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The Jewish Floridian ( July 29, 1966 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 29, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01956

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 29, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01956

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
r
ejewlslli Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 39 Number 29
Miami. Florida, July 29. 1966
Two Sections Price 23i
UN Security Council Meets on
Israel-Syrian Agression Charge
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.
(JTA) The United Nations Se-
curity Council met Monday to con-
sider Israel's and Syria's charges
and counter-charges of acts of ag-

" i'
PRfSIDtNT AMD MRS. ZALMAN SHAZAR
Johnson Host to
Zalman Shazars
lowing four acts of sabotage inside
Israel by Arab infiltrators from
Syria and Israel's retaliation by
attacking a Syrian position from
the air on July 14.
WASHINGTON (JTA) Pres-
ident Shazar of Israel will be the
guest of President Johnson in
ashington on Tuesday, Aug. 2,
according to an announcement by
the White House.
President Johnson will give a
tlinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs.
Shazar on that date. The Shazars
will stay at Blair House during
their unofficial visit to the capital
They were invited by the President.
Mr. Shazar arrives in New York
Thursday. During his stay he will
be the guest of honor at luncheons
1o be tendered by Mayor Lindsay
Friday and by UN Secretary-Gen-
eral U Thant on Monday. He will
also be accorded a special recep-
Tuesday and will meet with lead-
ers of major American Jewish
oiganizations.
Following the reception. Pres-
ident Shazar will fly to Washing-
Ion, where he will be received by
President Johnson.
Mr. Shazar will lay a wreath on
1 resident Kennedy's grave at Arl-
_:on National Cemetery.
President Shazar will be leaving
Washington on the afternoon of
nesday, Aug. 3, and will pro-
ceed \ia Kennedy International
Airport to Israel aboard El Al
Bel Airlines, due to depart at
were placed along the ten-mile
route from the airport to the city.
No civilians were admitted to the
airport. The 40 Jewish families
living in Brasilia welcomed Mr.
Shazar after he arrived at the
Continued on Page 8-A
No Major Result Seen
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
raeli officials were reported as
not expecting any major result
to develop from the Security
Council hearing in New York
either from its complaint to the
Council or from the Syrian com-
plaint.
The view here was that any
just and objective resolution in
the Council would almost cer-
tainly be vetoed by the Soviets
and that a pro-Syrian resolution
had no chance of adoption. The
slight importance Israel attaches
to the Security Council debate
was apparent from the delay
with which Israel lodged its
counter-complaint to the Council.
gression. Separate requests for a
meeting of the Security Council
were made by both countries fol-
In its request, last Friday, for an
urgent meeting of the Security
Council, Ambassador Michael S.
Comay, head of the Israeli delega-
tion to the United Nations, accused
Syria of "repeated acts of aggres-
sion committed by Syrian armed
forces and by armed saboteur
groups operating from Syrian ter-
ritory against the citizens and terri-
tory of Israel in violation of the
Israel Syrian general armistice
agreement."
Ambassador Comay's letter also
complained of "declarations by of-
ficial spokesmen of the Syrian I
Government containing threats
against the people, territorial in-;
tegrity and political independence
of Israel, and openly instigating
to war against Israel in violation
of the United Nations Charter and
the Armistice agreement." Mr.
Comay advised the head of the
Security Council that he had been
designated by the Israel Govern-
ment to represent it in presenting
these complaints and in answering
the Syrian charges against Israel
at the Council session.
The Syrian complaint charged
Israel with "aggression against Syr-
ian territory on the afternoon of
July 14" and said that Israel's
move "constitutes a clear provoca-
tion to Syria and a threat to the
peace of the whole region of the
Middle East." It asserted that the
Israeli claims that Syria is respon-
sible for four incidents which took
Continued on Page 5-A
Ytshiva U. Enrolls 400
NEW YORK (JTA) The
largest number of rabbinical stu-
dents in the 70-year history of
Ycshiva University's Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Theological Seminary'
have enrolled for the 1966-67 aca-
demic year, it was announced by
Norman Abrams. administrative di-
rector. He said enrollment will ex-
ceed 4C0. an increase of about 10
percent over last year.
The Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary is the nations
! leading school for training of orth-
i odox rabbis. Since its establishment
i in 1896. it has ordained over 1.000
I rabbis.
Chicago West Side Negro
Slum Area "Hates Jews"

I Parade Sets
Brazil Visit
BRASILIA (JTA) President
Zalman Shazar of Israel was greet-
ed by Brazilian President Castelo
Branco, Vice President Jose Alk-
min. Cabinet members and military
leaders when he arrived here for
a 10-day state visit on his tour of
South American countries.
Also present at the airport to
greet the Israeli President were
diplomats, Congressmen, repre-
sentatives of Brazil's Jewish com-
munity and Archbishop Dom Jose
Newton of Brasilia. After a per-
formance of the national anthems
of Brazil and Israel, Mr. Shazar was
given a 21 gun salute. He reviewed
an honorary guard of the Brazilian
Navy, Army and Air Force.
Exceptional security measures
were taken by his hosts. Troops
o
CHICAGO (JTA) Chester
Robinson, the executive director of
the West Side Organization, which
was involved in the rioting last
week in Chicago's West Side Ne-
gro slum, said flatly this week
that "on this side of town. Negroes
hate Jews."
He discussed this and other ele-
ments of the Negro battle in a talk
with Pete Hamill, New York Post
columnist, after National Guard
troops quieted rioting which
smashed hundreds of Jewish-owned
stores. Local sources insisted, how-
ever, that the burning and looting
was an anti-white, rather than an
anti-Jewish outburst, in the for-
merly all-Jewish Chicago neighbor-
hood.
Robinson told the columnist
that a month ago he saw a tele-
vision program "with a guy on it
who said Negro feeling against
the Jew wasn't really very
strong. Let me tell you some-
thing," he told Hamill, "on this
side of town, Negroes hate Jews.
"They have been used by the
Jews and abused by the Jews. The
Jew has cheated the Negro in these
credit stores where he gets his
appliances and stuff, in places
where he goes for loans, in the
used-clothing stores down in Jew
Town on Halstead Street. The Jew
owns the grocery store and lets
the bills go up, then charges more
cause he knows you're in his pow-
er. No man, the Negro hates the
Jew, at least on Near West."
German Official Charged
BONN (JTA) Friedrich
Karl Vialon, state secretary of the
West German Ministry of Develop-
ment, has been charged with re-
sponsibility for the deportation of
Jews to concentration camps under
the Nazi regime, according to doc-
uments turned over to the Bonn
authorities by the Soviet Embassy
here.
The material, comprising some
100 documents, reportedly shows
that Vialon gave orders for the
transfer of Jews from ghettoes to
concentration camps and for the
confiscation of the valuables be-
longing to the victims.
New Chaplains
Enter U.S. Forces
NEW YORK (JTA) Twelve
new Jewish military chaplains have
entered the U.S. Armed Forces in
time to officiate at Rosh Haslionah
services for Jewish military person-
nel, it was announced by Rabbi
Selwyn D. Ruslander, chairman of
the National Jewish Welfare
Board Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy and spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Israel, Dayton, Ohio. Six of the
new chaplains have gone into the
Army. Three are assigned to the
Air Force and three will serve in
the Navy.
Recruited and ecclesiastically
endorsed by the JWB Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy, the new
Jewish chaplains replace those
Jewish chaplains who have com-
pleted their tours of duty and
have been released from active
service. The new chaplains bring
the total number of full-time mil-
itary and Veterans Administration
Jewish chaplains on duty to 72.
There are also more than 250 civil-
ian rabbis currently serving as
part-time chaplains in the various
services.
Two top United Nations aides, William Epstein (left) and
Gabriel d'Abroussier, will participate in the forthcoming Plen-
ary Assembly of the World Jewish Congress that will take
place in Brussels. Belgium, from July 31 to Aug. 9. Mr. Epstein
is the Chief ot the Disarmament Affairs Division at the U.N.
and will be a key speaker in a symposium on "Peace and
Disarmament." Mr. d'Arboussier, Director-Genera' of the U.N.
Institute of Training and Research, is scheduled to take part
in another special session on "Human Rights." In this round
table there will also be Prof. Milan Bartos. vice president of
the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts; Mr. David Morse,
Director-General, I.L.O., and Prof. Rene Ccwsin, president,
European Court of Human Rights.
Soviet Jewry Urgent Problem
NEW YORK (WNS) The most urgent human rights problem
that the World Jewish Congress has to deal with is the situation of
Soviet Jewry, it was declared here by Dr. Maurice 1- Perlzweig on the
eve of the fifth plenary assembly of the WJC.
The meeting is to open in Brussels on July 31.
"What is at stake," Dr. Perliweig said in his report for the
Geneva parley, "is nothing less than the survival of Soviet Jewry as a
distinctive cultural and religious entity," adding that it was "becom-
ing increasingly clear" that to achieve the aim of easing the Soviet
position toward Jews "it will be necessary to engage the interest of
all sections of the international community committed to the idea
of human rights for all."
The issue of human rights is expected to hold the attention of the
delegates to the assembly at a special session to be addressed by some
of the outstanding world authorities on the subject.
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'


Page 2-A
vJewisti FJcr/kiiatn
Friday, July 29 Use
Education Chief Resents
Raid On Hebrew Teachers
JERUSALEM (WNS) Sharp
criticism was leveled here at the
American Jewish community for
'"coming hat in hand to Israel to
beg for teachers" for Jewish
schools in the United States.
The criticism was voiced at the
40th anniversary convention of the
American National Council for
Jewish Education by Israel's Min-
ister of Education Zalman Arahne,
who told the parley there was no
ream why a materially rich and. American
educated Jewish community cannot
meet its own cultural needs.
He Mid his "anger soars" when
he hears "that the great and rich
American Jewry is asking Israel
to send teachers to the United
States," adding that the problem
of the teacher shortage could be
solved If they were given proper
end adequate wages, better con-
ditiens and a status conducive to
elevating the profession and
teaching standards.
ish educator. Dr. Azriel Eisenberg.
criticized three major American
Jewish organizations for opposing
federal aid to education in the
United States. Dr. Eisenberg is the
outgoing executive vice president
of the Jewish Education Committee
of New York and the director of
the World.Council for Jewish Edu-
cation. He SBid that the position
of those organizations the
Jewisbi Congress, the
American Jewish Committee and
the Anti-Defamation of B'nai B'rith
was "anything but helpful to
Jewish education."
lecture Series Continues
The third lecture on "The Art
of Contentment" will be given by
Dr. Abraham Wolf son before the
Spinoza Forum for Adult Educa-
tion on Thursday, 10 a.m., at the
Washington Federal, 1234 Wash-
ington Ave. Raphael Burstein is
Earlier, a leading American Jew-1 chairman.
Prominent Business Leaders Swell Ranks
Of Local Property Owners Association
Nathan S. Gumenick, owner of
Southgate Towers, and president
of the Washington Ave. South
Shore Assoc, announces the ap-
pointment of three prominent
businessmen to the Board of Gov-
ernors of the association.
New board members are: John
Forte, vice president of Forte
Towers; Stephen II. Carner, pres-
ident of Carner Bank of Miami
Beach; and William M. Klein, Mi-
ami Beach district manager of
Florida Power & Light Co.
The association, composed of
business and civic leaders, spear-
beads the redevelopment, beauti-
iH *wL
fication and welfare of the Miami
Beach South Shore area. It was
chartered as a property owners'
organization in 1939. Since then,
two divisions have been added: the
hotels (Miami Beach South Shore
Hotel Association) and the mer-
chants (Washington Ave.-South
Shore Merchants' Association).
"Primary project for the coming
year is a parkway for 5th St., a
widened, beautified South Shore
gateway to Miami Beach at Mac-
Arthur Causeway entrance to the
ocean, and the redevelopment of
surrounding areas," stated Raj-
Redman, executive vice president.
.
Rosichan To Head
Conference Talks
Arthur S. Rosichan, Executive
D'rector of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation, has been named
chairman of the forthcoming "Big
16 Federation Executives Confer-
ence."
The 1966 conference, to be held
from July 31 to Aug. 3 in Strat-
foid-on-Merritt. Conn., is an annual
conclave for the executive directors
of the 16 major federations in the
United States and Canada. Vital
topics affecting the American Jew-
ish community are presented and
analyzed in depth for their Impact
on federations.
Among sessions which Mr. Rosi-
chan will chair at this year's con-
ference are: "Federations in the
Next Decade," with speaker, Philip
Bernstein, executive director of
CJFWF; "The Voluntary Role in
Innovation, Health and Welfare
Leadership," Samuel A. Goldsmith,
executive vice president of the
Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Chicago; "Jewish Communities
Now and in the Next Decade,"
Donald B. Hurwitz, executive di-
rector, Federation of Jewish Agen-
cies of Greater Philadelphia; and
"Overseas Responsibilities A
Ten-Year Perspective," Henry L.
Zucker, executive vice-president,
Jewish Community Federation of
Cleveland.
Mr. Rosichan will also head the
testimonial dinner on Tuesday
evening, Aug. 2, in honor of Ed-
ward M. Warburg "for many years
of devoted leadership to Jewish
philanthropy."
John Forte
Steven Carner
William Klein
Israeli Nurses Seek Increase
TEL AVIV (JTA) Four
hundred surgery and delivery room
nurses staged this week a 24-hour
strike to press demands for pay
increases they claimed they de-
served because of their specialized
skills and work. A spokesman for
the nurses said they would con-
tinue to serve during emergency
surgery in accordance with exist-
ing practice on Saturdays. They
demand from 40 to 50 pounds ($13
to S16) more a month in pay. The
spokesman said that if the one-day
strike failed to produce action on
the demands, the nurses would
start a prolonged walkout next
week.
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Friday. July 29. 1966
+Jtwisti flbrkUairi
Page 3-A
Sen. McCarthy Questions U.S. Policies
With Sale of Arms to Israel and Jordan
NEW YORK (JTA) Sen.
Eugene McCarthy, Minnesota Dem-
ocrat, has questioned the shift of
United States policy from one of
non-involvement in arms supply-
to the Middle East to one of seek-
ing to maintain an arms balance
between Israel and the Arab
countries.
Writing in the current Saturday
Review, the Minnesota Senator ex-
pressed concern over "the spiraling
arms buildup" in that area.
He asserted that "it was diffi-
cult to believe that the increas-
ing supplies., of sophisticated
weapons in the area will con-
tribute to the maintenance of
peace or the reduction of ten-
sions." The criticism is part of a
larger argument that American
foreign policy is being "under-
mined by $35,000,000,000 worth
of armaments exports."
Eetween 1050 and 1965. accord-
ing to Sen. McCarthy, the United
States supplied relatively small
amounts of military aid to the
area of about $100,000,000 worth of
The World Jewish Congress
Plenary Assembly at Brus-
sels features a special ses-
sion on "Germans and Jews"
with participation of Dr.
Eugen Gerstenmaier, Pres-
ident oi the Parliament of the
German Federal Republic
(above). Other participants in
the seminar on Aug. 4 will be
Prof. Golo Mann, of Zurich,
Piof. Salo Baron, of New
York, and Prof. Gershon Shol-
em, of Jerusalem.
WANTED
FUND-RAISER
MALE Car, trainee acceptable,
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weapons to Iraq, Jordan and Saudi
Arabia.
Now Saudi-Arabia is buying
$400,000,000 worth of British sup-
ersonic jet fighters and U.S. Hawk
missiles. Jordan has been given
U.S. tanks and on Apr. 2, the State
Department said the United States
had agreed to sell "a limited num-
ber" of supersonic fighter-bombers
reportedly the Ix>ckheed F-104,
costing $2,000,000 each.
Sen. McCarthy indicated that,
poverty-stricken Jordan would
proffably get credit to buy the
costly planes. *
He noted that the State De-
partment had been under in-
creasing pressure about Jordan
because of the United States sale
to Israel of weapons previously
promised by West Germany un-
der an arms deal cancelled in
1965.
Sen. McCarthy quoted Secretary
of State Dean Rusk as saying that
the United States has tried over
the years not to promote the arms
race in the Middle East "and not (
to encourage it by our direct par-
ticipation.'* The Senator added it
Was "difficult" to reconcile that
statement with the "aggressive;
arms sales program conducted by
the Pentagon."
AMERICAN ISRAELI
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British Government
May Finance
Reactor Project
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Brit-
ish Government is ready "in prin-
ciple" to help finance the con-
struction in Israel of a nuclear
reactor as art of a project for de- !
salination of seawater, according
to a statement made this week by
O. R. E. Brooke, commercial at- i
tachc at the British Embassy here, j
He said that conversations look-
log toward such help have been
underway in London at a semi-
official level, and "consideration" ;
is being given the proposal for;
British aid.
Israel's Finance Minister Pin-
has Sapir discussed the subject
recently in London with Marcus
Sieff, chairman of the British
National Export Council's Com-
mittee for Israel, and with Ed-
mund de Rothschild. The latter
said that the British could match
the terms for the project offered
by the Americans, according to
Mr. Brooke.
The Daily Telegraph reported in
Ixmdon that Israel is contemplat-
ing the purchase from Britain of
: a nuclear desalination plant valued
at E71,000.000 sterling (S198,-
800.000).
According to the newspaper, the
Weit Westgarth Company, of Glas-
gow, is marketing an advanced,
! gas-cooled nuclear reactor for use
! in desalination of seawater.

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insurance annually under strict rules.
i\Ar. Abbott is a Life and Qualifying Repeating Member
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Manager of the Miami Biscayne Branch of the Canada
Life, Mr. Abbott has led his associates to a position of
prominence in the entire organization of the Company
in United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and
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Page 4-A
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Service. National Editorial Assn., American Assn. of
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Volume 39
Friday. July 29, 1966
12 Ab 5726
Number 29
The Argentine Coup;
Still too Early to Tel!
It is still too early to assess the
new position, if indeed there is one,
of the Jewish community in Argen-
lina since the ousting of President
Illia.
Immediate reactions were un-
questionably unhappy. A number of
Jewish shopkeepers were arrested
immediately following the military
coup. Police officials promptly ex-
plained the action by declaring that
the shopkeepers had contraband tex-
tiles in their stores.
Adding to the mounting tension
was the disclosure of the added ar-
rest of six directors of a credit union
cooperative formed at the turn of
the century by Jewish farmers and
cattlemen. In this case, the police
accused the cooperative of having
shipped out from Argentina some
$50 million during the two-day bank
holiday declared after the Illia
ouster.
So far as the shopkeepers are
concerned, they have already flatly
rejected the police claim, emphasiz-
ing that "people who shop here can not afford
expensive smuggled goods." And, in the credit
union cooperative affair, it has by now been
discovered that three of the six arrested persons
were not even Jewish, hence diminishing the
anti-Semitic view.
Nevertheless, the Illia coup may very well
portend difficult times ahead for the Jewish
community of Argentina. All that can be said
at the moment is: Almost a month has passed
tince the military takeover, but, so far as
Argentine Jewry is concerned, it still seems too
early to tell.
On the Firing Line
Rabbi Pinhas Teitz, president of the Union
cf Orthodox Rabbis of America, remains a stal-
wart soul under any circumstances. He has
rarely if ever been known to avoid the firing
line.
His appearance at the recent convention
cf the Rabbinical Council of America in Falls-
burg, N.Y., is a case in point. The Orthodox
Union previously voted not to participate in
the convention.
Rabbi Teitz, explaining his own participa-
tion, was quick and to the point: Only six mem-
bers of the Orthodox Union, he declared, were
present when the Union voted not to take part
in the Rabbinical Council convention. Further-
more, "most of the members of the Union who
have an active interest in Jewish life in America
end its problems, are with me."
Quite obviously, Rabbi Teitz has once more
taken his place on the firing line. Without say-
ing too much, he has in fact said quite a bit.
In effect, Rabbi Teitz has declared that the
Orthodox Union's vote was a vote against ac-
tive interest in Jewish life in America.
Vergelis reminds his readers that, while an
arch opponent of Glatstein's politics, he is an
unflagging admirer of his poetry.
Apart from this unbelievable use to which
Mr. Glatstein has lent himself and his talents,
the profoundly disturbing thing about it all is
that the article deals, once again, with Sholem
Aleichem.
We say "once again." We might as well say
"again and again and again and
again ." ad infinitum. The Soviet Union never
tires of talking about Sholem Aleichem, quite
as if he were the only Yiddish author who ever
lived and wrote. Whenever the Moscow propa-
gandists want to disprove their anti-Semitism,
they write an article about Sholem Aleichem
in one of their official newspapers, or Radio
Moscow comes up wilh one more monolithic-
ally humorless presentation on the same sub-
ject.
We would seriously suggest that Mr. Glat-
stein write a piece on how the Soviet master-
minds assassinated David Bergelson or Itzhik
Pfeffer, or that he speculate on just how Isaac
Babel in fact died. Would "Sovietish Heimland"
be as quick to publish this? These were also
world-famous Yiddish writers.
As it is, the Muscovites have the best of
both worlds. They've got one more article on
their favorite subject when it comes to Jewish
literature, and it is the product of a Western
Jewish intellectual mind.
Mr. Glatstein might have thought some
more about this.
Poet's Mind Exploited
"Sovietish Heimland," that much-vaunted
Yiddish-language magazine in the Soviet Union
used unrelentingly as a stopgap against the
charge of Moscow-inspired genocide to destroy
Yiddish culture, can now, like the traditional
pig, try to impress us with its kosher-style foot.
The magazine has just published its first
article by a non-Communist writer. The June
issue featured a piece by Jacob Glatstein, noted
Yiddish poet and novelist, who is a staff mem-
ber of the American Jewish Congress Office of
Jewish information.
In true democratic fashion, the article ends
with a disclaimer by Editor Aaron Vergelis,
which notes that Glatstein's opinions have
often elicited "serious disagreements" on the
part of the magazine; but, on the other hand.
India's Best Interests
The recent ruckus over Prime Minister
Ghandi's snub of President Shazar when Is-
rael's chief executive made a brief plane stop-
over in India on a tour of several African
nations would now be one for the record books
alone.
Except that a delegation of Indian Jewish
leaders met last weekend with the Prime Min-
ister to report to her on various Jewish enter-
prises. Among others, were plans for a major
celebration in 1968 of the 400th anniversary
of the synagogue in Cochin.
According to reports reaching here from
Bombay, Indira Ghandi pledged her "whole-
hearted support" to the observance.
All of which suggests that politics are pol-
itics and, where free men reign, have often
nothing to do with the realities of experience
In the case of the Shazar snub, which has of
course since been denied, the Prime Minister
was only" acting in the best neutral interests
Rome Gives Bea *
Book on the Jeivs
A Very Big Play
By JULIO DRESNER
Jewish Telegraphic Agency Correspondent in Rome
Rome
a I
BOOKSTORES HERE now display the Italian edition of Cardins
* Bea's book: "The Chur*h and the Jewish People \ Com tentar
on the Second Vatican Council's Declaration on the Rclatior of the
Church to non-Christian Religions." The English translation s due
to follow soon, to be published by Geoffrey Chapman in London
Dublin and Melbourne; and by Harper and Row in New York"
These are the structural parts of the book: Introduction: a short
note on the history of the document; the general human implications
of the Declaration; election of Israel and the origin of the Church'
the Jewish people and the actual events of the Passion; after the
events of the Passion; the mystery of the cross; living and working!
together; all men are brothers, and children of the same heavenly
Father. In an appendix, the text of the Vatican Councils Declaration
is given in full.
"The sole purpose of this book" the cardinal explain* in the
introduction (to which we will limit ourselves in this note, in order
not to anticipate the many reviews that will follow) "is to offer a
succinct explanation of the document" which well deserves to In-
called a "milestone in the history of the relations between the etrurch
and the Jewish people." Cardinal Bea notes that this is the first time
that an Ecumenical Council has treated these relations profoundly
* *
VARIABLE DEGREE Of SUCCESS
THE CARDINAL AGREES with those who consider that its -bene-
ficial effects will depend on the degree'to which it will be under-
stood, assimilated and put into practice" and therefore an aim of the
book is to assist the process of understanding."At the same t'me he
wants to explain the Scriptural foundations of the document and to
discuss its suggestions and the methods of putting' them 'into Bffect
The book is addressed to persons of ordinary education/not to social-
ists "since it is precisely upon them that the practical implementation
of the Declaration will depend."
After stressing that, doubtless, anti-Semitism has also other than
religious roots, he states that the Church's best contribution toward
a "gradual solution of the 2,000-year-old problem lies in her spiritual
and religious sources and in the attitude of the faithful." wh"m she
wants to understand the religious aspects of the problem and to
apply to it in all honesty the teaching of divine revelation.
Since many difficulties can be foreseen in the application of a
document which deals in 500 words with a problem 2.000 years oldWn
there is need for some clarifications "in order that the Declaration
may produce the greatest possible fruit."
The cardinal mentions, for instance, the problem of those expres
sions in the Scriptures which are unfavorable to the Jews. Generallv
he states, they were not directed against Jews as such, but against
their opposition to the spreading of Christ's words. In particular
however, each such expression or act requires a thorough studj
of circumstances and of historical context.
CONCRETE HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION
"I OVE OF TRUTH and justice demands that we should refrain from
judging statements made in earlier times by the standards which
the Church has only attained in the light of the progress and the
growth of our understanding of doctrine extending over centuries."
states Cardinal Bea.
True concrete historical interpretation will not explain away
ChU f';KS,aoCumenu ~ the parl of authoritative persons in
he history of the Church which is contrary to the spirit and the
6"e'0f 2*. nc,w Counc'1 document. But the cardinal reminds us that
nt 5 noudlfficulty in proven cases in acknowledging
that one of its members, or some particular or local church has erred.
iLl 2TP?' h?.refers ,0 the known story of the cult of Little
Simon of Trent, which was abolished.
The cardinal foresees some reservations and criticism from the
Jewish side for whom the book is written just as much as for
hSST*."? lt1"?eaks t0 Christians about Jews." Acknowledg-
ing that it.is natural that Jews are sensitive to any adverse criticism
of any particular Jew or group of Jews at any period of their Ion?
history because of past persecutions and especially of the Nazi
holocaust, respect for the truth demands," he states, that it should
* *
ESTABLISHING MUTUAL TRUST
^NOTHER KIND of Jewish reservation may refer to their fear that
card?neaIRya des"Vnd Purose of Christians is to convert them.
rt h itrem'.ndS I?!ders that the Church ner hides her con-
rounH. ?tV *heruduty to Pre^h. But with the Second Vatican
%5m fJ? r *? ^come a rule for the Churcn through ,he
Peclaiation of religious freedom" to consider it as a "duty and
fes n h Z mm PUrSUe truth and jus,ice ^cording to the die
tates of his own conscience, not impeded and not influenced."
wriMlnV3"!!"31, conc,u.^es the introduction by saying that it is
Z PJ ^ Z eStabUsh "mu,uaI trust ^tween the author and
of ,mlrL Cn;,de"ce f thiS kind is most important "when men
cLrit! Z mentallty, come ^ther in love of truth, justice and
human' ZSP9J^ ^ ""' "**" f the ta'"
22? fni.hUld,Kbe 8dd,ed n,y ,hat the bo** abt 120 pages
totrSSSJST e6 JUthne f Cardinal Beas valiant speeches,
as wfn ra"d rephCa de,ivered durin8 the Council on this subject,
Sten IhLh ina,nya,"CueS f his' or inspired bv him. which have
rSM tUnng th3t Pe,i0d throughout the world. However,
hvTh! i T bv completeness of his thoughts, by the method and
Man -J gi y dltJet*ai purPose Then he fought for the Declare- -
rea.'hT' JVT^ ,,ts teachin8; and what is more, he attempts to *g
cntieisn^ ,?nuy CaSUally he defends il aSainst very small
n^ZrZSS ^ CnS,derS thCm 8eneiaUy that he avoids to


