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The Jewish Floridian ( December 16, 1966 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
December 16, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01976

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
December 16, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01976

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text

tndav.TiHt-oml^r'M 1OTT
iJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 39 Number 50
Miami. Florida. Friday. December 16, 1966
Two Sections Price 20*
United Jewish Appeal Adopts $75,620,000 Goal
NEW YORK (JTA) The
four-day national conference of the
United Jewish Appeal, attended by
2.500 leaders of Jewish commun-
ities from all parts of the United
States, concluded its sessions Sun-
day with the adoption of a goal of
$75,620,000 as the objective of the
UJA nationwide campaign for
1967.
Max M. Fisher was rcelected to
a third term as UJA general chair-
man. Edward Ginsberg, of Cleve-
land, was elected associate general
chairman a newly-created high
leadership post. Rabbi Herbert A.
Friedman was reelected to his
12th term as UJA executive vice
chairman. Mrs. Harry L. Jones, of
Detroit, was elected chairman of
the UJA's
Division.
National Women's
The 1967 campaign goal
$10,000,000 more than the UJA
total in 1966 is the minimum
needed, according to the budg-
etary presentation made during
the conference by the function-
al agencies supported by the
Appeal to meet the essential
aid requirements of 827,600 Jew*
in Israel and 30 other countries
throughout the world. All the
budgetary presentations cited
the extraordinary costs develop-
ing out of the sharply increased
needs of immigrant absorption
programs in Israel, as well as a
continued movement of Jewish
immigrants to that and other
countries, and relief and recon-
struction programs in Western
Europe, North Africa and the
Middle Eatt.
In his acceptance speech. Fisher
told the delegates that he ai
"deeply honored" to be given this
Continued on Page 3-A
Declaration
On Soviet
Jews Issued
NEW YORK (JTA) An In-
ternational Declaration on Soviet
Jewry was simultaneously issued
this week throughout the woild
in central Jewish organizations in
18 countries, including the United
States. France. Italy, Japan, Hol-
land. Mexico and Ireland. The
statement was issued in this conn-
try by Rabbi Israel Miller, chair-
man of the American Jewish Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, com
prised of 25 national Jewish
groups.
Declaring that the Jewish com-
munities of these 18 countries will
"continue our protests and appeals
until the Jewish minority is as-
sured equality of treatment with
all other ethnic and national
groups in the USSR," the declara-
tion presented a program to the
Soviet Government urging the
abolishment of current violations
of human rights suffered by the
Eisendrath Hits Jewish
Role in 'Backlash'
RABBI MAURICE EJSENDXATH
we ore victims
By Special Report
WASHINGTON Rabbi Maur-
H \ Eisendrath, president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-1
gregations, this week denounced a
"growing element" among Jews
who are part of the "white back-
lash in this country.
EXPLAINS THE PROBLEM
Eban Meets With High
LBJAides in Washington
WASHINGTON (JTA) Is-
rael Foreign Minister Abba Eban
Mondav met with a number of
three million Jews in Soviet Rus- high level White House and State
Department officials in a series of
talks aimed at explaining the Is-
raeli view on the situation in the
Middle East.
Mr. Eban is believed to have
sought to explain the security
problems confronting Israel and
to develop better understanding
: among Washington policy-makers
1 of the Israeli position.
sia.
The International Declaration
followed the publication of a
similar statement signed by 90
U.S. Senators and preceded a
nationwide series of protests in
32 communities throughout the
United States on December 11. A
supplementary statement was
also Issued by Rabbi Miller de-
claring:
"The American Jewish Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry notes with
Continued on Pag* 13 A
*
with spec.al emphasis on the
failure of the United Nations to
follow a balanced and equitable
stand on the Arab-Israel border
Continued on Page 5 A
Addressing the opening session
of a three-day meeting of the
I'AIIC's hoard of trustees at the
Washington Hilton Hotel. Dr. Eis-
endrath told the representatives
of B7U Reform synagogues in the
United states and Canada that "we
lews are becoming victims of the
wave "f reaction against the Ne-
gro that is sweeping our nation.
We have not been immune to what
is widely designated as the white
backlash.' "
He cited as an example the re-
cent New York City Question on
the Civilian Review Board which
the religious leader estimated
Jews voted 3 to 1 against the
Board.
Rabbi Eisendrath stressed
"We Jews dare not capitulate
to the wave of reaction that is
arising like a tidal flood in our
land." He instead called upon
Continued on Page 10-A
MINISTER OF JUSTICE
The Foreign Minister met
first with Joseph Sisco, Assist-
ant Secretary of State for Inter-
national Organization Affairs.
He held a general discussion
West German State
Picks Jew for Top Job
K-)
Reds Charge Israel
Mixes in Arab Affairs
BONN (JTA) Dr. Joseph
Neuberger. a Jew who returned
from Israel to West Germany, was
named Minister of Justice in the
newly-formed Social Democratic
Government of the West German
State of North Rhine West-
phalia.
Heinrich Albertz. a former Pro-
fairs in the new Bonn Government.
Albertz, whom the Nazis im-
pressed into the army after his
wartime imprisonment, gave up;
the ministry to aid refugees after,
the war. He was named as Brandt's
successor by the Socialist Party,
which has an absolute majority in
the City Assembly. He is to serve
until Mar. 12, when new city elec-
testant clergyman who was jailed tions are to be held by the Assem-
bv the Nazis for six months dur-1 My.
IN SEVERAL GENERATION'S
Survival
Crisis Seen
By Expert
SAN JUAN (JTA) The
American Jewish community was
reported here this week as hav-
ing a high rate of acculturation
acceptance of new culture traits
but a very low rate of assimila-
tion.
The report was presented by Dr.
Marshall Sklare, professor of
sociology at Yeshiva University, in
an address here at the annual con
vention of the Jewish Funeral Di-
rectors of America.
"There is no expectation that
widespread assimilation will
take place in the present gen-
eration," he said. However, he
predicted that American Jewry
may face its "survival crisis'*
within the next two generations.
The next generation of American
Jews, he said, would face great-
er difficulty in conveying the
"increasingly diffuse Jewish
heritage" to their children.
The form of the crisis, said Dr.
Sklare, would not be the "van-
ishing" of most of American Jewry
but a "shaking out process" in
which some Jews would remain
Jews and the others would assimi-
late. A polarization could take
place In which the strongly corn-
Continued on Page 7-A
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Gideon Rafael, vice chairman ol
the Israeli delegation to the Gen-
eral Assembly, clashed with USSR
Deputy Foreign Minister V, V.
Kuznetsov, in an exchange pro-
voked by the latter this week in
the Assembly's Political and Se-
nility Committee.
Kuznetsov initiated the
exchange during debate on imple-
mentation Of a resolution adopted
by the Assembly last year, enjoin-
ing all states not to "organize,
assist, foment, finance, incite, or
tolerate subversive, terrorist or
aimed activities directed toward
I lie violent overthrow of the re
Rime of another state, or interfere
in civil strife in another state."
The Soviet Deputy Foreign
Minister told the 121-member
committee: "This year has wit-
nessed a growing number of ac-
tions of interference in the in-
ternal affairs of Arab states
Continued on Page 11-A
ing the war for preaching a ser-
mon deemed by the Nazis as "hos-
tile to the state," is sure to be- i
come West Berlin's Governing
Mayor this week. He has been
chosen for the post, as successor
to Willy Brandt, now vice chan-
cellor and Minister of Foreign Af-
(Dr. Joachim Prinz, the Amer-
ican Jewish leader, an iving in
London from a visit to West Ger-
many, stated that all West Ger-
man Government leaders were tak-
ing seriously the neo-Nazi move
Continued on Page 8-A
Javits Asks for Veep Try
NEW YORK (JTA) Sen.
lacob K. Javits. the Republican
who is the senior U.S. Senator rep-
resenting New York State, pro-
jected himself Sunday M^enti
to
least"
for
In several appearances on tele-
vision, and in off-the-air inter
views, Mr. Javits. who has been
mentioned as the possible GOP
limning mate of Michigan's Gov.
he has proved himself as qualified
by showing he is "responsible and
farsighted."
"I think, he said. "I am entitled
to national consideration. I don't
ize it at all. I think I
ional position
ded hunselt auM?f- *^ (, Romney, pointed out that J want to minimize it a
, be nominated n 1968 as.at wo, ePuhlican Party's am entitled to a nati
SEN. IAC0B JAVITS
'responsible and farsighted'


?-uge2-A
ftjfcwtoi Fkrkiiatr
Friday, December IE
ANSIN AND ABESS NAMED CO-CHAIRMEN OF PHILANTHROPIC DIVISION
Friedland to Head CJA Pacesetters
HOME FURNISHINGS SEC. B
ft SERVICE SK.
Samuel N Friedland, founder
and chairman of the executive
i ommittee of Food Fair Stores.
Inc.. has accepted the chairman-
ship of the Pacesetters Division for
he 1967 Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign.
Friedland's acceptance was an-
nounced by Milton Weiss, overall
chairman of the 1967 drive. Weiss
noted that thi ta the second con-
secutive year In which Friedland
has assumed the leadership post.
Weiss also announced the ap-
;x>intment- two co-chair-
men of the Pac^^tters Division.
Sidney D. An-;;, and Leonard L.
Abesa
"The Combined Jewish Ap-
peal is honored and privileged
o have three such distinguished
leaders taking on the respon-
sibility for the Pacesetters Divi-
sion," said Weiss. "Last year,
h Pacesetters raised S287.600.
i feel certain that with Fried-
and, Ansin, and Abess in top
leadership positions, the Pace-
setters Division will come
Mm
PERMANENT
COLOR
?
* faj| yt,<\(
* 3i..-n -', :. i
* j}biiiiii! a;e.'p'ooi
v* Marfcanj :.-i. i
spo<;; equ:~'"
1 LOVE
ESTER
^WW
BARNETTS
OFFICE SUPPLIES
& EQUIPMENT
221 N.E. Sfth STREET-Miomi
1608 WASHINGTON AVE.-M.B.
134 NX 1st STREET-Miomi
272 VAUNCIA-Ceral Gables
Ph. PL 4-3457
brfRU. I*
County in 1964 and has been vice
president of. the United Health
of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith.
Abess is a trustee of the '
Fund of Dade County, past -..ce
president of the Miami Beach
. Chamber of Commerce, and
member of the Orange Bowi Com-
mittee. He is a former chairman
president oi in. i^uro nm, of the f^^ sute Board
Funds of Dade County since 1964. ^^lancy. and past president' 0f
He is a member of the boafd of ^ Florida 1^^ of certified
directors of the American Cancer> ^^ AccoUBtants. Abess fa
Society. Variety Children s Hos-. director ^ Rvder Systems. Inc
Samuel friedland
Sidney Ansin
leonord I. Abess
through with a tremendous in-
crease for the 1967 Combined
Jewish Appeal campaign."
Friendland. who is honorary-
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation which conducts
the CJA campaign, also serves on
Federation s executive committee
and board of governors. He is a
founder, vice president, and mem-
ber of the board of trustees of
Mount Sinai Hospital, a benefi-
ciary agency of Federation, and is
chairman of the Greater Miami
Committee for Israel Bonds.
A founding member and pres-
ident of Temple Emanu-El. Fried-
land is an active member and for-
mer officer of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews, a
member of Florida Council of 100
and the Miami Dade Chamber of
Commerce, and serves on the
board of directors of the Industrial
National Bank of Miami He is also
Ansin, president and chair-
man of the board of the Sun-
beam Television Corporation,
which operates WCKTTV, Ch.
7, is a vice president of the*
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and also serves on its executive
committee and board of gover-
nors. Last year, he served as
Miami chairman for Radio Free
Europe and is currently on its
fund commitee for 1967. He is
executive chairman of the Na-
tional Council for Equal Busi-
ness Opportunity.
Ansin la a director of the Com-
munity National Bank and Trust
Company, and holds memberships
in numerous civic organizations,
including the Metropolitan Char-
ter Review Board of Dade County.
Miami Beach Taxpayers Associa-
tion. Miami Beach Citizens Advi-
sory Committee. Junior Achieve-
ment of Miami. Greater Miami
a founder and continuing sponsor Fiesta Committee, and the Com-
of the Education Research Founda-
tion of Florida.
Friedland recently received the
Eightieth Anniversary Medal of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
mittee of 21 of the Miami Dade
Chamber of Commerce He also
serves as a director and a mem-
ber of the program action com-:
mittee oi the Chamber of Com-
of America, in recognition of his i merce.
services not only as a member of j Ansin served as campaign chair-
the Seminary's board of directors, j man of the United Fund oi Dade.
but as "a servant of the er.-
American Jewish community "
He is also the recipient of the
Brotherhood Award of the Na
tional Conference of Christians and
Jews, the Florida Governor s
Recognition Trophy, and the Syn-
agogue Statesman Award of the
Synagogue Council of America.
pital. National Children's Cardiac
Hospital, Big Brothers of Greater
Miami, Dade County Child Guid-
ance Association and Miami Heart
institute.
He is a member of the Board
of Brandeis University and vice
president of its Miami Chapter,
and is a member of the American
Fnends of Hebrew University, and
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. Ansin is a past chair-
man of ths board of directors and
honorary vice president of Temple
Beth Sholom.
Abess, chairman of the board
of City National Bank of Miami
and City National Bank of Mi-
ami Beach, is also a community
leader with a long list of phil-
anthropic and civic endeavors.
He is a member of the board of
governors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, president of
Mount Sinai Hospital, a trustee
of the University of Miami, and
honorary national vice chairman
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Phone JE 1-3595
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Yanich to Open
V Oneg Series
Joseph I. Yanich. director of
the American Jewish Cone.-.
Miami, will he first guest speaker
in the new series of "Oneg Shab-
bat programs at the YM and \V][.\
of Greater Miami on Saturday
Dec. 17.
Th Oneg Shabbat program will
bo held at the "Y." 8500 SW 8th
St. at 1 p.m. Topic will b<
iet Jewry Today." The program is
open to the public.
The new series will f
guest speakers on a variety 0f
topics of interest to all adults
the Miami area.
Miami Hebrew Book Store
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
H*hrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools AY Private Use
1585 Washington Ave.
Miami B-ach JE 8-3840
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Greater Miami's tartest & Oldest
Supply House for Synagogues,
Hebrew & Sunday School*.
Wholesale t Retail
ISffAEU GIFTS AND N0VE1TIES
417 Washington Ave. JE 1-9017
AMERICAN- ISRAELI
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All Religious Articles
For Synagogues
School? HomtS
1357 WASMMSrOM AVI.
It 1-7722 S. Schworfi
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exists to serve.
For more than three generations, Jewish families in the
New York Metropolitan and Miami areas have contin-
ued to entrust their funeral arrangements to Riverside.
They know that no matter which Riverside Chapel
makes these arrangements, standards of service are con-
sistently excellent because Riversidewhich owns, op-
erates and directly supervises each Riverside Chapel
knows that its very existence depends on superior
service.
Perhaps that is the reason why over eighty per cent of
the funerals conducted at Riverside are for families we
have served before. We are proud to have earned the
confidence of the Jewish community.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC FUNERAL DIRECTORS
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
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To arrange a funeral anywhere
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rnawr. Dec-ember MM Iflfi
Friday. December 16. 1966
+Jewish tkrkHam
Page 3-A
UJA Adopts $75,620,000 Goal
Continued from Page 1-A
responsibility.
"There is an Israel after
2.000 years because the people
of Israel and this generation of
American Jews acted together,"
he said. "There are restored Jew-
ish communities abroad because
the UJA mobilized this generation
of American Jews to meet that
task of regeneration. And there
are millions of Jews alive today
because we took up the noble op
portunity to save those lives."
Difficult Period
Rabbi Friedman stressed that
the UJA is the instrument of the
American Jewish community cre-
ated to serve all Jews in need of
help and the Jewish land in need
of upbuilding. "We are now en-
tering," he said, "one of the most
difficult and dangerous periods
since Israel achieved statehood.
The issues of war and peace,
bread and home, growth and life,
learning and stability are in
the balance All future genera
lions shall judge us on how we
use our wealth our freedom
our education. Our vision must
not be dim, our hearts must not
be small, our hands must not be
afraid. God and history await our
response."
Vice President Hubert Hum-
phrey, addressing the 2,500 Jew-
ish community leaders at the UJA
dinner Sunday night at the New
York Hilton Hotel, emphasized
that the United States policy with
regard to the Middle East is "un-
mistakably clear."
"We will energetically oppose
aggression there which would
threaten the peace," he said. "As
part of that objective, the United
States is committed to the integ-
rity of Israel as a free and inde
MIAMI DELEGATION
AT DELIBERATIONS
Attending the national
United Jewish Appeal con-
ference as representatives of
I the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation were Joseph M.
Lipton, president, Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Rosen, Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel N. Heller, Rabbi
and Mrs. Irving Lehrman,
and Arthur S. Rosichan, ex-
ecutive director of Federa-
tion. Rosen, Heller and Dr.
Lehrman are all members of
the Federation board of
governors. At the convention,
Dr. Lehrman was elected
chairman of the Rabbinic
Advisory Council of nation-
al UJA, succeeding Rabbi
David Golovensky, of New
York. The Temple Emanu-El
spiritual leader delivered
the invocation at the Satur-
day night banquet session,
which was addressed by
Vice President Humphrey.
other overseas Jewish commun-1 Jewry will be asked to raise
Hies for 1967 and why American ] $10,000,000 more than in 1966.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
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pendent state. That is our posi-
tion."
Mr. Humphrey drew comparisons
between Israel and the United
States showing that the basic prin-
ciples of both countries are the
same. He agreed that Israel has
been offering peace to the Arab
countries all the time, and that all
she wants now is to be "left
alone," as long as her peace offers
are not accepted. He emphasized
that Israel has the right to protect
her borders against Arab terror-
ists, and highly praised Israel's
Foreign Minister Abba Eban and
Louis A. Pincus, chairman of the
Jewish Agency for Israel, who
shared the platform with him.
Constructive Answer
Declaring that Israel is being
subjected to "piecemeal assault"
by terroristic infiltrators, Eban
told the audience: "We are pre-
pared to examine any constructive
and effective answer to this prob-
lem except one. The course that
we cannot accept is that of passive
submission to encroachment of our
land, our homes and the safety of
our lives. The advice that we
sometimes receive from outside
comes close to a suggestion that
we resign ourselves to being mur-
dered without using our right to
self-defense. This suggestion we
reject whether it comes from foes
or friends."
"The immediate alternatives in
the Middle East are not war or
peace," Eban continued. "The two
least likely things to happen in
the near future are final peace or
general war. We are destined to
live for some years in the twilight
zone between the two. What
statesmanship should try to
achieve is to bring the situation
nearer to peace than to war."
Ominous Technique
Stressing that the most urgent
need is to stabilize tranquility on
the Israel-Arab frontiers, Eban
said: "In the past few years a new
and ominous technique has been
adopted by those who seek to deny
Israel her right to peaceful co-
existence. The balance of regular
armed strength has recently im-
proved to a point at which our
neighbors recoil from the direct
confrontation. In these conditions
a new system of aggression has
evolved. It takes the form of or-
ganized terrorist infiltration. This
technique evades and neutralizes'
the regular balance of strength. It
seeks to dislocate peaceful life |
through the action of small groups
armed with primitive weapons."
Pincus told the dinner guests
that Israel is now facing "most
pressing social problems" which ]
stem from the fact that the mass-1
ive immigration of the past decade
has left a residue of 250,000 new-
comers who are stiil unabsorbed
culturally and economically. "Most
of that residue is made up of im-
migrants who have been settled in ;
21 newly-created towns in the Gali-I
lee region, the Negev, and other'
areas where Jewish settlement is
sorely needed. Nearly all lack the
training, skills and education
needed for productive employment
in a modern industrialized country
like Israel," he said.
The four-day national confer-
ence opened with a session at
which prominent UJA leaders ex-
plained the needs in Israel and in
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Page 4-A
vJewisti FlorSdUatjn
Friday, December 16 1966
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
305-696-4869
FRED K. SHOCHET.......... Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN .......................... Executive Editor
SELMA M. THOMPSON .... Asst. to Publisher
1 'ut.:j.-.'i- .1 everv Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Floridian
at 120 N.E. Slxih Street, Miami 1. Florida.
Second-Claaa Postage Para at .Miami. Florida.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and
the Jewish Weekly. Member of the ewish Telegraphic
Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service, National Editorial Assn., American Asan. of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
d
?*J B S C R 1 P T Loca 1 O N Area RATES!
One Year $5.00 Three Years S12.00
Out ot Town Upon Request
The Jewish Floridian does not guarantee the Kashruth
ot the merchandise advertised in its columns.
Volume 39 Number 50
Friday. December 16, 1966
3 Teveth 5727
One More Prize in His
Bag of Glittering Tricks
Premier Kosygin's statement in
Paris is remarkable. He vowed that
the Soviet Union is prepared to "do
everything to enable" reunification
of Jewish families in the Soviet Un-
ion with members living in other
countries.
We wonder.
For one thing, this is the first such
statement he has made; probably,
therefore, it makes up in exuberance
what it misses in sincerity.
For another, he coupled his ob-
servation with the classic denial of
anti-Semitism in the Soviet Union. In
a way, we suppose, there is no anti-
Semitism in the Soviet Union. At
least, so far as we know, the Mus-
covite leaders have not availed
themselves of the Hitlerite variety.
But there are many ways of
achieving the same end. For their
part, the Russians have chosen to
repress Judaism culturally, and to
deny the Jewish community the
broadly-sweeping means of trans-
mitting Jewish tradition from one
generation to the next. Conseguently, Jews are
being killed by attrition in fact if not in person.
Returnirfg to Kosygin's original vow to re-
unify families, it is interesting to note that
the Premier coupled it with this magnificent
non sequitor: "There is not a single country in
the world which found a solution to the prob-
blem of interior nations as did the Soviet
Union."
What this has to do with permitting emigra-
tion, we can hardly understand. Quite the con-
trary, it suggests an even more methodical
repression of the individual's right to move
freely as he sees fit than ever before.
Even taken on its race, the Kosygin state-
ment in Paris obviously had ulterior motives:
the Soviet need to keep all roads open to the
West at any cost, what with a maverick and
rampaging Red China increasingly hot on
Moscow's already-troubled ideological back.
Promises concerning some future easing up on
the Jewish plight were just one more prize in
visiting Kosygin's bag of tricks.
What's in a Name
Is Kurt Kiesinger Kosher
The word is out to make Kurt Kiesinger
kosher. Time Magazine devoted a cover story
in its Dec. 9 edition to just that end. The sus-
picions will continue to abound, and it may
never be made clear as to just how unwilling a
Nazi the new West German leader really was.
In any case, Kiesinger has declared that
Germany must never permit itself the luxury
of forgetting the past, even while seeking a
fruitful future in the family of nations. For what
it's worth, we must accept this assessment
And why not especially when no less a
trustworthy German politician than Willy
Brandt ha* himself decried the fact that Ger-
many today is a financial giant and a political
dwarf. Jews particularly, who have suffered so
unspeakably at the Nazi's hand, must finally
come to realize that a new day is dawning, as
Brandt's regretful words suggest, over the
Rhine. Until proven otherwise, Kiesinger's sin-
cerity must be accepted; and so must his na-
tion's, which now seeks a new role as the
post-war period fades into history.
In regarding Kiesinger with a jaundiced
eye, neither must we forget that the highly-
respected Konrad Adenauer also associated
himself politically with former Nazis. The one
neither excuses nor explains the other. But it
serves to offer us some hope in the matter of
Kurt Kiesinger's future objectives. Perhapjs,
indeed, he will be kosher.
The United Jewish Appeal national confer-
ence in New York over the weekend served as
a forum for at least one absurdity. Once more,
one of our major Jewish organizations, apart
from its central goals, showed a general predi-
lection for ideological bewilderment by offer-
ing its rostrum to a "name."
In this case, it was Vice President Hum-
phrey. One can hardly deny that the Vice
President is a "name." But what could he pos-
sibly-add to the occasion?
Mr. Humphrey told the cheering delegates
that U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East is
"unmistakably clear." We can, of course, hard-
ly argue that. U.S. Ambassador Goldberg's
enthusiastic maneuvering for UN censure of
Israel following her Nov. 13 self-defense raid
against Jordan seems self-exp'anatory. But
then the Vice President couldn't let his theo-
retical observation go at that.
He had to continue: "We will eneroetically
oppose aggression there which would threaten
the peace ... As part of that objective, the
United States is committed to the integritv of
Israel as a free and independent state. That
is our position."
How? By sending massive shipments of air
and ground weapons to the Arabs? By voting
to censure the Government of Israel, while
standing by silently in the face of an over-
whelming documentation of provocation?
Obviously, the delegates at the UJA con-
vention all knew the facts, and in their hearts
they knew the Vice President's words to be a
court jester's prepared text But Mr. Humphrey's
presence there made them rise in their self-
esteem. That is how it always seems to be in
Jewish organizational endeavor, the intellec-
tual dishonesty of it all notwithstanding.
Why do Jewish leaders continue to feel
that a "name" makes their deliberations more
meaningful? In the case of the UJA confer-
ence, it could only give rise to bewilderment.
Indeed, in the face of administration hvpocrisy
in the matter, it should aive rise to shame.
.,......mil:. .....--:'! i i;.
uring the week
... as i see it
,NE OF THE
reasons for
by LEO MINDLIN

Delicate Religious Balance
Aside from the immediate milttarv and eco-
nomic problems currently be^ettina Israel, the
d*'ica1e ba'ance betwpon reliaious and non-
reliaious elements which very resnonsible
leader has earnestly worked to maintain now
faces a newer and more severe test.
w the failure of Israels re-
taliation to receive total na-
tional acclaim is that ,vas
immoral not in the sense
that retaliation is immoral
but that politics so oft. n are'
As a consequence, the average
Israeli, smarting though he
has been under the onslaught
of terrorist incursion- across
the borders of his country
could not feel decently avenged. It is no good intellectually to know
that the repeated attacks came from Jordan, for emotionally every
Israeli recognizes that it was the Syrians who did the attacking. The
routing of the Jordanian village from which the Syrians repeatedly
launched their breaches of Isiael's border hence left a sense o: fount
and question in the general Israeli mind.
These feelings have since been debated in the Israeli press no
less than in the Parliament. The po;nt here is not to justify the
need of retaliation, which speaks for itself, nor to emphasize Israel'i
high sense of morality, which also at least ideally remains beyond
question. The point rather is to recognize why Israel chose to uunish
the Syrians via Jordan. Neither is Prime Minister Eshkol'a explana-
tion a good one: that it doesn't matter who was culpable, but from
where the attack? were launched.
Certainly, Israel understands Jordan's unique status in the Middle
East. Like so many of the Arab nations, it is a geographic expression:
a country with defined borders, people, cities, villages, and a presum-
ably common language and culture. On the other hand, Jordan's
poverty, also characteristic of every other Arab country if not of
their ruling cliques, is counterbalanced by owning the best lighting
force in the area. The Arab Legion, the legacy of Britain John
Baggott Glubb (Pasha) and the days of British dominion, can be
matched by no other in loyalty and capability save Israel's, own
ISRAEL SEEN If, JORDANIAN TtKMS
SESP1TE THIS military superiority, the truth as every Israel; knows
" it, is that without Israel, Jordan would never survive .the. week
through. Only Israel's twice-proven fighting strength, pr.ever.i~ the
other Arabs, .particularly Egypt and Syria, and possibly Saudi Arabia,
from overrunning Jordan. Neither does this mean that there are not
also Israelis who more than occasionally urge similar campaigns un-
der the seemingly innocent banner of "straightening" Israel's eastern
boundacy, of hacking the Jordanian hammerhead quf.bf lead's
spine. The Herut Party, for example, has never given up" dieam'ipg
sireh dreams despite the recent ouster of Menahem Beigin.
But responsible Israelis in government have resisted the pressure
for a variety, of reasons not necessary to the present discussion. In
fact, Jordan to the east is far from a total Israeli lraBlhty. it mUst,
for one thing, be remembered that it was Jordan's King Abdullah
who held those pre-staie secret meetings with Golda Meir. ar.d who
looked forward to the reestablishment of a Jewish nation in Palestine
as a great potential impetus to the languishing and backwaii Arab
world. For another, the United States regards Jordan as a reliable
ally in the Middle East, and refuses to be disturbed by the possible
duality of a policy that delineates Israel in similar terms
This is not so irreconcilable as it seems. Whether one likes to
think so or not, with the chips down, and particularly in ar. emer-
gency involving Egypt's Nasser, Israel and Jordan may very well
find themselves fighting side-by-side. It is, in fact, for reasons such
as these that Syria and Egypt have done their best during the past
few weeks to bring King Hussein down. Their principal propajanda
weapon against him was that Hussein is allegedly "soft on Israel."
The allegation, dearly, is not far-fetched. That Israel chose Jordan
as the object of retaliation added fuel to the Arab fire against the
Hasheihite," who strucH back with the charge that the Communists
were involved, not'in an anti-Israel barrage for the raament. but in
one directed against himself.
*
ISRAELS CALCULATION BAStD ON NON REPLY
COR A CHANGE, the charge was not a monarch's red-herrit.^ Hus-
sein hit it squarely on the head. But it also made him rattle his
sabre against Israel all the harder in order to blunt the attack of his
Arab colleagues. Since this was predictable, why did Israel pick on
him? Was it not a self-defeating decision?
In a sense, it was, particularly because there is a question as to
just how long the loyalty of the Arab Legion can be counted upon.
The day it wavers, Hussein goes. Could extremist thinking in Israel
about "straightening" the eastern border have had some impact on
the decision? (Not only would the Arabs move swiftlv against Jordan;
so, too, would Israel.)
The Israel Government obviously thought in more realistic terms.
After all, the lesson of Suez taught Israel to recognize that the days
of dominion by conquest are over at least for the small nations of
the world, In 1956-57. Ike Eisenhower forced Israel's victorious army
to withdraw, installed Nasser back on his Cairo throne, and sowed
the seeds of the full-blown anguish threatening the Middle East toda>.
What Nasser could not win on the battlefield, Ike handed him on a
diplomatic platter. The decision to strike at Jordan was hence lim-
ited to teaching Syria that Israel would no longer stand by silently
in the face of aggression. It was also calculated on two other factors:
that Jordan would not strike back; and that the Arabs would only
threaten assistance to Jordan, while in effect doing nothing.

