" Aires, Argen-
tina. ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED To
PILE your written response to this
action for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court, and
ervi a copy upon Petitioner's Attor-
neys, \ON ZAMPT .v.- SMITH. Suite
l K. 120 South Dixie Highway, Coral
i oil,1,-, Florida 3S1I-1. on or before
the 10th day of Sepi 1974, else the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
win be tal m at i rnfessed.
DATED Vl'O 9, 1974.
RICHARD I* I1RINKER
By: I. s I-RIETRO
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
g/ig-tS-30 *> ;
.
i; i<
M
VI-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ih tl
the u: di rslgned, desiring to engage In
business under th-* fictitious flame "f
VICCANTA IMPfiRTS at 17410 N.B.
;.'ii Court North Miami Beach, Flor-
ida ll tends to register said name
tl .....k ol the Circuit Court of
11 County, Florida
EMU i'> OOl DSTEIN
I VICCANTA 1MPORT3
BREUKR & SCHREIBEH
Attorneys fcr Appln
S 16-:T-Jn 3 C
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE :s HEREBY fHVEN that
undersigned, desiring lo engage
in hi; is under the fictitious na.....
MARTIN MOVERS: MARTIN
MOVING CO.: MARTIN STORAGE
MARTIN TRANSFER: MAR-
TIN'S LOCAL A. IONG DISTANCE
v.. >\ ING I O at 10342 N.W. Ifth Avi
Man.. !"' '"..it. intends to register
.. id m< >!!. the C srK of I lie i!lr-
cuit en'' Dade County Florida.
IH'WARD MARTIN
9 i 16-23-20
haul Saphire, 78. Author, Editor
Saul Saphire, 78. author of
is novels and short sto-
I -iish and Yiddish,
led A Ig, 13 in Mount Sinai Hos-
|: He came here two months
I : lived at 1329 Alton Rd.
Saj hire, a native of Vilna,
the Polish-Russian border,
J:*;e tn the United State-; in
K I tfl I settled in New York
. A graduate of Columbia
|- mann, Carl, d.d s o( Miami
.,-I'.TH
r8L | 70, of Miami Baa h
M imi D
u of Mlai
FR t, 8?. of Mis
-' erg
I- Jt. 4ynian 77, Of W
L
'- Miami i
-'.'-. m IMUi
iSWAN u-. S8, i f V
--E: | mi ....

