The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02311

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
llfewislli Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 23
Miami. Florida Friday, May 18, 1973
Six Sections Price 51
MORE THAN 95 FLOATS TO TAKE PART IN CULMINATING CELEBRATION SUNDAY
'Salute' Parade Sunday Caps Israel Anniversary
A Salute to Israel Parade will
culminate Greater Miami's cele-
bration of 'he Jewish State's 25th
anniversary o-f Independence. Tne
parade will be held Sundiy on
Miami Beach, with over 100 com-
munity or.sanizatitns, businesses
and clubs entering units in the
gala festivity.
Plan., for the event, which wore launch d with
deliberations and special pre-celebration functions back
in 1972 include mere than 7,> floats for the parade
scheduled to begin at th_' v. am; Beach Convention
Hall at 11 a.m. (For details, sec Israel 25ih Anniversary
Supplement, Page 4 Di.
The parade will proceed sauth en the west
aide of Washington Ave. to Lincoln Rd., east on
the north side of Lincoln RJ. to Collins Ave.,
no-fh on the west side of Collins Ave. to 22nd St-
and then will return to Convention flail, a total
route of 1.9 miles.
According to Stephen J. Rems< n chairman of the
I rael :?5 parr.de committee, "This will be the larg-
est Salute to Israel parade in t'.if South. Only th
New York City Salute to Israel Parade was larger,"
Among leading ;. itical figures in the 8p> ial
viewing stand will Isr: ador t> th<
States Simcha Dinitz, Consulate General B
Bonney and Consul David Pi I
Guests will al include U.S senators from Florida
Edward J. Gurnej ai I Lawton Chiles, U.S. repres nta
lives from Florida Claude Popper, Dante B Fas
William l.i hman and H bi rl Burke, Metro Mayor Jon::
B. Orr, Jr., and Miami Beach Mayor Chuck Hall.
Tiie lira i _t c mmittee, which ha- bet
by a sp cial a I ical i Greater Miami
Federation red by Mr Burton R. L
diate ;:.. t pri I oi F< lei it on worn -
Twenty-five years after
the establishment of the
State of Israel, immigra-
tion, the ingathering of
the exiles, is still a par-
amount endeavor. The
Jewish Floridian joins the
culmination of the cele-
bration here Sunday with
this special Israel 25th
Anniversary Edition.
STATE DEPARTMENT OEFICIAl VOWS:
U.S. Gas Needs
Won't Deter
Search for Peace
WASHINGTON (JTA) America's quest and need for petrol-
eum will not alter its search for a peaceful Middle East settlement,
three highly placed U.S. government officials told Jewish leaders
meeting here for the annual policy conference of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
The officials also deprecated the ---------------------------------------------
oommonly used description of the askcd not to be named publicly,
oil situation as a "crisis." Assist- to]d AIPAC delegates that he did
ane Secretary of State Joseph J.
Siseo. speaking of the "desire to
develop further" the relations be
tween oil-consuming and oil-pro-
ducing countries, observed:
"In this connection, there has
been much speculation of late as
to whether the so-called energy-
crisis is going to lead to changes
in our Middle East policy. In my
view, this is the wrong way to
pose the question. The question
is whether our policy of seeking
to promote a peaceful settlement
is going to succeed, so that there
will be n> temotatinn for some to
seek to politicize the energy prob
lem.
In a visit to the State Depart
ment, many of the more than 300
AIPAC delegates were told by a
Middle Fast sncciali t that the
U.S. would not bo panicked into a
change of policy for peace bised
on Israel's security. This official
who asked for anonymity, pointed
nut that most of the Arab threat*
to cut off oil supplies to the U.S.
come from countries that do no'
have oil resources. The oil pro
ducers, he said, have suitable re
lationships with the United States
Anoiher official, a specialist "i
world energy supplies who alsi
not believe the VS. is experienc
ing an energy crisis. The country,
he said, is facing a series of prob-
lems, hut these can be reasonably
settled. The oil situation he added,
can become a crisis only if the
U.S. does not take action to use
its resources of oil. natural gas
jnd particularly coal which would
upply it with enough fuel for 1.000
years at the country's present eon-
sumption of energy.
U.S. Brands Quaddafi Charge a 'Lie'
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
State Department denounced this
week Libya's Prime Minister Col.
Muammar el-Quaddafi for "propa-
gating" the "big lie" that "the
United States was somehow in-
volved" in Israel's Apr. 10 corn-
man > j raid on terrorist head-
quarters in Beirut.
Hare made his remarks in re-
sponse to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency which asked him to com-
ment on Quaddafi's charge at a
press conference in Tripoli on-
day that it was the U. S., not
Iserael, which sent agents into
Beirut three weeks ago to assas-
sinate three terrorist leaders.
Department spokesman Paul Hare said that Quaddafi "is, of
course, completely aware of our
categorical denia's of any allega-
tions of U. S. complicity in the
raid and we find incomprehen-
sible his lending credence to
what is no mor<> than an embel-
lishment of the previous can-
nard."
Hare suggested that if Quaddafi
"has any facts wnatsoever to back
up this latest bivi'i.s.. falsehood
he should make th.-m public a
soon as possible."
The State Department offeree
no comment on another chargi
by Quaddafi that the Oasis Oi
Co., which is partly American-
owned, had on its staff in Libya
Israeli agents who carried forgcci
Continued on Page S-A
Former Sen. Kenneth B
Keating.. R-N.Y., was nomi-
nated Monday by Presi-
dent Richard Nixon as am-
bnsMdcr to Israel. Keating
who turns 73 Friday, suc-
ceeds Ambassador Wat
worth Harbour to the post
which he held from 1951
until his resignation from
the U.S. foreign service
Feb. 18.


>Jtmist Ffrrf-fgjr
:-.- V7
Bosworth Memorial Award
Received Bv Robert Russell






:

I


I
i si dinner ol
ien Rcc H;
isel
'.
o
V

-


72 H

LET JS MAKE ISRAEL ON HER
24Hi ANNIVERSARY
EMERGENCY FUND TIL IT
ECONOMICALLY STRONG .
BUY ISRAEL EONDS AND
GIVE TO THE U LA AND
HURTS! Mayshie Friedberg
National Hebrew
fSAEU Ufl CHfTM INC.
e*^ rzv> h -L* .
01** AKTIC 5 01 rr
919 WASHINGTON AVE. 532-2210
jemmamammmmmmm
ijranwpn S* s^v y*
Eflt'bi Joseoh E. Rackovsky
Phsn* 672 7306
MS MICHIGAN 4VL MIAMI BEACH
^^^^**>*^^^irr^^^^^^>rfV
American Israeli
All Religious Articles
For Sfnc'iaqu'S S'fiaols Homel
J357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-7722 S. Schwortx
Vf

_______>_______
r
r
Hlfe 378-W32
lii
-
i
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE INSURANCE
If ;.
A DIVISION OF
Tnebiean
TITLE
mwERin
ANSWERING TELEPHONES
REPMUN'S HEBREW
ROOK STORE
HAS EVERYTHING FOR
lyn.;
cjro J( ivish Ho"s Free Gift
-h Outfi
417 Wasiin9lon Am. 672-70)7 ;

r|N THE FOLLOWING EXCHANGES <\
27 ICA) S3 Uf) 44 HO n 19
7* 47 in;. 47 S3 94 (V.'i'
35 43 INT, 6? (MU IS
37 'FR! 64 46
44 (HI) 65 75 IPLi 18 (IB
kl*H
eWiCC
PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS
FASHION CCf'TtR Of Till SOUTH
Largni Srle-tioii In Latett St/iea
for M-n *r>il vVornen
PPEL PARKING '.P/1CE IN
REAK CONVFNIFNT TO BUSES
72i LINCOLN HO AD
(On the Mali.
Oculiatj' Preicrip'.om Fillad
COr TACT I ENSE9
is*
ANSWErVA/'/ErtlCA
1 WAV
RADIO
FACING
FOR SERVICE CALL
TtUPHONI
AWf .I". SSOC
Or MIAMI
371-6688 or 538-0721
A EXECUTIVE OfflCES CONGRESS tlOC.
v/-- HAVE AN -
MfMEE.? CAlATH MIAMI COAl GABLES MIAMI B(Ch
CM4VIWS Of COMMERCE

'
I
!
HELP DOUGLAS GARDENS
WITHOUT SPENDING A DIME!
Funds earned by the Jewish Home for the Aged
Thrift Shop at 7300 N.W. 27th Avenue, in Miami,
are an important part cf the Home's operating
income.
Won't you help the Home todjy by contributing
items for resale at the Thrift Shop?
Do you have furniture, appliances, bedd'ng
c:me'3s clothing, sporting goods or any other
saleable merchandise which you no longer need
or can use?
Do you know someone, a friend or a neighbor,
who is redecorating? Perhaps a hotel, an apa-*
ment house. Teil them about our Ti.rift Shop.
Douglas Gardens has serious financial needs
since 70'': of its 222 residents are public welfare
rec;pients With increased operating costs and
public assistance pavments in Florida *ha lowest
ct ?!; states *'n-- Home urgently needs your help
to maintain its High quality c?.fl May we count
on your support?
Just phone 696-2101 and arrange for 0l 'ruck
to pick up your merchandise.
And remember contributions tc the Th':t-
Shop are tax dec!uc*;b!e.
The Douglas Gardens family resident;
Boarci ard staff thank you.
AARON KRAVITZ
JHA Vice President
Crnirman
Thrift Shnp Committee
JEWISH HOME FOR THZ AGED
i
Over thirty fii
ice to the co m m u n i1 ies
of South Florida
RIVERSIDE
MEMO* AL C-5=L INC FUNiKAL DIRECT^
to. Alton Road 1250 '
in the heart of Miami Be
JE 1-1151
Nortl '. ami Beach. 1648C N me
as Road at
-ester Bfon Fa
.. |
call the nearest R
Car
Murray N. Rubin. FD.



Triday, May 18, 1973
+Jcwifi ncridPftn
Page 3-A
French, Saudis Meet in Paris
To Discuss Oil, Jet Fighters
PARIS fJTA) The Middle
tuation and oil supplies to
France and oihrr Western Euro-
pean countries were discussed
this week by Presidenl Georges
1 and Kin:.; Faisal, of
Arabia, offii ial circles dis-
ci I en
The Arabian monarch arrived at
i i \irport aboard Ins p< rsonal
and was greeted by the
Pi esident. He paid tribute
: Pomj idou "and tlie French
Q'joddafi Charge
Branded a lie'
Continued from Page 1 A
rts and false certificates
ed by Israeli authorities and
m re ^p>ing on Libya.
Quaddafi cited no evidence to
.ip his charges against either
the U.S. or Oasis. During his press
conference which lasted five and
me half hours, he reaffirmed his
support for the Black September
terrorists and refused to confirm
ir denj that Libyan .Mirage jets
purciia-ed from France were
transferred to Egypt, Quaddafi
tj that Libya might utilize its
newl) found oil wealth as .i politi-
' poll.
! nation for their attitude toward
I their Arab friends and their help
i in ridding the Arabs of oppi
] sion."
President Pompidou, who later
greeted the Kino ;.t (he Elysce
Palate, praised "the dlgnltj and
modeiation he exercised In his
j quest for a solution of the Middle
East problem.' Informed sources
said (he two had- rs would discuss
the sale by France of Mi j,r ,i, u,.
I helicopters .., anti-aircraft mis-
! dies to the oil-rich Arab kingdom.
The sources id Fri nee hopes
I to sell Saudi-Arabia 20 to 30
Mirage fighters ,uu\ an undis-
closed number of helicopters and
ground-to-air missiles.
Myron J. Brodie, executive vice
president of the Greater Mianr
Jewish Federation, returned
from Israel this week, where he
attended special ceremonies in
celebration of the 25:h anniver
sary of the State of Israel.
Complete
Window Service
RIPAIRS
REPLACING REGLAZING
fqjf Service free Istimatet
PHONE 666-3339
ALL WINDOW REPAIR
7813 HIRD ROAD
PROFESSIONAL
FUND-RAISER
Temporary or
Permanent
For Miami Office
of
NATIONAL
ORGANIZATION
Ph. MARY BOTWIN
531-6738
Ighter bom!,.!- 48 British Li.u...
nings and an undisclosed number
of Strikemasters.
France and Britain are currently
competing for additional arms
contracts from Saudi Arabia.
Washington
Federal
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOWATION OF MIAMI BEACH
M ndian Ave. 123-1 Washington Ave
1133 Normandy Dr. 633 NE. 167th Street
538-8452
450 No'th Park Road Hollywood
Hollywood: 981-9192
2.
JACK D GORDON
Piesident
ARTHUR H. COUBSHON
Chjtrma,. of the Board
FREE WITH
EVERY ACCOUNT
The world we live in is an impersonal
one. Everyday living has become so
complicated that the old time friendly
relationship between patron and merchant,
doctor and patient, customer and banker
have almost been eliminated. Note we
said almost. There are always exceptions to
every rule. We like to think WASHINGTON
FEDERAL is just such an exception. Our
customers find not only a full range ol
services and maximum dividends they
find a full measure of warm, interested
friendship as well. Every one of our
branch offices is a community institution.
interested in the affairs of the area it
serves and even more interested in the
people with whom we do business Drop
into one of our conveniently located
offices and open an account. Your first
dividend will be friendship. And we'll
compound it every day of every year. You
see. we like people and we want
you to like us.

.... foot Great Stores to SeryelfouS
BEDDING CLEARANCE SALE!
HOTEL STANDARD
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING SET
REG. $79.95
$4095
DISCOUNT PRICES
WHILE THEY LAST
u
'o
*
*0
Op
X
ROLLAWAY BEDS
REG. S49.95
49


5*

EASY TERMS
WE DO OUR OWN FINANCING
STORE OWNER
JOHN STEMBRIDGE
545 N.E. 125 ST. NO. MIAMI
893-0800
ST -:
i

m--
STEMB
STORE
OWNER
OMJER
MBRIDGE
.*
I
..&.-
M
7 AVE? 3210 SO. ST. ROAD 7 34* WASHINGTON
If W HOLLYWOOD HOMESTEAD
J



Fcge 4-A
* Jenlsti HcridlSari
Friday. May 18. 1973
""Jewish Floridlian
C FFICE and PLANT 120 N E. 6th Street Telephone J73 -605
PO Bex 191%, Miami, Florida 3MC1
huU K. StfOOtlBT Sj-lma M. Thompson
Lc.-.ct c-.d Publisher Assistant to Pub
The Jewish Flor'dian Decs Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The. Mercnan4ae Advertised Hs Its Column*
MATTER OF
Publu'ied tvtry Fridd c< I -i" by The Jtwish Fiondwn
Second C-- Pottage Paid at Miami, Fla.
Tin -ew.sh Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jew ih Weekly.
Member of the Jewish "e'eg-achic Agency. Seven Arts Fea-.u't Syndi.
:;:< worldwide \'*.% Service Sat oral Eoitorial Assocat'On. As-
c: aten of Eng ih.JlvviSh Newsoapers. and the Florida Press Association.
s^sTsTcrTpTION RATES- keel '-ra, One Year F 0C Two Years S
Out c' Town k'oon Reauest
imber 20
16 I YAP. 5723

'* 4
WASHINGTON, D.C. All
eather gauges were set to
"fair" at any rate for public
limption for Dr. Henry A.
. -. .. .-, <
Kissinger's Moscow visit. The
effective head of state of the
nlon U noid Brezhnev,
has finally declared the "irrever-
Volume 46
Friday, May IS, 1973
I
Parade A Spectacular Climax
Thousands of South Fioridians will paiticipate in a
Miami Beach parade Sunday morning which will provide
a spectacular climax to this area's month-long celebration
of the 25th enniversary of the State of Israel.
The floats and bands and marchers of all ages should
not surfer in comparison with what the JTA described as
"the longest, largest and most spectacular Independence
Day parade in the nation's 25-year history" which took
place in Israel May 7. Thousands of miles from our Holy
Land though it may be. this Sunday's parade is as much
a public demonstration of American Jewry's commitment
to the existence of the Jewish state as the Israel parade
was a demonstration of the military strength that defends it.
The rallies and other activities which focused attention
on the anniversary since last September involved every
segment of the total community in a coordinated effort
which does credit to those who planned and participated
for many months. South Florida has shown that it can meet
the challenge of financial support for Israel and in these
past few weeks has proved that it has come alive cs a
Jewish community.
The events have meant more than a happy birthday,
even one as significant as a 25th anniversary for the Stat?
of Israel. They have signified for Jews throughout the world
another miracle of survival in the millenial history of a
people whose persistence is one of the wonders of civiliza-
tion.
A Major Step Toward Unity
The impending transfer of the headquarters of the
World Union for Progressive Judaism to Jerusalem marks
another major slep for the international Reform Jewish
movement which has long since discarded its attitude to-
ward Zionism, for it is further evidence of the unity of all
Jews in the upbuilding of Zion.
That same unity was expressed at the 73rd annual con-
vention of the Conservative movement's Rabbinical As-
sembly at the same time that keynote sp3akers empha-
sized that the welfare of Isrcel depends on viable Jew
communities all over the world.
The head of the assembly could not resist enunciating
the hope that Conservative and Reform Jews, in the name
-J. that unity, would seme day enjoy the same religious
freedom in Israel cs is presently permitted the Moslems
and various Christian sects, a con'inuir.g problem that will
some day not too far distant require action.
Example Must Be Followed
The decision of the Metropolitan Museum of Art to co
ahead with plans for a major Israeli archaeological ex-
hibit at the end of the year is an important victory for good
sense. At one point the question was raised as to the pos-
sibility of Arab terrorists creating a problem and doubt
was expressed as to whether the famous museum would
carry through the project.
As both Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem and Mayor
John Lindsay of New York told the Metropolitan Museum
authorities, there would be no end to threats and intimida-
tion if the museum retreated from its original invitation. The
two political figures were well aware of the implications in
bowing to terror, for such fears spread to other events and
activities. The example of Israel in standing firmly against
the terrorists is one which must be followed by ail nations
if we are ever to bring this condition to a close.
ft JOSEPH ALSOP
i
sibility" of his policy of d<
ing closer, more cooperati'.
is with the United s
ami the West.
But can one tru-t t'i" weal
gauges? It is a problem now I
..gued on the
est levi U of the U.S, govi
R c nti>. the problem v. .
Ily posed by '.lie elevati
I ugh, brilliantly abl S
of defense, Marshal A
drei Grechko. to full menil
ship in the ruling Soviet i
buro.
THIS HAS produced a So
ological debate comparab;.
the medieval theologians' dis-
putes about how many an
could dance on a pinhead Th.-
is only natural, sin.e Grechk -
new. purely political position has
made nonsense, once and for all
of the common Soviet analysts
belief that the Soviet armed
forces have "no political role
Long ago. this belief becamt
highly dubious. First, Marshal
Grechko was able to ram through
his own appointment as defen><
minister with the support of the
other Soviet military leaders, but
against the wishes of a majority
of the Soviet Politburo of that
period. Then it became apparent
that Grechko was the closest all>
of Leonid Brezhnev, and that
he was also able to give Brezh
Continued on Page 15-A
COMMENT
Pulitzer Prize judges have not
been noted for their daring. Con-
troversies over their awards in
the past have surfaced when a
few radicals protested a partic-
ularly conservative choice as
opposed to one which, particu-
larly in literature and drama,
spoke bluntly to the times.
The selection of "The Champ-
ionship Season" last week occa-
sioned no surprise or comment.
It already had been the recipi-
ent of the New York Dramatic
Critics Circle and Tony Awards
and, as .John Huddy wrote in the
Miami Herald last March, it is
a great play by virtually any
standards." Except the si
ards of a group of i I > minded
I Laudcrdale "anti-porn
phy. ai "lit;," cranks n
activil foi d canci llation of
the presi Parker
house north of u-, last
I
1 DON'T imagine those people
are a bit embarrassed by the
Pulitizer Priz selection H >nl;
es, no doubt, i1:-' present sin-
fulness of our society which per-
mits such plays to be shown.
dramas in which grown men use
word; and that's all that could
have been involved here that
offend them.
If a meritorious play like "The
Championship Season" can be
banned by frightened producers
because of intimidation, imagine
the damage that lurks in the so-
called anti-obscenity ordinance
which was passed by the Metro
Commission some time ago.
In the newly proposed Nixon
administration's federal criminal
code is an anti-obscenity law
which it is believed could effec-
tively cripple the legitimate film
and publishing industries, not
just the plainly pornographic
ALSO BUUED in mat cede is
the equivalent of an Official Se-
cret* Act which would -deny the
right ot the people to know of
i nment acts. It follows, of
course.
The real issue is censorship.
In 1933, the Nazis burned the
books of Jews and other liberal
thinkers only four months after
taking power a< an indication to
the world as to where they were
at. Just a few weeks ago, in
Buenos Aires, an armed band of
arsonists supported by Catholic
zealots, burned down the theater
that was about to show "Jesus
Christ, Superstar" on ihe grounds
tl'at it was immoral and sacri-
1 igious.
We are more respectable, how-
ever Rabbi Phineas Weberman,
writing in praise of the Mi I i
O m nisii ni rs I r pa i ing the
n in in oil i .:
trast to "socioiogi ts
e Relig onirts and well-
. olitical lea lers
ib cenity and immoral-
ly si t be eradii I
at la I to be held at bay
: d not b- allowed to permeate
through nil segments of society."
HARDLY A liberal and I
mu't confess to my pl-asant sur-
i rise Commi-sioner Edward
Foig was one of those who vo-
ted against the Metro ordinance,
stating that. "Most of us are re-
volted by this type of material.
But our basic freedom is threat-
ened by this ordinance." This is
a point which authoritarian and
totalitarian-minded proponents
of laws aimed at controling the
behavior of people have little
use for; their project is to fit
all of us into one mold deter-
mined by their own values. That
those values just as often as
the Nixon social program would
deny decent housing, educa-
tion, health care, employment
and a minimum standard of in-
come, is of little concern to this
type of person.
I think the record will bear
fcv EDWARD
me out that the anti-obscemtv
crowd is ccmpo:ed primarily ol
those who fit conveniently under
the label of reactionary, and
Rabbi Weberman is quite right
in attacking liberal religionists
and liberal politicians.
As one of the panelists in th<
session on pornography at Last
week's Mental Health Fair said
it's not a good idea to give Nixoi
the kind of obscenity law contr
he is seeking. "He's got a ba
track record."
THERE IS one statistic in o
crime rate that is most com?'
ins. Half of all arrests are f
crimes without direct victims
four million assorted drunks,
addicts, loiterers, vagrants, pros
titutes and gamblers and
.'iir police are el .
. mi mbers of our
sty for whose problem
. !)Ie to find no aolut
i liiri" increa i i
- gnificantly, I believe, the:
no hue and cry from the .
rbtcenity people about the vi<
lance di picted on the sen
i and t Revision, or th<
violence done to the little pe
pie of Southeast Asia by oui
bombers.
A long time ago, John Stuart
Mill in his essay, "On Liberty"
went to the heart of the matter:
The only purpose for which
power can be rightfully exercised
over any member of a civilized
community against his will is
to prevent harm to others. His
own good, either physical or
moral is not a sufficient war-
rant."
With those who are offended
by certain actions or language
in the movies or books, I have
no quarrel. They should have
the same freedom as I not to
attend or to. purchase, a free-
dom I exercise quite often so as
not to he offended, and a free
dom for which I shall continue
to fight. Even for them.


A Friday, May 18, 1973
+Jen>istt fiorkMoHn
f Abba Eban, Gen. Yoffe Spur
Israel Bonds Campaign Here
Page 5-fi
One of Israel's foremost military
heroes said in Miami Beach last
week that his country's 25th anni-
versary Independence Day Parade
'was well worth every cent ex-
pended."
Maj. Gen. Avraham Yoffe, now
Israel's director of Nature Rose:-..'
Authority and the Middle East's
foremost conservationist, spoke at
a series of meetings held in ad
vance of the silver Anniversary
Dinner Wednesday night at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
Dr. Leon Kronish. president of
the Rabbinie-il Association of
rGreater Miami, and Robert Rus-
sell, president of the Greater Mi-
ami Fewish Federation, received
the Prime Minister's Medal i from
Foreign Minister Abba Eban at the
banquet.
Some 700 person.- attend''! the
dinner which was chaired by L.
.1 :les Arkin. vice nreiden1 of Fed-
eration, and held under the aus-
I ices of State of Israel Bonds.
Gen. Yoffe spoke at receptions
hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Jerome
Kipnis and Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Levy, Federation leaders who as-
sisted in planning the Silver An-
niversary Dinner.
He said the demonstration of is
r el's militarj might "not only
impress thn Arab and Communisl
Mocs of Israel's ability to defend
.-o|f. but alto was a tremendous
unifying factor for the nation
GIN. ABRAHAM VOfft
which has endured a quarter cen-
tury without peace."
He said that Lebanon's efforts
to restrain the terrorists within
her borders "cannot succeed at
present, because Lebanon does not
lave the stren ah to risk upsetting
be precarious balance between her
in tan and Moslem populati.ni-.'
Gen. Yoffe. who became a gen-
ral in Israels War of Independ-
ence and led sweeping victories in
mi.;; in oi;i IP56 and 1967,
said, "Israel cannot overcome her
major problems of pollution at the
moment because of the tremend-
ous costs Involved."
Mr. Bbau flew into Miami
Wednesday afternoon, held a brief
news conference at the Fontaine-
bleau and addressed the Silver An-
niversary Dinner before departing
for a Chicago Israel Bonds func-
tion Thursday.
In his piepared remarks, he
lauded Rabbi Kronish, chairman of
the international rabbinic cabinet
for Israel Ronds. and Mr. Russell,
a member of the Jewish Agency
executive, for their leadership in
behalf of innumerable Israeli
causes and the cause of world
peace.
Milton M. Parson, director of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Organi-
zation, helped coordinate the anni-
versary event.
Planning meeting for Wednesday '.ight's Israel Silver Anni-
vorsary Dinner at which Foreign Minister Abba Eban spoke
brings togelher noted author Robert St. John, author o:
"Eban," and Mrs. David Miller, who hosted the reception
honoring Mr. St. John in her Miami Beach home. State :'
Israel Bonds ponso'"ed the banquet and preliminary m '6 -
ings.
I
CONDOMINIUM
* RESALES
CONDOMINIUM
* LEASING
CONDOMINIUM
HUSTINGS
CONDOMINIUM
SALES
MORTLAW
MANAGEMENT, INC.
Registered
Real Eslo:? Broker
*27-0571 Srowcrd
945-OS33 Dadc
PI. .it ask tor WtrW or koncf
EXCELLENT CANTOR
WANTED FOR
HIGH HOLIDAYS ONLY
Write E.C.W., Box 2973
Miami, Fla. 33101
r
V
Only 39 families will
be owe to enjoy this
prime Mksni Bench
condominium for
as little as $1,400.
Fountain Towers. Prestigious location on
Indian Creek waterway-with luxury
to match. All electric eat-in kitchen,
private terrace, recreation suite. Best of all
. no recreajjonjease, no land lease,
no --jnagement fees. Monthly maintenance
''from only $39.00. Immediate occupancy.
Founwin tovuRS
Open daily '0 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Directions: If on the Beach, go north or south to 71st Sweet.
qo .vest o" 71st Street, turn right before going over Indian (_reeK
bridge From Miami, go across 79th Street Causeway, make
tirst left on east side of Indian Creek bridge.
Love is
children knowing that
they are welcome.
We've made a survey and there's not too many
condominiums that love children. Sure, plenty
of places '.^e them. Pets too. Junior gets his
head patted in the sales office and everybody
smiles. But soon something seems to happen to
those smiles. Well, at Shaker Village, we not only
take kids and pets, we take to them. And they
love us back. Maybe they love us because of
verything that's hart for them. Like the party
rooms, picnic are; md all lh*j
places to pi v "* "-"
the way we ta^.e care to prol if and
their Barents. With security gates Bt ta sr-ranca
and 3x.t, steel doors, with dead-bolt lockl a-3
paep holes, weil-!it streets, fire hydrant! and
fire-resistant exteriors a?d the fuli-tima life-
guard at the children's pool. Or maybe tney snow
we were kids once ourselves.
Shaker Village is the Best Value! and most Convenient Location in Ft.
Lauderdale. Just 30 minutes from Center City Miami and offering 50% more
Park-like greenery surrounding your luxurious townhouse for your families
outdoor pleasure. Our 2 3 4 Bedroom -TA Bath Models up to 1656
Sq. ft. of actual living area. Priced $32,500 to $33,900.
Call or visit our Salts bffic:
6601 W. Commercial Blvd.. Ft. lauderdaU-.,
(305) 721-3300 / Models Open Daily 10 5
Anothar fin. dav.lopm.nt of Maccar. Bu-lding 8. Conduction Company. Inc.
"wSn
Turn right off E xit 20 jumhin.
1^. .Park*** (Commerce! 8lvd I dr.v 1 m,l. (v.t).
Oirectly across from the VYooo.anda Country Ciu*


Page 6-A
+Jewlst> fhrkMa*
Friday, May 18, 1973
Jordan C. Band To Give Keynote
Address At AJCommittee Dinner
Irving Gordon Appointed
Histadrut Campaign Head
Cleveland attorney and civic
leader Jordan C. Ban i will be the
i ynote speaker at Hie annual
H


'H^^^^^V^^B
L A
?

A
'%<'
*
I -'v ~ "'
worked with government leaders,
the leadership of the Christian
community. Black leaders and
labor, as well as with the lay and
professional heads of American
lewis)] organizations and Jewish
leaders from abroad.
Prior to hi- election to the chair-
manship of the NJORAC Ml
served as vice chairman of that
'gency and as chairman of its
..a onal Commission on Equal
unity. He Is presently a
i } of its Executive
mittee.
d is a Community Del-
gate to the Plenum of th
.(an ish Cot So
N n ""..i!
,', ur ii of thi
fairs imn and a
. tan of tii'
Urban Affairs and Publii H i
of the Council of Jewish Fedcra
tions and Welfare Fends A for-
mer member of the National Steer
Committee and Executive
c mmitti of the National Urban
Coali' i educa
tion ai W -; Reserve Univer
sity, tiie Univei I >i Alabama
and th Law Scl ool of Western
Resen ..:
.-v.' nej Robcrl Traurig i
ihaii,. a and Ii l> ring L
v., s. i a- so cl tirman ol
th i e vith Judgi William E
- i hairt tan of
the PI nitte<.
it men!
Irving Gor-
don of Miami Beach as director of
thi Israel Histadrut Campaign for
South Florida was announced
Wednesday bj Samuel Feinstein
!..I Moe Levin, president and
chairman of the board of the Israel
drut Council
Mr. Cordon. 19 a former
regional
presidi i I of the Workmen's Cir-
cle, am no its regional
board of direct He is a mem-
urd of direc-
.r, oi Labor Commit
tee.
i h Jewish
tee \ i:''',;
pioneet h
11
R. Beber is president of i Great* Chi pter.
hlomo Kin-
id of
i University S hool of
- sti licen es to
JORDAN 0 BAND
of the Greater Miami
\ lerii an Jewish Com-
h loring Mrs, Leonard
dlai ; nd .' na < Kij nis
. li-li, d ci' u
I ':. Bi ach Hi I
Juni
Lodge Is Sponsoring 25111
\j:iiual Memorial Day Kallv
i respected
n-ivi m utmi nt to
id his brilliant
: He is
mal
( lit nan of
organ! tion im i i on
w Id \.. and !
pi iv. d a
ernat lirs 11 rvati in
I Th |

he ha?
:
B'nai
B'rith Lo >1 h was
in 1946. ill present its
23lli annual Memorii I < Patri-
otic Rally in the I ami Head:
rium Saturday, May 20. at
7:30 p.m.
This year's main will
b i Richard 'Dick" SI in Flor
ida's 16th Secretarj of State A
a State Senator, Mr. Stone intro-
the nt in-the
He also i,' nsored
tion to prote the i n
role in con-
tive ci i of the J
a -. ". il c< nduct thi
The rd 1} nted annual!)
y tl iami It it
litj -' rvici
iy the rings and
. tan Assoi iati G !e W. Val
ntine. vice president. There is
.,> :. : iis >ion charge and the
ublic is welci
San.del rally chair
nan. s. h ej Z Rockwell is lodg<
resident.
practice, in New York. Nebrasl i
and Georgia
Dunn, 21 years in Atlanta, he
served as a member of various- i
mittee; ol the Atlanta Jewish Wei
fare Federation, was a cochairim i
ol several divisions of the CJA
i.i rives (here and was un
Vtlanta trade unior
foi 1
He v i a member of th I
of th-- Ji wish Commun
an l th? ii. rcau ol Jewish Edui a
an I v ex uti
of tl Atlanta Peopli I
i-, i | im from i'1 3
Goi Ion will
: -
Unco' Rd BUI ?., Mian Bca
-----._.
4*&

a<
2S;

V&
*. v
X h o Pie n r nre o
vour a ITaii'
JS
fciuiFi.-i it y;. u jo. simm ton
pop
r and l
i Breeskin ice I Or
1 ent 'i
tain are I
h i
by the

I!
C Mendelson and
F .
i' entini the Colors will be
from H i est ad Air
F in i B the I ,;. N ival Re
thi i oast
i
~en:ck On News Council
Ralph Renick, WT VJ vice presi
nd n ws director was one
if IS members named to the Na
ional News Council a new!
group established in the public in-j
terest for the promotion of accu-\
rate and frr r porting and protec-
tion of the press against govern
ncnt or private infringements of
ts freed, in with headquarters in
Jew Vcrk City.
onfaine
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
MAGN1 ICE NT FA< rLITIE '
: vii ;i..
CUISl .' V \. AVAILABl B AT
BLNSIBLE PRICES.
BILL coi DRnra
CATEIWHi nw.i' I' '
S38-


WS>S^ <55S: '-c^
If voure rich
ntiiw
v
anil
whvas'cmwe
u

Your litde girl
is getting married.
At last.
Will it be a small wedding and a big reception, or vice versa?
After all, there are a lot of relieved girl friends and rejected boy
friends that have to be accommodated, one way or another.
Either way, there are no two ways about who should handle
the affair. Wfro else but the Oeauville? For the affair of the
season...be it wedding, reception, confitmation, banquet, meet-
ing or gala...no one'can touch the Oeauville for elegance of
service and cuisine, and the downright luxury of the surroundings.
And we never let down our standards. Whether you invite
25 or 3500 guests. Can your little girl have been that popular?
Deauville
Call Al Sicherer/Executive Food Director/ B65-85U
Ocean at 67th Street On the new Miami Beach
j
i 3 1
EbttfRootf
,1 p.m.
2*rtl>
in.
' : in, nt
I' i in 1-ValuriiiK
JOHNNY MILANESE TRIO
G.iy 90's Mood Silent Flicks
Duly, 11 a.m. to 1 a m.
V
Happy Hour 4:30 to 9 p.m.
''. iVk,r,y iot Omnef &
Suiulj, II life! 50< LunclJ
?iK'iitfon- (S^i
Fcxu'.VnibBuwacIors
301 S. Bayshore Drive, Miami, Fid
Phone 377-1966
having an affair?
It could be the perfect affair. And it should be. After all. v.?'re
talking about the most important moments in your life, four
daughter'; wedding. Your son's confirmation. The one big party
of the season.
At times like these, you deserve the Eden Roc. The figures
may come to a iittle more, but would you re.illy settle for any-
thing less?
Our catering director. Charlotte Horn, is without peer on
The Beach. Please don't hesitate to call her for advice, for spe-
cialized attention, and for a chance to look over the magnificent
lie*' Cotiil.on Room.
Eden Roc
Hotel, Yacht and Cabana Club.
Ocean from 45th tt 47th Street On the new Miami Beach
Charlotte Horn, JE 2-2581.
-
r
For a catered afiair
in the grand manner.
v*
Entertain in the famed Starlight Roo
above the city, or in the country
elegance of the Grand Ballroom.
These and other superb rooms '
your pleasure...complemented by
the area's finest gourmet
cuisine and flawless service..
in the Doral grand manner.
D0RUONTHE0GF.W
DORAL COUNTRY CLIB

-


:y, May 18, 1973
* frw't-f! fk rfdtoit)
170 Israel Bond Meetings
Mark Israel's Anniversary
Page 7-A
Panelists To Discuss Ail Facets Of
Greater Miami High Schoo! In Ssrae!
ute to Israels 25th anni-
arj lasl week, a total of 170
' eetings and celebrations were
held in various parts of the coun-
I 3 under the auspices of the Israel
Bond Organization, it was an-
nounced by Ira Ouilden. president.
Persons attending these events
were asked to buy State of Israel
Bonds to further the economic
lopment of Israel and to facil-
itate the settlement of Russian
immigrants through the creation
(.' jobs, Mr. Ouilden said.
of the Bonds in l lis country,
Canada, and other parts of the tree
world.
Summing up the achievements
made possible with the aid of
Israel Bonds, he said: 'The Israel
Bond program established the
foundation for the rapid growth
of the country's economy, enabling
it to receive the i.5 million immi-
grants who came to Israel since
1948.
Industrial development, the pro
motion of exports, the expansion
He added that the purchase of of agriculture, the construction of
'highways and housing, and the
development of transport and com-
munications could not have been
accomplished without the Bond
dollars which have gone into
Israel's Development Budget every
year. We can be proud of our
role in helping to provide the
3.000.000 citizens of Israel with a
thriving economy."
Fsrael Bonds was a 'meaningful
way of celebrating this milestone
in 1 wish history and assuring the
future growth of Israel as it be-
- ns the second quarter century of
independence."
Israel Bonds have been the
major source of investment funds
foi Israel's economic growth since
1951 when the young state floated
its first bond issue In the United
- ates. Since then. Mr. Cuilden
reported, more than S2.2 billion
The anniversary
stresses the spet al
meetings also
effort to col-
lect S75 million in cash in
i en reaii/ed from the sale (and June in tribute to the
Sen. Kenneth Myers
ay
Receives A Citation
May
75th
birthday of Prime Minister OoMa
icir. who had a prominent part in
the launching of the Israel Bond
program 23 .rears ago.
The Israel Bond Organization
sent the following message of con
gratulations on Israel's anniversary
to President Ephraim Katzir and
Prime Minister Golda Meir:
"Mazal tov on this day of glory
nid inanksgiwng lor world Jewry.
Israel's monumental achievements
in building a dynamic nation of
Jewish freedom in midst of war
ind critical pressures of immigra-
tion have made this the most
blessed generation in history.
Thank you for giving our people
o much Nachas (joy). Mindful of
continuing serious problems and
needs, the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion rededicatcs itself to fullest
support in days and years ahead.
With you on your 25th anniversary
.ve say Shehecheyonu (prayer of
thanksgiving) and Hag Sameach
Happy Holiday).
IRA GUILDKN.
President
SAM ROTHBERG.
General Chairman
A panel will explore all facets
of the Greater Miami High School
::i Israel on Ch. 7's The Still Small
Voice program Sunday.
Ill' program, which is being
in (1 under the auspices of the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, can be seen at 10 a.m.
The Greater Miami High School
in Israel was founded by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Agency for Jewish Education in'
cooperation with the Dade County
Board of Public Instruction and i i
open to all Dade County high
.-.chool students.
Students selected to participate
for a quinmester of study and trav-
el in Israel will receive social sci
encc high school credit from the
Dade County Board of Public In-
struction for their participation.
Panel members will include Rab \
bi Morris Kipper, director of the I
Greater Miami High School in Is-
rael; Phyllis Miller, member of
the Dade County School Board: Dr.
Gerald O. Dreyfuss, director of
staffing control for the Dade I
County school system: Elizabeth
*loiv/<). foreign language consult-
ant for the Dad Count} stl......
system, and Lilliam R .- n gistrni
Greater Miami High School
Israel.
The Central A -ni, foi J< ....
Education is one of 50 local. i>.
tional and overseas social welts
agencies which are henefieiarii -
of Federation's annual CJA IK.
campaign
Myers, Courshon, Blumberg
Reappointed By Commission
Stanley C. Myers. Arthur Con. -
hon and David Blumberg ha<
been reappointed for indefintti
terms as members of 11 i- Dan.
Count\ Jackson Memorial Hospital
interim got ming board, by unani-
mous vote i>i the Dade County
Commissioners.
The three had submitted thl '
resignations in compliance with thi
Conflict of Interest Ordinance .
which has now been amended to
provide a pci il exception fur
members of the hospital's interns
<">v.'rnin" board.
VI I VHAS3EE Sen. Ken-
1 is. D-Miami, chairman of
. naie Health and Rehabillta-
chief sponsor of over 30 major i
laws of our state, including the
Florida Community Mental Health
Act df 1970, th< Florida Air and
Water Pollui on O ntrol Act, the
Florida Drug Abuse Law. the Com-
prehensive Alcoholism Prevention,
Control and Treatment Act (The
Myers Act), the Health Mainten-
ance Organization Act. the Fam.
ily Planning Act of 1972. and ma- i
jor prison reform legislation which
has made improvements in our
criminal justice system."
It's good business
to do business with a
Barnett Bank of Miami Beach, N.A.
420 Lincoln Road Mall
Member FD C
**MyFawmteGiA

StN. KtNNtTH MYtRS
r s rvices Committee, has been
cited by the Florida Psychologi-
cal Association for "distinguishing
li gii lation pertaining
entally ill and retarded.
.. i\j, ps and improvements
i welfare system."
,i. i tenting Sen. Myers with
(he citation, the a ioci ition said
mosl of the problems ol today's
orld are beyond the reach of in-
dividual action, and il is for this
ieasi n thai we look to our elected
i presi ntatives for efforts which
can mobilize our entire societ)
| thus create a richer, fuller life
all,"
The association praised Sen. My-
ishdor who has indeed
rppri iti I all peopl of good will
i 0ur state and has worked effec-
i ivelj to help solve some of our
i ,,.-; ressing reeds.
\ inan of vision and under-
.-,,,,: n. ol human dignity, Sen.
My, brought a long range,
well-organized, constructive ap
oacl I > problems concerned with
human well-being," the citation
' '' i
.i has been the author
Lodgs To Hold Awards Nite
Georgi Gershwin Lodge
Knights ol Pythias, will hold its
u "awards nite" in the Ivory
jow,. ,i the Saxon) Hotel, 3201
,H, Saturdaj al 7:15 p
elior Commander Milton
[cvers iH be honored a
_,, ; year"; h< will then
i "Knights" that h
i ,| to out i mmunitj
man P.S.D.G.C Oscar
Kantor *ill direct the festivities.
HWgDOd it is
utTt a
Winston tastes good,
when a cigarette should.
ton General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Cangerous to Your Health.
SUPER KING
OR KING
i n i arrxoiDI to*'co CO.
SUPER KING. 20 mg."t3i", 1.3 mj. nicotine. KING: 20 019."in". 1.4 mg nicotine, av per cigareiie. HC flepori fB '73.


Face 8-A
+Jeni*ti i icridtiatn
Friday. May 18, 1973
*S
Salutes ISRAEL
on its
25TH Anniversary
and renews its call to Miami Jewry to continue to reclaim
and redeem the land of Israel
GOLDAMEIR
PRIME MINISTER
OF
ISRAEL
"I don't know whether there were many
nations except us who seventy years ago,
accepted the principle of national owner-
ship of land, which has been the guiding
beacon of the Jewish National Fund since
1901. However, woe to the movement
which uses its ideology only for the for-
mulation or resolution and does not have
the strength or the determination to im-
plement the idea and the vision...to
redeem arid reclaim their land...through
::'e Jewish National Fund.
To the Jewish Family throughout the
.'.crld, who loves our country with heart
and soul. I declare that every inch of land is
orecious and every grain of sand. Believe
in a great ideal and help to implement it!
DR. IRVING
LEHRMAN
JUDGE ZEVW
KOGAN
Pres So P-
MOSHE DAYAN
"UNDER FIRE-JNFS ROLE
IN
THE WAR
An instrument for the peaceful building of
the Jewish Homeland, the JNF has been
engaged for almost seven decades in the
work of soil reclamation, afforestation, the
building of roads, the clearing of sites for
agricultural settlements. The record shows
that a string of border settlements is the
country's first line of defense. By providing
the sites for these settlements the JNF has
contributed mightly to the defense of the
homeland. JNF served Israel's military
defense in many ways. It delayed the
movement of the enemy's mortars and
tanks, and provided shelter for our defen-
ders. The roads built along the border by
the JNF provided mobility for the Israeli
forces the watch towers built by Keren
Kayemeth gave the settlers added
security. "WE NEED THE JNF TO TURN
IT GREEN."
JEWISH NATI'ti
!.**' press?-
tfSS
55 **

Photo shows I. to r.: M-M Max Affa
M-M Abraham Grossman, M-M Horn;
DR. MAYER
ABRAMOWITZ
chai'injn E.oc Bd.
HON. JAY
DERMER
JflillOV' >
'T



Friday. May 18, 1973
'Jenisti ncriJian
Page 9-A
DNAL FUND AND GREATER MIAMI LEADERSHIP
Dais Photo shows I. to r. Rabbi and Mrs. David Raab.
**'**
Standing: Mr. Moe Levin, Judge Zev \V. Kogan.
*****
"** V-A,
"**<4i
ToW5*
nds.

M-M l^Hiis l.uslig, M-M Max Hecht, guests,
MM J.Z. Staidlan, M-M Leon Schuster.
I
^HS^Si.

"""> wT
and
fiachiner. M-M Meyer Siegel. M-M Isidore Hifkin.
nig. and Mrs. Lillian Dubouy.
Photo shows I. to r Rabbi and Mrs. Roseiuwaig. M-M l.ifchut/.. M-M Samuel
Kusnetz. M-M l.eon Buda.
I'hotn shows I. to r.-M M Krnest Samuels, MM Irving
Ackerman. MM Frank. Mrs. Dorothy Kaminetzky. Mrs.
* Clara Nevis, Joseph Hill.


Page 10-A
*Jctt list fhrkttain
Friday, May 18. 1973
Jim rCaobi ^>pciifis J~r>** Jim f^tilpii
" *m .,
'
The Year Of Jubilee
By
RABBI NORMAN Ml'SSMAN
Befh Torah Congregation
land common property."
Our ancestors loo felt Ihat eco-
nomic equality had its roots in un-
"From rags to rksbe*," is a fa- pqUa] ownership of land. But rn-
riili.ii' phrase in American society. S{ead of going to the extreme pro-
We feel good living in a country posed by George, they worked out
th.ii allows men
uid women to
limb to wealth
and eminence
:'rom nowhere.
But we do not
top to think
hut we would
":e much better
off if our so-
v was not be-
in
Kobbi Mussmon into two camps,
rich and poor.
Wealth for the few is no compen-
sation for povertj for the many.
r>->ot of economic inequality
cribcd ij Henry George in
tno following fashion: "Unequal
i "i of land necessitates the
i listr but ion of wealtl
ECD Program
Offered In
North i)ade
The YM-YWHA of Greater
Miami will inaugurate a North
County Early Childhood Develop-
ment program next September.
The program is for children 2'i
to 5 years of age. including kinder-
garten. Mrs. Donald Lipp. pres-
ident of the North County ECD
program, is now accepting regis-
tration.
Special features of this unique
program include individualized
instruction, small classes, certified
early childhood educators, and an
enriched Jewish cultural exper-
ience with emphasis on sharing,
listening and caring.
The fall program will be offered
;iw days a week with morning
!us' \i man no land was in per-**wsions from 9-12 and afternoon
i bondage. sessions from 12:30-3 p.m. An
alternative program is also offered
U not this the goal toward which from 9-2:30.
in America should strive and
not this another instance in
a most ingenious device to even
out economic differences.
In this week's Torah portion it
... s; And ye shall hallow the 50th
year, and proclaim liberty through
out the land unto all the inhabi-
tant* thereof: it shall be a jubilee
unto you; and ye shall Return ev-
ery man unto his possession.''
Ancient Israel was divided among
divided, as ,|lP 12 tribes. In the course of years
presently, sonu, nu,n wcrc forced to seee their
property and even themselves. How
ever, in the jubilee year every-
thing returned to its original sta
pctual
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Behar
And the Lord spoke unto Moses in Mount Sinai ."
Chapters 29-28:2)
SABBATICAL YEAR AND YEAR OF JUBILEE: When the
people possessed Canaan, the land ws to enjoy -bath a*
rest" every seventh year and lie fallow. It was not to be sown >r
reaped, but grain or fruit which grew naturally during the j ir
ouid be eaten by the owner and his household. In the 50th ye IT,
t the end of each cycle of seven sabbatical years, a similar law
applied. The Jubilee Year was proclaimed by the sounding of I e
shofar on the lfllh clay of the seventh month (Tishri The Re-
Drew Slave was set free and all land reverted to its original owner.
REDEMPTION OF LAND: Land sold through hardship could
be redeemed at any time before the Year of Jubilee, by a relative
whose obligation it was to purchase it so that it should not pan
into the hands of another family, or by the original owner him-
self, the repayment again being calculated on an equitable ba.-;s.
CONSIDERATION FOR THE NEEDY: Loans K> a needy
fellow-Israelite were to he made without charging any interest.
If through poverty he was forced to sell himself as a slave, te
was to be treated leniently as though he were a hired servant, and
b( set free at the jubilee. Should he sell himself as a -lave it .,
non-Israelite, for an indefinite period, he could be redeemed bj a
relative or redeem himself if he acquired sufficient money, y
payment of an equitable sum. In anv event, he went tree in the
N. ear of Jubilee.
is
i dy to* (he unjust dis- whh h our ancient book again hold- (|
I -i of w?alth is in making promise for mankind?
An Open House lo outline the
program Will be held Tuesday
Mesivta Alumni Launch
Talmud Study Program
adual of '' lis VI< rwitzer thi pr ifound depth of th
M< sivta H ijh 10 il tnd of th
( tor Miami Hebrew Academy
I ated s m eeklj pro
grai r rah study, following a
mi eti un ni at the home of
i and Mrs Abraham Groner
Talmud
AH me indents of yeshivoi
and in isivtot, and others with a
oni 12:80-2 p.m. at 18801 W.
Dixie Hwy.. North Miami.
---------------------------------
Temple Israel
Elects (tfficers
Ai ts 51st annual meeting, th
Ci ngregation of Temple Israel of
rreater Miami elected officers foi
the 1973-74 y .r
Presidi nl is Arnold >' Rosen
vfathan S. Gumenick, Roh rl Rus-
hCobbinical J *U
eviston
Prc3
ramt
Thi I o hour sessions, to b
Sundi : m i ni and Thursda>
, ngs at th ': Bi th Med-
rash, 1963 Alton R I Miami Beach.
un thi- v. ek.
Rabbis Grone. ar ; Milton Simon.
I she.v Yeshiv i al the Mesivta.
the classi provide an oppor-
i )[ for all oung men in the
mmunity with a background in
T. rah study to 'X| lore as a group
background in Talmudic studj are sell, Jack Schillinger, Stanley G
Tate and FT I i Timoner were elected
ii e presidents. Bart I. Cohen wa:
selected secretary; Nathan B
Kond. treasurer: Mrs. Leopold L.
Schwartz, assistant treasurer, and
II. V. Green, financial secretan
i attend the sessions at
Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Thurs
day.
CANDLEUOHTING TIME
18 1YAH 7:40
Owsoawi *
Tin charter class includes Mar
'in Wasserman, Melvin Mann. Ron
aid Stauber, Abe Chames. Jeff
A. :-.-, Jerry Burstyn. Steve Schra
;.i. Steve Rosenberg and Michael
Rosenberg.
The Mesivta of Greater Miami is
the only Hebrew senior high school
in the soutn witn a complete He-
brew and general studies program.
according to Rabbi Alexander S
Gross, principal.
jVw:-7i GvH Service
The Robert Kanzcr chapter of
I 'Ii National Jewish Civil Service
Employees has scheduled a meet
iiu for Sunday at I p.m. in the
Washington Federal Bldg., 1133
Normandy Dr.
Elected to the board of directors
were Stephen H. Barnett, Dr.
Charles Beber. Dr. Sidney Bes-
vinick, William W. Binder. Marvin
Bransdorf, Jesse Caaselhoff, Rich
aid I. Furman. Max H. Goldhoff,
Sam H. Goldman, State Senator
lack D. Cordon. Lewis W, Gorfine
and Thomas L. Green.
Also named to the new board
were: Anthony W. Lane, Arthur
R. Leyton. Mrs. Clifford New-
murk. Michael D. Orovitz. Mrs.
Jerome Rado. S. Sidney Raffel.
Kenneth D. Rosen. Mrs. Harrj
Sands. Harold W. Spaet. Dr. Stan
ley Sutnick, Mrs. Sydney L. Wein
traub, Bar] L. Wiener and Mrs.
Peter Wolf.
May 20 Ch. 4. 8:30 a.m The First Estate
Repeal n Ch. 2 at 6:30 p.m.)
Host: Rev. Luther C. Pierce
,-. Ri igious Education via Daj S
Movement''
Guests: Father John Vered, David E
May \'0 Ch 10. 9:30 a.m. The Jewish Worshi H mr
Host: Rabbi Alexander s. Gross, principi Hcbi
Academy of Greata r Miami
Maj 20 Ch 7. 10 a.m. The Still Small V ici
I'opic: "Greati r Miami Hi ?h School in :
Panelists: Rabbi Morris Kij r P ylli i'.ler, 1
Gerald (>. Dreyfuss, Elizabeth Alonzo tnd
lian Ross
Grit To U-/M Music School for Zimmerman Memorial
The University of Miami School and Otto G. Richter Libra: on
f Music has received a gift from main campus. Part of it will lur-
Irs Dorothv Znnmcrmann of New ther the Frederick Zimmer nann
,'ork. widow of Frederick Zim- Memorial Scries for Double Bass,
'Hermann, who for more than 30 published by University of Miami
ear was professor of double bass I Music Publications: another part
it Juilliard School of Music, and will provide a portion of th tui-
i prominent member of the New tion.for a graduate student in
York Philharmonic Orchestra ac
ording to Dr. William F. Lee,
lean of the School of Music. The
lift will be used primarily for
the Frederick /.immermann Mem
>rial Collect! in of double bass
nusie. recordings, books and
nicronlm which will be housed
n the Albert Pick Music Library1
double bass.
THE MAPAM Central Commit-
tee has picked Meir Talmi. the
63-year-old founding member of
Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'emefc. as
its new secretary-general, re-
placing Meir Ya'ari who stepped
down after 52 year-.