IMMORALITY Of THE MORALS Of POLITICS
yHIS IS PRECISELY how it has turned out. The Arabs, especially
Syria at the instigation of Egypt, made fearful noises. But they
hung safely back until the major crisis had passed. By then, Hussein
had chosen to speak for himself. Making clear the nature of the Com
munist threat, he also explained his retaliatory intentions in the
event Israel launched another operation against his country', while
pacifying the Arabs further with gratuitous talk about the "liberation"
of Palestine. By then, also, the United States set for its own program
to support Jordan, of which the transfer of 36 F104 jet fighters is
now apparently just the start
It is hence the very "stability" of the Hashemite kingdom, the
object of continuing State Department infatuation, on which Israel.
herself relied. Syria would learn the lesson, but Jordan could be
expected to hold fire at least for the moment. For this reason.
tne Nov. 13 action does not sit well with the general Israeli public
today. There is, after all. something jaundiced about such maneuver
mg, indeed the kind of maneuvering in which other nations deal daily.
But the debate over the retaliation proves that the statehood of
Israel is more than a political expression subject to morality exOE
Continued on Page 6 A


"uut,iitBniDer:tii 1HKK
Fridcr.', December 16. 1966
vJewist fhridfian
Page 5-A

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Germans are on Their Way Again
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The West German election re-
turns, in [lessen and in Bavaria
evidence a definite comebac'* of
the Nazis a- a substantial politi-
cal force. The fact that the neo
Nazi parties are as yet a small
minority doesn't preclude their
influence in formulating Ger-
many's policies. The other politi-
cal parties which are sheltering
masses of Nazis are under constant
pressure in their own ranks to fol-
low in the footsteps of the policies
advocated by the Nazis.
Th:s doesn't take into account
his active membership in the Nazi
Party from 1933 to the bitter end
in 1945, when he was jailed by the
denazification organs. The German
nationalistic trend which has
permeated all their political
paities is now strong enough to
pull together for the accomplish-
ment of the reunification of Ger-
many to their old borders and to
..merge as a nuclear power. Rus-
sia, whose main concern today is
China, is becoming eager to deal
with West Germany on German
terms, which Would assure them
" .... ____:__.! Germany's backing in a Russian-
Thu>. nationalistic aspirations ... s
L v w j Chinese encounter,
are again beginning to be the de-
termining factor in Germany's
political organizations, regardless
of the official ideology of the dif-
ferent parties.
Th election of former Nazi,
Kurt Kieiinger, to the highest
office in the Government of West
Germany can only frighten those
who, in the past, have had sad
txperiences with German na-
tionalism. The fact that he oc-
cupied an important position in
the Foreign Ministry in the Nazi
ra, under whose auspices such
grevious crimes were committed
against humanity, should, in .it-
self, bo enough to keep anyone
of his nature from serving as a
leader of a democratic coun-
try.
It is remarkable how the founda
tion of the pact has already been
laid. The State visit of Kosygin in
'aris and the omission of any re
ferences to Kiesinger's Nazi past
in the Russian press releases,
move that history can be repeated.
Just as the Rapallo Agreement and
the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact .were
made, so another agreement can
easily come into being.
At the expense of NATO, Po-
land and Czechoslovakia, Rus-
sia will retreat to the Oder River
in order to receive Germany's
support in her struggle with
China and the German urge to
rearh her nationalistic goals will
again bring together these two
antagonistic nations.
The hopes that Nazism would
not play any part in the new Ger-
man nationalism is now greatly
diminished by the fact that a for-
mer Nazi has been elected as
chancellor of West Germany. All
the dreams, after World War II,
that the Germans would be re-
educated to change their arrogant
nationalistic tendencies have dis-
sipated into thin air.
It seems almost unbelievable
that on 1\ twenty years after the
holocaust of World War II, and
all the horrors and suffering com-
mitted by the Nazis, to nations and
countries within their reach, that
they are again ready to march un-
der their old banners and slogans
to conquer the world.
MAURICE GOLDRING
Miami Beach
Films Preview
Holiday Delights
Mrs. Joseph Duntov, librarian
of the Surf-Bal-Bay Branch of the
City of Miami Public Library', is
offering a film-preview of holiday
cruise vacation sights on Wednes-
day, 8:15 p.m., in the auditorium
of the Community Center.
Exploring Caribbean and Baha-
ma Island, their reefs, beaches, tra-
ditions and market places, films
to be shown include "Island Oddi-
ties," "Rendezvous in the Reef."
"Bon Bini Holiday," and "Let's
Look at Barbados."
Loan Meets With
Top U.S. Officials
Continued from Page 1-A
friction. It is thought that he
detailed the chain of events that
necessitated the Israeli action
of last month against Jordan.
Mr. Eban also met with Nicholas
deB. Katzenbach. acting Secretary
of State, for a general review of
current issues of mutual interest.
The Israeli Foreign Minister brief-
ed Mr. Katzenbach, a relatively
new appointee to the State Depart-
ment, on Israel's thinking on key
matters.
Mr. Eban had lunch with Robert
K omei\ an aide to President
and study in this article. I believe j Johnson with special responsibility
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I wish to say a word of praise
in behalf of Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz for his recent article on
Ritutls of Judaism Makes Faith
Richer."
I, for one. find much learning
the intelligent reader of The Jew
ish Floridian will read it and
should appreciate it. Yes, the Tal-
mud and Mussar. Jewish law and
Jewish ethics, are indeed insepar-
able.
DAVID MILLER
Coral Gables
including the area of the Middle
East. The Foreign Minister met at
the executive office of the Pres-
ident with Walt W. Rostow, spe-
cial assistant to Mr. Johnson on
international security affairs.
Member:
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Miami Beach residents Lawrence
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been named to the Dean's List at
! Yeshiva University's Yeshiva Col
\ lege, New York City, ior academ-
ic achievement during the 1965-66
school year. "
Ciment, who is a senior, is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ci-
ment, 1330 Drexel Ave.. and is
taking pre-medical studies at
Yeshiva College.
Galbut. a sophomore, also ma-
joring in pre-medical studies, is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hyman
Galbut. 4630 Royal Palm Ave.
FR 1-1363
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i


Page 6-A
fJenisti Fk>rkfian
Friday. December IS. 1966
Jewish Educators
To be Featured
At Seminars Here
Two internationally-famous Jew-
yh educators were to address a re-
gional seminar on Jewish educa-
tion set for Thursday. Dec. 15. and
FMday, Dec. 16.
Dr. Samuel M. Blumenfield. di-
rector of the Department of Edu-
cation and Culture, the Jewish
Agency, will address the opening
option of the seminar on Dec. 15
at 8:30 p.m. in Sirkin Hall of Tem-
ple Emanu-El. His subject will be
"The Eternal Fountain," based on
"Morning Stars," the recently-
published book by Zalman Shazar,
president of the State of Israel.
On Friday morning and after-
noon, Dec. 16, workshops in the
leaching of the Hebrew language
will be conducted by Dr. Shlomo
Haramati, supervisor of the
adult education program in the
Ministry of Education and Cul-
ture of the State of Israel.
Dr. Haramati's morning subject
will be "New Approaches in
Teaching a Second Language." In
the afternoon, he will discuss
Applying the New Approach to
, i ching of Hebrew."
The workshop sessions will be
d .u Kneseth Is ael Cong) i
tion from 9:30 a.m. to .'< p.m..
>. .i uncheon session at 12 noon.
The regional conference is
sponsored by the Bureaus of
Jewish Education of Greater Mi-
ami, Atlanta, and Savannah.
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Chairing the three sessions will
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reau; Hans Erman, Atlanta
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Savannah Bureau.
NO MINOKi
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PIRFECTAS
Dr. Blumenfield is a faculty
member of the New School for So
cial Research, honorary president
of the Society for the Advance-
ment of Hcorew Culture, secre-
tary of the Hebrew Culture Foun-
dation, former president of the
National Council for Jewish Edu-
cation, and consultant to the World
Jewish Education Assembly in
Jerusalem.
He is the author of many vol-
umes including, "Master of Trov-
es," "Maimonides, the Educator,"
"John Dewey and Jewish Educa-
tion." Dr. Blumenfield has also
contributed to many Jewish edu-
cation magazines.
Dr. Haramati received his Doc-
tor of Philosophy at Hebrew
Union College on a special re-
search project, "The Teaching of
Hebrew to Illiterates," in which
he devised a new language meth-
od now used in Israel, as well as
a number of newly-independent
African nations.
Dr. Haramati was supervisor
of Hebrew language instruction
in the Israel Army. He has
taught at Hebrew University and of "Hanhalat Halashon" and adult
has given courses in adult edu- Hebrew educatioral activities,
cation to African educators. "' regii-na. evsmkar is also co-
sponsored by the Hebrew Teach-
(jfl&OP
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i-ndcrv. Doemh*r ?ffl 1MB
Friday. December 16, 1966
vJewistncridHati
Page 7-A
Survival Crisis Seen for U.S. Jewry
Continued from Pag* 1-A
iintii'd Jews would coalesce into
a solid core group and the less
committed Jews the "marginal"
or "peripheral" group would
lose"fc clrfaln percentage.
The core group may then con-
sist of between 1,000.000 and 2,-
000,000 people, said Dr. Sklare. j
These people would be the Jews
involved in the structures and in-1
stitutions of Orthodox, Conserva-1
live and Reform life. The secular]
Jews', who are not involved in any
of these religious movements, were '
most in danger of losing their
Jewish identity, he said.
This secularist group, he con-
tinued, has no "organized edu-
. cational or institutional frame-
work" for its people. This group,
which had been active in the
Socialist and Yiddish culture
movements, shows the "poorest
prognosis" for survival, he said.
In spite of this, the "deep de-
sire" on the part of Jews to retain
I heir identity must not be under-
estimated, he declared.
Another leading sociologist |
called here for the development
by Jewish funeral director* of {
"new customs and social techni-
that of the divorced person of sev-1
eral decades ago who, he said, was
ostracized and neglected. "The
bereaved individual today," he
noted, "is, to a large extent, with-
ques" to assis, ^h^aj'whoni .death out sufficient religious resources
has touched" but for whom "there
is no longer an adequate social
response" in coping with grief and
mourning.
Dr. Robert Fulton, professor of
sociology at the University of Min-
nesota, urged the funeral execu-
tives to "acquire the social service
or community support and often
lacks the skills necessary to deal
adequately with his lots."
The Jewish funeral director, Dr.
Fulton declared, "could help fill
the vacuum arising from the abon-
donment of the bereaved by soc-
iety. Without actually assuming
techmque* needed to help reinte-1 thc role of other functionaries, the
grate the bereaved into a benefi- funorai director can assist the
cial social environment.". j ,n0Urner by cooperating more in-
Death to many people, he said, tensively with the clergy and other
"is now a private matter in which concerned social agencies and
there is emerging an individual re-
pudiation, and a social denial of
grief and mourning repudia-
' tion and a denial, however, that
: leave the survivor grievously alone
groups and guide the bereaved in
his efforts to seek help."
Edward T. Newman, of Miami
Beach, outgoing president of thc
organization, announced at the con-
and ill-equipped to cope with the ( vention thal ,he Jcwish Funeral
I myriad of personal and social dif- Directors of America had launched
' ficulties that are attendant upon a a nationwidc survey to determine
death." Ine effects of funeral practices on
Dr. Fulton compared the plight ,ho cmotional adjustment of bc-
of the bereaved person today with' rt,avcd familiies.
Newman said the survey is be-
ing conducted by a team of psy-
chologists and sociologists with
the cooperation of member funeral
establishments in communities;
throughout the United States and \
Canada.
In carrying out the survey,
Newman said that information
is being gathered from families
"at various periods following a
funerat to determine the imme-
diate and long-range effects of
the rites, ceremonies and funeral
practices in satisfying the emo-
tional needs of the survivors."
Citing the importance of deter- j
mining to what extent various fun-
eral ceremonies help persons cope
with the crises of grief and be-
reavement, Mr. Newman said that
poorly-managed grief "is known
to be a factor in the development
! of emotional disturbance and phy-
sical ailments." These factors, he
noted, explain the growing interest
in grief and mourning on the part
of psychiatrists, psychologists, soc-
iologists and clergymen.
Weinstein, who was elected to
succeed Newman as president for
the coming year, announced that
the 40lh annual convention of the
organization will be held in Israel
in December, 1967.
MALE HELP WANTED
PUBLIX MARKETS
is now taking applications for the
following jobs: Stockmen, Meat
Cotters, Front Personnel. Make ap-
plication at the following locations:
2551 le Jeune Road, Coral Gables;
12850 Biscayne Blvd., N. Miami.
FEMALE HELP WANTED
PUBLIX MARKETS
is now taking applications lor the
following job: Cashiers. Make ap-
plication at the following locations:
2551 Le Jeune Road, Coral Gables;
12850 Biscayne Blvd., N. Miami.
Young Judaea Winter Conclave
Southern Region Senior Judaea
has set its 20th annual winter
conclave for Dec. 25 to 29. at the
Wanderer Motel in Jekyll Lsland.
Ga.
Theme of the conclave will be
Testing the American Jewish
Community," in keeping with the
National Young Judaea theme,
The Zionist Approach to Jewish
Life." The theme follows the
American teen-agers' point of view
on problems of unity, identity, and
creativity within the American
Jewish community.
Representing National Young
Judaea will be Dave Bug, national
president, and Artie Friedman,
president of the National Leaders
; Association.
Highlights of the conclave will
be club contests, individual con-
tests, and election of Mr. and Miss
Southern Region.
Southern Region Young Judaea
' is sponsored jointly by Hadassah
and the Zionist Organization of
j America through the Southern
i Zionist Youth Commission.
Teen-agers 13 to 18, interested
in attending the conclave, may
! contact the Southern Zionist Youth
Commission in Atlanta.
.._
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Additional Services I QUALITY W0M of IC0H0M1 PRICK
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Page 8-A
+Jewist> fhridfiar?
Friday, December 15 i966
Top Figures at Ambassador's Ball
printed to Knioht by ,.,,,,. ft. I
Ambassador to the
State* Avraham Harmon.
United
A roster of national leaders
from all areas of communal life
has joined the committee of pa-
trons and hosts for the Ambassa-
dor's Ball, it was announced by
Sam Blank, Miami civic and busi-
ness leader, who is chairman of
the committee.
In tribute to John S. Knight,
publisher of the Miami Herald,
who will be honored at the Am-
bassador's Ball, leading figures
from the worlds of government,
business, letters, the arts and so-
cial welfare have joined the com-
mittee.
The traditional Ambassador's
Ball, which bring* to a climax
the annual Israel Bond drive in
Greater Miami, will take place
on Monday, Dec. 26, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel, where the
Eleanor Roosevelt-Israel Human-
ities Award will be conferred
upon Knight.
Among national figures who
have joined the committee an-
nounced by Sam Blank are Tom
SAM BLANK
C. Clark, Justice of the United
States Supreme Court, Sen. Spess-
ard L. Holland, Sen. Frank J.
I.ausche. Sen. Stephen M. Young,
Mayor John S. Ballard of Akron.
O., Mayor Richard J. Daley, of
Chicago, Ambassador James Roos-
evelt, Mayor Elliott Roosevelt, of
Miami Beach, and Mayor Robert
King High, of Miami.
Prominent committee members
from the world of journalism in-
clude Robert U. Brown, president
of Editor & Publisher; J. Howard
Wood, president of the American
Newspaper Publishers Associa-
tion; Mims Thomason, president of
United Press International; George
Beebe. senior managing editor of
the Miami Herald; Lee Hills, pub-
lisher and executive editor of the
Detroit Free Press: Fred K. Shoch-
et, publisher of The Jewish Flor-
idian; and Harry' Golden, editor
of the Carolina Israelite.
Among Greater Miamians on
the committee of patron-hosts are
Sidney D. Ansin, Max Boderman.
Shepard Broad. Jonas Brotman,
Charles C. Cleents, Nathan Darsky,
Leon Ell, Dante B. Fascell, Sam
Feinstein, Jose A. Ferre, A. C.
Fine, Abram Fox, Samuel Fox,
Harry Frauavei, Sam Fuchs, Isidore
Hecht, Charles H. Kellstadt, Sam-
uel Kipnis. James Knight. David
J. Light, Bud Maytag, Benjamin
Meyers, Leo Mindlin, A. J. Molas-
ky, Alexander Muss, William D.
Pawley, Claude Pepper, Jack S.
Popick, Jacob Rifkin, I-ouis B.
Rudnick, Murray A. Shaw, Harry
Sirkin, McGregor Smith, Louis F.
Snetman, Nathan A. Spiegelman,
Dr. Henry King Stanford. Carl
Weinkle, Max Weitz and S. Mort
Zimmerman.
John S. Knight will be cited
"for outstanding service to hu-
manity and friendship for Is-
rael in the spirit of Eleanor
Roosevelt." The Eleanor Roose-
velt Humanities Award will be
Taking part in the Amba-sador',
Ball will be the emissaries of for
eign governments who il| hi"
presented to Ambassador and fa
Harmon as "an expression of soo will in which the United State*
and Israel are proud to share with
the free nations of the world."
German State
Elects a Jew
Continued from Pg ).*_
ment represented by the electoral
gains of the extremist National
Democratic Party and thai they
regarded it with alarm. He said
that former inancellor Ludwia
Erhard had told him "we have to
watch developments ver care-
fully because, in the event of an
economic crisis in Germany, the
outlook would be bad.")
during the week ...as i see it
Continued from Page 4-A
the morals of politics much as America, today, to the horror
of the administration, is discovering that in the case of Viet Nam
the morals of politics seem no longer to be sacred to an unquestion-
ing citizenry. In the administration's UN censure of Israel, it is deny-
ing Israel essentially the political theology it has applied to the justi-
fication of the war in Viet Nam. But this duality is merely a cogent
illustration of the immorality of the morals of politics. The more
significant issue is that in both countries the sacrosanct military
decision seems no longer sacrosanct, particularly since the politics
involved are. in the final analysis, so very immoral indeed.
GELT
for next year
Join Dade Federal's 1967
"CHANUKAH CLUB"
It's exactly like the other weekly clubs. $1.00 or $5.00
set aside each week in the plan of your choice will
provide extra Holiday enjoyment next year for you or
someone you want to remember.
Fill out the form below and ma;l it with your first
payment today. We'll send you your coupon book by
return mail. The Chanukah Club is available only at the
following branch offices .
ALLAPATTAH BRANCH
1400 N.W. 36th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
TAMIAMI BRANCH
1901 S.W. 8th STREET
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33135
Here is my application and first weekly payment in the
S of Dade Federal's Chanukah Club
plan
Norn* (please print)
Add
rest
Telephone
Signolv
FREE!
PERSONAL CHECKING SERVICE
FOR SENIOR CITIZENS OR THOSE PERMANENTLY DISABLED
Phone any Officer for Bank-By-Mail Material
PEOPLES FIRST NATIONAL PEOPLES FIRST NATIONAL PEOPLES LIBERTY
BANK OF MIAMI SHORES
Complete Trust Facilities
Northeo.t 2nd Ave. at 95th St...!
Miami Shores, Florida
Telephone 757 5511
PEOPLES AMERICAN
NATIONAL
BANK
OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Weil Dial* Highway at I 62nd Street
North Miami Beach, Florida
Telephone 943-43 1 1
PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK
OF COMMERCE
Northwest 79th SI. at 33rd Ave.
Miami, Florida
Telephone 6*6-0700
BANK OF NORTH MIAMI
Northeast 125th St. at 10th Ave.
North Miami, Florida
Telephone 75 1-6*11
MEMBERS: FEDERAl DEPOSIT INSURANCE -"'"PP"">PAT"-'N PETFPAl RESfVE S'STEM
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Northwest 7th l 1 JS,h j,
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ay Hat-bar Islands. Her.do
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2190 S.W. 8th ST. PH. 373-5436
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Closed Sunday


tnaerv itoro^h*. 'jn 1QER
Friday, December 16, 1966
vJenisti th* id/iaw
Page 9-A
FORMER MIAMI SPIRITUAL LEADER HOME ON LEAVE
'Down Under' Rabbi Views Aussies
By RANDY FUHR
"Shalom fresher' welcome to
Hillel."
Ever hear a Rabbi call a stu-
dent a fresher?'" In a British
dominion, a first-year college en-
rollee is called just that.
Whether one is a freshman at a
Crown college or not. Rabbi Boris
A. Rackovsky will greet him with
'.his favorite expression of his, by
riow tinged with a slight English
iccent.
Rabbi Rackovsky serves at
Hillel director at both Mel-
bourne and Monath Universities
in Australia. He took up the post
five years ago the first such
to be instituted.
"I started from scratch in Aus-
tralia, but 1 always kept in mind
a pressing challenge to break up
cliques lingering in student cir-
cles for years before Hillel exist-
ed there," Rackovsky explained.
Well-Rounded Program
Whipping the clique problem.
P.abbi Rackovsky set out to design
"student-created programs. "The
(:iginal Student Unions in Austra-
lia's colleges overlooked much of
a well-rounded cultural and social i
program for their members," said'
the 37-year-old spiritual leader.
"Hillel offers the students at
he Universities of Melbourne
and Monash elementary and ad-
vanced Hebrew classes, Yiddish
instruction, and study of Jewish
thought," he noted.
He said that lectures. Oneg
Shabbats, and discussions arc held
many times weekly. "Attendance
a! most activities runs up to 500
participants," he asserted.
Before taking up his post "clown
under," Rabbi Rackovsky served
<..- a spiritual leader in Miami,
holding two pulpits here. Later,
he went to Cheyenne, Wyo., to
.service at Mt. Sinai Congregation.
and subsequently wound up at the
RABBI BORIS KACKOVSKY
on study leave
University of Indiana in Bloom-
ington. where he became director
of Hillel.
On Visit Here
While at Bloomington. he also
arranged for the university's first
Choir of Judaic Studies.
Now in Miami with his wife,
Ruth, until mid-December, the
couple are visiting her mother,
Mrs. Tiilie Saal, 1520 SW 12th
Ave., and his parents. Rabbi
and Mrs. Joseph E. Rackovsky,
945 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach.
The senior Rabbi Rackovsky is
spiritual leader of Beth Tl'ilah
legation.
With th:i:i are their children.
Sh ra I.ee 12. Voel Shalom 10.
Rena Faith 9. and Vona Abigail 3.
From his vantagepoinl of a study
leave to America, young Rabbi
Rackovsky noted that Australian
students participate in ""lootie," a
sport played like football in Amer-
GENERAL WINDOW
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1448-0890
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VACATION THIS YEAR AT THE
BEACH HOTEL and
COTTAGE COLONY
Fun galore at one of the world's f nest vacation resorts over-
looking the Caribbean with magnificent tropical mountains
rising just beyond.
Everything for your enjoyment sMmiring pool, private
beach, water skiing, sailing, canoeing, skin diving, deep sea
fishing charter cruisers, horseback riding, the fabulous Canr>
bean Dining Room and Birds Nest Bar, moonlit barbecues on
the beach, native floor shows, calypso bands, dance
orchestra.
. Plan an unforgettable holiday at the Golden Head
rite today lor Ire* brochure. y.-
ica, but with Australian rules pre-
vailing. -Hillel thrives on a sports
program, where each member dc-
vclops competitive character." he i
said.
Religious services are not held
on the Sabbath or High Holy Days,
with the exception of a daily Hin-
du, since most of the students live i
at home.
"My counseling centers around
a major problem facing modern
Australians. Parents are one
generation back. They shy away
from the community. They can-
not forget the concentration
camp," stressed Rabbi Rackov-
sky.
Thus, he noted, "the parent
tends to drift away from his child.
For his part, the child is not al-
ways willing to accept his parents'
strong negative feelings toward
non-Jews." he added.
Rejection of Judaism
"With the rejection of the par-
ents comes a rejection of Juda-
ism," Rabbi Rackovsky asserted,
"wherehy Hillel. for the student,
helps to give him the opportunity
to understand the basis of his
faith."
Through religious, social and
cultural endeavors, Hillel suc-
ceeds to "promote equality and
break up any formed clique."
kabbi Rackovsky and his wife
have opened their home in Mel-
bourne "for a challenge fail-
ure may teach a group of people,
while success may go to a
group's head."
Born in 1928 in Saratoga Springs,
N.Y., Rabbi Rackovsky received a
Bachelor of Arts degree in biology
at Ycshiva College. He graduated
with honors receiving the Mort-
imer Kogen Award for leadership,
lie took a graduate degree in Scm-
itics at Columbia University.
Holds Many Memberships
Ordination came to Rabbi Rac-
kovsky from the Rabbi Isaac El-
chanan Theological Seminary in
1951. He is a candidate for the
doctoral degree in Rabbinies.
He holds membership in the
American Oriental Society, So-
ciety of Religion and Mental
Health. Society of Biblical Litera-
ture and Exegesis. American
Schools of Oriental Research, Rab-
binic Council of America. Rabbinic
Alumni of Yeshiva University, and
National Association of Hillel Di-
rectors.
Holiday Theme In
Sunday Party
Games, entertainment and re-
freshments were included in ihe
Chanuka party sponsored by Tem-
ple Beth Raphael on Sunday at
I 6:30 p.m.
Committee members in charge
I of the evening were Mrs. Mao
\ Blumberg, Mrs. Fay Wilson, Hy-
| man Berger, Sam Cohen and Jos-
eph Lovy.
ISRAEL
Stay at the hotel
"in a class
by itself
We didn't say this about the Shera-
ton-Tel Aviv. Hundreds of visiting
tourists did when polled by a lead
ing Israeli newspaper!
Sheraton-Tel Aviv: enjoy its private
beach beside the Mediterranean, air-
conditioned rooms, superb food
nearby golf, spectacular entertain-
ment in the hotel's own night-
club. For Insured Reserva-
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Rates, see your
Travel Agent. Or
call 377-0275.
SHERATON-TEL A\
Youre a little bit richer
when you switch to
the Smooth Canadian
ORACABESSA, JAMAICA, W. I.
on the North Shore at Ocho Rios
CMM.M.S-mWWMilCHDHlSrtS SiXUMSOlD 66 8 PROOF MACJAM OlSTklW C0MPU.Y MA
J



Page 10-A Jew ism ncrkwann_______________________
JNF's Rose Banquet Over Subscribed
_ ...... >m--.~ ikfn .____r J M.,.
Friday, December 1E 1
966
Jewish National Fund of Great-
er Miami Wednesday said that
there are no more seats available
for the Philip Rose banquet on
Dec. 18 at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Rose, philanthropist, and civic
leader, president of the Greater
Newark, N. J. Club of Florida, and
of the King Cole Social Club, will
be honored by these two associa-
tions with the establishment of a
75.000-trec forest on the occasion
of his 75th birthday.
"This is a fining tribute to
link Philip Rose's name eternal-
ly with the State of Israel with
the establishment of a forest,"
said Joseph Schmier, chairman
of the banquet.
Guest speaker will be Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz. of Temple
PHIUP ROSE
Menorah. Guest artist will be Tova
Ronni, Israeli folk singer and
dramatic artist, interpreter of the
songs and folklore of Israel, as
well as the folk songs of many
lands in French, Yiddish, Russian,
Spanish. ..
Tova Roniu has sung for dis-
placed persons in internment
camps of Cyprus and the soldiers
of Haganah. She has appeared in
villages and settlements through-
out Israel, broadcast over Kal
Yisrael, and has traveled widely
in the Middle East, performing in
Egypt, Lebanon and Syria.
She recently returned from a
short visit to her home in Israel
with a new repertoire of chassidic
and other new Israeli songs.
Serving with Schmeir on the
committee are Bernard Katz, well
known Zionist and leader of the
JNF, as co-chairman, and Mrs
Ethel Herman, chairman of the ar-
rangements committee.
The new 75,000-tree forest will
help the Jewish National Fund's
continuing afforestation program
upbuild t'lu: land in Israel and es-
tablish new centers of fertile
growth on the centuries-long neg-
lected land.
Local Judges 1
Hold State Office
Two Dade County Judge, have
been elected to the 1967 slate of
the Florida Municipal Judges As-
sociation.
Judge George M. tfachwalt
has assumed the presidenc of the
group, composed of all Municipal
Judges in the State of Florida
and Judge Walter B. Lebov ;tz will
serve as secretary treasure-
"m
Eisendrath Raps Jewish 'Backlash'
Continued from Page 1-A
the lay and rabbinic leaders of
Reform Judaism to accelerate
their efforts and help the Negro
achieve his civil rights, especi-
ally, he said, "in the areas of
housing and job opportunities."
We must stand as a formidable
dike against this cowardly, conven-
ient retreat from our Jewish and
American commitment to justice."
Rabbi Eisendrath said. "We must
battle against the scandalous scut-
tling of new civil rights legislation
and the sabotaging of that which
has been enacted. We must join
with our Christian brethren and
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE"-"A?PIIANCES"
"CLOTHING" "JEWELRY," etc...
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
particularly with the House of
Bishops (Episcopal I which so re-
cently issued a new summons of
specific antidotes to the deepen
ing strife which has so marred ouri
domestic tranquility."
Rabbi Eisendrath felt there was
some justification for the charges
being made that certain elements
within the NegTO community are
"too militant" and "anti-Semitic."
He said "We cannot condone such
conduct which has characterized
some segments of the Negro com-
munity. We cannot condone Irra-
tional antagonism, indiscriminate
name-calling, irresponsible slogan
eering, hoodlumism. or wanton
violence. We cannot and we should
not capitulate to unworthy threats;
we dare not be blackmailed by
monocracy."
On the other hand, the Re-
form leader cited the need for
greater understanding of the
Negro problem saying, "we who
appear so shocked by the shib-
boleth or even by the specter
of 'black power' have, by our
'white power', too long over-
whelmed the Negro with frus-
tration, hopelessness and de-
spair, driven him to drink and
dope, to poverty and prostitu-
tion, illiteracy and illegitimacy.
What did we expect in return?
Grovelling servility, obsequious
gratitude, fawning love?"
He said "we must remember
that for every Negro who throws
a brick there are a hundred thou
sand similarly disadvantaged and
disillusioned who do not; for
every Negro who tosses a Molotov
cocktail there are a thousand fight-
in^ and dying in the swamps of
Vietnam."
GOOD SEATS
STILL AVAILABLE FOR
i\
PREMIERE SHOWING of
HAWAII
##
starring
JULIE ANDREWS
MAX VON SYDOW RICHARD HARRIS
at
Colony Theatre
LINCOLN ROAD MALL
THURS. EYE., DEC. 22 8:30 p.m.
Benefit for the
HEBREW ACADEMY LIBRARY
- -
For Tickets Call
HEBREW ACADEMY PTA or MRS. LEONARD ADLER
532-6421 379-5176
ANSWERITE
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
FR 3-2666 JE 6-0721
YOU GET MORE CALLS WHEN YOUR PHONE IS
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MODERATE RATES 24-HOUR SERVICI
Swing
JEFFERSON HIGHLAND MURRAY UNION
FRANKLIN PLAZA NEWTON

