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The Jewish Floridian ( July 15, 1966 )

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Friday, July 15.
CJA Reveals Immediate Cash Need
A growing backlog of unmel
needs, occasioned by lack of funds,
threatens to overwhelm overseas
migration and welfare agencies set
up by American Jewry and to af-
fect the health, welfare and safety
of tens of thousands of Jews in
Israel, Europe and the Moslem
countries, Max M. Fisher, general
chan man of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, declared in Geneva last week
following a meeting with the exec-
utive heads of four beneficiary
agencies of the UJA.
These are the Joint Distribution
Committee, the Jewish Agency,
the World ORT Union and United
their European
Geneva.
The UJA is the major Amer-
ican body raising funds for the
transportation of Jewish immi-
grants to Israel, and to provide
humanitarian aid to scores of
thousands of refugees and needy
Jews in 30 other countries
throughout the world. In 1966,
the UJA is seeking $73,420,000
for these humanitarian programs.
"The agencies whose work we
support are living on a hand-to-
mouth basis, meeting only the
most urgent of their clients' needs
headquarters in areas of service because of the
I lack of immediate cash," Fisher
declared.
Hias Service all of which have and putting off or neglecting large
Police Get Clean Bill of Health;
No Brutality During Adenauer's Visit
JERUSALEM (JTA) Al-
though a "small number of police-
men" acted with undue violence
in the clashes May 5 between the
police and students at the Hebrew
University during the visit of for-
mer West German Chancellor Kon-
In Miami, I-eon Kaplan, cash col-
lections chairman of the 1966 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, revealed
Wednesday that "we hope by the
end of the year to go significantly
ahead of the $1,566,666 we set and
have already reached for the cur-
rent drive."
CJA's annual campaign sends
approximately 50 percent of its
proceeds to the United Jewish
Appeal.
"This is, of course, projection,"
Kaplan declared, "based on the
present influx of pledges. But
if the United Jewish Appeal is
to be able to meet its overseas
commitments. Greater Miamians
must also meet theirs."
Birchites Drop
Their Mask Of
Respectability
Continued from Page 1 A
roaches, howling mobs, parasites
and lazy illegitimates."
He asserted that one of the ma-
jor causes of student protests on
American college campuses was
the use of drugs, particularly LSD,
which he said was "imported from
Israel." Observers noted that the
LSD used in this country is either
;Jiade here or smuggled in from
Italy.
Oliver is on record as having
argued that "it is a lie that the
Nazis killed 6,000,000 Jews." While
his record was widely reported in
the Boston general press prior to
the rally, that press did not men-
tion his anti-Semitic speech at the
rally.
Robert Welch, founder of the
Birch Society, was a leading figure
at the three-day rally. Booths at the
rally featured "Headlines," an
anti-Semitic paper published by
Joseph P. Kamp, a professional
anti-Semitic agitator.
Commenting on
rad Adenauer, a special inquiry
commission appointed by the Cabi-
net reported this week that in gen- Chairman Fishers
eral, the police behaved "according; Joseph If. ^ Lipton
to circumstances."
UJA General
observation,
newly-elected
president of the Federation, noted
.__,- .. .. that "UJA needs assurance from
Asserting that members of both nt .j.. ... jj;(;i
sides were at fault in the student "8 a .?e.ad? f 0W of adI0"al
demonstrations that gave rise to ",comt'.lf '] 1S t0, f with the
charges of police brutality, the con,inui8 demands of men. worn-
commission's report noted that the en and children who have not the
students shouted abuse at the
police and that the police used
means to take care of themselves
n the countries in which they live.
their batons too freely in putting an(1 of whose life and safety de-
pend on their being moved from
their countries of origin to more
hospitable havens elsewhere."
Lipton noted that "although
most American campaigns in Jew-
ish communities across the nation
are well ahead of last year's, in-
cluding our own in Miami, the flow
of cash is somewhat behind."
down the demonstration.
The commission placed part of
the blame on the fact that the
students were not told of the spe-
cial orders to police to prevent
demonstrations within sight of
the former Chancellor.
The students were also not told
that the university administration
had agreed to the presence of
policemen on the campus during
Adenauer's visit.
The special orders to the police,
which originated at the Foreign
Ministry, were aimed at prevent-j
ing insults as well as bodily harm ;
to the visitor. The fact that the,
orders were kept secret, the com-.
mission reported, confused the i
students who believed that quiet I
demonstrations were permitted on ?
the campus as they had been dur-
ing previous visits by dignitaries.
Arthur S. Rosichan, executive
director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, noted that
"CJA funds help the United Jew-
ish Appeal in the following
aims: expansion of vocational
training facilities for newcomers
in Israel, for North African Jews
who have settled in France, and
Sunday Night-on the Town
Naomi Group of Hadassah is
planning "A Sunday Night on the
Town" for July 17 at the 007Ms
Club of the Shelborne Hotel.
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Rosichan warned that the United
Jewish Appeal "and our own Com-
bined Jewish Appeal here in Miami
can not hope to meet their finan-
cial commitments to these agencies
on a scale commensurate with their
needs unless it can raise a mini-
mum of $40 million in cash by the
end of July."
Board Chairman Dismissed
LONDON (JTA) The Soviet
Supervisor of Religious Institutions
has dismissed Chaim Ochs from his
post as chairman of the board of
synagogues at Cherkizovo, one of
the three Moscow synagogues, it
was reported here this week.
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Friday. July 15.1966
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IN ILUA AFTERMATH
Argentina's Jewish
Leaders Mum on Raids
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Jew-
I ish leaders here refrained from
statements this week on raids on
Jewish shops by police on July 1
after the overthrow of the lllia
! Government and on the arrest of
. some Jewish shopkeepers allegedly
suspected of selling smuggled
goods.
However, it was recalled that
there had been police raids on
stores in the same shopping arcade
during the lllia regime. The July
1 1 raid was generally regarded as
an over-zealous police action.
The arrests of some Jewish and
non-Jewish directors of a Mewish-
' led credit union cooperative also
was not regarded here as an anti-
Jewish action.
A report from Montevideo said
that all of the arrested shopkeep-
ers and credit union directors had
been released without any explana-
tion.

CANADIAN POLICE BRUTALITY
Continued from Page 1-A
taken by the police, the Jews in
the area would have to form their
own self-defense corps. They said
rabbis have often been subjected
to indignities in the area, and stu-
dents of the yeshiva have been ;it-
tacked and threatened.
Shown at fifth national conference on Jewish
Education, held recently in New York City,
leaders of three major religious groupings in
Jewish life call on the Jewish community to
support the American Association for Jewish
Education as central agency to deal with all
aspects of Jewish training on all age levels.
Left to right are Earl Morse, Union of American
Hebrew Congregations; Max Etra, Yeshiva
University; Dr. Isadore Breslau, Association
president; Joseph S. Wohl, Jewish Theological
Seminary of America; and Isaac Toubin,
executive director.
Leading Minds Urge A-Ban
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fifty-
five Israel intellectuals, speaking
as members of the Committee for
Nuclear Disarmament in the Arab-
Israeli Region, called on the Israel
Government this week to take the
initiative to prevent the spread of
nuclear arms into the Middle East.
Most of the signators are mem-
bers of the faculties of the Heb-
rew University, the Technion-Is-
rael Institute of Technology ,at
Haifa and the Weizmann Institute.
The statement warned that Is-
rael's vulnerability to nuclear at-
tack was fa rgreater than that
of Egypt and added that even if
a nuclear second strike by Is-
rael was feasible, it would be
for Israel a "posthumous
revenue."
The committee urged the Gov-
ment to assert its readiness to
start negotiations on the issue with
the Arab governments and with
international organizations. It ex-
pressed the hope that such negot-
iations could ultimately lead to
conventional disarmament.
Defense Ministry sources mean-
while expressed "dissatisfaction"
and "irritation" over the "un-
authorized attendance" by former
Deputy Defense Minister Shimon
Peres and Prof. Ernst Bergman,
who recently resigned as chairman
of Israel's Atomic Energy Commis-

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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 15, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01954

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 15, 1966

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01954

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
T "dfewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 39 Number 27
Miami. Florida. July 15, 1966
Two Sections Price 2Q{f
Birchers Drop
Disguise: Hear
Jewish Smears
Negro and Jewish leaders discuss "The Negro
and Anti-Semitism" on an "Open Mind" pro-
gram in New York. Participants include (left
to right) Dr. Alex Rosen, dean of the NYU
Graduate School of Social Work; Bayard
Rustin, executive director of the A. Philip
Randolph Institute; Prof. Eric F. Goldman, mod-
erator; Dr. John Slawson, executive vice pres-
ident of the American Jewish Committee; and
Dr. Kenneth Clark, professor of psvchology
at CCNY. Program will be seen in Miami on
July 20, 10 p.m., over WTHS Ch. 2.
Human Rights Leaders Urge
Negroes Halt Anti-Semitism
BASK ELEMENT OF OUTLOOK
-(-
Columnist Eyes Negro
Attitudes Toward Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) Anti-
Semitism has become a basic ele-
ment of the outlook of many
\nu-rican Negroes in their strug-
gle for emancipation, according to
B New York Post columnist.
The theme of the report by Pete
ilimill is a quotation from Negro
author James Baldwin: "Georgia
has the Negro. Harlem has the
Jew."
The columnist describes the
"cliches" which are standard in
Harlem: "The Jew is possessor
of the thumb screws and rack;
he owns the furniture store and
the liquor store; he offers easy
credit and then, possessor of the
soul, he tightens the screws. The
slumlord is a Jew, the social
worker is a Jew; the newspaper-
man Is a Jew; the guy at the
top of the poverty program is a
Jew, and now, even the top cop
is a Jew."
The "top cop'* is San ford Garc-
lik, the second Jewish Chief In-
spector in New York police history
In recent years, reports the col-
umnist, the anti-Semitic language
has become broader and more vir-
ulent. The Negro preaching "black
power' in Harlem points to "Blum-
stein's department store." The
"young kid with the Malcolm X T-
shill brags to the latest shift of
TV cameramen about the "Jew
store' he helped burn out."
The fact that Jews have been
among the leaders in the Negro
struggle for equality is easily dis-
missed by a rationalization long
familiar in the psychology of anti-
Semitic hatred.
The Jew owns the slums and
Continued on Page 6-A
By Special Report
NEW YORK The executive
head of a national Jewish human
relations agency this week de-
plored the widening gap between
Negroes and Jews, and urged that
the gap be closed lest it lead to a
weakening of America's liberal co-
alition.
One of four participants in a dis-
cussion on "Anti-Semitism and the
Negro" on "The Open Mind" pro-
gram Sunday over WNBC-TV. Dr.
John Slawson. executive vice pres-
ident of the American Jewish Com-
mittee, said:
"I urge that the friendship be-
tween Jew and Negro be re-
stored. If it is not restored, this
is going to weaken the entire
liberal movement, and it is going
to be bad for the Negroes and
bad for the Jews and bad for
America."
Joining with Dr. Slawson on the
program, which was moderated by
Dr. Eric Goldman, professor of
history at Princeton, were Dr.
Kenneth B. Clark, professor of
psychology at City College of New
York: Dr. Alex Rosen, dean of the
Graduate School of Social Work of
New York University: and Bayard
Continued on Page 6-A
BOSTON (JTA) An openly
anti-Semitic rally here at which a
key spokesman of the John Birch
Society vilified Jews cast consid-
erable doubt this week on the re-
peated insistence of Birch Society
leaders that the organization re-
jects hatred of Jews.
The occasion was a New England
Rally for God. Family and Country
at which the principal address was
a smear against Jews delivered by
Dr. Nevilo P. Oliver, contributing
editor of "American Opinion."
Birch Society publication. Oliver
has a long record of anti-Semitic
activities, according to the Anti
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
Oliver, in a 65-minute diatribe,
told the rightwing audience that
the "conspiracy of the Jews" pre-
dated "the conspiracies of the
llluminati and the Communists"
and that it had helped produce
"the evils of today." These he
listed as "degenerates, scum,
dregs, savages, debased squeal-
ing enemies, dear little cock-
Continued on Page 2-A
ECONOMIC LIFE
Argentine
Gov't. Hurt
CANADIAN MP MAKES BLANKET CHARGES
Police Brutality in Yeshiva Tiff
MONTREAL (JTA) Police
brutality was charged here bj a
Biember of the Canadian Parlia-
ment against a Montreal policeman
accused of injuring a yeshiva stu-
dent :,t (he climax of a series of
anti-Semitic attacks against stu-
dents and faculty members, Includ-
111 rabbis, of !he Ilassidic Torah
hoi Yeshi' a in this city.
Harry Blank, a member of Parlia-
ment whose constituency includes,
the yeshiva's neighborhood, charg-
ed that, when several men accosted
some yeshiva students last week,
the policeman acted with brutality
against one of the students. Nor-
man Mandel. 18, of New York.
The policeman, according to
the charge, pushed Mandel's
head through the windshield of
a parked automobile. The youth
8
Money Units
LEADERS MUM PAGE 3-A
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) An
order which may have serious ef-
fects on Jewish economic life ar i
on the existence of the highly de-
veloped Jewish school system i
Argentina was issued by the newly-
established government of Pres-
idenl Ongania. It empowers the
Argentine Central Bank, highest
official financial authority, to ex-
ercise control over all credit co-
operatives and, in certain circum-
stances, even to close them.
Although the credit cooperatives
Continued on Page 8-A
Bonn Envoy Going
Home as Ties Chill
was taken to a hospital, where 35
s!itches had to be taken.
A police board of inquiry is
looking into the charges against
the policeman, whose name is be-
ing withheld for the time being.
A delegation of Jewish leaders
conferred with police authorities
and said that, if no firm action is
i
Continued on Page 3-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) Dr.
Rolf Pauls, the West German Am-
bassador to Israel, left this week
for a seven-week home leave for
consultations with the Bonn For-
eign Ministry over recent develop-
Arabs
Picket Fair
BONN (JTA) Israel
Week, a series of events or-
ganized by the German-Israel
Study Group of the Universi-
ties of Erlangen and Nurem-
berg, was opened this week
with the participation of Is-
rael's Minister to Bonn. Leo
Savir. who addressed the
gathering on Israel's foreign
policy. Arab students appear-
ed in the two universities to
demonstrate against Israel.
They carried various anti-
Israel placards including
some bearing the slogan:
Why did you recognize
Israel?"
ments causing new difficulties in
relations between the two coun-
tries. Asher Ben Nathan. Israel's
Ambassador to West Germany, ar-
rived here this week for a similar
home leave and consultations.
What observers termed an awk-
DR. ROIT PAULS
new difficulties
ward feeling" in those relations has
reached a nev. peak because of a
speech by Dr. Pauls at the Tel
Aviv Fair in which he criticized
Israel for its recent statement of
support for the Oder-Neisse line
as the permanent boundary he-
tween Germany and postwar Po-
land. The issue i.- a sensitive one
in Bonn. Dr. Pauls also said that
Israel had failed to recognize its
"debt of gratitude" to West Ger-
many.
Dr. Pauls also said that Ger-
Continued on Page 9-A


"age 2-A
vJewisti fkiria/iftn
Friday, July 15. 1966
i
CJA Reveals Immediate Cash Need
A growing backlog of unmet
iveds, occasioned by lack of funds,
threatens to overwhelm overseas
migration and welfare agencies set
up by American Jewry and to af-
fect the health, welfare and safety
of tens of thousands of Jews in
Israel, Europe and the Moslem
countries, Max M. Fisher, general
chairman of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, declared in Geneva last week
following a meeting with the exec-
utive heads of four beneficiary
agencies of the UJA.
These are the Joint Distribution
Cpmnuttee, the Jewish Agency,
the World ORT Union and United
their European
Geneva.
headquarters in
The UJA is the major Amer-
ican body raising funds for the
transportation of Jewish immi-
grants to Israel, and to provide
humanitarian aid to scores of
thousand* of refugees and needy
Jews in 30 other countries
throughout the world. In 19*6,
the UJA is seeking $73,420,000
for these humanitarian programs.
"The agencies whose work we
support are living on a hand-to-
mouth basis, meeting only the
most urgent of their clients' needs
JERUSALEM (JTA) Al-
though a "small number of police-
men*' acted with undue violence
in the clashes May 5 between the
police and student* at the Hebrew
University during the visit of for-
mer West German Chancellor Kon-
Birchites Drop
Their Mask Of
Respectability
Continued from Page 1-A
roaches, howling mobs, parasites
and lazy illegitimates."
He asserted that one of the ma-
jor causes of student protests on
American college campuses was
Uie use of drugs, particularly LSD,
which he said was "imported from
Israel." Observers noted that the
LSD used in this country- is either
.nade here or smuggled in from
Italy.
Oliver is on record as having
argued that "it is a lie that the
Nazis killed 6,000,000 Jews." While
his record was widely reported in
the Boston general press prior to
the rally, that press did not men-
tion his anti-Semitic speech at the
rally.
Robert Welch, founder of the
Birch Society, was a leading figure
at the three-day rally. Booths at the
rally featured "Headlines." an
anti-Semitic paper published by
Joseph P. Kamp. a professional
anti-Semitic agitator.
areas of service because of the
lack of immediate cash," Fisher
declared.
In Miami, I^on Kaplan, cash col-
lections chairman of the 1966 Com-
; bined Jewish Appeal of the Greater
: Miami Jewish Federation, revealed
j Wednesday that "we hope by the
I end of the year to go significantly
! ahead of the $1,566,666 we set and
: have already reached for the cur-
i rent drive."
CJA's annual campaign sends
approximately 50 percent of its
proceeds to the United Jewish
Appeal.
"This is, of course, projection,"
Kaplan declared, "based on the
present influx of pledges. But
if the United Jewish Appeal is I
to be able to meet its overseas
commitments. Greater Miamians
must also meet theirs."
Commenting on UJA General
Chairman Fisher's observation,!
eral, the police behaved "according Joseph M. Lipton. newly-elected j
to circumstances." I president of the Federation, noted
Asserting that members of both ??J'i "eed* assuan fr0 J
sides were at fault in the student Us of a *tead>' flow of addltlonal;
demonstrations that gave rise to income ,f ,l 1S t0 cPe W1,h M
charges of police brutality, the con,inuin8 demands of men. worn-!
commission's report noted that the en and en>ldren who have not the
students shouted abuse at the means t0 laKe care of themselves',
police and that the police used in ,ne countries in which they live,
their batons too freely in putting and 0I whose life and safety de-!
down the demonstration.
Hias Service all of which have and putting off or neglecting large
Police Get Clean Bill of Health;
No Brutality During Adenauer's Visit
to meet the rising demand for
technological skills in Latin
America; development of serv-
ices for handicapped children in
Israel; more assistance for sec-
ondary education in Moslem
countries; and the welfare needs
of thousands of aging Jews in
Poland and other East European
countries."
Rosichan warned that the United
Jewish Appeal "and our own Com-
bined Jewish Appeal here in Miami
can not hope to meet their finan- ]
cial commitments to these agencies
on a scale commensurate with their
needs unless it can raise a mini-
mum of $40 million in cash by the
end of July."
Board Chairman Dismissed '
LONDON (JTA) The Soviet
Supervisor of Religious Institutions
has dismissed Chaim Ochs from his
post as chairman of the board of
synagogues at Cherkizovo, one of
the three Moscow synagogues, it
was reported here this week.
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Oculists' Prescriptions Filled
CONTACT LENSES
rad Adenauer, a special inquiry
commission appointed by the Cabi-
net reported this week that in gen-
pend on their being moved from
their countries of origin to more
hospitable havens elsewhere."
Lipton noted that "although
most American campaigns in Jew-
ish communities across the nation
are well ahead of last year's, in-
eluding our own in Miami, the flow
The students were also not told j of cash is somewhat behind."
that the university administration
The commission placed p*rt of
the blame on the fact that the
students were not told of the spe-
cial orders to police to prevent
demonstrations within sight of
the former Chancellor.
had agreed to the presence of)
policemen on the campus during'
Adenauer's visit.
The special orders to the police,
which originated at the Foreign
Ministry, were aimed at prevent-j
ing insults as well as bodily harm
to the visitor. The fact that the
orders were kept secret, the com-
mission reported, confused the
students who believed that quiet [
demonstrations were permitted on -
the campus as they had been dur-
ing previous visits by dignitaries.
Arthur S. Rosichan, executive
director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, noted that
"CJA funds help the United Jew-
ish Appeal in the following
aims: expansion of vocational
training facilities for newcomers
in Israel, for North African Jews
who have settled in France, and
Sunday Night on the lown
Naomi Group of Hadassah is
planning "A Sunday Night on the
Town" for July 17 at the 007* i
Club of the Shelborne Hotel.
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5"
Friday. July 15,1966
+Jewist> fkridfarj
Pag^3-A

