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The Jewish Floridian ( February 23, 1968 )

UFJUD

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Friday. Februcrv 23. \%%
Capital Spotlight
By Milton Friedman
Soviet 'Black Beret' Forces Poised In Mideast
Washington
HE ADMINISTRATION has ver-
ified intelligence reports that
[new Russian "black beret" Ma-
rine battalions amphibious and
airborne are poised aboard So-
viet landing cralt in the Middle
I East.
An elite force, the Black Beret
units are modeled after the American Green Beret
special forces and the United States Marines. Black
Beret units are designed for rapid task force opera-
tions like the 1958 U.S. Marine landing in Lebanon.
They would be used to provide Arab states with a
safety screen against Israeli reprisalsthus facili-
tating increased Arab guerrilla raids into Israel.
Why, then, did President Johnson omit mention
of any aspect of the last year's dangerous Soviet
activities in the Middle East from his State of the
Union message?
Administration sources indicated that the Presi-
dent is not unconcerned about the Russian role
which is jeopardizing the Middle East and Med-
iterranean. But the only public stand would have to
be a firm proclamation that might detract from
emphasis on Viet Nam. Top priority remains on Viet
Nam. The President fears that a public challenge to
Russian pressure in the Mediterranean might de-
emphasize the importance attached to Viet Nam.
A difference of opinion exists among military
leaders. While the Administration has been pre-
occupied with Viet Nam, the last year has witnessed
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Florida And Israel
IERHAPS THERE will soon be adver-
tisements in the American papers.
isking: 'Why not go skiing in Israel?"
It has already come in a limited way. We
oicked up a copy of the Jerusalem Post
|idvertising weekend parties to "play in
he snow." in the newly acquired terri-
tory of the Six-Day War.
Snow, to be sure, occasionally comes
to Jerusalem too. but the snows of Mt. Hermon, famous
in Bible days, can be more counted upon, and the Is-
raeli papers tell us of skiing parties.
Most of us prefer to follow the sun during the winter,
but there are those hardier souls who prefer the ice" Is-
rael should now be able to offer attractions to both.
Maybe they can get the Habimah people also to put on
a kind of Jackie Ben Gleason type of variety show like
"Miami" on television. This should give an enormous
spur to the Israeli tourist business.
Gleason's opening line, "How sweet it is," comes from
the Psalms, but Gleason only uses the first half. In the
Psalms, it is written: "How sweet it is for brethren to
dwell together in unity."
Florida and Israel have much in common. Both have
oranges and bananas, but Florida has more Republicans.
Florida even had a town name Sdeh Goker, the name of
the kibbutz in which Ben-Gurion lives.
Sdeh Boker means Cowboy's Field. That was the name
of Jacksonville in the beginning. Andrew Jackson took
Florida from the Spanish, and the people in appreciation
named it Jacksonville.
Jackson was very much like Israeli leaders, Rabin,
Dayan or Eshkol. According to a story in the New York
Times, Eshkol was born in a railroad station. (It was not a
Pullman berth.) Jackson is said to have been born in as
unorthodox a fashion. He came in on the world when his
mother was visiting a neighbor. It really wasn't very
polite but Jackson was in a hurry.
Probably Jackson could swear better than Eshkol.
I hough we can not be sure. Eshkol is very fond of Yiddish;
though, as an Israeli, he speaks Hebrew and most of us
know, Yiddish has a very' adequate vocabulary' of swear
words.
Florida's development is also of a recent date. The first
thing the authorities realized there, was the importance
of a good slogan, "Keep Cool with Coolidge," so the Florida
people decided to take the opposite angle. They adver-
tised Florida as the Land of Sunshine. Even Moses in
Bible days realized the importance of a slogan. He pro-
mised the Israelites to take them to "A Land of Milk
and Honey." "We can get ice cream there," the Israelites
*aid. so they went along.
In Florida, they figured, get the tourists first and
Ihe Halutzim will come of themselves.
One can never be sure what will ultimately build up
a state, Take the first American colony, Jamestown. It
was languishing, its pioneer settlers complaining, until
a plain fellow. John Rolfe, came in one day on a ship.
He noticed that the people of Jamestown all seemed to
be going around with shovels. Everybody was looking for
gold You won't get any gold that way, said Rolfe. What
you need to do is plant tobacco.
The Indians also had a habit of shooting arrows at
the whites. We should get the United Nations to intervene,
some said. Well. Rolfe said, I think if we had peace for
seven years to plant tobacco, everything would turn out
well. So he married the Indian chief's daughter. Poca-
hontas, and by the way, most people don't know it, but
when he married her, he gave her a Jewish name. He
called her Rebecca. But anyway, they were married and
they had peace seven years and the tobacco brought pros-
prity and they lived happily ever after.
the crumbling of the Atlantic Alliance. Britain with-
drew from defense commitments east of the Suez.
Fiance quit NATO. Moscow pressed every advan
tage gained. Russian military power poured into the
Mediterranean to exploit the new situation. Despite
the defeat of the Arabs in the June war. the Rus-
sians gained great influence and even bases in the
Middle East.
Barriers Down For
West Bank Arabs
Jerusalem
IT HAS BEEN the deliberate pol-
icy of Israel, since her victory
ir the June war. not to elaborate
on the terms and conditions she
would offer the Arabs around a
peace table. Prime Minister Esh-
kol and other Israeli leaders have
slated repeatedly, however, that
Arabs coming to a peace table wouid find Israel
more generous than they may have expected. On
the other hand, they have reiterated that Israel has
no intention to withdraw to the pre-June 5, 1967
frontiers. Israel is determined to have secure bor-
ders and on that she stands firm
But Israelis argue among themselves, often heat-
edly, about how much if any of the territory taken
by ner army in the June war should be returned to
the Arabs within the framework of a peace pact.
Most often, they have in mind the West Bank of the
Jordan, that wedge of former Palestine territory
that the Jordanian Arab Legion occupied in 1948
when Israel was fighting for independence.
Right alter last June's Six-Day War Israel hoped
that King Hussein of Jordan would soon be ready
for peace talks. The West Bank territories (though
on no account. East Jerusalem) were regarded pri-
marily as an asset for bargaining. But as their hopes
for early peace talks with Hussein faded, the Is-
raelis settled down lor a long stay on the West Bank
And as they did. their attitude was. let nature take
its coursein this case human nature, the desire for
economic gain and a better and more secure life
Apparently this policy is having its anticipated
effect on the Arabs of the West Bank who never
properly considered themselves Jordanians but rath-
er Palestinians. They are, as a whole, better edu-
cated and better off economically than the East
Bank Jordanians and they tend to look down on the
Hashemite monarch, Hussein, as a Bedouin,
Apart from this, the West Bank Arabs quickly
discovered that the Israeli occupiers were not the
"devils" they had long been led to expect. The Is-
ralis guaranteed them more freedom of speech than
the Amman government ever did. Some of the more
vocal West Bankers took advantage of this to de-
nounce Israel and proclaim loyalty to King Hussein.
But it soon became apparent that neither Hussein
nor Nasser were in any position to back up their
calls for resistance and different voices were heard
among the West Bankers, calling for a "Palestin-
ian" rather than a "Hashemite" solution, in effect, a
divorce of the West Bank from Jordan.
Meanwhile, the West Bank Arabs are free to
draw certain conclusions. One is that their economic
interests are best served by maintaining open chan-
nels between the West Bank and Israel. Another is
that they need not be cut off from the rest of the
Arab world and that there is a possible solution by
which they could trade freely with any country.
Highlights In Sporti
President Johnson's State of the Union ana! -.
however, was that in developments Involving th.-
USSR "serious differences remain between us. mi
in these relations, we have made some progress
Apart from a call on the Israelis and Arabs to
make peace, the President confined his repo
the Middle East to observations that "a cease fir.
was achieved without a major power confrontaM in"
and that he had used the hot line for the first time
The President privately conceded that Russian
moves jeopardize Israel. There is no dispute about
that. But great care is taken to leave loophol--- ,,i
the issue of U.S. commitment to Israel.
Moscow is using the Arab-Israel issue as a dt- ice
They are aiming at the neutralization of the i S
Sixth Fleet and destruction of American influence
Before the June war the USSR maintained lim-
ited naval power in the Mediterranean. Now tin-
Ked naval force numbers more than 50 ships includ
ing missile cruisers, nuclear submarines, and an
amphibious task unit. The Russians have land bac>
at Port Said and Alexandria in Egypt and Latakia ;r,
Syria. Soviet bombers are known to have operated
from Egyptian bases. Thousands of Russian mi!i>ar\
experts arc in Egypt, Syria, Algeria and Yemen
British Admiral Sir John Hamilton recently to'-l a
NATO council meeting "... I can assure you thai
the presence of the (Soviet) fleet in the llediterra
nean is having a profound effect on men's mind< In
this respect it is contributing significantly to the
rise of influence in the Mediterranean area."

Today's Thought:
By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
Spread Of Vulgari a
A MERICA is currently suffering .,:
\asion by a foreign power wl i
might call vulgaria.
We know our air and water
luted. So are our literature and oui filmi
There is no depth to the b
which mars and scars our movies Thi
are no longer pictures; they hj.c '*
come peep-shows.
Avorks of non-fiction would make Boccaccio biusl
works of non-fiction would make Baccaccio blush
Some advertisements are lurid and often le.
many of our television programs are soiled with
tiveness and more And what of all the televioler <
One wonders why women permit themselves to h-
humiliated and disgraced by the kind of performance;
which are expected of them. Why have we never heara
an actress say that she will not subject herself to the
lack of dignity imposed by some directors'
The amount of indecent magazine fare rises regularl]
In the way some Americans dress and look, Ihcj l
dicate that they are the victims of Vuigaria. Modest]
morality and masculinity are casualties of much of modem
life.
As for tie unspeakable hippies, whenever anyoi. .^li-
me about them I reply: "ich hob zay in hood.' tt'hid
reminds me of the story about one of these unspe..k ibie
ones being told by a Catholic priest to take a bath and
asking his friend what a bath is. The rcplv: "How should
1 known I'm not a Catholic."
I don't ask for censorship against the filth contann: a:
ing much of the printed word. I do ask for self-censorsinp
I pray that the media will learn enough leif-Conl
not to spotlight the offbeatniks.
^s for me, I've decided to try to recapture m> Sf
of shock at some of the things going on in our land.
thinking of starting an organization called the Soci
of the Proud Prudes "Want to join?"
JESSE SILVER
Miami Basketball Stars In The News
It was a double celebration. Both Dave New
mark and Neal Walk set career-scoring marks just
a day apart. Columbia's Newmark dropped in 40
points to lead the lions to a 100-72 rout of Yale at
. the victor's home court. The seven-foot junior hit
15 field goals and 10 foul shots, and grabbed 18 re-
bounds. The effort put him on the ECAC weekly
all-star team. Newmarks previous high came in
1965 when he tallied 38 points against Lehigh.
The Yale game followed a fantastic victory for
Columbia in the Holiday Festival at Madison Square
Garden. Newmark contributed to the triumph but
was held back somewhat by a bad case of flu.
The night after Columbia whipped Yale Florida
stopped LSU 97-90, as Walk led the scoring' with 39
points. It bettered his previous high of 37 against
Jacksonville earlier in the season. The 6-10 junior
netted 16 field goals and 7 foul shots, and nabbed
21 rebounds to keep him among the nations leaders
in both categories.
Earlier in the season, Walk broke his own Florida
rebound record with 29 against Kentucky, and was
named to the Gator Bowl all-tourney team, although
Florida lost both of its games.
Newmark and Walk have younger biotbers phi
ing basketball. Brian Newmark, 6-6, is at Philli -
Exeter Academy, with plans to attend Harvard
While Warren Walk, 6 5. is the leading scorer aid
rebounder at Miami Beach High.
Not as tall as the Walks or Newmarks. Hi
hvans of Boston College has every bit as much
talent. Evans, a classy playmaker. has been havi
his troubles. He injured a leg against St. Johr -
and sat out most of the Holiday Festival in N *
York, as the Eagles took their lumps. "He's a tri|
threat, said head coach Bob Cousey about Evans
He runs the show. He can score, he can pass a
he can play defense This kid has the smarts."
Despite the setback by Columbia, Yale is don
well this season. Ed Goldstone won the Georm.
lech game in Atlanta with a 20-foot jump shot with
'w *,cnd;s to play. He led the Elis with 25 poin-
boo Steinberg, who scored 24 points in Connecuti
<-ut s opening game win over Yale, has been dropped
rrom the basketball squad. No reason was given f
ine dismissal.


Fridav, February 23, 1968
* ILx*i<.i< finrMNhun
Pane 5-D
15 Jewish Centers
Built In Two Years
NEW YORK <.ITA) The Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board has
reported that 15 new Jewish Cen-.
ten and Y buildings, costing near-
ly S15 million, were dedicated in
various parts of the country during
]96 The report said that member-
ship in centers and Ys increased
to 717.000. an increase of 7,000
o\er the 1966 figure. Activities at-
tracted an aggregate audience Of
29,900.000 persons, more than a
million more than reported for
the previous year, the report said.
Jewish tenter and Y budgets to-
taled S35.065.000. compared with
the previous record in 1966 of
$38,710,000. The data were con-
tained in a report by Emanucl
Berla'.-ky, JWB director Of com-
munity services.
The 15 new buildings are: New
Orleans Jewish Community Cen-
ter: Worcester. Mass.. JCC; East-
ern Union County VM & YWHA in
Union, N.J.; Emanu-El Ifidtown
VM & YWHA ol the Associated Ys
ot Greater Ne York: Schenectady,
K.Y., JCC; Troy. N.Y.. JCC: the
Charleston. S.C JCC: the Saidye
Bronfman Center of the Montreal
Y.M & YWHA and Neighborhood
House Services; the Davis Branch
of the Montreal Y: the Marin JCC
and the Brotherhood Way Center.
which are branches of the United
Jewish Community Centers of San
Francisco; Northfield Building in
West orange of the YM & YWHA
of Essex County. N.J.; the Feder-
man-Hersh Building of the North
Valley JCC. a branch of the Jew
ish Centers Association of Los An-
geles; the Anna and Samuel
> Schneider Building of the Pater-
son. N.J.. Y and the El Paso. Tex..
JCC. The community character of
the Jewish Community Center was
demonstrated, the report said, in
the fact that the planning of new
center facilities was jointly accom-
plished by local Jewish federations
and Jewish Centers in 14 cities.
An increased interest in the
cultural arts was reflected dur-
ing the year in a growing num-
ber of local and regional confer-
ences on the arts; an increase in
groups in the dance, drama, fine
arts and related areas; a greater
participation in Jewish Music
Festival and Jewish Book Month
events; and the sponsorship of
literary periodicals by a number
of centers and Ys.
The report said that a growing
number ol centers set up programs
lo serve Jewish college students
and that there were also more pro-
grams for teenagers, reflecting a
rise in teenage membership. Jew-
ish centers expanded activities for
Jewish military personnel and
ihcir families. There was increased
emphasis on research activity in
centers locally and also on a na
tional level
A wicie variety of public affairs
engaged the interest of Jewish cen-
ters to a greater degree than ever
before. These Included the Middle
East crisis, the treatment of Jews
in the Soviet Union, inter-group
relations, anti-poverty legislation,
disarmament and the social work
manpower shortage. An over-all
average of a six percent increase
in the number of beds in resident
camps conducted by centers was
reported, as was the fact that
about two-thirds of the resident
camps and four-fifths of the day
camps reported waiting lists of
persons who could not be accom-
modated.
PETCEMETERY
24-HOUR SERVICE
Complete burial and funeral
arrangements for Pets of all
types, including pick-up service
Beautiful Cemetery Grounds
Cremation Services
Moderate Prices
?tf HEAVfm
MEMORIAL PARK
FURNISHERS
AND INSTALLERS
ARMSTRONG'S
YARD GOODS AND TILE
696-3202 FOR FREE ESTIMATE
PAINTING &
PAPERHANGING
Work Myself. Very Reasonable
A-l Job Also Exterior
6334657
I0WI WEST FLA6LER
Lll
Glass &
Mirror Works
FREE
ESTIMATES
STORE FRONTS
MIRRORS
FURNITURE TOPI
RESIIVERING
BEVELING
CUSTOM WORK
FR I-.363
for
CLASS
136 S. W. 8tfi ST
WINDOW 17^
SCREENS I \~
RE-WIRED size
ft County-Wide Picfc-Up, Oelivery
A A SCREEN Phone 887-5133
275 W. 29th St., Hieleah
Jewish Folk Hour
WITH
Henry Seiden
3-4 P.M.
w i: ii ii -1 31.
99.1
JEWISH-ISRAELI HITS
COMMUNITY NEWS
PRIZES
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE"-"APPLIANCES'
"CL6THING"-"JEWEIRT," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
m TOD A Y
WIN EXCITING PRIZES
in Channel 23s LUCKY NUMBER CONTEST
OVER 1500 PRIZES
VvA/b i
NOTHING TO BUY!
Honda 90. Honda 50 (from Honda 36 St.)
S Columbia Bikes
1000 dinners lor 2
at international House ol Pancake-;
1 Wig per week, 1 Wiglet per week, 1 Fall per
week (from the oversea* wig warehouse 1901
NW 35 St., Miami; 739 NE 40 Ct, Oakland Pk.)
1 set ol 4 G.T. "Grabber" tires
Irom General Tire Stores
25 Dinky toys
20 cases ot Hammer regular or diet soft drinks
30 $5 ti 30 $5 gift certificates
Irom 163 St Shopping Center
10 $S gift certificates Irom West Hollywood
Shopping Center. Homestead Shopping Cen.
ter. Central Shopping Center. Northside Shop-
ping Center. Westchester Shopping Center.
$20 tS gift certificates and 100 toys
irom Jellerson Stores
100 tickets to Hialeah Speedway
10 surprise gifts from The Hub Sto-es
30 pairs of theatre tickets
Irom Florida State Theatres
GET YOUR
LUCKY NUMBER
AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
Grand Union Stores International House
of Pancakes Florida State Theatres
Honda 36 St. Hialeah Speedway General
Tire Stores The Hub Stores West Holly
wood Shopping Center Homestead Shop
ping Center Central Shopping Center
Northside Shopping Center Westchester
Shopping Center 163rd Street Shopping
Center Jefferson Stores.
WATCH CHANNEL 23 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
BETWEEN 5&7PM FOR DETAILS
steps to

CM. UHF TUNING
CHECK TOUR ANTENNA
VHF UHF
antenna antenna
screws screws
If you now use rabbit ears to get Chan-
nels 4, 6, 7, and 10, attach UHF Loop
to the UHF antenna screws on the back,
ol the set.
If you now use an outdoor VHF antenna
to get Channels 4, 6. 7, and 10, you will
need an outdoor UHF attachment to
your present antenna system to get
Channel 23.
CHANNEL 23 HAS MIAMI'S MOST POWERFUL SIGNAL. DON'T SETTLE FOR FUZZ OR SNOW.
4N
SINGLE KNOB TUNING SYSTEM
nS*'\
STEP 1
Click VHF knob to UHF position (this
position is just after Channel 13).
STEP 2
Gently rotate the Una tuning control to
Channel 23. Note: some sets do not have the
number 23 imprinted on the dial In this case,
dtal to the closest printed number and tin* fun*
lor Channel 23
TWO KNOB SYSTEM
STEP 1
Click VHF knob to UHF posi-
tion (this position is just after
Channel 13).
STEP 3
Oial UHF fiat tuaia*. control
for peak picture.
NOTE: IT TOItR SET WAS MADE
BEFORE MAT ISM. TOU RUT
NEED A UHF CONVERTER
STEP 2
Gently rotate the UHF knob to
Channel 23. Note: some ssts do
not havs the ?3 printed on the
dial. In this case, dial closest
prlntsd number and fine tuns
for Channal 23.
Hot* For pesk color and black and white picture, turn fine tuning control until
lagged horizontal lines appear In scraan then turn slowly back until the lines lust disappear
WHAT'S THAT YOU SAT TOU STILL CAN'T TUNE CHANNEL 23? Pkeec as st 3M-2S20 ana will |f*e yea ear
eerisnal attsatlaa la Mlplni ysv idjuit raw set sa Mat yea mar |ela tke (levers ef Ckamel 23.
STOCK MARKET OBSERVER 11 P.M. MOVIE
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on your UHF dial is your winning channel for top entertainment and business information.


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 23, 1968

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02038

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 23, 1968

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02038

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
"(Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 41 Number 8
Miami. Florida. Friday, February 23. 1968
Four S2Ctions Price 20c
Bond Inaugural To Plan For Third Decade
A saturation mobilization of
Jewish communities of the United
States and Canada for maximum
economic aid to Israel will be
launched at the 1968 International
Inaugural Conference for Israel
Bonds, it was announced this week
by Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice
president of the Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
The Conference will be in ses-
; sion from Thursday, Feb. 29th,
| through Sunday, March 3rd. at the
! Fontainebleau Hotel.
Observing that the Conference
I will celebrate Israel's twentieth
| anniversary. Dr. Schwartz said that
the Israel Bond campaign this year
will seek to help Israel start its
third decade on a note of intensi-
fied economic growth as the basis
for achieving a lasting peace with
its Arab neighbors.
The climax of the Conference
will be a dinner in tribute to
Con. ItzKak Rabin, which will bo
hold Saturday evening, March 2.
Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey will join in welcoming
Gen. Rabin as Israel's now Am-
bassador to the United States.
This will be Gen. Rabin's first
public address since assuming his
new post. More than 3,000 Jewish
leaders will participate in this ses-
sion at which Vice President Hum-
; phrey and the hero of the Six-Day
I War will be the principal speakers.
In calling attention to the vital
role which Israel Bond funds must
play in 1968. Dr. Schwartz said:
j "Israel's Development Budget
ior the coming year will amount
to S289.000,000. and Israel Bonds
must provide from one half to two
thirds of this sum. In previous
years Israel looked to Israel Bonds
to provide approximately one third
of its Development Budget. Is-
rael's capacity to meet the chal
lenges and problems which con-
front it will depend this year, to i
greater degree than ever before.
Continued on Pago 14-A
Dayan Reports Toll
In Arab Terror Drive
JERUSALEM fire ending last year's Six-
1>.<\ War. eighteen Israelis have
, r. killed and sixty-eight wound-
i i in clashes along the Israel-
in demarcation line, it was
ied here by Minister of De-
Moshe Dayan in a report <
i ssel which said thai the Jor-
ans suffered heavy casualties,
200 killed and more than too
:iled.
At the tame time Gen Dayan
used Jordan of repeated (la-
ram violations of the cease-fire
bj aiding and abetting the terror-
i-t gangs that have been conduct-
ing campaigns of sabotage against
Israel. Jordan, he charged has
directed artillery fire 41 times
against Israel since the cease fire
of last June. In addition, he said,
there had been thirteen cases of
sabotage. 24 abortive attempts at
sabotage and twelve mining inci-
dents. He also accused Jordan of
preventing former residents of the
West Bank from returning to their
homes under the family reunion
plan.
Referring to what he called the
growing incursions by terrorists
N. Y. Chain
Bars Arab
Merchandise
and saboteurs, which, he said, were
harbored in and abetted by Jordan.
the Minister ol Defense charged
thai Jordan was lending its soil to
every anti-Israel terrorist organi-
zation hi training and as a base
for sorties into Israel-held terri-
tory, warning thai those Incursions
must he cons del acts of war
and treated accordingly
The Jordanian Army, he told
Knesset, is providing the terror-
ists with intelligence on the de-
ployment of Israeli troops apart
Continued on Page 9-A
HUSSEIN BARS TERROR
Await Results
New Pledge
GEN. M0SHE DAY AH
Hadassah Rejects New
Definition Of Zionists
JERUSALEM (WNS) Jewry
outside of Israel "has a significant
role to p'ay in the collective sur-
vival of the Jewish people and
we will not accept the definition
or philosophy that a Zionist is only
one who is committed to living in
1 Israel." it was declared here by
Mrs Mortimer Jacobson. national
president of Hadassah. at the or-
ganization's mid winter conference,
the first major parley held in Is-
rael by the organization in its 56-
year history.
NEW YORK (JTA) The presi-
dent of J. W. Mays, a department
store chain in the metropolitan
area which has imposed a ban on
imports from Arab countries, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
this week that the public has ex-
pressed cooperation with the firm's
boycott of goods imported from
countries that are "unfriendly and
arbitrary" toward Israel.
Max Shulman, president of
Mays, said that oil products
from Poland, Yugoslavia and
Czechoslovakia as well as from
Arab countries have been bar-
red from Mays stores until fur-
ther notice.
Mays' volume of business is ,
$120 million a year, according to
Mr. Shulman, who stressed that
business dealings with countries
"guilty of excessive discrimination
against Israel will resume only
when those countries show they
know how to behave properly to-
ward Israel, which is far more
equitable in its treatment of other
peoples."
Mr. Shulman noted that the con-
sumer here has shown "favorable
Continued on Pago -A
Rejecting the view, advanced by
many Israeli leaders, that the term
Zionist can be attached only to
those who are commited to living
in Israel. Mrs. Jacobson said that
while Hadassah is dedicated to
promoting immigration to Israel
among Americans, it cannot accept
such a limited definition of Zion-
ism. She made the assertion at
the opening session, which was at-
tended by President Zalman Shazar
and his wile, and was to be ad-
dressed by Foreign Minister Abba
Eban
"The Zionist movement." Mrs.
Jacobson told the 150 delegates,
has a noble recordfar too noble
to fade awav under attack." add-
ing that there are a half-million
organized, dues-paying Zionists in
would be a great disservice to
make those who did not decide to
settle in Israel to feel that there is
no important Zionist mission to
fill in American life. It is our job
to create the atmosphere for Ali-
yah. but it is only the realities of
life in Israel that will get the im-
migrants to stay."
Mrs. Jacobson said there must
be no negating of the role of the
Zionist movement in stimulating
the deep well of friendship for Is-
rael in the American Jewish com
munity since the founding of the
Jewish state The role of Zionism
and Zionists, she asserted, is the
"unique task" of translating "the
concepts of Jewish unity and the
centrality of Israel into an action
program."
This, she said, "means influenc-
ing the course of Jewish education
and encouraging Jewish students
to learn at first hand through work
and study programs. It is certainly
our job to help create an atmos-
phere to encourage Aliyah and lo
help those who wish to go. How-
ever, we want to point out with as
much urgency as we can. that con-
stant criticism of the Zionist Move-
ment will not only not help to at-
tract idealistic young people, but
that constant criticism will actual-
TCL AVIV JTA) Calm pre-
iled all al mg the Israi 1 '<
n cation line this week al
Israeli agreement to Jordanian
i Hussein's request for a cease-
fire Bnd his subsequent pledge to
hall ..11 lerrorisl incursions into
Israel from Jordanian territory Is-
is, their optimism tempered by
caution, looked forward to contin-
ued quiet alter the heaviest fight-
ing since the June Six Day War.
Israel's Cabinet met for its
regular meeting in Jerusalem to
hsar reoorts from Defense Min-
ister Mo:he Dayan on the sav-
..ie 12-hour artillery and tank
duels in which Israel used jet
planes to knock out Jordanian
artillery positions.
The Defense Minister al-o pre-
sented an evaluation of the fight-
ing. Foreign Minister Abba Eban
reported to the Cabinet on the
warnings that preceded the clash
and the world's reaction to it. The
Cabinet also was scheduled to act
on Gen. Da van's decision to post-
pone indefinitely a scheduled visit
to the United States until the se-
curity situation was cleared up.
RELIGIOUS TRAVEL
EXEMPTION URGED
SEW Y IRK The Agu-
dath lsra< Ol America called
on President Johnson this
week to i xclude irom the
Administration's proposed
travel tax those Americans
who travel to the Holy Land
to visit religious shrines. The
organization said that trips
to Israel to visit religious
shrines 'should not be equat-
ed with overseas tourism tor
pleasure" since they stem
from deeply rooted religious
commitments.
King Hussein followed his appeal
for a ceasefire with an address
over the Amman Radio. He prom-
ised to halt terrorist raids into
Israel and Israeli-held territory,
he principal cause of the Thurs-
day cla who ignorod his orders. "As of to-
Continued on Pago 12-A
Jordan, Israel Agree On
Bank Branch Operation
organized, nues-paying ..
the United States and that "it ly keep them awa>
JERUSALEM (JTAi-An agree-
ment between Israel and Jordan
on the principles lor the reopening
ol Jordanian bank branches in the
occupied West Bank was reported
this week to have been reached by
a delegation of Arab bankers who
visited Amman and a group of Jor-
danian bankers who came to Jeru-
salem for the talks.
Two main obstacles to reopening
the bank branches, closed since
the June war. apparently were re-
solved. Jordan reportedly waived
insistence on direct control of the
ol the *.*
Zmm '>* >
>a~d If
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TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE
branches and Israel has agreed to
free deposits of Arabs who fled to
Jordan. Details of the agreement
are now being worked out with the
possibility that the bank branches
will resume operations in March.
The arrangements reportedly in-
cluded the return of most of the
assets of the branches from Am-
man where they have been held
under Jordanian law. Most of the
impounded funds belong to East
Jerusalem and West Bank Arabs.
"Paradoxical and perplexing'
was the description given in the
Ixmdon Financial Times for the
situation along the Israel-Jordan
demarcation line. The paper said.
"On one hand, there are daily ex-
changes of fire and on the other
, hand, there has been a completely-
unprecedented volume of trade and
the movemnt of tens of thousands
of people between the two coun-
tries in both directions."
It commented that "while mor-
tars and tanks have been firing.
trucks continue to take vegetables
to Jordan, former West Bank res-
idents return to their homes un-
der the family reunion scheme and
tourists pass in both directions."
J


Page 2-A
, knislh Fie*kjHoin
Friday, February 23. 1963
Israel Charges Tito with
Blocking "Mideast Peace
.JERUSALEM (JTA) The For
Ign Ministry charged this week
that President Tito of Yugoslavia
was interfering with the efforts of
United Nations agencies to pro-
mote a permanent peace in the
-Middle East and warned that his
one-sided" initiatives may have
just the opposite effect.
The Foreign Ministry statement,
in reply to questions here, referred
Eichmann Aide Is
Up For Retrial
VIENNA (JTA) The Austrian
- ipreme Court this week ordered
the retrial of an aide to Adolf Eich-
mann who was tried twice before
- a war criminal and twice set
Jrec. The defendant is Franz No-
alt, 54, Eichmann's chief trans- '
portation officer, who was known
'"the stationmaster of death"
for his part in transporting thou-
.-.inds of Jews to Auschwitz in
JSW4.
Novak was tried in 1964 and
sentenced to eight years in prison, '
but the verdict was annulled by j
the Supreme Court for technical ;
reasons. He was retried in 1966
out acquitted, even though found
guilty, when the jury accepted his j
plea that he had acted "under I
duress" when he sent Jews to the
quittal, the Supreme Court accept-
ed the prosecutor's appeal on
-rounds that the 1966 jurors were
insufficiently instructed on the na-
ture of "acting under duress The
court said it was well established
Ihat Novak had been a voluntary
. nd enthusiastic helper of Eich-
mann.
to Marshal Tito's recent visits to
India. Egypt and other countries
where he is reportedly attempting
to promote support for a Middle
East peace formula that was re-
jected by the United Nations last
June. It calls for Israeli withdrawal
to the pie-June 5. 1967, frontiers in
return ior an Arab declaration <>i
non-belligerency.
Marshal Tito has no authority in
this matter, the Foreign Ministry
said, because he has no interna-
tional status. The United Nal ins
interests in the Middle East illa-
tion have been entrusted by the
Security Council to Ambassad r
Jarring ami oiler IN agencies
charged with promoting .. perma-
nent pea< e bas< d on *ei and
recognized boundaries Nor
Tito any authority i iciliator
because he is oni sup-
ports Ara!> interests but has no
contact with the Israel govern-
ment's views, the Foreign Minis-
try said.
Yugoslavia's proposals have been
repeatedly discarded because of
their one-sided nature If Tito ab-
rogates to himself the right to in-
tervene in the efforts of approved
international bodies to promote an
agreement in the Middle East, he
will be doing no service whatso-
ever to international peace or the
will of the international communi-
ty, the Foreign Ministry stated.
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rriday, February 23. 1968
* knisirirr/dljicm
Paqe 3-A
Histadrut Conference Aims To Top
$10,000,000 Mark For Foundation
Israel's Minister Plenipotentiary
1u the United States, Ephraim Ev-
xon, will arrive in Miami Beach
Friday to take part in the third
annual Midwinter Conference of
the American Histadrut Develop-
ment Foundation. The conclave,
which has attracted 800 American
|Uld Canadian Jewish leaders, is
underway at the Pontainebleau
Hotel, where all sessions are
scheduled.
Mi Evron will present the cov-
eted international Histadrut Medal
of Honor to Frank Sinatra Satur-
day nigh! during a testimonial din-
ner to the veteran actor and singer.
Occasion will be the consecration
of the Frank Sinatra International
Youth Center in Nazareth, Israel.
Chairman of the conference is
William H. Sylk of Philadelphia,
who also heads the Histadrut Foun-
dation. Local chairmen are Jacob
Rifkin, president ol the South Flor-
ida Council on Medical Services
itii11 Vocational Training in Israel,
and l.ou I'oller. associate treasur
Libyan Community
Virtually Extinct
GENEVA (JTA)The 2.300-year
history of the Jewish community
in Libya has just about come to an
end, i/wis D. Horowitz, director
general of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee re-
ported here this week. Mr. Horo-
witz noted that of 35.000 Jews in
Libya in 1948. barely 200 remain
and most of those are likely to
leave soon.
He said that the biRRest exodus
occurred following Israel's war lor
independence in 1948 when 30.000
Libyan Jews emigrated to other
countries, with JDC assistance, to
escape Arab hostility. The mass de-
parture was repeated on a smaller
scale >ince last June's Arab-Israel
war. Of 3.100 Jews in Libya then.
2.900 took refuge in Italy.
Only 600 were self supporting.
Mr. Horwitz said. The res! request-
ed assistance which was provided
by the JDC jointly with the Italian
Jewish community and the United
Hias Service. At present, the JDC
official reported, only 450 Jews re-
main on the relief rolls. About
900 have left Italy tor other conn
Hies and the remainder have
found a means of livelihood
er of the Foundation's National
Advisory lioard.
Mr. Sinatra, who contributed
$100,000 towards the building of
the youth center, recovered this
week from a bout with pneu-
monia.
He will be cited at the dinner in
recognition ol his lifetime support
and leadership for the causes ol de-
mocracy, brotherhood, anti defa-
mation, religious freedom, youth
lurougnout tne world, and lor the
people ot Israel, which have made
the name ol Frank Sinatra a leg-
end in his own time "
Bernard n Dioomiieid is ( ana-
Jian chairman tor the conference,
v.Inch has scheduled a Friday al-
ternoon seminar on estate plan
ning, beginning at 1:15 p.m.
Dr. Sol Stein, national executive
vice president of the Foundation,
is coordinating the conclave.
Conrad Teitell, editor ol Tax
wise Giving" and director of the
Philanthropy Tax Institute, will
speax at the seminar, which is
tree and open to the general pub-
lic, lie is a member of the New
York bar and one ol the nation's
loreinost authorities on estate
planning.
The seminar will cover new
met nods ol charitable giving which
at the same tune provide income
tor the oonor and benefits for the
State ot Israel.
The conclave is expected to
send the amount raised by the
Foundation in some six years
past the ^10,000,000 mark. Pro-
ceeds are used to support tne
lon.?-range cultural, educational,
religious and welfare programs
of Histadrut in Israel.
Histadrut. Israel's million
member labor federation, supplies
medical needs to more than 80
percent of Israel's population.
Dr. Leon Kronish. national vice
president of Histadrutlhd a found-
er ol the Foundation, is honorary
chairman ol the conclave.
One of the highlights of Satur-
day night's program will be the
induction into the Histadrut Hall
of Fame ot Mr. Sinatra and other
American and Canadian leaders
who have donated S10.000 or more
to Histadrut through its Founda-
tion program of wills, bequests,
annuity and income funds.
Samuel .1 I.etrak of New York
is chairman ol the newly created
National Advisory Board. Confer-
ence cochalrmen include Jack S.
I opick, Moe Levin and Miss Lil-
lian Goodman.
Other top conference committee
chairmen include: Judge Herbert
S. Shapiro. Dr, Anna Brenner
Meyers, Mrs. Elsie Bonem, Mrs.
Trudj Hamerschlag, Morns New-
mark. Sam Lachman, Leonard Zil-
bert, Mr>. Jennie Grossinger, Jo-
seph Ash. Sain Feinstein. Dr Mi-
chael Sossin and Moshe Herman.
KIBBUTZ SHAMIR, situated near
Kiryat Shmone in Israels Upix-:
Galilee, is noted for its output of
honey.
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rcce 4-A
V'Jenist fkridfiatn
Friday. February 23. 1968
"Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N. E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miumi TWX
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The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity ana
the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. Seen Aits Feature "Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service. National Editorial Assn., American Assn. of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
m
Editor and Publisher
. Asst. to Publisher
. Managing Editor
The Jewisn Floridian does not guarantee the Kashruth
of the merchandise advertised in its columns.
Published every Fri.lay llnca IttJ by The Jewlab Floridian
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at 120 N.F.. Sixth Street. Miami 1. Florida
SUBSCR 1 P t Loca i O N Area RATES:
0 ie Year $5.00 Three Years $12.00
Out ot wwn upon nequest
Friday. February 23, 1968
24 SHEVAT
Volume 41 Number 8
^ Hotter of jf-ict Lf:
JOSEPH ILSOP
ALS0P
A Jewish Commitment
In Israel's 20th Year
In the two decades sines the es-
tablishment of statehood. Israel's
twentieth year promises to b? its
-.os? meaningful todaie.
Cominq as it does after the mo-
ir.ertous days of the nation's qreatast
military test and the historic reuni-
::cation of Jerusalem, the twentieth
anniversary year has already beaun
:o bring home the full significance of
Jewish statehood in the land of our
heritage.
Now more than ever, with the
sacred shrines of our faith in Jewish
hands for the first time in 2,000 years,
have we finally come to realize that
the commonwealth of which Jews had
dreamed and for whose restoration
tehy prayed over the centuries is a
dream no longer.
Today, Israel still faces hostility
irom Arab neighbors and from an
array of powerful states. The pro-
blems the nation faces are serious
and there can be no relaxation of
vigilance and determination.
Yet the fact remains that there is
much to be grateful for this year and much has
oeen achieved for which every Jew can feel
pride.
kJ^T1 in itS brief but turbulent history has
had to face many tests, but always, the miracle
SLw- "^y succun*ing to the few asserted
Jtself in the tune of crisis.
Who would have believed as the black
clouds were gathering over the Milddle East
last spring that a combined Arab threat against
Israel backed up as it was by Russian-manu-
.actured armaments of the most modem desian
would result in the sneedy defeat of an enemy
hat repeatedly boasted it would drive all Jews
:nto the sea.
None of us will ever forget the pride we
ted to our nation's hour of oreatness.
But, since we consider ourselves part of the
achievements of the Jewish nation, we cannot
relegate this pride to the status of merely a
memento of an event in hi-tory.
No Jew anvwhere, should pass uo the op-
portunity of making Israel's twentieth veer a
part of his own personal heritage and that of
his family.
There is no better way to achiovo t^s ct
this time than to undertake a personal visit to
Israel.
Such a personal pilorimaae can be one of
the most meaningful experiences of a lifetime
that will also serve to strengthen the ties be-
tween the Jews in Israel and the Jews of
the Diaspora.
That these ties exist among all Jews was
demonstrated by the universal suDDort shown
for Israel during the trying days of late May
and June, 1967 and thereafter.
They are ties that must arow ever stronqer
for the benefit of all of world Jewry.
There are. of course, also economic reasons
for visiting Israel.
Tourism is the second largest source of
foreign currency for the Jewish State and Is-
rael's defense expenditures are greater today
than they ever were.
Proportionately, hrael spands twice a much
for defense needs as does the United States. It
has to, in order to maintain its inteqritv and
ensure its security and tourism helps Israel
maintain this strength.
For those of us not in a position to make a
personal pikjrimaqe to Israel durino- th;s twen-
tieth year, let us at least make it plain that the
spiritual commitment is there.
In body or in spirit, this is a year for us to
make our presence known so that we may be
counted as an inteqral part of the generation
that rebuilt our land.
Johnson-Daley Axis
"-7K1U/
UAHC Executive Meeting
This weekend, Greater Miami will be the
site of the first meetina in the South of the
executive committee of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.

Dr. Nelon Glueck, president of the Hebrew'
Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, and j
Dr. Maurice Eisendrath. president of the UAHC.
are two of the torj leaders of Reform Judaism!
who will gather here vi'h local and national!
supporters of their institutions.
Each is a major p-rsonulity on the American i
Jewish scene.
Dr. Eisendrath's recent 22-dav worldwide!
mission for peace emphasized his oosition in'
the guest of human rights and social justice.
Dr. Glueck's role as one of the leading
archeoloaists in the world today has done much :
to orient Reform Jewry toward the State of Israel.
The importance of the meeting of Reform
Jewry this weekend is certain to extend well
beyond the confines of Greater Miami in issues
ot worldwide interest.
WASHINGTON With most of
the world in turmoil, it is nice to
know that politics goes on as
usual. Anil the big. unnoticed po-
litical development this winter is
the formation of .1 new Johnson-
Dalej a\.s.
The astute Mayor Richard Da-
lej of Chicago !>a~ some of the
survival value of a wily old hull
elephant! which he rather resem-
Hence he is now that last of
the once-numerous herd of big
Northern Democratic bosses. He
used to be distrusted by Presi-
dent Johnson, as a Kennedy man
from way back. The President,
moreover, has never felt at home
among his party's Northern
leaders.
Despite these obstacles, the
Johnson-Daley axis has come
into being one may guess,
through the friendship-broking of
Postmaster General Lawrence
O'Brien. The outward sign and
symbol of this major step for-
ward by the President was the
announcement by Illinois Gov.
Otto Kerner that he would not
run for reelection.
Sargent Shrivcr
Rabbi Eliezer Silver
The Second World War is generally con-
sidered the period of transition when much of
he culture and heritage of our peo-le nass-d
States 0pean scene to ,hat 'he United
One of the men largely responsible for the
RaZvI- ^ tl^ heri,ae "" ^- was
Rabbi Eliezer Silver, a renowned scholar, former
8TSKA5!Union of r,hodox Rabis ^
the.United States and Canada, and a founder
of the Agudath Israel of Amercia.
It was during World War II, that Rabbi Silver
rnKK u 7eateSt of ,he Euro-ean-trained '
rabbis who found his way to this counuy
organized rescue efforts for Jewish victims *
the Nazi holocaust and helped save thousands
Jm SSL*** deQ,h ;amDS' His tireless
efforts included repeated options to Preside"
T Z? h9T Wrr,d '"aders to oon Z
door, of Palestine and other nations to the
remnants of the people of the Book."
Rabbi Silver's recent death in Cincinnati at
ewry^ndbv fS? MOUrned bv **^
Jewry and by free men everywhere who were
ve^much aware of his humanitarian achteve
This announcement must be
intimately linked to the forth-
coming retirement of the long-
suffering director of the poverty
program. Sargent Shrivor. Hav-
ing served without complaint on
a rough battle front. Shrivcr was
first offered the ambassadorship
of Paris vacated, after long.
brilliantly distinguished service
by Charles E. Bohlen. But Shriv-
er's real aim is to enter elective
politics in his home state.
Furthermore, both Mr. Johnson
and Mavor Daley have a lively
common interest in putting up
the best possible ticket in Illinois
this year. It is one of the big
Northern states that the Presi-
dent really has to carry in order
to be reelected; and Daley also
wants to go on having a friend in
the governor's chair.
Shrivcr, who is close to Daley,
has all the makings of a glamor
candidate for the governorship;
and running for governor has al-
ways been Shriver's ultimate aim.
If Gov. Kerner had insisted on
running for reelection, however,
it would obviously have been im-
possible to run Shriver. too.
bly neat and promising arrange-
ments cannot easily be made m
the rest of the large-Northern, in-
dustrial states that also have
great importance to him
l.obrr( Kenneth
m
Yet the new John-on-ball axis
by no means stops there. It ig
known, for instance, that Dali
was consulted, not by Sen. Hobert
F Kennedy himself, but by some
of those silly people vho wished
the senator to commit political
suttee bv becoming an anti-John-
son candidate for the Democratic
presidential nomination.
The mayor replied, with the
voice of elephantine common
sense, that he wanted no part in
a Kennedy suicide attempt, sine
he thought the senator had a
great career before him; and that
Illinois would, therefore, be solid
for Lyndon Johnson in 1968. By
the same token, it is also known
that the mayor was consulted by
the President about the right re-
sponse to the pseudo-candidacy of
Sen. Eugene McCarthy.
The initial White House reac-
tion had been to start goin^ after
the "Kennedy-McCarthy crowd"
with hammer and tongs The
phrase, though totally misleading,
was actually used in public by
the President, himself. Daley in-
stead counseled a take-no notice
approach that is now being fol-
lowed.
ier
Renter's Price
Kerner's initial asking-price
for gently bowing out is rumored
to have been very high, indeed -
nothing less than the secretary-
ship of defense or the next place
on the Supreme Court, in fact. It
will be interesting, therefore to
sec just what (if anything) the
governor receives when, and if
the President wins another term!
At any rate, Kerner's promised
retirement opens the way for a
strikingly strong Democratic
icket in Illinois. One may guess
hat Shrivcr will head the state
ticket as the gubernatorial can-
didate. with Adlai Stevenson HI
assigned to the more uphill fight
hfJ S,CJnate soat' ^inst the
^^0^ perennia.. Everett
. By these transactions, the Pres-
ent and Daley have go, ,U
Illinois ducks quite beautifully in
* row. For Mr. Johnson's Sake. in
truth, it is ,00 bad that compara-
It is amusing to contemplate
these two powerful old political
animals, the President and the
mayor, meeting at last, as it
were, in the middle of the bridge
of past events that separated
them for so long.
Mayor Daley, after all. was
perhaps the single most import-
ant figure in John F. Kennedy's
drive for the nomination in 1960.
And that is the sort of thing that
is rarely forgotten by Lyndon B.
Johnson, who also has his cle
phantine side and, in particular,
an elephant's memory-for pa.t
wounds and slights.
Yet it is also signifceant that
these two are now working to-
gether. It means that behind the
scenes the President is doing a
lot more to promote his own re-
election than most people im-
Oopyrlghl Post Co. Dtatrlbuted by Los AllfalM
Timaa Syndicate.


'
Friday. February 23, 1968
fJenisti FhrSdli^ir,
Paqe 5-A
Conservative Leaders
Here For Seminary
Tl i nationally prominent lead-
ers oi Conservative Judaum will
participate In the ninth annual con-
vocation of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America at 5 p.m.
Monday at Temple Emanu-El, Mi-
ami Biach.
Rabbi Louis Finkelstein, chan-
cellor of tho Seminary, will join
with Rabbi Bernard Mandel-
bium, president, in conferring |
the honorary degree of Doctor of
Laws on United States Senator
Edward M. Kennedy of Massa-
chusetts. Rabbi Max Ant, vice
chancellor of the Seminary, will
preside at the special convoca-
tion.
Harry Sirkin. a pioneer in the de-
velopment of Miami Beach and
prominent in many facets of Jew-
ish community life, will receive
the Seminary's National Commu-
nity Service Award.
Sen. Kennedy will be presented
at tin invocation by Ollie A. Co-
hen (i. SrookLn.'. Mass.. and spon-
sored :' Philip Leff of New York
and l s Stei I Philadt Iphia.
I;. frying Lehrman, spiritual
leader i em] < Emanu-El, will
deliver the Opening prayer, and
Raboi ''aver Abrair.owitz of Tem-
ple Menorfh. '.lie benediction.
The Ninth Annual Samuel
Friediand Lecture will be given
by Dr Seymour Siegel, associate
professor of theology and assist-
ant dean of its Herbert H. Leh-
man Institute of Ethics. He will
discuss "Judaism and the New
Morality."
Scores of pronvnent educators,
civic, communal and religious lead-
ers will participate in the academic
procession of which Sidney M.
Baer ol Philadelphia, a Founder
of the Greater Seminary and lead-
ing force on its Board of Overseers,
is marshal.
Other recipients of the Semi-
nary's National Community Serv-
ice Award aie: Herschel Blu.n-
berg, Washington. D.C.; Jack A.
Goldfarb. New York City; Mayer
Kaplan. Chicago. III.; Louis Kasle.
Flint. Mich.; and Leo A. Lippman.
Indianapolis. Ind.
The Convocation will be followed
by a dinner at the Temple at
which the Massachusetts Senator
will be the principal speaker.
Spiritual leaders in the Greater Miami area
who are alumni of the Hebrew Theoloqical
College. Skokie. 111., met this week to discuss
plans for the dinner on behalf of the institu-
tion to be held Sunday evening at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Shown (from left) are:
Rabbi David Lehrfield, Congregation Kneseth
Israel (Chairman of the event); Rabbi Avrom
L. Drazin, Israelite Center: Rabbi Naftali
Porush, Young Israel of Greater Miami; Dr.
Simon G. Kramer, president of the College;
Rabbi Berel Wein, Beth Israel Congregation;
and Mrs. David Baloah the heart cathiteri-
Congregation. Rabbi Pinchas UL Teitz of
Elizabeth, N. J., will be quest speaker.
NAttr SIRKIN
Cochin Synagogue
Will Mark 400th
Year Of Existence
NEW DELHI (JTA) One of the
oldest, active synagogues in the
world, tbat of Cochin in the Indian
State of Kerala, will mark its
400th anniversary with celebra-
tions tc be held from Dec. 15 to 19,
it was announced this week by
S. S. Kuder, chairman of the Co-
chin Synagbgue quatrocentennial
committee. :
The committee has asked the
Prime Minister, of India to inaugu-
rate the festivities which historical
Scholars, art experts and archeolo-
gists from America, Europe and
India w.U attend. The committee
is also uiviting Jewish tourists
from all over the world. The cele-
bration will also mark the 1.900th
year since Jews settled in Kerala.
The synagogue there is the oldest
in the British Commonwealth.
The synagogue was built in 1568
when there was dissension between
the White* Jews and the Black
Jews of Cothin, who were the ma-
jority. The White Jews withdrew
from tee -community and built
their own synagogue. Today, most
Of the Jews of Cochin have emi-
grated and less than 500 remain
there.
Are Good Guy Glasses

So long as you drink only White Horse
Scotch from them, you should worry. And,
honestly, people who would drink any other
Scotch in a Good Guys glass don't have secbel.
It's such a nice haimischc Scotch. Has a taste you
just can't argue about: either you like it or you
absolutely bless the day you first tasted it. And
you must believe this: it tastes best in Good Guys
Glasses. Order a set. Maybe two you never
know when some nice couple might get married.
The Good Guys are ahvays
on the White Horse.
1
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.

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MORWE0"f 1.A,t"dmS" Ml'"ehNOn? N V. OS3./.LENOEO SCOTCH WM.SKY-B. PROOF-. ROWNE-VINTNER. CO.. NY.