Mil '.mill
' hCcliaious *J5<
civices
x
mum
A H A V A T SHALOf.' CONGREGA-
TION. 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox
Cantor Aron Ben Aron. 1
----
ANSHE EMES '533 SW 19th Ave.
American Traditional Judaism. Rab-
1 J Marshall Taxay. Cantor Sol
Pakowitz. 2
BETH AM . 5950 N. Kendall
Dr. S Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
tert Baumgard 3
SEPHARDu, jtWi: A CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 3'
^
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 15
44 Washington Ave. /labbi Avrol.->m
Gronsr. 3J
i NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
rILAH. 935 Euclid Ave. Or. | CENTER. 1720 79th Street Cause-
u ill nppnk on.
Mtii'iil I'rolili m
Knturtlny Lti:4!
l-i'. j. riek, -"M
l.-V Hni ii-i.in
-Vh>. I!.....-n I..., l.-liin.
I- W*aterRat6 ;t Po.
ii Moral Main
.i in. Kill- .Milzi ah:
I .Mr .....I
i 'urtls, -mi ..I Mr. and
thodox.
sky.
Rabbi Joseph E.
Rackov- .
22 !
OR OLOM iiemnle> 87S5 SW 16th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Elliot
wmegrcd. Cantor Vehouda Binya-
min. 11
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein. 14
i.'ii. i ). m lUililil Maurio
will H|H*ak mi. "The InHrrfptlon
n Hell mi Philadelphia i^ still Ihi
Toll of Axea."
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA.
TION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
'' CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
, (1). GREGATION. 715 Washington Av..
Dow Rozencwaig. Cantor Jr-
way. North Bay Village. Conserva-
tive. Cantor Murray Yavneh. 32-A
AGUOAS ACHIM NUSACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St., Mi
ami Beach. Orthodox. Rabbi Mor
decai Chaimovits.
NORTH MIAK! BIACH
Rabbi
seph Moore.
23
BFTH DAVID. 2628 SW 3rd Aye.
Conservative. Kaobl Irving A. Wein-
gart. Cantor William W. Lipson. 4
BETH
dox.
EL. 500 SW 17th Ave
Rabbi H. Rothman.
Ortho-
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 13th Ave
Modern Traditional. Rabti Max Sha-
piro Cantor Le'n Segai. 6
BETH TOV tiemple? 6438 SW 9th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles
Rubil. Cantor Sey.nour Hinkrs. 8
I r. p.in ;
I to "Ailull Kdu ..linn i:vi niiiL-.'
'i dull pduratlon i Imm, under thi
lia of llabhl and Mrx, I' i.ul -
^^ III be honored and u
i i in the kpi \ I. Thi i
i Kponaor Ihi
. nnclual
ZION (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con.
servattve. Rabbi Normar Shapiro.
Cintor Errol Heltman. 16
- in. Hal Mltzv .ill: Klllllei -
Ine, daUKhter of Mr. Howard Sonu;
>'-1 topli "The Soundi of si-
5 lenei Saturday R a.m sermon, Sed-
I VV. I.
HIAltAH
TIFERETH .'ACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabl.i N.
than Zolondex 15
EMANU EL (Temple). 1701 Washing.!
ton Ave. Conservative. R.bbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. ^400 Pine Tree'
Orthodox Ra.ibi Alexander S '
Gross.
25
UORTH MIAMI
BETH MCSHE COMGREGATION. 2225
NE 121*t St '. jnservative. R.ibbi
Joseph Gorflnkel. Cantor Ben 2ion
Kirschenhaum 35
MIAAU BtACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave
Orthodox Rahhi Sheldon M. Ever.
CONG^AN-NELL (Branch of Hebrew
av? ".yJ'- 7,h Sl-- and Meridian
Av- Orthodox. Rebbi Abraham Ben.
"""'________ 26-A
JAcvaBr^. SOHEN COMMUNITY!
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave
Orthodox R.bhi Tibor H. Ster~
Centor Meyer Engel. 2S
KoE.!ETH lSRAEL 1415 Euclid Ave I
Orthooox. Rabbi David Lehrfield
Cantor Abraham Sei*. 27
ISRAEL (Temple) CF GREATER Mi
ami. H7 NE 19th S Reform. Rahhi
Joseeh R. Naro- 1,
t u m i
' I J v \ : | .
i). V|) \
ISRAELITE CENTER. 31/6 V// T5th
sr. Conservatr.... r.'aii.'v t-aul I
E-nder. Cantor Nathan Parnau
;'
MENORAH (Tempte,. 620 75th St
Coniervat,ve. Rab'ji Mayt, Abram
ow.tz. Cantor Nlao F>-ldman. ?>
. wa5h,ng,on Ave" wfS&t I lavid .V '"""" ;"" K"
lid .VIi- II, tK. 1 1 1
BETH ISRAEL. >70 40th St. Orthodox
IVc-dr-ai Shapiro ig
'.
' f.,")hi Shmary.nhu T. Sv/ir.
-^rti, Maurice Mamches 19
RE-M RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
n Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
-to- Saul Breeh. 20
- a-------
CE7H SHOI OM (Temple). 4144 Chase
I Leon K.-on :h.
Ccr.viser. 21
i m
iimun,
.......r Mr.
ADATH YESHURUN (Temple). 102!
"NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserve-
tive. Rabbi Milton Schlinsky. Can-
tor Reuvan Eckhaus. 83
----*----
BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Crnservative. Rcbbi Max Lio-
schitz. Cantor Jacob B Vendelson 3<
---------a> ii
BNAI RAPHAEL. 141, NW 183rd St
Conservative. Rabbi Victor O
Zwelling. Cantor .'-if Lerner. 36
SINAI (Temple). 01 NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsiey. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
h'rldaj R: 15 p.m. xermon topic, "Wii.ii
'" ''|l' '' i l- 1 -m M...111 \\',.......
Kate rind Other Such Mattera." Sat-
urdaj 10:30 a.m. B'nal Mltxvah: Mark
111 i.iin 1.1 and si. \in Hhraxo.
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Jonah E
Caplan. 3f
YU.NG ISRAEL OF GREATER ML
AMI 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox >
riabbi Zalman KossowsKy. 39
Berger. Cantor P. H Mel Bru :imtr.
41
SURFSIDt
MOOAN DAVID COKGREGA'ION,
9348 Harding Ave Ci'.hodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. u
fOKT lAUDtRDALt
BETH ISRAEL (f em pie). 7100 W.
Oaklanri Park Blvri Rabbi Akiva.
Brilliant. Cantor Maurce Neu 42
--------
EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. (Reform). Rstti Arthur J.
Abrams. Cantor Jeron e Klemant. 43
Prlda> : I., i> in .1. Snl.
urday 11 n.m. Ilal Ml: tvak>: X II.
daughter of Dr. .i>-~ .-, >,ilev
' loodman,
P0MPAN0 BtACH
MNWG9thEStJEW,SH CENTEF1 tm
SHOLOM (Temple). 133 SE 11th Ave
Conservative. Rablri '.'crris A. koo.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer
HAUANDAll
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(ConseTvative). 416 vE Rn Ave.
I.Jk r.H*Ty E- Schwartz, Canto*
Jacob Danziaer.
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple, -3"
Reform. Ribbi Samuel
llcl;n s |S p ,
"rael-n 25th 1.....ivi-r-i
Jeruxalem of rjirl
Hen ted, followed In n
honied In Mr. and Mr.
i" honor of their -

S. 14l'i Ave.
Jaffe. 4S
rvi of
i -. in
ill 1..
1 .- i.i,.
Iveri
BETH
K

NER TAMID ITempiei. 80th St. inr
Tatum Waterway Conservative
Rabbi Eugene Labov.tz. Cantor Ed
ward Klein. 5,
O'-EV SHALOM. r.'5i Bonita Dr. Or
: Cantor Leo Radit, 30
IUDEA
R
CORAL C4Bf.fi
(Temple,. 5500 Granada Blvd
R-'"rn. c.abhi Morri, Kipper. 40
Pnda> r, ,, m .,.,, ,,,,,.,. ...
! \iYi.,A""'i"iSul?rdn?' "'' Bat
L /,;i '.''"'I. .. r. and
. e?HLOM 'T^c'e' 4601 Ar.
L .1 .' Con,servative Rabbi Morton
iv.alavsky. Cantor Irvmg Gold. 41
S,r!^'. (TemP,e>- "^ -'ohneon St.
r^?rv "!. .Rabhi David =*hapir.
Cantor Yehuda Heiltraun. 4}
T!!oP^EvBf7^"^M' Conservative.
R-..h: 62ndA*-""' Hollywood
Rabbi Salomon Bene'-::h.
AM Harvi .Mill
ZAMORA Temple). 44
Conservative. Rabbi
L beral) 5'ro
ywood. Rabbi
Zamora Ave
Maxwell A..
TEMPLE SOLEL
Sheridan Street,
Robert Frazlr,.
fllKAMAH
ISRAEL (Temple), t':: cw 35th t
Conservative. Ra,:r. A.",m Draz
Centor Abraham Kcmr. or"'fi


rridcry. Moy 18, 1973
+Jrn 1st) Mcrldttaw

- As...
Max Lerner
Sees It
LOS
poor
i npel
liti

f.ilvif


Pace ll-K
I
I
Inil \
ANGELES, Calif. No wonder Broadwaj theat?r,
- dying of playwright anemi H could a po s:b!j
lier, bloodier and mo rambun
. laying to full houses ml of Wash ns Los Angeles al tha D
inled" th Wal
rad | t]
torne-j u 1. His I i V in H
e Hamle Ri .
i i .nie i. urn ,
nee. H \
An
\


files w
fl '.'
tical theal
II tl eni
N "
' I wish some American |
o it?
i th" Nixon
I be i
fr reali i

i
r

ii-
it
.
cover
.
in conl
oci<'
Nixon


o
th< : blame oi 1 '.....
' ;on l!
., ,-
rh little of tl ly the bail
I and 1 I to
,. dii i invol i high ; and
I goal I ans which set him
.. o '' '' th
Of al Id the si i i Richaiv'
; |o thi li finit >ii
TO -' HOW Ml I H of ;i fal
Hi -ri v ill be, wc i" '-' w iil
,he furl : .Wings Bui who can dei I e ti igic qutlitj thus
far? 1 [, contradictory personality is there, and s i the
nd i! vitness th sumn iri itate of 1
draft oi -n polio*- 1,;" ;||<" the tawdr} llimate Bl*uni
which
T inevitable ravages lo th structure of pre
Hal pen, power arc also there. Item: the Japanese nonvwt.
Item: th of Europe" stillborn. Item Mr Nixon having to
meel George, Pompidou neither in Paris nor Washington but in
Iceland. I tting locus for an "ice age." Item: Mr. Nixon having
to woo C m ess, Mom compliments to the press, bespeaka coming
era of lib. .nd compassionate action in domestic policy winch
seems ali to lim.
Most people don't take all this as a big deal of tragic pro-
portion. The straw polls show them skeptical and even cynical
A big chunk ,f them feel thai Mr. Nixon was involved at the
least with the coycrup.
Bu* the: ion't see the whole Watergate business as notably
novel. Phones have been tapped before, they say. The tiles of
doctor- : psychiatrists have been rifled before, including John
Kennedy'- medical dossier and Mr. Nixon's own. This administra-
tion is pi (they add) no more so than past ones.
There is an earthlv quality to this which deflates moral pre-
tensions i hatever side. There is enough truth in it to make us
wary of I kind of high moralistic overkill that is setting in on
Water-ate But don't push the deflation too far. That compas-
sion" He Kissinger invoked may or may not be in order, but
resell of it for our poor country and the plight of all of
US no lit the sinners or angels but the ordinary earthly
creature-
President Zalman Shazar, who
will step down Co President o!
Ihe St< i ol Israel May 21, fol-
lowing the conclusion of his
-:oi 25ih annivci
lion, is due for a
United States on be-
'- si Ecnds shortly
Shazar took o
in M:. and will be suc-
ceeded b' phraim K
CH0LE1 TO!?AH DAY SCHOOL
THRIFT STORE
NEEDS YOUR GOOD, USED
EURNITURE, CLOTHING, APPLIANCES
DISHES, POTS AND PANS,
BRIC-ABZAC AND WHAT HAVE YOU!
fOR qu:k pick up call
759-4936
All Donations Tax Deductible
Then, s a n .. : ian in
tow n who tui
furnitu new right
b r own ho i e.
Lit e maj
I. iii.. ciga-
recte urns, blemishes,
/ejuvenan i your furni-
ture. Vou will be
amazed ai.d delighted
with the speedy results
fled 1 the un-
I e low prices.
For service you can
.11 11 -
l iturt Repair
Servii
223-9558
irrange
free < .timate.
Good Water
for Diets
Many diets call for many glasses oi wati
day. It's important i k tl t right amount, ind
Mountain Valley1 nakes it so easy to do this
sopa'atable, s m the system.
When you first tai t "" intain Valley'
you'll fee! like you're drinking real water for die
first tune. Dnnk it awhile-soonyou'll know
what incomparably good water c.ui mean tor) '-'
Only one water has caned nationwide actiaim-
Mountain Valley Water. Jus; one American spring
has been in constant use for 100 yeats, the
Mountain Valley spring m Hot Springs, Arkansas.
Today aplai'- iome protects that spring so that not
even au pollution can cfiect the precious water.
Mpuntam Valley is delivered to you only in glass
bottles.
OkOL HOWARD
691-2280 563-5995
3355 IW. lift St., Biami, F!a. 331(7
c^Vioantaiii Valley
"Water
HOT SHUHCS. AHK.
That's how much you can save
on a 3-rpinute long distance call anywhere in
Florida if you dial direct without an operator s
assistance after 5 p.m. And that 75% could add up
to a maximum savings of $2.25. The rate is even
lower all day Saturday and up until 5 p.m. on Sunday.
So dial direct. The percentages are in your favor:
MAXIMUM EVENING RATES
ODD....................................... 75C
Station To Station (Operator handled)............SI.25
Person To Person (Operator handled.)............$3.00
Maximum Savings............................S2-25
in ;
r li ran I .', i ,
Share a smite. Dial Ions* distance tonight.
Southern BpU


Page 12-A
+Je*ishfk>tkii&n '
Friday, May 18, 1973
Temple Menorah Teachers To Be
Honored By Graduating Students
Mrs Sharon Golub and Ronald
Heller who taught the Vav classes
will be honored by the students
during the 6th year graduation
ceremonies at Temple Menorah
which will take place during the
Friday evening services.
The graduating students will
participate in the services and will
receive graduation diplomas Iron)
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. Ronald
A. Heller, educational director and
Nathaniel Gliekman. chairman of
the school board.
The Kiddush sponsored by the
Parents of Menorah honoring the
students and their parents will
take place in the temple's socw I
hall following {he services.
The graduating students are
Belina Bejar. Dora Vilk. Jenny
Vainstein. Keina Ydo. Robin
fields, Deborah Sackner. Su/i
Chorowski. Sus.ino Cano, Prince
3f4Hf. 'Sffitflra OurJTTtir* iVtrrfTo
Grosfeld. Leonardo Tachmes and
Solomon Susi.
Also Aubrey Reiler. Eric Berger,
Isaac Karpel, Richard Weisshaut,
Foyce Siegel, Gisela Shahar,
Brenda Pundik, Sara Schwartz
iaum, Sonia Sapranik, Rosa Tel-
ler and Michelle Altmark.
Also Stuart Paul. Victor Maya,
Bernardo Garazi. Eli Mizrachi,
Wayne Bernstein. Danny Low-
inger, Stuart Friedman, Mark
squenazi, Richard Weinstock,
i ;hael Hennings, Paul Bochner
.: ,l Gary Nesbitt.
J. M. LIPTON ^V
INSURANCE AGENCY INC.
31-
> GENERAIMNSURANCE & SURETY BONDS
614 DADE FEDERAL BUILDING
101 E. FLAGLER STREET MIAMI 32, FLA.
FR 1-5631 FR 7-1671
rM
Join me! Oct. 25th 22 Days
ISRAEL ISTANBUL ATHENS
A deluxe tour, perionally escort
ed by Harriet Horwitz, includes
hotels, sight-seeing,
2 meais daily, etc.
From MIAMI to MIAMI
1277
plus S20 (Tarn I Tips)
FLORIDA V3SITS ISRAEL
8 1 SPECIAL GROUP Departures from
now until Oct. 29. Discuss YOUR trip
with our Israeli Specialists.

(jioiip Cruiiti nl ^if/ccitif KaltS
Traveling? Sit an :xpsrincie Travel Agant Sit Ut!
GLOBE TRAVEL, Inc.
1611 Nf 163rd Strttt
N.rth Miami 8a hont(305)9.2J27
Give
Yourself
a L?ft
COMFORTABLE
ELEVATING RECLINER
Takes the struggle out of getting p and down
Touch a switch the soft luxurious seat raises
gently, standing you on your feet. Touch a switch,
recline and stop in any position, automatically el-
evating feet and legs as you relax. Write for free
color catalogue and informat.on on a week's hom*
rial with no obligation. It's Burke's "Try before
you buy plan." '
be
BURKE ENTERPRISES
PO BOX 1011 Depi. JF-518
Mission Konsos 64202
913-722-0004
Stern Reelected
JFCS President
Arnold J. Stern was reelected
j president of the Jewish Family
I and Children's Service for the year
1973 1.974 at a recent, meeting of
{TrTe'T>oard of directors.
Other officers reelected for the
I coming year were Samuel S. Smith
and Mrs. Harold Kand. vice pres
[dents; Walter C. Kovner. secre-
tary, and Mrs. Eugene R. Katz
treasurer.
In addition, the following mem-
bers of the Board of Directors
were reelected for a three year
term expiring in May. 1976: Walter
S. Falk, Leo Landis, Mrs. Burton
Levey, Mrs. Bernard Nemeroff,
Mrs. Morton Silberman and Mrs.
Howard Trinz.
Five honorary directors were
tiro reelected for :i one year term
expiring in May. 1974. They are
David P. Cat-man. Irvin Korach
| Sidney Lefcourt, Mrs Edwin B
Oppenheim and Harold Thurman
The JFCS. which is supported
j through the Greater Miami Jew
ish Federation and United Fund ot
Dade County, provides counseling
and child welfare services to the
lewish community.
SYSTEMS FOR SECURITY, Inc.
ALARM SYSTEMS
JACK SCHENKMAN
MfUOINl
IVmi.l. .. t -IfUHGLfji- Fl HOLDUP)
(< rifticd I nderwriters Laboratories Ipprovcd Central Station Tor
CENTRAL STATION BANK SAFE and VAULT BURGLAR ALARM
CENTRAL STATION MERCANTILE PREMISES BURG..AR ALARM
CENTRAL STATION MERCANTILE and VAULT BUflGLAR ALARM
CENTRAL STA COMBINATION MERCANTILE PREMISES BURGLAR ALARM
CENTRAL STATION PROTECTIVE SIGNALING SERVICES FIRE ALARM
FACTORY MUTUAL APPROVED CENTRAL STATION
ALL CERTIFICATION REQUIRED
investment Advice On Tap
Emma Lazarus Chapter, B'nai
!', rith Women, will meet Tin -
i at 8 p.m. in the Jefferson Nationa'
Bank, 301 Arthur Godfrey Rd
Mickel Ross, investment advisor,
will be guest speaker.
EXCELLENT
MUSICAL CANTOR
Cultured tenor voice, ?0 years eft, .
re.idi the Torah, blows S-"'ir.
looking for High Holie'tv DO.it'rn.
Normandy B'\. Miani Bnrh. Pla.
Reasonable. Write P.O. Box *S00.
33141.
THE
CLOSET t\m
PESIGNERS H CREATORS
of Dutiful closet interiors
GUARANTEEP
TD GIVE YOU MORE
HAMGiNG & SHELF SFftCC
TD RT YOU3 PERSONAL WEEPS
660 N.W^-119th STREET
" MARTHA E. BARNES
688-0663 or 688*8000
SALES AND SEKVICE ,
afUA'#r/w,
BST/A1ATE
823-0085
Big Sun You've had a sunset ride.
You deserve Seagram's V.O.The First Canadian.
First in smoothness. First in lightness. First in sa'es throughout the world.
All the others come after. *
I
m

.
Radian -whisky
'
....
* it......
won* wh! m-a slew oi team wwMits.su iua$ oi. 86.8 psoof.suu* owiuus co,m.v.cT


Pridcy, May 18, 1973
Jmistifhridfar? "
' Page 13-A
:-.t
How to squeeze 6%
out of a 5 Y passbook.
1, Surprise. This big 6% interest is from a bank. Read on, skeptic. If you have one thousand
dollars that's not working too hard for you, here's our plan.
3, Okay. Months fly by, but you're cool as an Alaskan cucumber. You know your interest is
growing, building up, nourishing itself. But periodically you drop into the bank anyway, just to
make sure everything's running right. You chat with a guard, nod knowingly at a teller, and
maybe open a checking account. (After all, why not do your checking in the same place you've
got your passbook?)
5, Well, you did it. You had the willpower to let the interest ride for 2 years. Bring your
bushe! casket up to the window and collect
2, Open a 2-year, 534% passbook account with us. Now promise yourself to let the interest
accumulate for 2 yearsthat's what'll give you that glorious 6% annual yield. (Incidentally,
who else pays that much interest on as little as one thousand dollars?)
4, Now and then you might want to add a hundred dollars. Fine. Let it work for you. Add it
to your account anytime. That's a nice little feature about our passbook Some places won't
let you add to your 2 year account. They make you save up (at a lower rate of interest) until
you have enough to open another thousand dollar account. Ridiculous.
6, A fringe benefit: your smile is 6% broader.
Interest compounded daily.
The Miami Beach First National Bank
Coral Gables First National Bank
United National Bank of Dadeland
United National Bank of Miami
United National Bank of Westland
United Banking Group
MvmbvnMJK.


Vn~a in. a
Pcge 14-A
+Jmlsl> fTkjfMlirjP
Friday, May W. 1973
Only a few of the 240 units in Tower =7 are left
priced at prc-ccnstruction rates-now's the time to buy.
Sales office and model open 9 to 6 every day
all apartments with balcony and
unobstructed ocean view
entrance foyer, living-dining room,
dining area in kitchen, 2 bedrooms,
2 baths
total electric kitchens, including
built-in range, oven, dishwasher,
disposal, water heater
individual climate control
landscaped esplanade, recreation
area, saunas, heated swimming pool
undercover parking spaces
security guarded lobby entrance
nearby shopping centers, fishing,
golf and other activities
1 **
1000 South ( Porr.pano Et- nda 330bO Modei Phone 3tJS "82 2000
_


May 18, 1973
fJtnislh fkrkHoir.
Paqe 15-A
'*4L
sop
ttnliniiij From Page 1-A
rut valuable support when-
[ In- : ul rough.
is suppose that Gen.
CurJ.- I.I'M., had been able to
his own appointment
t etarj of defense. Lei us
jse, further, Secretary of
)>(. LcMay further emerged
iniiidl partner of the
i! Should we not then
t> l' S. armed forte-; had
ions power in U.S. politics?
question answers itself:
is the; "fore the wrong
Bon tu ask. The real ques-
whether the ideas of
^Htko a:i Brezhnev are a So-
ersion of th'' Ideas attrib-
i to Cen. I.e.May. Or are
men's true ideas those ex-
Id by Brezhnev the other
li ry much for public eon
Ion?
IE, THE right answer is
to be t iiind in the w i se,
ions warnings of the thrco
.. s of s< rious Soviet analy-
pi the U.S. government,
E. Bohlen. George F.
n an i the late Llewellyn
son.
used to say, over
D'. t again, thai j ''i could
[understand the Soviets un-
' Is understood that
lably pur tied
is but differenl poli-
policies alw j
1 lotplly contradictor to
W -i t;i mind. Holl-
and Thompson
add. j i both were valid
if is plainly the position
( sue policy is symbolized
Kissinger in Moscow pre-
. Leonid Brezhnev's visit
countrj. It was expressed
huge Soviet wheat pur-
in the tinted Stales a
of iiic necessity, This
s ultimate aim is whole-
nportation of the Western
I igj h\ Hi Soviets
i matter of dire necessity
Civilian side of the Soviet
The airadictory Soviet pol-
icy J equally tangible and visi
ble,owever. It show-; and
haso,mi for a long time in
the Dni.ihioiis. massive Soviet
military buildup along China's
northern Irontie:- II endangers
U.S. intcie-l- (|uile directly in
the Pc Man Culf. Here the So-
viets aw liuiliiinu a naval base
which will he like a knife to
oar vuliu rahle oil jugular run-
ning throuuh the gulf.
THIS SAMI: policy lias led to
a masM'e Soviet effort to
achieve naval predominance in
the Indian Ocean, to control the
entrance of the Persian (Julf.
The lasl list of Soviet actions
is every bit a. factual, every bit
undeniable and every bit
important, too as the first
; of So\ iei ai! ions given above.
1ERCIF. I.I.V. Dr. Kissinger
ly/e\\ aw.ne of the potential
:ing of I hi- si',end b-l i" en
[most of In .' r\ '" 'i: appi a;
be und"i' tin' pel iinnenl in-
fluence ot .."iiuilizers.
I" One of Ki- n; -r aims in M is-
cow is to : e\ -I whi'.!) ol the
two conti M'viel policies
to watch 111 I" e.il-efllllv.
His Mosi -.,\ >. i-it ".ill hoi K'-
singer lo form a judgment. Be-
ing Kissing .. h" will probablj
form an exceptionally shrewd
judgment
THE REAL trouble today.
however, is that Ki-singer and
the President lie serves may be
unable to take the actions their
judgment ma> indicate are neces-
sary.
For neitli"' dido ikuv nor
money credits, neither smiles
nor hopes, will influence Hie
final Soviet choice between the
two contradictor policies.
The only final influence will
! the Soviet estimate of the
: of the tougher policy, which
also be the more profitable
iicy if risk-free. Yel we in Un-
ited State- op- currently do-
all we can to make the risk
i'less and i'--.
Beth David Officers
Elected And Installed
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Garfinkle of New York and Miami
R-ach are pictured with part of his collection of American
art.
Lowe Arl Museum Receives
$2.3 Million Contribution
Beth David Congregation held
ts electi m and installation of new
fficers at its annual meeting lasl
week.
Norman Shoik, who was elected
0 the pi sid< I cv, has been a part
,f the Beth David family for the
past !(> years. He has served on
nan) ol Beth Davids vitai com-
nittres Finance, Hou e, Patrons
and Budget and as executive
ice president.
Mr. Shoik was educated in New
fork City and i- a vet ran of the
J. S. Army. He is presently ex-
cutive vice president of Grant-
Iholk Construction Company, Inc.
nd is also serving on tl". beards
( directors ol the Hialeah Indus-
rial Lions Club and the Jewish
Vocational Si n ice He past
'resident of the Hialeah Industrial
Jons < lub, and has been a co-
hairman ol the United Fund.
on ru( lion Division for the past
ive years.
Man I k
li Richard
etary,
Bail'... reco
*::::.>
Norman
lave three
nd Bill?
and his wile,
en: Rru
all are equall)
-. the varii >..- multi facel
Irene,
events
NOR.'.'.AN SMOIK
>avid.
thai make up Beth
Open far'<
BrcaW
' ) A.!\
l.iinrhabn
id : PJV
A 82 i milli i gifl to be used

. i ., i' wa announci
k hy 11 :.! K
li in. I'niver it? ol Mia ni.
Thi gifl ma to tha uni
er-i'.> b Miami Beach residents
ilr. -.'.u\ VIrs. Howar I Garfinkl i
..ho have pledged also to match
tor doll ir all (cations made
>. the university for the mainten
md opernti mal i xpenses of
he nev museum for the first fh <
k-ears.
\ portion of the gifl will be used
o sci u;- outstanding educatoi
i n e as professor of American
ri and also to being to the camp
is on a regular basis arti -: in r
lence, who will help to provide an
nriched educational experience foi
he art students.
Mr. Garfinkle, a real estate de-
eloper who maintains offices in
w Yorli and Miami, is an avid
'ollector oi American art. In ad
lition to his gift to the Lowe Mu
I'lim. he has contributed to the
upport of the Pennsylvania His-
torical Society in Philadelphia for
the restoration and preservation of
'important American documents.
John Baratte, director of the mu
cum said. "".Now Ihai the museum
aas completed phase one of its
!evel< pmenl toward a mature, ma-
!or in-f ution, this gifl from the
; its lo begii
pi two, which inclui a con
si h rably enlarged muse mi facil
' the pro 'iiremenl of in
anl works, especially in the an s
of American art."
Dinner VL-'i
"!(t9
Ultima**}

htiniof?
Conuneri
Plans for the new
facility will
nif-euni an
addition, !.
pa s the m
include a mu'ti-level
addition t i I .'. intj nd antage ol th
unique South Florida nnvirnriTi '
the new I" Idin ill also lend it-
si If to th i ntal mixei
media i vpe of w hib!1 ion w hie!
Baratlc has introduced at the I.owe
Mu cum.
Of icers w ith Mr.
.ill rich, ex
Bada Jerr>
li, Berl Saul, Harold Strumpl
Isaac Serui !: Ellii I Gordi .
and Morton \\ i inberger, \ ii i
idents; Te I Gordon.
Jules Bagdan, assistant
cm
< V.'vd \IuiiH\)-
r
Continental 12?3 Kosher Caterers
WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS BANQUETS UNUMTTES
At four Home, Hull or Syr.ogogue
COMPLETE TAKE-OUT FOODS XCWE DEUVERT
Cc.'i tor free Toke-Our Bicchi 8393 BIRD ROAD, ffciami Phores ?61/'., 27.1-9C94, 226-403T
CLUB PARTY TIME
is flOW at th
Wonderful World ot
BANQUETS PARTIES
LUNCKtONS
MEETINGS
Fabulous Dlnini Facilitiea
Private Areas 4 Garden*
/WVV JAVIA^'N^AA'-^^***''*** *SSS* >
American Se Cantonese
Menu at All Times
Authentic Native Show
RESTAURAIvr and iVAROENS
U.S. I JUST NOB'-l Or OUIISTII AM PACK
X SPANISH
AMERICAN RESTAURANT LOUNGE
2322N.W.7ST.
M
OPEN tVERY DAY
iTYOUWISHTOCAlt, 1
FOR RESERVATIONS
642-9043
HAROLD ruj snt iRViN GORDCM
KOKfHrX it nd POST
KOSHER CATERERS ir:
From Hors d'ocvr.s ft o Complete Bvile*
OPIN MOUSE WICDINGS BAP W1ZVAHS RtCtPVONt
Under ih rtrlcl wporvifiun o- iho Untied Krihi Ai cil on r:
r Miami -S Oftrvltlnj Rabbi: Raboi Abrar-an I S..'r,.
170 N W. ill. STKEtr, MIAMI i>KO;E rR 4>M5S
The finest
Catering Service in Miami
is aiso the fastest.
i"i> a
r-
liar
ivid ';
Delicfltesscn-Ca'
^jloii)icJ
- I .,!
2133 Cora! Way
irs-R< 'tauran*
856-6950 856-6"Sl 856-5-141
!iOYAL HUNCAKiAN &E KtiTAURAHl
OPEN YEAR 'ROUND
721 Wasliington Avenue, Miam: R>ach Teleohone 538-5401
specializing in Elegant Catering
for all Occasions
The Studio Restaurant
LUXURIOUS DINING
ELEGANT FRENCH CUI5INE
For So"-.trvr,g New and Different in Our Miami Area
2340 S.W. 32nd Ave. 443-2536
Call For Information Before Going To The Tneatre
WORLD RENOWNED
^J \AWW RESTAURANT
671 Washington Ave.,]*iaml_Beach_
OPEN YEAR ROUND AT 4 P.M.
lEVlSU-ROUMANI.W-
AMERICAN CUISINE
IT THAT rvtAKES THE FAMOUS FAMOUS
Th, ,'.,u'rs BANQUET FACILITIES
f. I.aii> finkU i
531-3987
J


:ge Page 16-A
> !# #ir.r-*hf*=-
FrHmr Mtv iq -q-r-
MORTON
-StMCE I9g4
TIRE CO.
SAFETY
SERVICE
UHUR
BE Goodrich
/
\
^ \J
>->
\
MAKE SURE YOU CAR IS IN TIP-TOP SHAPE
BEFORE YOU START THIS YEAR'S TRIP WITH OUR
it a iimm
SMFFTV CHNU-UP
0: NORTON TIBE CO SAYS p
H SATISFACTION GUARANTEED \
% OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED I
t
A
N?
HERE'S WHAT WE DO. KS
g TIRES D "^SmbVi WHEEL
feflSJoSSfl ?""
$
V
w
m
^MICHEUN
IMPORTED CAR
SPECIALS ->-
SIZE_______________PRICE
145X13 ZX Black 29.65
145X13 ZX White 35.57
FE TAxI
IHJAIJ.A Willie JJ.Jf
155X13 ZX Black 32~1>8
155X13 ZX White 39.32
160X13 ZX Black 34.36
i uua i o ./\ urav.r\
ll55X14ZX White
[150X14 ZX Black
45.15
33.39
BFGoodrich
LONGMILER
4 PLY NYLON CORD S2
GOOD MILEAGE LOW COST
650/700X13
m

i.24
t .31
144
1.48
148
1.56
Plus FE.
Tax 1.88
& Trade-in
155X15 ZX Black 38.75
Jl65X14ZX Black 45.37 i 167
J165X15ZX Black 44.39 t 1.81
1165X15 ZX White 57.58 193
|l35X13X Black 21.80 89
ll45X15X Black 31.55 139
|l65X15X Black 42.44 182
1520X12X Black 27.84 1 18
1560X15 X Black 39.85 169
590X14 X Black 42.38 176
SIZE
775X14
775X15
825X14
825X15
PRICE I F.E. Ti
15.25 209
15.50
17.00
2ll
855X14
17.00
21.25
2.24
230
2.43
855X15 I 21.50 2.47
While only Whitewalls slightly higher
1725X13 X Black
52.95 220
1165X13 XAS Black 44.20 i 167
165X14 XAS Black 48.25
1175X14 XAS Black 53.26
1165X15 XAS Black 51.08
77
90
95
DVNLOP
RADIAL
BFGoodrich
SILVERTOWN
BELTED
POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS BELTS
Some Sizes Rayon Cord & Belts
Plus 1 46
F E Tax &
Trade m
Black
SIZE PRICE IF E.TAX
155R-13 Black 23.95 | 1 50
165R-13 Black 24.95 169
175R-13 Black 25.95 1 98
175R-13 White 27.95 198
165R-14 Black 25.95 2 05
165R-14 White 27.95 2 05
165R-15 Black 27.95 187
165R-15 White 29.95 1.87
SIZE PRICE FE T.I
B78-14/645X14 20.95 206
C78-14/695X14 21.95 2.10
E78-14/735X14 23.95 2 34
F78-14'775X14 24.95 2.52
F78-15'775X15 25.95 258
G78-14/825X14 25.95 269
G78-15/825X15 26.95 2.78
H78-14/855X14 23.95 2.93
H78-15/855X15 28.95 3.01
"J78-15/885X15 33.95 312
L78-15/915X15 37.95 3.27
While only Whitewaiis slightly higher
CAMPER'S
SPECIAL
BFGoodrich.
HEAVY DUTY EXPRESS
CAMPERS. PICK UPS. VANS
PANELS AND HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS
600X16
6 ply tube-type
Plus 2.33 FE. Ta
SIZE 4 TYPE PlY PRICE FE Ti
670X15 Tube-type 6 21.95 2 40
670X15 Tubeless 6 24.95 2 65
700X13 Tubeless 6 20.95 229
700X14 Tubeless 6 [ 22.95 244
700X15 Tube-type 6 127.95 280
710X15 Tube-type 6 23.95 | 249
650X16 Tube-type 6 23.95 2 58
700X16 Tube-type 6 28.95 295
750X16 Tube-type 8 37.95 369
750X20 Tube-type 10 53.95 5.10
825X20 Tube-type 10 58.95 614
90CXP0 Tube-type 10 69.95 733
1000X20 Tube-type 12 94.95 910
1000X22 Tube-type 12 99.95 998
Free replacement
within 90 days of
purchase if battery
proves detective
After 90 days, we
will replace the bat
tery if defective and
charge you only for
the penod ol ownership based on the regular
selling price at the time ol return, prorated over
specified number of months.
BATTERIES
1495
r exchar
hange
as
fits most Chevys fords Plymouth*
Equivalent prices on all other sizes
SAFETY BRAKE SERVICE
FORD. CHEVROLET
AMERICAN COMPACTS
Turn drums if required
Replace linings all 4 wheels,
adjust new linings
' Bleed hydraulic system add
necessary tiuid
Repack front wheel bearings
Road lest car
M95
MON. THRU
FRI.
Most other American cars $39.95
Disc Brakes Higher
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 Biscayne Bl> a. 759-444o
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163rd St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-535^


SELF-REUANCi IS PRIMARY QUAU1Y
Behind the Cloud of Cigarette Smoke, Golda
Is a Woman of Destiny long Since Fulfilled
The Torcrh. symbol of Israel's spiritual existence, remains
a primary inspiration of the nation.
Prime Minister Views Her Country's future .. Page 1-C
Joy of Birth, Fear of Death
A Fact of Life in Israel
As State Becomes 25
No other modern state has ex-
perienced the joy of birth
and the fear of death within a
single day. Israel's dialogue with
the world has never broken out
of we ambivalence that marked
its international experience at the
outset of its career. On the one
hand, it bad come to life with
the support of a universal judg-
ment And yet it would always re-
call how drastically the world re-
coiled from its own verdict and
left Itrael to its solitary fate. On
May 14, 1943, Israel proclaimed
its independ"nce without prior
encouragement from anyone and
a few hours later it was fighting
f"" survival with nobody at its
side.
'I he result is that Israel has
never had to feel that it owns
the debt of its existence to the
outside world. The memory of
having won b'rth and survival by
lonely decision and unaided sac-
rifice has worked on Israel's mind
and policy in many ways. Self-
reliance became a natural pos-
ture for a people for whom no-
body would risk any blood, even
when destruction stared it in
the face.
Ta'.ent for Solitude
One of the elements in Israel's
character is a deeply ingrained
talent for solitude. After all. m
nation in the world shares its
language, iis faith or its historic
experience. It is hard to think of
any other stat? which lacks some
affinity with neighbors or friends
in one of more of these domains.
Jews also know that a carefully
nourished singularity has kept
their nation alive with enough vi-
tality to produce a dramatic re-
birth. In one of its moods Israel
is profoundly withdrawn into it-
self. In another, it is sharply
aware that its real vocation is to
take Jewish history out of pro-
vincialism and to make it flow
into the stream of universal cul-
ture. ,
Geography also forbids Israel
to emphasize its particularity too
strongly. The country is not shel-
tered by mountain ranges, nor is
i

"It is vital that the tol-
erant, humane, em-
pirical flame in Is-
raeli thought should
triumph over tenden-
cies of extreme na-
tional terror. A strong
nation does not have
to shout or beat its
chest in strident self-
reliance. The con-
sciousness Af Israel's
strength still lags be-
hind the reality of it.
The anniversary will
be fruitful if it offers
) a chance of accurate
j and hopeful self-
appraisal."

it an island in the sea. It is a
busy crossroad to which all the
currents of human activity,
thought and conflict converge,
and from which they branch out
into new and original combina-
tion.
There is also a tactical exigency.
Arab hostility compels Israel to
transcend its regional isolation
by building a complex network
of relations beyond the Middle
East.
The Arab assault has been total
and it is sustained by visions and
images that '-ring from the deep-
est level; of historic conscious-
ness. Arabic literary culture in its
earliest and mo-t poetic form was
fashioned in th- desert over which
the Arab nation has felt a unique
sense of command
Arabs in-tinefvcly believe that
the shifting aMs bare a way of
Continued on Page 2-B
By GEOFFREY D. PAUL
Behind the shroud of cigarette
* smoke which constantly en-
folds her head and shoulders like
some apocalyptic cloud, the marks
of t me are more sharply etched,
the greying hairs beyond restraint
and the weariness of manner in-
creasingb obvious.
But Golda Meir at 75 has lost
none of the quickness of wit or
sharpness of mind which makes
her. as the old quip has it, the
strongest man in the Israeli Cabi-
net.
While the heirs presumptive
awa;t her promised word on
whether she will lead the Labor
alignment into the next election,
lie herself goes about her daily
grind as if her eventual decision
is a matter of the smallest con-
sequence and displaying little of
that disability which, seven years
ago. saw her in semi-retirement
and her friends lamenting her ill-
health.
Now, after five firm years in
power, it is hard to visualize the
prime minister's office unclut-
tered by Golda's black handbag,
its ashtrays bearing the imprint
of her passing and the heavy.
"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, May 18, 1973
Section 3
slightly bent figure leaning
across the desk to point an ad-
monishing finger al some clearly
foolish questioner
Pace is Lightening
She still sets a pace which
younger ministers scarcely emu-
late. Her day. whether at her of-
ficial home in Jerusalem's leafy
Rehavia or her private apartment
near Tel Aviv University, starts
around 8 a.m. and can finish any-
where after midnight. She has
the Churchillian habit of snatch-
ing a nap during the day. some-
times at home, occasionally on
the couch in her office.
She relaxes when she can with
some of her favorite classical mu-
sic, a life-long love which re-
calls her first days in Palestine.
When the young Golda Meycrson
applied for membership of Kib-
butz Merhavia she was turned
down on the grounds of lack of
accommodation. The kibbutz
quickly made room for her, how-
ever, when they discovered
had arrived with her own gri
phone and records.
If. as .-!; frequently does,
spen.ls her weekends at her -I
Aviv apartmi nt, she prefers to to
h(v own shopping in the lo il
supermarket, picking her v ay
through the shelves with a qui t
eye for a bargain.
& le is. as the Scots would
a canny housekeeper, quer.
the electricity bills and keeping i
watchful eye on the outgoings.
iThis concern is also seen in
her refusal to use an Air Force
helicopter for her travels if a car
will do just as well. She has no
fear of flying, but resents waste-
fulness. >
She shops assiduously, too. be-
fore visiting her daughter and
grandchildren at their home :n
Rcwvim. where she herself plans
one day to spend her retirement.
Her arrival at Revivim is marked
by a flurry of parcels and goxi-
Continued on Page 4-B
r\
U R D I N E 'S

twin tops
COVERED AND UNCOVERED
Doublotake. Bare yourself with just the draw-tie
halter. Cover up with the matching button-
front shirt. Shown, from our great collection of
prints by Jami. Sizes 8 to 16. Seersucker in
gala polyester/rayon plaids, $18
SPORTSWEAR 2. SECOND FLOOR MIAMI. AND ALL BURDINES STORES.


Pom 2-3
-jewlst fkrMtor
Friday. May 13. 1973
(ooti uned fr^n Pa? IB
CTCf K;
U*a: :n toe end !". uttradi
Mr k
h.nd
notion
": '' ?
OOf
7 .. loC-
t ne n.
-


\r< llln-i.ns
-
I I
t '
''
f
t "
.
i is
f
To :' -
> task of 1
tained
ad-
vant had
recesses !ij- its
ton-
..:. from the re ill W
I irulous at.
irU
tta fact ii -hat no modem state
,<-r need of ex
If i i dance or m re sue-
cessful in obtaining it.
The at bievt meni is iodii
bj diplomatic relations with a
hundred -tat'--- :n five continent]
- d erce of four billion
< I ai .th 90 stat<-*- b) a grow-
ls intefntim into regional or-
cations in Europe and else-
bj a lively scientific co-
operation, by membership in all
the international agencies, by an
unuMially far flunc role in inter-
national development and by the
circumstance that most of the
efjion.'-nl and know-how neces
sary for an imposing military pos-
rj
from other countries and not
i from th'- same ones.
l"o kal there have also
of alienation and dl
is no more rignifi-
i record thai I rai mill
hm b .' pai
'd youthful g i
ikies does
the decisive fact of
i polio of reducing
i n has
:'..: d no Ii ; in Ibe diploi
in in the field of battle
ten at ional markets
l.ueid l.'nderstanding
To plan our policy in the corn-
in:' yean requires a lucid under-
standing of what it is that Israel's
relations ire meant to serve The
aim is not merely to enjoy the
symbolism of sovereignty, nor is
th'1 creation of an "ima^c" the
mam purpose. Israelis arc more
preoccupied than citizens of any
other state with what the outside
world thinks of them I have
rarel) heard an Engl.-hman or a
Fr-nthinan t jiment himself with
this question and our Arab
n<- ghbors have never !<-t it cross
theii mind The Israeli emphasis
on "image" is a consequence of
exilic Jewish history. For cen-
the question how Jews I
were regarded by others was a I
importance. I
determine I
of life or I
matteJ of immense
II con If ultimately
death
One of Israel's purposes is to
put Jewish survival beyond the I
Main square of a West Bank city where many !si~e3 -Jo
spping.
determination ot Gentile capr.ee.
and it is vain to hope that th
acts of self-ie,iano which ex-
I ess this aim will be univer-
sally popular. Israel is mo->t
cherished bv the world in its
r moments and most re-
sented when it rises above vul-
nerabilit) to a condition of self-
reliance In any case, its posi-
tion is not exceptional among
nation I ed ;n conflict, and
On the 25th Anniversary
of a great nation and courageous people .
GOD BLESS ISRAEL
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 JGFfCRSON AVL, MIAMI BEACH, FIA.
David Raab Rabbi Sol H. Breefi Cantor
Sam Cohen President
Officers, Members of tt>* Board, Men's Club and Sisterhood
TO ISRAEL
Our deepest admiration
for an incredible 25 years.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 Hi. 121st ST., NORTH MIAMI, FLA.
Joseph A. GorfinkelRabbi
Chas. WeissmanPresident

ISRAEL
You have enriched the world
by your presence.
We are grateful.
Harry Ridge
World Famous
PLACE PIGALLE
"Showplace of the South"
215 22nd Street, Miami Beach
Reservations 538-0055
CCOSflri ha- a ."a> of achicv-
in the end
There is yjth.ng, like OUT neisjh-
DOfl hatrc-d. but wt are ai >
reach el by afft .nicjue
depth and ardor
Cultivate Stmpathics
It is Still important to culti-
vate sympathies, but the aims of
n [*.: cj are also concerned
with more concrete toils. The
evi r" ace bj r at-
inc an Internationa] dynamic on
i!f of a neeotial i ment,
If other countries refute the Arab
myth of Israel's illisjetimac] bj
imple fact of maintaining
meaningful relations with her
contribute to a peace which
national-
:-m
Another aim of fore:. >
, cn-ure that Israel en
rive en#j?h strength '
external relations, in ter
itary power, economic
,7,r'ial opportunity. U
,i it.- recognition to er.-
pacity to grow wsthasxt |
'as Ion-' at ne.essary H
that the Arab govemn.
not offer Israel peace U
the very eondltioa of I-
..trr.n- Within heir own |
of reference than n
why they should It
peace can be
opinion as an ir.exora1"
ritj an) a reciprocal
,ny chance of beine
or accepted
is whj the cond
ive beer.
transform
of u.".a l
foreign powen
agencies tin
see i i' ou t
Coatinaed 'n Pase 4-r
presents
The
TwelveTribes of Israel
By Salvador Dali
13 ORIGINAL ETCHINGS
Signed and Numbered
Hand Painted
Foreword by ABBA EBAN
Levi
One of the world's foremost artists has dedicated his talents
to produce a memorable portfolio in Honor of this Great
Occasion We invite your inquiry.
1072 Kane Concourse, (' fj Bay Harbor Islands, Fla.


uHc /"**
^amki ^a/Zeueb presents
T
^
^2 ,>>
/
sAj i
REUVEN RUBIN
r'or Retiven Rubin's eightieth birth-
d.i\. which coincide.- with llic 25th an-
niversary oj the rebirth >l Israel, we
are proud to honor this distinguished
artist by dedicating to him this work oi
art, in which, through his fantaslii
imagery, he brings s the messages ii
the meat prophets of Israel.
Pew .11 (M- are so identified with a
countn as i- Reuven Rubin. lie has
hern living in the llol\ Land for more
than a halt' century. \s llic most uni-'
vei -all\ acclaimed of Israel's painters,
he is acknowledged to lie the dean id
i aeli artists.
No othei arfisl has portrayed in hi-
work such joyous colors. I'he people in
his paintings scemjmhued with hreatl
and warmth, and I he landscape in his
poelie Hihlical interpretations is filled
with a spiritual, translucent light.
lit is an expression of loir, once
wrote Rubin. "I paint what I lore .
m\ count! 'in lainih.and in) people.
To paint ins to sing, and ever) artitt
must sii ".his own way."
Reuven Rubin
"The Prophets*'
A Portfolio of 12 Original Color Lithographs
Pencil-Signed and Numbered by the Artist
Size: 20"\26"
Reuven Rubin is one of the mo*i
popular figures in Israel, where he
is called simply, "Reuven ihe
painter".
It is not to be wondered, that out
of the vast quantity and variety of
works that have accumulated in his
studio. Rubin did not have to go far
to find the material for the specific
theme of "The Prophets" that i-
presented here. The artist's ap
Textbj tor.mmGamm, Director of the Tel AvbMmmM pK>a?h *" su^ecl j~ ,nosl ""'
usual. He has taken certain pas-
This limited edition has been published as follows;
200 coiiies on Arches Paper
62 copies on Japan Paper
"The Prophets" was printed by Mourlol in Pan'-
*"~"'&m-
sages in the Bible which haveaspe
rial meaning for him. and has given
them plastic expression in line,
form, and color. Also, the choice of
the passages indicates something
the artist wants to assert: thai tin-
relationship of God ti all the peo-
ples and races of the world i> the
relationship of a father to his
children.
Mil-I '-
Recipient uf the 1st .
The Camhi Galleries are proud to bring
this magnificent Portfolio to the attention of
Floridians. We are the sole distributors
for the Publisher in this area.
We welcome your inquiries.
Q
(n>i/ii(fja//et(<>i
% 1072 Kane Concourse Bay Harbor Islands, Florida- 861-0907


rage 4-d
*Jewist fk>rkfi&n
Friday, May 18, 1973
jou of J^irtUj Continued from Page !B
ercepT in negotiation with Israel.
The military solution ha feeon
rationally eliminated by the" oaV
ance of strength which shows no
sign of bemi; undermined
The quest for an imposed solu-
tion has ended after six years
without result. The terrorist
movement is a threat to individ-
ual Israelis who come within
range of bullet or bomb, but it is
ineffective as a threat to Israel's
existence and basic security. The
design of "attrition" has been
put to work in varied forms, but
its exponents have a right to de-
spair when they reflect on Is-
rael's steep rate of demographic
and economic growth since 1967.
Indeed the rescue of Jews from
Eastern Europe and Arab lands
has been the crowning glory of
our foreign policy in recent years.
That the cease-fire lines can
only be changed by negotiating
secure and recognized boundaries
may soon develop from an Is-
raeli argument into an objective
fact. The challenge for Israel
will then be sharp. The majority
of our population understands the
need for a compromise under
which Israel'would"* have other
boundaries than before the 1967
war, but a- much more compact
tcohliginfion thin the present
cease-fire lines. In the former
Palestine area the logic of parti-
tion has not been refuted" by the
experience of the past six years.
It is a simple fact that two na-
tions, not one. have their home
here and the only alternative to
conflict or suppression is a dis-
tribution of sovereignty.
It is not a case of partitioning
the area "again." Six years after
the 1967 victory Eretz Israel is
still effectively partitioned. It is
divided into two legal systems
one parliamentary the other still
based on military- administration.
It is divided into two sharply con-
trasting economies. The one in-
tensely developed with an accent
on industry, specialized agricul-
ture, technology and export trade
the other still in the subsist-
ence stage, solid and modestly
prosperous, but without surplus
resources.
It is divided into two cultures
each sharply defined and nour-
ished by a distinctive pride. It is
divided into two languages and
w
oman o
>t Continued from Page IB
!es for the youngsters to whom
she behaves precisely like the
proverbial Jewish grandmother,
displaying her anxiety the min-
ute they wander out of sight.
Her Fierce Side
But the grandmother image, so
beloved of television interview-
ers, is not all of Golda. She has
a fiercer side to her. too. as those
know who have crossed her with
unsubstantiated argument, with
lies or at civil servant level
with lack of courtesy to members
of the public.
Calling on the assistance of a
Yiddish word, or an English one.
when the Hebrew phrase escapes
her (which is rare), she can dev-
astate a Cabinet minister with a
withering tirade.
But the same voice, her Eng-
lish still heavily accented with
her American upbringing, can
charm a president with an im-
promptu joke and. summoning a
photograph from the depths of
her ubiquitous handbag, involve
him in the latest doings of a fav-
orite grandchild.
Her femininity is displayed in
other directions, too. Her eyes
have been seen to fill with tears
when moving at some base among
the young men of the armed
forces (she is called at any time
of day or night when a casualty
is signaled).
ISRMIL
ALIYAH n^y
The ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER offers
you Information and Guidance in:
K
ft Professional Placement -fa Pursuing Your tducation
jr Housing + Learning Hebrew in Ulpanim
fa Business Opportunities -fc Kibbutz Life
Fer further information mail this coupon to the ISRAEL ALIYAH
CENTER, Aintley Buildinq, Suite 1401, 14 N.E. First Ave. and
Flagler St., Miami, Florida 33132 tel. (305) 358-6540.
Gentlemen:
? Mease send me more information about Aliyah opportunities.
D I woald like to arrange an appointment for an interview,
(please print or type:)
"" Age Tel______
(area code)
Address ..............................
Ciy State Zip Code
Profession or trade .................................................................
rears af experience _.........
two different categories' of na-
tional sentiment. It is united
mainly in military terms. There
is a promising and spectacular
juhumu a& men .ir.lcdmmoK
flj< a fjontieas- Iiul* anyone -aj.%s*p.-.
from the jrea of Israeli luvv into
the territories beyond makes n
sharper transition than is usual
between neighboring sovereign
states elsewhere in the world.
We should, of course, aspire to
u better and more viable partition
than Before, b'.it th? pa-.t -iv
ars have jr >ved that the duality
of the va is daeply embedded
..: -. in ton a;:,! geography and
there is' nothing artificial in giv'
.pfrsioii'to .Is essential IP
' Partition was Israel'
cj'jse ill" 1947 because it was ar.
instrument tor securing Jewish
itefc i id, immigration, military
autonomy and a distinctive Jew
-': society and culture. It ma,
yet be a necessary formula for
obtaining peace. For in the last
resort, Israelis and Palestine
Arabs can achieve harmony if
most of them live side by side
not one on ta of the other.
Israeli policy has much to do
in order to give durability to the
Amerira>j>artner.ship. to write a
'*'$*> .'un of association with a
united Europe and to defend and
expand the Israeli vocation in
th? developing states. But the
culminating achievement of a re-
gional peace can never be far
from the center of our ambition.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVIO
FOR ISRAEL
Providing Support to
Israel's official Red Cross service
wishes the
Land and People of Israel
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
AND SHALOM
On this historic date,
the Fifth of Iyar.
Yom Haatzmaut
Israel Independence Day
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID
FOR ISRAEL
Florida Headquarters
2400 Pine Tree Dnve
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Tel: 532 6421
We Pay Special Tribute on this occasion to
C01. DAVID R. MARCUS
Israel's Hero
V
In Whose Memorv We Proudly Dedicate The
MARCUS BLOOD BANK
SAMUEL REINHARD
Florida Chairman

David Coleman, Miam. Beach Chapter President
Sol Drescher, Joseph Handelman, Mark D. Soroko
Members of :e Njtonal Bosrd of Directors
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Honorary Chairman
.
i
K :*- .-T-


Friday. May 18, 1973
*Jfet*is#? HorMian
Page S-B
aku
Starting point of the parade culminating Greater Miami's
celebration of Israel's 25th anniversary Sunday will be
Miami Beach Convention Hail at Garden Center Dr. The
parade will march south on the west side of Washington
Ave. to Lincoln Rd., east on the north side of Lincoln Rd. to
Collins Ave., north on the west side of Collins Ave. to 22nd
St., back to Garden Center Dr., and disperse at Convan-
Hall. Participants in the parade must be at the Convention
Hall no later than 10:15 a.m. Floats must arrive between
the hours of 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. The parade is 1.9 miles and
will commence, rain or shine, at 11 a.m.
Mrs. Alvin Burger
New Chairman Of
Youth Commission
Sandee (Mrs. Alvin) Burger has
been elected to succeed Mrs. Max-
well L. Wcisbrrg as chairman of
the Hadassah Zionist Youth Com-
mission of Greater Miami for
1973-74.
The Commission is sponsor of
Hashachar. Young Judea in the
Miami area. It is funded by Na-
tional Hadassah almi with the
Miami and Miami Beach Chapters
of Hadassah.
Hashachar activities provide
Jewish \outh with positive Jewish
involvement through club activ-
ities, conclaves, Israeli dancing
and crafts, discussions, games and
a full camping program through-
iout the United States.
Mrs. Burger has been president
of the PTA of the South Dadc
Branch of the Hebrew Academy
for the past two years. She has
been president of the Naomi
Group of the Miami Chapter of
Hadassah. Youth Activities chait
man of the Florida Region, And
conclave chairman for the Youth
Commission for the past four
cars.
Other elected officers of the
Commission are Mrs. Morris Her-
man, personnel chairman: Mrs
Harry Goldstein, scholarship chair-
man: Mrs. Martin Zigler. conclave
chairman; Mrs. Harry Weisswan.
treasurer: Mrs. Jack Lubin. re-
cording secretary; and Mrs. Sher-
man Fast, synagogue liaison.
Mrs. Mentz Takes Helm
Of Beach Hadassah
Mrs. Emanuel Mentz, Zionist and
civic leader, will be installed as
president of the Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah Monday noon
at the Algiers Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Mentz came to
Miami Beach 13 years ago from
Kew Gardens, L. I., where she was
active in the temple Sisterhood
and other communal activities.
She is a life member of Hadas-
sah, and was president of Morton
Towers Group of Hadassah for
four years. She and her husband
were honored by the State of
Israel Bonds in 1968, and by the
Jewish National Fund in 1971.
Mrs. Mentz had been chairman for
every luncheon for Jewish Federa-
tion in Morton Towers.
She serves as a member of the
board of Emanu-El Sisterhood of
which she is a life member. She
is a member of Biscaync Chapter
of ORT, Hatikvah Chapter of
j B'nai B'rith, Fight for Sight.
| women's division of Brandeis Uni-
versity and women's division of
Technion.
Mrs. Maxwell L. Weisbcrg, re-
cently elected president of the
j Florida Region of Hadassah. will
he installing officer. Mrs. Philip
Thau, past president of the
chapter, is chairman of the day.
Other officers to be installed
i are: vice presidents: Mrs. Manny
I Temkin, organization; Mrs. Joseph
Rosenberg, membership; Mrs
j Sylvia Kurland, fund raising; Mrs.
j Sanford Jacobson, education; and
i Mrs. Barnett Bcekerman, program.
Area vice presidents arc the
i Mmes. Sol Grcenberg. Sam Feld-
! man, Herman Feinberg, Edward
' Lifshin, Manning Mintus. Marcella
Monford and Benjamin Stein-
I muller.
Other officers are Mrs. Harry
Hasten, treasurer; Mrs. Hyman
Chabner, recording secretary; Mrs.
Herman Altman, corresponding
| secretary: Mrs. Milton Sirkin, Mrs.
i Nat Barth. Mrs. Henry B. Wcrnick,
Mrs. Philip Thau and Mrs. Sher-
I man Fast, members of the advisory
alumnae committee.
Hebrew Academy Set
, First Auetion Sunday
The South Dade Hebrew Acad-
: emy is holding its first auction
1 Sunday starting at 7:30 p.m. at
i Temple Or Olom, 8755 SW 16th
j St. Available merchandise will
; range from small appliances to
| bicycles, and refreshments will be
i available.
The Academy is a non profit
Hebrew Day School located at
8500 SVV 8th St. with grades one
through six. The school is a branch
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy of Miami Beach, and is
a beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. ,
Heart Fund Tops Its Goal
The local Heart Fund has topped
its campaign goal of S500.000 in
,i record-breaking drive according
to Joe Robbie, general campa.-n
chairman of the Heart Association
of Greater Miami; $540,000 has
been received to date in contri-
butions and bequests to the Heart
Association, and that figure is ex-
pected to rise to about $600,000 by
the end of the fiscal year, June 30.
We Salute
the State of Israel
South Florida Council
of
Pioneer Women
MAZEL TOV ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
How do you mark the Silver Anniversary of
?ne of the world's oldest emerging nations?
his wayin 92 pages of stirring text and pho-
nography that's a military history, social biog-
raphy, and political portrait all in one. Who's
^publishing it? Life Spe-
fcial Reportsanew
(Time Inc. group formed
jo create single-subject
Sprint "documentaries."
THE SPIRIT OF ISRAEL
jit's on sale at your
local newsstand today.
Special rates are available for
&ulk orders. For information,
Ihone, toll free 800-621-8200
fontooi*mr972-8302l
Now four locations to serve you!
OIM.N
\u;i\i>i).\Y
III.I.
9 I'M.
INVENTORY CLEARANCE
LIGHTING SALE
TOP QUALITY DESIGNS INCLUDING FAMOUS THOMAS LIGHTING
tff
k
ENJOY
SAVINGS
UP TO 50%
TO LIGHTEN
OUR
INVENTORY ft
Exceptional values available on a first come,
first served basis. These aren't seconds. These
lighting styles are all first quality merchandise.
Some are showroom samples. And they'r*
being offered at important savings.
Why are we tioing this?
Simple. We have to make room for new
lighting collections always arriving. So com*
early, and save!
LOOK FOR THOM/\S
i -1"

KENDALL
mn WUTH
OlXli HIGHWAY
MIAMI
not nw >i~ ve.
I 94* is "> ST.
l."t
FT. LAUDERDALE
}?0AM
MOIAAl HIGHWAY
I *",' Savih of
MJ42M
TAMARAC
SI 10 No
STATE AOAOT
Ui lll'N.ol
Co">"**C'i Bl*.
70S MOO
center, inc.
OAILY M; OHM WID. TIL t:0 fM; SAT. Tit .-00 fM.


Page b-B
*Jenisi> ncridBan
Friday. May 18. 1973
*^
9e
M
With
W
w
"; Joint Installation At Tifereth Jacob Scheduled Friday
W A joint installation of temple Mrs. S. Schultzer, secretary. I Mrs. Oscar Mcsoon. cul
ISABEL fifCOVt:
ihari
A special "Champagne Bas-
Mitzvah" luncheon of the Greater
Miami Women's Auxiliary, Jewish
_ Home for the
Aged, honoring
Shari (Mrs. Law -
ence) Silver-
man on her 13th
year as pres-
:dent of the
Auxiliary, will
be held at noon
Tuesday, May
2.9. in the Al-
giers Hotel. Mrs.
Sol Silver man,
honorary life
president, will
be the chairman oi the day The
installation ceremony will be enn-
ducted by councilman Jerry Let
thuk. senior vice president of the
American Savings and Loan Assn.
Mrs. Louis Makovsky, program
i irman. lias arranged a delight-
ful musii i! program featuring
\!ist Cath( rine Russell with
i Bill i" Stern at the piano.
Reservations may be made with
Anne Tanenbaum, Henny Jaffee,
or Rose Roth.
V
i on the academic world:
1 in la Hausman is receiving a
masters ;n edecation and a degree
i: special honors from Patcrson
Teachers State College in New
,: rsey on Friday, May 19. Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Hausman of North Hay
!. will h(. in Jersey for their
daughter's graduation. Linda is a
product of Nautilus Junior High
School and Miami Beach High. She
has a bachelors in education from
the University of Miami, where
she was on the Deans List, and
has been teaching in elementary
schools in Wycoff. N. J.. for the
past several years. Tentative plans
call for Linda to return to Miami
Beach and work for a doctorate in
psychology at U-M.