*&*'-**% All n itatii
, **ru fAju.s8 in rm I1M
MHI'S,
Rancwi.,,,. ,K^mt
0SBM(*. -
865-2353
3 Stvmly f.itt Stml
tfU CM*i tVn
U.,-. 1,^,
Univei'sity, he sar\-ed as editor
of the Jewisli American Weekly
and was a featured bitlical-his-
todcol novehst for the "Daily
FoivvaiJ" in New York for the
! a>t 23 years
Survivors include his wife.
Bessie, son William, and two
indsons. Services were held
under the direction of Riverside
Cbai
3ARATZ
V81 \ M In Bd MB
lull -: < M
n I
Bu lei i Lev.
Hollywood. I
v :"
Sister ol
'
I- -' '
n mh. :
' '.n n
'
: mi: r the .
. at.', life I
MH Aux >
JWV, ,.'
, mlnR fr "' x
B
.-
.... tlverside Cl
i Mt. N.....
terv.
PALMER'S
HAMI MONUMENT COMPANY^ k
-M
ELKIN
I_____
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 74-21877
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
N RE The marrlaite ,>f
ERNES1 SBLLARS
Husband,
at] l
OIRLEY M SELLARS.
Wife
TOO GIRLEY M SELLARS, Route
Herndon Road, Durham. North
Carolina, are requireil to file vour
i it the petition for dissolution
of maniaffe with the Clerk of the
ab<)ve Court ami serve n oony thereof
U'm-:', the i" il ioner's attorney. Her-
Cohen Bsq, k.'l' s\v i~t Btreel
Miami, Florida S3180, on or before
Seul mber 1- 1^74. or else petition
., nfasaad
: Auk -. !S74.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By WU.I.IK HKADSHAW JR.
Deputy Clerk
s 9-18.28-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO 74-22019
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
: The Hurrt.ute of
CYNTHIA 1. SEABORN,
p< I Ition
-al I
TH( 'MAS N" SEABORN,
i,,.-o. denl
TO: Si'-l THOMAS N SEABORN
202-92-7425
B. Co.. 32nd 3
Ne Yorl New Yors '"""
TOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai m action for Dissolution if Mar-
riaKi hai been filed aaainst you, and
you ilred I n 1 of
l-oui ,-rlttei I" fenee w I r any
you have, on V ROBERT CARLISLE,
itl rney for tile Petitioner al [d-
dress: 299 Alhambra I !lr le. C la-
pi irlda SSI! I "n or bef re the
nth da) of Sepi 1974, ai d I the
(i'i, ti,. i ;, s of this i 'ourt.
before isrv......n Pel I oner -
:,.%. or ImtlMdl III ly ': -;,fter;
rwl e, a default will be en-ered
ngn i8i > i u for the reliel l-i-iaiitli-a
Pel Itlon
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this C urt on Aua 1 1974,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
a C'.erk if the uli Court
Bs R M K1S8BE
I l-U-M-SO
P1MOHAUZED MEWORIAJA
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUK WORKSHOP
444^r>2l-444<22
327* S.W.la ST. MIAMI
-^-S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY*
IN THE CIRC'.MT rotJRT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FlOR'DA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
(VII jfT'ON NO 74.''4745
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
r- MAB'lir.E
\ : uF:
j, ( ,i i .
Petit ,| ''n
ii i
.. : SC 'l '.
Wife
TO; i-\ SEA D ISCOUL
Rnrnes 8n ,
V, i!tl .:n. Mam I isetts
rOC ARE HER1
Mar-
ed as
. i: ulred l
, ... jr. to il
i- ii :: ; .:!"' 8P
for Pel h Iret
...
tfa ii ilnal with "
-) i urt oi
i 174;
.M an -' u "
the implalnt
Ol
ir ooi.....ive
|H I--1 ORID1 IN
W\> i
Mlam'. 1
f A 74,
:k.
,. i
. nutj I
'-
... ..
.

:
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN THE CIRCUIT rot'PT OF THE
eleventh judicial circuit of
flor'da. in and for
dade county
c'vil action no. 74-24573
action for dissolution
of marriage
in re: the marriagl of
ikk macker
A N"D
toi^aS Hormm
that an s i oration sr-
hai beei filed iralnst ) u and
^,,u are required i si rvs I copy or
"v.,ur written del ;, -. If ace. to \t 09
\VOI FSON AND DIAMOND. PA.,
. ... .. ,. .. ... iddress
the
' "'i., teahovt
. the ''''.. ni or ne!
pub
H
-
- .' ii '
nv
s
1 ''
I, ,. i' ,i: Plo '
'
I .... i"
;
ISS
''"A ?
'-...'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 72-6300
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL FI.EISHKIt. a. k/a
S^K^lsW1^^*
11. cased
CITATION (Publication)
THE STATE OF KUIRIDA:
TD: LILLIAN LIPOW8KY
151 Sea Sir.,-;
Qulncy, Massachusetts 02169
OERTRCDE FLEI8HER
.1711 Sci Street. Apartment
No. IM
Qulncy, Massachusetts 02169
and all other parsons concerned:
You are hereby notifi.-d that a
till, 'ti has I.e. n filed in said (ourt
praying for appointment nv
GIAHDIAN AD LITEM AND FOR
DETERMINATION OF BENEFICI-
ARIES .md you are harsh) required
( your written defi ireto
v, thin uiii t) laj iilti 1 the I ral pub-
;. itii n or posting 1 sie il ai i serve
a copy thereol upon petitioner's at-
y, whose name and tddi isa
SHAPIRl ', PRIED, WEIL a- 8CHEER,
107 Uncoln Road, Suite 10B, Miami
Beai ii. Florida 33139 If s u fail to do
. iidnni'-nt may be entered in due
course up. n the pi 'ition.
witness im hand ind 'he seal
of Bald oui t M 'ir v.
ic : 1974.
RH 'HARD P BRINK .. : -rk
By: NADINE S JENNINGS
Deuut) C
First publ shed .,1 ; ,,-. I in Augurt
lii 1!74
__________________________- ;.:.2:'-:ii> h 6
NOTICE OF AC" ON
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 74-22231
IN RE THE MARRIAO I '
D \NA V [QJ ESIAS, P r
and
ARTCRi l'",i ESIAS I ml
ACTION FOR DISSOLU-iON
OF MARRACE
Ar'.uro \il.
Edlflcin Siel raj sol !' thouaa
tui man
i ; i ., i. : le lo ''
1 ,,ra. 1 *, V'enezuel .
rOf ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an ad ilsaoli (Mai
riage has be n filed ana nsi s >u and
\ op 11.....qu red to servi ., opj 1 t
your written defenses if an3 I 1 II on
Al" '1 E' 1 Ki 'SS ,1 ; for Peti-
tioner, whose address s 101 n.w 12
w nue. Miami. Florida 3S128: 1 1
'..4-4".".",. and file the original with
lerk of the ab styled ourt on
or before Sepi ::', IS74: rtherwtaa a
default vk 1! 1 be entered agalnsl ram for
the relief d.nia teled ill the mil I I
or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecuth 1 weeks
in THE JEWISH FLOR.'DIAN.
witness m> )-.i\,'i and iaaj of
kid curt at Miami. Florida OB thin
5th dav of August. 1974
KU'H.AKD !' BRINKER
As 1 "lerk Iroull 1 'ourt
i., 'e 0 un'\'. FI01 da
Bj B ..' '
As Deputi cierk
(Clr.-ui! Court B
Adolfo K E.-ouire
1 ">! N u. 12 Avenue
Miami. Florida S8121 I-4S58)
Attorney for Petitioner
g/p.l<-SS-Sfl
TO:

IN
MIAMI
BEACH ',

CcjIIJEf (arson 1-7677
tVNEXAL HOUB ,
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
Edwcrd T. Ngwmon, F.D.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAt HOME
eON$EVTlM
T rtnr
'
____.
-: l riDER
Pl )US NAME LAW
I
NANDEZ

-. >T'ca oc &c~"N
r-.~ '. E SSRVIC6
,n pe,-lTCB-v
u THK CIRC "ri;T ~ "l-,~
BLBVBNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
c CTn* IN AND POF,
CIPf *"
C'vn r"iON v"1 "'- '
ACTION FOR D'SSOLUT'ON
C NIA^^'AGE
' '
Husl
ra,
-
r d .
r



-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT ON NO. 74-IS321
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE E MAKRIA<1I!
Ai ICIA MENDEZ, V -.oner
a ml
S MEN! EZ
Hu- .. I -
Tl: VA IS!
n
\ riED
Mar-
you and
i-.. ed l of
n
/. A N l
, itton
,. ii
.-.:'.'
i- ,
- thi al or

, led In the

VVl v ESS n 1 '1 Of
Miam it'is
- 74
i:i>
.v I ",. t. Oil
i : .III .V "
By 1 -'
\ mj
lit Coun

I- "
in
" g.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open [very Day C/eied" Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
c-..
FIC'plT IUS NAME LAW
NOT ''
\^S' '' :' ''''
"'. ......" of
ni Court of Dad* < unty,
' ""''a JACK A RON R-
STLAHT BERNSTEIN 5"*v
b/23-30 9/0-13
.





1
\ -'
- ,
, ,,,. BADBR, B8QS
4..' 1 ic i
Menu II-., h Flor la JS139
tor Petitioner
5:,8-T3" S/30 ITMMI
IN THE CI1CLIIT CO'JRT IN AND
FCR DADE COUN~V. F-ORIDA
IN Pfi-BATE DIV SON
no. 74.5043 (Barker)

' -
NOTICE TO Cl T ".PS
N I
1
u r-
!S dc-
i
I
n
i
\ ,'
Fi-- on
the 23rd 197*.
HAI I. PA.
Alto: fey for EX* UtriX
5th Floor Dade Federal nid*.
Miami Florida 33131 g/as-je