'Wjjgi^^-
^ Vf 17 ^"""iNs^^ a^Eft
lAfWow ^P^
MAN THAT ZIP COPS REALLY SENPS ME...
The Holiday spirit
c
can be ajwrt of oriiftng.too.
The greatest gift
you can give fellow drivers
and pedestrians
is life.
Theirs.
Or yours.
FLORIDA POWER ft LIGHT
HILFIN* HJILO riO/llOA
Pick up your free
"Do unto others" bumper
Strip at any FPL office.
And happy holidays!
COMPANY


I rnacnr rvw-^K^tn 1MB
iay. December 16, 1966
+Je*isl> nrridH&n
Paqe 11-A
hristmas Guide for Jewish Parents "'^denJ
jThe Rabbinical Association of bration. II is
rcater Miami has issued a
|r Jewish Parents
iristmas." The Guide Ls issued in
ktf name of the Association by Dr. |
lax Lipschitz, president, and,
Jabbi Solomon Schiff, executive |
lice president.
uses the taxpayer's
money for sectarian purposes and
h^rpUaraH hol,d.ay-'be ".qmred to sing hymns which stitution.
Regard m- regarded as such. embody a theology they do not ac-
-.__... .. cept. Natural song that have no ,
Would it not be> the better part religious references, however, -ire JcoPaidlzos the Principle of the
i? ,on "9 a,on9" with i acceptable. .separation of chueh^aod State,
our Christian neighbors, even if s .
it means observing Christmas?
No matter involving violations
The Guide is in response to of strong religious convictions can
be regarded as trivial or minor.
Iiany inquiries by countless Jew-
Mi families in the community dur-
lig the holiday season.
Do we harm our children by
directing them not to partici-
pate?
Wins Scholarship
A Farband scholarship has been
warded to Barry Kenneth Wesley
for his excellence in the Hebrew
language.
Wesley, a junior majoring in
without which there can be no re- math and psychology, was selected
ligious freedom.
The true spirit of Americanism
would never compel anyone to act
This is being done in order to as-1 in conflict with his freedom of con-
list Jewish parents in the confusion science. Our early American forc-
knd conflicts which the holiday
poses for them.
Would not the entire problem
be solved in the public school by
joint Christmas and Chanuka
celebration?
No. It is a violation of the Con
as "the most outstanding student
in Hebrew classes at the U of M."
The cash award was presented
to Wesley by Joseph P. Zucker-
man, representing the Faband
l.alior Zionist Order in Greater
Miami, and Thomas W. Sutton, di-
No. The classroom is one among
many places which reveal the ex-
istence of differences. We further
our children's personal growth
bears came to those Vh^r* ~nr~ and maturily y teaching them stitution to observe any sectarian rector of financial aid at the Uni-
ciselv for the opportunity to !llat ,hey can respect fai,h of holiday in thc public scho1- it ^ersity of Miami.
ship God according to the riietat neighbor without embracing joint observance or otherwise. We Wesley, who is not Jewish, find
. .. *.? ;-. of their hearts oiciaies tnat faltn Wc tan ciL,arly mark j0 not correct an error by com- the Hebrew language "a great cul-
Isn t Christmas national holi- tlr nea- : these differences by such simple pounding the error,
day which all Jews can observe ___ statements. "This is what we do-
in good conscience?
tural contribution."
What
tree?
about the Christmas
What about our Jewish chil-
dren who participate in Christ-
mas observances in the public
schools?
There are now, as there always
and "This is what we do not do."
Banks and government agencies^
do close, but above all things, The Christmas tree is distinc-
Jtf>ristmas is a major Christian lively a Christmas symbol. Since
Wly day which celebrates the birth Christmas is for Christians, the
ni Jesus, the Christian Messiah. To Christmas tree is appropriate lor
nggest to our Christian friends Christians only. The Christma tree
that Christmas is anything else has no place in the Jewish home, have been
vuld be presumptuous. Christmas nor should any Jewish child be JJ ^vtewffit rf rJmnnU -
no, In the same category S compel] d to participate in ob*rv- S^tad3S? lU^SS
on their own when they permit
--.... ,_. .... .. 'heir children to participate in
r;?Z- rT t ch,,dren.Par!'- Christmas observances. This con
fi. l!-K Cl?ns "1" "ar,,e$ ,n fuses the children of parents who
the pi.bl.c schools? ,|(, foow the ;;., recom.
Parties designated as Christmas mendations of Jewish leadership,
parties or having the appearance! Jewish parents will help their
children most ii the) (1) ai
diversity in the ranks ol Jewr; as
a normal condition in the Amer-
ican environment; (2) know and
understand the thinking of re-
sponsible Jewish leadership and
recognize that most parents arc-
anxious lo follow it; and (31 as-
rhanksgiving Day. Fourth of July, ances involving Christmas trees.
(oration Day. or any other
' neiican holiday. Since we do not
ard Jesus as our savior, we can
in good conscience observe
istmas. To do so is to violate
ioua principles
How do Christian clergymen
and the responsible Christian
laiety regard the problem?
tesponsible Christian leaders
noan the perversion of the
hristmas season and are trying
do something about il Christian
i-rgymen and laymen constantly
"I Christmas paVi.es have no place
public schools. Winter or
year end parties of a general na-
ture are acceptable.
Is it appropriate to give .gifts
to Christian friends?
II is appropriate to give Christ-
inns
..i.s yifts to our Christian friends, sure their children that despite the
\Sjm oi'the ChrWm e-" '
Soviets Charge
srael Meddles
Continued from Page 1-A
!which are struggling for con-
solidation of their independence.
present Christmas gilts to Jews.
Should Jewish children parti-
cipate in Christmas plays in pub-
lic schools?
No. Christmas plays generally j
portray religious themes which
have no place in a public school.
On the other hand, some schools
hold a so-called "Winter Festival" '
in which an attempt is made to
avoid all religious connotations.
But it is sometimes difficult to
dren. Jewish leaders have taken a
strong position for non-parttcipa-
tion in observances of a holiday
not their own and that this is also
their position.
Should Chanuka be celebrated
in the public schools?
No. To do so violates the Con-
The St. Petersburg resort
with everything...
SHERATON INN
(Where rooms start at only $6')
The Sheraton Inn at Sunshine Skyway has something
for everybody. Three swimming pools, two Don Budge
tennis courts, a marina, fishing and golf nearby. Family
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Wonderful meals choice of
American or Polynesian.
Come visit the Sheraton
Inn soon. For Insured
Reservations at
Guaranteed Rates: 377-0275
*Per person double occupancy till Dec. 15,1966
The extremists circles of Is-
I. encouraged from abroad, are
arting one provocation after an- dra,u he '"sanctions. lhe parenl
I her against Syria, Jordan and f'ls that the performance is free
i, j u' n ui- i" a religious overtones, children
,- United Arab Republic. may ^^gg participaU,
Exercising Israel's right of
ply. Rafael reminded the com-; Should Jewish children sing
ittee that the Arabs, not Israel, Christmas carols?
ad been violating the resolution No. Carols, being religious
tains! interference, as well as the, hymns, do not belong in the public
N Charter itself, by terrorist at- school. Jewish children should not
cks against Israel.
lie denied Kuznetsov's hint that
ier powers were goading Israel
o anti-Arab attacks, and in-
ated that "by a show of im-
|artialily" Moscow could assist the
abs and Israel to reach an un
irstanding.
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538-5511
538-5511
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21-3601 ,
TOWER OF THRIFT


Page 12-A
+Jewist> Meridian
Friday. December 16. 1963
neji
IGjlOUS
&
AGUDATH ACHIM. The Martinique
Hotel, 6423 Collim Ave., Orthodox
l-'iiday r. p ni Vamnlay'fi a.I*i. MinrTm
.". i> in.
AGuOATH ISRAEL 7801 Cariyi* Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ewer.
---- ---
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ay*.
Conservative. Emanuel Kushelwitz,
president. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
Friday p.m. Saturday f a.m. Mo-
cha p.m.
ETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave. Con-
ervative. Rabbi Sol Landau. Cauor
William W. Lipson.
Friday 1:16 p.m. HaflatTtti Efebbath.
Sermon: "The Dwrmbrr Dilemma."
Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "The Torah
laon." Bar Mitavah: Dennis, son
of Mr. and Mrs. William Lett ton;
Michael, eon of Mr. and alia, Dn\iil
l.e\ine. Mlni-ha -" p.m.
----
ETH EL. 500 SW 17th Ave. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Solomon Sch'ff.
Friday ',:: p.m. Baturda) 8:M a.m.
Sermon: "Tower \s. Wisdom." Min-
ha 5 p.m.
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Berel Wein.
Friday 5:06 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
--------
ETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Av*.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Benjamin Ben-Ari.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "\\'h> Do ] th
I Suffer'.'" Saturday 1:4* a.m. "A
ii-oper Approach." 4:80 p.m. "Por-
tk>n of Law." ."> p.m. "Preparing the
Way."
ervices
u*
J hie xAJeehend
CANDlEttGHTING TIME
3 Teveth 5:12 p.m.
3NAI RAPHAEL 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Harold Hicntei
Cantor Jack Lerner.
Frl a) l:U p.m. I SV Babuath. Ser-
mon: "Youth and Social Action."
FT. LAUOERDALE jEWISH CEN-
TER. 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Philip Chaiton. Cantor Theo-
dore Mindich.
Friday 8:16 p.m. Sermon: "The Jea
in Rusaia." I r. Jack I- Morrla, prea-
iiieut. in an as cantor.
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER,
126 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. Rev.
Paul Deutsch.
Frldai 8:16 p.m. Pervlcee conducted
by Max .r. Weitz. youth director,
Temple Adalh Yeslmrun. Topic: "A
Modern Mtrac.e.'' 1'SY Choir of Tem-
ple Beth Snolem of Hollywood under
direction of .la> Kemea will aaalat.
ETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
13*30 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi David Rosenfeld. Cantor Sey-
mour Hinkes.
Friday 8:1.". p.m. Sermon: "The Talk-
ing Books." Saturday 8:15 a.m. Bar
Mltzvah: Ronald, eon of Mr. and .Mis.
Herbert J. Kanter.
BETH SOLOMON. 50 NW 51st PI.
Conservative. Rabbi Aharon M. Feier.
Friday 6:15 and 1:16 p.m. Sermon:
"Joseph, Messenger of God's Mys-
teries." Oneg- Shabbat hosted by Mrs.
Ksther Gilenko and Mrs. Malvina
Rosenberg In honor of their birth-
days. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Por-
tion of the Week." Jae Cohen, fourth
i.i-.. Hebrew school student, will
,ff. r the Haftorah. Mlnchn 5:15 p.m.
ETH TORAH. 14th St. and NE 11th
Av*. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip
schitz. Cantor Jacob Raazer.
Friday 5:30 and 8:15 p.m. Saturday
*:3 a.m. Installation of student con-
rrrsatlon. Minclia 5:30 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Oross
Friday .':'.'". p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. F.ar
Mltsvah: Jeffry Lee, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Kaslmk. Mim-ha 5:1! p.m.
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin. Cantor William B. Nussen.
sen.
Friday 5:15 and 8:1-5 p.m. Sermon-
"Yes, My Child. 1 Do Not Love You."
Youth Group will participate In serv-
ice. Saturday 8:45 a.m. Sermon: "Por-
tion of the Week."
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stem
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Av*.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfirld.
Cantor Abraham Seit.
Friday ." p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Sermon: "The Confroniati"n Be-
tween the Lion and the Bull."
MINYONAIRES SYNAGOGUE.
Bird Rd. Modern traditional.
3737
Max
HEBREW LESSON
.ni-rfca '
vby wtjrj jiapV ncn:??
: amy vby\ nil totyrq J3$)
Kb *ritf -a) i?nn larV
I t t v :
.(y*v vib) *rfiBty$Q (]rtnnn
#* T/R-^ri by nnina^
"33 Tnx -,#2*3 :fjra :n?9
-on bx O'xa ,jr>nra EHW
ns .o-pnn iwn ,a ma sb
I t T T : T V -
a:-.V# nann jn DTJ9J an
--Dion ij^n ]a Tr-*#
... jriniirn
-?8 n?0 by niaoan
iflify dtp*1 raxa on
.-nafc
~ T
,30tJ lay1? D^Tt a? an
^!?an T1? VfrJf nnt?n
.^p by a-ipoa Viaarn
(rroVis rmas ma pKsina)
V I I I
The Kibbutz Near th* Border
narn -ntsn
cm *? ,aia vVf fiap>ri
nTna? tfffl rntoan
.rnn, rnia Q-iiSpn T1?
uojafl ,Tna t?x 3130 i.y
.UVb$ Tjf ^33n bV
"?iai ,nS* :iaix nnxn
: I T T V T
,f i3(?n by ny3?n by ir*?B
D^xin nxt ns73? nin^ra
-ps) D'aai^i LTiTka) onn
nf\ ns pn .(fs? ix na^
.afcy nyp nixi1? iBtox
t I : : r : v
D-jra? n"?x D,ni3j ann
.nnio nai^a
a? nixva? n"?x Q-nna
av? Kb .nion X3sn ninav
,n"7x ninaya Bnwo it
tri3lJj fi3pn nan Vy
W. Temchin, president. Cantor Louis
Cohen.'
Krlda> ">!15 p.rti RftthfdsW :> a.m.
-
SEPHAROIC JEW.SH CENTER. 045
., Collins Ave. Rev Cantor Sadi Nah
"las.
Friday .". p.m. Saturday B:M ni. B*r-
.....n, i on t \ Oi r> '
--------
6KY LAKE SYNAGOGUE 18151 NE
19th A- e Orthodox. Rabbi Jonah
E. Caplan.
I rida) 0UU and 8:15 p.m. Sermon:
"Tile Jew liies -Not Cower Any-
Uiore." HoatBi Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Deutsob. Satirda) '- am. Bertnon:
"\\"e Are liroihers." Mincha ." p.m.
TEMPLfc AOATH YESHURUN. Con
aervative. 1025 NE 1*3rd St., Miami
Gardens Rd. Rabbi Milton Schlinsky.
Cantor Maurice Neu.
Friday 8:16 p.m. Hodaaaah Sabbath.
i .,-s. B^waaei', M.s. Joseph Skopp,
president, C'h.ii Gioup oi Hadassan.
..,...r..... iiti a.m. Al.nclia 1:80 |i.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 S. Kendall
Jr., So. Miami. Keform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Micnaei
Kyrr.
I'riua) S:30 p.m. Danoeva Linda Rovln
an.i .-.i.u r*reciu..ii w..| |.resent a b.il-
,ei ou the im-iiie oi unanuKa, and
i a in..i- k..ir will dlrecl the Beth Am
auult cnoii in a special Kri'iip of
L'hanuka selections, baturoay ii:in
a.m. t>. r isiLtvan: Robeit, sou Ql
JMr. anu Mrs. hldaaril iilumeiithul:
Kiedenck, son oi Mr. and tars. Artliur
u daj |:M a.m. Sermon: "Portion of
the Weak "
riFERETH ISRAEL. 8500 N. Vim-
Ave. Connrvativ*. Rabbi Henri
Wernick
Friday S:I6 p.m. Sermon: "Modern
Maccabees." Sisterhood "ill boat the
dhalibiit. Saturday : a.m. .-'.-r-
m%
Dion: "Portion "f tiie Week."
YOUNG ISRAEL* OF GREATER Mi.
SaMh'h **?hNE ,71Ja 8t' O'thodo.
Frl.lay 5:15 p.m. SatOrda; s C, ,
*ermon: "Mourning f..r .i,-,-,,..
...olx., ,, m
THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULPIT
.....' "* r
Accept Yourself if You
Want Emotional Health
.p
ri.
The car passed speedily along-
side the Kibbutzim of Kinnereth
and Degania. One more Dend in
'in- road, and we are near Kibbutz
Tel-Katzir. )
On the road are two signs'. One
reads: "Danger, Border Ahead;"
the other, "Tel-Katzir."
We-ascended the hill of the
Kibbufe Behind this hill, we see good roadf-M.) married .
high and desolate mountains. Only The soca>gatherings of
here or there it is possible to see
a little grass.
These high mountains are in
Syrian territory.
In these mountains, too. are the
fortifications of the Syrian Army.
More than once, the Syrians shot
down from these fortifications on
to the members of the Kibbutz
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
nUUU, lltol s. 14th Av*. Reiorm
Haobi Samuel Jaffa.
Frluay :.'. l p.m. Sermon: "RelltTlon,
i'i,ui.es an.i vlec Num.' Cues'. speuK-
t-r. ,.ev. Itobei I T. VV'eStou, minister
ol the rl. utuderilaip I'nil.iiian
Ciuiicii.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL. 1546
Jefferson Ave Conservative. Cantor
Saul H. Breeh.
Friauy 8:13 p.m. tjuest speaker, I*rof.
AOurvW *. L.la.olenM. topic: "TIM
.\e-o lor L'nlty."
TEMPLE BETH a-HOLOM. 4144 Chae*
Av*. Liberal. Hjdoi Leon Kronun
Cantor David Conviser.
Friday S:15 p.m. t'ermon: "Is ll. Pos-
sioie to tie on Optimist?" Suturday
iu:4* a.m. Bar Mjtavaa: Howaiu. son
of L>r. .n.-i Mrs. auiomon 1;. i*oui-
nian; Roy. tun oi Mr. anil Airs. i;,-r-
li. : I- ., >,-.j|.
TEMPLE BETH TOvT 8438 SW 8tn
St. Cooservative. Rabbi Simon April.
Friday 8:16 p.m. Quest speaker, Louis
dchwartxman, executive director of
the Bureau ot Jewish KQucation.
Topic: "The .\obe4 Prise Winners."
Saturday si a.m. Sermon: "Portion of
the veek." Bar Mitxvali: Micuael
and Fhiiip. twin sons oi Mi. and
Mrs. I. sjperiinx.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing,
ton Ave. Conservative. Kabbi living
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adlar.
Friday .', and 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Jew-
ish Isolationism is Dead." Saturday
! a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion of
the Bible." Bar MiWvah: Billot, aon
Of Mrs. Robert tireen.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml.
AMI. 137 NE 1th St. Reform. Raboi
Joseph R. Narot.
Friday S: 1". p.m. Sermon: "Rabbi,
it's Kusy for you to i'reach Ideals."
-----a-----
TEMPLE JUDEA. 5500 Granada Blvd.
Liberal-Reform. Rabbi Morn* Kip-
P*r.
Friday S:l". p.m. Hadassah Sabbath.
Mrs. Seymour Schulnei, past pres-
ident. Uenorah Orouii of Maddaah,
and vice president of .ludea Blater-
hoo.i, will be Kuest ipeaker. Services
will be followeil by DlecuaeioD Sab-
bath with Adon Taft, religion editor
of The Miami Herald. Subject:
"Christmas Peace and Chunulea Con-
troversy."
-----a-----
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th St
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Nieo Feldman.
Friday 1:15 p.m. Sermon: "Once Upon
a Dream." Saturday a.m. Sermon:
"Portion of the I-a
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and r
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradl- :
tlonal. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can- [I
tor Edward Klein.
Saturday 8:4.', a.m. Bar Mltavajr. Har
irej Allan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ter Nemeroff.
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative
8755 SW 16th St.. Miami. Rabbi
Ralph Q I i x m a n Cantor Herman
Marchbein.
Friday 7:1.". p.m. Family service*. Sat-
urday S: 15 a.m.
-----a-----
TEMPLE SHULOM. 132 SW 11th Ave.,
Pompano Beach. Conservative. Rab-
bi Morris A. Skop. Cantor Leon
Segal.
Friday 8:11 p.m. Sermon: "The J*w-
lah People and the Cross." College
students will be welcomed. Baturda)
8:30 a in Sermon: "Torah Talk
By RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ
Tampl* Nar Tamld
It is well-known that many cases E
of emotional maladjustment are S
due to the fact that people will not r
accept themselves. They resent ':
their limitations. They want to be J
someone else. They keep day-
dreaming about what they would
do if they had
another chance
And so, disre-
g a r d i n g their
own possibilities,
they never make
anything worth-
while out of
themselves.
The most stim-
ulating successes
in history have
come from per-
sons who, facing
some kind of lim-
itations and
handicaps, took
azezeaVBVBni' "" aaai
This page optration with trie Greater Mi-
ami Rabbinical Association.
Coordinator of features ap-
pearing here is
DR. MAX LIPSCHITZ
spiritual leader of Beth Torah
Congregation of North Miami
Beach.
i*
9
r> :*
I.Bhi leaWvffi
of the emphasis in Scripture on
the importance of dreams. Scrip-
ture, I believe, is trying to tell us
that great living starts with a pic
ture, held in some person's imag-
ination, of what he would like
some day to do or be. Florence
Nightingale dreamed of being a
nurse, Edison pictured himself an
inventor; all such characters es-
caped the mere shove of circum
stance by imagining a future so
them as part of life's game and vividly that they headed for it.
played splendidly in spite of them.
Rebellion against handicaps gets
us nowhere. One must have the
adventurous daring to accept
oneself as a bundle of possibilities
and undertake the most interest-
ing game in the world making
the most of one's best.
In a battle with the Saracens in
Dream vividly of yourself aa de-
feated, and that alone will make
victory impossible. Dream of your-
self as winning, and that alone
will contribute immeasurably to
success. Do not dream of your
self as anything, and you will drift
like a derelict.
Second, courage. Real personal-
Spain, so the story goes, the Scots' i(ies always ^ ,he kimj of faith
threw the heart of Robert thelthat producec courage When his
Bruce ahead of them, and then I ^ration was against him. Most{t
with all their might fought toward j nad faith in his God. and it over
it. That is the method of proced- CJUne ,he world After centuries
ure. Take charge of your life, hurl had ^me unimpeachable testi-
some ideal and hope ahead, and
thea fight toward it; organize your
living around a purpose.
At least two factors enter into
the achievement of creating a true
personality. First, dreams. Dreams
niony to the devastating virulence
of polio, a few men had faith tha*
it could be conquered, and it was.
Faith is not credulity. It is cre-
ative power. It is vision plus valor.
It is in the words of the prophet.
play an important role in Biblical I "Your old men shall dream
narrations. Jacob, Joseph and I dreams, your young men shall R8
Pharaoh are but a few examples I visions!" (Joel III: 1).
working in the fields.
At the entrance to the Kibbutz,
we saw a high boulder on which
was written:' "In memory of the
Unknown Bachelor."
The young men of Tel-Katzir
havp an irrlprelinp otistom- When11"'!'."1'". vl:' l'"' ''"" oi'eUealon on
nave an interesting custom, wnm v,llh Sl.:lks ,,, ilh yUrra>
one of them marries, all the rest Blaaeiman, Blnai Relbjlou Bchool
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH OADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Marius Ranson. Cantor Chet Gale.
- -
SYNOPSIS OF THE TORAH PORTION VAYIGASH
VAYTGASH Jacob and his family come down to Egypt
in ox drawn carts.
"And they took their cattle, and their gopds, which they
had gotten -in. the land of Canaan, and came into Egypt.'Jacob,
and all.his seed with him" (Gen. 46. 6).
VAYIGASH Judah approached Joseph and offered him
self as a servant in Benjamin's stead, as he was responsible for
the youngest'son to their father. Unable to contain himself any
longer, Joseph revealed himself to his dumb-struck brothers.
He bade them return to Canaan, gather together their families
and possessions, and return to Egypt for the duration of the
famine. At Beersheba God removed Jacob's doubts as to the
wisdom of this course of action. He appeared to Jacob with the
words: :Fear not to go down into Egypt; for I will there make
of thee a great nation'" (Gen. 46. 3).
Jacob came to Egypt "with seventy souls." Joseph gave th.-m
the land of Goshen to settle in. There they flourished and multi-
plied. ""
Thit recounting of Hi* Weekly Portion of ttrt Law if *
traded and based upon "The Graphic Hiitory of fha Jewish
Heritage" edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15 Publisher is
Shengold, and the volume is available at 71 William St., New
York 5, N.Y. President of the society dlstributino Hw volume
is Joseph Schtang.

8 bachelors come to this boul-1 fer^wkrS'"^^ \^7'^Z,.
der. Here they part from the one; moderator
of their number who "left the
the
members of Tel-Katzir are already
known all over the country. They
really do 'know how to have a
good time.
They also know how to work
well. Their fields, by the Kinner-
eth and the Border, tell of this.
Published by Brith Ivrith Olamith
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 151 E
4th Ave., Hlaleah. Conservative
Rabbi Maurice Kl*ln.
Friday H:K> p.m. Sermon: "What has
the Synagogue, to Offrr Tn.l.n '
Young Judea Intermediate and senior
group officers will be installed. Sat-
urday 9 a.m.
-----a-----
TEMPLE ZION. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
rvativ*. Rabbi Alfred Waaman.
------a------
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora Av*.
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell Jr
-e. Cantor Ben Dlckaon.
Friday 8:1.1 p.m. Bermon: "Are We
Jc-wieh, KeligiouH or Confused?" Sat-
rCctohitfical Uclev
istort
'
. i
i'i*
fyr.*$r*ms
Dec. It Ch. 10, 11 a.m., "The Jewish Worship"Hour"
Guest: Rabbi Morris A. Kipper, Temple Judea
Dae. 18 Ch. 7. 10 a.m., "The Still Small Voice"
The Bureau of Jewish Education Jewish Book Month
Dae. 20 Ch. 2, 9:30 p.m.. "Man to Man"
Participants: Dr. Irving Lehrman, Temple Emanu-El;
Fr. Donald Connolly; Dr. J. C. Rose
Moderator: Rev. Luther C. Pierce
Topic: "Peace! Shalom!"
I
man


rndcrv. rwmk 'IP. IBM
Friday, December 16. 1966
*Jm isii fhriidliiain
Page 13-A

Leaders of the silver anniversary banquet of Chabad, slated
Jan. 22 at the Deauville Hotel, discuss ticket sales for the
S36-a-couple dinner marking the 25th year of the Lubavitcher
movement in the United States. Shown (left to riaht) are Mor-
$* ton H. Mayberg. president of Camp Gan Israel of Florida;
Michael Sossin, board chairman of Merkos L'Inyonei Chinuch
here; Murray Rosenberg, president of the 'Merkos Hebrew
Free Loan Society; and Harry Rosenberg, honorary president
of the free loan organization.
Siegel Named
Fellow' Of
U.S. Execs' Unit
Sidney Siegel. executive director
. f the Jewish Convalescent Home
A South Florida, has been desig-
nated a "Fellow" of the American
College.o^ Nursing Home Admin-
.Orators.
^Qualifications for the designate
M -"Fellow" include at least five
\ears of Orperience in an admin-
'strative position In an approved,
ong-ternv care institution.
Siegel ipirmd the Jewish -Con-
valescent Home in .1963 after
more than a decade of experi-
ence in the nursing administra-
tion field. He had previously
..-served as administrative officer
a of both the Bronx, N.Y. and East
Orange, N.J. Veteran's Hospitals,
and had been assittant executive
director of the Brooklyn Hebrew
Home and Hospital for the Aged
for three years.
Siegel left the Brooklyn Home
:o become a member of the Gov-
< rnor's Committee on Aging Com-
mission of the State of New Jersey
irom 1953 to 1958. during which
:ime he was instrumental in the
organization of Kessler's Institute
of Rehabilitation in Orange, N.J.
Further qualifications for the
American College of Nursing
Home Administrators' designation
of "Fellow" include the publish-
ing of at least four articles in rec-
ognized journals on nursing home
administration, and the comple-
non of a fellowship project.
The announcement of Siegel's
acceptance was "in recognition of
the major role he has played in
bringing the relatively young Jew-
SIDNtY SltGEl
ish Convalescent Home of South
Florida to its present state of
growth."
The Home will shortly transfer
its 67 permanent residents into a
new lQO-bed facility currently, un-
der construction directly adjacent
to the present building.
Under Siegel's guidance and in-
spiration, the new facility will con-
tain the latest equipment and
methods for geriatric care and re-
habilitation. Occupancy is expect-
ed to take place in April, 1967.
\
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Avenue
Abe Wagner, President
. Late Friday Night Services i
at 8:15 p.m. with Cantor .
1 Saul H. Breeh and choir.
GUEST SPlAKER
PROF. ANDRE S. EUALOLENKI
TOPIC:
"THE NEED FOR UNITY"
Cantor Wanted
N FRIDAY NIGHTS er WEEK ENDS
Kite for HIGH HOilDAYS Write te
POST OFFICE BOX #4091
WEST HOUYWOOO, FLORIDA 33023
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
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140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
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MEMORIAL PARK
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I
"THE SOUTHS
MOST BEAUTIFUL
JEWISH CEMETERY"
Guaranteed Perpetual Core Fund
N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE. {
TU 5-1689
Stand on Soviet Jews Issued
Continued from Page 1-A
great interest the positive state-
ment made in Paris on December
3, 1966 by Soviet Premier Alexei
I Kosygin that Soviet Jews who'
. wish to do so will be allowed to
! be reunited with members of then-
families living outside the Soviet
Union. The reunion of families has
been one of the major requests of
our Conference and we anxiously
await the translation of the Pre-
mier's promise into practical
deeds.
"Too often in the past have
promises failed to be followed by
performance. The implementation
of this promise would be in con-
foimity with the Universal De-
laration of Human Rights of the
United Nations and would be wel-
comed by men of good will
throughout the world. We also
j reiterate our appeal, as expressed
in the International Decalaration
on Soviet Jewry, that full cultural
and religious rights be restored to
the Jews of the USSR."
In addition to the American
Jewish Conference on Soviet
Jewry, the international statement
was issued throughout the world
by the Executive Council of Aus-
tralian Jewry, Melbourne, Aus-
tralia, the Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Bridgetown, Barbados; the
Centro Israelita de la Republica
Dominicana Inc.. Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic; the Eritrea
Jewish Community, Asmara, Ethio-
pia; the Counseil Representatif des
Juifs de France, Paris, France; the
Jewish Representative Council of
Ireland, Dublin. Ireland; the Na-
tional Council for Soviet Jewry in
Israel; the Unionc delle Comunita
Dade Residents at Brandeis
Localites among the 480 students
from 35 states and seven foreign
countries in the 1966-67 freshman
class at Brandeis University are
Richard Alexander, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Ferdinand Kauders, 1080 NE
92nd St., Miami; and Samuel, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Mostkoff,
7590 Bayside Ln., Miami Beach.
Israelitiche Italiane, Rome. Italy;
the Jewish Community of Japan,
Tokyo, Japan; the Comite Central
Israelita de Mexico, Mexico City.
Also by the Netherlands Is
raelitisch KerltaeryqaJschap, Am-
sterdam; the Jewish Community
Council, Curacao, Netherlands
Antilles; the Federacion de Co-
munidades Judias de Centro
America y Panama; the Jewish
Community of the Philippines,
Manilla; the Comunidade Is- !
raelita de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portu- ,
gal; the Central African Jewish
Board of Deputies, Bulawayo, '
Rhodesia; the Comite Central
Israelita del Uruguay, Monte-
video; and the Federcion de
Asociaciones Israelites de Vene- ',
zuela, Caracas, Venezuela.
The International Declaration
urges the Soviet Government: To *
restore its Jewish community to \
a position of equality with its!
citizens freely to practice, en- >
hance and perpetuate their culture I
and religions by removing all dis-
criminatory measures designed to
restrict this freedom; to make'
avp'iahio the institutions, schools,
textbooks and materials necessary
to teach Jewish children the!
iunguu0v-s, the history, the beliefs,
the practices and the aspirations I
of the Jewish people.
Also, to permit the Jews of the
USSR freely to develop Jewish
communal life and to associate and
work with Jewish communities and
groups inside and outside the Sov-
iet Union; to use all the means
at its disposal to eradicate any ^ex-
isting forms of anti-Semitism; and
to permit Soviet Jewish families,
separated as a result of the Nazi
holocaust, to be reunited with their
relatives abroad."'
REV. PINCUS ALOOF
CERTIFHD M0HEL
Associated with Young Israel of
Greater Miami. 990 N.E. 171t
St.. No. Miami Beach; Out of
Town Cases Attended.
17411 HJ. 71k O. 947-2267
No. Miami Beach, Florida
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J


