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The Jewish Floridian ( July 22, 1966 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 22, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01955

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 22, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01955

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
T
-)
"Jewish Floridian
Volume 39 Number 28
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
___________ Miami, Florida, July 22, 1966
Two Sections Price 200
Argentina
Assur.es .
Equality
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
Gen. Ongania, the President of
intina's new military regime,
received a delegation of the DAIA
rx this week for the first time and
assured them that his government
intended to treat all Argentinians
alike and to oppose "rightist" ex-
tremism. The DAIA is the central
representative body of Argentina's
500.000 Jews.
After the 25 minute audience,
I)r Isaac Goldenberg, DAIA pres-
ident, told a large group of wait-
ing newsmen that "we are very
satisfied."
An official communique con-
firmed the cordial nature of the
meeting. The communique said
President Ongania had affirmed
to the Jewish leaders that his
call to Argentinians to partici-
pate in the goals of his govern-
ment was directed "equally to
all Argentinians without distinc-
tion of faith or race."
The President said that, as a
practicing Catholic, he was deter-
Continued on Page 11-A
American Nazis
Picket War Vets
LONG BEACH, Cal. (WNS)
The annual convention of the Cali-
fornia branch of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States open-
ed here with American Nazi Party
members picketing the gathering
and shouting anti-Semitic slogans.
The marchers wore Nazi-like uni-
forms embellished with swastikas.
They had seemingly hoped to goad
the Jewish War Veterans into a
fight, but the leadership of the or-
ganization appealed to the veterans
to ignore the marchers.
In a recent intensive 10-day visit to Germany and Austria, Dr.
John Slawson, executive vice president of the American Jew-
ish Committee, visited cabinet officials, religious leaders and
educators to discuss ways of curbing resurging anti-Semitism,
strengthening education for democracy, and promoting Cath-
olic-Jewish relations. At top, Franz Cardinal Koenig, Arch-
bishop of Vienna, describes religious textbook revisions. Be-
low, Dr. Max Horkheimer, noted social psychologist, talks
wit; Dr. Slawson at unveiling ceremonies of his bust at the
City and University Library of Frankfurt, Germany. Dr. Hork-
heimer is coordinator of AJC-sponsored project to sponsor
visits of German educators to United States.
Postmaster Rejects Protest
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Office of the Postmaster General
has rejected a protest by the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress against issu-
ance of a 1966 Christmas stamp de-
picting the "Madonna and Child"
by Hans Memling. now hanging in
The National Gallery in Washing-
ton, it was reported here today.
I
A spokesman for the Congress, |
replying to the Post Office, said I
that the painting was religious in |
nature and that its reproduction |
on a postage stamp violated the i
Constitutional requirement of sep-1
aration of church and state. A copy
of the correspondence was sent by
the AJ Congress to the National
Council of Churches which is con-
sidering whether to support the
protest.
The AJ Congress assailed the
"Madonna and Child" stamp in a
letter by Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld
of Cleveland, president of the
group, to Postmaster General Law-
rence F. O'Brien, stating: "With
abiding respect for the sensibilities
of our Christian fellow-Americans
and for the aesthetic importance of
the subject, we must nevertheless
urge you not to print this stamp.
The celebration of religious holi-
days, we believe, should be left to
the church, the synagogue and the
individual conscience. It is not the
business of the United States Post
Office."
Rabbi Lelyveld said the "stamp
matter" was a "classic example"
of the way in which violations of
the principle of separation of
church and state "creep into prac-
tice and gain acceptance." He
pointed out that from 1789 to
1962, "the Post Office treated all
proposals for the issuance of
stamps commemorating religious
holidays as violating the require-
ment of religious neutrality im-
posed by the Constitution."
"In 1965, however," he contin-
ued, "the Christmas stamp, appar-
ently already regarded as a tra-
Continued on Page 8-A
Tunisian President Bourguiba Restates
Appeal to Arab Leaders for Israel Peace
BRUSSEI.S President Habib
Bourguiba of Tunisia reiterated
here this week his appeal to the
Arab rulers to negotiate peace with
Israel and asserted that "the time
is working in favor of my ideas."
The Tunisian leader, whose first
appeals for such negotiations rock-
ed the Arab world last year and
evoked savage criticism from the
Arab leaders, spoke out again for
the idea at a press conference at
the Tunisian Embassy. He is cur-
rently on an official visit to Bel-
gium.
Replying to questions about
the Middle East problem, he said
"peace in this area will not come
tomorrow but my plan will make
the responsible* think it over."
He said he had suffered criticism
in the past for his suggestions
"but after some time my ideas
are often adopted. Anyway, the
Continued on Page 8-A
Syria Troops
Spotted Near
Israel Border
JERUSALEM (JTA) Syrian
troop concentrations were seen by
Israeli units building up all during
last night along the border as the
situation remained tense following
the Israeli air strikes last week in
reprisal for Syrian sabotage acts on
Israeli territory.
Truckloads of Syrian soldiers
were spotted pulling up close to
the Israeli frontier and taking
up positions opposite the Is-
raeli settlements of Almagor and
Tel Katzir. Intense air activity
was also observed over Syrian
air space during the night when
two Syrian jets flew close to the
Israeli border for several min-
utes.
Israeli said that the planes were
sent into action following four
saboteur efforts within 48 hours
by raiders from Syrian bases. The
raids, which included two mine lay-
ings, cost the lives of a civilian
and a soldier, and wounded an-
other soldier and another civilian.
An Israeli spokesman said that the
air raids came from a long series
of terrorist operations in Israeli
territory.
The civilian victim was Yehoshua
Levi, 42. of Tiberias. He was killed
when a command car in which he
was riding with two soldiers hit a
mine at Almagor, north of the Sea
of Galilee. The blast hurled one
of the soldiers out of the car and
he died later in a Haifa hospital.
Later, a tractor working near Rosh
Continued on-Page 6-A

.....wmi "
U.S. DEPLORES INCIDENTS
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
United States Government de-
plores Israel's bombing of Syrian
territory but it also deplores the
infiltration of Syrians into Israe!,
State Department officials de-
clared yesterday. They emph*
sized that the United States tra-
ditionally deplores all border
incidents and had drawn the at-
tention of all parties concerned
to the dangers such action entail.
A State Department spokesman
was asked by newspapermen
whether the United States was
considering the suspension of
arms sales to Israel because of
Israel's retaliatory action las-
week over the Syrian border. His
answer was that the United
States is not considering such a
move at present.
"lilW
Vandals Wreck
100 Tombstones
NEW YORK (WNS) Un-
identified hoodlums last week des-
ecrated Mount Carmel Cemetery in
the Glendale section of Queens,
overturning about 100 tombstones,
shattering benches, ripping floral
decorations and wrecking the cem
etery gate.
One of the oldest Jewish burial
places in Queens, the cemetery-, ac-
cording to a gravedigger, "looked
like after a pogrom."
Philip E. Hoffman (right), attorney and executive committee
chairman of the U.S. Realty and Investment Co. in Newark,
N.J., chairman of the board of governors of the American
Jewish Committee, is greeted by Aaron Goldman, chairman
of the National Community Relations Advisory Council, at the
Council's annual meeting in Washington. D.C. The AJC, a
charter member of the NCR AC. withdrew in 1952 and has just
rejoined the coordinating body of major Jewish intergroup
agencies.


Page 2-A
fJewisii Fhridian
Friday, July 22, 1965
Lipton, Rosen Named to UIA
Joseph M. Upton and Leonard
Rosen have been named to the
Board of Trustees of the newly
constituted United Israel Appeal,
Inc., it was announced by Dewey
D. Stone of Brockton, Mass., chair-
man of the new organization. They
are among 200 prominent Jewish
leaders from 64 communities
throughout the United States nam-
ed to the board of the major Jew-
ish philanthropic organization
, which serves immigration and re-
| habilitation programs lee TsraeT.
Mr. Lipton, president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
is a past campaign chairman for
the Combined Jewish Appeal. Mr.
Rosen, long active in CJA cam-
paigns, was a co-chairman of the
Initial Gifts Division in the
campaign.
The UIA, a merger of the Jew-
ish Agency for Israel, Inc., and
the United Israel Appeal, re-
ceives funds from the Miami
Federation Combined Jewish
Appeal for the overseas program
of the United Jewish Appeal.
Since the establishment of Israel
18 years ago, the program has
made possible the absorption of
1,250,000 Jewish immigrants into
the country. Expenditures are
under American direction.
k> *
Then new UIA brings together
the 40-year-old UIA and the six-
year-old JAI. In effecting the con-
solidation of the two organizations,
Notorious Doctor Is Executed
BERLIN (JTA) Dr. Horst
Fischer, 53. a member of Hitler's
SS and a former Auschwitz con-
centration camp doctor, has been
executed in East Germany for
crimes against humanity." the
A.D.N., official East German news
agency, reported.
The report said he was sen-
tenced to death by the East Ger-
man Supreme Court Mar. 25. How-
ever it did not reveal when the
execution took place.
Dr. Fischer was accused of se-
lecting for extermination with
Zyklon B gas tens of thousands of
inmates of the Auschwitz camp be-
tween November, 1942 and Jan-
uary, 1945. When he was arrested
last year, he was practicing med-
icine as a country doctor under
an assumed name.
1966 Mr. Stone states "we are not mere-
ly concerned with achieving a
greater degree of operating effici-
ency. Our concern is not only with
budgeting and administration of
programs but with human lives.
The more than one and one quar-
ter million Jews we helped bring
to Israel during the past 18 years
represent a unique testimony to
Jewish survival and Jewish self-
help; yet the job is far from com-
plete. There are still hundreds and
thousands of Jews the world over
who require resettlement and this,
too.g is our responsibility."
Mr. Stone noted that the merg-
ing of the two groups "will en-
able us to give recognition to
the deep concern of the Amer-
ican Jewish contributor for the
adequate and effective function-
ing of vital philanthropic pro-
grams and offer full scope for
the participation and involve-
ment of all sectors of American
Jewry throughout the country."
He pointed out that "as long as
any Jew in need the world over
has a right to come to Israel and
be assisted in the process of reset-
tlement and rehabilitation simply
because he is a Jew; every Amer-
ican Jew ought to consider it his
moral responsibility to contribute
to the cost of receiving and re-
settling these refugees because he,
too, is a Jew. It has only been be-
cause of this unquestioned commit-
ment to mutual assistance and re-
sponsibility that Jews have sur-
vived the vicissitudes of the past
2.000 years of their history," Mr.
Stone declared.
Technion Applications Soar
HAIFA (WNS) The Tech-
nion-lsrael Institute of Technology,
which can accommodate only 1.050
students, has received more than
2,000 applications for next fall.
Entrance exams will be held next
month.
The new Pastoral Care and Human Relations Institute of the
New York Board of Rcbbis is dedicated by New York's Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller in the headquarters of the board, 10
East 73rd St. The Institute, made possible through a grant of
the Brookdale Foundation will focus its efforts at orienting
clergymen of all faiths to enable them properly to refer their
congregants who are seeking help in these four problem
areas: mental illness, mental retardation, aging and addic-
tion. Left to right are Gov. Rockefeller; B. Davis Schwartz,
trustee of the Brookdale Foundation; and Rabbi Edward T.
Sandrow, president of the New York Board of Rabbis.
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King Faisal
Receives Three
'Jewish Leaders'
NEW YORK (WNS) King
Faisal, of Saudi Arabia, who has
been under fire for an intemperate
remark he made in Washington
about Jews supporting Israel, re-
ceived a delegation of the anti-
Zionist American Council for Juda-
ism at his Waldorf Astoria suit
prior to his return here.
The delegation, consisting of
Rabbi Elmer Berger, Benjamin
Friedman and Alfred Lillienthal, i
was reported to have conveyed re- L
gret to the King over the action
of Mayor John V. Lindsay in can-
celling an official reception for
bin because of the remark.
Soviet Writer Defects
LONDON (WNS) Leonid
Finkelstein, a Soviet Jewish journ-
alist, has defected and has asked
and received asylum in this coun
try. Finkelstein was with a group
of 34 vacationing Soviet writers
and artists.
^>
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They know that no matter which Riverside Chapel
makes these arrangements, standards of service are con-
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Perhaps that is the reason why over eighty per cent of
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......


Friday. July 22. 196G
*Jenisi norkfi&n
Page 3-A
e
JWY Commander Lauds Orange Bowl
Committee Withdrawal from Bath Club
John K. Ring, chairman of the
Orange Bowl Cotr.iv :"<., has writ-
ten to Irving Cooperman. of 660
So. Shore Dr., Miami Beach, assur-
ing him that the committee had
dropped its plans tj hold the or-
ganization's annual Tennis Ball at
the Bath Club.
Coopenran is tha newly-elected
commander of the State Depart-
ment of Florida. Jewish War Vet-
erans of the U.S.A.
Ring released the paragraph
statement to Coop*rman m? sent
to the daily press here several days
later for Sunday, July 10 publi-
cation. In the release. Ring notetl:
"Because of the public mis-
understanding of the Orange
Bowl's previously announced
plans to hold its annual Tennis
Ball at a private club, the Orange
Bowl Committee wishes tp state
that this year's Tennis Ball will
be held at another facility."
Declared Ring: "The above par-
agraph tbould satisfactorily indi-
cate to \ciir membership the pre-
viously-announced non-discrimina-
tory policy of the Orange Bowl
Committee.''
In a Letter to the Editor pub-
lished in The Jewish Floridian on
CO'-'VANDf* COOPiRMAN
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone JE 1-3595
945 MICHIGAN AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
July 8, Commander Cooperman
said that "we of the Greater Miami
area, know the several 'private
clubs' which operate on Miami
Beach, and which under the guise
of being private, limit their mem-
bership according to their wishes."
Added <_ooperman: "We have
taken no action, believing these
clubs to be of minor consequence,
and have instead turned our atten-
tion to more important items.
"However, when a public organ-
ization such as the Orange Bowl
Committee plans a function at one
of these clubs, as they have done
with the Tennis Ball in conjunction
with Orange Bowl festivities, and
when persons invited will be from
throughout the world, then this be-
comes a matter to look into, and
is no longer of minor significance."
Concluded Cooperman's letter:
"The Department of Florida,
Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A., urges the Orange Bowl
Committee, as an important civic
activity of this area, not to hold
meetings or other functions at
private clubs which restrict
membership on the basis of race,
color, creed, or religion. With
our boys fighting and dying in
Viet Nam, such activities and
encouragement of discrimination
make a mockery of our professed
ideals."
Cooperman told The Jewish
Floridian early this week that "we
are of course delighted by Mr.
Ring's announcement and the ac-
tion of the Orange Bowl Commit-
tee. This should put the last nail
in the coffin of what would have
been an unhappy instance of un-
warranted prejudicial behavior."
Belgian Jewish
Community Has
Oldest Temple
BRUSSELS (WNS) The
Jewish community in the Ardenese
town of Arlon has only 65 people,
but its century-old synagogue is
the oldest in Belgium
Once among the most flourishing
Jewish communities in 19th cen-
tury Belgium, the Jewish commun-
ity in Arlon currently is the small-
est in the country.
Much of the history of the com-
munity was recalled last week at
a ceremony marking observance
of the 100th anniversary of the
synagogue, with Chief Rabbi Rob-
ert Dreyfuss of Belgium and a
number of Catholic and Protestant
lay leaders participating in the
event.

Miss Israel
In Top Five
Miss Aviva Israeli, repre-
senting Israel in the 1966
Miss Universe Beauty Pag-
eant, was named fourth
runner-up to Miss Sweden,
Margareta Arvidson, at Mi-
ami Beach Auditorium July
16.
A student in Tel Aviv, the
green-eyed beauty speaks
five languages and is plan-
ning a career as an inter-
preter.
. iimimiiMiffliiiMffl
Schwartzman At
Hebrew Workshop
Louis Schwartzman, executive
director of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, is one of 20 Hebrew
educators and administrators from
throughout the United States and
Canada attending a five-day work-
shop in Philadelphia to explore a
revolutionary method of teaching
Hebrew through a new audio-visual
method.
The introduction to teaching He-
brew by the Saint Cloud Method
will be made during the workshop
held at the Center for Curriculum
Development, a division of Chilton
Books.
Developed from the Saint Cloud
Method of teaching languages,
Hebrew by the Audio Visual Meth-
od is designed to teach modern
Hebrew with native-like fluency
in speaking, readirrg and writing.
Co-developers of the method are
Mrs. Judith Cais and Dr. Paul
Enoch, who worked under the aus-
pices of the Technion Research
and Development Foundation of i
Haifa, Israel.
The course, which is taught with
the aid of filmstrips and tape re-
COrdingS, emphasizes the true-life
cultural context of the country
The tape recordings provide a
constant model with the rhythm,
intonation and pronunciation of,
native speakers. Through this
method the student derives a deep-
er appreciation and fuller under-
standing for the language.
The Saint Cloud Method, which
, inspired the co-developers of He-;
brew by the Audio Visual Method..
' began as a project suggested to the
French government by the United
Nations in 1951.
William Alan Pomerance, recipient of an Eagle Scout award,
is a member of Troup 17, South Florida Council of the Boy
Scouts of America. The 17-year-old senior at Palmetto Senior
High, is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Pomeiance, 12530
Vista Lane. To be an Eaqle Scout, highest rank which can b&
achieved, a Boy Scout must have earned 21 merit badge-j
which include awards for "personal fitness," "citizenship io.
the community," and "citizenship in the nation." Young Pom-
erance is also active in Junior Achievement, and is a member
Oi the Civil Air Patrol.
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Page 4-A
fJewisti ncrktian
Friday, July 22. 196S
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Volume 39
Number 28
Friday. July 22. 1966
5 Ab 5726
Second View Of
The Faisal Affair
The recent visit of Saudi-Arabia's
King Faisal is stilr freshly enough
with us to speculate on some of the
alternatives to the decisions made
by New York Gov. Rockefeller and
Mayor Lindsay.
It is true that just about every
American Jewish organization jump-
ed into the breech with a statement
of praise for the Empire State's two
major political leaders.
What they had done, as we dis-
cussed in these columns in our issue
of July 1, was to cancel official func-
tions and honors to the Arab mon-
arch following his slurring remarks
about Jews at a press conference in
Washington.
Perhaps a more sober view of
the King's decidedly undiplomatic
behavior would have suggested both
to Gov. Rockefeller and to Mayor
Lindsay that they take public notice
of Faisal's insults, that they remind
him he hurled these insults on his
eve of arrival in a city containing
just about the largest concentration
of Jews ,anywhere in the world, and that such
behavior seemed ill-becoming not only to
Americans of Jewish faith but to the nation at
large.
In one way or another, both Rockefeller
and Lindsay, as well as a host of Jewish lead-
ers and organizations, have since said these
things in heat and hate.
But would it not have been more in keeping
with the dignity of New York's leaders and
their Jewish constituents, in whose behalf they
reacted so angrily, if instead of snubbing Faisal
they then carried out their official responsibil-
ities in any case?
This is not submissively turning the other
cheek. It sugqests, instead, greater integrity
and a profounder sense of Americanism. In the
first instance, neither Mr. Rockefeller nor Mr.
Lindsay is involved in the kind of governmental
office that has direct roots in U.S. foreign policy.
It was therefore gratuitous for them to react
as if they had.
In the second instance, it would have re-
flected far more positively on American Jewry
if, as Americans and as Jews, our principal
leaders and organizations shunned the kind of
pressure, implied or otherwise, that precipitated
the insult in reply to Faisal's provocation.
Above all, this would have denied Faisal
the kind of talking point he has since used in
newer levels of anti-Zionist propaganda.
, ET^NAt MONUMENT /A/ THE 6rei(NAl.CnY
fn it* dtdirafron of Ht Truman A*n)r
Meaning of Tisha B'Av
Tisha B'Av, the ninth day in the Hebrew
month of Av, falls this year on Monday even-
ing and Tuesday, July 25 and 26. The observ-
ance commemorates the destruction of the
Temple and the virtual fall of the ancient
Jewish nation in Palestine until our own time.
Hence, Tisha B'Av has for thousands of
years been one of the most profoundly sad
events in the Jewish calendar. Tisha B'Av
services are a time for reading the lachrymose
"Book of Lamentations." It is a time for sym-
bolic study of the Jewish dispersion.
In our own generation, Tisha B'Av has hap-
pily come to mean one more Jewish occasion
marked in the name of history and tradition.
For the Temple destroyed and the nation van-
quished are returned.
Torah comes forth from Zion again; while the
Temple in the form of a revised Jewish national
religious life flourishes anew. But in the larger
sense, Tisha B'Av stands as a sad reminder to
all men of the bondage of so many among
them, each in his own way lamenting the fall
of some temple, the destruction of some free-
dom.
Perpetuating Faithlessness
Some interesting views emerged out of a
Labor Zionist Organization conference in Chi-
cago recently. The conference, marking the
organization's 35th national gathering, heard
these opinions:
There is not very much Negro anti-
Semitism, according to Rabbi Jacob J. Wein-
stein, president of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis.
Third or fourth generation American
Jews have very little inferiority complex about
their Jewishness, but seek identity in terms of
a set of ideals and principles, rather than only
out of a vague idea of ethnic affiliation, de-
clared Dr. Ezra Spicehandler, professor at the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion in Cincinnati.
Eighty-five percent of all Jewish children
in the United States stop their Jewish education
at age 13; while 18 percent of marriages among
Jewish youth are mixed marriages. Dr. Spice-
handler also observed, adding that the "sheer
drop" in the population growth of the American
v Jewish community threatens it with "ultimate
extinction."
Rabbi Weinstein's statement about Negro
anti-Semitism is an academic sop he has
sounded time and again, and we are not pre-
pared to hold with him particularly when
too many facts unhappily point in another di-
rection.
But Dr. Spicehandler's multi-faceted view
of the American Jewish community today, of-
fering a variety of opinions in an equal variety
of other sociological areas, all knit together to
suggest some unhappy times ahead.
That Jews seek their identity in ideals and
principles, presumably topical and secular, is
symbolic of their ages-long concern for the
world in which they live. This is good, for men
unconcerned with the problems surrounding
them, and mainy focused on philosophical
hereafters, can not hope to attain the ultimate
salvation, which inevitably lies in an active
interest in men, their affairs, and their destiny.
But where this takes the place of respect
for heritage and tradition, we are bound to
emerge with the kinds of problems Dr. Spice-
handler declares are characteristic of the
American Jewish community today: the abys-
mal state of Jewish education, mixed marriage
and the threat to our survival as a people.
The concept of the "sociological Jew" is
the worst threat to the Jewish continuum. It is an
intellectual hoax designed to excuse Jewish
faithlessness. It merely perpetuates it instead.
India's Attitude
Toward the Arab
States is Debated
By T. NARAIN
JTA Correspondent in India
New Delhi
IN THE WAKE of Indo Pakistan conflict, tlic policy that India should
adopt toward the Arab states has become a hot topic for discussior
in the Indian Parliament and press. As the political commentator oi
the Statesman wrote: "Seldom before have so many complained si
bitterly about the fact that, to be friendly with the Arabs, the Arab
countries have, by and large, failed to reciprocate the sentiment, and
have, indeed, backed our adversary Pakistan. And it is a measure ol
the resentment felt by the MPs that never before have so many
amendments been moved, as during the recent debate, to demand thi>
establishment of diplomatic relations with Israel. There can be no
gainsaying the fact that India's position about Israel, judged by the
principles of justice and fair play, is anomalous. But that is preciseh
where the clash between wholesome principles and national self-
interest comes in.
Can we afford to antagonize 13 Arab nations just for the sake
of winning the support of one country? Is such a consideration in
accord with the policy of nonalignment that we are never tired ol
talking about? Such are the questions that the Indians ask and debate
in the national press. Needing, as Indians do, moral support from
and enduring friendship with every country, it would be folly on our
part to overlook Israel. It is clearly imperative in the national interest
of India to establish diplomatic relations with Israel, said an Indian
in the Hindustan Times.
Israel is a tiny state, he wrote, which has made tremendous
progress in the economic sphere within a short time. She has done
it within the framework of democracy under which man Is treated not
as a cog in the big wheel of the state, but is given the respect that
is due to an individual. Contrast this with the regimes in most ot
the Arab states. All of them are examples of one kind or another ot
dictatorship. Merely because these Arab states nurse an unreasonable
grievance against the Jews, should India follow them in her attitude
towards Israel? This is not nonalignment but a mockery of it, he wrote.
ftTISH Of OUR ANTIQUITY '
MEW IDEAS about India's foreign policy or at least about Indiai:
" foreign interests seem to be coming through. One of them i-
about India's relations or rather, lack of relations with Israel
and this takes me back, a columnist of the Hindustan Times wrote,
to a brief visit there not long ago.
India and Israel are both ancient countries, but in India, we
probably make a fetish of our antiquity. Age and seniority rule, whili
the young eat their hearts out until they, too, join the ranks of fossil-
ized and supine old. In Israel the difference hits you with a thwack
It is a country of the young in the streets and cafes of cities, in
the kibbutzim and moshavim, on the roads where they stand in uni-
form thumbing lifts, in the desert settlements, the young are every
where.
They are fit, fighting fit, and that may give some people cause
of worry. Someone I know thinks that, as a reaction from the earliest
submissiveness of the Jews, a new generation is hard and aggressive.
They live in an embattled country. I have never seen so many border-
always hostile. And I came to like the spirit of living with zest -
having theaters run, orchestras perform and cafes spill out to the
streets, almost in sight of sullen border troops.
SELf-RCUANCt IS NEEDfD 1
UT IT IS NOT my wish to speak so much of Israel as of our own
interests. Why should we too glibly assume that, to be friends with
the Arabs, we have also to be enemies of their enemies? The Indian
External Affairs Ministry's rigid case on Israel is full of closely-argued
nonsequitors. There is Arab opinion, too, which thinks that hatred of
Israel is an unrealistic myth; but only a few, like President Bourguiba,
have the guts to express what others silently feel. To be friendly
with the Arabs we do not necessarily have to cut or snub Israel. Noi
does Israel expect that we should turn away from our Arab friends
to have sane relations with her.
If it is self-reliance we want in food, arms, in our dealings
with countries of the world then we should frame our alliances to
suit our own interests. At one time the Arabs needed us, they still do
ill u^a them> t0- and value their goodwill but, the columnist of
fEfrf .k 4!? T,mes wrote- we a,s ned Wends wherever we can
ntVau.m'^?eWay.We have treated Israel over the last 17 vears is
hTrSKi Tke her'desPerately anxious to come forward and
An dSSS gain' l ,we bad,y need many thins in the wor,d ,oday
?olicv1r? m5!3.^ air route t0 EurPe for ^stance. AnA our
rigfcUty EaSt mUSt shed its hard and utworn crust o
* *
FISN8CT OVmURtS TOWARD DIPLOMACY
TAif' h-T0 y^ corresPndent. an Indian Foreign Office official,
Israersbn^vot^.h31^ 'Tf. Is the real consideration that, against
these votesha?,e abS h3Ve 13 vo,es in the United Nations- and
wese votes are badly needed by India in her dispute with Pakistan.