Page 6-A
+Jmis*fk>rMto
Friday. February 23. 135}
* m
i
EDWARD COHEN
Bold Action Needed
I Miprxw all of us got the feel-
ing at different times that we're
>n a treadmill, doing a weari
HUM job that gets nowhere.
"The more things change, the
more thev are the same trans-
lated from an old French proverb
'Peoples and governments have
never learned anything from his-
tory, or acted on principles de-
lucecl from it." Hegel. 1820
""Those who learn nothing from
history are fated to repeat it"
author and date unknown.
The deplorable condition of
teachers throughout the world is
warning that the modern world
must choose between war and ci-
vilization. Teachers and children
are paying the price of the last
war." Assistant Secretary of
State William Benton. 1947.
The proposition that it is our
children who will suffer most is
not an abstract one. As a result
of the low pay. there has been an
exodus of teachers to other cities:
there have been resignations in
order to take work in other field>
Young people are not interested
in makinu leaching their profes
-ion. replacements and Niibstitutes
.ue difficult to yet.
Children forced to attend over
crowded classes, taught by In-
competent or. at best, only fair
teachers whose morale is low be-
cau-e their standard of living is
low. are not being provided with
even a lair amount of education.
let alone the best which they
have a riyht to expect.'' Ed-
ward Cohen. Passaic VaUej Ex-
aminer. Feb. 23, 1SH6
Please iak.- a look at the date
ol tlii issue of The Jewish Flor-
idian I should apologize for quot-
ing myself, but I couldn't resist
after noting the coincidence of
exacl 'late- and problems just 22
years apart and some l^oo miles
lant.
Thi tragedy, '>' course, is that
neither m New Jersey nor in
Florida, where the confrontation
today is direct and urgent, have
we been able to answer the ques-
tion of quality mass education
with any intelligence. It has fes-
tered since the end of World War
II and the failure to heal in all
this time has brought the nation
and Florida to its present stat.
Gov. Kirk is not alone in his
dishonesty, his play to the rabble
by demanding a referendum on
new'" taxes. The Legislature cov-
ered itself with no glory by pro-
ducing bills which also appeal to
the venal by setting a ceiling on
property taxes. And the silent,
apathetic parents who look for
the teachers to do what they,
themselves, obviously are unwill-
ing to namely, provide for a
quality educational system
will undoubtedly turn their frus-
tration on everyone but them
selves.
I am convinced that the beau-
tiful phrases about "quality" edu-
cation is only another one of
those American myths which we
support by habit, not by convic-
tion. I have spent far too many-
years involved in politics and gov-
ernment to believe that a work-
ing majority of the American
people will voluntarily accept the
bill lor improvement, even ol
their own children. The polls
show mounting approval for esca-
lating the Vietnam war. but I'll
wager that the percentages will
be reversed the day Congress has
the courage to present the people
with the bill in the form of a sub-
>tantial tax increase.
Money for teachers, classrooms.
supplies and so on is not all that
is needed to reform an educa
tional system that is inadequate
for our times, but providing suf-
ficient funds i? at least a measure
of the interest we have in im
provement. Perhaps, if the bill
is large enough, many more
people will take an active role
in demanding the long overdue
change- required to bring educa
tion into locu> with the second
half ol the 20th century
I cannot fully agree with radi-
cals like Paul Goodman that
compulsory education is a uni-
\,ral trap, but I am tempted
t'p experiment with some of hi>
i definite "vacation. For instance.
Goodman ----- that there be
no school ai all" for a few
classes; will they learn the rudi-
ments anyway? he asks. "This ex-
periment cannot do the children
any academic harm, since there
is good evidence that normal
children will make up the first
seven years school-work with four
to seven months of good teach
ing!
Dispense with the school
building tor a lew classes; pro-
vide teachers and use the city it-
self as the school its streets.
cafeterias, stores, museums, mov-
ies, parks and factories. Where
feasible, it certainly makes more
-o to teach using the real
subject-matter than to bru^ an
ai>*ii*iwon of the subject-matter
into the school building as cur-
riculum." And so forth.
With :io thanks to any radical
thinkers, our childieii are now
ripe for such experiments It
might not be a bad idea to keep
the schools closed for the next
vear or so and see how we can
lope with the education problem
Nothing else seems to work.
'Mideast Conversations'
A film titled Conversations on
the Midesast" will be shown at
the meeting of the Emma Lazarus
Chapter of B'nai B'rith on Tuesday
at 8:30 p.m. at the Washington
Federal. 1234 Washington Ave.
There will also be a panel discus
sion with Mrs. Martha Morgan
serving as moderator. Mi>s Ettie
G. Kurzrok is chairman of the pro-
gram
Film. Jews of Silence/ On Men's Social Club Program
v-n,,-i.i to express solidarity sh. co-coordinator ot the ,
iView it. RuA." has betn florid. *c*Sflference ,. s0vM
StrtTlSrfMS 100 Lincoln Jew*, will gWe an addms
v the buildings
, social I lub Sal Friedman
ispresidenl ol the group Neil Simon's -Come Bio v -
1 .. Horn ha* completed its 12th per-
The film. "Jews of Silence, formance at Ruth.Foreman's North
irrattd bj Edward G. Robinson, Miami Playhouse and will :
Kill be shown, and Joseph I.Yan- over through March 3.
'Blow Your Horn' Held Over
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949-7461


Friday. February 23. 1968
* kwlsti narUKam
Paqe 7-A
Reform Judaism Week Set For South Florida
Dr. Eisendratii
To Speak Here
Climax of Reform Judaism Week
in South Florida will be a national
"Evening With Reform Judaism"
;it Temple Beth Sholom, 4144
Chase Ave.. Miami Beaeh. Sunday
night.
The program, slated to begin
at 8 p.m., will feature a talk by
Dr. Maurice Eitendrath and an
original musical concert by four
of the country's foremost can-
tors. Announcement was made
by Earl Morse of New York,
chairman of the board of hte
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations.
Dr. Kiseii(Jra ! MIC. will report on his recently-
concluded 22 .day peace mission
around the world and share the
platform with Mr. Morse and oth-
r members of the executive com
mittee ol the board <>f the I'AHC
in South Florida for a national
meeting.
Participating in the cantorial
concert will be Cantors Jacob
Bornstein of Temple Israel, Mi-
ami; Cantor David Conviser of
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach; Cantor Michael Kyrr of
Temple Beth Am, South Miami;
and Cantor Jerome Klement of
Temple Emanu-EI, Ft. Lauder-
dale.
Arrangements for the special
program Feb. 25. which is free and
open to the public with reserved
Mats obtainable from any Reform
synagogue, have been made by the
South Florida Federation of the
I'AHC. James Albert, president.
and Rabbi Robert P. Frazin. re-
gional director, have coordinated
plans for the meeting with rabbis
and officers of all Reform congre-
gations in the area.
Earl Morse,
Chairman
At Beth Am
Temple Beth Am. one of the
Souths fastest growing Reform
board chairman Earl Morse as its
pulpit guest duiing Friday night
Sabbath services.
Dr. Herbert Baumgard, rabbi
of the South Miami synagogue
which now has some 850 fami-
lies, has accepted the post of
RJA chairman for the Southeast.
Mr. Morse, a member of the
t>oard of trustees of Temple Beth-
El in Great Neck. NY., also is a
member of the famed Central Syn-
agogue of New York City.
Mr Morse also is a member of
ihe B'nai B'rith Hillel Commission
and a founder and director of Ihe
Child Development Center. He
spoke to members of the Beth Am
board at the temple Monday night.
Talking over progress oi the Reform Jewish Appeal's 1967-68
drive are Dr Jules Backman, left, and Dr.Maurice N.Eisen-
dralh. Dr. Backman is national chairman of the RJA. which
seeks to raise S5.000.0C0 for the Union oi American Hebrew
Congreqalions. a:d the He'.-row Union Collece-Jewish In-
stiaite ri Roliaion. Dr. Eiaendrrjth U president of the UAHC
and w"!l speak at T.-ran'' '-rael Friday night and at Temple
3oth Fhn'om Sunday niaht.
Dr. Nelson Glueck Visits
Area To Aid HUC-JIR,
Reform Jewish Appeal
Dr. Nelson Glueck (pronounced
Click), president of Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of Relig-
ion, America's oldest seminary of
Reform Judaism, is a distinguished
Biblical archaeologist, rabbi and
author.
He is the author o (numerous
books dealing with his archaeo-
logical discoveries in Trans.jordan.
the Negev, the Jordan Valley and
the Arabah rift. His latest book.
"Deities and Dolphins: The Story
oi the Nabataeans," is an account
ol the development of the Naba-
taean civilization based on his dis-
covery of hundreds ol Nabataean
sites in Jordanian and Israeli ter-
ritory and Mis excavations of the
Nabataean temple of Khirhct Tan-
nur in Transjordan,
A native of Cincinnati, he stud-
ied at Hebrew Union College and
was ordained there in 1923. He
obtained his PhD at University of
Jena in 1927. His studies led him
to exploration of the Biblical past
in the Holy Land and to archaeo-
logical discoveries which have rev-
olutionized the world's knowledge
ol Bible lands in antiquity.
A member of the faculty of the
Hebrew I'nion College since 1929.
he was named president in 1947.
In 1948. he was chosen to succeed
Rabbi Stephen S. Wise as presi-
dent of the Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion in New York. In 1950. the
two schools merged and Dr. Glueck
was named president of Ihe com-
bined institutions, now the world's
oldest graduate school for the
training of rabbis, educators and
cantors. In 1951, the Board of
Goverrors of the College-Institute
elected him to life tenure.
DR. NELSON GLUECX
Dr. Schindler
Slates Talk at
Temple Judea
EARL MORSE
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler.
executive vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, will be guest sneaker
at the Sabbath service of Temple
Judea Friday night, according to
Joseph H. Krefetz, president of
the Coral Gables congregation.
Former national director of edu-
cation of the UAHC, Rabbi Schind-
ler will participate with Rabbi
Morris A. Kipper of Temple Judea
in Reform Jewish Appeal Sabbath,
a highlight of Relorm Judaism
Week in South Florida.
A World War II veteran of the
U.S. Army ski troops. Rabbi
Schindler earned three European
Theater campaign ribbons, the
Bronxe Star Medal and the Pur-
ple Heart. Born in Munich, Ger-
many, son of the well-known
Yiddish poet, Eliezer Schindler,
he moved to the United States in
1938.
After receiving his B.S.S. degree
with honors in history at the Col-
lege of the City of New York, he
attended Hebrew Union College
and was ordained rabbi by the
Cincinnati seminary in 1953.
Among his positions since then
have been posl.s as assistant and
then associate rabbi of Temple
Emamicl of Worcester, Mass.
UAHC Leaders Meet
In Miami Beach; Slate
RJA Sabbath Friday
The executive committee of the Board of Trustees of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations will convene in the South for
the first time when it holds its semi annual meeting at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel in Miami Beach.
Announcement of the plenary session was made by Karl Morse
of New York. Chairman of the Hoard of Trustees of the UAHC M
Morse will preside over the a! 1-day gathering here, which will be pre-
ceded by a week of meetings among national and local lea U
the Relorm Movement.
Dr. Maurice Eisendrath, presi
dent of the UAHC, will be among
the top Jewish spoketsmen who
will take part in the executive com-
mittee conclave .lames Albert of
Miami Beach i~ Conference Chair-
man.
Mr. Albert noted that schedul-
ing of the meeting here "is re-
cogonition that not only is South
Florida the fastc-st growing Jew-
ish community in North Ameri-
ca, but also that this area has
become the crossroads of world
Jewry during the winter season."
Mr Morse, executive vice presi-
dent of DCA Food Industries. Inc.,
is .". former national vice president
of the American Jewish Committee.
DR. SCHINDLER
JAMES ALPERT
a member of the board of governors
of the Hebrew Union-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion and honorary
vice president of the Jewish Educa-
tion Committee of New York.
Member congregations of the
South Florida Federation of the
Union of American Hebrew Con
gregations are serving as hosts.
Participating synagogues are
Temple Israel of Miami, Temple
Sinai of North Miami Beach,
Temple Judea of Coral Gables,
Temple Beth-El of Hollywood.
Temple Israel of West Palm
Beach, Temple Emanu-EI of Fort
Lauderdale, Temple Beth Sholom
of Miami Beach and Temple
Beth Am of South Miami.
Each of the congregations will
devote part or all of their services
Feb. 23 to R .1 A. Sabbalh. in sup
port of Ihe Reform Jewish Appeal,
central fund raising organization
for the UAHC and for the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute ol
Religion.
The R J. A., under the general
chairmanship of Dr. Jules Back-
man of New York, this year
lounched a $5,000,000 campaign.
A highlight of the drive has been
the establishment of a Society
of honor, composed of individuals
contributing $1,000 or more to
the Reform Jewish Appeal.
Headquarters for the national
meeting of the executive committee
ol the Board of Trustees and for
Reform Judaism Week are located
in the UAHC's regional offices in
the Congress Building in downtown
Miami.
Aids Jewish
Education
Do you know that onlj 10
cenl ol oui Jewish youngsters
ceive more than an elementary
Jewish education' That intermar-
riage is up 20 per cenl in Canada
and is probabb higher in the I n
ed States? That only one Jewish
college seudenl in fiftj mar tains
even a tenuous connection with
Judaism?.
One has only to realize that
many Of our young people moved
.nto civil rights and then the peace
movement with almost religious
fervor losing touch with their
Judaism, repelled by institutional
life and synagogue ritual to know
that we arc waced with mounting
evidence pointing to a ge
of Jewish drop-outs.
DAVID LIGHT
... he sparks RJA here
Chaim Friend
Coordinates
Conference
Activities of the Reform Jewish
Appeal in South Florida are be
coordinated by the national exi
iltive vice chairman of the RJA,
Chaim Friend.
Mr. Friend, a former official
of the United Jewish Appeal, as-
sumed the key development post
after serving as New York, di-
rector of the RJA.
Assisting him is II G Rossman,
Southern regional director u to
headquarters in Greater Miami.
The lay and professional leader-
ship of the Union of Ana rit
Hebrew Congregations and of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion work clot
Paid Adv.


^
Page 8-A
^Jenist neridlikiin
Friday. February 23, 1968
OBT MACHT
HARRY MI1RACH
Robert Macht Named

For Bosworth Award
Robert Macht. chairman of the
board of Jordan Marsh-Florida, has
been named the 1968 recipient of
the Harold B. Bosworth Memorial
Award.
Mr. Macht, who recently assumed
the campaign chairmanship of the
Vnited Fund of Dade County, was
.scheduled to accept the highest
honor of the Mercantile Division of
the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund at a Friday after-
noon luncheon at the Dupont Plaza
Hotel.
Presentation of the award was
to be made by Jay I. Kislak, him-
self a former recipient of the Bos-
worth Award and a past general
chairman of both the United Fund
and CJA campaigns.
Mr. Macht, who also is vice pres-
ident of Allied Stores Corp., has
held key leadership posts in the
Miami-Dade Chamber of Com-
merce. Greater Miami Philhar-
monic, Committee of 21, Orange
Bowl Committee, Government Re-
>c*rch Council and numerous other
interim Steering
Committee Named
By JFCS Women
.An interim steering committee
has been set up by the Women's
Committee of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service, according
to an announcement by Mrs. Eu-
gene R. Katz. chairman.
Those named to the steering
committee include: Mrs. Arthur
Apple, Mrs. Edward Cantor. Mrs.
David Catsman. Mrs. James Co-
hen. Mrs. Stanley Ersoff, Mrs.
Burton B. Goldstein. Mrs. Charles
Goldstein, Mrs. Sam A. Goldstein,
Mrs. Alfred A. Green, Mrs. David
Hochoerg, Mrs. Donald Kaplan,
David Kirsh, Mrs. Sy Lawrence,
Mrs. David Phillips, Mrs. Harold
Rand, Mrs. Arnold Stern, Mrs. Mil-
ton Sirkin, Mrs. Alfred Swiren,
Mrs. Isidore Weinstein, and Mrs.
Maxwell Weisblatt
BERNIE BERKOW Sales Manager
says
BETTER BUICK
AND OPEL
BARGAINS AT
Sheehan
MODELS
miLAILE
BUICK
ENTIRE 2300 BLOCK S.W. 8th ST. HI 4-1661
Opt. Mm.. DM.. Fri. 'H S P.M. art Ties.. Trtrs. Sat. til t P.M.
Benad Avital To Be Guest Speaker
For Food Division Annual Luncheon
business, civic and philanthropic
endeavors,-
He was cofounder of the Mer-
cantile Division of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. The Memorial
Award is presented each year "to
an individual who exemplifies the
principles, beliefs and humanitar-
ian concepts of the late Harold
Bosworth, which have contributed
to the betterment of the Greater
i Miami Jewish Federation and for
the community in general.
A permanent plaque is on dis-
play at the Federation office, 1317
Biscaync Blvd., and a replica is
presented to each annual recipient.
Harry Mizrach will receive
the Special Award of the Mer-
! cjrttile Division in recognition
of his six years of leadership of
the Apparel Group, a major unit
of the CJA, and-his key role in
the 1967 Israel Emergency
Fund.
Maj. Shulamit Legum of the
Women's Army Corps of Israel will
be the principal speaker at the
fete, to be hosted bv Americana
Knitting Mills ui Miami, ArCO No-
tion and Trimming Co.. Burdine's.
Charles ol Miami, Jack Diamond.
Irving Getz. Jackson-Byron's. Jor-
dan Marsh-Florida. Maggie. Inc.,
Marcus Brothers. Miami Diamond
Center. Harry Mizrach. Robinson
Industries. Serbin, Inc., and Vogue
Originals.
Louis I- Davis and Herman
Hammer, cochairmen of the Mer-
cantile Division, are serving in the
same posts for the luncheon, in
one of the major events of the
mercantile industry in Florida
each year.
At the luncheon, a presentation
of the first Distinguished Service
Award of the CJA division will be
made posthumously to the late
Byron Topol. Mrs. Topol will re-
ceive the award in his behalf. Mr.
Topol was a leader of Federation,
the CJA, YM YWHA of Greater
Miami, United Fund and numer-
ous other philanthropic endeavors.
Benad Avital. first secretary of
the Embassy of Israel in Washing-
ton, DC. will be the guest speaker
at the annual luncheon of the
Food and Allied Trades Division
for the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund joint cam-
paign, according to Herbert Paige,
division chairman.
The affair, hosted by Mr. Paige,
will be Friday, March 1 at 12:30
p.m. in the Pepsi Cola Bottling
Plant hotunda Building.
Joseph Cohen and Leo Finkel-
LIONS were abundant in the Mid-
dle East through the entire an-
cient period.
stein arc the inchairmen of the
division, and Jerry Blank is the
honorary chairman.
Members of the committee in-
clude: Fred August. Lewis W. Bey-
er. David Blank. H. James Catliu,
Louis Cohen. Herbert Cole. Ed
Dokson. Jack Fineberg. Lillian
Glover. Samuel Godfrey. Lewis R.
Goodman, Haro'd Gotthelf. Max
Handihu, Ernest E. Harris. Rich-
ard M. Holt, Sydney Huberman,
Eric Jacobsen. Richard Lencer,
Harold Levinson. Morris Levitt,
Fred LoMand, Bernard Oxenberg,
Wilfred Rose. William Rose. Harry
Salzman. Robert Shaw, Herbert
Sher. Ben Silver, Harry' Susskind,
Dan Weinstein and Isidore J. Wol.
lowick.
Seymour Friend is coordinator
for the division.
Soviets Demolish Jewish
Cemetery Near Kovno
PARIS (WNS) The city ol
Yanev. near Kovno in the Lithu-
anian Soviet Republic, has trans-
formed its 33-year-old.Jewisltceni-
etery into a housing project. It wa-
! learned here wi& j local newspaper which carried a
notice of the date of demolition
jThe tombstone* .hftv*. been put
away for future disposition..
i*
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Friday. February 23. 1968
+Jtnisti ftcridlian
Paqe 9-A
F -- """" ".
li
High Rise Division To
Hold Three Meetings
Israel Finance Minister Pinhas
Sapir was in Miami this week
on behalf of the "nit"d Jewish
Apoeal's- 1968 Israel Emer-
qencv Fund. Mr. Std*' It-c\
ed Greater Miami's showinq
last year on behalf of the IEF
and uwjed continued intensive
pff'^s fr^Se <-fr^.T>-:.a*i.
Five U, J. A.
Leaders Are
I )ue Fh Miami
Momentum continued to climb
this week in the Combined Jewish
Appeal isiael Emergency Fund
joint campaign with the High Rise
and Residents Division planning
three key meetings, two this Sun-
day and the other one week later,
March 3, according to Ben Essen,
division chairman.
Mr. Essen and Daniel Nea] Heller
will be th? guest speakers at these
[unctions. Both will appear at in-
dividual meetings Sunday, with
Mr. Essen at One Hundred Lincoln
Road and Mr (teller at the Forte
Towers complex meeting.
One Hundred Lincoln Road will
' be meeting in the Club Room of
N. Y. Chain
Bars Arab
, Merchandise
Continued frerm Page 1-A
A quintet of national leaders of
the United Jewish Appeal were
due in Miami Thursday to join in
Operation Jet" the national hu-
manitarian campaign for Israel's
regulu and emergency needs in
major American Jewish communi-
ty
Among those who were slated
:o \isii this area are Israel Fink
of Minneapolis, honorary national
chairman of the UJA; Gordon
Zacks of Columbus, vice chairman
of the L'JA's Voun Leadership
Cabinet: Irwin Pruewrnan. former
Toledo campaign chairman and
Of Miami Beach communal
leaders Mr. and Mrs Charles
Fiuchtman; Aranl Sherman of
Davenport, Iowa, Midwest UJA
ii der: and Ben Domont of 1ml;
ap >ii-. former president <>l the
Indiana city's Federation and pas)
campagin chairman.
The national leaders were slated
i meet with top chairmen of
li eater Miami's Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergencj Fund
joHit campaign, and to accompany
Ibem on individual solicitations tor
gifts to the CJA-1EF.
General campaign chairman
Norton Pallot announced Wed-
nesday that the CJA division of
the twin drive has passed the
$750,000 mark towards its goal
of $1,991,200. No specific target
has been set for the IEF division,
which last year raised more than
$3,135,000.
Mr. Pall*- saic CJA gifts still
were avcragiq&^iosc to the 21 per-
cent increase needed for this
year's campaign to achieve its ,
goal. "Our si.pport of more than
40 overseas, national and local
agencies; on even a minimal basis
depends on reaching and exceed-
ing the CJA goal. And the tremen-
dous humanitarian needs of the
people of Israel demand sacrificial
gifts to the Emergency Fund," Mr.
Pallot asserted.
Associate chairmen Robert Rus-
sell. Lou Poller and Shepard Broad
joined Mr. Pallot in planning the
solicitation efforts for "Operation
Jet."
Greater Miami campaign lead-
ers also were scheduled to take
part in the UJA's coast to-coast op-
eration as the tempo of the na-
tionwide drive mounted steadily.
Martin Peppereorn, formerly of
Miami and now national field til-
rector of UJA, arrived here in
advance of the visiting team to
coordinate "Operation Jet" with
Arthur S. Rosichan. executive di-
rector of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation.
The Federation, headed by pres- |
ident Leon Kaplan, sponsors the ;
CJA-IEF drive.
the building for a breakfast at 10
a.m. Cochairmen for this event are
Joseph Bernstein. Nat Friedman,
Sam Horowitz and Samuel Pascoe.
The committee from One Hun-
dred Lincoln Road includes Henry
Altman, Joseph Amigo, Joseph Av-
eibook. Max Coggan, Joseph H.
Cohen, Edward Drimmer, Joseph
Gittelman, Philip Lubitz. Jacob
Pludo. Isadore Sailer. Milton
Sands. Sam Schneider. Edward
Schwell. Lawrence Shuman and
Nathan Toplin.
Mr. Heller, a former national
commander of the Jewish War Vet- !
erans, will appear at Forte Towers
for a breakfast in the restaurant
of the 1100 building at 10 a.m.
Joseph R. Mondres is the gen-
| cral chairman for this affair and
his chairmen for the buildings are:
Rabbi Max Zucker, Forte Towers
North; Raymond Berman and
George Gerring. Forte Towers
1 South; and Aaron Hershbain, Forte
(Towers Center.
Morris Baron. Julius Gracer,
Charles Holtz, Bernard Liberman.
Jack Paikoff. Charles Rapoport,
Harry Rosenthal, Murray J.
Schlussel. Sam Shapiro. Alexander
i H. Spitz and Eli Weiner are the
committee members.
Israeli products featured in the |
Mays chain include. gift ware, re-
ligious items, -.toys, candy, outer
ARTHUR S. ROSICHAN
response" to Israeli products found
at Mays, which, fee added, has
stepped up its imports from Israel
"thanks to merchandise that is dis-
tinctive in styling and competitive
in price."
garments, knit goods, rainwear
and beachwear. Mr. Sbulman said
the firm plans to send representa-
tives to fashion shows in Israel but
there are no current plans to es-
tablish a buying office there. He
-isserted that Israeli products "sell
well" and that continued import-
ing from Israel "would strengthen
its economy."
The following week, residents of
Plaza 800 will hear Mr. Essen at
a breakfast in the recreation room
at 10 a.m. (Sunday. March 3).
Abe Lewis is chairman for the
building and the committee mem-
bers are Abe Dipkin. Murray Fir-
man. Mrs Murray Firman. David
Kovnat. Moises Levin. Mrs Abe
Lewis and Bert Menachof.
Terror Toll
Reported By
Gen. Dayan
Continued from Poa 1-A
from helping them cross the Jor-
dan River and locating terrorist
bases in refugee camps along
the Jordan Valley.
Following the report, Knesset,
by i vote of 65 to 4, passed a reso-
lution endorsing Gen. Dayan's
warning that Jordan must desist
from further violations of the
cease-fire agreement along the en-
tire length of the demarcation line
with Israel or else face "calami-
tous consequences." Although the
debate on the resolution was
marked by restraint, many felt it
was time to warn Jordan it was
courting disaster if it continued its
present course.
Later, Gen. Dayan announced
that Arab villagers in the West
Rank would receive a supply of
arms to protect themselves against
terrorists. He made the disclosure
alter a meeting with the mayor of
Hebron, an Arab, and other chief-
tains of neighboring villages.
North Dade
CJA Unit
Sets Events
The North Dade area of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund joint campaign an
nounced a number of events Set in
various condominiums, accordi' [
to Dr. Max A. I.ipschitz. art;,
chairman.
First in the line of affairs is tix
CJA-IEF Night for the Fontain
view Condominiums March 4 at ft
p.m. Top attraction that evening
will be the movie, "'In Our Time,'
the first motion picture made in
Israel after the Six-Day War.
Chairman for the building, Max
well Skopit, said that Ben Essen,
local attorney and chairman of tht
CJA-IEF High Rise and. Residents
Division, will be the guest speaker
Dr. Lipschitz will also participatf
in the program.
The Marlen Gardens will hold
its CJA-IEF meeting on March ft
at 7 p.m., prior to a weekly binge
program. Guest speaker will be
Arthur S. Rosichan, executive di-
rector of the Greater Miami Jew-
; ish Federation.
I The North Dade area has raised
'to date, $27,000 of its $100,000
goal.
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Page 10-A
+JmteJi n Friday. Februcrv 23. 19S8
r/ BOOK REVIEW ^'^'f-Jf^Jc.
O?- svumimr b. livlnnait 'if7^1
WHILE SIX MILLION DIED
(A Chronicle of American Apathy)
By ARTHUR D. MORSE
In the October 1945 issue of
the Flatbush Zionist News, your
reviewer addressed an open let-
ter to the forthcoming Z.O.A. con-
vention. A thousand extra copies
were distributed to the conven-
tion delegates.
The letter caused quite a com-
motion. There were many who
praised and many who criticized
my effrontery. 1 was accused of
attacking F.D.R.. the friend of
the Jews. Those who criticized
were believers in the myth about
the man who was venerated by
in a-ses of American Jews in spite
of tor one plight scy in ignorance
of) what he permitted to be done
to Jews in Germany. Europe and
Palestine although he had full
knowledge of the holocaust.
1 had written in part: "The
Nads did not sink the Struma,
Hi >t. Louis or the Patria. The
Fascists were not the only ones
who killed Jews in Hitler's Eu-
rope. The British government un-
der Churchill, the American State
Department under Roosevelt and
Other governmental and interna-
tional agencies are equally guilty
. The blood of innocent vic-
tims who were refused admit-
tance to Palestine runs lrom the
hands of American and British
officialdom "
In While Six Million Died by
Alfred D. Morse ("Random House,
S6.95). we find that the author's
subtitle for his book. "A Chronicle
of American Apathy." is buttress-
ed by facts and copies of mem-
oranda from official files. Mr.
Morse names those primarily re-
sponsible and he brands them for
what they were, "vicious anti-
Semites."
Let us not forget that President
Harry S. Truman in his Memoirs
has likewise labeled these en-
trenched bureaucrats who lie. de-
ceive, distort reports and are a
disgrace to our country and to
the things for which we stand as
a democratcy. They are hirelings
of oil companies and of power-
intoxicated politicians. Our Am-
bassador to England. Joseph Ken-
nedy, is also revealed as one who
did naught to aid the Jews.
Mr Morse close.- his highly-
recommended hook with these
sentences: "As Hitler moved sys-
tematically toward the total de-
struction of the Jews, the govern-
ment and the people of the United
States remained bystanders .
Americans went about their busi-
ness unmoved and unconcerned
Those who tried to awaken the
nation were dismissed as alarm-
ists, cranks or Zionists. Many
Jews were as disinterested as
their Christian countrymen. The
bystanders to cruelty became by-
standers to genocide."
Negro Leaders Urged
To Curb Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK (WNSrAn appeal
to responsible Negro leaders to
curb the fomenting of anti-Jewish
and anti-Israel attitudes in the Ne-
gro community hy extremist ele-
ment.- was sounded here at the
87th annual meeting of the New
York Board of Rabbis.
Addressing the meeting, the
hoard's newly-elected president.
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman. said the
duty rested en responsible Negro
leaders to condemn efforts to in-
ject anti-Semitism into the civil
rights struggle by making Jews
the scapegoats for the injustices
being perpetrated against the Ne-
groes It is a matter of record.
Rabbi Klaperman added, that
MOSES LILIENBLUM, a Hebrew
writer who died in his native Rus-
sia in 1910. was well versed in the
teachings of the Talmud at the age
ot nine.
.*--ws have stood in the forefront
in the struggle for equal rights for
all citizens.
The board, consisting of 900 Or-
thodox. Conservative and Reform
rabbis, also took note of President
Johnston's "arduous task" in seek
ing an honorable peace in Viet-
nam .
Other resolutions called for de-
termined U.S. "support of freedom-
loving and democratic Israel" and
its quest for direct negotiations
with its Arab neighbors, denounced
the Soviet L'nion for its continued
policy aimed at destroying Juda-
ism and Jewish culture, and urged
convocation of an emergency con- ,
ference of religious leaders to deal
with the eroding morals and atti-
tudes among the youth. The youth,
Rabbi Klaperman told the meet- !
ing, "is bartering morality for
marijuana, loyalty for LSD, duty
for dissent, responsibility for re-
belliousness and sanity for sex."
I
Mrs. Harriet Green, nationally recognized Labor Zionist
leader and President of the Pioneer Women's Organization
of Greater Miami, and Mayshie Friedberq, veteran Labor
Zionist leader, are being congratulated by Yosef Almogi,
former Minister of Development of the State of Israel, upon
the honors they received last Sunday night at the Labor
Zionist-Farband and Pioneer Women Israel 20th Anniversary
Dinner on behalf of Israel Bonds.

Dr. Francisco Hernandez, (left) Professor of
pediatnc cardiology at the National Child-
ren's Cardiac Hospital, demonstratma to Mr.
and Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swirsky. Beth Jacob
zation equipment at the Hospital. Needed
next step is a pediatric open heart surgery
suite toward which the Government has
agreed to match up to S500.000. Kickofl for
the fund raising drive the Guardian Ana?!
Ball, will be held in the new cotillion room
Of the r.'--n R~~ Hot-
n i *:Hf
'ht.
Morris Lansburgh. owner of the Eden Roc,
will underwrite the entire cost of the black
tie event. Mi. and Mrs. Baloqh are servinq as
chaiimen of the affair with Dr. and Mrs.
Henry Kin" Stanford honorary chairmen.
Among guests will be Mr. and Mr. Sidney
Ansin Mr. and Mrs. Mark Denburg, Mr. and
Mrs. Burt Godnick, Mr. and M s. Will!
Seqal. Mr. and Mrs. Max Orovite, Mr. and
Mrs. P B. G^ulior Jr. and R:a> Admiral in I
Mrs. Gene Markv.
Liberty, when it
$d begins to take root,
is a plant of
rapid growth.
GEORGE WASHINGTON
For a people whose history is measured in
millennia. 2 decades is but a moment in
time. But in this brief span of 20 years, the
State of Israel has given life to a dream that
was kept alive and nourished through
2.000 years of cruel adversity.
It is not given to many generations in their
lifetime to see an ancient heritage grow
new life from old roots. Demonstrating
that freedom, independence and a national
identity are the living inheritance of the
Jewish people has been the crowning
achievement of an old faith in a new world
And. because of it, men of all faiths who
truly cherish liberty have stood a little taller
since that day in 1 948 when Israel a
nation once again, took its stand on the
barricades of freedom.
Washington Federal
SAVINGS AN "-ocat.on oF m.Im, BE*cm
1701 Meridian Ave./1234 Washington Ave Win w
699 N.E. 1697,n St^SSSA ^ *'"**
\
JACK D. GORDON
Prisiaer.i
ARTHUR H COURSMON
Chtwm of the Bunj


Friday. February 23, 1968
vJmlsli ihrkUsm
P-rge Il-A
Arms For Jordanians
To Include F-104 Jets
SHINGTON (JTA) The
Stat< Department announced that
the IS. government has decided
to resume arms shipments to Jor-
dan interrupted last June by the
Six-Day War Department spokes
mar Robert McCloskey said that
of the weapons to be supplied
Jordan were ordered before the
Jum war and others could be en-
ure : new items. He did not rule
out jet aireralt when asked about
the categories of arms to be fur-
nished. Jordan had 36 F-104 Star-
!i.f:cr jets on order before the
June outbreak.
Mr. McCloskey said the decision
was '.aken because it was deemed
xtial to the stability of the
.m. He said for the record that
the inouncement meant that the
l nited States was returning arms
supply to Jordan "as we have
don* in the case of other Near
Eastern countries." He cited the
lifting of the arms embargo last
i ict 24 to permit arms shipments
I p Uriel, Lebanon. Saudi Arabia.
Morocco, Libya and Tunisia.
~-e Amtncin decision, it was
lei -Td, followed n "SOS" from
Kins Hussein. The King report
'*. emphesited that he needed
.i d'amatic .gesture by Washing
tor to quiet growing dissent
air.c<\g Jordanian Army officers.
Jc'daman officers had complain
...t Jordan was the only na-
" tot resupplied following the
I tint var and it was also the Arab
tati *ith the "hottest" cease-fire
line Cxtreme pressures were said
to h< i' been exerted on Hussein
.mi arms from the I'nited
Stair- or to accept Soviet oflers.
Iln State Department concluded
that American influence in Am-
A'OUld be retained through
iii v\ s. arms shipments. This de-
i was described by official
s :i> the "lesser of two e\ ils."
II .i~ learned also thai an Ad
at ion promise was given t <>
\iner Kli.uiia.-li. the Jordan
el ol Staff, in expedite ship-
il American tanks, artillery.
planes and other military equip-
ment, and it appeared likely that
shipment ol K-104 Starfigliter jets.
ordered by Jordan before the June
war, would begin soon. Gen Kha-
mash has just concluded a secret
three week visit here.
Although the State Department
denied Congressional charges that
Arab pilots have been being train
ed here secretly since June, ofii-
cials admitted this week that 25
ol Jordan's best pilots have been
trained to fly F-104s at Lackland
and Webb Air Force bases in Texas.
The State Department also de
nied reports that the 48 A-4 Sky.
hawk fighter-bombers which Israel
had ordered in 1966. deliver] ol
which began last October, had all
been tinned over to Israel. An offi-
cial said only a few" had been
delivered and the total number
would not be in Israel before early
in 1969.
Israel has been seeking to ob-
tain Phantom lighters and. ac-
cording to the Washington Evening
Star, officials admit that the de-
cision to supply Jordan with the
supersonic Starfighters will in-
crease pressure to supply Israel
with sophisticated aircraft. The is-
sue was to have been discussed
when Defense Minister Dayan met
Secretary ol Defense McNamara
here.
W-!ter P. Reuther. president
ol the United Automobile
Workers of America, will be
honored by the American
Committee for the Weizmann
Institute with the establish-
ment of a chair at the In-
stitute to be known as the
Walter P. Reuther Chair for
Research in the Peaceful Uses
ol Nuclear Enerqy.
PERSONABLE
WIDOW IN MID
THIRTIES, NICE
APPEARANCE
Fcellent cook, oood bu*ine and
common sense. Has one child. Has
oood sense of humor. Wishes to
meet intelligent man. with or with
Out children interested in matri-
mony. Write Mr*. A. AA.. Bon. 2973.
AA.frnt, Florida
Meniojra ci tn-j Committee ot Pstron-Hosta
for the annual Morton Towers- Israel Dinner
ot Slate completed p.aiis to: th? event at a
luncheon mvtin" at the Morton Towers
restaurant. The dinner will take o'ace on
S- ir^- r-vpiv 'ft. March 9, at the Fontaine-
b'.ecu Hotel. Mr. nd Mrs. Ei-rviel Mentz
(s^tfod, rntri "i" r>o"->-~rl at IrSo dinner.
Headinq the dinner committee are Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Minov (seated leit) dinner chair-
men; Abe Solosko, (seated right) and (stand-
ing, from left) Mr. and Mn. Samuel Gold-
berg. Mr. and Mrs. Georae Mildwoff, Rabbi
David Raab and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ruden
beig.
Miami Zionists Offer 'Salute To Israel'
The .Miami Beach District of the
Zionist Organization ol America
v il! hold it- annual "Salute to Is-
rael" meeting on Monday at 8:15
p.m.. in the Voltaire Room of the
Pontaincbleau Hotel, according to
Abraham A. C.mnhut. president of
tne Miami Beacn Zionist District.
The guesl speakers, according to
Lawrence Wiener, program chair-
man ot the district, will include
Harry Kranton. national ZOA di-
rector of organization and mem-
bership, who is now in Miami
Beach. Mr. Branlon has served ;i>
8 s icial worker in Austria and
France, has lived as a "chalutz"
in Israel and was an Intelligence
Officer in the U.S. Army. He has
also directed rehabilitation of dis-
placed persons in F.urope.
A noted author and lecturer, he
is considered one ol the most elo-
quent speakers in the National
ZOA office and is considered one
of the bes! informed Zionist speak-
ers on Middle East affairs.
Also on the program will be
Harry Kimball. formerly of Boston
and a past leader of the New V.n'i-
hind Zionist Region.
The meeting, which is open to
the public, will also feature two
exciting new Israel movies in color:
"Children of the Exodus" and "In
Our Time."
Assisting Abraham Grunhul and
Lawrence Wiener in planning the
meeting are: Max Fierman. Harry
Dick. Anne (iold. Hyman Young,
Joseph Alter. Sidney Raymond,
Ben Ciller, Sylvia Tamber. Helen
Feder, Julius .1 Rosenstein, and
Gil Rappaport.
O 1967 P LOI j'J Cj.
Father of The Yiddish Theater
In the vast Yiddish-speaking Pale of
Eastern Europe, the Hassidim frowned
on the stage as immoral. Abraham Gold-
faden disagreed. He considered Theater
a legitimate means of bringing light into
the dreary lives of his fellows, and he
determined to start one.
Since there was no body of drama writ-
ten in the common language, he had to
start from scratch, writing plays and
musicals, training actors, directing and
stage-managing, even painting scenery
and choosing costumes. With no models
to follow, he had to create his own forms
and techniques, appropriate to a simple
culture which had hardly progressed
since the 17th Century.
Jewish audiences responded immedi-
ately. By 1879 Jewish theaters emulating
his productions were springing up in all
major cities. He turned to the glories of
the past for material and composed oper-
ettas that would foster the spirit of self-
respect and opposition to tyranny.
When he came to New York in 1883.
he found his fellow immigrants slaving
at low wages and living in squalid pov-
erty, unable to escape the dreary mo-
notony of their lives. Lost to the language
and mores of the Broadway stage, they
embraced Goldfaden's ideas with delight,
and the New York Yiddish Theater blos-
somed. It developed remarkable artistic
merit and culminated in the Yiddish Art
Theater and the works of such giants as
Sholem Asch and I. J. Singer.
Through the development of the Yid-
dish Theatre, Goldfaden brought hope
and pleasure to countless people, and left
a great legacy-the host of Jewish play-
wrights, actors and producers who enrich
the theater today.
P. LORILLARD COMPANY
ESTABLISHED 1760
First with the Finest Cigarettes
through Lonllard research
J


Page 12-A
*Jew1st nnridfirtr
Fri-i",, Fahniarv 23, 19<" =
Kenneth Koenig
[Hen Longer Mitchell Horwich
Leslie Brown
Jjat ^/Vlitz^aL
Daniel Feldman
Daniel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mil-
ton Feldman, 620 Santurce Ave.,
Coral Gables, will become Bar
Mitzvah Saturday afternoon. Feb.
24th, at Beth David Congregation.
A reception in his honor, follow-
ing services, will be hosted by his
parents.
* V
Steven Robbins
Steven David, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Robbins. will become
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday. Feb. 24.
at Temple Emanu-EI.
Sloven attends the seventh grade
ol Nautilus Junior High and plays
oc Ho and French horn in the band.
The celebrant will be honored at
a dinner Saturday evening at the
Eden Roc Hotel. Mr. and Mrs.
.S.-.muel Robbins and Mr. and Mrs
Sidney Kokol. Steven's grandpar-
- i !^. will attend.
* *
Mitchell Horwich
Mitchell Horwich will become
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Judea of
Coral Gables on Saturday. Feb. 24.
at 11:15 a.m.
Mitchell is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard J. Horwich, 731 San
Juan Dr., Coral Gables. He is a
seventh grade honor roll student
at Ponce de Leon Junior High, and
a graduate of Temple Judea He-
brow School and will continue with
bis religious education to confir-
mation.
Friday evening. Feb. 23. Mitch-
ell will be presented with the Ner
Tamid Award from the National
Jewish Committee on Scouting. He
is scribe of the award-winning
Troop 64 of Temple Judea and as-
sists in the Temple's library.
To help him celebrate will be his
maternal grandparents, pioneer
Miamians, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pal-
lot, and his paternal grandmother,
.Mrs. M. T. Horwich of Chicago.
* e
Leslie Brown
Leslie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Frei, will become Bas
Mitzvah during the late Friday
evening services, Feb. 23, at Tem-
ple Zion.
Leslie is a seventh grade stu-
dent at South Miami Junior High
and plays the piano. She is active
in the Girl Scout movement as a
cadet and has attended Temple
Zion Religious School for the past
three years.
Mr. and Mrs. Frei will host the
Oneg Shabbat following the serv-
ices, and a reception dinner at
Temple Zion Saturday night.
The celebrant is the granddaugh-
ter of Charles Reibman and the
late Irene Reibman.
Robert Lonsttr Steven Robbins Mitchell Hipsman
Jeffrey Verdon
Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ellis Verdon. 1175 .ic in ic.,
will observe his Bar Mitzvah on
Sunday morn'n-' Feb. 25. at Beth
Torah Congregation.
Jeurey n a .xuueiit of the Torah
class and will be a member of the
Con.irmation class of 1969.
Mr. and Mrs. Verdon will spon-
sor the Oneg Shabbat in his honor
following the services.
Ellen Linger
Ellen Sue. daughter of Mr. and
' Mrs. Jerome L.inger of 17525 NE
'8th Ct.. will become Bas Mitzvah
( Friday evening, Feb. 23. at Beth
! Torah Congregation.
Ellen is a seventh grade honor
Student at John F. Kennedy Junior
High. She is in the fifth year He-
brew graduating class at Beth To-
rah and has sung in the choir. She
is a Cadet Gir! Scout in Troop 214.
Her parents will host ihe Oneg
Shabbat follow:!;: services, and a
reception Saturdaj evening at
their home.
Sari Axelrod
i Friday evening. Feb. 23. Sari
| Hope, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Axelrod. 7441 Wayne Ave..
will be Bas Mitzvah al Temple Ner
! Tamid.
I Sari is a student at Nautilus Jun-
ior High and Ner Tamid Religious
School.
An Oneg Shabbat in Sari's honor
will be tendered at the Temple
Friday evening and a reception
will be held at the Axelrod home
Saturday evening.
* *
Mitchell Hipsman
The Bar Mitzvah ol Mitchell Alex
Hipsman will be celebrated during
Saturday morning services at Beth
David Congregation on Feb. 24.
The celebrant, a third genera-
tion member of Beth David, is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. David Hips-
man. 915 Alava Ave., and grandson
of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer A. Hipsman
and Nathaniel Zalka, pioneer mem-
ber and past president of Beth
David now serving on the board of
trustees.
Mitchell has attended Beth Da-
vid for the past six years and is in
the eighth grade at Ponce de Leon
Junior High, where he plays viola
in the school orchestra. He has
played baseball and football at the
Coral Gables Youth Center.
The Hipsmans will honor their
son at the Kiddush following the
Saturday ceremony and at a lunch-
eon on Sunday at the Algiers Hotel.

Jonathan Hurwitch
Saturday morning, Feb. 24, Jon-
athan W. Hurwitch of 1360 71st St.,
Miami Beach, son of Mrs. Ann
Hurwitch. will be Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Ner Tamid.
Jonathan is a student at Nau-
tilus Junior High and Ner Tamid
Religious School.
A Kiddush will follow the serv-
ices, and a reception will be held
at Jonathan's home Saturday eve-
ning. His maternal grandfather.
Jacob Silverstein of Miami Beach,
will attend.
Kea-neth Koenig
Kenneth Jay, son of Mr. and
' Sol Kcenig, will become Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Feb. 24. al Tem-
ple Emanu-EI.
Kenneth is in the seventh gi a le
at Nautilus Junior High. He plays
11 umpet.
The celebrant will be honored at
a dinner in his home Saturday
evening Mrs. Molly Rosenzweig,
grandmother, will attend.
-
Robert Lanster
On Saturday. Feb. 24th. at the
8:30 a.m. services. Ri.bert. son of
Dr. and Mrs. Solomon Lanster.
will become Bar Mitzvah at Tem-
ple Or Olom.
Robert is an eighth grade honor
ri'l' student at Palmetto Junior
High and plays the electric guitar.
Among those attending will be
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Lanster. of Brooklyn. N.Y., and
maternal grandmother. Mrs Sarah
.:. ssler, of Ft. Lee. N.J.
Dr. and Mrs. Lanster will host
the Oneg Shabbat following the
Friday ni:;ht services and the Kid-
dush Saturday morning. A recep-
tion-dinner honoring the celebrant
will be held Saturday night at the
Dupont Plaza Hotel.
Germany Faiwrs
Israel Ties With
Common Market
BONN (JTAi Wesl Germany's
Economic Minister. Karl Schiller,
-.-, d h '!'i- w. <'; ih d Germany
sought closer economic ties with
1 .... of four, oul of
i i :. ising the Eu-
opean Co num M irket, thai fa-
with the Europe.,!! economic
munitj.
Mr. Schiller said in a magazine
view that no competitive
"i ib i ms existed I etw en Israel
and West Germany. For that rea-
son, he said. Germany would wel-
come increased imports from Is-
rael and increased exports to that
country, He noted that Israel has
ordered steel pipe from West Ger-
many for the construction of a
pipeline between Eilat on the Red
Sea and Ashdod on the Mediter-
ranean.
Referring to the Common Mar-
ket. Mr. Schiller said that only two
member countries opposed ties
with Israel, though not as a mat-
ter of principle He said that Israel
was seeking an agreement for
preferential treatment and that
Germany and one other member
country favored the application of
general customs preference to Is-
rael.
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(A>



Wail Hesul!>
of New Pledge
Continued from Page 1-A
day. 1 shall not allow any,
supply the enemy with pi
' and .notifications tor aggressi
the King told his people. He
strongly backed by Jordan's Pr
Minister Bahjat Altahuni. who de
dared in a speech that (he Ji
danian Army would end all i
operation with terrorist gangs.
Jordan also reportedly warned
Syria, which provides training
bases for the El Fatah terror-
v ists, not to send :hro"jh Jordan-
ian territory guerrillas bound
for Israel. That warning was is-
' sued by the Jordanian Interior
Minister, Hassan al-Kayed, in an
address at the Jordanian town of
Irbid during a visit to towns hit
in the Fighting.
The Jordanian Minister did no-
mention Syria by name, accordin,
to reports here, but his allusion
was clear. According to Aramar
Radio, he said that the Jordania-
government "will not permit Jor
dan to be used as a passage for the
implementation of designs by those
who, like it-, have borders"
Israel "'but who do not ha.
en mgh courage to bear the re-
sponsibility of the coi'.s^uen, -
Iheir action."
The cease-fire was arrange
through the United States Emba-
sy in Tel Aviv since there ari
United Nations obseners on
Jordan River demarcation lit
Contact with Jordan apparent.;
was established through a neutral
third country, reportedly with I' S
State Department approval fsraei
agreed .only after Jordan under
took to ob.-erve a lota! cessation o:
shooting all along Hie demarcation
line, authoritative military source?
here reported.
Israels'heavy counter-fire fol
lowed pointed warnings from Jen.
salem to Jordan to desist from it-
support of terrorist raids. It was
reported here that warnings wei
passed on to Jordan not onh
through It Gen. Odd Bull, chief of
staff of the I'.N. cease-fire obsen-
ers, bill also through a direct em
issary of Premier l-evi Eshkol The
emissary was reported to lx 3
former Jordanian Cabinet mem-
ber named Mussa Nasser How-
ever, the former Cabinet Minister
declined to comment when he was
asked by the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency about his' reported role.
!*
I
I
.J


Fridcy. February 23. 1968
*lf^h^FhrkHan
Paqe 13-A
rank Sinatra To Accept Award
From Evron
William Sylk
Sparks Work
of Foundation
i i of .America's foremost Jew-
taders< William H. Sylk of
ptaia, i* in Greater Miami
rdinaie Ibe third annual Mid-
. i onlen :><< oi uie ruuei .-
ta li u Development Foun-
Sylk !> national chairman oi
dation. which has funnel-
re than S!>.500.000 to Histad-
rut i.Lii'.nional, welfare and re-
WILLIAM SYLK
Rious institutions in Israel dur-
ing the past six years.
Chairman of the boards of tho
Governor Lawrence Youth Cen-
ter in Israel and of Maimonides
Hospital, he is a member of the
boards of the Allied Jewish Ap-
peal and Ihe American Technion
Society, an officer of the Har
Zion Temple and was one of the
famed Sonneborn team.
istadrut Dinner
Saturday Night Banquet
To Hear Israeli Envoy
rael" Viin'r ,T" SP^9 at Ihe dedication in Is-
rael ol the Fra-k SinCra Inter alioral Youth Cnt^r ii
*cu~*h At hh Wl h Yehoahua Low. W-bSIoSK^
ol His.adr.it. Mr. Smctra contributed S10fJ.rC0 for th* con-
struction of Ih, enter. wh:-h will be r*m*9ted *Hwi
Hot"! ni9h,'S dlnner ta HiS hn0r Qt ,he Fonlainebl9au
Friday Seminar Opens
Mid-Winter Conference
First major event of the Mid-
Winter Conference is scheduled for
Friday (Feb. 23) at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel, with a free seminar
on estate planning and ways in
which charitable giving can bene-
fit both the donor and the State
of Israel.
Principal speakers will be
Conrad Teitell, one of the na-
tion's most noted experts on the
tax aspects of estate p'annina,
and Dr. Sol Stein, international
economist and executive vice
president of the Histadrut Foun-
dation.
Mr. Teitell is editor of Taxwise
Giving, a monthly philanthropic
tax guide, a consultant to tiie Com-
mittee on Taxation and Philan-
thropy of the Ann man College
i'ublic Kelations Association, a
member oi the National Associa-
tion ol College a;;d University At
torneys, and an arbitrator for the
American Arbitration Association.
Mr. Te:tell, a partner in the
New Yo'k law firm of Prerau
and Teitell, also is director of
the Philanthropy Tax Institute
and has advised Histadrut on
setting up its nationwide pro-
gram of annuity and income
funds, insurance programs, wills,
bequests and other legacy forms.
Frank Sinatra will receive his second international award in the
fleld of youth work Feb. 24 when the American Histadrut Develop-
din?,.,- Th and ,heuS'aU' "f ,M:"' honor him a* ;| testimonial
hteJSlEWJ ,S^ChedU,ed ,0 "gin a. 7 p.m. at the Fontaine
mean Hot( I, Miami Beach
The dinner will conclude the third annual Mid-Winter Conference
"f :" H'stadrul Foundation, which was to opn Thursday night with
a reception honoring members o' Ih Xa'ional Wvisory Board of the
Foundation at the Bay Harbor Islands hi me ol Mr. and Mrs Lou Poller
Mr Sinatra received Ihe Com-
mandeur de la Santa Publique from
the French government in 1085.
He is the first non-French citizen
:o be awarded the honor which he
received for his work in France
with social welfare organizations
dedicated to helping children.
He will receive the coveted.
:"fernat!on| H'stadrut Medal of
Honor at the Miami Beach ban-
quet on the occasion of the con-
secration of the Frank Sinatra
International Youth Center in
Nazareth, Israel. Mr. Sinatra's
gift of $100,000 soarked the suc-
cessful effort to build the youth
center, which serves youngsters
of all faiths, in the historic Is-
rael city.
Jacob Itifkin
Heads Local
Committee
Jacob Kifkin. chairman of the
South Florida Council for Medical
Service and Vocational Training
in Israel, is serving as Florida
chairman tor the third annual Mid-
Winter Conference of the Histadrut
Foundation.
Lou Poller, associate national
treasurer ol the National Advis-
ory Board of the Foundation, is
CONRAD TEITELL
Projects for the Israel Histadrut
Campaign launched under his lead-
is.i.p nave included the American
fl tadrui Development Founda-
tion, whose first chairman was
,!.S. Supreme Cuurt Justice Arthur
I. Goldberg.
Memoirs of the executive com-
mittee include Maurice Guins-
berg, Abraham Rovinsky, M?nc*l
Rothman, Abraham Grunhut,
Morris Lame, Samuel Zitner,
Aaron Shriro, Morris Lifton,
Leonard Rosen and Irving War-
shawsky.
The Histadrut Medal of Honor
will be presented to Mr. Sinatra
by His Excellency, Ephraim Ev-
ron, Minister Plenipotentiary from
the State of Israel to the United
States. The gifted and eloquent :
statesman and spokesman for his '
people is flying to Miami Beach
from Washington, D.C.. expressly
for the testimonial dinner to Mr.
Sinatra.
The American Histadrut Develop-
ment Foundation supports, through
a program of annuity funds, wills
and bequests, the long-range edu-
cational, cultural, religious, medi-
cal and welfare services of Histad-
rut in Israel. More than 1.000,000
Israelis Jews, Christians, Mos-
lems and other faiths belong to
Histadrut, the General Federation
of Labor in Israel, which furnishes
more than 80 per cent of the medi
cal care for the people of Israel.
Academy Award winner Sina-
tra, who is to begin filming a
sequel to the successful motion
picture, "Tony Rome," in Miami
Beach Feb. 26, is a member of
the board of directors of Warner
BrothersSeven Arts Records,
Inc., and in 1965 founded a jet
aircraft charrerir-j service.
Top-Level Committee Works
To Insure Conclave Success
JACOB RIFKIN
chairman of Saturday night's
dinner honoring Frank Sinatra,
and Dr. Leon Kronish, rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom, is honorary
chairman of both the conclave
and the dinner.
Dr. Kronish also is a national
vice president of Histadrut, chair-
man of the Greater Miami Com-
mittee for Israel Bonds, national
vice president of the American
Jewish Congress and a top na-
tional leader of the Reform Jewish
1 and
jtgani-
Working with the chairmen of the
Mid Winter Conference arc com-
mittees comprising some of the
foremost leaders of Greater Miami,
American and Canadian Jewry.
Steering committee members in-
clude Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ash,
Mrs. Ida Cooper, Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. Mor
ris Cooper, Mr. Louis Decoveny.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie Dickstein, Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Dubowy. Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Eistenstein, Mr. Sam-
uel Elman, Mrs. Frances Entine,
Mrs. Sam Felnstein,
Mr. and Mrs Abraham Filosof,
Mr. and Mrs. David Freedman, Mr.
and Mrs. Mayshic Friedberg. Mr
and Mrs. Bernhard Friedman.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Galfond, Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Gaiter, Mr. Jo-
seph Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs. David
Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. Max Hecht.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Honigbaum,
Mr. and Mrs. Kalmon Jablon.
Mr. and Mrs Bernard Katz. Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Krantz, Mr. and
Mrs. Sol Krival, Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Kuluva, Mr. and Mrs. I. Leder-
man. Mr. and Mrs. David Matanky,
Mrs. Kate Meidenberg, Mr. Ben-
jamin Meyers, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
N'e-hkin, Mrs. Anna Newmark,
Mrs. Leah Notkin, Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Packar. Mr. Joseph Rabin,
j Mrs. Sonia Bobbins, Mr and Mrs.
.wax Rosen, Mrs. Anna Rovinsky,
: Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schacter,
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Schwartz,
Mr. Alick Silveistein. Dr. and Mrs.
Nathaniel Soroff. Mr. and Mrs.
j Joshua Z. Stadlan, Mr. and Mrs.
Philip Thau, Dr. and Mrs. Isaac
Unterman, Dr. and Mrs. Simon Wi-
Itnsky, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Wolk,
Mr and Mrs. Sander Wolson.
7
LILLIAN GOODMAN
Appeal, United Jewish
numerous other com
zations.
Bernard H. Bloomne1
dian chairman of the c,o
and Samuel J. Lefrak
of the. National Advisor.
Strving as c
chairmen are Jack S.
vice (president of the
Friends of the Hi-raw Oniver
ity; Moe Levin, presWetif of the
Israel Histadrut Committee of
Greater Miami; and Miaat Lillian
Goodman, chairman, (women's
diviiicn ef Histadrut.
Morris Newmark is treasurer
and Sam Lachman is secretary of
the conference. Leonard Zilbert is
program chairman and Judge Her-
bert S. Shapiro and Dr. Anna Bren-
ner Meyers are cochairmen of the
Foundation's legal committee for
Florida.
Mrs. Elsie Bonem and Mrs. Tru-
dy Hamerschlag are cochairmen
of the arrangements committee.


