The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02370

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
^Jewish Flomdian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
lume 47 Number 27
Miami. Florida Friday, July 5, 1974
s*.- by Mail
Two Sections
Price 25 cents
I
abin Concedes Palestine Federation
LONDON (JTA) Israeli Premier Yitzhak Ra-
told a gathering of Anglo-Jewish leaders here that
lis living along the northern borders will never
idon their homes because of Arab terrorism.
("They (the settlers) will not yield their position in
[face of terrorist activity," he declared.
RABIN, during his address at the breakfast meeting
of members of the governing bodies of all Anglo-Jewish
organizations, a bo stressed that "above the party strug-
gle, of which you hear so much, there is Israel, united
and determined to assure the Jewish future."
Earlier, Rabin, who came to London to take part in
a one-day meeting of the Socialist International, con-
ceied to newsmen that a lasting peace in the Middle
East must include plans for a Palestinian settlement.
But he ruled out categorically the possibility of a
separate Palestinian state on the West Bank of the Jor-
dan "as a time bomb."
"EGYPT IS the key country," Rabin said, adding
that Cairo determines the posture of the Arab world
Continued on Page 8-A
REMAINS DEAF TO DISSIDENTS ON HIS RUSSIAN TOUR
Congressional Anter... 3-A
45,000 Jews to Leave Annually? ... 11-A
ixon Signs to Convert Israel Credit to Grant
MSKHT INTO BMAl POIICf STAJl
President Should
Be Reading New
Solzhenitsyn Book
By Special Report
IOSCOW President Nixon
no heed to the hunger strike
glared here Sunday by Andrei
larov, the Soviet Union's fa-
of the hydrogen bomb.
ikharov announced that he
Id take nothing but mineral
r until the President took
cognizance of nis strike joined
by other dissidents, Jewish and
non-Jewish, protesting Moscow's
treatment of those declaring
their desire to leave for Israel
and other countries.
INSTEAD. Nixon continued to
engage in conversation with
Communist Party Chief Leonid
Brezhnev and other Soviet lead-
ers on strategic arms limitation
talks, fears over the prolifera-
tion of MERV missiles (multi-
ple warheads) and economic
agreements that would give the
Soviet Union U.S. technical as-
sistance, cheap credit, and sev-
eral billions of dollars in trade
arrangements.
The talks were held here and
Continued on Page 6-A
INSISTS US. AH ACHED HO CONDITIONS
'eres Reveals Plans on Planes
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense Minister
limon Peres said on his return from the U.S.
it he had found an attitude of sympathy and
Mei standing toward Israel's military and eco-
mic needs at his meetingi with Administration
Congressional leaders in Washington.
He insisted that the U.S. attached no con-
tions to future Israeli arms purchases and de-
inded no further Israeli concessions or terri-
rial withdrawals in return for military aid.
PERES SAID he did not believe the U.S.
would sell arms to the Arab States. He observed
that U.S. arms sales to Egypt would only open
up competition with the Soviet Union with the
result of increased tension in the region.
The Defense Minister disclosed that Israel
would purchase American F-14. 15, 16 and 17
combat aircraft which he described as the best
answer to the new Soviet MIG-23 that the
Russians have begun supplying to Syria.
Schlesinger Outlines
Aid to Israel Details
SECRETAtr SCHMSINGH
' siioble imbalance'
i
INS Drags
Feet On
Ex Nazis
WASHING! ON (JTA) Rep.
Elizabeth Holtzman (D., N.Y.)
declared here that the reply
from the Immigration and Nat-
uralization Service to her charges
("confirms" her analysis that the
irNS has "failed to conduct a
thorough, result-oriented investi-
gation" of alleged Nazi war
criminals living in the United
States.
"It appears," she asserted in a
Continued on Page 15-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of Defense James R.
Schlesinger said here that the
need for a long-range U.S. mili-
tary assistance program for Is
rael stems from Israel's concern
for her security based on the
"relationship" of diplomatic and
political processes taking place
and military activities.
As a result of the Yom Kippur
War and the territorial with-
drawals by Israel in disengage-
ments with Egypt and Syria,
Schlesinger told the. Senate Ap-
propriations Subcommittee for
Foreign Operations, Israel's pre-
vious reliance on superior train-
ing of her personnel and cohe-
sion of forces "must be recon-
sidered."
SCHLESINGER, responding to
questions from subcommittee
chairman Daniel Inouye (D.,
Hawaii) said there was no "size-
able imbalance" at present in the
military strength between Israel
and her Arab neighbors.
Pointing to the Israeli with-
drawals in the Suez and Golan
Heights and "prospects of fur-
ther disengagement" in the Suez
sector, Schlesinger said "this
would reduce the territorial pro-
tection relied upon by Israel.
"The Israelis may regard addi-
tional equipment compensatory
for the loss of territory in the
disengagements," Schlesinger
said.
ADJUSTMENT of levels of mil-
itary equipment for the long
term is to "provide Israel with
confidence that somewhere in
the world there will be a sup-
plier of equipment. These larger
political objectives form the ba-
sis of our policy" to provide con-
tinued security for Israel, Schle-
singer said.
Israel Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres has been in Washing-
ton meeting with top U.S. offi-
cials, including Schlesinger, on
Continued on Page 9-\
By JOSEPH ALSOP
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
WASHINGTON Along with
his vast briefing papers, one
hopeo that President Nixon's lug-
gage for Moscow includes "The
ig Archipelago" by Alexan-
der Solzhenitsyn.
For obvious reasons having to
do with the sources of current
American fashions, this is begin-
ning to be an unfashionable
book. Vet it is a great book, a
turning-point book.
MORE THAN that (and this is
why President Nixon needs tl
have it along) this book tells yo'i
a lot more than you might gath-
er from its subject, which is the
Soviet Union's unimaginable rec-
ord as a brutal police state.
By implication, but maybe
without intention, the astonish-
ing Solzhenitsyn has also spoken
volumes about the nature of the
historical process in the 20th cen-
tury.
Of course, there is the ques-
tion whether historical phenom-
ena can be statistically measured.
It is the same question cur-
rently raised by the much more
questionable but important new
work on slavery in the United
States, "Time on the Cross." by
R. W. Fogel an.i S. L. Engerman.
YET NO humane man can read
Solzhenitsyn's heavily document-
ed, totally heart searing facts
and figures without reaching a
most unsettling conclusion.
The Russian people would be
Continued on Page S-A
ADD TO WAR Of NERVES

..!/.>,_____
AlFXANOFff SOIZHIN'TSVN
he hot spoken volumes
N.Y. Eyes
Fuentes
Proceeding
NEW YORK (JTA) A
spokesman for the State Human
Rights Commission said that fur-
ther closed hearings will be held
in an effort to conciliate a dis-
pute involving charges that Luis
Fuentes. superintendent of Com-
munity School District One in
Manhattan, had abetted anti-Se-
mitic abuse in one of the dis-
trict's schools.
The charges were made
Continued on Page 2-A
Raids May Delay Geneva
JERUSALEM (JTA) Po-
litical sources here are concern-
ed that the extreme reaction by
Arab leaders to Israel's bombing
of terrorist bases in Lebanon
may delay the start of the Ge-
neva peace conference scheduled
for autumn.
Statements last week by Arab
political leaders, as well as com-
We'U Control Terrorists Rabin .
Israel Blames Lebanese... 8-A
Maalot Committee Report... 15-A
2 A
ments in the leading Arab news-
papers, are seen here as part of
a war of nerves intended to
soften Israel's position before
the next round of talks begin.
THE SOURCES Indicated hat
the talks were scheduled to re-
sume in Geneva in the autumn
after a period of relaxation in
the Middle East which would
Continued on Page 11-A


1'
N
'
l!
Page 2-A
+Jeltnaridnar
Friday Tnty 5, 1974
If Lebanon Can't, We Will... f
l By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin declared
here that Israel holdi Lebanon
responsible for the murderous
attack in N'ahariyah.
In a special statement to the
Knesset, he promised that Israel
would continue to take action to
protect its citizens from such
attacks in the future. Before the
Premier's statement, the Knes-
set stood in silence in memory of
the four Israelis killed in N'aha-
riyah June 25.
INFORMATION Minister Aha-
ron Yariv told a press conference
after the Knesset meeting that
Israel had no doubt that Leba-
non couid. if it wished, take ef-
fective steps to curb infiltrations
by terrorists.
If it could not. then let it ab-
dicate its rights and duties and
Israel would take over the coun-
try, Yariv said.
But he said Lebanon could act.
c peciaiiy if Arab states, partic-
ularly Egypt and Syria, support-
ed Beirut in cracking down on
terrorists.
YARIV ADMITTKD that bor-
ders eannot be hermetically
tied, and steps to prevent ter-
rorism cannot be completely ef-
fective. But he said there was a
difference between taking >uch
steps, as Lebanon has done in
the past, and doing nothing as
Lebanon was doing now
Israel will not 'sit back and
wait.' Yariv said, but wi,I do
everything "we can to protect
FILLING IN
our citizens by every means we
consi lei appropriate."
He would not give any details
but indicated that the bombings
of terrorist bases in Lebanon
would resume.
The NtthariyaJ) raid, carried
out by eatah commandos, proved
Israel's thesis that there was no
es ential iffeieece between 'the
so-called "moderate" faction led
by Ya sir Arafat and the "ex-
tremists" led by Dr. George Ha
bash. Jibril and others, Yariv
maintained.
ALL wi.rfi: in fad extremists
aimed at eliminating the State of
Israel, disagreeing on'.y over tac-
tics, he said.
As a result of the continuing
terrorist raid-. Ya i\ sai I, Israel
has to ask whether the Arab
states which signed tin lertakin i
to seek a .iust and durable peace
through negotiations were sin-
cere in the : intentions and
whether I>rae! should believe
their signatures or the threats
made in Cairo and Damascus
against [artel following the Is-
raeli raids on the terrorist bases
in Lebanon.
Yariv said if the Arabs were
New York Probes
Fuentes Case Bias
Continued from Page 1A
against Fuentes. who had been
accused of anti-Semitism two
years ago when he was named
superintendent, and against Al-
len Boone, principal of Junior
High School 22, by Five assist-
ant principals at the school.
JEAN MacPHERSON, the
State Human Rights regional di
rector, has notified both side:,
that on the basis of closed hear-
ings this spring, there was "prob- ,
able cause" for a public hearing
into the charges.
The five assistant principals
had charged that Fuentes re- .
fused to investigate and act on '
what they said were incidents oi
anti-Semitic abuse at a C'omniu
nity School Board meeting at
meetings with the junior high
school Parents Association, am
in the school.
They udd the Incidents had
been occurring since July 19,
1973.
The complainants are Leonard
Lui it. Jack Levine, Arthui
Kaufman. Philip Levitus
Paul Flaumenhaft.
JACK M SABLE, the S
Human Runt- I i issioner
inclusions of thi
gional dir -ctor did not constitnti
a finding of sum against I lien
t''.- and Boone.
The spokesman sal 1 concilia
lion efforts would be madi to
en i the dispute by some form
a Fuentes j
Boone and the Bve complainants
If th'i-e fail id, he aald,
scale public hearings would :;
be held on the charges.
A number of Jewish and othc:
groups have charged thai Pneti
tea made anti Semitic itatem ints
and shirred other ethnic
while serving earlier ;,. a princi-
pal in the t.inner Oeean-H:.
Brownsville demonstration school
district in Brooklyn.
HE WAS cleared of th 0
charges last April by Vincent
Broderick. a former New York
City Police Commissioner who,
was named a hearing officer b)
the then New York City School
Chancellor Harvey Scribner to
examine the charges that Fuen
tes was anti-Semitic and unfit to
serve as School District One Su-
perintendent.
unwilling tc control the terror-
ists this made their declaration
on intentions to seek peace in-
sincere.
IF THEY were unable to con-
trol the terrorists, this meant a
peace settlement would be worth
less since the terrorists could
destroy it, he said.
Yariv said Israel's interest in
reaching a peaceful settlement
was sincere, but Israel had to
judge its neighbors by their act.-.
not only by their words and sig-
natures.
Yariv said that since the dis-
engagement agreement was sign-
ed, Lebanon has become the o.e
jumping off pom; for terror!
He said there was no mil.ca
tion that Syria was continuing
its forme: practice of aiding the
terrorists with Syrian regain
and irregular troops and equip
ment including anti-aircraft mis-
siles.
Meanwhile, some Israel:
source- see the Ns uu yah attack
and the shelling of Kiryat
Sin men., a; an attempt by the
Pale:tinian terrorist organiza
til r.s to drag Israel and the Arab
states into an escalation of fight
in.:, sabotaging the pea efforts
Regardli -- of this, the Israeli
public was outraged and was de
manding action
Premier Rabin also said thei.i
WU now sufficient indication i
that the recent terroi ae;.- wcr I
meant to jeopardize the "positive :
trends" which developed after'
the disengagement accords. He
said that was why the terrorist
were "using the complex polit
ical structure of Lebanon and the
weak will of the Lebanese gov-
ernment They are calling for an
all-Arab solidarity and want to
seive as ignitors of a spread uu
flame." Warning there was no
way to stop the terror quickly,
he said the fight against terror
will continue no matter how ion.
it will last."
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Won't you help the Home today by contributing items '
for resale at the Thrift Shop? !
Do you have furniture, appliances, bedding, cameras, I
clothing, sporting goods or any other saleable mer- '
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Do you know someone, a friend or a neighbor, who is
redecorating? Perhaps a hotel, an apartment house.
Tell them about our Thrift Shop.
Douglas Gardens has serious financial needs since 65
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Just phone 66-210T and a range for our truck to pick
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And remember contributions to the Thrift Shop
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i
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staff thank you.
AARON KRAY1T2
MJHHA Vice President
Chairman
Thrift Shos Committee
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L Friday,
Friday, July 5, 1974
* Jmisli Fkrktt&ri
Page 3-A

Must' Reading for Nixon: Solzhenitsvii
!
.CjoBiimfrtl from Page 1-A
jniiwnTsnrafcty better off today if
the revuJuUun of 1917 bad some-
how failed to take place. Czarist
autocracy *s pale, feeble,
downnsht comfortable system
compared fo the bloodstained So-
\iet tyranny.
Consider, here, a few figures.
Under the rule of the czars in
he 60 years from 1826 to 1906,
the death penalty was ordered
for a tctal of 1,397 persons of
whom more than 500 had their
sentences commuted or managed
to escape.
BUT IN the two years 1937-38,
Solzhenitsyn argues that "the su-
preme measur." *;.> taken
ilnst w;raiAh(-re between 1
and 1.6 million-
;
As to p> n, i$, it is
ti i'-..' Su.2:.c:!.:-. :.
side by side with thai rare but
remarkable boo:-:, the first
v .-man's "Siberian Piis-
cn System."
Kinnan shocked all of later
19th-century Euupe v.;:h this ac-
count.
Yel in two years, he managed
to visit a large majority of all
the political prisoners in exile or
in prison; and the tctal in that
wicked czarist time was well un-
der 1,000.
',*'
Congress Angered
By Red Repression
<
7
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Congressional anger rose here
over Soviet repression of Jewish
activists seeking the right to emi-
grate to Israel on the eve of Pres-
ident Nixon's visit to Moscow for
summit talks.
' Twenty Senators co-signed a
cable to the President urging
him to protect to Soviet author-
ities and to "publicly reject these
repressive tactics."
THI CABLE, drafted by Sen.
Walter Mondale i D., Minn.', de-
clared that the wave of arrests
and beatings of Jews in princi-
I ^1 S( viet cities over the pre
ion- week constituted "an ap-
patting beginn.ng for a visit that
is aimed al improving U.S.-Soviet
K .. tions and easing tenaii
In a separate Sen
Hubefl ii Humphrey .-.. I thi srTesta and harassments
in advaeee it were-."jBi-affi"ftnt to the United
StatejL and .sevesaly detrimental
to the eaur7 of" detente which
this trip is designed to advance."
- Sen.- Humphrey too urged
Nixon "to express officially
American disapproval of these
acts which violate the basic prin-
ciples of human rights."
~: Rep. Jonathan Bingham (D.,
NY), wrote the President to
".protest this dragnet against So-
viet citizens" and to immediate
JJ- ask in Moscow "not only those
arrested Soviet Jews be released
but also that they be allowed
to meet with him during his
Visit."
: SEN. HARRISON A. Williams
(D. N.J.), urqed the President
to "take a strong stand'' in fa-
pror of free emigration for Jews
and others in the Soviet Union
during his talks in Moscow.
etary of State Henry A.
^ ^JkissJnger, asked for a descrip-
^.// lion of the Soviet position on
Jewish emigration, said at a press
conference before leaving with
the President that "it is a very
delicate and sensitive subject."
He said the U.S. had taken
the position of pursuing the
dialogue on the issue in a way
that would not put it in "a pre-
cise legal form" between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union.
SOURCES HERE told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency that
senatorial discussions with Kis-
singer, involving Senators Henry
Jackson. Jacob Javits and Abra-
ham Ribicoff, centered on the
level of Soviet Jewish emigration
and the nature of reported assur-
ances the Soviet govt was
prepared to give on rock emigra-
tion.
THE MILLIONS of po
prisoners in Josef Stalin's more
progres-.ve time havi never been
.....U Ij <-":.- ated although
bert Conquest has put forward
an indicative figure that has-not
b:en effectively challenged.
During Statin's tenoi a.one
foi :he new horrors
f:er Woilii War II Conquest
has said that about 20 million
Russians died under the harh
hand of the Soviet state, mostly
in the prison camps.
THE HORRIBLE czarist pro-
grams were also surpassed by
what was inflicted in the war or.
the Crimean Tartars, the Che
chen-lngush people, the Volga
Germans, the Latvians and the
Estonians. In addition, one can
hardly say that anti-Semitism
has been banished from the mod-
ern Soviet Union.
Meanwhile, most of the other
minority peoples above listed,
torn from their homelands over a
quarter-century ago, remain in
forcible Siberian exile to this
day.
But one could go on in this
manner for a very long time.
There is no need to do so, how-
ever, to make the really relevant
points.
FIR>T OF ALL, President
Nixon ought to be taking "Gulag
Archipelago" along, and reading
it with great care, too, for the
simplest of all possible reasons
In brief, from the President's
friend 'ieneral Secretary Leonid
Kiev on down, every single
existing leader of thi Soviet
e-nment actively, enthusiastically
cc.laborate i in Stalir.'s terror
and its fearful postwar aiter-
math.
any one of : I not
done so, he c^uld|npt be at the
top today. 'And ail these men
bavi joined to perpetuate the
grim police machinery that Sta-
lin Used; and they are using it
themselves today, albeit on a
somewhat lesser scale.
SECONDLY, every one of the
rest of us ought to read "Gulag
Archipelago" and not only be-
cause it is a great book. We
ought to read this book, in fact,
because it tells us something we
need to know.
For reasons one cannot exact-
ly understand, the historical
rrcccs- in the 20th century has
ir.e infinitely more cruel,
more bloodstained, more danger-
ous than it ever was in the sim-
pler rast.
You have only to remember
that besides Josef Stalin our cen-
tu.y has seen Adolf Hitler and a
good many more of the same
stripe.
YOl HAVE only to add up the
casualty lists. The contrast is
striking with the worst horrors
of the past.
This is important for all Amer-
icans to know, too; for it is dif-
ficult, in this fortunate country,
to believe that history is either
dangerous or cruel. God help us
if we no not learn from experi-
ence.
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i
!
Page 4-A
+JmisHk.rktiar
rriday July 5. 1974
p
An Expensive Choice
President Nixon's signing of basic economic agree-
ments with the Soviet Union at the same time that dissi-
dents and Jewish activists in the Soviet Union are being
mercilessly repressed does not speak well for him or us.
We have a long and well-documented history of
opposition to Russian oppression that reflects admirably
on the American heritage of freedom.
It makes a mockery of President Nixon's position
voiced at Annapolis last month that the Soviet Union's
treatment of its nationals is an "internal matter" about
which we have no right to voice an opinion.
Perhaps the most august illustration that the President
is wrong was President Theodore Roosevelt's rupture of
relations with Czarist Russia in the wake of the dastardly
Kishinev pogroms.
President Roosevelt's action was this country's way of
telling Czar Nicholas that a freedom-loving America will
not do business with a benighted, bigoted, dictatorial gov-
ernment
President Nixon had an opportunity to do the same
thing in Moscow last weekend even more so. Never
have the Soviets, suffering from lack of technological
know-how, wanted American trade, assistance and cheap
credit (a commodity not even the ordinary American
citizen can get these days) more than now.
The President might easily have reminded Leonid
Brezhnev of this. There was little "danger" Brezhnev would
turn a cold shoulder to the reminder. Beggars can't be
choosers.
But in the Nixon lexicon, we seem to be the beggars
and the Soviets the choosers, although it is we who have
what they want.
The Nixon sell-out of human rights is something all
of us will pay for dearly in the years ahead.
Self-Defeating Action
The action taken by the Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica during its convention here to move against a growing
incidence of intermarriage and the alienation of Jewish
youth from Judaism is welcome by all observers of the
scene who have been worried about these social phenom-
ena ior a long time.
We commend the RCA for its creation of a committee
of scholars that will work on the problem.
But somehow, the convention's action fails to square
with the spirit in which it met.
Even before the Orthodox rabbis sat down for then-
ce liberations, the RCA had hurled cccusations against
leaders of the Conservative end Reform movements for
trying to "blackmail" the State of Israel.
What Rabbi Louis Bemstein, who made the chcrgs,
rnecr.t was that Conservative and Reform Jews are mak-
ing their financial support of Israel conditional on Israel's
lefusal to accept Orthodox Jewry's demand for changes in
the s:cte's Law o: Return.
-v
Bickering Wastes Energy
We don't intend taking issue on this thomy internecine
struggle whether Rabbi Bernstein is right in his charga
or Rabbis Alexander M. Schindler and Wolfe Kelman,
who responded in defense of the Reform and Conservative
movements, respectively.
It is our position in this regard that no matter what
measure of personal sacrifics we are called upon to make
in the cause of Israel, it can never be as great as the
sacrifices that the Israelis themselves are making.
We are being asked for our spirit and our substance,
not our blood, which the Israelis have shed four times
now during the past quarter-century to defend their right
to exist as a nation among nations.
It is also our position that such sacrifices as we make
do not entitle us to interfere in the governmental processes
of the State of Israel, which are matters of uniquely Israeli
concern.
So that, in the end, the charges hurled by Rabbi
Bernstein cloud the far more important issues with which
the RCA convention dealt. They force energetic response
by other branches of Jewry that might better be directed,
for example, toward a resolution of the problem enun-
ciated by the special committee of scholars that will look
into intermarriage and the alienation of Jewish youth.
If there is a genuine concern for the fate of American
Jewry, which no one can deny is inextricably tied to the
fate of Israel, then that is fcr more important than bicker-
ing among the movements cbout Israeli political problems
that are not or should not be within their province anyway.
US. Joins the Red Oppressors
A COUPLE or months back,
when Alcxandr Solzhenytsin
was exiled from the Soviet
Union, a number of readers pil-
loried me for venturing to say
that Solzhenytsin is a second-
rate novelist.
His excellence. I suggested, lies
in what in America we call the
"new journalism" and also his
great courage.
IN THE first instance. I coir
pared him to Norman Mailer
Mailer's phenomenal energy: his
lightning speed output; his ptn-
chant for meticulous investiga-
Mindlm
five reporting with an editorial
eye on philosophic social criti-
cism; his beginings as a novelist
which somehow never fulfilled'
their grand artistic promise, only
a propagandistic need.
In the second instance. I com-
pared Solzhenytsin's courage to
the courage of those political ac-
tivists and dissidents who re-
mained behind in the Soviet
Union to continue their rhetoric
of no their attack on Soviet
oppression at the cost of their
j..i safety and, in fact, their lives.
In retrospect, if anything, it
seems even clearer than before
that as for his first excellence,
well, the new journalism io>es
its punch thrown second-hand. In
the splendor of bourgeois isola-
tion, you can only ruminate.
AS FOR THE second, the
question of his courage: Having
since settled in Switzerland. Sol-
zhenytsin can no longer -claim to
be in the dangerous middle of
things despite his brave deilara-
tions that he lias not aetiied in
Switzerland at allthat be keeps
up his ties with the Soviet Union
via the mails and telephone, and
that he expects in any rase to
return there as soon as' practical.
The truth is that his corruscat-
ing attack on Soviet oppression
in "Gulag Archipelago has
meaning mainly because he re-
searched it and wrote it while
living in the threatening shadow
of the Kremlin.
He senses this. He recognizes
that his exile has diminished his
punch, which would not be true
if he were really a first-rate
novelist rather than a first-rate
journalist, and that is why he
declares his determination to re-
turn, although the likelihood of
that is near-zero.
WHAT HE will do in the fu-
Continurd on Page 12 A
S
'?
JAILERS SUBJECTED HIM TO INHUMAN TORTURE
Soviet Survives Prison Torture
By ARNOLD BRlNER
The ordeal Yaakov Khantsis
suffered be^.nnin^ on May 18.
1969. was mild compared
the one which awaited him fol-
lowing his announcement that he
wanted to move to Israel.
On July 19. IQ72. after two
years of impiis.nment. Khantsis
was back in the Kiron region,
one? again confined to a prison
dungeon.
He demanded to see the au-
thority in charge of documents
to learn what charges had been
laid against him.
On August 2. he began bang-
ing on his cell door, demanding
to see the official. At a signal,
he said, six men burst into his
cell and handcuffed his hands
behind his back. They then forc-
ed his legs under him and tied
his ankles to his wrists, effecting
what he described as the "swal-
low" position.
HIS JAILERS thrust their
weight suddenly down on his
legs, sending excruciating pain
through his lower body. Then
they lifted him and repeatedly
banged his head against some
metal part of the cell.
Finally', they threw him on the
floor and departed. He estimates
that he was left for two hours,
trussed up, dazed, and bleeding.
before he was untied. The follow-
ing morning, when he tried to
rise, his legs collapsed under
him.
"I thought I wju. weak because
of the poor prison diet," he said,
i could not get up from the
floor for six more days. Then on
Aug. 9, when I was able with dif-
ficulty to walk, they took me by
train to another place for inter-
rogation.
MORE THAN five months aft-
er his re-arrest. Khantsis learn-
ed the charge against him. "They
accused me of fascism," he said.
During five days of questioa-
THIS IS Part II of a three-
part -erie, on the 'treat-
ttt" of dissident J
seek.ng exit from the So-
viet t'nion. In particular, it
is the unbelievable story of
the inhumanity meted out to
yaakov Khantsis who was
imprisoned on May 18. iy70.
.'or publicly declaring that
be wanted to emigrate to Is-
rael.
|
|
i
ing. he refused to talk b,-cause
he noticed that everything he
said was being written down. On
the fifth day. he collapsed. He
lay unconscious for 10 days, and
was then returned to his cell.
NEARLY SIX weeks later, on
September 27. 1972, Yaakov
Khantsis was carried into court
on a stretcher to face Soviet
justice. His wife, whom he had
not seen in six months, was call-
ed as a witness. She was asked
if the wished to go to Israel.
- all we want.** she told
Court, and threaten d to
cau-e an uproar if her "riband
were m ; release i.
The court duly pronounced
Khantsu f anti-Sov:et ac-
tivity under Article 190 of the
Criminal Code and ordered h:s
imprisonment, again under
"strict regime" for two years.
HE WAS re turned to a solitary
basement cell in the Kirov re-
gion, ills place of confinement
sisted of four stone walls and
a cement floor. There was no
furniture, except a narrow bed"
attached to one wall in fact, a
ban- board During the day, dim
lisht penetrated through an air
vent. There were no windows, no
light bulb, and no heat.
The diet consisted of 400
grams of bread and watery soup,
every second day. "Every other
day was a fast day,' Khantsis
said wryly.
He did not use the bed. He
Continued oa Page 7-A
Y
/;
^
^Jewish Flor idian
UTICE and PI^NT no N.E. th Sneer Telethon. J7J-U03
PO Box 297J. Miami. Flomda 13101
Pm K- Shochit
Www and Publisher
Leo Mindun
AhocvjW Editor
Selma M. Thompson
Asjijunt to Pubhshn
W Tfi M.rchlnd.M Advdftl*** In |U CiWmni
rtilUUtwrj FmJav 19:7 by 7h< Jeu-ish Floruh*
Second Claw Portare Paid at Miami, Pla.
--------------------* ^m,,h w*wPP*r. and th. rioHd. Mm AMecldrtl**.
Volume 47
Friday, July 5, 1974
Number 27
15 TAMUZ 5734
.


M
.

