The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01974

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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lirewiislh Floriidilauii
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WMLY
/olume 39 Number 47
Miami, Florida, Friday, December 2. 1966
Three Sections Pries 2~X
CLIMAX SEEN APPROACHING
/tfiofe Break Out
Again on Tense
Border of Jordan
U.S. ARMS TO ISRAEL PACE 3-A
REPRISALS CANT BE TOLERATED PAGE 11 A
JEIU'SALEM (JTA) Israeli act to protect its interests. To act
Lbservers maintained a close watch! in such a Jordanian crisis would
L ,he unrest in neighboring Jor-|P,ace Israel in an awkward posi-
dan where rioting broke out again
Nablus and where local Arabs,
(incited by strong anti-Israel propa-
ganda, demanded arms from King
Hussein to be used against Israel
fin retaliation of Israel's reprisal
faid into Jordan on Nov. 13.
It was felt here that the situ-
ation in Jordan is nearing some
kind of a climax, as troops from
5audi Arabia were reported to
have arrived in Jordan today to
Mrengthen the position of King
Hussein against the growing rest-
lessness in the country. A spokes-
nan for the U.S. Sixth Fleet,
hich is stationed in the Mediter-
ranean, was also reported to state
[that the fleet is keeping an eye
on the explosive situation in the
liddle East and is ready to inter-
vene, should Washington give the
Icommand. The 'spokesman for the
t-ship fleet refused to state
thether the fleet has already been
|placed on the alert.
Tht question here is of what
possible action Israel could take
if King Hussein's regime should
fill under pressure of the Pales-
tinian Arabs on the West Bank
of Jordan, and bo replaced by
military junta linked either to
the Ba'ath regime in Syria or
| to President Nasser's regime in
Egypt.
Israel's declared stand in such
l.i event is based on the announce-
ment by then Premier David Ben-
iGurion in Parliament six years ago
that if a major change in Jordan's
[government took place, Israel
|-ould draw the consequences and
RCA Joins
Ford On
Boycott List
LONDON (JTA) The Radio
Corporation of America has been
added to the Arab blacklist of
firms doing business with Israel, it
was reported here from Kuwait
I where the Boycott Bureau of the
Arab League has been holding a
[ week long meeting.
The Kuwait Radio previously an
, nouneed that Ford Motor Company
and the Coca-Cola Corporation
were added to the blacklist during
the meeting. Mohammed Mahgoub,
commissioner general of the boy-
>cott bureau, said the ban on RCA
covered "all branches of the firm
even,where.'' Each member state
decides whether and how the ban
will be applied in its territory and
Continued on Peee 10-A
Continued on Page 10-A
Jews Protest
Nazi Gains
In Germany
GEN. DAYAN
csa defer peace
AT ANNUAL 10 A DINNER
Dayan Opposed to UN
Troops as Arab Buffer
U.S. JET 0*S CO TO JORDAH PAGE 13-A
NEW YORK (JTA) Gen.
Moshe Dayan, former Commander-
in chief of the Israel Defense
Forces, spoke up Sunday against
the stationing of United Nations
troops as a buffer between Israel
and the Arab states. "We should
aim towards normalization of rela-
tions with neighbors; the buffer
of foreign troops merely creates a
fiction in neighbor relations, and
thereby defers the peace," he said.
Gen. Dayan's statement, which
he made here in an address at the
annual dinner of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, is consid-
ered particularly significant in the
light of the reported proposal by
Washington for a permanent seal-
ing of the borders between Israel
and Jordan and between Israel and
Syria through the United Nations.
Over 1,000 Zionists and communal
leaders attended the dinner in
commemoration of the 19th anni-
versary of the United Nations Res-
olution for the establishment of
Israel.
Citing Israel's gain as a result
of the Sinai campaign of 10
Continued on Page 1S-A
NEW YORK (JTA) The |
electoral gains of West Germany's i
extreme right-wing National;
Democratic Party in last week's i
Bavarian election, evoked world-|
wide protests this week on the part
of Jewish organizations.
Headquarters of national Jew-
ish groups here issued statements
expressing fears over the rising
strength of the NDP in Germany.
A statement issued by Morris B.
Abram. president of the American
Jewish Committee, urged the Bonn
Government "to redouble its ef-
forts to maintain a vigilant alert
in which the growth of the Na-
tional Democratic Party and all
other extreme-rightist efenents
are carefully observed, using the
shcools, the churches, the mass
media and the courts as a grand
coalition to counteract these grow-
ing signs of a Nazi revival."
Dr. Joachim Prim, speaking
for the Conference of Presidents
Continued on Pago 15-A
Jewish Producer Will
Stage Passion Play
LONDON (JTA) A Jewish
producer, who said he would go
ahead with plans to stage an adap-
tation of the Oberammergau Pas-
sion Play in Britain despite sharp
Jewish criticism, asserted this
week that "as a Jew," his partici-
pation would "insure" that the
performance would not contain
'anything to offend Jews." The
adaptation will open in Manches-
, ter on Feb. 28.
Following a statement from the
I Board of Deputies of British Jews
; which urged Jews to have nothing
i to do with the planned present a-
! tion, two of the three Jewish im-
i presarios associated with the Bri-
I tish production plans Brian

CABLE TO JWV
Adenauer
In Defense
Of Kiesinger
BONN (JTA) Responding
to criticism by American Jewish
groups of the selection of ex-Nazi
Kurt Georg Kiesinger as Chancel-
lor-candidate, former Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer this week strong-
ly supported Kiesinger.
In a cablegram to national com-
mander Malcolm Tarlov, of the
Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A.,
Adenauer lauded the Christian
Democratic Party's controversial
Continued on Pago U-A
Histadrut Ups Financial
Success Over Last Year
Epstein, manager of the Beatles,
and Vic Lewis withdrew com-
pletely from the project. Mr. Ep-
stein's company, NEMS Enter-
prises was to have acted as agent
for the play in Britain and in the
United States.
Philip Solomon, the producer
and director of Dunedin The-
atrical Enterprises, said he was
distressed by the Board of De-
puties statement but that ho had
no intention of dropping the
project.
* i
The adapted version, for which
Dunedin has British. Irish a"nd|
Continued on Page 15-A
NEW YORK (JTA) The an-
nual campaign in the United States
for the Histadrut. Israel's labor
federation, raised $3,186,852 dur-
ing the 1965-66 fiscal year, an in-
crease of $178,000 over the previ-
ous year, delegates to the opening
session of the 43rd annual conven-
tion of the National Committee for
Labor Israel were told here this
week.
The report was made to the
2.000 delegates by Dr. Sol Stein na-
tional director of the committee.
He also reported that $891,000 was
raised for the social welfare pro-
gram of Histadrut's Working Wom-
en's Council by the Pioneer Wom-
en's Organization. This made the
total western hemisphere contribu-
tion $4,078,000 for the period, an
increase of four percent over the
previous period.
President Johnson in a mes-
sage to the convention, com-
mended "the productive ex-
change of ideas between Histad-
rut and the American trade
union movement." Premier Levi
Eshkol, in a message of greet-
ing, said that the annual cam-
paign was particularly signifi-
cant this year because of the
need to absorb into "productive
work thousands of youth and
unemployed workers" who need
"appropriate vocational train-
ing" to become wa.ge-earner.
Dr. Stein also told the conven-
tion that the National Committee
had developed two branches. One
is the American Histadrut Cultural
Exchange Institute to serve "as a
bridge between the intellectual
Continued on Page 2-A
CJFWF Eyes Long-Range Plan
LOS ANGELES (JTA) The
achievements of the General As-
sembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds,
which met here for five days, were
outlined by Philip Bernstein,
CJFWF executive director, in a
summary emphasizing that the
session marked "another turning
point" for the federations through-
out the country.
"We ventured beyond the im-
mediate to the long range," Mr.
Bernstein said. "We began to add
the vision of a decade to the usual
perspective of a single year; we
began to explore not only where
we are pushed to go by the force
of events, but where we seek to go.
We began to think seriously about
the aspirations and goals and basic
purpose.
"We did this In several dimen-
sions: in what we must do with-
in the Jewish community, by
Jewish agencies, to overcome the
pathologies the problems that
trouble us. We examined this in
terms of the needs locally in our
communities, nationally and
overseas. Wo examined it in
terms of what wo would help ac-
complish as part of the larger
society, through non-sectarian
organizations and through Gov-
Continued on Page 3-A
PHIIIP SftNSTEIN
another frn-emg point


Page 2-A
+Jeisti OwkUar)
Friday, December 2, 13
GG
LONGTIME FEDERATION CAMPAIGN LEADER
Talianoff to Co-Chair '67 CJAppeal
ACCOUNTANTS INAUGURAL PAGE 6-A
George J. Talianoff has accepted
an appointment as associate chair-
man of the 1967 Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign.
He will be working closely with
Norton Pallot, also an associate
chairman of the Combined Jewish
Appeal. Pallot's appointment was
announced previously.
Milton Weiss, overall chair-
man of the 1967 drive, publicly
announced Talianoff's accept-
ance at the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's "Bravos for Big
Wheels Bash" held at the Al-
giers Hotel last week.
Addressing over 200 volunteer
workers who had gathered for the
event, Weiss said. "I am grateful
to Mr. Talianoff for assuming this
post. With such able and dedicated
men as Norton Pallot and George
Talianoff filling the associate
chairmanships, we are assured of
success."
Talianoff and Pallot are accus-
tomed to working together on CJA
campaigns, LeUt year, they served
as co-chairmen of the Trades and
Professional Division for the 1966
CIA drive. The year prior, in 1965,
GEOKE TAUANOff
Talianoff had been sole chairman
of this division.
Talianoff is a member of the
executive committee and board of
governors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. He serves as a
trustee for the United Fund of
VENETIAN RAMBLER
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DECEMBER 20 DECEMBER 1
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tCCtURIS HOW mSURED UP TO IIS Mt AN ACIKCV Of THE II0IMI SOViMUMMT.
PER ANNUM Minimum
SAVINGS Period
CERTIFICATES 16 Months.
Savt by the 12th-Earn from the 1st
4ffc\
Washington Federal
SAVINGS an* LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
JACK O OOtOOH ..*-! AtTHUS H COUtSMON Ckvn-o- .1 th. tc.tf
1/01 Mendian Ave WU Washington Ave. 1133 Noimandy Dtive 699 N. E. 16.7th St.
Dade County, and is a member of
the boarjl and executive commit-
tee of the American Cancer Soci-
ety of Dade County.
He is a former state president
of B'nai B'rith and past president
of the Florida regional board. He
has also served as national com-
missioner of the Anti-Defamation
League, and is currently a mem-
ber of the board of trustees of
the National Committee of ADL.
Talianoff serves on the na-
tional executive commit!** of
the Joint Distribution Commit-
to* and it a board m*mbr of
the Children's Asthmatic Re-
search Institute and Hospital in
Denver, Colo.
For the last 17 years. Talianoff
has served as vice president of
Temple Emanu-El. He is former
special assistant attorney genera*
of the State of Florida, a member
of the Miami Beach. Dade County
and Florida Bar Associations, and
a past chairman of the Florida
Board. He is currently serving as
a member of the Charter Review
Board of the City of Miami Beach.
Talianoff is a senior member of
the law firm of Talianoff and
Waller, 420 Lincoln Rd.
JWV Gives Flag
To Beth David '
Murray Solomon Post 243 0r
Coral Gables, Jewish War Vel
erans of the U.S-.A and its .\uxi!
iary have presented Beth David
Congregation with a US. Hag that
has flown over the Cabifol i
Washington.
Commander M. Jay Berliner and
Auxiliary President Mrs Dian
Steiner.
Histadrut Ups Financial
Success Over Last Year
Continued from P9e 1-A
communities of the United States
and Israel" and the other is the
Histadrut Foundation for Educa-
tional Travel, he said adding that
last year, nearly 2,000 American
tourists were sent to Israel through
the Histadrut Foundation.
Dr. Stein emphasized that Is-
rael's current economic difficulties
were "far from catastrophic" and
noted that the Government and
the Histadrut were seeking to im-
plement a new economic policy
that will "ultimately place the
country on a healthier basis." He
YOU CAN MAKE ISRAEL
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ISRAELI a. DOMESTIC GIFTS
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools 4, Privata
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Miami Beach JE 8-3840
REPHUN'S HEBREW
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Greater Miami't largest 8 Oldest
Supply House for Synagogues,
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ISKAIU GlfTS AND NOVfimi
417 Washington Ae. JE 1-W17
said that in the interim many thou-
sands of families were feeling the
effects of joblessness but that "the
mutual aid institutions connected
with Histadrut are on hand to al-
leviate some of the hardships, pro- j
viding, first of all, continuing!
medical care and other welfare
services."
AMERICAN-ISRAELI
g RELIGIOUS STORE A
All Religious Articles
For Synagogues
Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 17722 S. Schworti
Riverside
exists to serve.
For morn than three generations, Jewish families in the
New York Metropolitan and Miami areas have contin-
ued to entrust their funeral arrangements to Riverside,
They know that no matter which Riverside Ghapel
makes these arrangements, standards of service are con-
sistently excellent because. Riversidewhich owns, op-
erate* and' dircetly supervises each Riverside Chapel
knows that its very existence depends on superior
service.
Perhaps tliat is the reason why over eighty per cent of
the funerals-conducted at Riverside are for families wo
have served before. We are proud to have earned the
confidence of the Jewish community.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
JE 1-1151
In Miami: Douglas Road at S.W 17th Street
In North Miami Beach: 16GG0 N.E. 19th Avenue
Manhattan
Brooklyn Bronx Westchester Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere
in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel.


Friday, December 2, 1966
'Jmhti fhrldUan
Page3-A
S JF WF Eyes Long Range Plan
|IIWIIIIIIIIII!lllllll;lllllllllllllll!IIIIIHIIIIIIIIII!llllllillllllM
Continued from Page 1-A
ernment. And beyond our patho-
ogies, we examined what we
would do to build an enlightened
and vigorous Jewish community
that will enrich the lives of its
members.
"We recognized that: 1. Short-
range planning must be guided by
long-range goals; 2. Annual budget
reviews should be sharpened
through guidelines developed in
five to ten-year financial plans;
3. Traditional Federation boun-
daries of responsibilities may have
But we must be selective in ac-, and other meaures.
cepting government funds so that
as Jewish agencies we do not at-
I tenuate special Jewish purposes; \
5. The people using our services
| arc likely to change. They will be
; people with more complex needs.
! more resources to purchase serv-1
; ices, more sophisticated ideas as to
I what service they believe will be |
helpful, with more opportunities to;
select what they want among sec- [
tarian and non-secretarian re-1
sources."
The discussions on needs in Is-
rael, Mr. Bernstein pointed out,
"In the discussions dealing
with building Jewish life con-
tructively here at home, we were
able to move from the pre-
vious level of general challenges
to the consideration of specific
recommendations presented by
our Council's National Commit-
tee on Federation Planning for
Jewish Education, established as
a result of the Asembly's action
a year ago/' Bernstein stated.

The Committee submitted 28
specific proposals to obtain quality
teachers, administrators and spc-!
cialists, and eight related recom-
mendations on post elementary
education. "The Committee will'
follow up in helping communities
to consider and act on the recom-
mendations most closely fitting
their own needs, and will address
itself to other elements of Federa-:
tion responsibility in this field,"
the CJFWF executive director em-
phasized.
A number of the Assembly dis-
cussions dealt with the involve-
, mint of the next generation in
WASHINGTON (JTA) The tional arms were being provided j jewjsn responsibility. "Running
I'nited States is continuing to pro- lo Jordan. They pointed out that > through all of the discussions was
cess pending arms sales to Israel, this transaction was not entirely] the urgent need for priority atten-;
new. but that Jordanian requests tion ,0 overcome the critical staff
were "under study" in line with I shortages of Jewish agencies
the existing programs of helping | across the country," Bernstein
Jordan meet its defense require- noted.
ments. U.S. official sources denied; "This problem will require most
reports that Washington had de; urgent action by Federation
ferred arms sales to Israel in con-! boards, committees and foremost
nection with the recent Israeli ac-1 lay leadership to attract the high-
size
to be redefined to reflect new con-' dealt with unemployment and po-
cerns:; 4. Increased government verty there the inadequacy of
funds provide new opportunities to \ the public assistance and work re-'
meet unmet needs of the past, lief payments, and the need for
emerging needs of the future, and: programs in depth that will re-
to explore new areas where volun- habilitate people and bring them
tary agencies can make special to self-support through vocational
contributions. I training, better welfare services
IS Continues Arms Sale to Israel,
Including Light Jet Bomber Contract
including the preparations for ship-
ment of light jet bombers previous-
ly contracted. State Department,
sources said this week.
These sources said that addi-
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stance. We make a razor blade. As good
as any on the market; better than most.
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... all the new features you expect from
a razor blade today.
Only difference is, ours is made in
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make a razor blade as fine as those made
by the giants of the razor blade industry?
Ever hear of David and Goliath?
If the man where you buy your razor
blades is found wanting in SHALOM razor
blades, ask him to get some. You will
both be benefitting and helping Israel at
the same time.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
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tion against Jordan.
Reports wore received in
Washington this week from Mos-
cow that a top-level Egyptian
military and political delegation
arrived in the Soviet capital for
"military and political" negotia-
tions linked with the recent Arab-
Israeli clashes. The delegation is
headed by Field Marshal Abdel
Hakim Amir, Egyptian First
Vice President and Command-
er-in-Chief of the Armed Forces.
est quality of young men and wom-
en to Jewish communal service. It
will demand leadership to obtain
personnel specifically for Jewish
federations and welfare funds and
for the other Jewish services; and
beyond that, to help obtain the,
Federal legislation which is indis-1
pensable for augmenting the uni-|
versity facilities, faculties, and ]
field training to enlarge the entire
pool of communal workers, of J
which the Jewish personnel are a
part," Mr. Bernstein stressed.
SHALOM
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Two previous visists to Moscow
by Amer were followed by heavy | >-==
shipments of modern arms to
Egypt. It is anticipated that Russia
will supply Egypt with ultramod-
ern weapons of types not yet in the
Egyptian arsenal.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
conferred this week with Israel
Ambassador Avraham Harman for
an exchange of views on the situa-
tion in the Middle East. The meet-
ing took place at the initiative of
Secretary Rusk.
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Pcgo4-A
*Jelsiifk>ridHar)
Friday, December 2, 1986
; .- i ':)..I
"^Jewish Floridlaii
CPFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
305-696-4869
FFID K. SHOCHET.......... Editor and Publisher
LI 3 MINDLIN .......................... Executive Editor
SI1MA M. THOMPSON .... Asst. to Publisher
Tff Jewish Floridijn does not guarantee the Kashmth
of the merchandise advertised in its columns.
Published every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Horldlan
;it 120 N.E. Sixth Street. Miami I, Florida.
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Volume 39 Number 47
Friday, December 2, 1966
19 Kislev 5726
American Contribution
To Middle East Peace
We can only hope that the
United States is demonstrating more
understanding of the Middle East
ccnger than Ambassador Gold-
berg's puppet-like vote for Israel
cer.sure showed last week.
Otherwise, our government has
fc^len into the same insensitive,
cense, predictably pro-Arab, and his-
torically short sighted view that
marked the eight-year Eisenhower
rule, when that area of the world
appeared to be in constant turmoil
and to which, indeed, this view con-
tributed an unhappy continuing life.
What American censure did was
to emphasize Israel's reaction with-
out noting the provocation. At least
publicly, therefore, what is again ex-
pected of Israel is that she should be
understanding about every Arab
effort to undermine her national in-
tegrity and the safety of her citizens,
while making not a single effort to
teach the perpetrators of these crim-
inal acts that they will have to pay
for their deeds. This is more than
can be demanded of any country and any
people. It is more than Washington would ex-
pect of itself.
The greatest "chutzpah'' of all was the story
"leaked" via the Associated Press early this
week which reports the Johnson Administra-
tion's backstage anger particularly because
Israel's retaliation put King Hussein's rule into
guestion. Of Hussein, the story said that Wash-
ington feels he is the "most stable" ruler in
the Middle East.
Imagine the "stability" when Jordanians
threaten his safety as a conseguence of Is-
rael's defensive action. In any case, our gov-
ernment promptly let it be known that we are
already assessing a need for a huge Jordanian
military buildup, and that we are prepared to
contribute to it with a variety of arms.
Now, there's a solid American contribution
to the peace of the Middle East.
vPfimv
BY HENRY LEONARD
Our Sermon Hexl
Friday Evening
"THE ART OF
? HUMILITY"
Rabbi L. B.-Jo Krister/}
Ph.D.,M.A.,M;B.E,,LITTD'
A New Mt. Sinai Wing
Formal launching of the 1967 Combined
Jewish Appeal campaign is just around the
corner. In conjunction with this, it is an apt
time to note the dedication of a massive addi-
tion to one of CJA's major beneficiary agencies
here.
Dedication of the Albert and Bessie Warner
Pavilion at Mt. Sinai Hospital will take place
on Sunday afternoon.
The $1,500,000 wing, contributed by movie
mogul Maj. Warner and his wife, will make
available 150 additional beds to the hospital.
The new addition stands at bayside. It will
help Mt. Sinai render even more extensive
service to our community than in the past.
With a long-standing record of service to
our community through its teaching, research
and healing programs, Mt. Sinai Hospital
moves forward once again ably assisted by
the philanthropic spirit of citizens like Maj.
and Mrs. Warner.
interesting comments on the significance of
our twin city in Israel, Me Ami, which serves
as an agricultural-defense settlement against
precisely the kind of border trouble Israel is
suffering today.
On Building Human Bridges
Another "first" for our community was to
be scored on Thursday at Barry College, with
the staging of a Catholic-Jewish Dialogue spon-
sored by the Catholic Diocese and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
At the dialogue, participants were sched-
uled to ask one another guestions about the
differences that trouble them, to air views they
have not yet ventilated, and happily to dis-
cover similarity in the tie? that bind them.
For Greater Miami, which has a laudable
record in interfaith and interracial relations,
the dialoaue will prove a noteworthy extension
of the deliberations at the Vatican Council
itself, where the ecumenical spirit was written
into the Jewish schema.
Among Jewish participants at the dialogue
was to be Dr. Joseph Lichten, of the national
ADL office, who made a distinguished per-
sonal contribution to the Vatican Council
deliberations.
In the staging of these events, both the
Catholic and the Jewish communities are
breakina pioneer ground in the building of
bridges between man and man.
Sen. Gruening Visits Us
The Jewish National Fund banguet Sunday
night at the Fontainebleau should prove an
enlightening platform from which our com-
munity can learn some of the facts behind the
current Middle East chaos. Speaker will be
U.S. Sen. Ernest Gruening, who has lona been
a critic of our government's foreign aid pro-
grams, particularly as (hey relate to the Arab
nations.
In this context, the Senator will have some
luring the week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
Our Young People Speak
At a time when we are constantly worried
about the status of our voung people today,
it is heartening to note the schedulina of the
annual YMHA teen-age conclave set for this
Sunday.
At this function, Dade County high school-
aae students get together to discuss central
issues of the day, with the accent on how
they feel about themselves, their parents, and
the world in which thev live.
Theme for the Sunday conclave will be
"Today's Issues Where Do You Stand?"
Among prominent guest speakers will be for-
mer U.S. Senator from Washinaton Harry Cain,
for many vears nnw. and happily for us, a
Miami resident. Welfare Planning Council
chairnvm. A. Budd Cutler, a former president
of the "Y," will also address the voung people.
In comina toaether for a serious examina-
tion of contemporarv problems and how t>ev
see them, our young people are showing their
mettle.
d THOSE HMW* report^B
urinq the week TSSSL bZT n
Jewish organizations invited
on study tours of West Ger
many simply had no meaning
They had no meaning because
both the Bonn Government
and what they saw failed the
visiting delegations in a very
? i,kt.....:. ii' ....!.. significant respect: Kadi had
no reality. Each was a pioiee
tion of optimistic American policy without regard to native Gerniar
spirit. It is a terrifying thing to suggest that the extremist National
Democratic Party reflects the true Germany, and that Konrad Ade-
nauer and Ludwig Erhard never did.
Unappended. the suggestion would be an utter distortion For one
thing, it must be remembered that however striking the party's sue
cesses in Hesse several weeks ago, and now in Frankfurt, still the
predominant Christian Social Union and the Social Democrat- ear
ncred a full 84 percent of the close to 5.5 million votes cast at the
polls. But the question is: How did the National Democrats mai
to take a sudden upsurge?
The answer lies precisely in the fact that there has been a
ing but long-evolving American reassessment of basic German pol
ideology. The reassessment began, not in Bonn, but in Washii
Seemingly, it sprang full-grown from the head of the recent El
visit with President Johnson, which forced "Dei Dikke" to return
home empty-handed and to find himself plunged into a govern
crisis. For the first time since the end of World War II. Washii
had turned its eye beyond West Germany as this nation-
significant ally on the European continent. And. for the first
the extremists in Germany could finally raise 1 heir voices sufficii
loudly to get a hearing from those interested in listening to anything
other than patently pro-American propaganda.
45 THE GERMANS SAW IT
THE DEMOCRATIC IMPRINT upon the face of Bonn was the CO*
metic makeup it woie to win American cooperation in the single
unifying fear that cuts across all German parties and ideologes
ol the East. During the Hitler era. this fear was expressed by the cry
against Bolshevism, and it may very well be that some of the Western
nations might ultimately have responded if the cry were not also g
rallying call for the violent racism marking the Nazi rule. (Specula-
tion here would also necessarily include as a presupposing factor the
non-existence of (he repeatedly threatening Hitlerian demand for
Lebensraum, which nearly consumed all of Europe, and against which.
the continent ultimately had to struggle, hence dissipating its ami
Communist energies into anti-German mobilization instead!
As the West Germans wanted to see it, our own postwar policies
were precisely in accord with Hitlerian doctrine so far as the S
Union is concerned. This did not necessarily make the German view
invalid at the time, as President Truman, for example, was to learn
so quickly after the German unconditional surrender. Placed into
proper speculative context, it must here be remembered that Hitler
was virtually shocked into inaction following the fall of France, when
he discovered that the British would not join him in an all-out cam
paign against the Soviet Union when it became clear to him tha-.
the British intended fighting him to the very last. Without Hitlers
horrifying racism and anti-Semitism, who knows but that his faulty
foresight might not have proven accurate in the final analysis that
the Western Allies might not have joined him in the "Dram: nach
Oaten"?
What Hitler failed to reckon with was the West's expedient mor-
ality: repugnance against his inhuman violence and a seemingly
incomprehensible and convictionless refusal to trust his offer of alli-
ance to battle the Russians. That he genuinely expected the British
to come over to his side was proof to the West of his instability and
unreliability. Nevertheless, Hitler felt he had good reason for his
hopes. That, despite the Western inertia in the matter of his over-
whelming anti-Semitism, the West continued to feel obliged at least
publicly to condemn him, Hitler found more confusing than ever
Brutal or not, his goals were clearer than the West's.
HI LOST THE WAR IN THE STARS
TPHE FRENCH, he discarded as hopelessly romantic and. besides.
' too traditional a German enemy upon whom to count in his
scheme of things. Anyway, it was necessary for him to whip them to
prove a point his campaign call to the German people. Roose\elt
he saw a captive of the Jews but a captive who would, as a conse-
quence of his weak and hopeless Anglophilia, follow the Brit;-li
It was on the British that he relied, for the West's repugnance and
distrust of him were, after all, lip-service and nothing more Was
there no anti-Semitism in Great Britain and the United State.-' And
was he not doing their job to outroot the Bolshevik menace, which
he hyphenated as Jewish?
The truth in fact is that the British rejection, which was no re-
jection at all. for England never considered an alternative choii
Churchill's grand design, confused Hitler beyond reason. Turin:
astrology to see a sign for the next phase in his European camp
now irrevocably" against Britain, he promptly lost the war.
This says nothing positive about the Nazis or negative about u-
The Russians had. after all. largely confined their Communism to their
own country. It was not until after World War II that the Cominform
and Comintern, although subsequently abandoned as the semantics
of their politics, became cruel realities in expansionist fact. Biit the
Germans as the Greeks and Italians were to learn much later
found their nation a battleground for Communist ascendancy almost
from the beginning of the Soviet Revolution. The Weimar Republic
barely squeaked through: it was on the tide of fear for the Bolsheviks
that Hitler finally succeeded.
On the other hand, the West was disinclined to believe that
Russia, a feudal society at least from the industrial point of view.
would within a short period of time throw down the gauntlet for a
battle in which-winner takes all.
* *
WARNING TUTTI AGAINST BOLSHEVIK SCOURGE
IN ANY CASE, what motivated the Germans under Hitler moti
them after Hitler, as well. Only now, and for the first time, i
motivated tho U.S., too. The Berlin Lift was America's finest
in strengthening the general German belief that we had finally
their bandwagon. And, when President Kennedy declared on a tni
to Europe before a hysterical mob, reminding us all of the v

Continued on Page 13-A


~rc
.k'Wl IBM
Friday, December 2, 1966
-Jewlsli ftcrMian
PageS-A
LEnERS TO THE EDITOR
a TVew; Light on 'Deicide'
FOR OTHER VIEWS FROM
KOlTOR. The Jewish Floridian:
1 have for a long time, as the
news unfolded, determined to
write a letter to the editor of The
Jewish Floridian on a seemingly
intei ininable controversy, namely
-:he "deicide" of Christ centuries
ago in a corner of Roman terri-
tory. One specimen of thr contro-
lersy is Paul Vis Lenten homily.
which has aroused dismay in both
hristian and Jewish sensibilities
to the extent that "a few more
\planations from Ihe Pope and
}Ioc-hhuth can write another play."
\nother specimen is Dore Schary's
ii\e points calculated to allay anti-
^vmitism but which at times strike
Christians as artificially ameliora-
te or out of focus.
The idea of "deicide" or, to use
the vulgar phrase "Christ-killer,"
urgently needs to be explained by
ill Christians of good will and
sound education. My own account
is presented essentially as a foot-
note to an actual American situ-
ation that should not be forgotten
in all the currents and cross-
currents originating in present-day
grand and grandiose theological
meetings and almost daily pro-
nouncements.
In my hometown in Wiscon-
sin, I attended a parochial grade
school for eight years, and then,
in the south-central part of the
state, lived in a Lutheran board-
ing school for four years before
entering the great university in
Madison. In about 14 years of
schooling and extra-curricular
activities, I never once heard
the phrase "Christ-killer" save
as a warning against vulgarity
".|=r, worse, intellectual nonsense.
Moreover, from teachers who
were painstaking scholars rath-
er than educationists, my class-
mates and I learned that the
concept of "deicide" is as dan-
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OUR READERS PAGE 8-C
geiously and horrendously play-
ful as Nietische's idea that God
is dead.
My education aroused a respect
and affection for the Old Testa-
ment and Its men of action or
prophets or poets to such an ex-
tent that 1 had a homebody
proprietary attachment to them,
and thus cannot significantly re-
gard the Bible as made up of two
contradictory parts. Despite the
wisecrack about the Impossibility
of woi hipi iv- a hyphen, the his-
toric phrase. Judaeo-Christian, en-
tered our lives as a permanent
value, along with such verities of
national existence as the Bill of
Rights, the franchise, the melting
pot. and the income tax.
Concerning one of the culmina-
tions of Christianity, namely the
crucifixion, we were told, or nat-
urally held, the following: that
"deicide" willed by man is per se
an impossibility; that Jesus was
a Jew who was inevitably accept-
ed by a few Jews and just as in-
evitably rejected by the majority;
that because of this rejection, the
Jews were a touch unfortunate but
not at all criminal (we regarded
Judas Iscariot and Simon Peter
during the moments of denial as
real criminals who acted as un-
naturally as those many outside
the nuclear group acted naturally);
that the alliance against Jesus of
Romans and Jews was a historical
necessity; that Jesus willed His
death to take place when and
where it did: that He was killed
by heavenly plan; that Romans
and Jews were divine instruments
(more or less like crthquakes)
and that all Christians should be
grateful that God had not selected
Turks or Egyptians for the sacri-
ficial act necessary for the mortal
and immortal joy and consumma-
tion of the Christ's orthodox fol-
lowers.
Let there be no doubt about
it: the phrase, "Christ-killer,"
was explained to us in our
American setting (one of thou-
sands of a similar cast and
philosophy) as something used
by yahoos and white trash. Even
today, in crossroads Miami, I
have never heard the phrase
save as the substance of serious
intellectual discussion that
would be acceptable to theolog-
ians and other scholars of al-
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most every faith: some people
do not invite or permit certain
crudities.
la there anything that accounts
for the decency and what I like to
call the normality of the plural-
istic society I am footnoting?
There is indeed. It is the coming
together of educated bourgeois
I hristians and Jews in a restrain-
ed environment that gave respect
to the art>. to proper and correct
language, to a constant sharing
nelghborliness, and above all to
warm human decorum that van-
ishing virtue In our recklessly pei--
missive and loosely expressive
way of life in which anybody can
Utter anything anywhere at any
time.
Of course, the times were more
at ease and were complex in a
somewhat different way than they
are now. and thus a partially new-
analysis is required. Rabbi Arthur
Hertzberg stimulates such analysis
when he says: ". the phrase.
Christ-killer, is a lessening danger
to Jews: it is a growing danger
to Christianity." But unfortunately
divine philosophy is no longer
charming enough to arouse signi-
ficant theological dialogue among
most busy materialistic people. As
a result, the issue is clouded by-
Jewish pride occasionally being
called anti-Christian and Christian
pride occasionally being called
anti-Semitic.
What I am advocating is a
sustained theological exchange
of views worthy of the best tra-
ditions and intents of our plural-
istic society. Such dialogue is a
source of cohesiveness and com-
JWV Auxiliary
Sets Two Events
There will be a regular meeting
of the Harry H. Cohen Surfsidc-
Bay Harbor Auxiliary on Wednes-
day evening. Dec. 14. at the Surf-
side Town Hall.
Membership chairman, Mrs.
Shirley Tragash, announces that
a paid-up membership coffee
klatch and card party is slated for
the Carillon Hotel on Dec. 5 at
7:30 p.m.
fort, and whets the mind for
sharper function and better cit-
izenship. Thus I am not the
least disturbed when Christians
and Jews criticize certain ex-
cesses or weaknesses in each
other, anymore than I am ham-
strung by Bernard Shaw's state-
ments: ". national Christian-
ity is impossible without a na-
tion of Christs." "... the
Holy Ghost, formally the most
nebulous person in the Trinity
and now become its sole (strong-
ly functioning) survivor ."
And such dialogue enables me
to counter at least partially a state
ment made by a member of the
ADL, namely that the two things
he fears most in this world are
atomic destruction and the suc-
cess of the international ecumen-
ical movement. But the image of
"Christ the Rotarian" ought to al-
lay all Jewish worries.
PROF. CARL M. SELLE
Department of English
University of Miami
Schwartz Talks
To Beach Lodge
Gerald Schwartz, past pre.-
of the Miami Beach Lodge of B'oai
B'rith. was principal speaker at
the lodge's monthly meeting ft'ed-
nesday night at the DiLido I
according to president, s (
Pascoe.
Schwartz discussed the ci tit
Middle East crisis, the n-vr. >f
neo-Nazisni in West Germar.j I
the problems of Jewish li
ment in the changing civil ta
struggle in the United States
Among guests were Rabbi .
ham Korf. regional direct I
Chabad; Hal Glasman, forme: >-
lie relations director of the I
er Miami Jewish Federation: i
.Michael Sossin, past preside -f
the South Florida^ Council of i
B'rith Lodges.
Mrs. Gershon Miller, wife
other lodge past pre-
presented a special di
ic reading on "The Meani: .1
B'nai B'rith." Mrs. Miller a
graduate ol the Northwestern Uni-
versity School of Speech, and
taught drama and speech for (
years.
Program arranged by Pai^oe
and August, presidentelect -a-
tured Judith Robinson, soprano.
Miss Robinson has appeared h
the Caesar LaMonaca Orel"., -i.
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Page G-A
vJenisfi ftcriaUajn
Friday, December 2, 13C4
STRONG CRITIC OF U.S. FOREIGN AID TO ARAB NATIONS
JNF Banquet Sunday Slates Gruening
U.S. Sen. Ernest Gruening. of
Alaska, will be guest speaker at
the Jewish National Fund banquet
on Sunday night at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel.
William Bornstein, president of
the JNF Council here, said thai
"this promises to be a sell-out
affair."
Molly Stark, noted soprano,
will entertain at the 6:30 p.m.
function, where plans will be
revealed to expand Me Ami, Mi-
ami's twin city in Israel estab-
lished by the Jewish National
Fond.
"It is no longer a privilege to
support this project." Bornstein
said on the eve of the Sunday
function. "It is now a responsibil-
ity, particularly with the present
troubles brewing on Israel's bor-
der. This is what Me Ami is about
11 is an agricultural community
composed of farmer-soldiers dedi-
cated to the development of the,
SIN. GRUCNING
land and to the defense of their
country."
Program will also include the
appearance of Dr. Irving Lehrman,
of Temple Emanu-El. chairman of
the Jewish National Fund Founda-
tion, and Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz, of Temple Menorah. chair-
man of the JNF executive board.
Son of a physician. Sen.
Gruening graduated from Har-
vard College, class of 1907, and
from Harvard Medical School,
class of 1912. From there, he
moved on to a career as news-
paper and magazine editor, au-
thor, government official and
"general practitioner" in public
service.
As Governor of Alaska, he was
in the forefront of the battle for
Alaskan statehood.
President Roosevelt designated
him as Governor in August, 1939.
He vigorously opposed discrimina-
tion in public places against Alas-
ka's natives Indians, Aleuts
and Eskimos. He sponsored legis-
lation to outlaw such discrimina-
tion and succeeded in having it
enacted.
He sponsored legislation to es-
tablish an Alaska Department of
Fisheries, to diminish the destruc-
tion of salmon resources, to help
restore the economy of Alaska's
coastal communities from depend-
ency on fisheries and to prepare
Alaska for the responsibilities of
statehood.
Through 50 telegrams to mem-
bers of Congress, he protested the
abandonment of Alaska defenses
and decommissioning of its bases
after V-J Day aware of the com-
ing peril from the Soviet Union.
When statehood was achieved in
1958, Sen. Gruening was "reelect-
ed" and took his oath of office as
U.S. Senator on Jan. 5. 1959.
In his valiant support of Is-
rael, he presented the Senate
Committee on Government Op-
erations with a 472-page report
on U.S. aid to ten Near East
countries. The report, resulting
from a two-month tour of Tur-
key, Iran, Syria, L-banon, Jor-
dan, Israel, Gre'ce, Tunisia, Lib-
ya and Egypt in the winter of
1962, heaped scathing criticism
on U.S. aid practices.
In it. he made clear thai I i
, has become a "socialist police
| state." that Nasser seeks "hjg (m
personal and Egypt's national ag-
I grandizement, in that order." and
i "U.S. dollais aie enabling Egypt
to wage war in Yemen, to foment
trouble in Jordan and Saudi Arab
ia, and to arm to attack Israel just
as surely as though they were
spent directly for that purpose "
^*rV^VrN '67 DODGE Mvvwvy
Other Fine Part
2?5
tla
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CALL 448-7262
ANNUAL GATHERING SUNDAY WILL HEAR SEN. CAIN
Teen Conclave to Air Issues of the Day
The 13th annual teen-age con-
clave of the YM and WHA of
Greater Miami will be an all coun-
ty interdenominational event. Re-
presentatives of all the senior high
clubs of all branches of the Y.MHA
will be attending the conclave on
Sunday at the Central Y.' 8500
SW 8th St.
plus other individual groups of the
YMCA. will be attending. Repre-
sentatives of United Synagogue
Youth and the National Federation
of Temple Youth also will be there.
Teen-agers representing other seg-
ments of the community have
been invited and are expected to
attend.
Representative youth leaders of Keynote speaker at the con-
Ihe Hi-Y and Tri-Y of the YMCA,| clave luncheon banquet will be
Criminal Court Judge Klein Will Speak
At Accountants Division CJA Opener
Sen. Harry P. Cain, of Miami.
Cain is well-known in this area
for his political, business, and
civic duties. He was a United
States Senator from the State of
Washington from 1945 to 19S3.
During World War II. he was a
colonel in the U.S. Army and was
I cited in the Battle of the Bulge.
At present, he is a member of the
policy study committee and Gov-
ernment Research Bureau of the
Miami Dade County Chamber of
Commerce.
Cain is also vice president of
Goodwill Industries of South Flor-
ida and a vice president of the Ur-
ban league of Greater Miami. He
has been on the executive com-
mittee of the National Conference
of Christians and Jews since 1959.
Theme for the conclave will be
"Today's Issues Where Do You
Stand?" The discussion sessions
will be involved with eight major
issues which confront the youth oi
America.
A. Budd Cutler, president of the
Welfare Planning Council of Dade
County, and a board member of
the YM and WHA of Greater Mia-
mi, will be present to outline the
conclave's basic objectives.
MALE HELP WANTED
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FEMALE HELP WANTED
PUBLIX MARKETS
is now taking applications lor the
following job: Cashiers. Make ap-
plication at the following locations:
2551 Le Jeune Road, Coral Gables:
12850 Biscayne Blvd., N. Miami.
Accountants Division of the
J967 Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign will hold its pre-tax sea-
son annual dinner on Tuesday, at
6 p.m., at the Columbus Hotel.
Judge Edward S. Klein, of the
Criminal Court of Record, will be
guest speaker for the event. His
subject is "The Criminal Court
Its Function and Responsibility."
A Miami resident for the pact
24 years, Judge--Klein served as
assistant state attorney for eight
years and was legal aide to the
Dade County legislative delega-
tion for the 1963 and 1965 ses-
sions. He is former executive
vice president of the Young
Democratic Club of Dade Coun-
ty, a member of the Dade Coun-
ty Bar Association, and serves on
the criminal law committee of
the Florida Bar Association.
The Accountants Division is the
first group to kick off its cam-
paign on behalf of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. The early start
affords an early finish and does
not interfere with the accountants'
busiest time of the year tax
season.
Harry Blumin. chairman of the
division, and Irving J. Bloom, as-
Strong Yet afe-ta$
Hours of Continuous
Relief from Minor
ARTHRmSMW
Anacin? gives hours of continuous
relief from arthritis' minor pains-
even such chronic pain arising from
deep In the joints. Anacin also re-
duces swelling and inflammation. In
eiinutea pain goes so that it's easier
to move afflicted limbs again. The
reason Anacin Tablets are so effec-
tive is because they contain the pain
reliever most recommended bydoctors
flus an extra ingredient not found
n leading aspirins or buffered
Muirins. Tsui* as directed.
fMMNS
Haym Topol
JUDGE tDWAKD KLtIN
sociate chairman, urged all Dade
County accountants "to make their
reservations as soon as possible."
Attention:
MIAMI BEACH
MERCHANTS
VISIT THE WINNFrt'l CIBCIT
DOG RACiNG
EVERY NIGHT
EXCEPT
SUNDAY
SpOfUO'l
MO MINORS
NOW)
A PURSE.
RACE at
TROPICAL
_ PARK
30 Club House
. I imisstons '
m
F ii.;0Rv.
I Merrill
Browne
Ftl. 6-t11|
PERFECTAS
Attend MESIV
GREATER
MIAMI
DINNER
Saturday Eve.,
Dec. 10th at 7:15 p.m.
at the
FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
GUEST SPEAKER:
RABBI DR. MOSES D. TENDLER
Talmudic Scholar and Research Scientist
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
RESERVATIONS $36
PER COUPLE
Hyman P. Gaibut
Chairman
Nightly, except Sunduys, thru Jan. 2
Enjoy Cafe Caribe.
Moderate Prices.
Admission 50c Parking 25c
Regular A Ample Bus Service
Res. Suacjested For
SMART CORAL TERRACS
RESTAURANT
f^SUN BENT A CAB
'^BSlKv NEW DODGES
Automatit. Power Steering
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0 Passenger Stafion Wauons
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Including Liability Insurance
Pickup-4 0lwry ^wvice
301 23rd St., MB
OTHER NEW
CARS FROW
'15
PHONE 532-5502


