The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01803

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
eJewish Florfidlian
'okttO* 36 Number 34
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKtr
Miami. Florida. Friday, August 23. 1963 _____
Three Sections Price 20*
Anti Semitic Negro Leaders Hit
By Major Spokesmen of NAACP
M r/MANUfl NEUMANN
. helped "Senofe
NEW YORK (JTA) A New that "if people of a Semitic on
York Times survey of the civil! gin continue to exploit Negroes,
rights struggle in Philadelphia 111 exploit them as anti-American.
ciled charges of anti-Semitism If you want to call that arti-
1 made against Cecil B. Moore,, Semitic, then I'm anti-Semitic."'
i president of the Philadelphia | He was also reported to have said
I chapter of the National Associa- that he did not know a Jew in
ition for the Advancement of Col- the civil rights field "who wasn't
I ored People. a phony."
! He was quoted as having said
Neumann Says Fulbright
Quiz OK'd Jewish Agency
NEW YORK ish Agencj-American Seection. issued a statement this week in response]
to requests for comment on the recent investigation and public hearing
into Jewish Agency-American Section affairs, conducted by the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee, headed by Sen. J. W. Fulbright. The
hearins look place in Washington,
during Dr. Neumann's absence., cting ,h. attention of official The MM***,* 5f^Snl!
white r.t was visiting Israel.
Neumarji stated.
His statements d r e w a
prompt rebuke from Bishop
Stephen Spottswood, chairman
of the NAACP national board.
The Bishop, in a letter, toW tho
Philadelphia Nro leader that
"the members of the- executive
committee were unanimous in
their shock at the anti-Jewish
statements attributed to you
and votod without dissent to
condemn this sentiment, if ac-
curately reported, on the part
of any NAACP officiallocal,
regional or national."
Dr. | SE&. to the Zionist conspir- Ala., are hv.ng in a vise of pre
In Uu first place, it should
be clear that the Jewish Agency
was calie.f upon to testify, alonj-
with manj other organizations and
aey*prt of their repeated at-
tempts to denigrate and discour-
age pro-Israel efforts in the
United States. Theso pathetic
attempts aro most certainly
rganuati-ns ana r Oor move.
individuals who are registered: ---
uiih the Department of Justice.
because they represent foreign
Continued on Page S-A
urea from both whites and Ne-
groes in the broiling civic rights,
struggle of that aouthern city, ac-,
cording to a Birmingham Jewish;
communal official. Harold E.I
KaU. executive director of the
Continued on Page 3-A
principals. The purpose of such
hearings, as stated olfieially. was
In help the Senate Committee on
Foreign Relations to decide wheth-j
er the operation of the law adopt-1
ed in 1938 is satisfactory, oi j
w hetht r any amendments should ;
In recommended. Sen. Fulbright
has been obviously within his
rights in conducting an inquiry
into the operations of the Jewish
Agency and other pro-Israel or-
ganitations, though i do not pro-
fess to know the precise reasons
that have prompted this intensive
study of our affairs
"Nor can I assess the boasts
of certain notoriously hostile
elements claiming credit for di-
Algeria Accuses Israel Agents'
Of Plot Against Bella Regime
WILL FIGHT BACK
Eshkol Warns
Israel Ready
For Aggression
TEL AVIV (JTA I Premier
Levi Eshkol issued a stiff warn
ing this week to Syrian and Egyp-
tian leaders "to think twice be
fore uttering threats against Is-
i rael." The warning was the sec-
' end by the Prime Minister in 24
hours, following a threat by Pres-
' ident Nasser of Egypt that the
time had come to "wipe out the
stain" of Egypt's defeat by Israel
in 1948.
The second warning was con-
tained in an adaress la paratroop
officers on Paratroop Day. The
Premier made it plain that, while
Israel did not desire bloodshed
i "our neighbors in the north
j (Syria' should entertain no hopes
I that Israel will remain quiet in
the face of their aggressions only
WASHINGTON-(JTA)-More! because Israel does not hurry In
Jewi-h organizations pledged sup- its reactwns.
port and participation this week |r his fir$f w,rnjr.g# the Prime
RABBI MMC H. TANfNBAUM
. appeal te Catholics
Top Jewish
Bodies Join
Rights March
Tension Mounts on Border
At Gaza Strip and Syria
in the Aug. 28 March on Washing-
ton in support of the Kennedy1
legislation tor civil rights now be-
fore Congress.
Each of the major Jewish reli-
DA,c i ita. The Alger- the "plot" came from Information | gious organizations has announced
PARIS (JTA) The Alger tn p Belaouane who that leaders and membcts trill
ian Government publicly accused J^SJ^K toEsKthe new march in the .
Israel this week of sponsoring n -revolutionary Algerian policy" | part in rallies to be held on marc.n
armed plot to topple the prO-Nas- \JSTSSSl at "home and in day Officially ^ffU^ NASSER FIRE FED
Z rejime of Premier Ahmen, ffl by Premier Ben B*^1;=^:'
SftrrnaTA announcement ft !ne American ^ Oon-
IZd "ere Israelis. Word Of Umtl that Razak Abdel Kader. a Hebrew Trades.
senior officer of the anti-French j Tne Reform movements Lnion
FLN, known for his pro-Israel; ol American Hebrew Congrcga-
sympalhies. had been arrested for tlcns and the Central Conference
leading an insurrectionary move- of American Rabbis announced
Minister addressed himself to
the Egyptian President, urging
Nasser to be careful in any
moves because "Israel is not un-
prepared." Speaking at a Mapai
Continued on Page 2-A
Javits, Hal pern
Question Aid
tired
ment.
The Premier said Algerian
gendarmes had captured Abdel
Kader's followers after a pitch-
ed battle at Dra el-Miian in the
Kabylia region, east of Algiers,
where several resistance groups
were said to be operating.
they had called on lay and rab-
ni wtv ( ITA 1 Tensions In the north. Syrians
J^i'to moS' .h, week .gain at j,group*^JJ*"-*
along the Israeli-Arab borders, as ers. attacking farm, is ... tttAJJ
suirstriiv'^: EMTsAJ s.ffxrs?l-rs srussmSmJi =.,=r,ias \ssl
s,r,P and In the north where the the farmer. J**J%^ published in Paris two years ago. of the movements Joint Comm,
Razak Abdel Kader wrote a
Syrians attacked again.
kept up sporadic firing in the
._ .. irpnt Ul> bP"i auit '""o
Along the Gaza Strip, the shoot- "M" v ^ Igrae cas
Continued on Page 9-A
WASHINGTON (JTA) At-
mey na.. caueu .., ...... tention of *J**^*,*
binical numbers of the emintry's House was directed tl.istk to
650 Reform congregations to join statements by hg>ptiai 1 l Kent
the march The Conservative Nasser telling his Utmps to pre-
United Synagogue of America pare for war against Israel The
sa.d that" its president. George Nasser pos.Uon was cited M wUj;
Maislen. Rabbi Simon Greenberg. tying tlu- objectives ol the l-o.-
"S chancellor of the Jewish eign Aid bill before Congress
Theological Seminary. Rabbi Ber- Sen. Jacob K *"**> V*
nard Begal. executive director. RepubUcan told the J^*2
assistance to Nassei only
Continued on Page 7-A
Continued on Page 5-A
,moii(. me udt.i suik, > .....- ; There were no isracn '---------------------
ing was done by the Urnelis, one o{ thcs0 at- -^ |J# fa. f A Da.a
t&sttzs^xttr&tL [fan Says Ban Won t Speed Peace
submachineguns and commando muw miutary ol)M.rvers investi- iisVM" **** /^ w i
knives. One of the infiltrators nleht'i attacks __ ____ ,_____ j...ji a bn. power differences, he said tf
Addressing a Jeru- rower differences, he said that

bj the Fedayeen.


Page 2-A
rJewistr ftoridiaii
Friday, August 23. 1963
YESHAYAHU ALMAGOR
Temple Israel
School Tops
Keren Ami Gifts
A check for S650 from the K^ren
Ami Fund of the Temple Israel
Religious School was the largest
individual contribution ever re-
ceived by the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation from the student
Keren Ami program here, it was
announced by Federation Presi-
dent Sidney Lefcourt on Wednes-
day.
The Keren Ami Fund, which
means "Fund of My People." has
tlirough the generosity of the reli-
gious school students of leading
jynagogues in Dade County con-
tributed over $2,500 to the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation and
Combined Jewish Appeal in 1963.
Leading synagogues that have
contributed substantial amounts
through the Keren Ami program
include Temple Beth Am. Temple
Emanu-KI. Congregation Beth
David. Temple Beth Tor ah, and
the Hebrew Academy. Religious
fChool students who also partici
pated in support of the commun-
ity's health and welfare programs
through Federation and in sup-
port ot the United Jewish Appeal
Overseas include the students of
the Hebrew High School. Temple
Ner Tamid. Temple Menorah.
Temple Judea. Temple Zion. and
Congregation Belli Kmcth-Yehud
ah Moshe.
"I am very proud of the Great-
er Miami Keren Ami Council,
which was headed by Jay Cassel-
hoff. of Temple Israel, lor its
outstanding support of the Fed-
eration campaign." Lefcourt de-
clared "It is important to me
;nd to our community that our
young people, as part of the learn-
ing experience, -become imbued
with the tradition of tzedakah'
righteousness and Justice lor all.
The traditional heritage of the
Jewish people has been "Help Thy
Brother. Help Thy Neighbor.'
and there is no finer demonstra-
tion of the continuation of 'tzedak-
ah' than the example that has
been shown to us by the religious
students who participate." in the
Keren Ami Council."
Veteran of Israel's Independence Fight
To Be Bond Representative for Florida
* ?c*K3ya'nurA'lmagor7"a'"veteran
o! Israel's struggle for independ-
ence on the military, diplomatic,
and economic fronts, has been as-
signed to the Miami a'rea office
of the Stale of Israel Bond Or-
ganization as a field representa-
r.ve.
Alinagor. a former major in Is-
rael's Army, will serve with Dr.
Aaron Kalian, executive director
ol the local bond organization, in
the mobilization of investment
dollars for Israel through the Is-
rael Bond program.
Almagor's service for Israel
goes back to pre-statehood days,
when ha enlisted in the Jewish
Brigade group of the British
Army, seeing active service dur-
ing World War II in the North
Africa campaign with Field
Marshal Montgomery and in the
invasion of Italy.
Prior to the outbreak of World
War II. he had enrolled at the
Hebrew University, but he inter-
rupted his studies to enlist in the
Jewish Brigade.
Following the war, he served
with the Haganah in underground
missions in Istanbul, his duties in-
cluding rescue of refugees and
secret procurement of arms.
With the beginning of Israel's
war of liberation in 1948. Almagor
v-as among Haganah officers as-
signed to form Israel's first arm-
ored force, the famed 8th Armor-
ed Brigade, participating in the
opening of the road to Jerusalem
from the Mediterranean and later
in the liberation of the Negev.
Following Israel's victory, and
while still in active service. Alma-
gor completed studies for a law
Eshkol Warns
Arab Aggressors
Continued from Page 1-A
municipal rally in Beersheba, he
said that Nasser had shown "his
true face" in making bellicose
speeches against Israel. Until
recently, the Premier noted,
Nasser had beer talking about
peace.
We must continuously strength
en Israel in the face of the de-
clared danger trom Egypt." Mr.
Efhkol said, adding that he had
no intention of competing with the
Egyptian leader in speechmaking.
He then quoted King Ahab's
answer to Syrian King Ben-Hadad
from I Kings: "Let him who girds
himself for war not boast as he
who ungirds himsell" after vic-
tory.
degree at the Hebrew University.
He remained on active duty
through the Sinai campaign in
1956. retiring as commander of
an armored battalion with the
rank of major.
In 1957, he entered Israel's
diplomatic service. When rela-
tions with Poland were opened,
he was assigned to serve with
Ambassador Katriel Katz in
Warsaw, as Israel's commercial
attache.
Later, he was transferred to the
State of Israel Bonds and assign-
ed to South America, serving for
two years in Argentina and for
the past two years in Colombia.
Almagor is married and has tak-
en up residence in Miami with his
wife. Genia, and two children, a
daughter Leah 17. now enrolled
at the University of Miami, and
son Chaim 15.
BEWARE
TERMITES
Uricin
for the sake of your home
PERPETUATE YOUR
NAME FOREVER
Throng*1 the Foundation
of the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
Call JE 8-6464 Mayshie
Sm vbn yn Tin.
Kabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone JE V359S
45 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BUCK
Rabbi Stern Scheduled
"Self-Evaluation" will be the
topic discussed by Rabbi Tibor H.
Stern, of Congregation Beth Jac-
ob, on the Ch. 10 program 'Give
Us This Day." heard Friday, 7
a.m.
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Phone JE 8-0749
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Also, they are familiar with
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When you save TIME, you
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Riverside funeral.
Itiv.-r.siu.'> proven ability, personal service tad superior leiBti'* are
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So, when the need arises, call Riverside, i.ere difnit* an.! personal
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FUNERAL DIRECTORS
NorthMiami Beach: 18000 N. E. 19th Avenue Wl ,4601
Miami: Donglaa Road al S. VY. 17th street Highland 8-2*21
Miami Beach: 1230 Normandy Drive 19th and Alton Road
JE 11151
*BE E-SENBERG EMANUEL MA.NDEI HARRY BEYER


Friday, August 2.3, 1963
> Jewish fkrklkir
Page 3-A
r i
NAACP Hits Negro Anti-Semites
Continued from Pago 1-A
Jewish 'Community Council and
i Jewish Center in Birmingham,
outlined the plight of Birming-
ham's Jews at a meeting of the
Los Angeles Council of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Jewish downtown merchants, he I
said, are the target of Negro agi-
tation hecause many of the city's i
250,000 Negroes40 per cent of |
the total populationfeel that the j
merchants exploit them as custom-
ers and discriminate against them
as employees. On the other hand,
many segregationist* charge that
Jews are the instigators of the
demonstrations which have re-
peatedly rocked Birmingham, Mr.
I Katz reported. Segregationists
I also fear that Jewish merchants
' will be the first to yield to Ne-
j gro demands for integration of
"; their stores.
An appeal to Catholic youth to
join with their Protestant and
Jewish counterparts in the Aug.
28 march on Washington was
made here this week by a rabbi
at the Youth Congress of the Third
Order of St. Francis.
Addressing 600 Catholic youth,
! Rabbi Marc H. Tancnbaum, di-
I rector of the Inter-religious Af-
President Zalrr.an S. Shazar of Israel (right) congratulates Dr.
Joseph J. Schwartz, vice president of the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, on the success of the 1963 Israel Bond drive, which is
running 15 percent ahead of last year's record effort. Dr.
Schwartz visited Israel to meet with Prime Minister Levi Eshkol
and other top government leaders to review current develop-
ment needs ot Csraels economy and to discuss the program for
intenBtfying t'r.e settlement and development of the Negev.
T Plans 3-Day Workshop Here
A thr^e-day training workshop Emanuel Tropp. associate direc-
v. ill be conducted beginning Mon- tor, will discuss "The Purposes
day for the full staff of teachers and Goals of the YM and YMHA."
and supervisor- in the Early \ A film, "A Good Day in Kinder-
CbJIdhOod Development program j gartcn," produced by the Cali-
ol the YM and YWHA of Greater j fornia Board of Education, will be
Miami. Twenty-five professional shown for the first time locally.
slatf members will use this orien- The script reading for the film will ,
tation period to prepare for the bo done by Mrs. Helen Weinstock. I fairs Department of the Amer -1
opening of the four nursery Miami Beach supervisor, and Mrs. ^SLS^S^.I?^
schools conducted by the "Y" at: Golds Chernowsky, Miami super- ** *2K*. ?!r2!LJ}\
the foUowmg branch locations: | visor. JJrt-njJ^^JJJ
Southwest Branch, 7215 Coral Mrs. Miriam Harris, Southwest prophetic witness to their faith by j
Way; Miami Branch, 450 SW 16th supervisor, will lecture on "The taking part in this demonstration;
Ave.; North County Branch, 14036 Meaning of Free Play," while the ol the moral commitment of
NE 6th Ave.; Miami Beach subject "The Meaning of Readi- Americans to "equal opportunity
Branch, i536 Ba Rd. The schools ness," will be discussed by Mrs. for all our citizens."
opT. for Um fall season on Bertha Kramer. The entire Insti-
tute is under the leadership of
Miss Jeannette B. Schwartz, di-,
rector, Early Childhood Develop-
ment and Family Life Education
program! tor the "Y." She will
lead the discussion on "Standards
ol Staff Performance in the Y
Pre-School Program." One day
will be devoted to reviewing cur-
rent professional literature.
population controls earnings and
allowances totaling $6,300,000 a
year and ho urged that youth
us* that purchasing power to in-
sist or>. desegregation at lunch
counters, drug stores, depart-
ment stores and entertainment
places they patronized.
Earlier in the week. Rabbi
Tanenbaum spoke at the fifth an-
nual curriculum and faculty work-
shop of the Sister Formation
Conference at Marquette Univer-
sity in Milwaukee, the first rabbi!
to address a meeting of teaching
nuns in the Catholic Church. Hej
advocated the creation of an m-\
ter-religious and inter-racial com-,
mission of educators to seek wider!
understanding among America's,
ethnic and racial and religious'
M Yean
groups of the contributions these
groups have made ? Aiwerican
culture and freedom.
Pabbi Tancnbaum told the nuns
that in the United States, the
majority of the "average Chris-
tian and Jew on the street" did
not know or understand each other
on the deepest level. A major
source of continued misunder-
standing, he said, was the "in-
adequate or distorted portrayal in
religious textbooks, of the Negro,
the Catholic, the Protestant and
the Jew." The process of correct-
ing such portrayals, he asserted,
could be "vastly augmented" if
a commission of specialists in the
fields of teaching training, text-
book writing and religious educa-
tion could meet regularly to act
on the problem.
Mem* Owned
Hum OftMte
Tuesday, Sept
Ban Won't
Speed Peace
Continued hrwn Page 1-A
Rabbi Tanenbaum told the
youth leaders they could us*
their own purchasing power in
the fight for civil rights. He
said the American teen-age
its reservoir ftf goodwill wher-
ever ii exi*ts
lit- '.old another questioner that
there was no question but that
the friendship of tne United States
was one of Israel'! greatest poli-
tical assets. He cited the con-
stant United i -- support "for
the viability of our economy" and
its concern ,V the military
balance in the Middle East.
He also disclosed the imminent
implementation .- an extensive
program of economy and social pro-
gress for the Arab populace of
Israel. He said this included "ac-
tive ("n^iderafiorr" concerning the
future of military government in
Arab-populated areas. This issue
has touched off sharp debate in
Israel.
pyct? '-rx fttiDV 2"in
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RABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN
1061 Michigan Ave., Miami Beoch
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Page 4-A
vJewistfkrklkHn
Friday, August 23. 1963
"Jewish Flor idian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX -
MM 396
FRED K. SHOCHET..............Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDUN..............................Executive Editor
SELMA M. THOMPSON..........Asst. to Publisher
ISRAEL BUREAU
Sheraton Hotel Tel Aviv, Israel
RAY U. BINDER................Correspondent
PilfeHahed .--> > ivi.i.-.v ,i,, [927 by Th. J*wlah FVrldlan
bi 1L'" N.E, Sixth Street, Miami I, t-'l > !
Beeopd-Ciaai Poatafe Paid at Miami, Ftariaa.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and
the Ww?h Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraph.c
Aoncy. Sevn Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service. National Editorial Assn.. American Assn. of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and th* Florida Praas Aaaa.
Th.' Jewteli KWridlan of tlic uicn-handiaf sMlTvlwad In It.- I .luitins._____
RATES
SUBSCRIPTION
Local Area
One Year $500. Three Years $12.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 36 Number 24
Friday. August 23. 1963
3 Bui--5723
A Tragic Kind
Of Human
Irony
The growing Negro-Jewish im-
passe represents a kind of tragic
irony. On the one hand, there is
iome truth to the Negro charge of
'Jewish landlord" exploitation of
heir interests. But it is a partial
ruth, the number of Jewish own-
ers of Negro property and of Jew-
sh merchants catering to Negro
"rade must be, we are sure, more
han adequately balanced by an
equivalent number of non-Jewish
entrepreneurs.
On the other hand, American
"ewish leaders and organizations
naye been for years in the van-
guard of the civil libertarian battle
demanding equal Negro rights.
The impact of this assistance is
today incalculable. Among other
things, the methods and tech-
niques the Jewish community has
been using in behalf- of its own
struggle against unAmerican
manifestations o f anti-Semitism
are today being adapted by inter-
ested Jews to the cause of Negro
integration.
The one does not, of course,
balance the other; but it is more
.han a sign in the wind that Negro leaders
currently seem to be forgetting the tremendous,
nfluential, and weighty Jewish assistance to
heir struggle in favor of accenting the rela-
tively minor incidence of what they now re-
gard as Jewish exploitation of the Negro com-
nunity.
What does this mean? Responsible Negro
eaders are guick to point out that Negro anti-
Semitism is merely a reflection of irresponsible
and fanatic elements, who do not speak for
:he entire American Negro community. While
this may be true, one can hardly discount the
growing prestige of such discordant voices as
those belonging to Malcolm X, of the Black
Muslims, and New York's Rep. Adam Clayton
Powell. Nor can one discount the growing
amount of anti-Semitic material published by
even the most conservative and respected
Negro journals.
Part of the answer may lie in the sudden
Negro recognition of his strength a strength
that can be expressed in the voting booth and
at the cash register of white-owned and con-
trolled business and industry. This is to say
that it ouaht to lie there. Unfortunately, it
does not. Increasingly, it lies instead in mas-
sive anti-Semitic statements as an expression
of the newly-liberated Negro's willingness to
strike back at the symbols of his repression. At
vhom better to strike back than the weakest
element, for the Negro, of the "in group"?
Some Serious Thinking
For the American Jewish community, any
characterization of itself as the "in group" mast
be a laughable one. Our continuing struggle
against manifestations of anti-Semitism on all
'evels of the nation's social and economic
spheres of influence speaks for itself.
But in terms of the Negro status and those
fanatic leaders who are wresting control of the
Negro point of view, anti-Semitism seems, to be
alleviating at least some frustration.
For ourselves, this latest tendency suggests
'.he sudden need for drastic reevaluations. As
we indicated in these columns several weeks
ago, it is a long march to Washington. Many
of our sophomorically-heated rabbinic and lay
bodies joining in the Aug. 28 march in behalf
of Negro civil liberties, and by. inference; Jew-
ish liberties, should do some serious thinking
about the problem along the way.
Speaking Out Now
The increasingly tense news from Israel
can be laid at the doorstep of fuzzy U.S. foreign
policy. Or perhaps it is not so fuzzy.
If our nation is determined to help Gamal
Abdel Nasser at whatever cost, it should do so
without trying to sell us a bill of goods that
military aid to Nasser will also help Israel.
For some reason or other, Administration
planners either fail to believe or refuse to care
about Nasser's own vows respecting the future
safety of Israel. But one thing is sure: So long
as Egypt's dictator continues threatening Is-
rael's security, and so long as the U.S. contin-
ues offering him military assistance at the
same time, he can only conclude that his plans,
if carried out, will not be deterred.
In the event our government is in fact
totally committed to Israel's survival, then it
should say so now. The aid Nasser is receiv-
ing from us has no such warnings attached to
it. All we are being told is that it enhances
our prestige in the Middle East and deters Nas-
ser from total reliance upon Moscow.
This, of course, is entirely untrue.
Group Treatment Home
Despite the burdens of reduced allocations
and the sad prospect of intake closing in Sep-
tember. Jewish Family and Children's Service
has been successful in the agency's initial
fund-raising efforts to open and launch the
operation of a group treatment home for emo-
tionally-disturbed children.
The proposed home, which the agency
hopes to get going by next January, will pro-
vide for the study and. treatment of a small
group of,children in a family-type setting, with
emphasis placed on meeting the specialized
needs at, the seriously disturbed child.
A recent study of the Dade County Welfare
Plannmg Council underscored the necessity of
establishing several such homes in the Greater
^a^L7eJlJ^1FCSaeea "' ,Ue *** of
tms kind of facility means that many children
suffering from emotional disorders reeuirinq
highly-specialized environment, go without any
therapeutic intervention whatsoever to rehabil-
itate their lives.
What Jewish Family and Children's Service
now has on hand is merely a starter for the
Proposed project Greater Micirnjans. applaud
his Federation agency's determination to serve
the community under all circumstances.
during the week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDUN
COME ADDITIONAL wonts
on the Jewish community
and its central fund-raising of.
fort: 1 suggested in a previous
column that the "Y" here
like Mt. Sinai Hospital and the
Home for the Aged, directly
relates the quality of its pro-
grams to the facilities in
which they are housed. Un-
like the hospital and the
Home, the "Y" has not been
granted the privilege of launching either a capital development or
subsistance fund campaign to augment the diminishing allocations
it is receiving.
Federation officials deny this. They say that the "Y" request
for such a campaign has been under study during the past few years
For their part, pressed to clarify the issue, "Y" leaders now indi-
cate they have never in fact been turned down, but that the action
on their application hardly seems to get off the ground. The-rea-
sons are apparent: Federation recognizes the "Y" dilemma and
would like to do something about it; but the status of Jewish com-
munity giving in Miami is so alarmingly low that a supplementary
campaign seems out of the question.
There is probably more than civic discipline in the "Y" accept-
ance of its unhappy situation. The Home for the Aged's campaign
launched last year did not receive Federation approval because the
local philanthropic condition was appreciably better; the Home sim-
ply presented Federation with a fait accompli. But the "Y," as dis-
tinguished from the Home and the hospital, does not have the kind
of economically prestigious leadership capable of extracting such
exceptions. The "V" is thus not at all sure that a supplemental
campaign under its own auspices would be successful
; .;.
THt CHANGED STATUS Of GIVING
f"\FFlClALS OF THE "Y" IK now pointing to the disintegrating
^* status of Federation as s thing they might help cure. "Y" lead
ers believe that the nature of Jewish community giving has Chang-
ed drastically during the recent years. Federation's declining annual
achievement is for them a case in point; while the Federation de-
cision to strike out in the direction of new power symbols proves
the point even further.
If Federation is now prepared to give up on the "old guard."
which has wickedly, sinfully, and even immorally betrayed its pre-
eminent civic responsibility, what are the future choices? Federa-
tion hopes shortly to develop new sources of leadership that are ad-
mittedly lower in economic potential, but that have a far broader
level ui current community identification.
"Y" officials say it is precisely here that their agency can be
most helpful. The "old guard" was to a great extent Israel and
overseas-oriented. The pressures in that area of philanthropic en-
deavor are hardly as overwhelming as they used to be. You can
not, they say, successfully maintain such pressures over the years;
and it may well follow that the effort to do so disenchanted the
traditional power structure, thus fragmenting the Jewish communal
leadership status as a whole.
If the new potential leaders are less economically prestigious,
they are also far less Israel-oriented. To a great extent, suburban
living across the land has contributed to such an ego-centered
condition.
fUKTHIRING THt fKAGMNTATION PR0CISS
A IMING TO PROVE their case. "Y" spokesmen now point to the
overwhelming success of huge synagogues and temples that have
developed in the outlying Greater Miami communities during the
recent past. Financially capable or not, it is the voung and often
the Jewish philanthropically unidentified who have contributed to
the development. This is the kind of achievement, "Y" officials
declare, the "new" Greater Miamian can understanda facility he
has helped build in his suburb and which he can use at will.
What Federation needs, they say. is a "face," and a new "Y"
structure would provide one-more than a Federation building as
symbol or a Federation campaign in behalf of overseas causes and
complex' agency programs to which young people respond half
heartedly because in the final analysis they fail to understand then.
A community center is something people "can understand;" and it il
something they can use.
The trouble with this reasoning is its short-term purpose. Alter
he new face,- then what/ And more: to what extent does such
thinking further aggravate the Jewish community fragmentation pro-
cess that has already set in here at an alarming rate? For does it
r th V*!! >vement away from total civic responsibility with
n the Federation framework-the sort of responsibility that nur-
neonln f.uT ? lPrai"CC of "*" agency programs even if
the moment' Unt
OMM StimS TO Bf UNCONCIKNID
'Y"OFFICIALS ARE nevertheless hardly to be criticized lor the
the rn* nlT ''"?'' only bccause th*y Und steadfastly with
carefu tl tt f .r"n,.d Gr*^r Miami Jewry. In fact, more
who now LeiT,ne? 'S 'he thinkinK of ,hose federation leaden
rael or entail ?r ,t" toWard a weani-way from the central Is-
tStenth.lS VV"* M parl ol the ove" evaluation of
sas sss ssass mm m *,he mor m ,h,s
marSledV'fh 52 *"5 of writin about these matters, I have
ew?sn rlwLS CnC* W'th Which m* Presentation has met here.
ilmJSSSSXth?land have featu"* K ~SS n th<,ir
b"heS 5i SE ma,n,lyMbecause Miami sm mak*6 ood copy
a: alf JEE T 52 ,etters at ,he outst. *ere is ne comment
Federation5 Sera Eg* frm aencv *"* not frm
ieaaer, not trom the community at large
to discuss an i,!!eHab0Ut a "peU his name wrong, were I
"set to r ghU"T.dlMC,a'ed, fr0m the !*<*>' *volved. I would be
mentati^G^/M"^ ^ ^ en"*h PertU,p* ** fr"*
I imagined Th! vL Wry has Pressed further than even
ago no 0t JBhSaW? ^^ Wh0 Said t0 me SCVeral ***
of Jewish FanSl aS rh!wrPeJ,eed ,he 8t0ry the tragic dsing
cause of impossible h^ S '^rvice intake come September be-
No one does^fre oJne h? '"J1*" W" PTOphetic in hiS won",
abandonment ^'^SJ^Z^ toexPress ou,rae at the tol!J
civic trust FrL,uZt S 1,n8tir"e leadership of its sacred
canlent that I have mere v .""? -1 hear va*u rumblings of dis-
My purpose was no,Tract VT*'" a"d ,hat l ffer M "^'i
W. Miami harSy ^ZZ****** '*' ""


Friday, August 23, 1963
vJenistt nrr/kfifun
Page 5-A
Jacob Sher. Miami Beach philanthropist, civic leader and
sportsman, is inducted in campus ceremonies as a Fellow of
Brandeis University, an honor conferred on persons who have
assumed major roles in the development of the Waltham,
Mass., liberal arts university. With Sher are his niece. Miss
Barbara Byrne (left), and his wife, Mary. The Shers live at
16 Island Ave.
Major Jewish Bodies Will
Join Rights March Aug. 28
Continued from Page 1-A
sion on Social Action, will
among the marchers.
be
The American Jewish Commit
tee's endorsement called on all
members "to participate in this
peaceful demonstration" and the
Committee voted Si,000 to help
meet expenses of the demonstra-
tion.
In. New York, the local sec-
tion of the National Council of
Jewish Women urged its mem-
ber* to launch a letter-writing
campaign to members of Con-
gress, asking support of the
civil rights bill. The Milwau-
kee Jewish Council said it would
give top priority to the strug-
gle of the Negro for full civil
rights, particularly develop-
ments in the Milwaukee area.
In Rochester, N.Y., the Jewish
Community Council said it would
be a sponsor of a tri-faith Con-
ference on. Race and Religion in
October, the first of its kind
there.
The Jewish Council Federation
of Long Beach, Calif., joined the
area's Council of Churches in cir-
culating petitions to homeowners
and renters, urging them to pledge
in writing they would not discrim-
inate against applicants for hous-
ing because of their race or creed.
The Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith urged the Senate Com-
merce Committee not to allow
political arguments" about Un-
constitutional basis for outlawing
segregation in public accommoda-
tion to interfere with ending "this
stubborn residue of slavery" in
the United States. Playwright
Dore Schary. ADL chairman,
n.ade the plea in a statement to
the Senate committee, holding
hearings on the proposed legisla-
tion.
Temple Adath Veslmrim
1025 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN
CANTOR MAURICE NEU and CHOIR
HIGH HOLY DAY SiATS AVAILABLE
TO NON-MEMBERS
VISIT THE TEMPLE OR CALL
W! 7-1435
REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
FOR NURSERY THROUGH CONFIRMATION
WORSHIP WITH US IN OUR
NEWLY COMPLETED SANCTUARY
Senate Quiz
Clears Agency
Continued from Page 1-A
ment has encountered more for- j
mldable adversaries in the past '
and emerged triumphant.
"Any official inquiry can easily j
be sensationalized in headlines.
What is most important, however,!
i- the fact that a prolonged and I
meticulous examination has turn-
ed up absolutely nothing damag-
ing to the status of the Jewish
Agency. On the contrary, it has
serve.! to explode some malicious
rrlyths and to dispose of misrep-
resentation propagated by fanati-
cal opponents.
"The hearings have also docu-
mented the historic role which the
Jewish Agency and other pro-Is-
rael organizations have played in
the rescue of Jewish refugees, to
the development of Israel and
support for her legitimate rights
and interests. Sen. Fulbrifht him-
self took occasion to compliment
the Jewish Agency on its great
achievements and to state re-
peatedly that there was 'no wrong
doing'either illegal or improper
in its activities.
"The only issue that developed |
concerns a technical question:
Whether reports filed by the Jew-
ish Agency periodically, in ac-
cordance with legal requirements,
were in every instance sufficient-
ly detailed. We have every rea-
son to be proud of the record. It
is a vindication of our program.
"We are quite confident that
the devoted friends of Israel in
this country, Christians and
Jews, Zionists and non-Zionists
alike, will not be deterred from
continuing to give their moral
and material support to a cause
dear to their hearts and sanc-
tioned by the overwhelming
majority of the American peo-
ple.
"Speaking for the American
Section of the Jewish Agency, and
American Zionist groups whose
close cooperation we have always
enjoyed, I have this to ad.1: Con-
sistent with our devotion to the
national interest, we will pursue
cur efforts on behalf of Zionism
and the State of Israel as vigor-
ously and cffeectively in the fu-
ture as in the past. We will con-
tinue to do so by all proper and
legitimate means available to
free men in a free society, and in
full compliance with all legal and
technical requirements."
AIR-CONDITIONED SANCTUARY OF TEMPLE NER TAMID
tTtKNAL LIGHT'
Temple Ner Tamid
fConservefrveJ
INVITES YOU TO BECOME A MEMBER AND ENJOY THE
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES IN THE
BEAUTIFUL, AIR-CONDITIONED MAIN SANCTUARY
RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ and
AMD
CANTOR SAUL H. BREEH
OfflCIATINC
Accompanied by the Choir under the direction of Joseph Schreibman
MEMBERSHIP DUES INCLUDE:
2 SEATS IN THE MAIN SANCTUARY
FREE TUITION IN RELIGIOUS SCHOOL & TRANSPORTATION
PARTICIPATION IN ALL TEMPLE ACTIVITIES
SEATS AVAILABLE IN CHAPEL SECTION FOR NON-MEMBERS
Temple Office Open Daily: 9 AM. to 5 P.M. cmd 7 to 9:30 P.M.
80th Street & Carlyle Avenue, Miami Beach
Telephone UN 6-8345 or UN 6-9833
BROCHURE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST
BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
The Traditional Synagogue on Miami Beach
311 WASHINGTON AVENUE
COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
You Will Hear the Dynamic Sermons of
RABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN
and Enjoy the Prayers with
CANTOR MAURICE MAMCHES
4 Few Choice Seats Still Available at Moderate Prices
For reservation call JE 1-6150
FREE SEATS FOR MEMBERS
I
Games Party Tuesday
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Medical Center at Den-
ver will hold a card party Tues-
day evening at 810 Washington
Ave Public is invited to the
frames function, which will include
prizes and refreshments. Pro-
ceeds are lor canter research.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
NOW REGISTERING FOR
NURSERY SCHOOL
Ages 3 thru 5 years
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Transportation Available
Open alto to Non-members
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
SOUTH MIAMI BRANCH
77th Ave. & S.W. 104th St.
tNear Palmet'o Bypass &
So. Dixte Hwv.)
MAIN SCHOOL
262S S.W. 3rd Avenue
NEW MEMBERS WELCOME
For Information: Call School Office FR 1-1882
*A^^
To the Parents of our Community
KNESETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
1415 EUCLID AVENUE
HAS OPENED THE DOORS OF ITS HEBREW SCHOOL
TO THE CHILDREN OF OUR COMMUNITY
AND IS OFFERING FREE HEBREW EDUCATION.
GIVE US YOUR BOYS AND GIRLS .
-THEY ARE ENTITLED TO A HEBREW EDUCATION
Registration begins Sunday, August 25th
between 10 A.M. and 12 Noon.
TEMPLE JUDEA
OF CORAl GABLFS
320 PALERMO AVENUE
REFORM
RABBI MORDECAI PO0ET
Cantor Gordon Richards
Services every Friday 8:15 P M.
For membership & School Information
Call HI 4-9876
HIGH HOLY DAYS BAR MITZVA
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL ADULT STUDY
CONFIRMATION YOUTH GROUPS
SCOUTING COTILLION
THEATRE GUILD
BETH RAPHAEL
CONGREGATION
139 N.W. 3rd AVENUE
Again Conducting
High Holy Day Services
With prominent Rabbi 4 Cantor
Seats $5 Each
Office Open Daily
9-12 noon. 6-9 p.m.
Julius elaperOi Proaldent
Ralph Krleger, Secretary
FR 9-8649 FR 3-9807
i
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Reform Congregation of the Suburban Southwest
5950 N. Kendall Dr. (S.W. 88th St.)
announces the return of
RABBI CANTOR
DR. HERBERT M. BAUMGARD CHARLES S. K0DNER
to the pulpit on Friday evening, August 23rd, 8:30 P.M.
Register now for September opening of Religious School,
Hebrew School, Youth groups, Adult Education,
Nursery and Kindergarten.
Phone MO 6-2536 for information.
*VMMM*^M^^*^*^^^V*^^^*^^A^**A*^A^AAAA*A*A**MA*
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
"North Dode's Pioneer Synagogue and School"
1051 NO. MIAMI BEACH BLVD., NO. MIAMI BEACH
PHONE: Wl 7-7528
Max A. lipschirz, Rabbi Abraham J. Girtelson, Educ. Dir.
Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum, Rebecca Kay,
Cantor Nursery-Kindergarten Supervisor
NOW ACCEPTING MEMBERSHIP AND REGISTRATION
ALL CHILDREN IN OUR SCHOOLS
Nursery School Kindergarten Sunday School
Hebrew School Bar and Bat Mitzvah Confirmation
Post Confirmation Hebrew High School
Reserved Seats Now Being Distributed tor the High Holyday Services.


Page 6-A
*Je*l$bncridiair)
Friday. August 83, 1963
Histadrut Rooted in the History of Israel
m i i
BEILINSON HOSPITAL OF HISTADRUT AT PETACH TIKVA.
Histadrut Horizon: Health to Industry


Four-hundred young leaders of the newly emerging nations of
Africa and Asia have attended courses at Histadrut's Afro-
Asian Institute for Labor Studies in Tel Aviv. The Institute
has gained an international reputation as a center for train-
ing government and trade union personnel in the principles
of cooperative; enterprise and democratic procedure. Above
are two American visitors, Rabbi Jacob I. Weinstein, chair-
man, and Dr. Sol Stein, executive director of the Israel Hista-
drut Campaign, with Akiva Eger (center), director of the Insti-
tute. Below is a typical class attending a lecture. Academic
studies are mixed with field trips and work in kibbutzim,
moshavim, and urban co-ops.
Afro-Asian Institute Aids
Advance of Israel's Status
The Afro-Asian Institute is one
of the most remarkable of Hista-
drut aehievements. A huge
building in Tel Aviv, it is the
nerve center for one of Hista-
drut's many ambitious efforts.
For a number of years now, Is-
rael has learned to realize the
importance of her friendships
among the newly-emerging Afri-
can nations. Israel's friendships
there are. in fact, far-ranging.
In Israel, you can not drive
along the highways, visit a kib-
butz, walk on the streets of any
large city, attend a university
classroom session, or enter a
technical school without seeing
evidence of this. Everywhere,
there are splendidly-dressed Afri-
can diplomats or students in
work clothes soaking up know-
how to bring back to their new
homelands.
At a recent Afro-Asian Insti-
tute session, I saw students
from Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast.
Ghana, Gabon and Upper
Volta in a discussion of Israel's
impact on the progress of their
countries. Each expressed his
gratitude to the Institute for the
education he was receiving. Each
blessed Israel for the assistance.
One particularly florid young
man ended his presentation with
"Long Live Israel!"'
What is the main Histadrut
achievement here? It is more
than simply cementing relations
with the African nations. It is
giving them the kind of tech-
nical skills they need. It is
helping people and countries that
trust Israelthe size of Israel,
which is like theirs; the inten-
tions of Israel, which asks for
nothing but friendship in return;
the scientific and agricultural
capabilities of Israel, which are
geared for small lands and small
needs like theirs; the lack of
condescension in Israel, which
does not approach the Africans
as new-comers who must be
patronized, but which genuinely
hopes to relate to Africa's bright
future in a positive way.
This is the Histadrut achieve-
ment at the Afro-Asian Institute.
It is one of which all knowing
Israelis are proud.
Enter Beilinson Hospital out-
side of Tel Aviv, and you are
in one of Histadrut's largest
medical facilities. Beilinson is
not simply a large hospital for
Israel; it is a large hospital for
any city, any country, any-
where in the world.
Beilinson is part of Histadrut's
medical service program, Kupat
llohm. to which lraelis belong
for a nominal monthly fee. You
need not be a general Histadrut
member to be jiart of Kupat
Holim. But as part of the ser-
vice, every modern health aid is
at your beck and call in the
event of need. Kupat Holim
runs a broad range of programs.
Gigantic Beilinson is at one end.
Greater Miami Histadrut's clin-
ic, now being erected in Beer-
sheba in the Negev, is at the
other. Regardless of size, all
are geared to deal with health,
whether on a cosmopolitan or
outlying regional level.
What Else?
What else is Histadrut? Yes,
it is a labor federation. But
there is no closed shop in Is-
rael. .Members pay to the fed-
eration, which in turn supports
67 locals in cities throughout the
country.
Histadrut is also Solel Boneh,
a construction organization; Te-
nuvah. a dairy combine; Ham-
ashbir, wholesale consumer or-
ganization; Koor, industrial en-
terprises; and Mekorot. a util-
ity jointly operated by Hista-
drut, the Israel Government,
and the Jewish Agencyall by-
products of the earliest Zionist
settlement efforts within the
agricultural cooperative frame-
work.
Histadrut represents some 21
per cent of the total Israel enter-
prise, with the balance either
private or government-operated
and owned. Neither does it look
merely to its historic past. Tiuz
is Histadrut's newest program
which, with the Government of
Israel assists new industry in
pioneering areas like Kiryat Gat
and Arad, where private indus-
try does not go too willingly.
Histadrut is thus many things
to many people. Add to these
the 30 to 40 Youth Centers it has
erected, the 8,000 scholarships to
high school and unversity it
sppports, and the many Batei
Avot for "old timers," such as
on the lovely seashore at Afridar
it operates, Histadrut remains a
continuing reflection of the
fundamental purposes of Israel's
earliest pioneers: the upbuilding
of a Jewish homeland in our
time.
Reflects the Earliest Drive
Toward Upbuilding Today
Of a Modern Homeland
By LEO MINDLIN
Executive Editor
The Jewish Flo-ridien
Histadrut is rooted in the his-
tory of the State of Israel like
perhaps no other organization or
institution, short of the Zionist
ideal itself. For Histadrut is a
manifestation of Labor Zionism.
It is an integral part of the ori-
ginal Aliyot to Palestine from
Eastern Europe at the end of the
nineteenth century. It repre-
sented, in the very beginning,
the active realization of the phil-
osophy of political Zionism
spawned in the drawing rooms
of Vienna and Berlin and Lon-
don.
Histadrut is the direct des-
cendant of the men and women
who first came to a maleria-in-
lestecl. swamp-ridden, and de-
sert-neglected country to wrest
from long dormant Pale-tine a
reemergenl Israel in our time.
Refugees from the political.
economic, social, and religious
repression ot Poland and Russia
they came to forge a new life
in the image of Theodor llerzl
and Max Nordau and '.'achum
Sokolow. They came i.i the
spirit of democratic MCttUam,
forming cooperative agricultural
communities to increase the cer
tainty of their -uccesst migra-
tion.
Today. Histadrut ha^ Ear out-
stripped the basic ccr^ept of
this kibbutz kvutzah nioshav
orientation. Hi-tadrat functions
on a variety of fronts i modern
Israel. Those who merely re-
gard Histadrut a.- a labor union
and one very importa ( taped
of its many programs ;.. in the
area of labor affair indeed
have a short-sighted ut I rstand-
ins of the organization
During my recent st tour
in Israel, 1 had amp. oppor-
tunity to see Histdnit ir mul
ti-faceted endeavora f re
Hoc ting light outward da
number of colorful hori: ach
independent frcm one .. lOther,
and all contributing t> tel -
well'being. From healt o lah-
er. to education, to chilli I
industry, to t- da
sources in the kibbutz his is
Histadrut, ami mare.
BROTHERS AND SISTERS TOGETHER
Onim Nurtures Young Nations
Energetic Citizens of Tomorrow
1 drove tiir out into the coun-
try one day, and near the bor-
der came upon a wood-secluded
camp site: Onim. Here, chil-
dren from toddlers to teens ca-
vorted in their afternoon games,
most occupied on a soccer field
Onim. a Histadrut program, is
a home for these youngsters who
came to Israel from a variety o|
lands. Their >kms and racial
features are an index to the
broad geography on which Omni
stands. To the Ashkenazic
youngsters wrested from misery
in middle and Eastern Europe,
I spoke Yiddish To the il.nk.
narrow-boned boys and girls
from North Africa. I conversed
in French All were rapidly
acquiring the fast patter of
Sephardic Hebrew.
The population at Onim is
more than immigrant children.
It is children from broken homes
in Israel; it is orphans; it |g the
abandoned; it is the unwanted.
But Histadrut wants them all
to brighten ther lives, to raise
them as Israel citU
morrow.
Through txu Ir tu .it ir ments
I meanderedtheir
pots, their tar from v. i lorn but
spanking clei n shot i r their
lovely dining room, t e >reath
takingly beautiful par! u which
in,an is gitual
i In the sOCCi r Bell
sembled, stared ;.; m> > -in
i, mera, and uetlj >
themselves into .< gn >
photograph, l was nbarras
ed. lor I never photo.- .| such
things But -heir rxpectant
eyes, their ah-, lute illi igness
to be coo] i e\ c hen I
ha i not asked for it. the way
they held ham- in a ledicated
brother-and-sistei fashion, show--
ed me that, in fact, they were
siblings on a new lane', it His
tadrut home. ng li huge
family to learn to meet the fu-
ture.
I clicked my shu*:er, and
they applauded. In turn. I ap-
plauded them a- they raced back
to their afternoon gair.
i
Workshop at one of Histadrut's 16 "Amal" vocational schools.


Friday. August 23. 1963
*Je*ist fk>ridUan
Page 7-A
Javits, Ha/pern
Question Aid
<
Former Opera Singer Gordon Richards v>ill be installed by
Rabbi Mordecai Podet as cantor of Temple Judea of Coral
Gables. Installation will take place Friday during the evening
service beainnina at 8:)5 D.m. A reception for Cantor and Mrs.
Richards will follow. Shown are organist Harry Carney and
Rabbi Podet as Cantor Richards prepares the Temple choir
in liturgy for the coming High Holy Days.
Panel Discussion Set Wednesday
Should Dade County Have a
' ii I) 1 i c Accommodation Ord-
nance?" will be the subject of a
panel discussion to be presented
by the Community- Relations Coun-
cil on Wednesday, 8 p.m., at the
Biscayne Terrace Hotel.
Dr. II Franklin Williams, act-
jiil: dean of the University College.
Vniversity of Miami, will be mod-
\ ralor.
Participants will include War-
ren Freeman, manager of the Bis-
cayne Terrace Hotel; Fr. Theo
or" Gibson, president of the local
..! Association for the Ad-
ancement of Colored People; and
Tobias Simon, member of the Flor-
ida Civil Rights Commission, and
one Of the attorneys involved in th?
litigation of the Bible School suit.
Also during the evening, Louis
J. Mitchell, newly-appointed di-
rector of the Florida Council for
Human Relations, will be intro-
duced to the community.
A graduate of Columbia Univer-
sity and the Virginia Theological
Seminary, he served in churches
in New York and Birmingham.
Ala. Married and the father of
five children. Rev. Mitchell will
conduct his duties encompassing
the State of Florida Irom the re-
gional office in Daytona Beach.
Continued from Page 1-A
feeds the fire of intransigence and
war in the Middle East." He
said Nasser's newly voiced bellig-
erence was in "direct contraven-
tion to the objectives of our for-
eign aid program He said fur-
ther that aid to Nasser must be
linked to a cessation of Middle
F.ast hostilities and the arms race
in the region.
In Mm House, Rep. Seymour
Halpern, co-author of the Keat-
ing-Halpern amendment, said
the Foreign Aid bill was before
Congress "at the very moment
that Nasser openly proclaims his
intention to destroy Israel by
force of arms, and diverts his
own resources to buy Soviet
weapons and hire ex-Nazi tech-
nicians."
The Keating-Halpern amend-
ment would sever aid to nations
diverting their own funds to pur-
chase Soviet weapons and threat-
en neighboring states.
Rep. Halpern, a New York Re-
publican, cited recent remarks by
Under Secretary of State W.
Averell Harriman which justified
continued assistance to Nasser on
grounds this was good for Israel,
in that it increased American 'in-
fluence" in Cairo.
The Congressman said that "if
this dubious line of thinking held
merit, one might try to increase
our influence in Moscow or Peping
bv sending lavish appeasement
gifts."
\

Empire State
Club Meeting
Empire State Club of Florida
was to meet on Thursday, Aug.
22. at the Barcelona Hotel,
An illustrated talk on "Safe
Driving for Senior Citizens" was
to be presented by William F.
Frawley, of the Metro Court.
Joe Riotto is president of the
club.
IS THERE A MIND READER
IN THE HOUSE?
:.
You'll need one unless
you get your estate plans
down on paper! Sure you
have everything in mind ..
how you want your money
invested, what you want in-
cluded in your will, who is
to be your executor. But
until you have it written
properly and legally on
paper, you'll find that mind
readers are scarce and not
welcome nor effective in
court. Instead, ask your
lawyer and one of the Trust
Ofacersot Mercantile National
Bank of Miami Beach to help
you work out the adminis-
trative and financial details
of an estate plan that will
benefit you now and your
family now and later.
MERCANTILE ^
NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH
420 LINCOLN ROAD MALL* PH. JE 8-7831
DRIVE IT

DREAM IT
Finance your new or used
tar through a low cost
Installment loan at
AMERICAN
^BANK
^V or MIAMI
f FIRST ST. FR 4 7211 I
PAN
nos.r
RENT A CAR
from $2.50 per day
(15 per wk. & mileage charge
ABOTT MOTORS, Inc.
1451 W. FLAGLER ST.
Phone FR 3-0326
ROOF LEAK?
CALL
VICTOR CONN
Let us repair it or apply
a new one. For free
estimate phone:
^^ ACME
^ lUMrllX,
685-1952
NORTON TIRE CO.
\B.EGoodrich/
UFESaVER
CLEaRMCE SME
Cheek These S.U I*-
On Our Finest Tire
Nylon Premium LHesaver
UJ1
LIMITED d ol '?" iouHUNO.
^' \NT|TIES condition. Muu
WIN A TON
OF MONEY!
*34,000 IN SILVER DOLLARS!
1571 OTHER BIG PRIZES
A NEW '64 STATION WAGON
20 MOTOROLA 19" portable TV SETS
i 50 SETS of 4 B.F.GOODRICH
* SILVERTOWN TIRES
500 MOTOROLA Transistor RADIOS
1000 KODAK Flashfun CAMERA OUTFITS
i''-r
B.F.Goo4rith

Come in for complete
sweepstakes tules.
FREE PRIZE
to everyone
who comes in!
NOTHING TO BUY OR WRITE
Come in and register! Hurry-offer ends Sept. 7
VACATION CREDIT TERMS
uy NowPay When You
Return From Vacation
MIAMI
lx 5366 N. Yf*
37th Av.
TFiJowetT
H.0l.r St.
* 4779 $. W.
Ilh Street
MIAMI BEACH
* 1454
Allen Roa J
NORTH MIAMI
* 133SO N. W.
7lh Avonue
1
SOUTH MIAMI
aWDB Sew*It
Dixie Hwy.
HAUANDALI
29 North
Dixie Hwy.
W. HOLLYWOOD
k 4017
( Hollywood
~ Blvd. it
State Road #T
HOMESTEAD
* 30100 South
Federal Hwy.
FT. 1AUDERDAII
* 1130 W.
Broward Blvd.
2432 W.
reward Blvd.
KEY WEST
540
Orten Sf.
Indicates mechanical service available.


J
Page 8-A
vJewistifhrkBari
Friday. August 23. 1963
Temple Israel Plans Rosh Hashona
Services at teach Convention Hall
Maurice Revitz (seated), president of Temple Menorah, dis-
cusses an cccelerated membership program with members
of the Temple Executive Committee. Standing (left to right)
are Max Krauss, honorary president; Leonard Solomon, vice
president; Jack Burstein. secretary; and Louis DeCoveny,
treasurer. Also participating in the drive are Irving Billig,
Joseph Denmark, Himen Fenster, Sol Frankel. and Louis Rein-
stem. Jack I. Korenblit is chairman of the membership com-
mittee.
Menorah Plans New Curriculum
For the first time sinj^27.
the congregation of Temple Israel
c[ Greater Miami "ill worship
c-utalde of its own sanctuary, it
vas announced this week by Har-
old Thurman, president of the 42
year-Old Reform Jewish >yna-
,oguc
"This year our High Holy Day
services will be at the Miami
Beach Convention Hall." Thurman
said, "so that we may accommo-
date the more than 3.000 members
and their families who will wor-
ship together on Rosh Hashona
and Yum Kippur. The move to
the Convention Hall is in the na-
ture of an experiment, and is de-
signed for the convenience of our
members."
Thurman emphasized that there
I will be no tickets available for
1 the public.
Dr. Joseph R. Narot, rabbi of
Temple Israel sine* 1M0, will
preach at all services. Cantor
Jacob G. Bornstein will lead the
choir ir the liturgical music.
Rabbi Morris W. Graff will
share in the reading of the ser-
vices.
Temple Menorah Religious
School will introduce a dange In
its teaching schedule by eleminat-
.ng Sunday morning sessions for;
the Hebre.v School and replac-
ing these sessions with Sabbath
morning worship and stu;'y hours.
Under the program, children of
the Hebrew School will meet Sat-'
urday morning for regular class-
room instruction, following which
they will all he brought into the'
main sanctuary to participate in.
the regular Sabbath service con-
ducted by Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
..;;=.;
witz and Cantor Edward Klein.
The decision to undertake the
Sabbath morning experiment was
made following individual inter-
views which Rabbi Abramowitz
and Herzl Honor, principal of the
school, held with every parent of
the school, who indicated "an
overwhelming approval of the
Sabbath morning plan since it will
expose the children not only to
the academic sturly of Hebrew,
but give them an opportunity to
experience the Sabbath spirit in
the Temple."
Special registration for new
children in Temple Menorah will
be held on Sunday morning and.
continue throughout the entire
week.
The Religious School of Temple
Menorah maintains a Gan Yela-
dim (nursery), as well as a fully-
graded Sunday School and Hebrew
School, with preparation for Bar
Mitzvah and confirmation as an
integral part of its curriculum. [
With the exception of the Nur-
sery School, Temple Menorah of*
fen its entire educational pro-
gram free of charge to its mem-
bers. Nathaniel Glickman, chair-
man of the School Board, explain-
ed that the policy of free education
for members which was establish-
ed five years ago, will continue
to be the policy of the school.
The Convention Hall area has
been redesigned and will be pro-1
fesslonally decorated for the ser-
vices. Myron If. Behrman and.
A. L. Nadlcr head a special com-;
mittee handling details of the
move.
From a modest beginning in
1922. in the home of the late Har-
ry V. Simons, when 22 people
gathered to form South Florida's
first Reform Jewish congregation,
the congregation of Temple Israel,
in 1924 built its first permanent
house of worship, a modest frame
building, on the northwest corner
of NE 14th St. and 3rd Ave. Forc-
ed to make way for Biscayne
Blvd., the congregation deel ed
to build at its present location.
137 NE 19th St.
It was the year. 1927. when the
congregation of Temple Israel last
used other facilities than its own
for worship services. Part of that
year, services were held at the
Central School, NE 1st Ave. and
3rd St.. now the site of the United
States Post Office.
Keeping pace with the growth
of Greater Miami, Temple Is-
rael found Its sanctuary too
small for its growing congrega-
tion in 1946, and instituted a
system of two evening services
on the major holidays. Even
this proved inadequate and in
1955, with the completion of a
$750,000 Religious School addi-
tion, the new Morris D. Wolfson
, Auditorium was used for ser-
i vices at the same time as the
sanctuary, and both on a two-
shift basis for the evenings.
With more than 1.300 family
membersa total count of over
' 4.000the shift to Miami Beach
Convention Hall will permit all
the generations of families to be
together for worship. Only mem-
bers of Temple Israel will receive
cards of admission to the ser-
vices.
*%%% OAOK BOULevAHO
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
JlmmeM aot
rUNINAL OiNrcTOR
A
I hope
Grandma
likes my
flowers
SAUL MINDIIN
I -pi d Pi i
".-, ..-v
I '; I !
i,ir\ of III of
dim I id nil i
Mr;;. Fannie Mtndlm mid bro"
ther Leo mourn him d
Sejbl and hit departed father,
Jacob Miidlm. .are nouf united.
EXCELLENT CANTOR
Unusually Fine Tenor
SEEKS POSITION
for
HIGH HOLY DAYS
CANTOR G. A.,
co P.O. Box 2973
Main Postoffice, Miami 1, Fla.
American-Israeli
Religious Store
Now Taking Orders for
HIGH HOLIDAYS
Full tine of: TAtAISIM
SXUll CAPS
MACHS0R1M end
everything for Synagogue & -Home
CALL S. SCHWARTZ
JE 1-7722
1357 Wacliinrjton Ave.
Dignified, beautiful and
reverently cared for
surroundings for our
departed loved ones are
a source of very real
comfort to alL
\-jordon jj-uneral <_/t<
eme
Emamu. Oomion. Pounder, Deceased
Harry CJordon
Ik p. OorrDON
|amei B. Gordon
A Good Name Is Far
Belier Than Great Riches.
\ L COMMUNITY MAUSOLEUM
I i |
ULL
"Tht
Cemetery
TMt IMkS
UktA
Cirdcn"
HAI1KT CORDON
Lto>,
.1 It.. SovtVt *? wtttwll
" 'jiwism etMimiw
TU 5-1689

Palmer
Memorials
i'
Jewish
monument
Builders"
Exclusive Deoler
"ROCK OF AGES
FAMILY MEMORIALS
SCHEDULED UNVEN-"-3S
SUNDAY, AUGUST 7S. 1*43
Mt. Sinni Cemetery
MAUR1CI FISHMAN, 11 ? .*.
Rdbbi H.> Vl Br...- ^
ESTILL STE.N8ERG
anil her son
LEO C. STEINBERG, 1 a..
Rdbb: TibiT H. Ste
Hit. Nrbo Cemefer/
IRVING DRILLICK, 2 BUR.
Rabbi Harold Ricfit.-
Stmr of. David Cemel*
EVA HERSHOFF
NO FINER QUALITY I -
NO LOWER PRICE i -
SAVE MIDDLEMAN i
PROFIT BUY DIRECT
FROM MANUFACTURER.
WE UNDERSELL
ALL COMPETITION
GET LOWEST PRICE FROM
ALL OUR COMPETITORS...
THEN GET OURS YOU
SURELY WILL BUY FROM
US and SAVE SAVE SAVE!
PRE-HOUDAY SPECIAL
GRAVE Q ft AIM
MARKERS
FOOTSTONES
HEADSTONES
FOR ALL CEMETERIES
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
3279 S.W. 8th Street
Ml 4-0921 Pho.es HI 44921
30'
FOR YOUR SYNAGOGUE
AND HOME NEEDS .
Get tvery thing-Its Everyfh .) at
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
417 Washington Ave me
Miami Bench, Fla.
Tel. JE 1-9017
Israeli Hebrew Study Cub
intermed;nte Group meet; very
Sun. \0:1d .1 m : p.ftl 1511
SW 5th Ave.. .it SW lit" SI Mi-
ami. All adults weKome ill 'ree
just come in, but nefc 10:30
i.ii. please!
Miami Hebrew Book Store
ISRAELI & DCVESTIC GIFTS
Hebrew Relig 0. I Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools A Private Use
1585 WASHI\GTON AVE.
Miami Beacn JE 8-3d40
WE INSTALL
GLASS
FOR EVERY Pf it POSE
STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW MASS
furniture Tops, Beveled Mine's and
ffesilvering Our Specie''y
L I G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS
136 S.W. 8th STREET Phone FR 1-1363
Marrit Orlin
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
"Progressing with Our Marty Satisfied Customers'
ANOTHER LOCATION f Off YOUR CONVENIENCE
C0ULT0N BROS.
"ART" HUMr "NAT*
Coral Way & S.W. 27th Ave.
TOUR TEXACO DOTS
840 S.W. 8th St.
'-v^\*vw\/^lV^ .