Friday, July 5. 1974
+Jmldh fhrkRw
Page 5-A

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Page 6-A
+JeisHtcrkii3ir
Frid
Nixon Converts Israel Credit to Aid Grant

Continued from Page 1 A
at Yalta, once a favorite Nixon
target, which early in his career
he attacked as the site where
Roosevelt and an unwilling
Churchill "sold out" to Josef Sta-
lin on what Nixon called a "Com-
munist-controlled" post-war Eu-
rope.
ON SUNDAY. President Nixon
also wrote off $500 million in
debts owed by Israel for U.S.
arms assistance in the Yom Kip-
pur War.
The President signed the au-
thorization to convert the credit
measure to a grant.
The $500 million will be con-
sidered part of the $2.2 billion
which Congress agreed in De-
cember to make available to Is-
rael as an emergency package.
In that agreement, Congress
gave the President the right to
decide if a sum up to $1.5 billion
to Israel would be considered as
a grant rather than a loan.
Last April, Mr. Nixon declared
that only $1 billion would be
considered a grant, but the Sun-
day signing extended the waiver
to the run amours
THE NIXON decision came in
response to pleas by Israeli De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres,
who was in TVashington to dis-
cuss with officials the economic
plight of the new Rabin govern-
ment.
Peres pointed out that his
country is now in the grip of a
runaway inflation.
From January, 1974, to the
end of May, the cost of living ha*
shot up 31 percent. At the same
time, it was revealed that Israel's
national balance of payments def-
icit went $2.5 billion into the
red, and in tne wake of the Yom
Kippur War It appeared likely
that the deficit might rise to
$3.5 billion before the end of
the year.
Meanwhile, the official rate of
exchange continues at 4.20" Is-
raeli pounds to the dollar, al-
though black market rates are
closer to IL5,
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Vriday.July.5, 1974
+Jmtst>nur*M9*
Pctg 7-A
Qaddafi Aims Up 'Foil' Dr. Kissinger's Mideast Plans
-
i
By EHUD YAAKI
rpHE flamboyant Col. Qaddafi of Libya has earned
for himself a reputation as an ardent antf-Com-
nuinisL For many years he has b^en critici/mj?
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and ether Arab
leaders for paving the way for the Sorfet domiia
tion of the Middle East.
He has been denouncing all sorts of political,
military and economic cooperation with the Rus-
sians, as well as Marxist doctrines and their Arab
subscribers. All members of the small Libyan Com-
munist Party who failed to flee, were arrested,
every book whose author was suspected of leftist
kaniiUSs was burned.
ALL THIS now belongs to the past. Not that
Qaddafi has suddenly turned into a Communist. Far
iicm it. But he has changed his taste and is now
seeking, for the first time, a political alliance with
Moscow. For the sake of this alliance. Qaddafi is
prepared to ignore his previous objections and to
praise the Russians as "sincere friends."
Libya's Premier. Major Jaloud. went to Moscow
to discuss at length possible joint ventures.
And Tripoli Radio commentators clearly ex-
plained his motives: "The aim is to foil Dr. Kis-
singer's diplomatic offensive, harmful to the Arab
cause, and to prevent Kissinger's Arab puppets
(that is, Sadat) from betraying their peoples."
QADDAFI IS out to stop Sadat before he gets
around to the second stage of the Geneva confer-
'encer He failed to convince Presidedt Assad of
Syria to join him. The Iraqis, who share Libya's
opposition to Sadat's policy, are too busy with the
Kurdish revolt
The Algerians have cold-shouldered Qaddafi on
several occasions. The only course, theretore, was a
quick rapprochement with the Kremlin.
Apparently, Qaddafi believes that the Russians
too are looking for new allies. They have lost their
giip on Egypt, and Syria too has become a risky
investment for them. What the Libyans are sug-
gesting is a diversion of Soviet support from those
Arab regimes who failed to pay back dividends to
a "truly revolutionary power."
QADDAFI IS in no need for money, or markets
for his oil. He can get all the weapons he wants in
France. Soviet support is necessary to him not in
material aid although a big arms deal was con-
cluded but in political and moral terms. Soviet
backing can rally behind Qaddafi many leftist or-
ganizations and help him in his efforts to draw the
armed Palestinian organizations from Sadat's sphere
of influence.
It is doubtful whether the Russians are des-
perate enough to put all their eggs in Qaddafi's
basket If tfiry switched into an open alliam*"witn '
the Libyans their losses elsewhere might prove
catastrophic. The switch would mean a clear-cut
rejection of a political settlement.
However, they would not like to miss the gold-
en opportunity to gain a firm foothold in Libya.
And so, apart from the red carpet treatment for
Jaloud, and promises for some cooperation and
help, the Soviets did not buy the idea of backing
Libya at the expense, for example, of Syria, as
Qaddafi had wanted.
Bl'T THEY certainly like the prospect of using
Libyan leverage against their former client, Egypt.
They would not agree with Qaddafi that no
political settlement with Zionism is tolerable. But
they a:e going to help him whenever it suits them
during the peace negotiation process.
This is perhaps the best bargain Qaddafi could
have expected under the present circumstances and
he is confident that he will play his new Russian
cards better than the Russians play their new Lib-
yan cards.
Russian Stands Up to Torture of Communist Prisons
Continued from Page 4-A
rat the next two-and-a-half
njor :h- lying on the cement floor
a foetal position, his useless
s tucked up under him. drift-
in and out of consciousness.
f
WINTER HAD come to the
> fcid.s. with temperatures of 35
|!ew zero. The hard frost pene-
ted the cell. The prisoner was
esstd in summer street clothes.
lin shirt and trousers. He was
aiiowed so much as a jacket.
and he hugged himself for
warmth.
During this period he got
two forms of "treatmont." A fe-
male doctor wou'ni look in occa-
sionally "to see if I was still
alive. When she was satisfied,
she told me: You will die there,
like a dog'."
The other treatment was
nightly soaking with cold water.
The water would turn to ice
upon and under his motionless
bo.:y. and in the morning a guard
Charge Catholics are 'Pygmies9;
1Can Learn Much from Jews
broke him loose from the floor
with a shovel.
ON DECEMBER 5. he was re-
moved, without any explanation,
and dragged by his collar on his
back nearly a mile through the
snow to a train. He was taken to
prison 2.16 10. where he was de-
posited under precisely the same
conditions with the exception .of
the nightly soaking.
He was aware in this place
that there were other cells con-
taining more than one prisoner,
but he was kept in solitary con-
finement. He was allowed no let-
ters and no reading material.
THE BREAD brought to him
every other day came wrapped in
scraps of year-oil newspaper.
These he read and re-read avid-
ly and unnoticed by the guards,
managed to tear off and hide a
few pieces.
"I played with the bits of pa-
per to keep my sanity," he said.
"I would twist them and make
different forms out of them. But
I had to be careful, because it
was il.egal."
NEXT WEEK: Finally, an in-
valid. Khantssi makes it
home to Israel.
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
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y\
<:
Philadelphia ijta)
>rican Catholics are "political
:mies" compared to American
in creating public under
[nding and acceptance of Catho-
positions on vital questions af-
rting their interests, a Jesuit
{holar declared in a commence-
?nt address to a Catholic high
iool here.
TTie result, the Rev. Virgil C.
m of Milwaukee, told the
iting class of Cardinal
Dugherty High School, was that
!ws are treated in the mass
ledia "with respect, decency and
mess, while much of it treats
tholics with total disrespect,
?decency and unfairness."
RFV. BLUM, president of the
wiy formed Catholic League for
ligious and Civil Rijihtv cited
list of media incidents he said
tefamod. ridiculed or showed "in-
ier.s.tive treatment of things
Ch::.--.ians hold sacred."
";
Jn contrast, he said. American
Jews have organized to defend
their interests so well that "it is
impossible to imagine the press,
radio and television being anti-
Semitic, distorting the news about
Jews, suppressing and misrepre-
senting facts about Jewish gath-
erings and activities."
He commended Jewish leaders,
in particular, for knowing that
"in American democracy the peo-
pty are king," and that the
"political clout" of the Jewish
community in the legislative,
judicial and executive branches
"is directly proportionate to its
ability to create public under
standing and acceptance of their
ideas, values, principles and ob
i'.-ctives: to fashion popular at-
titudes: to create public opinion
favorable to their causes."
HE SAID American Jews have
organized 25 national interest
groups, which he said were head-
ed by the American Jewish Com-
mittee, the American Jewish Con-
gress and the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai Brith.
He said the three agencies
alone had scores of regional of-
fices and budgets of millions of
doliars. while the 48 nvllion
American Catholics do not have
a single organization with "the
sole purpose" of influencing oub-
lic policy towards their rights as
American citizens.
But. he added, the three Jew-
ish agencies were members of an
"anti Catholic group." the Na-
tional Coalition for Public Educa-
tion and Religious Liberty
(PEARIA
ITS PURPOSE, he charged,
was U) deprive Catholic school
children of all federal and state
educational benefits."
The Jesuit scholar proposed, as
a major contribution to the na-
tion's Bi-centennial observance,
that Catholic lay persons either
join or support "Catholic groups
modelled on the hiirhly successful
Jewish interest groups." ____
X
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Page 8-A
*Jmist>ffcrXfi%n
Friday. July 5. 1974 *'
Rabin Concedes Palestinian Federation is on Horizon
.--
Continued from Page 1 A
today and can contribute greatly in making peace a pos-
sibility.
While there can be no peace "without solving the
Palestinian problem," Rabin noted that "We do not,
however, see any room for a third state between Israel
and Jordan because it can not answer the real problem
and would serve only as a time bomb in the area."
Rabin suggested, with an eye on Egyptian understand-
-
ing of the problem. "West of the River Jordan, there Hiis b much like Rabin's plan, except ht Rabin
could be the state of Israel that would include settled U bow pressing for an Israeli Federation.
Arabs with full and equal rights of citiienship, and cast Boti\_*ovenunente, however, oppose a separate Arab
of the river there would be enough room for a Jordanian- state.
Palestinian stafe1"' ~ The Pletinians, whose spokesmen number many
JORDAN'S KING Hussein has long been on record leaders and organizations are divided between whether
as supporting a Palestinian entity that would be autono- to insist on a se l^e PataUmu state ora newsecuUr"
mouson the West Bank, but under a Jordanian Federa- democratic state for both Arabs and Jew, that would
mean cancelling out the State of Israel,
tion.
World Jewish Congress Resolutions Deplore Terroi
LAUSANNE (JTA) The
governing council of the World
Jewish Congress welcomed in a
resolution at its concluding ses-
sion Israel's disengagement agree-
ments with Egypt and Syria as
steps toward a settlement in the
Middle East.
The council denounced the
Arab murder attacks on Kiryat
Shimona. Ma"alot and Shamir as
constituting "the gravest menace
toward ordered society."
THE DELEGATES expressed
"deepest regret" at the unabated
discrimination and persecution of
the"defenseless" Jewish commu- \
nity in Syria and. in a separate
statement, expressed "profound
indignation" over the "implaus-
able" charges against Yosif Sha-
louah and Azur Zalta, Syrian
Jews who are being tried in
Retaliations
Blamed On
Lebanese
UNITED NATIONS Israel has listed in detail here
its air attacks on the "bases of
the murder organizations in Leb-
anon" and said that "al! possi-
ble steps" were taken "to avoid
injury to residents of the refu-
gee camps."
The statemerr. in a letter to
the president of the Security
Council, reiterated that Israel
was "obliged to take al! the nec-
t-j-ary measures to prouet its
citizens who are being attacked
from Lebanese territory and to
foil the commission of atrocities,
such as tho;e of K;:yat Shemona.
Maalot and Kibbutz Sham;r."
IN THE i. rter. Jacob Doron.
acting permanent representative
to the United Nations, asserted
that the Lebanese government
"and it alone, is responsible for
all the consequences, including
the results of Israel's defensive
action, aiising from the exist-
ence and activities of a practical-
ly independent regime of the
terror and murder organizations
in and from Lebanon."
Doron reiterated that the Le-
banese government permitted
"the terror organizations" to set
up and maintain "and conduct in
complete freedom their head-
quarters, oft ices, propaganda ma-
chinery, bases recruiting activi-
ties, training camps, installations
and arms caches, and it is from
Lebanon that the terrorists set
out on their nefarious murder
missions in Israel and elsewhere."
HE ASSERTED that the Leba-
nese government had waived an>
right of its armed forces "to en-
ter terrorist bases, including the
refugee camps which have come
under the domination of the Pal-
estinian murder organizations,"
and that even in matters "arising
from ordinary criminal offenses,
the Lebanese armed forces are
denied access to those camps."
CANTOR AVAILABLE
FOR HIGH HOLIDAYS
Well qualified, experienced,
best of references, can read
Torah and blow Shofar.
Call 5-7 pjr\. 864-3356
secret in Damascus on charges of
murdering four Syrian Jewish
women, "deprived of the funda-
mental right" to be defended by
counsel.
The governing council, at the
suggestion of the WJC Israel
executive, decided to create 22
high school scholarships in mem-
ory of the 22 victims of the
Ma'alot massacre, to be offered
to children in development towns.
THE COUNCIL also decided to
institute a special award in mem-
ory of Dr. Stephen Wise, to be
made biennially to men and wom-
en of all faiths for humanitarian
services to either the Jewish peo-
ple or humanity as a whole.
Dr. Arieh Tartakower submit-
ted his final report as director
of the WJC cultural department.
Dr. Nahum Goldmann. WJC
president, praised Dr. Tartakower
as one of the founders of the
WJC and said he would dev'.te
his time to writing a three-volume
history of the WJC.
DR. GOLDMANN then intro-
duced as the new director Yitzhak
Harkavi, former Israeli ambas-
sador to Uruguay and to Brazil
and former head of the World
Zionist Organization education
and culture department.
Dr. Goldmann also announced
the retirement of Dr. Maurice
Perlzweii. WJC representative at
the United Nations who. he said,
"had splendidly represented" the
WJC at the UN for many years
and was retiring at 78.
Dr. Goldmann said Dr. Perlz-
weig's services would be retained
as a consultant on international
affairs.
A LUNCHEON was given hen-
oring Marc Turkow, WJC repre-
sentative in Latin America and
secretary general of the Latin
American Jewish Congress mark-
ing his 70th Dirthday.
Dr Goldmann lauded Turkow
for his work for the WJC, adding
he had made "a notable contribu-
tion" with a popular Jewish Li-
brary series and on the history
of Polish Jews.
WASHINGTON FEDERAL PRESENTS ITS 13th
STAR SPANGLED FODRTH OF JULY CELEBRATION
SPECTACULAR ALL-AERIAL FIREWORKS DISPLAY
As a community service, Washington Federal >a\in.s and
Loan Association of Miami Beach brings you ii> 13th
Independence Day Celebration. Starting at ') I'M. from (ha
ocean just off lOtli Street, an all-aerial
  • |.la> of hundreds
    of skyrockets, lmr^t> and pinwlieels will li^'lii the >kv with
    color. This mammoth display will be visible for anvoiie
    located on tin- beach, -outli of 14lli Strict.
    VJi--
    ?jj


    ^Washington
    S^ Federal
    SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
    If MIAMI BEACH
    How To Cat There-Best Places To Watch
    T.ik.' anj Causeway to Miami Beach ami then
    take either Biscayne, 5th, 10th or 15th Streets
    East to the ocean. Find finl available legal parking.
    Hit- heat u.-u of the fireworks will l<- seen
    anyuhiTP along the Beach, fronting Ocean l)ri\e
    from Uth Street south.
    ; FREE FLAGS/FREE BALLOONS:
    # Free flags and red. white and blue bal- *"
    ^ loons are available to each account
    J holder at all Washington Federal offices
    -* Its your Indtpcndmnci Diy. Join us m ctttbrttmg it.M.
    ********************

    JACK 0. CORDON
    Pruidtnt
    AtTHUH H. COtltSHON
    Chairman of It* toord

    7 CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU
    MIAMI BEACH:
    1701 Mendian Avenue
    1234 Washington Avenue
    1133 Normandy Drive
    Phone: 6733333
    BAY HARBOR ISLANDS:
    1160 Kane Concourse*
    Phone: 865-4344
    NORTH MIAMI BEACH:
    633 N.E. 167th Street
    Phone: 673-3333
    HOLLYWOOD:
    460 Hollywood Mall
    Phone: 981-9192
    BOCA RATON:
    899 East Palmetto Park Road
    Phone: 391-8903


    -Friday. July 5. 1974
    + knitUThrkJi&r
    Page &A
    y
    '
    ZOA Elects Sternstein President
    The El Conquistador Unit Owners Protective Association
    was the recipient of the State of Israel Bonds Scroll of Hon-
    or in appreciation of its service in advancing Israel's eco-
    nomic development program. Pictured at a recent -,Night
    in Israel" at El Conquistador in Kendall were (from left):
    Joseph Fleekop, chairman of the Israel Bonds event; Mickey
    Whiting, refreshments committee chairman; Jerry Caster,
    and guest speaker Gerald Schwartz.
    Schlesinger Outlines Aid Details
    Continued from Page 1-A
    the long-term aid program. Esti-
    mates, however, on the extent of
    the program were not available.
    REN. INOIYE suggested that
    the U.S. program for Israel is "in
    t xcess" of $6 bil.ion tor tne fust
    fiee" yeirs. Schlesinger replied
    that "the size cannot be deter-
    mined today."
    When Inouye countered. "When
    wijl.tke Congress know0" Schle-
    singer responded, "that' be-
    tween the Sec; e^a: y of State and
    Congress."
    Schlesinger sai i that of the
    $2 2 b.llion emergency fund for
    Israel, one bil.ion was "forgiven"
    in April, a credit of $500 million
    was ma ditional 1700 mihion was "re-
    cently' si.ned as a credit.
    Congres had authorised the
    I'.v.-ident to grant up to Si.5 bil-
    lion ai a trift to Israel.
    NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
    Joseph P. Sternstein, of Roslyn
    Heights, N.Y., who was elected as
    president of the Zionist Organiza-
    tion of America, said he would
    concentrate his efforts in the
    coming months on interpreting
    Israel's position to Americans in
    connection with the Geneva peace
    conference between Israel and
    the Arab states.
    He also laid great stress on the
    development of a broad scale
    Zionist educational program
    among young American Jews,
    part cularly those in the 25-40 age
    proup. and the upper high school
    and college levels through Masa-
    da, the ZOA youth movement of
    which Rabbi Sternstein was him
    self nre-ident 30 vears aeo.
    THE NEW ZOA president, at
    49, one of the youngest ever
    elected to that office, is rabbi of
    Temr>le Beth Sholom. Roslyn
    Heights.
    He has previously served a*
    chairman of the ZOA's national
    executive committee and of it
    public affairs committee. He IUC
    ceded Herman L. \VeL=man a
    ZOA president.
    Rabbi Bternteta wa= bin in
    New York and was educated al
    the .lewi h Theolocica' Seminary
    of America a>:d St. John's Uni
    vt ratty Law School.
    He hold- doctorates from both
    institutions. He is a member of
    i-o pvQfutive of the World Union
    of General Zionists, the World
    Zionist Actions Committee and of
    national executives of the Amer-
    ican Israel Public Affairs Com-
    mittee and the American Zionist
    Youth Foundation. He is married
    and has four children.
    Jai-Alai Champs Vie for Finals
    Tickets are now on sale for the
    U.S. Amateur Jai-Alai champion-
    ship at 1:30 p.m., July 7, at the
    Miami Fronton to select a team
    for international competition
    later this year.
    Eight finalists, six of them
    from Miami, will compete in 24-
    point quinielas for a berth on
    the four-member squad going to
    the world championship in No-
    vember in Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Miamians are defending cham-
    pions Victor Gomez and Larry
    Heffer, Charles Hernandez, Dan
    Zelonker, Arturo Menendez and
    Don Sayet.
    Other finalists are Hugh Gold-
    man, Fort Pierce, and Leonard
    "Yogi" Leonard, Fort Laudcr-
    dale.
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    ntart

    Too Many Novels Have Jewish Characters, but Aren't Jewish
    COME READERS have noted
    that I infrequently review
    novels. My rule is that this col-
    umn is devoted to books with
    Jewish content, not merely those
    with Jewish characters.
    The novels of recent vintage
    that have reached me have Jews
    as protagonists, but they have
    little or no Jewish content. The
    story would be the sar/ if
    O'Brien were substituted for
    Cohen.
    TWO RECENT novels have
    Jews and some Jewish content,
    but neither possesses any parti-
    cular literary- quality. Both do
    have something to awaken slight
    nostalgic remembrances. The bet-
    ter of the two is "The Last Sup-
    par. bv Chr. mi Bermant (St.
    Martin Press, S7.95. 296pp.).
    The other is "Tiffany Street,"
    by Jerome Weidman (Random
    House, $7.95). Weidraan's books
    a 1 have the same ring, and none
    has equalled his "I Can Get it
    for You Wholesale."
    The book is about a young man
    from the East Side and the Bronx
    in the time of Prohibition. It is
    practically all dialogue and must
    have been written with Holly-
    wood in mind.
    Bermant is the better writer,
    but his prorrayal of an English
    family gathered to sit "shiva"
    seemed vacuous at times. Despite
    the title, the book has nothing
    to do with Jesus or the Apostles.
    "THE SONG of Songs." with
    text and commentary by Robert
    Graves, and Illustrated by Hans
    Erni (C'.arkson N. Potter, Crown
    Publishers, $5.95), is noteworthy.
    The immortal book is presented
    in the form of a play with each
    speaker clearly identified. This
    facilitates an understanding of
    this sonj which has been inter-
    preted in several ways. It may
    not be to the liking of some
    orthodox but the book should be
    read.
    Emil Fackenheim. professor of
    philosophy, continues to titillate
    the brain and motivates people to
    think in his "Encounters Between
    Judaism and Modern Philosophy"
    (Basic Books. Inc.. $10, 265 pp.).
    He poses the question whether
    it is really proper to speak of a
    "Judaic-Christian theism" that is
    in total agreement about "an ul-
    timate unambigious 'in patria,'
    as well as our ambiguous 'in
    Jjcn i^adob
    Religious Law Bans AH Transplants
    AN AMERICAN Reform rabbi, reviewing the ap-
    plication of Jewish Religims Law to organ
    traisplants. has cited a rabbinic ruline that human
    heart transplants may not be Halachically sanction-
    ed untii the time when "the chances for survival
    from the surgery are greater than 'hose for failure."
    That ruling was made in an address to the Con-
    gress on Oral Law in Jerusalem. 1968. by Rabbi
    Isar Yehuda Unterman. the former Ashkenazic Chief
    Rabbi o! Israel, according to Rabbi William B. Sil-
    verman of Kansas City.
    RABBI SILVERMAN, who is chairman of the
    Committee on Religion and Medicine of the Amer-
    ican Medical Association, discussed the "agonizing
    dilemmas" which can confront rabbis in such areas
    as organ transplants, as well as on issues of defini-
    tion of death, the right to die and euthanasia.
    He reviewed the problems in a report in the
    current issue of the Journal of the Central Confer-
    ence of American Rabbis, the Reform rabbinate.
    He also cited Rabbi Unterman as holding that
    Halachic bans against deriving benefit from the
    dead, desecrating the dead and delaying burial of
    the dead are all "set aside" when what is involved
    is the question of saving a life (Pekuah Nefeshl.
    RABBI SILVERMAN added that, in the case of
    eye transplants. Rabbi Unterman has held that blind-
    ness is a life-threatening situation because a blind
    person may be killed in an accident stemming from
    his blindness and therefore corneal transplants are
    permitted.
    Rabbi Silverman also cited the views of Dr Fred
    Rosner. an expert in the field of medicine and Jew-
    ish Religious Law. Dr. Roner has raissd the issue as
    to whether the receipient of a heart transplant trans-
    gresses the commandments in Deuteronomy to "Take
    heed of thyself and keep thy soul diligently" or
    "Take ye good heed unto yourselves."
    Accordinc to Dr Rosner. both the Talmud and
    Maimonides have interpreted these commandments
    to mean "removal of all danger to one's physical
    well-being."
    ACCORDING TO Dr Rosner, another Halachic
    problem concerning the recipient revolves around
    the requirement for burial of any organ removed
    from the body of a living human being.
    "Thus, a gallbladder, stomach, lung or other dis-
    eased internal organ may require burial by Jewish
    Law and so might an excised 'old' heart."
    Another question concerns a recipient who hap-
    pens to be a Cohen, a descendant of the priestly-
    tribe.
    Dr. Rosner was quoted as asking: "Does the ques-
    tion of avoidance of ritual defilement apply to the
    heart of a dead donor which is now to be implanted
    into a priest (Cohen)"" What Halachic priorities are
    there in choosing a recipient?"
    Dr. Rosner also is cited on problems arising from
    the transplantation of kidneys from both dead per-
    sons and living donors. For the latter, there is a
    Halachic question of whether a living donor may
    subject himself to the danger, however small, "of
    the operative procedure to remove one of his kid-
    neys to save the life of another "
    L^arl ^/Jlpcrf
    A Mistake to Count Dayan Out
    Haifa
    "111 ANY" FAMILIAR faces are missing from the new
    Cabinet. This is not in itself bad Rotation in
    office is a healthy aspect of democracy'. However,
    one of the surprising results of the latest change is
    the disappearance of Moshe Dayan.
    For a period of several years, and up to the Yom
    Kippur War. his star had been constantly on the
    ascent. He led every public poll with respect to
    political popularity.
    AT ONE time. I believe, a straw vote showed
    him as the choice of some 80 percent of the public
    as favorite to succeed Golda Meir. Then, in the
    wake of the war. his foes mounted a lynch move-
    ment against him which has now culminated in his
    withdrawal from public life.
    It may be recalled that less than ten years ago
    Dayan was in the political doghouse after his at-
    tempt to buck the party bosses and set up a new
    party (Rafi) failed.
    On the eve of the Six-Day War. it was the power-
    ful pressure of street demonstrations and massive
    public support that compelled Levi Eshkol to ac-
    cept him into the Cabinet as Minister of Defense.
    The public slept more comfortably with Dayan in
    that po-t.
    AFTER THE Yom Kippur War. it was again
    demonstrations and articulate protest that toppled
    him and the whole Golda Meir government.
    Of few other leaders in Israel can it be said
    that they have charisma like Moshe Dayan. But he
    is also a man of ideas and of action. Ben-Guhon
    saw in him his natural heir. Dayan commanded
    loyalty and devotion from many, but he also evoked
    bitter and fierce opposition from those who opposed
    him. No one can say of Dayan that he is neutral or
    indecisive, pale or colorless.
    He has left his mark on many aspects of Israel's
    existence which he was in a position to influence.
    LONG BEFORE last Yom Kippur, he again and
    again expressed Israel's willingness to withdraw
    from the Suez Canal, realizing that there could never
    be peace with Egypt to long as we remained on
    that line.
    He was opposed by the old line political machine
    of Labor which regarded him as a maverick, not al-
    ways subject to party discipline. In this he followed
    his mentor, Ben-Gurion.
    Golda Meir did not always see eye-to-eye with
    him at first, but when his polictical enemies were
    baying for his blood, it was Golda who came to his
    defense, and courageously brought about the res-
    ignation of the entire Government rather than en-
    pose Dayan to solitary lynch.
    THE AGRANAT Commission specifically cleared
    him of any blame for the bad start of the Yom Kip-
    pur War, but the fickle public responded to dema-
    gogic accusations and turned its back on him.
    Moshe Dayan is 59 years cTd. His political career
    i-' not finished. Should the long overdue revision of
    the electoral system take place, and the public given
    greater voice in the choice of candidates than the
    party bosses, Moshe Dayan will be back in the Cabi-
    net, and perhaps as Prime Minister.
    via'."
    Should we continue to speak
    of a Judaic-Clyjsuan.athic when
    there are deep cleavages between
    the two faiths in their approaches
    to many facets of man and his
    life?
    FACKENHEIM aserts that ever
    since the Nazi Holocaust, West-
    ern civilization is on trial. Recent
    actions by France, Japan and
    Germany indicate that the Holo-
    , taunt has been forgotten, and na-
    tions, like man, are still in the
    barbaric state.
    For Jews, the philosopher-
    rabbi has a memorable lesson.
    He writes that Jews have failed
    where they have been "meo
    abroad" and "Jews at home."
    tJijavia +^ch
    wartz
    If Nixon Could Just Pick
    Up a Knack for Hebrew
    ICINGS ARE nothing new in
    Jerusalem. Herzl spoke to
    two who visited there. Wilhelm
    of Germany and the King of
    Italy. Nixon is not the first
    President in Jerusalem.
    Just about a century back, an-
    other whose administration curi-
    ously enough was also rocked
    with convulsions paid a visit
    thereU.S. Grant. Three mem-
    bers of Grant's Cabinet, the Sec-
    retar.es of the Treasury'. War and
    the Attorney General, had to re-
    sign, and the Vice President was
    not entirely exonerated.
    GRANT himself was not in-
    volved.
    The Grant visit, however, did
    not come until after the end of
    his termin his retirementin
    the course of a trip around the
    world. Everywhere as the hero
    of the Civil War. more than per-
    haps as ex-President, he was
    serenaded. In Jerusalem, at the
    Wailing Wall, a Jew came up to
    him to say Toda Rabba.
    Grant had done a big mitzvah.
    and the Jew wanted to thank
    him for it. It was like this Orfc
    day in Washington, Simon Wolfe,
    head of the B'nai B'rith. received
    a letter from a Jew in Jerusalem.
    HIS DAI OUTER required help
    for her dowry, so she could marry
    her chasan. Would Mr. Wolfe
    kindly sec "the King of Amer-
    ica" and ask him for the pecuni-
    ary assistance required.
    Wolfe was amused by the let-
    ter and showed it to President
    Grant. "Is he serious?" asked
    Grant.
    "Very much so," explained
    Wolfe, telling the President all
    about mitzvahs and how highly-
    regarded was the naiUvah of
    helping marry off a poor girl.
    GRANT thereupon wrote a
    check for $25 which was sent to
    the Jew in Jerusalem Subse-
    quently, the President received
    a portrait of himselfon tape-try
    done by "the Jew in Jerusa-
    lem." who seemed to possess
    some some artistic abilities.
    When Grant arrived in Jerusalem)
    and visited the Wailing Wall,
    tVre wa the Jew in Jerusalem
    to thank him.
    Perhaps while in Jerusalem,
    President Nixon could have pick-
    ed up a little Hebrew.
    American Diamond
    Rises from
    Dealer
    iel Opus (
    Hollvwood
    (-HARLES GRODIN who por
    trayed the brash, brazen, of-
    ten obnoxious gatecrasher with
    schlemihlic undertones in Elaine
    May's motion picture, "The Heart-
    break Kid." now returns to us in
    the disguise of an American dia-
    mond dealer whom fate has made
    an unwilling master thief in "11
    Harrowhouse." from the novel by
    Gerald A Browne (adapted to
    the screen by the actor himself).
    The scenario, by Jeffrey Bloom,
    is a blend of suspense and tongue-
    in-cheek humor.
    "11 Harrowhouse." produced
    in England by Elliott Kastner and
    directed by Aram Avakian (both
    hail from the U.S.) for Twentieth
    Century Fox Film Corp.. tells the
    unlikely story of a deposit of four
    tons of diamonds, stored in an
    impenetrable central London
    basement and watched over by a
    cunning inspector (portrayed by
    John Gielgud).
    CHARLES GRODIN, alias Ches-
    ser, is supported in the caper by
    a capricious young Swedish wid-
    ow who turns out to be Candice
    Bergen Others in the game of
    love and greed are Trevor How-
    ard as an old oil tycoon, Clyde
    Massey: and James Mason, mid-
    dle-aged watchdog of the diamond
    deposit worth a cool $12 billion,
    who tries to get his "share" from
    the contemplated jewel rob-
    bery ...
    Th" Miriach Company present-
    ed to the press a period Western
    made in Spain, "The Spikes
    Gang," from a screenplay by
    Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank,
    Jr. Richard Fleischer is directing
    Lee Marvin surrounded by
    three youthful gunslingers. Gary
    Grimes. Ron Howard and Charlie
    Martin Smith, who have gone off
    into the world to follow the
    example of a criminal whom
    they worship as the hero of their
    dre?m.-
    THOIGH brilliantly photo-
    graphed by Brian West of "Billy
    Two-Hats") in rugged mountain
    terrain north of Madrid (with the
    locale duplicating the U.S.-
    Mexican frontier territory at the
    Rio Grande in the latter part of
    the 19th century), we are at first
    dubious whether it is wise today
    to romanticize the activities of a
    gang of youthful hoodlums roam-
    ing about the countryside.
    fc'tt. as the story unfolds, we
    see that the restlessness of the
    boys is understood but not con-
    doned by authors Frank and
    Ravetch.
    When finally, the last survivor
    of a series of bank robbery plots,
    portrayed by Gary Grimes, falls
    dead in the hot, dirty street of
    Piedras Negras. we can't help
    but think of the younj members
    of SLA who paid the toll to
    society they abused in false ideal-
    ism .
    DON SIEGEIAS The Black
    Windmill," shot on actual loca-
    tions in England and France,
    deals with crime and passion on a
    more intellectual and sophi*
    ticafed basis.
    %
    Page 10 A >w<- 'i~rlrn>*r
    Friday July 5, .'974
    . J


    1^
    Idctjp July 5. 1974
    +Jenisii Ffrnfi tr
    Page 11-A
    lxit for Panovs Doesn't End the Struggle
    >ITO, The Jewish Floridun:
    [The fact that the ballet danc
    Valery Panov, and his wife,
    Una, were .finally granted exit
    is to leave the USSR for Is-
    aftcr continued harassment
    denial of their applications
    over 26 months proves once
    are that aroused world public
    pinion is capable of changing
    sviet callous disregard of basic
    jman rights.
    There are, however, many
    lousands of Jews in the Soviet
    ion, among them scientists,
    rri'ers. artists and artisans,
    rbo are still clamoring in vain
    or exit permits.
    THEIR APPLICATIONS have
    keen repeatedly denied, and as a
    onsequence, they have been
    from their jobs, harassed,
    prosecuted for "parasitism" and
    inder other trumped-up charges.
    Experience in the Panov and
    >ther cases has shown that, de-
    spite denials to the contrary, So-
    viet authorities are sensitive to
    pubiic outcries and protests ir.
    Ithe Western world against their
    jb.utal and arbitrary emigration
    Ipoacies.
    r- : *
    OUR
    READERS
    WRIH
    "Let Thy Words Be Brief
    KoheUth (EcclesUstet)
    MOaMWIM'UCn-B./'W "'JlUII-
    It is therefore incumbent on
    concerned people everywhere to
    continue the fight tor human
    rights and demand that the So-
    viet Union live up to the articles
    of the International Convention
    of Human Rights, as well as its
    own Constitution, and let persons
    who wish to leave the country
    to do so without hindrance.
    SUCH DEMANDS that the So
    viet Union adhere to the princi-
    ple of freedom of movement is
    imswmnr:: not interference in the internal
    affairs" of another country, but
    is in accord with the moral fabric
    of .the United States.
    If the Soviet Union is rincere
    in its desire for detente and
    wishes to be given a privileged
    status in its commercial relations
    with this country, it must ad-
    here to the accepted norms of
    civilized behavior among nations,
    and freedom of movement is one
    ot them.
    DR. REUBEN
    Miami Beach
    EFRON
    Kaminsky to Preside
    Chancellor Commander Max
    Kaminsky will preside at the sec-
    ond meeting of the month held by
    George Gershwin Lodge. Knights
    of Pythias, in the Surfsidet Com-
    munity Center, 9301 Collins Ave.,
    Monday, July 15. Samuel J.
    Rubin is publicity chairman of
    the group, which has 1.000 mem-
    bers.
    Can't Confirm
    Rumor Soviets Will
    Let 45,000 Go
    By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
    WASHINGTON (JTA) Reports over the weekend that the
    Soviet Government was prepared to guarantee in writing to I
    ?5 000 Jews to emigrate annually to Israel failed to receive confu ma-
    tin at the White House, the S'ate Department, or in the Senate.
    White House Deputy Press
    Secretary Gerald Warren said he
    hal "no comment whatsoever*'
    on the reports.
    STATE DEPARTMENT sources
    felt Secretary of State Henry A.
    Kissinger himself should discuss
    Ithe reports but he was unavail-
    able ~o newsmen. Only one Sena-
    torial aide said the renorU ap-
    peared to be 'true." but she
    [quickly added that her Senator
    ! was not commenting.
    The National Conference on
    [Soviet Jewry and the Greater
    JN- ,v York Conference or. S\
    Howry reacted to the reported
    45 000 per annum quota offer
    [with disdain.
    The Soviets are "flaying a
    I cynical numbers game with hu-
    man lives," said a join! State-
    m issued by Jerry Goodman
    and Malcolm Hoenlein. the exee-
    [ut.ve directors of the national
    an i New York groups.
    THE FACT that the Russians
    lay have advanced a quota
    Fear Raids
    May Delay
    Geneva Talks
    Continued from Page 1-A
    build up a proper atmosphere
    for negotiations.
    However, the recent threats of
    military action against Israel
    from Cairo and Damascus indi-
    cated here that the two Arab
    capitals were not doing anything
    to cool down the area.
    Both Premier Yitzhak Rabin
    and Defense Minister Shimon
    Peres said that Israel would not
    make any additional peace moves
    unless she was convinced that
    Egypt and Syria really want to
    make constructive efforts for
    peace.
    A continuation of the new
    anti-Israeli attacks might there-
    fore slow down the process to an
    overall settlement.
    GEN. MORDECHAI Gur, Chief
    of Staff, indicated on the radio
    over the weekend that Israel will
    continue with the preemptive
    raids on terrorist camps despite
    the Arab protests.
    admission by th-- Soviets "that
    countless Jews are eager to leave
    the USSR," the statement said.
    It added. "In principle, we are
    strongly opposed I i negotiations
    based on number- rather than on
    human rights. Our goal is total
    and free emigration."
    (According to reports reaching
    London from Soviet Jewish acti-
    vists, the quota promise given
    Kissinger, if true, would not
    solve the problem because it
    would be filled by lews from
    the Baltic states. Georgia and
    Moldavia who presently receive
    visas while Jew.-, in Moscow and
    Leningrad would still be unable
    to get them.)
    THE REPORTS i i that Kis
    singer on June 6 discussed the
    alleged Soviet offer with Bens.
    Henrv M. Jackson (D.. Wash.).
    Abraham RlMcoft, (D.. Conn >
    and Jacob K. Javits. R.. NX).
    Aides to those Senators laid
    at the time that "some move-
    ment" was indicated by the So-
    viet Government through Kissin-
    ger towards relaxing its emigra-
    tion policy and that they ha>i
    asked Kissinger to discuss the
    matter further with the Soviet-.
    They refused then, and rei
    again yesterday to discuss "num-
    bers."
    NEVERTHELESS, one ospo-
    cially well placed Senatorial
    source told the Jewish Telegra-
    phic Agency that if the Soviets
    were thinking of the 45.000 level
    of emigration yearly it was
    "unacceptable" and "wholly in-
    adequate."'
    He pointed out that the Jack
    son Amendment applies to all
    Soviet citizens, including Jews.
    The reports, he said, were mis-
    leading and implied assurances
    that the Soviets have not made.
    Some Senatorial sources sug-
    gested that the reported Soviet
    offer of 45.000 was deliberately
    leaked at this time by State De-
    partment sources to create a sit-
    uation which would indicate to
    the Soviet leaders that the Nixon
    Administration is doing its ut-
    most to kill the Jackson Amend-
    ment.
    The purpose was, they said, to
    try to provide President Nixon
    with some kind of advanced posi-
    tion as he meets with the Soviet
    leadership in Moscow this week.