n
Friday, July 29, 1966
*Jewish FkuridHatn
Page WL
Foundation Announces Cultural Grants
NEW YORK (JTA) Grants
by the National Foundation for
.Icwis'i Culture for the academic
year 1966-1967 were announced by
Label A- Katz- President, follow-
ing ;iclion of the Foundation's
Hoard, of Directors.
Eleven fellowships were award-
ed to indents who are completing
their doctoral work in the fields
of Jewish History, Semitics, Phil-
oMjphy, Hebrew Literature and
Culture, and Sociology. Universi-
ties M which these scholars are
.studying include: Brandeis, Brown,
Columbia, Johns Hopkins, New
York University, Pennsylvania,
Washington and Wisconsin.
Among the grantsin-aid award-
ed by the Foundation for the com-
ing year is one to Professor Irving
Ilalpcrin of San Francisco State
College for the preparation of a
t ook on the Literature of the Holo-
caust; and to Dr. Seymour Lainoff
for the completion of the Amer-
ican Jewish Novel.
Other awards made on the rec-
ommendation of the Grants Com-
mittee under the Chairmanship of
Edwin Wolf 11. are to the Cleve-
land College oi Jewish Studies in
behalf ot the Index to Jewish
Periodicals; to Harvard-Radciitle
Iiiuti lor the publication ot the
Jewish journal mosaic; to Vassar
Couege to assist in its course on
tonivinporai.v Jewisn i nought;
and to the conteience oi Jewisn
Pniiosophy.
Mr. t\au pointed out the award-
ing M grams is one 01 tne sifeiu-
1 leant luncuous oi the i-ounuauon
v nereby stuuents aie encouiageu
to prepare themselves tar careers
in various iieius ot Jewish schol-
arship. Almost $SdU,UOO m giants
have Deen maue oy the foundation
in live years. Many oi the recipi-
ents are now engaged as teachers
in Juaaica at universities, as writ-
free Classes At
Kneseth Israel
For the third consecutive year,
hneseth Israel Congregation is of-
fering free religious training to
the children of the community.
Classrooms are fully air condi-
tioned, and stall' members are ac-
cepted on the basis of competency.
Registration is open weekdays 1
to 4 p.m., Sundays, 10 to 1 p.m.
ers, archivists, librarians, research-
ers, lecturers, and other personnel
devoted to creative Jewish cultural
activity.
The National Foundation for
Jewish Culture was formed in 1960
upon the recommendation of a na-
tional study on Jewish culture
sponsored by the Council of Jew-
ish Federations and Welfare
Funds. In addition to its grants
program, the Foundation provides
consultation service to national
Jewish cultural agencies, colleges
and universities and to Jewish com-
munities, and seeks to enrich and
strengthen the total field of Amer-
ican Jewish culture.
Dr. Herzog Director Of Minister's Office
JERUSALEM (JTA) The ; also chair a special committee deal-
Cabinet approved the appointment
of Dr. Yaakov Herzog, Israel's for-
mer Ambassador to Canada and1
Minister in Washington, as Direc- i
tor General of the Prime Minister's [
Office. The post has been vacant i
since Theodore Kollek resigned
more than a year ago.
In his new post. Dr. Herzog will
ing with security matters and servo,
as the Premier's adviser for secur-
ity affairs, a function formerly
carried out by Isser Harel who,
resigned last month. Dr. Herzog-
had been named last year as tho
Chief Rabbi of Britain but later
withdrew on the grounds of ill-
ness.
Security Council
Meets On Conflict
Continued from Page 1-A
place on July 13 and 14 in which
two Israelis were killed and two
wounded by Arab exposives
have been denied by a Syrian mil-
itary .spokesman" and refuted be-
fore I Ik. Mixed Armistice Commis-
sion."
Ambassador Comay, in his com-
1 funication to the president of the
Security Council, following the Is-
raeli air attack, said that the air
strike uok place after evidence in-
dicate.! that the Arab terrorists
came iVam Syria, Planes of the Is-
raeli Air Force, he said, were
ordered to take "strictly limited
action" in order to impress upon
the S:nan authorities the gravity
with which the Israel Government
regarded the "continual Syrian
violence" against Israel and her
population.
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS VOUR DONATION
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when held for at least
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Minimum investment $2,000 or
more, in multiples ot $1,000.
Certificates or multiples thereof,
retained for less than six months
earn dividends at the current reg-
ular passbook rate of 4Vi % per
annum.
Dade Federal reserves the right to
discontinue issuance of savings
account certificates at its option.
REGULAR PASSBOOK
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Current Dividend Rate Paid and compounded quarterly
ANNUM
Effective on savings
accounts with minimum
balances of $1,000.
Our Main Office is open on Mondays and our Branch Offices on Fridays
until 8 P.M. On other week days we are open until 4:30 P.M.
"One of the Nation's Oldtsl and Largest"
Dade Federal Savings^
AND IOAN ASSOCIATION Of MIAMI
JOSEPH M. LIPTON, Preaidanl
MAIN OFFICE: 101 Ea*t Flagler Street
1 Convenient Branch Locations
Tamiami Branch
1901 S.W. 8th Street
' Allapatlah Branch
1400 N. W. 36th Street
North Miami Branch
12600 N. W. 7th Avenue
Edison Center Branch
5800 N.W. 7th Avenue
Kendall Branch
U.S. 1 at S. W. 104th Street
Cutler Ridge Branch
10808 Caribbean Boulevard
Our Resources Exceed 245 Million Dollars


Poge &-A
fJewisf fteridfian
Friday, July 29. 1966
The Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy of the National
Jewish Welfare Board an-
nounced that Chaplain (Ma-
jor) Ernest D. Lapp, an Army
Commendation Medal recip-
ient and a graduate of the
Chaplain Career Officer
Course, U.S. Army Chaplain
School, has been assigned
to South Vietnam, where he
will minister to Jewish mil-
itary personnel in that com-
bat area. He will arrive in
Vietnam in August, replacing
Chaplain (Major) Harry Z.
Schreiner, who has served
there since last October. The
other two Jewish chaplains in
Vietnam are Chaplain (Lieu-
tenant) Robert L. Reiner and
Chaplain (Captain) Alan M.
Greenspan.
Temple Sinai
Moves Offices
Offices of Temple Sinai of North
Dade have been moved to the tem-
ple's new location. 18801 NE 22nd
Ave., where all information on
membership and activities can be
obtained.
Until the new sanctuary is built,
Friday services will be held at
Washington Federal, at 8:15 p.m.
High Holiday services will be held
at the North Miami Beach City
Auditorium, 19th Ave. and NE
371st St.
Temple Sinai Religious School is
scheduled to open on Sept. 11. All
classes will be held at the John F.
Kennedy Junior High, from 9 to
1 p.m. on Sundays. Registration
will take place at the new offices,
Aug. 21 to 28
Morris Broad
Elected to YPO
Morris N. Broad, president of
American Savings & Loan Associ-
ation of Miami Beach, Peoples Na-
tional Bank of Bay Harbor Island,
and Best Insurance Agency, Inc.
of Miami Beach, has been elected
to the Young President's Organ-
ization (YPO), an educational as-
sociation with an international
membership of 2.100 chief exec-
utives who have become presidents
of sizable companies before the
age of 40.
YPO was founded in 1950 to
further friendships among young
chief executives, and thus provide
opportunities to exchange ideas
on mutual business problems, and
create an educational environment
to help the members become better
presidents and better men. By ex-
ample and leadership members
strengthen and promote the con-
cept of free enterprise and individ-
ual initiative which the organiza-
tion is dedicated to support.
Educational activities include
seminars at leading graduate bus-
iness schools, special seminars and
conferences throughout the world,
and the annual international Uni-
versity for Presidents. The Uni-
versity is YPO's week-long conven-
tion which features discussions
with leaders in fields such as man-
agement, finance, business ethics,
psychology, education, and govern-
ment and world affairs. Members
also learn from each other at over
300 chapter meetings each year.
MORRIS BROAD
TTaJxhc/t
ROCKING O CHAIR THEATRE
Oa fMi St.
e> CtlHm Anm
uruiMtGuns
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Reach in for a Handful of Money!
SR. CITIZENS 65c Mon.-Fri., 'til 6 p.m.
CLU Urges Stamp Be Dropped
NEW YORK (WNS) The
American Civil Liberties Union
this week called on the Postmaster
General of the United States to
abandon the idea of putting out
this year a special Christmas stamp
bearing a reproduction of the Ma-
donna and Child by the noted art-
ist Hans Memling.
The ACLU said the planned
stamp would clearly violate the
constitutional guarantee of separa-
tion of church and state and
"amount to governmental sponsor-
ship of, or participation in, the
celebration of a religious holiday."
The organization said it feared is-
suance of the stamp may set a
precedent for "uninhibited adop-
tion of Christian themes in stamp
designs."
A protest against the planned
stamp by the American Jewish
Congress was turned down by the
Postmaster General.
SS Florida Plans
4-Day Cruise
Over Labor Day
The SS Florida will reverse her
normal operating schedule and
offer a four-day cruise between
Miami and Nassau over the Labor
Day weekend, Kenneth A. Osborne,
vice president and general man-
ager of The Peninsular & Occi-
dental Steamship Co., announced.
The ship will sail from Miami to
Nassau on Friday, Sept. 2, at 4:45
p.m. and return to port on Tues-
day, Sept. 5, at 8:30 a.m.
The SS Florida will then sail for
Nassau Tuesday afternoon at 4.45
on a three-day cruise.
On her return to Miami on Fri-
day the SS Florida will revert to
her regular three-day sailings over
the weekend and four-day cruises
leaving each Monday through
Oct. 31.
Berthing records are now open
for the SS Miami.
p.1- '"" '\ ........
Last 3 Days
GEORGE C,
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Free Fishing from bridges or sea-
wall ... charter boats, drift boats and
skiffs available.
Free Golf. .. Free Tennis
Free Swimming ... salt snd fresh
water pools.
Magnificent Room* with TV.
Boat Docking accommodations
available.
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For reservations
call Sheraton Office
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Marathon: 1-743-5521
Ooc Harris, Manager
ww
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"CLOTHING"-"JEWELRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
Site for T Bldg.
Being Studied
David M. Blauner, investment
counsellor, has been appointed co-
chairman, with A. Lionel Bosem,
of the North County YM-YWHA
Development Fund, and chairman
of the Program Study Committee.
The Study Committee, organized
to determine the needs of North
Dade where the "Y" plans to build
a new facility, includes Robert Op-
penheimer, Morton Esan, facility
committee; Mrs. David Samuels,
Mrs. Robert Oppenheimer, cultural;
David Galabow, health club; Dr.
Alvin Stern, senior citizens; Mrs.
Stanley Mitchel, publicity; Hilliard
Avrutis, special consultant; Dr.
Stanley Mitchel, site; Stanley Bau-
man, Howard Max, physical edu-
cation; Mrs. Morton Esan, singles
and young marrieds; Mrs. Herbert
Holbrook, adult activities; Mrs.
Melvin Shrago, Junior High; Her-
bert Holbrook, mass activities.
Final plans are now being made
for the Founders Ball which will
herald the opening of the campaign
to raise funds for the new North
DAVID BLAUNER
Dade facility. To be held on Sat
urday, Aug. 13, at the Deauville
Hotel, chairman of the affair is
Michael Bodne.
Paul Faske is president of the
Greater Miami "Y" and Michael
Salmon is president of the Nort1:
County Branch.
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Friday, July 29, 196Q
-Jenisti nor id!ton
Page 7-A
Father and Son Ultimately Meet
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Henry Morgenthau Jr., Secre-
tary of the Treasury' in F.D.R.'s
cabinet, was 75 in May.
Sen. Javits is quoted as saying
that Amciica today would accept
a .lew as President. I do not know
whether aryone has yet calculated
which religious denomination has
produced the most presidents. But
the Unitarians, whose beliefs are
close to the Jewish, have produced
a number including Jefferson,
John Adams and I think Lincoln
must be included in that number,
and William Howard Taft was for-
mally associated with the Unitar-
ian church.
The religious issue of course
has played its part in the past.
Israeli Arabs Form
Educational Group
TEL AVIV (JTA) A spokes-
man for the new Israel Arab Action
Committee said this week that the
goal of the committee was "to dem-
onstrate to Jews in Israel and to
the public abroad that we are op-
posed tc all attempts at armed
action against Israel."
The spokesman. Rustum Bas-
touni, an architect and former Ma-
pam member of the Knesset, said
also that a majority of the non-
Jewish population in Israel identi-
fied itself with the state. He added
that an effort was now needed to
convince the Jewish population of
Israel that the problem of the
250.00C Arabs in Israel should not
be confused with the political prob-
lem of Israel's relations with the
neighboring Arab states.
"We regard ourselves as free
citizens of Israel and expect
equal rights," he declared. "If
we are suspected of conspiring
with hostile Arab states to bring
about Israel's overthrow and are,
as a result, subject to limitations
and discriminations, then we
have nc future here and we had
better leave the country.
"But,*' he added, "we were born
here, and we accept Israel's state-
hood of our own free will. We
believe it is perfectly compatible
to be an Arab and an Israeli cit-
izen. We also favor army service
for minorities."
He said the committee would
make its opinions known to Arabs
in Israel and to Arabs abroad, and
that it plans to send a delegation
to the United Nations General As-
sembly to call on the Arabs to
make peace with Israel.
Rabbi Pesach Z. Levovitz,
spiritucl leader of Congrega-
tion Sons of Israel of Lake-
wood, N.I., was unanimously
elected as president of the
Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica at its 30th annual con-
vention, held recently in
Fallsbuxg, N.Y. Convention
theme was "The Crisis in
Contemporary Religious
Thought."
Henry Clay running for Pres-
ident was attacked for having
taken a train ride on Sunday.
The Know Nothing Party cap-
italized on the anti-Catholic is-
sue but recently we saw John
F. Kennedy elected President.
Probably the growth in the Cath-
olic population of the country has
had its effect, but it does seem
true as Sen. Javits says, that "re-
ligious prejudice is less sharp. We
are less interested today in a can-
didate's ideas about Heaven, since
neither Congress nor the President
has power to regulate affairs up
there anyway.
A Jew has never been nominated
for President and we do not have
the voting strength of the Cath-
olics. Mr. Goldwater was nomin-
ated but he was like the cream
in the coffee only half and half.
Henry Morgenthau Jr. has at-
tained the highest political posi-
tion in the country a Jew has yet
attained.
The case of Mr. Morgenthau is
very interesting. The saying "like
father like son" doesn't work out
here. Morgenthau Senior was a
very successful lawyer and finan-
cier and prominent in public af-
fairs and he expected his son to
follow in his footsteps. He had
blazed the way. It would be much
easier for the son to take she same
road. Parents are that way. They
want to make it easier for children
but the new generation wants to
climb its own mountains.
Henry Morgenthau Jr. didn't
want to be a lawyer or financier.
He wanted to be a farmer. All
the world was going industrial
but young Morgenthau turned
the other way. He went to Cor-
nell University to study agricul-
ture, started his own farm, be-
came a very successful apple
grower and then branched out
as publisher of an agricultural
paper.
A neighbor of F.D.R., he aspired
to the post of Secretary of Agri-
culture for which his experience
and studies had given him the cre-
dentials but F.D.R. made him Sec-
retary of the Treasury. Perhaps
F.D.R. figured if a man could make
a successful business of apple
growing, he must be a financial
wizard.
Henry Morgenthau Jr. also
showed a will of his own in the
case of Zionism. His father was
Ambassador to Turkey, at the time
of the Balfour Declaration, prom-
ising the restoration of Palestine
as a Jewish Homeland, but Mor-
genthau Senior was opposed to the
Balfour Declaration and to the
whole Zionist idea. But the son on
the contrary was one of the found-
ers of the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion and also one of the chairmen
of the United Jewish Appeal.
Yet the anti-Zionist elder Mor-
genthau is entitled to the gratitude
of Israel for one very significant
thing.
He was instrumental as Amer-
ican Ambassador to Turkey in
getting both Ben-Gurion and
Ben-Zvi freed when in World
War I, the two were arrested
for Zionist activity. That made
it possible for them to come to
America to organize the Jewish
legion and help lay the founda-
tions of the Jewish State.
So father and son in their ulti-
mate works did meet.
Once upon a time, a rabbi was
chided by a Jew for not following
in the footsteps of his father.
"Your father" he was told "was
a great man. Why aren't you like
him and why do you not follow
in his footsteps?"
"I do follow in his footsteps,"
he replied. "My father always
spoke his convictions and so do I."
So perhaps in this case also,
fundamentally there was more re-
semblance between father and son
than might seem apparent at first
glance.
Young Israeli Jews
Sentenced As Spies
HAIFA (JTA) Three young
Israeli Jews, found guilty in dis-
trict court here May 8 of spying
for Egypt, were given prison sen-
tences here today, ranging from
two years to five years.
The heaviest sentence was met-
ed out against Gideon Goldstein,
20. He was convicted of having
crossed over to the Egyptian-held
Gaza Strip where he had been of-
fered 500 Israeli pounds (about
$167) monthly for furnishing in-
formation about Israeli army
movements. He recruited the two
other youths: Isaac Fishman. 18,
who was given two years; and Yoel
Reizman, 17, who was sentenced
to 18 months' imprisonment.
The three, according to testi-
mony during their trial, had col-
lected information for two months
about army movements in Israel.
They were caught by members of
the United Nations Emergency
Force when they attempted to get
into the Gaza Strip to pass on
thei rreports to the Egyptian In-
telligence.
Forceu Dy UNEF to go back into
Israel, they returned to their
homes and, later. Goldstein and
Fishman smuggled themselves as
stowaways aboard a Norwegian
ship bound from Haifa to Italy.
They were apparently apprehend-
ed by Israeli authorities after the
Norwegians captured them aboard
I that ship.
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Page 8-A
fjemistofkrkflan
Friday, July 29. 1966
Shazar Tour Reaches
Climax With U.S. Visit
Continued from Page 1-A
Motel Nacional which flew the
I residential Flag.
Many main street shops, offices
and institutions in Brasilia, Rio de
Janeiro and Sao Paulo were dis-
playing posters with the Pres-
ident's portrait, which had been
issued by the Brazilian foreign
ministry. The I.ubavicher school in
Sao Paulo also distributed large
welcome placards bearing Pres-
ident Shazar's picture. A caravan
of 30 official and 40 private cars
t >corted Mr. Shazar to the hotel.
During the ride, the two Presidents
discussed the meaning of the Holy
Scriptures, particularly the psalms.
In honor ot Mr. Shazar's visit,
the Brazilian Post Office put out
a special issue of a commemora-
tive postage stamp bearing the
lioness of the Israeli President.
Three million copies of the special
.stamp are expected to be distrib-
ute to the public. Many of the
k ading newspapers and magazines
in.Brazil published special editions
duvoted in whole or part to Mr.
Shazar's visit and to the State of
I>rael.
Out of respect for the religious
sensitivities of the Israeli Pres-
ident, special kosher catering fa-
cilities were set up at the Copa-
cabana Palace, the hotel used by
visiting dignitaries. One of the
Miites in the hotel was set aside
a> a synagogue, where religious
services are to be conducted by
two local rabbis.
In addition to being made hon-
oiary citizen of a number of cities.
President Shazar is to receive an
honorary doctorate from the Uni-
11 ratty of Brazil.
Shazar Witnesses
Uruguay Pact
MONTEVIDEO (.IT A) Vis-
iting Israel President Zalman Sha
zar attended last week a ceremony
in the Uruguayan Foreign Ministry
at which an Isracli-Uruuuyan
agreement was signed for joint de-
velopment and use of atomic ener-
gy for peaceful purposes.
Foreign Minister Luis Vidal Zag-
lio. who signed for Uruguay, then
presented to Shazar the principal
members of the foreign diplomatic
corps. The Posts Ministry said it
was rushing into print a second
issue of 100,000 postage stamps
bearing Shazar's portrait. The first
issue was sold out quickly and the
stamps were being sold on the
black market.
Gala dinners were staged for
Mr. and Mrs. Shazar by Pres-
ident Alberto Heber and Mrs.
Heber. The Israel visitors also
were guests of honor at a Uru-
guayan Philharmonic concert.
Mrs. Shazar told a luncheon giv-
en by the Organization of Uru-
guayan Jewish Women they
should maintain unity in the
fight on anti-Semitism and that
they made a greater contribution
to fostering Jewish conscious-
ness among youth than Jewish
men did.
Lasting friendship between the
two countries was pledged by Pres-
ident Alberto Heber at a special
meeting of the Cabinet in Shazar's
honor.
Federation Plans
Tour to Israel
Plans are ncaring completion for
the first annual. Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Study Tour to
Israel and Europe, it was an-
nounced this week by Arthur S.
Rosichan, Federation executive di-
rector.
In the planning stages for sev-
eral months. 20 young leaders have
committed themselves to partici-
pate in the tour, limited to 30
persons.
The tour will leave Miami on
Monday. Sept. 26, and spend two
weeks in Israel; participants may
then return to Miami, or spend an
optional third week in Europe.
Mr. aW^Irs. Marshall S. Harris
will be the leaders for the first
study tour. Syice the size of the
group is limited, Mr. Rosichan
urged that anyone interested in
participating, contact the Federa-
tion office as soon as possible.
Syria, Jordan Bar
Jews As Visitors
With Trade Group
NEW YORK (JTA) Syria
and Jordan have barred three
American Jews scheduled to visit
there next month as members of
a trade union group, it was re-
ported this week by the Retail,
Wholesale and Department Store
Union (AFL-CIO).
A spokesman disclosed that the
Arab governments had refused
visas to the Jewish members of a
union-sponsored tour of Europe
and the Middle East, scheduled to
leave New York July 12. The ac-
tion of the Arab governments was
in violation of earlier assurances
that there would be no discrim-
ination against the Jewish mem-
bers.
The union spokesman dis-
closed that Egypt and Lebanon,
which are also on the itinerary,
had not barred the three Jewish
union members. He added: "We
will not again plan visits to
countries where our members
would be exposed to such indig-
nities and religious prejudice."
Charging "bad faith" on the
part of Syrian and Jordanian con-
sular officials here, the union
spokesman declared:
"We deplore the attempts by
| these countries to divide our mem-
bers on the basis of religion. Our
union makes no distinction what-
soever among its members in terms
of race, religion or ancestry and
we resent the fact that such ir-
relevant and extraneous considera-
tions have been forced on us."
U.S. Solicitor General Thurgood Marshall addresses the inter-
national audience in the Wise Auditorium of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem prior to the groundbreaking ceremony
for the Harry S. Truman Center for the Advancement of Peace.
Judge Marshall represented former President Truman whose
participation in the ceremony was barred by his physicians.
At the speaker's table (left to right) are Teddy Kollek, Mayor
of Jerusalem; Abba Eban, Israel Foreign Minister; Walworth
Barbour, U.S. Ambassador to Israel; Eliahu Elath, Hebrew
University rPesident; Kadish Luz, Acting President of Israel
and Prime Minister Levi Eshkol. The second row consisted
mainly of 11 of the 41 Truman Center Founders, each of whom
contributed 8100,000 in support of the peace project.
*
Corruption Trial For Israel Judge
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
first trial of an Israeli judge to be
charged with corruption in office
opened here last week before the
Jerusalem District Court. Judge >
Eliezer Malchi is on trial on an
indictment that he allegedly ac-
cepted I4,000 (S1.333) to deal
leniently with a defendant in a
criminal ease.
A heavy police guard was posted
around the courthouse to handle a
huge crowd which jammed the!
building. The session was part of;
a preliminary hearing at which de-'
fense attorneys may raise technical
objections to the indictment docu-
ment.
Judge Malchi, who has not been
formally arraignd. nervously rif-
fled through law books while the
charge sheet was read to the court
by President Henry Baker.
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__