Page 12-tf
*JtWc# RnrHlrtr
Friday' August 30 '
30, 197,
Food Fairs Big Variety of Fine Quality Foods
ALL FOOD MARKETS CLOSED LABOR DAY
FOOD FAIR, DIPLOMAT MALL, HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD., WILL BE OPEN 9 to 6
FOOD
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A' FRESH ICED
FRYER
QTRS.
LEGS
BREASTS
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A' FUJSH ICED
FRYER
PARTS
89
WHOLE BREASTS
WITH RIBS
WHOIE LEGS
THIGHS
DRUMSTICKS
GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN
TURKEY
DRUMSTICKS
49e
OR
WINGS
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN BEEF ROUND
BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST
USDAt
CHOICE]
$1
LB. I
59
U.S. CHOICI WESTERN EF CHUCK
Shoulder Pot Roast BONLISU$159
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN BEEF CHUCK
Under Blade Roast......... $1"
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN
BEEF CHUCK
BLADE STEAK.
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN
Beef Brisket
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN
Beef Rib Steak...^"^.j$1M
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN REEF ROUNO
Bottom Round Steak lb. 1"
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
PRICES EFFECTIVE FROM DATE OF PUBLICATION
THRU SUNOAY. SEPTEMBER lit
AT AIL FOOD FAIR STORES.
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
FRUITS & VEGETABLES
DISPLAYED IN GREAT VARIETY TO MAKE YOUR CHOICE
EASY AND TO YOUR COMPLETE SATISFACTION!
FREESTONE
PRUNE PLUMS
23c
LB.
TANCY
Vusi
(cho
SDA
CE
.LB.
99
WHOLE OR
POINT HALF
TENDER
l. $159 Sliced Beef Liver l.M09

AJAX
CLEANSER
10
C 14-02.
CAN

P. P. BRAND
Charcoal Briquets
20 &$ 1*
LIMIT 2 CANS. PLEASE, WITH OTHER PURCHASES OF $7
OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
WHITE
LEISURE
WAY
LIMIT ONE BAG. PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES OF $7
OR MORE, EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
California Lemons.....1 69*
ADOS ZEST TO SALADS g
Endive or Escarole.................head 29*
U.S. NO. 1 BAKING
POTATOES
5 & 69<
HEALTHFUL AND GOOD
Acorn Squash.............................L, 15s
UNSWEETENED FRESHIE -
Grapefruit Juice IJ3HT 89c
EXTRA LARGE
Freshie Prunes '8b? 65*
MUSHROOMS
FLAVORFUL i
NUTRITIOUS
98
ITES 1 SO D >AS
FKC. OF 100 P.P. BRAND 4 ALL L FLAVORS t B [ 12-OZ CANS
BANQUET FROZEN
Chicken :< Basket
GREAT FOR DIPS
Chipos....................................
BORDENS
Chunk Longhorn Cheese
12-OZ.
..PKG.
93'
HEINZ
OZ
PKG
Kosher Dill Pickles 3# 75c
AUSTRIAN IMPORTED
Sliced Swiss Cheese 6PKCZ 69c
CHEFS
FRIENDSHIP
Creamed Cottage Cheese cup 65
LES CAL YOGURT
P P FRAND
Sour Cream
PINT
CONT
OR BORDENS
ALL
FLAVORS
8-OZ.
CUPS
Frozen Cheese Pizza 3Sf 99c
BOSTON FROZEN t. ..
Bonnie Perch Fillets...........SBTM"
BURNY MOTHERS ^j*.
Frozen Mini Danish !$' 89e
Seftoicc AftjutefVi'Defit.
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING SERVICE COUNTERS
ALL LUNCH MEATS t CHEESE SLICEO TO ORDIRI
HALF
LB.
Tfom&nfrdGaJUdtfauU! *pn46 Seafaxd QeM
P. P. BRAND HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog Rolls
37*
AVAILABLE ONLY AT STORES HAVING
SEAFOOD SERVICE COUNTERS
MACKEREL
Salami or Bologna
7*e
Cooked Corned Beef S? 79e
CAR* *4i%
Freshly Smoked Sable "
DELICIOUS _||C
Rice Pudding................................lb 59
AMERICAN
KOSHER
LEAN
FRESH
BAKED
PKG.
OF 8
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
55
NORWEGIAN ^ifc
Jarlsberg Cheese T W
RICH'S
LB.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. ALL CLERICAL, TYPOGRAPHIC. PHOTOGRAPHIC AND PRINTING ERRORS ARE SUBJECT
Dark Meat Turkey & 89*
TO CORRECTION. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS.


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