    A SIGN
    OF WHAT BARNETT BANK
    OF MIAMI BEACH, N.A.
    PLANS FOR ITS
    SENIOR RESIDENTS
    Barnett Bank of Miami Beach. N.A.. part
    of the statewide Barnett Banking Group,
    will build the first financial facility expressly
    for senior citizens of the area. This is our
    commitment to the residents and to the
    City of Miami Beach.
    This new facility-at Alton Road and 14th
    Streetwill have federal-regulation ramps
    ...no steps...special windows lowered es-
    pecially for the convenience of anyone in
    wheelchairs...as well as drive-up windows
    ...and additional walk-up windows.
    We are planning to offer every possible
    convenience to our senior citizens...and
    shall have a Senior Citizens Advisory Coun-
    cil to aid us in providing specific services
    for the residents of the area.
    THIS IS JUST ANOTHER
    WAY OF BARNETT BANK
    HELPING TO MAKE
    MIAMI BEACH
    A BETTER PLACE
    TO LIVE



    Barnett Bank
    of Miami Beach, N. A.
    MEMBER F.D.I.C.


    1
    Page 12-A
    +Jewisl> fhrUSsr
    Friday Iiyy 5. 1974
    LEO MINDLIN
    -

    IIS* Partners of Soviet Oppression
    Continued from Page 4-A
    ture as a respectable Zurich
    multi-millionaire remains to be
    seen.
    As a condition of his exile, he
    insisted upon, and was permitted
    to bring out with him, his pre-
    cious tiles. What he has to say
    on the question of Soviet oppres-
    sion will of course have more
    meaning than a PhD disscrtion
    written on some cushy American
    campus.
    But already there is the stink
    of the White Russian emigre
    about him in the splendor of the
    emigres Parisian heyday the
    counts and princes turned butler,
    lencing master and purveyors of
    the gentle arts, who became
    quaint so quickly that their ma-
    gisterial presence never did put
    to serious test the success of the
    Communist revolutionaries.
    IN PARIS, they could make
    the Bolsheviks look like country
    bumpkins in matters of dress,
    manners and finesse, but they
    could not move them from the
    Kremlin to turn history back
    ward. They could not oust Lenin
    lor some new czar.
    And so will it be with Solzhe-
    nytsin. No longer under the
    -word of Damocles, he will cer-
    tainly continue to make the So-
    viets appear to be mean and
    nasty even treacherous
    Still, those still-unpublished
    ...< ts in his f les are already a a
    demtc. How man) Gulags, writ-
    ten in absentia, are reallj needed
    io tell us that the Kremlin kops
    are krooks?
    IN FACT, already at this mo-
    ment, the new leader of the
    Soviet "loyal opposition" is An-
    drei Sakharov, a physicist not
    a novelist, new journalist, or any
    other kind of writer.
    Sakharov has taken up Solzbe-
    nytsin's mantle by dint of his
    courage to say no to the Soviets,
    whether he can publish a word
    about it or not. He is there, brav-
    ing the storm, and nothing more
    is needed.
    Compare his announcement
    over the weekend to Solzhenyt-
    sin's interview with Walter Cron-
    kite on CBS television the week
    before.
    NO MATTER how hard the ob-
    server tried to continue viewing
    Soizhenytsin as the principal an-
    tagonist, it remained an affec-
    tionate delusion.
    Soizhenytsin can now second-
    guess the Russians and President
    Nixon just like any other news-
    paper editorialist. Well, perhaps
    with a bit more authority.
    But certainly not with the tell-
    ing agony of personal sacrifice
    as can be seen in Sakharov's
    announcement that he was going
    on a hunger strike with Jewish
    and non Jewish dissidents
    throughout the Soviet Union to
    bring to President Nixon's atten-
    tion that Brezhnev is not the
    gay, chummy, delightful fellow
    we will be meant to believe he is
    until, like the Japanese, we have
    given him enough scrap iron to
    sink our navy a second time at
    some second Pearl Harbor.
    That Brezhnev ij, in fact, a
    Stalin of sorts, who may be more
    artful in disguising Soviet op-
    pression, but who is a savage op-
    pressor withal.
    THAT IS what Saharov, by-
    backing up his message with his
    life, can tell us not Soizhenyt-
    sin in the same way anymore.
    Top-drawer journalist, second-
    rate novelist, or even first-rate
    novelist if I am wrong, and those
    who recently took me over the
    If We Didn't Give
    Atoms to Egypt,
    Other Would-Dr. K.
    MOGAN DAVID
    CONGREGATION
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    WASHINGTON tJTA)
    U.S. considerations in agre -"-
    to piovide Egypt with nuc
    r 'i ihnology and supplies
    included the supposition that
    "Eastern European countries"
    wouhl do it if America did not,
    Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
    singer indicated.
    In a live-point defence of the
    agreement ;hat Congress is com-
    mitting to close scrutiny. Kis-
    singer declared "There is no
    reason to suppose" that Eastern
    European states would not be
    "quite prepared to engage in dis-
    cuasions" to supply nuclear pow-
    er plants for peaceful purposes
    with Egypt and "perhaps other
    countries in the Middle East *'
    KISSINGER WAS responding
    to questions at a news confer-
    ence, largely devoted to long
    statements denying Soviet-Amer-
    ican agree .nuts on nuclear
    weaponry, that the U.S.-Egyptian
    nuclear accord "opened the door"
    to the sprea I of potential atomic
    bomb manufacture in the Middle
    East
    India's manufacture of such a
    weapon fiom peaceful apparatus
    supplied by Canada was cited as
    an example of this danger.
    Noting in the first place that
    the U.S. nuclear agreement with
    Egypt is also being made with
    Israel. Kissinger added that the
    diversion of material in India oc-
    curred in a reactor that "did not
    even have" the safeguards of the
    International Atomic Energy
    Agency (IAEA).
    Additional safeguards for
    "both reactors" presumably
    Egypt's and Israel's include
    the sterage and disposition of
    production that "we believe are
    substantially foolproof," he said.
    IN ADDITION. Kissinger ob-
    served, the U.S. decision must be
    seen not in the context of pres-
    ent technology but in the 6 to 8
    years that it takes to construct
    the reactor.
    I:: that ;' riod, there would be
    incentives for "moderate behav-
    ior and constructive action." he
    Soviet Union alone among
    Eastern European count;;,- baa
    the nuclear powei reactors and
    production capacity.
    In the 18 years of close rela-
    tienship between the USSR and
    Egypt, since the 1956 Suez war.
    the Soviet Union has restricted
    its nuclear apparatus to a two-
    megawatt research reactor, ac-
    cording to the Joint Congression-
    al Atomic Energy Committee. ,
    THE U.S. has agr< ed to build '
    600 megawatt reactors in Egypt
    an.l Israel.
    A Soviet source told the Jew-
    ish Telegraphic Agency that the |
    Soviet government has withheld
    greater capacity because it op-
    poses proliferation of apparatus
    with atomic bomb production po-1
    tential and. perhaps more signif-
    icantly, it has sought to avoid
    to learn the Soviet method of
    opportunities for o'her countries
    bomb manufacturing.
    Once Again
    The
    Renowned Cantor
    JACOB
    JEROSOLOMSKI
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    coals are rightnone of these
    things matters any more.
    The action, inevitably, remains
    in Moscow, and the true hero is
    the Muscovite hero, not the bour-
    geois sitting on a multi-million
    dollar Swiss bank account.
    THESE CONSIDERATIONS
    apart, an American's tundamen-
    tal sadness these days is the ruth-
    less way in which President
    Nixon ignored the Sakharov
    statement
    As elected head of our nation,
    he placed America into the bu>i-
    ness-as-usual column bv signing a
    whole fistful of new US -Soviet
    economic agreements even as
    Sakharov said that his net would
    consist of nothing but water.
    He put us where we were in
    the days of Chamberlain at Mu-
    nich.
    The confrontation seems espe-
    cially significant because Sakha-
    rov can not be dismissed by the
    Nixonians as an "idealist dream-
    er" were he an American, as
    a Yadiclib," former Vice Presi-
    dent Agnew's favorite term for
    anyone who dared oppose the
    administration.
    SAKHAtOV is the father of
    the Soviet Union's hydrogen
    bomb. He is himself a product
    of Communist militarism, expan-
    ii oppression and Marxist
    politieism. to whoafi service he
    oner willingly brought hi- scien-
    tific genius.
    Sud | i~t in the role of a
    Nixon Brezhnev opponent, he
    pits himself as ;i ne ly bapti i I
    humanist scienti-t against the
    n oat Golem-like exploiters of
    the industrial technology mili-
    tarists since the era of Hitler and
    Stalin.
    If one can be dispassionate
    about this, it makes Sakharoi an
    infinitely more telling opponent
    than Soizhenytsin ever was or
    could be. Who will win the
    scientific genius who has seen
    the light, seen the evil in the
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    Golem, or the evil exploiters of
    scientific genius, the Golem it-
    seif?
    THE ILTIMATE sadness, and
    not for Americans only, is that
    the Nixon-Brezhnev axis is des-
    tined to win the opening joust.
    At stake is not the fraudulent
    "growing friendship between our
    two peoples" nonsense that Tass
    handouts and Ronald Zie^ler fan
    tasies talk about.
    At stake are giant financial
    agreements from which giant
    American corporations are des-
    tine! to make giant profits.
    And from which the Soviet
    Union will benefit in prototype
    industrial design which it ha*
    been unable to achieve for it-
    self and will now have neatly
    laid out ready for operation, just
    press the "start" button, courtesy
    of American engineering skill.
    THAT IS what is at stake
    profitand that is a word Nixon
    understands better than almost
    any other in his vocabulary.
    And so. to hell with Sakharov
    and human rights. They'll have
    to wait for some speech deliver-
    ed by some administration poli-
    tician on say, Mother's Day. or
    any other such irrelevant occa-
    sion, when sentiment won 1 inter-
    fere with the fascist accietion
    of power.
    As oi now. we're partners with
    Brezhnev even in his oppres-
    sion. By ignoring the Salcharova
    in the Soviet Union. Nixon made
    oppressors of us too.
    A physicist in the shadow of
    Kremlin threats and intimida': i
    can say this best not a Swiss
    prince. Not even this column.
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    July 6. 1974
    *imW fhrtUtr
    Page 13-A
    Congress Eyes Veto Power Over N-Pacts Abroad
    5HINGTON Legislation
    Congress veto authority
    U.S. government agree-
    to deliver nuclear reactors
    feign countries is expected
    Idbpted Uy" botH "House's in
    ^ke of provisional contracts
    on June 26 with Egypt
    krael.
    voting is not expected un-
    ler the Congress returns
    from a fourth of July re-
    The legislation, signed by
    members of the Joint Con-
    onal Committee on Atomic
    y, has strong bipartisan
    ig. At present an agree-
    must be submitted to the
    ittee which would allow the
    rient to become valid by
    po.nmittees not taking ac-
    tithin 30 days after receiv-
    It is not mandatory for
    Joint Committee to present
    the full Congress.
    nev legislation provides
    ['the Administration provide
    Agreements to the committee
    would have 30 legislative
    to review it and then sub-
    It. whether with approval or
    ; to the Congress for review
    Ig the ensuing 30 legislative
    anwhile the Atomic Energy
    ission informed the JTA
    its agreements with Egypt
    Israel are not identical,
    ng the differences, a spokes-
    said, was that deliveries of
    ear fuel would begin to
    t in February. 1980. and to
    1 11 months later, in Janu-
    1981 Both contracts call for
    ent of $39 million spread
    ten years.
    ft
    'Servant Jacob'
    TLANTA Marcus Wayne
    ".iult, accused of the murder
    ;. Martin Luther Kin^, Sr.,
    a church deacon here, Myi
    is "a Hebrew.''
    the 23-vear-old Black youth
    " I aytoa,- O. was arraigned
    held here Monday by City
    ge Ed Brock, who accepted
    innocent-on-all-counts plea.
    kenault told the court that
    e is Servant Jacob. 1
    a Hebrew. I was sent here on
    >si 'i. and r. is ; j. '.-.. J
    ifQanU'i atto: .-.-:. Ran
    'isher Again
    To Head
    [gency Board
    SRUSALEM fJTA) M I
    let of Detioit. i. elected
    lirman of the Jewish A _<:
    ard of Governors, said her*
    he was "more en< uraged
    an e\er" by the Agency's Gen-
    Assembly its third sinct
    Jewish Agency was recensti-
    fcted in 1970.
    The General Assembly ender1
    ;ne 23 The leconstitutior.
    khich Fisher and the late Louis
    incus first envisioned in 1964
    brought to reality six yean
    ater has worked remarkably
    ran. Fisher said.
    THE JEWISH Agency, he said
    las become "iht real represent
    tive body of world Jewry." He
    |sai"d he had "never seen better
    wxrking relationships than thost
    that have developed between the
    I World Zioni.it Organization and
    the so-called non-Zionists" the
    lepresentatives of the fund-rais-
    ing bodies abroad who joined to
    form the reconstituted Jewish
    Agency.
    But Fisher has set his sights
    on further expansion.
    DA-MNCH1
    lie laMrmc*
    RH 1STIMATES
    I ktoriM- Ml IxHri.r Paint
    !( PrMMn BtWi
    fwMii U Drrt tU far 3 T-
    } CAU IM-ITSS 0 633-0551
    11 I
    cote, explained that by "Hebrew"
    his client means that he is "a
    black follower of the God of Ja-
    cob, as distinguish^ fruit) being,
    Jewish." % \ J -, |
    ft ft ft
    Minkoff to Quit Post
    DETROIT The dean of the
    Jewish community's "civil serv-
    ice" paused briefly in his rounds
    here to signal that the next lap
    was his last.
    Isaiah M. Minkoff, executive
    vice chairman of the National
    Jewish Community Relations Ad-
    visory Council since the begin-
    nings of that coordinating body
    30 years ago. su; prised many of
    the 250 delegates attending
    NJCRAC's annual plenary with
    the a-inouncement that he would
    close his long tenure at next
    year's assembly.
    Minkoff, now 73. began his
    career in Jewish communal serv-
    ice in 1936 as executive secre-
    tary of the Jewish Labor Com-
    mittee. Five years later he was
    named professional head of the
    General Jewish Council, forerun-
    ner of the NJCRAC.
    tr & ft
    Anti-Sr-mitUm Cited
    NEW YORK In response to
    a charge made by Borough Pres-
    ident Robert Abrams that the
    Democratic State Committee had
    denied him its designation for
    Attorney General because he is
    Jewish and it was seeking a bal-
    anced ticket, the Anti-Defama-
    tion League of B'nai B'rith has
    declared that "the specific
    charge aside, we deplore the se-
    lection of candidates on any basis
    other than their individual merit
    and qualifications.1'
    Abrams. in a letter to the
    League, had asked the agency
    "as an organization devote 1 to
    guaranteeing basic constitutional
    rights for Americans in all walks
    of life" to take a stand in as-
    suring that "considerations of
    ethnic background or religious
    affiliation are not permitted to
    dominate the process of selecting
    candidates for elective public of-
    fice."
    Responding for the League.
    Seymour D. Reich, chairman of
    ADL's New York Board, wrote
    that "any political organization
    which makes its choices of candi-
    dates upon a racial, religious or
    ethnic basis should be condemn-
    ed as violating a fundamental
    concept in the American election
    process."
    ft ft ft
    Levlttown for Israel
    TEL AVIV William J. Le-
    vitt, the New York builder who
    revolutionized the mass housing
    industry in America right after
    World War II. announced here
    that he planned to build a Levit-
    town in Israel to provide housing
    for 50.000 persons.
    Levitt , tion of a 70-acre tract acquired
    by Bar I Ian University adjacent
    to its campus. The land was pur-
    chased with a donation of an un-
    iosed amount by the Amer-
    ican builder. Levitt described his
    project as a Primary Employ-
    ment Town (PET).
    He said it called for a complete
    city yith employment in fc.000
    basic or'primary Jobs which
    could support a population of
    50,000.
    ft ft ft
    'Chance' Encounter
    UNITED NATIONS Emerg-
    ing from a one-hour meeting
    with UN Secretary General Kurt
    Waldheim. Israel Ambassador
    Yosef Tekoah told newsmen he
    had expressed formally his sur-
    prise and dismay about Dr. Walri-
    heim's disclosure he had met
    with Palestinian representatives
    in Khartoum in the Sudan.
    Tekoah listed the terrorists
    Waldheim met as Zuhayr Muh-
    sin. commander of El-Saiqa in
    Lebanon, the group that called
    the Kiryat Shemona massacre
    "heroic" and took responsibility
    for many of the terrorist atroci-
    ties: Faruq al Qadumi. who rep-
    resents El Fatah in the Palestine
    Liberation Organization; and
    Khalid al Fatum, chairman of
    the National Palestinian Council
    of PLO.
    Tekoah said Waldheim told
    him the meetings with the ter-
    rorists was a "chance encounter"
    and that he was not aware of
    the identity of the terrorists he
    met.
    ft ft ft
    Scientists to l-ave Russia
    NEW YORK Alexander and
    Yevgeny Levich. the two sons of
    Soviet scientist Benjamin Levich.
    have been told they will be per-
    mitted to emigrate to Israel, the
    Student Struggle for Soviet Jew-
    ry reported here, but the SSSJ
    was unable to confirm reports
    that the sons were told they will
    be allowed to leave before the
    end of 1974.
    The Soviet practice is normal-
    ly to tell Jews given exit per-
    mits to leave within a matter of
    days of weeks.
    * The Levich brothers have been
    seeking exit visas for more than
    two years. Their father, a mem-
    ber of the Soviet Academy of
    Sciences, applied to leave for Is-
    rael more than two years ago and
    was fired from his Moscow Uni-
    versity post and from the Insti-
    tute ot Electrical Chemistry. A
    few hours later, the father was
    told he had been given permis-
    sion to emigrate.
    ft ft
    Survival Depends on I'.S
    NEW YORK Gen. Harold K.
    Johnson (Ret. I. former Army
    Chief of Staff from 1964 until
    1968. told Zionist Organization of
    America leaders here that "Is-
    rael's survival depends in large
    measure on the general posture
    of the IS forces."
    Speaking at the inauguration
    of ZOA House at 4 East 34th St.,
    Gen. Johnson, now vice chairman
    of Financial General Bankshares,
    told the ZOA leaders "in other
    words a weak U.S. cannot be a
    guarantor of the freedom of Is-
    rael.
    This does not mean that there
    is a commitment for U.S. forces
    to intervene. It does mean that
    strong U.S. forces introduce an
    element of uncertainty that must
    be considered by any power that
    entertains notions of over-run-
    ning the State of Israel."
    Gen. Johnson's prepared re-
    marks came on the eve of the
    77th national convention of the
    Zionist Organisation of America
    which opened June 27 at the Hil-
    ton Hotel.
    Gen. Johnson is a survivor of
    th.> Bataan Death March
    ARTHUR H. COURSHCN
    Choirmon of the Board
    David Balogh Cares
    about Miami Beach. He and his family have lived here
    a long time. He operates a substantial jewelry business
    and he is involved in the community. Like serving as a
    Past President of the Arthur Godfrey Road Merchants
    Association, working for the Kiwanis Club and playing
    1st Flute with the Miami Beach Symphony.
    David Balogh is, like all the members of the Board of
    Directors of Jefferson National Bank, interested in his
    home town of Miami Beach. When you're thinking about
    your financial needs think about your home town bank-
    ers in your home town.
    0)e Care.
    JEFFERSON
    . NATIONAL BANK
    OF MIAMI BEACH
    with Trait Department
    301 Arthur Godfrey Road
    Miami Beach. Florida 33140
    Phone 532-6451
    BARTON S. GOLDBERG
    President
    HOURS: 9; 30 AM 2 PM Doily, Drive-in and Walk-up Tellers, 8 AM 4 PM
    A SobMdmty o' Jelteison Bj^^otp. inc Member f DIC


    Page 14-A
    +JtwU> fhridFtor
    Friday July 5. 1974
    Rabbinical Council Will Study
    Intermarriage and Alienation
    The Rabbinical Council of
    Amei:ca announced here
    week creation of a CMMBittM of
    scholais and rabbis to formulate
    a course of at lion to arrest the
    rising Jneiftanca oi mixed mar-
    riage ami alienation of Jewi.h
    youth fiom Judaism.
    Rabb: Fabian Sehonfeld. of
    New York, newly-elected presi-
    dent of the 1.000-member Ortho-
    dox rabbinical group. toid the
    38th annual RCA convention that
    the committee will be headed by
    Dr. Norman Lamm, professor of
    Jewish philosophy at Yeshiva
    University: Dr. Simon Lopata,
    professor of economics at St.
    John's University in New York;
    and Dr. Joseph Kaminetsky. di-
    rector of Torah Umesorah, the
    National Society for Hebrew Day
    Schools.
    RABBI SCHONFELD said the
    committee would study in depth
    the "fundamental motivations
    which determine why young stu-
    dents tend to abandon traditional
    Judaism in the realm of mar-
    riage and other social areas."
    He said the RCA would co-
    operate with Yavneh, a Jewish
    Orthodox youth movement, and
    the B'nai B'rith Hi.lei Founda-
    08.
    Hi said mixed marriages on
    American .. npu es had reached
    "alarming proportions" and con-
    stituted "tne greatest challenge
    to the continuity of the Jewish
    community in this country" and
    "a serious menace to the very-
    survival of traditional Judaism.''
    He cited a survey which he
    said indicated that in the na-
    tional capita:, with a population
    of more than 100.000 Jews, more
    than 30 percent of children of
    Ame;ican-born Jewish parents
    mairy non-Jews and that rates as
    high as 40 percent had been re-
    ported in Iowa and Indiana.
    RABBI SCHONFELD cited a
    report that 41 percent of Reform
    rabbis had indicated their readi-
    ness to solemnize mixed marri-
    ages and said "we must admon-
    ish them to desist from paving
    the road to assimilation."
    Such "religious liberalism," he
    said, was suicidal to "the perpet-
    uation of American Jewry."
    MIAMI
    A H A V A T SHALOM CONGREGA-
    T ON. 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
    Cantor Aron Ben Aron. 1
    anshe ek'es ;::: SW 19th Ave.
    Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
    2
    BETH AM (Temp'e). 5950 N. Kendall
    Dr. S Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
    bert M. Baumgard. Associate Rabbi
    Barry Altman.
    and a.iults on the problems of a
    .....g American environment,
    mobipze community resources to
    combat mixed marriage, and hold
    (HJic meetings of American
    rai bintoaj and communal leaders
    with college youth groups to as-
    gesa the progress made to slow v-. 7daj' : :i p"ni Fan .> worahli -
    ... bi i Rabbi
    Barry Altmai ran srhoM i irth-
    fall in July will be .ailed to the
    11 diiim.
    ,Ch-M BAY V'LLAGE JEWISH
    CENTER. 1720 79th St. Caueway.
    North Bay Village. Conservative.
    Cantor Murray Yavneh S2-A
    the rate of mixed marriage.
    Meanwhile, Rabbi Shlomo Go-
    ren. Israel's Chief Ashkenazic
    Rabbi, warned the convention
    garnering at the Caribbean Ho-
    tel that the zero population
    growth of the Jewish people
    posed "a critical threat" to Is-
    rael's physical security.
    RABBI GOREN stressed that
    this condition "jeopardizes the
    spiritual and cultural existence
    of Jewish communities the world
    over, particularly in the United
    States."
    Israel's need for an increased
    population must be met either
    by aliya or by an increase in the
    birthrate. Rabbi Goren said.
    He said that an increased
    AGUDAS ACHIM NUSACH SEPARD
    CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Mi.
    ami Beach. Orthodox. Rabbi Mor.
    decai Chaimovita. 2: B
    --------a--------
    NOKTH MIAMI BIACH
    ADATH VCSHURUN (Temple). 1021
    NE Miami Gardens Or. Conservative
    Rabti Milton Schimsky. Cantor lan
    Alpern. S3
    BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave
    Conaervative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
    Cantor William Lipaon. 4
    AGUOATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
    Religious Community Center. 19254
    NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 38-A
    BETH EL. 500 SW 17th Ave. Ortho-
    dox. Rabbi H. Rothman. 8
    BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
    Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
    schitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendeleon.
    M
    BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
    Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
    piro. Cantor Leon Segal Rev. Alex
    Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
    Saturday, H.45 a m Sermon: "The
    l'aleftin'.an r'roblem "
    BNAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
    Conservative. Rabbi Elliot J. vv.ro-
    grad. Cantor Jack Lerner. 34
    BETH TOV (Temple). *438 SW 8th
    St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles
    Rubel. Cantor Seymour Hinkes. 8
    BNAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
    MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
    Miller Road, Orthodox, Rabbi Ralph
    Glixman. 8-A
    SINAI (Temple) OF NORTH DADE
    18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
    Ralph P. K>i"*ley. Cantor Irving
    Shulkes 37
    I '. .i :-.ilibalh evening
    Saturday, 1030 a.m. Sab-
    bath mcTiniK .ervi. .
    SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE ^9151 NE
    19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
    Bidnick 38
    ISRAEL (Temple) OF GREATER MI-
    AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi
    Joseph R Narot. 10
    YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
    AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox
    Rabbi Zalman Kossowsky. 39
    Orthodox Rabbis
    Urge Confidential
    Students Records
    birthrate would remove "com-
    Rabbi Bernard Twersky, the plete dependence on immigra- Fni,">' P "RjJ"1!?**,!".!h<' .Syn."-
    nr-A aai .u -..., i_ i_ .. Mi.arue series u.th Rabbi Nar.1 .I -
    KLA press officer, said the new tion. He noted that he had been r-uaalac The Chajiongt to th< 8yna-
    presaing the Israeli government ^u- ftr T"dy and Tomorroti "
    for greater benefits for families Israelite center. 3175 sw 25th
    "bleSSed With many Children." Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
    .in 1.. 1 1 .1... Waldenberg. cantor Nathan Parnass ,...-.-,, ,-._ ,. -.
    THE DELEGATION adopted a n zamora j rempiei. 44 ztmot* Ave.
    1 1 ies of tesolutions dealing with Friday f. p m 1.. orvleea; Satur-
    ?*.-.-h ,),.-,.,.. k ,. ; '-' 4' !T; Bi.' Mltavah of Alex
    Jewish education at the Closing ... K.-.-. Batarday, 7:S0 p.m.
    n in which they called on evening
    committee would create centers
    to advise young college students
    COKAL GAbUS
    JUOEA (Temple). 5500 Granada Blvd.
    Reform Rabbi Michael B. E.sen-
    Hal Cantur Rita Shore. 40
    Conservative Rabbi Maxwell A. Ber.
    ge Canf>- Stan ey Rich. 41
    i. v .>urt of the Or-
    thodox
    ami thii week called on all prin-
    cipals of Hebrew -< < and
    day here "io keep com-
    plete and pi j on
    all stutu con erning ttaeh
    Jewith ii '
    Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, presid-
    ing fJfficer of the Orthodox R
    binic Court, said that the confi-
    dential recor were necessary
    "in case of mixed marriages 01
    dubious conversions."
    RABBI stern said that un lei
    those circumstances, "the Beth
    Din of the Orthodox Rabbinate
    will be notified in order to rule
    on the Jewish identity of the
    children."
    In other directives to tht
    binate here, the court urged that
    Bar Miuvah candidates be re-
    quired to pn sent .rate of
    a competenl Ifohel -that they
    were circumcized ;n accordance
    with Jewish lav..
    "This i ite will be
    mandatory prior to the Bar M'tz-
    vah service. In care of the ab-
    sence of such a valid certificate,
    the Beth Din shall he notified."
    A BETH DIX directive al-c,
    ewis ii iui y to
    tx dn in livid
    acting as Ri
    form vai p rabbinic I
    tions such .1- divorces and 1
    versions.
    "We call U] e Jewish
    mumty and the legal pr.>f< 1
    to be careful of their choice" oi
    representative for all legal rab-
    binic functions.
    In addition, directives issued
    by 'he Beth Din include sta'e-
    ments:
    Urging Jewish organizations
    to observe dietar] laws and the
    Sabbath in all their pub ic func-
    tion-:
    Announcing a co munity-
    v 1 le program of public informa-
    tion via radio and telex i ion "tc
    strengthen the traditional 1 b
    servance of the Sabbath and to
    open new aieas for rrthodox
    worship and higher Jewish edu-
    cation."
    In a concluding pit the
    Orthodox Rabbinate u
    Greater Miami Jew "t 11 Is-
    rael Bond holder and :bu-
    tor to the Combined Ap-
    peal as a religious c em
    to the State ol Israel.
    Jewish Federations and welfare
    It throuj .:t the country to
    increase their allocations to all-
    1 ..; schools which the
    lution said "have proved
    to b< thi ffec-
    ... lor the --ion
    .. a! and : lues."
    In another resolution, u
    gates a int on n
    oppo>ed to the inti r. of
    po*.-. <.: il nuc eat ap nry into
    the Middle East, stressing that
    thi Mideast "la ;he most volati
    area in the world and that "the
    presence of nuclear weapons
    OR OLOM (Temple) 8755 SW 16th
    St. Conservative. Pahb David M.
    Baron, d-tor Benjam.n Ben Ari. 13
    ------
    TEMPLI 'SRAELSOL'H Formerly
    Betl T -vi S02g Bttnset Dr Reform.
    Pabbi Joseph R Narot. 13-A