vf

IN ILLIA AFTERMATH
Argentina's Jewish
Leaders Mum on Raids
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Jew-
ish leaders here refrained from
statements this week on raids on
Jewish shops by police on July 1
after the overthrow of the Illia
Government and on the arrest of
some Jewish shopkeepers allegedly
suspected of selling smuggled
goods.
However, it was recalled that
there had been police raids on
stores in the same shopping arcade
during the lllia regime. The July
1 raid was generally regarded as
an over-zealous police action.
The arrests of some Jewish and
non-Jewish directors of a "Jewish-
led credit union cooperative also
was not regarded here as an anti-
Jewish action.
A report from Montevideo said
that all of the arrested shopkeep-
ers and credit union directors had
been released without any explana-
tion.
CANADIAN POLICE BRUTALITY
Continued from Page 1-A
taken by the police, the Jews in
the area would have to form their
own self-defense corps. They said
rabbis have often been subjected
to indignities in the area, and stu-
dents of the yeshiva have been ;it-
tacked and threatened.
Shown at fifth national conference on Jewish
Education, held recently in New York City,
leaders of three major religious groupings in
Jewish life call on the Jewish community to
support the American Association for Jewish
Education as central agency to deal with all
aspects of Jewish training on all age levels.
Left to right are Earl Morse, Union of American
Hebrew Congregations; Max Etra, Yeshiva
University; Dr. Isadore Breslau, Association
president; Joseph S. Wohl, Jewish Theological
Seminary of America; and Isaac Toubin,
executive director.
Leading Minds Urge A Ban
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fifty-
five Israel intellectuals, speaking
as members of the Committee for
Nuclear Disarmament in the Arab-
Israeh Region, called on the Israel
Government this week to take the
initiative to prevent the spread of
nuclear arms into the Middle East.
Most of the signators are mem-
bers of the faculties of the Heb-
rew University, the Technion-Is-
racl Institute of Technology ,at
Haifa and the Weizmann Institute.
The statement warned that Is-
rael's vulnerability to nuclear at-
tack was fa rgreater than that
of Egypt and added that even if
a nuclear second strike by Is-
rael was feasible, it would be
for Israel a "posthumous
revervje."
The committee urged the Gov-
ment to assert its readiness to
start negotiations on the issue with
the Arab governments and with
international organizations. It ex-
pressed the hope that such negot-
iations could ultimately lead to
conventional disarmament.
Defense Ministry sources mean-
while expressed "dissatisfaction"
and "irritation" over the '"un-
authorized attendance" by former
Deputy Defense Minister Shimon
Peres and Prof. Ernst Bergman,
who recently resigned as chairman
of Israel's Atomic Energy Commis-
sion, at the recent nuclear dis-
armament conference in Toronto.
Mr. Peres, now secretary gen-
eral of former Premier David Ben-
Gurion's dissident Israel Workers
Party (Rafi), and Prof. Bergman
are known to hold views on this
subject contrary to those of the
Government.
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Film Withdrawn
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decided not to present his film.
"The Girl of the Dead Sea." for the I
Film Festival in Berlin because of,
the problems of German-Israeli
relations.
He said he made his decision
after a campaign in parts of the
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He said he had notified the Israel
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to Israelis opposed to such rela-
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Page 4-A
t-MnHt flcricJiair
Friday, July 15, 1966
"Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
305-696-4869
FRED K. SHOCHET .......... Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN .......................... Executive Editor
SELMA M. THOMPSON .... Asst. to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian does not guarantee the Kashruth
of the merchandise advertised in its columns.
Published every Friday since M7tar The^efW FlorldlM
at 120 N.E. Sixth Street. Miami 1 Honda.
Second-Claw Postage I'aid at Miami, Florida.
inolish-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
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One Year $5.00 Three Years $12.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 39 Number 27
Friday, July 15, 1966
27 Tamuz 5726
Notable Beginnings
In City of Jerusalem
The dedication on July 4 of the
John F. Kennedy Peace Forest and
the groundbreaking on July 11 of
the Harry S. Truman Center for the
Advancement of Peace on the cam-
pus of the Hebrew University, both
ci which took place in Jerusalem,
.mark big steps toward the creation
in Israel of institutions and sites
comfortably fitting the prophetic de-
scription of the special role of the
City of David.
Everything about the Center
augurs well for its success. Every-
thing about the Jewish National
Fund-inspired JFK Forest suggests
'he eternity of a man felled in the
prime of his life, who was dedicated
to the universal advancement of
humankind.
One can not but be struck by
the aptness of the Center's associ-
ation with former President Truman,
a man whose career was cast in the
mold of so many of the heroes of
ancient Jewish lore. Thrust into a
position of awesome responsibility,
seemingly without preparation, he became one
ci our great American presidents.
Faced with the necessity of having to make
epochal decisions, the man from Missouri bold-
Jy and forthrightly acted where others might
hcve vacillated.
One of these decisions, which now seems
would never have been made without him and
1he uniqueness of his vision, will enshrine the
name of Truman in the memory of the Jewish
people forever: his quick recognition of the
State of Israel barely 11 minutes after inde-
pendence was proclaimed.
Similarly, the John F. Kennedy Peace Forest
will stand as an eternal Israeli monument to
the young and vigorous American President
who, like a magic prince, rose on the tide and
the destiny of his time, only to be struck down
before the fruition of that which he and his
intellectual imagination had sown in the hearts
and the minds of men everywhere.
In the JFK Peace Forest on the gentle hills
of Judea outside Jerusalem, the trees there
will grow as he was not given by fate to grow,
the forest ultimately to become a symbol of his
highest aspirations for universal progress and
amity.
Tell it to the D.A.
It's a case of the district attorney advising
the assistant district attorney to drop the
charges. Perhaps, it happens all the time but
not out in the open and in public view.
Nazi Party Chief George Rockwell has
beaten the rap on disorderly conduct charges
arising from an incident in New York City
in 1960.
A 19-page opinion by a three-man Criminal
Court concurred in the view of Gotham's D.A.
that there was no evidence to warrant a con-
viction after trial.
Rockwell's misdeed? He made anti-Semitic
remarks and threatened Lester Fahn, then a
vice chairman of the Jewish War Veterans.
Fahn today is assistant D.A. in the Borough
of Brooklyn. Case dismissed.
Terribly Bad Faith
The imbroglio over the atomic reactor in
Dimona has rightly aroused the wrath of Israeli
authorities. What was apparently a sub rosa
Israeli decision to permit occasional U.S. in-
spection of nuclear research there has now
been "leaked" in America, leaving Jewish State
officials with egg on their face.
For one thing, the inspection extended be-
yond Dimona. It included secret research sites
at Nahal Sorek and the Weizmann Institute of
Science at Rehovoth, among others.
But more important, it betrays just how
anxious Israel was to please Uncle Sam. We
use the word "betrays" advisedly. For the
desire of one nation to allay the curiousity of
Enriching the Repertoire
Art, presumably, is above race and religion,
hatred or bigotry. It is, nevertheless, true'that
many artists of considerable world renown
have been active anti-Semites. Neither do we
mean the occasional collaborator, who took the
easy way out.
Chesterton. Belloc, Wagner and even
Brahms are arch examples.
The consequence of such examples has been
the cause of many difficulties in the relatively
new State of Israel.
Take music and the country's world-
renowned Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Only
a few weeks ago, in the face of a better than
tair amount of criticism and even public out-
cry, the orchestra finally lifted its ban on the
music of Strauss and Wagner.
It is hard for the true music-iover to imagine
the concert hall or opera house without the
works of these artists, anti-Semites thouqh thev
unquestionably were. 7
And now comes Felician Marceau, the Bel-
S eeSftQCCUSed havina cooperated
d
uring the week
... as i see it
by 110 MINDLIN
another in such sensitive matters hardly serves with the Nazis for some 15 vem iwf ,
to underscore its sense of independence. "The Good Life "the interS^H s
What, presumably. Israel hoped to achieve Habimah put on tintLSTiS^SISS
was to assure the U.S. that Dimona would no. demands by the taS tard 7n?5
become the site for nuclear weapons research. Theater Censorship S canceTIhe Irfo
What, instead. Israel has done is, as a conse- A spokesman L *^tlJr ^'man.ce-
quence of the "leak," to become partner to the
compromise of her sovereignty.
No matter the gamble so far as Israel was
concerned, this is above all else a case of bad
American faith. If, for example, our State De-
partment hoped in this way to assure the
Arabs, it has only managed to emphasize its
terribly bad faith.
spokesman for the theatre said the play
I go on because Marceau had been
cleared four years previously of the collabora
Uon charges against him
alaoW,fnHUndfr8?n? the kraeli sent. We
also understand the pressure of the art-lovers
who deplored the improverishment of the w*
.oire ^ideological grounds, however^.
IT IS by now old hat to talk
about this nation's being
an extension of the Roman
Empire. What observers mean
here is that we relate to Great
Britain in the same way that
Rome related to Greece. Like
the Romans, we have taken
over the culture of our prede-
cessors, and then we pro-
ceeded to outdo them. But the
outdoing was less as a conse-
quence of higher levels of sensitivity and, particularly, sensibility
than of sheer power. The Greeks were never put down by more
profound Roman intellectual achievement. It was the Roman view
of the universe the Roman military and technological superiority
that set the Greek sun. The parallel hold*, between the United
States and Great Britain today.
It is. of course, a crude parallel. The Romans really had a good
deal more than military and technological skills over the Greeks,
and we have more than power in myriad directions over England that
finally shifted the balance in our favor. It is not. for example, because
of our abstract and even precisely definite strengths that American
symphony orchestras meet with breathless and overwhelming response
on the European continent an area of achievement Europe long
held to be her own. Neither is it these strengths that have set the
American stamp, for good or bad, on the literature and art of the
world.
Nevertheless, the generality holds, and 1 mention it here because
there is yet another parallel to behold that has even greater meaning
for our time. It is from the history of Christianity in its earliest
and formative days that we can learn a great deal about an equally
profound movement launched in our own era Communism. Each
grew out of the vast and prevalent need for social reform. This is
not to say that Judaism failed to recognize the need; it is merely that
Judaism never did and does not today proselytize.
> *
NfCfSSITY IN TCRMS Of MVIIABILITY
IT TOOK a militant outgrowth of Judaism to do the job, much as it
took an equally militant outgrowth of the eighteenth century u
lightenment and age of reason to bring about the political, social and
economic reform necessary to the western continuum. When the
French revolution failed in this, and the American revolution pro\ed
the limit of its self-view by such pronouncements as the Mount
Doctrine, something had to fill the void. Marxist doctrine seemed
tailor made for the task.
The earliest Christians were plagued, hunted out and persecuted,
and still they persevered in the name of a divine compulsion; while
the Communists can point to similarly devastating treatment, and
still they continue in the smug certainty that capitalism is destined
to failure as a consequence of the alleged seeds ii spawns of its own
evil. Both views have required a kind of iron "chutzpah" to be SU(
cessful. for both were predicated on the necessary inferiority of their
opposites.
None of this is intended to suggest disrespect for Christianity
or implied insult to it. Nor does it anywhere say that there is some-
thing Communistic about Christianity in the strictly common uses of
the terms It does, however, show the parallel growth of two move-
ments begun by a handful of people in a hostile society on the basis
of revolutionary philosophical ideals, which considered the triumph
of these ideals as necessary to the salvation of mankind and which
described the necessity in terms of inevitability, one divine and the
other predictable when presented in dialectic jargon.
*
PIVOJAl HOll Of NfGRO COMMUNITY
THE SUDDEN change in values among our young people, their
rejection of authority without prior examination of the right of
authority to its role, including traditional reverence for parents, is a
case in point. Among other things, the change has since expressed
itself in the growing resentment and angry reaction to Viet Nam.
Draft card-burning and other forms of profound refusal to accept
American policy as binding, whether at home or abroad, demonstrates
the profound impact of the Communist revolution in the same sense
that the lowest grassroots level willingness to proselvtize in 300 C.K.
demonstrated the clear triumph of the Christian vision.
Again a warning is in order: 1 have not here either stated or
implied that there is anything Communistic, in the popular meaning
of the term, in the anti-Viet Nam feelings seizing our young people
today. What I have said is that these feelings are the logical end
product of the permissive revolt against authority and the establish
ment launched and encouraged by the Communist ascendancy and
prototype reform resulting from it.
This must, in fact, be taken a step further. What we see as
speculation ovei the propriety of the U.S. posture in Viet Nam
would be more than mere speculation given an American social order
without even more profound problems todav particularly problems
HrK A eSuali,>" of th* races. The agitation accompanying the
mZ *"n"?,ian s to power and the spread of Communism in our
SfnTi a" m0St certainty. mark our role in Viet Nam if we
could rely on a quiescent Negro community.
A CUAK CASt Of MISCHIEF
QF COURSE we can not. No less a cooperative and "non-militant
Nam?H8r0J? ,ha" Mmin Luthcr Kin8 has aready called Viet
int a nrrnWnHC "T"* 2T' has accused the us- <* deliberately draft-
artEfZtC* Tmb!r f Negro troPs for *he "ghting in Sou.h-
uS tl thif % !d ,he Preside"t that we might more logically
iioVas an^example. *"*" ^^ fr ,h< drive t0ward *****
to dJ5i?S! t?V ,east in the abstract, one issue has nothing
eve?s of n.re */ Twere iS n question ^at we must bring greater
done a nT ^ dVU righU batt,e" But why should this be
Nami ls?hP~,ng.lnSIStS,Jlt ,he CXpense of our commitment in Vie.
Nam. Is there not enough energy for both?
commVuhn'it,v'sern,inHr0d>UC v- 'heSe kinds of confusions into the Negro
SmeXnyr\Z ng iS being clear'y mischievous. He implies
He a ofd our r Ur S Nam role; he taahmrtee that we are using
to a oid our responsibility in the civil rights cause.
to the lutkinTfT5!?^.0"* necessariIy make us far more sensitive
Jones^typ^s amone L P ?egroe' may *umblng to the LeRoi
iTrhlS it is ShUS- TxapS succumbing is not even the right word;
for theViU n. rea' Ntgr leaders- such as they-ere. have begin,
^r the first time to make themselves heard that those who spoke
Continued on Pag* 6-A
5


Friday. July 15, 196S
*Jewish fPc/rkttam
Page 5-A
Israeli Youth to be Miami Visitor
On Lions international Youth Exchange
An Israeli youth will be visiting
Miami for two weeks on the Youth
Exchange Program of Lions Inter
national.
He is :>Ioshe Weinreb, of Neve
Efraim. The 16-year-old visitor will
be staying at the home of Mr. and
ington, D.C., before arriving in
Miami. After his stay here, he
will be going on to the Youth
'- -change Camp in Montgomery,
Ala.
Florida Lions Youth Exchange
ha i man John D. Baird. past dis-
MOSHS WtlNKta
Mrs. Bernard Low&nthal, 7513 Cut-
lass Ave North Bay Village.
"We are de'ighted to have
him," the Lowenfhals declared.
Mr. Lewenthal. a nember of the
North Bay Vii".i9* Lions Club,
added that "bof-i try wife and I
work. However, livd we're hoping
that so-^e of h focal folks will
help show Moshii around Miami
during the day."
Moshe will be arriving here to-
gether with another boy from Bra
zil, also ponsorei by the Lions
Club lo.rnatiotial on its Youth
Exehami Program.
Sponge, ing organization in Israel
is the Si: yon Lions Club, of which
Artur A. Weinreb is president.
A talJ boy, Moshi is 6 ft. 3 in.
He spt: his :tat: i Hebrew, as
well as English. German and Yid-
dish. He .'s a year and a half ahead
in his :-:hool stuiiss. After the
summej acation. he will be en-
tering hj- last year in high school.
Moshe's Vrterests are sDCcer-football
and starrp-colleetittg. lie enjoys
bicycle ruing and phMography.
Moshe spent Km:* earlier this
week > siting ?; ;':> in Wash-
Chamber Will
Sponsor Concert
Cham^r of Commerce of Surf-
side. Ba] Harbojt. Bay Harbor Is
lands an Sunny Esles will sponsor
a concer of the Miami Beach Sym
phony O.ehestri on July 24. 8:15
p.m., at Miami Beach Auditorium
The cichestra, under the direc-
tion of Barnett 3reaskin, will be
heard whh Vivienne Delia Chiesa,
noted scrrano soloist.
Amonjr those in charge of res-
ervations is Mrs. Rhea Cashman
CFladwir, who has recently been
appoint?: to the board of directors
of the Chamber. She formerly serv-
ed as a ftrector for eight years.
Her ;?te husband, Benjamin
Gladwin, .vas a charter member of
the organization
J1^^^^^^ '66 OODGE *****A*
Other Fine Ca'
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p s M ileage
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"FURNITURE'-"APPUANCES"
TIOTHING'-'JEWURY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
trict governor, and the state organ-
ization are acting as official host to
the young Israeli.
Meanwhile, the Lowenthals have
already proudly revealed that the
Downtown Miami Lions Club is
asking to "borrow" Moshe for one
of its weekly program presenta-
tions. And they continue to hope
that other Miamians will help show
him the town during his visit here.
Lubavitch Rabbi Freedom Noted
NEW YORK (JTA) Thou-
sands of Lubavitcher hassidim
crowded the Lubavitcher Center
in Brooklyn celebrating the "12th
of Tammuz," the date whon the
late Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi
Joseph I. Schneersohn, was li-
berated from Soviet prison in 1927.
He had been arrested and sen-
tenced to death for openly preach-
ing his religious views, but was re-
leased due to the intervention of
leading foreign statesmen.
A special address on the "mir-
aculous liberation" of the Rebbe
who later came to the United
States and died in New York in
1950 was delivered by the pre-
I sent Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi
I Menachem M. Schneersohn.
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earn dividends at the current reg-
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Dade Federal reserves the rigSf to
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SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
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MAIN OFFICE: 101 East FUgltr Street
Convenient Branch Locations
Allapattah Branch Tamiami Branch Edison Center Branch
1400 N. W. 36th Street
North Miami Branch
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5800 N. W. 7th Avenue
Cutler Ridge Branch
10808 Caribbean Boulevard
Our Resources Exceed 245 Million Dollars


s
Page 6-A
fJewish fhrkUam
Friday, July 15. 1966
Negroes Urged to Quash Jewish Bias
Continued from Page 1-A
forces, including Catholics, Jews,
, labor people, students and others
Rust in. executive director of the A.' continue "
Phillip Randolph Institute. j Qn ^ ^.^ of increased
This liberal coalition repre- j Negro hostility toward Jews a ..The reality," Rustin added, "is
scnting. among others, church point on which there was general tnat Negroes are expressing them-
and subtle aspects of relation-
ships, rather than the specific
concrete areas of difficulties of
20 years ago."
groups, labor, students, and minor-! agreement that it existed
ity groups had, according to ciark said:
Dr.
Rustin, been responsible for the.
.success of the 1963 March on Wash-
ington, which he organized, and
for passage of the Civil Rights Bill
ol 1964 and the Voting Rights Bill
ol 1965.
'As the war on poverty must be '
increased," he continued, "it can
be increased only if those same
"I think what we art witness-
ing may be a different form, a
different expression of anti-
Semitism. In the 1940's, I think
the problems of Negroes and
Jews seemed to be largely in the
area of employment. Today the
problems involve more complex
selves in regard to every segment
of the population in a way that 151
and 20 years ago they would not."j
"What is new," commented Dr.
Rosen, "are the young Negroes
since World War II who have
moved into the race for profes-
sions, who are now school teachers j
particularized kind of target.
Even if we eliminate all the
landlords and all the merchants,
you still would have Negro
anti-Semitism. We always walk
a treadmill when we try to at-
tribute anti-Semitism to the
prejudice of the victim. It is the
fault of the bigot."
Much of the discussion centered
around the question of Jewish
leadership in the civil rights
movement.
To Dr. Slawson's question, "Why
cerned with the stability of our
society. I think where the rub
does come in is in this question
of leadership."
Dr. Slawson added: "1 happen It
know a number of Jews all ove.
the United States who are angr-
at the fact that their helpfulnes
not only is not appreciated bu1
resented. There is no feeling of
welcome, and the leadership of
both groups have got to get to-
gether and work things out."
NY Columnist Eyes Negro
Attitudes on Anti-Semitism
Continued from Page 1-A
o. ins his money off the misery of
the Negro; the white liberal as-
- ages his conscience by sending
m iney to the NAACP."
plied "I'm sick of you cats talk-
ing about the six million Jews."
The columnist said that it was
true, of course, that Jews operate
businesses in Harlem, "but no one
. is stopping Negroes from operat-
From this point of view, the fact jng businesses in Harlem. There is
that Michael Schwerner and And- nQ ,aw on thc books abou( i(
rew Goodman were murdered by ,, ,. .... ,,,
Southern white racists did not mat- lo b'ame "?'* because the
U r. They were dismissed at a *ho M.,ne .s,ore on t12o
"black power" rally as "two Jews "* in Harlcm h**8, to be
Jewish is paranoic. the columnist
easing their consciences by work-
ing in Mississippi."
When a member of the audi-
ence demurred and referred to
the Nazi genocide, a speaker re-
asserts. "If Hitler in his madness
taught us anything it was that we
must always distrust the man who
blames his own inadequacies on
others." he concludes.
during the week... as i see it
Continued from Page 4-A
in moderation for the Negroes before them spoke, in fact, only for
themselves.
Hence, we are too anxious to be sensitive to the fullest implica-
tions of thc anti-Viet Nam feelings in America today, which can easily
mil their roots in the permissiveness of revolutionary principles
wherever they expressed themselves in history: in the doctrine of
l;ux or the forbearing of the early Christians.
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or social workers, government offi-
cials, inter-group relations experts,
and so on, and they are moving in-
to the professions which for his-
torical reasons Jews seemed to
have preempted. There is a bit of
rivalry, of competition for the
good things in life or for prom-
inence in these various profes-
sions."
"I think there is a tendency."
Dr. Clark pointed out. "for the
Negro to generalize and to use the ; Randolph has
term 'Jew' to meaning while peo-1 minority that
pie. because 1 think studies would
bear out that most of the whites
with whom ho comes in contact are
likely to be Jewish."
To which Rustin added: "He
touches many more Jews in his'
daily life in the ghetto than he
does any other whites."
Dr. Slawson, explaining that
prejudice and discrimination are
"irrational," said: "We all know
that the Jew has been a very
convenient target for the white
Christian, and the Jew is a very
convenient target for the Negro
Christian in the ghetto. It is a
is there such great resentment on j
the part of the Negro civil rights
leadership that Jews are in the,
civil rights movement?" Rustin'
answered:
"Nobody appreciates more than
I do the great work Jews have
done in this field. I know you built
schools and -libraries and helped ,
us when no one else would, but
there comes a time when every
person has to face what A. Phillip
said. Unless the
is being persecuted
stands up. lakes the leadership,
and says, "We want now to take
the leadership for ourselves no |
matter how badly we do it' until
that happens, nobody will take him
seriously."
Dr. Clark, commenting on the
same point, added:
"It seems to me there are
Jews in the civil rights move-
ment. There should be more Jews
in the civil rights movement.
But I don't think that anyone
should be in the civil rights
movement because you are con-
cerned with justice, you are con-
Israel Names
Biggest Ship
By Special Report
The name Orion, a combinatior
of the Hebrew words for light and
might, has been selected for a
60,000 deadweight ton bulk carrier
now building at the Maizuru Ship
yard in Japan for Zim Lines. When
completed later this year, she will
be the biggest ship under the Israel
flag.
The name was chosen at a meet
ing of the Zim Lines board of di
rectors in Haifa. They also selected
the names Tamar and Rimon fo.
two 7.000 deadweight ton combin;
tion general cargo and citrus car
lien under construction for the
Zim Lines at Split, Yugoslavia.
Tamar is Hebrew for date, and
Rimon is pomegranite. both fruit-
common to Israel and frequently
mentioned in the Bible. They pel
petuate in the Zim fleet the names
of two smaller ships built in Ho.
land in 1951 which were the first
ocean-going vessels built for Israel
The flagship of Israel's merchant
marine will continue to be thf
luxury cruise liner Shalom, which
means peace, measures 25,300 gross
tons and carries no cargo.
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FLORIDA P 0 W I
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HELPING BUILO FLORIDA
COMPANY


o
Friday. July 15, 19B6
^UnisHlaridUam
Page 7-A
Formal Dinner Dance to herald Campaign
For New North County YMHA Facility

A formal dinner dance lo herald
Ihe opening of the campaign for
Ihe new YM and WHA facility in
North Dade County will be held
Sunday, Aug. 13, at the Deauville
Hotel, it was jointly announced
by Paul Fa-ske, president of the
"Y" and Michael Salmon, president
of the North County Branch.
Lionel Bosem. chairman of the
North County Development Fund
Committee, is. directing "ofgSfififng
efforts of the campaign.
Chairman for the dinner
dance is Michael Bodne. Other
members of the committee are
co-chairmen for reservations and
invitations, Allan Gluckstern
and David Blauner; chairman of
publicity, Mrs. Stanley Mitchel;
chairman of the host and host-
esses, Mrs. Donald Reiff.
Other parties and functions to
help raise funds and promote the
new North County "Y" facility are
being conducted throughout the
entire summer.
Said Bosem: "The importance of
a new YMHA facility in North
Dade County is clearly evident.
There is a definite need for the
important community services
which this new Y facility can offer
The YMHA serves the community
as a center, a place for leisure
time, group work recreational ac
tivities for people of all ages under
professional supervision, and we
are certain that the North County
'Y' will provide the proper setting
for such programs and activities.
"We are pleased with the initial
reaction of the North Dade com-
munity, particularly because so
many persons have already hopped
on the bandwagon and arc giving
of their time, efforts, ideas and.
of course, funds."
The North County Development
Fund Committee, in addition to
Bosem, consists of Hilliard Avrutis,
Ben Baskin, Bernard Bendheim.
David Blauner, Michael D. Bodne.
Neil Chonin, Edward Decker, Irv-
ing Denmark, Mort Esan, Matthew
Ettinger, Samuel Fox, Allan J.
Gluckstern, Dan Harris, Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Holbrook, Dr. Jack
J.azar, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel I.Hi.
Mr. and Mrs. Manny Marlis, How-
ard Max, Judd Merl. Mrs. Stanley
Mitchel, Robert Oppenheimer, Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Reiff. Mel Shrago,
Dr. Alvin Stern, Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Wallet.
Said Bodne: "The dinner
dance on Aug. 13 will not only
be a social highlight for the
North Dade area, but also a
springboard to converting a
dream into a reality our new
North County YM and WHA.
New Government Recognized
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Government of Israel has recog-
nized the new military Govern-
ment of Argentina in response to
a note from the new Government
last week asking recognition. The
Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires
handed over an official note this
week to the new regime announc-
ing recognition.
"The T is a dynamic community
effort, and I am particularly pleas-
ed to see so many men and women
in this community interested and
willing to serve on one or more of
the many committees in addition
to taking active roles in the De-
velopment Fund itself."
Study committees are now being
formed to determine the specific
facilities to be included in the new
YM and WHA in order to best
service the North Dade community.
! Committees include pre school,
primary grades, intermediate
grades, junior high, senior high,
,' young adults, adults, senior cit-
izens, physical education, health
clubs, mass activities and cultural
arts.
Shrinks Piles
Without Surgery
Stops Itch-Relieves Pain
New York, N.Y.(Special)-For the
first time science has found a new
healing substance with the aston-
ishing ability to shrink hemor-
rhoids, stop rectal itch and to
relieve pain-without surgery.
In case after case, while gently
relieving pain, actual reduction
(shrinkage) took place.
Most amazing of all-results
were so thorough that sufferers
made astonishing statements
like "Piles have ceased to be a
problem!"
The secret is a new healing sub-
stance (Bio-Dyne) -discovery
of a famous research institute.
This substance is now available
in suppository or ointnu nt form
under the name Piipuratioii H*.
LIONEL BOSEM
MICH AIL BODNE
DUE ON CH. 4
Worship Service
Features Jazz
In TV Showing
Excerpts from one of the first
complete Jewish worship services
in the jazz idiom will be presented
on "Lamp Unto My Feet" on Sun-
day. July 17, 10 a.m., over WTVJ,
Ch. 4.
The broadcast's title, 'And
David Danced Before the Lord," is
taken from the service which was
presented at Temple Emanu-EI. a
Reform congregation in Long
Beach. N. Y., during the Passover
season. Composed by Cantor
Charles Davidson, of the Wantagh
Jewish Center, Wantagh. N. Y.. the
services featured a five-piece jazz
combo in addition to Temple
Emanu-El's five-voice choir and
Cantor Richard Botton.


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Savings Certificates
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Certificates are automatically self-renew-
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28875 S. Federal Hwy.


s
Poge8-A
Jewishfhridian
Friday, July 15, 1966
JNF Conference
Hears from Top
Israeli Officials
Southeast Region of the Zionist Organization of
America hosts a recent cccktail party at the
Fontainebleau Hotel in honor of Dr. Max Nuss-
bcrum. of Los Angeles, Cal., a past three-term
national president of the ZOA. Discussing the
scholarship fund of the Kfar Silver Agricultural
Training Institute maintained by the ZOA in
Ashkelon. Israel, are (left to right) Dr. Nuss-
baum; Joseph E. Jacobson, first donor of a per-
petual scholarship to the Institute; Nathan
Darsky, a scholarship donor; Ben Giller, pres-
ident of the Miami Beach Zionist District; and
Dr. Irving Lehrman, national vice president of
the ZOA.
Argentine Gov't. Hurts Economy
Continued from Page 1-A
and their parallel banking system j
are being used also by non-Jewish j
business enterprises, they are a I
major factor in Jewish commercial
li;e The measures against them!
wtre already prepared last Novem-;
btr under the Illia Government
which was ousted about ten days!
ag( by Gen Ongania, but it was not j
put into operation because of the!
strong opposition against it by j
numerous economic groups.
The credit cooperative move-
ment is divided mainly in two
'cups: One is the institute
Mcvilizador, rumored to be Com-
Statistics on Strikes
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Histadrut reported this week that
7.0.000 of the 90,000 workers who
went out on strike during 1965
were employed in Histadrut enter-
prises. The Histadrut central com-
mittee also reported that 40,000 of
the 200,000 work days lost in those
strikes were suffered by Histadrut
enterprises and offices.
munist-infiltrated, whose several
officials had been arrested a few
days ago but were since released.
The other is Ente Economico de
la Federacion de Cooperatives,
which is composed mainly of
Jewish non-leftist elements. The
latter, besides constituting the
financial basis for small Jewish
middle class business enter-
prises, also provides financial
support to the Jewish schools
here which are among the best
Jewish schools in the world.
While the precise effect of the
order on the Jewish businesses
was difficult to estimate until nor-
mal business operations are re-
sumed, it was widely feared that
the move would create irreparable
problems. The wide publicity given
the measure over the radio and in
the press alarmed many of the
clients of the cooperatives who
could completely break the cooper-
ative system if an extensive run of
withdrawals develops.
Sunday, Federal Police Chief
General Mario A. Fonseca visited
the Jewish Old Age Club here. He
was received by Mrs. Elisa Kohan,
THE NEW
president of the Institution, and
Samuel Glaserman. vice president
of the Buenos Aires Kehilla, the
city's official Jewish community
organization. This was the first
instance of a senior official of the
new regime visiting a Jewish in-
stitution.
In a special statement issued
yesterday on the occasion of the
150th anniversary of Argentine
independence from Spain, the
DAIA, the central representative
body of Argentine Jewry, said
that the Argentine Jewish com-
munity, "an inseparable part of
the nation, associates itself ju-
bilantly with the celebrations"
affirming its aspirations for a
peaceful life "and its ideals of
human solidarity which the
Ninth of July symbolizes."
The statement declared: "The
150th anniversary unifies in its
fervor all citizens of the Republic
without distinction of origin, race
or creed. The principles which
guided the Fatherland's birth al-
ways protected the essential dig-
nity of the human condition, pro-
tecting it from individual mistreat-
ment which, at the same time,
would have undermined the na-
tions unity."
.1. AVIV 'JTA' President
Fohnson has Inspired confidence
in the 1 tinned I ited States
mitment to Israel's security,
Vbba Eban told
the di -ion ol the first Jew-
ish National Fund ol America con-
ition here. In this way, the For-
Minister said, Mr. Johnson
v as continuing the late President
Kennedy's regard for Israel. Mr,
Johnson has shown a full under-
standing Of the need to support
Israel s security, the Minister de-
clared.
The Foreign Minister also stated
that Israel possessed sufficient de-
terrent force to make an attack on
it unrewarding. He added that "al-
though we are disappointed over
the progress toward a Middle East
peace, it is not unrealistic to con-
sider that the present tranquility
could be consolidated into a state
of co-existence'' with the Arab
countries.
Mrs. Golda Meir, secretary of
the Mapai Party, told the 400
delegates that Jews in the United
States and other countries failed
to realize the "real needs" of
Israel. She said that American
Jews did not understand thai
Ifrael needs additions Jews as
quickly as poss:ble.
"We have Ministers
police a ally
else bttt we do not h:
Jewish citizen-, she dec ared
we realize that this is >,
tion which, after 2 000 tears, has
been given the oppo itv to
prove itself?"'
The delegate- made a i -claration
of solidarity which pled^-i 'every
resource we possess to strengthen
the ties between the t 0 great
democracies the United States
and Israel."
Brig. Ezer Weizman.. former
commander of the Israel Air Force,
emphasized the close tie- between
the JNF and Israel's am:.. He said
the JNF often was caLed on to
build new road* on Isrii.'s fron-
tiers and tc clear Ian; Cor new
Nahal settlement*.
tired of shopping from
store to store?
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1