Paqe 14-A
9> frtvitf nortdiftn
Friday. February 23. 1968

.
U. S. Confirms Anti-Jewish Bias
Charges Among Top Executives
WASHINGTON (JTA) Dis-
crimination against .lows at man-
agement levels of business and
industry and their exclusion from
the "executive suite" of giant cor-
porations were confirmed in a sur-
vey made public this week by the
United States Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission. The com-
mission, under the chairmanship of
Clifford L. Alexander. Jr.. opened
hearings in New York on discrim-
ination in employment affecting
Jews
A summary of the Commission's
report on aspects of white-collar
bias affecting Jews revealed that
"under utilization of .lews at the
management level apparently ex-
ists throughout New York indus-
try." The report asserted that "the
representation of lews among cor-
porate executives contrasts sharp-
ly with their educational level and
share of the city's population." It
was noted that .lews represent ap-
proximately 25 percent of New
York's population, and 50 percent
ol its college graduates. The Com-
mission cited an Anti-Defamation
League report and other studii s
that revealed that major corpora-
tions employed only 4 5 to 8.9 per-
cent Jews among corporation of-
ficers.
A 1967 list of officers available
for 91 ot the 100 major corpora-
tions considered in the hearings
showed 8.9 percent Jews. This pat-
tern was confirmed by Dr. Philip
Harris, of the Baruch School of the
City College of Now York. He
studied six huge companies with
headquarters in New York, and
found only 198 Jews among 2.216
executivesor 8.9 percent.
The Commission maintained that
imder-rcprcsontation of Jews at the
executive level is a national as
well as city-wide pattern. Study of
the insurance industry in Hartford.
Conn., where Jews represent an
estimated 10 percent of the total
population, showed only 1.2 per-
cent Jews among the executives of
10 major companies.
Among the three largest auto
manufacturers in Detroit, where
the Jewish population is about
3 perrent, only two-thirds of ons
percent ef white-collar employ-
ees at all levels were identified
as Jews. Fourteen major ship-
ping lines nationwide had 0.9
percent Jewish officers.
According to the Commission,
the extremely limited participation
ol Jews in industry management
cannot be explained by Jewish ca-
reer preference but must be laid
primarily to employer attitudes and
practices. Studies at Harvard and
Cornell showed little distinction
between the goals of Jewish and
non-Jewish students. But both the
Harvard research and a study at
the University of Michigan uncov-
xed attitudes held by recruiters
and personnel staff which reflect
ed and influenced company hiring
ind promotion ol Jewish candi-
dates. The companies sought to
"minimize risk" by seeking con-
formist candidates with "undis-
tinctive" social characteristics
Jewish representation was stud-
ied in utility businesses, banking,
insurance, transportation, oil, elec-
tronic securities, and other cor-
porate structures. An ADI. stud)
showed fewest Jews in oil and
most in the securities firms. The
Commission made note ol the fact
'hat. in using findings obtained by
"surname recognition" as incor-
porated into the ADI. stud) the
government did not endorse tIn-
validity of this method. But "by
h" same token, w have i"> reason
to believe that the method pro-
duces data that are grossly dis-
crepant fiom the true state of af-
fairs," the Commission said.
Reference was made by the Com-
mission also to the American Jew-
ish Committee studies on banks
that found only 1.3 percent of bank
officers to be Jewish. Discrepan-
cies between various ADL and
AJC studies were cited by the gov-
ernment to show the difficulty of
compiling statistics on ariti-Semi-
lism. Yet the main point was ac-
cepted that the number ot Jews in
the banking business, for instance,
was far smaller than their per-
centage in the population. The
Commission cited studies indicat-
thal "although Jews share the
same career goals as non-Jews,
n... encounter employer attitudes
thai prevent the fulfillment of these
goals. The under-utilizatlon ol Jews
it a reflection of this encounter."
rAsr aaRflb
tACEUTJCAt
lOCirVTION
The Southeast Florida Pharmaceutical Association joined
with the Heart Association of Greater Miami this week in a
symposium on "Heart Disease and the Pharmacist." Seated
(from left) are the three panel members: Dr. lack Green-
berg, thoracic surgeon; Dr. Martin S. Belle, past presiden*
of the Miami Heart Association; and Dr. Frank Hildner,
cardiologist. Standing (from left; are: Ben Saks, secretary-
manager of the pharmaceutical group; Mrs. Svlvia Bowes,
program director of the Heart Association; and Sidney Simko-
witz, president of the pharmaceutical association.
This Summer give your child the
1By
tk
GOOD LIFE at
CAMP HiLI
"Experience Counts'
WHITE LAKE, N.Y.
.*<"*?.
i -; ',-'// V BOYS and GIRLS, 5-16
In the heart of the Catskills on beautiful White Lake and
Amber Lake, offering the ultimate in good camping. All land
and water sports. Arts & crafts, music, dramatics under the
supervision of a dedicated and mature staff. Special instruc-
tion in SCUBA water skiing and sailing. Unique teenage
leadership program. Comprehensive Hebrew Studies program.
Strictest Kashrutn standards. Resident medical staff.
Attended by children from 'JO yeshivos in U.S.A, Canada
and South America.
HILI a way of Life
Owned and operated by
HEBREW INSTITUTE OF LONG ISLAND
1742 Seagirt Blvd. Far Rockaway, N.Y, <212) FA 7-5O0
Rabbi Jacob I. Nislick, Exec. Dir.
Illustrative material sent on request
1 -? |
Lt. Comm. Richard Kanner (right), son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Kanner of Miami Beach is shown talking with S^m
Samuels, national commander of Die Jewish War Veterans,
during the latter'.--, recent visit to Viet Nam. Dr. Kanner is
serving as an internist with the U. S. Navy.
Bond Conference Will
Plan For Third Decade
s
'Y' Expai
Its Suniinei
Programs
The Y.M-YWHA of Greater Mi-
ami announced plans this week for
expanded summer programs de-
si) ned to meet the growing needs
oi all ages.
Paul Faske. president of the Y.
said there will he five Summer
Day Camp programs for children
under 12 as well as special Junior
and Senior High programs geared
to the individual ace groups. De-
tails of the programs are being
completed by the Summer ("amp
Committee under the chairman-
ship of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mai-
lah. who are well known for their
active roles in the Jewish and gen-
eral community.
The camping program at the Y
is under the supervision of Ira
Steinmetz. program director of
[he YM YWHA of Greater Miami.
who is a former owner and direc-
tor of a camp. He has also con-
ducted day camp programs at the
V for several years.
Mr. Steinmetz said the program
for the individual camps "will be
designed to enhance the develop-
ment of each child through guided
group experiences. In addition to
the regular athletic programs of
swimming, basketball and tennis,
the cultural aspects of American
Jewish life will be instilled. All
campers will be assigned to groups
on their own age and school level."
All programs during the summer
' will be conducted at the Central
branch (8500 SW 8th St ) because
of the suitable physical facilities
covering 20 acres and its central-
ized location to all MiamiNorth
Dade and Miami Beach.
Special programs for adult ac-
tivities during the summer are
also being planned and will pro-
vide a series of events and activi-
ties for men and women who look
to the Y as a center and meeting
place for recreational, social and
cultural attainment.
Transportation will be provided
for the Day Camp sessions.
Continued from Page 1-A
on the strength and stability ol Its
economj."
Dr. Schwartz reported thai activ-
ity in preparation for the Inaugu-
iai Conierence is moving at an
extraordinary level in scores ol
cities throughout the country and
in Canada Delegations from vari-
ous com in unities now in Miami
nave already arranged pace setting
[/re-Conference sale- meetings, he
said.
Direction of both pre-Conterence
and Conierence activity is in the
hands of a committee of foremost
communal leaders, chaired by
Samuel Hothberg of I'eoria. 111.,
national campaign chairman of Is-
rael Bonds, and Louis H. Bovar of
1 os Angeles, chairman oi Na-
tional Hoard ol Governors
The ripening session of th Con-
ference Will be devoted tj the
launching of the National Women's
Division campaign, which will take
the form of the world premiere of
'he 1068 all-Israel Fashion Show
on Thursday, Feb. 29. under the
chairmanship of Mrs. Jan Peerre.
national chairman of the Women -
Division.
JWV Auxiliary Games Party
Mrs Jennie C.errig is chairing
the games party sponsored by the
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary.
Miami Beach, at the Washington
Federal. 1234 Washington Ave.. on
Sunday. March 3 at 7:30 p m Pro
ceeds will go towards aid to the
Tel Hashomen Hospital in Tel Aviv.
CAMP JUDAEA
HENDERSONVILIE, N.C.
IN THE PICJURISQUI Bll/f RIDGE MOUNTAINS
Our 15th Season
Co-ed 3rd thru 10th Grodes
All OF THE USUAL CAMPING ACTIVITIES INCLUDING FULL
: Swimming Program -:- Canoeing -:- Sports -: Arts and Craft* -:-
:- Folk Dance and Singing :- Trip-outs : Tenting, Etc. -:
PLUS FEATURE Unique Program of Dynamic )ewith living
Jewish Culture Heritage and the Spirit of Israel Stressed
Dietary laws Observed
Once Again Specially Chosen Delegates of the Israeli Scouts will
Participate tor the Entire Season. Limited to 220 Cumpers.
FIRST SESSION JUNE 25th JULY 22
SECOND SESSION JULY 25th AUG. 21
FULL SEASON JUNE 25th AUG. 21
$290 TOTAL
$290 TOTAL
$545 TOTAL
Information Locally Phone Roy Joseph at 758-8688
or Write 50 WHITEHALL ST., S.W., ATLANTA, GA. 30303
FRANK FARBENBLOOM, Director
Theatre Party Fund Raiser
For Children's Dental Clinic
Alpha Omega Dental Auxiliary
i- planning a theatre party for its
annual fund raising affair which
benefits the dental clinic at Variety
Children's Hospital.
To be held on Wednesday. March
6. at the Coconut Grove Playhouse,
the evening will feature a per-
formance of "Lock Up Your
Daughters" starring Cyril Ritch-
ard. ,
Harder Hall Golf-Tennis
(amp For Teem [Co-Ed]
On beautiful Rex Beach Lake in the rolling lake-ridg?
country of Florida's Central Highlands A superior summer
camp program at Florida's First Golf Resort 18- hole
Championship Course Individual coaching in golf, tenns
and water sports by top Pros Pool and lake swimming
Water skiing Sailing Driver Training Fishing
Trips Overnight camp-outs Socials Discotheque
Academic tutoring available.
8 WEEKS: July 1 st to Aug. 25th 6 WEEKS; July 1 st to Aug f 1 th
4 WEEKS: 1st Session July 1st to July 28
2nd Session July 28 to August 25th
CAMP DIRECTORS: BEN ROMAN, A. RIFKIN
For Brochure and Particulars write: S. T. Giffard
Harder Hall Golf-Tennis Camp
Sebring, Fit. call collect 813-385-0151


Pride-;. Tebr-zr; 23,
1968
* ImlsiiflnrtdUaun
Paqe 15-A
PAVILION FOR THE AGED
JEWISH CONVALESCENT HOME DEDICATES NEW BUILDING
CEREMONIES MARK
OFFICIAL DEDICATION
The "'.v- h < valescent Home of S<'.!! Flori
%\ [ ially dedicd its modern new loo bed '.-.. i:v,
jMari are! & Abe < Fine Nursing Pavi ioi i -
ternoon, Jai kh, at 2 P.M
] ted euesi as well as the general pub u
symholit eremonies as Miami Bead '
:., iall. omi d the cit\ 's newest ai In r
;eriatric care institution. On hand to win es<
veiling (if a br >nze plaque comn ei
were Mr. and VIrs Abe C Fine, in
ding has been named
Following the fl ial ceremonies .: tests wtr
qmded tours throughout the three stor\ uu
members of the Home's Women s Auxi \ She:
Hour followed the dedication.
Residents of the community supported kosl er ii ti
have actually been living in their new hon t : !
High Holy Days in late September Although fu
touches had not been put on all of :: t pu
that time, rhe residents were eager to celebrar< -
portant religious occasion in then new private ch,
the building's premises.
SARAH-KEISER
IN SIXTH TERM OF
HOME PRESIDENCY
A tinv. ever busy woman with
a read) smile ai I .i < row n ol
snow white hair, happily admits
that "her dream has come
true!" Mrs. i ph E Keis-
er .. Sarah, t i ll tude i f
friends I i kers began
dream i< a m Jem,
rquipmi t-fill iome tor t!ic
needy aped
sears agi Six years ago si ri
pan hi first term as pri lent
<>t the : jiii.j. I onva-
:
or Bifc > holim, as it is oil
I*'v,,ir i ijm ii ins 'vi
sick", and Sarah Keisei and the
dedicate d womi ol I 11 Ladies
Auxiliai practi I w hat they
priml visited
ilic f j: nts in the
llomi s first I- i Iquarcers, they
held luncheons, told raffles,
dunes A':, with "tie thought in
mind, i'o someday raise
enough funds id build a mod-
ern, Well equipped home for
the indigent and the aged.
I'nder S. :^li Keiser's leadership
and dn g spin' the dream be-
:i
>\H\!I KhISI II
.-

i i .. ,
'
raisn ind

to learn il
work 3
fund grew wil
spec !
When tin .-,:,
mure n ts made the s
trip tr.'.-!< their antiquated old
building i" their bnj
cheeel I ew struci re on a
sunns afternoon earh this fall,
Sarah Keisei was stai
the doorwa) to w i
home'" The distance >js only
a lew feet, but th<- tr ;
been a lone one "i -
PAVILION FOR THE AGED
RECENTLY ACTIVATED
former Home was completely refurbished and the
Homo is now accepting custodial patients on a permanent
baas. Applications are available at administrative offices.
y*.
MARGARET & ABE C. FINE NURSING
PAVILION IS MODERN 100 BED FACILITY
The new nursinc pavilion ol the lewish Convalescent M. -
represents the Ial bci ati i nr< n It I
tii I t and equipi I w. the h
patioi inics. Pi
,. mem ealth clinic, a
. ...
mp'ete laboratoi
..... ten ed and n to pro-
room is
- \ meat stint aco nee
i
COUPLE DEDICATED T3
CARE OF THE >SE0
\l'l. MVKt.XHK'l
IIM PINK
STiFF OF BIKUR CHOUM
WELL QUALIFIED
'i Id of peria-
new nursing
i .\ lewish Conva-
nf 11 r N'Uth Florida,
un I )irector t<
.;. Sidnei Sit-
Ass '.' tiit-l Jacobson
... !': '. M been .is-
For the
'' list .ne of
r the super-
. \ urSCS, Jc'S
Me Thrashc-i
K\ I I Kl"|. .., Ml II DIM.
IHMM. KOOM
KKMIIKM ROUM
:ONGRATULATIONS TO THE JEWISH CONVALESCENT
HOME OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Sponsor:*:
Thrifty S g*r Market
Continent': 4'nffpr i'o.
Home Milk to.
[Norman Mend-l.-on It Sons
iCravitt & Kaha Insuraaee
^ i-llov. t ;.!> O.
ken- :.\m;. V.O.
Florida Medical SperN
Corre) IK.lribulon.-B.-!."!!, Mass.
General Mica <'
Lumber Yard Inc.
Kduard lion Co.
t rntral Hardware
*.niii.it s f i-h I .i>,
Siuthpitc Drug*
r !.i 1'lis -i. i;.n- I o.
A-....:.;. .1 I'hulugraphrn
an
:
.

n
to :

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LOOKS FORWARD
TO 'NEW HORIZONS" FOR AGED
-
.. the p
(.'.,i
-
. .
. ,
shinei:t thai
a old .-' '
..
-

die vcai 11
duties .
lit it I '. t is a
\s.
lit li < ........-
to
n
lions i
i F s oil '. :
1 .i.: i
. istrators
( holim i
it ra "
\i V i
Or.r hi V u Vttcr.
Mi ,i\ SIEGEL
r>!tais and a: as ant
.-... the Bruok-
rc m< :or the
. threi ears
cressive in his
tel IS noi i .'ntent
. and !>>. j: the
beautiful new bin'.
ai ;s mission as fin-
\\ i im:>[ continue to
.i out i ."- ol the aged.
t is ... tmualh pros
. .s mi ans ol ma
health'.
:. The Cood ,'"i
r '.' : Beai h must be com-
:. .r then ss i hearted
. i this .. ni ept \\
jupport, a
. .i- i- ot:- vAh re ''
, : ;. i res 3c i ts are i
. un welfare
<.s,>(.
DIRECTOR OF NURSES
JfcSSIE IIIKVSIIKK
n i I Sen ioi
! .Ill I Bi.....
. '*>*. t e'tft
Of s > t
. [>'
I
\t *. *t'h
I' P1'
||
tie
Alia i.
i
I I '. :. I'eiH.
\ H
^ [ Ul|T
Taid A.iv.


Page 18-A
*Jmrimt OpridKar
Fridav, February 23, 19c
The Israel Bond Organization is Happy to A that
The Han. HyBEiT H. HUMPHREY
Vice President of the United States
Gen. iTZHAK RABIN
Newly Appointed Ambassador ot the State of Israel
Will Be the Guests of Honor at
THE 1968 INTERNATIONAL INAUGURAL DINNER
Saturday Evening, March 2nd at 7:30 P.M. at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach
Musical Program: REGINA RESNIK of the Metropolitan Opera

Conference Chairmen
Louis H. Boyar Samuel Rothberg
Co-Chairmen
Max Abrams Leonard Goldfine
Jacob M. Arvey Ira Guilden
Morris W. Berinstein D. Lou Harris
Abraham Feinberg Lawrence G. Laskey
Joseph J. Schwartz
ISRAEL INAUGURAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
Barcelona Hotel 43rd Street and Collins Avenue
Telephone JE 4-8201
V


efewisli Floridian
Miair.i, Florida. Friday, February 23, 1968
Section B
Leaders Featured In Reform Events
Leaden of the Reform Move-
men! will climax a week of activi-
ties in Greater Miami with "An
Evening With Reform Judaism"
Sunday at 8 p.m. in Temple Beth
Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave., Miami
Beach.
Dr Maurice Eisendrath, presi-
dent of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, will make
a report on his 22-day mission for
peace. The UAHC leader was co-
chairman of a delegation of Prot-
estant, Catholic and Jewish clergy-
men which circled the globe in
January to promote the cause of
peace.
A special musical concert fea-
turing four Reform cantors will be
spotlighted at the Sunday night
program, which is free and open
to the general public with tickets
available at all Reform congrega-
tions.
Dr. Nelson Glueck, president of
the Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion, and Dr. Kis-
endrath met during the week with
numerous groups of local and na-
tional Reform leaders.
A series of pulpit exchanges Fri-
day night will highlight Reform
Jewish Appeal Sabbath The R.IA
is currently engaged in a nation-
wide campaign to raise $5,000,000 a
for the UAHC and the HUC-JIR.
Dr. Eisendrath is speaking Fri-
day night at Temple Israel. Dr.
Alexander Schindler, national vice
president of the UAHC. will share
the pulpit at Temple Judea in
Coral Cables.
Earl Morse, chairman of the
board of trustees of the UAHC.
will speak at Temple Beth Am.
Mr. Morse is chairman of a meet-
ing of the executive committee of
the Union board, slated Sunday at
the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Chairman of a host committee
is James Albert of Miami Beach,
president of the South Florida Fed-
eration of the UAHC and a past
president of Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin. regional
director of the UAHC. and H. G.
Rossman, regional director of the
R.IA. are working with Mr. Morse
and Mr. Albert to coordinate ac-
tivities.
ANo in town for the Reform
meetings is Chaim Friend of New
York, executive vice chairman of
the Reform Jewish Appeal.
Other leaders here for the con-
clave include Judge Emil Nathan-
iel Barr of New York, who became
member of the Supreme Court
of New York State in 1951; S. L.
Kopald, Jr.. of Memphis, board
chairman of the HUC-JIR; and
Harold W Dubinsky of St. Louis,
honorary life president of the Jew-
ish Chautauqua Society and of the
National Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods.
Rabbi Porush Is
Formality Installed
By Young Israel
Rabbi Naftali Porush was for-
mally installed as spiritual leadc
of Young Israel of Greater Miami
at a dinner marking the North
Miami Beach synagogue's tenth
anniversary.
Moses Honig, honorary president
of the National Council of Young
Israel, formally installed Rabbi
Porush at the celebration which
was addressed by Rabbi Sherwin
Stauber and by Emanuel Ungar,
president of the congregation.
Arthur Weingarten was chair
man of the e\ent and Samuel Rein-
hard served as cochairman.
Dr. Bernard Mandelbaum,
president of the Jewish Theo-
loqical Seminary of America,
will deliver the final lecture
in the Breakfast Forum of
Temple Emanu-El's adult ed-
ucation proqiam at 10:30
a.m., Sunday in the temple
Auditorium.
Tifereth Jacob
Birthday Dinner
Saturday. March 2. Temple Tifer-
eth Jacob. 951 E 4th Ave.. Hialeah.
is celebrating its 19th anniversarj
with a dinner dance honoring past
presidents of the temple. Sister-
hood and Men's Club at a candle-
lighting ceremony.
Cocktails at 7:30 p.m. will pre-
cede dinner. Mrs Charles Kirsch
is in charge of reservations.
Beth Sholom Plans
Reyiew of Novel
Dr. I.'on Kronish, spiritual lead-
er ol Temple Be;h Sholom. will re-
view, "Michel. Michel.'' current
best-selling novel by Robert Lewis
at the temple auditorium Monday
at 8:15 p.m.
"Social Problems and the Courts"
will be the subject of discussion a',
the regular monthly breakfast of
the Brotherhood Sunday at 10:30
a.m. in the temple auditorium
James S. Knopke is president of
the Brotherhood, and Aaron Farr
is Brotherhood program chairman.
Assistant State Attorney Morton
Lee Perry will speak on "Rackets
and Fraud." Alfonso C. Sepe; exec
utive assistant State Attorney, will
speak on "Narcotics." and Judge
j Milton A.Friedman, former senior
i judge of Miami District Court, will
I handle the problem of "Alco
holism."
Jack Block Is New
So. Miami Mayor
Campaigning on "sincerity in
government and keeping South
Miami a residential community ."
Jack Block upset incumbent Clyde
Taylor in last Tuesday's election
to become South Miami's mayor
for the next two years.
A former South Miami council-
man. Bl >ck said, "1 think there's
been a mandate by the people ti
keep h:-gh rise apartment develop-
ments from encroaching on resi-
dential neighborhoods."
Fleet.'d to the council were K
Holly, an accountant, and incum-
bent Ed Corley. The) will serve
tour year terms.
A
ID I IsT
\n,v)lv.,y.
.\. Save 40%
STATUS CASHMERES
citrditwn si
pmiloverst
17.99 to 26.99
Reg. $30 to $45 Cardigans and pull-
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Turtlenecks, gold-button trims!
Fashion Colors 36-40.
isses' sportwear. third floor
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Bl .!! 7 Burdine's stores
i
Ws a culoUe ... it's a shii'i
... it's a great new
paf-ttlrvas
6.90
Looks like a shift goes where a shift goes
... but has versatility of pants. Ail cotton
pantdress with new flip skirt and scoop neck.
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dramatic polka dots. Misses sizes 8-16.
budget sportswear, second floor
DOWNTOWN MIAMI (at all 7 Burdmes stores)


Page 2-B
lv*ist NtrSdHairi
Friday, February 23. 196'
New Morality' to be Discussion Topic
At Institute f Qr Public School Teachers.
The N'ew Morality* will be the
subject of diwiusioo at the eighth
annual institute luncheon for Pub-
lic School Teachers Saturday at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom.
Guest speaker will be Dr. Harold
Weisber^. professor of philosophy
at Brandeis University, and until
recently. Dean of its Graduate
School. Dr. Weisberg has contrib-
uted many articles to leading peri-
odicals and journals; he is the
Editor ot Studies in the History of
Philosophy series published by
Bobbs-MerrUI and is completing
work on a book of philosophy of
religion tentatively entitled "'The
Decline and Fall of Religious Be-
liefs."
Discussants on the program will
be Dr. Samuel Fekunan, poycnoio-
gist, and Mrs. Charles Finkelstein
ot the Channel 2 weekly program.
"Woman's v
Dr. Peldman is former chief psy-
chologist at the Dade County Juve-
nile Court's Psychiatric Clinic; ex-
ecutive board member of the Dade
County Mental Health Association:
Clinical Professor at Miami-Dade
Junior College, member of the Na- j
tional Medical Correctional Asso- ;
ciation. as well as a director of
the Florida Gardens Children's
Center in Hollywood, Fla.
Mrs. Finkelstein is the immedi-
ate past president of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the American
Jewish Committee and is a mem-
ber of the board and chairman of
its program committee. She is past
chairman and now a member of
the Women's Guild of the Univer-
sity of Miami; treasurer of the
Welfare Planning Council, and a
member of the board of YWCA.
Guests of honor at this annual
?unction, sponsored by the Board
of Education of Temple Beth Sho-
lom and its Sisterhood, will be
members of the public schools of
Miami Beach and North Miami
Beach, as well as member ot the
administrative staff and the School
Board.
Cochairmen are Mr;. Harry B.
Smith and Mrs. Paul Rosen, both
active in PTA work.
The original committee which
planned the function: Richard 0.
Roberts, Northeast District Super-
intendent: John Earle. director of
secondary schools. Northeast Dis-
trict: Miss Eleanor Fienherg. ele-
mentary school director. Dade
County School System: Marjorie
F Plummer. director of elemen-
tary education, Northeast District:
Mr- Harriet L. Bannon. principal.
Treasure Island Elementary: Dr.
Francis Haas, principal. North Mi-
ami Junior High: Mrs. Selma T.
Hayden. principal. Bay Harbor
Elementary: Martin Kavanaugh.
principal. Ida Fisher Junior High:
Dr. Salomon Lichter, principal.
Miami Beach Senior High: Ber-
nard Nissman, principal. LeroyD.
Fienberg Elementary: Miss Ro-
berta Reid. principal. Natural
Bridge Elementary: A'.do A. Sim-
mons, principal. North Miami
Beach Elementary: Robert R
Spink, principal. William Jennings
Bryan Elementary: Stuart D.
Wooley. principal. Nautilus Junior
High
And from Beth Sholom: Dr. Leon
Kronish. Rabbi Daniel Franzel.
Workmen's Circle School and Branches
Plan March Games, Lectures, Concert
HAROLD WUSBtRG
Cantor David COiivlser, Felix P.
. itional direct
Mrs. Milton S. Malakoff leeutive
secretary: Mrs. Irving B Kaplan.
nan. board o. i in: Mrs.
Seymour SHverman. pr, sident ol
Sisterhood: Mrs. Star.: > Levinson.
and Mrs. Walter I.,' Sister-
hood vice presidents
THE LOCUST, the insect most
often referred to in the Bible, is
called bv nine different names in
the Old Testament
Club Everglades, Branch 105.
the Workmen Circle, is having a-
Games Nite at the Coral Gables
Federal. 2501 Ponce de Leon Blvd..
IMesdav evening, March 5. Tradi-
tional Purim refreshments will be
served
Dr. Samuel Portnoy, chairman,
department of history, Florida At-
lantic University, will lecture on
The Biography of Vladimir Me-
dem" at the Lyceum. 1545 SW 3rd
St., Tuesday March 12. at 8 p.m.,
sponsored by the culture group of
the I. L. Peretz Workmen'.- Circle
School. Max Gleiberman, instruc-
tor at the school, will lead a com-
munity sin.: and Mrs. Molly Ru-
benstein will serve as hostess.
The I. L. PeretZ Workmen's Cir-
cli school of Greater Miami, in
celebratii n oi the 50th anniversary
of the establishment of the first
Yiddish scnool in New York, will
have a concert Thursday. March?.
at 8 pm at Miami Beach Senior
High School. Sidor Belarsky. lead-
ing basso, will be guest artist, with
the Children's Chorus ol the ,-chool.
and the Workmen's Circle Chorus
offering several selections.
Worth Shore
( httpter
of
MIAMI BEACH
B'nai
B'rith
Extends Greetings
fa the
STATI OF ISRAEL
on Hi 20th Anniversary
GRAND OPENING

DISCOUNT
STORE
FOR
BETTER
DRESSES
COUTURE
Outlet
Shop
2110 Poice deLeon Blvd.
446-3665
TALMUDIC SEMINAR
OF THE AIR
"Daf Hashovua"
For ths 14th Csjisectt.e Year
Miarn- JcT/ry wil. 1/SM ire cpaor
tunity cf learning a page ot the
Teiimi;', t.-enstoted tind trained
bv
Rabbi P.'nchas M. leitz
Schol-r zri Fumo'is Authority
On tfi Inimui
Rotlr; ot tliialie'h md
Dear. .' MMrfta of New Jersey
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puce chandeliers start be o.v :.n-s oc Sft
VVnen you come in ta'r,e yout I me a^d 'eafty looK
around Touch things turn hgtffl on and O* Talk le
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Fridcy Fbhtory 23, 19G8
^Jewish noridian
Paqe J-B
ZOA President Due Here Next Week
Jacques Torczyner, national
pre-kit.it of the Zionist Organiza-
tion o' America, will come to Mi-
ami Etach to address the annual
ZOA I-rael Bond Breakfast Friday
morning. March 1. at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel.
II' ill report at the special
Zioni". function, which is part of
the Inaugural Bond Conference,
on hi- recent tact-finding mission
to Israel.
Mr Torczyner, who was reelect-
ed national president of the ZOA
at it- 70th Jubilee Convention held
in Isrirl last summer, is a native
of Brussels and a resident of New
York
At :.-e Friday morning break-
fast be will urge ZOA local and
national leaders and members to
Increase Israel Bond purchases
and t( intensity their efforts on
Israeli Art Show
At Emanu-EI From
March 3 to 17
An Israeli Art Festival" will
1" U red a the new assembly
hall Temple Bmanu-El from
Mar to IT.
Mrs Harold .1 Rrooks is gen-
eral irman of the festival and
comn c chairmen include: Mrs.
Emil irton, who hosted a tea at
her i.' e for committee members,
chain n ol special events; Mrs.
A. I. ickman, patron of the arts:
Mrs. I-. i Essen. Mrs. Alex Kosan.
hnsti.....: Mrs. Sam l.uby Jr., pre-
miere mowing; Mrs. Louis Glas-
scr, | icity: Mrs. Seymour L. Al-
terma: children's division.
behalf of Israel Bond sales in the
United States.
During his stay in Miami Beach.
Mr. Torczyner will be honored by
the South Florida ZOA leadership
with a reception Thursday eve-
ning. Feb. 29, at which time he
Will discuss with the local Zionists
the important issues confronting
the State of Israel and the Zionist
movement.
Sunday afternoon, the national
ZOA leaders who will be in Miami
Beach, will honor Mr. Torczyner
at the Fontainebleau Hotel with a
cocktail reception.
Members and leaders of the 47
districts of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America located in the
seven-state Southeast Region will
meet in Miami Beach at their first
Board of Governors meeting of the
new year on Sunday, March 3. To
start at 9:30 a.m. at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel, the meeting will be
highlighted by a special luncheon
at 12:30. also at the Fontainebleau.
Rabbi David Shapiro, president
of the Southeast Region, has an-
nounced that the agenda for the
meeting which will be open to the
Zionist leadership of South Flor-
ida, will cover important issues
concerning the ZOA program and
projects.
One of the important topics to
lie discussed in addition to in-
creased membership, support of Is-
rael's projects and increased Ali-
>ah and investments in Israel,will
be the new ZOA Youth program
which is geared for young adults
from 18 to 35.
A large delegation of ZOA lead
ers from the major southern com-
munities are expected to attend
Lester Hersch, of Nashville,
Tenn.. chairman of the Board of
Governors, will preside at the busi-
ness session.
.YotVff Israeli liiisl
ZVI RAPHAEL!
ONE-MAN SHOWING
Sunday, February 25 2 p.m. 10 p.
Forte-Towers North Auditorium
1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach
PUBLIC INVITED
sponsored by:
Women of Oholei Torah School
1536 Bay Road, Miami Beach
The Officers, Directors and Students
of the
HEBREW ACADEMY
OF GREATER MIAMI
mourn the passing of their
beloved Friend and Founder
SAM
SCHWARTZ
Of Blessed Memory
A Dynamic individual whose high
goals and womlerful deeds have left their
mark on our community and shall be a
loving monument to his industrious
and altruistic life.
May the almighty grant his loved ones
strength aud courage to hear their great loss.
LEONARD ROSEN
Chairman of th Board
RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSS
Principal
SAUL M. ZABEL
Executive Director
Miami Delegation To Attend Tel Aviv
Convocation Of JWV Executive Body
James Stern, commander of the
Department of Florida of the Jew-
ish War Veterans, will head a dele
j gation from the Greater Miami
area attending the convocation in
Tel Aviv of the JWV's National
I Executive Committee which opens
Irvin Steinberg, National Adju-
tant Ralph Rosofsky, Irving Coo-
perman, Ainslee Ferdie, and De-
partment Chief of Staff, Leo
Slachter.
Henry Kramarz. a member of
in the Israeli city next Wednes South Dade F'o-t 778. has been
day. The Executive Committee named Department Photographer
members will also tour the conn- As such, he is one of two officia'.
.JACQUES TOIKZrWft
try.
Other NEC members from the
Greater Miami area making the
trip are Regional Commander
photographers assigned to the tour,
ii. which over 1.000 JWV members
and friends from all over the
United States will participate.
NOW!
FLAGLER FEDERAL'S
CONVENIENT NEW SERVICE!
"Save by
Phone"
WHEREVER YOU ARE...
CALL US AT 377-1711
Ask for a Savings Counselor
They'll open your Flagler Federal
Savings account in a minute, no waiting!
SAVIHGS CERTIFICATES
Minimum of $5,000 deDOsited 6 months or more
4Vi%
PASSBOOK SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Paid and compounded quarterly
......-.--.--------_.....________._.....__................. j
FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS FROM ANYWHERE
IN THE UNITED STATES OR CANADA
SAVINGS INSURED TO S15.000.........................BY THE F.S.L.I.C.
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:
DOWNTOWN: 101 Northeast First Avenue
BRANCH: Biscayne Shopping Plaza/570 N.E. 81st Street
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI.
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J


Page 4-B
+Jeist fhrkJiain
Friday. February 23,
^o m J CT
With ISABEL GROVE
City News Editor

Celebrating their 45th wadding
anniversary. Bella and Morris
Tippir ol 8400 Byron Ave. mark
ed the occasion by hosting a gala
reception at Agudath Israel He-
brew Institute last Saturday fol
lowing morning services. The
previous week, the Tepper chil-
dren and families honored them
at a surprise dinner held at the
Town House in Chicago. Plan-
ning the festivities were daugh-
ter Rosa and husband Leonard
Fishman, daughter Francos and
spouse Sam Cohen, .-on Samuel
and Grace Tepper, and another
daughter Marion and Marvin
Hoffman. Also participating were
w
n
Jewish Population Estimate Is Issued In Great Britain
. ___. : 1.....leak ctiticHrc rOCOrds Of that* TVmill it ...
Isabel Grove
i,,
the Teppers' 14 grandchildren
and one great-grandchild.
Congratulations and festivity
wire the order of the day when
Sam and Ida Putterman celebrat-
ed their 40th wedding anniver-
sary at a dinner at Chandler's
Restaurant. Hosts for the party
were the couple's son. Leonard
Putterman and his brother-in-
law. Ed Black.
Also seen at Chandler's recent-
ly were Fay and Mitchell Potter
>I North Bay Village.
*
Houseguesting with Pansy
Flaum are Louis David Jantow
and his wife Molly, of Orange.
N.J. The couple recently planted
1.000 trees in Israel.
Just back from Washington.
D.C.. and tea with Mrs. Lyndon
Johnson at the White House, are
Greater Miami Section NC.TW
mem hers Mrs. Stanley Myers,
Mrs. Aaron Farr, Mrs. Edwin Op-
penheim, Mrs. Irving Waxier,
Mrs. Charles Rosenberg, Mrs.
Norman Cohan, Mrs. Burton
Goldberg, Mrs. Bernard Abet and
Mrs. Florence Alberts. All attend
ed the NCJW Washington Insti-
tute where they heard top gov-
ernmental loaders review the
current concerns on foreign pol-
icy, crises within the cities, and
income maintenance.

Mr. and Mrs. Baron de Hirsch
Meyer will entertain at a cock-
tail party in their new home at
the Imperial House on Tuesday
in honor of Justice Freedman,
Chancellor of the University of
Manitoba and Justice of the Su-
preme Court of Manitoba.
Harold Chaekin, owner of Cae-
sar's Forum. Miami Beach's only
floating houseboat restaurant,
has had so much success with
his four dining levels and lour
dining moods this season, that he
is creating still another mood for
his followersluxury dinners at
nominal price? There will still
be the same wide selection ol de-
lectable entrees including roast
prime ribs of beef, sirloin steak
and Chicken Kiev, plus salads
and side dishes and desserts, but
the cost will be less than stag-
gering. Located at 6820 Indian
Creek Dr.. Caesar's Forum serves
dinner from 5 p.m. to midnight
Seen dining at the Forum re-
cently were Attorney Mike Ko-
lodny and his lovely wife, cele-
brating their anniversary with
dinner "a deux."
And a family reunion for two
big names in show business the
other night there when Irving
FiHds of the magic fingers flew
in from Las Vegas to spend a
few days with sister Peppy, now
doing a nightly radio show trom
the Lucerne Hotel. Joining them
was Peppy's husband. Danny
Flaxmen.
Members of Artists Equity As-
sociation will be guests at a lunch
eon given by the Beth Am Con-
gregation on Wednesday at the
Four Ambassadors Hotel. Associ-
ation members will also put on
an art exhibit for their hosts.
Miami artist Reyna Youngerman
is president of the group.
LONDON (WNS)The Board of
Deputies of British Jews estimated
this week that Great Britain has
a Jewish population of at least
410.000 and possibly 450.000. with
Greater London harboring about
280.000. or close to two-thirds of
the total.
This disclosure was made by the
board in a report which said the
survey covered the period from
I960 to 1965 The report said that
the figures cannot be regarded a-
conclusive because of the "diffi
JEWISH LITERATURE is unique
in that it is confined neither to a
single language nor to a geograph-
ical area.
.1
"It's Wvddiny Timer
FLOWERS
BLOSSOM SHOP
(Mercantile National Bank Building)
1616 Washington Ave., Miami Beach CALl JE 2-3231
Remember how good
bread used to taste?
August Bros*
still does!
_ AUGUST BROS. BAKERY
10777 N.W. 36th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA
cutty inherent in Jewish statistics
in a country where official census
records of the population dn
collect statistics oti religion
A soothing message
to the weary weight-watcher.
If you're watching vour delicious, country fresh flavor
wi-lu m voui ramih/i '-' ""P""" to ">y
weight, consider Alba. It's got other non-fat dry milk. It
all the calcium, phosphorous. all adds up to the fact that
Vitamin- B. and B, that
slummed milk dots- Ami. at
a Fractiono( ihec<*t. .About
lur a quart.) Plus
Alba's one of the sharpest
WaV* to cut calorics.
Rabbi Benjamin M. Kahn,
national director, B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation, will be pul-
pit quest at Temple Emanu-
El on Friday niqht.
j i rlifi.il K'i SIIKK hj Lh< i
c-f i trthodoi '-ni:i. imi onu
\ mi-Men
The beans that
madethe(0)famous.
Close to to years ago, the House of
Hcini introduced a new variety-
Vegetarian Hemsto meet the
needs of Jewish families for a
Kosher, quick-to-fix many-purpo*
delicious food.
To reassure our customers' of Kash-
ruth, we arranged for rabbini-
cal sanction and the ." seal of
Till UNION OF OKTIlo.
DOX JEWISH CONGREGA-
TIONS Or AMLRJCA to be
icrraniAaj
BEANS
pitted on our label.
The y was little known in those
days. In fact we were the first large
American food company to clearly
identify and advertise our Kosher
products with the o .
Today, you will find the 0 on many
hundreds of well known prod-
ucts, but no one of them is
more welcome injcwit.lt
homes than the "beans
thai nude the famous."
BEANS

31
HJ.HEINZC0Mft\NY^7;


L'W,
owian s
nit ij Swority Members Model Fashions At Phi Sig Affair
V"^ G" Id Siunia Si",n;i Alumnae nha Chi rtmoua- laanatta Mario include Mrs Xnrman S
slewxslli Floridian
Friday, February 23. 1968
Paqe 5-B
CJA IEF Women
Set Dinner Dance
Plans were announced this week Mrs. Myron J. Singer, Pacesetters
for the annual Spring Dinner Division; Mrs. Robert Traurig,
Dance of the Young Women"s Di- Leading Ladies Division; and Mrs.
vision of the Combined Jewish Harold Gaffin. No Minimum Di-
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund vision,
joint campaign.
Special Gifts Chairman is Mrs.
This year's affair, according to ; Lewis Silberman and the Area
Mrs. Robert Shapiro, president of ; Chairmen are Mrs. Lloyd Rnskin,
the division, will again be held at i Mrs. Harold Brooks. Mrs. Albert
the Westview Country Club on Weintraub. Mrs. Daniel Franco,
Saturday. March 9. | Mrs. Philip Bloom and Mrs. Thorn-
., .. ... as Reach.
Mrs. Henry Weiss, chairman for
the Spring Dinner Dance, said that 'FASHIONPLATE' A SUCCESS
there is a minimum donation of
$50 to the CJA-IEF campaign for Earlier this week, the Women's
those attending the affair. 1 Division held its annual fashion
Campaign vice presidents are ?!* with more than 350 women
in attendance.
Sisterhood Games Night The Women's Division, under
Beth Solomon Sisterhood is spoil- ****** f M Si,1"ey M
soring its annual games night ln ; Schwartz, chainiian. has set a pace
.he congregation auditorium on for the l'a'"Pal-n "' Uons running more than M) per-
Saturday. Cochairmen are Mrs. L^t ahead of last year.
PM Sigma Sigma Alumnae
Chapter of Greatr Miami will
hold its 18th an: ual dessert and
fashion show on Saturday. March
2nd. at 1:15 p.m. in the Dupont
Plaza Hotel lor the benefit of the
Children's Center for the emotion-
, ally disturbed.
The affair, under the cochair-
manship of Miss Audrey Borok
and Miss Bobbi Ann Ossip. will
feature fashions modeled by rep-
resentatives of the sororities of
the University of Miami who will
compete for the 'Model of the
I Year'' award.
pha Chi Omega; Jeanetle Marie
Wyokoff. Alpha Delta Pa; Terrj
Saltzman. Alpha Epsilon Phi; Mar-
garet Dunn. Chi Omega; Joyce
l.mdekens. Delta Delta Delta: Joy
D. Forman, Delta Gamma: Kathy
,Katz, Delta Phi Epsilon: Laurel
Miller, Delta Zeta; Irene Bang-
sirup. Kappa Kappa Gamma: Sally
Ann Whalen. Phi Sigma Sigma;
Doris Mogilefsky. Sigma Delta
Tau; and Marie Bellafiore. Zeta
Tau Alpha. Miami Alumnae Chap-
ter models will be Barbara Sutker.
Mrs. Irwin Polash and Mrs. Thcl-
ma Edwards.
include Mrs Norman Sholk, Mrs.
Michael Slotnick. program book:
Rita Pollack, reservations; Helena
Brenner a,nd Carole Rise, door
prizes; Mrs. Alexander KOgan, dec-
orations: Mrs. Samuel Heller, cor-
respondence; Mrs. Mitchell l.ipco.i.
' fashions coordinator.
Models include Linda Hoch. A!-' Committees for the fashion show
'Intellectual Love of God'
"The Intellectual Love of God"
will be Dr. Abraham Wolfson -
topic before the Spinoza Forum for
Adult Education on Thursday at
10 a.m. at Washington Federal
1234 Washington Ave.
LLOYD S. APPLE
George S<-j;i 1 and Mrs. Dave Ro-
senthal,
Extremists Groups in Florida
"The Jew in FloridaWhat Are
the Dangers Created by Extremist
Groups in This State?" will be the
For the lir>t time in the history
of the campaign, the Women's Di-
vision set their own goal. With an
overall campaign goal for the
Combined Jewish Appeal set at
SI.991.200. the women's goal in
1968 is S238.944. which is 12 per
CATERERS
FOR THOSE PARTICULAR PfcRSONS WHO
ARE INTERESTED IN TRULY FINE CATERING
AND THE ULTIMATE IN A PRESTIGE AFFAIR
PLEASE PHONE 448-2840
subject of the second session in
.,,,... .,. __ ,, I cent of the overall figure,
series entitled "We, The Jewry.
at the YM-YWHA of Greater Mi-
ami on Sunday at 8 p.m. The se-
ries is a joint venture of the
VMIIA and the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. Moderator
will be Arthur Teitelbaum, ADL
regional director, aided by Ed-
ward Lustig of the "Y."
The women, to assure success
in the campaign, held several
workshops designed to make the
task of raising contributions eas-
ier. These workshops, called Group
Dynamics, were held prior to the
campaign under the guidance ol
Mrs. Bea Finkclstcin of New York
WATCH FOR AN ANNOUNCEMENT SOON
AbOUT OUR "WEDDINGS EXCLUSIVELY DEPARTMENT
FIRST SERViCE OF ITS KIND IN MIAMI
LLOYD S. APPLE


1 1 LINCOLN MALL
Art L'enter 1 I
942 Lincoln Rood 1 i 1
CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING l ;Pr
I OIL PAINTINGS
Sale 1 W
S. CIMENT
1 A :..i.ii!u>n in jine ClUlOM J ranting -n .VlMTtn for over Meeniv sears
Opn: Mori thru Thtirt. 534-/JZ/ Fri.. 9-5 p.m. Closed Saturday 1
V

WEDDING & BANQUET SPECIALISTS
"COPIED BUT NEVER SURPASSED"

A ladies' fashion salon with the
facilities and atmosphere de-
manded h\ those who enjoy HIGH
QUALITY "COUTURE".
SALE
OF
ORIGINALS SAMPLES
25 *
OFF
IN FEBRUARY
7*5 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD. (Opposite Roostvh Th.ofr.). 532-S213
I
Quality Work
Free Estimates
Lowest Prices Available
Josh Upholsterers
IN MIAMI BEACH
701 5th STREET, MIAMI BEACH
Business Phone Call Us At 534-6806
Or Homo Phono 532-3370
This announcement is not an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities.
This offering is made only by the prospectus.
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH DADE
18801 N.E. 22nd AVENUE NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 33160
FIRST MORTGAGE 6l/a% REAL ESTATE BONDS
Dated February 15, 1968 Due Serialiyfrom 1 \i through lO' 2 years Semi Annually
A. B. CULBERTON and COMPANY, CORPORATE TRUSTEE
The Fort Worth National Bank, Fort Worth, Texas, Paying Agent
$437,000.00 Issue
$200,000.00 Property Valuation
$350,000 00 Building
Security: First Mortgage on the property of the Temple.
Purpose: To erect new Temple building and social hall.
Price: 100% plus accrued interest;
BOND DENOMINATIONS: $5000.00 $1000.00 $500.00 $250.00
For copies of the Prospectus and availabilities contact:
Temple Sinai of North Dade 18801 N. E. 22nd Avenue North Miami Beach, Fla. 33160
Area Code: 305 Phone: 949-3429


Fcge 6-B
* knisfi UtrkSan
Friday. February 23 1968

:
, \.,iM

Sr
m
.>

CHILDREN'S
REGENCY
SPECIAL
thru II wars
This is the
greatest bargain
of the year.
Surely the
exciting ages of
childhood
deserve heavenly
color portraits.
Save $21.50
for 3
Colour Portraits
$15 each
for three
ct4IU
jteckcv
LS Master of Photogr
graphy
COLOUR ALBUM
$115. COMPLETE
Ml
Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach,Florida
Telephone
532-2351
ftjj
.<
H'J
i..
-*-*>!
Shirley Pavilack.
Mr. Finklehoffe
Exchange Voivs
On their return from a honey-
I mo;>n In Nassau, the former Shirley
v n Pavilack and Edw'n Lawrei
Finklehoffe will live at 45 Warner
St., Springfield, Mass.
The couple exchanged marriage
vows on Sunday. Feb. 18. at the
Fontainebleau Hotel. Dr. Max Lip-
schitz officiated at the 6:30 p.m.
' ceremony which was followed by
a reception and dinner at the hotel.
The bride is the daughter of
Mrs. David Pavilack. 7291 Gary
|, Ave.. and Wheeling. W. Va.. and
the late Mr. Pavilack.
Given in marriage by her broth-
i er. Ivan Pavilack, new Mrs. Finkle-
hoffe wore an elegant gown of
ivory peau de soie styled with a
yoke and ruffled collar of beaded
Alencon lace and long lace sleeves
with ruffled cuff. The Aline skirt
featured a chapel train of peau de
soie. and the matching ivory peau
de soie and beaded Alencon lace
cap held a triple tier of French
illusion.
Mrs. Phyllis Gentry served a*
her sister's matron of honor, with
Susan Wolfson and Valorie Fried-
man as bride-maids.
Best man was Gurdon Wolfson
. and among ushers were Dr. Sidnev
Pavilack. George Gentry and
Richard Wolfson.
Son of Louis Finklehoffe of
Springfield, the bridegroom earned
an undergraduate degree at the
University of Florida and a mas-
ter's at Springfield College. His
bride attended West Virginia Uni-
versity and earned a bachelor of
education degree at the University
if Miami.
MRS
-I
Werner Kahi
EDWIN HNKUHOM
Susan Gertman.
Richard Vgelow
Plan Fall Rites
Dr and Mrs Samuel Gertman
of Miami and Washington. DC.
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Susan, to Richard S
L'gelow, son ol Mrs Philip R I ge-
low ol New York City and the late
Mr. Ugelow.
Miss Gertman "ill graduate
i, im Goucher College, Baltimore,
Md in June. Her fiance will grad-
, uate from the Washington College
t oi l.aw. American University, in
Washington, D.C., in June.
A Sept. 1 wedding is planned.
_________.____________
Miss Usher son
To Wed July 4
Mr. and Mrs Herbert Usherson
ol 10900 SW 62nd Ave have an-
nounced the engagement and fu-
ture marriage of their daughter.
Sandra Trina, to M Allen Saft.
The prospective bridegroom is
the son of Mr. and Mrs Herbert
Salt of 1663 SW 20th St. He will
receive a degree In mechanical
engineering from the L'niversitj
ol Florida in March and is a mem-
ber of Alpha Epsilon PI Fraternity.
The bride-elect will be a June
graduate oi the University oi Flor-
ida where she is majoring in mar-
keting, .md is founder member
oi Delta Sigma Tau Sorority.
The couple will be married on
July 4.