Friday. July 29. 1966
+Jewlsti fhridHan
Page9-A
Kennedy Memorial Dedication
In September 1964, a nationwide effort was initiated bv the' Jewish
National Fund of America to enlist the support of American Jewry
in the realization of an idea by the late President of JNF, Max Bresler;
namely, the planting of a forest and the erection of a monument in
honor of the late lamented President John F. Kennedy.
It took almost two years for the realization of that idea and the
dedication was set for July 4, 1966.
All Jewish National Fund Councils in the United States were
invited to participate in this most eventful dedication. Pursuant to the
invitations, delegations were organ-
ized from many cities and districts
and on July 4, 1966, as early as
9:00 a.m., thousands of people
were converging on the mountain
crowned by the glorious and most
impressive monument erected in
honor and in memory of John F.
Kennedy, surrounded by sufficient
land to accommodate 5,000,000
trees.
The Kennedy Memorial, consist-
ing of an edifice and a forest is a
labor of love brought into exist-
ence by the Jewish National Fund
of America. The Memorial impres-
sively proves that greatness trans-
rends time, place and even party
politics.
The design for this Monument
by the Israeli Architect David Res-
lick won first prize in a compe-
tition. Its simple appealing lines
convey many ideas. It consists of
fifty-one concrete pillars constitut-
ing the round structure seven
meters high and seventy meters
in circumference and it represents
the States of the Union, including
the District of Columbia. The in-
terior is illuminated from above
by a single opening in the saw-
tooth ceiling and is lined with
showcases which contain docu-
ments and photographs depicting
the career of John F. Kennedy and
a sculptured bust of John F. Ken-
nedy. In the center of the hall is
the eternal flame and through the
tall windows between the pillars
one can see the breathtaking gran-
deur of the hills surrounding the
Holy City. Here and there one sees
recently planted dark green wood-
lands.
The Memorial Plaza is paved
with black and gray granolite rays
broadening out from the center of
1he Monument giving the sense of
spaciousness. Below the Monument
on the lower terrace a beautiful
cafeteria, lounge and parking lot
was built and all around the hill
upon which this Monument is situ-
ated the Jewish National Fund con-
structed retaining walls and the ad-
jacent land is now in the process
of being landscaped.
The Monument is located a little
over nine kilometers drive from
Romema, the main entrance to
Jerusalem.
Standing near the Kennedy
Memorial, you have a breath-
taking vista of the ancient Beita
District, the stronghold of Bar-
Kochba's revolt against Roman
tyranny in 132 A.D.
Centuries of erosion on these
steep hillsides had despoiled most
of the soil and is as barren and
dismal as any desert can be. There
are Bible passages pointing to the
existence of thick natural forests in
this area. Wanton destruction of
the forest was renewed at various
stages and what was left was de-
stroyed by the flocks of goats be-
longing to the Bedouins.
Thousands of people assembled
on the temporarily constructed
amphitheater seats, many thous-
ands more than anticipated, and
the ceremony of dedication began
on July 4th, about 11:00 a.m.
Chief Justice Earl Warren, the
guest and main speaker for the
occasion, spoke for 25 minutes,
dwelling upon the history of the
Zionist Movement and the great
achievements realized by Israel
quoting the Prophets as the source
of inspiration for the re-birth of
a Jewish nation.
The Chief Justice quoted the
late lamented President, in part,
as follows: "It is time that all na-
tions of the world, in the Middle
East and elsewhere, realized that
Israel is here to stay: she will not
surrender she will not retreat
and we will not let her fall.
There have always been skeptics
iJK-~A-
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Morris Orfln, founder
Leon }. Ell. who here gives his
personal report on (he John F.
Kennedy Memorial dedication cer-
emony held recently in Israel, i.s a
retired lawyer, author, world trav-
eler and student of international
affairs.
He is ii member of the White
House Conference on Refugees, of
the U.S. Rejuaee Committee, and
represented the U.S. at the inter-
governmental committee on Euro*
pfiin Migration at Geneva in 1958.
He is on die national board of
directors and executive committee
of the Jewish TViirnmcil Fund, on
the bourd of directors of the
Union of American Hebrcu1 Con'
aregatt'OlM, and a trustee of the
Hebrew Union College, 1958-61).
Mr. 11 also serves on the
boards of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. United Fund and
Mental Health Institute. He is a
past president and lionorarv life
president of Temple Beth Sholom,
Miami Beach, and vice president
oj Farr Tours. Inc.
scoffing at the possibility of mak-
ing deserts bloom, and rocky soil
productive. In this regard, our own
country as a nation and Israel have
many parallels in the diversity
of their origins, in their capacity
o reach the unattainable, in the
receptivity to new ideas and social
experimentation. The Jewish Na-
tional Fund represents one of
Zionism's most constructive
achievements in human welfare
and social development."
The evening before the dedica-
tion a reception was held at the
Eden Hotel in Jerusalem, at which
reception top leadership of Israel
and from the diaspora were pres-
ent. It was an inspiring and most
interesting evening and a 37 year
THERE ARE
m
REASONS WHY MAIL
FOR JAMESTOWN, ALA.
CAN BE MISSENT..
reunion with the Chief Justice of
the Supreme Court of Israel high-
lighted my elation. I have known
the Chief Justice since 1927, when
still a law school student and
whose father. Dr. Agranot, was one
of a group fhat met daily at lunch
time to discuss local and world
problems in Chicago and who
moved to Haifa in 1929 and prac-
ticed dentistry until he died. The
group, including the writer, was
known as the Harmony Group. I
was highly flattered when he re-
membered me so distinctly and in
a three way conversation with
Chief Justice Warren, he said,
"that he was almost my law clerk
had he not left for Palestine in
1929." In the conversation that
ensued the writer facetiously said
that if nothing else, he has two
things to boast about Number
One that he clerked for Clarence
Darrow and Number Two that the
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
of Israel was almost his clerk!
The dedication of this impos-
ing monument to the memory of
John F. Kennedy excited the
imagination and buoyed the
spirits, not only of the delegates
but of all Israelites. For three
days you could feel a festive
holiday spirit in the air which
culminated at a dinner in the
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Hilton Hotel, Tel Aviv, attended
by 500 people.
Interspersed in the spirit of ela-
tion and pride was one fact that
marred the general festivity and
that was the absence at the dedica-
tion of any member of the Ken-
nedy Family and the disappoint-
ment gave rise to resentment and
speculation and the refrain was
"John F. Kennedy was the rose in
a field of thorns." The query was
repeated by scores of people "Does
the Kennedy Clan still belong
philosophically to the Cliveden Set
of yesteryear?" and I have heard
the paraphrasing of a quotation
from Samuels "Tell it not in Gath
but shout it in the streets of New
York."
Mr. Abba Eban, Secretary of
Foreign Affairs of the State of Is-
rael, delivered the main address
at the dinner and the general sense
of the talks delivered was keyed
to the hope that the hills near
Aminadad will now begin to
change from brown to green and
before too long the seel or ravaged
by centuries of neglect and ruin
will be brought back lo life again
in the name of John E. Kennedy,
whose own life was cut short on
that black Friday in November
1963.
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Page 10-A
+Jewish fhridUar)
Friday, July 29. 1966
Our Film Folk:
By HERBERT G. LUFT
Ross Martin Was Fluent in Yiddish Before English
Hollywood
JOSS MARTIN, star of CBS's new
* television series, "The Wild,
Wild West." was honored by the
photographic industry at a ban-
quet recently in the North Holly-
wood Sportsmen's Lodge, an event
highlighted by the presentation of
the annual Distinguished Service
tiuniaintaiian Award to Charles H. Percy, former
Bell & Howell president and chairman, who follows
such past recipients as Herschel Bernardi and
Stubby Kaye.
The event was under the auspices of the United
Jewish Welfare Fund campaign launched this year
1 toward the overall goal of SIO.000,000. While it has
not been unusual in the motion picture industry that
non-Jews such as Charles Percy lend their names to
non-sectarian humanitarian efforts of the Jewish
community, it so happens that Ross Martin, in spite
of his Latin looks, actually is one of us coming
with his parents from Grodek, Poland, to New York
when he was only a few days old.
As co-star of "The Wild, Wild West," Martin
reaches a highpoint in a series of versatile per-
formances. Portraying an undercover agent of the
U.S. Government, in the disguise of literally dozens
of itinerant vagabonds while pursuing his secret
assignments, Martin develops the qualities of a
one-man repertory company.
If he'd been born to a romantic era, Martin
might well have been the swashbuckling rogue he
portrays with such verve in "The Great Race," es-
pecially in his slashing duel with Tony Curtis.
Blake Edwards, the director of "The Great
Race." was one of the first to recognize Martin's
flamboyant talents casting him as Andamo in the
mmmm
"Mr. Lucky" television series a few years ago.
Switching to a more diabolical extreme, Edwards
guided Ross Martin in the role of the psychopathic
killer of "Experiment in Terror," a role that netted
him many award nominations.
Ross Martin said that he grew up in the tough
East Side tenement district where he learned Yid-
dish. Polish and Russian before taking up English
at the ripe age of five. It was the root from which
grew his skill as a dialectician of such Latin lan-
'iiifflmaMMBMfcwiitMiiin.in.iiiiiiriiir
UN Listening Post:
By SAUL CARSON
Arabs in Tizzy
United Nations
THE ARAB delegations here are
in a tizzy. For once, both the
United States and the United Na-
tions have confirmed charges
voiced here by Israel for a long
time, and especially at the last
session of the General Assembly,
about the manner in which inter- .
national monies are being misused in the apparatus
set up to help the Arab refugees.
The UN is concerned because the aid is admin-
istered by the United Nations Relief and Works
Agency for Palestine Refugees. Washington has a
legitimate interest because 70 percent of UNRWA's
iunds are contributed annually by the United
Slates. Both the UN and the USA, therefore, have
a right to know how the money is being spent.
For years, Israel has been insisting that the
UNRWA registration rolls are swollen with fraud-
ulent claimants. More recently, as last fall, Israel
has been pointing out that the United Nations
(and the USA indirectly) is subsidizing the Palestine
Liberation Organization by providing UNRWA help
to refugees serving in the PLO.
Now a probe by Washington has established the
truth of both claims. And, at its Beirut headquarters,
UNRWA has also conceded that (a) there are fraud-
ulent claimants on the UNRWA relief rolls, includ-
ing people who hold ration cards issued "to persons
who had died"! and (b) it is quite possible that young
refugees serving in the PLO are getting UNRWA
relief.
In Washington, the State Department has said
that there are between 8,000 and 12,000 Arab
refugees serving in or getting training from the
PLO. A dispatch from Cairo went one step further.
Not only are refugees getting UNRWA help. Some
of them, indeed, are employed for pay by the United
Nations Emergency Force the police group that
guards the Israeli-Egyptian-Gaza borders.
A spokesman for UNRWA said at Beirut: "When
you can't always eliminate dead men from refugee
ration rolls, how can you keep track of young men
undergoing military training who frequently come
home at night to sleep?"
Thus the UN official admitted 1) that there are
indeed dead men getting UN aid; 2) that some of the
people being helped by UNRWA are getting military
training in a force which openly proclaims its pur-
pose as making war against a friendly state.
When Ambassador Michael S. Comay, Israel's
chief representative here, said the same things be-
fore a General Assembly committe last year, he was
denounced by the Arabs. The U.S.A., indeed, also
backed Mr. Comay's charges. Now the State Depart-
ment is dishing up the same cup of tea which the
Arabs find bitter indeed.
On top of all that, the PLO's chairman, Ahmed
Snukairy, has not helped his cause. He announced
in Cairo that some of his boys are being sent to
Communist China to get training as guerillas, and
would receive this training by fighting against
United States forces in South Viet Nam.
C.....V .,
As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAL
How an Expert Can
Offer Some Advice
CHORTLY AFTER returning from a
* novice's look at the State of Israel.
I read with sadness that a labor dispute
had closed the new Mediterranean port
of Ashdod. Now I, too, along with a mil-
lion or so other tourists, had become an
expert on Israel; and so naturally I
could offer fine advice. Or could I? For
_ one way or another, the driving, vibrant,
....au.wants of that enterprising little country will
land right side up, hold off 40,000,000 Arab antagonists,
develop a stunning complex of industrial and agricultural
production, and show the world what a people with an
abiding love for literacy, art, music and life itself can
achieve in a fiercely competitive era.
"We are specialists in staying alive," our personable
guide, Arie Kligsberg, told our group early in the pro-
ceedings. One soon comes to appreciate the validity of
that claim. Much meat and grains have to be imported into
Israel; lumber needs to be brought from the Scandinavian
countries. But as to most other resources, the Israelis
scratch and dig and improvise and make the very best of
what nature has deposited there. Bom only 18 years ago,
Israel today has an economy comparable with that of
Holland: and the Middle East state's direction is always up.
There were many other memorable comments our
guide made as our eyes beheld the majestic hills, lovely
seacoast, and burgeoning countryside. "We didn't take
the Red Sea lying down," was one. A nation can do con-
siderable with phosphates and potash and modern ways
for extracting such valuable fruits of the earth. That now
pink-tinted, now golden lined stone one sees everywhere
can be blended with other materials and shaped into
homes a hundred, ten thousand, more and ever more.
True enough, the similarity of design grows monotonous.
But how majestic even the monolithic housing of touav is
for many whose people lived for centuries in caves; how
grand it is to know one is buying into a cooperative when,
just a few years ago, as a part of that oppressed band
uprooted by Hitler, one found refuge in the temporary
tin shacks that Israel had to construct.
Beholding the busy centers of Haifa, Jerusalem, Tel
Aviv, Ashdod, and environs, one is appreciative of the
industries now established along the way a steel mill;
a paper mill; granaries; a tire factory; turkey, pecan,
and peanut farms; and always the proliferating orange
groves.
But the sights and sounds of a booming productivity
are only a fragment of such a journey. To fly into Tel
Aviv in early evening and know the lights of that spec-
tacular metropolis are putting on a show for your plane-
load; to come for the first time upon wreath-crowned
Israeli military trucks of the 1948 War of Liberation,
rusting in glory on the hard-won approach to Jerusalem;
to see the loving care with which archaeological explora-
tions are carried on at Jaffa and Caesarea; to visit at last
the legendary place names Galilee, Jordan, Jezreel,
Beersheba; to go up seemingly forever into the eminence
that is Haifa; to grasp the dignity of the new Museum
and the Sculpture Gardens in Jerusalem these and
dozens of other adventures fill a heart with joy.
Overseas Newsletter:
guages as Spanish, Italian and French. Graduating
with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree
from City College, he continued for his Master's
in education from CCNY, taught marketing for a
year and went on to a law scholarship at the Na-
tional University School in Washington, D.C.
While earning a living as a buyer in a V. ashing-
ton department store, Martin started to pursue an
urge to act by accepting radio assignments. Finally,
he decided to give up his business career and de-
vote himself to acting under a CBS talent contract.
His growing recognition in a wide variety of tele-
vision roles in New York gave him Broadway breaks
in "Hazel Flagg," "Shinbone Alley" and "Guys and
Dolls'
Commuting to Hollywood between stage assign-
ments, he appeared on the screen in "Conquest of
Space." "Underwater Warriors'" and "Colo?5us of
New York." For several reasons, he has been the
guest of our home screen in TV's "Pantomime Quiz"
and other Hollywood television shew? In all. Martin
appeared in more than 300 TV segments, live and
filmed, a flock of movies and many stage loles.
i.
Oif the Record:
By NATHAN Z9PRIN
Need of Faith
HIEF RABBI Isser Yehuia Unt-
^* erman, sp:iitual head of the
Ashkenazic community in Israel, is
no stranger to American Jews. In
his visit to the U.S. some eight
years ago as guest of Mizrschi, he
left the impact of a man rot only
----- I steeped in scholarship but in
00| I worldliness and in undersanding
oi ine lorces that are operative in the world today.
His recent visit, at the invitation of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congregation of America, has
not only borne out but enhanced that imp.ession.
It was to be expected of course that the man
who symbolizes Orthodoxy in Israel should appear
on the platform of an organization that speaks for
Orthodoxy in the United States. What was perhaps
more significant was the fact that the gue?t they
invited exhibited a profound grasp of the currents
in Jewish life that are finding spiritual fulfilment
in forms not only other than Orthodoxy but other
than religion. Instead of holding cut purgatory for
the areligious and the irreligious, the venerable
Chief Rabbi of Israel developed the thought :hat all
men are bound by ties of faith whatever their be-
liefs or even disbeliefs.
As an example, he cited the fad that the so-
called unbelievers in Israel who challenged history
in their determination to establish the state were, in
reality, moved by a faith that believed in "nissim,"
miracles, no less than the Orthodox Jew. Call it
"nissim," call it whatever you will, the Rabbi said,
but its quintessence basically is faith. Only believers,
he told the dinner audience, could have lad the
courage, the conviction and the determina-Lon to
proclaim statehood against the advice of the prag-
matic wise who cautioned our people would be
engulfed by the hostile Arab world.
The military men who later planned the strategy
in the brilliant Sinai campaign that is now history
surely trusted their weapons and strategy, b'_t their
real weapon was faith, belief that the impossible
would happen, the Chief Rabbi told the dinner audi-
ence, many of whom probably came to see a "batlan,"
but saw instead an octogenarian as vigorous in mind
and vision as any bright eighteen-year-old. All men
live by a faith, he told the gathering, but what is
more is that "they derive their belief frj.r. the
same well."
By ELIA.HU SALPETER
Relations With Soviet Normalizing?
Jerusalem
COREIGN MINISTER Abba Eban's visit
to Warsaw last month to attend the
regional conference of Israeli ambassa-
dors in East European capitals was
widely interpreted in the pro-Govern-
ment press here as the first fruit, if not
a turning point, in Israel's relations with
the Communist countries. It was pointed
out that this is the first time such a conference was held
in an East European capital, the previous ones usually
having been held in Vienna or some other capital west
of the Iron Curtain, and that it was only last year that
Poland politely opposed the holding of such a conference
on its territory.
And, indeed, there are some signs that Israel's rela-
tions with the Communist countries are slowly emerging
from their low-point reached after the first Soviet-Egyptian
arms deal and the Sinai campaign (which, by the way,
destroyed or landed in Israeli hands much of that first
shipment of Communist weapons). In fact, the t ^freezing
of Israels relations with that part e-f the world seems
to be one of the many consequences oi the slow erosion
of the monolithic control by Moscow over her erstwhile
satellites. In recent years, it was almost a rule without
exception that the more independent a countrv is of Mos-
cow the less cold are her relations with Israel.
Thus, Bulgaria and Poland were the friei dliest for
many years, while with the East German puppet regime
there are not even formal diplomatic relations. (Actuallv,
East Germany is a special case, charaterized le>< by the
Pankow governments prolonged adherence to Stalinist
methods than by its refusal to accept, contrarv to Bonn,
any responsibility for what Germany had done to the
Jewish people during the Nazi era.) Significantly there
is a clear parallel between the attitude of each East .
European regime toward Israel and its attitude toward I
its own Jewish community; the better the relations with
Israel, the more readiness is there to permit Jewish
cultural life within the country.