Iridcry- August 23, 1963
t'Jk-ntelh flvktBu'}
Page 9-A
Services J his l^Jee
k e n a
-GUDATH iSliL. 7801 Carlyle ave.
. Orthodox. Raaui Isaac Ever.
kNSHT EMES 2533 SW 1*th ave.
Consrrvattve. J )seph Pious, pres-
cient.
------ a> ------
JETH DAVID. M25 SW 3rd ave. Con.
seryative. RabOi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor William W. LlMon.
i.i:.j li >jii. SeturdttV a a.m.
JETH EL, 500 W> tTth ave OrthoaoK-
Racbi Solomon Scruff.
iFrklay >: >''' > mm lay ;! a.m.
fSiiinon: "Pro'iri- .liutceiiivtu."
[BETH EMETM VEHUDAH MOSHE.
13630 W. Dime Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi S'tnen April. Cantor Hyman
Fine.
I riilay Srl5 r.m. Sermon: "I'eaoi-.
lhr<.uKN Strrntf'-ii." Miimliv Ml.ain.
Brfr Mifsvah: >rr... eon of Ml" uuU
,\|r> Maurice St.:**.
betm ISRAEL. 400 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox. faoo, M. Louia Rottman.
BETH JACP8. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox RabM Tikor Stern.
Cantor Maunca Mamches.
BETH KODESH. 110t SW 12th ave.
Modrrn Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bemetein.
Friday > p I'm-iiny S:3 n.m.
Surinom "You A-- Judged." :,-:.< |,m
"Klhlca of Ou- Huthera." 8:30 pin.
Who An Our L- i.r>?"
----- -
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
Orthodox. Raph Kriefler, secre-
tary.
BETH TFILAM. 933 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabb Joseph E. Rackovsky.
----
BETH TORAH I6h at. and NE 11th
ave. Ccnservat ve. Rabbi Max Lip.
scht*. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschen-
baum.
I'n.l.iy li and p.m. S. i mi.ii. "To
I <>.|ii..rir.li..te. Roimmelrto or IMs-
1 1 nil I Mttivah: Wend),
tci ol M and Mrs Bei nard
s.iiurda.i Mil a.m. Bar Mitx-
> i!i Barry, wi Of Mr. and Mr*. Pul-
ton 1;-. ii.Tj;: Warren, bod of Mr
Mnrr.-K- stein. Afternoon Bni
Mitxvafl Robert, son of Mr. aiul Mr*.
Kilwnrd >Valtermnn.
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1544
Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham St/assfold.
-----. -----
OADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 1401 NW 1S3rd at. Con-
servative. Rabbi Harold Richter.
Cantar Emanuel Mandel.
1 iilay :t: ". p.n\ ;,. rmoni "Justice and
n. (tatunlaj, S:3o a.m. liar
vah: Bruce Helter, .--on of Mr. and
.Mi>. Charisa Italian. Mincha n.111.
i:r Mlry.vah: Julian, tun of Mr. ..mi
Mr*. Ban -> lifebelt.
FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
pi. Conservative. Rabbi David Ros-
enfeld. Cantor George Goldberg.
| FT. LAUDEROALE EMANU-EL. 1801
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
Richard M. Lev ton.
-----
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
dr. Orthodox Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI, 1201
Johnson St. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. C a nt o r Yshudah
Heilbrn.in.
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservat've. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox. Rabu David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
MINYONAIRES 3737 Bird rd. Mod-
em Traditional.
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6431 SW 8th
St Cfi'-servative. Rabbi Zevi Green-
wald.
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN 1025
NE 183rd St.. Miami Qardsns rd.
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor
Maurice Neu.
Kri 13 iM- Saturday '.' a.m. Bar
-Vii/i. n. homus, ..;, of Mr. and Mm.
rimer, -.iiii..h: "Preper-
"- f> '.,> inOo .ii."
TEMPLE BETH AM 5960 N. Kendall
. 80. M.ar Reform. Rabbi
Heri> Baumgard. Cantor Charlea
Koan. .
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. I35t s 14 ave. Reform
R.ibbi Samuel Jaffa.
'
^
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
3 Elul 8:30 pan.
Ti^nLf,.2,EIM *HIRAH. Sunll.nd
Hall. 11539 So. Dixie hwy. Recon.
structiomst. Rabbi Morris Skoo
Cantor Herman Gottlieb.
iMP>E.jSET+H SHOLEM of Holly,
wood. 1726 Monroe at. Conservative
Cantor Ernest Sterner.

T^PhE,..BJNAU ABRAHAM. 3o7
k. .J67th st Conservative. Rabbi
OrVesoer Zw,tman- Cantor Ben
1 ri.luy 8:30 p.iii. Quest upoak.-r: I'. J.
Bemetein, journalist. Topic: "I Spoke
Advanced Courses in Math and Science
To be Offered at the Hebrew Academy
AMI ftfCfWC IAB0VIJ1
lo 1 asirt. About
t tiba." Saturdn
My Fellow JeWx in
a.m.
Advanced courses in math and
sciefice will be" offered to the Stu-
dents of the Junior High Depart-
ment of the Hebrew Academy.
Eighth grade students this year
will be getting Algebra a year
earlier and ninth grade students
will begin biology.
Dr. Clyde M. Brown, formerly
professor emeritus of the engi-
neering experiment station at the
University of Wisconsin, will con-
duct the math courses. Joseph
Ackner, chairman of the Science
Department of the Academy for
the past seven years, will teach
the biology course.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Habbi Leon Kromsh
Cantor David Conviser.
j-Yi.im > is p m. siiinii ,i- Aesiatnnl
Itnbbl: Michael (louhitui..... vi m-
cheeter. Knvlnnd. Sermon: "World
Jewlxh I'liinmuulileB." Sutunlay l":i:.
n.m,
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi S
M. Machtei.
TEMPLE EM/NU-EL. 1701 Washing
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irvine
Lehrman Cantor Hirsh Adler.
Friduj Mln.hn
We Must Discover What
Are the Goals of Our Life
! 'i
>;i 1 ui lav ;i
WE SPfCIALIZE in
CONDOLENCE
BASKETS
From $7.50 We Deliver
FRUIT CIRCUS
- 89 BISCAYNE BLVD.
FR 42710 FR 44783
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NS 19th st
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot
Cantor Jacob Bomstem.
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Mordeca
Podet and C lor Gordon Richards.
Iriil.i\ sir. |,.i,i. l.'i.ii.nvina Bervk-ex :
reception) in h......r u( CJnntor Rlelutrdtt'
inucillalion will lie lol.l.
TEMPLE MENORAH. (20 75th at
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owiu. Cantor Edward Klein.
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. ana
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Canter Saul H. Breeh.
TEMPLE OR OLOM~~Con.ervat.ve
755 SW 16th St. Miami. Rabbi
Samuel April. Cantor Gershon Levin.
-----
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI
12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rab-
bi Daniel M. Lowy.
Friday 1:15 p.m. Rabbi l.owy will pre-
sent Mil OneK SIl.llilKll bi .ok review ol'
"Th. Uoavaraion of I'ha.pliUii Cohen,"
bj K.-iiOil Herbert Tnyr. i.iniiKieni
iniislf RUBS '> '"int'-i ('h.'t ion. .ni.i
i lioir accompanied i>> H> Vrietl.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. S,
Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi
Hyman Gross. Cantor Jack Lerner
Klein.
Kriilay *:!.'. p.m. BMurdjiy 9 a.m. Rar
MIizvmIi: Robert, s..n ,.r Mi. and Mra.
I.'i ii->l Uiioloin.

TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave
Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Cantor Ben
Dickson.
I'rlil:i> 8:15 pin. S:itt:ril.i> >: i"> a.in.
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th st
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Seymour Hinkes.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. eSOO N. Miami
ave. Conservative Rabbi Henry
Wernick. Cantor Albert Glantz.
_ -----
YOUNG ISRA^k. mo NE 171 St
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber.
Friday i:4o p.m. Saturfiay 8:3i a.in.
Sermon. "Portien of ihe Wo-k."
By RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ
Temple Ner Tamid
With the blowing of the Shofar
each morning during the month
of Elul. we are alerted that the
High Holidays will soon be upon
us. This month of Elul is to be
used as a period of preparation
and self-analysis, so that we
might enter the High Holiday sea-
son somewhat prepared far what
lies ahead.
A college professor said to his
class one day, "Ladies and gentle-
men, I want you to go out of col-
lege to play courageously the
game of life." One young man
spoke up and said, "but. how can
we, professor, when wee don't
know what the goals are?" A
serious question we might ask at,
Dr. Brown has an internafion-
' al reputation for his work with
superior students. Since mathe-
matics has become the basis for
practically every field. Rabbi
Gross, prircipal, has directed
Dr. Brown "to begin a study of.
the mathematics crriculum at
the Academy."
"It is the responsibility of the
Hebrew Academy to keep the. in-
tellectually superior student aware
of the ever-widening horizons in
the world and provide him with
every type of unlimited oppor-
tunity for achieving his potential,"
Rabbi Gross said.
In view of the anticipated en-
rollment of some 400 students far
the coming year, the Junior High
Department, as well as the ele-
mentary school, will have par-
allel classes.
"Only students of top level ca-
pacity can carry such a heavy bt-
... ,,.v u. i' lingual work load," Rabbi Gross
th,s time is: "Where are the goal cx-ajn<, and ^ ,hjs
to a better J havp ,0 screpn our cmran(s
r:any of whom are here on partial
or even full scholarships.
"Because of this screening pro-
cess and the high intellectual lev-
el of the students it affords, plus
the individualized attention these
students get, we have no failure
problem at all. Our college ap-
plicants have a superior rating,
and just recently a county-wide
survey showed that we are a year
and a half ahead of the public
school level in the reading arts."
Israel Accused
Of Plotting1
Continued from Page 1-A
in which he traced the origins of:
the Arab-Israeli War and conclud-
ed that both sides would benefit |
from mutual understanding. He.
reportedly spent one year working
on an Israeli kibbutz while Pales-
tine was still under the British;
.Mandate, an experience that led
to his hope that the kibbutz idea
could be applied to Algeria.
In announcing the "Israeli
plot," Belaouane and other offic-
ials stressed that Algeria's 6,500
Jewsthe remnant of the pre-in-
dependence community of 140,000
had nothing to fear.
Gershwin Lodge Slates Speaker
Next regular meeting of the preside for the regular business
George Gershw in Knights of I portion of the meting, following
Pythias Lodge will be held Mon- which Dr. Oscar Ruskin, program
day evening in Hibiscus Temple, I chairman, will present a program
10th St. and Alton Rd. on "Teelestar" by a speaker from
Chancellor Frederick Zieger will the Bell Telephone Company.
year?
A sales girl in a ten-cent store
was asked by a customer if they
had any compasses. The girl re-
plied. "We have the kind you can
make circles with, but not the
kind you can go places with."
Until we have the kind we can
go places with, have a sense of
direction, know where the goal
posts are, we can only go in
circles. The secret of man's be-
ing is not only to live, but to
have something to live for. The
crime for many people is not,
"low aim" but rather "n aim."
One religious goal post means
finding your ability and devel-
oping it. Nothing is much more
important than finding what you
are good for, finding what you
have been built to do. Aristotle
said that human life is intellig-
ible only when viewed as directed
toward some end.
Another religious goal post is
using your ability and talents
for the welfare and enrichment j
of mankind. Toward the close
Of a life dedicated to science and
the health of mankind, Louis
Pasteur addressed a group of!
teachers with these words:
"Say to yourselves, what have
I contribuled to the progress and j
good of humanity?" Life is too;
precious to live for oneself
alone.
Finally, let it be said that
when we have fulfilled the pre-
vious religious goal posts, we
become servants of the Lord,
who gave us our talents, to see
what we would do with them,
thereby fulfilling the true end
of our creation.
Eleanor Roosevelt 'Day"
Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter,
B'nai B'rith Women, will have a
day at Westbrooke Country Club,
on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 10;
p.in Reservations chairman is,
Mrs. Sylvia Haber.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
OF GREATER MIAMI
137 N.E. 19th Street
A Reform Congregation
DR. JOSEPH R. NAROT,
RABBI
Jacob G. Bernstein, Canter
HIGH HOLY DAYS SERVICES
AT MIAMI BEACH
CONVENTION HAIL
fOR- MEMBERS ONLY.
Inquiries About Membership and
School Registration Are Invited.
FR 9-1757


TEMPLE TIFERETH ISRAEL
6500 N. MIAMI AVENUE
CONSERVATIVE
Selichos Service* Midnight Sept. 14
ROSH HASHONAH SEPT. 19 & 20
YOM KIPPUR SEPT. 27 & 28
HENRY B. WERNICK, RABBI
TEMPLE CHOIR IN ALL SERVICES
Registration open for Hebrew and Sunday School
Bar A Bas Mifzvah A Pre-Confirmation Classes
WE PROUDLY ANNOUNCE THAT THERE WW.L Be
NO TUITION FEES.
i___:
PL 1-6791 PL 7-1831
OPEN HOUSE
AT
Temple Ailalh Vesliiiriiii
SUNDAY, AUGUST 25
7:30 P.M, 9>30/ P.M.
ALL MEMBERS OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
ARE MOST CORDIALLY INVITED.
1025 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Phone: 947-1435
rVW^W^^rVV^^wMr^r^^^S^^^^r^^^r>MAwMa
i ,
r
?
t
*


i L
TEMPLE SINAI
ONLY REFORM TEMPLE IN THE NORTH BADE AREA
DANIEL M. LOWY, Rabbi Phone PL 40681
CHCT GAIE. Ceater IRVING JACOSSON, Educ.f.n Director
NOW ACCEPTING MEMBERSHIP AND
REGISTRATION FOR THE NEW YEAR.
DAilY NURSERY and KINDERGARTEN SUNDAY SCHOOl through CONFIR-
MATION e HEBREW SCHOOL Sr-ECIAl HEBREW INSTRUCTION in BAR one!
BAS MITZVAM e SISTERHOOD BROTHERHOOD YOUTH GROUTS
e ADUIT EDUCATION e SOCIAL and CULTURAL PROGRAMS.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL TEMPLE OFFICE
i\


Page 10-A
Jenisti tier Mian
Friday. August 23, 1963
63

Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDLIN
Some Warm Glimpses into the Creative Personality
a ___ --------------- thll (till l.
THE CREATIVE WOMAN. By Dorothy Goldberg. 204 pp.
Washington, D.C.: Robert B. Luc*, 1224 19th St., NW.
S3.9S.
[DOROTHY GOLDBERG, wife of Arthur J. Goldberg.
" former Secretary of Labor and now Supreme Court
Justice, is a warm, talented woman whose creativity spills
over into all parts of her life. An active painter, she holds
a Ph.B. in Art Education: in Washington she conducted
classes in art understanding, helped to found the Associ-
ated Artists Gallery, and held a number ot one man shows
of her own work.
A frequent speaker before women's groups, she is also
a charming writer. Some of the material for this book
appeared first in her speeches; other thoughts "have been
jotted down on the back of an envelope while riding in
a taxi; while waiting for ones hair to set under the dryer;
while waiting and waiting interminably for a husband
to come to dinner." The slightly haphazard organization,
disturbing at first to the reader, becomes later a pleasant
fashion of its own; Mrs. Goldberg has not two or three
overwhelming points to hammer home, but instead a
wealth of small observations. One skips through page
after page ot such tiny richnesses, pondering here, re-
jecting there, accepting with joyful glee in other spots.
t

Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Gruening Uncovers Nazi Elite in Egypt

Washingtoni
BRESIDENT NASSER'S exten-I
sive reliance on German NazisI
for secret police, military, andl
other functions in the United!
Arab Republic has been revealed)
by a Senator who recently visit
ed Cairo.
He is Sen. Ernest Gruening.l
Alaska Democrat, who went tcl
Egypt as a member of the Senate Committee on
Government Operations to examine the operation
of the foreign aid program. The Senator's atten-
tion to the Nazi role was aroused by American
military sources. Sen. Gruening reported to Con-
gress that the following Nazis are among those
employed by Nasser:
SS Gen. Dirlewangcr. known as the "Butcher
of Warsaw.'' a military adviser on guerrilla war-
fare.
Leopold Glelm, alias Lt. Col. AINasher, who
'
Foreign News Letter By JOSHUA JUSTMAN
A Visit to Moscow
Jerusalem
IN THEIR statements
' before the House For-
eign Affairs Committee's
healings on the Foreign
Aid Bill, high Washing-
ton officials have again
and again underscored
Mr. Nasser's role as a
moderating force and his
efforts to reduce his de-
pendence on the Soviet
bloc. The Director of
the Agency for Interna-
tional Development David Bell declared Mr. Nas-
ser went "a long way" toward the attainment of
this goal.
These statements sounded very encouraging in-
deed and we assume they could not have failed to
impress at least some of the distinguished Com-
mittee members.
Yet, these statements may well fit into the
image of Mr. Nasser as Washington wishes it to
see. They have, however, no relevance to facts
and realityand if additional proof was needed
there is the current visit of a large Egyptian dele-
gation to Moscow comprising military and economic
experts and headed by Egypt's Vice President and
Chief-of-Staff Field Marshal Abd Elhakim A'amer.
Dr. A'amer, who is now in Moscow for over
a week and is expected to stay on there for an-
other one, conferred with Mr. Khrushchev for nine
hcurs; even when allowing for the time required
for translation, it was a rather long interview that
could hardly be all devoted to a "general review
of the world situation." Dr. A'amer, together with
other members of the delegation, also conferred
with Defense Minister Marshal Malinovsky and
high officials of a number of ministries, including
the Minister for the Foreign Affairs Mr. Andrei
Gromyko.
It is quite clear from the itinerary itself, that
one of the visit's main aims was to improve the
political relations between the two countries which
became strained following the bloody suppression
of the communists in Iraq and Syria and the Cairo
proclamation about the establishment of an Egypt-
ian-Iraqi-Syran Federation. Subsequent develop-
ments in Iraq and in Syria produced a radical
change in the situation. The Baath Party opposed
the establishment of the Federation on Mr. Nas-
ser's terms, which in turn brought about an align-
ment between the communists and the pro-Nas-
serist forces in these two countries.
This, of course, is only one part of the picture
of Field Marshal A'amer's visit to Moscow. No
less important are the military and economic as-
pects of the visit
is in charge of Nasser's State Security Service
cadre, modeled after Hitler's SS corps, and was
a chief of Hitler's personal guard, and a Gestapo
security chief in occupied Poland.
Joachim Daeming, who is an adviser on con-
centration camps in Egypta former Gestapo chief
in Dusseldorof. ,
Dr. Hans Eisele, active in medical program
at Egyptian concentration camps, a former chief
physician at Buchenwald concentration camp and
wanted in Europe for trial for medical atrocities.
SS Guhrer Bernhardt Bender, alias Col. Ben
Salem, who is in charge of Nasser's prison police
guards, and was Chief of Intelligence of Wehr-
inacht security division in the Ukraine.
SS Gruppenfuhrer Moser, alias Col. Hassan
Saleiman, who is in charge of youth training.
Erich Altern. alias Ali Bella, who was the
Gestapo's commissar for Jews in Galicia.
Johaan von Leers, alias Omn Amin von Leers,
who is in charge of propaganda work for Nasser,
and was formerly in the Berlin foreign ministry.
Louis Heiden. alias Louis Al-Hadsch, former
chief of German News Agency, who distributes
Arabic translation of "Mein Kampf."
George Dieudonne. former leader of Swiss
Nazi Party, who works on anti-Jewish propaganda
with Von Leers.
SS Hauptarzi Heinrich Willermann, alias Lt.
Col. Nairn Fahum. official of Egyptian concentra-
tion camp system, a former "medical director"'
at Dachau.
Nasser's intended future use of these skilled
Nazis was indicated by a "Voice of Cairo" broad-
cast quoted by the Senator.
The Cairo Radio called on the Arab world to
prepare to "march together on our dear usurped
LandJerusalem, Joffa and Haitaand the crime
o( Israel will no longer exist. We call the army
and the people in the Arabian peninsula and Jor-
dan to quick action and to bloody revolution."
Radio Cairo said the "arch-enemies of the
Arabs included "the Americans and the Jews."
"Free Arab soldiers and officers," said the
broadcast, "the people call on you to shoulder your
full responsibilities in the forthcoming battle for
the liberation of Palestine our Arab people are
irrevocably determined to wipe away the disgrace
of Israel and to purge the Holy Land of the rem-
nants of Zionism ."
Sen. Gruening's travels in the Middle East
found "great apprehension about the growing pow-
er of Nasser and a resentment over the lavish aid
which the United States was giving him, which he
uses to achieve conquest and domination of that
entire area." He heard objections voiced in Iran,
Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Greece.
The Senator reported that despite American
hopes that the UAR would oppose Communism,
Soviet military equipment still arrived in Egypt.
Noting that the UAR received $250 million from
the United States in 1962, Sen. Gruening said the
American taxpayer was indirectly financing Nas-
ser's aggressive build-up.
ir---i|.

Off the Record:
It's a woman's book, of course; I suppose that must
be counted as a limitation. I confess to being most fas
cinated. mvself. by the first section, which treats more
personally of the author's own life as a creative woman,
mother of two. and busy wife. Here are warm glimpses
of the wav in which the creative personality views her
world puts her mark upon it. and acts and reacts in a
manner which enriches not only her family and com-
munity, but most importantly, herself.
"The last child." she calls the inner life of the ere
ative person, for which energy must bo reserved. "Even
if there arc six children to be helped toward their own
launchings. the inner life within a woman must be her
seventh child ... and it must be given all the attention,
concern and money we would somehow find if it were a
child in the flesh."
Of her own last child, art. she has much to say. some
of it highly formal and somewhat scholastic, some, again,
highly personal in concept. The feelings of an artist
of any kind toward his own craft are always interesting,
and to this Mrs. Goldberg adds, her own wcil-devclopec"
sense of community responsibility, both from and to the
artist.
Sprinkled throughout are favorite poems and quota
tions and Mrs. Goldberg's light-handed humor. It's by
no means a "how-to" book. But for those to whom the
terms are more than meaningful, it will be a valuable
and signilicant book.
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
What's in a Name?
THE ORIGINAL NAME of Rosa
' Bonheur, the famous painter
of animals, was Rosa Mazel Tov,
and Judy Holiday's original name,
Judy Yom Tov. (When they said
Good Yom Tov, to her, she thought
he was being complimented.)
M *
Bronco Billy Anderson, fa-
I mous western of the silent movie
days, was really Aaronson. and Douglas Fairbanks'
last name originally was U.illman.
*
Among the Jews of Bible times, a significant
change in the life of a man was often noted by a
B8W name. Jacob, after his meeting with the
angels, became Israel. an.l Gideon, after deleating
the forces of Baal, became Jerubaal.
Shortly alter the organization of the United
Nations. Dr Goldstein and Meir Grossman were
members of a committee which called on various
national delegations in behall of the Jewish home
land. At the Chinese headquarters, they met Gen.
Wu and Gen. Ma. Gen Ma, they discovered, knew
all about Jews. He really was Gen. Mosha Abra-
ham, and he had fashioned the Chinese name ot
the first initials.

A famous American musician. Rudolph Blut-
kopf, didn't like his name, which didn't harmonize
with the American scene, so he changed Blutkopf,
meaning bloody hea.l, into its Hebrew equivalent.
Damrosch. Everyone knows of Damrosch.
*
Among small town Jews, it is characteristic
to call people by some distinguishing feature. I
remember Moshe Nose. He had a long nose, and
there was Chaim Parch, or in English, Hyman the
baldhead.
* a
One man in the Talmud is always called Every-
thing is for the Best. (How would you like to be
called Mr Everything is for the Best?) The name
came about as a result of the man's philosophy.
He was badly crippled, but he insisted that every-
thing is for the best, so he got to be called that
or its Hebrew equivalent, which is "Gam Zu Le
Tov."
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Jewish Communal Services Scrape for Manpower
THE JEWISH TEACHER shortage is I
' a theme on which this columnist'
has paused on a number of occasions. I
If he has sinned in this regard w ith
respect to the dearth of Jewish com-
munal workers, it was only because he1
was strange to the semantics of that
skill and because, truthfully, he was
not aware of the seriousness of the sit-
uation.
It now develops from a speech made by B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization Director Dr. Max Baer that Jewish
communal services are scraping the manpower barrel
for competenl young people and that the situation will
become more aggravated in time if there is no ameliora-
tion in the circumstances responsible for the situation.
First of all, our young Jewish men and women prefer
to satisfy their professional yearnings in rich pastures
nf fhllr 'hKCy re J*l vvt'an<,(1 awa>' b-v ^e promises
of scholarships and fellowships in other fields And
perhaps above ill, they seem to be lacking in zeal tor
oed.cation to Jev.sh life-a sad reminder That we have
been remiss ,n influencing them Jewishly. The sSua
ton could also be due_as Dr. Baer said-to the re.ative-
wX recr!l',,n"nt P-8"m by Jewish agencies,
oromi i ,1"';, h; VU'S"i "K1 ",* remains thal enou*
><
*N
(fl


friday, August 23. 1963
l<**ilincridHar)
LEGAL NOTICE
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR LADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C-7606 (Lee)
lN ui I PMC Wii'N in'
\l A M v E SINCLAIR,
|,,'i;i-v.'Mi: A FRF:k ni:.\r.i:i:
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
FREE DEALERS LICENSE
VoTICJS IS HKREBT OIVEN Mini
|, ,-... -" -iuti.-.l. ADA MAE BIN-
I \IK IU, "i> Hi'' 4lh day "f s,'l'-
niber, ......I, : K-kH-h M.. or as soon thereafter as
, umM ; be heard, apply to one
I ,|,. ,.-. n of the Circuit Court in
Ll foi Dade CoUllty, Mori.la, for :.
,,........nage, t:.k.- charge of ami
.,,.,, ... in opt rtj. nnd to.....- tm- u
... !.. i In every respect
: rHt'R U. STARK
n i,,-> fur Petitioner
118; Mfred I duPonl Building
Miuuil :'-. Florida
v tc-sn
mwm
Page 11-A.
BY HENRY LEONARD
notice under
fictitious name law
fJOTI IS HEREBY. OIVBM thai
undi ri- l. desiring, to engage In
-in inder the fictitious name of
, \n-.i;ic.\.\ Am i.l >i.i..n a. '..
350 N.W. 36th St., Miami, Ha.,
in.- to register said name with
. Clerk of the Clrcull Court of Dade
I mnt). Floi Ida,
AL Rl'BKNSTBIN
.-ol.' Owner
< u:.-::-:;ii
NOTICe UNUtn
F.CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE I.-' HEREBY CJIVBN lhal
| inert, desiring to i-imiiKr In
del the fictitious name "i
j\\l \ Furniture 1',-pt. at IMNM N.W
|iiii Av. North Miami; I3B0I B. Dixie
tlichwuy, Dade County Intends to
lelsttci id name with the Clone of
|i,. cin ill Court of Dade County,
I DISCOl'NT Fl'RNITURE,
NC. (a Fla Corp.)
v 2-9-18-2"
||N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 56391
|\ UK late of
ISIDORE ARONOVITZ
11,...,-.I.
iNOTiCfc OF INTENTION TO MAKE
VPPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
XOTICE In herebj gRen thai I hnvi
tiled in> l-i'i.il Ke|K>ri and Petition f"i
Distribution ami Final Discharge as
,dmlnistrntrlx, i"r.\ of the estate ol
I DORK ARONOVITZ, deceased: and
lliai the :'tli da> ol Hepteinbi i.
will app'y to the Honorable
f.,unt> l la..- oi [Hide County, FTor-
ila, for approval ol ^., i ii.i i. i distribution and final dla-
- Administratrix, CTA of the
-tat-- "i the above-named decedent,
(TIiIh 30th day of July, 1963,
PAI'I.IX!-: ARI N< i\ ITZ
BYRON I. SPAHliER
la t lot in .
I,in In Road
Miami U.. eh, Florida
LEGAL NOTICE
"And before we hear Sister Goodman's report on
the state of our treasury, ... let us have a mo-
ment of prayer."
Copr. 1963, Doyenu rraJuctttm
LEGAL NOTICE
flN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1'TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 80t>4
i.WIP IM.CHIUST, Is Exei utor
tin w 111 mill i Mann nt of
lltlil.N A SI'.M MERS,
I'll llff,
i- FRANKLIN and JENNIE
IN, his Ifi SA RAH II,
It \Xki.iX und, 11 Married, her
I, '.\ Ii..- Christian Nam.
_ nknow n If any ol the aforesaid
Ll fen. ntn I"- dead, th< Ir reapeotlve
wiknown spouses, heirs, deviaeea,
tgatces, assignees, grantees, cred-
loi -.....I ,. i n lae, nai ural or cm |ki -
,*. havlnn oi claiming any Interest
. through, undei against an] ol
........ .1 defendants; the un-
kiwii ppouseii of urn oi in.- above*
inert di ndanta; and all pa i ties,
iiown or unknown, having or claim-
Ill to have any right or Interest in
i.i the real propert) described in
|; Complaint,
l'- i. ndants.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
A. l\ FRANKLIN nlnl JENNIE
FRANKLIN, his wife; SARAH B.
FRANKLIN, ami. if married, her
husband, whose Christian name
i- unknown.
IK any of the aforesaid defendants
dead, their respective unknown
ilMee, heirs, devisees, legatees, aa-
nees, grantees, credltora, or other-
->-. natural or corporate, bavins, or
Mining any Interest by, through. '
Jiii i .i against an; of the aforesaid
If.-ii.i.mi- ii nmi to the properlj
..'. in.ill. i desci Ibed;
frii. unknown spouses of any of the
e-nnmed defendants and nil par-
Is, known or unknown, having or
liiuiui: to have any right, title oi
geresl in or to the following des-
ped pi uate In I >ade Coun -
1 ii ... lo-vv il:
I. Uli 9, of FRANKMN
11 I'.DIV i N.....orcllnx i.. the
......1 in Plat
' Page :i ol the Publli
I)......'ounty, Florida.
Itl .i ,t ,.i j ..ii. .. r. Ii<'! eb>
Jl thai -i.ii ii ... In .-n bm i^ln
|ni | .., ;,, m, Circuit Co ii ol
! i'i isty, I lorl i b> DAVID C
f IIIUST, as Exei utor ol the Lasl
,1 nnrt i. M.iin. ni of VIRtllNIA
^imi:i:s, philntlfl The nature ol
..nil i. in quiet title to the prop-
herelnabovs described, anil you
li:i:i:i v it It t ii i: i: NOTIFIED
> HEyi ikk..... serve copj of
Answer to the Bill of Complaint
l.ii.l :nis.- on the plaintiff's altor-
KWITNEY ANKCS, 4^" Lin-
Bond, Aliunu Beach, |.'l<>riilii. and
I tin- urixliial In the < iffi.-.- of the
rk of the Circuit Court of Dade
My, .Miami, Florida, on or before
1th daj of September, !6Ji other-
the allegation* of said Bill of
?plaint win be taken as confessed
on.
'- Notice shall he published for
in consecutive Weeks In THE
ilMI FLOKIDIAN.
*ti:h D,iv turn ,i ,j ,,f June, |gu,
ni. Dade County, Florida.
h. II. I.EATHERMAN
I. k of Hi, Cln uit Coui i
i de i 'Hum Florida
B> : C. P iil'I'.l.ANii
Deputj .'I. il,
[I M^ \ ANKCM
fin s tor I'ldilltil'l
I Road
I ii. Florida
1'inl K urn ,
t 2-9-lt-St
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC.AL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 8759
PHI iRi V Ml lltCIF.i :> i
Plaintiff,
\.
All IA la ISEXZ \ I'i: |.Ei IN
\n >RI MHIH .
I lefendani
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
I'i i All >A la iRENKA I'i: 1.1a >X
M< Ri 'ii:' ;i
Ces|iedoH No. I.' Reparto Arroyo
A noli >, Havana, i 'uhu
Vul ARK in i:i:r.V NOTIFIED thai
;i t*omplallll I". Dlvi rce lUIS !,, n
filed against you, and you are n*-
aulred to serve s copy of your An-
swei or Pleading to the Complaint f..i
Divorce on the plaintiff's attorney,
KIDNEY KMtoXnO.N, -H BecurilJ
Trust Uullding, Miami ::.. Ploiiua. and
file the original answer or pleading in
the office oi the t'lerk of the Circuit
Court "ii oi before the 83rd day of
Si ptember, }'''.'. otlierylse, Ihe Com-
n|i ii ; tor IHvorce li.i. tof.r.. filed
herein ili be taken as confessed by
I oil
DATED nl Miami, Florida, this 14th
,' n ..I Allgu.it, 1 '
I' II i.i VTHKRMAN, Clerk
'ii full Court, i -a... i 'otintj. Florida
ixi-al) i:> : P 11 IPKI.A.V i'
i 'i \ i 'lei k
SIDNEY EFR< >XSi iN
A Hoi nej for Pl
.'I Sex in it> Trust i Jg
Miami 32, i-'i.'i Ids
- : t- in, a -i3
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60483
l.\ RK: Estate ol
MAN HOFrAIAN.
Deceai NOTiCE TO CREDITORS
I'.. Ml Creilltors ami All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified nnrt re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which 'on nay have agalnsl
the estate of MAX HOFFMAN, de-
,,.i...i late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Count} Judges of Dade Coun-
ty, and file the same In duplicate and
as provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in tin- Coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County, Mor-
ion, within si\ calendar months from
the time of Ho first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 13th
,!.. ol AltgUSt, A.M. IIM1S.
MINNIE HOFFMAN
As Kxecutrlx
ARONOVITZ, SILVER It KCHKR
Attoi in t for i-'.m-i tin lx
Sir] Ain.-I.y Building
Miami 13, Florid i
\ 23-IW, 9 B
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS IIKKKI'.Y UIVEN thai
ilio undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PISCATORIAL ARTS at 8400 Bls-
cayne Blvd., Miami. Florida Intends to
'eglster said nun.- It ri the i Ii i | nl
;ii. I'iicnii Court ot li.nl. 'oum y.
1
BRl'CE GORDON
705 W. I'll.irto Itrlve,
Miami Beach, Ma.
^ K-S - 10, 9 1
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 60342-A
IN RE: Estal.....
Al.no BODL'LICH
l leceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hnv-
Ing Claims or Demands Against Bald
Estate:
Von are hereby notified and re-
quired to present an> claims anil de-
mands which yon may have against
ill. estate of ALDO BODUDICH de-
ceased inti- of Dade County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Parts Pounty,
ami file thi sami In dunllcnte ami as
i.'ui i.l. .1 in Sei ; Ion '' 16, Floi Ida
Statutes, in Iheli offices In the Coun-
tv i "out thnusi Ir ''. "onn" i lur-
Idh, within si\ ilendnr months from
tin. tini" of the i.ist publication here-
of, or I he ss me will he h i
Dated si M iiii Fli rirta, this _:'ili
day of July, A.D. 1963.
HANFoRD S FAl'Nl'K
\- Rxi 1'iitor
i publli .iii'.n of this nol Ice on
i he 2nd An} ol August, I M
FACNCE. FINK .\ FORM \ S
\,,,,,.,,., f.....-.. Rx< into]-
1501 Congress Bids
Miami 32, Mam: 1-3471
v 2-9-16-21
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60311-C
IN RE: Retail of
ZDENA PICK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
Von are hen by notified ami re-
quired to present any olalnis and de-
mands which you may have agalnsl
the estate of ZDENA PICK deceased
ijrte of Dade County, Plorldat to the
fount] Judges of Dade County, and
fill- the same In duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.10, Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the Count)
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida
\ itiiin six calendar months from th**
tin.....f the first public itlon hi ri of,
or the same will i- barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 31sl
day of July, A.D. 1965.
KI'RT WKI.I.ISCII
167 Aim. rla Ai enue
Coral Hi'olis. Florida
As Kxecutor
KCRT WKI.l.lscil
Attornej for Estate of Zdenn Pick
167 a ini, i i.i Avenue
i loral tlables, Florida
s !i-iii-2:l-3n
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No, 63C 8476
STEVE nyi'RICB,
Plaintiff,
ANNA flYITRICZ,
I ','l.nilaiit.
TO: ANNA QYl'RICZ
.",.". Hedan 81 reel
New Brunswick. X, Jersey
Thu ANNA DYCRICZ '" herebj
notified thai a BIN of Complaint foi
Divorce has I.....n filed Rgatnat yoti
i and you are rei|Ulred to serve a cop>
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Mill oi Complaint on the plaintiff's
Attorney, C.OI.DMAN, ia H.l'STKI\
' A'- PACZIKR. 240] Wesl Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida, and file the original
Answer or Pleirtlng in the office "i
the Clerk of the i'i cull Conn on or
bef..... the : 11> daj of September, 1963.
| If you fall i" do so, Judgment by de-
fault will in- taken agalnsl you for
| the relief demanded In the Hill ol
i 'omplnlnt,
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
1 in THE JEWISH FDORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED al Miami
i'i..i Ida, tins Tin day "i August, A.D.,
1966.
E. R. LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Clrcull Comt. Dade County, Florida
meal) 0) c. p. COPKLAND
li.niiiy clerk
Ooldmnu, Goldstein v Paciter
.'mi Wesl Flagler Street
Miami. Ma. NE :.-i:is
i Attorn, v s for Plaintiff
-i 9-111-23-36
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
"Jewisti fioridHbtrj
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial Fit :t- H.05
lor messenger Berries
LEGAL NOTICE
i.i
i\
N THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60480-O
RK: Ksi.it. "i
I mis I RIKDM \N
I lei en si '
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
To All "redlti i and vil Pi rsons Ha\ -
, .,,,! s oi I .111 I-- Agalnsl Bald
' you are herebj notlfl. .1 and re-
,,iui,-.1 in pi. -"I' an> claims anil de-
mands which ."ni mas havi agalnsl
the .tate ol ums FRIEDMAN de-
, (lined lat. of Hade County, Florida,
to in, Count) Judges "i Dade t oun-
i\ nml fill- the same in duplicnti ana
a- provided In Hectlon *33.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices In the Coiin-
iv Courthouse iii l'o!. County, tlnr-
nil within six calendar months from
Hi.' time of the tir.-i publication hare-
,,i or th.' same ill be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
daj of August, A.D. I96J
l.KnN A. EPSTEIN
As Kxecutor
l.l'.nX A EPSTEIN
Attorney for Estate
i'.'n Lincoln Road
a
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 8175
MART EMS5ARETH Ut'RNS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRANCES r.l'KXS.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: FRANCES BCRNS
C Mrs. John Hay hurst
.'. Paul Place
Buffalo, New York
You are hereby notified that
Complaint for Divorce has been filed
against you, and you are hereby r.--
qulred to serve a copy of your \n-
sw. r to the Complain! on the Plain-
tiffs attorney, LESTER ROflERB,
whose address Is 981 N.W. 14th Street.
Miami, Florida, and file th.....'Iglnal
Answer with the office of the Clerk
of ill- Eleventh Judicial Circuit in
and for Dade County, Florida, on or
! I,,i, laj of September, 1963
In default of whhh the Complaint ili
be taken as (I bj yo
Dated thi- ! K. II i i: vtiikum \n
i 'I, I, ..I the i 'ii. nil i
(Meall !>: K. I-: I1P.CI1II,
I', uutj Clet k
i oh
(.11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVKX that
the undersigned, desiring to encage in
business under the fictitious name ol
CASA1IL.ANCA UKAITV SIKH' at
IS4S Collins Avenue, Miami Beach In-
tend to register said name "' "'
Clerk of the Clrcull Courl ol Dade
Countj. i'i irldii
EDW vl:l Kl.l-.IN
HELEN M W KLEIN
V\ HITEACRE ,y ROBRINS
Attorneys for \ppu< ants
801 wraths .ui.,;..... g/,.,.w.a
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 59664-C
IN RK: Rstnte of
Harriett i> wexi.er
1 leeeased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons llav-
Ing claims oi- Demand} Against said
Estate:
You are In-reby notifi.il and re-
iiulred to present any claims and da*
m.inils Which you may have agnlnst
the .slat, of IIAKIUKTT D. WEXL.ER
deceased late of Dad.- Opunty. Mor-
Ida, to the County Judges of H.ole
County, and tile ni.' saim In dun I-
eale and as provided In Section 718.16,
Morlila Statute.'. In their offices in
tin County Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within si* calendar months
from the time ol the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this l'Isi
day "f June, A.D, 1!':'..
MORRIS WEXLER
", Cast TKili Street
N,w York, N. w Y"i i,
As Executor
LIONEL I.. TI'I.IN
\ii.ii in for Executor
One I in. ..in Rd. Bldg.
Miami Beach, Florida
6/9-16-33-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 63C 8389
.i s til.EASoN, JR., as Vdmli Biratnr
ol Veterans Affali an Offlci of the
I'nit.-I Suites of America, and his
:- in sii. i. .a ; li-e, anil in^
oi th. Il IKXlKllf
Plaintiff,
\ s
JOHN W STHi iCI'E, el nx. t nl,
1 lefendants
NOTICE OF SUIT
T' I Ii HN W. S I'RI U PR an.I
HE1.EX STROCPK
Route -'
linn:- v ill.-. Alabama
ViiK ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED thai
.i .-uit ha.- been brought agalnsl you
bj .1. s (ILKA*toN, JR., as Adminis-
trator ..f Veterans Affairs, nn Ofl
ol the L'nlted States of Am, i lea, and
hi Kuccessors in such office, and l i
or their assigns, to foreclosi n mart-
gagi enetimberlng the following des-
,'1'lln-d property, to-wlt:
Lot 19, III Pi.'.k ::. of kkai.siti.
ESTATES, SECTION ONE, accord-
ing to tin plat thereof, as recorded
in i'lal I'.ook iii. at pane 60, o* the
public records ol Dade County, Flor-
ida :
and urn are required to file your an-
swer' with the Clerk of the Clrcull
Court ol I Hide County. Florida, at thi
Courthouse In Miami. Florida, on or
before Septembet 1. 196:'.. and to
serve a COD) of such answer upon
MYERS, HEIMAN, KAPLAN *
cavsmaX. Plaintiffs attornej-s,
whose address >- Eleven Fifty Bulld-
Injr, ii">" s.W. In.-t street. Miami 36,
Florida, on or be ore said date, as re-
quired bj the lavs of Florida, ir you
tall to do so. the complain) will bi
taken as confessed by you and n
Decree Pro Confessn will I"- entered
against >-ou fiw the relief demanded
in the complaint.
Dated August ". 196.1
K. Ii. LEATHERM \N
i 'i,n-k of the i "ii'.-uit i "ourt
l i.oie County, i irldii
(seal) 1'-.' : F. K ORl'BH
I.......i\ Clerk
Myers, Helman, Kaplan & Catsman
Elev. ii i I'-
ll."ai s \\ i eel
R 2-9 16- '' Mian I !i Floi I la
. 9-16-23-30
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60368 C
:i: Estate oi
ISAAI' UI M-l 'MAX
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors ami All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Agalnsl Bald
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired t" present any claims and de-
mands which you maj have agalnsl
the e-iat. of ISAAC OOLD.MAN de-
ceased late of I'a.le County, Florida,
to the County Judges of Bade Coun-
ty, and file the same in duplicate and
as provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in tin- Coun-
ty Com tinmse in Dade County, Flor-
ida, within si\ calendar months from
the time of thi Ilrsl publication here-
of, or tin si..... x. ill be barred.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
day of August, A D, 1963
ANNETTE HERMAN
JOSEPH OOLDMAN
As Exi cutors
Flrsl publication ol tins notlci
ill, 9th daj of August, 1963
HIMON, HAYS & UHCNDWERO
ai torn, e ol Isaai I loldman
.ni Alnsli i ug
j/9-16-:
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 57800-C
IN RE: Estal.....
RI In H.I- II. M IIMITT
I leceased.
NOT.CE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is herebj given that I have
filed my Final Report and Petition for
Distribution and Final IHscharge a*
i:i utor of in, state of RL'Di ILF II
BCHMITT, deceased: and that on thi
L'l.ih day of August, 1963, %\ ill apply
in the ll......r.ii.i. Countj Judges ol
linil.- County, Florida, for approval
said Final Report and for distribution
and final discharge ;i- Kxecutoi
the .-tate ..I the above-named dece-
dent. This 24th daj of Julj.
ii iSH REPHl'N, As Exe. utor
JOSH REPHL'N
Attorney
1370 Washington Avi
Miami Beach, Florida
1-16- -' I
IN 7 HE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 604C9-B
I S RE Estate of
II M!\ KY I. I1AMM
I', eeased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
'I'.. All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Agalnsl Sabl
l.st.n-i:
V..U are herebj notified and re-
quired to present any claims and di -
man,Is Which you inn' have .i-
Ihe esiai..... HARVEY L. IIAM.M de-
ceased late of Dude Countj, Florida,
to the County Judges of ii.nl.' County,
and file the sain, in duplicuti >Itd US
provided In Section 7:;.'..'.ii. Florida
Statutes, in their offices In tin Coun-
ty Courthouse In l>ade Count}', Flor-
ida, within six calendar month)' I '
the time of tin- first publication la r- -
of .III' tile same .Kill he li:.ll.-l
Hated at Miami. Florida, tills Mb
day of August, A l >. 1963.
K.-TKl.l.K F. IIAM.M
As Admlulstrutrix
I vi'.NCi:. I INK FORM \N
Attoi in-' > for Exi utrlx
l.*i0S "ongress B
Miami 32, Ma- IP. 1-3471
si'.
IX
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 59870-A
RE: Estate of
I.Kir. KRAMER
I I '.! Sell.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
i To All i'i. dltoi ind Ml -' I
I Iiib claims or Demands Against Sal
K.-talc:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to pies, iii anj claim* and di -
man.Is which you ma) have against
the estate of LEIII KRAMER '
.,i late of Dade County, Florida, t-.
the County Judges ol lade I mi-
ami file the sain, iii .liiplie.it. an 1 as
provided In Section ...:'. il. Fiorina
Statutes, iii their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in la.l- County, Flor-
ida, within si" calendar months fron
the lime ..f the lirst publication here-
of, or the same w ill be hni i ed,
Dated at Miami. Florida, this lJth
da) of AiiKUst. Al>. 1963.
Ol'SSIE Ki: vmki:
As Executrix
First publication of this n
the 16th day of August, 1963
AI.VIN s. CAWX
Attorney for Executrix
One Lincoln Road Bids
Miami Beach, Florida
. 16-23-30
..ii.
IN
I
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60434-C
IX RE: Estate of
liKN.IAMlN" r.KlliNKI:
I i. isell
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and Ml Persons I
Ing '' mi "i i man ti
I.Mat. .
\ ,,n lire ii.' ehj notlfle I and re
io present an i I ilms
n and), which )ou ma) hav.
the estate of HKNJ v M S BKIDNKR
ll I......I I 'art. u III I'I' r-
iiia. to the "ount) Judgi s oi
I'l.iiiih ami file the same 111 dill
and as provided In I >i J38.16,
I'liirlda Statutes, In their offices In
the Count) Courthouse In Dndi Coun-
t\. Florida, within six cak-ndu
tin
i-l'eof.
ilm.
til
.i tin
sain.
tii-:
will
this 13th
1st
on
months, fiom
publication he
be barred.
Dated at Miami. I i.-i In
day of August, A D. 1963
ADDIE I'.KII'XKi:
As Executrix
IRVING CYCKX LAW iil'l'li I'.S
Attorney foi Executrix
sir. Arthui 'iodfiey Road
Miami Beach, Florida
s 16-31-30, 9 1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Xhtici: is iii:i:;:i:v c.iVEN that
the undersigned, deslrlmt to engage In
l.usin. ss under Ihe fli lot name of
EVEN APARTMENTh al I301-1S1S
Rav Road, Miami Beach, Florida in-
tend t" register said name with the
Clerk of Ihe Circuit Courl ol I'.oi-
t'ounl). Florida
ARI N STKIMSERi I
BELLA STEINItERi I
SIMON, II \N s ,\ IRI'NDU ERtl
Al I '111.' si,: '" n. -
SOI Alnsli iulldins
M..... I, I lot
:a.}iL 9 i>
I


Page 12-A
* Jen *"<#' fliiM>Mm*>
Friday, August 23. 1963
Behind
The Trip
By MAX LERNER
Anti-Semitism on Rise in Harlem
1'?IIXMIIIiiM. .'
Rome.
It is a good idea in politics to go through with what you plan, and
refuse to be deflected by passing difficulties. That VII true of the
plans of the American Negro leaders for mass demons!rations, from
the Birmingham decision to the Washington decision. It was true in
Greece of the King's decision to go through with his British visit de-
spite the advice of former Premier Karamanlis. It has proved true
of the Kennedy trip.
No one expected the trip to yield new American positions or new
truths about the world's fate. The truths and positions have been
endlessly restated. A Presidential visit is bound to be full of sound
and protocol, signifying little. That was why so many editorialists
and commentators urged the President to cancel his trip when the
leaders he planned to visit started to crumble.
The danger lay, of course, in what seemed to be Parliamentary
debility and instability in European governments. An epidemic of
the falling sickness afflicted all three of the top people Kennedy
had planned to see. Adenauer, in losing his showdown with Erhard,
lost also a good measure of his authority. Masmillan, mangled in
the Profumo affair, became at once symbol j>nd victim of a ruling
caste that had lost selt-mastery and had. therefore, lost the capacity
to rule. He is now as surely a lame duck as is Adenauer. Fanfani,
who seemingly had everything in his favorItalian prosperity, a re-
form government, a Nenni alhar.ee and a good Pope in the Vatican
v.ailed himself into the structure he had helped build, and was stifled
v. ithin its solidity.
Even the Irish government almost fell on an internal issue, and
was saved only by the grace of a few votes. President Kennedy
must have wondered whether he had become a political plague car-
rier. What made it worse was the figure of de Gaulle, his presiden-
tial regime standing table and erect amidst the instability of the par-
liamentary regimes encirclintr France.
Despite all this, the trip went off well. In Germany he had
the built-in dramatic power or an American President at the Berlin
Wall. The Russians witlessiy helped by sealing off a wide area in-
side Communist territory to make sure that no East Berliners would
get a slave's-eye view of treedom by seeing the enactments on the
ether side of the wall. And in Italy the President's visitas it turn-
ed outwas rappily timed to follow the dramatic coronation of a
Pope.
These are, however, narrow perspectives. Whatever dangers the
President ran and whatever triumphs he may have achieved will be
all but forgotten in a year or two. What will not be forgotten is j
the continuing line of European thinking that reaches down to the!
deeper sources of hostility to America and that de Gaulle is likely
to continue exploiting as long as he is in power.
There are two main lines of hostile opinion in Europe. One
depicts America as a mass of power and affluence that tears Euro-,
pean efforts at unity and cares only about its own interests. The
other depicts an America that is ready to pull back its troops trom
Germany and Europe, and leave Europe to its own fate. One view
charges America with being too absorbed in the political war with
Russia to act responsibly lor the welfare of a changing, revolution-
ary Europe. The other charges America (as Sebastian Haffner has
notably been doing in the pages of "Der Stern") with wanting to
make a separate deal with Russia, especially on Berlin, behind Ger-
many's back, and with wanti1--.' to sell out Europe to spare America
the dangers of a nuclear war.
The fact that these two views of America contradict each other
doesn't seem to bother those who push them I have found in trav-
eling through Europe these past live months that the same people
can hold both views: that America seeks to rule and bully Europe
propaganda line that it can gloss over its own contradictions, and profit
by arousing hostility from two diverse sources.
It is in Germany that you find the core ol America's problem,
for it is the Germans (a minority ol them, but an important one)
vho are most trouh'ed by th.> question of what the Kennedy Admin-
istration reaLj means io no, tiic G.ii.....s, who are being wooed cruc-
iplly by de Gaulle, the Germans whose mode of nuclear rearming
(with NATO? with de Gaulle" will be one of the great problems ol
1965.
That is why I did not shnie tho fears of those who felt that a
Kennedy visit to Germain might seem to stress too much the Ger-
man-America relation. The tact is that the rivalry between Ken-
nedy and de Gaulle in the struggle for Europe's destiny is first of
all a rivalry to win over the German leaders and people. The fact
is there, and those who fell thai President Ken. dy could solve it by
staying away from Germany are more tender-minded and innocent
than any commentator has a right to be.
No there will be no new decisions coming out ol Kennedy's trip,
any more than there will be new ones coming out of de Gaulle's
second visit to Germany. B.uh men travel to show themselves ana
dramatize what they stand for. The struggle lor Europe has made
the whole of Western Europe as important a constituency tor Ken-
nedy as for de Gaulle
By SAMUEL SCHREIG
By Special Report
NEW YORK While some re-
sponsible Jewish leaders dismiss
reports of recent rise in anti-Sem-
i itism among Negroes as "Muslim
agitation." Jewish merchants in-
terviewed in New York's famed
I Harlem tell a different story'.
"I have been doing business here
for seme 15 years," a dry goods
store owner said, "and I tell you
that Harlem is beginning to look
' like Munich. There's too much
hate on the part ol loo many peo-
ple, not necessarily Muslims."
Harlem's shopping anm cen-
ters around 125th St., where
many business establishments
are owned by Jews. While many
store owners in the ra are
white, not all are Jewish. A
Catholic merchant of Irish des-
cent said that he was tired of
being called "Jew" by dissatis-
fied customers.
The coordinator of the American
Jewish CommitteeS three-month-
old Committee on Race Relations
attributed the surge of anti-Sem-
itism to economic problems, and
said that the recent surge is a
result of general militancy in the
-Negro community these days.
George Fleishman. AJC's expert
on race problems, maintains that
Negro anti-Semitism is generally
prompted by individual problems
which come up between Negro and
Jew usually related to business
matters creating a mass stereo-
Hpe that the Jew exploits the Ne-
gro.
Disheartened by recent events,
many Jewish merchants expressed
their dissatisfaction with the Jew-
ish fight on behalt of Negro civil
rights causes.
"Those freedom-riding rabbis who
caused a big ado in Birmingham
caused more harm than good.
They placed Jews in the south in
jeopardy, while Negroes back here
either don't know about it or don't
appreciate it. Why should we stick
our necks out and get a kick in the
pants in return?" a Jewish liquor
! store owner protested.
I "Not so," said the AJC spokes-
man. "The Negro press is doing
I a fine job in reporting Jewish
i participation in civil rights dem-
' onstrations, and responsible Ne-
1 gro organizations such as the
NAACP, CORE and the Urban
League voice their gratitude at
every opportunity." The AJC
I maintains that as a Jewish or-
i ganiiation, it has n obligation
, to combat all types of bigotry,
stating that "rights of Jews are
not safe when the rights of any
people *re not safe." AJC has
j taken notice of the rise in Negro
I anti-Semitism and hopes to com-
bat it through its new committee
on race relations.
j Morton Puner. spokesman for
1 the Anti-Defamation League, dis-
i agrees with the AJC, and denies
| that anti-Semitism among Negroes
. has risen in the past months. He
I asserted that two ADL investiga-
! tors assigned to the Harlem area
found no increase in anti-Semitic
feelings. According to Puner, racial
tension in Harlem is primarily be-
tween white and Negro, and is net
' a Jewish problem exclusively.
While the AJC and the ADL of-
I fered conflicting views on the rise
j of anti-Semitism among Negroes,
1 Jewish merchants in Harlem indi-
1 cated that anti-Jewish feeling was
| "getting out of hand." One mer-
chant said that he was so concern-
ed that he is ready to sell-out.
"The trouble is," he added, that
"potential Negro buyers are aware
of the problem, and are awaiting
the opportunity to buy cheap"
Other merchants said that they
contribute daily to local churches,
of which there are many, and civic
groups "to keep the peace." Somn
merchants make it a point to hire
Negro salesmen and keep them
selves in the background.
Th? National Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People attributes "the whole
stinking mess" to the Black Mus-
lims. CORE'S James Farmer
believes that non-Muslims u
well have been agitated and pro-
poses that responsible Ne^ro
leadership give this matter ur-
gent consideration.
Jewish merchants in the Brdiord
Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn
known as "Little Harlem," rr^ that soap-box hate-peddlers often"
urge passersby to boycott the
"Jewish plantation bosses."
An elderly Negro Harlemite of-
fered what he called "a cure for
this disease." "Have Jewish men
and women distribute photos of
Nazi concentration camps and lit-
tle Jewish babies thrown into the
ua> chambers to show some of m>.
ignorant brothers what hate car.
lead to."
Rabbi Greenwald
To be Welcomed
Rabbi and Mrs. Zevi I. Green
wald will he welcomed by friemU
and members of Southwest Jew
ish Center at a reception Satur
day evening at the Center, 6418
SW 8th St.
Center officials this week an
nounced that tickets for High Holy
Day services are now available
The office will be open Tuesday-
and Thursdays, from 7 to 10 p.m..
and Sundays, from 9 to 1 p.m.
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the ii/i
oman s
"World
Jewish Floridian
Mian--
Florida. Friday, August 23. 1963
Section B
Busy Heller Family
To be Busier Now
p | Heller has always known
I hat her Daniel Neal would maki
Last week, he did. He wai
elected by voice acclaim as na
tional commander of the Jewish
)u-,r Veterana of the USA. at thi
JWV's 68th annual convention in
Washington, D.C.
Thi couple live a quiet life with
their children, Douglas Paul l.
Mona T. and Lisa 8. at 460 So.
Shor< Dr. Quiet," of course,
means proudly basking in the In-
creasing amount of civic activity
their husband and father has tak-
i n on as a personal responsibil-
n\
Lovelj blonde Diane is a former
school teacher and area chairman
ul the Young Matrons Division of
the Combined Jewish Appeal. In
her own right, she has. in addition
i ihis. a long string of organiza-
tional achievements.
Diane is past president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of ORT.
former vice president of the Con-
ference of Jewish Women's Or-
. ifcnizatiOWnow the Federation
oi Jewish Women's Organization!,
a member of the Social Service
Bureau of the City of Miami
Beach, and CJA chairman lor the
Southeast Region of ORT.
She is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Miami and attended!
Columbia Teachers College.
All of which makes me under-
stand perfectly why Dan does
uhat his belief in humanity
makes him do.'" according to
Diane.
On his own. he has spoken for
the United Jewish Appeal at an
annual assembly in New York; re-
gional meeting in New Orleans,
La.; and has presented fund-
raising addrenta in Savannah
and Valdosta. 6a.; in Ft. Law er
dale. Vero Beach. Lakeland. Sar-
a ota. St. Petersburg. Ft. Mvers.
Palm Beach. Cocoa, and Orlando.
Fla
"1 the first Young Leadership
Mission ot the United Jewi>h Ap-
ical to Europe and Israel. There.
,\e met all the heads of govern-
ment, and really saw the coun-
.ry,"
In 1981," explains Diane, "we
\ Hi' both invited to be members
In addition. Dan. who is a prac-
Icing Miami attorney, had an op-
portunity to spend two days at
he then ongoing Adolf Kichmann
trial. Prosecutor Gideon Hausner
gave Dan an autographed copy of
his opening address to the court,
Tt was after the trip that Dan,
was asked by the UJA to join its
Speaker's Bureau of lay and un
paid workers." according to Diane.
Dan's latest honor, his election
as national commander of the
Jewish War Veterans thrilled us
all." What the Heller family will
never forget was Undersecretary
of State W. Averell Harriman. who
iiad just returned from forging
the Three Power nuclear test ban
treaty in Moscow.
Opening his keynote address to
the JWV convention in Washing-
ton. Harriman declared: Tm
supporting Dan Heller for your
r.ext commander."
Besides which. Diane reports,
"both our Senators Smathers and
Holland. Gov. Bryan'- a,Kl ReD
Claude Pepper helped Dans cam
paign for election. They are thrill-
ed by the honor bestowed upon
Florida for the first time."
It is 11 years ago that Diane
and Dan first met as members of
a Young Adult Group of the then
Miami Beach Jewish Center un-
der the auspices of Dr Irving
Lehrman. Both are from Brook-
lyn. "That was a good enough be-
ginning." Diane smiles. A year
inter they were married. Since
then it has been a decade *'<.
love! the three children, and ser-
vice to their community.
Dan's latest achievement now
puts him on the national horizon
of contributions to the civic af-
fairs of the Jewish community and
our nationIsabel Grove
I
At home are (left to right) Diane. Douglas Paul 1. Mona 7. Lisa 8, and proud Daddy Daniel Neal.
ORT Conference Heads are Appointed
dent of Women's American ORT,: convention of the organization to I 450 ^en s Amencan MIT chap-
land Mrs Philip Rear, of Ph.ladel-;be held Oct. 14 to 17. in New York ters throughout the U.S.. as well
' phia national rcenrollment chair- City at the New York Hilton Hotel, as key overseas personnel.
i
POTTERY BLUE
GOES TO CLASS
Two works of art by
Joseph Love executed
in wash 'n' wear cotton,
completed with
touches of white.
Left a-line nautical skimmie.
3-6x 5.98
Right: inverted-pleat skimmie,
3 6x 7.98 7-14 8.98
YOUNG PEOPLES' /l/OPID. MIAMI (FOURTH FLOOR I.
AISO DADELAND. MIAMI BEACH. 163rd S1REET. FT. LAUDEROALE, WEST PALM BEACH
Diane helps National Commander Dan type a speed