'
A reception in honor of
I>r. Louis Rosenblum, national
chairman of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews, will be held at
the home of Dr. and Mrs. Robert
M. Wolf. North Miami Beach. Sat-
urdaj evening. Dining his visit to
Miami. Dr. Rosenblum will be
meeting with Dr. Wolf, who is the
new chairman of South Florida
Conference of Soviet Jewry, and
other officers of the conference.
The South Florida Conference of
Soviet Jewry i< a member of the
Union of Councils for Soviet Jews,
which is the naitonal "grass roots"
activist organization devoted solely
to education and action programs
on behalf of Soviet Jews. For the
past nine years, it lias been the'
coordinating organization for all
Soviet Jewry activities in South-
east United States
The Jewish War Veterans
Of South Florida
ANNOUNCE
THE /MA!N MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE
on or
to all thoss '.vho have defended our beloved America,
and in humble gratitude to commemorate the patriotism,
i and sacrifice of our heroic dead
WILL BE HELD
SUNDAY, MAY 27th, 1973
AT 11:00 A.M.
AT
*^/vlt. c/VeTO v.cemetery
5505 N.W. 3rd STREET
American Flags will be available a? the Cemetery to Honor
!the Individual Gravesite.
Please be on hand not later than 10:45 a.m.
PHONE 633-6333
Live Oaks
NURSING HOME
Subsidiary of
mediatrics, inc.
2200 N.W. 26th St., Miami, Florida 33142
*- A Fully Equipped Physical Ther-
opy Deportment Supervised 8y A
Licensed Physical Therapist
- Recreational Vh.wopy Supervised
By A Qualified Recreational
Therapist
+ Barber Shop and Beauty Parlor
+ X-Ray and Laboratory Facilities
it floomt With Outdoor Patios
David Burack, MS, ACNHA
Administrator
-ft- A Dietary Department Supervised
By An A.D.A. Dietician 'Special
or Regular Dicrs Available
-*- Registered Nurses on Duty 24 hrs.
it Piped Oxygon in Every Room
it landscaped Private Garden
+ free Transportation for Visitors
to & From Miami Beach
Natalie Karlton, R.N., B.S.
Director of Nurses
A joint installation of temple
1 and Sisterhood officers will take
place at Temple Tifereth Jacob,
Hialcah, Friday at 8:15 p.m.. fol
lowed by a specijl Oneg Shabbat.
Temple officers being installed
are Jules Briklod, president; Mar-
vin Reichenthaler. vice president;
Mrs. Jules Briklod. treasurer, and
Debate On Amnesty
Sunday at Beth Am
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth Am h.is arranged a debate on
the subject. "Should Amnesty be
Granted to Draft Dodgers and De-
serters of the Vietnam Conflict?"
for its congregational breakfast
Sunday beginning at 9:30 a.m. in
the social hall.
Speaking on behalf of amnesty
is a husband and wife team of
attorneys. Irma and Richard Fo-
der: the or posing view will be pre-
sented by Harold Solomon, assist-
ant county solicitor for two years
and assistant state attorney for'
more than six years.
Serving as moderator for the dis-
cussion will be Judge Rhea Gross-
man, the first woman to serve as
Circuit Court judge in Dade
County.
Mrs. s. Schultzer, secretary.
Elected to two year terms on the
board of governors were Mrs. Eve-
lyn Silverman and Ben Green; Mrs.
Marion Kamolnick and Robert Low-
cnthal will serve for one year.
Board members carried over from
last year include Mrs. Renee Lev
its. Lawrence Wolfson and Mrs
Yetta Gclvan. trustee.
The Sisterhood officers for the
coming year include Mrs. Richard
Grossman, president; vice presi-
dents Mrs. L. Wolfson, member-
ship; Mrs. Fae Yochclson. program;
Mrs. Oscar Mescon. culture, and
Mrs. J Jacobs, ways and means;
Mrs. Leon Silverman. correspond-
ing secretary: Mrs. Jules Briklod,
recording secretary: Mr>. George
Galik. financial secretary, md Mrs.
David Goldberg, treasurer.
A "ChaT luncheon will be held
at the temple Thursday. May 24,
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Members
and friends are invited. For res-
ervations or information, contact.
Mrs. Leon Silverman, Mrs. Jules
Briklod or the temple office.
JaT^ KNACKWURS*
3
KNACKWURST
Kosher Zion products are all
KOSHERIFFIC ...all rrunu.
fac'.ured under strict U.S.
government inspection, and
the rabbinical sunervis'on of
Rabbi Solomon I. Birnbaum.
KOSHER ZION
Strictly Kosher Corned
Beef, Pastrami, Salami,
Bologna, liver Sau-
sage, Tongue, Knack*
wurst and Frankfurters.
"KOSHER ZION SAUSAGECOMPANYOF CHICAGO
1455 S. Aberdeen St. Chicago, III. 6GC08 Flwne: (312) 738-2208
Distributed By COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. INC
6985 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami, Florida 33147 (305 693-4262
BREATHTAKING
WATER VIEW
lllSpfc RIGHT ON THE
^!!>Ti?JUNTRACOASTAl
r JlBl^lli WATERWAY
^~ AND COLLINS AVE.
RENTAL APARTMENTS
WVfWgi;
i

J
->SS2
S&-- -"--:.- 55P
?*"*;1
I
1 BEDROOM 1 BATH
from
$240..s260pf.^
1 BEDROOM 1 V, BATH
mm,
I MM
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
moir.
FURNISHED & UNFURNISHED APTS. AVAILABLE
OCCUPANCY 1973
Look what you get at no extra cost:
Public beoch w.ts.n -oil
diUoncf
Ample (ee poring lor rrvd
and guett*
luth lord'.COC 7
Underground e'fC'iC 0"rf '
phone ric* no poli O' <(
Complete 8eceo*or> Cente
ppol. (Ounoi. vkrwlpool s^u
boo'd CO'd) 'CO"' \0<'Ot ho"
Miy equipped ki'c^en
^fcuniy
Laundry trash chutes throughout
$p0C<0uv oporfmentt
Pnote ter#oce with tiidma olau
door*
tosy o WoM to -O" COrpe'nt;
Delude kite htm
Contmwou* Clro'- 'oi.qi (>..
D'nwO\her m SO^nd \h -la ng
D<\pcvol
f'O-.* 't,r >,.',, 4, n,, f,. ,. ,
P'. iu< hood *'j>
p
|OOff '.on
17070 COLLINS AVE.
(Behind 170th ST SHOPPING CENTER)
PHONE 945-1050 OR 944-5960
OtlO'QIO' 'loo- tO.fli-
lun-.nou' (eilings
Spoc* 'oi fl.nnir it-l
fo'm.fo cobiftft'y
Pa\* Jhiuugh lo dnng
f logoM bolhl
Mol< I 'V Oftttnno
tOCh opO*'n>',"l
-mo't tltvaioi ll
c dni9
Ml i; pli iiiii-s \t\
"Hrrtp ri nf-


Friday, May 19, 1973
vJenislh fhrSdliaiti
Page 7-B
L
'Caring For The Aged Is Pioneer Women Schedule New Israel Minister
4 Complicated Problem
At the Miami Beach Hebrew
Home for the Aged, a quotation
prominently displayed on a wall
of a kosher nursing institution
reads, When we grow old, cast
us not away, and when we grow
feeble, let us not be lonely."
'This quote best explains the
primarv purpose of our mulli
faceted job here." Sidney Siegel.
executive vice president of the
Home, explained this week.
"Carin? for the aged is a com-
plicated problem, including ad-
ministrative, medical, nursing and
rehab;:i'.ative techniques. But.''
according to Siegel. "even more
import ?nt, is dealing with the
residents' mental well-being."
Siegel said that while this is
intangible, "not readily measur-
able in terms of success like the
other techniques used at the
Horn* it bears more on the good
spirit of the institution and those
who live in it than most, if not
: ail of the others.
"With so many of the people
in the community who grow old
;.nd feeble, the overriding thcra-
| peutic technique must be tender,
loving care. Personal attention
: goes a long way toward giving the
elderly ill a much-needed sense of
security."
Siegel is currently marking 30
; years as an executive in homes
; for the aged. Previously, he filled
geriatric positions with the Brook-
lyn Hebrew Home and Hospital
for the Aged and the Governors
Committee on Aging of the State
of New Jersey.
Since Siegel's appointment to
1 his present post at the Miami
: Beach Hebrew Home for the Aged.
the institution began and in 1967
completed its 100-bed facility at
320 Collins Ave.
Moshe Arad, Israel's new Min-
I later to the United States, will be
welcomed to Greater Miami May
30 at the Jerusalem Day celebra-
tion sponsored by the Israel His-
tadrut Foundation and the Pioneer
Women Council of South Florida. !
A lurcheon at the Eden Roc
Hotel, with the Israel Histadrut
Women's Council as a co-sponsor.
will highlight the observance here
of the sixth anniversary of the re-
unification of Jerusalem.
Dr. Leon Kronish, national
chairman of the board of the,
Israel Histadrut Foundation, an-
nounced Minister Arad's accept-
ance. The envoy will serve as chief
deputy to Ambassador Simciia
Dinilz. who replaced Gen. Yitzhak
Rabin.
Rabbi Kronish returned this
week from a 10-day visit to Israel.
during which he conferred with
tup Histadrut leaders on future
plans for the Foundation.
The May 30 luncheon will mark
ihe national launching of a joint
effort by the Pioneer Women and
che Histadrut Foundation to raise
funds through deferred giving.
Mrs. Milton Green, president of
the Pioneer Women Council, is
general chairman of the luncheon.
Mrs. Piiil S;ihi. president of the
Histadrut Women's Council, is co-
chairman.
Reservations for the luncheon
nay be made at the off,res of
either the Hi&tadrul Foundation
' Pioneer Womer>. Bit Zlan
Steinberg, South Florida repre-
sentative of the Histadrut Founda-
tion, is luncheon coordinator
Hadassah Units Install
Officers and Slates
Mil: i Beach ( hapter of Hadas-
sah Gi mps i meeting on the
follow :;.. dates:
Miami Beach Chapter board will
meet .. mdaj ai if) a.m. at the
I. Mrs. Emanuel
Men, iviil pre! ide. At 12 noon.
in will be served
folloi illation of officers.
Reuanah Group will have its
men at noon, on Monday,
al thi Imperial House. Mrs. Jay
(V.ift Dermei will be installing
officer Mrs. Ufred Freeman will
be th. chairman of the day. Mrs.
Florynce Breeh will preside.
Herri Group will have its final
meeting of the season on Tuesday^
at noon. Mrs. Rose Zeigmund will
report en ihe recent Hadassah
lonferei? ie I eld in Tamoa.
Lino'i Group installation of
fflcers in Tuesday noon at the
I d Snapper Restaurant at ICO
1 incoln Rd. Mrs. Clara Goldberg
\ ill be installed as president with
Mrs, Sylvia Kurland officiating.
If You Built A Condominium With
2 Golf Courses,
7 Swimming Pools,
14 Tennis Courts, And A
$1,000,000 Club House
(But No Membership Dues-Ever)
What Would You CaS hi
1 VDDflfll
Z\ 0 fl^ GOLF &TENNIS CLUB
"(M'callsit
Cheese Pizza
but the family
calls it an
Italian Mychel
Chef 3oy-Ar-Dee* Cheese
Pizza a real family
pieaser! Just follow the-
easy directions on the box
and in just about 20 min-
utes you get a sizzling hot
treat-crisp, cheesy, au-
thentic Italian pizza. Ail the
makings come in this one
package-pizza flour mix,
pizza sauce and cheese.
How about some for sup-
per, tonight? How about a
whole one for yourself, just
as soon as you get bacb-
from the store!
Wholesale Distributors of
MORIAH KOSHER POULTRY
ani
Processors and Exporters
of the finest U.S. Govt. Inspected
KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Fla.
Phone 371-1855
If you like socializing If you want recreation If you need relaxation.
Then come to Hollybrook.
Hollybrook is a garden-style community of men and women who, like you. demand
a lot of a place to live.
See for yourself. Visit our information center & models any day from 9 30 till 5 30.
Hollywood Blvd. at Douglas Rd.
1 & 2 bedroom condominium residences from $23,900, and only an $SO per <-non1h
estimated charge includes all this: Maintenance of building, golf course, club hou se,
pool, ground and common areas; sewage and water; manager; insurance: anc land
lease. (Excludes individual apartment taxes and utilities.)
Information center and mode's
open every day from 9:30 till 5:30.
Phones: Hollywood 96V62W;
Ft. Laud. 525-6546; Miami 624-1430.
Address: Hollywood 3vd al Douglas Rd.
Mailing Address: 900 Hollybrook Drive,
Pembroke Pines, Fl 33025
Model Dscoration & Furnishing
by Mangunans.
Appliances by -Hotpoint
ALL-EXPENSE FABULOUS 3 DAY$ 2 NIGHTS
COMPLETE
Cheese
Pizza
This is sure to be one of your greatest golf week-
ends. Golf-wise and value-wise! There is an excel-
lent new 18 hole executive cou-se *o challenge your
skill and a great raw Hi. ..day !nn that offers com-
plete resort facilities. Boating, fishing, horseback
riding and swimming in our pool or sparkling blue
lake luxurious air conditioned accommodations
. gourmet dining in the delightful Caladium
Room and nightly entertainment in the Camelot
Lounge. Relax or. the pat.o around our King size
pool. Say, why not bring the family? They'll find
plenty to do and leave you free for golf
$45
Far Person
Double Oeeupawey
INCLUDES: ROOM.
UNLIMITED GOLF
LAKE PLACID \^o&ucfiaA\ Svu/v.
LAKE PLACID. FLA. 33852
. .. rooms for date as noted
RT. 3 BOX 250
Please reserve .......
below.
I am enclosing deposit in the amount of $
Name .........................-.
Address ........................
City ....... State .....Zip
Date .. 1972 No. Rooms ........
Deposit $ ....................Signature .......


Pnn in H
"age &-B
+Jewlsti tlirldtor)
Friday, May 18, 1973
Mrs. Miller President Of
Beth Shalom's Sisterhood
Shirley (Mrs. Irving) Miller of Kotler in the post.
23C5 Lake Ave., Sunset Isle No. 3,
M ami Beach, was formally elected
pi
nv.
MRS. IRVING mum
: sident of the Sisterhood of
nple Beth Sholom, at its
.thly luncheon meeting this
ek. She succeeds .Mrs. Meyer
Mrs. Miller came to Miami
Beach from Boston in 1552, She is
a graduate of Bryant Business
College. Providence, R. I.
The mother of five children, she
has nevertheless been active in
community work. She has served
as president of the Island Divi-
sion, National Council of Jewish
Women, and on the NCJW's Sec-
tion Board, and as president of the
Deed Club, an organization in
which she is still active as a
volunteer in the Children's Cancer
Clinic.
In spite of her domestic duties
and service projects, Mrs. Miller
finds time to study painting and
Hebrew, in classes which she at-
tends regularly.
Serving with Mrs. Miller will be
the Mesdames Leonard Miller,
Albert Rosenberg, Michael Albin.
Albert Greene. Lester Schner.
Leonard Platt. Jack Hartley and
Stanley Arkin. vice presidents;
corresponding secretary, Mrs.
Lewis Zorn; recording secretary,
Mrs. Bernard L. Loring; financial
secretary, Mrs. Joseph Rosen-
krantz. and chaplain. Mrs, Leon
Kronish.
Cultural Society
Sponsors Concert
A concert of light classical and
folk music will be presented by
the Miami Beach Cultural Society
Saturday, May 26, at 7 p.m. in the
Assembly Hall at 755 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach.
Etea Zigler, soprano and Hflen
Klein, violin soloist with Tammy
A&ronson at the piano, have se
lected music that will appeal to all
groups bound together by race,
ethnic or national origin.
The concert., are sponsored by
the Miami Beach Cultural Society.
Allen A. Dworkif, director, as a
community service.
'Way Out' Dance Sponsored
By Emanu-EI Young Singles
The Young Singles of Emanu-EI
are sponsoring a "Way Out'" dance
(way out in South Miami), at the
Kings Creek Apts. Clubhouse. 7735
SW 86th St.. Sunday, at 8:30 p.m
Under the leadership of Marty
Listowsky. young tingles has many
exciting events projected for tho
summer. The summer program will
be inaugurated with a full day
outing at Haulover Park Sunday.
June 10.
Mizrachi Groups Plan Functions
Aviva Chapter, Mizrachi Women's
Organization, will hold its final
meeting of the current season on
Monday at 1 p.m. at Beth David
Congregation. At a luncheon on
Wednesday at the Coronet Hotel.
Mrs. Simon April was installed for
a 10th term as chapter president.
Dvorah 'Chapter 'presidium.
Fannie Berg and Beatrice Fuchs,
will honor Mothers in Israel, and
Minnie Posner, Mother of the
Year, at a gala luncheon on Mon-
day at 12:30 p.m. at the Roney
Plaza Hotel.
Jeanne Finkelstein, coordinator
! of MWO Florida Council, has re-
I served a Council booth for the
j Midway Mall Charity Day Sunday,
j May 27.
rUMHTWC tf?AS
I REF'flSHIMG
NAT LOUPUS TORN. SPECIALIST
Antioues Restore- toucn-Up in
Home. loose Chairs Repaired
Cigarette Burns Removed. Moving
Damages Repaired. Farn. ReHnished
893-0679 861 6152.
OPEN ALL YEAR
KOSHER
ON-THE OCEAN 20tfc to 21st STREET, MIAMI IEACH
Belli Sholom Sisterhood
Fetes 'Lnsung Heroines'
16 Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Si lorn of Miami Beach held a
;u.-.?heon Wednesday to install now
u:: crs of the group and to honoi
31 "unsung heroines."
Heading the slate of leaders is
Mrs. Irving Miller, president, sue
ceediOg Mrs. Meyer Kotler; Mrs.
Leonard Miller, Mrs. Albert Rosen-
btr?, Mrs. Michael Albin, Mrs.
A iert Greene, Mrs. Lester Schner.
HEBREW
BAR & BAT MITZVA
TEACHER
"ost effective method. Your
rome or mine. Call Benjamin
251-7686.
Think of them
as multiple
vitamins
with
wrinkles
We're not suggesting
you give up vitamin pills
for prunes. All we're saying
is, Sunswect Prunes have
mauy important vitamins.
J_ikeAandB-l,B-2and
oincin. Like minerals, too
calcium, plenty ot" iron,
rich inpoiassiutn.
Yet low in sodium.
Delicious with natural
sugar. So you can nibble
something sweet for
only a measly 18-odd
calories per prune.
Abigezunt
with
Hi **""'"
.1B8K2
Tu^uHiuic^ ioc. m nS *> MUM scac*
TROPIML GARDENS AU ROOMS WltM PRIVATE
OLYMPIC POOl BATH.SHOWERi PHONE
i PRIVATE BEACH PUNNED ENIERTAINMENT
i 6AR0ENE0 PATIO SHOWS. BINGO
. .... .,. Serving KoMier
bHiSufJi r-t Diets CilcirOo
B^Sfum-* Mals Only
.-.P.t-rit. MASHGIACH OH
Special MtfttM) St on '" PRMJSES
ISIDORE KAPIAN. Mang. O"-
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PHONt
5310761
Mrs. Leonard Platt, Mrs. Jack
Hartley and Mrs. Stanley Arkin,
vice presidents; .Mrs. Lewis Zorn,
Mrs. Bernard L. Loring and Mrs.
Joseph Rosenkrantz. secretaries,!
and Mrs. Leon Kronish, chaplain, j
Sisterhood members who were j
honored included: Arlene Albin, \
Shirley Alexander, Minna Blum,
Sylvia Davis, Ann Drecksler,
Blanche Eskin, Gertrude Ginsberg,
Sarah Gladstone, Ruth Glickman.
Stella Gordon, Ada Granof, Mar-
garet Greene, June Mailman, Jean
Hershey, Bertha Joel. Mae Levine.
I.ibby Levy, Anna Miller, Angje
Neham, Reba Pied, Rose Reingold,
Beatrice Sailor, Naomi Sail, Millie
Ser, Dorothy Spoont, Cele Swickle,
Rose Teplis. Nancy Weiss, Jean
Weissman, Millie Yasman, Rae
Yoffy. and Doreen L. Marx.
msmr fitted prunes
r
Entire ocoiinfront ulork
37th to 38th St. MIAMI BEACH
Phono 13051631-0001
r
Daily !" por. an o. oc
oomi
Sopt 3
Including Strictly Kosher Vim ,
* n nn"j,lv'"pc
1/4 UU 12o< 157 .
Juii.i 19 to
^ 'ush Water Swimming Pool
PrivBto Oum h t. PutiO
I>u(jr a. Sail f-ruo L) uti
Oceantront Svnououuu
Air ConUitionud rco Po'kinj
DINING ROOM OPEN
TO THE PUBLIC
Far Reservations or
Information
V 'HONE 5314061 d
SOLAR GALLERIES!
Original Works of Art
Oils by Henry Hau
Metal Sculpture by DeWain
Psychic Portraits by ETTA
Special this weekend only
Pencil Signed Dali(l) $100.00
10% off on all limited editions
20% off on all custom frames
17011 W.DIXIE
949-0594
With my hectic days
who needs caffein?
light! And that's where Sanka* Brand Decaffeinated Coffee hits ths
potwhen a good cup of coffee Is all you really wont Yes, Sanka is
Oood tasting coffee. But taken out of it is 97% of the caffein which
lias no coffee taste anyway. Also taken out are a lot of harsh, bitter
elements. So the result is incredibly smooth, rich tasting Sanka
Coffee. It's delicious.
FREEZE-DRIED
INSTANT
LChayim! Enjoy allyou want anytime
Sanka Decaffeinated Coffee
\ CERTIFIED KOSHEFl
REGULAR


Friday, May 18. 1973
MnMiMlfarttM
Page 9-B
".i

River Reach. The kind of i
like most to be shipwrecked"bn
When you compare our
island for convenience of location,
the natural beauty of balcony
views, privacy and security we
don't believe you can find anything
like it at anywhere near the price.
Take convenience of
location. River Reach is on an
island just five minutes from
downtown in a single family
residential neighborhood. The
Davie Boulevard Interchange of
1-95 is only 5 blocks to the west.
No waterway in Fort
Lauderdale is more lushly
landscaped with towering palms
than New River. And all day long
there is an endless parade of yachts
and boats plying their way to the
Intracoastal and the ocean. Always
something different. A sight to
behold. And nearly every
apartment has a front row seat.
As for privacy and security
you'll certainly have peace of mind
here. Our island has only one
entrance. Across a waterway that's
guarded twenty-four hours a day.
We're so particular about who
comes and goes the island is also
patrolled by boat as well as land.
If you don't belong here it's next
to impossible to get in.
So, before you buy
anywhere, come see our furnished
models. We'll let them tell you how
liveable our island is.
/:'


Pnna T A. S
Poge 10-B

lenitfi Meridian
Friday, May 18, 1973
Students Participating In
Nationwide Test on Israel
More than 150 students through-
out the Greater Miami aiva will
participate this week in the Ami-
Award of Merit of Israel F.xamina-'
tion toTJfcTfeld ufnfe'r'Tne sponsor-
ship locally of the Central Agency j
for Jewish Education in coopera- \
*ion with the Department of Edu-
cation and Culture of the World
ZioHi-t Organization and the youth
and education department of the
Jewish National Fund.
The examination which is be-
ing given throughout the entire
United States is a non-competitive
test of 200 questions on the geog-
raphy, history- culture, sociology,
politics and demography of Israel
for students between the ages of
11 and 15.
For those students answering
between 100 and 125 questions cor-
rectly, a bronze pin will be award-
ed, with a silver pin being given
for those who answer correctly
126 to 174 questions, and a gold pin
and bouk on Israel for those who
answer more than 175 questions
correctly.
i
Purpose of the quiz is to en-
courage Jewish youth to learn
'lir story of the land of Israel and
the attachment to it of the Jewish
p .in throughout the ages, to
de< pi n 11. ii knowledge about pres-
ent day Israel and its people and
to strengthen ties of Jewish youth
with Israel and the Jewish people
throughout .the world.
Schools participating in the pro-
gram include Hebrew Academy.
Miami Beach, Hebrew Academy of
South Dade, Temple Adath Yesh-
urun, Beth David Congregation.
Temple Emanu-El. Temple Me-
norah, Beth Moshe Congregation,
Hillel Community Day School, and
the Hebrew and Judaica High
School of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
Temple Menorah Installing
USY Officers Friday Night
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz and
Ronald A. Heller will install Tem-
ple Menorah's incoming USY of-
ficers during the Friday evening
worship services this weekend. A
Kiddush honoring the entire chap-
ter as well as the officers will fol-
low sen ices. ;
Taking the oath of office will be
Rosa Lowinger, president: Roslyn
Schniadoskl and Laine Varon. vice
presidents; Lenny Mai man, treas-i
urer; Sara Esquenazi, correspond-
ing secretary, and Carlos Fundik,
i-i c nl. :. i 'tary
Sol Schreifoer
Reflected By
Temple Judea
At an election meeting held at
Temple Judea Sunday. May 6. Sol
Schreiber. 7001 SW 77th PI. South
Miami, was reelectcd president of
the Temple for the 1973-74 year.
Also elected were Albert Jacob- |
son, Harold Jaffer, Marvin Levin
and Dr. Clifford Marks, vice pres-
idents: Donald Murray, secretary: '
Sidney Richman. treasurer, and
Marvin Pearlman. financial secre- ,
tary
Trustees for the coming year
will include Mrs. George Baum. j
Mrs. Julius Bearman. Donald ,
Homer. Paul Indianer. Jerry Isan. i
Ben Klein. Dr. Eugene Komrad.
Jack Langer, Morton Marcus. Mrs
Harvey Miller. Eli Nadel, Victor
Reiter. Dr. Sorrel Rcsnick. Ernst
Rosenkrantz. Irving Schwartz.
Manuel Serkin. Mrs. Norman
Spitzer, Dr. Fred Witkoff, Mrs.
Bernard Yesner and Leroy Zim-
merman.
Richard Horwich is immedhte
past president; Mrs. Stanley Bui-,
bin will serve as Sisterhood pres-
ident, and Barry Hesser as Brother-
hood president.
CARIB 163'St.
t.N HIGHLANDS
NORTH CAROLIN*
camp
hiqhUndeR
A residential camp for boys
and girls ages 7-15 in 5-4-9
week sessions, June 16-
Aug. 18. Located at 4200
feet in the heart of the Blue
Ridge Mountains,
Highlander offers a moun-
tain of fun with horseback
riding, hiking, nature crafts
and riflery. Water sports
include sailing, skiing and
canoeing.
Mr. Mario D. Pena, Pine Crest
School, 1501 N.E. 62nd St., Ft.
Lauderdale, Flo. 33308 Phone:
772-6550

JOIN RABBI DAVID RAAB
of
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
on a Pilgrimage of 3 weeks
TO ISRAEL
AMSTERDAM and COPENHAGEN
DEPARTING JULY 3rd MIAMI to MIAMI
$1249 Toted Price rabbi raab
First Class Hotels and Meals. Rabbi Raab is a Sabra
ard forme MEMRFR OF U.S. VACCABISH S0CCIR TUM.
For information call: 673-1759 or
532-3475
(Mil Utll ISt'm*K
' !: imI.i IVter"
Jackson Finch
"The
r*^ Nelson
Affair'

ft
*HOr.G c!t..I v.**!,
"Might just turn out to be
this years 'BILLY JACK.' "j
"UlaHang
fell"*
BAR MITZVAH PLANS
Begin With Your Di vital ion
We offer she finest in fngrcving and Thcrmoarnuhw.
Ye < will be delighted with our complete 'iue ot
Menus, Matches and all Table Accessories
in:ljd:j Satin and Velvet.
An Appointment With Our Consultant Is Suggested
Smarti Parties, Inc.
523 Arthur Godfrey Road, Miami Beach
502-8111


BRING THIS 40 FOR 100 PF?S0V/,l,'ZFD NAPKINS fRIC
WITH BACH INVITATION 0RDIR
*6SO*T TA9HIOMS
at ^
i
magpie:
9100 ?.Ol(.ffj$ fcUCMUt
15;.L AM&tOR,
MARLO RENTAL APARTMENTS
Furnished and Unfurnished
3500 Polk Street
Hollywood Hills
Dade 625-4543 Broward 989-3030
30 Different Buildings
I'M B.B. CATCH ME!
J DOG TRACK
; NORTH
MIAMI
620 N.E. 127 ST.
893-1021
Except service on all B&W and Color sets in Shop or Home
I TVS REPAIRER IN 24 HNS. OR LMNER SET GIVEN
I SPECIALISTS IN STEREO REPAIRS u
I SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO SENIOR CITIZENS
M $5 FFON ,N SHOP REPA,R WORK
Dr^haHe^LPope
Chiropractic Physician
announces The Opening
of His Offices in the
jPAiNCOR^^
9751 EUREKA DRIVE
MIAMI, FLA. 33157
Bv APPOmTMENT233-0356
MAY 5 NOVEMBER 6
POST TIME 8 P.M.
MATINEES 1P.M.
I-95 AT 119 STREET
BISCAYNE HAS IT ALL
Exciting Racing Nightly. 11 Trifectas,
Quinielas and daily double wagennq.
Matinees Tuesdays. Thursdays, Satur-
days and Holidays. Elegant Restaurants
and lounges.
Reservations 754-3484
Broward 524-0747


r'riday. May 18, 1973
+Jm!*F*nrklten
Page 11-B
r*"*^*yw'w^^
^^^fV-^N^^
PHILIP FRIEDMAN
Philip Marc, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Friedman, will bo-
come liar Mitzvah Saturday. May
19. during the 6 p.m. services at
Temple Emnnu El.
Philip attends the Vanguard
School whore he is on the Student
Planning Council.
The celebrant will be honored
at a reception at the Eden Roc
Hotel. His grandmother will attend
the event.

JODI MILLER
.Torii Beth, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey Miller, will become
Bat Mitzvah (Hiring the 11:15 a.m.
worship service at Temple Judea
"i Gables Gables Saturday. May l<)
Jodi is a seventh grade student
B1 Glades Junior High School
where she is on the honor roll, and
; mi mber of the Studc nl Council.
\ graduate of Temple Hebrew
School, v here she received the
outstanding scholarship trophy,
i. to continue her re-
ius edui ation through Confir-
' ii it.
Following the services a
on wi I he held at the
tt Motel in Jodi's honor
iier celebrate will be her
n I] arcnts, Hairy Pearl and Mr.
Mrs. Alike Miller, and her
I i at grandmother, Sadie Diamond,
cal residents, and Mrs. Henry
i of California.
BENJAMIN HACK
iamin, son of Mr. and Mrs.
d Hack, will be called to the
ra!i
a a Bar Mitzvah Saturday
i >rnii .... Ma) 19, at Temple B I
iamin is a seventh
Thomas Jeffei son lunior '
h .'ind i- a member of the
gi aduati class
i I Ml Hack will host
Sh ,bb and Kiddush in
i| ; celebrant. Ii
be hi nor Ian ytion and '
Si i .i .r. tin
!c Hotel w "i out of town
in a I n I mi <.
i
IOAN LABB
\\ nrshii -i t ici Sail i laj May
1 I, at Beth David C ion.
ini ,i' the Bat ^ itzvah o
Lllisi i, daughter ol Mi and
s Leon Labbie, 2313 s\\ 25th
S
Hie celebrant is a seventh grade
nt at Shenandoah Junior
Higl School and attends Beth
David's Religious School, where
she is in Hebrew grade Hay. A
Dolphin Doll, she is especially pro-
fl ient in baton twirling and
dieerleading.
Joan will be honored at a re-
Jodi Beth Miller Benjamin Hack
ception in the synagogue. Helping
her to celebrate the occasion will
be her grandparents. Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Finesilver ol Pitttsburgh,
Pa., and Mrs. Emma Sachs of
imi.
DUID ANTELL
David, the son ol Mr-. Irene
Anteli. will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah al Shabbal afternoon ser
ices n Beth Torah Congregation
May 19,
David i i member of the Torah
class in the Haroid Wolk Religious
School nds John F. Ken-
nedy Junior High School, where
hi in ; ie seventh grade. He
plays ball with the Little League
Optimist Club.
Th guests will include the
celebrant's maternal grandmother,
Mrs. Ann man of North
Miami B
'
BARRY HOCKSTEIN
Bi rry, the son of Mrs. \
Hockstein, will observe his Bar
Mil In day morning. May 19.
al Beth Torah Congregation.
c ceh brant attends Beth
Harold Wolk Religious
: re he is in the Torah
class, :. d i in the seventh grade
I I Kennedy Junior High
will sponsor the
dusl the sen ice- in
her soil's ll nor
DAVID FREEDMAN
Davi i dman, -on of Mr an
II ii u p, will becoi ie a
Bi '' Temple Menorah,
Satat y mo n ng, May 19.
Davi is .- 'vonth gradi studenl
il Mau ilus Junior High School.
There wilt be a Kiddush following
al Temple Menorah and
the celebrant will be honored with
a buffel Surfside Plaza.
STEVEN SHRAGO
Sti ven. Ihe son of Mrs. Esther
Shrago and Melvin Shrago, will
illed to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday. Ma) '9. during
Ihe worship services at Temple
Sinai of North Dade.
Steven is a seventh grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Junior
Hil-'h School and attends Temple
Sinai's Religious School.
Attending the services will be
the celebrant's grandparents, Mr.
; and Mrs. I. sacks, his aunts, Miss
Rose Sacks and Mrs. S. Sacks, and
his uncles. Charles Sacks and Joe
Sacks.
a ->
MARK D'GABRIEL
Saturday morning services at
Temple Sinai of North Dade will
include the Bar Mitzvah of Mark,
the son of Mr. and .Mrs. Julio
D'Gabriel, on May 19.
The celebrant is a student at
John F. Kennedy Junior High
School, where he is in the seventh
grade, and attends Temple Sinai's
Religious School.
FOUNTAINS I WATERFALLS
FISH PONDS
INSIDE-OUTSIDE-ILLUMINATED
call 666-3905
[^,
s
X
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
lei me quote yoo rotM. Also
local moving & long distance
noving anywhere in the U.S.
>r overseas.
A. B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
HARDER HALL
Golf Tennis Camp
(orTeensfCo-Ed)
In rts 67H SEASON
Private 18 hole golf course. 7 all
weather tennis courts, individual
coaching, instant replay TV. top
"pro" staffs, pool and lake
swimming, sailing, water skiing,
discotheque, band entertainment,
talent shows, drama workshop,
movies, bowling. DRIVER
EDUCATION Trips to DISNEV
[Special 2 Week Session: June 13-27 WORLD (l1. hours away).
7 and 4 Week Sessions begin June 30 Cypress Garden^ L.on Country
l-iiu .o i < < to Satan, Nassau. Deep Sea Fishing,
|3 Week Sessions beg.n July 28 100o Air.Cond,on^
ICamp closes August 18. Directors Abe Rift i
Victor E. Jacob.on Tony Anthony
Sebring, Fla. 33*70 Call Collect (813) 3850151
Harder Hall
FlQndo i First
6oll fteiorl
Io cloy
pti period,
double occupancy.
UNLIMITED
FREE COIF
ZALKA
UNVEILING SERVICES
Unveiling services to the memory
of the late
ALBERT A. ZALKA
will be held Sunday, May 20th at
11:15 A.M. at IvU. "-bo Mausol urn,
xvith Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiat-
ing.
Friends aH relatives are
inviijd to attend.
SOUTH
HEBRKW
DADE
ACADEMY
.>()() S.W. 8TH STREET, MIAMI
ANNOUNCES REGISTRATION FOR FALL TEAM
GRADES 1 THRU 6
Beneficiary Agency of deafer Miami Jewish Federation
Finest Secular Judaic Education
Transportation and Kct Meat Lurches Provided
Swimming Program in Olympic Sixe Pool
CALL 223-3291

Camping Experience
Boys & Giris
Ages 3-13
'ri-J'-.

' :r s

Two Four Week Sessions
June
July
ur Week Sessions ^
! 18-July 13
16-Aug. 10
SWIMMING (POOL ON PREMISES) HORSEMANSHIP ATHLETICS
CAMPING FISHING BOATING ARCHERY
... AIR CONDITIONED INDOOR FACILITIES
Limited reservations available
Qualified Adult Supervision
LOCATED 11925 SUNSET DRIVE
CALL 274-5 1 1 1
Cabbage Juice Pill
Used In Ulcer Cases
By Science Service
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 14 A
cabbage juice concentrate can
be used to heal ulcers. Dr Gar-
netl Cheney of the Stanford
School of Medicine reported to
the National Gastroenterological
A-mi. here.
Instead of drinking a quart of
cabbage juice daily, the 100
Jlcer patients he treated swal-
lowed three tabl'-spoons of the
concentrate. Yet their pain van-
ished within five days, and ulcer
craters in most cases healed in
:in average of 13 to 14 days,
about Hie same time as required
with the cabbage juice treat-
ment.
Using the concentrate, pa-
tients were allowed to eat what
they pleased. The Pure Cabbage
Concentrate is available in cap
sule form at
Lyons Happy Health Foods
542 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
For Further Information Call
672-4764
MAIL ORDERS FILLED
The Spirit of Israel
Comes Alive
KIBBUTZ PROGRAM
ISRAELI MUSIC
ISRAELI DANCING
ISRAELI FOOD
ISRAELI ART
MANY MEMORABLE EVENTS
AND EXPERIENCES
FOR AN EXCITING SUMMER
AT CAMP MENORAH
SWIMMING
SPORTS
DANCING ATHLETICS
MOVIES DRAMA
BOWLING MUSIC
ARTS & CRAFTS
AND NOW
PRIVATE TUTORING ON A ONE TO ONE BASIS
Elementary Through Jr. High School
CERTIFIED TEACHERS WILL HELP YOUR CHILD
There Will Re An Additional Charge For Tutoring
AND WEEKLY TRIPS AND OUTINGS TO PLACES
OF INTEREST IN THE MlAlvll AREA
Delicious, well balanced hoi Kosher Meat Luncfies are
served daily in our dii conditioned dining room.
Regular school bus transportation is available.
CAMP
MENORAH
75th STREET AND CARLYLE
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Telephone. 866 215S S6S-0221


Vena Ifl. S
Page 12-B

Imm #'<#? ff^ririi^n
.!' I
-. -
THE BEST
WAY
WEST IS
Brentwood West
A condominium townhouse development
2 bedroom 1 Vi bath and 3 bedroom IVi bath units
FROM
$
30,500
Located in Davie, Florida, the heart of the horse ranch and
orange grove country In South Broward. Within walking dis-
tance of Nova University and Broward Community College.
Two parking places for each
townhouse
Central air conditioning and
heating
Wall to wall carpeting
Swimming pool and sun deck
Luminous ceilings in kitchens
General Electric range ft oven,
dishwasher,
ft garbage disposal, washer ft
dryer.
Walk to shopping center,
schools, etc.
Sliding glass doors to private
terrace or balcony
Directions: Go south from Rt. 84 or north from Griffin Rd. on Davie Road to S.W. 39th St West
on SW 39th St. to SW 67th Ave. and south on 67th Ave. one block to Brentwood West
Townhouses.

FiHav. Mnr 18, 1973
4 FURNISHED
MODELS
OPEN DAILY
11 AM-5 PM
INCLUDING SUNDAYS
GENERAL @ ELECTRIC
appliances
Bring the family out to Davie and
BRENTWOOD WEST TOWNHOUSES
to see what we have for you___
6679 Southwest 41 Ct.
(at SW 67th Ave.)
Phone 791 -6130 or 584-3402





Friday. May 18, 1973
fJenist ftcr/dfiaf?
Page 13-B
Barry Commencement Sunday
Barry College commencement
exercises win be held Sunday at
2 p.m. and 8 p.m., in the college
auditorium. Mrs. Athalie Range,
former secretary. Department of
Community Affairs, State of Flor-
ida, will address 131 Barry bach
elor's d-gree graduates at 2 p.m.
John M. Riley. Ph.D. dean of the
School of Social Work, will ad-
dress. 35 graduates of the grad
uate division (education. English,
religious studies) at 8 p.m.
LIGAL NOTICE
the ooiieciors item, a group ol seven young professional
singers and dancers, will be appearing for one night only
at the Surfside Community Center next week. Their perform-
ance is scheduled to begin at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Tickets
may be obtained at the doer.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
cOTICE of action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
El EVFNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN and FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-11927
ACTION FOR crS**1"" UTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK: THE MARRIAGE OF
PEDRO IBARZABAL. Husband.
Peli:i iur.
A' MCDENA IBARZABAL. Wife.
Respondent.
TO! .Mrs Almudena Iharjabal
RESIDENCE I VK'l'WN _____
Yd!" ARE HKRERY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage haa bee" filed again*! you ana
1*011 are required to serve a eoni ol
your written defenses. >f any. to 11
on ABE KO88. nttornev for Petitioner.
*hoso address is lft' N.W. 12th Aye-
in..-. Miami. Florida 88188 (868-42821.
iiml fill the original with the c'e* ""
the above styled court on or before
June 2S. lt7S; other**Is* n default will
lie entered attains* you for the relic.
demanded In the comnlaint or petition.
This notiee shall be published once ,
k-uh week for four .oils.....itive weeks
|ln THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand an.I the seal or
aid court at Miami, Florida on this
5 dav of May. 197.1. __
RICHARD P BRISKER.
A^ Clerk. Circuit Court
Pn.le County. Florida
By C P. COPEI.AND
As Deputy Clerk
[Circuit Court SeaM
RE KOSS. ESQIORE
101 N.W. 18th Avenue
iiaml. Florida 38128
4'%forpltrtlbr,er
6'18-85 eri-f "
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
(Formerly: Civil Court of Record)
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 72-5194
BOND STREET RAINWEAR, a
: nvw York corporation,
Plaintiff.
VS.
I*i fiRENCE Lt'STIG.
Defendant
NOTICE OF AC.T'l-IN
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
TO: Fl ORENCE Ll'STIO
.in South Ocean Boulevard
Palm Bench. Florida
TOC ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for damages haa been filed
attains) you and ">u are reoulred io
rve a cony of your written defense*
.f rtnv to it on JONAS I ROHAT.
NER. ESO of TAI IANOFF AND
RADER. BSQS.. Attorneys for Plain-
iff whose nd.lrcss Is- 42il I Incoln
Road. Miami Reach. Florida, on or he-
fore June 85, 1973. nnd file the oriei-
nal with the Clerk of this Court either
before aervlc.....I Plaintiff's Attorneys
.,r Immediately thereafter: otherwise
a default will he entered attains! you
fur the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or netitioa. ... ,
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this Court on May II. 1973.
RICHARD P. HRINKEP.
As Clerk of the Court
By: J. W. RODOERS
As Deputy Clerk
Court Seal
TAT .IANOFF ANlVBADER
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Id I incoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida ZZ\Z9
(Tel Nu ; 5S*t-7*l:!7'
.1, -, .*r48-8.1 -6/1-8-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-2776
In RE: Estat.
if. NURRY LEFF
de. i as,-.,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
"o All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
iik Claims or Demands Against Said
Sstat.
You are hereby notified and re-
lulred to pre sen I any claims and de-
nanda which you may have attains)
he ratal..... \i Mi'iuiv LEFF de-
eased late of Dade County. Florida,
o the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
mil file tin- aane In duplicate and as
trovlded i" Section 733.16, Florida
statutes, in then- offices in the Coun-
y c.iu [hi um' in Dade County. Florida,
.ylthin six calendar months from the
Ime of the first nuhllcstloh hereof,
r (be same will be harred.
Filed a' MlsnX. Florida, this 11 day
if May. ad. 1973.
LILLIAN LEFF
NORMAN C1MENT
Co-Executors
Finst publication of this notice on
the l* day of May. 1973.
OROVER-CIMENT WEIN8TEIN &
STAirBER. P.A.
Attorney for Estate of M.: Murry
I.eff. deceased
.ir.o Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
:, ls-23 6'l-8
legal notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT f*. tHJ
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
No. 73-1015
in RE: Estate of
Jl iSEPH Ti iRTORELLO,
I leceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All red I tor* and All Persons Hav-
ing Claimn or Demands Attains! Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
Io present any claims and demands
hli h i>u ma*, hat attains! .he es-
ate of Joseph tortoreli o de
ceased late of Dade County, Florida.
ii the Circuit Judges nl Dade County
in.I file th.- same In du'illci te and -
orovided In Section 783.18, Florida
Slalu.es. in their ofl..... ill i ... i null-
(j Courthouse !! Dade County, Flor-
I... within ,-!x calendar months from
the time nl the firs, publication here-
f, or .'. name ill l"- bai red
Dal d al Miami, Floridn. this < day
of May. AD. 1973.
ANN RER'ARiq
A Executrix
First pub'lcnflon of this ....tire
he i1* das of Ma). 1973
HARVEY RICHMAN
Attorney for Executrix
136 Lli coin Road
Miami Bead !'!.i 33139
-. 18-23 81-8
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 73-11538
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF SUIT
IAMUN, INC.. a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff.
VI
vvil LTAM O. CLEVE and -----------------
I EVE. bis wife: DOROTHY
IVINOSTON and -----------------
IV'NGSTON. h.-r husband; ANNA
")AVIS and ----------------- DAVIS, her
lUSbnnd: I.AI'RA M. MILLER, a
itittie woman: ida v. MEALS,
i sinelc woman : MA I'D
VILLOCGHBY and -----------------
A'H lol'liHRY. her husband:
SETTY 8CHOENTAG and -----------------
tCHOEN'TAG. her husband:
*1 ORENCE H. TOY and -----------------
i"OY. her husband: WALTER 8
lli I Elt and----------------- MILLER.
lli wife; and CAROLINA M.
til I EH and ----------------- MILLER.
ler husband.
Defendants.
WD Al SO ALL CNKNOWN
ERSOV, HEIRS. DEVISEES.
IRANTEES ASSIGNEES OR ANY
rTHER Cl AIMANTS CLAIMING
IT TIIRnl'iill I'NDER OR
lOAINST ANY OF THE ABOVE-
NX MED DEFENDANTS XX Ho MAY
.] hk v|. IXD NOT KNOWN TO BE
HEAD ol! ALIVE, AND Also ALL
UNKNOWN PERSON. PARTIES.
I Ai.MANTS AND DEFENDANTS
[AVINC olt Cl AIMING ANY
fOHT TTT1 E oR INTEREST IN
il( TO THE PROPERTY INVOLVED
\ THIS CAl'SE AND
-IEREINAFTER DESCRIBED.
TO: WILLIAM G. CLEVE and
----------------- CLEVE, his wife.
Washington Road
Bradford. N< w Hampshire
DOROTHY LIVINGSTON and
---------------- LIVINGSTON, her
husband,
S' elhv, Michigan
l.Al'R.X M MILLER.
a single woman,
jiT-.'iib Avenue West
Hendersonville,
North Carolina
IDA V. MEALS slnitle woman.
4177 McKnlfthl Road
Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania
maid WH l OCOHBT and
----------------- WIl.l.oriiHin. her
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREB1 GIVEN that
the undersigned desltina to emtaxe
i. business under the fictitious names
if PASKOW REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL; PASKou REAL ESTATE
SALES TRAINING COVRSE at
11205 s. Dixie Highway, Miami. Fla
ntenii to rettlster said names with
the I'l-r-k of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida:
JOAN B, PASKOW
IKW IN N. PASKOW
r./18-L'.-. 6't-S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY I
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO 73-?271
Fi-iANK B. DOWLING
in RE: Bstati
MARY mines MITCHELL a I i
MARY A Mil. HELL
deceased I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Tu All Creditor!, and All P. i oim Hair
in; Claims Demands Aealnsi s.ijl
Estate:
You are hi rebj notified and i.
to present any claim- and (lemnndh-
Wlllch Vfiu muj n.i\. i the i-s-
tate of Mui i Ami. Mltcha II n k a
Mar- A. Mitchell deceased I. I. nf
Dade Count} Floi Ida, to th. Cli nil
Judtti i of 1 lade i 'ounty. and file the
same In duplicate and a pr. .led
,n Seciloi Floi Ida Statut. ...
their ". In thi C .untj Cou**tl
In Dade i .uiii Floi Ida, Ithl .-ix
Al< mi ir nth* from the I Im of the
first publication hereof, or i ii name
ivlll barred
Filed al Miami. Flo.ida. |
lay of Ai'ril. a D, IS7S.
THOMAS :: SPENCER. JR
a- Executor
First publication of this notlci -i
the 27 da}- of Aoril. 1973.
Rdtvin M i i'nahuni
Myers, Kaplan Porter. Levinson &
rCellin
Vttorney for Exi cutor
7th Floor. 1428 P.ri.-kell Avenue
Mian... Florida 3:1131
t :: 5 1-I1-1S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-11801
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Mart-lao* ,,,
RI'RTON HALPRIN
and
IATI i: HA I.PR IN-
TO: QATI E HALPRIN
1933 Bronson
1 'is Antteles, California
YOI' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
hat an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riaiie has been filed attalnul you and
you are reouired to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to it on
IERRY a. BURNS, attorney for Pa-
Itloner, whose address is 908 City
National Hank Rldtt :'.". West Flatt-
Vr Street Miami, Florida 33130. and
ii.- the orlttlnal with the clerk of the
ibove siyi.-d court on or before June
22 ''.iT.".: otherwise a default wil be
ntered attains! you for the relief de-
manded in the comnlaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
''ach week for four ronaeeutlve weeks
ii THE JEWISH FLORIDIAX.
WITNESS my hand and (he seal of
said court -it M'*>ml. Florida on this
il day of Mac. 1978.
RICHARD P. DRINKER
As Clerk, circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By R M kisski:
As Deputy Clerk
. irculi i "in Seal)
IERRY A Bl'RNS
"is City National Rank HI.1l.*
Miami. Florida :;.:!':'1
Vttornes for Petitioner
S 13-23 C 1- IN THE 1ITH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 73-9703
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIV'SION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriaee of
SIXTO PEREZ. Husband.
and
DORIS a PEREZ. Wife.
TOC DORIS O. PEREZ, residence
unknown, are re.tulred to file your an-
swer to the petition for dissolution of
marrlatte with the Clerk of the above
Court and serve a copy thereof upon
Herman Cohen. Eso.. 131<>-11 Con-
KXess RuildiiiK. Miami Florida, on or
before May 30. 1973, or else petition
will be confessed.
Dated: April 30. 1*173.
Richard P. Rrinker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: R M. KI8REE
Deputy Clerk
4 J7 5/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
Notice IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ui.ilers.i:ne.l. desiriiiK to enuaite
in business under the fictitious name
of RACES UPHOLSTERY at 5841
S W. sth Street. Miami. Fla. Intend!
to rettlster said name with the <'! rk
of the Circuit Court "f Dade county.
Florida.
RACI. D. FORTES
4/87 5/4-11-18
husband.
722 Fas. lrt-1 !
Apartment No. J .
Hoiis...... Texas
I: "TTY SCHOENTAO and
__------------ SCHOENTAO. her
husband,
Saxon hurt;. Pennsylvania
FLORENCE H TOY and
-----------------TOY her husband.
Pine Hill Route No M
Rlttannlntt. Pennsylvania
\\ ALTER S Mil.I ER and
----------------- Mil I ER. his wife.
8688 Marceiia Avenue
Stow. Ohio 11224
VOL' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to Quiet Title encum-
bering the followliiB-descrlbed Prop-
erty situated in
Ida. to wil:
I .it 6, and the
I ol 5, Block
SUBDIVISION
Plat thereof.
Dade County. Flor-
South One-Ha'f of
9. of PALOMAR
according to the
v ..I..riled in Plat
Hook 7 at Pane 158. of the Pub-
lic Records of Dade County. Flor-
ida,
lias been filed attainst you. and you
ire reoulred to serve a copy of vour
written defenses, if any, on: shei.-
DON R. PALLET. ESQUIRE. At-
ornev for Plaintiff. 1497 Northwest
7th Street. Miami, Florida 33136. on
or before the 20 day of June. 1978.
and file the original with the Clerk
of thli Court whether before service
m Plaintiffs Attorney or immedi-
itelv thereafter: otherwise a Default
will be entered attainst you for the
reBef demanded in Plaintiff's Coin*1
plaint.
WITNESS-1*0>'. hard au itiMiami. Dade County. Florida, this
1 allay of May.J978.
.Circuit 'rrturt-Stearf *'*
\ RIl^HARD P. RRINKER
V Clerk of Said Court
* tMy R..M. KISSEE
ffs,^SJf*1^ i '?irtc**
m .--- -v-182S-/r-S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
No. 72-3856
in RE: Estate nf
THEODORE JOSEPH MONTROSE
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors .....I All Persons Hav- fCircuit Court Seal)
Inn Claim* Demands Attains! Said
Estate:________;________
Vou are '-... ii\ notified and re..uire.i
to present anj claims and demands
which you ... .\ have aintlnsl the es-
tate nf THEODORE JOSEPH MONT-
ROSE d......ased late "f Dade County,
Florida, t.> th. Circuit Judjtes of Dade
County, and file the same In duplicate
mil as provided in Section 733.16, Flor-
ida Statutes in their offices in the
County Courthouse in Dade County.
Florida, within six calendar months
from the time of the first publication
hereof. .- the same will be barred.
Dated at M'ami. Florida, this 9
day of Mac. AD. 1978.
Dorothy Montrose
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice or.
the ixth dav of May, 1973.
I ERR I FEF. ESQ.
11: .rues for Petitioner Estate
I'Ji. I.inch. Road ,
Miami Beach. Florida 93139
5 18-25 i:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDXIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 73-9897
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
t.N RE: TDK m KRRIAGE OF
rOHN H. DANIEL.
Petitioner. ,
\ s
LTNELL DANIEL.
Kes.ii.l iie.lt.
TOC I.vi.ell Daniel. 8*>81 Windfern..
Houston, Texas ARE HEREBY NO-
TIFIED To FILE your written re-
snoiis" to this action for dissolution of
narria-'e. with Ihe Clerk of the above
in., and serve a conv noon Petl-
tlnner-a Attorneys, VON ZAMFT ft
SMITH. Suit. IK, 420 South Dixie
Hitthn-ay Coral Gables. Florida 83146,
on or before the l day of June 1973
else th.- Petition for Dissolution "f
Marriaee will be taken as confessed.
DATED Ann' 23. I '.":
RICHARD P. RRINKER
Bj R. M KISSEE
I.....an Clerk
4 27 5 1-11-18
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
th.- underside d. deslrlntt to enttatte In
business und.r the "Ictltlous name of
MIANi'liTA SHOE STORE at 4757
N.W. 167th Street. Ona l.o. ka. Fla
Intends to register "aid name with
ihe Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv Fli.ridfl
RAII. ALVAREZ
r, 4-11-18-25
1-S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
NO. 73-2683
In RE: Estate of
Rl IDIA R IBINOWITZ
a k a BERTHA RABIN* .VVITZ
I...... is".I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All ('.editors and All Persons Hai
nar Claims or Demands Attains! Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and reoulred
to unseat :...j claims and demands
which you m:v have ir-io.'-i ihe es-
tate of BODIA RABINOWITZ a 'k/a
PERTH A RABINOWITZ decei.....1
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dole County, and
file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 738.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dad, County. Flor-
ida, within six calendar months from
the tin..- nf the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
BAMUEIj N RABINOWITZ
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the is day of Mav. l">7n.
WEINER. AND VYEISENFELD P.A.
Joseph J. Weisenfcld .
Attorney for Samuel N. Rahlnowitz 'J
8378 Collins Avenue 'f
Miami Reach. Fla. _
M ig-aigii siii ii 11 to*>rTT~f**** *"*"*** '*fc ***
i/18-23 6/1-8
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underslttned, de'rintt to enease In
business under ihe fictitious came of
H R JASAN INTERNATIONAL at
P. O. ltox 1"'".. Miami Fl. 83191 In-
tends t.i rexister said name with the
Cler* of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. F'ori.i.
BARRY I ORl'RER
5 11-1R-2S Cl
|M TOir riRCU'T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISOIf-PON DIVISION
No 73.1'son
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
.,, p.. I-.,.. Mn-r....... Oft
in..ri| iiii a : \s. wife and
DAN'EI I'HiClNS i.i.^lei.. i
TO: DANIEL HIOOINS (CPLl
Comnanv R 19 Infnntrv
is* BDE '' Infantry Division
APO SF 96R17
vot* are HEREBY notified thai a
Petition foe Dissolution "f Marriatte
has been filed nealnst vou. and you
are herein required to serve copy
of your inswer or o'her nleadlna; to
the Petition on the Wife's nttornev.
i ESTER ROOirPS. WSO... whose ad-
drens Is c.4 N W. 17th avenue. Mi-
ami Florida fli*'-., and file the. orlttl-
nal with the ci -I. of H-c above Myled
court, on or befo*-e !h's *" day of
Ijline. 1S73 or a Default will be en-
.tered -*ir**llis-1 you.
, DATED 'M~ I? '
niTKP 'b'~ '" dV C x'iv ">73.
RICHARD P RRINKER,
Clerk of the Circ.ni Court
PV; R J FOY
Deputy Clerfc