    TIFE"ETH ISRAEL b\M N. Vami
    Ave Conserv.it ve. Rabbi Maurice
    Kieln, 14
    Joseph Corfmkel.
    Binyamin.
    Cantor
    Vehoda
    35
    Z'CH i Temple) SOC: M lr Pel Con-
    servatlve Rabl rmaf Sh.iu ro.
    Cantor Eto. Het'man. 16
    HtAltAH
    TIFERETH JACOB (TtmpU). 981 E.
    4th Ave. Conservative. Rab*i: Na-
    t an 2o VOKTH MIAMI
    there endanger. :, existence of th SST5tC^^.At.Tv.ONH
    (ntire world.
    Rabbi Schonfeld said Ortho-
    doxy has failed to develop new
    methods to underscore Jewish
    precepts to youth, resulting in
    Jewish youth pursuing 'all sorts
    of new ideologies such as the
    exotic and the adoption of radi-
    cal leftist philosophies.'
    Rabbi Walter S Wurtzburger.
    editor oi the RCA's journal,
    "Tradition," noting that nine out
    of 10 Jewish youth go to college.
    MIAMI BIACH
    AGUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
    Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
    e ------
    BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. OrthvdOK.
    Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
    -------
    BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
    Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swir-
    sky. Cantor Maurice Mamches. 19
    e
    BETH RAPHAEL iT'mple). 1545 Jef-
    ferson Ave. Cons.-rvative. Rabbi
    Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
    20
    MMfSfM
    VCf.AN DAVID CONGREGATION
    ?:4fr H-0ing Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
    Isaar D. Vine. Cantor L ebele
    Lev ne. 50
    H>*T lAUClKDALt
    BETH ISRAEL iTemplei. 7*00 W.
    Park Blvd. Rabbi P>v c A.
    LaDOM ix. Cantor Maurice Neu. 2
    KMANU-IL 3MC w. C.ikland Park
    B'vc .Reform). Kabbi Arthu j.
    -ms. Cantor J-rome Klement, 43
    e
    CCRAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
    CREGATiON. Conservative. S5C1
    Un vert ty Dr. P.iboi Max Waits. 44
    POMP AW BIACH
    V)ARGA~E JEWISH CENTER f101
    NW 9th St.
    -------------
    SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
    Conservative. Riibbi Morris A. Skop.
    Cantor Vaacov Renier. 4t
    haua'ndale
    hallandale jewish center
    (Conservative) 416 NE 8th Ave.
    Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor
    Jacob Danziger. 12
    HOLLY VJOOD
    BETH EL (Temple). 1551 S. 14th Av*.
    Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaff 45
    Friday, 1 IS p n. Babbath Veapa Bar.
    ducted b> Mi 1 .!. 1 r .
    i. a III also delltri r
    moi etti ';.. Book pf Huth "
    1 be recited at
    : .
    70 SCHOLARS AUTHORIZED TO 0 TO BUDAPEST
    Said they expect those who wish BETH SHOLOM. (Temple). 4144 Chase
    Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
    Cantor David Conviser. 21
    -------
    TEMPLE BETH SOLOMON. 927 Lin-
    coln Rd. Modern Conservative. Rab-
    bi David Raab. 21-A
    e-------
    BETH TFILAH. 925 Euclid Ave. Or.
    tnodox. 22
    BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE-
    GATION. 843 Mend,an Ave. 22-A
    --------a
    CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
    1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox.
    Rabbi Dew Rozencwaig. 23
    CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
    GREGATION. 715 Washington Ave.
    Rabbi Meir Masliah Melamed. 23-A
    to communicate with them" to
    usi the type of "intellectual con-
    cept-, in which today's youth ex-
    their ideas.
    BIT RABBI Rafael S. Gross-
    . i of Memphis, Tenn., said the
    obsession by youth with sex and
    freedom from discipline posed a
    piave threat to the future of the
    Jewish community, particularly
    Orthodoxy.
    Soviets to Study for Rabbinate
    BUDAPEST (JTA) Ten
    Soviet Jews have been authorized
    to come to Hungary to study at
    the Budapest Theological Semi-
    nary, according to unconfirmed
    reports here.
    If the reports prove to be true,
    the total of 12 students current-
    ly attemling the seminary would
    be upped to a record high of 22
    students.
    The seminary now counts two
    Soviets among its students. Chaim
    Levitish. 20, uf Moscow, and
    Adolph Chaevitch. 20. of Birobid-
    zhan.
    Iir.VGARJ.VN JEWISH com-
    n unify leader Geta Seller! 1 lid
    the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
    that, while in New York r. cent-
    ly, he had been informed of the
    new, by an American Rabbi, Ar-
    thur Schneir of Ni
    firmed the informali<
    There is no indie, to
    He said, howevei. I iun-
    garian officials had i con-
    when the Soviet ra stu-
    dents mi.'ht be exp- ti ar-
    rive in Hungary a is
    some peculation thai final
    number may be less an-
    nounced ten.
    Seiiert said he to
    find out moie dl I i ub-
    ject during lis up. p to
    i ow.
    Hi: HAS nue to leave TI urs-
    daj for a six- lay ? b< So-
    viet capital when to
    Durl
    i ii k ler said bj -I a
    i mony in hone jet
    EMANU-EL (Temple). 1701 Washing,
    ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irvinq
    Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
    HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
    Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
    Gross. 25
    community leader. Efroim Grigo-
    rievu-h Kaplun, who is celebrat-
    ing his 80th birthday.
    Seiiert said Kaplun is an old
    friend who could clarify the de-
    aiis concerning the ten prospec-
    tive students from the USSR.
    THE BUDAPEST Theological
    Seminary is the sole institution
    of its kind still operating in
    Stern Europe and therefore
    n.ust serve a wide radius.
    However, apart from the two
    Soviet students, there arc no oth-
    er foreigners attending the
    school.
    A few years back. .he rtudent ^h^ox^R^rPh7,^.6!"^.?:..0:.
    body included two East Germans
    and two Chechoslovakians. In
    Western Europe, there are two
    such seminaries, in London and
    re.
    CONGREGATION AN.NELL (Er.-..-c:.
    of Hebrew Acadimy). 7th St and
    Meridian Ave. Orthodox 25.A
    ----------a----------
    JACOB C COHEN COMMUNITY
    SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Av
    Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stri
    Cantor Meyer Engel. jj
    --------a--------
    KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave
    Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrficld
    Cantor Abraham Seif. 27
    --------a--------
    MENORAH (Temple). 620 7"th St
    Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
    owita. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
    -------
    NFR TAMID (Temple). 20th St and
    ZV>1= Waterway. Conservative.
    Rabbi Eugene L.ibovitz. Cantor E 1
    ward Klein.
    ---------~w.. ... v,. ur
    tabbi Phinerss A. Wei
    BETH iHALOM (Temple). 4S01 Ar-
    thur St. Conserv.itive. Rabb' Mor.
    ton Maiuvsky Cm'or Irving Gold. 4#
    SINAI (Temple). 1301 Johnson St.
    Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
    Cantor Yehuda H- Ibr.ium. 47
    ----------------
    TEMPLE BETH AHM Conservative.
    3'0 1 .V SSfld Ave Hollywood. Rabbi
    D.iv d Rosenf.-eld. Cantor Harry
    Scnmer.ing. 47.B
    - a
    TEMPLE SOLEL It brral). 5101 Sher-
    id.--n S! Ho lywood. Rabbi Robert
    Frji n, Cantor Michael Kyrr. 47-C
    e
    YOUNC. ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
    iOr-hrdox). 2B91 Stirling Rd. 53
    S.i 1 j: i .
    MIKAMAH
    ISRAEL (Temple) 6920 SW 35th St-
    Conservative. Rabhi Avrom Drum
    Cantor Abr.iham Kester. 48
    a
    HOMtSltAO
    HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER
    183 NE 8th St. Ccr ^^r*rAAA^v
    I
    -v*^^^V^
    CANDLELIGHTING TIME
    15TAM.
    7:56

    .vrAAA,AAAA

    Thi pa?
    co iperaxxom
    r,.l in

    Collins Ave. Rabb, Sad, Nsl
    44 Washington Ave.
    I
    M.drri Rdibusi Uun
    Ccordina:, feczurei
    ppearfttg \,r-r it
    RALBi MAXWELL BEHGEB
    Spin-, -i Oxiey f
    Ttmp' Zamtrn
    Carol oMs
    - '
    ft
    < \


    iday. July 5. 1974
    k Ah / *# FJhrHi^r
    Page 15-A
    Charge INS Slow to Probe Former Nazis
    Continued from Page 1 A
    letter to INS Commissioner Leon-
    ard Chapman, "that whatever ad-
    ditional action INS hai taken
    was not the result of a more
    vigorous and systematic investiga-
    tion but was solely in reaction
    to my initial inquiries or in
    response to them."
    SHE REITERATED her de-
    mands for a full and competent
    ir.ve-tigation of the alleged
    criminals. Ms. Holtzman had al-
    1 that 60 reported war
    criminals are in the U.S. with
    little or no federal effort to ar>
    pp'hep.d them
    INS -h? *aid. had allowd 73
    of them to take range in thi =
    cou...... following World War II.
    and '' that number 13 had died.
    y were charged with the
    killing >>f tens of thousand' oi
    -'.-. persona, noit of them
    CHAPMAN reviled that he- a!-
    i,. ..... -vcrc ba u Hiding" of his asenc'
    and are "without
    I i mdation." Ilo'vver Chanman
    ;i "d that INS ;-; inv -
    t iting 37 neraotM "who com-
    prise >ur current Nstl war crim-
    ina'? llsl "
    In his reply. Chapman cited a
    U.S. Supremo Court deci-ion
    which he said supported the view
    that "there is no authority to
    deport an alien solely because
    his activities are considered of-
    fensive or because he is purport-
    edly a war criminal."
    Chapman also reported that
    the alleged statement attributed
    to a former Lithuanian prelate
    forbidding church support to
    Jews in jeopardy "does not in-
    dicate in any way that he waj
    involved in war crimes or war
    atrocities."
    TN THE case of another on
    the !i=t who was al'.eied to have
    nunlered a Jewish scb o1 teach-
    er, that person was reDorted in
    Chapman's reply to have died ir.
    1954 in Cicero. 111.
    Chapman did not axolain why
    tint person who Ml, H't'tzmar
    said was wanted hv the West Gtr
    lanv Govornment hadn't been
    deported prior to 1964.
    Pointing out tha* Commission-
    er Chapman "confirm* that INS
    hi= never contacted W -' Ger
    01 in or fin th last 1? vear<>
    any othr country for h" Mr
    pti^e of depot-tin.; or pTtradil '
    Andriia Artukovic." Ms. Holtz
    ADL Charges Educators
    Whitewash B:as in Jersey
    NEW YORK (JTA) The board of education of a New 1
    Jersey town was accused Friday of trying to "whitewash- an inci-
    dent in which a Jewish pupil was alleged to have been the victim of
    a verbal ami physical anti-Semitic assault by some of he: class-!
    mates.
    The charge was made by Ar-
    nold Forster, general counsel of
    the Anti-Defamation League of
    B'nai B'rith, after a special com-
    mittee of the board of education
    of Little Falls. N.J.. issued a
    Statement denying charges of
    iniensitivity. stereotyped con-
    cepts and anti-Semitism" in the
    town's grammar school system.
    THE CHARGES were made by
    WCBS-TV in a recent telecast on
    "the new anti-Semitism." The
    education board held an hour-
    long press conference at which
    its president, John Heath Jr..
    defended the "character and in-
    tegrity" of Little Falls.
    The telecast featured Alyssa
    FtvJiran. an eighth grader, who
    said she had been beaten and
    subjected to anti Semitic re-
    marks after the class was shown
    a film on freedom of speech.
    The film, which was shown to
    newsmen before the press con-
    fe.er.ee. showed a neo Naii
    speaking in front of a Brooklyn
    Synagogue.
    The showing was meant to il-
    lustrate constitutional protection
    f the r: [hi of free speech.
    MISS FELDMAN and her
    n I .i were muniewed on the
    telecast. Th.- girl sait otfaei stu-
    d nts had thrown pennies at her
    til n showing and
    cal'.ed her a "cheap Jew" and
    "dirty Jew."
    Forster told the Jewish Tele-
    graphic .Agency he had been told
    Miss Feldman was picked up and
    slammed against a wa.l. Heath
    denied that Miss Feld-r.an, the
    only Jew in the class, had been
    insulted or beaten.
    He said her complaint might
    oe due possibly to "experiencing
    the pains of growing up." Heath
    said the special committee had
    investigated the WCBS TV
    clait.is and had found them to be
    "totally false."
    He admitted however that the
    committee tailed to speak to
    Miss Feldman. But Heath said
    he spent more than three hours
    at the Feldman home talking to
    Mrs Feldman.
    FORSTER. who sail the inci-
    dent took place eariy in April.
    >:u i he was "shocked to learn j
    that at this late date" the boar 1
    of education would declare that
    the incident never happened.
    He said there were children in
    the classroom "who witnessed
    the anti-Semitic assault." adding
    that if the board o: e lUOBtlon
    was able "to stifle this kind of
    evidence,'' they mi iad in
    ki.ling the story 'but that this
    take a lot of doii
    Maalot Committee
    Findings are Studied
    By Israel Cabinet
    ,! (JTA) The
    Maal it tnmittee's report sub-
    , nnic- <:. found
    t.i ult with communications be-
    twe i he | >v< mmant in Je< u-
    salem and the town near the
    tanese border on that fateful
    May 15 when terrorists b (1 I
    school children and teachers hos-
    Part of the report, apparently
    Iced to the press, said the t
    ir.ittee headed by Res Gen. Amos
    Horev found that the Cabinet 9
    decisions during the day were
    taken without tne Ministers be-
    ing in po_ session of ail of the
    facts of the situation.
    ALTHOUGH THE government
    agreed to tei
    or the
    [M M youngsters ver..
    whi n Israeli I r< >s later
    id tiie Maalet school build-
    A ordinfl to the newspapers,
    Maariv and Yediot Achronot. the
    I found that the army ani
    .., I Lrrepr i :. b ly
    of
    authorities.
    The report alsa raised the
    -tionwithout [>.--::i; iud
    meritof the guide* who '.eft
    their charges and swap ::"m
    the school builoing when th.- ter-
    rorists broke in.
    There was no official confirma-
    tion of the newspaper reports.
    man Government hadn't been
    Croatian Minister of Interior
    under the Nazis, had been under
    a deportation order for more
    than 20 years.
    Ms. Holtzman also noted that
    Chapman said no extradition
    treaties exist with Iron Curtain
    countries. "In fact," she said,
    "there are treaties in force with
    Poland. Yugoslavia. Ruman / and
    Hungary'. Something is clearly
    awry with INS investigating pro-
    cedures if, as the INS memoran-
    dum shows, it took six months
    to discover that Joseph Matukas
    had been dead for ten years,"
    she said.
    POINTING out that INS claims
    it cannot contact the Soviet Union
    for information on individuals
    from the Baltic countries because
    the U.S. does not recognize the
    Soviet Union's takeover of them,
    Ms. Holtzman posed the question
    to INS. "How then does it ex-
    plain handing over the Lithuan-
    ian seaman. Simas Kurdika. to
    the Soviet Union?"
    She said that her assertion that
    INS has not yet directly contact-
    ed official or documentary
    sources in Israel is not "chal-
    lenged" and that is "only now"
    that INS is making "efforts to
    establish liaison" with two gov-
    f.....or>i ;i'Tr"' in I-rael
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    Page 16-A
    > $mist> tymiir
    Friday luly 5, 1974
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    NJCRAC Adopts
    elfewisll FlOiridlJan Policy Statement
    At Annual Plenary
    Mlccn:. Fiorida Friday, July 5, 1974
    Section B
    EVELYN FERDIE NEW PRESIDENT
    JWVA Installs 1974-75 Slate
    At 23rd Annual Convention
    Evelyn L. Fcrdie of Coral
    Cables was installed as president
    of the Department of Florida-
    Ladie.* Auxiliary of the Jewish
    War Veterans of the United
    States, for the year 1974-75, Sun-
    day during the final day of the
    Department's 23rd annual con
    vention which was held at the
    Ci.-illon Hotel.
    Also installed were Mrs. Fer-
    die's officers. Ceil Zucker of
    North Miami, senior vice presi-
    dent: Bell" Swartz of Coral
    Gabcle .junior vice president; Ann
    Marcus of Orlando, treasurer:
    Rose Lisansky of Miami Beach,
    historian; EJayne I'hr of North
    Marr.i Beach, chaplain; Mae
    Sohreib?r of South Miami, patri-
    otic instructor; Elaine Kornfield
    of Fort Laudcrdale. conductress,
    and Lillian Newman of North Mi
    ami Beach, guard.
    At 2 special session Saturday
    afternoon under the chairman-
    ship of Pswt Auxiliary President
    Gladys tsgar of Wesl Miami No.
    223. many individual* and aux
    iliaries were the recipients of
    awards for outstanding services
    in their particular fields.
    Mrs. Julii Deitch was present-
    ed a gift for outstanding and
    superior services to the veterans
    at the Veterans Administration
    Hospital. Mrs. Elizabeth Reibel.
    Coordinator of Student Activities,
    Jackson Memorial Hospital School
    of Nursing, was presented a
    plaque, and Susan Hamilton of
    Tampa, was awarded the Past Na-
    tional President Rose Chanin
    Nurses Scholarship in the Field
    of Mental Rehabilitation. Ms.
    Hamilton graduated 10th in her
    class at Jackson Memorial Hos-
    pital School of Nursing and was
    on the honor roll in both her
    junior and senior years.
    The Bertha Lach Memorial
    Award was given to Anna Bedcr |
    of Norman Bruce Brown No 174
    and Eva Koch of West Miami No
    223 was the second place winner
    The Edith H. Pdbelman Memo
    rial Award was presented to Jcan-
    With Sue Martin of G.A.C. Inc., recipient of the Jewish Vo-
    cational Service "Contractor of the Year" award, are Eu-
    gene Greenspan, (left) JVS executive director, and Herbert
    : Ivu Lberg, who had just been installed as president for the
    coming year.
    Jewish Vocational Service
    Elects Officers And Board
    Jewish Vocational Service.
    a b ney of the Great-
    er Miami Jewish Federation and
    the I nRed Wav of Dade County
    . ated at 318 NW 2Dth St.. held
    its annual meeting recentlv for
    tile p.irpose of electing officers
    lor the year 1P74-75.
    rn an of the arrangements
    committee was Mrs. Dorothy Fein-
    berg. The new officers and board
    members were installed by My-
    ron .1. Brodie, executive vice
    pre.-ident of the Greater Miami
    Jewish Federation.
    The slate of officers for the
    coming year includes Herbert P.
    Blumberg, president; Sam J. Hei-
    man, honorary president; Ronald
    L. Albert, CLU, Andrew A. Cel-
    ler. CLU. CPCU. Sam Stark and
    Marvin I. Weiner, vice president:
    Irvin W. Katz, treasurer: Stephen
    Carner, assistant treasurer; Dr.
    Marvin G. Isaacson, secretary:
    and Mrs. Florence Raskin, assis-
    tant secretary.
    Three board members were
    elected to serve a one year term.
    They are Herbert Bernstein,
    Marvin Rosen and David Schech-
    ter.
    Board members renominated
    and installed for three year terms
    include Barney Bernstein, Dr.
    Leonard Haber. Marshall S. Har-
    ris. Charles Hertzoff, Mrs. Har-
    riet Horwitz. Dr. Marvin G. Isaac-
    son, David J. Liebman, Mrs. Har-
    lene Marks. Sam Stark, Dr
    Ronald Tikofsky and Morton L.
    Weinberger.
    Linsey Named Cochairman
    of Brandeis Gift Program
    WALTHAM, Mass.-^Joseph If.
    Linsey of Palm Beach, has been
    named a national cochairman for
    Brandeis University's new fund
    raising program.
    The program, entitled "A Cove-
    nant With The Generations,"
    sfeks to raise $6.5 million in un-
    restricted gifts for the University
    in 1974-75, $7.5 million in 1975-76.
    $8.5 million in 1976-77, and $9.5
    million in 1977-78. The program
    is also designed to double Bran-
    deis' present endowment of $50
    million over the next four years.
    ne Charles of Abe Ader No. 24
    of St. Petersburg.
    Mrs. Charles is a past president
    of the auxiliary and has been
    historian for the Department of
    Florida for 1973-74. Essie Kolin-
    sky of Norman Bruce Brown No.
    174 was the second place winner
    and Jerri Bartlett of West Miami
    No. 223. the third place winner.
    The Child Welfare trophy for
    membership over 75 members
    was won by West Miami No. 223,
    and citations were given to Harry'
    H. Cohen No. 723 of Surfside-Bay
    Harbor and Abe Horrowitz No.
    682 of North Miami. For under
    75 members, trophy was awarded
    Continued on Page 12-B
    DETROIT (JTA) Jewish
    community relations agencies en-
    dorsed here affirmative action
    policies" that advance education-
    al and employment opportunities
    without imposing "reverse dis
    crimination."
    A policy statement adopted at
    the annual plenary of the Nation-
    al Jewish Community Relations
    Advisory Council here proposed
    that special provisions be made
    through government facilities
    and public funding to industry,
    for compensatory education, job
    training and in placement and
    other forms of help for the de-
    prived "to realize their potential
    capabilities."
    BUT THE sole criterion of eli-
    gibility for such assistance must
    be individual need and not "of-
    fered preferentially" on a racial,
    ethnic or other group basis, the
    NJCRAC constituents agreed.
    The 250 representatives of the
    constituent agencies acted after
    a long session at which speakers
    agreed that the Supreme Court
    decision in the DeFunis case, al-
    though mooted, had opened the
    way for a "new consensus on af-
    firmative action guidelines that
    could both avoid preferential
    quotas and help ease strained re-
    lations between the Jewish and
    Black communities" and that
    "the surest path" was by expan-
    sion of opportunities "rather
    than in competition for scarce
    ones."
    BENJAMIN R. Epstein, direc-
    tor of the Anti-Defamation
    League of B'nai B'rith. said the
    ADL and other national Jewish
    agencies were ready to join with
    Black and Chicano groups in sup-
    port of affirmative action pro-
    grams "that can push the disad-
    vantaged ahead without pushing
    someone else aside."
    But Epstein dismissed calls for
    a revival of the civil rights coali-
    tion of liberals, labor, ethnics,
    Jewish and Black groups of the
    1960s.
    He said if it means '.sacrific-
    ing Jewish interests merely to
    achieve coalition, it is not worth
    the price." Epstein said it was
    possible in the 1960s to identify
    common goals "and much hard-
    er" now.
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    T
    Poge 2-B
    >Jcnist Fkrktian
    Friday July 5. 1974
    Israel Must \ye Example to the World, Say
    Miami Leaders at Agency Meet
    younger
    "We don't want Israel to be
    just another nation. We want it
    to be an example to the world."
    Having carefully followed the
    proceedings at the thiid annual
    assembly in Jerusalem of the Re-
    constituted Jewish Agency, this
    <$t$a Harry Levy's summing up of
    the urgency in improving the
    Quality of life in Israel.
    GREATER MIAMIAN Robert
    Rus ell. who chaired the Hou-
    < wnnuttee. es a giar-
    in.L : .< major obstacle
    in the way 1 I \ ing the
    ejaality of life.
    Th 0 tiles in Is-
    rat are threi
    r. ( re pei in a 1
    than b s, I 1 sai I, is
    20,000
    fa:
    h emism ior (
    23.000 young (
    pt
    iasi : ir .-- I are con-
    cen (i 100 ]
    menu | for immigrant
    thu .ior
    lest an m< ..
    R n| rf
    the Gr at r Miami wish i
    e:ct seriously
    in;,.: facilities fo I
    in-.n and practically no
    fcci : i for sinj in mig ants
    who I t me sufficient!}' discour-
    aged to forego their initial irieal-
    ism ; n return to their countries
    of
    RUSSELL DEPLORED the de
    lay* in completion of essential
    housing units, and suggested that
    the e rr.i?ht be a solution to this
    Tirr-v. hv way ot crash recruit-
    CLUB PARTY TIME
    is VO'.I at the
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    RESTAURIII lid 61 ROMS
    W.S. I JWST NOtt* Of GM'Sfai AM .
    EKC"=C A 3-C421
    pelican
    'Today tcr.toht dine in an
    island lodge. A setting of sea
    grapes, weathered pilings ana
    driftwood. See forever across
    Biscayne Bay. Polynesian
    Specialties steaks seafood.
    LUNCHDINNER
    allei Luncheon Qa'ly S3.2S
    Luaui a->1 Fanes
    Available L'pon Rcqueit
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    merit and training programs
    for all skilled craftsmen in the
    construction industry; productiv-
    ity and completion incentives
    and increased utilization of in-
    dustrialized methods.
    On this latter score he noted
    the almort total abience of sub-
    contractinc in Israel, and was
    confident if the American style
    of subcontracting would be rt
    into effect, it would undoubtedly
    spec.! up building processes.
    disturbing to Russell is
    the inadequacy of rental housing.
    t rm'al housing in Israel is
    i.i bitantiy coatty, making it
    difficult for need} immigrant',
    < s, rinfl ,in,1 large
    . ... to find suitable hous
    iin the eal i oj thi ir earn-
    .' i -
    LEVY, EORMER chairm in
    iter Miami's CJA-IEF I'ara-
    ;. tient w ith ineffi-
    > and lives with th- maxim
    that time is money. "American*
    could soive Israel's probu to but
    fo : le diffen nc< in the way of
    maintained.
    "U.S. builders should come to
    Israel to teacn I.-rae.i buiiiii I -
    their systems. Time is money.
    and if the Israelis can see that
    they can turn something out
    fasterthat's profii "
    A greater believer in the im-
    portance of communication. Levy
    is enthusiastic about t.'.e new
    s*''rit c' inte'",^fi'*M'l n*Aw na-
    tion in fund-raising for Israel.
    "More communication an i i
    change of idea- between l< 'i'-!'
    in .iitferent countries can 00
    have the beat results fr Israe>"
    he opined.
    "It's the lity of a:l
    of u- to see that everj body
    makes the ii^''t ifl We ht\i
    impress on peopl < thai Israel
    post-war need- are great, and
    that we want I i nol
    list from "''< s, but
    from their capital o one l ever
    knew, Brent bankrupt from siv-
    Ing."
    TO STIMl I.ATI giving,
    I. j i! Ivocates year-round pub-
    lic relations on behalf of Israel,
    and cites a=. an example Miami's
    young leadership groups.
    "When I see all the fruits of
    time and effort spent with young
    leadership, with more and more
    young peoile involved in work-
    ing. I know that this is the sal-
    vat.on of the future.
    leadership welcomes
    people-but it doesn't hapZ
    everywhere. ^"
    "We've got to continue the
    public relations for Israel. if.
    part of community education, be
    cause people have got to s
    where their dollars are gojnf.
    Contact all year round and no'
    just for fund raising is impor.^l
    tant."
    SENSING THE winds of chang.
    which are blowing through th
    I)
    r.
    Irving
    Lr.imi.t.i Elected ,Bv
    Svnagojnie Council And Zionists
    Pr. Irving Lehman, rabbi of
    Tempi" Em a nil Ei in Miami
    Beach for more than 30 year-,
    this week was elected to two na
    tionai posts in recognition of hi3
    lifetime of leadership for Juda
    im and the State of Israel.
    Dr. Lehrman was reelectrd
    honorary national president of
    the Synagogue Council of Amer
    ica. He served for two years as
    national president, and then wa
    slctcd for the Dost of honorary
    president a year agothe first
    time any one has been so hon-
    ored in the 50-year history of the
    umbrella agency of Orthodox.
    Conservative and Reform Jewry
    in the United States.
    The positionin spite of the
    titleis not merely an honorary-
    one, with Dr Lehrman travelling
    to national headquarters in New
    York at least once a month to
    participate in executive commit I
    tr-e meetings of the Synagogue
    Council.
    In addition. Dr. Lehrman wa
    elected national honorary via
    president of the Zionist Organ
    ization of America He has served
    a* a vice president for nearly
    two decades of the ZOA, on of
    the principal organizations sup
    porting the State of Israel in th.
    i n ted State.
    Dr. Lehrman continues as
    chairman of the board of gov-
    ernors of the State of Israel
    Bonds Organization for Greater
    Miami and in numerous other ac
    tive capacities.
    MMMT HUiiiU f*a HAJtKY IHmpI LlVf
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    "These people will be the lead-
    ers in a few years from now. and
    we have to keep the program
    going. It's the responsibility of
    the present leadership to make
    room for therr.. because there is
    a tendency of old leadership to
    perpetuate itself In Miami, old
    Jewish Agency. Levy is keen tha;
    the numerous problems whici
    confront Israel be solved witl
    the most possible immediacy.
    "Every- year that goes by that
    we don't do something, "-he say
    ith a sigh, "ft gets toogher U
    stop the piocess."
    The Studio Restaurant
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    Friday, July 5, 1974
    +Jenist n-rrir/fori
    Page 3-B
    Rabbi Harvev Rosenfeld Engaged
    CO
    As Associate Rabbi Of Beth El
    Receiving a plaque from Miami Mayor
    Maurice Ferre and City Commissioners in a
    surprise presentation during last week's
    City Commission meeting was public rela-
    tions consultant Morty Freedman, (third
    from right), chairman of the city's Miami
    International Folk Festival Committee. The
    inscription praised Freedman for his "inspir-
    ing and enthusiastic dedication in the suc-
    cessful organization and execution of the
    third annual Miami International Folk Fes-
    tival." Participants in the presentation in-
    cluded (left to right) Commissioners Rose
    Gordon and Theodore Gibson, Mayor Ferre,
    Freedman and Commissioners Manolo Re-
    boso and J. L. Plummer.
    Tiie appointment of Rabbi
    Harvey M. R->,enfe!d as assistant ma
    rabbi of Temple Beth El, was an
    nounccd by its president, Robert j
    :.I. Baejf
    R:.bS*i RosenfifcM his sjnjjd af fl
    a student rubbi at the Reform
    Temple. Suffer!), N V, and at
    Congregation Beth Israel, Hones-
    dale. Pa. While attending semi-
    nary, he he'd educational posi-
    tions in Closter and Teaneck.
    N I.
    Rabbi R->sonfeld was president
    of the Rabbinic Student Body and
    was awarded the Jack Stern
    P':7o in Human Relations in 1973.
    He is a graduate of Rutgers Uni-
    versity.
    In addition to regular rabbinic
    duties, under the direction of Dr.
    Jaffe. Rabbi Rosenfeld. will be
    responsible for the conduct and
    administration of the Temple j
    Beth El Religious School and
    Youth Group program. He will
    assume his duties on Aug. 1.
    RABBI HABVir M. BOSEHFtLO
    NEW PRESIDENT Miami
    Commissioner J. L. Plummer Jr.
    was installed as president of the
    Dade County League of Cities,
    Inc., during its annual general
    membership dinner meeting Fri-
    day in the Sheraton Four Ambas-
    sadors Hotel. Plummer, who
    moves up from League first vice
    president, has been succeeded in
    that post by Homestead Council-
    man Charles S. Glenn.
    Complete
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    ...and you can tafcei,
    We've cooked up something special for yon at
    Flagler Federal. From July 1st through July 10U>,
    well be dishing out the gifts.
    Open or add $5,000 to a savings account and take
    home a 16-piece Corelle Dinnerware Set by Corn*
    ing. It looks and feels like china, yet so tough it
    can take everyday use and still come through with
    shining colors.
    Open or add $1,000 and take home an 8-piece
    Pyrexware Bake and Serve Set by Corning. Goes
    from freezer to oven to table.
    Along with the gifts, we give you the highest in-
    terest rates allowed. See the Savings Chart to fit
    your needs. Then see us, we'll be dishing them
    out to you.
    .O '">%>
    If you can Tie,
    even ,i few hoi'rs.'.. ne
    wfeo rteechmhand. not a h lout,
    coll your local Volunt iry A< lion
    Center. Or write to' V ir.:-cr,"
    \Vasrrirtan.D.C2CVlJ
    the National Center tot
    Voluntary Action.
    ^
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    r tJrul Ri,: il ntihere wilf bt >rf-;..!. ~.< -. .,',.!