FOR
LIVE IN
I) OMESTICS
Call
MR. BUSH
National
Employment
379-8443
MISS DeVIRA SIIVIR
DeVera Silver Affianced
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Silver.
5300 SW 64th Ave.. announce the
engagement of their daughter. De-
Vera. to Charles Rubin, son of Mr.
and Mrs Morris Rubin. The bride-
.'lect is l 'anddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs Morris Segal
Fern Ellis To Be
Bride in April
Mr and Mrs. Herbert Ellis, 869
NE 173rd Ter., announce the en-
gag* nient and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter. Fern
Sharon, to Jeffrey Freeman.
The future groom is the son of
Mr and Mrs Ell Freeman, De-
troit, Mich.
The betrothed couple plan to be
married on April 28.
MISS SUSAN HAlPtRT
Susan Halpert Is
lietrallied To
Michael Try son
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Halperl
Manati Ave.. Coral Gable- an-
nounce the engagement of
daughter, Susan Abby, to Mi had
John Tryson, ion of Mr. ai M -
Frank Tryson, 6539 SW 84th \
Miss Halperl is a graduati
Coral Gables Senior High,
c ,i the Univers to Bi rt.
and i" now ;i senioi at the i
sit) ni Miami School of Edu il
S! e was an editor of thi m :
ibis and is a memb< r of FEA
NEA
Her fiance is president Z< .i
Beta Tau Fraternitj and h.-
awarded two national scholarships
from the fraternity He has been
named to Orange Key. Omega and
Omicron Delta Kappa for scholas-
tic and leadership qualities
He has been sports edit r and
managing editor of "he I
wa> sports editor c, the Hun
lie i~ listed in "Who's Who in
American Colleges and L'n
ties "
Mr. Tryson enter 1 l'ni-
versitj ol Mia Schoi I e
fall.
A December i
FREE BOARD & ROOM
FROM END OF MARCH
Woman to live in apt. on S.
Beach with my mother. Kosher
preferred 945-2024.
Prepare Now! Coaching For
COLLEGE BOARDS
& Senior Placement Exams
Tutoring In All Subjects All levels
ADELPHI PREP.
North Miami
757-7623
South Miami
757-7638
*>V>*r*rA>WVW^V^^^r^VW
DIET IN LUXURY
AT THE NEW HOTEL
LIDO SPA
For Information Coll
(30S) 538-4621 Miami Beach
AArWWWWWVWWVWvW*
NEW WIGS
TINE SPANISH HAIR
We Alto
REPAIR i CLEAN WIGS
Pick Up Delivery
1566 Washington Ave.
Phone 531-6850
MUSICIAN-ENTERTAINER
Experienced Accordian,
Organ Player for
WEDDINGS, BAR MITZVAHS,
BANQUETS, ate.
Hank H. Wollack 821-9616
.. For that Special Occasion .
Made more Memorable uith an Appropriate Cake From
HOLSUM BAKERS
Bar Mitzvahs Weddings Birthdays
and Anniversaries
Whatever the Occasion
Crown it with a Hoi sum dike
FOR INFORMATION CALL ... MO 1-3441
.
4ii# bread
to b
Holsum


Friday, February 23. 1968
rrctnceB tJU, cftntan
We
the
Women
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Peggy (Mrs. Stuart) Gordon was born in New Rochelle.
NY. She was a good little girl who never answered back.
in fact she was almost inhibited. When she was 15 years
old her family moved to Florida. It was as if the gorgeous
Florida sun and blue skies caused Peggy to flower along
with all the lush greenery. A whole new life opened for her.
She went Miami High and was
swept into a whirlwind of activities
After high school she went to
Froebel [ e'ague Teachers Training
School in New York City. When
School for a year until she got
married.
She had met Stuarl in a very
practical way, "heir families were
friend- Pi ggy grew up in a com-
munityoriented home Even though
it has been many years -nice her
father and mother Monte ;uid Fa
Selig died they are rememben I
with great love and respect in
PEGGY Greater Miami. It was expeete I
that in their home "tzedakah" (charity! was part of their
of life. Then' names, what they >tood for and their
Is are part of the Miami tradition.
The Gordons have thru children, .lady. Jon and Monte.
started for Peggy the usual swing rhythm of P.T.A
uficuring, working with the Mt. Sinai Womens Auxilary,
nong others. Peggy has always adored children
a- but all children. She became active in the Child-
- Tenter It became apparent that something must be
e if this home for emotionally disturbed children was
,'tinue. She did thai somthing. She was founder of
Women's Auxiliary and became its first president, its
md and now third.
rhe women help in the office with programing with
children, and fund raise, fund raise, fund raise Next
k h one ot the big fund raising affairs for the Children's
ter, the Jazz Festival
Peggy also found time to be publicity chairman for the
i Mental Health Fair for two years. She found it so
ating that she spent most oi her free time there.
tlj she is helping with publicity again.
As a hobby she in an artist, a good one. She stu
lean Vlasin an I Robed Mi an ong "'hers she
* :ks in nds and ceramics She onlj sells her paintings to
.. people so Ih it I ure will hang in a home
is friendly ami warm sin works v.ith the Vrt Center,
courses Halev Sofgi ;'' tusing au-
; was d< lij hted n ith the result of the Art S
conducted for the benefit of the Housing Authority,
i bought the then donated them to put
thi i enters to make the apartments so much
active To a creative person everything is a challenge
even a Hopped cake.
Sometimes Peggy thinks that her family wishes that
wouldn't be so creative and the cake would be dumped
into the garbage can instead of being disguised.
Small intimate groups that can sit around the table and
have dinner and talk are the basis for the Gordon lorm of
n-.tertaining. Peggy and Stuart play golf together at least
once a week. They also play bridge togther and manage to
remain friends at the bridge table only because they work
at it. They go dancing Their dancing is in the era of the
tamba and the meringue and that is where it is going to
stay, says Peggy.
They wait for letters from their foster child in Hong
Kong ile is almost the same age as their Monte and lives
.i sampan. With the letters written in Chinese comes an
English translation. It is a rule that the foster parent*
cannot see the child.
The Gordons are inveterate travelers, having been to
Europe several times. Last year they went to Denver and
now Peggy thinks that Americans should see America first.
She has some very firm convictions. She took the Dale
Carnegie course and became a graduate assistant. But she
feels that just reading or studying won't help at all. You
list put your theories into practice.
She believes that parents should be at hand when need
ed but as the child becomes an adult he or she should have
his freedom and privacy. If more parents would practice
this there would be more happy families.
To some Peggv seems reserved. A many-faceted person
She is warm loving and generous to a fault when you know
her. She feels that there are two things in life that go to
create a better life and a better person When you have
these two things, you have everythingimagination and
enthusiasm.
*.#phI.#> neridliiair)
Paqe 7-B
Werner Kahl
MISS VANNE DOKSON
The Morris Blaus
Announce Jane's
Wedding Plans
Dr. and Mrs. Morris II. Blau of
Coconut Grove announce the en-
gagement of their daughter. .lane
Carole, to Howard Elliot Chakoff,
son oi Joseph Chakofl ot H807 Gra-
ta Blvd., Coral Gablt i, and the
late Mrs Chakoff.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Univcrsitj of Miami. The lu-
ture bridegroom is attending the
University nl Florida School of
Nuclear Engineering.
A wedding Is planned for early
'. is summer
Lights On Again At
Levin's Copa City
Miami Beach's world famous
Copa City, located on the Miami
Beach side of the Venetian Cause-
way, turned on Its light- once
again when Ben Levin premiered)
his new Copa City Lounge Thurs-
day evening. Feb. 15.
levin, who purchased the Copa
property last year, spent more
than $250,000 Letting the lounge
in shape for Thursday night's
opening. Tlu entire 300 seat
ige has been rede, orated i
r< furbished under the e of
Kay Stark, noted interior des gner,
has restored the famous night
club to ;t; former glory with plush
interiors.
Levin has established a no mini-
mum, no cover policy with contin-
uous entertainment starting at 9
p.m. each eve:
......

YOU eon fc SUH < tht UST -
Todd-S BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER

2144 fONCf Of IION Corol G-Hts
WOW SHIPPING flOKIDAS HMff '"''
Tel. 448 5215
BASKtTS I GinS
Vanne Dokson
To Wed In June
Mr. and Mrs, Fdward O. Dokson.
755 South Shore Dr., announce the
engagement of their daughter.
Vanne Iris, to Fred Louis Cohen.
son of Mrs. Jacques Coh in and the
late Mr. Cohen of Sunset Island
No 4. Miami Beach, and Ellen-
ville. N Y
Miss Dokson is a graduate of
Miami Beach Senior High and the
University of Michigan. She is
presently doing graduate work at
the University of Miami.
Mr. Cohen is a graduate of Mi-
ami Beach Senior High, the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, and is a
senior at the University of Miami
School of Medicine.
A June wedding is planned.
SAMUEL GALLANT, a New York
attorney, has been named execu-
tive director of the American-Israel
chamber of Commerce and In-
dustry.
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTRACTING REP//RING
I Serving Dade County Over 25 Years
1811 S.W. 14th ST. HI 6 9904
v>
v>
O
v>
v>
<>
^????????^o
s
DIAMOND'S
818 ALTON RD.
532-4110
"Where A Smile Counts'
DRY
CLEANING

LAUNDRY
CS3
ALTERATIONS
o
o
o
<>
<>
<>
<^
^?^? Ike embiaci*uf
the liu*u*Uj
fvu*i(f ieaio*t...
Uie tiadituHial
ceielviatio*t oft Ute
oft1 freedom.
PASSOVER
Cantor
Herman
Malamood
Assisted by
Sholom
Secunda
And the Concord
International Choir
Services Sedarim
Dietary Supervision by
Rabbi
Seymour Freedman
Concord
K.imn^i Lake. New fork 12751
90 MiN (ROM NYC
RAY PARKtR GF.N MGR.
HOTEL TEL: 914, 794 4000
On SEE TOUR TRAVEL AGCNT
MISS JANC BIAU
m/p><&*^-*K^yA^>*.&*^*^^&*.&*&*^*^,*&*^>*^^^-A&M.
I Photographic
I Portraits by
A valued gift.
A priceless treasun
Our New lor-rion 923 ARTHUR GODr RCY ROAD MIAMI BEACH i
leohones JE 11872 and 534-4930
i our New tofno
s>^Y7^s-^>--^'&--4r*-**-&^&*4r*&''^&*&
The word tor quality
cleaning and laundry
1201-20 th Street,
Miami Beach, Fla.
Tel.538-6104
Open 7a.m.to 7p.m.
In by 10, out by 5.
Same day service for
cleaning, shirt laundering,
flatwork,fluffdry.
Never an extra charge.
PS. We love you.


Page 8-B
>. tenist r/rriafifar)
Fridav, Februcry 23. I?68
Miss Snyderman
To Wed In April
An Anrfl 27 wedding it (He Fon-
tainebleau Hold is planned for
Suzan Snyderman and Jerjld Mar-
tin Nichter. wbOM MfagMMDt is
being announced by the future
bride's parents. Mr. Bad Mrs. N.
David Snyderman. 91S4 Bay Dr.
The prospective bridegroom is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert
Nichter of 2235 Arch Creek Dr.
The bride-elect attended the Col-
lege of Emporia. Kimn. and her
fiance attended Miami-Dade Jun-
ior College.
MfSS SUZAN SNYDftMAN
Hebrew Academy Cabinet Formed
The Hebrew Academy Journal
Cabinet was appointed at a recent
luncheon meeting at the home of
Mrs. Isadore Spolter to serve as
the working committee on the An-
nual Pictorial Yearbook of the
organization.
Mrs. Samuel Rosncr. president,
announced that Mrs. Leonard Ro-
sen will serve as chairman with
Mrs. Isadore Spolter as cochair-
man.
Plans for the forthcoming Pre-
mier Journal Function honoring
Mrs. Joseph Shapiro as the 1968
Hebrew Academy Woman of Valor
were discussed and formulated.
Serving on the Cabinet arc: Mrs
Leonard Adler, Mrs. Morris Bicn-
enfeld. Mrs. Carl Brandos. Mrs
1-ouis Ciment. Mrs. Sam Cohen.
Mrs. Irving Firtcl. Mrs. Harry Ge-
net. Mrs. Alexander S. Gross. Mrs.
Joseph Halfon, Mrs. Joseph Hoff-
man. Mrs. Jacob D. Katz. Mrs.
Ruth Mirmelli. Mrs. Samuel Rein-
hard. Mrs. Harry Rosenberg. PTA
president; Mrs. Joseph Shapiro.
Mrs. Sam Shapiro. Mrs Herman
L. Shaw and Mrs Louis Sussman.
'Tevya' At Cinema Theatre
Tevya." the original film ver-
sion of the Broadway hit. 'Fiddler
Oil the Roof."' will be shown at the
Cinema Theatre from Friday
through Thursday, Fab. 2. Also
on the program will be a Yiddish
American vaudeville show present-
ed by Leon Schachter with a prom
inent cast of Yiddish American
artists.

RUTH FOREMAN PRESENTS i
NEIL SIMON'S
"COME BLOW YOUR HORN"
STARRING MICHAEL NESTOR SUNOAY MATINEE
CRITKS RAVE UNANIMOUS "l.9h$ Constant, Total Evening Enjoyable."
NORTH MIAMI PLAYHOUSE THIMS. thru. SUNS. 75.-i.3i
1603 N.E. 123rd St. (Off Bis Bl.d I "A LAUGH A MINUTE" 751-5446
LAST 3 DAYS
JOSE MAUREEN
FERRER O'SULIIVAN
sssf
OPENING FEB. 27
CYRIL RITCHARD
in LONDON'S 2ANIEST,
SEXIEST MUSICAL
"LOCK UP YOUR
DAUGHTERS'
"TOM JONES SET TO MUSIC"
n<3on f* -, f icess
COCONUT GROVE PLAYHOUSE
RESTAURANTS 1 ART GALLERY
MOOMAIN HIGHWAY. MIAMI HI 5-2501
LEON SCHACTER'S YIDDISH AMERICAN
VAUDEVILLE
Continuous From 1 p.m. to Midnight Many Stars of Th
YIDDISH AND AMERICAN THEATRE
COMEDY iy SINGING -A- MUSIC v DANCING
NEW SHOW NEW STARS EVERY WEEK
Also A Feature Film
"TEVYA & HIS DAUGHTERS" the Original Story of
Fiddler On the Roof by Sholem Aleichem
BRANDT THEATRES
CINEMA
I owe:!* vr :3 sr.
MATINEE
75c
EVENING
1.75
PHONE
531-6202
WORLD FAMOUS
\ropa ^^ity JL^ouncji
The South's Most Beautiful & Relaxing Lounge
The Price Is Right
DADE BOULEVARD & WEST AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
(On Venetian Causeway)
Present*
REMA TO REMZI International Song Stylist
JOBNN Y GRA YSOI\ Mr. I ersitalUx
_______JOE PI LOLL A TRIO
\ CONTINUOUS ENTERTAINMENT
\ FROM 9 P.M.
FREE VALET PARKING
Tel. 532-4421
NO MINIMUM
No Cover
OPEN 11 A.M. to 5 A.M. DAILY
Birthday Party,
Luncheon Meet
On Jilt Calendar
Greater Miami Women's Auxil-
iary. Jewish -Home for ttlP Aged,
will hold its next birthday party
at 2 p.m. Sunday at Douglas Gar-
dens. Mrs. Samuel Rost, life mem-
ber and trustee of the Auxiliary,
will host the affair in honor of
her own birthday-
Mrs. Lawrence Silverman. Aux-
iliary president, will give the
message of welcome.
Mrs. Louis Makovsky, program
chairman, will introduce Joseph
Mondrcss, president of B'nai B'rith
Maccabee Lodge, who will present
excerpts from "A Handful of
Dust.'* a musical written by Mrs.
Mondress and directed by Henry
Howard.
On Tuesday, the Auxiliary will
hold its noon luncheon meeting at
the Algiers Hotel. Mrs. Max Yo-
kell. life member and trustee will
give the invocation.
Mrs. Sol Silverman. life honor-
ary president and building pro-
gram chairman, will give a report
on building expansion plans and
the dedication of the newest build-
ing.
Mrs. Makovsky will present the
musical entertainment with Mrs
Olga Bibor Stern at the piano.
In charge of luncheon reserva-
tions are Mrs. Anne Tanenbaum
and Mrs. Benjamin Orlow.
Mrs. Jeanne Levey of Miami
Chairman of the National
Parkinson Foundation, will be
hostess Tuesday eveninq at
the Fontainebleau Hotel to
the more than 1,400 persons
expected to attend the S50
per plate formal dinner and
star-studded show honoring
Bob Hope, notional honorary
cochairman of the Foundation
CLUB PARTY TIME
is NOW at the
Wonderful World of
BANQUETS PARTIES
LUNCHEONS
MEETINGS
Fabulous Dining Facilities
Private Areas & Gardens
American L Cantonese
Menu at All Times
Authentic Native Shorn
RESTAURANT and GARDENS
US I JUS! -<0!h Ol GUIISIIIAM MM
MIAMI MI-S437 BROOAND WA3-2il
Mayor Clark Key Speaker
Mayor Steve Clark will be the
principal speaker at the annual
Mayors' seminar on beautification
Friday. 12:15 p.m.. at the Colum-
bus Hotel.
MIRACLE M63'St.
^37cjr3Tj^
10th
Week
MAYFAIR
fcfl'a!'VlJ
HoRKANDY
MIKE
NICHOLS
LAWRENCE
E3 TURMAN..: .
THE6RADUATE
DUSTIN HOFFMAN
COLOR
lor HOLIDAY .
Vand Everyday
flu, perfectSOI
for Kosherlng
II your meat and fowl
SAND-ELL
KOSHER CATERERS
Undtr Rabbinical Supervising
BAR MIT7VAHS
WEDDINGS PARTIES
Specialiiinq in Nome Cattrinf
and Hotel Work
SOL WEISS 866-6226
If No Answer Dial 866-5278
The Only Kosher Caterers
not connected with
Restaurant or Delicatessen.
1216 Normandy Dr., MB.
Florida Citizens
Club Plans Events
The Florida Citizens Club 2 has
scheduled a membership meeting
for Monday, 1:30 p.m.. at Washing-
ton Federal, 1234 Washington Ave.
Guest speaker will be Abraham
Grunhut. vice president of Wash-
ington Federal.
On Tuesday at 8:30 p.m.. at the
Miami Beach Federal, 755 Wash-
ington Ave.. the club will have a
meeting dedicated to the 20th an-
niversary of the founding of th*
State ol Israel An appropriate pro-
gram of music and a film on
Israel will be featured on the eve-
ning's program.
NOW OPEN
Little Italy. Inc
ITALIAN FOODS
PIZZA
Eat In or Take Out
11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
16401 N.E. 15th Ave.
North Miami Beach
949-4979
SCMECHTEK a miiischs\
CfflBBEM
KOSHER MOItL
{t>tt ICtMlmt I.Cl 3)11 || 3|[, Jf
MIAMI BEACH HA.
Mn Q SMtniru tun mis jena
lift c:-ii?i teuNCFs mi:
Fill PIIKINC
fill I* t RADIO
fimisuc nil
Pllll litCI 1
u-sr
Mtr in* ir it
Pill It KM IEVU *>*> mm
^^ yiNClllfllNC MEMS
I Msssifi ii iii hum PW
k M If-I..U tM UMf I. (Hi
j I ili iM*ac1 wi.cn 1 MWI "v"
^^^ ImaMM fimiMi
fit IcsettiiNMS PkMi: )IS) UHIti
Or Write For Free Brochure
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN OOROON
<. KOSHER CATERERS
l/w N.W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FB 4.4AM
uTri:ur liiiscESKa o,ih- un"e *", 52ft
Mfflmr E."' "bb': R"bb' ADrah"*- S.fr..
mt WlDDIHUi BAK MIJ1VAHS StClPJIONS
r**"*'------TTTTl.....M.m,._____JZZZ '
[STAR Dairy, Veg. & Fish Restaurant;
.j^-'-9"3 U"d'r San" Management
p Many Additional Improvements in the Menu
I 841 Washington Ave. Ph. 531-9182 lV
i
.4i
1173 KING SOLOMON STRICTLY KOSHER TOB
w?r-TESSEN AND CATERERS W
Wt CARRY HEBREW NATIONAL ftODOCTS
Call For Your Tahe Out Brochure
MM DeKciou. F.od, $>.UI Cafori,,,
OP^ All wJfl^'&ygSl A"' Miami
Phone 6aS-M4
|KUyAL HUNGARIAN H* RESTAURAI
AND UTERING
731^22 ?*m fop lh^ KA|
,/3l W,sh,g,o Avenue ____________________Phone 538-5401
r ^ -r V^v^^^p^^^^^^^^kkWaiBk^Blt^H BJBBJBjjj^Bj^^i^^BJa^BlBfaallBiaBii^i^ia^
?Sinen,a! sKosher Ca,er<
biddings |id mntuui __________
BAR MITZVAHS
BANQUETS UNUMITES
CAU FOR FREE TAKI-OUT BROCHURE
.393 b,rd J^'tt****!?'*'!* -**mm
CryiulSaliCavBRj
MICHAEL'S T: RESTAURANl
AND CATERERS
Is Now Open Under the
Original Management of
BARNEY
Open Daily 4 to 9 p.m.
Phone: UN 6-6043

:."


Fridc-v. February 23. 1968
vjfwitff/rridrfon
Paqe 9-8
"JANKIIE" ARNOLDS
LITTLE VIENNA
THE ONIV AUTHENTIC VIENNESE RESTAURANT IN MIAMI
JEWISH POLISH HUNGARIAN AND VIENNESE CUISINE
DINNERS from $1.95
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL YOUR HOST "JANKELE" ARNOLD
830! BISCAVNE BOULEVARD 7" 7 7 I >*>
|Nor of Golf Amricn Bldg I tJ I I I
lspeel the ItciltttM il Ikt
RESTAURANT
i'i ei|y Iht tictiirnt cusuw
Dine and Dance
AT MIAMI'S FINEST AND MOST BEAUTIFUL RESTAURANT
AND LOUNGE
E H DINES
..
EMBASSY
>>
Featuring
RALPH PROCTOR and hi. SOCIETY ORCHESTRA
Continental Cuwne by CHEF JOSEF
Cattail Hr 11804 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Open
4 3c 7 p m CALL "VAN" FOR RESERVATIONS from 4 30
758-6901
DINERS I AM EXPRESS ACCEPTED CLOSED MONDAYS
K
3
lr
In
ir
ui
r-
In
PJ
s
7 Course Gourmet Dinner
Irom $2.95
COMPLIMENTARY GLASS
"X OF WINE FRIDAY NITE
f e BUSINESS MEN'S
y LUNCHEON SPECIALS
[jittmt laciiities available
S ftahery in BfMlSt!
D|M |ait| pic-o' Mn-.i,
8 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Ln
r\J
1/1
ru 1100 Wst 4f Mumi Beach I 1
Vi____________________________
FORTE
Ef, n at r it no Spanish restaurant
SaeCMttty or the House PAELLA VALENCIANA"
Oven 11:30 A.M. Til 11 P.M. Daily
2222 N.W. 7th STREET, MIAMI Phone NE 3-9496
RMBfffJn
0oubloc
PIFt ATtS COVC
LOUBMBB
Entarlammtnt with
FobMloua Steok. anal
m ef Mum's Finest fiourmet RettarMtt
Featuring French and Italian Cuisine)
DINNER SERVICE FROM 6 P.M.
BUFFET LUNCHftN 11:M Ml DAILY
Open 'til 4 A.M.
Ucatt* m U.S. I)
liMSfMBne.
t 172*4 St 4
t
17201 ilSCAYNE SLVO PH 944-0.61
If YOU CAN
FIND US
YOU'LL ENJOY A
Complete S Course Dinner
Caesar's
Forum
68th Street & Indian Creek Dr
Miami Beach 866-1661
sioh or sufckb dihihq
V ILL A MIA
ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT
DINNER SPECIAL
CHILDREN'S DINNER
| jes
$169 I
95c
(Si.Ri'Ris/: ./(T POH ALL CHILDREN)
OIN DAILY 11 AM 10P.M WEEKENDS 11 AM 12 MIDNIGHT
12953 N.W. 7th AVE., NORTH MIAMI
FOR TAKEOUT LQQ AHAI '
SERVICE CALL OOO'OUO I I

JkUii..."mimmtkt
TAtliMt... HIGHEST QUALITY of LARGE
DELMONICO CHOICE STEAK DINNER...at
Ijj^j- MODERATE PRICi
6756 COLLINS flVE. M.B.
^.c"""1".,..
11 tayv.i Lf motels
MSWn*
SIRLOIN PIT V ',
.-LuOtS- B"f3 iD"0 J
IAGE DELMON'CO CHO'CE (.'*'0 TOSItO CaRu-.
SIRLOIN DINNER .'. T5$, "
1
SKAK
tKHtfrr
Prime Sirloin Steak .
Served Japanese Style
Exciting!
MIAMI
VILLAS
500 DEER RUN 885-1911
I TAKE OUT
onsets
m-iml
BEEF .CHICKEN
FISH
OPEN
I; DAYS A WEEK
|M:AJJ1.W:PJI.
GLASS HAT
1VBOO Won Dixie Hwy., Ojoi
Open 7:M AM 9:30 P.M.
RESTAURANT
and SEAFOOD HOUSE
North Dodo Wl 7*31*
Ownod and O*or.tod fcy *< **
letth St. I iWck Wort of Bioyio Btvo).
i
MORRIS & RUTH LERNER Catering for All Occasions
HARRY ZUCKEHMAN Established in 1945
Famous
&&
WASHINGTON
JE 1-3987
PARKING MIAMI
FACILITIES BEACH
*esfauranl
SOW OPK\ 7 Ml AYS A H/IK
New Studio Restaurant
LUXURIOUS DINING
ELEGANT FRENCH CUISINE
For Something New and Different in Our Miami Area
2340 S.W. 32nd Ave. 443-2536
Make Your Reservations Before Going To The Theatre
^toeta otutt *morgpstDor&
"ALL YOU CAtf TOYnT"
DINNER
$2.25
4:30 9
Sunday 11:30-9
14875 SOUTH DIXIE HWY. 238-8852
LUNCHEON
$1.20
11-3 Daily

COCKTAILS
BAKERY
GIFT SHOP

Giovanni's
ITAUAM.AMERICAN RESTAURANT
Cock toil Lounge
ChickenCocclotere Losoane e Pino
Menicetti St.ok. e Chop, o Seafood
* Free Legs -Plenty Free Parkin*
1005 M.W.Ttth Street 693-4232 69I-900V
OFEN 7 OAYS 11:90 A.M. TO 1 A.M
ITALIAN CUISINE
F.ST. 1919
OPEN FOR LUNCH
1300 N.W. 7th AVENUE
Phone 379-7661
KATZ's PARADISE Restaurant
1451 Collins Avenue Phone 532-1671
KREPLACH if KISHKE -ft MATZO BALLS ft KNISHES
MEAT vVFISH STEAKS if CHOPS y, CHICKEN
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Excellent Cuisine Superb Service Modern Decor



Page 10-B
*. Iwl<* nwrkJHan
Friday, February 23. 1968
Bench Hadrtssah Book Review Set
The Mimi Beach Chapter of
Hadasnh will present the fourth
session of its book review series
Monday at 1:30 p.m. in the Algiers
Hotel. Mrs. Mortimer C. Burton,
an attorney now teaching at the
Hebrew Academy of Greater Mi-
ami, will review "The Confessions
of Nat Turner."' by William Sty-
ron.
, have an Oneg Shabbat on Satur-
day at the Hadassah office. Pro
gram will include a book review.
Mrs. Evelyn Decky is presiden";
and Miss Lillian Goodman serve*
as publicity chairman.
Checking the successful results of "Fashion-
plate '68" at the affair held this week are
(left to right): Mrs. Sidney M. Schwartz,
campaign chairman. Women's Division Com-
bined Jewish App3al-Israel Emergency Fund
joint campaign; Zvi Kolitz, guest speaker.
Israeli author, journalist end r>li"wnTM:
Mrs. A. L. Glickmr n. chairman for "Fashion-
plate '68" and Mr?. A. Herbert Mathis.
program chairman, "Fashionplate '68." More
than 350 women viewed the latest couturier
creations which will be the voque in the
coming year.
Life Members Honored
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Convalescent Home will
hold a regular meeting at the Al-
giers Hotel Wednesday at 12 30
p.m. Celebrating its Bar Mitzvah
year, the division will honor life
members. Also on the program
will be a review ol "Our Crowd."
given by Mrs. Effir So,- Cohen.
Dr. Morris Gutstein, spiritual
leader of Shaare Tikvah,
Chicago, was to be quest
speaker at the 8:30 p.m. meet-
ing on Thursday of the Bath
David Men's Club. His topic
will be "Early American Jewry
Is This a Christian Coun-
try?"
'Know Your Neighbor' Panel
North Dade Chapter of B'nai
E'rith Women will hold its regular
meeting on Tuesday at the Wash-
ington Federal in North Miami
Beach at 8:30 p.m. The program
for the evening will be an inter-
faith panel of women who will
talk on 'Know Your Neighbor."
The Heril Group will hold its
regular luncheon meeting Monday
at noon in the Algiers Hotel. The
afternoon will feature an auction
for the benefit of Youth Aliyah.
I Cochairmen of the day are Mrs.
Samuel Meiselman and Mrs. Flor-
1 ence Bernstein; Mrs. Milton Wein-
berg is president.
t: ft <
The I. R. Goodman Group will
Gerald Schwartz
To Address B.B.
Gerald Schwartz, honorary pres-
ident of the Zionist Council of ,
South Florida, will speak on "Is-
rael's 20th AnniversaryTime of
Triumph and Tension." Tuesday
afternoon at the 100 Lincoln Road
Building.
His speech will highlight a
luncheon meeting of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Games Luncheon
Sunshine L'.iapter. B'nai B'rith
Women, will sponsor a luncheon
and card party at noon Thursday,
Feb. 29. at Washington Fe leral,
699 NE 167th St.
i
Ccntor David Kusevitskv will
bs featured at Kr.eseth Israel
Conqreqation this weekend.
On Fridav eveninq and Sat-
urday morninq. Cantor Kusevi-
tsky will chant the liturqical
portions of the service, and
on Sunday eveninq he will
K" "'<*"tH in n concert.

-


Lchayia f

*
Sanka Coffee tastes as good as
or better than your usual coffee.
And it's 97% caffein free.
So, drink it, enjoy itin good health.
It's 100% real coffee, too.
Only the caffein has been removed.
And caffein adds no flavor to any cup of coffee.
Comes instant and ground.
Another fine product of General Foods.
CERTIFIED KOSHER-PARVE
look ma
no pits!
The tastiest prunes ever.
fresh-fruit flavor, moist and
tender, and instant me-!
chayeh right out of the !
package! That's the marvel
of new super-tenderized
Sunsweet Prunes... today, j
no pits. Everyday...
Abi Gezunt with
SUNSWEET
The Pitted Prune
ra
about
gathered for you
Miriam Field
tC>>ir mure you think about it, the
more fantastic it is. It has no gold and
hardly any oil. It is just about the
size oj New Jersey, and much of it ;*
desert. Yet for three thousand yeart
the mightiest empires in the world
have cast covetous eyes at this tint
lillle land, vying with one another for
Its possession. Allthose mighty empires
have long since vanished into ohlivio-
and toda\ that ancient tiny little land,
miraculously reborn and Just 21 yean
old. slandi on the threshold .,' a tie*.
perhaps apocalyptic, e>a. For :n lovini
Jewish hands f/ri /' nised I m< ?-.
in good nine Julfill i/i pi, -.
the benefit of all mankind .
,,k,Gie survival of mankind depend,
upon the sun i alofthc Stale of Israel.'-
declares the astonishingly articulate
Eric HoiTcr. longshoreman-turned-
author in a recant tele* ision inter\ :ev..
"As it goes with Israel, so it will jto
with all of us. If Israel perishes Ihd
holocaust will be upon us. and histo"-
will cease to make any meaning to r :
. No country of the Occident will
ever discharge its debt to Israel."
"w'srael is not a matter for Jewish
Americansit is a matter of OMCCra
forajl Americans," maintains empa-
thctic Senator Robert I-. Kennedy.
"Our national interest is intertwined
with Israel's in many ways: for us
role in assisting the new nations
toward self-sufficiency, for its shining
example that democracy and develop-
ment are not opposed, but are natural
partners. More than this, we U
Americans share a responsibility with
all humanity to the survivors, those
who remained from history's greatest
example of man's capacity for cruelly
towards his fellow man."
"vj\ot simply a geographic location
but an abstract messianic principle, a
part of their own spiritual life. .." For
the Jews of Kussia, "the Jewish State
is wrapped in a prater shawl of purest
blue," according to I'.lie \\iesel in
The Jews of Silence.* "Its citizens
are all righteous men and heroes .
Some will say: double loyalties. But
they will not understand that the
loyalty of these Jews does not extend
to a foreign power but to a concept
and a vision, not to a foreign gov-
ernment but to loagiags which the
act of fidelity rt***f both defines and
symbolizes. Israel occupies a
vital and central place in the con-
ciousness of Russian Jews at all ages
and all levels ... out of a profound
sense of shared purpose."
I imlnh IrauUtioa published nJ .119w> by
Holt. Rinchart and Wiaatoa, Inc.
HfDell, as diligem readers know only
too well, one of this column's anoint
characteristics is its practice of flitting,
more or less with ease, from topic to
topic. And somehow we always end up
cosily in the kitchen in time to
share a recipe like this piquant
PICKLE PECAN MUNCH BREAD
3 cups unsifted flour % cup sucar
4 tsps. bikini powder 1 tsp. salt
*A cup chopped candied pickles
Vi cup chopped Planters Pecans
2 tbsps diced pimiento }. cup milk
2 tffs. well-beaten Vj cup Planters Oil
Sift ihib fcar, mm. aWfanM 1
Ma mat. A44 pickle*. Planter.
aad laaltato. Mend taajathcr milk. ..
aad Planter* OD. Add to Hoar aaixlwra
all at oace. Stir aatll newly moist bat
do not beat. Spoon koto arrived 9x5x3-
inch loaf pan. Bake in Moderate oven
(350F.) foe 5S to W> annum, or Mil
done. Reawxe from pan and cool na
wire rack. Make* one very laaty loaf.
TALKING Of RECIPES REMINDS ME TO
REMIN0 YOU THAI THE SONG Of SONGS
MOKBOOK IS READY NOW FRESH FROM
THE PtfSS. FOR VOW FREE SAMPLING
OF THIS PASSOVER POTfOURtk QUICKLY
WRITE (ENCLOSING A PLAtCTERsW LABEL
OR CAPLINER) TO THE SONG Of SONGS
COOKBOOK. P.O. BOX 644. MAOISONSa
STATION, NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10010.
MANNA ABOUT TOWN
IS A STANDARD BRANDS EXCLUSIVE
EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE
BRIGHT YOUNG H0MEMAKER
K KOSHER PARVE


fcidcy. February 23, 1968
^Jenislt fkrkMam
Paqe 11-B
Memorial Services
For Leo German
A memorial service will ue held .
i>.- ti i i i*""' undersigned, ilmrii' -uh d> aKy Lake Synagogue al 8 p.m. i.u mdr the n.iitiou
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.V iTtl i: is HEREBY ujvi:x
LEGAL NOTICE
thai
for Leo Berman. late
II .1. r ilif flclQInVN lumen
tai. HEALTH i.vsti-i i TB;
pHl I'll ii >': H "Al. INFORM ATI! IX
lounder d charter -i.-. i m.k -'' mreci
.Mi: r with ihe Clerk of the Clrcull Coun
of Dade County, Florida
LEI IXARD HABER
BYVIL MARQL'IT
ARTHUR STII,l..il.W
8/23 H 1-8-13
Sunday
tie
member of the congregation on
the occasion of the completion of
ihe 30-day mourning period.
Rabbi Jonah Caplan, spiritual
leader, will deliver the eulogy and
Cantor Abraham Seiff of Congre-
gation Kneseth Israel, will chant
ihe liturgy.
\
SCHWARTZ
Planning final arrangements for Beth David's Annual
Patron's Dinner Dance to be held on Sunday, in Spector
Hall, are (from left) Harry J. Tavss, ccchairman; Mrs. Albert
J. Beer, decorations chaiiman; Sam Badanes, vice-president;
Albert J. Beer, president ,and (seated) Joseph Milton. Chair-
man. This year Beth David will honor Mrs. Gussie Marqulies
for 29 years of dedication and service to Bet}) David.
Siimui'l. ;;.
died I', b
ago from Ni
.f llr.ffniiiii
if 483.1 CoUIn* avi..
lit' <-;ij11- here -'" yeeu-e;
w York and was owner
Cafeteria*, and found
Herschel Bernard! Due At Deauville
and operator of Wnlfiea Reetauranu
He was n mason, member of Miami
Reach Elks Lodge 1601, on the board
of directors ami a trustee <( Can-
ttrega'i.ai Beth Jacob, on the board
ni directors of ihi Hebrew Academy,
member of Krai, pun I Order of Police,
and one of the founder* of mi. Slnal
Hospital H.- i- survived by his wife
Sadie, a son. Michael; a dam
Mrs Elaine I. Shapiro; a brother
Jerry, and grandson, Randall s r-
vices were h-lil Feh 19 at Rivcr-
Ide Alton Rfl i'li:,p.i
Morris l.ansbureh, president of
Miami Beach Associated Hotels,
(nc., has signed Herschel Bernardi,
Luncheon for Crfy of Hope
Mrs. GustavfJ Martman, author
r>f "I Gave My Heart," her auto-
biography, will be' guest of honor
hi the luncheon and show being
sponsored by the Miami Beach
Chapter, City of Hope Sunday
afternoon at the Fontainebleau
lotel. Funds raised will be chan-
neled towards Ihe support of the
leukemia wing of the City of Hope
in Duarte, Calif.
the versatile actor who is best
known for his role of Tevya in
' Fiddler On The Roof," to star in
the Deauville Hotel's Casanova
Room from Friday through Wed
nesday.
BECKERMAN
Lola Falan beautiful singer-
.iancer-actres.- who costarred with
Sammy Davis in "Golden Boy"
will be on the mil with Bernardi. GOLDMAN
Bernardi and Miss Falana were
ti ned to replace comedienne
Phyllis Diller. who was forced to |
cancel her scheduled appearance I
at the Deauville became of delays
in filming her latest movie.
Koi In II Qusxle, L'4. of 7050 S V IS
Ter passed rwii Tues. Shi-h.nl been
a re*ldi here for Ihe nasl 14 years
coming from Cleveland, ohm Mi-
Beckerman nail been employed with
she is surrlvejd liy her parents*, Mr
She i- survived by h-r parents. Mr
Mini Mrs Charles Beckerman- :'
brothers Sheldon and David Berk-
erman and her irrandmother Mrs
Bather Ollenko Services were held
mi-.
Wed al Gordon Funeral ll.
Jack, 7:'. of 'a' West ,\v
I-'.-t. is h- name here :' ye
from New York and .-...s a
owner and .....r&tor of the
House and I'll vit Clnb, H.
tin nili r < f The Masons, the
Un-
til.
KlkS, Krvt-htS Of
American Neirlon
i- died
nra asm
former
Hickory
was a
Bhrli -
Pythias and
LEGAL NOTICE

DR. IVAN 1. PRAGER '
PODIATRIST
DISEASES HE FOOT AND LEG
BY Phc ltment 34-9742 1515 Wasrv'.gfon A enue Peach
IN
TOBACCO ROAD
"Everything For The Smoker"
FEATURING A COMPLETE LINE Of
IMPORTED CIGARS, PIPES AND TOBACCO
TOBACCO BLENDiMG BAR
COMPLETE PIPE REPAIRING
1754 NI.E. 163rd Street
No Miami Beach, Florida Phone 045 0661
THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 77825-A
In RE: Batati of
M>K(C I RHATLY
i i aased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All i ''-il 'i and All I', r -
Hav -il- i. lm Demands Aa&lnst
Ba -I K*ti li
\"nu re htrel fled a' id m n i
In i r. ins and demui -is
1 \ < against the
. i its MIKE RSATlA I
late <>f I onty, Florida, lo I
County i-. de County, aid
ril the luplieati and .,- i r
\- il.-,I Section 733 1 ',. l-'lorola.
Statut- i rices In the i 'out ij
i II I'.i. 1'i.unty. Florida.
within al< ndar in. nths from the
time publication hereof
or thi II i" barred
Date I da, this I'.th
duv i f i < brnsrv. A 1) *
' ' ~'<\TI.Y
\s Executor
Kir- ii'...:.on of ihi* notice
the L'l day f February, 1968
Attorn, i .. uti r
i.w>v a in-.' \ ;.i.-'i
|^s -I Pont urn* Miami, Fla ?ai.ii
2 23 l/l-e-H
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
No. 68-2737
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
CO.VR.AU THOMAS (JUMP,
Plaintiff.
vs
JKHUV DUMP,
i
th JERRY lil'.MP
Route No
rhfilli-othe, Ohio
VOr, JERRY (II'MP. ar hereb>
notil i that a Mill of Comnlalm for
Divorce has been filed ag'alnsl you,
and you are required to serve a copj
'if your Answer or PleadlfUE t<- the
r.ill of Complaint on the Plaintiffs
., ey EN'C.EI. A: I" il.l.ACK. 17""
N.W. 7','- Street, Miami Florida, tele-
phone 7 l and file th. orig-lnal
Answer or Pleading In Ihe office of
ii:, Clerk of the Clrcull Coun on at
i..... the day ol March, 196* II
you fal d so, iudfcmi i I by '' fauli
a w ba tnkei asainsl you for the re-
ded In the Bill -( 'ora-
plaint
DONE \N'!' ORDERED al Miami
I 21 day "f February. 196*
i: II LfSATHBRMAN*, Clerk
Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
Bj K M I VMAN
l>, puty Cl.rk
BNOEI. AVI' Pl I.AI'ls
Alt -.- r Ihe Plaintiff
i JO N u Tin street
Miami, Florida
2 23 3/1-8-15
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY
No. 68-2746
St IT FOR DIVORCE
REMHJM VARBER,
I untlff
I.KKhn > \\ BBR,
I I.-l.'iadt
TO: LBRi >Y YARBER
Ri -,,!. n.e I'nknou n
You, I.KHi'Y YARBER, are hereby
ed that a BUI of Complarnl for
Divorce has been filed against you.
and you ari rettulred lo serve u c of you- \. wer r Pleadina to tin
..'it on the Plaintiff's
attorney, IRWIN .1 STONE, ESQ.,
!-' S.M Third \venue, Miami Flo-
rida -i fill ii Blnal An.-wer or
Plead 11 i of Ihe Clerk
i.f ihe i "in uil i "i m' on or l" fore the
.7th das V-.....,f v"u f"
to do Judirmi by defaull will be
taken au-.i isl you for the relli
mnndi : In thi Hill of i 'omnlalnt.
Th'- tlei -!.a!i he published once
each foui
In THE A1SH FLORIDIAN.
DON] AND ORDERED
Florida lay of Februarj
A I-
K n NEATHBRM \N. Clerk
i in u:' Court V.untj Florida
l., i i in iPBI VND
Dei 'ierk
(Clrcull "out I Bi ill
. :: i-R-is
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND rOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. M006-B *
Ii f:!-: i :'
FRANK IIINM.V'.HAKI-:
I-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS i
T-. All Creditors and All Perwins Hav-
ing Claims or Demands AaraliiH Said
!:
You are hereby notified and re-
iiu... ,. ,,i. .... uny ciaims and de-
mands which you may havi aaralnHl
he estate of FRANK HU.VNINOHAKK
deceased late of Dade County, Flo-
i,,.,.. .-, in.- County JudKes oi Dade
County, and file the same in duplicate
and as provided in Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, in their offices in
the County Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within six calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, .-r the same uiii be
barred.
Dated al Miami. Florida, this I9lh
day of February, A.D. 196f
ANN M Hl'NNINOHAKE, a l< a
ANNA MARY HUNNINCJHAKH
A Exei \n rix
r rsi publication of this notlci i a
ih. L:;ni day of February, l( -
MYERS K M'l.AN \- PORTER
Alton > for Bxecuti la
- \\ 1st Sir.-, t
Miami Florids
: 23 :: 1-8-15
on
MIAMI BEACH
oivvextio^ Hall
SATURDAY, MARCH 2-8:30 P.M.
SUNDAY-MARCH 3-2:30 P.M.
t!
' .- ...
jftft
I:

HARifM
GLOBETfiOTJERS

X
*
HARIEM GlOBETROntRS
VS
WASHINGTON GENERALS
- PIUS -
THE GLOBETROTTERS
CELEBRATED
ADDED ATTRACTIONS
All SEATS RESERVED
PRICES S2 00S2 jO-SJ 00-S^ >1
SAVE $1.00
CHIlDftEN UNDER 11
SUNDAY-2:30 wowckiy
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
M'AM BEACH CONVENTION HA.'. A.
JORDAN MARSH STORES at 1501 B scavie Si.d hi *"i-,
d Shoopinq Ceoter S'-"'ise Sr-oppmg C^.w In f-t. Laud
IN THE COuNTV JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FlORiDA IN PROBATE
Nc. "7636-C
In RE: El'
HENRY !(i i.-'irv
Decei '
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO yl.l. PERSONS' INTERESTED
IN Till: BSTATB <>F SAID DE-
CEDBNT
You aie hereby notified that a
written Instrument purportlntt to be
the Usi ;;i and testament of said
deredent has been admitted to pro-
bate In said Court You are hereby
commanded within >ix calendar monthi-
from the date of the first publication
of this notice to appear In said Coun
ami shoe cause, if any you can, whj
the a- Ion of said Court In admitting
saul will to probate should not
unrevdkod.
Plrsi ni .-.in n i>( this notlci
the i:ird day f February, 191 -
UBORCJBT CLARK
County JudRe
By: MELD \ c dick
\''. CYPEN I H'i OFFICES
Atl rnej
-. Arthur tlodfrej Road
Miami Bea< h Fl rid 13U
i/Z3 3/1-R-l"
IN THE COUNTV JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR CADE COUNTY.
FLORID* IN PROBATE
Nc. "T6C0-C
In RE: Estate I
CI.AKENCK I. I'AliTMOI.DT
Deceawad
NOTICE TC CREDITORS
To All CTedltors and Ml Persons
Having Claim- or Demands Against
Saul K.state:
You are her. 1 > I fled and requir-
ed to present any rlalms a*:.-! demands
u-htrh vou rri-v have :urainst the
estate of CI-ARENCE K BAHTHOLDT
ueceaeeil iate ol 1 M Countv. Flo-
rida, to the County Judges ol Dade
County, ami file Ihe same In duplicate
and as provided In S-, tion 733.11',.
Florida Statut. -, In thi ir offices in the
County Court],, us- m Dadi County.
Florida, within .-i\ calendar months
from the time : thi tlrsl i.ith'ieatlon
hereof or the n.. \. ill l-i i-;'-od.
Dated at Miami. Florid, i this
day of February, i- l6H.
As Adml .' .ilor
Cum 'r* *'.'mi "*' A''' >A
First pabllcal of I "tlce
the i:inl day it '' ">'. "";s
u i MILTON \ PRIEDV w
Attorney for Administrator
(]
on
1111 Amsl.-y \:n
Miami. Florida
2'W 3 1-R-l".
IN THE COUNTV JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
NO. 77988
k late i
Fit H K Al FFMAN
. ,s.sl
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
| .1 Al. I
Ha | l 'lalmi Demand* .\^ i -
S..M : its
j
ed to | nt o mn and
. r havi
.w H KAl'FFM VN
... ii lade -Count: Florida
i hidi i' untj
and .-- .
I
. '. i
I LIT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
No. 68-2738.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
- i \ -i:ii;i:u.
I lalntiff,
\ -
VANCE S! i:i;R.
Inf. nda'M
T' i VANCE SEIOER
i iri envllle, Maryland
. i Bdmonvton Terrace
Apartment No. 2"
v \ \ WEIGEEt
I th.ii Rill i' i l"i
Divorce ho
and vu ar
of yo iir A
.... .
IN Ell. POLI..M
rth Street, M mi F
. und file tl

' rciiR '' an
. ... ;.
-ii f., i luda '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
No. 68-2781
CIVIL ACTION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
KARA Ji IFFRB a, k SARA
di I VAIJ3TTE,
Plaintiff.
YU
I.CIS de Lh-VALETTE,
I 'el'ellllant
TO: I,CIS de Iji-VAI-ETTE
M Momingsidi Di
i isslnins;, New Voi :-
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a complaint lor divorce has been
filed against you, and you ar. required
to servi a -,|i> of your Answer to
thi.....mplaint on the Plaintiffs At-
torney. MICl'Kl. A BIAREZ, 110
ii ayne Tower Suite i-il'. l"" Bul-
cnyne Blvd., Miami. Florida and file
an original Answei In the office of
I. rl. of the Circuit i'our' on or
before the 27 day of March, l88. if
you fail to do --. a default will he
aa*a'ns1 you for Ihe relief de-
mand, -l in the complaint
. \ i'KIi ai Mlam Florida, the 31
daj "I F.hrilarv. !
i: i: LEATH ERMAN
i 'Ierk, Clrcull 'ourl
Dade County, Flotilla,
By K M I.YMAN
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Courl S. ..i'
MIOCBI- A SCARBZ
\ Iti ey for Plaintiff
' v.. r Suite 812
Miami, Florida
: ::: J 1-8-15
NOTICE BY PLBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR D'l^E
COUNTY. IN CHANCEERY
No. 68-2706
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
RAYMi >N Rl '.MAN,
FRANCES ROMAN,
11, '"i..m
Tl MRS FRANCES IV 'MAN
. i ii
Stateii Islat d, New York
You FRANCES IMiWMAN, are
hereby m-iifie.l thai Bill ol Coir
plan: fur Divorci has ii.ei. filed
ngainsl > -n .and \ "U ure required '. i
-,i\. ., opy of your Answer or IMead-
Ing to the Bill of cmolunt on the
Plaintiff1* attorney, l-i N\ and JOHN-
SON, id"- Blacayne Building, 19 West
Flagler street. Miami. Florida J8180
ami file the original Answer or Plead-
ing In the office of the clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 25
i day of March, H"; if you fall to do
| so judgment by default will be taken
' against you for the relief demanded
in the li'!! of Complaint
This notice shall be published one*
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH F1.DRIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 2"ih day of February
A D idSfl
B 11 I.EATHEHMAN, Clerk
Circuit CuUrt, Dade County, Florida
Bj : K M I.YMAN
D puty Clerk
(Circuit 'ourt s.al i
DUNN and JOHNSON
41 0 His..,; lie iluildlUK
Miami, Fla 331*0
Attorneys for RATMON human
t 83 3 I-8-1B
the Bill of

i-
Mi '
' '
J M'i
..
Attorney fi : E
-


I'M; AN
"
-Ida
: 23

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 68-2710
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TI IRA Si -I.\ IK.
Plaintiff,
VS
LARS SI ilAIK.
I II fl ; dan:
'in MR I .All.-' BOI.VIK
:v Penn Avenue
Stat. n Island, N.n Y->rk
I IKS Snl.VIK are hereby
: that .i Bill of Complaint for
I livorce has bi i filed aga In* ll -i
you serve i opy of
l | i "it'll
of C .t-
,- in.
\'. iglet
I file
,. i | |ii
reult
lay of
ded
I once
iRfl
LN

' I i
<
la
i

M m
Attorn. | I t Ti R -
S-15


Page 12-B
* Jen is? Fkriatfj/ir
Friday, February 2? !9|JJ
D
le
ij
']
ir
D
w
ir
TENDER-
DELICIOUS. LB.
LOWEST FOOD POKES'...HIGHEST FOOD QUALITY!
/m^lfy^Al FOOD FAIR!
TOP U.S. CHOICE WESTERN- U.S. GOV'T. INSPECTED & U.S. GOVT. GRADED
DELMONICO
STEAKS
K I D 9 I E M\. |% 9 WELL TRIMMED.........LB ^F M
CHUCK STEAKS ^ 59c
CALIFORNIA ROAST 79
CROSSRIB ROAST Hf 99c
GROUND CHUCK 79c
FOOD
FAIR
FEATURES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY AT ALL
FOOD FAIR AND FREDERICH' S STORES
Excluding Koihit Market!
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
3^1 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
v> I YOURS WITH EVERY PURCHASE
GRADE A-OUICK FROZEN FULL CUT MEATY
_ DRUMSTICKS-WINGS ^Bfc ^Qk
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GREENDELL BRAND TOP QUALITY QUICK FROZEN
Beef Steaks :lbbepdkg !79
Service *DeUcAteteen
AVAILABLE WHERE THERE ARE SERVICE COUNTERS.
ALL CHEESE & LUNCH MEATS SLICED TO YOUR ORDER
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Franks Knocks
and Specials
STO COUPON tOiniO WITH fURCHASt fe-'
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5 IMPROVED
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, FCE VALUE PLUS >< MANOLINC CHARGE
S\ .AIL TO SCOTT PAPER CO.PAN-
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59-
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SAVE21C
DECORATOR, WHITE. ASS T COLORS. JUMBO POLL
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WITH
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29
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Scotties FAC,,&T,'S'ES 25'
ROLL
BUNDLE
SAVE 38c IB -LEAN COOKED
Sliced Pastrami .B
SAVE 40c18 -FRESHU SmOkED SMOKfD
Nova Scotia Lox saimon ,, lB
SAVE 50c IB -FRESHIY SMOKED
Large Whitefish i. 99
SAVE 10c -DEl'ClOUS HOME MADE
Pickled Herring EA M29c
SAVE 10c-OlD FASHION GERMAN
Bologna smE lB 69c
WISCONSIN FINEST
Muenster Cheese 79
Chopped Liver lB 39
WHITE &
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LIMIT ONE BUNDLE. PLEASE. WITH
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ESKIMO PIE
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LIMIT ONE CAN. EITHER BRANO.PIEASE. WITH OTHf R
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FRESH
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MACKEREL
.LB.
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FOOD FAIR CREAMED
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CHEESE
l-LB.
, CUP
29
SAVE I0e-MORTON S FROZEN
CREAM
PIES
U OZ.
S VARIETIES PKG.
29
SAVE 10c CAL-IDA FRENCH FRIES OR
i FROZEN AA
* POTATOES2 AT<
GARDEN FRESH WESTERN
2
LBS.
39
FLAVORFUL BROCCOLI.GARDB!K 29'
TENDER BRUSSELS SPROUTS 29!
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79
IDAHO POTATOES ^^"10
LB.
BAG


"cJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 41 Number 8
Miami, Florida, Friday, February 23, 1968
Section C
land bridge be-
tween Europe and
Africa with its
ports of Haifa,
Ashdod and Eilat
ser vi ng the na-
tion's trade, west-
ward through the
Mediterranean and
the Atlantic Ocean
and eastward *o
the Far East.
Of the more than
two million six
(hundred thousand
inhabitants, 2.-
340 000 are Jews
250JJOO Vosle-ns.
It .rh
Jewish festivals 37e official holi
days freedom of Access to the
holy places C the various de
nominations is guaranteed by
Mw as il their free
dom of worship
^t thr sites Israel
s .i republic and
a parl.jrnentary de-
mocracy. Its Presi-
dent elee'ed every
five years by the
Knesset, a s ingle
1 hambei 120 scat
I* i
^
re.ves and appoints d
plomats. signs treaties and
'le'j slation. and when necess
upon th* leader of the party with the
largest electoral sup*
po't to fo*m a Gov-
imanl, The Knesse* is elect.
>d every four years by secret
riallot unde' propor'-onal represen
'd'on on a Y \ countrywide basis
'.. lh 'he r ghl f /to vo*e held by evefv
8 years ^^^and over. Executive
. pow" i /ested in the Cabinet wheh is
spomible to the Knesset and holds
" only as long as it emovs p.r
'
cooperative and
private enterprises
with 70 percent
of the workers
employed in pri-
vate undertak-
mgs. 12 percent
in State enter-
prises and the rest
m cooperative-
owned plants.
Given peace, the
State of Israel has
all the potential
*o play a major
role i n the eco-
'd" ( socal and
cultural develop
nent of the '." I
die East and for
iSt nq benefit
nanfc nd
i'
20i ii ANNIVERSARY SUPPLEMENT
D**7kVVl*
1
11
\
-*e=r.
V\*

* -*
wtl

. 11
J*>
>. ;
M & -*i


Page 2-C
*Jft*ist' fhrtdHar
Friday. February 23. 1968

I
1368 ISRAEL'S 2Dth
ANNIVERSARY YEAR
Di
ie-
a
in
EH
wi
in
S H ALOM
to the state of
ISI^fL
on
their20
years
of remarkable growth
*Q
3D I 2ST E 'S
Wywv (tWu^
i


Friday, February 23, 1968
""Jenisti ncridiain
STATe of iSRAeL
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
PROCLAMATION INAUGURATING
THE CELEBRATION OF ISRAEL'S TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY
Paqe 3-C
:
:

~ lauthority of the Government of Israel, the Knesset and the Chief
fXy> Rabbinate in the Land and of the Zionist Organization throughout
M^ V the world, here in the House of the President in reunified Jerusalem,
_---------the Holy and Kingly City, it is my great privilege to inaugurate
the celebrations marking the twentieth year of the renewed sovereignty of
the State of Israel.
May the year now opening auspiciously before us, the year 5728, in
the calendar of our people, be consecrated both in the Land and in the entire
Diaspora, to deepening, solidifying, enriching the living relationship between
the people of Israel, wherever it is dispersed, and its eternal Fatherland which
two decades ago became free and independent once again.
Having risen to such exalted heights in the great and heroic days
of the past year; being confronted with such historic tasks in the year to
come, our people is all the more prepared to celebrate the completion of
Israel's second decade with the elevation of spirit, the heartfelt thanksgiving,
the far-reaching constructive activity befitting such grave times and such
high hopes. Let us revive this year the ancient custom of pilgrimage to
Jerusalem, city of our glory, and to all our Holy Land pilgrimage from all
Jewry's communities in the world, following in the footsteps of those of our
brothers and sisters who have streamed here in great numbers during this
Festival of Succoth.
Let this year, this festive year, be the time of realization for every
one of our people who has determined to settle in the Land; for every one who
plans to give of his means and strength to its rebuilding. And those who are
not ready or able to do so, let them and their households come this year to
witness the wonders that have been wrought in this Land of our fathers and
our future. And thus it will become clear to all the nations of the world that
the relationship of our people to its Land is no matter of lip-service but a
living and everlasting love: that the soul of our people is bound up forever
with this Land, now, as in the days of old, and forever.
As in the first days of the return to Zion from Babylonian exile, let
the great and heartening call ring out in all the countries of our dispersion:
"Whoever there is among you of all His people the Lord his God be with
him let him go up!".
torn ,ioy vnVx *n ,iay Vdd dd: 'd "
Delivered in the House of the President in Jerusalem,
4th day of Succoth 5728,22 October 1967.