Page 14-A
-.Jen is It fhrMiar?
Friday, December 16. 1966
Tdoy's Thought: By PR. SAMUEl SitVEK
?
Stirring Testament to Woman's Faith in Judaism
tJER brother
* is a priest,
and her sistei
is a nun. Her
parents were
so strict in
their Roman
Cathol i c i s m
that the fam-
ily had to go to church
day.
For reasons not entirely
every
clear.
the woman I'm talking about
fell in love with Judaism.
She was referred to the Jew-
i s h Theological Seminary.
There she was discouraged
from leaving her faith. But she
persisted.
When it came time for her
to convert, she did not care for
the statement she was to make
explaining her move.
She wrote her own. The
statement is one of the finest
testimonials to the grandeur of
Judaism I "nave ever read.
You can read it too. It's in
the new-book this woman has
written. The book is "Hope is
My House," and the publisher
is Prentice-Hall.
As for the lady in love with
Judaism, her name used to be
Jane Frances MacDyer. Upon
conversion, she changed all her
names. First, she wanted to be
known as Devorah, for that
prophetess was the first female
in the Bible who was Jewish
on her awn, and not because
she was someone's wife. Then
she changed her second name
to Emmett, because that was
the name of a deceased broth-
er and also the Hebrew word
for truth. And for her last
name she picked Jaffee, which
is Hebrew for "beauty," which
is what she saw in Judaism.
She met a rabbinical student
named Jeffrey Wigoder. They
were married and went off to
live in Israel.
Her life in Israel; her vicis-
situdes as a newcomer to the
country and the faith; what
happened to home life during
the Sinai campaign; her strug-
gles toward a viable religious
faith in Israel; her stirrins
thoughts these form the
bulk of an irresistible book.
By:
MAX LERNER

JFK's Presidency: Quality of Work of Art
I IA#E HAVE BECOME so absorbed in the technics of
John Kennedy's killing that we are in danger
of forgetting both the death itself and the man. The
scuffle over the Warren Commission Report has
been mounting until it has become a pitched battle
where ignorant armies clash by night.
It is a historic irony that, three years after Ken-
nedy's shooting, while the scene of his memory is
still the street in Dallas, it has become an arena
on which the great political mystery of our time
is being constantly reenacted. Possibly this is our
sacred way of paying homage to the dead hero: the
ritual is not the laurel wreath and votive stone, but a
permanent murder trial.
My own nonexpert view of it can be put quite
summarily. It was Edward Jay Epstein's "Inquest"
(Bantam paper), the first (and still the best) of the
I
As We Were Saying:
anti-Commission books, which shook me and com-
pelled me to reopen my mind on the finality of the
Commissions work. I am certain that the Commis-
sion staff still believes in its findings: note that
Wesley J. l.iebeler, a law professor in California and
a leading author of the Report, has again accused
Mark Lane of distortions and dared him to file a
libel suit. Increasingly, the mood of the Warren
fracas is becoming that of the tangle over the Hiss
ease. But with all my respect for the harried and
overburdened Commission staff, I feel they should
have waited and weighed the evidence longer, to
resolve the questions that have stubbornly resisted
being pushed aside.
What is happening, I suppose, is a struggle for
the possession of Kennedy as icon. The only thing
that both sides in the battle agree upon is JFK's
greatness and the fact that he was killed. If it can
1
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
House Un-American Activities Skirmish
l|U HAVE a breather now on Congres-
" sional action while Texas Rep. Joe
Pool and his colleagues are home from
the 89th Congress skirmishes in Foggy
Bottom. And while we're resting up
from the oratory, we would do well to
take another look at the need for ditch-
ing the House Un-American Activities
Committee.
For 22 years, we have had this Washington opera
bouffe as a permanent investigating body to keep us
alternately amused and apprehensive; but surely now
that even Sen. Everett Dirksen has raised serious doubts
about the Committee's course, every American civic or-
ganization fearful of subversion of our lawmaking pro-
cedures and concerned about the right to refuse to
conform should speak up.
What are the recent storm signals set off by the
House Un-American Activities Committee?
First, the shameful performance in which Arthur
Kinoy. a professor of constitutional law at Rutgers, was
dragged from the hearing room by three marshalls while
vociferously defending his rights as a citizen and a lawyer
before the Committee.
Second, the revelation by Cong. Wayne L. Hays, of
Ohio, that one of three "friendly" witnesses before the
Committee was paid $1,000 by the Congress, allegedly
for giving the testimony he did.
Third, the passage by the House itself (fortunately
not by the Senate) of the so-called Pool Bill. This measure,
designed ostensibly to punish Americans sympathetic to
the Viet Cong, would actually strengthen the hands of
those who would equate simple dissent with treason.
Of these recent developments, the third is far and
away the most serious. Indeed, the proposal is so terrify-
ing that high government officials, including Ramsey
Clark, now Attorney General of the United States, and
Fred B. Smith, general counsel of the Treasury Depart-
ment, testified against the proposal. One would have
thought the Pool bill would go under when Brig. Gen.
William W. Berg, deputy assistant secretary of Defense
for Military Personnel Policy, appeared before the com-
mittee to say that the Defense Department had no evi-
dence available indicating that the morale of American
forces had been impaired by the demonstrations of dis-
sent to U.S. policy.
But appeals of conservative witnesses like Clark,
Smith, and Berg apparently were not enough to stop the
Pool steamroller; and a cowed House voted the unneeded
measure. Only 64 lawmakers had the courage to vote
against the proposal.
Actually, in the two decades of its existence, this
mischievous Committee has achieved the enactment of
only three pieces of legislation.
Between You and Me: By BORIS SMOLAR
Exciting View of Israel's Navy
THE SEA IS SMOOTH as we start
' our trip on one of Israel's de-
stroyers as honored guests of the
Navy. The plan is to be on the
water for several hours, passing
on the way several shore fortifi-
cations, meeting an Israeli sub-
marine emerging from the waters
of the Mediterranean, and witness- wU
ing a mock attack by torpedo boats. It is a sunny
pleasant day and the ride is both instructive and
pleasant. Officers and sailors display alertness and
the usual discipline at their stations on the decks
and the captain speaks with pride of his crew.
Within a half an hour after leaving the shore,
we note a kind of a cane sticking out from the quiet
blue waters of the Mediterranean. This is a snorkle
of a submarine with which our ship is to have a
rendezvous. A signal from our vessel, and the
waters around the submarine begin to foam and
the underwater craft begins slowly and majestically
to emerge into the open. With the naked eye one
can see how locked hatchways on the submarine's
deck are being opened with sailors coming out
from there to greet us from the assigned distance
for about 30 minutes.
Another signal from our ship, and the sailors
on the submarine disappear from the deck, and the
craft begins slowly to submerge into the depth of
the sea, hardly leaving any sign behind it. She es-
corts us from under the water for another ten
minutes and we are told by the captain of our ship
that she is about to return to her station where
we met her. "And now," the captain says with pride,
"you will see what would have happened to the
submarine if she were an enemy craft."
He sounds a signal, and within a few seconds
one of the many torpedoes on the deck of our ship
is released in the direction of the disappeared
submarine. The quiet waters suddenly become angry
and foamy at the site where the torpedo fell, and
a terrific burst is heard. The depth-charge mortar
has exploded under water with such an impact that
even our own ship quite a distance away from
the explosion suddenly started to shake.
be shown that there were more
killers than Oswald, or that he was
not among them, it will be a blow
to the liberals who claim him but want the life of a
liberal American society to go on. If the Commis-
sion findings are reaffirmed, it will be a blow to
the scattered rebels who feel that everything stop-
ped with his killing, that American life is somehow
enveloped by a conspiratorial suppression of the
truth, and that only a wiping clean of the whole
social slate can continue Kennedy's work in the
spirit he intended.
As a non-cultist admirer of Kennedy I have no
stake in the outcome, but I do want to see an effort
(perhaps by a commission of law school deans) to
settle the big questions if they can humanly be
settled. Then we can go about our more affirmative
work.
One segment of that work will be to reassess
John Kennedy as a leader, rather than as an icon
made out of a frozen legend. The important question
is what kind of man and President he was and what
place he is likely to hold in the cool assessment
of history. To compare him constantly with Lyndon
Johnson, as partisans of both have been doinj:. is
to do damage to both: Kennedy lacked Johnsons
effectiveness as a political manager; Johnson lacks
Kennedy's political grace and his incandescence
If you look only at Kennedy as a decision maker,
then I fear he doesn't rank with the top few Pres .^i
idents. Harry Truman, for example, comes through
much better by that test than anyone in our time.
But Truman's was a limited mind and personality,
and there was a tawdriness about many of the
people around him. Kennedy had the feel of excel
lence, along with the tang of command and an
extraordinary openness to experience.
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Advantage of Rich
THI
IE ROCKEFELLERS have done very
well politically in three states. Sen.
Jlavits, who handled Gov. Rockefeller's
| campaign in New York, should be grati-
fied.
Even if one differed with their
loolitical views, it is comforting to have
li wealthy man as Governor or President.
_____________J suppose, I say to myself, as in the case
ui me i-ouisiana Purchase by Jefferson, someone offered
a big hunk of territory like that for fifteen million dol-
lars. A Rockefeller would find it no problem. If I or any
of my friends were President, all we could do would fr _
to offer a few dollars down on account.
The great advantage of being very rich, it x*m*
to me, is not that you have money, but that you dont
need money. Some years back. Dr. David Blaustem, ot
the Jewish Educational Alliance of New York, was a
guest at a dinner along with Andrew Carnegie. When it
came to paying the tip, Carnegie found he had no money.
He asked Dr. Blaustein to give him three dollars and
wrote out a check to Dr. Blaustein for the amount. But
the good doctor did not even cash the check. He framed it.
The old time Jewish healer would shake your hand
or say a few words to you and heal you. The rich man
possesses something of the same magic. If he just walks
with you, you are better off.
There is the famous story about the man who came
to Rothschild asking for a loan. "I can't give you the
money," said Rothschild, "but if you come to the syna-
gogue on Saturday, after the services, I'll walk out with
you, and then you will have no difficulty in getting the
loan elsewhere."
Unlike the Rockefellers, the Rothschilds, except
among the earliest group, were not candidates for office.
One of the first Rothschilds, as we know, was twice elected
to Parliament, but they refused him a seat because he
would not take oath "on the faith of a Christian."
August Belmont, who was an American agent otfSe
Rothschilds, did mix a good deal in American politics.
He had started work with the Rothschilds, as a sweeper
in their London offices


inaav. DevswnruM- in iqce
December 16, 1966
*"3en>ist fkridiar
Page 15-A
boTICE BY PUBLICATION
IE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
[VENTH JUDCIAL CIRCUIT
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
L COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 12848
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
||CIA A. MINNAMON, .
6 tin,
VS.
i;K MLNNAMhN,
i ndant.
11 R.MAN FIRST CLASS,
EORGE IUNNAMON
|\F11334S07
R200 Supply
jlox 502
l\PO San Francisco,
California f>6274
, GEOKOE IUNNAMON, are
",> notified that a BUI of Com-
It for Divorce has been filed
pst you, and you are required to
copy of your Answer or
IlinK lo the rill of Complaint on
Plaintiff's attorney, ALBERT
|ENSKV, L'SQCIP.K, M-118 I'.i-
,. Building, Miami. Florida 88130,
1 il tin- original Answer or Plead -
in the office of the ci.rk of the
tit Court on or before the llth
of January, 1 ln;T. If you fail to flo
ludgannt by default win be taken
n-t you for the relief demanded
ho Mill of Complaint.
|his notice shall be published once I
week for four consecutive weeki
[Till-: JEWISH I l.oltll'l w
KNE AND ORDERED at Miami
Ida, this 1st day of December,
' P. I.IMTHFKMAN, Cl, rk
Court. Dade County, Florida
By: K. M. LY.MAN
Deputy Clerk
.:\v- wii.f.n>ky, esquire
_:. y for Plaintiff
..s. :,\ nf Building
PI rlda :;:. i ;"'
12/9-16-28-80
BY HENRY LEONARD
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
|THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
.tVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
3F FLORIDA IN AND FOR
IDE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 12740
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
l\N*N C. (IKRKKN,
intiff.
LI AM B, (IKRKKN,
'.-ndant.
| WILLIAM E. OERKEN
GOLDIE OERKEN
1202 Sc-uth 20th Street
tsh .toil, Nebraska
i. WILLIAM E. CERKEN. are-
by notified that a Hill of Com-
lit for Divorce has been filed
|nst you, and you are required to j
a copy of your Answer or I
Iding to the Hill of Complaint on I
Plaintiffs attorney, PAI"L
TNEY, 420 Lincoln Road, Miami!
,h, Florida, and file the original
Iwer or Pleading in the office of
" 'le-k of the Circuit Court on or
the 10th day of January, 1967. I
|}oU fail to do so, judgment by
fault wiil be taken against you for
relief il, aianded in the Hill of
in notice shall be published once
week for four consecutive weeks
ITHM JEWISH PLORIDTAN.
|" 'Mv ANH ORDERED at Miami,
thiH 7th day of December,
liter..
K. H L-EATHERMAN, Clerk
I: uit C< irt, Dade County, Florida
V) Ky U SNEEDEN
I i.-puty Clerk
, KWITNBY
-,. for Piaintiff
,-ERSTElN, KWITNEY &
>IS>
I Hood
, Beai .'i. Florida
12/9-16-23-30
LEGAL NOTICE
notified and re-
any claims and
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71953- B
In RE: Estate ,,t
TOSS1E MAE LAWRENCE
a'k/a MAX INK LAWRENCE
a lea Mils JOHN <'. LAWRENCE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or I 'cinands Anainst
Said Estate:
You are her.^iy
ijuire*! to present
demands which you may bays ajcalnst
tho estate of TONSIE MAE UW-
RENCE a/k/a MAX INK I.AWRENCE
a/k/a MRS. JOHN C, UAWRENCK
deceased late of Dade County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dade
County, and file the same in dupli-
cate and as provided in Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, in their offices in
the County Courthouse in Dado
County, Florida, within six calendar
months irom the time of the first
publication hor-of, or the same will
be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 29th
day of November, A.D. IMS.
HARRY H SMITH
As Administrator
First publication Of this notice on
the 2nd day of December, i1-
SAMI'KI. S. SMITH
Attorne.y for Administrator
4i>7 Lincoln lto.ul
12"J-9-16-23
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
lEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
>F FLORIDA IN AND FOR
JE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 6eC-12B39
|NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
r.V GOUL-D,
juntlff,
vs.
\ (,nil.H.
ndant.
|ANITA OOI
c/o SALLY BENSON
1401 South Ran -ait lloulevard,
| A lit. 44W,
Los Angeles, Californlu
M! ARK HKP.EP.V NOTIFIED,
a Complain', for Divorce has
filed against you, and you are
iired to serve copy of your An-
PleadUtg :o said Complaint
plaintiff's attorneys, 7.EMEL,
I'KMAN ZEMEL. Eeqs I-"
Din Road, Miumi Beach, 88129,
Ida, and file the nrlKlnal Answer
Pleading in the Office of the fir-
Court Clerk, on or before the
' day of January, 1967.
I you fail to do so, Judgment by
lult will I*- Liken against you for
] relief demanded in said Com-
kt.
ONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
|da, this 1st day of December,
E B. IJ2ATHEKMAN
Clerk. Circuit Court
I Mde County, Florida
By: L. SNEEDEN
Oeputy Clerk
jKU KAUFMAN & ZKMKL,
frneys for Plaintiff,
ol ii Road.
tea.h, 33139, Florida
fdi'RToN B. ZEMEL
__________________12/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
ICE IS- HEREBY OIVEN that
undersiKtied, dashing to enRnpe
-iaess under 'he fictitious name
SINGER'S BAGOAOH AND
SFER at 7 Collms Avenue.
Reach, Florida, intends to reg-
|aiil name with the Clark of the
|it Court of Dade County, Florida
SINGER Mi ?VBRH, INC
OVITZ, SILVER \ SCHER
' \ s fn, I
r Rufidlnn
Florida *
12 9-16
NOTICE UNDER
[FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
ICE IS HERERY fllVKN r 11 .t
Ing io engage
flol hi.His name
IRE SALEM COMPAN1
N W. JGtl Btreel Miami, Fla
Witli
It Court of l >ade
i Plot
I \'!ll'.|. S-" \ 'E8 P.I'AK I:
I LINING IRPORATK N
12, 9
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72995
In RK- Estate of
INEZ O. KJC1IMANN
Deoet
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors ami All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Agttlnsl
Said Bat
Voa are hereby notified and re-
i to present any iliilms and
, da whii h you may h ive against
h- estate of INKZ U. KIOHMANN
d- ce.ised lato of Dade County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dade
County, and file tho sane in dupll-
i in.! i- provided in Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, In their offices in
County Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within six calendar
months from the time of the first
oat..nation hereof, or the same will
!' I.arred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 30th
day of November, A.D. 1966.
J. CASPER OEYER
As Bbtaoutor
First publication of this notice on
th- -'nil day of December, 1966.
MANI'F.L I.CHKL
Attorney for Executor
I'H Baat Flagler Street
12/2-9-16-^3
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72904-B
In RK: Estate of
PAIL CROW,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Ci editors and All Persons
Havlnir Claims or Demands Against
Said Batata:
You are herefcy notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may have agalnsl
the estate of PAUL, GROW, deceased
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the sine in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16, Floria Slat
ules, in their offices in the County
Cotu-thoune In Dade County. Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami.- Floiida. this 23rd
day of November. A.D. I'.'66.
JUSII RF.PHCN
As Bxecutor
First publication of this notice OD
he 2nd day of Decemlx :, 1966
JOSH RF.PHUN
Attorney for Bbtecutor
a lahtngton Avenue _
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE :s HEREIIY civ UN that
. ,, I to ngnge
,, business under He S?SS
RUYAI. Ilnri:i. .v PROPKK1 ILS.
. North Miami Wi
., mien.Is to r. glster said name
With the CVrl. nl lit < ouri ol
County. Florida.
\ INC.. a I ration
H1T1ENF. I.EMI.ICH
.ir C> In

LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICr
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12712
NOTICE OF SUIT
Till-: WIU.IAMHBUROH
SA VINOS BANK
PlalntlPr,
vs.
JOHN .1. LaFONTAINE, at ux,
I defendants,
T">: John J. IjiFontalnfr and
Bonnie I^iFontalne, his wife,
1117 Jan is Avenue
Akron, tihlo
You are hereby notified that the
above captloned action nas been In-
stituted against you in the circuit
Court of the Eleventh Judicial Cir-
cuit of Florida In and for Dade Coun-
ty to foreclose a mortgage upon the
following described real property:
l-ot 13 Block :.3 CORAL PARK
BBTATEW BECTiON t, according
to the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Hook 68 Page 91 of the Pub-
lic Records of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
You are required to file respon-
sive pleading to the plaintiffs com-
plaint with the Clerk of the aforesaid
Court, an.i Rerve a copy thereof upon
plaintiff's attorney. MARTIN FINE,
Dade Federal Burldingt Miami, Flor-
ida 83181, not later than December
10th, 1966, i: a l caret Pro I lonfei i o
will be entered nuainst you.
DATED November 28, 1866.
P. B, L-EATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By c. P C( iPRLAXD
Deputy Cl. rk
MARTIN FTNE
H : derai Building
Miami, Florida 38131 12/2-9-16-28
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 72853-C
In RK: Estate of
ABRAHAM HAIMl "WITZ,
a/k/a ABRAHAM MAINS
( I, ceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO All Creditors and All. Persons
Having Claims or Demands Agalnsl
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands, which you may have against
tho estate of ABRAHAM HA1MO-
WITB, a/k/a Abraham llalns. de-
ceased late of lade County, Florida. I
to the County Judges of Ihide Coun-
ty, and file lha same in duplicate
and as provided in Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, In their office- m
the County Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within six calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same will
be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, thi- lOtk
of December. A.D. 1966,
CHARLOTTE BUACKMAN
As Administratrix
First publication of this notli on
Btl I a I'.,-ember, 1964,
K-I.LIOT I.. MiLI.I-:i!
Attorn.y for administratrix
BW-'SSnd Avenue, Mian.I 8SI33
12/16-88-10 1/6
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No.-73104-B
'-. RE Batata of
' M'RKO OITENITETM
1LAZER
'. >ewi .- -u.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To VII ir. I.tors ,,nd All Persons
Having1 Claims it D> mands AK.ur.st
Said :
You are hi re4,y notified and re-
- red : present any claims and
..- whl h VOU may have ag
tati M Jil.l.N NURKO OPfKN-
' ULAZER, deceased late of
Dade ounty, Florida, to the County
Judges ol Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided In
Section 16, Florida Statutes, in
their offices in the County Courthouse
in I lade County, Florida, within six
calendar months from the time of the
first i tdlcatli n hereof, or the same
In barred.
Datid al Miami, Fliu-lcla, this 8th
I .i-ember, A.D. 1!>.
Wi.KY I OLAZER
SEYMOI II LOKWIO.VBKRIJ
As Kxei-iilors
F il publication of tills notice on
:ii. 6th da) of December, 1966.
PltF/D AND NEWMAN
Attorneys for Executors
80S Cade Federal HullditiR
Miami, Florida 3:u3i
12/16-23-30 1/6
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C131S7
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
iiii.DA ciiasi:.
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS K CHASE,
1 >, -fondant.
TO THOMAS K. CIIASK
U.S. Public Health Hospital
Statin Island. New York
You, THOMAS K CHASE, are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for DiVonOC has been filed
agalnsl you and you are required to
nerve a copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the BUI of Complaint on
th. Plaintiffs attorney, wimjam
J. UOLDWORN. i;j7 S.W. 27th Ave-
nue. Mian i. Florida 33135, and file the
original Answer or Pleading in the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or I the 19th il >v ol
January. 1967 If you fall to do so,
ludgmi nl b) > fault 111 be taken
agalnsl you for the relief den
in tb. Bll ilnlnt.
Tins nolle.- phall he publish* I
each week I
In thi: Jewish n.i'Kiio vs
DONE VND ORI 'RRF.I i "
Florid I, ih 'J|i il..... i
\ D
I-: i: l.EATHERM VN Cl
Circuit Ci

\\ ill' I \ iDDWORN
62" S.W %
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
thi undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious
ol BIIROBR CASTLK OP CORAL
GABLES at 8350 Douglas Road, Coral
tiables. Florida, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of th. Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida
FRANKS-GEORGE. INC ,
a Florida corporation,
By: KENNETH PRANK'S
As President
AI.LF.N' KORNBLUM
Attorney for Applicants
101 B. Flagler Street. Mian... Fla.
________________ 11/1 8-9-16
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72983C
In RB: Estate of
MINN IK FARKASH
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having claims or Demands Agalnal
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and r. -
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may ha'........isl
the .state of MINNIE FARKASH
deceased late of i>ad,- County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judt.es. of Dade
County, and file th.- same In dupli-
cate and as provided In s> 'lion
Florida Statutes) In thi ir offices In
the Ci imty Courthouse tr, Pad.- coun-
ty, Florida. within six i alendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof. .-r P.- same will
be r>-i
Dat< (I at Cr.at N'e. k, N V
26th day of November \.D
MILTON SHDRR
As \dnilnlstrator
Flrsl publication of thl> nntlci < u
th,- 2nd day ol Re( sml i
SMITH ,<.- M \M'I '<
Mton syi for vi-i.
407 Lincoln Road
MiHiiu Beach, Florida
12/2-9-16-23
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 72999
In RJ5: Estate of
D' '(' rTHY STIT1 >BNSKI
I .-used.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
and All 1
I it ntands Against
notified and i -
any i laims and
To All Ci.
- Claims or
Said Estate:
^ on ai !,. i. by
quired to present
demands which you may have agalnsl
th- estati of DOROTHY STUDEN-
ski deceased late of Dade County,
Florida, to the County Judges of Bade
County, and file the same in dupli-
cate and iis provided in Section 733,14,
l-'lorida Statutes, In their offices In
the county Courthouse In Bade Coun-
t v. Florida, wll hln six cat
months from the time ,.f the first
publication hereof, or the sami
be barred.
li.it.il al Miami. Florida, th
day ol !> ci iniier, a l' 1966
ARNI 'LI i II STPDENSKI
A DM I MS TH \T< 'It OP TIM-;
ESTATE "F
Di.ROTHY BTCDENSKr, deceased
F publication of thi~ notice on
the 9th day of December, 1966.
i.i-:sTi-:it ROGERS
Attorney for Administrator
nn9 N.W. llth Street,
Miami, Florida
12/9-1R-23-3n
notified and re-
any claims and
may hat against
IN THE COUNTY JUDOfi'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 729T2-A
In RB: i'state of
MITCHELL- M. Pl.ISKIN.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You ara hereby
quired to in senl
demands Which VOI
the estate ol mitciiki.i. M. pi.is-
KIN. di i eased late of Dad County,
Florida, to the County Judges of Dade
County, and file the same in dupll-
and is provided In Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, In their offices In
anty Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within six calendar
s from the time of the first
hereof, or the gum will
i ii v. imi, Florl a, thla Bth
* oember, III,
l-T.ll'A PUSHKIN
A Exei utrlx

day of Dei ember,
! .:in
ulrlx
1966.
on
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS.
solicits your legal notlcaa.
W* appreciate) your
patronage and guarant**
accurat* fMrric* at legal
Dial FR 3-4 tar metwengsc
LEGAL NOTICF
NOTICE OF SUIT
OR
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12689
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
CHARLOTTE WASHERMAN,
Plaintiff.
\ s
HARRY WABSERM \N.
ndant,
in: HARRY WASHERMAN
1138 Golden Hate
Mayfield Heights, Ohio
YOU, HARRT WASHERMAN, are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been filed
agalnsl you, and you are required to
serve a cops of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Hill of Complaint on Plain-
tiff's attorneys, CA1D1N, ROTHEN-
BERG, LEUCHOK & Sl'SSMAN, 305
Rlscayne Bulldinv. Miami. Florida,
and file the original Answer or I'lead-
Ing In the office of the clerk of tho
Circuit Court on or In-fore the HOth
day of December, I9M. if you fall to
do so, judgment by default will be
taken agalnal you for the relief de-
manded in the Pill of Complaint.
DONE and ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, thla 88th day of November,
I9H.
r. n LEATIIKR.MAN
Clerk. Circuit Court
I ! Seal) IV K M 1,Y.MAN
Deputy Clerk
12 '2-9-16-38
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12508
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
.11ISK Ll iI'ESS- RJGO
Plaint iff.
VS.
CARMEN LI PEZ-TRIQO
Defei
T" i \i:.\ii N LOPEZ-TRIGO
81211 97 Street Apt. IP
i: go I'.iti- Nc,\ Fork
vi.l KRB HEREBY N'OTIl
that a BUI of Complaint for Divorce
ipu been fill i ugalnsl you and > i
are required to file an Answer or
PI adlng with tht Clerk of this Court
and to s.rve a Pop} on jack
KING, Utorni t n Plaintiff, Sure
.!:.. 1150 H.W I St., Miami. Florida,
on or before th* Soth da) of IH el
1966 a d< fault shall be i i -
lend :-'.- .
THIS NDTICI n ill be publlahe l
onc< each four conai
In The -' n lah I ilorifiian.
DONE : flRDEltED at Ml
1 '..a.. Count), I-"!' rlda, thla .
ot November,
E It Li A ; HERMAN
Cl, rk of th.- Cn .it I
I >ad. Count). h'lo Id i
By K. M. LYMAN
l 'eput) 'lerlt
JACK I. KING
I 1.10 S.W I si
MlHtnl, Fl
... i 11/25 12/S I
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C11950
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
II MILKNi; V i Rl HN1A l.'lillM,
Plaintiff,
VS.
,l \CK CHESLEY REHM,
I ', fondant.
l'i' JACK CHESL-EY REHM
You, JACK IIKSI.KV REHM a
hi ... notified thai a Kill of
plaint for Divorce has been filed
ugalnat I you are required I
serve a -opv ..f your Answer
Pleading to thi Bill of Complaint on
i.a Plaintiff1! attorney, JOSEPH C.
BRANNBN, ESQL'IRE, M-118 BIs-
cayne Building, Miami. Florida
and file the oriKinal Answer or Plead-
ing In the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on i.r before the 19tti
day of January, 19U7. If you fail to do
so, judgment by default win be taken
agalnal you for the relief demanded
in th. Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published onco
each week .for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLOUID1AN.
DONE AM' ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 9th l>ay of December,
A.D. lsKK.
E i: UBATHBRMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(Seal) By: C P. COFELAKD
I Mputy Clerk
JOHHPH P BRANNEN
- PlaintlH
M-118 Blacayne ituiiding
Miami, Florida ; 1180
II I-:-: 1-30 I '6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.l\ EN il
ihe undersigned, desiring engage
in business under the
il ESTATE PROTECTION SER\
N T K R AMERICAN BPSINESS
\i IENCY, at 1 i
S tloi al Bank I "
Miami.
aid
Flor-
ida.
.1, (UN N M ~
MARVC Vtl
-
G