Friday, July 29, 1966
v-hwist* IhrkHan
Page 11-A
What Will Israel Have to Interest Asia
Daniel Grodofsky has been
named to the new post of as-
sociate director of national
services of the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board. At pres-
ent the agency's consultant
on personnel, Mr. Grodofsky
will assume his new JWB
duties on November 1. He
wiD be associated with Man-
uel G. Batshaw, director of
JWB's national serrvices, and
will share responsibility for
guiding the specialist serv-
ices provided by this JWB
unit in the area of program-
ming, training, research and
publications.
JDeauville Names
I Banquet Manager
Charles Miller, executive food
land beverage director, Deauville
hotel, has announced appointment
of Fred Batzinger as banquet man-
I ager.
Batzinger, a veteran of the Mi-
| ami Beach hotel industry, was more
, recently affiliated here with the
^Diplomat Hotel in Hallandale as
laitre d'hotel of the Celebrity
*oom, and maitre d' of the Bath
and Tennis Club, East Hampton,
N.Y. He also served for several
years with the Deauville in the
feame post.
Watcomt Wagon Trtemattonal, with
ovar 5,000 hostesses, has mora
thin thirty yuri prianct in
fostering good will In business and
community lift. For mon informa-
tion about.. .
iWfclco
443-25*6
VRLCOME NEWCOMEMI
Um ihli (mpm to M
fcara.
M4n
0 Please haw the Welcome Wagon
Hostess call on me.
G I would like to subscribe to
The Jewish Floridian.
Fill out coupon and mail to
Circulation Dept.,
M.P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Ftau
By ELIAHU SALPETER
JERUSALEM (JTA) It is
one of the paradoxes of Israel's in-
ternational relations that her ties
with the underdeveloped countries
of Asia are much less close than
with nations of Africa and parts
of Latin America. Actually, one
has almost forgotten that friend-
ship with Burma and cooperation
in numerous agricultural projects
of that country not only was the
beginning but in many ways set
the pattern for Israel's technical
assistance programs to newly-
emerging nations.
After Burma, with the take-over
from U Nu by General Ne Win,
turned a more neutralist and prim-
arily inward-oriented path, the
close ties between Jerusalem and
Rangoon weakened considerably.
By that time, however, Israel es-
tablished very friendly relations
with Ghana which was the first
African country where Israeli ex-
perts began massive participation
in the local development projects.
From Ghana the road led to Ni-
geria, Senegal, the two Congos, and
to scores of other African coun-
tries.
And in the past two or three
years with the limit* of Israeli
cooperation in Africa practically
attained under the prevailing
circumstances the focus has
turned, in part, toward Latin
America, where the oldest and
largest concentration of Israel's
international supporters is to be
found.
Now, however, the process has
reached full circle. In the first half
of March, Israel's chief of staff,
Gen. Yitzhak Rabin, departed on
a good-will tour of six Far Eastern
countries. During his one-month
trip, he visited Burma, Japan, the
Philippines, Thailand and Cam-
bodia. The fact that he was ac-
companied on his tour by Col. Nah-
man Kami, head of the interna-
tional assistance department of the
Israel Army, indicates that one
has to expect more than general
expressions of friendship from
Gen. Rabin's meetings with leaders
of political life and military estab-
lishments of those countries.
There were three interesting
aspects to the list of countries on
Gen. Rabin's itinerary, two of
which are particular to Asia. First,
there was the broad political spect-
rum of the countries on the list,
from South Korea which today is
probably the most anti-Communist
country on the Asian continent,
through pro-Western Japan, Philip-
pines and Thailand, through neu-
tralist Burma to Cambodia, which
severed diplomatic relations with
the U.S. and oft professes friend-
ship toward Communist China.
While the area here may be some-
what wider, there is no funda-
mental difference here between
this list of friends and that in
Africa, for example, where Israeli
experts work in Western-oriented
as Well as in neutralist-leaning
countries. .
What is different concerns two
other aspects. First, while Israel
has friends all over Africa and
Latin America, two-thirds of
Asia is "out of bounds," being
the territory of Arab and pro- I
Arab Moslem countries and of
Communist China. Actually, Is-
rael has political relations with
only one of the four major Asian
powers Japan. There are no
relations with Red China and In-
donesia; and while there is mu-
tual recognition between Israel
and India, there has been no ex-
change of diplomats, Israel be-
ing represented in India only by
a Consulate in Bombay.
Thus, with the exception of,
Japan, Israel's Asian relations arc
limited to the secondary powers j
and smaller countries of the con-
tinent. (By the way, one of the
most interesting and closest
friends of Israel in Asia is Nepal,
situated high in the Himalayas, be-
tween China and India, both of
which, as indicated, are far from
staunch supporters of Israel. King
Hehendra paid an official visit to
Israel, and President Shazar went
in mid-March on a state visit to
Nepal.)
The second difference between
friendly African countries and
those in Asia now on Gen. Rabin's
itinerary was in the size of the
armies involved. African (not
North African, which are Arab)
armies are rather small and even
the largest among them are count-
ed in tens of thousands.
The South Korean Army, on the
other hand, with 600.000 men un-
der arms, is the fourth largest in
the world. Japan has 300.000 sol-
diers; Burma and Thailand 100,000
each: and only the Philippines and
Cambodia are under the 50.000 fi-
gure. This, of course, alters the
type of impact Israeli cooperation
can have, compared to the impact
on African armies.
Nevertheless, there are sev-
eral things Israel can contribute
to those countries. South Korea,
presumably, may be interested
in ways and means to maintain
the same military effectiveness
with smaller manpower.
Japan's army, still in the shadow
of World War defeat as far as do-
mestic opinion is concerned, could
utilize techniques for cooperation
with the citizenry and thus im-
prove its public image.
The Southeast Asian countries
are probably interested in methods
of protecting their ill-defined bor-
ders by paramilitary agricultural
settlements. And most of the six
are likely to be interested in Is-
raeli paratroop training and the
pre-military Gahna youth brigades.
c-K*****^********************^************************-^*-
Gurion's 80th Birthday
JERUSALEM (JTA) A spe-
cial committee of all political par-
ties and movements in Israel has
been formed to organize celebra-
tions for the observance of former
Premier David Ben-Gurion's 80th
birthday on Oct. 1. The 35-man
committee will handle preparation
of the Observance of "the old
man's" birthday.
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by ISABEL GROVE
Cruising on their yacht, State
Rep. Louis and Lynn Wolfson
and guests will spend a few days
in the Bahamas, starting with
Bimini and then another island
or two Other State Senators
accompanying them are George
and Ann Hollahan, Murray and
Helen Dubbin, with Carey and
Barbara Matthews left out, per-
force, when he was called to
Marine duty .
Friends and relatives gathering
for the weekend wedding of Rox-
anne Hirsch and Noel Robert
Zusmir include the prospective
bridegroom's grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Friedman, Mrs.
Pearl Dudick, Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Rabkin, Mr. and Mrs. Leon-
ard Frank, all of New York, and
Mrs. William Weisberg of Phila-
delphia, the bride's aunt .
Roxanne is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Hirsch Her
fiance is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Zusmir of N. Massapequa,
L.I. The couple will middle-
aisle it on Sunday evening at the
DuPont Plaza.
0
Jessica Rae Hurwitz, formerly
of Coral Gables, now of Daytona
Beach, a staff member of the
American Friends of Hebrew Uni-
versity here for the summer .
A graduate of Miami High, and
valedictorian when she gradu-
ated from Miami Beach Hebrew
Academy, Jessica received a de-
gree, magna cum laude, with hon-
ors in sociology, from Brandeis
University in June With a
choice of a four year graduate
fellowship from several universi-
ties, she decided on the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania and will
major in religion and sociology
. Her parents, Rabbi and Mrs.
B. Leon Hurwitz will visit with
her in Miami Beach during the
summer Rabbi Hurwitz is
serving as spiritual leader of
Temple Israel in Daytona Beach,
and is on the faculty of Bethune
Cookman College where he is lec-
turing on the "Philosophy of
Human Values."
* *
With both their daughters now
married, Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence
A. Weston of 1450 Cleveland Rd.,
feel like newlyweds, so for their
25th wedding anniversary they'll
take a second honeymoon .
Plan to stay at the Americana
Hotel in New York City, take in
the Broadway shows, and perhaps
add another shade of red to
Gotham Town .
Lily and Harry Schiff of Miami
Beach, who have reached Cali-
fornia on a coast to coast tour
Continued on Page 3-B
u 1AI<
oman s
lUorU
dfewislh Florfclian
Miami, Florida, July 29, 1966
Section B
Aviva Israeli, Miss Israel 1966, fourth runner
up in the recent Miss Universe Beauty Pag-
eant, visited with leaders of the Miami Beach
Hadassah groups on May 19. Seated (left to
right) Mrs. Henrietta Fine, Mrs. Joseph Shapiro,
and Mrs. Samuel Z. Sakrais who conducted
the indoctrination course for presidents that
day, Emma Lazarus Group; Miss Israeli; Mrs.
Henry B. Wernick, president, Miami Beach
Chapter; Mrs. Sol Greenberg, Henrietta Szold;
Mrs. Joseph Meyer, Israeli. Standing (left to
right) Mrs. Joseph Rosenberg, Southgate; Mrs.
Joseph Epstein, Bay Harbor; Mrs. Meyer
Schneider, Kadimah; Mrs. Harold Melnick.
Mrs. Betty Feuer. arrangements co-chairmen;
Mrs. Alex Dellerson, Stephen S. Wise; Mrs.
Sylvia Kurland, Hanna Senesch; Mrs. Emanuel
Mentz, Morton Towers; Mrs. Hattie Safir, Esther
R D I
4M Mi*W -
brwd
When city folk catch
sight of these way-out
westerns, watch out for a
stampede! Corraled here,
with the White Stag brand:
Shaggy white "Nor'wester";
a fun "fur" of Acrylic/
Modacrylic. $35
Buckle knickers in cotton
corduroy; string or
plum. 6-12. $10
Fun "fur" cardigan, in
string or plum. $16
Not shown, corduroy jeans, $10
misses' sportswear, third floor
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
(at all 6 Burdine's stores)


Page 2-B
vJemsti fhrkUan
Friday, July 29, 1966
............ '" !"i uiniiiiiiiii.raii
... 42^4bout J^eople ana i"
aces

THE SHOT GUN TOURNAMENT AT
WESTVIEW COUNTRY CLUB
A Shot Gun Tournament isn't anything like
a shot gun wedding. It's a nine hole golf match.
Players start at 2 p.m., returning several hours
later to the clubhouse for a barbecue dinner. The
children had their own brand of fun around the
pool. Westview members enjoying the change
of pace party were Dr. and Mrs. Harold Rand,
who were with a large group of friends, Dr. and
Mrs. Donald Michnoff, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Leder
feind, Mr. and Mrs. David Hochberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Login, and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lefcourt.
BETWEEN JUNE ANO AUGUST
So many things happen in the Dotty and
Leon Kaplan household between those two
months that it is a continual party. First came
Fathers Day. It was daughter Linda (Mrs. Rich-
ard) Brlckman's birthday too. So the family, in-
cluding son Stanley, went to the Studio Res-
taurant for dinner and had a flaming rum cake
for dessert. Next came Dotty and Leon's anni-
versary, celebrated by the family taking them
to an Italian restaurant for dinner proving that
they didn't have to diet. Linda and Dick's anni-
versai-y on July 9 was celebrated by the family
with a dinner in the Kaplan home. Daughter Rita,
now Mrs. Edwin Ginsburg, and her daughter
Lynn, celebrated their birthdays together. Lynn
is three and Rita, 24. It was a regular Friday
night family dinner at the Kaplan house with
birthday cakes galore. Lynn put up two little
fingers and said she was going to have two birth-
day parties. The next night, another one was
given by fraternal grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Zion Ginsburg. It might have been Lynn's
birthday but it seems as if the grandparents had
all of the fun.
DIO YOU KNOW?
Florence and Elsie Schwabe left for a month
in Portugal. Spain and North Africa.
Who is a secret agent? Marilyn Matter! She
isn't exactly, but she won a Proctor and Gamble
secret agent contest and is waiting for her prize
to arrive. It's a color polaroid camera.
Diane and Danny Heller got a card from

camp from Lisa in which she states she "isn't
quite so homesick anymore." She has stopped
crying, she "just gets tears in her eyes.'"
Frances and Jack Katzman write from Israel
that it is inspiring to revisit "this old new
land" and witness the progress made by its
people since their last visit.
Lilly and Harry Schiff write that they are
in the middle of their Western trip and are in
Los Angeles with daughter Eileen and husband
Charles Bonaparte from New York City, also see-
ing the sights. Next stop is San Francisco.
Martha (Mrs. Stanley) Myers' new stationery
is very clever. In the upper left hand corner the
replica of a sign in gold says "Mar-Stan's View."
The view is great. Martha writes from Henderson
ville, even to the red cardinals and squirrels who
feed at the bedroom door.
FAMILY REUNION
Bea and Maxwell Hyman are home from their
family reunion in Ann Arbor, Mich That's where
daughter Doris and husband Larry Sperling live
with their three children, Michael, Gene and
Anne. While the Hymans were there, the stork
brought Sperling number 4, a son named Kit-hard
Harlan. Ted and Sue Hyman and their three
moppets stopped enroute from Madison, where
Ted is taking his doctorate in International Com-
munications, to their home in Raleigh. Son Tom-
my who lives in Lansing, Mich., came down each
week end. Tommy, who will be in Miami for the
Thanksgiving holidays, gave his mother a list
of his favorite "fixings." Daughter Rita, husband
Leslie Bukstel and family, who live in Miami,
waited until their folks came home to have their
reunion.
SO SHE HAD TO WORK IN THE GARDEN
Helen (Mrs. Hyman) Kaplan felt that her
rose garden had been neglected while they were
away on vacation. So she got busy with the roses
and a scratch from the thorns got busy with her.
Chills, fever and an infection landed her in the
hospital, but by this time she will be home work-
ing in the garden but wearing gloves.
Frances Lehman
.ii
JWV Post States Talk on LSD
Continuing its summer series of
community programs. West Miami
Post, Jewish War Veterans, was to
presenr Sgt. R. R. Bellinger, inspec-
tor-incharge of the Southeast Dis-
trict Office of the Florida State
Board of Health, on Thursday His
subject was to be "LSD arid Its
Effect on Youth ir. Particular."
The 8 p.m. prrgram was to be-
held at post headquarters, Ahavat
Shalom, 975 SW 67th Ave.
Sgt. Bellinger, a Florida pharma-
cist, is also registered in Georgia
and New Mexico. He has been with
the Florida State Bureau of Nar-
cotics for 21 years, and is cur-
rently president of the Interna-
tional Narcotic Enforcement Offi-
cers Assn
Leo Schlachter is West Miami
Post commander.
The_EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT of
* ""-- m -?. '' 'rw
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF
ALL DIVISIONS OF ITS RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
THE SOIOMON SCHECHTER DAY SCHOOL
fM PfS "" c' C-^gral & HeV,i; Stud e, Grades 1 through 6
NURSESY-KINDERGARTSN DEPARTMENT
Half-Dy Pie-School M-CWfairal P-ogram
Blackstone Hotel Holds
High Holy Day Services
For the sixth year, the Black-
stone Hotel will sponsor High Holy
Day services, this year to be held
in the fully air-conditioned facil-
ities next to the hotel at 842 Wash-
ington Ave., Miami Beach.
Rabbi Abraham Korf, the repre-
sentative of the Lubavitcher move-
ment in Miami Beach, will conduct
the services, which are open to the
public and to hotel guests. Rabbi
Korf has built the movement into
an organization which includes
daily services, adult and children
study groups, youth activities, sum-
mer classes and summer camps.
Rev. Ernest Field-will be in
charge of the musical part of the
services and will chant the liturgies
for the sixth consecutive year.
WEEKDAY AFTERNOON HEBREW SCHOOL
Main e II ling. 170' VVc;'-,i.-i3to-i Avcnuj Toesdjy, Thursday, Sunday
North :' :h- T Si. '. Picons Ave Monchy. Wednesday, Sunday
SUNDAY J. CONFIRMATION DfPARTMENTS
Main Building 9 A.M. 10:30 A.M.
North Srancl- II A.M. 12:30 P.M.
Under lha personal supervision of Dr. Irving lehrman, Rabbi
Rabbi Arthur Hollander, Educational Director
Mrs. E J. Berman, Principal, General Studies Dept.
for further Information Cdrfl Itmrit IMAmi-tl SCHOOt. OFFICE
Main Branch at Washington Avenue: JE 1-9745
North Branch Building UN 5-0216
JWV Ladies Fete
Mrs. W. Adelman
Testimonial luncheon in honor
of Mrs. William Adelman, past
president of the Miami Beach Jew-
ish War Veterans Auxiliary, was
held recently at the Algiers Hotel.
Mrs. Adelman was cited for "out-
standing services during her two
years as president," and was cred-
ited with helping to "double the
membership of the Auxiliary, mak-
ing it the second largest in the
State of Florida."
Special guests at the affair were
Mrs. Arthur Lee, president, State
Department, JWV Auxiliaries of
Florida, and Mrs. Max Kern, na-
tional historian, who served as
chairman of the day.
A program of vocal selections
was offered by Stanley Rosensweit
accompanied at the piano by Paul-
ine Lynn.
Miamian In Line
For Nat'! Award
Mrs. Charles H. (Audrey) Finkel-
stein has just been named a Cita-
tionist in the I Awards competition in recognition
of "outstanding community service
in 1965."
Also designated Woman of the
Year and a Dade County Out-
standing Citizen last year, Mrs.
Finkelstein was nominated for the
award by University of Miami
President Henry King Stanford.
The citation means that Mrs.
Finkelstein, an alumna of the Uni-
versity, is among those being con-
sidered for one of two awards of
i $1,000 given annually to encourage
j volunteer work designed to ben-
I efit the American community. One
award is made to an individual,
and one to a group.
Last year Mrs. Finkelstein was
| honored by the National Urban
League for working toward equal
opportunity as chairman of the
Education Committee of the Com-
munity Relations Board.
She was one of 100 American
women invited to a Washington
conference to lay the foundation
for the Job Corps for Women, and
is also chairman of the Quality
Education Committee, appointed
by the Dade County School Board.
Mrs. Finkelstein has been active
in the PTA both at local and coun-
ty levels for the past 15 years. She
is a member of the National Com-
mittee for the Support of the Pub-
lic Schools, a board member of
the Community Television Founda-
tion, and an active member of Re-
cording for the Blind.
She was president for five years
of the Girl Scout Council of Trop-
ical Florida, is presently on its
board and is also active in the
GSC at the national level. She is
a member of the Metro appointed
Youth Advisory Board and is vice
president in charge of education
of the newly formed Council of
United Fund Women. She is also
vice president of the Council for
International Visitors and on the
board of the Welfare Planning
Council.
She was the first woman to serve
as president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee and is now serving her
third year in this post, as well as
serving on the national education
committee.
Mrs. Finkelstein is one of 184
candidates across the country to
attain citation status for the Lane
Bryant Awards. Each o: these can-
didates survived a rigid prelim-
inary screening carried ont by New
York University, Graduate School
of Social Work.
Fiiwl selection for the awards
will be made by a distinguished
panel of five judges. They are:
Edward W. Brooke, attorney gen-
eral of Massachusetts; Ralph Emer-
son McGill, publisher of the At-
lanta Constitution; Maurine B.
Neuberger, U.S. Senator from
Oregon; General Lauris Norstad,
president of the Owens-Corning
Fiberglas Corporation, and Roberta
Peters.
The awards will be presented on
Dec. 1, at the Plaza Hotel in New
York City at a luncheon honoring
the winners.
MIDDLE-AGED BUSINESS
WOMAN WANTED
o share my bedroom apartment.
$15. a week. References.
Call 12-240. 864-2784.
J:
SECRETARY-GIRL FRIDAY
for Rabbi of Leading Synagogue,
excellent working conditions,
stone-typist, knowledge of mim-
eographing. CALL 371-1882.
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
'FURNIT'JRE"-ABPUANCES
"ClOTHiNG"-"JEWElRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
Mrs. Louis (Bess) Glosser will
represent the Greater Miami
Urban League at the 56th
annual conference of the
National Urban League to be
held July 31 to Aug. 4 at the
Sheraton Hotel in Philadel-
phia. Theme of the conclave,
which is expected to attract
1100 delegates, will be
"Translating Equal Rights in-
to Equal Opportunity: A Pro-
gram for Action."
1966-67 Slate
Installed July 4
The following officers of the
George Gershwin Ladies were in-
stalled by Mrs. Jack Herman, past
president, on July 4: Mrs. Milton
Hurwitz, president; Mrs. Murray
Streiff. president-elect; Mrs. An-
drew Hersbin, Mrs. Harry Herman,
vice presidents; Mrs. Irving Wein-
stein. treasurer; Mrs. Irving Rubin,
Mrs. Irving Bick. Mrs. Morris Sil-
ver, Mrs. Harry Eilen, secretaries;
Mrs. Jack Herman, parliamen-
tarian.
Dancing and entertainment fol-
lowed (he induction ceremony,
held at the Surfside Community
Center.
Spaghetti
Dinner
ii Hi I ftw'C
We use the Jewish word
"mychel" because we don't
know How to say "extremely
delicious dish" in Italian.
Which is exactly what you get
from this one package. Cook
spaghetti to taste. Heat and
dd authentic Italian Mush-
room Sauce. Top with lots of
iippy nheese. Easy, quick.
SLRVE SOME TONIGHTI


Friday. Ju]y 29, 196S
vJewisti norid/an
Page3-B
Y1 Under-Six Committee Forms
Mrs. Milton Sirkin has been
named chairman of the YM-WHA
County Comittee for Children Un-
der Six according to an announce-
ment by President Paul Faske. ,-
On assuming the post, which
supervises the Nursery School
program for all the YMHAs in
Dade County, Mrs. Sirkin reported
that a committee has been appoint-
ed and will work throughout the
summer on the two annual county-
wide early childhood development
affairs scheduled for the Fall.
The annual parent education
meeting to be held in October has
Mrs. Allen Kornblum as chairman,
and a premiere showing of a film
will be the major fund raising af-
fair of the County ECD committee.
ECD registration is now open for
children in the 3 to 5-year-old
bracket at the Central, North
County and Miami Beach "Y"
blanches. YMHA schools are sup-
ervised by a staff which has been
professionally trained in early
childhood education.
MRS. MILTON SIRKIN
Mrs. Sonia Smelansky, of 139 Meridian Ave.,
mother of the late Dorothy Friedman, Amer-
ican painter, presents one of her daughter's
works, "The Cotton Picker," to Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross, principal of the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami. The gift-painting,
in honor of the artist's 10th Yahrzeit, will hang
in the board of directors room at the school,
2400 Pine Tree Dr., Miami Beach.
K^octaiite ... b\j Isabel \-jt
Continued from Pag* IB
are so happy on their travels,
they "highly recommend the tr:p
to everyone" .
Among many friends giving bon
voyage cocktail parties and din-
ners for David and Carolyn Hess,
and Carolyn's mother, Claire
Katz, who leave shortly for a
rove
Scandinavian holiday, are Mme.
Mana-Zucca and husband Irwin
Cassel (she is the internationally
known composer and pianist), Ed
and Mary Mandell and Lou and
Gert Alexander of Hollywood,
whose beautiful table was gay
with Norwegian, Swedish and
American Hags, and a luscious
bon voyage cake.
Agudath Israel Marks 15 Years
Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute,
founded on the 'Sabbath of Com-
fort Ye' in the summer of 1951.
will mark its 15th anni' i-rsary dur-
ing service- on Saturday morning,
according to an announcement by
Morris Feldman. president. A buf-
fet reception in honor of the occa-
sion will tallow the celebrat'on.
Spiritual leader of the synagogue
since it; organization is Rabbi
Isaac Hirsh Ever, author and
scholar, who has seen its member-
ship r&ster grow to the present
600 families.
Dr. Ever is included in the 1965-
66 "Who's: Who" in the South and
SouthweM. in the enlarged edition
of "Who'i Who in World Jewry,"
and the 1958 "American Jews
Their Lives and Achievements."
His biography, "Israel Honorar-
ium," in six volume, will appear
next month.
Saxony Appoints
Asst. Manager
Herbert Katz, managing director
of Miami Beach's Saxony Hotel,
has announced appointment of
Wesley E. Griffith as assistant
manager.
Griffith was assistant manager
of the Fontainebleau hotel for 11
years, and has been resident man-
ager of the Barcelona Hotel.
A member of Tropical chapter,
Hotel Greeters of America, and
other hottl and travel associations,
Griffith it a resident of Hollywood,
Fla.
KABBI ISAAC EVER
U.S. Synagogue Leaders
At Geneva Convention
GENEVA (WNS) Some 150
synagogue leaders from the U.S.
and Canada, representing congre-
gations affiliated with the United
Synagogue of America, are ex-
pected to converge here for the
sixth international convention of
i the World Council of Synagogues
on Aug. 3 to 5. Other delegates,
about 100, are to come from twenty
. other countries.
Mogul Leaves
For New Post
Ira E. Mogul, assistant treasurer,
member of the executive board,
and chairman of interreligious ac-
tivities for the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee is leaving Miami for
Philadelphia where he has accepted
the post of general agent of the
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insur-
ance Co.
During his nine years in Miami,
Mogul has served as chairman of
the Heart Association of Greater
Miami, vice president of the Junior
Chamber of Commerce and pres-
ident of the University of Pennsyl-
vania Alumni Club.
He also held the office of secre-
tary in the Boston Colh>ge Alumni
Club, was an instructor in char-
tcrcdlife-underwriters at the Uni-
versity of Miami, and on the fac-
ulty of the high school department
at Temple Israel.
Fund-Raising Needs Approval
MEXICO CITY (JTA) a!
committee representing all Mex-
lean Jewish central institutions de-
clared this week that Jewish fund-|
raisers from other countries will
not be permitted to seek donations
in Mexico without prior permission
from the committee. The commit-
tee is comprised of the Jewish
Central Committee, the Ashkenazi
community and the Mexican Zion-
ist Federation. It was organized to
control and coordinate all fund-
rasing among Mexican Jews. The
committee asked Jewish organiza-
tions in the United States, Israel
and other countries to stop send-
ing fund-raisers to Mexico without
consultation with Mexican Jewry.
ANSWERITE
TELEPHONE ANSWERING
SERVICE
Serving
JEFFERSON UNION
HIGHLAND FRANKLIN
MURRAY PLAZA
NEWTON
FR 3-5581
YOUR
TELEPHONE
PROPERLY ANSWERED
IS YOUR GREATEST
BUSINESS ASSET