] Page 4-C
*jnisti fhridliain
Friday. February 23, 1968
r
1.
(
i
r
Israel's_____
Economic
Development
The story oi a nation's economic
development is generally told in sta-
tistics. But any person who visited
Israel in the early 1950's and who
returned in the 1960's for a second
visit needs no statistics to tell him of
ihe progress Israel has made In 'he
20 years since its independence.
New cities have mushroomed up
out of the sand and rock, seemingly
overnight, to give the modern day
inhabitants a world of opportunity
and satisfaction never before avail-
able to them. Alona with the cities,
have qrown agriculture, new farm-
ing settlements, new fields rescued
from the passage of time, new crops,
and new farming techniaues. Along
with the cities have grown new fac-
tories producing the full ranqe of
products needed bv a modern so-
ciety. Many problems still await the
Israel economy but any lesser wed
than miraculous fails to describe the
accomplishments.
Arad, Carmiel, Ashdod Eilat,
Kiryat Shemona, Dimona and Addu-
lam, are just a few of the cities es-
tablished since 1948. Other cities
such as Ashkelon, Beersheba and
Hadera have undergone such inten-
sive development so as to be nearly
unrecognizable to those who knew
these areas before.
Israel's economy has been grow-
ing at an average 9 percent in gross
national product every year, which
gives it one of the highest growth
rates in the world. National income
is over $1,000 per capita which now
compares favorably with the more
advanced nations of Europe.
The transition has been from a
comparatively primitive economy
to a modern economy. An accom-
plishment which it should be re-
called was achieved at a time
winn the nation faced a border
challenge which forced it to spend
a disproportionate amount of sore-
ly needed capital on defense.
Kcw has the miracle of Israel's
cccncmic development been accom-
plished? The answer is threefold:
2eal, organization and capital. If any
one of these three had been missing
there is little doubt that not only
would Israel have failed to make the
economic strides described, but she
would have without a doubt hav?
been wiped out by her antagonistic
noighbors lonq ago.
ISRAELI VITALITY
The zeal is represented in the
vitality with which the Israelis have
marshalled their sUength to accultur-
ate and absorb more than twice their
number in new immiarants. It is
shown in their love for the land and
the willingness with which their
young volunteer for work in border
kibbutzim, qo out to farm new areas,
embrace western technology as if
thev had been born to it, and effec-
tively apoly this technology with the
necessary adaptations to their own
unique conditions. If there have been
failures in specific projects, these
failures can usually be ascribed to
on excess of zeal, rather than in-
difference.
The organization is shown in the
Israeli ability to bring a project from
-'aming tr. fruition with the use of
its own architects and planners, con-
tractors and builders, and in the
final analvsis foremen and workers.
On each level, each knows his task
rnd is able to accomoHsh it. Without
the ton to Kottcm capability of taki"a
t^p caDi'al and u=ina it to tu'n
dr<^*ns into reality there can be no
reality.
The third and in many ways the
most crucial element in the area of
economic development is capital. It
have risen from S63 million to $407
is the elemont most available to those
who need it least, and most scarce
omenq those who need it most. Put-
ting it another way the rich oet
richer and the poor qet poorer. In
the world of nations a state without
capital has not even the bootstraps
with which to pull itself up. It is
poisibie for nations to slowly, aqo-
nizinqly accumulate local capital,
but this is depenaent upon trje coun-
try's natural wealth and a favorable
balance of trade. Israel had compar-
atively little natural wealth and a
heavy influx of new immigrants
guaranteed that the balance of trade
would offer little opportunity, at least
in the eaTly years, for the accrual of
local capital.
Yet the capital did come. It came
States. It came in the form of repar-
in the form of loans from the United
ations from Germany. And most im-
portant it came from the hearts of
Jews the world over who set and
are still settinq records in personal
generosity which may never be
matched.
SOURCES OF CAPITAL
At first the money came in the
form oi donations to Jewiih charities,
money which went to build the tent
camps for the new immiqrants. Then
it came in the form of Israel Bonds,
earmarked for economic develop-
ment. The capital helped build the
modern communications network of
roads and hiqhways without which
economic development is unthink-
able. It financed the extension of
electrical power throughout the coun-
try. As a result output since 1955 has
increased threefold. The number of
emp'ovees has qrown from 127.001
to 225.000 and industrial exports
million.
.. *--*-
The accomplishments are a cause
for pride for all who have had a
part in Israel's economic develop-
ment, but it is impossible for Israehs
and those who support her to ease
the pace of development. The pres-
sures ol a hostile environment still
threaten instant annihilation. A se-
cure and mature Israeli industrial
capability is perhaps the surest
quarantee of peace in the Middle
East.
The Israel government is ac-
tively encouraging foreign invest-
ment. Under the recently amended
Law for the Encouragement oi Cap-
ital Investment, incentives such as
large allowances for depreciation,
and relief from property, income,
customs and purchase taxes are
given to approved enterprises.
It should be recalled that the Is-
raelis tax themselves more than any
other nation in the world. The gov-
ernment'* willinqness to provide re-
!:f :n this area is r clear indication
of the warmth and cooperation in-
vestors in the country can expect.
Industrial aiants such as Ford,
Hilton Kaiser, Philco, Sheraton and
Studebaker have already joined with
250 other American enterprises in
establishinq business ventures in Is-
rael. Where warranted, the qovern-
ment throuqh its Industrial Bank
makes loans available. While the
economv is mixed includinq pri-
vate, state and cooperative enter-
prises most of the plants are pri-
vately owned and these account for
the employment of approximately
70 percent of the wage earners.
GOING TO ISRAEL?
SEE AN ISRAELI
TRAVEL AGENT
HE Knows About:
^3*^^?,' B5ITnALFA' CEASAR,A< DAA, EREZ, GEDERA, HAGOVRIM,
ILANIYA, JABNEEL. KARKUR, LEHAVOT, HABASHAN, MA'AGAN NESHER
OFAQIM, PAROD, QEDMA, RA' ANANA, SARID, TIVON, URIM YAGUR, ZORAH
and of course
TEL-AVIV, JERUSALEM, HAIFA, EILATH
AT
.
MIAMI BEACH
9457 Harding Avenue 865-2357
BAL BAY TRAVEL CENTERS
CORAL GABLES
2101 Ponce De Leon Blvd. 444-9876
:-


Friday. February 23, 1968
* kt* i s* nrrHinr
Paqe 5-C
The ancient city oi \azarcth with
its twisting, narrow streets.
** Mgp^B |
TWA Brings Israel
Close To U.S. Cities
The modern state of Israel on the shores oi the blue-qreen
Mediterranean Sea combines, the advantages of natural beauty
with.a climate similar to that of southern California or Florida
andi tor the historically inclined traveler, the rich traditions and
many shrines of both the Jewish and Christian faiths.
Israel's dynamic record of development as. a 21-year-old
stale makes it a natural tourist attraction, for the "Land of the
Bib;e" draws visitors from every faith and nationality. Its con-
trasts are almost startling.
Trans World Airlines' 600-mile per hour StarStream jets
touch down at the modern Lod airport every day of the week.
Yet in the interior areas, donkeys and other means of almost
primitive forms of transporation still are in daily use. Tel Aviv
is one of the world's most modern cities, while Jerusalem is one
of the world's oldest continuously inhabited centers.
While there is not too much of historical interest in Tel Aviv,
it is Israel's largest and busiest city. However, it does boast the
ancient seapoit of Jaffa and recalls the Biblical story of Jonah
anci the whale. The city is the natural springboard for tours
north through the Sharon Vallev, alona the Mediterranean and
south to Beeisheba. the Dead Sea and the Negev.
In centuries-old Jerusalem the tourists find Mt. Zion, the
living symbol of Judaism, and the vicinity is rich with Biblical
heritagethe memories of King David, and the Sanhedriah
Rock Tomb. More modern features are the House of Parliament,
the President's residence and the Hebrew University.
From Jerusalem it is only a few hours by automobile to
Isrcel's second largest and most beautiful cityHaifa. Spread
against the slopes of Mt. Carmel with a sweeping view of the
Mediterranean,. Haifa is the home of the Bahai Shrine and Gar-
dens, Elijah's Cave, the Israel Institute of Technology and a
Carmelite monastery.
A short drive from Haifa is Nazareth, with many Christian
shrines, and still a sleepy village. Also nearby is ancient Ti-
berias, the Sea of Galilee and Capernaum with its ruins of the
first known synagogue. The entire area is filled with mementoes
of the Bible.
Tiberias, aside from its historical importance, has one of
the best winter climates of Israelwarm, dry and sunnv at all
times. The tourist can take medicinal hot baths as the Rgmans
did centuries ago or swim in the waters of the Sea of Galilee.
The resort area has excellent hotels, lovely miblic gardens and
many old tombs and fortifications dating back two thousand
years and more.
Even warmer than Tiberias is the oort cf Eilat, deep in the
Negev desert at the entrance to the Red Sea. Here m the dead
of winter you may swim, fish, skin dive, take underwater ohoto-
grcphs and ride in alassbottomed boats offering a close-up view
of marine life below.
t i
Isifee!.has a wide rang of hotels us evert price cateqofv.
from dlu*i establishments to vouth haetefc afcd hospices. At
places like the new Tel Aviv Hilton risina above the shores of
the Mediterranean, the King David in Jerusalem, or the Zion
is Haifa, or at resort hotel'. *uch aa the Galei Kinneret in Tiber-
ias, rates are very reasonable.
"" fWXTin addition to offerinq daily service to Israel from
throughout the United States, has many interesting all-inclusive
tours of Israel.
. m -
Welcome to the world of
Trans World Airlines
TWA
Tour 1 Visiting
ISRAEL 18 Days
(17 Nights'
LONDON 3 Days
IT LM 70
INDEPENDENCE DAY
Tour "1"
ISRAEL 13 Days
ROME 4 Days LONDON 4 Days
iT-um
ROME 4 Day
Tour "2"
ISRAEL 77 Days
LONDON 3 Days
IT-IM 76
PARIS 3 Days
ROME4Da.y5
INDEPENDENCE DAY
Tour "2" ISRAEL 77 Days
LISBON 3 Days
MADRID 3 Days
1
ITLH SO
ROME 4 Days
Tour "3" Visiting
ISRAEL 77 Days
LISBON 3 Days
MADRID 3 Days
ROME 4 Days
Tour "4" Visiting
ISRAEL 77 Days
PARIS 3 Days
FLORENCE 3 Days
ISTANBUL 3 Days
Tour "5" Visiting
ISRAEL 77 Days
ROME 4 Days
IT-IM '
ATHENS 3 Days
VIENNA 3 Days
LENINGRAD 2 Days
Tour "6" Visitin
ISRAEL 77 Day.
CSCO\ 3 Days
. UDON 2 Days
PASSOVER TOURS
ISRAEL 73 Days
ROME 4 Days
LONDON 4 Days
IT '. 7'.
PASSOVER TOUR
Including 8 DAY MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE on the T.S.S. QUEEN ANNA MARIA
FROM HAIFARETURNING TO HAIFA
ISRAEL 10 DAYS
CRUISE 7 DAYS LONDON 3 DAYS
IT-LKM
COMPLETE PACKAGE from New York
from '878
bee your travel agent or call TWA
36 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD 228-71st STREET, MIAMI BEACH


Page 6-C
fJenist ncridHair
Friday, February 23, 1968
$18 Million Raised
In Miami For Israel
As the State of Israel prepares
to celebrate its 20th anniversary of
independence, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation is makinq plans
for its own 30th anniversary of serv-
ice to the Jewish end general com-
munities.
If is particularly meaninqful that
these anniversaries toqether with
the 20th anniversary of the foundinq
of the United Jewish Appeal will
lake place at a iime of triumph and
tension for the State of Israel.
The brilliant military victory of
the Israel Defense Forces in those
six fateful days of June 1967, will be
remembered in Jewish history alonq
with the feats of our ancestors in
Biblical times.
But the sober lealization that Is-
rael has only won another battle
and not a final victory has slowly
but surely made itself felt. The re-
arminq of the Arab armed forces,
the renewed terrorist attacks into Is-
raeli territory, the continued blockade
of the Suez Canal all make the
evidence of a continuinq emerqency
overwhelminq.
It is for this reason that the board
of qovernors and executive commit-
tee of Federation authorized th< joint
campaiqn for the Combined Jewish
Appeal and the Israel Emerqencv
Fund of 1968 which i-5 now under
way.
C*ur leadership felt that the qenu-
ine outpourinq of support for Israel
v/hi6h enabled us to raise more than
S3.000.000 in little more than 30 davs
last summer was a true siqn of
community maturity.
Therefore, after an initial recom-
mendation for one campaiqn qoal
was put forth, a more realistic and
larger one was officially determined
for a minimum of SI.991.200 for
the Combined Jewish Appeal and
an unlimited amount for the second
Israel Emerqsncy Fund drive.
At the time of ti.e announcement
of this tarqet, we pointed out that
unless Greater Miami raises this
amovnt this year our continued
growth as an orqanized Jewi-.h com-
munity is in serious jeopardy.
To achieve this goal calls for on
averaqe increase in excess of 21 p=r
cent in the CJA division of the cam-
paian, end o' the some time for lifts
to the Israel Em-rqfncv Fund corre-
spondina to the needs of the bo-
leaquered peop'e of Israel.
In the vears 1939 (when we staqed
cur first CJA drive) throuqh the his-
toric 12 months iusi passed in 1967,
the people of G-eater Miami have
made available the stanqerina ?"m
of more than S18.290.000 in free dol-
lars to the United Jewish Anp^al.
Althouah the steady destruction of
European Jewrv bv the Hitler reqime
was anrxjrent to manv of us at the
time of Federation's birth, it **tn n*
mtU the fmal months of World War II
thai reallv siqnifi<~ant sum<= of monev
were raised in Greater Miami.
Tn the fir"* s*\ eral years a cm-
Call Us Today.
For All Your
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MAKE YOUR
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V0LPE TOURS
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Phone 532-7326
5880 Bird Road, Miami
Phone 665*6289
bination of factors kept our fund rais-
mq success at a low level: the de-
pression, which stayed lonqar in
South Florida than in much of the
nation: the seasonal nature of much
of our population's business and pro-
fessional people upon whom the
weight of the campaign bore most
heavily; and a disbelief by many in
the Jewish population a= to the ac-
tual extent of the qrcwinq Hitler
holocaust.
As reports of the wholesale ex-
termination cf Jew3 in Eurooe spread,
and as Allied armies advanced to
the startlina and unbelievc.ble con-
frontation with Nazi concentration
camps, receipts for thp Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and United Palestine
Appsal mounted sharply.
Bv 1948. wi'h the birth of the
United Jewish Appeal and the State
cf Israel, record sums were forth-
cominq. In the hectic month* follow-
inq the birth of Israel and the empty-
inn of the Displaced Person cmos.
intere:t and income for the CJA re-
mc'ned hiqh.
The Sinai can.paiqn of 1956,
combined with a pcpjlcion SDurt in
the mid-1950s aqain =ent CJA results
forward, but the reversal was short-
lived.
The recession of 1958. counted
with an unusual freeze in H>e 1957-58
tourist season. deoresc ed the milestone of its 25th anniv?r-
conditions here for several years,
rmA it was not until Fed-^^i'vi n*i"<"
sary in 1963 that a steady trend of
progress was felt in campaiqn re*
suits.
Four straight CJA campaiqns.
achieved oi surpassed their goals,!
auguring well for the 1968 drive into
which we only recently entered.
The local agencies Mt. Sinai-
Hospital, the Jewish Home for the.
Aged, the YM-YWHA of Greater
Miami, Jewish Vocational Service,
Jewish Family and Children's Serv-t
ice. Bur-au of Jewish Education.;
Community Chaplaincy Service and"
the National Council of Jewish Worn-:
en's immigration department for-,
Florida have individually and
collectively expanded their services
and facilities to meet the qTowinq
naeds of a qrowinq community.
Their achievements can continue
to advance only if funds made avail-
able to them match the increase in
lH* qualitv and quantity of pro-
arams. performance and personnel.
The steady inflationary process
me'ees increase? in operatinq costs a
m"''""' fac'or annually, and that alone
re""ire= increases in allocations.
When we add in the personnel
and facilities necessary to meet the
influx of thousands of new Jewish
residents each year, an increase in
f;v'm of 21 percent is necessary in
1968 just to keep pace with our local
needs.
Even today in the midst of the
1068 CJA-IEF effort, we are conduct-
inq a detailed campaiqn evaluation
study so that the proqress in our
next five years will enable Greater
Miami to celebrate the 25th anniver-
sary of the State of Israel in 1973 as
one of the major Jewish communities
of the world in every sense of the
term.
But bv the early 1950s apathy-
set in. and onlv the qrowina accept-
ability of our local aqencies as im-
n->rtant elements of community serv
ice to all eqments of the population
prevented a serious downturn in
cammirrn results.
CM I^V FOR ltASI VC
ClMJUY DRIVING A NEW AIR COND. CAR
EVERY 24 MO.
AT LOW SENSIBLE PRICES!
94.52 MUSTANG
98.90 PLYM. FURY III 2 DR.
10248 FORD GAL. 500 2 DR.
97.05 CHEY. IMP. 2 DR.
106.92 PONT. CAT. 2 DR. H.T.
1424)8 IUICK RIVIERA
. 166.78 CADILLAC COUPE
\ 175.26 LINCOLN CONT. 2 DR.
Information about maintenance and Insurance Leases available.
CALL 759-4351
9999
NE. 2nd Ave.
A VIS
"WE TRY
HARDER.'
AVIS RENTS AND LEASES ALL MAKES OF CARS. FEATURES PLYMOUTH


Pri
riday, February 23. 1968
* liwliaft ft^ridMain
Paqe 7-C


JM SALUTES
THE BONDS
FOR ISRAEL
FASHION SHOW
AND THE STATE
OF ISRAEL ON ITS
20TH ANNIVERSARY
Highlighting the show and
luncheon, a premiere of designs by
Israel's finest couturiers
and craftsmen including Beged-Or,
Lola Beer, Aled, Stefan Braun ...
names that are famous for originality
and quality in design. The
fashion show will be presented and
staged by Jordan Marsh, with
commentary by Mrs. Eleanor Morris,
fashion director.
Leslie S. Fulop, president of Beged-Or,
will be guest of honor at this
' international premiere, Thursday,
February 29, at 12 noon, at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach.
M :LOWOAHAlRtSMlONS
1501 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
J


Page 8-C
Wherever
you want
to go ...
For all
your
travel needs
Call
MIAMI BEACH: 1006 LINCOLN ROAD / PHONE 538 7641
MIAMI: 330 E. FLAGLER STREET / PHONE 3771611
L.^1/ %j ralit latic 11 -
fo t/ic
*^tcttc of Israel
WALDMAN HOTEL
WALDMAN and
LANDESMAN
FAMILIES
-


Friday, February 23, 1968
fJewlst ftcridKari
Page 9-C
Greater Miami's
Bond With Israel
Some day when the full story of
Miami's exemplary Israel Bond story
is written the key word will be "in-
volvement."
Miamians, at the forefront for
Israel through the years, derive a
sense of achievement and deep
personal satisfaction throuqh their
involvement in the Israel Bond pro-
gram, and both Isiael and ,the com-
munity are the richer for it.
Whether it lies in the nature of
the community, its youthfulness, the
makeup of its citizenry including as
it does a nucleus of "old timers" and
a large proportion of comparative
newcomers, the Israel Bond program
in Greater Miami has developed a
character all its own and in doing
so has added a dimension to the
life of the community.
Many have found in the Israel
Bond activities a lewarding glow of
identification with Israel, a oneness
with the people of Israel -citizens
and soldierswhose deeds have
made Israel a respected nation
among the nations of the world. This
redounds not onlv to the benefit of
Israel and of the individuals con-
cerned but to the community as a
whole.
Through a series of dinners soon-
sored by synagogues, major organi-
zations and by the residents of sev-
eral high-rise aoartment buildings,
thousands of Miamians are able to
aive expression to their community
identification as well as their identi-
fication with Israel. These dinners
are projected not merely as func-
tions held on behalf of Israel Bonds
but as celebrations for and with
Israel. Thev are gala events., filled
with meaninafulness for everv indi-
vidual who takes pnrt, and who thus
shares in the joy of building Israel.
Highlightina the year's activities
is the annual Ambassador's Ball, a
colorful and brilliant event originated
in Miami which has now beon adoot-
ed by other communities throuahout
the land. Hiahliahtina the B<-'1 are
a number of ceremonies which aive
broad meaning to our community's
role on behalf of Israel.
These include the presentation of
the emissaries of foreign govern-
ments whose official presence at the
Ball is an expression of qoodwill
among the nations; the presentation
of temple and crnanizational hon-
crees, reflecting Miami's bond-with-
Israel; and the presentation of young
ladies come-of-age. symbolic of the
rhain of tradition linkinn nene^t'T
to aen?ration in the service of the
people of Israel. The de^'tan'e cere
mcny, originated in Miami som
vears ago, has since been adopted
in many communities, both here and
abroad.
It was also here in Miami that
1968 Sponsor Pin
the National Society of Honorees of
Isiael came into being. The Hon-
orees of Israel are men and women
w.10 have been at the forefront in
the endeavor for Israel. Events ol
privileged participction for the As-
sociates of the Society of Honorees
again a reflection of the program
of involvement and identification
includes the temple and organization
functions, the Ambassador's Ball, the
Chanukah Festival, the National
Sponsors' Luncheon, the National
Inaugural Dinner, Capital for Israel
specie! events, coveted awards such
ns the Sponsor's Pin and Chen
chorms, and the Miami-Israel Oleh
Regel Tour.
The Oleh Regel Tour, which was
originated in Miami last year dra-
matically demonstrates the bridge of
identification fostered by the Isiael
Bond program. Oleh Regel, tradi-
tionally the "Festival Journey." goes
back to biblical days. In those days
there was but one Temple in all the
worldthe Temple in Jerusalem. Out
of nostalgia and the desire to join
in calebration with fellow Jews in
Israel, people in distant lands form-
ed Oleh Regel groups and together
journeyed to the Holy Land. In due
time, Oleh Regel became a veritable
folk institution. The "pilgrims" ex-
perienced the exalted joy of the Fes-
tival in Zion and shared in a journey
which was a unigue joy all its own.
As they moved lrom town to town,
they would be received with much
gladness. They made friends and re-
newed old acguamtances and ihus
?hared in what became a mission of
goodwill between their cities of ori-
gin, the places they visited and
Israel.
With the des.ruction of the Tem-
ple, the custom of the Oleh Regel
dicapDeared. Jerusalem was thsre,
but it was in the hands cf stranaers
and for manv long 03rior's. as in our
day up to the S x-Dav War, J->r"~.a-
lem was a forb'dden city. In tV;s
reflect, Tune. 1967. wn- a turning
p-int in Jewish his'orv. Not only did
Imao!eni and th-? ha .'owed WeM~rn
Wa'l r' the ancini Temole beome
acces-ible, but for th f'rst tim^ in
uvo thousand vears, Jer,,salem h^-
lopaod to the TQws to all Jews, ond
vi';t.r;-! Jerusalem !ck on the char-
acter c' a hemf^omina-
In this spirit, the Miami-Israel Oleh
p^o^l came into being. I' took o'-r >
sr< weeks after the liberc-ti^n of J>rti-
f-l-m and was hailed throng'iout
th country ond in J'rae! as a cher-
.1 revival oi an ancient tradi'"">n.
I; was pind possih'e hv th" valiant
,.,-., ~r.-i wem^n of Israel of our dav
rnd th^ tf!wart manner in which
Jews of t>>a w*rH stood b" tnm.
The O'-ou*-. visited Israel the Nw
from >se Golan HHahts to E! Ansh
and fwi Dan to Beers^eba. Tnov
m^t with Israelis from David 3=>n-
r.-'r.n to Gen. Yitzhak Rab'n. to the
Hbb"r7.r>ik-turned soldier. Thev r^-
fr.^r-,d tna step-? of the ancient O'oh
Rpao' wi'h t^e orcoession from the
heights of Mt. Zion to what was for
two thousand years the Wailing
Wall end in our day once again be-
came the Wfll of Exaltation.
The 1968 Oleh Regel will simu-
late the Oleh Regel of olden davs.
Apprcpriately. it is beina scheduled
to co ncide with the celebration in
Israel cf the historic liberation of
Jerusalem and will brina a grouo of
Miamians to the Holy City to join
with their Israeli brothers in this ex-
alted celebration. Thus is the Bond
with Israel being forged in Miami
from day to day by Bonds for Israel.
w
PAN
AMERICAN
QAI\IICOF MIAMI
250 S.E. FIRST STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33131
mbtn Ittmt tmm Mmt o*m* tmmm IwfO
Takes Note
With Pleasure
1968 ISRAEL'S
ANNIVERSARY


Page 10-C
+Jelst ncrkfiar
Friday. February 23 19}}

i
\
t
i.

D
le
C
'I
in
D<
wi
1r
twentieth
anniveRSARy
the stRenqth And fORtitude which have seen !
isracI thpouoh the difficult fORtiutive yeans
of nAtionhood will tindotiBtedly insuae its
continued development And paospemtv
tc the state of isracL and to hep spiritual dependents
evepywheRe, we extend our war congratulations


'.


Friday. February 23. 1968
*Jenisl> tJcridKaw
Paqe 11-C
BEST WISH US
on the occasion or .
W
'

.,:

/ CONVENIENT
OFFICES
SERVE
BADE COUNTY
Main Offiei 101 East Flaglei St Allapaltah Btinch 1400 N.W. 36th St. Edison Center Branch 5800 N.W. 7th Avi.
Sky Lake Branch 18300 N.E.I9thAw. Tamiami Branch 1901 S.W. 8th St. Kendall Branch U.S.I at S.W. 104th St.
North Miam! Branch
12600 N.W. 7th Ave.
Cutler Ridg* Branch
10608 Caribbean Blvd.
- :

!: H
J


Page 12-C
+Jenist> fhrkJUar
Friday. February 23. 1968
-
> ? m
- *
il

m
LAND OF THE PROPHETS
. FACING A NEW DESTIt
20
th
Anniversary
Salute to the
State of Israel
ISRAEL, born anew after nineteen centuries. Spanning the ancient with the modern
Fashioned by many tongues into cne nation. United by spiritual and democratic tradi
tions. Where the pages of the Bible come to life. Where the prophets stood proclaim
ing the word of God for peace and for justice.
May the peace it seeks with honor and strength help the State of Israel achieve
its hallowed destiny.
The MIAMI BEACH FIRST NATIONAL
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
ALTON ROAD AT LINCOLN MALL MIAMI BEACH 531 0711
MEMBER:
v-

V
United
Banking
Group
FRANK SMATHERS. JR.. CHAIRMAN

___________
. i'



Friday, February 23, 1968
-Jewls* FkridRmn
Paqe 13-C
ISRAEL'S 20 YEARS OF PROGRESS
Many new nations have emerqed
since the United Nations was estab-
lished 23 years aqo but none has
made as much impact on contempo-
rary history as the one that came
into beinq May 14, 1948.
Since its rebirth as a modern na-
tion Israel has been hobbled by
adversities that could well have
hampered its qrowth. Instead, a na-
tion surrounded by enemies, del-
uged by a torrent of immiqrants, and
lacking in the natuial wealth which
has made some of its neiqhbors rich,
it has harnessed its one siqnificant
attribute a people determined to
succeed.
As Israel enters its 20th year it
celebrates its qrowth from a nation
of some 6C0.GOO to one of mere than
2,600.000 citizens. It celebrates a vi-
brant economy with a qrowth rate
which exceeds that of many Euro-
pean countries. It has been a haven
to the persecuted who have come
and established new lives. Their
pride in livinq in the new Israel is
reflected in the new cities, farms,
factories and roads they have built
on the face of their land.
When the Unitad Nations declared
Israel's sovereiqnty as a nation
amonq nations it was immediately
attacked by the Arabs who pitted
their armies aqainst what seemed
to them to be a phantom force. Yet
these young, untried men and wom-
en forced the invadinq armies into
retreat and provided Israel with the
relative peace it needed to beqin the
determination of its future.
Though two more wars have
upset the often shaky peace of
Israel during its 20 years of exist-
ence, it has managed to win its
share of friends. Its programs in
the Asian and African continents
involve the sending of skilled tech-
nicians to help the newly emerg-
ing nations establish themselves.
At the same time Israel provides
their young people with scholar-
ships enabling them to sharpen
their skills at Israel's leadinq edu-
cational and research facilities.
On the continent Israel's remark-
able will and determination to forqe
new paths of proqress in a lonq-
blighted Middle East have won it
praise from both governments and
people.
In the United States these strengths
have garnered the same respect and
support. The test of this is that while
the people of Israel have demon-
ln line with the nation's
policy of sharing its
experiences and knowledge
with many of the newly
established states in
Africa and Asia, Israel
assists those countries with medi-
cal and technical aid missions
a well as with advisers
from the Nahal agricultural
fighting force such as
he officer shown with an
African unit.
strated their determination to build
a viable nation the people of the
United States have reflected their
support by investing in Israel and
by channeling their dollars through
such institutions as the United Jew-
ish Appeal and Israel Bonds.
Israel's response can be seen in
the building of such monuments as
the Kennedy Memorial in the Judean
Hills and the upcoming Harry S. Tru-
man Peace Center in Jerusalem. Oth-
er similar, though perhaps less phys-
ically overwhelming dedications, are
on view throughout the country.
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
In its international cooperation
program Israel has extended its
services to developing countries end
in the pal vear. 620 Israeli experts
were in the field at the invitation of
the governments concerned or under
the aegis of the United Nations.
Some 1.600 students from these
countries attended 32 courses in Is-
rael and between 1962 and 19S5,
Israeli experts conducted 69 courses
with more than 3,600 participants in
developing countries. Israel, which
officially ccme into being with the
blessing of the community of nations
is helping other young countries sur-
vive in this community.
As to its own achievements in
the area of education, Israel has de-
veloped the Hebrew University, the
Technion and the Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science into institutions of in-
ternational esteem. Next to defense,
education takes the largest part of
the country's budget. Last year there
were appjoximately three-guarters of
a million students enrolled in Israel's
schools and colleges.
In the cultural area Israel has
also excelled. Its Philharmonic Or-
chestra entertains full houses on its
naiive soil as well as in concerts
abroad. The Israel Museum in Jeru-
salem has in its three years of ex-
istence become one of the most pop-
ular local and tourist attractions, dis-
t laying the works of Israelis as well
as obtaining the creations of famed
artiste from abroad. And, to Samuel
Yosef Agnon, who has made Israel
hi = home during the past 60 veers
r"centlv came the coveted Nobel
Prize for Literature.
Thus the heritage of the Jewish
people is ensured by the nation
of Israel and is being shared with
peoples all over the world in self-
less endeavor.
Perhaps one of Israel's greatest
accomplishments in its 20-year-
history is the amalgamation of its
people who have come from such
romantic sounding places as the
Atlas Mountains in Morocco, Yemen,
Kurdistan and Tripoli. Of the coun-
try's population 40 percent are na-
tive born,, the rest come from 100
different countries31 percent from
Europe and America, 14 percent from
Africa and 13 percent from Asia.
While all have a common bond
in their Jewish heritage, they are as
different as the cultural climates in
which they lived. Yet their feeling
for Israel as the spiritual center of
Judaism has brought them together
and helped them overcome their dif-
ferences.
In addition to Isiael's Jewish pop-
ulation there are Arab Moslems and
Christians, Druzes. Circassians, and
the desert Beduins. While each has
its distinct community, their oppor-
tunities for education, health care
and employment ere on a par with
the Jewish population.
The diversity of Israel provides
i's visitors with its attractions. It is
the Land of the Bible with ancient
sites. It is a land of modern cities
literally arowinq cut of the desert.
It is the Israel where the Orthodox
Jew walks through the streets of Je-
rusalem dressed in long-frocks as
did his forefathers in Poland and
Russia while a youna Sabra bathes
along the Tel Aviv shores in a more
contemporary Bikini. It is a land of
past and present accomplishment,
whose future will be determined by
the will of the people.
1968 ISRAEL'S 20th
ANNIVERSARY YEAR


Page 14-C
*.kwisli fhrkfbn
Friday. February 23, ig:s
--_-
See "THE NEW ISRAEL"
FARR TOURS & TRAVEL SERVICE
424 LINCOLN ROAD MALL 531-5327
6705 COLLINS AVENUE 865-7444
1968 ISRAELS
ANNIVERSARY
GREETINGS

{oar
\^y of mm
'ner ^Rank
Of MIAMI BEACH W member of
IBER OF F D I.C.
NOW LOCATED IN OUR NEW BUILDING AT
930 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
JACK CARNER
Chairman of the Board
STEPHEN CARNER
President
- a,
20tlx J^irtiiJay
PDBIL1K
V9KBR8 8RQH-1K9
r^^nir^^r^^^i^^-j^if;^ l
MMKEY
is A MLBj&eifaa

-

Israel's industrial development has included pro-
duction facilities (above! as well as the construction
of Haifa's Kishon Harbor with the aid of Israel Bonds.

--
ISRAEL
AND EUROPE
3 *
WEEKS from
799
ESCORTED 6R0UP TOURS -INCLU0IN8 AIR FARE FROM NEW YORK
GUARANTEED DEPARTURES
"""ESS 532-3336


Fridoy. February 23. 1968
+Jeis* ftorkfian
Paqe 15-C
FOOD
FAIR

SALUTES
SQthAIMNIVERSARY YEAR
J


Page 16-C
>Jenisfifk)ri Friday. February 23, 1968
F
X if!
ifty years aqo, on a bleak day
in February, 1918. the first contin-
gent of American volunteers for the
Jewish Battalion left for Palestine to
fight alonqside the British to free the
land from Turkish domination. A
young man from Chicago, Nehemiah
Rabin, was one of the volunteers.
His battalion, part of the Jewish Le-
gion, entered Jerusalem in triumoh
on Sept. 28. 1918. after pursuing the
enemy across the Jordan and cap-
turing 4.000 Turks.
After the end of World War I.
Nehemiah Rabin stayed in Palestine.
His son, Itzhak Rabin, was born in
Jerusalem in 1922. In June. 1967,
Itzhak Rabin was the Chief of Staff
of Israel's Defense Forces in the spec-
tacular Six Day War.
A professional soldier with a
brilliant record in Israel's three major
military campaigns the 1948 War
of Independence, the 1956 Sinai
Campaign and the 1967 Six Day
War former Chief of Staff Rabin
has never given up his hopes for
peace, has sought to maintain Is-
rael's defensive strength and is con-
fident that any future war will be
won by Israel.
Named by the State of Israel
as its new Ambassador to the
United States. Itzhak Rabin will
be the guest of honor in his new
capacity at the 1968 State of Israel
Bonds International Inaugural Con-
ference and Dinner Saturday eve-
ning. March 2. at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel
Clausewitz has said: "War is a
continuation of diplomacy by other
means." Rabin, the soldier-diplomat,
sees no reason why he cannot re-
verse the process.
Thus, more than a year before
June, 1967. he declared hopefully. "I
believe that there is a possibility that
peace will come. It is a slow process
and depends on how guickly the
Arabs realize that Israel cannot be
eradicated. This fact is already
known to them today."
The fact that war did come hasn't
changed his mind. He believes that
the hostilities resulted from two basic
miscalculations by Nasser and the
Russians. When the Russians told
Nasser that Israel was preparing for
war with Syria, they were in fact
only creating a pretext for building
up Nasser's prestige, Rabin sur-
mises. The truth is, he says, that
Israel's forces in the north were
weaker than Syria's, and that the
Russians knew it. Yet, by encourag-
ing Nasser to concentrate his troops
in the Sinai peninsula, when thev
knew that Israel was not going to
attack Syria, the Russians figured
that it would appear that Nasser's
move had prevented an Israeli at-
tack on Syria.
Gen. Rabin's analysis of the
events preceding the June war indi-
cates that Nasser also apparently
fell victim to his own propaaanda.
He demanded partial evacuation of
the U.N. supervisory forces in Sinai
and got total evacuation, with the
result that he was able to move his
forces into Sinai and close the Straits
of Tiran with impunitv. Carried awov
by these easy triumphs and his own
optimism, Nasser had reached the
point of no return.
Itzhak Rabin has reason to re-
member Gamal Abdel Nasser. Dur-
ing a cease fire in the War of Inde-
pendence in 1948, youna Rabin cot
married. But the resumption of fight-
ing on the southern front, where he
was Chief of Operations, ended his
honeymoon after one dav. In the en-
suing battle in the south, an Etvp-
tian brigade was surrounded. At a
meeting held to arrange a surrender.
Rabin met Capt. NaiMr, who in the
GEN. AND MRS. ITZHAK RABIN LOOK FORWARD TO NEW LIFE
course of conversation wanted to
know how the Israelis had gotten rid
of the British.
At 46, Rabin is the last of the
breed of senior officers of Israel's
War of Independence men like
Moshe Dayan, who was Chief of
Staff in the 1956 Sinai Campaign,
end who was named Minister of
Defense before the start of the June,
1967 war and Yigal Allon, the
veteran commander who is serving
as Minister of Labor. Rabin, young-
est of the trio, traces his early train-
ing in military tactics to the influence
of these two men.
As a student at the Kadoorie ag-
ricultural high school near Mount
Tabor in Galilee, young Rabin did
so well in his courses that the princi-
pal recommended that he go on to
college for a degree as a water en-
gineer. But the three years that Itzhak
spent at the Kadoorie school 1937
through 1939 were vears of some
of the worst Arab riots aqain'M the
Jewish settlers. The youngsters at the
school became their own defenders.
The students were organized in
platoons, and young Rabin's platoon
officer was Yigal Allon, who in 1941
recommended the serious young
men to Moshe Davan as a likely
prospect for the Palmach, the com-
mando unit of the Haganah.
This was durina World War II,
when Palmach units were helping
the British by making advance raids
into Syrian territory, then controlled
by the Vichy regime. In his first brief-
ing, Rabin was assigned to a group
of four m*n to penetrate bevond the
fighting lines and cut telephone
commun'cations in preparation for
an Australian attack on the area.
Rabin's arouD was rxxrt of the unit
under the command of Allon. who
headed the east flank, while Dnvan
commanded the west flank. It was
in thi raid that Dayan lost his eye.
The job of cutting the teleohone
wires was difficult enouah 01 the
iunior member of his group, Rabin
had to climb each pole, beinq care-
ful itself come crashina down. The rol
danger was that they were wearing
civilian clothes. They were warned
to keep clear not only of the Syrians
but also of the Australians, who used
to shoot first and ask guestions later.
Following this exploit, he was
kept busy in many succeeding oper-
ations, and advanced rapidly in the
Haganah chain of command. After
World War II. the Palmach struggle
once again turned aaainst the Brit-
ish, whose rigid immigration policy
was preventing many thousands of
Jewish refugees of European d.p.
camps from entering Palestine. In a
memorable action. Rabin took part
in the attack on the refuqee camp at
Atlit. where the British had interned
hundreds of "illegal" immigrants.
Rabin was the last to leave, cover-
ing the raiding unM while other Ha-
canah men led the e<5caoees to safe
hiding in various kibbutzim where
the British would not find them. At
one point, when the British soldiers
surrounded two kibbutzim suspected
of harboring the refugees, thousands
of Jews from Haifa formed n human
wall and prevented the soldiers from
entering.
On another occasion when he
was asked to undertake the difficult
assignment of inhltratinq the main
British police station at Jenin, he dis-
guised himself as an electrician. He
rode up to the station on a motor-
cycle, successfully completed his
task of information-gathering, and
was on his way back when his
motorcycle collided with a car and
his leg was broken. Recognized by
other Palmach men. he was taken to
a hiding place in Tel Aviv where his
leg was placed in a cast. It was in
this helpless condition that he was
taken prisoner on "Black Saturdnv."
when th British rounded up hun-
dreds of Palmach ond Haaanah men
and other political leaders in the
Jewish strugale for an independent
State of Israel.
The British Mandate was due to
end on May 15. 1948. but since the
British troops beqan to move out
some hours ahead of time, the State
of Israel was aHe to oroclaim its in-
dependence on Mav 14. A few hours
later, the armies of Egypt Jordan.
Syria, Lebanon and Iraq, with Saur1
Arabian contingents, crossed \\
frontiers of Israel at several points.'
Rabin, then 26. had risen i0 *>,
ond in command of the Palmadl
under Yigal Allon. However with th
establishment of a sovereiqn Stale
Israel, the Haganah and its COm
mando force, the Palmach, which
had served as volunteer defe*"
units for the Jewish population unde;
the Mandate, were merged into th
newly constituted Defense Forces
Israel.
:
It
:
Given his own commend of th*_
newly formed Har-el Brigade. Rabin
came face to face with cr.^ of }'.
most difficult and heartbroc;. ;q task:
of the War of Independence
defense of beleaguered Jerusalem
Trying to get provisions throuc
Gen. Ral
meant running -he gauntlet oi thi
Arabs who controlled the road. Late:
Brigade lost many men in a b.-cvi
but unsuccessful attempt to take tb
Old City from the Arab Leq;on:icjd
who far outnumbered them an i cis
held strategic positions. Twenty yec:
later, now fully armored, the Har-e
Brigade was destined to fiqht on lhe|
identical terrain. This time they wen
part of the Central Command in the
Six Day War. This time their
commander had become the Chief:
Staff. This time they made it.
Over the years, nothinq hes
erased the terrible sacrifice hi- mes
made day after dov in the oncir.d
Hcrr-el Brigade in 1948. The memorjl
has left Rabin a serious, oensivej
man with a -deep consciousness a
the responsibility involved in the
military's role in overall decision
makinq.
His most memorable dav
wa

V-'
\
^


?*-co>.T*


Friday. February 23, 1968
also his loneliest it was the first
dav of the Six Day War. At the end
cf that day. a3 he received the re-
ports in the command headquarters,
all doubt melted cway. With Israel
supreme in the skies and its Armored
Corps at EI-Arish, he could say, "I
felt that we had really achieved
somethina areat, both as reqards the
State of Israel and in the liqht of
history itself."
He described his entrv into the
Oid Cilv of Jerusalem "like some
never-fullv-finished circle finally join-
.:.<: tcqeiher as a complete who!?.
Mv narents first met each othe-- in
t!ip Old City during the riot= of 1921.
I was born there ,n 1922 and in 1943
I commanded the Har-el Briaade
which fouqht for the retention of the
city. Apart from the Six Day War,
"JfnittJkiriaHaun
onship between military actions and
tneir political implications. He not
only briefed his officers personally
out was mosi precise in his instruc-
tions and Ins admonition that thpy
be carried out to the letter and
not beyond. When the Arabs staqed
-errcnst raids in'.o border areas h-
maae certain that the retaliation was
ccrned out according to prescribed
limits.
In one enqcqerr.enl, Israeli tanks
v.-cre used for the first time in an
crti.lery du=l with Syrian tanks. The
Cnief of Staff saw immediately that
scmethinq was wronq with the ranae
and accuracy of both sides. He asked
the chief cf the armored corps to
draw uo plena for improvinq the
ef.'iciency cf the qunners and the
full results of this improvement only
career I have tended to minimize
the importance of outward appear-
ances. Let's forqet the qrandeur of
the surroundings cqainst which one
carries out a diplomatic task let's
say that I see it as another frame-
work, another area of public service."
He likes to look at thinqs in their
historical peispsctive. The develop-
ment of Israel's modern army, for
example, he views as a confluence
ci two streams: the flexibility and
freedom cf the underqround volun-
teer represented by the veterans of
the Hcqrmah and Palmach, and on
the other hand, the oraanizational
cbi'ity, the professionalism and the
set patterns that were adopted after
1948. "Since we had no doubts as to
the deqree of readiness, devotion and
enthusiasm en the part of our popu-
ton-Soldier Turned Diplomat
i
that battle for Jerusalem was the
hardest and most challenqinq as-
signment I ever faced in my military
career. On June 7, 1967 I entered
Jerusalem as one who finally draws
toqether in complete harmony all the
meaningful threads of his life."
Durinq his service as Chief of
S:aff in the four years which ended
Dec. 31, 1967, Gen. Rabin had ample
cDportunity to display his skill, cour-
cqe and Ioqic in what is considered
one of the most tryinq periods in
Israel's history. One of his first tasks
was to counter Arab attempts to di-
vert the sources of the Jordan River
- a decision made at the Arab
summit" conference in January,
1964. The viability of Israel's na-
tional water carrier was in jeopardy.
Throuqh carefully measured steps
which he took to prevent the Arab
diversion orojects from beinq put
nto effect, he demonstrated his con-
stant awareness of the oVlicato r1 became evident several years later,
in the Six Day War.
Because of his phenomenal mem-
ory for details and his broad intel-
lectual qualities, Rabin has been
called both a computer and a phi-
losopher. He is still youthful-lookinq
at 46 as he contemplates his new
career that of a diplomat in
the key post as Israel's new Ambas-
ways been of the opinion that mili-
tary men should leave the army at
sador to the United States. Comment-
inq on this transition recently, he
explained philosophically, "I've al-
a comparatively ycuna ace. But a"
one qets older one finds oneself
movinq that concept of 'relatively
younq' ever further forward to an
aqe just a little older than that which
cne has presently reached. On the
other hand, I still think I'm at an aqe
when I can chanqe my ways and
r wo" ~< Iff*. rv,n >n m rn'Httrv
lotion, younq and old, we strove to
add to their readiness by increasinq
their professionalism," he says in
summinq up some of the hiqhliqhts
of his tenure as Chief of Staff.
The qeneral's wife, Leah, althouqh
six years younqer, is like her hus-
band, also of the Palmach qenera-
tion. In 1948. when they were mar-
ried she already had a "record" by
the aqe of 20, havinq been arrested
by the Biitish authorities for her ac-
tivities as a Haqanah scout and one
of the editors cf the Palmach maqa-
zine. All throuqh his military career
she qave up any thouqht of a career
of her own, devotinq herself to mak-
ina a home for the family and beinq
both a mother as well as a father to
her two children since from the
beqinninq she had resigned herseli
to the loneliness of an army wife
whose husband's duties so frequent-
lv kept him away from home. She
can count only one venr when they
Paqe 17-C
had a normal married life that
was in 1952 when he was sent to
study in Enqland. He made it a
practice to be home for tea every
afternoon.
When he is home in Tel Aviv, he
indulqes in his hobby, photoqraphy
or relaxes by the pool. He even
manaqes occasionally to take an
afternoon nap on the Sabbath. He
keeps in touch with his wife by
phone at least once a day a habit
he kept up even in the emerqency
and the war. She recalls that the one
time he did qet home durinq the
emerqency he was so exhausted he
failed to notice the anti aircraft
trench the children had duq in the
qaiden like all the other children in
the neiqhborhood.
A close friend of Rabbi Shlomo
Goren, Chief Army Chaplain, Rabin
is deeply conscious of the historic
role of religion in sustaininq the
Jewish people in its exile and of its
spiritual value in their daily lives.
When he was awarded a deqree
of Doctor of Philosophy on Mount
Scopus, he said, "War is intrinsical-
ly harsh and cruel, and blood and
tears are its companions. But this
war which we have just waqed
brouqht forth rare and maqnificent
instances of couraqe and heroism,
and at the same time movinq ex-
pressions of brotherhood, comrade-
ship and even of spiritual qreatness."
His father, the younq American
Jew who was inspired by the Balfour
Declaration to qo to Palestine to help
it become the Jewish homeland,
never came back to the United
States.
Today, fifty years later, his son,
the former Chief of Staff of Israel's
Defense Forces, is cominq to the
United States as Israel's new Am-
bassador.
Another "never fully finished -
circle" in Itzhak Rabin's life seems
to have ben completed another
aspect of his destiny fulfilled.
He will be welcomed here by
more than 2 500 Jewish leaders from
the United States, Canada and Latin
America at an historic occasion, the
1968 State of Israel Bonds Inter-
national Inaugural Conference on
March 2 at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
.
/

r
\
PAHOKEC
WEST PALM BEACH
4
\-
FORT LAUDERDALE
v^

CORAL GABLES
>T HOMESTEAD
MIAMI
J

TEL AVIV
Despite the miles between us, the Coca-Cola Bottling Com-
panies of South Florida and of Israel are closely related... in.
product, pride and mutual numagement. Mr. Carl Navarre, oufc*
President, and Mr. Abraham Fember&a member of our Board of
Directors, are principal members of the group that establfched the
Israeli Company.
With them, and all Israelis, we share the joy of celebrating
Israel's 20th Anniversary.
>


John M. Howard
Extr. Vice-Prttident & General Manager
Coco-Cola Bottling Company of Miami
I **'* *'*, r>ntmi ,. u.r th. **or.ty C.e-Cd* C.mp.n, by th C.-Cof_.*. Comply ,,
Miami
.-


Page 18-C
+Jewlst> ntridfia/n
Friday. Febr-ay 23. 1968
Israel Bonds- The Major
WKMMllM$%i Source Of Capital Funds
As Israel prepares to celebrate
its twentieth anniversary of inde-
pendence, it can look back on its
past accomplishments with a great
sense of satisfaction and fulfillment.
Israel can trace its early beqin-
nings as a faltering infant state to
its present position as a stronq na-
tion with a stable economy that has
come of aqe. It can rejoice in the
knowledqe that, ihiouqh its sacrifice,
couraqe and determination it has
carved a proqressive country out of
the hard rock of medieval backward-
ness which still exists in the Middle
East.
Reviewinq Israel's economic his-
tory durinq the past two decades,
one is impressed by certain mile-
stones in the country's development.
Durinq the fir-t thre vars of its
existence, from 1948 to 1951, while
the nation successfully dealt with a
War of Independence and border
skirmishes. Israel was confronted
with a mass influx of immigration
which remains unprecedented in
modern history. More them 500.000
harassed and homeless persons from
the DP camps of Europe. Cyprus and
North Africa entered Israel's shores
in this period. Israel was hard-
pressed to handle this flow of hu-
manity, for its economy was geared
primarily to take care of 650,000 in-
habitants, the country's population
when statehood was attained.
It soon became obvious to the
leaders of the government that
these newcomers would have to be
absorbed and integrated into the
lifestream of the country throuqh
massive economic programs which
would create basic development
projects for the country's welfare. It
also became clear that a new method
of financinq would have to be estab-
lished as a means of supportinq this
objective.
With the advent in 1951 of the
Israel Bond drive, an instrument of
investment which has become the
central source of development capi-
tal for Israel, the fledqlinq nation
beqan to take its first forward steps
toward economic independence. Dur-
inq the next five years, Israel utilized
the proceeds from the sale of Israel
Bonds to create the basic framework
for its economy.
Israel Bond funds helped to estab-
lish new industries and farm settle-
ments, which provided jobs for many
of the immigrants, so that they could
become self-sufficient citizens. Bond
dollars were also utilized to push
forward a large-scale- housing pro-
gram which the country considered
essential to the well being of all its
citizens, many of whom lived in tem-
norarv shacks tents and tin huts.
During this period. Israel's arche-
ologists, scientists and mineralogists
began to report the discovery of nat-
ural resources in various parts of the
country, despite the fact that officials
of the British Mandate in Palestine
had for years stated categorically
that they could not find any minerals
anywhere in the country.
After two thousand years, the
dusty curtain that had obscured the
mineral resources of Israel beqan to
be lifted. Deposits of phosphates,
copper, iron ore, qlass sand, kaolin,
ball clay, oil and other minerals
were discovered and their exploita-
tion was bequn.
At the same Hire, Israel beqan
constructinq reqional irriqaiion proj-
ects to help cultivate the arid land.
The larqest irriqation project then
was the Yarkon Neqev pioeline,
which beqan operating in 1955 to
feed water to the Lachish agricultural
reqion, Southern Judea and the
northern Negev area. It utilized pre-
stressed concrete pipes 66 inches in
diameter manufactured in Israel at
the Yuval Gad Pipe Factory near
Ashkelon. one of hundreds of indus-
trial enterprises which Israel Bonds
have aided.
Another regional water scheme
was centered in the Kishon Valley,
supplvinrr irriaation to the farm set-
\^Jttr ^alnte tlements in the Western and Central
Jezreel Valleys and the Ta'anach
Valley.
Israel also reclaimed thousands of
acres of land in ;he Galilee through
the efforts of skilled enqineers and
hundreds of workmen who drained
the swampland of the Huleh Vallev.
This effort became a "master plan"
which is now used for draininq
swamps in many parts of the world.
As a result of these irrigqt m
swamp e'eanna projects, Israel's aq-
ricultural development beqa:-. to
prove rapidlv. New commerr.
such as cotton tobacco, suqar beets,
neanuts and sisal were introduced,
and p'oduction in wheat, barley,
vegetables and citrus increased. The
supply of livestock, fowl end fish
became more plentiful, while the out-
put cf eqqs and milk rose. Throuqh-
out the country, the pinch of auster-
ity was bacomina less notice cole as
food supplies increased.
Industrially, in addition to :ts ear-
ly beqinninas in mininq, Isrcel had
becrun to build up its chemical in-
dnstrv. With the financial aid of
Israel Bonds, the Fertilisers and
Chemicals Ltd plant at Haifa was
established for the manufacture of
puper-phosphates. Other chemical
plants such as Makhieshim L-. Beer-
sheba, which makes insecr.crdes;
Continued On Pace 2C
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Kravib
and
Mr. and Mrs. William Weintraub


Friday. February 23. 1968
* knistinforidri&n
Paqe !3<
Citrus products, shown above being loaded aboard ship
at Haifa harbor, are Israel's largest agricultural export,
and represent a major share of her total sales abroad.
The growth of cirus and other farm products has been
greatly increased with the help of 'srael Bonds. In picture
below, is the ore enrichment plant near the Oron phos-
phate mines southeast o! Besrsheeba. Phosphate dpostH
in the Neaev a-e being mined and processed with the aid
of Israel Bonds.
I I I 1 f I
DAVID TRAVELS

Call Us At .
Je 2-2561 extension 3275

or Je 1-3370
For Your Group Tours
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?