Page 14-B
^!fsrfiwdmr
ifiaay, wwy i. u'j
UCAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-11018
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN KE: THE MARRIAliE OF:
JAIME PUKNTE
and
R"SA PUENTE
T' : ROSE PtTEXTK
1616 7dth SI.
Jackson il.-n-li'-
Queens. NY.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed airalnHl >u and
you are required to serve a copy Ol
your written defenses If any. |a it on
David Sione. atiomey for Petitioner,
whose address is Inl N.W. I'JIh Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida, Phone: 358-4232.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled pourl on or be-
fore .lun.- 14. 1972; otherwise n de-
fault will i>e entered attains! you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This noti.e shall In published (Mice
ea,ii week for four ronaecutlve week?
in THE JEWISH FU'RIDJAN
W1TNB8S my hand and the seal of
s...l court at Miami. Florida on this
\ da) of May. 1273
HM-HAHIi P RRINKER
AaClerk. Circuit Court
Dade (""nuntv. Florida
Uv c. r. copi-:i\xd
As Denuty Clerk
(Circuit <"ourt Seal I
DAVID E STUM-:
l"! N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
-, 11 n.?-. r, '1
LEGAl NOTICt
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTVI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 79-11121
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
THOMAS JOSEPH LITTLE
Husband
\-< ENE H. LITTLE
Wife
TO: ARI.ENE If. LITTLE
Residence I'nirnnwn
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an notion for Iiissolutn.ii of Mar-
riact* has been filed ajrninst you and
you arc required to serv* a popv of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stanley E Goodman, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 28K8 N W
_ d Street. Miami. Florida 22147. and
fill the original with the clerk of the
above styled cowrl ,.i <' l>"'.r. Tune
13. 1878: otherwise a default "ill be
entered amtnat ynu f"i the relief de-
manded in the comnlalni or netitlon,
Tin- notice shall be published once
ea.-h weak for lou* <>'>-.. .,;., weeks
in THE tv\Vi'I vi DPrrvtiV,
WITNESS my hand and thl seal '
i court at ,l;-nii. l-'lorid r iln-
; da) of May. 1973.
RICHARD I' RRINKRR
As < Hark, Plrcu'i *'.....r
Dad,- County, Florida
Bv b .' pnv
\~ Deitut.t i"
in Court s. i
STAN I BY E Hi IDMAN
: \' VV f!2nd Strei i
141
\ i n.-\ t,.i Petitio
:, ii-'-.. i. i
NOTICE OF ACTIOf
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. N AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-9758
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
i.V RE:
J \Mi-:s EDWARD REED,
Husband.
SHIRLEY EILEEN REED,
Wife
TO: JAMES EDWARD REED
Residence I'nknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
rlajK has been filed again*! you and
vou are required to serve a copy of
vuur written del.-uses. If any, to it
on MARJORIE F, ROBBIN8. attorney
for Wife, whose address is 1875 N.E
i'Mid street. North .Miami Beach, Flor-
ida, and file the original wit'i the
clerk "f the above styled .-..'urt on or
before May ::". l;T:f: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered airalnsl vou fot
ill,- relief d< manded In the complaint
or nelition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in Till; JEWISH El.OR IDI \\
WITNESS my hand nnd the senl of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
10 day of April. 1973
Richard P, Brlnker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By v. A HEWBTT
\ Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
BAXTER FRIEDMAN
m MMi.iMi: [ RonniNS
is":. N i-: 163rd Slreel
Wrth Miami Reach, Florida
\iti rnej for Petllloner
4 2" .". I-11-1R

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 73-9985
NOTICE OF SUIT
IN RE: Th. marrlajtr of
KATHICVN ALAYNE IMI.EY.
Wife,
and
HI'OH FRANCIS POLEY.
Husband.
TO: HITOI FRANCIS FOIJ3Y
c/o Mrs. E c. Foley
(013 San Plllpe
Houston. Texas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action fur dissolution of mar-
riam has- been filed amlnat you. and
you are reouired to serve a copy of
v.-ur written defenses, if anv to It on ,
J08EPH J. (lERSTEN. Attorney for
Petitioner. whose address is IftSfl
StiriiiK Harden Road. Miami. Florid.-,
13136. and file the original with the
Clerk of trie above Styled Court on ol
in for, June i. 1973: otherwise n Judg-
ment may be entered nxalnst you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
WITNESS nu hand and the seal of
BStd Court on April L'4 1973
RICHARD P BRINKER,
< It-rk. Circuit Court
Bv B J FOY
I. i-iii\ i "1, 11,
l 27 '4-11-1S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-2134
JOHN R. BLANTON
In RE: Estate of
AHRAH\M EBERT
d, ceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and ah Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Aaamel Said
Estate:
Vou are herein- notified and required
to in. sent any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
..r Abraham Eberl deceased lati ol
Dade County, Florida, to th.- circuit
Judge* of Dade County, and file the
same In duplicate and as provided in
Section 732.16, Florida Statutes, in
in. I offices In the County Courthouse
in Dade County. Florida, within six
calendar months from the time of the
urst publication hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 2a day
oi April, A.I) 1973.
MICHAEL EBRRT
As Executor
First publication of this notli on
the 4th day of May. 1OTJ.
Myers. Kaplan, Porter. Levlnson &
Ken in.
Attorney for Executor
428 llrickell Ave., Miami. Florida
6/4-11-18-25
Reconstructionist College Graduates Its First Rabbi
Rabbi Mordecai M. Kaplan. 92-1 Ritter Hall, Temple University,
year-old founder of the Jewish
Reconstructionist Movement, this
week conferred the title of rabbi
on Michael Jonathan Luckens. 27,
the first graduate of the Recon-
slructionist Rabbinical College, at
Philadelphia. Pa.
Rabbi Luckens, who was born in
New York City and received a tra-
ditional Talmud Torah religious
education is thi- son of Rabbi and
Mrs. Reuben Luckens of Far Rock
away. N.V.
Obituaries
Services Held For Harry Muf son.. 64
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 72-5545
(formerly County Judges Court)
It, HE: Estate of
Hlt.T>A Mil.I ER
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
in*; claims or Demands Against Staid
Estate
Vou are hereby notified and requln
In presenl any claims and demands
which you may have attains! th.- eatati
of mi n> MILLER deceased late of
had.- County, Florida, lo the Circuit
Judges "f Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided in
Section 7"'l 16, Florida Statute-, in
their offices in the County Courthouse
in Dade County. Florida, within six
calendai months from the lime of the
first publication hereof, or the s.itne
u ill hi barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 20 day
oi April. A.P. l!'7:l
MOHKIS Mill l'i:
SIDNEY MILLER
As Executors
First uuhlic.itiin "f this notice on
Hi.- I day of May, tf<7::.
SIMON, HAYS A <:ur\"li\\ Kin;
Attorneys for Executors
ting Ainsi.-v Bulldina
Miami. Florida 13133
B'4-11-18-33
Services were held Sunday at
Riverside Chapel for Harry Muf-
son, 64. former president of the
Eden Roc Hotel and board chair-
man of Jefferson Stores.
Mr. Mufson, of 5640 Collins
Ave.. died of a heart attack Sat-
urday night.
Born in New York City. Mr.
Mufson founded the Fordham Tire
Co. and the Vanderbilt Tire Co.
there.
He came to Miami in 1946 and
founded, with his brothers, the
Jefferson Stores. He wa> named
chairman of the board in 1971.
HANSMAN
Jacob. 74. of Ml', passed nway Fri-
day A IL' year resident formerly of
South Bend, Ind, Survived b> wife,
Mary, son, Paul and two grand-
children, Ald.y Anne and Marc
is.-.,, Member of Kneseth Israel
Coiimciiation Services were held lit
Riverside Memorial Chapel, 1880 Al-
ton fed. Miami Reach, followed with
Interment at Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
Mr. Mufson was honored by the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America for his suppor of a
scholarship fund in 1962.
He was a member and officer
of Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach, and a member of 4 he
Young Men's Philanthropic in New
York City. He also was a f< How of
the Synagogue Council of .America
Mr. Mufson is survived by his
wife. Iris; two sons, Robert and
Stephen; four brothers, Samuel.
Julius. Raymond and Seymour; a
granddaughter and a grardson.
BROWN. Harry. [:,
Isaac, 7s.
ol mi: N. wraan,
.f Ml;. River-
ACKNER. M.iris. 53. 2M NW 177th
St. Riverside.
BEER. Brna Kitty, "8, of Hollywood
Riverside. Interment Mt. Sinai.
FREMONT. Sarah, of NMB Levitt.
KOSOVER. Max. SH. of MB. Rlv.-r-
d.
7:1. of Ml'..
72. of MB
NOTICE UNDER Fir. r IT'OUS
NAME I AW
\l ITII t: IS II RRKltY i v- '
thi ui di rsiftm d, flesh
l.u-n b undei thi ......
SF.M I X MM' i W ESTCHKSTEI
X \\ 7th \- .to Sliti Kla In-
tend res lei nan
rk ..f the Circuit Court
Count] Florid:.
RACI f" IV X
.1 I I.AZAHV
- '
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
.-.Th I-: IS Hi:i:i:i:v ES that
thi undersljciu d. di
1-u-ii-. n undi < u e of
11. -.MS. STRAl'SS AI>\ ERT1SIXI
i.-- \ E 124 Stn \\ m Fhirldn
81 intends to n
with the Clerl C url .-:'
1 lade i 'aunty, Florida
HOMS, STRAl'SS ISC
a Florid
KII'.T WELLISCH v......- aw
Attorney for BOMS, STH \'--s ISC
Ki Almerls \% nui P'lii
i labli -. Fl n Idi "."I
:, 4-n --"-
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
No. 70-3859 (Blanton)
IX RE: Estan ni
i'.\i:i. Rdssi >\V
I i-----1 sed
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
\| iTIl 'K lt< hereto iriven Hist I have
fill .1 m\ Kli ..! 11. i-.-ri and Pel ition r,,r
i I Final I dfchargi h
Exei nt- r f tin .....i i \i:i I-. >
* 'W, -1.....! ind thai on tin
"I .lUIll U|>l>l> l" till III.II
-' tilde i 'ounly ,lu ,-t i inde Count
. for apiiryi .. d I" i Ri
il for di driliul --il nnl dl>
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FDR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-2539
In RE: Estate of
PETER VAN VOOREN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav
ins Claims or Demands Airalnsl Said
K-i.-il.-
Vou -ii'.- l 'ri-l>\ notified and reouired .
in tn-Miii any claims and d. mauds
tthk-li you miu I f airalnsl tli-- estati
of PETER VAN VOOREX rteceasetl
: 11.oi. i 'nunts Fh'i da, to thi
Circuit ,lu.l.-s of Dade County,
file tin -am. in duplicate and as tro-
\ Ided it Si i Ion 73.1 16, Flot Ida Slat'
ui- in tin ii In th.- I'liiinii
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida
:7th
-v. n
-i- Ex..... 11 ,ii- 1 Rohl 1 Joel 11 Sll SEY EFRl '\.-' IS \M,.- Ill \ 1 A Hull iml. Florii
will.in >i\ cHleudnr nioi -I ni th.
I i inn- nf i In first puhlii titioi In n of, .n
i he Kami w ill he ban ed
Filed ,n .Miami, '."lorldii,
1 dm of Awll. \ D l7n
Pi ui Edwiird Van V.
A Vdminli Irntor
I'n -' puhlii alion of this in '
ih. iili day Mas. 1973
ARi '\'i iVITZ, Sll.'.' EH & '.....TI I
of \ltorne> foi Vdmil iHtrnli .,f
i tale nf Peter Vni V..... II
KulldliiK
Mluml Plot I.. :.:;\?.-i
.-. i-n-is-i:
SHRIEBER. Nathan.
Hiverside.
SPIELBERG. Harry,
Rlversidi
TOBIN. Abe, 77. of MB. Hiverside.
FRANK. Anna. 19, of Miami, River-
side. Interment Mt Nabo,
GREEN. Benjamin, 76, ittli Mar-
nellies Dr MB Blasbera
HAAS, Lillian i:. 77. of ME
Riverside.
KISCO. Louis J 72. of MB. Newman.
MARGOLIS. Max. ii'.'. oi N.MF.
Riverside.
shocket, Hnrrj 68, of MB River-
side
SILVERMAN. Josei.li. 83, of MB
Riverside
tanner. Helen, M, 2481 Meridian
Ave. Mil Riverside Interment
.Mi .Who.
bloom. Amelia K 7". of S'orth Raj
Vlllaiti Riverside.
DAVIDSON. Blanche Ida, "1,
i":h St MB Riverside.
ELKHOUSE. Solomon M S6, 11111
Dim ayne Hlvil Blasbere
GOLDBERG, Joshua 84.
N'.-w man
GOI-DSTEJN. .'hail-.-. 7,"., 361 Collins
A.- MB Rlvi.....
GORDON. Sarah, S". of Sorth Miami.
Iii\ erslile.
ho, 72, of MB
COHEN.
Side
REIMER. William I:.. 85. Of MB
Riverside Interment Ml. Sn.ai
REISMAN. Pouald D. 17. 1 i SW
tilth .\> Riveraidi
ROSENTHAL. Kulherine. 78, 18&00
XK 1Mb Ave., NMI'. Riverside.
SILVERMAN, Jacob, :!. ol Mil.
Riverside
SIMON, Helen. 7^. of Mil Newman.
STERN. Norl..rt. 88, :iii"i Collins
Ave Mil Btasbeor.
HARRIS. David, 67, ."..'. SW 6.".th Ave
Gordon. Interment Mt. Sinai.
LAUFMAN. Mollie I... 70. UK. Pelin-
sylvanla Ave. Mil. r.lasli.ic
LOWENSTEIN. Rose. 68, of North
Miami Levitt.
ROOiN. Belle, 80. ..t MB. Newman
SONENFELD. Abraham. 6*. of NMB
STROMINGER, Manny. 71. of MB.
New man
Sutton. Samuel w 80, ..f MB
Riverside
- ZOWADER. Rebn. of MB Riverside.
Interment Mt Who
BENDER. Jack. :.. IJiM) West Ave .
MI! Riverside.
DUNKEL. Sarah. 8.1. 83S l.etiov Ave.,
MB. Gordon. Interment Mi. Sirai-
gordon. Betty, 68, ol C iral
Oables, I.eviit.
GROSS. AuRUSta, 7s. U6I KE l*>th
st Riverside
mayer. Fannie A.. 81, of Hollyv d
Rlverslilt- Inli-rm.-nt Mt Sinai
mellin. Bertha, 7:i. 280 Euclid Ave.,
Jin Rlasbera
N0T0VIT2. Benjamin. 80 nf MB
Riverside Interment Ml Saho
ROBERTS. Sarah. 83, of Ml. \- -
ma o
RUBIN. Raj mi nd, <^ il lit
MB Blnsbenc
SMOLIN. Samuel, 91. 22ol \K 11 I
St, RIverMdi
ll-ls-'-, r.-i
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY DIVES
ti undersigned, di Klrins ii
i : i under the fli : u
\ AAABAR TREE SERVICI I 18*
North Plata, Room 12, Northnide shop.
ping i 'enter, Mis ml Fin nd* to
i saldd nani. v "
the Circuit Court of l' idi >unty. I
Florida.
DAVID All EN
-. 1 t. 1
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME I AW
NOTICE IS HEREIl\ \ EN tl I
the undersipn.il deslrtiis In enmce h
business under the fietli -- nf
HERTTAOE PCRNITCRE REPAIR
SERVICE at 12780 B W I6tl Stn i I
Miami Fla. Intends lo rerlslei ald
name with the Clerk nf |hi Circuit ]
Court of Dade Count v. Ft I
JOHN MARSICAVO
:. i ll-K-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
.NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL AC-ION NO. 73-9948
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IS RE THE YIARRI \-;i: OF
M \HU,\ \ BLISS,
W if.
and
Jl'Lll'S I. BLISS,
Husband
TO Jl i.ii g I. BLISS
- -. Leaning Towi r V.\|i A
63ti \\ .--i Touh)
Slles. Illinois
Vnr ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
action tor I ilssolution i .,- -
ii.ic- has I,,,.,, filed airalnsl you mid
you :n. required to serve ii copj nf
i.'lli ritt.ii ,1, i. iis.s. |f hdj to It
Fredet Ich B Spii Rel, nttorm \
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t engage in
business under the fictitious nami
CONDOMINII'M RESAIE Bt'REAP
OF FLORIDA: CONDOMINTCM RE
SALE CORP OF FLORIDA, CONDO-
JI/.Vjr.M OONSTRI'CTION CORP (>F
FLOHIDA at Pn Bo> |8| I l.-i.,
Branoh. .Miami. Fit tends to
register said nm.-s with |erk
of the Circuit Court of Dade unt]
Florida.
.AIARK" D SHAN'
51
for Pi III inner, nhosi ttddresi In im
Northwest l: Hi Avenue, Miami. Kl..r-
, Kls 33128. and file thi original with the
I clerk of the above styled curt on or
I before June l, 1973; otherwise a de-
1 fault will be entered against you for
"" relief demanded in tl......mplaiiu
, or 11, t :
This notice shall be DUbllahed one.
each week for r- u......xecutivo weeks
In Tin: JEWISH Fij.iiiniw
VVITNE88 mi hand and th. seal <>l
said court at Miami, Florida on thi- "I
da] ol April. I'.7.:.
Richard Brink) i
As 1 1,-rk. 1 lircull Court
Dade Count) Florida
By N a mi h i:tt
At li-iniiv Clerk
H 'iivuii 1 "ourl Seal)
FREDERICK B SPIEJEL
'"I \'oi thwesl l.h Avenue
Miami. Florldfl .....-
Attomej for Petitioner
4.L-7 "- 111 M
: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADC COUNTY,
FORMERi V
1 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
No. 73-2271
FRANK B. DOWLING
In RE: Estate of
MAIM AONES MITCHRI.I*
..... MARY A MITCHELL
D.-.-.-.I-. .I
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO VI I. PERSON'S INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE OF SAID DECEDENT,
Vou are I ei ei notified lhal a u rlt-
ten instrument |iun>ortlng In he th"
will nnl lei Inmenl "f -aid deced-
.111 has been admitted 10 probate In
: 1 '..in t. Vou at.- hen by comma
..1 within ~i\ calendar mnuthr from
ih.- .late of the lii-t publication of
Ice In aopeai In si I f*oui 1 and
show cause, if nn] you ci wh] Ihi
net Ion of said 1 .-ui 1 01 iidmitiinu said
i\ ill 1.. probate should not land 1111-
i'evoked
PRANK B linwlivi:
Cln ull .Tudgi
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk I
By MEI.RA c iiiric
Denut) Clerk
Myers. Kaplan, Porter, Levlnson *
Kenill
, '1? llrickell Avei ui
Miami. Florida 3313I
First nublicnilon of this notice on '
i the 4th day Of May, 1873
'___________________M-ll-ll '.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY RIVEN that
ih.- underslgm 1 dei irlna 10 engage In
business umu-,- the rictuinui name ol
PAN AMERICAN SERVICES at 147
S u 1st Street, Miami. Fl Intends to i
register said cam.- with Ih. I'lerk of
the Circuit court nf /.!.- Countv
I- loll In
PABLO CAO
4 :: i-it-is
,.( M It Ni 11 man
SW s -, 1,
Int. iiii.-iit star of
MB Newman
f Ba> I
Si .
sw
MONTAGUE. .1
OKIN. I .- 7-.
WALZER. Rosi
Ten 1'. -I lo"
I I. M.I
ABRAMS. AIL. rl Tl of
BURROS. P on III 1 Rl
Islands Riverside
CURLAND. Mas. 7-1 104.1 19th
MB RIm
GUNTHER. Harry fl 53, SI' I
TJiid Avi lo' erside.
STEUER. Rilllh II :>ti. ol Hnllnn-
dale Rivi
THOMAS. Rosi K 63. 2301 Ci
Am ii 1 i lurdon. Interment Ml.
N. i.o.
ALLEN. IrvlllR II of surf
Rh rsnl.. Interment Mt, Si 1
BLECKEK, Yettn, 83, S5.1 Meridian
Ave MB. Riverside,
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open [very Day Tloiti Sobboth
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
Miomi'i Only Strictiy Jewish
Monument Deoler
Palmer's
Miami Monument Conipor,/
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbrth
Personalized Memorials Cus'c m
Crafted In Our Own Worksnop.
T7-1 .^ "

i
k
IUVINC AU St iTAn?
AMU fAllAlMfi IN THI IOI
DM
11.1 u
UM
865-2353
720 Stvnty first St; ft
ol Wo. C.nI 0..',.
. Ata>, bod.
4 CINIRATIONS 01 HIV If
Jteviil
Jflemorial Ghape
'JEWISH WNEtAl D.7.fCfORS"
10CAI AND OUT OF STATE
ARHAMii Mt Mi
947-2790
1338S W DIXIC MWV N M.
J


1
iday.May 18. 1973
' knisti IHoridHan
Page 15-B
UGAl NOTICt
circuit court of the
nth judicial circuit
florida in and for
i oade county
^probate division
7robate no. 73-2613
frank b. cowling
stale of
MAXIMIW
tice to creditors
^editors nnd All Persons Hav-
B*1' or Demand* Against Said
hereby notified and required
hi any claims and demand*
^feu maj have against the es-
BBlXMK M.wiiou deceased
thiil, County, Florida, to the
In Igi k of Dnde County, and
inn iii duplicate and a* pro-
! Si iii.,n ::::; 16, Florida Stal -
[their offices in the County
|*e in Dude County, Florida,
I* calendar month* from the
^i' i i rs i publication hereof,
^n>. n ill I.,' barred.
B .Miami, Florida, ibis isi day
m D. 1873.
LEW IS MAN1I.OW
As Executor
First Bui.'-. :iiinn ol IJhlv notice on
the I
jAMKS S It! (TH
)MBKI'.i;. FROM HERO ROTH.
lGAl NOTICE
for Executor
Ifi a* in- Building
Mm-ida. ::::: I
. -. ,: I
aoTici of action
constructive service
i (no property)
IN Teg CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELBMNTH JUD CIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-1P*S
SEHOKl. JURISD'CTION DIV'SION
AOflON FOR D'SSOLUTICN
OF MARRIAGf:"
-:dwaB)1> cassei.l. Petitioner
ntn!
^^^Kva.-'ski
,0: marie cassell
T^H v. -i
W York City. X Y
1^^Ba<:i: iii:i:i.:::v notifikti
I'ril sjfcn ir Dlsaolull in ol Mm

are. r-.iuired w. p..rvi n .-.i|> ,l
vnur wri
ti KI'MHIE : i...... I...
w i.....e address Is 350 I,ln-
kd. Mlnml B< ich, Florida, and
trlelnul w iib the cli rh of Un-
ix i. .1 court mi or before .in u
i herwise n d< fault will be
Ibe.tIpsi you for the relief de-
ii. Hie complalnl or petition
rtlce shall in- published once
[i for four consecutive weeks
li:\\ isii |-|nKiniAX.
|CSP im hand and the seal ,if
rt hi .Miami. Florida on this
FMny, !!?::
|]i-H AIM' P BRINKER
lerk. Circuit Court
|1>,i.i, County. Florida
Ity R, M KISSEE
As Deputy Clerk
Jourt Beall
Win s k i mule
riJncoin :;.!
-Bead.. Florida 381 fl
lley for Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 10868
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IX RE:
The marriage .>i:
SANTO PATAXE, husband
and
J( ISEPHINE PATANE. wife
TO: JOSEPH IXE PATAXE
.. Paul Outrlerl
:;::-:.-. 31st si. Am. XI
' lueem \, u Virk 11372
YOL* AUK HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you nr, required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Robert II. Hums, attorney for pe-
titioner, whose address i- 4SP Lincoln
IM. Suite !"' Mn nn Beach, Fla and
file Hie original with th. clerk of the
above styled court on or befori Hun
IS, 1973: otherwlsi h default will he
entered agalnsl you foi the relief de-
nial .1 in ih.- complalnl : r petition.
This notice shall he published one,
each week for foul consei utlvi
in THE JEWISH Ff.i IRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand nnd the seal of
said court ii Miami, Florida on this
. ill of Mas I'';;;
RICHARD P. BRINKER
\- i'jerk i'ireull '"ourl
11,ni. i'. .nn) \. Florida
Bj I! M KISSEE
ii.-imi-. i lerk
(Clroull Courl Seal)
ROHERT II RI'RNS
iiii Lincoln ll.l
llein h. fla :.:- 4431
Atlorm y foi Petition! ,
-.,ii-in--.-, .; i
Ul.nL NOTICE
DAV i
141
5/11-18-33 f..'l
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
PENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
[PROBATE DIVIS'ON
UTE NO. 73-2388 (Dowllng)
Istati of
'FEl'.P.o.
Ed.
TICE TO CREDITORS
redltors and All Persons Hnv-
liis or Demands Against s.-ikl
I reby notified ami required
In', any c'alms and demands
|u may have aaglnsl "he estate
FERRO deceased late of
iVunv. Florida, to the Circuit
nf Dad- i'iiUI'V. anil file llic
Bhjollcati ami as provided in
l".T! lfi. Florida Ptntutos. In
-. in ill- County rourlrmuse
^('oiiii'v Florida,
nlead^l months from the tin-, ol
M publloat'on hereof, or the
name will
Hii Miami. I-'1.a i.la, this "Pih
" i Ho ;i \ 11
n'riam ai \ aim:/
I V~ Admlnlstrsirlx
^^ilhlieaMon .f :his nodec on
in
^& RIRKIX, I' \
^h for Ailiiiinislral r\\
ear 11 oh I'nler.il Rlilg,
ml. Vli
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADC COIiNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73 10837
GEM^AL .IURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR D'SJOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN i:i: nn: \, \rriaok OF
Kl IZARETH nitKi;x
..III
sa.\| OREEN
In SAM OREEN
Ri siden unknown
Y(l' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an arth n for l ilssidution of Mar-
riaue has been riled against you and
you a r, quired to serve a copy of
your written defenses, ii any, to it
on haviI) E STONE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is nn x.vv
12th Vvenue, Miami Florida, Phone:
"'- 1322, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled courl on
or i..'on- June 12, IB73; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in Til K .IKW ISII FI.ORIDIAN
witxioss my hand and I he seal nf
saiii courl at Mlsmi, Florida on (Ills
i day of May, I97J.
RlfllARD P. HRIXICF.t
As ("lerk. Circuit Court
1 tatje County. Florida
liv H J. FOY
As Deputy lerk
(Circuit Courl Soul)
UA\'ir> E STOXE
mi N.W 12th Avi iiu--
Miami. Flnrids 33123
Attorney for Petitioner
5/11-18-15 3/1
r.'i i -i-c. ; i
N' 'ICE OF ACTION
l CONS ITT' VF SFPVICS
NO PROPERTY!
^H^KiRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVEN'H JUDICiAi CIRCUIT
^.ORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVH. ACT'ON NO 73-10860
'
SE
Mfci
P JUR'SDICTION DIVISION
N FOR DISSO' UTION
OF MARRIAGE
AOE OF
| Hi; Petll n i
fts.
d
i-'uri: Respondent.
[Kl \si-. n;it
Bin Street
ft in. i oo. N'.'W York
Kl IIERKI1Y NiiTIKIKO
Bt:. for Dissolution of Mar-
ii rili 'i agalnsl you and
Dlred I" serve a i'ohy "'
i defenses, if any, << It
OOODMAN, lost;, altor-
etltloner h -se addt i u
el Drive, Miami Flor-
i> the orlatnal with lb*
above styled court on or
11. 1473: otherw Ise a (*
. rnten-d against you for
eiiiaml.il in the complalnl
i shall he published win'
ir four ..... si-."1"vr weeks
1SH FT-ORID1 VX.
m\ hand and (he seal of
Miami Florida on nils
. HiTI.
ahi i p. BRINKBR
elk. Circuit Court
Couniv. Flie-iiln
P. t'OPF.l.AND
Deputy ticrk
t Seal .
^ft)rlve
Ula 33145
fcr Petitioner
/11-H-2r. till
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-11175
PETITION FOR ADOPTION AND
CHANGE OF NAME
1 IX UK:
! The adoption of TEHE8CA
FAYE Hll/TON nnd TERRENCK
REN AE HIl.Ti IN. minors
liv : Their Stepfiithci
JtlSEPH Tllo.M \s FISHER
Residence I 'n'.i aown
1 TO Wll.I.IK A HIl.TiiN
YOIT ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Adoption and
Chang* of Nam,. : hi n filed against
v.m ami you an' required to serve u
{copy of voui written defense, If any.
to ii on: DAVID K. STONE nl thi
law offfices STONE .* Si iSTCII IN.
nil N.W. 12th Avenge. Minnc. Flor-
i.i; Phone: 3R3 1222, and file the
oriKlnal with the i 'lerk of the ahove-
ntylcil l*ourt i...... la-fore .rune !."..
' 1973 oth( '> la, default ill he en-
tered ":......' ^ oil for i he i. Ill de-
manded In ihi complalnl or petition
This notice shall be published once
eae! week for four consecutive wecki
n THE JEW ISH FIjttRIDl V N.
\\ iTnkss my hand and the seal
n| --.ml i '..in i .ii Miami, Florida on
! rhis : ,l..v ,.( May, 1973
RICHARD P URINKER
At I "lerk. Clreull "url
l iade Count). Hot Ida
1!\ : I!. .1. FOY
Demits Clerk
ICIn nil Coui I Seal)
, DAVID K STONE
STONE SOST''Hl.N. PA.
mi N.W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
'. 11 -Ik-2.1 C '1
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY I1IVKN lhal
ilie undersigned, desiring io enaage In
business under tin fictitious name of
fl A M ATTTOM.OT1VE SI'ItVICE nl
R4 N.W. '-'Oih Street Miami. Fla. lu-
ll ml |o register said name with the
Clerk f'ountv. FloHilii
AXHIM DOMEZ
i.si AR MERCED
I 27 S I 11-IS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIYIL ACTION NO. 73-11282
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
H IHN DANIELS
Petitioner
ami
l.VXKI.I. DANIELS
Respondent
TO: I.YNKl.i, DANIELS
YOI- ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
ihai a petition for Dissolution of your
Mnrrlagi has been filed and com-
menced in I his eour! ami you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses if any. to it on Charles
W, lien- m. attornej for Petitioner,
Whos.....hlress is 2:'.i'l S.W J'.' \ve.
Miami. Fla. 33146. and file the original
uhii the clerk of the above styled
courl on or before June IS, 1073; other-
wlsi ,i default "ill be entered agalnsl
you for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shr>II ho published onre
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH Fl ORID1AN
WITNESS my hand ami the seal ol
said .ourl at Miami. Florida on this
N day of May. 1073.
RICHARD P RRTNKER
As ( lerk. Clroull Court
Dade County, Florida
B] I, s nePIETRO
As Denuiy '" rk
HAIM.KS W. HEIil! 111
-::ni s W !2 Avi
Miami. Fli 33148
Attorney for Petitioner
:. II.13-25 t 1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVIS'ON
PROBATE NO. 73-269
In RE: Estate of
Wll I AIID II STEIXEK
i-----ised
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor-- and All Persons Hav-
ing claims oi Demands Attains! Saul
Estate:
You are In r, i.i notified and required
to ores,-ni an\ claims and demandf
which you may have against the es.
lai. of WILLARD II STEINER de-
ceased late oi Dad.- Couniv. Florida,
In ilo Clreull Judges nf Dade County.
and file Ih. sam, in duplicate and as
provided In Section 783.16. Florida
Statutes in their offices in thi Copnt>
Courthouse hi Dade County, Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first nubllcatlon hereof, or
the same w ill he bam Filed at Miami. Florida. Ihis 36 dav
of April. A.D 1"7:;
MARSHALL WOLPBR
As Executor
Flrsi publication of this notice on
the nth day of May. IH73
BPARBER. /i:.Mi:i.. ROSKIN AND
HEILBRONNER PA
\ilornev for Executor
ton N Blscn.vne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 13132
;. MIS-:':. 8/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-1381
In RE: Estate of
NATHAN I.INM.
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To am Creditors and All persons Hav-
int Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hcrehy notified and rroutred
I., pies, ni any claims and demands
whl.-h you may have against the estate
..f NATHAN I.INN. deceased late of
Dad. County. Florida, to the Circuit
.ludses of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as nrovlded In
Section 733 16. Florida Statutes, in
heir offices In the County Courthouse
in Dade County. Florida, within six
calendar months from the lime of ih
first publication hereof, or the same
y. ill be barred,
Filed al Miami, Florida. Ihls 21st
day of April. A.D. IMS,
PAl'L M08KOW1TZ
Vs Executor
First publication of this notice on
I he nth day of May, ''
Ji ISRPH .1 OERSTEN
\i loi nw foi Executor
111511 Sin Ilia larden Road
Miami. Florida I
3-11-13-2 I
lEGAt kOHCt
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-1759
in RE: Estate of
DYM1TR TRUBOWICZ
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To ah Creditors and am Persons Hnv-
hiK Claim- or Demands Against Said
Ksii,,.
You are hereby notified ami required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
ol DYM1TR TKI'BOWICZ deceased
late of Dad. County, Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade Counts', and
file the same in duplicate and as pro*
vidi d in Section 733.13, Florida Stat-
utes, ill their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
wiiiiln six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof
or Mi. same w ill be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, thi 28th
da] of Man h, A D l73
SONTA TRUBOWICZ
A- Executrix
First publication of this notice en
the llih da) of May, 1971
LLOYD I. HISKI.N
Attorney for Executrix
In; Lincoln Road
Miami Reach, Florida
5 11-18-25 ii I
lEGAl NOTICT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
No. 73-2470
in RE: Estate of
STANLEY K MORTON
Dei .as. d
NOT'CE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
inB Claims oi Din.:.:eis Against Bald
Estali
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present anj claims and de-
mands which you may have agalnsl
h.....tate of STANLEY K. MORTON
deceased late of Dad,- County Florida,
to the Circuit Judge* of Dade County,
ami file the same In dunlicate and as
II led in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices i'i the Com
ty Courthouse In Dnde L*oupty. Flor-
ida, within sin calendar inontbs from
the time ..f the flrsl publication here-
of, ,.r the same will be barred.
Daie.i al Atlanta, Georgia, this 25
las of April. A D 1973.
ELLIS I MORTON
V- Executor
First publication of ihis notice on
the :' day of tnrll. l^T:!
FACNCE. FINK' .\- FORMAN
Attorney for the Executor and the
Estate
IS2 Congress RulldlnK
Miami Fla 83132
1 j; :. 1-11-is
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-2533
In RK: Estate ol
i.KNXIK SHERMAN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
iii*- claims or Demands Agalnsl Said
Estate: Bennle Sherman
You are hereby notified and re-
niiired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
die estate of Bennle Sherman de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida
to the cireuil Judges of Dad, County
and filc t'.e same in dunllcali and as
nrovlded m Section 738.16, Florid*
Statutes, in their offices in the coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County. Fr-
Ida, within six calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be haired
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 27 daS
of ,'pril. A.D. 1173.
(IVI.ViA Si H OFF
Administratrix
Flrsi nubllcatlon of ihis notice on
Ihe ti'i diiv of Mae. 1973,
Edwin M Oinshura. Ken.
Myers, Kaplan, Porter, Levins m A
Kellill
v .......i foi im'ob lratri>
140* Drlekell Avi nue
Miami, Florid.-, 3:5131
S'l-ll-l- "
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
No. 73-10595
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage
PAi LENE JANE W VTFOUD, wlfi
and WALTER THii.m VS WATFORD,
husband.
TO: WALTER THOMAS WATFORD
107 South Ida Lane
Long Beach Mississippi
Yi ill ARE HEREBY notified thi I n
Petition for Dissolution ol .Man
has been filed agalnsl you, and u
an her, by requin d to serve a i
of your answer or other pleading
the Petition on the Wife's Attorney,
LESTER ROGERS, ESQ.. wine.
I dress is nr,4 N.W. lTih Avenue. Mi-
: .t in j. Florida 33123, and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the al
s|\ led court, on or hi for, this B day
of June. 1973 or a Default will '" -
i, '.i against you.
DATED ihis 39 day of April, 197:
RICHARD P URINKER
clerk of Circuit Court
By: It. M KISSEE
Doputy Clerk
(Clreull 'our( Seal)
.-. 4-11-18 '
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOI ICE IS HEREBY OIVEN
ihc undersigned, desiring to i-ngn
business under the flcl i im I
PRESTIGE DISPLAYS INC., d< a
WILSON'S yl'AIL ROOST NCRSEKY
in Dade County, Florida, intend-
register said name with the Clerk '
i nn tin Court il i. oi- County,
Florida.
PHESTKIE DISPLAYS, INC.
in : J 1. Wilson
Vice Pn sldi
HAKIMS ft SIRK1N, P \
' An,.- aeys for Applicant
' :,ili Floor Dade Federal Bldg.
Miami. Florida 83131
-./4-11-18 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN tje CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
Nl >TII "E IS hi-:i:i:i:'i IIIVEN '
the unden Igni d, dci liing i ill i
business under ihe flctl lnu nami ol
PARAMOt'NT PROMOTIONS at P '
i:.,\ 896, i 'oral tables, Flu Inti nd tu
register Bald name with the (lerk of
. ihe Circuit Courl ( I Dnde i 'oui 'J.
Flotida
SYLVIA HRI'MMER
DAVID s BRI'MMUR
-, I1-1R-2.-I :
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-9856
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARIA c PROHIAS
and
DAttlo F, PROHIAS
TO: DARIO F. PROHIAS
Residence I'nknow n
TOP ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an actmn for Dissolution nf Mar-
riage has been filed agalnsl you and
you are required to serve a cops of
vour written defenses. If any, to it on
\uk KOSS, attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 101 N W !-"'i ^
Miami. Florida, and file the original
with the eh-rk of the above styled
couri on or before May 28th 1973:
otherwise a default will l>c snti red
against you for the relief demanded
in th, complaint Or petition.
This notice shall he publl h-l .......
each wk for four consecutivi weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mj hind ami the seal oi
said court at Miami. Florida mi thi:
^j day of Anril, iii"::
H. P BRINKER
.'is CliTk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N A IIICUKTT
As Deputy Clerk
fCIeellM Courl Seal)
ARE KOSS
m n W 12th Ave
Miami. Florida 358-4222
At tome v for Petitioner
4/27 i H-l'
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVRN iha'
rhe undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
"HE CLEANING MACHINE al Dado
County. Florida Intends to register
.aid name wiih ihe Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Cnunlv. Florida.
JOEL H. SET T7ER
BY11-18-2S 6/1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE '.SERVICE
(NO PKOPEHTYi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 73-10719
C'NERAI. JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE !'
FREDDIE LEE ROBERTS,
Petitioner,
and
:i ADYS ROBERTS,
;: pendent
TO: (il ADYS RORERT8
RESIDENCE CNKN' >WN
Yul' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
lhal an action fo: Dissolution of Mar-
riage has he,n filed against you and
you are required to serve a cony nf
vour written defenses If any, to it op
DAVID B. stone. ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is STONE
A SOSTCHIN, P \. mi N.W 13th
.In Miami. Florida. Phone: SS8-2t.
nml file the original with the clerk of
the above styled courl on or before
June 7. 1973: otherwlsi a defaull will
i. pntered agalnsl you for the rellel
demanded in the eomolainl or petition
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl ORI1UAN
WITNESS inv hand hii.I the seal nl
aid .'ourl at Miami, Florida on Ihis 1
i\ of Mav. 1973.
II P RRtNKKR
As Clerk. Cii.irt i 'nurt
Dade Couniv Florida
By c p copi.'i AND
As J N niiti i 'U rk
Clreull Coun Beall
-.-, ive \. SOSTCHIN. PA.
Ill S.W 121 h Ave
RamL Plorlds 'K
Attornevfo. PeliLouer 5<_nuB
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN THE CIRCU'T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
CIVIL ACTION NO 73.105R9
ACTION FOR D'Sc-OLUTI0N
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: Tin Man age i f
'El 'ILIA l vJBZ MARTI S'EZ,
w Ife
and
A DO I I'n MANI'Fl. MARTINEZ.
liu iband.
TO \DOI.FO MANl'EL MARTINEZ
c n Migui i A Martinet
Administrator* Contrn Miranda
Avi nida tndenendencla, Edifli lo
i: idenclaa Don (let man
i.....; \ 4
I os Teniies. Venesuela, 8 A
YOI' ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an n I'on for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed agalnsl you and
you are required to serve n com of
your written defenses, If any, to it
mi HAROLD CEA8E, attorno for
P( tilei.. i. wl..... address it 2726 \Yi si
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida, and
file the original with the clerk of
the ai.ov- styled court on or before
Jum I973: otherwise a defaull will
he entered against vou for th.....I
demanded !n vh- copiolaint or netllion
This ii..; .. -'..ill he published oni-i
each week for tom- consecutive week>
In THE JEWISH Fl ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand mil Ihe seal nl
-aid courl ai Miami, Florida on ihis
36 das of \nri' 1918.
RICHARD '' BRINKER
,\ curl;, i IrcuH Co,I
Dsde I'l.il'ltV F'opida
nv It M KISSKK
As Deputy i i-' i-
iCirellll Courl Seall
ii \ noi ii Ch'ASK. KSQ
::7Jii Wi si Flutler Street
Miami. Florida MI8S
Attorney for Peiliioner
-. 4-II-IS-*l
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 73-9769
IN RE
\l a iPTK IN OF FRANt'lS RALPH
nARRECK, a I. .. FH N< IS RALPH
ii U1SZEWICZ. ami JACUl'ELI >>
il ItRECK .. k H JAl'iji'ELI N
, i ;.Mis/.i:\\ ICZ
Minor*
NOTICE OF PLBL CATION CF
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
iii I I'.' IXARD F GA BREl 'K,
.i I: a LEONARD F
HAHSZEWICZ
. : Jackson Sin I I
i 'am.l-n. Ni Jei si i I
VOI' VRE HEREBY SOT
I lull I, Petition has bei i '
above styled Courl b> FRANK R.
'RAXIs >N foi the adoption ol FRAN
CIS RALPH OABRECK, a k u FRAN-
IS RALPH HABSZEW ICZ, and .1 \C
ijI'ELTN GABRECK .. <' JAL-
UI'ELINE GABZEWICZ minors. liV
ih, Petitioner. FRANK R CRANDDN,
.....I \..u are rcnuired to s,.r\. copy
' ,.i vour Answer oi Objections to show
cause why said Petition should not be
gran11 d, on the atlurnej foi Pet II n
-r. MORTON U. '/EM El.. ESQ., Suite
nt. 16464 \ K. ivih Avenue, North
I .Miami Pea, h. Florida 3 162, al ll file
the original in Ihe office of the Clerk
... the Cir. uii i '.nn i on or before Ihi
Jfi da> of May. 1973 if you fall n thi
pn. hldgmenl by default will be (akin
'against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint
i This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH Fl.oiilDIAX
TONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
I Duo County, Florida (his i'i> oaj of
1 \tiri I'.'T.'i.
RICHARD P BRINKER
, rterk. Circuit rUI I
nv R, -M KISSKK
1>, iiutv Clerk
1 MORTON n BEMKL
AMornel for Petitioner
-111 I e It]
I MM \.K. ISIh Avenue
N'ortti Miami Beach. Florida SSI 62
4/27 6/4-11-18


Pcge 163
* l* fst> tfcridfar.
Friday, May '.3,
Depend on Food Fair's Real Honest Values!
FAMOUS NAME BRAND FOODS AT REASONABLE PRICES!
U.S. CHOICE WESTERN
BOTTOM &** $
ROUND ROAST
.
U S CMO'Cf WCST?RN
BONELESS RUMP ROAST
USDA
CHOICE
GA. FLA. GRADE A' FRESH ICED
.......LB.
LEG OR BREAST QUARTERS
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SUNDAY MAY 2C
AT All FOOD FAIR FREDERICH S STORES
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
SAVE MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS -OUHS
WITH EVERY PURCHASE FOR BEAU' :..
G'FTS FOR YOUR EVERY PURPOSE1
SAVE 52' ,) KEEPS ON
;.on 4ROUS,..'' WORKING
.............. WHEN WET
ASSORTED COLORS OR DECORATED
VIVA
TOWELS
JUMBO
ROLL
LIMIT 4 ROILS PIEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
DEL MONTE CHUNK LIGHT
AIL FLAVORS REGULAR
P.P. Brand SodasloVXl 1 0 '&& 99c
CHUN KING _
Chow Mein Noodles 'eft 23c
DELiCIOUS -
Master's Sour Cream .'. 39e
P P BRAND FLORIDA FRESH MEDIUM
Grade'A'Eggs dozen59c
I
SERVICE APPETIZER BEPT.
ONIY AT STORES WITH SERVICE COUNTERS.
All IUNCH MEATS SLICED TO YOUR ORDER
SAVE
ALL
30* ....'' FLAVORS
P.P. BRAND
ICE
CREAM
HALF
GALLON
CARTON
LIMIT ONE CARTON PIEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Of $7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES

6'/>:OZ;
CANS
SAVE 10c
Eskimo Thin Mints c, 59
DECANTER STYLE
Del Monte Tomato Juice &% 37c

GARDEN FRESH FIRM SALAD
___=> .- ___
-
-. \ :
BOXES
MOLOW ACE
Cheese Spread 2ft 89
QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's Margarine p 29c
SAVE 16e-BORDEN'S
-.;
ALL
FLAVORS !
1 8-OZ. '
CUPS'
ALL WHITE MEAT
SAVE WITH FROZEN FOODS!
SAVE WORK FOR YOURSELF BY SERVING DELICIOUS
MEALS FROM OUR BIG VARIETY. SAVE TIME TOO!
SARA LEE FROZEN
TURKEY ROLL I POUND CAKE
SAVE
80 LB.
HALF
LB.
SAVE 20< LB HEBREW NATIONai KOSHER
SAVE
SAVE 6c FOOD FAIR FROZEN
v 12-OZ.
PKG.
M*^ V* ----- rWW rIR TRULf
Whipped Topping
loor lac
PKG
39'
GO- DEN "OP '^F^SAVP 20'GREEN GIANT FROZEN
Pineapple Pie Snack wiches
SAVE
10
22-01.
PKG.
All BAKfD GOODS MAD! WITH PUl VCGCTAIU 5MOI[NINC
ALL
VARIETIES
SAVE high
^JT- 20'... PERFORMANCE
GAIN
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
49-OZ. PKG.
LIMIT ONE FKG. PIEASE,WITH OTHER PURCHASE
OF S7 OR MORE, EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
GA. FLA: GR-ADE A.FRESH ICED
Fryer Parts
WHOLE BREASTS
(WITH BBS)
WHOLE LEGS
THIGHS -
DRUMSTICKS
-. U-S. CHOICE-WESTERN
Chuck Roast
LB.
AMERICAN KOSHER SKINLESS
Franks or Knocks
?SAVE^
C 12-OZ.
PKG
P.P. BRAND CREAMED
Cottage Cheese
C 2 LB.CUP

SMALL CURD)
- l-LB..r,'-|
CUP
M DELICIOUS FLO-SUN
OrangeJuice
SAVE
QUART
CONTS.
SAVE 20 -MILLER PREMIUM BEER
High Life
I WE RESERVE THE GHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEAIERS. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
12-OZ.
POP TOP
CANS


^Jewish Floridi&a
Miami, FloridaMay 18, 19/J
*
RRIME MINISTER GOLDA MEIR AS HER NATION HITS ITS QUARTER-CENTURY MARK
GREATEST CATASTROPHE fOUOMD BY THE MIRACU Of REDEMPTION
Twenty Five Years for Israel: A Moment in History
By MRS. GOLDA MEIR
Prime Minister of Israel
"*wenty five years are but a brief moment for
' a notion with a memory more than 35 renturis
lonfi. Yet for us this quarter of a century bears the
quality of a wonder: the third era of independence of
the Jewish people in the land of Israel came 1.878
years after the destruction of the Second Temple in
Jerusalem by the legions of imperial Rome, and only
three years after the end of the holocaust, in which
German Nazis and their European collaborators mur-
dered six-million Jews one-third of our nation.
The greatest catastrophe in the history of the
Jewish people was followed by the indomitable act
of national redemption. Within the span of a few
years, we experienced the agony of knowing our people
massacred defenseless in the towns, villages and death
oamps of Europe, and the realization that in Israel
the Jewifh people are again master of their own des-
tiny and capable of defending their own life.
Return to Land
For 19 centuries the Jews lived as a dispersed
and persecuted minority throughout the world. Hu-
miliation, expulsion and slaughter were the fate of
our people in the countries of Europe, the Middle
i '

"The solidarity between the Je
steadily over the past 25 years and i
The links are multiplying in many fi
one is probably that of education."
East and North Africa. For all those long centuries of
suffering, our people clung to the hope of return,
prayed for it, dreamed of it. Every century some re-
turned, to the land, keeping the Jewish community here
from extinction.
During the past century, the return became a
movement of national renewal. Zionism meant that
Jewish life could be recreated with roots in the land,
a land that we found in large parts barren and desol-
ate. Jews now became workers, farmers, soldiers. From
a minority we were transformed into an independent
society, with its own language, institutions and demo
cratic practice. In 1948, for the first time since the
first century of the Common Era, the Jewish peoole
became independent in their own land; the State
of Israel was established and joined the family of
nations.
During the 25 years of its independence, Israel has
been concerned with four main human efforts:
wish people and Israel has grown
n particular since the Six-Day War.
elds, of which the most important
i
First, to defend our independence and assure
the survival of our nation;
Second, to make Israel the home tor Jews from
all corners of the earth, whether in need of refuge or
in search of an independent Jewish identity;
Third, to develop as a human society, preserv-
ing ancient Jewish values, yet responding to the needs
of a modern democracy;
Fourth, to develop our material resources and
give our pecple a better quality of life.
Arabs Deny Recognition
Defense and survival have been a major effort
in our life because the Arab governments have so far
refused to accept our right to live as an independent
nation. Persistently they have sought to put an end
to the existence of independent Israel and to deprive
us of our right to live as we choose. Israel has known
Continued On Pe -C


Peg* 2-C
* Jm ist Fkrrjiir
Moy 18. 1973
CONSOLIDATION OF A SPLINTER-PARTY SYSTEM HAS ENTAILED MUCH SKILL AND PROfOUND PATIENCE
Israel's Coming of Age: Quest for Political Reform to Meet New Needs
By ROBERT SLATE!
COR 2.5
1
a! re-
I


7 ."
I
I
I
i
-


I
t
)


.


I
I
.
I i '
r ...
r few Ml f Kl
effect ol this ki
form in I
i-. the ruling Laboi Partj r.;
ition Gahal Part;, wi
t multitudi of small parties
in the Km lei Th< osl tha'.
ore can U kind of
i -
that
M ffi in ... politic a
'Hi be minimal.
If it. knai rangi impact on the
it mav
en of
; ;.'. otes mea-
i has still aroused the most
i m and antipathj of an)
bi lo come ore the Kn -sset
i pa eat i"'ii one thing,
t ii debate pri ceding the
on the bill 'In- past -Jan. 2
I ed the longest and Bom<
say lormiest sestion in the his-
':
..nan lial*;r the Gahal
Km tex who pon ored the bill
.' ifer of :,(
bin) that th:-.
Cabinet membaa vote ol Knesset session. Lett is Defense Mi
Center ia Prime Minister Gcida Meir.
"Essentially, the focal point of total elec-
toral reform hangs on shifting the present pro-
portional representation system to constituency
representation. Right now, the political parties
draw up their own lists of candidates."
of reform Ii in the national :n-
becaoM it will discourage
pUnter factions. Bader pomu
out that most countries usins a
piopoiional representation sys-
tem handle surplus vot< in ac-
cordance with the bill h'- ha:-
drafled.
Reform Hay Succeed
As for the bHI itself, which
did pass the Knesset in
January, and v. as released fwci
Committee in early March for
the imal plenarj vote, it basi-
cally performs a simple arith-
School children aftendfng a traditional festival in Israel
metical calculation, but it
it different y from the past. In
the future, surplus vote- in
Knesset elections would he trans-
lated into Knesset seats, accord-
ing to the faction !i-t drawing
the largest surplus, as is the case
now. The bigger parties would
jet larger, and the smaller par-
ties would grow smaller, undei
the new system. This is the ki" of partial reform that has a
good chance of succeeding. But
other kind of total reform hav
thus far m Although people !:k" former
' ice Minister Uov J >s< ph ... .
former Premier David
their pol
.....king tots
irm. virtually nothing had
b doni to
intil the past
/. thai
the i

and .:.'.i.
BtiOl
rcsenta'ion. Rieht
n the i |
I .
' i ; i the pei
'-'-'-'" pan;
n the eiectioi Th
formers would liki I
move toward a em in
candidates have th ii
titui and thei
i. based purely on the nui .
of votes received in local i
tions.
Support for Yaacobi
'Jad yaacobi, the 37-year-old
Member of Knesset, who
hi, time between working as
Deputy Minister of Transporta-
tion and fighting for bgi lation
in the Knesset ha., led the
paaUasneatary campaign for elec-
toral reform ever the past year
A memo r of the Labor Party,
yaacobi has the almost un-
equivocal support of his party
in his bid to push enactment of
a bill that would brine abou'
major electoral reform. The odds
against an early passage of tin.
measure are heavy, and even
Dieter Gen. Ivioshe Dcyan.
Vaacobi, who drafted thi
under question, thinks res
ally it- enactment j- another two
; an r v at least
Last July, "h? measure passed
the fir.-t reading of the Knesset,
but since then political infighting
between the Liberals and
partner in Gahal. the Herut
Part ha- created an impasse
for the bill that is but one more-
obstacle in the Ions campaign to
overhaul the political system ->f
the country. Herut insisted after,
the July vote that it would leave
the Gahal partnership if the
Liberals persisted in their sup-
port for the measure. So. the
Liberals switched positions, and
abstained when the bill came
before the Constitution and Leg
islation Committto
Under the Yaacobi bill. 90
me- > i Kfli *cW
I
the oth
elected from
The 90 Members of K
would cc
with 18 races in each ::
measure says yaacobi, is a com-
promi-e -
tern that he
and the old system wbJ
firm backing of so mar;.
olo '
Historv of Obstacle,
Elect iral reform ha-
history ol
back to
bc-f re 1
State
the "arcbiti l I elect
. r. I -.
I
political -

was ica
D G
pre-ent p ti nal -
- ise 1948 .
tion; of war ind turmoi
no other choice." said J
"There was no practical art
dividing up the countrj int
stituencie- quickly enougl I
in any case parts of the S i
and the Negev were still
enemy occupation at the time of
the first election.
After the war ended, "he
Prime Minister was beset wit i
thousand and one problems
which loomed larger in the pub-
lic mind And. in any ca^ It
appeared to many so convenient
and unproblematie just to carry
on with the system hallowed by
tradition at World Zionist
gresses which caused no
tion amons the parties."
As early as 1954. Mapal. ihi
forerunner of today's Lab :
Party, put electoral reform ii :o
its election platform liapai's
Sectretariat overwhelmingly sup-
ported a plan to have 120 single-
member constituencies Then, in
October. 1956. a bill for regional
Continued on Page IOC
Mazel Tov!
Call is Today...
For All Your
Travel Meeds

MAKE YOUR
RESERVATIONS EARLY
VOLPE TOURS
1502 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
Phone 532-7326


Page WJ

--*
^
\*
3
*.-'v
t % -
; i
MM
Best Wishes
on (he occasion of

DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI
MAIN OFFICE: 101 EAST FLAGLER STREET
377-1671


Cutler Rtte Brmet f KiniaU Branch ITimiam! Branch I Allapalbh Branch
104 C.v.obMn B.vo U.S. 1 at S.W. lMrhSt I 1901 S.W. 8lh St. ttOO MAV. 36th St.
2385131 SM-6951 J 643-4544 j 63J-2491
Ediscn Center Branch I North Miami Branch 1 Sdy take Branch I Miami Laics: B'l It*
53C0 M.W / A.c. I 12K0 N W. Tin A/c. j 13300 N.f. 19th Avc.' 13975 N.W. S7th .' .e,
757-3441 688-0587 I VH 7221 I SJKUO
'* *i -** -
M ---^-w Hi
'* J


B~~~ l
Page 4-C
vJewist fhjridHair
May 18. 1973
The Critical Night 25 Years Ago Leading to Israel's Birth Began With
A Phone Call from a Future Prime Minister
By BORIS SMOLAR
?he birth of the State of Israel was hang-
ing on a hair. The Partition Resolution which
led to the establishment of Israel had to be ac-
cepted in the United Nations by a two-thirds
majority vote. And such a majority did not exist
until the : lay just before that historic reso-
lution was I to the vote.
The Jewish Agency delegation, led by Moshe
Shertok Sharon i. was worried. The Arab dele-
gations who going around the corridors of the
UN with pleased smiles. Only a few days earlier
the resolution had been accented by a UN sub-
committee !r. a majority of 25 to 13. This ma-
jority was sufficient for the sub-committee, but
MOSHf SHARtTT
changed the balance
it was inadequate for the full session of the UN
where a two-thirds majority was necessary foi
adoption.
The British delegation made no secret of its
propaganda against the Partition Resoluti "
among delegations under its influence. The
French delegation was cool towards the resolu-
tion. Of the major influential states, only Amer-
ica and the Soviet Union had announced
they would support the resolution. Accord.!'.: "
the calculations of Shertok and the other mem-
bers of the Jewish Agency delegation one or two
votes were missing to make up the necessary
two-thirds. The problem was mainly the votes
-uch countries as Ethiopia, the Philippines an
two or three ether small countries that
hesitant but sympathetic toward the Arabs.
Romulo in Favor
Due to pressure fey the United States I
Ion, Gen Carlos Romulo. the chiel
of the Philippines, announced that he w
vote in favor of the Partition Resolution. One
('>> before :!'. \ >:.. how-' ',', ;. !' :..
1. red a speech against partition at the UN
and. in order \> avoid further pressure by the
American delegation, h- left 'he same day on .*
cruise, leaving instructions with his delegati
to vote against partition He was sure thai n
one could reach him while at sea.
At midnight, the night before the Par:
Resolution was u> be voted on, my teleph* n
rang. I was already in bed. On the line was
.Moshe Shertok.
"I know." he said, "that the hour i< late
But we are now sitting here, our entire delega-
tion, racking our brains to make sure that we
get the necessary two thirds vote tomorrow. We
have calculated that the fate of the Partion Reso-
lution now depends entirely on one vote, an I
that is the vote of the Philippines. If we can g
GIN. CARLOS P. ROMULO
mind needed moking-up
it. we will win. But if we do not succeed in
ting it. I am afraid that we will lose. Only a
miracle can save us."
And what can I do to help?" I asked. It
was not clear to me why he was calling me and
what 1 could do about this problem.
Call to Truman
'"You can help us through a contact." was
his reply T know that it i late to phone any-
body at this hour and get him out of bed. es-
pecially when the person I want you to reach is
about TJ years old. However, I know that the
man respects your opinion, and he is the only
one who can help us at this critical hour. He
will have to call President Truman and ask
him to place a call to the President of the Philip-
pines that he. on his part, should reach Gen.
Romulo at sea and instruct him to phone instruc-
tions frcm the ship to his UN delegation that
Continued On Page 14-C
exan
Uhe *j}tate of sjrsrael
der itilders KJwners ^/Vlctnaqentent
<3e?cot?i* *J osvers *S5eacoci~t Josvcrs -^>oittli
^)eaco <^eacoast Uowers Ocrgrt*
^eacoast *J owers L %J
On '7/,c QJJ Co.t of JILnu cn, "JUrlL


May 18. 1973
t*Cfg>eX>U IMSIM9C4
Page 5-C


^y^^^*--|g
......
*
OF IS
NXfeCongratulateThem
onTheir 25th Anniversary.