Page 16-A
. k**i*t nntJMsun
Friday, December 16,
I960
Mk
NORTON
TIRE CO
E192<4
Visit out Newest
Auto Service Center
I 5300 NW 27th Avenue
Miami
OfMR 24 Hows & AH Day Sunday
B.EGoodrich
YEAR
ALL TIRES
SALE PRICED
WHITEWALL
FOR THE PRICE
OF BLACKWALL
*FULL 4-PLY!
PRICE
FITS THESE CARS:

650x13
rw. Eicit.
Til $1M
750/775 x 14* SMS"
670/775 xW*"
III II H
800/825x14
710/815xl5*?.?r
850/855x14*?^^
760/845 xl5*?r
820/885 x 15*?- "
900x15* S"
900/950xl4*?r
COMPLETE SAFETY
BRAKE JOB
MONDAY TMU FIIDAY ONLY
$0/195
INCLUDtS
Rtn'jce llnlnf
(4 Wttot's*
Over* *1 AMI
Turn All I
SI MOdeO;
IftSt klMl
mil Inti IMI
Fill Brake System
I* Field
FREE A Creese Seats Spfln;
CHECK Mister Cylinder Erne rfenty Hand
Shock Absorbers
24
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Rambler,
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Corvalr,
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Brake
Corvair, Falcon, Fairlane, Chevy II, Olds F-85, Comet,
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Chavy M, Chovy, Dodis, Plymouth, Tempest, Mercury,
Ford, Studabakar, Pontiac, Ramblar Ambassador,
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Chavy, Chrysler, DeSota, Dodfe, Ford, Edaal, Mer
eury, Olds, Plymouth, Pontiac, T-Bird, Ramblar,
Buick, Chryalor, DeSota, Dodfe Ford, Mercury,
Old, Pontiac, Studebafcar, Plymouth, Willys.
Buick, Chrysler, Lincoln, Olds, Cadillac
COMPLETE SAFETY
FRONT END JOB
Includmi -M, v
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Balance Front Wheels
Adiust Camber
Adjust Caster
Adjust Toe-Out
Adjust Steering
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bar cars sl.fMly kilter.
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY ONLY!
FREE CHECK
Brakes Ball Joints Shock Absorber*
* Muffler Toil Pipe


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rnaav ihk. 'jn ijujb
i1
oma s
Oi/o^
"Ofewislli Floridiaxi
Miami, Florida. Friday, December 16. 1966
Section 3
Cancer Control to Get Proceeds
Left to right are Mrs. Max R. Silver, co-chairman. Mrs. Harold
S. Abbott, chairman, and Mrs. Seymour Friend, vice president
of fund-raising of the Sisterhood of Beth David Congregation
fas they check results of Beth David Day, which this yea:
has special significance in that it marks the Charter Golden
Jubilee Year of the congregation. Features of this year's Belh
David Day celebration were c luncheon and fashion show.
In charge of reservations were Mrs. Harold S. Abbott, Mrs.
Max R. Silver, and Mrs. Seymour Friend.
. u
n
j
by ISABEL GROVE
.Miami Beach Chapter of Hadas-
sah. in conjunction with national
hadassah, and in tribute to found-
er Henrietta Szold, will launch its
cancer control campaign during
December. National Hadassah has
announced a gift of SI million
from the Siegfried and Irma Ull-
mann Foundation, largest Single
gift in the organization's history,
earmarked toward building the
new Cancer Control and Research
Center in Hadassah Medical Cen-
ter, which is expanding its facil-
ities. All proceeds from the Hen-
rietta Szold Day luncheons will be
applied to the cancer control cam-
paign.
Bay Harbor Group will hold its
annual Henrietta Szold Founder*
Dav dinner, dance and show on
OLCA PAVLOVA
Saturday, Dec. 24, 7 p.m., in the
Cafe Le Can Can Room of the
Carillon Hotel. Mrs. Barney Davis
is chairman of the day. Mrs. Jos-
eph Epstein is president.
*
Esther Group will hold its an-
nual Henrietta Szold Founders
Day luncheon on Tuesday noon at
the Deauvillc Hotel. Gala will in-
clude Mr. and Mrs. James Ben-
quke. impersonator and singer,
pianist Ann Grief, and Mr. Ver-
non, ventriloquist and magician.
Mrs. Peggie Slaughter is program
chairman. Mrs. Hattie Safir is
president.
Forte Towers Group will hold
its annual Henrietta Szold Found-
ers Day luncheon on Tuesday noon
Continued on Page 4-B
The month of December is al-
ways a particularly happy one
for the family of Joseph Rieger,
for as the New Year approaches,
there are birthdays and anniver-
saries galore to celebrate .
On Dec. 25, Joseph marks his
76th natal day. as well as the
56th anniversary of his marriage
to charming wife Cclia For
son Pat and Sarah Rieger, of
Brooklyn, N.Y., 1966 will make
it 31 years of togetherness, and
for granddaughter Roberta and
spouse Marty Plachter, a mere
six years Adorable great-
granddaughter, Sherry' Plachter,
sharing the tradition-laden day,
will be all of 5 years old on
Dec. 25 The Riegers will
be honored by the Senior Citizens
of Miami Beach, which Joseph
serves as president, on Tuesday
evening, and will be feted at a
party on Tuesday afternoon, Dec.
27, by the Golden Ring Club 1.
0 a o
It will be a happier holiday
time for the Seitlin clan now
that Mrs. Henry Seitlin is out of
the hospital following major sur-
gery Popular community
leader Jennie is recuperating at
the home of son David and his
wife.
Miami Beach Wolfson ladies
delighted these days with two
first place wins in as many weeks
at Aqueduct Race Track to the
credit of their "Too Stelle" .
The oddly-named Too Stelle is
from the stables owned by Lynn
Wolfson, wife of State Rep. Louis
Wolfson, her mother-in-law Fran-
ces (Mrs. Mitchell) Wolfson, and
the latter's daughter. Frankie
Samet Like all fashionable
society which follows the sun,
the Wolfson horses will be mov-
ing around the first of the year
from the cold north to sunny
Hialeah.
And at the other end of the
birthday spectrum, that single
candle was a mighty important
one for tiny Todd Rubin, who
can now boast of 365 days of hap
piness he has brought to parents,
Dianne and Murray Rubin, big
brother Marc 3. and grandpar-
ents Lcn and P.oz Zilbert.
Outstanding Democratic Woman's Award is presented to Mrs.
Andre S. Bialolenki by Mrs. Louis Glasser, president of the
Adlai Stevenson Democratic Women's Club. Looking on is
Mrs. William R. Kidd. chairman of the Governor s Commission
on the Status of Women.


Krge 2-B
+Jewi$ti Fkridiairi
Friday, December 16,1955
Librarian Updates
Children's Books
At Beth David
Mrs. Melvin Rosenbaum. libra-
rian at the Beth David Harry Sim-
ons Library- and at the Sam Schorr
Memorial Library at Beth Torah.
has been elected by the Associ-
ation of Jewish Libraries to be edi-
tor and coordinator of an updated
list of books recommended for
children in religious schools and
libraries.
Bibliographies and lists will be
annotated and evaluated as to the
age level of the students, and
whether they are for general use
or slanted towards the Reform,
Conservative or Orthodox views.
Working with Mrs. Rosenbaum
will be Mrs. Bess Shavzin, of Pitts-
burgh, and Miss Miriam Leikind,
of Cleveland.
... .__ She was editor of the Newslet-
Mrs. Rosenbaum is also assist-
ing Mrs. Ann Kirschenbaum. of ter for American Jewish Library
Rochester. N.Y.. in setting up the Association, and served as Flor-
program for next years conven- jda regional chairman. She has
tion of the Association of Jewish published scvera, children's short
Libraries.
Social Singles Hold Donee
Tickets may be pui
or the Saturda;
Shelborne Hotel
rchased at th
door for the Saturdav niaht a,
at the Shelborne Hotel ..".*"*
MRS. MELVIN ROSfNBAUM
Byron Topol, past president of United Cerebral Palsy of Mi-
ami, admires the plaque recently presented to Mrs. Esther
Levitz (center). Cerebral Palsy luncheon chairman, while Mrs.
Hilda Saults. national director, adds her congratulations dur-
ing a Cerebral Palsy luncheon at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Women's Group Hears Wechsler
Marie Wallace, program chair- sides granting its annual scholar-
man for tteMiami Chapter of the ship program to outstanding worn- wi,h additional courses in art and
American bocietv of ^men Ac- en high school graduates interest- literature at Columbia University and a son, Steven 18. who is at
eountants announced that Louis ed jn enlering the accounting pro- and University of Miami. She is a tending Miami Dade Junior Col-
G Wechsler addressed a monthlv ----_ _. ". .._. ~
_ ,. .-r. .__ .... fession. licensed preschool teacher. lege.
meeting on 'Design. Installation__________________________________________________________________ ________________________________
Mrs. Rosenbaum has been a res-
ident of Miami for 21 years, com-
ing from Phoenix. Ariz. She at-
tended Youngstown College. Uni-
versity of California at Berkeley.
stories, and is now writing reviews
of children's books for education
magazines and a New York pub-
lishing firm.
Mrs. Rosenbaum lives at 3421
N'W 2nd Ter.. with her husband
by the B'nai Brith Soc.al"'^
A"alr wj" ,nclu nig*
show and dancing to a live band
Temple NerTamid
80tfc St. A Corlyle Ave., Mj.
FIRST ANNUAL
MONTHLY SYMPOSIUMS
Monday Evening,
January 9th, 1967
MR. DREW PEARSON
Syndicated Columnist
'-Washington Mer-y-Go-Roimii"
Nationa.ly Known *?
Comrr*n*ator
"Behind The Crisis In
The Middle East"
Thursday, Feb. 19th, 1967
HON. BROOKS HAYS
Pretidential Ass start ad
Advisor to Three President,
Distinguished Professor
at Rutgers University
"The Quest for Peace'
Monday, March 27th, 1967
IRVING R. LEVINE
N.B.C. TV and Radio
Foreign Correspondent
"What Happens After the
Ecumenical Council"
Tickets for tne series
$5.00 Donation
for Information cell UN 6-SHS
and Service of Pension and Profit
Sharing Plans" on Tuesday night t***************.*************************
at the Columbus Hotel. *
Wechsler is vice president of
First Florida Consultants. Inc.. an
independent local company deal-
ing in deferred compensation
plans. He has previously lectured
on this subject at the graduate law
school of the University of Miami,
and in the fall of 1965 appeared in
a seminar along with Mortimer
Caplin. former United States Com-
missioner of Internal Revenue.
Purpose of the group, according
to president. Hillelene Lustig. is
to encourage women to enter the
accounting profession, exchange
pertinent tax ideas, and to inform
the public on the proficiency of
these women.
Last year, the chapter ran a
workshop for the treasurers of
local clubs and organizations, be-

Herman and /Marry Pop kin of Atlanta. #.. and
BLUE STAR CAMPS
il tender ho nrillv. \orth Carolina
20th SEASON FOR
BOYS AND GIRLS
From 7 to 17
Extend Hanukah Greetings and Best Wishes to our many friends, former campers and
staft, and cordially invite those from the Greater Miami Area
(even if they have not been to Camp before) to join us for our
ANNUAL GET-TOGETHER
Beth Mosbe
Welcomes Joiners *
TO BE HELD
on SUNDAY, DEC. 25, DUPONT PLAZA HOTEL, BISCAYNE BAY, MIAMI, FLA.,
beginning at 2:30 p.m. for Prospective Campers and at 4:30 p.m. for Former Campers
Regular meeting of Beth Moshe
Sisterhood was held on Monday
evening in Popiel Social Hall.
The meeting honored paid-up
members and welcomed the fol-
lowing new members: Mesdames
Fred Berman. Samuel Berkowitz.
Lee Borafsky. Carl Epstein. Mel-
vin Heller. Herbert Kanter. Mil-
ton Schwersky. Alexander Winn
and Bette Clein. Mrs. Stanley Tam-
bor is vice president of member-
ship.
Program was an original skit by
Mrs. Mildren Shapnick entitled.
Annie Forgets Her Gun."
Cast included Mesdames Fred
Blank. Norman Faber. Richard
First. David Dogoloff. Robert Har-
ris. Marty Martin. Saul Reiter.
Howard Richman. Ruby Rubin,
Burton Streit, president.
FOR ALL YOUR
CAMP NEEDS
Paper Tiffany Shades
Art Nouveau Paper
Posters
Gum Goodies
Old Portraits
Greeting Post Cards
GMJ.KRY
ilOOKSHOP
Mof te mention
PAIM7IMGS by KCAL C0UNTCSS
618 N.E. 79th STREET
fnt Farkimn in fear
PL 1-6906
*
*
*
*
*
COLOR FILMS
REFRESHMENTS
FELLOWSHIP
RENEW CAMP FRIENDSHIPS
SHARE OUR PLANS FOR
20th CREATIVE SEASON
A PREVIEW Of THINGS TO COME .
Creotive end talented High School Jrs. and Srs. please
note Mo. 8 below: We'vo ADDED Drama, Dance and
Art to our Specialist Training Program. And we've
ADDED Physical Fitness to oor Basketball Camp. Our 4th
Annual Co-Ed Student Tour to Europe and Israel is an
exciting 36-day adventare .
BLUE STAR HAS TEN* EXCITING AND CREATIVE PROGRAMS FOR 1967 .
We invite you to be with us to hear about thetnl If you can't attend one of our GET-TOGETHERS then please contact or
write to our FULL-TIME winter offices: 1100 Crescent Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga., 30309 Phone 404 872-4723.
Blue Star's 1967
*Ten (10) Creative Programs:
(All grades as of September 1966)
(1) PIONEER GIRLS CAMP
(Grade 2nd thru 6th)
(2) PIONEER BOYS CAMP
(Grade 2nd thru 6th)
(3) SENIOR GIRLS CAMP
(Grades 7th thru 9th)
(4) SENIOR BOYS CAMP
(Grades 7th thru 9th)
(5) CO-ED TEEN-AGE VILLAGE
'Grades 10th thru 12th)
(6) CO-ED COUNSELOR TRAINEES
'12th Grade onlv)
(7) SPECIALIST TRAINEES
(12th Grade only)
() CO-ED TOUR TO EUROPE
8 ISRAEL
(High School & Older)
(9) BOYS' SOUTHERN BASKET-
BALL CAMP
(Grades 6th thru 12)
(10) TWO-WEEK CO-ED CAMP
(Grades 2nd thru 8th)
EARLY ENROLLMENT IS NECESSARY
TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
Let us hear from you soon We'll be happy to meet with you
PERSONALLY and INDIVIDUALLY
to talk about your summer plans .
CALL US LOCALLY at FRanklin 1-8205
1967 DATES & FEES
1967 Schedule of programs with dates
for Girls and Boys from 7 to 17 years of age;
Program Dates Cost
Two-Week
Session ......... June 6-20 $ 160
First
Session June 21-July 17 $ 350
Second
Session July 19-Aug. 15 $ 350
Six-Week
Session June 6-July 17 $ 510
Full
Season June 21-Aug. 15 $ 635
Europe-Israel
Tour July 3-Aug. 7 $1,264
- Southern
Basketball
Camp June 6-20 $ 150
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
* J
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
1 #
*
#
*
#
*
*
*
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*
*
*
*
*
s
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*
|.|.,.p^p.Mp.p^IHM.p.p^
item


rna Friday, December 16. 1966
vJewist ncrldian
Page 3-B
'Fun Program* For Children
A special Sunday "fun program'"
open to all elementary' school chil-
dren will be conducted this week-
end by the North County Branch
of the YMHA of Greater Miami at
temporary facilities provided by
Beth Moshe Congregation, 13630
W. Dixie llwy.. announced Michael
Salmon, president of the North
County "Y."
The fun program will feature
entertainment, a magic show.
movies, and refreshments for all
i youngsters who attend. The pro-
gram starts at 1:30 p.m.
One of the highlights of the
Sunday program will be entertain
1 ment by Bill DeShara, who will
make a special appearance for i
the North Dade youngsters. Free
Monday Session
For Torah Club
The Torah Luncheon Club, con-
ducted by Dr. Irving Lehman,
will meet Monday, 12:15 p.m., at
the Sbelbome Hotel.
The club, which is an extensive
corns'1, utilizing texts and com-
mentaries, is part of the adult edu-
cation program of Temple Emanu-
El.
tickets for the program are avail-
able at the temporary headquar-
ters of the North County "Y."
1100 NE 163rd St., it was an-
nounced by Salmon and Lionel
Bosem, who is chairman of the
North County development fund.
for HOLIDAY
^and Everyday
The Perfect Salt
for Koshering
II your meat and fowl

IAMOND
*VSTAL
ff)S(fR
SALT
<*. Duuuoiui tryiUl Sail Compaq
Casting off for "Hawaii," which will have its
gala premiere on Wednesday evening, Dec.
21. at the Colony Theatre for the benefit of
Greater Miami Section of National Council of
Jewish Women's Service programs, are (left
to right) Mrs. Charles Rosenberg, Section vice
president of ways and means; Mrs. Mortimer
S. Cohen, Section publicity chairman; Mrs.
Edwin Oppenheim, section president; Mrs.
Burton Goldberg, Section special events chair-
man; Mrs. David Schechter, hostess chairman;
Mrs. William Altman, arrangements chair-
man; Mrs. Aaron Farr, patron chairman; and
Mrs. James Rodenberg, ticket chairman. Photo
was taken aboard "The Blossom," sailing
vessel used in the film, and now known as
"The Paradise."
Extremism Film Due at Meeting of AJCong. Chapter
'Star-Spangled Extremists," a
pictorial profile of radical and ex-
tremist movements which threaten
and corrupt the American dream,
'O was to be the featured film at an
open meeting sponsored by Justine
Chapter, American Jewish Con-
gress, on Thursday, 1 pm., at the
Community Auditorium of the
Normandy Isle Branch, Washing-
ton Federal Savings and Loan As-
sociation, 1133 Normandy Dr., ac-
Young Adult Club
Young Adult Singles Club of the
YMHA has planned a sports night
for Thursday, Dec. 15, at the "Y,"
8500 SW 8th St. Co-ed archery and
volleyball games were to be
played. The club is open to all
young adults, 18 to 28 years of age.
cording to Mrs. Irving Westin,
program vice president.
Alan F. Westin, professor of law
at Columbia University and direc-
tor of the Columbia University
Center for Research and Educa-
tion in American Liberties, has
helped create a clear picture of
radical group tactics, both right
and left, as shown in book censor-
ship, PTA take-over, and charac-
ter assassination which are un-
dermining communities across the
land.
Following the movie, a discus-
sion was to be led by Mrs. Irving
B. Kaplan, including commentary
on the extremist's growing
strength in areas outside the U.S.
New members were to be wel-
comed by program vice president,
Mrs. Maurice Cahn. Mrs. Harold
Druker, fund-raising vice presi-
dent, was to review activities be-
ing planned for the support of
the Louise Waterman Wise Youth
Hostel in Jerusalem.
<^w/teeda?#& cffiteJ/
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w///e/tj
In convenient foil-wrapped slices and
wedges. The way you want it. for sand-
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Imported from Thoune, Switzerland,
by Gerber Cheese Co.. Inc., New York
Who else
But Chef
Boy-ftp-Dec
Could Create
Such Rauop?
Deep, rich, "simmered all-
day" flavor! Delicious toma-
toes, onions and spices, en-
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of pure olive oil. Great with
spaghetti, omelets, fish-
meat loaf, too!
HAVK SOME SOON1

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zjoWjoo

' cktoctotUl
SALAMI
TO3 PURE BEEF
Kaihruth Supervision by
prominent Orthodox Rabbi:
Rabbi Ben Zion Rosenthal
ind two tteady Maihgichim
WILNO KOSHER CHK&TCSSSb' *)
SALAMI FRANKFURTERS CORNED BEE/ BOLOGNA
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 1-6551
MIAMI BRANCH:


?cge 4-B
+Jewisti rkrkii&n
Friday. December 16,
Miami Beach Chapter of Hadassah
Launches Cancer Control Campaign
Continued from Pag* 1-B
at -he Algiers Hotel. Program for
! day will feature Syd Skolsky,
television and radio performer,, in
a One Woman Show." In addi-
tion, Mrs. Dorothy Krieger Fink
wi;i be guest speaker. Mrs. Moe
Scheffer is chairman of the day.
Mr=. Frances Sass is president.

Hnl Group will hold its reg-
ular meeting Tuesday, 11:30 a.m.,
a; the Algiers Hotel. Life mem-
I rs will be honored with a candle-
b.iting ceremony." Guest speaker
v.'.'.l be Mrs. Nat Barth, former
[.esident of Miami Beach Chapter
c: Hadassah. Mrs. Milton Wein-
btrg is president.

Israeli Group will hord its an-
r.sl Henrietta Szold Founders
Day luncheon on Monday noon at
the- Algiers Hotel. Guest speaker
v.'.~:\ be Rabbi Avrom Drazin. An-
o'.r.er feature of the day will be
list Joyce Farber. Mrs. Sadie
Kaplan is program chairman. Mrs.
Icseph Meyer is president.
*
Emma Lazarus Group will hold
it: Henrietta Szold Founders Day
Parents Attend
Open School Nite
open School Night, an annual
event of the Temple Emanu-El
Solomon Schechter Day School,
was to be held on Thursday, 8:00
p.rn., in the North Branch Bldg.
Prof. Josephine C. Damler,
speech therapist, Miami-Dade Jun-
ior College, was to speak on "The
Development of Speech in the Nor-
mal Child." A question and answer
period was to follow the lecture.
Parents were invited to meet
their childrens' teachers, learn
about the school program and see
the instructional materials used
in the Hebrew and General Stud-
ies Departments, announced Rabbi
Arthur S. Hollander, education di-
rector of Emanu-El.
Mrs. E. J. Berman is principal
of the General Studies. Depart-
ment of the Solomon Schechter
Day School.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of the congregation, was
to extend greetings to the parents
and children.
luncheon on Monday noon at the
Deauville Hotel. Mrs. Johan Ber-
man, former president of the Em-
ma Lazarus Group, and now a res-
ident of Israel, will be guest
speaker. Musical portion of the
day will feature Jeannette Sand-
ers, continental songstress, and
her Hungarian group. Mrs. Hen-
rietta Fine is chairman of the day.
Mrs. Jack Wolfstein is president.

Hannah Sanosch Group will hold
its annual Henrietta Szold Found-
ers Day luncheon on Monday noon
at the Algiers Hotel. Program will
include a Chanuka candlelighting
ceremony, and Syd Skolsky, of
television and radio, who will pre-
sent a "One Woman Show." Mrs.
Laura LaTuchie will be chairman
of the day. Mrs. Sylvia Kuiiand
is president.

Shaloma Group held its annual
Henrietta Szold Founders Day
celebration on Dec. 14 at the Al-
giers Hotel. Program included
Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, guest speak-
er, and Sally Dermer. entertainer.
Mrs. Morris Kripple was chairman.
Mrs. Michael Feinstein is pres-
ident.
* e
Stephen S. Wise Group will hold
its annual Henrietta Szold Found-
ers Day luncheon on Monday. 11:30
a.m., at the Deauville Hotel. Mus-
ical portion of the day will fea-
ture Sam Haber, instrumentalist,
and Olga Pavlova, continental
singer, with accompanist, Aida
Yaslo. Rabbi Richard M. Leviton
will be guest speaker. Mrs. Rhea
Gladwin is chairman of the day.
Mrs. Alex Dellerson is president.
Miss Pavlova, a resident of Coral
Gables, records for Monitor.

Henrietta Szold Group will have
a tea for new members on Wed-
nesday, 12:30 p.m.. at the home of
Mrs. Ann Klayman, 1154 Bairritz
Dr. Group will hold its annual
Henrietta Szold Founders Day
luncheon on Monday, Dec. 26,
12:30 p.m., at the Algiers HoteL
Mrs. Nat Barth, former president
of Miami Beach Chapter, will be
guest speaker. Musical teature of
the day will be Joyce Farber, song
stylist, accompanied by Mrs. Olga
Bibor Stern at the piano. Mrs. Sol
Greenberg is president.
Feldmans Slated At Concert Here ^ -
^T
NO OTHER HEBREW-ENGLISH
CALENDAR LIKE THIS ONE!
FREE TO OUR READERS!
Temple Seeks life Members
At a regular meeting of Temple
Beth Raphael, Abe Wagner, pres-
ident, launched a drive to enroll
50 new life members by Apr. 15.
All Hebrew dalesdays of the
week equivalent English dates
I9tf to 1967Jewish holi-
days to 1973.
This Calendar absolutely free
to our reade.j. Mention name
ol pubiicatk i whi n writing.
Send post-card or letter to:
H. J. Heinz Cj., Dept. J2. Box
57. Pittsburgh, la. 15230.
NOW!
SUNSWEET,
"TENDERLY NEW
PITTED PRUNES
RBAOT TO EAT PITTED PRUNES
No need to cook...great new nosh, ready to eat right from the
purple and orange package. Ideal for lunch boxes. Snip 'em into
cookies, cakes, salads. No pits, just fresh fruit tenderness
through and through. Rich in 1~. ^^ itmM
natural fruit...bite right inl (Jfc^'*
ABI GEZUNT W rr
with SUNSWEET PRUNES!
Annual Chanuka concert will be j
held at Temple Menorah on Sat-
urday evening, starring Cantor j
Nico Feldman and his wife, Nora,;
as guest artists.
Cantor Feldman, served one year ,
as cantor of Temple Menorah fol-1
lowing a successful career on the j
opera stage in Israel, where he was .
first tenor of the Israel Opera |
Company. Mrs. Feldman is an
operatic soprano, and studied
voice in Europe's leading music
institutes.
The repertoire will include Is-
rael. Yiddish, as well as classical i
music. Instrumentalists will be
Leonardo Beatiz. flamenco guitar-
1st. and Al Wolf, who wHl bo'h
accompany the singers, as well ,
give piano renditions.
The concert will be undcr ,h(
sponsoiship of (he Sisteihood.
NerTamid Eternal
Light Luncheon
Sisteihood of Temple \er Tam
id was to celebrate its tenth
nual Eternal Light Luncheon at
the Fontainebleau Hotel on Thurs
day noon, Dec. 15.
Entertainment
Vince Perrone,
was to include
violinist, aceom
oanled by Nick Plla, and features
Miss Syd Skolsky in a "One \Vom.
an Show."
Mrs. Irving
chairman.
Rubin was ticket
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S. RicHmir
I.M.CIU'--'
NOW IN YOUR GROCERS DAIRY CASE


n
Frid
' ncictv. Deremhw M IflftR
1
Friday, December 16. 1966
-lewlst fhrldUan
Page 5-B
Religious Zionists Plan Reception Sun.;
Zaiis to be Honored at Community Fete
UATASHA MMJKU
Singles to Offer
Chani&a Concert
In cMebrat'on of th? Thai"
year o'. Israel, ihe Miami Beach
Commun'ty S'ngers will present
its annual ChanuVa concert on
Sunday, 8 p.m., at the Hebrew
Academy.
Following the candlelighting
ceremony, the Singers, led by
music director and conductor, Ben
Yomen, will present "Our Glori-
ous Brothers," from the novel by
Howard Fast, with music by Sonny-
Vale.
The cantata commemorates the
victory in the City of Modein of
Judah Maccabee and his brothers,
who overcame the Greeks and the
forces of tyranny and oppression.
Soloists appearing with the 60-
voice mixed ehfcus will be Natasha
himmell, mezzo-soprano, and Ed-
ward Doe, baritone, of the Miami
Opera GuiW. Narrators will be
Hope Pomerance and Jimmie
Rosenstrauch, with Kay Sestok at
!he piano.
The production is sponsored by
the Louis Segal Branch and the
l.tbeciKer Bianch of Farband.
M irschi Hapoel Hamizrachi. Re-
ligious Zionists of America, are
li tiding a reception and dinner on
Sunday evening at the Dcauvillc
Hotel, starting at 5 p.m.
Keynote speakers at the affair
will be Rabb: Sidney Weinschnci-
der, of Chicago, formerly of Tam-
pa, Fla., and Rabbi Moshe Weiss,
of New York, chairman of the RZA
cultural committre.
The dirncr will honor Mr. and
Mrs. Joseoh Za'.it, community
leaders, "for outstanding serv-
IcM and contributions to focal
and Israel education." In charge
of reservations are Rev. Joseph
Krantz, loral RZA president, and
Sol Rashin, national representa-
tive.
In calling for support. Rev.
Krantz recalled that "the divine
light of Is ael's redemption, kind-
led 18 years aco with the estab-'
li-hmcnt of the state, grows big-
ger and brighter with each passing
SWV .____b.o.c ...,.
"As religious Zionists, we are
happy and proud of our active and
wholehearted share in the revival
of our people in its ancient soil.
Now. we c:;ll upon you again to
walk with US in the path Mizrachi-
Hapocl Hamizrachi has walked for
the past six decades, the path that
leads to Zion and the strengthen-
ing of Torah Judaism in Israel and
the diaspora, the path that leads
to our ultimate goal, the land of
Israel for the people of Israel'."
Serving as general chairman of
the dinner committee is Howard
Galbut, with Hyman P. Galbut and
Milton Kahn, associate chairmen,
and Jacob C. Cohen, honorary
chairman.
Listed as co-chairmen are Jack
Ciment, vice president. Rev. Sol-
omon Coooer. Moti< B. Frank,
C. Gluckovsky, Henry Groudan,
Rev. Jacob Katz, Isidor H. Kra-
mer, Rev. Josepn kranti, pres-
ident, Morris M. Kravet, Rabbi
Abraham Safra, vice president,
Sam Schachno, Morris Steinbuck,
treasurer, Benjamin Weinberg,
Rev. Nathan Zeichner, and Rash-
'ft
Members of the Rabbinical c
mittces are Rabbis Berl An
wtz. Jonah E. laplan, iMac
Ever, Alexander Gross. I).
Lchrficld. Joseph E. Kackox
Dow Rosencweig, Abraham S;
Sherwin Stauber. Tihor If. St
Shmaryahu T. Bwtrsky, Solo
Schiff,""Berel Wein.