Page 20-C
Jmteti Hcrkliain
Friday, February 23. 1968
Israel Bonds- The Major
Source Of Capital Funds

Continued From Page 18
Frutarom in Acre, which produces
chlorine, and the Kadimah Works in
Haifa Bay, which turns out deter-
gents, were established soon after.
Encouraged by the success of
these enterprises many well-known
American firms began appearing on
the scene to help bolster Israel's
economy. Among these were Con-
solidated Telephone and Radio, Gen-
eral Tire and Rubber Co.. Kaiser-
Frazer Automobile Co.. Pilot Radio.
Mack Trucks, Scran Plastics, Stude-
baker Corp. and Trans-World Air-
lines.
To import the raw materials it
needed for industry, and to export
some of the products it was begin-
ning to make and qrow, Israel em-
barked on a project to enlarge the
capacity of Haifa Harbor, which at
that time was Israel's only seaport.
It also started to enlarge its mer-
chant fleet and to improve its air-
line service within the country and
throughout the world. It opened ud
mass road transportation through
the construction of the Beersheba-
Sdom Road. Israel's first four-lane,
concrete highway, so that the com-
modities of the Negev could be
moved more rapidly to the northern
part of the country.
Israel also expanded and im-
proved the railways, a vital link in
the country's transport system. A
dramatic example of this expansion
took place in 1953, when Israel Bond
delegates from the United States par-
ticipated in a ceremony at which they
drove the first spikes into railroad
ties to commemorate the inaugura
tion of the new Hadera Tel Aviv
line. Since that time, thousands of
additional miles of rails have been
laid throughout the country.
However, these achievements
were marred during this five-year
period by the unrelenting hostility of
Israel's Arab neighbors who through
border raids and commando attacks
had killed and wounded some 1,500
Jewish settlers and had committed
hundreds of acts of sabotage on rail-
ways, roads and irrigation works. In
October, 1956, Israel army units
moved into the Sinai Peninsula and
in a week's time put a stop to these
raids and acts of terror.
As a conseguence of the Sinai
Campaign, Israel's security was
strengthened and the country moved
forward rapidly along the road to
economic progress. During the next
ten years, which many have called
"the Decade of the Negev," these
important milestones took place:
The Straits of Tiran were opened
to Israel shipping for the first time
since the country had achieved its
sovereign independence.
The Negev, the southern region
of the country, which had remained
barren for centuries, was opened up
to mass settlement and industrial and
mineral exploitation. With the upper
half of Israel almost fully! developed
agriculturally and industrially, Is-
rael's major prospects for future
arowth now lay in the Negsv area.
It was here that Israel's fujure poou-
lation would live and work. It was
here where new factories, farm set-
tlements, roads, railwavs and other
facilities would have to be construct-
ed. After ten vears of steady devel-
opment, the Negev has become the
.most important element in Israel's
economic development.
New development towns were
founded, primarilv in the Neqev to
house new immiarants and to create
new industries which would produce
goods for export as well as for local
consumption. Such towns as Arad.
Besor, Zihor, Nizzana and En Hazeva
were established, with light indus-
try, schools, shopping centers, elec-
J
v>
0
.'

y\
7
I

trie power, paved roads and many
other facilities to accommodate Is-
rael's new c.tizens.
Development towns which had
been established earlier, such as
Kiryat Gat, the industrial hub of the
Lachish agricultural deveopment
area; Dimona, a mining c?nter for
raw rock phosD'iates; Mitzpah Ra-
mon, where phosphates and other
minerals can be found, and Ofakim.
where natural aas deposits and other
natural resources are being discov-
ered and exploited, were enlarged
and modernized with the aid of Is-
rael Bonds.
Israel's existing ports were im-
proved for world trade end a new
one was established. Haifa Harbor,
the nation'* largest seaport, has un-
dergone extensive repairs and mod-
ifications which have increased its
ennual carqc caoacitv from 1,250,003
tons to over 3,000,000 ton3.
Eilat. on the Gulf of Akaba. has
been enlarged as a city and a sea-
port. Its docks now berth freighters
and tankers from scores of nations,
a .situation which could not exist
prior to the opening of the Straits of
Tiran to Israel shicping. Eilat has
b<"-ome Israel's third largest seaDort,
with an annual capacity of 250.000
tons. Future plans call for an expan-
sion program that will increase the
port's capacity to over 1,500,000 tons
annually.
In Ashdod. ancient Philistine site
on the Mediterranean between Ash-
kelon and Tel Aviv, a new deep-
water oort was built to provide the
Jerusalem area and the resources of
the Negev easier access to foreign
markets. At the inception of this crcj-
ect in 1961, hundreds of Israel Bond
leaders took part in an emotion-
nackod ecremenv at which the first
h-qe bcu'dpr was lowered into
plare to mark the beainnim of con-
struction on the new harbor's break-
water. The initial strao of this port
was competed in 19G5 and oro-
vides an ennual cargo capacity of
600 "CO tens. Whn the entire port is
completed, the annual capacity will
be 2.500.000 ten:,
Irrigation, which had heretoiore
been set up on a regional basis, was
expanded and consolidated under a
ma3ter plan called the National
Water Project, which thus far has
brought an additional 100.000 acres
of land under cultivation in the
Besor area of the northern Negev.
Over 100 miles in length, it brings
the waters of the Sea of Galilee in
the north to the Negev in the south
u^ing gigantic 108-inch pipes which
t-avel through mountainous terrain,
along a series of canals, tunnels,
open channels and pumoing instal-
lations comprising a project of out-
standing engineering skill.
Two oil ripelines, 8 inches and
16 inches in diameter, were laid from
Eilat to Beersheba and extended to
the Mediterranean Sea, with the fi-
nancial assistance of Israel Bond
capital. These pipelines facilitate the
f'ow ci oil from tankers docked at
Eilat to the refmerie3 of Haifa. They
have also beccme a valuable ass^t
for the Heletz oil fields in the north-
ern Negev, which new suDply about
twelve percent of Israel's reguire-
ments.
Israel's current Development
Budget calls for Israel Bond alloca-
tipns which will finance the con-
struction of a new 42-inch oil pipe-
line from Eilat to the Mediterranean,
to increase the amount of oil which
can be pumped from ships berthed
at Eilat to Ashdod and Ashkelon on
the Mediterranean.
Tj*J fcneri stage of the Huleh
Lake drainage project was complet-
ed and added over 15,000 acres of
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MARTINIQUE HOTEL
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Mr, and Mrs. Bernard R. Welder
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Washington Ave at Lincoln Rd Mall. Phone 538 7831
S Mort Zimmerman
Chairman of the Board
Walter L Hartman
Preiiden'
Mamber F D. I. C F. R. S.


Friday. February 23. 1968
* l**i*firir,ri>(ffor)
Paqe 21-C
fertile farm land to the country's
total
The town of Eeersheba was in-
dustrialized and became the capital
of the Neqev, a central terminus for
processitoq. and disttibtttinq car* ">
modities qrbwn. mined and "made
throuqhout the Negev. Jts population
has risen to over 60,000 as compared
with 10.000 in 1957.
A new 143-mile highway from
Beersheba to Bilat was completed to
help integrate Eilat more closely into
the life of the country. Described as
Israel's drv land Suez Canal, which
Inks us with the Bed Sea and the
Mediterranean Sea'' by former Prime
Minister David B3n-Gurion. the road
ties tcqether with the industrial cen-
ter of Beersheba, which is also tve
southern t?rminus of the Israel rail-
road, and Eilat. Israel's modern port
which has become the count--'s
cateway to trcde with the country;
ci Africa and Asia and other land?.
The earlier discovery of nvn-
i led to a massive orooram :
envelopment and exploitation of 'he
i ntry's natural resoutc^?.
lemon's leaendcrv crr.-r mi ~"
:: Timna wen ^div^yared on
Lna plant lor rff'.'iinq th --.
: are was Dut into ooera'i^n R-~-
osoholes i". Ih9 central N?q-v. 'r-
rether w>th the ootc-h, V-rom;n -
ether salt- of the reaot'vated D=nd
?:a Works, now svrolv the rra n a-
[ls fo>- the manufacture of chem-
ical fert:'i;3rs an^ mc" inH"-
.-'r.emica's ex'->or!i-' bv Isr-0'. Oil :-
reina rumped at H^'^tz nnd n",'".T'
cas is bei"""* ta*D*,od at 7">hnr. 0,vo
minerals wHrh have ben discov-
ered and develoDed in the Ne"v
inc'''de iron, ceramic clavs. a'aes
sind. manqanese, qyp-um, feldspar
end auartz.
Thanks to the investment capital
provided by Israel Bonds, which
r.cve performed the spadework in
t:ie conquest of the Neqev. the devel-
opment of the Neqev, and that of
Galilee in the north, is now bei:iq
continued on a larqe scale.
In examininq Israel's economic
proqress durinq the past twenty
years it is obvious that the lessens
learned from the successes of the
pest have provided enthusiasm cri
hope for the future. In the past two
decades, Israel has advanced from, a
".::nd of austerity to a country which
vres technical and scientific assist-
; rice to newly established nations
c.round the world. To-^*- I~ -
crowth as an economically viable
r.ew democracy has piocvided a
eiul example cf success for o'her
vounq nations which have come into
beinq in recent years.
At Lbs same tune, Israel continue
) radiate hop? to the immiqr:i~;s
who have mede a new life there
and for those who are still to come.
Since its establishment in 1948, Is-
rael's population has increased to
2.75C.0O0. with about half this total
newcorftars who have been absorbed
into the country's economy. Israel
, has provided these new citizens with
over 630.000 perman?nt housinq
units and has made available to
them opportunities for employment
and'education on a scale which only
a country like the United States can
match.
Todav, as Israel enters its thirr"
decade of independence, it finds it-
self facinq a new era of develop-
ment the era of total industrializa-
tion. In the next ten years. Israel
will have to expand its industry and
promote its export trade on a larqe
scale to achieve economic self-
sufficiency.
Industrialization will have to be
pushed forward, not only in the
major rrban centers but in the Ne-
qev and the Galilee which are still
comoaratively undr-rw^ulatpd. Is-
rael's economy must move forward
in the direction of buildinq a more
modern nation, one that will play a
meaninqful role as a center of free-
dom and spiritual and cultural ful-
iilknenl [* ,,+> I
To ensure the success Of its eco-
nomic programs of development
which will brinq about the country's
modernization, Israel will continue
to rely on larqe amounts of Israel
Bond investment capital, the corner-
strvrie r"' i,s economic arowth.
1074 North Miami leach Blvd.
(N.E. 163rd St.)
Phone: 945-7491, 949-8899
YOUR
-i.r. *Mrt
The installation of new electric power generating equip-
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economy, particularly its industrial development. I-rael
Bend money has also b"en used for the construction of
the ciant pipeline from the Sea of Galilee to the Negev.
HEADQUARTERS
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Pimm. Pesach Shavuoth, Rosh Hashanah Tours ISRAEL ONLY
Any length ol time or include Greece. Turkey. Italy.
Spain. Portugal. Scandinavia, Russia. Switzerland. France.
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Alto aimhihlr: Itnm Htilh I'oltri, Y.ionltt llrgantfilion Tnnrl, lli$-
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(El Al) Co-ed 13.17 years
SAM ROSENKRANZ
of Tel Aviv New York Miami
fttxmt M
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INCLUDES 2 MEAKFAST AND 2 STEAK
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GREETINGS TO
THE STATE OF ISRAEL
ON ITS 20th ANNIVERSARY
'
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0
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> -
American savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI IEACH


Page 22-C
Mewfaft fhrkttan
Friday. February 23. 1968
Officers Who Will Lead The 1968 Israel Bond Campaign
I # ^2
1
tt*^**** -vis
ft
IRA GUILDEN
Outstandinq personalities on the
American Jewish scene have as-
sumed responsibility for the direction
of the Israel Bond drive duiinq 1963.
In addition to the leadinq positions
most of these individuals have
achieved in the business wcrld. thsy
have played a key role in orqanized
American Jewish life, especially in
relation to the establishment and
ABRAHAM FEINBERG
DR. JOSEPH J. SCHWART7
LOUIS H. BOYAR
development of the State of Israel.
In this qrcup are those who have
been prominent in work for Israel
thicuoh a variety of channels. In-
cludinq the United Jewish Appeal
and the Israel bnd Oiqanizat'on,
on bcth the local and national level.
Amonq them also are those who
were r"rti<"=lv involved in the frvnd-
inq of the Israel Bond drive in 1951.
The officers of the Bond cam-
puian for 1968 are: Abraham Fein-
Leiq of Nt?w Yoik, president; Dr.
Joseph J. Schwartz of New York vice
president; Samuel Rothberq of Pe-
oria. !i!., national campaiqn chair-
man; Louis H. Boyar of Los Anqeles.
chairmen, Board of Governors; Ira
Guilctan of New Yo>k, national chair-
SAMUEL ROTHBERG
man Jack D. Weiler of New Yo:i:
secretaiy treasurer; Lawrence G
Laskey of Boston, chairman. Execu
live Committee; Morris W. Berin
stein of Albany, N.Y., national chai:
man for Trustees; Mrs. Jan Peerc.cf
New York, chairman. National Wom-
en's Division; Julian B. Venezky of
Peciia, nat.onal chairman ior Re-
aim-.
DAVID ROSNER
SAM ROSNER
owner management
Extend Greetings
196H Israel's 20th
Anniversary Year

JHr. *J JI4,*.
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l-v 1


Friday. February 23, 1968
* Jew I si tk>ridBar7
Page 23-C
New Territories Greatly
Historical Highlights
With the end of the fighting last
June Israel found herself with vastly
expanded responsibilities, a new
border configuration and new terri-
tory. The change has resulted in
the addition of a number of sites to
the tourist itinerary.
Most important of all the sites
is the city of Jerusalem. Now that it
is unified the contrasts of East and
West, new and old, are no longer
underlined by high stone walls,
barbed wire and checkpoints. Today
the two sections of Jerusalem flow
naturally one into the other.
Of prime importance to the Jew-
ish visitor is the Western Wall. This
waH dates back to the time of
Herod, and it is possible that arche-
ological excavations now going on
near the wall will positively date it
to the Temple of Solomon. The West-
issuod By Hertz
First Comprehensive Guide
To Motoring Around Israel
The first comprehensive motoring
guide to Israel and the Holy Land,
including new territories under Is-
raeli administration, has fust been
issued by Hertz Rent A Car.
Featuring a large-scale motoring
map of the entire nation, involving
all major cities, as well as a full
line up of religious and historical
locales, the new motoring guide also
provides a har.dy chart in both miles
and kilometers of distances between
key areas of Israel. Thirteen auto
tours of the country, complete with
step by step itineraries, are also
included in the colorful folder.
For :he co-venience of motorists
in the Holy -and, the guide also
highl:c,r.ts locations of the Paz and
Oz gasoline service stations scat-
tered L-.roughout the country.
Among the maps included in the
motoring guide, in addition to the
road map, are a regional map show-
ing Israel, its neighborina countries,
and areas like the Sinai Peninsula.
or place of worsh'D bv sending a
check or mor>/ order for S2 to Hertz.
Hertz in taooi has locations in
Av:v, Lo-i Airport, Jerusalem,
Kallandia Air por. Haifa ar.d Na-
I tahyn. Hertz orovides a varietv of
models of European Fords and other
fine cars crs well as U.S. Mustangs
with automatic shift. Chauffeur-driver.
service .s also available. One-wav
rentals are available free of added
charge between all offices. Offices
are closed Saturdays, in compliance
[with national law.
, ..
FREE COPY
OF I.I iih;
Tup Jfwish Floridias ha* in-
< ivdtd a copy op tup motoring
gcidi in" tup Israel Slpplpmpnt to
rm- week's ISSUE op tup pappr as
A MRV1C1 TO -IH-CRIBERS.
I
In summer, rates begin at S4 c
day and 6 cents a kilometer. In
winter (Oct. 31 through March 31)
rates begin at S5.15 a day and 6
cents a kilometer.
Miami area residents can reserve
Hertz cars in Israel through a travel
agent or by calling the Hertz reser-
vation office at 377-8101.
Golan Heights and the formerly Jor-
danian territory east of Jerusalem.
all under Israeli administration since
the brief Middle East war of 1967
The gu.de lists also Israel tourist
o.lices in ti.o U.S. end Ccr.crda where
additional inform at i or. car. be ob-
tained.
A sperlal feature o: th I
' le is c dramatic poster f
rec-eatior. by an outstajiC-T.s <.:-.
termoorarv artist of mcr,or e
in the hiMorv of the three :r.;.-
founded in the Holy Lo
A large, full-color copv ..-
four feet >.:ah, without advertising
Tiafe-r ra:. i? obtainec for he
Expand
For Tourist
ern Wall was never a part of the
Temple itself, but was part of the
wall built to separate the Temple
Mount from the rest of the city.
It is the most sacred Jewish site
in the world for the pilgrim of today
and forms a visible link to the glo-
ries of ancient Jerusalem. While
there will probably be no more
meaningful visit than that which
brings the traveler to the Wall, there
is much else to see in Jerusalem.
David's Citadel and Tower,
which dominate the Jaffa Gate en-
trance to the city is also a point of
Jewish interest as are Rachel's
Tomb on the southern outskirts of
the city, and the Cave of Mach-
pela further south in Hebron.
The Golan Heights are not too
far from the Dead Sea area, where
the Jordan River empties its precious
water. But here at the source of the
Jordan it appears to be a different
world. Well watered, cool and green,
the area is the complete opposite of
the deserts in the south. The view
from the heights overlooking upper
Galilee is breathtakingly beautiful
but it only reguires one glance at
the formidable fortifications to realize
that these same heights had been
turned to the purpose of war, and
for too many years Syrian artillery
had rained death and destruction
down on the settlements below.
Druse peasants, the only residents
of the heights who did not flee dur-
ing the war gather at Bamva in the
north and sell their wares from stalls
hastily constructed to meet a new
element in life tourism.
The descent from the Heights at
El Hamma into the group of settle-
ments established at the southern
end of the Sea of Galilee has to be
experienced to be believed. The
transition from an area which is po-
tentially fertile into an area which
.s blossoming is most dramatic. The
road unwinds down the heights and
straightening ct the foot of the hills
enters the irrigated banana fields of
the settlements. The pulsino spray
cf life-giving water forms rainbows
in the sunlight and the deep rich
brown of the earth sets off ti
nreen of the be nan a trees.
THE SOUTH
In the south interest is fo:
on Gaza. Khan Unis and E. Arish.
It was at Khan U.nis that Israeli in-
fantry and armor broke throuch the
Go to Israel!
Go Greek Line!
Visit Israel in rts 20th anniversary year and come with us,
the pioneers in trans Atlantic service to Israel. We have the
largest, fastest ships in regular service to Haifa. Enjoy an
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Greek Line is famous. Ask any of your friends who have
sailed with us.
And what else? Continental, or Kosher cuisine (Private
Dining Room), Synagogue, Rabbi, Mashgiach. Lectures in
Israeli art and history, travelogues. Hebrew lessons by Brit
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all the way.
And what else? Greek Line sailings and arrivals coincide
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GREEK LINE ft ft&fffisr
377-32 Bos'.on Chicago e Detro
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Philadelphia Sao Franeitco CanaJt
tight defense perimeter protecting
Gaza and then encircled the city. It
was here that Samson, blinded by
his enemies, chose a hero's death
rather than captivity.
El Arish, further to the" south and
in the northern reaches of Sinai, is
an oasis. Surrounded by row upon
row of carefully tended date palms,
the oasis is lush in the otherwise
austere desert. On the ocean side
of El Arish are some of the most
beautiful beaches in the Middle
East. Fine white sand washed out
of the fertile earth of the Nile Delta
has been deposited here through the
centuries. A little more inland and
the desert takes on the appearance
of Israel's Negevrocky and forbid-
dina with only a few shrubs finding
sustenance in the bed of a dry
channel.
There are tours which go into
deep Sinai as well and many trav-
elers have taken advantage of a
unique air tour offered by Israel's
Inland airline, Arkia. The tour de-
parts from Tel Aviv or Jerusalem
and then flies over Gaza and El
Arish. It turns south at El Arish,
passing over places such as Bir Gaf-
aafa and the Mitla Pass. The high-
light of the trip for many occurs
when the plane circles famed Mount
Sinai before continuing on beyond
Sharm El Sheikh and up the Gulf of
Akaba to the city of Eilat. At Eilat
travelers can spend a few hours and
then either take off for the return to
the north or stay overnight to savor
more of Israel's Red Sea port. Here
they can tour the coral banks, take
a boat to the Coral Island with its
Crusader ruins, or take a leep to
Solomon's Copper Mines before re-
turning.
For the hardy there is a five-
day Jeep tour of Sinai, organized
bv Neot Hak;kar in Beersheba.
This tour in-ludes all of the sites
men'^ncd. but sinre it involves
traveling over some of the rough-
est terrain in the world, it is a
cha'len-ro reserved almost exclu-
sively for the young.
While Israel's dimensions have
been increased by its successful en-
counter with the Arabs, the visitor
hould remember that the country
is still a fncl! one. No site is reallv
anc1 with the combination of
modem highways buses and trains,
travel in Israel i.s convenient. The
new s!!ec on the itinerary, when
rdded to the lure of West Jerusalem.
Tel Aviv Haifa. Beersheba, Tiberias,
-r.cnv more, make sure
,c: whatever time is invested in Is-
I will e'd dividends of pleasure.
Something old has been added.
Jerusalem. Old, when the Bible was
only a short story.
And as beautiful as you'd expect
the city that three religions call holy,
and poets call "golden" to be.
After 20 years you can include ttte
Old City in your tour of Israel without
any visas to worry about.
And we've got the tours. Just tell
us what you want to see. and time you'll have to see it in. We'll take
care of the rest. We'll fly you direct from
New York to Tel-Aviv. Show you the
country inside and out. (After all, who
knows it better than we do?) And then
use up whatever energy you have left in
Europe on the way home. In places like
Rome, Pans, or London.
We figure that's really giving you the
best of both worlds.
The old. And the oldest.
The airline of the people of Israel.
El Al Israel Airlines
1602 Washington Avenue, Miami 8each
532-544i


Page 24-C
9'Jmisii ftoridKiatr
Friday. February 23. 196?
1 here are few words in the lexicon
of language as tilled with emotion,
as representative of the aspirations
of man, as the single word "Jerusa-
lem." For in addition to being the
capital city of the State of Israel, it
is also a state of mind.
As a city Jerusalem is a blend of
East and Westa mix of reinforced
concrete and hand trimmed stone, of
Arab Pittah bread and hot doq rolls,
of miniskirts and flowing robes.
In West Jerusalem there are large
proud modern buildings. In East Je-
rusalem there are small stone build-
ings rising, it seems, one atop the
other without the planning that char-
acterizes West Jerusalem. For thouqh
Jerusalem is a parent to man. East
Jerusalem is a child of the East, and
West Jerusalem a child of the West.
The visitor in Jerusalem will find
it a city to savor. In the northwest
there is the Biblical Zoo where a
collection of animals mentioned in
the Bible is housed in cages marked
with the chapter and verse reference
in both English and Hebrew.
Nearby are the Tombs of San-
hedria, the burial places of the Is-
raelite judges.
Nearer to the heart of the city
is the Meah Shearim orthodox
quarter where Hassidim dressed
in fur-trimmed hats and long black
robes gather in the dozens of syn-
agogues that dot the quarter.
The center of West Jerusalem is
the Kiriya. the government center
which boasts the Parliament Build-
ing, the Israel Museum with its
Shrine of the Book. Government Of-
fices, and the Hebrew University
Givat Ram Camcus. The Chief Rab-
binate is located on Kina Georqe
Street, its tall buildinq capoed bv n
small round dome n s~"r--e cf
smiles in Israel where? the Hebrew
word "Kippa" means both dcme and
yarmulke.
The commercial center cf West
Jerusalem is Zion Square where re-
tail shops offerinq the latest in fash-
ion and home fumishinq, como*te
with dozens of the most heavily
attended movies in the world fc the
attention of the paieinn throna. Side-
walk vendors offer "Americar." ir*
cream (frozen custard), hot boi'ed
sweet corn. Falafel. Dctato rh:Ds and
donah nuts. There is no stia"i-r at-
tached to eatina as vou wa'k t^e
streets of th citv and saraoU"" 'he
local specialties is recommended.
Also in West Jerusalem is the
hill-top home of Yad Vashem, 'he
memorial devoted to the six million
killed in World War II. This romn'^x
of buildinqs represents a dramatic
weddinq of architectural styl and
concent. Few persons are able 'o
visit iMs site without beinq deeply
moved.
Mount Zion is the traditional site
of David's Tomb and thouqh it lies
outside of the Old City Walls it is
more an orqanic part of East Jeru-
salem than of West Jerusalem.
THE OLD CITY
Most visitors approach the Old
City from either the Damascus Gate
or the Jaffa Gate to the north and
east of the walled city. But no mat-
ter which gate is used the prime
point of interest in the Old City is
the Western (Wailing) Wall. The
Wall is part of a larger wall that
completely surrounded the Temple
Mount setting the hallowed ground
off from the rest of the city of Jeru-
salem.
It is the most sacred Jewish site
in the Holy Land. There are few
Jews who did not share the joy at
the news the Wall was once more
in Jewish hands, who were not
moved by the pictures which
showed the young soldiers puttinq
on TeBllin. and praying through

rusaiem
-%-

tears at being reunited with this
physical embodiment of the Jsw-
ish soul.
A visitor today will be shocked
by tiie desolation that characterizes
what was once end will be aqain
the Jewish Quarter of the Old City.
In those traaic days of 1948 when a
few held out here aqainst the Arab
Legion thouqh rut eff from the main
body of the Jewish community, much
was destroyed. What was not de-
stroyed in the fi-ihtini w~~. rtiven 0
";n by time and the rulers of the
city.
But today Jerusalem is one and
plans to revitalize the Jewish Qjar-
ler are already underway. In the not
too distant future larqe numbers of
Jows wil ence cqcin live within the
wal's of their sacred citv.
To the east of the walled c.tv is
the Voile/ of Kidron. n sacred Jew-
ish burial clace for many centurie3.
Firm here it sp'ead ud the slopes of
the nearvv Mount of Olives, maki-n
it net on'v cne of the oldest r-n i
most sacred Jewish cemeteries bjt
ako one cf the laiqest.
Cn M-unt Scopus, an is-.la'ed
end neut-nUZed piec- of Jewish ter-
ritory for the oast 19 years, a co-
cess o! renewal is aoinq on. Vol n-
t-~-s and s'udent- from the Hehr=v
Un versitv who had to abandon th*
ite in 1948 havo worked to clear
and clean the rubble ace urn u la tod
over the years. Dormitories will be
built here as will the Harry S. Tru-
man Center for Peace and the Mjr-
tin Buber CenWir. Mount Scopus will
once again be a center of knowl-
edge, a high point ox peace.
There is much to see in Jerusa-
lem, and more important there is
much to exoerience. The trave' who casts a casual eve over tie
r'irrinq landscape of the city wffl
be well rewarded. But the person
v/ho takes the time to look into the
heart cf the city will find the siul
of a pec->le revealed, and a spir-
itual enrichment obtaincble only in
Jerusalem.
I


Friday. February 23. 1968
+Jmi& itcridiar

Paqe 25-C



NK^V
1968
m
II
come smile with her
on her 20th anniversary
FAQS ABOUT ISRAEL:
HER PEOPLE
Shalomthe welcome that Jews from
more than 100 countries around the
world are hearing as they return to
their Promised Land, Israel: their
heritage. Israel's population has grown
from 650,000 to more than two-and-
a half million. Warm, friendly people,
represented by the 120 members of
Israel's parliament, the Knesset,
symbol of this thriving, young
20-year-old democracy. And it's nice
with the Israelis: so many of them
speak English.
HER EXCITING CULTURE
g VIBRANT YOUTH
Israel has 230 kibbutzim, and many universities and
institutes of higher learning, all giving today's
youth the knowledge and training needed
for Israel's dynamic society. Tomorrow s leaders-
Israel's young peopleare learning from the
cultural traditions of the land: the Israel Museum
in Jerusalem, fine dramatic theaters, and many othe
cultural centers. And, like typical Israelis,
they're not ortfy learning how to accept -
responsibility, but they're also enjoying
themselves at events such as Israel Philharmonic
SO MUCH TO SEE
SO MUCH TO DO
Fly to Israel via the national
carrier, El Al, the airline of the
people of Israel. Sight-see In
Jerusalem. Sunbathe along
>t\e Red Sea, float in the
i.)ead Sea. relay. In the soothing
/ r I t- 1.1
Visit Tel Ayi\ sidewalk
i afes.'swingin:: nightclubs,
ind artists' color>;es.
.'isit Israel, la.iu of smiles,
excitement, and a
You too can learn and enjoy!
\ : 'v:':' a '"
See your locaf-travel agent or contact the Israel Government Tourist O.f-oe.
574 Fifth Avenue, NfewYork, N. Y. 10036/ 5 So. Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 60603
805 Peachtree St. N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30308/615 So. Flower St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90017
loves company


Page 26-C
*Jetrt*# fhoridliiciiin
Friday, February 23. 1968
El Al Growth Aids
Israel's Development
Not so lonq aqo a woman jour-
nalist from an Israeli newspaper de-
cided on the spur of the moment to
pose a question to passenqers ar-
riving at Lod Airport. Tel Aviv, olf
an El Al flight. Her objective was a
simple one: to discover what sort of
image, in terms of size, E3A1 pre-
sented to the travelinq public. To
provoke an instant leoction the ques-
tion was straiqht to the point: how
many aircraft did the passenqer
think that the airline operated? It
was asked of Israeli and non-Israeli,
Jew and Gentile.
The answers were staqqerinq.
They ranqed from a low of "around
1
1
(
i
I
MORDECHAI BEN-ARI
HOLIDAY
HUNTERS
TRAVEL
AGENCY
20" to the heady heiqhts of "would
200 be too many?" The passenqers
who had been quizzed were equally
amazed to leam the correct fiqure
just seven.
The journalist went away happy.
She had qone to Lod with the inten-
tion of raisinq a contentious point
with E1A1 in the hopes of diqqinq
out a story. Now she had a better
one. Small as it miqht be in reality,
mirrorinq the size of the country it
serves, the Israeli carrier had, to the
all-important passenqer, the stature
of an air transport qiant.
Logically the hit-or-miss type of
reaction from a qroup of passenqers
(who obviously had no connection
whatsoever with the airline business;
is hardly the riqht sort of yardstick
to use when makinq a critical assess-
ment of the standinq of a particular
airline within the overall world
scene.
Yet the fact remains that despite
its small physical stature the name
cf E1A1 is one of the most widely
known throuqhout the air transport
industry and one that is held in due
reverence when mentioned in the
same breath as the twin orbs of ef-
ficiency and productivity.
El Al's mission in Israeli life is
clearly defined. To precis the official
constitutional parlance, drawn up in
November 1948 under the laws of
the emerqent State of Israel, it was
to act as the country's lifeline with
the outside world, and to provide an
efficient public service with the ac-
cent on service. This is not to infer
that profitability is not a major con-
sideration. E1A1 is a 100 percent
profit-motivated airline but in terms
of overall priority the maintenance
of external links is the No. 1 consid-
eration.
Never was this policy more neces-
sarily put into effect than durinq the
six-day war with Israel's perpetually
hostile neighbors, which beqan on
lune 5. El Al continued flyinq throuqh-
out the entire period and was the
one means of nir communication
with the rest of the world durinq the
actual warfare.
From May 14-24 there was a tre-
mendous exodus from the countrv as
a result of the war threat. More than
20 "00 visitors left durina that period.
11,500 of them via El Al* And this
was desnite the fact that the airline
itself was on a war footinq. Some
600 of the 2,100 staff in Israel, clrdinq a larce number of pilots,
were mobilized. These that were left
worked seven days a week, 16 hours
a day. Air stewardesses drove buses,
mechanics and white collar workers
humped baqqaqe Israel was on
the brink of war but El Al continued
fivinq just the same.
Since the war. Israel has become
the focal point of the Middle East.
El Al knows so only too well. It
simply cannot cope with the amount
of traffic which has been qenerated
by recent events. If the Dace is main-
tained, the airline's qrowth could be
transformed from a crr^u'lv planned
steady proqression into a meteoric
climb which could make even the
ready for anythinq Israelis catch
their breath. Then perhaps the jour-
nalist should pose her question all
over aqain. The next time the an-
swers miqht be riqht.
The architect of El Al's commer-
cial success. Mordechai Bn-Ari, is
the new president of El Al, and if
past performance is any indication
of what is to be expected, QA1 can
look forward to a period of dramatic
qjowth.
One of the major advantaqes that
Ben-Ari possesses is that he was
closely associated with tb two ad-
ministrations that preceded him. He
worked closely with Gen. Ben-Arzi.
who was president of the airline
from 1956 to 1966 and who then be-
came chairman of the board of di-
rectors. He was a close personal
associate of Shlomo Lahat, who led
the company durinq the past two
years. In this respect it can be as-
sumed that El Al's qeneral philoso-
phy and its current trend of activities
will not underqo onv drastic chanqes
in the new administration.
I rvpogrdfih ... >u( |
i.jii pdjd "I HIM / ..
rinfni was detigned and
executed by WMIi.im T Breicci
,1 The lewsh PleruiMTi itafj
..-> :, ,i b. Rudy Cry>'K- i on
cull mi
Ti-.e frets u." iont b\
George Took^er,
Agent for All Major Airlines
Steamship Companies
Hotels, Hertz
in
J_jest lAJishes Jo
ki ESTABLISHED 1926 ,
LITTLE RIVER BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
8017 N. SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
MtMMi KDtu Msnvt srsrtM. nw>u ocrour insu*anci cowotAtiON
(Jn the eve of IsraelS 20th anniversary,
ana our own 30th anniversary, the
(greater tHlliami Jewish federation
is proud to report that we have Sent,
In the years 1939 throuah 1967, more than
$18,290,000 in free dollar S
to the people of Israel through the
United Jewish ^Arppeal,
With the continued qenerouS cooperation of
Cjreater rfliami, we are confident that we
wilt surpass $20,000,000 Juriny tliis
historic year. Contributions may he made
now throuah the 1968 Combined Jewish
^rppeal-Israel which is in progress.
prop
-JLeon Kupfan
/ resident
tlrion S. PJLf
C umjmiun C nuirmun
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH
FEDERATION
1317 BISCAYNE BLVD., MIAMI, FLORIDA 3313:
TELEPHONE 373 04 U
f


Friday. February 23. 1968 ....
r
Last June you gave to meet a
great human emergency in Israel
THE EMERGENCY CONTINUES
SO THE EMERGENCY FUND
MUST CONTINUE

Give to the
ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
OF THE
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
for great humanitarian needs in Israel
v
and give to the
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL OF GREATER MIAMI
for regular welfare needs locally and overseas

4
Give both gifts through...
THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
1317 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI 33132, FLORIDA
Telephone: 373-0411


Page 28-C
# fri<#< n^rlHU^r
FriHav. February 23. 1969
MIAMI
ORGANIZATIONS
ALUTE...
AMERICAN FRIENDS OF THE
HEBREW UNIVERSITY, INC.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE (ORTHODOX)
0
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
O
CONGREGATION BETH EL
.3
AMERICAN TECHNION SOCIETY

AMERICAN TECHNION SOCIETY
MIAMI BEACH CHAPTER
WOMEN'S DIVISION
o
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH
(ORTHODOX)

CONGREGATION B'NAI RAPHAEL

CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF MIAMI, INC.
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
FARBAND LABOR ZIONIST ORDER
BEN GURION BRANCH NO. 304
O
BUREAU OF JEWISH EDUCATION
$
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
O
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION

1500 MEN'S CLUB MORTON TOWERS
V-
GREATER MIAMI SECTION, NATIONAL
COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
t?

HEBREW ACADEMY


Fr:dcy, February 23. 1968
* if w ist Flcridliain
Paqe 29-C
rv> Mb
42.
&.
1968 ISRAEL'S 20th
"7W
t
ISRAELITE CENTER TEMPLE
TEMPLE BETH TOV
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE
0
MIAMI BEACH CHAPTER OF HADASSAH
TEMPLE EMANU EL
0
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR

TEMPLE JUDEA OF CORAL GABLES
MIAMI CHAPTER OF HADASSAH
"."AMI-GABLES ZIONIST DISTRICT ZOA

PIONEER WOMEN DADE &
BROWARD COUNTY
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE
r
TEMPLE MENORAH
TEMPLE NER TAMID
TEMPLE ZAMORA
TEMPLE ZION, SOUTH MIAMI
SPINOZA FORUM FOR
ADULT EDUCATION
UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW
CONGREGATIONS OF AMERICA

TEMPLE BETH AM
YIVO FORUM

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA


Page
* lf*l*t flnridfiajn
Friday. February 23. 1968
Jewish National Fund News
This page of pictures has been inserted to give Greater^ Miami Jewry a look at the activities
** "of Greater Mrami. We"riope to give you additional'and more complete information in a later i

of the Jewish National Fund Council
ssue.
Joseph Cohen Dinner, Nov. 26, 1967 In The Diplomat Hotel
Left to right: Mr. Joseph Cohen, president of the Jewish National
Fund Council of Greater Miami; Mayor and Mrs. Shepard Broad,
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, and Samuel Friedland.
Jerusalem Reunited Dinner, Dec. 10, 1967, At Fontainebleau Hotel
Mr. Joseph Cohen, president of the Jewish National Fund Council
of Greater Miami is shown receiving an Album of Tribute pre-
sented by Judge Harold B. Spaef, chairman of the event.
JNF Tag Day Reward Luncheon
Pictured at Waldman's Hotel on
Ja.-.. 17, 1968 are, left to right:
Mr. Joseph Cohen, president ot
the Jewish National Fund Coun-
cil of Greater Miami, and Mrs.
Jacob D. (Beulah) Davis, chair-
man of the Tag Day drive.
JNF Reunited Dinner, Dec. 10th
At the Fontainebleau Hotel were,
left to right: Judge Harold B.
Spaet, chairman ot the dinner,
Mrs. Spaef and Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz.
A Successful Concert Produced Ry The Jewish National Fund
At the concert under the direction of Shmuel Fershko, composer
and director, are shown from left to right in the photo at left:
Zev W. Kogan, John W. Beard, Mrs. Zev Kogan, Herschel Bernard.,
Mayor Jay Dermer, Beulah Gill, Hy Einhorn and Mrs. Jay Dermer.
Bottom photo shows Mr. Fershko as he conducts.
Honored For Their JNF Tag Day Efforts At A Recent Luncheon
Shown standing, left to right are awardees Mollie Skell, Hannah
Finn, Malke Shklair, Gussie Heyman and Fannie Werner; Joseph
Cohen, president of the Jewish National Fund Council of Greater
Miami; Tillie Kirson, Lee Edelman, Rita Scherr and Sarah Rubel.
Seated are Dora Goldman, left and Mrs. Jacob D. Davis. Not shown
are Charlotte Fisher and Mrs. Rose1 Marcus, champion Tag Day
collector.
Jerusalem Reunited Dinner, Dec. 10, 1967, Fontainebleau HoM
Left to right are: Zev W. Kogan; Benjamin Appel, treasurer, Jewish
National Fund of Greater Miami; Judge Harold B. Spaet, chairman
of the dinner,- Mrs. Eva Blum; Nissen Yaish; Joseph Cohen, presi-
dent, Jewish National Fund of Greater Miami; Miriam Press, comp-
troller; Sam Schachno, financial secretary, and Abraham Grunhut,
vice president.
Joseph Cohen Tribute Dinner, Nov. 26, 1967, At Diplomat Hotel
Left to right are-. Mr. Joseph Cohen, president of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund Council of Greater Miami; Mayor Jay Dermer, Sam
Friedland and Dr. Shlomo Sitton pose for cameraman.


Friday, February 23. 1968
*Jewisttk>ridlic>n
Paqe 31-C
::>-
Jjcst Wishes to tltc
*Statc O/ 3sracl
p
om its
20tk *4,
nn
Carl Weinkle
ivcrsaru
Leo A. Chaiki
in
WEINKLES LIQUOR
STORES INC.
24 STORES IN DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES
K-jrcctincjs Jo s^Jsracl
Om PORTOFINO
PAY NO INTEREST FOR 60 DAYS!
When you borrow to build a home, you pay the builder in installments during
construction .. and usually have to pay interest on the entire construction
loan. But at FIRST FEDERAL you pay no interest at all for two full months
and your first principal payment isn't due for at least four months.
No wonder more people finance their homes at FIRST FEDERAL. If you're
buildingor buyingmay we help you?
{$) First Federal Savings
*..- ANO LOAN ASSOCIATION Of MIAMI
W. M. WALKCN OR, CH*IKMAN>*M(mC'S OLDEST FEDERAL ... LAR6EST IN THE SOUTH
DOWNTOWN FU6LER STREET CORK W UTUE RIVER NORTH MIAMI RtRMU KOMEJTEAD ROOSEVELT
Congratulations .
ANNIVERSARY YEAR

^/wcS(mtdaUHm^imJ^ tfORm 3tm^


Page 32-C
P A/ Fridav. Fbruar
tv 23. 1963

ISRAEL'S 20th ANNIVERSARY
It's an investment with a double dividend: you're flying the
most modern, most convivial Boeing 707 Jets, and you're
buying your share in Israel's economic independence.
El Al can take you to sixteen countries besides Israel. Every
time you proudly fly El Al to Athens, Amsterdam, Brussels,
Copenhagen, Frankfurt, Istanbul, Johannesburg, London,
Munich, Nairobi, Nicosia, Paris, Rhodes, Rome, Sofia,
Teheran, Vienna, Zurich and Tel Aviv it's double dividends
for you and for Israel.
Start investing in your happiness and Israel's future by
calling any of our authorized travel agents today. They
know all about our assets.
'.
ISRAEL
AIRLINES
1602 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, Florida
JE 2-5441


Education Group Reports
Decline In Enrollment
~<3rewisli Floridian
[XKW YORK (JTA) A slight .
ine i" enrollment in Jewish j
in the United States since
| ias been reported by the '
an Association for Jewish
mi on the basis of data
im its third national census of
iwisb schools.
Other findings from the compre-
nalional survey were thai
[ore than 40 percent of all re-
0i-,,l students attended one-day-
veek schools; Yiddish-speakinR
rhools have ceased to be a signifi-
ement in American Jewish
lucation; and that more than 90
Brcent o' all children receiving a
wish education attend congrega-
onal schools.
The data from the 196667 cen-
s were compared with find
surveys conducted by the AAJK
1955 and in 1062, according to
(r Isaac Toubin, AAJE executive
In ctor Data from the previous
indicated thai a plateau in
ihool em I'.lmenl was reached in
fc'iio. The slight decline was attrib-
L the declining Jewish birth-
|ate during the 1950s and 1060s
\ VJE census show "!
I more than 54 i, lOO Jewish
| m three lo 17 years of
gc were estimated to be receiving
. i ol Jev Lsh education,
rvej is di scr bed as the
i ii eh nsive in the historj
\l the Jewish community. A re
I to i te survey questionnaire
:ained from 455 (mi "I 671
I communities, representing
-Hi,' than 95 percent ol the total
k can Jewish populal Ion. I hese
t nities included 2.070 out of
.7^7 li-' schools. Responses re-
lied an actual attendance of
|45.648 children in the 3-to-17 year
kel A projection for miss
s< h ols indicated that more
fcan 540,000 children were regis-
Bred during the 19!>6-t>7 school
pear.
The Study fo-jnd that more than
half of all repor-ed students at-
tend religious schools for two
days a week or less The study
fount" also that 193,000 children,
cr 43.2 percent, were enrolled in
one day -aweek schools; 193,000
were enrolled two to five days a
weJk and 59,8C0, or 13.5 percent,
were enrolled in day Jewish
schoo's. The AAJE estimated
that 'here are 1,300,000 Jewish
children in the United States in
the 3to-17 year age bracket.
Among the major conclusions
cited by Or. Toubin in analysing
the findings was the fact that
Yiddish-speaking schools, which
erc a substantial part of the Jew-
ish educational system in the
United States in the early part of
khis century, are no longer a sig-
nificant factor. Only 4.364 are cur-
lently enrolled in such schools.
Another conclusion was that
laltemoon Hebrew schools under
Icommiinal auspices, which for a
predominantly occupied by the
Conservative school system.
In evaluating the implications
oi the survey findings by congre-
gational groups, Dr. Toubin noted
hat more than 46.000 children or
half ot the 96.000 children attend-
lithodox-sponsored schools, are
registered in all-day schools. At the
other extreme, only 9.600 children
attend one-day-a-week schools.
By far the largesl number of
children in Conservative congrega-
tional schools attend two to five-
day-a-week afternoon schools. More
Miami, Florida, Friday, February 23, 1968
Sect!
D
DK. ISAAC TOUBIN
than 106,000, or nearly 711 percent.
r ceive this relatively more
s.ve Jewish education but 41.000
are still receiving a meager one-
daj a week Jewish education, it
A-as noie.I. Day School education
..- a recent development in Con-
servative Judaism and still a minor
factor, with 3,600 children enrolled
,n such day schools.
The data showed that one-day-a
week Jewish education remains
largely a Reform approach, with
125.000 or 7o percent of all chil-
dren of Reform families attending
school one >:a> a week, which rep-
resents more than 84 percent of all
.n.iiii'.n in the tailed slates m
such school- The study noted that
educators generally and Reform
educators In particular are critical
of this "minimal form" of Jewish
education. The data showed, how-
ever, an "encouraging" move lenl
toward two to five-day-a-week Re-
form-sponsored schools with 34,000,
or 21 percent of Reform Jewish
children now attending such addi-
tional classes.
Of the 306,000 children attend
ing Jewish schools outside New
York City, 115.000 do so in Con-
servative congregational schools.
But the number of children receiv-
ing two days or less Jewish educa-
tion a week in Conservative schools
forms a substantial proportion of
the total, representing 50,000 or
nearly 45 percent. Of this num-
rong time were the major institu- ber. 42,700 receive their education
ion for educating Jewish children, at one-day-a-week schools.
Nationally. 159,000 children, or I
about 36 percent of all children,
attend Reform congregational
schools but the Reform educational !
movement is much stronger out-
side of New York City41 percent
than in New York City, where
about 24 percent go to Reform
enroll only 21.456 children or less
than live percent of the total.
A consequence of these develop-
ments, Dr Toubin indicated, was
Ihat the responsibility for provid-
ing Jewish education in the United
tates is now virtually in congre- schools. In New York City, there is
ational hands. He reported that little Reform education beyond
15 percent of all children receiv- one-day-a-week. Most children who
attend two to five-day-a-week Re-
ig Jewish education attend schools fQim do SQ outside New York City.
nder congregational auspices. The
ata showed that schools under Re- examining day schoo educa-
tion, the study lound that 59,o\ m auspices teach 35.7 percent, I halna wt,ie reported as attend-
hools under Conservative aus- jng all levels of day schools na-
ices. 34.3 percent, and schools i.oiiany iroin nurseiy to secondary
nder Orthodox auspices 21.5 per- [ schools. Ut this number 44 875, or
io percent, attend day schools
pent of the total number of en-
rolled children.
On the whole. Dr. Toubin #.
lPred, the census supports the
proposition that the mere Inten-
sive the character of Jewish edu-
cation, the more likely it is to
Orthodox, and the less inton-
the more likely it is to bo
taform. Tho middle ground is
New York City and only 14,959 at-
tend day schools in all other cities,
unuer all auspices. Specifically,
4,609 or six percent, attend Con-
servative sponsored day schools;
tf,23i or lo.4 percent attend day
schools under communal or non-
denominational auspices and 46,714
or 78 percent attend Orthodox-
sponsored day schools.
Fashions Will Pass In Review
For Israel Bonds Women's Unit
The house lights will dim, the
room will qrew quiet the music will
start and a spotlight will illumine a
large runway along which glamor-
ous young models will begin mov-
ing. They will be wearing clothes
made exclusively in Israel. This is
the beginning of a unigue fashion
show.
For, behind !he glitter and ex-
citement is a more serious purpose
one thai goes far beyond fashion
itself. It will be a showcase lor one
cf Israel's voun", vigorous and dy-
namic industries, and it will launch
a nationwide bond-soiling campaign
on the par! c! the Women's Division
c; israe: Bonds.
Proceed-; from Israel Bends are
used for iriiqati-n. establishmen' of
new towns and villaaes, expansion
of industiv, exploitation oi natural re-
source:-, development ot haibors and
construction cf roorls and harbors.
The occasion will be the Inter-
national Premiere of the all-Israel
Fashion Show on Thur.-dav. Feb. 23
ct 12 noon in the Font:.'nb'eau
Hotel, sponsored bv the Women's
Division cf Israel Bonds.
The price of admission to the
Fashion Shew will be by Bond pur-
chases, a pattern that will be re-
peated in the 60 cities to which tne
show will travel during the year.
This blending of the glamour of
fashion with tho serious busmess of
investment was explained by Mrs.
Jan Peerce, wifo cf the noted tenor
end National Chairman of the Wom-
en's Division, who will oreside at
the luncheon and premiore.
"Bonds are the major source cf
investment for Israel's Drcaram of
economic development, which is
what Isrccl ne?ds if she is to be-
come strong and free. And the
fashion industry represents Israel's
attemot to boccme just that. Fashion
is one of Israel's major export items
and the industry itself is an import-
ant source of emolcment for the
people of that nation."
Mrs. Peerce hes been guiding '.he
effort* of women Bond vo'unteers for
a number of vears, as chairman of
Greater New York, and then as na-
tional chairman of the Women's Di-
vision. She is also active in local
community and philanthropic work.
Over the years the Fashion
Shows, arranaed with the help of
the Israel Trade Commission, have
succeeded in bringing to the Ameri-
can public a qlimose of a major
accomplishment of Israel on the in-
dustrial front. And most important,
they have become a major instru-
ment for selling Israel Bonds.
"And I want to add," said Mrs.
Peerce. "it's not all one-sided. The
Bonds are interest-bearinq."
The Fashion Shows have been
successful for a number of reasons,
not the least of which is the broad
array of ready-to-wear and haute
couture which Israel is producing
these days.
A generous sampling will be on
display at the International Premiere
when the 67 pieces to be shown will
comprise the largest collection of
Made-in-Israel clothing ever to be
shown.
Among them will be the lea her
and suede fashions oi the interna-
tionally famous Beqed Or, whose
president and {sunder, Leslie S.
ruiop, will be gucit c: honor for the
event.
Beged-Or is one of Israel's top
ready-to-wear firms and leads the
fieia in exports. Like ail cf lsrcol's
garment industry, it has made a
cc n.ribu.icr. to worldwide racoqni ion
cf Israel's fas.iion know-how und
creativity an.1 has heip:-d make
ion a vital force in Israel's eco-
nomic lil .
Boged-Or is c::e cf twenty-five
fashion hou i -. which will bs repre-
sented ct ihe fc ihion shew, which
. bo st.i-.'d by Mrs. E.fanor Mor-
ris ol Jorau.i Marsh.
Among the bin > that will be
seoa v.-.i. eleqant kn'ts and wools
in classic 3uits, miniskirts, culottes,
pants and dasi inq capes from Is-
rael's knitwear houses; breathtaking
.tail dresses end evening en-
sembles horn the ateliers cf Israel's
to;: hauto cou'.ure houses; colorful
b >achwear bat.ks. and at home out-
fits, and luxurious fur fashions.
As varied a-- the styles will be.
they will hc:ve something in com-
mon. They are the products of the
tradition of craftsmanship and de-
sign brought to Israel by immigrants
from more than 70 European and
Asian nations. The dc-:iqi3 aro a
blending of east and west, tradi-
tional and modern. And the des.an-
eis drew en the rich color of the
Israeli landscape and tho Biblical
history of Israel for their inspiral on.
The fo'lcwinq is a fall list ol
participants:
Ready-to-Wear Aled, Arpaz,
Beqed-Or, Ita Corta'.e, Dorina, Elctnit,
Elastex, Galia, Gcttox. Jadoli, Jantz-
en of Israel, Jercoli, Moskit, Matzkin.
Rosen. Schiff-Atlas, Shelly Boutique
end Tadmor; Haute Couture Lola
Beer, Finy Leitersdorf, Gideon Ober-
son, Rivka Shafir and Pnina Shallon;
Furs Stefan Braun and Eliahu
Neulander.
The Fashion Show is one of the
highliqhts of the International Inauq-
ural Conference of the Israel Bond
orqanization which will be held in
Miami Beach from Feb. 29 through
March 3. to launch the 1968 cam-
paiqn for Israel Bonds.