Friday. July 22. 1966
+.k*ristn*rMan
Pago5-A
*
DIRECTORS
JOSEPH ft UPTON
President
RONALD A. UPTON
Executive
Vice- President
GEORGE A. PRICE
Senior
Vice-President
LEO ROBINSON
Vice-President
GUS FEUER
Vice- Pres iden t
and General Counsel
SAMUEL LIPTON
V ice-President
LEONARD BARR
Treasurer
I MILFORD L. CLEMENTS
;L Vice-President
% and Secretary
MARSHALL S.HARRIS
Vi^e-President and
Associate Counsel
Experience makes the difference...
WE'VE SERVED DAD6 OOUNTY SINCE 1934 _
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
at commencement of business
JUNE 1, 1966
ASSETS
Cash on Hand and in Banks.............. $ 1,446,846
U.S. Government Securities, at cost....... 16,922,283
First Mortgage Loans.................... 212,575,005
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock, at cost. -.. 2,275,000
Prepayment to secondary reserve of Federal
Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation 1,283,163
Loans on Savings Accounts.............. 1,238,586
Real Estate Owned, at cost............... 755,150
Land, Buildings, and Equipment at cost less
accumulated depreciation.............. 5,486,284
Deferred Charges and Other Assets....... 822,309
TOTAL ASSETS $242,804,626
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES
Savings Accounts....................:.. $211,847,602
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank.. 2,000,000
Loans in Process........................ 5,952,444
Advance Payments by Borrowers for
Taxes and Insurance.................. 2,537,759
Other Liabilities........................ 503,119
Deferred Income ....................... 856,837
Reserve for June 30, 1966 Dividend....... 1,565,000
Surplus and General Reserves............ 17,541,865
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES $242,804,626
HASKINS & SELLS
Accountants and Auditors
1701 Alfred I. duPont Building
Miami, Florida 33131
ACCOUNTANTS' OPINION
Dade Federal Savings and Loan
Association of Miami:
We have examined the statement of
financial condition of Dade Federal
Savings and Loan Association of Miami
as of the commencement of business on
June 1.1966. Our examination was made
in accordance with generally accepted
auditing standards, and accordingly in-
cluded such tests of the accounting
records and such other auditing proce-
dures as we considered necessary in
the circumstances.
In our opinion, the accompanying state-
ment presents fairly the financial
position of Dade Federal Savings and
Loan Association of Miami as of the com-
mencement of business on June 1. 1966
in conformity with generally ac-
cepted accounting principles con-
sistently applied.
HASKINS & SELLS
June 17. 1966
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AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI MIAMI, FLORIDA
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Page 6-A
Jmist fkridiar
Friday, July 22, 1966
Shimon Peres Asks For
New Meaning to Judaism
\
/
Dr. Abraham Wolfson, (seated) recipient of a
gold plaque from B'nai B'rith District 5 for "his
work on behalf of Israel and the community
of Miami Beach." Award was made at a BB
luncheon meeting held at the DiLido Hotel.
Looking on are Oeft to right) Irving Schenker,
lodge officer and 25-year member; Samuel
Pascoe, president; Leo Rutstein, vice-president;
Gershon Miller, chairman of weekly luncheon
meetings; Irving Schatzman, honorary life
president
Dr. Wolfson Cited
By District 5 BB
Dr. Abraham Wolfson. philos-
opher, author and lecturer, was
presented with a gold plaque dur-
ing the recent 90th annual conven-
tion of B'nai B'rith, District 5.
Named by Rabbi Irving Lehrman
of Temple Emanu-El "The Sage of
Miami Beach,'' Dr. Wolfson has
wntten several books on Spinoza
and conducts the Spinoza Forum
which meets weekly.
The 85-year-old advocate of "hap-
pier living," has also served for
the past 15 years as newscaster for
the weekly luncheon meetings
sponsored by Miami Beach BB
Lodge. He is a life member of the
lodge and also its historian.
The plaque given to Dr. Wolf-
son cites him 'for his work on be-
half of Israel.'' It also recognizes
"his service to adult education and
the development of cultural pro-
grams for the entire Miami Beach
community."
Art Brans Considers Israel
As Possible Hotel Site
Art Bruns has returned from a
trip which included Southampton,
England, where the international
hotel group of which he is a part
opened the new Skyway Hotel.
The group also owns a Skyway Ho-
tel opposite the London Airport.
From Southampton, Bruns and his
associates fletf to Israel to check
into a possible site for a third
Skyway. *
REASONS WHY MAIL
FOR JAMESTOWN, ALA.
CAN BE MISSENT..
? Jeaiestewii, Ark.
Jem. it own, Celrf.
# Joeieilewn, Cele.
? J amtHewn, lite".
* Jeaeetewa, Kane,
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# J erne Hewn, La.
* Jeaeateam, Mick
* Jeaestewn, eW.
* JMMm,N.Y.
* jwntm, M. C
Jmtowi, M. Oak
* Jeaiestewa, Okie
# Jmaw. Pa.
? Jaa>a*toR, R. I.
* Jaawstowa, S. C
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When you ust ZIP Code a.
your address, your corre-
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torn. ZIP Code adds ac-
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Syria Troops Concentrated
Along the Israel Border
Continued from Page 1-A
Pina hit a mine seriously wounding
Varon Landesman. 15, a member
of the Ayelet Hashacher kibbutz.
Police found tracks leading to the
Syrian border from the sites of
the two mines.
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and
Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin, mean-
while, presented to the Cabinet
Monday the latest reports on the
Syrian border situation. Foreign
Minister Abba Eban reviewed the
international aspects of the situ-
ation. While last Friday, Israel im-
mediately accepted a plea by Gen.
Odd Bull. Chief of Staff of the
United Nations Truce Supervision
Organization, for a cease fire along
the border, Damascus has not yet
responded to the plea.
Observers here noted today that
Israel's other neighboring Arab
states confined themselves to ex-
pressing solidarity with the Syrian
government but failed to take any
effective action such as declaring
a state of emergency or reinforcing
their border positions with Israel.
This seemed to indicate, the ob-
servers pointed out, that the neigh-
boring Arab states realize that the
Israeli action last Thursday was
only a one-time reprisal measure
against the El Fatah terrorists and
was not a major operation.
In a radio interview broadcast
yesterday by Kol Israel, the Is-
rael radio network, Mr. Eban
expressed the hope that the
major powers would use their
influence with the Damascus
government to ease the tension
on the border and ensure peace.
He also voiced the hope that
the "state of equilibrium"
achieved in the clashes along the
border would now be followed
by "an equilibrium of peace."
The Foreign Minister said that
he was convinced that Israel's re-
NEW YORK (JTA) The
vounger generation of Jews, both
in the United States and in Israel,
i must help develop new organiza-
tional forms and new methods "to
. give meaning to Judaism in the
modern world." Shimon Peres,
j former Deputy Defense Minister in
Israel, said here.
The secretary-general of Rafi,
former Premier David Ben-
I Gurion's dissident party, made the
statement in a press interview in
which he summarized his impres-
sions of American Jewish life dur-
ing a two-week visit.
A one-time student at Harvard
University who knows the Amer-
ican Jew, he said he had re-
freshed his understanding of
American Jewry by conferences
with leaders of the American
Jewish Committee, the Zionist
Organization of America, the
Rabbinical Assembly and leading
American Jewish intellectuals,
such as Saul Bellow, Isaac Bash-
evis Singer and Arthur Miller.
He said he had come to the
United States "to listen, not to
talk."
He said he found American Jews
"much more eager to have an open
dialogue about the future of Juda-
ism and the relationship between
Israel and the Jewish community
in the United States." He said the
younger generation of American
Jews was "highly intelligent and
very alert both to Jewish problems
action to Syrian sabotage efforts i and t0 problems in general" in the
against Israel had not weakened
the effect of Tunisian President
Habib Bourguiba's renewed peace
plea, which. Mr. Eban said, he
hoped would eventually be taken
up by other Arab states.
Gen. Rabin said the clash Thurs-
day was the first time that French-
made Mi rage-3 jets had shot down
Soviet-made MIG-21 jets. He said
the clash lasted two minutes and
was fought at low level by four
Israeli jets. He said the shot-down
Syrian jet was hit by cannon fire
from an Israeli plant. He ridiculed
the Syrian report that two Israeli
planes were shot down during the
fight, emphasizing that all four
jets returned to their bases in
Israel.
The Damascus Radio monitored
here yesterday lodged most of the
blame for the Israeli air strike on
"American imperialism" and call-
ed upon all other Arab states to
break their diplomatic ties with
Washington.
hope for new meaning for Judaism
in the modern world.
He said he had been asked
"searching questions'" about Israel
and about Rafi and that his reac-
tion generally was the feeling
"that old established organizations
and slogans are not sufficient any
Chief Vatican Delegate Talks
NEWARK (WNS) The
Apostolic Delegate to the United
States, Archbishop Egidio Vag-
nozzi, declared here in a speech
at an Israel Bonds dinner that what
happened to the Jews of Europe
in recent times was "a shame on
all humanity." Calling for close
and friendly relations between
Christians and Jews, the Vatican
spokesman told the gathering,
"You are gathered today in order
to see that this shame will not
happen to humanity again."
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more, either in Israel or here. The
channels for dealing with Jewish
life through party organizations
and fund-raising should be based
on a much more intellectual and
scientific basis." He said that he
could not understand, as an ex-
ample, why internal Israeli polit-
ical parties "should be extended in
any way" to Jewish life in other
countries.
He also reported that many
American Jews had" complained
that many Israeli Jews were ig-
norant about the problems and
achievements of Jewish life in
America and that this complaint
was probably justified. He said a
"more knowledgeable contact mu4
be established so that American
Jews will knew more about Israel
and Israeli people will know more
about American Jewish life.'
He suggested that Israeli and
American Jews must assume
joint responsibility for the fate
of Soviet Jewry and must make a
joint effort to meet some of Is-
rael's security problems. He sug-
gested also that the two Jewries
"must organize a dialogue about
the future of Judaism as a faith"
and that Hebrew and Jewish
education "must be expanded for
the younger generation in coun-
tries outside of Israel."
Such activities, he said, should
be done through nonpa:tisan con-
ferences and by institutes created
for dealing with such problems.
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Friday. July 22. 1966
*J(wisti fkrfcfictjn
Page 7-A
Reform Rabbis At Moscow Services
LONDON (JTA) Three
American Reform rabbis, who
along with 19 other members of
the Central Conference of Amer-
ican Rabbis, are visiting the Soviet
Union and other East European
countries to acquire up-to-date in-
formation on the status of Jewish
communities in those countries,
addressed the Central Synagogue
ill Moscow during Sabbath services.
The three were Rabbi Jacob J.
Weinstein, president of the CCAR
head of the delegation; Rabbi
George B. Lieberman of the Cen-
tral Synagogue in Rockville Cen-
U r, N.Y., who spoke in Russian,
and Dr. Eugene Mihaly of the He-
brew Union College-Jewish Insti-
tute of Religion in Cincinnati. Last
summer, a group of American Or-
thodox rabbis, members of the
Rabbinical Council of America,
also spoke from the pulpit of the
Moscow synagogue.
In his address yesterday. Rabbi
Lieberman recalled that many
of the Jews in the United States
traced their ancestry to Russia.
Rusk Discusses
Arab Refugees
WASHINGTON (JTA) Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk testified
this week before the Senate Sub-
committee on Refugees and was
ssked about the United States atti-
tude on the solution of the Arab
icfugee problem. He said that the
United States sees in the United
Nations Relief and Works Agency
the important factor for maintain-
ing stability in the Middle East and
that the political situation in the
area renders it impossible to solve
this problem.
The Subcommittee on Refugees
will hear reports on the Arab ref-
ugee problem from Assistant See
retary of State for International
Organisation Affairs, Joseph Sisko,
who is now touring the Middle
East and from Assistant Secretary
of State for Middle East and South
Asian Affairs Raymond Haire.
Jt is assumed that one of the major
questions will be whether the
United Nations Relief and Works
Agency which aids the Arab ref-
ugees should continue to aid those
.refugees who undergo military
' training in the socalled Palestine
Liberation Army.
Israel-Diaspora
Tics Trumpeted
TEL AVIV (JTA) Prime
Minister Levi Esbkol called upon
Israeli schools this week to teach
Ihe importance of close ties be-
tween Israel and the diaspora. (
Addressing the 22nd convention
of the Teachers Union, the Pre-
mier said that the schools must
implant in children's minds the
realization that Israeli Jews were
a small part of a large nation.
Education Minister Zelman
Aranne criticized what he term-
td 'The Soviet Union's 50-year
ciefle on the spiritual existence
of her millions of Jews."
Barring a miracle, Mr. Aranne
fcaid he feared Soviet Jewry would
t* completely cut off before long
from Jewish, national existence-.
The occasional reports from
Russia, he said, on the publication
of a Jewish prayerbook or Yiddish
manuscript are nothing more than
"mocking" by a formidable na-
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"We, therefore, are united by
spiritual history," he said. Rabbi
Weinstein described the active
life of Jews in the United States,
both religious and secular and
the role of the young people in
the synagogue. Earlier in the
services, the congregation was
visibly impressed when David
Lieberman, the 13-year-old son
of Rabbi Lieberman, recited the
blessings on being called to the
reading of the Torah.
Responding to the addresses by
the American rabbis. Moscow Chief
Rabbi Yehudah Leib Levin said:
"We Jews pray for peace and when
you go back to America, use your
influence to insure that peace will
come. Do what you can to end the
war in Viet Nam, because once the
destructive forces are given sway,
they gain strength and it is diffi-
cult to stop them."
The American rabbis, who ar-
rived in Moscow after a three-day
visit to Poland, will travel to Vilna,
Leningrad and Kiev before leav-
ing July 27 for Hungary and
Czechoslovakia.
Scholarship Goes
To Consultant
Robert M. Segal, Planning Con-
sultant. Welfare Planning Council
of Dade County, has been awarded
a $7,000 scholarship from the
Florence Heller Graduate School
for Advanced Studies in Social
Welfare, Brandeis University, Wal-
tham, Mass.
Immediate past president of the
South Florida Chapter, National
Association of Social Workers, Se-
gal was recently nominated secre-
tary of the association which has
a membership of 40.000.
ROBERT StGAL
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Page 8-A
vjewisli FkrHBarr
Friday. July" 22, i966
High school education for 1,000 children in
Israel immigrant development town of Tirat
Carmel is assured by S500.000 gift of Detroit
realtor and philanthropist Abraham Schiffman
(left), to Israel Education Fund of United Jewish
Appeal. Artist's rendering of comprehensive
school is presented to the benefactor at UJA
national headguarters in New York in pres-
ence of (from left) Ambassador Nachum Sha-
mir, Israel's Economic Minister in the United
States; Ralph I. Goldman, executive director,
Israel Education Fund; Charles J. Bensley,
president, Israel Education Fund; and Max M.
Fisher, general chairman. United Jewish Ap-
peal. Construction of the school, one of 26
activated by IEF in 18 months, will begin
this fall.
Postmaster Rejects Protest
Continued from Page 1-A
dition. depicted an angel blowing
a trumpet a theme that was
clearly religious, though arguably
nonsectarian. Now we have the
proposal for 1966 that is plainly
both religious and sectarian." He
added that the fact that the design
is a reproduction of a work of art
is "irrelevant."
The full text of the Post Of-
fice's reply, signed by Ira Kap-
enstein, special assistant to the
Postmaster General emphasized
two points: "1. No one is forced
to use the Christmas stamp; it is
not mandatory in any way. 2. Our
1966 stamp will portray a portion
of a work of art and the stamp
design will identify at the bot-
tom both the artist, Mem ling,
and the National Gallery of Art.
"Since 1962 special stamps have
Note Increase Australian Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) An Aus-
tralian Jewish leader reported here
This week that more than 35,0001
Jewish men, women and children
have resettled in Australia since 1
the end of World War II.'doubling
the country's Jewish population.
The report was made by Syd-
ney Einfeld. a member of the
Australian Parliament and pres-
ident of the Federation of Aus-
tralian Jewry.
In his report to the United
Hias Service here, he said most
of the Jewish newcomers to
Australia had been aided by
Hias. He added, that they had
"mad* a successful adjustment
to Australia with the aid of the
Federation of Australian Jewish
Societies which provides temp-
orary housing, jobs and financial
support to help in their econo-
mic and social integration."
The visiting Australian Jewish
leader, who is a Labor Party mem-
ber of. Parliament, said that there
are 70.000 Jews in Australia's
population of 12,000,000.
Noting that Australia continues
to encourage immigration, he said
that the Immigration Ministry had
recently stated that the Govern-
ment would continue to support the
Jewish settlement program.
He said that Australian Jewry
wanted very much to receive Jew-
ish newcomers.
been provided for the benefit of
those who wish to use them on
Christmas mailings. Postmasters
always have other issues, both reg-
ular and commemorative, on hand
for patrons who prefer them," the
letter from the Postmaster Gen-
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Tunisia President
Restates Appeal
Continued from Page 1-A
time is working in favor of my
ideas."
'Acceptable solutions," he said,
"have to be found for both parties,
for the Palestinians who were the
subjects of an injustice and lost
their land, and for the Jews
that means the Israelis who
were also the subjects of an injus-
tice." To put an end to an injustice,
however, "one must not create an-
other injustice. I repeat, acceptable
solutions for everybody must be
found in order that peace may be
established in this part of the Mid-
dle East."
Wildes Bequeath
Gift to Histadrut
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Wilde
have bequeathed $60,000 for the
Israel-Histradut Scholarship Fund,
to be applied toward the academic
education of needy young men in
the State of Israel.
In accordance with the agree-
ment concluded between Mr. and
Mrs. Wilde and the National Com-
mittee for Labor Israel Histadrut
Campaign, a large part of the mon-
ey will be devoted to aiding cap-
able students in completing their
studies in the Technion at Haifa.
Eligible students will be selected
on the recommendation of the His-
tadrut Scholarship Fund Commit-
tee in Israel.
Mr. and 'Mrs. Wilde were born
in Mohiley, White Russia. Mrs.
Wilde taught in a government high
school for Jewish girls and is a
graduate of the Teacher's College
in Moscow. Mr. Wilde studied busi-
ness administration and law at the
University of Rostov.
The Wildes came to America in
1922, and for 20 years, he was
connected with the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Co. During the last
15 years, he and his wife have
been active in mutual funds. Their
home is in Miami Beach.
MR. AND MRS. WUDE
Parliament Chief Invited
VIENNA (JTA) Alfred
Maleta, chairman of the Austrian
Parliament, announced here that
he has accepted an invitation from
Kadish Luz, speaker of Israel's
Parliament, to attend the inaugura-
tion ceremonies to be held in Jer-
usalem on Aug. 30, dedicating Is-
rael's new Knesset (Parliament)
building. Maleta, who was impris-
oned by the Nazis in a concentra-
tion camp for a number of years,
due to his vigorous opposition to
the Nazi campaign against Jews,
has been an outstanding fighter
against neo-Nazism and anti-Sem-
itism in Austria throughout his
career in parliament.
950 Attending
Mission Schools.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Pub-
lic Council for Combatting Chris-
tian Missions in Israel launched a
campaign to enlist public !-joking
for its goals.
Shlomo Bukai. Council chairman,
declared that 950 Jewish children
were being educated in nission
schools in the greater Tel Aviv
area. He said the Council wanted
each of the 700 synagogues 'n the
area to "undertake the cost ^>f re-
moving at least one child from a
mission school and supporting and
educating the child until the age
of self-support."
The Council is a central agency
for organizations of antimission
groups. It includes among Its mem-
bers leaders of the Tel Aviv Re-
ligious Council, Members o: Parlia-
ment and other public figures.
mmmawm
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July 22. J966
*Jewist fhrSdiiciin
Page9-A
agency having been twice re-
e.-,ed by the County Commis-
; -,d has served as chairman
: ne resignation of Ronald L.
e is also a member of the
County Citizens Advisory
:tee for Community Im-