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Page 4-B
fJewteti ncridliain
Friday, luly 29, 196(5
Israeli Prime Minister Levi Eshkol (center) meets with Morris B.
Abram (right), president of the American Jewish Committee,
and Judge Theodore Tannenwald, Jr., chairman of the AJC
Committee on Israel, during recent visit to Israel that coincided
with the dedication of John F. Kennedy Memorial Forest. AJC
officers also conferred with Foreign Minister Abba Eban,
former Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, Education Minister
Zalman Aranne, and officers of the Hebrew University.
Mapam Party Poses Possibility of Crisis
As Austerity Program Is Introduced
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
leftwing Mapam party, a member
ef Premier Levi Eshkol's Mapai-
dominated coalition Government,
posed the threat of a government
crisis this week over Finance Min-
ister Pin has Sapir's three-year
austerity program.
Mapam leaders warned the
Premier that Mapam would not be
able to continue in the coalition if
the Sapir plan was adopted without
major changes. They said they
could not accept "sacrificing the
workers' interests" unless similar
steps were taken for industry. The
Premier reportedly promised that
before the Government acted on
the Sapir plan, it would be dis-
cussed informally by the coalition
partners. A certain coolness about
the plan also was reported among
members of Achdut Avodah. the
Mapai alignment partner, who also
asked for clarifications about the
plan.
The plan, designed to cope with
Israel's economic problems and to
eliminate a $500,000,000 annual un-
favorable trade balance, calls tor
a ban on wage increases for three
years except when tied to greater
productivity; payment of the cost-
of-living allowance once a year
instead of every six months; spe-
cial legislation to prevent strikes
affecting exports, such as those
that recently tied up the Haifa and
Ashdod ports; encouragement of
industry to increase productivity
and penalties for industries failing
to boost efficiency and output.
The plan calls for a growth in
annual exports of $450,000,000 by
1969 and proposes creation of
nearly 40,000 new jobs, primarily
in export industries, import sub-
stituting industries and slum clear-
ance projects. Also provided for
are special benefits for export en-
terprises in tax rebates and exemp-
tions from national insurance
premium payments. '
The plan would also continue a
second stage of imports liberaliza-
tion program with a gradual lower-
ing of customs rates on competitive
imports and establishment of large
joint marketing firms to sell export
products of small industries. In
presenting the program the Fin-
ance Minister warned that firms
unable to operate under the lower
protective tariffs would have to
close down, even if it meant in-
creasing joblessness. The plan en-
visages 50.000 unemploved workers
in 1969.
Abolition of the legal maximum
on interest rates also was proposed,
while low interest loans would
continue to be available for "pro-
ductive branches." The plan as-
sumes no increases in Government
and municipal taxes but calls for
a new gifts to supplement the in-
heritance taxes and a capital tax
to replace the present property
taxes on equipment and stocks.
GIVE
THE
priceless"
GIFT........,
A
LITTLE
OF
YOURSELF
BE A UNITED
t.
FUND VOLUNTEER
CALL
377-8311
the best
recipe
for
folks
^-newly
moved
to GREATER MIAMI
Tike one phone call (or coupon
below), idd hostess with basket*
of gifts and information about the
city, stir in genuine hospitality,
and ytu'll have i generous and
delightful welcome. Just phone
tna&onoe?
443-2526
MUOM MWCOMOtM
Hue eteeee to
Minm.
O Please have the Welcome Wagon
Hostess call on me.
P weuld like to subscribe te
The Jewish Floridian.
Fill out coupon and mail te
Circulation Dept.,
M.P.0. Box 2973, Miami, Flo.
Bill for Sabbath
Observance Aired
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Sabbath observance bill which
would impose fines of up to 1.000
pounds ($333) on factory owners,
shopkeepers and artisans for work-
in;; on the Jewish Sabbalh or other
religious festivals was introduced
by the Government in Parliament
this week and evoked vigorous
debate.
Labor Minister Yigal Allon in-
troduced the bill on behalf of the
Government coalition of labor and
religious parties as a compromise
measure. Foes assailed it as an in-
fringement of personal freedom
but it was expected to be passed.
The measure represented a new
focus of the struggle in Israel be-
tween religious and non-religious
groups in Israel. The religious par-
tics have been battling for years
for a rigid Sabbath law which
would ban public entertainment,
sports events and many services.
Qther parties in and out of the
coalition campaigned in the last
elections against any new Sabbath
restrictions.
The Labor Minister said that the
measure would only extend to self-
employed Jews in Israel and mem-
bers of cooperatives the restric-
tions which have been applied in
the hiring of workers since 1951.
He said the measure would not
affect hotels, restaurants, cafes,
places of entertainment, gasoline
stations, bathing beaches, swimming
pools and sports arenas. Some of
these services are banned in some
Israeli localities and presumably
the bans would remain in effect
locally. The restrictions would ap-
ply to the affected persons both
on the Sabbath and on nine holi-
days when work is banned under
Jewish Religious Law.
Shlomo Gross of the ultra-Ortho-
dox Agudat Israel Party announc-
ed that his party would oppose the
measure. He said the proposal in
effect sanctioned more Sabbath
transgressions than it banned. Dr.
Elimelech Rimalt of Gahal, the
Parliamentary faction of the right-
wing Herut and some of the Lib
erals personally an observant
Jew opposed the measure on
grounds that "the legislature has
no right" to enforce such prin-
ciples of use of the police.
Rocky Lauded For Signing Bill
NEW YORK (WNS) A
statement lauding Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller for signing the amend-
ment to the 1965 Textbook Bill,
which increases state aid for text-
books to children in non-public
schools from the 7th through the
12th grades, was issued here by
Agudath Israel of America, one of
Corner Bank
Board Adds Two
Election of two veteran officers
of the Carner Bank of Miami Beach
to the board of directors has
been announced by Jack Carner,
chairman of the board of the 12-
year-old bank located at 937 Wash-
ington Ave., Miami Beach.
M. H. Honsinger, executive vice
president, and Robert D. Lang,
vice president, were elected to the
board. They will serve under
Stephen H. Carner, president of
flobert Lang H. Honsinger
the Carner Bank of Miami Beach.
Honsinger, who began his bank-
ing career with the Imperial Bank
of Canada in 1927, became an
American citizen after World War
II service overseas with the Royal
Canadian Air Force. He jotned the
Bank of Miami Beach in 1857, and
lives at 6105 N. Bay Rd.
Lang, who joined the Bank of
Miami Beach eight years ago after
service as a vice president and di-
rector of the Miami National Bank,
served for nine years with the
Florida State Banking Department
as a bank examiner before becom-
ing a bank officer. He has been
a resident of Dade County since
1922 and lives in Miami.
New York Hospitals
Raise Room Rates
NEW YORK (JTA) Seven
Jewish-sponsored hospitals in New
York City raised this week or indi-
cated plans to raise their basic
room rates following a wage in-
crease to non-medical and semi-
professional workers.
Maimonides Hospital in Brook-
lyn announced its room rate in-
create would go up to $8 per day
on Aug. 1. The average daily
charge for a semi-private room is
$75 per day for all services except
private doctors" care. Montefiore
Hospital in the Bronx said it would
raise its rates by S5 a day per
room.
Long Island Jewish Hospital, the
Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, Mount
Sinai Hospital. Jewish Memorial
Hospital and Beth Israel also indi-
cated plans to raise rates. All but
Jewish Memorial Hospital are af-
filiates of the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies of New York.
All of the city's voluntary hos-
pitals with agrements with Local
1139 of the Drug and Hospital Em-
ployes Union were expected to pass
on the increased costs to their
patients.
the stmmchest backers of ;he text-
book bill.
Rabbi Morris Sherer, executive
vice president of 'he organization
said thrt "Gov. Ro .,. dc'
serves the coir.mci,d;.t:oi ol every
American for not bowing to the
pressure of doctrinaire church
state separat'onists. wfeej BtfWcated
his vetoing the TexthOek BUI."
The amendment is a compromise
formula which spreads out the in'
crease evenly over a three year
period, by granting $15 per pupil
lor each of the next three years
beginning September 19fifi.
Indemnification Conference
BONN (JTA) Dr. Nahim.
Goldmann conferred h*T*j with
Finance Minister Rolf Dahlgruen
and explained to him the need to
end further delay in payments of
indemnification to victims of Naz-
ism. The West German Government
announced last year it was defer
ring in 1966 and 1967 payments
from a special hardship fund for
certain classes of victims of Naz
ism for budgetary reasons.
Dr. Dahlgruen promised to do al!
in his power to avoid unnecessary
delay. Dr. Goldmann said. How
ever the Bonn minister said he did
not know himself the exact budget
ary situation and would not be abl<>
to give Dr. Goldmann further de-
tails until September.
Dr. Goldmann told the press tha'
Dr. Eugen Gerstenmaer, president
of the Bundestag, the West Ger-
man Parliamentary lower house
would join him in a discussion, a*
the plenary of the World Jewish
Congress in Brussels, on German
Jewish relations. The plenary will
open at the end of July.
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in sum pinous settings.
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4


Friday. July 29. 1966
+JmisiincrAflGV7
PageS-B
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If I
.* .
Forget Thee
By MAX LERNER
EDI j
-St. Louis
Speaking here recently to an audience including students and
recent graduates from a number of universities. I found them less
obsessed with political protest than one might gather from the recent
commencement episodes. I thought I detected, as I have elsewhere
around the nation, the beginnings of a cyclical swing away, among the
students, from the heavy politicizing of their outer world to a concern
with their inner world. p
Partly this may be due to the habit-fatigue which inevitably sets
in when there has been continued focus on any issue. But mainly it is
the harvest o/ the emphasis which our writers have been placing on a
whole array of problems concerned with the inner individual life of
the students: On learning to be and know themselves; on not becoming
estranged from whatever they need ties with; on keeping themselves
from being crushed by the new juggernauts of their society con-
formism, the media the computer, organizational bigness; on the sexual
revolution and the new morality; on forming attachments, reading
erotic literature, probing erotic experience, flirting with drugs, deciding
what things count in life.
* .
The student has been asking these questions for some time, but
1he doubts about the war and the bitterness about the draft have been
strong enough to push them aside or throw them out of focus. If they
are beginning to come back into focus now, it is because the student
knows that even after the war is over, these other questions will remain.
The older generation, which is baffled by the outbursts of some of
the students at the recent commencements the parading of placards,
the gesture of walking out of the ceremonies, the wearing of white
protest bands on the sleeve forgets that every generation needs an
enemy. In a letter to one of his brothers, a decade or more after the
Civil War, Henry Adams wrote that during the war, "We knew who
1he enemy was. But may I be hung out to dry for the next 50 years
jf I know who the enemy is now."
The World War II generation counted the Nazis as the enemy.
That of the Cold War period felt the enemy was the Communists. But
it is hard to hand over an enemy from one generation to another. The
activists of the present student generation have picked their own enemy
symbol: They call him Lyndon Johnson, and sometimes Robert Mc-
Namara. Sometimes so strong is their need for an enemy they
even call him Arthur Goldberg.
But there is another need that may be even stronger. Simone Weil,
that strange writer-saint who died in 1943, left behind a book in
which she called this need of the soul "the need for roots," and isolated
the disease of our time as "uprootedness."
Every modern society is experiencing this disease now, whether
Communist or democratic, whether developed or developing. In fact
the developing countries, whose uprooting from their traditional so-
cieties has been so rapid and drastic, are experiencing the failure of
roots even more violently than we are.
There is a story about the great English historian L. B. Namier.
that sheds some light on this need. (I found it in a new book by J. L.
Talmon "The Unique and the Universal" to be published in Sep-
tember by Braziller.) Namier was a Polish emigre whose family, aspiiing
1o be accepted in the landed Polish nobility, had tried to hide its Jew-
jshness from the world and from the boy too.
Making a new life in England. Namier became an influential his-
torian of English politics, a strong conservative, and a dedicated Zionist.
Toward the end of his life he was invited to lecture at the Hebrew
University. He began his lecture, using Hebrew, with the great Biblical
passage which is at once lament and affirmation "If I forget thee,
O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its cunning." and he continued
to the end of the passage as the tears rolled down his face.
What is there that the young American today feels this way about?
What is his Jerusalem? Not America itself, nor its history, since
patriotism of such depth would be a monstrous thought. Not Paris as
a moveable feast, which it was for the generation of Hemingway after
World War I. Not the proletarian idea, which gave the generation of
the 1930's some rootedness in past struggles and considerable zeal
for the future. Not a religious tradition, since God has been pronounced
dead. Not the University itself, toward which one feels no affection or
loyalty, and which is only the arena of struggle against the enemy.
Not one's family and its memories, because the family also is tainted
by the enemy or is simply not there; Not even the "New Left," which
? may be a fightmg faith fer some but offers little in the way of roots,
only a new uprootedness and a new set of enemy symbols the Estab
lishment, the power structure, and "white liberal."
That may be why the stadent is increasingly turning inward. But if
the disease is uprootedness, the cure lies not in self-analysis or in
narcissism, but in finding something about which one may some day
say, "If I ferget Thee ."
N.Y. Times Studies
CORE Attitudes
NEW YORK (WNS) The
New York Times, in a study of the
sharp decline of contributions by
Northern liberals to the more mili-
tant civil rights organizations, gave
as one of the reasons for the de-
velopment concern over CORE and
S.N.C.C. attitudes that were de-
scribed by many persons as black
racist, anti-Semitic or "extreme."
According to the Times reporter,
Edward C. Burks, eighty percent
of the contributions to CORE have
come from the white community,
with Jewish contributions most
predominant. The reporter quotes
Joseph Willen, executive of the
Federation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies, as having said that CORE
apparently had decided not to be
an interracial group any longer
and that "the opposite of that is
racist." He said Jews are disturbed
"about what they fear is growing
anti-Semitism among Negroes." He
also told of a recent meeting with
a CORE official who, he said, made
sharply anti-Jewish remarks in his
face. Had that man been a white
Protestant, Mr. Willen is quoted
to have said, "I would have slap-
ped his face."
Facts & Figures
By BORIS SMOLAR
Some of the companies in the
insurance field claim that Jewish
young men are not attracted to the
field because they are ambitious,
and salaries are not commensurate
with what they can achieve else-
where.
This claim is definitely refuted
in a study made recently by the
American Jewish Committee of
following passage of a series of
tests, so that an individual can
reach the $12,000 or $13,000 state-
in five years.
It is interesting that, in New
York, there has been a significant
change with regard to the involve-
ment of Jewish young men at en-
tering levels, after the Civil Rights
Bureau there made a survey of
several companies. The number of
Jews admitted into the manage-
the relationship of Jews to com- ment trainee programs of the life
mercial banking. It is pointed out insurance companies has increased
in that study that Jews are em-
ployed in large numbers in gov-
ernment service, teaching and so-
cial work fields which are nei-
ther aggressive nor highly remun-
erative.
Moreover, information based
on Cornell University research
shows that Jewish young people
do not differ significantly from
their Protestant and Catholic
counterparts in the attitudes
and values they bring to the job
world.
Nat'l CORE Body
Expels N.Y. Chapter
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Congress of Racial Equality dis-
closed here that it had expelled
its Mount Vernon Chapter as an
aftermath of an anti-Semitic re-
mark made by a chapter officer.
Clifford Brown, then educational
chairman of the chapter, told an
audience of 100 persons, including
Jews, that "Hitler made one mis-
take, he didn't kill enough of you."
The shouted remark came at the
height of a heated meeting on
school integration of the Mount
Vernon Board of Education last
Feb. 3.
James Farmer, then CORE na-
tional director, called the remark
"intolerable" and ordered an in-
vestigation. Several members of
CORE'S national board, including
Will Maslow, American Jewish
Congress executive director, were
not satisfied with Mr. Farmer's re-
action and resigned.
Later, Mr. Brown apologized and
he resigned. In announcing the ex-
pulsion, CORE said it had "to
spend thousands of man-hours dis-
avowing bigotry." A spokesman
said that there had been a sharp
drop in contributions to CORE
which currently has a $200,000
deficit.
In the insurance field, a college
graduate can start out within a
range of between $5,200 and $5,600 factors and the
a year. Within five years, such I cess, values and
trainees would rise to about $9,000.
The starting salaries for actuaries
is about $6,200. Thereafter, salaries
of actuaries rise in gradual steps,
since the inquiry began.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee started examining the bar-
riers to employment of Jews in
non-traditional fields of work
about six years ago. Under a
grant from the Falk Foundation,
studies have been undertaken by
the Harvard Business School,
Cornell University, the Survey
Research Center at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, and the Uni-
versity of California.
These studies deal with the hir-
ing procedures of major business
in the United States, non-ability
promotional pro-
attitudes of Jews
as they relate to the job world, and
the social milieu of the large
corporations, including club mem-
bership.
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Culture Group
Announces Grants
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress has received its
second $100,000 grant from the
Ford Foundation for the Interna-
tional Foundation for the Inter-
racial Council for Business Oppor-
tunity.
The ICBO was formed in 1963
and is co-sponsored by the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress and the
Urban League of Greater New
York.
The ICBO was formed to provide
business advice and assistance to
Negro businessmen and to help
them apply for financial assistance
when needed. Negroes who wish
to start their own business are
encouraged and guided by the over
200 New York City businessmen,
both white and Negro, who partici-
pate in the Council's work on a
voluntary basis as consultants.
Fourteen banks are also partici-
pating in the program.
Offices of the ICBO have been
established in New York City, Los
Angeles, Newark and Washington,
D.C.
The total pledge made to the
American Jewish Congress by the
Ford Foundation was $300,000
to be paid in three equal yearly
installments.