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Festival Features
Humorist, Tenor,
Seating of State
Mrs. Pauline Hyman served as
chairman of the Jacob C. Cohen
Sisterhond Chanuka luncheon Sun-
day at the Dcauville Hotel. Over'
400 persons attended.
The annual affair featured sup-
^er club humorist. .Michael Ros-
enberg, in a Yiddish English pro-
gram, and Cantor Meyer Engel, oi
Ramat-Gan. Israel, recently en-
gaged by the synagogue, who of-
fered Chanuka musical selections.
Also held was installation of
-lie following Sisterhood date:
resident, Mrs. Abe Dlatt; vice
presidents. Mrs. Icon Gottlieb.
Mrs. Althea Gerstein; recording
secretary, Mrs. Florence Albert;
corresponding secretary. Pauline
Hyman; treasurer, Mrs. Alfred
l.ieber; chaplain. Mrs. Tibor H.
Stern.
The Sisterhood meeis on the last
Tuesday of each month in the so-
cial hall of the synagogue. A Torah
session precedes each meeting led
by Rabbi Tibor H. Stern.
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Paqe G-B
+Je*ist> Fkvridk**7
1
Friday, Dec-mber IK jrgg
1
I i li.r m : it i ii- i-i; i ;
;.!'. :'' l'"
tZ/Qoout people and j^laces ...
ON THE GOOD SHIP SS FRANCE
It was a grand cruise, exciting from the
start, when the Miamians flew over to Nassau
to board the ship. There was fun for everyone,
the swingers, the non-swingers, and as Beth and
Harold Zecman said, also for the "inbetweeners,"
the group to which they belonged. Florence and
Morris Green were with Florence's parents. Mr.
and Mrs. A. H. Wolff, of Fti I>audcrdale, who
were celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary.
In their party were the Louis Grossmans. Seen
on board were Mr. and Mrs. Sol Brooks, Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Jacker, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Granoff,
Mr. and Mrs. Al Obler, Mr. and Mrs. Max Boder-
man, and Samuel Hyman. Something was doing
every minute. Folks had to come home to rest.
*
FOR DEVOTED SERVICE
As the audience sang, 'Hello Connie," Con-
nie Gee walked up the aisles formed by the
luncheon tables on the arm of her former boss.
Bill Baggs. All of the people she had written
about, whose scrapbooks were filled with the
news she had written as club editor and com-
munity sen ice editor for The Miami News,
gathered at Miami Springs Villas Playhouse at
a luncheon to pay her tribute on her retirement
from her typewriter. It was fun for all of the
old-timers to greet Connie and. at the same time.
their friends. There was much shrieking, hugging
and a tear or two. Among those doing the "hello-
ing" were Mrs. Stanley ('. Myers, Mrs. Leo Ack-
erman, Mrs. Ixwpold Schwartz. Mrs. Anna Bren-
ner Meyers. Mrs. Sydney Weintraub, Mrs. Flor-
Kupperman, Mrs. Nathaniel Levin, Mrs.
Aaron Fair, Mrs. Charles Jacobson. Mrs. Philip
Thau. Mrs. Hannah Kahn. Mrs. William I. Bren-
ner, Mrs. Irving Wexler, Mrs. I. M. Weinstein,
Mrs. Aldred Huss, Mrs. Edwin B. Oppenheim,
Mrs. Charles Finkelstein, Michelle Levin, and her
mother, Mrs. Herbert Levin.
FLORIDA FANS BLOODY BUT UNBOWED
Marcia and Lewis Kanner started out for
Gainesville to see "The Game." They drove, and
on the turnpike they met Burt and Fran Levey.
They went to dinner in Gainesville and at the
restaurant they saw Kenny Myers, Gerald Lewis,
and the Murray Dubbins. It was Legislative Ap-
preciation Day! Back they went to the home of
Dr. and Mrs. Sam Proctor., who were having a
buffet supper, which included many old grads
from Miami. There they saw Dr. and Mrs. Carl
M. Baumann, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Magoon, Mr.
and Mrs. James Spector, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Furman. It is an old tradition to take your lunch
to the parking lot before the game, so that is
what the Lewis' did next day. Marcia saw a car
full of people grilling hamburgers. They also
saw Mr. and Mrs. David Rifas and the Fred Dia-
monds. Among those attending the game were
Barbara and Marvin Gilman. Henrietta and James
Gordon. Gail and Max Spiegelman. and Martin
Segal. It was the first time that Martin had been
back since he was an undergraduate, and he was
having a ball. As Marcia and Lew came out of
the game, out of all of those 60.000 people they
bumped smack into Marcia's former roommate
at college, Sybil Barnett, now Mrs. Luckej \n-
bacher. And lest you don't know by now
Miami won.
Frances Lehman

-

Blue Star Camps State Reunion for Next Dec. 26
Blue Star Camps. Henderson-
ville. N. C, announce plans for
their 201 h camping season this
summer and Invite former camp-
ers and staff, as well as their
friends, even if they have not at-
tended the camps, to their Greater
Miami area get-together on Sun-
day. Dec 25. 2:30 p.m., for new
campers, and 4:30 p.m.. for for-
mer campers at the Dupont Plaza
Plans for the annual reunion,
which will feature color movies of
last summer, were announced by
Herman and Harry Popkin, of At-
lanta, co-founders and co-directors
of the camps, which attract camp-
ers and staff from throughout the
country and abroad.
"We want our many friends to
know they are most cordially wel-'
come to see our movies, join with
us in fun and fellowship, and to:
gather informally to discuss the
welfare of children through or-
ganized camping as an educative
and recreative experience." the
Popicks declared.
Founded in 1948, the Blue Star
Camps are divided into six sepa-
rate camping programs for boys
and girls from 7 to 17 years of
age. This summer, the camps are
sponsoring their fourth annual
summer co-ed student tour to
Europe and Israel in cooperation
with Traveltime, Inc. They will
also conduct a two-week South-
ern Basketball Camp, a short-
term two-week session, and the
seventh annual Israeli Folk
Dance Workshop, with Fred
Berk, of New York City.
A new 54-page brochure describ-
lag location, facilities, staff and
program is available upon request
from the camps' full time winter
offices at 1100 Crescent Ave., NE.;
Atlanta. Ga. 30309.
Miami area representatives are |
Mrs. Harry (Lillian) Rosen. 2301
Shore Dr. E.. Miami; Mrs. Bernard '
(Roz) Sutta. 1335 Sorolla Ave..
Coral Gables; Dr. and Mrs. Irving
Bernstein, 711 Surfside Blvd., Surf
side: and Mr. Harry Kaplan, 1431
Dewoy St., Hollywood.
Medical Center
Marks Holidays
Greater Miami Chapter, Amer-
ican Medical Center, will celebrate
the holiday season with a fun and
games party at the Glades Hotel on
Sunday at 8 p.m.
Chairman of the event is Mrs. |
Ruth Mitchell. Featured will be
prizes and refreshments.
Jewish Family, Children's Service
Provides Confidential Counseling
Completely confidential service,
offered by professionally qualified
family counsellors, is available to
the entire community through the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Greater Miami.
With main offices at 35 NE 17th
St., and a fully-staffed office at
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach,
JFCS is a member agency of the
Child Welfare League of America,
Family Service Association of
America and the Welfare Planning
Council of Dade County.
Among the services provided
re marriage counseling, par- ;
ent-child counseling, personal
counseling, service to the aged,
aid to the unwed mother, adop-
tion service, foster home serv-
ice and homemaker service.
A competent staff, headed by
executive director Leon D. Fisher,
points out that everyone has prob-
lems. "Sometimes we can solve
them ourselves, other times pro-
fessional help is needed."
Confidential interviews with a
skilled, professional caseworker
are available to all persons, re-
gardless of their ability to pay.
The sliding scale fee contributes
to the cost of the service, but does
not cover the bulk of it.
JFCS receives the major part
of its financial support from
the United Fund of Dade County
and the Greater Miami Jewish \
Federation. The inability to pay
never disqualifies a person who
needs help, nor does It alter the
quality of the service rendered.
Dr. Melvin L. Becker is president'
of JFCS for 1966-67, with Ben No-
vack and Mrs. Charles Goldstein
serving as vice presidents. Joseph1
Gassen is secretary and Eugene R.:
Katz is treasurer.
Additional information on JFCS'
services is available by telephon-
ing 371-3433. (dv)
DO YOU WISH TO SEND ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES
TO FRIENDS OR RELATIVES IN ISRAEL?
We sell, package and ship National Brand Appliances
for use on 220 Volt.
GENERAL ELECTRIC SUNBEAM OSTER etc.
for further information caff or visit our offices:
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(We will also package and ship ether articles to Israel at low cast)

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Mrs. Bert Saul (seated left), reservations chairman of the Phi
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pletes a ticket sale to Miss Audrey Borok, general co-chair-
man of the event, as Mrs. Harris Steinberg (seated) sapphires
chairman, and Miss Bobbi Ann Ossip, general co-chairman
look on. The 17th annual affair was held on Saturday,
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Fri
i-ndctv. De^^mk^'lfl 1MB
Friday, December 16, 1966
t'Jewist' ncridian
Page 7-3
'Joint Program
Solutes the UN
"Salute to the UN" will be the
program of Temple Menorah joint
Sisterhood and Men's Club even-
ing -on Wednesday in the temple
social hall. Speaking in behalf of
the United Nations Association
will be its president, Andre S.
Bialolenki, on the subject, "Is
There Another Alternative."
Bialolenki is a former professor
of psychology at Jacksonville Uni-
versity, as well as director of the
Acorn Civic Theatre. He is princi-
pal of the Whitefield School here.
Dean of the Consular Corps,
Luis Debyle. Ambassador from
Nicaragua, will present a Certifi-
cate of Merit to the United Na-
tions Association "for distinguish-
ed service in bringing the message
of the United Nations to the,
United States."
Kabbi Mayer Abramowitz. spir-
?- $ itual leader of the temple, will
compare the UN charter with bib-
lical quotations. His address will
be titled-"War in Out Times."
Mrs. Edwara Sciiuman, Sister-
hood president, and Marshall Krat-
zer. Men's Club president, will act
as cohosts for the evening.
Hebrew Academy PTA Sponsors 'Hawaii'
Theatre Party at Colony Next Wednesday
Day at Races
For AMC Chapter
Coral Chapter of the American
Medical Center at Denver held a
Day at the Races on Wednesday
at Tropical Park Race Track.
Tickets included lunch in the
Club House Dining Room and seats
for the races in the club house.
Mrs. Ann Berkowitz, chairman
of the day, announces that a race
was named for Coral Chapter, and
Mrs. Jack Gordon, chapter pres-
ident, awarded a trophy to the
winning jockey.
Proceeds will iieip maintain
free patient care at the hospital
in Denver, where there are pa-
^ tients from Dade County
James Michener's "Hawaii"
starring Julie Andrews, Max
Von Sydow and Richard
Harris, will have its South-
eastern premiere at the Col-
ony Theatre, Lincoln Road
Mall, on Wednesday, Dec.
21. Sponsors will be the Na-
tional Council Ol Jewish
Women. The evening per-
formance of Dec. 22 is under
the auspices of tbe Hebrew
Academy pTA. TVkets are
now on sale for all perform-
ances starting Dec. 23.
Milestones For
Joseph Rieqers
ftnvt ""'liar meptine of the
Senio' Citizen's Association of Mi-
ami Reach will be held on Tues-
day. 7:^0 p ni i>t Washington Fed-
eral. 1234 Washington Ave.
The evening will celebrate the
birthday and anniversary' of PICS-
ident. Joseph Rieger. and Mrs.
Rieger.
Guest speaker will be Dade
County Mayor Chuck Hall.
Hebrew Academy PTA is spon-1
soring a theatre party on Wednes-'
day, Dec. 22, at 8:30 p.m.
Featured will be the James
Michener film. 'Hawaii,'' at the {
Colony Theatre.
On the committee are Mr. and
Mrs. Jerome Bienenfeld, Mr. and
Hn. Max Deakter, Mrs. Mildred
Dearr, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Ehren-
reich, Mrs. Milton Fruman, Dr.
Uld Mrs. Morry Fox, Mrs. Irving
Firtel, Mrs. Maurice Goldberg, Dr.
and Mrs. Morton Lieberman, Os-
car Mamber, Mrs. Howard Rod-
non, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rein-
hard, Ray Sinuk, Mr. and Mrs.
Simon Simkovic, Mrs. Edythe Som-
mers, and Dr. and Mrs. Mathew
| Zuckerman.
Funds from the party will go
to the school library. Mrs. Leon-
I ard Adler, library chairman, said
this week that "in the initial plan-
. ning of our school building, the
design of the library assumed the
, most prominent place in the en-
tire structure. The physical beauty
of the library is insignificant un-|
less every shelf is filled with;
books."
With the sudden burst of en- j
rollment reaching 520 students,
and the establishment of the Girls
High School, "our goal is to in-,
crease the library by an additional I
1,000 books," she noted.
"We have established a com-
plete Hebrew section in the libra-
ry, which covers all types of books
from kindergarten through ele-
mentary, junior high and senior
high school levels.
"Presently, more than 1,500
Hebrew books have been pur-
chased, most of them printed in
Israel. Since we do not use the
film library of Dade County, we
want to build up our own film
library. Films are projected to in-
clude every aspect of the school's
program."
According to Mrs. Adler, "we
are encouraging our children to
read both in our Hebrew and Eng-
lish Departments, covering fiction.
Mercantile National Bonus
S. Mort Zimmerman, chairman
of the board of Mercantile National
Bank of Miami Beach, has an-
nounced a year-end bonus to all
employees amounting to 6 per cent
of annual compensation. The bonus
will he paid Dec. 16.
New Jersey Club
Formed on Beach
A Hudson County. New Jersey
Club, has been organized on Miami
Beach, with some 250 attending
the first meeting of the social
group recently.
Slate of officers who will serve
for the coming year are Judge
Morris E. Barison. president;
Harry Herman. Matthew Slepin,
vice presidents; Mrs. Rose Belle,
secretary; Harry Perkel, treasurer.
Members elected to the board
are Dr. David Coyne, Harry Heller,
George Laiken. Mrs. Sophie Stern-
feld, Jack Perlmutter. David Can-
tor and Sidney Rockwell.
history, poetry, literature and
books of religious nature."
"Is Paris Burning?" a Paramount Seven Arts P^sentl/";
based on the international best-seller of the same nome about
the liberation of Paris in 1944. will have ^Southern premiere
opening Thursday evening. Dec. 22 at the Beach' Theatre.
Lincoln Road Mall. It will be an exclusive road show attrac-
on. two shows daily, matinees at 2:30 p^m-*
at 8:30 p.m.. with reserved seats now on sale. Is "*"
ina?" stars Jean-Paul Lapierre. Charles Boyer. Leslie Caron.
GeS Froi Jean-Pierre Cassel, Qocp* Chd**jAWjjto.
Kirk Douglas. Glenn Ford Yves Montand An honyPerkins
Simone Signoret, Robert Stack. Mane Versini, Skip wara.
a nd Orson Welles. _____
name your destination
WB HAVE THE PLAXE
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JM CITRUS, first floor, miami
available at dadeland and fort lauderdale
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Pcge 8-B
+Jewlst> ncrSdUan
Friday, December 16.
1966
RUTH
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Ruth Brown, now Mrs. Julius Spector. was a happy
child in Maiden, Mass. She came from a large family that
always got together to talk about the old days in Russia.
But Ruth was an adventurous child with a mind of her own.
When one of the aunts made sweaters for all of the children
to wear for a family picture, Ruth, at the age of six, took
off both her own and her sister's
sweater; and there they are in the
picture for posterity, but sticking
out like sore thumbs, sweaterless.
There was no depression in
the Brown household. Frank
Brown was a bookbinder, and a
prosperous one. It was the train-
ing Ruth received working in his
shop that has influenced her life
and made her particularly good
at organization (her son-in-law's
political campaign is an example).
Everything in the shop was done
on an assembly line and organized
to the nth degree in order to ex-
pedite things.
It was during the depression
that Julius Spector hitch-hiked
from Miami, looking for work. He worked for Ruth's father
for over a year, coming to see her folks, but just to look
at her. He bought a Model T Ford and drove back to Miami
where building was starting again. For two and a half
years, they corresponded without ever having a date.
Then Julie and Ruth made headlines when they
eloped. Ruth came to Miami as a bride in 1934. During
four of the war years, since building had stopped in Miami,
Julie worked at the Key West Naval Base the next best,
after he failed to make the Seabees. Their living was prim-
itive, adventurous and fun. Ruth was surely born under a
lucky star, because when she tried to boil kerosene instead
of water, it didn't explode.
Then back to Miami, wnere the Spectors' two daugh-
ters were born, and where they live now with gobs of
children. Joyce is now Mrs. Irvin G. Christie, and their
five include Donna, Lisa, Bart, Jenifer and Brenda. Daugh-
ter Freda is now Mrs. George Sould, with their three,
Michael, Deborah and Tamar. They all get together for
birthdays, holidays and special occasions.
Something is always in progress at the Spector home.
They are the pivot of the huge Spector family that has
been such a vital force in this community. Ruth says that
this seems like the year of silver anniversaries. The Spec-
tor home is a grand one for entertaining, featuring levels,
with a heated pool and a gym in the basement level, as
well as a steam room and all kinds of exercise machines.
Ruth enjoys gardening, and there are little garden spots
all around, tucked in here and there with a few vegetable
plants on Miami Ave. Ruth is still adventurous; her cook-
ing shows that. She has many hobbies, but particularly
likes doing things with cloth. She also enjoys designing
clothes, especially for folks who have a special need.
Ruth has always been a Jack-of-all-trades. When there
is a special requirement, she is anxious and willing to
satisfy it. In National Conference of Jewish Women, she
was one of the originators of the Hobby Huddles. She was
also one of the originators of the Mothers March on Polio,
for which she worked three months of the year gathering
together 1.000 women.
together 1,000 women. Daughter Freda had had polio, and
that was her inspiration.
She worked at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital long be-
fore the floors were poured. The death of Mother Spector
and her own mother within a few months of each other
was a tragic experience. Pop Spector is now with Ruth
and Julie. They have involved themselves in the fine arts
program of Beth David. "It is something that we can
work on together and is the start of something big," says
Ruth. Beth David is the Spectors' second home. This is just
another fresh age in Ruth's book to fill in what she thinks
are the needs of her community, her friends and her family.
BAR MITZVAH and BAS MITZVAH INVITATIONS
NAPKINS MATCHES MENUS STIRRERS PLACE CARDS
THE WEBBiNG SHOPPE
"Everything but the Gown ana" Groom"
Phone 444-0614 3614 CORAL WAY, MIAMI Closed Thursdays
MARK'S
Quality
Cleaning Laundry
1201 -20th Street
Miami Beach
JE 8-6104
OPIN 7 AM. 7 PM. Some Day Service Never An Extra Charge
Noon Ceremony
For Miss M or eels,
Jay Steckler
A high noon ceremony on Sun-
day, Dec. 11, united the former
Myra l.ee Moreels and Jay Steck-
ler. Rabbi Max Lipschitz officiated
at the nuptials held in the Bal-
moral Hotel, where a reception
followed.
On their return from a honey-
moon in Jamaica, the couple will
live in North Miami. Parents of
the newlyweds are Mr. and Mrs.
Edward C. Moreels. 980 NE 138th
St., and Mr. and Mrs. Harris Steck-
ler, of Brooklyn, N.Y.
Wearing a bridal gown of crepe-
trimmed alencon lace in the em-
pire style, new Mrs. Steckler car-
ried an heirloom Bible with or-
chids and a cascade of carnations.
She was attended by her sister,
Mrs. Richard W. Dass, and Harriet
Yacker.
The bridegroom's twin brother,
Alan Steckler, served as best man,
and ushers were Richard W. Dass
and Jack Packar.
A member of the 324th General
Hospital Medical Corp Reserve
as a pharmacy specialist, the
bridegroom attended New York
Military Academy and College of
Pharmacy, University of Georgia.
His fraternity is Tau Epsilon Phi.
Mrs. Steckler is a graduate of
Werner Kahn
miSS NANCY DRUBIN
DECEMBER PERMANENT
SPECIALS
Mon. Thru Thurs.
Reg. $17.50 Wave $10.00
Reg. $20.00 Wave $15.00
SM'XSET
conn ins
Open Than. tve. by Appointment
Phone 271-4521
7007 S.W. 87th AVE.
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTRACTING REPAIRING
Serving Ornio County Over 25 Years
111 S.W. 14th ST. HI 6-9W4
DOMESTIC MAIDS
RESTAURANT & HOTEL
HELP
A-l EMPLOYMENT
Ph. FR 9-8401
vn nil' i Kahn
MRS. IAt STKKLM
North Miami High, and attended
Miami-Dade Junior College and
the University of Florida. She is
a member of Tau Sigma Chi Sor-
ority and Orchesis.
Janet Marks Is
Prospective Bride
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mark-.
6416 SW 14th St.. announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Janet Barbara, to Richard David
Berg. The future bridegroom is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Berg,
of Brooklyn, N.Y.
Miss Marks is a graduate of
Coral Gables High, and attended
Miami-Dade Junior College. She is
employed by Bell Telephone Co.
Her fiance attended Brooklyn
College and served four years in
the Navy on submarine service.
Nancy Drubin
Engaged To
Jerome Lahman
Mrs. Samuel Donner, 900 Bay
Dr., Miami Beach, and Mr. Dru-
bin. of Maplewood. N. J.. have an-
nounced the engagement of their
daughter. Nancv Jo Drubin, to
Jerome E. Lahman. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Lahman. 2687 Ridge Val-
ley Road.. NW. Atlanta, Ga.
A graduate of Hewett School
for Girls and Pmecrest Academy,
the bride-elect is a student at the
University of Miami, where she
is a member of Delta Phi Epsilon
Sorority.
A graduate of Tulane University,
the prospective bridegroom is pre-
sently attending the Medical Col-
lege of Georgia, in Augusta. A
past president of Sigma Alpha Mu
Fraternity and a member of Omi-
cron Delta Kappa, honorary frat-
ernity, he is listed "Who's Who in
Judith Cohn Now**
Mrs. Geo. Feller
The former Judith Ann Cohn
daughter of Mr. and Mis. Berna*
G. Cohn. Woodlands Rd.. HarS
N.Y.. became the bride oAan
B. Feller on Sunday, Dec 4 Th
bridegroom is the son ofMr?
Irving Aronberg, of Brooklyn "and
George Feller, of Miami. '
The ceremony was performed by
Rahbi Lawrence Schwartz Rahh,
Richard Sternberger and Cantor
Raymond Smolover at the jej,n
Community Center of White
Plains. A reception followed.
Given in marriage by her father
the bride selected an empire gown
of ivory peau de sole trimmed
with alencon lace-appliqued net for
the ceremony. It was styled with
a matching train which began at
the shoulders as a cape, and was
completed with a short tulle vei!
held by lace flowers. She carried a
small family Bible with a cascade^-
of orchids, stephanotis and iv>
Honor attendants were Mrs
Phillip Brooks, Miss Judith Barth
olomew and Miss Sharon Shefter.
Carol Weinberg, Barbara Nuss
baum and Barbara Hellin served
as bridesmaids.
James Jay Cohn was his broth
er's best man, and there were ten
ushers.
New Mrs. Feller, who attended
the University of Georgia, and
graduated from the Laboratory In
stitute of Fashion Merchandising,
is associate fashion coordinator for
Independent Retailers Syndicate of
New York City.
Her bridegroom is a graduate of
the University of Miami, and is
regional sales manager tor Stace>
Fabrics Corp.. New York City.
Miss Gail Rubin's
Engagement Told
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cold, 4110
Alhambra Circle, have announced
the engagement of theii daui,h t\L
ter, Gail Ellen Rubin, to Richard
Joseph Kaplan.
The future bridegroom is the
son of Mrs. Ella Kaplan. 3769 SW
27th Ln.. and the late Lorn-
Kaplan.
1
American Colleges and Universi
ties."
Miss Drubin and her fiance will
exchange marriage vows in June.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
CAU^KUIH SHOE S \LO\
8134 N.E. 2nd Ave., Little River Tel. PL 8-6302
"The Place lo Co for the Names Yea Know"
Fine Name Brand Shoes New Complete line of Smart Handbags
MAKE YOUR WEDDING, BAR MTZVA, ANY fUNCJIOH
"THE TALK OF THE TOWN" with
IRVING PIETRACK ORCHESTRA
NO JOB TOO SMALL JE 8-0204___
NAYARRO Beauty Salon
look Smart for the Holidays
SHAMPOO & SET 2.50 TOUCHUP & SET 5.50
HAIRCUT................. J.00 WIGS SET ........ 3.50
PERMANENTS (CUT & SET) 8.50 MANICURE 1.50
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS For Appointment Phone
542 Arthur Godfrey Road, Miami Beach 532-7630
mil mi


r
f ndcrv. itoram^'in ibeb
Friday. December 16. 1966
+JeivIsHFk>rl Page 9-B
ullAMI BEACH Auditorium
" js the setting for the
Chanufca Festival Sunday night.
Sponsc.-ed by the Israel Bond
Organiiation, the event featured
Metropolitan opera star Jan
Peerce.
Mrs. Jay Leshaw chose a shell
pink knit ensemble for the even-
ing. Her three-piece knit was
softly tailored and was worn
with a white blouse. Mrs. Morris
Young chose a pretty light pink
knit er^emble. Cocoa brown was
the cc.or of Mrs. Carl Zaret's
three f.ece silk ensemble.
Mr. Akin Katzif's long-
sleevtd tangerine wool sheath
had tfc high jewel neckline. The
classic navy blue knit ensemble
was Mrs. Harry Cypen's choice.
Mrs Ei! Hyman combined pow-
der bine and beige in her print
sheath Her neckline was draped
in tht Grecian style and was
caugh: with a large pin. Rabbi
Leon Kronishs wife was in a
beige textured suit. Her double-
breast* -.i jacket was cut in the
tunic Itngth.
kJRS. Mac MermeU's emerald
green brocade was trimmed
at the neckline and around the
short sleeves with green irides-
cent sequins. Her bodice was
scooped neck, and the dress fol-
lowed the sheath silhouette. Mrs.
Aaron Reder's tapestry suit was
in brown and white, featuring
long sleeves and a peaked col-
lar. White beads trimmed the
navy jacket which topped the
matching navy sheath worn by
Mrs. Stanley Stein.
Mrs. Adrian Kaufman's aqua-
marine wool suit had pencil slim
checks created with cocoa stripes.
Her long jacket had the double
breasted front. A royal blue
crepe with the tunic-styled bod-
ice was Mrs. Gerald Schwartz's
choice. White panels were at the
sides, and her jewel neckline
was also banded in white. Wife
of Miami Beach Symphony con-
ductor, Barnett Breeskin. select-
ed a stunning black suit for the
program. Her skirt was a sheath,
with the jacket featuring a godet
flared back.
National board members of the Southeastern
Florida Region of Women's American ORT
are congratulated by top ORT leaders for
their achievement in membership during
1965-66. The trophy was presented at the na-
tional board conference in Los Angeles re-
cently. Region officers (left to right) are Mes-
dames William Fishman. executive commit-
tee chairman; Florence Kupperman, immedi-
ate past president; George Linden, special
projects vice president; Max M. Rosenberg,
national president; Mr. Michel Fedotin, di-
rector of ORT-Morocco; Mesdames Harold
Schneider, region president; Phillip Stark,
membership vice president; Harry Rosenblatt,
national southern expansion vice president;
and lack Eisenberg, national membership
vice president.
Schlossmans To Mark Anniversary At Aged Home
Local Artist In One-Man Show
Rita Gombimky, local artist, is
holding a one-man show at the
Beth Sho'om Art Gallery through
Jan. 6. according to Mrs. David
Druckc chairman of the Bcth:
Sholom Art Committee.
Mrs. Gombinski graduated from
Pratt Institute Art School and New
York University School of Edu-
cation. She holds several degrees,
and ar advanced certification in.
art education for teaching on the \
college and university level.
The artist, who came to Surfside
in 1964, where she established a
studio, had her first one-man show
of paintings in Miami at the Ba-
cardi Art Gallery in May. At Beth
Sholom, she will include figurative
expressionistic oils and water col-
ors.
The Gallery is open week days
from 9 to 5, Fridays following
services until 10 p.m.. Saturday
and Sunday mornings from 9 to 12
noon.
Annual Chanuka party sponsor-1
ed by the Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary, Jewish Home for the
Aged, on Sunday, 1:30 p.m.. will
honor Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Schlossman, of 1500 Bay Rd., who
are celebrating their 61st wedding
anniversary.
Mr. and Mrs. Schlossman, sup-
porters and benefactors of the
Jewish Home for the Aged, are
former residents of Rochester.
N.Y., and have lived here for 15
years.
Schlossman and his three sons
own and operate the Zero Food
Storage of Hialeah. Their sons and the distribution of gifts to res-
idents.
Mrs. Louis Makovsky. program
chairman, will present a program
married daughter and families
will be on hand to celebrate the
occasion.
Mrs. Lawrence Silverman, auxil-1 featuring the holiday season, with
iary president, will welcome the | Anita Karnes and Estelle Reeb as
guests. Mrs. Sol Silverman, hon- entertainers Olga Bibor Stern will
orary life president, will assist in accompany them at the piano.
SEASONS SPECIAL
Children To Age 12
3 Regency 8x 10 Color Portraits
$50 $25 saving
3_llxl4 Regency Color Portraits
$75 $30 saving
3 Black & White 8x10 Silvertone Portraits
$25 ... $10 saving
3 Black & White 11 x 14 Silvertone Portraits
$40 ... $15 saving
E. Allen Becker
MASTER Oe PHOTOGRAPHY Telephone JEfferson 2-2351
426 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD MIAMI BEACH 40, FLA.
HOLIDAY SPECIAL!
WIGS. WIGLETS & FALLS
Hand made from finest Human Hair
Gold Coast Cosureties Inc.
55 GIRALDA AVE.
Phone 444-2740
OFF
Holiday Magic Cosmetics
Complimentary FACIAL ANALYSIS
Free Delivery
Giant Carnival in Miramar
A giant carnival is coming to
Miramar Dec. 21 to 31. with games
and amusements "for the whole
family. To be held at Perry Park,
opposite Perry Junior High School
on S\V 68th Ave., the carnival is
sponsored by Temple Israel of
Miramar.
Grand Opening Special
SARAH'S BEAUTY SALON
SARAH formerly of Raffe & Man Trap
NOW OPENS HER OWN SHOP
Opening Specials
PLAIN SHAMPOO & SET (Rayetfe)
PERMANENTS $15 SPECIAL
MANICURE (with Shampoo & Set) FOR ONLY
FANCIFUL RINSE $1.00 Val.
TINT HAIR COLORING
$1 75
$5.00
$1.00
$ 75
$7.00
CHILDREN'S HAIR CUT (with or without appointment) $1.00
1117 N.E. 163rd St. 947-9310
Mon., Tues., & Sat. 8 to 6 Wed., Thurs., Fri., 8 to 9
Open Sundays 9 to 6 Dec. & January by Appointment
YOU can be SUM of the BEST at -
Todd's BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
2164 PONCE OE LEON Coral Gables Tel. 448521S
MOW SHIPPING FUNHM'S flHlST UiT BASKETS GIFTS
"it's Wedding Timer
CT
* FLOWERS
JILL OL 1i/.JJi9
BLOSSOM SHOP
(/Mercantile National Bank BuiUlm>
1616 Washington Ave., Miami Beach CALL JE 2-3231
you must see
The Weekend Artist
Fine Original Oil Paintings
Paintings priced far below retail value
SAVE 25% TO 75%
OPEN EVERY DAY THROUGH DEC. 25-3 P.M. 9 P.M.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 10 A.M. 9 P.M.
SUNDAY 10 A.M. 6 P.M.
8247 Sooth Dixie Highway
666-6683
for appointment
667-7759