Page 2-B
>. U wist flcrkKain
Friday, August 23. 1963
J
c
t
<
i
<
n
j
by ISABEL GROVE
Participants in the "Leadership Chat" series
under the guidance of Mrs. Arnold Perlstein,
an honorary vice president of Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah, are seated (left to right)
Mrs. Sherman Fast, Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, Mrs.
Joseph Halfon, Mrs. Nathan Rifkin, Mrs. Max
Goldberg, Mrs. Sam Feldman Mrs. Morris
Parets, Mrs. David Masser, Mrs. Edward
Schuldner, Mrs. Samuel S. Goldberg, Hattie
Sa.'ir and Mrs. Hadassah Fassler. Not present
is Greta Rappaport.
Mildred
G.
Bellin
Cooking
Corner
Ground Iamb is for most home-
makers like a rieh vein of precious
ore. waiting to be mined. Al-
though it is used rarely, ii at all,
in most of our homes ground lamb
is as versatile and easy to pre-
pare as the familiar ground beef,
and can be used in both simple
and elaborate dishes to add end
less variety to our daily meals.
It can be shaped into patties with
no further ado. and br tiled or
panfried as we do hamburger.- Or
it can be baked as a meat loaf
or blended with other ingredients
in top-of-t he-stove dishes or oven
casseroles. Combinations of ground
lamb and rite, known as pilevs or
pilafs. are particularly appetizing.
and are traditional favorites in
lands where lamb is a widely
used meat.
Today, we suggest two recipes
tor ground lamb which are good
the year round. The first is for
a meat loaf, equally delicious hot
or cold. For a super-special
sandwich, spread while bread with
orange marmalade, and add a slice
of the chilled cooked loaf and let-
tuce. On a hot day, a dinner plan-
ned around a main dish of the
chilled slices. attractively ar-
ranged on a bed of salad greens.
would be an appetizing choice.
In cooler weather, the hot loaf
could be served with potatoes
Welcome
Wagon
Remembers
Special Family
Occasions
Carrying on our community's
traditional hospitality,
Welcome Wagon Calls
are made when your
family celebrates a
(sixteenth birthday,
announces an
I engagement or
the birth of
a new baby,
or moves
to a new
home. Ci\ /
baked at the same time as the
meat.
The second recipe is a pilev
zesty enough to tempt appetites
on both hot and cool days. A
perfect recipe for preparing in an
electric skillet, this pilev is just
right for those times when we
want our main dish light. To com-
plete the meal, a tossed salad
and a e'essert of fresh fruit would
be sufficient.
In purchasing ground lamb.
there is one important considera-
tion which must always be re-
membered. The lamb must be
lean. Otherwise, as the dish
cooks ar.cl the fat melts away, so
little actual meat remains that the
recipe cannot be completed cor-
rectly. So. if there is any ques-
tion about the amount of fat in
lamb which is alreach ground, it
is wiser to select a piece of solid
meat, have all visible fat remov-
ed, and have the butcher grind
ihe lean meat for you.
Lamb-Orange Loaf
4 slices white bread, cubed
1-2 cup orange juice
1 medium-large onion, minced
1-2 cup minced parole)
2 eggs
1 teaspoon salt
1-8 teaspoon pepper
1-2 teaspoon ground thyme
2 lbs. lean ground lamb
Orange and parsley ror gar-
nishing
To a medium-large mixing bowl,
place the cubes of bread and the
orange juice. Mash until the mix-
ture becomes a smooth paste Add
the onion, parsley, eggs, salt, pep-
per. and thyme. Mix thoroughly.
Add the Iamb and blend lightly,
but thoroughly. Pack the mixture
Women to Hear
Judge Friedman
Judge Milton Friedman will
speak on "A Day in the Life of a
Judge" at the annual membership
tea sponsored by Tifereth Israel
Sisterhood in the social hall of
the Temple on Sunday at 7:30
p.m.
Theme of the evening will be
"Every Member Bring a Mem-
ber." and membership chairman
Mrs. Irving Querido will introduce
Sisterhood members in a skit.
firmly into a lightly greased 9x5x3
' inch loaf pan. and bake at 350
dig. F. for lVs hours. Spoon off
any fat which rises to the surface.
Inmold the loaf and garnish with
orange slices or sections and
sprigs of parsley. This loaf is de-
licious hot or cold. The recipe
serves 6 to 8
Lamb Pilev
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 lb. lean ground lamb
1 cup onion, diced medium fine
1 cup raw rice
2'.' cups canned tomatoes
1-2 cup water
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground alspice
1 teaspoon marjoran leaves
1-2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Heat the oil in a large skillet
over medium heat, add the meat,
and mash until the particles are
brown. Drain the meat in a
strainer, and reserve 2 table-
spoons of the fat. Return these
2 tablespoons of fat to the skillet
and heat again. Add the onion
and stir over medium heat until
the onion begins to brown. Add
the rice, and stir until the nee
becomes translucent. Add all re-
maining ingredients and the meat,
stir to blend, cover the pan. and
cook until the rice is tender and
the liquid is all absorbed If
the mixture becomes too dry be-
fore the rice is tender, add a lit
tie water or tomato juice. This
amount serves 4 to G. The pilev
may be reheated if a little addi-
tional liquid is added to prevent
sticking.
Sweet are the rewards for
maintaining a "B" average in a
tough physics course For
Rhoda Grant, a student at Car-
negie Tech. it was the "Grand
Tour" of Europe as a gift from
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Max
Grant Trip started with 999
other vacationing boys and girls
on a Netherlands-owned student
boat .
Then with a smaller group of
30. Rhoda traveled to Holland,
England. France. Spain. No.
Africa. Italy. Switzerland, with
Austria and Germany yet to
come Although Europe is
"positively crawling with col-
lege Stucents," our girl reporter
feels that "American parents can
be proud that they are all so well
behaved and really are terrific
ambassadors for the United
States" .
Another conclusion: There
still is no place like Miami, and
shopping on Lincoln Rd. or
Flagler St. is still tops" Dad.
County loves you too. Rhoda.
A host of friends and relatives
helped Mr. and Mrs Henry D.
Rosengarten celebrate their 25th
wedding anniversary at a gala
dinner in the Rubayiat Room of
the Algiers Hotel recently .
Out-of-town contingent included
John M. Goldsmith, of New
York City. Mr. and Mrs. David
H. Goldsmith. Roselle, N.J.. the
Charles Rosengartens, of Water-
bury, Conn., and the Ted Rosen-
gartens, Mr and Mr- A. ,1 par.
doll, and Mr. and Mr- Robert
Konhauzer, of St. Petersburg
Fla .
Joyous family reunion | r \|r
and Mrs Seymour Horowitz, ol
Coral Gables, and then two
daughters who have been attend-
ing Hebrew University in Israel
. Occasion called for :i din
ner party on the Miracle Iftlsj
Chippy's Restaurant .
And Chandler's was the >itt> of
the festivities planned by Milton
Wand for wife, Estelle's birthday?
. One gift no intimate
have attempte:'a sweate
Estelle Winter, the gue
honor, is one of Miami Reach's
leading sweater stylists.
birthdayT*
:e would^
'ateras I
uest of
Howard Kay. eldest son of the
Sheldon Kays, has transferred
from the University of Florida
to the University of Miami .
Spent part of the summer on j.
trip through the Eastern t s
and worked on several of the
programs at Westbrookc Conn
try Club, where his dad is pres-
ident, the rest of the time .
Speaking of the Kays, they
hosted the Parkinson 21 Cluh at
their Ray Heights home Satur-
day night The group is com-
posed of 21 couples who work
for the benefit of Parkinson's
Disease cure Mrs. Mom
(Gail) Podell is president
Dialogue Will Be Sponsored
When the occasion arises, phone
HI 8-4994
Tifereih Jacob Registration
Temple Tifereth Jacob Religious
School is accepting children for
registration on Sunday. 10 am,
or from a.m. to 1 p.m.. Monday
through Friday, at the Temple of-
fice. Adult education classes will
meet at the Temple on Tuesdaj
Opti-Mrs.
Reveals Gift
A contribution ot ci.2(X) to Va-
riety Children's Hospital by the
Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami Beach
was announced this week by hos-
pital oflicials.
Mrs Murray Sonnett, president,
said the donation will be earmark
I'd for use in the new psychiatric
division for emotionally-disturbed
children, a wing now under con-
struction
Main project Of the club is the
rehabilitation and care ol disturb
ed children.
Sugnrine
Msmr-uuaM
oiiotK-nff
uotMnmuimt
A >|M. k p> mMM
"MM* CWMlHt
errot-tmovB
NMiusma
Hnvouowm
KM KUCHB- u
TAKI UM
*-oi. sorru -,
r tit
'The Modern JewFact or Fic-
tion" is the theme of an informal
community dialogue to be spon-
sored by the Biscayne Chapter.
Women's Division, of the Amen
can Jewish Congress on Thursday.
Aug. 29. 8:30 p.m.. at the Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium, ii 19
\K u;7th St.. No. Miami Beach.
Rabbi Max A Lipschitz, spiri
tual leadei of Beth Torah Congre
gation. will be the keynote sp.-ak
er. Prominent women of the
.North Dade Community, as well ;is
Congress memherss. have been
invited to participate.
Mrs. Leonard Sidcrsky. presi
dent of Biscayne Chapter, will
chair the meeting, assisted bj
Mrs. Abraham Augenstein. CO-
chairman of program
Hostesses will be Mrs. Albert
Zuckerman. membership chairman
ol the chapter, and her cochair
man. Mrs. Sy Reese.
Arrangements committee in-
cludes Headlines Fred Eelevan,
David Vishoot, Joseph Skiiarl
David Wise. Daniel Oilman. Mil-
ton Levy, Abraham Goldstein. Nat
Glazier, Jerry Dudell. Dolly Baura,
Si Iney Rudnick, Ben Wtfintraub
ll.'ien Finger and Julian Frank
If you like
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little macaroni pies...filled with
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with savory tomato sauce and
cheese...seasoned the real Hal-
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easier than tha frozen kind. So
much thriftier, toocost* only
bout 15c per serving I


Friday, August 23. 1963
9-JewistfhridHain
Pioneer Women to Raise $2,750,000
For Israel Work During Coming Two Years
Page 3-B
By So*ci*l Report
Pionee r Women pledged last
week to raise $-*.75O,O0O in a two-
\ear period to finance the organi-
zation', weltare program in Is-;
raeL The goal, announced by
Mrs. .Sniney A. Leff, national pres-
ident, was adopted at the organi-
zation': ]8th national biennial con-
vention in Detroit. Mich.
The p-ogram. which will be car-
ried out by Moetzat Hapoalot. the
Israel Working Women's Council
iMstei organization of Pioneer
Women includes child care ac-
tivities vocational, agricultural
and rehabilitation projects.
At r symposium on "A Positive
% Hollywood Lady
Attends Seminar
Mrs. Natalie B. Freedman, edu-
cation chairman for the Florida
Region of 1 la i --ah and education
\ice president of the Hollywood
Chapter of Hadassah, was select-
ed as regional representative to
the Ha assah National Education
SeminOX in Stamford, Conn., this
week, It is the second time Mrs.'
Freed i in has represented the
llondr Region at the seminar.
One- a year, the national |
Iladass.i Education Department'
calls t< jrether one delegate from
every vgion of the United States
and I erto Rico. In intensive'
session 35 carefully chosen worn-1
en are -xposed to the best teach-
ers ; m techniques in adult Jew-
ish education. The course this
year mnsists of Bible, sacred sym-
bols, a- 1 the Hebrew language.
Inctr .tors include Dr. Louis L.
Kaplai president. Baltimore He-
lm u ; i lege and Teachers' Train-
ing : iool: Rabbi Yochanan
Muffs nstructor in Bible, Teach
en till tute. Jewish Theological
Seminary, NY ; and Mesdames
Goldman. Sarlin. and Gamoran,
head.- of the National Education-
al Department ot Hadassah.
On her return. Mrs. Freedman
will conduct a similar education
seminar for t:-.e 15 chapters of
the Florida Region. Mrs. Irwin
Liss, o Coral Gables, is regional
president, and Mrs. Arthur Friend
i- llili vood Chapter president.
Approach to Jewish Survival-
Jewish Women's Role," Rabbi
Morris A.ler, Congregation Shaare'
Zedek, Detroit, urged the forma-'
tion of a National Adult Jewish!
Education Council to sponsor aj
variety of programs both formal]
and informal that would aim to
educate American Jews in their
traditions and culture. Rabbi Ad-
ler stated. "Through summer in-
stitutes, weekend seminars, for-
ums, and panel discussions, as
well as by written word, the
Council would bring to large num-
bers of Jews the best in Jewish
thought, art, ethics and scholar-
ship."
I. L. Kenen, editor. "Near East
Report," speaking on "Relation-
ships with Israel." said that "We
will make progress towards peace
in the Near East when the inter-
national community has the cour-
age to isolate and outlaw those
who persist in belligerent policies
and preparations to carry them
out." Kenen told the delegates,
"For a long time, the Near East
has been a free zone for belliger-
ence and aggression where nations
could shoot at each other immune
from international intervention
and censure."
Sidney Shevitz, president of the
Detroit Community Council, spoke
on "Jewish Community Life." He
said that "the great events of
human experience in our lifetime
which influence us deeply are his-
tory to our children." He con-
tinued, "The horror of the Nazi
holocaust, the excitement of the
formation of the State of Israel
and the past 15 years of develop-
ment cannot have the same im-
pact on them unless it is related
to their present and their future,
and unless it is significant for the
preservation of Jewish values that
are essential to them and their
fellowmen."
Dr. Sara Feder, chairman of the
symposium and the head of the
Education Department of Pioneer
Women, stressed the increasing
effectiveness of Pioneer Women in
American Jewish Life,
ed out the role of the mother and
her family and spoke of Pioneer
Women launching a new family
holiday.
JWV Auxiliary
Hears Rports
Reports on the National Con-
! vention of the Jewish War Vet-
1 erans of the U.S. will be given
] at a meeting of the North Shore
| Ladies' Auxiliary 677 to be held
! Wednesday. 8 p.m., at the Nor-
j many Isle Branch of Washington
I Federal Savings and Loan Assn.
Held in Washington, D. C, from
Aug. 4 to 11. the convention was
attended by localites Mrs. Sol
Spielberg, president of Auxiliary
677; Mrs. Ben Haberman, past na-
tional president; Mrs. Max Levine,
past State Department president;
and Mrs. Bertram Whitman,
State Department treasurer.
Instructor Helene Taylor gives some pointers to four of her
pupils who gather together each Tuesday at Temple Or
Olom's community auditorium. The classes, by the former
Roxette dancer, are sponsored by the Temple's Sisterhood.
Getting their lesson are (left to right) Marcie Aronow, Aileen
Bill, Sharon Budnick, and Susan Horowitz.
Temple Adds Faculty Member
Benjamin Altshuler. formerly of
Ontario, has been engaged as a.
full time Hebrew School teacher
by Temple Menorah.
Holding a BA degree from He
brew University, Altshuler, who I
is 33 years old, has six years of
teaching experience in Canada.
where he emigrated from Israel.
While in Canada, he took grad-
uate courses in educational psy-
chology. He has experience in
youth work, having served with
Maccabbee Youth Organizations
and Young Judaea in Canada.
Altshuler is married and ha:-
three children.
Flagler Adds
Two to Staff
With the addition of two new
members, the Religious School
staff of Flagler-Granada Jewish
Center. 50 NW 51st PI., is now
complete. ,,
Merwyn Levin and Lew Leon,
both Dadc County public school
teachers with Master's degrees in
education, have joined the fac-
ulty.
Levin, who has taught Hebrew
in Ohio and Pennsylvania, will
teach first and second grade He-
brew, and Leon, a local Sunday
School teacher for the past four
years, will have charge of eighth
and ninth grades Sunday School.
Other staff members include
Mrs. Mathew Cohen, second and
third grades, Sunday School;
Daniel Borowsky. fourth grade;
Mrs. David Hertz, sixth; Mrs.
Daniel Borowsky, seventh. Ar-
nold Levy is principal.
Rabbi David Rosenfeld. spiri-
tual leader of Flagler-Granada,
will instruct third and fourth year
Hebrew classes. Cantor George
Goldberg will continue to coach
Bar Mitzvah students.
CONGENIAL WOMAN
to help with tight housework in
P'i> j.te home, own room.
"hone FR 1-4098
Ci mm
I-,.
tOOM and BOARD
I For llttrly Pacpl* Special low um-|
I met Mm, strictly Kothar. Warm |
mosL.ru i*. Car Mrvto. Also Efficiency i
-astmabla Rare Mrs. H. levin,
I 1541 Euclid Avt. JE 1-3741 )
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
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THRIFT SHOP
All fMrf FMHtVW, C/afMne;,
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PHASE CAll US FOR PICK-UP
THE JEWISH HOME FOR
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7331 N.W. 77th AVENUE
Ph. 696-2101
C/ostrf Saturdays
Singers Group
in Rehearsal
Miami Beach Community Sing
its will Start rehearsals for the
coming season on Thursday even
ing. Sept. 5. in the Bandroom ot
the Ida M. Fisher Junior High
| School under the direction of its
: new conductor and music direc-
I tor, Hirsh Marchbein-Marbiny.
Rehearsals will be held regular
ly on Thursday evenings. Vacan
! cies exist in the bass, tenor, alto
and soprano sections, according to
Mrs. Geertrude Canter, 543 13th
St., Miami Beach, in charge of in-
formation.
CONSERVATIVE
SUNDAY SCHOOL
IN NEED OF
QUALIFIED TEACHERS
Call
CA 1-5406 or HI 5-1529
Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231
"YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT"
for an AFFAIR to REMEMBER
BLOSSOM SHOP
1572 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
There IS a Difference in Flowers-TRY OURS
WEDDINGS- BAR MITZVAHS GARDFN PARTIES
BIRTHDAY ANNVERSARY
& HOSPITAL BOUQUETS
FREE DELIVERY ALL GREATER MIAMI
that's "Happy Netty Year" in Hebrew
here it is in everybody's langnage ..
When it comes to gift-giving for Rosh Hashanah, JM's
Barton's delicacies say it with Continental flavor!
The Shofar gift box of Continental Bartonettes shown,
miniature chocolates filled with nuts, fruits, cordials
and creams, one pound, 2.IJI. Other O.ft boxes:
New Year Cookies, 15 oz., 2*00 Miniature Fruit and
Honey Cakes, 15 for |.J)]| Chocolate-Dipped Fruits,
14 oz., 2.25. Almond Kisses, 1 lb. gift caniiter, |.||{
New Year Favorites, 14 oz., |.f)]t. Tov Shofars, each <|J)
BARTON'S BONBONNIERE, first floor, miami and ft. lauderdale.
BARTONS
(0) IMwimtW.
B1SCAYNE BOULEVARD AT VENETIAN WAY. PARK KKIK


Page 4-B
+Jewl$t> Ftrricf/ntr
Friday, August 23. 1963
Yaschik, Barnett
Exchange Vows
A reception and luncheon at the
Eden Roc Hotel followed the 1
< 'clock ceremony there uniting
the former Miss Betty Rose Bar-
rett and Harvey Yaschik on Sun-
< ay, Aug. 18. Officiating at the
ruptials was Rabbi Mordecai
}odet
The newlyweds will live in At-
l.tnta, Ga., on their return from
f> honeymoon trip to Nassau.
For her wedding, the bride wore
r pea u de sole gown fashioned
v ith a portrait neckline, enhanced
with appliques of alencon lace
; Dd seed pearls. The full skirt,
trimmed with two large bows in
tiie back, extended into a cathe-
t ral length train.
The double-tier French illusion
veil fell from a pillbox trimmed
\ ith iridescents and pearls, and
the carried a Bible topped with
hite orchids and lilies-of-the-val-
lejr. A single string of pearls
vorn by the bride was a gift from
the gi oom's mother.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Lewis
Ansbacher, the bride's sister. Ar-
llne Trupkin and Mrs. George
Greene were bridemaicis. and Re-
riee Greene served as flower girl.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
Lawrence Barnett, 5750 SW 56th
St.. r.ewlywed Mrs. Yaschik is
tmplo.-.ed as a speech therapist
by the Atlanta Board of Educa-
tion. She attended the Univer-
i ity of Florida and graduated
from the University of Miami.
She Is a member of Sigma Alpha
Eta, .speech honorary society, and
served as treasurer of the Pan-
hellenjc Council.
Her husband, now with the;
2achry Clothing Co., attended the
University of South Carolina,'
\ here he was president of Hillel,
;.nd belonged to Alpha Phi Ome-
-:>, service fraternity, and Eu-
phradian Literary Society.
Son of Mrs. Morris Yaschik and
the late Mr. Yaschik, of Charles-!
1 in. S. C. his brother, Dennis1
^ aschik. served as best man. and'
i shers included George Greene.
Lewis Ansbacher. Michael Cohan
nd Meyer Lipman.
Warner-Kali
MRS. MARVtY YASCHIK
WVrrvr-Knlui
MKS. LAWRENCE BOBBINS
Robbins, Termin Married Here
Joint Meeting Monday
Ladies' Auxiliary of the George
(ershwin Lodge will meet Mon-
day evening at Hibiscus Temple.
Following the regular business
meeting, the members will join
tr.e Knights of Pythias Lodge 196
for a program on the story of
"Telestar" by a speaker from
E Hithern Bell Telephone Co.
Gowned in peach silk organza
over taffeta, the former Florence
R. Termin became the bride of
Lawrence J. Robbins on Sunday.
Aug. 18. at the Dupont Plaza
Hotel, where a reception followed
the 5:30 p.m. nuptials. Rabbi
Norman N. Shapiro officiated.
Judy Termin served her sister
as maid of honor, and attendants
were Irma Greene. Judy Warshaw.
Merri Mann and Arlene Braun.
Flower girls included Ivy Jacobs
and Carol Beth Schwalb. with
Howard Jacobs, ring bearer.
Best man to the bridegroom
was Marvin Robbins. and John
Alterman. Paul Taylor. Joel Rif-
kin and Jeffrey Lefcourt served
as ushers.
Following a honeymoon in Ja-
maica, the newlyweds will live at
407 NW 15th St., Gainesville.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Termin. 7940 SW 21st St.,
the bride graduated from Miami
High, and attended the University
ot Florida, where she was a mem-
ber of the Lewislative Council.
Her sorority is Phi Sigma Tau.
The bridegroom was active in
Hillel AZA when he was a stu-
dent at Miami High. He attend-
ed Syracuse University, and be-
longs to the Executive Council at
the University of Florida. He is
a member of Tau Epsilon Phi
Fraternity.
Parents of the bridegroom are
Mr. and Mrs Meyer I. Robbins.
243 Shore Drive East.
Roses Will
Live in Miami
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. GrOBS-
man. 6221 SW 61st St.. announce
the marriage of their daughter.
Tcbv Gail, to Jerald Rose on Sat-
in day. Aug. Tf. "at Westbrooke
Country Club. The bridegroom is
the son of Samuel Rose. 635 85th
St., and the late Mildred Rose.
The bride will graduate, with
honors, from the University of
Miami in January. A member of
Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority, she
is the recipient of the highest na-
tional award given by the organi-
zation, the Blanche Greenber-er
Award for outstanding scholar-
ship and college activities.
She is vice president of Orange
Key, Associated Women Students,
College Board, and Phi Alpha
Theta. She also served as secre-
tary-treasurer of the freshman and
sophomore classes. Delta Theta
Mu. Kappa Delta Pi. and the Ad-
\isory Council of the Dean
Mr. Rose, now with a local
firm of Certified Public Account-
1 ants, is attending the University
of Miami Law School at night.
He received his degree in account-
ing from the University of Miami,
where he was a Dean's List stu-
dent. He belongs to the Account-
ing Society of Miami and Beta
Alpha Psi. professional fratern-
ity. After graduation, he served
v ith the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice in Washington. DC, and
Palm Beach.
, Attendants to the bridal couple
were Alma Dosal, maid of honor;
Carol Lynn Blum. Joyce Hyman
and Carol Rose, bridesmaids; Wil-
liam Cohen, best man; Paule
Ashe. Gerald Babbitt and Ken
Grossman, groomsmen.
On their return from a honey-
moon trip to Jamaica, the newly-
weds will live at 6300 W. Flagler.
your next affair
deserves
UML
Community is Invited
Joseph Schmier, president, and
Adrian Kaulman. membership vice
president of Congregation Beth
Torah. are inviting the commun-
ity to meet Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
and Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschen-
baum at two special summer Fri-
day evening services on Aug. 23
and Aug. 30 at 8:30 p.m.
Associated Photographs! -
MRS. JIRALD ROSt
Students to Get
Temple News
Rabbi Hershel Brooks, of Tem-
ple Zamora, this week announced
that the Temple is compiling a
list of all children of its mem
bers who are attending college
this year, Every student attend-
ing various universities over the
country will receive the quarterly
magazine of the United Syna-
gogue, as well as bulletins of the
Temple.
"We want our college students
not to forget our Temple and to
keep up with the work going on
back home in their synagogues."
he explained.
"The Temple bulletins will re- %
mind the university student ot
home, as well as keep him in toucli
with the portions of the week and
the sayings of our rabbis."
with a wonderful choice of
Miami Beach's
Newest
Luxury Hotel
DORAL
BEACH HOTEL
A new standard of elegant*
on Miami Beach. Superb-
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weddings... confirmations,
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Country Club. Rooms that
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For complete detail*, please call
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WEDDINGS
BANQUETS
FASHION SHOWS
MEETINGS
RECEPTIONS
StnVIMB ttTO itoo.
Plan your N,i event at the
Westbrook
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8S21N JHE TRArL^CA 1-8000
^SaasC ''**'...iM, oft ,. Pelmetto
r\
Wrri,.T-Kahn
The former Miss Priscilla
Rochelle Kipnis and Ira
Michael Elegant were mar-
ried Aug. 10 at the Seville
Hotel. The bride is th da-ah-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Kipnis. 115 4th Ter.. DiLido
Island. The groom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ele-
gant. 4531 Sheridan Ave. The
groom will enter the Univer-
sity of Miami Law School in
September. Rabbi Irving
Lenrman officiated.

For Elegant Function*
Complete Cataring Facilities for that Special
Party served In superb fashion setting that
will reflect your good laafe.
CONFIRMATIONS a RECEPTIONS WEDDING)
A t... *ANUETS MEETINGS PARTIES
DIETARY LAWS STRICTLY OBSERVED UNDER THE SUPERVISION
OF RABBI TIB0R H. STERN
CD
B.LL6OLOB,N0,E tfoodDr>c|[>r moNI| UN S.S5,|
THIIT, MIAMI BEACH


Friday, August 23. 1963
Double Ring Rites
For the Neijnas
A late morning, double ring
ceremony on Sunday Aug. 18,
united RuTh Marcia Belaid and
Michael Slephan Neijna at Tim
pie Ncr Tamid, with Kabbi Eugene
Labovitz otficiating.
For her wedding, the bri.'e se-
lected a ballerina-le; gih sheata
>:own of white silk shantung with
hell-shaped overskirt and square
neckline. The two-tier French il-
lusion veil tell from a pillbox cov-
ered with alencon lace and seed
pearls.
Daughter of Mrs. Adele Belaief,
5401 N. Bay Rd.. aid the late
Abram M. Belaief, newlywed Mrs.
Neijna is a graduate of Miami
Beach High School and attended
the University of Florida.
Her husband received a degree
in engineering from the Univer-
sity of Flori a. and is a member
JA ni Tau Kpsilon Phi, -ocial fratern-
ity.
Now honeymooning in Puerto
RiCO and the Virgin Islands, the
couple will live in Atlanta while
both attend dcorgia State Col-
lide. A recipient of a graduate
fellowship from Georgia Institute
ol Technology, the bridegroom will
be working towards his Master's
degree. He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs Nathan N. Neijna. 230 W.
San Marino Dr.
fJcnlsii IkiiUi,
Page 5-B
MRS. MICHAH NtllNA
Rabbi Sfard At Miramar
Temple Israel of Miramar, for-
merly the Jewish Community
Center of Miramar. has engaged
Kabbi Nathan Sfard to conduct
services during the High Holy
Days which will include Selichot
starting midnight, Sept. 14.
Before retirirg to Miami. Rab-
bi Sfard served several prominent
congregations in New York As-
sisting him at Temple Israel will
be Cantor Joseph M. Levin, who
will chant the liturgical portions
rl the services.
Cantor Levin, who has served
as spiritual leader of the Temple
for the past year, will continue in
that capacity during the coming
season.
Plans have also been made to
tnlarge the Hebrew and Sunday
School classes. Director of edu-
I cation will be Daniel Medwin, who
I filled that position in the North
| Dade Jewish Community Center
for the past five years.
Registration of new pupils for
the classes will be held on Sun
day morning. Aug. 25.
Brills on Wedding
Junket Now
The former Elaine E-terman
and Stephen A^Brill are on^ jt.
honeymoon trip to Jamaica, Mex-
ico and California, following their
wedding on Sunday evcring, Aug.
18. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro par-
formed the ceremony at the Se-
ville Hotel, where the receplion
was also held.
Attended by Mrs. Mitchell Gold-
man, matron of honor, and Dar-
lene Kaplan, flower girl, the bride
v ore a candlelight peau gown with beaded alencon lace
bodice and elbow-length sleeves.
The front of the skirt was en-
hanced with appliques of beaded
alencon lace terminating in a
flowing full chapel train topped
with a self fabric bow. The open
pillbox of matching beaded alen-
con lace had a double pouf of
French imported illusion, and
she carried white orchids on a
prayerbook.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam-
uel L-terman, 220 SW 24th Ter.,
the bride at tender! Douglass Col-
lege. Rutgers University; Teach-
er's College. Columbia University;
and was elected to I'si Chi, nation-
al psychological fraternity.
Mr. Brill is an engineer and
graduated from Miami High and
the University of Miami. His par-
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Jack Brill,
330 SW 55th Ave. Serving as his
best man was Larry Brill, with
Mitchell Goldman, Marvin Adel-
man and Fred Krammer, ushers
Cedars Issues
21-Month Report
Cedars of Lebanon Hospital has
admitted 8.210 patients since open-
ing its doors on November 19,
1961.
In a 21-month report to the
Board of Trustees, President Har-
ry L. Lewis disclosed that there
were 3.616 surgical proc dures
and some 140,000 X-Kra>s pro-
cessed in Ihis period.
He reported that 858 babies were
born at Cedars of Lebanon, in-
cluding two sets of twins and one
set of triplets.
A major expansion program ifl
now under way to add three new
v ings to the hospital, increasing
the bed capacity to 282 bed*, com-
plete the upper three floors, cstao-
lish a Heart Pavilion, and expand
Hie Laboratory. X-Ray and Out-
patient Departments.
Hay Ride Scheduled
Shoshana Chapter, B'nai B'rith
Women, will "Hit the Hay" for a
hay ride and barbecue on Satur-
I day evening. All funds raised will
i go to finance the hospitals sup-
ported by B'nai B'rith Women, as
well as other projects. Mrs. Bui-
! dy Aronson and Mrs. Bill Kur-
land are in charge of reserva-
tions.
Mrs. Ruth Wittenberg, of Brooklyn, is first-prize winner of
Yuban's Land of the Bible contest. Her piize will be a round-
trip to Israel for two. In addition, she won a S500 cash bonus
because her entry was accompanied by an Instant Yuban
Label. She is shown with Mr. Wittenberg, being congratulated
by Walter Stephan, New York sales manager for Yuban.
Other winners across the country included Harold Shapiro,
of Miami Beach.
The Specialty
of the Seville f.t
PREFERRED
HOTEL CATERING
WEDDINGS CONFIRM ATfONS
LUNCHEONS RECEPTIONS
MEETINGS to accommodate 10 or 1,000
Adath Yeshurun
Open House
Joseph Lie.man. president ol
Adath Yeshurun Synagogue, has
announced an Open House to be
held at the Temple. 1025 NE Mi-
ami Gardens Dr., on Sunday from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
"Purpose of the Open House,"
explained Liedman, "is to pro-
vide an opportunity to become
familiar with the many programs
carried on under the auspices of
the Temple. For this purpose.
. all of the activities will be repre-
sented by an illustrative display. I
"These will include the Sister-
hood, headed by Mrs. Ira Levin,
Men's Club, presided over by Jos-
eph Fields, as well as the United
Synagogue Youth. B'nai B'rith, I
religious an,i nursery schools,
summer day camp, and an exhibit
representing congregational ser-
vices held on the Sabbath, holidays
and al daily minyars."
Rabbi Jonah C.iplan and Can-
tor Maurice Neu will greet guests
Beth Torch
Splash Party
Beth Torali Y......: Adults is ha\
ing a splash party on Sunday
ing :ii the Apache Motel.
H Biscayne Blvd.
Event will include box lunches,
swimming and dancing to a live
band.
Reservations chairmen are Deb-
bi Smith and Marsha llersliman.
The group he'd a birthday
dance on Tuesday evening in the
I'SY Room of the Temple.
\VcriuT-K;ihn
MRS. STEPHEN BRILL
Services Slated
At Blackstone
Ernest Field, of North Miami
Beach, will conduct High Holy-
Day services at the Blackstone
Retirement Hotel. 800 Washington
Ave.. on Rosh Hashona. Sept. 19
and 20. and Yom Kippur. Sept. 28.
He will be assisted by his son.
Benjamin. They have conducted
High Holy Day services at the
Blackstore for the past three
years.
Cantor Field has many years of
experience in the cantorate here
and in New York. His son is a
qualified Torah reader.
Services w ill be open to the pub-
lic for a nominal fee.
Dr. Jacobson
Is Reassigned
Dr. (Capt.) Ralph W. Jacobson,
. of Miami, who recently came on
active duty in the United States
Air Force, has completed the
orientation course for officers of
the Medical Service at Gunter
AFB. Fla.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Jac-
obson, of 435 SW 19th Rd., he was
given familiarization instruction
covering administrative proce-
dures, military medicine and med-
ical service support of USAF ob-
jectives.
Capt. Jacobson is being reas-
signed to the USAF hospiial ai
Pease AFB. N.H. He will join
, the staff there for practice as a
dentist.
Dr. Jacobson attended Emory
University, Atlanta. Ga., and the
University of Maryland School of
Dentistry. He is a member of
Alpha Omega Fraternity.
His wife, Phyllis, is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Stank >
Weincr. Baltimore. Md.
Have that
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Special Occasion

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Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party '.
at the


for Information:
HAZEL ALLISON
Catering Director,
JE 1-6061
2Sth St. A Collins Ave.

For Very Special Occasions..
W/omat
10 NEWLY DECORATED
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KOSHER
CATERING AVAILABLE
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MIAMI BEACH
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CALCUTTA ROOM
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exclusively for weddings, parties or special dinners! Catering
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/'\>r reservations, cull 945-9571 in Miami, or WA 3-81 11 in Hollywood
HOLLY WOOD-BY-THE-SEA


Page 6-B
mjmiat ncridUan
Friday. August 22. 1963
tfflE
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Effie Platoff's sweet smile and gentle manner are always in evi-
dence when there's figuring to be done. As a little girl, brought up
quietly and properly by her widowed mother, Etfie remembers be-
in interested in arithmetic, not dolls. She trained as a secretary
and went right into the business world. In 1921, she met her late
husband, Harry, through mutual friends of their families. She al-
ready was active in Hadassah. Working with Judith Epstein for ten
years, she organized the West End Hadassah
Group, and was treasurer there for ten years.
She ind Harry went to California where her
latent ability of rhyming, inherited from her
father who was an author, came to the fore.
Arranging place cards for a birthday party
for Harry, she discovered she could write
symbolic poetry for everyone. Now when-
ever a bit of rhyming has to be done Effie is
called without delay. They visited Miami
every year until Harry retired, and they came
here to live.
Effie's forty years in Hadassah can be
summed up in her own words, "I adopted
Hadassah for my child." Certainly, no moth-
er could have been more devoted than Effie.
On moving to Miami. Effie continued where
she left off. She was treasurer and financial
secretary for 16 years. Presently, she's auditor tor the Miami Beach
Group. Since Harry was such an ardent Zionist. Effie also became
active in Bonds for Israel. She was also treasurer of the Mt. Sinr.i
Hospital Women's Auxiliary rind Gift Shop, and has earned her 600- j
hour pin by being a Pink Lady. She has just been made an Honorary!
Life Director of the Auxiliary.
Among other organizations on whose board she sits are Brandeis
National Women's Committee. Board of Governors of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and Technion. Effie is in much demand when
someone is needed tc man the entrance desk at luncheons. Her total-
ing always comes out right, and the door goes smoothly. Effie cooks
I little, reads a little, and watches television. She has learned since
her husband's last illness to be self-sufficient. Mostly, she sits at
her desk making the figures race quickly and correctly across the
pages. In her quiet, calm way. Effie has dedicated herself not only
to Hadassah but to her community, proving that there is always some
one who cares for others enough to try to uphold the dignity of life.
* *
NOTES ON A "POP" CONCERT PROGRAM
The tenth and last concert in the Miami Beach Auditorium was
a huge success. A warm, friendly feeling swept over the whole au-i
dience from the beginning. The nostalgic songs of Richard Rodgers
put everyone in a gay mood. When Bernard Frank presented Marie I
Volpe with a plaque of honor lor her inspiration and leadership, he
confessed he was a little nervoushe had just been a father for six-,
teen hours. Hillevi and David Schine had a full table of guests.
Hillcvi's pictures don't do her justice; she's breathtakingly lovely.,
Dr. and Mrs. Albert Rosenthal took advantage of the intermission to
say "hello" to their friends. Florence (Mrs. Albert) Pick's table:
was desiged by friends stopping to offer greetings. She has just,
returned from a European toui two weeks earlier than she had plan- ]
ned because she got homesick. Sophia and Mai Englander, with sev-
eral of their daughters had a table for themselves. Among others en-
joying the music ar.d table-hopping were Rose and George Levenson,
Dr .and Mrs. Harold Rand, Mrs. Arthur Treister, Ruth and Shepard
Broad. Mrs. Herbert Scher, Mis. Theodore Chertok, Babette and Leo
Ackernian, Laurette and Ted Sandier, Mrs. Edward Pincus. and Bar-
bara ;i;irl Marvin Brown.
*
FOOTBALL CAPERS AT WESTVIEW
Six o'clock sharp a buffet dinner was served in Westview Coun-
try Club dining room lavishly decorated according to a football theme.
At seven o'clock on the dot, two bus loads left the club lor the Miami
Stadium and the game. Dr. Richard E. Deutch did the honors in one
bus and David Haber in the other. Among the football enthusiasts
were Diana and Leonard Trei'ler, Georgian and John Serbin, Leon
Manne and a party of eight. Dr. and Mrs. Lester A. Russan, Mr.
and Mrs. Jaime Goldenbcrg, who have recently moved here from
Medellion, Colombia. After the game, the buses returned their pass-
engers to the club lor a late snack and to cool off.
* *
EVERYBODY SANG AND PLAYED
Seen having dinner at Les Violins where everyone gets into the
act from the bus boy up were Mollie and Dan Ruskin, Claire and Syd-
ney Weintraub, and the Ed Kahns.
* *
MIAMI BEACH GOES TO NEW YORK
During August, there will be an exodus to Gotham Town to at-
tend the wedding of Michael, son of Ruth and Max Orovitz, and Norma,
daughter ol Mr and Mrs. David Achsen, of New York City. The
wedding will be at the Essex House on Sept. 1. The Orovitz family,
Mr. and Mrs. David Bass, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Deutch, and Mr. and
Mrs. James Orovitz will be joined by the Samuel Friedlands, the
Leonard A. Wiens, Mollie and Dan Ruskin, Lois and Herbert Matbes,
Eleanor and Gus Feuer, and the James H. Meyers. The night before
the wedding there will be a rehearsal dinner for the wedding party
and out-of-town guests. Most of the Miami Beach contingent will
take time out to shop and see a show or two.

JUST LIKE MAMIE EISENHOWER
Lillian Frumkes has been around the world and a few other places,
but she declares that the most beautiful spot of any that she has seen is
Ixtapen in Mexico. She just came back and hasn't stopped raving
There is a Beauty Institute there like the one in Arizona, called Main
Chance, where Mamie Eisenhower goes. That pampered feeling in a
beauty salon from nine to six o'clock leaves an inward as well as an
outward glow. "Wonderful,"' says Lillian.
Peris to Live
In College Park
Susan Carol Siegel and Jeffrey
Alan Perls exchanged nuptial
vows on Sunday, Aug. 18. Rabbi
' Joseph Narot performed the high
noon ceremony at the Seville
Hotel, where a reception follow-
ed.
Matron of honor to the bride was
Judith Alice Kramer, with Michele
Drasner and Sara Ellen Berman
serving as bridemaids. Ira Siegal
acted as best man, and Lawrence
Kramer, Ervin Shames, Lawrence
Levitan and Jeffrey Klivans were
groomsmen.
A graduate of Miami Senior
High, the new Mrs. Perls attend-
ed the University of Florida and
is a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi
Sorority. Her husband is an in-
dustrial engineer with a degree
from the University of Florida.
He belongs to Pi Lambda Phi, soc-
ial fraternity, and Sigma Tau, en-
gineering honorary.
Following a wedding trip to Ja-
maica, the couple will live in Col-
lege, Park, Md.
Parents ot the newlywcds are
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Z. Siegal,
2500 SW 1st Ave., and Mr. and
Mrs. Edmund F. Perls, 1801 SW
19th Ave.
M*S. JtffSli *IJ
B. -Ml.n Bucket
MISS KAY fSTA WtISS
Hebrew Acad.
Now Registering
Registration for the new semes-
ter at the Hebrew Academy of
Greater Miami. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr., is now open.
In addition to nursery, kinder-
garten, elementary and junior
high school classes, a special pro-
gram is being offered this year
for junior high students with no
previous Hebrew education.
Also available to the new, mod-
ern school, is transportation
throughout the Greater Miami
area.
Kay Esta Weiss
Betrothal Told
An early winter wedding is be-
ing planned by Kay Esta Weiss
and Neil I. Harris, of Maplewood.
N.J. Announcement of the en-
gagement and future marriage is
made by the bride-elect's parents.
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiss, 5815
Alton Rd.
The prospective bridegroom is
the son of Mrs. Florence Harris.
Maplewood, and Allen Harris. Irv
ington. N.J.
Miss Weiss received her early
education in Miami Beach Schools
and the University of Florida, and
attends the Philadelphia Museum
College of Art, where her liance
is majoring in industrial design.
It was 22 years ago, in the Jan.
1. 1941 issue of The Jewish Flor- \
idian. that the engagement of the
future bride's parents appeared
under the byline of Ray IT, Sho-
chet, society editor.
The former Miss Cecile Alex
ander. of Long Island and Miami j
Reach, was described as a grad- <
uate of the University of Miami
and a member of Theta Chi Ome
ga Sorority.
Her fiance. Milton Weiss, an at-
torney, graduated from the I'M
Law School and served as its ores-
ident in 1935. He had been elect-
ed to Iron Arrow, honorary frat-
Congress Confab
Labor Weekend
Plans Speakers >
Final plans were completed for
the fifth annual Labor Day Week
end conclave "of the American
Jewish Congress at a meeting here
this week.
Mrs. Harvey E. Kramer, pres.
ident of the Women's Division,
and Mrs. Benjamin Kamer, chair-
man of the conclave, announce
the activities will begin with a
Havdalah service to be conducted
on Saturday evening by Rabbi
Jonah Caplan, vice president of
the Southeast Region of th Amer-
ican Jewish Congress, and spiri-
tual leader of Temple Adath Yes-
hunin. Site is the Diplomat
Hotel.
On Sunday and Monday morn-
ings, from 11 to 12 noon, "Congress
Confabs" will be held on two
vital issues. On Sunday, the
"confab" will concern "The Inter-
Racial DialogueRole of the Jew J"
ish Community." Chairm.m will
be Rabbi Leon Kronish, president
of the Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congrev Pan-
elists are Tobias Simon, secre-
tary. Florida Advisory Commit-
tee of the United States Commis-
sion on Civil Rights, and J >ha Orr,
former State Legislator.
On Monday morning, Mr-. Abra-
ham Augenstein will cha;r a dis-
i ussion on "The America 1 Jew-
Challenge in 1963." s leaker*
will be Leo Mindlin, executive
editor of The Jewi.sh Flondian,
and Rabbi Sanlord Seltzer, area
director of the Union of Amen
can Hebrew Congregations
"Congress Koftee Klataches"
will be held on Saturday and
Sunday afternoons in the Embassy
Room for informal get ti gathers
with members and guest- Troph
it's will be awarded to i an and
women in the Congress Golf Tour-
nament to be a part of the week-
end activities.
Assisting Mrs Kamcn ir the ar-
rangement! arc Misdame- Harvey
B. Kramer, Tobias Simon, trying
Kaplan and Russell Wine--. "J
Mrs. Benjamin Kamcn, 1012
Obispo, Coral Gables, chairman
of the conclave, is ;:ccept:ng hotel
reservations.
Pi Lambda Phi Party
Pi Lambda Phi Fratermiy held
its second annual twin party last
Saturday night at ;he San:. Souci
Hotel, chaired by Ed Abbot
Music for the Twist wai furnish-
ed by Doctor Voo-Doo and Don
Owen, of Deauville Recorls
entity, and Rho 3eta imicr
Frati rnitv.
LEO HOHAUSER
PLUMBING
CONTACTING RtPAIRING
Serving Djde County Over 25 Yean
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Phone JE 1-0496
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Like the career woman
pictured before and ar>er
treatment, you can aet
the "lift" needed for the
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The clinic now enters its
fourth year of outstanding
service in the non-surgrcal
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rejuvenation.
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Friday. August 23. 1963
fJewisti FkrkMar)
Page 7-B
ALMOST every temple, B'nai
^ B'rith group, Hada ssah
chapter, and every other type
of organization has at least one
howling league. With the com-
ing of the bowling season, we
asked several readers what their
opinions are on bowling attire.
Mrs. Bernard Stone finds the
full-length slacks the most com-
lortable. She finds it easier to
bowl in pants, but reminds us
that she is a beginner, and that
her icon can not be correlated
10 her clothes. Where she bowls,
she has noticed that "most of
the women prefer slacks in win-
ter and shorts for the summer,
with few culottes at any time
of the year."
Diametrically opposed in opin-
ion is Mrs. Herbert Goldberg.
She contends that if profession-
al women bowlers and instruc-
tors wear skirts, there must be
;i reason. Culottes have been
tried, with little success by Mrs
Goldberg.
The ones I have worn seem to
be too full, and the ball tends
to get caught in the folds."
The "A" line skirt is her fav-
orite, and it seems best for most
of the women on her team. They
have tried the skirts featuring
a low flare, with the godet type
of insert, but when the shorter
women hem them up, they end
up with a sheath.
From the watcher's point of
view, we checked Mrs. Leonard
Barr, who believes the new
madras wrap-around skirt, and
solid color tuck-in blouse, to be
very effective.
* o
lulRS. Murray Turetsky consid-
* ers her bowling attire from
a fashionable point of view.
She feels women should always
be in vogue, even if bowling.
Slacks are her preference. For
evening bowling, she believes
that shorts are unladylike, and
finds culottes to be cumbersome.
She freely admits that the skirt
is more becoming to many wom-
en, and finds that the over-
blouse gives more freedom of
movement.
Since bowling is one of the
largest indoor sports in the
country today, we can expect
more and more of our readers to
become personally involved in
the game. As in most every-
thing, there is more than one
way of doing somethingand do-
ing it right. The one bit of ad-
vice all bowlers had to offer was
that when you do begin bowling,
forget what you are wearing and
concentrate on "hitting the head
pin."
he
Cedars Plans
Seminars Here
Two leading specialists in-ilie
field of obstetrics and gynec^e^y
will come to Miami to take part
in a seminar at Cedars of Leb-
| anon Hospital on Aug. 29 and 30.
Dr. Abraham Rakoff, clinical
! professor at Jefferson Medical
College in Philadelphia, and Dr.
Harry Prystowsky, head of the
Obstetrics Department at the
j University of Florida School of
Medicine in Gainesville, Fla., will
speak at the two-day meeting.
Seminar director is Dr. Daniel
O. Hammond, chairman of the
Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology at Cedars of Lebanon.
Sessions are open to all inter-
ested physicians without registra-
tion fee and will be held from 9"
a.m. to noon, and 7:30 p.m. to-
10:30 p.m., on Thursday, Aug. 29,
and 9 a.m. to noon on Friday,
Aug. 30.
B'nai B'rith Women of South Florida pitch in to help tubercular
patients at the Veterans Administration Hospital at Coral
Gables. When the patients recently moved to new ground
floor quarters with access to a patio, the Council purchased
two large ceramic tables complete with umbrellas and crank
handles. Left to right are Mrs. Miriam Kaplan, veterans chair-
man, Emma Lazarus Chapter; Mrs. Geneva Haynie, R.N., head
nurse of TB Ward; Mrs. Peter Duchon, Miami Chapter, and
Council co-chairman; Mrs. David I. Sachs, president, Miami
Council; Mrs. David Weisberg, chairman, VAVS, Miami
Chapter; and Frank Williams, assistant administrator.
Scientific Body Picks Rabbi Stern
Miss Levine Now Mrs. Levine
I.. Man
MKS. NORMAN ItVINi
The former Lyn Hope Levine
and Norman Robert Levine ex-
changed marriage vows on Sun-
day, Aug. 18, at the Israelite
Center, with Rabbi Morton Malav-
sky officiating.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Len-
ny Levine, 5959 SW 16th Tei\, the
bride was attended by Miss Bar-
bara Dardick.
The bridegroom is the son of
Mrs. Pearl Levine, 6331 SW 18th
St., and the late Morris H. Le-
vine. Mark Rabin served as his
best man.
Newlywed Mrs. Levine graduat-
ed from Miami Senior High and
Fairleigh Dickinson University
School of Dental Hygiene. Her
husband, a senior at the Univer-
sity of Miair.i, is an alumnus of
Southwest High.
Following a wedding trip to
New York City, the couple will
live in Coral Gables.
~-N AUTHORIZED DEALER
wira
Quality
HEARING AIDS
$50 to $285
' Service All Mahn
-------* Batteries Molds
STANLEY GOULD
1238 Lincoln Road i> # M.)
TIti-Tridn-Trlls-Tefmi
PHONE JE 1-7911
The National Association of
Orthodox Jewish Scientists of,
America has elected Rabbi Tibor
II. Stern, spiritual leader of the
Beth Jacob Congregation, as a
member of the organization.
The organization is composed of
leading professors and scientists
in the field of physics, chemistry,
medicine and mathematics. A
great number of the members are
affiliated with the United States
Government nuclear program and
lesponsible for major develop-
ments in the field. Devout Ortho-
dox Jews, they are active mem-
bers in the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of America.
Rabbi Stern is one of the few
rabbinic members who have at-
tained national recognition in
Talmudic research. He is the au-
thor of many scholarly works, in
addition to his publications in Tal-
mudic Law. He is credited with
the first publication of a two
volume book. 'The Eternal Law."
as a proposed Constitution for the
State of Israel. He also is author
of Composition of the Talmud,"
where he reveals the unity of the
Babyllonian and Israeli Talmuds.
Rabbi Stern is presently prepar-
ing his latest publication, 'The
Illumination of Light," which
deals with theoretical physics and
Kaballah.
Rabbi Stern will participate in
the third annual convention of
the National Association of Ortho-
dox Scientists to be held during
the Labor Day weekend in the
Empire Ho'.el in the Catskills, New
York.
Services Set
At Beth Kodesh
Rabbi Max Shapiro, who will
conduct High Holiday services at
Beth Kodesh Congregation, will be
marking his 30th anniversary in,
the community, having conducted
his first High Holidays here in
1933.
Rabbi Shapiro organized and
was president of the Greater Mi-
ami Rabbinical Assn., president
of the Zionist Council, and mem-
ber of the University of Miami
faculty. He served for many years
as a member of the round table
in racio discussions sponsored by
the Conference of Christians and
Jews.
Seat reservations are being
taken at Beth Kodesh.
An all-day carnival scheduled
for Sunday, Sept. 8, on the con-
gregation grounds will feature
gifts of a cruise to Bimini and
weekends for two at several
motels.
Alpha Omega
'Hoedown' Slated
North Dade Group of Alpha
Omega Dental Auxiliary is spon-
soring a "Hoedown" on Sunday
at the Trails End Square Dance
Center, 18160 NW 2nd Ave.
Mrs. Ira Rothfield is chairman
of the event, which will include-
music for all types of dancing
and a late supper.
BEAUTY SALON
WIGS
High Fashion Hair Pieces
PROBLEM PIECES
8 Generations Wig Business
7437 COLLINS AVENUE
Ph: UN 6-1226 Or UN 5-9157
NURSERY through 12th GRADE
A CONTINUOUS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Accredited by Florida State Department of Education
MEMBER OF FLORIDA COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOIS
REGISTER NOW FOR 1963 1964 SCHOOL YEAR
CLASSES START SEPTEMBER 5th
ENRICHED ACADEMIC PROGRAM
CERT1FED TEACHERS
TRANSPORTATION ARRANGED
throughout GREATER MIAMI AREA
INQUIRIES and VISITATIONS INVITED
SMALL CUSS GROUPS
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EXCELLENT PHYSICAL FACILITIES-
lrga C lattrooma. Auditorium,
laboratory, library, Art Tarraco.
Science
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Playgrounds, Swimming Pool, Dining Roomt.
MRS. IDA R. LEAR, Director
THE
1010 Wetf Avenue, Miami Beach
RICHARD E. LEAR, Principal
LEAR SCHOOL
Phone JEfferson 1-0606
WATERMELON TIME
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Enjoy Ice-Cold Slices at Our Tables
... Or Take Out!
ALSO HALVES & WHOLE
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1789 Biscayne Blvd. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783