Tiiday. July 15. 1966
i*Jewisl> F*cridH&n
Page 9-A
Bonn Envoy Going
Home as Ties Chill
Continued from Page I-A
many no larger needed to be
regarded with caution as a mem-
ber of the family of civilized
rat:ons. His speech evoked sharp
cri'icism in Israel and continued
'.o be a cause of irritation among
Israelis. His functions will again
b-.' assumed by Dr. Alexander
Toroo!<. >''ho will be acting
Charge d'Affaires.
Pcrtial view of the Religious School wing of
the new Temple Judea, now going up at
Granada Blvd. and So. Dixie Hwy., Coral
Gables. The wing includes ten large class-
; corns'and stresses such safety factors as re-
cessed doorways and intercom systems for
emergency. With emphasis on Jewish educa-
tion for its young children, Temple Judea has
announced the appointment of Herzi W. Honor
as new education director of the Temple.
Having completed his doctoral work at Drcpsie
College. Honor will officially jo:n Judea next
month.
Jewish Educators Eye Bond
GENEVA (JTA) The for-
malization of the World Council
on Jewish Education, first pro-
posed at a world conference on
! n Israel, moved closer to com-
: letion here this week as an inter-
l: onal body to strengthen Jew-
' ,-lucation throughout the world.
But developments here, at a
Tr rr.ake it evident that it will take
; i '.her year before the Council
1< tomes a formal entity.
The 12-member presidium ap-
.-tinted Dr. Azriel Eisenberg,
*crmer executive vice president
tt the Jewish Education Com-
mittee ot New York, as execu-
tive director of the Council.
The presidium also elected as
its chairman, Rabbi Joseph Look-
Mein, of New York, and named
Aryeh L. Pincus, chairman of the
Jewish Agency executive in Jeru-
salem, as co-chairman of the Coun-
cil presidium. Dr. Nahum Gold-
Tiiann continues as president of the
Council.
The presidium, which will con-
tinue for another year as a pro-
visional body, also affirmed the
.(m posit ion of the 50-member
Council proposed at its last meet-
ing here two years ago.
The United States, with 12 mem-
MAYrAlR! SUNSET
Sorry. No Fos7e>
Tail Eaqogement
Cm Under II MaMta*
7)
bers. will have the largest repre-
sentation and the Council admin-
istrative headquarters will be in
New York. The election of Mr. Pin-
cus as co-chairman recognized the
centrality of Israel, which will
have eight Council members, as
a creative force in Jewish educa-
tion.
The Council will maintain a
regional headquarters in Jeru-
salem and it is expected that
much of the programing and re-
search will be centered there.
The Council will also include six
European representatives, two of
whom will be from Great Britain,
five from Latin America, one each
Eshkol Bars
Debate on Dimona
JERUSALEM (JTA) Parlia-
ment rejected this week an opposi-
tion motion for debate on visits by
United States Atomic Energy
Commission scientists to Israel's
nuclear reactor at Dimona after
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol de-
clared there was no inspection and
no control by the United States
.over the Dimona reactor.
The Premier spoke on the mo-
tion offered by Yohanan Bade:, cf
the Gahal (Herut-Liberal) faction.
Mr. Bader asked for discussion on
American press reports about an-
nual visits of American experts to
the reactor on behalf of the United
States Government.
The Premier also declared that
the visits by the engineers did not
impair Israel's sovereignty and
that they were made at the in-
vitation of the Israel Government.
from Canada. Australia. South
Africa ana Iran and 15 members-
at-large to be elected by the Coun-
cil's executive committee.
I | Govei nm< nl does not
to 1 ng up the issue i t Dr.
Paul's speech with West German
i fficials, i ither here or in Bonn.
- ares of leftwing mem
of the coalition, the Govern-
ment has decided to let the matter
pass without official reaction.
A spokesman for the West Ger-
man embassy told journalists that
Dr. Pauls did not wish to amend or
discuss his speech. Israeli sources
said the home visit had been plan-
ned some weeks ago and it was not
the result of widespread criticism
in Israel of Dr. Pauls' speech.
In Bonn, Gunther Von Hase. the
West German Government press
spokesman, said emphatically that
Dr. Pauls had expressed the opin-
ions and policy of the federal gov-
ernment in his speech.
Von Hase made his commen
in replv to a question from ..
correspondent about the Wes
German Government's reactioi
to criticism in Israel against Dr
Pauls' address.
The spokesman said thai the fed-
eral government identified itself
completely with Dr. Pauls' remar
and that government officials feit
thai the formulation and content n
the Pauls speech were well-bi
anced. The hostile Israeli reactioi
to Ambassador Paul's speech -has
incrased tension in Bonn and pol
ical sources were reported as being
very unhappy about the chill in
Israeli-West German relations.
Jews In Spain
MADRID (JTA) The Jewish
population in Spain now total*
7,000. according to estimates re-
leased by leaders of the Spanish
Jewish community. About 3,00
Jews live in Madrid, another 3,000
in Barcelona, and most of the re-
maining 1,000 in Valencia and Mal-
aga. The bulk of Spanish Jewry
consists of European Jews who
found refuge there during the Na?.i
era and Sephardic Jews from Spaiv
ish Morocco.
Feel walled in?
Get away from it all by phone.
Swap recipes,
trade laughs,
reminisce,
plan a surprise party,
tell secrets,
ask that new couple over, and thank
Aunt Mary for keeping the baby.
(What else that costs so little makes you feel so good?)
LAST 3 DAYS!
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niitu; h iimi
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KTOKUWOOO MINMNIUME
BEYOND
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Wk. + 6c ml.
Including Liability Insurance
Pickup & Delivery Senrice
BENT A CAB
301 23rd St., M.B.
PHONE 532-5502

Southern Bell


Page 10-A
vJewisti fhridiain
VIET NAM .. CIVIL RIGHTS ... AND THE NEW CAMPUS LEFT
How German Students Eye the U.S.
By MAX LERNER
Berlin
I have been giving talks in
German universities for the bet-
ter part of a week at Heidel-
berg, at Freiburg, at the Free
University here in West Berlin.
1 have learned, through the ques-
tions from the floor and through
talks afterward with the stOdertts.
something about their image of
Americaand their attitude to-
ward their own situation in Ger-
many.
As with other young Europeans,
their image of America derives
from three areas of controversy
about which they read and hear:
Ihe Viet Nam war. the civil rights
confrontations (especially in Mis-
sissippi), and the new student left
as typified at Berkeley. Their re-
actions are the predictable ones:
they are hostile or skeptical about
the Viet Nam war. they get an
over-simplified view of the civil
rights struggle, and they would
like to imitate Berkeley.
In a Tokyo dispatch in Ham-
burg's Die Welt, about the un-
rest in Japanese universities,
the correspondent writes that
they have much the same prob-
lems as the Germans. The symp-
toms he names are overcrowd-
ed classrooms, hectic building
of new universities, teacher
shortage and a radicalism of
the left among the students. It
is striking that the two great
defeated nations of World War
II should be going through the
same crises of a generational
struggle under the conditions of
affluence and of a pervasive
directionless malaise which are
not very different from the
generational struggle among
the victor nations, whether in
America, Western Europe or
the Soviet Union.
In Germany there is a sharp
difference between student feel-
ing in Berlin and in the other
universities. On most campuses
the crux problem is how long the
students will be allowed to re-
main before they graduate. The
federal authorities and those of
the states would like to get the
student out after eight semesters
that is, four years in order
to provide room for other stu-
dents who are hammering at the
gates. The students answer that
classes and seminars are so over-
subscribed that they cannot get
into them, not even into the re-
quired ones; that library facilities
are under a crushing load; and
that they cant make it in eight
semesters.
It is one of those deadlock
arguments in which both sides
are right. It is absurdly true that
a number of students remain stu-
dents for nine or 12 or even 15
years perpetual students who
either enjoy the slight govern-
mental subsidy they get, or else
are afraid of exams and the out-
side world. But it is also true that
the federal and state govern-
ments are not spending nearly
enough on new universities, that
salaries remain low, that chairs
remain unfilled, that professors
do their lectures and exams but
carry on no real dialogue with
students.
Throughout Germany the stu-
dents have been pressing for
strictly educational goals. But in i
the Free University of Berlin the i
student leaders have broken
away; starting with the educa-
tional goals they have broadened
them out into a larger political
protest. They have held anti-Viet
Nam meetings and teach-ins. and
have made the life of the rector
a hell. Their model is clear
enough: after one of the teach-
ins the other day, several stu-;
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Bimt
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D I would like to subscribe to
The Jewish Floridian.
Fill out coupon and mail te
Circulation Dent.,
M.P.O. lex 2973, Miami, Fin.
SheratOn uses a modern and exclusive electronic computer
called Reservatron that makes and confirms room reserva-
tions for keyed up executives in seconds. To help you unwind
after you arrive, Sheraton has a big, quiet, comfortable room
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Keyed-up
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dents approached an American
observer and asked him. "Is this
the way they did it in Berkeley?"
What worries the German
authorities almost as much as
their own students are the
"Gammler" the youngsters
from every country who bum
their way into every German
city by road, the bearded, un-
washed young men and the un-
bridled young women
The elder Germans can't fig-
ure out why they come or why
they stay: perhaps they have for-
gotten the charms of "the Ger-
man girls, the German girls"
whom Archibald MacLeish once
recalled with nostalgia and for-
gotten, too. the unnamed and
unnameable restlessness of youth.
They blame the "Gammler" for
political unrest and marijuana
and the very loose new sexual
morality of German youth. Lud-
wig Erhard. the Chancellor him-
self, has made local election
speeches about it. and averred
that as long as he holds the
power he will do something about
the Gammler. But what can he
do other than the futile act of
banning them. Perhaps join
them?
Why should not the youth be
restless? Germany is at loose
ends, wandering rootless in limbo
between a nasty world that is
dead and a not impossible better
one that is not yet wholly born.
Friday. July 15, 1966
unknowing even whether its two
halves will come together.
Its culture is mediocre, except
for some good novelists and mu-
sic and some first rate opera pro-
ductions. Its cosmopolitan capital
city is in enemy territory.
Its Jews art gone, either
dead or fled, although the few
remaining ones are made much
of, especially by the universi-
ties. It has lost a whole gen-
eration, either by the bombs
or Russian imprisonment or
the moral malady of Naii com-
plicity, and there ar few of
the middle generation to stand
between the forlorn old and
the anxious young. <>
I asked some student leaders
at Heidelberg whom they looked
up to. No one. ihey said. Whom
do they trust. I asked. Myself, one
of them answered. Perhaps that is
a good start. But if you trust no
one else, in the end you cannot
trust even yourself.
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July 15, 1966
vJcwisti WorSdHain
Page 11-A
\. 9-
**
V
Eisendrath States Religion's High Purpose
IRVING JACOBSON
icobson Will
Irect Beth Am
Jacobson has been ap-
kted new administrator of Tom-
Am. according to Pres-
et AJan Kessler. His duties will
upervising the temple of-
and staff, and temple proper-
Miami resident for 21 years,
fcobson served as administrator
local congregation and princi-
of it? religious school. -
)ona]d Frank has been named
lirnian of of the forum commit-
for the coming year.
By Special Report
Religion in America must not
become "the mere handmaiden of
the government establishment" in
the fight for racial justice and the
struggle against poverty, declared
Rabbi Maurice N. Eisendrath.
president of the 1.000.000-member
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations.
Speaking at the annual award
dinner of the Reform Jewish Ap-
peal, held at New York's Amer-
icana Hotel. Rabbi Eisendrath
declared that religion "must de-
mand of government the highest
standards of ethics and truth."
Citing controversy over al-
leged shortcomings of the pov-
erty programs which have
drawn criticism, and current re-
ports of political corruption in
Washington and elsewhere, the
Reform Jewish leader called up-
on religious leaders to serve "as
goads to conscience."
Mayor John V. Lindsay. Sammy
Davis Jr., and Max M. Fisher, gen
eral chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, were guests of honor
at the SlOO-per-plate dinner held
in behalf of the national institu- j
tions of Reform Judaism, the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations and the Hebrew
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion.
Mayor Lindsay was presented
with the Humanitarian Award by I
State Supreme Court Justice Ken-
Beth B. Keating. Davis was the j
recipient of the Achievement
award, presented by a close friend
and noted Jewish leader. Rabbi
| Max Nussbaum. of Los Angeles.
Fisher received the American
Judaism Award, presented by
Gustave L. Levy.
Fisher, citing the vast scope of
American philanthropy, said it re-
flects "the persistent and deep-
running force of a powerful reli-
gious heritage springing from Ju-
daism to Christianity to the ^mer-
ican people."
To be a good protestant. Catholic
or Jew. he said, "is to support re-
ligiously-inspired efforts to relieve
human suffering and advance
human welfare."
In his address. Rabbi Eisend-
rath paid tribute to the award
recipients. "It is clear," he said,
"the great principle of separa-
tion of church and state which
we must uphold does not mean
and never was intended to
mean that religion should sur-
render its sacred role as the con-
science of the community."
In the fight for racial justice,
for the elimination of poverty, and
for a peaceful world, religious
forces, working together with un-
precedented effectiveness, have
become powerful expressions of
the conscience of the nation.
"By engaging ourselves in the
deep issues of our time, however
controversial, we have redeemed
the church and synagogue from ir-
relevance, and we have given the
national and government at all
levels a mighty moral and spi-
ritual thrust to reckon with."
RABBI MAIffffCE UStNDRAlH
U.S. to Sign Convention
GENEVA (JTA) The U.S.
Government will sign the Conven-
tion for the Abolition of Racial
Discrimination, it was announced
here last week by Ambassador Ar-
thur J. Goldberg.
re'sgn Minister Has Guests
EL AVIV (JTA) President
rris Abram, of the American
ish Committee, and Judge
odore Tannemvald. chairman
the group's Committee on Is-
, were guests this week at a
noon given them by Foreign
istex Abba Eban. They review-
with the Foreign Minister some
Israel's foreign relations. They
o met with Dr. Zorach Warhaf
Rolgious Affairs Minister, and
anc< Minister Pinhas Sapir.
THERE ARE
Jl
m
REASONS WHY MAIL
FOR JAMESTOWN, ALA.
CAN BE MISSENT.
# Jomettown,
4t Jamestown,
X- Jomtshwn,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
& Jamestown,
*fr Jamestown,
4fr Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
4t Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
# Jamestown,
Ark.
Calif.
Colo.
Ind.
Koni.
Ky.
La.
Mich.
Mo.
N.Y.
N.C.
N. Dak.
Ohio
Pa.
R.I.
S.C.
Ten*.
Ve.
When you use ZIP Code In
your address, your corre-
spondence is more likely to
Wind up in the right James*
town. ZIP Coda adds as*
curacy to your mal.
ATTENTION!
ewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE'-'APPUANCES"
"CL0THING"-"JEWEIRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101

CITY
NATIONAL
*
BANKS
June 30, 1966
ASSETS
Cash and Due from Banks......... $ 26,680,625.05
Securities:
U. S. Government
and Guaranteed ....$36,377,329.82
State, County
and Municipal...... 15,980,355.38
Federal Reserve
Bank Stock........ 247,250.00 52.604,935.20
Loans and Discounts.............. 89,454,423.23
Banking Houses and Equipment ... 4,135,799.24
Accrued Interest and Other Assets ___2,258,240.57
TOTAL..................... $175,134:023.29
LIABILITIES!
Deposits ......................... $151,759,206.57
Other Liabilities.................. 8,632,641.87
Unearned Discounts and Reserves .. 2,445,610.23
"Capital Debentures ..$2,000,000.00
Capital Stock........ 4,340,430.00
Surplus ............. 3,900,000.00
Undivided Profits .... 2,056,134.62
TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS .... 12,296,564.62
TOTAL..................... $175,134,023.29

$
|$ CITY NATIONAL- BANKS
MIAMI CORAL GABLES MIAMI BEACH
COMPLETE NATIONAL BANKING SERVICES
COMPLETE INTERNATIONAL BANKING SERVICES
BUSINESS AND PERSONAL BANKING e COMPLETE TRUST SERVICES j
MEMBERS; fEOERAL RESERVE SYSTEM I FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION J
CITY NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI
25 W. FLA3LER STREET
MICHAEL J. FRANCO, President
LEONARD L. ABES6, Chairman of the Board
CITY NATIONAL BANK OF CORAL GABLES
2701 LJEUNE ROAD
ALLAN T. ABESS, JR., President
ROBERT M. altemus, Chairman Of the Board
CITY NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI BEACH
326 V1t STREET
GERALD A. KELLER, President
LEONARD L. ABESS, Chairman of the Board
i
jiftih.i^iWW^*f^^.>^'AlltJ^ iMIamft I.. >


Page 12-A
Jkt* ***# flhrirffaf
Friday. July 15. 196S
9&/:-
d
ions
'&
ervices
\Jhi* lA/eekenJ
i
AQUDATH ACHIM. Lombard/ Hv. 6305 Collins Ave. Orthodox.
Friday 6:15 p.m. Saturday K:I5 a.m,
Mincha :30 p.m..
AGUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Itaac Ever.
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. 985 SW 67th Ave Oorthodox.
Cantor Morris Barr.
----- ----
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.!
Conservative. Emanuel Kushelwitz,
president.
---- ----
BEjjTH OAVIO. 2625 SW 3rd Ave. Con-'
tarvative. Rabbi Sol Landau. Cantor
William W. Lioson.
Friday -fi p.m. Baturda) I i.iii. Minolta
i IT, p.m.
-------I-------
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th Ave. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Solomon Sch Viiday 7 p.m. Saturday B:80 a.m. St-r
mon: "Wisdom of Agea." Mlnclua 6 30
p.m.
--------
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Berel Wein.
--------
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Snmaryahu T
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
----
BETH KODFSH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Benjamin Ben-Ari.
ft tturday 8:45 a.m Sermon: "We Nred
i ilty." 6 p.m. "Portion of Law." *
]i ii. "Politics in our Age "
--------
BETH MOSHE CONGREGAT 0\
13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi Richard Marcovitz. Cantor
Seymour Hinkes.
--------
BETH TFILAM. 935 Euclid Ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
---- ----
BETH TORAH. 164th St. and NE 11th
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
schitz. Cantor Jacob Renzei
Fiiday 6 p.m. Saturday i:*3 a m
Mincha p.m.
m
CANDIEUGHTING TIME
27 Tcanuz 8:47 p.m.
9'NAi RAPHAEL 1*01 NW 183rd St
Conservative. Rabbi Harold Richter.
Cantor Jack Lerner.
CUBAN HE3REW CONGREGATION
OF MIAMI. 1242 Wash ngton Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Oov Rozencweig.
"LAO'.ER 3RANAOA. 50 NW 51st
Pi. Conservative. Rabb< Oavid Ros-
enteli. P-antor George Goldberg.
HOMESTEAD JEW SH CENTER. 8ti
St.. Homestead. Conse-vative.
------a------
ISRAELITE CENTER 5175 SW fftl
St. Conservative. Rabbi Avrom L
L. Dra^in.
Friday 6:80 and 8:15 p.m. Si-rmun
Who's Kt-fpiipf Track?' Pulpit gueel
Cantor William B. Nuaaen, Baturda!
8:45 a.m. Sermon: "Are We Judne-
i- We Judge Others." Cantor Kusaei
win ohant.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Steri
-----a-----
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfielo
Cantor Abraham Seif.
Frlda] 8 :: p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m
Sermon: "Qaa stations in the Desert.'
6 p.m. Classes in T-ilmuil and Ethic*
i of the Fathers.
; LUBAVITCHER MiNVAN. 300 Wash
ington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra
ham Korf. Cantor Ernest Field.
FT. LAUOER3V_E JEWISH CEN-
TER 547 E. Oa<'iia Park Blvd
Conservative. Or J>^< L. Morris,
president Cantor Theooore Min.
dich.
-t. .a'j: = ':i.e emanu-el *:
S. Andrews *; Reform Paob
c3 -, Levlton Cantor Jerome
Klement.
MINVONA'RES CONGREGATION
3T 3 rd Rd. Modern Traditional.
HALLANOALE J6V\ ;- CENTER
126 E. Hallanda Beach Blvd. Rev.
Paul C;..:>:
HEBREW CA3Svv 24.10 Pfnetres
Orthodox. R3b0i Alexander S.
Gross.
"OL'-YWOOO TEMPLS S'NAI 120'
Johnson St Conservative Raob1
David Shaoiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heiiora-in.
HEBREW LESSON
33 "?3 np-:y
' T t I r -:
":-v i T t "! T
^a1n ,tr ? ipmv ht two
.o?a ~ix3 ?# t*i& *?s inix
aipa r\2ip2 .a*rOi-in join
,"ixa nlTj?^i msn1? "?nn
-iDOD ^3 nx nxT3 rovfrn
: t v I :
K^n iXd npos 1X3 -isn Kin
: : It-.-: t
37ms iTi a-^xn .era rni
1 : t t-: r t t *
inn "D D'l'jixi i"7 D"yi'7i
ix3 iDin xm ax ,D,a'? vivfo
trr\ x1? nan
T (til
.ann D-a'3
ira nftj1? rr^xn .^io?1?
fnx ,3-1 pai3 3'3iai D*3n
inv3 D-i-Cryn DTjn ninipi?:
ni3"i3^ n3i3L' rnr .^m&ra
I : t r : r V t : :
.na*aon ^s1?!
t : t :
3 ^xn rr3in w m*i?a3
"D^aiZran-i a'Tyiin iron!
t -. : : T J I
XXUKtnax n3n"?i
: t
vpbys n--i3y rvna nKxina)
I I- 1 I I :'i
The Water Pool in Karkur
The settlement of Karkur was
poor in water. Today, it and all its
surroundings have a lot of water
which was discovered by Mr. Abra-
ham Levazovsky, who was engaged
in planting citrus groves in Kar-
kur.
The mani ctaimark thai thpre must
he a lot of^rfrerin theTfeighbor-
hood, as the Bible says that the
Hills of Ephraim, which are near
the settlement, were very fertile.
The man began to investigate
and to look for sigYiS/^f sources of
water in the neighborhood, and he
even interested himself in the stor-
es of the ^rabs, in the neighbor-
ing villages dealing with subjects
connected with water.
One day, he heard a story about
a war which had taken place hun-
dreds of years before between two
villages in the neighborhood, and
which had ended with the blocking
narn -iiBri
1U13 3 D'an n31 a
rro nrrn 11313 nsiznsn
r t : r : T r -
^3"?1 a1? BT DT3 .3*^3,
l^rntf ,1X3 D'31 Q-3 ,ir3'3D
733173^ D113X 13 nT ^
D'3-713 D^12 p0y^7
.113133
n3'333 s3 7173 HT D1X
T : I .- r T
Pr*3 n*3i o^a nrn^ D-ans
,3'isx nn *?5 isoa 1,-211^
rn a ,na^1a^ Q-anpn
.1X3 B"11D
t^Ein1?! iipn1? B?'xn Vnnn
.13^333 o-a niiipa ?&* o^ao
t : 1 : ... t
*rf ani333 %xsrm ^xi
- a-aoa onsaai Q^iyn
.D'a to *?$ Q^soanl
"?y us? vnti iriK of
WM niKa 'is1? nq$f nan"?a:
htk: ,na,atp3 ansa "W fa
1X3 nx lanoa; nxm rrma
up of the rich well of water, as it
was said that the well was cursed.
This story', which he investigated,
led him to the remains of a well)
of water from Roman times. He!
started to dig nearby and to drill;
a well in which he invested all his
money. He dug a very deep well, I
but he did not find water. People'
laughed and .mocked him, saying:
that he was crazy on the subject of
water if he dug so deep a well,
which was unusual in those days.
In the end, he succeeded in find-,
ing a lot of good water at a great j
depth, one of the richest sources
Of water in Israel, which was a!
blessing to Karkur and all the
neighborhood.
By this deed, the man proved
that it is to the credit of those
who are daring and "crazy about"
a thing that our country is being
built.
Published by the Brit Irvrit Olamit
OHEV SHALOM. 11 No-randy Dr
Ortnaaox. Ran'j Phineas Weber
-. -
BEPHAROIC JEW Sh CENTER. 64
Coll ns Ave. Re*. Can::.- Saai Nah
r- !j
-------e
b- LAKE SYNAGOGUE -3'V SE
19th Ave. Orthjaox. Raobi Jonar
E. Caolan.
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN. Con
s--vjtive. 1025 N= '3;-a St., Miam
Gi );ns Rd. Rioj Samuel R. Stone
Cantor Maur'ci Neu.
TEMPLE BETH AVI. 535-0 S. Kendal'
Dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabb
Herbert Baumga.-d. Cantor Michael
Kyrr.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly
wood. 1725 Monroe St. Conservat vt
Rabbi Morton Maiavsky. Cantor Er
neat Steiner.'
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1351 S !4th Ave Reform
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Friday 8:15 p.m. M irton L. Abi
president, will on.luct eervicei Mil-
ton Knrman. board 'f tr is -,.- mem-
ber, will apeak on hie trip t.> i.-
--------
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL. 1545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Cantor
Saul H. Breeh.
TEMPLE BETH SHiRAH. 7500 SW |
;20th st. Reconatructlaniat. Raoa
Morris Skop.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOV. 4'44 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kron.sn
Cantor David Conviser.
Prld ij IS ;. ir Rabbi Pra
. -:i "W ir and the C
ibjei a Talm Pulpli
Buest, Cantor William :. .\ ,
1 '
SYNOPSIS OF THE TORAH PORTION MATTOTH MASE
Map of the tribes of Gad. Reuben and the half-tribe of
Manasseh in Transjordan
And Moses gave unto ... Gad Reuben and unto the
half tribe of Manasseh ... the kingdom of Sihon" (Num. 32. 33).
MATTOTH Moses informed the tribal heads regarding the
laws concerning vows. He sent 12,000 arrmed men (1.000 from
each tribe) to war with the Midianites. The expedition was suc-
cessful. Among those killed was Balaam. The tribes oj Reuben
and Gad. who had large herds of cattle, asked to be allowed
to settle on grazing laud in Transjordan Moses agreed, on
condition that these tribes lead the other tribes across the Jordan
and not return to Transjordan until all their brother tribes had
been provided for. Part of the tribe, of Manasseh conquered
half of Gilead. and were granted it for their territory.
* *
mase ;
A man flees to one of the six cities of refuge to escape an
avenging slayer. (Mapi
"Three cities beyond the Jordan, and three cities in .
Canaan; they shall be cities of refuge" (Num. 35. 14).
MASE The portion begins with a detailed account of the
various way stations on the Israelites- route to the Promised
Land, from'the time they left Egypt until they reached the plains
of Moab. by the Jordan at Jericho Instructions concerning the
apportionment of the land followed. "And ye shall inherit the
land by lot according to your families to the more ye shall
give the more inheritance, and to the fewer thou shalt give the
less inheritance; wheresoever the lot falleth to any man, that
: be his' Num. 35. 54). It was necessary that all the Canaan-
ites be expelled. But if ye will not drive out the inhabitants of
the land from before you. then shall those that ye let remain of
them be as thorns in your eyes, and as pricks in your sides, and
they shall harass you in the land wherein you dwell" (Num.
33. 55).
The portion gives specific instructions concerning the bound-
ary lines and lists the names of the persons who should divide
the land.
This recounting or the Weekly Portion of the Law is
tracted and based upot "The Graphic History of the Jewish
Heritage" edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15 Publisher is
Shengold, and the volume is available at 27 W:lliam St.. Naw
York S, N.Y. President of the society distributing the volume
is Joseph Schlang.
MMmil ii ,:a
TEMPLE 3ETH TOV.
St. Conservative.
63 SW Stt.
TEMPLE B'NAI S-lOLOV. '6800 N W
22nJ Ave. Conservat e. Cantor
Abraham Reisemnn.
Prld }:80 p m 9 .o i will host
the i meg Bhabbat.
---------a---------
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washina-
ton Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler
Friday >> p.m. Saturdaj i.m Mincha
i ;i m
TEMPLE ISRAEL OP GRHATER Ml.
AMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. RaOOi
Joseph R. Narot.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR
3500 SW 69th Way. Conservative.
Rabbi Irwin Cutler
TEMPLE JUOEA. 320 Palermo Ave
Liberal-Reform. Rabbi Morris Kip-
per.
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th St
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Aoram-
owitz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
TEMPLE NER TAMIO. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Edward Klein.
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative
8755 SW 16th St.. Miami. Rabbi
Ralph Ralph Glixman.
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI
Temporary office 1820 NE 164th St
Reform. Rabbi Daniel M Lowy
Cantor Chet Gale.
Friday B:15 urn. m Wmahlntrtoi Fed.
ml, M9 NB M7th s- Services <-on-
ducted by Rabbi Benjamin Roeayn of
Dothan, Ala.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB 951 E
4th Ave.. Hialeah. Conservative
Rabhi Maurice Klein.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Saturday > .m. f,,i-
lowed by Kiddush.
TEMPLE ZION. SOOcTMiller Rd. Con
ervative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman.
TEMPLE ZAMORA.~44 Zamora Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Maxwell 3er
"r. Cantor Ben Dickson.
Prid.iy b pvn. Saturday 8:48 a m Bar.
mom "Portion >( tin- Week."
TIFERETH ISRAElT^SOO N. Miami
WeSr'nick0n,erVatiV8' R'bb' H,nry
Fri-tay Sii.rn. BUterhood will h-.st the
Onei? Bhabbat Baturday | a.m.
YU,NQH ISRAEL. 990 NE I71rt St
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Staober.
Y9ttg3. ttBfti^-VIAHI BEACH
t!iSp8or^.hV",h,n0tOn Ave- R'bbi N-f"
THE RABBI SPEAKS FROM HIS PULP?T
Vows Must be Related
To Concepts of Holiness
By RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
Hollywood Beth SholeTi
The sciiptural portion >f this
ath brings to a close the Boifc
of Numbers. Before the itinerary
of the wandering Jew in the desert
is enumerated, a great deal of
stress is placed upon :he subject
of promises, vows
and holiness. A
word, an oath or
a vow should be
one intertwined
with "Kedusha"
or "Holiness."
Our Torah em-
phasizes a holi-
ness that exists
among the every-
day, ordinary
man is one who
lives not as a re-
cluse, but as a
part of daily liv-
ing and is a well Rabbi Mafavsfcy
integrated member of society.
Man's value to himself, fellow-
man and the world is almost un-
limited. Simultaneously, holiness
can and should manifest itself in
illustrative greatness even though
his very method might appear par
adoxically inconsistent. There are
times when a person must be bend-
ing and yielding, when he must be
humble and forgiving to those who
abuse him and offend his pride.
There are also moments when man
must be straight, firm, unbending
and unwilling to yield, even under
the most oppressive circumstances,
when a struggle for the principles
and ideals of Torah and holiness is
being Waged. A sage once said,
"Every person should have two
pockets. In one, he should have a
slip of paper saying, I am dust
and ashes.' In the other, there
should be a slip saying, 'For my
sake was the world created."'
Sacred Aura
Of all the places of holiness, the
temple or sanctuary occupies, in-
deed, one of the most prominent
positions attainable The holmes*
of a sanctuary' 19 sacred I
eternal aura. A Talmudic rabhi
was once asked, In what way did
you merit long life"" He an-
ed. "I never made a thoroughfare
of a house of worship.
Now, what can we say of Hw
iynagogue in American life today?
Unfortunately, too often the pres-
ent sanctuary has become a thoi
oughfare. The place of worship
lias become a place of mourning
to be visited only upon the loss o
memorialization of a .dear one. It
behooves all of us to strive towar i
a renewed era of holiness to su:
rour.d our temples and synagogues
The present temple must again be-
come the genuine replica of the
sanctuary wherein resided the div
ine presence and true holiness.
There must be a return and re
vival of Jewish holy days. While
physically, our houses of worship i
are filled on the High Holy Days,
they are terribly neglected on the
holiest of days, namely, the Sab-
bath.
Creature of Holiness
By transfusing a holy feeling
with these two areas, then and only
then can man become a creature
of holiness as he was- intended to
be. When man lives In a demon-
strative climate of holiness, then
can he be both yielding and uti
yielding Then can he be submis-
sive while he refuses to compro-
mise principles.
unnrimiinilnmai
' ''i'i This page is prepared in ca
i oheration with tha Greater Mi-
| ami Rabbinical Association.
Coordinator of features p-
; peartng here is
DR. MAX LIPSCHITZ
f Jpiritual leader of Beth ToraA
1 Congregation of Xorth Miai4
} Beach.
r