. *
***



f

'; *:'--.:-'i----
JEFFERSON
BANCORP. INC.
Subsidiaries:
JEFFERSON CAPITAL CORPORATION
301 Arthur Godfrey Road
JifftRSQH HATIOHAL BACKS
MIAMI BEACH, mitli Tmti Bnuitmtat
301 Arthur Godfrey Road
SUNN? ISLES
2$0 Sunny Isles Boulevard
MNOAl L
9600 North Kendall Drive
Mtn.bts FOX


Pcqe 6-C
* Jkvflsi' fhtkttan
May 18. 1973
400,000 Arabs Represent
Minority With Problems
That Often Defy Solution
By S. TOLEDANO
Prime Minister's Adviser on
\i ib Affairs
fithin the pr 1067 bounda-
numbered
4" 1.000 si 1972 This
r I iom | minority represents
of Hit' enl
t
r i i nd a s]
v.
.', ibs were a mail
(' tish Viand ite. The>
v e sure I h il the;
i the Land when tl B
left. lint; was the
to tl tions of the
mmunil
j
i aders
time v
p. rsonal rh alries In th<
I .. to "Zion qui i
to .i II
S ite, i
v nited bj their b< that
t .
v i force, 1
; .1
si terei when tin numi
i
i; t. On eve oi B
d a i s exodus ol P:
t' the first to
I vui lotables <
I In;''
i defeat oi
.i
I'nsure Minority
.A- Oi he A abs living
i quent-
ly ii i
< uring the 11
f re trie 1;
<- a'.th ii t<
tua su t >ache
v .1 crs When tl
sraeJ was a
corn ".i"' leprhed of its social
< te. Th majority had become
a mi what to ex-
p. cl and fearful lesi the Jewish
S at behave towards it a.s a
vindictive victor.
Most of in .; ids were coun-
trj folk, who hail been tena
i rmers during the Mand i
thej subsisted on land that did
nut belong to them and had to
hand over aboul a third of their
i 'o the landlords. More .ban
half 'he villages had no primary
..mis. Tnore were government
si hoola in the large villages, but
oiten without upper grades.
Farm tools were primitive. The
donkey and the camel were al-
most the only means of traiis
portation. There was no running
water, and the women drew what
they needed in pitchers from ad-
joining springs or domestic rain-
water cisterns. Today, in retro-
spect, the point of departure
seems remote. In the 25 years
of existence of the State the lives
of Israel's Arabs have changed
a treat deal.
, 'Fellah' is Gone
Tne coniuslon that followed
the debacle in 1948 has gradually
vanished, and there is a sense of
stability instead. The Arab still
has difficulty in finding his way
bat is sob^r in his approach and
knows how to insist on his rights.
The "fellah" of the early days
is gone. In the villages, there are
Arab farmer* with up-to-date
methods of cultivation who raise
largely export-orientated crops.
Modern agricultural machinery is
hiing useo more and more. The
once unlit villages now have elec-
tricity. Waterworks have been jn-
staJ/ed and roads paved, large-
scale construction has altered
the face of the villages beyond
recognition.
The development of tacminc
hMi transformed the employment |i
structure of tne Arar> community, if I
'The inner restless-
ness of the youncj
Arabs is aggravated
by the absence of re-
warding leisure in
terest, and by the fact
that they do not form
organized groups.
Compared to them,
young Jews feel an
utter belongingness
to the State .. Fences
must be taken down,
socio-economic inte-
gration accelerated,
mutual respect en-
gendered. Israelis.
Jew and Arab alike,
should get to know
one anoiher better."
, i'
krabs worl
side tin
h bei ii a decisiv, fai tor i
lai Ii Is 'i
land 1
rapidly develi
: I
,. i im n ii focus from i
to city.
Vi't Yet I'rbaniied
I ".rab rural bi
winner- an ei
but this has not led to urb i
lion. 1 hey live in their i il
11 turn to them in the < -
nings oi o nds. Thi j pre-
fer that, ail i iugb the; absi b
Jewish urban culture and bri
back home.
Outside work has radl
modified the income scale of
villagers who, in the past, !.
survived or, their wages. Demand
for manpower has raised wage
rates and multiplied the total
income of the rural family -i
that a social change in the village
results. The landlords have, by
iii greea, been iosmg their secure
Israel's Arabs line up to v eta in government elections.
A young Arab boy carries a tray of sweets on the streets
of the Old City. Since 1967, the city has been reunited, and
both Arab and Israeli walk and work together there in
peace.
place at the of tl
ip et'.w n
the familii s of the trai
leadership an I I fai
hired woi kei arrowed
Furthermore, the
..... on
the farm-hands. o eai ilways
gel the be lei t ol
outside tlie llagi 'I
spread of
ing class has I pi
i clas.' of an ithei
ntage: the rati
lends more im] nee to the
individual than
i i [he bi sic social-pi
ii, the .i hai i
I'.i onomic di
ho patri
reduced hi '' Ii.'. an to
work oul side I
r had I i h
livi lihood E i creal
i.
.
ip in
put I n Ii i i i)
.. ho i !-:' h r
stitutes 11 iiit 65 pel i
Arab population it- I ni
in moulding ,: tage il"?
future Arab minori >
Aral) academics
more numerous. There are a
thousand Arab stu l< "- :1 !*
rael's institutions I ighet
ing compared with !:'ti in
Young Arabs are more lleit to
developments outside the
confines. They are fluent in
Hebrew, many have also mas-
tered a Europe: language. They
discuss a wide ranj,c of political
Continued on Page 14-C
YQM tWAZMQT
SRAEL-25
CONGRATULATIONS FROM
y THE SKYUKE STATE BANK
^ VERONICA l, DOLAM Prtd" JAV 1. KISLAK.Bc.o9 CW-W
'ITTfi WI IhriiMm
Sk>l4.rSlM^i|iJ.,B;ilrr Nortli Miami tle
btMTN Moh. Ki'. | \\|.;l|>.\| f. 4-7 PM
drivr-iip uimlnu :
Han, Ttiur-. <> Mt'iVM Vn\') AM-" I'M


~"____________*M*ig9l-fkridtotn Page 7-
These 14 Leaders Who Signed Declaration of Independence Mil! Alive
! the n(signers of Israel's Proclamation of Inde-
LraUon^,? WWch ",Cir namcs "" on lhp lee-
iii\ii..in the 14 are:
DAVID BE.VGURION, who read the Proclamation.
became Israel's fir,, Prime Minister and is gflwidered
he tether c the State of Israel. Rorn in Plonsk,
J Hand, October 18, 1886, as David Green, he is now
in retirement in his H6th year.
MORDECAI BENTOV, third signature on the
i reclamation, is now a member of the Cabinet and
israi is MinUter of Housing.
0
MIAMI DOBK1N, whose signature is 11th was
to b rerusalem May 14. 1948. and signed the
Proclamation in Tel Aviv a month later during the
truce that < the first break in the siege of the Holy
City. For many years, he was a member of the Execu-
tive of tl i Jewish Agency for Israel and at times
headed it.- D partments oi Immigration, Kduc.it,on and
Youth.
MEIR WU.NER (Kovner), 12th signature on the
Proclamal ;i ;ned in behalf of the Communist Party.
He is currentlj a member of the Knesset, Israel's Par-
liament, and has served in even Knesset since the
state was born.
< (:
ZORAH WAHKIIAFTIG. 13th si-nature, has also
been a Knesset member since Israel's birth and has
been Israel's Minister of Religious Affairs and a Cabi-
net member since 1961.
There were no signatures the size
of John Hancock's to make sure
the British would not miss the
point. But there was a weight of
conviction behind these men and
women 25 years ago to make up
for the modesty of their names.
And their names and this modesty
will live in history.
HERZL VARDI, 14th signature, signed the Proc-
lamation at the request of Ben-Gurion. under the name
of Vardi, a Hebrew pseudonym under which he wrote
for newspapers. His real name is Dr. Herzl Rosenblum.
RACHEL COHEN. (Kaftan), 15th signature on the
Proclamation, is now honorary president of Women's
International Zionist Order (WIZO). She has been a
member of several Knessets and was one of the tv\o
women signers of the Proclamation.
3A&2H KELMAN KA1IANA. loi ii signature of the
Proclamation, has been Deputy Minister of Education
and Culture since 1962.
*
SAADIA KOVASHI, 17th signature on the Procla-
mation, was assistant director of the Department of
Communities of the Union 'if Yemenite Jews, in II 48,
Until his retirement in 1887, he was supervisor id
principal of religious schools in Jerusalem and T I
Aviv. He is currently rabbi of a small Sephardic cu i-
gregation in Brooklyn, NY.
MEIR DAVID LEVINSTEIN, 19th signature Oil
the Proclamation, signed as a member of the Religious
Bloc. After serving in the first Knesset, he withdrew
from party politics and public affairs.
GOLDA MEIR (Myerson), 21s! signature on the
Proclamation, is now Prime .Minister of Israel, its
fourth. A Milwaukee school teacher, she settled in
Israel in 1921 and eventually won national recognition
as a labor leader, as a member of the Jewish Agency
Executive and as Israel'.-, Foreign Minister.
MOSHE KOI. (Kolodney), 27th signature on the
Proclamation, was in besieged Jerusalem ii the time
of the May 14. 1948, signing. He reached Tel Avm a
month later and signed. He has been Minister of
velopment and Tourism since I any ; ;
he was a member of the Jewish Agency Exi cutivi and
headed its Youth Aliyah Department.
P1NHAS ROSEN (Rosenbleuth), 38th signatun I
the Proclamation, served for 10 years in the Cabinet
as Minister of Justice.
*
BEKL REPETl'R. ,32nd signature on the Proclama-
tion, was for many years active on the Executive of
the Histadrut. He was a member of the first Knesset.
M Twf. SfOAE wir* TMC FLORIDA *LAI
". "---------'
"'"' '' "-----~~------- ~~~"

--------------------------TT----------1------""""";"% ( ; "' '
JM SALUTES THE STATE OF ISRAEL
ON ITS TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY


B- ir
rage 8-C
vkmlstrhwidton
May 18. 1973
25 y*ars for Ssrael: <3<4 Continued from Page 1-C
>nly armistice lines, until 1967, and since then only
:ease-fire lines. -We have never known frontiers of
peace, and even between wars the Arab government;
have intermittently directed terror and violence again -1
our people. They have violated agreements and cease-
fire accords They have conducted economic warfare
Against us. They have launched against Israel and the
Jewish people virulent propaganda riddled with anti-
iemitic venom.
To assure the survival of our nation, the Israel
iefense forces have evolved as a people's army. It is
an army where our sons and daughters serve, often
vithin sight of their homes; ours is an army for which
he supreme objective is not war but the prevention
rf war. It is not an army bound for conquest, but an
army utterly zealous in the defense of our lives and
n Impendence.
Peace with our neighbors, and not war, is the
paramount quest of our people.
While seeking peace. Israel continues to fo ter in
areas administered .since 1967 the conditions which
v in i part of th p ace settlemenl
the open frontiers between the population <-t
[ and the Arab p : il ition ol the ireas; an
brid which, in the summer ol (72
enabl d more than 150.000 Arabs from n?igh
>o;m: countries to vi.-it Israel. Full conditions ol
will be realized when we can reci:nx tl 5U
to Amman, to Beirut, to Cairo.
Central Destiny of a People
Although for 25 years we have been denied peace.
*e have remained faithful to the central destiny of
Israel: to be a haven of the Jewish people. Within
hree years after independence immigration doubled
he population of Israel. By 1973 more than 1.5 million
Jewish immigrants had arrived. We have absorbed the
lews of Europe, refugees from the holocaust, and the
Jewish refugees from Arab countries whose number
s almost identical with that of the Arabs who became
efugees. during the 1948 war. We must remember
hat Jews had liyed in Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Yemen, and
Libya for over 2.000 years indeed from times pre-
ceding the Arab occupation of those lands.
With the departure thence of the entire Jewish
communities, the long history' of the Jewish minorities
in those countries is coming to an end. Perhaps this
transformation of the Jews, from a minority group
living on sufferance into an independent nation, is
what some Arab rulers find hardest to accept.
During the past few years, after a long and bitter
struggle over their rights, Jews from the Soviet Union
have begun to reach Israel. The Jews of Silence as
they were known, are no longer silent, but the struggle
for their rights continues. Above all, this is a struggle
for national self-determination by Jews whose single
demand is to be free to leave a society which pratices
ai I i-Semitism. discrimination and suppression, and
denies them the rights of national identity.
Two forms of village life which are uniquely Is-
raeli have played a central role in the return to the
land and the evolution of Israel society: the kibbutz
a socialist commune; and the moshav a cooperative
village. To these have been added, since 1948. new
towns such as Ei'.at. Dimona. Arad, Ashdod and
Kiryal Shemona; and development regions such as
tl i La hish regl >n and the Besor region The new
towns and thi developmenl regions have b?ei
i and there the lives ol
lave undergone a ha1 ic cl Jews
abn d wove artisians and traders ha b
rk( rs an I modern farmers,
Immigration has brought together, in Israel, peo-
ple who share the common Jewish heritage, but have
ccme from societies with different cultures. Wo have in
Israel Jews whose origins are in the developed coun-
tries of Europe and America: we have Jews who come
from countries mainly in the Middle East where
feudalism and medieval conditions prevailed not long
ago. This is what we in Israel call the "Cultural Gap."
and closing it is one of the principal challenges which
Israel faces. The "Cultural Gap" is not an integral fea
ture of Israel society, it is an important feature, the
result of the different levels of education and back-
ground which immigrants bring with them. Closing
it requires of us efforts in two fields: one. probably
the most important, is education; the other is the
improvement of social and economic conditions.
During the past few years, despite an immense de-
fense burden, Israel has allocated increasing resources
to those two fields and the results are ateeady evident:
greater opportunities in education for children of the
lower income groups and gradually improving -housing
conditions and social services for those groups. Be-
cause the "Cultural Gap" is caused mainly by different
levels of education, closing it will require more than a
few years.
It may take as long as one generation. We may
find an indication of the shape of things to come in
the fact that nearly one-fifth of all marriages taking
place now in Israel are between young people who
come from different cultural backgrounds. This means
that when Israel celebrates its 50th anniversary most
Israelis will belong to one principal culturethat of
Israel itself.
Rapid growth has been one of the chief features
of modern Israel. Our population has grown five-fold in
25 years In 1948 we were a prc-industrial society To-
day we have a rapidly growing industry. We consume
30 t'mes more electricity than we did in 1948. Our
exports ore more than 39 times greater. The area un-
der irrigation is six time* larger and so is our wheat
production. These are only a few examples.
Creation of Entire People
This rapid growth the absorption of l'j million
ints ic change into an industrial economy.
til i up of the Israel defense >rces into a modern
arm) increasingly relying on local production of weap
one all these would not have been achieved but for
the tremendous aid which the Jewish people in al! coun-
tries of the world have given to Israel. Modern Israel
is a creation of the entire Jewish people. It was cre-
sted for them, it is part of them. and. without them,
its lot would have been different.
The solidarity between the Jewish people and Is-
rael has grown steadily over the past 25 years and in
particular since the Six-Day War. The links are multi-
plying in many fields, of which the most important one
is probably that of education.
As a young developing nation, Israel has not con-
Continued on Pane 12-C
..<-


I
mazel tov to the
te Of tSRA.61
on the siLvcr anniveRSARy
of its nationhood!
may it have
iLonq Life of
tzvahs And nachas,
ommemoRAtion
Lift up our cups of wine
Rejoice.........Lehaim!




May 18, 1973
>.lewlslfkrfiffon
Page 9X3
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
DISCOUNT FOODS
SALUTES
25th ANNIVERSA RY YEAR
:. '-;


o ie -
*j^m #"*#> PfcridriaiP
May IS. lii/J
Religious Issue Still Poses Thorny Problem
After Years of Grappling With its Agonies
By PINCHAS H. PEI.I
IN its 25 years of existence, the
state of Israel has experienced
n:.my a political and social con-
flict centering around so-called
".- ligious" issues. With all these,
or i, still asking the more pro
(< I question. What is the spir-
itual image Of reborn Israel? Is
it emerging as a continuation, a
. timate link in the chain of
Jewish religious existence, or is
it oing to drift from its Jewish
i .,in- : id emerge as an utterly
i..-.. entity?
in two generations, what will
grandchildren in Israel have
common with the grand-
< n n if Jews in the Diaspora?
. .: schism between nationalist,
i mi red lews and religious,
. oguc-centered Jews inev-
itable, will there be some
>n ground to keep us to-
. ivti.'i a.- one people'.' Will Israel
1 a secular force swelling the
des o! assimilation which as-
ill Jews in the Diaspora, or
i I it serve as a spiritual foun-
tainhead tor Jewish creativity?
The answers to these questions
obviously depend on how Jewish
Is ii i-, and how Jewish it will
tx in the future.
Secular Roots
The Jewish component in Israel
must be viewed in the light of
the State's historical develop-
ment Israel is a child of the
Zionist movement, a political
force possessing a spiritual di-
mension. Theodor ller/y under-
stood this well when he said. "We
have, so to say, gone home.
Zionism is a return to the Jewish
homeland." In his exceptional
perception. Herzl realized that
then- would be no renaissance of
statehood without a thorough re-
casting of the Jewish people.
The "new" Jew who was des-
tined to become the founding
father of modern Israel was a
child of the age of secularism.
He was cast in the mould of
nineteenth century rationalism
and other contemporary "isms."
But secularism meant much more
to him than to the typical free-
thinking individual of the age,
The "new" Jew was an ortluv
dox non believer, and the foun
dations of the State of Israel
were laid upon the religion of
secularism. As a result, the Zion-
ist renewal of the age-old Jewish
culture was less a continuation
of an old tradition, than a hc-
ginning of a new one.
Fortunately, life takes its
course outside the confines of
ideology. The "official" Zionist
line was to establish a "free"
secular society, but the Yishuv
also saw the growth of a vig-
orous, observant population, for-
Jhc X^uest for r^efc
orvn
Continued from Page 2-C
ections was debated in the
Knesset, but defeated by a vote
oi 72 to 40.
Tabling the Referendum
In 1958, Mapai tabled a bill
to hold a referendum on the
question of electoral reform
iJong constituency lines. The
k; esset's Constitution and Leg-
islation Committee passed it, but
th<- bill died a natural death in
committee.
It took another ten years for
electoral reform to emerge in
another Knesset bill, the same
one essentially as the Yaacohi
0!!1 now being debated in
the 1973 Knesset. In February.
1988, the Labor Secretariat es-
tablished, what has come to be
h own as the Joseph Committee
on electoral reform. Foreign
Minister Abba Eban. Knesset
Speaker Yisrael Yeshayahu, for*
mer Minister Haim Zadok, and
the late Reuven Barkatt were on
ihe committee.
Just what's wrong with the
sent proportional system?
According to Dov Joseph, the
iggent flow is that too few
people choose the government's
leaders. "This way of selectins
< ndidates for public office
means that the dozen people in
-r-e back room end up deciding
DOV JOSEPH
to* few invtvei
what sort of ministers and what
sort of Knesset members are go-
ing to rule the country."
A system like this "negates the
essence of democracy," weakens
the State, and in fact endangers
democracy, adds the former Jus-
tice Minister.
Gad Yaacobi, who is fighting
Joseph's fight now in the cor-
ridors of the Knesset, thinks that
a constituency system would en-
courage more governmental ef-
forts on behalf of the country's
domestic problems. "Now every-
body wants to be involved in
security and foreign policies,"
Yaacobi said, "because these are
very popular subjects in the
papers. But. there's not a good
equilibrium in the Knesset be-
tween domestic and foreign af-
fairs."
By making Members of Knes-
set more responsive to what the
people want and feel, electoral
reform will push to the surface
such issues as the environment,
social welfare and education that,
according to Yaacobi, have been
too often neglected by public
officials.
'Constituencies' Opposed
There are many people in the
country who have grown up quite
accustomed to proportional rep-
resentation as a way of political
life. They do not regard Israel
as democratic, simply because
Members of Knesset are not
chosen on the basis of local con-
stituencies.
Rather, they point to other
things, like the free nature of
debate, the freedom of the press,
the large number of political
parties, the large numbers of
people who vote in elections, as
evidence of a demoency in ac-
tion in Israel.
Beyond this, there arc people,
like the representatives of the
Kibbutzim and the Moshavim
who have a large stake in the
present system. If the country
changes to a constituency set-up.
these people would see their
politic!)] power wither as the
"constituencies" they have built
up would shrink in the process
of change. They are fighting this,
and it is one of the important
causes for the small prospects of
major electoral reform in .he
near future.
tilled by a multitude of institu-
tions, ranging from schools and
yeshivot. to chassidic centers, fi-
nancial and economic enter-
prises, and special settlement and
housing projects. This fact, how-
ever, hardly influenced the lead-
ers and educators who shaped
the image of life of the State
of Israel according to their
ideological commitments and up-
bringing.
Religious Arrangement
Wherever religion appears on
the Israeli scene, it is in the
form of political parties and
politilal power, with the rab-
binate as one of its tools. The
status of religion in the life of
the country is decided on a bar-
gaining basis like any other po-
litical deal, and its position !n
Israel is very precarious, for its
role within the State apparatus
comes up for reappraisal when-
ever a new government coalition
is formed. The religious front has
provided a balancing influence
between the leftist and the right-
ist factions competing for heg-
emony in Israels political arena.
There is little recognition of
the place of religion in the essen-
tial operation of the State. Po-
litically, religion is represented
by some 15 per cent of the na-
tional vote, although its real
strength is probably somewhere
Continued on Following Page
Orthodox schoolboy in Jerusalem represents the future of
the city. After the United States and Canada, Israel has the
highest percentage oi college students in the world.
jMQCSGlDT]
PIOIUHUI,
IHHAEL
ANNIVERSARY
SPECIAL
ISRAEL'S 25th ANNIVERSARY ...
It lias special significance for us. The Chair-
man of our Board of Directors, Shepard
Broad, was present at the meeting where,
according to David Ben-Gurion, the State
of Israel was born. Step into any of our four
offices and pick up your complimentary re-
print of the Miami Pictorial cover story. It
features the role which Shepard Broad
played in making Israel's 25th anniversary
a reality.
MERICAN SAVINGS
8*. Loan Association of Florida
OCEANS.Df. (MAIN) OFFICE
ATie' -.* ij. rtgi
(Co-ne o'L.r.coin am Ads" ngion,
M j- Seach
8ATSI0E OFFICE
com Booa Mjii
(Ccner oi Aiiop Roadt
M.aiv Beacn
WORTH SHORE OFFICE
>C0 'in Si'eei
iCo-ntr o'Ciu'ri Ave.i
V av Bca;n
In Oadc Phone 673 5566 In Bream Phor* 564 8547
CALT OCEAN MIIC OFFICE;
3)16 N C 34th See**
G. I Shopping Plata)
For! lauO'dj'e
''.'
I = J ^iSURI?
SHEPARD BROAD. Chairman of the Board MORRIS N BROAD. /',../.


May 18, 1973
"Jmidh Flcricfibn
Page li-C
hCcligieus Sssuc Still "Poses ^JUorny 'proLLm
Continued from Preceding Page
breuiti 93 t-r-fft pW^Mt. At besl
there is a working arrangement
which is acceptable to hot!) '.'.v
secular majority and the re-
ligious minority.
The secularists are Bble to
shift all problems concerning
religious issues to their orthodox
partners thereby freeing them
selves from facing the challenge
wh ii historic Judaism maj rroni
time to time present to the Jew-
ish stne in it- internal or even
ign policies. The orthodox
groups, en the othei hand ar
happy with the present "am i
.' having given up their
desi v to i v..i;: religion to Ihe
mould the state in
i r image. Religion is i
represented by religious pet
or lenders.
Mori than not. s elai ns
are voiced by politicians who
r from their secular col
'i,n in their ethical or
'. but in the litle
.kull:mo which is somi
i i : to co i r up Ihe
n< toi ii j ii the politi
wears it.
Ethical 1 eadership Silenced
r irah per.
1 ill: ll HI tl'iil I
'; |1 e '
. i his
i tual
I -i.l-.-'i
n H with
:i sym but
-. rve .:- a 'vernmeni i i ;
in the
ol he i
t'.i.

'si
raol. Til
pi i ies wage holy wars on some
i U .v.lie.i in fuel have no b.-ai
'"'' on itself or on the
Hi ol tlu non-religious lsri I
The battic may sc un lh r ilig-
ious pa lies positions of pow*r,
bi i ii h the non-rcl
I rae.i even further nway from
any interest in the reiigi in ir. m
which he was alienal : ihrough
his i lui ati m.
1'nfortunately. the religious
v n ng following the Six i ly
Wi .i loo much publici:
that helped kill it In -
In ai cy rather than nurturo it.
Lu m icher Hassidim pub
-' lies of th< ma ly thoui
pti i lh" ii" i; i
h they extended to p< pie
" ic places, especially i< th
W Wall, to put on tc i
for th fir I time \ I this pub-
licit: did nol help
the first time,
r a g ite bj which to
re Ihe sanctuarj ol Jud ii.s n
aba oi r 1 by their fathers Any
ki e i and sens live obs* rver could
si e how their steps to-
Acre still he
;,.. j .- Il:.
i, ,;. Thej were in n
ol mi i o relcome ;
fii to guide their hi
.. their questin oil
v (h n us political
m m chei red !l r -
. beyi nd
poll
I
;. id i nj
iinilci : ng of ;i Host o
i.i.,. do ii >t kn
! eon u istioi
is. Others
n
C -'<'-ir \tttlai i .
NATHAN 11. DAKSKY

State of J*wW
tratlve issue b! Who is a lew.''
thai lii.y had no tune io deal
with the qu istion of "What \- a
Jew?' that so many Israelis were
ning to ask.
Great Potential
The Sis Day War in Isrr.el is
not over y; Israelis still live
With it in every phase of their
liv s Neither is the raligii us
awakening which came with the
Six jDay War a Ihiflg of tfte,u,a>st.
)i gull holds the potential of
becoming a widespread mow
merit which may eventually
Change the essence of
from a secular orientation io a
Jewish religious one.
We do not know what the new
Imaj e of religion in Israel will
be if and when il emerges. We
doubi whether ii can be a i >$}
of Judaism as practiced in '
saw, Cracow or Berlin; neither
can ii be a copy "f Judais
practiced in S in a, Baghdad or
Marakesh; and cortainl; not (
the, .Judai m practici 'l in Cincin-
pii; Philadelphia or I.os \n:-' s,
We doubt very much whi e
the non-religious Israeli is
for th" >'>'' i ivcepti. but
know that the time of
bciipsc ol God is on thi
out. There ii a possibility
<; ,,i ma> again Bpeak to
and that the people
respond
^^cnciratiilatcs ^jsrcicl \^/n *Jsts
25tn _'fin live r~iiru
J, ir!in ^/(cii~c
- Vortn v_ rliatni .fjcaeft
vtyrltn Jjcnch a/Qoartment 5701 Cm'Oilint ->-/>.-., rtiami Jrfeach
&4rlen tJKlna C-o/c a^partment 900 J$jy .'-/)Vc, sjniami Jjtacfi
&4rlen *_- rlimota a/tpartmentt
47*17 Km^oilins &fve,t ^/trlcit Ciolaen o4i
rr /5600 CJIins

D------
Page 12-C
+Jew1sti Her Mian
... .....
May 18. 1973
25 Uears toy Israel: ^^r 3 fj
Continued from Page 8-C
l fined its experience to itself. We have shared with the
developing nations of !!P* ilWd the IrssWw-we have
learned in many fields, such as agriculture, coopera-
tive organization, education and defense. More than
15.000 men and women from developing countries have
studied in Israel and more than 4,000 Israelis have
gone abroad on missions of technical assistance.
As we move into the future, our basic aspirations
remain those which have followed us throughout the
past quarter of a century.
Our Basic Aspirations
Peace within secure boundaries is the principal
objective of Israel. Peace we need because human life
is the highest value in our society We seek secure
boundaries, becai ilicve that such boundaries
will not be a temptation to an aggressor as were the
lines before the Six-Day War when our Parliament in
Jerusalem was one mile from the armistice lines and
Tel Aviv within range ol the Arab artillery.
The right of the Jewish people in their land to
Self-defense will continue to be a central tenet of
Israel. We shall maintain strong Israel defense i
strong enough, we hope, to make another war un-
wanted by our adversaries.
Immigration will continue to be a major effort
in our lives. We hope for more immigrants from the
Union, from the few Jewish communities still
surviving in Arab countries, and from the countries
Df America and Europe. We maintain an utter faith
that the Jewish people throughout the world will
share in this effort with us and help us meet whatever
challenges we may confront in absorbing the succeed-
ing waves of immigration. We expect that by 198U the
population of Israel will reach four million, and by
1990. five million.
Social and cultural integration will continue
to be a major effort of Israel. We hope to create a so-
ciety where every social gap. subjective and objective,
has been closed, and where all individuals enjoy
equal opportunities, in education and in conditions of
living.

Israel's Prime Minister Golda Meir is shown in a rare moment of relaxation at home
with her grandchildren.
Lastly, we hope that a rapidly developing Israel
will continue to contribute from its experience to the
needs of developing societies elsewhere.
Our vision of the future can best be summed up in
the words of the Phophct Amos, who lived 2.800 years
ago:
I will restore the fortunes of my people Israel,
And they shall rebuild the ruined cities and inhabit them;
They shall plant vineyards and drink their wine.
And they shall make gardens and eat their fruit.
will plant them upon their land;
And they shall never again be plucked up
Out of the land which I have given them.
Crongvatiilatcs J he dreaders ^Xtnd
J^cople of Israel on J h
cir
25th &Qnn
iversarx
'if
SUPER MARKET
527 WASHINGTON AVE
M B FLORIDA *****
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


May 18, 1973
. Imlsti nrrMlfMl
FagI9C
y.v.v. wv.v.v.v.v.v. V.vJ*X*J!,X,'*Mv!:
>::>>
WM
..'..::: v.v.vlv.v.v.v.v.v
I INCORPORATED
FLORIDA AGENTS AND STEVEDORES FOR
ZIM ISRAEL NAVIGATION CO., LTD.
SHIP AGENTS STEVEDORES' WAREHOUSE TRUCKING
A Tree Planted Strong
And Bold Lives Mightily
Thereafter
Happy Anniversary, Israel!
MR. and MRS. H. G. TEITELBAUM, PRESIDENT
MR. and MRS. MANDEL KRATISH
MR. and MRS. SAM KRATISH and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH TEITELBAUM and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. MANNY LEVY and FAMILY
MR. and Mrs. BEN MUSSARY and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ISRAEL KRATISH
DODGE ISLAND SEAPORT
1001 North American Way
MRS. ADOLPH KRATISH
MRS. ROSE KRATISH and Daughters
ESTHER, SARAH, and RUTH
MRS. JULIUS KRATISH
MR. and MRS. IRWIN LESCHOWITZ and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ROBERT KRATISH and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ROBERT DOWLING and SON
PHONE: 377-4071, TWX-810-848-7061


r--~
.#1. rrv^'K u ft.14 U\JIU rj-w^pp
<^Ac (critical\J\iciht 25 iJjcars ^Mgo JL^caAing to ^Israel s J^irtli
Continued from Page 4-C
they should vote in tayor of partition at tomor-
row "s session."
The tak Sliertok had given me was fantas-
tic. The person to whom he referred was a promi-
nent Jewish Uuider; he h>id never been a .Zion-
ist, but was deeply involved in Jewish affairs.
He was highly esteemed by President Truman,
and his dramatic telephone call could certainly
make an Impression on Truman. I never doubted
for a minute that he would get to work if I
phoned him and transmitted to him what Shertok
had told me. However,.a different idea occurred
to me.
Proposal Thought Over
"You know." I t'>U Shertok. "that I am
quite willing to get this man out of bed. but be-
ing intimately acquainted with him. I know that
he would feel highly honored if you. rather than
1, would phone him. This does not mean that 1
will net do it. It means only that the effect will
be greater if you would speak to him. He will
be greatly impressed by your turning to him for
help at such a critical moment. And if I know
his moods, he will not lose a minute but will
immediately phone President Truman On the
other hand, if you prefer that I should phone
him. 1 will do so* immediately and call you back
within a few minutes"
Shertok thoughl over my proposal for a
moment and decided to follow my advice. I gave
him the private number of that person. an\ we
agreed that should he need my assistance during
the night, he should phone me at any time he
u Ished.
Shertok did not phone me that night, but
the Philippine delegation did vote in favor of
the Partition Resolution on the following d i
and not against it. as Gen. Ronuilo had announced
befoiT he left. Everything was settled dining the
night hours.
I did not see Shertok that day. He did not
rely only on the vote of the Philippine delegation.
He was busy with efforts to ensure the votes of
other dclgates from small countries which were
inilined to vote for Arab rather than for Jewish
interests, for they had never been in contact with
Jews.
The dramatic moment of the voting came
in the late afternoon of Nov. 29. 1947 when the
President of the UN General Assembly called
for the vote at a session of extreme excitement.
Every delegate from every country had to an-
swer "yes" or "no" on the Partition Resolution.
The anxiety about the outcome reached a climax
when the summing up of the voting was
announced.
Thirty-three in favor, 13 against and 11
abstentions ." the President announced. A
storm of joy broke out after this announcement.
The joy spread in every corner of the UN build-
ing. In t!i? corridors the Jews, delegates as well
as Jewish leaders and guests, who came especi-
ally to witness the historic vote, sang and danced
the bora in a circle around Sherlok.
Personal Thanks
0
At that moment, to my great amazenvnt and
to the astonishment of the dancing crowd, sher-
tok thanked me dramatically in front of every-
body. The Jewish leader whom he had called the
night before, and who had, in turn, called Presi-
dent Truman regarding the vote of the Philippine
delegation, was later honored by the Israeli
government.
He paid several private visits to Israel dur-
ing ever) visit he was given the "red carpet"
treatment by the Israel government, although
his visits wore always without publicity. Once I
had an opportunity to sec Prime Minister Ben-
Gurion heartily embrace him and kiss him. I
:;!.- had the opportunity to read private letters
which Ben-Gurion wrote to him, letters several
pages long which, if they are ever published,
wHl be of extraordinary historic value.
This articlfl i a chaptei from the forthcoming book
i Bom Smolar relating high points ol his worldwide
journalistic carter. In thit chaprc:. Smotar tells how he
was awakened by Jl'oshe Shertok (Shareft) the night
bef ..?s.nct of rhc I istoi Partition Resolution
W the United Nations.
400,000 o/trabs arc Unique ^M'morit
;v
Continued from Page 6-C
subjects, Their main interests n
i question of their nation i
identity and the al I o:
key posts in the l ic
public e tablishments.
A Groping Minority
They are brought up as Vrab
:. id are schooled in Vrabic. 'ili<
politics of the Midd East fi
qui ntly involves them in ., !oj
' dilemma Are Ihe) iid
iu adopt the hostility of (he >
ates tov ards t1' it ou"
: 'ir loyalty to I-1 ad us its .
n-, contrail: thi
. msi ii usne '1 y wHi I
sure of themseh es pn
their "' \
po
linst ael
i ir hoi i"
thi thai ; i
ds y an in-
OP their
id fulfill their persona i-
tio i- Al h the; are
i national minority gropi i Is
.'. in a complex w< rid, and
sometimes besi I with inner mi -
:\\ ings whi n the politic! I situa-
tion is tense Besidi
Arab finds it difficult to inte-
grate himself into the Israel so
ciety, which has not yet estab-
lished itself fully as a structured
entity. Because of the ongoing
hostility of the Arab Stales, he
sometimes excites suspicion
among his Jewish peers. The so-
cial fences are still high.
No Attempt to Assimilate
There is still unevenness in
educational levels, in ways of
living, in general outlook, apart
from the obvious national con
fliet. All these factors obstruct
the path of the young Arab, who
laces a mounting struggle within
his own society. His generation,
as we saw. is dissatisfied with the
traditional leadership, and wants
to climb to the apex of th" social
ladder itself. Already young in-
tellectuals, graduates of th
Hebrew University, serve upon
local councils and workers' com-
mittees, and occupy fairly senior
appointments in the Civil Serv-
ice. The front row. however, is
still held by the old guard.
Changing the guard will not be
easy, but we are no dOubl on the
threshold of it. From time to
time, the Government i5 asked
to help the young Arab genera-
tion in its fight against the an
cient cadres. A dcmt>cru:-c Israel
I
r
". there are people,
like the representa-
tives of the Kibbutzim
and Moshavim, who
have a large slake in
the present system "
mp.y, be i
' '- ll I >! :
ional .'it. ol v u ', the
- di clar d si
l> il in ,' b ill Ii
cm "in-. i to oci up.v K
post suited h l!n ir
l '-,i i
counter to official reluctan
I i i an inti rnal all .
Iieli
youn vi ..'.. to distin i
si .1-. ai .i their ...
t" 1 d, ai n > pro* an im-
; n tanl step in charting the fu-
ture course ol Israel's Ar
The Araii society is still in the
throes ol a transitional phase.
Traditional leader-hip i^ strong
yet, but little by littli losing
ground, The young Arabs, who
demand that the shackles of tra-
dition be cast off. are bound to
it Still b) many bond.-,, some ol
them subconscious. Their nation-
alistic sentiments are understand-
able and incontestable. The Arab-,
are entitled to full civic equality
in Israel, yet to maintain their
right to be different, to protest
their Arab identity, to develop
their national character end na-
tional culture.
Israels Declaration of Inde-
pendence defined its Arabs as
members of the Arab penpl.<
thus acknowledging their na-
tional identity as part of a world
that had waged war on Israel
entitled to full citizenship and
representation in the institutions
of the .state No attempt has ever
b*en made to assimilate them
or to deny their nationality F,ut
they have always been asked to
withhold cooperation iu any form
with the enemies of the Stale
The inner restlessness of the
young Arabs is aggravated by the
absence of rewarding leisure In-
terests, and by the fact I hat they
do not form organized group.
Compared to them, young Jews
feel an utter belongingness to the
State,
In the light of Israel'.- security
problem, the assumption thai the
Arab minority was dooim d to
total alienation as long as peace
did not come could hardl
thoughl far-fetched. Vet. thi fi
is that a process of integration,
speedier every year, is t.iki ig
place. The SOCiO-ecOnomi
being bridged, there are points
of contact between the two so
cletlcs, mutual suspicion ,-. fad
niu But let us not be over-
sanguine. Because ol their spe
il position, Israel's Arabs fi.t I
it difficult to mi k? ful
the manifestations ol
: in .i Jew t-i .
for ii. sun ral
Lrabi in the neighboi iug Stal
Then have, then bi in H
pi i....Is for them, Th
18 : 1955, was the -jeriod el
waiting, -.hen they v
. idered by thei I sta
from majo: ity to minot
believed the change to ':
lived and so felt i i
i ike a special effort to a< apt
thcmselvei to what thej
be a fleeting reality.
Arabs Seek Identity
The second, from 1955 to 1965,
was one of partial acceptance,
although with a vexed economy
and with grievances about mil-
itary government and security
/ones In Arab areas, about fit
expropriation of land, the eco
nomic troubles of the individual,
the laggard rural progress,
The third, since 1966, is the
period of virtually complete ac-
ceptance of the State, character-
ized by economic prosperity Of
the individual and an impressive
development of the Arab village,
the disappearance of most, ii not
all of the grievances about mil-
itary controls, and in intensified
integration of intellectuals, oddlv
enough, it is now that Arabs ask
themselves: Who are we? What
is our identity? What is our
status and how much influence
do we have in moulding the life
of the State politically, locially.
and economically? What is 'he
future of our children and what
ideological heritage rein we be-
queath them: What is our rela-
tionship to the Jewish copula
tion? Shall we be a bridge for
peace between Israel and the
Aiab States? These are pointed
questions that may take years to
answer. A major challenge tad v.
the Government of Israel is to
provide the right replies.
MAYOR CHUCK HALL
^ ongrafulcttes s5fsracl
w;i lJhc Occasion of


3. 1973
V'Jkniti Hkredfirain
Page 15-C
&**


OFFICE OF THE INNKEEPER

THE NEW HOLIDAY INN OF HOLLYWOOD BEACH IS NOW A REALITY!
THIS NEWEST HOTEL ON THE COLD COAST WAS BUILT WITH YOU AND OUR FINE
COMMUNITY IN MIND. WE BOTH ANXIOUSLY AW AIT THE PLEASURE O.
INTRODUCING YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO THE -BEST OF ALL WORLDS"
AND MAKING FRIENDS OF YOU FOREVER! ALLOW IS TO SPOIL AND PAMPER
YOU IN AN ATMOSPHERE OF SHEER COMFORT AND LUXURY.
EACH OF OUR 320 LAVISHLY DECORATED ROOMS. COMPLETE
WITH IMPORTED TILE BATHS, COLOR TV AND PRIVATE BALCONY WITH
sPECTAd'LAH VIEWS OF THE OCEAN OR WATERWAY. WASGIVEN CAREFUL
ATTENTION KNOWING THAT WE WILL RK CATERING TO THE MOST DISCRIMINATING
TRAVELERS AND VACATIONERS IN THE WORLD. ENJOY ALL OF THIS AT MODEST,
SENSIBLE.TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY INN RATES!!
*
INCLUDED IS \ RKAI TIKI I. FRESH-* \TKR SWIMMIV; POOL.
SPACIOUS SUN DECK. WADING POOL FOR CHILDREN. OI'IET MEZZANINE SI :s
\RK\. MEVS HEALTH CUV \ND SAUNA. SIHFFIJCROARD. CARD RMS. Fl N IND
CAME ROOM IND SHOPPING PROMENADE WITH \ WIDE VARIETY OF SERVICES
IND SHOPS.
01 R DINING ROOMS AND LOUNGE ARE SI RE TOBECOMETHE
INN" PLACES IN TOWN. AMI ST FOR YOU AND ML VISITORS Till HI SI NNY
sol TH IS \ GOURMET FEAST AT MPI'Y s PIER .',2 RESTAUR Wl\ ENJOY YOI R
BEFORE DINNER COCKTAIL OR AFTER DINNER APPERTIF IN Ol R SWINGING
M HOONER LOUNGE. FEATURING 11\ I ENTERTAINMENT AND MUSIC FOR DANCING
NIGHTLY. MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE FOR BREAKFAST. LUNCH OR TABLE D'HOTE
DINNERS AT OUR CAFE MIRASOL OR INFORMAL U'NCHEON ON OUR OUTDOOR LAKAL
OUR MEETING. HANOI Et AND FUNCTION ROOMS \HK \LS<> l\ MLABLE
TO THE COMMUNITY.
FOR THE BEST PARTI EVER. CALL Ol H HANOI ET MANAGER WHO
M ILL WORK Ol ITHI MINUTE DETAILS TH XI SPELL SUCCESS FOR AN\ HANOI ET,
PARTY. WEDDING, SHOWER, BAR MITZVAH OR SOCIAL GET-TOGETHER.
WE COULD HAVE PUT IN A BIG FLASHY AD. BUT WHAT WE ARK
,'RYING TO ACCOMPLISH IS TO RK NEIGHBORLY AND TALK TO YOU AS FRIENDS
DO. STOP IN LET IS SHOW YOU AROUND YOU'LL LIKE WHAT WE HAVE TO
OFFER 4ND WE'D LOVE TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY OF GETTING TO KNOW YOU
BETTER.
ON BEHALF OF THE KNURL STAFF, AND FOR OURSELVES. WE
ARK HAPPY TO BECOME PART OF YOI R COMMUNITY!
YOUR HOSTS
*
ALLAIN J. EHRLKH
EXECUTIVE FOOD & BEVERAGE
DIRECTOR


**%. rrvj
" **-* ^&*5r^^
Fog* *:
* 3eiit llu-mar
May 18. ||m|

LAND OF THE PROPHETS
. FACING A NEW DESTINY
Anniversary
Salute to the
State of Israel
ISRAEL, born anew nineteen centuries. Spanning the ancient with the modern
Fashioned by many tongues into one nation. United by spiritual and demo-
cratic traditions. Where the pages of the Bible come to life. Where the pro-
phets stood proclaiming the word of God for peace and for justice.
May the peace it seeks with honor and strength help the State of Israel
achieve its hallowed destiny.
0
]
t
1
t
f.
h
a
ti
t<
};
1.
H
](
IT
a]
ic
st
ej
th
ti
to
i
ci
The MIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEFOSlT INSURANCE CORPORATION
1111 LINCOLN ROAD MALL ,VJA.\'I BEACH 672-"2C:-
MEMBER:
Unrted
Banking
Group


"Jewish Floridian
I
Miami, Florida Friday. May 18. 1973
Section D
"KJe extend
the kzact (^ peace
tod yaod r*n, vttt*


n rtt
5^-t



***'

^
*


,mYX*** arm ?*,a^ p->n ""

.%:

vW
\ -^*^
^
35



y/r->^/"'

"The question is wheth-
er Arab leadership can
break loose from an ob-
solete routine of con-
flict to explore this pro-
spect. It is in peace, not
in violence, that the Pal-
estine Arabs will find
their true destiny. Let us
not forget that 99 per-
cent of the Arab nation
has achieved its self-de-
termination in sovereign
Arab states. Few peo-
ples in history have ever
attained such a high
proportion of their total
ambition. In conditions
Df peace, Israel's eastern
neighbor would be an
Arab state, a majority
of whose population
would be composed of
Palestinian Arabs, and
a majority of all the
Palestinian Arabs would
be citizens of it."
Abba Eban
i
BUT THEY ARE CONSTANTLY BILIAGUERID BY NATIONS SET ON MAKING WAR
Peace Remains the Supreme Vision of a Free People
By ABBA EBAN
Israel Foreign Minister
BE ACE has been the supreme
' vision of the prophets of Is-
rael, and an essential value of
Jewish civilization. The prophet
Isaiah, who lived in Jerusalem
2,700 years ago, summed up the
quest for peace in these immor-
tal lines:
And thy shall beat their swords
into ploughshares
And their spears into pruning hooks
Nation shall not lift sword against
nation
Neither shall tthey learn war any
more
Our era, perhaps more than
any preceding period in history,
bears the hope of dialogue and
understanding between nations
previously in conflict. Within the
last few years we have fitnessed
long-standing conflicts trans-
formed from a condition of vio-
lence intq a condition of nego-
tiation. The United States and
China, India and Pakistan, East
and West Germany, and tre two
Koreas are examples of the new
pattern now emerging in inter
national relations. Eventually
this process should and must
reach the Middle East.
What Peace Would Bring
Peace has too often been con-
sidered by International bodies in
semantic formal terms and
too little in terms of human reali-
ties. It is not enough that Egypt.
Israel, Lebanon and Jordan
should agree on a form of words:
indeed such an agreement may
be a perilous illusion if it con-
ceals a wide gap in intention and
interpretation. What is needed
most is that they, and all con-
cerned with their deeper intci-
ests, should have a clear vision
of what our region would look
like and how its people would
live once hostility were replaced
by peace. The most conclusive
evidence of the hall-mark of
peace is the open frontier.
In a peaceful Middle East, a
man would be able to travel by
road and rail from Cairo through
Israel to Beirut and Amman;
Egyptian civil aircraft could Ira-
ABBA IBM
astronomic defense cost!
verse Israel eastward, Israel ship-
ping would pass unimpeded
through the Suez Canal; Israel
and Arab civil aircraft would
land in Cairo, Lod and Amman on
their present route to East Africa;
and a railway for the transpor-
tation of heavy Roods would pass
from the Suez area through
Kantara, along the Israel coast
northward. The ports of Eilat and
Aqaba would plan their expan-
sion and development in neigh-
borly coordination. In the sum-
mer of 1972. 152.000 Arabs from
neighboring countries visited
their relatives west of the Jordan
and Israel. This year nearly
three-quarters of a million tour-
ists came to Israel and approxi-
mately as many to Egypt. In con-
ditions of normality and peace,
the ancient splendors and mod-
ern amenities of our countries
would attract millions more, who,
by their very pilgrimage, would
join us closer to them and them-
selves to each other.
In the last resort, a nation's
strength and greatness will be
measured not by the number of
its missiles, but by the quality of
its scholars, scientists and tech-
nicians. Why should not Israel
and Arab doctors and scientists
cooperate in the common quest
for learning, visit each other's
institutions, lecture to each
other's students, meet together to
face the opportunities and Ilia
which arc- common to our region'
If the Israeli yield of cotton is
about half a ton per acre, more
than twice the average in other
areas of the Middle East, might
not the lessons be experimentally
learned and applied? The sense-
lessness and tragedy of war are
most vividl) expressed in the in-
excusable waste of resources. In
25 years, the Arab States and
Israel have spent more than $25
billion for military purposes. If
one-tenth of that sum had bean
invested in a refugee solution,
the nroblem would have beer,
solved long ago, in a way tha
would have promoted economic
progress in all the countries in
which the resettlement was mad-;.
Defense vs. Economic Need
At the present time, Egypt and
brat 1 are spending, between
them, more than $3 billion a year
for military purposes.
It would be a delusion to be-
lieve that a formal peace agree-
ment would be followed by an
instant relaxation of vigilance or
Cents****] en Pa** 6 D


- r i <,* n\jiu^jim i
l'lUyTCTTT77
Page 2-D
vJmUl FkridHar,
Friday. May 18, I973
Israel's Modern Woman: Soldier. Scientist, Home-Maker
By BEBA 1DF.I.SON
General Secretary of the
Working Women's Council
State of Israel
^HE achievements or Israi I
women ha", e become an
around the world: the girl soldier
at her military post, shouli
worn.-
men in th<
lory, in thi factory.
and 1
the emi
Ifinisti
know
tained dur n^ the 25 years < I
exist 1 I State ol
only Th> of a
- :--
and
... hundred
a/> appy
mum who
:. t path. rh
new ideas r*- ,r":
especia thi building, of a ri'(
rac v are fore nil
fad".'- ... ( ?ing her )
They challer.-fd her stn
her independence, her adaptebil-
r jusl a nrt.....'
helpmate she became her hus
band's conscious -nJ active
ner, taking the initiative within
hex family and within the- new
society evolving in the Lar..:
Tremendous Effort
Already during the first aii.-ah
starting in 1882. women toiled
alongside men. resolutely raising
their families amidst hardship,
sickness and want as they set ap
the early agricultural villages
The women pioneers of *he
second aliyah 19041914). v.tv.
strove to attain total equality ol
the sexes, soon realized that a
tremendous effort was required
If women wanted to be part ol
eonomics, politics, and "< n
defense 0/ the nation, they must
undertake serious commitments.
wmcfi they did.
Even before the establishment
of the State, women play
active role in the World Zionist
ement, in the governing
bodies of the yishev 'the Jewish
community in Palestine 1. in the
political parties, in the labor
' and in the free profession .
in 'he Histadrut, and cooperative
ultural settlements. Women
also founded their out
tions which contribute
to the welfare of the entiri p :>-
ulation and particularly
ad" incemcm of women e 01 1
from various parts of the 1
When the State was
.1. Ism 1 began enacting
station befitting a modern,
htened nation, one of the
touchstones being the qua!
men as tit-
izens, mothers, and ivoi It 1-.
I rael's Declaration >f l.ndi
pend- rhere shall be
equa al and pi
for all citizens, regardli -
Young girl of Moroccan origin in traditional costume.
ligion, race or sex." In 1951, Ihe
Knesset enacted the Women's
Equal Rights Law. annulling all
Mandatory statutes that discrim-
inated against women. and
women now enjoy the following
rights:
To vote in elections, and t.>
be elected to any national or local
body.
To maintain her own cit.-
zenship after marriage.
To be tl.e natural custodian
of hei children in the event Of
the father's death.
To retain possession of prop-
erty that belonged to her b?fore
marriage and the right to 50 per
cent of the family possessions.
To enjoy educational, pro-
fessional, and employment oppor-
tunities equal to those of men
To serve in the army (mar-
ried women and mothers are ex
as '-ire religious women, it
they -,0 choose).
In the Family
The Marriage and Divorce
Law, enacted in 1993, provides
"Jewish marriages and divorces
shall be conducted according to
the Jewish religious laws and full
jurisdiction in these matters joea
to the rabbinical 1 owts .' The
1. ns of 'he other
deno: linations in the State hat
the lame authority over their
nienibi-i .-
There have been lively public
discussions, at times stormy,
since this law was brought to the
Knesset. Even after the law was
passed, discussion not only did
not quiet down. but. on the con-
trary, from time to time, erupted
with greater fervor when the
contradiction between the legal
civil status of the woman and
the discrimination against her in
the rabbinical courts was brought
to the fore.
It is clear that besides the re-
ligious coercion resulting from
the fact that only religious mar-
riages are recognized, this type
of marrage does not adequately
answer the severe individual
problems of today. For example,
the difficulty facing a "cohen."
descendant of the ancient priestly
caste, who wishes to mam a
divorcee, the problem of the
abandoned wife and the Law of
Levirate the authority of the
brother-in-law over the wite of
his dead brother: and the prob-
lem of mixed marriages. With the
immigration from the Commun-
ist countries. Europe, and Amer-
ica, where there are numerous
mixed marriages, thi- matter baa
become much more acute and
calls for a speedy and final
soluti in.
There lias been a continual
demand to allow civil marriage
Although it has not yet been
met, important steps have been
taken by the Knesset to improve
the woman's standing.
The Marriage Age Law.
1950. set 'J m 'he minimum age
of marriage for a woman.
The Prohibition of Bigamy
Law. 1951,
In certain cases the material
rghta of the "Common jj
wife." that is, the woman not
officially married, have been roc-
ognized.
According to the Marriag,
and Divorce Laws enacted
Knesset, a woman may keep her
own family narne.^ftcr marriage,
In cases of family separation,
Continued on Page 10.0

<^y Miami ^f^each s
Jrjean #v/va 9955 L^/mt W.o.
18335 C^ellin* ->-/w.
C/niteau i\
9115 (ZJIhtt a4*.
*4 'Jir.t r&rpcration 0/ ^S^rmcriCti
tttcrpritc
CONGRATULATIONS ... ISRAEL on your 25th Anniversary
TP
SECOND
*r?
of North Miami & North Miami Beach
North Miami 11755 Biscayne Blvd. Phone 893-8411
Horth Miami Beach 18281 N.E. 19th Ave. Phone 945-1831
Member: Federol Deposit Ins. Corp. Member: Federol Reserve System
Member of Americon BorKshoret, Incorporated


Friday, May 18. 1373
+Jmi$ti ihridfiori
Page 3-D

25 Years a State
5733 Years a State of Mind
H>-
THE
CITY
BANKS
City National Bank of Miami
25 W. Flakier Street
City National Bank of Miami Beach
300 Seventy-first Street
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
City National Bank of Coral Gables
2701 Leleune Rond
City National Bank of Hallandale
1995 East Hallandale Beach Boulevard
City Bank of Lauderhill
14b3 N.W. 40th Avenue
Subsidiaries and Affiliates of City National Bank Corporation Members F.D.I.C


-. rr v* *,* i/^jiu. Mil
Page 4-D
> knist flcridiian
Friday. May 18. 1973
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Leads 25th Anniversary Celebration J
Proceeds from the Grea ish Federation's annual Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaigns
help support 50 local, national and overseas-
welfare agencies?T'wenty-two of these agen-
cies and services are Miami-based, helping
to make Greater Miami a better place in
which to live for all people. But when Fed-
eration speaks of the unique hand-to-hand,
heart-to-heart relationship between Miami's
Jewish community and the people of Israel,
it speaks of more than just financial support
of life-serving and life-saving programs. Mi
amians have also c^yjen freely and gen|
cisly of their expertise" experience, energy
and ideas so that in Israel today. institutions
and services can be found which parallel
those provided by the 22 Miami agencies
that comprise the local Federation family.
A day care center for the aged in Ramie (lefO is one of the many
community health and welfare centers established by the Joint
Distribution Committee's Malben during its 20 years of service
in Israel. The JDC is a beneficiary of the United Jewish Appeal,
and UJA is a Greater Miami Jewish Federation beneficiary. In
Miami, Miriam Scheinberg (left in photo at right) directs the
South Beach Activities Center in the Workmen's Circle building
at 25 Washington Ave.. a protected environment day care center
serving the elderly of South Beach.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service (left), a Greater Miami
Jewish Federation beneficiary, offers professional counseling
services on personal or family problems. In Israel, street social
workers refer troubled youngsters to such special vocational
training schools as Beith Shemesh (right) which is maintainel
with UJA funds.
Miami's Jewish Home for the Aged, a Federation beneficiary, is
a "heme for beginning again" for residents like those pictured
(left). In Israel, the JDC operates 12 Malbens, like the one (right),
which serve over 3,000 elderly people helping them too, to begin
again.
The full range of absorption services are provided to Israel's
immigrants (70 000 expected in 1973 like the ones above at left)
through the Jewish Agency for Israel with United Jewish Appeal
funds. In Miami, the immigration and naturalization service of
the National Council of Jewish Wcmen serves Jews (like the
Specter family at right) seeking to relocate in the U.S. The
Spectors, from the USSR, crre shown with Miami relatives and
Mrs. Philip Bloom, president. Greater Miami section of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women.
Gala Parade With 40 Floats Will
Cap Festivities Sunday Afternoon
When Israel turned 25 on May
7. the United States' fifth
Jewish community was
[n act, Greater Miami's
the Jewish homeland's
.., ration be-
Ian back in 1972, v ith th
mati hi of tin' Israt
unity's su|
il i ed ratii
A spec! i 'u ii the
nily will I Saiul
to Isra in Ma; 1 '
: al t:ii' Mi-
r ...i 1
:._ reti hi of Washing!
and Collins Aves. and Lit
Rd.. the parade will Include over
a doz-'ii bands, as well as march-
ing units and dance groups num-
bering up to 10.000.
More than 40 floats participat-
ing will represent synagogues
and Jewish groups as well as
leading banks, airlines, and bus
iness and civic organizations.
With the efforts of Chairman
Stephen Remsen and parade di-
rector. Morton Grebelsky, this
event will cap the entire com-
munity's unity in honoring Israel
on her silver anniversary. Much
of the work necessary to co-
ordinate the community's exten-
sive involvement in Israel 25 was
led by Outreach Chairman Mrs.
Clifford Marks.
Other Special Events
Special events in May will also
include a presentation of the play.
"He Walked in the Field." by
Israeli playwright, Moshe Shamir
often referred to as Israel's fln >
tic achievemer! Directo 1
Art Kedem, the u-oduction
will take place May 20 through
the Theati r oi lev i ill Culuii :
in cooperation with t.ie Israel 2.3
imittee
Greatei Miami's widespread ob-
lervance of Israel 25 'ms .' o
brought about a variety of sig-
nificant educational programs,
many of whicil stay in as an
enrichment to the area's educa-
tional system and a bequest of
Israel 25. The Committee's edu-
cational subcommittee, headed
by Mrs. David Miller and Jerrj
Sussman, worked closely with the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, headed by A. B. Wiener,
planning committee chairman.
With the coordination of -Mrs.
Mayer Abramowitz, projects
which were introduced to and
adopted by the Dade County
Board of Public Instruction in-
cluded teacher seminars, creative
Israel stud' programs within the
schools' curriculum, and a
county-wide poster contest. The
Ami "Knowledge of Israel" Quiz
was p ed in area syna
and day schools.
i mmi". r
(,f in >re than 2uo I
lions 'gal ons a I youth
rove to be one of
outstanding festival;
:hi :ommunitj has evi
direct bend with the Jewish Stati
was quickiy created through tin
Jewish Cultural Agency. Profes-
sional guidance was provided by
the VM-VWHA of Greater Miami
and its president, Stanley Gil-
bert, with funds and coordination
through Federation, led by Pres-
ident Robert Russell.
Torch of Independence
Hundreds of community lead-
ers and local dignitaries joined
in the Israel 25 venture through
the Committee and its leadership
cabinet and steering committee.
Mrs. Burton R. Levey became
chairman of the local committee,
with honorary chairman Gov
Keubin Askew. Heading the na-
tional committee for Israel 25
activities are Senators Jacob
Javitz. of New York, and Abra-
ham Ribicoff. of Connecticut.
Here in Miami, activities began
Sept. 26 with the arrival of the
Torch of Israel's Independence,
kindled by former Israeli Presi-
dent Zaluian Shazar. A symbol of
the ivcni and its significance to
Jews everywhere, the Torch has
already been presented at the
openings of more, than 150 local
happenings with the coordin i
ticn of Mrs. Arnold Cans. These
included events as widespread as
the annual meeting of Dade
County's United Fund and the
Jewish National Fund Governor's
Ball.
In early October, a Simchas
Torah rally was sponsored by the
Jewish Youth Council and the
Israel 25 Committee. Attended by
an overflow crowd of more than
3.500 people, the program called
attention to the plight of Smiet
Jews and commemorated Israel's
25th anniversary.
As early as last February, the
Continued on Page 11-D
FOOD
FAIR
KOSHER MARKETS
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
to the
**5tnte OJ Sjr*J*4*#f
On Sts 2 5 tit jjirttidctu