Friday, December 2. 19G6
wr
+Jewish mridigar.
Page 7-A
Rush Meets Leaders on Soviet Jewry
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
held an extended discussion
here on the special problem
of Soviet Jewry with Rabbi
Israel Miller, chairman of the
American Jewish Conference
on Soviet Jewry.
* 'Joining Secretary Rusk in
the discussion were Douglas
MacArthur II, Assistant Sec-
retary of State for Congres-
sional Relations, and Walter
.1. Stoessel Jr., Deputy As-
sistant Secretary for East
European Affairs.
Senators Abraham Rihicoff
and Jacob Javits. who were
unable to attend the discus-
sion because of a vote in the
Senate, sent representatives
in their stead. Rabbi Miller
satd that he was "most En-
couraged by the depth of
concern and awareness ex-
pressed by Senator Rusk." He
described the meeting as i
detailed examination of the
problem.
Rabbi Miller presented an
assessment of the current
status of Soviet Jewry to the
Secretary of State.. He re-
ported that there has been
no basic change in the situ-
ation during the past year
except for token concessions.
Carner Bank Continues
Monthly Mailings for
Interest of Certificates
Highest Rate Now Paid
ll.ooking over progress report of Carner
iBank of Miami Beach for first five
[months under new management are, left
Ito right, M. H. lionsinger, executive
If ice president; Stephen Carner, presi-
dent; Joe Hart, owner of the Castaways
Motels and member of the board of the
Carner Bank; and Alexander Muss, na-
tionally-renowned builder and Corner
Bank board member.
Jack, Stephen Carner
Head Bank's Officers
Now paying the highest rate of Interest
permitted by the United Stiites e;ovemnicnt.
I he Carner Bank ot Miami Beach set the
pace in South Florida by mailing monthly
interest checks to holders of certificates ol
deposit.
This 1111 i<111,- feature permit! certificate
holders t<> get their payments without ever
visiting the bank and the certificates arc
automatically renewable.
Minimum deposits are only $1,000 for
the CD's, and the certificates are available
for periods of six months or longer.
All CD's, as well as regular and special
banking accounts and the passbook Ravings
accounts, are m>w insured up lo S15.000.
This is a 5(1 per cent increase over the pre-
vious glO.000 figure set by the Federal De-
posit Insurance Corporation.
FDIC, an agency of the I'nited Slate*
government, makes il possible 1": a couple
to have as much as $75,000 in accounts in-
sured.
Details of the many savings, checking
and loan possibilities are gladl} given by
anj officer of the Carner Bank of Miami
Beach.
The man most responsible for the drama-
lie speed with which the Carner Bank of
lliami Beach has found favor in the city,
|nd in the booming South Shore area where
:.s In. iic: at 937 Washington A\e. is Jack
r/arner.
Chairman of the l>oard of directors. Jack
,4t p -inds several hours daily in his of-
ai the Carner Bank, lending his lifetime
If experience in banking, financial and busi-
ness matters to the capable bank officers
leaded by his son. Stephen H. Carner.
Jack Carner has served his community
I'li:; ami well. He is a former general chair-
1 iii ot the Combined Jewish Appeal, the
Imiuai fund-raising effort ssponsored by the
renter Miami Jewish Federalion.
Long a vice president of Temple Emanu-
, he is a perennial Trustee of Israel, and
ill's in a key leadership role for State of
|srael Bonds, the United Jewish Appeal and
lumerous non-sectarian causes.
Within the little more than five months
lime Jack Carner purchased control, the
I'arner Bank of Miami Beach has incn
capital from |1 25 0 to $1,70 i,l
President of the Carner Bank of Miami
Beach since its change in name several
months ago is one of the South Shore area's
most dynamic community leaders, Stephen
II. Carner.
Steve as he is known to thousands of
Miami Beach citizens resigned as a direc-
tor of the Mercantile National Bank of Mi-
ami Beach and closed his own mortgage
brokerage office to accept the full-time posi-
tion as president.
Before returning here three years ago,
Carner was vice president of the Colonial
Bank o.f Orlando. Steve also serves on the
advisory hoard of the Dixie .National Bank
in Bade County.
Prior to his bank service in Orlando, Car-
ner was engaged in various real estate man-
agement, financing and building enterprises
in Florida. Married for 12 years, Steve and
his wife have two children.
Steve Carner is a member of the hoard
of Temple Beth Am, and just this month
produced th*- hit show, "Fiorcllo," for his
congregation.
Judge Cypen on Bank Board
One of Miami Beach and
I'lorid.;'.-. 1" si known civic
paders is a director and gen-
li-al counsi 1 of the Carner
lank Judge Irving Cypi n whose
nitre on the circuit court
lere brought him numerous
honors, is a past president of
the Jewish Home for the
Aged of the Greater Miami
and vice president of Temple
Emanu-EI.
A past president of the
Cl vl c League of Miami
Beach, Judge Cypen has
been in the forefront of the
I mini Fund, Combined Jew-
ish Appeal, State, of Israel
P.oinls and numerous Other
community-wide efforts.
Talking over plans to increase service
by the Carner Bank of Miami Beach to
the South Shore area and the entire com-
munity are. left to right, board chair-
man Jack Carner; Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, bank board member and mem-
ber of the Dade County school board;
vice president Robert D. L*ngi and Mor-
ris l.apidus, internationally-known archi-
tect and Carner Bank board member.
A Bible is presented to tarner Bank or Miami
Beach's board chairman, Jack Carner, by Dr. Irving
Lehrman. left, rabbi of Temple linmnu-hl. Carner is
^ president of the Miami Beach congregation and has
amed In innumerable top-level civic, religious and
business leadership posts.
Civic Leaders on Bank Board
Flection of five Dade Coun-
ty business and community
leaders to the lx>ard of direc-
tors of the Carner Bank of
Miami Beach was announced
recently by Jack Carner.
chairman of the hoard of the
12-year-old financial institu-
tion.
New directors of the bank.
located at 937 Washington
Ave arc Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, attorney and mem-
ber of the Dade school
board; Morris L.apidus, head
of the New York and Miami
Beach architectural firm of
Morris Lapidus Associates;
Joe Hart, owner and opera-
tor of the Castaways Motels;
Alexander Muss, board chair-
man of the New York and
Miami Beach real estate de-
velopment and management
firm of Alexander Muss &
Sons, Inc.; and Joseph M.
Rose! owner and operator of
the Royal Palm Hotel.
Mrs. Meyers has been pres-
ident of numerous Interna-
tional, national and Southern
women's bar associations;
Chairman of such women's
divisions as Community
Chest. Federation and Israel
Bonds
l.apidus. designer Of many
of the nation's leading finan-
cial buildings, hotels, apart-
Bank Professionals
Have Top Records
Working closely with Stephen Carner. president. In guid-
ing the dally activities Of the earner Bank of Miami Beach
are two veteran officers of the 12-year-old bank.
Both M. H. Honsinger. executive vice president, and Rob-
ert D. Lang, vice president, also serve on the board Ol direc-
tors of the bank
Honsinger, who began his banking career with the Imperi-
al Bank of Canada in 1927. became an American citizen alter
World War II service overseas with the Royal Canadian Air
Force. He joined the Bank of .Miami Beach in 1957, and lives
at til05 V Bay Kd.
Lang, who joined the bank eight years ago after service
as a vice president and director of the Miami National Bank,
has been a resident of Dade County since 1922.
ments and shopping ci i
is considered an expcri city planning
Hart, a veteran of 10
years service on the CH> "t
Miami Beach Public Rela-
tions Board, is owner of
Hart Properties, Inc.
Muss, now completing the
third Seacoast Towers high-
rise ap n tmenl buildlni
Miami Beach, is a vice presi-
dent of '
pie Emanu-El
and a found-
er of t ii e
Albert
Stein College
of Medicine.
i; '-e. for-
nie r general
chaiDnan of
Israel Bonds
here, is honor-
ary life presi-
dent anil past
Temple Kmanu-F.l. He is
trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital
PD. ADV.
ROSK
president of


Page 8-A
. Jfc-/#f fhrirfinr
Friday, December 2,1965
=$
A


..- in incc
Friday, December 2. 1966
* Jewish fk>i adHicnn
Page 9-A

I
I
:
-
I





^^53$5J$5J$5^I$5^
from jm
nf barton's
Bring the sweet taste of Barton's
chocolates to your holiday season
with a selection from JAA's Candy
Shop! Everybody's favorites, have
a good supply on hand for enter-
taining ... to give as gifts.
The AAenorah, 15 ounces of Barton's
famous continental chocolates.
The candies in the center of the
box are colorfully foiled and
packed to resemble a Menorah,
2.2.9
Hanukkah Favorites, 14 ounces of
assorted continental miniatures,
beautifully boxed for gift-giving,
$2
Bartonettes, one pound of parve or
assorted miniature chocolates, wrapped
with a mosaic Menorah design,
2.29
Dredel and Sweets, filled with
treats including kiddie pops,
chocolate medallion, fruit drops
and a plastic spinning dredel,
Si
Bag-O-Dredels, 11 hollow Swiss
.nilk chocolate dredels plus a
plastic dredel, in a mesh bag,
Dredel, a plastic spinning top
with chocolate Hebrew coins,
JM CANDY SHOP, first floor, miami
available at dadeland and fort lauderdale
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s

TM STORE WITH TMt FLORIDA FLAI*


Puge 10-A
+ Jewish ftcridtiarj
Friday, December 2, 196G
AU-DAY SESSION THURSDAY
Catholic Jewish
Dialogue at Barry
Features Notables
Daniel Neal Heller (left), chairmen of the High Rise and Res-
dents Division for the 1967 CJA drive, and Byron J. Topol,
-.vho co-chaired the division with Heller last year, appraise
Federation's qift a reproduction of a Euqene Massin orig-
inal. The print was presented to each volunteer worker at
a Big Wheel Bash of the Combined Jewish Appeal last week.
Riots Break Out Anew
On Hot Jordan Border

Continued from Page 1-A
lion in the United Nations. But
not to act. it was pointed out.
would convert Israel's longest bor-
der and the one most difficult to
defend, into a permanent front
controlled by an enemy power.
King Hussein's decision to arm
-< (tiers in Israeli border villages
v as received here with mixed feel-
ings. On the one hand, there was
hope that such aiming might
weaken the violence of the radio
campaign from Cairo against King
Hussein mounted by Ahmed Shu-
kairy, head of the "Palestine Lib-
< at ion Organization," who has
called for Hussein's assassination
ii the King continued to refuse
help from Egypt and Syria and
from the PLO. On the other hand.
there was fear that giving arms
Ii the most passionately anti-Israel
element in Jordan's population
might cause new border incidents
ii bloodshed.
The observers noted that fire
a opened last night in the Jerus-
alem vicinity on a car in Israeli
NOW A LITTLE BIT
'. OF ISRAEL
COMES TO FLORIDA
CRUISE TO THE
CARIBBEAN ON THE
LUXURIOUS .
Shalom
territory in which one passenger
was injured. The observers said
I that the shooting probably was
done by relatives of casualties in
the Nov. 13 action, in the tradi-
tional Arab loyalty to the concept!
of revenging relatives. Israel j
lodged a complaint over the inci-
dent with UN' military observers.
Border tensions also caused
Jordanian officials to close to- .
day the MandaJbaum Gate divid-
ing new and old Jerusalem,
which yesterday was opened
only for a few hours. The gate ;
was opened briefly yesterday
after the American consul in
Jerusalem crossed into Jordan
and persuaded the governor of
Old Jerusalem to allow a group
of American tourists to go
through the checkpoint.
Israeli officials meanwhile post-
poned Israel's regular twice-a-
month convoy to Mount Scopus
until next week because of con-;
ccrn over possible reactions by''
Jordanians in Old Jerusalem
I which the convoy traverses en
route to the Israeli enclave. The
' convoy brings relief police guards
: and supplies to the Israeli guards
i on Mount Scopus.
Some of the nation's and this
community's most prominent Cath-
olic and Jewish leaders were to
take part at Thursday's Catholic-
Jewish Dialogue scheduled in an
all-day session at Barry College.
Co-sponsored by the Catholic
Diocese here and the Florida of-
fice of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith. the dialogue was
to continue with a banquet in the
evening.
Co-chairmen are Judge C.
Clyde Atkins and William L.
Pallot, with the theme slated as
"The Person, the Family and the
Common Good."
Registration, under the direc-
tion of Sister Mary Clifford, was
to lake place at 9 a.m., in Thomp-
son Hall on Barry College campus.
Sister If. Dorothy, president of
Hairy College, was to give greet
ings to guests.
Judge Atkins was to introduce
the morning keynote speaker. Dr.
Joseph L Lichten. national direc-
tor of intercultural affairs for the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Small discussion groups were to
be formed, stressing "The Person"
during the morning session, and
"The Family" during the after-
noon session. Judge Pallot was to
introduce the Fort Lauderdale
attorney, Francis K. Buckley, guest
speaker for the afternoon session,
following the opening remarks.
Buckley is past president of the
Broward County Bar Association
and president of the Community
Service Council of Broward Coun-
ty.
The Rev. Cyril Burke, chaplain
of Barry College, was to summar-
ize the conference, emphasizing
social concern and community is-;
sues influenced by religious be-
liefs and traditions.
Greetings were to be extended
by Bishop Carroll. Dr Irving Lehr-I
man. Judge Pallot and Judge At-1
kins at the 8 p.m. session.
Out-of-town speakers for the
evening session were to be the
Rev. David J. Bowman, theolog-
ian, author, educator and mem-
ber of the Bishop's Committee
for Ecumenical Affairs in Wash-
ington, D.C., and Or. Samuel
Sandmel, professor of Bible and
Hellenistic literature at Hebrew
Union College.
Fr. Bowman holds a licentiate in
philosophy and theology at West
Baden College. Ind., and a doctor-
ate in sacred theology from the
Gregorian University in Rome,
specializing in the theology of the
redemptive incarnation and the
theology of ecumenism.
Dr. Sandmel is a specialist in
the New Testament and its rela-'
tion to Judaism. He was appoint-
ed to the faculty of Hebrew Union
College in 1952, and served as j
provost from 1957 to this year, |
when he was named distinguished j
service professor.
in the heart of
Miami Beach
400 foot private beach
and cabanas Vz mile of
boardwalk two heated
pools steam, sauna and
massage facilities* stores
and specialty shops right
on the premises
STUDIOS U? *
BEDROOM APIS.. "
RENTALS FROM mo
Uatfi ConsmtliU Scit 6) Occtfmy
Kitchen Sit/\ y" can >
appliances by \XJ sure il it's...
144
Westinghouse
Triton
Tomer
ON THE BOARDWALK
IN THE HEAAT OF MIAMI BEACH
Rfftln OH'Ce on premises open 7 djps 9-S
COLLINS AVE. & 29th ST.
PHONE JE 2-2411
t
1

li
(
Now you can cruise on the niciit
it, the new Shalom,
right from Port Everglades. The Jl-
"ere aboard the Shalcm
unique blend ot Israeli warmth and
C .nbbean excitement...and you'll)
visit such places as St. Maarten,
St. Thoma*, San J. an, Guadeloupe.
January 6 for 8 days. Reservations
are going*fast. so hurry.
S.S. Shalom Israel Registry, built
in 1964. pr more information see
your travel agent, or call
ZIM
UNES-21
Owner's Representative:
American Israeli Shipping Co.. Inc.,
24,5 Southeast First St.. Miami. Fla.
Arab League
Boycott Adds
RCA to Ford
Continued from Page 1-A
Tunisia has been boycotting Arab
League meetings.
In a related development, Eygp-
tian assets of Ford were frozen
by three Alexandria banks. Hans1
Slock, general manager of Ford:
operations in Egypt, denied re- ]
ports that the action had been!
taken because the American firm |
had refused to assure the Arab I
League that II would not operate
in Israel. Ford recently entered
into an agreement with an Israeli
firm to assembly Ford vehicles in
bsael,
Mr. Stock said that the banks
froze Ford funds in Egypt pending
settlement of a $1,840,000 customs
claim. Egyptian law requires pay-
ment of a customs duty on com-
pleted cars assembled in the Alex-
andria free zone. Ford has paid
duty only on imported parts of the
completed units and not on locally
supplied items such as tires, bat-
teries, upholstery and labor. (In
Detroit, Ford officials declined
comment on the report of the
freezing of company assets in
Alexandria.)
YOUR
SAVINGS
INSURED
up to
$15,000
If you want EXTRA PROFIT we will automatically add
the dividends from your Savings Certificate to your Regular Passlx>ok
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MITCHELL WOLFSON
Chairman ot the Board
MILTON WEISS
President
m
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Second Oldest in the Nation. Largest in Miami Beach.
MAIN OFFICE
LINCOLN ROAD MALL AT WASHINGTON AVENUE 538-5511
BRANCH OFFICES
755 WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH 538-5511
301 71st STREET, MIAMI BEACH 538-5511
260 SUNNY ISLES BOULEVARD, MIAMI 947-1415
18330 N, W. 7th AVENUE, MIAMI 621-3601
** FAKKINO AT ACL. OFFICES
TOWER OF THRIFT


T33J
ht:
..._?,* 1MB
[riday. December 2. 1966
*Jfewfef, meridian
Paqe 11-A
Reprisal Can '* be Tolerated
^
[Meeting to discuss the Dec. 15 Woman of the Year Luncheon
of the Greater Miami Women's Division, American Friends of
the Hebrew University, are (from left) past president, Mrs.
Louis Glasser; president, Mrs. Philip F. Thau; board members,
Mesdames Herbert S. Shapiro and Jack S. Popick.
WITH ASSIST FROM JACKIE GUASON
lew $1,500,000 Warner Pavilion Ready
:or Dedication at Mount Sinai Sunday
Dedication of Mount Sinai Hos-
pital's new 150-bcd Albert and
lassie Warner Pavilion will be
Bid on Sunday at 2 p.m. .lackie
lea son will make a special ap-
earance at the ceremony to pay
ribule to Maj. Warner, one of the
bunders of the Warner film
|\ nasty.
Ma), and Mrs. Warner presented
llount Sinai with Sl.500.000 for the
^instruction of the new edifice
following Maj. Warner's hospitali-
lation at Mount Sinai two years
Iffo.
"The groat growth of our com-
, monity, th efforts of this fine
.medical institution, and the con-
sistent goals of the hospital to
Iprovide the best patient care to
all" is what impressed him at
the time and made him decide to
|help provide additional needed
beds to the institution.
The new win-:, on the bayslde of
the hospital grounds, i- a four-
story building, the three middle
floors o! which are patient areas.
Rooms have the latest in modern
furniture and contain free televi-
sion and telephones, in addition to
necessary hospital equipment.
Each floor has a spacious visitor-
patient lounge.
The first floor contains a large
lobby, offices and other adminis-
trative areas. The roof of the
pavilion contains recreational and
solarium type equipment. The en-
tire building is colorfully-deco-
rated, and work is currently under
way so that the surrounding
grounds will be an attractive set-
ting for this modern .structure.
The ceremonies will be followed
by conducted tours of the new
wing and refreshments. Admission
to the program is by invitation
only.
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
After more than a week of bar-,
gaining behind the scenes of the
United Nations Security Council
over the text of a resolution on
Jordan's complaint against Is-
rael's reprisal raid into Jordanian
territory on Nov. 13. a joint draft
resolution by Mali and Nigeria was
presented to the Council.
The resolution censures Israel
and emhapsizes that actions of
military reprisal 'cannot be tol-
erated.'' It warns that if they are
repeated, the Security Council
"will have to consider further and
more effective steps" as envisaged
in the UN Charter.
In the meantime, it requests
the UN Secretary-General "to
keep the situation under review"
and report to the Security Coun-
cil "as appropriate." The resolu-
tion avoids recommending any
sanctions against Israel, as re-
quested by the representative of
Jordan.
i he text of the resolution reads:
"The Security Council, having
heard the statements oi the repre-
sentatives of Jordan and Israel
i ii i erning the grave Israeli mili-
tary action which took place in the
southern Hebron area on 13 No-
vember 1906.
"Having noted the information
provided by the Secretary-Genera1
concerning this military action in
ins statement of Hi November and
also document S/7593; Observing
that this incident constituted B
large-Scale and carefully planned
military action on the territory
of Jordan by the armed forces in
Israel; Reaffirming the previous
resolutions of the Security Council
condemning past incidents of re-
prisal in branch of the General
Armistice Agreement and of the
United Nations Charter; Recalling
the repeated resolutions of the Se-
curity Council for the cessation of
violent incidents across the de-
marcation line, and not overlook-
ing past incidents of this nature;
"Reaffirming the necessity for
strict adherence to the General Ar-
mistice Agreement, 1. Deplores the
loss of life and heavy damage to
property resulting from the action
of the Israeli Government of 13
November 1966; 2 Censures Israel
for this large-scale military action
in violation of the United Nations
Charter and of the General Armis-
tice Agreement between Israel and
Jordan; 3. Emphasizes to Israel
that actions of military reprisal
cannot be tolerated and that if they
arc repeated, the Security Council
will have to consider further and
more effective steps as envisaged
in the Charter to ensure against
the repetition of such acts; 1. Re-
quests the Secretary-General to
keep the situation under review
and report to the Security Council
as appropriate."
Prior to presentir.-j the resolu-
tion, the representatives of Mali,
Nigeria and Uganda addressed
the Security Council. The
Uganda representative suggested
that a "hot line" be set up be-
tween Israeli and Jordanian
military commanders to prevent
further incidents. He also said
that his country welcomed steps
planned by Israel to seal the bor-
der.
The delegate from Uganda in-
dicated that UN trace machinery
had outlived its usefulness. He
called for practical measures, such
as meetings of military command-
ers on both sides of the armistice
lines to work out means of sur-
veillance of the border. He also
said there should be full freedom
of movement in the demilitarized
zones for UN military observers so
that UN personnel will not be stop-
ped in tracking offenders. He also
called for UN observation posts in
sensitive sectors on the demarca-
tion lines.
Before the Mali-Nigeria draft
resolution was presented to the
Security Council, members of the
Council were working to combine
several proposed texts into a re-
solution that might be acceptable
to the Council.
'flu delegates from Mali and Ni-
geria, i.: pi esenting their joinl r
solution, said that they did not l -
pact either Jordan or Israel to ac-
'cl i in this resolution, but asked
that thej accept if as part "! B
genuine concern of the Seem
Council that "peace should he re-
stored and maintained in the arei
|on the basis of peaceful co-ex! '-
c nee thai we all advocate."
DAVID LIGHT SLATED FOR AWARD
Jen Pastore to be Guest Speaker
Sunday at Beth Am Bond Dinner
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MfMBMS- FfOFHAI DEPOSIT INSURANCC COKPOtATION-FlOEKAL ItSl'VC SYSTIM
United States Sen. John O. Pas-
lore, of Rhode Island, will be
puest speaker at the Temple Beth
>m Israel "Chai" dinner Sunday
ivening at the Dupont Hotel, it
WU announced by Herman Feld
lan. dinner chairman.
Feldman noted that Sen. Pastore
r\ill come to the Beth Am dinner
if the personal invitation of Dr.
Herbert M. Baumgard, spiritual
eader of the temple.
Dr. Baumgard and Sen. Past re
irst met Jast spring at the Isrpel
SEN. PASTORE
Independence Day dinner where
Sen. Pastore was speaker.
David J. Light, veteran South
Dade community leader and a
founder of Temple Beth Am, will
be the recipient of the Herbert
I H. Lehman Award.
A member of the U.S. Senate
' since 1950, Sen. Pastore, in addi-
tion to serving on the Joint Atomic
Energy Committee, is assigned to
I he Senate Committees on Appro-
priations and Commerce He also
plays a leading role in the Senate
Democratic Policy Committee.
Prior to his election lo the U. S.
Senate, he had served for five j
years as Governor of Rhode Is-
land. His political career began in
1935. when he was elected to the
Rhode Island General Assembly.
Shortly thereafter, he was ap-
pointed to the Attorney General's
Department He served for six
years as Assistant Attorney Gen-
eral of Rhode Island, before hold-
ing the office of Lieutenant Gover-
nor in 1944.
A leading figure in the passing
of the nuclear test ban treaty. Sen.
Pastore had a decisive part in the
adoption of the Civil Rights Act.
lie was President Johnson's choice
to deliver the keynote address of
the Democratic National Conven-
tion in Atlantic City in August.
1964.
The dinner will be at 6:30. pre-
ceded by a champagne reception
tendered In honor of Sen. Pastore
by Dr. and Mrs. Baumgard and
Mr. and Mrs. Light.
67 RENAULT
avm
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2190 S.W. 8th STREET
PHONE 373-5436
18340 S. DIXIE HWY.
PHONE 235-1053


Page 12-A
KjfeNtftf fk>rktiat
i
Friday. December 2. 1966
Israel Will Keep 'Nili
For Auction to Meet
.< {scsrl Treasury officials decided
Sunday lo keep' the "Nili," the
Hgl^L sh^p in _thc J^ryjd^jJ.
in Miami Port
Mortgage Debts
Miami YMHA senior high students discuss Jay Gartman, president of the Presidents
plans lor the 13th annual teen conclave to be Council, Jay Veber. Seated is Mike Rosen,
held at the YM and WHA of Greater Miami conclave coordinator. Not shown are conclave
on Sunday. Standing (left to right) are Mike coordinators Bonnie Kalish and Sherry Hech-
Weinberg, Glenna Allman, Susie Goldberg, felsen. (See story, Page 6-A.)
DEEPLY-HELD RELIGIOUS CONVICTIONS REMAIN UNCHANGED
Dialogues Have No Effect -- AJCong.
By Special Report
NEW YORK Interfaith dia
logues and other programs aimed
at bringing Catholics and Jews
closer together have had little or
no effect in changing deeply-held
positions on birth control, public
funds for parochial schools and
other church-state issues, the
American Jewish Congress re-
ported here.
Despite the new look in Cath-
olic-Jewish relations since the
Ecumenical Council, differences
between the two groups remain
"as wide as ever" on both public
and theological questions, it was
stated.
Howard M. Squadron, chair-
man of the Commission on Law I
and Social Action of the Con- j
gress, said he was "neither sur-
prised nor disappointed" that
closer ties had not led to fewer
differences. "Dialogue does not
have to result in agreement," ;
he declared.
"It does serve a useful purpose
by exposing different points of |
view to rational exploration rather
than emotional expulsions."
The American Jewish Congress
leader said it was "not unusual for
Jews and Catholics to oppose each
other at a public hearing on an
issue of church-state separation in
the morning and sit around a table
the same evening in interfaith
dialogue.
"This is a healthy development."
he commented. "It is healthy that
the two groups should meet to-
gether in civilized discourse and it
is healthy that neither group
should feel it must abandon prin-
ciple as the price of interfaith har-
mony."
Squadron said one of the major
differences between Catholics and
Jews was the question of public
financing of church connected
schools. He conceded that some
Orthodox bodies in the Jewish
community had joined with Cath-
olics in seeking Federal and state
funds for parochial schools and
Yshivoth. But he said the "over-
whelming majority of American
Jews as represented by the sec-
ular and religious organizations
Adenauer OK's Kiesinger
Continued from Page 1-A
candidate. He added that his
opinion was "shared by authorita-
tives representatives of Jews liv-
ing in West Germany."
Meanwhile Kiesinger made
public this week his exoneration
by a West German De-Nazifica-
tion Court. The verdict said that
Kiesinger joined the Nazi Party
on May 5, 1933, but that he op-
posed the party program at both
professional and personal risk,
after Hitler liquidated Ernst
Roehm and other storm troop-
ers in the summer of 1934. ^t
Kiesinger released the Courfs
verdict without comment. He had
previously made public a repon'hy
the Nazi Secret Service accusing
him of having worked against the
party program during the second
World War while he was a foreign
ministry official. According to Kie-
singer, Allied de-Nazification au-
thorities completely exonerated
him in 1946 after holding him in
prison for more than a year.
The West German exoneration of
Kiesinger was handed down by the
County Court at Scheinfield near
Munich in August, 1948. It con-
firmed that he did not resign from
the Party, but said he had never
held office or rank. It added that
from the time he recognized the
true nature of the Party program
he had opposed the Nazi "Mastery
of the Select" to the extent within
his power.
t&H
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that speak for them strongly
oppose any weakening of the wall
of separation between church and
state."
Another area of disagreement
is the question of providing
birth control information and
materials as part of the anti-
poverty program. Catholics have
opposed this aspect of the war
on poverty in many parts of the
country. Squadron noted.
He added: "We recognize that
the Catholic community has its in-
ternal disagreements and that we
find ourselves at odds, on some
issues, with only some of its
spokesmen.
"It is clear, however, that on
the matter of public funds for
church-connected schools, Cath-
olic leaders are united in opposing
the principle of church-state sep-
aration as uniformly understood
and practiced by the American
people since the writing of the
Constitution."
The American Jewish Congress
spokesmen said a significant trend
was developing in the "rising num-
ber of church-state issues now be-
lug fought out at the state as well '
as the Federal level."
Recent proposals to repeal Ar- j
tide XI. Section 3 of the New York
State Constitution the provision
that bars the expenditure of pub-
lic funds for church-connected
schools were the "first salvo
in a campaign to open the public
treasury to sectarian schools, not
only in New York but in states
around the country," he charged.
"Opponents of strict separa-
tion," he said, "have opened a
new front in the State Legisla-
tures, where they hope to find-
a more receptive climate."
He cited legislation proposed or
already enacted to provide text-
books, bussing and public school j
teachers for church operated
schools. State courts in Michigan,
New York, Ohio, Oregon and Penn ;
sylvania are expected to hand ]
down decisions on these issues
soon, he noted.
Somerfin shipping company, in
Miami until it is auctioned to meet
some of the debts against Somer-
fin which have been guaranteed by
the Israel Treasury.
The decision to bar the Nili
from a scheduled Caribbean cruise
was taken after Tieasuiy officials
heard a report from the Treasury's
iegal adviser. Elhanan Landau,
who went to Miami to investigate
the situation, and returned to
Jerusalem for conferences with
top Treasury officials.
The Nili is mortgaged to the
Bank of Glasgow, Scotland. Its
mortgage, which is in default, is
guaranteed by the Israel Govern-
ment, which has provided the
Geneva-based firm with SI 8,-
000,00 in various forms of guar-
antees and collateral.
The company, which was found-
ed and is operated by Meir Halevy,
an Israeli citizen, was disclosed to
be in difficulties about two weeks
ago when Swiss creditors and
banks asked for a court injunction
to freeze Somerfin assets and to
bar Halevy from the management,
reportedly to protect their invest-
ments in Somerfin.
Treasury officials said that the
Israel Government would not lose
any money on its guarantees if
the Treasury was permitted to act
as a "hard banker" without "sen-
timental considerations."
II AM K AH
SPK4 I A
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TO
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On the C-?anjtG7t!i Street
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KOSHER CATERERS
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BAR M1TZVAHS
WEDDINGS PARTIES
Specializing in Nome Cateriaf
and Hotel (Verb
SOL WEISS
866-6226
IF NO ANSWER DIAL
866-5278
1216 NORMANDY DRIVE., MJ.
Handwriting Analyst Heard
A regular business meeting of
the Business and Professional
Women's Chapter of Women's
American ORT, took place Tues-
day evening in the Hospital Room
of Chase Federal, 425 Arthur God-
frey Rd. Charlotte Leibel spoke
on "History of Handwriting." So-
cial hour followed.
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unucn ntn MAMAbtMfNT
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Miami's Only "Shomer Sbabbos" Restaurant Quality Par Excellence
8393 BIRD ROAD, MIAMI Phone 226-1744
HAROI.r. PONT and IR-VIN GORDON
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KOSHER CATERERS hmii
from hop> d'oeuvres to a complete buffet l^rnkftW
170 N.W. 5th ST.. MIAMI PHONE FR 4-2655
Under the ttrict tuperviaion of the United Kashrue Association of
Greater MiamiSupervising Rabbi: Rabbi Abraha'- J. Safra
OPEN HOUSE WEDDISGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTIONS
^tWB
ROYAL HUNGARIAN TW RESTAURANT
AND CATERING
NOW OPEN for the SEASON
731 Washington Avenue
Phone 538-5401
Bonfc's Capital on Rise
Capital structure of Jefferson
National Bank of Miami is in ex-
cess of $1,700,000 as of Nov. 15,
according to an announcement by
Arthur H. Courshon, chairman of
the board. Jefferson National's
original capital structure in March,
1964 was $1 million, according to
Courshon, who noted that "this
is a 70 percent Increase in only
32 months of operation."
KATZ's PARADISE RESTAURANT
1451 Collins Avenue Phone 532-1671
REOPENING FRIDAY, DEC. 9 AT 4 P.M.
KREPLACH ft KISHKE ft MATZO BALLS -A- KNISHES
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RE-OPENING SUNDAY, DEC. 4th at 4 PM.
STAR Dairy. Veg. & Fish Restaurant
EST. 1943 Under Same Management
THE OLDEST AND ONLY DAIRY RESTAURANT IN DADE COUNTT
* 841 Washington Ave. Ph. 531-9182 *
!
(/


Friday. December 2, 1966
+Jeist fh>rId in r)
Page 13-A

36 Jet Fl04's Go to Jordan
I Florida's most controversial bank issue, branch banking, was
I the major topic discussed at the fu.it annual Florida Com-
mercial Bankers Forum held in Miami recently. Pat DuBois,
president. Independent Bankers Association of America
(right), explains why his organization favors unit banking to
Frank Smothers Jr., president. United Bancshcres of Florida
[(left), and William Pallot, president. Greater Miami Clearing-
house Association (center).
luring the week... as i see it
Continued from Page 4-A
I in their heyday, that "Ieh bin ein Berliner.'" he simply confirmed
| their erroneous impression of the facts.
The Germans were upset about the division of their country and
[of Berlin; and they have needed repeated assurance that we would
not abandon them in the face of
a threatening Communist tide.
[What we have done, in our NATO
[maneuvering, in our designation
of former Nazi elite Gen. Speidel
as NATO commander, in our re-
creation of the German military
image, in our acceptance of West
Germany as this nation's prin-
cipal ally in the ultimate con-
frontation with the Soviet Union,
is also to tell the Germans that
we finally accept what Hitler
said in the first place.
This is the duality with which
the Germans have since lived.
They have not ever been able to
understand why we continue to
countenance the trials of former
Nazis, why we silently approved
of world pressures designed to
underscore German sins during
the Hitler era, and why we turn-
ed the other way when some
forces, notably the Jews, never
let up in seeking to stir whatever
(guilt the Germans could feel.
As the Germans wanted to see
I it, this has been the minor note
and why not forget it? in
the major composition that was
the Hitler symphony: the warn-
ing tutti against the Bolshevik
scourge. If we joined them, why
were we still fighting them?
Erhard's visit with Johnson
changed all that. Suddenly, the
U.S. suggested a newer view of
the European continent and the
Western struggle against the
East. Individual nuclear capabil-
ity was denied him. A less stern
view of the Russian threat was
voiced, however sotto voce, in
the face of newer threats we
wanted the Germans, along with
the West generally, also to feel.
NATO, it suddenly grew appar-
ent, would no longer be what it
had been in the past. Erhard re-
turned and his shaky coalition
came crashing down on his head.
Now the old guard, the Nazis,
the extremists of the thirties,
could speak again, raising t.fiir
tattered banners anew. And,
since Uncle Sam was no longer
a democratic ally, the makeup on
the face of Bonn smeared, grew
streaky and ran. It ran in the
successes in Hesse, and grew
bleared in the ballot boxes in
Frankfurt.
By Special Report
The United States announced
Tuesday that it is sending 36 F104
Star-fighters, Lockheed jets cap-
able of 1,500 miles an hour, to
strengthen King Hussein's regime
in Jordan.
The announcement came in the
wake of open and frank expres-
sions of State Depaitment dis-
pleasure and even anger at the
Nov. 13 retaliation by Israeli
loices against repeated Arab in-
fractions of the border and ter-
rorist activity in Israeli village
settlements.
Meanwhile, Israel claimed,
also on Tuesday, to have shot
cown two Egyptian MIG 19's in a
tattle over the Negev Desait.
According to the claim, an Is-
raeli communications plane was
patroiing over (he desert and
was intercepted by the two So-
viet-produced Egyptian fighters.
Israeli jets came to the rescue
at 15.000 feet over the frontier
settlement of Beertayim. Israel
said that one MIG fell on Egyptian
soil. Hi- Mirages, the vaunted
French-manufactured fighters, are
both reported to have returned
safely.
King Hussein, of Jordan, re-
ceived the U.S. F104-s following a
weekend assessment in which the
State Department concluded that
it would be necessary to bolster
the King's military strength
against new calls by the Arabs,
and particularly Syria, to bring
down Hussein's rule. Allegedly,
Hussein is regarded as "soft on
Israel'" by other Arab rulers.
The King, determined to main-
tain his throne, was this week
forced into making new strong
statements against Israel to put
the lie to the Arab charge. At the
i same time, in a press conference
in Amman, he attacked the Soviet
| Union, accusing Moscow of adding
to present Middle East tensions
because of the Communist deter-
j initiation to gain control of the
oil-rich area. He openly called the
Communists to blame for the pres-
ent unrest.
Hussein frankly told the West
that if the Middle East fell to
Communist influence, "the
threat will be very, very severe."
Wednesday, U.S. JSecrejtary of
Labor Wiliard WirtT'arrived in
Israel. But it was reliably under-
stood that he was bringing a per-
I sonal warning from Washington
[ not to repeat the Nov. 13 incident.
I Washington clearly blames Israel
: for the threat to the Hussein re-
gime. The Jordanian King, 31, is
considered by State Department
observers as the most stable mon-
arch in the Middle East.
MORRIS & RUTH URNER
HARRY ZUCKERMAN
Catering for All Occasions
Established in 1945

PARKING
FACILITIES
Famous
471 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-3987
MIAMI
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J^esfauranl
VOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WOR
fC Branches Set Dinner Show
Workmen's Circle Branch 1059,
fcliami Beach, will celebrate its
lOth anniversary with a dinner
know at the Lucerne Hotel on Sun-
pay. Dec. 11.
Reservations and tickets are
Available from Murray Gold, 6905
pay Dr.. or the Workmen's Circle
Dilic. 940 Lincoln Rd.
Branch 1059 is one of the
English-speaking branches in the
Greater Miami ar*a. Meetings
are held the third Saturday
evening of the month at the .
Washington Federal Normandy
Isle Branch.
Mrs. Max Greenberg, chairman,
Announces that in lieu of the Jan-;
pary meeting, the group will spon- <
or a concert by the Greater Mi- j
pnii Mandolin Orchestra with the
proceeds to the Workmen's Circle
Schools in Greater Miami.
Miami Beach Branch 692 of the
Workmen's Circle will install new-
officers at the last meeting in
December.
Slate for 1967 includes financial
secretary. Harry Schuldiner, 1015
Meridian Ave.; treasurer. Arthur
Geller; recording secretary. Isaac
Frankel: Isidor Cohen, correspond-
ing secretary; Max Zimmerman,
hospitaler.
Executive board are Saul Block.
Sidney Borenstein. Sarah Gold,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel H. Levine,
I. R. Levine. Nathan Rosenfeld.
Hyman Simon, Katie Tischler and
Abe Boyer.
Meetings are held at 25 Wash-
ington Ave.. the first and third
Thursday of each month at 1 p.m.,
Chabner to Serve
Cemetery Assn.
As Prexy 4th Time
Hyman Chabner has been re-
elected president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Cemetery Associa-
tion, and will serve in the office
for a fourth term.
Others reelected as officers for
the current year are Fredric
Rosenthal. first vice president: Leo
Meyer, second vice president-
Nathan Ginsburg, secretary;
Samuel Kostoff. treasurer; Max R.
Silver, chairman Trust Fund.
Serving on the board are Philip
Berkowitz and Abraham Pepper,
Beth El Congregation: Morris B.
Frank and Morris Krevat. Beth
Jacob Congregation: Lewis Stern-
shein, Beth David Conaregation;
Irving I.ubin, Beth Kodesh Con-
gregation: Hyman P. Galbut and
Mrs. Samuel Geltner, Chesed S'lel
Ernes Sisterhood.
The Greater Miami Jewish I
Cemetery Association owns and J
operates the Mount Sinai Memorial
Park Cemetery and the Jewish i
Section of Woodlawn Park Ceme-j
tery.
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I
Page 14-A
+Jewlsli mhridlur
Friday. December 2, 1966
P
Today's Thought: By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
Americans Overseas Cease Being Americans
VHHEN DOES- an American cease to
** be an American? When he ceases
to be in America? Most American tour-
ists, I am sure, are exemplary >n their
conduct. Others seem to change outlook
when Ihey go overseas.
American Jews, for example, sub-
scribe to the notion that evil should not
be fostered. Yet thousands of them go
to Austria, a country which is pock-mai.cu v.
Semitism more blatant than latent.
Recently, the Reconstructionist Magazine wondered
aloud why Jews would surrender their dignity and patron-
ize a nation where Hitlerites are almost lionized and
where anti-Nazism is enough to make a person the butt
of popular ridicule.
The attraction of Spain and Portugal for American
tourists Jewish and non-Jewish, evokes wonder, too.
A friend of mine told me about one of his friends
who spoke enthusiastically about the charm of Spain
and the picturesqueness of the Portuguese people.
My friend was boiling because his friend had spoken
:
OH the Record:
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Demonstration of Orthodox Love
I HAVE NEVER been ashamed ofl
being a Jew nor of Orthodox
persuasion in an age that strains
religious credulity. This faith, |
however, was shaken quite pro-
foundly recently when I was wit-
ness to an unbelievable spectacle
a picket line by young religious I
zealots against one of the great I
Jewish scholars of the clay and a man ol impeccable
Orthodox piety.
The target was Dr. Samuel Belkin, president of
Yeshiva University and of its Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary of America, an institution without
which the American Orthodox rabbinate would be
extinct today. Dr. Belkin's sin was acceptance of an
invitation from the Synagogue Council of America
to participate in a dinner ceremony in tribute to
the heads of the three leading rabbinical seminaries
in the country Orthodox, Conservative and Re-
form. The invitees, besides Dr. Belkin, were Dr.
I 'inis Finkelstein, chancellor of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America, and Dr. Nelson Glueck.
UN Listening Post:
By SAUL CARSON
A Big Lesson
United Nations
|SRAEL has learned several les-
ons of great importance from
its last diplomatic encounter here
in its case against Syria. Perhaps
i the most important of those les-
sons is that, contrary to the views
held by many people including
I Israel the Jewish State is not a
lone woii at the United Nations and does have
friends at court. They are powerful friends. They
include not only the Big Three Western powers
the U.S.A., Britain and France but also a net
majority of the Security Council's ten non-perma-
nent members.
Although the resolution on which the Council
finally took a ballot had been a dehydrated version
of a somewhat stronger draft previously moved by
the United States and Britain, the fact that the last
draft had been co-sponsored by six of the ten non-
permanent members showed that Israel's case was
not a lost cause.
Syria's ambassador himself, George J. Tomeh.
in voicing his objections to the final draft, conceded
that it "implies that Syria is being admonished, that
Syra is being blamed for not having taken the neces-
sary measures." That is precisely what Israel sought,
and that is exactly why the Soviet Union vetoed
the draft.
By exercising its veto, the USSR killed all the
efforts to adopt the resolution formally. But the
Council's official records show that ten of its 15
members agreed with the Syrian evaluation of the
main operative clause, which stated that the Coun-
cil "invites the Government of Syria to strengthen
its measures for preventing incidents that constitute
a violation of the GeneraT^Armistice Agreement."
Mild as such wording was, it is. indeed, as the Syrian
ambassador complained, "tantamount to laying the
responsibility for these incidents at the door of the
Syrian Government."
If Israel could get six co-sponsors out of a
Council membership of 15 to stick their necks out
when Israel's case happens to be just if Israel
could get two-thirds of the Council members to vote
for its side what does that show about Israel's
status at the United Nations as a whole?
The recent Security Council debate and final
results on the Syrian-Israeli dispute showed also
where Israel's real friends are situated. For a time,
during the Council deliberations, France was un-
willing to join the United States and Britain in
out-and-out endorsement of Israel's case against
Syria.
president of the Hebrew Union College Jewish In-
stitute of Religion.
On encountering the pickets before the hotel,
who were surrounded by bewildered people who
could not grasp how so-called religious people could
picket an event that marked the sitting together of
brethren. I asked one of them whether he believed
in the dictum that "all Israelites are comrades." His
impudent answer was yes, but that the term "Israel-
ite" referred only to "our Jews." I received a sim-
ilar answer when I reminded another of the pickets
about the Psalmist's admonition, "Indeed, how good
and pleasant is the sitting of brethren together."
And when I reminded a bearded gentleman with
piercing eyes of a fanatic of the Biblical injunction.
"Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thy heart," he
burst into an irate flame that almost consumed me.
Angrily he replied, "the word brother means our
brothers, not of the kind you have in mind." At
this point. I could not resist reminding him'of the
Talmudic dictum that falling into wrath is a worse
sin that idol-worshipping. Now. his still more angry
reply, was "Ihr zeit an am haaretz" (you are an
ignoramus).
On entering the dining room of the hotel, where
the function was held, I hoped to meet and talk
to Dr. Belkin and other erudite Orthodox scholars
about the demonstrators and the rationale behind
their conduct. But before I could get into a con-
versation with Dr. Belkin, the dinner bell rang, and
our talk was interrupted before it even began.
At our table there was speculation whether any
of the three honored guests, particularly Dr. Belkin,
would react to the situation. The answer was not
long in coming, though Dr. Belkin did not specific-
ally refer to the religious zealots who objected to
his sitting at one table and under one roof with
men of different Jewish religious views.
My notes on what he said may be incorrect,
but here is what my notebook says he said.
Dr. Belkin observed that he could see no ob-
jection to a uniting of Jewish religious forces within v
the Synagogue Council of America on matters of
common interest and concern, but that "in the
things in which we differ we can have- no unity,
nor should it be expected of us, particularly of
Jews of Orthodox orientation."
Continuing he said, "we do not hate any Jew
in our heart; we love our neighbors regardless of
whether they are Jews or non-Jews ... As an Ortho-
dox Jew, I have no hatred for any Jew whether he
is observant or non-observant. I have the deepest
affection for my fellow co-religionists, and when
we rebuke them, or make pleas to them in furth-
erance of Tdrah, we never do it in the spirit of
hatred, vengeance or grudge, but in the spirit of
genuine love and affection. We shall never diminish
our deep devotion to our brethren and fellow-
citizens, nor shall we compromise with our sacred
heritage, with our link in our golden chain of
being."
admiringly of the Portuguese as "unspoiled." The bucolic
nature of the Hispanic countryside also evoked praise.
"Doesn't he know," roared my friend, "that unspoiled
means untouched by progress, that picturesque often
means squalid, and that obsequious people are the fruit-
age of dictatorship? Doesn't he know that despite the
whitewashing done on Franco he remains the hater he
was, unrepentant and brutal, still refusing to grant free-
dom to his own subjects, to organized Protestant and
Jewish groups? Naturally, he wants American dollars.
But how can Americans who in this country are adherents
of freedom and supporters of democracy betray these
ideals when they go abroad?"
Of course, it's the thing to do these days to go to
Spain. But one can understand my friend's feelings about
this strange blend of fashion and fascism.
One tourist spot worthy of support is Gibraltar, which
has a Jewish prime minister, Israel Hassan, and lots of
troubles because in his zeal to get it away from England.
Franco is putting the squeeze on Gibraltar's economy with
undisguised ruthlessness.
When an American leaves America would it not be
well for him to bring to other nations that which is finest
in America?
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Of Isaac Carmel
JTHE MAN WHO shook hands
i with Theodore Herzl himself
3 flew into Kennedy Field the other
I day for his annual visit from Is-
JraeL We mean Isaac Carmel.
They tell of Paul Revere that
I in his old age he liked to put on
his Revolutionary War uniform
land reminisce over the famous
noie ride he took back in Boston in 1776. Carmel
hasn't got a horse, but he flies about more than
Revere ever did, bespeaking the message of Israel.
But he isn't as old as some people think. "I was
sitting the other day in Jerusalem at the opening
of the Knesset in its new, beautiful building. Sitting
alongside of Dr. Schwartz, of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization, when up comes my friend, Meyer Weisgal,
of the Weizmann Institute.
"Carmel," he exclaims exuberantly, "you here!
You must be 100 years old."
"Well," I say, "I don't know, Meyer, but you
ought to know. You were at my brith."
Actually, Weisgal only recently celebrated his
77th birthday. Carmel is 83.
Despite his love for Israel, Carmel usually man-
ages to return for a few months annually to Amer-
ica. Along with Israel, he says, he regards America
as one of the great powers.
"What a wonderful thing we have done in Is-
rael." he says. "In 18 years, we have built up a
Jewish state of two and a half million people, de-
veloped a substantial industry and a wonderful ag-
riculture. We export oranges, bananas, eggs, even
flowers.
"Do you know that when Ben-Gurion first went
to Sde Boker in the Negev, his wife, Paula, said,
'Do you want to know why Ben-Gurion chose Sde
Boker? Because it is the worst place in Israel.' And
she was right.
"When Adenauer visited Israel, he went to see
Ben-Gurion at Sde Boker."
"But I understand," I said, "you do have un-
employment in Israel today."
"It's greatly exaggerated," said Carmel. "Any-
one who really wants to work can get a job. Take
my friend, Krinitzi. Many years ago, he was out of
work, so he went and founded the city of Ramat Gan
and has been its mayor since."
As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Freedom Budget for All Our Citizens
A SHARP RESEARCHER noted in
^ June when that XB-70A experi-
mental bomber cracked up over the
Mojave Desert, the destroyed aircraft
was one of two way-out planes built
at a cost of $1,200,000,000. And that fig-
ure is just about what Uncle Sam will
spend in 1966 on the anti-poverty pro-
gram. So perhaps a great host of people
were ready for the recent unveiling of the "Freedom
Budget for All Americans," the A. Philip Randolph Insti-
tute blueprint for achieving freedom from want.
The plan may cost $185,000,000,000 over a decade of
operation. But when one of its chief architects, Econo-
mist Leon Keyserling, insists that it can be carried out
with no new taxes and no let-up in expenditures for our
operations in Vietnam, people have to pay serious
attention.
There is never an ideal time to come forward with
a request for such a huge expenditure. Should the archi-
tects and sponsors of the plan have waited for the white
backlash to ease off? Is it appropriate to introduce such
a proposal when we are sending thousands of young men
into the Asian conflict? Do we not realize that this is the
year of the cut-off for federal civil rights legislation?
All such questions can be answered. We'll have the
backlash with us for quite a spell; but the Freedom Budget
is by no means an exclusively Negro-benefit project. If
we assure income and pass it around a little more, we can
produce guns and butter. And if doubts are raised about
civil rights legislation, it can be convincingly stated that
the enabling act needed for the Freedom Budget is not
a civil rights law, but a socio-economic measure.
The Freedom Budget is a good companion to the
Demonstration Cities proposal. Under the latter, the fed-
eral government will move in to rehabilitate our urban
slums; under the former, there will be a heavy invest-
ment in health services, education and training.