Pace 2-D
* IrmriMtl nrrrjrffftin
Friday, Febra-rv 23
r_

lAJhCft s H^ook
*7

By ROSALIND 5. ZUNSER. -
Comparatively (ew housnwives today ro to the trouble of
baking cookies or even a simple cake The reasons are not far to
seek Why bother when one can buy these, so attractively packag-
ed, at the convenient supermarket? Yet to me the very symbol of
a good and hospitable home is the presence of the enshrined
Mama's Cookie Jar highly prized by young and old; never empty
and forever replenished by a new batch good when hot out
of the oven, or on tap. You could even freeze them. So get out
the cookie pan and bake yourself a reputation.
Sand Cookies
3 cups flour
H4 teaspoons baking powder
1'-' cups sugar
2 eggs
'j pound butter
'a teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons cold water
1 egg
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
2's cups flour
'4 lb. butter
'- teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
'j teaspoon salt
Cream butter and sugar together until batter is creamy;
add egg, water and vanilla. Sift together flour, cream of tartar,
soda and salt and add to above ingredients. Roll out 18 inch
thick, cut out and bake in 400 degree oven until brown (8 to
10 minutes.)
You probably are one of the mothers whose children turn up
their noses when you serve spinach with the familiar comment
inspired by a famous cartoon, "I say it's spinach, and to hell
with it. Well, here is a way to dress up that despised but nu-
tritious and iron-rich vegetable so as to make it a welcome guest
at the family table. Not only does it look better but it tastes better
Undoubtedly you must have a dozen recipes for tomato soup
This one. a dairy one, may be new to you. It is good too.
SPINACH KUGEL
(This recipe can be put in a Ring form)
la4 cup boiled spinach, chopped
1 small carrot, grated
2 tablespoons grated onion
1 small boiled potato, grated
2 tablespoons minced green
pepper (optional)
2 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons flour
"t cup milk
3 egg yolks
3 egg whites beaten stiff
but not dry
To 2 tablespoons melted buttter. add flour, put over low heat
and mix wall; when Hour is not raw but not brown, add milk
Slowly. When smooth and slightly thickened, add rest of ingredi-
ents, except egg whites Cool, then add egg whites beaten stiff but
not dry. Place in a mold, set mold in a pan partly filled with
boiling water. Place in a 350-degree oven and bake until knife
when inserted comes out clean. If you bake spinach in a ring
form, you can fill center with tuna fish to which cut celery and
minced onion and mayonnaise have been added, and surround
with cooked sliced carrots.
MILCHIG TOMATO SOUP
3 cups canned tomatoes
2 cups water
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 tablespoon chopped celery
leaves
'- bay leaf
2 cloves
2 teaspoons sugar
IM2 teaspoons salt
2 cups scalded milk
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
Put first eight ingredients in a pot and simmer one half hour.
Melt butter, add flour and, when thickened, add scalded milk.
When cooked, force the first eight ingredients through a sieve,
stir in the milk or white sauce, mixing tomato soup well all the
time so it does not curdle. Serve hot.
When your family grows a bit tired of a meat dinner and
craves a simple vegetable repast, how about Potatoes with Cottage
Cheese and Stuffed Eggplant? Both are as simple to prepare as
to digest and few pots need scouring afterwards.
POTATOES WITH COTTAGE CHEESE
4 potatoes, pared and diced J* lb. cottage cheese
1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon butter
'i teaspoon pepper I* cup cream, sweet or sour
Arrange in layers in greased baking dish. Bake at 375 de-
grees for about one hour or until potatoes are tender.
STUFFED EGGPLANT
1 eggplant
1 onion, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
4 tablespoons butter
1 cud boiled rice
H lb. mushrooms, chopped
2 stalks celery, minced
1 tablespoon breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon grated Swiss
cheese (optional)
Cut eggplant in half lengthwise and slash the cut surfaces
Bake both halves in a 375 degree oven until f.esh is soft (about 1C
minutes). Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet and add onion
garlic, celery and mushrooms and simmer altogether until mix-
ture is almost dry. Scoop meat from the eggplant halves leaving
shell intact. Chop meat fine and add rice and other vegetable,
and mix well over a low heat for a few minute... Fill shell,
sprinkle with breadcrumbs, cheese if -used, parsley and 2 table-
spoons melted butter; bake in 350-degree oven until top is broun.
Cream butter and sugar until well mixed and creamy, one
at a time, add eggs and vanilla then add flour, mixed with bak-
ing powder and salt, alternately with milk. Bake on a greased
cookie sheet in a 350 degree oven after they have been cut out
with a cookie cutter or with a small glass, 1,8 inch thick after
dough has been rolled out on a floured board.
Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies
00
-X ^J* 4R r* '^Li wSu
^H HVt( #**
^fifik Bib.' 'jQr Li I Bi/1 aWl
k ^
U fl kV
THE ALPHA OMEGA Dental Auxiliary-, Miami Chapter, met
recently to discuss plans for the purchase cf a portable
X-ray unit for the dental clinic at Variety Children's Hospital.
Shrwn fhent row from left) are: M-s. Barrv Meiselman, Mrs.
Robert Adler and Mrs. Robert ApH: and 'tear row from
left): Mrs. Murry Zinner, Mrs. Alan Staler. Mrs. Paul Ric'.i-
man (president), Mrs. Howard Rosen and Mrs. William
Si'ver.
Plans for the welcoming of more than 2,000 optometrists to
the 71st annual congress of the American Optometric As-
sociation, scheduled June 26-29 in Miami Beach, were dis-
cussed by Dr. Melvin B. Dunbar. Lebanon, N.H. (left), chair-
man of the AOA Committee on the Annual Congress. Dr.
Jesse Cortes, of Miami, a member of the national meetinq's
local arrangements committee, and Dr. Jack B. Wolfe oi
Opa Locka. president-elect of the Florida Optometric As-
sociation.
Standing before the new Mural coverinq the entire wall of
the New Assembly Hc'.l at Temple Emanu-E! are (from
left): Max Boderman. president of the Temple M:s. S-.-nira
Carson, the artist, Ben Feinberg, doncr. and Dt. Irving Lehr-
man, spiritual leader of the Temple. The Mura'. which de-
picts the story of the Jewish people f.cm the time o! Moses
to modern Israel, was formally dedicated bv the Board of
Directors cf Temole Emanu-El a! i- '-st -^optin^
V/trti t/fiur J*r/a/rir///
aemarua cafomta //e//tr//'n,
f/ie numoef afotr a ua/// aaAietr.
C ur ra/erS/ta manaarr's AmUmmf
aHe/itSe* to yur mdi'va6m6
SHFRATOX
TOWAMMSMDOm

lets
H H. MARCUSE
rood Bev,.3([e Drect0f
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the wedding cakes,
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For, when you select
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No matter how large
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5
Friday. February 23. 1968
+Jf!*lstinrMtori
Page 3-0

:~ tj ji .....i. -Hi
jmiuwmiraauii
. :
. &yboi4t f^eople and f^L
FOR A FRIEND
In fact the party was for two friends. The
Open House, given by Mrs. Charlotte Beil and
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sandier, was a
bon voyage coffee for Mr. and Mrs. James Stern,
who are going to Israel for the national execu-
tive committee meeting of the Jewish War Vet-
erans of the United States of America. Jimmy,
Florida Department Commander, and Trudi are
so excited there's no living with them.
The center of the buffet table was a huge
model of the El Al plane they are going on. They
could actually pick out their seats. The bon voy-
age cake was as good as it looked. Forgot to ask
if Tillie Sandier made any of uie goodies, but
she's a fabulous cook. Among the guests who
came to say "goodbye, have a wonderful time,
wish we were going too," were Mr. and Mrs. Hy
Morris. Mr. and Mrs. Irv;n Steinberg, Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Deutsch, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Dron-
sky, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Burman, Mr. and Mrs.
Maurice Weinman, Mrs. Jeanne Spiegel, Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Gold. Mrs. Zelda Glass. Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Achtman, Mr. and Mrs. Max Rubin
and Mr. and Mrs. Abe Isgar.
DID YOU KNOW?
Pretty, dark haired Gail Sandier is now Mrs.
Ellis Feinstein.
AT THE SNAP AND GARTER SPEAK EASY
The guests all came in the costume of their
favorite movie stars of the '20s and '30s. Some
of them hadn't even been born yet but they all
knew the movie idols of that era. The costume
late buffet supper party was given by Buddy and
Jacquie Kott at their home on Rock Garden Lane
which had been turned into a speak-easy for that
night only, complete with huge movie star post-
ers and a life size nude behind the old fashioned
bar. Jacquie was dressed as Jean Har'.ow and
Buddy as Groucho Marx. The grand march was
really something. A lot of effort and research
went into the costumes, which had to be seen to
be believed. Three couples went as "Our Gang."
Sy and Helene Somerstcin, Neil and Barbara
Schiff and Alan and Leila Marcus were the gang.
Leila was Farinaremember, she was was the
little colored gir! with the pigtails. Lenny Parker
made a dashing Valentino and his wife Babs was
Velma Banky. The best character presentation
Was Shurburt Weiss as Wallace Beery (Pancho
Villa I and his wife Lenore whs Cleopatra. Felicia
and Dick Deutsch and Bunchie and Arnie Gertner
were great as Wall Disney characters, Joel Satz-
man was made up as Charlie Chaplin and his
Wilma as Pola Negri Richard Perwin made a
fine W. C, Fields and I-orretta was the "It Girl."
A band played "Charleston'' music. Right after
the late buffet supper the joint was raided by
five Keystone Kops. who ended their carryings-on
by falling in the pool. Them days are gone for-
everbut the memory lingers on.
aces
WHAT MAKES A PERSON WRITE?
Jessie (Mrs. Samuel Gertman was the worst
correspondent ever to leave Miami. No one ever
hears from her, including her best friends. But
she finally wrote from Washington. D.C.. where
she is living, to say that daughter Sue is engaged
to Richard Ugelow and will be married in Sep-
tember. I expect to get two more letters-one
when son Paul is engaged and the other to an-
nounce the engagement of son Richard. Unless,
of course, they decide to be bachelors.
LENNY'S HIDE-A-WAY
"Lennys Hide-A-Way" (the restaurant) is
staying stationary, but the "Hide-A-Way" (yacht)
went off on a cruise. Leonard and Margie Wein
look Larry and Mae Wein floating off to Palm
Beach to a party. From there they cruised
around enjoying the air and sun and just being
family together. Larry, chairman of the board of
rruitees of Brandeis University, and Mae were in
Miami for the vicennial srandeis dinner. I am
intrigued by the fact that he is part owner of
the Empire State Buildinga very big building
THE PRESIDENT! THE PRESIDENT!
Ferd Meyers has been president of the West-
view Country Club as long as the tenure of any
oresident of the United States. It's that time of
year again and last week "The President's Ball"
was held at Westview Country Club. The setting
Df the dinnerimpressive as alwayswas blink-
ing lights and red and white baskets of flowers,
and everyone looked beautiful. Ferd was present-
ed with two keysone was the key to the Club,
the other was a key to the men's room.
Seen at the black tie affair were Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Windt, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Bloom,
Mr. and Mrs Charles Block, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Max Kern, Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Ayares, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Tate. Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Sachs, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
Koven. Dr and Mrs. Leo Levin, Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Koren, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Gumenick,
and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney J. Rudolph
THEY WRAPPED THE PATIO IN PLASTIC
David and Elinor Catsman wrapped their
screened-in-patio in plastic, covered over the pool
and dared the elements to creep in. Nothing
crept in but the people whom they had invited
for a cocktail buffet to meet their daughter,
Ellen, and her husband, Philip Freidin, who
were visiting. They had invited friends who didn't
get to meet toe coupre when they married in the
late summer Among the guests were Dr. and
Mrs. Harold Rand. Dr. and Mrs. Richard Flem-
ing. Col. and Mrs. W. J. Harris. Mr. and Mrs.
B. J. Harris of Palm Beach lit was cold there,
tool. Mr, and Mrs. Cason Ives. Mr. and Mrs. Jules
Abramson. Mr. and Mrs Sam Jamison, Mr. and
Mrs. Lou Zorn. Mr and Mrs. Morton Stein. Mr.
and Mrs Van Myers. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Welnkle
and Judge and Mrs. Milton Friedman.
Frances Lehman

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Call:
379-8861
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CALL ... MR. M. APPEL, Catering Manager, FR 9-3792
Nazi Victim's Child
Suffers As Result
Of Parent's Ordeal
HAMILTON (JTA) The suffer-
ing of concentration camp victims
at the hands of the Nazis during
World War II is having a distress-
ing effect on their children who
were born after the holocaust, a
; psychiatrist said here.
Dr. Vivian Rakoff, a member of
the department of psychiatry at
, Jewish General Hospital in Mont-
real, said that the children of con-
centration camp families were
often extremely depressed or po-
tential delinquents. Dr. Rakoff
spoke at a meeting sponsored by
the psychiatry department of Mc-
Master University here.
"These kids were treated like
l young princelings," he said. "Their
' parents felt that they were so
! precious that they wouldn't disci-
j pline them or they were so tired
they just didn't have the energy
to do so.
"The offspring of the camp sur-
vivors were expected to fulfill the
lives of all those the Nazis destroy-
ed. These children found it difficult
' to express the anger and resent-
ment they often felt toward their
parents because of the realization
I of what they had suffered. But
when they hit adolescence, the ex
plosion is often violent," Dr. Ra-
koff said.
He cited two cases of attempted
suicide by teen aged children of
parents who survived concentra-
tion camps.
.1
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heDdMan
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He's James "Jimmy" De Nicola, Catering Manager
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CALL Jefferson 8-8811
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Dinners, luncheons, weddings, parties
club meetings, confirmations, all in
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Call for your own tour of facilities.
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TEL: MR. DAVID KOVAC. 888-3600
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TEL: MR. CARLOS FERNANDEZ. 532-3600
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Dietary laws strictly observed under the
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CONFIRMATIONS RECEPTIONS
WEDDINGS BANQUETS MEETINGS
PARTIES for up to 3,500 guests
OCEAN AT 67th ST.. MIAMI BEACH
Phone UN 5-8511
BILL GOLDRING
EXECUTIVE FOOD DIRECTOR


Page 4-D
*Jewisti ncrMian
Friday, February 23. 1968
Capital Spotlight
By Wilton Friedman
Soviet 'Black Beret' Forces Poised In Mideast
Washington
HE ADMINISTRATION has ver-
ified intelligence reports that
[new Russian "black beret" Ma-
rine battalions amphibious and
airborne are poised aboard So-
viet landing cralt in the Middle
I East.
An elite force, the Black Beret
units are modeled after the American Green Beret
special forces and the United States Marines. Black
Beret units are designed for rapid task force opera-
tions like the 1958 U.S. Marine landing in Lebanon.
They would be used to provide Arab states with a
safety screen against Israeli reprisalsthus facili-
tating increased Arab guerrilla raids into Israel.
Why, then, did President Johnson omit mention
of any aspect of the last year's dangerous Soviet
activities in the Middle East from his State of the
Union message?
Administration sources indicated that the Presi-
dent is not unconcerned about the Russian role
which is jeopardizing the Middle East and Med-
iterranean. But the only public stand would have to
be a firm proclamation that might detract from
emphasis on Viet Nam. Top priority remains on Viet
Nam. The President fears that a public challenge to
Russian pressure in the Mediterranean might de-
emphasize the importance attached to Viet Nam.
A difference of opinion exists among military
leaders. While the Administration has been pre-
occupied with Viet Nam, the last year has witnessed
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ

Florida And Israel
berhaps there will soon be adver-
tisements in the American papers,
isking: "Why not go skiing in Israel?"
lit has already come in a limited way. We
picked up a copy of the Jerusalem Post
[idvertising weekend parties to "play in
he snow," in the newly acquired terri
'ory of the Six-Day War.
Snow, to be sure, occasionally comes
to Jerusalem too. but the snows of Mt. Hermon, famous
in Bible days, can be more counted upon, and the Is-
raeli papers tell us of skiing parties.
Most of us prefer to follow the sun during the winter,
but there are those hardier souls who prefer the ice" Is
rael should now be able to offer attractions to both.
Maybe they can get the Habimah people also to put on
a kind of Jackie Ben Gleason type of variety show like
"Miami" on television. This should give an enormous
spur to the Israeli tourist business.
Gleason's opening line, "How sweet it is," comes from
the Psalms, but Gleason only uses the first half. In the
Psalms, it is written: "How sweet it is for brethren to
dwell together in unity."
Florida and Israel have much in common. Both have
oranges and bananas, but Florida has more Republicans.
Florida even had a town name Sdeh Goker, the name of
the kibbutz in which Ben-Gurion lives.
Sdeh Boker means Cowboy's Field. That was the name
of Jacksonville in the beginning. Andrew Jackson took
Florida from the Spanish, and the people in appreciation
named it Jacksonville.
Jackson was very much like Israeli leaders, Rabin,
Tiayan or Eshkol. According to a story in the New York
Times, Eshkol was born in a railroad station. (It was not a
Pullman berth.) Jackson is said to have been born in as
unorthodox a fashion. He came in on the world when his
mother was visiting a neighbor. It really wasn't very
polite but Jackson was in a hurry.
Probably Jackson could swear better than Eshkol,
though we can not be sure. Eshkol is very fond of Yiddish;
though, as an Israeli, he speaks Hebrew and most of us
know, Yiddish has a very- adequate vocabulary of swear
words.
Florida's development is also of a recent date. The first
Hung the authorities realized there, was the importance
of a good slogan, "Keep Cool with Coolidge," so the Florida
people decided to take the opposite angle. They adver-
tised Florida as the Land of Sunshine. Even Moses in
Bible days realized the importance of a slogan. He pro-
mised the Israelites to take them to "A Land of Milk
and Honey "We can get ice cream there," the Israelites
aid. so they went along.
In Florida, they figured, get the tourists first and
Ihe Halutzim will come of themselves.
One can never be sure what will ultimately build up
a state. Take the first American colony, Jamestown. It
was languishing, its pioneer settlers complaining, until
a plain fellow, John Rolfe, came in one day on a ship.
He noticed that the people of Jamestown all seemed to
be going around with shovels. Everybody was looking for
gold You won't get any gold that way. said Rolie What
you need to do is plant tobacco.
The Indians also had a habit of shooting arrows at
the whites. We should get the United Nations to intervene,
some said. Well. Rolfe said, I think if we had peace for
seven years to plant tobacco, everything would turn out
well. So he married the Indian chief's daughter. Poca-
hontas, and by the way, most people don't know it, but
__when he married her, he gave her a Jewish name. He
called her Rebecca. But anyway, they were married and
they had peace seven years and the tobacco brought pros-
prity and they lived happily ever after.
the crumbling of the Atlantic Alliance. Britain with-
drew from defense commitments east of the Suez
Fiance quit NATO. Moscow pressed every advan-
tage gained. Russian military power poured into the
Mediterranean to exploit the new situation. Despite
the defeat of the Arabs in the June war. the Rus-
sians gained great influence and even bases in the
Middle East.
Israel Newsletter By ELIAHU SALPETER
Barriers Down For
West Bank Arabs
I
Jerusalem
[ r HAS BEEN the deliberate pol-
icy of Israel, since her victory
In the June war. not to elaborate
on the terms and conditions she
would offer the Arabs around a
peace table. Prime Minister Esh-
kol and other Israeli leaders have
stated repeatedly, however, that
Arabs coming to a peace table wouid find Israel
more generous than they may have expected. On
the other hand, they have reiterated that Israel has
no intention to withdraw to the pre-June 5, 1967
frontiers. Israel is determined to have secure bor-
ders and on that she stands firm
But Israelis argue among themselves, often heat-
edly, about how much if any of the territory taken
by her army in the June war should be returned to
the Arabs within the framework of a peace pact.
Most often, they have in mind the West Bank of the
Jordan, that Wedge of former Palestine territory
that the Jordanian Arab Legion occupied in 1948
when Israel was fighting for independence.
Right alter last June's Six-Day War Israel hoped
that King Hussein of Jordan would soon be ready
for peace talks. The West Bank territories (though
on no account. East Jerusalem) were regarded pri-
marily as an asset for bargaining. But as their hopes
for early peace talks with Hussein faded, the Is-
raelis settled down for a long stay on the West Bank
And as they did. their attitude was, let nature take
its coursein this case human nature, the desire for
economic gain and a better and more secure life.
Apparently this policy is having its anticipated
effect on the Arabs of the West Bank who never
properly considered themselves Jordanians but rath-
er Palestinians. They are, as a whole, better edu-
cated and better off economically than the East
Bank Jordanians and they tend to look down on the
Hashemite monarch, Hussein, as a Bedouin.
Apart from this, the West Bank Arabs quickly
discovered that the Israeli occupiers were not the
"devils" they had long been led to expect. The Is-
ralis guaranteed them more freedom of speech than
the Amman government ever did. Some of the more
vocal West Bankers took advantage of this to de-
nounce Israel and proclaim loyalty to King Hussein.
But it soon became apparent that neither Hussein
nor Nasser were in any position to back up their
calls for resistance and different voices were heard
among the West Bankers, calling for a "Palestin-
ian" rather than a "Hashemite" solution, in effect, a
divorce of the West Bank from Jordan.
Meanwhile, the West Bank Arabs are free to
draw certain conclusions. One is that their economic
interests are best served by maintaining open chan-
nels between the West Bank and Israel. Another is
that they need not be cut off from the rest of the
Arab world and that there is a possible solution by
which they could trade freely with any country.
Highlights In Sports
President Johnson's State of the Union ana: -.
however, was that in developments Involving
USSR "serious differences remain between us
in these relations, we have made some progress
Apart from a call on the Israelis and Arab;
make peace, the President confined his repo
the Middle Fast to observations that "a Cease-fire
was achieved without a major power Confrontation"
and that he had used the hot line for the first time
The President privately conceded that Russian
moves jeopardize Israel. There is no dispute about
that. But great care is taken to leave loophole- m
the issue of U.S. commitment to Israel.
Moscow is using the Arab-Israel issue as a device
They are aiming at the neutralization of the L'.S
Sixth Fleet and destruction of American influence
Before the June war the USSR maintained lim-
ited naval power in the Mediterranean. Now the
Red naval force numbers more than 50 ships includ
ing missile cruisers, nuclear submarines, and an
amphibious task unit. The Russians have land base,
at Port Said and Alexandria in Egypt and Latakia in
Syria. Soviet bombers are known to have operated
from Egyptian bases. Thousands of Russian military
experts are in Egypt, Syria, Algeria and Yemen
British Admiral Sir John Hamilton recently told .i
NATO council meeting "... I can assure you that
the presence of the (Soviet) fleet in the Mediterra
nean is having a profound effect on men's mind- In
this respect it is contributing significantly to the
rise of inlluence in the Mediterranean area."

Today's Thought:
By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
Spread Of Vulgari a
A MERICA is currently suffering ai
vasion by a foreign power u I i
might call vulgana.
We know our air and water
luted, So are our literature and oui film!
There is no depth to the base
which mars and scars our movie- I to
are no longer pictures: they h iv<
come peep-shows.
Avorks of non-fiction would make Boccaccio blush
works of non fiction would make Baccaccio blush
Some advertisements are lurid and often lev
many of our television programs are soiled with -u-._i--
tiveness and more And what of all the televioler .
One wonders why women permit themselves to b.
humiliated and disgraced by the kind of performance!
which are expected of them. Why have we never beani
an actress say that she will not subject herself to the
lack of dignity imposed by some directors?
The amount of indecent magazine fare rises regularlj
In the way some Americans dress and look, the) in-
dicate that they are the victims of Vulgaria 'Modesto
morality and masculinity are casualties of much of modem
life.
As for the unspeakable hippies, whenever anyone ash
me about them 1 reply: "ich hob zay in hood." Which
reminds me of the story about one of these unspek .ble
ones being told by a Catholic priest to take a bath, and
asking his friend what a bath is. The replv: "How shouM
1 know0 I'm not a Catholic."
I don't ask for censorship against the filth contaminat-
ing much of the printed word. I do ask for self-censorship
I pray that the media will learn enough lelf-COnti
not to spotlight the offbeatniks.
A,s for me. I've decided to try to recapture nu sens
of shock at some of the things going on in our land
thinking of starting an organization called the Sociel
of the Proud Prudes "Want to join?"
JESSE SILVER
i
Miami Basketball Stars In The News
It was a double celebration. Both Dave New
mark and Neal Walk set career scoring marks just
a day apart. Columbia's Newmark dropped in 40
points to lead the Lions to a 100-72 rout of Yale at
the victor's home court. The seven-foot junior hit
15 field goals and 10 foul shots, and grabbed 18 re-
bounds. The effort put him on the ECAC weekly
all-star team. Newmark's previous high came in
1965 when he tallied 38 points against Lehigh.
The Yale game followed a fantastic victory for
Columbia in the Holiday Festival at Madison Square
Garden. Newmark contributed to the triumph, but
was held back somewhat by a bad case of flu.
The night after Columbia whipped Yale, Florida
stopped LSU 97-90, as Walk led the scoring with 39
points. It bettered his previous high of 37 against
Jacksonville earlier in the season. The 6-10 junior
netted 16 field goals and 7 foul shots, and nabbed
21 rebounds to keep him among the nations leaders
in both categories.
Earlier in the season. Walk broke his own Florida
rebound record with 29 against Kentucky, and was
named to the Gator Bowl all-tourney team, although
Florida lost both of its sanies
Newmark and Walk have younger brothers pi,,
ing basketball. Brian Newmark, 6-6. is at Phill; -
Exeter Academy, with plans to attend Harvard.
While Warren Walk, 6 5, is the leading scorer and
rebounder at Miami Beach High.
Not as tall as the Walks or Newmarks, Bill>
Evans of Boston College has every bit as much
talent. Evans, a classy play maker, has been having
his troubles. He injured a leg against St. John -
and sat out most of the Holiday Festival in N<
York, as the Eagles took their lumps. "He's a trip',
threat, said head coach Bob Cousev about Evans
lie runs the show. He can score, he can pas- a
he can play defense This kid has the smarts."
I'espite the setback by Columbia. Yale is doir
well this season. Ed Goldstone won the Georgia
iecn game m Atlanta with a 20-foot jump shot with
wo seconds to play. He led the Elis with 25 poin'-
Bob Steinberg, who scored 24 points in Connecuti
cut s opening game win over Yale, has been dropped
rom the basketball squad. No reason was given f
the dismissal.


_
Fridav February 23, 1968
* rfcicf> llnrgrgt+r
15 Jewish Centers
Built In Two Years
NEW YORk i.JTA) The Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board has
reported that 15 new Jewish Cen-j
ten and Y buildings, costing near- !
|j S15 million, were dedicated in
various parts of the country during
1966 and 1967.
The report said that member
.ship in centers and Ys increased
to 717.000. an increase of 7,000
over the 1966 figure. Activities at-
tracted an aggregate audience Of
29.900 000 persons, more than a
million more than reported for
the previous year, the report said.
Jewish Center and Y budgets to-
taled S35.065.000. compared with
the previous record in 1966 of
$32,710,000. The data were con-
tained in a report by Emanucl
Berlalsky, JWB director of com-
niuiuiy service.-.
The 15 new buildings are: New
Orleans Jewish Community Cen-
ter: Worcester, Mass.. JCC; East-
ern C'nion County YM & YWHA in
Union. N .1 ; Kmanu-El Midtown
YM & YWHA of the Associated Ys
of dealer New York; Schenectady.
N.Y., JCC; Troy, NY. JCC; the
Charleston. S.C JCC: the Saidye
Bronfman Center of the Montreal
YM & YWHA and Neighborhood
House Services: Hie Davis Branch
of the Montreal Y: the Marin JCC
and the Brotherhood Way Center.
whieii are blanches of the United
Jewish Community Centers of San
Francisco: Norihfield Building in
West orange of the YM & YWHA
of Essex County. N.J.: the Feder-
man-llersh Building of the North
Valley JCC, a branch of the Jew-
ish Centers Association of Los An-
geles; the Anna and Samuel
Schneider Building of the Pater-
son. N.J., Y and the El Paso, Tex..
JCC. The community character of
the Jewish Community Center was
demonstrated, the report said, in
the fact that the planning of new
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center facilities was jointly accom-
plished by local Jewish federations
and Jewish Centers in 14 cities.
An increased interest in the
cultural arts was reflected dur-
ing the year in a growing num-
ber of local and regional confer-
ences on the arts; an increase in
jroups in the dance, drama, fin*
arts and related areas; a greater
participation in Jewish Music
Festival and Jewish Book Month
events; and the sponsorship of
literary periodicals by a number
of centers and Ys,
The report said that a growing
number of centers set up programs
to serve Jewish college students
and thai there were also more pro-
grams for teenagers, reflecting a
use in leenage membership. Jew-
ish centers expanded activities for
Jewish military personnel and
iheir families. There was increased
emphasis on research activity in
centers locally and also on a na-
tional level.
A wide variety of public affairs
engaged the interest Of Jewish cen-
ters to a greater degree than ever
before. These included the Middle
East crisis, the treatment of Jews
in the Soviet Lnion. inter-group
relations, anti-poverty legislation,
disarmament and the social work
manpower shortage. An over-all
average of a six percent increase
in the number of beds in resident
ramps conducted by centers was
reported, as was the fact that
about two thirds of the resident
camps and four-fifths of the day
camps reported waiting lists of
persons who could not be accom-
' modatcd.
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Jewish Folk Hour
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3-4 P.M.
ftI: l II F. 31.
99.1
JEWISH-ISRAELI HITS
COMMUNITY NEWS
PRIZES
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE"- "APPLIANCES"
"Cl6THINC"-"JEWElRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
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in Channel 23s LUCKY NUMBER CONTEST
OVER 1500 PRIZES

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5 Columbia Bikes
1000 dinners for 2
at International House ol Pancakes
1 Wig per week. 1 Wiglet per week, 1 Fall per
week (from the overseas wig warehouse 1901
NW 35 St.. Miami; 739 NE 40 Ct Oakland Pk.)
1 set of 4 G.T. "Grabber" tires
from General Tire Stores
25 Dinky toys
20 cases of Hammer regular or diet soft drinks
30 $5 gift food certificates from Grand Union
30 $5 gift certificates
from 163 St Shopping Center
10 5 gift certificates from West Hollywood
Shopping Center, Homestead Shopping Cen-
ter, Central Shopping Center, Northside Shop-
ping Center. Westchester Shopping Center.
$20 55 gift certificates and 100 toys
from Jefferson Stores
too tickets to Hialeah Speedway
10 surprise gifts from The Hub Sices
30 pairs of theatre tickets
from Florida State Theatres
GET YOUR
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BETWEEN 5&7PM FOR DETAILS
steps to

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CHECK YOUR ANTENNA
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If you now use an outdoor VHF antenna
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CHANNEL 23 HAS MIAMI'S MOST POWERFUL SIGNAL. DON'T SETTLE FOR FUZZ OR SNOW
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SINGLE KNOB TUNING SYSTEM
STEP 1
Click VHF knob to UHF position (this
position is just after Channel 13).
STEP 2
Gently rotate the tine tuning control to
Channel 23. Note ton* >> do not have the
number 23 imprinted on the dial In this case,
dial to the clOMtt printed number and lint rune
for Channel 23
TWO KNOB SYSTEM
STEP 1
Click VHF knob to UHF posi-
tion (this position is just after
Channel 13).
STEP 3
Dial UHF fine tvaiaf control
for peak picture.
for peak picture._________
NOTE: IF IMf WAS MADE
IEF0RE MAY 1914, YOU MAY
ton a tun cowrdtTti.
STEP 2
Gently rotate the UHF knob to
Channel 23. Note: some sttt do
not have the 123 printed on the
dial. In Oils case, dial clostst
printed number and line tune
for Channel 23.
Hole For peak color and black and while, picture, turn lint tuning control until
lagged horizontal linea appear iq acreen then turn elowly back until the lines lust disappear
WHAT'S THAT YOU SAT T0U STILL CAN'T TUNE CHANNEL 23? Pk.M l at 3M-2S20 ami we'll |le YM ew
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Page b-D
Friday. February 23, 1968
*Jtnist> Hcr/dfiaun
"*Jeniti Hcridiain
Friday. February 23, 1968
Page 7-D
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Goldman (left) of Coral
Gables are shown durinq a recent visit to
New York where they attended a "Salute
to Israel" Ball honorinq Mr. and Mrs. Meshu-
lam Riklis (next to the Goldmans). Also
shown (from left) are Mrs. Mortimer Jacob-
son, national president of Hadassah, and
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pacun. Mis. Pacun is
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Goldman.
Harold Zeeman Installed As President Robbi Schind,er Pu,pit Goe$t
Of Florida Restaurant Association
Harold Zeeman. a well-known
Miami cafeteria owner, was in-
stalled as president of the Florida
Restaurant Association at the or-
ganization's first quarterly meet-
ing of the year held in Tallahassee.
The installation ceremony was
conducted by James Hunter, ad-
ministrative assistant on the staff
of Gov. Claude Kirk. Jr., substitut-
ing for Hotel and Restaurant Com-
missioner A. R. "Ad" Brautigam.
Mr. Zeeman operates two highly
successful locations: Biscayne Caf-
eteria in downtown Miami and a
second in Miami Shores. He is
president of the firm.
A native of New York state, he
was in the printing business 20
years before coming to Florida to
spend six years in the wholesale
meat industry. He opened his first
cafeteria in Coral Gables He has
been married 23 years and has one
daughter. Peggy Jill, a nursing
senior at Vanderbilt University.
Others taking office were: Lewis
L. Fraser, president of the Plaza
Food Corp., St. Petersburg, to
serve his second year as state vice
president: Mrs. Dorothy Hunt, of
the Highlander Restaurant in Lake
Wales, to serve her 12th year as
state secretary; Richard Pasch, of
Frisehs Big Boy Restaurants in
Tampa, state treasurer.
Charge TV Net
With 'Distorting'
Facts On Yiddish
NEW YORK (JTA) A Work-
men's Circle official charged here
this week that national television
programers were "presenting gro-
tesque caricatures and distorting
the contributions made by Yiddish
language writers, journalists and
actors in the fields of world litera-
ture and American culture."
The charge was made by Joseph
Mlotek. educational director of the
organization, at the 50th anniver-
sary of the organization's schools.
He did not single out any network
but noted that "within recent
weeks several national television
programs, purporting to depict
Yiddish language contributions to
American culture have given a dis-
torted and sophomoric conception
that was painful to watch and his-
torically inaccurate to hear." The
ABC network televised a series of
four programs on the Yiddish Ian
kuage and culture during January.
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler,
executive vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, will be guest speaker
at services of Temple Judca Fri-
day. Joseph H. Krcfetz is presi-
dent of the congregation.
Former national director of edu-
cation of the L'AHC, Rabbi Schind-
ler will participate with Rabbi
Morris A. Kipper of Temple Judca
in Reform Jewish Appeal Sabbath.
Mr Mlotek
I demiuc witln
-M-rli'd thai
mi nffeol :,
1 meaning to
H>.'
Rabbis In Toronto
Denounce Y For
Sabbath Opening
TORONTO (WNS) An open
letter denouncing the YM-YWHA
I decision to keep their doors open
| on the Sabbath was issued here by
fifteen rabbis, eight of them Ortho-
dox, six Conservative and one Re-
form.
The rabbis called on the Jewish
community to support their posi-
tion.
Of the Toronto Y. the rabbis said
that the center "in its cultural and
social programs" has "progressive-
ly reduced the Jewish element,
moving further and further away
from identification with Judaism."
It buttressed its charge with an
assertion that the Y's snack bar
did not observe dietary laws.
Replying to the protest, the pres-
ident of the Y, Alex Fisher, said
that keeping open 111< institution
i,n Rnturdaj 'v ill nol i-onflWM In
.................
Hospital Ball On March 24
Mrs. George Mael-ean, president
of Variety Children's Hospital
Women's Committee, announces
that the annual dinner dance of
the Women's Committee will he
held March 24 at the Eden Roc
Hotel.
Mrs. Ben Levin is chairman of
the ball and hostesses arc Mrs.
Neil Miller, Mrs Edward .1. Mel-
Biker and Mrs. Harry Simone.
In charge of reservations are
Mrs. William Kruglak II. chair-
man. Mrs. Newell Taylor, Mrs.
Murray Friedman and Mrs. Ralph
Jones.
John Davidson and London Lee
of TV and night club fame, will
ntcrtain.
Rucki Seeks Senate Post
Waller Rucki. 41. Coconut Grove
businessman, has declared that he
will be a candidate for the United
Stales Senate seat being vacated
by Sen. George Smathers.
The Coconut Grove Republican
is active in many business and
civic groups.
MRS. ALEX DELLERSON (left), president of the Lincoln-Miami
Beach Chapter of the Women's Leaque for Israel, and Mrs.
Morris Schwartz (rght), nc:ional life membership chairman,
meet with M^s. Jack L. Starr, national president, at a recant
concert sponsored by the local group to benefit the Leaqua's
Home for Girls in Israel.
SS Hope To Stop
In South Florida
The peacetime hospital ship, S/S
Hope, sails into Port Everglades
the afternoon of March 4 for a
three-day stop-over. It will then
continue on its way, taking to Cey-
lon modern medical teaching and
treatment.
At noon on March 4. the Dade
County Women's Committee for
Project Hope will hold a com-
bined membership luncheon, in-
stallation and fashion show at the
Doral Country Club, in honor of
the S/S Ilope visit.
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thai \h<-
HAKOLD ZttHAN
Dan Piver Seeks
Reelection To
Council Seat
Dan Piver. Surfside councilman
and former vice mayor, is seeking
reelection to the Surfside Town
Council. The council election to
fill three -eats is scheduled for
March 1!.
Piver. a builder and real estate
broker, is presently engaged as a
registered representative in the
securities business, and has been
active in civic, social and welfare
organizations in this area and in
Washington. D.C.
Prior to moving to Surfside, Dan
Piver practiced general law in
Washington. D.C, and is a mem-
ber of the bar of the Supreme
Court of the United States.
Mr. Piver was acting president
and vice president of the Surfside
Civic Association; a past president
01 the Men's Club of Temple Ner
Tamid, the Washington, D.C. Club
of Greater Miami and the D.C. So-
ciety of Crippled Children. He is a
member of the Masonic Order, the
Grotto, Elks, Order of the Eastern
Star and B'nai B'rith.
In Surfside, Dan Piver had serv-
ed as chairman of the Charter
Revision Committee, the Library
Committee, chairman of United
Nations Day and of the Surfside
Committee on the Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital Building Fund Drive.
Elected to Surfside Council in
1964, Mr. Piver has served as As-
sistant Mayor. Vice Mayor and
Councilman. This is his first bid
for reelection.
Mr Mlotek .1 >erted
i....." >.
t Semitic wttnont meni
;iihI only because no DOC
i i check out the facts The historj
of the Yiddish theater as shown on
the TV screen was a caricature.
with names of past stars bandied
about in a potpourri of hurried
studio rather than respectful por-
traits. The whole Yiddish press and
literature were treated as though
they trespassed on American soil
instead >>f having contributed to its
cultural spectrum."
that keeping open tlu
mi Saturdays will nol
Pell w^' *^ba*^prWH-rtTTt flTTTTTTtr TTTP
III -I itutiuu
i-onflicM in
il I ill I i
hours I' d to"> p.m.. he declared.
will i'ik^Ti:/! Spiritual values
. and'the snack, bar will lie
closed adding thai it was the
aim of the Y to service young
Jewish people "in a meaningful
way and keep them from trouble
some are getting into on Satur-
days," particularly in Toronto's
"hippie" area.
BEN SAKS, program coordinator
for the South Florida A'.umni Chap-
ter of Rho Pi Phi International
Pharmaceutical Fraternity, has an-
nounced that David Uran. expert
in pharmacy public relations, ad-
dressed the group on Wednesday.
Leukemia Society Dinner
Phyllis Diller. star of films and
television, will headline the Leu-
kemia Society of America's Dade
County Appeal kick off proclama-
tion dinner show on March 3 at
the Deauville Hotel
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!'
"FURNITURI"-"APPUANCES"
"C10THING"-"JIWUR.Y," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
WELFARE BOARD
JOINS CONFERENCE
NEW YORK (JTAI The
National Jewish Welfare
Board has voted to affiliate
as a constilutent member of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major Jewish Organiza-
tions, according to a joint
announcement by Louis A.
Stern, president of the Na-
tional JWB. and Rabbi Her
schel Schacter. chairman of
the Presidents Conference.
The JWB will become the
22nd national Jewish organi-
zation to join the Presidents
Conference.
PLEASE MENTION THIS
PUBLICATION WHEN YOU
SEND FOR YOUR FREE
COPY OF THE HEINZ
24 YEAR HEBREW-
ENGLISH CALENDAR
We have arranged with
the Heinz people to send
to our readers on request
an- extremely useful book-
let that should be in every
Jewish home. Within the
32 pages of the 24-Year
Hebrew-English Calendar
are all the Hebrew dates
and days of the week along
with their equivalent 'Eng-
lish" dates from Rosh
Hashanah, 1943 to the day
before Rosh Hashanah.
1970. With this calendar,
you can find Yahrzeit dates
at a glance.
You can get your free
copy simply by writing a
post card or a letter to:
H. 1. Heinz Co.. Dept. J2.
Box 57, Pitts., Pa. 15230.
'SWERITL
ANSWERING TELEPHONES
IN THE FOLLOWING EXCHANGES
FRANKLIN ......37 NEWTON .......63
HIGHLAND......44 OXFORD........69
JEFFERSON.....53 PLAZA .........75
MURRAY .......68 UNION .........86
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-] South i)i\- s-:-.i;;j4


Fage 8-D
* tewiffi fJorSdliar
Friday. February 23. 1968
'

THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULPIT
M"'
rhev Musi Understand
&,
iurp. We want to reach out for a
handful of stars. What we don't
always want to rctiMimbur- *a that
order to achieve these dreams
and aspirations there are rules and
i emulations we nnut abide.
Passion Play Text Again Under Study
By RABBI MAXWELL BERGER
Temple Zamora, Coral Gables
"And these are the laws which
thou shalt set before them ."
The children of Israel had just wit-
nessed the most thrilling experi-
ence that the human mind and
spirit could encounter. They trem-
bled with awe at the sight and
sound of the Revelation at Sinai
and accepted the word of God and
His commandments.
Instantly Moses is instructed to
' -it before them" the laws. It is
not enough for them to hear the
law. It is not even enough for
them to know and be able to re-
cite it. They must understand it!
Set it before them, commands
Rashi, "like a table which is set
and prepared for eat mm ." where
every detail is known and care-
fully arranged. They must under-
stand the reasons and the explana-
tions.
This occurred when the People
ol Israel was very young in its
early childhood. Moses had to teach
them how in grow up and how to
live. ". tlie.-e are the laws ."
for young and old alike.
There is a significant lesson in
this that is unmistakably clear.To
the young it would seem as it did
to them, that life consists of noth-
ing but rules and regulations
do's and don'ts mays and may-
riots: and inadvertently there al-

ways seem to be more nays than
yeas more don'ts than do's.
But maturity is not just a suc-
cession of years. It is. rather, an
accumulation of knowledge and
experience during that succession
of years. "Growing up' is not just
pushing time behind you in order
to get older. It is. rather, learning '
each day to select the good and
improve on it, and accept the rest
as an object lesson in living.
It is, in a sense, like driving a
car. There are lanes in which you
mav drive with perfect safety, and
there are lanes in which you may
not drive, because, if you do, you
endanger yourself and others as
well. There are speed limits with-
in which you may drive and be
safe: there are speeds that spell
danger. If you violate these rules
you must suffer the penalties.
I.ife is very much like that. The
only difference is that the penal
ties for violations are not pre-
scribed and they may not be im-
mediate That is probably the rea
son why it is more difficult to
undertsand the rules and regula-
tions that govern our daily living.
But accept them we must. And
when we do. we show the first
signs of growing up' regardless of
age.
It is a natural human trait to
picture ourselves as complete and
competent human beings. We want
to build castles in the air. We want
to dream dreams of ennobling tex-
"And these are the laws which
thou shalt set before them ."
Make sure they understand the
leason and the explanation. Emo-
tion is not enough. Fear is not
enough. Recitation by rote is not
enough. They must understand it!
r
/Kcit>binicai ision
Vr
roqramg
'9
Feb. 25Ch. 10. 9:30 a.m. The Jewish Worship Hour.
. Host: Rabbi Morris Skop. Temple Sholom.
Pompano Beach.
Feb. 25Ch. 7. 10 a.m. The Still Small Voice
Host: Rabbi Max A. Lipschilz. Beth Torah Con-
gregation, North Miami Beach
Feb. 27Ch. 2. 9:30-10:30 p.m. Man to Man.
Topic: Love and Law.
Moderator: Rev. Luther C. Pierce.
Participants: Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, Temple Israel
of Greater Miami; Dr. J. Calvin Rose. Miami
Shores Presbyterian Church; Rev. David Russell.