Page 8-B
*, If**/*?! ilnridliari
Friday. August 23, 1963

Lebediker Branch To Help Clink
At a Lebediker Branch of Farband meeting
are top row (left to right) Maurice Forer, Ben-
jamin Talmadge, Simon Tetenbaum, Albert
Ricklin. Frieda Sack, Meyer Goldstein, Hyman
Eisenbaum. and Moshe Berman, executive di-
rector of Histadrut. Bottom row (left to right)
UM Symphony
Names Palevoda
Walter Palevoda has been nam-
ed office manager of the Univer-
sity of Miami Symphony Orches
tra. Acting Dean Joseph Tarpley.
Of the I'M School of Music, an-
nounced Wednesday.
Palevoda, a Symphony staff as-
sistant since his graduation from
IM in 1958, will also serve as
assistant to Dr. Fabien Sevitzky,
symphony director and conductor,
Tarpley added.
Although his title is not the
Kame, Palevoda will assume some
Of the duties formerly carried
out by Mme. Marie Volpe, who
retired last Sunday. Other of
Mme. Volpe's former duties will
be share:: between Dr. Sevitzky
and himselt. Dean Tarpley ex-
plained.
are Joseph P. Zuckerman, president, Ben
Meyers. Michl Gibson, Solomon Parness, fi-
nancial secretary, Oscar Shapiro, vice presi-
dent, Jacob Fioydman, recording secretary.
Sarah Babiei, and Ely Malin, treasurer.
Beth El Ends
Tuition Fees
All tuition fees at Congregation
Beth El Religious School will be
eliminated, effective for the new
school term, according to an an-
nouncement by Hyman Chabner,
congregation president.
The new ruling will be initiated
with classes beginning Tuesday,
Sept. 3. for Hebrew School, and
Sept. 8 for Sunday School, taking
the place of the scholarship pro-
pram used previously.
Registration for a complete edu-
cational program lor students
from 5 to 15 in Hebrew, prayers,
customs, traditions and Bible is
now being accepted at the office,
500 SW 17th Ave.
Chairman of the educational
committee is Joe Zalis.
Lebediker Branch of Farband
this week opened its campaign
of assistance in behalf of me
4Uti--iuivoi'>ary celebration of
Histadrut.
At a special meeting of the
Lebediker Branch Executive
Board. Moshe Berman. executive
director of the Israel Histadrut
Committee of Greater Miami, de-
scribed the current needs of the
organization.
Responding, Joseph P. Zuck-
erman, president of the branch,
and a member of the Israel
Histadrut Committee Board here,
vowed support of the Lebediker
Branch toward completion of
Greater Miami's Medical Center
now being erected in Beersheba.
The branch decided during the
KOSHER hotel
MARSEILLES
meeting to undertake a special
sponsoring project of the Pedia-
tric Section oi the Medical Cen-
ler, with" the 300 membe a ofthe
branch underwriting I up-
port .
Visit the fabulous
STARLIGHT
ROOF
America's Smartest
Supper Club
for
Superb Dining and
Delightful Dancing to
MAL
MALRIN
His Piano and
His Orchestra
COMPLETE DINNERS
from *5.50
I Uike Starlight !l""f
for a tptctacutar i !*&
-.if, '
HML
BESACH HOTEL
On the Ocean at -I
RBSEHVATIONSl
B.:.:. JE ie-.'iOOO
MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SACKS
Couple Mark
50th Anniversary
At Dinner Party
Golden wedding anniversary is
being celebrated by Mr. and Mrs.
Louis (Gertrude) Sacks, formerly
j of Detroit, Mich., who came to
; Miami in 1948.
They were feted on Sunday,
Aug. 18, at a dinner party for the
immediate family hosted by
daughter and son-in-law, Dr and
Mrs. (Dottie) Benjamin G. Oren,
; 1640 Tigertail Ave.
Participants in the celebration
, were their other daughter. Miss
j Bess Sacks, and granddaughters.
[Jenny ar.d Marianne Oren.
He'll Coordinate
WQAM Dep't.
WQAM announce? t:ie appoint
nient of Ron Lieberman as high j
school cordinator. His duties in-
clude the management of 24 cor-
respondents, one from each of
the major Dade and Broward
County high schools and of teen-
age affairs in South Florida.
A Palmetto High senior. Lieber-
man was a WQAM correspondent
for two years. He is a three-year
member of the Palmetto Panther
Editorial Board and serves as a
correspondent for the Miami News.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Alvin H. Lieberman. 7245 SW
105th Ter.
1$
100". Air Conditioned
7 daily pei" person
double occupancy
25 of 116 rooms
To Sept. 18
INCLUDES
Complete Breakfast
and 7 Course Dinner
FREE TV in every room
Movies. Beach. Parking
Entertainment.
Swimming Pool
Oceonfront at 17th St.
RESERVE FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
Sept. 18th to 29th
CANTOR NULMAN
e Services in the Hotel I
CALL JE 8-5711
Miami Beach
SAND-ELI
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And al No Extra Charge to Our Pa-
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by a well-known Rabbi and *iually
well-known Cantor.
RESERVATIONS AIU
AVAILABLE FOR 6 DAYS
SEPT. 18 thru SEPT SB
SEPT. 27 thn, SEPT j)
FOR '1 DAYS
SEPT. 18 thru SEPT 31
For Further informa- ,<^
and Rese,_v.-tions Ca i
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NIGHTS: UN 6-52"8
Or Wl 5-4084
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THE FABULOUS ZEIGER KOSHER CUISINEI f
ti nwT I
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500 Deer Run TU 8-4521
ART BRUNS. Co-Ownar
Open
Irom
7 in.
to
2 am.
Sit.
Salutes The
EUS NESS MAN
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on the corner
111 Miracle Milt, C.C
Ph 446-7031
For T3ke-0ut Semes
If you seek the ^
BEST IN DINING.. .
it's Hl'ritUttl's
BIG PORTERHOUSE
THE KING OF STEAKS
anaf Sea Food Specialties
s d.-. Mwy I iW. IIImI ll
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Dade Heights
Now Registering
Registration for Dade Heights
.icwish Congregation Religious
Schools, as well as nursery and
kindergarten, scheduled to begin
on Tuesday, Sept. 3, is continuing
through Sunday Irom 9 a m, to
12 noon,
Heights Theatre Guild ill
hold its firs! ca ting for the i%4
season on Sunday at 8:30 p.m.,
and Monday at 9:30 p.m. Need-
ed are actors, actresses, stage-
hands, electricians, and carpen-
hands, electricians, carpentters!
For High Holy Day tickets. ;i
representative of the Religious
Committee will be at the syna-j
gogue office every evening. Mon-1
day through Thursday
ZEIGER'S
Ritz Plaza
HOTtl POOL CASANA CLUi
All outside M LRU tum ROOM! aaa
MNTNOUSIS PRIVATI MACK a TIR-
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ass M0VII TMIATlt OUTDOOR patio
PLANNIO INTIRTAINSSHIT PRII PARK-
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FRII PARKING
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Call Mrs. HOFFMAN
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ON THE OCEAN AT I 7th ST., MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
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Established Ipi 1945
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DINNERS SERVED DAILY
21s St. erf
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w.lh DISTINCTION
ll-ncheons private parties
organizations business groups
Pn-oic Roorm Banquet Contultonl
Open All Year
Co" JE 8-OC.U
$80,000 Classic
Set at Flagler
The quarterfinal eutdown point
in the Flagler Kennel Club's $80,-
| 000 International Classic comes up
! Saturday with the duel between
I Sonda and Memento capturing the
fancy of greyhound racing fans
as nothing else has in many a
season.
While the stake campaign con-
tinues to occupy the spotlight as
| the summer racing season moves
toward its final three weeks, oth-
er events ami eventualities add
to the expense of the drive to-
ward the finish.
Aside from the $80,000 jackpot,
John Prevatt's Sonda has her
sights set on matching or better-
' ing Honey Line's record of 19
wins for a single season at Flag-
ler. hut she'll have to win just
| about every remaining start to
. make it.
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON
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Jay, August 23, 1963
*, #r-H#"#; flflrikM&tf)
Page 9-B
JLjcir ^jVlitzvan

i*
ij. and Mrs. Harold Pomerantz and Mr. and Mrs. Al Levine
hat in between dances at Westbrooke Country Club's Aug-
st dance and supper. Pomerantz is vice president of West-
rrooke. It was also a welcome home party for the Levines,
?ho were on a two-month-long. 9,000-mile automobile tour
the United States.
te#h Shirah Sets Dedication
be Lcation ceremonies of the
iu, air-conditioned sanctuary
L oltiMa of Temple Beth Shirah,
HMi SW 120th St.. will be held on
piday, Sept. 8. at 3 p.m.
ollowing the Torah Caravan
|om t'.e homes of donors of
JCTed Scrolls. Mrs. Shirley Whit
Ip Fenstein and children and
Ir and Mrs. Israel Goldman, a
jiecial dedicatory service will be
lid in 'he sanctuary.
I Guest will include Rabbi Loon
ironist;, Rabbi Solomon Schilf.
(resident of the Greater Miami i
Rabbinical Assn.. and Cantors
Ibrahan: Seif ana Charles Sheldon/
lodner.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop, spiritual;
[adir Of Beth Shirah, will award
itatiem of appreciation to thei
iuilder of the new sanctuary,
Pernan; Goodman. Seymour Drcx-
t r. arihitect. members of the
puildinj: committee, headed by
Abe Smukler. Morris Herman, Wil-
bur Aerensoi-.. and J. William;
faros, chairman, advisory council.
Dedicatory psalms will be chant-
i by Cantor Herman K. Gott-
b .:ihI choir during the ritual of
eating the Torah Scrolls and
|!ie sanctuary.
Included in the ceremonies will
a tfi.ided ton:- of the $150,000. ]
lour-acre complement of social
lull, rabbi's sturiy. cantor's music
room, classrooms. Temple offices
biiii nursery-kindergarten play
rrouni I
First service in the new sane
luary v.U be held at Selichot,
[midnight, Saturday. Sept. 14,
tailing at 11 p.m.
Mrs, Bernard Chesman, super-
tisor of the Religious Schools.
K ill b- hostess at the "Faculty-
Cet-Together" to be held in the
sanctuary on Sunday. Sept. 15, at
fi a.m. A pre-Holy Days assem-
bly will open the school at 10 a.m.
with special ceremonies of dedi-
cation.
Wendy Epter
First Friday evening service- of j
the season at Congregation Beth i
: Torah will include the Bas Mitz-
1 vah of Wendy Maria Epter on
Aug. 23.
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz and Can-
: ton Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum will
officiate at the
I ceremony, which
! will be followed
by a Kiddush
i hosted by Mr.
and Mrs. Ber
nard A. Epter,
20020 NE 21st
Ave., in their
daughter's hon-
or.
Wendy, in the
eighth grade at
Miami Beach
Junior High, is a
member of the
Society at Beth
Torah Hebrew
School. Her out-
side activities inciudi
and dancing.
The celebrant will also be fet
Wendy Epter
swimming
ed at a reception Saturday even-
ing iu Urn Warnings Kuom ,he-
Barcelona Hotel. Second guest of
honor will be Mrs. William Epter,
Wendy's grandmother, who will be
marking her 80th birthday. Pat-
ernal grandparents of the Bas j
Mitzvah are Mr. and Mrs. Louis'
Sussman.
* *
Barry Silber
Barry, son of Mr. and Mrs.;
Maurice Silber, will become Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning,!
Aug. 24. at Congregation Bethj
Emeth-Ychudah Moshe. Rabbi!
Simon April will officiate, andi
Cantor Hyman Fine will chant the |
liturgy.
The celebrant is a student at i
the congregation's Hebrew School
and attends North Miami Beach
Junior High, where he plays in,
the band, belongs to the Audio |
Club, and is a Junior Counselor at
Camp Avir.
Mr. and Mrs. Silber will honor
their son at an Oneg Shabbat fol-
lowing services on Friday even-
ing and at a dinner at Chandler's.
Beach MD Gets
Army Orientation
Dr. (Capt.) Arthur L. Alex-
ander, of Miami Beach, who re
cently came on active duty in the
United States Air Force, has com
plet'ed the^>rientation course for
officers of the Medical Service at
Gunter AFB, Ala.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Alexander, of 3010 Alton Rd., he
was given familiarization instruc-
tion covering administrative pro-
cedures, military medicine and
medical service support of USAF
objectives.
Capt. Alexander is being reas-
signed to the 839th Tactical Ros-
pital at Sewart AFB, Tenn.
Dr. Alexander attended the
University of Miami and the Med-
ical College of Virginia. He is a
member of Alpha Omega.
Registration is now open for the
daily nursery -kindergarten, dally
Hebrew School, and Sunday Reli-
gious School.
Rabbi Skop will head a faculty
of 18 certified teachers, and Can-
tor Gottlieb will direct the sen-
ior and junior choirs in a full
program ol Jewish music from
nursery through confirmation.
Regisration for the nursery-
kindergarten, to be supervised by-
Mrs. Nathan Cynamon and direct-
ed by Mrs. Jane Schulman, will
continue until Aug. 25. with open-
ing of school on Tuesday, Sept. 2.
The reading readiness curricul-
um will include a full program
ot Jewish holiday celebrations
and arts and crafts. Classes and
transportation will be available to
boys and girls 3 to 5 years.
Miamian Wins
Optical Award
Bernard I Gelbart, of 1810 SW
24th Ave., a graduate of the
Opthalmic Dispensing Course at
Lindsey Hopkins, has won the
Cobb Award for Excellence in
Clinical Dispensing.
A plaque was presented to him
by Thomas Peterson, general man-
ager of Cobb Optical Co. Grad-
uation was last Friday at the
Lindsey Hopkins Hotel Skyline
Room.
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~,AR fAY Ma


p
Page 10-B
vJewisti fkridiam
Friday. August 23. 1963
r
e<
M
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ol
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11
0
85
Ti
fa
of
01
re
M
bt
ar
Pi
Rabbis Flay Commercializing Of Services Here
Members should not be solicited
from other synagogues or disat-
filiation encouraged."
National and regional lay re
life. Our Jewish people every-
where are being asked to affiliate
themselves, with established^con
gregations of their own choos
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro, of
Beth David Congregation, chair-
man of the Ethics Committee of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical As-
sociation, this week reiterated the
position undertaken by the rab- Hg'ous bodie.-, m th.s area are being mg.
binic bodv in its condemnation of asked to cooperate in our endcav-
commercialization of religious ors to elevate synagogue standards 0f. VVoJfson in Talk
services ar.d religion in general: and eliminate pernicious practices.
In attempting to preserve the sane-

-It is felt ti of services for the High Holy r.,K1,lni,. nll.ml,rrs of the
Eden Roc Hotel will be the scene of a four-day international
convention of Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity beginning Wednes-
day, Aug. 28. Royal Flagg Jonas (left), Miami Beach attorney,
is national president. Assisting will be Dr. Bill Schiff (center),
dentist of Coral Gables, and Charles Festinger (right). Miami
businessman. Social activities will include a luau at Harry's
American Gardens, a midnight boat cruise, and a formal in
the Cafe Pompeii. _________________
they represent are being urged to Forum for Adult Education at
avoid any ;ibuse or practice which the Auditorium of Washington
will debase our Jewish way of Federal, 1234 Washington Ave.
John On to Speak
The Hon. John B. Orr will speak
on "States Rights or Human
RightsTake Your Pick" at the
next meeting of the South Shore
Unit, American Association for
the United Nations, to be held
Monday evening at Washington
Federal Savings and Loan Assn.,
1234 Washington Ave. President
of the group, Abraham A. Grun-
hut. will moderate the program.
Holy Day Services
Set at Lombardy
At a meeting this week at the
Sterling Hotel, Rabbi S. H. Cohen
was appointed to officiate for the
High Holidays at services in the
Lombardy Hotel. 4305 Collins Ave.
Rabbi Colien. who will also
serve as mashgiach in the dining
room of the Lombardy. was inter-
viewed by Rabbi Joseph E. Rack-
ovsky, Frank Brickman. Sol Weiss
Mid Lester Siegel.
Weiss and Siegel are owners of
Sand-ell Caterers, who jointly op-'
crate the strictly kosher Crystal
Hoom of the hotel.
In announcing the appointment
of Rabbi Cohen, Weiss said that
a cantor will assist the rabbi at1
'he High Holiday services.
Special rates are being offered
at the Lombardy for the entire
eleven-day stay. Or guests may
arrange to check in the day be-
fore Ro>h Hashona, leaving Sun-
day morning, then check in again
Erev Yom Kippur until the fol-
lowing Sunday
USY Youth
Camp to Open
Southeast Region of the United
! Synagogue Youth will hold its
j 12th annual encampment Aug. 21
I to 29, at Camp Blue Star, Hender-
i sonville. N.C.
The enrollment, numbering 272,
exceeds by far any previous num-
ber of campers ever to attend
Camp USY in the past.
Theme of this year's encamp-
I inent will be "The Jewish Fam-
ily and the Jewish Home." Rich-
ard Friedman, of Temple Menorah,
i Miami Beach, is USY Camp chair-
, man, while Rabbi Allen Rutchik
' will direct the encampment for
| the third straight summer.
Mr. and Mrs. Al Meyers, of
Montgomery, Ala., will return '
as head counselors. JerroM .
Leeson, of Ahavath Achim Syna- '
gogue in Atlanta, will serve as j
a divisior head and special in- I
structor.
There will be a faculty of sev-i
en rabbis and educators who will
lead the daily study groups, as
well as specialists in song and i
dance.
Debates, socio-dramas. camp-
fires, plays and cantatas will fea-
ture many of the evening pro-
grams, in addition to a special
kinescope showing of the "Quiet
Revolution." an NBC documen
I tary on the role of religion in:
American life today.
The United Synagogue of Ameri
ca is the organization of Conser-
vative congregations in this coun-
try and in Canada
Do We Have Free MB?" wa-
to be the topic of a lecture by Dr
, ail rabbinic members of the Abraham Wolfson on Thursda>
Days or any other time during the (|w congrP8ations > morning. 10:45, before the Spinoza
year should be dignified, proper
and limited in its appeal to mem-
bers of congregations or those who
join specific movements, such as
the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations (Orthodox). the
United Synagogue of America
(Conservative1, ard the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
(Reform)."
Rabbi Shapiro said that
"wheneever public auditoriums
must be used by existing syna-
gogues, thero should be no ad-
vertising or public announce-
ments that seats are available
to ran-members. Such congre-
gations should be urged to con-
fine High Holy Days and other |
festival publicity to their mem-
bership mailing lists and own
congregational publicity media.
Ner Tamid
Plans Program
Registration, now taking place
at Ner Tamid Religious School,
i indicates that enrollment this
year will be double last year's.
New teachers have been engag-
ed for the additional classes, and
all classrooms have been decorat-
ed and individually air-condition-
ed.
A special class for 6 and 7-year-
olds, to meet four afternoons a
week from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.. with
Aaron Center, instructor, has been
organized in the Hebrew Depart-
ment.
Meyer Samberg, education di-
rector, and Rabbi Eugene Labo-
vitz will teach the confirmation
and pre-confirmation classes which
have been enlarged.
Bar Mitzvah-age youngsters at-
tending the minyan on Sunday
mornings will be invited to break-
fast under a program sponsored
by Harry Rappaport and Mitch
Reiner. A youth program for chil-
dren age 10 and over is being plan-
ned by the Men's Club. Activities
will include cotillion, sports, clubs,
bowling, socials and discussion
groups.
ELECT
HARRY HURST
MORE LEADERSHIP
LESS POLITICS
elect Harry Hurst
TO THf
NORTH MIAMI COUNCIL
Pull Lever 5-A Sept. 3rd
I'd. Pol. Adv.
MIRACLES NEVER CEASE!
FRANTZ MIRACLE OIL CLEANER
You can keep your engine oil clean continually and end all
oil changes permanently with a 15< bathroom tissue. If I
couldn't replace the Frantz Oil Cleaner for less, I wouldn't
take a thousand dollars for itl
ALL WHITE TAXI CABS HAVE THEM.
WHY NOT YOU?
DON'T PUT IT Off PUT IT ON BEFORE IT IS TOO IATE!
Distributed by MORTY SCHOENFELD
OWNER AND OPERATOR OF THE
WHITE TAXI CAB CO.
OF NORTH DADE
PL 9-5723
PS. 24-Hr. Air-Conditioned Taxi Service throughout North Dode Areo.

m
RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
(FOUNDER OF THE RADIO SYNAGOG OF AMERICA)
SPIRITUAL LEADER OF
TEMPLE B'NAI SH0L0M
OPA LOCKA, FLORIDA
WILL CONDUCT A PRE-HIGH HOLY DAY PROGRAM
SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 4:15 P.M. TO 4:45 P.M.
FOLLOWING THE JACOB SCHACHTER HOUR ON
WEDR-FM
99.1 MEG. ON YOUR FM DIAL
)
*


Friday, August 23. 1963
* Jew Ist) fhriclimi
Page 11-B
Showing smiles of satisfaction over their smorgasbord meal at
Fonc She Noon's Chinarama are two executives of the Deau-
ville Hotel. Left to right are Chinarama owner Al Olchak;
Richc:c Elterman, vice president of sales for the Deauville;
the hotel's catering manaqer, Bill Goldring; and the other
Chine; ama owner, Robert Willnei.
Brother Daniel
Gets Citizenship
JERUSALEM (JTA) Broth
er Dame!, the Jewish-born, Cath-
olic Carmelite monk who sought
Israeli < tizensbip under the Law
ol Return, but was rebuffed by
the I-r^tl Supreme Court, has
been t n nted Israeli citizenship
through ordinary naturalization
procedures, the Interior Ministry
announced here.
A spokesman lor the Ministry
said th< monk became a citizen |
hiTaiij-t .-. fulfilled the conditions,
for naturalization incumbent upor ;
non-Jews under the citizenship
law. Tht Polish-born monk, whose
orinigal same was Oswald Rufeis-
en. became a Roman Catholic \
during the Second World War.
h lule hiding from the Nazis in a
r.unnen
Rood fo be Finished"
Temple Sinai of North Dade,
1480 NE 123rd St.. plans to have
a new road ready for the High
Holy Days, commencing on Sept.
16. The "Road to Sinai" will lead
from NE 123rd St and loth Ave.,
Pinski School
To be Opening
The ." ;.vi<| pinski Folk School
will it ;tn in its air-conditioned
building 842 Washington Ave, on
i ii -.;. Sept. 3.
included in the school
curriculum are Yiddish and He-
brew; reading, writing, speech
and sii ng; Jewish history and

I" ition, the students are
prepan :or Bar and Bas tfitz-
vah, c irate all Jewish holidays,|
and ei ge in discussions direct-
ed to\ stimulating an interest
and u: rstandicg of the State of
Israel
Gelb Monuments
Has Anniversary
Gelb Monuments is currently
marking its lirst anniversary in
(he Greater Miami area.
The firm was launched here
June 1, 1962 by Saul Gelb. Quar-
ters are at 140 SW 37th Ave.. with
a complete display of monu-
ments and footstones. open daily
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.. and closed
every Saturday to observe the
Sabbath.
Gelb's brothers-in-law represent
the lirm in New York under the
names of Lewis Monuments and
Goodman Monuments.
Memorial consultant to Gelb
Monuments her*; is Milton I. Green,
'Silver Dollar*
Jacob Schreiber
Dead at Age 72
' Services"'Were held here -last
week for Jacob Schreiber. color-
i ful Miami Beach resident, who
i died her Wednesday. Aug. 14.
Mr. Schreiber. who lived at 298
So. Coconut Lane, Palm Island.
j was 72.
Known as "Silver Dollar Jake."
j the former owner of a string of
motion picture theatres acquired
his nickname by passing out un-
told hundreds of silver dollars to
GI's during World War II. as well
as to blood donors or those who
j bought war bonds.
His trademark was a con-
vertible automobile, which he
drove around town decorated
with yacht wheels, barometric
equipment, trailers with exhibits
depicting war situations, and
signs affixed to the car urging
blood donations and the pur-
chase of bonds.
In the front seat of his car. sat
l a bright-feathered macaw.
"Silver Dollar Jake's" auto was
frequently a part of the pomp and
parading marking a variety of
Greater Miami events. He visit-
ed veterans hospital often, and
frequently took show troops to en-
terain them.
He was born in New York City.
Services here were in charge of
Riverside.
his plays of protest, one of which,
"Waiting for Lefty." a one-act
drama, catapulted him into na-
tional prominence. A number of
his plays drew upon the back-
ground of American Jewish life
for*rheTr*TnJiJ6r"rnemes. -"""
BERKOWITZ, Sol, 79, .! S273 SW
112th St.. .Ii. I Auar. IS Gordon.
ELLIS. Max, 56, ..f 1->7I NK 170th St.,
died Aim. it Rlvi rslde.
KRASNO. Mm Bather, 61, of L22S
Pennsylvania We. Riverside
classman. Mm. Bally, ".n. and Dan-
iel '!.. 88, of ill". Washington Ave.,
.11. .1 Aug. n; within five h.....> ol
each other. Services in x. w York-
Rlvi i- de
czapko. Kolman, ;:. of 13* NE Itlai
si.. .11...I auk. it. Riverside.
FLEiSCHER, Miss I i. >... 40, of 1378
SW I-".tli St. Service* In New York.
Hi.ril..m
CREENWALD. Morris, S3. ..f 131 NK
32nd .-i. Clordon
Paul, Harry, 32, ..r I4u:.r, Risrayne
lllvd Services in Philadelphia. Gor-
don.
< ACKERMAN. Riidnl|>h I... (1, ..f 1071
I SW Itih Ter., died Auk. 15. Rlvei -
I Hide.
COVERMAN. Stmuel, 75, ..f 41". s\v
IHh si.. ,li.-,i AiiK. It! Service* In
1 Brooklyn. Riverside.
kopelman, Harry B., 70, of I860
X\Y I78rd si., riled Auk. -'". Services
in Providence, R.I, Riverside.
Rubin. Julius, 85, of 1390 Collins
Ave., .Ii.-.l A UK. IS. Riverside,
WEXLER. Anna. 78, ..I 1542 Jefferson
Ave. died Auk. 20. Riverside.
markowitz, Mrs. Fannie, i;7. of
I'i'lT Cnrlyle Ave. Newman.
; VICTOR, Mrs II. I. n. 70, ..f SH 8th
St, Services in White Plains. N.V.
Rlvi rslde,
COViN. Sarah, 72, of 985 79th Ter.,
died Aug, iv Uortlon.
BERCER. Dr. Michael M., >>". of 1777
Collins Ave. Services In Brooklyn.
Rlversld .
SIAVEWlTZ. Mrs. Anna Mary, 91. ..f
151 NK 32nd St. "Mr-flee* in Brook-
lyn Rlv< rside
GOOBICH, Meyer, 71, of H'SO XH
159th St., ill. il Aim. 13. Rlv< raid.
. FAJ&6.ER' William, 57, of 6881 Taml-
,'inii Canal ICil Uordon.
KRIEGER. I.,,ui.-. 83, ol 280 11*1 St..
Services In Cleveland. Newman.
MARCUS. Manning:, t :. of 72 Lenox
Ave. Newman
STEINBRECHER. Harry, 65, ol 2450
NW issnd Tei Blasbers
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Tubin Chapter
Card Social
Robyn Tubin Chapter. City of
Hope, will hold a luncheon and
card social on Tuesday noon at
the Hollywood Beach Hotel Ca-
bana Club.
Regular meeting of the group
is scheduled for Thursday, Sept.
12. at the First Federal Savings
and Loan Assn.. 125th St. and 9th
Ave.
P. J. Davis, 74
Passes Away
Phillip (P.J.' Davit, or 5600 Al-
ton Rd., died here Sunday, Aug.
18, at the age of 74.
Mr. Davis came to Miami 44
years ago. He was a receiver
for the U.S. District Court of
Miami.
A past president of the Miami
Beach Taxpayers Association,
he wa$ awarded the Civic
League of Miami Beach Outstand-
ing Citizens Plaque in 1953.
Mr. Davis was a 32nd degree
Mason and a member of Main
Shrine Temple He built the 79th
SI. Causeway.
Surviving are his wife. Ida S.;
three sisters and a brother.
Services were at Riverside Al-
len Rd. Chapel, with interment in
Woodlawn Park Mausoleum.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60098-C
IN RK: Estate of
ZACCHARIA CCRRY, a 1, a
SSACKARIAH CCRRY,
u k ii ZACCHARIAS CL'RRY,
I deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims ..i Demands Agalust Said
i:m,u. :
v..u are hereby notl'ted and re-
quired to present an- claims and de-
munds which v..ii ma) have against
ih. estate -f ZACCHARIA CCRRY,
g/k'a X.Al'KAISIAH I'l'KISY. a/lt/a
ZAtVHAIMAS Cl'RRT, deceased late
..I DADE County, Florida, to the
Count} Judges of Dade County, and
fill ii., same In duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.1(1, Ktorlda Stat-
utes, in their offices In the Count)
Courthouse In Dude County, Florida,
within six calendar months rrom iln
time "f Hi.- first publication hereof, or
Hi.- same il! be bai red.
Doted al Miiml, Florida, this 20th
da; of July, A.D. 196.1.
TERBSETA DE VEACX.
;. 1. a TERRY Cl'RRY DEVOE
As Executrix
" I.AI'I'K M. KAK.N i'..-
Attorni > fi Kxecuti i\
211 ";. In i... ; IMilX
M i' hi Id
v 2:1 :'.'. 8-13
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD CIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 63C 8992
MARIA ("'AMI'.'.
Plaintiff,,
vs.
MARIO I., i "'.Wil'i'.
I "I. n.li.nl.
SUIT FOR D VORCE
I i .: MARIO I.. I K'AMPt I
3036 l lomlnga su. el
Pasay ("ity.
Philippine Islands
v..ii, MAltm i.. OCAMPO are here-
i> notified that a BUI of ompla nl
(m Divorce has been filed agalnsi
you, an.I you are required t. serve a
copy <>f your Answer or Pleading I"
ih. i :u .if Complaint on the Plaintiffs
attorney, HOL ALEXANDER. One
Lincoln Road Building, Miami Beach,
Florida, and fil- the original Answer
..i Pleading in the office of th.' Clerk
..i the Circuit Conn .>n ..r before the
::ith das of September, 1863, If you
fall ( be lak.-n ..li.iitisi you for the r,-li-f
demanded In the Hill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four coneecutlve Weeks
in TIIK JEWISH KI.HKIDIAX.
DONE AND ORDERED ut Miami.
Florida, iliis '.'lsi da.i ..f August, A D.
i in;::.
E. Il L.EATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: DONALD TACT EX HAN
Deputy clerk
BOL ALEXANDER
i ui. Lincoln Road Building
Miami Beach, I ia.JE s-:.T>;i
v ::.-:.". 8-13
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Noted Author
Dead in Calif.
HOLLYWOOD Calif., (JTA)
Clifford Octets, famous American
Jewish playwright, considered one
of the foremost dramatists of his
era. died here this week, aged 57.
Mr. Odets came into promi-
nence during the 1930s through
YOUR
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FR 3-5581
Webmel/li^n
Honors Special
family Occasions
Your Welcome Wagon Hostess
will call with a basket of gifts...'
and friendly greetings from reli-
gious, civic, and business leaders
of our community when your
family celebrates a sixteenth
birthday, announces an engage-
ment or the birth of a new baby,
or moves to a new home.
When the occasion arises, phone
HI 8-4994
Dignified, beautiful and
reverently cared for
surroundings for our
departed loved ones are
a source of very real
comfort to all.
I M Vi1'.
M0 1-7693
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice la hereby given by the un-
lierslgned thai on September "*. I.""-
,\: ll a.m., :u Palm Motor* ami Ua-
race, 1450 Palm Avenue, Hluleah; th.-
Following car will be sold at auction
foi etoraite rharaen: II T IS3S 2-1.....r
Korii Ifalrlane ownel h> William R.
Oaken, I5SS !:. Brlckenrldae, |y>ulM-
\111.-. Kentucky', 1.1'. No. C50V18327J.
I .it-ii amounting to I1RS.0M.
I'AI.M MOTORS AVI' "'.AltA'ii:
H i 10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HKKKHY UIV'KN that
the underwlsned, dealrina to ensaae In
huelneee under the flctltloue it.int.. ..*
I'll'.l'.i: CLASS HI'ECIAI.TIKS :il 1": i
, N.W. 10th Avenue, Miami. Plorldn In-
tend i" register nal-
Clerk ..I the Circuit Court of Pade
i 'oum *. l- lorlda.
Ji ISE \ (IRTBOA
PEDRO PELAKZ
Sole nem
v 23-:in, i :-1 :
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 8904
MARY SISAN MM.I.Y.
Plaintiff,
\ -
i IIKSI.KY Hi i\\ VRI1 KKI.I.Y,
I i.i. 11 1,111'
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: i'HI'm.KY HOWARI" KKI.I.Y
I > ii ndanl
I'i.m i iiiir.' Hox :m
i Uanto, Si'
TOf ARE HKKEIIY StiTIPIKH I -
r Complaint for li\i-t-.'i- hae I
iii.il RKainal you, ami you are re-
quired in serve h cony ol your \
BWer or Pleading thereto "ii Plalntlffa
[Attorneye. SMITH \ M \M M.ll:
I'.sujs to" Lincoln Rt>ad, Miami Kt*ach
| xv. Florida, and file the original there-
; ui In the office of iln- Clerk of tin-
Circuit ''mill "ii or before the 23rd
da) of September, IMS: otherwise
judgment bj default will i"- taken
I against you for the relief demanded
in Bald Complaint.
DONE ANli ORDEREO, at Mlam
l lorlda, this 19th May of August, 196:
E. u. WEATHERMAN, Clerk
Circuit Court, l)ade County, Hi i i.i
I is. ah By: IX)NAU> TAfTENHAN
Deput) Clerk
S :-:. -i 8-1J
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY lilVKN that
the underalg ned, desiring to i
huslness undet the fictitious name of
i"i|.s by ati.as at I07U i:
si Hlaleah Intend^ lo i eg lr
n Ma with the Clerk of the Circuit
dI I '.nil i 'ounty. Florl h
CCR1.EY W I'l.Rli-ll
WH1TEACRE ,v Rt IIIIHNH
Attorney fi r Applicant
801 \V llltli St., Hialeuh
s'ja i'.-i::
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CHVEN that
the umli'isiKii.-ii. deBtrlni to engage In
buelneee undet the fictitious name ol
AI.M SPRINGS ANIMAL llllS-
1'lTAI. ai Hlaleah, Elnrlda Intend to
register said name \\:ili the i'l*'ik of
the Circuit Court ol Hade County,
I-:, rlda,
lHis. LOWRT AND i 'KAWnv. I'.a
By: llari-\ K. Lowry, President
Attest: .hunt's I-. Drawdy, Sfcretarj
RICHARD M. SKl'l.Ki:
Attorney f r
Ins. i.nuii ami Drawdy, P.A
, js-so, 'i i;-i::
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
N'l'TK'l-: is HEREBY GIVEN that
l the undersigned, desiring t>> engage In
business under the fictitious name of
I.KIMKK CITY SUPER M VRKET at
2M19 Klngman Rd., i. i-an City, Fla.,
Intend i.....glstei snlil name 'lth the
i'I.ik ..I the Circuil Court ol Duds
Count). i- iin ill.i
I'A VII I'.AI.I. ANTINK
UARGI KRITK I'.A 1.1.AN I'I N B
i > ne -
.1. DAVID I.IEBll W
Attorney for ni i h
S-13


Pttge 12-B
*. a^m <#' ftorMftM
Friday, August 23. 1983
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
men effective thru
I SUNDAY. AUGUST 25th
* ITEMS RELOVV
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
965
Washington Ave.,
MIAMI BEACH
FRESH CAUGHT
LAKE CARP
FRESH CAUGHT LAKE
WHITEFISH
FRESHLY SLICED
SALMON STEAKS
FRESH CUT GENUINE
FLOUNDER mm
19
59
89^
69;
BREAKSTONE'S
lb.
lb.
lb.
IT:
PINT
CONTAINER
LIMIT 1 PINT OF SOUR CREW. PLEASE, WITH 5.00 ORDER OR MORE
ROYAL 'R'
FOOD FAIR FLORIDA FRESH
GRADE
"A"
3
(SMALL)
DOZ.
EGGS
89c
PINEAPPLE juice
DIET SNAX
STREITS
12-OZ. BOX
RED CROSS
NAPKINS
WHITE
PAPER
3
PKGS
OF 8'
23
25
29
c
c
c
MERCHANTS GREEN
STAMPS FOR THE MOST
EXCITING SELECTION OF
VALUABLE GIFTS
PLUMP 4 JUICY CALIFORNIA
NECTARINES
LUSCIOUS & REFRESHING CALIFORNIA
RED GRAPES
VINE RIPENED PINK MEAT CALIFORNIA
CANTALOUPES each
IN OUR APPETIZER DEPARTMENT
FRESHLY SMOKED
CARP
TAILS
FANCY FAT
SCHMELTZ
HERRING
39
19
OR
[riiSrlZION
WfelK* VKSg&i
-
BROILERS 3
FANCY TRIMMED
FOR BRO....-JG
CHUCK
STEAK
59
C
LB.
MERCHANTS
GREEN STAMPS
25 EXTRA
With Purchase of Item Below
NECK MEAT or
BEEF CUBES
FRESH KOSHER MADE
GROUND
BEEF t
79
c
lb.
2 98
FIRST CUTS
Veal Chops 8
Veal Breast 3
Rib Chops 89
SHOULDER r %0\J
Veal Cutlets 89
Ik.
c
lb.
ZION BRAND
FRESH KILLED-KOSHER MADE
PULLETS, ROASTERS
or BROILERS ,EADY

iii


COMFORT AND SAFETY
PAGE 2-C
"dfewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, August 23, 1963
Section C
PRESIDENT'S DRUM
PAGE 5-C
' ..... ...,. ,, m
NATURAL BRICK WALL AND DECORATIVE CONCRETE PAMOS SET OFF MODERN EXTERIOR OF NEW 150 .JED JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME
150-Bed Jackson Manor Opens Doors Here

Progressive
Convalescence
In Our Time
By MRS. HELEN HOLT
Speciol Assistant for Nursing Homes
Federal Housing Administration
Washington, D. C.
The day may not be far off
hm nursing homes throughout
the United Slates will be con-
sidered as indispensable a part
"f community health facilities
s hospitals are today.
Fast disappearing are the
cluttered fire traps of former
days, the
d i e a r y ol.l
converted man-
sions and gen-
erally run-down
derelict hous-
ing, where the
old and the
sick were sup-
posed to wait
out their final
days in bleak,
cheerless and
u n c omfortable
surroundings.
Gone, too, is
the concept of
the nursing
home as a "last
refuge." New nursing homes of
today are being built specifical-
M$. HUtN
HOIT
With the words "The best of luck to you people at Jackson
Manor," U.S. Rep. Dante B. Fascell (second from left) officially
cuts the ribbon opening Jackson Manor to the public. At left
is Jackson Manor's Administrator Harold G. Huff, while at
right is Charles E. Gottlieb, president, looking on. Mrs. Helen
Holt, special assistant for Nursing Homes with the FHA in
Washington, D.C., who came to Miami for the opening of the
Home, holds the ribbon as Fascell cuts. Jackson Manor was
built under the FHA program Title 232.
Affiliations Show Quality
Continued on page 7-C
Dade County's newest resident
and convalescent homerecog-
nized locally, regionally and na-
tionallyis a member of num-
erous nursing home and medical
organizations.
Numbered among Jackson Man-
or's affiliations are both the
Dade County and State Board of
Health.
In addition, Jackson Manor is
a member of the South Florida
Hospital Council and the Florida
State Nursing Home Associa-
tion.
On the national level. Jackson
Manor is affiliated with the
American Nursing Home Asso-
ciation.
Memberships such as the-e.
further substantiate the home's
role as a responsible institution.
Nursing Home Launches
New Concept in Patient
And Resident Care Here
The most medically-advui c<: facility of its type or.da
Jackson Manor Nursing Home opened its doors ik
and in the process ushered in a new concept in pal < and
resident care.
Attending dedicatory ceremonies for the four-story. lftObed
Jackson Manor, located at N'W 8ih Ave. and 18th T<.. "-e a
number of local and national officials, as well as members of
the medical field.
"Jackson Manor is part of whrt will become tht greatest
medical center in the entire world the Jackson Memorial
Hospital complex." stated IS Hip. Dante B. Fascell. wikO key-
noted the opening.
Other dignitaries present at the formal opening included
William Wilcox, Miami director of the Federal Housil Admiav
istration, and Mrs. Helen F. Holt, a Washington special I -tant
for nursing homes with the FHA.
"It is a thrill to see this completed project.*" said Mrs, Holt.
Jackson Manor will insure the most important ol all things
that patients in nursing homes ;.el the finest possible caro."
Jackson Manor is unique among mirs'ng homes in its prox-
imity to a major hospital. The modern facility is loofcted two
blocks east of the Jackson Memorial Hospital complex, to the
vicinity of Cedars of Lebanon am' other institutions. .h in-
clude a blood bonk and the University of Miami Medical SchooL
Representing a pioneer step in patient attention. JacksoS]
Manor is the first institution to plan and develop a BMtJar facil-
ity designed for all phases of resident care.
Its physkal-therapy room maintains a full-time physical
therapist a milestone in South Florida nursing ho. -
All room-, at the home are either private or semi-private,
another advancement which stamps Jackson Manor ;:s the onkf
Continued on P;ci 1 C


Page 2-C
fJewisli Fk>ridlii&n
day. August 23, 1%
All patient rooms at Jackson Manor nre either private or semi-
private blending considerations of comfort and safety to
create a pleasant environment. All rooms are centrally air-
conditioned and heated, with fingertip patient controls. The
rooms are carefully color coordinated, with special cove
lighting to eliminate overhead glare. Each resident has his
or her own closet and drepser. Easy chairs, paintings and
other modem accessories offer the utmost in convenience.
Shown above is a typical semi-private room.
New Concept in Care
Continued from Page 1-C
nursing home in Dado County to eliminate wards and thus allow-
more comfortable attendant conditions.
As a member of the South Florida Hospital Council. Jack-
son Manor is the first nursing homo to be affiliated with this
organization.
Also numbered among its "firsts" is Jackson Manor's Family
Relations Counselor, and a beautiful, non-denominational chapel
Fully approved under Federal Housing Administration Bill
232. Jackson Manor lists many attributes which have combined
to make it the best possible patient and resident home.
Charles E. Gottlieb, who spent two years intensively
researching nursing homes all over the country, is president of
Jackson Manor.
Air-conditioned and heated throughout. Jackson Manor is
:i "doctor-Oriented" facility, complying strictly to medical stan-
dards.
"In discussions with people in the medical profession, we
have extracted numerous suggestions and put them into effect,"
Gottlieb added. "One of these is to work as closely as possible
with attending physicians.
"For this reason, we are maintaining medical records of
every patient." he added. 'Additional accommodations as sug-
gested by medical authorities include an examining room and
a doctor's conference room. This allows for quicker and more
thorough physcian attention here and greatly eliminates the
time-consuming necessity of transporting a patient to a hos-
pital for examination there."
Built according to FHA specifications at a cost exceeding
$1,000,000, Jackson Manor has three patient floors.
Features on each floor include a central nursing station
which is connected to each room by a unique audio-visual com-
munication system; a dining and recreation area, and rooms
which have been specifically designed for maximum safety,
comfort and appearance.
High-low beds, adjustable to various reclining positions, are
used exclusively. Pleasant color combinations, semi-private
lavatories and modern furnishings serve to add warmth to
each patient room.
Among the other facilities at the home, which employs
approximately 95 persons, are a visitors' apartment, patient
laundry room, modern kitchen, employees' dining room, spa-
cious lobb>. and a richly-cultivated garden area for relaxation
and recreation.
Elevators connect all of the floors, and Jackson Manor is
tiie first nursing home in South Florida to maintain separate
barber, beauty and podiatrist facilities.
Ample parking around the building is another convenience
to visitors and physicians.
Rooms Feature Comfort and Safety
As Prime Consideration for Patient
Man$ ingredients have gone
Into the design and planning of
patient."' rooms at Jacks n Man-
orall of which combine to of-
fer residents the utmost in com-
fort, safety and privacy.
Centrally air-conditioned and
heated, with individual tempera-
ture regulators, rooms in the
150-bed facility are either semi-
private or private.
Complete color coordination
is reflected in the matching
drapes and bedspreads, as well
as the pleasant pastel shadings
for walls and ceiling. Each
room (except for private
rooms) contains two high-low
beds, which can be adjusted to
various reclining levels.
To eliminate glare of over-
head illumination, cove lighting
is used in each room, as it is
throughout the four-story home.
The semi-private roomslocat-
ed on the second, third and
fourth floorseach have two
dressers, two side chairs, two
large closets, wall paintings,
easy chair and window shades.
Each has its own private bath-
room.
"We've tried to make each
room as warm and friendly as
possible," explained Harold G.
Huff, administrator. "Wards
have been eliminated through
usage of private and semi-private
rooms exclusivelycreating bet-
ter working conditions and in-
creased resident satisfaction."


Top Decorator
Handled Home
Interior Design
The nation's third largest dec-
orator of hospital facilities
handled the entire interior de-
sign of Jackson Manor Nursing
Home.
Will-Ross, Inc., of Milwaukee,
planned all of the color com-
binations and design coordina-
tions of the home. Youthful
Mary Ann Rapp, chief designer
for the 49-year-old firm, super-
vised the aesthetic arrange-
ments.
With branches from coast-to-
coast, Will-Ross is a nationwide
leader in the development of fur-
niture for the aging. Specially-
designed chairs in Jackson Man-
or were formulated by this com-
panychairs which do not look
institutional but are still func-
tional.
The Jackson Manor assign-
ment was the first Florida pro-
ject for Will-Ross.
Wmcc a
i nee
yam serving the
as of oUaac K-^oitntu
We are proud that JACKSON MANOR
selected Associated Elevators to contribute
to Florida's finest nursing home facility

Associated Elevator Co.
A Division of Transitubes Electronics, Inc.
1400 N.E. 131st STREET NORTH MIAMI
Phone PL 1-5628
Shown above, a beautifully-furnished private room at Jackson]
Manor. The home features only private and semi-private
patient accommodations.
Centrally Located Nursing
Station in 24 -Hr. Service
A centrally-located nursing
station on each of three patient
floors at Jackson Manor Offers
residents constant 21-hour ser-
vice.
The three stations are connect-
ed to all of the rooms in the
four-story home by an unusual
audio-visual intercommunication
system.
Each station is situated be-
tween the two wings of the
L-shaped floors. This gives
nurses on duty the best poss-
ible vantage point to all of the
patient rooms.
Mrs. Kathryn Fitzpatrick, di-
rector of nui;.cs at Jackson
Manor, will supervise activity at
the stations.
Immediately adjacent to the
nursing stations are rooms which
contain both linen and medicin-
al supplies. If, for example, a
nurse is requested by a patient,
she lick access to wha
ever may need t> fulfill il
sen ( t all.
"Th< stations excellently me
the needs of expedience an
rapidity of communication
said Mr-. Fitzpatrick. a veten|
hospital and home n u i
"Ar the deck rcg
nurses assure the maximu
ani". I efficiency and -ecu
Ity."
A LOT OF BRICKS
There are 19.472 bricks
in the main front wall of
t .- c modern, four-story
Jackson Manor Nursing
Home, and 4.128 ornament-
al C< ncrete blocks in tiers
around the building.
We are proud to have played a
part in the erection of
Dade County's newest nursing home.
Center Chemical Company
5410 N.W. 37th Avenue
NE 4-9778
Miami
A fine new facility for
the people of South Florida.
Congratulations from
Big Chief, Inc.
400 N.W. 27th Avenue Ft. Lauderdale
Phone 945-6891


Friday, August 23. 1383
+J&*lsti Fk>ridr/&ri
Page 3-C
Physic Therapy Room
Has M6st Advanced
Equipment in Florida
Oik of the in. j need a
rooms in I entire state is an in
Nursing i cornph .
Locatecj on the tit -1 floor, the
to ofier Jackson Mai.oi residents
a wide variety of needi,
A fulJ ume phy.-io-therapy
technician will be available, to
aid residents in use of the equip-
ment, which has been it .-signed
specifically for rehabilitation and
rxercise.
We have consulted many
people in the medical profession
concerning what should be in-
cluded i: our physical therapy
room," -aid Charles E. Gottlieb.
president.
'This facility is a basic, yet
vital, part ol" our Home," he add-
ed "I expect that almost all of
the resident! and convalescing
patients will use this room.
Among the exerci.-e and phy-
sical treatment accommodations
of the room are an assortment
<'i baths I' nibseach adapted
for specifii uses.
"Some ;-. tienta will require
physical therapy for certain
parts ol th< body, ami some will
require treatment fr others."
continued Gottlieb. "For this
reason, n i .; bathseach design-
ed for dif:erenl purposesare
a\ ailabli
Dd best equipped physical therapy
tegral part of the Jackson Manor
room has been carefully designed
complete physical treatments for
Included are arm baths, leg
baths, full-submersion tubs and
a sitz-bath.
An ultra-sonic machine, which
operates on electric impulses,
will be used for muscle tissue
exercising.
Similarly, a hydrocollator em-
ploys hot wet packs to various
parts of the body.
Many exercise facilities are
present alsoincluding dumbells
for hand and arm strengthening.
Triplex wall pulleys for arm and
back muscle development, exer-
cise mats and an electric treat-
ment table.
"Two factors guided our plan
ning for the physical therapy
room: competence and complete-
ness." Gottlieb explained. "Un-
der the watchful instruction of
our technician, combined with
the carelully-engineered mach-
inery and healthful program of
exercises, Jackson Manor offers
patients what we believe to be
the most modern psysio-ther.ipy
room in Florida."
Veteran Hospital Administrator
Takes on Challenging Role
Harold I
South Fktt
is admini
Manor Nur
The 42-
spent five
llo-pita) in
charge ol
operation o
facilitj
"Jackson
.. Huff, i veteran
.ca hospital director.
-ator ot Jackson
-.rig Home
> ear-old Huff. who
years at Holy Cross
Ft, Lauderdale, is in
ft )1 coordination and
1 the modern l.iO-bed
Manor will maintain
HM010 6. HVn
tiministruttr
a close association with physic-
ians and medical authorities,"
Huff declared. "A complete
medical history will be kept on
all patients in conjunction with
the records of their personal
ph.vsi.cian."
Huff spent six months at Pal-
metto Nursing Home, and in
that period successfully super-
vised a substantial increase in
patients.
A bronze star recipient in
World War II. Huff has been con-
nected with the Medical Supply
Company of Miami and Servel,
Inc., of Evansville, Ind. His ten-
ure with the former gave Huff a
in all fields of medicineinclud-
ing physicians, supply manufac-
turer.-, and distributor represen-
tative-..
In his five years at Holy Cross
Hospital, the hospital increased
its bed capacity from 50 to 225.
He joined the hospital when it
was formed in 1955, and led var-
ious fund-raising campaigns in
cooperation with the Women's
Auxiliary.
A resident of Miami for 10
years, Huff is married and has
three children. He lives at 155
NW 192nd St.
The physical therapy room at Jackson Manor
is the most modern and extensive in Florida.
Here, one of the physical therapy technicians
is shown with some of the equipment contain-
ed in this exercise and rehabilitation studio.
Numbered among the facilities of the physical
therapy room, in addition to specially-planned
exercise and muscle building schedules, are a
wide variety of baths, muscle treatment ma-
chines, weights, arm pulleys and an electric
treatment table. Individual walkers and
parallel bars are used for additional exercises.
Separate Dining and Recreation Areas
Typical of the attention and
planning given to all segments
of Jackson Manor are the three
separate dining and recreation
areas.
Located on floors two, three
and four, the large facilities
serve both as a place of enjoy-
ment and relaxation, as well as
dining.
"Of prime concern when we
outlined construction of the
home was where the dining and
recreation areas should be sit-
uated," explained Harold G.
Huff, administrator, "We rul-
ed out having a cafeteria on any-
one floor, because this would in-
convenience residents of the
other two floors.
"Instead, we decided to have
separate dining areas on each
flooroffering equal accommo-
dations for all three."
But more than this. Jackson
Manor principals wanted to in-
still color and warmth to the
dining areas.
"For this reason, we combin-
ed both recreation and dining
into one general location on
each floor." Huff said 'Each
is completely separate of the
other, with one large room serv-
ing both purposes."
The recreation section has a
television, reading room, lounge
and game tables lor checkers,
chess, cards, and others. Across
from it. the spacious dining area
comfortably seats 50, the capac-
ity of each patient floor.
"A casual atmosphere is im-
portant when dining," according
to Charles E. Gottlieb, president.
'By making the food area as
non-institutional as possible, I
believe we have created the
proper relaxed conditions."
Located on each patient floor is a combined dining-recreation
area, offering residents separate facilities for meals and relax-
ation. The dining portion of the room comfortably seats 50,
the capacity of each patient floor. The recreation area has a
television, reading room lounge, and game table.
A rew concept in
^OTAL patient care.
Harold G. Jaffer. Inc.
2141 S.W. 3rd Street Miami
Phone FR 1-1496
IAWN SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
Kislak Helped
Make Mortgage
J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corpora-
tion of Florida, through the First
National Bank of Miami, nego-
tiated mortgage arrangements
for Jackson Manor Nursing
HoTge. a *
"tta were very happy to handle
arYSriglments'for sucTi a fine in-
stitution as Jackson Manor,"
commented Jay Kislak, presi-
dent. "This is_one of the most
domjWte' and competent nursing
homes I have ever seen, and I
am certain it will make a worthy
addition to our community."
The Kislak Mortgage Corp. is
one of the largest in the South-
eastern United States.
It has handled a number of
nursing home negotiations in the
jWSt, tfltteT FHX title 232.
Landscapers of the
Patient Gardens at
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME.
North Dade Nursery
14231 N.E. 2nd Street
PL 9-0018
Miami
Best wishes on the completion of
JACKSON MANOR foURSING HOME.
Richard Waterproofing
Service/ Inc.
7901 S.W. 53rd Court
Miami & MO 1-2413
"Our 40th year serving Dade County"
4


Page 4-C
vJewist noridllan
Friday. August 23. 1963
...:i' a,t*i li..'. .ii ~ ivm '........ i." """ "" .....'i. "'"' i "''"


-
Mrs. Matilda Brenner (left), consultant dieti-
tian, and Miss Annie May Carey, food man-
ager, discuss meal preparations in the mod-
ern and sanitary kitchen at Jackson Manor.
The kitchen is designed to serve in excess
of the 150-resident capacity of the home,
assuring complete and carefully-prepared
menus. Stainless steel equipment, includ-
ing special pressure cookers for rapid and
easy food preparation, is utilized.
1


Jackson Manor Family Relations Counselor
Addin } to its firm policy of
; the best possible per-
f nal attention for residents,
C Manor Nursing Home
is 0 >eMM a Florida pioneer in
aintaioing a full-time "Family
la .- Counselor."
importance of a person
.i> serves as a liaison between
lysic ins, family, relatives and
. sidents cannot be over em-
lasized," declared Harold G.
- iff. .'ue'eson Manor administra-
-
Mrs. Alice Kent, a Registered
ITs has been selected for
-.tion.
A graduate oi the School of
' irsi ; Of Beth Israel Hospital
Bflwtan, Mrs. Kent is a mem-
ber of the Florida State Nurses
AssoniattMl and the Massa-
i lusetts State Nurses Associa-
ton
Mrs. Kent has previously been
- surgical nurse, private duty
.r-,.?. and has served as an
estttetist at Mercy Hospital.
MK. AUCt KINT
full-Tim*
Mrs. Kent is also an active mem-
ber of the Board for Rehabilita-
tion of returned patients from
state and local hospitals.
Her varied responsibilities be
gin when she visits the patient
prior to arrival at Jackson Man-
or. She welcomes them and
makes certain they become sat-
isfactorily adjusted to their new
environment.
"In offering each resident SI
much a home life as is possible,
the family relations counselor
must coordinate many different
phases of activity at Jackson
Manor." Hulf added
To keep everyone abreast of
the latest occurrences at Jack-
son Manor, Mrs. Kent also is in
charge of publishing a periodic
newsletter to the families of
patients.
Administrative Resident Keene
Is Tint' for Florida Homes
La D Keene,
George Washington
31 year-old
University
Lit D. XKNf
Sfvrfeal Mtmkt
graduate, has become Florida's
first nursing home administra-
tive resident and is presently do-
ing his residency at Jackson
Manor.
Keene is a former business
supervisor for Wise Memorial
Hospital in Wise. Va. The Uni-
versity of Tennessee graduate
recently completed a course of
study at George Washington in
nursing home administration.
He was chosen by GWU offic-
ials to serve as administrative
residency at Jackson Manor un-
der the direction of Harold Huff,
administrator.
An Air Force veteran, Keene
is a member of the American
Hosptial Association and a stu-
dent member of the American
College of Hospital Administra-
tors. He is married and has two
children. J.
A great need has been filled
for all Dade County.
We are proud to have contributed.
Contractors, Inc.
101 N.W. 176th Drive Miami
Phone NA 4-3651
Ultra-Modern Kitchen
Assures Scientific Diet
For Jackson Residents
The most modern approach to food preparation, with heavy
stress on sanitation and convenience, keynotes Jackson Manor's
kitchen operation.
Spacious and immaculate, the kitchen is designed to serve
more residents than normally occupy the building, eliminating
any problems created by cramped conditions.
Jackson Manor President Charles Gottlieb, former execu-
tive vice president of Stevens Markets, will utilize his long-time
food experience to insure the highest quality food operation at
the 150-bed nursing home.
The kitchen walls and floor are in easy-to-maintain ceramic
tile. The kitchen is also outfitted with stainless steel equip-
ment. This includes a number of special pressure cookers
which facilitate the preparation of large amounts of food in a
matter of minutes.
All food coming into the kitchen is carefully selected before
hand under scrutiny oi a highly-trained food manager who
supervises the overall kitchen program.
A registered dietitian plans nutritionally-balanced menus
to assure that physicians' directives in this regard are carried
out to the letter. Individualized diets are also prepared when
required.
In addition, special menus are developed for holidays, birth-
days and other special occasions.
Food trays are transported on heated carts from the kit
chen to three separate dining rooms, one of which is located
on each of the patient doors In addition, there is an employees'
dining room which is situated on the first floor.
These carts have separate "hot" and "cold" compartments
to insure that all food is kept at the proper temperature until
it is served.
An "instant" garbage disposal system has been installed,
with a series of outlets located at various key spots. This inno-
vation offers the twin advantages of eliminating the necessity
of collection of such material and, at the same time, provides
for its speedy removal and consequently improves the sanitary
atmosphere.
Other equipment in use at the kitchen includes walk-in
freezer, refrigerator, ranges, coolers, dish and pot washers.
c/Vo# Just another bitilJincj ...
More than another medical facility .
JACKSON MANOR represents three years
of planning the culmination of combined research,
.thorough analysis the product of a vital need.
What has been omitted at
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME?
Only the ordinary!
^Srtorri* Jjurlt
Burk Construction Company
12777 N.E. 14th AVENUE
NORTH MIAMI
PHona Pt 4-2676


Friday, August 23. 1963
*Jenist> fkrt/nr
Page 5-C
Tenacity of Charles Gottlieb Brought New
Nursing Home to Fruition in South Florida
CHARUS f. GOTTllfB
President
Self-Service Laundry Featured
To allow residents as much
freedom of movement and activ-
ity as possible, a self-service
laundry room is available at
Jackson Manor Nursing Home
The room contains automatic
washen and doers, and is open
throughout the day.
Many ambulatory residents
like to assume some of the
chores they normally would at
home," said Harold G. Hull, ad-
ministrator. "For those who are
able to. the self service laundry
room will offer them this con-
venienceanother way in which
we are trying to create a typi-
cal institution atmosphere.
Then, too, many patients may
have personal clothing that they
themselves will want to laun-
der." Huff added
In addition to the self-service
laundry facilities, regular laun-
dry pickups and deliveries are
in effect
The personal interest, ability
and tenacity of Charles E. Gott-
lieb has been the potent force
in the founding of Jackson
Manor Nursing Home.
Since the project was conceiv-
ed two years ago, Gottlieb, as
president, has exercised finger-
tip control in every phase of
planning, construction and oper-
ation of the new facility.
His 17-year background as a
Miami building contractor, busi-
nessman, real estate developer
and civic leader proved inval-
uable, enabling him to counsel
with many friends in the medi-
cal profession about the nursing
home picture in Dade County.
They convinced me and my
associates of the real need in
our community for a good nurs-
ing home." he said. "Through-
out our overall elfort, their ad-
viee and guidance has been in-
estimable."
Gottlieb, former executive vice
president ol Stevens Markets.
Inc., determined at the outset
that first-hand knowledge is es-
sential in planning a modern
medical facility.
"I visited nursing homes all
Over the country." Gottlieb re-
called, "including some of Amer-
ica's finest and best administer-
ed in Baltimore. Washington.
New York. Cincinnati and Chi-
cago.
"It took time and effort, but
the rewards made it more than
worthwhile."
This research enabled Gott-
lieb to incorporate the best fea-
tures of the nation's top nursing
homes into Jackson Manor's
quality operation.
"In addition," he emphasized,
"we have developed many in-
novations of our own. This mod
ern facility is one that will con-
tribute substantially to the bet-
terment of our community."
One of the new concepts stem-
ming from Gottlieb's efforts is
the creation of a "doctor-orient-
ed" policy for Jackson Manor.
Under it. complete medical his-
tories are kept on all patients
admitted, in conjunction with
records of their personal phy-
sician, strengthened by the psy-
chological support of the Fam-
ily Relations Counselor.
"This is a tremendous help to
our well-trained staff in many
areas," Gottlieb said. "For ex-
ample, our registered nurses can
carefully follow the physician's
orders for medication, using up-
to-date, accurate procedures
much the same as any well-or-
ganized hospital."
Gottlieb, an active member of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and a member of Beth
David Congregation, is a native
of Asheville. N.C. He attended
Roosevelt High School in Wash-
ington, D.C.. and the University
of Maryland, where he received
a Bachelor of Science degree in
mechanical engineering.
He served with the Navy in
the Pacific during World War II
Gottlieb was married in 1948 and1
lives with his wife. Bernice, and
their three children. Jay 12,
Laurie 10, and Joan 8. at 2920
Alatka St.
ANOTHER JACKSON INNOVATION
A Furnished Guest Bedroom
A fully-furnished guest bedrom is another innovation at Jackson
Manor. The room will be used for families, friends or nurses who
accompany newly-admitted patients and wish to stay at the home
for short periods.
Accommodations include a convertible sofa. desk, lounge chair
and closets.
Artist's Work is Exhibited
Supervisor and creator of all
artistic works at Jackson Manor
Nursing Home is Edward D.
Wilkins, HI. a former Miami art
instructor.
More than 30 paintings, vary
ing in technique, were executed
by Wilkins, who also acted as a
consultant in the selection of
other works of art.
The "d'wilkins III" signature
ha> appeared on scores of paint
ings since the William and Mary
College graduate moved to Mi-
ami six years ago. In addition,
Wilkins spent two years in the
Orient, enriching his varied
style, which ranges from im-
pressionistic modern to classical
painting.- in the Renaissance
manner.
His works at Jackson Manor
include oil paintings, water col-
ors, sketches, scratch board, oil
paintings on wood putty board,
and works done with plastic
paints.
Spacious lobby at Jackson Manor highlights
pleasant color combinations, modern furniture,
wall-to-wall carpeting and an attractive in-
terior garden. Shades of brown, green and
yellow are utilized to create a serene atmos-
phere. Wall decorations include classic paint-
ings, as well as decorative tapestries. To the
left of the lobby are the chapel and doctor's
conference room, while on the right are ad-
ministrative offices.
*S*Ltting tftc ^Aten of Vision
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME
An Institution of which ALL South Florida can be Proud.
IRANI AND ASSOCIATES
PAN AMERICAN BANK BUILDING
PHONE: FR 9-7987