L
Friday. July 15.1966
^Jewisfi tkxkMat)
Page 13-A
Marshall at HST Center Dedication;
Tunisia's Bourguiba Sends Message
JERUSALEM (JTA) Former ,
president Harry S. Truman called
Monday for a halt in the world
nuclear arms race and for better
relations between Israel and the
reiphboring Arab countries.
The former President expressed
his sentiments in a message read
lor him at the dedication of the
Harry S. Truman Center for the
Advancement of Peace at the He-
brew University. The President,
who had planned to come here
jor the dedication, changed his
raind on advice of his doctors, and
>tnt U.S. Solicitor General Thur-
good Marshall to represent him.
The Truman message was
brought to Israel by Mr. Tru-
man's personal representative,
David Noycs, who read it during
the cornerstone laying ceremony.
Attending the ceremony were
Premier Levi Eshkol, Acting
President Kaddish Lux, Mr.
Marshall and many other digni-
taries. Premier Eshkol praised
the former President as "one of
Israel's best friends."
A unique development at the
ceremony was a cable to Mr. Tru-
man from President Habib Bour-
guiba ol Tunisia which was consid-
ered here as the most "heartening"
of all the messages sent to the cere-
mony. The Tunisian leader, who
Jews Decorate Former German
Soldier for 'Humanity and Courage'
NEW YORK (JTA) A unique occupation army in Drohobicz in
ceremony took place at the Con-
-..icte General of Israel here this
.tek when Eberhard Heimrich, a
former major in the German occu-,
i ation army in Poland, now a New
': ork resident, was awarded the;
r-'edal for the Righteous, given to
Gentiles who saved Jews during
World War II. The award was pre- supplied food to the Jewish hos-
: d bv Michael Arnon, tha Con PltaI dur,n a severe food shortage.
General. He a'so ol"dered his subordinates
, .. to behave humanelv to inmates at
rased on evidence gathered over ,. ,_______ J, -
, .... the labor camp at Hyrawka. which
several years and presented to the
mittee of the Martyrs and He-
Galicia, Poland. While directing
agricultural work in the area, he
set up a labor camp to save
Jews. He also helped the Dro-
hobicz ghetto inhabitants.
Survivors of the Nazi holocaust:
have testified that Mr. Heimrich
rocked the Arab world last year
with several public calls for the
Arabs to negotiate peace with Is-
rael, said in his message that "ul-
terior engagements" prevented him
from assisting in the Jerusalem
ceremony.
After the ceremony in the Wise
Building at the University, the par- j
ticipants walked to the site where i
the Truman Center will be built. A |
scroll stating the nature of the
purpose of the Center "Peace,
understanding and harmony be-
tween nations" was buried on
that spot. The American visitors
were luncheon guests of the Prem-
ier and attended a reception at,
night given by Acting President
Luz at the Presidential residence.
It was reported that $4,000,000
had been raised so far for the
multi-million dollar Center.
Some 50 American Jewish lead-
ers, including several "central
founders" attended the cere-
mony. Central founders are the
41 American Jewish leaders who
contributed $100,000 each to the
center. Speakers included Mr.
Marshall and Samuel Rothberg
of Peoria.
because they feared the trip might
be too taxing for a man of Mr.
Truman's age. He is 82.
Mr. Truman's message stressed
two themes: the urgent need in
a nuclear-armed world of meas-
ures to control the arms race
and an equal need for peace be-
tween Israel and the Arab coun-
tries. In urging more peaceful
relations between the Arab states
and Israel, the former President
cited the history of relations
between the United States and
Mexico "in which we had many
bitter quarrels in the past."
He warned that a third World
War "could be unprecedented cal-
amity, threatening the very exist-
ence of the human race on the
j surface of the earth." He said that
I the existence throughout the world
; of an ever growing arsenal of mis-
siles with nuclear warheads cap-
able of mass destruction made it
evident that there was no other
means to ensure the world's sur-
vival than by halting the nuclear
arms race. In view of this "terrific
situation," he declared, there was
no logical reason why any govern-
ment should refuse to reach under-
standing with its neighbors.
Remembrance Authority in Is-
rael the Yad Vashem, the con-
i usion was reached that Mr.
rich worked extensively to
. < Jews during the occupation
ci Poland.
In 194i-44, he was director of
The Economic Department of the
CANTOR-TEACHER
wonted for yearly position
with Conservative Synagogue
in Southwest section.
CALL Off ICE 221-9131
HlV. PINCUS ALOOF
CIMlfliD mOHU
Associated With Temple Adath
Yeshurun, 1025 N.E. Miami Gardens
Drive, No. Miami Beach, Fla. 33138
17611 NE 7th Cf. 947-2267
Wo. Miami Beach, Florida
oVftfcss 2(jMpafiy
and Com^o/it
Sympathy (Ehc ^xmtic Gorhrns
MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
CORAL GABLES HOLLYWOOD
FT. LAUOERDALE BOCA RATON
was under his supervision. He gave
help to individuals in many cases,
transported Jewish children to hid-
ing places in his official car and
even hid them in his house.
He also saved the lives of Jewish
girls by offering them jobs with
his friends in Germany, where they
passed as "Aryan" housemaids
with forged certificates. Even dur-
ing the days of the German mili-
tary victories and while the holo-
caust was at its peak. Mr. Heim-
rich displayed liking and respect
toward Jews. He eventually mar-
ried a Jewish girl whose life he
had saved.
Survivors related he always
acted for reasons of humanity
and not for reward. In several
cases, he paid for food, clothing
and transport for survivors he
managed to smuggle to safe hid-
ing places.
The committee citing the Right-
eous, headed by Supreme Court
Justice Moshe Landau who pre-
sided at the Eichmann trial de-
cided to award to Mr. Heimrich a
Medal, struck by Nathan Karp, an
Israel artist.
ATTENTION!
Jewish Home for the Aged
THRIFT SHOP
NEEDS YOUR DONATION
NOW!
"FURNITURE"-"APPLIANCES"
"CL6THING"-"JEWEIRY," etc.
"All Items Tax Deductible"
CALL 696-2101
WELL KNOWN CANTOR
In Greater Miami wants engagement,
for the High Holidays, or year-round
position. Has served as Canter for
past 15 years.
Please call 374-0816 after 5:30 a.m.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open ttery Day Cloud Sabbath
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
Miomi'i Only Strictly Jewish
Monument Dealer
ANSWERITE
TELEPHONE ANSWERING
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JEFFERSON UNION
HIGHLAND FRANKLIN
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NEWTON
FR 3-5581
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IS YOUR GREATEST
BUSINESS ASSET
Premier Eshkol recalled Mr.
Truman's part in announcing the
United States recognition of Israel
which kindled a flame in Israel's
spirit which is still burning."' Im-
mediately after the ceremony, the
Premier sent a cable to Mr. Tru-
man in Independence. Mo., on be-
half of the Government and people
of Israel. The cable offered "every
good wish for your health and for
many happy years," and added.
"Through your friendship, you
have become part of our people's
inner consciousness and your vis-
ion of peace through Jerusalem is '
shared by the people."
In his message, the former
President also said he would visit j
Israel next autumn. University |
sources indicated a belief he would ;
make the visit next spring if his i
health permitted. Mr. Truman's '
physicians barred the visit Monday
BASS and
TENOR
EXPERIENCED ONLY
for
TEMPLE CHOIR
JE 8-4909 10 to 4
p.m.
Palmer
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AND VALUE!
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SUNDAY, JULY 17, 1966
Ml. Unai Cemetery
MRS. ETHEL PEARL
at 11 A.M.
h^hh, >i lomon Schiff
Stl WHAT YOU BUY I
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Pag 14-A
* Jen 1st ncrfdfan
Friday. July 15, 1966,


. .....
Today's Thought: By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
Meaningful Guide
To the Mourner
r
A MOVING statement by an
Orthodox rabbi of Brooklyn,
Rabbi Howard Kahn, I read for the
first time the term, "Cemetery
Judaism."
Rabbi Kahn says that on Sun-
days the roads to the interment
places of Greater New York are
clogged with cars carrying those
wno want to spend some time near the graves ot
their departed dear.
Rabbi Kahn lauds the sentiments of those who
feel that such visits are helpful. As one person said
to him, "I feel better after going to Mamma's grave,
crying a little and talking my heart out." Comments
the rabbi: "This therapy is cheaper than a psychia-
trist who charges for listening."
But Rabbi Kahn feels that mourning could be
made more purposeful if people understood better
the Jewish concept of death. "What we bury is
dead." he explains, "but what we call a soul lives
eternally and is not located underground, and the
best thing to do for a loved one is to do something
for that part of him that still lives."
Muses Rabbi Kahn: "If the money spent for
gasoline and tolls on cemetery visits would be
spent for synagogues and yeshivos, or even for good
books on Judaism, how much more alive the current
Jewish scene would be!"
Adds he: "The next time you get into your car
for a visit to the cemetery, ask yourself, when was
the last time you visited a synagogue, when was the
last time you read a book on a Jewish theme, or
discussed religion with vour children?"
The statement concludes with this touching
thought: "My father's grave is in Israel. I've never
been there. But when I open one of the Hebrew
books he bequeathed me, when I reread some of his
letters, when I get up to give a sermon and behold
his face before me, when I conduct a Seder the way
he used to, I feel his presence. I sense his living
soul. And it matters not that his grave lies beyond
my physical reach."
Rabbi Kahn has given us a meaningful Guide
to Mourning.
As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAL
A Criminal Code
IT IS QUITE natural that a seething
intellectual debate over the model
at the same time that tempera boil over
the unresolved issue of proposed civil-
ian dominance of police review boards.
Both activities gain momentum from
b widespread twin desire to see to it
criminal code taken up by the Amer-
ican Law Institute hits the front pages_________
that police are not hobbled in their work and that those
who dwell in the depressed areas of our great cities are
not mishandled by officers.
Simply to mention these two objectives is to raise
blood pressure and to provide ammunition for the rigid
and unrelenting. Yet it has been noted that domestic
violence had not been an issue in a Presidential campaign
in all the years since Prohibition until 1964; and now
that the Negro revolution and riots and rumors of riots
are of such importance, the issue of urban crime and the
handling of suspects is apt to continue of national signi-
ficance for some time.
The Presidents National Crime Commission has been
trying hard to suggest ways of modernizing procedures
and practices affecting thousands who appear to have
violated the law. That body has had to deal with such deli-
cate issues as investigative arrests on suspicion, confes-
sions, bail, allegedly cruel and unusual punishment for
alcoholics, confinement in the "bull pen," and charges
of politics at a municipal court level. The American Civil
Liberties Union' has raised strong objection to some of the
remedies .proposed by a sub-group of the American Law
Institute. ChieWlldge David L. Bazelon of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the District of Columbia has branded the
proposal a' systematic repudiation of Supreme Court doc-
trines. Other highly respected critics have added their
warning cries.
But at least there is good reason to believe that the
President's, National Crime Commission will eventually
make a lasting contribution to the campaign for reform
Some are just as optimistic about the outcome of
the fight over proposed civilian dominance of police
review boards.
,i-.Thf f'ery ?tew York experience is current Exhibit A.
Militant new leaders of CORE and spokesmen for the
police, while at opposite ends of the dispute, have vigor-
ously attacked Mayor John V. Lindsay's action in estab-
lishing a review board giving majority voice to others
than police. CORE and other "minority group" champions
are convinced the mayor's action doesn't go far enough-
the police are just as firm in their views that it goes
too far. 6
OH the Record:
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Artist Frowns on Sentiment
IN A FLAT in Greenwich Village
New York City's colorful artist-
ic colony, a quiet man is engaged I
in the process of creativity. He is
the well-known Israeli artist, Motke
Blum, now visiting the United
States. Blum has been acclaimed
for his gouaches, for his mosaics
and for his jewelry. He is at home
in each medium, for each is an outlet for his artistic
expression.
Recently, his gouaches were acclaimed at a
UNESCO exhibit and a one-man show in Washing-
ton, D.C. This led to his being offered representa-
tion by the I.F.A. Gallery in the nation's capital.
His mosaics have also been shown at the Smithson-
ian Institute, where they made an enviable impact.
The important thing about Blum is that he
seeks not to create Israel art if there is such a
thing. He frowns upon commercialism" and "senti-
mentality" in art.
"It makes no difference where an artist comes
from," he says. "'The important thing is his art. Of
course, his culture and his environment are reflected
in many ways in his paintings. But when he creates,
he should strive to create meaningful art in the uni-
versal tongue that is peculiarly the artist's."
Blum looks forward to the emergence of a new
art in Israel an art that is in keeping with his
own universal concepts.
Blum is a quiet man, a big man in more ways
than one, who paints with an emotional serenity
that is the mark of poetry. And yet, his life's experi-
ences come through, albeit devoid of sentimentality.
A Rumanian by birth, Blum escaped from forced
labor in 1944. That year, he settled in Palestine and
became a member of Kibbutz Avuka. He has seen
the devastating cruelty of the Nazis and the destruc-
tion of humanity in what used to be called modern
warfare. And he has seen his friends, longing for
haven in Zion, machine-gunned and drowning as
their torpedoed boats sank after them into the
watery abyss. The sinking boats have been haunting
him ever since and they have become part of his
art. His gouaches of boats are world-famous. There
are happy boats and sad boats, optimistic boats and
boats that seem to be sailing nowhere. And yet the
quality of his work is such that it creates a bond
between the painting and the viewer that cannot
easily be sundered.
There are strong currents within Motke Blum
within this almost silent man who would rather
paint and create mosaics than talk, especially about
himself. But the record shows that he fought in
Israel's War of Independence and that his art studies
took him from the Bezalel Arts and Crafts Institute
in Jerusalem to Italy and Holland.
...
Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Dream of Alliance Gone Up in Smoke
Washington
QFFICIAL WASHINGTON underesti-
mated the depth and intensity of
Saudi Arabian King Faisal's anti-Jewish
bias a miscalculation that undermined
President Johnson's hopes for closer
American-Arabian ties.
When the King characterized the
Jewish people in general as "our ene-
mies," he brought down the tent on his head. President
Johnson and other officials had carefully sought to por-
tray the King as a moderate and intellectual leader, a
progressive force in the Near East. But the King's emo-
tional anti-Jewish outburst shocked a nation that is not
accustomed to such outspoken tirades by official guests
of the White House.
The first Congressman to protest, Rep. Seymour Hal-
pern, New York Republican, touched the heart of the
issue. Rep. Halpern asked: "How can the King remain in
America after today and continue to accept our hospital-
ity." He pointed out that it was "a deplorable breach
Of diplomatic courtesy for the King, an official
graciously received the the Government and people of
the United States, to deprecate a section of the population
of the host country by anti-Jewish remarks." He advised
the King to "fold up his tent and silently fade away."
Mayor John V. Lindsay of New York understandably
canceled the dinner scheduled to honor the King in New
New York City. Secretary of State Dean Rusk sought to
minimize the King's outburst against the Jews and asked
Mayor Lindsay to gloss over it and proceed with the
tributes.
A vapid and meaningless joint communique was issued
by President Johnson and King Faisal. It included a joint
pledge to continue mutual efforts "to promote the cause
of peace with honor and dignity for all." The King had
previously made it obvious he envisaged no peaceful
attitude toward Israel or the Jewish people. Indeed, the
King actually had denounced the United States Govern-
ment by stating in Washington that "we consider those
who provide assistance to our enemies as our own ene-
mies." The United States aids Israel in an official and
open manner.
King Faisal's hosts were deeply embarrassed by his
lack of diplomacy. He had spoiled the tedious efforts of
his friends to project a new image of the desert monarch.
The President had even taken lessons in Arabic in order
to greet the King with the greatest cordiality. V
The administration sought to persuade the American
Jewish community that there should be no criticism of
the King because he was a foe" of Egypt's Nasser, the real
menace. Not a word of criticism was voiced when the
bands played for Faisal and the Saudi flags fluttered.
Jews knew that even U.S. diplomats of Jewish faith weir
barred from Saudi Arabia. But the climate quickly changed
when the King brazenly denounced the Jews at a lunch-
eon tendered in his honor by the Washington press corps.
Official Washington had hoped to sell Faisal to the
American public, along with King Hussein of Jordan,
as liberal leaders who provided a bulwark for democracy
in the Near Bast. Policy-makers were awere of growing
Communist ties with Egypt and Syria. There was concern
over the threats of the so-called "Palestine Liberation
Organization." based in Egypt and Syria, to fight In Viet
Nam against the United States. Another fear pertained
to American oil interests in Saudi Arabia which socialist
Egypt eyes with greed and lust.
A dream had been conceived that turned into a desert
mirage. It was a vision of an Islamic alliance linking Saudi-
Arabia and Jordan with America as reliable and stable
allies. Washington preferred to ignore the basic differ-
ences between these Arab states and Israel.
The failure of Washington to insist on United Na-
tions efforts to promote Arab-Israel peace was a factor
that contributed to the Faisal disaster.
Overseas Newsletter: By ELIAHU SALPETER
After All, Jerusalem is the Capital
Jerusalem
^OBODY IS trumpeting it from
' the roof tops, but Israel's dip-
lomatic "Battle of Jerusalem" is
making slow, but steady progress.
Jerusalem is Israel's capital; de
facto all foreign countries main-
taining diplomatic relations with
Israel have tacitly accepted this.
Formally, most of the countries, including the
Big Powers, proclaim their support of the 1947
United Nations resolution which sought to interna-
tionalize the city. The broad interpretation given to
this resolution was that the entire city of Jerusalem
should become some kind of international territory
not belonging either to Israel or to the Arabs But
the actual facts of life were determined in 1948
when the U.N., which should have governed this
international territory, failed to prevent an all-out
Arab attack and siege of the city. The siege was
lifted by the Israel Army. Since then, Jerusalem has
been divided into the western and southern Israel
part, and the northern and eastern Jordanian part,
which also includes the famous Old City.
The Arab countries regularly try to revive the
question of internationalization of Jerusalem. All,
that is, except Jordan, which considers its sector of
the city just as much part of its national territory
as Israel considers her sector.
In the early years of Israel's independence, the
Western Powers tried to turn the clock back. They
protested when Israel moved the Knesset and offices
of the national Government to Jerusalem. They boy-
cotted official functions held at the capital and
even tried to limit the contacts of their diplomats
with the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem. Israel
adopted a policy of slow erosion of this opposition.
Since then, an acceptable modus vivendi developed,
enabling both sides to maintain their positions with-
out a clash between them.
Most of the foreign embassies are located in
Tel Aviv. Thus they can maintain that they did not
accept Jerusalem formally as Israel's capital.
Y*.