?age 10-B
+Jewish fk>rldfor
Friday, December 16, 1966

Home Furnishings Execs at CJA Helm
Five executives in the home
furnishings industry will be hon-
ored for their contributions to the
furniture industry of South Fior-
ina ai a Combined Jewish Appeal
luncheon on Dec. 28L
The Home Furnishings Group of
the 1967 Combined .Jewish Appeal
drive will piese.nl "citations, of
aihievf men I and appreciation" to
Aaron T. Busier, of A. T. Busier
Furniture Company, and Henry
Knd, of Homy Knd Associates, for
"their outstanding contributions
to the Residential and Institution-
al Interiors Design Division of the;
Furniture Industry
And to J. William Baros Jr., of |
the Miami Rug Company, for "spe-,
cial peiforraance in the Floor Cov-
ering Industry;" and to Dave Mel-
in. of Tech-Aerofoam Products,;
Inc., for "superior achievement to
the Furniture and Furnishing Sup-
plies Industry."
A special Award of Honor
will be presented to A. J. Alex-
ander, of Kent Furniture, Inc.
Alexander, who is honorary
chairman of the Home Furnish-
ings Group for the 1967 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal campaign.
Htnry Ini
A.1. AUxier
J. Win. Bares
Aaron Eusfcr
Dave Mefin
will be cited for "his outstand-
ing leadership and dedicated
service toward the development
and growth of the Home Furn-
ishings Group of the Combined
Jewish Appeal and in appreci-
ation of his dedicated efforts
toward community betterment."
The CJA co-chairmen of the
Home Furnishings Group, Maxwell
II. Weisblatt, of Jordan Marsh
Company, and Hyman I.ipzin, of
Richards Department Stores, said
that the awards will be presented
at the annual Initial Gifts lunch
eon on Wednesday, Dec. 28, at the
Miami Springs Villas.
Cohen Maps Services
Campaign for Appeal
\ prominent South Florida Jew-
ish educator. Edward Cohen, has
been named chairman of the Com-
munal Services Division for the
3967 Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Cohen is exec-
mi vc director of Temple Israel.
Cohen has held this CJA lead
ership post since 1964. Under his
guidancc and leadership, the divi-
sion, which includes those persons
in the social, welfare and educa-
tional fields, has grown to one of
the largest in the CJA campaign
structure
A veteran of World War II,
Cohen is a member of the Inter-
faith Agency, and serves on the
rational board of the National
Association of Temple Adminis-
trators. He is also chairman of
NATA's inter congregational
committee. Cohen has served on
the Armed Services Committee
of the Jewish Welfare Board.
Cohen is working hard to set up
Idword Cohen
Rabbi Azulay
HAPPf CHANUKA
Bly's Garage
GENERAL REPAIRS
ALL MODELS
232 SW 2nd Avenue
Phone FR 1-6804
his division's campaign organiza-
tion and has already named Rabbi
Shimon Azulay as chairman of the
Hebrew Teachers Section of the
division.
Rabbi Azulay. who is a teacher
at the Hebrew Academy. Mesivta,
and at the Hebrew High School of
the Bureau of Jewish Education,
has served as a member of the
board of governors of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation for the
past four years.
He is a member of the executive
hoard of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, a beneficiary agency of
Federation, and is*president and
founder of the Hebrew Education
Alliance. He is a past president of
the Histadrut Ivrit and vice pres-
ident of the Federation of Hebrew
Teachers and Principals of Amer-
ica.
"It is significant." said Weis-
ilatt, 'that all of the award re->
ipients have not only contributed
reatly to the South Florida Furn-
ture Industry, but have also con-
tributed to the betterment of our
community through their partici-
pation in numerous civic and
philanthropic endeavors."
Aaron T. Euster. past president
of the Florida Furniture Mart, cur-
rently serves on the board of the
Better Business Bureau. Euster is
particularly well known for his
work with the physically-handicap-
ped and is the recipient of an
award from the Florida Furniture
Mart for his efforts in this respect.
He is a member of the board of
Goodwill Industries and past
chairman of the President's Com-
mittee for Employing the Physi-
cally Handicapped. Euster also
served as an ambassador for this
committee, and toured various
countries abroad in behalf of the
physically handicapped.
Henry End, interior and indus-
trial designer, has received more
interior design awards than any-
one else in the profession 12
awards from "Institutions" mag-
azine, a unique recognition from
the Societe Calinaire Philanthro-
pique, and a special citation from
the American Institute of Archi-
tects.
Founder and president of Mi-
ami's International Design Center
and the Los Angeles International
Design Center. End is a member
of the American Institute of In-
terior Designers, the Industrial
Design Institute, and the Nationa'
Society of Interior Designers.
He is the author of "The In-
teriors Book of Hotels and Mo-
tor Hotels," a hardcover 300-
page pictorial reference book
which will serve the designer
and the hotel profession for
years to come. End has design-
ed for Hollywood motion pic-
ture studios, had done the inter-
ior design for numerous hotels
and restaurants, and has been
chosen to design feature exhib-
its for the International Hotel
and International Restaurant
Expositions. End is listed in
"Who's Who in America."
J.> William Baros Jr., who has
been active in the Home Furnish-
ings Group of the CJA for the past
five years, is a member of the
board of governors of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and has
served on Federations budget
committee for the past thiee
years. A member of the board of
the Jewish Vocational Service, a
beneficiary agency of Federation
Baros serves on the board of the
Park and Shop Association, and is
active in the Downtown Merchants
Association, a division of the
Chamber of Commerce. Baros i.- a
past president of Temple Beth
Shirah.
Melin also serves on the Fed-
eration board of governors ami
has been active with the Home
Furnishings Group for sue years
as chairman of the Foam Rubber
and Suppliers Section. Melin is a
member of the Masonic Order,
Miracle lodge No. 321 and is a
member of the Scottish Rite and
Shrine.
Alexander also serves on Fed-
eration's board of governors. He
was chairman of the group for
three years and has also served
in a similar capacity for the United
Fund of Dadc County. He is a past
president of the Florida Furniture
Mart and past president and di-
rector of the Florida Association
of Furniture Manufacturers. In
1966. Alexander was the recipient
of an award from the City of Mi-
ami Beautification Committee.
Other members of the Home
Furnishings Group Committee, in
addition to Mendell M. Selig,
Special Gifts chairman, aie I.ouis
W. Adler, Milton Beresh. Boh
Gregg, Norwood I.evine. Marly
Martin. George Mildwofl. Ray
niond Mufson, llanv Packman,
Ronald Rey, Edward Sal.....on
Frank M. Seiden. Benjamin Selen
gut, Steve Stone. Jerome Uliner
and Larry Zirn.
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO ALL
PHONES: 691-4343 691-0131
"A LIVING SERVICE TO THE LIVING''
RANGE FUNERAL HOME
5727 NW 17th Avenue
M. ATHALIE RANGE
Owner, Funeral Directress
N. PATRICK RANGE
Business Manager
Union-gram Luncheon
Sisterhood of Temple Judea
Uniongram gathering on Wednes-
day included a buffet luncheon
and card games. Chairman for the
afternoon was Mrs. Frank Toback.
Cutler Ridge
Bowling Lanes
Restaurant
WHY COOK AT HOME?
LET MINNIE
COOK FOR YOU!
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
$1.25
BUFFET EVERY TUESDAY
6:30 P.M. 'TIL
>">">
WISHING ALL MY FRIENDS
A HAPPY CHANUKA
from
JOSEPH GUIDA
11 years at
Eden Roc Hotel
BARBER SHOP
CHANUKA
greetings:
COLUMBUS
HOTEL
BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
at
N. E. 1st STREET
GILBERT ROOFING CO., INC.
RER00FING REPAIR ROOF CLEANING & PAINTING
ON ALL TYPES OF ROOFS
GUTTERS & DOWN SPOUTS A SPECIALTY
754-3505
OAY OR NJ6HT 7 OAYS A WEEK
20 YEARS' EXPERIENCE
\
'
BEST WISHES
for a
HAPPY CHANUKA
JAY KASHUK
ASSOCIATES
Public Relations
BODY & FENDER COMPLETE AUTO
REPAIRS PAINTING
INSURANCE ESTIMATES
GLUE'S BODY SHOP
1490 N.E. 123rd St., N. Miami PL 7-4729
TO ALL GREETINGS
CAPT. S. HAMWAY
BOAT POPEYE
HAULOVER BEACH DOCK Phone Wl 7-3525
GREETINGS
IIAIIIH It LUMBER to.. IXC.
901 NW 71st ST., Miami, Fla. Phone PI 9-0417
Courteous Service Good Lumber Reasonable Prices
SEASON'S GREETINGS
from
JACA & SON
ROOFING CO.
Re-Roofing & Repairs
All Kinds Since 1945
Licensed and Insured
FR 3.7836
HAPPY CHANUKA to ALL OUR JEWISH FRIENDS
CLOVERLEAF GOLF RANGE
9 a.m. TO MIDNIGHT
EXPERT INSTRUCTION IN WOODS & IRONS
COMPLETE PRO SHOP
Located at 441 Exit of the N-S Expressway
Phone NA 4-7452
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO ALL
JOHN T. SLATER
CALL SLATIR "THE REALTOR" REAL ESTATE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
1697 NE 123rd Street, North Miami Phone 759-2795
t


All
Friday, December 16. 1966
+Je*isi IFtvridnari
Paqell-3
Bishop Coleman F. Carroll, of the Catholic Diocese, and Di.
Joseph Lichten, director of the Intercultural Affairs Depart-
ment of natinncl Anti-Defamation Leaque of B'nai B'rith, meet
at UV Catholic-Jewish dialcgue co-spon-oored by the diocese
and the ADL on Dec. 1 at Barry Colleae. Dr. Lichten addressed
one of the 12 workshop sessions on the spirit cf ecumenism in
today's continuing Judeo-Christian dialogue.
Judge C. Clyde Atkins (left) and Judge William L. Pallot, chair-
man of the Florida Reqion. Anti-Defamaticn League of B'nai
B'rith, were co-chairmen of the Catholic-Jewish Dialogue
sponsored by the Catholic Diocese here and the Florida ADL
at Earry College on Dec. 1. The all-day sessions cu'mincted
in an eveninq banquet attended by upward of 750 persons.
The Bible1 Opens
At Bav Harbor
Few films have ever been more
carefully cast than "The Bible."
the Dino De Laurentis production
which opens a road show engage-
ment Jan. 25 at the Bay Harbor
Theater on Bay Harbor Islands.
From the very start, both De
laurentis and director John Hus-
ton were determined to avoid-the
pitfalls of typecasting in favor of
players who would best fit the
roles they were to play.
Because of this, there are quite
a few surprises, for virtually all
are -newcomers to Biblical films.
Among them, for example, are
Peter OToole, cast as the Angel
of the Lord, who comes to warn
Lot and his family to flee the
doomed city of Sodom; Ava
Gardner, who breaks new acting
ground for her by portraying
Sarah, wife of Abraham, who
bears him a son when she is 90,
and George C. Scott, famed
Broadway actor who plays
Abraham, the great Patriarch,
and ages from the forties to more
than a hundred years old in this
dramatic role.
'
Richard Harris, brilliant Irish-
born actor, is Cain, the first mur-
derer, and he brings an intensity
lo the role rarely encountered on
the screen. Abel is played by
Franco Nero, a new face to films
The role of Adam, father of
mankind, is filled by young Holly-
wood newcomer Michael Parks
Stephen Boyd is Niinrod, King of
Babel, and Lot is portrayed by
Gabrielc FerzetU, one of Italy's
Witstanding actors. Noah, of course,
is played by John Huston himself,
and with his home-raised beam"
looks every inch the grand old
Patriarch.S.T.
CANTOR JACOB BORNSTEIN
Cantor Bornstein
Offers Musicale
At the Wednesday noon meeting
of Temple Israel Sisterhood in the
Wolfson Auditorium. Cantor Jacob
Bornstein, of Temple Israel, and
Harold FranU, accompanist, will
present a musical program on the
theme. "Love is a Many-Splendor
ed Thing."
Alan Solomon, director of the
Coleman Camp in Cleveland. Ga..
will give a talk on the camp.
Mrs. Morris E. Greene is Sis-
terhood president, and Mrs. Mar-
tin Spector is program chairman.
fun, Philosophy and Poetry
A program on "Fun, Philosophy
, and Poetry" was conducted by
' Jordan Davidson, columnist ! poet, on Tuesday noon at Ihe
| luncheon meeting of the Fight for
i Sight League at the Fonlainebleau
Hotel.
Cornerstone Ceremony for Ohev Shalom Beth Am Ushers in New Year
f ... bi Temple Beth Am will sunnsnr a
Sunday to Attract Roster of Leaders
Temple Beth Am will sponsoi a
New Year's Eve party this year in
the social hall. Co-chairmen Wil-
A festive celebration marking a noted orator, has traveled ex liam Sancs and Allred Lewis have
the start of the construction of tensively throughout the United matle l)lans fo1' hand, midnight
Ohev Shalom Congregations new States, Sneaking on behalf of the "" h.ir#. ..-h ., ------; r
temple will take place Sunday United Jewish Appeal, and was a
delegate to the American Jewish
Conference. He is now associated
with the Martinique Hotel in
Miami Beach.
snack, breakfast and an evening of
entertainment
Festivities will he h'ghl'ehted by'
a cornerstone laying ceremony,
which will h<- Hi" realization of
th" congregation's six year old
dream.
Hemophilia Is
Subject for Talk
The Orthodox congregation was Mrs. Ellen Wynne, president,
organized six years a-;o by a small National Hemophilia Foundation
group under the spiritual leader- Southeastern Division, was to be
ship of Rabb. Ph.neas Aaron Web- uucst sp,.ilktM. Thursdav. Dee. 15,
erman under whose leadership it when Dclia De, (-n' t(,r ho|ds
o\ yjT0" 7Uf 810Wf'h- "'" i,s anni,al mernhH-r-bring-amemher
nresenl ,Z ?o ."v ^ lnchn a' >e home of Mrs. Mae
present quarters a. 911 Normandy Suchcr I409 Bjarrjtz m. u, ,.,.,
Pm
Sam Arnold, president of the,---------- -----
Ohev Shalom Congregation, and
Dr. Mayer Herman, rabbi cmer- Leonard O. Wcinstein, chairman which will be held on the building
itus ol the Mo-holu Parkway Jew- of the arrangements committee, site at 7011 Bonia Dr., one block
tsn (enter in New York City, will Wednesday invited the public to west of Indian Creek Dr. Refresh-
He principal speaker. Dr. Herman, join the afternoon festivities, ments will be served.
Miami Beach Counci'man Mai-
vin Englander will h-ad an im-
pressive roster of city, county
and state officials, who are ex-
pected to attend and participate
in the rsremories, and will be
the master of ceremonies for the
afternoon program.
e
harder to make
your day shorter
WVCG-AM now on
the air until midnight
-
WVCG
SOUTH FLORIDA'S GOOQ MUSK STATIONS
AM 1080 KC. 10,000 Waffs
FM -105.1 MC. -160,000 Waffs

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j


Page 12-B
* U ** i f nnririian
Friday. December IS. 1966
Zionist Club
Starts Meetings
The 21st annual Zio.iU Lunch-
eon Club, sponsored by the Miami
Beach District Zimjist Or^hiijsa-
tion of America, mis elected th>
National'Hotel. 1677 (.o'lins Ave..
Miami Beach, ijf the newjpeeting
plaie for this years sessions.
Each Wednesday at 12:15 p.m..
members of the South Florida
Districts of the ZOA will meet in
the newly-decorated dining room
of the National Hotel for a dairy
luncheon and to bear an outstand-
ing speaker, news repsrt, local or-
ganization announcements and
community singing.
Cantor Saul Breeh, of Temple
Beth Raphael, l4b Jefferson
Ave., has been appointed chair-
man of the 21st annual Lunch-
eon Club, according to Abraham
A. Grunhut, president of the
Miami Beach Zionist District.
Cantor Breeh, who was chair-
man of the Luncheon Club last
year, has been active in Zion-
ist work in the community for
several years, and is a board
member and an officer of the
Brandeis Zionist District and of
the Miami Beach Zionist Dis-
trict.
Jacob C. Fishman. who has been
chairman of the Luncheon Club
for the past five years, will serve
as honorary- chairman.
Guest speaker next Wednesday,
at 12:15 p.m., will be Louis
Schwartzman, executive director.
Bureau of Jewish Education of
Greater Miami. He will discuss
'The Nobel Prize Winners."
Dr. Abraham Wolfson, who has
served as newscaster for several
years, will review the current
news.
$30,000 Gift Goes To AmoT School At Meeting Here
l
Artists Offer
Opera Preview
Av Beth Sholom
A preview of the highlights of
he Miami Opera Guild season will
be piesented at the open meeting
of the SisteihoDd of Temple Beth
Sholom on Wednesday, 1 p.m., in
the Sisterhood Lounge, according
to Mrs. Seymour Silverman, Sis-
tei hood president.
Mrs. Leo Levin, past president
of the Sisterhood, will introduce
Dr. Paul Csonka, associate direc-
tor of the Miami Opera Guild,
Joseph Papa, tenor, and Judith
Drucker, soprano, of the Guild.
They will present duets and solos
from the season's forthcoming
repertoire.
Mrs. James S. Knopke, vice
president, is in charge of hospital-
ity. Refreshments will be served.
KATZ's PARADISE RESTAURANT
1451 Collins Avenue
Phone 5321671
KREPLACH MEAT
FISH -V STEAKS ft CHOPS ft CHICKEN
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Excellent Cuisine Superb Service Modern Decor
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I EST. 1943 Under Same Management
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| 841 Washington Ave. Ph. 531-9182 j
A $30,000 contribution for per-
petual scholarships at the Great-
er Miami "Amal" Trade School in
Ramleh. Israel, by Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Zi'rier. Mfcpii Beach eWJ
leaders, highlighted' a series
meetings here last week welcom-
es IsnUfTen-'il General Zeev
Boneh to the United States.
Boneh spoke both at a Wednes-
day night Histadrut celebration
sponsored by the Farband-Labor
Zionist Organization and Poale
Zion at the Fontainebleau Hotel,
and at a Thursday luncheon of the
Greater Miami Business and Pro-
fessional Council of the Israel
Histadrut campaign.
Alsc participating in the se-
ries of sessions with top local sup-
porters o, the bt.ite of Israel
was Israel Stolarsky. associate
national director of Histadrut.
Zitner, who moved here from
Philadelphia several years ago and
las tak'-ii an active part in Israel
Bonds and other community af-
fairs, stressed Israel's increased
need for vocational training and
education facilities.
"With the rapid advance in
technology and so large a percent-
Club Gavel To
Change Hands
Men's Social Group of South-
gate Towers Apartments will in-
stall 1967 officers Thursday even-
ing, Dec. 22. at the Algiers Hotel.
Circuit Court Judge Harold
Spaet will officiate at the installa-
tion, and the affair will include
refreshments, entertainment, and
dancing to the music of Bob No-
vak's orchestra.
William Rosenberg, 1966 pres-
ident, will pass the gavel to H.
Jack Chasin. newly-elected pres-
ident.
Other officers include Maur-
ice Kniznik, first vice president;
Reuben Levinson, second vice
president; Robert Ober, secre- j
tary; Dave Frank, treasurer;
George Coin, cergeant-at-arms.
Board of directors are Emanuel
Blum, Abraham Heller, Henry
Kramer, Jack Schwartz, Max A.
Weiss, Harry Burden, Charles
Herman, and Herman Tobin.
The organization sponsors en-
tertainment and social functions
to raise funds for charitable pur-
poses, and in the last several years.
age of Israel's present and future
1 immigrants lacking trade skills.
, the need for the Amal Trade school
is critical,'; Zitner asserted.
Consul' General Boneh reviewed
the factors which necessitated Is-
rael's retaliatory raid on Jordan
, last month, and emphasized that
Israel does not follow "an eye-for-
i aneye policy, but seeks peace
j above all else."
Stolarsky summed up Israel's
economic situation by stating
! that Histadrut in Israel and
I Histadrut supporters in the
j United States "both must acce-
lerate their efforts to balance
' off the Jewish State's current
j financial problems."
Taking part in the meetings
j were Rabbi Leon Kronish. honor-
i ary chairman; Jacob Rifkin,
i chairman: Jack S. Popick, co-
I chairman; Mrs. Anna Brenner
I Meyers, honorary chairman; Sam-
uel Feinstein. Histadrut president;
Abraham Rovinsky, head of the
Labor Zionist movement here:
Morris Newmark. treasurer: Sam-
uel Elman; Joseph A>h: | M.he
Beiman, Florida regional director
of Histadrut.
Chris Dallon
Opens Dance
Stt'dio at Sea Isle
Chris Dalton. who has opened
his Ballroom and Latin Dance
Studios at the Sea Isle Hotel for
| the season, has create-: a new
dance called the Brazilera
The Bra7ilera was imi luced to
a professional dance clas; >n Dec.
9 at the Sea Isle Hotel iritfa Gia
and Gita. former Harvest Boon
Ball champions, giving Out exhibi-
tion.
And on Dec. 11 at the Sea Isle,
dance stylist Chris Dj. hi was
master of ceremonies at the Latin
Dance Festival, which presented a %"
preview of the new La: dance
Brazilera.
MORRIS & RUTH LERNER
HARRY ZUCKERMAN
Catering for All Occasions
Established in 1945
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L
Friday, December 16. 1966

+Jen>ist>ncriciian
Page 13-B
J3*r JWitzvalt
Elliot Green
Elliot Benjamin, son of Mrs.
Robert ireen and the late J*r.
Green, will become Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Dec. Vf, at Temple
Emanu-El.
Elliot attends eighth grade at
Nautilus Junior High and plays
drums i*i the band. He has won
awards for scholastic achievement
in Temple Emanu-El Religious
School.
The celebrant will be honored
at a luncheon in Sirkin Hall fol-
lowing 1he service.
Mrs. Ray Benjamin, Elliot's ma-
ternal prandmother, will attend.
*
Phillip and Michael Sparling
Phillip Dean and Michael Fred,
twin sens of Mr and Mrs. Harry
Sperling. 311 gW 51st Ave., will
celebrau their Bar Mitzvah on Sat
urday, Dec. 17. at Temple Beth
Tov.
Now attending Kinloch Junior
High, the celebrants began their
education in New York, where
they lived prior to coming to Mi-
ami.
Phillip and Michael will be hon-
ored at a reception and open house
in their home.
6 a
Dennis Leaton
Dennis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Leaton, 4185 Pamona, Coral
Gables, will become Bar Mitzvah
at Beth David Congregation on
Saturday morning. Dec. 17.
Denr.js is a se\enth grade stu-
dent at Pone* de Leon Junior
High and has been attending Beth
David JReligious School for the
past rwrt years. He is active in
sports and has a collection of rib
bons and trophies for running and
lumping. Dennis is also active in
the Boy Scouts.
< Herbtrt Ehrenhaus, grandpar-
ent of Dennii,*. nill attend the
services.
trumpet in the Symphonic Band.
Isador Levine and Frank Katz.
grandparents of the celebrant, will
attend the services.
r
Jeffry Kashuk
Jeffry Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Kashuk, 860 NW 174th
St., will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday morning. Dec. 17, at
the Hebrew Academy.
Jeffry, an eighth grade student
in the Academy, is a member of
the Hebrew Academy Choir and
active in sports.
Among guests will be Jeffry's
grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Ben-
jamin Kashuk.
A Kiddush in honor of the cele-
brant will be held following the
services.
* a
Ronald Kantar
Ronald, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert J. Kanter. 122 NE 122nd
St.. will become Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Dec 17, at Beth Moshe
Congregation.
Ronald is an eighth grade stu-
dent at North Miami Junior High.
Elliot Green Phillip Sperling
Michael Sparling Dennis leaton Michael levine
He is a member of the Naturalist
Club and on the Control Board of
his class.
An Oneg Shabbat on Friday!
evening and a Kiddush on Satur-
day in Ronald's honor will be I
sponsored by his parents.
Ronald's grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Max Stechler, and Mrs.)
George J. Kanter, all of Miami j
Beach, will attend the ceremony!
and a luncheon at the Dupont
Plaza Hotel on Saturday after
noon.
Alan Weinstock
Alan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Weinstock. will observe his Bar!
Mitzvah on Saturday morning. I
Dec. 17. at Temple Zion.
Alan attends seventh grade at
West Miami Junior High and is
interested in art.
Mr. and Mrs. Weinstock will
host the Kiddush following the
service and a reception at home
on Saturday night.
* *
Harvay Namaroff
The Bar Mitzvah of Harvey
Allan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Nemeroff. 8055 Noremac Ave., will
be observed during Saturday
morning servi.\ u, Dec. 17, at
Temple Ner Tamid.
Harvey is a student at Nautilus
Junior High and Temple Ner
Tamid Religious School.
He is a sports fan.
A Kiddush in honor of the cele-
brant will follow the ceremony,
and a dinner and reception for
Harvey's friends will be held at
the Algiers Hotel on Saturday
evening.
T Maps Winter Vacation Camps
..,
Michael Levine
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Levine. 4020 Riviera Dr..
Coral Gables, will become Bar
Mitzvah at Beth David Congrega-
tion or Dec. 17. Saturday after-
noon.
Michael is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Ponce de Leon Junior
High, and has been attending Beth
David Religious School for the
past three years. He is interested
in golf and football, and plays the
Three separate winter vacation
day camp programs will be held
at the three major blanches of
the YM and WHA of Greater Mi-
ami during the elementary school
vacation period, Dec. 26 to 30,
which is open to children.
The programs will be conducted
at the Central "Y."' 8500 SW 8th
St, Miami Beach "Y," 1536 Bay I
Rd., and the North County "Y,''
temporary facility at 1100 NE '
163rd St.
The Central "Y" program will
be in the form of fun and play
groups held each afternoon
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., during ;
the vacation weak. Included in
the program are such events as
trampoline, tumbling and stunts,
archery, basketball, volleyball,
bowling, softball, wrestling (boys
only), group games, and swim-
ming (depending on weather).
Deadline for registration is Tues-
day, Dec. 20.
The Miami Beach day camp pro-
gram will be divided into two
parts a full day and a half-day
The full day session will run
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with chil-
dren bringing lunch each day, ex-
cept Monday, Dec. 26. The half-
day session will run from 12 noon
to 4 p.m. The children are re-
quested to eat lunch at home prior
to coming to the "Y." There will
be live trips for the youngsters
during this period, including a vis-
it to Pioneer City, roller skating,
cook-outs, athletic events, and
winding up with a pre-New Year's
Eve party on Dec. 30.
The North County "Y" winter
vacation day camp program will
also include a series of trips for
the youngsters. They also will vis-
it Pioneer City, go roller-skating,
have cook-outs, participate in
games and have parties with
prizes and refreshments. House-
to-house transportation is available
if desired.