Iday, December 2, 1966
_____________*,Jwist)fk>ri(fiatr7
Page 15-A
Dayan Opposes UN Border Troops
leth David Congregation members of the Parent Teacher
Committee meet with Rabbi Sol Landau to discuss a Chanuka
Workshop on Tuesday, 9:30 a.m., at the South Dade School
1500 SW 120th St. Left to riqht are Mrs. Robert Sirull chair!
[nan of Room Mothers; Mrs. Lawrence Scherr, Sisterhood
frouth vice president; Rabbi Sol Landau; and Mrs. Sol Ger-
thakov, teacher, representative.
\Jetvs in Protest
Of Nazi Advance
Continued from Page 1 A
[lajor American Jewish Organi-
ations, called upon the German
eopte and rhe German Govern-
ment to reject these ultra-na-
alistic trends before they ac-
i*ire substantial power. "For
sake of the German people
i well as for the security of this
Janet, every means must be em-
toyed in Germany to insure that
here shall be no revival of Naii
geology, no return to Nazi fana-
cism, no restoration of Nazi
olitical power," he said in his
atement.
|ln Israel students of Tel Aviv
luverity picketed the West Ger-
Embassy in protest against the
^tional Democratic Party. They
ricd banners with such slogans
"Remember 1933,"' and "We
rme Looking for Another Ger-
any," and "The Neo-Nazis Got
ven Percent Hitler Started
Ith Even Less." Police forces
\n rushed to the Embassv build-
to prevent students from enter-
After the police were told that
students intended only "quiet
Iketing," they were allowed to
|nd opposite the Embassy build-
Police were also called to Kiryat
klik. near Haifa, to disperse
lups of youths protesting against
1st Germany and the "resurg-
pe of neo-Nazism" there. The
ptesting pickets gathered at the
I Council hall where a council-
was reporting on a recent
lit to West Berlin. The council-
f said a West Berlin borough had
tineMed arrangements for a "sis-
' city" relationship with Kiryat
alik and that he had been given
marks (S400) for promotion
It he idea here. The councillor was
Incized for acting in the matter
1 his fellow councillors.
p Paris a resolution calling for
dissolution of the NDP was
opted by more than 1,000 per-
l attending a meeting of
nch Jewish war veteran. The
Nting was called to foeus atten-
|n on the danger of a resurgence
[Nazism in Germany. Mrs. Made-
leine Fourcade, president of the
Committee of Action of the French
Resistance, told the meeting that
the "neo-Nazi" NDP already had
more support than did Hitler's
Nazi Party in 1928. All speakers
at the meeting said danger hovered
over Europe in the wake of NDP
electoral victories.
In Munich a group of univer-
sity students this week an-
nounced the re-establishment of
the "White Rose" Society, which
tried to oppose the Nazis in 1943,
to combat the National Demo-
crats. Its manifesto said that the
National Democratic successes
in Hesse and Bavaria showed
that "there are men in Germany
who have forgotten everything
and learned nothing."
Rainer Huf, one of the leaders of
the new society, said that the Nazis
had enrolled many young people,
that the National Democrats were
calling themselves the Party for
Young Germans, and that the
"White Rose" Society would op-
pose the National Democratic
"Octopus." Two of the leaders of
the Society in the Nazi era were
captured and executed.
Continued from Page 1-A
year's ago, Gen. Dayan voiced
the conviction that had the
Gaza Strip remained under Is-
raeli Army control "there would
have been a possibility at some
time to reach an arrangement
with the government of Jordan
whereby the Gaza Strip would
be transferred to her rule, in
such an event, Jordan would
settle the refugees in her terri-
tory, and, by developing the
Port of Gaza, gain an outlet to
the Mediterranean, a prize of
supreme importance to her."
Elaborating on this point, Gen.
Dayan said that such an arrange-
ment "would offer three general
advantages: the most difficult seg-
ment of the Arab refugee problem
would be solved; Egypt would lose
the administrative and military
"bridge-head" she maintains in
Gaza and would retire to her nat-
ural borders the western side
of the Sinai desert; and the Jor-
dan government, with her own
outlet to the sea, would ensure her
independence from Syria and
' could consolidate political and
economic freedom."
| At this point Gen. Dayan voiced
his opposition to the stationing of
I United Nations force~ buffer
j between Israel and her Arab neigh-
I bors. He said: "1 do not believe
' that Scandinavian and Canadian
i troops should separate Israel from
the Arab states. We should aim to
wards normalization of relations
with our neighbors. I prefer the
normalization of even hostile rela-
tions over artificial arrangements.
Arab and Israeli farmers should
plough their lands right up to the
trontier, and get used to living in
neighborly proximity. The troops
and government of Egypt must
reconcile themselves to the fact
that Israel is their neighbor on
land, at sea and in the air, and
her rights to peaceful existence
must be respected."
Jacques Torczyner, ZOA pres-
ident, was toastmaster at the
dinner. He presented Gen. Day-
an with a scroll as well as with
the first Israel medallion minted
on the occasion of the Tenth
Anniversary of the Sinai Cam-
paign. In behalf of the ZOA, Mr.
Torczyner renewed the pledge
on behalf of American Zionists
"to stand by Israel and provide
our firmest support to its just
cause."
The medal presented to Gen.
Dayan shows, on its observe side,
a ship passing through the Straits
of Tiran and a great sun, to sym-
bolize peace and tranquility. In
Hebrew and English, the inscrip-
tion reads: "Sinai Campaign
Tenth Anniversary," with the
verse "And all her paths are
peace." from Proverbs. On the re-
verse, the verse "A time for war
and a time for peace," from Ec-
clesiastes.
Parents Join Children
Parents will join with their nur-
sery and kindergarten children at
a special Chanuka party Friday,
10 a.m., at the YM and WHA of
Greater Miami. The children will
present a dramatization of the
story' of Chanuka. A lunch of tra-
ditional food for the occasion will
be served.
Jewish Producer
To Stage Bigoted
Passion Play
Continued from Page 1-A
American rights, will be performed
also in Dublin and Glasgow. Solo-
mon said he "quite understood"
the decision of Epstein and Lewis
to cease to act as agents but added
he had found substitute agents.
Mr. Solomon explained that "as
a Jew, I feel that by retaining my
interests in the production. I can
insure that it does not contain any-
thing likely to offend Jews." The
original version, staged every ten
years by the villages of Oberam
mergau, has been widely criticized
as anti-Semitic in its portrayal of
the trial and crucifixion of Je-
sus.
CAR DEPT.
OPEN'TIL 5 PM
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24 Hr. Service
JE 2-6451
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Page 16-A
, hnist ITk>ridf.*<*Jnn
Friday, December 2, 1966
)
Our
42nd
Year
NORTON TIRE CO.
OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN SUNDAYS
5300 N.W. 27th Ave.
Should Greek be made
the official language
for tire-buying day ?
<
We're agin it.
Simple English gets our vote.
Sure, B.F.Goodrich dealers can expound
on cord angles, high-hysteresis rubber compounds
and kerf depths.
Mostly though, they give you straight talk on finding
the right tire for'your kind of driving.
And they've got a pocket-size device to aid
their eloquence: the BFG Tire Value Calculator.
You tell it how much you drive... where and when...
how fast. Then it tells you which tough BFG tire will suit you
best, cost you least. (Maybe as little as $10.95.)
We figure you're interested in what a tire
will do for you. Not in how it does it.
That's straight talkthe kind of language you can
translate into savings.
The straight-talk tire people.
REGoodrich
f
NNf. 4A
BFGoodri
ENJOY YEAR ROUND
SAVINGS AND
SPECIAL CREDIT TERMS
AT THESE
^ NORTON TIRE STORES:
O.IN 14 MOU.S
OPIN SUNDAYS
CENTRAL MIAMI
S300N.W. 37th Ava.
? 33-1435
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
SOO w.ii Naal.r SI.
373-4*3.
NORTH MIAMI
1JJ..N.W. 7th .
411-1541
MIAMI SHORES
7J.-444.
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alt.n ...
534-5331______
N.MIAMI BEACH
1 704 N.I. t .3 St. .45-7454
A.M. I. P.M.
TH S P.M. M^< Iri.
SOUTH DADI
fNI Saalh Mai. Mwy.
_______*47-7S7S_______
HOMESTEAD
S0100 S.. F.d.ral Mwy.
Cl 7-1*17
W. HOLLYWOOD
40 I 7 Hoi I yw..d II v d al
Stat. laad 7 TU 7-04S0
FT. LAUD!RDALI
1S30 W.tt Irtwird II. J.
1. 5-3 13*
WEST PALM BiACH
SIJ S..thiia
Tl 1-4 111
4
'


"" *
*.1Ut
owian s
UJorU

"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, December 2, 1966
Section B
AT SABBATH SERVICES THROUGHOUT MIAMI
Hadassah to Mark Israel's 'Chai'
Ticket chairman, Mrs. Robert Apfel (center), discusses ticket
-sales for the Temple Israel Sisterhood "Sound of Books" series
with chairman and co-chairman, Mrs. Julius Rosenberg (right)
and Mrs. Sidney Raffel. The series begins on Tuesday with
>r""v':-ieakfast at 10 a.m., in the Wolfson Auditorium. Dr. Joseph R.
Narot, spiritual leader of Temple Israel, will review Bernard
Malamud's "The Fixer."
n
j
by ISABEL GROVE
Hadassah Sabbath will be ob-
served in Miami synagogues on
Dec. 2, 9 and 16 as a tribute to
Henrietta S/.old, founder of Ha-
dassah, and to the State of Israel
in its "Chai" year.
Dedicated to humanitarian prin-
ciples in the fields of medical re-
search, social welfare and voca-
tional training, Hadassah looks
back on 54 years of progress that
helped make possible the estab-
lishment and growth of the State
of Israel.
The more than 320,000 Hadassah
members in the United States and
Puerto Rico look to even greater
achievements in the future by vir-
tue of ever-increasing member-
ship.
Through Youth Aliyah. Hadas-
sah has brought into Israel
130,000 children, rescued from the
European holocaust of the thir-
ties; from the world of the dis-
placed; the lost and homeless chil-
dren of 80 different countries to
freedom, new life, educational op-
portunity and the gift of Jewish
heritage.
The following synagogues will
participate in observance of Ha-
dassah Sabbath:
Dec. 2: B'nai Raphael, Rabbi
Harold Richter, guest speaker,
Mrs. Morton Amster.
Dec. 9: Beth Am, Rabbi Herbert
M. Baumgard, speaker, Mrs. Ber-
nard Mandler; Beth Solomon, Rab-
bi A. M. Feier, speaker, Mrs.
.Michael Krop; Beth Torah Congre-
gation, Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz,
speaker, Mrs. Adolph Jacobs: Beth
Tov, Rabbi Simon April, speaker,
Mrs. Gerald Soltz; Temple Beth
Moshe, Rabbi David Rosenfeld,
speaker, Mrs. Maurice Simmons;
Temple Tifereth Israel, Rabbi Hen-
ry B. Wernick. speaker, Mrs. Nor-
man Chasin.
Dec. 16: Temple Ad.ith Yeshu-
ron. Rabbi Milton Schlinsky,
speaker, Mrs. Joseph Scopp; Tem-
ple Judea, Rabbi Morris A. Kipper,
speaker. Mrs. Seymour Schulner.
Dec. 9: Beth Kodesh Congrega-
tion, Rabbi Max Shapiro; Temple
Or Olom, Rabbi Ralph Glixman;
Sky Lake Synagogue, Rabbi Jonah
Caplan; Temple Sholom of Pom-
pano Beach, Rabbi Morris Skop.
Over 300 guests crowded the
in me of the Max B. Astors, at
2380 S\V 26th St., on Sunday aft-
ernoon to honor the host who
was celebrating his 80th birthday
Family circle included the
couple's son and wife, Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Astor. of Ft. Lee,
N J., and their daughter and
son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Sussman, here from Orlando
with their three charming daugh-
ters Way back in 1906, Mr.
Astor was a prominent member
ol the Yiddishe Progressive, and
he social and civic organizations
which can lure him to present
nis charming programs of hum-
orous readings consider them-
selves "in luck" .
On retiring to Miami in 1948,
the talented performer turned to
another facet of art painting
. Since then, he has produced
o\ er 500 works which have been
exhibited in the Dupont Build-
ing, Burdine*s, in museums and
libraries all the way to Canada,
ai <1 won him a blue ribbon in
the Miami Jordan Marsh Senior
* itizens show ... In addition to
irtistic pursuits, the octogen-
has found time to be active
.numerable civic organiza-
He is a past president of the
rarband Labor Zionist Order.
Gurion Branch, the David
i Folk School of Greater
i. veep of the Miami Beach
Israel Histadrut, executive mem-
ber of the Yivo Scientific Organ-
ization of Miami Beach, and be-
longs to Hebrew University, the
Jewish National Fund and the
United Jewish Appeal.
a a
Looking forward to the coming
holidays are Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Berger. who have waited three
years for another visit from son,
Warren; spouse, Ruth; and their
three Vacationing from their
New Jersey school careers will
be teen-agers Bonnie 16. and Lee
14, and pre-teener Laurie 11.

Local deb in the news, 16-year-
old Caron Roman was first run-
ner-up in the recent Merritt Is-
land Miss Junior Miss contest
... In addition to the many gifts
she received, pretty Caron is elig-
ible to vie on the national level,
should it become necessary .
Brown-eyed Caron is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ro-
man, and granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Jerry Baker ... A sen-.
tor at Merritt Island High, the
gifted teen-ager came out with
one of the highest averages ill
the National Merit Scholarship
awards and will he sunong the
youngest college X'T-shmen when
she enters Sophie Newcomb in
September, 1967.
An elegant dinner at Mr Ber
Continued on Page 4-B
"It's a good party," says Leonard Abess (left), president of
Mount Sinai Hospital, to Dr. Charles Binder, chairman of the
hospital's medical staff Thanksgiving Eve dinner donee held
at the Fontainebleau with over 400 physicians, trustees and
guests attending. Looking on are Mrs. Abess and Mrs. Binder.
f
1
f
I 1
\ 1 \
the
rare vashmvrv
by Vrinqli'
The softness of Pringle's cashmere like the mist on
the Scottish moors. Whether you prefer the manly cardi-
gan or the traditional v-neck pullover, you may choose
navy, burgundy, yellow, grey, spruce, s, m, 1, xl.
Cardigan $40. V-neck $35.
flore for men, street floor, DOWNTOWN MIAMI
{at all 6 Burdine'i starts)
J


Page 2-B
uJewisti Fhridliari
Friday. December 2
1966
Descending the stairs of the Fontainebleau
Hotel is the planning committee for the annual
"Duet Affair" of the Louis D. Brandeis Group
of Hadassah. Left to right cere Mesdames
Allan Wilson, Rose Turetsky, co-chairman;
Rose Ruban. chairman; Matilda Washton.
honorary vice president; Bernard Lipson, hon-
orary vice president; and Elizabeth L. Stein-
bach, president.
Beach Hadassah Groups Planning 2 Big Functions
Louis D. Brandeis Group of Ha
dassah will begin its "Duet Affair"
with a Henrietta Szold Day lunch-
eon on Monday noon, Dec. 12, at
the Fontainebleau Hotel, to be
followed by the Matilda Washton
birthday luncheon on Tuesday,
Jan. 24, at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
This will be Ids. WashtorTs
tenth year for sponsoring these
musical luncheons.
Proceeds from both functions
are for the programs of healing,
teaching and research at the Ha-
dassah Medical Center in Israel.
Mrs. Elizabeth L. Steinbach is
president.

Israeli Group of Hadassah will
hold a paid-up membership lunch-
eon and card party on Monday
noon at the Promenade Hotel. Pro-
gram chairman is Mrs. Sara Appel.
Mrs. Joseph Meyer is president.
Kadiman Group will hold its
regular luncheon meeting on Mon-
day noon at the Singapore Hotel. I
Highlight of the afternoon will be \
a Chanuka party with the kindling \
of the Chanuka lights and holiday i
songs led by Mrs. Leo Paul. In '
addition, there will be a birthday '
cake-cutting ceremony in tribute
to Hadassah's founder, Henrietta
Szold. Mrs. Meyer Schneider is
president.
* *
Morton Towers Group will hold
its regular monthly luncheon
League Sponsors
'Capshule1 College
Mrs. Lawrence Wulkan will
serve as chairman of "Capshule
College." (also known as Education
Day) sponsored by the National
Women's League of the United
Synagogue of America, Florida
Branch, on Dec 1 at Temple Beth
El, West Palm Beach, from 930
to 2 p.m.
Attending will be Sisterhood
presidents, activity chairmen and
rabbis' wives from throughout the
State of Florida. Branch officers
will act as workshop chairmen at
the two morning sessions.
Mrs. Arthur J. Brown, president
of Florida Branch, will extend the
welcome at the 12:30 luncheon.
Speaker will be Rabbi Allen Rut-
chik, executive director, Southeast
Region* of United Synagogue of
America. His topic will be "Some
Religions I've Known."
meeting on Monday noon at the
; Morton Towers Restaurant. High-
light of the meeting will be the
lighting ceremony and telling of
1 the Chanuka story by Lillian Haut,
| education vice president. Mrs.
i Emanuel Menu is president.
*
Renanah Group will hold its
j regular monthly meeting on Mon-
| day at the home of Mrs. Robert
Berner at 12445 Keystone Dr., No.
. Miami, at 1 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Guest speaker will
I be Mrs. Morton Silberman, re-
gional president of Hadassah. Mrs.
Walter Lebowitz is president.
s
Hanna Senesch Group will hold
its regular luncheon meeting on
Monday noon at the Algiers Hotel.
Guest artists for the musical por-
tion of the program will be Ruth
Dean, soloist, and accompanist is
Jean Ronin. Mrs. Sylvia Kurland
is president.
a
Southgate Group will hold an
Oneg Shabbat on Saturday, 1 p.m.,
in the Terrace Room, sponsored b\ i
Mrs. Sadie Adaskin. Mrs. Hannah
Fassler will review the book, "The
Fixer.' Another feature of the day
will be songs and a piano recital.
Mrs. Henry Schwartz is chairman.
*
Southgate Group will hold its
regular monthly meeting on Mon-
day, 12:30 p.m., in the Terrace
; Room. In celebration of Chanuka.
j there will be a candlelighting cer-
emony and a dramatic reading by
| Mrs. S. Goldberg, with musical
background by Mrs. R. Utal, in
addition to a piano recital by Mrs.
E. Levine. Mrs. Joseph Rosenberg
is president.
* a
Miami Beach Chapter of Hadas-
sah has once again established a
Center for Winter Residents at the
Moulin Rouge Motel, 41st St. and
Indian Creek Dr. The Center is in
the process of planning special
functions, and will welcome win-
ter visitors and all Hadassah
group meetings. The Center will
be open Monday to Thursday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mrs. Alfred Tuv-
in is national liaison officer in
charge of the Center.
Melaveh Malkah
At Beth Solomon
Beth Solomon Congregation will
conduct a Melaveh Malkah on Sat
urday at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Aharon M. Feier will de-
liver a sermonette Dvar Torah bib-
lical interpretation,' and the He-
brew School students chorus will
offer selections of Hassidic, Israeli
and folk melodies.
The program will also feature
Jewish and Hebrew songs record-
ed by outstanding artists of liturg-
ical and folk music.
Greater Miami Council, Pioneer Women'
Observes Chanuka in Musical Programs!
A meeting of Pioneer Women
Club 1 was to be held Thursday,
1 p.m., in Washington Federal,
1234 Washington Ave. Mrs. Joseph
Krantz, president, announced that
Dr. Celia Davis was to review the
book, "Signal Fires of Laehish,"
by Rivka Guber.
On Thursday, Dec. 8, at 7:30
p.m., in the Royal Hungarian Res-
taurant, the club will hold its an-
nual Chanuka party. Mayshie
Frieberg, who will celebrate his |
85th birthday, will be honored.
* 9 *
Club 2 will tender a dinner in
honor of the golden wedding an-
niversary of Mr. and Mrs. Morris
! Kobemick, on Sunday, Dec. 11,
at 6 p.m., in the Royal Hungarian '.
Restaurant.
. Chairman for the evening will I
be Mrs. Sally Barr. Mr. and Mrs.:
Joseph Hurwitz will kindle the!
Chanuka lights. Invocation will be \
delivered by Mrs. Sadie Hubert.!
Mrs. Milton Green, president of'
the Greater Miami Council of Pio-!
neer Women, will be guest speak-
er. A program of Jewish folk i
sones will be offered by Mrs. Louis!
Packar.
p.m., at the Coral Gables Federal I
12501 Ponce de Leon Blvd V1
Fred Sandier, president, will P'!' I
duct tho business agend^S
will mclude plans for the chapter,
Dec 10 night club affair aithe
Carillon Hotel. Evening will con
elude with card games and a social
Mrs. Joseph Lowy, president of
",Va,K Ch,8Pt:r' uhaS annnu"cnd
that the chapter held a luncheon
card party on Nov. 29 in the Wash
ington Federal, 699 NE lfi7th St
Hostesses for the luncheon were
Mesdames Ros Goobich. Ginnie
Shore, Libby Waltck, Julie Rush,
ell, and Isaac Donen.
The chapter was to have its
next regular meeting on Thursday
1 p.m.. in the First Federal Pool
NE 125th St. It was to be a cdffi
bined business meeting and Chan-
uka celebration.
Golda Meir Chapter will hold its
next regular meeting on Wednes-
day noon, Nov. 14, in the Bis-
cayne Cafeteria. Mrs. Abraham
Seltzer will conduct the business
portion of the meeting. Program
for the afternoon will include a
presentation on the Maccabcan era
by Mrs. Miriam Yelson, cultural
chairman. David Lippman will
light the Chanuka candles, and
holiday songs will be presented by
Mrs. Irving Herman Cender.
Chairman for the afternoon will
be Mrs. Louis Kandell.
* *
Kadimah Chapter will have its
regular meeting on Tuesday, 7:30
Sibling Rivalry
Is Subject At
Central PTA
Central Beach Elementary pi'A
will present, at its general' mem
bership meeting on Tuesday. 8
p.m., a program entitled "Sibling
Rivalry."
After a short business agenda
conducted by president, Mrs. Theo-
dore Trushin. a film from the
Mental Health Society will he
shown.
Mrs. Paul E. Rosen, vice pres-
ident of programming, will intro-
duce guest speaker. Dr. Richard
Emerson, local psychiatrist, associ-
ated with the Dade County Child
Guidance Clinic.
Leroy D. Fienberg, principal of
Central Beach Elementary School,
will greet guests, and dessert and
coffee will be served in the school,
cafeteria prior to the meeting. ^'"

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rndmr. IW*n^
Friday. December 2, 1966
** Unitti fhrkiiari
Page 3-B
Opera Guild Stars to Excerpt 'Martha'
At Hebrew University Women's Luncheon
Program for the Dec. 15 Woman
of the Year Luncheon of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University was announced this
men; Mrs. David Ponve and .Mr-
Louis Glasser. lecture hall co-
chairmen; Mrs. Harry Platoff,
tickets chairman: and Mrs. Trudy
week by the president. Mrs. Philip Hamerschlag, patrons chairman.
F, Thau, at a committee meeting The Woman of the Year lunch-
held in the home of Mrs. Leo Rob- eon is an annual event sponsored
inson. by the Greater Miami Women's
The program will be a presenta- Division of the American Friends
tion in excerpted form of the op- of the Hebrew University to rec-
era "Martha," by Von Flotow. sung ognize the Florida woman who has
in English. Guest artists who ap- distinguished herself for her civic,
pear through special arrangement cultural and philanthropic endeav-
with the Opera Guild of Greater ors. The 1966 honoree will be Mrs.
Miami will be Elizabeth Walker, Jack Katzman, to whom a presen-
soprano, as Martha; Joseph Papa., tation will be made by Dr. [rving
Meeting to discuss plans for the Dec. 15
Woman of Year luncheon are (from left) Mes-
dames Anna Brenner Meyers, Philip F. Thau,
K MAKE YOUR CHANUKA TABLE SPARKLE
Herbert S. Shapiro, Irving Lehrman, Jack S.
Popick, Louis Glasser and Jack Katzman.
Qoo
dies for
tenor, as Lionel; Natasha Kim-
mell. mezzo-soprano, as Nancy;
and Daniel Green, baritone, as
Plunkett.
Introducing the opera and serv-
ing as narrator will be Dr. Arturo
diFilippi, artistic director and gen-
eral manager of the Opera Guild
of Greater Miami. Accompanist at
the piano will be Dr. Paul Csonka,
former conductor of the Havana
Philharmonic. The artists will ap-
pear in costume.
Mrs. Dorothy Kriegcr Fink.
Lehrman, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Emanu-EI.
By ROSALIND S. ZUNSER
sorbent paper. Serve with apn'e
sauce
Chanjka, the eight day Feast of apple
Lights, celebrates the final triumph
Dessert-Coffee
Marks Holiday
Miami Beach Chapter, Women's
Division of the American Technion
Society, will hold its annual Chan-
uka meeting on Thursday. Dec. 8.
at the Algiers Hotel. The dessert-
coffee will begin at 12:30 p.m.
Program will highlight the holi-
chalrman'Ttne Woman of the | &- fL'^J^ 2
Year luncheon, which will take
the j~east of JL^ights
nt paper. Serve with apn'e- Cream the vegetable shorten:..,
i mixed with crushed pine- and sugar. Mix baking powder and! place in the Fontainebleau Hotel. Mrs Dorothy Kneger Fink who
Serves five' flour together. Add egg to shorten-! presented a resume of recent He- bring the latest news from
Wagner in a group of songs, and
ol Judas Maccabeus over the
Greek Syrian pagans under Anti-
chus who had desecrated the Tem-
ple. Chsnuka begins on the 25th
day of Kislev and commemerates
tlic cleansing and reconsecration
of the Temple in 165 BCE.
What this holiday meant to the
children of the "Shtetl" was besr.;
described by Sholem Aleichem in
his stories. For eight whole days
there was no going to the Cheder
(Hebrew School), the distribution
of Chanuka gelt; the daily con-
Mimption of hot latkes potato
pancakes fried in schmaltz and
the constant visitation to the j
homes of one's kin where each
child received the gift of money.
t.- day usually ended with the
spinning of the dreidel, a four,
sided leaden top with Hebrew Let-j
lers. one on each side of the i
rectangular top carrying the mes j
sage "A Great Miracle Happened j
Here." Chanuka called for a Fes-1
tive Meal particularly the Fifth]
Night at the burning of the Fifth
candle.
Fifth Candle Dinner
Radishes Celery Green Onions
Hot Petcha Soup
Broiled Roumanian Camatzlach
Potato Latkes
Apple Sauce mixed with can
of Crushed Pineapple
Chanuka Cookies Tea
Potato Latkes
6 large potatoes
3 tablespoons flour
3 eggs
1 teaspoon salt
Vt teaspoon pepper
1 onion grated
Pare and grate potatoes; squeeze
out liquid and reserve; cover
grated potatoes with flour to pre-
-wnt potatoes from darkening; add
'.*gs, salt and pepper and grated
onion. Spill out reserved liquid and
add starch at the bottom at batter j
(to hold pancakes together batter)
and mix altogether well. Drop by
spoonful into hot fat and brown
well on both sides Drain on ab-
A viva Chapter
Chanuka Party
Aviva Chapter. Mizrachi Wom-
en, will celebrate Chanuka with a
latke party at the home of Mrs.
Esther Solomon on Monday noon.
The significance of the candle-
lighting ceremony will be narrated
by chapter members under the
leadership of Mrs. Simon April,
president.
Games on the terrace will con-
clude the afternoon, and all funds
will be forwarded to vocational
schools in Israel.
Co-hosts for the day are Mes-
.mes Joseph Roth Louis Zimmer-
an, Nathan Zeichner, Elias
Schoenberg, Ferdinand Lewis and
Irving Linden.
Chanuka Cookies
l2 cup kosher vegetable
shortening
1 cup sugar
1 egg
"4 cup orange juice
2'j cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
together. Add egg t ramw-i P....~-..v~------------------------.....
ing mixture and mix we... Add flour | gL^JSHl ^^ "* Cm' iSTmS-TSi*. president,
and orange juice alternately mix-\ ""^ JgjjJ^ ^ ed on announces the following commit-
ing between each addition and mix resg ot tneir committees in- tee in charge: Mesdamcs Norman
well. If dough does not roll easily ciuc|ed Mrs. Anna S. Melnick, ar- Hill, Ruben Porter. Trudy Hamer-
add more flour. Roll and cut out | rangements chairman; Mrs. Mau-
as desired. Bake in 375 degrees I rice Yorkin. gifts chairman; Mrs,
oven about 10 minutes. Makes! Emil Friedlander and Mrs. Myrtle
about 3 dozen cookies
Epstein, decorations co-chair-
LONDON
_^ PARIS
schlag, Jack Cantor. Max Kern,
Joseph Sugerman, Nan Cohen,
David Ponve, Flora Sinick, H. P.
Forrest, Jack Goldberg.
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NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
OFFICAL SWEEPSTAKES RULES
IUse entry blank or write your name
and address clearly on a plain piece
of paper.
2 Enclose your entry in an envelope
with one inner seal from any jar of
Instant Sanka" or the code number
from the top of the can of ground
Sanka" coffee or with the word SANKA
printed in plain block letters on a plain
piece of paper, 2Vz" % 3", and then
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SANK*. P.O. BOX 4443
Grand Central Station
New York, M.Y. 10017
3 You may enter as often as you wish,
but eich entry must be mailed in a
separate envelope.
J All entries must be postmarked not
*' later than midnight Dec. 15. 1966
and received not later than Dec. ZZ,
1966.
5 Winner of prize described above
will be selected by blindfold draw-
ing on Dec. 26, 1966 and will be
promptly notified by mail. Transporta-
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not included.
C The prize award of 2 round trip
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Pan American Airways includes stop-
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date winner is announced.
7 Sweepstakes is open to art residents
' of the United States except in Mis-
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General Foods Corporation, its subsidi-
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judging staff, and their families.
8 Any liability for federal, state, and
local taxes will be the responsibil-
ity of the winner.
Q No purchase necessary to enter.


Pcge4-B
-Jewlst fiortdKari
Friday, December 2, 1966
-''' -.,-"'';- -
_
Hostesses at Temple Menorah Sisterhood donor games are
,ieft to right) Mesdames Sally Birken, Dora Lefkotf, Liber Ring-
er and Harry Center. Donor games are held in the Temple's
Youth Lounge every Tuesday afternoon.
Seven Miami Section Divisions of Council
Plan Varied Programs for Wednesday
7ie seven divisions of Greater
Miami Section of National Council
c: Jewish Women will hold meet-
- on Wednesday.
ft *
Bay Division will meet for
t :ich at Surfside Community
Center at 11 a.m. Program will be
"Wills, Bequests and Opportunities
iri Today's Market," with panelists
Herbert Kurras. vice president and
trust officer of Community Na-
tional Bank and Trust Co.; Howard
Re-kin, attorney: and Robert S.
Childs, stock broker. Moderator
ill be Mrs. Aaron Farr, NCJW
( paign chairman.
* 0 *
Coral Division will hold its an-
.1 Ship-A-Box luncheon, pre-
pared and donated by members of;
th board, with proceeds going to
Coundl'1 Ship-A-Box project.,
Luncheon takes place at 11:30 a.m. '
81 Hillel House, 1100 Miller Dr.
*
Indian Creek Division will meet
1 he Sea Isle Hotel at noon for a|
;.' o-A-Box luncheon, Mah Jong
t^oc/a lit
Continued from Pag* IB
nard's Crystal House Restaurant
honored Dr. Stephen Wright and
his recent bride, the former
Bobbie Schechter Hosting
the 50-guest dinner party were
Lynn and Louis Wolfson and his
sister, Frankie Samet Gold-
en harvest theme was carried out
with gold tablecloths and golden
cornucopias filled with fresh
fruit Cuisine with an inter-
national flavor featured shrimp
from French Guiana, salad as-
paragus from Nice. France .
Main course was Chicken Kiev,
and French wine was served
through all the gourmet courses.
Ruth and Manny Rudes. cele-
brating their 25th wedding an-
niversary on Dec. 17. have in-
vited 50 friends and relatives to
b\f their home at 6120 Twin Lakes
Dr., to make the occasion a mem-
orable one Besides, they feel
a little guilty because one year
ago they took themselves off to
Europe to mark the previous
milestone, leaving behind their
50 friends and relatives Com-
ing a week early from New Or-
leans for the happy event, the
former Marilyn Rudes and hus-
band. Dr. Nelson Zido, whose
nephew, son of his sister, Ruth
and Dr. Don Altman, will mark
his Bar Mitz.vah on Dec. 10 at
Beth Am.
a a
A surprise party, which was a
genuine surprise to the guest of
honor, given in mid-November
for Syd Steinhardt. who was
feted by the members of the
JWV Norman Bruce Brown Aux-
iliary for her many years of con-
sciences service as correspond
ing secretary and sunshine chair
man Pythian Hall in Miami
bulged with well-wishers, especi
ally the many who had received
get-well cards from Syd through
the years Floral corsage from
Esther Jacobs, president, seemed
an appropriate gift to the honor
ee, who has spread so much
beauty around her Acting
hostesses for the evening were
Julia Berger, Kate Graham
Belle Swartz, Sylvia I.iebman"
Jean Tobb and Eva Taub
* a
Loyal University of Miami fans.
the Glatzers. Gayle who is now a
student there, and N. Abraham
UM '65, traveled to Gainesville
this past weekend to see the
classic UM-UF clash Couldn't
have been happier about the
whole thing.
and card party. Mrs. Charles Ser-
kin is chairman of the day.
Islands Division will hear Mrs.
Edyth Geiger review Bernard Mai
amud's "The Fixer" at the Ven-
etian Isle Motel at a 1 p.m. coffee.
*
Lincoln Division will present a
Ship-A-Box program and fashion
show by Sylvia of Moiton Towers
at 12 noon at the Sea Gull Hotel.
Coffee and cake will be served.
Shores Division will hold a noon
luncheon meeting at Westview
Country Club. Hank Messick,
crime reporter for the Miami Her-
ald, will discuss "Ci ime in the
Community."
< +
South Dade Division members
will meet at 9:30 a.m. for a bus
tour of community services. In-,
eluded are visits to the Braille,
Bindery and Library, the Uptown |
Thrift Shop, and the Jewish Home
for the Aged, where a box lunch
will be served.
Forbcmd Branch Installs Officers
Time for Tetley Tea
Have a hard day?
'.'.'hen you need a pick up, nothing brightens your life like Tetley Tea!
The secret is Tetley's tiny tea leaf flavorplus bags that brew so
fast you get real potbrewed ta'am. Favored in Jewish homes
s rice 1875.
Real old
Haimische ta'am!
Tetley tastes better
because it never
tastes bitter.
K on the package means kosher certified kosher and parve.
Mrs. Sol Henkind, cf Scars-
aaie, N.Y., has been elected
president of the National
Women's League at its re-
cently-concluded jubilee con-
vention in Kiamesha Lake,
N.Y. The League, with a
membership of 200.000 wom-
en organized into 800 Sister-
hoods of Conservative con-
gregations, is the largest
synagogue women's group
in the world. Some 1,700
delegates from the U.S.,
Canada, Mexico and Puerto
Rico attended. The League
engages in a broad program
of educational, religious and
social service activities
reaching into both the Jewish
and general American com-
munity.
Eiahth Annual
Aliyah Auction
Naomi Group of Hadassah pre
sented its eighth annual Youth
Aliyah auction on Saturday ni.Ltht
at Hillel House. 1100 Miller Dr.
Leonard Stern, auctioneer, open-
ed the bidding at 7:30 p.m. for
hotel weekends, health spa stay?.!
dinners, small appliances, car ren-
tals, handbags, clothing, sec-
retarial services, jewelry, furni-
ture, linens and other items
All proceeds from the auction,
which was headed by Mrs Kli R
nick, will go toward the support in
Israel of children from oppressed
lands.
Farbar.d, Ben-Gurion Branch,
will meet on Wednesday evening
at the Hungarian Kosher Rcstau-1
rant.
Piogram will be dedicated to'
Uhanuka w ith Bernard Furman.'
incoming president, lighting the
first holiday candle, and Dr. Si-
mon Wilensky, past president..
Poale Zion. chain, Greenber.^:
Branch of Greater Miami, giving |
a talk on Chanuka.
Musical selections will be pre-,
sented by Mrs. Rose Rosemand
accompanied by Mrs. Aida Yaslow.
Also included in the evening j
will he installation of officers forl
1966-b'T conducted by Manuel Bur-1
stein.
Serving with Furman, president, j
will be Abraham Fraidlin, vice|
president; William Beckwith, Mrs.;
Meyer Kahn. secretaries. Mrs Ru-
bin Bornstein. treasurer.
Also Dr. Simon Wilensky. cu',
tural chairman: Mrs A
Bild. publicity; Mrs. ,1,.
son,' social.
Outgoing president Mi
Burstein, and Max Astor, h
ary president of the brai
ing his 80th birthda;.. will be
honored.
Chariff to be Speaker
Meyer Chariff will present a lec-
ture on "What is Man at tl
M. Fisher Community School or.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. The lecture
will be followed by a question-and-
answer period until 10 p.m in the
school auditorium, and is fre
the public.
POPPIN' COTTAGE
A FIRST FOR MIAMI BEACH
Where Candy is
an art Come in
and watch your
Candies being made
I
Let us help you
with your Fund
Raising ideas.
Come in & Browse Around
DELIVERY SERVICE
. r 11(11 tj
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Assorted Handmade
Chocolates, Candies
Finest Imported
Hard Candies
Fresh Roasted Nuts
Fruit Shipping, Jellies
Gifls, Greeting Cards
special r\\i)ii:s
For Parties and Meetings
SATURDAY 10 A.M. to 9 P.M. SUNDAY 12 P.M. TO 6 P.M
7435 COLLINS AYE.
PHONE 864-1457
Next to
Currys Restaurant
COlLlQO
Wine-Tasting At
AMC Luncheon
Regular monthly luncheon meet-
ing of Tropical Chapter, American
Medical Center at Denver, i-
scheduled for Friday noon. Dec. f.
at the Deauville Hotel.
Fred Senton will conduct a wine
tasting program, compliments of
the Taylor Wine Co.
American Medical Center pro- (
vides free medical care to victims
of advanced or recurrent cancer
and chronic respiratory diseases
Many patients from this area have
benefited from the medical atten-j
.ion offered.
juicy omcL
* ekMtouAt
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MIAMI BRANCH:


rnarrw. Imrf*mhxw rl 1HKK
t
Friday. December 2, 1966
-kwlstncrtdton
Page E-B
Dr. Kaplan Will Receive AZA's Alumnus Award
By Special Report An alumnus of the boys' division lie also serves on the editorial
WASHINGTON Dr. Abraham of ,nc B"na> B'rilh Youth Organ- boards of 'Inquiry.' 'Philosophy
Kaplan w*ll be the 16th recipient I ization in Duluth, Minn., Or Kap- East a:id UVst and "The. Journal
Of the S^Bi^er Distinguished! !an is now a ptofossor of philos- o| A ,jc(| r;,.llavi(,,a! sciences .'
Aleph' Zadik Ateph Alumnusophy at the University of Mich
Award.
igan.
the Department of Philosophy
t UCLA, a visiting professor
at Harvard University and Col-
umbia University, and president
of the -American Philosophical
Association's Pacific Division.
He received his PhD degree at
Formerly, he was chairman of | UCLA. *>
Dr. Kaplan is director of tne
East West Philosophy Confei
which will take place at the
versity of Hawaii next sum
He is anaatoeiate at the Acac
I for fsytnfianalysis and Nat*...tal
Training Laboratories; and he -
received several fellowships
/
;
>T%
good
food