**,v-
die Reelected To Second Term
fide County Urban Renewal Agency
ate County Urban Renewal provements and Associate Judge of
has re-elected Ainslee R. j the City of West Miami. He is
die, Coral Gables attorney, as | president of Temple Zamora and
i an for the ensuing year. I vice president 6f the Miami Mul-
e is an original member of | tiple Sclerosis Association.
In 1965 he was elected to a two
year term as North American Re-
gional Chairman of the Younger
Lawyers Section of the Inter-
American Bar Association. Ferdie
is currently Secretary of the Coral
Gables Bar Association, and is the
only Florida lawyer on the Com-
mittee for Public Regulation of
Land Use of the Real Estate Sec-
tion of the American Bar Asso-
ciation.
He serves on the Board of Di-
rectors of Economic Opportunity
Program, Inc., Coral Gables Op-
timist Club and the Board of Gov-
ernors of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation.
He is counselor of the South
Florida B'nai B'rith Youth Organ-
ization and past president of the
Gilbert Balkin B'nai B'rith Lodge.
He is a member of the National
Executive Committee of the Jew-
ish War Veterans and is National
Legislative Co-officer. In 1964 he
was chairman of the Florida De-
partment Commanders Conference
of Veterans Organizations.
The Urban Renewal Agency now
has Project R-10 in execution with
an anticipated cost of $17,000,000.
Two additional applications for
survey and planning grants have
been submitted to the Federal
Urban Renewal Agency. Under his
term as chairman, the agency ac-
quired its first property and began
demolition of slums in the Central
Miami area. An on-site service of-
fice was opened at the Ronald L.
Fine Community Service Center
and the agency is now preparing
to advertise for proposals for its
first disposition contract.
AfNSlEE FERDIE
CAR B = SURF
MUST SEE THE WILDEST.
FUNNIEST NEW DAY!
DORS
DAY
ROD
TAYLOR
ARTHUR
Participating in the ground breaking ceremonies held July 7
for the Margaret and Abe Fine Nursing Pavilion of the Jewish
Convalescent Home were (left to right) Mrs. Sarah Keiser,
president of the Home, Leonard Zilbert, chairman of the board,
Irving Pietrack, Men's Club president, and Sidney Siegel,
executive director of the Home. The pavilion will contain a
synagogue, rehabilitation room, diagnostic clinic, and an occu-
pation! therapy department among its facilities.
Bonn Probe Says
Dr. Toeroek OK
BONN (JTA) The West
German Foreign Office announced
here that its own disciplinary in-
vestigation had found no evidence
to support charges that Dr. Alexan-
1er Toeroek, counsellor at the West
German embassy in Tel Aviv, had
been a member of the Arrow Cross,
the wartime Hungarian Fascist or-
ganization.
The charges were made shortly
before Bonn opened its embassy in
Tel Aviv last year. Dr. Toeroek,
who is currently serving as Charge
d-Affaires while Ambassador Rolf
Pauls is on home leave, had re-
quested the Foreign Office inves-
tigation of the charges.
The Foreign* T>ffk* statement,
which was officially forwarded to
the Israel Embassy here, stressed
that Dr. Toeroek had been fully
rehabilitated as a result of the in-
vestigation. Throughout the probe,
the Hungarian authorities refused
to grant both West German and Is-
raeli experts access to requested
documents.
Rabbis Told To Tend Vineyards
WOODRIDGE, N.Y. (WNS) The duties of a rabbi, he as-
A call on Orthodox rabbis to pre- j serted, arc above all to his con-
occupy themselves less with inter- i gregation, to his community, and
national functions of the rabbinate he must set a personal example
in Jewry was sounded here at the to his flock by erudition, by learn-
annual convention of the Rabbin- ing and by bringing true religious
ical Alliance of America. values to his congregants. Instead
Addressing the initial session, of giving away much of their time
Rabbi Abraham D. Hecht, pres-
ident of the organization, told the
parley that it was not the function
of a rabbi to become involved over
the Viet Nam issue and to advise
the President of the United States
how to conduct the war or to wage
the fight for civil rights.
for things that are outside of the
sphere of their functioning, he
said, rabbis should strive to make
their congregations a central point
of influence in Jewish life. The
synagogue, he added, must remain
the focal point of Jewish life.
Rockwell Beats Gotham Rap
NEW YORK (JTA) George
Rockwell, leader of the American
Nazi Party, was tree this week of
disorderly conduct charges after
the New York District Attorney.

PAVAVISlON MFTR0C0LOR
No Allowance Permitted
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Mapai-Achdut Avoda Alignment
formally endorsed a proposal un-
der which cost of living allowances
paid to Israeli workers in addition
to basic salaries will not be in-
creased this month despite a rise
in the cost of living index esti-
mated at between five and six per-
cent over the past six months.
Normally, the allowances would be
increased every six months follow-
ing such a rise in the index. Under
the proposal, employees earning
up to I 1,400 ($467) monthly
would be compensated for the
higher cost of living by increasing
old age pensions and family allow-
ances administered by the Nation-
al Insurance Institute.
the Nazi's counsel and a three-man
panel of Criminal Court judges
agreed that there was no pos-
sibility of obtaining conviction due
to questions of constitutional law.
The charges against Rockwell
dated back to 1960, when, in the
rotunda of the Supreme Court
Building here, he made some an-
ti-Semitic remarks and allegedly
threatened a vice-chairman of
the Jewish War Veterans, Lester
Fahn, now an assistant district
Pt serve Now
LAST
3 DAYS!
"II0T0US" "SIDE SPIITTINC"
1 OFMMIONS" "MIUIMir"
Joan Heffernan Geoff Garland
Peter Bellwood Brendan Burke
nrunun u._ minor'
COCONUT QR0VE
Mat. Wed. 4 St.
OPENS TUESDAY
Miami Plans Birthday
Celebration at Bayfront
Miami, one of the youngest ma-
jor cities in the United States, will
celebrate its birthday July 28 in
a ceremony open to the public at
Bayfront Auditorium.
On July 28, date of incorpora-
tion of the city in 1896, Miami will
be 70.
Joining in the annual birthday
festivities will be the Miami Wom-
an's Club, founded in 1900 and
credited with the beginning of
today's Miami Public Library sys-
tem in 1902.
V///.:v-s/..<
GEORGE C
scon
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attorney in Brooklyn.
Judges Simon Silver, Thomas G.
Weaver and Daniel Hoffman of
the Criminal Court, ordered Rock-
well's case dismissed. All parties
concerned, including the court, the
office of the New York District At-
torney and the defense counsel,
agreed that they "abhor" Rock-
weirs principles.
Any way you
figure it...
THE FINEST/^
WELCOME ^Q
TO GREATER MIAMI
IS WELCOME v
WAGON
A visit from our hottest .win m i he
you ftel it home, with htr basket
of lifts end answers to question*
about the city, Its ssr.icts ud
facilities. Just call .
HI 8-4994
EC0MC NEWCOMERS!
ttia (eupea M M m faww yn'm
H Please have the Welcome Wagon
Hostess call on me.
p would like to subscribe to
The Jewish Floridian.
Fill out coupon and mail to
Circulation Dept.,
M.P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Flo.
Congratulations to
Solomon and Anna Wilde
The National Board of Directors of the
ISRAEL HISTADRUT CAMPAIGN
and Officers and Members of the
ISRAEL HISTADRUT COMMITTEE OF GREATER MIAMI
join your many friends in extending our most
hearty congratulations on this momentous
FIFTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
We wish you many more years of
continued health and happiness
OR. SOL STEIN RABBI LEON KRONISH
Executive Director Honorary Chairman
MOSHE BERMAN, Secretary
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Page 10-A
vJewist fhridUar
Friday, July 22, 196G
L
Between You and Me:
By BORIS SMOIAR
w
Impressive Data on Jewish Participation in War
IMPRESSIVE DATA on Jewish partici-
pation in the armies which fought
the Nazis and their allies during the
war has now been compiled. A picture
emerges which shows that about 2,000,-
000 Jews were in the fighting ranks, in
addition to about 25,000 Jewish partisans
who conducted guerilla warfare in the
woods. When the war broke out, after
the Stalin-Hitler pact, there were 150,000 Jews in the
Polish armed forces, of "whom 32,126 were killed.
In the Anders Army a Polish unit formed in Russia
after Nazi occupation of Poland and during Stalin's war
against Germany there were about 5,000 Jews in the
Kosciusko Division, another military unit of Polish citizens
in the Soviet Union, who marched into Berlin with the
Red Army, there were at least 2,000 Jews. In the Red
Army itself there were 500,000 Jews of whom about
ninmiumiiiiiiiiiitmiii'ini.....mi.....i.....

As We Were Saying: By ROBERT L SEGAL
_
Affer- Study of Anguish in Watts
kAOT LONG AFTER the initial
^ disturbance in Watts, a pastor
of the African Methodist Episcopal
Church, Dr. H. H. Brookins, made
a study of the anguish there and
came forth with an evaluation
seemingly more significant than
the one teased out later by the
California Governors Commission,
headed by John A. McCone, former chief ot the CIA.
Said Dr. Brookins: "The most significant thing
about Watts and that which is most difficult to
describe, is the quality of the life there not
merely its poverty and filth, but its hopelessness
and despair."
The quality of the life of most of the Negroes
of Watts (and Negroes comprise at least 98 percent
of the community's people) is determined not only
by the fact that this overpopulated place is the
portal through which are passing Negroes not long
up from the agrarian South into a throbbing, prom-
ise-you-all, sunny California. Nor is the quality of
the life there determined only by the facts that
pi
'.II.IIHIMUMIIIIIIII..I.I 'ii.i.....III1IIIIMI I |
Overseas Newsletter: By EllAHU SALPETER
Medicine Needed
M(
Jerusalem
|OST EVERYBODY here now
agrees that Israel's economy
needs some strong medicine, but
practically everybody has a differ-
ent medicine in mind.
Three major issues have
brought the complex problems of
the economy into focus. First,
:ic slowdown strike of the Haifa port workers,
second, the growing unemployment in several de-
velopment areas and third, the imminent showdown
over the question of the semi-annual increase in
cost-of-living allowances.
Indeed, these three issues again highlight the
rather unusual structure of Israel's economy, full
as it is of contradictory trends and tendencies.. It
is among the generally accepted axioms that Israel
must reduce her relatively high production costs
if she wants her services and merchandise to com-
pete on the world markets. But instead of adopting
measures to bring down the wage component in the
production costs, the Histadrut where Mapai
needs support from left-of-center Achdut Avodah
and Mapam to muster a semblence of convincing
majority could only obtain a decision that wage
increases in 1966 would not exceed ten percent.
However when the dockworkers presented their
demands, they exceeded considerably the ten per-
cnt. When the Histadrut refused to back them, the
stevedores began a slowdown strike. Wages at the
port are paid according to work norms. These are
quite outdated because of the more modern equip-
ment. Actually a worker can hardly make a living
from one norm a day, but in fact they finish two,
three or even more norms in one eight-hour work
day, thus assuring themselves of total wages far
above the average among skilled Israeli workers.
Under the slowdown strike each team ("hand," as
it is called) works only one norm. As a result, they
lose half or more of their usual wages, but at the
same time they cleg up the port, cause expensive
demurrage charges and hurt the country's exports,
since Israeljs only other big seaport, Ashdpd, has
only recently oeeh completed and is not yet able
to cope with all the additional traffic.
And whih? port workers demand excessive wage
increases, in other sectors of the economy industries
begin to feel the pinch of the slowdown in the
spectacular boom o_the past three years. With
production exceeding demand at home and possi-
bilities to sell abroad, several plants all over the
country began to lay-off part of their workers. The
absolute numbers are still not high nor does the
national average reach what is generally believed
to be an acceptable percentage. However, most of
the unemployment is centered in a half a score
of big development towns in Northern Israel and
to the Negev, and in those the local situation is
becoming very serious.
f
practically every one in two families must live on
annual incomes of $4000 or less, that underemploy-
ment is dangerously high and housing shamefully
decrepit.
Rather, the quality of the life is rooted in neg
lect, alienation, the sharp polarization between the
Negro enclave of Watts and the shiny affluent, lush
communities beyond that range of despair. The
quality of the life may be attributed also to what
has been accurately set down by Dr. Benjamin F.
Payton of the National Council of Churches as "the
conditions of impacted evil rooted in centuries of
inequality." '
Many who have ventured beyond the textbook
report of timorous sociologists and have made more
than passing acquaintances with the quality of life
in Negro areas identify quickly with the articulate
and long suffering ghetto dwellers. Not long ago,
in carrying out a civic assignment, I sat for 14
hours listening to more than a score of spokesmen
in Boston's Roxbury section where two in every
three of all the Negroes of Massachusetts live.
The facts about public aid administration, slum-
lords, police practices, merchant-consumer antag-
onisms, inferior education, and job anxieties were
presented in dignity and with great eloquence. Bos-
ton's sharply alert educational television station
WGBH (associated with a number of the fine col-
leges in the area) moved in on the dramatic sessions
and showed the whole town the sorry story of expec
tations unrealized and community morale depressed.
The shortcomings of the anti-poverty campaign, the
mountainous caseload of the workers in the multi-
service welfare center, the fury about inadequate
trash collection, the burning anger engendered by
lack of recreational facilities and play supervision
were all described in detail.
There was much to mourn over. The absence
from these open meetings of those highly placed
officials whose responsibility it is to develop imag-
inative and effective remedial programs was noted
by many. Failure of some agencies to make abund-
antly known to the people of the area the services
available and the aids to which many were entitled
was marked. The stubborn refusal of public school
authorities to acknowledge the human erosion re-
sulting from racial imbalance in the classroom stood
out clearly.
But most of all, the sickening frustration over
the thought that investigation after investigation,
hearing after hearing, study after study misht we'l
be a cover-up for inaction! "What's going to come of
this? What will be done to help us? Mow can we
win enough allies to get through City Hall?" These
questions hang over all such proceedings.
What will come of the studies?
Well, President Johnson is hopeful of putting
a man on the moon not long from now. So our
national economy should be able to afford the
massive assault on the conditions breeding the ills
of the modern urban ghettos. Such an attack may
cost a hundred billion dollars. And if we can't see
our way clear to spending such a huge sum on pro-
viding decent housing, on teaching the illiterate,
and making whole the ill, we are destined to spend
a similar amount on mopping up after riots and
crime waves and civic blight.
Panorama:
200,000 were killed on the front. In the Lithuanian Divis
ion, formed in the Soviet Union there were 12,000 Jews.
The entire division was composed of 15,000 men; of
Jewish fighters, 4,500 fell in combat with the Germans
The number of Jews who served in the American armed
forces was 555,000.
There were 62,000 Jews in the British fighting forces,
and 9,250 in the South African units. The Jews in Pales
tine gave the British army about 26,000 fighters. In th/;
Canadian armed forces 16,883 Jews participated. Jews
fought also in large numbers in the ranks of the French,
Belgian^aiyLTJu^ch armies.
The information on Jewish armed participation in
the war against the Nazis has been compiled by the Asso-
ciation of War Invalids in Israel.
* *
The Cultural Front: Much is now being spoken about
Jewish heritage, Jewish culture, Jewish education. Com
plaints are heard of the lack of Jewish educational act'.v
ities in Jewish community centers and in other Jewish
institutions engaged in strengthening Jewish conscious
ness. A study of how Jewish the programs are of th %
Jewish community centers has, therefore, been undertaken
by the Workmen's Circle
Our Film folk:
By HERBERT G. LUFT
They Sign Daliah
Hollywood
r\ALlAH LAVI, the Israeli-born
actress whose starring credits
in American films include Colum-
bia's 'Lord Jim" and "The Sil-
encers." has been signed by Joseph
E. Levine to co-star with Laurence
Harvey in "The Spy With a Cold
Nose," a Paramount-Embassy cc-
___production to go before the cam
eras this summer in England. Miss Lavi who por
trayed a simple native woman in the adaptation of
Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim," went glamorous for
the secret-agent role in "The Silencers" is to essay
once more a seductive spy in the forthcoming movie.
A comedy of international intrigue set in London
and Moscow. "The Spy With a Cold Nose" is being
produced by Leonard Lightstone and directed by
Daniel Petrie from an original screenplay by Ray
Galton and Alan Simpson. This will be the second
venture for Lightstone and Petrie, who collaborated
on the recently-completed "The Idol,"' starring
Jennifer Jones, Michael Parks and John Leyton,
in London.
Gila Golan, our second Israeli favorite, in Eu-
rope on a p.a. tour for 20th Century-Fox' "Our Man
Flint." in which she, too, depicted a slick secret
agent (who doesn't these days?), nearly met the
same fate as Isadora Duncan in Rome. In the
studio of photographer Pierluigi, Gila was posing in
a pink chiffon evening gown with a floor-length
scarf she'd wrapped around her neck. Pierluigi
had set an electric fan on each side of her, out of
camera range, to get a windswept effect. The scarf
ends caught in the fans, tore them, and nearly
choked her to death before the plugs were pulled
out to stop the rotation.
Marty Allen who says that his family came from
as far South as 'South Poland" and his Latin part-
ner Steve Rossi raced wildly around Los Angeles
by helicopter and limousine last weekend to kick
off the first of two days of intensive personal appear
ances at drive-ins and theaters, having toured eight
een cities from Philadelphia, New York to Wash-
ington, DC, Boston -and Charlotte, South Carolina
in conjunction with the openings of "The Last of
the Secret Agents?" a madcap comedy filled with
visual gimmicks but pretty weak in the writing.
Nancy Sinatra, John Williams and Lou Jacobi (our
friend since "The Diary of Anne Frank") are sup-
porting the zany comedy team in their motion
picture debut.
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
The Great Increase in Intermarriage
A CCORDING to the papers, there ha I
** been a great increase in intermai I
riage. We recently heard of an interest |
ing case. A Jewish boy was in love witl jj
a girl of another faith. The boy's fathe
was against the marriage but the so
married her anyway. The son was en
ployed in his father's store and on th
Sabbath following the honeymoon faile________
to ahow up at the business. He expiah.,.u M u* muief
that his wife would not allow him to work on Shabbes.
"Didnt I warn you not to marry her?" exclaimed the
father.
Intermarriage is not a new thing. Akiba, the great
father of rabbinic Judaism, according to tradition, was
himself the product of mixed ancestry as were several
other Talmudic luminaries.
We have seen no survey, but probably in more in
stances, the offspring of a mixed marriage will tend to
go away from the Jewish fold, for the simple reason that
it is the easier route.
It is hard to be a Jew even in outer space. Morrr;
Margulies tells a story of three astronauts who took a
flyer in the stratosphere, a Protestant, Catholic and Jew.
When they came down, the Protestant and Catholic fell
fine, but the Jewish astronaut was all petered out
"Why so tired?" he was asked.
"Well, he answered, "I would put on my phylacteries
(telfilin) to say my morning prayers and in a few minutes
it would grow dark and I would have to take them o*
and then it became morning again and I would have t
put them on and so it went, putting them on, and tak
ing them off every half hour. It wore me out."