Greenberg Unit
Monthly Meeting
Poale Zion Chaim Greenberg
Branch of Greater Miami held its
monthly meeting on Wednesday,
8 p.m., at the Royal Hungarian
Kosher Restaurant.
President Abraham Filosoff con-
ducted the meeting which was fol-
lowed by a program in observance
of the Chanuka Festival.
Manuel Burstein chaired the
cultural portion of the evening,
which included a talk on This
Significance of Chanuka" by Rab-
bi Leon Goldenberger. and Cantor
Zvi Adler. of Temple Emanu-El.
who lit the candles and offered
traditional melodies.
TOYS DOLLS GAMES
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eeth st. a coiim* iv*.


Fcrqe 14-B
* k n i*.! ncridfian
Friday, December 16, 1968
Sen. Fulbright to Launch Beth Am
Forum Series in Talk Here Jan. 26
Temple Beth Am third annual
forum series will be launched here
Jan. 26 with the appearance of
Sen. J. William Fulbright. of Ax-1
kansas.
The series will also feature Dr.,
Ashley Montague, Mar. 1. in a dis-
cussion of "The Natural Superior!-
t\ of Women;'" Sam I.evenson,
Apr. 2. renowned Jewish comic;
and William Buckley. Apr. 17. edi- j
tor of the National Review, who]
will talk on "The Aimlessncss of |
American Education,"
Sen Fulhrisht's presentation
Jan. 26 is titled as "The World
ol Today.
The Democratic Senator was
born at Suniner. Mo., on April 9.
1905.
Before graduating from the
University of Arkansas, he won
a Rhodes Scholarship, and con-
t.nued his st.idy of history and
political science at Pembroke
College, Oxford University, Eng-
land, for three years, graduating
with an AB degree in 1928. He :
received a MA degree from Ox-
awarded an honorary doctorate
there.
After completing his studies at
Oxford, he visited many of the
countries of Europe, then returned ,
to the United States to begin the t
study of law at George Washing-
ton University Law School. He re-
ceived a LLB degree with distinc-
tion in 1934.
Accepting a position as special
attorney in the Anti-Trust Divi-
sion of the Department of Justice,
he stayed there until 1935, when
Corner Bank
Breaks Ground
For New Site
The Carner Bank of Miami
Beach, whose control was pur-
chased some six months ago by
financiers and philanthropists Jack
and Stephen H. Carner, on Mon-
day took steps to build a new
bank building at 930 Washington
Ave.. directly across the street
from its present, leased site.
One of Miami Beach's land-
marks, the old Fredrickson Hotel
was demolished as a large con-
tingent of public officials, civic
leaders and bank directors attend-
ed the event.
Morris Lapidus, Miami Beach
and New York architect, who
also serves on the board of the
Carner Bank, is rushing final
plans to completion for a two-
story structure to be erected on
the 153-front-feet location. Tha
new bank will have its own park-
ing, and is adjacent to a munici-
pal parking lot at the corner of
9th St. and Washington Ave.
Among those taking part in
brief ceremonies, in addition to
the Carners, were former Beach
Mayor D. Lee Powell and former
Vice Mayor Malvin Englander,
both now city councilmen; Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce
president, Aaron Fair; school
board member. Anna Brenner
Meyers, also a Carner Bank di-
rector; Albert Nash, president of
the South Shore Hotel Association;
Ray Redman, executive vice pres-
ident of the Washington Avenue-
South Shore Association; and
numerous others. .
Stephen Carner, president of the
12-year-old financial institution,
said construction will begin im-
mediately upon approval of the
final plans, with groundbreaking,
"hopefully within the next six
weeks."
Jack Carner, board chairman,
noted that "the bank has increased
its capital by almost 40 percent
and its deposits and loans by
strong percentages" since he took
over the former Bank of Miami
Beach last June 17.
he became a lecturer-in-law at
George Washington University. He
returned to the University of Ar-
kansas as a member of the law
school faculty in 1936 and served
in that capacity until 1939. In that
year, he was appointed president
of the University of Arkansas at
the age of 34.
In 1942. he entered politics by
running for Congress in the Third
District of Arkansas, and was
elected by a large majority. Soon
after he entered the House, he be-
came a member of the Foreign Af-
fairs Committee and introduced
the Fulbright Resolution, which
passed the House of Representa-
tives on September 21, 1934. by
a vote of 360 to 29. The resolution
called for the participation by the
United Stales in an international
organization to maintain the
peace, and is generally considered
to be the forerunner to the estab-
lishment of the United Nations.
In 1944, at the age of 39, he
ran as a candidate for the Senate
and defeated four opponents in
the Democratic primaries.
In 1950, he was reelected to
the Senate without opposition
from either party and in 1956,
without a Democratic opponent.
He was nominated for a fourth
term in the Democratic primary
in 1962 by a two-to-one margin
and elected over his Republican
opponent by an even greater
margin.
In 1954. Sen. Fulbright was the
lone member of the Senate to vote
against additional funds for the
Special Investigating Subcommit-
tee headed by the late Joseph Mc-
Carthy, and was the sponsor of the
censure resolution against Sen.
McCarthy, which was passed by the
Senate. Later the same year he
was appointed by the President
as a member of the United States
delegation to the General As-
sembly of the United Nations.
Chairman of the Banking and
Currency Committee from 1955 to
1959, he resigned that post on
February' 6, 1959, to become chair-
man of the Senate Committee on
Foreign Relations. In addition to
this position, he is a member of
the Finance Committee and the
Joint Economic Committee.
Currently, he is a strong op-
ponent of President Johnson's
pelicies in Viet Nam. and among
leaders of the "doves," demanding
a conclusion to U.S. participation
in war in Southeast Asia.
Siti. fULBKIGHT
Shalom Home
Names Moll
Fred Moll, a member of the
American College of Nursing
Home Administrators, has been
appointed administrator of the
Shalom Nurs-
ing anu Conva-
lescent Home
on Miam1
Beach, accord
ing to Michael
Sossin. execu-
tive director.
The Shalom
Home, now un-
d e r construc-
tion at 500-9th
St.. is expected
to be completed
M011 by the start of
the year. It is planned for 100
beds, with expansion for the fu-
ture provided through the archi-
tectural and building desien.
Moll, from St. Louis, Mo., at-
tended Washington University
and majored in business admin-
istration. He served three years
in the U.S. Army during World
War II and took an administra-
tive residency course with the
Division of Hospitals in St.
Louis after the war. He was
named administrative assistant
for the St. Louis 3,500-bed com-
plex after successfully complet-
ing the course.
Moll came lo South Florida in
1957 as superintendent of a South
Dade hospital and later took the I
post of administrator at the Palm-
ettO Convalescent Home.
Noted Israeli
Educator Will
Speak in Miami
Dr. Alexander Rosenfeld, world-
traveler, author, and lecturer, will
address Hebraists of Greater Mi-
ami on Thursday, Dec. 22. 8:15
p.m.. at the offices of the Bureau
of Jewish Education, 940 IJneoln
Rd.
Dr. Rosenfeld will discuss the
life of David Ben-Gurion, former
Prime Minister of Israel, not as a
politician, but as a man of culture
and ideas.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Bureau and the MoAdon, Hebrew
Cultural Society, is open to the
general public.
Dr. Rosenfeld is a member of
the board of directors of the
Hebrew World Union with head-
quarters in Jerusalem. He re-
ceived his PhD in sociology and
philosophy at the University of
Vienna, served as Hebrew teach-
er in the Hebrew schools of
Lithuania, as well as lecturer at
the People's University of Kaun-
as, capital of Lithuania.
Since 1930. Dr. Rosenfeld has
been a resident of Tel Aviv and
has served as a roving ambassador
for the World Union to Jewish
communities throughout the world.
In recent years, he was a dele-
gate of the Hebrew Union in
Jerusalem to Argentina, Brazil,
and Venezuela.
He is now associated with the
Mayer Export Bank of Tel Aviv.
Chairing the meeting will be
Dr. Nathaniel Soroff, consultant
of the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion.
Wr. AUXANDtR KOStNftlD
Detroit Club Has
Holiday Party
The Detroit Social Club of
Greater Miami will have its 18ili
annual Chanuka party Mo
evening. Dec. 19, at the \ ers
Hotel.
Cantor Ben Dickson, of Temple
Zamora. will officiate at the can
dlelighting ceremony, and will
offer several vocal selections
Also on the program will be
members of the Toby Poulton
Dancing School.
CARNER W&
('/,
I BEAU

| kt BUJff**1 wki
8E rH VEW iOCAW*
EXm*""*!*
***
Ceremonies marking the demolition of the old Fredrikson
Hotel, site of the new Carner Bank of Miami Beach Building,
brought together (left to right) Albert Nash, president of the
South Shore Association; Aaron Farr, president of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce; Stephen H. Carner, president
of the Comer Bank of Miami Beach; and Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, a member of the Dade School Board and a director
of the Corner Bank.
Multi-Talented
Executive Now In
Candy Business
Stan Banks is a multi-talented
professional who easily juggles
several careers at the same time.
The 25-year-old Chicagoan, a pro-
fessional singer and a graduate
architect and interior designer, re-
cently became partners with his
father in a "Poppin Cottage"
candy-making business here.
There is a Poppin Cottage in
the Northside Shopping Center,
and another at 7433 Collins Ave.,
where a large window serves as a
frame for spectators to watch
candy being made by hand.
Although the Banks family, con-
sisting of Sol, senior, who has been .
in the candy-making business for 28 j
years; wife, Florence, who assists;:
and helper Alexia 14. a Nautilus
Junior High student, came to Mi-
ami Beach a year ago, it is the
first time that Stan has been able
to join them.
Young Stan Banks was in the i
Army for six months, now acting,
sergeant, specialist fourth class in
the reserves, and prior to that, he
traveled almost a million air miles
as a designer fc- Playboy Clubs i
International.
The Miami Beach store Italian
decor is a joint effort of Stan's, j
who designed the pink and gold
interior and his mother, who ex-
ecuted the plan. In addition to the '
home-made chocolates, the new i
store will feature imported hard i
candies, roasted nuts, fruit ship-1
ping, jellies, gifts, greeting cards'
and a delivery' service.
The store will be open Monday ;
through Saturday from 10 to 91
p.m., Sundays, from 12 to 6 p.m.
A graduate with a degree in i
architecture from the University j
of Illinois. Stan studied singing at
th' Chicago Conservatory of Mu-
sic. He has appeared locally at the
Doral Beach and Fontainebleau
Hotels, and at many hotels in the!
mid-west, as well as in summer
stock and legitimate theatre.
He has done several radio and
television shows, plans to do an
album, and has several concert
dates with Louis Varon and his
Eden Roc Orchestra coming up.
S.T.
TELL
THEM
ABOUT
ELCOME
#m* WAGON
If you know of family who hat
Just arrived in your community, be
aura to tell them about Walcome
Wagon. They will be delighted with
the basket of gifts and helpful
information they will receive from
our hostess, t symbol ol tha com-
munity'a traditional hospitality. Or
you nay cell ,,-,
Welco:
443-2526
from
eaaeea la M m n*n
] Please have the Welcome Wage*
Hostjss coll en me.
~< would like to subscribe te
The Jewish Floridian.
"HI out coupon and mail te
Circulation Deet..
M.r.0. Bex 2973, Miami, Pie.
1200 ROOM HOTEL
NEW YORK CITY
Vour ideal headquarters close to
attractions, shopping, sightseeing
fine dining and entertainment.
YEAR 'ROUND \
SWIMMING POOL M
FREE TO GUESTSjfj
Rates, including TV
and air-conditioning
from $8.85 single
$11.85 double
Call: PLaza MO0O
or write the
8HELTON
TOWERS
HOTEL
Lexington Ae.
48-4S St-^Ji____
Send 7ree*ilteralure and money
saving Courtesy Card to
Name


rndcnr rw-~k~ in isbb
[Fiiday. December 16, 1966
*Jenisfi fkrMian
Page 15-3
New Beth Solomon Consecrated Here
lieth Solomon Congregation
Iheld consecration ceremonies on
Jnov. 27 in the former Fiagler-
iGianada Jewish Center.
Members of a five-piece teen-
lage band, Francine Kavenoff. Neil
iKonel. Stewart Krantz, Barbara
Mahler and Marco Winer, accom-
panied the Hebrew School Stud-
[ cnts Chorus, which included Lucy
and Myra Graetz, Carla and Rob-
ert Moskowitz, Miriam Oroshnik.
World-renowned tenor, Jan
Peerce, of the Metropolitan
Opera Co., at the Israel Bond
Chanuka Festival on Sunday
night at Miami Beach Audi-
torium.
Susan Poller, Sharon Golen, San-
dra Gordon, Ricky Fine, Peter Uor-
en, Scott Karafin, Eugene and
Francine Sherwood, Daniel Booth.
Evan Chern, Robbin Hollins, Stev-
en Kaplan, Paulette Kesslcr. Rich-
ard l.pvinc. Edmond Mahoncy.
Howard Sanders. Norman Schloss
berg, Mark Strousberg, Kenny
Kolen, Frank Kronberg and Eileen
Strul.
Harold Strumpf introduced May-
or Robert King High, Judges Jack
Falk and Milton Friedman, and
Mrs. Selma Green, who offered
greetings and blessings to the new
congregation.
Torah procession included mem-
bers of the Issenberg family, Dav-
id, Sam, Harold, Joseph, and Hen-
ry and Mark, grandchildren. Mrs.
Pearl Issenberg, widow of the late I
Solomon Issenberg, was honored |
at the reception, as were Mes-
dantes David, Sam, Harold and Joe '
Issenberg.
Honor certificates for attend-
ance at Sabbath services were pre-
sented to Scott Demsky, Howard'
Sanders, Richard Levine, Kenny'
Golen, highest honors. Also Lucy;
and Myra Graetz, Miriam Orosh-
nik, Susan and Solomon Poller,
Sharon Golen, Scott Karafin, Eu-
gene and Francine Sherwood, Dan- ]
iel Booth, Evan Chern, Edward
Mahoney, Norman Schlossbcrg,
and Dana Gold.
David Dorfman, president of
the congregation, and Mrs. Grace
Booth, president of Sisterhood, ad-
dressed the gathering. Rabbi
Aharon M. Feier delivered the
sermon, "In God's Sanctuary For-
ever," in honor of the late Sol-
omon Issenberg.
SILVERSTEIN
Musical Program tor Club
MRS, ida, of 1300 Pennsylvania
a vc, died l lee. l". .-in- came !-.- in
David Pinski Culture Club hits
' Member of Na^na!*Council Planned a musk;'' P.ror*F :,M
of Jewish Women, sin- is survived\ refreshments for Friday. 8 p.m.,
at 842 Washington Ave. Abraham
Filosof is chairman.
>> her husband, Jacob; :i sons,
Maurice "I Caracas, Venesueln,
Jerome of Oklahoma City, and tier-
m.m of \Vv\ Voik i.'itj. ;i daughter,
Mm. Jeanette blelachman ..f Miami,
;niil >; grandchildren. Services were
In-ill I'o;. 13 .it km raid, \-, rman-
dy Dr. Chapel, wllh Interment In
Ml. N.I... Cemetery,
LEGAL NOTICE
Oti
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
i I u a
rice
..f BIS
River-
WILLIAM B0RNS7EIN
Wm. Bornstein,
Philanthropist,
Dies Here at 74
Miami Beach community leader
William Bornstein, of 1681 Bay
BIRCHANSKV. Mis Mi in. 7;
Mulniia Ave., died Dec. 13
li
gersten, Isidore, :.".. of 1604 Penn-
-> Ivanla Ave ill, ,i Dec, 13. Gordon.
BERLIN. Charles Morrow, 59, ol 1286
l"i-i St., illi-ii I >..(. lo, Set v ii h in
I it ii-" l. Itlverslde.
BASKiN. Max, 82, of IT.;.i SW l:;ih
Si., tiled Dec. 9. Services In St.
IxiuIh, Mo. 'it.nit.n.
JARRETT, Saul M.. 59, i.f 220 King
luiiii Dr., died Dec. 10. Rlvi
kroop, Morris, 83, of Bill i: llaj
Harbor Dr., died Dec. 9. Newman.
RESNICK. Mary, 93, ..f 1163 Norman-
tl.v Dr., died Dec. :. Services in
Chicago. Riverside,
SIMON, David, ;:'.. ..f 1045 Lenox
Ave.. died Dec. 9. Riverside,
IN THE NAME AND BY
THE AUTHORITY OF
| THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO ALL Til WHOM THESE 11:1.s-
ENTS KHALI. i'ii.MK, GREETINGS:
Whereas, MARVIN I. WIENER,
Miami, Florida; BEKNK'E M. WAD-
TON, Miami, Florida: .11 nv H'SAU-
DI, Miami, Florida, uf June, A l>. li'ii". cause In be In -
cons rated undi i the laws of the Stale
..f Florida AtiliEY HOTEL CORP.,
.i i-ui |.nriiii>.ii. with its |>rincl|ial
place of business .ii Miuml, I'tade
County, in the Slate of Florida, and
whereas such corporation on lh
mii day of December, Ah i960, ..-lu-tii
' to be riled In tin- office of the Seen -
tary of State of in. Slate "i Florida,
iln- tl.. .inn. -Hi. it \ nuthiirily i f.|iili'."i|
under Bectl.....108.37, Florida S1..1-
utes, showing the dissolution of such
corporal Ion.
Now, Hi. refore, Ihu s. cretar) of
State does herebj certify lo the foi
LERNER. Eugene, 38, of 92S 7ili Bt.. I going and that h. is satisfied ih:.i
Lake Park, Fla., died. Dec. 9. River- the requirements ..f the law have been
,,';r compiled with.
marten, Cornelia, IS, of !I4| Penn- in witness WHEREOF, I have
sylvanla .\v.-.. died Dec. 8. River-1 hereunto sei my hand and have af-
fixed tin Urea I Seal of the suit.- ..f
Florida, al Tallahassee-, the Capital,
this the Eighth da) of December, A i'.
1966,
TOM ADAMS
Kecretar) ol State
12 III ..ii
aide.
Rice, Anno, 81, of 2350 s\v 13th St.
died Dec. 8. Gordon,
Rd., died Dec. 10 at the age of 74.; stoller, Maurice, :s. ,,r urn NB
Services for the philanthropist z^^; %&*&, \ta%3g*xx
were held Dec. 12 at Riverside '"-'h Aye., died Dec !. Riverside.
, ,-hnn< frankel, Mrs. Alice, 77. of 6400
Alton Rd. Chapel. Collins Ave., died Dec! 7. Riverside
A resident of Miami Beach for 14 friedman, victor. 7:1. ..r r.sxu La-
years, Mr. Bornstein was a Wash- MAflCUS^Maullce U,'i ffw?*W I
ington, D.C. builder, and in 1964 _*"* .Df-i/H*" "'< 7 Riverside.
Raphael. Mrs. Bertie, '".:.. of 82?
won the John F. Kennedy Peace; Euclid Ave., dl<.......c. s. Riverside.
Award for his unstinting efforts dolin. Morris, 78, of 3350 Magnolln
in charitable causes. 8ervtee ln Cn-
In Washington he had served
as president of B'nai Israel Syn-
agogue and of Master Plumbers
Association, and also of B'rith
Sholom, Bethlehem, Pa. He was
a member of the Masonic order,
B'nai B'rith, Jewish National
Fund and Temple Beth Sholom
of Miami Beach. He served as
president of the Greater Miami
JNF Council at the time of his
passing.
He also belonged to the Amer-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C13121
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
HAUOl.D KAIIN.
PlallUlff,
.ami. Riverside. u,.s...',"' 1.-vuv
besser, Samuel Joseph, 7.-,, <.r St2l BfS} ,',,,
Adams, Hollyw....... Sled Deo. '
*ei vices in Sharon, Mass. Rlversld
ferron, Mrs. Rose, 71, <.r 1670
James Ave., died Dec. >\. Service!
in New York. Riverside.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 73048-C
in RE; Estate of
IDA ST KIN
1 leceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or l>.....mils Agninsi
Said Estate:
v.iu .ire hereby notified and re-
ican Society of Sanitary Engineers, quired to present any claims and
Demands which you may have against
and the American Society of Heat-
ing and Ventilating Engineers.
He is survived by his wife, Kate,
of Maryland; two sons, Alfred B.
and Robert E., of Maryland, and
six grandchildren. Also three sis-
ters, Mrs. Katherine Wilson and
Mrs. Rose Sarch, of California, and
Mrs. Helen Goldenberg, of New
York City.
the estate t.f ida STEIN deceased
late t,f Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
fil. the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.14, Florida
Statutes, In their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County, Flor-
ida, within six calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 14th
day of December, A.l>. i6.
HOWARD SHAPIRO
As Executor
First piil.liiaiii.il of this notice on
th.. nuh day of December, v. HAROLD SHAPIRO
Attorney for Executor
427 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach, Fla. SUM
12/10-33-30 l/il
Mayshie Friedberg lights the Menorah at the Israel Bond
Chanuka Festival on Sunday night at Miami Beach Audi-
torium, where some 3,000 persons heard a concert featuring
Ian Peerce, leading Metropolitan Opera star. In addition to
Chanuka. fee concert marked Israel's "Chai" (18th) anni-
versary of statehood.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 73100B
In RE: Estate of
ISADORE li. SACKS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To \il Creditors and All Persons
ii.ninu Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
V011 are hereby notified ami re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of ISADORE B. SACKS
deceased late of Dade County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dad
Rabbi Kalchman
Passes in Ohio;
Father of Localite
Rabbi Bernard Kalchman, fath-
er of Miamian Solomon Henry
Kalchman, counselor in the public
school system here, died Nov. 19
in Cincinnati, O., where he was
spiritual leader of North Avon-
j dale Synagogue for 20 years. He
was 67.
A well-known scholar, teacher
I and lecturer, Rabbi Kalchman was County, arid file the same In duplicate
, n 1 -j :.. 1 non -J _Un as provided In Section 73:1.16, Flor-
born in Poland in 1898 and came SI';,,t,s ,, fflecs in the
from a long line of rabbis. Or- county Courthouse In Dade county.
1 j .1. ._. _r 10 i_ r-- Florida, within six calendar months
darned at the age of 18 in oer- j f|.lim lh), lhm. lm, flrsl ,,,......,,,
manv. Rabbi Kalchman was the hereof, or the same win be barred.
; c _i 1 ,...- ,, Dated at Miami. Plorlda. this tith
master of several languages, and
also spoke English when he came
to this country m *924-
His first American congregation
was the Scphardic Judah Touro
' Synagogue in Newport, R.I. After
lerving congregations in Pennsyl-
vania, and then as leader for 13
years of Beth Israel Synagogue in
Hamilton. O., Rabbi Kalchan went
to the North Avondale -Synagogue
in 1946.
A past president of Mizrachi, the goMij Airwj^ ^ f m ^ |h,
Rabbi served on the board of Com-' cierk of the circuit Court of i> County, Florida.
I.KNSAN, INC.
I lorlda Con'-
en \1t1.1 i'1'Ti: BRRLIND, I'res.
1.1:1 iN EPSTEIN
TO: SUSAN <:. KAIIN
S*8 Miller Avenue
Hi ooklyn, New Vm-u
TOL" ARE HEREBY Ni iTIFIKM
thai a Complaint for Invoice has
been ii!''i against you, and you ace
required to serve 1.......> of your
Answer or Pleading to the Complaint
on Plaintiffs attorneys, SMITH &
MA.NI il.KK. l"7 Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach, Plorlda, and file the original
of same in the office of the Clerk
of the circuit court on or before the
17th day of January, 1967. If you ftl
10 .in s.i, Judgment by defaull will bte
taken against you for the jellel de-
manded in the Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Plorlda, this sih day ol December,
IMC.
K II. LEATHERMAN
1 'lerk, Clrculi 1 'ourl..
Iiaile County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
Deputy clerk
IS, 16-23-80 I '
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 72968C
in RE: Estate of
JOSEPHINE PARENTI
Deceased,'
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persoufl
Having claims or Demands Against
Bald Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may have against
Hi. estate of JOSEPHINE PARENTI.
deceased late of Monroe County, Ni w
York, to the County Judges of Dinit*
County, ami file the same in dupli-
cate and as provided in Section 733.16,
Florida Statutes, in their offices In
tin. County Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty, Plorlda, within six calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same will
be barn d.
Dated this nth day of October,
Al>. 1966.
ORACE FFLTZ
As Ancillary Executrix
First publication of this notl......n
the n'.ili da) of December, ir>G6.
WAl.TKIts. MOORE *i COSTANZu
Attorneys for Petitioner
1008 Alnsley IIIiIk.. Miami. Florida
1J 16-23-36 1 d
lay of December, A.D. 1966.
OERSON L. SACKS
As Kxi'Ctitor
First publication t>r this notic on
the lflth day of December. 1966.
J. DAVID I.IKIt.MAN
Atorney foe Oerson L. Sacks
ilnr, Lincoln Rail, Miami Beach, Fla.
IJ m-L':i-:!n 1/1;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of (1LBNN-HOBY IMIMHiTS, at
SI.NCAI'ortK REHORT MOTBU 9flftl
Bill Harbor, Florida
_J Principals in "A Funny Thing Happened on tne Way to the
I forum," starring Zero Mostel, Phil Silvers and Jack Gilford,
will hold forth at Florida State Theatres Sunny Isles Twin
Rocking Chair Theatre on Sunny Isles- Causeway at a gala
opening engagement starting Dec. 15. "A Funny Thing
r
munity Hebrew Schools.
Rabbi Kalchman bequeathed his
library of over 3,000 volumes to
;randson.s attending Yeshivoth and
Hebrew Day Schools, including the
Hebrew Academy, Miami Beach.
In addition to his son. Solomon,
Rabbi Kalchman is survived by his
wife, Esther; four daughters. Mrs.
Jules Glogower,
Mrs. Bernard Spitz and Mrs. Ray-
mond Solomon, both of Cincinnati,
and Mrs. Burton Hutman. of
Washington. D.C; 11 grandsons,
and five granddaughters.
Ail. -ni- v for Applicant
4L' Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla.
IJ 16-23-SA 1 I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
WOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN thnl
the undersigned, desiring "> engage
nf Pittshtirch In business under the fictitious nami
8n,'..f MADRID GARDENS at %..... N
Ki luiall i nbc. Miami. Intends to
register said name -iiii the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
IRWIN RASKIN
Trustee
12/16-Z3-30 1/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS' IIKHKIIY GIVEN Hl.il
the undersigned, desiring to enn
in business under the fictitious nanie
of MR. "K" at 1633 Michigan Avenu
Miami Beach, Florida. Intends to n
ist.r said name with the Clerk tt
th Clii-ult Court of Dade ('mini v,
Florida.
EVELINE KENNARD, Owner
cii'l ril VRDT, CHRISTIE A
SHBPARD
Attorneys for Eveline Kennard,
I IWUt!
II K I2/2-9 l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in hnsin- sh under the fictitious name
of LE8AN ATARTMBNTS at 3I!>-
SOth Street, Miami Beach, Florida.
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
HARRY BRANDEIS
REOINA ItltANlHWS
DAVID I.. TRABK, Attorney
ijii Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
IL' 16-23-1(1 I d
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
\i ii'i'i; is HEREBY GIVEN 11. ,-
iii- undersigned, desiring to engiu:*
in business under the flctlous nanu -
of liKSTKN DRY-r*tiRANER, DES-
TEX SI I VMI'i a .. ,\ I IERTEX
Miil'ir-Kll.l.i:u /i DRY CLEANER
ai To I" N W :':'iiil \v.-., Miami, Flol -
Ida. intends to register said names
with the cierk ni the Circuit Court
of Dads County, Florida.
ROBERT CASTORO
n/23 uy*-9-t<


Page 16-B
* Jen is* Ikx-kUan
Friday. December 15,
1966
FAIR p* BEST PLACE u SHOP ** W* ARE
NO GAMES, JUST
Seivtce
DELICATESSEN
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING APPETIZER OEPTS.
FOOD
FAIR
Smoked Lox
FRESHLY
SMOKED
%-LB.
FRESHLYSMOKEO
BABY SAVE 400 LB.
WHITEFISH lb
SAVE 40< LB.
STORE SLICED
TO INSURE
FRESHNESS!
(CHUBS)
J
LOW, LOW PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY AT ALL FOOD FAIR &
FREDERICKS STORES
EXCLUDING KOSHER MARKETS
IMPORTED FANCY
POTATO OR KASHA
Savet6e4e
GREEN STAMPS
o* the
SAVE
. EA.
. .DOZ.
FINEST NAME BRAND GIFTS IN
THE GREATEST VARIETY THAT ARE
SUITABLE FOR EVERY OCCASION
Save 20* lb.
AMERICAN KOSHER
FRESHLY MADE
COLE SLAW
SAVE
IOC LB.
FRANKS KNOCKS
CREAMED
COTTAGE
CHEESE
1-LB.
PKG.
Save 34* CHASE & SANBORN
ALL GRINDS
1-LB.
CUP
MASTERS PLAIN
FOOD
FAIR
I6-0Z. CUP
1-LB.
CAN
YOGURT 25
49
ALL UKINUb 1-LB. CAN A A
Food Fair Coffee 3V
Coffee
ALL GRINDS 1-LB. CAN
C
f
ALL FLAVORS
8-OZ. ^Cr
CUPS OX
LIMIT ONE CAN EITHER BRAND, PLEASE, WITH
OTHER PURCHASES OF $5 OR MORE
MASTERS DELICIOUS
8-OZ.
. CUP
19
DELICIOUS
JUNIOR'S
BORSCHT
24-OZ. JAR
Save UP TO 29< ON TWO CANS
PINEAPPLE-GRAPEFRUIT
LIBBY'S DRINK ^
PINEAPPLE-GRAPEFRUIT 7 17
Food Fair Drink.......can 1/
LIMIT 2 CANS EITHER BRAND, PLEASE, WITH
OTHER PURCHASES OF *5 OR MORE
c
c
0.UANTTTY
RIGHTS
RESERVED
MADE WITH FRESH EGGS
SOUR CREAM
AND A ZIP OF
LEMON JUICE
Sdve SO* SUNSHINE SWEETS
SUGAR
5
IB.
BAG
39
UMIT ONE BAG, PLEASE, IttTH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $8 OR MORE