> <*>
good
\bmtov!
>
Hanuka
Treat your holiday guests and family to plenty of Maxwell House. So rich and mel-
low in flavor, so constant and unchanging in quality...this matchless coffee is a
tradition in itself, as cheering as the glow of the Hanuka candles. Certified Kosher
andParve. MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE- M Always... Good to the last drop*


Paqe 6-B
tJenlst noridiqn
Friday. December 1
i m i'l. ......... U*'ihi : :i .' :iin,. i i
i lilillNIUI'IU^
tzArhout f~^eople and /"
TIME OF THEIR LIVES
Hattie Friedland, all the children and grand-
children, were joined by a host of "Who's Who"
dignitaries, local and national, at the Diplomat
Hotel last weekend to mark Sam Friedland's
70th birthday.
TINKLE
"Tinkle"- is the name of a game. Mollic and
Sol Silverman had some of their friends over
for desert some of Mollic's famous apple
strudle. cake like a feather. Afterward, the guests
played "Tinkle." Those tinkling were Mr. and
Mrs. Irwin Becker, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Wagner,
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fruchman, Mr. and Mrs.
Tobias Sussman, Mr. and Mrs. Ix>uis Housman.
and Mrs. Fay Tupler.
* V *
JUST BECAUSE SHE BOUGHT A LOAF
OF RUSSIAN RYE BREAD
Dolly (Mrs. Stanley) Jonas decided to have
a Russian dinner party. They had had a trip to
Russia and brought home some Russian records.
Dolly thought it would be a good time to play
Ihem. She did. and no one liked them at all.
While she was buying the Russian bread, a tellOW-
shopper wondered why she wasn't buying either
- or bauds When Dolly explained that it
was a Russian dinner party, the woman gave a
parting sally, 'What will your friends think?"
The friends. Dr and Mrs. Robert Trope, Mr. and
Leonard Rrickner. and Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Adds, liked the borscht, the caviar, the whole
dinner, in fact

A TURKEY ON'EVERY TABLE
Thanksgiving at Westview Country Club was
aces ..
the closest to being at home. There were huge
turkeys on the table of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin
Cohen, as well as the table of Dr. and Mrs. David
Nathan, as they each had a large gathering. Also
among those seen at the fruit decked festivities,
which in the old tradition had home made bread,
were Col. and Mrs. 1-arry Rosenberg, Dr. and
Mrs. Stanley Wcinkle, and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
1'aige. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hillman were there with
their whole family, and also Mrs. Fay Ablin with
her family.
9 < a
HERE'S NEWS
Bubbles Wallach will, no doubt never be
called Bubbles again, but by her given name.
Barbara, which sounds more sedate. Her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Wolpaw. of Shaker
Heights, O.. are announcing her engagement and
forthcoming marriage in March to Julius Drossin.
Julius was with the Cleveland Symphony and is
the composer of works that have been performed
in the northern Ohio area. Not only is he an
accomplished musician, but he is a member of
MENSA, an international organization of gen-
iuses. Bubbles will now be a "faculty" wife.
Julius is a professor and chairman of the Depart-
ment of Music at Cleveland Stale University.
With marriage, her family of two daughters will
mow her husband-to-be is the father of two
daughters and a 20-year-old son. Her many
friends in the Greater Miami area are just as
excited aa She Is, and they all know that if there
is an award for being the best faculty wife and
the best mother. Bubbles, now Barbara, will
get it. Frances Lehman
A cocktail party at the home of Judge and Mrs. Henry 3ala-l
ban launched the planning sessions for the Van Cliburj
Benefit Concert to be held Dec. 13 at the Deauville Hot/
to raise funds for Variety Children's Hospital. Shown (sterna!
ing center), with Mrs. Balaban, cochairman, are (left to right)
Mrs. Edward Melniker, president, Variety Women's Commit-
tee, Mrs. Maune Ashman, Mrs. Jay Oxenberg, Mrs. P Wil-
liam Burke, Mrs. Casdan Roberts, and Mrs. William Wis-
newsky.
B'nai B'rith Women's Council Schedules
December Meetings, Chanuka Program;
------ v -:..
Nine pre-school teachers of the Religious
Schools of the Greater Miami area were
awarded certificates of merit for ten years of
service to the Jewish community at the annual
dinner of the Bureau of Jewish Education at
the Diplomat Hotel on Nov. 20. Albert E. Ossip,
Bureau president, presented the nursery and
kindergarten teachers awards "for their de-
voted service to the community." Left to right
are Mesdames Beatrice Saal, of Beth Dav-
id; Ray Berman, Beth David; Rebecca
Stern, Temple Menorah; Naomi Brandeis,
Temple Emanu-El; Rebecca Kay, Beth Torah
Congregation; Ruth Penick, Temple Or Olom;
and Gertrude Golden, Beth Solomon Congre-
gation. Not shown are Beatrice Seldith, Tem-
ple Or Olom; and Jane Schulman, Temple
Emanu-El, who also received certificates.
BBW Unit Holds
Saturday Gala
An evening sponsored by B'nai
B'rith Women of Miami, Chapter
787, on Saturday night will in-
clude dancing and entertainment.
Reservations for the affair, to
! be held at the Algiers Hotel, are
under the direction of Mrs. Betty
Birchansky.
On Thursday, at the Park I.ane
Cafeteria, the chapter held a
luncheon and card party with Mrs.
Peter Duchon in charge.
Mrs. Herman Pearl is chapter
president.
Miami Beach Council of B'nai
B'rith Women will meet Monday
evening at the Deauville Hotel
President is Mrs. Rose I.itt.
Chai Chapter will meet Tuesday
evening. Dec. 20. at the Deauville
Hotel. President is Mrs. Paul
Gaier. A Chanuka program will be
presented by Mrs. Max Kern,
adult education chairman.
Freedom Chapter will meet
Thursday noon. Dec. 15, at Cafe
Francaise, Harbor House South.
Mrs. Bernard Austcin, president,
announced that a luncheon will be
followed by a white elephant sale
and cards.
Harmony Chapter will meet
Tuesday evening, Dec. 27. at the
Deauville Hotel. Mrs. Jack Cohen
is president. Mrs. Jack Herman
is program vice president.
* *
Hatikvah Chapter will meet,
Tuesday, Dec. 13, 12:30 p.m., at
the Morton Tower Savoy Restau-
rant. Mrs. Gertrude Solomon, prcs-
j ident, announced there will be a
I Chanuka candlelight ceremony
followed by a film, "The American
I Jewish Tribute to Freedom." The
i Study Group will meet on Dec. 20, j
I 12:30 p.m., at the home of Mrs.:
I Ida Cooper, Morton Towers, Apt.
' 427.
-:. 4 ;
Maccabee Chapter will meet
; Thursday, Dec. 29, 7:30 p.m., in
the Forte Towers North Auditor-1
ium. Mrs. Herman Auerbach. pres-
ident, announced that Judge Mil- \
, ton A. Friedman will be speaker
of the evening.
Miami Beach Chapter : mei
Tuesday. Dec. 20. [2:30 m.
the Deauville Hotel. Mrs Samiu
Baum is president, and Mrs Ann
Kaufman, program chail
North Shore Chapter v. I] nici
Monday. Dec. 19. 1 p in at th
Deauville Hotel. Mrs, Ira Youm
entob is president.
Menorah Chapter will uold
regular meeting on Tuesda De
27. 12:30 p.m.. at the Was lingtc
Federal, 1234 Washington Ad
Mrs. Bertha Woskoff Is presidenl
and Mrs. Louise Rich, ; rograi
vice president.
ISRAEL
Stay at the hotel
"in a class
by itself
We didn't say this about the Shert-
ton-Tel Aviv. Hundreds ot vis ting
tourists did when polled by a lead-
ing Israeli newspaper:
Sheraton-Tel Aviv: enjoy its private
beach beside the Mediterranean air-
conditioned rooms superb food,
nearby golf, spectacular entertain-
ment in the hotel's own night-
club. For Insured Reserva
tions at Guaranteed ,y,
Rates, see your
Travel Agent. Oi
call 377-0275.
SHERATON-TEL AV1VJH
Holiday gifts made in the Occupational Therapy Department
of United Cerebral Pafeyy-f Miami were shown at the first
annual fund-raising fashion show and luncheon for UCP of
Miami held Nov. 29 at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Mis.
Esther Levitz, 4747 Collins Ave.. was general chairman of the
event. Above are Mrs. David Braun. 2481 SW 26th Ave..
president of the Miami unit of UCP, and Attorney W. L.
Adams, president of the beard of tHrectors. The UCP units in
Greater Miami are cooperating for the luncheon.
Oneg Shabbat For
Culture Club
Oneg Shabbat of the David Pin-
! ski Culture Club will be held on
Friday evening at 842 Washington
] Ave.
President Abraham Filosof will
i conduct the meeting, and program
i participants mclade L Lesavin,
', author and lecturer; Michl Gibson.
of the Yiddish stage; Ben -Yomen,
choir director and composer.
"Brenfng will conclude with a
social hour aird refreshments.
5? W**
^RACING GREYHOUNDS ***
i \ *
QUOTA
LIMITED
s1finn will purchase
I wW One Racing Greyhound of your Choice
We Will Lease the Greyhound you purchase
Train it Care fer it Race it at absolutely
No cost to you And
PAY YOU "naTST
The greyhound you purchase it registered and
races in your name. Select your Greyhound Today
fer fun and Profit.
Visit Phone or Wire us Today
UNIVERSAL GREYHOUND RACING CORP.
"teeo tisoamtratvo
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MIAMI, HOaiDA


FndfTV nrr Friday, December 2, 1966
* Jewisti ncridfiain
Page 7-3
Secret Groups
In High School
To be Debated
Parents of junior and senior
high school students who belong to
non approved or secret organiza-
tions should be subject to legal
penalties according to a resolu-
tion to be debated on the program
of the Dade County Council o(
Parent-Teacher Associations meet
ing on Wednesday. Dec. 7, 10 am..
at William Jennings Bryan Ele-
mentary School, 2(M) \K 125th St.
Giving both negative and af-
firmative viewpoints on the n k>1u
tion will he the Debate Club of
Southwest High School, coached by
.lames R. Ferguson Jr.
Students have conducted orig-
inal research for the topic. Inter-
viewing administrators, educators
activities directors and people ac-
tive with the groups under discus
sion. Moderating chairman of the
bate will be Robert Apt. Speak-
g Cor the affirmative will be
Steve Povsner and Sue Guild. For
the negative, speakers will be Mit-
chell Taub and Nina Balsam.
Mrs. Florence Cittadino, pro-,
gram chairman, has entitled the,
program "'From Aloha to Omega."
Mrs. Martin Uubinstein. Dade
County Council president, will
preside at the session.
New Book By
Singer Reviewed
Rabbi Avrom 1.. Drazln, spiritual
leader of the Israelite Center, re-
viewed Isaac Bashevis Singer's
new nook, "In My Father'-. Court,"
al the Miami-Coral Gables (hap
ter, American Jewish Con ess,
meeting on Wednesday at Toby's
Cafeteria
Chairman for the day was I
Jeannette stern president of the
Chapter.
A report on current American
Jewish Congress activities in the
area of church-state relations
given by Mrs. Irving Quartin, pro-
gram vice president.
Gomes Night
Scores Su-ccess
Annual scholar-hip games night
of the VM and WHA of Greater
Miami was declared a successful
venture by chairman. Mrs. Paul
Kheingold. Over 500 people attend-
ed the event, and the "Y' Scholar-
ship Fund received SI,500.
On Thursday, a "Thank You"
party for all workers was to be
held at the Central 'Y,' 8500 SW
8th St.. where the funds were to
be presented to Paul Faske, pres-
ident.
Scholarship games night was
^ujiisored by the "Y's" Women,
^Aen's Club and the "Y's" Singles.
Proceeds helped provide scholar-
ships for needy children at the
YMHA.
Phi Sigma Siqma Alumnae of Greater Miami
will hold its 17th annual fashion show at the
Fcnta:nebleau Hotel on Saturday, Dec. 10,
at 1:15 p.m. Proceeds will be donated to the
Children's Center for emotionally-disturbed
children. Seated (left to right) are Misses Aud-
drey Borok and Bobbi Ann Ossip, co-chair-
men of the event. Standing are Mrs. Harris
Steinberg, sapphires; Mrs. Samuel Heller,
correspondence; Mrs. Sanford Schwartz,
prizes; Mrs. Bert Saul, reservations; and Mrs.
Myles Eaton, model coordination and pres-
ident of the local chapter. Also included on
the committee are Mrs. Bernard Baer and Mrs.
Norman Sholk, ad book; Mrs. Alex Kogan,
decorations; Miss Rita Pollack, prizes; and
Miss Laura Beren~, Beta Theta chapter chair-
man. The show will feature fashions by Patty's
Editions modeled by representatives of the
sororities on the University of Miami campus.
Chanuka Dinner
At Beth Moshe
Beth Moshe Sisterhood will hold
its annual Chanuka family dinner
on Sunday. Dec. 11. from 4 to 7
p.m., in Popiel Social Hall. Menu
will include traditional holiday
fare.
Chairmen are Mrs. Joel Daum
and Mrs. Robert Harris. Assisting
hostesses are Mesdames Norman
Faber, Fred Blank, Joseph Foos,
Max Greenberg, Harold Klusky,
Seymour Hinkes. Henry Naftali,
.lay Rand. Saul Reiter. Ruby Rub-
in. Milton Schwersky, Burton
Streit, president, and Rhoda Willis.
Chanuka items will be available
all week in the Temple Gift Shop.
Am
"Keep the Lamp of Learning Aglow" is the
motto of these ambitious Hebrew Academy
Women discussing results of the membership
luncheon Wednesday in the French Room of
the Fontainebleau Hotel. Left to right are
Mesdames Maurice Goldring, Daniel Zalis,
Samuel Rosner, Hebrew Academy Women
president, chairman, Charles Simon, co-chair-
man, Louis Sussman, Saul H. Breeh, Harry
Rosenberg, decorations chairman, and Sam
Shapiro.
WC Schools Set 22 Annual Dinner at Algiers Hotel
The I. I.. Peretz Workmen's Cir- 8500 SW 8th St., and at 1545 SW
cle Schools will hold its 22nd an-
nual banquet on Sunday. 1 p.m.,
at the Algiers Hotel.
The schools, which teach the
Yiddish language, hold classes
for children at the YM and WHA,
3rd St.
Students presenting recitations
and songs include Olean Deaton,
Ann Glusman, Barney Gordon.
Ann Rayman. Eva Skrande, Deane
and Robin Wagner and Hermine
Wciner.
The program will also include
a concert of Yiddish and Hebrew
songs by A. Krashinsky, formerly
of Canada, who has directed choral
groups for many years.
Ben Swire, chairman of the
school board, is in charge of tick
ets and reservations which are also
available at the office of the Work-
men s Circle, 940 Lincoln Rd.
This great sauce is the recipe
of seafaring Italian folk, mada
as only Chef Boy-Ar-Dee can '.
make it'. Chunks of Italian- ,
style plum tomatoes, rich and .
zesty with onions, herbs,
spices and olive oil. For spa-,
ghetti, noodles and rica,
meats, fish and egg dishes-j
its geshmakstc.and meat-
less!
TRY SOME SOON!
for HOLIDAY .
and Everyday
the Perfect Salt
for Koshering
II your meat and fowl
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Friedman, of 425 Malaga Coral Gables,
ft shown at the Wall of Healing at the Hd%sa^Henb";W ""
<> versity Medical Center in Jerusalem. The Fr.edmans noted
that -'It is wonderful to have seen for ourselves th ark>
able Center after working for it so long. Mrs. Fnedman is
a member of Hadassah here*
NOW!
SUNSWEET.
TENDERLY NEW
PITTED PRUNES
PITTED PRUNES READY TO EAT
c/5 -^^>- a~
RRAIW TO EAT PITTED PRUNES
No need to cook...great new nosh, ready to eat right from the
purple and orange package. Ideal for lunch boxes. Snip 'em into
cookies, cakes, salads. No pits, just fresh fruit tenderness
through and through. Rich in ^ ^_J*?3
natural fruit...bite right in I WM f CHT|FIED
ABIGEZUNTlR
with SUNSWEET PRUNES!


-
?cge 8-B
vJewlsli ncrkiian
DODO
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Dodo Weinsteinr now Mrs. Leon Sirkin, spent her win-
ter months as a child in St. Augustine, and her summer
months in Old Orchard Beach. Me. Life In a small town is
no different from life in any other small community, ex-
plained Dodo. But her life during the summer months
in Maine was nevertheless very different indeed, with
dancing lessons, of course, and a
business. Dodo was everybody"s
pet. Before she had even started
nigh schoolj she had a candy shop,
which later turned into a coffee
shop. It was through this business
venture that she put herself
through school.
She got her BA at Sophie
N'ewcomb. There, she was pres-
ident of her dormitory and an
active Alpha Epsilon Phi. Sophie
Ncucomb is a girls' college, but
so close to Tulane University that
it made dating easy. It was a mat-
ter of exposure that caused Dodo
to be a lawyer. Law was in her
family. It could be a law firm of
Weinstein. VVeinstein and Weinstein indefinitely there
are five Weinstein lawyers.
Dodo's oldest sister, Natalie, had moved to Miami and
opened a law office; so Dodo moved here, too, and went
to the law school at the University of Miami. It was here
that she met her husband, Leon Sirkin, and now there are
two little Sirkins, Molly Ann and David. In the six years
that Dodo has been married, she has put her husband and
children first. Her law career is secondary, and on a part-
time basis. Since she never cooked before, she has gone
all-out to become the best. She adores gardening and has,
besides, a wide range of fruit trees, and her own kitchen
garden with parsley, onions and super tomatoes.
Dodo has been secretary' of the Miami Beach Bar Asso-
ciation for almost ten years. It is an integral part of her
profession, and she finds it both interesting and time-
consuming, but in a way she likes. She adores politics,
and when she picks out a candidate she feels is worthy she
goes all out to support him and to see that he wins. Pres-
ently, she is chairman of the Miami Beach Democratic
Committee.
The Sirkins like to relax with television, and spend
quiet week nights at home. Dodo started to play golf, but
decided it was too strenuous; so the family waits for Leon
to come home from golf on the weekends. Then they bounce
about, having fun, taking long rides, and visiting family.
House-hunting is also included. Every summer, they go to
Old Orchard Beach, and last summer, Leon fell under the
spell of sailing. So a house on the water is a "must." Dodo
feels that sailing will include the whole family, and she
is just as eager to start sailing as Leon.
Dodo was always a happy youngster. She grew up to
be a happy young woman, and is now a satisfied and happy
young matron. She feels she has the fulfilment that comes
with a happy marriage combined with an interesting voca-
tion. She has no time for the boredom that besets the
matron of today. Her family and friends feel this gift she
has of being satisfied, this wonderful feeling that she can
invoke in others ever since she was everybody's pet during
the summer years in Old Orchard Beach, is a most desir-
able trait that would be well for the whole world to emulate.
MMti.t. ;: i: "- '-" -** ~t~ :ci
Ellen Benus Now
Mrs. Herschfeld
A late evening ceremony on Sat-
urday, Nov. 26, united Ellen Shay-
na, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam-
uel Benus, 2150 SW 19th Ter.. and
Philip Stuart Herschfeld, 118 Za-
mora Ave.
For the nuptials, conducted by
Rabbi Maxwell Berger at Temple
. Zamora. the bride chose a floor-
i length gown of white peau de soie
with three-quarter-length sleeves.
It was trimmed with appliques at
the neckline and the bottom of the
Aline skirt, and had a detachable
train. A pillbox headdress with a
short illusion veil completed the
ensemble.
Attending the couple were Cyn-
thia Rheingold. maid of honor, Di-
ane Fishman and Donna Hochstadt,
bridesmaids. Robert Lippman
served as best man, and Ronald
Friedman and Stephen Gottlieb
ushered.
Friday, December 2, 1968
Garden Club
Plans Workshops
Mrs. Ben Lond, president ol Mi
Sinai Garden Club, announces that
a basic course in floral arrange
ments will, be given at the Garden
Center.
Members who will instruct the
classes are Mesdames Harold
Spaet, Anthony Lane, Ben San-
uels, Harold Hirschfield, Etta Bu
bis and Rose Kelemer.
Workshop dates are Nov. 28
Dec. 5, Dec. 12, Jan. 16. .1;,
Jan. 30, 10 to 12 noon.
Committee chairmen for the
course are Mrs. Charles Courshoa
and Mrs. Sanford Levine
MRS. PHILIP HERSCHFELD
Beach High. New Mrs. Benus is
Son of Samuel Herschfeld. 600 a graduate of Coral Gables High.
SW 9th Ave.. and Mrs. I.ouis Free-
man. Newark, N.J.. the bride-
groom is a graduate of Miami
Following a honeymoon at the
Diplomat Hotel, the couple will
live in Coral Gables.
Singles Club Sets
Chanuka Program
Special Chanuka program will |>e
featured at the next meeting ol "% <
"Y" 's Young Adult Sinj;U' i li^H *
on Thursday. Dec. 8. 8 p.m., in the
Cardinal Room at the VM and
WHA. 8500 SW 8th St.
Young adults between 18 and 2:
years of age are invited to atten
Dancing will follow the meeting
A varied program of coed sports
July Nuptials For
Ronna Nathanson. S^iStf!:1^;
Phillip Slotsky
MISS RONNA NATHANSON
Randi Hochfelsen
Engaged to Wed
In March Rites
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hochfel-
sen, 415 NE 158th St., announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Randi Hope, to Leonard H. Roth-
enberg. son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward Rothenberg. Ill NE 170th
St.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of
North Miami Senior High and
Miami-Dade Junior College.
Her fiance is a graduate of North
Miami Senior High and Emory'
University. He is now attending
the university's School of Dentist
ry, and is a member of Alpha
Omega, dental fraternity.
A March wedding is planned for
the betrothed couple.
Mrs. Anna Nathanson, 101 SW
13th St.. has announced the en-
gagement of her daughter, Ronna
E., to Phillip S. Slotsky. son of
Dr. and Mrs. Israel Slotsky, 2185
SW 17th St.
Also daughter of the late Mr.
Abraham Nathanson, the bride-
elect is a graduate of Niagara
Falls High, Niagara Falls, N.Y.,
where she was a member of Beta
Alpha Sigma Sorority. Now attend-
ing the University of Miami, she
is active in the Hillel Foundation
on campus.
The prospective bridegroom,
now teaching physical education
in the Dade County School Sys-
tem, earned a Bachelor of Educa-
tion degree from the University
of Miami, and a Master's degree
from the University of Illinois.
His fraternity is Phi Epsilon
Kappa.
The couple will be married on
July 2 in Niagara Falls.
for Young Adults is scheduled for
Thursday, Dec. 15. at 8 p.m.
Officers who have been elected
to represent the newly-forme
Young Adult Singles Club at the
WMHA are president, Tom Shu
pack; program vice president
Shelly Weiss; fund-raisini; vice
president, Barbara Jano.>i; record
ing secretary, Ileen Goldblat. cor
responding secretary. Cynthi,-
Robinson, treasurer. Barry Sher
bal; historian Kay Levin; parlia-
mentarian, Stuart Jasper
Miamians Attend
NCJW Confab
Mrs. Edwin Oppenheim. pres
dent, Greater Miami section of N^fr _~^
tional Council of Jewish Women
and Mrs. Irving Wexler. vice prea
ident of administration, are in New
York City to attend a two-day con
ference designed for metropolitar
area Section leaders in larger Jew-
ish communities of the United
States.
Meetings will take place in the
Council national office on Dec. I
and 2.
Representatives from the Balti-
more. Chicago, Los Angeles and
.New York Sections will examine
big-city challenges and how IhC)
are being tackled by government
other agencies and the Jewish
community. Discussions will focus
on the role of the Council Section
within this framework, both at pre-
sent and in planning for the future
mw *wwn
YOU can be SURE of the BEST at -
Todd's BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
PLACE YOUR HOLIDAY ORDERS BEFORE DEC. 6
2164 PONCE DE LEON Coral Goblet Tel. 448-5215
NOW SHIPPING FLORIDA'S flNEJT FRUIT
BASKtTS I ClfTS
<
4
i
t
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Social Events
For JWY Groups
MISS RANDI HOCHFELSEN
BAR MITZVAH and BAS MITZVAH INVITATIONS
NAPKINS MATCHES MENUS STIRRERS PLACE CARDS
THE WBBBtNG SHOPPE
"Everything but the Gown ami Groom"
Fhone 444-0614 3614 COtAl WAY, MIAMI Closed Thursdays
Speaker at the Gold Coast Lodge
of B nai B'rith on Thursday, 8
p.m., was to be E. Albert Pallot,
international vice president of the
order, in the auditorium of Sea-
coast Towers North Building.
MARKS
Cleaning Laundry
Storage
1201 -20th Street
Miami Beach
JE 8-6104
OPM 1 AM. 7 PM. Some Day Service Never Am txtra Caere;*
West Miami Auxiliary. Jewish,----------------------------------
War Veterans was to hold a regular
meeting on Thursday evening. Dec. Gold COOSf Ba SBSSIOII
1st. at the home of Mrs. Stanley
Gold. 8410 SW 36th St.
Program was to include a
Chanuka observance and a gift
:^rab bag.
Membership chairman is Mrs. i
Ben Shapiro.
President of the Auxiliary is'
Mrs. Norman Burman.
West Miami Post and Auxiliary
will hold a membership social on!
Saturday evening, at Hillel House,
100 Miller Dr.
Men and women who have
served in the U.S. Armed Forces!
in wartime and their families are |
eligible for membership.
Entertainment will be provided
by Miss Gwen's Studio of Dance.
President of the auxiliary is
Mrs. Norman Burman. Command
er of the post is Mr. Leo Slachte-.
In charge of reservations are Mrs.;
Ben Shapiro and Abe Isgar.
Sky Lake Marks
Chanuka Holiday
Congregation and Sisterhood "
Sky Lake Synagogue will celel
Chanuka with a special pro
on Saturday night, Dec. 10 ft*.
turing Larry Stang and Joe Ga^
ane in song and comedy.
Included in the program will he
games, Chanuka songs and
tional holiday food.
In charge of the prog rat
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Fine, assiste
by Norman Lieberman. Ashen En-
gelman. Daniel P. Tunick. Mrs
Ralph Deutsch. Mrs. Lo"'-
ban, Mrs. Ben Jacobson Mrs
Abraham Feld, Mrs. Ashen En-
gelman, Mrs. Stanley Kestin an
Mrs. Julius Salitsky.


i-vMrnr rw~,krin ibbc
Friday. December 2, 1966
.Jewisl) Fhridlian
Page 9-B
y^ESTVIEW Country Club held
" its annual formal dinner
danct Saturday evening, and the
even: as a most glamorous one.
Mr-. John Serbin topped her
black velvet, figure molding
sheatr gown with a chinchilla
stole. Emerald green silk dynas-
ty was the color and fabric in
the Stole worn with an emerald
green brocade gown by Mrs.
Daniel Oilman Mrs. Paula Gol-
ub's black velvet sheath featured
a slashed bateau neckline border-
ed ir >hite mink. Mrs. Bernard
Walls nory-colored alaskan silk
gown featured the empire waist-
line, narrow shoulder straps, and
a prix -.ess silhouette skirt.
Pet;.' pink satin was worn by
Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer. The
square-necked sheath was cover-
ed with rows of fringe created
with loops of satin-lined crystal
beads Her stole was in the pink
satin. Mrs. David Balogh's white
satin gown had appliques of
white brocade flowers which
were reemhroidered with a
Fren lace. Her black peau de soie
evening coat was three-quarter-
length and had a wide ascot type
neck!ix.t. Mrs. Leonard Miller
was fi muted lavendar silk chif-
fon with clear crystal beads at
the halter neckline. Panniers
were in back and went to the
hemlir?.
>
LJRS. Louis Cassett caused
*?* many eyes to turn with her
white !ace gown. Rosettes of silk
organ:.: rn white and soft pink
completely covered her gown.;
Her neckline was a high bateau,
with a wide panel across the back
creatir,^- the Aline silhouette.
Other towns seen at the sump-
tuous cocktail party preceding
the c: r.ner were those of Mrs.
W'altt Jacobs, in a white alas-
kan silk with long sleeves and |
jet jev els encrusted at the neck-'
line and cuffs; and Mrs. Harry!
Nathaiison, in pale pink silk cov-
ered with sequins, satin-lined
bugle fjeads. and crystals.
Blccx and white were the col-
ors used in the floral center-
piece in the dining room. Bas-
kets t:' white flowers were sus-
pended from the ceiling on ropes
of bi^tk satin Candles were lit
in baskets which hung high
enout- over each table to give
an unobstructed view to the din-
ers, ax.d crystal tear drops were
suspt ;uled on the bottom. The
orchestra played on the revolv-
ing dais, and guests danced in a
wide circle around the musicians.
Mrs. Don Michnoffs brocade
gown was in multi-colored pastel
florals with gold lame interwov-
en into the fabric. Mrs. Homer
Grossman was in a waist-skim-
ming silver lame with silver
beading. Coral silk chiffon with
long full sleeves was worn by
Mrs. Margie Rossin. Her collar
and cuffs were jewel encrusted.
Mrs. Ferd Meyer, whose husband
is Westview's president, chose
American Beauty red over white.
Her coat was slit on the sides
and followed the A-line silhou-
ette. Mrs. Alex Miller's black
silk crepe followed the Grecian
influence with a criss-cross
neckline and flowing draped
lines.
e e
LJRS. Larry Singer's silk chif-
"* fon had long full sleeves,
and was gathered across the
neckline in back to give a full
A line silhouette. Matching |
American Beauty crystal beads i
trimmed the neckline and cuffs. I
White silk crepe with silver and ;
pink crystal teardrops on the I
bodice was worn by Mrs. Arnold
M. Strauss. Mrs. Lawrence Mark-1
man's silver lame gown was cut
with a halter neckline and in
the Aline silhouette. A silver
French metallic thread was used
to interweave in the fabric for
an interesting textured effect.
Mrs. Jerry Black's Hurel-
French fabric was a silk blend
with rhinestone buttons down the
back of the gown. It had three-
quarter-length sleeves and was
in the popular Aline silhouette.
Another of the conversation
piece ensembles was worn by
Mrs. Sam Luby Jr. Her gold and
white brocade had asymetrically-
placed buttons on the bodice, and
the skirt was slit to the waist.
It was worn over gold lame
knife-pleated evening pants. Mrs.
Arnold Gertner's black velvet
sheath had a deep gold beaded
bib designed in the ancient
Egyptian motif. Ice pink peau
de soie was Mrs. Richard
Deutch's choice for the evening.
Her empire gown was embroid-
ered with pearl caviar beads and
silver-lined bugle beads. Mrs.
Irving Miller chose black silk
crepe with white satin forming a
face-framing neckline. Her scoop
neckline dipped to a low V in
back, and the white satin was
used to detail the cuffs on the
full long sleeves.
Religious Schools
Schedule Annual
Holiday Assembly
departments of Temple
All
MISS GLORIA BRICKMAN
March Rites For
Gloria Brickman
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brickman,
of Miami Beach, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Gloria
Brickman, to Michael Kenneth Su-
pran, son of Mr. and Mrs. Al
Supran.
Miss Brickman is working to-
ward a Master's degree in statis-;
tics at the University of Georgia.;
She is a graduate of Emory Uni-
versity in Atlanta, Ga., where she
was president of Alpha Epsilon
Phi, social sorority, and a member
of Phi Betta Kappa.
Mr. Supran is a doctoral candi-
date in food science at the Uni-
versity of Georgia. He received his
Bachelors' and Master's degrees j
from the University of Georgia,
where he was president of Phi Ep-
silon Pi, social fraternity. At pres-
ent, he is on a leave of absence
from the Mead Johnson Company
of Evansville, Ind.
A March wedding is planned.
Emanu-El Religious School will
participate in the annual Chanuka
assembly on Sunday, 10:30 a.m.,
in the main sanctuary. Raphael
K. Yuncs is chairman of the board
of education.
Feature of the morning will be
a presentation entitled "Judah
Rides Again," written and directed
by Trixie Levin, and presented by
the United Synagogue Youth
Group of the temple.
Members of the cast include
David Abelow, Debbie Buchwald,
Murray Cohen, Jill Danziger,
Mark Hauser, Rochelle Hyman,
Olivia Levin, Jeffrey Nevil, Sheryl
Retkoff, Bruce Singer, Susan
Singer, Kenny Spielfogel, Sandi
Stein, and Andrew Sweet. Musical
accompaniment will be by Sally
Glass.
The PTA, under the direction of
Mrs. Harold J. Brooks, president,
will present treats and Chanuka
drcidels to all youngsters.
Following the Chanuka program,
the faculty and members of the
board of education will meet for
lunch and discussion with Dr.
Irving Lehrman in Sirkin Hall.
Miami Beach Mayor Elliott Roosevelt is assisted by Mrs. Mai
Englander (left) as he presents an oil portrait r.f his late mother.
Eleanor Roosevelt, to the Eleanor Roosevelt Democratic Club
of Dade County. Accepting the painting, done by an anon-
ymous Czechoslovakian artist, are Mrs. Joseph Leifer and
club president, Mrs. Lee Weissenborn (extreme right).
Bonnie Brody Wins Top Award
verse
MAKE YOUR WEDDING, BAR MITZVA, ANY FUNCTION
"THE TALK OF THE TOWN" with
IRVING PIETRACK ORCHESTRA
NO JOB TOO SMALL JE 8-
WNCTION I
STRA I
-0204^1
Warehouse Sale
To Aid Sick Tots
A one-day benefit warehouse
sale will be held Saturday, from
10 to 4 p.m., sponsored by the
Suburban League Women, with all
proceeds earmarked for Variety
Children's Hospital.
The warehouse is located at 3635
S. Dixie Hwy.
On display will be all types of
household appliances, toys, books,
infants' furniture, and miscellan- (
eous household goods.
Mrs. William Cooper is chair-
man of the one-day sale, assisted
by Mrs. Robert Sussman. publicity
chairman.
The Suburban League is a serv-
ice organization whose members
raise funds to assist two cancer
patients at Variety Children's
Hospital. Mrs. Alan Hertz is pres-
ident.
Bonnie Sue Brody 17. winner of
the Robert Frost Memorial Award
"McFaddley's
M a 1 a d y," has
received a
merit award
from the Dairy
Council of South
Florida.
The daughter
of Mr and Mrs.
Morris Brody,
211 SW 51st PI.,
she is a superior
honor roll stu-
dent at Miami
Bonnie Brady High School, a
member of Beta Club, and a staff
writer for the Miami High Times.
Bonnie is cadette captain in the
Miami All Girls Squad of Civil Air
Patrol, and a CAP representative
to Dade County Youth Council. She
is also corresponding secretary for
Teen Democrats.
The Dairy Council has a con-
tinuing program to honor meritori-
ous young people in Daue County.
Nominations can be sent to Agnes
Edwards, P.O. Box 615, Miami
33152.
Pompano Sholom
Marks Chanuka
In commemoration of the Fes-
tival of Lights, members and Re-
ligious School pupils will celebrate
the victory of the Maccabees in
their struggle for religious free-
dom during the Friday evening
services at Temple Sholom, Pom-
pano Beach, conducted by Rabbi
Morris A. Skop.
On Sunday, Dec. 11. a special
Chanuka assembly will depict the
Maccabees in a dramatic presenta-
tion, and Chanuka skits will be
presented by classes of the Re-
ligious School.
The Sisterhood will host a
Chanuka brunch, featuring tradi-
tional holiday foods.
CT
ICm Wedding Time!"
- FLOWERS
JILL VL 'WMinc,
BLOSSOM SHOP
(Mercantile National Bank Building)
1616 Washington Ave., Miami Beach CALL JE 2-3231
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTRACTING REPAIRING
I Serving Dade County Over 25 Years
11811 SW. 14th ST. HI 6-9904
DOMESTIC MAIDS
RESTAURANT & HOTEL
HELP
A-l EMPLOYMENT
Ph. FR 9-8401


Page 10-B
+Jwist ncrkHar
Friday, December 2. 19S6
Interfaith Group
For Interama Is
Announced Here
Newly-elected Parents of Menorah officers
and members cf the board of directors are
installed a' an "Orchid" Luncheon at Temple
Menorah. Rear (left to right) are Mesdames
Nathan Friedman. Lester Axelrod, Arnold
Felder. Moris Bahmoiras, Joel Grossman, Al-
vin Mund, Edward Greenberg, Morris Beren-
thal and Arthur Reich. Front row are Mes-
dames Gerald Nathanson, L. S. Berens, Shel-
don Hacker. The first function sponsored by
the newly-formed Parents cf Menorah was the
Chanuka Institutes held last Monday morning
and Wednesday evening.
Luminaries to Lead Festival
LOUIS COHENS TO BE HONORED PAGE 14 B
A host of luminaries of the enter-
innient world have been an-
ounced for the second annual
immunity-wide Chanuka Festi-
al. which will be held on Sunday
k'ening, Dec. 11, at the Miami
I each Auditorium.
Heading the festivities will be
pen star Jan Peerce. He will be
lined by humorist Emil Cohen.
t ie Miami Beach Symphony Or-
chestra under the baton of Barnet
I reeskin, the Hora Festival Danc-
rs. the Scottish Baa Pipers, and
the Greater Miami Choral Society,
i nder the direction of Lawrence
1 I'dgpeth.
A highlight will be the dramat
c presentation of "The Saga of
israel," with a cast headed by
Arnold Warren and Ken Taylor.
Emil Cohen
Barnetl Breesfcin
Choreographer i Jack Nagle.
Musical consultant is David Con-
viser.
The Chanuka Festival is spon-
sored by the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion. Complimentary tickets are
available to all Greater Miami
1966 Israel Bond purchasers.
In announcing the Festival, Rab-
bi I.eon Kronish. chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization, noted that "this year's
Chanuka Festival will be a two-
fold celebration, marking Israel's
year of 'Chai,' as well as the
triumph of Judah Macabee.
"Some 2,000 years ago, Judah
Macabee rallied the people of Is-
rael and led them to victory
against the fortes of tyranny and
oppression. The second annual
community-wide Chanuka Festi-
val, coinciding with Israel's "Chai"
year, will truly be in the spirit of
the Macabees of old," he said.
Symposium On Synagogue Role At Emanu-EI
Adult Education Committee of;
Tempi' Emanu-EI announces the
first in n scries of symposiums to:
fee held on Tuesday, 8:30 p.m., in
the main sanctuary of the temple.
Particinants in this symposium,,
> eing h; Id in conjunction with the :
Rabbinical Association of Greater]
Miami. arn Rabbi Herbert Baum-
-ard. Rabbi Solomon Schiff and
(alibi Alfred Waxman.
Subject for discussion is "The
Role of the Synagogue Today."
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Emanu-EI, will act as
moderator of the symposium.
The symposium is part of the
adult education program, which
consists of evening classes for men
and women in the study of Hebrew
and the Bible, and classes for wom-
en on Tuesday mornings in the
same subjects. Instructors include
Rabbi Arthur S. Hollander, Miss
Sarah Weinberg, Mrs. Aliza Bren-
ner, Miss Rachel Charuvy and Mrs.
Fay Feinstein.
A special symposium will be
held on the first Tuesday of each
month for participants of all
classes.
Interfaith Committee for Inter-
ama, a non-profit corporation
which had been in an unofficial
planning stage for nearly two
.ears, was formed here this week.
The committee is sponsored by
the three major faiths, including
the Greater Miami Rabbinical As-
sociation, the Greater Miami
Council of Churches, and the Di-
ocese of Miami.
The committee has been or-
ganized "to establish, operate,
and maintain a facility or facil-
ities in the Inter-American Cul-
tural and Trade Center, known
as Interama, to present the vital
role of religion in the American
way of life."
Among the various plans are a
religious pavilion, art exhibits,
concerts, and worship service.
Rev. A. E. Guysan, of the Christ
Carmel Wines
In Top Awards
At the .2th International Wine
Exposition held at I.jubljan. Yugo-
slavia, 18 gold and silver medals
were awarded to Carmel Israel
Wines.
There is viitually no interaction
or relationship, official or unoffi-
cial, between Yugoslavia, an Iron
Curtain country, and the Jewish
State.
Dr. Eliakum Ostashinsky, man
aging director of Carmel Wines in
Israel, received communication
from Gospodarsko Raztavisce in
Ljubljana, informing him of the
high degree of success achieved by
the Carmel entries. These includ-
ed Chateau Rischon Vin Rouge,
Chateau Rischon Vin Blanc. Hock
white and red wines. Topaz. Mus-
catel. Sharir and Partom (dessert
wines and vermouths, sweet and
dry) and the President's Sparkling
Wine, as Carmel's champagne is
called.
Informing Moses Englander,
general manager of Carmel's New
York Office in charge of the dis-
tribution of Carmel Wine through-
out the United States, Canada and
South America, of this tribute, Dr.
Ostashinsky noted that Carmel
brandies and Wishniak had not fig-
ured in the Exposition for a rather
special reason. The consignment
had never arrived.
"They may have been stolen en
route to the Fair," noted the Is-
raeli, "and if so, we can only con-
gratulate the thief on his excel-
lent taste, because the missing
liquor beverages are the best of
our products. We have every rea-
son to think that if they had
reached their destination, they also
would have received the highest
award."
Lutheran Church, was elected
chairman of the committee. Other
officers are the Very Rev. Msgr.
Robert W. Shiefen, vice president;
I,eonard Sauer, Lutheran layman,
secretary: and Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive vice president of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical As-
sociation, treasurer.
Since the permanent exposition
includes all the Americas, the
schedule of exhibits also will in-
clude expressions of the religious
life in the Latin and Caribbean
countries and in Canada Each
progiani will be built around In
terama's theme of "The American
Way of Life Progress with
I- reedom."
The committee will be rasponsi
ble for planning for the religious
needs of the thousands of persons
who eventually will be living on
the grounds of Interama, as well
as for letting the millions of vis
itors know about the services
available to them at local churches
and synagogues.
Dr. Irving Muskat, director of
Interama, has been working
closely with the committee
through his administrative as-
sistant, Vincent Antel. He is
channeling all religious pro-
gramming and requests for re-
ligious exhibits through the
committee.
Others on the committee, made
up of five Protestants, live Cath-
olics, and five Jews, are the Rev.
Luther Pierce, executive director
of the Greater Miami Council of
Churches: the Rev. J. Calvin Rose,
of the Miami Shores Presbyterian
Church; R. Douglas Hazcn, a Prot-
estant layman; the Rev. Vincent J.
Sheehy, of the Catholic radio and
television commission: Edwin
Tucker, attorney; Joseph Walker.
Catholic financier; Rabbi Leon
Kronish, of Temple Beth Sholom;
Sidney Lefcourt and Harold Thur-
man, noted Jewish community
leaders; and Rabbi Max A. Lip
schitz, president of the Greater
Miami Rabbinical Association.
Temple Ner Tamid plans a Chanuka celebra-
"ion Sunday morning, Dec. 10, in Sklar Audi-
;orium. Presentation will feature an assembly
with children of the Drama Club presenting a
play, "You Were There," with the Dancing
Club and Junior Choir participating. Rabbi
Eugene Labovitz, spiritual leader of the tem-
ple, will quiz the children on the holiday, and
a prize will be awarded to the outstanding
student. Standing are Simie Estrach, Joy Mol-
ko. Rose Ann Lewis, Debbie Schick, Karen
Schick, Vicky Kaufman, Annette Geller, Min-
dy Oppenheim. On the floor, Gary Vermette,
Keith Robbins, Daniel Green, Howard Shapiro.
Standing (front row) are Miss Diane Keshlan-
sky, teacher, Sam Axelrod, Scott Schlitz, Rich-
ard Du Beshter, Michael Berky.
Beth Am Annual
Chanuka Festival
The annual Chanuka Festival
sponsored by Temple Beth Am will
take place on Friday evenings,
Dec. 9 and 16.
The Dec. 9 family service at
7:30 p.m. will be the annual
Candle-Lite service, and those at-
tending will bring a Chanuka
candle.
The program will include the
C hildrcn s Choir in a cantata writ-
ten and arranged by Cantor Mi-
chael Kyrr, and a children's dance
group, under the direction of Miss
Linda Rovin. The observance will
be followed by an Oneg Shabbat.
The 8:30 p.m. Dec. 16 service
will feature the Senior Choir, un-
der the direction of Cantor Kyrr.
The group will offer a Chanuka
musicale featuring the music of
Isaachar Miron and Handel. Miss
Linda Rovin and Shaul Freeman
will present a program of dances.
Art Featured
On Shalom Cruise
By Special Report
Prof. Murray J. Schlam, who ad-
mits to having "nurtured many
substantial talents" among his pu-
pils during a 20-year career as an
art teacher, is now providing in-
structions to cruise passengers
aboard the SS Shalom by courtesy
of the Zini Lines.
Prof. Schlam is a Friend of the
Royal Society of Art, London,
headed by Prince Philip. Duke of
Edinborough.
His appointment as art instruc-
tor aboaid the Shalom is in keep-
ing with the Zini Lines policy of
providing cultural activities, as
wall as the lighter amusements of
a cruise. The Shalom has nine
Caribbean cruises scheduled be-
tween November and the end of
February. 1967.
A unique Israeli art festival will
be held aboard the Zim Lines'
flagship Shalom during a 12-day
cruise to the Caribbean early next
year.
It will be conducted by Miss
Yurika Mann, director of the Jer-
usalem Art Center in Israel, and
will feature an exhibition of orig-
inal works by 17 of Israel's most
prominent artists.
Her program aboard the Shalom
will be highlighted by a special
art and fashion show titled "The
Women of Yesterday and the
Women of Today in Israel."
The Shalom sails on her "Art
Cruise" on Jan. 4, 1967 from New
York and on Jan. 6 from Port
Everglades, calling at St. Maarten,
St. Thomas and San Juan.