liday. July 15. 1966
*Jemsti ITtDirndHain
Page 15-A
LEGAL NOTICE
THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR OAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71155-A
liK; Bkftste of
i;:i;i) II. LINK
I 1,1'rJi.''' i.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
, \|| ( ilil.-i and All Persons
.vi'ng Claims or l>einunds Against
hou are tier.by notified and required
1 present any olalms and demands
iich you may have against the es-
T[. of FRED H. IiINK deceased late
ICade County. Florida, to the Cmjn-
ludge" <>f 1 lido County, and file
. .same in duplicate and an provlde Section 7:(X.16. Florida Statutes. In
|. h- offices in the County Courthouse
Hade County, Florida, within six
I nriar months from the time of the
publication hereof, or the same
III he barred.
fl. ,i..(| at Miami. Florida, this 24th
of June. A.I'. H'66.
MAKV LINK
As Executrix
First publicHtion of this notice on
jlth day of June. 1966.
I.UON, HAVS & (llll'XUWKRU
)l"iney for Estate
! Ainaley Building
6/24 7/1-8-15
THE COUNTY JUCGC'S COURT
IN AND FOR OAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. A71391
III.-: Estate of
cknh mumpow i;n
'notice to creoitors
All Creditors and All Persons
.iving Claims or Itiiuiiids Against
. i estate:
j'ou are herein notified and re-
lired to present any claims and de-
nds which you may have against
estate of EUGENE Ml'MPOWEB
-ased late of Dade Count)'. Florida,
II..- County Judge* "f Hade Coun-
and flle^ the suiie in duplicate and
provided in Hection 788.14. Florida
mtee ,in their offices in the Coun-
I'.iurthouse i: Dade County, Plor-
u.ihln six calendar months from
"> of the. first publication here-
r the same nil1 be I.urred.
ati-d at Mt.iti: Florida, this 85th
of June. A.D
FRANCES '. HAFNER
:'917 S' V. 57th Ct.
Miami. Fia.
As Bhtecutvix
.1 p iblicatior. of this notice on
-i day of July. 1986.
H11JRT SCOTT KAUFMAN
to n.y lor Executrix
Hisca\ne Building
7/1-8-16-2!
DMMV
BY HENRY LEONARD
"Me afraid of dying?... Ridiculous!
I'm afraid of LIVING!"
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE by publication
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit
of florida in and for dade
county, in chancery
No. 66C 6685
VIRGINIA KAZIK.
Plaintiff,
Di.MlTlti KAZIK,
Defendant.
TO: DIM1TRI KAZIK
1160 Curl.. Avenue
New York City, New Yorlt
Vou, DIMITRI KAZIK. are hereby
notified that a liill of Complaint for
Divorce has been filed against you,
and you are required to serve ;c cony
of your Answer or Pleadinu to the
liill of Complaint on the plaintiff's At-
torney, thkoixh-k m. tRUHUN,
(89 IJneoln Road, Miami Beach, Flor-
ida 83189, and file the original Answer
or Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
1st day of August, lftHJ. If you fail to
do so, judgment by default will he
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Hill of Complaint.
This notice shall he published once
eaeh week for lour eonsecutivc weeks
in THK JEWISH FLORICIAN.
DONIC AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 2Srd day of June. A.D.
1889.
B. .11. LEATHERMAN, clerk
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
By I.. s.vkkdex
Deputy Clerk
T1II"X>I >!{!: M. TRUSHIN
42 Miami Beaoh, Florida
Attorney for the Plaintiff
7/1-8-15-M
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
+Jewist) tkridiiftr
solicit* your legal notice*.
W* appreciate) youi
patronage and guarantee)
accurate eenrice at legal
tales
Dial FR 8-4MI
lor
LEGAL NOTICF
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
-EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 66.C 6555
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IMS SAI.A.
Plaintiff,
IT1.1.NA PKREZ de XALA.
1 IWendant.
I-'EI.ina PEREZ d.- SALA
Calif U No. 96116
San Juan de Ins Plnos,
f- m Miguel del Padron
1 lavana, Cuba
I" AKfcJHEREBY notified that a
iplaim for Divcco,. has bean field
''. >';, and you are hereby re-
to ~.i v.-, a copy of your answer
tlio rmy. IJSCSTEK ROtiKRftS, who.-e
V :9 N.W. nth Street. Ml-
i. Hon.la, and file the original of
Answer In the office of the Clerk
tlio Eleventh Judicial Circuit in
I for Hade Countv. Florida, on or
ore the 2mh day of July. 1P66. in
rault of which the Complaint will
taken >- confessed by vou.
DATED this 2lst day of June. 1966.
E. H LEATHERMAN
Clerk fit the Circuit Court
Ly.C. V. COPKLAND
R'M-7'1.0-1-,
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71151-C
In RE: Kstate of
KM A XI' I: I. IIA N T MA N
1 leceaaed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona
Having. Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which siui may have against the es-
tate 0* KMANl'KI, HANTMAN. de-
ceaaed late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County JudjjpM !' l>ade Coun-
ty, ami file the same in duplicate
and as provided In Section 733.16.
Florida Statutes, in their offices III
th. county Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, with six ealendar months
from the time of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred.
Date.I .it Miami. Florida, this 1,'ith
day of June. A D. 1966.
IXil'ISt: HANTMAN
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice on
the 16th day Of June. l!"l'i
A1.NSI.KI-: F. FKRDIE
Attorney lor Administratrix
Suite 2 .'-204
231S S\\ l.i-.l.um- Road,
Coral Gables, Florida
6/24 7/1-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 3010
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MARY LOV18E BENNETT,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PVT. HAKi'I.n BENNETT,,
I tefendant.
TO: PVT, HAROLD BENNETT
1*863001041
CO. B 12th P..N. 1st Trng. DDK.
USATC1 2nd Plat.
l-'iii-t Helming, tleorgla 3190"
Vi lU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Complaint fi>r Diver., has been
filed against you. and you are hereby
required to serve a oopy "i your an-
swer to the Complaint on the Plain-
tiffs attorney, DKSTKK ROGERS,
whose address is 888 N.W. nth Street,
Miami. Florida, a ml file the original Of
the Answer in the office of the Clerk
of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit in and
for Dade County. Florida, on or before
the 86th day of July. 19C6. in default
of which the Complaint will be take!
u- confess! -1 by you.
DATED this 20th day of June. 1906.
i: B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
i:> N. A. HKWKTT
<; :'i T 1-8-15
':
J" CIRpUIT COURT OF THE,
EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. 66,0 6558
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
SA LJSE KJUHEY,
'lalntlff,
VH.
IKS fj. KK'HEY.
19 Orion As.
Villa;;. Illinois
ndant,
OU AltE HEREBY NOTIFIED
t a Complain) roi Divorce has
" filed aa-alnal you and you are
uu-ed to s.-rve a copy of vour An-
r ct- pleading to th.- Complaint on
Plaintiffs attorneys, WHITK-
II. and KoimiNB. Palm Springs
ressional Building. Kui West 49th
*t. Iligleah. Florida, and file the
mal Answer and pleading In the
of the Clerk of the Circuit
on or before the 28th day of
ist>t>. if JI)U fall tp do so, iudg-
t by default will be taken against
ror the relief demanded in the
plaint,
?ONE and ORDERED In Chambers
[Miami. Dade (Jounty, Florida, this
pt day of June, 1966.
T.' }$ l-K^TMERMAN, Clerk
cult Court of Dade County, Florida
By C. F, COBKLAND
6/24 7/1-S-l".
lee
li rt
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6571
NOTICE OF SUIT
PATRICIA CYW1NSKI,
Plaintiff.
STANUtV CYWNSKJ,
Defendant.
TO: STANLEY CYWINSKJ
c.o Mary Cywlnskl
367 Clinton Street
VVyandotte, Michigan
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Complaint lor Divorce has been
filed against you, and you are re-
quired to Berve a copy of your Answer
or other pleading upon Plaintiff's at-
, ALAN SILVERfTSaN, 420
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Florida.
and fil the original of your Answer
or other pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court. Dade
County Court House. Miami. Florida.
On or before the 25th day of July. 1966,
In default of which a decree pro con-
fesso will be entered against you.
DATED at Miami, Dade County.
Florida, this 21st dav of June. I960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of Circuit Court
By L. 9NEBDEN
Deputy Clerk
6/24 7/1-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6578
NOTICE OF SUIT
MICHAEL .!. BICHSELA,
Plaintiff,
JOSEPHINE B ZICHELLA,
Defendant. .
TO: JOSEPHINE B /.l< II1.IJ.A
298 North Mountain Avenue
Upper Montclalr, New Jersey
TO!' ARK HERKP.Y NOTIFIED
thai Complaint for Div. re. hat
filed against you. and you are re-
quired to.s.-rv.- 4 copy of your Answer
or other pleadjne. upon PUvintlfl
attorney. ALAN SII.YKKSTKI.N. 420
Lincoln Roaif, Miami Behch, Florida,
and file the original of \our Answer
or other pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Dade
Countv Court House, Miami, Florida,
on or before the 25th d.o of July,
1966, in default of which a decree pro
confesso will be entered against you.
DATED at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 21st day of June, 1966.
K. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of Circuit Court
By I-. BNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
6/24 7/1-8-15
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6652
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
ACMlKY i:. BELLINGER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GORDON SCOTT BELLINGER,
Defendant.
TO: UORDON BCOTT BELLINGER
13 Brandt Plai
Amsterdam, X.w York
You, CORDON SCOTT BELLINOER,
are hereby notified thai a Bill of
Complaint for Divorce has been filed
against you, and you are required to
serve a copy ing to the Bill of Complaint on the
Plaintiffs attorney. DUBBIN,
SCHIFF, BBRKMAN .>; DUBBIN.
.".14 Dul'ont Plaza Center, Miami.
Florida 83181, and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 88th day of July. 19U6. If
you fall to do so, judgment by default
will he taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THK JEWISH FDUHIDIAN.
DONE AND OIlDKKED at Miami,
Florida, this 22nd day of June. A.D.
n't;.;.
B. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
Circuit Court, Dade County. Florida
Bj : C. P. COPBLAND
Deput) DUBBIN, SCHIFF, BERKMAN
<< DUBBIN
Attorneys for Plaintiff
514 l 'uPonl Plasa l 'enter
Miami, Florida 88381
6/24 7 1-8-15
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 70854-A
In RE: Kstate of ....,
II.. .RBNCBL. DEARBORN
Deceased. __
NOTICE TO CREOITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Kstate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you mny have against the es-
tate of FLORENCE 1-. DEARBORN
deceased late of Dade County, Hor-
iila, to the County Judges Of Dade
County, and file the same fn duplicate
anil as provided In Section I33.lt>
Florida Statutes, In their offices in
the County Courthouse In Dade coun-
ty, Florida. within six calendar
months from the Mine of th first
publication hereof, or the same win
be barred. .
Dated al Miami. Florida, this 21st
das of June. A.D. I9JS6. ......
I%l VIRGINIA ii:i: POSNBR
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the -'2nd dav of June. 1866.
ARONOVIT2, SILVER .v SCHER
Attorm v for Exi outrlx
801 Alnsle) Buliainvj S/M7/1-8-U
E COUNTV JUDGE'S COURT
N AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71084-8
t: EsU'.i of
Y C. FLUHR,
eoeaeed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All Creditors and All Persons
tng Claims or Demands Against
I Estate:
ou are hereby notified and re-
red te present any claim* and de-
nds which you may have against
estate of HARRY C. FLUHR
eased late of Dado County. Florida,
the Count* -Judgee of Dade Coun-
and file the same In duplicate and
provided in Reel ion 733.18. Florida
tutes. In their offices In the Ooun-
Courthuuse In Dado County. Flor-
v-ithin six ealendar m-mtha from
time of the first publication here-
or the name will lx barred,
ated at- Miami, Florida, this 29th
y of June, A.D. 1966.
CKIJA H. FIAIHR
KDWARD FDUiril
ROBERT 3. FLUHR
As F.xoc.ulor.M
[Flrgt publication of this notice on
1st day of July, 1966.
HOLD. .SalAVlRO,
orney for Flxeuutors
Lincoln Road
ami Beach. Florid* ,_,...
IN THE COUNTY JUCGE'S COURT
IN ANC FOR DACE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71324-C
In RK: Kstate of
I/HT1S .1. W1CKNETR.
""NOTICE TD CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hay-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Kstate: ,
You are hereby notiried and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may.hv'' ^BSl
ihe estate of LOUIS J. WKKNUt
deceased late of Dad* County. Florida,
to the County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 783.16. Florida
Statutes. In their offiees in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade County. Flor-
ida within six calendar months from
the time of Ihe first publication here-
of, or the tame will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 22nd
day of June, A D. 1866.
' MM: ETTA MUJ.F.R
1U3: 1R.VINO H. SCHWARTZ
As Buecutors
First publication of this notice on
tho 87th day of June. 1966.
MARVIN I. WIENER, ESQ.
Attorney for Co-Executors
13 Ainaley Building, Miami Fia-
7/1 -8"II>*62
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 70806-B
In RK: Estate of ^
MORRIS GOLDEN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Ha Id Estate: .
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of MORRIS GOLDEN, deceased
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided In Section 733.16. Florida Sta-
tutes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Datnd at Miami. Florida, this 13th
day of June, A.D. 1966.
*y PACLA L f!OfJ>EN
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice on
the 24th day of June. 1966
PAUL KWITNEY
Attorney for Estate of Morris Golden
420 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach. Florida ^ ^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QlVl N that
the undersigned, desiring to i i;age
In business under the floti: ou.> me
of la PLAZA RESTAURANT \nd
BAH. at II"" \V,..-t Flaglar -tr.. Mi-
ami. Florida, Intend! to r. .-_ -aid
name with the Chirk of C. lit
Court of Dade Cuunty", i"i<...
.IKS IS i Ala i PERA2A
sole OA ;., r
AIN8LEE P. FERDIB
Attorney for Apjilicaut
Suite L'n2-:iM
2il0 S\V I.eJeune Read
Coral Cables, Florida J3J34
8/24; -IB
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71100-B
in RE: Estate of
MORRIS LUNCH
Dccc.is. d.
NOTICE TO CREOITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate: ,
You are hereby notified and required
to present anj claims and demands
Which vou may have against the es-
tate of MORRIS LUNCH, deceased,
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in their offices In the
Conty Courthouse In Dade County,
Florida, within six calendar months
from the date of tho first publication
hereof, or the same will !> barred.
MiLTi >N F 1.1'NCH
BERNh i: -1 SHESTACK
As Executors >f 0 nstate of
M.i rls ased.
ROBERT H TRAURia
Attorne}
: 183 A. 1 duP int Building
Miami. Floj :!..
6/24 T'l-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 'HE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUI- OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 66C 7110
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TIIKt'DORK Fl.'ltlA,
l'lain'iff.
CATHERINE FURl V
Defendant.
YOU, CATHERINE FURl V 938
Morris St.. Phllad. IpJ ., Penn
are rciuired to flfi your unswei to
the Complaint for Dlvqrce wi'ii the
Clerk of the abov. <'o>irt and serve
a coiiy thereof upon Herman Cohen,
Ks.|., 1310-11 Congre-w lildg.. Miami,
Florida, on or before August -th,
1966, or else complaint will bo taken
as confessed.
DATKD at Mia- 11, Hade C< nty,
Florida, this 6th .1.., of July. l6.
B. B. LKA'l'He ".MAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. U.\UN
7/8-15-25 -
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
NCnOK IS HKRBBY (I1VI-N thlt
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BMCMi. at 1042 Seybold Building
Miami. Florida intends to register said
name wtth tho Clerk of the. Circuit
Court of l^ad" Countv. l-lornla.
C HIIH1N1-S4S MAN'S CRJBDTT
numaii. iNtjjuuMR.vraTD
A Florida Corporatibn____
Ry- ROBERT L. ROSENBERO
President
MAX A. OOLDFARB ,
Attorney" for Business Mans Credit
Bureau, Inc.. a Florida, ^j.g.^.y
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, de-siring to engagd
In business und of PALMA C1C.ARS at 296 Northweat
26th Street. Miami, Florida, intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Cifeuit Court of Dade County,
TOEAR HAVANA CIGARS. INC.
MARTIN LHMLICH
Attorney for
Omar Havana Cigars, Inc.
M-10T. Blscayne Building
Miami, Florida
7/1-8-16-2J
NOTICE TO DE F-END
or
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRQUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No- 66C 713?
SUIT FOR D!\ ORCE
WILLIAM C. RAY,
Plaintiff
vs.
IRENE KAY,
Defendant.
TO: IRHNi: HAY
61 Falmouth Street,
Portland, Maine
You. IRENE KAY, are hereby noti-
fied that a Bill of Compluint for Di-
vorce has been filed against you, and
you are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the Bill
of Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attor-
ney. M. H. ROVENHOUKE, 910 Olym-
pia Building. Miami. Florida, and file
the oriirlrwl Answer or Pleading in
the office of the Clirk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 12th day of
August. 19S6 If you fail to d.
judgment by default will he taken
againat you for the relief demanded
in the Bill of Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 6th day of July. 1966.
E. B LEATHERMAN
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Seal) By M. CAVALARIH
Deputy Clerk
7/8-15-22-i9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6578
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
SAM I'EL D. DOH.NF1KLD,
Plaintiff.
VS. J
ZELDA .1. DORNFIELD,
Defendant
TO: ZELDA J. DORNFIELD
:i^4 West I'm. Street
1-Ong Beach, L.I., New York
YOU M.K HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Cosnlalnt for Divorce has been
filed against you, and ypu at< re-
quired to serve a copj of > mr Answer
r pleading to the Complaint on tho
Plaintiff's attorneys, TALIANt IW &
WALLER, 420 Lincoln Road, Miami
i .. h, Florida, and file the or ginal in
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, on or before the -.".til day of
July, l!>tii>. If you fail to do bo, judu-
ment by default will be taken against
you for the ruilcf demanded in tho
Complaint
HONE and ORDERED at Miami,
Dade County, Florida, this 21st duy
of June. 1966.
K. R. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade Count) Courthouse
Miami, Florida
Bj: L. SNEEDBN
Deputy Clerk
_______________ 6/2-1 j MS
FN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Ir'E
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7192
the
NOTICE OF SUIT
THE WILLlAMSlll RC11
SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHIRLEY L. HOI.TON, a k a
SHIRLEY L. P1NCUS, et u.\, et al,
Defendant.
TO; SUSAN SPBCTOR
RFI> No. 1 12768
Parksville, Sullivan County,
New York
Y'ou are hereby notified that
Jbove cajitione.l action has bun insii-
uted against yon In the Circuit Court
of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit of
Florida In and for Dade Count >
foreclose a mortgage upon the foil', a-
ing described real pruperty:
Lot 26, Block 5, HI. ill I.A" '
MANOR SECTION TWO accord-
ing to the plat thereof, reel I I
In Plat Hook 61 at Page b'. jf
the I*ublic Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Yqu are required to file a respon-
sive pleading to plaintiff's complaint
with the Oerk of the aforesaid Court,
and servo a copy thereof upon plain-
tiffs attorney, MARTIN FINK. Dade
Federal Building, Miami, Fl.wida 8:1131,
not later than AujruSt IS. 1986. or a
Decree Pro Confesso will be entered
against vou.
DATKD July 7, 1966
E. II. LEATHERMAN ,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By K. M. LYMAN
Deputy Clerk
MARTIN FINE
Dade Federal Building
Miami. Florida, .JJIjI
7/lo-2:-;S 8/5


Pagel6-A 1
+Jewlst> HhridHnr
Friday, July 15, lgJ
= 1

..... R^_
flL^B
jj^^^v'
WINS $1000
t MRS. LILLIAN I HARRISON MIAMI BEACH
TH.S WEEKEND yQU ^y W|N ^OOO!
CUP THESE FREE GAME SUPS
TO HELP YOU WIN!
YOUR CHANCE TO WIN
TWICE AS
SERVICE DELICATESSEN AT STORES WITH APPETIZER DEPTS.
FOOD

FAIR
Corned
Beef
LEAN
DELICIOUS
Stone-diced
to youi oncCe*
FRESHLY SMOKED, FANCY
Sturgeon
SAVE 80* LB.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WEEKEND
EXCLUDING KOSHER MARKETS
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


Stone-diced t* yawi .-5;
ALL WHITE MEAT
CHICKEN ROLL
STORE SLICED TO YOUR ORDER
LARGE... FRESHLY SMOKED
Whitefish
SAVE 40< LB.

SAVE
40 LB.
BORDEN'S All VARIETIES
Cheese _,
Spreads Mr

KOSHER ZION FRANKS
or
Merchants
IjGREEN STAMPS I
Knocks
SAVE 20< LB.
v
Merchants Green Stamps...yours FREE with every purchase!


.l.
oman s
lUorU
:-B
"clewisli Floridian
Miami, Florida, July 15, 1966
Section 3
Ethel Dolgin, 15-year-old Los Angeles Hebrew day school
student, is presented with a trip to Israel this summer by Mrs.
Rose L. Hcrtprin, chairman, Jewish Agency-American Section,
on winning the seventh annual Bible contest sponsored by the
Agency's Department of Education and Culture. Ethel was the
winner in the Advanced Hebrew division. Other winners of
trips to Israel were Brenda Fleschner 16, of Far Rockaway,
N.Y., in the Intermediate Hebrew division, and David Bruce
Witkin 14, of Denver, Colo., winner in the English competition.
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller receives a lithograph by Yehuda
Bakon from Mrs. Max Scnenk, national treasurer of Hadassah.
Looking on are (extreme left) Mrs. Joshua L. Lewis, honorary
president of the Mizrachi Women's Organization of America,
and Mrs. Sidney A. Leff, national vice president of Pioneer
Women. Occasion was the proclamation of "Child's Day for
Youth Aliyah" at special ceremonies in the Governor's office.
The three organizations are the sponsors of this annual cele-
bration which underscores the work of Youth Aliyah, inter-
national child welfare movement. Yehuda Bakon, a survivor
of Auschwitz and a Youth Aliyah graduate, is now a prom-
inent Israeli artist of international repute.
.
A $1,000 prize-winner in Food Fair's shopping game has do-
nated the money to the Hillel Foundation student centers at
the University of Miami and the University of Florida The
lucky shopper is Mrs. Henry Blum, of 2305 S. Flagler Dr West
Palm Beach, who is shown presenting the check to Jay Marko-
witz, of Tampa, National Hillel Commissioner for the south-
eastern states, at the Miami campus. Mrs. Blum is president
of the Florida State Association of B'nai Bnth Women s
Chapters.
by ISABEL GROVE
Touring through Northern Eur-
ope, Paule and Martha Marks
boarded the SS Argentina in New
York on July 7 for an extended
cruise through the Scandinavian
countries and the Baltics ... In
addition to several days in Len-
ingrad, there will be other brief
stops in Russia, as well as longer
ones in Iceland, Norway, Sweden,
Finland, Denmark, Belgium and
England Some of the trip
will be a sentimental journey,
since the Marks will be returning
to places where they touched
down during their honeymoon .
And in England, they'll meet
friends who were also part of
that first tour Returning to
New York around Aug. 10, it will
not be too long after that when
Mr. Marks will be back at Flagler
Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation, where he is chairman of
the board.
* *
Busy, busy days for Gail Suz-
anne Smilan as her July 31 mar-
riage to Donald Robert Tescher
at the Diplomat Country Club
comes closer Among parties
given for the bride-to-be was a
recent shower hosted by Mrs.
Martin Karns and Mrs. Edward
Tescher Daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. I^awrence Smilan, pretty
Gail will fete her bridesmaids
and out-of-town guests at a lunch-
eon on Friday, July 29, at the
Yorkshire Inn The following
day, the bridegroom's mother,
Mrs. Irma Tescher, will honor
the couple at a family luncheon
for wedding guests.
*
Now returned from a month-
long vacation. Rabbi and Mrs.
Simon April divided their time
between visits with daughter Es-
ther, spouse Herbert Blumenthal
and their three in Savannah. Ga ,
and the Chattanooga, Tenn.. home
of son Rabbi and Mrs. Samuel
April and their two .
Leaving Sunday for New York,
Rabbi Sherwin and Barbara Stau
ber will jet from there to Israel
for their first trip to Israel .
During their parents' six-week
stay in the Holy Land, the four
young Staubers will remain in
New York with family Sev-
eral Saturdays before departure
date, the vacationers were hon-
Contirued on Page 5-B
sunshine fashions
RD I NE '
the newly elegant
Dacron" knits
*40
By Domani silken
in texture, soft in
detailing, exciting
in transition colorings.
Du Pont's Dacron '
polyester knits are
packable, washable.
Bell Sleeve two-piece;
8-16. Two-piece with
welt seaming; 10-18.
Both in navy or
wineberry.
mines' moderate dresses,
third floor
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
(t all 6 Burdine's stores)


Page 2-B
+Jewish norSdiiiair,
Friday, July 15. 1966
BimKWNHHigmMIHIIII


... sz/tbout f*eople and f^li
I Jewish Identity Furthers Interest
^_ m---_ n IS I I A I A Am rl T n. on /"' n --. L ^ _. f __ -
[aces

MIAMI GOES TO BUCK KEY
The Fourth, the glorious Fourth of July.
Every time'you turned around at the Indies Inn
in the Florida Keys, you bumped into someone
from Miami.
t *
ALMOST A DOZEN
Waiting for their parents in front of the
breakfast buffet were the most adorable group
of youngsters from 15 months to six years of age.
Their parents, four couples of them, always go on
vacations together. They are Joan and Jerry
Leader and their three adorable little girls. Tain-
mi, Jodi and Randi; Nan and Eddie Friedland
I and their three cuties, Randi, Ilene and Leslie;
Marcia and Harold Sheff with their red-haired
Dana and blonde Kim; Simone and Ivan Perl-
man, who broke the pattern by having two boys,
Keith and Mark, and sister Lauren.
* *
A PHONE CALL
Sylvia and Buddy (Sandford) Kramer got a
phone call from Chicago from Diek and Adele
Rubin, who said they had just met Ed Gralnick
and his family who sent greetings to all of their
former Miami neighbors. The Rubins, with their
brood, Donna, Sheldon, Andy and Elizabeth, are
touting the States in their home-on-wheels, the
Dodge Bus; it is fully air conditioned, has stereo
is equipped with surf boards and a Honda for
quick trips to the store for bread. The Rubins
have sold their home in Golden Beach, and no
doubt will move to another beach Miami Beach.
*
BICYCLES, AIRLINES AND FISH
Josie and her doctor husband, Lewis Gluec-
kauf, went for a tandem bicycle ride up the tree-
lined entrance to the Inn. Barbara and Marvin
Brown were sitting under the seagrape tree with
Millie Wasman trying tt> persuade Millie's hus-
band. Dr. Stanley Wasman, that he shouldn't rent
a plane because the air was so crowded. But
they didn't and he did. The Friday Night Club
caught forty pounds of fish and had it frozen to
take back home. Thoy forgot to take it, of course.
But they had fun catching them. Among the
catchers were Mildred and Maury Gidney, who
are pretty keen fisherfolk they get a lot of
practise at home and Manny Luck, who's no
slouch either and his son, Joel. Carolyn Luck
went down to the dock to see them off and then
was there to give them a royal welcome.
*
AROUND THE POOL
In and out of the water were Doris and Ted
Warren, Marshal and Barbara Kline, and Ellie
and Bill Levin. Every' once in a while there would
be a glimpse of Jerome and Zenia Weinkles*
teen-agers, Stevie and Louis. The three Kramer
offspring, Larry, Bobby and sister Susan, who
was flashing her dimples, were asking Bobby
Glueckauf to play his guitar. Esther and Allan
Kessler managed to get a little sun, too, in
between seeing that everything was going
smoothly.
* :
A PARTY A PARTY A PARTY
Saturday night in the dining room there was
an extra special party going on. Eileen and Jerry
Goldsmith were there with their sons, Richard
and David. Jerry, amid a lot of applause, was
given a neatly-wrapped present, which turned
out to be "A Lovers Lunch" (all filled with
canned goodies). Dave (he was the one with the
big cigar) and Bette Lehman gave it to him be-
cause of the marvelous cooking he does on their
boat, "The White Cap." Arthur and Yvette Burkie
came down on their boat, too. Included in their
group were Mattie and Howard Brenner with
their sons. David and Michael, Irving Lehman
and his girl, Mary, Ethel and Harry Guntler,
Lilly and Charles Medwood, Andy Guntler and
Mark Goldsmith and Ann and Sam Wenig. There
was another big dinner party, Roz and Byron
Topcl, who came down by boat, too, and a group
of their friends.
Frances Lehman
""*'""'