4
___


Poae B-B
9-Jenisf fkrkttan
Fridoy. July 29, 1966
<7>
ranees
XJ
*n We
the
Women

~3^"M
1 **-"
F ^r^lJjB
r%- JUDY
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Judy (Mrs. David) Drucker has a fine heritage of music.
A Brooklyn girl, she is the daughter of concert singer and
pianist Lillian Nelson who was in the original Metropolitan
Quartette. Her maternal grandfather was a noted cantor
and rabbi. Rabbi Solomon Levine. The whole family is
inclined towards music. She studied piano when she was 11
at the New York College of Music. Even though she studied
the piano she wanted to sing but
was afraid that she wouldn't be
good enough to live up to her
mother's standards. The Nelsons
moved to Miami Beach in 1941. At
Beach High, the music teacher
heard her sing and put her in the
choir. After school she would take
voice lessons in secret, paying for
them with her lunch money. One
day someone from the Opera Guild
called at home to see why she
wasn't at rehearsal and the secret
was out. It was during war time
and Judy was a little girl with a
big voice, singing for the soldiers
in the hospitals and U.S.O. One
day she met a night club legend,
Willie Howard, and sang with him at the old Latin Quarter
on Palm Island. She started out at the University of Miami
School of Music when she was 15. Adding a few years to
her real age she was able to work her way through college
by singing at the Latin Quarter and The Brook Club. She
has thrilling memories of Martha Ray and Milton Berle
at the Latin Quarter.
David, her future husband, who had been a major in
the Marine Air Corps, a fighter pilot, heard her sing at the
Latin Quater. Then he saw her on the campus at the Uni-
versity and couldn't believe her eyes. Her father shook his
head, it was David for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Judy
had so confused herself about her age that when she finally
reached her majority she didn't even know it. They had
a hard time to fit their wedding date in with Judy's final
exams, her senior recital, singing with the Symphony and
graduation day. She has a degree from the University of
Miami and she also attended the Curtis Institute of Music
in Philadelphia. Two years ago she went back to school,
working towards a Masters Degree and Certification to
teach music. The Druckers have three songs of their own,
Kathy, who already is in the a cappella choir at Beach High,
Vicki and Andy.
Art and music go together. Judy is active in the Sis-
terhood of Temple Beth Sholom, where she is director of
the fine arts gallery, chairman of a new series of Chamber
Music and week-end music director. She is on the board of
the directors of Greater Miami Philharmonic.
The Druckers do a lot of entertaining and Judy is often
referred to as the Perl Mesta of musical circles. She thinks
it's great that her husband wasn't so musical when they
were married. When she first met him his taste ran to
music like "Begin the Beguine.' Now after being exposed
in such a big way to better music, he has developed into a
music critic as well as a music lover. Judy thinks that it is
fine that he is not a musician too. There is no tension and
every thing she does he thinks is just great.
She was given a gift of a little furry animal they
named Iago so that everything that went wrong in the
household could be blamed on him. That tiny little bit of
fluff has turned into a big German Shepherd dog. Next
March on the seventh day, to be exact, a long cherished
dream of Judy's will come true. She will give a recital in
New York City in Carnegie Hall. But Greater Miami is
delighted with the Judy that they know and love.
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Geraldine Katzen
Is Engaged
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Katzen. 4539
Royal Palm Ave.. have announced
the engagement of their daughter
Geraldine Barbara to Michael H.
Radell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Radell, 3894 NW 2nd St.
The future bride is a graduate of
Miami Beach Senior High, and has
a degree in education from the Uni-
versity of Florida. She will be on
the faculty of Opa Locka Elemen-
tary School starting with the Fall
term.
Her fiance is an honor graduate
from Miami Senior High and at-
tended the University of Florida.
He is now a sophomore at the
Baltimore College of Dental Surg-
ery, University of Maryland, where
he is a member of Alpha Omega,
dental fraternity.
MISS GHMID/NE KATZEN
Miss Klein To Be
December Bride
Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Klein.
8640 SW 122nd St.. announce the
encasement of their daughter.
Miriam Ruth, to Allan J. Taksier,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R
Taksier, 8501 SW 43rd St.
Miss Klein graduated from Miami
Palmetto Senior High. She has an
associate of arts degree from the
University of Florida, and a bach
elor of education degree from the
University of Miami., She now
teaches English and journalism ai
Palmetto High.
Mr. Taksier graduated from Cen-
tral High School in Detroit, Mich,
and attended Wayne State Uni
versity and the University of Mi-
ami. He is presently associated with
the S. S. Pine Co. of Miami.
The couple plan a December
wedding.
T Singles Plan
Swim Party, Meet
A swim and bar-b-que party con-
ducted by the "Y" Singles Club
will be held Saturday, Aug. 6, 8:30
p.m. at the YM-WHA of Greater
Miami, 8500 SW 8th St. There also
will be dancing, community sing-
ing and refreshments at the party,
open to all "Y" Singles members
and guests.
In charge of reservations are
Jackie Jordon and Sarah London.
Refreshments and social hour
will follow a game, "Post Time at
the 'Y'," to be featured at the club
monthly meeting on Monday even-
ing, Aug. 8. in the Golden Key
Room of the Central YMHA.
'Polka' Wins Poetry Contest
Monthly contest of the Laramore-
Radar Poetry Group, sponsored by
Mrs. Leah Udell, was won at a
meeting in her home on July 19
by Mrs. Esther Church for her
poem, "Polka."
MffS. MICHAEL TATKEN
Local League Unit
Cited In New York
Mrs. Michael (Guss) Tatken,
founder-chairman of the Florida
Chapter of the Women's League
for Israel, has returned from New
York with an award from the na-
tional organization.
Organized a little over two years,
the Florida Chapter of the League
draws its membership of over 100
women from N. Miami Beach, Ft.
Lauderdale, Hollywood and Mira-
mar. Mrs. Tatken, associated with
the League for over 20 years, is an
honorary life member, and served
as chairman of a chapter in New
York City before coming to Florida.
Since its founding in 1928, the
Women's League for Israel has
built five Y-style homes in the prin-
cipal cities of Israel where young
women newcomers live, are taught
Hebrew, and given vocational
training.
Some 50,000 girls have been
taken care of in these homes and
are now serving in Israel as doc-
tors, lawyers, scientists, working
at a trade, and as housewives and
mothers of a new generation of
Israelis.
Presently, the League is enlarg-
ing its home in Nathanya to con-
vert it to a board-in training school
for handicapped as well as normal
girls. This is in addition to the
Workshop for the Blind which the
organization maintains adjacent to
this home.
At the Hebrew University, the
Women's League for Israel built
dormitories for girls, the Students'
Cafeteria which provides hot meals
at nominal prices to more than
1,500 students a day, and the 3-
building Student Center.
Ner Tamid Award
To 3 Nagler Sons
Three brothers, Joel, Bruce and
Malcolm Nagler will be presented
with the Ner Tamid Scouting
award during Friday evening serv-
ices at Congregation B'nai Raphael.
The award, highest in its category,
is for "voluntary services to the
synagogue."
Sons of Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Nagler, the boys are members of
Scout Troop 467 sponsored by the
North Dade Optimists. Lou Min-
gacci is Scoutmaster.
Emanu-EI Camp
Offers TV Spoof
TV or not TV? That is the
Question" will be posed in sons
and skit by the Temple Emanu-F.l
Day Campers at their closing pro-
duction to be held in the Main
Sanctuary of the Temple, 1701
Washington Ave.. on Thursday
evening. Aug. 4. at 7:30 p.m.
Parodies on scenes from TV pro-
grams will be presented by the
groups under the direction of the
counselors.
Temple Emanu-EI Summer Day
Camp will complete its ninth year
on Friday, Aug. 5. The camp pro
gram was supervised by Dr. Irving
Lehrman and directed by Milton
Feinstein.
Members of the day camp staff
this year included: Mrs. Berta Bar-
nett, Miss Judy Deutschman. Stu-
art Cypen, Miss Carol Trent, Miss
Sally Krachmer. Jeffrey Kaplan.
Robert Feinstein, Miss Inez Sam-
uels, Miss Maxine Firtel, Miss
Susan Singer. Steve Greenberg.
Arthur Litowit? and Mrs. Joseph
Grifkin.
Splash Party
Set for Sunday
Chaim Weizman Group of Ha-
dassah is having a splash party and
chicken dinner at the home of
Mrs. Charlotte Gouz, 540 SW 25th
Rd., on Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.
Chairmen of the afternoon are
Mrs. Harvey Cypress and Mrs. Wil-
liam Schoenberg.
President of the unit is Miss
Rosalyn Klein.
TRANSFORMED!
by the loss of 31 vital indies
at her local Staufhr Salon
Why net let the Steuffer System transform you?
Pearl Lindner has good reason to bok
pleased. Maturity had intensified her thigh
problem so that she was forced to avoid
sheath skirts ... So she came to Stauffer.
Who would think to look at her she was six
times a grandmother? And these are the-
results that put a big smile on her fact
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Friday. July 29. 1966
W fenist ffcrfctisfr
Page 7-F
C
Localites Attend Nat'l CARIH Meet
QUESTIONS often come in over
the phone. Some callers iden-
tify themselves, others don't, but
many questions asked are ones
that others in the community are
curious about.
One of the most frequent ques-
tions concerns the length of the
dress that is considered appropri-
ate to the occasion. The floor
length gown is being worn more
- find more, and is usually seen at
most functions your columnist at-
tends. Unless the invitation spe-
cifically states "dress informal,"
you can reasonably expect to see
Jeng gowns at the larger evening
affairs.
There are two basic reasons
for seeing so many gowns these
days. First, properly fitted, the
floor length gown is more elegant
than the street length dress. Sec-
ond, this gown usually represents
a larger financial investment than
its street length counterpart.
Most women are astute in their
wardobe buying, and several have
stated that they want "to get their
money's worth" out of this in-
vestment. As long as they have
the gown they want to wear it
more than once or twice.
These two reasons for women
wanting to wear a formal length
gf.wn often creates a problem.
This is a situation which many of
you have consulted me about.
*
TTHE discussion is with a mother
" who is planning her son's
Bar Mitzvah reception. What orig-
inally was planned as a fairly
simple, family-type party, often
becomes a more elaborate affair
held in either a hotel or country
club. The mother is still trying
to maintain some of the family
informality while her friends are
urging her to plan a party where
Ihey may wear their gowns.
In the middle of the winter sea-
son, when the fashion trend is
always more formal, there is sel
dom a problem. It is the off-
season party which usually cre-
ates the question under discus-
sion.
The "rule-of-thumb" when en-
tertaining, and the carefully
planned Bar Mitzvah reception is
"entertaining," is to do what
would please the majority of
guests the most. Therefore, if
your friends do urge you to plan
your party and mode of dress so
that formal gowns may be worn,
and you do consider the fact that
the women will enjoy wearing
them, then plan it so that they
will receive additional' pleasure
from the reception.
* *
RJOWEVER, after carefully re
" viewing the fashion motives
and social obligations of the
hostess, it is advised that the
personal desires of the family are
also to be considered. Unless the
Bar Mitzvah reception is defin-
itely planned as a formal social
function, the mother should plan
the party and mode of dress to
suit her individual standards.
When the reception is primarily
planned for the boy, his friends,
his family, and their immediate
circle of friends, then the mode
of dress that would make the
mother the most comfortable
should be chosen.
Strictly speaking, from the
point of view of social etiquette,
it is not considered correct for
guests to request a particular
mode of dress. It is the obligation
of the hostess to advise her
guests as to what type of dress is
being worn at any type of gath-
ering she is planning, no matter
how informal. This social respon-
sibility of the hostess has solved
the problem for many who have
discussed it with me, and should
help others who are involved in
a similar situation.
MAKE YOUR WEDDING, BAR MIT1VA, ANY FUNCTION
"THE TALK OF THE TOWN" with
IRVING PIETRACK ORCHESTRA
NO JOB TOO SMALL
JE 8-0204
"IVm Wedding Timer
-i FLOWERS
BLOSSOM SHOP
(Mercantile National Bonk Building)
1616 Wshinflton Ave., Miami Beach CALL JE 2-3231
Mrs. Sidney Ritterman, president
of the South Florida Council of
Children's Asthma Research Insti-
tute and Hospital ai Denver, will
head a delegation representing
local CARIH chapters attending a
five-day national auxiliaries con-
vention in Denver July 30 to Aug.
3.
Chapter presidents attending the
conclave are Mrs. Lillian Fames,
Breath of Life; Mrs. Stephan Con-
tos, Greater Miami; Mrs. Robert
Fishman, North Dade; Mrs. Robert
Herbert, Peshkin; Mrs. Sanford
Freed, Lorber; Mrs. Ritterman.
Miami Beach Chapter.
Delegates from CARIH's nation-
al network of volunteer auxiliaries
convene annually in Denver, to be
briefed on latest developments in
treatment techniques and research.
CARIH's center not only pro-
vides free treatment and care for
the nation's most severely afflicted
asthmatic children during an 18-24
month period but. through inte-
grated clinical and basic research,
works toward better management
of the disease.
The Denver Institute is open for
intractable asthmatic children of
the greater Miami area who meet
the medical and other criteria for
admission. Funds raised in this
area are used to further the
CARIH's medical and research
programs.
Merit Award To
Nancy Goldman
Nancy Goldman. 17, who will be
second vice president of Student
Council, and president of Inter-
Club council at
Miami Senior
High this Fall,
has received a
merit award
from the Dairy
Council of
South Florida.
Daughter of
Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Gold
man, 3884 NW
3rd St., Nancy
was treasurer
of Student Council this past year.
She is a member of Honoria, serv-
ice club, was co-chairman of the
football programs, and is active in
Omega Delta Psi, a club of the
Young Women's Hebrew Associ-
ation. She will be sponsor of Inter-
act Boys' Service club this Fall.
She is spending the summer work-
ing at Central Shopping Center.-
The Dairy Council has a contin-
uing program to honor meritorious
young people in Dade County.
Nominations can be sent to Agnes
Edwards. 1001 NW 7th St.
Nancy Goldman
Beachile Weds in New York
Mrs. Moe Kurman (nee Sally
Blumenfield) of Parkview Island,
Miami Beach, was married in New
York City on July 16 to Edward
Adnopoz of Hartford, Conn.
WANTED MIDDLE-AGED COMPANION
for nice elderly lady. Car preferable
but net necessary. Own room and sal-
ary. Wonderful borne for the right
arty. Beth David Synagogue area,
Southwest Miami. References.
-----CALL 865-8098 or CA 6-6189-----
PIANOS TUNED
AND/OR REPAIRED
By expert technician. All types and
makes. Special summer rates. Call
before 12 Noon or after 5 p.m.
IRVING GOLDBERG 621-0084
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTRACTING REPAIRING
Serving Dade County Over 25 Years I
1811 S.W. 14th ST. HI 6-9904|
DOMESTIC MAIDS
RESTAURANT & HOTEL
HELP
A-l EMPLOYMENT
Ph. FR 9-8401
MRS. ROBERT HERBERT
Peshkin Chapter president
Tots Will Benefit
From Luncheon
Pioneer Women, Golda Meir
Chapter, will have a luncheon and
card party on Tuesday noon, Aug.
9, at the home of Mrs. Mary Klein-
man, Jewish National Fund chair-
man. 121 SW 55th Ave. Rd.
Chairmen of the afternoon are
Mrs. Sarah Rosen, Mrs. Gussie Fell-
man. Mrs. Lena Eisenstat and Mrs.
Kleinman.
Proceeds from the affair are ear-
marked for the Child Rescue Fund.
Goldberg, Foster
Betrothal Told
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Goldberg,
6446 SW 9th St.. have announced
the engagement of their daughter,
Claire Deborah, to Lewis Foster.
The future bridegroom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Foster, 64<}6
SW 9th St.
Richard, Steinboof*
Tell of Engagement
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Richard
of 4520 Adams Avenue, Miami
Beach, have announced the engage-
ment of their daughter, Suzanne,
to Richard M Steinbook. son of
Mr. and Mrs Sol Steinbook. of
Miami Beach
The engaged couple are both
graduates of Miami Beach High
School. The bride-to-be will gradu-
ate from Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity in December and will teach
in the Baltimore school system.
Dr. Steinbook graduated from the
University of Florida and the Uni-
versity of Florida Medical School,
interned at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital and is presently a resident in
psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Hos-
pital in Baltimore. Md.
\
Machinists Give
Blood While Idle
Three thousand members of the
International Association of Ma-
chinists and Aerospace Workers,
Airline Maintenance Lodge 702.
are donating blood through July
29 to the Leukemia Society of
Dade County.
Mt. Sinai Hospital is supplying
the bloodmobile under the direc-
tion of Dr. Mark Cirlin. Three
shifts have been set up to accom-
modate the union members, 9-11
a.m., 1-3 p.m. and 9-11 p.m. Tri-
chairmen of the leukemia Blood
Bank are Don Shea, president of
Local 702, Maj. Fred St. Clair.
USMC, and Ed Suss.
Members of the Florida Restau-
rant Assoc. are donating food for
the blood donors.
Any group or individual wishing
to give blood to the Leukemia So-
ciety may get further information
from Mrs. Dorothy Grant, executive
director, at 804 Congress Bldg.
Bloodmobiles are available for
group donations.
Discriminating homemakers choose Cellu-Tone Satin,
the one paint for all these surfaces: walls, woodwork...
furniture. It helps to achieve the modern, uncluttered
look-makes rooms seem larger, more pleasant. And you
will enjoy using this odorless type, alkyd
base semi-gloss paint. White and exquisite-
decorator colors that you can scrub repeat-
edly without harming the beau- *} jo
tiful finish. Remember, it's Cellu-
Tone Satin by Pratt & Lambert. <*
^M^en^^vke
LOCATIONS
TO SERVE
YOU!
LUMBER
SUPPLY


Pog8-B
fjewistntrtdian
Friday, July 29, 1966

73U
w
tows
s
crvices
AGUDATH ACHfM. Lombardy Hetel
6305 Collins Ave. Orthodox.
AQUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever
Friday 8:49 p.in. Saturday 8:31) a.m.
Sermon: "Thi- Vole, of Comfort and
lYoapect* for ltrljslit^r Time*." Min-
rha 6:4.". p.m.
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. 985 SW 67th Ave Oorthodox.
Cantor Morris Barr.
-------o------
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Emanuel Kushelwitz,
president.
---- ----
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave. Con-
servative. Rabbi Sol Landau. Cantor
William W. Lioson.
Friday rt pin. Saturday 9 a.m. Mini'ha
HA'i p.m.
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th Avo. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Solomon ScMff.
Friday 8:45 p.m. Saturday -S::t<> a.m.
Herman: "Kabbatb of Consolation."
Minoha C:"l> p.m.
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Berel Wein.
---- -----
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Sh.ioiro. Cantor Benjamin Ben.An.
Saturday 8:48 a.m. Sirmon: "After-
math "f Destruction." p.m. "Portion
of Law." ii p.m. "Tip- Season of Com-
fort"
--------
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative-
Rabbi Rich.u-d Marcovitz. Cantor
Seymour Hinkes
---- ----
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid Ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
- ---
BETH TORAH. 164th St. and NE 11th
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
schitz. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
VrUlay ii p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. Min-
i ha 6 p.m.
--------
B'NAt RAPHAEL.. 1401 N 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Harold Richter.
Cantor Jack Lerner.
--------
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF MIAMI. 1242 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Rozencweig.
CANDIELIGHTING TIME
12 Ab 7:07 pan.
enfeM. Cantor George Goluberg.
FT. LAUDERDALE JEWISH CEN-
TER. 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Dr. Jack L. Morris,
president. Cantor Theodore Mtn-
dich.
---------
FT. LAUDERDALE EMANUEL. 1801
S. Andrews Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Richard M. Leviton. Cantor Jerome
Klement.
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER,
126 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. Rev.
Paul Deutsch.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S-
Gross.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson St. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heilbran.
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER. 8th
St., Homestead. Conservative.
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L.
L. Dim. m.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern
---------
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
Friday ;:::" p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Sermon: "A Time t. I'irk (Tp the
Broken I'it'is." p.m. Clasaes in Tal-
mud and Ethics <>f 'he Fathers.
. 9
LUBAVITCHER MINYAN. 800 Wash
ington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. Cantor Ernest Field.
FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st MINYONAiRES CONGREGATION.
PI. Conservative. Rabbi David Ros- I 3737 Bird Rd. Modern Traditional.
HEBREW LESSON
n^tf ; rue pi nn*r\2 nsni
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* t : t: t t ; : '::-
iKznn ran s-Dintf n"ft .-wox
T T T 1 T T ~ '.' ~ '-' J V
Brsnrn fcri^n ^irnri
.D-mpxa ntT^i D'3ry-i3
- i" : .- i : t -: t
:mjxn n^iy irDin ~3 -inx
tt-t It ~~
final VW) .'ifttT p?
- niiwj niiixn ]S itBfe
t \~: t I v :
.liin n^-i-rrp
^ p^ V"pin orr-trix
o'ins -d^oti mmta rrnv
T T -: : T T :
DS7 pnt7a 3KT lltiRtt ID*
"?-$ oy ipn frm ja .fens
3^3 HQ p3n?p do Tiin ,"ratq
... "p Tin
triisn jit xin rVs?
pi xa mvQ ^ans .nnira
... nitfa nnK'Di/S
tnMg P^ar ir-n MMM
t : t
(irfftt ntt*0ft> p-isj ffm
+ Adlayada
Adtayada is the name of the gay
Purira holiday parade which takes
place each year on the Putim holi-
day in the streets of Tel Aviv. It
is a masquerade parade, a kind of
large carnival.
First, thejMreman's Band/march-
ed along plying livery marching
songs. After, the Band, came boys
and girls clrrying beautiful flags
of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
Then followed a nice parade of
"Kibbutz Galuyot" (Gathering of
the Exiles) in which Jews who had
come to this country from 70 lands
participated in their beautiful cos-
tumes. They walked or danced,
and the public applauded.
Then heroes of the Bible ap-
peared Noah in the large ark
and Moses in the small ark, King
: t
57 1" *> 1 17
" T T I ~
170 iW IWI "UT^H?"
t : T T 1 -
nr^n arm m na^qr
-ins mtfs my ""TO n3ira-
- : T T : T T V v v -
; s^x-^n ni3im3 onis-
pp ,ni3pa *7U nai^nn *riy
.*7i"T3i ^mnp'
T t t : "
yff rntoTpn rrrgs niitixi
lr>3'? n^J ruari -m-n^7p'
o^n niiatnn nnx &?*?$
3,D, trtm ixtwi niii?]! any:
t t : : t: t : t
.^xiftr pas? 12 ^c
: np" nsi^qn nsr-^in omnx
T T T T V ": -
hsnrn&n na ,~ni'^a fisp" *7C
lo,3i?a msix i^vtf nmrT
.... t : TV
an .DrT^ niD^n nisfia^n:
xrra *?nj?"n OHEV SHALOM. 911 Normandy Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weber-
man.
SEPHARDIC.JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rev. Cantor Sadi Nan-
mlas.
--------
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Jonah
E. Caplan.
KYMoy 8:98 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Mln-
cha 8:46 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. Con-
servative. 1026 NE 183rd St., Miami
Gardens Rd. Rabbi Samuel R. Stone.
Cantor Maurice Neu.
----
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 S. Kendall
Dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Michael
Kyrr.
--------
TEMPLE. B6TH SHOLEM of Holly,
wood. 1725 Monroe St. Conservative.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Er-
nest Steiner.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1351 S. 14th Ave. Reform.
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
--------
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL. 1 545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Saul H. Breeh.
---------
TEMPLE BETH SHIPAH. 7500 SW
120th St. Reconstructionist. Rabbi
Morris Shop.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisn
Cantor David Conviser.
Friday >:1". p.m. Rabbi Kranzel will
Hiicirk on "The Jew and Civil RlRhts."
Cantor William [loyal will ibant mm-
icai portions' of ail Bsrvioes.
TEMPLE BETH TOV. 6438 SW Stt.
St. Conservative.
--------
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Abraham Reiseman.
Friday 8:S0 p.m. Sisterhood will host
the cmii-u Knabbat.
| TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler.
Friday n p.m. Saturday :i a.m. Mlncha
6 p.m.
----- ----
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi
Jotph R. Narot.
---- ----
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR.
3500 SW 69th Way. Conservative.
Rabbi Irwin Cutler.
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo Ave.
Liberal-Reform. Rabbi Morris Kip-
per.
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
-------o------
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Edward Klein.
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative,
8755 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi
Ralph Ralph Glixman.
---------
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI,
Temporary office 1820 NE 164th St.
Reform. Rabbi Daniel M. Lowy.
Cantor Chet Gale.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Services conducted
in s.ni'tv. temple youth Kroup, at
Washington Federal, 699 NE HiTth St.
----------
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 951 E.
4th Ave., Hlaleah. Conservative.
Rabbi Maurice Klein.
TEMPLE ZION. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
--------
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell Jer-
0". Cantor Ben Dickson.
Friday 6 p.m. Saturday s:4,"> a.m. Ser-
mon: "I'oition of the Wi-.-k."
Tifereth Jacob .......______ ........_ __
Friday 6:80 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Kld-
dlixll fOUOWS.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6600 N. Miami
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Henry
Wernlck.
rYirttiy X p.m. Sisterhood will host the
one Bhabbat. Saturday 9 a.m.
----------
YOUNG ISRAEL. 990 NE 171st St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stautoer.
--------
YOUNG ISRAEL OF MIAMI BEACH
1542-44 Washington Ave. Rabbi Naf-
tali Porush
'ill/. II
T t- 1
K
|a D'-riaa is-pin ]3 -inx
Solomon and the Queen of Sheba,
I David and Goliath, and, of course,
! all the heroes of the story of Es-
! ther. The moment wicked Haman
appeared, the children began to
spin their Putim rattlers and to
shoot off their revolvers.
Then followed a fairyland world,
a kind of Disneyland. We saw vari-
ous story book figures Pinoc-
chio, Peter Pan, Red Riding Hood,
I Cinderella, and others.
After them came the section of
"In the End of Days" a beautiful
1 and happy world: a wolf playing
with a lamb, Ben-Gurion dancing
with Gen. Nasser, Uncle Sam hug-
ging the Russian Bear.
The Pufim holiday is merry in
Israel. It's a pity it comes only
once a year.
Published by the Brit Ivrit Olamit
NY Congregation
Desecrated Again
SOMERS, N.Y. (JTA) The
Hebrew Congregation here was
desecrated for the second time in
six months. Several swastikas and-
the words, "Hitler Forever" and
"Nazi Youth of America," plus a
number of obscene epithets were
painted on the building with black
paint.
The discovery of the desecration
was made by Rabbi Joseph Scha-
piro when he arrived for Sabbath
j services. Six months ago, vandals
broke several windows in the syn-
agogue which is located in the
town of Shenorock in Westchester
County near the Connecticut bor-
der.
Paul Schwartz, president of the
congregation, expressed hope that
some member of the community
would volunteer information as to
the culprits. State police are in-
vestigating yesterday's desecration.

MSB SJSl I
n:i .,: ii ,':.i:... *:i ti. -1 '..;>:
SYNOPSIS OF THE TORAH PORTION VACTHAtlAN
"Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is One" (Daut.
6. 4).
e
VAETHANAN The Portion begins with Moses' plea to
God for permission to enter the Promised Land, and Gad's re-
fusal. The law-giver warns the children of Israel against practising
idolatry in Canaan, calling their attention to their special history
and mission.
"Did ever a people hear the voice of God speaking out of
the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? Or hath God
assayed to go and take Him a nation from the midst of another
nation, by trials, by signs, and by wonders, and by war, and by a
mighty hand, and by an outstretched arm, and by great terrors,
according to all that the Lord your God dfcd for you in Egypt
before thine eyes?" (Deut. 4. 33-34).
Moses sets aside threw cities of. refuge on the east side of
the Jordan. He repeats the Ten Commandments, with slight vari-
ations for the purpose of clarity. The first section of the Shema
i~ beginning "Thou shalt love the Lord iy 3od-with all thy heart''--
and ending "And thou shalt write them upon the door-ponis of
thy house, and upon thy gates" is in this portion (Deut. 6 4-9).
Moses urges the Israelites to show no mercy to the seven
Canaanite nations. "And when the Lord thy God shall deiiver
them up before thee, and thou shalt smite them; then thou shalt
utterly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them,
nor show mercy unto them; neither shalt thou make marriages
with them: thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor
his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son For thou art a
holy people unto the Lord thy God: the Lord thy God hath chosen
thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that are upo ; the
face of the earth" (Deut. 7. 2-6). Finally, Moses stresses the need
for strict observance of the various ritual commandments.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of rhe Law Is at-
tracted and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish
Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, S15 Publisher is
Shengold, and the volume is available at 27 William St., New
York 5, N.Y. President of the society distributing the volume
is Joseph Schlanq.
,.
.

IIIWIM* I
No Human Document Like
Lord's Ten Commandments
THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULPIT
Robbi jresanfefe'
By RABBI DAVID ROSENFELD
"And ye who cleave to the Lord
your God are all alive this day."
There is no human document which
has exercised a greater influence
upon our moral and religious life
than the Ten Commandments.
These have been
considered t h e
minimum re-
quirements for
humanity. When
t h e Decalogue
was proclaimed
on Sinai, no bird
sang, the ocean
did not roar, and
no creature stir-
red. All nature
was hushed in
silence.
We witness to-
day a collapse of
tradition, of mor-
al standards, of
faith. We need a reevaluation of
these noble ethical teachings to.
follow them to their fullest teach-
ings for perfect conduct and uni-
versal brotherhood of man.
A man who was able to quote
the Bible by heart, confided hia
secret ambition to his friend: "I
would like to climb Mount Sinai
and from there read the Ten Com-
mandments aloud." His friend said
to him: "Instead of going to Mount
Sinai to read the Commandments,)
why not stay at home and observe!1
them?"
In order for us to prepare a bet-
ter world for our children, we
have to study our guideposts and
realize at alL times that there is
an eye that sees, an ear that hears,
and all our actions are recorded
and televised.
Rabbi Salanter once rode on a
coach. Coming to a field, the coach-
man noticed a bundle of hay. When
he was about to grab it, Rabbi Sal-
anter called out: "M'zehet, m'zeht
Some one is looking." The driver
hastily dropped the bundle of hay,
jumped into the wagon, cracked
his whip and let his horse gallop
away. He asked the Rabbi, "Ididn't
see anyone. Who was looking?"
The Rabbi replied, "God was look-
ing."
"Confound it," said the driver.
"And I thought 4he farmer was
looking. I got scared for nothing."
The first precept of the Com-
mandments is that God i> a God
of freedom, of justice, of mercy,
and as God is holy, so r.m.st we
learn to be holy. Belief in God
means complete faith in bis good-
ness and wisdom. ->
The Decalogue is a message for
all men for all times.
!
Iran Approves \
Israeli Chief Rabbi
JERUSALEM .JTA) Sep-
hardi Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Nissim
announced here on his return from
a visit to Turkey and Inn, that
the Iranian Government had
agreed to the appointment of an
Israeli rabbi as Chief Rabbi for
Iran.
Rabbi Nissim said he had con-
ferred in Teheran with the Iranian
Interior Minister, who has juris-
diction over the local Chief Rab-
binate. He said the Minister had
readily agreed to the appointment
of an Israeli citizen to the post.
It was reported that Iranian Jew-
ish religious and lay leaders had
apparently agreed on Dr. Kahnan
Kahana, presently director general \)
of the Israeli Ministry of Religions,
&s the choice for Chief Rabbi. How-
ever, Dr. Kahana has not as yet
replied to the presumed invitation.
Before leaving Turkey for Israel,
Rabbi Nissim issued a statement
praising Turkey's tolerance toward
its religious minorities. The Chief
Rabbi said that his studies and
contacts In Turkey had proved
certain allegations made abroad on
the issue of religious freedom in
Turkey were completely false. "I
observed complete religious free-
dom," he said.
"i"-nin:iiii'!iauiiuiiuianOTiifimi'miinrirmmcmin
This page is prepaied in co
I operation u'lth me Greater Mi-
i ami Rabbinical Association.
Coordinator of features I pearing here is
DR. MAX LIP6CHITZ
jj spiritual leader of Beth Torah
Congregation of Xorth Miami
Beach.
v..
i