Friday, May 18, 1973
+jf*i<>nfi~+MM
Page 50
Umc[e By ROBERT RUSSELL, President
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
By HARRY LEVY, General Chairman
'...... 19*3 CJA-IEF campaign ,....
yhe Jewish community of Greater Miami
is tied to the State of Israel by something
stronger than transportation links. The approxi-
mately 200.000 permanent Jewish residents of
this area are united with Israel by a unique
hand-to-hand, heart-to-heart relationship thflft has
flourished in the 25 years since the Jewish state
was founded.
In the 34 years since the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation was founded, it has striven to
oecome the true "central address of Miami's Jew-
ish community.''
After the State of Israel was declared, home-
grown talent, energy and commitment were mo-
bilized to help Israel fulfill its goal of rebuilding
tne land as it rebuilds lives.
Story of Immigration
The story of modern-day Israel is the story
ot immigration.
It's a familiar story to many residents of this
area who themselves emigrated to this country
as children in search of a better life, free from
persecution because of their Jewishness.
The difference is that when America received
its wave of Russian Jewish immigrants at the be-
ginning of the 20th century, there was no Jewish
state. The Promised Land was a promise that was
not yet fulfilled.
From hand-to-hand, from heart-to-heart, with
an awareness that grew from the shared experi-
ences of emigration, this Jewish community's sup-
port of the Federation's annual Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaigns has
grown to keep pace with the State of Israel. In
just a few years, the campaign picture has chang-
ed drastically.
Need for Expansion
From $1.4 million raised in 1965, the effort
flourished to the $10 million raised in a cam-
paign that saw the Federation leading North
America's Federations in percentage of cam-
paign increase.
Greater Miami is now the fifth largest Jew-
ish community in the United States and the fast-
est growing Jewish community outside of Israel.
Realizing that it cannot begin to fulfill its
ROBIRT RUSSCU
pledge of "helping Jews in need, wherever they
may be 'unless its own Jewish community is
strong. Federation's officers and board of direc-
tors have constantly stressed the need for inno-
vation and expansion of the 22 Miami-based
agencies and services funded by the annual
campaigns.
But without the involvement and drive of
those leaders of the Jewish community who have
made Federation's goals their own. the best in-
tended professional goals of Federation agency
directors could not be pursued.
This involvement has been increasingly
fueled by missions to Israel. Coordinated by UJA,
the missions arc not tours; they are intensive
learning experiences which afford the partici-
pants an "insiders view" of Israel.
The mission to Israel last October, which
was limited to 200 individuals, saw 60 Miamians
sign up. an unprecedented response.
Intensive Mission to Israel
Federation arranged a special sub-mission to
Vienna so that the Miami group could witness
the Soviet Jews arriving in their first free world
stop on their way to Israel.
Once in Israel, the group was briefed by top
government officials and was taken to areas
of the country usually off-limits to visitors.
From the Golan Heights in the north to
the Suez Canal, the Miamians covered the coun-
try, talking, touching, dancing and singing with
MMMf UVY
the people who with their bravery and persist-
ance. have taken the dream and made it a
reality.
Throughout the mission, the Miamians visited
social welfare institutions and services that paral-
leled those offered by their 22 Miami benefici-
aries.
A Magnificent Obsession
Joint Distribution Committee Malbens run
along lines similar to Douglas Gardens, Miami's
Jewish Home for the Aged; modern, fully equip-
ped hospitals, similar to our own Mount Sinai
Medical Center; Ulpans, for new immigrants simi-
lar to those run by the Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education to instruct Miami's youth in a
language that many had thought dead.
The similarities were not denied, and neither
was the commitment to a pledge and a promise
that will not be broken.
F, r 25 years the people of Israel have labored
and battled to keep the doors open to immigra-
tion, to reclaim the land, to fulfill the dream of
a Jewish homeland.
And for all that time, the Jewish community
of Miami has battled with them, knowing that
with their financial, emotional and moral support
no dream would be impossible.
When Theodor Herzl spoke of a Jewish na-
tional homeland at the turn of the century, many
called him a madman.
The madness became an obsession. And the
obsession has become a magnificent reality.
Fm Karen-Take
my tour to Israel
during the 25th
anniversary year
Israel...Plus Europe and a Greek Isle Cruise.
Tour me to Israel, the land of incredible contrasts, where the old blends perfectly with the new; where
people of all beliefs and backgrounds live and work side by side. Whether you're looking for historical sights or a
sun drenched beach, you'll find it in one of my four tours to Israel in this, the 25th anniversary year. In each tour,
after kraelthere's a stay in Zurich, Rome. London or Athens and 3 peaceful, lovely days cruising through the Creek
Islands and Rhodes, Andros, Mykonos. Crete and the rest. Choose from 21 and 22 day tours, prices start at $569*
plus airfare from Miami. Prices slighdy higher in June, July and August. A call to your travel agent will get you all
the details or call National at 874-3160 or send me this coupon.
Mail to: National Airlines, Inc., P.O. Box 2055/AMF, Miami, Florida 33159.
Name.
Address.
_City.
-State.
Zip-
Travel Agents name.
National# Holidays-
AMhiMinK llllllllhallllllhlf S75 h,**,,^^determined."The rncin.hiadcrcrpc,>on^oct***-, ****** <*>> *<*' IV Wt
Al lh.% Ml, _... ^ ^k ^ navc) (ot filu, lour pri, whcn mJ.iT* your m*, ......
\* fMMM .he lowe Mn available on .eeularly scheduled Hjo. ll.l-l.Tilr ..,l, .he unc...you, demure. a0.6-18


.rr MM1.ll l.UIM.-MM,
Page 6 D
A break from guard duty for Israel's armed forces.
Continued from Page 1-B
art abantlonrr.cnt of security, but
there would certainly be a more
rational distribution between the
security and the economic needs
of the signatory countries.
Every year the population of
the leading Arab States grows by
a million, that is to say, by t
number much greater than tint
of the reiuaees in camps. In con-
ditions of war and conflict,
neither the refugee problem nor
the problems of increased popu-
lation can be solved, since there
is no rational its<> of resources
for human needs.
Peace is not a word or a
juridical phrase It is a total rev-
olution in the meaning style and
content of life. It is not a docu-
mentary device, but a human
oondition the like of which our
generation in the Middle East has
never known.
The question is whether Arab
leadership can break loose from
an obsolete routine of conflict to
explore this prospect. It is in
peace, not in violence, that the
Palestinian Arabs will find their
true destiny. Let us not forget
that 99 per cent of the Arab
nation has achieved its self-
determination in sovereign Arab
States. Few peoples in history
have ever attained such a high
proportion of their total ambi-
tion. In conditions of peace,
Israel's eastern neighbor would
be an Arab State, a majority of
whose population would be com-
posed of Palestinian Arabs, and
a majority of all the Palestinian
Arabs would be citizens of il.
This has always been true of
the Kindom of Jordan, whose
Structure, name and regime were
determined not by Israel but by
its Arab citizens. Wherever the
boundary is drawn in the peace
agreement, the Palestinian Arabs
on both sides of the Jordan will
find a hotter future than that
which Arafat and Habbash and
the terrorist leaders can offer
them There will always be a
sizable Palestine Arab commun-
ity in Israel. But this will have
no negative significance when
close cooperation across an open I
frontier exists between Israel and j
its eastern neighbor. The original
former Palestine area on both |
sides of the Jordan will aecom-'
modate two States. Israel aad an [
Arab State, while the area re-
gains its natural economic unity
and advances towards new forms
of economic integration.
Working Backwards
This, at any rate, is what Israel
means by peace. If we have a
clear vision of peace aims, it will
not be difficult to work back-
wards from the desired result
towards the process that leads
towards it. In the territorial
negotiation. Israel's aim will be
the fixing of new boundaries of-
fering a firmer security than the i
old armistice lines could provide.'
In short, there are no problems
which peace cannot solve.
On Israel's 25th anniversary
we can confidently say that war
has ceased to be an option for
anyone who seeks to effect a real
transformation in the relation-
ship between Israel and the
Arabs. Peace remains the only
viable choice. And the road te i
peace is through negotiations
between those who need it most,
Arabs and Israelis.
..... V

Frontispke Artist
Frontispiece for this special Israel 25fh Anniver-
ary Edition of The Jewish flondian was done by
Harrv lui, an industrial designer, science writer and
technical illuet'jtor. Lui is a grsduate mechanical
engineer, whose interests in art and writing led
him into many years of activity as an industrial de-
signer. He has by-lined articfes published in many
technical journals. Currently, he Is writing and illus
faring a boo* dealing with applied science. *e-
production courtesy of The tWtrofl Jew.sh New..
"'-> ....

* JJpw iit Fhridian
Friday, May 18, 1973
(omplinH'iils of
I

IMPORTERS OF LIGHTING FIXTURES
TABLES LAMPS WALL SCONCES
MIRRORS ACCESSORIES
'.' AMI
ISI.E -Oth STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE
N. OCEAN BOULEV/ D
BOCA RATUri
T880 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
SALLY and GEORGE MILDWOFF
Salute to
25th Anniversary
of the
State of Israel
from
CHASE
\
FEDERAL.
'


I
V.-
Friday, May 18. 1973
fJknist fhrktbf)
Page 7-D

/
BURDINE.'S

M
v>
*
*&>*.
. where ancient empires and civilizations
rose and flourished, and left
their indelible stamp on the history of mankind.
. where the Patriachs laid the foundations
of the Jewish faith
. where King David built his beautiful
city, Jerusalem, sacred to Jew, Christian.,
and Moslem alike.
. where, in our time, a nation was reborn,
May 14th, 1948, fulfilling the biblical prophecy.
shabco


?age MJ
pJewistifkx-Mfor
Friday, May 18. 1973
mRY BLADE Of MASS HAS ITS OWN ANGtl THAT MATS AND URGtS IT TO G*OVi
Revolutionary Changes in Israels Economy Over the last 25 Years
Production Increases 9 Percent
Annually Since Stale Began
By PINCHAS SAP1R
Minister of Finance
In her 25 years of existence. Israel has under
gone revolutionary changes in every sphere of life,
including the economy. Her population has increased
fourfold while production has jumped sevenfold. Fur-
thermore, the nature of production has changed com-
pletely. When created. Israel was an agricultural, un-
developed country where most locally manufactured
products were earmarked for domestic consumtion.
Twenty-five years laf. she is a modern industrial
country producing machinery, complex electronic
equipment, fine chemical products and iet plan's
Whereas Israel once produced mainly for her own
needs, today her exports exceed S2 billion a year.
Whereas a considerable part of Israel's territory was
once desolate and unpopulated, scores of new t>'*n>
populations in the thousands and tens of thou-
sands have mushroomed. .-,< we'! as hundreds of new
villages Whoever saw the country prior to the
non of the state would hardlv recognize it today It
has changed in every field of ecmomic activity, and
yet it has retained .ts own special character! tics.
Several Major Goals
A Jewish legend relates that every blade of grass
has its own angel that beat-; it and urges a t > grow,
and this legend has been realized in the State of Israel.
From the day the state was declared, the economy has
been expanding rapidly in all fields, to solve the many
pressing problems confronting it. Since 1948. produc-
tion has increased by an average of 9 to 10 per cent
annually, one of the highest growth rates in the world
and similar to that of Japan. Only through this rapid
expansion has the economy been able to fulfill the
tasks imposed upon it.
Israel is unique in that she had to achieve several
major goal* simultaneously. On the face of it, each of
the targets should have been given undivided atten-
tion. But the special conditions in Israel precluded
this approach.
lion on defense, of which approximately $850 million
was for arras procurement abroad. This imposes a very
heavy strain on the economy, in view of the steady defi-
cit in the import-export balance, the growth of which
is due mainly to arms procurement. The defense effort
also necessitates the transfer of qualified workers and
of modern equipment from production for domestic
civilian consumption and exports to the defense field
which yields no economic profit. For example, a trac-
tor driver might be mobilized, together with his trac-
tor, for fortification work, or a large metal plant might
have to produce shells.
Immigrant Absorption
A second factor, necessitating large investments and
conducive to inflation in the short run and to develop-
ment in the long run, is the absorption of immigrants.
In 1948, there were about 650.000 Jews in Israel. In
1972, there were about 2.7 mi/.on. About 15 million
immigrants have come to this country since the state
was founded. Their economic absorption was difficult
because of the narrow scope of the economy and be-
cause many of them lacked vocational training.
During the period of large-scale immigration, the
heavy economic pressures and shortages sometimes
The first and most pressing need is security. The
POPULATION BY TYPE OF SETTLEMENT' 1I7Q
tie. *f Settlement* Population
Tcwnt 17
Urban ettiement* 47
Villages H
l/lcshavim
K'Sbutzim
Institution?, farms, tfh
OtHar*
TOTAL 7f
M. j#wh only
FOREIGN TRADE BALANCE 194* 170 ( tW.n*. M *"*>
Import*.
19-19
1962 1970
Arabs' reaction to Israel's birth in 1948 was an imme-
diate invasion of her territory. Sine" then. Israel has
continually been in a state of war with her neighbors
who refuse to make peace with her. Successfully to
meet all eventualities, the state must purchase the
most up-to-date and expensive weapons, maintain a
regular army, be able to mobilize all the young men
and women and locally produce arms, ammunition and
equipment.
This effort involves the state in heavy defense ex-
penditure. Even during years of relative calm, in the
early 1960s, for example, Israel spent 10 per cent of
her total resources on defensea rate unmatched in
any country in tthe western world, apart from the
United States. After the Six-Day War. the percentage
rose even higher because of the hijrh cost of modern
equipment. At present Israel spends more than 25
per cent of her total resources on defense, a rate with-
out parallel in any part of the west.
In her 25th year, Israel has spent about SI.5 bil-
forced the government to impose a policy of rationing.
Even in other periods, integration of immigrants neces-
sitaed sizable investments, especially in the construc-
tion field. At the same time, immigration proved a
most dynamic factor for the development of the econ-
omy. It obliged the State to develop its agriculture and
establish new industries. It led to the creation of new
villages and development towns and the resultant dis-
persal of the population over the entire country'.
The first 25 years of the State indicate that every
rerind of mass immigration brings rapid economic
development, while a slowdown in development is
iinked to small-scale immigration.
Many immigrants arrived completely destitute. To
prevent a gradually widening social gap in the level
of education and the standard of living, the govern-
ment undertook to ensure comprehensive social serv-
ices for all the inhabitants of Israel and comprehen-
sive education services were evolved. Today, school
attendance is ccmpulsory and free for all five- to 16-
year-old children. And children from poor families can
receive free education even in the upper grades of
high school and in universities.
The number of students receiving higher educa-
tion has increased 45-fold and Israel has the third
highest proportion of students per capita in the world.
New hospitals were set up and a medical insurance
network developed. A comprehensive welfare system
and national insurance were organized to ensure mini-
mum income to persons unable to earn a living because,
of poor health, old age, and so on.
A system designed to help families of all sizes to
maintain a decent standard of living is being devel-
oped: it embraces the entire population, veterans and
newcomers, Jews and Arabs. We are striving confi-
dently to turn Israel into one of the most enlightened
welfare states in the world. The pohcy reflects the
Cm tin* el on Pf* 12-0
Israel's Silver flnniuersciry
373
1,878,100
410.400
S 43,900
j= 127.800
== 84,900
* 13,200
2,200
TOTAL 2,560,500
"If you will it...
it is no dream."
Cheodor fierzl
Congratulations To The
State of Israel
from
The Management and Employees
Of Levitz Furniture Corp.
r*


Friday, May 18, 1973
-Jewish fhrMian
Page 9-D
To Israel
whose gates remain open to immigration
To Israel
upon the threshold of the celebration
of 25 years of independence
To greater Miami-Miami Beach,
host to the nation at the annual
Israel Bond Inaugural
i
And to the multitude of Americans
Friends of Israel whose continuing
support is an inspiration to a nation
striving for peace in the Middle East
MIAMI
NATIONAL
BANK
Come In And See Us At
8101 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI
797-2441
CURRENT BANKING HOURS
LOBBY
MM*.* Ml M- **** ***
$MfM. t*1MpM. fihtaf Htafaf
DRIVE-UP AND WALK-UP


Jag 10-D
* kwist fhrkttor,
Friday, May 18. 1973
Jjsraels Continued from Page 2D
the husband is obliged to pay
alimony to the wife and her
children.
la east* of separation, the
daughter stays with the mother
the sun stays with her up to
i^e age of six only). If a public
factor intervenes, the son also
remains with the mother.
In cases ot mixed marriages,
-lere the mother is Jewish, the
hild i- registered as a Jew. (The
problem of registration of chil-
. en of mixed marriages where
1 e mother is not Jewish has not
1t beer, solved and causes com-
'cation- in the lives of those
. ivolved).
Every child born is legal, and
e i- no discrimination against
I i unwed mother or against a
ol recognized by his
are few such cases
ii Israel.)
At Work
Although women represent 33
, cenl of the labor force, this
rcentage is lower than in some
. veloped. industrial countries
I is due chiefly to the number
women immigrants from
Islamic countries, where w >men
aditionally do not go to work
and Hi'- large families are a fur-
.,-. deterrent. With time, this
barrier is crumbling and women
S~t. Do'ci writing home to Kibbutz Neot Mordehcri during
break from field exercises.
of all sectors are joining fhe
labor force Women dominate the
fields of education aid nursing.
and of social, clerical an,' office
work. A constantly-expanding in
dustry ami techm logy are cre-
ating a need for more women
employees. Many have attained
high rank in the judiciary as
judges and attorneys, although
few serve in elected national
bodies or in the diplomatic
corps, for all their record of ac-
complishment in the delegations
abroad and at the UN. Regret-
fully, too. there are few women
in local government.
The National Insurance Law.
1953. which provides social pro-
tection for the general popula-
tion, is the basic law protecting
the woman worker. It provides
as follows:
Women giving birth in hos-
pital (this includes one hundred
per cent of Jewish and over 94
per cent of Arab and Druze
women! receive a maternity
grant. The working mother Is en-
titled to 12 week.-' leave at 75
per cent of her salary.
Old age insurance. Women
receive a pension at the age of
SO. equal to 'hat received by men
at the age of 65.
The housewife who i- not
independently insured is entitled
to 50 per cent of tin old
pension Efforts are being made
to extend housewives' protection
to include coverage for home
accidents.
An allowance is assured for
the widow and her children.
In cases of work accidents
the insured salaried employee
and the self-employed (women)
arc entitled to insurance benefits
in the '-ame way as men.
Large families arc given
granl i lor -he fourth and cadi
sub eoin ill child.
The Law of Work
The Labor Laws i;' Israel
which aim at ensuring proper
work conditions for the em-
ployee have borne rich fruit. The
Law of Woik and Host H
acts lo protect the worker i
health. The Animal Holiday Law
grants him leisure time witl
familj II"' working woman en-
.. the benefits of these law
in equal measure with the mar
and the laws endure this in thei
interpretation.
Oi special importance are th
instructions laid down in Th:
Work Law for Women: S'i
work and work harmful to 1
health of women is forbidden
Dismissal of pregnant v. men ;<
forbidden. Women have the right
lo nurse their babies during work
lime without deduction of salarj
.twice a day for half an hour'.
In 10(54. the Law of Equal Pay
for Equal Work for Men and
Women was enacted. The inten-
tion of this law was to equalize
pay for non-professional work, in
professions tn< re i- no difference
Continued on Page 12-D
I financial]
[Tederal
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
Tower of Thrift Since 1933
Salutes
THE STATE OF ISRAEL
A Toner of Strength & Freedom since 1948
Main Office: 401 LINCOtN ROAD MAIL, MIAMI BEACH
Eight Offices in MIAMI BEACH, SUNNY ISLES, NORWOOD, KENDALL, AVENTURA, LAUDERDALE LAKES


Friday, May 18, 1973
+ kwisli fhrkUan
Jraradc LUill C^ap Page 11D
iversan
?/
Continued from Page 4-D
Torch received public Attention
at the opening of i.rloi,.
Shalom," a two-week celebration
of Israeli products at three local
Jordan Marsh stores, planned
with the assistance of the Israel
25 Committee. The occasion
brought not only displays of
Israeli-made clothing and house-
wares, bin Israelis themselves,
demonstrating individual craft-
manship, as well as cooking and
other aspects of cultural interest.
Jewish Specialties
M imians met "Shalom. Sha-
lom" enthusiastically, contribut-
ing scores of Jewish specialties
to a Jordan Marsh food contest.
requesting Israeli stamps through
the Jordan .Marsh philatelic
booth, and responding in an un-
precedented way to the merchan-
dise.
Betwei n Ken 12 and 23. the
Genera] mica Corporation of
Miami featured an exhibit if
furniture and accessories from
Israeli manufacturers. Eagerly
received by the trade and the
general public, the display items
were brought from Israel with
the sponsorship of the Greater .
Miami-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce, in conjunction with the
Israel 25 Committee.
During the same period, i!i
work of many of Israel's nu-t
noted artists was on display at
Miami's Bacardi Gallery. These
were obtained through the Col-
lector Art Gallery, the Glori*
l.uria Gallery and Gallery 3. An-
other successful display of art
works from Israel was held Fab.
28 through Mar. 9 at the Ami-
icana Hotel's Collector Gallery.
Art Chairman Mrs. Marvin Gill-
man worked closely with Cul-
tural Chairman Mrs. Mike Sum-
berg to bring about the success
of these events.
Groups from all segments of
the Jewish community, from (lc-
mentarj school children to senior
citizens, were both thrilled and
moved by the Israel 25 Cultural
Festival, held at the Federation
building from Mar. 1 to 4 under
the leadership of Mrs. Aaron
Farr. Among the noteworthj at-
tractions was a Holocaust art
exhibit, n collection of heart-
rending works which blazed into
the memories of the lhou>ards
who saw it.
Treasures of Judaita
Also on display at the Festival,
along with contemporary paint-
ing and sculpture, books, coins
and a stamp exhibit, were many
treasures of Judaica spldom seen
outside Israel. Photography films
and live entertainment added
txcitement to this multimedia
celebration of Israel's meaning to
Jews around the world.
An official Israel 25 reception
on Mar. 4 at the Federatcn
building welcomed Israel Consul
General Benjamin Bonney on be-
half of the Committee and the
community as a whole.
Over 50 voices were uplifted
in sacred song, when the Cantors
Association sponsored the Can-
tonal Music Festival on Mar. 24,
at Miami Beach Auditorium. Fea-
turing music by an ensemble of
cantors, soloists and a combined
children's chorus, the religious
music was enjoyed by an audi-
ence of more than 3,000.
The spotlight shifted to danc-
ing on Apr. 1, when the Israel 25
Committee, Jewish Youth Coun-
cil, the Hillel Jewish Student
Center and the YM-YWHA of
Greater Miami sponsored Israel
25's Folk Dance Festival at the
University of Miami. Chairmen
Deborah Lubin and Mine Klein
helped create an exciting pro-
gram that captivated an audience
of more than 1.000.
The Israel 25 Zimriah. co-
ordinated by Cantor David Con-
viser and Mrs. William Kanniol.
was held Apr. 5 at Temple Beth
Sbolom. Seven youth choirs from
synagogues in the Miami area
performed in an evening of
Israeli folk and religious music
More than 40 synagogue- in
the Miami area commemorated
Israel's 25th anniversary in the
Shabbat sen ices. Friday evening,
-May 4. and Saturday. May 5. with
special programs coordinated by
the Babbinical Association of
Greater Miami, in conjunction
with the Israel 25 Commit I -
All festival events culmi-
nated at 7 p.m. on Sunday.
May b'. when the Committee pre-
sented "A Night in Israel'' at
Flamingo Park. The entire park
was transformed into an
Israeli bazaar, with decorations,
music and refreshments, opening
wliii a stirring multimedia .. im-
memorative prayer service
Ritual and Music
The service was prepar ,i hv
Rabbi Stanley Ringler, director
of the University of Miami's
Hillel Jewish Student Center.
and included ritual and music
with the cooperation of the Rab-
binical Association, end dunce
presentations coordinated by
Mr.-. Ari Kedem. all capturing
'' '.i "! cr>jri| ,.' the -I" < -h
state's 25 years. Noted impres
sario Shmuel Fer.hko produce*
the entertainment, and Mrs
Ira Rothfleld was chairman of the
evening.
The following evening, the
American Zionist .;.ration pre
- nted its Yom Ha'A/moat
Israel Independence Day pro
gram in conjunction with the
Israel 2"> Committee. .Sen. Ed
ward Gumey was the featured
speaker, with BarncM BreesWn'a
Miami Beach Sj mphony Orches
tra providing music. In cha-': of
information was AZF vice pres-
ident Mrs. Milton Green.
The Israel Stamp Service was
established, and special library
exhibits of Israeli culture were
'initiated here
With the slate of interesting
activities spanning several
months, and the understanding
that results from it^ variety of
educational programs, Israel 25
is more than an ordinan festival.
It is an event whose meaning
will remain in the hearts and
minds of thousands for years t->
come. And it is uniting the entire"
Jewish community of Greater
.Miami in a -;>i-it nf eeletvAll n
Mis. Burton R. Levey, Israel 25 chairman for Greater Miami,
presents the Torch of Israel's Indepandenco to the cast an'i
audience oi "From Israel With Love." a Miami Beach
i-,-,,tr rttrrcticn.
Hag Sah-may-ach
Israel!
Air France Salutes You
on\bur 25th Anniversary
We started flying to Israel on August 12,
1947 even before there was a Jewish State
and our people-to-people flights to
Israel have been going on ever since.
And remember, a bon voyage is still a
trip on Air France. It is the assurance of
the most thoughtful service and
superb cuisine. It is a choice of departing
from New York, Boston. Philadelphia,
Washington, Chicago, Los An.eeles,
Miami, and Houston. It is a multitude of
destinations: France and all Europe,
Israel, Mexico, or the West Indies, or for
that matter almost anywhere in the world.
Call your travel ag-ent or your nearest
Air France office.
800-221-2110
AirFranceiT
\Afe make it easy to get there


Page 12-D
Jewish fk*kfian
Friday, May 18. 1973
EMPLOYED PERSONS BY ECONOMIC BRANCH 1970
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing
Manufacturing (Mining and Industry)
Employed person* Percentage
(Thousands)
84.8 8 8
oman
ig (Mining
Electricity and Water

Construction and Public Works
Commerce, Restaurants and Hotels
Transport and Communications
Financing and Business Services
Public Services
Other Services
Not Known
TOTAL 963,2 100.0%
AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS 1949 1970 (in U.S.$ million)
126 4 TOTAL
OTHERS
1&4
CITRUS
EGGS
1955
1960
1965
1970
J^jrisk C^c
onom
n
Continued irom fagt 1-0
fundamental recognition of the responsibility of the
state for its citizens and the desire to give an equal
opportunity for development to every child and adult.
These three goals can be attained only through
the maintenance of a rapidly developing economy. And
in fact we have worked, over the years, for an accele-
rated economic development through large investments
and the mobilization of means to finance them.
Ideological Conception
Israel's meagre national resources soil, water,
and the few raw materials have been utilized. Nu-
merous enterprises have been set up ports and air-
ports, villages, water pipelines and irragation networks,
industrial enterprises, quarries and hotels. These in-
vestments reflect both an economic necessity and an
ideological conception. The ideal of Zionism was to
settle a nation in its own country, living in peace with
its neighbors and subsisting on its own labor. The
rapid development of the country is a direct outcome
of this ideal.
Each one of these goals is important and demands
a special effort of the people. The burden of taxation
in Israel is in fact higher than in any other country.
And yet, Israel's independent resources are far
from meeting her requirements and throughout the
years especially since 1967 the state has suffered
from an external debt and has had to resort to foreign
loans. These come from various quarters, foreign
governments, banks, and sales of Development Bonds
and have been responsible for making Israel's foreign
debt the highest in the world.
Not All Objectives Attained
A major factor in our development to date has
been the aid extended by the Jewish communities
abroad. This has taken the form of large donations and
long-term loans, investments by businessmen, partner-
ships between foreign investors and Israelis, the im-
port of know-how and purchase of Israeli goods. The
participation of world Jewry is characteristic of Israel's
economy and is one of the secrets of its rapid expan-
sion. The economic conference which met in 1968 and
is due to convene in 1973 reflects the strength of the
Jewish communities in the business world and their
desire to endow Israel with the fruits of their experi-
ence.
After 25 years, not all our objectives have been
attained. The road ahead is still long, but we can look
to the future with confidence, in the realization of
our past achievements and the knowledge that we arc
not alone in our struggle.
Continued from Po| 10-0
in the pay of men and women.
Also of note is the Provision
of Employment Law which for-
bids discrimination between men
and women in giving employ-
ment.
Special attention has been de-
voted to the income tax problems
of the married working woman.
Achievements up to now include
the right of a woman working
outside ner home to file separate
income tax returns from those
of her husband, and a woman
working in a joint business with
her husband may claim a IL250
exemption from taxes.
However, the tax problems of
working women have not yet
found a satisfactory solution,
which would encourage more
women to seek employment.
One of women's basic demands
is that the wages paid to house-
hold help be tax-deductible and
that the greater household ex-
penses of a family !n which the
wife works be taken into account.
Voluntary Work
The extent of women's capa-
bilities can be seen in their per-
formance in women's organiza-
tions, especially in education,
social work, professional training
of women, helping new immi-
grants, organizing volunteer
groups and promoting coopera-
tion between Jewish women in
Israel and those in other coun-
tries.
The improved status is not lim-
ited to Jewish women. The Work-
ing Women's Council has aided
Arab and Druze women by or
ganizing dozens of local groups
and encouraging tjiem to under-
go training and enter the labor
market in agriculture, industry,
education and other professions.
Recently, day-care centers have
been opened In Arab and Druze
villages to help working mothers.
We turn dreams
Into realities
EVERYONE HAS A DREAM THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL HAD A DREAM .
AND IT CAME TRUE MAYBE YOU'VE NEVER BEEN TO ISRAEL ANO YOU
DREAM OF GOING THERE SOME DAY MAYBE YOU'VE BEEN THERE AND
YOU DREAM OF A DAY WHEN YOU CAN RETURN "SOME DAY" CAN SEEM
LIKE AN AWFULLY LONG TIME TO WAIT ONE DAY YOU MAY TURK
AROUND ANO FIND THAT "SOME DAY'' NEVER CAME ANO YOU NEVER
WENT. BUT "SOME DAY" COULD BE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK YOUR
DREAMS CAN COME TRUE, EVEN IF MONEY STANDS IN THE WAY TELL US
YOUR DREAMS WE TURN DREAMS INTO REALITIES
CALL 534 1577 OR COME SEE US
YOU TALK. WELL LISTEN YOUR SOME DAY MAY BE JUST AROUND
THE CORNER1
We're there with the money when you need it!
FCXC
CARNER BANK
or MIAMI II) Ai M
930 WASHINGTON AVE.. MIAMI BEACH. FLA. PHONE: (3051 534-1677

KET WISHES I
SHALOM
IN ISRAEL
CM YOU1R
TK
VERSAR3T


Friday, May 18, 1973
+Jmte* f^rHlar
Page 13-D
.New Era Opens in Land Development as Emphasis Shifts from Process
Of Reclamation to Projects of Resettlement
By BR. HERBERT FREEDEN
JERUSALEM'"History has no
** record in the short quarter-
Sentury of the state's existence,
ot only have a coiicsive society
kml a viable economy emerged
jn a country which until recently
was reckoned among the poorest
in the Mediterranean region, bill
even the landscape has been
transformed beyond recognition,
in these achievements, the Jew-
ish National Fund has played a
decisive role.
The Desert Blooms
The role of the Jewish Xationa'
Fund in the national renaissance
Is one of historic dimensions. A
pioneering generation settled on
Fund holdings in areas which
Seemed forlorn, on soil which
Seemed uncultivable. The JNF
helped them not only to occupy
Jhe land, but to ameliorate it
ind improve it. The fund's land
licy was amply vindicated: in
lovember, 1947 the United Na-
ns drew the boundaries of the
oposed Jewish State almost .
sly in accordance with the land
foldings of the Jewish National
Fund. In the War of Indepen-
dence, settlements on land.
bought by the JNF in strategic
areas; iielpc'tf' to' stop the in-
vaders.
With establishment of the
State, a new era in land develop-
ment opened. The accent shifted
from land purchase to land recla-
mation, from the redemption of
the soil to making the desert
bloom." After the victorious de
ol Israel < nst the ene-
mies without, the offensive had
to starl on the enemy within

wildernesa.
There are no glamarous vic-
tories in this battle which is
protract) d and und amatic. And
with large parts of the country
even today bare and barren, the
battle is still far from won.
The Keren Kayemeth i- the
exclusive agent for all land de-
velopment tasks in the country.
In 1960. a law was adopted by
the Knesset extending the JNF
principles of inalienability of the
soil and its use in terms of hered-
itary leaseholdship to almost all
public land holdings in Israel.
This arrangement constitutes the
finest vindication of JNF Work
during seven decades.
By 1947, the JNF had acquired
1,089,000 dunams, almost all of it
at exorbitant prices and 87 per
cent of all Jewish" were on JNF land. After 1948.
the JNF turned its efforts to vast
land reclamation projects to clear
the way for the resettlement of
the hundreds of thousands of im-
migrants pouring in. The Fund
was allotted the exclusive task of
"conquering" the wastes no
small undertaking. The area of
cultivated land was 4.5 million
dunams, out of a total of 2'J
million dunams.
Afforestation is (ioal
The problem was to what ex-
tent the desolation could be re-
stored to fertility. Soon the
answer was found: an appreciable
part of the wasteland could be
revived. Within the plan, an im-
portant roie was given to affores-
tation on lands which even
with a maximum effort could not
be converted into farming or
grazing sites. By 1967. the JNF
planted its 100 millionth tree,
and plantings continue at the
rate of approximately 5 million
saplings per year.
The first step in developing
new regions is the construction
of a road, demarcating for the
CULTIVATED AREA 1948 -1972 (in thousand* of dunam)
4.120 4-280
4.4Q0
'.948/49
1954/55 1964/65
1969'70
1970/71
1971.72
first time the border, which 'hi
then was a hunting ground for
infiltrators and marauders. Ver-
accomplished in road building:
itable feats of engineering were
The road to Adamit crossing
the Tiger Canyon.
The road to Biranit atom,
the Lebanese frontier.
The road to Mount Gilboa
of Biblical fame.
The road to lonely Mei Ami.
The highway from Arad to
the Dead Sea.
Roads built by the JNF to
make the frontiers of Israel
safer, from the north to the south
the road along the River Jor-
dan, the link between Aduliara
and Etzion. and the mountain
road up mighty Hermon.
Continued en Page 150

South Florida
we love you!
We just had the W
biggest month in our 27-year-old historv...and we're still going strong!
Thank you, South Florida, for giving us the opportunity to prove that the "personalized
service" we speak about is fact, not an idle promise. It's paid off for us handsomely!
And we continue to stand ready to help you in all of these lines:
automobile insurance
life insurance
fire insurance
homeowners insurance
foreign insurance
apartment house insurance
commercial package insurance
workmen's compensation
group insurance
flood insurance
NSURANCE AGENCY,INC.
1820 SW 3rd Avenue, Miami 33129
Phone 854-1770
ALLANS. BORK
NEAL T. SLESS


Page 14-D
f.knisi! Fl'orSdHan
Friday. May 18, 1973
Quarter-Century of Israeli Diplomacy Has Steered a Skillful Course
By ARTHl'R I.Ol'RIE
I choose as my starting; point what is essen-
tially a personal memoir: the faundln: confer
eni-c of the United Nation-; in San Franci co in
May 1945. The nature of Jewirh participation ;-
that gathering serves to illustrate the before an I
after of Jcwi h statehood, the contrast betv e 'II
then and now.
In San Francisco, the nations of the *
lathered together t > e tablisfa a new order in in
ternational relationships. The Jewish people, re?
resented so far as ths Jewish national hum
Palestine was concerned by the Jewish Ag 'IH )
for Pale tine, recognised for that purpose und v
the Mandate for Palestine, was also there but
only on fie door:tep. The. agency dclegatioa. of
which i was a member and which included
among others. Dr. Nahum Goldmann, Eliafa
Elath. Jacob Rr.binson. Si Kenen and G rsh '
igron, did not even have access to the conference
building,
Baited From Reply
Five Arab states participated in the gath
ering as founding members, and vhen they cir-
culated to the other delegations as official docu-
ment-, material hostile to Zionism and to Jewish
rights in Palestine, om- own unrecognized group
was baned from circulating a reply through con-
ference channels
As a special concession the secretary of the
conference. Algcr Hiss, agreed in the course of a
telephone conversation I had with him that we
might leave copies of our reply with the guard
at the entrance to the conference building, and
that he himself would arrange to have them
placed in the letter boxes of the various delega-
tions.
Our concern was that th constitution of the
new organization should nol inadvertently or
otherwise whittle down Jewish rights in Pales-
tine as defined in the League of Nations Mandate.
We lobbied delegates wherever we could reach
them, at then hotels, over lunch or by written
communication Our group worker assiduously
and not without eff.t Bui it was ail *lightly
humiliating, as though wo were intrudcrt, .n .'.
corridors ol power.
Arthur lourie, now eteputy director general -i .
Israel Ministry lor Fore;- Aff.'-rs. w..i .i member '
the Jewish Agei I itioi in l4j to the Unifi I
Nations conference H- wai << liaison officer in Pales
tine with the Anglo-American Committee of Inqu
in 1946, Israel consul general and deputy pern
representative of Israel to the UN fiom 148 to 1953
and a-nbas-.ddor to Great B'li.i.n hom 1960 to 1965.
SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
angry response
Three years later, the establishmen' <'
Israel as an independent state brought with it >
fundamental change in status and functions, .lev.
Ish Agency officials were transformed overniglii
into n presentatives, in various capacities, of *
sovereign state. And with that change in status
came a "astly increased capacity for diplomatic
initiative.
Years of Struggle
At the same time, it will be clear from what
I have -aiii above that, Israel's diplomacy dii
nol suddenly spring into the world full-grown,
like Pallas Athene. Its roots lay in the lor..'
years of struggle, of hard negotiation and some
tiiii 'S of open conflict which preceded statehood
and in which the diplomatic arm of the State ill
the-making was the Political Department of th.
Jewish Agency, with its offices in Jerusalem
LonJoii, in the Geneva of th' I eague of Nations.
in the final phase in New York ami Washing
ton.
With independence, the experience thus
\. the cadres of trained personnel immed:
ateh available, proved invaluable and provided
|hp basis and the framework for Israel's Foreign
Ministry at home, and it- Foreign Service abroad.
The first achievement of Israel's diplomacy
startling enough Within h turs of the dec-
laration of iudepen lencc. President Truman. ir
re-:\>n-e to a letter from the representative In
Washin ton of the Provisional Government
Israel Eliahu Elath, accorded to the new-born
state the official recognition of the United Stati
' intent. The So\iel Union followed suit.
Peak in ( risis
During the Firs! year of statehood, l-;'.
main preoccupation in the diplomatic field was
Ihe fighl for recognition by as many countries as
possible \- far In: United Kingdom was eon-
rented Fore .;-. Secretary Erne I Bevin could not
ive Israel for having come into existence at
ill Recognition was denied for many months and
in the end came only after a dramatic and dan-
gerous episode,
In late December. 1918. renewed fi h
between Israel and Egypt once again erupted in
the Negev, Five British Spitfires based on Suez,
at that time Britain's last remaining military
base In Egypt, were scut out on a reconnaissance
mission over the Israeli lines. They were shot
down by Israeli fighter planes. The chronic cri-
sis in Anglo-Israel relations had reached a new
peak. In New York the UN General Assembly
< ssion was over, and it happened that Abba
Eban, as head of our delegation, was or. his way
home, leaving me tcmrorarily in charge,
The British delegation had until then no of-
ficial contact with tl.< representatives of a
ernment which their own government somewhat
contemptuously described as "the Jewish au-
thorities in Tei Aviv.' and i was surprised sud-
denly to receive a visit from the then head of the
United Kingdom delegation. He handed me a
stiffly worded note ol pretest and warning from
his government, which on examination prow I
be addressed not to the Government of Israel.
but to those self-same -Jewish authorities My
refusal to accepl it did nothing to relieve the
prevailing tension.
Paradoxically, however, the downing of the
British planes brought in its train recognition.
Following a furious onslaught m Parliament by
Winston Churchill on the policies of the Labor
Co'.ernment which had made this clash possible.
Bevin al length bowed to the inevitable. Israel
was accorded formal recognition and shortly
thereafter Sir Knox Helm was sent to Tel Aviv
as Britain's first Diplomatic Representative.
In the spring of 1949 the Armistice Agree
ments between Israel and the neighboring Arab
states were concluded at Rhodes under the chair-
manship of United Nations Acting Mediator Ralph
Bunche. The negotiations between the Israeli
and Egyptian delegations, the former led by the
director-general of the Foreign Ministry Waltei
Eytan. extended over a period of several weeks
The agreement thus reached set a pattern als -
for the agreements with Jordan. Lebanon and
CAMAL ABDtl NASS[R
conciliatory at first
On 25 %rs Of StateLoJl
Tlcdwnjod TITLE
()compiet MORTGAGES
^y TITL AND COMMERCIAL
INSURANCE COMPANY 2S2T W MVULT1,AMILY
Permanent and Interim
Financing Thru Insurance
Companies, Pension
Funds, Real Estate
Trusts. Savings
Banks, etc.
ALL TYPES OF
MORTGAGE LOANS
151 S W 27TH AVE.
MIAMI PHCNE 642-6220
AND
HOWARD PHONE 529 104*
r


I
View of the Old City of Jerusalem with Dome of the Rock
in foreground.


Friday, May 18, 1973
*Jpm"*fl ttorktfori
Page 15-D
f

Syria, and provided the framework for relations
between us and our neighbors for nearly two
decades. But the precedent of the direct talks
which led to the Israel-Egyptian Armistice Agree-
ment has not been repeated to this day.
Admission into United Nations
The next milestone in Israel's diplomatic his-
I tory, almost a year to the day after Israel's inde-
f pendence, was Its admission May 11. 194!), to
t membership to the United Nations.
It was a proud moment when Moshe Shared,
I flanked by members of his delegation, took his
f seat in the General Assembly at Lake Success,
and later that day. when he unfurled the (lag ol
[ Israel in the courtyard ol the UN building. In
r the years that followed Israel's delegation, led
during its first decade by its brilliant permanent
representative, Abba Eban, and at the various
General \ssembly sessions by successive foi gn
ministers. .Moshe Shareti, Golda Meir, and later
also in tli.it i.'parity by Abba Eban, was con
Btantly in the limelight as the tensions engen
dercd by unremitting Aral' hostility and acts "f
aggression found their reflection in meetings of
Ihe Security Council and in the debates of other
UN bodies.
Problems .Multiplied
The problems of Israel diplomacy at the
UN have more recently been multiplied not op.1>
by the greatly increased number and cohesion
of the Arab member states, now 18 in number,
but also by the crystallization of UN Noes, ol
none of which Israel is a member. These blocs
are based on regional or in some cases ideological
criteria The UN itself has in the meantime d"-
clined in prestige and authority, but it remains
an important forum of international debate and
propaganda whose influence should not be under-
estimated.
Perhaps its greatest value derives from th?
fact that the annual General Assembly gathering
of leading stalemen from all over the world pro-
vides an opportunity for intimate and unobtru-
sive discussion outside the council chamber, and
*M>
Home made armored cars built over ex-
is'ing truck chassis formed the basic
armament of the Israel army in 1948.
The sophistication c! the Israel defence
forces today is a far cry f-om ihe primi-
tive equipment available in the fighting
25 years ago. Daring and commitment
made the difference.
of the Israel leadership that has taken full ad-
vantage of till-.
Two of the most significant of Israel's diplo-
matic achievements, were connected respectively
with the Sinai campaign against Egypt in 1958,
and the Six-Day War of 1967. The first culmi-
nated, after a prolonged and bard-fought negotia-
tion primarily in Washington, in the affirmation
of American support, with wide international
backing for Israel's right to free and unhindered
passage through the Straits of Tiran.
The second, which followd Gen. Nasser's
renewed closure of the Straits in May. 1967, cen-
tered initially on the tense but vital weeks of dip-
lomatic maneuvering which preceded the actual
outbreak of hostilities; and then, following Is-
rael's decisive victory, on the bitter struggle at
the United Nat.on;, in the face ol Soviet and
Arab pressure, to ensure that what had been
achieved on the battlefield should become the
prelude to a genuine negotiated peace and not
.i return to the status quo and another war for
sun ival.
Setbacks in Diplomacy
Israel's diplomatic relationships extend to-
day to inoal o: the countries of the world apart
from th." Arab and most other Moslem stales.
Notable excej lions are china and Spain. Rela-
tion* which had been established with the So-
vii I Union and the other Communist states of
Eastern Europe 'ere. with the exception of Ru-
mania, served after the Six-Day War. There have
.1 o been some setbacks recently in the compre-
hensive network of relationships which had been
established with the countries of black Africa
B I the scone of Israel's international links todaj
is reflected in the fact that Israel is represented
by embassies, legations and consulates in no less
than 94 countries throughout the world.
As to the quality of these relationships i! Is
worth recording that within the past 18 months,
official or semi-official visits have been paid to
Israel by the foreign minister and in some cases
the prime minister of no less than 22 countries,
among them the United States, the United King-
dom, West Germany, Austria. Belgium, Denmark,
Holland, Italy. Norway, several African coun-
tries fthe presidents of Zaire, Nigeria, Senegal
and Cameroon came on a special peacemaking
mission) and various Latin American countries,
including mo*! recently the foreign minister of
Brazil.
Diplomacy is in the last resort a function of
policy; policy in its turn is the responsibility of
government. Israel's diplomacy may justly claim,
throughout the 25 years of Israel's statehood, to
have carried out the tasks imposed upon it with
loyalty, dedication and an impressive degree of
competence.
.
e/Vew Cra x^spens: C*mph
asis on
iKesettli
settlement
<_/odaxi
ContinueJ from Page 130
Some 540 new settlements
were set up between 1948 and
1071. twice the number in ex-
istenee when the State was es-
tablished. To sored up set: ie-
menl. even before the necessary
minim -mi of arable soil for new
villages v.a, available, the Keren
y*ar- of Statehood a new, transi
tory form of settlement, the
"work village'' whose inhabitant.
in the initial years, based their
Bvelihi'i'M on their work as hired
laborer.-, of the .Jewish. National
Fund. The Fund 'luarantecd them
the number of annual workdays
necessan for the upkeep of their
families
Second Phase
The second phase began in Ihe
middl? fifties with the idea of
rural settlement on a regional
scale, the I.akhi-h Region becom-
ing the prototype. The Hula
swamps were drained in a huge
and complicated ooeration which
took eight years (1951-1958) and
brought 100.000 dunams under
cultivation by now the fines'.
soil in the country.
The Jewish National Fund look
the initiative for the develop-
ment of particularly difficult
border areas like the Adullam
Region of southern Judea, or
later, the Adorayini and Yatir
regions still further south, or 'he
smaller projects.for the Modi'im
Area of northern .Judea, the
Korazim Region north of Lake
Kinneret
An important regional enter-
prise with the ku-ren Kayemeth
as a senior partner, is in central
Galilee. The latest such area is
the Arava Valley, stretching from
the Dead Sea to the Red Sea,
along the Jordanian border.
A third phase, initiated in the
early sixties, runs parallel to
regional settlement planning It
is characterized by the close
cooperation between the Jewish
National Fund and the Israel
\rmy. Nahal (Army Pioneer
Settler Corps) outpost villages
have been set up on border sites
because of their strategic impor-
tance. The settlers are male and
female soldiers who give part of
their i rvice in the form of work
in land development and farming.
The JNF in these cases has taken
upon itself not only the reclama-
tion of the soil and the building
of access roads, but also the con
struction of all the Installations
needed in the initial period.
Important Factor
Altogether, the Keren Kaye-
meth has emerged as an impor-
tant factor on the labor market.
Th" number of workdays pro
vided in land reclamation and
afforestation programs rose from
60.000 in 1948 and 1949 to 295.000
n 1949 and 1950. and 715.000 in
1951 and 1952. and then settled
down to 500.000 annually.
By 1975. contemplated projects
would extend land preparation to
an additional 137.000 dunams of
agricultural acreage: and the
planting of 12 million trees, with
Investments totaling 258 million
II..
Some 33 pei cent of contem-
plated development will be car-
ried out in settlements which
came into being after the 1967
war. These projects will call for
an investment of II. 164 million
ki land reclamation, drainage
and road building and will be
carried out In nine regions with
the bulk of the expenditure go-
ing to land improvement for ag-
riculture: in the Jordan Vall-y.
46.000 denams; in the Golan
Heights. 36.000 dunams. and in
the Arava, 14.000 dunams.
The afforestation allocation for
the next four years of IL 94 mil
lion, in addition to new forests,
will bring the total of trees plant-
ed to 120 million by the end of ":;6 000 dunams (231.000 acres* dunams won by drainage opera-
1975. to 2,520.000 dunams (641,000); tions: some 2.600 kilometers .'
In the 25 years of statehood. 450 000 dunams oi land were roads were built and over 100
JNF land holdings grew from reclaimed and another 200.000 million trees planted.
-


*
Hot :> +JemHtfkrH&r. _________rr^ry Key 13 ;r:

THE
STATE
OF
ISEAEL
LongaDream.
25 Years aReality.
\ Washington i
I Federal1,
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI KACI '
Miami Beach offices: .
1701 Meridian Avenue
1234 Washington Avenue
1133 Normandy Drive
Phone: 538-8452
North Miami Beach office:}
633 NE. 167th Street
Phone: 538-8452
Hollywood office: >
450 North Park Road ,
Phone. 987-9192
.tCID GORDON AATMU* M. COUKSeeM/
B C-t it ii ** -***
/


5 Years After: And the Reign of Terror Continues
^Jewish Meridian
Miami. Florida Friday, May 18, 1973
Section E
/En Nabatiyt
En Naqure
Dill /'
GesneJ Majiy,
SK I /'
Qifyat Shtmona]
(., TibflinO :, /|
Bin! JuMiIq
EBANON y
Ft
tkhaj
nYirta
Tirat Hakarma
Allift
Oalyt JH
ISRAl
Zikhran Yi' --"
Of 'AqiveJ,
Pafdai Mi
Hade/I
Kefar Vilkn
NitJt/
Even Yah
_Ktt
<-YYbad
o
ItaUtMy ,
lajat'ja
k
kaim
foBurqj
vTutel
. OTammun
"" Her/eliyJ2^oJ
Ramjt Hashjrj^
raiwn,
Itae Bi
Tel Aviv Jaffa,
cm'1
----------- T"iM
umaliya
HiSharon
6an^ -WtsT
oBeirr^
IX&ateian^
Riihon le (inoj
Hti lipjr*
Yaw
Ashdod8
Javne >_.
'it Shemeth0
Glut uu*r*
Qn MV'.kh
Yad Mordtiinaij
GAZA STRIP '^gjg^HTTfcte"
ANK ,
nMllill eiKSni'5
(Otcupiadfby '"Itrotl)
B Zail0/ ,.,
iN.lin L\*v
iallarlV; Den Dibat|
fcjljnd Je,|C
LshuW. >
irusalem
f08il Sahui
Nu*"ali^1Ei Bure
Deir el BaiaW >\_
Ban! Si-n*'/ /
KINIIiall l
COHDUII
'

Bejhieh*
|idna f Haifa* >.
]ou.'aO/ Ban, Nairn
y i/^ ..Yalta >-'
luhamaX X X
Dhahi-i^l OSji,,u. ^/
Miihma> >p----------f"4 Hanegrv ^ ^ *&**-*
*/ai
Dtad
S
\
RiimO
oM V,
-Difnona'
>"

'EtUI
.,T'V

Hit o/\
i.m
MUCK Ramon(
*"'J T"
v
J.l0
^
(in Yahavl
a
\
d
A
\/*
CcroMi
\
xx.
'/
-. Tna0 f//
I B*.
"It could be assumed that Israel has expanded its security operations
over the world. The death oc ->-< Israeli Embassy official in Brussels last
October, of an Israeli agen* : *^dnd and of a businessman with appar-
ent security connections i- "," -^^int to the existence of a network."
Arabs from Everywhere
Plus Observation Posts
In Lebanon Spell Siege
BY GEORGE GAR VI
Copyright J< wih Chronicle News Service)
yh* incidents which marfced the running battle
between Arab terrorists and Israeli authorities
in the past 12 months indicate the emergence of
several distinctive characteristics.
On the Arab side the one which appears
most clear is the fact that the terrorists, having
been effectively prevented from operating inside
Israel, have chosen a worldwide battlefield. It
is flanked at one end by Bangkok, the scene of
an abortive attempt to kidnap the Israeli ambas-
sador last December, and by New York at the
other, where New Leftists and Negro militants
ar-H'ared to lend them a helping hand in placing
a tomb-packed car at Kennedy airport recently.
It is no less significant, however, that the
bases of their activities remained in the Arab
countries bordering Israel. The terrorists still
maintain their major training camps in Syria and
do most of the recruitment from among the -ref-
ugees" there.
Their operational command post and dis-
patch center for terrorists is in Lebanon.
Turning Point in Policy
They have apparently discarded earlier plans
to set up local headquarters in Europe and con-
duct instead hit-and-run operations by groups
making quick excursions and. if they can, even
quicker withdrawals from their assigned target
cities.
This change in their methods was the result
of tlio new pattern which has been emerging in
Icrael's counter-terrorist tactics.
The turning point for the new Israeli policy
could be pinned down to the immediate after-
math of the Munich massacre last September.
Up to that point Israel confined itself to re-
atlon a ainsi the countries sheltering terror-
i t Military raids on terrorist camps and work-
chops in Lebanon were frequent before Munich
and the occasional elimination of terrorist lead-
ers in the Mid,lie East might also be credited to
fie Israel s, like ihe death of Ghas3an Kanafani,
a bader of the Popular Front for the Liberation
'" '" nc, h:..' was killed vh<-n a bomb at-
d to hh car on: lo led in Beirut.
S nee Munich ths Israeli tactics have change I
from retaliation to prevention. Mrs. Golda Meir
I cl a.-ly after the bloodbath in th- Olympic
tillage thai "we have no choice but to strike at
.'t? terrorist organizations wherever we can
reach them."
The appointment of Gen. Aharon Yariv, for-
um- director of Military Intelligence as her spe-
cial advisor on security, also indicated the open-
ing of a new chapter in Israeli counter-terror
tactics.
The- Israeli government was anxious to con-
duct its defensive operations in cooperation vith
the European countries, and a certain degree of
I >1 aboration, particularly in the provision of in-
telligence, did occur.
tncertain Collaboration
Israel soon discovered, however, that the
European states' collaboration was not suffici-
ently hard-fisted to deter the terrorists. Even
when caught red handed, with weapons, explo-
sives and stacks of forged passports in their lug-
gage, thsy were set free after some pro forma
procedures for the sake of "higher" political
considerations.
Thus. Germany got rid of the Arab terrorists
caught after the Munich massacre at the first
convenient moment. An Arab, who was caught
at Amsterdam airport with arms and a diplomatic
passport in his possession, was allowed to con-
tinue his deadly journey. Two Arabs who were
captured in Rome after an unsuccessful attempt
to blow up an El Al airliner were given bail and
predictably absconded.
France, too, quickly deported a terrorist rep-
resentative last month when he got caught at the
most inopportune time, when Arab delegates
were negotiating the possible purchase of the
hard-to-sell Concorde supersonic airliner. In Aus-
Continued on Page HE


Pcr;e 2-E
rJeniit fkrrften
MASS IMMIGRATION IS KEY TO THE PROBUM
(rush of Many Cultures Demands Move
i
Toward-ftrnaiizafioiHo ftedme Tension
!'. U.ISA LEVEXBEBG
THE
11
I
d



born A
..nder-
: ac a rule orien'a!
has cerl
(x- r.l Tr .ji-- mea
' : i. ill .
rtsol
;
:
-
s
p
an I
-
the pool
inds pu
More Articulate
'.
a. .-
ilate than ia I it II
cepts without prol
the ; terize
pattei if< -' ncentrates
o.i education and I when
- demands before the
Bride in I Mtume at Yei iding.
Publix
inhere
shopping
is a
pleasure
Congratulates
ISRAEL
on its
25th
Anniversary

i
it all the le"
:
.
I
it errtii thai ol I
idered the
ich a

, ., j.... r. .
- It is aiso exp I
and realit; out the
i affect the family
. .- particularly
jmpo
Btal farn-
: es fit in poorly into industrial-
ized or post isti a.'ized society,
Role of {.(iuuiiwii
problem of educatk
ed up wit
During irnmigr,
from I- hole-
towns, d-
ere founded
in which newc
'

thai
r.d a
entar
.-

:
I
: -
|
not toi
studii -
'here is inert .
B< aren< of the role education
Continued on Page 13 E
Arab socle: ivorkw Zaheii Bashoran 31 work ir
sector in the Galilee.
L' CHAYIM
a toast
MAZELTOV
LUBY CHEVROLET CITY
9200 N.W 27th Avenue 696-1711