Emanu-EI Day Campers Mark Independence Day
Temple Emanu-El's Day Campers man, Susie Weinstock, Zita Wilen-
celebrated July 4 with a special
assembly on Friday dedicated to
American and Israeli independ-
ence.
The Junior Girls Group, directed
by Inez Samuels, senior counselor,
assisted by Maxine Firtel and Su-
sanne Singer, junior counselors,
consists of Debby Aberman, Rose
Ann Abrams, Rebecca Bear. Thea
Berens, Ellen Cohen, Debby Firtel,
Roberta Green, Sherci Habu. Susan
Kreisler, Eileen Lurie, Ettie Taul.
Ellen Rochles, Mayra Reyler. Gale
Ross, Maria Rothstein, Abbe Suss-
sky. Sheri Zilman.
The Temple's Day Camp, now
in its ninth consecutive year, is
under the supervision of Dr. Irv-
ing Lehrman and direction of Mil-
ton Feinstein, head of the Social
Studies Department and former
athletic director at Miami lieach
High School.
The synagogue-centered program,
for boys and girls from 4 to 12 \
years of age, includes athletics,
field trips, dramatics, singing and-]
dancing, arts and crafts, and' a
weekly Sabbath- service. Transport
Germans Seek Return of Nazi
ACCRA (JTA) Two repre-
sentatives of th? West German
Government arrived here this week
to negotiate an extradition treaty
with the new Ghana Government,
to make possible the extradition
of a Nazi who took refuge in
Ghana for several years.
The Nazi is Dr. Herat Schumann,
who is wanted In Bonn for truss
murder as a physician at the Au-
schwitz death camp. The Nkrumah
regime refused to accept West
German requests for the extradi-
tion of Dr. Schumann, who came
to Ghana in the late 1950's as a
medical officer in the Health Min-
istry here.
He is now under protective cus-
tody.
tation and lunches are provided.
The second, four-week -session of
day camp begins on July 11 and
concludes on .Aug. 5. Registration
for the -second session will be ac-
SANTIAGO, Chile (JTA) A
Conference on Jewish Identity ant
Identification, the first of its load
in Chile, has been held here undei
auspices of the Kehila Ashkenaz
of Chile, the Circulo Israelite and
the Association of Jewish Profes-
sionals of Chile.
The Conference was inaugurated
by Dr. Uri Naor, Israeli Ambassa-
dor to Chile, Gil Sinay, president
of the Representative Committee
of the Jewish Community of Chile,
Prof. Abraham Monk, director of
the Latin American office of the
American Jewish Committee,
Radolta BerauUky, president of
the Zionist Federation of Chile,
Israel Party
Aids Camp Fund
In* Cleveland. 6a.
Temple Israel Sisterhood is hav-
ing a summer youth camp fund
party and luncheon on Wednesday
noon, Aug. 3, in the Wolfson Audi-
torium.
Proceeds from the affair, which
will include a cake sale, will go
toward two- two-week camp schol-
arships to the Southeastern Fed-
eration of Temple Youth Camp in
Cleveland, Ga.. next summer.
Chairman of the event are Mrs.
Alvin Katzif, Mrs. Jules Balaban,
and Mrs. Louis Fegelman, who is
in charge o reservations.
CARIH Unit Sets
18th Luncheon
Lorber Chapter, Children's Asth-
ma Research Institute and Hospi-
tal, will hold its 18th membership
luncheon on Tuesday at the home
of Mrs. Irwin Block.
The affair, under the direction
of Mrs. Julius Seidner, membership
vice president, will be chaired by
Mrs. Robert-Smith and Mrs. Sidney
Harris.
Chapter president is Mrs. San-
cepted at the main office. ford Freed.-
odiLoo
julcq omcL
SALAMI
TIM PURE BEEF
Kaihruth Supervision by
prominent Orthodox Rabbi:
Rabbi Ben Zion Rosenthal
ind two steady Mashgichim
0~T If.lp.cto4
WILNO KOSHER-Stfc""" ?ff?JS-
.ALA*, FRANKFURTERS 2^^^
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 1-6551
MIAMI BRANCH:
"If I were denied
MILK
VITALITY COOLERS
/ couldn 't be the promising
youngster that I am."
SOUTHEAST FLORIDA DAIRY INSTITUTE
LEMON-BANANA
SHAKE
Yield: apttts. $ cues
1 pint vanilla ice. cream, softened
1 can (6 oz.) Iimm concentrated
lemonade, thawed
1 cup mashed kaunM
3 cups milk
1 pint vanilla ica cream
In mixing bowl while prating softened
ee cream, gradually add lemonade:
bleed in bananas. Gradually add milk
and mix until blended. Pour into large
glasses and top with scoops of ice
i up your own
MUb Vitality Coolers
and rawembot...
"UK'S TOO GOOD TO Bt
JUST FOR THE YOUNG
* BSF/VC 19
and Leon Gomberof. president of
Circulo Israelita.
The goal was not to arrive at
conclusions but rather to create
interest in the subjects discussed
and to stimulate future confer
encea. Leading Chilean profes
iionals and university students at-
tended the two-day conference.
bout
dWN
gathered for you
Miriam Held
cWat aoman appointedtoSuanaH <',,, i
No, this, is not a presidential appoint-
ment. Jt dales back some 3.000 yean
to Deborah, wife of Lapidoth, whom
the people elected judge and chief of
stale. Mrs. Lapidoth, a lady gifted
with the power, of prophecy and (he
gill of song, described herself simply
as "a mother in Israel." In .oilier
words, "just" a homemaker...
c\ evolutionary Aoti-Poert> Program
launched ... by Moses with lawi
thi throb with compassionate con-
cern for the underprivileged. "Antic-
ipate charity, by preventing poverty,"
urged his noted namesake Moses
M-iimpniJes, 800 years agq. "Aid a
man in reduced circumstances by
gifts or loans, or by leaching him a
trade, or by helping him to set up his
own business, so that he can earn an
honest livelihood." In the Judaic tra-
dition to help a man to help himself
is the highest form of philanthropy.
Commission proposes schooling for
4-year-olds. People were startled by
a proposal, made recently by leading
educators, for a lower school-starting
age. Yet for centuries it has been the
custom for Jewish children to enter
Cheder at the advanced age of three!
For summery menus here are t*o
b'ifthi ideas that are also light ideas,
both mail* with ease and sure Jo please.
CREAMY ONION CUSTARD
1 ...c 41 P-lanlers Oil 4 cups chopped Dnipns
1 cup.iight cream 2 eggs
1 teaspoon salt V*. teaspoon, pepper
Fine bread crumbs
Meal. Plantar* Oil in larne^kiUeL. A-ia
onion]. i>nd 'i cup cream; cook over low
I.i .ii mail oelaaa ace tender, about. 15
iiidime*. Measure about cup of. i!m
onloa mixture into each of nine custard
cops. Item tints, cream, sail and pepper
until light. Pour an equal amount (alMut
2 a tapicspoons) over onions in each cup.
SpriaMe with bread crumbs. Set custard
0 hsiii a pan of hot water. Bake .,( .< >r
F. about 25 to 30 minutes, or until set.
Serve hot. Makes nine savory custards.
Now this fili di\li with a sauiy Fienih
air h possibly the most delicious thing
thai lius ntr happened to cod!
CODFISH PROVENCAL
1 cup chopped onion Vi cup diced celery
U cup Planters Oil
2 cups (1 pjjtd J-ouace can) tomatoes
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 bay leaves IVi tsps. salt
V4 tsp. pepper 1 pound codfish fillets
Flour (optional)
In large skillet saute onion and celery In
Planters Oil unlit tender. Add tomatoes,
parsley, bay leaves, sail, popper. Goner)
suamer gently 20 minutes. Add flab; ik
' more remans, or until nab Hakes
osily with fork, ehtmotc Hab lo platter.
Of ihfckii sane* is desired, add a mile
ft** nd emk until thickened.) Serves .
Swtlwichesamyem? Pack m-m-mw.chy
surprises into ike.-* picnic pucka; I'D
these iuiusuuI Bread Spreads.
J*ngy Orange Treat
Cream % pound Heischmann's Mar-
garine with 2 teaspoons grated orango
rind. Gradually beat in 3 tablespoons
orange juice, % teaspoon lemon j,. co.
Nutly Idea
Cream 14pound FleJschmann'sMar-
ganne. Beat in 2 tablespoons dark.
brownsuKfan02tiiblcspoonigi.Kd
chopped pecans.
M-m-m for Mustard
blend V4 pound Hcischmann's Mor-
uurino with 2 tablespoons mustard
and 2 teaspoon* grated onion.
W invented tew saodwickr Cele-
brated first century scholar Rabbi
Hilrel who, as we read in the Passewer
Haggndhab, took (titter herbs and
"sandwiched" then between pieces *
eoatzo. He b, of course, known in
enany snore momentous contexts, but
we must give credit where credit's due.
MANNA ABOUT TOWN
IS A STANOARO BRANDS EXCLUSIVE
EXCLUSIVELY. FOR THE
BRIGHT YOUNG HOMEMAKER


Friday, ]uly 15. 19G3
>Jewisfi fkriafibr}
Page 3-B
At the annual planning conference of the
Southwestern Florida Region of Women's
American OB.T held at the Everglades Hotel.
Mrs. Jack Elssaberg. national vice president
(right), present the National ORT Day mem-
bership trophy for 1965-1966 to Mrs. Florence
Kupperman, past region president (left) as
Mrs. Phillip Stark, region membership vice
president (center), looks on.
CRITICAL INJURIES
PTA President,
Mrs. Benson,
Listed as 'Fair*
President of Miami Beach High
School PTA was removed from the
surgical intensive care unit at
Mount Sinai Hospital on Monday
following a weekend boating acci-
dent that nearly took her life.
Mrs. Jerome (Minette) Benson,
of 5261 LaGorce Dr.. was admitted
to Mount Sinai on Saturday night
following the accident in which
3he was felled and crushed against
a pier near Purdy Ave.. as she
and her husband, Dr. Jerome Ben-
son, approached the dock.
Mrs. Benson was forward prepar-
ing to throw the bow line up onto
the dock, when first one motor
died and the second failed to go
into reverse.
Mrs. Benson's condition was list-
ed as critical when she was ad-
mitted to Mount Sinai, where she
underwent immediate surgery for
multiple chest and abdominal in-
juries.
Dr. Benson is director of labora-
tories and pathology at Mount
Sinai Hospital. He is president of
MRS. JEROME BENSON
the Florida Society of Pathologies.
Mrs. Benson has been active with
the Quality Education Committee
of the Dade County School Board
and also in studies relating to edu-
cational television here. The
couple are members of Temple
Beth Sholom and have two dau b
ters.
Mrs. Benson was listed as fair
by hospital officials on Wednesday.
Hygienists Plan Convention Here
Leading British Intellectuals Hit Soviet Policy
LOND:N (ITA) Thirty-two
of the leading intellectuals in Bri-j
tain sen a protest which appeared
in a letter to the editor of The:
Times a London, objecting to the
Soviet Embassy's rejection of a
petition n behalf of greater reli-
gious and cultural freedoms for
Russian "ewry. The petition, pre-
sented to the USSR embassy here
a montb ago by 5,00 British uni-
versity : ..dents, had been rejected
on the -ound that 'there is no
Jewish p oblem" in Russia.
At the -ame ti n i, 127 members
Of Parliament, rr.ireienting all
politic;.! arties. Bled a motion in
the HOUM of Commons here, call-
ing upon the British Government
to secin- for the Jews in the Sov-
iet Union "the basic human rights
afforder to all other citizens of
the USJ." ." The rtution deplored
"the cc :inuing difficulties con-
frontinj: the Jews in the USSR."
The Joint letter to The Times
was signed by sane of the coun-
try's le.n-:ng authors, playwrights,
critic?,, liver;, y ) i jssors and
"Y" Presents
Musical Comedy,
UN! Program
The jung Peoples Theatre
Group, oi the M and WHA of
Greatei .:ami will present adapta-
tions of Mary Poppins" and "Bye
Bye Bu V on Svr-lay. 2 p.m., at
8500 STPl 8th St.
Mrs. R:;a Trilling is in charge of
choreogir hy. ami Betsy Soucy
and Judj Gindin asi'sted with cos-
tumes aod sets.
Miss Syd Ske-'sky. director of the
Jewish acd General Cultural Arts
Departme-t of the "Y," will super-
vise the ; roductions.
The Summer Day Camp of the
"Y" held a festive United Nations
Program on Sunday afternoon.
Ever> group in the Day Camp,
including boys and girls from kin-
dergarten through sixth grade, rep-
resented a different country
through ongs, dances, and his-
torical aVSts.
Partic;rants came from every
part of Dade County, and from all
three birches of the '%** North
Country, Central and Miami Beach.

political personalities. The letter
declared:
"It has been recognized for some
years, even by good friends of the
USSR in the West, that the sur-
vival of Soviet Jews as an historic
nationality is threatened by prac-
tices whic1! deny them cultural and
religious rights equal to those
given other Soviet national and
ethnic minorities. It is also known
that the Soviet Union has lagged
behind other East European coun-
tries which allow Jews victimized
by the Nazis to reunite with rela-
tives abroad."
The keynote of "How Common
Sense Living Can Improve Health
and Prevent Disease and Prema-
ture Death" will highlight the 18th
annual international public con-
vention on July 17 to 23 of the
American Natural Hygiene Society
this year, it was announced by
Mrs. Bess Mindes. of Surfside, con-
vention arrangements chairman.
The convention, which will be
held at the Barcelona Hotel, is ex-
pected to draw an attendance of
more than 1,000 hygienists, includ-
ing delegates from many of the
50 states, Australia, and Canada.
Assisting with meeting arrange-
ments will be Jack Solomon, na-
tional president, of West Palm
Beach; president of Greater
Miami Chapter. Jerome Cavell,
and Julius Berenson, of North
Miami Beach; Charlotte Shurin,
Abe Mindes, Ann Sharp, and
Goldie Press, of Miami Beaci;
Leonard May, of South Miami;
Bina Gordon, of Miami; and mem
bers of the Metropolitan, Holly-
wood, and Fort Lauderdale chap-
ters.
Saudis Threaten Ford
LONDON (JTA) Saudi-
Arabia has ordered Ford automo-
bile agents to leave that country
within three months unless tins
company "changes plans for open-
ing a branch in Israel," it was re-
ported here from Riyadh.
SIMCHAS
VISIT TO
AVDAT
IN THE
ipjlkNEGEV
The colorful remains of an ancient
Nabatean and Byzantine city have
been restored, deep in the burning
desert. Avdat thrived on the cara-
van trade between Egypt, Arabia
and India from about 200 BCE
into the 7th century CE.The
people lived on locally grown
food, made possible through an
ingenious irrigation system of
wadi dams, cisterns and channels.
To visitors, it is incredible that
Avdat was ever built or that
people could ever live there.
Yet today, they may see barley
ad other crops growing,
thanks to a revival of the
ancient Nabatean water preser-
vation system.
No matter what you do, all a
man is sure to talk about at
mealtime is the coffee. So why
not get the best there is,
Yuban, and get yourself a
compliment. Every cup a
joyous occasion, every sip a
simchaYuban!
The Simcha Coffee.
Certified Kosher and
Parve by Rabbis
Hersch Kohn
and Bernard Levy.
The premium coffe*
of General Foods.


7*7*

Friday. July 15. 1965
VdedicfoHan Cites Psalmist
NEW YOBS WVS
M OM
P"-J Kl

re i


,lr(
B "' .

at--. i i


rra -W3J' :e 1
Tam Ufa hi wan the B'na.
Zmb eabJ atedal far excellence ir
Hebrew The Farband Labor Zton
Ht enter awards for excellence ir.
Ikfata and Yiddish studies went
to William Mark Steinberg and
ShetU Scott Da. and Lots B.
Hater won the Julian Ofaexmanr,
prize for excellence in Chinese
Jewish students rated extremely
lush on the list of recipients of
prizes.
The ,** ** He-
ore* the **!* i*| *r** the
TSrb Psahw: -L*rw. who suit
at*** m the tabernacle? Wb*
staff wwwM m lb* hot* hill? He
Hue ii*isi wpriabHi, and
criteth nghaaowaness, and
c* Utmsteim Gets Decree
V...*
r-ZZZZ ZZZZT -r
r: -: sfzzJLZ us-? ;
BOB :: A rr: ; *-.~ \ie :;;;:.; r:~ i.-; 5_= ;-- rczLcs s
::. rs zzzz.zzzzz. :: 'Jir Haananr bafanj n*ad :? : 5:1 ILL :.?::; :;: v.?
A:i;-r :..-..- 5cz-c Prc-ect. r--rrl.--.- mjze szz.ee'. = c -
: .--*.- : ."
*i !:- v. ~.i :
ercu'iaa. Hss |
at ~2* C^seec

aaaafaf
BALTIMORE Biaustein. Jewish industrialist and
Ml leader, was awarded ar
honorary degree of Doctor of Fine
it commencement exercises of
the Maryland Institute of the Col
ege of Art The citation referred
n math- to Blaustein s activities m a:
ncsabers alurr. the Maryland Institute
cited h:- gffl *o the United
of the sculpture by Bar-
ibo* a ban Hepworth ir -. of the
j.-kjo!d
For Formal Summer Dining
= B06JU.IMO S ZUNSE5
:
i -: ft l-i-ri V.Z.Z Z : -^~
:* universal there an
- >aal naps af pr

7
>.".3cy wtoeh teas be -
-w ceok -
:
-

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Frwde Corned B*f wvrt. Cabc*?*
C--ofi %-ti petarc*s
--
1 ao-oo
2 data
stalk eelerr with leaves cut op
2 bay '.eaves
-taspooo. peppercorns
sprl* af

:- : i
Wb
-'3
:--* :- :.az-'-.;.. y-? v-.-_ -:.-ier
>i~ ::' :: ;a-ai BBBnahaaJ fah
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Narse'i: :.- :- "uiri-- Sj^c*


:.-.--. :z.:c ^Lp.11- i>:; :";..-
and an -. ntt real :-' -^r-e-:.?--.,
-Z.-... V.:,r -
Swanavanaa Su -
mat>,i
-.-*

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Waal
wa-
ne! -. I
caver, add
wbake ciaves.
nnj
Hetf fa) pal i
fresh water to
aafaa stack w-.-Jt 3
I stafa etiery wisk
.
4 ifaajnannnB anannad
1 :-: km laaBBn r .;<.
I ana, 2 baj ieanres.
-^--*---. i 1-.- 'a .
mt H a bad. co*ier and
ytiy antfl tenner (ahant
sh fann naanwi scum use
fanaf. ABaw to coat hi band
in waieh baaed. Kenaxe skkt. re-
hard nibiiimi and
M-x
Serre hat ar caht
NOW RENTING'.
BAY
TIRRAC I
Miami Beach's New Luxury Rental Apartments
'.'.: : : --: s o->d one-bedroom optj. Air Conditioned
: : ;:- : e.e-. jcr Laundry room and e?ro storage
: **- ec- Co'fee Shop Auditorium O Co'etorium
: -: *a Ca'pe- "g Spacious Baths O Central oir-tondi.
-: -: ;-; -.; -9 Mos'er TV antenna Overs.ie wolk-in
>r c GE k tchens Salt water heoted ansmbaj
::: a--3 a-eos Boo* ond ihing dock* Outdoor recreation
-;: C-e bn. to s-epp -g plus many more features for
e" ; o- t g
IcAiONABlE SENT AaMol, Seoson SEE THEM TODAYI
IIS* WOT AVL. MIAMI BEACH PH. 531-0171, S34-1M2

French Novelist
Wins Top Award
P.\BJS JTA. Jean Fran-
cois Steiaer. a 2t-rear-aal Jew.
was sraated here tfas week the
anaaal Prix de la Brrtrraari far
bank, enatied ^rebnaka."
The iJOa^ranc CUB prne was
aaasaaJ : kfai faajfai
by ssaa
iiv:
Coral
Babies
Convalescent
Home
. .fOi
fRIENDLY, GEHTlt
CARE IN GRACIOUS
SWUKHM04NGS KMT
THOSE YOU LOVE.
- FOR ENT -
af great btetar?
A Preach Cathahc
aes Maaaafa.
- fa anaaal Xarasae Le^ea
Award. I III I by the fan**
^ bCe Gw L***^ nee
^ af the AEaace faraenat
The Caral Gabies Cocvaiescer:
'hhiilj and ifaaaa ilj m. We i
plus |f'Tnaail:
'!-'.: .a. i iti

X2??2L *?*mt* *& niPPd ^ the care of the
i .-5-^? fT5^ wou t** to gh-e a loved one.
"*" aaa meoaai attenuon far be>ond any stncfa
SBtVKL
tarekaj
!Lh-n*
Or. J*.,^ Ham. Mr .*%,S3r**
C#f4il CaMes Conva/escenf Hoi
7-*i$.W. tin Street ^*t.
*"-!
Fk.
M6-1363


Friday, July 15, 1966
*Jei$tifk>rkHann
Page 5-B
Socialite ... by Isabel Qj
First copy of a new brochure outlining the General Land Use
Master Plan for Metropolitan Dade County is presented to
Mayor Chuck Hall by Planning Department Director Reginald
R. Walters (left) and Planning Advisory Board Chairman Emil
J. Gould (right). The brochure describing the plan recently
approved by the Board of County Commissioners will be
available free of charge to interested citizens.
Continued from Page IB
ored guests at a KMdush hosted
by Young Israel past presidents
Harry Lcrner and wife Ethel,
Emanuel Ungar and spouse Sarah.
Betty Jacobs didn't have to
change her name when she be-
came the bride of Mort Jacobs
50 years ago in Paterson, N.J.
. The couple celebrated their
golden wedding anniversary on
Saturday, June 25, by repeating
their vows at the Deauville Hotel
. Reception and dinner hosted
by the honorees' daughters and
husbands, Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Mufson, of Miami Beach, Dr. and
Mrs. Myron Tobias, of Fairlawn,
N.J. David and John Mufson,
Geoffrey, Jill and Joanne Tobias
serenaded their grandparents
with "The Years that Were" .
Many relatives from New Jersey
and California made the trip here
to share the milestone with the
Jacobs who have been local res-
idents for several years Mr.
Jacobs is active in North Dade
CJA.
* *
Several long distance phone
calls urging their aunt, Mrs. Flor-
ence Kupperman, to "hurry,"
speeding her motor trip to Wood-
men;, L.I., where she will spend
the summer with the David
Kleins ... In addition to relaxing
from the hectic pace she main-
tains here for ORT projects, per-
sonable Flo plans to see some
Broadway shows and watch her
brolh.-M-"s trotters ^at Roosevelt
Raceway.
* *
First child, a son. born to pop-
ular couple Rabbi and Mrs. Allen
Rutchik on July 11 at Cedars of
Lebanon Hospital The wel-
come young man's father serves
as director of the United Syna-
gogue of America's Southeast
Region He'll be named David
Hillel .
A second son born July 6 to
rove
Eleanor and A. Jay Cristol, of
244 So. Coconut I.n., joins brother
Steven M.
*
All systems "go" for the rapid
recovery of man-in-a-hurry, Jean
C. Lehman, now recuperating at
home from recent surgery at Mt.
Sinai Hospital Wife Frances,
son Jere, and mother-in-law Didi
Rothschild in close attendance
throughout the trying days, still
relating to Jean's many callers
his extended walk down the hos-
pital corridor" almost as soon afl
the anesthetic wore off .
Still several weeks to go for
Nikki (nee Kraus), Mrs. Jack
Press, who has already been con-
fined too long to Room 275 at
Mercy Hospital with a painful
back Helping to while away
the long hours is the patient's
mother, Yvette (Mrs. Micky)
Kraus, reminiscing about her re-
cent cruise through the Scandi-
navian countries.
Brochure Shows
New Master Plan
For Dade County
Distribution of a new brochure
with color-coded map outlining the
General Land Use Master Plan for
Metropolitan Dade County will be-
gin this week, according to Reg-
inald R. Walters, director of the
Dade County Planning Depart-
ment.
The plan envisions Dade County
by 1985 as a dynamic urban com-
munity with a population of nearly
2.5 million and sets a pattern for
the area's orderly growth and de-
velopment.
First copy of the new bro-
chure was presented to Mayor
Chuck Hall by Walters and Emil
J. Gould, chairman of the Plan-
ning Advisory Board.
Copies of the brochure were in
the mail Monday to officials of all
Dade municipalities and others
who have already requested a copy.
Public distribution will begin by
1he end of the week. A free copy
of the brochure can be obtained by
calling or writing the Dade County
Planning Department, 1351 NW
12th St., or the County Manager's
Office at the Courthouse.
The General Land Use Master
Plan recently was approved by the
Board of County Commissioners
culminating six years of intensive I
work and study by the Dade Coun-
ty Planning Advisory Board and j
Planning Department.
The plan will be a guide for
forming development decisions, (
public and private, city and coun-
ty, individual and corporate.
Its broad purpose as stated in
the Metropolitan Charter is to
"promote the public health,
safety, convenience, prosperity
and general welfare."
Ultimate goal of the plan is the
achievement of a physical, eco-
nomic, cultural and social environ-
ment which best meets the present
and future needs of Dade County
citizens.
The new brochure indicates the
location and extent of the various
major uses of land which planners
feel will be necessary to accom-
modate the projected 2.5 million
permanent residents plus several
million annual visitors.
Orthodox Leader Dies
JERUSALEM (JTA) Rabbi
Zalman Sorotzkin, chairman of the
Moetzet Gcdolei Hatorah, the Coun-
cil of Sages of the Agudath Israel
movement, died here at the age of
85. He was taken ill three months
ago but, according to his follow-
ers, he refused to enter a hospital
fearing a possible autopsy. Dozens
of heads of Yeshivot in Israel and
members of the Council were at
his bedside when he died.
fiOOn THINGS IN LIFE
i
Bagels. ..and Good Coffee
No taste in the world satisfies like a bakery fresh
bagel... and a cheering cup of Maxwell House
coffee. Both are constant, unchanging and match-
less in the joy they giveeach in its own, a tradi-
tional favorite in Jewish homes.
MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT OK REGULAR
Good to the Last Drop!
*4=* I*:!**"
AXWEU
'HOUSE
COTt&
K means Kosher. Under supervision of
Rabbis Hersch Kohn and Bernard Levy.
V
<