    Page 4-B
    Jenlstncrktfor
    Friday July 5. 1974
    Rabbi Solomon Waldenberg
    Engaged By Israelite Center
    Chester Leiter, president, and
    the board of directors of the Is-
    raelite Center Temple, 3175 S\V
    25th St., armonnte"flwengage-
    ment of Rabbi Solomon Walden-
    berg as their spiritual leader.
    Rabbi Waldenberg was born in
    Jerusalem. Israel, and is a fifth
    generation Israeli. He studied at
    the Jerusalem Yeshivoth and was
    first ordained there He was an
    early activist in the groups pro-
    tecting the Jews of Jerusal
    against Arab assaults.
    Rabbi Waldenberg continued
    his secular e.iucation at New
    York University school of Arts
    and Science.; where he receiu
    his B.A. degree followed by an
    MA. degree from the New York
    Universitj School of Education.
    \ .1 u ite of the Jewish The-
    ological eminary of America, he
    was ordained a Rabbi with a
    Master of Hebrew Literature
    (MHL) degree in 1956. He then
    served as Rabbi of the Agudas
    Achim Congregation of Yonkers.
    N.Y., during which period he
    also served as director and con-
    sultant cf the Riverdale Temple
    Schools.
    Rabbi Waldenberg later went
    to Puerto Rico and served as
    rabbi of its Jewish community
    for five years. He came to Miami
    last September and served a
    term as associate rabbi and edu-
    cational director of Beth David
    Congregation.
    m
    '"m
    ^ Catering
    4
    ?"
    1
    I
    ~\ 11 assure >ou of a
    sup*tb social event -
    Bar Muzvah, Wedding,
    Anniversary Pany,
    Gala Organizational
    Dinners & Luncheons.
    Hans H. Mjreuse
    Louis Witkin
    Formerk tt.e?
    ALGIERS CATERERS
    at the all new
    i tteeloaa 4
    L>-Am ( oUins Avenue A^M
    532-3311 ^
    RAhBI SOLOMON WALDtNBWG
    Upon settling in Florida. Rab-
    bi Waldenberg was appointed as
    Av Bet Din bv the lorida outh-
    eni Region of the United Syna-
    gogue of America. He is a mem-
    ber of the Rabbinical Assembly
    of America and a fellow of the
    Rabbinical N'ationaJ Bet-Din.
    Rabbi Waldenberg has served
    as lecturer and speaker for the
    Israel-Histadrut of America and
    has received many citations for
    outstanding work in behalf of La-
    bor Zionism. He has lectured on
    Bible and Jewish History for the
    B*nai B'rith Lodges of New York
    and was cited by the national
    office for his "guidance and de-
    votion to the encouragement of
    Jewish education for adults."
    Rabbi Waldenberg has terved
    as president of Bronx Zionist
    District No. 117. and as consult-
    ant on the Youth Board. Urban
    Renewal program and the Head
    Star! program in New York. He
    conducted radio and TV pro-
    grams under the sponsorship of
    the New York Board of Rabbi-
    and served as first president of
    the Yonkers Council of Rabbis.
    Rabbi Waldenberg was chap
    lain for Barney Air Force Base
    during the five years he lived
    in Puerto Rico. Previous chap
    laincy had been in New York
    hospitals and in the penal insti
    tutions of Westchester County,
    N. Y.
    Rabbi Solomon Wallenberg
    will officially assume his duties
    at the Israelite Center when he
    returns from a three-week visit
    to Israel, where his family re-
    sides.
    * AN Off Eft \
    YOU CAN'T fttf USE !^
    THE MOST
    BEAUTIFUL AFFAIR
    ANYWHERE

    Jacobs Wins 1st
    Place In Golf
    Tournament Here
    Miami Beach hotel owner Wal
    ter Jacobs won first place in the :
    annual American Red Kafei
    David for Israel golf tournament
    held at the Bayshore Golf Course
    it was announced Wednesday by
    Howard G. Kaufman.
    Kaufman is president of the j
    Greater Miami Chapter of the ,
    American Red Magen David
    which supports Israel's official
    Red Cross service.
    Bernard Castalan won a color
    television set ai -'
    with Al Isaacson taking lecoiu
    h. hind Jacobs
    Dade County Judge G<
    Klein of Miami Beach took th
    p!ice followed by Alan Lipkii
    and Earl Portnoy. Trailing in or
    der were Saul Radler, George Hor-
    Urs Angle Aschendorf
    Mrs Norms Steele, Brad Rothen
    berg and Sam Ketover.
    June's steady rains delayed
    completion of the golf meet and
    reduced the proceeds to the
    American Red Magen David
    Kaufman said, but "the results
    warrant our making this an annual
    event. We anticipate a greatei
    field and more money for the Red
    Magen David next vear."
    PLANTATION
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    Friday, July 5, 1974
    * Jmtsil Ihri&for
    Page 5-B
    Third Century U. S. A. Elects
    New Officers And Trustees
    Norma (Mrs. Richard) Hunt
    was elected president of Third
    Century U.S.A., at the Board of
    Trustees meeting held last week
    at the Dupont Plaza Hotel. She
    succeeds Lester Johnson, who has
    served in this capacity for the
    past year. Mr. Johnson received
    a recognition award given in ap-
    preciation of his services.
    Mrs. Hunt will continue to
    head the Special Events Panel
    until a successor can be found.
    In addition to her Third Century
    activities, Mrs. Hunt is also ac-
    tively involved with Beaux Arts,
    the Ixwe Art Museum Patron
    Group: Junior League of Miami,
    Inc.; Amptheon; Friends of the
    Ring Theatre; and Player's Re-
    prrtory Theatre Rainmaker's So-
    ciety.
    Other newly elected Third Cen-
    tury officers include Mrs. Edward
    Graften, vice chairperson; Ralph
    Renick, vice chairperson; Miss
    Eunice Liberty, secretary'; and
    Frank Callahan, Tony Descalzo,
    Howard Grothe. and Alan Rad-
    cliff. members-at-large.
    Continuing in office are Sylvan
    Meyer, chairman of the board;
    Ricardo Nunez, vice chairperson;
    Pr Charles Perry', vice chairper-
    son; Ivan Faggen. treasurer; Se-
    lim Karagulla. recording secre-
    tary: and WiMiam Frates, Lester
    Freeman, and Dr. Elton Gissen
    danner, members-at-large
    A number of social, civic and
    business leaders have been elect-
    ed to the board of trustees bring-
    ing the number on the board to
    270. They include Everett Abney,
    Armando Alejandre, Manuel Ar-
    ques, Maj. Gen. Robert Ballard,
    Ms. Bill Baggs, Dr. Jose Balseiro,
    Alicia Baro, Nikki Beare, Jeanne
    Bellamy, Roxcy Bolton, Ruth
    Braddock, Frank Callahan. Guil-
    lermo Hernandez Cartaya, Talbot
    D'Alemberte and Andrew Dann.
    Sr.
    Also Jeanne Davis. Audrey Fin
    kelstcin, Arturo Hevia. Susan
    Johnson, Antonio Jorge, Rudy-
    Juarez, Robert Lando. Ms. Kirk
    Landon. Dr. Peter Masiko. Emilio
    Milian. Evelio Levy, Ms. Sam Luby
    Rev. Harold Long, Doretha Nich
    son. James 0. Plinton. Melvin
    Reee, Sam Rogers. Bill Ryder.
    Audrey Simms. Fred Smith. Ed-
    ward Taylor, Buffalo Tiger. Fran-
    cina Thomas. Ulysses VanSpiva.
    Elizabeth Verrick, Jessie Weiss,
    Ellen Whiteside, Mary Ford Wil-
    liams and James Chambers.
    Alternate nominees elected
    were Byron Cherkas. Myron H.
    Cohen, Arthur Courshon. William
    Higginbotham. Marge Pearlson.
    John Pike, Richard Plumer. Wil-
    liam Quesenberry. Brown What
    ley and Ernest Stamey.
    New B'nai B'rith Lodge In
    Miami Beach Gets Charter
    The granting of a provisional
    charier to Isaiah Lodge, B'nai
    B'rith. in Miami Beach was an-
    nounced this week by Jack R.
    Glick, the New Lodge Directoi
    for Florida. The new lodge brings |
    the number of B'nai B'rith lodges
    in the Greater Miami area to 35.
    Charter memberships in Isaiah
    Lodge, which will meet in the
    American Savings and Loan As-
    sociation Building at 1200 Lin-
    coln Rd., (corner of Alton Rd.)
    are still available. Contact Nor-
    man M. Sevin for additional in-
    formation.
    -*
    TH FAMILY JACOBS
    Of FN Alt XlUtl
    OCEANfRONT
    2Stt) & COLLINS
    MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
    INCLUDES MEALS
    PtrPtn.Oav.Dbl.Oa.
    75 oil 25 roe mv
    July 110 Stpl 1
    FRK JACOBS, Owner Mgt,
    14
    Wione collect 5385721
    MfWOT MIAMI BEACH
    0CEANFffONT KOSMCT HOTtt-
    KESIKVE MOW
    hr th, HIGH HOLY DAYS!
    nationally known cantor
    11 night-12day package
    from Jl85.00 pp dble. occ,
    Every room waterview Color TV
    Relug Air Cond 2 meais.daily 3 meals ShabooS
    Synagogue m Hotel Resident Mashgiach.
    Salt, sugar, tat-tree diets Fiee Chaises
    Complete Social P'oa/ams 4p
    Howard J. Hirschfield, C.L.U.
    DUPONT PLAZA CENTER
    MIAMI, FLORIDA 33131
    has completed all the requirements to be certified as a
    Qualifying Member
    of the
    1974
    MILLION DOLLAR ROUND TABLE
    During the past year, Mr. Hirschfield personally provided Life Insurance
    protection for his clients in excess of 8 MILLION DOLLARS.
    Bar Mitzvah
    ALEX KF.NNI K
    Alex Paul Kenner. son of Mr
    and Mrs. Maynard Kenner. will
    become Bar Mit7.vah Saturday
    morning. July 6, at the Israelite
    Center Temple.
    Alex is-w the seventh grade at
    Ponce Junior High School
    He will b? honored at the Kid
    dush following services. Amone
    the quests will be grandparents,
    Mrs Betty Schulman and Mr. and
    Mrs. Philip Kenner.
    J
    IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
    5oVeRBIGT)5
    Country Club Condominiums
    Apartments at Kendale Lakes
    This Italian chef could have'
    had a Jewish mother. Ravioli
    by ChePEJoy-Ar-Dee* are as
    luscious;84 kreplach. But it's
    cheese they're bursting with.
    Chef Boy^r-Dee simmers
    Ms ravioli fn a savory tomato
    auce, rtert with more cheese
    !.. mmmrB, Ideal for a meat-
    less meaJI'AII you have to do
    Is heat-artd watch them eat.
    Keep plenty handy to make
    your farrrty happy when
    (they're hungry-in-a-hurry. .
    OVERLOOKING THE BEAUTIFUL
    KENDALE LAKES GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
    2 & 3 bedroom apartments. Minimum 1,340
    square feet of luxury and comfort, from $38,490.
    (Approx. $28.72 per square foot)
    Sales Office on premises: 274-9727 274-5877
    6851 S.W. 147th. Ave., just off Sunset Drive
    Directions: Take N. KENDALL DRIVE to 142nd. Ave., turn
    right to golf course and then left to The SOVEREIGNS.
    ^

    Tamiami Trail Bird Road
    GolfCoui t- se ) 2 "S Palmetto Exway.
    Sunset Drive
    5 CO 5 N. Kendall Drive

    C/O C/3
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    r.


    Vrqe 6-B
    * knist ntrkftof)
    Friday July 5 ]c74

    Morris N. Broad president of American Savings, award*
    two S50C ecbokrrahip6 to Marcic Novick, center, graduat-
    ing senior from Miami Beach High School and Rebecca
    Stem, a June craduate of the Hebrew Academy of Greater
    Miami
    American Savings Awards $506
    Scholarship* To 2 M. B. Students
    American Savings and Loan
    AfxL^.s.;- of Florida has award-
    ed $: (. :n scholarship assist-
    ance -.l two Miami Beacn stu-
    dt.-ii .'l.- their college educa-
    t..ns.
    The fchoarhip presentations
    r pa.- : American Savings'
    c:r.::rr_ rnunity relations
    jrc:-rarri. which includes aiding
    ;eop.e oi the ar>a from
    grat through public and
    parochial 'r..'r. school?, as well as
    ; l -' -.' < then in the COmmu-
    nitj ttaroi ie and Senior Cit-
    izen organizations.
    A* Beach High Schorl.
    .a Novtek was present
    v. :.-. SSOO scholarship at the
    \'i iiumal Hanen A-sem-
    1 Ms \-.\..-fc. daughter ot Mr.
    k 1871 13th
    ill attend
    of Fluri :a in
    Gail ere .-he pUns to
    - attending Miami Beach
    tire
    ivic organizations
    r scholastic era :es placed
    in the top of her grad-
    A* the Hebrew Academy of
    Bter Miami, a S500 schoUr-
    GRIAT SAVINGS OM A PIG SHIP!
    4 SPECIAL BON VOYAGE CRUISES:
    AUG. 17 AUG. 24 AUG. 31
    loior Cc-; Dec. 7
    ttt MAtOI GfiAS 27 250 Imi -
    Ro. Ponomo
    r'o-i S325. !f riUDlNS FUEL SUt-
    CHARGE Pint S9 25 Port Taxes
    EAVIT PIAN CMIIOREN UNOEt
    lb OMY $95. IN SAME C*BI* W'TH
    f *RHTS Ttll ROW.DTRIP
    TRANSFERS TO SK'P IS DACE MB
    BRCWARD COUNTY
    ship was awarded to Rebecca
    Stein Ms. Stem is the daughter
    of Mr and Mrs. Jweph Stein.
    4510 Royal Palm Ave., Miami
    Beach.
    At the graduation exercises for,
    the Hebrew Academy. Ms. Stein
    :e: vt d as Salutatonan of her',
    clas*. an honor for outstanding
    achievement in scholai^hip She [
    plans to attend Stern Coll.
    part of Yeshiva University; to
    milll her studies both in He-1
    brew Education and the Sciences.'
    Morris N. Broad, presicent of'
    American Savings who met with
    the two winners, expressed his
    pleasure in transmitting the
    scholarship certificates fro::-.
    American Savings ;o these out
    tins: young people. He re-
    ted h:s strong feeling that
    the yooqg people of today con-
    tinue to be the hope for tomor-
    row.
    Rertick Elected President
    of So. Florida Boy Scouts
    Lpfa Renick. WTYJ :ce presi
    " new- director, was el
    -.dent of the Soutci Florida
    Bay Scou'
    organization's annual meet
    in? Junf 24
    The Ch. 4 new^ director hac
    I a^ chairman of the South
    Florida Boys Scouts' Public Re
    mmiMee and headed it
    S3 m.liion development campaign
    :n 1971 He was elected a mem
    I larg of the National Coun-
    run WEDDING StKVICtS I
    fCfPT/0* FOR
    H0NIYKOOH PASS:V6ERJ
    BUSrNESS OPPORTUNITIES
    NOW IS THE TME TO RESERVE
    ChOKE CAENS ON OUR GALA
    CRUISES: CHR STMAS DEC. 21 -
    NfW TEATS DEC. 28
    BON VOYAGE TRAVEl, INC.
    Your Cruitt HeoWouorters
    1074-1074 INTEKAAU ilWO.,
    N.M.I., FIA.
    CAll JOSE at t45-74tl or 945 7572
    INGUIRF. ABOUT OUR OTHER
    5AJUMCS AT JPICIAX GROUP RAYtS
    1. Bi. for Sale "Gentleman's
    Clothing"
    2. Grocery I Deli "Beer I Wine
    Included"
    3. Or, Cleonin, J. laundry 'Tally
    Automated '
    4. Aato Repair Shoo "Completely
    Equipped"
    5. Aato Pert* I Appliance Store
    "Good location"
    EDMAX
    ED.VAX BUS'KESS BROKERS,
    866 Ponce De Uon Blvd..
    Corel Gab lei, Florida 33124
    Suite 209 444-3411 Dory or Niflht
    JEWISH & SINGLE?
    announcing
    JEWISH C0MPU DATE
    sponsored by
    South Florida Rabbinical Assembly
    For Information Write:
    JEWISH COMPU-DATE
    1820 N.E. 163rd St., Suite 208 J., No. Miami Beach. Fla. 33162 i
    lanan Banana i enm a ioi _________ i
    Music Showcase Competition
    Largest In Scholarship Funds
    Rabbi Sadi Nahmias, spirit-
    ual leader oi the Sephardic
    Jewish Congregation and
    Center, Miami Beach, was
    praised recently by the
    Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
    eration and the local com-
    munity for his outstanding
    work and dedication on be-
    half of the 1974 Israel Emer-
    gency fund. Nearly all of
    the members of the Sephar-
    dic Jewish Center partici-
    pated in this vear's drive. A
    200" giving increase result-
    ed from the group's success-
    ful fund-raising.
    Financial Federal Savings and
    Loan Association a Music Show-
    case c mpetH n which has dou-
    bled ti larship awards thi<
    tal of $\000is draw-
    ing Irrf, -.- r'rpm young mui-
    ugnoni the Untied
    Stat<
    _ram is only in
    ttl is already the
    larg --. lymphony competition :n
    thi in terms of schoUrahip
    funds award d accurdinp to Fi-
    nancia] Federal's president. Mil-
    ton Weiss
    Even though participants still
    have until Auc 1 to officially
    ent?r the contest, we have re-
    ceived iacjairiei from 13 states.
    rnchldini one from as far away
    as California." Weiss said. "We
    expect tr have several more
    rtates lenieseuted by the entry
    deadhne "
    Competition is di\ided into
    font cntaBJOfloa, with winners
    selected in voice, piano, strings
    and wind hras FUch category'
    winner will receive a $500
    scholarship and will compete in
    a public concert for an additional
    S2.00C grant. The runner aprll -4
    recede an additional Sl.coo
    Financial Federal Initiated the
    competition last year in ,
    lion With UK Senior
    'm: In addition to :
    -ure and fin
    port t:> desen-ing your.
    Dl the contest -
    H of tifferine cultural events
    'or community resident. -,,
    cost.
    Competiuon in the four cate-
    gories will be held thi- year be-
    tweeo Sept 6 and 15. The final
    public concert has been tchad-
    u'.eri for Oct. 12 at the Miami
    Peach Auditorium Last year's
    final competition drew some 3,000'
    cemrrur'.ty residents.
    The competition is open to in-
    strumentalists 25 years old or
    le', while vocalists may be 27
    yean old or less Student.-, wish-
    ing to participate in the 1974
    competition should write for an
    application to Music Showcase,
    Public Relations Department. Fi-
    nancia! Federal Savings and I-oaa
    Association. 401 Lincoln Rd Mi-
    ami Beach. Fla. 33139.
    The
    Miami
    Club.
    A
    A NEW STATUS SYMBOL
    IN DADE COUNTY.
    IS NOW NEARING COMPLETION
    AND FEATURES
    THE FINEST HAR TRU COURTS
    THE MARK (ALL FLUORESCENT)
    LIGHTING SYSTEM
    RESTAURANT
    TV LOUNGE AREA
    MEN'S AND LADIES'LOCKER ROOMS
    ICE CREAM STORE
    STEAM CABINETS
    2 FULL TIME PROS
    CLINICS
    The Finest Tennis Facility
    in South Florida
    Membership Now
    Available for a
    Limited Time.
    14860 N.E. 6th AVE. 949-3407


    riday. July 5. 1974
    +Jmitf) fhrHlnr
    Page 7-B
    Council
    Tom
    s
    Mt. Sinai
    The City Council of Miami
    ,3lh. headed by Mayor Chuck
    all. visited Mount Sinai Medical
    [l week (o personally observe
    Hi hmd the inner workings of
    .t*ir community's major non-
    it voluntary hospital and
    aching facility in action, as part
    their responsibility as city
    then. They were impressed by
    vastness of the activity in
    edical healing and research
    nerated at the center.
    After a buffet luncheon, they
    en briefed by Dr. Manuel Via-
    onte, Jr., director of Radiology.
    the tremendous expansion pro
    am at Mount Sinai, as he re-
    lewed the past 25 years of th"
    mplex and its imoortance to
    e community it serves.
    Under the direction of Samuel
    rtner, executive vice president
    d Sylvia I'apier. public rcla-
    -. director, the touring group
    is soon facc-to-face with the
    esome Cyclotron, the "Stetho-
    f the Space Age," used in
    lection of disease.
    M ntol S;nai's instrument, a
    of th> nuclear age, Is the
    h Facility In the world
    : ice radioactive mate
    iW capable of detecting the tin-
    I tun or or chemical chr"
    the body when picked uo by
    scanning device, thug aliminat-
    traditional exploratory sur-
    rv.
    The Council learned many facts
    iry seldom publicized; that
    unt Sinai is the largest em-
    iyei of people on Miami Beach
    . 2.200 are on its payroll: more
    n 650 patient beds are avail-
    e; the Orovitz Emergency unit.
    area's largest facility for im-
    diate.handling of accidents and
    diac: incidents functions 24
    mrs each day.
    More than 35,000 patients were
    ated last year at a cost of
    1.000.000 to the hospital. No-
    y Is turned away because of
    ilor^creed. nationality or ability
    pay,
    iThe Outpatient Clinic, which
    Indies more than 60.000 penile
    |arly, and the new Blum Build
    and its Intensive Care unit.
    Radiology and Pathology De
    | nta were other sections of
    t : -I
    The Council was apprised of the
    that Mount Sinai Medical
    f" i- not reimbursed through
    tax sourcenational, city or
    Junty for the care of the In-
    nt l! d< pendl on the bene-
    cence of donors and public bene-
    :'.ors to meet this deficit.
    : Mr. Gertner thanked the ci
    laden for their concerned inter-
    It and visit. "Mount Sinai is the
    aJ product of dedicated com-
    inal intere.st by people who
    kre and perform each day seek-
    \l the ultimate in better pa-
    pnt care." he declared.
    Mayor Chuck Hall observed.
    This visit by the Council was by
    one of its most important as-
    gnments in a busy schedule be-
    muse a knowledgeable leadership
    ans intelligent understanding
    matters of public concern,."
    Touring Mount Sinai Medical Center were (left to right) Al-
    vin Goldberg, execulive director; Counci'men Murray
    Meyerson, Dr. Leonard Haber, Leonard Weinstein, Harold
    Rosen, Samuel Gertner, executive vice president; Mayor
    Chuck Kail, Dr. Simon Wikler and Dr. Manuel Viamcnte
    Jr., director oi the Radiology Department.
    Artist's rendering depicts new million-dollar
    home for The Smith, Korach, Hayet, Haynie
    Partnership scheduled for completion in
    September at 195 Fontainebleau Blvd. The
    two-story office building will provide the
    Miami-based architectural, engineering and
    planning firm with 46,000 square feet of
    space and will feature open landscape and
    energy conservation concepts. The structure
    was designed by Bernard Horovitz of Smith
    Korach, and Bee Construction Co. was
    awarded the construction contract.
    Three beaming Shaare Zedek nurses pose with the three
    sets of twins born within hours of each other at the hospital'
    last week.
    Happenings
    CANDIDATEAlfredo Duran.
    who was appointed by Gov. Reu-
    bin Askew to a seat on the Dade
    County School Board last October,
    has rnnounced his candidacy for
    election to that seat.
    -'? ft
    PROMOTIONS President E.
    Albert Pallet has announced
    three promotions at Biscayne
    Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
    ciation: Jack Streicher to asab
    tant vice president. Main Office;
    Jean Totulis to acting manage
    at Coral Way Branch, and K I
    Greensoan, to supervisor, Mort-
    [e Servicing.
    Quiz Box
    By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
    Why do some Jews, > cially in Israel, l.i\ the tomii-
    sione flat o\er the grave in-
    stead of putting it in an up-
    right position?
    Some cairn that this wai i g-
    inahy done s i as to deviate fr i n
    some nonJcwi,h practices i
    affording a means of identifying
    Jewi h graves.
    Others claim thai '
    position came fro:-: an old cus-
    tom ol creating some kind of a
    superstructuie over the grave.
    An upright stone woul i be some
    kind of a remnant of this super-
    structure.
    Many favor this practice of
    laying the stone flat over the
    grave now because it practically
    covets the whole grave and pre-
    cludes the possibility of anyone
    walking on the grave, as is tha
    case now in many cemeteries
    wr-er-' curbings have been elimi-
    nated.
    Whv is it a c-stom in MUM
    Sephanlic Jewish communi-
    ties to blow the Shofar at a
    ftmeral?
    In ancient times, the Shofar
    was sounded in time of trouble
    to sensitize the people to the
    trouble and have them search
    their souls and repent. Certainly
    death Is a time of troubl.' and
    thus blowing the Shofar was
    deemed to he in place by the
    Sephardim.
    It is possible that the Ashke-
    nazic community may have d
    carded the practice because of
    the disturbance it might nuke in
    the general community.
    Twins At Shaare Zedek Put
    y Doctors, Nurses On The Run
    Doctors at Jerusalem's Shaare
    Zcdt k Hospital worked at a "dou-
    ble -time" pace last week as three
    sets of twins were bjrn within
    three and a half hours.
    Hospital obstetricians and Is-
    rael Ministry of Health experts
    could not recall a similar case of
    triple twin births in one day, let
    alone in the space of one mcrn-
    RETIRED? ON A LIMITED BUDGET?
    BEAT INFIATI0N & HIGH FOOD COST.
    UVE YEAR-ROUND Hi A WATERFRONT
    RESIDENCE PAY AS LITTLE AS 175
    PER MONTH WITH 3 MEALS daily.
    Urn m wU mi *Mtj. iH MM m cwrttMt*. gMt, MMj *H
    ncul mi mmtm* Klmlm. Mggal shIwc. MMjgjagJMJMl;
    KOSHER COfcONET
    -ttnawf >at>siini53i
    PRESIDENT MADI
    Mont*
    MlKC
    '225
    i ft Mth Street 531 0741
    Mofllhl, JO|C
    *l.cc BM i-lJ
    BISCAYA M the Bay
    [6':S433
    ins. One obstetrician stated that
    the odd; against the multiple
    birth were M large as if the six
    had been born together as sex-
    tuplets.
    Shaare Zedek's busy day began
    at 9:15 am. when Mrs. Margo'.it
    Hazan. a 29-year-old Jerusalem
    housewife, gave birth to twin
    daughters.
    Two hours later, Mrs. Dina Ra
    hamim. also of Jerusalem, de-
    livered twin boys, and at 12:30
    p.m. another set of twin girls
    were born to Paulette Avital. All
    the mothers and infants were re-
    ported in ^ood health.
    For Dina Rahamim. the twin
    birth is an unexpected burden.
    Her husband, who is blind, is
    i Diployed as a rug weaver, and i
    the couple has six other chil
    dren.
    I
    Upon hearing of her circum-
    stances, the staft of the hospital
    began contacting various sources
    to obtain h do for the family. The
    "Brith Milah" (circumcision)
    ceremony and reception for the
    twin boys will be oaid for by
    Shaare Zedek Hospital.
    0
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    v ^pkwu urcn: /
    7345 COLLINS AVE. M.B
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    PHONE: 861-3066


    Page 8-B
    + kl*l fhskjiir
    Friday Jujy 5, 1974
    /v ^ i# M d J ,
    0 u n a MM ISABFL 111 HI!
    Mrs. Louis Remson. president
    of the United Order of True Sis-
    ters. Miami No. 43. recently pre-
    sented a $1,000 check to Jules M.
    Hinkes, executive director of Va-
    riety Children's Hospital, where
    the L-roup has maintained a spe-
    cial clinic for cancer patients for
    the past 16 years. Known for their
    philanthropic work, the UOTS
    also donated S461 to Variety's
    Division of Hematology and On-
    cology to be used for laboratory
    lipment. Accepting the gift on
    behalf of the hospital was Dr.
    Ser?io DeLamerens, head of that
    department.
    it David H. Lichler. son of Dr.
    and Mrs. Solomon l.ichter, 1030
    N Shore Dr.. Miami Beach, has
    been listed in "Who's Who Among
    American High School Students.
    1973-74" the eighth annual edi-
    tion of the publication, largest
    award listing in the nation, which
    recognizes students from more
    than 20.000 public, private and
    parochial high schools through-
    out the United States for their
    leadership in academics, athletics.
    activities or community service.
    Less than three per cent of the
    juniors and seniors nationwide
    are accorded this honor. David U
    active in student government at
    Miami Beach Senior High School,
    a member of the Thespians, and a
    paramedical group: he serves as
    vice president of the Health and
    Ecology Committee, is first cellist
    in the hieh school orchestra and
    a member of a string quartet and
    I he Carmen Nappo Youth Or-
    chestra: he was awarded a letter
    for academics and is a member
    of the Mu Alpha Theta math hon-
    or society, the National Honor
    Society and Spanish National
    Honor Society. David also serves
    as president of the youth group
    at TemDle Beth Sholom. In ad-
    dition to having his biography
    published in the book, the honor
    makes David a competitor for
    scholarship awards of $500 to
    SI.000 funded by the publishers
    and he will be invited to partic-
    ipate in the firm's annual "Sur-
    vey of High Achievers" later in
    the academic year.
    Sr it -ft
    One of modern Israel's first
    heroes was guest of honor Thurs-
    day night at a Miami Beach re-
    ception under joint auspicies of
    Sidney Poland and the Univer-
    sity of Miami Sea Grant Program,
    headed by Dr. Richard G. Bader.
    Admiral Vohay Ben Nun 48,
    It (1 the daring assault by small,
    fast boats that resulted in the
    sinking of El Emir Farouk, flag
    ship of the EgyDtian Navy, dur-
    ing the 1948 War of Indepen-
    dence, for which he was awarded
    the highest Israeli decoration for
    bravery. He had commanded the
    Pa.Tr.ach Underwater Demolition
    Group which demolished British
    shipa takine par; in the Jewish
    Refugee chase of 194547. He was
    injured twice in land and sea en-
    gajcementl but afterward com-
    manded ships carrying tanks and
    ammunition through the British
    blockade.
    The admiral who commanded
    a destroyer in the Suez Campaign
    of 1956 and later became com-
    mander in-chief of the Israeli
    Navy, is touring the United
    States, speaking in behalf of the
    Israel Institute of Oceanography,
    of which he is director-general.
    ft
    At the closing exercises of
    Temple Ner Tamid Religious
    School. Steven Neufeld. son of
    Mr. and Mrs. Luis Neufeld. re
    ceived the "David Kuritz Scholar-
    ship Award He was chosen from
    the entire Religious School as
    the outstanding student in reli-
    gious studies. The scholarship is
    made possible through the g"n-
    ero.-ity of the chi'dren and wife
    of the late David Kuritz and is
    presented annually to the most
    deserving student of Temple Ner
    Tamid.
    Joan Ellen Fandler Becomes Bride
    Of Michael Alan Friedman June SO
    Films Being Held Over
    A number of films are being
    held over in Wometco theatres
    here, including "Old Yeller" and
    "Incredible Journey" at the
    Miracle. 163rd Street, Twin II.
    Palm Sorings I and Plaza-Holly-
    wood: "The Three Musketeers."
    at the Patio and Andrews-Fort
    Lauderdale. "For Pete's Sake."
    at the Twin II. Carib. Parkway
    and Gateway Fort Lauderdale:
    The Terminal Man." at the
    Byron, and "Thunderbolt and
    Lightfoot" at the Carlyle.
    Small Businessmen Invited
    South Florida owners and op-
    erators of small businesses are
    invited to attend a one-day con-
    ference sponsored by the Small
    Business Administration and
    SCORE (Service Corps of Retired
    Executives) in Room 208 of the
    Federal Building. 51 SW 1st Ave.,
    Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 pjn.
    The overall theme of the con-
    ferences which are conducted
    monthly, is "What You Need to.
    Know to Operate a Small Busi-
    ness."
    MRS. MALCOLM NACLIK
    Phyllis Faber,
    Malcolm Nagler
    Exchange Vows
    Phyllis Faber. daughter of Mr.
    and Mrs. Norman Faber. 12510
    NE 1st Ct, North Miami, ex-
    changed vows with Malcolm Nag-
    ler. son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris
    Nagler. l>25 NW 175th St.. Sun
    day. June 30. in the South Ball-
    room of the Forte Towers. Rabbi
    Charles Rubel conducted the i
    p.m. rites, which were followed
    by a reception.
    The bride, a graduate of
    North Miami Senior High School,
    majored in Cosmetology and is a
    member of the "U.I.C.A. Club."
    The bridal party included Jaye
    Johnson, matron of honor: Val-
    erie Nagler, Laurel Nagler. Joyce
    Fihr. and Gorri Faber. brides-
    maids: Bruce Nagler, best man,
    and Leonard Nagler. Ricky Nag-
    ler. Steve Brochin and Fred Fa-
    ber, ushers.
    After a honeymoon in Gatlin-
    bu--g. Tenn.. Mr. and Mrs. Naglr
    will make their home at 2050 NE
    171st St.. North Miami Beach.
    Singles Group Seminar Set
    The Young Professionals and
    Professionals II are cosponsoring
    a seminar, on Dating Compatibil-
    ity, featuring Richard Schaeffer.
    psychologist, and Toby Berman.
    counseling consultant, discussing,
    "Is Marriage for You"", at the
    Washington Federal Bank. 633
    NE 167th St.. Sunday at 8 p.m.
    Non-members are invited.
    Joan Ellen Fandler became the
    bride of Michael Alan Friedman
    Sunday. June 30. in 11:30 a.m.
    ceremonies conducted by Rabbi
    S. T. Swirsky in the Deauville
    Hotel A champagne breakfast
    honoring the couple followed at
    the hotel.
    The bride, daughter of Mr. and
    Mrs Milton Fandler. 7441 Wayne
    Ave. Miami Beach, graduated
    from the University of Florida,
    where she was a member of AI
    pha Bpsilon Phi, and is present-
    ly teaching mathematics at Miami
    Beach Senior High School.
    The bridegroom, son of E.-ther
    Friedman, 226 Jefferson Ave.,
    Miami Beach, and the late Tosie
    Friedman, graduated from the
    University of Miami and attended
    New York Law School. He is Mi-
    ami Beach Senior High Scho >!'..
    former community school direc-
    tor.
    The new Mrs. Friedman chose
    a gown o: candlelight sataoeau
    with Alencon lace trim, fashion-
    ed in the Empire style with
    Bishop lleeves and built in chapel
    train. She carried a cascade
    bridal arrangement of yellow
    sweetheart ro
    Terri Fandler served as maid
    of honor: Mark Orr wa.- the best
    man.
    Ifr. and Mrs Friedman plan to
    make their home at 1175 Njr-
    nundy Dr.. Miami Beach
    Midweek 'Sunday School'
    Seen At Temple In Pines
    The Temple in the Pines Ke-
    ligious and Hebrew School Board,
    under the leadership of Mrs.
    Martin Weisz. is considering an
    innovative concept in class sched-
    uling. The plan is to eliminate
    all week-end classes, thus "Sun I
    day School" would be held one
    day mid-week.
    This innovation would permit
    family we^k-end outings, avoid
    early rising Sunday mornings,
    and conflict with "Dolphin Foot
    ball Sundays." It is anticipated
    that this plan will enable fam
    ilies to spend additional time to
    gather. Parents desiring further
    information about the school may
    rail the principal, Mrs. Rhona
    Sandman.
    BARNES
    660 N.W. 119th STREET
    MARTHA E. BARNES
    688-0663 or 688-8000
    SALIS AMD SERVICE
    FOR "GOODNESS" SAKES
    SEE BOCA LAKES
    One story condos near turn-
    pike with all amenities includ-
    ing security guard. From
    $24000. High assumable
    mortgages.
    Eves: 392-5058
    Florida Sites, Inc.
    392-5998 395-1890
    W^ M'Kivvn:
    W KKKIDKVTIAI.
    ' HOMktOKTIlK \(.KI>
    Would Vnu Like Your Loving
    Elderly To Live In Al
    Beautiful Private Horn*
    |Atmosphere Or *tT1
    Institutional Environment''
    AFTER YOU'VEMADK
    YOUR CHOICE.
    CALL R93 0642
    IF YOU COMMAND
    THE BEST
    CALL 893-0642
    IF YOU CAN AFFORD
    WHAT YOU COMMAND.
    CALL 893 0642
    REMEMBER THOSE WHO
    LIVE IN
    HAPPY &- PLEASANT
    SURROUNDINGS
    LIVE LONGER
    Spring Fresh Water
    OWT, RUST, TASTE, ODOR REMOVAL WITH
    AQUA RLTER AP 200
    COMPLETE PACKAGE
    WITH INSTALLATION
    $49.00
    CALL 866-8513
    t irm SUi
    rw 0
    M <
    MKNDAMf PLUMBING SHVKE INC
    At your nrrvico ell tfa
    bb's back-
    n .make tracks to
    Biscayne
    dog track
    1-95 AT 119 STREET
    Reservations Miami 754-3484 Broward 524-0747
    MATINEES 1PM
    TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS,
    SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS
    MRS. MKHAU A. HUDMAN
    to heck with
    housework!
    '* I l I" mmi rail
    Minute Maid*
    666-7961
    complete house cleaning
    transportation C. Supplies
    furnished
    Bonded & Injured
    JULY 5th IS FAN
    APPRECIATION
    DAY!
    FREE GRANDSTAND
    ADMISSION...
    We are also giving away more
    !han S8,000 in prizes
    including a new 1974 fully-
    equipped Pontiac. The gates
    open at 10:30 a.m. so
    come early.
    For further information caii,
    toll free Dade 625-1311,
    Broward 523-4324; West
    Palm Beach 833-4016 Sorry,
    no one under 18 admitted.
    AT <&*
    Sfei
    post time 1:30
    at colder we love you
    and you'll love colder too!