kidcry. July 22. 196G
+Jmlsti HbrkMoHn
Pagell-A
i
[Argentina
(Assures
Equality
Continued from R9 1-A
intc to enlist the support of all
[tin -. for "the general well-
cinp" and to "proceed with full
nergj against any extremism of
ight or left." This was the first
;ondemnation of rightist extrem-
sni bj the new regime. The. DAIA.
eadere had expressed concern
about 'the persistence of extrem-
ist group*" seeking "to provoke
artificial divisions in the Argentine
family
President Ongania reportedly
told the Jewish leaders he was
aware of some "versions" of his
government's actions in its first
few days and that he had been
worried about the concern of Ar-
gent ne Jews over some of those
actions. Shortly after the regime
ousted President Illia. police ar-
iWed a number of Jewish shop-
keepers and 18 directors of the
Jewish-led credit union coopera-
tive All were soon released. The
President indicated he was pleased
about his talks with the Jewish
leaders and about the fact it had
occurred so soon after his taking
oil ice.
The Jewish leaders reportedly
asked President Ongania to empha-
size his government would not tol-
erate aggression or extremism
against any group. He replied he
would not tolerate such actions
and that when a Jew or Catholic
was punished by the government,
il would be for a misdeed and not
because he was a Jew or Catholic.
He stressed that he would he avail-
ible to the DAIA to deal with any
>rob!em affecting Jews but also
tressed 'here would not be any
problem.
Meanw hile. the Buenos Aires
lerald, the only English-language
lnewspaper>noted recent criticisms
jof the new regime by New York
(Senators Jacob Javits and Robert
Cennedy, and added that in the
light of those criticisms it was "un-
fortunate" that Interior Minister
Enrique Martinez Paz should have
received a member of the Tacuara.
ut orgir.ization "with a record of
error.'. The Interior Minister
net thu week with Patricio Pueri-
jleon, Tacuara general secretary.
In Washington, the State De-
partment declared that a report
Submitted by the American Em-
bassy in Buenos Aires proved that
Ihe arrest of people connected to
Ihe credit union cooperates was not
1,800 German Nazis had found
refuge in Argentina.
Dr. Jaime Pompas, of Cordoba,
declared that "the present tran-
quility enjoyed by the Jews of
Argentina is due mainly to the
efforts of DAIA." Dr. Golden-
berg had warned that a recent
survey indicated that "more
than SO percent of the working
population of Argentina shows
Dr. Emanuel Pushkin of Mi-
ami who will be installed as
president of the Florida Op
tometric Association during
the organization's 64th an-
nual convention Aug. 18-20
at the Doral Beach Hotel. Dr.
Stephen Morris is serving as
convention chairman.
caused by anti-Semitic trends. Of-
ficials in the American Embassy
had talks with members of the
Jewish community in Argentina
who supported the conclusion that
there were no anti-Semitic motives
in the arrest of Jewish merchants,
the State Department communica-
tion said.
Anti-Semitism
In Argentina
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Ar-
gentinian Jewry was advised by
Dr. Isaac Goldenberg, president of
DAIA, the central body of organ-
ized Jewry in this country, to
maintain contacts with all sectors
of the Jewish community in the
United States but to reject "un-
requested protection." Dr. Golden-
berg made that statement in sum-
marizing the proceedings of the
DAIA's fifth national convention,
which had been in session at Men-
doza. The parley was attended b\
218 delegates from every Jewish
center in the country.
Throughout the conclave, stress
was laid by many speakers on
DAIA's ability to fight anti-Sem-
itism in Argentina, and on the
need to continue such activities.
Herzl Gesang. secretary-general of
DAIA. told the convention that,
since the end of World War IL
Swastikas Smeared on Club
KIRYAT SHMONO (WNS)
The walls of the National Religious
Club here were found smeared
with swastikas, according to police
disclosure.
.
^n ,|ftr--*
lor MEMORIES yooj.neverforget
vow wceWn -
for XOCWmILCO, a nigbligltf of
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totalitarian inclinations."
One of the proposals discussed
at the end of'the convention was
the establishment of closer con-
tacts between Argentinian Jews
and the local Arab population.
More than 400 guests joined the
delegates in attending the annual
DAIA banquet. Prominent among
the guests were Mendoza Province
Gov. Francisco Gabrielli, Vice
Gov. Felix Aguinaga and Mendoza
City Mayor Jorge Peltier. Gov.
Gabrielli, in an address greeting
DAIA, lauded Argentine Jewry's
contributions to the country's de-
velopment. Another of the speak-
ers was Aba Geffen, counsellor of
the Israel Embassy here, who had
also addressed the convention's
opening session.
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Page 12-A
f'Jenist fhrktt&r
Friday, July 22. 136G
'*_?-
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,J
n n
by ISABEL GROVE
'
Plans made by Boo and Stu
;ihapiro to celebrate their anni-
versary quietly, taken out of their
hands when friends decided on
their own that 15 years warranted
something special The sur-
prise festivities began with cock-
tails at the home of Herm and
Bobbi Pomerantz enjoyed by the
honorees, but not until the initial
.-.hock wore-off Then it was
otf to dinner at the Red Coach
Inn for them surrounded by well-
wishers Lois and Arthur Kauf-
man, Phyius and Arnold Gross-
man, Auaie and faul fcaiow,
Marilyn and Sandy freed, Caio-
k line and Sy SKiar, and Rhona
and Marvin Uuberman .
Following a "thrilling stay in
Israel, Kaobi living and Belle
l ..-in i in. 11 are relaxing ana en-
joying Home in a cuiope mat is
busy and warm" .
Irene (Airs. Louis) Pilzer sur-
prised guest 01 honor at a bon
voyage luncheon Wednesday at
'lony s Pish AiarKet Hostesses
wno plotted the festive day, Mrs.
V. .111,1111 caunei, mia. Jaciv aegcii
anu Kirs. L.awience Wesion .
Leaving the end ol tins montn
tor a cuiopean lour, ine Pnzeis
will be visiung fiance, naiy and
hpain Luncheon guesis in-
cluded Mrs. bam Hiiscn, Mrs.
Anna Hyman, Mrs. Jerry Kay,
Mrs. Arthur Leibowitz, Mrs. Ken
Lipman, Mrs. Dora Lcikoii, Mis.
June iVliller, Mrs. Milton Olkin,
Mrs. Leonard Platt, Mrs. Harry
Pinsky, Mrs. Sol Rosenkranz, Mrs.
Joe Small, Mrs. Sidney Sussman,
Mrs. Abe Starin, Mrs. Moe Yae-
ger, Mrs. Bernhard Baer, and
Mrs. Henry Levy, who, with her
' husband, will accompany the trav-
elers on their trip.
*
Gloria and Mel Muroff will de-
posit their three offspring, Jan
10, Jodi 9 and Joseph 7, at Blue
Star Camp and then continue
their motor trip north making
stops in New York, Boston and
Cape Cod Near summer's end,
they'll reverse the process, treat
the three young campers to a tour
of northern Florida and return
home in time for school and the
holidays .
The Dr. Doran Zinners of Coral
Gables making American history
in the Boston area and environs
come alive for daughter Karen
and son Michael who acquired
the factual accounts in a course
at MIT When not vacationing.
Mrs. Zinner is president of Cedars
of Lebanon Hospital Auxiliary .
rf.1(/<
ontan s
14U/
As the president's mantle set-
tled on the shoulders of Steve
Carner, who now heads the ear-
ner Bank of Miami Beach, Jewel
and Jerry Shainuck toasted him
on two occasions, first in their
Gables home, and again at the
new Grove Club in the James-
town building Missing it all,
Mrs. Steve (Lee) visiting her par-
ents in New York at the moment.

Edith and Monnie Zipp met
many Miamians while on a four
day cruise to Nassau and Free-
port aboard ship, among them
Evelyn and Ben Clein and Sylvia
Weiner The adventurous
Zipps managed extra sightseeing,
swimming and shopping by scoot-
ing around the Island on a Honda
. Now the couple is motoring
to Orlando on a combination bus-
iness and pleasure trip While
there, Edith will be seeing sister
Sandy (nee Shier), spouse Alan
Altshuler, former Miamians, and
two of their four sons, Don and
Ken Third offspring, Mike.
tiaveling in the opposite direction
with Mona (Mrs. Jason) Jason, re-
turning from a visit with the
same menage, and Barry, the
fourth member of the quartet, in
New York with grandparents.
Jennie and Jack Altshuler.
* *
To be added to the list of spe-
cialized trips the fraternity
tour Members of Sigma Alpha
Mu, Sheldon Zilbert and Howard
Braverman back after six weeks
visiting frat houses as far away
as Canada and California as well
as Miami Son of the Leonard
Zilberts, Sheldon is a student at
Tulane; the Nat Bravermans
Howard" has switched from the
New Orleans school to the Uni-
versity of Miami .
Midway in a 70-day tour of
Europe, 19-year-old Jeff Cohen,
traveling with Ira Hirsch, also of
Miami, writes his dad, contractor
Bill Cohen, that he is carefully
inspecting new construction all
over the continent.
* *
On July 6. David Alan joined
brother Stephen M. in the home
of Eleanor and A. Jay Cristol at
244 So. Coconut Lane .
Released from a brief stay in
the hospital, Clarice (Mrs. Sam)
Badanes still has half of the sum-
mer to be with daughter Alva,
vacationing from college on home
grounds, and teach the baby girl
born to the former Sharon Bad-
anes and Dick Feingold to say
"grandma."
"Jewish Floridian
Miami. Florida, July 22, 1966
Section B
Comedian Jack E. Leonard appearing at the mat. and President Irving Cowan with wife
Diplomat, is shown with (left to right) Mr. and Marge.
Mrs. Samuel Friedland, owner of the Diplo-
Two Miamians At UAHC Art Fest
Two Miamians, Janice Fold and
gfMarlene Zaret will be among col-
lege students participating in the
first Masters Fellows art festival
to be conducted by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
at Kutz Camp Institute, Warwick,
N.Y., from July 24 to Aug. 24.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max
Feld, 5120 SW 87th Ave., Janice's
field is music composition. The
family is affiliated with Temple
Beth Am. Marlene, whose major
is painting, is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Karl Zaret. They are
members of Temple Israel.
Inaugurated to teach talented
college students to express relig-
ious and historical Judaism through
music, drama, dance and art. the
experimental program, conducted
by the National Federation ol Tem-
ple Youth, is part of an ongoing
live Band tor Social Singles
iy The Casablanca Hotel will be
the setting for the night club show
and dance sponsored by the B'nai
B'rtth Singles on Saturday starting
at 9 p.m. Music will be furnished
by a live band.
series of pilot projects by the
UAHC to relate "Judaism and the
Arts."
Leonard Bernstein, Isaac Bash-
evis Singer and Boris Aronson will
head a list of distinguished no-
tables from the arts who will serve
as members of the faculty and
guest lecturers.
Two prominent theologians of
American Reform Judaism will al-
so participate in the program:
Rabbi Jack Bemporad, Director of
Worship of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations, and
Rabbi Eugene Borowitz, Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, NYC.
The Masters Fellow program was
made possible by a special grant
from the woman's branch of Re-
form Judaism, the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods.
UAHC Director of Programs. Al-
bert Vorspan, NYC, noted "this is
the first time that a religious body
has brought together in a religious
atmosphere the great masters of
the arts in America together with
college youngsters with promising
potential in the arts. This is the
beginning of what we hope will
become a Jewish Tanglewood."
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MIAMI (at oil 6 Burdine's stores)
and phone orders tilled on purchases of $3 or more.
BU RD I N E '


Page 2-B
vJenisfi fhrkUam
Friday, July 22,
... &^bout f^eople ana f^L
Summer Season Engagement Told
/
aces
*
COOK IN, COOK OUT, AT WESTVIEW
COUNTRY CLUB
It was to be an old fashioned steak cookout
at Westview Country Club but the rains came,
so they put on the checkered table cloths and
had the cookout inside. Lots of steak, a good band
and a good time was had by all. Among members
having fun were Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Roesing,
the Langers, Sidney, Jack and Mack and spouses.
Mr. and Mrs. John Serbln, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Weintraub, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wolf son, Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Landfield and Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Furman.
* *
NEW YORK DOESN'T WANT HER
First it was a black out in New York City,
then there was the water shortage, and the last
time a week ago, there was the airline strike.
Pauline Lefkowitz looked askance at her mother
Nettie (Mrs. Philip) Lefkowitz when she came
to visit her and wondered what would be hap-
pening the next time she came. Pauline is teach-
ing in a school for disadvantaged' children in
Staten Island. This summer she is taking the
course given by'the government for teachers in
that program. Nettie went to New York from
Grossingers in the Catskills where she attended
the 50th anniversary' Council Meeting and annual
convention of her sorority, Sigma Delta Tau.
Jennie Grossinger came in to dinner one night to
say hello" to Ihe Miami delegation which in-
cluded Mrs. Morton Grant, Mrs. Charles Fe.stin-
ger. Mrs. Bert Waller and Mrs. Tobias Levey.
* *
START-OFF PLACE, LONDON
Miriam and William Weintraub. with their
children Paula and Abner, flew to London to
start their vacation. In their hotel, who did they
see but Lucille Ball in slacks, looking very voung
(the eye lashes were real long, the kind you stick
in.) She is going to do the narrating in a film
about seeing London even if she doesn't have an
English accent. The Weintraubs did a lot of sight-
seeing. They drove all around England and Scot-
land, took the Fjiord trip in Norway and motored
to Denmark. Willie played golf at the famous
St. Andrews, and played two of the three courses
at Gleneagle*. He played on The King and The
Queen courses but The Princess will have to be
left until next time.
r lii,.


OH DIARY ME
Talk about Times Square in New York City!
It doesn't hold a candle to the number of people
that you see in Mt. Sinai Hospital Sadie Kravitz
in her pink uniform was working in Snack Bar
as she has since time immemorial. Mrs. Carl
Susskind was dashing around as busy as a volun-
teer could be, Lucia (Mrs. Philip) Grenwald with
her sweet smile is a natural for the information
desk. Virginia (Mrs. Harry) Orleans wears a
smock instead of a uniform but it is pink too. Ed
Cowen and his Helen were doing their round of
hospital visits. As ihey came out of each room
Ed would check it off his list. Doris Kalman was
shuttling between the floor that her husband was
on and the floor where her mother was. Mollie
(Mrs. Sol) Silverman was visiting Kate Meiden-
berg who has a broken hip and was glad to
catch up on all of the news. Spotted as they
made their calls to their friends were Jean (Mrs.
Frank) Becker, Lena and Sam Goldstein and Grace
(Mrs. B. B.) Goldstein. Among visitors to Jean C.
Lehman in Room 711, which is a natural if there
ever was one, were Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Cantor,
the Arthur Rosichans, Aaron and Myra Farr, Ber-
nie and Pi Marko, Miss Minnie Feinberg who will
be a Mrs. around the first of September, Daniel
Neal Heller, Mrs. Joseph Duntov, the Manuel
Lucks, Morris Gidneys, Marvin Browns and Henry
Morris. Mr. and Mrs. Morton Greenwood. Mrs.
Lewis Gleuckauf. Mrs. Albert Barmack and Mrs.
Lulu Gleuckauf. Mrs. Stanley Tate. Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Falick. Donald Barmack who sneaked out
of his hospital room on the next floor and came
calling with wife Carolyn, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford
Kramer, Miss Yetta Freedman, Edna Wolkowsky,
Mike Brenner. Amon De Mur, Bill Brenner, Carl
Epstein, the Jack Silvermans, Esther and Sidney
Schwartz, Mrs. Alexander Robbins, Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Zion Ginsburg, Dr. and Mrs. Hyman Lieber,
Mrs. Jack Brantman and the James Albert's son
Jerry, who wheeled in Bonnie Dorfman looking
adorable in her blue robe and certainly looking
none the worse because of her automobile acci-
dent, and Mrs. Adelma Helman, Mrs. Jeanette
Good.
Frances Lehman
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Goldberg,
6020 SW 108th PI., announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Shirley, to Michael Warren Yaskin,
Seniors Hold
Medicare Meet
Florida Senior Citizens Club II
will hold a public meeting on Tues-
I day. 7:30 p.m., at Miami Beach
; Federal. 735 Washington Ave.
Principal speakers will be Mrs.;
Byrdie Daniel, supervisor, Social
Security Office, whose topic will
be "Highlights of Medicare," and
Councilman Joe Malek, who will
discuss Mayor Robert King High's j
campaign for Governor.
A musical program will also be
' presented.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ned Yaskin
9240 SW 60th Ct.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of
Miami Senior High, attended the
University of Georgia and is pres
ently a senior majoring in English
at the University of Miami. She
is a recipient of a Food Fair
Foundation Scholarship and a
member of the Student Education
Association.
The groom-to-be is a graduate of
Coral Gables Senior High, attended
Miami Dade Junior College and i>
presently a student in the Uni
versity of Miami School of Archi-
tecture.
Birthday Cake At
Vets Hospital
A birthday cake was the high-
light of the luncheon sponsored
by the Harry H. Cohen Surfside-
Bay Harbor Post and Auxiliary re-
cently for the out-patients of the
Day Care Center at the Veterans
Hospital in Coral Gables.
In charge of the affair were Sam
Frank and Mrs. Ruth Spiegel, hos-
pital chairmen, assisted by Louis
Spiegel, Mrs. Ruth Schneitzer and
Mrs. Doris Frank.
Schools in Hostile Countries
CASABLANCA (JTA) The
Alliance Israelite Universolle is
still operating Jewish schools in a
number of Arab countries hostile
to Israel, it was revealed here this
week by a statistical report issued
by the Alliance General Assembly
Alliance has a school in Syria, with
an enrollment of 424 Jewish stu-
dents; five schools in Tunisia, with
2.800 students; and three schools
in Lebanon, with 1,220 students.
The report showed that Alliance
operates 34 schools in Morocco,
with 9.062 students. The statistics
showed also that there are 14 Alli-
ance schools in Iran, with an en-
rollment of 5,200 students.
RaTrfS
Party Proceeds
Go To Retarded
Friends of Retarded has sched-
uled a games party for Sunday
evening at Washington Federal.
1234 Washington Ave.
All proceeds are earmarked for
the building of a cottage to house
retarded adults.
Chairman of the affair is Mr-
Sophy Mass. Mrs. Flora H. Slnick
is ways and means vice president.
Abbe Lane Plans New Restaurant
Protest Against Shakespeare
KITCHENER, Ontario (JTA)
The Jewish Community Council
of Kitchener-Waterloo protested to
the Boiird of High School Educa-
tion here against permitting the
study of Shakespeare's "Merchant
of Venice" in local high schools.
In a brief, the Jewish organization
stated it was 'concerned" with the
effect of that Shakespeare work on
the children because of the drama's
"obvious message of racial hatred
and mistrust."
Not content with her spectacular
show business career, scintillating
Abbe Lane plans to head a chain
of restaurants starting in Surfside
at the old Maxim location, 95W
Harding Ave.
Naturally. Miss Lane will be the
star attraction when Abbe', Res-
taurant opens here in mid-Decem-
ber, and wherever her theatrical
commitments permit her to be in
the area
The restaurant buildii j will be
remodeled inside and out by Met
1 will feature a sand-
wich shop and cocktail lounge.
In addil hi to breakfast, lunch,
dinner and supper, the purchase of
a aquor li ense bj Miss Lane will
enable the establishment to have a
bar, and remain open to 5 a.m.
Close to 300 people will be easily
accommodated in the one-story
buihhng open from 6 to 2 a.m. daily
and unti' 3 a.m. on weekends.
for HOUDAY .
^and Everyday
Yhe Perfect Salt
for Koshering
II your meat and fowl
Dialled Crystal Salt Ciff
Miss Lane will be president of
the new venture incorporated un-
der the name of Abbe Lane Enter-
prises, Inc. Her father, Abbey
Lane, in the men's clothing busi-
ness here for many years, prom-
ises that "we will have top people
throughout the operation, and we
are certain that as a show person-
ality herself. Abbe will attract
other stars to the restaurant when
they are in the South Florida
area."
Miss Lane, who will be on the
Merv Griffin "Tonight" show the
week of July 25, will hardly pass
up such an opportunity to "plug"
her new role as "restaurateur."
She has starred in a one-hour TV
color special "Something Special
Abbe Lane," to be shown here
soon over Ch. 10, and will also do
a one hour TV show in London the
first week in August. |
'U'h Wedding Timer9
FLOWERS
JHcL OL lA/cJMng
BLOSSOM SHOP
Mercantile National Bank Building)
1616 Washington Ave., Miami Beach CALL JE 2-3231
Remember how good
bread used to taste?
August Bros.
still does!
AUGUST BROS. BAKERY
10777 N.W. 36th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA
"Of course I'm a demon
on the tennis court.
' "MILK
VITALITY COOLERS
SOtHHEASr FLORIOA DAIRY MMSriT'.IE
CHOCOLATE
PEPPERMINT
SHAKE
Yield: appmt. 6 cups
1 pint pip|MfMint ice cream,
softened
1 Hart dmcalita milk
pint peppermint ici cream
|n a mixing bowl while beating softened
IC* Mm- gradually add chocolate
milk. Pour into large glasses; fop wirti
*eoopi of ici cream.
Bat... D* w owe>
Milk Vitality Coolers and reen..
.. MILK'S TOO G000 TO BE
JUST FOR THE YOUNG
$) BGf/VC 1368


* Jewish HorkMam
Page 3-H
Book On Sarnoff
To Be Reviewed
A 12:30 p.m. snack-luncheon at
the home of Mrs. Jeanne Levey,
9764 W. Bay Harbor Dr., will pre-
cede the book review sponsored
by the Florida Woman's Division |
of the National Parkinson Founda-
tion on Saturday.
Mrs. Levey, board chairman, will
discuss the new biography of David |
Sarnoff by Eugene Lyons, senior
editor of the Readers Digest.
Mrs. Flora Frey, group president,!
is in charge of reservations for the !
afternoon which will benefit the
Institute.
Enroute to the Mediterranean
are local residents Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Glazier, 9517
Bay Dr., who sailed from.
New York on the SS Consti-
tution late in June.
Newly ejected officers who will serve the
Florida Women's Division, American Jewish
Congress, during 1966-67 are, (left to right)
Mrs. Benjamin Kamen, financial secretary
and treasurer; Mrs. Joseph White, program
vice president; Mrs. Gertrude Mogul, record-
ing secretary; Mrs. Mary S. Cohen, corres-
ponding secretary; Mrs. Irving B. Kaplan,
president; Mrs. Jeannette Stern, president,
Miami-Coral Gables Chapter; Mrs. Jack Sha-
piro, membership vice president; Mrs. Harold
Druker, fund raising vice president.
Food Friends Loyal During Hot Summer;
Hot Cross Be an wiches-Trail Blazer Beans
Every fariily has its food favor-
ites. And following the American
tradition, these foods no doubt in-
clude tuna, beans, cheese and
pickles.
During tbe busy summer season,
when menu ideas seem not to be
forthcoming, these food "friends"
can be courted on to add variety
and interest to meals.
And they can be used in recipes
typical of foreign countries as well
as America/) dishes.
, ., HOT CROSS BEAINWICHES, a
^ recipe frorn the Down Under Coun-
try. Australia, is a delightful sand-
wich suggestion that's nutritious
as well a? tasty.
Who m fiGsftmakste?
Hot Cross Beanwiches
1 can (1 pound) Heinz Vegetarian
Beans in Tomato Sauce
2 tablespoons Heinz Sweet Relish
3 tablespoons minced onion
1 can (6-1/2 to 7 ounces) Tuna,
drained, flaked
1/2 teaspoon salt
Dash pepper
4 sandwich buns, split, toasted
16 thin strips process sharp cheese
(3" x 1/2")
Combine first 6 ingredients. Spoon
a generous 14 cup bean mixture
on each bun half. Broil 6 to 8 inch-
es from heat source 3 minutes. Top
with 2 strips of cheese, crosswise;
broil an additional minute or until
cheese melts. Serve immediately.
Makes 4 servings (2 halves each).