Rabbi Lieberman's
Subject To Be His
Trips To Russia
The knowledge gained from two
recent visits to Russia will be
shared by Rabbi George Lieber-
man of Nassau County's Central
Synagogue Sunday morning when
he speaks before the Greenfield
Adult Institute at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami.
Dr. Lieberman's latest trip was
made in 1966 when he was part of
the Central Conference of Ameri-
can Rabbis Study Mission to the
Soviet Union. Poland. Hungary
and Czechoslovakia. While in Mos-
cow, he had the rare experience of
speaking in Russian from the pul-
pits of two congregations, the Cen-
tral Synagogue and the Union
Baptist Church. He also spoke at
the Great Synagogue in Leningrad.
He has appeared in a documentary
motion picture on the plight of
Soviet Jewry with Edward G. Rob-
inson. Arthur Goldberg. Sen. Ja-
cob Javits and others.
In addition to filling a pulpit in
Rockville Centre, Dr Lieberman
teaches literature and Bible at the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, from which he
graduated after completing under-
graduate work at Western Reserve
and Harvard. He earned his doc-
torate in literature at West Vir-
ginia Wes'.eyan.
Dr. Lieberman has served on a
number of key national and inter-
national committees and as a mem-
ber of the National War Labor
. Board during World War II.
BONN (.ITAiThe deputy mayor
ol Munich. Artur Haser. told the
Jewish Telegraphic ,Aajiejt Ihis
iveek that a priest has been study-
ing the controversial text of the
Bavarian Passion Play to deter-
mine whether there was anything
in it that could be called anti-
Semitic The charge has been made
repeatedly against the version
used in trie Bavarian village of
Oberammergau where it is pre-
sented every ten years.
The American Jewish Congress
recently renewed a call for a boy-
cott of the next scheduled presen-
tation in 1970. charging that the
villagers had refused to alter its
"viciously anti-Semitic" text. The
deputy mavor said the priest. Ste-
phan Scheller. had been studying
the text for six months and would
submit his proposals for changes
by next September at the latest
The deputy mayor added that he
thought "certain changes will be
made."
Another source. Michael Iloeck.
an assistant to Julius Cardinal
DoTpfner. Arefibishop of Munich.
aid the text had been changed
but gave no details other than that
it had to be "brought into accord"
with the new position of the Vati-
can Council which approved a dec
laration repudiating the charge of
deicide against the Jewish people
in the crucifixion of Jesus, which
is the theme of the Passion Play
The assistant added that the text
had been changed, not because of
the American Jewish Congress
call for a boycott of the 1970 per
formance. but to conform with the
Vatican Council position. He said
the boycott call was unjustified
APPOINTED to tin- board of di-
rectors of the leukemia Society of
America. Dade County Chapter,
was former City of Miami Munici-
pal Court Senior Judge Milton A.
Friedman He will also serve on
the public health information and
education committee
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Mishpatim

Moses instructs the Israelites in the divine Law.
"And he took the l>ook of the covenant, and read in the
hearing of the people: and they said: "All that the Lord hath
spoken will we do. and obey' (Exod. 24:7).
MISHPATIM The laws that Moses submitted to the chil-
dren of Israel after they had heard the Ten Commandments dealt
with the following subjects:
The Hebrew servant, murder, filial aggression and blas-
phemy, kidnaping, criminal assault, maiming of a servant, the
butting bull, accidents and damages, theft, property damage,
watchmen, seduction, proselytes, the orphaned and the widowed,
lending and borrowing, the sanctification of God and man. re-
lations with the enemy, the Sabbatical year, the Sabbath, the
three pilgrim festivals and idolatry.
This portion concludes with the renewal of the covenant with
God. The children of Israel accepted the covenant with the
words: "All that the Lord hath spoken will we do. and obey"
(Exodus 24:7). Moses then ascended Mount Sinai to receive the
tablets of the Law.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted
and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,"
edited by P Wollman-Tsamir, $15. Publisher is Shengold, and the
volume is available at 27 William St., New York 5, N.Y. President
of the society distributing the volume is Joseph Schlang.
.i rrj'wwp.-.i'.iMmrivrtM.rj
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA- i
TION 985 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox. '
Cantor Morris Barr.
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz. .
}'. iday H:15 p.m Baturdas 8:4B no
BETH AM (TEMPLE). 5950 N. Ken. I
dall Dr.. S. Miami. Reform. Rabbi '
Herbert Baumqard. Cantor Michael
Kyrr.
Frloa) N ; p tn Quest speaker, Karl
Morse, newl) elected chairman of the]
board of trustee* Topli "The In-
IcraaUunal Character of Reform
Judaism' Saturda) 11:16 am Bar
Mltsvah: Jeffrey, son of Mr and Mrs.
N.ithun t'ynamon.
rCclidioiis <^<
w
crvices
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
liar Mlttvah Bteve, Ron ol Mm Sara
K Braun
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin. Cantor Nathan Parnats.
Friday ':''" and 8:18 p.m, Sermon:
'Mas th- Synagogue Deserted Society?"
Saturday sir. a.m. Sermon: "Portion
of Hi- Week."
BETH DAVID 2626 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William W. Lipson.
>' iday ''" and VI" p.m Sermon-"New
liulde Lines ni Jewish Bilueation
I'art T\w." Bas Mltsvah: Randy,
laught>i- "1 Mr ami Mrs Moe Farrow.
Saturday : a.m. Sermon: "The Torah
lesson liar Mil/.vali: Mitchell, ROTI
of Mr. and Mrs David Hlpsman.
Alinrna 5:30 pin Bar Mltsvah: Daniel,
Win of Mr .inJ, ,viif. Mlltotl FeUlmmi.
------e-
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th Avenue.
Orthodox. Rabbi Salomon Schiff.
Frtoaj pi" Baturdaj in Ser-
mon: "Brotherhood a L'nivarsal
.\. -ed." .Mi.i. ha ':4* p in
MINYONAIRES SYNAGOGUE. 3737
Bird Rd. Modern Traditional Cantor
Louis Cohen.
OR OLOM (TEMPLE). Conservative
8755 SW 16th St. Miami. Rabbi
Ralph 2. Glixman. Cantor Benjamin
Ben Ari
Friday s p m. Saturday 1:45 am. Uar
Milzvah: Robert, son of Dr. and Mrs
Salomon Lanster.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Ralph
Carmi. Cantor Albert Glantz.
BETH KODESjH, 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Ben Dickson.
KrMay 8:13 pin Sermon in honor of
Hrotherh.....I. Washington and Lincoln's
hirtnoVt) Men of Truih I>tl They
Uve |.i Vain." Mi ami Mr* Nathan
K Spec-tor will host rti.- Oneg Bhabbal
In honor ..f Mr and Mrs Alex Btahl.
Satunfa) is a in Sermon: "Bring
Your Offering.' 13 pin "What is
an i Offering "*
TIFERETH JACOB (TEMPLE). 951 E
4th Ave.. Hialeah. Conservative.
Rabbi Maurice Klein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Brotherhood Week
observed. Guest speaker, t'ircult
Judge William A Meadows Jr. Topi.-:
"The Role of Religion In Crime Pre-
vention Oneg Sliahbnl In.sled by Air.
and .Mrs Ted l.inftaton.
ZION (TEMPLE) 8000 Milter Rd. Con.
servative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
Friday 8:15 p.m. "Israel The New
Spiritual Boundaries." Has Mltsvah:
Leslie Brown, dau*;hter of Mr and
Mrs. Abraham Frei Saturday P a m
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid Ave. Or.
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Dow Rosencwaig.
EMANU-EL (TEMPLE). 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Irving Lehrman. Cantor 2iv Adler.
Friday 5 and 8:88 p.m. Pulpit guest,
Until)! Benjamin M. K.ilm. national
director, Dual Itrlth Hillel Founda-
tion. Saturday S a.m. V. I. I\ Sabbath
Sermon: "Weekly Portion of the
llililo." liar Mltsvah: Kenneth, son
of Mr. and .Mr. Sol Koenig: Steven.
Oii of Mr and Airs. Jack Robblns
Junior congregation. 10:86 a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern
Cantor Meyer Engel.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
MENORAH (TEMPLE). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
Friday S:1S p.m. Sermon on Con-
ervatlve Judaism: "Piercing the
Mountain Saturday 9 n m Sermon
"Portion of Die Law."
ADATH YESHURUN (TEMPLE).
Conservative. 1025 NE 183rd. St..
Miami Gardens Rd. Rabbi Milton
Schlinsky. Cantor Harry Sterling.
Friday B:15 p.m. Sermon. "To Itlol or
to Reason?" Saturday 8:45 a.m
Junior congregation 9:45 a.m
FT. LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL (TEMPLE). 547 E.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip
Chaiton. Cantor Theodore Mindich
BETH TORAH. 164th St. and NE 11th
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip.
schitz. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
Friday 5:16 and >: I:. pin. Baa Mlttvah:
Btlen, daughter of Mr and Mrs Jerome
Langer. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
136 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi David Rosenfeld. Cantor Ben
Zion Kirschenbaum.
Friday sir. p.m. Quasi speaker. LeRoy
Itorofsky, congregation president. Sat-
urday S:4". a in Sermon "Portion of
the Week."
EM AN U-EL. 1801 S. Andrews Ave
Reform. Rabbi Richard M. Leviton.
Cantor Jerome Klement.
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
126 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
HOLLYWOOD
EETH SOLOMON. 50 NW 51st Place. |
Conservative,
l-'riflnl and 8:15 p.m. Mr and .Mrs
Samu'i Coldberg will host the Oneg
Shul.lini iii honor of their annlvemar)
Saturda] 8 a in .Mini ha 8:M pm
------e-------
BETH TOV (TEMPLE). 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservstive. Rabbi Simon April.
Friday s it Sm. Sermon: "Brother-
hood in our IWv Saturday morning
.-. i in..o Ports.....i the Wee*."
B'NAI SHOLOM (Temple). 275 NW
199th Street. Conservative. Rabbi
Abraham M. Cassel.
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL, 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
BETH ISRAEL.. 770 40th Street.
Orthodox. RabbLJBerel Wein.
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave..
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
NER TAMID (TEMPLE). 80th St and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Edward Klein.
Friday 8:18 p.m Has Mltxvah Sari
Hope, daughter of Mr and Mr' Ja< h
Aeli..... Saturday 8:45 am. Par Mlts-
vali: Jonathan, *.......I .Mrs Ann liur
u itell
OHEV SHALOM. 7011 Bonita Dr..
Orthodox. Rabbi Phlneas Weber-
man.
BETH RAPHAEL (TEMPLE). 1546
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
David Raab. Cantor Saul H. Breeh
Sa lurd.iv s .. Si-' i
aha >; p m
"JUStll
Min
-----*-----
ISRAEL (TEMPLE). OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot.
Friday 8:15 p.m Pulpit guest Rabbi
Maurice N Blaendrafn, preaidenl ..i
Union ..f American Hebrew Con-
negations Topic "Judaism in the
n id Todaj "
BETH SHOLOM (TEMPLE). 1444
Chase Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon
Kronish. Cantor David Conviser.
Friday :!:. p.m. Sermon: "Zionism,
Socialism and Liberal Judaism" Sat-
urday i" t". a in Uar Mltsvah mm -
ellell von of ,\|r and .Mrs Joseph
Kaplan.
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER 645
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias.
Pridaj ". p in Saturday B:30 a m Ser-
mon "The Pledge at Blnal "
Frida) mlttcha ". p.m Saturda] I ..
a in Sermon Inspln.....n Musi be
Retained
YOUNG ISRAEL OF MIAMI BEACH
1542-44 Washington Ave. Rabbi A.
Ben-Hillel.
B'NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Charles M. Ru-
bel. Cantor Jack Lerner.
Friday Sir. p.m. Interfnlth service
(iuest speaker, Rev. A. K. Qyson
pastor of Christ Lutheran Church.
Saturday a in liar Mltsvah: Robert,
son of Air. and Airs. Harvey Goodman.
SINAI (TEMPLE). OF NORTH DADE
Temporary office, 18801 NE 22nd
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Ralph Kingsley.
Friday 8:15 pin Sermon: "Aspect*
of It.:...in Judaism Changing Plat-
forms ami Changing Definitions."
Saturday II a.m. Sermon: "Portion of
the Week." All services held at Wash-
ington Federal. ;: \ gj |.,7th Sir. i
--------
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Jonah E.
Capian.
Frldaj B ami 8:15 p ni Sermon "The
Communist Ploi Against Israel." Oneg
Shal.l.it hosts. Mr. and Mrs Jerome
I I nk. Saturday :. a in Sermon: "The'
March Tlirouch tin Desert Towards
'he Holy Land Mlncha 5:50 p m
------e-----
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml.
AMI. 90 NE 171st St. Orthodox
Rabbi Naftah Porush.
CORAL GABLES
JUDEA (TEMPLE) 5500 Granda Blvd.
Reform. Rabbi Morris Kipper.
Frida) 15 p m Pulpit guest, Rabbi
Alexander M Schlndler, r a ii c
' 11:18 a in Bur
Mltsi h M hi II r Ml .n.l Mi -
10. hard .1 Hoi
ZAMORA (TEMPLE). 44 Zamora Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell Berg,
er. Cantor Seymour Hinkes.
Friday 8:l(...... Sermon "Baata
1....."s '" f>< mocracj Saturday
" "i Sermi n s. i iptural Lesson '
BETH EL (TEMPLE). S. 14th Ave
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Friday 8:16 p in. >: i..i m .ludaisni ShU-
hath. (iuest speaker. Judge F.mil N
Parr, honorary ehalrma'n, board of
trustees, I'. A. II C. Saturday II
a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Alan, ton of Dr. and
.Mrs. Stanley Welder.
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLE). 1725
Monroe St. Conservative. Rabbi
Morton Malavaky. Cantor Philip
Lutman.
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun.
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE). 3500 SW 69th
Way. Conservative. Rabbi Irwin
Cutler.
POMPANC BEACH
SHOLOM (TEMPLE). 132 SW 11th
Ave.. Conservative. Rabbi Morris
A. Skop. Cantor Leon Segal.
Friday si-. ,, Sermon: "Bridges
'< Brotherhood Saturday $ a ill.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
Surfside Community Center, 9301
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac
D. Vine.
Friday | p in Saturdai '. a m
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
17 SHEVAT 5:55


Friday. February 23. 1968
+Jenisti fhridian
Communal Services
Set at $725,000,000
NEW YORK (JTA) The ag-
gregate value of Jewish communal
services in the United States was
more than $725 million in 1965,
according to an estimate by the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds.
The data were assembled in a
report on "Jewish Communal Serv-
ices: Programs and Finances" by
S. P. Goldberg. The total excluded
almost all endowment income of
Jewish federations and local agen-
cies, all local capital fund cam-
paigns and all internal congrega-
tional operating expense. Costs of
Jewish education probably were
understated in the total, the report
added. The total referred to aggre-
gates of major sources of income,
such as annual campaigns, service
payments and public tax funds re-
ceived by various types of Jewish
service agencies.
Surveying the history of Jew-
ish communal service income
and costs during the 1955-65 dec-
ade, the report said that such
income and costs rose more than
S340 million in that period, that
federation campaigns produced
$22 million more, non-local Jew-
ish organizations raised $51 mil-
lion more, community chest
grants to local Jewish services
increased by $9 million and Jew-
ish hospital income rose by $170
million.
The increased income collected
>\ noii local Jewish groups includ-
ed $4.3 million for the Israel Edu-
cation Fund of the United Jewish
Appeal; S12 million for Brandeis
University; S6.3 million for Ye-
shiva University; $5.3 million for
the Conservative and Reform theo-
logical campaigns; S4.5 million for
City of Hope Hospital and National
Jewish Hospital; S6.2 million lor
three institutions of higher educa-
tion in Israel: $1.7 million each
for B'nai B'rilh National Youth
Service Appeal and the American
Israel Cultural Foundation; and $1
million each for the American
Jewish Committee, the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith.
ORTand Hadassah.
other non contributed income
including earnings, investments.
service payments and government
grants rose by $50 million, of
which $34 million was accounted
foi by Brandeis University and
Yeshiva University, according to
Ihe CJFWF report; and grants by
community chests to local Jewish
services rose by almost $9 million.
i Hospital income rose by at least
S170 million, aged care income by
about $25 million and Jewish cen-
ter income by about S16 million,
ihe report indicated.
The report added that from 1953
;to 1963 the book values of endow-
ment fundl held by Jewish organi-
sations increased In $37 million
lor large cities, with market values
S13 million higher
The study also examined the
rccocd of Jewish tederation fund
j raising, reporting thai lor the 1939
to 1942 period the annual level was
$27 million to S2!l million. In the
1943 to 1945 period there were an-
Inual increases of $10 million,
bringing the level at the end of
World War II to S57 million. Rec-
, ord levels In Jewish giving to
federated campaigns were estab-
lished in the 1946-48 period, when
the struggle for a Jewish state cul-
minated with the establishment of
Israel The 1946 results were more
than double those of 1945. and in
1949 total contributions reached
; more than $200 million.
Totals declined in the 1949 to
i 1955 period to SI 10 million. Totals
in the 1956 to 1964 period ranged
from a high of S139 million in
1 1957 to a low of $124 million in
; 1958. In 1956 the total reached
S132 million and S137 million in
1966. The total figure for 1967.
spurred on by the May-June crisis
and Six-Day War. has still not been
determined but it will probably ex
ceed the record of more than S200
million of 1949
Over the 28 year period from
1939 through 1966, more than
$3 billion was raised by the
central Jewish community or-
ganizations. This period coin-
! cides with the organization of
Paqe 9 O
ARON ISAK, born in Prussia In
1731. was the first unbaptized Jew
I allowed to enter Sweden.
SOME 400 guests assembled at the DiLido Hotel recently o
honor Louis Shafkin. life president, and Mrs. Shafkin (Yetta)
hie vice president of the South Shore Citizens' Club. Digni-
taries included Mayor and Mrs. Jay Dermer. Mayor Chuck
Hall, Judge Gene Williams, Rep. Gerald Lewis. Judge Don
Stone. Judge Jack Folk, Judge Gwynn Parker, Judge James
Rainwater. Installation of officers for the new year was con-
ducted by Judge Bernard Frank.
the UJA, which received almost
$1.7 billion, mainly from the
Jewish welfare funds.
The study stressed that these
campaigns covered only mainte-
nance and operating needs, with
Some minor exceptions. They did
not include totals tor capital funds
or endowment drives, conducted
bj Jewish federations alone or to
gether with local Jewish agencies
tor hospitals, homes for the aged,
centers and other Jewish institu-
tions
^utiercUVtipel
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National Kuiwai
Director* Aaan.
Florida Kuner.tl
Directors Assn.
J.F.D.A.
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H. W. BEYER, FUNERAL DIRECTOR
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Jewish Home for the Aged
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Page 10-D
-Jen lsl> lk>rkHan
Friday, February 23. 1968
; Jewish Quiz Box
By. RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is the Grace after the
wedVirtg feast introduced with
a special poem?
This is the poem of the famous
Spanish Poet Dunash ben Labrath
of the 10th century. Its brief con-
tents state: "O* Banish sorrow and
also wrath, and then even the
dumb will sing a song. Lead us in
the circle of righteousness; heed
the blessing of the sons of Aaron."
The poem may serve a number
ol purposes. First, it indicates to
the assembled, who are at this
point preparing to give thanks for
the food which they have con-
sumed, the fact that this is no
ordinary meal. i.e.. that it had a
special purpose (a wedding feast).
Immediately there is recognition
that while we are happy for the
moment, this happiness is erst-
while and localized in the immedi-
ate gathering.
The poem expresses our wish
that the mood of happiness be-
come both universal and everlast-
ing. Secondly, according to some,
it asks for the priestly blessing to
take effect upon us. taking into
account that, at a large gathering,
there is bound to be a member of
the priestly family in the assembly
who has most likely been honored
with conducting the Grace after
the meal.
Does Jewish tradition be-
lieve that "marriage* are
made in heaven?"
The Rabbis in the Talmudic lit-
erature attempt to prove that this
is so from various Biblical sources.
They point to the statement made
by the family of Rebecca in giving
her to Eliezer to be married to
Isaac: "The thing proceedeth from
the Almighty" (Genesis 24:50).
Samson's parents somehow were
convinced that his coming mar-
riage was "of the Lord" (Judges
14:4). The Proverbs contain a state-
ment to the effect that "a prudent
wife is from the Lord" (Proverbs
19:14). The Almighty himself is
pictured in Talmudic literature as
being preoccupied with "matching
couples" after having completed
he creation of the Universe.
One of the seven nuptial bless-
ings recited at a Jewish marriage
declares the Almighty to be the
one who prepared for the first man
his intended mate The inference
is that He likewise prepares the
same for every man thereafter.
Challenged by the realization
that many marriages apparently
do not find happiness, the Rabbis
sometimes say that in such a case,
man has not found his true mate,
which may be found in a second
marriage. Whatever the tradition
is, while in some places Talmudic
episodes picture some individuals
as being fatalistic in this respect,
nevertheless in other places, the
Talmud exhorts young people to
be cautious in choosing mates. An
example of the latter is the Tal-
mudic description of the festive
activities at such times as the
night after the Day of Atonement
when young people would rejoice
in the fields and the Rabbis warn
the young men not to be misled
by outer beajtfy but to look for the
inner worth {jpihe damsel in ques-
tion. Eliezer*6 own mission in the
Bible when he looked for Rebecca
indicates a kind of care taken in
the selection of a girl with charac-
ter and kindness.
This subject may well fit into
.he philosophical dilemma of man's
Freedom of Choice versus the Al-
mighty's Providence which may
create a kind of predestination for
him. While Arabic traditions have
developed a sort of f.italism out of
the doctrine of predestination, Ju-
daism has raised man to the level
of God's partnerthe Divine part-
ner having a sort of foresight as to
the direction that the human ele-
ment will take.
Why does the traditional Jew-
ish benediction begin by speak-
ing to the Almi.ghty addressing
Him in the second person, and
then switch to the third person
form of expression (i.e., "Bles-
sed art Thou who .")
This pattern is not one which was
universally agreed upon originally.
There was one opinion (that of the
'Amora Samuel) who claimed that
in a benediction one did not ad-
dress the Almighty in the second
person at all. According to this
opinion, a benediction simply stat-
ed "Blessed be the Almighty who
The opinion that was officially
' accepted as binding was that of
! Rav (Yerushalmi Berakot 9:1) who
I gave us the formula we use. to this
very day (i.e., "Blessed art Thou
I. who .") using both the sec-
ond as well as the third person in
addressing the Almighty. Some
commentators consider this form
as simply a continuation of the
original Biblical style which evi-
dently was used in oriental texts
in those days. This is drawn, for
example, from the sequence of
verses in one of the Psalms (145)
where one verse states "All your
works shall give thanks to Vou. O
Lord." while a succeeding verse
states "to make known to the sons
of man His mighty acts."
Some commentators claim (e.g.,
' Ibn Yarchi) that when one men-
I tions the name of the Almighty one
envisions himself as standing di-
1 rectly in His presence, while when
, one considers that He is the sov-
, ereign ruler of the universe one
becomes aware of the great span
' of distance between Him and us.
Others (e.g.. Rabbi Isaac ben
Asher) claim that this indicates a
blend of philosophical attitudes.
The Almighty is both revealed and
hidden from us. The fact that He
exists is directly revealed to us by
the overwhelming forces of nature
and its phenomena. On the other
hand, His true and exact nature is
incomprehensible to us and beyond
our grasp. On the one hand it is
possible to draw near to the Al-
mighty. In doing so. however, wi
lealize that we can never actually
reach Him completely He is there-
fore both imminent in the nature
of things and yet transcendental
and out of reach.
Another source (Machzor Vitri]
states that both form- of expressioi
are used so as to understand that,
on the one hand vn are in direct
contact with the Almighty, while or.
the other hand we seem to be in
need ol an intermediary.
Why is there a benediction in
the prayer book which is re-
cited every morning by men
. who thank the Almighty for
"not having been made worn-
i en"?
This has been a most misunder-
stood custom. It certainly was not
instituted because women were re-
garded as being inferior. In the
, Cairo Genizah. a text lor this bless-
ing has been found which e.\,j. eases
, it by giving thanks to the Almighty
for having made one "a man and
1 not a woman." It is related that the
early Greek philosophers claimed
i that among the blessings a person
should make every day is that he
was made "a male and not a fe-
male." The source of the blessing
we make is in the Talmud >Mena-
thot 43b i.
The medieval commentary to the
, prayer boon authored by Abudra-
ham explains that this benediction
was instituted to make a man
aware oi trie tact that he has more
religious obligations than a woman
has and. instead of considering this
an aduuional burden, he should be
thankful that he has additional
ways I i serve the Almighty. Wom-
en, in Jewiajl tradition, have been
excused from the positive obliga-
tion of certain commandments
especialy those which come at cer-
tain appointed timesbecause they
! are responsible for the care of the
j home and the children and this is
; considered at least equally impor-
itant or perhaps more important
Velda Farms Introduces New Design
A bright new contemporary de-
sign in packaging has been in-
troduced to the Florida market
for adaptation to all Velda Farms'
packages, equipment, stationery,
uniforms and signs, it was an-
nounced by Mason A. Copeland,
general manager.
While the range of colors gen-
erally follows conventional dairy
product color-
coding systems,
the "two-toned"
effect against a
white back-
ground makes
the Velda color
system distinc-
tive.
Velda Farms
Dairies, head-
quartered in a
65.000 square
Meson A. Copeland foo, building in
Miami, today is one of the fastest
growing and most progressive
firms in the industry.
Acquired by The Southland Corp.
in 1962, Velda now blankets F!or-
I ida with processing plants in Jack
'sonville. Winter Haven and Miami
' It has major distribution branches
j strategically located at Tampa.
Daytona Beach. Delray Beach,
(Jacksonville. Live Oak. Miami. Or-
j lando. Tallahassee and Winter
Haven.
Also growing rapidly are South-
land owned 7-Eleven Stores in
| the state.
Southland gave birth to the con-
. venience store concept in 1927
J when it first stocked bread, milk.
i eggs and a few staples in one of
| the companv's ice-dock stations in
Dallas.
During the 1961-1967 period, the
I number of the company's 7-Eleven
Stores has increased from 700 to
I more than 2.500. with milk gallon-
age for its dairy processing and
distribution plants, of which Velda
Farms is one of its leading pro-
ducers, up from 25.5 million to an
estimated 113.5 million gallons for
1967.
than the carrying out of additional
religious or ritual obligations.
This blessing is particularly
phrased in the negative (i.e. "who
has not made me a woman" and
not "who has made me a man")
according to some commentaries,
because as far as having been
brought upon this world is concern-
ed, it seemed to have been the con-
sensus of the Rabbis that man
would have been better off not hav-
ing been born (or made) at all (Tal-
mud Bavli, Eruvin 13b). Indeed the
vicissitudes of life are such that
whatever one does attain is often
offset by the struggles, the sins and
the shortcomings one endures and
perpetrates. However, since Provi-
dence has made it so that we were
born, it is best to have been born
with the opportunity of observing
as many commandments as possi-
ble (i.e.. a man as contrasted to a
woman who is exempt from many
commandments).
Some commentaries (like Wolf
Yaawetz) claim that this was in-
troduced to reflect upon the fate
assigned to Eve in the Book of
Genesis where her destiny to be
pained in labor is mentioned
among other difficulties that wom-
en bear. Sonic sophisticated writers
have claimed yet another interpre-
tation. Sin somehow seems almost
unavoidable for the common man.
In the original story of Genesis, it
v as man who sinned while women
i onls sinned bul caused man to
sin. They say. therefore, that it is
better, if sin is inevitable, to be a
sinner rather than to be east in
the role of templing others to sin.
a role which women often are un-
intentionally cast into because of
j the powers of attraction which the
j Almighty has bestowed upon them.
What does the response "Amen"
signify?
This is a response required by
Jewish Law when hearing a bless-
j ing. (Orach Chayyim 215). It is
found in the Bible itself as a re-
sponse to both the blessings and
curses issued from the two moun-
! tains. It is also found in the Bible
1 as the affirmation of an oath taken
' by a woman suspected of unfaith-
, fulness.
I
In one place the Midrash (Yalkut
Shim'oni) claims that when the
[ "Amen" is proclaimed upon hear-
; ing a blessing it is a fulfillment of
the Biblical passage which tells us
When I proclaim the name of the
Almighty, ascribe greatness to our
I Lord" (Deuteronomy 32:3). The
Midrash goes on to locate the ex-
pression of Amen as a response to
a benediction in the passage of the
1 Book of Chronicles (16:36) which
,-ays: "Blessed be the Lord, God of
Israel, from everlasting to everlast-
ing. And all the people answered
and said 'Amen' and praised the
| Lord." As to its implied meaning
j the Tur (Orach Chayyim 124) con-
{tains the explanation that "One
: should bear in mind that the bless-
ing just pronounced is true, and
that he believes in it, since Amen
is an expression of affirmation."
There is another meaning at-
tached to the response Amen when
it follows a benediction during the
I prayer of petition. Here, according
' to one opinion (Bach, Orach Chay-
jyim Tur), it means "The blessing
just uttered is true and I believe
! in it; and in addition. May it be the
will of the Almighty that this
(Prayer) will be realized before our
j eyes ." Rabbi Chaninah in the
Talmud claims that "Amen"
means "God, faithful King" (which
is represented by using the three
Hebrew letters making up the word
| Amen to signify three Hebrew
words (Kel Melech Ne-Eman). This
makes the expression "Amen" a
proclamation of faith on the one
hand and an expression or petition
on the other hand. Where the bless-
ing is simply one of praise or ador-
ation, it is of course, a matter of
faith. Where the blessing concludes
a petition, the "Amen" becomes a
combination of both affirmation of
one's faith and prayer. The Talmud
attaches great influence to the
proper usage of this term, going as
far as to say that the gates of Para-
dise open before one who pronounc-
es the "Amen" with all his .strength
(Shabbat) 119b).
Basically, of course, the Amen,
in whatever context it is used,
transfers the preceding benediction
from a private experience to a
communal experience. It turns a
private plea into a public demand.
It converts a solitary voice of
praise into a public outcry of ado-
ption. It tells both the individual
who makes the original blessing, as
well as the listener, and even the
Almighty Himself, that faith, pray-
er and praise is the common ex-
pression of the community and not
the lonely outcry of one individual.
Why are there blue stripes on
the Tallit?
The value of the Tallit is con-
tained in the fringes that are at-
tached to its four corners. These
fulfill the Biblical command order-
: ing us to affix fringes to the four
corners of our garments. Since we
; now wear rounded garments, the
Tallit is worn over the other gar-
; ments to give us a garment to
whose four corners one can attach
; fringes.
Since the original fringes in
Biblical times had a strand of blue
in them which we do not have
( today only because we seem un-
able to get the original blue color-
ing, the Tallit to which the fringes
are attached have stripes of either
blue or black to remind us that
originally the fringes had this
strand of blue.
The original strand of blue was
considered to be of great signifi-
cance. It represented the blue of
heaven to some, the blue of Divine
Royalty to others. For this reason,
: the Zionist Flag, which is today
the flag of Israel, was made of
white and blue stripes, since it
was a copy of the Tallit which had
the blue stripes, representative of
the blue strands of the original
Tzitzit.
| Deaths In
Greater Miami
SCHNEIDER. Hamad. 47. of 040 85th
st Blasberg Chapel.
SCHWARTZ. John, 73 ,of .14" BW 4th
>rdnn Chapi i
SHAVEL, Ida Brown, s7. of Itt Wash-
ington Avc Mveralde Chapel. In-
ternment .mi. Nebo
Simon. Mrs. Bva, IS, of 1SSS Collins
AVC. II i-i" : L' i'h., p. I
simon Samuel, '' of 1655 Collina
Ave. Blasberg Chapel.
wulp-"son, Mrs. Esther, 70 .of 5ivi
Collina .v\. ti\. I.-....- i nauel
BlUM, Mis Quisle, 76, of 1735 X.
Treasure Dr. Gordon Chapel.
GOLDSTEIN. .Mrs Ousslc, 80, of ;41t!
K'nminirn Dr. Riverside Chapel
HERTING. Mrs Dora. 68. of BJ3
Alton ltd. Newman Chapel.
H.^atNnAD. Herman, 64, of imoo
KE 22nd Ave Riverside Chapel.
leitner. Edward. S7, of :i [aland
Ave. Riverside <*hapd.
NASON. Philip. 73. of 3800 Collins
Ave Newman Chapel.
SOLOMON. Leo, 71. of 2451 Brlrkell
Ave, lionlon t'haiiel.
wagner. Abraham, 7.1. ol soo vv.-.t
Ave Riverside Chapel.
B- i Reuben, 6* ,of I0S75 Col-
lins Ave. Riverside Chapel.
LINER, Ellas, 84, Of MMO Harding
Ave. Riverside ChapeL
PANZER. Morris, >;7. of 4015 Indian
Creek Ir. Riverside Chapel.
seligman, Joseph, 82, of 7000 Bonlta
Dr. Riverside chapel.
van praag. Mrs Doretta, >>7. of
171" W 23rd Si Riverside Chanel
ANGSTREICH. Mrs Yetta. IS, of -.44
Collins Ave Blasberg chapel.
BERNHEIMER. Mr- Hannah Rose.
81. of 2727 Indian Creek Dr. River-
side Chapel.
BOBICH. Mrs Rebecca, 72. of 826
41 h St niaherg Chapel.
CHERRY, Charles, 7". of 2340 8W 13th
St. Riverside chape]
FEIGEN. Miss Hetty. .".<. of 1203 NW
Slat Ter. Riverside Chapel.
FREED. Samuel. 56, of tiMil Collins
Ave lil.isi.. ,K Chape).
GOLDEN, Benjamin. >:7, of 3225 Col-
lins Ave. Riverside Chapel.
MARGULIES. Mrs Rhonda, 62. of
1S.-.7 S\V 14th St. Gordon Chapd
PATCHIN, Frank. 88. of 3.10 Ocean
nr Blaaberg ChapeL
PECKE. Hymen, 7n. ef 2863 Lenore
IT Hlasherfr Chapel.
SNYDERMAN. Sidney. 61, of 280 41st
St Hlasl.ei-K Chapel.
STEIN. Mrs. Ret.ee. a, 82. of 1735 N.
Treasure Dr Riverside Chapel.
; RETSKIN. Mrs. I>na. 79. of 644 Meri-
dian Ave. Riverside Chapel.
ALEXANDER. Mrs Gertrude H :..
of :il"l Alton Rd. Gordon Chapel
ALLISON, Mrs Hetty. 71, of 751 8|st
Bl Riverside Chapel.
BERGER. Harry. .;h. of 10155 Collins
Ave Chapel .
GOLDSTEIN. Mrs. Gussle. of 2416
, Plamfnco I>r Riverside Chapel
GOLDSTEIN. Stephen, Benjamin. 31.
f rn.l \'K :,ih Ave. Gordon Chap-I
Interment Mt Xebo.
GRODSKV. Mrs Kay. of 7!'.'." Tatum
Waterwa) Blasberg Chapel
kahaney. Harry. 62, "f 7424 Byron
Ave Vevvman chapel.
koppman. Mrs Henrietta. 78, nl
7S8 Washing-ion Ave Newman Cha-
nel,
kurland. Mm Motile, II, of 1657
Euclid in Riverside Chapel
LEWIS. \|.-- Bertha, 7". ..f 6M5 Col-
lins Avi Rlvi i-i.l. Chapel
MEILBERGER. Philip, 63, of 6065 BW
it'll SI Gordon Chapel. Interment
Mt N.i...
RappapoRT. Mrs Rose, 71, of 471
Piuetree Dr Newman Chapel
SAMSON. Hymnn, -4. ..f ..74" Harding
A\ Riverside 'hap. 1
Savitz. Mrs Lena. 74 ..( 2025 m:
i. mii sir.. i Ki\. nddc "hapel
SIMON. Alfred. 63, of JO0B Collina Av
" ..!. "hapel
WELLS, .vi i- Rebecca, R, of B621
ht.trdnig Ave Riverside chapel.
BAER. vir- Gertrude P 78, of 1440
vi: I71sl SI Riverside Chapel
BROWN. Mr- |.i||Mu. ..;. f :t |s-
land Ave Newman chapel
ESKIN. Harrv M i I, n| 1885 NE l-'l-'
sr. P'verslde < "hsnel '
hughes. Mr- Helen J.. 61, ..f 86O0
Itlacayne lilv.l Blaaberg Chapel
OP"iN. n 77 .f 7441 Wayne Ave
Riverside Chapel
STOLPEN. Samuel, 65. of 6M Bspl-
nola Way Beyer chapel.
WALLENSTEIN. Isidore. 75. of 1034
Jefferson Ave NVw in:,n Chap- I
Friedman. Harry, 66, of 850 list Si
Blaaberg Chapel
GITELSON. Monroe, of 744 85th 81.
Blaaberg Chanel
KOENIG. Isidor. 84), of 30180 SVV 27th
tvr cordon Chanel
MOLL, Mrs Mollle. 7' of 243 Meri-
dian Ave. Riverside chapel Inter-
ment Mt. Nebo
nass. Michael, 70, of 840 ith si.
Riverside chapel
SCHANKMAN. Max, 78, of !'34 Meri-
dian Ave Blasberg: Chapel
SCHLITTEN, Mrs lena. 68, of 4444
Collins Ave Illa-I.. re Chapel
SHOUR. Jacob, 82 ..f 7781 Byron Ave.
Riverside Chapel
singer. Bamuel a 74. of 154)0 Bay
IM Riverside Chapel
weiss. William. 71, of 18*85 Collins
Ave Oordon Chapel
BAILIS. Wilbur, BO, Of 1"75 '..3rd St
Blasberg Chapel
BLANC. Adolph I si ,,f 7501 E.
Treasure Dr Blasberg chapel
COHEN, Mrs I lllinn, 7k. ,.f ."..Ml |th
sr BlRsherg Chapel
HERBST. Mrs Ri till 7.1. of 7.-.M E
Treasure l >r Newman ChapeL
LEVIE. Mr- Jeannette, ;;. of 5730
Collins \w Riven l< Chapel In-
' 111. nl Ml Ni ho
LONG. .1.....1. .; r 788 Collina Av<
Newman Chapel
MAPO. Harry, 74. ..f 6835 Rue Ver-
satile Ni u man 1 'hapi!
MOREIN. Mrs niadyn > of 1500 Col-
lins Avi Blaher Chapel
PEARLMAN Mr* Martha, 67, of 4747
C0IH1 tve Rlvi 1 -nl. Chapel
BERNSTEIN. Mm Harriet, ._'. of 550
11th st. N< n man 1 'I ..i..-i
CUTLER. i,.l 73 < 3J VV 7tich
SI Or.!. 1 '
DOHN. Mrs Gertrude, M. ..'f iim w 1'
Ave Newman Chapel
FRIEDMAN. Mlf I ||l|a ,.. ,,f 3771
Royal Palm Ave Riverside chapel.
GREENBERG. Morris, 81, ,,f tiiS BW
I 5th si Riverside Chapel.
GREENFIELD. Sam. 77. of Ml
, Pennsylvania Ave Riverside Chapel
, KUGELMAN, c.ustav. 81, of 1544
Euclid Ave Riverside Chapel.
I L.EB' Edward I.. 78, of 3 Island
Ave Riverside Chapel.
I S^!"TCoN- Mr" Mlnrd* 84, of goo O. au
Dr. Riverside Chapel.
91


Fiiday, February 23. 1968
* U *#f norkHan
LEGAL NOTICE
" % THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
NO.-87-11168
kdpulion Petition ><<,
II l,fjjk' TAVl|Hn.l
.lilSIB-TAVI.niV'susha.ld
.1 n-lfi
NOTICE OF ADQPTIOfil. .,.
PROCEEDINGS
. |{i iBERT l.E COMPTE
and I1HENDA DAVIS
'.!; >'' i.MITK
x:,n North '-il Btreet
i:.isi Balm Louis, nil.iols
Mil- AJIB HEREBY NOTIFIED thai
id, above named Petitioners .ii'I.ian
.....I joslE TAYLOR, have filed n
,,. iin..n in the above styled Court for
ill. adoption of tin' minor child named
therein and you are required to
show cuum why iht aamu should not
... granted by serving a copy
f \..ur written defense. If
ij 'u|'li OEOROB NICHOLAS. At-
inrne) for Petitioners, 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida, mid by filing
ill. original thereof With the flerk
itld Court, on "i" hcfarc the 2"th
,h ..f March IMS. otherwise a de-
fault will '" entered against you
WITNESS my hand and sen I '.f said
dun ..i Miami, Florida, this 14th day
February 1968
i: o I.RATHKRMAN Clerk,
Circuil Court, Dado County, Florida
By: C P. COPBLAND
I leputy clerk
Seal)
2/16-23 3/1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELFVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
Cut No. 68-2151
NOTICE OF SUIT
FOR DIVORCE
i'AKill* Dll.l.INOHAM.
I' ...i 'in'
i \m KEITH Dll.l.INOHAM.
I ..-feiidant
TO .;m:Y KEITH DIIJ.INOHAM
;7i3 State Lin.
Kansas City, Missouri 64111
N GARY KEITH Dll.l.INOHAM.
,r. hernby notified that a Complaint
f,r l^vorce has been filed against
i .1 \.-u are required to serve a
npj ..f your Answer or Pleading to
the Complain! for Divorce on the
i tiffs attorney, Ronald L
D.WIK, Rsq., 417 Blacayne liuildiug-
19 w Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
Phone: 179-28A1. and file the
anginal Answer or Pleading in the
..i tli. t'lork of the Circuit
Court on or before the lfth day of
M in h, 1968 If you fail to do eo,
ii men! by default will be taken
i yon for the relief demanded
i the Complaint for Divorce.
notice shall be published once
..,.|i w-ek for four consecutive weeks
tub Jewish fi.oridian.
IwiNE AND ORDERED, at Miami.
,. this Oth day of February.

i: ll I.BATHERMAN,
i 'l.rk. Circuit Court
Dude County. Florida
By: c P. COPBI^AND
ileputy Clerk
mi i 'ourt Seal)
t/16-33 .- l-i
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 77876
In RE Estate of
ANNIK III RWITZ,
......used
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T \n creditors and All Persona
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any rlaims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of ANNIK HL'HWITZ, de-
ceased late of Dado County. Florida,
lo the County Judges of Dade County.
and file the same in duplicate and as
: vlded In Section 733 16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices In the County
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within six calendar months from the
lime of the first publication hereof.
ci ill.- same will bo barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 1st
da} ol Fobruarv. AD. 1968
EDWAHD N. MOORE
Am Executor
First publication of this noli.,- on
'he l'. day of February. 1968.
WALTERS, MHE A
1 "I ISTANZO
i'\: Arthur D Deckelman
Vtorney for Petitioner
'0" Ainsley Itldg Miami. Fla
l7tt-23 3 l-s
Demands Ag.un.-t
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 77570
In RK: Estate ol
MATILDA V\lt;l.RH .1* || X
Deceased. A
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and ah p*nn.
i i "iiijii. <-^4i .in: or
Said ICstale:
You are jiereb) notified and re-
illllred to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
ihe estate of Matii.ua WINKI.ER
deceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dad. County,
and file the sain, in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dad. County, Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the Mime will be hancl
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 25
day ..i January. A.D iH'ix.
BBULAH PADBR
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of February, 1968
RARNETT ROBINSON, JR.
Attorney for Executrix
410 Concord Building;,
.Miami. Florida
Page 11-D

"My AAaxie is now so assimilated, he
takes his Shabbas nap on Sunday!"
Copr. 1968, Doytnu Productions
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN An/0 FOR
DADE COUNTY IN CHANCERY
No. 68-2418
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
JIMMY STBPTO
Plaintiff
Vs.
JOYCE STEPTO,
Defendant
You, JOYCB STEPTO. ale here-
by notified that a llill of Complaint
for Divorce has been filed against you,
and you are required lo serve a eopy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Hill of Complaint on the Plaintiffs
attorney, BNQBL AND POLLACK,
1700 N.W. 7th Street. Miami. Florida
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing in Ihe office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 2th day
of March, 196X. If you fail to do so,
judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
in the Hill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THF. JEWISH PLORIDLA.N
DONE AND ORDBRED at Miami,
Florida .this 15th day of February
AD. 1968.
E It I.F.ATHF.RMAN. Clerk
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
By: c P cof-f.i AND
Deputy Clerk
(ClrCUll Court Seal)
BNOEL AND 11'l.l.ACK
1700 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida
I/IS 1/1-8-15
!.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KOTK'E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the nudersigned. desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of IMPERIAL MEN'S WBAR at MB
N.E. 1st Avenue Intends I) register
said name with the Clerk ol the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
JOSE SCHLESrNOER.
Sole Owner
2/9-16-23 3/1
NOTICK CNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
' 7A'a PARKING at 2.15 West Flagler
sii-eot intend to register sit id name
with the cierk of ihe Circuit Court
"t M>. County. Florida.
BENJAMIN AGRONOW
MILDRED AORONOW
2/16-23 3 1-8
NOTICE UNDER
., FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
lth.OTIi? Is HBRWM OIVBN that
. undersigned, desiring to engage
i in business under the fictitious name
lv imJYJ11 '"''TAR SHOP at 3418
i.-n.un Highway. Cm-onjut Grove intends
Hi ZK"',\fr ld ""mp ro> 'he Clerk
V-, "? h-euij Court of Dade County,
| r londa.
BOB & SUE'S CORP.
____________________!/!- 31*
'?iTCwE;^U'T POUBT OF THE
LEYENTM judicial cmcurr
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. CIVIL ACTION
.,_, No. 68-2038
M uv.TCE BV PUBLICATION
MARJ ANN VERNIB,
Plaintiff,
h'',ANK 8. VKUNIE.
Defendani
,,);"'; FRANK S. VEKN1K. resi-
C e unknown, are required to scr>e
ll.i... of.mu Answer to the Com-
puini for Divorce on DAVID M c.nN-
I v>it,. A"orney for Flalnllff. 14H7
t..i h str"-'- Miami. Florida 33125,
If ...'""rigliial Answer In the office
r I rk "( '"' Circuil Court on
J Before the lxth day of March.
S'. or a Default will be entered
ran.s| you
lisATK"' "''" !"n ,lHy of r'ebruary,
E it L.EATHBRUAN
' lerk. Circuit Court
Dad.- County. Florida
By: N, A. HEWETT
Uvuuty Clerk
2/16-23 3/1-8
RONALD L. Q HENRIQUES was
the first English Jew to be killed
during the first World War.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HBREBY GIVEN that
| the undersigned, desiring to engage
, in business under the fictitious name
of miss & MR. I_\TI.\ TEIJSVISION:
MISS ft MR LATIN TV. at 190 g.w!
8th Btreet, Miami intends to register
sai.I name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit "ourt of Da.le County, Florida
T V Ol'IDE IN SPANISH
MAGAZINE, INC.
S -! 13 3/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS I1EKKHY OfVKN that
th. undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of cry i'askkv H.\Mi!!j-:i: com-
PA NY at HhMfi s Federal Highway,
Homestead, Florida, intends to regist-
er said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida
I'ASKKV and EDWARDS COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
sole owners.
.1 DAVID UEBMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
*>nfi Lincoln Road
Sui'e 315
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
__ 9-16-23 3/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of VICTORS REPAIRS at 1278 N.W.
; 29th Street, Miami Intends to register
, said name with Ihe Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade i unty, Florida
EI.IAS VICTOR
SIDNEY BFRON80N
Attorney fur Applicant
612 Ainsley liuilding
_________________ 2 2-9-16-33
IN THE COUNTV JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 77728-A
In UK: Kstate of
JACOB KAUFMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Cri-ditors irnd All persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Against Said
Bat ate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and de-
mands which you mav have against
the estate of JACOB K.M'FMAN de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to tlie County Judges of Dade County,
anil file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices i'n the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof.
or the same win be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 2 day
of February, A D 1968.
Gloria martin
As Executrix
First publication of 'his notice .
the 9 day of February, 1963
SIMON. HATS & GRI'NDWERG
Attorney for Executrix
3H1 Ainsl.y llldg Miami
2 9-16-23 3 1
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 77477-A
lii i:i;: Kstate of
GEORGE II KOHN
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claim- ..r Demand.- Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
qulred t.. pre* m any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
ihe estate of GEORGE H KOHN
deceased late of Hade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file tin- same in duplicate and a.
provlded in Section 783.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse In Dad. County, Florida.
within six calendar months from the
llmi of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred
Dated itl Miami. Florldq .this 30th
day of Janitor;. A.D 1963
PA II.INK D KOHN
As Executrix
Plrsl publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of February, 19611
SIMON, HAYS A rjRI'NDWERO
Attorneys for Executrix
301 Ainslej lildg
2 : -i.i 23
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial .17:1-4605
for messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY IIIVBN Ih
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious nan
of N-.TTIN.iHH.I. SHIRTS I...I .
1173 s IV 85th Terrace, Miami Inter. I
to register said name with the f"lci
ol the i'l.rk or the Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
SUSAN .\- ROBERT RAl'CHMAN,
* IWllers
- 16-23 3 I-*
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COUR"'
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 77458-A
In RK: Estate of
WIM,IAM ARTHUR Tl'ICHVvil.l.K
11.. used
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Per.....
I Having i lalmi
I Said Estate:
Vou ale herd
quired to presi m
I mauds which yo
; the .Stale of
: Tiiipvviu.i:,
r Demands Again..
notified and rr-
ny claims ami d. -
u may hav agl
UII.I.IA.M ARTHUR
leased lat. of Dad
County, Florida, to the County .ludg
I of Dade County, and file the same in
i duplicate a,,.! as provided in Section
Statutes, in th ..
County Courthouse
Florida, u itlun
nths from the time
of
the
to GREATER MIAMI
Tik ono phone call (or coupoa
below), idd hostess with baskets
of gifts ind inlormstion *bout ths
city, stir lo gtnuiot hospitality,
and you'll hava a generous and
alightfuJ welcome. Just phone
443-252*
JFSrjSSVm Im per*
m*
J Pleas* have the Welcome Wooes
Heirex cull **.
~l I would lik* to subscribe to
The Jewish Floridion.
"ill tut coupon ond mall t*
Circwlarit* Dept..
SLP.0. oox *73, Miami, Fir.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 68-1764
RANDJtA KBRNKNK
Plaintiff
DDNAI.irC KKKNENE.
Defendani
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: DONAI.I) C KBRNBNB
Rasidepcf I'nknown
VOt' AR*: HKRKHV NOTIFIFD
that an action for divorce has been
filed against you In the above styi.nl
court, and that you are required to
serve a OOpy Of your Answer or Plead-
ings if any, to it, on th*' Plaintiffs
attorney. l'AII. KWITNKV. t:'0 Lin-
coln Road. Miami Reach. Florida and
file the original uith Ihe Clerk of the
anove styled Court on or before the
(I .lay Of March. 1968: otherwise a
judgment may he entered against
you for ihe r. Ii. f demanded in the
Complaint.
Witness, my hand and seal of said
Curl on Fel.ruar\ '_'. 'ii'-
K It I R VTIIERMAX,
Clerk. "if nit 'ourt
Hade CoUlll} Plot da
Ity I. SNBKDBN
Deom\ I lei I.
Circuil Court S.ali
l'AII, K\\ ITNEY
136 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach, Florida
Atloni.A for I'lainlff
^ :-!; a :. l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring lo (mirage
In business under the fictitious name
of FLORIDA YACHT BASIN al 1583
N.W. I'lth Avenue, Miami. Florida
intends to r-gistei- >a|<] name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Cr.urt of Dade
County, Florida.
SAPiF i;v'i:ni'itisi:s. \sr
a Florida corpomtlon
BY: Ellas A Safle
President
Sole Owner
MYBR8, KAIM.AN .<: PORTER
I A' lorneys for
Safle Enterprises, Inc.
lisn S W 1st sire.i
' Miami. Florida
J '.-Ii. :::: .: I
I IN THE COUNTY JUDCESCOURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 77665-A
In RB: Estate of
DAVE ZINKIN
i Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor- and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
I-; late:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which vou mav have against the
estate of DAVE ZINKIN" d.....a.-d
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16, Florida Sta-
tutes, in their offices In the Countv
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof
or the same will be nnrred.
Dated at Miami. Florida. Ihi- .'.illl
day of January, A.D 1868
ISRAEL ZINKIN
MAI.VIN RNOLANDER
As Co-Kxecutors
Firtot publication of this notice on
th. 2nd day of February, 186*
SHBVIN, OOODMAN *
HOI.TZMAN
Attorneys for Rxecntors
346 Seybold tlulldli ..;
: S-fl 16 -<
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS I1ERKBY fJIVEN that
the undersiL'iie.i. dovfrlnff i. noajre
In business under the fictitious name
oi MIAMI VACHT CBNTBR at 1586
\'\V "tth Avenue. Miami. Florida in-
tends to register said name with th.'
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
SAFIK ENTERPRISES, LVC.
u Florida corporation.
IIY: Klia-s A. Safie
President
Sol.- Owner
MYERS. KAPIvVN & PORTER
Attorneys for
suifie Enterprises, jn<-.
Hit 8.W, 1st Street
Miami. Florida
J/S-16-23 3/J
CIRCUIT COURT. ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 68-2482
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
OSCAR FIN I .AY SON,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DKI.C.RF.S FIN1.AYSON,
Defendant.
YOU. DBLORBS FINI.ayson. ore
notified to serve a copy of your
answer lo Divorce Complaint filed
srslnsi you on Plaintiff's attorney,
HKOROE NICHOLAS, 'il^ N.W. 13th
\\.-. Miami. Fla, and file original
with Clerk of this Court on or he-
fon March 36, 1968, otherwise com-
plaint lll he confessed by vou.
Dnteil February IS, 1968
K. P.. I.EATHERMAN, Cleric
n> \ A HBWETT
I leputy Clerk
2. a ::. 1-8-15
733.16, Florida Statutes, In their ..-
fices in th
Dade Count!
calendar in
the flrsi publication hereof, or
same w ill be barred,
Dated .ii Miami, Florida ,thi*
das of January, A D. i!'.:
CAROLYN FRY l.i'TT
A- Administratrix
First publication of this notice .v,
ihe > day of February, 1961
Dl'NN and .1' illNSflN
Attorneys for Estate
4I>; P.is. in lie liuilding Miami
: 16-23 3 l->
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA N AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 68-1337
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
MARTHA ROBBRSON,
: Plaintiff,
!
! WII.I JE flHOROE ItOBERRON,
Defendant,
in WILLIE GEORGE ROBBRSON
mil' spring Garden Strec l
Apt. No. II
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
You. WILLIE GEORGE ROBBRSON,
are hereby notified thai a Bill of
Complaint for Divorce has 1.....n filed
against you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your Answer or
PI. ailing to the Bill of Complaint i"
the Plaintiffs attorney. ENGEL a
POLLACK. 1700 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Dade County, Florida ail
file the original Answer or Pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the Cii
cull Court on or before the 4th da)
of March, 1968 If you fail to do s.
Judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demand. I
in the ii.il of Complaint.
This notice shall be published on,
each v*.....k for four consecutive weeks
in THF JEWISH FI/1R1DIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miam
Florida, this 26th day of Januai
A.D. 1968
F It I.KATIIF.RMAN. Clerk.
Circuil Court. Dade County. Florida
Ity : c P. COPBI.AND
Deputy Clerk
.. 'Ircuil Court Seal i
ENGBL It il.LACK
1700 N W. Tth Street
Miami, Florida
NOTICE UNDER'
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
he undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of lU'BINDALE KOSHER MEAT
AND I'ori.TRY MARKET at Uioi
2103 Coral Way. Miami. Florida hi-
end to register said name with th--
Clerk ol the circuit Court of Dad.-
County. Florida.
HERMAN DALE BO*! Partner
GEORGE ki.i'.in :.or: Partner
Call.OMAN, OOLDSTEIN &
P \'/.ii:r
Attorneys for Registrants
L'411 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida :t.li3.'.
___________il j/3-9-16-3
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADS COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 77799-C
In RB: Estate of
I'HHJP BERNSTEIN
Decvnsed
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Oedltors and All Person--
Having Claims or Demands Agalnsi
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and re
nuirc.l to present any claims and de
mands which you may have against
ihe .-late of PHILIP BERNSTEIN
deceased late of IVade County, Florida
to the County Judges of Dade County
and file th.1 same in duplicate ana
a-s provided In Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices In the
County Courthouse in Dade County
Florida, within six calendar months
from the time of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barrel
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 39ttl
doj ol January. A.D. l!'t;x.
KATE BERNSTEIN
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the -mi day of February, 1968.
SPARBER AND ROSK1N
Attorn, ys for Executrix
inn North Blacayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33132
2/2-9-16 -21


Page 12-D
JtrWc* #irvrtfrr'
Friday. February 23, iggg
He has a safe deposit box, ample savings, is fully insured, and his estate is in good order.
But he is threatening his family's security.
He has not yet made his cemetery arrangements. Like other
important obligations, these arrangements must not be over-
looked. If left unattended, they could cause your family unneces-
sary emotional and financial strain. By planning ahead, these
arrangements can be made with a minimum of pressure. Prices
and services can be compared in a calm, rational manner. And
difficult decisions will not be left for the family to make when they
are least prepared, financially and emotionally. If you have not
yet made your cemetery arrangements, we urge you to do so now.
Your family is certain to benefit.
oMmtoJ^^B,
M.AM.S MOST BEAOT.FUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CBMSTBKV
5505 Northwest 3rd Street Phon MO 1-7693