    Friday, July 5, 1974
    * // tkrkftor
    Page 9-B
    Arlene Suzanne Hechter Weds
    Dr. Clifford Alan Lakin
    Arlene Suzanne Hechter and
    Dr. Clifford Alan Lakin were
    united in marriage Sunday eve-
    I'' X '
    MM. CLIffOtD A. LAKIN
    June 30, in the Diplomat
    Country Club. Halhndale Rabbi
    Mordecai Shapiro of Beth Israel
    Congr g.ition officiated.
    The bride is the daughter of
    Mr and Mrs, George Hechter, 700
    W 47th St., Miami Beach. Dr.
    parents are Mr. and Mrs
    ! >roard l.akin. 6933 Harding
    A. Miami Beach.
    Both the bride and groom
    graduated from Miami Beach
    i ;: School where he was elected
    to Boy's State and National Hon-
    or Society. The new Mrs Lakin
    graduated from Sophie Newcomb
    I College, New Orleans. La., where
    >h i r-'ceived her Bachelor of
    |Arts degree and was a Dean's
    -ist student. She participated in
    the Junior Year Abroad program
    as a student at University of The
    I Anvwrtcx and Univcrsidad Ibero-
    imencana in Mexico City. She
    ras accorded a scholarship and
    assistant ship towards her Master
    of Art* dc*ie. which she com
    pletid at Tuljne University.
    Dr. Lakin is a graduate of Duke
    University with a Bachelor of
    Science degree and Vanderbilt
    Medical School, where he receiv-
    ed his medical degree. He intern-
    ed and served one year of resi-
    dency at Albert Einstein School
    of Medicine in New Yoik and re-
    cent > completed three years of
    surgical residency at Bit Sinai
    Hospital, Miami Beach. He and
    his bride rlJ live in Del Rio.
    Tex., whore he has been assigned
    to Laughlln Air Force Base Hos-
    piUi.
    For her wedding, the bride
    ebo e a Prisciila of Boston gown
    of wh.t" satin faille with pearls
    and embroidered French Alen-
    con lace. It featured a yoked Em-
    pire lace bodice with a wedding-
    band neckline and panel skirt.
    A court train completed the
    gown. Bridd h adpiece was a
    petrl and Alenton lace mantii'.a
    with 1 >ng veil. The entire cap
    was sprinkle! with seed pearl
    and the outer veil was a short
    mantilla ed^ed in Alencon lace.
    The floor-length under veil w
    scatte:ed with Alencon appli-
    ques She carried cascading yel-
    low and white roses with baby's
    breath which covered her father's
    Bar Mitzvah bible.
    Honor attendants were the
    bride's listers, Mrs. Ephraim Col-
    lins and Janice Hechter. They
    wore matching yellow chiffon
    gowns fashioned in Grecian style
    w:th floating chiffon panels in
    the back and carried bouquets of
    dai-ies Beat man to Dr. Lakin
    was Charlafl Htrsh of Miami. Ush-
    ers were Enhraim Collins and
    Eugene Lakin; junior ushers
    were Steven Collins and Brian
    Collins.
    After a honeymoon in Ochos
    Ricos, Jamaica, the couple will
    motor to Texas.

    Temple Emanu-El Setting For
    Davis-Mermelstein Nuptials
    Termle Fmanu-El was the set
    tir.i tor the nuptials of Helene
    lermelstein and Joseph Irving
    )avis. Jr.. Sunday, June 30. Rab-
    ji Irving Lehrman performed
    the 5:30 p.m. ceremony. A recep-
    tion followed in the temple.
    The bride, daughter of Mr. and
    [V-- David Mermebtein.9121 sw
    \b- .: Terr., graduated from Flor
    li '.a International University and
    i- n >w a special education teach-
    sr. Her husband, son of Mr. ami
    Irs. Joseph I. Davis. Sr.. 720 SE
    1101st St., Miami Shores, gradu-
    Wnmetco Theatres
    HAUAWMii
    -Mil.- .
    km* > Um \vm *d
    MIRACLE! 163 St
    J ^OgW^|KttJ
    KIRS. JOStHI I. DAVIS. It.
    ated from the University of Flor-
    ida and Stetson School of Law
    and is now a practicing attorney
    in F'oit Lauderdale.
    The bride was attended by
    Karol Hirschberger. matron of
    honor, and Amy Tobin. Debbie
    Mermelstein. Jane Davis and
    Joan Steinheimer. bridesmaids
    Joseph I. Davis served his son as
    best man: ushers were Stan
    Blake, Jerry MarkowlU. Michael
    Mermelstein and Richard Frank,
    The Davisps will live at 4200
    NW 79th Ave. after a honeymoon
    in Europe.
    WEDDING, BAR-MITZVAH
    AND COMMERCIAL
    PHOTOGRAPHY
    done at reasonable prices
    Contact: Saul Rosen at
    966-5785
    Mother Teresa of Calcutta received a proc-
    lamation from Miami Commissioner J. L.
    Plummer Jr. Tuesday, June 25, during a two-
    day stop in Miami. Participating in the cere-
    monies were, (left to right) Msc/r. Brian
    Walsh, Mother Teresa, Plummer, Rabbi
    Irving Lehrman and Metropolitan Dade
    County Commissioner Mike Calhoun.
    American Friends
    Elect Lantenberg
    c*
    NEW V :'{K~FrankR. I.auten-
    berg of Montclair, N.J.. is elected
    president of the American Friends
    of The Hebrew University, suc-
    ceeding Henry Sonneborn III.
    Mr. Lautenberg. who is presi-
    dent of Automatic Data Process-
    ing. Inc. of Clifton. N J. had
    previously served as first vice
    president of the American
    Friends and is a member of the
    International Board of Governors
    of The Hebrew University in
    Jerusalem.
    Active in communal affairs,
    Mr. Lautenberg is one of the
    twelve national chairmen of the
    United Jewish Appeal, the 1974
    campaign chairman of the United
    Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan
    New Jersey and a member of the
    board of governors of the Essex
    County chapter of the American
    Jewish Committee.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lou Aronson of Morton Towers, recent visitors
    at the Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem, are pictured in
    front of the new Shaare Zedek Medical Center, which is
    destined to become the largest and most complete medical ,
    complex in the Middle East. Mr. and Mrs. Aronson are
    Founders of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center.
    CREATIVE, TALENTED, INTO THE CRAFTS
    AND BORED WITH STAYING AT HOME?
    START YOUR OWN CRAFT BUSINESS with minimum investment and to
    suit your own time schedule. Sublease a shop-within-a-shop inside Miami's
    largest and most unique multi-craft store. Flat rate or percentage.
    WE HAVE OPENINGS FOR:
    JEWELRY MAKING
    CUSTOM FRAMING
    WEAVING
    NEEDLEPOINT
    LEATHERCRAFT
    OTHERS
    mr
    contact: \j/te C-^rctft C-*enter, corner w- Dixie H'9"way
    and N.E. 147th Street North Miami.
    947-7307,
    LEN CHUSMIR


    Pcge 10-B
    mVh # / HerkHar
    Friday July 5, 1974
    Gardner I?
    Not Typical
    Dog Owner
    Benamin F Gardner Jr., th?
    m usl kennel owner a! Biici
    Dog Track, i- not what \ou would
    coil a typical "dolman."
    B n is a schoil teacher and he
    ii blackin fact the f'r-t I I
    to be booked at a greyhound
    track ir Florida.
    "1 don"! think you can r / i
    anything serious :nto the fact I'm
    ihe fiiit black man to be in-
    vwhed in greyhound racing."
    (iaidner said "I guess the others
    are not as interested in it as I
    jta. You don't see manyif any
    black horse owners either."
    Born in Haliandale and raised
    in Key West, the 28 year-old pur
    p!e heart Yu-t Nam veteran
    became Interested in dog rac:n^
    two years igo when a friend gave
    him a greyhound as a pet Be
    tra <: the doj (Gh?tt> Won
    himself and raced it at the Key
    \1e-\ track.
    Gardner, who was on 'he track
    tsm at Key WOTt High, equate*
    dlrvjf racing with that MWrt. "I've
    1- !>s liked the running ... th
    competition .. and now that I
    can't do ;t a* well anymore the
    dou lo for me."
    F,\ en more important to Gard-
    ner ii *he conditioning. '1 enjjy
    the training aspect th? most
    MtuaHv I hone to buv a farrr.
    an.1 .' oreeding But tin.'-
    a long way off vet. in the n
    time I expect to have the be>t
    racing kennel in the state."
    Gardner is racing a kennel of
    37 dogs at Biscayne. Most of
    them are leased from other own
    ers but 10 belong solely to him.
    One litter of pu?s was raised in
    his own home. Thev are now with
    his stepfather. Willie Hall, who
    i> conditioning them at the Flor
    ida Greyhound College in Ocala.
    A graduate of the University
    of Miami. Gardner teaches special
    education in a Dade County jun
    ior high school. His wife. Inez
    graduated from Florida Inters
    UonaJ University, where she
    majored in elementary education.
    th..- spring.
    It is significant that Gardner
    is making his debut at Biscayne
    That's the track where I saw
    my first greyhound race," he con
    firitd.
    Kominsky to Preside
    Chancellor Commander Ma>
    Kaminsky will preside at the sec-
    ond meeting of the month held b\
    ge Gershwin Ix>dge. Knights
    ofl Pythias, in the Surfside Com
    mur tj Center, 9301 Collins Ave..
    Monday. July 15. Samuel J
    Pubin is publicity chairman of
    the group, which has 1,000 mem
    hr<.
    NORTH MIAMI BEACH
    Condominium on lake Corner 4
    expciiiTei 1 bedroom, 1 j baths
    paneled porch ground floor
    Swim pool Lake Free Bus
    Orthodox temple IMl* nrrae.
    LUMCNTHAL 652-2228
    ARTS. IN TEL-AVIV
    One 4-Rm. Furn. Apt. ft One 3-Rm.
    Furn. Apt. from Aug. for 1 Year or
    Lett.
    Coll 531-6529 or 531-5577
    (Room 205)
    r
    FOR SALE
    300 Hioh Ho lido v orayerbeoks,
    Mrr Silb*rmon Edition It* Con-
    servative Synoaonaes, In food
    condition. Reasonably priced, All
    Interested parties please call
    Congregation Ohev Shalom, Orlando,
    Florida, 2*8-4650.
    L IZAAK A SOU
    325 SovboW Bldg. 371-4797
    FIRST ANNIVERSARY SALE
    Atfgs. af 14Kt. Chains & Importers
    af 18*Jt. Jewelry. Fashion Watches.
    WHOLISAU JCWtlMY STOKt
    Of FLORIDA."
    Parking Available
    A GIFT FOR OUR SUBSCRIBERS
    ENJOY THIS SPECIAL GIFT OFFER
    FROM THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
    The revolutionary find of the century ...
    and now you can own an outhentic replica
    absolutely free! If you are a current
    paid-in-full subscriber, just secure one
    new subscriber* and this valuable
    collector's item is yours.
    Historically significant, the Dead Sea
    Scrolls are the proud possession of the
    people of Israel. Your special gift is
    a true replica of the "Manual of Discipline",
    one of the original "Seven Dead Sea Scrolls"
    exhibited in the "Shrine of the Book" Museum,
    Jerusalem. It has been sealed and certified
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    illustrated booklet revealing the story of
    these famous scrolls with a condensed
    translation.
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    e
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    Ma


    r. July 5. 1974
    +Jeisii Mtrilirtr
    Page 11-B
    \
    Coming
    to
    Alton
    litoad
    [Aian E. Master (left), president of Barnett Bank of Miami
    iBeach N.A., and Bob Callander, vice president, look over
    plans at the Alton Road site of the bank's new "senior citi-
    |zen facility."
    Barnett To Build
    Bank For Seniors
    The first bank to bo expressly
    designed to serve senior citizens
    [will be built by Barnett Hank of
    Miami Beach, N_A.. it was an-
    nounced this week.
    The banka remote facility of
    Parnett Bank of Miami Beach
    will be located in the 1400 block
    at Alton Road.
    Aian E. Master, president, said
    the single-story. 1.500-square-foot
    facility would be built to serve
    the 17.000-plus population who
    n tide in the condominium and
    nntdl units of Miami Beach
    alone Biscayne Bay.
    This area, according to recent
    St rveys, is composed primarily of
    elderly residents.
    The concept of providing a
    banking facility for the senior
    citizen is not an afterthought,"
    Master said. "Our decision to
    build the facility at Alt mi Road
    reflects our commitment to the
    City of Miami Beach and its sen-
    ior residents to provide an addi-
    tional convenience. We are cur
    rently working with our archi-
    ls to that the new facility will
    provide every possible conven-
    ience for the elderly of our com
    mun:t>."
    "tr and Ms staff have been
    rking with the bank's archi-
    I '.- Kcmp-Bunclic of Jackson
    ^ leso that the new building
    : is "a nior citizen oriented "
    ster lid this Includes provid
    in.t: the building W:,n rumps meet
    federal specifications; provid-
    - >lli r counter drop-
    ped two I et from the ordinary
    pi I le easy access for
    * in wh< el h ilrs; and a num-
    ber of walk up window-; as well
    as three drive-up windows.
    ''We believe this will bo fie
    first hank in the nation to be
    expressly designed to m^et the
    needs of the elderlyboth in
    physical facilities and in our in-
    ternal operation."
    Master said that construction
    of the new facility would be
    underway in October, and "we
    hope to be open the spring of
    1975."
    In order to serve the needs of
    the elderly. Barnett Bank of Mi
    ami Beach plans to form a Sen
    ior Citizens \dvisory Council of
    approximately 12-18 persons
    which would meet on a regular
    basis to aid the bank in provid-
    ing specific services for the pop-
    ulation of the area. For example,
    an Initial suggestion by one sen
    ior citizen about having a person
    available to answer questions re-
    garding Social Security and Medi-
    care is now under consideration.
    "Our total commitment is to
    make the Alton Road facility re
    ceptive to the needs of the area,"
    Master said.
    The $700,000 bank building is
    expected to be the first banking
    facility in the nation whose de-
    sign and services are being plan
    ned well in advance of actual
    construction and may provide an
    "historical" first, according to
    vice president Bob Callander. Cal-
    lander said that to his knowledge,
    this is the first time any bank
    has been conceived as a service
    outlet for the financial and other
    needs of a concentrated popula-
    tion of senior citizens.
    The announcement was the sec-
    ond innovation hy Barnett Bank
    of Miami Bnach this year It re
    cently initiated a program to al-
    low hotels, motels, and retail
    stores to provide immediate cur-
    rency exchange sen ices for all
    foreign visitors.
    Officers of Barnett Bank of
    Miami Beach are Alan E. Master
    president; Theodore Kernel, exec
    utive vice president; Stanley N
    Bookbinder, senior vice president
    and cashier; .1 Edward Fahrner
    and Donald W. Sydow, senior vice
    dent Richard H. Chapman, vice
    vice president and trusl officer;
    Robert A. Callander. vice pre-:
    dent; Richard H (".."man.
    pi >sidev< and trust officer; R>b
    eit i Pflieger, vice president and
    seni tru^t officer; George A
    Gurchaa Gail J. Morrell, Leroy
    H i llenn M Runyan and
    R. Fii'.'ene Snidew, assistant vice
    presidents.
    Also Betty Amat, accounting
    officer; Rita Miller, assistant
    cashier; Jack M Brown, advertis
    inager; Anne K. Manzi,
    credil department manag
    Barbara i? Sullivan, data pro ;esa
    ing manager: Arthur W. Mangan,
    auditor: and Gustavo Herrero, as
    sistant au litor.
    Directors of Barnett Bank of
    Miami Beach ars Robert Ander
    son. president. Barnett Bank ol
    Hollywood; Theodore Kenael
    executive \ice president, Barnett
    Bank of Miami Beach; Harry S
    Koffman. chairman. Public Loan
    Company, Inc.: Alan F. Master
    president. Barnett Bank of Mi
    ami Beach: Nathan Mcltzcr. presi
    dent. Flagler Federal Savings and
    Loan Association: Harry Mill
    man, president. Millman Con-
    struction Company: Herbert H
    Robins, executive director. Caril-
    Ion Hotel: Morris Rosenberg, at-
    torney at law: Leo Starr, presi-
    dent. Monarch Wine Company.
    Inc.; and Malcom Woldenberg.
    investor.
    Tallahassee Night Planned
    All incumbents and candidates
    have been invited to participate
    in the Voters Incorporated "Tal-
    lahassee Night" Tuesday at 8 p.m.
    in the Washington Federal Audi-
    torium. 1234 Washington Ave.
    Miami Beach, moderated by Har-
    ry Levy, president. The meeting
    is open to the public. There is no j
    admittance fee.
    Dado Federal
    Discounting
    Best Sellers
    Dade Federal Savings and loan
    Association has announced across-
    the board discounts of 24 to 55
    percent on best selling books and
    other volumes, all in publ sher's
    e '.tions, to members of its Savers
    Club.
    Unlike conventional book club
    options, the offer requires no ob-
    ligation to buy books, there are
    no monthly offerings that must
    be returned, no unwanted books
    are received in the mail, and
    prices include postage, handling
    and packaging.
    The list includes the best-sell-
    ing "Times To Remember" by
    Rose Kennedy for $5.95 (55 per-
    cent off): "Jaws for $4.95 (28
    percent off): Garson Kanin= "\
    Thousand Summers" for $4 50
    (24 percent off) and the only un-
    abridged collection in English of
    Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy
    Tales '40 percent off).
    No discount is lower than T4
    percent and some, such as the
    savings on Mrs. Kennedy's book,
    exceed 50 percent.
    The Savers Club book list.
    which will be updated every 90
    days, includes not only fiction but
    sports, religion, gardening and
    cooking.
    To be eligible for the discounts,
    one must be a member of the
    DFS Savers Club, which requires
    a deposit of $1,000 or more. The
    -club also permits liberal dis-
    counts on dining, entertainment
    and travel.
    JPS Reelects Shestack
    The Jewish Publication Society
    of America reelected PhiladH
    phia attorney and ajvic leader
    Jerome J. Shestack for a third
    term as president during the re-
    cent annual membership meeting
    20 Temple Menorah Teenager! To
    Spend Seven Weeks In Holy Land
    Twenty teenagers from Temple
    Menorah of Miami Beach left on
    an Israel Pilgrimage this week.
    They will spend seven we< is
    tcuring th" Holy Land, studying
    Judaic texts, and meeting with
    the Israelis.
    The Temple Menorah groun
    will Hun with the National USY
    P.l| U) I-rael numbering
    about 1.000 teenagers from Amer-
    ica and Canada. Accompanying
    the group to Israel will be Amer-
    ican rabbis and youth leaders
    who will be joined in Israel by
    an Israeli staff especially pre-
    pared to nromote the educational
    and social welfare of the Amer-
    ican young people.
    Rabbi Mayer Abramowi'z.
    spiritual leader of Temple Meno-
    rah. wi'l wet with his teenagers
    during his visit to Israel this sum-
    mer when a special program will
    be arranged for the rabbi and his
    wife to lead th" Menorah group
    in special projects around Jeru-
    sal"m.
    "We are especially proud f
    this project." Rabbi Ahramowitz
    stated. "becaue one week in Is-
    ra-1 i= worth one year of Jew-
    ish education in America Ths"
    younsfters wil' return as insnired
    and enthu iastie leaders both in
    Temrle Mnorah and in the gen-
    eral Jewish community."
    Among the 20 pilcrim* are
    Steven Greenspan, who will be
    on a special mission to Russia,
    and Frank Varon. Jr. who w 1!
    participate in the national USY
    leadership seminar in Jerusalem.
    Frank wai recently elected presi-
    dent of the Greater Miami Youth
    Council.
    They Will be accompanied bv
    Isaar Arber. Carlos Punriik. Len-
    ny Maiman, David Jove. Brian
    Oberlander, Marc Sincer. Luii
    Brafman. Albert Yahva. Lizctte
    Zacarias, Sara Schwartzbaum. So-
    pia Sapoznik, Celia Zacaria-. Mau-
    ri en Avery. Ana Gartenbaum,
    Pi ter (iroifeld, Sara Esquenazi,
    LLlian <:. mb rg and Os<
    ger.
    Flagler Breaks
    Most Greyhound
    Racing Records
    With the end of its 1973-74 sea-
    son Tuesday night Flagler Dog
    Track cl aiiy emerged as the No.
    1 greyhound track in the world
    after breaking virtually every rec-
    ord in the racing industry.
    With a total betting handle of
    more than $81 million over four
    months of racing. Flagler easily
    shattered the previous best of
    $76,587,818 set hy Biscayne Ken-
    nel Club last year.
    More than a million people at-
    tended th races at Flagler dur-
    ing the 1973 74 season, which ran
    from Nov. 7-Jan. 9 and from May
    1 July 2.
    Three world betting records
    were broken the night the 15th
    $100,000 International Classic was
    held June 22. as Flagler became
    the first track in the history of
    greyhound racing to handle m-re
    than $1 mil1 ion in a single night.
    TV total of $1,013,974 was a
    word record as well as the day's
    matine-ni:*ht performance total
    of $1,461,020. Flagler had held
    the previous sinri- night record
    Of 930 630 set on the night of the
    14th Clastic la ler had also held the previous
    combination record of H.359,068
    se last May 4,
    Flagler's 1974 75 seann wHl
    h"?in next Sept 5 with the split
    meeting ending Nov. 6 Tie sec-
    ond half of the season will start
    next July
    For A Change Of Pace..
    If you're planning a sales or
    incentive meeting for your cor-
    poration, or a convention of any
    >ort. Nassau in the Bahama.-.
    would provide a delightful change
    of pace and the Halcyon Bal-
    moral Hotel is THE place to get
    it all together.
    Special meetings become even
    more special when held at this
    elegant yet relaxed island resort.
    Superior accommodations and
    personalized service make the
    difference.
    The hotel is designed for the
    good taste of those who appreel
    ate the finest arrangements and
    facilities be the) top produc-
    er-;, top-echelon executives or
    simply prized members of a
    worthy organization.
    Halcyon Balmoral is a com-
    plete meeting facility self
    contained and well appointed. The
    hotel has a gift shop, beauty
    salon and barber shop, boutique
    for men's and ladies' apparel,
    liquor store, straw market and
    effers 24-hour laundry .service
    and dry cleaning.
    For a change of pace, your
    group might like an outdoor buf-
    fet or barbecue, easily arranged.
    For fun, there are surrey rides
    into town for Bay Street shop-
    ping or simply seeing the sights.
    Between sessions there is the
    recreation room with ping-pong
    and billiards, or the large pool
    area with palm-lined terrace for
    relaxing. There's boat dock swim-
    ming, too, plus an inviting, in-
    vigorating choice of recreational
    pursuits, depending on how ath-
    letic you feel,
    feel.
    Halcyon Balmoral has an un-
    usually large selection of meet
    ing rooms You can break out in-
    to a variety of concurrent ses-
    sions with each small group in
    attractive, comfortable quarters.
    Groups of 30 to 250 fit comfort-
    abb into the hotel, depending on
    season.
    Haivcon Balmoral Hotel on Cable Beach
    With 110-volt current in the
    hotel, you can be sure all your
    audio-visual equipment can be
    plugged right in and ready to go.
    Of course, at Halcyon Balmoral
    you dont have to bring your
    projectors just your slides and
    films.
    The hotel has a wide assort-
    ment of equipment to fit most
    meeting plans.
    For example, you will find an
    overhead projector, a 35mm slide
    projector. 16mm sound motion
    picture projecto.% 8mm silent
    film projector, as well as screens
    f assorted sizes plus lecterns.
    easels and blackboard even
    a stage for your presentation
    If your sessions include inter
    national audiences. Halcyon Bal-
    moral can provide multilingual
    translation Stenographic service
    also is available.
    And when the work day is over,
    your guests can rent cars, motor-
    cycles or motor scooters for ex-
    ploring the island of New Prov-
    idence, or they can try their
    luck at a casino on Paradise Is
    land if they are so inclined.
    Truthfully, you'll all return
    homeas refreshed as from a
    vacation barely aware you've
    been on a "working holiday."
    Come to think of it. even that
    doesn't sound half bad.
    M H L



    1
    raae 12-15
    J!pw##> fhrHkto t
    Friday July 5. 1974
    , JWVA Installs 1974-75 Slate
    | At 23rd Annual Convention
    Continued from Page 1-B
    to Murray Solomon No. 243 of
    Coral Gables, and a citation to
    Hisleah-Miami Springs No. 681.
    Community Relations trophy
    for over 75 members was pre-
    sented to Norman Bruce Brown
    No. 174 of Miami, and a citation
    to West Miami No. 223. For under
    75 members, a trophy was given
    to South Dade No. 778 and a
    citation to Palm Beach No. 408.
    Servicemen's Service for over
    75 members to West Miami No.
    223 and a citation to Norman
    Bruce Brown No. 174. Under 75
    member?, trophv to South Dade
    No. 778.
    Veterans Services for members
    over 75. trophy given to West
    Miami No. 223 and citation to
    Norman Bruce Brown No. 174.
    For under 75 members, a trophy
    was given to Murray Solomon
    No 243
    i Senior Citizens, for member-
    ship over 75. trophy to West Mi-
    ami No. 223. and a citation to
    Miami Beach No. 330. For under
    75 members, Robert K. Franzblau
    1 cf Miramar. was given a citation.
    Membership numerically, tro-
    phy was given to Harry H. Cohen
    No 723 and a citation to Victor
    B. Freedman No. 613 of Holly-
    wood. Members on a percentage
    basis for over 75 members, the
    trophy was given to Harry H.
    Cohen No. 723 and a citation to
    Victor B. Freedman No. 613. Un-
    der 75 members, trophy was pre-
    sented to William Kretchman No.
    730 of Ft. Lauderdale. and a cita-
    tion to South Dade No. 778. The
    individual member who brought
    in the most members was Jeanne
    Farkas of Harry H. Cohen No.
    723.
    Hospital, over 75 members, tro
    phy to West Miami No. 223, and
    a citation to Abe Horrowitz No.
    682 of North Miami Beach. Hos-
    pital, under 75 members trophy
    to Abe Ader No. 246 of St. Peters-
    burg, and a citation to Colonel
    David Marcus No. 746 of North
    Miami.
    As there is no trophy for Cul-
    tural, Point East No. 698 was
    given a citation. Also no trophy
    has been established for Legisla-
    tion, and for membership over 75.
    West Miami No. 223 was pre-
    sented a citation and Four Free-
    doms No. 402 of Miami Beach
    was given a citation for member-
    ship under 75.
    For membership over 75, West
    Miami No. 223 was awarded a
    trophy for Publicity, and Harry
    II. Cohen No. 723 was given a
    citation. Under 75 members, Hia-
    leah-Miami Springs No. 681 won
    the Publicity trophy and Colonel
    David Marcus, a citation.
    The Aid to Israel program, for
    members over 75, Harry H. Co-
    hen No. 723 was presented a
    trophy and a citation to Victor B.
    Freedman No. 613. Under 75
    members, Robert K. Franzblau
    No. 177 of Miramar was given a
    trophy and South Dade No. 778.
    a citation.
    For Program, over 75 members,
    trophy to West Miami No. 223
    and a citation to Harry H. Cohen
    No. 723. Under 75 members, cita
    tions were given to Paul Suren
    sky No. 409 of Clearwater. and
    Pompano Beach No. 196.
    Historian trophy was won by
    West Miami No. 223 and a cita
    tion to Norman Bruce Brown No
    174. both for over 75 members.
    For under 75 members, trophy
    to South Dade No. 778, and a
    citation to Cape Kennedy No. 775
    Department President Evelyn
    Ferdie announced that her first
    Council of Administration meet-
    ing will be held Monday evening.
    July 22. in the Granada Room of
    the First Federal Savings Bank
    Building. SW 27th Avenue and
    22nd Street.
    First Residents Will Move
    Into Rossmoor In September
    F.rft residents will move in to
    Rossmoor Coconut Creek, the
    adults-only "total environment*'
    community being developed near
    Pompano Beach and exit 24. Flor-
    ida Turnpike, in September, ac-
    cording to Larry Uchin, vice
    prej denl .if sales.
    Thi first Rossmoor building to
    be completed will be the com-
    munity's administration, sales
    ar.d information offices. Five
    furnished and decorated model
    apartments will be on display as
    part of the sales complex. Uchin
    noted. The models will include
    al! the basic floor plans present-
    ly offered.
    Construction in the Bahamas
    Village section, the first develop
    mer.t phase, is on schedule and
    mo. id. according
    to : d rector. In adiition
    1o th.- administration building.
    " of th" res! lential manors
    buildings 1101, 1102 and 1103
    d out" (roofed)
    and foundations poured for 1C
    Wallw irk is under way on
    most "r tl
    Residences in the master-plan-
    ned community are priced from
    $17,900 to $35,500; there is no
    recreation lease and no land
    lease at Rossmoor Coconut Creek
    The 18-hole Rossmoor golf
    course will also be finished in
    September, and Uchin compli-
    mented golf-course architect Roy
    Rogers for bringing it to comple
    tion on schedule.
    Rossmoor Center, the $1.2-mil-
    lion social-recreational complex
    for the adult community, will be
    completed in November.
    The entrance esplanade at Gate-
    house One now has sidewalk
    poured: the fountain will very
    shortly by ready for water. Most
    of the shrubbery and foliage for
    the entrance area is planted and
    flourishingand the American
    flag is now very visible, flying
    over the entrance.
    Rossmoor's security-and-privacy
    wall is well under construction,
    and the section fronting Coconut
    Creek Parkway has been painted
    The decorative "Rossmoor Coco-
    nut Creek" custom-made tile
    panels are in place at the en-
    trance.
    Rossmoor Coconut Creek will
    have very advanced security
    measures, a community owned
    minibus transportation system,
    health services, a carefully-plan-
    ned social and cultural activities
    schedule, and a sophisticated safe-
    ty system.
    The temporary model exhibit
    and sales offic is at 3880 Coco
    nut Creek Parkway, one-half mile
    west of exit 24. Florida Stat-
    Turnpike, at the Pompano Beach
    exit.
    A two bath, two-bedroom mode'
    residence il on exhibit at the
    model and s.iles office, and com
    plete floor plans, a topographic
    scale model of the entire com
    munity and other information i
    either on display or available
    daily, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.. including
    Saturdays. Sundays and holidays
    HIGHLANDS: NORTH CAROLINA
    camp hiqhUndec
    A Residential Camp for Boys and Girls
    Ages 7-16 Now Enrolling for Second Session
    July 20-August 17
    Also split Sessions
    July 20-August 3
    August 3-August 17
    David Azbel, 63 year old
    Moscow physical chemist
    who was imprisoned lor 16
    years under Stalin, staged a
    17-day hunger strike before
    being issued a visa and al-
    lowed to emigrate with his
    wile and son.
    CAMP HIGHLANDER offers a mountain o* fun with horse-
    bock riding, nature study, arts and crafts, archery and ri-
    flery. Water sports include kayaking, sailing, tkimg and
    canoeing. Diversified program developed to meet nedt
    of all age groups, including Highlander's advanced
    camping and climbing H.A.W.K program.
    Contact Mr. Fred R. lawman
    PINE CREST SCHOOL
    1501 NE. 62nd St.
    Ft LawdWreW*. 33301
    Ww: 772-6550
    I
    Mrs. Cynthia Kronish. chairman of the executive committee,
    presents ORT's yearly contribution to the Student Revolving
    Loan Fund to Eugene Greenspan, executive director ol the
    Jewish Vocational Sarvice.
    ORT's 1st Revolving Loan Grant
    Goes To Newly Arrived Student
    Mrs. Cynthia Kronish. chair-
    man of the executive committee,
    represented Women's American
    ORT, (Organization for Rehabili-
    tation Through Training) South-
    eastern Fionda Region, at a
    meeting of the Student Revolving
    Loan Funds Committee to grant
    the fira of this year's loans
    last week at the Jewish Voca-
    tional Service.
    The initial loan was granted to
    a newly arrived Soviet immi-
    grant from Odessa who will re-
    side in Dade County.
    The 31 year-old female, a cer-
    tified, licensed beautician in the
    Soviet Union, will begin an eight
    week beauty culture course.
    The loan will help this young
    lady to replace the tools of her
    trade, confiscated when she de-
    parted the Soviet Union, learn
    American hair styling, updated
    methods of cosmetology and to
    prepare her to meet the State of
    Florida requirements for licens-
    ing, Ipon completion of the
    course she already has a job wait-
    ing for her.
    Women's American ORT is
    proud to be a part of this worthy
    service to resident* of Dade
    County. The ORT revolving loan
    with the Jewish Vocational Serv-
    ice will be used to train newly
    arrived Soviet immigrants in the
    vocational fields.
    M
    Academy of
    Learning
    The Academy of Learning
    a clinical school for learning disabilities
    announces the opening of a second facility
    5555 Biscayne Boulevard
    Mm mi. Florida
    661-5544
    I
    ti
    y<
    y
    B
    3;
    I
    b
    Summit Academy
    a private school offering an alternative
    where each child achieves his oun potential
    announces the opening of a second facility
    5555 Biscayne Boulevard
    Miami, Florida
    667-2374
    (
    K