BEANS DE JOUR puts a French
accent into a casserole. This com-
bination includes Heinz Vegetar-
ian Beans, blue cheese, onion and
Heinz Worcestershire Sauce.
Beans De Jour
2 cans (1 pound each) Heinz Veg-
etarian Beans in Tomato Sauce
3 tablespoons minced onion
2 tablespoons blue cheese, crum-
bled
1 teaspoon Heinz Worcestershire
Sauce
Heat oven to 350F. Combine all
ingredients in a 1-quart casserole.
Bake 35 minutes or until beans
are hot. Stir before serving. Makes
4-6 servings (3-1/2 cups).
* *
Back home in the U.S.A., we
have TRAIL BLAZER BEANS .
as hearty and nourishing as the
dishes "served up" from the chuck
wagons of the pioneers.
Trail Blazer Beans
2-1,4 cups coarsely chopped onions
(2 large onions)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon salad oil
1/2 cup Heinz Tomato Ketchup
1/3 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 cans (1 pound each) Heinz Veg-
etarian Beans in Tomato Sauce
1 cup grated process sharp cheese
1/3 cup chopped Heinz Dill Pick-
les
In large skillet saute onions and
garlic in oil, over medium heat, 3
minutes. Stir in ketchup and next
4 ingredients; simmer 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally. Add beans,
cheese and pickles; simmer an ad-
ditional 10 minutes, stirring occas-
ionally, until cheese melts. Makes
6-8 servings (5-1/2 cups).
Have some real soon com-
plete in this package. Now, a
tender, crunchy crust is easier
and quicker than ever to pre-
pare, everytime! Rich, true
Italian pizza sauce seasoned
with herbs and spices.Topped
with choice Italian-style
cheeses.
ENJOY SOME SOONI
Wanted: Middle Aged Woman
LIVE IN, WITH ELDERLY LADY.
KOSHER, LIGHT HOUSEWORK.
Call 9 to 12 A.M. JE 76365
LICENSED HEBREW TEACHER
with
ADMINISTRATIVE CAPABILITIES
Please send complete resume
Reply P.O.B. 61-263, NO. MIAMI
WANTED COMPANION WITH CAR
for nice elderly Lady. Own room and
salary. Wonderful home for the right
party. Beth David Synagogue area,
Southwest Miami. References.
-----CALL DAUGHTER 865-6098-----
ACQUAINTANCE DESIRED
A Conservative, Congenial Gentleman under 50, college
background, desires acquaintance of pleasant young wom-
an. Must be willing to help one another, practical, open
minded, financially comfortable, age 52 or under and
under 5'4".
Write Mr. A. D., Box 2973, Miami, Fla. 33101
YOU can be SURE of the BEST at -
Todd's BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
PUCE YOUR ORDER FOR MANGOS
VALENCIA ORANGES AVAILABLE THRU JUNE.
21*4 PONCE DE LEON Coral Gables Tel. 448-5215
NOW SHIPPING FLORIDA'S FINEST FRUIT BASKE1S S. GIFTS
... 4
MAKE YOUR WEDDING, BAR HITZVA, ANY FUNCTION
"THE TALK OF THE TOWN" with
IRVING PIETRACK ORCHESTRA
NO JOB TOO SMALL
JE 8-0204
NOW OPENING another
Gourmet Pastry Shop
325 MIRACLE MILE CORAL GABLES
THE fINEST Of CONTINENTAL ALL BUTTER PASTRIES
... FRESHLY 8AKED .. .
A Complete Selection of Continental Delicacies for Your Tasting Pleasure
Present this ad for FREE GIFT with Purchase!
UNTIL JULY 28
SURFSIDE
9523 Harding Avenue
'other Pastrf Shop locations;
MIAMI BEACH
511 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Time for Iced
Heat slowing you down?
When you need a pick up, nothing brightens your life like Tetley Teal
The secret is Tetley's tiny tea leaf flavorplus bags that brew so
fast you get real potbrewed ta'am. Favored in Jewish homes
since 1875.
Real old
Haimische ta'am!
Tetley tastes better
because it never
tastes bitter.
K on the package means kosher certified kosher and parve..
-


Page4-B
V'Jcnisti fkridHiuir
Friday. July 22. 196(3
166
I ONG hair versus short hair.
curls or straight, razor cut or
blunt cut these are some of
'he decisions which we must con-
stantly make regarding our coif-
lures. Our hair styles are like our
clothes styles, they change, then
wing back like the pendulum.
.tyrs. Marvin Taube likes most
lair styles. She fluctuates be-
ween long hair and short hair.
but she definitely doesn't like
the bog hair on the boys. She
feels that a hair style depends on
'he individual personality and
he age The more mature worn
an, in her opinion, looks best
in something fairly short and
i< at. She just can't see the long
straight bob on the woman in
this age category.
Today's styles are a blessing
tor the girl who has naturally
straight hair. Mrs. Taube feels
"hat the short curly coiffure is
4ood for the small girl or the
.nerjl tall and thin girl. The se-
ere. long, straight styles should
inly be worn by a girl who has
a good head of thick, healthy
hair, otherwise it has a tendency
-o become straggly and unkept.
.She also feels that the young girl
can get away with almost any-
thing, but that a good cut and
styling for the individual face
^ extremely important. She dis-
likes seeing the girl with a small
race covering it with too much
hair.
ufRS. Daniel Fried can admire
One coiffure on a woman that
VOttM leave much to be desired
I won by .someone else. She
.refers straight hair, then added
t as probably because hers is
curly. The shingle back, with the
lair separated over the ear and
nail .section of hair in front
'I the Styles. However, there are so
nany women wearing this style
that unless it is treated with a
ouch of individuality, it begins
to look like a uniform.
As far as color is concerned
she tends to be conservative. She
adds color for highlight and to
cover the grey, fat this point she
said. "Well, even-one will now
know!"i but she admires the
woman with enough courage to
make an extreme change in col-
or, providing of course, that the
change is more complimentary
to her than her natural color.
She'd like to become a blond, but
admits that she lacks the daring
to do it.
To Mrs Fried, the beauty salon
is a treat. Some women don't
like to spend the time under the
dryer, but to her it's complete
relaxation. The luxury of having
her hair shampooed, napping un-
der the dryer or reading the
latest fashion magazine, then
having her hair combed into a
smooth style, all in posh sur-
roundings make the afternoon at
the beauty salon something to
look forward to.
*
l_f*s- Sidney Palmer has just
" let her hair grow a little
longer, almost to shoulder length,
and she finds that it is easier to
keep looking neat. It's just long
enough to put up, and she has
no loose ends hanging as she did
when it was just below ear level.
She prefers the soft, casual curl
that doesn't have a "set" look
to it.
A few years ago she visited her
sister in California, and was talk-
ed into dyeing her hair back to
its original light blond color. It
looked beautiful, but her hair
couldn't take the constant touch
ing up, and when she returned
to Miami her husband made her
let it grow back out. Their daugh-
ter has a Mary Quant hair style,
and colors her hair, and it looks
good on her. All of which is what
-Mrs. Palmer feels is the basis for
determining hair decisions; it's
purely personal, and highly in-
dividualized situation.
BBYO National Director Takes Issue
With Rebellion Charge At Jewish Youth
we are paying for the enjoyment
of the privileges of the most open
society in all history "
Rabbi Myron Fenster of New
York told the youth convention
that "Some synagogue leaders have
a growing tendency to view them-
selves as the sole bearers of au-
thentic Judaism. As they see the
synagogue emerging as the most
potent factor in .American Juda-
ism, some assume there is a con-
flict between themselves and the
so-called secular agencies in Amer-
ican Judaism. Such a conflict is
time consuming and self-defeat-
ing."
STARLIGHT, Pa (JTA) A
Jewish youth expert rejected this
week the contention that American
Jewish youth was in rebellion
against the Jewish heritage assert-
ing that "what we are witnessing
today is more apathy and indiffer-
ence than hostility to Judaism."
Dr. Max F. Baer. director of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization,
expressed that view in an address
to the 21st annual Inetrnational
Convention of the B'nai B'rith
Young Adults, at Camp B'nai
B'rith. He said the reactions of
youthful ignorance of the Jewish
heritage, the increasing rate of
intermarriage, and oHfiffhYmS of
"alienation from Jewish life"
should be considered "the price
New Shop Offers
Kosher Foods
King David Kosher Foods. Inc..
is opening their brand new shop
at 1339 Washington Ave.. on Thurs-
day, July 28.
Co-owners of the new shop in
the Washington Ave. area are Dav
id Nunberg and Abraham Schwartz-
berg who comes from a family of
restaurateurs and who was in the
delicatessen and catering business
for many years in New York City.
The proprietors of the King
David Kosher Foods assure the
public that "we are here to serve
the finest quality in a complete
line of Hebrew national products,
and will cater to Bar Mitzvahs,
parties, and other occasions with
strictly Kosher foods, beautifully
and artistically decorated."
German-Jewish
Ties Mrvtl Airing
NEW YORK (WNS) Dr.
Nabum Goldmanr president of the
World visit < 'ingress, declared
here in a sta'"mcnt reviewing the
major issues his organization was
facing today that the decision of
the World Jewish Con'_'rp<; to in-
clude a sped:'! symposium on
"Germans and Jews" at its forth-
coming Plenary Assembly in Brus-
sels was based upon belief that
"open and frank discussion of this
difficult and delicate problem" was
necessary.
The ten-day parley, which i
slated to open on July 31. will be
attended by approximately 500
Jewish leaders from ail parts of
the world.
fall. Mr. Baldi was in New York
recently where hair styles from
all over the world were presented
to the LCD. (International Coif-
fure de Dames). He predicted
that the presentation by Guilli-
ume of Paris, of the tiered look,
will be the most important inno-
vation. This is a blunt cut, with
one tier at the forehead, one at
the ear level, and the last at the
shoulder level. It will be interest-
ing to note just what the fashion
trend setters do adopt for their
fall coiffure silhouettes.
COR the professional opinion on
what is new in coiffures we
asked .1. Baldi. He informed us
that long hair is coming in for
Jjridal Cjift ARDMORE
STUDIO
ESTABLISHED SINCE 1 '/40
JE1-3415
S oliti n C&IOSI
WEDD'NGj
OAR MIT7VAHS
PORTRAITURE
COMMERCIAL
COPIES
FULL STAFF AT YOUR SERVICE
7J3 ARTHUR GODFREY" RD.
MIAMI bEAC H
^1^ Cleaning Laundry
^ Storage
1201 -20th Street
Miami Beach
JE 8-6104
7 P.M. Same Day Service Never An txtra Charge

: ..
l M
M u
TT
^ft-^"Kl ^4
t* n
*: I&akHHlllHI 1

^^M BL^^ ^^^^M

/ M I r "**
>* Si
m it In

H i !x ^|
f', ^^H^P^^^^ '''ft^L ^^
j_ "*^aJUtiH| ^fe
Dr. Louis Finkelstein (left), Jewish Theological Seminary chan-
cellor, examines rare edition of the rabbinic Bible-with Rabbi
Israel H. Levinthal (right) and Rabbi Benjamin Z. Kreitman
(standing), spiritual leaders of the Brooklyn Jewish Center. The
book Is one of 5,000 volumes recently presented to the Sem-
inary by the synagogue in an effort to help replace books
lost in the disastrous fire which swept the Seminary library
last April 18. More than 70,000 volumes were incinerated in
the fire. The remaining 150,000 books, many of them badly
damaged by water, have been saved, and will be restored
to the shelves when the Seminary library reopens in tempo
rary quarters in the fall.
ADELPHI SUMMER SCHOOL
Attendance accepted by Dade County
Board of Public Instruction. TUTORING
all school and business subjects. Credit
Courses. See our "Yellow Pages" adv.
"7-7623 68T-3586
PIANOS TUNED
AND/OR REPAIRED
By expert technician. All types and
makes. Special summer rates. Call
before 12 Noon or after 5 p.m.
HIVING GOLDBERG 621-0084
OPtN
MUSIC -ENTERTAINMENT
BOB NOVACK
ORCHESTRAS
msuKt rnt success or
WlDDtNGS BAR MITZVAHS
AMD All SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
Orchestras-Trios-Accordionists
UN 6-5434
SUPERB CATERING IN A
LUXURIOUS NEW SETTING
Miami's newest, most beautiful accommodations
tor weddings, club luncheons, banquets, bar
mitzvahs, card parties, confirmations, receptions,
etc. Parking on premises. For groups from 15 to
1500...superb cuisine...fine wines, experienced,
personalized attention. Call Joseph Meyers,
Catering Manager, 379-8861.
DUPONT PLAZA HOTEL
MIAMI

"' viV
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
JONTRACTING RiP AIRING
Serving
Coonty
Years!
1811 S.W. 14th ST. HI 6-9f04
DOMESTIC MAIDS
RESTAURANT & HOTEL
HELP
A-l EMPLOYMENT
Ph. FR 9-8401
Elegant PutoBHH^^^^^^^^^^
Complete Catering Facilities for that Special
Party served in superb fashion setting that
will reflect your good taste.
.CONFIRMATIONS RECEPTIONS WEDDING]
BANQUETS MEETINGS PARTIES
A Tete-a-tete or a gala celebration with 3.500 aua.t.
DIETARY LAWS STRICTLY OBSERVED UNDER THE SUPERVISION
OF RABBI TIB0R H. STERN
EAUVILLE
Charle. Miller. Executive Food Director PHONEt UN 5-8*11
e^th STREET. MIAMI BEACH


"
Friday. July 22. 1966
*Jeisi)fk>rMtor?
Page 5-B
Leaders of the North County "Y" who are
making preparations for the Founders Formal
Dinner Dance scheduled for Aug. 13 at the
Deauville Hotel. The affair will mark the
opening of the campaign for a new YM-YWHA
facility in the North bade area. Seated (left
to right) A. Lionel Bosem, chairman of the N.
County Development Fund Committee; Neal
Chonin; Michael Bodne, chairman of the
Founders Ball; Herbert Holbrook. Standing
(left) Allan Gluckstem and Harold Rosen. Joey
Adams, noted comedian and author, will be
featured guest at the ball.
Summer Fun For Miami YM-YWCA
An evening of square dancing
will be held at the YM-YWCA of
Greater Miami, 8800 SW 8th St., on
Saturday at 8:30 p.m.
Sponsored jointly by the "Y's"
Women, Men's Club, and the "Y's"
Social Singles Club, the event will
feature Lew Green, square dance
caller, and an exhibition of square
and round dancing.
Serving on the committee for
the evening are Mrs. Al Raven,
president of the "Y's" Women, and
Mr. Raven, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Heyman, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome
Klein, Mrs. Manuel Jacobson, Leon-
ard Yesner, Hewitt Weiss, Mrs.
I 'aul Rheingold, Miss Jeanne Tratt-
ler, Miss Fannie Levitt, Miss Sherri
Lciberman.
* *
The summer program for senior
citizens at the "Y" will include a
square dance in the main ballroom
on Sunday starting at 1:30 p.m.
Seniors celebrating birthdays and
anniversaries during the summer
will be honored.
During the Summer Carnival
and Auction at the "Y" on Sunday,
July 31, the senior citizens will
operate a cake and coffee booth
with Mrs. Ida Levitt serving as
chairman.
Final summer meeting is slated
for Sunday, Aug. 7. Senior Cit-
izens Day Center will close on
Aug. 9, and meetings resume
Aug. 28.
* *
The Summer Carnival to be held
at the Y from 2 to 5:30 p.m. on
July 31, will channel all funds to
the "Y" scholarship fund.
A. Budd Cutler, chairman of the
^Y program committee, announces
".hat the following are assisting in
the day's events: Mrs. Lee Shapiro,
auction chairman; Mrs. Harriet
Glick, ticket chairman; Evan 01-
ster, rides committee chairman;
Mrs. Giselle Cilbrith, telephone
chairman; Mrs. Albert Morrison,
Mrs. Evelyn Ikenson and Mrs. Jos-
eph Mallah, food co-chairman.
Children in the combined Day
Camps, Fun and Play Groups, will
participate in the carnival. In addi-
tion, they will be entertained by
a mafic show and movie cartoons.
The afternoon will feature fun
booths which can be enjoyed by
all the members of the family as
j well as carnival rides and typical
I carnival foods.
The "Y" scholarship fund which
will benefit from the affair as-
sures that needy childrn can con-
tinue to participate in the "Y"
programs.
* *
Men's Club of the YM and WHA
of Greater Miami, 8500 SW 8th St.,
held its monthly meeting last
Thursday, 8:15 p.m., in the Golden
Key Room, announced President
Al Raven. The Men's Club is open
to all "Y" members interested in
working for and bettering the "Y."
* a *
Graduation Exercises
Kindergarten graduation exer-
S cises and a spring festival program
[ were held recently at the Miami
Beach YMHA, 1536 Bay Rd.
Certificates of graduation were
presented to eight children for
completion of their Early Child-
hood Development Program work.
The children are Diana Boru-
chin, Marshall Garber, Elizabeth
Rotten, Brenda Hofman, Katby
Kaplan, Sheryl Miller, Barry Spell,
and Mark Weinberg.
The entire school partici-
pated in a special entertainment
Have that
Business Meeting.
Banquet, or
Special Occasion
i
1
You'll find complete
focilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyot Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
it the
//
* %
loiters *
5^ i
lor Informations
HAZEL ALLISON
Catering Director,
JE 1-6061
aSth St. Collins Avo.
exercise entitled "Train to Vaca-
tionland."
Mrs. Cathy Whitebrook, PTA
chairman, announced that the pub-
lic was invited to attend the cere-
monies.
Mrs. Whitebrook said the ECD
School at the Miami Beach "Y"
will reopen Sept. 6 for the fall
semester, and registrations are
now being taken.
* *
Teen Club
Epsilon Eta Phi Club of the
; North County YM and WHA Tecn-
I Age Council has announced its new
officers for 1966-67.
They are president, Pam Good-
man; first vice president, Bonnie
, Nachman; second vice president,
| Cindy Weinberg; secretary, Linda
King; treasurer, Sandy Lloyd; ser-
geant-at-arms, Nina Goode; chap-
, lain, Meredith Fricdlander; pledge
mother, Madelyn Shwake.
New officers will be installed at
a mother-daughter luncheon at the
! Carillon Hotel.
#
Tennis Classes
New adult tennis classes for be-
ginners and intermediate players
! are being given at the YM and
' WHA of Greater Miami, 8500 SW
8th St., on Tuesdays and Thurs-
! day evenings.
The intermediate classes will be
| held on Tuesday evenings and the
| beginner classes on Thursday
nights. Classes open to "Y" mem-
bers only, will be instructed by
Chris Paget, former Florida State
tennis champion. In charge of
further information is Linda Hart
at the "Y."
* >
Member Drive
A concerted campaign for mem-
bership renewals, as well as new
members, is now being conducted
by the YM and WHA of Greater
Miami, reports Marshall S. Har-
ris, chairman of the membership
and membership relations commit-
tee.
A special steering committee
met this week to map a blue print
for action and to assign specific
duties to team captains who will
coordinate the efforts of the task
force in the field.
First session was a breakfast
rally on Sunday at the Central
"Y." Other report meetings will be
held succeeding Sundays.
Purpose of the campaign is to
renew memberships of families
who have been too busy to reenroll
or were just neglectful, and to
reach and enroll prospective mem-
bers who can make good use of the
services, programs and projects of
the "Y."
An incentive program for work-
ers has been devised and a special
party will culminate the campaign
in mid-June.
* *
Awards Night
Teen-Agers of the North County
YMHA, 14036 NE 6th Ave., held
their annual awards night at the
"Y" building recently.
Awards were presented as fol-
lows: President's Awards, Patti
Harris (Sigma) and Sue Wool
Ebbs); Outstanding Club Award,
Ebbs; Community Service Award,
Sigma; Outstanding Project
Award, Epsilon; Outstanding Sen-
iors Award, Patti Harris (Sigma)
and Barbara Hirsch (Ebbs); Out-
standing Pledge Award, Andyj
Kaufman (Delta); and Improved!
Club Award, Epsilon.
0RT Plans Installation
Miami Business and Professional
Chapter of Women's American
ORT has scheduled its next meet-
ing for Thursday evening, Jury 28,
at Chase Federal.
Agenda wiil include plans for
installation of officers to be held
on Sept. 22, and guest speaker,
Mrs. Ethel Sadowsky.
THE
BISCAYNE TERRACE
340 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida
FACING BISCAYNE BAY
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BANQUETS RECEPTIONS
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CATERING
Strictly Kosher facilities Available Una'tr Supervision of
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CALL Miss SHIRLEY, Catering Manager, FR 9-3792
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For you irho can afford the best
offers superb catering
in sumptuous sett inns.
DORAL HOTEL ON-THE-OCEAN
OORAL HOTEL ft COUNTRY CLUB. MIAMI
TELEPHONE: MR. DAVID KOVAC 532-3600


Poge B-B
+JeisHTerkttar}
Friday, July 22.
Ben-Gurion Invited to US.
TEL AVIV (WNS) Mayor
John V. Lindsay, of New York
City, has invited former Premier
David Ben-Gurion to visit his city,
it was reported here following the
return of former Deputy Minister
of Defense Shimon Peres from a
visit to the United States. It is
understood the invitation to Mr.
Ben-Gurion was extended by the
Mayor through Mr. Peres, who cur-
rently serves as secretary of Ben-
Gurion's Rafi Party.
Jewish Organizations World Conference
Moves to Extend Consultation Role
Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey receives a copy of the
Absolute Charter of recognition granted to Bar-Ilan University,
of Ramat Gan, Israel, by the Board of Regents of the State of
New York. Presentation is made by Edward Adams (left), close
friend of the University; Mattitayu Adler (right), director-
general here on a visit; and Harold N. Blond, director of
development. With the issuance of the charter, degrees con-
ferred by Bar-Ilan University, which combines studies in tra-
ditional Jewish values with modern secular areas of inquiry,
ore formally recognized throughout the United States. Dr.
Joseph H. Lookstein of New York is acting president.
Latins Migrate
To Israel Homes
HAIFA (WNS) Some 144
Jewish immigrants from Brazil,
Argentina and Uruguay arrived
here aboard the Zim liner Jerusa-
lem for permanent settlement in
Israel.
Among the arrivals was a stow-
away, Israel Monweiser of Rio de
Janeiro, who was recognized as a
man who tried to smuggle himself
into Israel about 13 years ago.
Monweiser was turned over to
coastal authorities and held for
psychiatric examination pending
his return to Rio de Janeiro.
GENEVA (JTA) A plenary
meeting of the World Conference
of Jewish Organizations (COJO)
acted this week to strengthen its
structure and extend its role as a
worldwide consultative body by
dropping a proposed veto rule. Dr.
Nahum Goldmann. who was re-
elected chairman of COJO. and Dr.
William A. Wexlcr. president of
B'nai B'rith. both COJO affiliates,
spoke for closer coordination
among Jewish groups on interna-
tional matters. Other delegations
joined in adopting a set of "basic
principles" to enable COJO to en-
gage in more functional activities
without impairing the autonomy
of the ten constituent organiza-
tions.
The veto proposal, which would
have required unanimity among
the ten constituents for COJO to
act on any substantive matter, was
abandoned in a proposal made by
Dr. Wexler, as chairman of a com-
mittee drafting bylaws for COJO,
in favor of a policy requiring a
substantive majority. Under the
proposed rule, any dissenting con-
stituent would be free to dissociate
itself publicly from any majority
decision.
Dr. Wexler said that the "vol.
untarism" which unites COJO mem-
bers should dispose of any fear
that a constituent would surrender
in any fundamental way its sover-
eignty or freedom to act. He said
each group had much to gain and
to give in the coordinate aspects
of COJO.
Israeli to lecture
NEW YORK Yitzhak
Ben-Aharon, a leader of the Hi*
tadrut General Labor Federation
of Israel and a member of the
Knesset arrived here to lecture and
hold discussions with labor and
management leaders, clergy, fac-
ulty and students in seminars ?
the Universities of California and
Minnesota. Mr. Ben-Aharon's lec-
tures are being jointly sponsored
by the universities and the Amer-
ican Histadrut Cultural Exchange
Institute.
ORT Problems
Aired in Geneva
GENEVA (JTA) An extra-
ordinary appeal to member groups
of the World ORT Union for aid
to help meet a budgetary crisis j
threatening the extensive ORT I
vc-cational training network of;
schools in Israel has received a;
favorable response, a two-day i
meeting of the executive commit-
tec of the organization was told j
this week.
Max Braude, director-general of
the World ORT Union, reported on
the budgetary problems and on the
response to the appeal. Members
of the executive committee, from
30 countries, studied ORTs role
and perspectives in 21 countries
cf operation in the light of the
major Jewish demographic shifts
of recent years.
The sessions were led by
Daniel Mayor, chairman of the
WorW ORT Union, and Dr. Wil-
liam Habor, doan of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, who is pres-
ident of the ORT control board.
Delegates took part in gradua-
tion ceremonies at the Central
ORT Institute for instructors and
technicians, including the first
group of teachers for technical
schools in Guinea and Mali. The
schools are operated by ORT un-
der a technical assistance agree-
ment with the United States Gov-
ernment.
The meeting declared Oct. 16,
the tenth anniversary of the death
of Dr. Aron Syngalowski, a found-
er and longtime leader of the
World ORT Union, as Syngalowski
Day. The anniversary will be ob-
served in ORT schools and or-
ganizations throughout the world.
Greetings were extended to
Charles H. Jordan, executive vice
chairman of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, which provides
funds for the ORT programs.
No Aid to PLO.
Britains Assured
LONDON (JTA) The Bri-1
tish Government stated officially j
in the House of Commons that the I
monies it contributes annually for1
the relief of Arab refugees "are!
f;ot intended to support political
oz military activities" by the re- j
fugees. "whether directly or in-
cirectly."
The statement was made in
Parliament by Mrs. Irene White,
Minister of State for Foreign Af-
fairs, in answer to a question by
Leo Abse, a member of the Labor
Party, who requested clarification
of the Government's stand regard-
ing contributions to the United
Nations Relief and Works Agency
for Palestine Refugees.
He requested specifically that
the Government report on how
much of its UNRWA contributions
went to Arab refugees "being
trained in the Palestine Liberation
Organization, which is pledged to
the annihilation of Israel." Mrs.
White said there was no way of
knowing.
Of
>
-
*-
Special Interest
to the
JEWS
of Greater Miami
s