F'rirlmr TWk-r VI 1WJT
pday. December 2, 1966
JfiWfcft flfrSdHmr
Page 11-B
frSt?^ iriyn
PSE^ K
500 Will Attend Mesivta Dinner
1
[Members of the Mesivta dinner committee are
standing (left to right) Jerry Bienenfeld. Mrs.
Samuel Feiner, Paul Weiss, Mrs. Jerry Bien-
enfeld, Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, Oscar B.
Schapiro, Mrs. S. Louis Schwartz, Max Gut-
imanu-EI School
.hief Returns
Tom Confab
Mr-. Naomi Brande-s. supervi-
lor of the Nursery-Kindergarten
department of Temple Emanu-El'a
Koliiinon Schecter Bay School, is
j)iis\ reviewing some of the litera-
Ere she brought back from the
|966 conference <>f the National
association for the Education of
roung Children held last week in
phicago.
Mrs. Brandeis has been with
Xmanu-El for almost 20 years and
fas devoted herself to keeping
khreust of all the latest develop-
ments in the field of education for
Jhe very young.
She was honored recently at the
B5th anniversary dinner of the
jBureau of Jewish Education "for
Bier many years of service in the
Jewish community" and "for her
active part in the early childhood
Iprogram."
She is the wife of Leo Brandeis.
land lives at 1605 Pennsylvania
lAve.
Staff of the Nursery-Kindt ruar
Men Department consists of highly-
|t|iialified and experienced teach
En. "The Temple Emanu-El Nur-
sery Kindergarten Department for
Ithe total personality development
lof the child," Mrs. Brandeis ex-
plained.
"The department is concerned
Iwith the intellectual development,
[social and emotional adjustment,
[and physical growth of each child.
lit provides an introduction to Jew-
|ish culture at the preschool level."
The Solomon Schecter Day
I School is now in its ninth year un-
I der the personal supervision of Dr.
Irving Lehrman and Rabbi Arthur
I S. Hollander, director of Educa-
tion. Mrs. E. J. Berman is princi-
pal of the General Studies Depart
ment.
mann, Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Roth, Mrs. Max
Gutmann. Seated (left to right) are Mrs. Joe
Zalis, Isidore Schwartz, Joe Za'.is, Louis Mer-
witzer, S. Louis Schwartz, Mrs. Murray Berko-
witz, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Geller.
Beth Torah Adds
New Courses
A discussion group on "Jewish
Family Living" and a "Book
Reading Club" have been added
to the Adult Education Institute
of Beth Torah Congregation.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, spiritual
leader of Beth Torah. conducts
and coordinates the course on I
family living which meets every
Monday evening at 8:15 p.m.
The book club meets at 9 a.m.,j
every third Monday of the month,
and in December will hear a re- '
view of "The Assistant," by Bei-
nard Malamud. The group is con-
ducted by Abraham J. Gittelson,
education director.
Chanuka Festival
Slated at T
The YM and WHA Chanuka
Festival will be held Saturday;
evening, Dec. 10, at the "Y," 8500 |
SW 8th St., from 7 to 9:30 p.m.
In addition to celebrating the'
significance of Chanuka, the major!
portion of the evening will be de-'
voted to entertainment.
The Festival is open to "Y" j
members only, and there is no ad-j
mission charge. 1
MM. NAOMI BKANDCIS
Funeral Directors
Plan Convention
In San Juan, P.R.
The annual convention of the
Jewish Funeral Directors of Amer-
ica will be held Dec. 5 to 9 at.
the Americana Hotel in San Juan,
P.R., according to an announce-
ment by Edward T. Newman, of
Miami Beach, president of the or-.
ganization.
Newman is owner of Newman
Funeral Home here.
Other Greater Miami funeral
directors at the convention will ,
be Leonard Zilbert, vice pres-
ident of Riverside Funeral
Chapels; Larry Blasberg, of Bias
berg Funeral Home; and Mrs.
Ike Gordon, Mrs. Jennie Gordon
and Mrs. Irvin Gordon, of Gor-
don Funeral Home.
Some 250 executives of Jewish
funeral establishments throughout;
the United States and Canada will
take part in the four-day conclave
which will deal with major issues
of concern to Jewish families
throughout the nation.
Nationally prominent personal-
ities in the fields of education and
social services will address the
convention on a variety of topics
dealing with psychological prob-
lems and ethical aspects of the
funeral and bereavement and re-
lated subjects.
Commenting on the importance
of the convention with regard to
vital issues of widespread interest,
Newman said that the conclave
will stress the growing need for
"a better understanding of the:
problems surrounding death and
grief by the psychological, med-
ical, theological and funeral pro-
fessions." He noted "the increas-
ing realization in medical circles,
as well as among the general pub-
lice, of the significance of grief
as a causative factor in psycho-
somatic illness.-' >
E. Germans Hit
For Denouncing
Bonn Regime
BONN (JTA) Qunther Von
Hase, the West German Govern-
ment spokesman, denounced this
week the East German Communist
leaders, charging them with seek-
ing to undermine the West Ger-
man regime by accusations that
high West German officials had
participated in Nazi war crimes.
In a special Statement at a press
conference, he cited as an ex-
ample an effort to discredit Pres-
ident lleinrich Luebke by dissem
ination of charges that he had
been responsible for building Nazi
concentration camps during the
war.
He cited an exhibit under
Communist auspices in Munich
containing documents about Dr.
Luebke in that connection, some
bearing Mr. Luebke's signature
which the West German Govern-
ment promptly denounced as
forgeries.
Mr. Von Ilasc noted that such
documents had been confiscated by
his Government. He also disclosed
that Government officials had
considered instituting libel pro-
ceedings against persons in West
Germany who had repeated the
libel."
However, he said, it was de-
cided that the dignity of the Pres-
ident's office might be harmed by
such proceedings, and the idea was
dropped. He reiterated that ma-
terial purporting to prove" that
Dr. Ijicbke had engaged in such
activities was "entirely false" and
that there was absolutely "no sub-
stance to the charges."
More than 500 persons are ex-
pected to attend the sixth annual
scholarship dinner of the Mesivta
of Greater Miami-Louis Mcrwitzer
High School on Saturday night,
Dec. 10, at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Principal speaker for the occa-
sion will be Rabbi Dr. Morris D.
Tendler, of Yeshiva University, i
who is scheduled to discuss "Jew-
ish Survival in an Age of Accept-
ance."
Dr. Tendler will also be given
an award, "Torah in Derech
Eretz," meaning a synthesis of
Jewish scholarship with academ-
ic achievement. Dr. Tendler, a
rabbi and bacteriologist at Ye-
shiva University, will be recog-
nized "for his Torah scholarship
and his scientific research in
the field of cancer."
Out-of-town students will pre-
sent a brief playlet depicting the
goals and activities of the Mesivta.
According to fly Galhut, chair-
man of the dinner, "the entire
student body of the Mesivta High
School is receiving a complete He-
brew and a full secular program
within the Mesivta, plus dormitory
fa< ilities."
Proceeds will help defray the
expenses of the costly Mesivta pro
gram.
Serving with Galbut arc co-
chairmen Murray Berkowitz, Jer-
Civil Rights Panel
Heard on Beach
A panel and symposium on "Re-
cent Civil Rights Demonstrations
Should the Line be Drawn?"
was featured at a meeting of Free-
dom Lodge, B'nai B'rith. on Mon-
day night at Surfside Community
(cnier, it was announced by Judge
Theodore R. Nelson and Herman J.
Nudelman, program chairman and
president.
Chief panelists were Morton
Perry, assistant states attorney,
and Richard Yale Feder, Miami
attorney and a counsel for the
American Civil Liberties Union.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive
vice president of the Greater Mit-
anii Rabbinical Association, intro-
duced the discussion and debate
with a brief review of "Civil Rights
in the Jewish Tradition."
Moderator was Judge Sam Sil-
, ver, of West Miami, a past pres-
; ident of the Dadc County Bar As-
sociation.
2 Mexican Trips
Free at Luncheon
Prizes of two round-trips to
Mexico will be awarded at a lunch-
con on Dec. 5 sponsored by the
Women's Committee of Variety
Children's Hospital. The luncheon
will be held at the Deauville Ho-
tel.
Jordan .Marsh will present a
showing of new styles in ladies'
lingerie fashions. Models will dem-
onstrate the creations.
Reservations may be made with
Mrs. Terryce Kaplan and Mrs.
Tillie Ashmann. Mrs. Ashmann is
serving as chairman, assisted by
Mrs. Rcnee Rodney.
ome Bienenfeld, Milton Kahn. II
man Kolko, Harry Lerner. D
Irwin II. Makovsky, Louis Me
witzer, Alexander ('. Moskovit-.
Mrs. Sam Schandlcr. Rabbi Hen
Wein. Serving on the arrange
tnents committee are Louis Pol-
lack, chairman, Mrs. Murray Ber
owitz, Mrs. Hyman P. Galhut. Ml
S. Louis Schwartz, co-chairmc
Abe Chiel, Henry Groudan, Ben
Kadushin, Louis Meyers, Oscar
Mamber, Harry Rosenberg, Mm
ray Rosenberg, J. Jerry Schechte,
Sam Schechter Ben Stern, Mori -
Waidman, Sam Waldman, Pa'.d
Weiss.
Day at Races To
Benefit Children
United Order of True Siste;
Miami 43, will have a day at tl
races Monday at Tropical Park.
In charge of tickets is Mrs. Lou
Gillman, chairman of the day.
Miami 43 gives support to tl
Children's Tumor Clinic at Varie
Children s Hospital financial
and with volunteer service.
- fob saij: -
Complete Set of 'Beautiful CASTUTON
I FINE CHINA, floral patten,
seven place setting, extra cups, sic
dishes $150.00. Phone 538-187--.
NICE FRONT
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM
560 a month. Near ocean, shop>
Three buses.
Call 864-2784 after 2 p.m.
Elderly Active Woman Would
Like to SHARE Her HOME
(S.W. Section) with Same. Maid, Kosh-
er kitchen. All in exchange for Com-
panionship. Phone 379-9988, 443-2816
WANTED Woman to Live In
as Light Housekeeping Companion to
Elderly Woman, light cooking re-
quired. Call Bernice at WAbash 3-130
after 6 p.m.
Groups Formed
For All Ages
Temple Beth Am is organizing a
group for Young Adults, between
18 and 25, which met for the first
time on Wednesday evening in the
Youth Lounge.
The Beth Am Temple Youth
Group, an affiliate of the National
Federation of Temple Youth,
meets each Monday evening at
7:30 in the Youth Lounge. Miss
Ellen Sherman, president, an-
nounces that the group now has
its own office adjacent to the,
temple office.
The newly-formed eighth and
ninth grade groups, under the di
reel ion of Gary Canner, also meets
on Monday evenings.
RELIEF FOSTER PARENTS
(COUPLE) to live in agency oper-
ated home with small number of
older boys. Two days weekly,
good salary and fringe benefits.
Write: R. F., Box 2973
Miami. Flo. 33101
Avoid the Holiday Rush
Caff NOW for
TUNING & REPAIRING
OF YOUR PIANO
IRVING GOLDBERG 621-0081
Cantor Wanted
FOR FRIDAY NIOHTS or WEEK-ENDS
Also for HIGH HOtlDAYS Write to
POST OFFICE BOX .'.-4091
WEST HOllVWOOD, FLORIDA 3302.
MAN THAT ZIP COPE REALLY
SENDS ME...
** e"v
*o co.
JEWISH
CONVALESCENT
HOME OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
310 Collins Ave.
Phone 532-6491
NONPROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
Miami Beach's Only
Kosher Nursing Home and Health Center
SIDNEY SIEGEL SARAH KEISER
Executive Director President
(Kales start of S55J


Paae 12-B
JewlstiJtvrldton
Friday, December 2, 1966
2nd YIP Service
At Emanu-EI
Second 1966-67 Sabbath service'
dedicated to VIPs, (Very Interested
ParentsV v, ill be observed on Sat-'
urday during regular services. '
following the services, parepts
and ciiiklien' will"join Dr. Irving
Lchrman. spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Emanu-EI, at a luncheon and
discussion session.
Mrs. Alfred Stone and Mrs. An-;
dre Bialolenki are co-chairmen of
the \ IP Committee.
Reform Judaism
Is Subject At !
Temple Israel
Spokesmen for Orthodox and
Conservative .Judaism and Rabbi
= %
Joseph Karasick, a New York
City businessman, hes been
elected the new present of
the Union of Orthoc;:< Jew-
ish Congregations c: Amer-
I Joseph H. Narbi will provide the ica, the national organization
Members of the Women's Cancer League of luncheon chaiiman; Mrs. Frances Linn, non-
Miami Beach put their heads and hands to- orary chairman; Mrs. Martin Wexler and
gether in plannilKJ deccrat'ons f-r the eighth Mrs. Robert Grossman, ticket co-chairmen;
annual luncheon fcr the benefit of the Tumor Mrs. Malvyne Sommers, decorations chair-
Clinic at Mount Sinai Hcsp:tal. The a'fair wi'l man; Mrs. Edward L. Cowen, sponsors chair-
be held at the Fcn'a'nobieau on Dec. 14. man; Mrs. Morris Gidney, president; and Mrs.
Shown (left to right) are Mrs. Abe Schonfeld, Michael Bright, treasurer.
base for 'What a Jew Should
Know About Reform Judaism al
this Sunday's Greenfield Adult
Institute at Temple Israel of Great-'.
er Miami.
On Saturday morning. Dr. John
McDavid. of the University of
Miami, will address the parents' I
serving 3,100 syncjogues
throughout the United States
end Canada. He svoceeds
Moses I. Feuerstein, of Brook-
line, Mass., who served in
the post for the past 12 years.
The election was held 3t the
series on^"High-Pressured Educa- UOJCA 68th anniversTry na-
tional biennial convention in
Washington, D.C.
Lubavitch Group
To Celebrate Two
Events Sunday
A joint celebrating marking the
dedication of the second Sefer
lion." Both weekend lectures begin
at 10 a.m.v
Professor of psychology at the
University of Miami, Dr. McDavid
has worked for many years in the
field of education. A graduate of
Rice, he received both his Master's
and Doctorate at Princeton Uni-
versity, where he also taught prior
to a stint at the University of Iowa
and. since 1960. at the University
of Miami.
Rabbi Schiff To
Install Beth El
Slate on Sunday
Self-Serviee
Postal Units
To Open Here
Newly-elected officers and board
members of Congregation 3eth El
He has published extensively on I wjn be installed at a piv-Chanuka
IZl JZ* h Z Sh"3 Psychological subjects, and is a dinncr 0n Sunday evening Rabbi
Synagogue and the 168th anni- mcmber of a nuni!ber of honorary Schjff ^ r.c, ,he
versary of the release from prison as weii as professional societies.
of Rabbi Schneur Zalman of I.iady,
founder of the Chabad-I.ubavitcher
movement, will be held on Sunday,
10 a.m., at 832 Washington Ave.
The new Sefer Torah has been
donated by members of the Luba-
vitcher Minyan Synagogue, which
meets daily in the Blackstonc Re-
tirement Hotel, 800 Washington
Ave.
The self-service postal units in
the 163rd Street and Northside
Shopping Centers will open for
The Yud-Tes Kislev commemo- business on Dec 13- Postmaster
ration, marking the release of
E. M. Dunlap announced this
Silver anniversary banguet of Chabad, scheduled for Jan. 22
at the Deauville Hotel, is topic of discussion by (left to right)
Abe Dlatt, Norman Ciment, Isidore H. Kramer and Miami
Beach Councilman Joseph W. Malek. Ciment is chairman, and
Malek is co-chairman with Michael Sossin of the dinner com-
mittee, which wili mark the 25th anniversary of the Luba-
vitch movement's educational activities in the United States.
Initial committee meeting was held Sunday at the Blackstone
Retiremen'1 Hotel.
Rabbi Zalman, is celebrated by wee't-
followers of the Lubavitchcr move-
ment throughout the world.
A luncheon will be served fol-
lowing the Sefer Torah dedica-
tion ceremonies, during which
the Yud-Tes Kislev anniversary
wiil be commemorated.
Rabbi Abraham Korf, regional
director of Merkos L'Inyonei Chin-
uch, the educational arm of Cha-
bad-Lubavitch, will officiate. Also
participating will be Norman Ci-
ment. chairman of the Chabad sil-
Vending machines will offer
stamps, postal cards, envelopes
and minimum insurance. Letter
and parcel scales indicating post-
age plus bill and coin changers
will be available. In addition, a
free direct telephone line to the
Post Office will assist customers
in obtaining additional informa-
tion throughout the day and
night.
ceremony.
Officers to be installed include
Hyman Chabner. president: Ben
Boskin. Andrew Mandel. vice pres-
idents; Philip Berkowitz treasur-
er: Joseph Rotenberg. secretary;
Sam Phillips, financial secretary.
The 5:30 p.m. dinner will be
sponsored by the Beth El Sister-
hood. Mrs. Jack Shapiro pres-
ident.
Chabner ha- served Bt h El for
many years in various capacities,
including the presidency He is
also president of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Cemetery' Assn. He is
active in many community activ-
ities, including Hebrew Acidemy.
The new self-service postal in-
stallations are two of 100 being
ver anniversary banquet; Michael constructed in major shopping
Sossin and Councilman Joe Malek,
centers throughout the nation this
co-chairmen; and Morton May berg, >ear at a ,fost f approximately
president of Camp Can Israel. S1500 eaeh" Each umt wl11 havc
sponsored by the Florida Chabad Uvo ** mal1 *** and a
Committee.
Sunday's celebration also will
discuss plans for the silver anni-
versary banquet, scheduled Jan.
22 at the Deauville Hotel. It will
mark the 25th anniversary of the
Chabad Lubavitch movement's
move to the United States follow -
Paul Faske (far right), president of the Greater Miami YM and
WHA, and his brother, Louis Faske, buy literary items from
Mrs. Esther Stern, one of the many volunteers at the "Y"
outdoor art ehow last Sunday. Art objects, books and records
were featured on sale at the spacious "Y" grounds at 8500
SW 8th Si.
Deborah Women Meet Tuesday
Dobin Joins
Graphics Firm
Jerome Dobin ha? joined Graph-
ic Advertising. Inc. as vice pres-
ident, it has
been announc-
nounc^i by Sey-
m o u r Gerber,
presid e n t of
the newly-
formed Miami
advertising
tising agency.
Dobin, a vet-
eran 0 f 2 0
years in adver-
tising an! pub-
1 i c relations,
headec his own
York City and
P;ior to joining
lnc he had
advertising
tudv group is led by Dr. Irving i and public relations director for
Lehman, spiritual leader of the Doral Beach Hotel and Dora! Coun-
congrej;ation. I try Club Hotel.
Members meet bi-weekly at! Holder of a Bachelor of Arts de-
special parcel post deposit.
Torah Club
Starts 7th Year
Torah Luncheon Club of Temple
Emanu-EI will hold its first ses-
sion of the season on Monday,
DOBIN
agency in New
Miami Beach.
w* S0"' iPVa8i0n f RuSSia in 12:15 p.m.. at The Shclborne Hotel!' Graphic Advert
World War II. jjow jn its ^.^1, year) the' served four years as
Chanuka Dinner
. V" "*eSCUe lunch'to study" the sacred "Titera-i gree from City College of New
Annual Chanuka dinner for the ture of Judaism and t0 participate York, where he majored in psy-
Child Rescue Fund sponsored by in djscussl0n. The course utilizes! chology, Dobin saw World War II
the Golda Meir Chapter, Pioneer | texts and commentaries.
Women, was held Sunday at the
Barcelona Hotel.
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Hollywood Temple Sinai,
was guest speaker, and Mrs. Meyer
Golob offered the invocation.
Rabbi Stauber
Is Guest Speaker
Daughters of Israel will hold its
A group of vocal selections was I annual Melavah Malkah on Satur-
Greater Miami Chapter of Deb-
orah Hospital will hold its regular
monthly meeting at the Deauville
Hotel on Tuesday noon.
Mrs. Mildred Auslander, pres-
ident, will conduct the meeting,
and plans for the forthcoming
paid-up membership luncheon wili
be discussed.
day night at Kneseth Israel Con-
gregation, 1415 Euclid Ave.
Proceeds will go towards the
Miami
offered by Harry Rosensweet, as-
sisted at the piano by Olga Bibor
Stern. Mrs. Abraham Seltzer, pres-
ident, extended greetings on be- j maintenance of Greater
half of the chapter, and Mrs. Dav- community Mikvah.
id Lippman, vice president in
charge of Child Rescue, served as
chairman.
Mrs. Milton Green extended
combat service a? a naval Lieuten-
ant in both the European n'.d Pa-
cific Theatres, and was iwarded
the Purple Heart.
Graphic Ad\ertising. Ir.c is af-
filiated with Graphic Arts, Inc., of
Miami. Both organisations, iocated
at 230 NE 70th St., Miami, are
headed by Gerber, one-time Chi-
cago advertising executive who
moved to Miami 12 years ago.
Mrs. David Lehrfield, president,
will present Rabbi Sherwin Stau-
ber, of Young Israel of Greater
Miami, speaker, and Cantor Abra-
gree4inu's in the name of the Pio- ham Seif, of Kneseth Israel, who
neer Women's Council. | will sing musical selections.
lb
Time and Free Will Discvssei i ,
"Bergson's Time and Free Will"
will be the subject for the Great
Books Discussion Group meeting
on Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., at the
Miami Beach Public Library.


htxmm in lOCC
Friday, December 2, 1966
J3<*r +Jewisti fhridian
Page 13-B
Richard Mufson
Richard Alan, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Mufson, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah on Saturday
Dec. 3, z\ Temple Emanu-El.
RichartT-atter.ds eighth grade at
Nautilus Junior High, plays trom-
bone in the band and is captain of
the volley ball team. He has won
many awards and trophies in
sports <; all kinds, also enjoys
dancing, arts and crafts and play-
ing the piano.
The cdebrant will be honored
at a reception Saturday at his
home.
Mrs. Mollie Mufson and Mrs. Lee
Leibow, Richards grandmothers,
will attend the e\ent.
?
Raymond Meinberg
During service.- at Temple Sinai
of Nortt i)ade on Friday, Dec. 2,
at Washington Federal, 699 NE
167th 5-: Raymor.d A., son of Mr.
and Mn Raymond C. Meinberg,
will be Bar Mitzvah.
Raymond is in the ninth grade
at Norland Junior High and stud-
ies ?. Temple Sinai Religious
Schocn He i> head of the audio-
visual department, news reporter
for his Home Room and a member
of the Student Council'at Norland.
His hobbies are model-building
drawing and reading. Raymond
plans to study law.
An < r,eg Shabbal In Raymond's
honor will follow the services.
*
Craig Dearr
Bar Mitzvah of Craig Rorv
Dearr was observed on Saturday
Nov. 26, at Temple Beth El in
Miami.
The lebrant is the son of Mrs.
Mildred Dearr. 725 Cremona, Cor-
al Gables, and the late Sheldon'
Dearr. and was honored at a re-1
ception at his home on Sunday. I
An eighth grade student at the'
Hebrew Academy. Craig is study-1
ing the piano and is active in I
sports.
High, and is in the pre-confirma-
tion class at Beth Torah-Harold
Wolk Religious School. Her inter-
ests include debating and writing.
She is active in the United Syna-
gogue Youth program, and also
plays guitar.
Oneg Shabbat following the
ceremony, and a luncheon recep-
tion at her home, was held in hon-
or of the celebrant.
Among guests were Mrs. Ann
Rosenthal, grandmother, of Miami.
Richard Rothman
Richard, son of Mr. and Mrs
Bernard Rothman, will observe his
Craig Dtarr
Raymond Meinberg
Richard Mufson
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, Dec. 3,
at Temple Zion.
Richard is an eighth grade pu-
pil at West Miami Junior High
and is interested in journalism.
Mr. and Mrs. Rothman will host
the Oneg Shabbat on Friday even-
ing following the services, and
the Kiddush on Saturday morning.
The celebrant will be honored
with a luncheon at the El Bolero
on Coral Way.

Frederich Poritzky
Frederich Larry, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Poritzky, 1060 NE
Paul Sharr
Paul Sherr, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Dale Burkett, 100 NE 174th St.,
celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at Beth
Torah Congregation on Saturday
morning. Nov. 26.
The celebrant is a ninth grade
student at John F. Kennedy Junior
High, and is in the fifth grade at
Beth Torah Religious School. He
won the American Legion of Hon-
or Award for Outstanding Boy in
his last year of Elementary School,
is active in athletics, and inter-
ested in art.
Following the Bar Mitzvah serv-
ices, a buffet luncheon was held
in Pauls honor at Beth Torah on
Saturday afternoon.
Benna Solomon
Benna, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph W. Solomon. 17510 NE
8th PI., celebrated her Bas Mitz-
vah on Friday evening, Nov. 25,
at Beth Torah Congregation.
Benna is an eighth grade honor
student at John F. Kennedy Junior
ZBT Frat Men
Stage Fun Day
For Sick Kids
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity men
at the University of Miami, more
interested in community service
than Dailies and good times, have
raised S500 for the kids at Variety
Children's Hospital to sponsor a
Fi'n Carnival for the patients last
week.
Fraternity president, Andy Ecfel-
man. said some 100 members of
the local chapter helped con-
struct same booths on the hospital
grounds, put or, a big show, and
distribute special toys to every
sick youngster in the hospital as
part of an all-day project to bring
sunshine to the shut-ins.
"More and more, fraternity
men are becoming aware of the
local health and welfare insti-
tutions which need community
support," said ZBT trustee, Mar-
shall Rosenberg, commending
the students on their action.
Recently, they signed a pledge
;or a $500 donation to Variet>
Children's Hospital representing
jersonal gifts from each of tru
nen at the Chapter House oi
uiguria Ave., Coral Gables.
President Edelman said this wa
i "100 per cent project" involving
ill the members.
Named to head up the workirv
committee for the recent Fun
Carnival were booth construction
,nd games. Richard Magid; cix,
aimes, Wallace Kleinberg; giua,
Howard Ullman; entertainment,
rtonald Deblinger; planning, Irving
Halperin. Fred Goldsmith, ana
steve Lungan: publicity, Michael
Try son.
I66th St.. No. Miami Beach, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah on Sat-
urday. Dec. 3, at Beth Torah Con-
gregation.
Frederich is in the eighth grade
at John F. Kennedy Junior High,
and in the fifth grade at Beth
Torah Religious School.
The Oneg Shabbat following the
Friday services will be given in
his honor. A luncheon will be held
Saturday afternoon at the Beach-
comber Motel.
Michael Zagrodny, of Boston,
grandfather of the celebrant, will
be among out-of-town guests,
a a
Leonard Goldstein
Bar Mitzvah of Leonard San-
ford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Goldstein, 18120 NE 10th Ct., No.
Miami Beach, will take place on
Saturday morning, Dec. 3, at Beth
Torah Congregation.
Leonard attends John F. Ken-
nedy Junior High and is in the
eighth grade. He is a sixth grade
student at Beth Torah Religious
School and plans to continue his
studies after Bar Mitzvah. Leonard
plays the clarinet and the sousa-
phone, and is interested in model
rocketry.
A dinner reception will be held
at the Beau Rivage Hotel. Bal Har-
bor, on Saturday evening.
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity men constructed a games booth
for their Thanksgiving Fun Carnival at Variety Children's
Hospital here recently. As a community service, the
fraternity members also distributed gifts and toys to pa-
tients, provided ."trolling comic acts, and brought much
cheer to sick youngsters who couldn't get home to enjoy the
holiday. To top it all, they donated S500 to the Variety Chil-
dren's Hospital free medical-care deficit. Hard at work are
(left to right) Bruce Kern, Ted Orkin, Alan Asher, Ken Lieber-
man, and President Andy Edelman.
Pre-Chanuka
Meeting Slated
Mrs. Rose Ogrodnick announces
that a meeting of the Minyonaires
Synagogue Sisterhood is scheduled
for Tuesday.
Final plans for the annual Chan
uka dinner and concert will be
made. Mrs. Lillian Ciment, chair-
man, is in charge of reservations
A pre-Chanuka program will be
presented at the meeting by Mrs.
Rose Cohen.
Bureau Starts
Winter Semester
In Ulpan Courses
Eighth annual Ulpan program
in Hebrew Conversation, sponsored
by the Bureau of Jewish Educa
tion, is now registering adult stu-
dents for the winter semester, ac-
cording to an announcement by
Albert E. Ossip, president.
Classes will begin Tuesday, 8
p.m., at the offices of the Bureau.
40 Lincoln Rd., and will continue
for 10 two-hour weekly sessions.
Courses to be offered are begin-
ners, intermediate, and advanced.
Modern audio-lingual methods
in language teaching will be em-
ployed in the program. Media
used in teaching Israeli conversa-
tion are tapes, records, music and
Israeli daily papers.
Herbert Zvi Berger, Bureau as
ociate director, is acting as reg-
istrar.
Seniors Seek Actors
Senior Citizen's drama group of
the YM and WHA of Greater Mia-
mi is now presenting a special
Jhanuka program. The group
meets every Tuesday from 11 to 12
noon in the Golden Key Room of
-he YMHA, 8500 SW 8th St. The
Senior Citizens are looking for ad-
ditional actors. In charge of In-
formation is Mrs. Rita Schoen-
berg.
Dr. Lipschitz
At Beth Sholom
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. president
of the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association, and spiritual leader of
Beth Torah Congregation of North
Miami Beach, will speak on "Is
There Room for Doubt Concerning
the Nature of God?" at a sympo-
sium as part of the adult education
program of Temple Beth Sholom
on Monday evening at 9 p.m.
On Dec 12. at 9 p.m., Dr. Ira
Eisenstein, president of the Recon
itructionist Foundation, will clos;
he series of lectures with ;i "solu-
tion" to the problem ol the "death
of God."
The program is sponsored by the
'oard of education of Temple Beth
Sholom, of which Mrs. Irving B.
Kaplan is chairman.
Lapidus Named
Architect For
Brooklyn Pool
Noted Miami Beach architect
Morris Lapidus has been named to
design a swimming pool for one
of the most congested sections in
Brooklyn, N.Y.
The pool will serve the Bedford-
Stuyvesant section and will be sit-
uated at Marcy Ave. and Koscius-
ko St.
The $1.9 million pool and center
will occupy a block-square site
covered with low, reinforced con-
crete structures of multiple uses
o that the center may be used
throughout the year.
"Although the project is call-
ed a swimming pool, it is, in
fact, a neighborhood park,"
Lapidus explained. There will be
a small pool for diving and a
larger one for swimming.
An immigrant, Lapidus was him-
self raised in the Williamsburg
and Bedford-Stuyvesant section of
Brooklyn. He was the architect for
such renowned Miami Beach ho-
tels as the Fontainebleau. Eden
Roc and Americana, as well as the
Americana Hotel in New York
City.
".-,- n Greater Miami area was the new
Temple Judea opposite the Uni-
versity of Miami.
:iub 2 Seniors to Elect Slate
Florida Senior Citizens Club 2 N
will hold nomination and election
of officers for the coming year at
a membership meeting on Monday,
2 p.m.. at 842 Washington Ave.
More than 190 committee members of the
Hebrew Academy's 19th annual scholarship
dinner at a breakfast honoring Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Merwitzer, the school's president. Seat-
ed (left to right) are Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gon-
shor, quests of honor, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Kclb, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Merwitzer, Ben I.
Hinder, Oscar Member, Mrs. Henry Penchan-
sky, and Mr*. Jerome Bienonfeld. Stand'^a,
second row (left to right) are Morris Nash, Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Kolko, Louis DeCoveny, Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Genet, Mrs. Flora Berman,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Reinhard, Prof. George
H. Pickar, Carl Brandes, Harry Ro-en, Oscar
Shapiro, Mrs. Georae H. Pickar, Rev. and Mrs.
Joseph Krantz, Mrs. Morris Bienenfald, and
Henry Penchansky. Standina, back row (left
to right) are Jerome Bienenfeld, Louis Cohen,
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Groudan, Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Firtel.
Former Principal
To Give Address
Brandeis Zionist District of Mi-
ami Beach will hold its next reg-
ular meeting at 8 p.m. on Monday
at Washington Federal, Normandy
Isle.
Dr Sigmund Fogler, former
principal in the public schools of
New York City, will address the
group on "The Jew and Hit
World." The talk will be followed
by a question and Jdiscu.ssion per-
iod.
Mrs Isaac Donen will host the
collation during the social hour.
Mrs. and Mrs. Izzv (Hilda)
Karp, cf 1146 Biarritz Dr., will
be guests of honor at a testi-
monial dinner in their be-
half at the Algieja Hotel on
Sunday evening, Dec. 11.
Tho Asthmatic Children's
Foundation of America will
hest the dinner.


/

Paqe 14-B
* If i si, fkjrkttam
Friday, December 2, 1966
Family Service
At Beth David
The season's first Sabbath Eve
service at Beth David Congrega-
tion will take place on Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Services will be conducted by
Rabbi Sol Landau and Cantor Wil-
liam Lipson. assisted by the choir
linden the direction oi Albert
Sussman.
Religious School students have
been invited to attend with their
parents. They will be joined by
the staff of the Religious School.
William Bornstein, president of the Jewish
National Fund Council of Greater Miami, has
unnounced that the Philip Rose banquet on
Dec. 18 "promises to be a most outstanding
event," sponsored by the Greater Newark,
New Jersey Club and King Cole Apartment
Social Club. Proceeds will go toward the
establishment of the Philip Rose Forest in
Israel. "This is a unigue honor in tribute to
an outstandinq individual for dedicated
achievements," said Joe Schmier, chairman
of the committee. Goal is a 75,000-tree forest.
Guest speaker at the banquet will be Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, of Temple Menorah. Com-
mittee for the banquet consists of Dr. William
B. Stollman, H. Finder, Z. Feit, B. Katz, co-
chairman, S. Hammel, Philip Rose, Nathan
Glaser, Joseph Schmier, chairman of banquet,
B. Goldstein, Sam Gross, David Werner,
Charles Cohen, Leo Rutstein.
Islander ORT
Dec. 13 Luncheon
RABBI SOt LANDAU
Forest to Honor Philip Rose Here for 'Dedication1
William Bornstein. president of
I he Jewish National Fund of Great-
er Miami, announced Wednesday
that the Greater Newark. New
Jersey Club of Florida, in conjunc-
tion with the JNF. will hold a de-
dication supper on Dec 18 at 'he
Fontainehleau Hotel in honor of
Philip Rose, president of the New-
ark club and King Cole Apartment
Social Club.
Rose will be cited 'for his out-
standing services and dedication
to all humanitarian and Jewish
Consul General Zeev Boneh to Appear
At Dinner in Honor of Louis Cohens
Zeev Boneh. Israel's new Consul
General for southern United
States, will come to Miami from
.Atlanta to join in honoring Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Cohen at a Temple Ner
Tamid Israel "Cnai" dinner Satur-
day night at the Fontaincbleau
Hotel. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. of
Temple Ner Tamid. announced.
Boneh will present Israel's
Chai" Award to Mr. and Mrs.
Cohen "in recognition of their
yean of service in Jewish life."
Murray Shaw, president of the
temple, is dinner chairman.
Prior to the dinner, Boneh will
be feted at a reception tendered
in his honor by Mr. and Mrs.
Cohen. The reception will be in
the Gigi Room of the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel.
Boneh is a sabra. born in Tel
Aviv. At the age of 16, he enlisted
in the Haganah. After receiving of-'
licer's training, he served for eight,
years, leaving the Army with the
rank of major.
The dinner program will feature
entertainment by the noted sing-
er. Jan Bart, who will present his
.-pocial adaptation of "Fiddler on
the Roof," which will also feature
his wife, Lillian, a noted soprano
in her own right.
Shaw announced that music for
dinner dancing will be be provided
by a continental society orchestra.
The dinner will start at 7 o'clock
in the Fontaine Room of the Fon-'
tainebleau Hotel.
causes" in the form of the "Philip
Rose Forest" in Mei Ami. Israel.
"This tribute is justly deserved."
said Joseph Schmier. chairman of
the Philip Rose supper committee.
"Tickets for the banquet are
selling rapidly," said Mrs. Ethel
Herman, secretary of the com-
mittee.
Bernard Katz, co-chairman of
the arrangements committee, an-
nounced that means are being
made "to secure a prominent Is-
raeli star to appear at this special
event."
Guest speaker will be Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz. who has just
returned from a visit to the State
of Israel, and who will report on
the latest developments in the Mid-
dle East and on the role the JNF
plays in the security of the State
of Israel.
Women's American ORT. Island-
er Chapter, will hold its regular
meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 13, at a
noon luncheon at the Deauville
Hotel.
In addition to a candlelighting
ceremony, entertainment will be
provided by Stanley Rosensweet. ,
sightless singer, accompanied by 10 QQ Speaker
Mrs. Oiga Bibor Stem.
Mrs Melvin Rose and Mrs. Sam
Garfunkel are co-chairmen of en-
tertainment.
MDJC Prof.
Rabbi to Talk On
Chanuka Holiday
Next meeting of the Women's
league for Israel, Florida Chap-
ter, will be held at the Forte
Towers. North, on Wednesday at
1 p.m.
Speaker for the afternoon will
be Rabbi Max Zucker, whose topic
will be "The Chanuka Holiday."
Also on the program will be
"Kindling of the Lights," comem-
orating the holiday.
James McWhortcr, professor at
Miami-Dade Junior College, will
be guest speaker at Temple Or
Olom Atid on Sunday, 7:30 p.m.
McWhortcr served with the
Peace Corps in Bolivia and will
relate some of his experiences.
Temple Or Olom Atid is a social
and cultural young adult group.
open to men and women between
18 and 24. which meets every Sun
day evening at the temple.
MR. AND MRS. 10UIS COMIN
Holiday Items
At ORT Gift Shop
There are holiday gifts galore
in the Topiary Gift Shop at 1629
Michigan Ave., which is sponsored
by Southeastern Florida Region of
Women's American ORT. The shop
is stocked with items from the far
corners of the world, as well as
hand-made articles.
Proceeds will go to the ORT
Health Project, which provides
medical and dental care for stu-
dent! around the world, and helps
the mentally retarded, the deaf
and the blind.
ORT program for the blind in
the Textile School at Ramat Gan
is the only one of its kind in Is-
rael. It was established to conduct
research in effective methods of
instruction in textile skills for
blind people and to conduct
courses to prepare them to handle
machines and carry out normal
work operations. The Institute
also serves as a training center
for vocational teachers for the
blind.
Criminal Lawmen
To Hear Speaker
Florida Criminal Defense Attor-
neys' Association will hold its third
annual dinner on Saturday at the
Carillon Hotel. President Mitchell
M. Goldman announced that the
principal speaker will be the noted
Northwestern University professor
of law. Jon R. Waltz.
The Criminal Defense Attorneys'
also will present an award "to the i
person who has contributed the1
most to the furtherance of crim-
inal justice in the past year." Pre-1
vious winners were Dade Criminal
Court Judge Ben Willard (post-
humously) and Broward Court of
Record Judge Douglas Lambeth.
Prof. Waltz teaches evidence,
procedure and trial practice and is
co-author of the book, "The Trial
of Jack Ruby" (with John Kaplan i
He is also the author of "Medical
Jurisprudence," to be published
next year by Macmillan.
His topic before the Criminal De-
fense Attorneys will be "The Trial
of Jack Ruby How to Conduct a
Legal Disaster."
Friends Board
Meeting Sunday
First board meeting of the sea-
son will be held by the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
on Sunday morning, at 10 a.m.,
in Juniors Restaurant, according
to Jack S. Popick, president of
the group.
In addition to plans for parlor
meetings to be held during the
forthcoming visit of Dr. Moshe
Prywes, coordinator of the medi-
cal, dental and pharmaceutical fac-
ulties of the Hebrew University,
Popick will announce scheduled
dates for the groundbreaking and
dedication ceremonies planned for
the Ruth and Jack Popick Miami
Humanities Building soon to be
erected on the Jerusalem campus
of the Hebrew University
Attorneys Talk
On Legal Equality
"Rich or Poor: Equality Before
the Law," will be the topic of the
People Speak Town Hall Forums
on Friday, 8 p.m., in Washington
Federal. 1234 Washington Ave.
The panelists, all attorneys on
the Economic Opportunity Pro-
gram legal service, are Howard
Dixon, Joseph Segor," and Donald
Castor.
Chaim Rose will preside. Ques-
tion period follows.
Wagner to Head
Beth Raphael
Abe Wagner was installed this
week as new president of Temple
Beth Raphael, 1575 Jefferson Ave.
Former Miami Beach Mayor
Kenneth Oka was installing offi-
cer. Others installed were Max .1
Affachiner, first vice president.
Sam Siegel, second vice president;
Sol Podolsky, financial secretary
I. Rosenberg, recording secretary;
and Sam Huessin, treasurer.
Joseph Lovy was named execu
tive director.
Pofsy Board fleets
New members elected to the
board of directors of United .Cere-
bral Palsy. Association of Miami
are Jerry Toffler. 6815 Maynada
Ave Coral Gables; Robert G.
Ven.. of Snapper Creek; David S.
Minton. Sears Roebuck & Co.;
Joseph Kaplan. 112 E. st Ct., Hibis-
cus Island; and W. E. Johnson, of
Hialeah. II
Bazaar Luncheon
For Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tam-
id is planning a bazaar luncheon
on Tuesday noon in Sklar Audi-
torium. Admission is by contribu-
tion of saleable merchandise,
vhich will be sold at the Sister-
hood Bazaar in February.
Reservations may be made with
the temple office or with chair
men, Mrs. Sol Dwork and Mrs
Yvette Silberger.
Proceeds will help subsidize the
Religious School.
Menorah Enrolls
135 New Families
A record 135 new families will
be feted at lale Friday services
conducted by Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz at Temple Menorah, and will
be honored at the Oneg Shabbat
following the service.
Hubert Ponter, of Rhodesia,
will respond for the new members,
and fiis. Joel Grossman will make
the blessings over the candles and
open the service with the medita-
tion.
Of the 135 new families, 82
have enrolled their children in
various departments of the temple
Religious School.
Miami Rabbis
Talk About Books
"Religion in Our Age as Reflect-
ed by Florida Authors" was to be
discussed by Rabbi Herbert Baum-
gard, author of "Judaism and
Prayer." and Rabbi Sol Landau,
author of "Length of Our Days."
at the City of Miami Public Library
on Thursday at 8:30 p.m.
Louis Schwartzman. executive
director of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, was to serve as mod-
erator.
Ruby Fogel I^vkoff was to read
from her book. "Of Apes and
Angels and Other Poems."
Rabbi Baumgard has been th
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Am for the past ten years.
RaNii Landau is spiritual leader
of Beth David Congregation.
Pallot to Attend Meet
E. Albert Pallot. international
vice president of B'nai B'rith. will
I attend the annual board of gov-
| ernors meeting Dec. 3 to 6 in
Washington, D.C. Pallot accepted
' the international post at ceremon-
ies in Israel last year and has been
; active in the fraternal organization
for over 25 years.
Dr. William Wexler (left), president of B'nai B'rith, continue*
his organization's 123-year-old tradition of assisting disaster
victims by presenting Ambassador Turgot Menemencioglu in
Washington with B'nai B'rith's contribution to Turkey's emer-
gency relief fund for victims of a recent earthquake. First B'nai
B'rith relief efforts, in 1865. aided Jewish colonists in Palestine
stricken by a cholera epidemic.
K
J