Page B-B
+Mwist fhrldian
Friday, July 13, i966
L
K
7.
ranees
JCJ
man
We
the
Women
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
No one would ever guess today that Dorothy (Mrs.
Arthur J.) Brown was a shy retiring, quiet child. After
graduating from high school in Boston. Mass., Dorothy
became a legal secretary. She felt that she wanted to have
a profession, so she went to the School of Law at North-
eastern University for four years at night. Not only did
she get a law degree, but she also
met her future husband. Arthur,
whom she calls Jack. They met
during their junior year. He was
going to law school, too, and they
were married in the middle of
their senior year. They graduated
together and passed the bar to-
gether, being the second couple
in Massachusetts to achieve this
distinction, and hung out a shingle,
Brown and Brown, in front of their
house.
Since childhood, Dorothy had
had a speech impediment. When a
friend wondered how one goes
DOROTHY into a courtroom speaking this
way, Dorothy realized that she
couldn't. By sheer grit alone, she overcame the impedi-
ment. In 1945. the Browns came to Miami with daughter
Joan Ruth, now Mrs. Gary Canner. Gary is a third year
law student. No sooner did they arrive in Miami, when
along came son Norman.
Law fell by the wayside because neither of the Browns
practised here. Jack is resident manager of Richard J. Buck
and Company in Bay Harbor. He started in the brokerage
business in Boston as a bench polisher and loved it. At
that time, incidentally, Joseph P. Kennedy was with the
same firm as a customer's man. When her daughter entered
kindergarten, Dorothy became involved in PTA and has
stayed there 17 years. She was president of the Parent
Teacher Association at Highgland Park Elementary and
North Miami Beach Junior High School. She then became
an area coordinator for Dade County Council, and later
chairman of legislature.
As a charter member of the Roosevelt Pythian Sisters,
she went through the chairs and is now past chief. At
the same time that Dorothy was most excellent chief, hus-
band Jack served as chancellor commander of Roosevelt
Lodge. Dorothy has been active for the past 11 years in the
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Moshe. She is past president
of the Sisterhood, as well as the Religious School PTA.
When she left the presidency of her Sisterhood, Dorothy
joined the board of the Florida Branch of National Women's
League, United Synagogue of America. Next, she was a
vice president, and presently she is the newly-elected pres-
ident. She has just returned from a meeting of the top
leadership, representing 771 synagogue women's groups
of the Conservative movement.
Dorothy firmly believes in what she is doing, making
sure that the Sisterhoods carry out the program of edu-
cation, service and religious activities of the League. Her
duties take her on trips throughout the state, which she
finds exciting and stimulating. Both she and her husband
are interested in congregational work. Dorothy has taught
Sunday School for the past five years, first and fourth
grades. She loves the children and her religion, which
makes her an excellent teacher, as well as a happy one.
Dorothy doesn t read as much as she would like; most
of that kind of time is devoted to preparing her notes and
speeches for speaking engagements. She's not fond of
housework, but likes knitting. Dorothy knitted her daughter
so many sweaters while she was in college that Joan could
have gone to two colleges. The Browns bowl a little, not
good enough for trophies, but good enough to have fun.
iintiniiiiimtiiii MMiii'iintmniuv
-*-'. -T :.il :" hlljllmii 11
JjriJal Cfift ARDMORE
1 STUDIO
1
JEl-3415
Spec iQIt Stl n
GcU&i
"EDDINGS
-1 BAR MITZVAHS
PORTRAITURE
COMMERCIAL
COPIES
FULL -' -OLP SEP.
738 ARTHUR GODFREY RD
MIAMI 3EACH
Cydelle Pines
Now Mrs. Greene
The former Cydelle Diane Pines
and Michael Eric Greene exchang-
I ed marital vows on Saturday even-
I ing June 11. The double ring cere-
monv. conducted by Rabbi Maxwell
Berger. was held at the home <>i
Mr. and Mrs. 11. Alvin Pines, 1411
Trillo Ave.
For the wedding, the bride
chose a gown of imported silk or-
ganza with fitted bodice trimmed
in reembroidered alencon lace ap-
pliques. It was fashioned with
point-on hand sleeves, a front panel
with lace appliques beaded with
; seed pearls, and a full bustle in
the back. The triple layered bouf-
fant veil was held by a crystal
beaded double tiara, and the bridal
bouquet was an arrangement of
1 stephanotis and orchids with ivory
satin streamers.
Maid of honor was Rita Joan
Beigel. and the bride's grand-
mother, Mrs. Rose Pines, acted as
matron of honor. Bruce Scott
Greenberg served as his brother's
best man.
The bride is a graduate of Coral
Gables Senior High and the Uni-
versity of Miami, where she ma-
jored in elementary education. She
was an honor graduate. Dean's
List, and will begin working to-
wards a Master of Education de
gree in September while teaching
at Tropical Elementary School.
Mr. Greene, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Greenberg, of Brooklyn,
MRS. MICHAtl GRttNi
NY. graduated from Midwood
High and attended Brooklyn Col-
lege. He earned a degree in history
from the University of Miami,
where he was Dean's List. Dean
of Men s Honorary and Archontes.
He will teach English and history
at Miami Edison Junior High in
the fall while working towards a
Master of Arts degree.
Following a honeymoon in Mi-
ami Beach and New York, the
newlywids will live in South Mi-
ami.
Tiki Stern On
National TV
Miss Tiki Stern, selected from a
large group of visitor.' at the CBS
studio in New York, was chosen
to apppar on a coast-to-coast TV
program known as Password" on
July 6.
Daughter of Rabbi and Mrs Tibor
H. Stern, the attractive young lady
made an almost perfect score on
her TV debut, winning $600 and a
set of luggage.
A recent graduate from Miami
Beach High. Tiki served as school
treasurer, and was elected a Beach
High Princess. She will attend
Stern College for Women of the
Yeshiva University in New York.
Ardmor-
TIKI STF*N
Klein, Berger
Betrothal Told
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Klein, 9333
Rodcrigo Ave., Coral Gables, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Diane Marilyn, to Ste-
phen Edward Berger.
The groom-to-be is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Berger, 611
SW 47th Ct. A graduate of the
University of South Florida, he
plans to do graduate work at the
University of Miami.
Miss Klein attends the University
of South Florida.
Lena Mintzes'
Birthday Marked
Senior Citizens Association of
Miami Beach will honor Lena
Mintzes on the occasion of her
birthday at the meeting scheduled
for next Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.
To be held at Washington Fed-
eral, 1234 Washington Ave.. the
evening will include refreshments
and entertainment.
Sisterhood Sets
Social Meeting
Temple Beth Raphael Sisterhood
will hold a regular meeting on
Thursday evening, July 21, at the
temple, 1545 Jefferson Ave.
Mrs. Harry Cornfeld, vice pres-
ident, will conduct the agenda to
be followed by a social hour and
refreshments.
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTRACTING REPAIRING
I Serving Dade Comity Over 25 Year*
"11 S.W. 14th ST. HI 69904
DOMESTIC MAIDS
RESTAURANT A HOTEL
HELP
A-l EMPLOYMENT
Ph. FR 9-8401
JWV Program
On Medicare
The Norman Bruce Brown Post
Jewish War Veterans, and Ladies'
Auxiliary will sponsor jointlv a
special program on Medicare to be
held Tuesday. 8 p.m., at Pythian
Hall. 4601 W. Flagler St.
A film and lecture on Medicare
will be presented by Arthur Hage-
meier, a representative of the Mi-
ami Social Security Administration
office. A question and answer per-
iod will follow the address
William G. Samet is post com-
mander, and Mrs. Esther Jacobs is
auxiliary president.
Minnie Feinberg *
To Be Fall Bride
Minnie Feinberg of Miami
Beach, and Louis Finke: whose
betrothal was announced this week
plan to be married on Sept. 3 \^
Greenville. S. C.
Daughter of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Feinberg, the bride-to-
be is executive secreta.; if the
Greater Miami Section. National
Council of Jewish Wonv
Her fiance is in charge of the
Roston Hosiery Mills ir. Landrunj,
S. C where Ihe coup!;- will live
following their nuptials.
Feldhelms Mark
61st Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Feldheim,
of 1410 SW 22nd Ave.. -arried
on July IP. 1905, are celebrating
their 61st weridirg anni'. j
In August. Ibcy will ive for
Israel, where thej have : : v rela-
tives and fritnOf:, and pla : to make
the Holy Land their 1 anent
residence.
MR. AND **f. JCHMi FiJMIlM
I
rVomefcc Se Hcs Hue
Wometcc Enterprises. c. and earnings in the secor quarter
ended June 18. 1966 we. i records
for any 12-vvetk pt riod. a id results
in the fiscal half year aliC reached
new highs.

*C* Woddini, Timer
FLOWERS
^U. <7L lAU!;n
'9
BLOSSOM SHOP
1A1A u* L. f*,ereo",,'' "'ion Bank BuiWs.y)
6 W"h'"9ton Ave., Miami Beach CALL JE 2 3231
w


Friday. July 15. 1966
vJetvisfi ncridian
Page 7-B
ywHAT are the motivating fac-
" tors that make women buy
one dress instead of another?
What are some of the things we
look for in our clothes, and after
looking, are we satisfied with
nhat we have bought? There
stems to be almost as many dif-
ferent reasons as there are
women.
There are the women who buy
strictly on impulse, and there are
those who buy only after very
carefully shopping. Some buy in
compulsive fashion and enjoy it,
2nd there are those who buy in
controlled color patterns.
Mrs. Samuel J. Rossman can
scarcely resist a two-piece, simply
can, raw silk ensemble. Her closet
is full of these practical outfits
that appear so striking with a
strand of pearls. She's glad the
princess line is coming back into
fashion, feeling that dresses with-
out the seam at the waistline are
slenderizing. Since she is small
in size, she finds that the more
conservative dress looks best on
her. A classically-cut sheath in
a good fabric, which may be
vrrn for more than one or two
special occasions, is what she
looks for.
ICNOTONING is Mrs. Ross-
man's favorite way of co-
ordinating her ensembles. Beiges
.'id browns .are the dominating
colors in her wardrobe. The
monotone treatment is even fol-
lowed in decorating her home,
except that she does use prints
in her drapes and picks up her
colors in these. Occasionally, she
will buy a bright color or a
splashy print, but then she fails
to wear it because "it doesn't
feel like me," feeling that the
individual personality evaluation
is the most important factor to
be considered in wardrobe-buying.
Mrs. Jerry Sokolow doesn't fol-
low any set pattern in her ward-
robe-planning or buying. Some-
times she just "falls in love" with
a dress, and sometimes it seems
like such a practical type of dress
to buy. Her wardrobe is divided
between the conservative in style
and color type of dress she wears
to the office and the bright, gay,
decollete-type of dress she likes
for evening. Fads are what she
avoids, and fashion is something
she stays with. As far as motivat-
ing factors are concerned, she
buys each dress at a different
time, when she is in a different
mood, and in a different frame
of mind, and her wardrobe re-
flects all these various buying
situations.
Sometimes, Mrs. Sokolow finds
that a particular dress isn't
"right" for her during a par-
ticular time Span, so she hangs
it back in a corner of her closet
and takes it down again only
when her mood changes. She's
happy with the clothes in her
wardrobe, has no special color
favorites, but knows which shades
of base colors are most compli-
mentary to her.
Mrs. Sokolow is convinced that
its not how much you spend, but
how you wear your clothes that
is most important. Some women
spend very little and look good;
others spend a lot and never look
good.
*
|U|RS. Marshall Feuer shops for
,TI the silhouette which she
finds most flattering to her. The
dress that fits to the hipline
then flares out softly, usually in
a modified A-line, is what she
looks for first. The shift silhou-
ette is one that she feels is not
best for her, and she rarely buys
it.
White seems to be one color
that may be worn all year round
in our area, and it dominates her
wardrobe. After that is the per-
ennial favorite, black. These two
colors are ones you never seem
to tire of, and they also lend
themselves well to marvelous ac-
cessorizing. The soft cowl neck-
line is one which Mrs. Feuer be-
lieves to be flattering to many
women. The ensembles are mar-
velous, but she feels that they
are not as versatile as the basic
dress. They are usually very
smart and eye-catching, and
therefore are remembered, and
so they do not lend themselves
to multiple wearings.
Solids are Mrs. Feuer's natural-
ly basic choice, but she feels that
a wardrobe should be spiced up
with a related print
MAKE YOUR WEDDING, BAR M12VA, ANY EUNC1I0N
"THE TALK OF THE TOWN" with
IRVING PIETRACK ORCHESTRA
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MARKS
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Cleaning Laundry
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1201 20th Street
Miami Beach
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Denver American Medical Center Merges
With the Ex-Patient Sanitorium
Young new version of the
smock dress, in an imported
checked tweed, is casually
belted with a leather thong.
Designed by Shannon Rodg-
ers for Jerry Silverman, it is
being modeled for a group of
buyers who know that they
must stock the right type of
clothes to satisfy the multi-
plicity of desires of their cus-
tomers.
By Special Report
The American Medical Center at
Denver and the Ex-Patient Sani-
torium, Denver, have merged into I
one organization under the Amer- j
ican Medical Center name, AMC
board president. David W. Garlett, I
announced.
The American Medical Center, '
which was founded in 1904 as the
Jewish Consumptives' Relief So-
ciety, is a free, national, non-sec-
tarian hospital that specializes in
unlimited treatment of advanced
and recurrent cancer and chronic
respiratory diseases and cancer re-
search.
The Ex-Patients Sanitorium
was founded in 1908 and until
recently provided free medical
care and rehabilitation for pa-
tients discharged from Denver
sanitoria but still unable to lead
normal lives.
Under the terms of the merger,
the American Medical Center as-1
sumes all assets and liabilities of ;
the Ex-Patients Sanitorium, includ-
ing 8.5 acres of land at 8000 Mont-
view Blvd., where the hospital is j
located. In addition, eight members
Of the Ex-Patients board have been
elected to the board of the AMC. j
They are Morris Binstock. Eugene \
Farkas. Samuel Frazin, Samuel
Jacobs. Marvin Pomeranz, Simon
Quiat, Morris Stein, and John j
Streltzcr.
AMC board president. David W. \
Garlett. described the merger as
"unprecedented."
"This is the first time that two
national, charitable institutions
have merged." he said. "In a day
of ever rising costs, this merger
represents a return to a more nor-
mal fiscal policy since it enables
us to increase our services to the
j needy ill at the same time that we
! cut costs of operation by more
than half."
Garlett explained that the AMC
will not operate the Ex-Patients
Sanitorium, although the AMC
will take over its program of
care and rehabilitation of pa-
tients.
"Basically, the acquisition of this
hospital means that we can go
ahead with plans to expand oui
present facilities," he said. "On the
basis of the merger we have been
able to this month open up a 20
bed unit for cancer patients and
to complete installation of a new
$100,000 diagnostic X-ray unit. We
have long been aware of the need
for more beds we have operated
with a waiting list in the cancer
division for the past 10 years. It is
our hope that this 20-bed unit is
just the beginning of an all-round
expansion program not only in pa
tient care but in research facilities
as well."
Dr. Samuel Levine, medical di-
rector of the AMC, described its
program as far above average in
treatment given. "The American
Medical Center is one of a handful
of hospitals in this country which
provides free treatment for pa-
tients in the later stages of cancer
and combines with this treatment
basic and clinical cancer research."
he said.
PIANOS TUNED
AND/OR REPAIRED
By expert technician. All types and
makes. Special summer rates. Call
before 12 Noon or after 5 p.m.
IRVING GOLDBERG 621-0084
DACE'S MOST P0PUIAR
PARTY MUSICIAN
ANDOR KELLERT
Electric Organist & Accordionist
For successful affairs such as home
parties, weddings. Bar Mirzvahs
etc. Special arrangement for con
dominiums, apartment house A or-
ganisations. Make arrangements
well in advance to avoid disappoint
ment. Wl 5-4878.
Lchapixi!
u,'*.r
CfNIMlFOOO*
Sanka Coffee tastes as good as
or better than your usual coffee
And it's 97%cOTfein free.
SO, drink it, enjoy itin good health.
It's 100', real coffee, too.
Only the caffcin has been removed.
And caffein adds no flavor to any cup of coffee.
Comes instant and ground.
Another fine product of General Foods.
CERTIFIED KOSHER-PARVE


jyc -t-
vjewism rnnaiKan
Page 8-B
>Jfcn #s#? ncrkJian
Fridcy. July 15, 1966
Floridians join the 137 students in the Amer-
ican Student Proqram who sailed for Israel
this week for a year's study at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem under the sponsorship
of the American Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity. Left to right are Julia Ann Sussman,
3310 SW 17th St., Miami; Richard Friedman,
Seiderman Speaks
At Beach BB Meet
Councilman Paul Seiderman will
be featured speaker at a special
summer meeting of the Miami
Beach B'nai B'rith Lodge on
Wednesday evening at the Dil.ido
Hotel.
A trustee of the Miami Beach
Lodge, and ADL National Commis-
sioner, Seiderman is a member of
the board of governors of District
5 B"nai B'rith. and recently was
elected second vice president of
the district at the 90th annual con-
vention in Baltimore.
Samuel Pascoe, lodge president,
will give a report on the conven-
tion, and there will be a report
on lodge summer activities by Irv-
ing Schatzman.
Entertainment will feature mu-
sical selections by Cantor Zvi Adler
of Temple Emanu-El.
JWV Group Lists
Appointments
Irving M. Cooperman, com-
mander, Department of Florida,
Jewish War Veterans, will conduct
an executive committee meeting
on Monday evening at the Casa-
blanca Hotel.
The following department ap-
pointments for 1966-67 will be an-
nounced:
Adjutant, Marvin Duke; quar-
termaster. Leon Silverman; chap-
lain, Edwin Feibelman; chief of
staff, Maurice Weinman; depart-
ment surgeon, Dr. Donald M. Kass;
inspector, M. Jay Berliner; histor-
ian, Sidney Chaskes; patriotic in-
structor, William Schoenfeld; offi-
cer of the day, Phil Cohen; major
of the honor guard, Harold Uhr;
liaison officer, Robert Rappaport;
service officer, Nat Brown.
Also on the agenda will be con-
sideration of a proposal by St.
Petersburg Post to hold the next
council of administration in St.
Petersburg.
Stephen Corner
Jack Corner
Metro Community
Relations Board
Names Director
H. Benjamin Sissel 45. has been
named new executive director of
the Metro Community Relations
Board.
He succeeds Ernest Lent, who
has been acting director of the
board.
The announcement was made
last week by Rabbi Joseph R.
Narot, chairman of the 18-member
board.
"Sissel comes to Dade County
highly recommended," Rabbi Narot
said. "He has vast experience in
the field of community relations."
Sissel, a graduate of Yale
Divinity School, will leave his
post as secretary for public af-
fairs for the United Presbyter-
ian Office of Church and So-
ciety in Washington, D.C., to
come here in mid-August.
He served as consultant to De-
troit in the field of community
relations and is a member of the
National Association of Intergroup
Relations officials.
The Community Relations Serv-
ice in Washington, formerly head-
ed by LeRoy Collins, recommended
Sissel.
7410 Carlyle Ave., Miami Beach; Scott Saul-
son, 10070 E. Bay Harbor Dr., Miami Beach;
Linda Fried, 19215 NE 18th Ave., No. Miami
Beach; and Ami Saperstein, St. Petersburg.
This year's contingent is the largest in the
12-year history of the program.
Corner Bank
Named on Beach
By Father, Son
Election of Stephen H. Carner
as president and change in name
to the Carner Bank of Miami Beach
were announced Saturday by Jack
Carner. chairman of the board of
I he P.ank of Miami Beach.
Jack Carner and his son pur-
chased controlling interest in the
12-year-old Miami Beach bank last
! month.
Stephen H. Carner resigned as
a director of the Mercantile Na-
tional Bank of Miami Beach and
closed his own mortgage broker-
age office here to accept the
full-time position as president.
Before returning to Miami Beach
three years ago, he was vice pres-
ident of the Colonial Bank of Or-
lando. Carner also serves on the
advisory board here of the Dixie
National Bank.
Prior to his bank service in Or-
lando. Carner was engaged in vari-
ous real estate management, finan-
cing and building enterprises in
Florida. Married for 12 years, he
lives with his wife and two chil-
dren at 6312 Cabellro Blvd., Coral
Gables, and is active in numerous
community organizations.
Also announced Saturday was
an increase from $1,250,000 to
$1,700,000 in the capital of the
bank, located at 937 Washington
Ave.
Further steps in an expansion
program of the Carner Bank of
Miami Beach will be taken in the
near future, Jack Carner stated.
Election of Judge Irving Cypen,
legal counsel for the bank, to the
board of directors was announced
at the same time the two Carners
were elected to the board.
SUPERB CATERING IN A
LUXURIOUS NEW SETTING
Miami's newest.most beautiful accommodations
for weddings, club luncheons, banquets, bar
mitzvahs.card parties, confirmations, receptions,
etc. Parking on premises. For groups from 15 to
1500...superb cuisine...fine wines, experienced,
personalized attention. Call Joseph Meyers,
Catering Manager, 379-8861.
DUPONT PLAZA HOTEL
MIAMI
Mrs. Jennie Grossinger pre-
sents the "Jennie" Fashion
Award to Samuel McCollock,
vice president of Burdine's,
at Women's American ORT
Beach luncheon at the Deau-
ville Hotel recently.
Name Top Rabbi
Cultural Director
Aboard SS Shalom
By Special Report
Dr. Sidney B. Hoenig. professor
of Jewish history at Yeshiva Uni-
versity in New York, and a scholar
widely-known for his work in auth-
enticating the famous Dead Sea
Scrolls, has been appointed by the
Zim Lines to serve as cultural di-
rector and spiritual leader for pas-
sengers aboard the SS Shalom dur-
ing her 48-day cruise to the Medi-
terranean and Israel sailing from
New York next Aug. 30.
In announping Or. Hoenig's ap-
pointment, Avner Manor, execu-
tive vice president of the Amer-
ican-Israeli Shipping Co., Inc., U.S.
representatives of the Zim Lines,
observed that high-level cultural
programs have become an import-
ant part of passenger activities
aboard the Shalom. He attributed
this development to a desire by
passengers for "self improve-
ment." as well as a vacation, and
said that as a result it has become
Zim Lines policy to carry a lead-
ing scholar in the fields of arts,
letters and Judaica on all long
cruises.
A native of New York City. Dr.
Hoenig received his BS degree
from City College in 1927 and was
ordained by Yeshiva University's
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological
"*>**' :*9*>mX{
Brazil Cwgnss fit Vt
RIO DE JANEIRO (TTA)
A bill passed by Congress, permit-
ting the use of foreign languages,
including Yiddish, on Brazilian ra-
dio and television broadcasts, was
vetoed this week by President
Humberto Castelo Branc.v Marshal
Castelo Bianco explained that he
was opposed to the use of foreign
languages in broadcasting because
he wants to avoid "the perpetua-
tion of racial differences in the
Brazilian community" and because
the Government lacks the facilities
to monitor broadcasts L: a 1 non-
Port uguesft languages.
Summer Courses
At Tifereth Jacob
Rabbi Maurice Klein will con-
I duct Bar and Bas Mitzvah training
i at Temple Tifereth Jacob tbrough-
! out the summer.
Also available, will be junior
\ choir training, membership in the
Cantorial Club, and instruction in
. conducting High Holiday services.
Children can be registered for
' fall classes in all departments of
! the Religious Schools, Mondays
1 through Fridays. 9 to 1 p.m..
<
Seminary in 1931. He obtained his
I'hD degree from Dropsie College
in 1934.
A heated studio argument precedes the discussion on the air
of "Dreams and Vision in the Bible." Discussions on this topic
will constitute this summer's "Words We Live By" jeries,
produced by the Eternal Liaht on the coast-to-coast radio net-
work of the National Broadcasting Company. The discussions,
which are scheduled every Sunday for 15 consecutive weeks,
feature Mark Van Doren, author, critic and Pulitzer-prize-
winning poet who is Professor Emeritus of Enalis-h at Columbia
University, and Maurice Samuel, author and lecturer (second
and third from left). At their left is Rabbi Ben Zion Bokser,
of the Forest Hills Jewish Center, radio program editor for the
Eternal Light. Right is Kenneth MacGregor", director for NBC.
;' *'

ONLY
ONE
bntainebleau
MOTik miam Mack *i nrnn
CM. MR. ItSTin WkliY
IANQUET MANASCK
JEMroi 1-8311

PW-TMK QCEAW AT *4th &TRCBT... MIAMI. V*Cta


Fnr1: July 15. 1966
*JenistincrdFiatr7
Page 9-B
apers of the intermediate and junior high
T-c.n I of the Hebrew Academy Summer Day
"amp witness the launching of a missile at a
liniaturo Cape Canaveral set up under the
bupeivision of Joseph Ackner, camp director
and head of the Hebrew Academy Science
Department. Launching the missile are stand-
ing (left to right) Ronald Stauber, Louis Huss
and Marc Rosenblum.
rs. Meyer Feinstein, of Philadelphia, views artist's rendering
>f Myer and Rosaline Feinstein Public Library in Eilat, Israel,
vitii Joseph Meyerhoff (center), chairman of the Israel Edu-
:ation Fund of the United Jewish Appeal, and the Fund's
^resident, Charles J. Bensley. Mrs. Feinstein established the
Jibrary with gift to the Fund through the Myer and Rosaline
?eins;ein Foundation.
Navi
ImsIiu
Banqui
Special Ocei
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
for Information!
HAZEL ALLISON
Calerlng Director*
JE 1-6061
Hh St. Collins Avet
Dem. Club Slates
Prominent Guests
Democratic Club of Miami Beach
will meet Wednesday evening at
the Sea Isle Hotel.
Among speakers will be State
Sen. Robert M. Havcrfield, William
Lehman, newly-elected Dade Coun-
ty School Board member, and
Judge Louie Bandel, member of
the Florida State Racing Commis-
sion.
Subject for discussion will be
"Our Democratic Party," with
Wally Gluck, club president, acting
as moderator.
Young Marrieds
Set Get-Together
Young Married Couples Club of
Temple Beth Am will meet for an
informal get-together in the Youth
Lounge of the temple on Saturday
evening, July 23.
The group is open to couples
30 years of age and under. Temple
affiliation is not required.
Michael ("1cm is chairman.
Leukemia Group
Elects Officers
New officers who will serve the
Dade County Leukemia Society
during 1966-67 are:
John Basmajian, president;
Judge Meyer Brilliant, vice pres-
ident; Joseph Manners, secretary;
William Lowenthal, treasurer.
Next board meeting is scheduled
for Thursday, July 28, at the Fire-
lite Restaurant.
Registration Open
For Day School
At Emcnu-EI
Registration is open in the Solo-
mon Schechter Day School of
Temple Emanu-El, now in its ninth
year, Raphael K. Yunes, chairman
of the board of education, has an-
nounced.
Classes begin at the nursery and
kindergarten level and this year
extend through the sixth grade.
Children accustomed to small
classes and individual attention
wUl find the same pattern followed
in the Solomon Schechter Day
School.
Curriculum combines secular
studies that meet all standards of
the Dade County Board of Public
Instruction, with the ultimate in
Jewish education.
Provisions have also been made
for children without previous edu-
cation in Hebrew as a language,
bringing them up to the level of
fellow students at their own speed.
The school program is under the
supervision of Dr. Irving Lehrman.
and staff members of both the
Hebrew and English Departments
have been selected on the basis of
qualifications and experience.
( lasses meet in the temple No.
Branch Blclg.. 77th St. and Dickens
Ave. Lunches are served, and
transportation is provided by the
temple fleet of buses.
40 Students Enroll
MADISON. Wise. (JTA) The
University of Wisconsin reported
here that 40 students enrolled in
the university's first Summer In-
stitute in Hebrew Studies have left
for an eight-week study tour of
Israel. The Institute is directed by
Prof. Menahem Mansoor. chair-
man of the university's Depart-
ment of Hebrew and Semitic stud-
ies. The 40 summer institute stu-
dents came from 14 universities,
colleges and seminaries in the
United States.
Sunday Breakfast
For Brotherhood
The monthly congregational
breakfast at Temple Beth Am,
sponsored by the Brotherhood, will
be held on Sunday, 10 a.m., in the
Youth Lounge.
Dr. Maxwell Dauer. program
chairman, will introduce Oscar
Kappaport. attorney, who will
speak on "Has Judaism Faced the
Challenge of History?"
Macey Schaffer is Brotherhood
pn lident.
Rabbi Stern In
Two TV Talks
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, spiritual
leader of the Jacob C. Cohen Com-
munity Synagogue, is scheduled
for two appearances over Ch. 10
for The Jewish Worship Hour."
The TV programs, sponsored by
the Rabbinical Association of
Gn ater M'ami, are set for Sunday,
July 17 and 24 at 11 a.m.
Dividing the lectures into two
parts. Rabbi Stern will deal with
the new theological approach of
"Cod is Dead," and also discu: 9
"The Function <>r the Rabbi."
Rabbi Stern has just returned;
from New York where he attended
several conclaves and gave several
talks over radio.
'Contentment'
Subject for Talk
"The Art of Contentment" will
be the topic of the lecture by Dr.
Abraham Wolfson before the Spin-
oza Forum for Adult Education on
Thursday. 10 a.m., in the auditor-
ium of the Washington Federal,
1234 Washington Ave.
Music and readings by members
of the audience precede the lec-
ture. Questions and comments fol-
low. Thomas Davidov is chairman.
insurance Men
Win Trophies
Robert A. McCord. president of
the Illinois Mutual Life and Casu-
alty Company, has presented two
trophies to Bernard Landers. 7275
SW 61st St.. Miami, and Martin H.
Stein, C.L.U., 6020 SW 93rd PI.,
Miami, of the Landers-Stein In-
surance Agency, 3850 W. Flagler
St.
The awards were given to the
agency leading the entire nation
in sales and premiums during the
1966 Presidents Month. The agen-
cy specializes in the sale of life
and disability insurance.
The presentation was made at
the national convention of Illinois
Mutual held at the Pheasant Run
Country Club, St. Charles. III.
THE
It I S C A Y IV E T E ES R A E
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FACING BISCAYNE BAY
M "WHIRS THE STARS AND HEAVEN JOIN YOUR tZSTIVITIES"
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p^jfl WEDDINGS CONFIRMATIONS
mjak BANQUETS RECEPTIONS
W ^ LUNCHEONS MEETINGS
CATERING
Strictly Kosher facilities Available Under Supervision of
RABBI TIBOR H. STERN
CALL Miss SHIRLEY, Catering Manager, FR 9-3792
For you who can afford the best
offers superb catering
in sumptuous settings.
DORAL HOTEL ON-THE-OCEAN
DORAL HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB MIAMI
-EPHONE: MR. DAVID KOVAC 532