I
%
\


-"
up-to-date on the rapidly moving, history-making events throughout
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feu owe it to yourself and to your family to keep informed and
In South Florida, THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN now in its 37th year of
continuous publication ... is the one, authentic, fearless source of
accurate, vital news of particular interest not only to the Jewish
people, but to every thinking man and woman in this area.
In this alert, feature-packed, English-Jewish weekly newspaper,
you'll find column after column of accurate, on-the-spot reporting ..
coverage by international servicessuch as Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, World-Wide News,Service and Seven Arts Features. '":
You'll find interestihg articles swift-paced, clear and human. You'll
discover down-to-earfh editorial comment that will stimulate
practical, intelligent thinking on the problems we face today.
You'll read revealing features ... by columnists based in major
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It's your duty to read THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN regularly your
whole family will enjoy it. So, don't wait. Start your subscription
now. Just clip this coupon, fill it out and mail it todayl
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4

tilresi.
(*! Prla)
City
Xeae___.Stale.
%


Friday, July 22, 1966
+Jewist ncridfiar)
Page 7-B

Director Calls For New Focus
As he begins his tenth year as
Administrative- Director of the
S uth'a largest synagogue. Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, ex-news-
paperman Edward Cohen is con-
vinced that most synagogues are
overwhelmed by the revolution in
technology and theology which is
taking place
"If religious institutions focus
ell their attention on today, there
may be no tomorrow for our
traditional religions. Change it
master, but I think it is essential
that we try to understand the
changes directly affecting us. We
have no other choice if we are
to be viable," he believes.
Religious institutions must try a
lore imaginative approach to mo;
biJity. one of the major problems
of our society. "One out of every
five Americans moves each year,
and that movement affects our in-
stitutions and the movers
financially and socially. Many of
our synagogues have become part
of that movement, at great expense
and waste of manpower and dupli-
cation of building facilities. Every
*'ttle suburb has an edifice-complex
eJI its own which, in less than a
generation, can be as obsolete as
the inner-city structure which the
txurbanites deserted."
'""ohen admits to a prejudice in
Javor of the large city congrega-
tion. "The spiritual, financial and
tfoministrative resources built up
*jver many decades by the city
synagogue cannot be duplicated in
the suburbs without generating
major costs in money and man-
power which are not as available
to us as they may have been a
iutcade ago.
"1 believe that there must be
irate* cooperation and coordina-
uon of effort in terms of use of
facilities, teacher training, adult
nd child education," Cohen said.
"Every synagogue is a little sov-
rreignty or a big one and
mo one really gains from this con-
dition, particularly the congregant
who must foot the bill for needless
duplication of facilities and pro-
gram. In my opinion, the cost of
belonging to most synagogues to-
day has made these institutions al-
xnost exclusively for the rich and
une middle-class.
"We deplore the loss of Jews,
cut we cannot see that our own
actions have literally 'priced' many
thousands out of the synagogue,"
L'ohen stated.
In the community at large, Co-
fen says he agrees with Protestant
theologian Robert McAfee Brown
that there is no space in modern
society less efficiently used than
church and synagogue space, much
t>f which lies idle five or six days
IDWARD COHEN
of the week.
"I am pleased that Temple Is-
rael's Board of Trustees has met
this community challenge, first by
inviting the School Board's Opera-
tion Headstart to use our Religious
School facilities last winter, and
now by providing room for a Day
Care Nursery Center of some 75
children under the direction of the
Economic Opportunity Program.
"Dr. Brown looks for the time
when a Protestant church and a
Jewish temple will be able to work
out arrangements for building and
using the same facilities, not only
'as an emblem of the healing of
some terrible historical scars, but
as a simple exercise in good econ-
omy and logistics'. What he. is say-
ing, as was brought out strongly
at a recent conference of church
architects, is that there is more
today than the 'right' to build; we
have to 'justify' such a decision in
the light of the current theology
and state of the world."
There is no attitude of boastful
ness in Cohen's comment that the
last decade has seen Temple Israel
buck the tide which has marked
the disappearance of many church-
es and synagogues in major cities
throughout the country, for the
downtown Miami Reform syna-
gogue has grown from a family
membership of 1,200 in 1957 to
1,550 today."
"The chances in program and
outlook, under the leadership of
Rabbi Narot, has kept Tempi.
Israel from atrophying like SO
many others. We haven't master-
ed change, but neither have we
failed to try to understand it, to
meet its challenge and to brine
our Jewish outlook into some
sort of harmony with the revolu-
tion of our times," states Cohen.
"The best testimony to that, I
suppose, is the unique cosmopol-
itan character of Temple Israel's
membership for most of our- fam-!
ilies must travel between 10 and-1-
20 miles to get here. Evidently,
they think Judaism is still worth
some effort."
Although he often thinks nos-
talgically of his two decades as a
newspaperman before assuming
the post at Temple Israel, Cohen
is satisfied with his decision of'
commitment to his "new" role.
He has been editor of the Quar-
terly published by the National
Association of Temple Administra-
tors, serves on its national board
at present, and heads a number of
key committees, including one in
which he is helping to develop new
concepts of inter-congregational re-
lationships for the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations, parent
body of the Reform movement.
Dr. William Wexler (right), president of B'nai B'rith, is first
signer of Declaration of Rights for Russian Jewry at a meeting
of 25 national Jewish organizations in Philadelphia's historic
Congress Hall. Declaration calls on Soviet Union to grant Jews
full religious, cultural and communal rights. Rabbi Israel
Miller (left), chairman of the American Jewish Conference for
Soviet Jewry, which sponsored the meeting, presided.
Signing an historic agreement whereby the State of Israe'
leased half a million dunams of land to the Jewish Nationa'
Fund for development purposes are Minister of Agriculture
Chaim Gevati (center), Jacob Tsur (left), JNF world chairmen...
and Joseph Weitz, head of the Land Development Authority.
1++++++++++++++++++++++++++^+++++++++++++++++++++++++++,
Announcing...
BOSTON POPS
Concerts
SATURDAYS 2 PJi
Presented by
AUGUST BROS. BAKERY
BAKERS Of 23 VARIETIES OF BREAD & ROLLS
UJVCG
SOUTH FLORIDA'S GOOD MUSIC STATIONS
AM 1080 KC. 10,000 Watts
FM -105.1 MC. -160,000 Watts
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Page 8-B
*kisinorkhfon
Friday. Inly 211966
n&ti
'3
lOUS
s
ervices
AOUDATH ACKIM. Lombardy Heeel.
6306 Collins Ave. Orthodox.
Friday 6:1S p.m, Saturday S:15 a.m.
Mlncha 6:15 p.m.
AOUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGRECA-
TION. 985 SW 67th Ave Oorthodox.
Cantor Morris Barr.
----- -----
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative. Emanuel Kushelwitz,
president.
-----
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave. Con-
lervative. Rabbi Sol Landau. Cantor
William W. LiDson.
Kri.i.i t p.m. bbtnrda) 9 a.m. Mlncha
*': 4." p in.
BETH EL. fiOOOsV 171h Ave. Orlho
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
5 Ab 6:43 p.m.
be i n ti. a*io *w i/in rve. vrxno-i
dox. Rabbi Solomon Schitf.
r'rlda) p.m. Katunlaj :''" a.m. Ser-lu
mon; "i :-i. Sniilmih of Saotieaa." Min-
FT. LAUDERDALK EMANU-EL. 1801
S. Andrews Ave. Raform. Rabbi
Richard M. Leviton. Cantor Jerome
Klement.
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER,
126 E. -H.iii.Tnd.ile Beach Blvd. Rev.
Paul Deutsch.
elm t:30 p.m.
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Berel Wein.
----------
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
---------
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Benjamin Ben-Ari.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. Sermon: "The Fin-
al Booh "' .". p.m. "Portion of Law."
p.m. "The Sabbath of Vision."
----
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi Richard Marcovitz. Cantor
Seymour Hinkes-
----------
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid Ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
----*. ----
BETH TORAH. 164th St. and NE 11th
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
achitz. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
Frldaj 6 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a.m. .Mln-
cha fi p.m.
B'NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd St.
Conservative. Rabbi Harold Richter.
Cantor Jack Lerner.
----- -----
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF MIAMI. 1Z42 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Rozencweig.
----- ----- .
FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
PI. Conservative. Rabbi David Ros-
enfeld. rtantor George Goldberg.
FT. LAUDERDALE JEWISH CEN-
TER. 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Dr. Jack L. Morris,
president. Cantor Theodore Min-
dich.
IEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson St. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heilbraun.
----------
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER. 8th
St., Homestead. Conservative.
----------
ISRAELITE CENTER. 317* SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L.
L. Dn. ni.
----------
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern
----- -----
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self.
Friday 8:80 p.m. Saturday 8: JO a.m,
Sermon: "What Are We Crying For?"
i p.m, Classes in Talmud and Ethics
<>:' ill.- Fatli.-i s.
---- ----
LUBAVITCHER MlNYAN. 800 Wash
ington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. Cantor Ernest Field.
----------
MINYONAlRES CONGREGATION.
37.17 Bird Rd. Modern Traditional.
- a ------
OHEV SHALOM. 911 Normandy Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weber-
man.
Saturday 8:t0 a.m. Baroioa: shall I
W'.ili mi the Fast of the Fifth
Month?" Mlncha !>:.'. pint,
----------
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Rev. Cantor Sadi Nah-
mias.
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Jonah
E. Caplan.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. Con-
tervative. 1025 NE 183rd St.. Miami
Gardens Rd. Rabbi Samuel R. Stone
Cantor Maurice Neu.
-------- _
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 S. Kendall
Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Michael
Kyrr.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1725 Monroe St. Conservative.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Er-
nest Steiner.
Friday 8:30 p.m, Ones Shabbat boated
by Sisterhood.
------ m------
\ TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1351 S. 14th Ave. Reform
Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
- ----
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL. 1545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Saul H. Breeh. I
----- -----
TEMPLE BETH SHIRAH. 7500 SW.
120th St. Reconstructionist. Rabbi
Morris Skop.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisn
Cantor David Conviser.
Friday 8:18 p.m. Rabbi Fnrniel will
speak on "Rathw Than Mourn for
Wails. \\e Mourn for People." Cantor
William Royal will .chant at all serv-
ices.
TEMPLE BETH TOV.
St. Conservative.
6438 SW 8th
HEBREW LESSON
tf'Bsri .q^'ddi main
i D'nn1? ni2inn nx onaitf
N"3in nm mi runs mrolta
* t : t v : t
Drnann innpi tvtrffi
ain *ij ^x ia xar ift wnx1?
ip -.nan^a lis nay x^i
' T T t : : :
.nytf *7D3 -mn -mn
T T T : T T "
ir^sn D^isjn nan*?a "wa
nxi iasy nx y?n*? ]iwn
t : : t t v : v :
x^Din Tiytfn nx D| inx x-an
t : I t
Hf% nr>"7 ran n?? nann .n$
If? xn ^x ,nj nua jtsnf iya
nax "I ,in,x niaa1? nsn
9nf? pi xa naa? i$s nj pytf
unn iaipai ,oV?ifn p-y-i nx
k^n?? H? PI} iff xin iV
.Dfttfn nxi33 fix
* T I T !
i (jvtvv myto p?t j-ipi
The Peace Clock
T -
D lVtfn 11178?
a-ax-^na *p^tca-.raa
t : t
Lratzten bn-ra 17 ns7c? iota
- ^ax^n pjann nyu nx
"73 y^x ds7 niprn-
pstf- ,nm yw&n nx .hit
,nDa nn- 7L?c? nizra /-mpnn
T- jItt tt t!:--
njria inix ]na^ ,pa?a no7a
.p^x^a )am o^n -ntoa1?
*?iT| Vf fMf na rua nr |9f
D'p.arpa t)^psa ,inx x^di
faHfr ib xij? iota ,o,9*i
nx y^a^a xn -3 /-Di^^n
73 *?w^| ay oi'w n"?an
)am ^3 nai1? ns-j nxt3 ,ns^
yns .naixn ^s? tftofo vn\p
T TTIT t: "I
^s^sa oi^ n*?an nsatt is
o^pia ]iy|n *j$ ^yi ,pi7z?n
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Abraham Reiseman.
----- -----
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler.
Friday i; p.m. Saturday a.m, Mlncha
7 p.m.
--------
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi
Joseph R. Narot.
--------
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR,
3500 SW 69th Way. Conservative.
Rabbi Irwin Cutler.
Friilay s p.m. Oik-k Shabbat hosted
by Sisterhood. Saturday H a.m.
---------
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo Ave.
Liberal-Reform. Rabbi Morris Kip-
per.
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Edward Klein.
----------
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative.
8756 SW 16th St.. Miami. Rabbi
Ralph Ralph Glixman.
----- -----
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI,
Temporary office 1820 NE 164th St.
Reform. Rabbi Daniel M. Lowy.
Cantor Chet Gale.
Friday 8:15 p.m. at Washington Feil-
i ral. 899 NE 167th St. Services con-
ducted Uv Rabbi -Milton 1. Bchlaner
of Meridian, -Miss.
--------
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 951 E.
4th Ave., Hialeah. Conservative.
Rabbi Maurice Klein.
Pridaj 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m.
----------
TEMPLE ZION. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
----- -----
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell ,-3er-
ger Cantor Ben Dickson.
Friday n p.m. Saturday s:4a a.m. Bar*
mon: "Portion of tin- Week."
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Henry
Wernick.
YOUNG ISRAEL. 990 NE 171st St
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber.
----------
YOUNG ISRAEL OF MIAMI BEACH
1542-44 Washington Ave. Rabbi Naf-
tsli Porush
i ......' '"!
'
i la
MMIMllllMinM'IIMISUaMIIIIN'1 Ml
SYNOPSIS OF THE TORAH PORTION DBVARIM
I
Moses explains and interprets the Law to the people.
"Beyond the Jordan, in the land of Moab, took Moses upon
him to expound this law" (Deut. 1. 5).
DEVARIM The first few verses introduce the entire book
of Deuteronomy, which contains Moses' address to the Israelites
in Transjordan after the defeat of the Amorites and Bashan. In
this speech Moses summarizes the Torah as a whole. He reviews
the causes that had led him to appoint judges and officials:
"How can I myself alone bear your cumbrance, and your
burden, and your strife? And I charged yonr judges a*, that
time, saying: "Hear the causes between your brethern, and judge
righteously between a man and his brother, and the stranger
that is with hup.-V-~shall not respect persons in judgment ye
'sh! he"af'ttiP small and the great alike' (Deut. 1. 12-17}.
Moses goes on to review the incident of the scouts sent to
spy on Canaan, and the conagfluences of their pessimistic report.
He reminds the Israelites how they had skirted Edom, Armnon,
and Moab; and mentions the peoples who had formerly inhabited
those regions. Finally he recounts the story of the conquest of
Transjordan, and Ihe partition of the area between the tribes of
Reuben, Gad, and half of the tribe of Manasseh.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is ex-
tracted and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish
Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15 Publisher is
Shengold, and the volume is available at 27 William St., New
York 5, N.Y. President of the society distributing the velum*
is Joseph Schlang.
mi m ananas
Tisha B'Av Should Inspire
A Real True Jewish Home
THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULPIT
At the Bialik House in Tel Aviv, |
there stands a large grandfather'
clock which plays the tune of the !
national anthem. "Hatikvah," when'
each hour chimes. "The Hope j
Clock" was made by a Jewish clock-
maker from Paris, Moshe Maimon,!
who gave it to the poet, Haim'
Nahman Bialik, as a gift.
The same clockmaker also made
another large, wonderful grand-
father clock, profusely decorated,
which he called "The Clock of
Peace," as it says the word "Sha-!
lorn" when each hour chimes. In i
this way. he wanted to say that'
time is calling for peace on earth.
The moment the word "Shalom"!
is heard, the clock chimes, and
swords and hammers appear on.
the face of the clock. The hammers'
break the swords into pieces, and
an inscription appears containing
the words of the Prophet Isaiah,
"And they shall beat their swords |
into plowshares Nation shall i
not lift up sword against nation,'
neither shall they learn war any
more." This is repeated each hour.
During the World War. the clock-
maker succeeded in saving himself i
and this clock of his, and when
he immigrated to Israel, he brought
the wonderful clock with him. The
clockmaker was offered large sums
of money for this interesting clock,
but he did not want to sell jt, for
he said that this clock which was
made to serve only the idea of
peaqe, and its proper place was
only in Eretz Yisrael, the land of
the prophecy of peace.
Published by the Brit Ivrit Olamit
Church Reacts
To Hate Smear
WINNIPEG (JTA) The All
Saints Anglican Church of Winni-
peg has reacted to swastika smcar-
ings of two Winnipeg synagogues,
by sending letters of sympathy and
contributions to the two houses of
worship.
The church sent the letters and
contributions to Shaarey Zedek and
Rosh Pina Synagogues. Rector R.
Desmond Kimmit said in the let-
ters that the clergy and wardens
of the church were dismayed that
such smearings could happen and
added that the Nazi slaughter of
European Jewry could not have
happened if the church over many
centuries had not contributed "to
a total environment of anti-Sem-
itism.'"
He added that the contributions
were sent "as symbolic of that new
understanding" among all creeds
"which thankfully seems destined
to be born in our day."
President Ben B. Cantor, of
Congregation Shaarey Zedek, re-
sponded that if people could be
generally educated to think as did
the congregation and officers of
the All Saints Church, "the broth-
erhood of man would be a reality
and not a dream."
The story is told that at the time
the Holy Temple of Jerusalem was
being razed by the Romans under
the command of Titus, a group of
Jewish die-hards gathered at the
Temple under
the leadership of
the stalwart Elie-
zer. When all
hope seemed to
run out, Titus
called to Eliczer
to concede de-
feat and throw
himself upon the
mercy of imperial
Rome. Where-
upon, Eliezer
ripped a broken
menorah, with
only two remain-
ing stems, from
its stand and
shouted, "As long as these two
remaining lights burn, there will
be an Israel."
For this reason, some believe
Jews kindle two candles on the eve
of Sabbath and festivals. They are
a manifestation that the light of
the Jew is still kindled and still
Rabbi Richter
testifies to an imperishable people
and faith.
This Monday evening, July 25,
we shall begin the 24-hour fast of
Tisha B'Av, commemorat.iig the
destruction of the Jerusalem Tem-
ple and other tragic events of Jew-
ish history. And though the State
of Israel in its "Chai" year now
testifies to a thriving Jewish peo-
ple, we still find room for mourn-
ing on Tisha B'Av. But we do not
mourn only the destruction of the
Temple and the six-million little
sanctuaries destroyed by the Nazis,
but also for the many Jewish
homes in which Sabbath candles
no longer tesitfy that "Am Yisroel
Chai," that Israel still lives and
that God is alive.
The tragedy of modern Jewish
life is not that there are not
enough synagogues, but that there
are not enough miniature home
sanctuaries which have always
been the lifeblood of JeAvs Let us
then pray, but more important,
work toward the reestablishmtmt
of what is probably the most sig-
nificant institution in Judaism
the Jewish home.
Rabbi Stern At RZA Conclave
Rabbi Tibor H. Stem, chairman
of the Religious Zionist Organist
Southeastern Region of the U.S.,
will be featured speaker at the
RZA Northwestern Region con-
clave to be held in Seattle, Wash.,
Aug. 1.
The noted author will also ap-
Enrollment Open
For Fall Classes
Registration for fall classes in
all departments of the Religious
Schools at Temple Tifereth Jacob
is now open.
Bar and Bas Mitzvah training by
Rabbi Maurice Klein will continue
throughout the summer, as well as
Junior Choir training now in pro-
gress at the temple.
Further information may be ob-
tained at the temple office, open
from 9 to 1 p.m., Monday through
Friday.
Insurance Firm Buys Bonds
NEW YORK Security Insurance Company of
Hartford purchased $100,000 in Is-
rael Bonds, it was reported here
by the Israel Bond Organization.
The large purchase of Israel Bonds
was made "in tribute to Israel's
18th anniversary of independence."
pear on TV and radio during his
stay in Washington, and deliver
several lectures to the rabbinical
study group there.
Rabbi Stern, spiritual leader of
the Jacob C. Cohen Community
Synagogue, recently returned from
New York where he was presented
with the Chief Rabbi Gold Medal
Award.
Guest Rabbi at Synaqogm
L'rve Band for Social Siagks
Rabbi Henry Okalicka of New
Britain, Conn., formerly of North
Miami, will be pulpit guest at the
Jacob C. Cohen Community Syna-
gogue on Saturday morning. His
topic will be 'Shabbath Chazon,
A Vision in Retrospect." Rabbi
Tibor H. Stern will deliver the
Saturday afternoon sermon at S
p.m.
' 'HiMtMnMmtMii
This page is prepaied in co-
\ operation with trie Greater Mi-
ami Rabhinical Association.
Coordinator of features ap-
pearing here is
DR. MAX LIPSCHITZ
spiritual leader of Beth Torah I
Congregation of Xorth Miami
I Beach.
M ......
*/