rnnmr I
in TOCC
Friday, December 2. 1966
* knist nrrSdHimri
Paqe 15-B
URGES ESTABLISHMENT OF 'HEALTHY SPIRITUAL BRIDGE'
Rumania Chief Rabbi at UOJC Meet
By Special Report
NEW YORK Dr. Moses Ros-
en, Chief Rabbi of Rumania, was a
featured guest speaker at the 68th
anniversary national biennial con-
vention of the-Jnion or Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of America
being held Nov. 23 to 27 at the
Shoreham Hotel in Washington,
DC.
Dr. Rosen, who has accepted an
invitation to come to the United
Slates to address the UOJCA con
clave, spoke at one of several
sessions devoted to issues affect-
ing Jewish communities through-
out the world.
The convention sessions fo-
cused on creative approaches to
the major issues affecting Amer-
ican and world Jewish life and
on the role of Jewry in the
worldwide quest for peace and
security and the struggle against
poverty, injustice and other
problems confronting mankind.
DR. mOStS ROSEN
Addressing the dinner session of i
the 68th anniversary national
biennial convention of the UOJCA,
Dr. Rosen also asked that his in-:
vitation be transmitted to the |
Conference of European Rabbis'
and to the associated religious na
tional organialions with which the
UOJCA and the Rabbinical Coun-
ci* of America are affiliated.:
Harold Jacobs, vice president of'
the UOCJA. announced that his or-
ganiiation had formality accepted
Rabbi Rosen's invitation.
Dr. Rosen, who is also .president
of the Federation of Rumanian
Jewish Communities, invited the
rabbinic and lay leaders to meet
in February. 1967, in Bucharest.
He stressed that such a confer-
ence in Rumania would be im-;
portant in bringing about a
closer association and understand
ing between the Jewish com- j
munities in the West and those
in Eastern Europe.
"The participation of import- j
ant rabbinic and synagogues
leaders in the deliberations of
this conference will go a long
way towards establishing a
healthy spiritual bridge between
the Jewish communities of East
and West," Dr. Rosen told the
ganlzation's president for the last
12 years, voiced disagreement wil .
leaders of other Jewish religion,
organizations who have taken
strong position against the war i I
Viet Nam.
The position of the UOJCA was
set forth on issues of America i
society such as civil rights, Kegn-
Jewish relations, moral slatidan s
and business ethics.
Some 2,000 delegates attende;
the fiveday conference of tl
UOJCA, the national organizalk) \
serving 3,100 Jewish congregation -
throughout the United States an
Canada. The convention ws*
the largest multiple-day assem-
blage of Orthodox Jews in Anie
ican history.
LEGAL NOTICE
B'nai B'rith Martyrs' Memorial Set
By Special Report
WASHINGTON B'nai B'rith
announced plans this week to erect
a 35-ft. memorial to Jewish mar-
tyrs of the Nazi holocaust on a
Judean hilltop overlooking the
entrance to Jerusalem.
The bronze monument, designed
by sculptor Nathan Rapoport in
the form of two Torah scroll seg-
ments, will be the central point of
a 500,000-tree section of the B'nai
B'rith Martyrs' Forest in Israel.
The segments will be engraved to
depict symbolically the history of
Kuropean Jewry from pre-war
days through the Nazi era.
The monument, on its hilltop
site, will be a landmark to trav-
elers on the principal highway
leading into the Israeli sector
of Jerusalem.
The $150,000 project, to be com-
pleted by 1970, was adopted last
week at the annual meeting of the
B'nai B'rith Commission on Israel.
The 500.000 trees surrounding
it will be a companion forest ad-
joining a similar project com-
pleted by B'nai B'rith in 1964.
More than 170,000 saplings of the
new section have already been
planted.
A smaller version of the monu-
ment was rejected by the New
York City Art Commission in
February, 1965 in a controversial
decision over a proposed memorial
I hat several Jewish groups offered
'<) sponsor in the city's Riverside
Park.
At that time, a member of the
commission opposed the design as
excessively and unnecessarily
large." Another objection was that
the theme of the memorial, since
it did not interpret American his-
tory, was inappropriate for a mu-
nicipal park and could open the
way for other religious and eth-
nic groups to ask for public land
to establish memorials of their
own.
Samuel Levltsky, of Philadel-
phia, chairman of the B'nai
B'rith Commission, said that he
and his colleagues had approved
the Rapoport design as "a styl-
istically Impressive and dram-
atic symbol of Jewish remem-
brance."
Rapoport, who attended the
meeting of the B'nai B'rith Com-
mission, said that the monument
would first be cast in hundreds of
small pieces, then welded together.
The 55-year-old, Warsaw born
sculptor, who now lives and works
in New York, is the creator of a
number of famous ghetto mem-
orials.
Model of a 35-ft. bronze memorial to Jewish martyrs of the
Nazi holocaust which B'nai B'rith plans to erect on a Judean
hilltop overlooking the entrance to Jerusalem. Designed by
sculptor Nathan Rapoport in the form of two Torah scroll
segments engraved with symbolic art depicting European
Jewish life from pre-war days through the Nazi era, the
$150,000 monument will be the focal point of a second 500.000-
tree section of the B'nai B'rith Martyrs' Forest in Israel.
'Witch of Buchenwald1 Makes New
Attempt to Receive Gov't. Pension
BONN (JTA) rise Koch,
who became known as the "Witch
of Buchenwald" when testimony
at her Nazi war crimes trial re-
vealed she had ordered lamp-
shades made from the skins of
victims of the Buchenwald death
camp, renewed this week her ap-
plication for a government pen-
sion.
She is serving a life term for
atrocities at the camp during the
period when her husband, Karl,
was commandant. He was shot by
German troops the day before the
Allies liberated the camp. Her
first pension application was re-
jected.
She filed a complaint against
the rejection, contending that
she was entitled to a pension
because her husband was a
member of the Waffen SS, and
not of the General SS. The Waf-
fen SS was made up of Hitler
Elite Guard members who were
in active military service.
The General SS comprised the
men who ran the Nazi concentra-
tion camps.
Use Koch was sentenced to a
term of life imprisonment at hard
labor by an Allied court in 1947.
The sentence was reduced by
American occupation officials a
year later to four years. After
a public outcry, a new trial was
held in 1950, and she received the
life term she is now serving.
convention. He said that Eastern
Jewry must be hosts as well as
guests. ."The Jewish community
in Rumania," he emphasied, "is
an integral part of the world
Jewish community, recognizing
its role and responsibilities in
the religious affairs of Jewish
people everywhere. -While root-
ed in the Rumanian Socialist
Republic, it is freely developing
an independent Jewish religious
and. cultural life within the
framework -of the Rumanian
Socialist society."
He pointed out that the con-
ference "could help ease the ten-
sions of the cold war. In this way,
Jews in different parts of tlie
world might well be instrumental
in carrying out the Jewish reli-
gious mission of bringing peace
to mankind."
At another session the delegates
went on record in support of Pres- J&JK? J* 'i^S^.'l
ident Johnson s position on Viet
Nam. The resolution stressed the
determination of the U.S. Govern
ment to resist Communist aggies
sion anywhere in the world and
declared that "a true conception
of America aspirations must also
encompass a continuing quest for
peace." In presenting the resolu-
tion to delegates, Moses I. Feur-
stein who has served as the or-
NOTICE UNDEK
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS RERKI1Y fllVKN I !> '
tin- undersigned, Centring t, engfls
in business under the fictitious nami -
of BTATK PROTECTION HKRYIItt
I NT Kit AMERICAN IR'SIN'MSH
AOBNCY, :it I"" s. Blscnyne BWrt ,
First National Bank of Miami UMa
Miami, Fla. 33131, Intends to netrtcr
said name* with the Clerk of n
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flo -
Ida.
JOHN \\ ADAMS
802 lilsca) no liulMInu
12 2-0 i
Art Lectures
Held at Beth Am
The Art Committee of Temple
Beth Am, co-chaired by Edward
Grad and Mrs. Abraham Turoff.
presented the first in its series of
lectures on Wednesday evening in
the Adult Education Room of the
temple.
Josh Kligerman lectured on
"Random Thoughts on Art Collect-
ing" and showed slides.
Director of the Gulf American
Collectors Gallery, Kligerman's
experience includes the organiza-
tion of an Art Center in Atlantic
City, the arrangement of exhibi-
tions and managing galleries. An
artist himself, he did graphics
with the Workshop of Graphic
Arts in Mexico.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY lilVEN thit
the undersigned, desiring t< enguitg
in business unili-r the fictitious nan -
of ROYAL HOTEL A PROPERTIES
.ii .".:::.' North Miami Ave., Mian
Florida, Intends to register said nan -
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court C
Dade County, Florida
.11' i'V, INC., a Florida Corporatloi
Hl'ClENE I.KMLH'H
Attorney for II" CY, Inc.
^:ii:. w. Flagler Hi .Miami. Pte,
12 2-9-16-23
BB Social Singles
Plan 2 Affairs
B'nai B'rith Social Singles will
| hold a night club show with danc-
ing to a live band on Saturday
night at the Barcelona Hotel.
Also on the calendar is the
club's New Year's Eve dance and
supper slated for the night of Dec.
31 at the Saxony Hotel. In charge
of tickets is Mae Blum.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71953-B
111 RE: Estate of
Tossn: MAE LAWRENCE
a k II MAXIM: t.AWIIKM K
n/k-H MRH, John .-. LAWRENl !
I> reused.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All "i i illtoiw and All I rson l
Having Claims or Demands Again-t
s.ilil Estate:
Yi.ii are hereby notified and r. -
oulred tn present any claims ar
demands which you may have again*!'.
il.....state ..: TONS1E MAE LAW
HENCE ii h H MANINK LAWRENC .'
a/k/n MRS. John C. LAWRENCE
leceused late < Dade. County, Flo
Ida, i" tIi.- County Judges of Dajrie
County, and rile the same in dunli
rate and as provided in Section i
Florida Statutes, in their offices I
the County Courthouse in Dado
County, Florida, within six calendar
months from tin time "f the first
iiuiilicaiic.il hereof, or the same will
in. barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this SI .
da) of November, A.l>. 1966.
HARRY B. SMITH
As Administrator
Plrsl publication of this notli.....;
the 2nd day of December, 1966.
SAMUEL 8. SMITH
Attorney for Administrator
la, Lincoln Road
IS Z-9-36..
V-' o i / n .i r i e 3
WELLISCH
UNA LAURA, 84, of 3661.SW SSrd
Ti r., dlt'd Nov. SS. S*h cann* hi re
26 years ago from Vienna, Austria.
Survivors Include her husbaml. Sam-
uel: two sons, Kurt Wellisch of
Coral Cables, Heinz Welllwh of Mi-
ami; anil four grandchildren, Serv-
ices wire held Nov. JO at Dordon
Mineral Home with Interment in
Mt. .Who (".in. t. rj
POTRUCH, Mrs. Ann, :.9, of B380
Carlyle Ave died Nov. 28. River-
side.
SANDS. Mark. 66. Of TMM k. Treas-
ure Dr., iiiiii Nov. 27. Gordon,
weiss, Louis, (6, of 1320 Carlyle
Ave., died N"v. l>7 Services in New
Vi.rk City. Riverside.
BURNS. Ueorge Michael, fia. of 17.1
XB 20th St., Boca Raton, iiii'il Nov.
L'ti Riverside.
KATZER, Harry i: 80, "f 1037 Mich-
igan Ave., died Nov. 24. Riverside.
LIEBOVITZ. Jacob', 72, of 128 Collins
Ave., died Nov. 247 Services In Chi-
cago, Khi'isiii.
GOLDBERG, Samuel I... of ...... Weal
Ave., died Nov. 21 Riverside.
PRAVITZ. Mrs Dora, 74, of in:,
West Ave., died Not 24. Services
in New York Cits R ,'erslrie
ADRIAN, Mas P., ,,f 2744 BW ::ith
ci., died Nov. 23 Riverside.
GREEN. Robert, .".7. of 171" Alton ltd.,
li.-il Nov. 23. Riverside.
SHAP'RO Ellas IAIIIp) 7",. .,f 7......'
Bonita Dr., died Nqv. 23, Services
in New Vork City. Riverside,
adelman. Mrs. Sarah, B0, of 1219
Euclid Ave. died Nov. 21. Services
in Boston. Riverside.
SCHWARTZ. Ruth. .".!. of 413 Alml-
tuir, died Nov. :';'. Riverside.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72995
in RE: Estate of
INEZ Q, R1CHMANN
I i. is.-il.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Ta All Creditors and All i rsoi I
Having claims or Demands Against
sain I.state:
ITou are hereby notified and ri -
'iniii'il ti, present an) claims and
demands which you may have agaio*
the estate of INEZ U. RICHMA.NN
......i late "i l Hide Count). Floi
Ida, t" the Count) Judgos of Dnil.-
County, and file the same In dupl
call and us provided in Section 733.lv.
M'.iMa Statutes, in their offices i
the i 'ounty i U>ui thouse in I lail
County, Florida, within six laliiula-
months from the tima ol the first
I Ion hen of, or tin* bh m, n
be barred.
Dated al Miami, Florida, this 3 .
da) il Noventber, a.m. 1966.
J. CA43PER UEYER
As ESxecutor
First publication of this notice -.
the 2nd day of December, 1966,
MANUEL LUBBL
Attorney for Exeoutor
101 Hast Flagler Street
___________________I2/2-9-16-2J}
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COUR-
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72904- B
in RE: Estate of ;
l'.\ II. OROW,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
I'" All Creditors and All Persons
ii.iMnt Claims or Demands Againsc
Said Estate:
you an- hereby notified and re.
quired to present any .ilalms an
demands which you imv have agalpsr
the .stale ol PAIUi OROW, ili-.-,.,-.
late of Dade County, Florida, to 11
County Judges of Dade County, and
rile tin- same in duplicate ami as pro-
vided In Section 733.16, Florla Stai
utes, In their offlpei n the Count}
Courthouse In Dade C......tv. Florida
within six calendar months from tii i
time of iln first pHbUogtlon hercol
or the same will be Barred
Dated ,u Miami. Hlorida, this :':ii-
da) ol November, A.D. 1966
JOSH i;i:i'iii.\
As Exec He r
First publication of this notice ..
the 2nd day i.r December, 1966
JOSH ItKI'lll'.V
Attorne) for Rx< cutor
1370 Washington \\enue
12 2-9-16-23


Page 16-B
fjewisti flcrkiiair
Friday, December 2, 1968
OUR ONLY "GAME" IS TO

FOOD
FAIR
DELICATESSEN
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVINO APPETIZER DEPARTMENTS
Corned Beef
LOW, LOW PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY AT ALL FOOD FAIR 8.
FREDERICKS STORES!
(EXCLUDING KOSHER MARKETS)
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
'ptetA fruMt t&e Ocean!
FLORIDA
MACKEREL
DELICIOUS
LEAN
Va LB.
Save
40< LB.
BELLY LOX
FRESH
CAUGHT
29
FRESHLY
SMOKED
ib
Save
I Merchnt\ j
k-4.
CftrCM STAMPS
jttftjUt
THE FINEST NAME BRAND GIFTS
IN THE GREATEST VARIETY AWAIT
YOUR CHOICE
Save
___ __ 40< LB.
%LB.
STORE SLICED TO iNSURi FRf SHNES
SAVE 40< LB. FRESHLY SMOKED
Large White!ish lb
SAVE 40< LB. DELICIOUS
Chopped Liver
99
.'? ,Vi LB.
FRANKS KNOCKS
l-LB.
PKG.
X
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YOGURT ALL
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STOCK-UP & SAVE AT OUR
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LIBBYS YELLOW CLING
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or
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$
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24-OZ.
.......... JAR
MADE WIT HRESH EGGS, SOUR CREAM & A ZIP OF LEMON JUICE
FOOD FAIR CREAMED
l-LB. CUP
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i
U.S. NO. 1 LARGE WHITE
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20 89
LIMIT ONE CAN, EITHER
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S FOLGER'S COFFEE
...... ......,. .#'
FOOD FAIR COFFEE all grinds i~lb. can
l-LB.
CAN
49
39'
l>_


rnnmr iMnMharin 10CR
"eJewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, December 2, 1966
Section C
Greater Miami Armed Services Group
And YMHA Honor Jewish War Vets
Installation breakfast for the newly-elected
oificers of the Young Judaea groups, Senior,
"ntermediate and Junior, was held in Sklar
Auditorium recently. Josh Rephun, member
of the Young Judaea Youith Commission,
wrought greetings from the Greater Miami
Young Judaea membership, and Sam Pearl-
man, Ner Tamid Youth Commission chair-
man, welcomed children with their parents.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spiritual leader of the
temple, installed the newly-elected officers.
Front row (left to right) are Karen Rosenfeld,
junior vice president; Debbie Goodman, junior
secretary; Peter Farbman, intermediate third
vice president; Richard Prager, intermediate
president; Michael Wolland, intermediate vice
president; William Nankin, intermediate treas-
urer; Jay Pecrlman, junior treasurer; Robert
Goodman, junior president. Back row (left
to right) are Rephun, member of Young Judaea
Youth Commission; Teddy Eorkan, senior
treasurer; Barry Schimler, senior secretary;
Michael Lynn, intermediate second vice pres-
ident; Lloyd Sieqendorf, senior president;
Bruce Richman, educational director of Tem-
ple Ner Tamid; Linda Klein, senior vice pres-
ident of membership; Liza Breslaw, intermedi-
ate recording secretary; Marcia Posin, inter-
mediate corresponding secretary; and Mr.
Pearlman.
Toys and games collected by the Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women, as part of its Ship-A-Box
program last Chanuka, are now in use at the Morich School
under the direction of Jacob Lanery, of Ashkelon. Kindergar-
ten and nursery schools throughout Israel are also recipients
of these toys, such as tea sets, dolls, balls, kitchen stoves,
crayons and paints. On Nov. 20 and 27, this year's Ship-a-
Box program was conducted in temples and religious schools
in Miami. All costs of packing and shippinq are paid by the
Greater Miami Section, National Council of Jewish Women.
Mrs. Edward Oppenheim is Section president, and Mrs. Max
Fuchs Is Section Ship-a-Box chairman. Mesdames Irving El-
sen, Jack Primack, Al Berkowitz, Charles Serkin, Ethel Gold-
stein, Michael Morcan and Robert Siegel are chairmen of
their respective divisions. ____________
Jews Seek Funds For Day Schools
Rabbi Caplan
Explains Three
Big Observances
Sky Lake Synagogue of North
Miami Beach marked three an-
nual Jewish observances with a
program to celebrate Jewish Book
Month. United Nations Day, and
Palestine Day. Festivities were
held on Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 8:30
p.m.
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, spiritual
leader of the congregation, ex-
plained the meetings of thes ob-
servances.
Highlight of the evening will be
a review of "Justice in Jerusalem,"
a book by Gideon Hausner. Rabbi
Berel Wein. of Congregation Beth
Israel, Miami Beach, was the
reviewer.
A new slate of officers was
presented by Mrs. Stanley Kestin,
chairman of the nominations com-
mittee. Serving with Mrs. Kestin
are Mrs. Norman Lieberman, Mrs.
Irvjng Laufer, Mrs. Harry Moro-
vitz, Mrs. Howard Roskin, and
Mrs. Daniel P. Tunick.
NEW YORK (JTA) The i
New York City Board of Educa- j
lion was urged to allocate funds j
immediately to help pupils in the |
city's Hebrew day schools, as pro-
vided by the Federal Elementary
and Secondary Education Act of
1965. While the legislation pro-
vides funds for remedial and en-
richment programs for both public
and non-public school children, the
Board has not yet passed on the
allocations to parochial school
children m New York. Such grants
are opposed by some Jewish and
non-Jewish groups.
In a joint statement, Rabbi Pes-
ach Z. Levovitz, president of the
Rabbinical Council of America,
and Moses I. Feuerstein, president
of the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America, said
that delay in granting the funds
"may make it impossible to Imple-
ment the program for the coming
year." Any delay in granting the
Federal funds, the statement de-
clared, "would prove an irrepar-
able damage for hundreds of thous-
ands of youngsters in New York
City, and will advrsely affect
their future."
Both Orthodox Jewish leaders
stressed that their groups are
"traditionally opposed" to Federal
aid and involvement in religious
schools. But they maintained that
the present law "is in full con-
sonance with the separation of
church and state."
Greater Miami Armed Services
Committee, in conjunction with
the Greater Miami YM and WHA,
paid tribute to Jewish War Vet-
erans and other organizations for
their work and support in the
Armed Services Program at a spe-
cial tribute luncheon at the
YMHA, 8500 SW 8th St., last
week.
Keynote speaker was Ben Stern-
berg, director of the National
Jewish Welfare Board Armed
Service. Sternbcrg came to Miami
from New York specifically to
make the awards presentation.
The Armed Services Committee
of Greater Miami, under the chair-
manship of Mrs. Louis Glasscr,
honored the following Jewish or-
ganizations of the community:
Temple Judea Sisterhood. Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women's
Greater Miami Section, Beth Tfi-
lah Congregation, Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah. American
Jewish Congress Florida Worn-
en's Division. Temple Ner Tamid
Sisterhood, Temple Ner Tamid,
Temple Israel of Greater Miami,
Temple Or Olom Sisterhood, Tem-
ple Mcnorah Sisterhood, Beth El
Congregation, Jewish Home for
the Aged Miami Auxiliary, Temple .
Beth Moshe Sisterhood. Torah
Group of Hadassah, B'nai B'rith
Sholem Lodge, Sisterhood of Tem-
ple Emanu-El, Temple Beth Sho
lem Sisterhood, Pioneer Women's
Greater Miami Council.
These organizations have pro-
vided religious, cultural and rec-
reational services for Jewish men
and their families in the Armed
services who are currently sta-
1 tioned at the Homestead Air Force
1 Base.
Special tribute was paid to the
i Jewish War Veterans "for their
', outstanding program of service
! provided for the men in uniform
! during the past year."
Special awards were given to
! Jack Gordon, of Washington Fcd-
! eral Savings and Ix>an Association,
and to Michael Schechter, of the
Jewish War Veterans.
All Jewish War Veteran post
commanders and women's auxili-
ary presidents received honors for
their active participation.
Included in this group are past
State Commander Jack Berman.
present State Commander Mr. Irv-
ing Cooperman, past Women's
Auxiliary State President Mrs.
Irving Cooperman, and present
Women's Auxiliary State Pres-
ident Mrs. Sofie Lee.
BIN STIRNBtRG
Eisenstein On
Boxing Board
Of Miami Beach
Leo Eisenstein, Miami Beach
businessman and realtor, has been
elected chairman of the Miami
Beach Boxing Commission. His
term ''ill run through September
of 1967.
Eisenstein was appointed to the
Commission last September. He
has been a Beach resident for the
past 32 years, and has served as
president of the Miami Beach
Realty Board, B'nai B'rith, and
the Miami Beach Zoning Board for
16 years and was a member of
the original Auditorium and Con-
vention Hall Advisory Boards.
He also served as a member of
Exchange Club.
Chanuka Party
Workshop Slated
"Significance of Chanuka To-
day" was the topic of discussion
at a Chanuka Party Workshop for
adults on Monday, 8 p.m., at the
YM and WHA of Greater Miami.
The Workshop, sponsored by the
Adult Division of the "Y" and PTA
of the Early Childhood Develop-
ment Program, emphasized the
songs, dramatics, arts and crafts,
and special holiday foods.
In charge of information wer
Miriam Scheinberg and Jeannptte
B. Schwartz.
Balabans Co-Chair
Van Cliburn
Concert Dec. 13
Judge and Mrs. Henry R.ilaban,
i both active in civic and fraternal
organizations for many years, and
particularly for Variety Children's
Hospital, have been appointed co-
chairmen of "An Evening with
Van Cliburn," a Variety benefit on
Dec. 13 at the Deauville Hotel.
The black-tie affair will include
a reception, banquet and piano re-
cital by the renowned virtuoso,
who has appeared on concert
stages throughout the world and
has become a recording legend in
recent years.
The circuit court judge and his
wife have announced that "the
sole purpose of the Van Cliburn
event is to raise funds for Variety
Children's Hospital to meet the
annual free-care deficit of some
$700,000 annually.
"This represents the cost of giv-
ing free medical treatment to
more than 60,000 sick youngsters
in the 21 clinics of Variety's Out-
patient Department."
Judge Henry and Mrs. Balaban are co-chairmen of the Van
Cliburn benefit banquet concert for Variety Children's Hos-
pital on Dec. 13 at the Deauville Hotel.


Page 2-C
vJentet: Fforidlfon
Friday, December 2, 1
966
VA Supervisor Marks 25 Years
Children consecrated at Temple Zicn recently
are bottom row (left to right). Iris Oaken. Stev-
en Beiser, Robert Feldman, David Bush, Steven
Colsky, Arthur Pascal, Brian Matlin. Middle
row (left to right )aie Frank Katz, Mark Topp,
Solomon Rosen, Irl Marcus, Jeff Froug, Steve
Singer, Barry Brazer, Jay Weisman. Top row
(left to right) are Louis Oaken, Mike Cohen,
Beth Drexler, Risia Topp, Robert Drexler,
William Press.
Completion of its major project in three years since its organ-
ization sees donation by the North Miami Beach Auxiliary of
the Jewish Home for the Aged of ten wheelchairs for use by
residents of the Home. Here Mrs. Ida Gross, a resident at the
Home, is comfortable in one of the chairs, as current Auxil-
iary president Mrs. Leah Wenig (left), looks on, with Mrs. Sara
Gordon, president of the Auxiliary, during the major portion
of the wheelchair fund drive.
Rabbi Stern To
Attend Mizrachi
N.Y. Conclave
The Religious Zionist Organiza-
tion of America will hold its 59th
annual convention at the Promen- ]
ade Hotel in Long Island, N.Y., [
through Dec. 4.
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, spiritual
leader of the Jacob C. Cohen Com-
munity Synagogue, and chairman
of the Southeastern Region ZOA,.
will serve as chairman of the Tor-'
ah session to be held on Dec. 3,
according to Rabbi David Hill,
convention chairman.
Among the over 1,000 dele-
gates expected at the conclave
will be the Ambassador from the
State of Israel to the United
States, Michael Comay; Dr. Jos-
eph B. Soloveitchik, of Boston;
and the Minister of the Interior
of Israel, Chaim Shapiro.
Local Mizrachi group will ob-
serve the Chai anniversary dinner
at the Deauville Hotel on Sundav.
Dec. 18.
While in New York, Rabbi
Stern will attend the annual ban-
; quet of Beth Midrach Gehova, of
j Lakewood, N.J., where he will ac
I cept a plaque in behalf of Jacob
| C. Cohen, president and founder
of the synagogue witch bears his
name.
Bob Melion. supervisor of the
out-patient administration section
of the Veteran's Administration
Hospital, ("oral Gables, will receive
recognition later this month for
25 years of government service.
Melion. a resident of Miami
since 1946, helped establish the
VA Regional Office here at Din-
ner Key in the same year. Dinner
Key is the present site of City j
Hall.
Born in Vienna, Austria, Mel- {
ion came to this country in
April, 1940. On Oct. 6, 1941, he
was drafted into the Army Air
Force. He left the service as
staff sergeant on Nov. 15, 1945.
Melion received citizenship in
1942 while on active military duty
in Tampa. His service with VA
began in December. 1945.
He lives with his wife, miu.
and daughter, Debbie, at 1504 S\V
102nd Ave. Another daughter
I.mdy, is a teacher at Miami
Park Senior High School
A 25-year service pin and ,
tificate will mark his dutv com
pleted until Nov. 6. '
Weight Watchers
Course Given
A highlight of the luncheon and
card party being sponsored bj the
Junior Auxiliary. Jewish Home for
the Aged here recently was the
gift of a Weight Watcher; course
Held at the Deauville Hotel!
reservations chairmen of the af-
fair were Mrs. Larry Levey and
Miss Rena Stein.
President of the grouii is m,Si
Gladys Israel.
Sbs
Beach Student
Receives Award
Richard Miller, 10, a fifth grad-
er at Solomon Schecter Day
School, who is "Mr. Fixit" around
his home,1 has
received a
merit award
from the Dairy-
Co u n c i 1 of
South Florida.
Son of Mrs.
Glorida Miller.
9273 Caryle
Ave., Surfside,
he has been
with the Re-
creation
ichorJ Miller Depart-
ment parks program since first
grade and is described as a boy
'with a good sense of humor who
does not always win but knows how
to lose."
He plays football in the 75 lb.
Optimist Football League and
Little League baseball.
The Dairy Council has a con-
tinuing program to honor meritori-
ous young people in Dade County.
Cotillion Classes
At Beth David
There are still openings for co-
tillion lessons being held at Beth
David on Sunday evenings, ac-
cording to Mrs Seymour Kaplan.
Sisterhood president, and Mrs.
Leonard Adler. chairman.
Classes are under the direction
of Mrs. Peggy Logan, and meet
[ from 7 to 8:10 p.m.. for sixth
I grade students, and from 8:20 to
j 9:30 p.m., for seventh and eighth
! grade students.
Enrollment may be made at the
synagogue, and is open to the
public.
THE
BISCAYII TERRACE
340 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida
FACING BISCAYNE BAY
'WHERE THE STARS AND HIAVCN JOIN TOUR rfSTIVIWS"
AT THE BEAUTIFUL NEWLY DECORATED ft ENLARG(t)
STARLIGHT HAIXROOM
SEATING UP TO 400
ir WEDDINGS ir CONFIRMATIONS
* BANQUETS RECEPTIONS
ir LUNCHEONS MEETINGS
CATERING
Strictly Kothrr facilities Available Under Supervision of
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CALL Miss SHIRLEY, Catering Manager, FR 9-3792
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if
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Banquet, or
Special Occasion
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
It th
&
i
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faiicrs *
for Information!
HAZEL ALLISON
Catering Director,
JE 1-6061
SSth St. A Collins AWo.


^uHuy. iSBCvii'umi i., 1000
+ Jew I si) Meridian
rage
MAKES TOP MARK IN FINANCIAL WORLD
Dr. Irving E. Muskat, chair-
man of the Inter-American
j+ Center Authority, said that
Congress has approved an
appropriation bill to finance
the U.S. exhibit at the Inter-
American Cultural and Trade
Center (Interama) in Miami.
The S5.87 million approved
by Congress will be used to
finance the federal exhibit
in the U.S. Pavilion, Dr. Mus-
kat declared.
Tribute Paid
To Hemophilia
Group Founder
John Walsh, vice president and
director of the National Homo
philia Foundation, attended a spe-
cial memorial meeting held by the
Miami Beach Auxiliary Chapter to
pay tribute to its late founder
president, Mrs. Delia Delancy.
Walsh praised Mrs. Delancy't
dedication and achievements, and
suggested renaming the Auxiliary
to Delia Delancy Chapter of the
i,' National Hemophilia Foundation
to "perpetuate her name."
Mrs. Ellen Wynne, regional
president, spoke on the care of
hemophiliacs.
Auxiliary' appointed Mrs. Leah
Udell as acting president. She an-
nounced that the Auxiliary would
continue its function of fund-rais-
ing for research and procurement
of blood for needy sufferers.
Joint Thanksgiving Services
Community Thanksgiving serv-
ices were held at Temple Emanu-
El, Ft. Lauderdale, jointly with
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, on
Wednesday at 8 p.m.
TELL
THEM
ABOUT
ELCOME
#|*tt WAGON
If you know of family who hai
kilt arrived In your community, be
sura to tell them about Welcome
Wagon. They will be delighted with
the basket ot gilts end helpful
Information they will receive from
our hostess, a symbol of the com-
munity's traditional hospitality. Or
you may all a
443-2526
"j Please have the Welcome Wagon
Hostess call on me.
H I would like to subscribe H
The Jewish Floridian.
Fill out coupon and mall to
Circulation Dept.,
M.P.O. Bex 2973, Miomi, Flo.
Miamian Gains National Recognition
By RANDY FUHR
It's not hard for Myron S.
Zeientz to hold both a command-
ing role at his concern and in the
community.
Zeientz. a pioneer Miamian, was
recently appointed national vice
president of Bache and Co., a
worldwide securities exchange.
The 53 year old executive
speaks a language familiar to
the market investor, small and
lar.ge. Employees respect his in-
sights when he talks about "sell-
ing short" or "buying on mar-
gin."
At a touch of his fingers, the
world of securities comes into
view. In his office, he uses a tele-
register a small, inclined box
with code buttons on it.
Instant Quotes
It looks something like an add-
ing machine. He presses two or
three of the buttons, a screen lights
up, and he instantly reads the lat-
st quotation on any security.
Zeientz entered the business
world in 1933. when he became a
joard marker for Hcntz & Co., ol
Miami, members of the New York
Stock Exchange. In 1938, he joined
Tache in Miami as a salesman.
Today, as national vice presi
dent of Bache, he has come a loni
way. He smokes a pipe and relaxc;
in his black executive's easy chair
waiting to aid the many investors
small and large, who seek his as
sistance and knowledge.
Born in New York City in
1912, Zeientz. left the bvj city for
Miami, when he was nine years
old. In 1930, he graduated from
Miami Senior High School, and
later attended New York Univer-
sity. He's been a resident of
Surfside since 1950.
jnterfaith Party
Seeks Better Ties
LONDON (JTA) A Chris-
tian-Jewish "consultation" held by
70 Protestants, Catholics and Jews
at Newnham College of Cambridge
University called upon both Cath-
olice and Protestants here to fol-
low through on the decisions to
improve Christian-Jewish relations.
The participants in the week
long parley called attention of the
Catholic Church to its Vatican
Council declaration condemning
hatred and persecution of Jews
and anti-Semitism in general. A
resolution adopted by the partici-
pants requested the Catholic
Church to issue "clear and un-
ambiguous expressions of regret
regarding those events in the his-
tory of Christian-Jewish relation-
ships which are contrary to the
spirit of the document."
As for the Protestants, the
session noted that the World
Council of Churches had shown
a desire at its New Delhi assem-
bly to improve relations with
Jews. The consultation then call-
ed on Protestants for "formula-
tion and clarification of theolog-
ical understanding of Christian-
Jewish relationships."
The conference also recommend-
ed that all Christian education
treat Christian-Jewish relations in
the context of other group rela-
tions; that use of authentic Jewish
sources be encouraged in Christian
education; and that more money
and personnel be allocated to in-
tensify Christian-Jewish dialogues.
The conference also voiced con-
cern over the resurgence of neo-
Nazism and bigotry in some areas,
pointing out that the defeat of
Nazism had not ended racial and
religious discrimination. The par-
ley noted that, while legislation
against discrimination and incite-
ment to hatred could help improve
relations, "no law could substitute
for the initiative of citizens to re-
sist vigorously against all attempts
to undermine the democratic
structure of society."
MYRON ZEIENTZ
pioneer Miamian
His role in the community In
eludes serving on the South Flor-
ida Council Boy Scout Advisory
Board, a position he has held for
10 years; lormer councilman of
Surfside, from 1951 to 1952; for-
mer member of the Surfside Plan-
ning and Zoning Board, and Per-
sonal Appeals Board: and former,
chief, and now assistant chief of
the Sufside Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
'I've served as a member of the
board at Temple Israel of Miami,
and as president of the Bayshore
Service Club," Zeientz said. In ad
dition. he is a member of Sholem
Lodge of B'nai B'rith, and a parti
cipant on the board of directors of
the Miami Security Dealers Asso-
ciation.
loves Trove/
Zeientz loves to travel parti-
cularly on freighte-s. "Two years
ago. on our 25th wedding anniver-
sary," he recalled, "my wife and I
left for the Dutch West Indies on
a freighter. We especially like the
peace and quiet this kind of travel-
ing has to offer.''
The financial executive has
sailed on freighters to New Or-
leans, around the Keys, and on-
ward to New York.
In addition, he collects stamps.!
gardens around the house, and
fishes "when I can find the time."
He will boast his sailfish catch at
the drop of a lure.
He is married to the former I Tar-1
. riet Kahn. and his father-in-law
' was well-known in Miami in the
real estate investment field. He
and his wife have two daughters,
Judy 19. and married Susan 24.
Judy is a sophomore in nursing at
the University of Miami, and Susan
is ;i registered nurse.
The Market Today
Securities today? "The disap-
pearance of human board markers;
is only one of the major changes
in the market today. In this age,
industry tends to locate near large
universities.
"For South Florida, this ran
spell the development of a good
deal of light industry in the fu-
ture we're simply too far away
from raw materials for the reloca-
tion of the larger industrial enter-
prises."
In Zeientz' view, "investors
nowadays must show their op-
timism when they trade on the
market the country should not
be Mild short."
True to his own advice,
Zeientz declares optimistically:
"There's more change brewing
a kind of return to normalcy.
The last month has seen the rise
in sales of blue chips over specu-
lative glamour issues."
Himself. Myron Zeientz is a
symbol of the blue chip the man
rooted in his community.
Get personal. Have all
your gifts initialed VO. this yean
Known by the company it keeps
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Fcge4-C
9-JewlsMcrMton
Friday, December 2,1966
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AJCong. Names
Duo Laureates
At N.Y. Dinner
By Special Report
S. Supreme'Court Justice Abe
ft.'tas and Frank Abrams, of New I
Yc rk, nationally prominent Jewish |
t: nmunal leaders, have been
Denied the 1966 laureates of the
Stephen S. Wise Award of the
A.rierican Jewish Congress.
The awards were presented at a
ner recently in the l'laza Hotel
it New York.
Justice Fortas was honored
anting human freedom."
for
Abrams, who is the national
treasurer of the American Jew-
ish Congress, was cited "for
s'rengthening Jewish life."
^abbi Arthur J. I.elyveld. of
Cleveland, O., president of the
A.r.erican Jewish Congress, pre-
sented the award to Justice For
t. -
Samuel J. Levy, of White Plains,
N V., an industrialist and civic
1-sder. presented the award to
A rams.
The annual awards, established
ir 1949. are named for the late
Ribbi Wise, founder and long-time
resident of the American Jewish
C< ngress.
Shad Polier, of New York,
chairman of the National Gov-
t-ning Council of the Congress,
>s ho was the dinner chairman,
r.oted that the annual awards
tr presented to persons, organ-
izations and institutions "whose
-oral courage and love of lib-
erty exemplify the tradition of
Rabbi Wise and the teachings
of the Jewish heritage."
Last year"s laureates were Am-
I -sador Arthur J. Goldberg. Sam-
lie! J Bronfman, of Montreal, and
v ii roe Goldwater. of New York.
Previous winners have included
: mer President Harry S. Tru-
r an. former Israel Prime Minis-
ter David Ben-Gurion, Sen. Robert
F. Kennedy, the late Adlai E.
S-evenson, and others.
Students who were consecrated in special services conducted
by Rabbi Leon Kronish at Temple Beth Sho'.om recentlv are
front row (left to right) Michael Somerstein, Jeffrey Miller,
Katherine Brodie, Harry Schaefer, Suzanne Harris, Steven Hal-
pert, Babette Bodin, Bruce Wilson, Mark Brooks, Michael Sand-
ier, Robert Arkin and Joanne Zaiac. Second row (left to righO
are David Silvers, Frederick Brownstein, Maria Sue Popkin.
Doralie Chesky, Sheri Franzen, Lori Bell, Susan Klein, Richard
2-Term Courses
Offered at Sinai
Temple Sinai adult education
program, which began here re-
cently, will have two terms of
10 weeks each this year. Second
session is scheduled to begin Jan.
9.
Courses offered include, from 8
to 9 p.m., basic Hebrew and con-
tinuing Hebrew, from 9 to 10 p.m.,
modern approach to the Bible, and
the vocabulary of Jewish life. A
coffee follows at 10 p.m.
The courses are offered free to
Temple Sinai members with a
nominal charge for non-members.

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Stander, Howard Waxman. Joel Yasman. Third row (left to
right) are Steven Teplis, Andrew Lazlo, Shepard Nevel, Daniel
Ccminsky, Karen Ser, Sandra Levin, Bradley Arkin and Scot!
Feder. Fourth row (left to right) are Debra Brooks. Steve Bron-
stein, Earry Adler, George Luck, Jack Kline, Cindy Adler,
Michael Cominsky, Abby Sussman. Rear are Anita Koppele,
teacher; Felix Bertisch, Director of Education at Beth Sholom;
Morcia Levin and Emily Grunwald, teachers.
Scholarship Fund Launched Here
A Scholarship Loan Fund has
been initiated by the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation as a result
Of the benefaction of Maurice
Gusman.
An active participant in Jewish
romnfunal lift". Gusman has long
been Involved in philanthropic
endeavors. Hi' is a resident of Mi-
ami Beach and a well-known busi-
nessman in the Greater Miami
area
"Federation's Scholarship Loan
Fund has already awarded one
scholarship to an I :duate
student presently attending the
University of Miami." said Arthur
S. Rosichan. executive director of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
"The Jewish
grateful to Gusman roi his <
bution to such a wot' h
Rcuchan declared it is our tape
that o hrv h-II 'ht'-twl
generous footsteps so thai Fi'JeraV
tion's Scholarship Fund can help
more needy students In oto cam-
munity."
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JOSEPH MtDOff
Medoff Honored
At Beth Tfilah j
Sabbath Service
Joseph Medoff Shabbos"
Saturday honored Joseph Me
during services at Beth Tfilah Cow,
gregation.
Rev. Jacob D. Kal nt o:
Beth Tfilah, g eeted Medofi i
he was escorted to the Oren Ko-
desh bj Louis Merwitzer, trej
er, and I Gi ienb
Rabl i Joseph F. Rackov -
itual leader ol Beth Tfilah
the Messii ledqfl
"as Incere, d<
\ plaque prominently place I I
Beth Tfilah marks Medoff's serv-
ice during the past five years
Kiddush following the Sabbath
prayers honored Medoff.
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Officers of Parkview Island who'
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Friday. December 2, 1966
"knistinnriaficin
Page 5C
Soviet Policy Against Religious Training
May Doom Judaism in Russia in 15 Years
By Special Report
NW^.YORK If _JJ3j Soviet
Union continues its present policy
of discouraging the practice and
teaching of Ju.ism, within 15
years nearly three-million Russian
Jews "will no longer exist as
Jews." a prominent American rab-
bi warned this week.
In a signed article appearing in
the current issue of Look Mag-
azine, New York Rabbi Arthur
Schneier said "the Soviet Govern-
ment is making it impossible for
Jewishnesa to survive."
Rabbi Schneier recently vis-
ited Russia as the head of the
interfaith Appeal of Conscience
r Foundation of New York. Along
with Rabbi Schneier, on the trip
were leading Protestant and Ro-
man Catholic clergymen, includ-
ing Dr. Harold A. Bosley, min-
ister of New York's Christ
Church Methodist, and Fr.
Thurston N. Davis, editor in
chief of the Jesuit magazine,
"America."
Jewi-hness in Russia is doomed,
said the Rabbi, because "fear and
discrimination have virtually de-
stroyed Jewish religious training
in the Soviet Union."
It was reported that the num-
ber of synagogues in Russia has
declined sharply since 1956, when
the Soviets said there were 450
synagogues. The latest informa-
tion indicates that now only 62
synagogues exist in Russia, the
rabbi said.
Although the Soviet Govern-
ment denies that Jews are ill-
treated in Russia, Rabbi Schneier
found that discrimination against
Jews is very much a part of Soviet
HIM
"Jews hesitate to call attention >
to their Jewishness.'" he said. "At
the very least, a Jew might be'
regarded as an eccentric" for at-
tending a synagogue and thus not
worthy of oromotion on h>s \<\h."
In contrast to the Soviet sup-
pression of Judaism, the rabbi
noted that Christian churches in
Russia appear to be faring well
despite official policies of athe-
ism.
At present there are some
20,000 Russian Orthodox church-
es in the Soviet Union and some
5,000 Protestant churches, re-
ported R?bbi Schneier in his
Look article.
In talks with Archbishop Niko-
dim, Metrooo'itan of the Russian
Orthodox Church, Rabbi Schneier
learned that an estimated ?0 to
50 million of the 232 million Rus-
s'ans are believers who attend
church.
Rabbi Schneier was later told
by a Soviet official that his gov-
ernment was "not going to lift a
finger to promote religion. The
religious groups themselves must
take the initiative."
Concluded the Rabbi: "Only
world opinion can save the Rus-
sian Jews."
Jacob C. Cohen Sisterhood arranaements com-
mittee and hostesses for their annual Chan-
uka luncheon at the Deauville Hotel on Sun-
day noon, Dec. 11, are first row (left to right)
Mesdcmes Julius Schwartz, Joseph Zalis, Sol
Rcshin, Abe Dlatt, president, Anna Platt and
Pauline Hyman, luncheon chairman. Second
row are Mesdames Alfred Lieber, Bella Yelli.-.
Joseph Rosenblatt, Nathan Sommer, Abe K:-
el, Florence Albert, Leon Gottlieb, Tibor n
Stern, and Althea Gerstein.
Sculptor's Death Implicates Rabbi
JERUSALEM (JTA) An I chain across the road to Mount
official of the Ministry for Relig- j Zion on a Saturday night. The ac-
ious Affairs pleaded not guilty this
week to charges of negligence in
the death of David Palonibo, the
internationally-known Israeli sculp-
tor who was killed last August
when his scooter crashed into a
cident revived the controversy in
Israel over the role of rabbinic
law in Israel.
The magistrate ordered the trial
to start in January for Rabbi Am-
ram Blau, who is in charge of
Mount Zion maintenance. On> "
his assignments is to block the
road on the Sabbath.
The indictment charged
Rabbi Blau failed to take ne
sary measures to warn drivers
after the chain was put in pi .-;
on that Sabbath. The defend: at
is not related to the leader of the
Ncturci Karta zealots organizat :.
who has the same name.
Parents Oppose
School Classes
In Religious Bldg.
SPRING VALLEY. NY. (JTA)
Twenty-five Jewish. Protestant
and Catholic parents served a
complaint here against a local
school board which has assigned
pupils to attend public school
classes, beginning in September, to
be held in a Catholic church and a
Reform temple.
The complaint by the parents
was backed by affidavits by two
parents one an Orthodox rab-
bi, the other a Catholic house-
wife who protested against
assigning their children to
schools conducted in the house
of worship of a faith other than
theif own. The two are Rabbi
Solomon Zeides, who lives here
and is a librarian at Yeshiva
University in New York; and
Mrs. Madeline Ret, a member of
St. Margaret's Roman Catholic
Church in nearby Pearl River.
(1 The school board served with the
petition had decided two months
ago to hold some public classes
next September at St. Josephs
Roman Catholic Church and at
Temple Beth El, a' Reform house
of worship. The American Jewish
Congress is aiding the complaining
parents with counsel. The dissent-
ing parents said they would file
a petition in the State Supreme
Court, at White Plains, N.Y., seek-
ing an order to restrain the school
board from proceeding with its
plans to use religious edifices for
school purposes.
I
Toys for Tots
At Holiday Party
At the Jewish War Veterans
Auxiliary of Miami Beach Thanks-
giving party on Saturday, at the
Parkway Children's Center, NW
17th St. and 30th Ave., 50 children
received clothing and toys. Re-
freshments were served.
Mrs. Rose Goldberg, child wel-
fare chairman, Mrs. Ben Roch-
warg, Mrs. Sydel Brooks, Mrs.
Dorothy Cohen, Louis Brigioti
and Irving Spiro hosted the party.