|ay. July 23. 1966
+Jewisii fhrkttair)
Page9-B
";".- '.v

?-***.
I
faith Mission to Soviet Union finds "all religious groups
[Russia facing future with confidence, concerned however
>ut the religious and cultural survival of Soviet JewTy."
Appeal of Conscience Foundation-sponsored delegation
bluded (left to right) Dr. Harold A. Bosley, Minister of Christ
[uich Methodist, New York, vice president; Rabbi Arthur
Mtor, of Congregation Zichron Ephraim, New York, presi-
it of the Foundation; Rev. Thurston N. Davis, S.J., editor-
rbief of the Jesuit magazine "America," New York, vice
sicent.
ragall Donates Art to French
IRIS ("JTA) Marc Chacall
Jsmitted to the French Republic
week 67 of his works which
| par!, of a series known as the
lied Message" on which the
Han-bOID Jewish artist has been
king for the last 15 years. The
Jworks will be displayed in a
utr to be built at Nice on the
fiera to the artist's specifica-
V*. The works include 17 oils
50 gouaches, aequarelles and
rimis on biblical themes. Two
kous masterpieces in the group
"Moses and the Tables of the
v" and "The Creation of Man."
ay of the 67 works have never
^n on display.
The 79-year-old painter signed
fcr title to the works at a ccre-
|ny in Nice which was attended
a representative of Andre Mai-
ls, Minister of Culture. Mr. Cha-
(l will be the consultant for the
gall Museum, which will be
ill at Cimiez in a huge park
lich is part of Nice. A Matisse
Iseuni already has been opened
fion Boat Strays
TEL AVIV (WNS) The Is-
li coast guard intercepted a
|ton Egyptian boat well within
aeli waters Bound from Egypt
[Beirut, the vessel was claimed
its crewmen to have entered
Israeli waters by mistake. The
at's four crewmen were held for
lerrogation.
(EiLL KNOWN CANTOR
Greater Miami wants engagement,
the High Holidays, or year-round
sitinn. Mas served as Cantor for
|st 15 years,
ease call 374-0810 after 5:30 p.m.
tapttss Sympathy
onrf Comio/it
u4 ^fowm
MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
CORAL GABLES HOLLYWOOD
FT. LAUDEROAi.-: BOCA RATON
at the site. The Chagall Museum
will not be completed before 1969.
By then the artist plans to donate
more of his works.
Small Percentage
Receive Education
JERUSALEM (JTA) Dr.
William Chomsky, faculty chair-
man of the Gratz College of Phila-
delphia, asserted here that only 53
percent of American Jewish chil-
dren attend some Jewish school
and that more than half of them
attend only Sunday school.
Speaking at the 40th anniversary
convention of the National Council
for Jewish Education of the United
States, which is attended by 168
American Jewish educators. Dr.
Chomsky added that in spite of the
low percentage, the number of
young people attending Jewish
high schools and Jewish teachers
institutes or studying Judaica and
Hebrew was Increasing in the
United States. He said this was "a
sign that in the hearts of Amer-'
lean Jews there still whispers the
ember of Jewish consciousness."
The American Jewish educator
also asserted that American
Jewry was paying only "lip serv- ,
ice" to Jewish education. "Amid
all their fine talk about the val-
ue of Jewish education," he
charged, "the Jewish federations
continue to support it stingily to
the extent of only 10 percent of
their total expenditure."
The convention which opened
this weekend is scheduled to last
two weeks. Its theme is "50 Years
of Jewish Education in the United
States Retrospect and Prospect."
Lakeside
MEMORIAL PARR
AND
GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
"THE SOUTH'S
AAOST BEAUTIFUL
JEWISH CEMETERY"
Guaranteed Perpetual Care Fund
N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE.
Educator Charges
Federations Fail
To Support Schools
JERUSALEM (WNS) Sharp
criticism of Jewish federations for
failing to give wider support to
Jewish education was sounded here
by a prominent educator at the
40th anniversary convention of the
National Council for Jewish Edu-
cation in the United States.
Addressing the opening of the
two-week parley. Dr. William
Chomsky, faculty member of Gratz
College in Philadelphia, charged
that American Jewry was paying
only "lip service" to-Jewish edu-
cation and that 'amidst all their
fine talk about the value of Jewish
education, the Jewish federations
continue to support it stingily to
the extent of only 10 percent of
their total expenditures."
At the same time Dr. Chomsky
told the more than 160 eucators
attending the convention that only
53 percent of Jewish school-age
children attended Jewish schools
and that more than half of them
were only attending Sunday
schools. Nevertheless Dr. Chomsky
struck a hopeful note, declaring
that in spite of the low percentage
there has been an increase in the
number of young people attending
Jewish high schools and Jewish
teachers institutes or studying
Judaica and Hebrew. That develop-
ment, he observed, was a "sign
that in the hearts of American
Jews there still whispers the em-
ber of Jewish consciousness" and
that "it is our sacred duty to fan
this ember."
Another speaker, Dr. Louis
Katzoff, director of the North
Suburban Synagogue Beth-El of
Highland Park, Illinois, advocated
establishment of centralized bu-
reaus of Jewish education which,
he said, would be service organiza-
tions and not deal with ideology.
This drew a retort from Dr. Leon-
ard C. Mishkin. educational direc-
tor of the Associated Talmud Tor-
ahs of Chicago, that Orthodox ele-
ments never trusted the central
education bureaus because they
were averse to the founding day-
schools.
JEWISH QUIZ BOX
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do some people customarily
drink a small amount of liquor
before sitting down to their
regular meal?
There is an interesting Halachic '
basis which many apply to this,
practice in order to establish its
origin. There is a basic principle
in Jewish law which requires that j
a blessing be pronounced over ev-
ery food we eat. In the case of a
meal which naturally contains var-
k>us foods, the blessing over the
bread before the meal relieves us
of the responsibility of making a
blessing for all the other foods,
consumed in the meal.
With regard to water and liquors
whloh are consumed within the
meal there are various opinions.
Some claim that water is part of i
the meal and therefore requires
no special blessing during the
meaL Others say that the first i
drink of water during the meal ,
requires a blessing and the subse-:
quent drinks do not. Some are of'
the opinion that every drink of j
water during the meal requires a,
blessing.
Therefore, in order to satisfy j
all of these authoritative opinions
without being partial to any one
of them, some people will consume
a little water or whiskey before
the meal (i.e. before pronouncing
the blessing over the bread) hav-
ing in mind that this blessing
should cover all the beverages
such as water, etc. consumed later
during the course of the meal.
This is one of the reasons why
| the Kiddush over the wine is re-
cited before the blessing over the
bread on Sabbaths and Festivals.
(There is universal agreement that
I the blessing made over the wine
j exempts one from pronouncing a
! blessing over all other beverages
during the meal.)
The Kabbalist, Rabbi Isaac Lur-
i ia, required that a person must
offer a prayer for his food and
i sustenance before he partakes of
a meal. This is a means of asking
the Almighty to sustain him both
spiritually and physically. It then
becomes his understanding that
the enjoyment of his food is like
an answer to his prayers and a
matter of Grace on the part of the
Creator. The twenty third Psalm
is the vehicle used for this expres-
sion because it shows man as plac-
ing himself in the trust of the Al-
mighty.
Some point out that the Psalm
has fifty seven words and fhat th>
two Hebrew letters that make up
the number 57, by their numerical
equivalents, spell "Zan" which
means "He sustains" or "He feeds."
thus making this the appropriate
Psalm to use as a prayer for food,
and sustenance.
Rabbi Okolica at Beth Raphael
Rabbi Henry Okolica of New
Britain, Conn., will be pulpit guest
at Temple Beth Raphael, 1545
Jefferson Ave., on Saturday morn
ing. His sermon topic will be
"After Destruction Rebuilding."
Israel Releases
Egyptian Sailors
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
this week returned to Egypt four
Egyptian sailors who accidentally
drifted into Israeli territorial wat-
ers while sailing from Port Said
to Lebanon.
A joint Israeli-Jordanian health
committee dealing with anti-
malaria and other health measures
in the Jerusalem no-man's land,
met in the old city of Jerusalem
this weekend. The committee,
which is meeting under auspices of
the Israeli-Jordan Mixed Armistice
Commission, decided to continue
the joint work and will meet again
at the end of December.
GOLDMAN UNVEILING
The dedication of a monument
to the memories of the late
ISRAEL AND SARAH GOLDMAN
will be held Sunday, July 31st,
at 11 a.m. at the Star of David
Cemetery with Rabbi Morris
Skop officiating.
Mr. and Mrs. Goldman are sur-
vived by two sons, Leo J. Gold-
man and Hananiah Harari.
Friends and relatives are asked
to attend.
Palmer
Memorials
"Miami's Only
Jewish
Monument
Builders"
LEADERS IN
SERVICE, QUALITY
AND VALUE!
Scheduled Unveiling
SUNDAY, JULY 31, 1966
Mt. Sinai Cemetery
BEN JOHNSON, 1 p.m.
Rabbi S. T. Swirsky
SEE WHAT YOU BUY I
DO NOT BUY FROM
MAIL ORDER FIRMS
AND BE SORRY)
Buy Direct from the
Manufacturer in Miami
and save many dollars.
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
Miami's Only
Jewish Monument Builders
3279 S.W. 8th Street
HI 4-0921 Phones HI 4-0922
TU 5-1689
>*wwww
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open tvery Day Closed Sabfaofh
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
Miami's Only Strictly Jewish
Monument Dealer
^JJouk, tyevriAv
%
FUNERAL. HOME
EXPERIENCE
UNDERSTANDING
DIGNITY
A
EMANUEL GORDON
Founder. Deceased
HARRY GORDON
Pres (Deceased)
IKE GORDON
F D
JAMES GORDON
F.D
Servi'fid, IN
Contmunity of
Miami Miami Beach
t Date Cemty
SINCE '938 ...


I
Page 10-B
*,Jmisi> ftoridUairj
Friday. July 29. 19SG
-National Commander Miiton A- Waldor. of the Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S.A.. reports to Secretary of Defense Robert
S. McNamara on the recent findings by a JWV delegation he
headed and visit to Viet Nam. and reassures the Secretary
of the veterans' support of United States policies. Waldor
mmended Administration efforts to achieve peace in Viet
Nam, but stressed that if efforts fail, the veterans understand
he need for necessary military measures to implement Amer-
ican commitments.
Declares Eshko! Tour Great Success
PARIS (JTA) Premier Levi
Eshkol's current tour of sevei.
African nations is a success be-
cause of the care which the Israel
Government has implemented its
program of technical aid to those
countries, the influential Paris
daily newspaper, Le Monde, de-
clared this week. Mr. Eshkol is
visiting the Ivory Coast, Liberia.
Israeli Arabs Sentenced
HAIFA (JTA) Three Israeli
Arabs convicted of membership in
a Syrian espionage ring were sen-
tenced here to prison terms of
seven years each. The court ruled
that the defendants passed valu-
able information to Syria, preju-
dicial to Israel's security.
The three Arabs are Budrus
Saudah, Mahmoud Omariya, and
Mouhammed Mahmoud. A fourth
member of the ring, Ahmed Kha-
til. was sentenced Tuesday to a
three-year term. Saudah was ac-
cused of going to Syria eight years
ago after a quarrel with his fam-
ily. He returned that year after
receiving training in espionage in
Syria and carried out orders to
enlist other Israeli Arabs in the
espionage.
The Four Arabs were found
guilty of giving information on
military camps in the Haifa area
and access roads to them, as well
as photographs of postal communi-
cations, installations and move-
ments of warships in the Haifa
Ray area.
Congo Leopoldville. Madagascar,
Uganda and Kenya.
The newspaper attributed the
effectiveness of the Israeli pro-
gram to three conditions. One of
these is that Israel avoids giving
the former colonial powers the
impression that it intends to take
their place.
At the same time, Le Monde
pointed out, Israel seeks to avoid
giving the new African countries
any impression that it is acting as
an assistant to those powers. The
Israeli diplomats always stay out
of the international political quar-
rels of those nations. Attention to
these cautions, the newsnaper add-
ed, is backed by the efficiency of
the technical experts Israel sends
to the new African nations, wlvch
Le Monde said might very well be
the fundamental reason for the
Israeli success in Africa.
Rabbinical Assembly Rejects
Dr. Heschel Criticism
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Rabbinical Assembly, the interna-
tional association of Conservative
rabbis, issued a statement here
recently, rejecting criticisms of
Rabbi Abraham J. Heschel made
by leaders of other Jewish organ-
izations, and declared that the As-
sembly was -dismayed'' by those
attacks.
''resident Johnson accepts "B'nai Zion's Bill of Rights Gold
medal" at the White House last February from Edward Short,
president of B'nai Zion. Right to left are Cong. Abraham Mul-
-er, vice president; Herman Z- Quittman, secretary; Sharf; Nor-
man G. Levine. former president; and Raymond Part, vice
president of B'nai Zion. President Johnson was selected as
* I?ciPient toe award at the 56th annual convention of
B'nai Zion "as a tribute to his inspiring leadership in the fur-
therance of the letter and spirit of the Bill of Rights."
Egyptian Marshall
!n Angry Attack
LONDON (JTA) One of the
most bellicose statements against
Israel by a leading official of the
Egyptian Government was voiced
in Cairo Sunday by Field Marshal
Alxiel Hakim Amer, the First Vice
President, at the annual military
parade marking the 14th anni-
versary of the overthrow of King
Farouk. Displayed for the first
time at the parade were scores of
newly supplied Soviet jets, missiles
and, tanks. ^__
"The armed forces," Marshal
Amer declared at the parade,
"must be ready at all times to
deter Israeli aggression and then
advance to liquidate it in the
battle that every Arab dreams
of and prepares for." With Pres-
ident Gam.il Abdel Nasser at his
side, Amer pledged that the
Egyptian armed forces would
defend any Arab country against
"Israeli aggression" regardless of
inter-Arab conflicts.
Asserting that Egypt will "al-
ways maintain definite superiority
in quality and quantity over Israel
in weapons and combat efficiency,"
Amer said that "any social and
ideological differences will disap-
pear completely at the line of bat-
tle against the common enemy of
the Arab nations." Among the new
armaments displayed by Egypt in
the parade were Soviet-made air-
to-ground missiles mounted under
the wings of Soviet TU-16 medium
bombers, and two squadrons of
advanced MIG-21D jets equipped
with air-to-air missiles comparable
to the heat-seeking Sidewinders be-
ing used by United States jets in
Viet Nam. Also shown in the par-
ade were 120 new Soviet tanks
especially equipped with lights and
radar for night fighting.
Earlier, at a mass rally marking
the anniversary of the revolution,
President Nasser accused the
United States of delaying a new
aid program for Egypt because of
policy conflicts over Israel, Com-
munist China and Egyptian fric-
tion with Saudi Arabia. He direct-
ed the brunt of his attack against
the failure of the U.S. Government
to open negotiations on the latest
Egyptian request for S150.000.000
worth of wheat, corn and other
farm surplus goods and the recent
vote in Congress approving an
anti-Egypt amendment to the For-
eign Aid Bill.
Contending that it was political
policy disagreements that were de-
laying American aid, "because we
spoke of Israel and nuclear devel-
opment, Saudi Arabia and China
as we feel,'" President Nasser said:
"We expressed our views and the
American Congress decided three
days ago that there is to be no
aid to the UAR unless there is a
certain American national inter-
est." The Egyptian President also
announced that he would not at-
tend the next scheduled meeting
of Arab chiefs of state due to be
held in Algeria in September.
(Israeli political sources greeted
with satisfaction the announce-
ment by President Nasser of Egypt
that he would not attend the Sep-
tember Arab chief of states meet-
ing in Algeria, the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency correspondent in
Jerusalem reported. The sources
noted that while Arab "summit"
meetings in the past have not pro-
duced threatened anti-Israel meas-
ures, they have always been pre-
ceded by periods of competition
among the Arab countries in seek-
ing to outdo each other in anti-
Israel stances, as well as of increas-
ed activity among Arab refugee
organizations.)
Rites July 21
For Mrs. Rubin
Mrs. Lee C. Rubin. 800 Lakeview
Dr.. one of the organizers of the
Mount Sinai Hospital Pink Ladies,
died July 20 at the age of 72.
Originally from Charleston, S.C.,
Mrs. Rubin came here 42 years
ago and was a member of Temple
Israel Sisterhood board of direc-
tors, American Friends of Hebrew
University, and Miami Chapter of
Hadassah.
She is survived by her husband.
Harry; two sons, Edward S.. of
Miami, and' William* of White
Plains. NY.: four sisters, Mrs. Cele
LEGAL NOTICE
J
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY. GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to image In
-.-. under the fictitious same it
i .i n i;: MUSIC ri>. at 2841 N.W
.- reet, Miami, Fla.. Intends I
-;i name with the Clerk ol 11- cir-
> iii oil! I "I Dade County. !"'.
SAM FEE .1. WEISS. Sole owner
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
. FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 69432-B
i.v RE: Estate <>i
I iENJ A MI N SA I.KOHT,
I let-eased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given th.t I Itav
filed a Final Report ami Petition for
Distribution and Final Discharge as
Executor of the estate of BENJAMIN
SALKoFF, deceased: and that on
iii, ii; day "i sept, mii-i. '"'" win
apply t" the HonbraMe Count) Judg -
..r Dade County, Florida, for approval
:.i i.-1-..i !... ,. .,- ,j for i*trll
Freeman of Ft. Lauderdale, Mrs. tion. and- final discharge as Executo--
OHa C Ruhin and Mrs I illinn of the estate of the above-named le-
uiaa l. Kunin ana Mrs. Lillian oe(,ent This Mnd a.iv .,uIv
Simonhoff of Miami, and Miss Esta: QOopwiN sai.koff. Bxecui -
Cohen of Miami Beach: a brother.
Joseph H. Cohen of Miami, and
eight grandchildren.
Services were held Thursday
afternoon. July 21, at Riverside
Alton Rd. Chapel.
\^J bituariiet
SUGARMAN
Joseph, it, of im 8W nth st.. died
July 2:.. a retired building contrac-
tor, he came to Miami 27 years asro
from Jamaica. N.Y. Ho was an
honorary life member Of the Miami
Elks Lodge IMS. a member Of the
Masons and the American Technion
Society. Survivors Include his wife
Hattie: two daughters, Mrs. Miriam
J. BIrkin, and Mrs. Shirley J. Qroh,
both of Miami: six grandchildren
mil three great-grandchildren. Ser-
vices were held July 2'! at Riverside
Alton Rd. Chanel, with burial in
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
COBDEN. Anne L.. 61. of 1400 Lincoln
Rd.. died July 2.r>. Services In New
Haven. Conn. Riverside.
GOLDMAN, Irene C. ;,:{. of 2816 Arch
Creek Dr.. .lied July 16. Riverside.
GRADSTEIN. Arthur. 38. of 94."i 79th
Ter riled July 22. Riverside.
FRIEDMAN. Ella. 89. of 1011 West
Ave.. died July 23. Services in New
York. Newman.
STEISEL, William B.. 55. of 29*0 BTW
23rd St.. died July 23. Riverside.
ANTHONY. Michael Bud, S9, of 19"
N\v 7th St., die,i July 21. Gordon.
OLLSWANG. Harrv. of 516 La Oorce
Dr.. died July 22. Riverside.
DEUTSCH. Dorothy R.. 52, ..f :::'!, N'.
Meridian Ave died July 22. River-
side.
brenner. Mrs. Nettle, SO, ;' 2261
8W 2t6h St died July 21. Services
In Chicago. Cordon.
MiCHELSON. Leon a ;;. of 1307
Alton Rd., died July 20. Services in
New York. Riverside
MORRISON. David, 69 of 125 .-' died .luiv 19 Gordon
SON'N. Louis 69, "l" 1750 NE Nth
Ave. died July 19. Riverside
EISEN. Harry Louis, 21, of 721 NE
th si died July IS Riverside
TALIANOFF .< WAI.I.KK
AUol in \ s
120 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
7 2:' 9 5-12-19
Boston Hadassah Convention
BOSTON (WNS) More than
2.000 delegates are expected to par-
ticipate in the 52nd national con-
vention of Hadassah when it opens
here at the Sheraton Boston Hotel.
Senator Edward M. Kennedy is to
address one of the five-day ses-
sions.
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE i
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
bj virtue of Chapter 678, of Floi
Statutes Annotated 11941'. v\
housemen and Warehouse Receipts,
wherein Ace-It.I!. VAN LINES. INC.,
a Florida corporation, by virtue of -
warehouse lien, has in its possessl in
the following described property:
Household Ooods as the property >(
Mr and Mrs. Tom Stevens, i 1- N.W.
Slst Street. Miami. Florida and that
on die 19th day of August, 1966. dur-
ing the legal hours of sale, mainly
between ll:n0 forenoon and 2:00 in
the afternoon, at 2136 N.W. 24th
Avenue. Miami. Florida, the under-
signed shall offer for sale to the high-
est bidder for cash In band the ab described property of Mr. and Mr*.
Tom Stevens. 1612 N.W. Slst Street.
Miami. Florida.
D.ited at Miami, Florida, this Mtfa
day of July. 1966.
ACE-R.B. VAN LINKS. INC.
_______________________________7/29 8/1."
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
L6&AL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FlCT,TiOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the .(. desiring to ingage
in business under the fictitious name
of ASSOCIATED MANAGEMENT
RECV IRDING8, at 11120 Killlan Park
Road, South Miami. Florida, intends
to register said name with the Clerk
Of the irculi Court of Dade ''.hum,
r lorlda
RONALD LEE MAQRAM, Sola Owner
i."I DMAN, GOLDSTEIN \- I'ACZIER
Attoi neys for Registrant
24"1 W. Flakier street
Miami. Florida 23135
7/29 8/6-12-19
Berlin Swastika Smearings
BONN (WNS) A spate of
swastika smearings on homes in
the British sector of West Berlin
has been reported by the police.
It is believed the perpetrators were
the same hooligans who set fire
to the Jewish community house in
Berlin two weeks ago.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR OAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7762
CAROLE KBLLEY,
Plaintiff,
Joseph f. kei.eey.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
To: JOSEPH F. KELLBT. Defendant
,<" Washington Street
Brighton, Massachuselis
You. JOSEPH F. KELLEY, are
hereby notified thai a Bill of Com-
plain: for Divorce has been filed
against you. and you are required to
serve ,i copy Ol your Answer or l'lead-
'",*. l" $"* Bm Complaint on the
plaintiffs Attorney. LEONARD J
KA.I.ISH. l2'i duPont Building, Mi-
ami, I-lorlda 33131. and file the orig-
inal Answer or Pleading In the office
Of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
i r .before the list day of August,
lHt,h If you fail to do so. judgment
Dy default will be taken against vou
for the relief demanded in the Bill of
Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
h? T.i?BT*kJ&.SSr^05S?SJ!t,ve weeks
iJ.v','. n':UISH FI.DRIDIAN.
oiIXl?E AND ORDERED at Miami,
""'""'a- this 21st day of July. A.D.
1300.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
(S3T WLVlfBar-Florld"
LEONARD J^Sh"*
1629 duPont Building.
Miami, FIcrlda 33131
Attorney for Plaintiff
7/29 8/5-12-19
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO ALE To WHOM THESE PRE*-
E '-MAM. r-OME, 'SHEETINGS:
Whereas. AARON M K ANN Ell. Mi-
ami, Florida. RICHARD KANNBR.
. ..I, ........i. t ii.u.l.OTTK W. OS-
LiOR.NB. .Miami. Florida, did on thn
luth day of July. A.D. 1961 cause
to lie incorporated under the laws of
the State of Florida H & H SHORT-
ENING, INC., a corporation, with Its
principal place of business at Hi il
Dade County, in the State of Florida
and whereas such corporation did a
iiie i.iih dai of July. a.d. 1966, causa
! be filed in the office of the Se<
tarj of Stale of the State ol Ploi w
i i documentary authority requ
Section (08.27, Florida Stat I
show Ing the dissolul Ion if icn
<:.' on.
Now, therefore, the Secretarj >f
.--'.ate does hereby certifj
foregoing and thai he Is sat iflea
the requirements .ii the law .....
complied with.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I I
..to set mj hand and have
fixed the Gn al Seal of the -
: lor da, at Tallahassee, the 'apll i
this the Fifteenth day .! Ju i
- :.\l-> TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State
__________7/M II
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTV,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71487 A
In RE: Estate of
ROSE PB1NBERG
I I e.ised
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
i'o All Creditors and aii Pars
Having Claim or Demands Aga
said Estate:
^ >" are hereby notified and ro-
aulred to present any claims mi
demands which you may have ORS
the estate of ROSE FEINBERG,
ceased la.....r DadT County. Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and I lie the same In duplicate and i
provided In Section 733.1. Florl I i
Statutes, in their offices In the Cou
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida
within six caiehdar months iron. h-
tlme of the first publication he;
or the same will be barred.
Dau-d al Miami, Florida, this 20th.
day of July. A.D. 1966.
ED VIIIE K. QLSON A
As Executrix m
Firsi publication of this notice on
the 29th day of July, 1966
MORTIMER s. COHEN
Attorney for Executrix
13 Allisley HulldlllK
Miami. Florida
_______._________________V-'9 8/5-12.19
CERTIFICATE OF '
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO ALL To WHOM THESE PRES-
ENTS SHALE COME. GRBETINl
Whereas, JOHN G. DAUBER. Dad*
County. Florida. MARGARET E
DAI I'.Elt. Dade County. Florid!
1'OKoTIIEB V. KZECHBL. North
Miami Reach. Florida, did on the 8th
day ,,f May. A.D. 1H1. cause to be
Incorporated under the laws of th"
State ol Florida SHORTENING
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA INC
a corporation, with Its principal place
Of business al Miami. Dude County.
In the State of Florida, and Where I -
such corporation did on the 20th dav
?f .'.uly'-.An- 1966' caus'- lv be- filed
in the office of the Secretary of state
of the State of Florida, the docu-
mentary authority required under
Section 608.27. Florida Statutes, show-
ing the dissolution of such corporation.
Now, therefore, the Kecretary of
States does hereby certify to the fore-
going and that he is satisfied that
the requirements of the law have been
complied with.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have
hereunto set my hand and have af-a
rixed the Great Seal of the State oiS '
Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital,
this the Twentieth day of July. A.D.
I HI,
(SEAL) TOM ADAMS
Secretary of Stat


ickr;. July 23. 1966
vJenisli Fk>ridHan
rage 11 B
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
|ivi-|(' IS HEKKIIY (IIVKX Unit
undersigned. desiring to engage
iHiness undt r the fictitious name
PLA'iT-GR.VSS FOOTVVE.VII lit
.- w 8th Street, Miami, Florida
puds to registtr said name with
,ri< of the Circuit Cowl of Dade
lilt v. Florida.
i.'KRTINA shoes, inc.
Nicolas Stern. lVesldent
(S'o|e ( IB Ml | ]
LuviN I. WIENER. ESQ.
i,rncy for Pin ti-Grass Footwear
Alnsley Building,
lini, Fa. 18182
7/29 8/5-1:;-19
t. 13
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
IN THE MAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
.MJ-. To \VIK>.\1 THESE PREB-
SiiALiD COME UREETINGS:
,li. i'v-. AARON .VI. KANNER, Mi-
Florida, DANIEL NEAL I1KLL-
Mlaml. Florida, CATHERINE
Jit!'If., Mia mi. Florida, did on tlio
day of August. AD. 1854 cause
|>e Incorporated under the law.- of
State <>f Florida It M TRUCK-
CO., INC.. a corporation, with its
crpu1 nhwc or business at Vlboni,
8 County, in the State of Florida,
wiiffas the proper officers of
i corporation did on the 5Ui day
| I). ,>emb kI in the office of tin- Secretary of
Ito of the Mat.- of MerMa. a Cer-
Icato of Amendment changing its
fporate nan.- to MIAMI TRUCKING
INC., aad aim reas such corpura-
did I D tin- 16 li day of July, A.l>.
I cause to Ue filed in the office
[the Secretary of State of the State
[Florida, th documentary authority
tion 808.27, Florida
the dissolution of
the Secretary of
certify to the tore-
le Batislied that
if the law have been
huired undi i .-
ItuteH, sheaving
lh corporation
low, fhessfi re
Ite does hereby
|nt.' and that 1
requirements
luplied with.
I.N WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
Itvunto set my haud and affixed the
feat Seal of the State of Florida, at
Blahasaee, the Capital, this the
fteentu day of July, ad. iy.
lEAL.) TllM AHA.VIS
Socretarv of State
7/29/66
rBmHU
BY HENRY LEONARD