*JenisJh BhekRam
Friday. August 23, 1963
Jackson Manor Chapel Will Meet
Spiritual Needs of All Residents
KHT5. XATHBYN HTZMTWCK
Nursing Supervisor
Beauty, Barber
Shops Available
. the modern accommo-
a i Eor complete resident and
a 't.venience at Jackson
I iai sing Home are a spec-
tL .".t'd barber shop, beau-
v H podiatrist ollice.
V- sarate facilities, an in-
ovatii among Soulli Florida
ursi homes, will offer ser-
ice- to all resident.-. Each
located on a different
:!oor y. the four-story building.
tire goal at Jackson
lar.or i> to create an atmos-
"herc that will provide all daily
ecessities for residents," corn-
ier..'*: Charles E. Gottlieb,
resident, "This particular con-
( that Of separate barber.
eat', and podiatrist rooms
flee- a convenience never be-
>r as ituted in South Florida
u -.;:i homes."
PHILIP COLIMAN
Secretory-Treasurer
Meeting the spiritual need.- o!
residential facility.
That reasoning prompted pit
a modern, non-sectarian chapel a
Nursing Chief
Knows Field
A former Dade County Public
Health Department nurse, with
more than 20 years of hospital,
nursing home and overseas ex-
perience, is director of nurses at
Jackson Manor.
Mrs. Kathryn Fitzpatrick, a
registered nurse previously asso-
ciated with Eastern Air Lines
and Palmetto Convalescent
Home, will supervise nursing
procedures at the 150-bed Jack-
son Manor complex.
A native of Pennsylvania and
a Miami resident for 14 years.
Mrs. Fitzpatrick served as an
Army Nurse Corps first lieuten-
ant in Europe for three years
during World War II.
Well-known throughout t h e
community. Mrs. Fitzpatrick is
a member of the district and
state Nursing Association, Amer-
ican Nursing Association, and
American Red Cross. She is a
University of Pennsylvania nurs-
ing education major, and train-
ed at Philadelphia General Hos-
pital for three years.
UM Graduate
Heads Finance
its patients is essential to any large
iners of Jackson Manor to include
part of its overall operation.
It also adds to the unique-
ness of the nursing home, mak-
ing it the first in Dade County
with its own chapel.
"I earnestly believe that, in
providing for the physical com-
fort and well being of our resi-
dents, we must not overlook the
spiritual aspects." said Charles
E. Gottlieb, president.
"And thus, in providing this
chapel, we are fulfilling one of
our most important obliga-
tions."
The chapel, with a seating
capacity of 30 to 35, is located
just off the main entrance lob-
by.
Its decor is highlighted by
paneled walls of teak. Another
features four stained glass pan-
els with fluorescent back-light-
ing. This creates an illusion of
outside lighting and enhances
the chapel's inspirational at-
mosphere.
Wall-to-wall carpeting adds
warmth to the room and special
altars have been provided for
each of the major faiths.
The chapel will be in regular
weekly operation starting Aug.
30 with Jewish services. Pro-
testant services, to be held each
Sunday, will commerce Sept. 1
under auspices of the Greater
Miami Council of Churches.
Masses for Catholic residents
have also been scheduled.
Regular religious services for denominations of all faiths will
be held at the chapel in Jackson Manor the first nursing
home in Dade County to offer such an accommodation. Four
stained glass panels with fluorescent back-lighting create an
inspirational effect. Seating capacity of the chapel is 30 to 35,
and the room is tastefully designed with wall-to-wall carpet-
ing and paneled walls of teak.
Prominent Hospital Design
Specialists Served as Engineers
Aspee Irani and Associates,
specialists in designing hospitals
and other medical facilities,
served as engineer and archi-
tect for Jackson Manor Nursing
Home.
The firm, which has been in
operation for only three years,
nevertheless lists a wealth ol
experience in the architectural
and engineering phases of many
Dade County medical buildings.
Among those designed by
Aspee Irani are the Pan Amer-
ican Hospital in Miami, the
Faith Osteopathic Hospital in
Miami, the Hope School for Men-
tally Retarded Children in Mi-
ami, and the Lehigh Acres Nurs-
ing Home
Builder and contractor for
Jackson Manor was Burk Build-
ers, Inc.
Formerly of Nashville, Tenn.,
Burk Builders have contracted a
wide variety of projects in South
Florida during the company's
16 years of operation. Among
them are the Hollywood Post
Office, Temple Beth El in Hol-
lywood. Temple Beth Sholom ot
Miami Beach, Holmes Elemen-
tary' School in Miami, and the
Terrace Towers Apartments of
Miami.
A University of Miami grad-
uate with degrees in accounting
and biology is secretary-treasur-
er of Jackson Manor.
Thirty-year-old Philip Coleman,
president and general manager
of Palms Memorial Park, has
been associated with the Home
since its inception more than
two years ago. He supervised
selection of all interior decora-
tions of the new facility in con-
junction with Mary Ann Rapp of
the Will-Ross company.
"We are quite proud of the
appearance -of our Home." Cole-
man said, "but we are even
more proud of our trained per-
sonnel who will give Jackson
Manor real meaning."
Coleman attended Riverside
Military Academy and Miami
Senior High School before re- n.
ceiving his BBA degree from the discussing present and future plans for Jack- treasurer; Lee D. Keene, adm
university.
Coleman also belongs to the
Elks Club, Florida Turf Grass
Association, YMCA, and is a
member of Temple Beth Am.
The Jackson Manor secretary-
treasurer and his wife, Barbara,
live in Kendall with their two
young sons, H. Charles "Chuck"
Coleman 2, and John, 6 mos.
.n
son Manor are the modern home's principals, dent; Harold G. Huff, admii
Left to right are Philip Coleman, secretary- Charles E. Gottlieb, president.
istrative resi-
istrator; and
We offer our congratulations to
JACKSON MANOR .
Cade County's newest nursing home!
Yale Ogron Manufacturing
Co., Inc.
671 West 18th Street
Hialeah, Florida V<
Cl
ctvinci
ew
tfte
<
wet
V
for
ret in
Dade County nursing homes.
Curcie Brothers, Inc.
West Hafiandale Beach Blvd. Hallandale, Florida
Phone Wl 5-5932
paVing contractors


Friday, August 23. 1963
fJkwisl fhiradHairi
Pcce 7-C
ACCENTUATES FLORIDA ATMOSPHERE
Nursing Home Has Lovely
Gardens to Cheer Patients
Located in a part of the world famous for its climate presents an
added advantage to residents of Ji.ti.-i:. ".;..nor.
It takes the form of a beautifully-landscaped garden which spans
irge area in trout of the building.
Designed t" permit patients
and visilois alike to enjoy South
Florida's beneticial fresh air
and sunshine, the garden, with
its neatly trimmed surrounding
hedge, feature* an arboreal bo- fa~iling'"cocon i or
oanza ol trees, palms and shrub-
bery.
interlacing the lush green
turf are numerous walkways
and shaded benches where resi-
dents can meet, pause and con-
\erse about topics of the day.
len-free as possible. And cuco
nut palms and avocado tree.'
were lift out to eliminate the
pi lillty of injury caused b}
The garden features an array
of colorsfrom luxuriant hlbls
cus plants with blooms of vary
ing p.istel shades to the bril-
liant red blooms of the ixora.
Many of attendant activities between residents Manor's regular staff nurses, is show
ANo contributing heavily to and nurses originate from three centrally- station, which is connected to each KK
Shuffleboard courts and other the natural beauty are stately located nursing stations on each of the patient a modern audio-visual intercommur.
outdoor rccreat.onal facilities umbrella trees, allamandas, ara- floors. Mrs. Esther Hoffman, one of Jackson system
St the
m by
cctior.
ire also available.
The scores of trees, palms and
-lirubs which adorn the garden
were carefully selectedfrom
the standpoint of health and
safety.
For example, trees were chos-
en on the basis of being as pol-
Dietitian Has
Many Years
Of Experience
Mrs, Matilda R. Brenner,
whose experience in the hospital
and nursing home profession in-
cludes positions at Mt. Sinai ll<>s
pital. North Shore Hospital, and
Osteopathic General Hospital in
Miami, is consultant dietitian at
Jackson Manor.
A former Army dietitian in
the Medical Corps, Mrs. Brenner
will be in charge of planning of
meals for residents of Jackson
Manor in accordance with spec-
ific health and medical recom-
mendations.
She will also arrange diets for
patients requiring special foods
as directed by personal physic-
ians.
Mrs. Brenner, a foods and nu-
trition graduate of New York
University, is a member of the
American Dietetic Association
as well as the Florida and Miami
organization.
Assisting Mrs. Brenner will
he Miss Annie Kate Carey, who
as employed as a high school
lunch manager for 15 years. In
1957, she became director of the
dietary department at Christian
Memorial Hospital and also serv-
ed a year with Palmetto Con-
valescent Home.
lias, silver button woods, sea-
grapes, crotons, and a variety of
palms including cabbage, swamp.
Christmas and MacArthur. The
landscaping was installed under
the supervision of J. D. Greer,
one of Miami's well-known nur-
serj men.
Progressive Convalescence Today
MBS. MATILDA K. BRlNNtK
Consultant Dietitian
Continued from Page 1-C
ly for the care of the sick and
the elderly, and are complex and
highly efficient operations. They
are modem in design, often sit-
uated on sprawling green acre-
age, and the current-day version
is bright, colorful and appealing
both inside and outside.
Nursing homes in the Sixties
are acquiring new dignity and
stability, which make them more
attractive to an ever increasing
number of prospective patients.
Kxcellent facilities and skilled
care performed in attractive sur-
roundings contribute to the pat-
ients' sense of well-being.
Anxieties are lessened, and
many patients respond with bet-
ter health, increased vitality and
a desire to be participants in
life rather than onlookers.
One widespread misconception
about nursing homes is the idea
that the patient who enters is
beginning a long and tedious
stay. This is not the correct
picture for a modern facility.
A recent study shows that al-
most half the nursing homes
(/.ulj.Niiu Manor hurting Home
was built under Federal Hoiui'ng Ad-
ministration Title 2 32 a section of
the Housing Act of 1959 which aw
thonzes tint FHA to insure mort-
. I'M qualified proprietary nur\-
me homes. The FHA nursing home
program is aimed at providing nurs-
ing homes which arc economically
.. id structurally adequate for
the safely ami proper care of occu-
pants (.:,'>i,i Manor complies with
all the rigid stipulations under /rHA
Title 232. Herewith u the idt
and concept involved, at teen />-. Mr,.
Hul,-. iii present day trends and phil-
nsophies of patient and resident
..... )
patients remain in a nursing
home less than 30 days. Post-
operative convalescent patients
accounted largely for this short-
stay group.
In only 11 per cent of the
cases do the patients stay for
over one year.
Assisted in great measure by
the new FHA program, there
has been a rapid development
of the nursing home : . past few years as f- ; -irable
place not only for tht care but
for the rehabilitation .1 pat-
ients.
Today, some 500,00 I this
country's older citizt-r- live in
nursing homes. Prr.pt. care for
these people present- a growing
challenge and emphasizes the
increasing need for gc I r.irsing
home facilities.
As America's older pulation
continues to increase..-.! .-ome
experts estimate that by 1980
the number of Americans 65
years of age or older could well
exceed 11 per cent ol the total
populationit is only logical to
expect a corresponding ..icrease
in the chronically ill.
The American Medical Asso-
ciation phrases the necessity for
belter nursing homes as "the
most urgent health care need be-
fore the nation today." and only
a "strong program" Of nursing
home construction car iJeviate
the pressure.
Shower-Tub Safe for Invalids
A fear normally accompany-
ing advanced age is that of step-
ping into a bathtub.
Jackson Manor has taken pro-
visions to eliminate their fear.
For residents who are afraid
ol tubs, or for those unable to
bathe under their own power,
novel baths arc in use at Jack-
sun Manor.
The bath enables a patient to
shower himself while in a sit-
ting position. For invalid-type
patients, the tub is designed so
that he or she may be removed
from a stretcher into the tub
and shower or bathe while in a
horizontal position.
President Charles E. Gottlieb
stated these are the only tubs of
this kind in Florida.
. LUc arc proud to nave plaited
1 role iit tnc construction of
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME.
Kammer and Wood, Inc.
297 N.W. 54* STREET
Phone PL 1-3621
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
MIAMI
Recognizing a need .
Fulfilling a service
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME!
Dade Plumbing, Inc.
375 N.W. 24th Street Miami
NE 4-9778
Congratulations to
JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME
on the establishment of Dade
County's most modern nursing Home.
Architectural Hardware, Inc.
70 N.E. 40th Street
Phone 754-6664 Miami


Page 8-C
T'.Jenisti fhridiSain
Friday, August 23, 1963
for those who seek a nursing home
that offers complete care... and more...
JACKSON MANOR
Jackson Manor is the first nursing home in South Florida
offering tun complete and distinct nursing services:
RESIDENTIAL NURSING CARE
Around-the-clock professional attention for senior citizens cheerful, comfortable,
homelike surroundings cooperation with private physicians ... delicious, nourishing
food (personal diets followed) complete physiotherapy facilities interesting
activities and regular entertainment that make each day a pleasant experience.
CONVALESCENT CARE
A complete, modern, medically-oriented program for patients of all ages, recovering
from illness or surgery, to ensure a swift and complete return to good health.
Because Jackson Manor was designed, constructed and staffed specifically to provide total
nursing care, the facilities, comforts, personal attention and food are unsurpassed by any
nursing home, anywhere. Because it offers such facilities as a dining room and recreation
room on each of its 4 floors, a private bath with each room, air-conditioning and heating,
and a chapel for all denominations, the comfort and well-being of each patient is assured.
Because it is conveniently located, close to downtown Miami and just r.econds from Jackson
Memorial Hospital, doctors are able to visit their Jackson Manor patients easily and fre-
quently. But, most important of all because the welfare of each patient is of prime
concern to every staff member, Jackson Manor guests are always kept in good health
and good spirits.
Write for color brochure and full information including low rates\ about South Florida's
only complete nursing home Jackson Manor!
JACKSON MANOR Nursing Home I
1861 N.W. 8th Ave. Miami 36, Florida I
Please send me information about Jackson Manor. I ar
especially interested in .. Residential Nursing Facility
...........Convalescent Facilities. 1
I
NAME.................................................................................... |
ADDRESS....................................................................
CITY ZONE STATE
WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES WHOSE EFFORTS
MADE POSSIBLE DADE COUNTY'S NEWEST NURSING HOME:
General Contractor
BURK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
DADE PLUMBING, INC.
D'ANGELO PLASTERING COMPANY
EDDIE PULLER
FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
GODDARD PAINTING COMPANY
HAROLD G. JAFFER, INC.
H. C. NUTTING OF FLORIDA
IRANI AND ASSOCIATES
JAMES J. GORMAN
KAMMER AND WOOD, INC.
KOHNEN-NESBITT, INC.
LINDSLEY LUMBER COMPANY
MARKET FORGE COMPANY
MEDICAL SUPPLY COMPANY
METALLIC ENGINEERING
NAPOLEON STEEL CONTRACTORS, INC.
NORTH DADE NURSERY
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY
ACME KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
ADOBE BRICK
ALEXANDER HARDWARE
ALLIED LUMBER COMPANY
ANNINGJOHNSON COMPANY
ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE, INC.
ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR CO.
BERNARD INDUSTRIES, INC.
BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY
BIG CHIEF, INC.
CECO STEEL PRODUCTS CORPORATION
CENTER CHEMICAL COMPANY
CLAUDE SOUTHERN CORPORATION
COASTAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY
CONCRETE PLACING COMPANY
CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORPORATION
CURCIE BROTHERS, INC.
POSTON BRIDGE AND IRON, INC
RENTAL MACHINERY COMPANY
RENUART-BAILEYCHEELY LUMBER YARDS
RICHARD WATERPROOFING SERVICE, INC.
ROBERT L. BOWERS
ROWELL SOUTHERN FLOORING. INC.
RUBBER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
SAM L. HAMILTON, INC.
SUN CITY BRICK
TEC-MILL AND SUPPLY COMPANY. INC.
TERRAZZO-TILE CONTRACTORS. INC.
THE 2ACH COMPANY
VIRGINIA STEEL DIVISION
WILL-ROSS. INC.
WILLIAMSBURG STEEL PRODUCTS
WILKINSON CHUTES
YALE OGRON MANUFACTURING COMPANY


Full Text

PAGE 1

Pttge 12-B *. A^M <#' ftorMftM Friday, August 23. 1983 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED men EFFECTIVE THRU I SUNDAY. AUGUST 25th ITEMS RELOVV AVAILABLE ONLY AT 965 Washington Ave., MIAMI BEACH FRESH CAUGHT LAKE CARP FRESH CAUGHT LAKE WHITEFISH FRESHLY SLICED SALMON STEAKS FRESH CUT GENUINE FLOUNDER mm 19 59 89^ 69; BREAKSTONE'S lb. lb. lb. IT: PINT CONTAINER LIMIT 1 PINT OF SOUR CREW. PLEASE, WITH 5.00 ORDER OR MORE ROYAL 'R' FOOD FAIR FLORIDA FRESH GRADE "A" 3 (SMALL) DOZ. EGGS 89 c PINEAPPLE JUICE DIET SNAX STREITS 12-OZ. BOX RED CROSS NAPKINS WHITE PAPER 3 PKGS OF 8' 23 25 29 c c c MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS FOR THE MOST EXCITING SELECTION OF VALUABLE GIFTS PLUMP 4 JUICY CALIFORNIA NECTARINES LUSCIOUS & REFRESHING CALIFORNIA RED GRAPES VINE RIPENED PINK MEAT CALIFORNIA CANTALOUPES each IN OUR APPETIZER DEPARTMENT FRESHLY SMOKED CARP TAILS FANCY FAT SCHMELTZ HERRING 39 19 OR [riiSrlZION £WfelK* VKSg&i ——BROILERS 3 FANCY TRIMMED FOR BRO....-JG CHUCK STEAK 59 C LB. MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS 25 EXTRA With Purchase of Item Below NECK MEAT or BEEF CUBES FRESH KOSHER MADE GROUND BEEF t 79 c lb. 2 98 FIRST CUTS Veal Chops 8 Veal Breast 3 Rib Chops 89 SHOULDER r %0\J Veal Cutlets 89 Ik. c lb. ZION BRAND FRESH KILLED-KOSHER MADE PULLETS, ROASTERS or BROILERS EADY iii



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Page 2-C fJewisli Fk>ridlii&n day. August 23, 1% All patient rooms at Jackson Manor nre either private or semiprivate — blending considerations of comfort and safety to create a pleasant environment. All rooms are centrally airconditioned and heated, with fingertip patient controls. The rooms are carefully color coordinated, with special cove lighting to eliminate overhead glare. Each resident has his or her own closet and drepser. Easy chairs, paintings and other modem accessories offer the utmost in convenience. Shown above is a typical semi-private room. New Concept in Care Continued from Page 1-C nursing home in Dado County to eliminate wards and thus allowmore comfortable attendant conditions. As a member of the South Florida Hospital Council. Jackson Manor is the first nursing homo to be affiliated with this organization. Also numbered among its "firsts" is Jackson Manor's Family Relations Counselor, and a beautiful, non-denominational chapel Fully approved under Federal Housing Administration Bill 232. Jackson Manor lists many attributes which have combined to make it the best possible patient and resident home. Charles E. Gottlieb, who spent two years intensively researching nursing homes all over the country, is president of Jackson Manor. Air-conditioned and heated throughout. Jackson Manor is :i "doctor-Oriented" facility, complying strictly to medical standards. "In discussions with people in the medical profession, we have extracted numerous suggestions and put them into effect," Gottlieb added. "One of these is to work as closely as possible with attending physicians. "For this reason, we are maintaining medical records of every patient." he added. 'Additional accommodations as suggested by medical authorities include an examining room and a doctor's conference room. This allows for quicker and more thorough physcian attention here — and greatly eliminates the time-consuming necessity of transporting a patient to a hospital for examination there." Built according to FHA specifications at a cost exceeding $1,000,000, Jackson Manor has three patient floors. Features on each floor include a central nursing station which is connected to each room by a unique audio-visual communication system; a dining and recreation area, and rooms which have been specifically designed for maximum safety, comfort and appearance. High-low beds, adjustable to various reclining positions, are used exclusively. Pleasant color combinations, semi-private lavatories and modern furnishings serve to add warmth to each patient room. Among the other facilities at the home, which employs approximately 95 persons, are a visitors' apartment, patient laundry room, modern kitchen, employees' dining room, spacious lobb>. and a richly-cultivated garden area for relaxation and recreation. Elevators connect all of the floors, and Jackson Manor is tiie first nursing home in South Florida to maintain separate barber, beauty and podiatrist facilities. Ample parking around the building is another convenience to visitors and physicians. Rooms Feature Comfort and Safety As Prime Consideration for Patient Man$ ingredients have gone Into the design and planning of patient."' rooms at Jacks n Manor—all of which combine to offer residents the utmost in comfort, safety and privacy. Centrally air-conditioned and heated, with individual temperature regulators, rooms in the 150-bed facility are either semiprivate or private. Complete color coordination is reflected in the matching drapes and bedspreads, as well as the pleasant pastel shadings for walls and ceiling. Each room (except for private rooms) contains two high-low beds, which can be adjusted to various reclining levels. To eliminate glare of overhead illumination, cove lighting is used in each room, as it is throughout the four-story home. The semi-private rooms—located on the second, third and fourth floors—each have two dressers, two side chairs, two large closets, wall paintings, easy chair and window shades. Each has its own private bathroom. "We've tried to make each room as warm and friendly as possible," explained Harold G. Huff, administrator. "Wards have been eliminated through usage of private and semi-private rooms exclusively—creating better working conditions and increased resident satisfaction." %  Top Decorator Handled Home Interior Design The nation's third largest decorator of hospital facilities handled the entire interior design of Jackson Manor Nursing Home. Will-Ross, Inc., of Milwaukee, planned all of the color combinations and design coordinations of the home. Youthful Mary Ann Rapp, chief designer for the 49-year-old firm, supervised the aesthetic arrangements. With branches from coast-tocoast, Will-Ross is a nationwide leader in the development of furniture for the aging. Speciallydesigned chairs in Jackson Manor were formulated by this company—chairs which do not look institutional but are still functional. The Jackson Manor assignment was the first Florida project for Will-Ross. WMCC a i fulfill il sen ( t all. "Th< stations excellently me the needs of expedience an rapidity of communication said Mr-. Fitzpatrick. a veten| hospital and home n u i "Ar the deck rcg nurses assure the maximu ani". I efficiency and -ecu Ity." A LOT OF BRICKS There are 19.472 bricks in the main front wall of t .c modern, four-story Jackson Manor Nursing Home, and 4.128 ornamental C< ncrete blocks in tiers around the building. We are proud to have played a part in the erection of Dade County's newest nursing home. Center Chemical Company 5410 N.W. 37th Avenue NE 4-9778 Miami A fine new facility for the people of South Florida. Congratulations from Big Chief, Inc. 400 N.W. 27th Avenue Ft. Lauderdale Phone 945-6891



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J Page 8-A vJewistifhrkBari Friday. August 23. 1963 Temple Israel Plans Rosh Hashona Services at teach Convention Hall Maurice Revitz (seated), president of Temple Menorah, discusses an cccelerated membership program with members of the Temple Executive Committee. Standing (left to right) are Max Krauss, honorary president; Leonard Solomon, vice president; Jack Burstein. secretary; and Louis DeCoveny, treasurer. Also participating in the drive are Irving Billig, Joseph Denmark, Himen Fenster, Sol Frankel. and Louis Reinstem. Jack I. Korenblit is chairman of the membership committee. Menorah Plans New Curriculum For the first time sinj^27. the congregation of Temple Israel c[ Greater Miami "ill worship c-utalde of its own sanctuary, it vas announced this week by Harold Thurman, president of the 42 year-Old Reform Jewish >yna,oguc "This year our High Holy Day services will be at the Miami Beach Convention Hall." Thurman said, "so that we may accommodate the more than 3.000 members and their families who will worship together on Rosh Hashona and Yum Kippur. The move to the Convention Hall is in the nature of an experiment, and is designed for the convenience of our members." Thurman emphasized that there I will be no tickets available for 1 the public. Dr. Joseph R. Narot, rabbi of Temple Israel sine* 1M0, will preach at all services. Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein will lead the choir ir the liturgical music. Rabbi Morris W. Graff will share in the reading of the services. Temple Menorah Religious School will introduce a dange In its teaching schedule by eleminat•.ng Sunday morning sessions for; the Hebre.v School and replacing these sessions with Sabbath morning worship and stu;'y hours. Under the program, children of the Hebrew School will meet Sat-' urday morning for regular classroom instruction, following which they will all he brought into the' main sanctuary to participate in. the regular Sabbath service conducted by Rabbi Mayer Abramo..;;=.; witz and Cantor Edward Klein. The decision to undertake the Sabbath morning experiment was made following individual interviews which Rabbi Abramowitz and Herzl Honor, principal of the school, held with every parent of the school, who indicated "an overwhelming approval of the Sabbath morning plan since it will expose the children not only to the academic sturly of Hebrew, but give them an opportunity to experience the Sabbath spirit in the Temple." Special registration for new children in Temple Menorah will be held on Sunday morning and. continue throughout the entire week. The Religious School of Temple Menorah maintains a Gan Yeladim (nursery), as well as a fullygraded Sunday School and Hebrew School, with preparation for Bar Mitzvah and confirmation as an integral part of its curriculum. [ With the exception of the Nursery School, Temple Menorah of* fen its entire educational program free of charge to its members. Nathaniel Glickman, chairman of the School Board, explained that the policy of free education for members which was established five years ago, will continue to be the policy of the school. The Convention Hall area has been redesigned and will be pro-1 fesslonally decorated for the services. Myron If. Behrman and. A. L. Nadlcr head a special com-; mittee handling details of the move. From a modest beginning in 1922. in the home of the late Harry V. Simons, when 22 people gathered to form South Florida's first Reform Jewish congregation, the congregation of Temple Israel, in 1924 built its first permanent house of worship, a modest frame building, on the northwest corner of NE 14th St. and 3rd Ave. Forced to make way for Biscayne Blvd., the congregation deel ed to build at its present location. 137 NE 19th St. It was the year. 1927. when the congregation of Temple Israel last used other facilities than its own for worship services. Part of that year, services were held at the Central School, NE 1st Ave. and 3rd St.. now the site of the United States Post Office. Keeping pace with the growth of Greater Miami, Temple Israel found Its sanctuary too small for its growing congregation in 1946, and instituted a system of two evening services on the major holidays. Even this proved inadequate and in 1955, with the completion of a $750,000 Religious School addition, the new Morris D. Wolfson Auditorium was used for seri vices at the same time as the sanctuary, and both on a twoshift basis for the evenings. With more than 1.300 family members—a total count of over 4.000—the shift to Miami Beach Convention Hall will permit all the generations of families to be together for worship. Only members of Temple Israel will receive cards of admission to the services. *%%% OAOK BOULevAHO MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA JlmmeM aot rUNINAL OiNrcTOR A I hope Grandma likes my flowers SAUL MINDIIN I -PI % %  D Pi I — ".-, ..v — I '; I i,ir\ of III of dim I id nil i Mr;;. Fannie Mtndlm mid bro" ther Leo mourn him d Sejbl and hit departed father, Jacob Miidlm. .are nouf united. EXCELLENT CANTOR Unusually Fine Tenor SEEKS POSITION for HIGH HOLY DAYS CANTOR G. A., co P.O. Box 2973 Main Postoffice, Miami 1, Fla. American-Israeli Religious Store Now Taking Orders for HIGH HOLIDAYS Full tine of: TAtAISIM SXUll CAPS MACHS0R1M end ever ything for Synagogue & -H ome CALL S. SCHWARTZ JE 1-7722 1357 Wacliinrjton Ave. Dignified, beautiful and reverently cared for surroundings for our departed loved ones are a source of very real comfort to alL \-jordon jj-uneral <_/t< eme EMAMU. OOMION. Pounder, Deceased HARRY CJORDON IK P. OorrDON |AMEI B. GORDON A Good Name Is Far Belier Than Great Riches. \ L COMMUNITY MAUSOLEUM I i | ULL "Tht Cemetery TMt IMkS UktA Cirdcn" HAI1KT CORDON Lto>, .1 It.. SovtVt *•• &f ••wtttwll •'JIWISM etMimiw TU 5-1689 — PALMER MEMORIALS i' Jewish monument Builders" Exclusive Deoler "ROCK OF AGES FAMILY MEMORIALS SCHEDULED UNVEN-"-3S SUND AY, AUGUST 7S. 1*43 Mt. Sinni Cemetery MAUR1CI FISHMAN, 11 ? .*. Rdbbi H.> Vl Br...^ ESTILL STE.N8ERG anil her son LEO C. STEINBERG, 1 a.. Rdbb: TibiT H. Ste Hit. Nrbo Cemefer/ IRVING DRILLICK, 2 BUR. Rabbi Harold Ricfit.Stmr of. David Cemel* EVA HERSHOFF NO FINER QUALITY I NO LOWER PRICE i SAVE MIDDLEMAN i PROFIT BUY DIRECT FROM MANUFACTURER. WE UNDERSELL ALL COMPETITION GET LOWEST PRICE FROM ALL OUR COMPETITORS... THEN GET OURS — YOU SURELY WILL BUY FROM US and SAVE SAVE SAVE! PRE-HOUDAY SPECIAL GRAVE Q ft AIM MARKERS FOOTSTONES HEADSTONES FOR ALL CEMETERIES PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. 3279 S.W. 8th Street Ml 4-0921 Pho.es HI 44921 30' FOR YOUR SYNAGOGUE AND HOME NEEDS Get tvery thing-Its Everyfh %  ) at REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE 417 Washington Ave me Miami Bench, Fla. Tel. JE 1-9017 Israeli Hebrew Study Cub intermed ; nte Group meet; very Sun. \0:1d .1 m • : p.ftl 1511 SW 5th Ave.. .it SW lit" SI Miami. All adults weKome — ill 'ree just come in, but nefc • 10:30 i.ii. please! Miami Hebrew Book Store ISRAELI & DCVESTIC GIFTS Hebrew Relig 0. I Supplies for Synagogues. Schools A Private Use 1585 WASHI\GTON AVE. Miami Beacn — JE 8-3d40 WE INSTALL GLASS FOR EVERY Pf it POSE STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW MASS furniture Tops, Beveled Mine's and ffesilvering Our Specie''y L I G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS 136 S.W. 8th STREET Phone FR 1-1363 Marrit Orlin GELB MONUMENTS INC. Open Every Day • Closed Sabbath 140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583 "Progressing with Our Marty Satisfied Customers' ANOTHER LOCATION f Off YOUR CONVENIENCE C0ULT0N BROS. "ART" HU Mr • "NAT* Coral Way & S.W. 27th Ave. TOUR TEXACO DOTS 840 S.W. 8th St. '-v^\*v w \/^ l V^



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Friday. August 23. 1963 *Je*ist fk>ridUan Page 7-A Javits, Ha/pern Question Aid < Former Opera Singer Gordon Richards v>ill be installed by Rabbi Mordecai Podet as cantor of Temple Judea of Coral Gables. Installation will take place Friday during the evening service beainnina at 8:)5 D.m. A reception for Cantor and Mrs. Richards will follow. Shown are organist Harry Carney and Rabbi Podet as Cantor Richards prepares the Temple choir in liturgy for the coming High Holy Days. Panel Discussion Set Wednesday Should Dade County Have a •' ii I) 1 i c Accommodation Ordnance?" will be the subject of a panel discussion to be presented by the CommunityRelations Council on Wednesday, 8 p.m., at the Biscayne Terrace Hotel. Dr. II Franklin Williams, actJIIL: dean of the University College. Vniversity of Miami, will be mod\ ralor. Participants will include Warren Freeman, manager of the Biscayne Terrace Hotel; Fr. Theo or" Gibson, president of the local ..! Association for the Adancement of Colored People; and Tobias Simon, member of the Florida Civil Rights Commission, and one Of the attorneys involved in th? litigation of the Bible School suit. Also during the evening, Louis J. Mitchell, newly-appointed director of the Florida Council for Human Relations, will be introduced to the community. A graduate of Columbia University and the Virginia Theological Seminary, he served in churches in New York and Birmingham. Ala. Married and the father of five children. Rev. Mitchell will conduct his duties encompassing the State of Florida Irom the regional office in Daytona Beach. Continued from Page 1-A feeds the fire of intransigence and war in the Middle East." He said Nasser's newly voiced belligerence was in "direct contravention to the objectives of our foreign aid program He said further that aid to Nasser must be linked to a cessation of Middle F.ast hostilities and the arms race in the region. In MM House, Rep. Seymour Halpern, co-author of the Keating-Halpern amendment, said the Foreign Aid bill was before Congress "at the very moment that Nasser openly proclaims his intention to destroy Israel by force of arms, and diverts his own resources to buy Soviet weapons and hire ex-Nazi technicians." The Keating-Halpern amendment would sever aid to nations diverting their own funds to purchase Soviet weapons and threaten neighboring states. Rep. Halpern, a New York Republican, cited recent remarks by Under Secretary of State W. Averell Harriman which justified continued assistance to Nasser on grounds this was good for Israel, in that it increased American •'influence" in Cairo. The Congressman said that "if this dubious line of thinking held merit, one might try to increase our influence in Moscow or Peping bv sending lavish appeasement gifts." \ • Empire State Club Meeting Empire State Club of Florida was to meet on Thursday, Aug. 22. at the Barcelona Hotel, An illustrated talk on "Safe Driving for Senior Citizens" was to be presented by William F. Frawley, of the Metro Court. Joe Riotto is president of the club. IS THERE A MIND READER IN THE HOUSE? :. You'll need one unless you get your estate plans down on paper! Sure you have everything in mind .. how you want your money invested, what you want included in your will, who is to be your executor. But until you have it written properly and legally on paper, you'll find that mind readers are scarce and not welcome nor effective in court. Instead, ask your lawyer and one of the Trust Ofacersot Mercantile National Bank of Miami Beach to help you work out the administrative and financial details of an estate plan that will benefit you now and your family now and later. MERCANTILE ^ NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI BEACH 420 LINCOLN ROAD MALL* PH. JE 8-7831 DRIVE IT • • • DREAM IT Finance your new or used tar through a low cost Installment loan at AMERICAN ^BANK ^V or MIAMI f FIRST ST. FR 4 7211 I PAN nos.r RENT A CAR from $2.50 per day (15 per wk. & mileage charge ABOTT MOTORS, Inc. 1451 W. FLAGLER ST. Phone FR 3-0326 ROOF LEAK? CALL VICTOR CONN Let us repair it or apply a new one. For free estimate phone: ^^ ACME • ^ lUMrllX, 685-1952 NORTON TIRE CO. \B.EGoodrich/ UFESAVER CLEARMCE SME Cheek These S.U I*On Our Finest Tire Nylon Premium LHesaver UJ1 LIMITED „d ol ••'?" iouHUNO. ^' \NT|TIES condition. Muu WIN A TON OF MONEY! *34,000 IN SILVER DOLLARS! 1571 OTHER BIG PRIZES %  A NEW '64 STATION WAGON %  20 MOTOROLA 19" portable TV SETS i %  50 SETS of 4 B.F.GOODRICH SILVERTOWN TIRES • 500 MOTOROLA Transistor RADIOS %  1000 KODAK Flashfun CAMERA OUTFITS i''-r B.F.Goo4rith Come in for complete sweepstakes tules. FREE PRIZE to everyone who comes in! NOTHING TO BUY OR WRITE Come in and register! Hurry-offer ends Sept. 7 VACATION CREDIT TERMS uy Now—Pay When You Return From Vacation MIAMI lx 5366 N. Yf* 37th Av. TFiJowetT H. 0 l.r St. 4779 $. W. Ilh Street MIAMI BEACH 1454 Allen Roa J NORTH MIAMI 133SO N. W. 7lh Avonue 1 SOUTH MIAMI aWDB Sew*It Dixie Hwy. HAUANDALI 29 North Dixie Hwy. W. HOLLYWOOD k • 4017 ( Hollywood ~ Blvd. it State Road #T HOMESTEAD 30100 South Federal Hwy. FT. 1AUDERDAII 1130 W. Broward Blvd. 2432 W. %  reward Blvd. KEY WEST 540 Orten Sf. Indicates mechanical service available.



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Page 2-B >. U wist flcrkKain Friday, August 23. 1963 J c t •< i < n J by ISABEL GROVE Participants in the "Leadership Chat" series under the guidance of Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, an honorary vice president of Miami Beach Chapter of Hadassah, are seated (left to right) Mrs. Sherman Fast, Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, Mrs. Joseph Halfon, Mrs. Nathan Rifkin, Mrs. Max Goldberg, Mrs. Sam Feldman Mrs. Morris Parets, Mrs. David Masser, Mrs. Edward Schuldner, Mrs. Samuel S. Goldberg, Hattie Sa.'ir and Mrs. Hadassah Fassler. Not present is Greta Rappaport. Mildred G. Bellin Cooking Corner Ground Iamb is for most homemakers like a rieh vein of precious ore. waiting to be mined. Although it is used rarely, ii at all, in most of our homes ground lamb is as versatile and easy to prepare as the familiar ground beef, and can be used in both simple and elaborate dishes to add end less variety to our daily meals. It can be shaped into patties with no further ado. and br tiled or panfried as we do hamburger.Or it can be baked as a meat loaf or blended with other ingredients in top-of-t he-stove dishes or oven casseroles. Combinations of ground lamb and rite, known as pilevs or pilafs. are particularly appetizing. and are traditional favorites in lands where lamb is a widely used meat. Today, we suggest two recipes tor ground lamb which are good the year round. The first is for a meat loaf, equally delicious hot or cold. For a super-special sandwich, spread while bread with orange marmalade, and add a slice of the chilled cooked loaf and lettuce. On a hot day, a dinner planned around a main dish of the chilled slices. attractively arranged on a bed of salad greens. would be an appetizing choice. In cooler weather, the hot loaf could be served with potatoes Welcome Wagon Remembers Special Family Occasions Carrying on our community's traditional hospitality, Welcome Wagon Calls are made when your family celebrates a (sixteenth birthday, announces an I engagement or the birth of a new baby, or moves to a new home. Ci\ /• baked at the same time as the meat. The second recipe is a pilev zesty enough to tempt appetites on both hot and cool days. A perfect recipe for preparing in an electric skillet, this pilev is just right for those times when we want our main dish light. To complete the meal, a tossed salad and a e'essert of fresh fruit would be sufficient. In purchasing ground lamb. there is one important consideration which must always be remembered. The lamb must be lean. Otherwise, as the dish cooks ar.cl the fat melts away, so little actual meat remains that the recipe cannot be completed correctly. So. if there is any question about the amount of fat in lamb which is alreach ground, it is wiser to select a piece of solid meat, have all visible fat removed, and have the butcher grind ihe lean meat for you. Lamb-Orange Loaf 4 slices white bread, cubed 1-2 cup orange juice 1 medium-large onion, minced 1-2 cup minced parole) 2 eggs 1 teaspoon salt 1-8 teaspoon pepper 1-2 teaspoon ground thyme 2 lbs. lean ground lamb Orange and parsley ror garnishing To a medium-large mixing bowl, place the cubes of bread and the orange juice. Mash until the mixture becomes a smooth paste Add the onion, parsley, eggs, salt, pepper. and thyme. Mix thoroughly. Add the Iamb and blend lightly, but thoroughly. Pack the mixture Women to Hear Judge Friedman Judge Milton Friedman will speak on "A Day in the Life of a Judge" at the annual membership tea sponsored by Tifereth Israel Sisterhood in the social hall of the Temple on Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Theme of the evening will be "Every Member Bring a Member." and membership chairman Mrs. Irving Querido will introduce Sisterhood members in a skit. firmly into a lightly greased 9x5x3 inch loaf pan. and bake at 350 dig. F. for lVs hours. Spoon off any fat which rises to the surface. Inmold the loaf and garnish with orange slices or sections and sprigs of parsley. This loaf is delicious hot or cold. The recipe serves 6 to 8 Lamb Pilev 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 lb. lean ground lamb 1 cup onion, diced medium fine 1 cup raw rice 2'.' cups canned tomatoes 1-2 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground alspice 1 teaspoon marjoran leaves 1-2 teaspoon ground cinnamon Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat, add the meat, and mash until the particles are brown. Drain the meat in a strainer, and reserve 2 tablespoons of the fat. Return these 2 tablespoons of fat to the skillet and heat again. Add the onion and stir over medium heat until the onion begins to brown. Add the rice, and stir until the nee becomes translucent. Add all remaining ingredients and the meat, stir to blend, cover the pan. and cook until the rice is tender and the liquid is all absorbed If the mixture becomes too dry before the rice is tender, add a lit tie water or tomato juice. This amount serves 4 to G. The pilev may be reheated if a little additional liquid is added to prevent sticking. Sweet are the rewards for maintaining a "B" average in a tough physics course For Rhoda Grant, a student at Carnegie Tech. it was the "Grand Tour" of Europe as a gift from her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Max Grant Trip started with 999 other vacationing boys and girls on a Netherlands-owned student boat Then with a smaller group of 30. Rhoda traveled to Holland, England. France. Spain. No. Africa. Italy. Switzerland, with Austria and Germany yet to come Although Europe is "positively crawling with college Stucents," our girl reporter feels that "American parents can be proud that they are all so well behaved and really are terrific ambassadors for the United States" Another conclusion: There still is no place like Miami, and shopping on Lincoln Rd. or Flagler St. is still tops" Dad. County loves you too. Rhoda. A host of friends and relatives helped Mr. and Mrs Henry D. Rosengarten celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary at a gala dinner in the Rubayiat Room of the Algiers Hotel recently Out-of-town contingent included John M. Goldsmith, of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. David H. Goldsmith. Roselle, N.J.. the Charles Rosengartens, of Waterbury, Conn., and the Ted Rosengartens, Mr and MrA. ,1 p ar doll, and Mr. and MrRobert Konhauzer, of St. Petersburg Fla Joyous family reunion | r \| r and Mrs Seymour Horowitz, ol Coral Gables, and then two daughters who have been attending Hebrew University in Israel Occasion called for :i din ner party on the Miracle Iftlsj Chippy's Restaurant And Chandler's was the >itt> of the festivities planned by Milton Wand for wife, Estelle's birthday? One gift no intimate have attempte:'—a sweate Estelle Winter, the gue honor, is one of Miami Reach's leading sweater stylists. birthdayT* :e would^ 'ater—as I uest of Howard Kay. eldest son of the Sheldon Kays, has transferred from the University of Florida to the University of Miami Spent part of the summer on J. trip through the Eastern t s and worked on several of the programs at Westbrookc Conn try Club, where his dad is president, the rest of the time Speaking of the Kays, they hosted the Parkinson 21 Cluh at their Ray Heights home Saturday night The group is composed of 21 couples who work for the benefit of Parkinson's Disease cure Mrs. Mom (Gail) Podell is president Dialogue Will Be Sponsored When the occasion arises, phone HI 8-4994 Tifereih Jacob Registration Temple Tifereth Jacob Religious School is accepting children for registration on Sunday. 10 am, or from a.m. to 1 p.m.. Monday through Friday, at the Temple office. Adult education classes will meet at the Temple on Tuesdaj Opti-Mrs. Reveals Gift A contribution ot ci.2(X) to Variety Children's Hospital by the Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami Beach was announced this week by hospital oflicials. Mrs Murray Sonnett, president, said the donation will be earmark I'd for use in the new psychiatric division for emotionally-disturbed children, a wing now under construction Main project Of the club is the rehabilitation and care ol disturb ed children. Sugnrine Msmr-uuaM oiiotK-nff uotMnmuimt A >|M. k p> MMM %  "MM* CWMlHt •errot-tmovB NMiusma Hnvouowm KM KUCHBu TAKI UM *-oi. sorru -, •r tit 'The Modern Jew—Fact or Fiction" is the theme of an informal community dialogue to be sponsored by the Biscayne Chapter. Women's Division, of the Amen can Jewish Congress on Thursday. Aug. 29. 8:30 p.m.. at the Washington Federal Auditorium, ii 19 \K u;7th St.. No. Miami Beach. Rabbi Max A Lipschitz, spiri tual leadei of Beth Torah Congre gation. will be the keynote sp.-ak er. Prominent women of the .North Dade Community, as well ;is Congress memherss. have been invited to participate. Mrs. Leonard Sidcrsky. presi dent of Biscayne Chapter, will chair the meeting, assisted bj Mrs. Abraham Augenstein. COchairman of program Hostesses will be Mrs. Albert Zuckerman. membership chairman ol the chapter, and her cochair man. Mrs. Sy Reese. Arrangements committee includes Headlines Fred Eelevan, David Vishoot, Joseph Skiiarl David Wise. Daniel Oilman. Milton Levy, Abraham Goldstein. Nat Glazier, Jerry Dudell. Dolly Baura, Si Iney Rudnick, Ben Wtfintraub ll.'ien Finger and Julian Frank If you like KREPLACH M A OUSS •• A CU TETLEY TEA ft wnm A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES SINCE 1837 Yea, mere's Yoea Toe spirit la (his in* tea.. ."flavor crushed" *0€ fullest strength and ala* Htioa... richer taste aod pies*. •rt with your fleishigs aod asilchigi tod fcetwere, „ e .i •tfreshmerit... Ravioli You'll love GUARANTEED NON-FATTENING! Certified Kosher '"toRabbirtcelS^erUMom CHEF BOY-AR-DEB CHEESE RAVIOLI Hear family, guests, cheer for that real Italian flavor created by famed Chef Boy Ar-Dee. Tender little macaroni pies...filled with tangy Italian Cheese...simmered with savory tomato sauce and cheese...seasoned the real HalIan way. So much tastier and easier than tha frozen kind. So much thriftier, too—cost* only •bout 15c per serving I



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Friday, August 2.3, 1963 >• Jewish fkrklkir Page 3-A r i NAACP Hits Negro Anti-Semites Continued from Pago 1-A Jewish 'Community Council and i Jewish Center in Birmingham, outlined the plight of Birmingham's Jews at a meeting of the Los Angeles Council of the AntiDefamation League of B'nai B'rith. Jewish downtown merchants, he I said, are the target of Negro agitation hecause many of the city's i 250,000 Negroes—40 per cent of | the total population—feel that the j merchants exploit them as customers and discriminate against them as employees. On the other hand, many segregationist* charge that Jews are the instigators of the demonstrations which have repeatedly rocked Birmingham, Mr. I Katz reported. Segregationists I also fear that Jewish merchants will be the first to yield to Nej gro demands for integration of ; their stores. An appeal to Catholic youth to join with their Protestant and Jewish counterparts in the Aug. 28 march on Washington was made here this week by a rabbi at the Youth Congress of the Third Order of St. Francis. Addressing 600 Catholic youth, Rabbi Marc H. Tancnbaum, diI rector of the Inter-religious AfPresident Zalrr.an S. Shazar of Israel (right) congratulates Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice president of the Israel Bond Organization, on the success of the 1963 Israel Bond drive, which is running 15 percent ahead of last year's record effort. Dr. Schwartz visited Israel to meet with Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and other top government leaders to review current development needs ot Csraels economy and to discuss the program for intenBtfying t'r.e settlement and development of the Negev. T Plans 3-Day Workshop Here A thr^e-day training workshop Emanuel Tropp. associate direcv. ill be conducted beginning Montor, will discuss "The Purposes day for the full staff of teachers and Goals of the YM and YMHA." and supervisorin the Early \ A film, "A Good Day in KinderCbJIdhOod Development program j gartcn," produced by the Caliol the YM and YWHA of Greater j fornia Board of Education, will be Miami. Twenty-five professional shown for the first time locally. slatf members will use this orienThe script reading for the film will tation period to prepare for the bo done by Mrs. Helen Weinstock. I fairs Department of the Amer -1 opening of the four nursery Miami Beach supervisor, and Mrs. ^SLS^S^.I?^ schools conducted by the "Y" at: Golds Chernowsky, Miami super** *2K*. ?!r2!LJ£}\ the foUowmg branch locations: | visor. JJrt-njJ^^JJ—J Southwest Branch, 7215 Coral Mrs. Miriam Harris, Southwest prophetic witness to their faith by j Way; Miami Branch, 450 SW 16th supervisor, will lecture on "The taking part in this demonstration; Ave.; North County Branch, 14036 Meaning of Free Play," while the ol the moral commitment of NE 6th Ave.; Miami Beach subject "The Meaning of ReadiAmericans to "equal opportunity Branch, i536 Ba Rd. The schools ness," will be discussed by Mrs. for all our citizens." opT. for UM fall season on Bertha Kramer. The entire Institute is under the leadership of Miss Jeannette B. Schwartz, di-, rector, Early Childhood Development and Family Life Education program! tor the "Y." She will lead the discussion on "Standards ol Staff Performance in the Y Pre-School Program." One day will be devoted to reviewing current professional literature. population controls earnings and allowances totaling $6,300,000 a year and ho urged that youth us* that purchasing power to insist or>. desegregation at lunch counters, drug stores, department stores and entertainment places they patronized. Earlier in the week. Rabbi Tanenbaum spoke at the fifth annual curriculum and faculty workshop of the Sister Formation %  Conference at Marquette University in Milwaukee, the first rabbi! to address a meeting of teaching nuns in the Catholic Church. Hej advocated the creation of an m-\ ter-religious and inter-racial com-, mission of educators to seek wider! understanding among America's, ethnic and racial and religious' M Yean groups of the contributions these groups have made &f • •Aiwerican culture and freedom. Pabbi Tancnbaum told the nuns that in the United States, the majority of the "average Christian and Jew on the street" did not know or understand each other on the deepest level. A major source of continued misunderstanding, he said, was the "inadequate or distorted portrayal in religious textbooks, of the Negro, the Catholic, the Protestant and the Jew." The process of correcting such portrayals, he asserted, could be "vastly augmented" if a commission of specialists in the fields of teaching training, textbook writing and religious education could meet regularly to act on the problem. Mem* Owned HUM OftMte Tuesday, Sept Ban Won't Speed Peace Continued hrwn Page 1-A Rabbi Tanenbaum told the youth leaders they could us* their own purchasing power in the fight for civil rights. He said the American teen-age its reservoir ftf goodwill wherever ii exi*ts lit'.old another questioner that there was no question but that the friendship of tne United States was one of Israel'! greatest political assets. He cited the constant United i -support "for the viability of our economy" and its concern ,V the military balance in the Middle East. He also disclosed the imminent implementation .an extensive program of economy and social progress for the Arab populace of Israel. He said this included "active (•"n^iderafiorr" concerning the future of military government in Arab-populated areas. This issue has touched off sharp debate in Israel. pyct? '-rx fttiDV 2"in BETH DIN OFFICE RABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN 1061 Michigan Ave., Miami Beoch JE 1-1969 JE 1-6150 FHA—VA RESALES IN PERFECT CONDITION DADE & BROWARD COUNTY From $150.00 down $50.00 Mo. ALTMAN INSURANCE & REAL ESTATE 768 NW 3rd ST. FR 1-2421 We Handle Insurance of All Kinds TERMITES? ROACHES? ANTS? Safe, positive pt control with regular service for the home TRULY NOLEN EXTERMINATORS ** "The Sign of Good Housekeeping" COSTS LESS THAN YOU THINK E ALL F R 7-1411 / Greorer Miami'* Lareest Exterminator EXPERIENCED PET DEALERS ^VVWVWWVWWWWWVW 1 DISCOUNT PROCESSING KODACMROME 8MIVI Roll 100 r5x20Mt 1.00 127-620-'20 EKTA 1.00 K0DACOIOR 1UMB0 PRINTS 12 EXPOSURES 200 BAW EXPOSURES .75 Mail or Bring wilh This Ac* Crnig's Camera Center 7356 S.W. Red Rd. Ph. 665-5111 % % % 1105 NW 119th ST. L ^^.^ EXPERT DOG GROOM.NG BOARDING ANIMAL KINGDOM PET SHOP MU 8-3021 GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC. 2148 NW 10 Ave. FR 3-7180 Have your roof repaired now: you will save on a new roof later "Satisfactory Work by Experienced Men" Complete and Dependable Title Service M IAMI TITLE s, Qkttact Co. 37 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS • ABSTRACTS • TITLE INSURANCE 104 Northeast First Street Telephone FRanklin 3-8432 t Mwed£aa

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Jay, August 23, 1963 •*, #r-H#"#; flflrikM&tf) Page 9-B JLjcir ^jVlitzvan i* ij. and Mrs. Harold Pomerantz and Mr. and Mrs. Al Levine hat in between dances at Westbrooke Country Club's Augst dance and supper. Pomerantz is vice president of Westrrooke. It was also a welcome home party for the Levines, ?ho were on a two-month-long. 9,000-mile automobile tour the United States. te#h Shirah Sets Dedication be Lcation ceremonies of the iu, air-conditioned sanctuary L oltiMa of Temple Beth Shirah, HMi SW 120th St.. will be held on piday, Sept. 8. at 3 p.m. ollowing the Torah Caravan |om t'.e homes of donors of JCTed Scrolls. Mrs. Shirley Whit Ip Fenstein and children and Ir and Mrs. Israel Goldman, a jiecial dedicatory service will be lid in 'he sanctuary. I Guest will include Rabbi Loon ironist;, Rabbi Solomon Schilf. (resident of the Greater Miami i Rabbinical Assn.. and Cantors Ibrahan: Seif ana Charles Sheldon/ lodner. Rabbi Morris A. Skop, spiritual; [•adir Of Beth Shirah, will award itatiem of appreciation to thei iuilder of the new sanctuary, Pernan; Goodman. Seymour Drcxt r. arihitect. members of the puildinj: committee, headed by Abe Smukler. Morris Herman, Wilbur Aerensoi .. and J. William; faros, chairman, advisory council. Dedicatory psalms will be chanti by Cantor Herman K. Gott• b .:IHI choir during the ritual of eating the Torah Scrolls and |!ie sanctuary. Included in the ceremonies will a tfi.ided ton:of the $150,000. ] lour-acre complement of social lull, rabbi's sturiy. cantor's music room, classrooms. Temple offices biiii nursery-kindergarten play rrouni I First service in the new sane luary v.U be held at Selichot, [midnight, Saturday. Sept. 14, tailing at 11 p.m. Mrs, Bernard Chesman, supertisor of the Religious Schools. K ill bhostess at the "FacultyCet-Together" to be held in the sanctuary on Sunday. Sept. 15, at fi a.m. A pre-Holy Days assembly will open the school at 10 a.m. with special ceremonies of dedication. Wendy Epter First Friday evening serviceof j the season at Congregation Beth i : Torah will include the Bas Mitz1 vah of Wendy Maria Epter on %  Aug. 23. Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz and Can: ton Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum will officiate at the I ceremony, which will be followed by a Kiddush i hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Ber nard A. Epter, 20020 NE 21st Ave., in their daughter's honor. Wendy, in the eighth grade at Miami Beach Junior High, is a member of the Society at Beth Torah Hebrew School. Her outside activities inciudi and dancing. The celebrant will also be fet Wendy Epter swimming ed at a reception Saturday evening iu Urn Warnings Kuom • ,he Barcelona Hotel. Second guest of honor will be Mrs. William Epter, Wendy's grandmother, who will be marking her 80th birthday. Paternal grandparents of the Bas j Mitzvah are Mr. and Mrs. Louis' Sussman. Barry Silber Barry, son of Mr. and Mrs.; Maurice Silber, will become Bar Mitzvah on Saturday morning,! Aug. 24. at Congregation Bethj Emeth-Ychudah Moshe. Rabbi! Simon April will officiate, andi Cantor Hyman Fine will chant the | liturgy. The celebrant is a student at i the congregation's Hebrew School and attends North Miami Beach Junior High, where he plays in, the band, belongs to the Audio | Club, and is a Junior Counselor at Camp Avir. Mr. and Mrs. Silber will honor their son at an Oneg Shabbat following services on Friday evening and at a dinner at Chandler's. Beach MD Gets Army Orientation Dr. (Capt.) Arthur L. Alexander, of Miami Beach, who re cently came on active duty in the United States Air Force, has com plet'ed the^>rientation course for officers of the Medical Service at Gunter AFB, Ala. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Alexander, of 3010 Alton Rd., he was given familiarization instruction covering administrative procedures, military medicine and medical service support of USAF objectives. Capt. Alexander is being reassigned to the 839th Tactical Rospital at Sewart AFB, Tenn. Dr. Alexander attended the University of Miami and the Medical College of Virginia. He is a member of Alpha Omega. Registration is now open for the daily nursery -kindergarten, dally Hebrew School, and Sunday Religious School. Rabbi Skop will head a faculty of 18 certified teachers, and Cantor Gottlieb will direct the senior and junior choirs in a full program ol Jewish music from nursery through confirmation. Regisration for the nurserykindergarten, to be supervised byMrs. Nathan Cynamon and directed by Mrs. Jane Schulman, will continue until Aug. 25. with opening of school on Tuesday, Sept. 2. The reading readiness curriculum will include a full program ot Jewish holiday celebrations and arts and crafts. Classes and transportation will be available to boys and girls 3 to 5 years. Miamian Wins Optical Award Bernard I Gelbart, of 1810 SW 24th Ave., a graduate of the Opthalmic Dispensing Course at Lindsey Hopkins, has won the Cobb Award for Excellence in Clinical Dispensing. A plaque was presented to him by Thomas Peterson, general manager of Cobb Optical Co. Graduation was last Friday at the Lindsey Hopkins Hotel Skyline Room. BEFORE you travel write for your free TRAVEL GUIDE! < T *4VE L Trove! the Congress wo/ with this Travel Guide Just the size to carry in your pocket or the glove compartment of your cor. Gives rotes, locations, facilities of better class motor hotels coast to coast, Inspected and approved by Congress Motor Hotels. Members of Corejreti Motor Hotels offer free reservation service. We honor Credit Cards. WiT TO CONGRESS MOTOR HOTELS 1674 Meridian Avenue Miami Beach 39, Florida t atJ7tm4uteCt*tf,A&> will enjoy the real Newark : the new and eCitig Shelton lowers Finest East-Side location — midway between United Nations and Rockefeller Center; close to all transportation "d l^ntikwh. Beautiful air-conditioned rooms and suites with television — at most moderate rates! OUTDOOR ROOF GARDEN AND SUN DICK ; SWIM RB5 i^JUQUJt: 1$ ejjj li'iiT New.it fun ipot offers 3-day, 2-night get-acquainted 1 Adventure fccloge. SM per pers., 2 in room, include* air-conditioned room, 7 gourmet moots, choice o' fishing, sailing, bus and boot tour, or water skiing pics swimming ond other Island pleasures. Good until Dec. 1 cost ol travel ot included. Flights dully from West Folm teach. Ft. louderdale ond Miami. Reserve thru ony Holiday Inn •f America or Jim Mills, Ml N.t. 3rd Ave., Miami, fla. 3 Day,2 Night Adventure Package per person, double occupancy 'in a gorgeous twin-bedded (room with all meals Choicer rooms up to $65 per pen, Hiratf42ffil! Coffee thee. Excellent Reef#Mf>nt Famou. Supper Club the 1200 ROOM l.i.ntton Avenue, 4Wi te 4Mi .tree* NEW yoejc ir, N. Y.-TH. PUH fT^^Vi. SHELTON TOWERS| %  UwM.t Cert Mk>| w H seeim mat | I 1 I Aet'lil I LjRf—A A RARUNGTONj k H0TEL *BA-,>vsJ NEW HEALTH with every LUXURY _l people went everything...end find ot The Arlington! Mat In our new teaiperature-control lad twin cascade poQit, enjoy exsr potto and eun decki.. .dine on gourmet food.. .ounce ond M entertained...golf on our two 18-hole Chowprorwhlp courtee. All aportt and reeraoHont in Hot Spring! including excellent fltftlnf and plenty of exciting night life with big noes, entertainer. In the neoiby Supper Ctubf. Both, owoy oil your mUm and ,**, due to fctigu. tn RWfc ^"^1 o^'^ ^ rheum.**., ormrlti. and high blood pro-ur.. Com. re The Atlingfn for Health and Fur ,tyl Color 8rO<*u ~,AR fAY Ma