> LO'."'U CO
rM the News That's Fit to Print"
Adolph Ochs' life story reads like one of
Horatio Alger's rags-to-riches tale9. For
his is the story of a printer's helper who
became owner of the most successful and
influential newspaper in the world .
The New York Times.
You might say Adolph Ochs started his
newspaper career in 1872, at the tender
age of 14. That year he took a 25c-per-
day job sweeping floors and running er-
rands for his hometown newspaper, the
Knoxville Chronicle.
Five years later, young Ochs purchased
the almost bankrupt Chattanooga Times
with a borrowed $800. Within a relatively
few years, the young publisher made
that moribund newspaper one of the
most influential in the South.
In 1896, Ochs was invited to reorga-
nize The New York Times which was
steadily moving towards bankruptcy.
Just three short years later, Ochs became
owner of The Times and had it on the
road to becoming a great newspaper.
Ochs' policy for The Times was simple.
In the days of "yellow journalism'' and
sensationalism, he set out to publish a
newspaper that "reflects the best in-
formed thought of the country, honest
in every line, more than courteous and
fair to those who may sincerely differ
from its views."
Married to the daughter of Rabbi
Isaac Wise, Ochs was one of the promi-
nent leaders of Reform Judaism. He also
headed the fund-raising campaign for
the Hebrew Union College. The Adolph
S. Ochs Chair in Jewish History at the
college is a fitting and lasting memorial
to this eminent publisher.
P. LORILLARD COMPANY
ESTABLISHED 1760
First with the Finest Cigarettes
through Lorillard research
i-
j


Page 6-C
+Je*ist Her id/an
Friday, December 2,]oej^
AJComm. Prexy
Wins ZBT Award
By Special Report
NEW YORK The president
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee accepted an honorary member-
ship in a Greek-letter fraternity
recently, "because its doors are
opened to people of all back-
grounds."
Furthermore, he said. "I earn-
estly hope that this pattern will
be followed by other Jewish social
organizations as Jews are ac-
cepted by their non-Jewish coun-
terparts."
Presentation of the award was
made by James R. Katzman, past
vice president and long-time mem-
ber of the Greater Miami Chapter.
Katzman is past national president
of Zeta Beta Tau. and a member
of its Supreme Council.
Morris B. Abram, president of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee, has been presented Zeta
Beta Tau's Gottheil Medal for
the year 1965. Special ceremon-
ies were held Oct. 20 at New
York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel.
At the same time, Mr. Abram
was initiated as a member of
the fraternity.
"As you know." Abram said.
"the American Jewish Committee
has. since its founding GO years
ago. been committed to eliminat-
ing discrimination in all areas oi
life in employment, in housing,!
in education, and in the social
club.
The Gottheil Medal is presented
periodically to that individual
whose activities best promote bet-1
ter human understanding in re-
lationships among all people.
Previous winners include Adlai
E. Stevenson, John Fitzgerald Ken-
nedy, and Pope John XXIII.
SHOPPING AROUND
WITH
(Izkk^&wrf
Sliitreet
Quits As
Police Chief
TEL AVIV (JTA) Behor
Shitreet, a member of every Is-
raeli Cabinet since statehood, re-
signed this week as Minister of
Police for reasons of health but
said he would continue to be ac-
tive in Parliament and in Mapai
Party institutions.
The 72-year-old former police
officer and magistrate indicated
he thought Yosef Mahmias, the Is-
raeli Ambassador to Brazil, a for-
mer police chief, would be the
best man to replace him.
Other suggested nominees men-
tioned were Beersheba Mayor Eli-
ahu Nawi, Deputy Speaker Israel
Yohayahu and former Knesset
member Shlomo Hillel who is pres-
ently Israel's deputy representa-
tive at the United .Nations in New
York.
Premier Eshkol accepted the
resignation with "great regret"
Some sources in the Government
were reported to feel there was
no need for a special police Mm-
Istry. Former Premier David Bcn-
Gurion's dissident Israel Workers
Party (Rafi) has already submitted
a formal proposal to Parliament
to close the Ministry and merge
its functions with the Interior or
some other Ministry.
Seagram's V.O.
From time to time in almost
every product category, a single
brand will shoot into prominence
only to fade away equally as fast.
For a short time it is considered
i "in." but suddenly it becomes
"out."
On the other hand, you have
products,which through the years
have steadily won a large and:
loyal following based on continued
excellence. Such a product is Sea-
gram's Imported V.O.. a Canadian
whisky that reigns once again as
the season's most classic import.
More people order and serve V.O.
than any other imported whisky,
including Scotch.
Seagrain's V.O. has a special
kind of lightness that actually
brings out the brilliance of the
whisky.
The approaching Chanuka holi-
days will provide many opportun-
ities for giving and serving Sea-
gram's V.O. Honor your guests
with V.O., the choice of "may-
vinim."
Switzerland Swiss
Often imitated but never dupli-
cated is Switzerland Swiss Cheese.
There are many Swiss cheeses on j
the market, but if you know qual-
ity, then you surely know that
nothing equals the true flavor and \
taste of Swiss cheese from Switzer-
land. A product of centuries of
craftsmanship and the most strict i
quality controls, Switzerland Swiss |
is 100 percent natural. It contains
no chemicals or food colors.
If you have special company
coming for Chanuka, your even- i
ing will get off to fine start if you j
serve the following Swiss Dip.
SWISS DIP
Add Switzerland Swiss cheese,
finely grated, to sour cream. Add
finely chopped olives, onions and
pimento. Salt and pepper to taste
and dust with paprika. Serve with
crackers and melba toast.
Remember that when it comes
to Swiss cheese, anybody can
make the holes, but only the Swiss
make the flavor.
Planters Oil
One product you can reach for
with confidence is Planters Peanut
Oil, and with Chanuka at hand,
smart Jewish housewives will be
reaching for it again and again. |
Housewives reach for Planters j
Peanut Oil when they are making,
salads because Planters is light I
and tasy, and it mixes well with all |
other ingredients. Good cooks j
reach for Planters when baking,
whether they have a new cookie i
recipe or Mama's favorite old |
recipe for homemade bread, and j
naturally smart gals reach for |
Planters Peanut Oil for all their
frying. Frying with Planters gives
you the crispest fried foods you
ever tasted.
Planters Oil is the premium
quality polyunsaturate, and lab-
oratory tests have shown Planters
is so light that it floats on other
oils.
Look for Planters, the 100 per-
cent vegetable oil, in the new
handy-grip bottle. Planters Oil is
certified Kosher and Parve for all
your cooking needs.
0 *
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
In planning the meals for her
family, the Jewish housewife often;
looks for new and different treats
for her daily menu. Frequently.
there a need for something extra
special that can be prepared quick-
ly and easily. With Chanuka soon
upon us, many housewives will be
looking to Chef Boy-Ar-Dee to fill
that "something special" meal-
time order for family or friends.
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee offers a com-
plete line of food products that
add excitement to your family
eating schedule and satisfy even |
the most discriminating appetites.
If \ou like cheese kreplach and
who doesn't you'll love Chef
Boy-Ar-Dee Cheese Ravioli in
Sauce.
These tender little macaroni
pies are filled with tangy Italian
cheese, simmered with savory to-:
mato sauce and cheese and sea- \
soned in the real Italian way. ;
Other fine Chef Boy-Ar-Dee prod-1
ucts include the Complete Cheese [
Pizza with the new quick crust,
the all-purpose Marinara Sauce, i
the Complete Spaghetti Dinner,
and the -wonderfully rich Chef
Boy-Ar-Dee Spaghetti Sauce with
mushrooms.
The next time you go shopping
be sure to buy all of the fine Chet
Boy-Ar-Dee products. Keep plen-
ty on hand. It will add zest to your
eating schedule.
Tetley Tea
One of the most satisfying things i
about a traditional Jewish holiday
like Chanuka is the knowledge
that you are sharing this holiday
not only with all Jewish people
around the world, but with many;
generations that have gone before. |
When you enjoy a cup of hearty
Tetley Tea, you are sharing a
pleasure that also has been en-
joyed by generations of Jewish;
families. That is one of the many j
reasons why Jewish housewives
have made Tetley the leading tea
in Jewish homes.
Tetley Tea has an aroma and |
flavor that could only come from i
its exclusive blends of tiny tea,
leaves, choice tea leaves that are
picked at the height of perfection.'
This Chanuka. add to the warm
glow of the menorah lights by
serving your family and friends
Tetley Tea.
*
Mar-Parve Margarine
Mar-Parve margarine is the per-
fect margarine for Jewish fam
ilies because Mar-Parv is made
with the Jewish housewife in
mind. ('
Delicious Mar-Parv is kosher,
pareve and made from pure high-,
1\ iinsaturated corn oil and other1
vegetable oils with Vitamins A
and D added for good health and
good eating. Mar-Parv contains no
milk or animal fat, and is recom-
mended in diets where milk is
restricted. ;
Use Mar-Parv for Chanuka din-
ners and every day as a delightful
table spread to give your family
the double benefit of good eating
and good health.
Mott's Products
Chanuka is almost here, and
holiday time means that the kids
will be home instead of in school,
and even dad will be taking time
off to be with the family during
the holiday season.
With the family home more
than usual, mothers are going to
have to do a little extra planning
to get variety into all those meals
they'll be serving.
For ease of both preparation
and planning, include the wonder
ful .selection of Mott's products on
your shopping list. At the head
of the list put down Mott's Apple
Sauce, long a favorite in homes
from coast-to-coast, which is avail
able in several convenient sizes.
Then for variety, or for festive
company dinners, try Mott's Ap-
ple-Raspberry Sauce or Apple
Cranberry Sauce.
Make sure that your family
starts off each morning of the hol-
iday season with a delicious
healthy glass of Mott's Apple
Juice or Mott's A.M. which is five
fruit juices blended into one
breakfast drink that will have the
kids clamoring for more.
All of these Mott's products
carry the Kosher "K." your guar-
antee that only the finest ingredi-
ents go in before the Mott's label
goes on.
Yuban Coffee
Chanuka is a happy holiday and
a good time to offer your family
and guests an extra measure
pleasure by ,. 01
Toffee II- 'ul,an
i-oucc, iru. p.i;..iiaai i ,ff0i> t
General Foods. '"
Yuban costs r little more than
regular coffee, b-u di-:fer ?"
tatasta la tcsr, .;,., ,h *
difference in cost. The taste telk
you that h-c is a coffee ma2
from the pic; n' ',.. ,,-.,, '
aged oaie uV.y, ,<> .,,,. ,r| "J
blended artfully to give you a n
vor that cant be matched.
Your company will ask for ,cc
ond and third cups when vou
serve Yuban coffee, so be sure |0
make enough for all 11;, ,.('t,,(.
lovers in tha cro.vd.
Yuban is available in regular
and instant.
Sossin Named
'Man of Year'
By Fla. Seniors *
Michal Sossin. chairman of the
City of Miami Beach senior citi-
zens advisory board, was hon-
ored as Miami Beach "Man of the
Year" on Wednesday night, 7:30
p.m.. at Miami Beach Federal
Savings and Loan Association
Auditorium. 755 Washing* in Ave.
Sponsoring orgazination was the
Florida Senior Citizens League ol
Voters, affiliated with the Nation-
al Council of Senior Citizens. An-
nouncement of Sossin's selection
for the annual award was made hy
Henry I. Oilman, preside: of the
organization.
Sossin, a charter member of
the Florida State Commission on
Aging, is executive director of
the Blackstone Retirement Res-
idence and of the Shalom Con-
valescent Home, under construc-
tion adjacent to the Blackstone.
New members of the Florida
Senior Citizens League i I Voters
also were feted at the recep-^-
tion, which was open to the public.^!
Oilman said. Irving Wodin and
Milton Schwartz are vice pres-
idents of the group.
Sossin is past president of the
South Florida Council of B'nal
B'rith Lodges, Miami Bea ii B'nai
B'rith Lodge. Men's Club if Tem-
ple Emanu-El. and other philan-
thropic and service organizations.
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rnaar. u*r*mhw ri ion
Friday, December 2, 1966
+J Page 7-C
"< c
NBC Admits Von Shirach Paid for Interview
NEW YORK (JTA) A Na- Von Shirach. who was released | president, said that the network and to set It, it became clear, we former Nazi youth loader for a
tonal Broadcasting Company of- recently from Spandau Prison, in i "probably" felt that "if we did- would have lo pay for It." Von I similar appearance, canceled the
ical confirmed this week reports West Berlin, after serving a 20- n't buy it, somebody else Shirach reportedly was paid plan, explaining von Shirach
that th. network paid Ba.dor von Si^fflSrSBS W,d- S4000 for h,S X,!(' wanted "too much money." The
Shirach, former Hitler youth ;J "' Iluntley-Bunklej ^ ^^
lender, for an exclusive appear- news Program. "The feeling at NBC was (hat Hie British Broadcasting Com- 1)mt(,s|s againsl the projected
ancc on one of its news programs. Don Meany, an NBC vice it' was a legitimate news story; pany, which had sehWnled the appearance.
HAPPY HANUKA TREATS _
FOR YOUR FAMILY AND GUESTS
>**
M I

MOTTS and SUNSWEET
PURE FRUIT PRODUCTS
HIGHEST QUALITY, FINEST FLAVOR, BEST VALUES!
SUNSWEET
APRICOT
APPLE
PRUNE
. JUICE f

ALL CERTIFIED KOSHER
BY RABBI J. H. RALBAG OF NEW YORK

-

W


1 K W /MOTT'K 7 (J=rult ) Vfti- .. -St* K


MOTT
AM]
dru/nJc /
i
i
i


Pcge 8-C
+Je*lsti ncrk/ian
Friday, December 2,
1966
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
They Value Your Assistance to Them
EDITOR, The Jewish Florldian:
On my recent trip to Israel, I
St i) men. women, and children
\ j. for the first time in their
lives, were entering a country
\ re they would be completely
frte. I want to tell you what your
UJA dollars and your support of
Israel Bonds and Histadrut are do-
ing to welcome these newcomers.
On the same ship on which I ar-
rived in Haifa Harbor came many
newcomers from Asia. Africa,
Europe and other lands. The only
question that I heard on the ship
v.i- "What will become of us?"
Who will meet us?" "Will we
fan e houses?" "What will become
oi our children?" "Who will take
ce-e of our fathers and mothers?"
Yes, the buyers of Israel
Ecnds, the givers to Combined
Jtwish Appeal and Histadrut
ihould have seen their faces
when the UJA people met them
with open arms as if they were
their lost brothers and sisters.
You could not have kept back
your tears if you, too, saw moth-
ers and fathers hugging their
children and crying for joy be-
et use they got such a reception
trom people they had never seen
er known.
Automobiles were ready to take
them, not to camps, but to their
pt.manent homes. And these
be nes. the ones that your gifts
rrrde possible to build, are not
ih;cks but new houses with new
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
[ oncerning the scholarly article I
cr Oct. 21 by Dr. Samuel Silver,
"H pocritieal Use of Pharisees":
Dr. Silver states, "Indeed most !
' he utterances of gentleness in
the New Testament stem from
P arisaic originals. Even the com-
i nt about turning the other
k is Pharisaic."
i would greatly appreciate it if I
uood Doctor could give us the |
. ce where such an extreme I
( istian adage as "turning the
er cheek" is found in any!
:isaic o:- Rabbinic literature.
1 have not seen anything sim-
in our Torah, the Prophets.
I serbs. the Midrashim, the Tal-
im. the Mechilta. or the Eth-
of the Fathers.
Dr. Silver have in mind
other source than these?
DAVID F. MILLER
Coral Gables
furniture, everything that a family j
needs.
Come with me to the homes of.
those who arrived in Israel two or j
more years ago. There you will see!
happy homes, children who speak
the language of the country as
though they had been born there,
and parents who are working at
trades that they are best suited for. i
They build factories w here they ;
can pursue their talents. The new j
farms are blooming, made possible
from your dollars and cents that
you gave to get the land for them.
You are carried away with such
a feeling of blessings that help was
made possible for these newcom-
ers. You sec happiness and success
in the work that they do. You see
the glow of hope for a wonderful
future in their eyes. You see the
same man who just yesterday left
the "luftmenchen" and today he
is producing and getting out of
Mother Earth the best that she can
give. You see green fields of all
kinds, vegetable fields, corn fields,
barley and other crops.
Orchards of all conceivable fruits
that have never grown for the past
2.000 years are growing there now.
Some people raise cattle, some of
them have chicken farms, some of
them are building houses and fac-
tories. And they are making all
kinds of material that you can
imagine in the factories and in the
shops. All of this produced by the
people who have been helped
through the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal by purchasing Bonds, by giv-
ing to the Jewish National Fund
and giving to Histadruth.
The happiest newcomers to Is-
rael are the aged parents, who
are living in a special old age
community center made possible
by the money of the United
Jewish Appeal. With other men
and women of their own age
they live in this cooperative cen-
ter as they would in any com-
munity. The women cook and
bake, the men plant gardens and
crops. They work in orchards
and fields or at their own trades
in shops provided by UJA.
This rejuvenates them and makes
them feel like useful members of
their community and of their new
land in the State of Israel. By do-
ing this they are making full use
of their talents and energies in
their later years.
As you see, every dollar you
give to UJA through the Combined
\ Jew ish Appeal, to Histadrut, to
Jewish National Fund, to Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, and your
I purchase of Israel safe bonds made
; this miracle a reality a reality
I so wonderful that the world is
' amazed how we "luftmenchen" ac-
i complished this building of the
i State of Israel.
MAYSHIE FRIEDBERG
Miami Beach
Wounded Vets
See Film Here
Some 300 wounded veterans
were invited to view the premiere
showing of "Gambit" at the Carih
Theatre as guests of the Miami
Beach Elks Lodge.
The premiere showing Wa5
on Sunday night. Max Lenchnet i.
chairman of the veterans commit-
tee, and he arranged for busses
to transport the vets to the theatre
Proceeds will go toward th*
Harry Anna Crippled Children's
Hospital at Umatilla, Fla
% (2
Kosher Home
Names Directors
Leonard Zilbert. chairman of
the board of directors of the Jew-
ish Convalescent Home of South
Florida, has announced the ap
pointment of five additional board
members. The new appointees
bring the community-supported
convalescent home's executive*)" 4
group to a total of 27 workers,
Newly-appointed members in-
elude Morris Malmud, Joseph Co-
hen, Michael Sudakow. Isidore
Schwartz, and Mrs. Selma Oritt.
Pietrack Heads
Pythian Camp
ircheslra leader Irving Pietrack
been elected state chairman j
'.. the Pythian Youth Camp, Inc.,;
i organization sponsored by thl
Chancellors Association.
iet rack is a past chancellor in
- Order of the Knights of Pyth
ic- He is also affiliated with- Ma-
- s, Elks. Footlighters, B'nai
h rith, and the American Jewish
'. :grcss. He is president of the:
K n s Club of the Jewish Coir I
ent Home and vice president
'.. the local Zionist Organization
\merica.
Pythian Youth Camp is a non-
arian, non-profit organization
Oted to the betterment of
; ng people, which sends under-
j. vileged youngsters to camp
( ing the summer.
A dinner dance featuring stars of
I ies, radio and television will
b* held Mar. 26 at the Deauville
Hrv'.el for the Pythian Youth Camp.
Square Dance for Men's Club
Men's Club of Beth Torah will
.' d its annual square dance on
S:.'urday evening in the social hall
oi the temple.
Marvin Hertz, caller, will lead
the dance.
mm
mmsm\
FROM THE MAKERS OF CHASE & SANBORN-THE GUT YOMTOV COFFEE
Light up your Chanukah entertaining with the
heftier taste of Chase & Sanborn, the gut yomtov
coffee. This heftier blend of the world's finest
coffees puts extra aroma, extra
flavor, extra festivity into every
cup. So, at Chanukah time
and all year round, enjoy
Chase & Sanborn's gut
yomtov coffee. It's heftier.
CERTIFIED KOSHER BY
RABBI DR. J. H. RALBAG
*J
f)


Friday, December 2, 1966
fr
*Jmisll fkridUan
Page 9-C
/?/# Police in Bigoted Acts
Mrs. Frances Katzman (left), Woman of the Year of the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew University, looks on as Mrs. Wal-
ter Kirschner. hostess at the Patrons of the Woman of the
Year luncheon, discusses the unusual bust of Franklin Delano
Roosevelt with Dr. Warren J. Winstead, president of Nova
University of Ft. Lauderdale, special guest at the function
where Mrs. Katzman's citation was publicly announced.
Thant Urges Israel,
Arabs to Talk Peace
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Secretary General U Thant ap-
pealed here to the Arab states
and I-rael to enter into direct
peace talks.
He made that appeal in a re-
port to the representatives of the
21st annual General Assembly,
which contained an evaluation of
the world situation, including the
Middle East where he said "dan-
gerous tensions"' continued to
exist.
He asked all member nations
to help achieve a settlement of
inferrationnl conflicts but said
that only the parties directly in-
volved could change conflicts in-
to peace. Beyond such issues as
Yemen and Aden, he said there
was "the long-standing conflict
between Israel and the Arab
states and the continuing need
for passions to be restrained
and the terms of the armistice
agreements to be observed by all
concerned."
The 1949 armistice casts, signed
between Israel and Egypt, Le-
banon. Jordan and Syria, specified
that the pacts were to be a first
step toawrd peace treaties.
He ferred to the idea of peace
talks again In citing the United
Natioi Emergency Force and the
UN Truce Supervision Organiza-
tion. He called the "crux" of the
problem "the continuing absence
of any resolve" of the "parties di-
rectly involved" to seek "a reason-
able way out of it." In fact, he as-
serted, "the Middle East countries
tend to take the attitude that the
very United Nations presence frees
them from any pressing obliga-
tion to exert a really serious effort
towards a settlement." But, he
said, the only possible course was
for the UN to maintain its peace-
keeping forces in the area and to
intensify peace-making efforts.
Principal items on the 1966
Assembly agenda affecting Israel
are scheduled reports on the
Arab refugees situation and
UNEF. Items of general concern
to Jews are reports on various
aspects of human rights, includ-
ing further efforts to approve a
UN convention banning all
forms of religious intolerance.
Abba Eban. Israel's Foreign
Minister, arrived to head an Israeli
delegation of 25 diplomats and
principal aides. Mr. Eban was
Israeli delegation chairman for
the early period of the Assembly.
Ambassador Michael S. Comay, Is-
rael's permanent representative,
is serving as chairman after Ebau's
return to Israel.
School children of the Solomon Schechter Day School of
Temple Emanu-El, observed Veterans Day with a new flag
presented to them by Mrs. Irving Cowan. Ceremonies were
held on the patio of the school with Dr. Irving Lehrman, spir-
itual leader of Temple Emanu-El, making the principal ad-
dress. Rabbi Alexander S. Hollander, director of the school,
and several children were on the program. Left to right are
Mrs. Cowan, presenting the flag to her daughter, Cindy, while
her sister. Debra, looks on. In the background are Rabbi
Hollander and Dr. Lehrman.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish Conference on
Sovicty Jewry reported here re-
cently it had learned that police in
Riga, in Soviet Latvia, committed
a number of anti-Semitic acts and
arrested several Jews after a con-
cert given last July in Riga by
Geulah Gil, an Israeli folk singer.
Miss Gil toured the Soviet Union
last July under a cultural ex-
change program with Israel
According to the report, mem-
bers of the audience at the con-
cert, most of them Jews, crowded
the stage entrance at the end of j
Miss Gil's concert to get her auto-
graph. Policemen and other se-!
eurity officers moved in to prevent'
the autograph seekers from reach- J
ing Miss Gil. The report was ob
tained from witnesses whose
identities have been withheld for
personal reasons, the Conference
said.
An incident then developed
between Naomi Garber, a 15
year-old Jewish girl, and a police
major named Bezkhlebnikov.
The report said that the girl re-
sponded in a restrained way to
a remark by the police major
she considered to be anti-Se-
mitic The police major contend-
ed Miss Garber had slapped his
face. She was arrested.
Police also reportedly arrested
Maxim Kushlim. 23, a Jew charged
with having assaulted a police
lieutenant named Zayev and a
plainclothes detective named
Sprugis. Later that night, the wit
nesses reported, police arrested
Mrs. G. Roth, a 45-year-old Jewish
woman. She was charged with hav-
ing incited a riot against police
and with having led a delegation
tc the police station to seek Miss
Garbcr's release.
On July 14, according to 'he re-
port, police arrested Mordechai
Blum. 28, a Jewish engineer, who
was charged with trying to free
Miss Garber by force. Police said
that Blum had hit a police officei
on the head and knocked his cap
to the ground.
The report said that police had
questioned witnesses at the the-
ater to obtain evidence in support
of their charges against the Jews
they arrested.
But, the report added, the
police refused to accept testi-
mony volunteered by Jewish wit-
nesses. Witnesses against Mrs.
Roth were policemen and a de-
tective named Popov, who said
Mrs. Roth called the police anti-
Semitic and Gestapo members
Miss Garber was released later
because, as a minor, she v j, not
considered responsible before the
Jaw. Three other Jews in the case
were said to have been tried Aug.
31, but the outcome of the trial
was not known.
Women's League
Fetes Dr. Wolf son
Miami Beach Chapter, Women's
League for Israel, honored Dr.
Abraham Wolfson on the occasion
of his 85th birthday, with a lunch-
eon at Washington Federal. 1234
Washington Ave. last week at
noon.
Proceeds are earmarked for
blind and handicapped girls in
Israel.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Dellerson
offered a program of songs, and
Mrs. Leah Udell read several of
her original poems.
Icftdoit I Rmk
IHl SIO WltH IHI FLORIDA FLAI*
sfut titl Florida sunshine this
iin si u li lush with iiiuvi oranavs
10.19J5 full bushel, delivered
G.5).> half bushel, delivered
A gift packed with all the sunny flavor of
Florida! Sweet, seedless premium navel oranges
. tree ripened and so full of juicy goodness!
A welcome way to spread Florida sunshine
to friends and relatives in the North.
JM CITRUS, first floor, miami
available at dadeland and fort lauderdale
Sorry, no C.O.D.'s
1501 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD PARK FREE!
v .


Page 10-C
ftjm#jft FhrMKOHn
Friday, December 2, 196G
Bonn Official Urges
Leave for Self-Study
BONN^(JTA) Dr. Friedrichwitness in a war crimes trial.
Karl VialonTSeeretary of State in Later he was accused by East Ci. r-
the West (ii'iman Ministry r"Ec-' mans-wf having heeh involved di-
nomic Cooperation, suggested in ajrectly in the Nazi "final solution
television interview here recently, i of the Jewish problem." Docu-
that he be temporarily suspended.: ments from Latvian archives are
pending the outcome of an Invest!-1 among the materials being studied
,'ation as to whether he was in- by the Bonn state prosecutor.
The network program displayed
documents bearing Dr. Vision's
signature presumably proving that
volved in the wartime German
mass murders of Jews.
Dr. Vialon offered the sugges-
tion after the West German tele- j he had given orders that Jewish
vision network broadcast a sharp i gravestones be sold for the beno
Mayor Root* a, idling office, Mr, M*M *. "* 5&"JWTa& Z "^^ fii *&*
ior the Morton Tower North Women's Club communications; Mrs. Louis Cane, treasurer. '*
at its annual installation dinner at the Fon- Mrs. Sophie Sternfield, financial secretary; |
ainebleau. Taking office at the banquet were and recording secretaries, Mrs. Edith Weiss-
Mrs. Bennett Wexler, president; Mrs. Milton man and Mrs. Ceil Markowitz. Bert Sheldon
Gross, editor of the club paper, the "Chatter- was master of ceremonies, with Lenny Daw-
cox," Mrs. Augusta Goldstein, vice president; son providing the music._____________________
Christian-Jewish Ties Aired
I KVEl.AND (JTA) An Christians and Jews during the The warning was contained in a
tmerican Jewish leader expressed past year may be jeopardized if report by Philip E. Hoffman.
fears here recently that the "dm- both groups do not accelerate ef-; chairman of board 0 governors
maUc and significant" advances ill forts to learn more about each .of the America,
I u i u ; 1 understanding among other.
tee. to the annual meeting of the
organization's national executive
board. The report by Hoffman,,
who has just returned from a
siudy mission of intcrreligious de-
velopments in Western Europe, i
was keyed to the first anniversary
of the passage by the Ecumenical
Council in Rome of its historic
declaration on Catholic relations
with Jews.
Hoffman cited numerous tech-
niques used by national, region-
al and local bodies of Catholics,
Protestants, Eastern Orthodox
and Jews in "enthusiastic efforts
among school children, teen-
agers, college and university
students, seminarians, clergy-
men and adults" all eager
to "join in a movement" given
"historic impetus" by the Ecu-
menical Council.
The network documentary as-
serted it was hard to believe Dr.
Vialon's court testimony that he
had never known about the
Nazi murder of Jews. The net-
work also noted that the state
prosecutor in Bonn has been
investigating for two years the
charges that Dr. Vialon commit-
ted perjury in his defense.
Dr. Vialon served as registrar
of Jewish property In the German I
administration in occupied Riga!
11 om 1942 lo 1944. He made his
statement about never having
heard of the mass murders as a
lation Center for Nazi Crimes in
Vienna, appeared on the program.
He said that Franz Maurer. a de-
fendant in a trial of Austrian Nazi
war criminals, was in possession
of considerable material against
Dr. Vialon.
The office of President Hein-
rich Luebke described this
week as "forgeries" signatures
of Dr. Luebke on a Communist-
sponsored display of documents
allegedly demonstrating that he
gave wartime orders for con-
st ruction of concentration
camps. The exhibit is being held
in Munich.
The president's office said that
he had never participated in any
such activity and thai the allega-
tions were without foundation.
The office added that, on Dec. 30.
1964. the United States Embassy
in Bonn commented on similar
JERUSALEM (JTA) Wide charges made then, saying that l>i
spread reports that Israel has the Luebke's entire life was known to
capability of producing an atomic the United States Government
bomb In a few months are e\ag- that all details of his life had
gerations, Dr. Glenn Seaborg, been checked, and that the United
chairman of the United States States had the greatest respect for
Atomic Energy Commission, as- him.
sorted recently. He expressed ^^^^_^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
U.S. Expert
Denies Israel's
Atom Capability
it-, dialogues at every level "from
scholars to housewives," more
chairs of Jewish learning, prepar-
ation of new religious textbooks
and other teaching materials elim-
inating passages offensive to other
groups, and expanded educational
and interpretive publications.
He held that, nevertheless, a
deep mutual ignorance remains
and "much of Christian thinking
is completely inadequate about the
living Jewish community, the syn-
agogue, and Judaism as relevant
expressions of an unbroken and
Metro Commissioner Alex Gordon presents a certificate of vital way."
appreciation to Mrs. Lynne Levin who has started the nations Kmmm g Rabb of ^
:jst university-level course in hotel and cruise social directing
ct the University of Miami. Dade County commissioners hon-
ored Mrs. Levin "for bringing the course to Dade County
which has the world's greatest concentration of hotels."
that view in reply to a question
after a lecture at the Weizmann
Institute.
Dr. Seaborg left Israel after a
three-day visit, during which he
met Prime Minister Levi Eshkol.
as well as Israeli atomic scientists.
These include interrehgious vis- |R, aU, visi(ed an Isi..u,,i ,uu.u,a|.
reactor and science laboratories.
It was learned that the ques-
tion of United States-Israeli co-
operation on desalination was
broached only in very general
terms during Dr. Scaborg's meet-
ing with Premier Eshkol. Dr.
Seaborg explained a planned
United States nuclear desalting
plant to be established in Cali-
fornia, and listened to a sum-
mation of Israel's needs.
The United States had agreed
to help finance a S200.000.000
pioneer plant in Israel to test the
feasibility of the use of nuclear
chairman of the Committee's in- energy for desalination of sea-1
terreligious affairs committee, re- watel" Tho atomic expert said he j
ported on an audience he had: believed Israel would be using |
earlier this month with Pope Paul, atomic plants to produce much of'
FOSTER ELECTRIC
COMPANY, INC.
Electrical Contractors
HESIDENTHL COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS
MAINTENANCE
PAUL FOSTER, president
AIR CONDITIONING and
ADEQUATE WIRING
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Nights. Sundays A Holidays Dial
HI 3-OP',2
MAN THAT ZIP COPE REALLY
SENDS ME..,
VI. at which he discussed the or
ganization's program in Jewish- j
Christian relations.
Rabbi Marc II. Tannenbaum. j
the Committee's director of inter I
religious' affairs, reported on the \
four-day International Colloquium (
on Judaism and Christianity, held
last week in Cambridge. Mass., at
the Harvard University Divinity i
School, which was attended by 100
scholars from Western Europe, Is
rael and Ihe United States. He call
ed the event "an unprecedented
and major breakthrough on the]
highest levels of academic schol-
arship."
The French Jewish commun-
ity, which had been tending to-
ward assimilation, has become
more aware of Judaism and Jew-
ish tradition as a result of the
Influx of widespread immigra-
tion from North Africa, accord-
ing to another report.
French Jewry has grown from
a post-World War II population of;
150,000 to more than 500.000 to
its electricity needs in the 70's.
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___


rn r, December 2. 1966
* Jenisfi FkjrSdNnn
Page 11-C
1
Women Suffer Bias in Jewish Law
LM
bnple Ner Tamid's Men's Club discusses plcns for the year
lead. Standing (left to right) are Louis H. Kleinbera. member
[the board of trustees; Joseph Silverman, Prst vice president;
Id Charles Goldstein, financial secretary. Seated (left to
ht) are Dr. Michael Horwitz, president of the Men'= Club;
Id Rabbi Euaene Labovitz, spiritual leader of Ner Tamid.
Ist-Thanksgiving Day dance was held Saturday. 9 p.m.,
[the Deauville Hotel. Also scheduled are a Blood Bank drive
December, joint meetings with Ner Tamid Sisterhood in
auary, a Las Vegas Nite and the annual Purim concert
(rturing Cantor Edward Klein.
GERMAN INDEMNIFICATION
*ay to Victims
NEW YORK (JTA) Grow |
ing numbers of American Jewish j
women are suffering hardships as j
a result of disabilitcs of women in j
Jewish religious law concerning re-
marriage and divorce, according
to Dr. William Salem Fisher of!
New York, a rabbi who is an'
authority on matrimony and di-;
voice. He is a practicing attorney '
specializing in divorce law.
Dr. Fisher reported this week
to the board of directors of the
National Council of Jewish Women
'hat since Jewish religious courts
in the United States have no civil
power, and therefore cannot com-
pel a Jew to give a religious di-
vorce (Get) American Jewish wom-
en are subject to "extreme an-
guish and frustration."
The NCJW, whose board has
been holding its five-day annual
meeting here, has endorsed an
International Council of Jewish
Women's petilion urging rabbin-
ical authorities to call an as-
sembly to consider reinterpret-
ing Jewish religious law to over-
come some of the disabilities for
Jewish women.
Dr. Fisher noted that growing
assimilation into American life had
brought growing divorce rates
among Jews. He also asserted that
the problem was compounded by
growing intermarriage among
members of different movements
of Judaism. He stated that the
disabilities affect all Jewish wom-
en, not just the Orthodox, since
a Jewish woman desiring to re
marry an Orthodox Jew must have
a Gel from her previous marriage.
The result may be "sorrow and a
breakdown of Jewish life." he said.
Citing eases where the Get v. as
used as a weapon to obtain unfair
alimony or custody provisions in
Civil divorce agreements. Dr.
Fisher explained there was no pos-
sible relief from U.S. civil courts
which insist that "separation of
church and state" forbids action
by them, among other reasons in
such situations.
Dr. Fisher commended the
NCJW for calling on rabbinical
authorities of the world to meet
to consider reinterpretation of
Jewish Religious Law on the
status of women.
The meeting also heard a pro-
posal by Mrs. Joseph Willen. its
national president, urging Jews to
continue their financial support
of the civil rghts movement.
now we work
v .
wai be Delayed harder to make
|OME (JTA) Informed!
fees reported here this week
compensation payments to
|ims of the Nazi occupation of
i. from a special $10,000,000
German fund given to Italy
1963, will not be completed
Ire 19(58. An estimated inini-
of 8.000 Jews appear to be
le for payments.
Be West German Government
Hded the money for partial In-
Unification of Italians deported
he Nazis between 1943 and
. An Italian law regulating
ibution of the funds was
pted in 1964. It excluded sen- j
hen taken to Germany as pris- i
is of war after the Italian ar-
jice in 1943. Under that law. it
estimated that applicants
|Id total about 20.000, includ-
"one-third who were Jews.
Later it developed that the
jse excluding prisoner of
war deportees had been incor-
rectly interpreted, and some
300,000 applications were filed.
Current estimates of eligible
claimants are between 30,000
and 40,000 persons, and the
number of Jewish claimants may
be higher than the initial esti-
mate. The original deadline for
submitting documentary proof
of eligibility was Nov. 22, 1966.
However, final examination of'
the 300,000 applications by a spe-
cial commission, eventual appeals
against findings of the commis-
sion and other procedures assured
delay in payments until 1968. the
sources said.
It was estimated that the av-
erage payment, when finally made,
will be about S250 per person.
Since payments will be based on
duration of deportation of each
victim, the actual payments will
vary from that average.
your day shorter
WVCG-AM now on
the air until midnight

jeater Miami Hebrew Free Loan Association annual election
Jeering installed (left to right) president, Isadore Schwartz;
Ice president, Franklin D. Kreutzer; corresponding secretary,
ax Price; financial secretary, Fred Ochs. Not shown are Mrs.
ase Siegel, second vice president; Max Rappaport, treasurer;
*d Mrs. Zelda Kunst, recording secretary. The association
devoted to making interest-free loans to individuals indis-
5ss and needing financial assistance. At the meeting. Mrs.
ena Weger announced Schwartz as the winner of an afgan
Me by the late Mrs. Rebecca Gordon, founder of '
Bsociation Blood Bank.
SOUTH FLORIDA'S GOOD MUSIC STATIONS
AM 1080 KC. 10,000 Watts
FM -105.1 MC. -160,000 Watts
the
*^-^.'--' *


Page 12-C
-JewistncrkHati
Friday, December 2, 1966
:
!f

neji
igious
S<
ervtces
\JUi iJJeehend
AGUDATH ACHIM. The Martinique
Hotel. 6423 Collins Ave. Orthodox
--- ----
AGuDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Cariyle Ave
Orthodox.. Rabi Isaac E>er. ,
---- ----
AMAVAT SHALOM CONOREOA-
TION. 985 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Cantor Morris Barr.
--------
ANSHE EMES. 2033 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Emanuel Kushelwitz,
president. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
---- ---
ETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave. Con-
servative. Rabbi Sol Landau. Cantor
William W. L.osir
Fiii.ii t.:m p.m. Family services. Ser-
mon: "Mlckej 3d rcus Modern
Maccabee." Saturdaj :> a.m. Sermon:
n: "Torah Lesson." Bai Mlts-
van Larry, sun ol Mr. and .Mrs. Ed-
ward Kravil-.
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th Ave. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Solomon Schti
Friday 5:13 p.m. Saturday 6:30 a.m.
bkrmon: "Spiritual Security." Mln-
. p.m.
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Berel Wein.
Friday 3:lo p.m. Saturuay :* a.m. Ser-
mon: "Eternal Truths."
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
19 Kislev 5:09 pan.
1 *
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
lETM TORAH. 164th St. and NE Htli
Ave. Conservative. Rjbbi Max Lip
ich'tz. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
Friday S:8 ami 1:13 I'm- Saturdaj
..;, .: m. Bar JUluvah: Leonaru, son
..: Mr. and Mi"s. living lio.duteln;
,r,.i. son of Mr. mi., Mrs, Irving
sky.
----- e -----
3'NAI RAPHAEL :401 NW 1S3rd St
Conservative. Rabbi Haiuld Ki.niei
Cantor Jack Lerner.
Fi I mi S:l Liuesl speaker, Mrs Martin Amster,
organisational vice president, ,'h ..
nupter "i Hadassah.
Bird Rd. .Modern traditional Max
W. Temehin; president. Cantor Louis
Friday 6:13 p.m. Saturdai' 9 "i-
^..IK nil J'.lo l'[j_
OHEV SHALOM. 911 Normandy Dr
urtnouox. Haobi Phineas Weber-
man.
Saturday s::w a.m. Sermon: seen
Tranquil ity." Mlncha ", p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF MIAMI. U42 Wash.ngton Ave.
Orthouox. Rabbi Dov Rozencweig.
SEPHARDIC JEW.SH CENTER. 646
Coiuns Ave. Rev. Cantor Saoi Nah
i a s
Frida) |i mi. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Ber-
I inou: "Tne Discipline >: Sulferlnf.
--------
: SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Jonan
E. Capi^n.
Friday '> and 8:15 p.m. Sermon: baii-
, re the L'N." Mr. ami Mis. Louis
Abramaon anil Mis. Qussle Brown
I wlii h-.st Hi, Ones Shabbat. Satur-
,,.,, ., a.in Sermon: "A House Dl-
., .i .Mm. ii., .. p.m.
--------
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. Con
servative. 1025 NE 1P3rd St.. Miami
Gardens Rd. Rabbi Milton Schlinsky.
'.antor **aur r, M
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "To Drink
and Tii Remember." Mr. and airs.
jack J.u-ks will present a K.lduun
cup ami traj i' Hi'' temple. Satur-
day 5:43 a.m. Mlncha 5:80 p.m.
sonof Mr. and Mm. Bernard Roth-
man.
--------
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell Jer
or. Cantor Ben Oickson.
Friday 8:18 p.m. firmon: "I Am a
lio.'d Juv itu*?* ." Saturday via
a.m. Stimuli: 'I'm linn of ,i>- Week."
riFERETH ISRAEL. SSOO l>. frUss* ... J1_^-
Ave. Conservative. Rabrfl Htnr> YOUNTT'lSlf/rtL OF v
Technicolor." Oiii-g Shabbat I. itd l,y
Blsti rhoou. Saturday '. a.m. Sermon'
== K
Turiiun of the \V< i
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER M.
AMI. 990 NE 171et St. O-.nodox
Rabbi Shcrwm Stauber. Cantor
Pincua A|ae*.
Pri.la> S>*5 p.m. .-.-. r-laj
Slim,. II 'lat's net .- llal'i-/ !,:.!,_'
Ika! Mlnclia 3 p.m.
Wernick.
Friday s:lr, p.m. s>-rmon: "Dreams in
. !i: :t-. i. .i 'uasasaatatasi
fAMI BEACH
1542-44 Washington Ave. Rabbi Nat.
tali Porush.

BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave. [ rT. LAUDERDALE EMANUEL. 1801
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor E-.njamm Ben-Ari.
Frida) 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Moaln,
Pearl Harbor and Viet Xam." Uueat
speaker, L)r. Clark Myers, Dean,
School of Business Administration at
the University of Miami. Topic: "Eth-
ics In Business." Saturday t:80 p.m.
"Portion "f Law." 5 p.m. "To Dream
is Essential."
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi David Rosenteld. Cantor Sey-
mour Hinkes.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon "Pre-Chan-
uka Services RellBloUS Fr,-,.d,,m."
Onee Bhabbat hosted bj Sisterhood.
Saturday 8:43 a.m. Sermon: "Portion
of the Week.''
-----e-----
BETH SOLOMON. 50 NW 51st PI.
Conservative. Rabbi Aharon M. Feier.
Friday 5:15 and 8:15 p.m. Bern......
'I'h, Wanderer or the Settled." Ones
Shabbat hosts: Mrs. Hermin Rosen-
berg. In honor of Rabbi Feier: Mr. ami
Mrs. Philip Dresnick in honor of son-
in-law Sam Kessler's birthday. Sat-
urday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Portion of
the Week." Min.-ha 3:13 p.m.
BETH TFILAH 935 Euclid Ave. Or-
i
This page is prepared in CO-
I operation with tne Greater Mi-
I ami Rabbinical Association.
Coordinator of features ap-
pearing here is
DR. MAX LIPSCHITZ
- spiritual leader of Beth Torah
Congregation of ?sJorth Miami
Beach.
S. Andiewk ve. Reform. Rabbi
Richard .\i. Leviton. Cantor Jerome
Kiement.
FT. LAUOERDALE oEWISH CEN-
TER. 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Philip Chaiton. Cantor Theo-
dore Mindich.
-------e-------
| HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
126 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. Rev.
Paul Deutsch.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Pulpit fajest, Jack
Lefton of Temple Beth Bfiolem, Hol-
lywood. Quest speaker, Max .1. Welts,
teacher and Youth Oroup director of
Adath Vi-shuiim.
--------
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
Dr Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
Friday 5:20 p.m. Saturday H a.111
Mlncha S 15 p.m.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson St. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heilbraon.
-------e-------
SRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin. Cantor William B. Nussen.
sen.
Friday 5:15 and s:]3 p.m. Sermon:
"i'an There Be Jewish Ecumenism?"
Saturday 8:45 a.m. Sermon: "Portion
of the Wi ek."
-----e-----
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern
-:|
HEBREW
iCNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
--------
LUBAVITCHER MlNYAN. 800 Wash
ington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. Cantor Ernest Field.
-------e------
MINYONAIRES SYNAGOGUE. 3737
LESSON
f : : t t
"1ST '"7i3 ,niLJ3Dn .*?i?nfcr
nans a-xtpii ^9? nno^^^o-rnw ^Tft^ T9
.irnasn nnhDn 1^3 n"3ns;i
T T -
c: vpia "a^nn |invn
niiD1? n^s^i n^-iai n'^ya
T T : v : : 1
DSBran-'na 'ids
nzto dj x-n rra-wn nai^n
- : : r t t -
naon T)3 ^aa iia'pn
* t t :
.o^a-wn o^na^oan
tnbia rvnya nna wtrtia)
T I .| ,'
JlnniiT roann1? tins? npi
The Arabs of Israel
are Equal Citiiens
About 88 percent of the Arabs
in Israel voted in the elections for
the Sixth Kenesset.
The Arab members of the Ken-
esset make their speeches in the
Arab language, and a Hebrew
translation is given immediately
afterwards by the official trans-
lator.
All of the speeches made in the
Kenesset in the Hebrew language
are immediately translated into
Arabic and transmitted to the
t : *
nDia*?
"aiva
nVrnaa
88x "3
waxn
n^ii a^rnvn nwa n^n
iransn na&3 an^aixi nx
: T T T V t
-hnx1? ny? yaB,3 nsv mnni
.-acn lanna ,,T-,?y ]?a
noa crvatfin o-a .xan "73
to a-anna nnan nat?a
T t : : T T T -
-pn "nan1? onajjw n,any,7
.nis3Tx n^saxs n^ai^n no
: t t : v : I T
nfrya1? x-n n^aian nafcn
v -: : t TT--
Arab members of the Kenesset
through earphones.
The Arabic language is practic-
ally a second official language in
the State of Israel. Coins, stamps,
and banknotes bear Arabic in-
scriptions. The Official Gazette
also appears in Arabic, and Arabs
have the right to turn to Govern-
ment Offices and to plead in the
courts in the Arabic language.
The Arabic language is also the
language of instruction in all the
Government Arab Schools.
Published by the Brit Ivrit Olamit
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 S. Kendall
Jr., So. Miami, Reform. Rabin
Herbert Baumg.ird. Cantor Michael
Kyrr.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1351 S. 14th Ave. Reform
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Friday B:1B p.m. Sermon: "Samuel
AaTnon: Nobel Prise Winner." New-
born daughter of Mr. and Mrs. ssteven
E. Schuster will be named.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL. 1545
^efterson Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Saul H. Breed.
-------e-------
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly
wood. 1725 Monroe St. Conservative
Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Er
nest Sterner.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase ,
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisn I
Cantor David Conviser.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Sholem
Aleichlm Lives." Beth bholom Youth
(Jroup will participate In portion < service commemorating 5Uth armi-
versary of death of Bhoiem Aleichlm.
Saturday 10:45 a.m. Baa Mltsvah:
Shelley, dau^ht,T *,f Mr. and Mrs.
Koyal fihkk Jonas
----------m-----------
TEMPLE BETH TOV. 6438 SW 8tn j
St. Conservative. Rabbi Simon April.
Friday n:I" p.m. Hadassah Sabbath.
(lueHt speak, r, Mrs. <;.r.iM P. SoltS,
past president <-i Miami Chapter of
Hadassah, <>i the Florida Region, and
a member "f the regional board, Sat-
urday B a.m. Sermon: "Portion of tn<
Wi k."
-----a -
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Abraham Reiseman.
--------
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler.
Fr.,Ia> ." and VI" p.m. i'haniika ser-
mon: "An Anclenl Miracle, s Modern
Message." Haturday 8 a.m. Sermon:
"Weekly Portion ,'f thi Bible." Bar
Mltsvah: Richard, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Mufson, Junior congre-
gation in the assemblj hall 18:80 a.m.
-------e-------
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabo
Joseph R. Narot.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Wh<
.1,.''
-------e
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR
3500 SW 69th W.-iy. Conservative
Rabbi Irwin Cutler.
e
TEMPLE JUDEA. 5500 Granada Blvd.
Liberal-Reform. Rabbi Morris Kip-
per.
---- ----
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 7bth St
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "To Dwell]
in the House of the Lord." Satur-
d i so a.m. Sermon: "I'ortlon of
the Law."
--------
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Edward Klein.
Friday B:16 p.m. Sermon: "The Bonds
that Built Bridges."
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative
8755 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi
Ralph O I i x m a n Cantor Herman
Marchbein.'
Friday 7:15 p.m. Family service. Sat-
urday t 15 a in. Bar MHsvah: Beth,
Hun of Mr, and Mrs. Kly Kaufman.
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SW 11th Ave..
Pompano Beach. Conservative. Rab-
bi Morris A. Skop. Cantor Leon
Segal.
Friday 8:1a p.m. Sermon: "The .Ma<--
cabean Struggle for Religious Free-
dom." Saturday S::in a.m. Sermon:
"Torah Talk."
SYNOPSIS OF THE TORAH PORTION VAYESHEV
The brothers strip Joseph and throw him into the p \
caravan of Ishmaelites is seen in the background.
"And it came to pass, when Joseph was come unto his
brethren, that they stripped Joseph of his coat" (Gen. 37. 23'
VAYESHEV Jacob and his sons dwelt in the lani_ of
Canaan as shepherds. Of all his sons, Jacob loved Joseph ist.
His obvious favoritism, and Joseph's account of his grani -i
I" dreams, produced hatred and jealousy among the brothers.
i: Joseph's brothers sold the hated favorite to >ome Ishmaelite
merchants, who took Joseph to Egypt with them. There Pol ip
an officer of the Pharaoh and captain of his guard, bought Joseph
as a slave. The Hebrew lad quickly rose to a position of reap
biiity in his master's household. However, Joseph rejected the
advances of Potiphar's wife: she slandered him. and he i
imprisoned. But in prison, too, God was with Joseph, and he won
the confidence of the jailers. He became known as an interpreter
of dreams by correctly reading the significance 01 the dreams
of the Pharaoh's butler and baker when they were his prison-
mates.
This recounting of the WeeKly Portion of the Law it e-
tracted and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish
Heritage" edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15 Publisher is
Shengold, and the volume i* available at 11 William St., New
York 5, N.Y. President of the society distributing the volume
Is Joseph Schlang.
*
BMBSmiU .
tnwaa.ininuE:

l\.aL>biiiicai evision
Vr
rc-it rams
V
Dec. 4 Ch. 10, 11 a.m., "The Jewish Worship Hour"
Guest: Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Dec. 4 Ch. 7. 10 a.m., "The Still Small Voice"
Host: Rabbi Sol Landau
Topic: Chanuka theme
Dec. 5 through 11, Ch. 7, 6 a.m. and 1 a.m.
Rabbi Harold Richter will conduct the Inspirational
Message.
Dec. 6 Ch. 2, 9:30 p.m.. "Man to Man"
Participants: Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Beth Tr rah Con-
gregation; Fr. Donald Connolly; Dr. J. Calvin
Rose
Modera'or: Rev. Luther C. Pierce
Topic: "Special Guest Night"
THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULPIT
We Must Seek Our
Brethren Today
6/ RABBI AVROM L. DRAZIN
The Israelite Center
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Marios Ranson. Cantor Chet Gale.
Friday 8:15 p.m. at Washington Fed-
eral. 699 NB 167th St. Bar Mltsvah:
Raymond A., nun of Mr. and Mrs.
Raymond C. .Mi-inbrrg.
--------
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 51 E
4th Ave., Hialeah. Conservative.
Rabbi Maurice Klein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: 'The Strug-
gle for Peace." One*- Shabbat hosted
by Mr. and Mra. Marvin itelrhen-
thaler in honor of their wedding an-
niversary. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
Friday 7:30 p.m. Family nervlces.
Sermon: "Coats of Many Colon*." Sat-
urday 9:30 a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Richard,
poses. There are many a.eas in
which "denominational'' different
The Torah portion assigned to ces W >* forgotten for the com-
this Sabbath open* with the story [ mon gd of people,
of Joseph's meeting with an Angel Various organizations \.e with
while in search each other for the honor of gath-
for his broth-, ering all faction- within Judaism
eis. At the be-; urujei. their banner. Make no mis-
tiest of Jacob, L .. _
who is concern-1 taH? ~ ,here can ** no success for
ed for the wel-' these efforts unless the religious
fare of his old- beliefs of all Jews are taken into
er sons pastur- J consideration.
ing their flocks, | There is absolutely no excuse
Joseph arrives for jewish organizations and fed-
at the appoint-. erations, which claim to include
e d place an d j al| Jews and meet their needs, to
finds that his j hold non-kosher dinners, especially
in an area such as ours, where
kosher catering is easily available.
There is no reason to hold meet-
Rabbi Drazin
brothers have
disappeared.
Uncertain as to their where-
abouts, Joseph, obviously bewil-
dered, begins his search and meets
with an individual who asks him,
"What are you seeking?"
Joseph s answer, "Ess Achai,"
means: "I seek to be with my
brethren I wish to belong to
my people, to succeed with my
people, for my future is tied up
with the future or my Drethren."
This is the same cry which we
utter today. Let us unite Jewry
under one banner. Let us unite
in the struggle for common pur-
ff
ings and activities which are a
desecration of the Sabbath and
prevent a portion of the member^
ship from participating.
Joseph still seeks his brethren,
and if the non-traditional Jew
wishes to invite his traditional
brethren to break bread with him
in serving the common good, let
it at least be a piece of bread he
can eat not something which
will stick in his throat. And let
his activities be scheduled at a
time acceptable to everyone. Who
knows, maybe some day, Joseph
will find his brethren.


innnr iwnmhwin TOCIT
Friday, December 2. 1966
'Jew 1stHcridiar
Page 13-C
Greater Miami BB Young Adults
Plan Active Weekly Agenda
With activities well under way for the vear
1966-67, the newly-in?tailed executive board
cf 1he National Conference of Svnnoccue
Youth of the Hebrew Academy of. Grecter
Micmi meets to discuss plans for a loithcom-
ing regional weekend concWe and concert.
Standing, front row (left to right1, Ruth Woiss,
treasurer; Jan Safra, recording secretarv;
Scndra Ehrenreich, president and national
eastern cocrdiator; Susan Roth, vice president,
programming; Tova Cavell, secretary; Minda
Phillips, publicity chairman. Back row (left to
riaht) ore Joe Morgonthau. editor; Robert
G'eenberg, financial secretary; Pinches Ra'-
b-rrr. chaplain; Rabbi Zev Litenat=kv, rpoional
odvisor end assistant principal of the Hebrew
ccdrrv; Barry Benenfeld, vice oresident of
eraanization; and Ephrain Gorlin. chapter
historian.
Seaboard Winter Service Features Family Travel
S"?.board Railroad antic;patcs
anotHw banner winter for its
streamliners, Silver Meteor and
Silver Star, between Florida and
New York, according to \V. J,
Ficht. general passenger agent,
Miami.
Bas.ng this view on advance res-
ervations already made, Ficht
statei "There i> more going on
for rail travel than ever before,
as people realize the comfort and
fun te be found aboard thoroughly
n trains. We're going to be
i.i.:: ng a great many vacationers
to ai from Florida this year.
"This is especially so in the
case of family travel," he said.
"In the course of a round-trip
Rockwell Barred
From Shul Areas
WASHINGTON U.S. District
(o in oi Illinois, JUage josepn
S:.n; Perry presiding, has granted
a permanent injunction upon the
tion of the Jewish War Vet-
against George Rockwells
American Nazi Party conducting
:. march within a half mile of any
Jewish house of worship on any
of the Jewish faith.
JWV National Commander Mal-
colm A. Tailov hailed the decision
"as an important step against
ell's use of the civil rights
e to foment hate and un-
ii against Jews and other ethnic
-1 OU'
The injunction was initiated
by the JWV Department of Illi-
nois, headed by Department
Com-nander Herman Moses, af-
ter Rockwell threatened to or-
ganise Nazi-led marchers through
Jewish neighborhoods. Attorney
Luis Kutner, of Chicago, repre-
ttnttd the Jewish War Veterans.
* i mander Taiiov indicated
c fully intend to use the
Courts to the limit of our resources
10 to it that bigotry spewed]
by Ai erican Nazis does ndt spread |
hatred or result in incitement to
Hot '
on one of our silver streamlin-
ers, there's a great deal for
children to see and lea>-n while
they enjoy c'ose-ups through
our wide windows of scenes
right out of their American his-
tory boo'xs. Growr.-ups, too, con-
sider our route one of the most
fascinating to be found in the
Ur.lred Sia^es.
"Effective Dec. 1(1. Seaboard
will offer twice daily streamliner
service to the North fiom both
coasts of Florida. This means that
from Miami, Hollywood. Fort
Lauderdale and West Palm Beach,
and also from Tampa, Clearwater
and St. Petersburg, our patrons
may select the departure time
that suits them and travel to
Washington, Baltimore, Philadel-
phia and New York without
change of trains.
"Again this winter Seaboard
will feature the increasingly pop-
ular New York City theatre tours,
which include streamliner trans-
portation to and from New York,
tickets to the most wanted stage
plays and musical hits, hotel ac-
commodation^ and sightseeing.
Group tours leave on specified
dates, but theatre tours can be
arranged individually at any time,
These theatre tours are available
through travel agents and local
Seaboard offices.
Seaboard streamliners are no-
ted for their modem lightweight
stainli ss ste i sleeping cars, re
serve'1 ,c reel in
coache s, spacious : nclud-
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEPS YOUR DONATION.
NOW! j
.r;.^UNIJURE"^'ArPLIANCIS
"ClOTHING'-'JEWELRY/' etc.
CAt^69MT01
ing the uniquely decorated, glass-
| topped Pullman Sun Lounge on
j the Silver Meteor, and tavern ob-
servation cars.
"Seaboard dining cars, which
retain the niceties of gleaming
crystal and silverware, crisp
white tablecloths and fresh-cut
flowers, have a tradition of
fine food and service, with menu
prices geared to vacation budg-
ets. Special menus for children
arc available, too.
Another exclusive Seaboard
streamliner innovation is the reg-
istered nurse, reassuring to par-
ents traveling with small children.
A passenger service agent, coach
attendants and Pullman porters
are also members of the train
service staff."
"Our group tries to give more
to the community than just mere
money," said Miss Phyllis Fiedler,
president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of B'nai B'rith Young
Adults.
MM Fiedler- said the newly-
formed chapter is the "only one
in existence in the Southern
United States." More chapters
should be formed to "promote a
region," she added.
Aims of the parent organiza-
tion, B'nai B'rith Youth Organi-
zation, are the following: Ju-
daism, democracy, individual de-
velopment, and service. "3BYA
develops these aims through
committees who support educa-
tion, recreation, and service,"
stated George Termotto, first :
vice president.
Other local leaders are Gary
Cohen, second vice president; .Miss
Carol Traeger, corresponding sec-
retary; Dave Termotto. recording
secretary: and Miss Barbara
Schoneberger. chaplain.
Also, Miss Sheilah Bitterman.
who serves as parliamentarian;
and Miss Bonnie Bassman. treasur-
er. Consultant is Mrs. Edith Bass-
man.
Committees are headed by the
following, aged 13 to 26-yearold,
Miss Mois Passoff and Miss Joan
Houseman, education; Miss Linda
Davidson, and Steve Field, recrea-
tion; and Miss Linda Blumenthal
and Miss Arlene Goldberg, service.
Chartered in 196*, the group
holds elections every fall. "Last
May, our chapter began to hold
a multitude of activities," said
the president, "which included
parties, bowling nights, sailings,
picnics, religious services, and
discussions."
Miss Friedler said that the or-
ganization's program was already
well-mapped out for the balance
of the year.
Lakeside
MEMORIAL PARK
AND
GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
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/V.OST BEAUTIFUL
JEWISH CEMETFRY"
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N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE.
TU 5-1689
xpaess Sjppatluj
and Cornet
*ltW iOif Exotic Gnrhfits
MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
CORAL GABLES HOLLYWOOD
FT. LAUDERDALE BOCA RATON
REV. PINCUS ALOOF
CCRTIflED MOHEl
Associated with Young Israel of
Greater Miami, 990 N.E. 171st
St.. No. Miami Beach: Out of
Town Cases Attended.
7761? N.f. 7th Ct. 947-2267
No. Micmi Beach, Horida
GE1B *
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Ever, Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57h Ave. MO 1-8583
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4:05-5:00 P.M. MUSIC AROUND THE WORLD
5:05-7:00 P.M. CLASSICS IN STEREO
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8:05-9:00 P.M.-UPREM!ERE"- "BUS?0
ON ALL 94.9 131 DIALS
DON'T MISS IT THIS SUNDAY
i


Page 14-C
+Jewish narkttan
r'nday. Uecemoer z,TS?
Hal Glassman Joins PR Firm on Beach
Helping to plan the Temple Beth Am Israel
Chai" Dinner of State are members of the
orps of patron hosts who were guests at a
.eception tendered by Mr. and Mrs. Herman
W. Feldman at their home. From left are Mrs.
Feldman, Mrs. Herbert Sobel. Mrs. David
Eddie Cantor Group of Hadassah installed its new president
here recently at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Standing
(left to right) are Mrs. Harry Glass, newly-installed president;
Mrs. Nat Barth, immediate past president of Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah, and installing officer; and Mrs. Saul
Katz, national Hadassah organization chairman.
Canadian Nazi Vows Public Appearance
TORONTO (JTA) Canadian
Nazi Party Leader, John Beattie;
vowed this week to make an ap-
pearance in Allan Gardens, a To-
ronto public park, "by hook or by
crook," after the Ontario Supreme \
Court rejected his application to
speak at a rally there on Septem-j
her 11. Beattie was involved in an
incident last year in the same park
that led to violence and the arrest
of a number of persons at a rally-
he had addressed. He appealed to
the court when the Toronto city
authorities denied him a speaking ;
permit.
Tn rejecting Beattie"s request for
a court order to speak in the park.
Justice Donahue said that the Nazi
was certain to cause a commotion
in which police would have to risk
physical harm to protect him. He
Mid the "courts have to protect
people from harm and have the
power to do so."
M. E. Fram. counsel for the
city, argued that granting Beattie'sI
application would force the city
to break a bylaw which deniesj
park speaking privileges to any-
one charged with stirring up rac-!
ial or religious hatred. Mr. Fram
said that Beattie 'can speak else-
where than in a public park."
Kornberg, Mrs. Louis Kirk, Mrs. Saul Genet
and Mrs. Nathan Selditch. The dinner, at
which David J. Light will receive the Herbert
H. Lehman Award, is set for Sunday evening,
Dec. 3, at the Dupont Plaza Hotel.
Meridor Takes
Over Helm Of
Herut Party
TEL AVIV fJTAI Ynkov
Meridor was elected here to an-
il her term as chairman of the ex-
ecutive right-wing Herut Party
after a riotous session of the badly-
split party's central committee.
Tension became apparent im-
mediately when the session open-
ed with the expressed intention to \
choose a new executive. Support-,
ers of Shmuel Tamir, an attorney |
who has challenged Herut's cur-1
rent leadership, proposed a non-1
confidence motion against Or
Johanan Bader. Herut chairman.
The proposal was beaten 56 to 36.
A similar vote defeated a proposal
by Mr. Tamir to postpone the
meeting.
Charges and counter-charges
greeted Mr. Tamir's effort to
explain his position about the
party's longtime leadership, in-
cluding his opposition to Mena-
hem Beigin, who gave up the
party leadership this summer.
Suddenly supporters of the pres-
ent leadership threw a handful
of nipples of baby bottles at the
opposition with shouts of "bab-
ies." In the uproar that ensued,
Mr. Tamir and his followers left
while the remaining executive
members continued the meeting.
Mr. Meridor was instructed to
propose a new executive to the
central committee.
Mr. Meridor said he would invite
some members of the outgoing ex-
ecutive to serve in the new one.
He added, however, that a party
tribunal would have to clear Mr.
Tamir of charges of initiating and
backing an allegedly slanderous
letter against Mr. Beigin which
was the basic cause of the tur-
moil in the party.
Hal Glassman. sports editor of
the Miami Beach Daily Sun for
nearly five years, has been named
vice president of the Gerald
Schwartz Public Relations Agency,
One Lincoln Road Bldg.
Glassman also will continue to
serve as sports director of radio
stations WMBM-AM and WGOS
FM, both of Miami Beach. An-
nouncement of his appointment
was made by Gerald Schwartz,
president of the Miami Beach-
based firm which was established
in 1949.
The new vice president will
continue to write a regular
sports column for the Miami
Beach Daily Sun.
The Gerald Schwartz Agency is
the only member in Florida of
Public Relations Management
Corp., a world-wide organization of
leading public relations firms
headquartered in New York City.
Former public relations direc-
tor of the iiieater Miami Jewish
Federation and of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. Glassman served
for three years in public informa-
tion and publicity offices of the
United States Army. He held pub
lie information positions in F.urope
and in California.
Glassman is president of the
Florida Chapter of the U.S. Har-
ness Writers Association, now
serving his second term. He is a
member of the Florida Thorough-
bred Writers Association, Florida
Sports Writers Association, Na-
tional Baseball Writers Association
and the National Sports Wiiters
Association.
He is an active member of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce, Miami Beach Jay-
caes, a charter member of the
Miami Beach Sports Promotion
Committee, and the American
Jewish Public Relations Society.
Glassman has received awards
for reporting from broadcasting
and writing associations. A gradu-
ate of Miami Beach High School
he is a native of the Beach and
attended the University of Miami
Monterey College in California!
and Tubingen University in Ger-
many. He is married to the for-
mer Linda Lessner, of Schenec-
i tady, N.Y., and has one son. n,m.
I ard Daniel, two years old Mr
'and Mrs. Glassman live at '.:>:(,
; Bay Dr., Miami Beach
HAL GLASSMAN
The St. Petersburg resort
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SHERATON INN
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M.P.0. Box 2973, Miami, Flo.
fE




Friday, December 2, 1966
LEGAl NOTICE
vj-pnlst Flnr/ldfon
Page 15
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
. lei signed, rtesii In* to engage
111 Under till- fictitious linlllcs
DREAMBOAT; SEVEN SEAS
i iREAMBl 'AT, al Pli r 8. I'.a} lloMl
Marina, Miami, Florida; int.mi
register said names with ihe Clerk
the Circuit Court <>f Bade County,
: rida.
DREAMBOAT LINKS INC.
Bj: UENE s.Mirii, President
Itest: FRANK .1. URBAN, Secretary
\RONOVITZ, silver f, scilER "
vttorneya for Dreambosl Lines Inc
< te '"' \ iii.-i.-y Building
Miami, Florida 33131
11/11-18-25 II I
PICO,
PI No
\ THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CiRCUlT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
NO. 66C11922
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
tElNALDo Pico,
Plaintiff,
V8,
AEMK.s MARCELA PINO <1
i tefendant.
I'U: CARMEN MARCELA
da PICO
Manuel Landa 31
Culm da Melena
Havana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY notified dial
, Complaint fur Divorce has been
filed agalnsl you, and you are here-
...v required to serve a copy of your
answer to the Complaint on the Plain-
tiffs attorney, LESTER ROGERS,
whoso address is wj N.W. nth
Street, .Miami. Florida, and file the
original of the Answer In the office
.1 the Clerk of the Eleventh Judicial
circuit In and for I hide County, Flor-
ida, on or liefore the. l.'.th da} of
I'. .ember, RIDS, in default of which
ihe Complaint will he taken as con-
: Ksed hy you.
BATED this 4th day of November,
E B. LEATHERMAN
Cl. rk ..i the circuit Court
lb ; c. P. COPBLAND
11/11-18-23 12 .'
BY HENRY LEONARD
"And when your Ma and I argue,
Haskelenever interfere. It's the only
pleasure we still have left!"
u\.
LEGAL NOTICE
iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12712
NOTICE OF SUIT
III E WILLIAMSBL'RUH
SAV1NOS BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
.!< iHN i LaFi tNTAINE, .-i
I >< i. ndanls.
i'| >: John .1. LaFontaine and
Bonnie LaFontaine, his wife,
HIT Jania Avenue
Akron, iiiii.i
You are hereby notified thai the
shove captloned action lias been In-
stituted against you in Ihe Clrcull
Conn of the Eleventh Judicial c r-
cull of Florida In and for Bade Coun-
ty to foreclose a mortgage upon the
following described real property:
I...I IS Block 53 CORAL, PARK
estates SECTION ".. according
to the Plat thereof, rei urdeil In
Plat Book 88 Page :.| ..i the 1.....-
lie Records of Dude County, Flor-
Ida
Von an- required to file a respon-
sive pleading to the plaintiff's com-
plaint .v |th the Clerk of the aforesaid
Court, ami serve a copy thereof upon
plaintiff's attorney. MARTIN KINK,
Had.- Federal Hull.Iin;. Miami, Flor-
ida 33131, imc later than Beceinliei
80th, I960, or a Decree Pi.. Confesso
will be entered against von.
DATED November 28, 1968,
B. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By C. P. COPBLAND
Deputy Clerk
MARTIN FINE
Dade Federal Ruilding
Miami, Florida 38181 12/2-9-16-2S
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS?
solicits your legal notice*.
We appreciate youi
patronage and guarantee;
accurate service at lego)
rates .
Dial Fit 3-46M
tor messenger let tJQf
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72886- B
In RE: Estate of
EDITH Sr.vKLE TOKSTAD,
.. k a EDITH S. TOKSTAD
I deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
in All Creditors and All Persons
I laving Claims or Demands Against
- dd Betate:
You are hereby
u
d to pi --.lit
notified and
any claims

and
i. nianaa which you may have agalnsl
Uie -state of EDITH SEA RLE TOK-
STAD, a/k/a EDITH S. TuKM'.lli
l.ieaaed late of Hade County, Plor-
Ida, to the Counts radges of Hade
I'ounty, and file the same in dupli-
te and as provided in Section 733.18,
! rlda Statutes, in their offices in
Hie County Courthouse In Hade
'uuiltyj Florida, within six calendar
....."His fr..... ihe time of thi first
inibilcoUon hereof, or the same
barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
lay of November, A.D. 1888.
SAN FORD S. FAUNCB
As Executor
\CNCi:. FINK & PoRMAN
\ttorneys for FSxecntor
I.1U2 Congress Building, .Miami. Kla.
11/18-31 12/8-9
will
15th
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY U1VEN that
hy virtu.- of Chapter 878, of Florida
Statutes Annotated (HMD. Ware-
housemen and Warehouse Receipts,
wherein Ace-RB. VAN LINES, INC.,
a Florida corporation, by virtue of Its
warehouse lien, has In its possession
the following described property:
Household Hood-, as the property of
Alex Mackey, 1918 N.W. 5th Pli......
Miami. Florida, and that on the 18th
day of December, 1986, during the
legal hours of sale, mainly between
11 :tm lor.-noon and 2:00 in the after-
noon, at 3138 N.W. 34th Avenue, Mi-
ami, Florida, the undersigned shall
offer for sale to the highest bidder
for .-ash in hand the above described
.....perty of Alex Mackey. 1912 N.W.
Ill Place. Miami, I- oral..
Hated at Miami. Florida, tills 2Sth
day of October, 1908.
ACE-R.D. VA-N I.INKS, INC.
n/2.1 u :
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12002
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
i'MMPIA ROSA M. LoSADA
Plaintiff
vs.
|SABINO LOSADA
Defendant
|TO: s'ARINo L08ADA
9i."iV4 W, Sunnyalde Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
YoU, 8ABINO LOSADA, are hereby
"tilled that a Hill of Complaint for
ivorca has lurn filed against >ou,
nd you are required to serve a cop)
' your Answ.r or Pleading to the
:l! ,.f Cmnuiaint on the Plaintiffs
itornepj CUTLER EFRonsox,
"-' Alnsley Bldg., Miami, Florida
!'-. and file tin- original Answer or
'leading in the office of the Clerk
I 'he Circuit Court on or before the
Win day of December, 1966. If you
il to do so. Judgment l.y default
ml t.e taken against you for the
lief demanded In the Bill of Com-
atnt.
This nothe shall bo published once
Itch week for four consecutive weeks
THE JEWISH FI-OKUH.YN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
I'.ri.la. this 7lh day of November.
H. 1966.
E. B. I.KATHKRMAX, Clerk.
|< ireult Court, Dade County, Florida
el) By: MARODKRITE KENT
_ lleputv Clerk
11 TI.KR KFRONSON
12 Alnsley Bldg.
Ilaml, Florida 83132 377-9685
______________________U/H-18-2S 12/2
.THE CIRCUIT COURT ^FThI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
.OF FLORipA IN AND FOR
IDAOE COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12138
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(ART I AW SON,
IPlalnUff,
I'l.N C. LAWSON,
npefendanL
JOHN c. [jAWSON
Residence Unknown
poif ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
t a Complaint for Divorce, has
filed against you and you are
aulred to flic your answer thereto
h the Clerk of this Court and
fve a copy upon Plaintiffs Attor-
, MAX P. ENGEL. 1700 N.W. 7th
''t. Miami. Florida on or before
-'dth day of December, 1986, else
lUecree Pro Confess., will be ell-
" against you.
ated this loth day of November,
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. t wi \n-
,.,,.. Deputy Cl.rk
I'.1.1. AND lin I. ,i K
'in.vs for Plaintiff
1 N.W, 7'h .Street
.ml, Florida
| MAX P. BNGEIj ""
11/18-20 12/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notch; is HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictions names
or DE8TEX DRY-CLEANER, DES-
TEX SHAMPOO, & DESTEX
MOTH-KILLER A- DRY CUBANER,
ut 7340 N.W. 22nd Ave., .Miami, Flor-
ida, Intends to register said num. s
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of I'.ut IVmnty, Florida.
ROBERT CASTORO
U/2:i 12/2-9-11
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
b) virtue of Chapter 678, of Fiorina
statutes Annotated (1941), Ware-
housemen and Warehouse Receipts,
wherein Ace-RB. VAN DINES. INC.,
a Florida corimration. by virtue of its
warehouse lien, has in its possession
the following described property:
Household Goods as the property of
I. DEMTS, 2211 N.W. 71st Street,
Miami, and Care of Joshua D.-nits, Til
Pe.ichtiee Street, ltuffalo. N.Y., and
that on the 16th day of December,
1988, during the legal hours of sale.
mainly between 11:00 fore......n and
2:00 in the afternoon, at 2138 N.W.
21th Avenue, Miami, Florida, the un-
dersigned shall offer for sale to the
highest bidder for cash In hand the
above described property of 1.
DEMTS. 2211 N.W. 71st Street, Mi-
ami, an Care of J.islria Dcints, ,"
Peachtree Street Buffalo, N.Y.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 2Mb
day of October, 1966
ACE-R.B. VAN LINES, INC.
11 25 12/2
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 68C12235
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MARIA ELENA ROS de GONZALEZ,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDRES ALBERTO GONZALEZ,
I'. fendant.
TO; ANDRESADBERTOGONZALEZ
Call.- G 31580 (altos) 1 litre 23 y L'".
Vedndo, llah.ina
CUBA
SOU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Complaint for Divorce has been
filed against you, and you are her.
by required to serve a copy of your
answer to the Complaint on the Plain-
tiff's attorney. LESTER ROGERS,
whose address Is 899 N.W. 1 itli Street,
.Miami, Florida, and file the original
of the Answ.-i in the office of the
Clerk of the Eleventh Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Dad.- County. Flor-
ida, on or before the 23rd day of
December, 1968, in default of which
the Complaint u ill be taken as con-
fessed by you.
DATED this llth day of Nov.in-
h.-d, 1968.
K. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Clrcull Court
By K. M LYMAN
Deputy Clerk
11/18-2.', 12/2-9
NOTICE OF SUIT
OR
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12689
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
illARI.OTTE WASSERMAN
Plaintiff,
vs.
HARRY WASSERMAN.
Defendant.
TO: HARRY WASSERMAN
1488 Golden Gate
Mavfleld Heights, Ohio
YOU, HARRY WASSERMAN. arc
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been filed
agalnsl you. and yon ar.- required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bin of Complaint on Plain-
tiffs attorneys, caidin. rotiien-
liERG, I.KI.CIICK *;- SCSSMAN. 805
His. a\ in- Building. Miami, Florida,
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing in the office of the cl.rk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 80th
day of December, 19(6. If yon fail to
do so. Judgment by default will be
tak.n against you for the relief di
man.led in the Pill of Complaint.
DONE and ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 2Mb day of November,
I9(iti.
E B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk. Circuit Court
Iiside County. Florida
(Seal) P.Y. K. M LYMAN
Deputy Clerk
______ ____________ 12/2-0-16-23 I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THS
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, IN CHANCERV
No. 66C 12016 (Schulz)
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
IN RE: PETITION OF:
RICHARD ALAN KWATCHER
Notie. is herebj given that RICH-
ARD AI.AN KWATCHER whose
residence address is nin Nonnand)
Drive, Miami Beach, Florida. Intends
to a|.|.i\ to on.- of the Judges of II -
Eleventh Judicial circuit, In And For
Dade County, Florida, at Ills offlci
in the Count] Courthouse., at 9:41
O'clock A M on Ihe 19th day of
December 1966, or as soon thereafter
as he may be heard, for an Order
changing his nam. from RICHARD
AI.AN KWATCHER to RICHARD
AI.AN I'llRRIN
DATED: At Miami. Dade County,
Florida, this 9th day of November
i *
EDWARD WALTEKMAN
Attorney for Petitioner
809 liis.ayne lliillcllng
19 \\". Fktgler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
11 18-35 12
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
tin undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious 11a.....
of BITRGER CASTLE OF CORAL
GABLES at 2350 Douglas Road, Coral
Gables, Florida, intends to register
said name with the Cl.rk of Ihi Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida
ERA N KS-i; EOR< i E. INC.,
a Florida corporation,
By: KENNETH FRANKS
As President
ALLEN KORNBLI'M
Attorney for Applicants
101 E. Flagler Street, .Miami, Fla.
_________________11/2:. 12/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12049
NOTICE OF SUIT
THE W1E1.1AMSBURG11
SAVINGS BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROHERT DARRELL COFFMAN,
et ux
Defendants.
TO: ROBERT DARRELL COFFMAN
and
PATRICIA ANN COFFMAN,
his wife
c/o Mrs. Delhert II. Coffman
Slssonville Road
Charleston, West Virginia
You are hereby notified that the
above captloned action has been In-
stituted against you In the Circuit
Court of the llth Judicial Circuit of
Florida In and for Dade County to
fore.-low a mortgage upon the fol-
lowing described real property:
lx>t 24 In Block 1 of HIGH
house SUBDIVISION accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
In Plat Book 59 at F.ige 62 of
the Public Records of Dade
COURty. Florida.
You are required to file a respon-
sive pleading to plaintiffs complaint
with the Clerk of the aforesaid Court,
and serve a copy thereof upon plain-
tiff s attorney, MARTIN FINE. Did.
Federal Building, Miami. Florida
83181, not later than De.ember 16,
1986. or a Decree Pro Confesso will
be entered against yon
DATED: Nov. 8, 19ri6.
E. I! LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C I. ALEXANDER
Deputy Clerk
M \RTIN FINE
I 'ado Federal Building
Miami, Florida 33131
11/11-18-20 12/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of MR. "K" at 1633 Michigan Avenue.
Miami Reach, Florida. Intends to reg-
ister sa.i name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dad.- County.
Florida
EVELINE KENNARD, Owner
UOTTHARDT, CHRISTIE &
HHBPARD
Attorneys for Eveline Kennard,
' iwner
__________ ______ 11/25 12/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
Of MBDICAL CASE HISTORY RE-
READ al ::::.' W, 29th street. Hlaleah,
Florida, intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dude Cl.....ty. Florida.
MIRIAM ICKSBNRR
MYERS. KAPLAN .v PORTER
Attorneys for Miriam Wessner
11.'* B.W. 1st Street
Miami. Florida 33130
________________11 11-18-2.'. 12 '2
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AMD FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 72983C
In RE: Estate of
MINNIE FARKASII
D......ased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
ipiired to present any claims and
demands which you may have against
the estate of MINNIE FARKASII
ibs-.ased late of Dad- County, Flor-
ida, to the County Judges of Dade
County, and file the same in dupli-
cate ami as provided In rlectlon 733.16.
Florida Statutes. In th.ir offices In
Ihe County Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, within six calendar
months from the time ..r the firs'
publication hereof, or the same will
be barred.
Dated al Great Neck, N.Y.. this
2tith day of November, AD. 1966.
MII.T. IN SHERR
As Administrator
hirst publication of tins notice on
the 2nd day of December, 1966
SMITH .1- MANDLER
Attorneys tor Administrator
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach, Florida
12/2-9-19-28
NOTICE TO DEFEND
or
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12085
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
PHYLLIS I. SCHWARTZ
Plaintiff,
vs.
GILBERT C. SCHWARTZ
Defendant.
TO: GILBERT C. SCHWARTZ
. 0 P, Schwarts
7521 North Sheridan
Chicago, Illinois
Y..11. GILBERT C. SCHWARTZ.
tire hereby notified that a BUI of
Complaint for Divorce has been I lied
against you, and >011 are required ("
serve a copy of your Answer 01
Pleading to ihe Bill of complaint on
Ihe Plaintiffs Attorney, BOL ALEX-
ANDER One Lincoln Road llulldlng.
Miami Reach. Florida, and rile the
original Answer ..1 Pleading In ihi
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Com t on or before the 1 ltd day of
December, 1966. If you fall to do s..,
Judgment by default will be taken
agalnsl you for Ihe relief demanded
in the Rill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published one.
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEW ISII FLi IR1DIAN,
DONE WD ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 9th day of November,
A.D. 1966.
E. B. LEATHERMAN,
1 'lei k. i 'Ireult Court.
Dad.* County, Florida,
iSe.,1) By L. SNEEDEN
Deputy Cl.rk.
11/11-18-21 12/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN ih.it
the undersigned, desiring i" engaji
in business under the fictitious nan
of HARRY .1. DELL ASSOCIATES
al ::>'. N.W. Tth Street, Miami, Flo
Ida 3312a, intends in register
nanie with the Clerk of the C
Com 1 hi Dai.- County, Florida
FOREIGN MARKET SERVICES
INC
By HARRY .1. DELL
WILLIAM I GOLDWORN
Atlorile) loi
For. Ign Ms 11.. 1 Services, |nc
ll/lh-2."i 12
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURr
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71751-C
In RE: Estate of
HARRY BELFORD
Dei .ased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
I temands Again -\
notified and re
any claims an-*
mayvhave again.--'
Having Claims
Said Estate:
You ure hereby
quirt demands which you
the estate of HARRY HIM.Ford, de-
ceit ..1 late of Dude County, Florida
to the County Judges >i Dade Coun-
ty, and tile tlie same In duplicate mil
as provided in Section 738.16, Plot
la Statutes, in their offices in the
county Courthouse in Dade County,
Florida, within six calendar months
from the time of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barrel
Dated at .Miami, Florida. Gils lln.
day of November, A.D. 1966.
CHARLOTTE FIRMAN
As Executrix
Fii.-i publloutl....... 'ids notice
the Dth day of November, 1966.
MARK! YA KERNICK
Attorney for rJxecutrlx
120 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach
II D- 25 12 2

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C12S08
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
JOSE LOPEZ-TR1UO
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARMEN LOPEZ-TRIOO
Defendant.
TO: CARMEN LOPEZ.TRIG'!
6128 97 Street Apt. 4F
It.-go I"nrk, New York
you are Hereby notified
that a Rill of Complaint for Divorce
has been filed agalnsl you and you
are required t" file an Answer or
PI.-ading with the clerk of this Court
and to s.rve a copy on JACK I.
KING, Attorney for Plaintiff, Suite
216, 11.10 8.W. 1 Si Mi.mi. Florida,
on or before the 3mh ilav of Decem-
ber, Haiti or a default shall be en-
tered against you.
this NOTICE shall I..- published
once each week for fopr consecutive
weeks iii The Jewish Dlnridinit,
DONE and ORDERED at Miami.
Dad. County, Florida, this l'1-l da)
of November, 1966.
E. B. LEATHERN \\
(!lerk of Ihe tin '" 1
I lade '..uiity. Florida
By K. M I.Y.MAN
I l.-piKV
JACK I. KING
1130 S.W. 1 Si 1. el
Miami. Florida
373-1507
I. rk
11,2". 12, !-:-1 li
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 66 C 5682
(Judge Cullen)
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
.11 IHNNIE L. JINKS,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANNIE DELORJ38 JINKS,
Defendant.
TO: ANNIE DELORES JINKS,
Defendant
1421 H.lmont Street, N.W. Apt. i
Washington, D.C. 20009
You, ANNIE DEL'.RES JINKS, al
hereby notified that a Rill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been (lied
against you. and you are required I
s.-rvn a copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the Rill df Complaint on
the Plaintiffs attorneys, LEVEY
LRVEN.STEIN *. S1RKIN, ?'>! Alns-
ley Riiiid.nu. Miami, Florida 88183
and file 'the original Answer or
Pleading in the office of the Cleric
of the Circuit Court on or before tlv
1 litri day of December. 1966. If you
fail to do so. judgment by default
will he taken against you for the re-
lief dvmauded in the Hill of Com-
plaint.
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH I'l.oRlDIAN.
DONE AND ORI.ERl.iD at Mian,
Florida, this 8th day of November
A.D. 136ti.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, cl.rk.
circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(Seal) Bj C. P. COPBLAND
I eputy 1 l.-rk
LEVEY, LEVENSTi:iN,'fc SIRKIN
'.''.' Alnsley Building
Miami. FI01 Ida 23132
______________ Ft 11-18-25 12 .
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY tMVEN that
Ihe undersigned, d. It ln to en
'" buslm 11 nd. r the fictitious nan.
of MARIES GRAND WENI'E MAR
KET at L'.il Grand Avel...... Co
flabl) S, 11,ends I.. regl I. p -aid nan
with the ci.ik of ihe Circuit Com
ol Dad. CoilUty, Florida.
MARIE liny GWOOK
II, I1-1S-20 12, 1


Page l&C
-Jmtsti nrrHian
Friday. December 2. 1966
WISHING ALL OF OUR FRIENDS A...
\
efj^iwStMk
**-


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