"And Morris, be sure to ask the Pope
where he gets his yarmulke*."
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engagi
In business under the fictitious name
of IVY OF Fl.oltlD.v at 840 vi.
177 St., Intends to register said name
with the Cleg* of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
1VV THAYHR
7/K-22-29 8/3
NOTICIE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IK HEREBY GIVEN that
undersigned, desiring to engage
business under the fictitious name
MIAMI SPORTING GOODS, at 213
IB. 2 Avenue, Room 212. Miami,
fiends to register said name with
|e Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
uunty, Florida
JEROME KIMBADL
Sole Owner
____________________7/22-29 S/3-12
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
INOTICB is HEREBY GIVEN that
e undersigned, desiring to engage
business under the fictitious name
VIDEO AUDIO SPECIALISTS at
1)61 N E. !:,:'.Ui Street, North Miami
each, Klorid-1 intends to register said
|une with the Clerk of the Circuit
ruirt of Dad< County, Florida,
riDEO VUDIO SPECIADISTS. INC.
|By: NEIL it BERGER, President
M1TH A. MANDLKR
ptorneys for Video Audio
jicchiu- ts. In
l.i i : 1. i. Miami Beach, Fla.
7T>t-1f,-22-29
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTiCE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
INOI "r bS IEREBY GIVEN that
e undersigned, desiring to engajre
-s under the fictitious name
\V. ,n HOUSE, at 1*16 W.ih-
t Miami Beach, Florida.
lend) to raycister said naaie wuti tlie
rk Oi lh| Court of iHide
:>unty lorldu
III >i VRONJA, Sole own-.r
HBVIN, i ,-. H.ii.'IV..M N
gtorm plli ant
Sei i" Id i-: ..
7/J'J s,5-12-19
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKHY GIVEN' that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of ROUND ROBIN I'.AR at 1227 N.VV.
29th St.. Miami, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
GRACE L. FISCHER
Sole i rawer
KE8SLER, MAS6EY ti
BECKERMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
i I'.ill mi-re Way
Coral Gables, Fla.
7/l.r*-22-2 8/5
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUOGE'C COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 714C6-C
In RE: Estate of
BKRTIIA IJl'MAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
SaM Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may have aeainst
the estate,oi BERTHA L-1PMAN, de-
ceased la#e of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Had.- County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16, Florida
state;, s. In ii-ir offices In the County
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida.
within six calendar months from the
.inie of the. first publb'.i'ion hereof,
or tne same wiii be barred,
Bated ,\l Miami, Florida, this 26rl
da) oi June. AC" 1868.
ST AN UK Y LIJ'MAN
SolUikS 1.1PM AN-
As Co-Executors
St publication of this notice on
Jo ..ii I li. ;. Of -I'lly. ll'fli.
SMITH & MANi/LER
,--.: for '.Keentors
Uil Uir.culu lU-o, Miami lieacll
7/*-
NOTICE TO DEFEND
or
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1 ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7137
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
WM.I.IAM C. RAY.
Plaintiff
IRF.NK RAY.
Defendant.
To: IRENE RAY
61 Falmouth Street.
Portland. Maine
You. IRENE RAY. are hereby noti-
fied that a Bill of Complaint for Di.
Vilcas has been filed against you. and
von aa-e required to serve a copy of
your Answer or I'leadlng- to the Bill
of Complaint on the Plaintiff's Attor-
ney. M. II. ROSENHOL'SE, 910 01yraT
pia Building. Miami. Florida, and file
the original Answer or Plciullne in
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 14th day of
August. 19U*. If yon fail to do so,
judgment by default will he taken
again*) yod for the relief demanded
in the BUI of Complaint.
DONE A.NO ORDER ED at Miami.
Florida, this 6th day of July. 1868.
B. H. U8ATHERMAN
Clark, Circuit Court
Dude County. Florida
(Seal) By M. CAV.VUARIS.
Deputy Clark
7/8-13-22-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the -fictitious name
of KEY'S TAVERN at U0 N.VV. 2ith
Avenue, Miami intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the t u-
cuit Court of Uade County. Florida.
H1.AKE A.VDERKOX. Sole Owner
KHggUBR. MASREY. BECKERMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
4'.'" Milt more Way
Coral Gables. Florida 7/8.I5.,2.2)1
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIOA. IN PHOBATE
No. -<0822-B
In BE: ICatutc of
HEN.I.VMIN JOsi:rns
Dee.-as-ll.
NOTICE TO CREOITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Agulnel Said
IChiaie:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to on s.-m any claims and de-
mands \*l-.uh you may have against
the estate or DKN.1AM1N .TOSKI'HS
dBceastd lute of Bade County. Flor-
IdM. to the County .lodges of Dade
County, and file the same in duplicate
and as provided ill Section 738.18,
Florida Statutes, in their offices In
the Count/ Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida", within six calendar months
from the time of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st
day of July. AD. 1866.
/s- OERAI.D JOSEPHS
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the Kth day of July. 1966.
GAX.BCT AND HALBLT
AfttornevM for Executor
240 Fifth St., Miami l'.each. Fla.
7 8-15-22-28
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS.
vjenist: f/trtdfiTf?
solicits your legal noticM.
W* appreciate your
patronage and Guarantee
accurate service at legal
rate* .
Biai Fit 3-464NI
lor
LEGAL NOTICE.
i
THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, iN PROBATE
No. 71252 C
in i tat.
r.\T BE> 'IN
! .
NOTICE. TO CREDITORS
All Cr* s and All !' rsons
vina i tni or Demands AKalnat
i :
on ii re hi i i-v notified a i d re-
Ired to pi sent any claim ai
inlands which you may have against
estate or .ikanne SEGUIN de-
ted late of Hade (>>unty. Flurida.
the Coin.!/ .Iui1k of Dade
unty, Plqrida, and file the same
duplicate and as provided in Bee-
n 733.10. Florida Statutes. In their
icew in the County Courthouse in
de County, Florida, within si* cal-
dar months from the time of the
at publication hereof, or the same
II be barred.
Dated at Miami. Flortda, thia 18th
y of July, A D. 1988.
IIANN II. MARCUSE
Ah Administrator
First publication of'this notice on
22nd day of July. 196.
ENRY NORTON
ttorney for Administrator
Blecayne, Building
___ 7/22-29 S/5-12
E COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
Ne. 71656 C
RB: Estate of
WARRKN HONED.
Deoeaaed.
NOTISE TO CREDITORS
o Ail Creditors and All Peraons
aving Claims or Demands Afiaiiiat
ild Estate:
You are hereby notified aad r-
3ulred to present oy claims and
emands which you may have aitainbt
' the estate of WARRKN 8UNKD de-
. coused late of Dade Coanty. Florida.
to the County Judges Of Hadn Countv.
and file the same in duplica-tn and as
vrovlded in Section TH:t.l>!. Florida
fatut'-H, in their office*! in the County
lurthonse in Jjadc <'outity. Florida.
thin six calendar motrths from the
n of the first publication hereof,
the same will be barred.
Dated at -Miami, Florida, this 2 day of July, A.D. 19S6
MERCEDES SO NED
As- Executrix
FirHt publication of this notice on
the 22nd day of July. 1966.
SIMON. HAYS ft C.RUNDWERG
Attorneys for F'llato
801 Ainslcy Building
7/22-29 8/5-12
IN TrtE COUNTY JUDGE'S OO'JRT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
Nj. 71501
In Rli: Kst.it.j of
CU m::.i:.~ RAVBTT
''notice to creditors
TO All
Hid All
i >t mands
Against
notified and
any claims
re-
aod
ii tors
Claims or
Said Bsl '
You are koroby
i|il,|. a to I
tlemands which you may havejaKjUnst
of CIIARI.1-.S ItAVWn , ... 0f I r..-.vaiil County F*>r-
to the County Judges of Dade
County. Florida, and file tee sawe
In duplicate and as provided in sec-
tion 7S3.16, Florida Statutes, in then
oUic.s in the County Courthouse in
Daile Counts. Florida, within six cal-
endar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the same
W Dated'at'' Miami. Florida, this 18th
rtav of Julv. A.D. 1966.
d y BDAINB RAVETT DAVIS
PAUD1NB ESTHER RAVBTT VERGA
Aa Bxecutrlxes
htrst publication of this notice on
U6 22nd day of July. 1966.
ISRAEL. A BRA MS
Attorney tor Executrixes
ut'S Aipsley BulldlnR
Miami. Florida
7/22-29 8/5-12
al,
the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 6C 7192
NOTICE OF SUIT
THE WLUUIAMSBURGH
SAV.bN i'u, in tiff.
\>.
SJilRLEV 1 HU-I.TO.V a.k.a
.SHIIU,ICY 1. PIVCIS. et UX. et
Defendant.
IXj. SL'iAN SHECTOR
RED I I87H8
Parksvllle in County,
Ni V :-k
v.. ,. e hi r*b notified thai
. bo* Honed tion has been Instl-
.... ill ,-ou .a i h< Clncull < "int
of tin Bleventh Judicial Circuii oi
norld i for Bade County i"
foreclose a raorl pon the follow-
ing describi : I pro]
ix-t 86, Hi.-.k ... HKilll.A.vn
manor skctioN two accord-
ing to the I -it thereof, recorded
in I'ui book 81 at Pace -ii of
tb, Public He...no of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
You are raqutoed to file a reapoi
sivo pleading to plaintiffs complaint
with the Clerk of the aforesaid Court,
and servo a copy thereof upon plain-
tiffs attorney. MARTIN FINE, Dude
Federal Building. Miami. Florida 33131.
not later than August 18, 1966, or a
Decree Pro Conleuso will bo entered
aKainst you.
DATED July 7. 1966.
B, B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. EYMAN
Deputy Clerk
MARTIN FINE
Dado Fed. nil Building
Miami, Florida. 33131
1 7/15-22-29 8/5
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71403-A
In RE: Estate of ____,
CLAY FRANCES SMITH
^NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All P.raoBS Hay-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
^You'are aeraby aotifipd and re-
quired to preaaat any claims and de-
mands which you >I*2L9B&g
tae estate of CBAY FRANCKS-WMi i m
deceased late. Of Dade County, nor-
Ida. to Uie Counti Judges of Dad*
county, and file tae same in dupUcaU
w.iifpn.v ik'd in Sec-Jon 73.116. Flor-
ida Statutes, ... their i.tuc.s in the
(.vuinty Courtbouee In IWe ^".ft
raorlaa, within sis f,e"*urhfr^'}SS
fnim the tine oi ibe f(^' x'"*^,;'
h*r Dated at Muuni, b'londa. this -Jth
d*yj ua^t\%Vph.ne wau.
As Executrix
Flrat publicaUon ol: tni* noUce on
the 8th day of July, 1966.
FRED AND NEWMAN
Attorneys for Bxecwtrtx__
805 Dado Federal Building
Miami. Fla. 7/8-1B-38-M
1N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71419-B
In RE: Estate of
FRANK CEDL.A.
lieceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All CradiU.ra and, All Parlous llav-
-ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate Of FRANK CKJJ.A. de-
ceased late ef Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes. In their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within six calendar months from th
time of the first publication aerettl, or
th.. name will be barred.
U.ited it Miami. Florida, this 7th
day of July. AD. 1*6.
MISS MARIE T C1U-DA
As l-ixecutri.x
First publication of this notice on
.the lfith day of July, 1966.
CAtOIN. ROTIIKNRERO &
i.in.ciitiK
Attorney for Executrix
305 Blscayne Building
"Miami, Florida
7/171-22-29 8/5
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 66C 7110
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THEoIMiRE FL'RIA,
Plaintiff,
CATHERINE FITRIA.
Defendant.
YOT. CATHERINE Fl'RIA. 93S
Morris St., Philadelphia. Pennsylvania,
are required to file your answer to
the Complaint for Divorce with the
Clerk of the above Court and serve
a Copy thereof upon Herman Cohen.
Esq., 1". 10-11 Congress Bldg.. Miami.
Florida, on or before August 8th.
M88, or .Is.- complaint will be taken
us confessed.
DATED at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 6th day of July. 1966.
E, B L-EATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. LYMAN
7/S-15-22-29
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA. IN AND FOR OADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7363
NOTICE 3Y PUBLICATION
I/H'IS IN'.-. i'TA,
Blajn
F.I.ISA InSpTTA,
I lefendnn
TV: lOLIriA INSETTA
Isola Vico I'anci llorum
Pro' i Italy i
YOl HEREBY NOTIFIED
thui a Co'utilaiiit for Dlvorci has been
filed <- ,ou, -iikI i "i i n quired
to Kerve cony of your Answer or
pleading to th Complalnl on the
WAI.l.i 'i.. i n Roa i. Miami
H m h, Worlds I original
in tin f) the Clerk ol the
. i i fore the 15th
daj "i to do
. faull vlll be taken
for I he lie! di mandi d
In thi '.\i.
DONE and ORDERED al Miami
Florida, this l-ih uay
E, l; U9ATHERM W
c rk of the circull Co rl
I lade '' rthouse
Miami Floi
By: H, CA '. '. '. IS
Depu i ''
-22-29 8/6
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THc
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7447
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
MARYA C. DEI, Sol,
Plaintiff
vs.
HECTOR DEI. Sol.
I ..fendant
TO: IIKCTOR DI'.I, SOI.
!-. Berr) street
Neuark. New Jersey
You. IIEi.-1'olt DEI. sol., are here-
l.v notified that B Bill of Complaint
r.'.r Divorc, ha- been filed against
you, and you are required to servrt
a copj of your Answer or Pleading
to the Bill of Complalnl on the Plain-
tiffs Attorney, Jack I* Kimr. Suite.
215, 1150 S VV. I Street. Miami. Flor-
ida and file the original Answer or
Pleading i" the. office of the ci.rk
of the Circuit Court on or before-
th.- 25th day of August. 1M8. If you
fall to do so. ludgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief in
th.- Bill of Complaint.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for tour consecutive weeks
in the JEW'IKH Fl.oP.IDI-\N.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida this nth day of July 1988.
K B, LEATHERMAN, CL-ERK
Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
By: K. M, l.YM.vN
Deputy cierk
JACK E. KING
Suite 215, 1150 S.VY. 1 Street
Miami, Florida Telephone 878-1507
7 82-29 8/5-11
NOTICE OF INTENTION
TO APPLY FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
Chanctry No. 66C 6847
To Whom It Ma> Concert
Notice is hereby i;i-.'-n that the
undersigned petitioner, HERBERT
WEISS whose reslden. o address is
4727 N.W. I68U1 Terrace In Ue City
of Miami, Dadi County, Flcriila, in-
tends to apply to thi llotcrahle J.
Fritz Gordon, Judge of the Bleventh
Judicial Circuit, in and for Dade
County, at his office in the County
Ceurt-Hoase at llflfi o'cloak AM. on
the 9th day of August. 1MB. or as soon
thereafter as be may he heard, for an
order changing his name from I HER-
BERT WEISS' to scor HOYAI,, by
which name he shall thereafter be
known.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 28th
day of June, A D 1988.
HERHF.irr WEISS
Petitioner
GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney for Petitioner
612 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida ,.
7/15-28-29 8/5
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7105
PETITION FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
MARILYN Y.VFFK. as natural mother
and nest friend of DEBORAH IA)RI
ANGEIJ, a minor child.
Plaintiff
EDWARD ANGEDI,
I lefendant.
To: EDWARD ANGEIJ
It, sic a. .- I'nknown
YOCi EDWARD ANGEDL are here-
by notified thai a Petition for Change
of Nam,- under Chapter u'.'.l)!! of I-lor-
ida statutes has l een filed < vour
for,n.i- wife M VRH.YN VAFFK on be-
half "f your .'.'! child DEBORAH
I.<>Ul ANGEIJ, i ";"' Mtth Btn et.
".as- Harbor Island, Florida, and you
are required serve a copy of your
Vnsw.r or Pleading to Hie Bald Pe-
tition on thi I'lalntlff'S Attorn, v.
REXEDICT V. SILVERMAN, 9
\- \\- |oth Street, Mian i, Mori la, and
file the I 'i i^ii a 'i- r PI ling
in th. offici the Clerk of the cir-
, it .' iurl or beft re he 22nd day
,,f August If you fail to do i o,
iudgmi di fault will be I '< n
del 1
i- 'hanpi of Name.
You an notified II 'ho
. i .i vRii.YN v v';:.
Inter Is Hoi
,t GWYNN idlte I lie
K ni In and for
County C al 9:i '
O'clock on I lay ol
Vi. or as si '''' er ila
may be Drdi r -
the name of i I fr ':,
, ,;; \i, I \.\ to DEBORAH
I i ,i:i YAFFF. vely, by vi lili li
name shi shall Ihen. fter 1"- h nown.
This nol
eai ii w> rl, for our ronsecui Ivi I
in Thi Ji W I' h i loi in
DI iNE AND GRDERICO al inl,
Florida, th daj of July, D.
186''' E. B. di- a thi :i: vi an
Clerk ol i-.-iii Court
Dade Countj. Florida
By: K M. i.vvi \.N
Deputv Clerk
7 22-29 3/5-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS III'.KI'I'.Y GlVKN that
the undersigned, de-iring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of THE OLD VVORI l> SHOP at num-
l>er 166a Michigan Avenue, in the
City of Miami Boa oh, Florida. Inlands
to register the aid aaio. Bitfc the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dido
County. Florida.
I'ateJ a.t Miami. Florida, UtU Dth
day of Inly, 1966
BARRY NJ..AD MARIJ.V
FOVVI.KR, WTHITR, OIDLiEN,
Ht'MKrTY TRPJNAM
Attorneys for Applicant
r.oi city N itl nal c-ank Bldg.
Miami. Florida 83130
By: JAMES S. ROTH
7/15-22-29 8,1.
IARIA i>OT/>BT0K BiOR.RI.co
IK ESCoriUDO
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No 66C 7445
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
JOAQI'IN KSiolRIDO
Plaintiff
vs.
M/
DE
Defendant.
TO: MARIA DOr.OrtEs' BORRE' )
DE ESCOCRIDO
Calle de la Cruz No. 20
Cadiz. Spain ______
You. MARIA D01/>RES RORREOO
DE ESOVUBipO are hereby notified
that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce
has been- filed against Jto. and you
jhw required to aecre a.eOt>Y of your
Answer or 1'loading n*.:he Hill of
Coropla'nt on tie Plaintiff's Attornev.
JACK I. rCfNO. Suite iff. 1C0 S.W.
1 Street, Miami, Florida and file the
original Answer or Wleading In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before th 2IRh day of August,
LitiM If you fall tij default IH be taken iattlwst > iu for
th.- relief in the rim cotncUmt.
this NOTICF ihaB be published
oi>< i oaoh wae* for 'our aonsec.utl s
weeks In thP JlOW::-! I Cl. R DIAN.
IKinr i'i docdored at Miitnii. Florida
this 14th day of July 1886.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. CLERK
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
By: K. M. LYMAN
Deputy Clerk
JACK I. KING
lir.O S.W 1 Street
Miami. Florida
^ : 22-XI l/l 12


Pago 12-B
*"Jen/$t fkari1*3r
Friday, July ?3, 136gB
Our
42nd
Year
NORTON TIRE CO.
OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN SUNDAYS
5300 N.W. 27th Ave.
Next time you have
to buy tires, take
this instead of aspirin.

Buying tires is a headache for lots of people*
So we've come up with a cure: the Tire Value Calculator*
It can figure out what tire you need for the driving you do.
That means you won't have to struggle through all that
gibberish about tire cords, ply ratings and rubber compounds.
Or sweat over a confusing array of tire grades and prices.
At B.F.Goodrich, we've got a new way of doing business.
We give you straight talk. And back it up with our Calculator.
You tell it how you drivethe speeds, the roads, the loads.
Then it tells you which tough BFG tire will suit you best,
cost you least. It's as simple as that.
We think you'll find tire-buying painless at B.F.Goodrich.
But if headaches persist, see your doctor.
Hie straight talk tire people)
BEGoodrich
M-M
---.--.. :-,rv.~
IP ENJOY YEAR ROUND
cffijB > SAVINGS AND
^T SPECIAL CREDIT TERMS
AT THESE
NORTON TIRE STORES:
FGoodrich
0KN14NOWS
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 NW. 2 7th A.a.
4331S35
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
WO "in riifitf St.
373-4431
NORTH MIAMI
HMONW. 7lh Avtnu.
Ml-IMI
MIAMI SHORES
HOI iscayna li.o
________1 ******
MIAMI BEACH
I 454 Allan Raa4
5315331
N. MIAMI BEACH
170.N.C. IS3f4St "'"
S45-7454
i in
Maa wtl^
SOUTH OADE
S001 Saulh Oun Ha.
SS7 7575
HOMESTEAD
30100 Sauth FadanlMw,.
ELU12L
W. HOLLY WOOD
SOW H.II,.o. 11.4. at
Slaia Raa4 ?
^Uu^BaLI
1430 W(It I..wa>4 11.4.
JAMIM.
Li
Al
WEiT FaViJI'sEACH
S15S..Di..
IE 2-4111
._