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Friday, August 23. 1383 +J&*lsti Fk>ridr/&ri Page 3-C Physic Therapy Room Has M6st Advanced Equipment in Florida OIK of the in. j need a rooms in I • entire state is an in Nursing i • cornph Locatecj on the tit -1 floor, the to ofier Jackson Mai.oi residents a wide variety of needi, A fulJ ume phy.-io-therapy technician will be available, to aid residents in use of the equipment, which has been it .-signed specifically for rehabilitation and r xercise. We have consulted many people in the medical profession concerning what should be included i: our physical therapy room," -••aid Charles E. Gottlieb. president. 'This facility is a basic, yet vital, part ol" our Home," he added "I expect that almost all of the resident! and convalescing patients will use this room. Among the exerci.-e and physical treatment accommodations of the room are an assortment <'i baths I' nibs—each adapted for specifii uses. "Some ;-. tienta will require physical therapy for certain parts ol th< body, ami some will require treatment f r others." continued Gottlieb. "For this reason, n i .; baths—each designed for dif:erenl purposes—are a\ ailabli Dd best equipped physical therapy tegral part of the Jackson Manor room has been carefully designed complete physical treatments for Included are arm baths, leg baths, full-submersion tubs and a sitz-bath. An ultra-sonic machine, which operates on electric impulses, will be used for muscle tissue exercising. Similarly, a hydrocollator employs hot wet packs to various parts of the body. Many exercise facilities are present also—including dumbells for hand and arm strengthening. Triplex wall pulleys for arm and back muscle development, exercise mats and an electric treatment table. "Two factors guided our plan ning for the physical therapy room: competence and completeness." Gottlieb explained. "Under the watchful instruction of our technician, combined with the carelully-engineered machinery and healthful program of exercises, Jackson Manor offers patients what we believe to be the most modern psysio-ther.ipy room in Florida." Veteran Hospital Administrator € Takes on Challenging Role Harold I South Fktt is admini Manor Nur The 42spent five llo-pita) in charge ol operation o facilitj "Jackson .. Huff, i veteran .ca hospital director. • -ator ot Jackson -.rig Home > ear-old Huff. who years at Holy Cross Ft, Lauderdale, is in ft )1 coordination and 1 the modern l.iO-bed Manor will maintain HM010 6. HVn tiministruttr a close association with physicians and medical authorities," Huff declared. "A complete medical history will be kept on all patients in conjunction with the records of their personal ph.vsi.cian." Huff spent six months at Palmetto Nursing Home, and in that period successfully supervised a substantial increase in patients. A bronze star recipient in World War II. Huff has been connected with the Medical Supply Company of Miami and Servel, Inc., of Evansville, Ind. His tenure with the former gave Huff a in all fields of medicine—including physicians, supply manufacturer.-, and distributor representative-.. In his five years at Holy Cross Hospital, the hospital increased its bed capacity from 50 to 225. He joined the hospital when it was formed in 1955, and led various fund-raising campaigns in cooperation with the Women's Auxiliary. A resident of Miami for 10 years, Huff is married and has three children. He lives at 155 NW 192nd St. The physical therapy room at Jackson Manor is the most modern and extensive in Florida. Here, one of the physical therapy technicians is shown with some of the equipment contained in this exercise and rehabilitation studio. Numbered among the facilities of the physical therapy room, in addition to specially-planned exercise and muscle building schedules, are a wide variety of baths, muscle treatment machines, weights, arm pulleys and an electric treatment table. Individual walkers and parallel bars are used for additional exercises. Separate Dining and Recreation Areas Typical of the attention and planning given to all segments of Jackson Manor are the three separate dining and recreation areas. Located on floors two, three and four, the large facilities serve both as a place of enjoyment and relaxation, as well as dining. "Of prime concern when we outlined construction of the home was where the dining and recreation areas should be situated," explained Harold G. Huff, administrator, "We ruled out having a cafeteria on anyone floor, because this would inconvenience residents of the other two floors. "Instead, we decided to have separate dining areas on each floor—offering equal accommodations for all three." But more than this. Jackson Manor principals wanted to instill color and warmth to the dining areas. "For this reason, we combined both recreation and dining into one general location on each floor." Huff said 'Each is completely separate of the other, with one large room serving both purposes." The recreation section has a television, reading room, lounge and game tables lor checkers, chess, cards, and others. Across from it. the spacious dining area comfortably seats 50, the capacity of each patient floor. "A casual atmosphere is important when dining," according to Charles E. Gottlieb, president. 'By making the food area as non-institutional as possible, I believe we have created the proper relaxed conditions." Located on each patient floor is a combined dining-recreation area, offering residents separate facilities for meals and relaxation. The dining portion of the room comfortably seats 50, the capacity of each patient floor. The recreation area has a television, reading room lounge, and game table. A rew concept in ^OTAL patient care. Harold G. Jaffer. Inc. 2141 S.W. 3rd Street Miami Phone FR 1-1496 IAWN SPRINKLER SYSTEMS Kislak Helped Make Mortgage J. I. Kislak Mortgage Corporation of Florida, through the First National Bank of Miami, negotiated mortgage arrangements for Jackson Manor Nursing HoTge. %  • A "tta were very happy to handle arYSriglments'for sucTi a fine institution as Jackson Manor," commented Jay Kislak, president. "This is_one of the most domjWte' and competent nursing homes I have ever seen, and I am certain it will make a worthy addition to our community." The Kislak Mortgage Corp. is one of the largest in the Southeastern United States. It has handled a number of nursing home negotiations in the jWSt, tfltteT FHX title 232. Landscapers of the Patient Gardens at JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME. North Dade Nursery 14231 N.E. 2nd Street PL 9-0018 Miami Best wishes on the completion of JACKSON MANOR foURSING HOME. Richard Waterproofing Service/ Inc. 7901 S.W. 53rd Court Miami & MO 1-2413 "Our 40th year serving Dade County" 4



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Page 12-A Jen *"<#' fl i i M > M m > Friday, August 23. 1963 Behind The Trip By MAX LERNER Anti-Semitism on Rise in Harlem %  1'?IIXMIIIIIM. .' Rome. It is a good idea in politics to go through with what you plan, and refuse to be deflected by passing difficulties. That VII true of the plans of the American Negro leaders for mass demons!rations, from the Birmingham decision to the Washington decision. It was true in Greece of the King's decision to go through with his British visit despite the advice of former Premier Karamanlis. It has proved true of the Kennedy trip. No one expected the trip to yield new American positions or new truths about the world's fate. The truths and positions have been endlessly restated. A Presidential visit is bound to be full of sound and protocol, signifying little. That was why so many editorialists and commentators urged the President to cancel his trip when the leaders he planned to visit started to crumble. The danger lay, of course, in what seemed to be Parliamentary debility and instability in European governments. An epidemic of the falling sickness afflicted all three of the top people Kennedy had planned to see. Adenauer, in losing his showdown with Erhard, lost also a good measure of his authority. Masmillan, mangled in the Profumo affair, became at once symbol j>nd victim of a ruling caste that had lost selt-mastery and had. therefore, lost the capacity to rule. He is now as surely a lame duck as is Adenauer. Fanfani, who seemingly had everything in his favor—Italian prosperity, a reform government, a Nenni alhar.ee and a good Pope in the Vatican— v.ailed himself into the structure he had helped build, and was stifled %  v. ithin its solidity. Even the Irish government almost fell on an internal issue, and %  was saved only by the grace of a few votes. President Kennedy must have wondered whether he had become a political plague carrier. What made it worse was the figure of de Gaulle, his presidential regime standing table and erect amidst the instability of the parliamentary regimes encirclintr France. Despite all this, the trip went off well. In Germany he had the built-in dramatic power or an American President at the Berlin Wall. The Russians witlessiy helped by sealing off a wide area inside Communist territory to make sure that no East Berliners would get a slave's-eye view of treedom by seeing the enactments on the ether side of the wall. And in Italy the President's visit—as it turned out—was rappily timed to follow the dramatic coronation of a Pope. These are, however, narrow perspectives. Whatever dangers the President ran and whatever triumphs he may have achieved will be all but forgotten in a year or two. What will not be forgotten is j the continuing line of European thinking that reaches down to the! deeper sources of hostility to America and that de Gaulle is likely to continue exploiting as long as he is in power. There are two main lines of hostile opinion in Europe. One depicts America as a mass of power and affluence that tears Euro-, pean efforts at unity and cares only about its own interests. The other depicts an America that is ready to pull back its troops trom Germany and Europe, and leave Europe to its own fate. One view charges America with being too absorbed in the political war with Russia to act responsibly lor the welfare of a changing, revolutionary Europe. The other charges America (as Sebastian Haffner has notably been doing in the pages of "Der Stern") with wanting to make a separate deal with Russia, especially on Berlin, behind Germany's back, and with wanti 1 --.' to sell out Europe to spare America the dangers of a nuclear war. The fact that these two views of America contradict each other doesn't seem to bother those who push them I have found in traveling through Europe these past live months that the same people can hold both views: that America seeks to rule and bully Europe question of what the Kennedy Administration reaLj means io no, tiic G.ii s who are being wooed cruciplly by de Gaulle, the Germans whose mode of nuclear rearming (with NATO? with de Gaulle" will be one of the great problems ol 1965. That is why I did not shnie tho fears of those who felt that a Kennedy visit to Germain might seem to stress too much the German-America relation. The tact is that the rivalry between Kennedy and de Gaulle in the struggle for Europe's destiny is first of all a rivalry to win over the German leaders and people. The fact is there, and those who fell thai President Ken. dy could solve it by staying away from Germany are more tender-minded and innocent than any commentator has a right to be. No there will be no new decisions coming out ol Kennedy's trip, any more than there will be new ones coming out of de Gaulle's second visit to Germany. B.uh men travel to show themselves ana dramatize what they stand for. The struggle lor Europe has made the whole of Western Europe as important a constituency tor Kennedy as for de Gaulle By SAMUEL SCHREIG By Special Report NEW YORK — While some responsible Jewish leaders dismiss reports of recent rise in anti-Semi itism among Negroes as "Muslim agitation." Jewish merchants in%  terviewed in New York's famed I Harlem tell a different story'. "I have been doing business here for seme 15 years," a dry goods store owner said, "and I tell you that Harlem is beginning to look like Munich. There's too much hate on the part ol loo many people, not necessarily Muslims." Harlem's shopping anm centers around 125th St., where many business establishments are owned by Jews. While many store owners in the ra are white, not all are Jewish. A Catholic merchant of Irish descent said that he was tired of being called "Jew" by dissatisfied customers. The coordinator of the American Jewish CommitteeS three-monthold Committee on Race Relations attributed the surge of anti-Semitism to economic problems, and said that the recent surge is a result of general militancy in the -Negro community these days. George Fleishman. AJC's expert on race problems, maintains that Negro anti-Semitism is generally prompted by individual problems which come up between Negro and Jew usually related to business matters creating a mass stereoHpe that the Jew exploits the Negro. Disheartened by recent events, many Jewish merchants expressed their dissatisfaction with the Jewish fight on behalt of Negro civil rights causes. "Those freedom-riding rabbis who caused a big ado in Birmingham caused more harm than good. They placed Jews in the south in jeopardy, while Negroes back here either don't know about it or don't appreciate it. Why should we stick our necks out and get a kick in the pants in return?" a Jewish liquor store owner protested. I "Not so," said the AJC spokesman. "The Negro press is doing I a fine job in reporting Jewish i participation in civil rights dem' onstrations, and responsible Ne1 gro organizations such as the NAACP, CORE and the Urban League voice their gratitude at every opportunity." The AJC I maintains that as a Jewish ori ganiiation, it has n obligation to combat all types of bigotry, stating that "rights of Jews are not safe when the rights of any people *re not safe." AJC has j taken notice of the rise in Negro I anti-Semitism and hopes to combat it through its new committee on race relations. j Morton Puner. spokesman for 1 the Anti-Defamation League, disi agrees with the AJC, and denies | that anti-Semitism among Negroes has risen in the past months. He I asserted that two ADL investiga! tors assigned to the Harlem area found no increase in anti-Semitic feelings. According to Puner, racial tension in Harlem is primarily between white and Negro, and is net a Jewish problem exclusively. While the AJC and the ADL ofI fered conflicting views on the rise j of anti-Semitism among Negroes, 1 Jewish merchants in Harlem indi1 cated that anti-Jewish feeling was | "getting out of hand." One merchant said that he was so concerned that he is ready to sell-out. "The trouble is," he added, that "potential Negro buyers are aware of the problem, and are awaiting the opportunity to buy cheap" Other merchants said that they contribute daily to local churches, of which there are many, and civic groups "to keep the peace." Somn merchants make it a point to hire Negro salesmen and keep them selves in the background. Th? National Association for the Advancement of Colored People attributes "the whole stinking mess" to the Black Muslims. CORE'S James Farmer believes that non-Muslims u well have been agitated and proposes that responsible Ne^ro leadership give this matter urgent consideration. Jewish merchants in the Brdiord Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn known as "Little Harlem," rr^ chambers to show some of m>. ignorant brothers what hate car. lead to." Rabbi Greenwald To be Welcomed Rabbi and Mrs. Zevi I. Green wald will he welcomed by friemU and members of Southwest Jew ish Center at a reception Satur day evening at the Center, 6418 SW 8th St. Center officials this week an nounced that tickets for High Holy Day services are now available The office will be open Tuesdayand Thursdays, from 7 to 10 p.m.. and Sundays, from 9 to 1 p.m. ij I WOLPERT FURNITURE CO. OFFERS YOU The BIGGEST choice ever! ^•R %  %  ;• Choose...fo*^ first time..at No Extra Costy d4|j00% loom Rubber or Innerspring ; s • rwir**$pouble Size fattress or Box Spring \ ^f M OtJREST Label Aeftnr 49 MATT>tt 0 BOX SMINO • Quilted inside and outside • Climatized for Southern Climate • Bodybracer Box Spring • 100; Foam Rubber YOU GET MORE CALLS WHEN YOUR PHONE IS ALWAYS ANSWERED We can answer your phone in your own name. Less than $5 per week for a full time Telephone Secretary. ANSWERITE, INC. TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE Pnone JEfferson 8-0721 • Innerspring has Dynaflex 5 Spring Unit • Gold or White, Decorator Print Cover PLUS OTCHGARD STAIN REPELLER -k Repels oil-borne stains -k Repels water-borne stains Resists soil and dirt / 1200 CORAL WAY (S.W. 22nd ST., Corner S.W. 12th AVE.) OPEN MONDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 PM. WltUte PHONE FR 3-7317 u ., EST "37 mSfa "' *"""" !*£•£!W- '**.. M% Cpft Dr.p. FREE DECORATING SERVICE"



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Page 8-C T'.Jenisti fhridiSain Friday, August 23, 1963 for those who seek a nursing home that offers complete care and more JACKSON MANOR Jackson Manor is the first nursing home in South Florida offering tun complete and distinct nursing services: RESIDENTIAL NURSING CARE Around-the-clock professional attention for senior citizens cheerful, comfortable, homelike surroundings cooperation with private physicians ... delicious, nourishing food (personal diets followed) complete physiotherapy facilities interesting activities and regular entertainment that make each day a pleasant experience. CONVALESCENT CARE A complete, modern, medically-oriented program for patients of all ages, recovering from illness or surgery, to ensure a swift and complete return to good health. Because Jackson Manor was designed, constructed and staffed specifically to provide total nursing care, the facilities, comforts, personal attention and food are unsurpassed by any nursing home, anywhere. Because it offers such facilities as a dining room and recreation room on each of its 4 floors, a private bath with each room, air-conditioning and heating, and a chapel for all denominations, the comfort and well-being of each patient is assured. Because it is conveniently located, close to downtown Miami and just r.econds from Jackson Memorial Hospital, doctors are able to visit their Jackson Manor patients easily and frequently. But, most important of all — because the welfare of each patient is of prime concern to every staff member, Jackson Manor guests are always kept in good health and good spirits. Write for color brochure and full information including low rates \ about South Florida's only complete nursing home Jackson Manor! JACKSON MANOR Nursing Home I 1861 N.W. 8th Ave. Miami 36, Florida I Please send me information about Jackson Manor. I ar especially interested in .. Residential Nursing Facility • Convalescent Facilities. 1 I NAME | ADDRESS CITY ZONE STATE WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES WHOSE EFFORTS MADE POSSIBLE DADE COUNTY'S NEWEST NURSING HOME: General Contractor BURK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY DADE PLUMBING, INC. D'ANGELO PLASTERING COMPANY EDDIE PULLER FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION GODDARD PAINTING COMPANY HAROLD G. JAFFER, INC. H. C. NUTTING OF FLORIDA IRANI AND ASSOCIATES JAMES J. GORMAN KAMMER AND WOOD, INC. KOHNEN-NESBITT, INC. LINDSLEY LUMBER COMPANY MARKET FORGE COMPANY MEDICAL SUPPLY COMPANY METALLIC ENGINEERING NAPOLEON STEEL CONTRACTORS, INC. NORTH DADE NURSERY PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS COMPANY ACME KITCHENS OF FLORIDA ADOBE BRICK ALEXANDER HARDWARE ALLIED LUMBER COMPANY ANNINGJOHNSON COMPANY ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE, INC. ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR CO. BERNARD INDUSTRIES, INC. BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY BIG CHIEF, INC. CECO STEEL PRODUCTS CORPORATION CENTER CHEMICAL COMPANY CLAUDE SOUTHERN CORPORATION COASTAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY CONCRETE PLACING COMPANY CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CORPORATION CURCIE BROTHERS, INC. POSTON BRIDGE AND IRON, INC RENTAL MACHINERY COMPANY RENUART-BAILEYCHEELY LUMBER YARDS RICHARD WATERPROOFING SERVICE, INC. ROBERT L. BOWERS ROWELL SOUTHERN FLOORING. INC. RUBBER CORPORATION OF AMERICA SAM L. HAMILTON, INC. SUN CITY BRICK TEC-MILL AND SUPPLY COMPANY. INC. TERRAZZO-TILE CONTRACTORS. INC. THE 2ACH COMPANY VIRGINIA STEEL DIVISION WILL-ROSS. INC. WILLIAMSBURG STEEL PRODUCTS WILKINSON CHUTES YALE OGRON MANUFACTURING COMPANY



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eJewish Florfidlian 'okttO* 36 — Number 34 Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKtr Miami. Florida. Friday, August 23. 1963 Three Sections — Price 20* Anti Semitic Negro Leaders Hit By Major Spokesmen of NAACP M r/MANUfl NEUMANN helped "Senofe NEW YORK — (JTA) — A New that "if people of a Semitic on York Times survey of the civil! gin continue to exploit Negroes, rights struggle in Philadelphia 111 exploit them as anti-American. ciled charges of anti-Semitism If you want to call that arti1 made against Cecil B. Moore,, Semitic, then I'm anti-Semitic."' i president of the Philadelphia | He was also reported to have said I chapter of the National Associathat he did not know a Jew in ition for the Advancement of Colthe civil rights field "who wasn't I ored People. a phony." He was quoted as having said Neumann Says Fulbright Quiz OK'd Jewish Agency NEW YORK— bP"i auit '""o Along the Gaza Strip, the shoot"M" v ^ Igrae „ cas Continued on Page 9-A WASHINGTON (JTA) Atmey na.. caueu .., tention of *J**^*,£* binical numbers of the emintry's House was directed tl.istk to 650 Reform congregations to join statements by hg>ptiai 1 l Kent the march The Conservative Nasser telling his Utmps to preUnited Synagogue of America pare for war against Israel The sa.d that" its president. George Nasser pos.Uon was cited M wUj; Maislen. Rabbi Simon Greenberg. tying tluobjectives ol the l-o."S chancellor of the Jewish eign Aid bill before Congress Theological Seminary. Rabbi BerSen. Jacob K *"**> !" V nard Begal. executive director. RepubUcan told the J^*2 assistance to Nassei only Continued on Page 7-A Continued on Page 5-A ,MOII(. me udt.i SUIK, > — ; There were no isracn %  ing was done by the Urnelis, one • „ o{ thcs0 a t-^ |J# fa. f A D A A t&sttzs^xttr&tL [fan Says Ban Won t Speed Peace submachineguns and commando muw miutary ol)M rvers investiiisVM" *•*** /^ • w — i knives. One of the infiltrators nleht'i attacks __ J. !" ..JI a bn. power differences, he said tf Addressing a Jerurower differences, he said that bj the Fedayeen.



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Page 8-B *, If**/*?! ilnridliari Friday. August 23, 1963 Lebediker Branch To Help Clink At a Lebediker Branch of Farband meeting are top row (left to right) Maurice Forer, Benjamin Talmadge, Simon Tetenbaum, Albert Ricklin. Frieda Sack, Meyer Goldstein, Hyman Eisenbaum. and Moshe Berman, executive director of Histadrut. Bottom row (left to right) UM Symphony Names Palevoda Walter Palevoda has been named office manager of the University of Miami Symphony Orches tra. Acting Dean Joseph Tarpley. Of the I'M School of Music, announced Wednesday. Palevoda, a Symphony staff assistant since his graduation from IM in 1958, will also serve as assistant to Dr. Fabien Sevitzky, symphony director and conductor, Tarpley added. Although his title is not the Kame, Palevoda will assume some Of the duties formerly carried out by Mme. Marie Volpe, who retired last Sunday. Other of Mme. Volpe's former duties will be share:: between Dr. Sevitzky and himselt. Dean Tarpley explained. are Joseph P. Zuckerman, president, Ben Meyers. Michl Gibson, Solomon Parness, financial secretary, Oscar Shapiro, vice president, Jacob Fioydman, recording secretary. Sarah Babiei, and Ely Malin, treasurer. Beth El Ends Tuition Fees All tuition fees at Congregation Beth El Religious School will be eliminated, effective for the new school term, according to an announcement by Hyman Chabner, congregation president. The new ruling will be initiated with classes beginning Tuesday, Sept. 3. for Hebrew School, and Sept. 8 for Sunday School, taking the place of the scholarship propram used previously. Registration for a complete educational program lor students from 5 to 15 in Hebrew, prayers, customs, traditions and Bible is now being accepted at the office, 500 SW 17th Ave. Chairman of the educational committee is Joe Zalis. Lebediker Branch of Farband this week opened its campaign of assistance in behalf of me 4Uti--iuivoi'>ary celebration of Histadrut. At a special meeting of the Lebediker Branch Executive Board. Moshe Berman. executive director of the Israel Histadrut Committee of Greater Miami, described the current needs of the organization. Responding, Joseph P. Zuckerman, president of the branch, and a member of the Israel Histadrut Committee Board here, vowed support of the Lebediker Branch toward completion of Greater Miami's Medical Center now being erected in Beersheba. The branch decided during the KOSHER HOTEL MARSEILLES %  meeting to undertake a special sponsoring project of the Pediatric Section oi the Medical Cenler, with" the 300 membe a ofthe branch underwriting I •upport Visit the fabulous STARLIGHT ROOF America's Smartest Supper Club for Superb Dining and Delightful Dancing to MAL MALRIN His Piano and His Orchestra COMPLETE DINNERS from *5.50 I Uike Starlight !l""f for a tptctacutar i !*•& -.if, HML BESACH HOTEL On the Ocean at -I RBSEHVATIONSl B. %  •:. %  :. JE ie-.'iOOO MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SACKS Couple Mark 50th Anniversary At Dinner Party Golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated by Mr. and Mrs. Louis (Gertrude) Sacks, formerly j of Detroit, Mich., who came to ; Miami in 1948. They were feted on Sunday, Aug. 18, at a dinner party for the %  immediate family hosted by daughter and son-in-law, Dr and Mrs. (Dottie) Benjamin G. Oren, ; 1640 Tigertail Ave. Participants in the celebration were their other daughter. Miss j Bess Sacks, and granddaughters. [Jenny ar.d Marianne Oren. He'll Coordinate WQAM Dep't. WQAM announce? t:ie appoint nient of Ron Lieberman as high j school cordinator. His duties include the management of 24 correspondents, one from each of the major Dade and Broward County high schools and of teenage affairs in South Florida. A Palmetto High senior. Lieberman was a WQAM correspondent for two years. He is a three-year member of the Palmetto Panther Editorial Board and serves as a correspondent for the Miami News. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs Alvin H. Lieberman. 7245 SW 105th Ter. 1$ 100". Air Conditioned 7 daily pei" person double occupancy 25 of 116 rooms To Sept. 18 INCLUDES Complete Breakfast and 7 Course Dinner FREE TV in every room Movies. Beach. Parking Entertainment. Swimming Pool Oceonfront at 17th St. RESERVE FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS Sept. 18th to 29th CANTOR NULMAN e Services in the Hotel I CALL JE 8-5711 Miami Beach SAND-ELI STRICTLY KOSHE* CATERERS Of The LOMBARDY HOTEL 6305 COLLINS AVE. M 3. Cord'ally Invltci You • • HIGH HOLY DAYS Rosh Hashanali Yom Kippo And al No Extra Charge to Our Patrons: The Holy Day Sorvicos iv+toatad by a well-known Rabbi and •* *iually well-known Cantor. RESERVATIONS AIU AVAILABLE FOR 6 DAYS SEPT. 18 thru SEPT SB SEPT. 27 thn, SEPT j) FOR '1 DAYS SEPT. 18 thru SEPT 31 For Further informa,<^ and Rese ,_ v.-tions Ca i DAYS: UN 6-422 > NIGHTS: UN 6-52"8 Or Wl 5-4084 li NATIONALLY FAMOUS ... FOR SO YEARS i THE FABULOUS ZEIGER KOSHER CUISINEI f ti nwT I I iXefrauraM^P^tZK KING ARTHUR'S COURT SINGING STRINGS DINNER • SUPPER MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS 500 Deer Run • TU 8-4521 ART BRUNS. Co-Ownar Open Irom 7 in. to 2 am. Sit. Salutes The EUS NESS MAN CF THE WEEK Al PANETZ on the corner 111 Miracle Milt, C.C Ph 446-7031 For T3ke-0ut Semes If you seek the ^ BEST IN DINING.. it's Hl'ritUttl's BIG PORTERHOUSE THE KING OF STEAKS anaf Sea Food Specialties s D.-. Mwy I iW. IIIMI ll (I S-I63I Dade Heights Now Registering Registration for Dade Heights .icwish Congregation Religious Schools, as well as nursery and kindergarten, scheduled to begin on Tuesday, Sept. 3, is continuing through Sunday Irom 9 a m, to 12 noon, %  Heights Theatre Guild %  ill hold its firs! ca ting for the i%4 season on Sunday at 8:30 p.m., and Monday at 9:30 p.m. Needed are actors, actresses, stagehands, electricians, and carpenhands, electricians, carpentters! For High Holy Day tickets. ;i representative of the Religious Committee will be at the syna-j gogue office every evening. Mon-1 day through Thursday ZEIGER'S Ritz Plaza • HOTtl %  POOL • CASANA CLUi All OUTSIDE M LRU tum ROOM! aaa MNTNOUSIS • PRIVATI MACK a TIRRACI SNACK A • 01YMPIC POOL • TV ass M0VII TMIATlt • OUTDOOR PATIO PLANNIO INTIRTAINSSHIT • PRII PARKINS • IITT LAWS 1TRICUT ORSIRVil I • 100". AIR CONDITIONED AN0 H1ATE0 FAIULOUS ZEIQER CUISINE Dining Room Opn To Public FRII PARKING RESERVE EARLY Call Mrs. HOFFMAN JE 1-6881 D4r$ ''•"is*, ON THE OCEAN AT I 7th ST., MIAMI BEACH, FLA. THE LERNERS Established IPI 1945 jRwisJt-American WORLD RENOWNED Calslno IE 1-3987 MIAMI FAC.L.T.FS BEACH FAMOUS 671 WASHINGTON AVE. Jfesfaurant DINNERS SERVED DAILY 21s St. erf Miami loach.. Chv .ciCer'l ll 111 |F&. CATERING w.lh DISTINCTION LL-NCHEONS • PRIVATE PARTIES ORGANIZATIONS • BUSINESS GROUPS Pn-oic Roorm • Banquet Contultonl Open All Year Co" JE 8-OC.U $80,000 Classic Set at Flagler The quarterfinal eutdown point in the Flagler Kennel Club's $80,| 000 International Classic comes up Saturday with the duel between I Sonda and Memento capturing the fancy of greyhound racing fans as nothing else has in many a season. While the stake campaign continues to occupy the spotlight as | the summer racing season moves toward its final three weeks, other events ami eventualities add to the expense of the drive toward the finish. Aside from the $80,000 jackpot, John Prevatt's Sonda has her sights set on matching or better' ing Honey Line's record of 19 wins for a single season at Flagler. hut she'll have to win just | about every remaining start to make it. HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT ^WJ %  • • %  I I CATIIItf fro* kars •"oeuvrts fa a cmplet, aattat 170 N.W. Sth ST., MIAMI %  m PHONE PR 4.26SS Greater M i, C rni ,U £ erVi,l ? n 1*" U i,ed K hrus ssoc"t£ of On*, HOUSE WED0IN6S IAI MIT2VANS tUEPTHMM MICHEL'S Kosher Restaurant CATHOsS FM AU OCCASIONS RAR MIJZVAHS OUR SRfCMlTr 940 7lit STREET UN 4V4043 NORMANDY ISLE (CU.ad M.nd.y I Salurst,,) BAR MITZVAHS • BANQUETS UNLIMITED Mian,;: n i ci T H#me Ha or Synogaqu. iff-a s.*8a*—fl s&s-s; J



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Page 4-A vJewistfkrklkHn Friday, August 23. 1963 "Jewish Flor idian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX —• MM 396 FRED K. SHOCHET Editor and Publisher LEO MINDUN Executive Editor SELMA M. THOMPSON Asst. to Publisher ISRAEL BUREAU Sheraton Hotel — Tel Aviv, Israel RAY U. BINDER Correspondent PilfeHahed .--> > IVI.I.-.V ,i,„, [927 by Th. J*wlah FVrldlan BI 1L'" N.E, Sixth Street, Miami I, t-'l %  > % %  !• %  Beeopd-Ciaai Poatafe Paid at Miami, Ftariaa. The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Ww?h Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraph.c Aoncy. Sevn Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Assn.. American Assn. of English-Jewish Newspapers, and th* Florida Praas A aaa. Th.' Jewteli KWridlan vement away from total civic responsibility with n the Federation framework-the sort of responsibility that nurneonln f.uT ? l Prai CC of "•• %  •* %  agency programs even if the moment' Unt OMM StimS TO Bf UNCONCIKNID 'Y"OFFICIALS ARE nevertheless hardly to be criticized lor the the rn* nlT ''"?'' only bccause th *y Und steadfastly with carefu£ tl tt f r n, d Gr *^r Miami Jewry. In fact, more who now L e iT ,ne ? S he thinkinK of ,hose federation leaden rael or entail ?r ,t" toWard a wean i-wa y from the central IstStenth.lS VV"* M parl ol the ove evaluation of sas sss ssass mm m he mor m ,h,s marSledV'fh 52 *"5 of writin abou t these matters, I have !" ew? sn rlwLS CnC W th Which m Presentation has met here. ilmJSSSSX t h ? l and have featu "* K ~SS n th<,ir B" h eS 5i SE ma,n ly M because Miami sm mak 6 ood copy a: alf JEE T 52 ,etters at ,he outs€t *ere is ne comment Federation 5 Sera Eg* £ fr m a encv *"* not fr m ieaaer, not trom the community at large to discuss an i,!! e H ab0Ut a %  %  "peU his name wrong, were I "set to r ghU"T. d l MC,a ed fr0m the !*<*>' *volved. I would be mentati^G^/M" !" ^ ^ ^ en "* h PertU,p ** fr "* I imagined Th! vL Wry has Pressed further than even ago no 0 „t JBhSaW? ^^ Wh0 Said t0 me SCVeral *** of Jewish FanSl aS rh!wr Pe J e ed ,he 8t0ry the tragic d sing cause of impossible h„^ S '^ rvice intake come September beNo one does^fre „oJn e h? '"•J 1 *" W PTOphetic in hiS won ", abandonment ^'^SJ^Z^ toex P ress ou,ra e at the to l!J civic trust FrL ,uZ t S 1,n 8 t ir "e leadership of its sacred canlent that I have mere v .""•? %  • 1 hear va *u rumblings of disMy purpose was no,Tract VT*'" a d ,hat l ffer M "^'i W. Miami harSy ^ZZ ** **** • '*' "" !"



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Friday, August 23. 1963 9-JewistfhridHain Pioneer Women to Raise $2,750,000 For Israel Work During Coming Two Years Page 3-B By So*ci*l Report Pionee r Women pledged last week to raise $-*.75O,O0O in a two\ear period to finance the organization', weltare program in Is-; raeL The goal, announced by Mrs. .Sniney A. Leff, national president, was adopted at the organization': ]8th national biennial convention in Detroit. Mich. The p-ogram. which will be carried out by Moetzat Hapoalot. the Israel Working Women's Council iMstei organization of Pioneer Women includes child care activities vocational, agricultural and rehabilitation projects. At r symposium on "A Positive % Hollywood Lady Attends Seminar Mrs. Natalie B. Freedman, education chairman for the Florida Region of 1 la i --ah and education \ice president of the Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah, was selected as regional representative to the Ha assah National Education SeminOX in Stamford, Conn., this week, It is the second time Mrs.' Freed i in has represented the llondr Region at the seminar. Onea year, the national | Iladass.i Education Department' calls t< jrether one delegate from every vgion of the United States and I erto Rico. In intensive' session 35 carefully chosen worn-1 en are -xposed to the best teachers ; m techniques in adult Jewish education. The course this year mnsists of Bible, sacred symbols, a 1 the Hebrew language. Inctr .tors include Dr. Louis L. Kaplai president. Baltimore Helm u ; i lege and Teachers' Training : iool: Rabbi Yochanan Muffs nstructor in Bible, Teach en till tute. Jewish Theological Seminary, NY ; and Mesdames Goldman. Sarlin. and Gamoran, head.of the National Educational Department ot Hadassah. On her return. Mrs. Freedman will conduct a similar education seminar for t:-.e 15 chapters of the Florida Region. Mrs. Irwin Liss, o Coral Gables, is regional president, and Mrs. Arthur Friend illili vood Chapter president. Approach to Jewish SurvivalJewish Women's Role," Rabbi Morris A.ler, Congregation Shaare' Zedek, Detroit, urged the forma-' tion of a National Adult Jewish! Education Council to sponsor aj variety of programs both formal] and informal that would aim to educate American Jews in their traditions and culture. Rabbi Adler stated. "Through summer institutes, weekend seminars, forums, and panel discussions, as well as by written word, the Council would bring to large numbers of Jews the best in Jewish thought, art, ethics and scholarship." I. L. Kenen, editor. "Near East Report," speaking on "Relationships with Israel." said that "We will make progress towards peace in the Near East when the international community has the courage to isolate and outlaw those who persist in belligerent policies and preparations to carry them out." Kenen told the delegates, "For a long time, the Near East has been a free zone for belligerence and aggression where nations could shoot at each other immune from international intervention and censure." Sidney Shevitz, president of the Detroit Community Council, spoke on "Jewish Community Life." He said that "the great events of human experience in our lifetime which influence us deeply are history to our children." He continued, "The horror of the Nazi holocaust, the excitement of the formation of the State of Israel and the past 15 years of development cannot have the same impact on them unless it is related to their present and their future, and unless it is significant for the preservation of Jewish values that are essential to them and their fellowmen." Dr. Sara Feder, chairman of the symposium and the head of the Education Department of Pioneer Women, stressed the increasing effectiveness of Pioneer Women in American Jewish Life, ed out the role of the mother and her family and spoke of Pioneer Women launching a new family holiday. JWV Auxiliary Hears Rports Reports on the National Con! vention of the Jewish War Vet1 erans of the U.S. will be given ] at a meeting of the North Shore | Ladies' Auxiliary 677 to be held Wednesday. 8 p.m., at the Norj many Isle Branch of Washington I Federal Savings and Loan Assn. Held in Washington, D. C, from Aug. 4 to 11. the convention was attended by localites Mrs. Sol Spielberg, president of Auxiliary 677; Mrs. Ben Haberman, past national president; Mrs. Max Levine, past State Department president; and Mrs. Bertram Whitman, State Department treasurer. Instructor Helene Taylor gives some pointers to four of her pupils who gather together each Tuesday at Temple Or Olom's community auditorium. The classes, by the former Roxette dancer, are sponsored by the Temple's Sisterhood. Getting their lesson are (left to right) Marcie Aronow, Aileen Bill, Sharon Budnick, and Susan Horowitz. Temple Adds Faculty Member Benjamin Altshuler. formerly of Ontario, has been engaged as a. full time Hebrew School teacher by Temple Menorah. Holding a BA degree from He brew University, Altshuler, who I is 33 years old, has six years of teaching experience in Canada. where he emigrated from Israel. While in Canada, he took graduate courses in educational psychology. He has experience in youth work, having served with Maccabbee Youth Organizations and Young Judaea in Canada. Altshuler is married and ha:three children. Flagler Adds Two to Staff With the addition of two new members, the Religious School staff of Flagler-Granada Jewish Center. 50 NW 51st PI., is now complete. ,, Merwyn Levin and Lew Leon, both Dadc County public school teachers with Master's degrees in education, have joined the faculty. Levin, who has taught Hebrew in Ohio and Pennsylvania, will teach first and second grade Hebrew, and Leon, a local Sunday School teacher for the past four years, will have charge of eighth and ninth grades Sunday School. Other staff members include Mrs. Mathew Cohen, second and third grades, Sunday School; Daniel Borowsky. fourth grade; Mrs. David Hertz, sixth; Mrs. Daniel Borowsky, seventh. Arnold Levy is principal. Rabbi David Rosenfeld. spiritual leader of Flagler-Granada, will instruct third and fourth year Hebrew classes. Cantor George Goldberg will continue to coach Bar Mitzvah students. CONGENIAL WOMAN to help with tight housework in P'i> j.te home, own room. "hone FR 1-4098 C i mm I-,. tOOM and BOARD I For llttrly Pacpl* Special low um-| I met MM, strictly Kothar. Warm •| mosL.ru i*. Car Mrvto. Also Efficiency i -astmabla Rare Mrs. H. levin, I 1541 Euclid Avt. JE 1-3741 ) THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED NEEDS FOR ITS THRIFT SHOP All fMrf FMHtVW, C/afMne;, IMNI, Diihts, Drapes, Efc. PHASE CAll US FOR PICK-UP THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 7331 N.W. 77th AVENUE Ph. 696-2101 C/ostrf Saturdays Singers Group in Rehearsal Miami Beach Community Sing ITS will Start rehearsals for the coming season on Thursday even ing. Sept. 5. in the Bandroom ot the Ida M. Fisher Junior High | School under the direction of its : new conductor and music direcI tor, Hirsh Marchbein-Marbiny. Rehearsals will be held regular ly on Thursday evenings. Vacan cies exist in the bass, tenor, alto and soprano sections, according to Mrs. Geertrude Canter, 543 13th St., Miami Beach, in charge of information. CONSERVATIVE SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NEED OF QUALIFIED TEACHERS Call CA 1-5406 or HI 5-1529 Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231 "YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT" for an AFFAIR to REMEMBER BLOSSOM SHOP 1572 Washington Ave., Miami Beach There IS a Difference in Flowers-TRY OURS WEDDINGSBAR MITZVAHS GARDFN PARTIES BIRTHDAY ANNVERSARY & HOSPITAL BOUQUETS FREE DELIVERY ALL GREATER MIAMI that's "Happy Netty Year" in Hebrew here it is in everybody's langnage .. When it comes to gift-giving for Rosh Hashanah, JM's Barton's delicacies say it with Continental flavor! The Shofar gift box of Continental Bartonettes shown, miniature chocolates filled with nuts, fruits, cordials and creams, one pound, 2.IJI. Other O.ft boxes: New Year Cookies, 15 oz., 2*00 Miniature Fruit and Honey Cakes, 15 for |.J)]| Chocolate-Dipped Fruits, 14 oz., 2.25. Almond Kisses, 1 lb. gift caniiter, |.||{ New Year Favorites, 14 oz., |.f)]t. Tov Shofars, each <|J) BARTON'S BONBONNIERE, first floor, miami and ft. lauderdale. BARTONS (0) IMwimtW. B1SCAYNE BOULEVARD AT VENETIAN WAY. PARK KKIK



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Friday, August 23. 1963 fJkwisl fhiradHairi Pcce 7-C ACCENTUATES FLORIDA ATMOSPHERE Nursing Home Has Lovely Gardens to Cheer Patients Located in a part of the world famous for its climate presents an added advantage to residents of Ji.ti.-i : ".;..nor. It takes the form of a beautifully-landscaped garden which spans irge area in trout of the building. Designed t" permit patients and visilois alike to enjoy South Florida's beneticial fresh air and sunshine, the garden, with its neatly trimmed surrounding hedge, feature* an arboreal bof a ~iling'"cocon i or oanza ol trees, palms and shrubbery. interlacing the lush green turf are numerous walkways and shaded benches where residents can meet, pause and con\erse about topics of the day. len-free as possible. And cuco nut palms and avocado tree.' were lift out to eliminate the pi lillty of injury caused b} The garden features an array of colors—from luxuriant hlbls cus plants with blooms of vary ing p.istel shades to the brilliant red blooms of the ixora. Many of attendant activities between residents Manor's regular staff nurses, is show ANo contributing heavily to and nurses originate from three centrallystation, which is connected to each KK Shuffleboard courts and other the natural beauty are stately located nursing stations on each of the patient a modern audio-visual intercommur. outdoor rccreat.onal facilities umbrella trees, allamandas, arafloors. Mrs. Esther Hoffman, one of Jackson system St the m by cctior. ire also available. The scores of trees, palms and -lirubs which adorn the garden were carefully selected—from the standpoint of health and safety. For example, trees were chosen on the basis of being as polDietitian Has Many Years Of Experience Mrs, Matilda R. Brenner, whose experience in the hospital and nursing home profession includes positions at Mt. Sinai ll<>s pital. North Shore Hospital, and Osteopathic General Hospital in Miami, is consultant dietitian at Jackson Manor. A former Army dietitian in the Medical Corps, Mrs. Brenner will be in charge of planning of meals for residents of Jackson Manor in accordance with specific health and medical recommendations. She will also arrange diets for patients requiring special foods as directed by personal physicians. Mrs. Brenner, a foods and nutrition graduate of New York University, is a member of the American Dietetic Association as well as the Florida and Miami organization. Assisting Mrs. Brenner will he Miss Annie Kate Carey, who as employed as a high school lunch manager for 15 years. In 1957, she became director of the dietary department at Christian Memorial Hospital and also served a year with Palmetto Convalescent Home. lias, silver button woods, seagrapes, crotons, and a variety of palms including cabbage, swamp. Christmas and MacArthur. The landscaping was installed under the supervision of J. D. Greer, one of Miami's well-known nurserj men. Progressive Convalescence Today MBS. MATILDA K. BRlNNtK Consultant Dietitian Continued from Page 1-C ly for the care of the sick and the elderly, and are complex and highly efficient operations. They are modem in design, often situated on sprawling green acreage, and the current-day version is bright, colorful and appealing —both inside and outside. Nursing homes in the Sixties are acquiring new dignity and stability, which make them more attractive to an ever increasing number of prospective patients. Kxcellent facilities and skilled care performed in attractive surroundings contribute to the patients' sense of well-being. Anxieties are lessened, and many patients respond with better health, increased vitality and a desire to be participants in life rather than onlookers. One widespread misconception about nursing homes is the idea that the patient who enters is beginning a long and tedious stay. This is not the correct picture for a modern facility. A recent study shows that almost half the nursing homes ( /.ulj.Niiu Manor hurting Home was built under Federal Hoiui'ng Administration Title 2 32 a section of the Housing Act of 1959 which aw thonzes tint FHA to insure mort. I'M qualified proprietary nur\me homes. The FHA nursing home program is aimed at providing nursing homes which arc economically .. id structurally adequate for the safely ami proper care of occupants (.:,'>i,i Manor complies with all the rigid stipulations under / r HA Title 232. Herewith u the idt and concept involved, at teen />-. Mr,. Hul,-. iii present day trends and philnsophies of patient and resident ..... ) patients remain in a nursing home less than 30 days. Postoperative convalescent patients accounted largely for this shortstay group. In only 11 per cent of the cases do the patients stay for over one year. Assisted in great measure by the new FHA program, there has been a rapid development of the nursing home : .


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the ii/i oman s "World Jewish Floridian Mian-Florida. Friday, August 23. 1963 Section B Busy Heller Family To be Busier Now p | Heller has always known I hat her Daniel Neal would maki „ Last week, he did. He wai elected by voice acclaim as na tional commander of the Jewish )u-,r Veterana of the USA. at thi JWV's 68th annual convention in Washington, D.C. Thi couple live a quiet life with their children, Douglas Paul l. Mona T. and Lisa 8. at 460 So. Shor< Dr. ••Quiet," of course, means proudly basking in the Increasing amount of civic activity their husband and father has taki n on as a personal responsibiln\ Lovelj blonde Diane is a former school teacher and area chairman ul the Young Matrons Division of the Combined Jewish Appeal. In her own right, she has. in addition i ihis. a long string of organizational achievements. Diane is past president of the Greater Miami Chapter of ORT. former vice president of the Conference of Jewish Women's Or. ifcnizatiOW—now the Federation oi Jewish Women's Organization!, a member of the Social Service Bureau of the City of Miami Beach, and CJA chairman lor the Southeast Region of ORT. She is a graduate of the University of Miami and attended! Columbia Teachers College. All of which makes me understand perfectly why Dan does uhat his belief in humanity makes him do.'" according to Diane. On his own. he has spoken for the United Jewish Appeal at an annual assembly in New York; regional meeting in New Orleans, La.; and has presented fundraising addrenta in Savannah and Valdosta. 6a.; in Ft. Law er dale. Vero Beach. Lakeland. Sara ota. St. Petersburg. Ft. Mvers. Palm Beach. Cocoa, and Orlando. Fla "1 the first Young Leadership Mission ot the United Jewi>h Apical to Europe and Israel. There. ,\e met all the heads of government, and really saw the coun.ry," In 1981," explains Diane, "we \ Hi' both invited to be members In addition. Dan. who is a pracIcing Miami attorney, had an opportunity to spend two days at he then ongoing Adolf Kichmann trial. Prosecutor Gideon Hausner gave Dan an autographed copy of his opening address to the court, Tt was after the trip that Dan, was asked by the UJA to join its Speaker's Bureau of lay and un paid workers." according to Diane. Dan's latest honor, his election as national commander of the Jewish War Veterans •thrilled us all." What the Heller family will never forget was Undersecretary of State W. Averell Harriman. who iiad just returned from forging the Three Power nuclear test ban treaty in Moscow. Opening his keynote address to the JWV convention in Washington. Harriman declared: Tm supporting Dan Heller for your r.ext commander." Besides which. Diane reports, "both our Senators Smathers and Holland. Gov. Bryan'a,Kl ReD Claude Pepper helped Dans cam paign for election. They are thrilled by the honor bestowed upon Florida for the first time." It is 11 years ago that Diane and Dan first met as members of a Young Adult Group of the then Miami Beach Jewish Center under the auspices of Dr Irving Lehrman. Both are from Brooklyn. "That was a good enough beginning." Diane smiles. A year inter they were married. Since then it has been a decade *'<. love! the three children, and service to their community. Dan's latest achievement now puts him on the national horizon of contributions to the civic affairs of the Jewish community and our nation—Isabel Grove I At home are (left to right) Diane. Douglas Paul 1. Mona 7. Lisa 8, and proud Daddy Daniel Neal. ORT Conference Heads are Appointed dent of Women's American ORT, : convention of the organization to I 450 ^en s Amencan MIT chapland Mrs Philip Rear, of Ph.ladel-;be held Oct. 14 to 17. in New York ters throughout the U.S.. as well phia national rcenrollment chairCity at the New York Hilton Hotel, as key overseas personnel. i POTTERY BLUE GOES TO CLASS Two works of art by Joseph Love executed in wash 'n' wear cotton, completed with touches of white. Left a-line nautical skimmie. 3-6x 5.98 Right: inverted-pleat skimmie, 3 6x 7.98 7-14 8.98 YOUNG PEOPLES' /l/OPID. MIAMI (FOURTH FLOOR I. AISO DADELAND. MIAMI BEACH. 163rd S1REET. FT. LAUDEROALE, WEST PALM BEACH Diane helps National Commander Dan type a speed



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IridcryAugust 23, 1963 t'Jk-ntelh flvktBu'} Page 9-A Services J his l^Jee K e n a -GUDATH iSliL. 7801 Carlyle ave. Orthodox. Raaui Isaac Ever. kNSHT EMES 2533 SW 1*th ave. Consrrvattve. J )seph Pious, prescient. a> JETH DAVID. M25 SW 3rd ave. Con. seryative. RabOi Norman N. Shapiro. Cantor William W. LlMon. i.i:.j li >JII. SeturdttV a a.m. JETH EL, 500 W> tTth ave OrthoaoKRacbi Solomon Scruff. iFrklay > : %  "• >'•'' > mm lay ;! a.m. fSiiinon: %  "Pro'iri.liutceiiivtu." [BETH EMETM VEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dime Hwy. Conservative. Rabbi S'tnen April. Cantor Hyman Fine. I riilay Srl5 r.m. Sermon: "I'eaoi-. lhr<.uKN Strrntf'-ii." Miimliv Ml.ain. Brfr Mifsvah: >rr... eon of Ml" uuU ,\|r> Maurice St.:•**•. BETM ISRAEL. 400 Prairie ave. Orthodox. faoo, M. Louia Rottman. BETH JACP8. 301-311 Washington ave. Orthodox RabM Tikor Stern. Cantor Maunca Mamches. BETH KODESH. 110t SW 12th ave. Modrrn Traditional. Rabbi Max Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bemetein. Friday %  > p — I'm-iiny S:3 n.m. Surinom "You A-Judged." :,-:.<• |,m "Klhlca of OuHuthera." 8:30 pin. Who An Our L• i.r>?" • -— BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave. Orthodox. Raph Kriefler, secretary. BETH TFILAM. 933 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabb Joseph E. Rackovsky. • —— BETH TORAH I6h at. and NE 11th ave. Ccnservat ve. Rabbi Max Lip. scht*. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum. I'n.l.iy li '• and p.m. S. i mi.ii. "To I <>.|ii..rir.li..te. Ro i m m e l r t o or IMs1 1 nil I %  %  Mttivah: Wend), tci ol M and Mrs Bei nard s.iiurda.i Mil a.m. Bar Mitx> I!I Barry, wi Of Mr. and Mr*. Pulton 1;-. • %  i i.Tj;: Warren, BOD of Mr %  Mnrr.-Kstein. Afternoon Bni Mitxvafl Robert, son of Mr. aiul Mr*. Kilwnrd >Valtermnn. CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1544 Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham St/assfold. OADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGREGATION. 1401 NW 1S3rd at. Conservative. Rabbi Harold Richter. Cantar Emanuel Mandel. 1 iilay :t: ". p.n\ ;,. rmoni "Justice and n. (tatunlaj, S:3o a.m. liar %  vah: Bruce Helter, .--on of Mr. and .Mi>. Charisa Italian. Mincha • n.111. i:r Mlry.vah: Julian, tun of Mr. ..mi Mr*. Ban ->• lifebelt. FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st pi. Conservative. Rabbi David Rosenfeld. Cantor George Goldberg. | FT. LAUDEROALE EMANU-EL. 1801 E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi Richard M. Lev ton. • —— HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree dr. Orthodox Rabbi Alexander S. Gross. HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI, 1201 Johnson St. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. C a nt o r Yshudah Heilbrn.in. ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th St. Conservat've. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabu David Lehrfield. Cantor Abraham Seif. MINYONAIRES 3737 Bird rd. Modem Traditional. SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6431 SW 8th St Cfi'-servative. Rabbi Zevi Greenwald. TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN 1025 NE 183rd St.. Miami Qardsns rd. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor Maurice Neu. Kri • 13 iMSaturday '.' a.m. Bar -Vii/i. n. homus, „..;, of Mr. and Mm. rimer, -.IIII..H: "Preper"•f> • '.,> inOo .ii." TEMPLE BETH AM 5960 N. Kendall %  80. M.ar Reform. Rabbi • Heri> •. Baumgard. Cantor Charlea Koan. TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLYWOOD. I35t s 14 ave. Reform R.ibbi Samuel Jaffa. ^ CANDLELIGHTING TIME 3 Elul — 8:30 pan. T i^n L f,.2, E I M *HIRAH. Sunll.nd Hall. 11539 So. Dixie hwy. Recon. structiomst. Rabbi Morris Skoo Cantor Herman Gottlieb. i MP > E .jS ET+H SHOLEM of Holly, wood. 1726 Monroe at. Conservative Cantor Ernest Sterner. — • — T ^ P h E ,.. B J NA U ABRAHAM. 3o7 K. .J 67th st Conservative. Rabbi OrVesoer Zw,tman Cantor Ben 1 ri.luy 8:30 p.iii. Quest upoak.-r: I'. J. Bemetein, journalist. Topic: "I Spoke Advanced Courses in Math and Science To be Offered at the Hebrew Academy •AMI ftfCfWC IAB0VIJ1 lo 1 asirt. About t tiba." Saturdn My Fellow JeWx in a.m. Advanced courses in math and sciefice will be" offered to the Students of the Junior High Department of the Hebrew Academy. Eighth grade students this year will be getting Algebra a year earlier and ninth grade students will begin biology. Dr. Clyde M. Brown, formerly professor emeritus of the engineering experiment station at the University of Wisconsin, will conduct the math courses. Joseph Ackner, chairman of the Science Department of the Academy for the past seven years, will teach the biology course. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase ave. Liberal. Habbi Leon Kromsh Cantor David Conviser. j-Yi.im > is p m. siiinii ,iAesiatnnl Itnbbl: Michael (louhitui vi mcheeter. Knvlnnd. Sermon: "World Jewlxh I'liinmuulileB." Sutunlay l":i:. n.m, TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi S M. Machtei. TEMPLE EM/NU-EL. 1701 Washing ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irvine Lehrman Cantor Hirsh Adler. Friduj Mln.hn We Must Discover What Are the Goals of Our Life %  'i >;i 1 ui lav ;i WE SPf CIALIZE in CONDOLENCE BASKETS From $7.50 We Deliver FRUIT CIRCUS 89 BISCAYNE BLVD. FR 42710 FR 44783 TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NS 19th st Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot Cantor Jacob Bomstem. TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave Liberal Reform. Rabbi Mordeca Podet and C lor Gordon Richards. Iriil.i\ sir. |,.i,i. l.'i.ii.nvina Bervk-ex :• reception) in h .r u( CJnntor Rlelutrdtt' inucillalion will lie lol.l. TEMPLE MENORAH. (20 75th at Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramowiu. Cantor Edward Klein. TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. ana Tatum Waterway. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz Canter Saul H. Breeh. TEMPLE OR OLOM~~Con.ervat.ve %  755 SW 16th St. Miami. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor Gershon Levin. • —— TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI 12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Daniel M. Lowy. Friday 1:15 p.m. Rabbi l.owy will present Mil OneK SIl.llilKll bi .ok review ol' "Th. Uoavaraion of I'ha.pliUii Cohen," bj K.-iiOil Herbert Tnyr. i.iniiKieni iniislf RUBS '•> '"int'-i ('h.'t ion. .ni.i i lioir accompanied i>> H> Vrietl. TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. S, Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Hyman Gross. Cantor Jack Lerner Klein. Kriilay *:!.'. p.m. BMurdjiy 9 a.m. Rar MIIZVMII: Robert, s..n ,.r Mi. and Mra. I.'i ii->l Uiioloin. —— • — TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Cantor Ben Dickson. I'rlil:i> 8:15 pin. S:itt:ril.i> >: i"> a.in. TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th st Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Cantor Seymour Hinkes. TIFERETH ISRAEL. eSOO N. Miami ave. Conservative Rabbi Henry Wernick. Cantor Albert Glantz. —_ YOUNG ISRA^k. mo NE 171 St Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber. Friday i:4o p.m. Saturfiay 8:3i a.in. Sermon. "Portien of ihe Wo-k." By RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ Temple Ner Tamid With the blowing of the Shofar each morning during the month of Elul. we are alerted that the High Holidays will soon be upon us. This month of Elul is to be used as a period of preparation and self-analysis, so that we might enter the High Holiday season somewhat prepared far what lies ahead. A college professor said to his class one day, "Ladies and gentlemen, I want you to go out of college to play courageously the game of life." One young man spoke up and said, "but. how can we, professor, when wee don't know what the goals are?" A serious question we might ask at, Dr. Brown has an internafion' al reputation for his work with superior students. Since mathematics has become the basis for practically every field. Rabbi Gross, prircipal, has directed Dr. Brown "to begin a study of. the mathematics crriculum at the Academy." "It is the responsibility of the Hebrew Academy to keep the. intellectually superior student aware of the ever-widening horizons in the world and provide him with every type of unlimited opportunity for achieving his potential," Rabbi Gross said. In view of the anticipated enrollment of some 400 students far the coming year, the Junior High Department, as well as the elementary school, will have parallel classes. "Only students of top level capacity can carry such a heavy bt... ,„,.v u. i lingual work load," Rabbi Gross th,s time is: "Where are the goal cx a jn< „ and ^ hjs to a better J havp 0 screpn our cmran(s r:any of whom are here on partial or even full scholarships. "Because of this screening process and the high intellectual level of the students it affords, plus the individualized attention these students get, we have no failure problem at all. Our college applicants have a superior rating, and just recently a county-wide survey showed that we are a year and a half ahead of the public school level in the reading arts." Israel Accused Of %  Plotting 1 Continued from Page 1-A in which he traced the origins of: the Arab-Israeli War and concluded that both sides would benefit | from mutual understanding. He. reportedly spent one year working on an Israeli kibbutz while Palestine was still under the British; .Mandate, an experience that led to his hope that the kibbutz idea could be applied to Algeria. In announcing the "Israeli plot," Belaouane and other officials stressed that Algeria's 6,500 Jews—the remnant of the pre-independence community of 140,000 —had nothing to fear. Gershwin Lodge Slates Speaker Next regular meeting of the preside for the regular business George Gershw in Knights of I portion of the meting, following Pythias Lodge will be held Monwhich Dr. Oscar Ruskin, program day evening in Hibiscus Temple, I chairman, will present a program 10th St. and Alton Rd. on "Teelestar" by a speaker from Chancellor Frederick Zieger will the Bell Telephone Company. year? A sales girl in a ten-cent store was asked by a customer if they had any compasses. The girl replied. "We have the kind you can make circles with, but not the kind you can go places with." Until we have the kind we can go places with, have a sense of direction, know where the goal posts are, we can only go in circles. The secret of man's being is not only to live, but to have something to live for. The crime for many people is not, "low aim" but rather "n aim." One religious goal post means finding your ability and developing it. Nothing is much more important than finding what you are good for, finding what you have been built to do. Aristotle said that human life is intelligible only when viewed as directed toward some end. Another religious goal post is using your ability and talents for the welfare and enrichment j of mankind. Toward the close Of a life dedicated to science and the health of mankind, Louis Pasteur addressed a group of! teachers with these words: "Say to yourselves, what have I contribuled to the progress and j good of humanity?" Life is too; precious to live for oneself alone. Finally, let it be said that when we have fulfilled the previous religious goal posts, we become servants of the Lord, who gave us our talents, to see what we would do with them, thereby fulfilling the true end of our creation. Eleanor Roosevelt 'Day" Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter, B'nai B'rith Women, will have a day at Westbrooke Country Club, on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 10; p.in Reservations chairman is, Mrs. Sylvia Haber. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI 137 N.E. 19th Street A Reform Congregation DR. JOSEPH R. NAROT, RABBI Jacob G. Bernstein, Canter HIGH HOLY DAYS SERVICES AT MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION HAIL fORMEMBERS ONLY. Inquiries About Membership and School Registration Are Invited. FR 9-1757 30/ P.M. ALL MEMBERS OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY ARE MOST CORDIALLY INVITED. 1025 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE NORTH MIAMI BEACH Phone: 947-1435 rVW^W^^rVV^^wMr^r^^^S^^^^r^^^r>MAwMa i r % t %  i L TEMPLE SINAI ONLY REFORM TEMPLE IN THE NORTH BADE AREA DANIEL M. LOWY, Rabbi Phone PL 40681 CHCT GAIE. Ceater IRVING JACOSSON, Educ.f.n Director NOW ACCEPTING MEMBERSHIP AND REGISTRATION FOR THE NEW YEAR. DAilY NURSERY and KINDERGARTEN • SUNDAY SCHOOl through CONFIRMATION e HEBREW SCHOOL • Sr-ECIAl HEBREW INSTRUCTION in BAR one! BAS MITZVAM e SISTERHOOD • BROTHERHOOD • YOUTH GROUTS e ADUIT EDUCATION e SOCIAL and CULTURAL PROGRAMS. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL TEMPLE OFFICE i\