    July 5. 1974
    +Jmlstinork9kri
    Page 13-B
    LECAl NOTKE
    LEGAL NOTICE
    i-
    ! 11
    '! %'
    %. :
    >-M*ii- >*** *-.
    * jl -


    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
    OADE COUNTY
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    CASE NO. 74-16355
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
    In Re The Marriage of
    MATIAS KunRlCI V.7.. iiust-ami
    and PASTORA ROpRIOirEl Rile
    'tot i'astora w>rmv:vr.x
    E North Turner 8t
    Lansing. -Mi' tii:>i> It.....
    voi' ARE HEREBY notified that
    Petition for Dissolution of Marriaire
    has been filed utalniil you and you
    are in n by r< quired t.> set ^ a <
    I your answer "r other pleading to
    the Petition on the Husband's Attor-
    ney, LESTER ROGERS, whose ad-
    ilresi i- in \ u it Avenue, Mlam
    I" I < > r. and i;i. the original
    null Hm- Clerk of the above styled
    Couri "ii "i before 'his 15th .lav *f
    in 1974 "i .i Default will bi
    against you.
    DA'i l- 11 this mth day ol Juni '
    RICH .l(H r DRINKER
    i llerk i ill- < "lr uii 'ourt
    ,'.% a D.WADE
    I '. put i i
    ; 14.21-28 T :,
    r C. Guggenheimer, (left). New York
    Commissioner of Consumer Afiairs;
    e E. Matzkin (center), national president
    adassah; and Rose Goldman, national
    ibership chairman of Hadassah at rally
    nching Hadassah's 1974-75 membership
    paign this week. "Money cannot buy
    it a volunteer gives to many movements
    institutes," Mrs. Matzkin, president of
    country's largest women's volunteer or-
    -.izatidn with 340,000 members, said in
    I
    answer to a resolution opposing volunteer-
    ism passed by NOWthe National Organ-
    ization for Women. Commissioner Guggen-
    heimer said that she is a member of NOW
    and supports its position on equal job op-
    portunity and equal pay for women. "But,"
    she said, "until children are incubated from
    birth to 18.. some women will choose to stay
    home. These women should have the free
    choice to work full time or to volunteer at
    their own pace. Liberation means options."
    Icbbi Simon April, who served as installa-
    >:: officer at the May 15 donor luncheon
    ?!d by Aviva Chapter American Mizrachi
    >men's Organization, is shown at left ad-
    inistering the oath of office to Mrs. Joseph
    3'.h, social secretary, and at right to his
    ::e, who began her eleventh term as pres-
    ident. Center photo shows the five vice pres-
    idents who will be serving with her during
    the coming year (from left to right, front
    row) Mrs. Nathan Zeichnsr and Mrs. Isaac
    Fmmer; (back row' Mrs. Ben Jeffries, Mrs.
    Philip Goldberg and Mrs. Alex Stahl.
    LEGAL NOTICE
    notice of action
    Constructive service
    iNO PROPERTY)
    "HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    VENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    )F FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    IIV'L ACTION NO 74-f718
    kCTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    ti... Marriage of
    I'.iAII Al.l.
    | ind.
    , !
    ISTINE i.kk A I I.
    by '
    .! hristinh i kk a i i
    -i'km'-: unknown
    vhe hereby notified
    lion fa Dial nlution ol Mar-
    hue been f11 1 against >"U and
    required to serve copy of
    |written defense*, if any, to it on
    .1 Scheinbersj attorney for Pe-
    ti hose address Is KWITNEY,
    DP X- SCHEINBERO P A 420
    Road, Mian) Beach, Florida
    nd file the original with the
    the r.hnve styled court on or
    f- luiv :'>,. 11.74: otherwise '
    will be entered asalnal ypu for
    ellef demanded in the eoinptalnt
    lUtlon.
    notice shall he published once
    week for four consecutive weeks
    IK JEWI8H PI ORIDIAN
    pTNESS my hand and the seal of
    court ..i Miami. Plorida on this
    I nf June. 1974.
    RICHARD P. BRISKER
    A- Clerk, Circuit Court
    Dade County, Florida
    By II HERMAN
    As Deputy t'lerk
    [cult <-ourt Seal)
    flTNEY, KROOP *
    CHEINBERO. pa.
    Uru.-e .1 Soheinber*
    oln Road. Suite tit
    ^mi Beach, Florida ISIS*
    Attorney for Petitioner
    t>ne: C8-7575
    i ;s 7 S-lt-U
    IEGAL NOTICE
    NOTICE UNCER
    F CTITiOLS NAME LAW
    N< >1 |i : IS H ':'".' GIVEN thai
    the u :" i"
    i ,.. iii MN.I IMth S set,
    \ : M Florida m del tl fic-
    |. :\ N COUNTRY
    FEMININE FASHN >NS I K nds to
    r eaist I nam with the < ''.< of
    i Circuit i l Dade i "ounty,
    PI. rl I i
    t< >WN ''NTRY OUTl BT
    SHAPIRO, FRIFD WBI1 8CHEER
    41 : I : oln R. Suite MB
    Miami Bea
    : s-is-19-tt
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCT.VE SERVICE
    NO P^TPERTY)
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JLD'C'AL CIRCUIT
    OF FLOR'DA. IN AND FOR
    DACE COUNTY
    CIVIL ACT'ON NO 7* '5*6*
    ACTION FOR DISSOLLTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    In RE The Man II . CHARI ES B .....\'A>*
    Husband
    and
    THKI.MA sen; MAN.
    TO: a MM CHAR! BS B II'MAN
    pgCl Bos MM4
    gheni ird Air Fo I: I I
    Te\ .- ft
    Vcir ARE ME tEBY NOTIFIED
    thnt an aci ilasolutla I Mar.
    t uu has been filed utainsl v inu are required to serve cony of
    your written def >n I inj to it on
    TALIANOFF H BADER, BSQS.. at-
    tomeys for Petitioner, whose .hires-
    ,. 4 | | Ro I !. Suite -7 I, Miami
    H- ..-h Florida '"<'' '"
    nal with the clerk of the above
    1 court on >r before July 17. IIMS
    otherwise a defaull will be entered
    asainst you for tha railof demanded
    In the i mol ilnl or petition.
    Tub!ish-.i one*
    ,.,. h week r four consecutive weeks
    In THE JEWISH PDORIDIAN.
    UITN'KSS ml inl ;l1'" sra! nl
    V.: ,m:. Florida on this
    -,-!. da] Jut i. !"4
    y ,-H \"I> P BRINKBR
    .-rl. Circuit .'ourt
    H i.l.. loui "'. Florida
    |:. >EN
    5 ? lerk
    fCircisi' Court Soal)
    TALIANOFF ArfD BADKR. Ed'jS.
    I_ [.,.. .-::,. I Suite 270
    v n| ii- i Florl 11 'I'tiM
    Attornw f,r hUtt-jr^ f/|
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DAPE COUNTY
    PROBi E DiVlS'ON
    FRANK 8. COWLING
    PROBATE NO. 74-3879
    In RE Estate of
    OEI 'ROE I IZARI'S
    . ...a
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All i"re! i......I All Persons
    Havlri Claims or Damands Atrslnsl
    Said i: tati
    J"ou are hereby notified ami re-
    quired in innl any claims and de-
    mand* which you maj have naralnsi
    il estate of QEOROE LAZARl'8,
    .!. ased I i'. of 1 lade fount v.
    plorida, '" the Circuit Juda*. ol Dade
    ." unty, ami file ti'..' same in dupll-
    , and af pi "v If i In Serf ion 733.11
    K orida Statutes, in their offlcei
    the Count) Courthouse In Dade Coun-
    ty, Florida, within four calendar
    months frm : I me of the first
    publication hereof t the same will he
    barred
    Piled at Miami Florida, tins L'lth
    day I June, A l> 1974
    SHIR1 BY I. I A7.ARFS. a k a
    SARAH I AZARUfl
    As Executrix
    Fir-i publication <>f this notice on
    -> day of June. 71
    BPAPBER ZEMEI-. ROSKIN.
    HE11 BllnNNKH AND KAP.P PA.
    v nev for Kxe. utrlx
    inn v Bls> a) ns Blvd.
    Miami. Kb. M133 ?,s
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    11TH JUD'CIAL C'RCUIT IN AND
    FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
    NO. 74.18C58
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATON
    In KK. The Marriage of
    AI-NKS NOEL,
    Husband,
    and
    CHF.NA PHILLIP NOEL.
    YOU. CHEN A PHILLIP NOEU
    residence unknown, are required to
    file your an war t I 'he petition for
    dissolution of marriage with the rierk
    ..f the above Courl and serve copj
    thereof upon : -' attorney,
    Herman Cohen Eso III 8 W 1st
    i Miami. Florid.. 3rtl3">. on or
    before July 10, IfM or else petition
    v ii; b.- confess i
    Date .Tun,- It, 1974
    R1CHAB tor*
    By P \ND
    Deputy .'''-';
    /i* 7 l-li-ll
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
    hi ii ed, dealt Ins. li i image In
    i under the I ; name of
    tCO-MODO PAVINO COMPANY al
    -i W Flaxler Strei t, Su li
    Miami, Plori'la, Intend lo register said
    name with the Clerk of the Circuit
    Court of Dadi County, Florida.
    JULIAN PINA i." i
    MERCEDES PINA I 0 I
    7 -,
    ^B i
    ^Bs^ ^V M Br ~*m
    ^H aasBsa. I 1 T T# EV V BBf H
    h wW a, B BBsf ^Bsi
    ' I JU 1 r r _4
    I / ^ I f A V m ^
    ^^^jM
    Mi *> ( F rJ
    I Ml ^ BBssl^*v-: -N-.'ir^"-*1^^^^
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
    HADE COUNTY
    NO. 74-16407
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
    IN RE: The marriage of
    M \i:i;i'KRlTK PINTRO.
    Wife
    ami
    I.OIIS PINTRO.
    Husband,
    YOU, LOUIS PINTRO residence
    unknown, are required to fllo your
    answer lo the petition for dissolution
    of marriage iih the .'lerk of the
    ibove ourt and serve a cony thereof
    upon the petitioner's attorney, Herman
    Cohen, Esquire, Sti s u 1st Street.
    Miami, Florida, 33130, on or before
    July 19, ::'T4 or else petition will be
    nfessed
    Dated: June 11. ir>74
    RICHARD P. BRINKER
    Clerk Circuit Court
    B) A I> WADE
    li.-nutv Clerk
    6 14-21-21 in
    i
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THg
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLOR'DA. IN AND FOR
    DADg COUNTY
    GENERAL JUR SDICTION
    DIVISION
    CASE NO. 7329893
    NOTIOE BY PUBLICATION
    ISABEL MARY KRUBGEB and
    MATILDA S 'Al.l.AN.
    Is^tWfsa, .
    VIOLET I". Kt ILAR. and
    Km AR. her
    huabai 'I and ROBERT J< iSEPH
    KOI AR and DOROTHY K'U.AIt.
    i if.*, and If in11 *'f
    the al iii'-'i
    Def. ndants be dead th. h" un-
    helrs,
    1... i
    or
    a ma under JBT
    or agn ini t them and T \ .
    per ons unkn *i
    i ring -it
    . a m '" ^i.t

    r under

    , i.
    T'.: VII '' ET K K' LAR tnd
    ---------------------------------------- K'H.ai:. .r
    u
    lead. I .
    nest
    almanl
    -..'-. ui ... r or t i'iisi ih< in and 1
    i the
    i tiffg | ilmlrg i
    .i rest In t inds.
    -r in der said 1
    YOL' WKV. HEREBY NOTIFIED
    that ai IET T1T1 I I I
    the I ; ropertj In I ia< -
    ty, Florida:
    i i Block I ol TRI 'PICAL ES-
    TATES rdins th' Plat
    ti,, ., f, re. ord. d Plat ,: '
    Page '. of Hi. Publl Re. 'i- '.f
    !.i. Ci untj Plorida,
    has b. en filed ogainsl you and voo
    in., required lo serve copy of your
    rltien defen.-e ii any. lo II SA '' -
    L'EL I. SMITH. Attorney for Plain,
    tiffs whose address is 120 South Dixie
    Highway, suite 4K, Coral Oablea.
    pi, |i and t i. tl or
    in. Clerk of the ab. vc I
    Court on or before the 12th day >f
    juiv 1971; otherwise a default
    nat you foi i <-
    mat ded In the Cumnlalnt.
    This Notice shall be published
    x.... k f. foui ons. week".
    In the Ji wish Floridlai ,
    WITNESS my I and ai seal *
    Court 'in- HOI day of June. l74.
    RICHARD P BRINKER,
    ig Clei iid t ourt
    I., i. pePIETRO ,
    A- Depu .
    (fi, ul| C u S. li
    \...\ ZAMFT \- SMI I l!
    Attorn. for Pla
    ,.., g, ,. .. |, xii H ghv. i: -'i I
    G ibh F
    7/5
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    11TH jUU.C.i-1- C.r-CUiT, .N ANl)
    FOR DAOE COUNTY FLORIDA
    No. 74-9J30 (Lake.
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    NOTICE bV 1-oelL.ICATION
    IN 1; E Thi in irriaare of
    l,i:< IN M.M U.I.EN PEBTS,
    1 hi-1.
    and
    ANA DEI. 'ARMEN PEBTS,
    Wife
    you. ANA PEI, CARMEN PEET8,
    i. idem i unk n n, are re quit ed to
    i || | in i er to the l"1' It.....
    lulton of marrl uri aiOl the Clerk
    ..f the ai- I serve .....ov
    Ihi reof upon Ihi i" I lonei iti
    Herman Cohen. Bsq 822 S.V
    Street. Miam Floi Ida, lo, on or
    i 1974 oi
    w111 i' onfi '!
    11.. Jui 1971
    RK )l \!:l> P URINKE
    Circuit C 'urt
    By A D w M'K
    i'.;iu'\ '
    . ,.14-21-28
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
    (NO PROPERTYI
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA. IN *ND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 7416076
    ACTION FOR DISSOLLTION
    PF MARRIAGE
    IN RE The Marriage t
    JOAN HONDLRICH MATA.
    Wife,
    and
    \-;i KNSION' MATA.
    Husband
    Ti. ASCENSION MATA
    Uu,....,ii iiMress ui
    H A*K HEREBY NOTIFIED
    that an actlAn for Dissolution of Mar-
    riage has been filed against you and
    you are required to serve copy '
    your wr'tii ii defenses, if any. to ii on
    lOCIS U BELL EH. attornes for Pi
    mi,,...... whose address Is 120 Lincoln
    Road Sui'e 828, Miami Beach. Flr-
    i.'a (::':'.:. and file the original with
    Hie clerk of the shove styled court i n
    or before July 17. IOT4; otherwise
    defaull "ill :.....ntered against vou for
    th. relief '1em.ui.led In the complaint
    ' '"' ... t
    This notice shall he published once
    eath week for four consecutive weeks
    In THE JEWISH FI/^KHMAN
    WITNESS mi hand and the seal of
    aid COUrl al Miami Florida, on this
    7lh day "f Jure. 1!'74
    RICHARD P BRINKBR
    As 'lerk. Circuit Court
    Da le CounM FloHda
    B) i SVEEDEN
    As Denutv Clerk
    (Circuit Court Seal)
    i <\- s i: RBLIJER. ESO
    s Lincoln Road. Suite SSI
    Miami Beach. Pla BHM
    Mtornev Ii Petitioner
    1/14-21-21 7 -
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE IS HEREB i' ''.!v l-N
    th. undersigned, desli H Jo
    n business under th. I
    of QOCRMET QALLEK "W
    SUBMARINE al I A t-ey
    Road, Miami Beach. F
    ,,. register said n ime with t
    Circuit Coi
    EONARDA YE ilN N
    Sole i n>
    M \! N FABEP
    I
    i.; An Bu
    '
    - 1 11
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
    ihi undersigned, 'lesjrinK t.. sngaare i"
    ess under the fictitious name of
    IAFATETTE HOTKl. al M1 Collins
    Ay... Miami Beach Florida Intenda to
    register said name with the Clerk of
    ih. Circuit Court of Dade County,
    Plorida
    JACOB MOIDEL
    I eon A. Ensteln. Atty.
    Attornnv for Applicant
    4J0 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach Fi.
    U 7/5-12
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TME
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DAOE COUNTY
    PRCBSTE DIVIS'ON
    PROBATE NO 74-4112
    GEORGE E. SCHULZ
    In RE: K
    l.i'\\ IE CLARENCE HOW ELL
    'notice to creditors
    v I Creditors and All Pet
    'la in- or I lemai di Af i
    s u are h< reby notified an i re-
    qulred lo present any claims and de-
    la which you may have gainst
    , ., ,;,. of I' >WIE I.AKKN. t.
    Hi iWEI 1. d ased late of I
    Count) Florida, to the Clrcuil Judisea
    ,; Dade County, and file the same
    , Hp||, a ind as provided In Sec-
    , ; 6, Florida Statutes. In their
    County Courthousi in
    County. Flori la within I iur
    dar months from the tune of the
    ai on hereof, or the same
    ill l.i '''' i ed ,...
    Piled al Miami Florida, tins .-.th.
    : Jun< A.D 1974.
    EDRA S YOl N'l
    \: Administratrix
    Firs! nui'i ailon "I this n itlce on
    rt-,. ggth .lav of June. l7d
    Tip K Ts- iUPRAKE
    Vttorney for EDRA 8. TO UNO
    .:.i Miracle Ml Suite 222
    Coral Cables, Florida H1I4
    . 2s I
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA N AND FOR
    CADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 72-6353
    In RE' Estate of
    ES TRUST
    NOT'CB TO CREDITORS
    T Ml Creditors and All Persons Hav-
    rjlalms or Demanda Against sail
    You'an h reby notified and -."luired
    to present any claims and demands
    v.i' ch you ma\ have against th.' es-
    i HELEN TRUST decea I Uvta
    ,.f Dade County, Florida to the Cir-
    cuit Judges ui Dade County, and file
    the same In duplicate and as rrm I
    | g |8, Flori.la Statutes, IrU
    the'r offices in the County C .urthousel
    ia bade County, Florida, within ("url
    lar iia nths from the tim- "f thds
    ii hereof "r the same
    Will he barred.
    Filed at Miami, Ptorida, this Dtix
    I Hay, A D. 174
    SAM TRU8T
    A- Executi r
    First publication of 'his notice on
    8th da\ of June. 1H74.
    DAV.D DOl DMAN, B8Q.
    v..... Executor
    710-All:-ley Bid*., Miami. Pla
    i 28 7/5


    Page 14-B
    'Jenist ikrkti^r
    Friday July 5, 1974
    Composer Milhaud Passes
    GENEVA (JTA) Private : \ e:e htld
    at the Jewish cemetery June 89 tor Darius Mil tuned
    French-Jewish composer who ied urday at tl 1 tgt of 81.
    The services, in conformance witl haud'i
    conducted b> jUbbi Alexander Safran. Hi* body was buried in
    Aiz-En-Frovence, the town of his birth.
    Mil!;.. I was a tan who left 1
    cam.: hamber ntfsfl
    He enjoyed particular success in the Unil States e
    he was tl uctor of 1 eag Sj oy Orchestri
    ICGAl NOTICE
    LEGAL NOTICf
    LEGAL NOTRE
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA IN AND
    FOR DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIV'S'ON
    PROBATE NO. 71-4785
    N .:: Estate it
    ; ;
    r CE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
    APPLICATION FOR DISTRI BUTION
    AND FINAL DISCHARGE
    ' >T li hereby gl> i n thai I
    .1 The Final !:;
    f--- Dls-
    II Ex ecu 11 I
    \;u:u-' lT4, Will
    applj
    NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICF
    (NO PROPERTVi (NO PROI'ERTvi
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF IN THE CIRCUIT COL"- -,-
    THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL THE ELEVENTH JUDIC'AI
    CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AMI e-
    OADE fOUNTV DADE CO.Ntv
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74:7105
    !\ RE Tl '
    ka pa :i>a.
    Wife
    i xai \ ------
    Mil-1
    SE DEIDA

    YOI FIKD
    DADE CO.N7Y
    ACTION FOR DISSOLu-' )N
    OF MARRIAGE
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74.
    IN RE: Tl Man
    >SEPH AN ,;y,
    Petit I
    fink Tl I PIN El I8E SIM< .

    ED
    Obituaries
    GIILER
    MRS. ESTHER. 7. Ol Mil. p.--- I
    ftWM Wed Ju<- ** 8h :..- the
    mother of Archite u Norman nnd
    Oilier Sh.- Il ."Urvived by
    hu.-t.aml. Morris Ciller ..f Mil. sonn
    .Norman liiller ol MB und Charles
    Oilier of MB. Grandchildren Ira Oil-
    ier of MB, Mr.- Anita Grossman of
    Groton-on-the-Hud.-xin, NY.. Bryan
    Oilier of MB and Mrs Wendy Ra-
    phael of Collinsvillc. Va. Great-
    grandson Michael of Colllnsvllle The
    motto she lived by was "Treat ev-
    eryone with kindneiw." She was an
    Arti.it and a Hou.-euife She was '
    m*-mbpr of Temple Emanuel and
    Temple Emanuel Sisterhood, a Pink
    LeMty at kit Sinai Hospital and a
    Bembr of Shaloma Chapter of Hi-
    dassah. Shiva was observed ut the
    r- -Mlence of Norman Glller. Services
    were held at 'The Rivrside." Inter-
    ment Mt. Neb.i Cemetery.
    SCHULMAN. BUM, 74. ..f Miami
    Beach. Blaaberg.
    ULMAN, David. Ti. of North Miami
    Beach. BkMbWC,
    ZUCKER. Jack, St, of North Ba)
    Village. Riverside.
    BACHER. Ervinr. ST, "f Miami
    i ... >, Bl isberg.
    grant. Badle St, .>i Miami Baa oh.
    hlveralde
    LEPENDORS. Helen. M, Of Miami
    Beach. Newman.
    LEV IS. Amalie. Ut, of North Miami
    Beach. Newman.
    NASS, J;uk. K7. of North Miami
    : ... h. Riverside
    REICH. Louis, TS, of North Miami
    Beach. Bla,berit
    Rubin. Bernice, rs. of Miami
    ld
    tvler. Robert. ':. rormeriy >f
    Mi;.mi Beach. BlasBSIg.
    vangelder. Jennie, T7, oi North
    \i nn Beach Riverside
    COHEN. Nat!
    Riverside
    fink. Roee, II of Miami
    lesser, r.. Miami Bea h
    \. man
    KAPLAN. Ethel. SO, of Holly*
    i:i\
    sherwood. :
    M ; ml I
    DON. Mn B------. 74. of North B .y
    Village Newn
    ARNo. Sam, U Q
    Davidson. Leah, ::
    Mi. ?..l i<>-a. h I
    GORDON. Sa :
    i. ..
    HIM MEL.
    . tide
    "ARbAN. i. n v.. T. I M

    VNEISS
    Riverside. Im
    m<
    ALMAN. C
    I
    BRODER. : f Mlai

    -
    EISENSTEIN
    f Km
    RASCH. M
    Ul\. rtdde
    ROBINSON
    i
    f i bove-i amed
    of July, 1974
    v RE SARANG \. Bsei utrix
    JOSEPH 9CHMIKR
    Attori |
    Road Suite Ml
    Mil ml Bea h, Florida 33139
    7 S-12-19-2S
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
    the undersigned, desiring to engage in
    Sarah ami Moses Omsberg The ac- business under the fictitious name of
    five philanthropist and community THE COVERED WAOON it !4!"73
    participant came here 35 years ago South Dixie Highway. Miami Florida
    fr.ni NY Surviving are son. Steven intends to register said name with the
    Robinson of Miami, sisters. Mrs. Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
    Yvette Rosen son. Mrs Diana Jaffa County. Florida.
    and Mrs Sylvia Kaplan Brothers. BERNARD RAE INTERIORS. tWC
    NY 2 grandchildren Services were By HAROt D R MARKS President
    Calmon and Morris Ginsberg all of FRANKLIN D KRECTZEH. ESQ.
    held Thurs at 'The Riverside with Attorney for Anolicant
    Marl
    Poi ..11 l'i i .
    ofiVadi Coini .rids for approval '; in actloi >( YOU' ARE
    - rge as Executrix and you are i re has be. n fti.,i .,
    your wrlti -. if any, t.. it and you an
    SIDNEY EFRONSON, attorney t.r of your written defei
    Petil >ner whose add "'' DANIEL RETTER .. ','1
    Build nc. Miami. Florida Petitioner, whose ublr.
    ELSIE. 71. of MB. passed away
    U ed June Jh Wife of the late I-eo
    Robinson and daughter of tl-

    &wcrcU<6//iape,l
    AU. H VATH
    ra>iH* m thi iui
    r
    865-2353
    720 Snn'y Firil SirI
    e SHSl
    4 IWIKT'XS ci Hiv-ct
    interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
    SPILO. Albert W 73, of Miami
    Beach. Riverside. Interment Star
    of David.
    ELBErt. Julius. of North Miami
    Beach. Riverside.
    KASDAN. Charles. 74. of North
    Miami Beach. Riverside
    LAKS. Herman. 81. of Miami Beach.
    Blaabent.
    MELLER, Helen. 74. of Miami
    Beach. Riverside lntermnt Mt.
    Nebo Cemeterv
    PAULETTE. Helen. St, of Miami
    Beach. Riverside.
    ROSEN, Samuel. 5, ol Miami
    I le ich Riverside
    SOMMERS. Charles, ol Miami.
    Rivers..le
    SVv.nSKV. Irving. 49. of North
    Miami Beach. Riverside.
    SA^bENG, Harry, IS, >f North
    Miami Beach Levitt.
    CAMMERON. Edgar. S7. of Miami
    N v man
    2138 Biscayne Blvo.
    Miami. Florida I81S7
    U-Sl-M
    7>
    snid court at Miami. Florida on this
    17 day of June, !!>7l
    RICHARD P BRINKER
    As Clerk. Circuit Court
    Dade County. Florida
    (Olrcuit Court Seall
    Bv B J. FOY
    As Denutv ilerk
    SIDNEY EFRONSON
    611 Amslev Building
    Miami Florida 3311L'
    Attorney for Petitioner
    8/J1-28 7'S-U
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
    THE ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
    CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTV
    GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-IS7S4
    IN RE: The Marriage of
    ISRAEL NEWMAN Petitioner
    and
    Ji'l 1A NEWMAN, Respondent.
    TO: JULIA NEWMAN
    Dwelling I nit L-E
    in the Exeter
    M-tS ".";h Avenue
    New York New York
    YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    a copy of your An- 'hat an action for Dissolution of
    swer to the Petition on the Petition- Marriage has Deen filed against vou
    Ittorney. MARTIN BLITRTRIV and >'" ir" required to servi
    GOODMAN. Mae, .. .f North Miami 1440 NW 14ih Avent
    B isberu
    KAUFMAN. Rose. 85, ol Coral
    '; ib:.-.. aordon
    OLGIN. Besst : : Miami.
    i; ird 'ii
    POOEL. N ithan, N, .: Miami
    Bess h Newn
    ^f Miami RICHARD P RRJNKER b" entered against you for the relief
    Oerk if the Circuit Court demanded in the complain I or M
    Muiiti' Dade t'ountv. Florida This notice shall be published once
    Bv A D WADE each week for four consecutive weeks
    as Deputy Clerk "> the JEWISH FI.OI'.IDIAN
    Court Seali
    MI-SI 7 ft.
    rid file the original with the Kress Building. Ill N E S
    Clerk Of the above styled COUrl Ml or nue Miami. Florida
    before ,'uli .' '71 otherwise a de- IhH original with th.
    fault will he entered against vou for above atyled court on or
    the relief .lemanded in the complaint < IS74; otherwise a defaull rI
    or petition entered against vou for th* i
    This notice shall be published once mimded in the comiilamt
    each week for four consecutive weeks This notice shall be pul>'
    in the JEWISH FI-ORID1.W Mich week for four con-, u _
    WITNESS my hand and the seal of in the JEWISH FU>RIDUV
    WITNESS my hand and the
    said court at Miami Florida in thi..
    1. day of June. 174
    RICHARD P BRIXKCTt
    As Clerk. Circuit Court
    Bv B J FOY
    As Denutv Clerk
    (Circuit Court Seal)
    DANIEL RBTTER. ESQITRB
    111 N E Se,ond Avenue
    Miami. Florida 33132
    Attorney for Petitioner
    /n-js
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANO
    FOR DADE COUNTV. FLORIDA
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    CASE NO. 74.17313
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
    IN UK- The Marriage of-
    KATHLEEN ANNE PUMA.
    Petitioner.
    and
    ANTHONY DOMINICK PCM A.
    Respondent.
    TO. Mr. Anthony Dominick Puma
    100 Seneca Street
    Geneva. New York
    YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    thai a Petition for Dissolution of
    Maniacs has been filed against vou
    in t!ie above cause, and you are re-
    quired to serve
    T'VIJ
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
    DADE COUNTV
    GEORGE E. SCHULZ
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74-3788
    In RE Estate of
    ROSE GI.AHEKMAN.
    deveased
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All Creditors and All Persoi Hai
    ing Claims or Demands Ag ,
    Estate:
    You are hereby notified and i .
    e.l to present any claims an.l lemandl
    which you may have gains!
    tat., of ROSE GI.ABERMAN I
    i late of Dade Cavity, Florida to
    the Circuit Judges of [>M.le COM '.
    and file the same in dupli.a*- w<
    il Miami Beach,
    Riverside
    BLOOM. KaiTJ n
    FELDMAN, Sat I, 75. of '

    mava, Sarah it "...
    i- Riven
    CHARLES GLABERMAN-
    AS Executor
    First publication of this >tic as
    the Sth day ..f July, 1!>74.
    ARNOI D FEIN
    MEYERS.
    v im B h Se i -- ir Bi
    I
    SKLAR. Saul f N01
    Levltl
    PALMER'S
    IAM1 MONUMENT COMPANY\
    PtBaOMAUZFD MEMORIALS
    CUSTOM CRATTBD
    IN OUR WORKSHOP
    44449:i -4444922
    3279 S.W. m ST.. MIAMI
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLOR'OA IN ANO FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MS RRIAGE
    CIVIL ACTION NO 74-141J1
    Marri uri
    JAMBS W HAKSKR.
    Huabar
    and
    tTRA Q Hai-.SK!',.
    ' VMB3 '. IER
    WITNESS mv hand and he teal > Attornej for Executor
    ,., said court at Miami F thlf 4"" I -im oin Road. Mami R-x "
    " 13 day of June IFM
    RICHARD P BRINKER
    Clerk ilr.-ui' Coaai
    I tade 1 'ounti. Florida
    By I. SNEBDEN
    ut) Clerk
    11
    !AV P A
    Building .-
    da
    -1
    ner

    NOTiCE OF ACTION
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF
    THE ELEVENTH JLDIC'AL
    GELB
    MONUMENTS INC.
    Optn frery Ooy s CsW Sebssfh
    140 SW 57th Avenue
    Phone 266-2888
    ^ CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA" IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    yu ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    defel 74.-6-5"
    vRTHCR H UPSON....... y for IN RE Th. M
    tier, R -.
    1
    of !
    he 11 'led court 01 '' ":' "'J'.
    '; ihei a default v !
    u j .. Tl MARC BRn
    Residence
    W Ti U ARE H KOTI

    thla
    .'
    RICH A INKER
    ill
    C tuu
    friendship...
    means someone cares
    GORDON FUNERAL HOME
    r* t Ctmmumty t,nc 1*M
    0RTHO0OI
    cjNs;a.iT|V
    -0V SERVICES
    ' Ike .
    ISM Jj-t-eii Comor
    ' ipi
    JZeviU
    Jilemorisl Chapel
    "JtWISH fUNttAl DireCTOW
    LOCAL ANO OUT OF STATI"
    ARRANGEMENTS
    947-2790
    133RS W DIXIE HWY N M.
    N1T1CE OF ACTION
    CGNSTPLCTIVE SERVICE
    iNO PROPERTY)
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT np
    THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
    C'RCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COl.NTY
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    CIV'L ACTION NO. 74-170S1
    IN RE Tl e Marrlaae I
    JACK Bl ELD
    Hu* ner.
    W BTERUP BUTTESHITBLD,
    CRUP

    n filed 1
    that ai
    1
    1 are r. ...
    - 1
    - 1

    ____
    I
    P.'.
    I. SN I
    D< uuty .
    1 .:-:*
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF -HE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRC.IT
    OF FLORIDA. IN ANO
    FOR DADE COUNTY
    CASE NO. 74.18398
    NOTICE TO DEFEND
    [ R< Tl M
    Pati w .'. '.'
    \- 1
    . Bantlnt.
    _______ IIU'I- .! -I I!
    V'l ..
    u '
    !
    .. ......:
    your ,.''.' a
    f tl .....
    w 7 h Avi nu<
    DUI
    I. \ll.ll-' 1 1
    Default nil b< entered '

    11
    - nn< IS74, Mlsrr
    RICHARD P
    1.. outs
    i AI SSEL
    - ., -., ,
    Mlai

    : : : t

    IN THE CIRCU'T COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA, -IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74.17Ci7
    Marr|aB
    Huvi
    KATHI

    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF "-E
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RC "
    IN ANO FOR DADE C0U\*
    FLORIDA. FORMERL"-
    IN THE COUNTY JUDGES
    IN AND FOR DAOE COUN""*
    FLORIDA
    IN PROBATE
    NO 73-2805
    of
    *IK ; \ski.n.
    r>. .-..-.i
    NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKI
    APPLICATION FOR OISTR'BV.' ON
    AND FINAL DISCHARGE
    NOTICE erehy riven I
    ;--
    rihu
    ' of t h e
    MINNIE IJASKIN. .! 1 I
    the 1 tl .1 .
    1
    Dadi 1 1

    .:
    II
    U UBI, Florida H'-iZ
    a T/5-ia
    As Deouty Clerk
    "ir.-uit Court Seal)
    < ll-M 7/5-U
    NTERPRIBS8 DISCM'NT INC.
    6/21-28 .