Fridcy, July 22. 1966
*Jewisti f/'orffdiatr?
Pcrge9-B
<= Rabbi Kipper In New Approach
launching an experiment in Jew-
ish i-iijcation lor the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
this summer, Rabbi Morris A. Kip-
per o! Temple Judea will take up
residence in the Southeast Region
of IMHCV Camp in Cleveland,
(la., on July 25.
For \e next three weeks, Rabbi
Kippe will conduct a confirma-
tion class of five 10th graders. Con-
centra1.'ng on the confirmation
curricium, it is hoped that the
teenager! will be able to absorb
twice 2; much knowledge as would
be possible in a normal confirma-
tion JH : i".
The experiment in Jewish edu-
cation will be watched carefully by
the n;> onal office of Jewish Edu-
cation of the UAHC as a possible
breakthrough into a new frontier
for Jewish education.
"If this experiment proves suc-
cessful, Rabbi Kipper states, "it
is conceivable that within the next
decade, synagogues will join to-
gethei to establish summer camps
where "ic Religious School curric-
ulum will be employed as the ma-
jor program for the children and
suppla I the current Sunday
School and midweek Hebrew
classc
"In "cent years," Rabbi Kipper
continue*, "Jewish educators have
become increasingly aware of the
fact ti.at even though excellent
teachtirs may be available, and su-
perb t-xtbooks published, the sys-
tem of religious education as it
presently exists in the American
Jewish community has not achiev-
ed tht: goals which we would like
lo set -iany children are alienated
from Judaism because of their Re-
ligifeus School experience, and even
more Jewish homes lack any iden-
Israel* Writer Wins Prize
NEffl YORK (JTA) Hayim
Hazaz, a prominent Israeli writer,
has bet n named the recipient of
this year's annual Irving and Ber-
tha Newman Prize of the Institute
ol Hebrew Studies of New York
I niversity. The $1,000 prize will be
presented to Mr. Hazaz next month
in Jerusalem for bis book, "B'kolar
Echad" ("In One Collar Chain"),
which depicts the patriotism and
self-sacrifice of the illegal under-
ground during the period before
the establishment of the State of
Israel,
RABBI MORRIS KIPPER
Variety Plans
Fall Dinner,
Scroll of Honor
Leading off the fall and winter
program at Variety Children's Hos-
pital will be a testimonial dinner
in honor of Mayor Elliott Roose-
velt to be held Sept. 26 at the
Deauville Hotel.
Robert Turchin has been named
chairman, and Herbert (Pinky)
Schiffman will serve as first asso-
ciate chairman.
Recent contributors to the hos-
pital's Scroll of Honor, to be in-
stalled in the hospital soon, in-
clude Mr. and Mrs. David S. Bell,
Burns' Ltd.; Mrs. Alma Coates,
Harry Diamond, Albert E. Ellis,
Frank J. Fanelli, First Methodist
Church of South Miami, Flame
Restaurant. Hy Frackman, Mrs.
Paul V. Jacox, R. O. Jeffress. The
i Jewel Box, Posh, Inc., Lee C. Rob-
inson. Dr. Gabriel A. Sanchez. The
Swerdlin Family, Summers War-
i den. Mrs. W. R. W'alrath. and Mrs.
L. G. Wright.
tification or training in Judaism,
thus making the Religious School
experience ineffective.
"Although young in the history
of Judaism, Jewish camping seems
to be the one bright hope in a grim
picture of Jewish education in
America. Children returning from
Jewish camps have suddenly dis-
covered the excitement and the
inspiration that worship and study
and intensive Jewish living can
bring to their lives.
"Jewish eductors have reported
that children returning from a pos-
itive Jewish camp experience come
back with a strong desire to learn
in the Religious School. It is con-
ceivable therefore that a child at-
tending a summer camp Religious
School might be protected from
the contamination of his peers who
do not share his enthusiasm and
love of Judaism in the Religious
School experience.
"Perhaps the experiment this
summer may be a revolution, |
which, although upsetting to many,
may be the answer if Judaism is
to survive in the minds and hearts
of the next generation,'' Rabbi
Kipper concludes.
Moscow Rabbi
Sends Greetings
To N.Y. Confab
FALLSBURG, N.Y. (WNS) -
Chief Rabbi Yehudaa Leib Levin,
of Moscow, in a message to the.
convention here of the Rabbinical j
Council of America, said it was a
matter of deep personal regret to i
him not to have been able to ac- ]
cept an invitation to attend the
parley.
Rabbi Levin said he could not
accept the invitation because "I am
no longer a young man." The con-
cluding words of the message, writ-
ten in Hebrew, were: "May our
eyes see the uplifting of the light
of Torah and mitzvah. Amen. May
this be His will."
A significant development at
the convention was an appeal by
Rabbi Pinhas Teitz, president of
the Union of Orthodox Rabbis
of America, for cooperation in
the ranks of the Orthodox rab-
binate. He said cooperation was
essential, "if not organization-
ally, then at least among the in-
dividual Orthodox rabbis of all
organizations."
The Union of Orthodox Rabbis
had voted against participating in
the convention. When Rabbi Teitz
was asked privately about the mat-
ter, he was reported to have re-
plied that the session at which the
vote was taken had been attended
by only six members. To a query
whether the Union was for or
against his appearing at the con-
vention, Rabbi Teitz replied that
"most of the members of the
Union who have an active interest
in Jewish life in America and its
problems are with me."
Among the resolutions adopted
WELL KNOWN CANTOR
In Greater Miami wants engagement,
for the High Holidays, or year round
position. Has served as Cantor for
past 1S years.
Please call 374-0816 after 5:30 p.m.
Palmer
Memorials
"Miami's Only
Jewish
Monument
Builders"
LEADERS IN
SERVICE, QUALITY
AND value:
Zim Introduces
New Family Plan
Zim Lines have introduced a
plan whereby families of four
sailing on any one of the S/S
ShalOm's Caribbean cruises during
the 1A66-67 season will pay the
equivalent of only three full fares
provided that they share the same
cabin, it was announced by Mr. A.
Manor, Eecutive Vice President of
the American-Israeli Shipping Co.,;bvYhe convention such as an
Inc., U.S. representatives of the | appeal to the Soviet Union t0 grant I
Zim Lines. i fun religious rights to its Jewish ;
In addition to her cruise sailings j nationais and a call on the U.S. to '
from Baltimore and New York, the ..take the necessary steps for I
Shalom, for the first time, will j tne securitv of Israel," was one
offer two cruises from Port Ever-1 voicing "dismay and condemnation !
glades, Florida. The first, a 9-day 0f the desecration of the observ-1
cruise, will depart from the South' ancc 0f (he Sabbath in certain
Florida port on Nov. 17th and re-, Jewish Centers and Ys through-
turn there on Nov. 26. The second, out the country."
an 8-day cruise, will sail on Jan.
6, 1967 and return to Port Ever-
Scheduled Unveillngs
SUNDAY, JULY 24, I960
Mt. Sinai Cemetery
AARON LIEBMAN, 11 a.m.
Double Unveiling
HYMAN & ROSE BECKER, 2 p.m.
Rabbi S. T. Sti'irs^y
SEE WHAT YOU BUY I
DO NOT BUY FROM
MAIL ORDER FIRMS
AND BE SORRY!
Buy Direct from the
Manufacturer in Miami
and save many dollars.
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
Miami's Only
Jewish Monument Builder*
3279 S.W. 8th Street
HI 4-0921 Phones HI 4-0921
Bxpftess Sympathy
and Gbmjofct
Cjinbalfcy ?f(VuM ^H'lued MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
CORAL GABIES H0LLYW0O0
FT. LAU0ER0ALE BOCA RATON
British Nazi Given Fine
LONDON (WNS) John Tyn-
dall and tour other members of his
i neo-Nazi movement were fined by
a London court for possessing of-
fensive weapons.
Lakeside
MEMORIAL PARK
AND
GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
"THE SOUTH'S
MOST BEAUTIFUL
JEWISH CEMETERY"
Guaranteed Perpetual Care funi
N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE.
TU 5-1689
glades on Jan. 14.
Ports of call on the Shalom's
1966-67 cruises will be San Juan,
St. Thomas, MontegO Bay. St, Maar-
ten. Guadeloupe. St. CroJx, Free-
port (Bahamas). Martinique. Bar-
bados, LaGuaira. Curacao. Aruba
and Port-of-Spain.
GELB v
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
Miami's Only Strictly Jewish
Monument Oeoler

W*w ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE"-"APPUANCES"
"CL6THING -"JEWEIRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
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* *


Page 10-8
*Jenisl> fhridkun
Friday. July 22, 193G
Olt
CATSMAN
/ t u r i c i
Mrs. Anna Q., 84, of NE
it died July i> She cam
from Flint, Mich :: years 1*0 and
1 member of the Jewish H011 e
for the Axed Auxiliary, National
Council of Jewish Women and Beth
tavld Congregation. She was also 1
ounder and life member of Temple
'.amora Survlng are three sons.
laviii I' of San Mart no Island, Sam-
u-l M. and IIa\ niond .\1.. hoth of
['lint; two daughters. Mrs. Henri
DuBois hi' Delra) Beach, and Mrs,
Xihel Kuizman of Buffalo. N.Y.;
hrec sisters, Mrs. Edith Kuhel i>f
1 Cleveland, Mis Bernlce Tukel ami
Mrs. Bessie Blake, both of Detroit:
3 grandchildren ami I* meat-maiid-
hiidren. Services were held Julv 19
1 Riverside Alton Rd. Chapel.
benstin, Bassuel s., go, "i 101
NIC lTNth Ter.. died Julv 15. River-
aide,
OOLDBETTER. Abe, 88, Of 1080 Hill
St., died July 16. Riverside.
LIPPERT, Harry. .'.:,. of 3035 Jeffer-
son Ave.. died .1 u 1\' 16, Riverside
meyer, Jeanette, 81, of 2454 SW
(3rd Ter.. died July 15. Riverside.
SONNENSCHEIN, Charles, (Sin shine)
>f i:,(Mi May Dr., died July 18. Riv-
erside.
hyman. Mrs Pearl, 888, of ISO \v.
1 lil.iilo in dli-.1 July 11. Rivi rside
haber, Isidore, :::. "f 1228 Drexel
\v.-.. Bervlces In Par Rockaway,
\'.v. Newman,
WALDFOGEL. Mas. 74, of 700 Za-
mora Ave., 'died July 15. Riverside
atlas, Philip, 85, of Mm Washington
Ave.. died ,)ul\ I-. Services in New
York City. Riverside.
Givner. Jared Steven, 81, of 1 lot
3rd St.. died Julv 13. Services in
N".w York City.
GOLDFINGER, Samuel, 4!'. of 21S
Bay Dr. Services in New Jersey.
Newman.
weiner. Earl (Doc) ;:. of MO n\v
70th Way, Hollywood, Flu., died July
13.
ARNOLD. Peter J.. till, of 5970 Indian
'-reek Dr.. died July 11. Riverside.
BERMAN. Miss Bertha B 51, "f 8885
Myron Ave.. died July II. Riverside.
BERNARD, Jack, 7. of 9674 N\V 10th
Ave., died July it. Gordon,
KAMIN. Joey, of 242 St., (inlden
shores, died July 13. Riverside.
LEVIN, Nathan (Nate) ,',7. of mil NYV
44th St.. died July 11. Gordon.
A8RAMOWITZ, Anna. 7'.', of 616
Washington Ave.. died July 11. Riv-
erside.
ISAACSON, Louis. 80, of 220 Collins
Ave.. died July it. Gordon.
Massacre Noted
In Rumania
BUCHAREST (JTA) Jew-
ish visitors from all parts of Ru-
mania and virtually the entire
Jassy Jewish community took part
in a memorial ceremony on the
25th anniversary of the slaughter
of 11,000 Jassy Jews in a 1941
massacre during the German occu-
pation.
The pogrom took place at the
instigation of the Gestapo but was
carried out by Fascist gangs of the
Antonescu pro-Nazi regime. Chief
Kabbi Moses Rosen said in his ser-
mon that the 500 year history of
the Jews in Jassy had come to a
tragic finale in the pogrom.
He said the present Government
had punished the killers and creat-
ed conditions which secured the
liberty of the Rumanian Jewish
people. A collective Prayer for the
Dead was recited for the victims.
At the Jewish cemetery of Roman,
the site of another mass grave, a
monument was unveiled to 370
victims buried there
Defense Weapons
No Problem,
Esrko! Declares
JERUSALEM ,JTA> Prime
Minister Levi Fshkol reported with
satisfaction this week that Israel
no longer -had any problems in
getting defense weapons from
western countries.
Speaking at graduation ceremon-
ies at the National Defense Col-
lege, the Premier nevertheless
voiced the hope that "the day will
come when East and West will get
together to promote disarmament
in the Middle East."'
Meanwhile, Foreign Minister
Abba Eban reportedly told
United Nations Political Under-
secretary Ralph Bunche here
that Israel opposed a U.N. plan
to reduce the U.N. Truce Super-
vision Organization forces in
Sinai and the Gaza Strip border
areas. Dr. Bunche came to
Jerusalem from a visit to sev-
eral Arab countries. Mr. Eban
indicated Israel feels that UN
forces have ensured peace on
those borders.
Mr. Eban also reportedly re-
ferred to the fact that Arab ref-
ugees recruited into the Palestine
Liberation Army Organization
were continuing to live in camps
of the United Nations Relief and
Works Agency and to receive
UNRWA rations.
He also reportedly raised the
long-standing issue of Jordan's re-
fusal to admit Israeli Jews to Jew-
ish holy places now in Jordan's
jurisdiction. Mr. Bunche also con-
ferred with Prime Minister Levi
Eshkol.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE!
the undersigned, esirins
siness under the t;.
of R( >CND RoBI.N BAR i- 122 \
29th St., Miami, in ten i- -
ttnid name ith the Cl rk of the
OUlt ''"lilt of Duo
GRACE I. F1SC1
Sole tw
KESSl.KK, MAS8EY *
BECK ERM \N v
Attorneys for Applicant
4'.'."i Biltnn re Waj
Cons I Gables, Fia.
I IS-22-38 1/5
Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey meets informally in the
U.S. Senate cloakroom with delegates to the four-day National
Jewish Welfare Board Middle Atlantic Region Jewish Com-
munity Center Youth Institute on Government. Co-sponsored
by the Greater Washington, D.C., Jewish Community Center,
the institute had as its theme "Jewish Values and Ideals
In Our Government and in Our Lives."
Latin Jews Hold Four-Day Confab
were presented during the sessions.
TELL
THEM
ABOUT
.WELCOME
"l WAGON
If you know of a family who naa
Jutt arrived In your community, be
aura to tell them about Welcoma
Wagon. They will be delighted with
the basket of gifts and helpful
Information they will receive from
our hostess, a symbol of the com-
munih/a traditional hospitality. Or
yw may calf
iWfelcoi
HI 8-4994
WfLCOMt MIHCOMUSI
Um thli Mupoa te let s
Bmm_
AMrMt.
D Pl"se have the Welcome Wagon
Hostess call on me.
0 wU like to subscribe to -
The) Jewish Floridion.
"ill Mt cesson anal moil to
Circslotiea Dest.,
M.P.O. Bei 2973, Miami. Flo.
Catholics Find Distortions
PITTSBURGH (JTA) A
committee of Catholics here re-
ported that the views of Negroes
and Jews are distorted in three
geography textbooks used in paro-
chial schools. The distortions, said
the committee, were sufficiently
serious to warrant a review of all
textbooks used in the Pittsburgh
diocese. Sponsored by the Catholic
Interracial Council, the committee
was made up of eight persons, in-
cluding five members of Duquesne
University.
SA NSALVADOR (JTA) A
four-day convention of the Federa
tion of Jewish Communities of
Central America and Panama con-
cluded here. Reports of the status
of the Jewish communities of Costa
Rica. Honduras, Guatemala, Nica-
ragua. Panama and El Salvador
Israelis In Soviet
Attract Crowds
Four New Cities
TEL AVIV (WNS) The
Ministry of the Interior this week
made public a blueprint for four
new cities in the Negev with a
population- of 750.000 people. To
be completed over a period of 20
years, the plan envisions building
of a railway, a national park and
a number of resorts.
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
1.400 spectators, mostly Jews, pre-
sent at the Estrada Theater in
Moscow this week for the perform-
ance by two Israeli artists joined
in singing Hebrew songs in an at-
mosphere of enthusiasm, it was re-
ported here from the Soviet capi-
tal.
The audience members, most of
them young people, applauded
wildly after each Hebrew song by
Geula Gil and frequently burst into
song in accompaniment.
The report said rho audience
members knew the words of such
melodies as "Havenu Sholem
Alsichom," and "David Meleeh
Israel Hai V'Kayom," declaring
that Israel still lives.
Miss Gil also sang Yiddish songs
which brought tears to the eves of
many of the listeners. The hall was
sold out and hundreds who were
unable to buy tickets jammed the
adjoining streets to hear the per-
formance through the open win-
dows of the theater.
The other artist was Jacob Abkin,
a mimic. Posters about the per-
formances appeared throughout
Moscow.
Herut Elects New Chairman
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yaacov
Meridor was elected chairman of
the national executive of the right-
wing Herut Party in a last minute
effort by the central committee to
preserve party unity A new oppo-
sition group, led by Tel Aviv at-
Ber Mark, 58
Historian Dies
NEW YORK (JTA) A re-
port from Poland this week said
that Prof. Ber Mark, noted Jewish
historian and director of the Jew-
ish Historical Institute in Warsaw,
died in the Polish capital after a
lengthy illness. He was 58 years-
old.
Born in Lomzha, Poland, he
worked in the pre-war years on
the editorial staff of Der Moment,
large Jewish daily in Warsaw. He
became known after World War II
for his books on the revolt against
the German occupation army in
the Warsaw Ghetto and other
works dealing with life of the Jews
under the Nazis in Poland.
He is also the author of a two-
volume History of the Jews in
Poland. He visited Israel where he
lectured at the Hebrew University.
Some of his works have been trans-
lated into English, French, Spanish,
German and Portuguese.
torney Shmuel Tamir, emerged at
the party's annual convention last
week to challenge the leadership
of Menachem Beigin, who resigned
during the convention as party
chairman.
Mr. Meridor said he would try
to form a new party executive
within four weeks but said he was
not optimistic about his chances of
success. Yohanan Bader, a Herut
member of Parliament, was elect-
ed chairman of the central com-
mittee. _,
The two factions waged an in-
tensive campaign in the past few
days over election of the new ex-
ecutive chairman, with lobbying
continuing until a few minutes be-
fore the central committee was con-
vened. Mr. Tamir was asked by
several party members to agree
not to join the new executive "to
help smooth out internal differ-
ences," but he refused.
Berlin Mayor Posts Reward
WEST BERLIN (JTA) West
Berlin Mayor Willy Brandt an-
nounced a reward of 5,000
deutschemarks ($1,250) for infor-
mation leading to the apprehen-
sion of those responsible for set-
ting fire to a building of the Jew-
ish community center here last
weekend.
Among the issues which the del-
egates discussed were the effect of
the Central American Common
Market on Jews in the area, the
nature of Judaism and Jewish con-
sciousness, the Jewish declaration
by the Second Vatican Ecumenical
Council, anti-Semitism in the Cen-
tral American countries, problems
of integrating Jewish youth, par-
ticularly Jewish university stu-
dents, into Jewish communal life,
Jewish youth and Israel, the halutz
ideal and its influence on Jewish
youth in Central America, and
Jewish education.
Participants in the conclave in-
cluded also Israeli Ambassadors
Shmuel R. Kapel and Col. Izhak
Shany, Dr. Woodrow de Casto,
president of the Federation, Man-
uel Tenenbaum, president of the
regional council of the Jewish
Youth of Latin America, and Mark
Turkow of the South American
Executive of the World Jewish
Congress.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVBN tru-
the undersigned, desiring to -v.
in business under the fictitious nan
nr WAFFLE HOUSE, at li> \\ .
Ington Avenue, Miami Iteach. Flo
int. iuls tt. register said name with !'
Clerk ( iin- Circuit Court 'f Dad
County. Florida
8HEVIN, QOODMAN Hoi.TZMAV
Ait- rneys for Purchaser -
7/21'- :
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to en
in business undei the Fictitious
i Miami SPORTING 'itM r>B,
N.E Avenue, I:.....n SI 2, v
Intends to register said name with
nI'e Clerk or tli.- Circuit Court ot I ids
County, Klori.la.
JEROME KIMRALL
Sole 'wner
7 22-29 8/5-12
LEGAL NOTICfe
IN THE COUNTY JUDGEC COURT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71426-C
In UK: Ksiate or
BERTHA I.II'.MAN.
i leceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To Aii Creditors an,l All Persona
Having Claims or >em tuds I
SaM Estate'
You are hereby notified and re-
'J1'- |..<-->ii; an} claims
demands whtcn you may hi..... the .state ,.r BERTHA L-1PMAN, de-
ceased ..I.- ..I i iade County, Florid .
;.. the County Judges or Dads County
and file the same in duplicate and ..-
provided in Section 733.18, Florida
statutes, in their offices in the County
Coiiiili.iu.se in Dade County. Florida
tvitiiin bix calendar months rron the
nil' or the first publication hereol
or the sain.- win b barred
Dated at Miami. Florida, this '-';ri
lav of June. A.D. l6ii.
STANLEY I.II-.MAN
NORMAN i.ii-MAN
As i 'o-Executors
First publication r this notice on
the --'ml day of Julv. 1968
SMITH A HANDLER
Attorneys for < 'o-Kxecutors
40< Lincoln Koa.l. Miami BeaOh
7/22-1'J s
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71252 C
In RE: Estate of
JEANNE SEQUIN
I 'creased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To ah Creditors and ai. Persons
Having claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims an.l
demands which you may have against
the ..-tate of JEANNE SEQUIN de-
ceased late "f Dade County. Plot
t" th. County Judges or !
County. Florida, and file the
in duplicate and as provided in -
t "ii 731.16, Florida statutes, in thel
offices in the County Courthouse in
I'ade County. Florida, within six cal-
endar months from the time of thf*
first publication hereof, or the sam
will he barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 18tli
day of July. A.I>. 1966.
HANS ll. MARCUSE
As Administrator
First publication of this notice on
(he 22nd dav of July, 19fi6.
HENRY NORTON
Att rney for Administrator
um; Blacayne iiuil.iing
7/22-29 8/5-12
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71501
in RE: Estate or
CHARLES RAVETT
i leceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To ah Creditors and Al. Pen
Having claims or Demands Asalnsl
Sai.i Estate:
notified at"! ro
any claims 111.1
-12
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
1 b"?i.'"'s'' u,'er the fictitious name
of_i\Y of FLORIDA at it" N.E
1.. St. intends to register said name
vvith the. cierk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
IVY THAYER
__^_ 7/15-22-2:t 8/8
^ ou are hereby
quired to present
demands which you may have aaratna!
the .state of CHARLES RAVETT
ceases late "f Broward County, F
Ida, to the Count) Judges if
County, Florida, and tile the
in duplicate and as provided In -
tlon 733.16, Florida Statutes, In tl
offices In the County Courthi se In
County, Florida, within si\
months from the time >f
flrai publication hereof, or the -
will be barred,
Dated al .Miami. Florida, this 18th
la) of July. A.D. IM6
ELAINE RAVETT DAVIS
PAULINE ESTHER RAVETT VEHOA
A.- Executrtxi a
First publication of this notl a on
tin- 32nd day of July. 1966.
ISRAEL ABRAM
' i rney for Exec ul rlxes
608 Alnala) Building
Miami. Florida
7/22-29 8Afi-l2
'N|JHEmSOU^JY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
. n ,. No' 71558C
in KB.: Estate of
WARREN BONED
Deceased.
T ,M7.'Cf,.TO CREDITORS
i",^11 Creditors and All Persons
"iid'nI^uiei:m*, "r Demad8 Against
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
demands which you may have against
the estate of WARREN s'oNKD'de-
ceased Inte of Dade County. Florida.
iJJ ;V ':',""' """'' of I>ade County
"^'iVV "'n'.ln uPHcate and as
provided In Section 733 111 Flori.li
Statutes. In their offices In the Count?
''.'vr,tno",,,e ln Dade County. Florida
Mmh'n f"V",,'mlar "'"""" fro, the
SVfJS SBMS&r h"reor
da?aofdJun.V,MA:.Dnl19^0r"la- th'8 2Mh
MERCEDES SONBD
_,__ .As Executrix
^F1l?t publication of this notice
the 22nd nay f juiv ioio nollc'' on
SIMON. HAYSi ORUNDWBRO
Attorneys for Estate "
301 Ainsley Building
7/22-29 8/5-12
GIVE
THE
PRICELESS'
GIFT........
A
LITTLE
OF
YOURSELF
BE A UNITED
*
FUND VOLUNTEER
CALL
377-8311