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Page 10-A • Jenisti tier Mian Friday. August 23, 1963 63 Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDLIN Some Warm Glimpses into the Creative Personality • a thll (till l. THE CREATIVE WOMAN. By Dorothy Goldberg. 204 pp. Washington, D.C.: Robert B. Luc*, 1224 19th St., NW. S3.9S. [DOROTHY GOLDBERG, wife of Arthur J. Goldberg. former Secretary of Labor and now Supreme Court Justice, is a warm, talented woman whose creativity spills over into all parts of her life. An active painter, she holds a Ph.B. in Art Education: in Washington she conducted classes in art understanding, helped to found the Associated Artists Gallery, and held a number ot one man shows of her own work. A frequent speaker before women's groups, she is also a charming writer. Some of the material for this book appeared first in her speeches; other thoughts "have been jotted down on the back of an envelope while riding in a taxi; while waiting for ones hair to set under the dryer; while waiting and waiting interminably for a husband to come to dinner." The slightly haphazard organization, disturbing at first to the reader, becomes later a pleasant fashion of its own; Mrs. Goldberg has not two or three overwhelming points to hammer home, but instead a wealth of small observations. One skips through page after page ot such tiny richnesses, pondering here, rejecting there, accepting with joyful glee in other spots. t • Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN Gruening Uncovers Nazi Elite in Egypt Washingtoni BRESIDENT NASSER'S exten-I %  sive reliance on German NazisI for secret police, military, andl other functions in the United! Arab Republic has been revealed) by a Senator who recently visit ed Cairo. He is Sen. Ernest Gruening.l Alaska Democrat, who went tcl Egypt as a member of the Senate Committee on Government Operations to examine the operation of the foreign aid program. The Senator's attention to the Nazi role was aroused by American military sources. Sen. Gruening reported to Congress that the following Nazis are among those employed by Nasser: SS Gen. Dirlewangcr. known as the "Butcher of Warsaw.'' a military adviser on guerrilla warfare. Leopold Glelm, alias Lt. Col. AINasher, who Foreign News Letter By JOSHUA JUSTMAN A Visit to Moscow Jerusalem IN THEIR statements before the House Foreign Affairs Committee's healings on the Foreign Aid Bill, high Washington officials have again and again underscored Mr. Nasser's role as a moderating force and his efforts to reduce his dependence on the Soviet bloc. The Director of the Agency for International Development David Bell declared Mr. Nasser went "a long way" toward the attainment of this goal. These statements sounded very encouraging indeed and we assume they could not have failed to impress at least some of the distinguished Committee members. Yet, these statements may well fit into the image of Mr. Nasser as Washington wishes it to see. They have, however, no relevance to facts and reality—and if additional proof was needed there is the current visit of a large Egyptian delegation to Moscow comprising military and economic experts and headed by Egypt's Vice President and Chief-of-Staff Field Marshal Abd Elhakim A'amer. Dr. A'amer, who is now in Moscow for over a week and is expected to stay on there for another one, conferred with Mr. Khrushchev for nine hcurs; even when allowing for the time required for translation, it was a rather long interview that could hardly be all devoted to a "general review of the world situation." Dr. A'amer, together with other members of the delegation, also conferred with Defense Minister Marshal Malinovsky and high officials of a number of ministries, including the Minister for the Foreign Affairs Mr. Andrei Gromyko. It is quite clear from the itinerary itself, that one of the visit's main aims was to improve the political relations between the two countries which became strained following the bloody suppression of the communists in Iraq and Syria and the Cairo proclamation about the establishment of an Egyptian-Iraqi-Syran Federation. Subsequent developments in Iraq and in Syria produced a radical change in the situation. The Baath Party opposed the establishment of the Federation on Mr. Nasser's terms, which in turn brought about an alignment between the communists and the pro-Nasserist forces in these two countries. This, of course, is only one part of the picture of Field Marshal A'amer's visit to Moscow. No less important are the military and economic aspects of the visit is in charge of Nasser's State Security Service cadre, modeled after Hitler's SS corps, and was a chief of Hitler's personal guard, and a Gestapo security chief in occupied Poland. Joachim Daeming, who is an adviser on concentration camps in Egypt—a former Gestapo chief in Dusseldorof. Dr. Hans Eisele, active in medical program at Egyptian concentration camps, a former chief physician at Buchenwald concentration camp and wanted in Europe for trial for medical atrocities. SS Guhrer Bernhardt Bender, alias Col. Ben Salem, who is in charge of Nasser's prison police guards, and was Chief of Intelligence of Wehrinacht security division in the Ukraine. SS Gruppenfuhrer Moser, alias Col. Hassan Saleiman, who is in charge of youth training. Erich Altern. alias Ali Bella, who was the Gestapo's commissar for Jews in Galicia. Johaan von Leers, alias Omn Amin von Leers, who is in charge of propaganda work for Nasser, and was formerly in the Berlin foreign ministry. Louis Heiden. alias Louis Al-Hadsch, former chief of German News Agency, who distributes Arabic translation of "Mein Kampf." George Dieudonne. former leader of Swiss Nazi Party, who works on anti-Jewish propaganda with Von Leers. SS Hauptarzi Heinrich Willermann, alias Lt. Col. Nairn Fahum. official of Egyptian concentration camp system, a former "medical director"' at Dachau. Nasser's intended future use of these skilled Nazis was indicated by a "Voice of Cairo" broadcast quoted by the Senator. The Cairo Radio called on the Arab world to prepare to "march together on our dear usurped Land—Jerusalem, Joffa and Haita—and the crime o( Israel will no longer exist. We call the army and the people in the Arabian peninsula and Jordan to quick action and to bloody revolution." Radio Cairo said the "arch-enemies of the Arabs included "the Americans and the Jews." "Free Arab soldiers and officers," said the broadcast, "the people call on you to shoulder your full responsibilities in the forthcoming battle for the liberation of Palestine our Arab people are irrevocably determined to wipe away the disgrace of Israel and to purge the Holy Land of the remnants of Zionism ." Sen. Gruening's travels in the Middle East found "great apprehension about the growing power of Nasser and a resentment over the lavish aid which the United States was giving him, which he uses to achieve conquest and domination of that entire area." He heard objections voiced in Iran, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Greece. The Senator reported that despite American hopes that the UAR would oppose Communism, Soviet military equipment still arrived in Egypt. Noting that the UAR received $250 million from the United States in 1962, Sen. Gruening said the American taxpayer was indirectly financing Nasser's aggressive build-up. ir---i|. Off the Record: It's a woman's book, of course; I suppose that must be counted as a limitation. I confess to being most fas cinated. mvself. by the first section, which treats more personally of the author's own life as a creative woman, mother of two. and busy wife. Here are warm glimpses of the wav in which the creative personality views her world puts her mark upon it. and acts and reacts in a manner which enriches not only her family and community, but most importantly, herself. "The last child." she calls the inner life of the ere ative person, for which energy must bo reserved. "Even if there arc six children to be helped toward their own launchings. the inner life within a woman must be her seventh child ... and it must be given all the attention, concern and money we would somehow find if it were a child in the flesh." Of her own last child, art. she has much to say. some of it highly formal and somewhat scholastic, some, again, highly personal in concept. The feelings of an artist — of any kind — toward his own craft are always interesting, and to this Mrs. Goldberg adds, her own wcil-devclopec" sense of community responsibility, both from and to the artist. Sprinkled throughout are favorite poems and quota tions and Mrs. Goldberg's light-handed humor. It's by no means a "how-to" book. But for those to whom the terms are more than meaningful, it will be a valuable and signilicant book. Panorama: By DAVID SCHWARTZ What's in a Name? THE ORIGINAL NAME of Rosa Bonheur, the famous painter of animals, was Rosa Mazel Tov, and Judy Holiday's original name, Judy Yom Tov. (When they said Good Yom Tov, to her, she thought he was being complimented.) M Bronco Billy Anderson, faI mous western of the silent movie days, was really Aaronson. and Douglas Fairbanks' last name originally was U.illman. • • Among the Jews of Bible times, a significant change in the life of a man was often noted by a B8W name. Jacob, after his meeting with the angels, became Israel. an.l Gideon, after deleating the forces of Baal, became Jerubaal. Shortly alter the organization of the United Nations. Dr Goldstein and Meir Grossman were members of a committee which called on various national delegations in behall of the Jewish home land. At the Chinese headquarters, they met Gen. Wu and Gen. Ma. Gen Ma, they discovered, knew all about Jews. He really was Gen. Mosha Abraham, and he had fashioned the Chinese name ot the first initials. • A famous American musician. Rudolph Blutkopf, didn't like his name, which didn't harmonize with the American scene, so he changed Blutkopf, meaning bloody hea.l, into its Hebrew equivalent. Damrosch. Everyone knows of Damrosch. • Among small town Jews, it is characteristic to call people by some distinguishing feature. I remember Moshe Nose. He had a long nose, and there was Chaim Parch, or in English, Hyman the baldhead. a One man in the Talmud is always called Everything is for the Best. (How would you like to be called Mr Everything is for the Best?) The name came about as a result of the man's philosophy. He was badly crippled, but he insisted that everything is for the best, so he got to be called that or its Hebrew equivalent, which is "Gam Zu Le Tov." By NATHAN ZIPRIN Jewish Communal Services Scrape for Manpower THE JEWISH TEACHER shortage is I a theme on which this columnist' has paused on a number of occasions. I If he has sinned in this regard w ith respect to the dearth of Jewish communal workers, it was only because he 1 was strange to the semantics of that skill and because, truthfully, he was not aware of the seriousness of the situation. It now develops from a speech made by B'nai B'rith Youth Organization Director Dr. Max Baer that Jewish communal services are scraping the manpower barrel for competenl young people and that the situation will become more aggravated in time if there is no amelioration in the circumstances responsible for the situation. First of all, our young Jewish men and women prefer to satisfy their professional yearnings in rich pastures nf fhllr h K Cy %  re J*£l vvt an<,(1 awa >' b v ^e promises of scholarships and fellowships in other fields And perhaps above ill, they seem to be lacking in zeal tor oed.cation to Jev.sh life-a sad reminder That we have been remiss ,n influencing them Jewishly. The sSua ton could also be due_as Dr. Baer said-to the re.ativewX recr l ,,n nt P-8"m by Jewish agencies, oromi i ,1"';, „ h ; V U S "i K1 ",* remains thal !" enou* •>< *N (fl



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Page 4-B +Jewl$t> Ftrricf/ntr Friday, August 23. 1963 honeymoon trip to Nassau. For her wedding, the bride wore r pea u de sole gown fashioned v ith a portrait neckline, enhanced with appliques of alencon lace ; Dd seed pearls. The full skirt, trimmed with two large bows in tiie back, extended into a cathet ral length train. The double-tier French illusion veil fell from a pillbox trimmed \ ith iridescents and pearls, and the carried a Bible topped with hite orchids and lilies-of-the-vallejr. A single string of pearls vorn by the bride was a gift from the gi oom's mother. Matron of honor was Mrs. Lewis Ansbacher, the bride's sister. Arllne Trupkin and Mrs. George Greene were bridemaicis. and Reriee Greene served as flower girl. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Lawrence Barnett, 5750 SW 56th St.. r.ewlywed Mrs. Yaschik is tmplo.-.ed as a speech therapist by the Atlanta Board of Education. She attended the Univeri ity of Florida and graduated from the University of Miami. She Is a member of Sigma Alpha Eta, .speech honorary society, and served as treasurer of the Panhellenjc Council. Her husband, now with the; 2achry Clothing Co., attended the University of South Carolina,' \ here he was president of Hillel, ;.nd belonged to Alpha Phi Ome-:>, service fraternity, and Euphradian Literary Society. Son of Mrs. Morris Yaschik and the late Mr. Yaschik, of Charles-! 1 in. S. C. his brother, Dennis 1 ^ aschik. served as best man. and' i shers included George Greene. Lewis Ansbacher. Michael Cohan %  nd Meyer Lipman. Warner-Kali MRS. MARVtY YASCHIK WVrrvr-Knlui MKS. LAWRENCE BOBBINS Robbins, Termin Married Here Joint Meeting Monday Ladies' Auxiliary of the George (•ershwin Lodge will meet Monday evening at Hibiscus Temple. Following the regular business meeting, the members will join tr.e Knights of Pythias Lodge 196 for a program on the story of "Telestar" by a speaker from E Hithern Bell Telephone Co. Gowned in peach silk organza over taffeta, the former Florence R. Termin became the bride of Lawrence J. Robbins on Sunday. Aug. 18. at the Dupont Plaza Hotel, where a reception followed the 5:30 p.m. nuptials. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro officiated. Judy Termin served her sister as maid of honor, and attendants were Irma Greene. Judy Warshaw. Merri Mann and Arlene Braun. Flower girls included Ivy Jacobs and Carol Beth Schwalb. with Howard Jacobs, ring bearer. Best man to the bridegroom was Marvin Robbins. and John Alterman. Paul Taylor. Joel Rifkin and Jeffrey Lefcourt served as ushers. Following a honeymoon in Jamaica, the newlyweds will live at 407 NW 15th St., Gainesville. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Termin. 7940 SW 21st St., the bride graduated from Miami High, and attended the University ot Florida, where she was a member of the Lewislative Council. Her sorority is Phi Sigma Tau. The bridegroom was active in Hillel AZA when he was a student at Miami High. He attended Syracuse University, and belongs to the Executive Council at the University of Florida. He is a member of Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity. Parents of the bridegroom are Mr. and Mrs Meyer I. Robbins. 243 Shore Drive East. Roses Will Live in Miami Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. GrOBSman. 6221 SW 61st St.. announce the marriage of their daughter. Tcbv Gail, to Jerald Rose on Satin day. Aug. Tf. "at Westbrooke Country Club. The bridegroom is the son of Samuel Rose. 635 85th St., and the late Mildred Rose. The bride will graduate, with honors, from the University of Miami in January. A member of Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority, she is the recipient of the highest national award given by the organization, the Blanche Greenber-er Award for outstanding scholarship and college activities. She is vice president of Orange Key, Associated Women Students, College Board, and Phi Alpha Theta. She also served as secretary-treasurer of the freshman and sophomore classes. Delta Theta Mu. Kappa Delta Pi. and the Ad\isory Council of the Dean Mr. Rose, now with a local firm of Certified Public Account1 ants, is attending the University of Miami Law School at night. He received his degree in accounting from the University of Miami, where he was a Dean's List student. He belongs to the Accounting Society of Miami and Beta Alpha Psi. professional fraternity. After graduation, he served v ith the Internal Revenue Service in Washington. DC, and Palm Beach. Attendants to the bridal couple were Alma Dosal, maid of honor; Carol Lynn Blum. Joyce Hyman and Carol Rose, bridesmaids; William Cohen, best man; Paule Ashe. Gerald Babbitt and Ken Grossman, groomsmen. On their return from a honeymoon trip to Jamaica, the newlyweds will live at 6300 W. Flagler. your next affair deserves UML Community is Invited Joseph Schmier, president, and Adrian Kaulman. membership vice president of Congregation Beth Torah. are inviting the community to meet Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz and Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum at two special summer Friday evening services on Aug. 23 and Aug. 30 at 8:30 p.m. Associated Photographs! MRS. JIRALD ROSt Students to Get Temple News Rabbi Hershel Brooks, of Temple Zamora, this week announced that the Temple is compiling a list of all children of its mem bers who are attending college this year, Every student attending various universities over the country will receive the quarterly magazine of the United Synagogue, as well as bulletins of the Temple. "We want our college students not to forget our Temple and to keep up with the work going on back home in their synagogues." he explained. "The Temple bulletins will re% mind the university student ot home, as well as keep him in toucli with the portions of the week and the sayings of our rabbis." with a wonderful choice of Miami Beach's Newest Luxury Hotel DORAL BEACH HOTEL A new standard of elegant* on Miami Beach. Superbly planned and executed weddings... confirmations, luncheons, business meetings ... ranging from 10 to 1000. or, •A Stunning 2400 Acre Country Club Setting In Miami DORAL COUNTRY CLUB True plushness in a country club setting. Spaciousness is the keynote for your affair amidst the magnificent decor of the Doral Country Club. Rooms that Ideally accommodate social groupi from the most intimate party to banquet* •n the grand scale. For complete detail*, please call Mr. Oarld Kurmc •ral Beach Mfatel amtt Comntrm Clmh ./fv 2-3GOO EVENTFULL ti WESTBROOKE .. ( LUNCHEONS WEDDINGS BANQUETS FASHION SHOWS MEETINGS RECEPTIONS StnVIMB ttTO itoo. Plan your N,i event at the Westbrook Coimtry 8S 21N J HE TRArL^CA 1-8000 %  ^SaasC •'•'**'•...iM, oft ,„. Pelmetto r\ Wrri,.T-Kahn The former Miss Priscilla Rochelle Kipnis and Ira Michael Elegant were married Aug. 10 at the Seville Hotel. The bride is th da-ahter of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Kipnis. 115 4th Ter.. DiLido Island. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Elegant. 4531 Sheridan Ave. The groom will enter the University of Miami Law School in September. Rabbi Irving Lenrman officiated. For Elegant Function* Complete Cataring Facilities for that Special Party served In superb fashion setting that will reflect your good laafe. — CONFIRMATIONS a RECEPTIONS • WEDDING) A T... AN UE TS • MEETINGS • PARTIES DIETARY LAWS STRICTLY OBSERVED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF RABBI TIB0R H. STERN CD B.LL6O LOB N0 E tfoodDr>c|[>r moNI| UN S S5 ,| THIIT, MIAMI BEACH



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Page 6-A *Je*l$bncridiair) Friday. August 83, 1963 Histadrut Rooted in the History of Israel m i —i BEILINSON HOSPITAL OF HISTADRUT AT PETACH TIKVA. Histadrut Horizon: Health to Industry Four-hundred young leaders of the newly emerging nations of Africa and Asia have attended courses at Histadrut's AfroAsian Institute for Labor Studies in Tel Aviv. The Institute has gained an international reputation as a center for training government and trade union personnel in the principles of cooperative; enterprise and democratic procedure. Above are two American visitors, Rabbi Jacob I. Weinstein, chairman, and Dr. Sol Stein, executive director of the Israel Histadrut Campaign, with Akiva Eger (center), director of the Institute. Below is a typical class attending a lecture. Academic studies are mixed with field trips and work in kibbutzim, moshavim, and urban co-ops. Afro-Asian Institute Aids Advance of Israel's Status The Afro-Asian Institute is one of the most remarkable of Histadrut aehievements. A huge building in Tel Aviv, it is the nerve center for one of Histadrut's many ambitious efforts. For a number of years now, Israel has learned to realize the importance of her friendships among the newly-emerging African nations. Israel's friendships there are. in fact, far-ranging. In Israel, you can not drive along the highways, visit a kibbutz, walk on the streets of any large city, attend a university classroom session, or enter a technical school without seeing evidence of this. Everywhere, there are splendidly-dressed African diplomats or students in work clothes soaking up knowhow to bring back to their new homelands. At a recent Afro-Asian Institute session, I saw students from Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast. Ghana, Gabon and Upper Volta in a discussion of Israel's impact on the progress of their countries. Each expressed his gratitude to the Institute for the education he was receiving. Each blessed Israel for the assistance. One particularly florid young man ended his presentation with "Long Live Israel!"' What is the main Histadrut achievement here? It is more than simply cementing relations with the African nations. It is giving them the kind of technical skills they need. It is helping people and countries that trust Israel—the size of Israel, which is like theirs; the intentions of Israel, which asks for nothing but friendship in return; the scientific and agricultural capabilities of Israel, which are geared for small lands and small needs like theirs; the lack of condescension in Israel, which does not approach the Africans as new-comers who must be patronized, but which genuinely hopes to relate to Africa's bright future in a positive way. This is the Histadrut achievement at the Afro-Asian Institute. It is one of which all knowing Israelis are proud. Enter Beilinson Hospital outside of Tel Aviv, and you are in one of Histadrut's largest medical facilities. Beilinson is not simply a large hospital for Israel; it is a large hospital for any city, any country, anywhere in the world. Beilinson is part of Histadrut's medical service program, Kupat llohm. to which lraelis belong for a nominal monthly fee. You need not be a general Histadrut member to be jiart of Kupat Holim. But as part of the service, every modern health aid is at your beck and call in the event of need. Kupat Holim runs a broad range of programs. Gigantic Beilinson is at one end. Greater Miami Histadrut's clinic, now being erected in Beersheba in the Negev, is at the •other. Regardless of size, all are geared to deal with health, whether on a cosmopolitan or outlying regional level. What Else? What else is Histadrut? Yes, it is a labor federation. But there is no closed shop in Israel. .Members pay to the federation, which in turn supports 67 locals in cities throughout the country. Histadrut is also Solel Boneh, a construction organization; Tenuvah. a dairy combine; Hamashbir, wholesale consumer organization; Koor, industrial enterprises; and Mekorot. a utility jointly operated by Histadrut, the Israel Government, and the Jewish Agency—all byproducts of the earliest Zionist settlement efforts within the agricultural cooperative framework. Histadrut represents some 21 per cent of the total Israel enterprise, with the balance either private or government-operated and owned. Neither does it look merely to its historic past. Tiuz is Histadrut's newest program which, with the Government of Israel assists new industry in pioneering areas like Kiryat Gat and Arad, where private industry does not go too willingly. Histadrut is thus many things to many people. Add to these the 30 to 40 Youth Centers it has erected, the 8,000 scholarships to high school and unversity it sppports, and the many Batei Avot for "old timers," such as on the lovely seashore at Afridar it operates, Histadrut remains a continuing reflection of the fundamental purposes of Israel's earliest pioneers: the upbuilding of a Jewish homeland in our time. Reflects the Earliest Drive Toward Upbuilding Today Of a Modern Homeland By LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor The Jewish Flo-ridien Histadrut is rooted in the history of the State of Israel like perhaps no other organization or institution, short of the Zionist ideal itself. For Histadrut is a manifestation of Labor Zionism. It is an integral part of the original Aliyot to Palestine from Eastern Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. It represented, in the very beginning, the active realization of the philosophy of political Zionism spawned in the drawing rooms of Vienna and Berlin and London. Histadrut is the direct descendant of the men and women who first came to a maleria-inlestecl. swamp-ridden, and desert-neglected country to wrest from long dormant Pale-tine a reemergenl Israel in our time. Refugees from the political. economic, social, and religious repression ot Poland and Russia they came to forge a new life in the image of Theodor llerzl and Max Nordau and '.'achum Sokolow. They came i.i the spirit of democratic MCttUam, forming cooperative agricultural communities to increase the cer tainty of their -uccesst migration. Today. Histadrut ha^ Ear outstripped the basic ccr^ept of this kibbutz • kvutzah nioshav orientation. Hi-tadrat functions on a variety of fronts i modern Israel. Those who merely regard Histadrut a.a labor union —and one very importa ( taped of its many programs ;.. in the area of labor affair— indeed have a short-sighted ut I rstandins of the organization During my recent st %  tour in Israel, 1 had amp. opportunity to see Histdnit ir mul ti-faceted endeavor—a f %  re Hoc ting light outward da number of colorful hori: ach independent frcm one .. lOther, and all contributing t> tel well'being. From healt o laher. to education, to chilli I industry, to tda sources in the kibbutz his is Histadrut, ami mare. BROTHERS AND SISTERS TOGETHER Onim Nurtures Young Nations Energetic Citizens of Tomorrow 1 drove tiir out into the country one day, and near the border came upon a wood-secluded camp site: Onim. Here, children from toddlers to teens cavorted in their afternoon games, most occupied on a soccer field Onim. a Histadrut program, is a home for these youngsters who came to Israel from a variety o| lands. Their >kms and racial features are an index to the broad geography on which Omni stands. To the Ashkenazic youngsters wrested from misery in middle and Eastern Europe, I spoke Yiddish To the il.nk. narrow-boned boys and girls from North Africa. I conversed in French All were rapidly acquiring the fast patter of Sephardic Hebrew. The population at Onim is more than immigrant children. It is children from broken homes in Israel; it is orphans; it |g the abandoned; it is the unwanted. But Histadrut wants them all to brighten ther lives, to raise them as Israel citU morrow. Through txu Ir tu .it ir ments I meandered—their pots, their tar from v. i lorn but spanking clei n SHOT I r their lovely dining room, t e >reath takingly beautiful par! u which in,an is gitual i In the sOCCi r Bell sembled, stared ;.; m> %  > -in i, mera, and • uetlj > themselves into .< gn > photograph, l was nbarras ed. lor I never photo..| such things But -heir rxpectant eyes, their ah-, lute • illi igness to be coo] i e\ c %  '• hen I ha i not asked for it. the way they held hamin a ledicated brother-and-sistei fashion, show ed me that, in fact, they were siblings on a new lane', it %  His tadrut home. ng li • huge family to learn to meet the future. I clicked my shu*:er, and they applauded. In turn. I applauded them athey raced back to their afternoon gair. i Workshop at one of Histadrut's 16 "Amal" vocational schools.



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Friday, August 23, 1963 vJenistt nrr/kfifun Page 5-A Jacob Sher. Miami Beach philanthropist, civic leader and sportsman, is inducted in campus ceremonies as a Fellow of Brandeis University, an honor conferred on persons who have assumed major roles in the development of the Waltham, Mass., liberal arts university. With Sher are his niece. Miss Barbara Byrne (left), and his wife, Mary. The Shers live at 16 Island Ave. Major Jewish Bodies Will Join Rights March Aug. 28 Continued from Page 1-A sion on Social Action, will among the marchers. be The American Jewish Commit tee's endorsement called on all members "to participate in this peaceful demonstration" and the Committee voted Si,000 to help meet expenses of the demonstration. In. New York, the local section of the National Council of Jewish Women urged its member* to launch a letter-writing campaign to members of Congress, asking support of the civil rights bill. The Milwaukee Jewish Council said it would give top priority to the struggle of the Negro for full civil rights, particularly developments in the Milwaukee area. In Rochester, N.Y., the Jewish Community Council said it would be a sponsor of a tri-faith Conference on. Race and Religion in October, the first of its kind there. The Jewish Council Federation of Long Beach, Calif., joined the area's Council of Churches in circulating petitions to homeowners and renters, urging them to pledge in writing they would not discriminate against applicants for housing because of their race or creed. The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith urged the Senate Commerce Committee not to allow political arguments" about Unconstitutional basis for outlawing segregation in public accommodation to interfere with ending "this stubborn residue of slavery" in the United States. Playwright Dore Schary. ADL chairman, n.ade the plea in a statement to the Senate committee, holding hearings on the proposed legislation. Temple Adath Veslmrim 1025 N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN CANTOR MAURICE NEU and CHOIR HIGH HOLY DAY SiATS AVAILABLE TO NON-MEMBERS VISIT THE TEMPLE OR CALL W! 7-1435 REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR NURSERY THROUGH CONFIRMATION WORSHIP WITH US IN OUR NEWLY COMPLETED SANCTUARY Senate Quiz Clears Agency Continued from Page 1-A ment has encountered more forj mldable adversaries in the past and emerged triumphant. "Any official inquiry can easily j be sensationalized in headlines. What is most important, however,! ithe fact that a prolonged and I meticulous examination has turned up absolutely nothing damaging to the status of the Jewish Agency. On the contrary, it has serve.! to explode some malicious rrlyths and to dispose of misrepresentation propagated by fanatical opponents. "The hearings have also documented the historic role which the Jewish Agency and other pro-Israel organizations have played in the rescue of Jewish refugees, to the development of Israel and support for her legitimate rights and interests. Sen. Fulbrifht himself took occasion to compliment the Jewish Agency on its great achievements and to state repeatedly that there was 'no wrong doing'—either illegal or improper in its activities. "The only issue that developed | concerns a technical question: Whether reports filed by the Jewish Agency periodically, in accordance with legal requirements, were in every instance sufficiently detailed. We have every reason to be proud of the record. It is a vindication of our program. "We are quite confident that the devoted friends of Israel in this country, Christians and Jews, Zionists and non-Zionists alike, will not be deterred from continuing to give their moral and material support to a cause dear to their hearts and sanctioned by the overwhelming majority of the American people. "Speaking for the American Section of the Jewish Agency, and American Zionist groups whose close cooperation we have always enjoyed, I have this to ad.1: Consistent with our devotion to the national interest, we will pursue cur efforts on behalf of Zionism and the State of Israel as vigorously and cffeectively in the future as in the past. We will continue to do so by all proper and legitimate means available to free men in a free society, and in full compliance with all legal and technical requirements." AIR-CONDITIONED SANCTUARY OF TEMPLE NER TAMID tTtKNAL LIGHT' Temple Ner Tamid fConservefrveJ INVITES YOU TO BECOME A MEMBER AND ENJOY THE HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES IN THE BEAUTIFUL, AIR-CONDITIONED MAIN SANCTUARY RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ and AMD CANTOR SAUL H. BREEH OfflCIATINC Accompanied by the Choir under the direction of Joseph Schreibman MEMBERSHIP DUES INCLUDE: 2 SEATS IN THE MAIN SANCTUARY FREE TUITION IN RELIGIOUS SCHOOL & TRANSPORTATION PARTICIPATION IN ALL TEMPLE ACTIVITIES SEATS AVAILABLE IN CHAPEL SECTION FOR NON-MEMBERS Temple Office Open Daily: 9 AM. to 5 P.M. cmd 7 to 9:30 P.M. 80th Street & Carlyle Avenue, Miami Beach Telephone UN 6-8345 or UN 6-9833 BROCHURE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST BETH JACOB CONGREGATION The Traditional Synagogue on Miami Beach 311 WASHINGTON AVENUE COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED INVITES YOU TO ATTEND HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES You Will Hear the Dynamic Sermons of RABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN and Enjoy the Prayers with CANTOR MAURICE MAMCHES 4 Few Choice Seats Still Available at Moderate Prices For reservation call JE 1-6150 FREE SEATS FOR MEMBERS I Games Party Tuesday Greater Miami Chapter of the American Medical Center at Denver will hold a card party Tuesday evening at 810 Washington Ave Public is invited to the frames function, which will include prizes and refreshments. Proceeds are lor canter research. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION NOW REGISTERING FOR NURSERY SCHOOL Ages 3 thru 5 years 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue Transportation Available Open alto to Non-members RELIGIOUS SCHOOL SOUTH MIAMI BRANCH 77th Ave. & S.W. 104th St. tNear Palmet'o Bypass & So. Dixte Hwv.) MAIN SCHOOL 262S S.W. 3rd Avenue NEW MEMBERS WELCOME For Information: Call School Office FR 1-1882 %  *A^^ To the Parents of our Community KNESETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION 1415 EUCLID AVENUE HAS OPENED THE DOORS OF ITS HEBREW SCHOOL TO THE CHILDREN OF OUR COMMUNITY AND IS OFFERING FREE HEBREW EDUCATION. GIVE US YOUR BOYS AND GIRLS -THEY ARE ENTITLED TO A HEBREW EDUCATION Registration begins Sunday, August 25th between 10 A.M. and 12 Noon. TEMPLE JUDEA OF CORAl GABLFS 320 PALERMO AVENUE REFORM RABBI MORDECAI PO0ET Cantor Gordon Richards Services every Friday 8:15 P M. For membership & School Information Call HI 4-9876 HIGH HOLY DAYS BAR MITZVA RELIGIOUS SCHOOL ADULT STUDY CONFIRMATION YOUTH GROUPS SCOUTING COTILLION THEATRE GUILD BETH RAPHAEL CONGREGATION 139 N.W. 3rd AVENUE Again Conducting High Holy Day Services With prominent Rabbi 4 Cantor Seats $5 Each Office Open Daily 9-12 noon. 6-9 p.m. Julius elaperOi Proaldent Ralph Krleger, Secretary FR 9-8649 FR 3-9807 i TEMPLE BETH AM The Reform Congregation of the Suburban Southwest 5950 N. Kendall Dr. (S.W. 88th St.) announces the return of RABBI CANTOR DR. HERBERT M. BAUMGARD CHARLES S. K0DNER to the pulpit on Friday evening, August 23rd, 8:30 P.M. Register now for September opening of Religious School, Hebrew School, Youth groups, Adult Education, Nursery and Kindergarten. Phone MO 6-2536 for information. *VMMM*^M^^*^*^^^V*^^^*^^A^**A*^A^AAAA*A*A**MA* BETH TORAH CONGREGATION "North Dode's Pioneer Synagogue and School" 1051 NO. MIAMI BEACH BLVD., NO. MIAMI BEACH PHONE: Wl 7-7528 Max A. lipschirz, Rabbi Abraham J. Girtelson, Educ. Dir. Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum, Rebecca Kay, Cantor Nursery-Kindergarten Supervisor NOW ACCEPTING MEMBERSHIP AND REGISTRATION ALL CHILDREN IN OUR SCHOOLS Nursery School — Kindergarten — Sunday School Hebrew School — Bar and Bat Mitzvah — Confirmation Post Confirmation — Hebrew High School Reserved Seats Now Being Distributed tor the High Holyday Services.



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COMFORT AND SAFETY PAGE 2-C "•dfewish Floridian Miami, Florida, Friday, August 23, 1963 Section C PRESIDENT'S DRUM PAGE 5-C •' %  %  % %  .. %  „ ..,. ,„, m NATURAL BRICK WALL AND DECORATIVE CONCRETE PAMOS SET OFF MODERN EXTERIOR OF NEW 150 .JED JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME 150-Bed Jackson Manor Opens Doors Here — Progressive Convalescence In Our Time By MRS. HELEN HOLT Speciol Assistant for Nursing Homes Federal Housing Administration Washington, D. C. The day may not be far off ••hm nursing homes throughout the United Slates will be considered as indispensable a part "f community health facilities s hospitals are today. Fast disappearing are the cluttered fire traps of former days, the d i e a r y ol.l converted mansions and generally run-down derelict housing, where the old and the sick were supposed to wait out their final days in bleak, cheerless and u n c omfortable surroundings. Gone, too, is the concept of the nursing home as a "last refuge." New nursing homes of today are being built specificalM$. HUtN HOIT With the words "The best of luck to you people at Jackson Manor," U.S. Rep. Dante B. Fascell (second from left) officially cuts the ribbon opening Jackson Manor to the public. At left is Jackson Manor's Administrator Harold G. Huff, while at right is Charles E. Gottlieb, president, looking on. Mrs. Helen Holt, special assistant for Nursing Homes with the FHA in Washington, D.C., who came to Miami for the opening of the Home, holds the ribbon as Fascell cuts. Jackson Manor was built under the FHA program Title 232. Affiliations Show Quality Continued on page 7-C Dade County's newest resident and convalescent home—recognized locally, regionally and nationally—is a member of numerous nursing home and medical organizations. Numbered among Jackson Manor's affiliations are both the Dade County and State Board of Health. In addition, Jackson Manor is a member of the South Florida Hospital Council and the Florida State Nursing Home Association. On the national level. Jackson Manor is affiliated with the American Nursing Home Association. Memberships such as the-e. further substantiate the home's role as a responsible institution. Nursing Home Launches New Concept in Patient And Resident Care Here The most medically-advui c<: facility of its type or.da — Jackson Manor Nursing Home — opened its doors • ik and in the process ushered in a new concept in pal < and resident care. Attending dedicatory ceremonies for the four-story. lftObed Jackson Manor, located at N'W 8ih Ave. and 18th T<.. "-e a number of local and national officials, as well as members of the medical field. "Jackson Manor is part of whrt will become tht greatest medical center in the entire world — the Jackson Memorial Hospital complex." stated IS Hip. Dante B. Fascell. wikO keynoted the opening. Other dignitaries present at the formal opening included William Wilcox, Miami director of the Federal Housil Admiav istration, and Mrs. Helen F. Holt, a Washington special I •• -tant for nursing homes with the FHA. "It is a thrill to see this completed project.*" said Mrs, Holt. •Jackson Manor will insure the most important ol all things— that patients in nursing homes ;.el the finest possible caro." Jackson Manor is unique among mirs'ng homes in its proximity to a major hospital. The modern facility is loofcted two blocks east of the Jackson Memorial Hospital complex, to the vicinity of Cedars of Lebanon am' other institutions. • .h include a blood bonk and the University of Miami Medical SchooL Representing a pioneer step in patient attention. JacksoS] Manor is the first institution to plan and develop a BMtJar facility designed for all phases of resident care. Its physkal-therapy room maintains a full-time physical therapist — a milestone in South Florida nursing ho. All room-, at the home are either private or semi-private, another advancement which stamps Jackson Manor ;:s the onkf Continued on P;ci 1 C



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*JenisJh BhekRam Friday. August 23, 1963 Jackson Manor Chapel Will Meet Spiritual Needs of All Residents KHT5. XATHBYN HTZMTWCK Nursing Supervisor Beauty, Barber Shops Available the modern accommoa i Eor complete resident and •a 't.venience at Jackson •I iai sing Home are a spectL • .".t'd barber shop, beauv H podiatrist ollice. V• sarate facilities, an inovatii among Soulli Florida ursi homes, will offer sericeto all resident.-. Each located on a different :!oor y. the four-story building. tire goal at Jackson lar.or i> to create an atmos"herc that will provide all daily ecessities for residents," cornier..'*: Charles E. Gottlieb, resident, "This particular con(• —that Of separate barber. eat', and podiatrist rooms— fleea convenience never be>r as ituted in South Florida u -.;:i homes." PHILIP COLIMAN Secretory-Treasurer Meeting the spiritual need.o! residential facility. That reasoning prompted pit a modern, non-sectarian chapel a Nursing Chief Knows Field A former Dade County Public Health Department nurse, with more than 20 years of hospital, nursing home and overseas experience, is director of nurses at Jackson Manor. Mrs. Kathryn Fitzpatrick, a registered nurse previously associated with Eastern Air Lines and Palmetto Convalescent Home, will supervise nursing procedures at the 150-bed Jackson Manor complex. A native of Pennsylvania and a Miami resident for 14 years. Mrs. Fitzpatrick served as an Army Nurse Corps first lieutenant in Europe for three years during World War II. Well-known throughout t h e community. Mrs. Fitzpatrick is a member of the district and state Nursing Association, American Nursing Association, and American Red Cross. She is a University of Pennsylvania nursing education major, and trained at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years. UM Graduate Heads Finance its patients is essential to any large iners of Jackson Manor to include part of its overall operation. It also adds to the uniqueness of the nursing home, making it the first in Dade County with its own chapel. "I earnestly believe that, in providing for the physical comfort and well being of our residents, we must not overlook the spiritual aspects." said Charles E. Gottlieb, president. "And thus, in providing this chapel, we are fulfilling one of our most important obligations." The chapel, with a seating capacity of 30 to 35, is located just off the main entrance lobby. Its decor is highlighted by paneled walls of teak. Another features four stained glass panels with fluorescent back-lighting. This creates an illusion of outside lighting and enhances the chapel's inspirational atmosphere. Wall-to-wall carpeting adds warmth to the room and special altars have been provided for each of the major faiths. The chapel will be in regular weekly operation starting Aug. 30 with Jewish services. Protestant services, to be held each Sunday, will commerce Sept. 1 under auspices of the Greater Miami Council of Churches. Masses for Catholic residents have also been scheduled. Regular religious services for denominations of all faiths will be held at the chapel in Jackson Manor — the first nursing home in Dade County to offer such an accommodation. Four stained glass panels with fluorescent back-lighting create an inspirational effect. Seating capacity of the chapel is 30 to 35, and the room is tastefully designed with wall-to-wall carpeting and paneled walls of teak. Prominent Hospital Design Specialists Served as Engineers Aspee Irani and Associates, specialists in designing hospitals and other medical facilities, served as engineer and architect for Jackson Manor Nursing Home. The firm, which has been in operation for only three years, nevertheless lists a wealth ol experience in the architectural and engineering phases of many Dade County medical buildings. Among those designed by Aspee Irani are the Pan American Hospital in Miami, the Faith Osteopathic Hospital in Miami, the Hope School for Mentally Retarded Children in Miami, and the Lehigh Acres Nursing Home Builder and contractor for Jackson Manor was Burk Builders, Inc. Formerly of Nashville, Tenn., Burk Builders have contracted a wide variety of projects in South Florida during the company's 16 years of operation. Among them are the Hollywood Post Office, Temple Beth El in Hollywood. Temple Beth Sholom ot Miami Beach, Holmes Elementary' School in Miami, and the Terrace Towers Apartments of Miami. A University of Miami graduate with degrees in accounting and biology is secretary-treasurer of Jackson Manor. Thirty-year-old Philip Coleman, president and general manager of Palms Memorial Park, has been associated with the Home since its inception more than two years ago. He supervised selection of all interior decorations of the new facility in conjunction with Mary Ann Rapp of the Will-Ross company. "We are quite proud of the appearance -of our Home." Coleman said, "but we are even more proud of our trained personnel who will give Jackson Manor real meaning." Coleman attended Riverside Military Academy and Miami Senior High School before ren ceiving his BBA degree from the discussing present and future plans for Jacktreasurer; Lee D. Keene, adm university. Coleman also belongs to the Elks Club, Florida Turf Grass Association, YMCA, and is a member of Temple Beth Am. The Jackson Manor secretarytreasurer and his wife, Barbara, live in Kendall with their two young sons, H. Charles "Chuck" Coleman 2, and John, 6 mos. .n son Manor are the modern home's principals, dent; Harold G. Huff, admii Left to right are Philip Coleman, secretaryCharles E. Gottlieb, president. istrative resiistrator; and We offer our congratulations to JACKSON MANOR Cade County's newest nursing home! Yale Ogron Manufacturing Co., Inc. 671 West 18th Street Hialeah, Florida


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Friday, August 23. 1963 •*Jenist> fkrt/nr Page 5-C Tenacity of Charles Gottlieb Brought New Nursing Home to Fruition in South Florida CHARUS f. GOTTllfB President Self-Service Laundry Featured To allow residents as much freedom of movement and activity as possible, a self-service laundry room is available at Jackson Manor Nursing Home The room contains automatic washen and doers, and is open throughout the day. Many ambulatory residents like to assume some of the chores they normally would at home," said Harold G. Hull, administrator. "For those who are able to. the self service laundry room will offer them this convenience—another way in which we are trying to create a typical institution atmosphere. Then, too, many patients may have personal clothing that they themselves will want to launder." Huff added In addition to the self-service laundry facilities, regular laundry pickups and deliveries are in effect The personal interest, ability and tenacity of Charles E. Gottlieb has been the potent force in the founding of Jackson Manor Nursing Home. Since the project was conceived two years ago, Gottlieb, as president, has exercised fingertip control in every phase of planning, construction and operation of the new facility. His 17-year background as a Miami building contractor, businessman, real estate developer and civic leader proved invaluable, enabling him to counsel with many friends in the medical profession about the nursing home picture in Dade County. They convinced me and my associates of the real need in our community for a good nursing home." he said. "Throughout our overall elfort, their adviee and guidance has been inestimable." Gottlieb, former executive vice president ol Stevens Markets. Inc., determined at the outset that first-hand knowledge is essential in planning a modern medical facility. "I visited nursing homes all Over the country." Gottlieb recalled, "including some of America's finest and best administered in Baltimore. Washington. New York. Cincinnati and Chicago. "It took time and effort, but the rewards made it more than worthwhile." This research enabled Gottlieb to incorporate the best features of the nation's top nursing homes into Jackson Manor's quality operation. "In addition," he emphasized, "we have developed many innovations of our own. This mod ern facility is one that will contribute substantially to the betterment of our community." One of the new concepts stemming from Gottlieb's efforts is the creation of a "doctor-oriented" policy for Jackson Manor. Under it. complete medical histories are kept on all patients admitted, in conjunction with records of their personal physician, strengthened by the psychological support of the Family Relations Counselor. "This is a tremendous help to our well-trained staff in many areas," Gottlieb said. "For example, our registered nurses can carefully follow the physician's orders for medication, using upto-date, accurate procedures much the same as any well-organized hospital." Gottlieb, an active member of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and a member of Beth David Congregation, is a native of Asheville. N.C. He attended Roosevelt High School in Washington, D.C.. and the University of Maryland, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering. He served with the Navy in the Pacific during World War II Gottlieb was married in 1948 and 1 lives with his wife. Bernice, and their three children. Jay 12, Laurie 10, and Joan 8. at 2920 Alatka St. ANOTHER JACKSON INNOVATION A Furnished Guest Bedroom A fully-furnished guest bedrom is another innovation at Jackson Manor. The room will be used for families, friends or nurses who accompany newly-admitted patients and wish to stay at the home for short periods. Accommodations include a convertible sofa. desk, lounge chair and closets. Artist's Work is Exhibited Supervisor and creator of all artistic works at Jackson Manor Nursing Home is Edward D. Wilkins, HI. a former Miami art instructor. More than 30 paintings, vary ing in technique, were executed by Wilkins, who also acted as a consultant in the selection of other works of art. The "d'wilkins III" signature ha> appeared on scores of paint ings since the William and Mary College graduate moved to Miami six years ago. In addition, Wilkins spent two years in the Orient, enriching his varied style, which ranges from impressionistic modern to classical painting.in the Renaissance manner. His works at Jackson Manor include oil paintings, water colors, sketches, scratch board, oil paintings on wood putty board, and works done with plastic paints. Spacious lobby at Jackson Manor highlights pleasant color combinations, modern furniture, wall-to-wall carpeting and an attractive interior garden. Shades of brown, green and yellow are utilized to create a serene atmosphere. Wall decorations include classic paintings, as well as decorative tapestries. To the left of the lobby are the chapel and doctor's conference room, while on the right are administrative offices. *S*Ltting tftc ^Aten of Vision JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME An Institution of which ALL South Florida can be Proud. IRANI AND ASSOCIATES PAN AMERICAN BANK BUILDING PHONE: FR 9-7987



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Friday, August 23. 1963 Double Ring Rites •For the Neijnas A late morning, double ring ceremony on Sunday Aug. 18, united RuTh Marcia Belaid and Michael Slephan Neijna at Tim pie Ncr Tamid, with Kabbi Eugene Labovitz otficiating. For her wedding, the bri.'e selected a ballerina-le; gih sheata >:own of white silk shantung with hell-shaped overskirt and square neckline. The two-tier French illusion veil tell from a pillbox covered with alencon lace and seed pearls. Daughter of Mrs. Adele Belaief, 5401 N. Bay Rd.. aid the late Abram M. Belaief, newlywed Mrs. Neijna is a graduate of Miami Beach High School and attended the University of Florida. Her husband received a degree in engineering from the University of Flori a. and is a member JA ni Tau Kpsilon Phi, -ocial fraternity. Now honeymooning in Puerto RiCO and the Virgin Islands, the couple will live in Atlanta while both attend dcorgia State Collide. A recipient of a graduate fellowship from Georgia Institute ol Technology, the bridegroom will be working towards his Master's degree. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs Nathan N. Neijna. 230 W. San Marino Dr. fJcnlsii IkiiUi, Page 5-B MRS. MICHAH NtllNA Rabbi Sfard At Miramar Temple Israel of Miramar, formerly the Jewish Community Center of Miramar. has engaged Kabbi Nathan Sfard to conduct services during the High Holy Days which will include Selichot starting midnight, Sept. 14. Before retirirg to Miami. Rabbi Sfard served several prominent congregations in New York Assisting him at Temple Israel will be Cantor Joseph M. Levin, who will chant the liturgical portions rl the services. Cantor Levin, who has served as spiritual leader of the Temple for the past year, will continue in that capacity during the coming season. Plans have also been made to tnlarge the Hebrew and Sunday School classes. Director of eduI cation will be Daniel Medwin, who I filled that position in the North | Dade Jewish Community Center for the past five years. Registration of new pupils for the classes will be held on Sun day morning. Aug. 25. Brills on Wedding Junket Now The former Elaine E-terman and Stephen A^Brill are on^ jt. honeymoon trip to Jamaica, Mexico and California, following their wedding on Sunday evcring, Aug. 18. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro parformed the ceremony at the Seville Hotel, where the receplion was also held. Attended by Mrs. Mitchell Goldman, matron of honor, and Darlene Kaplan, flower girl, the bride v ore a candlelight peau s processed in Ihis period. He reported that 858 babies were born at Cedars of Lebanon, including two sets of twins and one set of triplets. A major expansion program ifl now under way to add three new v ings to the hospital, increasing the bed capacity to 282 bed*, complete the upper three floors, cstaolish a Heart Pavilion, and expand Hie Laboratory. X-Ray and Outpatient Departments. Hay Ride Scheduled Shoshana Chapter, B'nai B'rith Women, will "Hit the Hay" for a hay ride and barbecue on SaturI day evening. All funds raised will i go to finance the hospitals supported by B'nai B'rith Women, as well as other projects. Mrs. Bui! dy Aronson and Mrs. Bill Kurland are in charge of reservations. Mrs. Ruth Wittenberg, of Brooklyn, is first-prize winner of Yuban's Land of the Bible contest. Her piize will be a roundtrip to Israel for two. In addition, she won a S500 cash bonus because her entry was accompanied by an Instant Yuban Label. She is shown with Mr. Wittenberg, being congratulated by Walter Stephan, New York sales manager for Yuban. Other winners across the country included Harold Shapiro, of Miami Beach. The Specialty of the Seville f.t PREFERRED HOTEL CATERING • WEDDINGS • CONFIRM ATfONS • LUNCHEONS • RECEPTIONS • MEETINGS to accommodate 10 or 1,000 Adath Yeshurun Open House Joseph Lie.man. president ol Adath Yeshurun Synagogue, has announced an Open House to be held at the Temple. 1025 NE Miami Gardens Dr., on Sunday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. "Purpose of the Open House," explained Liedman, "is to provide an opportunity to become familiar with the many programs carried on under the auspices of the Temple. For this purpose. all of the activities will be represented by an illustrative display. I "These will include the Sisterhood, headed by Mrs. Ira Levin, Men's Club, presided over by Joseph Fields, as well as the United Synagogue Youth. B'nai B'rith, I religious an,i nursery schools, summer day camp, and an exhibit representing congregational services held on the Sabbath, holidays and al daily minyars." Rabbi Jonah C.iplan and Cantor Maurice Neu will greet guests Beth Torch Splash Party Beth Torali Y : Adults is ha\ ing a splash party on Sunday ing :ii the Apache Motel. H Biscayne Blvd. Event will include box lunches, swimming and dancing to a live band. Reservations chairmen are Debbi Smith and Marsha llersliman. The group he'd a birthday dance on Tuesday evening in the I'SY Room of the Temple. \VcriuT-K;ihn MRS. STEPHEN BRILL Services Slated At Blackstone Ernest Field, of North Miami Beach, will conduct High HolyDay services at the Blackstone Retirement Hotel. 800 Washington Ave.. on Rosh Hashona. Sept. 19 and 20. and Yom Kippur. Sept. 28. He will be assisted by his son. Benjamin. They have conducted High Holy Day services at the Blackstore for the past three years. Cantor Field has many years of experience in the cantorate here and in New York. His son is a qualified Torah reader. Services w ill be open to the public for a nominal fee. Dr. Jacobson Is Reassigned Dr. (Capt.) Ralph W. Jacobson, of Miami, who recently came on active duty in the United States Air Force, has completed the orientation course for officers of the Medical Service at Gunter AFB. Fla. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Jacobson, of 435 SW 19th Rd., he was given familiarization instruction covering administrative procedures, military medicine and medical service support of USAF objectives. Capt. Jacobson is being reassigned to the USAF hospiial ai Pease AFB. N.H. He will join the staff there for practice as a dentist. Dr. Jacobson attended Emory University, Atlanta. Ga., and the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. He is a member of Alpha Omega Fraternity. His wife, Phyllis, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stank > Weincr. Baltimore. Md. Have that Business Meeting, Banquet, or Special Occasion You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a wedding or a private party '. at the for Information: HAZEL ALLISON Catering Director, JE 1-6061 2Sth St. A Collins Ave. For Very Special Occasions.. W/omat 10 NEWLY DECORATED BANQUET ROOMS KOSHER CATERING AVAILABLE Phase Call ESTELLE D. POLAK: JE 2-251X Seville AT 29th STREET MIAMI BEACH COUNTRY CLUB'S CALCUTTA ROOM Juat imagine having the entire Diplomat Country Club, yours exclusively for weddings, parties or special dinners! Catering facilities for groups of 100-300.. available 7 days a week. There's no other room quite like the Calcutta Room in thia area! Unlimited free parking. /'\>r reservations, cull 945-9571 in Miami, or WA 3-81 11 in Hollywood HOLLY WOOD-BY-THE-SEA



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Page 4-C vJewist noridllan Friday. August 23. 1963 ... %  :i' a,t*i li..'. .ii ~ IVM i." """ "" • 'i. "•'"•' i "''" %  %  %  Mrs. Matilda Brenner (left), consultant dietitian, and Miss Annie May Carey, food manager, discuss meal preparations in the modern and sanitary kitchen at Jackson Manor. The kitchen is designed to serve in excess of the 150-resident capacity of the home, assuring complete and carefully-prepared menus. Stainless steel equipment, including special pressure cookers for rapid and easy food preparation, is utilized. 1 Jackson Manor Family Relations Counselor Addin } to its firm policy of ; the best possible perf nal attention for residents, C Manor Nursing Home is 0 >eMM a Florida pioneer in aintaioing a full-time "Family la .Counselor." • importance of a person .i> serves as a liaison between lysic ins, family, relatives and sidents cannot be over emlasized," declared Harold G. iff. .'ue'eson Manor administra%  Mrs. Alice Kent, a Registered ITs •. has been selected for -.tion. A graduate oi the School of irsi ; Of Beth Israel Hospital Bfl wt an, Mrs. Kent is a member of the Florida State Nurses AssoniattMl and the Massai lusetts State Nurses Associaton Mrs. Kent has previously been surgical nurse, private duty .r-,.?. and has served as an £estttetist at Mercy Hospital. MK. AUCt KINT full-Tim* Mrs. Kent is also an active member of the Board for Rehabilitation of returned patients from state and local hospitals. Her varied responsibilities be gin when she visits the patient prior to arrival at Jackson Manor. She welcomes them and makes certain they become satisfactorily adjusted to their new environment. "In offering each resident SI much a home life as is possible, the family relations counselor must coordinate many different phases of activity at Jackson Manor." Hulf added To keep everyone abreast of the latest occurrences at Jackson Manor, Mrs. Kent also is in charge of publishing a periodic newsletter to the families of patients. Administrative Resident Keene Is Tint' for Florida Homes La %  D Keene, George Washington 31 year-old University Lit D. XKNf Sfvrfeal Mtmkt graduate, has become Florida's first nursing home administrative resident and is presently doing his residency at Jackson Manor. Keene is a former business supervisor for Wise Memorial Hospital in Wise. Va. The University of Tennessee graduate recently completed a course of study at George Washington in nursing home administration. He was chosen by GWU officials to serve as administrative residency at Jackson Manor under the direction of Harold Huff, administrator. An Air Force veteran, Keene is a member of the American Hosptial Association and a student member of the American College of Hospital Administrators. He is married and has two children. J. A great need has been filled for all Dade County. We are proud to have contributed. Contractors, Inc. 101 N.W. 176th Drive Miami Phone NA 4-3651 Ultra-Modern Kitchen Assures Scientific Diet For Jackson Residents The most modern approach to food preparation, with heavy stress on sanitation and convenience, keynotes Jackson Manor's kitchen operation. Spacious and immaculate, the kitchen is designed to serve more residents than normally occupy the building, eliminating any problems created by cramped conditions. Jackson Manor President Charles Gottlieb, former executive vice president of Stevens Markets, will utilize his long-time food experience to insure the highest quality food operation at the 150-bed nursing home. The kitchen walls and floor are in easy-to-maintain ceramic tile. The kitchen is also outfitted with stainless steel equipment. This includes a number of special pressure cookers which facilitate the preparation of large amounts of food in a matter of minutes. All food coming into the kitchen is carefully selected before hand under scrutiny oi a highly-trained food manager who supervises the overall kitchen program. A registered dietitian plans nutritionally-balanced menus to assure that physicians' directives in this regard are carried out to the letter. Individualized diets are also prepared when required. In addition, special menus are developed for holidays, birthdays and other special occasions. Food trays are transported on heated carts from the kit chen to three separate dining rooms, one of which is located on each of the patient doors In addition, there is an employees' dining room which is situated on the first floor. These carts have separate "hot" and "cold" compartments to insure that all food is kept at the proper temperature until it is served. An "instant" garbage disposal system has been installed, with a series of outlets located at various key spots. This innovation offers the twin advantages of eliminating the necessity of collection of such material and, at the same time, provides for its speedy removal and consequently improves the sanitary atmosphere. Other equipment in use at the kitchen includes walk-in freezer, refrigerator, ranges, coolers, dish and pot washers. c/Vo# Just another bitilJincj ... More than another medical facility JACKSON MANOR represents three years of planning the culmination of combined research, .thorough analysis the product of a vital need. What has been omitted at JACKSON MANOR NURSING HOME? Only the ordinary! ^Srtorri* Jjurlt Burk Construction Company 12777 N.E. 14th AVENUE NORTH MIAMI PHona Pt 4-2676