Fridcry, May 18. 1973
* Jewish fkridUan
Page 3-F
\^E$)
wise
IWe buy them lower so we sell them lower.)
CONGRATULATIONS ISRAEL!
Our pride in the achievements of the
first quarter century of statehood
is surpassed only by our con-
fidence in your future.
fa.
Freshness Dated means clearly
readable labels or dates on perish-
able foods. You can buy any-
time on or before the date shown
on the label and be assured your
purchase is completely fresh -
because it's Freshness Dated!
Total Savings every dayyou save more money
than anywhere else in town. Any day you shop.
That's because every price every day is as low
as we can make it. Not just scattered "Specials".
But everyday low prices on every item. That
means your total food cost is lower.
thelreasury Supermarket
Come In and make us prove it.
PARCEL
PICK-UP
SERVICE
WE PLACE
YOUR
GROCERY
PURCHASES
IN YOUR
CAR
Perrine
16051 S. Dixie Hwy.
Lauderdale Lakes
U.S. 441 & Oakland Park
Hialeah
103rd off Palmetto Expwy
Hollywood
1951 So. State Rd. 7
4


Pom
Page 4-E
fJewist Fhridian
Friday, May 18, 1973
FIRST IN A SERIES OF HEROES: TO QUICKEN A PEOPLE'S DREAM
Before the State, Bialik Was Israel's First National Poet:
treasure-house of the Jewish
people, investigate its innermost
recesses, catch a glimpse of the
By HAIM SHACHTER
IT is significait historical coin-
' cidence that the 29th year of
Israel's independence marks also
the centennial of the birth of
Chaim Nahman Bialik who is
universally known as the poet
of Jewish national revival. Ever
since the latter's death in 1934.
"Kaf Tammuz" (the 20th of
Tammuz) has always marked the
anniversary of the death of
Theodor Herzl, the founder of
modern Zionism and the seer of
the State and of Chaim Nahman
allk, in whose poetrj the Ioa
of Zion found their yearnings for
Jewish revival expressed so
meaningfully and so enchant*
Wherever modern Hebrew cul-
ture is known and Hebrew is
read Bialik s name stands lore
most. He is taught in Jewish
schools throughout the world.
His poetic works have served as
a source of inspiration for young
Hebrew writers down to the pres-
ent day. and even modernists
look upon his writings with ven-
eration and regard them as a pro-
totype.
Romantic Yearning
From his very first poem. "El
Hatzipor" ("To the Bird').
Bialik's poetry was steeped in
the twilight of romantic yearning
for the homeland that is far, far
away, in a naive yet confident
reaching out for his cherished
goal. But his poetic writings ex-
press the whole range of feelings
of a generation beset by pogroms
and persecution, and struggling
between galut and redemption,
yearning for closeness to nature
and a connection with the soil,
for love, for national pride and at
the same time giving vent to
wrath and calling for retribution
Bialik, in his poetry, pilloried
the baseness of the people rot-
ting away in exile, decaying in a
hopeless galut. given to sloth
and spiritual vileness. He was
perhaps one of the greatest rebels
against the galut and its values,
and in his writings he voiced the
feelings of renewal that were tak-
ing shape amongst the first
pioneers in their ancient home-
land. He became the voice of the
renewal that was taking place,
and in his poetry his readers
found the echoes of rebellion and
change, of a new life. "In the
City of Slaughter" which he wrote
after the Kishinev pogrom of
1903. he depicted not only the
horrors perpetrated against the
Jews but expressed shame that
the Jews had not resisted their
attackers: "For great is the
anguish, great is the shame on
the brow, but which of these is
greater, son of man. say thou .. ."
Calls for Revolt
It was he who called upon the
pale youth of the galut to
straighten their study-bent
bodies, to stand up and hit back
In the midst of the smoking
ruins, while the blood was still
warm upon the ground and its
smell sickening in the air, Bialik
stood fearlessly and cried out that
the attacked were no less guilty
than the atackers; the victim, no
less offensive in the sight of God
than the murderers.
And he cried out against God
who allowed the spirit and the
virtue to fade in His people so
that it succumbed and cowed
underneath the armed fist of the
attackers. It was from Bialik's
denunciation of Jewish cowardice
that a new, courageous Israel
was born that would no longer
be defeated in silencean Israel
that would stand up and fight.
Then came Bialik's songs of
remembrance and yearning for
the galut the same galut that
he had reviled and decried. His
"Matmid" ("The Diligent Talmud
Student") and "Al Saf Beth
Hamidrash" ("On the Threshold
of the House of sSttmr")',; which
are among his besf, and which
are steeped in wistful longing
and painful'regret, he expressed
warm feelings for t lie little Jew-
ish townlet, the dark, half-for-
gotten s\:.., [o ie, the Ark with
its veil and solitary scroll.
The Aggadah
To Bi ilik the land: 'ape of his
childhood was evi nt, dear
. ; it was the
, bed r and ; et I it
the material fro
gi n shaped I n forms
oi poetry.
But B a II i- no( onlj the
s| of Hel rew pot ts in the
modern pi riod He Is the
creator of the national cultt
one of the pillars of the revival
of Hebrew literature. He lias
written stories which are clas ic
i:i Hebrew literature; he
written essays which delve deep
into questions of culture and
language and which clarify fun-
damental problems in Jewish
history. He has translated classi-
cal works into Hebrew and has
made considerable contributions
to the revival and enrichment of
the modern Hebrew langu:
In his brilliatnt essay. "Hala-
cha and Aggadah." Bialik delin-
eated the path to be taken by
the renascent Hebrew literature
and set the goals to be followed
by the builders of culture and
literature. He demanded a litera-
ture drawing sustenance from
the fountains of thought and the
treasures of experience and
knowledge of the generations.
And Bialik not only preached, he
actually practiced what he
preached.
He himself undertook the duty
of implementing the plan, setting
an example to others. It was he
who undertook and completed, in
collaboration with his lifelong
friend and associate. Ravnitzky.
l(Mi\ i
CHAIM NACHMAN BIALIK
the great and important entei-
prise of collecting and arranging
the "Aggadah" (Jewish legen-
dary lore), that vast Jewish spir-
itual and imaginative literary
treasury which was evoived over
hundreds of years by the spirit
of the Jewish people.
The "A :gadah contains stories,
anecdotes, conversations, imagi-
nary and actual descriptions.
homilies, dicta, parables, tall
stories, moral teachings, things
uttered in jest. It is remarkable
for its short and pithy, yet de-
scriptive and clear style and, as
Eiaiik put it. "through the
Apad ih a man can enter the
nation's sovereignty, obtain a
view of its reality in all its col-
oring, in its lights and shadow,
and its true atmosphere.'' This
legendary lore, rich in its spier.
(jdur, replete with the wisdom of
Wife, lies scattered throughout the
Talmud and Midrashim and for
gertfWttblWHdl* -WiA'the-Mcw i-
people drew sustenance from .
and drank avidly at this II
sustaining fountain.
In the course of time, howv
tl c average Jewish readei
cai >'< d from the soun .
ich the "Aggadah" is scat-
i so thai it was transform!
into ajomsj archival mated;
unl ii came and tra
formi d it once again into a livi
sury at the disposal a
withm the {rasp of all inquiri
Literary Treasure House
'i h "Sef< i Haaggadah," ace
pi nil : bj elucidatorj notes
the editors, contains everyth
that i- best and typical of ;..
t.'i" generations over which i
\ adah t as created. The bo
has become a classic. It is a text-
book for schools, a source bo
for scholars, a treasury h
which writers both experienc
and novices, cull handful< i
wisdom. He also published a n
and carefully-edited edition
the finest of Hebrew poetry o:
the Golden Age of Spain. And -
under the magic touch of I
poet all the riches of the pas
and its tradition, stiff and hai
with the silt and dust of ei
ated scholars, came alive an
aglow.
Eiaiik was all three: the poi
of yearning for the old-new Ian
the poet of rebellion against tne
galut and all that it stood for
the poet of the glorification at
that same galut and its tradition-
In one and the same breath h
preached revolt and lived an I
glorified it. His rebellion was sus-
tained by a true love for tra
tion. It is perhaps in this iiu
sistency that his true greatness
lies.
FLORIDA
VISIK ISRAEL
On the occasion of Israel's 25th Anniversary Celebration, EL AL and
EASTERN AIRLINES invite you to experience the vacation of a lifetime.
At the LOWEST PRICES AVAILABLE!
Enjoy 2 or 3 weeks touring fascinating JERUSALEM, BETHLEHEM, GALILEE, HEBRON, NEGEV, TEL AVIV and many more.
Or if you desire, visit Israel and then spend 4 days enjoying the excitement of either LONDON, ATHENS or ROME.
Your "FLORIDA VISITS ISRAEL" vacation value includes:
Round-trip flights on EASTERN AIRLINES between Florida and New YorK
Round-trip flights on EL AL AIRLINES between New York and Tel Aviv
. Hotel accommodations, meals, sightseeing and ground transportation in Israel.
Monday departures through October 29,1973.
Detailed descriptive brochures are available upon request. For your free copy or additional information see your
Travel Agent, call EASTERN at 873-3000 or EL AL at 532-8724.'
5> EASTERN
The Wings of Maa
6^7
--------1----------
I


Friday, May 18. 1973
fJewisti ncridfiar?
Page 5-E
SECOND IN A SOtltS Of NATIONAL HEROES: THE CHEMIST TURNED VISIONARY
Chaim Weizmann Had All the Requisites for Greatness-Humility, Humor
By JULIAN MELTZER
It is a well-known truism that
great national leaders are best
remembered for their public
words and acts, whether valiant
or vile, rather than for the traits
of personality which actuated
them as human beings.
The halo surrounding histori-
cal figures overshadows the
lesser-known personal attributes
which are of primary importance
in helping to evaluate their total
characters.
Such, too, was the case with
Chaim Weizmann.
He was the first elected Nassi
(President) of the Jewish people
Jjlian Melizer, veteran writer and trans-
lator who settled in Jerusalem in March,
1921, as a young journalist in his rr.id-
de teens, is now associate general edi-
tor of the Weizmann Letters and Papers,
Jtd director of the First President's ar-
chives. He was a personal acquaintance
c- Dr. Weizmann.
m the flncl of Isfael IB almost
2.000 years. Throughout his mid-
dle and later life he ranked
head and shoulders above his
people and fellow-men.
His election to the presidency
of the Provisional State Council
of Israel 25 years ago, in 1948.
signalled the resurgence of that
long-dormant Jewish national en-
ergy and creativity the fruits of
which are visible today in tlv
vitality and power of the State.
Man of the People
He became the headstone of
the arch of the national edifice
that has been teerected on the
ancestral soil. The Jewish people
remained his top priority until
his dying day.
That was his public image.
Though he was the Exilarch
who survived his great Zionist
contemporaries Herzl, Wolff-
gohn. Soklow. Jabntinsky and
led the people to the land, where
he became the first President, it
DR. CHAIM WEIZMANN
people were his element
is not his abilities as a leader
or his political achievements, re-
markable though they wore, or
the illustrious role he played in
securing the Balfour Declaration
in 1917 that remain foremost in
my recollections of him. What 1
do recall vividly lies at a more
mundane level.
Weizmann was a man of the
people. Though he moved at the
upper levels of society, physi-
cally, socially, intellectually, in
all spheres of life, he always felt
himself akin and sincerely at-
tached to "am'cho," the lowliest
groups in the community.
It was they who reminded him
of the youthful and adolescent
environment of his Russian
"shtctl" upbringing. "Am'cho"
were his father and mother, his
grandfathers, his brothers and
sisters and relatives: the little
people of Motole and Pinsk and
a thousand other centers of Jew-
ish life throughout the world. He
loved nothing better than spend-
ing time and mingling among
them, speaking Yiddish in its
inimitable humor. His relaxation
racy idioms and basking in its
was to exchange opinions .;nd
chitchat, even badinage, with the
carters and shopkeepers, the
artisans and workmen, the
porters and builders and other
folk on the economic fringe
whose company he sought out.
Among ChessPlayers
He could be received by the
King of England in the com en-
tional attire of morning-coat and
striped trousers, wearing a top
hat. But deep inside of himself
he belonged to the common
people, with whom, he once told
the aristocratic Arthur James
Balfour, "I could pave the street
of the country I erne from." He
regarded them as the right kind
of Jews, different from those
whom Balfour met.
Even after induction as Presi-
dent of the State by the Knesset
Continued on Page 11E
How would you like to tell a blind
90-year-old survivor of Dachau that
you re sorry, but there's no room for
him at the Jewish Home for the Aged.
Or tell a young Jewish mother that
you're sorry, but there's just no money
available to help her retarded son with
the special training he so desperately
needs.
How would you like to tell a Russian
Jew to give up his dream of finding
freedom for his family in Israel because,
well you're sorry, but you just can't
afford to give something right now.
Can he possibly wait another year or
two until you don't have all the expenses
of the kids tennis lessons and paying
for the new car?
We don't want the dreams of Jews
in need to turn into nightmares.
>
With your help,
no dream
is impossible.
o
We don't believe you do either.
Make your year's commitment for
Jewish survival. For 50 life-serving
and life-saving agencies.
You have the power to make impos-
sible dreams come true. Use it now.
Before you turn this page.
Send you check or pledge today
not tomorrowtoday.
.-' .. .
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
1973 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137 Phone 758-3321


Page 6-E
+Jenist fk>iidBr-n
Friday. May 18, 197]
THIRD IN A SIMS Of NATIONAL HEROES: THE JOMNAUST WHO LAUNCHED THE PRFAM
Herzl Wrote 'Jewish State' in a Spirit of Exaltation Never Felt Before
By THEODOR HERZL
N 1891. the Vienna newspaper.
'Die Neue Frtie Presse," of-
fered me the position of its
foreign correspondent in Paris.
1 accepted, even though up to
that time I had despised and
avoided politics. In Paris 1 had
an opportunity to learn what it
la that the world understands is
the word politics, and 1 expressed
my own opinion in .1 little book,
Das Palais Bourbon.- In 18.05. I
had had enough of Paris and re-
turned to Vienna.
During '.he last two months of
r j stay in Paris. 1 wrote the
I ih -'i he '' wish State." I can-
not remember ever having writ-
,.!> thing 1 sucli a moo:' of
ation Ine tells us that he
,i th flapping of eagl *'
above hi* he:id when he
rtair stai ws. I too
seemed to hear the flutter of
bovi my head while I
the "1 hi Jewish State." I
worked at it daily, until I was
completely exhausted. My one.
recreation was on the evenings
when 1 could go to hear Wagner's
music, and particularly "Tann-
hauscr." an opera which I go to
hear as often as it is produced.
And only on those evenings when
there was no opera did 1 ha\e
my doubts as to the truth of my
ideas.
Solution to Problem
My first idea was to let this
little essay on the solution of the
Jewish question circulate pri-
vately among my friends. It was
only later that I thought of pub-
lishing it; it was not my intention
to begin a personal agitation on
the Jewish question. The major
ity of my readers will be as-
tounded to learn of this reluc-
tance on my part. The who'e
matter seemed to me to be on<-
in which action had 10 be taken,
but in which discussion was im-
possible. An open agitation was
reserved as a last recourse, only
when my private advice was
ignored or repudiated.
When I had completed the
book. I asked my oldest and best
friend to read the manuscript.
In Ihc midst of the reading ho
suddenly burst into tears. I found
this natural enough, since he was
a Jew: I too had wept at time?
during the writing of it. But 1
was staggered when he gave me
an entirely different reason tor
his tears. He thought that I had
gone off my head, and since ne
was my friend he was touched to
tears by my misfortune. He ran
off without saying another word
After a sleepless night he ie-
turned and pressed me hard to
leave the entire business alone.
for everyone wocld take me for
a lunatic.
Time of Crisis
He was so excited that I prom-
ised him anything, in Order I"
soothe him. Then he besought me
to ask .Max Xordau whether this
plan of mine could possibly have
entered Hie mind of any mar. still
capable of making calculations
"I shall not ask anybody." I said.
"If this is the impression my
ideas make on an educated and
faithful friend, I shall give then.
up."
It was thus that I went through
my first crisis; the only compar-
ison I can find for it is the
plunging of a red-hot body into a
basin of cold water. It is true,
however, that if the body is iron,
it becomes steel.
My friend, of whom I have
written above, had to cast up mj
expenses for telegraphic mes-
sages. When he handed me the
account, which was made up of a
great number of items, I saw at
a single glance that he had niij
calculated. I drew his attention
to the error, and he added up
the total a second time; but it
was only at the third or fourth
attempt that his figures agreed
with mine. This little incidenl
returned lo me my self-con 1
deuce. If it was a matter of cal-
culation, I seemed to be capable
of greater accurao than he. My
reason, then, had not left me
entirely.
On that day began my restless
nes concerning the Jewish State.
During the two voar- and morJ
that have passed since then
have lived through manv .sorrow!
ful days, and I fear that olhej
days, even more sorrowful, a,-3
still in store for me. Ir. i8;n
began to keep a diary, and bvl
now four thick volumes are al-l
ready filled. If I were to publish!
these volumes the world would!
be astounded at what effort, J
had to put into this work, to I
know who were the enemies ofl
my plans, and whe were the menl
that stood by me.
Zionism Will Not Die
But one thing I regrel as 1 ,-
tain, and place beyond t1 reach
of all doubt: the m vem
endure. I do not know 1 ;
shall die, but Zion never
die. Since th..-- days in
the Jewish people .
representation again; as a
result the Jewish SI
more rise in its own country.
The diaries oi Theodor H
which this Is en excerpt, ended May 16
1904. The original
scnpi is bound in 16 volumes which ait
preserved in the Central Zionist Archive,
Off. THCOBOR HERZL
friend's lews were fr him and not the tragedy
MAURICE A. FEKKE
President
of
Maule Indus! ries
Congratulates the leaders
and
the people of
ISRAEL
on their
25th
Anniversary.
f
Congratulations Israel and Best Wishes
On Your 25th Anniversary
Am ..nf ran -r\\ rlutho H> rll iivfcmn.
Some ill the brands c rr lainoui for
tjji'c. Hwnmonlon Pjrk (, f. (,. u Baton. Loim Ruih. Aristocrat
I x i our American Impress < rd MinerChiti*, RanfcAmericml nrvoui Damn's Charte Card
DADEL AND / HAL HARHOl'R 163rd STREET / WESTLAND/ HOLLYWOOD MALL / 445 LINCOLN ROAD
POMPASO/ HOLLYWOOD FASHION CENTER / PALM BEACH MALI I SUNRISE BOLL EVARD Ft LAUDERDALE


Friday, May 18, 1973
+Jewislfk>ildiian
pr.^
Pag 7-E



Si
Teen-ager Hagar Hershkovitz at a jamboree camp in the Bet
Shemen Forest. For her, the Warsaw Ghetto is almost impos-
sible to understand how it could have happened that a
people were slaughtered, and no one helped or cared.
Recalling (he Heroes in the Warsaw Ghetto
By GABRIEL RAY
|ew:sh self-defense is as old as
lev iaspora. Even in
ipe there were
acts armed Jewish resistance
to th before the uprising in the
Wars .-. ., ;;,: after.
duration, i: troism
and impact, wel las in the
' ;i! and in tht1
iS| '; !' lie ;
been ni i
I'ke j
i. I I l- .:
This 'I the End
i the wot Id over
i the Warsaw anni rersaiy
as a da- of national ren embn.nce
and collective Kaddish for .ill
the six million who perished in
the holocaust, others too should
recall that the revolt >.f '.he
ghetto slaves 30 years ago was
al.-.o a significant date in the an-
nais of Euri pean resistance, the
first urban rising against the Ger-
man occupii r
When the "Aryan" Warsivians
(disastrously) aid the Paris ans
(gloriously), both much beitci
!'ie!'iiii1 and armed tht:n the
ghetto remnant, rose in the
auti inn of 1944, the Gem ans
vviv in rtreat, the Rti ana
were on he Vistula and the
MR. and MRS. IRVING NEWMAN
and FAMILY

SHORES INSURANCE AGENCY
530 N.E. 92nd St., Miami Shores, Florida
Telephone 757-1636
TO ISRAEL
Our deepest admiration
for an inc.edible 25 years.
A SALUTE to the
STATE OF 'SRAEL
and a wish for
Peace and Brotherhood
JHiLe o#le
PONTIAC-MAZDA
30501 So. Federal Highway, Homestead
247-7011 Open Sun. 11-5
"DRIVE A LITTLE-SAVE A LOT"
Western Allies at the gates of
the French capital.
How different it was in the
Warsaw Ghetto on the eve of
Passover in 1943! Though the
Third Reich had just suffered
one defeat at Stalingrad and an-
other at Alamcin, its military
might still stretched from the
Volga to the Atlantic and from
the Baltic to the shores of North
Africa.
In Churchill's memorable
phrase, this was not the end nor
even the beginning of the end.
hut only the end of the begin-
ning.
By this time the ghetto itself,
set up in October. 1940, was
greatly reduced in area and in
numbers. Of the 500.000 Jews
who had been herded there, in
eludine some 150.000 from out-
side Warsaw and even from
foreign lands, one-fifth had per-
ished from hunger, epidemics,
Hard labor and executions by the
sumer of 1942. Another 300000
were put to death during and
after the "resettlement action
which lasted from the end of
July to the middle of September,
with Trcblinka as the main des-
tination.
The final liquidation of Jewish
Warsaw, the largest ghetto in
Europe, was set for January,
1943.
Passive Endurance
Only 35.000 so-called "useful
Jews," employed in the German
"shops" or in the still existing
communal ins'i'utionsJudenrat,
militia, hospiaal still had the
official right to exist A similar
iumbnr lived on illegally in the
ghetto, while another 20,000
Jews were in hiding on the Aryan
side of the walls.
But there was a new spirit
among the 70.000 Jews in the
ghetto. Even those who had
earlier been opposed to armed
resistance lest it "sealed the fate"
of all the ghetto were convinced
by the extermination campaign of
The 30'h a miversary of the Waisaw
ghetto uprisinrj wj< commemorated
recently. After the mo-e than 30C000
Jews h.id > the Trcblinka
death camp ly thf Nails rnuntls
thousand- had died .i" .1 result of
starvation and dll the remnant
turned on their persecutors. Between
Aoril 19 Mav 16, I9a3. armed Jews
Untied with tie haled enerry-70 000
were killed 01 canti>r-d but fhev
led a picture of glorious courage
for all time.
the summer thu" passive ...o,.
ance was no longer either a in
tional virtue or a.: Insurance foi
personal survival-
The martyred historian E:nan
uel Ringelblum. archivist ;.r..|
t of the ghetto, noti d "
his diary: "Why did ei I ig
< ome so i as] to the enem) tt e
should have run oui into the-
Continued on Page I'VE
\!^tevcn Wet vj tic
^Knitting 285 W. 74th PLACE, HIALEAH
822-0530
Salutes Israel on its
25th Anniversary
in Peace and Brotherhood
CONGRATULATIONS ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
May Peace ever reign among
all Mankind. In this our Prayer
on the wonderful occasion of your
Glorious Silver Anniversary Celebration
CARFEL, INC
7495 N.W. 48th Street
MIAMI
MR. and MRS.
GEORGE FELDENKREIS


?cge 8-E
*Jmi& norldUar,
Friday, May 18, 1973
CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF ACHIEVEMENTS SCORED BY JEWISH STATE
Miami Makes Significant Contribution to Israel Economy
|g|IAMIANS can rightfully point
"3" with pride to the role they
have played in the Israel Bond
program over the past 22 years.
Of the close to $2 billion in
Bonds purchased in the U.S.
nee the inception of the pro-
gram in 1951. Miamians have
accounted for over 5 per cent, or
r.early $100 million, even though
Miami Jews number far less a
percentage of the total American
Jewish population.
While the Miami community
has traditionally held first place
in sales of Bonds on a per capita
casls. Miami in 1973 has out-
paced all other cities in actual
dollar sabs for the first two
onths of the year, according to
"iilton M. Parson, director of the
: rael Bond Organization i'l
nth Florida.
The goal this year for Miami i-
SI3 million in bonds, out of an
ternationai goal ol S"'J0 minion
quired to finance GO per cent of
Israel's $600 million develop-
.Hi budgi t.
Some Projects Financed
\ look at some oi the
lanced by !> :'. I capital v ill Jil e
clear idea ol the purpose of tne
md program. Parson listed
the following as representative oi
e bond drive's scope:
1951 Construction of a dam
: d an auxiliary harbor at tiv
-outh of the Kishon River ior
ie expansion of Haifa Harbor.
1952 Reactivation of the
'- ad Sea Works at S'dom and
iexpansion of fertilizers and
. lemicals (now the chemicals
end phosphates) plant in the
Haifa Bay area.
1953 Opening of the road
::om Beersreba to S'dom. inaugu
.tion of railway line from Tel
Aviv to Hadcra and construction
of new road to Jerusalem through
Jerusalem Corridor.
1954 Discovery of copper
Shalom!
EMBASSY
RESTAURANT
1417 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
A DEVOTED SON Of ISRAEL
BEN URMAN
Born in Israel
Product of the Haganah
Interpreter In the British
Army during World War 2
I
KSJSSS
I?rc?l's new international telecommunicatior.; satellite was ccnitiuctsd at a cost of S10
million with the aid of Israel Eonds.
ore deposits at Timna and sub-
si quenl exploitation and con-
struction of processing plant pro-
ducing conuer for export.
1955 Construction, contin-
uing for over a decade, of the
National Water Project which
brought some 450.000 acres under
irrigation. Oil was struck at
Heletz. New development towns,
like Dimona. were started.
1956 Extension of railway
lines and electricity to outlying
areas. Development of Elath and
construction of port facilities.
1957 Mass development and
settlement of Negev begun.
1958 Opening of road from
Bcersheba to Elath. Construction
of electric power station at Ash-
dod. Discovery of natural gas at
Zohar.
lEGl Beginning of construe
tion of new deep water port at
Ash-:td.
1962 First houses built at
the new town of Arad, ne ir the
Dead Sea.
1963 Pilot desalination plant
built at Elath.
1964 Construction of Car-
rr-iel, a new development town in
the Galilee.
1965 Completion of firs':
phase harbor and start of port
operations. Opening of railway
nom beersheba to Dimona.
1966 Introduction of science
based industries, including opti-
cal equipment, electronics, pla>
tics, chemicals and other export
products.
1967 A ten-year plan for
development of the oil and petn
chemical industry on a nationa:
scaie, combining the efforts o."
the country's chemical plants anj
oil refineries.
1968 Electric power suppK
was expanded, with power sta-
lions and transformers producing
14-fold the volume of 1948, am]
high tension cables and disttibu
tion networks multiplied four
times.
1969 Construction of th-
huge chemical complex neai
Arad. laying of the new 42 inci
oil pipeline from Elath to the
Ashkelon.
1970 Construction of n<
oil refinery at Ashdod.
1971 Acquisition of two
ing 747 jumbo jets by El A.
Israel Airlines.
1S72 Inauguration of ne
satellite communication center.
Bonds for Peace
As immigration to Israel in-
creases, and defense costs ill
no sign of diminishing, fsrai
will continue to depend on Bur.
for a large proportion of hei
peacetime financing. Parson sai-
that funds from Israel Bonds w
provide, in large measure, the
job> and housing that will allo
the 50.0C0 Russian Jews expect)
to arrive this year to take their
place as productive members
Israeli society.
And the Miami Jewish com-
munity will continue to be in the
forefront of the American effort
through Israel Bonds to further
the development of Israeli in-
dustry and keep Israel econom-
ically strong and viable.

JiV HOWOR OF A MODERN MIRACLE!
Shown are David Ben Gurion, First Prime Minister of the State of Israel with Mr
Arthur Stein, President of Stein Paint Company of Miami. Mr. Stein recently
presented a citation commemorating Israel's twenty-fifth anniversary.
AM YISRAEL CHAI


Friday, May 18, 1973
*pnifl fhrkffctri
Page 9-E
World Leaders Gathered at Bond Inaugurals on Beach
There is a time in the year when
" the image of Miami as a care-
free winter playland is challen"
ged by the less publicized role
of a center of national activity
for Israel.
This is especially true in the
case of the worldwide Israel
Bond Organization which sched-
ules its international inaugural
conferences in Miami to launch
its annual campaigns for the pro-
motion of Israel's economic de-
velopment. These conferences
have brought Israel's foremost
leaders to our community to
impress American and Canadian
Jewish leaders with the role
which Israel Bonds play in en-
abling the country to absorb
large numbers of immigrants to
build up its industry and agricul-
ture to sustain the population
which now exceeds three million.
Go'.da Meir Visits
In the large procession of dis-
tinguished Israelis who com?
here year ai'ter year, the most
charismatic personalities have
been Prime Minister Golda Meir.
former Prime Minister David
Ben-Gurion, President Zalman
Shazar, and Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan. Each in his or her
own way has created an aura o;
excitement and importance which
goes far beyond the boundaries
of their special appeal to the
Jewish community.
At 5:15 p.m. on Friday, Mar. 2,
this year, President Nixon's Air
Force Two landed in a corner of
the Miami International Airport,
and down the ramp came the
familiar grandmotherly figure of
Golda Meir. The air was charged
with an extraordinary measure of
drama. It was not the first time
in its 2j yeais or existence that
a Prime Minister oi Israel had
come to Miami. But minutes after
she arrived, the weld was stun-
ned by the news of the assassi-
nation in Khartum ot three dip-
lomats from the United States
and other countries. The extreme
act of Arab terrorism sharply-
highlighted the importance of
the Israel Prime Minister's visit
to the United States and the
White House meeting she had
with the President the day before
she came to Miami.
Hei visit to Miami to inaugu-
rate the 1973 campaign for the
sale of $360 million in Israel
Bonds and to honor Sam Roth
berg, general chairman and one
of the chief founders of the Israel
Bond Organization, focused na-
tionwide attention on Mrs. Meir's
own close connection with this
program to advance the develop*
ment of Israel's economy.
David Ben-Gurion, who pro-
claimed the independence of
Israel on May 14, 1048, came to
Miami early in 1967, three years
after he stepped down as Israel's
first Prime Minister. His visit
occurred at a time when Middle
East tensions were not at a full
boil, but it had its own drama
in the presence of the white-
haired patriarchal figure who is
revered throughout the world a?
the father of the modern State of
Israel. ,
Ben-Gurion Honored Here
The leaders of the Israel Bond
campaign had a special reason
for honoring Ben-Gurion in
Miami because he was also the
father of the Israel Bond pro-
gram. In September, 1950. Ben-
Gurion convened a conference in
Continued on Page 15-E
1-8


?c
Faqe 10-h
*Jen 1$t> ftcrMiatf
rriday, May 18, 1973
Q


t
One-Day Flying Visit to Stiarm el-Sheikh
B> Special Report
[EGEV'- A slim pile of rounded boulders lies
|in the center oj the Lsra li desert city of
!. People from northern climes would assocP
ate boulders such as these with the refuse of re-
treating or advam I g glaciers, l;t the cold of
the lec Age never reached this part of the world.
The rounded boulders were formed at the bottom
of some ancient tidal sea.
, The stone pile rising from the desert floor
is indicative of what has haooened in Arad. The
natural resources of the area are its stones and
in the hands of Intelligent men they can be
turned into a positive force Just as Boy Scouts
ihe world over mark the trail with piled /tones
so this pile declare; the presence of man.
The Seme Changes
Eleven years ago there were nothing but
Ki douin goats and camels on this plateau in
the Judean hills. The goats and camels arc
still there, but now the scene includes swim-
ming pools, air-conditioning and 2.300 young
families in Israel's best planned development
town. Not just for travelers who will do anything
for a breath of fresh air. Arad's plateau loca-
tion aha mak -. it an appealing base for explor-
ing the Dead Sea area or a convenient stopover
spol between Tel Aviv
on the Red Sea.
or Jerusalem and Eilat
On the health front is Arad's Asthma Re-
' i WflKlfc-itiorf'fnsfituttJ. A maximum 40 youngsters,
mo tly Israeli, live at the institute, go to local
schools and are adopted during their rtay by
Arad families. Children stay at the institute for
at least a year.
Choke Stopover Spot
\ B00-bed sanitarium is under construction,
but for most asthmatics whose condition is
caused by allergies the essential ingredient in
relief is the clean air. To make sure the air stays
that way. Arad's founding fathers legislated
against industrial smokestacks and the town
ordinances outlaw ail flora considered a respira-
tory menace by the president of the Israeli So-
ciety of Allergenists. Even for trees low in pollen.
tin' law specifies how many of each type can be
planted per square meter. Anyone planting any-
thing without an official okay may be asked to
defoliate his garden. And not only visible hazards
are checked. The air i~ tested daily for pollen,
fungus and mold.
All this clean air plus the plateau's cool
nights and the new town's new hotels make Arad
a choice stopover spot for touring the area. To
the north along the Dead Sea is Masada. The
hilltop palace-fortress with swimming pool and
Roman baths was built 2.000 years ago by Horod
the Great. It was here that 1,000 Jewish zealots
fl"d after the fall of Jerusalem in 71 A.D. When
defeat was inevitable, they chose to kill them-
selves rather than surrender to the Roman unity.'
Today Ha ad a is easily accessible by a three-
minute cable car ride or a more grueling climb
up die "snake path." (The cl'mb is best made
pre-dawn, especially in summer.)
Town is Still Small
Near the southern end of the Dead Sea were
the Biblical towns of Sodom and Gomorrah,
whose wicked inhabitants were destroyed by fire
and brimstone. Today Scdom is the site of the
Dead Sea pctash works. Many of Arad's settlers
commute to the Dead Sea Works although Arad's
own light industry is developing along with the
population.
Arad is the Israelis' pride and joy when it
comes to development towns. Unfike other de-
velopment towns where most of the developing
was left to new immigrants, many of the first
settlers in Arad were Sabras native-born Is-
Continurd on Page 14-E
iO
FIRST
MORTGAGE INVESTORS
801 ARTHUR GOOFREY ROAO
^Solutes Ssracls 25th adnnivereary

m********
L, n^i-^t^it^i

~rt Tourist at Sharm e'-Sheikh.
lilt, Mute.
7U f3 RESTAURANTS AND
BAKE SHOPS
SALUTE The State of Israel
on its 25th ANNIVERSARY
If We Can Help The
sraelisand Arabs to Live
Together in
PEACE
Then The Rest Of The World
Will Not Have Any Excuse For
Doing The Same!
Our Wish!!
tana
ounqtan
Iradni
adnionS
9561 MarJina Jli
venue
~->iirpl(/e


Friday. May 18. 1973
----
Kwistinkrktfan
Page 11-
iAJeizmannt r^ccjuisitcs for L-jrcatncss
Continued from Page B>E
in February, 1949. he would often
emerge from his mansion in
Rehovot the "White House."
as it is still called, both because
of its outer hue and its symbol-
ical connotation and sit among
the chess-players and other
habiturs in Cafe Shtrim, then a
landmark in the center of town.
He would engage in pleasant dis-
course with 'am*cho" assembled
there and behave as any royal
kibbitzer watching a chess-game
in New York's ""ast Side.
All this is salutary and heart-
warming to recall in the ?.5th
anniversary year of Medina! Yis-
rael, with its diplomatic protocal
and trippings and fripperies of
formal statehood.
Subtle as Voltaire
Weiz nann's friends and less
intimate acquaintances were un-
failingly regaled by the dry,
laconic Jewish wit typical of hi.,
public and private utterance.'-.
Like his old time crony, Dr.
Shmaryahu Levin, who enjoyed
the reputation of ha', ing (he
sharpest mind and tongue of his
time, and even excelled the
gifted Chaim Nachman Bialik in
a waggish turn of phrase. Weiz-
niann adored folk-humor.
Nothing diverted him more
than the broad drollery which
pays scant respect to subtlety
and lays .stress upon the "con-
trast and comparison" witticisms
which contribute so richly to the
Jewish folk treasury. Sometimes
they verged on the ribald.
That is not to say he could
not be as subtle as a \ oltaire.
a tongue-in-cheek Apuleius. in
fact, his public manner and ur-
bane style of speech, hi:' en-
counters with people in high
places, in which he displayed I >-
foil dignity and charm, wore far
removed from the influences "f
early life in Russia, as a son of
the "shtetl," and as student an I
university tc achi r in Germany
and Sv itzerland.
Impromptu Nature his Charm
Numerous anecdotes and satir
leal remarks concerning this
aspect of his volatile tempera-
ment are extant They have been
published in booklets and are
hilarius to read. The charm of it
all lay in the impromptu nature
of his folksy, down-to earth ap-
proach on occasions v. hen he felt
he had to debunk an over
npous person. For instance, ot
a certain Jewish party leader who
wore a bushy, rabbinical-like
beard hut was heretical in his
religious views indeed, he be-
longed to the radical left
Weizmann once caustically com-
mented. "Behind that beard of
his. he's clean-shaven." In other
words, an "apikoiros."
One morning, standing with
his private secretary on the bal-
cony of his Rehovot residence,
he pointed at a clump of tall
trees swaying in the wind. In the
near distance, and said, "Don't
they look like a 'minyan' of Jews
shokkling-zech' (genuflecting to
and fro> at prayer?"
When he was a lecturer in
chemistry at Manchester Umvcr-
sity, the story goes, one of his
female siudent assistants used to
iush up to him regularly to re-
port a thrilling" laboratory find,
onlv to come back the next morn-
ing to confess ruefully that the
(xpermicnt had not worked out
;. expected.
Great with Words
Tell me," he drawled ore day,
'if you hit upon something prom-
ising one day and then Und OUl
t:,. following day ii was wr<
docs that count as one discovery
ii tv
He had a marvelous facility for
these "imrot-kanai," the Hebrew
term translateable as "saying., on
the wing."
After the Daniel Sieff Re-
search Institute began to func-
tion in Rehovot in 1934. be al
ways counselled its scientists
only ten then, compared with the
many hundreds on the vast Wei:-.
mann Institute campus in that
town today against the pitfalls
of parochialism. With that typical
salty touch of his. he said "It's
easy to be a good chemist in
Rehovot."
One day, at a reception in his
honor in Jerusalem sonic 27 yeais
ago, I introduced my wife to him.
He shook hands gravely and
looked at her. saying. "Ah. Mcl-
tzcr. Melt/er. your wife is a beau
tiful woman." And then, con-
vulsing us both with laughter,
he adder). "Keep an eye on hoi "
The classic anecdote of ail that
stamps Wei/mann in my life as
a man who summed i.p others in
the twinkle of an eye, concerns
a somewhat overbearing fellow
scientist from oversea? who came
lo xi.-it him it the Sieff Inslitulc
in the 19S0's.
As the nowcomrr was armed
with the highest letters of rec-
ommendation, Weizmann himself
conducted him around the lab n'a-
tories, explaining what was ;;oing
on in each. The other invariably
interrupted, asserting important-
ly, "(>h yes, we've been doing
thai at our place for n Ion;: time
now," or. "They're ahead of you
there at MIX'
Rut he restrained himself un
til they came to a large research
laboratory, filled with the usual
paraphernalia of test ii.'icn and
retorts. Looking rour.d. lie said.
"Well, there's nothing of great
significance going on here."
Water for Tea
Then he noted a whitecoated
scientist standing in the far cor-
ner, hack to the room. One
moment." he went on. "Sec that
c.iap over there? He's ensaged
on something which, when he fin-
ishes it, will bo of the utmost
boon I.) mankind.''
Deeply impressed, the visitor
asked, naturally, "What's he
doing?"
"Well ." the Zionist pres
ident hesitated. "Let's ask him
to explain in his own word-."
Wh'-n the Rehovort -nen'i.l
came over. Weizmann add]
him with dramatic emphasis'
"What are you up to. Dr. Blank.
that'll be of the greatest herefit
to humanity when you complete
it?"
The other gazed at his "Chi. '"
with raised eyebrows, astonis '
"Dr. Weizmann, all I'm doing is
boiling water for tea." he said.
Turning triumphantly to the
gape mouthed visitor, We:
exclaimed, "You see, I told you
so."
That is the facet of chaim
Weizmann's personality shall always remember him for.
Dr. Cha:m Weizmann, first President cf Israel, in rare
phclo with Dr. Albert Einstein, who was offered the presi-
dency but politely refused.
|WB '- P W*
''em the
of *fce
/
from the forests of the world...
by boat and train, come shipments of lumber for our
stores located throughout Florida. Lumber to
meet the building needs cf a state that, like
Israel, has known fantastic growth during the
past twenty-five years. Lumber for the weekend handy
man as well as the contractor, and
at surprisingly low prices.
LINDSLEY-RBC, the largest supplier of lumber
and building materials in Florida, salutes the Stato
of Israel on its 25th Anniversary.
// / //v FL11TD
HOME CAR'.; IW'JBi
CENTERS
>-,- ;- :< ._...v.-.j~:a mmm


Page 12-E
*Jmisii Hcrktiar
Friday, May 18. 1973
v^Ai #veca//i7tcr the sA/arsaw L^jhetto <-J~le
l9

crocs
Continued from Page 7-E
streets, .have $ct fire to every,
thing in sight, have torn down
the walls and escaped to the
other side. The Germans would
have taken their revenge. It
would have cost tens of thou-
sands of lives but not 300,000."
Thus, it is not true, as is often
said, that the revolt in the ghetto
was simply a heroic act born of
desperation. It was more than
that. It was the result of a de-
liberate course of action deter-
mined out of conviction by the
leaders of the ghetto, represent-
ing all parties from the Com-
munists to the Revb.'f.n'.its, and
implemented by the li.iitei! Jew-
ish Fighting Organization under
Mordecai Anielewicz and the Re-
visionist Jewish .Military Union.
It was expressed in the slogan:
"We shall not surrender a .-ingle
Jew to the Germans."
Germans Withdraw
The slogan and the new spirit
of the ghetto were first put to the
test on Januarv 18. 1943. when
SS and police units once again
entered the ghetto in strength to
complete Its liquidation by de-
porting the last remnant to
"camps in Lublin" where they
were promised an easier life.
Though their arms were even
more pitifully inadequate than
they were to be three months
later, the Jewish fighters resisted
so effectively that, after four
days (and 60 casualties amont;
the troops, 20 of them dead), tne
Germans withdrew, having man-
aged to seize only a small number
of ghetto inhabitants.
They came back, in much
greater strength, on the eve of
Passover and of Hitler.- birth
day. The final liquidation of the
Warsaw Ghetto was to have been
Himmler's birthday present to
the Fuehrer. The troops which
entered the ,c;'-;tto at 2 o'clock
in the morning, under the com-
mand of Gen. Jurgen Stroop,
numbering 3.000 officers and men,
were composed of mainly Waffen
SS units, supported by detach-
ments of artillery and sapper.: of
the Wrhrmacht. several battal-
ions of German and Polish police
and Ukrainian and Latvian aux-
iliaries. ****
They had at their disposal
armored cars, tanks, flame
throwers and, in the later stages
of the battle, also some planes
for dropping incendiary bombs.
All Jewish fighters had were
a few machine guns, a lew rifles,
50 pistols and many hundreds of
grenades, Molotov cocktails and
homemade bombs which they
used with great effect against the
German tanks and armored cars.
Act of Jewish Defiance
friend Itzhak Cukierman, the
deputy commander of the JFO,
* *mo was its liawon officer to the-
Polish underground on the Aryan
side:
Dream of My Life"
"What occurred has exceeded
all our most daring dreams. Twice
the Germans have been put to
flight from the ghetto ... It is
impossible to describe the con-
ditions in which the Jews now
exist only some will survive:
all the rest .vill per'sh sooner
or later But the main thing
is that the dream of my life has
come true. Jewish self-defense
in the ghetto has become a fact.
Jewish armed resistance and re-
venge have been realized."
It was realized, moreover, with
only minimal help from the
Polish underground and in the
face of total indifference from
the mighty Allies.
There had been only one air
raid on Warsaw by Soviet planes
during the whole of the ghetto
battle, which lasted for a month,
and nothing at all, not even a
promise of aid to the survivors,
from either Britain or the United
States.
SOL FRANKEL
president
Extends Congratulations to the
STATE OF ISRAEL
On the Observance of its
GLORIOUS
SILVER ANNIVERSARY
Though only about 400 were
organized within the fighting
groups of the JFO and another
300 in the Military Union, the
total number of active resisters
was estimated at 6,000, with
every "shop" a base and every
house and bunker a fortress.
But at a time when Hitler and
Himmler were supposed to be
their overlords the refusal of the
thousands of non-combatants in
the ghetto to surrender was in
itself also an act of Jewish de-
fiance.
In the manner of Masada.
Anielewicz and his comrades
committed suicide when the com-
mand bunker on 18 Mila Street
was surrounded by the Germans
on May 8 and. according lo
Stroop'S report, some 6.000 un-
jrmed men and women allowed
them-elves to be burned or
buried in the flaming ghetto
rather than respond to the Ger-
man call for capitulation.
The same report gave the num-
ber of Jews killed in the uprising
or executed afterwards at 50.063.
making a total of over 56.000.
It was a terrible price to pay.
hut the fighters and martyrs of
the ghetto paid it almost with
elation.
Four days after the battle be-
gan. Anielewicz wrote to hi*
We Join With World Jewry
in Saluting the State of Israel
on its 25th Year
Of Independence
FARR TOURS
& TRAV!
2323 COLLINS AVENUE/531-5327 (Bill Farr)
6705 COLLINS AVENUE/865-7444 (Harvey Farr)
J/ AUTO LEASING, inc
EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 1545 ALTON ROAD
Miami Beach
A salute to the twenty-fifth anniversary
of the State of Israel and to its h
eroic
TO ISRAEL
Our deepest admiration
for an incredible
25 years.
WALDMAN HOTEL
Mr. & Mrs. Sam Waldman
Mr. & Mrs. Morris Waldman
Mr. & Mrs. Ted Landesman

people in their struggle for independence.

Sheehan
BUICK
2301 S.JW. 8th STREET
'MIAMI
j
- A


Friday, May 18, 1973
+Jmtsfi l**HMw
Continued from Page 2-E
plays in the narrowing of the
gap. Therefor)), even parents who
have themselyes no formal edu
...cat^n, vttU;Wlu$ntlxX(OCt lo
organized portest in order to re-
move a teacher considered, often
rightly uiuuited, or clamor for
better distribution of textbooks
and allocation of auxiliary means.
What is missing, so qualified ed-
ucators and psychologists agrei.
is the consciousness that toys and
botiks are essential from early
childhood on. They arc often
deemed superfluous by the un
derprivileged family i n I even
wealthy parents In new develop-
ment towns, for example, who
take good physical care of their
children but will hesitate to make
purchases of what they would
call "fancy goods" for them.
One fact is evident. There is
so far not yet a real danger of,
as the American Jewish sociolo-
gist and bestseller writer Oscar
Lewis called it, a culture of
poverty. There is no petriftcation
of patterns of life, and little
tendency to put up with reality
as it is. This is largely due to the
influence of immigration that
raised expectations and promises
improvements and advancement.
Propaganda does its share and is
potent even among the second
generation and the third.
Only a thin layer of ultra
conservative and usually aged
oriental Jews display that sub-
mission to fate, that unwilling-
ness to fight for betterment, that
is perhaps the greatest obstacle
to the integration of new immi-
grants and sometimes such as are
not so new any more, in the
veteran society of Israel. The
demands aiming at narrowing the
Page 13-E
Kmrn^awses J C,
cnsion
gap are also motivated by the
justified feeling that those who
have served in the army, as a
bout to bt married or mar-
ried for a short period only, have
a right o proper 'housing' ac
mable cost.
It is here that the tension pre-
vailing between the newest irmri-
- and those who came in
the fifties has its roots. Many of
a ho arrive now arc better
i ii d and receive n
intial hcli (hi n any i
igration While this argument
i ioi ac< e] ted for immi-
i ii : fr .1 h -'."in countri ;
who come from affluent soi
i did not perst
il d< es not a nvince n
II i- applied to Soviet
Jews, and there is open resent*
ment. especially among ex-
soldiers who have to cram Intfl
small apartments, often without
appropriate facilities, and in
slum areas There is little doubt
that it is not easy to determine
the proper scale of priorities, and
to strike a balance between the
concern for an encouragement
and integration of immigration
on the one hand, and the respon-
sibility for the underprivileged,
who have a right to be helped
clear out of the slum?.
In any case, neglect of the
creation of suitable frameworks
for the absorption of immigrants
is no more in the interest of the
community as a whole than is the
acceptance of large-scale depriva-
tion as a fact. The government is
trying to find ways of meeting
the challenge of both, in addition,
to the need of guaranteeing se-
curity, since internal peace is
essential and one of the pre-
conditions of military security.
TO ISRAEL
ON ITS 25th ANNIVERSAR Y
WORLD
RENOWNED
OUR 27th Year
**
RESTAURANT
671 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH
J


Page 14-E
frJewisti ftcridiatn
Friday, May 18, 1973
25 Uears ^Mfter: Continued from Page IE
(ria three terrorists were conveniently shuffled
over the bolder after a nominal jail sentence.
It would not have been illogical for the 1s-
ratlis to ti'.ke action after Buch obvious lack of
cooperation. Whether they did so remains a
matter of assumption. They have never admitted
responsibility for the death of a P1.0 leader in
Rome last autumn, nor for gunning down a Syr-
ian "Journalist" in Paris, nor for the death of
the local P1.0 head in the French capital last
December, nor for another one in Cyprus
Unlike the Arabs, who in their search for
self-justification not least for the sake of con-
tinued financial assistance, arc always quick
off the mark to claim credit for terrorist aits.
the Israelis are understandably tight-lipped about
their successes. Thus it remains a matter of con-
jecture whether the apparently systematic elimi-
nation of terrorist chiefs in Europe was part of
Rraeft counter-terror operations', conducted by
Mj !,.:< special advisor, or, a not Inconceivable
assumption, at least partly the work of some mili-
tant Jewish organization wiucn attempted to
smuggle weapons out of Israel last year for this
very purpose.
It could be assumed that Israel has expanded
H security operations over the world. The death
of an Israeli Embassy official in Brussels last
October, of an Israeli agent in Madrid and of


\flying ^fyip to J^harm el-Sheikh
Continued from Page 10-E
raelis. There were more Mian 1.000 applications
for the first housing available for 70 families.
Now 40 t.i 50 new families are integrated into
'he town each month.
The plan calls for a city of 70.000 but the
town is still small enough to walk around and
-ee that it really has been well planned.
Since everything in town i* easy to find,
trad is a good place to see what life's like for
new immigrants. Absorption centers throughout
Israel provide new immigrants with temporary
housing and a five-month "ulpan" for Hebrew-
instruction. For the pa-t two years, most of
toad's new immigrants have been Russian. Ab-
sorption center manager Michael Peled suggests
hat anyone interested in talking with families
at the center phone him.
\oi just future oriented, Arad has a 5.000-year
pasl Articrafts from the Bronze Age Canaanite
town that became part of the Judeaa Kingdom
will go on exhibit this summer in Arad*s new
cultural center.
\v for nightlife, that's an introduction to
'he community, the Histadrul has folkdancine
each week. The Masada Hotel has plans for a
discoteqne and the Nof Arad is planning a piano
bar, both to open this summer. Until then. Arad
- still primarily ,-, -, :: t" breathe the pure ni
air and go to bed which could explain
has one >f the highest birthrati in
Israel
One cf the cable cars leading to the
top oi Mount Masada, the prime tourist
attraction in the Arad area. In recent
months a ?e: of two sound and light pro-
the mount drew 4,000 per-
st year 470,000 pers
. '.. cable cv.: ride to the top cf the
untain.
businessman with apparent security connections
in Nicosia, point to the existence of a network.
It seems to be confined largely to the collec-
tion of intelligence so far, while effective elimi-
nation of terrorist hot beds remains largely re-
Etricted to the real center of their activities, to
Beirut and other parts of Lebanon, as last week's
Israeli air raid on terrorist chiefs' hideouts has
shown.
Thus, the pattern of the Israeli counter-terror
tactics which emerges shows an effective colla-
tion of intelligence, successful penetration of
the terrorist groups and a systematic elimination
of its leaders.
The demoralizing effect of the Beirut raid
on the terrorists must be vast. Whether they
move now to new hiding places remains to be
seen.
They will find no satisfaction in the confidant
prediction of Gen. David Elazar, the Israeli chief
of staff, that wherever they go they can be
reached.
The Israeli counter terror operation, while
basically ttill defensive, has turned into an attri-
t.on-type of activity. This strategy had already
succeeded in a military context, leading to the
still observed cease-fire in the Suez Canal zone
Oi August, 1970. It couid become just as fruitful
in its new application.
May Peace ever reign among
all Mankind .. In this our prayer
on the wonderful occasion of your
Glorious Silver Anniversary Celebration
DAVID TRAVELS
CALL US AT
893-0500
For Your Group Tours
And Travel Needs
I
i^fe>rc* ^rjroctctca-tina
MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
Salutes the
State of ISRAEL
on its
15-
1
25th ANNIVERSARY
J


fciday, May 18, 1973
* Jewish IFtorSdlildin
Page 15-E
World dreaders <^fppcarea PP


f Continued frcm Page 9-E
Jeru-aieni at which he proposed
- the launching of Israi i e first
Overseas Bond l-.-iev and ihe fil-
lov..:.:; year lie made a special
trip to the United State I.,
fcui'vli the first Israel Bond cam-
. pai'n in a triumphant coast to
Boa.'' lour.
Ik re in Miami, only three
^Honin- prior to the outbreak ol
;the >>. > War. Ben I uri >n de-
* toi a i:-'-1 hi entire pcech to
^fcc'im;--..n;:i!i-e of reclaiming and
re ;ev Desert as a
Bje;uN of providing greater op>
MJortu.'niie.; ior additional large
wave, oi .Jewish immigrants.
rTo dramatize the need for de-
ffelojvn'4 and populating t'le.
."Neg-v. Israel's lir.-t Prime Min-
Uto :i nrii out of Pel A':\ i.ito
a modest, almoi't primitive cot
tage ill the heart of the d"- rl
in a kibbutz known as Sde Boker
and eliailcngcd the younger n
Station to follow his example. It
was i his personal art of pioneer-
ing on the part of Ben-Gurion
which did more than Innumerable
ipecehes to encourage and pop-
ularize the establishment of de-
velopment towns in the Negev.
Honor to Shazar
No one symbolizes Israel's mili-
tary prowness or its formidable
system of defense better than it's
defen minister Moshc Dayan.
Gen Day has visited Miami at a
number of occasions, He was a
special guest together with Iho
late President Harry S. Truman
at the opening of the li>(j') I .
Bind campaign, and more re-
cently he was h-re to promote
it- 1972 campaign, Dayan is a
man ofacUin who speaks gimpl]
and forthrightly in the style of
a military man who shuns the
flourishes of oratory. lie had
be, n the chief architect of the
country's security ever since he
was summoned to join the Cab-
inet days before the outbreak of
the Six-Day War In June. 1967.
In the roster ol early pioneers
in the movement for the < b
' nent of the State of Israel,
President Zalman Shazar, who is
about to step down after ten
yi ITS in that largely ceremonial
post, occupies a special placi ol
honor.
l resident Shazar. who was a
al guest of honor at the
i .hi Bond Inaugural conference
in 1971, has a worldwide reputa-
tion as an author and editoi lie
combines an intimate knowledge
of the mystic secrets of rlaasid-
ism with the worldiy philosophy
of socialism, in Israel, he Is also
known as a flamboyant orator
who can galvanize an audience
with his flights of hyperbole and
eloquence. His advanced age did
not dilute his strong voice or
animated gesturing in :ne ad-
dress which he delivered hire
onlj two vears ago.
Another top Israeli figure who
has on a number of ossasions
here in behalf of the Israi I
Bone! program is Israel's minister
for foreign affairs, Abba Eban,
who has won worli iteem
as a tatesman of extraordinary
In 1960, Gen. Moshe Dayan and former President Harry S.
Truman were guests of honor at the launching of the Israel
Bond drive in Miami.
ability and C'hurchillian elo-
quence.
Many oilier members of Israel's
cabinet have also graced the plat-
form of the annual conferences
of the Israel Bond Organizati n
including Yigal Allan, deputy
prime minister and minister ol
education and culture; Pinchas
Sapir, minister of finance; I i
Bar Lev, minister of con,:
and industry: Ze'ev Sharef, min-
ister of housing; Shimon l:
minister of transport and com-
munications.
Rabin Appeared in Ml
If is also of interest that H
Rabin, who has just returned to
Israel after heading the Eml
iii Washington for live years,
made his lirsl public addrei
the United states as the nc
Ambassador at the 1968 Israel
Bond Conference In Miami, after
having served as Chief-of-Staff
in the Six Day War.
In a verv real sense it can be
said on this 25th anniversary Mat
Miami, ton, has been part oi the
dramatic and exciting history of
the State of Israel.
Former Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion addressing bond
leaders in Miami March 4, 1967.
The largest factor in the Real Estate Financing Field
is proud to make its services available in the State
o? Israel through their office at:
33 Shaul Hamelech Blvd.
Tel Aviv, Israel
Wal*er E. Heller & Company
900 N.W. 54'h St., AAiom. 76A9551
lA-.-Pi CiAN'DO JACK '.
Ihe Businsjsmon % Money Company
CONGRATULATIONS
ISRAEL
AND BEST WISHES
ON YOUR
25th ANNIVERSARY
FROM ALL OF IS AT
rllNB m
01111111
iriNPMD
^
aJOUMinHM)lm.n. M....... Mondri 13133
1973-1974 Season
Opening October 21
Subscriptions Now Available
j


icge 14-t
roo? .i-


Friday. Mav 18. 1973
Fr^rr May 1
r
f.
>
t
-

n
b
h
ii
A
*..
I
a'
P
'.<
'.
c
tl
e
i
b
Follow
the
stars
to
Come, join the people o* lyoel ood
rheir friends... become port of rhe
25rh Anniversory celebrotions.
See and er.py rhe \r rerr of oral Eir Hod .
An : Fesr< /oi The Ein Gev Music Fer
ThelnTerronc -ve'S^ He *'c
The //occGoee jo-es The Fesnvoi OMusic
ond Ooroo or Coescec T-e tr 1/0/ Scooe end c / Tee
Follow rhe Srors ro Isroel.
Johnny Corson. Poblo Casals. Liza Minnelii.
Frank Sinatra. Oorbro Srreisond.
Israel Government
Tourist Office:
For further information and details,
please contact your travel agent, or
The Israel Government Tourist Offke-
466 Madison Ave., NX N.Y 10022.
Tel. (212) 593-1665.
Pork Squore Bldg..
31Sr.JomesAve.,
Boston. Mass. 02116-
55o.WobashAve..
Chicooalll. 60603 -
8929 VilsNre Blvd.,
'.
795PeachtreeSr..N.E.,
Atlanta, Go. 30308-
1118 Sr. Catherine
102 Bloor St. W..
Toronto. Conodo,.
or the El Al Israel Airlines
Beverly Hills, CoJrf. 9Q2 j 1 Street West, Montreal Office in your city.