Page 10-B
*Jenist> ftoridfiar
Friday. July 15. 19GG
Pepper Wan*s
To Hear About
Medicare Issues
By Special Report
WASHINGTON Congressman
Claude Pepper (D.-Fla.) urged Flor-
ida's senior citizens to let him
SHOW whether or not they get the
medical attention to which they are
entitled under the Medicare pro-
gram which went into effect last
Friday.
'I want each of those eligible
for this hospital and medical care
to feel free to call to my attention
any problem he encounters under
this program." Pepper said.
One of the original sponsors of
Medicare, the Florida Congress-
man said he believes the new pro-
gram can be put into effect with
a minimum of difficulty 'for so
vast an undertaking."
"But I feel an obligation to see
that it works well and to do every-
thing I can to see that trouble
areas are spotted early. The sooner
we find out where the bugs' are,
the sooner we will be able to elim-
inate them." he said.
Minister Baffled
By Cleric's Charge
JERUSALEM (WNS) An
assertion by Dr. George Hakim.
Greek Catholic Archbishop in Is-
rael, that Israel was discriminat-
ing against Arabs was questioned
here by Minister for Religious Af-
fairs Dr. Zerah Warhafting, who
said he could not understand Dr.
Hakim's charge in view of his re-
peated assertions in the past that
no such bias existed.
Dr. Warhaftig recalled that Dr.
Hakim and other Christian leaders
have on many occasions voiced sat-
isfaction with Israel's attitude to-
ward its non-Jewish minorities.
At the same time, he asserted
that he intends to ask for legis-
lation exempting Jewish religious
institutions from customs and pur-
chase taxes, a privilege now being
enjoyed by Christian religious in-
stitutions. Dr. Warhaftig said he
could see no reason for discrim-
ination against Jewish institutions
in that respect.
New Law Fails
To Stem Hatred
LONDON (JTA) Paul Rose,
a Labor member of Parliament,
said this week in the House that
the new Race Relations Act was in-
adequate to cope with "a deliber-
ate attempt" now underway in
Britain "to sow hatred." He said
that the act had been called in-
adequate in debate "and now this
assessment has proved correct."
He cited "cases of arson in places
of worship and circulation of racist
literature."
He referred to the recent trial
of four former members of Colin
Jordan's British National Socialist
party on charges of setting fire to
two London synagogues who were
freed.
Maurice Foley, Undersecretary
of the Home Office, conceded that
it had been indicated during the
trial that the defendants had been
influenced to commit their con-
fessed acts by Jordan. However, he
added, there was not enough evi-
dence to warrant prosecuting Jor-
dan.
Weitz Named New
Youth Director
Temple Adath Yeshurun an-
nounces the appointment of Max
J Weitz as youth director for the
coming year.
Weitz, who has had many years
of experience in youth work and
teaching, was associated with the
Midchester Jewish Center in Yon-
kers, N.Y., where he headed the
t*en-age program.
Since coming to Florida, he has
worked at Temple Beth Sholem in
Hollywood, and is currently serving
Camp Simchah and the Diplomat
Hotel as teen-age counselor.
Governor Ralph M. Paiewonsky (right) receives the gavel in-
stalling him as president of B'nai B'rith in the Virgin Islands,
the first official of that rank to head a B'nai B'rith group while
in public office. Maurice A. Weinstein (left), chairman of the
B'nai B'rith International Council, installed the Governor, laud-
ing his accomplishments in advancing the Island's economy
and its education and social welfare programs. Several hun-
dred attended the ceremonies in St. Thomas last week. The
52-year-old Governor, a native, was a charter member of
Sasso-Cardoze Lodge, which B'r.ai B'rith founded two years
ago as the first Jewish organization on the Islands.
Remedial Reading
Expert in Talks
Before 3 Groups
An expert on remedial reading
has been scheduled to deliver three
lectures at the University of Miami
and Florida Atlantic University on
July 6, July 13 and July 20.
On July 6, Dr. Robert Tanner.
5730 Bird Rd., reading specialist
and a member of the Dade County
Optometric Association, spoke on
"Visual Skills and Abilities and
Their Relation to Reading Diffi-
culties." He addressed a group of
students n't the University'of Miami
Graduate School. Head of the read-
ing clinic at the University is Dr.
RoWefTCafrier.
Dr. Tanner spoke the follow-
ing week, on July 13, at a Read-
ing Institute attended by class-
room teachers interested in school I
achievement. The all-day session
was held at Florida Atlantic
University and is being arranged
by Dr. John Spagnoli. coordinator
of reading. Board of Public In-
struction, Palm Beach County. The|
all-day session was taped for fu-l
ture closed-circuit television.
Discussing the subject "Develop-1

DR. ROBERT TANNER
ment of Perceptual Abilities an/I
Vision Training," Dr. Tanner will
conduct a course in remedial read-
ing at West Laboratory School 9Q
July 20, sponsored by the Univer-
sity of Miami. Also participating
will be Mrs. Nan Hiers. director o(
reading at Nova High School In
Ft. Lauderdale.
Of Special Interest
to the
JEWS
of Greater Miami
up-ro-dare on the rapidly moving, history-making events throughout
the world which can vitally affect the future of Jews everywhere.
Ycu owe it to yourself and to your family fo keep informed and
lr South Florida, THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN now in its 37th year of
continuous publication ... is the one, authentic, fearless source of
accurate, vital news of particular interest not only to the Jewish
people, but to every thinking man and woman in this area.
In this alert, feature-packed, English-Jewish weekly newspaper,
you'll f!"d column after column of accurate, on-the-spot reporting ..
coverage by international services such as Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, World-Wide News Service and Seven Arts Features.
You'll find interesting articles swift-paced, clear and human. You'll
discover down-to-earth editorial comment that will stimulate
practical, intelligent thinking on the problems we face today.
You'll read revealing features ... by columnists based in major
capitols around the world.
These and other interesting features wili keep your family
informed and enlarge your knowledge of local, national and
international Jewish affairs social events and Synagogue activities.
It's your duty to read THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN regularly your
whole family will enjoy it. So, don t wait. Start your subscription
now. Just clip this coupon, fill it out and mail it today!
i^liBwiislbJEIloipidliiQun
Florida's Most Complete English-Jewish Weekly
Printed in English
JcfAtoW/fwey Me/VexT/ssve/
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. Box 2973
Miami, Fla. 33101
Please start my subscription to THE JEWISH
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-*^

(PL... Prim)
Addren
City.
*____SUte.
:J


-uly 15. 1966
* tfm'i^Jhft^rHHiiin
Fagell-B
peer ieachite
ia H. Kirsch
;es Away
>Vna H. Kirsch, who had
>n Miami Betch since 1935.
e\v York on May 5 en
-rael.
Kirsch. who came here
Birmingham, Ala., partici-
Ijn innumerable philanthropic
ties both here and in Israel.
wi> the founder of the first
Isan group in Greater Miami,
[ April of this year, she was
led the Gold Medallion by the
lean Friends of the Hebrew
-sky of Jerusalem for her
significant contributions.
Kirsch is survived by a son,
eJph E. Kirsch; three grand-
;,, Judith, David and Dan-
sister, Mrs. Doris Adler, and
Itrnr, Arthur Herman, both of
(vices were held in New York
Liverside Chapel, and
in
ujr-u.
itimist Club
kks Members
prry King was guest speaker
[meeting ot the Sky Lake Opti-
C'lub on Wednesday evening
lantation Restaurant.
lever Sherniat'.. president, has
ponced that the club is current-
nj-'aged in a membership drive,
is also planning its program
koys work for the coming year.
Oh
l a r i e
)nick, Phoebe, B8. of 1500 Bay
,!.. died July 9. Gordon.
>ED, Warren, 54 of 15206 NK 8th
died July 9. Riverside.
= ND, I. Tony, 6:;. of Stil NE 163rd
;.. died July 9. Riverside.
4UB, Alex M.. r.4. of 220 Kings-
ki:it Dr., died July 9. Riverside.
toMON. Harold, of -fii Jefferson
vi-.. died July i, Riverside.
ider, Benjamin, (8, died July 7.
aide.
JOWOL. Anna. 68, of 1330 Collins
.. died July fi Riverside.
[RE5.S. David, 57. of 7221 BW 13th
. .i il i 7 I iverslde.
[IS, Robert J., 53, of 1360 N\V
Brd Rt died Julj 7. Riverside.
^ENSTEIN, Joseph, 633. of ir.00
V J7th St., died July li. Cordon
iRETON, Charli <".. 46. of 1630
Treason Dr., lied July 6. Rlvor-
|SER, Myrtle. 71. of 2398 BW 22nd
lied July 6. Gordon.
|iner, Abraham, 72, of s:sr jeffer-
Av died Juiv 6. Riverside.
RVlN. Mr- R '. 54, of 91" We..|
K> died Jul -vices in Dan;
\'k. Mass. Rivera
INES. Mrs. Theresa. 71. of 2151
IV 20. h St., died luly 5. Riverside
t, Helen K. 50, of 1 !3 , died Juiv \ Riverside
*ZOG, Berthn J7 of 1735 No.
asurePr luto I. Riverside
hmam, David of 1556 P
'Ivania Av. | uly ;>. Rlversl 1"
rHSCHiLD, Betty, of Miami
[ ",''h ", |n Bro .klyn.
ENBERtQ i: IB, of 1085 NH
t>:h HI died July ll. Riverside.
JCOFF, William, 60, of 801E BW
th Bt iiii (i July II. itiv. rali a
"IM, Nathan, 57, of 901 NW 44th
dn'il July '1 d( nlnn.
the best
recipe
for
folks
newly
moved
to GREATER MIAMI
Tato om phone call (or ecu not
below), add hostess with basketJ
of gifts and information about Ilia
city, stir in genuine hospitality,
nd you'll have a generous ana
delightful welcome. Just phona
hi Mm
I Heosa kenaj> the Wekoma Wage.
Hosfesa coll on me.
1 voi'lJ like to subscribe H
' Jewish Floridian.
'Ill out coupon and mail H
Circulation Dept.,
WO. Box 2973, Miami, Flo.
Nazis Disturb
Negro Confab
LOS ANGELES (JTA) The
annual convention of the National
, Association for the Advancement
of Colored People here was dis-
torbed by four American Nazi
; storm troopers who shouted anti-
l Semitic slogans.
The Nazi group appeared in,
front of the Statler Hilton Hotel
i where the NAACP held its 57th
I annual convention and shouted:
"It is time for the whites and the
blacks to stand up together against
the Jews. Don't let a Jew lead
you."
Negro delegates expressed their
regrets over the anti-Semitic shout-
ing.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
****.'
Messages of tribute from
throughout the nation have
arrived in Miami and New
York on the occasion of the
passing of Charles Rosen-
thai, founder of Riverside
Memorial Chapels, who died
at his home June 28 in his
90th year. Mr. Rosenthal
launched his firm in 1926,
which several years before
his passing joined with the
Kinney System. Services for
Mr. Rosenthal were held June
30 in Temple Shaaray Tefila,
79th St. and 2nd Ave., New
York City, with interment at
Westchester Hills Cemetery.
Sentence is Reduced
STUTTGART (JTA) The
prosecutor in the trial of 10 for-
mer SS officers charged with the
mass murder of Jews in Tarnopol.
Galicia, in occupied Poland re-
duced this week his demand on
the sentencing of Thomas Massen-
berg, one of the defendants. Pro-
secutor Rolf Sichting originally de-
i manded life imprisonment for
murder. However, according to ex-
! pert testimony at the trial, Massen-
j berg is mentally deficient and
therefore his participation in mur-
' der in two cases could not be con-
sidered an offense punishable by
i life imprisonment. The prosecutor
j correspondingly reduced his de-
! mand to eight years at hard labor
i for Massenberg.
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIOA
TO AI.Ii TO WHOM TlilCXi: PRES-
ENTS SHALL TOME, GREETINGS:
Whereas, JOSEPH H. STEIN, Miami
IV:.. Ii. Florida, MAHSUAI.I. I. ST EH*.
.Mluuii Heaeh, Florida, LEWIS w.
fSORMNK. Miami Reach. Florida, did
on th- Stli day ..r June. A.D. IS6
cause to be incorporated under th.
laws of tli*- State of Florida SOCTH-
KllS WINK AN'I> SPIRITS. INC., a
corporation, with Ita principal place
of business at .Miami, Dade County,
In the State of Florida, and whereas
such corporation did on the 8th day
of Jane, ad. i9;. cause to be riled
in the office of th.- Secretary of (Kate
of the State of Florida, the docu-
mentary authority required under
Section 608.27, Florida Statutes, show-
ing the dissolution of such corpora -
Now-, therefore, the Secretary of
state does hereby certify to the rare-
trolng and that he is satisfied thai the
rviinlrrTnents of the law have been
uutpplii d with.
IN WITNESS WlliniKi.r. 1 have
hereunto set my hand and have af-
fixed the (ireal S.al of th.- Sum.- of
Florida, at Tallah-ee, the Capital,
th!.-i the istli day of June, A.D, I9GU.
(Seal) TO*l A1>.\.\IS
Secretary of Mate
7/16/M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the underaigned, desiring to enaaaa
in huKinewH under the flctltloiiH name
of THE t'I,l> WoRI.D SHOP at num-
ber lfilir. MIchlRan Avenue, in the
t'lly of Miami Beach, Florida, intends
tc. register the said name with the
Clerk of tin- Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Oat.d at Miami. Florida, this Tith
daj of July, 1966.
HARRY NK.U, MARLIN
I'owi f.i:. WHITE, aiL-LEN,
III'MKKV &- TRENAM
Attorneys for Applicant
'"I City National Hank Uldg.
Miami, Florida 33130
Bj : JAMES S. llo'l'II
T/15-2S-29 S/"i
'American-Israel Dialogue' to Take Place
This Month on Jewish Distinctiveness
By Special Report
Leaders of academic, intellect-
ual and Jewish communal life in
the United States and Israel will
hold a cidtural exchange later
this month in Israel at the fifth
annual 'Amerj^an-Israel Dialo-
gue" sponsored by the American
Jewish. Congress.
The "Dialogue" will take place
July 27 to 29 at Jhe Weizrna.nn In-
stitute of Science in"Rehovolh.
Th* subject of this year's dis-
cussion wjll be "The Nature of
Jewish Distinctiveness in Israel
and in the United States."
Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld, of
Cleveland, O., president of the.
American Jewish Congress, will
li-.. i a. group of ten Americans fly-
ing to Israel'to participate in the
three-day meetir...
Simultaneous translation facili-
ties will permit both the Amer-
icans and Israelis to speak in their
own languages.
In addition to Rabbi Lelyveld,
who is .spiritual 1 mount Temple in Cleveland, the
American "Dialogue" group will
include:
Phil Baum, director cf. the
Commission on International Af-
fairs oX the American Jewish Con-
gress.
Richard. Cohen, assistant exe-
cutive director of toe American
Jewish Congress.
Meier.Deshell, managing edi-
tor of the quarterly magazine, "Ju-
daism."
Dr. Leonard J. Fein, professor
of political science at the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology.
Max Fraiikfl, diplomatic cur-
respondent of the New York
Times.
Dr. Maurice Friedman, pro-
fessor, of philosophy at Manhattan-
ville College, and a leading autho-
rity on Martin Buber.
a. Dr. Irving Greenherg, profes-
sor of history at Yeshiva Uhiver-
sity-
Dr. Louis IL Peliak, dean of
the Yale University Law School.
Herbert Poster, editor of
"Congress bi-Weekly-' magazine.
The Israel group, which is not
yet complete, will include:
Israel Ben Meir, deputy direc-
tor of Israel's Ministry of the In-
terior.
Justice Haim Cohen, a mem-
ber of the Israel Supreme Court.
e Dr. Israel Eldad, a noted Tal-
mudist.
Eliezer Goldman, an authority
on Israel church-state problems.
e Nissim Rejwan, Israeli jour-
nalist and writer.
Dr. Amon Rubinstein, special
correspondent of Ha-aretz, a lead-
I ing Israeli daily.
Dr. Yaakov Talmon, professor
of history at Hebrew University.
Sessions will be chaired alter-
nately, by Americans and, .Israelis,
with panelists from each group
commenting on the main, session
paper.
i Meml'cjrs. rl.tfjc public, wil^.be
l invited to p rtitipatef St an open
j session of thj "! Hangup" Thurs-
day evening, July 28.
The "Dia'.rs-. | wjij close Ffiday
afternoon, .' .'.! .
Apiong thai questions expected
to be dise -: '*. the "Dialogue"
are:
e what an 1 tors that en-
dow Jewish iife ii -. and Is-
rael with a singular and distinctive
character?
What forma do thfsc factors
take and how do they operate in
the lives of the two communities?
What conditions are necessary
foi meaningful Jewish survival in
the U.S. and in Israel?
What are the ingredients and
the meaning of a decision tQ re-
main a Jow in modern times?
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the untlt-rsfKru'ri, desirine lo enavw
in biutinevs under the fictitious name
Of IV V <>K KIX.)RII)A al 640 N.E.
177 St.. inti-nds to register Bald name
with thi- Clerk of th.- Circuit Court
of Dude County. Florida
IVY THAYKi:
7/1.J-22-29 8/5
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 6715
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME.
in the Matter of:
Chanarina Name of p.\n*
UKUHIKKER, sometime*
known aa PAIX <;.\i:i>XER,
to PACI, CARUNKR.
TO WIU)M IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the
uinlirslmn-il I'etkttoaer, IUIT1. GROB-
IFKI'.U, whose rslilen<-e address in
ISS0 7i.-t Street, Miami Beach, Dado
Count}', i-'loriiki, mt.mi.is to apply to
the Hone.ruble William A. Herin. One
of the Judges of the Klev.-nth Judicial
circuit. In and for l>nde County,
Florid;., nt his office In the Dude
CouMQ Court Hcm.-e, Miami, Florida,
at 1:"". o'clock i'.M.i on the 26th day
of July, li8, or as soon thereafter as
ho may he ht-urd. for ftn order chanff*
ing hi> name from l'Al'l. (IRkBIKKR,
to PAUL GARDNER, >> which name
he shall thereafter h*- known.
l.tuted at Miami. Dad.- County, Flor-
ida, this J It Ii da) of .lone. A.D. VJ66.
/B/ l'All. GROB1FKER
Petitioner,
VICTOR l.i:\ ink
Attorney for I', titlon.r
!'::7 ciiy Siitlonaj Hank Building
Miami, I-loii'la :ii:i:.ii
I'hone: 379-7.".M
T/1-S-18-M
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71375-C
in RE: Batata of
ANNA WIGL.ER ROSS
Deceaped.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona
Having Claims or Demand* Against
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may nave against
the estate of ANNA VVIGbER ROSS
deceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of uftde Coun-
ty, and file the same in duplicate and
as provided In Section 7:::'..I. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the I'ounty
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida,
within six calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 29th
das of June, A.D. 19(6.
First publication of this notice on
the 311th day of June. 1966.
GEORGE .1. TA1.1ANOFF
Attorney for Fxeciitor
Guest Cantor
Israelite Center
Cantor William B. Nussen will
be pulpit guest this weekend at
the Israelite Center.
Cantor Nussen will conduct Fri-
day evening .services arid chant the
liturgy on Saturday morning.
A. member of the Cantors As-
sembly of America, Cantor Nussen
has appeared in concerts in this
country and in Europe with Shol-
em Katt.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAWE LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY' GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to >ni*u*e
in buslnes* under the fictitious name
of ROCND ltt>BlN BAR at 12^ N*
49th St., Miami, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
KE8ST,ER. MAHSEV &
BKCKBRMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
49b Biltmore Way
Coral Uables, Flu.
T/H-aa-M 8/5
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 71419-B
In RE: Estate of
FRANK CEI.EA.
I>. :, il.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Bstal :
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and dc-
manda Which you may have agaitist
tl.' estate of FRANK Ct-H-LA. de-
.. .is, d late of Dade County, Fiorina,
to the County Judaea Of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate ..ml as
provided In Section 733.16, Florida
StHt .;tes. in their offices in the Countv
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida.
within >i\ calendar months from the
tim< 1 the first publication hereof, or
the -..me will be barred.
Dated at .Miami. Florida, this 7th
d:o 1 I July, A.D. 1966.
Miss MARIE T. CEJLLA
As Kxecutrix
Fir-1 publication ol Miis notice on
the Win day t>f July, 1966.
. m \. K(it.'ii:ndi:ru &
l.El.Cm'K
\n .....y r-r Exec urix
S05 K bc ij ne Building
Mi.11 Florida
7/15-22-29 8/5
-II l' 'I > 1 I .1 1 IMI'l
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Reach, Fla.
7. 1-8-15-22
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of KEY'S TAVERN at 116 N.W. 27th
Avenue. Miami Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
Ill,ASK ANDERSON, Sole owner
KESSLER, MASSEY, BECKERMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
!!", Biltmore Way
i N va] 1 lables, l-'iorida
7/8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious n
VIDEO AL'DIO SI'i:ciAI.ISTS at
lotil N.E. 155th Street. North Miami
Reach, Fiorina intends to register said
name with the Clerk of th. Circuit
Court ot Dade County, Floridu.
VIDEO AL'DIO SI'KCI A LISTS. INC.
By: NEIL R BERGER, President
SMITH ,\ HANDLER
Attorneys for Video Audio
Specialists, Inc.
iu7 Linco.n Road. Miami Beach, Fla.
; 8-15-22-29
NOTICE OF INTENTION
TO APPLY FOR
CHANGE CF NAME
Chancery No. 66C L8i7
it Was C01 1 rn:
Mot! n that the
HERBERT
vhosi psld. address la
1721 l6Hth Terraci in the City
ol i .. County, Florida. In-
to Bppi; norable J.
the Eleventh
Jadioial 1 ircuit, in .-i:.'! r..-r Dade
County, at hti County
CoOM rli .-. .1- M. on
the 9th day ol A \g 1-1 1966, 1 r aa soon
Ihernufter as he may be heard, for an ;
prder changing his name from 'licit-!
BERT WEISS to 1 IYAL, by
which name h shall thereafter be
known
Dated at Miami, Florida, this .-
day of June, A.D. 196H.
HERBERT WEISS
Petitioner
OEORGJ NICHOLAS
Attorney tor Petltioni r
W-N-.W. 12th Awnue
Miami, Florida
7/15-22-29 8,-r,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY
No. 66C 7363
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
r.-OCl* INSET TA,
i'i ut 1 r*.
EIJSA IN8ETTA,
Defendant.
TO: l-.I.ISA IN'si.....1
li 1 la Vlco I'ani rum
Trov. Lucca (Italy)
Till' ARK HEREBY Nt.-rTFIFT
tha' a 'ompl.iii-.t for Dlvi ha-; t-<-n
filM'itaenmst you. and you ar* r to s^< it -eooy of in ay AUsWer or
f leading to the foimmtlnt on the
tatnttrfH attorneys. -TAIJANOFV* &
VTAr.I.FH, 42p Lincoln Road. Miami
Bear*, Florida, and file the original
In thf Offlr.- of the Cl^rk of the
jCtrrult Court, on or before the If.th
day of August. 1W6. U yoiTfail to do
so, judgment by default wHI be. taken
^igminst von ft* the retief-demtinded
in \fto Complaint.
DONE and ORDERED at Miami.
Dade County, Florida, this 12th day
of July. 1966.
1 m B. IJOATHHRMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County Courthouse
Miami, Florida
By: M. CAVALARIS
Deputy Clerk
7/15-22-29 8,5
IN THE COLNTV JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 71-103-A
In RE Estal
CLAY fKANCES SMITH
I i( u
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Person? Hav-
ing claims or Demands > 1
I :-.ate:
You are hereby 1 ol fled and re-
quired to present an. claims and
man.is which you ma) have -.. -t
thi estate of CRAY FRANCES S.VI
deceased late "t Dade County, I
Ida, to th. 1 tauntj Judgi f Di 1
'ounty, ai -i I lie 1 he -.i m< in dup I 1
and aa provided in Section 7S3.16, Pli
Ida Stai itea, in their offices In the
County Courthouse in Dad. County,
Florida, within -i\ calendar months
from the time of the first publics 1
of. or the same will he barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 30th
day of Jum A I >. 1966
JUAN ITA JOSEPHINE WALL.
As Executrix
First p iblicatlon of this notice on
the Stli day of Juiv, 1966.
I'ltlS) AND NEWMAN
Attorneys for Executrix
805 Da.I.- Federal Building
Miami, Fla.
: 8-15-22-29
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. ;0822-_
n RE: Estate of )f/
\.i iMIN JOSEPrW
Deceaaed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All CredttiOA a'1 TW 1'i'r-.. -
lainin or Uemanda Against Said
Estate:
You are, hereby notified and re-
|Uir'.l to V si nt any claims and de-
maiids which you may lm\. against
K esta'e nt BENJAMIN JKSF.I'HS
i-d late ol Dad) county. Elor-
.11, to tb county ludgog of Dada
County, and file the sain, in d ipli 'o
and as provided' In WVrtwn i.l'i,
Florida Statutes, in their, offices in
the County Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within six calenda" months
from tho time of the first jaubllcatli a
hereof, or the same will bo barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 1st
day of July. A.D. 1966.
/s/ GERALD JOSEPHS
\*'W*e*utor
First publication of this notice on
the 8th GALBUT \ND GALBUT
Attorneys f. r fOtecutor
.'40 Firth Bt., Miami Beach. Fla.
7/8-15-22 -D

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Page 12-B
+Jeistr thrkUar.
Friday, July 15, 19gg|
Our
42nd
Year
NORTON TIRE CO.
OPEN 24 HOURS
OPEN SUNDAYS
5300 N.W. 27th Ave.
Do tire ads speak
with forked tongue?
Unfortunately, they often do.
And those big come-ons dissolve when you
read the fine print.
$7.95 tires turn out to fit only a few old-model cars.
And when the "second tire is half-price," the price on the
first tire is higher than you'd usually pay.
At B.F.Goodrich, we deal in straight talk. We won't
try to con you. Or confuse you with mishmash about
cords, plys and miracle rubber.
All we're concerned about is selling you the right
tire for your kind of driving. And we do it with something new:
the BFG Tire Value Calculator.
You tell it how you drive-the speeds, the roads,
the loads. Then it tells you which BFG tire suits you best.
Now, we can't promise to save you money on
your next tires. But we'll try.
The straight talk tire people
i
REGoodrich
f
NOHTON]f|
TIRE CO.
BFGoodrich
ENJOY YEAR ROUND
SAVINGS AND
SPECIAL CREDIT TERMS
AT THESE
NORTON TIRE STORES:
OPEN 24 HOURS OPIN SUNDAYS CENTRAL MIAMI J300 N.W. 37th Av. 633 1635 MIAMI SHORES oi UwrM Bud. 759-4446 HOMESTEAD 30100 So. Federal Hwy. Cl 7-1673
MIAMI BEACH 14S4 Alton Road 534-5331 W.HOLLYWOOD 601 7 Hollywood Blvd. at Slot* Road 7 TU 7-04SO
DOWNTOWN MIAMI 500 Win Moglot St. 373-4639
N.MIAMI BEACH 1700 N.I. 163 St. 945-7454 A.M. to 4 P.M. Til t P.M. Mon, Wed., fri. FT. LAUDEROALE 1130 Wot Broward Blvd. JA S-3136
NORTH MIAMI 1 3 360 N.W. 7th *lint 1-.S41
SOUTH DADE 9001 SoLth Dil. Hwy. 667-7S7S WEST PALM BEACH S 1 S South Di.io Tl 3-41S1

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