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Friday, August 23. 1963 *• Jew Ist) fhriclimi Page 11-B Showing smiles of satisfaction over their smorgasbord meal at Fonc She Noon's Chinarama are two executives of the Deauville Hotel. Left to right are Chinarama owner Al Olchak; Richc:c Elterman, vice president of sales for the Deauville; the hotel's catering manaqer, Bill Goldring; and the other Chine; ama owner, Robert Willnei. Brother Daniel Gets Citizenship JERUSALEM —(JTA)— Broth er Dame!, the Jewish-born, Catholic Carmelite monk who sought Israeli < tizensbip under the Law ol Return, but was rebuffed by the I-r^tl Supreme Court, has been t n nted Israeli citizenship through ordinary naturalization procedures, the Interior Ministry announced here. A spokesman lor the Ministry said th< monk became a citizen | hiTaiij-t .-. %  fulfilled the conditions, for naturalization incumbent upor ; non-Jews under the citizenship law. Tht Polish-born monk, whose orinigal same was Oswald Rufeisen. became a Roman Catholic \ during the Second World War. H lule hiding from the Nazis in a r.unnen Rood fo be Finished" Temple Sinai of North Dade, 1480 NE 123rd St.. plans to have a new road ready for the High Holy Days, commencing on Sept. 16. The "Road to Sinai" will lead from NE 123rd St and loth Ave., Pinski School To be Opening The ." ;.vi<| pinski Folk School will it ;tn in its air-conditioned building 842 Washington Ave, on i ii -. ; Sept. 3. %  included in the school curriculum are Yiddish and Hebrew; reading, writing, speech and sii ng; Jewish history and • I" ition, the students are prepan • :or Bar and Bas tfitzvah, c irate all Jewish holidays,| and ei ge in discussions directed to\ • stimulating an interest and u: rstandicg of the State of Israel Gelb Monuments Has Anniversary Gelb Monuments is currently marking its lirst anniversary in (he Greater Miami area. The firm was launched here June 1, 1962 by Saul Gelb. Quarters are at 140 SW 37th Ave.. with a complete display of monuments and footstones. open daily 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.. and closed every Saturday to observe the Sabbath. Gelb's brothers-in-law represent the lirm in New York under the names of Lewis Monuments and Goodman Monuments. Memorial consultant to Gelb Monuments her*; is Milton I. Green, 'Silver Dollar* Jacob Schreiber Dead at Age 72 '• Services"'Were held here -last week for Jacob Schreiber. colori ful Miami Beach resident, who i died her Wednesday. Aug. 14. Mr. Schreiber. who lived at 298 So. Coconut Lane, Palm Island. j was 72. Known as "Silver Dollar Jake." j the former owner of a string of motion picture theatres acquired his nickname by passing out untold hundreds of silver dollars to GI's during World War II. as well as to blood donors or those who j bought war bonds. His trademark was a convertible automobile, which he drove around town decorated with yacht wheels, barometric equipment, trailers with exhibits depicting war situations, and signs affixed to the car urging blood donations and the purchase of bonds. In the front seat of his car. sat l a bright-feathered macaw. "Silver Dollar Jake's" auto was frequently a part of the pomp and parading marking a variety of Greater Miami events. He visited veterans hospital often, and frequently took show troops to enterain them. He was born in New York City. Services here were in charge of Riverside. his plays of protest, one of which, "Waiting for Lefty." a one-act drama, catapulted him into national prominence. A number of his plays drew upon the background of American Jewish life for*rheTr*TnJiJ6r"rnemes. -""" %  BERKOWITZ, Sol, 79, %  .! S273 SW 112th St.. .Ii. I Auar. IS Gordon. ELLIS. Max, 56, ..f 1->7I NK 170th St., died Aim. IT Rlvi rslde. KRASNO. Mm Bather, 61, of L22S Pennsylvania We. Riverside CLASSMAN. Mm. Bally, ".N. and Daniel '!.. 88, of ill". Washington Ave., .11. .1 Aug. n; within five h > ol each other. Services in x. w YorkRlvi ide CZAPKO. Kolman, ;:. of 13* NE Itlai si.. .11...I AUK. IT. Riverside. FLEiSCHER, Miss I I. >... 40, of 1378 SW I -".tli St. Service* In New York. Hi.ril. .M CREENWALD. Morris, S3. ..f 131 NK 32nd .-i. Clordon PAUL, Harry, 32, ..r I4u:.r, Risrayne lllvd Services in Philadelphia. Gordon. < ACKERMAN. Riidnl|>h I... (1, ..f 1071 I SW Itih Ter., died AUK. 15. Rlvei I Hide. COVERMAN. Stmuel, 75, ..f 41". s\v IHh si.. ,li.-,i Aii K It! Service* In 1 Brooklyn. Riverside. KOPELMAN, Harry B., 70, of I860 X\Y I78rd si., riled AUK. -'". Services in Providence, R.I, Riverside. RUBIN. Julius, 85, of 1390 Collins Ave., .Ii.-.l A UK. IS. Riverside, WEXLER. Anna. 78, ..I 1542 Jefferson Ave. died AUK. 20. Riverside. MARKOWITZ, Mrs. Fannie, i;7. of I'i'lT Cnrlyle Ave. Newman. ; VICTOR, Mrs II. I. n. 70, ..f SH 8th St, Services in White Plains. N.V. Rlvi rslde, COViN. Sarah, 72, of 985 79th Ter., died Aug, iv Uortlon. BERCER. Dr. Michael M., >>". of 1777 Collins Ave. Services In Brooklyn. Rlversld SIAVEWlTZ. Mrs. Anna Mary, 91. ..f 151 NK 32nd St. "Mr-flee* in Brooklyn Rlv< rside GOOBICH, Meyer, 71, of H'SO XH 159th St., ill. il Aim. 13. Rlv< raid. FA J&6. ER William, 57, of 6881 Taml,'inii Canal ICil Uordon. KRIEGER. I.,,ui.-. 83, ol 280 11*1 St.. Services In Cleveland. Newman. MARCUS. Manning:, T :. of 72 Lenox Ave. Newman STEINBRECHER. Harry, 65, ol 2450 NW issnd Tei Blasbers LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Tubin Chapter Card Social Robyn Tubin Chapter. City of Hope, will hold a luncheon and card social on Tuesday noon at the Hollywood Beach Hotel Cabana Club. Regular meeting of the group is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 12. at the First Federal Savings and Loan Assn.. 125th St. and 9th Ave. P. J. Davis, 74 Passes Away Phillip (P.J.' Davit, or 5600 Alton Rd., died here Sunday, Aug. 18, at the age of 74. Mr. Davis came to Miami 44 years ago. He was a receiver for the U.S. District Court of Miami. A past president of the Miami Beach Taxpayers Association, he wa$ awarded the Civic League of Miami Beach Outstanding Citizens Plaque in 1953. Mr. Davis was a 32nd degree Mason and a member of Main Shrine Temple He built the 79th SI. Causeway. Surviving are his wife. Ida S.; three sisters and a brother. Services were at Riverside Allen Rd. Chapel, with interment in Woodlawn Park Mausoleum. IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60098-C IN RK: Estate of ZACCHARIA CCRRY, a 1, a SSACKARIAH CCRRY, u k II ZACCHARIAS CL'RRY, I deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims ..i Demands Agalust Said I:M,U. : v..u are hereby notl'ted and required to present anclaims and demunds which v..ii ma) have against ih. estate -f ZACCHARIA CCRRY, g/k'a X.Al'KAISIAH I'l'KISY. a/lt/a ZAtVHAIMAS Cl'RRT, deceased late ..I DADE County, Florida, to the Count} Judges of Dade County, and fill ii., same In duplicate and as provided in Section 733.1(1, Ktorlda Statutes, in their offices In the Count) Courthouse In Dude County, Florida, within six calendar months rrom iln time "f Hi.first publication hereof, or Hi.same il! be bai red. Doted al Miiml, Florida, this 20th da; of July, A.D. 196.1. TERBSETA DE VEACX. ;. 1. a TERRY Cl'RRY DEVOE As Executrix I. AI'I'K M. KAK.N i'..Attorni > fi Kxecuti i\ 211 •";. In i... ; IMilX M i' HI Id %  v 2:1 :'.'. '• 8-13 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUD CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 63C 8992 MARIA ("'AMI'.'. Plaintiff,, vs. MARIO I., i "'.Wil'i'. I "I. n.li.nl. SUIT FOR D VORCE I i .: MARIO I.. I K'AMPt I 3036 l lomlnga su. el Pasay ( "ity. Philippine Islands v..ii, MAltm i.. OCAMPO are herei %  > notified that a BUI of • ompla nl (m Divorce has been filed agalnsi you, an.I you are required t. serve a copy <>f your Answer or Pleading I" ih. i :u .if Complaint on the Plaintiffs attorney, HOL ALEXANDER. One Lincoln Road Building, Miami Beach, Florida, and filthe original Answer ..i Pleading in the office of th.' Clerk ..i the Circuit Conn .>n ..r before the ::ith das of September, 1863, If you fall (;i v ::.-:.". % %  8-13 WKAT-FM FROM BRAHMS TO BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music on WKAT-FM 93.1 on your FM dial MIAMI'S ONLY PURE CLASSICAL MUSIC STATION Prog-amming MORE LIVE Concwtsl WKAT-FM Noted Author Dead in Calif. HOLLYWOOD Calif., —(JTA) — Clifford Octets, famous American Jewish playwright, considered one of the foremost dramatists of his era. died here this week, aged 57. Mr. Odets came into prominence during the 1930s through YOUR TELEPHONE PROPERLY ANSWERED IS YOUR GREATEST BUSINESS ASSET Answerite. Inc. Telephone Answering Service SERVING JEfferson — Union Highland FRanklin Executive Office FR 3-5581 Webmel/li^n Honors Special family Occasions Your Welcome Wagon Hostess will call with a basket of gifts...' and friendly greetings from religious, civic, and business leaders of our community when your family celebrates a sixteenth birthday, announces an engagement or the birth of a new baby, or moves to a new home. When the occasion arises, phone HI 8-4994 Dignified, beautiful and reverently cared for surroundings for our departed loved ones are a source of very real comfort to all. I M Vi 1 '. M0 1-7693 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice la hereby given by the unlierslgned thai on September %  "*. I."",\: ll a.m., :u Palm Motor* ami Uarace, 1450 Palm Avenue, Hluleah; th.Following car will be sold at auction foi etoraite rharaen: II T IS3S 2-1 r Korii Ifalrlane ownel h> William R. Oaken, I5SS !•:. Brlckenrldae, |y>ulM\111.-. Kentucky', 1.1'. No. C50V18327J. I .it-ii amounting to I1RS.0M. I'AI.M MOTORS AVI' "'.AltA'ii: H i 10 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IH HKKKHY UIV'KN that the underwlsned, dealrina to ensaae In huelneee under the flctltloue it.int.. ..* I'll'.l'.i: CLASS HI'ECIAI.TIKS :il 1": i N.W. 10th Avenue, Miami. Plorldn Intend i" register nalClerk ..I the Circuit Court of Pade i 'oum *. llorlda. Ji ISE \ (IRTBOA PEDRO PELAKZ Sole • nem v 23-:in, i :1 : IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 8904 MARY SISAN MM.I.Y. Plaintiff, \ i IIKSI.KY Hi I\\ VRI1 KKI.I.Y, I i.i. 11 1,111' NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: I'HI'M.KY HOWARI" KKI.I.Y I > %  ii ndanl I'I.M i iiiir.' Hox :M I Uanto, Si TOf ARE HKKEIIY StiTIPIKH I R Complaint for li\i-t-.'ihae I iii.il RKainal you, ami you are required in serve H cony ol your \ BWer or Pleading thereto "ii Plalntlffa [Attorneye. SMITH \ M \M M.ll: I'.sujs to" Lincoln Rt>ad, Miami Kt*ach | xv. Florida, and file the original there; ui In the office of ilnClerk of tinCircuit ''mill "ii or before the 23rd da) of September, IMS: otherwise judgment bj default will i"taken I against you for the relief demanded in Bald Complaint. DONE ANli ORDEREO, at Mlam l lorlda, this 19th May of August, 196: E. u. WEATHERMAN, Clerk Circuit Court, l)ade County, Hi i i.i I is. ah By: IX)NAU> TAfTENHAN Deput) Clerk S :-:. •. -i 8-1J NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY lilVKN that the underalg ned, desiring to i huslness undet the fictitious name of i"i|.s BY ATI.AS at I07U i: si Hlaleah Intend^ lo i eg lr n Ma with the Clerk of the Circuit DI I '.nil i 'ounty. Florl H CCR1.EY W I'l.Rli-ll WH1TEACRE ,v Rt IIIIHNH Attorney fi r Applicant 801 \V llltli St., Hialeuh s'ja %  •' I'.-I:: NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY CHVEN that the umli'isiKii.-ii. deBtrlni to engage In buelneee undet the fictitious name ol •AI.M SPRINGS ANIMAL llllS1'lTAI. ai Hlaleah, Elnrlda Intend to register said name \\:ili the i'l*'ik of the Circuit Court ol Hade County, I :, rlda, lHis. LOWRT AND i 'KAWnv. I'.A By: llari-\ K. Lowry, President Attest: .hunt's I-. Drawdy, Sfcretarj RICHARD M. SKl'l.Ki: Attorney f r Ins. i.nu ii ami Drawdy, P.A •, js-so, 'i I;-I:: NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW N'l'TK'l-: is HEREBY GIVEN that l the undersigned, desiring t>> engage In business under the fictitious name of I.KIMKK CITY SUPER M VRKET at 2M19 Klngman Rd., i. i-an City, Fla., Intend i glstei snlil name 'lth the I'I. i k ..I the Circuil Court ol Duds Count). iiin ill.i I'A VII I'.AI.I. ANTINK UARGI KRITK I'.A 1.1.AN I'I N B i > ne .1. DAVID I.IEBll W Attorney for ni i H %  S-13



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p Page 10-B vJewisti fkridiam Friday. August 23. 1963 r e< M tr ol n< 11 0 85 Ti fa of 01 re M bt ar Pi Rabbis Flay Commercializing Of Services Here Members should not be solicited from other synagogues or disatfiliation encouraged." •National and regional lay re life. Our Jewish people everywhere are being asked to affiliate themselves, with established^con gregations of their own choos Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro, of Beth David Congregation, chairman of the Ethics Committee of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association, this week reiterated the position undertaken by the rabHg'ous bodie.-, m th.s area are being mg. binic bodv in its condemnation of asked to cooperate in our endcavcommercialization of religious ors to elevate synagogue standards 0 f VVoJfson in Talk services ar.d religion in general: and eliminate pernicious practices. In attempting to preserve the sane• -It is felt tih Hashona, leaving Sunday morning, then check in again Erev Yom Kippur until the following Sunday USY Youth Camp to Open Southeast Region of the United Synagogue Youth will hold its j 12th annual encampment Aug. 21 I to 29, at Camp Blue Star, Henderi sonville. N.C. The enrollment, numbering 272, exceeds by far any previous number of campers ever to attend Camp USY in the past. Theme of this year's encampI inent will be "The Jewish Family and the Jewish Home." Richard Friedman, of Temple Menorah, i Miami Beach, is USY Camp chair, man, while Rabbi Allen Rutchik will direct the encampment for | the third straight summer. Mr. and Mrs. Al Meyers, of Montgomery, Ala., will return as head counselors. JerroM Leeson, of Ahavath Achim Syna' gogue in Atlanta, will serve as j a divisior head and special inI structor. There will be a faculty of sev-i en rabbis and educators who will lead the daily study groups, as well as specialists in song and i dance. Debates, socio-dramas. campfires, plays and cantatas will feature many of the evening programs, in addition to a special kinescope showing of the "Quiet Revolution." an NBC documen I tary on the role of religion in: American life today. The United Synagogue of Ameri ca is the organization of Conservative congregations in this country and in Canada •Do We Have Free MB?" wato be the topic of a lecture by Dr ail rabbinic members of the Abraham Wolfson on Thursda> Days or any other time during the • (|w congrP8ations > morning. 10:45, before the Spinoza year should be dignified, proper and limited in its appeal to members of congregations or those who join specific movements, such as the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations (Orthodox). the United Synagogue of America (Conservative 1 ard the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (Reform)." Rabbi Shapiro said that "wheneever public auditoriums must be used by existing synagogues, thero should be no advertising or public announcements that seats are available to ran-members. Such congregations should be urged to confine High Holy Days and other | festival publicity to their membership mailing lists and own congregational publicity media. Ner Tamid Plans Program Registration, now taking place at Ner Tamid Religious School, i indicates that enrollment this year will be double last year's. New teachers have been engaged for the additional classes, and all classrooms have been decorated and individually air-conditioned. A special class for 6 and 7-yearolds, to meet four afternoons a week from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.. with Aaron Center, instructor, has been organized in the Hebrew Department. Meyer Samberg, education director, and Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will teach the confirmation and pre-confirmation classes which have been enlarged. Bar Mitzvah-age youngsters attending the minyan on Sunday mornings will be invited to breakfast under a program sponsored by Harry Rappaport and Mitch Reiner. A youth program for children age 10 and over is being planned by the Men's Club. Activities will include cotillion, sports, clubs, bowling, socials and discussion groups. ELECT HARRY HURST • MORE LEADERSHIP • LESS POLITICS ELECT Harry Hurst TO THf NORTH MIAMI COUNCIL Pull Lever 5-A Sept. 3rd I'd. Pol. Adv. MIRACLES NEVER CEASE! FRANTZ MIRACLE OIL CLEANER You can keep your engine oil clean continually and end all oil changes permanently with a 15< bathroom tissue. If I couldn't replace the Frantz Oil Cleaner for less, I wouldn't take a thousand dollars for itl ALL WHITE TAXI CABS HAVE THEM. WHY NOT YOU? DON'T PUT IT Off PUT IT ON BEFORE IT IS TOO IATE! Distributed by MORTY SCHOENFELD OWNER AND OPERATOR OF THE WHITE TAXI CAB CO. OF NORTH DADE PL 9-5723 PS. 24-Hr. Air-Conditioned Taxi Service throughout North Dode Areo. m RABBI S. M. MACHTEI (FOUNDER OF THE RADIO SYNAGOG OF AMERICA) SPIRITUAL LEADER OF TEMPLE B'NAI SH0L0M OPA LOCKA, FLORIDA WILL CONDUCT A PRE-HIGH HOLY DAY PROGRAM SUNDAY, AUGUST 25, 4:15 P.M. TO 4:45 P.M. FOLLOWING THE JACOB SCHACHTER HOUR ON WEDR-FM 99.1 MEG. ON YOUR FM DIAL )



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Friday. August 23. 1963 fJewisti FkrkMar) Page 7-B ALMOST every temple, B'nai •^ B'rith group, Hada ssah chapter, and every other type of organization has at least one howling league. With the coming of the bowling season, we asked several readers what their opinions are on bowling attire. Mrs. Bernard Stone finds the full-length slacks the most comlortable. She finds it easier to bowl in pants, but reminds us that she is a beginner, and that her icon can not be correlated 10 her clothes. Where she bowls, she has noticed that "most of the women prefer slacks in winter and shorts for the summer, with few culottes at any time of the year." Diametrically opposed in opinion is Mrs. Herbert Goldberg. She contends that if professional women bowlers and instructors wear skirts, there must be ;i reason. Culottes have been tried, with little success by Mrs Goldberg. The ones I have worn seem to be too full, and the ball tends to get caught in the folds." The "A" line skirt is her favorite, and it seems best for most of the women on her team. They have tried the skirts featuring a low flare, with the godet type of insert, but when the shorter women hem them up, they end up with a sheath. From the watcher's point of view, we checked Mrs. Leonard Barr, who believes the new madras wrap-around skirt, and solid color tuck-in blouse, to be very effective. o lulRS. Murray Turetsky consid%  %  ers her bowling attire from a fashionable point of view. She feels women should always be in vogue, even if bowling. Slacks are her preference. For evening bowling, she believes that shorts are unladylike, and finds culottes to be cumbersome. She freely admits that the skirt is more becoming to many women, and finds that the overblouse gives more freedom of movement. Since bowling is one of the largest indoor sports in the country today, we can expect more and more of our readers to become personally involved in the game. As in most everything, there is more than one way of doing something—and doing it right. The one bit of advice all bowlers had to offer was that when you do begin bowling, forget what you are wearing and concentrate on "hitting the head pin." he Cedars Plans Seminars Here Two leading specialists in-ilie field of obstetrics and gynec^e^y will come to Miami to take part in a seminar at Cedars of Leb| anon Hospital on Aug. 29 and 30. Dr. Abraham Rakoff, clinical professor at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, and Dr. Harry Prystowsky, head of the Obstetrics Department at the j University of Florida School of Medicine in Gainesville, Fla., will speak at the two-day meeting. Seminar director is Dr. Daniel O. Hammond, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars of Lebanon. Sessions are open to all interested physicians without registration fee and will be held from 9" a.m. to noon, and 7:30 p.m. to10:30 p.m., on Thursday, Aug. 29, and 9 a.m. to noon on Friday, Aug. 30. B'nai B'rith Women of South Florida pitch in to help tubercular patients at the Veterans Administration Hospital at Coral Gables. When the patients recently moved to new ground floor quarters with access to a patio, the Council purchased two large ceramic tables complete with umbrellas and crank handles. Left to right are Mrs. Miriam Kaplan, veterans chairman, Emma Lazarus Chapter; Mrs. Geneva Haynie, R.N., head nurse of TB Ward; Mrs. Peter Duchon, Miami Chapter, and Council co-chairman; Mrs. David I. Sachs, president, Miami Council; Mrs. David Weisberg, chairman, VAVS, Miami Chapter; and Frank Williams, assistant administrator. Scientific Body Picks Rabbi Stern Miss Levine Now Mrs. Levine I.. Man MKS. NORMAN ItVINi The former Lyn Hope Levine and Norman Robert Levine exchanged marriage vows on Sunday, Aug. 18, at the Israelite Center, with Rabbi Morton Malavsky officiating. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lenny Levine, 5959 SW 16th Tei\, the bride was attended by Miss Barbara Dardick. The bridegroom is the son of Mrs. Pearl Levine, 6331 SW 18th St., and the late Morris H. Levine. Mark Rabin served as his best man. Newlywed Mrs. Levine graduated from Miami Senior High and Fairleigh Dickinson University School of Dental Hygiene. Her husband, a senior at the University of Miair.i, is an alumnus of Southwest High. Following a wedding trip to New York City, the couple will live in Coral Gables. ~N AUTHORIZED DEALER wira Quality HEARING AIDS $50 to $285 Service All Mahn Batteries — Molds STANLEY GOULD 1238 Lincoln Road i> # M.) TIti-Tridn-Trlls-Tefmi PHONE JE 1-7911 The National Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists of, America has elected Rabbi Tibor II. Stern, spiritual leader of the Beth Jacob Congregation, as a member of the organization. The organization is composed of leading professors and scientists in the field of physics, chemistry, medicine and mathematics. A great number of the members are affiliated with the United States Government nuclear program and lesponsible for major developments in the field. Devout Orthodox Jews, they are active members in the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Rabbi Stern is one of the few rabbinic members who have attained national recognition in Talmudic research. He is the author of many scholarly works, in addition to his publications in Talmudic Law. He is credited with the first publication of a two volume book. 'The Eternal Law." as a proposed Constitution for the State of Israel. He also is author of •Composition of the Talmud," where he reveals the unity of the Babyllonian and Israeli Talmuds. Rabbi Stern is presently preparing his latest publication, 'The Illumination of Light," which deals with theoretical physics and Kaballah. Rabbi Stern will participate in the third annual convention of the National Association of Orthodox Scientists to be held during the Labor Day weekend in the Empire Ho'.el in the Catskills, New York. Services Set At Beth Kodesh Rabbi Max Shapiro, who will conduct High Holiday services at Beth Kodesh Congregation, will be marking his 30th anniversary in, the community, having conducted his first High Holidays here in 1933. Rabbi Shapiro organized and was president of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn., president of the Zionist Council, and member of the University of Miami faculty. He served for many years as a member of the round table in racio discussions sponsored by the Conference of Christians and Jews. Seat reservations are being taken at Beth Kodesh. An all-day carnival scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 8, on the congregation grounds will feature gifts of a cruise to Bimini and weekends for two at several motels. Alpha Omega 'Hoedown' Slated North Dade Group of Alpha Omega Dental Auxiliary is sponsoring a "Hoedown" on Sunday at the Trails End Square Dance Center, 18160 NW 2nd Ave. Mrs. Ira Rothfield is chairman of the event, which will includemusic for all types of dancing and a late supper. BEAUTY SALON WIGS High Fashion Hair Pieces PROBLEM PIECES 8 Generations — Wig Business 7437 COLLINS AVENUE Ph: UN 6-1226 Or UN 5-9157 NURSERY THROUGH 12 TH GRADE A CONTINUOUS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Accredited by Florida State Department of Education MEMBER OF FLORIDA COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOIS REGISTER NOW FOR 1963 1964 SCHOOL YEAR CLASSES START SEPTEMBER 5th ENRICHED ACADEMIC PROGRAM CERT1FED TEACHERS TRANSPORTATION ARRANGED throughout GREATER MIAMI AREA INQUIRIES and VISITATIONS INVITED SMALL CUSS GROUPS COLLEGE PREPARATORY er COMMERCIAL COURSES EXCELLENT PHYSICAL FACILITIESlrga C lattrooma. Auditorium, laboratory, library, Art Tarraco. Science Spaciout Playgrounds, Swimming Pool, Dining Roomt. MRS. IDA R. LEAR, Director THE 1010 Wetf Avenue, Miami Beach RICHARD E. LEAR, Principal LEAR SCHOOL Phone JEfferson 1-0606 WATERMELON TIME IS HERE! Enjoy Ice-Cold Slices at Our Tables ... Or Take Out! ALSO HALVES & WHOLE TAC.IH.CU5 1789 Biscayne Blvd. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783



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friday, August 23. 1963 l<**ilincridHar) LEGAL NOTICE UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C-7606 (Lee) l N ui I PMC Wii'N in' \l A M v E SINCLAIR, |,,'i;i-v.'Mi: A FRF:K ni:.\r.i:i: NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FREE DEALERS LICENSE VoTICJS IS HKREBT OIVEN Mini |,„ ,„-...• -" %  -iuti.-.l. ADA MAE BINI \IK IU, "i> Hi'' 4lh day f s, 'l'niber, I, : fur Petitioner 118; Mfred I duPonl Building Miuuil :' %  -. Florida v ••••tc-sn MWM Page 11-A. BY HENRY LEONARD NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW fJOTI IS HEREBY. OIVBM thai undi ri %  %  l desiring, to engage In -in inder the fictitious name of \n-.i;ic.\.\ Am i.l >i.i..n a. •'.. 350 N.W. 36th St., Miami, Ha., in.to register said name with Clerk of the Clrcull Court of Dade I mnt). Floi Ida, AL Rl'BKNSTBIN .-•ol.' Owner < u:.-::-:;ii %  • NOTICe UNUtn F.CTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE I.-' HEREBY CJIVBN lhal | inert, desiring to i-imiiKr In del the fictitious name "i j\\l \ Furniture 1',-pt. at IMNM N.W |iiii Av. North Miami; I3B0I B. Dixie tlichwuy, Dade County Intends to %  lelsttci id name with the Clone of |i,. cin ill Court of Dade County, I DISCOl'NT Fl'RNITURE, NC. (a Fla Corp.) v 2-9-18-2" ||N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 56391 |\ UK late of ISIDORE ARONOVITZ 11,...,-. I. iNOTiCfc OF INTENTION TO MAKE VPPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE XOTICE In herebj gRen thai I hnvi tiled in> l-i'i.il Ke|K>ri and Petition f"i Distribution ami Final Discharge as ,dmlnistrntrlx, i"r.\ of the estate ol I DORK ARONOVITZ, deceased: and lliai the :'tli da> ol Hepteinbi i will app'y to the Honorable f.,unt> l la..oi [Hide County, FTorila, for approval ol ^., i4 I.WIP IM.CHIUST, Is Exei utor tin % %  w 111 mill i • Mann nt of lltlil.N A SI'.M MERS, I'll llff, iFRANKLIN and JENNIE IN, his Ifi SA RAH II, It \Xki.iX und, 11 Married, her I, '.\ Ii..Christian Nam. nknow n If any ol the aforesaid Ll fen. ntn I"dead, th< Ir reapeotlve wiknown spouses, heirs, deviaeea, tgatces, assignees, grantees, credloi I ,.• i n lae, nai ural or CM |KI ,*. havlnn oi claiming any Interest through, undei ••! against an] ol .1 defendants; the unKIWII ppouseii of urn oi in.above* inert di %  • ndanta; and all pa i ties, iiown or unknown, having or claimIll to have any right or Interest in i.i the real propert) described in |; Complaint, l'i. ndants. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION A. l\ FRANKLIN nlnl JENNIE FRANKLIN, his wife; SARAH B. FRANKLIN, ami. if married, her husband, whose Christian name iunknown. IK any of the aforesaid defendants dead, their respective unknown ilMee, heirs, devisees, legatees, aanees, grantees, credltora, or other->-. natural or corporate, bavins, or Mining any Interest by, through. Jiii i .i against an; of the aforesaid If.-ii.i.mi II nmi to the properlj ..'. in. ill. i desci Ibed; frii. unknown spouses of any of the e-nnmed defendants and nil parIs, known or unknown, having or liiuiui: to have any right, title oi geresl in or to the following desped pi %  uate In I >ade Coun 1 II ... lo-vv il : I. Uli 9, of FRANKMN 11 I'.DIV i N o rcllnx i.. the .1 in Plat Page :i ol the Publli I) ounty, Florida. Itl .i ,t ,.i j ..ii. .. r. Ii<'! eb> Jl %  thai -i.ii II ... In .-n bm i^ln |ni | ..,„ ;,, m, Circuit Co ii ol !• i'i isty, I lorl i %  b> DAVID C f IIIUST, as Exei utor ol the Lasl ,1 nnrt i. M.iin. ni of VIRtllNIA ^IMI:I:S, philntlfl The nature ol ..nil i. in quiet title to the propherelnabovs described, anil you li:i:i:i v IT It T II i: i: NOTIFIED > HEyi IKK serve %  copj of Answer to the Bill of Complaint l.ii.l :nis.on the plaintiff's altorKWITNEY *• ANKCS, 4^" LinBond, Aliunu Beach, |.'l<>riilii. and I tinurixliial In the < iffi.-.of the rk of the Circuit Court of Dade My, .Miami, Florida, on or before 1th daj of September, !6Ji otherthe allegation* of said Bill of % plaint win be taken as confessed on. 'Notice shall he published for in consecutive Weeks In THE ilMI FLOKIDIAN. *TI:H D,iv turn ,i ,j ,,f June, |gu, ni. Dade County, Florida. h. II. I.EATHERMAN I. k of Hi, Cln uit Coui i i de i 'Hum Florida B> : C. P iil'I'.l.ANii Deputj .'I. il, [I M^ \ ANKCM fin s tor I'ldilltil'l I Road I ii. Florida 1'inl K urn t 2-9-lt-St IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDIC.AL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 8759 PHI IRI V Ml lltCIF.i :> i Plaintiff, \. All IA la ISEXZ \ I'i: |.Ei IN \n >RI MHIH •. I lefendani NOTICE BY PUBLICATION I'i i All >A la iRENKA I'i: 1.1a >X M< Ri 'ii:' ;i • Ces|iedoH No. I.' Reparto Arroyo A noli >, Havana, i 'uhu Vul ARK in i:i:r.V NOTIFIED thai ;i t*omplallll I". Dlvi rce lUIS %  %  n filed against you, and you are n*aulred to serve s copy of your Answei or Pleading to the Complaint f..i Divorce on the plaintiff's attorney, KIDNEY KMtoXnO.N, -H BecurilJ Trust Uullding, Miami ::.. Ploiiua. and file the original answer or pleading in the office oi the t'lerk of the Circuit Court "ii oi before the 83rd day of Si ptember, }'•'•'.'•. otlierylse, Ihe Comn|i II ; tor IHvorce li.i tof.r.. filed herein ili be taken as confessed by I oil DATED nl Miami, Florida, this 14th ,' n ..I Allgu.it, 1 "• '• I' II I.I VTHKRMAN, Clerk %  'ii full Court, i -a... i 'otintj. Florida ixi-al) i:> : P 11 IPKI.A.V i' i 'i \ i 'lei k SIDNEY EFR< >XSi iN A Hoi nej for Pl .' %  I Sex in it> Trust i • Jg Miami 32, i-'i.'i Ids : tin, a -i3 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60483 l.\ RK: Estate ol MAN HOFrAIAN. Deceai claims anil demands which yon may have against ill. estate of ALDO BODUDICH deceased intiof Dade County, Florida, to the County Judges of Parts Pounty, ami file thi sami In dunllcnte ami as i.'ui i.l. .1 in Sei ; Ion %  %  16, Floi Ida Statutes, in Iheli offices In the Countv i "out thnusi Ir ''. %  '•• "onn" i lurIdh, within si\ ilendnr months from tin. tini" of the i.ist publication hereof, or I he ss me will he h i Dated si M %  II ii Fli rirta, this _:'ili day of July, A.D. 1963. HANFoRD S FAl'Nl'K \Rxi 1'iitor i • publli .iii'.n of this nol Ice on i he 2nd An} ol August, I M FACNCE. FINK .\ FORM \ S \,,,,,.,,., f %  -.. Rx< into]1501 Congress Bids Miami 32, Ma— M: 1-3471 v 2-9-16-21 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60311-C IN RE: Retail of ZDENA PICK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: Von are hen by notified ami required to present any olalnis and demands which you may have agalnsl the estate of ZDENA PICK deceased ijrte of Dade County, Plorldat to the fount] Judges of Dade County, and fillthe same In duplicate and as provided in Section 733.10, Florida Statutes, in their offices in the Count) Courthouse In Dade County, Florida \ itiiin six calendar months from th** tin f the first public itlon hi ri of, or the same will ibarred. Dated at Miami. Florida, this 31sl day of July, A.D. 1965. KI'RT WKI.I.ISCII 167 Aim. rla Ai enue Coral Hi'olis. Florida As Kxecutor KCRT WKI.l.lscil Attornej for Estate of Zdenn Pick 167 A ini, i i.i Avenue i loral tlables, Florida s !i-iii-2:l-3n NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No, 63C 8476 STEVE nyi'RICB, Plaintiff, ANNA flYITRICZ, I ','l.nilaiit. TO: ANNA QYl'RICZ .",.". Hedan 81 reel New Brunswick. X, %  Jersey THU ANNA DYCRICZ %  '" herebj notified thai a BIN of Complaint foi Divorce has I n filed Rgatnat yoti i and you are rei|Ulred to serve a cop> of your Answer or Pleading to the Mill oi Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorney, C.OI.DMAN, i a H.l'STKI \ A'PACZIKR. 240] Wesl Flagler Street, Miami, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleirtlng in the office "i the Clerk of the i'i cull Conn on or bef the :• 11> daj of September, 1963. | If you fall i" do so, Judgment by default will intaken agalnsl you for | the relief demanded In the Hill ol i 'omplnlnt, This notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks 1 in THE JEWISH FDORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED al Miami i'i..i Ida, tins Tin day "i August, A.D., 1966. E. R. LEATHERMAN, Clerk. Clrcull Comt. Dade County, Florida meal) 0) c. p. COPKLAND l i.niiiy clerk Ooldmnu, Goldstein v Paciter .'mi Wesl Flagler Street Miami. Ma. — NE :.-i:is i Attorn, v s for Plaintiff -i 9-111-23-36 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! •"Jewisti fioridHbtrj solicits your legal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates Dial Fit :tH.05 lor messenger Berries LEGAL NOTICE i.i i\ N THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60480-O RK: Ksi.it. "i I mis I RIKDM \N I lei en si NOT.CE TO CREDITORS To All "redlti i and vil Pi rsons Ha\ .,,,! s oi I %  • .111 %  I-Agalnsl Bald you are herebj notlfl. .1 and re,,iui,-.1 in pi. -"I' an> claims anil demands which ."ni mas havi agalnsl the .tate ol ums FRIEDMAN de, (lined lat. of Hade County, Florida, to in, Count) Judges "i Dade t ouni\ nml fillthe same in duplicnti ana aprovided In Hectlon *33.16, Florida Statutes, in their offices In the Coiiniv Courthouse iii l'o!. County, tlnrnil within six calendar months from Hi.' time of the tir.-i publication hare,,i or th.' same ill be barred. Dated at Miami, Florida, this daj of August, A.D. I96J l.KnN A. EPSTEIN As Kxecutor l.l'.nX A EPSTEIN Attorney for Estate i'.'n Lincoln Road a IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C 8175 MART EMS5ARETH Ut'RNS, Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES r.l'KXS. Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: FRANCES BCRNS C Mrs. John Hay hurst .'. Paul Place Buffalo, New York You are hereby notified that Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you, and you are hereby r.-qulred to serve a copy of your \nsw r to the Complain! on the Plaintiffs attorney, LESTER ROflERB, whose address Is 981 N.W. 14th Street. Miami, Florida, and file th 'Iglnal Answer with the office of the Clerk of illEleventh Judicial Circuit in and for Dade County, Florida, on or I,,i, laj of September, 1963 In default of whhh the Complaint ili be taken as %  (I bj yo Dated thi!: K. I-: I1P.CI1II, I', uutj Clet k i oh (.11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVKX that the undersigned, desiring to encage in business under the fictitious name ol CASA1IL.ANCA UKAITV SIKH' at IS4S Collins Avenue, Miami Beach Intend to register said name "' "'•• Clerk of the Clrcull Courl ol Dade Countj. i'i irldii EDW v l : l • Kl.l-.IN HELEN M W KLEIN V\ HITEACRE ,y ROBRINS Attorneys for \ppu< ants 801 wraths .ui.,; g/ ,.,. w a IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 59664-C IN RK: Rstnte of HARRIETT I> WEXI.ER 1 leeeased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons llavIng claims oiDemand} Against said Estate: You are In-reby notifi.il and reiiulred to present any claims and da* m.inils Which you may have agnlnst the .slat, of IIAKIUKTT D. WEXL.ER deceased late of Dad.Opunty. MorIda, to the County Judges of H.ole County, and tile ni.' saim In dun Ieale and as provided In Section 718.16, Morlila Statute.'. In their offices in tin County Courthouse In Dade County, Florida, within si* calendar months from the time ol the first publication hereof, or the same will be barred. Dated at Miami, Florida, this L'ISI day "f June, A.D, 1!':'.. MORRIS WEXLER ", Cast TKili Street N,w York, N. w Y"i i, As Executor LIONEL I.. TI'I.IN \ii.ii in for Executor One I in. ..in Rd. Bldg. Miami Beach, Florida 6/9-16-33-30 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 63C 8389 .i s til.EASoN, JR., as Vdmli Biratnr ol Veterans Affali an Offlci %  of the I'nit.-I Suites of America, and his : %  in sii. i. .a ; li-e, anil in^ oi th. Il IKXlKllf Plaintiff, \ s JOHN W STHi iCI'E, el nx. • t nl, 1 lefendants NOTICE OF SUIT T' I Ii HN W. S I'RI U PR an.I HE1.EX STROCPK Route -' linn:v ill.-. Alabama ViiK ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED thai .i .-uit ha.been brought agalnsl you bj .1. s (ILKA*toN, JR., as Administrator ..f Veterans Affairs, nn Ofl ol the L'nlted States of Am, i lea, and hi Kuccessors in such office, and l %  i — or their assigns, to foreclosi n martgagi enetimberlng the following des, '1'lln-d property, to-wlt: Lot 19, III Pi.'.k ::. of KKAI.SIT i. ESTATES, SECTION ONE, according to tin plat thereof, as recorded in i'lal I'.ook iii. at pane 60, o* the public records ol Dade County, Florida : and urn are required to file your answer' with the Clerk of the Clrcull Court ol I Hide County. Florida, at thi Courthouse In Miami. Florida, on or before Septembet 1. 196:'.. and to serve a COD) of such answer upon MYERS, HEIMAN, KAPLAN CAVSMAX. Plaintiffs attornej-s, whose address >Eleven Fifty BulldInjr, ii">" s.W. In.-t street. Miami 36, Florida, on or be ore said date, as required bj the lavs of Florida, ir you tall to do so. the complain) will bi taken as confessed by you and n Decree Pro Confessn will I"entered against > ou fiw the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated August •"•. 196.1 K. Ii. LEATHERM \N i 'i,n-k of the i "ii'.-uit i "ourt l i.oie County, i %  irldii (seal) 1'-.' : F. K ORl'BH I i\ Clerk Myers, Helman, Kaplan & Catsman Elev. II i I'll."ai s \\ i eel R 2-9 16' %  Mian I !i Floi I la 9-16-23-30 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60368 C :i: Estate oi ISAAI' UI M-l 'MAX Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors ami All Persons Having Claims or Demands Agalnsl Bald Estate: You are hereby notified and required t" present any claims and demands which you maj have agalnsl the e-iat. of ISAAC OOLD.MAN deceased late of I'a.le County, Florida, to the County Judges of Bade County, and file the same in duplicate and as provided in Section 733.16, Florida Statutes, in their offices in tinCounty Com tin mse in Dade County, Florida, within si\ calendar months from the time of thi Ilrsl publication hereof, or tin si x. ill be barred. Dated at Miami. Florida, this day of August, A D, 1963 ANNETTE HERMAN JOSEPH OOLDMAN As Exi cutors Flrsl publication ol tins notlci ill, 9th daj of August, 1963 HIMON, HAYS & UHCNDWERO AI torn, e ol Isaai I loldman •.ni Alnsli i ug j/9-16-: IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 57800-C IN RE: Estal RI In H.III. M IIMITT I leceased. NOT.CE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE is herebj given that I have filed my Final Report and Petition for Distribution and Final IHscharge a* i:i utor of in, state of RL'Di ILF II BCHMITT, deceased: and that on thi L'l.ih day of August, 1963, %\ ill apply in the ll r.ii.i. Countj Judges ol linil.County, Florida, for approval said Final Report and for distribution and final discharge ;iKxecutoi the .-tate ..I the above-named decedent. This 24th daj of Julj. ii iSH REPHl'N, As Exe. utor JOSH REPHL'N Attorney 1370 Washington Avi Miami Beach, Florida 1-16%  -' I IN 7 HE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 604C9-B I S RE Estate of II M!\ KY I. I1AMM I', eeased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS 'I'.. All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Agalnsl Sabl l.st.n-i: V..U are herebj notified and required to present any claims and di man, Is Which you inn' have .iIhe esiai HARVEY L. IIAM.M deceased late of Dude Countj, Florida, to the County Judges of ii.nl.' County, and file the sain, in duplicuti >Itd US provided In Section 7:;.'..'.ii. Florida Statutes, in their offices In tin County Courthouse In l>ade Count}', Florida, within six calendar month)' I •' the time of tinfirst publication la rof .III' tile same .Kill he li:.ll.-l Hated at Miami. Florida, tills Mb day of August, A l >. 1963. K.-TKl.l.K F. IIAM.M As Admlulstrutrix I vi'.NCi:. I INK FORM \N Attoi in-' > for Exi utrlx l.*i0S "ongress B Miami 32, MaIP. 1-3471 si'. IX IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 59870-A RE: Estate of I.Kir. KRAMER I I '.! Sell. NOTICE TO CREDITORS i To All I'I. dltoi ind Ml %  -' I I IIIB claims or Demands Against Sal K.-talc: You are hereby notified and required to pies, III anj claim* and di man.Is which you ma) have against the estate of LEIII KRAMER •' .,i late of Dade County, Florida, t-. the County Judges ol lade I miami file the sain, iii .liiplie.it. an 1 as provided In Section ...:'. IL. Fiorina Statutes, iii their offices in the County Courthouse in la.lCounty, Florida, within si" calendar months fron the lime ..f the lirst publication hereof, or the same w ill be hni i ed, Dated at Miami. Florida, this lJth da) of AiiKUst. Al>. 1963. Ol'SSIE Ki: VMKI: As Executrix First publication of this n the 16th day of August, 1963 AI.VIN s. CAWX Attorney for Executrix One Lincoln Road Bids Miami Beach, Florida 16-23-30 %  ..ii. • IN I IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60434-C IX RE: Estate of liKN.IAMlN" r.KlliNKI: I i. isell NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and Ml Persons I Ing '' mi "i i '• man ti I.Mat. \ ,,n lire ii.' ehj notlfle I and re io present an • i I ilms n and), which )ou ma) hav. the estate of HKNJ v M S BKIDNKR ll I I I 'art. u III I'I' riiia. to the "ount) Judgi s oi I'l.iiiih ami file the same 111 dill and as provided In •-• I >i J38.16, I'liirlda Statutes, In their offices In the Count) Courthouse In Dndi Count\. Florida, within six cak-ndu tin i-l'eof. ilm. til .i tin • sain. tii-: will this 13th 1st on months, fiom publication he be barred. Dated at Miami. I i.-i In day of August, A D. 1963 ADDIE I'.KII'XKi: As Executrix IRVING CYCKX LAW iil'l'li I'.S Attorney foi Executrix sir. Arthui iodfiey Road Miami Beach, Florida s 16-31-30, 9 1 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW XHTICI: is III:I:;:I:V c.iVEN that the undersigned, deslrlmt to engage In l.usin. ss under Ihe fli lot name of EVEN APARTMENTh al I301-1S1S Rav Road, Miami Beach, Florida intend t" register said name with the Clerk of Ihe Circuit Courl ol I'.oit'ounl). Florida ARI N STKIMSERi I BELLA STEINItERi I SIMON, II \N s ,\ IRI'NDU ERtl Al I '111.' si,: %  '" n. SOI Alnsli iulldins M I, I lot :a.}iL 9 i> I



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Page 2-A rJewistr ftoridiaii Friday, August 23. 1963 YESHAYAHU ALMAGOR Temple Israel School Tops Keren Ami Gifts A check for S650 from the K^ren Ami Fund of the Temple Israel Religious School was the largest individual contribution ever received by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation from the student Keren Ami program here, it was announced by Federation President Sidney Lefcourt on Wednesday. The Keren Ami Fund, which means "Fund of My People." has tlirough the generosity of the religious school students of leading jynagogues in Dade County contributed over $2,500 to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and Combined Jewish Appeal in 1963. Leading synagogues that have contributed substantial amounts through the Keren Ami program include Temple Beth Am. Temple Emanu-KI. Congregation Beth David. Temple Beth Tor ah, and the Hebrew Academy. Religious fChool students who also partici pated in support of the community's health and welfare programs through Federation and in support ot the United Jewish Appeal Overseas include the students of the Hebrew High School. Temple Ner Tamid. Temple Menorah. Temple Judea. Temple Zion. and Congregation Belli Kmcth-Yehud ah Moshe. "I am very proud of the Greater Miami Keren Ami Council, which was headed by Jay Casselhoff. of Temple Israel, lor its outstanding support of the Federation campaign." Lefcourt declared "It is important to me ;nd to our community that our young people, as part of the learning experience, -become imbued with the tradition of •tzedakah'— righteousness and Justice lor all. The traditional heritage of the Jewish people has been "Help Thy Brother. Help Thy Neighbor.' and there is no finer demonstration of the continuation of 'tzedakah' than the example that has been shown to us by the religious students who participate." in the Keren Ami Council." Veteran of Israel's Independence Fight To Be Bond Representative for Florida ?c*K3ya'nu r A'lmagor7"a'"veteran o! Israel's struggle for independence on the military, diplomatic, and economic fronts, has been assigned to the Miami a'rea office of the Stale of Israel Bond Organization as a field representar.ve. Alinagor. a former major in Israel's Army, will serve with Dr. Aaron Kalian, executive director ol the local bond organization, in the mobilization of investment dollars for Israel through the Israel Bond program. Almagor's service for Israel goes back to pre-statehood days, when ha enlisted in the Jewish Brigade group of the British Army, seeing active service during World War II in the North Africa campaign with Field Marshal Montgomery and in the invasion of Italy. Prior to the outbreak of World War II. he had enrolled at the Hebrew University, but he interrupted his studies to enlist in the Jewish Brigade. Following the war, he served with the Haganah in underground missions in Istanbul, his duties including rescue of refugees and secret procurement of arms. With the beginning of Israel's war of liberation in 1948. Almagor v-as among Haganah officers assigned to form Israel's first armored force, the famed 8th Armored Brigade, participating in the opening of the road to Jerusalem from the Mediterranean and later in the liberation of the Negev. Following Israel's victory, and while still in active service. Almagor completed studies for a law Eshkol Warns Arab Aggressors Continued from Page 1-A municipal rally in Beersheba, he said that Nasser had shown "his true face" in making bellicose speeches against Israel. Until recently, the Premier noted, Nasser had beer talking about peace. • We must continuously strength en Israel in the face of the declared danger trom Egypt." Mr. Efhkol said, adding that he had no intention of competing with the Egyptian leader in speechmaking. He then quoted King Ahab's answer to Syrian King Ben-Hadad from I Kings: "Let him who girds himself for war not boast as he who ungirds himsell" after victory. degree at the Hebrew University. He remained on active duty through the Sinai campaign in 1956. retiring as commander of an armored battalion with the rank of major. In 1957, he entered Israel's diplomatic service. When relations with Poland were opened, he was assigned to serve with Ambassador Katriel Katz in Warsaw, as Israel's commercial attache. Later, he was transferred to the State of Israel Bonds and assigned to South America, serving for two years in Argentina and for the past two years in Colombia. Almagor is married and has taken up residence in Miami with his wife. Genia, and two children, a daughter Leah 17. now enrolled at the University of Miami, and son Chaim 15. BEWARE TERMITES Uricin for the sake of your home PERPETUATE YOUR NAME FOREVER Throng* 1 the Foundation of the JEWISH NATIONAL FUND Call JE 8-6464 Mayshie SM VBN yn Tin. Kabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky Phone JE V359S •45 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BUCK Rabbi Stern Scheduled •"Self-Evaluation" will be the topic discussed by Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, of Congregation Beth Jacob, on the Ch. 10 program 'Give Us This Day." heard Friday, 7 a.m. S^OPV etCHCC PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS FASHION CENTER OF THE SOUTH Largest Selection in Latest Styles for Men and Women fill fASKING ifACt IN REAR CONVENIENT TO BUSES 728 LINCOLN ROAD (On the Moll) Phone JE 8-0749 OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS F/tlfO CONTACT LENSES GREYHOUND RACING JUNE 1 thru SEPT. 16 k* \<&T[ e Paddock loom %  •ttowont | • Af-Condit'Onvd Oi#b Howit | I • Cock'oil lowngo I • Vo>'" Park>na RCSERVATlQNf Tin Noiioru fiitttjbiiri Sbwpki LAST QUARTERFINAL ROUND i80,000 INTERNATIONAL CLASSIC SATURDAY NIGHT • • e WEATHER PROTECTED £^r POST TIME 8:15 P.M. No minors admitted 37th AVENUE and 7th STREET, Northwest • MIAMI Our friendly soles personnel were selected tor their jobs because of their knowledge of com true tie* practices. Also, they are familiar with materials and tools which will complete your job faster. When you save TIME, you save MONEY, don't you? Then come in and talk with us. LOCATIONS TO SERVE Comult Your Directory F-* %  "P.n." &f -. IM.. RENLMRT BfllLiEY CHEELY LUMBER & TWHf CITY ULASS CO. GUARANTEED MIRRORS STORE FRONTS FURNITURE TOPS ANTIQUE MIRRORS I RE-SILVERING AUTO CLASS INSTALLED WHILE YOU WAIT 1230 • 16th Street, MB. Closed Saturdays Tel. JE 1-6141 INSURANCE ONE STOP AGENCY JEWELRY—FURS— MISCELLANEOUS PLOATItl AUTOMOIILI LIAIILITY PHYSICAL DAMAOI Limits to moot year SMOOU The Agency that CAN icy YISI Deo't lot year oaoot say "It Can't le Coo" ACKERMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. n SiffffiS Now also in North Miami Beach. MlMO It I 1/ 1HAPHI. The Beyer Funeral Home has joined the Riverside family in order to oiler the North Miami Beach community the unsurpassed quality i Riverside funeral. Itiv.-r.siu.'> proven ability, personal service tad superior leiBti'* are no* available in lour ot Florida's most beautiful funeral claifwls. • conveniently located in Coral liable*. Miami: Miami Beach and North Dade Unnty... :u ,.! nnrinf a || „, t | 1(> l||y s|il|( .„ So, when the need arises, call Riverside, i.ere difnit* an.! personal attention to details are a tradition. riverside memorial chapel, inc. FUNERAL DIRECTORS NorthMiami Beach: 18000 N. E. 19th Avenue Wl ,4601 Miami: Donglaa Road al S. VY. 17th street Highland 8-2*21 Miami Beach: 1230 Normandy Drive 19th and Alton Road JE 11151 • *BE E-SENBERG • EMANUEL MA.NDEI • HARRY BEYER



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Page 6-B mjmiat ncridUan Friday. August 22. 1963 tfflE WOMAN OF THE WEEK Effie Platoff's sweet smile and gentle manner are always in evidence when there's figuring to be done. As a little girl, brought up quietly and properly by her widowed mother, Etfie remembers bein interested in arithmetic, not dolls. She trained as a secretary and went right into the business world. In 1921, she met her late husband, Harry, through mutual friends of their families. She already was active in Hadassah. Working with Judith Epstein for ten years, she organized the West End Hadassah Group, and was treasurer there for ten years. She ind Harry went to California where her latent ability of rhyming, inherited from her father who was an author, came to the fore. Arranging place cards for a birthday party for Harry, she discovered she could write symbolic poetry for everyone. Now whenever a bit of rhyming has to be done Effie is called without delay. They visited Miami every year until Harry retired, and they came here to live. Effie's forty years in Hadassah can be summed up in her own words, "I adopted Hadassah for my child." Certainly, no mother could have been more devoted than Effie. On moving to Miami. Effie continued where she left off. She was treasurer and financial secretary for 16 years. Presently, she's auditor tor the Miami Beach Group. Since Harry was such an ardent Zionist. Effie also became active in Bonds for Israel. She was also treasurer of the Mt. Sinr.i Hospital Women's Auxiliary rind Gift Shop, and has earned her 600j hour pin by being a Pink Lady. She has just been made an Honorary! Life Director of the Auxiliary. Among other organizations on whose board she sits are Brandeis National Women's Committee. Board of Governors of Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and Technion. Effie is in much demand when someone is needed tc man the entrance desk at luncheons. Her totaling always comes out right, and the door goes smoothly. Effie cooks I little, reads a little, and watches television. She has learned since her husband's last illness to be self-sufficient. Mostly, she sits at her desk making the figures race quickly and correctly across the pages. In her quiet, calm way. Effie has dedicated herself not only to Hadassah but to her community, proving that there is always some one who cares for others enough to try to uphold the dignity of life. %  •* NOTES ON A "POP" CONCERT PROGRAM The tenth and last concert in the Miami Beach Auditorium was a huge success. A warm, friendly feeling swept over the whole au-i dience from the beginning. The nostalgic songs of Richard Rodgers put everyone in a gay mood. When Bernard Frank presented Marie I Volpe with a plaque of honor lor her inspiration and leadership, he confessed he was a little nervous—he had just been a father for six-, teen hours. Hillevi and David Schine had a full table of guests. Hillcvi's pictures don't do her justice; she's breathtakingly lovely., Dr. and Mrs. Albert Rosenthal took advantage of the intermission to say "hello" to their friends. Florence (Mrs. Albert) Pick's table: was desiged by friends stopping to offer greetings. She has just, returned from a European toui two weeks earlier than she had plan] ned because she got homesick. Sophia and Mai Englander, with several of their daughters had a table for themselves. Among others enjoying the music ar.d table-hopping were Rose and George Levenson, Dr .and Mrs. Harold Rand, Mrs. Arthur Treister, Ruth and Shepard Broad. Mrs. Herbert Scher, Mis. Theodore Chertok, Babette and Leo Ackernian, Laurette and Ted Sandier, Mrs. Edward Pincus. and Barbara ;i;irl Marvin Brown. • FOOTBALL CAPERS AT WESTVIEW Six o'clock sharp a buffet dinner was served in Westview Country Club dining room lavishly decorated according to a football theme. At seven o'clock on the dot, two bus loads left the club lor the Miami Stadium and the game. Dr. Richard E. Deutch did the honors in one bus and David Haber in the other. Among the football enthusiasts were Diana and Leonard Trei'ler, Georgian and John Serbin, Leon Manne and a party of eight. Dr. and Mrs. Lester A. Russan, Mr. and Mrs. Jaime Goldenbcrg, who have recently moved here from Medellion, Colombia. After the game, the buses returned their passengers to the club lor a late snack and to cool off. EVERYBODY SANG AND PLAYED Seen having dinner at Les Violins where everyone gets into the act from the bus boy up were Mollie and Dan Ruskin, Claire and Sydney Weintraub, and the Ed Kahns. MIAMI BEACH GOES TO NEW YORK During August, there will be an exodus to Gotham Town to attend the wedding of Michael, son of Ruth and Max Orovitz, and Norma, daughter ol Mr and Mrs. David Achsen, of New York City. The wedding will be at the Essex House on Sept. 1. The Orovitz family, Mr. and Mrs. David Bass, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Deutch, and Mr. and Mrs. James Orovitz will be joined by the Samuel Friedlands, the Leonard A. Wiens, Mollie and Dan Ruskin, Lois and Herbert Matbes, Eleanor and Gus Feuer, and the James H. Meyers. The night before the wedding there will be a rehearsal dinner for the wedding party and out-of-town guests. Most of the Miami Beach contingent will take time out to shop and see a show or two. • • JUST LIKE MAMIE EISENHOWER Lillian Frumkes has been around the world and a few other places, but she declares that the most beautiful spot of any that she has seen is Ixtapen in Mexico. She just came back and hasn't stopped raving There is a Beauty Institute there like the one in Arizona, called Main Chance, where Mamie Eisenhower goes. That pampered feeling in a beauty salon from nine to six o'clock leaves an inward as well as an outward glow. "Wonderful,"' says Lillian. Peris to Live In College Park Susan Carol Siegel and Jeffrey Alan Perls exchanged nuptial vows on Sunday, Aug. 18. Rabbi Joseph Narot performed the high noon ceremony at the Seville Hotel, where a reception followed. Matron of honor to the bride was Judith Alice Kramer, with Michele Drasner and Sara Ellen Berman serving as bridemaids. Ira Siegal acted as best man, and Lawrence Kramer, Ervin Shames, Lawrence Levitan and Jeffrey Klivans were groomsmen. A graduate of Miami Senior High, the new Mrs. Perls attended the University of Florida and is a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority. Her husband is an industrial engineer with a degree from the University of Florida. He belongs to Pi Lambda Phi, social fraternity, and Sigma Tau, engineering honorary. Following a wedding trip to Jamaica, the couple will live in College, Park, Md. Parents ot the newlywcds are Mr. and Mrs. Morris Z. Siegal, 2500 SW 1st Ave., and Mr. and Mrs. Edmund F. Perls, 1801 SW 19th Ave. M*S. JtffSli *IJ B. -Ml.n Bucket MISS KAY fSTA WtISS Hebrew Acad. Now Registering Registration for the new semester at the Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami. 2400 Pine Tree Dr., is now open. In addition to nursery, kindergarten, elementary and junior high school classes, a special program is being offered this year for junior high students with no previous Hebrew education. Also available to the new, modern school, is transportation throughout the Greater Miami area. Kay Esta Weiss Betrothal Told An early winter wedding is being planned by Kay Esta Weiss and Neil I. Harris, of Maplewood. N.J. Announcement of the engagement and future marriage is made by the bride-elect's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiss, 5815 Alton Rd. The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mrs. Florence Harris. Maplewood, and Allen Harris. Irv ington. N.J. Miss Weiss received her early education in Miami Beach Schools and the University of Florida, and attends the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, where her liance is majoring in industrial design. It was 22 years ago, in the Jan. 1. 1941 issue of The Jewish Flor\ idian. that the engagement of the future bride's parents appeared under the byline of Ray IT, Shochet, society editor. The former Miss Cecile Alex ander. of Long Island and Miami j Reach, was described as a grad< uate of the University of Miami and a member of Theta Chi Ome ga Sorority. Her fiance. Milton Weiss, an attorney, graduated from the I'M Law School and served as its oresident in 1935. He had been elected to Iron Arrow, honorary fratCongress Confab Labor Weekend Plans Speakers > Final plans were completed for the fifth annual Labor Day Week end conclave "of the American Jewish Congress at a meeting here this week. Mrs. Harvey E. Kramer, pres. ident of the Women's Division, and Mrs. Benjamin Kamer, chairman of the conclave, announce the activities will begin with a Havdalah service to be conducted on Saturday evening by Rabbi Jonah Caplan, vice president of the Southeast Region of th American Jewish Congress, and spiritual leader of Temple Adath Yeshunin. Site is the Diplomat Hotel. On Sunday and Monday mornings, from 11 to 12 noon, "Congress Confabs" will be held on two vital issues. On Sunday, the "confab" will concern "The InterRacial Dialogue—Role of the Jew J" ish Community." Chairm.m will be Rabbi Leon Kronish, president of the Southeast Region of the American Jewish Congrev Panelists are Tobias Simon, secretary. Florida Advisory Committee of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and J >ha Orr, former State Legislator. On Monday morning, Mr-. Abraham Augenstein will cha;r a disi ussion on "The America 1 JewChallenge in 1963." s leaker* will be Leo Mindlin, executive editor of The Jewi.sh Flondian, and Rabbi Sanlord Seltzer, area director of the Union of Amen can Hebrew Congregations "Congress Koftee Klataches" will be held on Saturday and Sunday afternoons in the Embassy Room for informal get ti gathers with members and guestTroph it's will be awarded to i an and women in the Congress Golf Tournament to be a part of the weekend activities. Assisting Mrs Kamcn ir the arrangement! arc MisdameHarvey B. Kramer, Tobias Simon, trying Kaplan and Russell Wine--. "J Mrs. Benjamin Kamcn, 1012 Obispo, Coral Gables, chairman of the conclave, is ;:ccept:ng hotel reservations. Pi Lambda Phi Party Pi Lambda Phi Fratermiy held its second annual twin party last Saturday night at ;he San:. 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