t>


Fridcty. July 22. 1966
vJewisti nurkttar)
Fage 1 IB
LEGAL NOTICE

in THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
eleventh judicial circuit
of florida in and for dade
county, in chancery
No. 66C 6715
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME.
I,, the Matter of:
changing Name <>f PAUL
ClinBlKKER, sonietlm.m
known as PAl'L GARDNER,
to I'M I- GARDNER.
To WHOM" IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the
miderailPMd Petitioner. PAUL. (iKoll-
ll-'KKK, whose residence address In
[::(> 71st Street. Miami Beach, bade
I'-unty, Fkirldn, intends to apply to
i!m- Honorable William A. Henn. One
.,: the Judge* of the Eleventh .Is.lid.11
Circuit, in and for Da I'li.iidu, at hi.-- office in the Dude
Count* Court House, .Miami, Florida.
I :.*> o'clock I'.M., on the 26th day
July, 18'lb, or as soon thereafter n
lie may !* heard, for an order rhang-
ij hiB name from i'Al'L OROUIKER,
I.. PAUL GARDNER, by which name
I., .-hall thereafter be known. .
Itued at Miami. Dade County. Flor-
ida, thia -'-1th day of June. A.U. 1966.
/.-:/ PA I'I. OROU1FKER
Petitioner.
VICTOR LEVINH
uiorney for Petitioner
:; City National Hank Building
.1 inii, Florida ".UISO
I'lii.ne: 379-75S2
7/1-K-15-22
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADS COUNTY,
FLORIOA. IN PROBATE
No. 71375-C
In RE: Estate of
ANNA Will LEU I'.OSS
I ii ceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
To All Creditor-, and All Persons
I laving C-laima or Demands AgaiuM
Paid Estate:
You are hereby notified and. re-
quired to present an) claim* and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of ANNA WIGLKR ROWS
deceased lute of I >ade County, l-"lorlda,
to the County Junajat of Dade Coun-
ts. and file the ume in duplicate and
as provided III Section 7M.18, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florldti,
within six calendar month! from the
time, of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Dated a Miami. Florida; this 29th
da} of June. A.I>. !!'S6.
Hirst publication of this notice on
Hie :16th day of June, 1 *.
CEORtiB J. TALIANOFF
\t mrney. for Executor
i l.iiii oln Road, Miami Reach. Flu.
7/1-8-15-22
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICH IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business undiir the fictitious name
KEY'S TAVERN at 310 N.W. 27th
\ venue. Miami Intends to register
Ltd name with the Clerk of the Cir-
di Court of i'ad. County, Florida.
:i.A- i ANDERSON". Sole owner
KKSSIJSR, MASSEY. BECKERMAN
Attorneys for Appltc&nj,
1 Uiltmote Way
..ii c s, Florida,
7/8-15-22-29
notice under
fictitious name law
TICK is HEREBY GIVEN thai
igned desiring to engage
isiness under the fleTttleua name
\IDEo UDIO SPECIALISTS at
1 N.E 55th Street, North Miami
' intends to register s.i d
8 ith the Clerk ol the Cir< uit
i'.ci. County, Florida.
IDBO UDIO SPBCIALISTS, INC.
u. I! B Kit'.: Kit, Presidi nt
'I1T11 .. | l,ER,
-rm-jf for \ iuto Audio.
mmO. Miami Reach. Fla.
7/S-J ;
HE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 7U03..A
I Estati ol
V PRANCES SMITH
... ..,1
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All Creditor* ana All Persons Hav-
i -- or Demands Against Said
le.
Yuu are hereby notified and re-
nired to present .my claims and de-
" 'Is which you may have against
the ia... of ('LAY PRANCES SMI I'll
oj-wased late of Dade County, I'lor-
lo the County Judges of Dade
unty, and file the same in duplicate
arid .is provided in Section 733.16, Plor-
;i. statutes, in their offices in the
eitity Courthouse in Dade County,
Ulurida. within six calendar months
fi oin the time of the first publication
r-ereof, or the same will be, barfed.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 30Th
day of June, A.U. 1966,
JUANITA JOSE-PMINE WALL
m As Executrix
.i. o J Publication of this notice on
i.,?.?.1" aiiy "f *iiy is.
IKED AND elF.VVMAN
Attorneys for Executrix
Wo Dade Federal Building
Miami, Fla.
7/8-15-22-29
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY*
FLORIOA, IN PROBATE
t ~~ No- ?0S-B
In RE: Estate of
J "-NJAMIN JOSEPHS
Deceased.
NOTJCK TO CRSOITORS
To All Creditors and All -Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Instate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have agulnst
the estate of BfcTNjAMlN JOSEPHS
deceased late of Bade County, Flor-
'}?* to the County Judges of Dade
lounty, and file the.same, in duplicate
and as provided in Section 738.li>.
I'londa Statutes. In their offices In
the County .Courthouse, in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within six calendar montlis
from the time of the", first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 1st
tfay of July. A.D. 190*.
\ /a/ OHRADD JOSEPHS
, As Executor
tlnst-publlcatlon of this notice on
the Sth day of July. 19*8.
t'AUWT AND IVALBUT
Attoafteys for ENeciitor
- 2*0 18j.., Miami Beach. Fla.
7/8-15-22-29
mew
BY HENRY LEONARD
There he goes again on one of
his Cantorial Filibusters!"
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. A7I391
In UK; Estate of
EUGENE M CM POWER
1 leceaai I.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Cstate:
Yon are hereby notified and re-
quired to r mands which you may have against
the estate of KITOKNE MIJMPOWEK
deceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judge* of Dade Coun-
ty, and file the same in duplicate and
as provided in Section 7:tR.lfi. Florida
Statutes ,in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Hade County. Flor-
ida, within six calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be. barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 25th
day of June, A.I). 1966,
KRANCKS I). IIAFNKR
2917 SW. r,7th Ct.
Miami. Fla.
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the !st day of July, 1966.
ROBERT SCOTT KAUFMAN
Attorney for Executrix
317 Biscayne Building
7/1-g-15r2t
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN -AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71084-B
In RR: Estate of
IIAUJIY C. FL-PIIR,
ased.
NOTICE TO CRECITORS
To All Credit i All Persona
H.iving Claims .,r Demands Against
Said I'state:
You arc hereby notified and re-
quired to present anj claims and ile-
m.inds-.which \ >u may have i,_
tlm estati of FTARR7 C. FLl'HR
dei eased late i I I el i 'ounty, Florida,
to tiie Cpuaty J -.c.'.-f, of Dade Coun-
ty, and file the.same In duplicate and
as provided In Faction 732.16) I'iorlda
Statutejj, In their i fflcee In the Coun-
'OUJTthbuse In Dade County. Flor-
id, i, within six calendar months from
the time of th first publieatfon here-
i. or the same will he bar: ed
Dated al Miami. Ptorlda. th
d.ij ol .lure, \ D. 1!6.
CEI.1A II KU'IIR
i DWARIJ KLI'IIK
ROMERT .1 KLl'llft
\s Ebra< utoi;
First publication of I ... on
the 1st day of .lulv, 1966,
HAROJJJ SHAPIRO
Attorney for cicecutors
927 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach, Flcrida
________________________________7/1-8-15-22
IN IHE COUNTY JUCGE'S COURT
IN ANt FOR CACE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71324-C
In RE: Estate of
DOIUS J. WK'KNER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Lemands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
Mm estate of IX)"IS J. WlCKNF.n
deceased late of Cade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.16, Florida
statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade (Njunty, Flor-
ida* within six calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florlua. lius 22nd
day of June, A.D. 1966.
KM. ETTA Mir.I.CR
IHS; UtVINO ft. SCHWARTZ
As Eoiecutors
First publication of this notice on
the 27th day of June, 1966.
MARVIN I. WIENER. BHQ.
Attorney for Co-Executors
913 Arnsley Building, Miami, Fla.
7/1-6-15-22
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE TO DEFEND
or
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7137
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
WILLIAM ,'. KAY.
Plaintiff
IRENE RAT,
Defendant.
TO: IRENK RAY
61 Falmouth Street,
Portland. Maine
You. IRENE RAY, are hereby noti-
fied that a Bill of Complaint for Di-
vorce has been filed against you. and
you are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the Bill
of Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attor-
ney. M. H. ROSENHOCSE. 9111 Olyni
pia Building. Miami. Florida, and file
the original Answer or Pleading in
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 12th day of
August. lfi6. If VOtf" fail to do so,
judgment by default will be taken
agatbUt you for the relief demanded
in the Bill of Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 6th day of July, 1966.
E B LEATHERMAN
Clerk Circuit Court
I >ude 'ounty, Florida
(Seal) B) M "avalaris
Deputy Clerk
7/S-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NeTrCK IS UKRIOBY OIVEN that
the under..igned. desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PAX.MA CIOAKS at 29a Northwest
J6th Street, Miami. Florida, intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
OMAR HAVANA CIGARS, INC.
MARTIN IdOMiulGH
Attorney for
Omar Havana Cigars, Ino.
M-lffc .Biscayno Building
Miami.. Worlda 7/1.,.18.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7192
NOTICE OF SUIT
THE WIDDJAMSBURGH
SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHIRLEY T IIOLTON, a k a
SHIRLEY I.. PINCL'S, et us, et al.
i f.-i.dant.
ru SUSAN SPBCTOR
FtFD Ni
Parktvijle, Sullivan County,
New Yi j-k
You thai the
uapl loned ael V n has been Ini t
luted againsl you in th. Pircuil Court
of thi i Circuit or
KloridA In i mi fi i lounty t foreclose .< moi 'i the follow-
ing U 26, Ml. k 5, MbiHLAXI)
MANOR TWO ucc-oi-d-
ing to t he Plat ..... < u ded
in Plat Rook Ul .'i Page ill of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Yon are required to file a respon-
hIvs pleailine; to plnjritiff's lomplalnt
with the Clerk of the aforesaid Court,
and serve a copv thereof upon plain-
tiff's attorney, mautiv fine, Dade
Federal BuHdlng, Miami, I'l.-rida 33131,
not later than August 18, 11166. or a
Decree Pro Confesso will be entered
against you.
DATED July .7, 1906.
B. H. US ATI IK RM IV I
Clerk of the Circuit '"ourt
By K. M. LYMAN
l>e.puty Clerk
MARTIN FINE
Dade Federal Building
Miami. Florida, 33U1
7/13-22-29 8/*
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AMD FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71419-B
In RE: Estate of
PRANK CELJ-A,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate;
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which ycu may have against
the estate of FRANK CES.LA. de-
ceased late of Dade Oounty, Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 732,16. Florida-
Statutes. In Uieir offices In the County
Courthouse in Iiade Oounty, Florida.!
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof, or
the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 7th
day of July. A.D. 1966.
MISS M\R1F, T CELEA
As l-Sxe, utrix
First publication of this notice on
the 10th day of July, 1966.
IAJD4N. ROTHKNBEKG &
DHI-CHUK
Attorney for Executrix
05 Blacasnc. Building
Miami, Florida
7/15-22-29 8/5
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6685
VIRGINIA KAZIK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DIMITRI KAZIK.
Defendant.
TO: DIMITRI KAZIK
1 lt> Burke Avenue
New York City, New York
You. DIMITRI KAZIK. are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce has been filed against you,
and you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's At-
torney. THEOIKIRK M. TRI'SIIIN.
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Hoi-
Ida 28139. and file the original Answer
or Pleading In the office of the clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
1st day of August, 1966. If you fall to
do so. judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded in the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be publlsln-d once
each w,ck for four consecutive weeks
ill THE JEWISH I'LORIl IAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 29rd day of June, A.D.
1966.
E. P.. DEATMERMAN. Clerk
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
THEOIHIItH M. TIUSHIN
4L't> Lincoln Roud
Miami Beach, Florida
Attorney for the Plaintiff
7/1-8-15-22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 66C 7110
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THEODORE FUR1A,
Plaintiff.
CATHERINE FCRIA,
Defendant.
YOC, CATHERINE FCRIA, 93S
Morris si., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
;ue required to file yom- answer to
the Complaint fir Divorce with the
ci.rk of the above Court and serve
a C04>y thereof upon Herman Cohen.
Esq., 1310-11 Congress Bldg.. Miami.
Florida* on or before August 8th,
1966. or else complaint will be taken
as i .TlT'i ssc'l
DATED at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 6th day of July, I960.
E. P.. I.EATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. LYMAN
7/8-15-22-29
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
oHcits your legal node**.
W appreciate youi
patronage and guarantee)
accurate enrice al legal
rfrie^B
fnVif FR 3-46tfl
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 64C 7447
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
MARYA C. DEL SOL,
Plaintiff I
vs.
HECTOR DEL SOL
1 'efelKlant
TO: HECTOR DEL Sol,
i >\ Ferry Stri i I
Newark. New Jersej
You, HECTOR DEI. SOL. are here-
by notified that a Dill of Complaint
for Divorce has been filed again*
you. and you ale required to serve
a copj of your Answer or i'leading
to the Bill of Complaint on the Plain-
tiffs Attorney, Jack L. King. Suite
21".. 1150 S.W. 1 Street. Miami, Flor-
ida and file the original Answer or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or beforo
the 25th day of August. 1966. If you
fail to do so, judgment by default will
he taken against you for the relief in
the Bill of Complaint.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in the JEWISH FLuRtDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida tins I ith day of July 1966.
E. I'. I.EATHERMAN. CLERK
Circuit Court. Dade County. I Wida
Bj : K M. LYMAN
DeputN Clerk
JACK I* KINO
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
i: M O.E at 1042 Seyhold Building.
Miami. Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BI'SINESS MAX'S CREDIT
BUREAU, INCORPORATED
A Florida Corporation
By: ROBERT I. ROSENBERG
President
MAX A OOEDFARB
Attorneys for Business Man's Credit
Bureau, Inc.. a Florida Corp.
7/1-8-15-22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7363
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
I."' IS INSETTA,
Plaintiff,
iblRA i\ I 'efendant.
TO; CLISA INSETTA
Isoi.i vieo Pars i ii i '
Pro a fflaj
Y'.'l' SUE IIEIC-rtY NOTIFIED
that a Complaint for Dlvorci has been
filed against >u, and j n quiri d
to serve, >pj or >..,- Vnswer or
plead,ng to thi Com] on the
tiffs attorm i ,\ 'A.'.'i'CC &
WAI.'.I.I:. 420 l.r. d Miami
a, and fi!. oi ginal
in th< flee i thi f*lerj
Circuit Court, i i ibi 15th
to do
so. ludgmi nt 1 del b< iken
against you for the i di ndi d
in the i'on pluinl
DONE and ORDERED al Mlai i
Dade Countv, Florida, this 12th day
of July. 1966.
!: H l.i- '.'I HI RMAN
Clerk of the ClrCI II I ourt
Dade i'. mtj !oui He,use
Miami, i"ii,i-.l.i.
By: M. C.\\ A LA I: -,
Deput) !
_____________________________7/15-22-29 8/5
NOTICE OF INTENTION
TO APPLY FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
Chancery No. 66C 6847
To Whom It May Concern:
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned petitioner, HERBERT
WEISS' whose residence adrir. i
4727 N.W. IBHth Terrace in the City
of Miami, Dade <'ounty, Florida, in-
tends to apply to the Honorable r
Fritz Gordon, Judge of. the Eleventh
Judicial Circuit, in and for Dad.
County, at his office in the County
Court House at 11*1T o'clock A.M. on
the 9th day of August, 1966, or as soon
thereafter an he may be beard, for an
order changing Ins name from HER-
BERT WEISS to SCOT liiWAI.. by
which name he shall thereafter b
known.
Dated at Miami, Clorldc, this 28th
day of June. A.D. 1966.
HERBERT A :'.'-S
Petition vr
OEOROE NICHOI Attorney for Petitioner
612 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida
7/1'-22-29 8/5
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business jinder th'e fictitious name
of THE Orj> WORDD SHOP at num-
ber IS65 Michigan Avenue, in tne
City of Miami Beach. Florida, intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, thi.- 5th
day of July, 1966.
BARRY NEAI. MARDIN
FOWLER. WHITE. C.Il.UEN,
HUMKBY & TRBNAM
Attorneys for Applicant
SIM City Notional Rank Pldg.
Miami, Florida ?S1fl
By: JAMES J*. ROTfi
7/15-22-29 8,5
LI
Suite 215, 1150 S.W. 1 Street
Miami, Florida Telephone 872-1507
7/22-29 8/5-
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FuORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7105
PETITION FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
MARIIA'N.YAE!'E. as natural mother
and n.xt friend of DEBORAH LORI
AN'c.EI.I. a minor child.
Plaintiff
vs.
EDWARD ANC.ELI.
Defendant.
To: EDWARD ANGELI
Residence I'nknowu
VOl', EDWARD AMlEI.l. are here-
l,v notified that :i Petition lilt change
..f Name under Chapter -- I Flor-
ida Statutes has been filed b> your
former ivifi MARILYN YAFFtt on be-
half of your min. r child DKliORAH
l.iilil XNCEI.I. of I0K5 l>Tih Stiiet.
Has Harbor Island, Florida, and you
are reuufred to arrvi a oops '" your
Answer or I'|. aditic to tin. said !' -
Utli u on the I'l tintifj Mti rne.v,
BENEDICT A SI I .VERM AN. ':'
\' w. I0tb Street..Miami. Flbrlda, I
the Drlgrha rer or Pleading
in the offli of II Clerk i I thi Cir-
cuit Court on i 22nd i.-v
of A If you fall to 'I" i ,
ludgmenl by default will taken
against you for the relief deWnndi 1
n the Petition I I anfte of Name,
you tire further Mflefl thfli the
.. Pi tltioner. MARILYN Y VFFE.
in:, nds to apply to th- Honorable
' GWYNN PARKER, ludgi
. '. and for
i ici the
i ouni v.M.
'lock on thi i. o( All
as this
may bi hei foi an i Vd" r changing
d from DEB-
I Ml !R1 i to I'l'Dc IRAH
l.ORl yai'F!' r' -: lively, by which
' th, reafter be known.
This notli'i '"ill be published one,,
1, iv. foi four i-onsecutlve weeks
m Th. Jewish Florldlan,
DONE \ND IRDEKED at Miami,
5th day of .Inly. A.D.

K I' I.I.Al'IIERMAN
ci.rk ol Circuit Court
; lie county. Florida
K. .VI. LYMAN
I inity Ci.rk
7 12-29 -
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF T*-E
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7445
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
JOAQPIN TCSCOl RIDO
Plaintiff I
MARIA DOLORES BUjRUlOGO .
DE lose ,| 1.IDO
Defi ndant.
TO: MARIA LOI.(*R*;.B<'KREOO
DS ES> Ol'It 11 ii i
t'alle ,i" la Crus No. 20
i 'adiz. Spain"f.^.
You. MVRIA IK>Lf>RES BORRIMD
sCOimiDO are h,eb> notified
that a Bill of ComsJalnt for Divorce
i.as he-'n M1M against you. and you
are re.niimd to s*rve n copy of your
Answer or Pleading ta 'he Bill of
'.'omplai' I on tho Platntnf's Attorney,
JACKt,. KING, Shrtte *15. 11"" 8.W.
I street, Miami, Florid* and file the
original Answer or I'leading in the
office of the (Terk of the Circuit Court
on or before thb 25th day of August.
1966. If you fail to do so. judgment by
default, will be taken against yon for
the relief in the Hill of complaint.
THIS NOTICE fftall be published
once each week for four consecutive
week- in the .TRW1KII Fl.liRIDIAN.
lH>ne an dnrdereri at Miami, Florida
this 14th day of July 1966.
E. D IJ4ATH*7RMAN. CLERK
Circuit Court, Dade County. Florida
By: K. M. LYMAN
Deputy Clerk
JACK L. KING
1150 S W. I --, t J
Miami, Florida
373-15OT
7/22-29 8/5-11
*"
^


Page 12-B
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