    Friday. July 5, 1974
    Jewlst> rhrHictr
    Pooe !5-B
    LEGAL HOTKl
    UGAl Nona
    LfGAL NOTKE
    LECAl NOTICE
    LEGAL NOTKE
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLOR'DA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74-3842
    In RE: Estate of
    I i ,- 1:1: TBVBPAI'QH
    .1 ted
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All Creditors and All Persons
    Having Claims or Ili-mnil Against
    s d Betatl
    ''< u nri hereby notified and re-
    (i to pres.nt any claims and de-
    ls which pou ma] hare against
    th. .-Mai. Of I ESTER O TEVE-
    PAUOH, deceased laic of Hade
    i ., > Florida, to th. circuit Judees
    , ( !... County, and file the saOM
    duplicate and as provided in s.
    !.,. Florida Statutes. In their
    In tin County Courthouai in
    County, Florida, within four
    :.-,: monthi fn m the time of the
    l ill "ti he.....f. or the udh
    I., barred.
    . i ., Jltam Florida, i! |i Mth
    Jm A T> 1874
    HERBERT X M\RVIN
    As Executor
    notice on
    da) i '. June, 1874
    -MKI'l ARD

    ' i hi M i i" i
    7 3
    l\ ~-Z C'DCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVFNTM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    Or FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE D'VIVON
    PROBATE NO 74
    J GWVNN PARKER
    PER
    I
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    . v I'
    . i tn- i Demandi Ai
    ' | tlfled re-
    i. an; ill 11 rim nit!
    , f II \HRY !
    of i >ad ii
    ' i n J udKl i'
    ' and flti .....ami lu
    ;.- dl
    ~- lutes, in ill- .i offli
    ... ] .,,,. I ,
    fi ur aU
    I..... Ime of the fir-^t
    UM wIII he
    : '. at M;..mi Florida, this Mtfl
    ,',.. I June A H
    MORRIS N BROAD
    An Bxeoutoi
    i -it publication of 'his notice on
    II > da) of June, If/71
    I '. I VM' I'ASSKI..
    t v Philip M Segal
    .....y for Batata
    J. I .It: Road
    . r- Beach, Florida M1SI
    t T I
    NOTICE UNOF.R
    F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE IS HKHKHV OIVBN thai
    i'. undersigned, desiring to engage In
    l .-. under the fictitious name of
    .. BUSINESS BROKERS al Suite
    6499 \ K lth Ave North Miami
    I FI Mtfl Intends to register
    :,me with the Clerk of the Clr-
    , i". urt of Dade County. Florida
    li : QOULDBN > Owner
    6/14-21-2* 7/5
    CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
    CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. PLORIOA
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    NO. 74-18011
    NOT'CE BY PUBLICATION
    iv RE THE MARRIAGE OF
    BILPBRTO CABRERA GONZALEZ
    Husband.
    EMIA HERNANDEZ
    GONZALEZ
    Wilt -
    Toil OLICBMIA HEKNANPE7.
    i NZA1 '"/. Edlflclo I, Anl ln1. Ha-
    \. !.l Bate, Cuba, are hereby notl-
    t d -, .. pj of your Answer
    li lh< Diaaolutlon of Marriage filed
    M you, noon husband's altnrney.
    f!E vi'Hnl.AS ESQ M2 N w
    ivenue, Miami. Florida MIS*, and
    ylnal with dkara of Court on or
    !<-. Aurust 2. 1974; otherwise the
    I i 'ii h. confessed by | u
    thin Mth 'lav .if .luce 1'.'74.
    RD P BRINKER, CLERK
    By: a D aTE
    Deput) Clerk ......
    I 7 .-12 19
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO 74-3837BLANTON
    In HE Estate of
    DANIEL, a FL'RMAN
    I. eaard
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All Credit,,,- and All lvrsons Ha\
    'tin Claims m Demand- Attains! Said
    i: late:
    You are hereby notified and re-
    quired to preaenl any claims and de-
    mandi which you ma) have against
    'he eal......( DANIEL n Fl'RMAN
    deceased lat< of Dade County, Bprtda,
    to the Circuit Judaea of Hade County,
    and file the *;1in, in duplicate and as
    provided In Section 733.18, Florida
    statutes, in tin r office* In the Count j
    Courthouse iii Dadi County, Florida,
    within four calandai inonihs from the
    t in. of 'he first publication h.rc.f. or
    'I -an will be barred
    Flb-d al Miami Florida, thli Mth
    daj June, A I> 1974
    BVBLTN Fl'RMAN
    A- y;v, ulrlx
    i" puhtli atloi of n,is notice on
    lay ol Ju i
    PTANI ET M PRRD
    Exi uti l
    sol D di F ,' Rulldlng
    7 -
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
    V' TI'K is HEREBY GIVEN
    ' M|-
    of < fY*w s
    ' i
    the
    i i in i of l

    : II day
    Ju t
    JOHN I HI 40X .IP.
    vir n i PIER, .1!:.
    i;i: \i n SI1,VERM w
    tit
    itu idina
    * !S 7 I
    IN THE C'RCL'IT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    O17 FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO 74-3630
    .1 c\\ v.\ \ PARKER
    In RE K
    MIX NIK PRtllACK
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All rredltor* .....i All Peraoni
    Havlne i'iim> or Demandi Aaralnat
    s d Bal
    Vnii an ii.-reb>- notified and rv-
    ciuir.-.l to preaenl any claims and
    demands which you maj havt aaralnat
    the estate of MINNIE PRIMACK
    to th. Circuit .ludj;. ol Dade County,
    and f |i "I same In I'unlicale and as
    : vlded in Section 733 16, Floral..
    Statutea, In theli offices In th.- County
    Courthouai In Dad< County, Florida.
    within four calendar months from the
    tim> of the first publication her.of. or
    ime w ill be barred
    Filed at Miami Florida, this Hat
    da] of Juni. A D 1974
    HARRY PRIMACK
    As Administrator
    First publication of this notice on
    the 2Kth dav of June, 1974.
    KWITNKV K'ltoor a.
    srHEINBERO. P A.
    t n. \ f. r Administrator
    ltd I m.-In Road, Suite ',12
    Miami Beach, Florida I11M
    '2R 7 5
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
    CIVIL ACTION No. 74.16596
    IN RE: THE MARRIAOE OP
    NATHAN H KOWLB88AR.
    Pet II loner,
    and
    i I.E.MENTINK KOWI.ESSAR.
    Respondent
    TO: Cl KMEVTINE KOWLE88AR
    R1S Howard Avenue
    Brooklyn, Ncu York 11212
    TOU AUK HBKEBY KOTIFIBD
    thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
    rlaue has been filed atalnst you and
    you are rcituir.-d to serve a copy of
    your %\"rltten defenaea, if any, to It
    on DAVID FEI.DMAN attorney for
    Petitioner, whose address i- 4n7 l.in-
    ooln Road, Sun.- 4a. Miami Bench,
    Florid.i 3311* and file the original
    with the clerk thi above styled
    court i i.. for.- July :i. 1874: other.
    a I" n'lll be entered aaralnat
    you for the n III I demanded in the
    complaint or petition
    T'n- otli shall bi publish) .1 once
    t'eek for four ronaecutlve wei
    i IISH I'M RIDIAN
    WITN B8S in hand n al of
    , on this
    ' In "71
    Rll HARD I- BRINKER,
    ... | .
    11..
    Bj DEN
    ir
    ' U |l I'RI OMAN
    la* I j n coin Ro Sut 11 I i
    N
    AI ion in -
    S 21 2S
    NOTICE UNDER
    F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
    ! is HEREBY GIVEN thai
    Ihf ii
    under the I ".ime
    KET A-BA8KET at lfsUl
    I street, Miami r'l.....1-. la-
    te- ,,,-i natni a Ith the
    i nil Court of Made
    |
    PA GREBNBAI'M
    MAE1 A BEGAL.L.
    I : \'. saman
    ant
    i P A
    -'-.: : Towers
    uleviir.1
    7 :,-12-l
    NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
    NAME LAW
    ; is HEREBY GIVEN thai
    ii :. d. slrina to enaaate
    umli'i the llctll n name
    i I PI ADO PUB at MM s \\ 'h
    ::, FI Ida Intends to rei
    trr sail am< \> Ith the Clerk of the
    un ot I lade Counts Floi Ida.
    HARRY ALAN RI'DD
    RE KESRI BR BHERAD8KY.
    Hi CKERMAN
    A ......T8 for AppfeV
    18! B YV ^rd Ave
    Miami. Florida
    _______ 8/14-21 2- I S
    NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
    NAME LAW
    NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
    thi une> ralgneaV d. Irlng to ensraae
    in i u- i --s under 'Ui name
    L'RT at .50 *3nd street. Mi-
    ami Beach, Florida Intend to realster
    aaid name with the Clerk of the Cir-
    cuit cun of Dade County, Florida.
    DIMAS DOMINQI EZ,
    CBUSO AND MARIA DOMINQUEZ.
    HIS WIFE .,
    on, Peldman k Davldaon, Esas.
    By: Tt eodore R Nelaon
    Attorneys for Owners
    Il3r, Kane Concourse
    Miami. Florida 33154
    6/14-21-28 7/1
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
    FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
    GENERAL JURISDICTION
    DIVISION
    CASE NO. 74-17562
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
    (NO PROPERTY)
    In R. Th.- Maniacs of
    IRENE FEKETE
    Petition! r wife,
    and
    ! V I !.A FEKETE
    Ri epondent husband.
    Th: HVl'IA FEKETE
    Vine Keily
    i 'oata Rica, c A.
    TOO ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    i petition for Dissolution of youi
    Man.ik. has been filed and commenc-
    ed in this court and >ou are required
    cop) ol i our writti n de-
    fensei If any, to It on MARX M FA -
    HER, attornej tot Petitioner, >>
    nddr< -- i- S V'i l< I Ri'la n N B.
    let Avenue, Miami. Florida SS132, and
    file ii,. original a Ith the clerk of the
    tj led ouii on or before Ho-
    2nd da) of Aucuet, 1874: oth. ru
    . w ill be entered atralnal you
    elli I praj ed for In tbe i om-
    plalnl or petition
    This aotlci shall i" publlahed
    each we.k for four consecutive weeks
    in the JEWISH FI I IR1DIAN
    \\ itness my ban.i and the asal of
    ||d court BI Miami. Florida this lOUl
    daj of June, 1874
    RICHARD P. BRINKER
    as Clerk "f iid Court
    B) B .1 FOY
    a- Denuij i 'l.-rk
    MARX M FABBH
    \--,., Petitioner
    ilnale) Blda
    Miami !' nrida I3III
    CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
    CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
    NO 74-18009
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
    l\ RE THE MARRIAGE OFi
    I.IIS DIAZ.
    Husband,
    JOSEFINA IZQCIERDA DIAZ.
    You".M'Si:fi\a IZQCIERDA DIAZ,
    i'all.- Chin i u. a Ki -' o API N'.'
    entri Ban Crletobal y Pequela,
    I Havana 'ui a, are hi rebj
    to s.-iv. a cop) of your Anawer to
    u,,. Diaaolutlon of MarriasTi '"''
    iirainst mu ui'"n husband's attorney,
    GFMHGE NICI1.H AS BBy 812 N W
    18th Avenue, Mian... Florida
    iid file onainal with Clerk of Court
    ,.n or before Auffltat I. 1874; otherw.s..
    ih. PeUUon win .oni.s.s.a b) you
    Pated this 2-th day of June. lfM.
    RICHARD P BRINKER. CLERK
    Un A I> WADE
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
    (NO PROPERTY)
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY.
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74.15792
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    In RE: The MarriaK. of
    LYNN ANN MIQOEL1
    \\ if.
    ami
    NlI/> N MIQ1EI.I.
    Husband
    Ti' NILO N MIQCEI.I
    I'.irk Avenue
    New York. New York 10631
    TOO ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    thai an ai tlon for Dissolution of Mar-
    tial:., lias been filed acains' vnu and
    >< u are required to serve a copy of
    youi written defei sei II any, to it on
    LOO IB I: BEI.l.ER. attorney for rvti-
    .i whose address is 42" Llnooln
    Road, Sun. 238, Miami Beach. Florida
    S3188, and fill the original with the
    k-rk of I'. above styled ourt on or
    i" f, .lu'\ 17. 1974. nthi se
    drfaull will he entered aaainal vov foi
    thi ef d. in.i ndi .1 in thi complaint
    .,i i IIiIon
    This notice shall be published tnce
    each week for four conaecutlve wi
    THE i':\' ISH FI IRID1 \N.
    \\ ITNESS m hand a
    ; \;,. ml. I'l,.i Ida hli
    '74
    RICHARD P BRINKER
    .' i: 'out I
    Dde I .
    By I -

    (Circuit i

    i -
    i
    I 2^ '. o
    IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74-3751
    G iROE K Sl-HCLZ
    ' RE
    ABRAHAM .I VNKOW ITZ, a k .i
    A I. JANKl '\\ ITZ
    di .
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To Ail '' and Al Personi
    Demands Aaalnat
    !:- '.i i.
    You are hereb) notified and required
    In pri si nt an) rlalma and mai ri*
    which von ma) havi aaminal thi -
    of ABRAHAM JANKOWITZ, a k a
    / i. JANKl >M itz deceased lati
    Bade County, and file thi same In
    lupllcaU and ..s provided In Section
    : : II Florid.. Statute* In their offli i -
    Ir the County Courthouse In Dadi
    County, Florida, within four Calendar
    inonihs from the time of the fit-si
    publication hereof, or the same will
    i. barred.
    flled al Miami. Florida, this 19th
    da) of June. A I) H'74
    MILDRED JANKOWITZ
    A- Executrix
    First publication of this notice on
    the Mth das of tune i""4
    BPARBER, ZBMEL ROSKIN.
    MK.il BRON-NER AND KARP I'A.
    Attornej for Eaeeutiix
    lao \ in-. ..\n. Boulevard
    Miami. Florida S31S2
    28 7/5
    1<\
    Deputy Clerk
    i. 2k
    7/5-12-18
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY.
    CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-129*6
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    IN RE:
    The marriage of
    JOHN CLAYTON I.EE. hu-hand.
    and
    LENDA FAYE Hil.I, I.EE. wife.
    Ti i JOHN CLAYTON LEE
    ....... HONTINOTON AVENUE
    AI-EX A N'DRIA, VIROINIA
    YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    that .tn action for Diaaolutlon of Mar-
    riagi in.- been filed aaalnat you and
    ...i, are required to serve a copy ..(
    voui written defenaea. if any. to II
    on ARTHI'R II UPSON, attorney for
    Petitioner whose addram is ::,v' Bo
    an Drive, Hallandale Florida
    .uiii file th. ortnlnal with the i lerk
    hi al v St) led COUI on or before
    ih. Mb ,,i Auvuat, 1874: otherwlai s
    default will bi entered aaalnst vnu
    for the relief demanded In the com-
    plaint or petition
    WITNESS m> hand and ih. -..j ,,,
    said i ourt at Miami, Florida, on this
    I'lnl da) Ol .lit!>. 1974
    RICHARD P BRINKER
    . ii
    Dadi Count) Florida
    b) a \. A I SM
    A> Deput) .'l.-rk
    (Circuit '"in i --
    7/5-IS-l
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUOICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74-3926
    JOHN R. BLANTON
    r Estate ol
    IRENE DeWOLV,
    -, .i
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    Ti \ i dlh and All Persons Hav-
    .., Demandi Aaalnat Ba d
    Bstati
    Vou hereh) notHied and resjulr-
    e,i to preaenl an) clalmi ami demands
    i \,.u maj iiav. aaalnat tbi
    ol IRENE I'iWi ILF, di aw rt
    I.,:, of Dade County, Florida, to thi
    Circuit Jude-es of Dade County, and
    .. in. in .lupin ati and ...s pro-
    ed in Be. nor. 7SI It Florida Bta
    llles. Ill their offices 111 the Counlv
    Courthouae In Dade County. Florida,
    w-ltl u ih nuar months fron
    tlmi of the first publication hereof.
    or ih.- same will h. ba
    Filed at Miami Fonda, thli U
    da) I June, a i> 1874
    s HENRY It 1). WOLF
    s BEi M< 'OR SIMON
    A- Km lltors
    First publication of thli notice on
    :l,, ih .lay of July. Is74
    SIMON hays A ORONDWERG
    - MOSES .1 ORONDWERG
    Attorne) for Co-Executora
    608 Ainsley Ruildinr
    Miami. Florida 33133
    7/5-12
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA l>\ AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PHOBAT E DIVISION
    PROBA TE No. 72-2446
    IN RE: Ealati f
    SA.MOKI. -MAI.KAN R
    Sa:MI El. GEORC.E M \l KAN
    Di .a-, .1.
    NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
    APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
    AND FNAL DISCHARGE
    \, |i herebj Riven that I
    rvi filed Fin* ':.,' ind Petl.
    lion for Distribution ami Final Die-
    i .ire, ai \ ',iii:\ of the ertate
    nl S \.\|i EL MAI KAN k .. S\M-
    OEL GEOROE MM KAN. deceased,
    ai d iliai on the 'th da) ol July.
    1874, "ill apply lo the Honorable Cir-
    ,n ; Judges ol Dadi County Florida.
    for approval of said Final Report and
    foi distribution and finai dtachanti -
    Admli of th.- eataU of 'he
    above-named decedent Tins 12th da)
    of .lun. 1874
    HOTH nt' INBON.
    Administratrix of thi- Eatatl of
    Samu. 1 Malkan. dei ease.'.
    JOSEPH s. Iimiki:
    A tiorm )
    i.i i id In Road Suite 20f
    Miami i:. a< h. Florid.. SJIIf
    I 8I-tJ 7 : 12
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 71-4234
    IN RE: Estate of
    HENRY T WHITE
    I leci as..)
    NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
    APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
    AND FINAL DISCHARGE
    NOTICE Is hereby civen thai I have
    filed my Final Report and Petition foi
    Distribution ami Final Discharge as
    Ancillar) Administrator of th< aBtati
    that on ih. 23 d) of July. 1874. will
    atp!\ to the Honorable Circuit Judges
    , Dad. Count)', Florida, tor approval
    I t said Final Report and for dirtrlbu-
    lion and final dlachargi as Ancillar)
    Administratoi ol the > stat
    .,).. v, -named di dent Tins loth da)
    ,,f Jun.. 1874
    EITHER 1, WHITE
    Ancillary Administrator
    ANDREW J Ti'TH
    AttOI IL.
    Suit. i. 8385 lark Drive
    Miami Shorea, Florida Mtl*s
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
    FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74-4035
    In RE: Estate of
    PETER DANNA.
    li. .eased
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All creditors and All Peraoi Hav-
    ing Claims or Demands Asian -I Said
    Estate:
    You ar.- hereby notified and re-
    quired to preaenl any claim- and de-
    ni.itals which you ma) have agalnat
    th. eatati of deter DANNA de-
    ceased late Of Dade County, Florida,
    to the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
    and file ill. s.,,,,. in duplicate and as
    provided In Section 733.16, Florida
    Statutea, In their offices in the County
    Courthouai in Dadi County. Florida.
    within four calendar months from the
    Inn. ui thi firs* | ui 1 i atlon hereof, r
    I am. w iii i" bam ii
    Filed al Miam:. F'orida, this ::'!i
    dnj of Juni. A.D 74
    i 'ATHERINE !'ANN v
    A- !'' Ill
    Firs' pub' atlon of this notice on
    thi 28tl daj i June, 1874
    KORT V ELI I.-' H
    Attorne) for ( Dai
    i'
    '
    134
    7 5
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEvtNTh JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DADE COUNTY.
    C'VIL ACTION NO 14 15)15
    PETlT'CN FOR ADOPTION
    IN RE OK

    b) PHILIP JOSEPH l .
    Hi- .-
    TO CAR I tEZ
    i.. i.
    ..
    hi n
    ,

    -
    salei for Petit
    : .'. \ -
    nue. Mian I
    ol I
    befoi An u I
    . i nthi pw si a '' fault v
    red ai
    in.limed In the complaii I oi petit ion.
    Thli shall b. publ
    . | i ... r foui nnsecutlvi neeka
    ni THE JEW ISH FI ol'.Il'IAN
    \\ ITN ESS iiix hand and
    said court at Miami, Florida on this
    26th da) of June. 1874
    RICHARD P BRINKER
    A- Cl. rk Cln un Court
    Dadi County Florida
    By A w ALSH
    .. L>eput) Clerk
    (Circuit 'ourt Si
    RtiV COKZALEZ. JR.. BSQOIRE
    inl >< \y 1-tll Avenue
    Miami, Florida 831M 884-4.-.r.5
    Ait..: i,.\ for Petltloni I
    7 5-12-18-M
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    Notice is HEREBY (IIVEN that
    the undersigned, desiring lo engage
    - -- under thi fi- tltlous I I
    \l UTA < 15 W 26th Street.
    !' |nti 'ids to i glster said
    nnmi with ihe Clerk ( thi Circuit
    Court of Dade County, Florida.
    i i:s \i: FASHIONS i >F
    MIAMI. INC
    7 S-1S-18-24
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
    DACE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    PROBATE NO. 74.J2t>6
    IN RE ESTATE >F
    l.i.I IS A HI MM.
    ,. nCW A RCNIMOW1 1 /-
    I........I
    NOTICE OF PROBATE
    THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
    r, M.| PERSONS INTERESTED
    IN THE ESTATE OF SAID DECE-
    DENT
    a are hereh) notified that '
    n-i II.....intrumi nt purporting to be
    iii. last will and testament or said
    qi, ,,, : has i n admitted to pro-
    i n n, said Court You ari
    ami. ,i I thin six call i d.n
    >..- from the dale of the first
    publication of this nottci to appear In
    -in,i Court ni 11 '""
    .. ,, rh) '""'i ol siiiil Coui i
    in admitting said will to pn
    should not stand unn voked
    JOHN R BLANTON
    Circuit Com i Judate
    RICHARD r BRINKER Clara
    B) CORNELL ROBINSON
    Deput) Clerk
    Attorm v
    BPARBER ZBMEL, ROSKIN.
    HEILBRONNEH AND KAItl' l'A.
    \ II -. B] Blvd.
    Miami Florida
    First publication of this notice on
    the 5th day of July, 1S74.
    7 5-12-19-26
    NOTICE OF ACTION
    CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
    (NO PROPERTY!
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
    COUNTY CIVIL ACTION
    NO. 74.17490
    ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
    OF MARRIAGE
    IN RE Th. Mania*! of
    SERVANDO LOZANO
    Husband
    and
    JOSEFINA PACHECO DE LOZANO
    W if.
    Ti .losefma PacheoO ile Low
    Carrera "-". 10-a-Ji,
    Barrio Colaeguros, -ail
    i 'olombia
    Yoc ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
    that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
    riage has been filed against you and
    you are required lo aervi B cop) of
    your written defenses, if any, to it
    on LAWRENCE F KAINE. attorney
    for Petitioner whom address is 855
    s W First Street, Miami, Florida.
    and file lh.....It'll..] \. Hli H Cl! rk
    of Hi. ahov. styi.d court .....i be-
    fore August 8, 1874; otherwise a de-
    fault "in be entered aga.li -' % "U for
    th. reh.f il.mlnd. .1 in lb. complaint
    or petition
    This notice shall hi published
    each week for four consecutive weeks
    in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
    WITNESS nt) hand and the seal
    Bid court al Miami Florid I on
    this 27th da) of Juni I8W
    rich Mil BRINKER
    As Cl.rk Circuit Court
    I ii. i ount) Florida
    | iOPELAND
    As I IU
    - ull Court Si
    1 AWRENCE I' KAINE
    "",'. s \\ First Si
    Mi..in
    nej foi Pi ; Itioner
    7 '
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
    OF FLORIDA IN AND
    FOR DADE COUNTY
    PROBATE DIVISION
    FRANK B DOWLING
    PROBATE NO. 74-4142
    : RE Estate ol
    A! LAN R LANHENDORF
    Deci
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To All Creditor! and All P. i Hav-
    ing Claims "i Demands Against Bald
    I.
    Vou a,-.- hereb) notified and n qulr-
    , ,i to pn mi : iny i lalmi 11 < di manda
    whi.h vou may have Bgalnsi the es-
    tate of All AN R I ANQENDORF
    ,l., ased late of Dade County, Florida,
    to the Circuit Judges ol Dadi County.
    and file the same In din i Bfl
    provided In Bectlon 788.18. Florida.
    statin.- m tlon offices in the Coun-
    ty Courthouae In Dade > nm*. Flo-
    rida, within four calendar months
    from ih. inn. el the fust publcatlon
    her. of, or th. sain, a ill be barn a
    Filed at Miami. Florida ,thli 18 th
    daj of Jun. \ D l74
    IA\ D !AN6ENDORF
    ,\s BSxecutrla
    First publli atlon I this notice on
    1h. Mli dav of July. 1874
    BARTON s I DEI I,, t-xs...
    HI.ATT. IDEM.. ALTEKMAN
    a i.A.-KV
    Attorney for
    FAY l LANOENDORF
    414 Dupont Plaza Center
    Florida ._ .,


    Page 16-B
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    Friday Juty 5, 1974
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    WHOtf BREASTS WITH Rill
    THIGHS DRUMSTICKS
    WHOlE LEGS
    FRESH
    ICED
    FLA OR SHIPPED GRADE A FRESH ICED
    GRADE A' QUICK FROZEN
    Fryer Roaster ............................u.49 Turkey Drumsticks....................u 38
    Blade Roast ,69c
    .79'
    US CHOICE WESTERN REEF
    Rib Steak Urge End L.$1"
    US CHOICE WESTERN REEF CHUCK
    US CHOICE- WESTERN
    Beef Chuck Blade Steak
    U S CHOICE WESTERN REEF CHUCK .. ^.^,, ... ...r .^->^
    Under Blade Pot Roast u M19 Shoulder Pot Roast NiU" l. $ 13S
    U S CHOKE WESTERN REEF CHUCK US CHOICE WESTERN -
    Shoulder Steak Boneless I49 Cubed Beef Steak.....................it. I79
    U S CHOICE WESTERN TENDER
    Ground Beef Chuck $109 Sliced Beef Liver u 89e
    BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 34'
    WISK
    ^s LAUNDRY DETERGENT
    F*a _half $ 159
    HALF
    GALLON
    JUG
    1
    LIMIT ONE JUG PHASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
    OF $7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
    -BRAND 1 S ODA! i
    3 i*oz. $' CANS 1 ALL
    1 FLAVORS
    BONUS SPECIAL I SAVE 56'
    RICH'S
    COFFEE RICH
    4 c- $ 1
    LIMIT 4CTNS.. PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
    OF $7 OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
    Falstaffff Beer
    12-OZ.
    NO-RETURN
    BOTTLES
    P P BRAND
    Potato Chips "">"* \l 55c
    RETTY CROCKER
    Angel Food Cake Mix \t 81c
    59e
    PP RRAND
    FRESH
    Seashore's Sauerkraut
    QUART
    JAR
    Pretzels US 59c
    38
    FLAVORFUL
    Gold's B or sent
    PP BRAND
    Yellow Mustard
    32-OZ
    BOTTLE
    24-OZ
    MR
    Franks or Knocks LES CAL YOGURT
    AMERICAN
    KOSHER
    RETTY ANN S
    Potato Salad............
    QUARTERS
    Saffola Margarine
    12-OZ.
    PKG.
    24-OZ
    CUP
    OR BORDENS
    ALL FLAVORS
    BARREL CURED
    8-OZ.
    CUPS
    1-lB.
    PKG
    55<
    Seashore's Kosher PicklesQMRBT79e
    FLAVORFUL
    Friendship Pot Cheese !.8F 57e
    SOUR CREAM
    FIEISCHMANNS
    Soft Margarine......................! 75e
    BOROENS
    Sliced Pimento Cheese S9 59e
    All BAKED COOOS MADE WITH PURE .(CE'ai.E SMORTININC
    BORDEN'S
    AXELROD
    PINT
    CONT.
    HOT DOC ROLLS
    35e
    OR
    HAMBURGER
    ROLLS
    P. P. BRAND
    PKG.
    OF S
    PIAIN OR SUGAR
    Velvet Creme Donuts l*\ 49'
    Sour Half & Half .3JF 35e
    BOROENS
    Creamed Cottage Cheese ^ 99c
    ONLY AT STORES HAVING SEAFOOD SERVICE COUNTER*
    MACKEREL
    55c
    FRESHLY SLICED
    King Fish Steaks.................*
    FOOD
    FAIR
    SUPERMARKETS
    PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SUN.. JULY 7th.
    AT ALL FOOD PAIR STORES
    EXCLUDING FOOO PAIR KOSHER MARKETS
    FRUITS & VEGETABLES
    BUY JUST WHAT YOU NEED FOR YOUR COMPLETE
    SATISFACTION FROM OUR RIG VARIETYI
    NECTARINES
    49<
    LB.
    PLUMP
    AND
    JUICY
    US NO 1
    Yellow Onions 3 & 49
    CALIFORNIA _
    Sunkist Lemons II no. 69:
    ALL FRESHIE
    Roadside Jellies .'. 69
    CRlSP ANO TENDER
    Endive and Escarole each 33
    FIRM RIPE
    TOMATOES
    6 IN A |(d ft C
    PKG. fJPY
    TENDER
    Yellow Squash u 19
    79=
    FRESHIE
    Orange Juice
    EASY-TO-FIX
    Instant Potatoes
    HALF CAL
    CONTAINER
    24-OZ $119
    CANISTER
    DRESSELS FROZEN
    POUND CAKE
    12-OZ
    PKG
    FROZEN
    Eggo French Toast
    TROPHY FROZEN
    Sliced Strawberries
    MATEUS
    oz
    PKG
    69'
    10-OZ
    CTNS
    25-OZ.
    BOTTLE
    *.Nt NOT AVAUAIll AT 'OOO 'All STORE
    IIC W ink A.. HIAIIAH
    AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING SERVICE COUNTERS
    All LUNCH MEATS t CHEESE SLICED TO ORDER
    Salami or Bologna
    ^W^^G "A"
    AMERICAN
    KOSHER
    LB.
    FLORIDA
    CAUGHT
    WE RESERVE THE BJGHT TO UMiT QUANT.TIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. NOT RESPONSE FOR TYPOgSpWi
    FRESHLY SMOKED SLICED LOX OR c 4
    Nova Scotia Salmon l? M"
    DELICIOUS LEAN __
    Cooked Corned Beef...........!P 79
    AUSTRIAN IMPORTED ...
    Swiss Cheese..........................IT 896
    \,
    ERRORS.


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