What is the Future for Occupied Territories?: Two Views
BY SHIMON PERES
A revolutionary development is
^ under way in the relationship
between the Jews and the Arabs
who now live as close neighbors
in the stretch of land between
the river Jordan and the Med-
iterranean Sea. To understand its
full significance it is essential to
keep in mind that they belong to
two nations, each bearing its own
ideological and political "freight,"
who have met in the Middle East
and who have set themselves
different priorities: for the Arabs
it is the "ingathering of their
territories:" for the Jews it is the
ingathering of their people."
The Arab world demands the
return of the territories lost in
A Former Deputy Minister Sees
No Going Back to Old Lines
the Six-Day War: the Sinai
peninsula to Egypt, and the Gaza
Strip to "Arab hands" (not nec-
essarily Egyptian); the West
Bank and part of Jerusalem to
Jordan (though her control of
these areas was of comparatively
short duration from Israel's
War of Independence in 1948 to
the war in June 1967): and the
Golan Heights to Syria.
The Jewish world is grimly
conscious of the Holocaust and
of the grave problems that still
baset its people. There are com-
munities who seek desperately to
each Israel but who face tough
exit barriers. Among the three
million Jews of the Soviet Union
the yearning for Zion is stronger
than ever, nourished by the mag-
netism of Israel and by the
"eJe wish Meridian
Miami, Florida Friday, May 18, 1973
Section F
Bedouin women with their flock.
... And Today's Foreign Minister Thinks Keeping
Them Bodes Great Trouble for Mideast Peace
By SAUL MANN
What exists on the West Bank
today is a fairly tense, re-
sentful tranquility, in the view
of Israel's Foreign Minister,
Abba Eban. As he has made clear
in recent speeches in Haifa, and
Abba Eban is a worried man. He It
concerned lest Israelis become memer
ijed by their successful military nil*
of the occupied territories, so that what
was originally conceived as tempor-
ary meaaure doe not freeze into per.
manence. He talked in Jerusalem to
Saul Mann.
Jerusalem, its effects on both
occupiers and occupied concerns
him deeply. Eban concedes that
apart from the essentials of safe-
guarding Israel's security in the
absence of peace, there are bene-
fits to the kind of pseudo-normal
relationship which has been es-
tablished. However, he is per-
turbed that this might be re-
garded as a substitute for the
settlement which would deter-
mine a relationship of equality
between the two peoples.
"To say that I feel comfortable
In contacts with West Bank or
Jerusalem Arabs is not the case,"
he confessed during a conversa-
tion at his Jerusalem home. "I
feel we do not talk on an equal
basis and, therefore, we are not
in a position to open hearts,"
Mr. Eban said.
No Real Co-Existence
He continued: "I am uncom-
fortable about saying there is co-
existence between us, because
co-existence has to be like this
(he raised his hands on the same
horizontal level), whereas now it
is like this (one hand horizontal,
the other above it vertically). I
would wish for a little more
humility about the way in which
Continued on Page 15-F
continued anti-Semitism, which
has proved more ingrained and
durable than communism itself.
The million Jews in Latin
America arc aware of the earth
tremors beneath their feet. And
even in the largest of Jewish
communities, United States' Jew-
ry, there is anxiety over assimi-
lation, the growing hatred among
the Black Power movements, and
the drug culture which threatens
their young. Thus, despite its re-
markable achievements and the
speed with which they were at-
tained, the Jewish people has not
yet found peace and tranquility.
There are some 14 million
Jews in the world today, of whom
2.700.000 are in Israel. (At the
birth of modern Zionism a hun-
dred years ago the total Jewish
population was 7.1 million, and
only 22,000 were in Palestine.)
At the current birth rate and
with the addition of even a mod-
erate annual immigration (40.000-
50.000) the future Jewish popu-
lation in Israel could well reach
many millions.
So it is that Hie Jews lay their
stress on demography; the Arabs
on geography.
Anxiety Over Assimilation
The dramatic situation cre-
ated by this difference in em-
phasis inevitably gives rise to
extremist positions. Even inside
Israel the debate ranges between
two poles, the one urging the
"Greater Israel" view, the other
pressing for the territories to be
exchanged for a contractual
peace. It is my judgment that the
first will find no support among
a majority of the Jews, and the
second will be spurned by a
majority of Arabs.
I think that most Israelis
would be prepared to give up
certain territories m order to
achieve peaceful relations with
the Arabs and this is also the
official position of the Govern-
ment. However, I do not believe
that a peace treaty with the
Arabs is likely in the immediate
future, precisely because of the
geopolitical difficulties.
No Cease-Fire Arrangement
Syria demands the return of
the Golan Heights, but she has
refured to sign even a cease-fire
arrangement with Israel, and rer
attitude of hostility is among the
most extreme of any Arab State.
In such circumstances, any com-
promise over the Golan Heights
would mean handing over to
Syrian militarism more favorable
gun-sites from which to menace
Israel's settlements in the Huleh
and Jordan valleys.
Jordan, the monarchy flecked
by the shadow of Palestinian ex-
tremism, has shown the liveliest
inclination to find an accommo-
dation with Israel. But the Kind's
hands are not as free as they
would seem. He must demand
part of Jerusalem, but "the re-
newed division of Jerusalem is
not a matter for discussion;" and
he also wants back most of the
West Bank, without his being
able to give it the peace and
security it enjoys now (and
shimon nwn
farmer deputy wt-rster o#fimisfic
<\nn......lM.....""


?cg :4-E
>Jmistfkj-H&r
Fridov Mat 18. 19T3
* k*i& RrrkBir
v-

Recalling the First Day of Independent in
*U <5% fmUK 0^

^^ .-'j*mo*ar-*



I
i i-: BBC .
- .
-
r -
.
v.
~


i
- .
-
'

T--
'

-
*
- VJS>.~.
V '- n .
'
mi. -wi% :.i m *-izs,
. :
_ tail
t rfc*
kga.*.-.
-' ratal

K3*s- r'jeat: rarer !
j i
- '....:
-



-

-.
ipniv^ir1! .: : l* ; i
jri uxiiriii va



... :v
sac wj scar.* a aesv
*j BrlM :
"'-
t*i- '.
....

aal ii_
!

-.~i
I
C~>jBmm'J m

MR. aed US.
IMlMMt DEEMAft
I.
ITaej I vr .-;...
i-- a* btmte
- - 2 Ai *
..*Lot* j5
.:.*. iMi a.'.'.cas? *j>
eDBsdxaj shells
Sudden:;, the Hi m .Tiled with
Use Mtaa '..' -.: ~ :a* expi>
bom of she!: i neaaaal .o ir
axd
*u roar
> rate a*c oac
teac **** a* Eraai -.s*
-. c ate Mdi
Md 4s* *> uiii< dtat tM
irii sa -Berajrad" *e se-
:he General Pa* Office.
Mhfiag aad Pna-
_}.-.*-- n
van 5rv ai Jeara* ade
at aaonaag f iDOepeo-
aesee In;
ssdei er* ;*'-*:<
am*; a tai raesaBW lefl
-. :
jjfA'.x tke in '^cam* sBitor- B .** onaie^.
Tat .-isanianr.er *-* aJ
taaa :*.-
kaeft -'.
Th* ^r. so.
*.-a. Heao|uar.*Tf ..- the Ks*
^ai.; Batri Ihc Brdaat
;:*ai eassw) awv*c sJo*;--
,^to Siieikis .\rrafc ai etnuc
* aea final sac Xtartat eJtj
MR. and MRS.
BURTON R. LEVEY
Be4t Jeff md Jod e
- THBfi 25i+ ANN /S&Afi
Bella & Mauriee H. GoMring
Lvdia & E. Peter Goldrin
MEETINGS
ON
ISRAEL'S 25rh ANNIVERSARY
FROM
MIAMI BEACH BNAI 3'RlTH LODGE, No. 159?
S one/ Z. Rock we \ Dres'dent.
--E STATE OF SRAB
3' '5
25--
ANN.'VERSA' I
~- : so; s o* *ree-c"
:- e .ev. sr, -2-^e =-c
nations o* the iwoHd *sr s
unbf d'ea progress ar*d courere
.*3 unyielding s"cc=: uf
deToc-scy and setf-detenTi nation
MR. and MRS.
LEON J. ELL
_
.A CHA V
o- tH occaston of
ISRAEL'S 25tK ANNIVERSARY
RABBI and MRS.
TIBOR H. STERN
JACOB C. COHEN CONG*GATlOfl
Miami Beach


cry
+Jewist noridUbun
Page 3-F
r
To All
/
rsrcter 7^n^7
%
Heartiest Best Wishes
On Your 25th
Anniversary
M. mill '.Ills. DAVID J. I ll.il I


r-~i>cger4-r
-' *Jelst>flcf*/ter7
"wflay.JfefHir/a
I
Many New Vistas of Discovery in Archaeology Made Since Statehood
By PROF. BENJAMIN MAZAR
The 25 years of Israel's state-
hood have opened up new
vistas for archaeology in Israel.
The change is evident in all as-
pects quantity, quality, tech-
nique, and goals.
Since the inception of the
state, considerable progress has
teen made. The scope of proj-
ects expanded rapidly. More
holars are working in more
fields. Research today encom-
passes studies of ail the archaeo-
logical layers, representing all
the periods of settlement in the
bnd of Israel from the pre-
- storic age to the Islamic period
n the 16th and 17th centuries.
New methods are being used to
explore new subjects, from strat-
. craphic research of aiie strata to
the study of the ceramics and
;.!chitecture of the several peri-
ods. Scholars deal with the re-
search of epigraphs inscrip-
tions preserved since ancient
t:mes. of which the most famous
are the Dead Sea Scrolls. The di-
mensions of research have also
widened. Archaeological finds in
the land are being incorporated
with the results of digs in neigh-
boring countries, and gradually
light is being shed on the devel-
opment of the entire Near East.
Jason's Tomb
Archaeology involves many peo-
ple from such local institutions
U the Hebrew University and
the Government Department of
Antiquities and Museums, as well
..- from foreign institutions. The
exploring is not confined to sys-
tematic excavations planned in
advance. Sometimes interesting
finds are unearthed by chance
during mundane construction
v. orks. That is how Jason"s Tomb.
a splendid sepulchre over 2.000
>cars old. was found in Jerusalem
;. short dUtance from my home.
The plot on which a modern
dwelling was to be built became
:.n ancient site. In Tel Aviv, too,
tiquities have been uncovered
when the foundations of build-
- were being dug. The govern*
and the major municipalities
PROf. BSNIAMIN MAZAR
findings near home
maintain a staff of archaeologists
whose job it is to see to it that
important treasures of old are not
lost.
The professionals are helped in
their work by a host of amateurs.
There is tremendous public in-
terest in the archaeology of the
country, and many people are
ready to devote time and energy
to digs. Volunteers youths of
this country and from abroad
come to every large-scale excava-
tion and are happy to lend a
hand. As a result, work becomes
easier and more comprehensive.
In the Golan Heights
The country has been system-
atically divided into archaeologi-
cal zones. There have also been
explorations in Judaea and Sa-
maria, in the Golan Heights, even
in Sinai. The discoveries of
mounds ancient settlements and
burial sites have led to signifi-
cant conclusions which may con-
siderably niodifv' our conception
of the history of the land over
many periods. -,
An excellent example is the
Continued on Page 8-F
MAZEL TOV
ISRAEL ] .. -
on i ,: your 25th Anniversary
from "
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION : OF MIAMI, INC.
MURIEl and ROBERT RUSSELL
Congratulations, Israel!
OUR PRIDE IN THE ACHIEVEMENTS
OF THE FIRST QUARTER CENTURY
OF STATEHOOD IS SURPASSED
ONLY BY OUR CONFIDENCE
IN YOUR FUTURE.

^V e Salute TEMPLE EMANU-EL AND THE
the State of Israel LEHRMAN DAY SCHOOL PROUDLY SALUTE
TEMPLE JUDEA ISRAEL
Coral Gables on its glorious
MORRIS A. KIPPER, Rabbi 25th ANNIVERSARY
' Rita Shore, Cantor Ray Berman, Principal TEMPLE EMANU-EL 1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Sol Schreiber, President Helen D. Cohen, Exec. Director JUDGE HERBERT S. SHAPIRO SAMUEL N. FRIEDLAND President Chairman of the Board
1 DR. IRVING LEHRMAN Rabbi
-


Friday, May 18, 1973
*Jemst) fkrHtfur
Page S-F
Ml "*

****** *, >

k'
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Zilbert
SALUTE THE
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of
the STATE of ISRAEL
And its heroic people
In their struggle for
INDEPENDENCE
_
ii


Page 6-F
+Jmit> UmiUHw
Friday, May 18, 1973

jf-ormer JUeputu ,W
Continued from Page IF

, ,. ,-
which is more than he can pro-
vide in his own East Bank).
As for Egypt, she demands the
return of the whole of Sinai and
ignores not only the results of
the wars of 1956 and 1967, but
also the actions which provoked
them, notably her blockade of
Israeli shipping in the Straits of
Tiran. Indeed, she imposed her
blockade in 1967 despite her spe-
cific undertaking after the 1956
Sinai Campaign never again to
interfere with Israeli navigation
in the Straits. Israel is accord-
ingly determined to give coastal
protection to her vessels by re-
taining control of a territorial
strip along the west coast of the
Straits from Sharm el-Sheikh to
Eiath.
On the lave o; u there would
appear to he no way out of the
impasse. In fact, however, if we
free ourselves from the under-
standable tendency to force all
political life into a rigid frame-
work of treaties and declarations,
we see that the situation is not
so desperate.
Iiael*s control of the Golan
Heights ma\ not have changed
the tone of Syrian policy, but it
definitely imposed an element of
restraint on Syrian actions.
Syria has had to curb her de-
sire to swallow up Jordan, and
she has been increasingly re-
luctant to bring Upper Galilee
under fire.
New Relationships
With Jordan, even in the ab-
sence of a peace treaty, a new
system of relationships is coming
into being accompanied by the
joint pursuit of common inter-
ests. The debate between Jordan
and Israel is less wild and noisy
than it used to be. King Hussein
had the courage to condemn the
Munich massacre, the only Arab
ruler to do so while Israel's
press and radio find frequent
prai;e for the Hashemite king-
dom.
In deeds, the reality is even
better. The Jordan border is
calm. The guns are silent. The
bridges are open and carry, in
both directions, people, goods
and even ideas. Neither country
wants war. both abhor Fatah
terrorism, and neither is anxious
to draw the Russians or their in-
fluence into its realm.
Along the Suez Canal, the
cease-fire continues: but there
appears to be no quick or easy
path from cease-fire to peace
treaty with Egypt. In truth, the
route would seem to be more
like a staircase than a super high-
way, with the need to mount a
series of partial arrangements as
a start towards a new future.
Step Toward Peace
,... Tranquility along the River
Jordan, comparative restraint in
Syria and a cease-fire at Suez are
of no small moment; but the real
step toward peace, a step of strik-
ing significance, was taken, to
the surprise of many, on the ter-
ritory lying between the Jordan
and the Mediterranean.
No one planned the encounter
there between the 2.7 million
Jews and 1.4 million Arabs; and
none would have thought there
was hope of their peaceful co-
existence After all, at the cen-
ter of the Arab-Jewish conflict
was the Palestinian problem.
And, indeed, when the smoke A
the six-day battles had cleared,
both sides faced each other with
embarrassment, anxiety, uncer-
tainty. The peripheral mood was
still charged with the impact of
the recent hostilities; at its cur-
lay a mistrust which had hard-
ened over the decades.
The Arabs of the West Bank
and the Gaza Strip were thus eas-
ily induced to resume their char-
acteristic behavior towards the
Jewish population which ex-
pressed itself in grenade threw
ing. firms from ambush, I
stores to close, law. !rike.
"I think that most Israelis would be prepared
to give up certain territories in order to achieve
peaceful relations with the Arabsand this is
also the official position of the Government.
However, I do not believe that a peace treaty
with the Arabs is likely in the immediate
future, precisely because of the geopolitical
difficulties." Shimon Peres
terrorist violence not a sinele ter-
scho.dchildren to stage demon-
strations, and in bombarding the
international news media with
wild charges against "the oppres-
sor." On the Israeli side, there
was the precedent oif military rule
w ith its restrictions on Arab move-
ment, controls to limit extremism,
and the introduction of security
zones. This was the situation in
the months immediately follow-
ing the June. 1967 fighting.
Within a short time, however,
a fundamental change was
wrought in the entire pattern of
Arab-Jewish relations, with con-
flict replaced by cooperation. The
man chiefly responsible for this
charge was Moshe Dayan.
While punitive action was tak-
en against the terrorists
mostly by tearing down the
houses of those associated with
acts of terror the government
remained firm in its resolve not
to carry out death sentences.
Throughout the entire period of
terrorist was executed. Strikes be-
came less frequent as the strikers
found that they were able either
to raralvze or to provoke the ad-
ministration.
Security zones were soon re-
placed by open bridges across
the River Jordan, and the Israeli
economy was opened to Arab
labor. A flow of goods eastwards
and of workers gradually brought
about an economic blossoming in
the West Bank.
Arab Mayors in Charge
Later, a similar trend had a
similar effect in the Gaza Strip.
Mayors were given full opportun-
ity to run their municipal affairs.
Arab agriculture was introduced
to the new methods and equip-
ment employed by the Israeli
farmers, and the result was an
incredible jump in crop yields.
In some areas and with certain
crops in the West Bank, there
Mazel-Tov
L'Medinot Yisroel
from the
HILLEL COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
21288 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami Beach
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE Of AMERICA
salutes Israel on its 25th Anniversary
Joseph Golden, Regional President
Marshall Baltuch, Regional Youth Director
MAZEL TOV
ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
from
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
LA CHAIM
on the occasion of
ISRAEL'S 25th ANNIVERSARY
TEMPLE
NER TAMID
Conservative Daily Minyon
7902 Car\y\e Avenue, Miami Beach
Dr. Eugene Labovitz, Rabbi
was a nine-fold increase in the
harvest within two years.
Freedom of expression was
granted as a matter of course
though much to Arab surprise.
(There are now three Arab news-
papers in Jerusalem and the West
Bank, and Arab correspondents
themselves say that they enjoy
greater press freedom than any
of their colleagues in the Arab
world).
The example of Israel, the true
Israel, the Israel they had now
come to know as their immediate
and accessible neighbor, also be-
gan to have its impact. At first.
the West Bank residents were
struck by such marginal features
as the skyscrapers of Tel Aviv,
the beach at Xetanya, and the
traffic lights of Jerusalem. But
soon their eyes, and minds, were
opened to more fundamental phe-
nomena, like the classless queue,
with no distinction of treatment
between "fallah" and "effendi.''
or the doubling of a man's salary
after completing a vocational
training course, or talk without
fear. Then came the physical
meetings. Arab met Jew at the
scaffolding on a construction site,
in factory', fWd and market place.
They mingled with each other in
the city streets.
The national confrontation
gave way to the human encounter.
The administration in the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip is staffed
almost exclusively by Arabj. Of
the 8,500 employees in the West
Bank, only 196 are Israelis. Of
A salute to the twenty-fifth anniversary
of the State of Israel and to its heroic
people in their struggle for independence
from
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
DR. JOSEPH R. NAROT
From all of us at
Temple Tifereth Israel
6500 N. Miami Avenue, Miami
TO ISRAEL
Heartiest congratulations
Maurice Klein, Rabbi Mario Offner, Pres.
(Students prepared for Bar Mitzvah and Bas Mitzva)


Friday, May 18. 1973

Zvi Behir. supervisor of the Gem Hashlosha park in the Galilee g.eets a West Bank Aruo
coaple arriving for their Friday picnic in Israel
the 4.100 in Gaza. 103 are Is-
Returning to Normal Life
Of the 800.000 Inhabitants of
the West Bank, loo.ooo were
considered refugees and lived in
l!) small refugee camps. After
iy*>7 these refugees began to re-
RETIRED PEOPLE
Escape
TO SUNNY
/m I %J 9UNI
jsraei
Be pampered on a leisurely vacation
at ire ne/- luxurious Goldar Hotel
in Nc'anya on 'srael's Riviera.
turn to normal life. The develop-
ment of the Arab economy and
accessibility to the Israeli econ-
omy created work opportunities.
Instead of being dependent
solely on welfare, they started
earning their living, and their in-
come trebled and quadrupled. Vo-
cation;.! courses were introduced,
hospitals and clinics were opened,
drinking water was piped into the
camps, sewage systems and elec-
tricity were installed. Some
Camps were linked to nearby mu-
nicipalities and are developing in-
to flourishing suburbs, just like
the normal suburbs of the other
towns in the West Bank.
In effect it can be said that the
refugee probbm in the West
Bans has b<. i solved.
Of the 360,000 inhabitants in
the Gaza Strip, half were refu
gees living in eight cpnips, foui
very large numbering up to
30,000 to 40 000 and four
small, Gaza as a whole suffered
dire poverty. The average annual
income per capita was about IT.
53 in 19C7. as compared with
over II, 100 in the West Bank.
With poverty came in.su rrcr
tion. Up to a year >. o Gaza was
rife with terrorism But again, tht
economic opportunities, the unex-
pected freedom as well as the
effective, though much criticized,
anti-terrorist measures made
5
3 *!; allinciusive
874
50'
4*us ali-inclusive $1,020.80'
Aiicort assistance
ana transfers :.i
t.sw*-
1 \
ana transfers :.i /. i ,
irriuiand f \
apsrturs Jv^
Acccnmodationsfftt ^r.V
Heartiest Congratulations and Sincere
Wishes for Good Health and Peace
for one and all.
THE DEED CLUB
in twit
bedffi roe.-s

per day
Leisurely
spaced weekly
s htsef ni lours /,
Social and
I
activities jjj., ej^
ISRAEL
You have enriched the world
bv your presence. We are grateful.
CONGREGATION B'NAI RAPHAEL
1401 N.W. 183rd Street
Victor D. Zwelling, Rabbi
Jack Lerner, Cantor
Rudolf Mann, President
From New York
For Reservations Call in
Confidence: Kurt Kothschild
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL, INC.
at 945-5276
Your Israel Headquarters & Top
Agency in North Miami Beach
1074-107-S Inferama Blvd.
We Speafe Hebrew Yiddish
German French Spanish
Italian Roumanian
CONGRATULATIONS ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
May Peace ever reign among
all Mankind ... In this our Prayer
on the wonderful occasion of your
Glorious Silver Anniversary Celebration
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Irving Newman, President
Pn/w l&JE
Page 7-F
themselves felt. The fisherman
again went out in their hoats.
(ia/a port was opened and a
proper pier built for the first
Lime in Gaza's long history. The
refugees' started traveling north
to v\ork. earning sums which en-
abled them to emerge at last
11 the appalling straits into
i they had been forc< d a
"the" i*r-;b world," which "was po-
litically interested in keeping th \
refugee problem, if not the refu-
gees, alive.
Electricity Brought In
Camps and towns in the Gaza
Strip were linked to electricity
and water In some camps new-
houses were built and the refu-
gees willingly vacated their
shacks Jo live in them. This made
it possible to widen roads, reduce
overcrowding, improve security,
and attach the camps to existing
municipalities for the provision
of local services. Many problems
Still remain in the Gaza Strip,
but it is following with giant
strides in the model fashioned in
the West Bank.
Many of the Arab workers from
th? West Bank and the Gaza
Strip are employed by Israeli
Arabs, oldtinie citizens of Israel,
who number some 350,000. Is-
rael'c economic boom has not
passed them by. Their far
have greatly developed. Access
roads have been built t,. connect
their villages to the highways.
And new hotfsfog has been cop.
structed on a cp i idi rable seal \
W^-l'v.'Mn/'V rift blVth rate
the average is low, and some 50
per cent are under 14. There is
schooling for all.
When one considers (he total
picture, it must be evident that
what has happenfl here Is x
political miracle and this is
more remarkable than the eco-
nomic miracle. Two enemy camps,
in the absence of official peace,
suddenly discovered the way to
live as cooperative neighbors in a
state of de facto peace. Theirs is
surely a peace with an export po-
tential prototype that can be cop-
ied in the entire Middle East.
POT myself, aware of present
realities. I do not seek a solution
to the problem of Arab-Jewish
relations in the territorial but in
the political srhcre: not through.
Continued on Page 8-F
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
'The Liberal Congregalion
On Miami Beach'
Pays Tribute to
Mcdinat Israel
On its 25th Anniversary
Eli Katzin, President _^._
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
,4144 Chase Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
MAZEL TOV
ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
- from
TEMPLE ZAMORA
Maxwell Berger P. H. Brummer
Rabbi Cantor
Harry Pinesick, P>-es.
JH
BETH DAVID
CONGREGATION
(celebrating its 6C!h anniversary)
Proudly Salutes
THE STATE OF ISRAEL
ON THEIR 25th ANN VERSARY
From all of us at
Israelite Center Temple
31 75 S.W. 25th Street
5-1529
To Israel
Heartiest congratulations
Paul J. Bender, Rabbi
Chester Letter, Pres.


?:qe 8-F
* Jen 1st thrfdX&n
Friday. May W, 1973
;3aic floor of the fourth cen ur I H mat-Tibs wi .7
ne h branched end ether ril 1 chjeclb.
\>r??C Vew l/is
hi -3 in
L

Mayshie Friedberg
aeoioq*.)
1 ontinued froi 1 Pa > 4-F
long tl
T> ly.five irs
im 1
.; "
auotit it. Since then a revoluti in-
> change has taken place in our
nderetandinc. The unearthin ol
ne hidden Qumran Scrolls and
,0 finds in the excavations at
Ein Gedi and elsewhere have
roved that this was no remote
ind desolate area but a fertile
nd flourishing region for thou-
sands of years, even after the
destruction of the second temple
^>y the Romans, and until the end
f the Byzantine era. The last
Jewish rebels against Roman rule
who fled to the region escaped
-3t to a barren wilderness but to
a populated area. In fact, the re-
:ion, with its unique climate and
unusual flora, was a source of
uealth and a base of interna-
"onal trade during the Kingdom
of Judaea and the reign of Herod.
The accepted assumption that
the destruction of the temple by
-he Romans led to the annihila-
tion of the Jewish community in
the land of Israel has been re-

: logical finds. II
t thi
to ;.-! hu
:" II. Fur-
nore. Jewish culture, which
. ultra cur.-.''.... a dur-
ing the Herodian period, tthen
became more liberal. During the
second temple period, reproduc-
tions of human beings or animals
did not appear on coins or pave-
ment mosaics. After it, they were
found in abundance.
Strong Ties
Other discoveries proved that
there were more extensive con-
nections between the Jewish na-
tion in the land of Israel and the
other nations in the vicinity than
was previously bettevedr-^The re-
lationship between the culture of
Israel and other Middle Eastern
cultures was strong, arid not lim-
ited to commercial ties. Contacts
were maintained between Jews
and Philistines, Phoenicians, Na-
bataeans, Greeks and Romans in
all spheres of life, material and
spiritual. .
The Jewish people created its
own culture through contact, con-
frontation and struggles' with all
the other cultures. It conducted
its life within the general cul-
tural framework of the Middle
East, in which it fashioned a civ-
; ..
. The cultural
r 1 ion
ir cultui ir.ii I
i thoi 1'. : pcneti'ti il
th synagogue.
Another era Intend el) "
plorcd is the early Mus im th \
7th and 8th centuries J i h re
searchers have brought to I; shl
many structures dating from this
period a'ong the Dead Sea shore
and in Jerusalem.
Ail of this selves many pro')
lems of the history of the Ian.I
of Israel and creates new prob-
lems and more work. An attempt
can now be made ti> draw an
overall and accurst.1 picture of
life in the land, making use of all
the sources the Bible, the Tal-
mud, epigraphs found in excava-
tions, writings of historians, com
prehensive digs that recreate all
aspects of that life, and only now
is it gradually becoming possible .
to see the historic process <> it.
development. We can already af-
firm that there was a continuity
in the development of the country
and the life of its inhabitants.
This continuity was. apparently,
interrupted during th* Crusades,
but before them, and possibly
even after them, the country was
lively and thriving, an integral
nart of the life and culture of
the Near East and the Eastern
Mediterranean.

-^yVlinistct
Continued from Page 7-F
8 division of tracts of land but
t-y a division of administration,
ith the object of creating a pat-
' m whereby every man is able
to enjoy equality of rights and
* ach community can preserve its
special character.
It seems to me that this can be
retained not by dividing the coun-
Vydivision only brought blood-
iedbut through the establish-
- ent of a federal system in Is-
rael. In this system, barbed wire
fences and boundary posts will
_.ve way to roads and bridges,
lectric cables and water pipe-
-nes. The standard of life will
be advanced for all, with free-
t-om of movement and of expres-
sion, and cooperation which does
rot require anyone to separate
.himself from his nation or com-
munity, or to relinquish his re-
Lgion, his political convictions,
bis language, his customs, or his
mode of living.
Congratulations, Israel!
Our pride in the achievements
of the first quarter century
of statehood is surpassed
only by our confidence
in your future.
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14 Ave., Hollywood, Fla.
Samuel Z. Jaffe, Rabbi
Lewis E. Cohn, President
A Salute to the twenty-fifth anniversary
of the State of Israel and to its heroic
people in their struggle for independence
from
TEMPLE MENORAH
Dickens Ave., at 75th Street, Miami Beach, Fla.
Mayer Abramowitz, Rabbi
Robert L. Siegel, President
Says Shalom
and Mazel Tov
to all his
friends
in Israel
- 2
CONGRATULATIONS ISRAEL
on your 25th Anniversary
May Peace ever reign among
all Mankind ... In this our Prayer
on the wonderful occasion of your
Glorious Silver Anniversary Celebration
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
4601 Arthur St., Hollywood, Fla.
Dr.Morton Malavsky, "Rabbi
Jack Shapiro, President
r
OF AMERICA
SOUTHEAST REGION
Salutes the Land
of the People of Israel
On Israel's Glorious Silver Jubifee"
r r


Friday, May 18, 1973
t.i-a. .____
tf*>l*tfk>rknan
f
B^^. 11-P
Page 9-F
and H ^ f di!ec,ors' offl ?HF ff *he M'AMI BEACH HEBREW HOME FOR
Inni ""S'atulate the State of Israel on its 25th
anniversary and extend a wish for everlasting peace.
DON'T LET
THEM WAIT
UNTIL IT IS
TOO LATE
Foi Many The Time Left Is Too Limited...
Host Are In Urgent Need Of Medical Care...
THEY SERVED WELL...
fORSAKE THEM HOT
The task of our generation is clear we must now build again...so that our
aged and chronically-ill may live out the twilight of their lives in dignity
and peace nourished by the strength of our goodly heritage, and our com-
munity commitment.
NON-PROFIT-NON-SECTARIAN
CONSTRUCTION OF NEW CUSTODIAL BUILDING
PLEASE SEND CASH CONTRIBUTIONS OR STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS TO
i fOfi lift

I
320 COLLINS AVE., MIAMI BEACH
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: 672-6464
Margaret and Abe C. Fein, benefactors
Lonard Zilbert, president AArs. Murray Kostoff, president Women's Auxiliary
Sidney Siegel, executive vice president
Paid for by the friends 5? the Miami Beach Hebrew Home For the Aged


Page 10-F
*>Jml$ti Fk>ri/ftatr?
rriday, May 18, 1373
3
First Outside Reference to Israel Dates from Egyptian Era
By PROF. J. L. TA1.MON
re earliest reference in an ex-
ternal source to Israel in the
land of Canaan as a people, at all
events as some sort of collective
entity, is contained in an Egjrp-
tian document dating from 1230
BC1, the Mernettah" or "Israel
Stele." This puts us. in so far as
antiquity and unbroken contin-
uity are concerned, well ahead
of any other nation extant, on a
par with the Chinese.
See where they are now. and
where we are. and take heart.
Even without the facts of pro-
longed dispersal and martrydom.
and the vital part played by the
Jewish component in world his-
tory, this alone would suffice to
mate the reestablishment of Jew-
ish statehood the most remark-
able and most constructive cor-
porate Jewish achievement in the
last 2.000 yean, and to turn it
into one of the great feats of uni-
versal history.
Religious Historic Tradition
Monumental greatness is writ
large upon Jewish struggle tor
national liberation. It was driven
and sustained by unexampled
faithfulness to a religious-historic
tradition, most urgent needs, and
a vision of a luminous future. It
bore the character of an explo
JEWISH IMMIGRATION TO ISRAEL 1947 1972

<--> en Ul in .'i
o N> Ul *j o
8
S< in (O (D tO
pi 3i -J -, ~J
-, & (> O *
240.000
220.000
200,000
hi 80 000
160.000
140.000
120,000
100.000
80.000
60.000
40.000
20.000
------- 0
"Israel and the world should begrudge no cost and no effort
needed for the resettlement of refugees .
sion of volcanic energies in all
fields of endeavor and called to
life an astonishing ability to rise
to most difficult situations and
master them. An unflagging na-
tional purposefulness brought in-
to play untapped organizational
talent and valor in the field of
battle.
This vast, strenuous effort
AMERICAN JEWISH
COMMITTEE
Dr. Charles R. Beeber, President
Walter Zand, Florida Director
Congratulations
ISRAEL
on its
25th
Anniversary
r \
MIZRACHI HAPOEL HAMIZRACHI
of
GREATER MIAMI
heartily congratulates our sisters and brothers
in the Land of Israel on the 25th Anniversary
of its rebirth. We thank the Almighty for tht
countless miracles showered upon our people.
We pray for the continuance of these bounties,
that peace come to Israel and to the world at
large.
Our motto is "Eretz Yisroel Layam Yisroel Alpe
Torat Yisroel"
The Presidium Hyman Kolko
Herman Eisenbetq
Jacob R. Modansky
awe inspiring in its single-n
ness, unprecedented in it.>
?trategi< s, and often heart rend
ing in the moral dilemmas it
was called upon to confront
was carried out in the midst of
the greatest calamity thai has
ever befallen a people
It w.i brought lo fruition on
the morrow of tin most l orrible
blood-lettins thai i ij
ever experienced Dull must be
the man, Jew or Gentile, who
would fail to respond with a
thrill to the most powerful asser
lion of the will to live i.i the
shadows and agonies of death: to
this triumph of the human spiril
over the deepest degradation and
wretchedness.
Ideological Controversy i
Ideological controversies under
the guise of historic evaluations
continue to rage as to the sig
nificance and the respective
roles of the various forces in
achieving national independence.
Some view the events of 1941 48
as the inevitable messianic "de
nouetnent." towards which 'ti-
whole of Jewish history has been
moving in a preordained man-
ner, something like the revolu-
tion in the vision of the Socialists
of an earlier day.
Others see Zionism as the Jew-
ish, rather late, response to the
challenge of nationalism, which
has been stirring and tormenting
people after people across tht
globe tor the last 200 years, and
to the rise of which the Jewish
conception of the congregation
of believers and partners in the
collective destiny of a chosen
people have made an essential
contribution. There is finally the
school which puts all emphasis
upon the despenatc needs of a
homeless persecuted race.
The State of Israel was brought
into being, some maintain. In
patient constructive labor in add
ing dunam to dunam. a goat to a
goat, settlement to settlement, in-
stitution to institution. The diplo-
matic skill and finesse in mobiliz
ing international sympathy and
in harnessing the aid of the great
powers are highlighted by others.
There are people who glorify the
direct and armed action resist-
ance, terror and victorious war
as the midwives of our national
liberation.
Writing from a vantage point
above the noise of battle, the fu-
ture historian will find enough
room for all of these forces ji the
pantheon of Israel, assigning to
each of them its right place.
Minority of Zealots
There is that minority of zeal-
ots which dreams of a total and
radical break with almost ali
previous Jewish history through
the liquidation of the diaspora
and the complete absorption in
the State of Israel. As against
them we have the Canaanites
who are toying with the idea of
a definite rupturt between the
Jews of the diaspora and a new
Israeli nation of 'natives." They
want the Jews tc mingle and
fuse with the non-Jewish resi-
dents of greater Israel by shed-
ding the religious distinctiveness
and taking on the color of the
region.
I he vast majority, which re-
thi orientations, can-
not help confronting its own
problems with similar situations
in the Jewish past.
From the destruction of the
first commonwealth until long
after the fall of the second there
was always a special relationship
between the Palestinian "yishuv"
and some powerful diaspora, rich
in spirit or in material goods or
in hp'.h Babylon of the first
exile and then of the Talmud
Continued on Page 14 F
Congratulations, Israel!
Our pride in the achievements
of the first quarter century
of statehood is surpassed
only by our confidence
in your future.
MIAMI BEACH and
MIAMI CHAPTERS
of HADASSAH
GREATER MIAMI SECTION
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, INC.
Proudly Salute
THE STATF OF ISRAEL
ON THEIR 25th ANNIVERSARY
DR. ABRAHAM WOLFSON,
the 91 year old director of the
SPINOZA FORUM FOR ADULT EDUCATION
and a Zionist since 1897,
salutes the State of Israel on her
25th anniversary.


Triday. May 18. 1973
vjeefffffcrftftor
The Board of Trustees of
Mount Sinai Medical Center
of Greater Miami
Salutes The State Of Israel On Its
25th Anniversary
Page 11-F
A Major Medical Center Of Florida
Is Proud To Be Affiliated With
The Chaim Sheba Medical Center of Tel-Hashomer
A Major Medical Center Of Israe


Page 12-F
vJewlsti HerkHan
Friday, May 18. 1973
CONGRATULATIONS
ISRAEL
AND BEST WISHES
FROM ALL OF US
... > 11
ALAN S. BECKER
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
DANTE B. FASCELL
CONGRESSMAN
ELAINE GORDON
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
CHUCK HALL
MAYOR OF MIAMI BEACH
GWEN SAWYER CHERRY
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
MAURICE FERRE
MAYOR, CITY OF MIAMI
ROSE GORDON
COMMISSIONER, CITY OF MIAMI
SY HOWARD AND FAMILY
VICE MAYOR, SURFSIDf
JOHN CYRIL MALLOY
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
KENNETH MYERS
STATE SENATOR
CLAUDE PEPPER
CONGRESSMAN
RICHARD J. POTVIN
COUNCILMAN, GOLDEN BEACH
JUDGE SIDNEY L. SEGALL
RICHARD A. PETTIGREW
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
HARVEY RUYIN
COMMISSIONER, CITY OF MIAMI
JUDGE SAM I. SILVER
*7/W


rCccallincf the J-'irst Jjavf of SnJepcnM
ence
ntinued from Page 2F
_gh the former British cheek-
|s now manned by the na-
J\ guard (Mishmar Haam).
i*we entered Julian's Way
near the King David Hotel Hare
came under a hail of bullets.
A bullet grazed my driver's head
leaving him a permanent partin,"
for life. Somehow we arrived at
the Consulate General of France.
Inside, Consul General de Neu-
ville, the doyen of the Consular
Corps, and a zealous guardian of
Jerusalem for Christianity, was
bi near hysterics. Nieuwenhaus,
the Belgian Consul General, was
there as was my friend Col.
Roscher-Lund, the Norwegian
military expert of the UN Ad-
vance Party. Mme. de Neuville
was occupied with her nine
children all stretched out on the
floors in the upper corridors, and
with 60 French citizens who
sought asylum in the Consulate.
The Consulate was in no man's
nd and we came under heavy
re from both sides. All sat on
lie floor to avoid bullets coming
through the windows and to
nefit from the protection of
he heavy stone walls. We estab-
hed telephone contact with the
ifabs in the College des Freres
i the Old City.
They promised repeatedly to
id an envoy. He never materia-
ed. Every few hours a cease-
re was negotiated. Shaltiel with
whom I was in touch by phone,
invariably .confirmed the arrange-
ment.
As the hour of each, cease-fire
arrangement arrived, the Arab
fire continue Cut off as we were in Jeru-
salem from the rest of the coun-
try, we nevertheless knew that
Mr. Ben-Gurion would be an-
nouncing the establishment of an
independent state in the Munici-
pal Museum in Tel Aviv that
afternoon.
Mixed Emotions
Accordingly, at 4 p.m., I rose
and announced solemnly and
somewhat incongruously to the
assembled group i;, Jc Ncuville's
room that I now represented an
independent Jewish State.
Roscher-Lund embraced me,
Nieuwenhaus regarded me pity-
ingly, while de Neuuville ful-
minated and gesticulated in his
best Gallic manner with the gist
of his remarks being "a plague
on both your houses."
Our repeated efforts to achieve
a cease-fire in the Holy City
failed. The Arabs never once
complied. As evening drew on, I
contemplated the scene. Here we
were on the first Friday night of
a Jewish State (I did not yet
know the name of the State) in
no man's land under heavy and
relentless fire.
The toll of wounded in the
building had already reached six.
It was obvious that the Arabs did
not intend to agree to any ar-
rangement. There was little
future in this building.
I contacted Shaltiel who
authorized me to attempt to re-
gain our own lines. Mmevde
Neuville insisted on giving food
and French wine to those who
wished to eat. ___
ISRAEL
You have enriched the world
by your presence. We are grateful
GREATER MIAMI
HEBREW FREE LOAN
ASSOCIATION
The Board of Directors
of the
South Florida Chapter
of the
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TECHNION-ISRAEL
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, INC.,
[Israel's most vital technological institution and
the third largest in the world,
salutes the 25th Birthday of the
State of Israel during this, the
Technion's 50th Jubilee Celebration.
Norman J. Raster, President
At ten o'clock, under cover of
darkness, I organized our party
which included Col. Roscher-
Lund, Nieuwenhaus, many of the
Jevs trapped in the building, and
he j^y wounded. A few were
nidfiff out by cars which edged
up the narrow road leading from
the Consulate to the King David
Hotel in total darkness.
Some ol the party climbed the
wall into the garden of the King
David Hotel. The terrace win-
dows were open, the main hall
was eerie and hollow as the odd
bullet shattered a glass window.
Curtains flapped in the wind
Swinging doors turned slowly. We
moved slowly across the road to
the YMCA. Shells whistled and
exploded. Rifle fire cracked.
Flashes lit the sky.
Abu Tor Attacked
Near the King David Building
on the corner of King George Ave
an Israeli force challenged us. A
friend of mine was second-in-
command of his force readying
Itself for an attack on the Abu
Tor quarter.
Nieuwenhaus asked for soldiers
to help him retrieve his car
abandoned near the Jerusalem
railway station at the bottom of
King lieorge Avenue. My friend
remarked drily that he had other
priorities.
We were through our lines.
Behind us the air filled with the
crescendo of an attack. We
moved slowly up the hill to
Talbieh.
We were in our own indepen-
dent state. My independence bay
v. .1- over. The next Sabbath
morning dawned hot and sultry,
The daily routine of struggle and
death in Jerusalem recommenced.
Many of tn figures dodging the
bullets and shells hurried into
the synagogues on the way to
their posts and offered up the
first prayers of thanksgiving for
independence.
The world belongs to
people with skills
ORT's vocational training equals
freedom, security and dignity
Israel: an instructor of architectural design at th I ORT Givatayim Center shows a student what
she can do to improve the model she is constructing
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
4200 Biscayne Boulevard 757-2539
ORT (ORGANIZATION FOR REHABILITATION THROUGH TRAINING),
THE VOCATIONAL TRAINING A 'ENCY OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE.
OPERATES 700 VOCATIONAL 1NSTAI ATIONS IN 22 COUNTRIES OVERSEAS
Congratulations, Israel!
Our pride in the achievements of the first quarter
century of statehood is surpassed
only by our confidence in your future.

- 4-_'_^li_:


Tnno 14.F
--j*ff*#' iKiKuncau
rnaay. may 10, i/o
C^gupt s is jf*V## K-)utsidc rCeh
crcncc to
Israel
Continued from Page 10-F
Persia, the mistress of the whole
Middle East for a long while and
traditional friend of Jewry, the
Alexandria of the Hellenistic and
Roman period, metropolitan
Rome and finally Byzantium.
Meaningful Parallel
One is tempted to view the ties
between Israel and American
Jewry as well as with the U.S.A.
in general as the most recent
variation on the same ancient
theme. As if Providence had tak-
en care, just on the eve of the
extinction of the Central and
East-European Jewish civilization
and Jewish life in the lands of
Islam, to plant the largest and
most powerful Jewish community
of all time in the most powerful
state in history. There is a mean-
ingful parallel between New York
Of today and Alexandria, the
scene of that momentous en-
counter between Judaism and
Hellenism, which prepared the
ground for diffusion of the
Christian message heard first
in Judea among the nations.
The end of the second common-
wealth was followed by the vio-
lent rejection of the Jews by
those who were absorbing the
tidings brought forth by Jews.
The rise of the third common-
wealth is witnessing a somewhat
similar break between the follow-
ers of a great creed, which was
largely shaped by Jews, and the
Jewish begetters thereof rev-
olutionary Marxist messianism.
The Six-Day War was no doubt
the crowning exploit in a tre-
mendous success story. It has
opened vast perspectives, but al-
so posed most agonizing question
marks. To some it was the ful-
fillment of the divine promise
and the final decree ot history
that Israel shall come into the
fullness of its inheritance and es-
tablish such wide flung and im-
pregnable borders as to inhibit
any thought of aggression on the
part of enemies who will other-
wise never reconcile themselves
Others fear it may turn into a
Others fear it may hum into a
barren achievement and even a
trap, if the opportunity is not
seized for a compromise settle-
ment with the Arab neighbors.
(ihctto of Victor>'
The former take great prid
Israel's position :i< the strongest
power in the Middle E.st and
the only dependable ally of Amer-
ica in the- area, The hitler have
uncomfortable associations when
contemplating the fact that Is-
rael a "ghetto of victors"
is the only country in the world
upon which its enemies not
merclv make claims but which
they are pledged to destroy, and
certainly not to enter into any
give and take. Yet they hope to
take the sting out of this bitter
hostility by generous concessions.
The former have visions of huge
waves of Jewish immigrants
swampine the Arab minority, the
others abhor the idea of a Jew-
ish master race lording it over a
large hostile minority of drawers
of water and hewers of wood in
an age of passionate nationalism,
and thus exposing the Jewish
essence, our moral and social
ethos and strength-giving social
cohesion, to grave dangers.
The former tendency is driven
to lay all the emphasis upon im-
personal values the presumed
dictates of God and history
the need for unity, discipline
and doctrinal purity in a situa-
tion of permanent emergency.
The latter attitude is informed by
the spectre of a closed society in
which freedom of individual
choice is denied. It recoils from
the possibility of a dissociation
from the spirit and forms of that
open liberal society which has
proved to be the only favorable
setting to Jewish well-being.
Prolongation of War
These dilemmas are moment-
ous The road which we may
choose, either because of Arab
intransigance. great power rival-
ries or our own Inability to de-
cide, may well prove irreversible.
My own vi-w is that in order
to realize its destiny Israel urg-
ently requires peace and a chance
for consolidation as a relatively
homogeneous and closely knit .so-
ciety bent upon its creative en-
deavor. Disbelief in the possibil-
ity of peace, in particular when
consciously or unconsciously mo-
tivated by a wish for expanded
borders, threatens to become a
self fulfilling prophecy.
The prolongation of the state
of war and war emergency, not
to mention the contingency of
sudden conflagration, are bound
to escalate into endless armed
conflict and squalid global com-
petition in cloak-and-dagger
methods, and to plnnge the Mid-
dle East into barbarism to which,
with the best will in the world.
Israel will not be able to remain
immune.
Israel is strong enough to take
on all Arab countries and to de-
feat them on the battlefield. But
it is not powerful enough to im-
pose its will upon an implacably
hostile Arab world forever. It is
not the destiny of Israel to be a
Sparta sitting on loaded guns and
leaping up from time to time to
strike. Beyond and above state-
hood, there is Judaism as a civ-
ilization, as one of the great
traditions of mankind, a system
of values. Sad would be the day.
were it to come, when all its in-
terests and attention arc reduced
to logistics, electronics, powerful
alliances and efficient policing.
Israel must continue to be so
strong militarily even after a
settlement, through the possesion
of weapons and reasonable bord-
ers, that the Arabs will remain
convinced that they cannot de-
feat Israel on the battlefield.
Resettlement of Refugees
At the same time. Israel should
offer the Arabs generous terms,
and respect their demand for
dignity. Israel and the world
should begrudge no cost and no
effort needed for the resettle-
ment of refugees, so that on top
of the conviction that Israel could
not be destroyed militarily the
Arabs should be enabled to feel
that, after all, the grievance and
humiliation are not of such a na-
ture as to justify desperate poli-
cies like terror of war.
The Jewish historian becomes
a kind of martyr in his permanent
and anguished intimacy with the
HEBREW EDUCATORS ALLIANCE
Salutes
ISRAEL 25 ^W mKx^ n"3
and invites ail Hebrew Educators to
join us on SUNDAY, MAY 20th at 8 P.M.
at the FEDERATION BLDG., 4200 Biscayne Blvd.
in celebration of
Yom Ha-Atzmaut together with Ycm HaMoreh,
when we honor
DR. NATHANIEL SOROFF
Zahava Sukenik, President
Shula Ben-David, Secretary
ISRAEL HISTADRUT COUNCIL
OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Proudly Salutes
The State of Israel
ISRAEL HISTADRUT CAMPAIGN
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
HISTADRUT TOURS
Samuel Feinstein, President
Morris Newmark, Treasurer
Moe Levin, Chairman of Board

Israel Histadrut Council
420 Lincoln Road Building
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Tel.: 531-8702
mystery of Jewish martyrdom
and survival,
Whether he be Orthodox in be-
lief or has discarded all religious
practice, he cannot help but be
sustained by a mystical faith
which can neither be proved nor
disproved.
I beiicve notwithstanding all
the vexations and entanglements
caused by emergency and ines-
capable necessity all so remi-
nisent incidentally of the times
of Ezra and Nehemiah that
Israel will one day be spiritually
significant and, in conjunction
with the Jewish diaspora spiritu-
,all(a effective in the world. His-
THE YM/YWHA
OF GREATER MIAMI
SALUTES
THE STATE OF ISRAEL
ON ITS
25th ANNIVERSARY
AM YISRAEL CHAM
LEBEDIKER BRANCH FARBAND
LABOR ZIONIST ALLIANCE
and FARBAND ZIMRAH ENSEMBLE
We salute Israel on the 25 Israel Independence
Celebration.
We salute the gallant people who have found-
ed e democratic nation in our ancient home-
land, and brought freedom and glory to the
Jewish people who have not known it for
over 2000 years. May the nation of Israel grow
from strength to strength.
May it be a land of peace and freedom for
all its citizens and an inspiration for peace and
freedom to all mankind.
Joseph P. Zuckerman, President
Oscar Shapiro, Vice President
Fannie Gibson, Vice President
Hannah Yesner, Recording Secretarry
Anne Keller, Financial Secretary
Morris Tamres, Parliamentarian
Leon Ornstein, Treasurer
ZIMRAH REPRESENTATIVE
Joseph Glat, President
Lester Bigelman, Vice President
Julius Nadel, Vice President
Mirriam Shephard, Secretary
Hilda Glat, Celia Gottliebjillie Bigelman,
Frances Packar, Joseph Remnik,
Sylvia Einhorn, Estelle Ehrens, Jean Uffer.
Special celebration committee.
I
<*
J


'Friday, May 18, 1973
>:
"^Jenisii FkriaHratn
Page 15-F

Continued from Page IF
discuss our successes, "i here
the-success of order, but'.tfiat
ten happens when you have a
milil.ii> monopoly."
Hint if there is no choice but
for Israel to remain in occupatior
until the coming of a settlement
^B something which he himself
^ists upon what, then, should
^B Israel's approach to the West
Bank'
hvhai i am worried about
Jld no: everybody in Israel is
^Bially worried is that we
hive moved away from the origi-
nal assumption: that we will cer-
tainly hold on to these territories
(Until peace comes), but that they
are 'fro/en' as an option left
open.
"We have to ne very careful
to maintain that assumption, not
in the meantime to shift our
ground so that when they move
towards us. we have gone further
away I think the moderates
(in Israel I have been sold short
in the world press because by
their moderation their voices arc
less loud. Much of the world
press was surprised at what hap-
pened when the Cabinet decided
not to allow individual Jewish
land purchases in the territories.
I have been reading reports from
all over Europe and the imprcs-
!
1
"'..' I
1
"I feel we (Israel and the Arabs) do not talk on
an equal basis and, therefore, we are not in
a position to open hearts." Abba Eban
all over Fur

sion is that if Dayan (Gen. Moshe
Dayan. the Defense Minister)
wants something enough, it hap-
pens and here be is flat on his
face."' the Foreign Minister
stated.
Spelling Out Settlement
But what was wrong with
Israel spelling out what she was
prepared to cede in a peace
settlement? "It's one thing to say
in a negotiation, that is what
we would want to have.' But to
say that is what we will keep
and the rest we will give up,'
simply means that the argument
between us and the Arabs will
concentrate on the things we will
say "we will keep .
"The Arabs have not seized the
dynamic effects of negotiation
on the Israeli position. By ask-
ing us to declare our position
ahead of negotiations, that is to
say in a suspicious spirit, they
are almost asking for maximalist
definitions."
On the 25th Anniversary
of a great nation and
courageous people .
GOD BLESS ISRAEL
The Residents, Staff and
Board of Directors of the
JEWISH HOME FOR AGED
Douglas Gardens
Jack S. Popick, President
AMERICAN FRIENDS
of the
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
Join in Honoring
The State of Israel
On Its Glorious
25th Anniversary
Greater Miami Chapter
Harry A. Levy, President
Jack S. Popick, National Vice President
A. Harold Murray,, Executive Director
Florence Ferdman, Women's Director
American Friends of the Hebrew University
60S tmeoln Road, Miami Beach, Ha. 33139
Telephone 532-1707

Eban then returned to the sub
ject of Jewish land purchases in
the occupied territories. "If we
had said that land was free to be
bought by Jews in the territories,
it would have created the kind
of situation where, if you wanted
to extricate yourself, it would
have become impossible." he
said, adding: "We would have
found massive Israeli interests
all over the place, not selectively
in little corners that you hoped
to chip off, but in the heart of
populated zones."
Did not "facts" create an al-
most irresistible momentum over
a period of time? I asked. He
replied: "It depends how long.
Let's look back at the areas in
the past six years. It is very hard
to say that there has been a
change in their structure, their
sociological balance.
"I think there are 3.000 Jews
living outside the former armis-
tice lines, plus Jerusalem. There
is an official figure of 4,000. but
that includes 1.000 Nahal (sol-
dier-farmer) settlers. The figure
also includes Kiryat Arba and the
C.olan Heights with 800. If we
produce a similar figure of an-
other few thousand over the next
six years, how many more Arabs
will be with their proliferation,
heaven only knows."
Arab Identity Safer
"In spite of our victory, the
Arab identity is much safer than
ours is. We have not had much
effect on their sociology. Any-
body who goes to Nablus and
Tulkarm today wouldn't know
that anything much had happen-
ed there, because the Israeli pres-
ence is so unobstrusive and slei -
der and the Arabism is so deep
and solid. They are probably hav
ing more effect on our society. 1
think Israeli society needs more
protection from them in order to
maintain its identity, its values
and particularity, then they need
from us because their superiority
of numbers and density of popu
lation is a great safeguard."
What if the status quo does
continue another six years? "1
think there are some palliative
things that could be done. One
is to go back to the thinking in
our original party platform which
was based not on using the Arab
labor force in our economy, but
on creating an absorption capac-
ity in their economy. We have
made this decision, but to say
that we have carried it out is
very difficult. It takes money and
a renunciation of the advantages
of the workers coming here. The
economic leadership have not car-
ried it out because of a certain
recoiling from the territories
which exists in their minds. 1
think that Finance Minister Pin
has Sapir does not like the whole
klea ... it's very hard to per-
suade him to go there at all."
Refugee Problem
"The second thing is the refu-
gee problem, and here we may
have fallen victim to the all or
nothingat-all mentality which
dominates so much of the Middle
East thought. We say rightly that
vwe cannot solve all the problem
there is no reason why we
should but does that have to
lead to the conclusion that be-
cause you cannot solve all of
it. then you do nothing?"
The foreign mjni.ler suggested
that Israel should "take some
thing which may be symbolic,
but even symbols have their im-
portance, which is the 65,000 ref-
ugees in the camps that is all
there are on the West Bank. I
suggest we take them and use
Israel's experience of taking peo-
ple out of camps and putting
them into their own homes, with
factories and vocational schools
close by.
"I wouldn't ask them to give-
up their refugee cards. That's a
political matter and if you agki I
them to do that, they would re-
sist the economic solution. It i-
true there are refugees outtii
camps, but for the world imag
of the refugee in the camp is tl
image of suffering. The refuge
who disappears from the can '
is verv hard to identify."
DAVID ROSNER
SAM ROSNER
owner management
Extend Greetings
1973 Israel's 25th
Anniversary Year
Mr. & Mrs. Philip Weiss
operators of
Royal Hungarian Kosher Restaurant
at 731 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
join their many friends in the
Jewish community in extending to the
STATE OF ISRAEL
sincerest congratulations on the
25th Anniversary
of its independence
(We specialize in catering)
In Loving Remembrance
of
Our Parent Founders
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz
Mr. and Mrs. David Rabinowitz
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rabinowitz
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstein
MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER
Salutes Israel on the 25th Anniversary
of a great nation
and courageous people .


-, <. --,
rtrn-rrr im/ Pope 16-F
* Amitt HtrH&r
Fridcy, May 11
wifh
dreams
That's why our sewings plans pay up to 6 per year.
Ii you have ;. dream,
I lagler federal would like 10
help it come true.
After all, we're named
for Henry Flaglerthe man
who dreamed "1 a great
city when Miami was just
a trading post.
Fur big dreams, our 2-year
:. ings ( crtificates pay
6% per year (on 55000 or mun .
compounded daily so you
actually earn 6.18%.
i ii other di .. -.

we have 1-year
certificates that pay 5:
(on Si000 or more).
And our flexible passbook
accounts that
pay 5%, from day of deposit to day
of withdrawal.
You see, at Flagler Federal,
whether you bring us
a big dream or one not-so-big,
(- think it's
our job to help it come true.
Mr. Flagler would ha\e
it that wav.
i

Hagter Federal
^^ Stvinfi and Loan A xnii n
We believe in people with dreams.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERA71ST24_U7GMEG INGEST_TIME 2013-06-10T22:56:57Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02311
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES