The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01800

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
T eJewish Flor idliain
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE WISH WEEKLY
am 36 Number 31
Miami. Florida, Friday, August 2, 1963
Two Sections Price 20*
ennedy Eyes
lew Law For
Immigration
V. Va NGTON (JTA) Pres-
ml wedy this week made a
geep B move to liberalize the
n -Walter Immigration Act,
elm: the elimination of the
itior;. origin quola system and
Bur ran of discrimination.
IT. tnnedy sent proposals to
Vth t Senate and House. They
ire accompanied by the Presi-!
pit's personal letter saying that
lactr- it of the new legislation!
Bui. help eliminate discrimina '
mi between peoples and nations."
In Ms letters to Congress,
president Kennedy declared:
The ma of a national origin
|uot? system is without basis in
kith*' logic or reason and it
Leitfcer satisfies a national need
Lor accomplishes *n internation-
al purpose." He added that "In
in age of interdependence '
kmonc nations, such a system is
n anachronism."
II'rt- ent Kennedy recommend
that the national origins quota
[-ten-:, in effect since 1920. and
Ihich denied entry to many ret
^ees from Hitler's Europe, be
limi: ited within live years. He!
Bated nit that 60,000 quota num-
fcrs were wasted annually be
an-i <: a biased system in which,
farther-. European countries were
fvorec'
Eastern Europe and Mediterran-
an areas were considered less
isirable sources of immigration
der the quota system which was
a-petuEted in the McCarran-
falter Act. Un.'er the proposed
legisl. :... 20 per cent of quota
Burnt" .i vear would he put in
I
Continued on Paoe 2A
U.S. Dismisses A-Threat
To Peace in Middle East
PRESIDENT KENNEDY
.. fully owore
WASHINGTON (JTA) State Department sources said this
week that Israel and Egypt have been urged to subscribe to the Amer-
ican-British-Soviet ban on nuclear weapons testing as part of the over-
1 all policy of the United States and not because the nuclear potential
', of the two countries is being taken seriously.
There is no current evidence to!
justify either Israeli or Egyptian tw0 countries is within sight of
; fears of nuclear attack from the i nuclcar arms capability, although
Other, it was stressed. It was em- ___
Phasized that, in the official ^e United States desires aban-
! American view, nether of the *"* $SLmA ob>ecl,ves
in the Middle East.
fltra Orthodox
'tone Vehicles
]ln Jerusalem
JEW '.'..km (JTA) Ultra-
lialous Orthodox youths <>t the
ieturei Karta organisation con-
|nued -toning buses Sunday night,
bile their elders held an open-
fcu ma-s meeting denouncing al-
leged Sabbath violations. The
Meturei Karta demonstrations, be-
igiwi Saturday, resulted In the r-
Irtst Two policemen
Ivcie injured, and numerous buses
carrying Christian pilgrims enter-
ling Israel from Jordanian territory
through the Mandelbaum Gate,
tv ere amaged.
During Sunday night's demon-
stration, Amram Blau. one of the
Neturei Karta leaders, addressed
a crowd of his adherents in Yid-
di 'i. denouncing Sabbath dese-
crations. He threatened that, next
Saturday, "all of Jerusalem will
& iemble to defend the Sabbath."
Meanwhile, youthful followers
continued attacking buses, throw-
irj passengers into a panic. The
Hamkasher Cooperative, whose
buses were the cause of the
demonstrations, continued here
Continued en Page 5-A
COMMANDER IONDON
.. facts at hand
mmm with wds?
JFK Considers
Friendly Role
WASHINGTON (JTA)- Presi
dent Kennedy indicated here this
week that he may consider friend-
ly intervention with the Soviet
authorities to relieve the pressure
on Jews in the Soviet Union. He
also indicated that he was ob-
serving the Egyptian rocket build-
up, with an appreciation of Is-
rael's concern over the matter.
The President expressed his
sentiments to National Command
er Morton London, of the Jewish
War Veterans of the United States,
who was received in the White
House
Citing the prospect of a thaw
in U.S.-Soviet relations, Mr. Lon-
don told the President that the
time might be ripe for Presi-
dential intercession with Soviet
leaders on behalf of Russian
Jews. Mr. London cited a re-
cent State Department letter to
the JWV, containing evidence of
Continued on Page 5-A
Supreme Court
Justice Regrets
Dialog Remarks
JERUSALEM (JTA) Jus-
tice Minister Dov Joseph repotted
to the Knesset this week that Su-
preme Court Justice Chaim Cohen
has expressed regret that his re-
cent remarks comparing the rab-j
binic definition of a Jew with the
Nazi racist Nuremburg laws had
given some people the impression
that it was his intention "to dis-j
parage the Jewish religion."
Dr. Joseph told the Israel Par-
liament that he did not intend to
accede to the suggestion of the:
Agudat Israel and Poale Agudat'
I-rael deputies that Justice Cohen
be brought before a disciplinary j
court. He said that the jurist's |
remarks, delivered before the re-,
cent American Jewish Congress!
Dialogue in Israel, were apparent-1
ly taken out of context and creat-
ed a false impression.
In his remarks at the Dia-
logue, which aroused strong
criticism in religious quarters.
Justice Cohen had declared: "It
is one of the bitterest ironies of
the State that the same racist
approach that was propagated
by the Naxis and characterized
the infamous Nuremburg laws
shoe-Id, because of an alleged
sacrosanct Jewish tradition, be-
come the basis for official de-
termination, or rejection of Jew-
ishness in the State of Israel."
Dr. Joseph informed the Knes-
set that Justice Cohen had ex-
' pressed his regret over the state-
\ merit in a letter to Supreme Court
President Yitzhak Olshan as soon
: as he saw his remarks reported in
: the press.
(Egypt's President Gamal Ab-
del Nasser announced Sunday
night in Cairo that his govern-
mert would adhere to the nu-
clear test ban treaty initialed in
Moscow last week by the United
States, Britain and the Sovet
Union. At the same time, it
was reported in London that
Egypt is now operating "at least
one plant full time producing
poison gas.")
Israel's adherance to the nuclear
test ban agreement signed in Mos-
cow last week is expected to be
decided unanimously when the
pact comes up for discussion at
next week's Cabinet meeting, it
was reported in Jerusalem.
The United States and Britain
have officially invited Israel to
join in the agreement, in accord-
ance with the third article of the
pact which permits accession at
any time by other countries. The
invitations were extened to Israel
by the British and U.S. ambass
adors during the past lew days.
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol
meanwhile welcomed the three
power nuclear agreement as a
"positive step towards the relaxa-
tion of international problems "
Addressing a conference here of
Continued on Page 3-A
Nasser's Weapons Display
Believed Aimed at Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Egypt's
display of armaments made by
German scientists and of Soviet
armaments at Nasser's "Revolu-
tion Day" parade in Cairo was
viewed here this week by Brig.
Gen. Tzvi Tzur, chief of staff of
Israel's defense forces, as "a
display against Israel."
In an address to graduates of
Israels Communication Officers
Course, Gen. Tzur said that Nas
ser's exhibit of new armaments
"should act as an alarm and as
a warning sign" tor Israel. "We
shall sin if we underestimate its
meaning." he said.
Israelis possessing television
sets saw, ani others heard
through radio descriptions, the
massive arms displayed by Nas-
ser's forces in the parade at
Cairo. Among the new weap-
ons, there were a 30-foot, two-
stage Vanguard rocket with a
range of more than 3*0 miles
enough to hit an Israeli targe-
if guided accurately. Egypt
Continued on Page 7-A
ALREADY TOO RICH FULBRIGHT
Aid to Israel 'Bad Business'
Washington (JTA) Amer-
ican economic assistance to Israel
came under severe criticism at a
hearing of the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee, on grounds
that Israel was "too rich" to go
on receiving American benefits, it
was disclosed this week.
Under questioning by the com
mittee. David E. Bell, administra-
tor of the Agency for Internation-
al Development, pointed out that,
"on a per capita basis, U.S. aiJ
,o Israel has been higher than to
any other country." Chairman
j. w. Fulbright, Arkansas Demo-
crat, stressed that 'Israel has re-
ceived from (his country, private
Continued on Paqe 3-A
ACHIEVEMENT OF A HUMAN RELATIONS IDEAL STUBBORNLY PURSUED
Story Behind Dade's Community Relations Board
South Florida didn't want a
Birmingham in its midst, and so
Dade County did something about
it. The story was told here in
mid-June with the establishment
by the Metro Commission of a
Community Relations Board to
deal with racial tension-.
But there had been other pleas
to Metro here before for the
establishment of such a board-
pleas that were cooly brushed
aside. In fact, the effort to
create an overall agency with of
ficial government status capable
of dealing with potential racial
flareups goes back several years.
What happened in the interim?
For one thing, it was in fact
Birminghamas well as other
spectres across the nation of
communities suddenly torn in
conflict. For another, it was
the patient pursuit of an ideal
by the Greater Miami Chapter
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee that finally achieved the
establishment of the board in a
unanimous vote on Tuesday. June
11.
Purpose of the board is to act
as a mediator in racial disputes
and squelch them before they
arise. The emergency ordinance
provides for an 18-membcr body,
including three Negroes and a
Cuban. Chairman of the special
selection committee was Catholic
Bishop Coleman F. Carroll. Mi-
ami City Commissioner Sidney
Aronovitz acted as spokesman
for the committee.
These are the bare bones of
the story. What lies behind:
them"
The American Jewish Commit
Continued on Page 4-A

r


Page 2-A
vJewisti flcricfiar
Friday. August 2, 1963
JFK Asks Major Immigration Change
u**WAeA^WA^/<
Continued from Page 1-A
mtmm
a "quota reserve pool" for redis-i
nibution. At the end of five
years, the old structure would noi
longer exist.
The President stipulated that
no single country would be per-
mitted more than 10 per cent of
quota numbers in any one year.
He proposed the establishment of
I a new seven-member board on
immigration matters. He ask-
ed authority for the White House
to carry.out the board's recom-
mendation-, to reserve up to 50
per cent of unallocated numbers
for issuance to persons disad-
vantaged by change in the quota
system, and up to 20 per cent to
refugees in cases where sudden
dislocation requires special treat-
ment.
Beach UF Names
Campaign Chiefs
Top leadership posts for the
i:iini Beach Division of the 1963
United Fund campaign have now
been completed, it WM announced
here. Heading the Beach's ef-
forts will be Capt. "Dick" Mer-
rill. 321 E. Di Lido Dr.. dean of
America's pilots.
This will be Merrill's first ac-
tive participation in a United
Fund campaign, according to
Campaign Chairman Gen. E. A.
Evans.
Serving as associate chairman
will be Mrs. Milton Sirkir., 2024
N. Bay Rd. She has long been
ar active United Fund volun-
teer, and currently serves as a
member of the Board of Trus-
tees.
Samuel L. Seltzer, president of
Mercantile National Bank, has
agreed to serve as chairman of
Section I. He will be assisted by
Associate Chairman Mrs. Aaron
Farr, 936 79th Ter.
Heading Section II is realtor A.
D. Smith. 260 95th St. His asso-
ciate chairman is Mrs. George
Israel. 10300 W. Bay Harbor Dr.
PERPETUATE YOUR
NAME FOREVER
Through the Foundation
of the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
Call JE 8-6464 Mayshie
First call on the first 50 per
cent of quota numbers would be
given to persons whoso admission,
by virtue of exceptional skill,
training or education, would be
especially advantageous to the
United States. First call on the
next 30 per cent, plus any part of
the first 50 per cent not issued to
the skilled specialists, is given to
unmarried sons and daughters of
United States citizens, not eligible
lor non quota status, because they
are over 21 years of age.
First call on the remaining 20
per cent, plus any part of the first
80 per cent not taken by the first
two classes, is given to spouses
and children of aliens lawfully ad-
mitted for permanent residence.
Any portion remaining is issued to
other applicants, with percentage
preferences to other relations of,
United States citizens and resi-
dent aliens, and then to certain
classes of workers.
Within each class, visas will be
issued on a first come, first serv-
ed basis. These preference pro-
visions, which under present law
determine only relative priority
between nationals of the same
country, will now determine prior-!
ity between nationals of different
countries throughout the world.
In certain oversubscribed coun-
tries, a ^registration of regis-
trants would be taken to elim-
inate those who have died, emi- '
grated elsewhere, or changed
their minds. All who failed to
re-register could be eliminated.
reregister could be eliminated,
viously declined visas would be
terminated.
One section of the legislation
amends the Refugee Relief Act
to allow the admission of refu-
gees from North Africa who are
unable to return to their coun-
tries because of their religion,
race, or political views. The act
now admits such refugees from
"any country within the general
area of the Middle East." This
is expanded to substitute Morocco
for Libya as the western border
of the area defined.
The 130.000 Algerian refugees in
France will not he aftecte;! by the
legislation since they are French
nationals.
BEWARE
TERMITES
WE INSTALL
GLASS
I OR EVERY I'i RPOSE
STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS
furniture Tops, Beveled Mirrors and
Ro silvering Our Specialty
L. & G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS
136 S.W. 8th STREET Phone FR 1-1363
Morris Orlin
tpssWpSe
etoHCt
PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS
FASHION CENTER
OF THE SOUTH
Largest Selection in Latest
Styles for Men and Women
fllU PAWING S?ACC IN REAR
CONVENIENT TO BUSES
728 LINCOLN ROAD
(On the Mall)
Phone JE 8-0749
OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS flUED
CONTACT LENSES
INSURANCE
ONE STOP AGENCY
JEWELRYFURSMISCELLANEOUS FLO ATM*
AUTOMOBILI LIABILITY PHYSICAL DAMA*I
LlmlH te meet year eeedl
The Afeacy the* CAN say YISI
_________> It yea? ajpaj say "h Cnt Be Do*
ACXERMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. ^.'VSi
^^jJEPjlJPr
TO SERVE YOU
IS OUR PLEASURE
Ed. J. Vischi
ifffff tistalv in
All Us ilranvhvs
12486 N.E. 7th AVENUE
Phone PL 4-4661
ANOTHER LOCATION fOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
C0ULT0N BROS.
ART'
MAURY" "NAT" YOUR TEXACO BOYS
Coral Way & S.W. 27th Ave. 840 S.W. 8th St.
ONCE TRIED AtWAYS A CUSTOMER
GET YOUR NEXT MASSAGE
AT
Boulevard Health Salon
10-4, SAT-SUN-114. OUTCAllS
IV 03J V301 MON
1031 N.W. 36th St.
Air Condition.d
Ph. 634-2609
Complete and Dependable Thle Service
MIAMI TITLE
tQktvactCo.
37 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
* ESCROWS
* ABSTRACTS
* TITLE INSURANCE
104 Northeast First Street
Telephone FRanklin 3-8432
ROOF LEAK?
CALL
VICTOR COXX
Let us repair it or apply
o new one. For free
estimate phone:
? ^ ItOOl IM.

685-1952
WINDOW SPECIALISTS
"SERVICE WE'RE PROUD OF'"
Maintenance Inc.
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE OF AIL TYPES
WINDOWS AND JALOUSIES
Complete Stock of Replacement Parts
7400 N.E. 2nd AVENUE Miami 37, Fla.
FRanklin 3-5491
^v-w^w-ww-\^v^-
THE McCUNE COMPANY
CONSULTANTS APPRAISERS
MIAMI
Established 1914
FRanklin 3-7796
Fossett's Prescription Pharmacy
HUNTINOTON MEDICAL BUILDING
168 S.E. FIRST STRFET Phone FR 4-7691
MIAMI FLORIDA
One of the Largest and Most Complete Prescription
Pharmacies in the World
W. E. FOSSETT, Founder
i
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I
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FOR AIR CONDITIONING CALL
C. E. MORGAN
"IT IS OUR PUASURt TO SERVE YOU"
SALES and INSTALLATIONS ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS
2034 N.W. 24th AVENUE NE 5-7201
BATTERIES for ALL AMERICAN and FOREIGN CARS
Experts on Starter and Generator Repairs
BATTERIES GENERATORS STARTERS
iii-voi/r irvrn-:by IBfC
SALES & SERVICE at Home or On the Road
1850 N.W. 7th Avenue FR 9.345)
8345 S. Dixie Highway MO 1-5357
Now
also
in
North
MlVllOlil 1/ i HAM'II.
The Beyer Funeral Home has joined the Riverside family in enter to
0I1.T the North Uiaiai Beach comnranily the nnaunkuned quality "'
Riverside funeral.
Riversides proven ability, personal service ami superior liu-iliiies are
now awihbk iu ton of Florida* DM* UmiiIiinI funeral aha**...
ohvemei.lly loftted in c.ral liable*. Miami: Miami lie... I, and Worth
Dade (.onnty...aml servinjrall of the fifty Mate*.
So. when the need arises, call Riverside, where difatf and personal
attention to details are a tradition.
riverside memorial chapel, inc.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Korth Miami Beach: 10660 N. K. 10th Avenue Wl 7-8601
Miami: Douglas Road at s. w. 1711, street Highland 3-3**l
Miami Beach: 1250 Normandy Drive mil, and Alton Road
JE 11151
3NARD Z.18ERT ABE E.SENBERO EMANUEl MAN0EI HARRY BEYE*
.


^
Friday. August 2. 1$63
>h*ist\ncrklian
Page 3-A
Mid-East Atom Threat is Dismissed
Continued frem Pane 1-A
an Israel Bond leadership group
from C'f icago. Mr. Eshkol also ex-
presse change of atm.i.-phore would bring
about improvement in the situa-
tion of Soviet Jewry, and that
'Russian Jews will at some future
date b> able to rejoin families
here, and also come to partici-
pate in the workings of society."
The nuclear test bin treaty
?rttrla'leW in" Moscow last weei
by the United States, Britain and
the Soviet Union is "not, in it-
self, enough to affect the Mid-
dle East situation," Abba Eban,
Israel's deputy Prime Minister,
declared in Stockholm. "Later
developments," he said, may af-
fect the situation. "But," he
added, "the lessening of world
tensions will favor our region."
Mr. Eban made that statement
to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
upon his arrival to attend a meet-
ing of scientists discussing the
contributions of science to the
welfare of humanity. The Israeli
deputy Premier is president of
the Weizmann Institute of Science
at Rehovot.
His first official meeting was
with Sweden's Prime Minister
Aid to brae! 'Bad Business/ Says Fulbright
Continued from Page 1-A
and pubic, nearly two billion dol-
lars."
Mr. Bell adored that Israel's
foreu' exchange reserves have
been rising, "so that they are in
really quite good shape." Sen.
Fulbni-t added that Israel re- !
serves have been rising, while ;
AmeriM's "have been going
down." In the opinion of the
ehairn.n, on the subject of con-
tinuing American loans and
grantr, o Israel, "thl is not
very i'i-od business."
Sen John J. Williams, Dela-
ware Republican, attacked the
Administration tor being too slow-
in phasing out aid to Israel. Sen.
Williams told Mr. Bell: "You are
loaning about three and a half
times as much in 1962. as you did
in either of the two preceding
years. I don't know what kind of
a phasing out that is." Sen.
Williams went on to enumerate
new loans to Israel.
Sen. Fulbright pointed out that
Israel has "one of the highest
gross national product rates per
Lake Worth
Rabbi Resigns
Rubbi harle, rleilprin, for two
yean i ritual leader of Temple
Beth Shi >:n at Luke Worth, has
resigi i ils post, according to
Dan GOOdmark, president of the
Trill,
A nati e of England, Rabbi Hcil-
prin wi a chaplain during World
\\'ai I I id h !. organize ser-
vicemen': social programs, for
Which I re e high official
commendation.
Temjtfi Beth 3 lom is the only
iynagogi in La ; Worth
Humcr, Mind Discussed
" n iman Mi id" was to be
the topic of a lei re by Dr. Abra-
ham \V oil son on Thursday morn
ing, 10'AS a.m i the auditorium
ol \\,i ngtol eral Savings
and I an Asa n, 1234 Wash
ingtoi A e. This marks the sev-
enth in a course >i lectures on
tin' "Life ami isophy of Spi-
noza" the Spinoza
Form in I \'
DISCOUNT PROCESSING
KOOACtffOME
8VM Roll 1 !5x20Mt 1.00
127-620-120 EKTA 1.00
KODACOIOK JUMBO MINTS
12 EXPOSURES 2.00
B4W EXPOSURES .75
Hull or BVmj th This Ad
Crciig's Camera Center
73St S.W. Red Id. Ph. 665-5111
<*A*A^A0)^MMMWMM>0iV*JM*
CORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC
2148 NW lOAve. FR 3-7180
Have your roof reoalred now; you
will aav* on a now roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Exptrlencod Man"
RENT A CAR
from $2.50 per day
115 prr wk. & in ii-nice chance
ABOTT MOTORS, Inc.
1451 W. FLAGLER ST.
Phone FR 30326
FHAVA S6SALES
IN PERFECT S :ONDITION
DADE 4 BRT rV A '0 COUNTY
From (150.00 d i 550.00 Mo.
MlTMAN IN$UAIC = 1 REAL ESTATE
768 NW 3rd 5" FR 1-2421
Wo H'H.dte In- : of Ail KMl
tXPLHIENCEO
?
PcT OEALERS
EXPERT DOQ ^rOOMiNQ
boao :
an; mal kingdom
PET SHOP
1105 MW llyfi ST. MU 8-3021
4
4
4'
4
4
4
4
J
A I
capita" in the world. He said that
per capita aid to Israel was $39.70,
while Mexico got only $2.60.
Much of the discussion on phas-
ing out the Israeli program, and
criticism of American programs
benefiting Israel, was deleted
from the transcript made avail-
able for "reasons of national se-
curity," so that the public is only
informed of a censored version of
the actual full remarks.
Tage Erlander, with whom he ex-, It was Mr. Erlander's first con-
changed impressions regarding thejference with a member of the re-
general international situation, cently-formed Israeli Government.
41 Yeea..
bperieaser
Home Owac-4
Hom Operate
TERMITES?
ROACHES? ANTS?
Safe, positive pet control with
regular service for the home
TRULY NOLEN
EXTERMINATORS
"The Sign of Good Housekeeping"
COSTS LESS THAN
YOU THINK
^FR 7-1411--'
Greartr Miami's Largest Extenaiaater
g<
*ei
8
roc
daj
nt
e
THE PLACE
FOR YOUR SAVINGS...
the reasons?
D Sound, Conservative Management
D Resources Exceeding
195 Million Dollars
D Reserves Over 14 Million Dollars
fl One of the Nation's
Oldest and Largest
Serving Dade County
Over a Quarter of a Century
B ^ix Convenient Offices
Intended Dividend Rate on Savings
4
]/ or Per Annum
/ /0 Paid Quarterly
Savings Accounts Insured to $10,000
by the Federal Savings and Loan
Insurance Corporation, a Permanent
Agency of the Federal Government.
Savings Accounts opened or added to on
or before August 20th can share in a full
quarterly dividend September 30th.
Once-a-week evening hours:
Main Office open Mondays and
Branch Offices open Fridays'til 8 p.m.
'One o' the Notion's
O/des' and targes'*
E)ade Federal
^/a-vinos ond Ioan Association o> Miami
MSIPH M IITION. htvitKI
6 CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVE DADE* COUNTY
MAIN OFFICE Allapattah Branch North Miami Branch Tamiomi Branch Edison Center Branch Kendall Branch
101 E. Flagler St. MOO N.W. 36th St. 12370 N.W. 7th Ave. 1901 S.W. 8th St. 5800 NW. 7th Ave. U.S. 1 at S.W- 104th St.


Page 4-A
* Jewish ftoridlair
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
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FRED K. SHOCHET..............Editor and Publisher
LEO MJNDLIN-............................Executive Editor
iELMA M. THOMPSON..........Asat to Publisher
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MAY U. BINDER___________Correspondent
Volume 36
Number 31
Friday, August 2,
12 Av 5723
1963
Quota System
Must be Abandoned
President Kennedy is to be
congratulated for the positive
stand he has taken on the nation's
cntiguated McCarran-Walter Im-
migration Act.
The act has been a sore point
of controversy ever since it went
through Congress over President
Truman's veto some 13 years ago.
In the intervening decade Presi-
dent Eisenhower made a public
commitment to its amendment,
and now Mr. Kennedy suggests
an across-the-board abolition of
me national origins quota system.
The statistics the President
brings to bear in accord with his
request are irrefutable: They show
the existence of an unreasonable
fear of the newcomer in our midst,
and clearly suggest we can no
longer afford such immature emo-
tions certainly not in a world
v/here fee thorny walls of national
antagonisms must be lowered if
men can hope to survive.
Apart from the question of
cownright bigotry, the President
demonstrates the utterly inequit-
able purpose and practice of the quota system.
It is to be hoped that Congress will finally see
the error of its ways.
The growing era of McCarthy terror in the
early '50's was largely the impetus behind the
passing of the McCarran-Walter Act. The tide
has done more than turn since then; it has
presented us with a broad variety of necessary
coals of challenge, the successful achievement
of which require amity rather than disparity
cmong men. They also require our nation's
overall reversal of the quota system psychol-
ogy, and it is this President Kennedy's stand
so clearly expresses.

CW* ANOPUMtfiHMWt*
The President's Awareness
The vague leport listing the agenda be-
tween Jewish War Veterans National Com-
mandei Morton London and President Kennedy
ends on a happy note, which assures the
President's awareness of the missile buildup
in Egypt.
But the parade last week in Cairo cele-
brating Nasser's 11th anniversary of succes-
sion to power speaks another language.
If the President is well aware of the prob-
Dade County's New Community Relations Board
Continued from Page 1-A
*ee has long felt the need to dis-
cuss human relations problems
beyond the specific incidents
wringing the problem to a head.
For years now, they have look-
ad to ttoe time when Negro lead-
ers would press for full imple-
mentation of the 1S54 Supreme
Court ruling on integration. Be-
hind t)|e scenes in Dade County,
AJCommittee has worked pat
.ently ment of a community-wide
agency capable of bringing to-
gether Negro and white leaders
representing the Catholic, Pro-
testant, and Jewish faiths.
But individuals and organiza-
tionseven those directly involv-
ed in eivil libertarian endeavor
have long felt that such an
agency would inhibit their free-
dom to operate in the civil rights
field. Some pointed out that the
creation of a Community Rela-
tions Board would serve as a buf-
fer between their efforts and
the people, thus slowing down
the process of change.
Forum of Opinion
It was the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Jew-
ish Committee that gamed their
support and turned the tide.
For one thing, AJCommittee of-
ficials suggested that Metro had
repeatedly turned a cold shoulder
to their civil libertarian pro-
grams in the past and that, with-
out at least quasi-governmental
acceptance, they had in fact
achieved little response from the
community at large.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has since been proved correct
at least to the extent that the
establishment of the beard now
tends to put civil rights into a
sharper frame of reference. WiU
the week
as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
s s s
R*... .,.!: ...::'-r:
lem. what is he doing about it? In the event
he fails to understand the implications of the
threat, there have certainly been enough
people around him to explain that U.S. foreign
aid to the United Arab Republic is being imme-
diately translated into dollars for the purchase
of missiles manufactured in the Soviet Union.
These are the missiles that Nasser again
vowed last week would achieve in Israel what
seven Arab armies could not accomplish in
1948. Then what is it of which the President
assures his awareness?
Add to this the statements before a Senate
Foreign Relations Committee hearing several
days ago by representatives of the State De-
partment, all suggesting the total "success" of
U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East based
on the nation's commitment to friendship with
Nasser, and the confusion becomes total. To
emphasize the "success," the State Depart-
ment spokesmen have the gall to assert that
it has even eased progress in the resolution of
the Israel-Arab dilemma.
Perhaps this is so in the reckoning of the
Administration. But the parade in Cairo said
other things last week as did the UAR jet
attack over Israel territory launched to cele-
brate the anniversary occasion.
the adding of governmental
status to the programs of civil
libertarian organizations here,
they have virtually achieved the
kind of prestige that was long
their due.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee's efforts in this regard have
been legion throughout the year
even before the establishment
of the board. In mid-winter, the
Committee sponsored a dialogue
here, involving representatives
of the Catholic, Protestant, and
Jewish faiths, whose purpose
was to discuss the differences
among them on the then pend-
ing Supreme Court decision con-
cerning religion in the schools.
Remove religion^ AJCommittee
speculated, and have you, in fact,
created the kind of vacuum that
leads to immorality among our
youth? What does the repeti-
tion by rote of the Lord's Pray-
ComSnuaei an FolUwrn, aV, ,
Friday, August. 2, 1963
MOUNT SINAI Hospital and
the Jewish Home for the
(lull IIJ! tfle WeeK af1uient\eaWri*ipofthecoBi
munity. Generally speaking,
this leadership constitutes the
lion's share of the "Old
Guard"men whose promi-
nence in Jewish affairs goes
back to pre-Federation days.
With few exceptions, they
have held positions of respon-
sibility in Federation at one time or another; while some were di-
rectly involved in the formation and growth of Federation Itself.
But the civic world in which we live is changed. Increasingly, they
are withdrawing from their roles of total Jewish communal preemi-
nence- many of them merely fill high campaign posts on a nominal
basis, and only as a consequence of behind-the-scenes pressure.
It is more than in a leadership capacity that their interest has
flagged. The size of their gifts also seems to be affected with the
passing years. A few may be holding the line, at least to the extent
that they do not cut backj but in other cases, there have been dras-
tic slashes. At the same time, a sense of responsibility toward the
federated concept of civic identification is apparently giving way
to individual agency identification, with the result that a fragmenta-
tion process has long since developed here.
Neither can it be said that the two largest and most independent
institutions are doing anything about reawakening their increas-
ingly isolationist-minded leadership to the value, purposes, and im-
portance of Federation as Greater Miami's central fund-raising and
planning agency. Indeed, the Home last year launched an expan-
sion project with little regard for the community's total economic
capability or the best advice ot Federation, relying instead on it
individual agency prestige to forte Federation acceptance of the
project as an alternative to losing face: while the hospital can easily
show its own record ot maverick BOtioo designed to suit the hospital
primarily.
: : :
THE HOME WILL be quick to reply that it merely accepts a token
Combined Jewish Appeal allocation; while the hospital may just
as easily and cooly let you know that it is. alter all. a non-sectarian
institution. None ot these mswers the problem, for the toll that
independent agency action extracts from the community as a whole
inevitably affects the potency of Federation giving.
Fragmentation is only one part of the sad development here
during the past few years. Another is apathy. The withdrawal of
affluent leadership from its role of civic preeminence has led to a
tragic conseauence; where Gther Jewish Federations throughout the
nation axe reporting annual increases in their campaigns, Miami's
seems to be going in the opposite direction. As a result, there have
been cutbacks in operational allocations to CJA's affiliate agencies.
Jewish Family and Children's Service is a case in point. This
organization will be forced drastically to reduce its client intake dur-
ing the months ahead. As one board member recently suggested, re-
fleeting the general sense of agony the organization at large feels,
you'll have to be pretty close to needing emergency psychiatric at-
tention before JFCS can unlock its doors for immediate help. The
reasons are of course rooted in a staggeringly reduced CJA alloca-
tion, thus necessitating equivalent reductions in staff and program.
: t- :
THIS IS A SAD thing for an agency that has won national awards
and professional acclaim, both of which must inevitably be
jeopardized in the light of developments here. But it is especially
sad in the case of JFCS: Jewish Family and Children's Service is
not only Dade County's oldest welfare organization, regardless of
sectarian affiliation; it was also the pilot welfare body out of whose
programs and leadership grew the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
The extent of the apathy is illustrated by the bewildered com-
ment of one top Federation leader, who described for me the plight
of this agency and then commented: "And if you told the story, would
anyone care?" Other Federation affiliates will be suffering similar-
ly unhappy experiences in the years ahead: the inability of the Bu-
reau of Jewish Education to hire much-needed instructors; the pros-
pect before the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center of con-
tinuing to house its facilities in quarters that can no longer properly
be illustrated by words such as "inadequate" or "outdated."
The JFCS story is. of course, particularly sad because crippling
it necessarily cripples the Jewish communitv^ ability to deal with
some of its most profound welfare problemsproblems that inevit-
ably aflect the family unit and the individual. The bete noir here
is not Federation. It is those who have willy-nillv distorted the
mantle of their leadership inio the shape of individual agency inter
est. or who have perceptibly taken to rejectng the mantle entirelv
Lp until now, the Federation reaction has been to nurture this lead-
ership at any price What has this meant?
: : ..
IT HAS MEANT increasingly paying financial allocation heed to the
particular agency predilections of this leadership at the expense
ol other agencies without the advantage of similarly prestigious repre-
sentation in the highest councils of Federation; although another
Federation leader to whom I have spoken vigorously denies this as
untrue and a distortion of fact. In practical terms, it has meant
catering to .he best interests of the hospital and the Home lest its
leaders be oflended and encouraged to reduce their CJA'gifts In
amounts commensurate with their added individual support to these
institutions. rr
It has also meant succumbing to affiliate agency pressure for
?fTrri,?.6r JS \si"8ular|y ""happy illustration. Lacking the kind
i ha! T leadeJsh,P ,hat ,s hallmark of the hospital end Home.
gra^to Federnaa,t, ^^ Wt aCCOn,pU CapUaI exP*nSi0a T-
rati^atvL.F!dera.Li0n's resPnse to this Achilles heel in its organi-
"nv k tlHngl ,here is tbe ">win8 recognition that too
EaZJFSJTw Pa.S9ed in stubborn rehanc o *** community
travai ufa^n,J *v f .!hPir taad*iP amounts to virtual be-
tellLr/ rL Vt anothlT' as some Federation leaders are now
on demand T^ a s,r,?n*hening of purpose to tighten up
Z^JTJffiSE^"9^no matter wh0 "sks for
a J2JE?**!* o an American Jewish Committee bid for such
taK? Ws ,n nt 2*7 ta ,he wlnd' Although AJCommrttee cer-
occuduST1 ",Uent ,eadersh*P. has not generally speaking
moTsou^ thl rrle *!! Federation- Thus, the denial,* Perhaps
monlh ahead "m^ ^n' tkt *"* te8t W,U "* for more on this, another time.
0


Friday. August 2. 1963
Kk*i.*Hkridteu7
Page 5-A
. Stubborn Pursuit of Dade's New Community Unit
Continued from Preceding Pag*
er have to do with their morality,
especially when the adult com-
muuity serves by example in its
business, social and sexual prac-
tices to impress the young with
the presumable viability of a
dual code of ethical behavior?
Bishop Carroll Holps
Examining the issue were such
.leaders-as Bishop James Duncan,
.Suffragan Bishop of the Diocese
of South Florida Episcopal
Church; Luther Pierce, executive
director of the Greater Miami
.Council of Churches; Rabbi Jos-
eph R. Narot, then president of
the Welfare Planning Council;
Fr. McCarthy, president of Bis-
cayne College; and Virgil Pit-
stick, director of the Department
of Human Relations at the Uni-
versity of Miami.
Neither did the efforts end
there. Bearing in mind the
Statement of Conscience" emer-
ging out of the National Confer-
ence on Race and Religion held
in Chicago last February, the
Greater Miami Chapter of Amer-
ican Jewish Committee sought to
sirmoun SAMET
... befcid-t-icenei
achieve the formulation of a sim-
ilar statement here. And so.
chapter officials, headed by Sey-
mour Samet, executive director.
North Dade Member Tea
North Dade Chapter of B'nai
B*rith Women will hold a member-
ship tea at the home of Mrs. Al
Schwartz, 1030 NE 177th St.. No.
Miami Beach, on Tuesday at 8:30
p.m. Program for thj evening
will be a film on one of B'nai
B'rith's philanthropies. In charge
of information are Mrs. Schwartz
and Mrs. Ralph Abramson.
Panel Talk Set
Friday Evening
Westbrooke country Club lec-
ture group, the Wisdom Workshop,
will have a panel discussion Fri-
day evening on "What is Suc-
cess?"
Dr. Evan Katz, local psychia-
trist, will be guest speaker. Ben
Lcvitan will be moderator.
The Wisdom Workshop meets
twice each month at the Club.
8500 on the Trail, with a variety
of panel discussions and guest
speakers on timely subjects.
Ultra-Orthodox
Stone Vehicles
Continued from Page 1-A
to bypass passenger routes
through the two districts inhabit-
ed by the ultra-OrthodoxMe a
Shearim and Bet Yisroel.
Of the 18 youths arrested Sat-
urday, 12 were remanded to jail
for five days each. They were be-
ing held for hearings, and not sen-
tenced, as erroneously reported
i Six others were freed on parole.
, to be tried with the 12. Among
, the six was 16-year-old Jacob
Warhaflig. a son of Dr. Zcrach
Warhaftig, Minister for Religious
Affairs The youth is a student
at an Orthodox yeshiva here.
Magistrate Moreno Levy, who
heard the police charges of riot-
ing of the arrested youths, order
ed those being detained to be giv-
Ai facilities in jail to observe
Tisha B'Av.
went to Bishop Coleman F. Car-
roll. Would he cooperate?
uishop Carroll immediately in-
volved tiu- Catholic community
with a resounding affirmative
providing the statement would be
a strong and meaningful one.
Bringing together Bishop Dun-
can, for the Episcopalians; Rabbi
Solomon Schiil. president of the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Assoc-
iation: Pierce and the Council of
Churches; Rev. Theodore Gibson,
president of the Miami NAACP;
Rabbi Joseph Narot, signing for
the American Jewish Committee;
and Rev. Edward Graham, of the
Ministerial Alliance. Bishop Car-
roll emerged with his strong state-
ment which declared: "We, the
religious leaders of this commun-
ity, believe on the common basis
of our faith in the Fatherhood of
God that all men are equal in
His eyes.
"Therefore we proclaim as in-
alienable every man's right to
equality without discrimination of
any kind in: employment, educa-
tion, housing, hospitals, labor
unions, public accommodations,
political organizations, job train-
ing, recreation and worship. We
proclaim that racial prejudice,
discrimination and segregation
;>rc a violation of justice and an
affront to the dignity of man ..."
What of Future?
Miami now has its Community
Relations Board. What of the
future? More as a tribute to his
personal abilities than his role in
pressing for the board's establish-
ment. Seymour Samet was this
week named temporary execu-
tive director of the Dade .County.
Community Relations Board, at
the request of the board to na-
tional American Jewish Commit-
tee, which Monday announced its
part-time release of Samet
through December. 1963. Samet,
who has been at the head of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
since his arrival here in 1952. is
a soft-spoken, hard-wcrking exec-
utive, who achieves most of his
many accomolishments from be-
hind-the-scenes, and is loathe to
talk about himself.
Communal Cross-Section
Said John Slawson, executive
vice president of AJCommittee,
in a letter to Bishop Carroll: "We
are pleased to lend Mr. Samet's
services to the board as AJCom-
mittee's contribution to this
unique community achievement."
Samet holds a BA degree from
the New Jersey State University
in Montclair and a Master's de-
gree from the University of Mi
ami. Previously, he was assist-
ant director of the Community
Relations Comntittee of the Jew-
ish Community Council of Essex
County, New Jersey, from 1949
until he came to Miami.
He has served as an instructor
;it the Rutgers University Work-
shop in Human Relations, was
coordinator for the Civil Rights
audit of Dade County, and con-
sultant to the Puerto Rican Com-
monwealth on its Workshop on
Puerto Rican Affairs in San Juan.
He is a resource advisor to the
League of Women Voters, Coun-
cil of Churches, Rabbinical Asso-
ciation, Urban League, Citizens
Slum Clearance Committee, and
Public Housing Authority.
,. A" jnstr.uctpj at Temple..Israel
on "Judaism and Justice," he is
affiliated with numerous profes-
sional organizations, including the
National Association of Inter-
group Relations Officials, and
Association of Jewish Community
Relations. He is married, and
he and his wife. Elaine, an in-
structor at the University of Mi-
ami, have two daughters. They
live in Coral Gables.
Hopefully, prospects for the
board look bright now, with a
solid cross-section of religious
leaders, Negro and white, as well
as business leaders represented.
Named to two-year terms were
William C. Baggs, editor, The
Miami News; James L. Keller,
accountant with Haskins & Sells;
Dr. Henry King Stanford, presi-
dent, University of Miami; Ed-
ward F. Swanson Jr., senior vice
president, First National Bank of
Miami; John B. Turner, past
president, Miami-Dade Chamber
of Commerce and division man-
ager for Cities Service Oil Co.;
and Elmer A. Ward, Negro phar-
macist and president of Roose-
velt Savings and Loan Assn.
Named for one-year terms
were John H. Halliburton, exec-
utive with Eastern Air Line*;
John C. Harrison, vice president,
Miami-Dade Chamber and an of-
ficial of M. R. Harrison Con-
struction Co.; Robert Macht,
president. Jordan Marsh; Stan-
ley C. Myers, local attorney and
long time communal leader;
Stuart W. Patton. attorney; Rob-
ert Suero, past president of rhe
Chamber of Commerce of Cub.i.
V I
JFK Considers
Friendly Role
Continued from Page 1-A
I
' the increasing persecution of
Jews in Russia.
President Kennedy made it ap-
| parent that he would give the
Kussian Jewish situation further
thought, and that he was concern-
ed.
In his half-hour meeting with
i the President, Mr. London also
; cited aspects of the Egyptian mili-
tary buil.'-up and contended that
; the State Department may not
have properly evaluated develop-
ments. President Kennedy then
revealed that he was following
the situation very closely His re-
sponse was attentive, sympathetic
and encouraging. Mr. London Bald
after the meeting.
.
GET GOOD MEN.

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Page" 6-A
*Jewl$t rtorkjian
Friday, August Z, 1963
Israel Bonds Point the Way to Development
No Road Signs Needed
To Demonstrate Progress;
Country Proves the Point
By LEO MINDLIN
Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian
Drive along the roads of Israel,
and you will see occasional blue
and white signs erected on the
way that tell you Israel Bonds
help build the country. For the
sharper eye, the signs are not
necessary: the country itself de-
clares the significance of bond
funds at every passing mile.
I spent nearly a week in the
Negev of Israel during my recent
visit there. A week out of a
total five-week stay is perhaps a
long time: but it was barely long
enough reckoned in terms of the
significance of this part of the
country' to its ultimate develop-
ment. For here is Israel's new
horizon; here lies her future.
Return to the Desert
Just south of Boershcba and
Dimona. the desert is gentle, with
its swelling sand dunes the back-
drop for Arab beduin who. at
least at a distance, appear to be
playing the romantic role of a
iong-forgotten world in a low
budget movie. Further south,
near Mitzpa Ramon, and from
there to Israel's southernmost
point, Eilat. the landscape takes
on a frightening and awe-inspir-
ing presence, where you might
perhaps be making a return trip
to a part of the globe atom-blast-
ed several hundreds of years be-
fore, and since lying deserted,
bereft of the signs of men and
their civilization.
Civilization on Sand
It is to this heated, violet-color-
ed world, for the desert seems
a variety of shades of violet that
Israelis are taking today in their
latest bid to conquer the land
they won on the field of battle in
1948.
Ask any Israeli acquainted with
current afairs. and he will tell

you that everything in his coun-
try is one-third Israel Bonds.
This means that roughly a third
of the capital investment for eco-
nomic and industrial progress
comes from Israel Bond develop-
ment funds. But sights show
more than statistics.
It is perhaps a forty-minute
drive from Beersheba to Arad,
a new town literally rising out
of the desert sands. At a dis-
tance, in the descending sun, I
came upon Arad to view it from
the perspective of a Georgia
O'Keefe painting: a narrow line
of civilization, of buildings, sil-
ver and concrete and garden-
colored, spreading out upon the
horizon. To Arad will increas-
ingly be moving pioneer families
to make of that part of the desert
a verdant enclave.
It is Israel Bond funds that are
helping to achieve this, as in
other areas of the Negev. which
serve to shore up the nation's
huge southern area an area be-
longing to Israel on the map. but
which must in fact be made a
part of Israel by incoming set-
tlers and incoming industry.
Salt and the Sea
Starting from Beersheba again,
in another direction, lies the
Dead Sea. with Sdom and its
huge Bromine Works. The plant
currently produces some 3,000
tons annually, most of which is
exported. The salt mines here
are huge jagged walls of mineral
rising from the highway. Stop on
the way. pick up a rock and taste
it, and you have returned to the
world of Lot and his wife. But
bond funds have returned there,
as well, as even the solid high-
way on which you drive straight
to Eilat. one of the most marve-
lous Israel Bond achievements,
proclaims in the song beneath
your ringing tires, cutting the
silence of a desert-soon to give
way to the ingenuity of men bent
on building a new nation.

With a massive assist from Israel Bonds, an
immigrant boy (left) in the northern Negev is
trained to handle a tractor. Right are Israel's
own airplane repair facilities at Lydda Airport.
The Israel Bond drive, which hcs- abroad"- rais-
ed more than S600.000.000 for economic devel-
opment, is seeking to obtain $75,000,0CC in
1963 to further the country's economic pro-tress.
EMERGING HORIZONS OF A VIGOROUS NATION
Negev Yields to Conquest Today
If Israel's Negev desert is to
become a viable part of the na-
tion, what must be brought there
are water, housing, harbors,
roads, communication, industry
and agriculture.
Signs of Israel Bond assistance
in the achievement of these seem-
ingly impossible goals are every-
where apparent. Dimona, a love-
ly new city south of Beersheba.
is growing apace. I stopped on
the highway one morning, about
7:15, to pick up a teacher hiking
to her class in Dimona. Arrived
at her school. I beheld a host of
children of all ages trudging to
meet the bell in a world of new
housing and public accommoda-
tions standing everywhere on
sand.
Israel Bond funds have here,
too, been helping to make the
difference, not alone in capital
investments in the growing tex-
tile industry, but in the phos-
phate deposits there, as well as
at other sites in Israel, where
some $7 million in allocations
are being applied in the direction
of developing the mines and
quarries.
Key is Water
But the principal key is water,
as exemplified by the fact that
during the current year some
$27.5 million in development bud-
get funds have been earmarked
for the Jordan Rivcr-Negev irri-
gation project.
Israel's national water project
is expected ultimately to span
some 100 miles and cost in the
neighborhood of $200 million,
adding 320 million cubic meters of
water to the country's annual
capacity for urban and industrial
use, and bringing an additional
100.000 acres of land under irri-
gation.
Thus, even in the north of the
country, the impact of bond in-
vestment dollars is felt. I drove
down to Tiberias one day, and
coming from the mountains.
- a?*

ipN

1
Work nears completion on the Wadi Amud section of the Is-
rael national water project, being built with the aid o: Israel
Bond funds, which will bring 100,000 additional acres in the
Negev under irrigation. The concrete pipes shown ~bcve,
which are nine feet in diameter, will feed water i:om the Sea
of Galilee into a ten-mile open channel to the Zalmc.i Res-
ervoir. Israel Bonds are the principal source c: funds ::r the
economic development of the Negev.
could see Lake Kinneret in the
distance. At either side of the
road. Stretching hundreds of
yards back, there were excava-
tions and pipe-laying crews. How
would the water get from one
mountainside to the other? Not
by pump, but by the syphon
principle, the water on the sec
ond side naturally seeking the
level of its original source.
'How' of Housing
It is this kind of ingenuity that
will be bringing water to such
new points of development in Is-
rael's southland as Arad and Ash-
dod, ultimately to be the coun-
try's third important deep-water
port after Haifa and Eilat, a
project certainly to cost in the
neighborhood of $75 million, in-
cluding a S27.5 ;:ion lc in from
the World Bai
Who will Ij .n the c new
cities rising i i the d ssert?
The question ess "wb >" than
"how." for noosing remains a
principal problem in an expand-
ing nation such as Israel it has
been estimati that In 1963.
alone, Israel v jiild be -pending *
-some $61.5 million, o. which
more than S2t. have been allo-
cated by Israel Bond develop-
ment funds. Tin goal? The erec-
tion of more than liO.OOC housing
units in 1963 and c iefly in
the Negev,
The blasted '.; nd I s.iw, Ihe
moonscape horizon, is being roll-
ed back for it -,ilux of people
and their industry, and israel
Bond dollar- wiping to do
the Job.
Window on Africa Major Recipient of Bond Aid
Prime Minister Levi Esh-
kol, then Minister of Fi-
nance, launches Israel's
first gas pipeline as Dr.
Joseph J. Schwartz, vice
president of the State of
Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, looks on.

Israel's "window on Africa" is
the city of Eilat, at the southern-
most point of the country. Eilat
figured prominently in the 1956
Suez-Sinai campaign; for out of
that campaign came the liber-
ation of the port from the ship-
ping barricade Egypt had set up
on the Straits of Tiran and
Sharm el-sheikh, an encampment
in the Red Sea.
Shipping to and from Eilat now
free, the city has begun to grow
by leaps and bounds. Mayor Jos-
eph Levy will tell you that, like
Beersheba, he hopes some day
for a population of 50,000 and
more; and, in fact, both Eilat and
its port show signs that the
mayor has good reason for his
ambition.
Copper Cement
Despite its sensitive and stra-
tegic position you can see
Aqaba in Jordan and the silver
oil tanks of Saud Arabia just a
few miles south on the border
the port burgeons with trade.
And the impact of Israel Bond
funds is everywhere apparent. To
begin with, bond funds have con-
tributed to the development of
the port itself, as well as its hous-
ing projects.
Just north of the city arc King
Solomon's mines and the Timna
copper works. The storv of the
rediscovery of the mine I by Dr
Nelson Glueck in the late 1920's
is a fascinating one. which in-
volved total reliance on the ac-
curacy of the Bible; but the cop-
per works today arc mere than
m archaeological curiosity. They
are big business, involving mil-
lions of dollars annually of some
B8 percent pure copper cement
xport a venture to which Is-
rael Bond fundi have cor.'.ributcd
substantially.
Tnus, when \ .- one goes in Is-
rael, the sign.' ; re everywhere
apparent in the land of Israel
Bond assistance, whether in the
108 in. pipeline, whose shoulder
from the Yarfcoa in the nnrth
st'll needs Unking, to the stone
and chemical c.carries of the
desert in the sotrtn, the road
through the Negev on which you
drive, and the Port of Eilat at
the Red Sea. In industry, in %
housing, in .- ( iltare, in com- '
merce, Israel Bonds daily play a
vital role.


Eriday, August 2. 1963
+Jkwislh fhrBdttan
Rabbi Greenwald
# Takes Southwest
Center Pulpit \
Southwest Jewish Center win
hnve-sr new spiritual leader as of
Aug. 15. Jerome Simms, presi-
dent, this week announced the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Zevi I. Green-
wald to the pulpit. He succeeds
Kabbi Max Klein.
Kabbi Greenwald comes to Mi-
..mi from Philadelphia, where for
ten years he was spiritual lead-
i of the Kensington Synagogue
.nd Jewish Center.
Previously, he held other pulpits
..I Congregation Etz Chaim, Bid-
ciford, Me., for four years, and
i ongregation Anshe Israel-Km
Jacob, Newark, N.J., for live
yean.
He Was ordained by th* Yav-
nh Rabbinical Seminary in
New York. Born in Prossburg, |
Czechstovakia, he received his
rabbinic background and train- I
irg at Hi* Yeshiva Chasam Sof- I
er in Pressburg and tho Dr. Jos- |
eph Breuer Rabbinical School in
F rankfurt-a m-Ma in.
Rabbi Greenwald holds secular
degree) from the University of
Frankfurt, the Sorbonne in Paris,
and is a graduate of Dropsie Col-
lege in Philadelphia, where he is
now a candidate for the PhD de-
gree
While in Maine, Rabbi Green-
uald conducted a regular radio
program. He has contributed to
rarioui nationally-known publica-
tions, including the National Jew-
ish Monthly, Chicago Sentinel, and
Boston Advocate.
lie and his wife have a daugh-
ler, Penina ll. Mrs. Greenwald
i graduate kindergarten teach-
Adath Yeshurun
Making Plans
School registration for the fall
term is now in progress at Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun, 1025 NE Mi-
iami Gardens Dr.
Yehuda Segal, newly-appointed
education director will supervise
the Nursery, Kindergarten, He-
brew School and Sunday School,
and will also be in charge of the
Sabbnth morning junior congrega-
tion services and youth activities.
There will be a special junior con-
gregation service for the High
Holy Days.
Joseph Licdman. president of
the congregation, announced that
sealing arrangements for the High
Holy Days in the newly-decorated
main sanctuary are now complet-
ed, and that reservations are be-
ing accepted.
Nasser Displays
Weapons Muscle
Continued from Page 1-A
also announced its first domes-
tically-built submarine which will
start trial runs in 15 days.
There were at least four new
Vanguard rockets, six Zafir rock-
ets which have a range of 220
miles, six Kaher rockets, and six
Soviet-made SA-2, anti-aircraft
rockets. The Vanguard appeared
to be an advanced model of Egyp-
tian rockets shown earlier.
Also displayed were MIG-21 jet
fighters, built by the Soviet Union,
turboprop troop transports design-
ed and built in Egypt by Ger-
man scientists, and jet trainers.
The Russian MIG-21's are capable
of flying at supersonic speeds.
In a speech in Cairo, Col. Nas-
ser declared that the Arabs failed
in their 1948 war against the then
new State of Israel, "because we
were seven nations." Plans to
'liberate Palestine," he said, de-
pended "not on words alone but
] on one plan, with armies, with
missiles, with everything."
Insurance Costs
To be Surveyed
"Rising Insurance CostsWho is
to Blame?" will be discussed at
the People Speak, year-round Town
Hall Forum, at Washington Fed-
eral, 1234 Washington Ave.. on
Inday at 8 p.m.
The talk will be based on a re-
cent Miami News series. Mil-
ton Kclner will represent the Na-
tional Association of Claimant
Attorneys. Edward Atkins, at-
torney, will present the views of
the largest U.S. insurance firm
in the field. Chaim Rose, presi-
dent of the group, will moderate.
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care* mechanic*! service evj


Prjge 8-A
vJwisti FhrMian
Friday. August 2. 1963
Pa
Mmij,,. :..:, ui>'..-ital Kuwio. i*iiuuui.ii
The
Rootless
By MAX LERNER
. i' -
Bellagio. Italy.
The sensation over the disclosure that Harold Philby was the
-third man" in the McLean-Burgess spy case, and had himself been a
Soviet spy since at least 1946, should not obscure the deeper and more
sober meaning of the whole sequence of the current Soviet spy inci-
dents. Include here the Wonnerstrom case in Sweden, the earlier
Vassall case in I he British Admiralty, the 1961 case of George Blake
in ttie British Foreign Office, the connection (whatever it may have
been) of Captain Ivanov with the'current Ward-Keeler-Profumo com-
plex, as well as the McLean-Burgess-Phflby spy triangle.
Obviously and on the surface they raise the security issue in an
age of overkill weapons. One hapless result of the rash of British spy
incidents is likely to be a greater resistance of the American secur-
ity services to sharing overkill secrets with the British nuclear estab-
lishmentor. for that matter, with any European nuclear establish-
ment that may emerge in ihe remainer of the decade. It can be
argued that European nations must tighten ttieir security apparatus,
but I trust that this will not lead to the argument that Americans
.-hoold ignore the need for some kind of European nuclear network
(with American help) as the basis for an integrated European economic
and political system.
Nor can the Labor Party people in Great Britain reasonably get
much political ammunition from the latest news about the Philby case
or the Wennerstrom case in Sweden. Philby was in the British For-
eign Service during Labor and Conservative ministries alike. Even
Herbert Morrison (now Lord Morrison), who complained in the House
of Lords about the "longhaiied journalists"the Observer and the
Economistwho employed Philby as their Miadle East correspond-
ent after his dismissal from the Foreign Office, was himself Foreign
Minister during part of the Philby espionage service.

Harold Wilson has decided that the coming Labor government (and
a Labor victory is growing more certain with every scandal) will opt
out of tin nuclear effort. I >u.-pect that the American security chiefs
will'sigh with relief when that happens, whatever the American de-
lense Chiefs may feel about it. Yet that will not resolve the deeper!
problem of Soviet spy recruiting, which depends less on governmental
policies in the West than on the question of roots and rootlessness. com-
mitttent and emptiness, selfhood and the disintegration of self.
When Newsweek speaks of the current spy cases as pointing to
the rise of a "new pornocr.u-y," the phrase is clever, but the sex
aspect is not the crucial one. Eros marks only one of the ways in
which the Russians tried to exert pressures on their chosen victims.
The dangerous spy recruits are less whose who are won over by
sexual largesse or sexual blackmail than those who come over because
a free society somehow has lost its hold on their allegiance, and who
arc'therefore pushovers when the Soviet recruiting agents touch their j
vulnerable point.
It i? interesting that most of the people -involved in the recent
European spy casesMcLean, Burgess, Philby and Wennerstrom arc
instancesfelt that they were not selling out anything very important
to them when they sold out 'heir country, as compared with whatever^
it was that went beyond their country and their culture. Anyone who
has'had some contact with European education, especially in the uni-
versity system in the 1980s and 1940s, knows that the main drift of
it was to corrode some of Ihe great values that Europe built up in
the centuries before the WorM Warsthe idea of freedom, of dissent.
of religious and political tolerance, of man himself as the root of
values.

To be or the left in Europe, whether in labor parties or Socialist
parties, baa not always kept this erosion from beeoming destructive.
The case of McLean and Bujrgess and Philby illustrates that a man
could be highly literate with every resource of the society at his com-
mand, and even have acquired some vague notions of equality as the
prime value, and yel be empty as a person and morally sick unto
death.
The Communists try to resolve the problem of their own youth
by attempting complete control of the educational system, by party
discipline and penalties, by stressing Soviet triumphs and ultimate
victory, by drilling into their youth the enormity of betrayal. They
throw out a Xekrasov from the party because he dares write an account
of his American journey in which he confesses that he enjoyed some,
things about it. and that not all America is a wasteland. They humil-
iate a Ycvtushcnko for talking of the difference in outlook between
the generation of the fathers and that of the sons.
There are better ways, lor the Western cultures, of holding the
allegiance of the sonsnot by penalties and excommunication but by
raising the sons to struggle in their own way for their own goals, as
rebels or conservers or both, hut always to struggle as men with an
unassailable core of self, and with roots reaching to the soil of their
culture or sub-culture. The niverities cannot do what the parents
and community, by behavior as well as precept, fail to do; nor can
the univerities undo what the parents and community do well.
Ft. Lauderdale
Temple Elects
Burnstine Prexy
Kenneth Q. Burnstine has been
clecte.i president "St Temple
Lmanu-El of Ft. Lauderdale.
Other officers named at a re-
cent meeting of the congregation
j include Dr. Robert A. Uchin. first
vice president; Leo J. Moss, sec-
ond vice president; Mack Katz.
treasurer; Hyman Lipshires, fi-
nancial secretary; and Elliott B.
Barnett, recording secretary.
Board of directors includes Dr.
Alvin Colin, Morris Golden, Alvin
; Gross. Siegfried Herz, Sam Katz,
Mrs. Peter Lawson. Gilbert Mal-
linger. Joseph Novick, George
j Overbrook, Simon Ruden, Dr.
'Henry I. Thanz. Irwin Weiscr.j
Marvin Wolff, and Martin Yohal-i
em.
President of the Brotherhood is
Henry Stcrngold. Mrs. Alvin Colin
is president of Sisterhood. Harry
Ozer and Stuart Gardner are pres-
ident of the Thirty-Niners and
Youth Group, respectively.
y
^
>\
U OAOC IOUUVMO
MIAMI IIACH. FLORID*
JlrflMON 3 002-4
t*"H a. LI-JIEK*
PUNKRAk OiWCCTOn
A
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583
Attend
services
tab week
at if our awn
place of
worsEib
KENNETH BURNSTINE
Bible Class Resumed
Rabbi David Rosenfield will re
sumc the meeting of Bible classes
at Flagler-Granada Jewish Center
beginning Saturday at 6 p.m.
B'nai B'r'rth Social Singles
B'nai B'rith Social Singles will j
hold a night club affair at the
Balmoral Hotel on Saturday even-1
in j The organization, now in its i
seventh year, is inviting single
adults from 35 to 55.
Palmer
"Miami's Only
Jewish
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IMert" Sid H. Palmer
Exclusive
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FAMILY MEMORIALS
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Scheduled Unveiling*
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 1*>3
Laknide Mrmoriml Pn
HARRY ZIMMERMAN, 11 aan.
Rjhbi Mortem MaUvikj
"May Tlifir So-.ili Repose
in E.cmcl Pe*ct'
PALMER'S
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3279 S.W. 8th Street
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1061 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
JE 1-1969 JE 1-6150
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Religious Store
Now ready to tahe orders for your
Synagogue. Big selection of Tal-
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Boohs for High Holidays. Please
call S. Schwartz at JE 1-7722.
1357 Washington Avenue
(tabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone JE 1-3595
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WE SPECIALIZE m
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Friday, August 2. 1963
*Jewisti norktaam
Page 9-A
IWniHtilIWtf i imiilWMWMill"
GEMS OF WISDOM
Water, having pawst rated the
earth, < In/it .'.diinij ujrxed the cart/|iy
cYusflrW !>'-. forth plants, thtu *
f one glorious fha:n of love, o/ git -
f ing And refewrrig. unites all ere- -
I attires; '.one i bj or /or itself, but ']
Pr all tni-.gs exrr hi omnnmil re- Z
' siproful actitt*-, one for all. arul I
^ all for vie one s. r. hirscii.
*.
What ue get MM of lift it in I
'direct pntasfti'on to what we put}
. 1.1(0 it. -Human

If yo:. doni g e faath ynu gjeja I
I sau.. l-ROVtRiis.
. < *
The icJ[ ui. ass), the ueil you,'
.U>LOM ALElCltkM.

\ot a hanJ/u! of rum descends*
|rom acute ui: ->:.: iJje earth send-- I
- mg up Oca hsndfull of moisture to f
fmeel it. GENESIS rabba.
*
I ulu'avj g:ie tnucli au'ay. and*
...".rr IhlpJttfMM msteadof pleas- I
I' < varnhahen. -!
*
Ffcajl !': : ; Imping to re- r
Ch t or honor, are
M% bargain.
PJIII.O
.& C7X. %/ Of JHt
Let the Bible Artists Go
Back to Study the Source
iami s
r^cligious ^ e rv i c ea Unit (A/e e L e n d
"ni
RABBI NORMAN SHAPIRO
... the Bible revisited
xsjiicsticn <[jox
By PABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Mrtiatarrthi "Kinoth"?
The "Kinoth" represent a special
collection of puetry which lament*
the satl events in Jewish history.
6ome |he tragic events when the Chris-
tian Cn.saders killed >o many Jew-
ish people. One of the poems la-
nionU the public burning of Tal-
piudic 'actates in France during
, the 13!a century. Naturally, the
most common theme is the destruc-
tion of 'he Temple. This collection
read on Tislia B'Av. Perhaps
"most popular of' the poems are
Ithose written by Judah Halevi in
the llta centur>. who expressed
|his deep sentiments for Zion.
Why en some Jews observe some
decree of mourning even on the
day .Her Tisha B'Av?
Th.re is a \ery authorative
Opinii n which holds that the Tem-
ple was destroyed on the tenth day
Ol A. Therefore, the very pious
Observe some measure of mourn-
ing on 'his day. besides the custo-
mers day of mourning on the
ninth o Av.
Why ar penitential prayers such
"ichnun omitted from the
prayers on Tisha B'Av?
Tisha B'Av, while it is recog-
nized a day of mourning for the
destruc on of the Temple and
u.ilui Lr*g4c Jewish events, is also
Tons:. | bs ;i type of holiday.
'"he -i.ih is said to have been
born oo Tisha B'Av. In general.
no Jewish tragedy is without some
lines i of hope. Actually, when
all u. e full> realized and events
will |. jiupletely understood, the
tragi it in our personal life as
will our communal lives, will
be seci u have been a blessing in
| disguis-
Thu:: ,t is claimed that peniten-
tial prayers are omitted on Tisha
jB'Ay tfl strike remote symbol of
I festivity. Furthermore, on occa-
sions Iwe Tisha B'Av, the spirit of
| mourning brings about penitence,
even without formal reminders
and thus claim the penitential
|Prayetu re not omitted.
BVrakot. 4 lb.
Six :-.mgs are a disgrace to an
educalrd person: 1. To u-ali. on
the wrfet perfumed. 2. -Te u/dk
ahnt tv night. 3. To uwr old
dout.rf Wiae*. 4. To tal^ seith a
ieoma.i overlong in the atreet. 5.
| J m tabit j7!i itbterate men.
7 "r Idie at the sywagogue.
*
| Bibs Met:i, 8$.
H a -tan. his son- amd grandson.
" J'lolars, ehe Torah iciH not
?^ong hu ittttndmu.
By RABBI NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
Beth David Congregation
Of late there has been a re-
turn to the Bible: the new books
* the literary market, the new
movies, the increase in Biblical
radio programs, and eyen ah at-
tempt to present Biblical drama
on television.
Pictorial presentation has a
great and. good effect upen both
adults and children.' There is only
one dangereither of omission- or
commission of Biblical facts as
they are. For some reason, there
seems to be a concerted attempt
to sugar-coat, cover, and mis-
represent history. Technical ad-
visors forget that the public,
while it may be backward in some
areas, is more familiar with the
Bible as a whole than any other
literature.
i To attempt to gloss the facts
and present them in such a way
as to add romantic and modern
values has robbed the pictures, books and programs of a dynamic
punch. The heroes become too heroic and the tyrants receive just
punishment for their errors. This is not always true in Biblical telling.
The appeal of the Bible lies in the fact that, though some of the
stories are based on fiction, romanticizing them does not emphasize
their moral anneal, Thcatr? and radio and literature have a mag-
nificent opportunity to complement the job begun by the rabbi or the
minister. They can make it easier for him to draw analogies, know-
ing that there is background in the mind of the congregation. But
my complaint is that they have instead added situations and charac-
terizations which do not exist and, in some cases, have gone along
more dangerous ground and changed the philosophy and the morals of
the point in question in order to increase the entertainment and spec-
tacular values.
In toe cane of the Biblical movie, it is necessary that the sacrcd-
ness of the text be preserved and respected. There should be not
one but a panel of technicians to see that there will be no offense
committed. Today more than ever we are seekers of truth. We must
see to it in an atomic age that the beauty and sanctity of the Bible
are preserved. It is a sad state of events when liberties are taken
with the word of the law.
In our perusal of Biblical novels, movies, radio porgrams and
television productions, it would be well for us if we could find the
time to reread our Bibles in order to get a clear picture of the morals
and patterns of human behavior as they affect us today. It is well
that the Bible has been brought into the foreground. Let us make
it a policy to follow our Bibles as closely as we follow the books and
music and theatre and related fields of entertainment, and make it
as natural a part of every day living as possible.
Information to be included in the Religious Services column
must be in the News Room of The Jewish Floridian not later
than Friday, a.m., preceding the week of publication. AH re-
leases received after that time will be returned as proof of
their lateness.
AGUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave.. anHiiiiiiuii.:iBk:..miUi!.rjanj:mile im
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
r^elicjion Rabbi Reports on Jewish Aid ni
CHICAGO (JTA> The Amer-;j
ican Jewish community, which
has been involved in the quest for
civil rights for a long time, has
now developed "a new sense of
urgency regarding inequality to
the Negro." a representative of
the Reform rabbinate told a
Catholic conference here. This -
view was expressed by Rabbi Bal-
four Bricknor. director of the lie schools was criticized
Commission on Interfaith Activi- weekend by the Vatican newspap-
ties of the Union of American He- e[. L-0sst,rvat0re Romano. The
brew Congruous in at.address o{ Hon bctwC(,n
before the Na .onal Catholic^ Con- P P '
ference ior Interracial Justice. ^^ ^ newspaper saidi ..
tending to become, also legally.
This page is prepared in
cooperation with the Spiritual
Leaders of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Assn.
BABBI MAX A. LIPSCHITX
Coordinator
Contributor:
RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
Gems of Wisdom
*NSME EMES. 2533 SW 19th ave.
Conservative. Joseph Picus, pres-
cient.
---- ----
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd ave. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor William W. Lipson.
fcVidu.i 6 p.m. S;*!uil.i> If .. i
----- -----
BETH EL. 500 SW 17tn ave Orthodox,
Rabbi Solomon Schiff.
BETH EMETH YEHUDAH MOSHE.
13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative.
Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Hyman
Fine.
Kri*l;i\ s:ir, p.m. Kernmn: "Confesvtoa
of l\.iih." Saturday s:ir. a.m.
BETH ISRAEL. 400 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox. Rabby H. Louis Rottman
- <------------
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamches.
i-'i iila.x 6:,1o p.iii. Saturdaj S:"(i u.m.
Bar Mltsvah: Mark, on of Mr. und
,\li>. Juck i-li* li.-l. Beemon: "True ami
K,list- S..'
BETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bernstein.
I ri.lai 6:10 pin. Paturda> <:45 u.m
"Kihiis of the I'.Hlit i>' at .".::'." p.m.
Sermon: "Wi are Comforted."
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
Orthodox. Ralph Krieger, secre-
tary.
BETH TFILAH, 935 Euclid ve. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE slth
va. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
chits. Cantor Ben-Zion Xirschen-
baum.
Friday 6:18 p.m. Saturday :l" a.m.
Bar Miizvali: Lester, *'n of Mr. and
Mi> Max Hirst
CONGREGATION ET2 CHAIM. 15441
Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Strassfeld.
FROM THE TALMUD
Pesahim. 112.
Reside not in a town, whose -
I mayor is a Disciple of the Wise.
i He icill hare no time to attend to
I municipal affairs, being occupied
with his ttmlies.

Shcmot Rahbah, 41:5.
As the bride is anointed U'lth
[iicniv-juiir ^inds of cosmetics, so
I should tjir Disciple of the Sa?es
be acquainted uilh the firentyfour
boos,.s of the Bible.
*
Zohar Hadash, Tikkun, 70.
A pseudo-sage is lil(e a donkey
thai curries a lotfd ('} b<'
s
Kohelet Rabbah,
Who it .i Disciple of the Sa^.<
He iclii> considers Ins studies more
important than his business.

Kallah Rabbati, 5
Humility and lowliness of spirit
mariy the manner of the Disciples
of the Sages.
*
. Taanu, 7.
Why is Torah lil(e a piece of |
uciod.' As a small piece of wood
I Ijmdle. the lii so a minor scholar
I sharpeiu the mind of the greater.
c
Ln.Uin. 54.
As u-tji perfume, any one who '
desires may be made fragrant by it.
10 the scholar .should be willing t,>
teach any one who desires to pro- .
fit by his leuriunx. In such a case.
DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGRE
CATION. 1401 NW 1S3rd st. Con
aarvative. Rabbi Harold Richter. his learning wvl be retained by h
Cantor Emaauel Mandel.
tviiitiy at lunonwi. s.iin.iii: "Portion
i the ft'eek." Saturday S:S0 a.m.
FLACLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51ot
pi. Conservative. Rabbi David Ros-
enfeld. Cantor George Goldberg.
Friday SMS p.m. S.iuir S:8U a.m.
Sermon: "Weekly Portion."
aiFMuiiiiiM'' jot iisniimniii'iiiinmam ue
cheater, Knelnnil. Sermon: "Woriii
.i. wi-h Communities." Baturday 10:4"
a in. Cantor VVUUain Ro*aJ renders
the iiiusi.al portions of tb.- ntursy in
the abaonce of Cantor Convtoer,
FT. LAUDERDALE EMANU-EL. 1801 TEMPLE B NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi 22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi S.
Richard M. Leviton. M. Machtei.
------ ----- I Friday s.:;n p.m. Onao. BhaWiat to
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree honor Rabbi ami Mrs. M Iit.-i, who
dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heilbraun.
i ---------
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
MaJavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif.
MINYONAIRES. 3737 Bird rd.
em Traditional.
Mod-
.........i
last
Facsimile of Psalm Book
JERUSALEM (JTA) A fac-
simile of a Psalm Book published
in 1649. the first to be printed in
the United States, was presented
to Prime Minister Levi Eshkol
here by Harry Zaidenburg, on be-
half of an Israel Bond leadership
group from Chicago. Premier
Eshkol, who was given a standing
ovation by the group at a re-
ception in his office, told the visi-
tors that it was a source of great
agnosticism."
Intermarriage in So. Africa Rising
JOHANNESBURG (JTA)
Intermarriage between Jews and
non-Jews in South Africa is on
the increase "to an appreciable de-
gree," the Federation of Syna-
gogues of the Transvaal and the
Orange Free State declared in its
annual report here. The report
has been readied tor submission
to the third national Conference
joy that Israel was repaying the, ^ orthodox Hebrew Congrega
1951 bonds "through the toil and *___ .._ u_ _______,, ^___"\.r_,
achievements of Israel's popu-
lace." He added, however, that
this did not signify the end of
the country's development needs.
Vatican Crltklfes Cot#rH Ban
ROME (JTA) The United
tions, to be convened here next
month. According to the report,
intermarriage in South Africa "is
assuming disquieting proportions."
The report also noted that there
is a shortage in this country of
rabbis and other Jewish religious
functionaries, and urged expan
States Supreme Court's decision sion of training for such posts by
banning the Lord's Prayer in pub-1 local Jewish institutions.
OHEV SHALOM. 911 Normandy dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weber-
man.
---- ----
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins ave. Cantor S. Nachmias.
----
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
---- ----
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN 1025
NE 183rd st.. Miami Gardens rd.
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor j
Morris Bergar.
l-ridav i, p.m. >atlirail>
7.!.". a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall
dr.. So. Miami." Reform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles
Kodoer
liMav s::,! p.m. fined! speaker: Byron
i'Ii. rk-iM. executive \i->- preas Tii, UI. "Your Child Enters the P.u.-l-
ii. .-? World."
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1351 8. 14 ave. Reform
Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
TEMPLE BETH 8HIRAH
Hall. 11839 So. Dixie hwy. Recon-
struotionist. Rabbi Morris Skop
Cantor Herman Gottlieb.
TEMPLE BET4H 8HOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Mendeiowiti. Can-
tar Ernest Steiner.
TEMPLE B'MAI ABRAHAM. 387
NE 167th St. Conservative Rabbi
Nathan H. Zwitman. Cantor Ben
Or ess berg.
Wiilu>- 8:.14i p.m. Beta fAmbrto OHta
Fraternity MudenU at-tho Untvaudty
ol Miami to assist in conductluK Sali-
luiih ,1" i\niifi.r and Connotation ser-
vlre. Sernpin: "Israel's Klaht of Ae-
e.-Fi to the WailluK Wall." Oneg
Slmlib.x basts! Member* of Meter*
hoot).
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ivi. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish
Cantsi David Cenvlser.
Frtdsv' 8:1* p*tn. Mummer Assistant
TtaVbt: Mtcnaflt -Ct-utstoiT,- ot -MUn'-
have Jusl returned from abroad.
Youth service Saturdaj 9:80 a.m.
TEMPLE EM'NU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrmae. Cantor Hirah Adlar.
lYiday ii p.m. Saturday ^ a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NS 19th St.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot.
Cantor Jacob Bornstein.
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave.
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Mordacal
Podet. Cantor Gordon Richards.
Frlda) R:IS p.m. Rabm l'odet to
preaoh. i men Bhabbat will follow.
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Edward Klein.
---- ----
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Laboviu.
Cantor Saul H. Breeh.
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative.
8755 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi
Samuel April. Cantor Gershon Levin.
---- ----
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI.
12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rab-
bi Daniel M. Lowy.
I*i aia;- s;i.", p.in. S.'rnmn: "i 'an th.-
Ilelle? in One Ood Kurvlve tha Space
Aare?"
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 51
Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi
Hyman Gross. Cantor Jack Lerner.
Klein.
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave.
Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Canter Ben
Dickeon.
Friiuiy r.::t0 p.m. Saturday S.lj a.m.
Suniland TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Seymour Hinkes.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 8500 N. Miami
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Henry
Wernick. Cantor Albert Glanta.
YOUNG ISRAEL. WI NE 171 It
Orthodox. Rabbi herwm StauSar.
Friday 7 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Weekly Portion."
Ji t. t::ii
BaraaHsaaBHaRsa:wa^svesiB>L
* I
MDUUGHWIG Tim
12 Av 6:49 p.m.
* I


Page 10-A
9Jewistfhridian
Friday, August 2, 1963
. 3
Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDLIN
Powerful Story About Papacy, Told in Human Terms
THE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN. By Morris L. West.
374 pp. Morrow. $4.95.
THE TENDENCY IS to forget that this is fiction, and
to read it literally, as history or chronicle. That is
how good a job Morris West has done with his novel of
the Ukrainian who becomes Pope. With his scene the
awesome splendour of the Vatican and his time the pres-
ent moment, West, author of 'The Devil's Advocate." has
managed one of the most difficult feats in modern fic-
tion, a novel about the Papacy which is neither offen-
sive, silly, nor incredible.
Drawing from his twelve years as a postulant of the
Capitol Spotliqht:
Christian Brothers order in Australia and his stint as
Vatican correspondent for the London "Daily Mail," as
well as from what can only be called sheer brilliance of
conception and technique. West's Pope is a holy man-
but very much a human, subject to fears and doubts, need-
ful ol love. Kiril Lakota is also a liberal Pontiff, deeply
dedicated to making both the Faith and the power of
the Church meaningful in a bomb-terrorized world.
Thus the book moves ceaselessly between the Vatican
and the world outside the Church. The most evil spectre,
godless Communism, is of course the major problem, and
one for which Kiril is particularly qualified; he has spent
Bv MILTON FRIEDMAN
Liberals Now Seeking to Defend Black Muslims
Washington!
IS THE "CULT of c'vil liberties" pro-
viding a cloak for the gutter tactics]
on anti-Semites oposed to religious and
racial freedom? Efforts of Federal and
local authorities to prevent racist bigot;
from exploiting the current civil rights |
crisis have in some instances been
thwarted by well-intentioned liberals.
One police official stressed that the
right of law-abiding American citizens to safety and free-
dom outranked the alleged "right" of Nazis or others to
shout "gas the kikes" or "kill the niggers" and foment
violence.
Off the Record:
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Summer Thoughts
rORMER PREMIER David Ben-
Gorton, in his first public ap-
pearance since his resignation
more than a month ago. told the
TOA convention in Tel Aviv that
Israel is "the collective creation
j( the entire Jewish people" but
that the work of creation must yet
je completed. Since Zionists had
something to do with the pre-natal
history of Israel, stood at its birth and lent a len-
der hand in its nurturing, can it be assumed that
what the former Premier meant was that the Zion-
isl movement still has a historic role to play in the
consummation of the work of creation? If so. the
parley may well have witnessed a significant change
of thinking on the part of the fiery Ben-Gurion, who
in the past rarely missed an opportunity to lambast
the Zionist movement, particularly the American
brand. If this surmise is corect. the ZOA may well
find a better climate for rejuvenation when its lead-
er- return from the convention.
Just an Idea
In recent months, much has been written about
the deplorable lack of rabbis, social wrokers, teach-
er- and othei functionaries in the Jewish commun-
ities of America. Overlooked in almost all assess-
ments of the Jewish scene, has been the Anglo-
Jewish writer, whose business it is to report on and
interpret the Jewish scene in America. Editors of
important Jewish journals have recently told this
writer that the situation has reached a point where
it has become impossible to fill the pages of a pub-
lication with Jewish authors. In another decade,
one well-informed Jewish journalist told me, the
field of Jewish writers will have dried up com-
pletely. It seems to this corner, that the problem
merits study by our Jewish universities and other
institutions of higher learning.
*
Question Mark
Is an important Jewish source sitting on an
explosive report about the status of the Jewish com-
munity in America? The study, I hear, has been
completed, but it has not been released allegedly
because the control figures have not yet been prop-
erly checked. Was the control study part of the
original plan, or were the original disclosures so
shocking as to be unbelievable?
*
Falling Apart
The American Council for Judaism is on the
lookout for deviationists among its members who
give furtively to Israel an unforgivable sin in the
Council's theological lexicon. The latest "scandal"
to hit the Council was disclosure that one of its most
prominent members in the South had bought a
$1,000 Israel bond. This writer wouldn't know
whether the Council has hired detectives to trail the
sinner, but if they did he would like to tip them
off that the "sinner" confessed his transgression to
a rabbi of one of the Jewish religious denominations
in his city.
The American Civil Liberties Union, which has many
achievements to its credit, bewildered its membership a
few years ago. by rushing headlong to the defense of Nazi
street brawlers. This did not involve classic defense of
free speech in all cases. Once the issue hinged on a
question of violent assault. Even the defended Nazis
were amused and made lewd jokes about being defended
free by the "Jew lawyers" of the ACLU.
Within the ACLU, the tendency to "lcan-over-back-
wards" to defend Nazis was debated bitterly. Gradually,
leaders moderated their doctrinaire and dogmatic civil
liberties interpretation. It was conceded that crafty bigots
were cynically trying to make wholesale use of the good
lawyers of the ACLU.
Today, the ACLU is again advertising for free clients.
This time it is seeking adherents of the fanatic anti-Semite
and anti-white sect, the Black Muslims.
The Black Muslims claim a portion of the United
States on which to establish a "Nation of Islam." Mus-
lims refuse to serve in the American Armed Forces and
to register for selective service. When asked by the
U.S. civil service. Muslims said thir first loyalty was to
the "Nation ol Islam" rather than to America.
The civil service commission made known that the
fanatacism of twelve Muslims was so extreme that they
were fired from Federal jobs. They would support their
Islam rather than America in event of conflict.
Employing a Negro chauvinist version of Hitler's
Aryan supremacy concept, the Black Muslims are trying
to stir the Negro masses against the "white dogs" and
especially against persons of Jewish faith. Malcolm X,
their articulate leader in Washington, has openly de-
nounced American Jewry and justified Muslim contacts
with American Nazis.
The ACLU feels it does not matter, in terms of Fed-
eral employment, that the Muslims swear to uphold the
flag of Islam, rather than the Stars and Stripes.
Lawrence Speiser, manager of the ACLU Washington
office, announced: "We would be interested in hearing
from any Black Muslims fired. We would offer them
legal aid ." The ACLU national headquarters con-
curred.
The U.S. Department of Justice, citing the Nazis and
the Black Muslims, has expressed concern about "the
activities of extremist groups which attempt to arouse
racial emotions." In a letter to the Jewish War Veterans,
the Department revealed the Nazis and Black Muslims
have been under close Federal scrutiny. The letter was
in reply to a communication from the Jewish veterans
drawing attention to recent attempts by the extremists of
both races to ignite explosive racial tensions.
The department, speaking through Oran Waterman,
chief of the civil section, made clear its disapproval of
both Nazis and Black Muslims. He revealed that thought
has been given to declaring the groups subversive, but
complications were encountered. The Black Muslims,
claiming themselves a religion, seek the constitutional
shelter afforded all faiths. The Nazis would exploit sub-
version hearings to broadcast what Mr. Waterman termed
their "obnoxious doctrines."
An irony exists. The West German Government de-
plores American neo-Nazism, while the United Arab Re-
public feels the Black Muslim's racist hate goes too far.
seventeen years in a Communist prison, and he carries
the marks of torture inflicted by the man who now head.,
the Soviets. Kamenev. Like Milton's Satan, Kamenev
strikes off sparks of sympathy with chilling insistence
his logic as perfect and honest for his terms as the Chris
tian ethic is in rebuttal. "A sublime folly," Kamenev
calls it. "What is your heaven but a carrot to make the
donkey trot? What is your hell but a rubbish heap for
all your failuresGod's failures, my friend! And yov
say He's omnipotent *'
What is important, however, is not what is said, but
that the dialogue occurs. And so it does in other ways
too. in the constant confrontation of science and mat
erialism with the Church. The Pope's dearest and only
I-iend is a Jesuit scholar, Jean Telemond, whose life
work is a book wedding evolutionary theory to Catholic
theology. When the Holy Office orders him to "re-
examine" it. he submits, but the agony is mortal, and
he dies. Thus Kiril. too, is bereft, and must submit.
There is the Jewish woman. Ruth Lewin. a one-tinfV
convert to Catholicism; there are the monster babie-
bnrn in Rome, victims of drugs, and mercy-killed by the
delivering doctor; there is an Italian politicians divorce
In all these rooms, the Church must speak. Her voice
is especially fascinating to non-Christians, for whom the
terms and mechanics of this faith are new. It is mes
merizing to note that the logic is so often Talmudic
while the atmosphere is psychologically so strange. The
apparent paradox of continual humility coupled with the
egotism of con-it ant concern for the salvation of one'-
own soul interests those who view the man-God relation
ship so differently.
West's novel :s a powerful story of the loneliness and
sincerity of a possible Pope.
Ponoromo:
Bv DAVID SCHWARTZ
Tidbits and People
w
i
JANT TO LEARN Hebrew"' The
easy way is to become a child.
Congressman Ogden Reid was Am-
bassador to Israel for a relatively
;|iort time, but his children, he
lays, continue to greet him in the
norning with "Boker Tov" instead
i "Good Morning." They speak
lebrew well. (My ov\n nieces and
ephew spent only a year in Is-
rael, ami speaK a fine Hebrew. I have been wrest-
ling with the language for year- and can't speak it.)
James Waterman Wise, son of the great Stephen
Wise, now li'. e- in Paris and is an art dealer, (After
all. there is a kinship between art and religion
Heine maintained thai Muses wai ,i great artist,
but he worked fashioning a people, instead of dead
clay.)
Edward G. li ibinson, the actor, has been having
a try .it art and ii< says, "I've gotten -o thai I can
always hit Ihe canvas when 1 throw some paint
or, it."
Harry Simonhoff, of Miami, who has turned out
five or six books ol Jewish histories and essays, is
soon to have a work of fiction published. The pub-
Usher is Yoseloff. Simonhoff was once a member of
the South Carolina Legislature. His father was can-
tor in the Charleston synagogue, and he had a beau- v<
tiful voice.

Edna Ferber was so disappointed in the first
book she wrote, she refused to send it to a publisher,
but her mother, without her knowledge, sent it. It
proved quite a success. .
Between You and Me: By BORIS SMOIAR
Drama May Disrupt Jewish Catholic
JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS in this]
** country arc beginning to show signs |
of nervousness over the play "The Dep-
uty" which is scheduled to be produced |
on Broadway this autumn. The play.!
written by a German author named Rolf I
Hoehbut. disparages the failure of Pope
Pius XII to issue a public statement con-
demning the Nazi mass-murder of Jews.
The author's portrait of Pope Pius XII La
is unsympathetic, ascribing the Pope's failure to a
the Nazi anti-Jewish atrocities publicly to political moti-
vation.
The play has caused interrcligious control i
rope, and some fear that it may become a source ol d
cord between religious groups in the United Stat. when
produced in this country while in I
versy was largely a Catholic-Protestant one i
iHHS. "a "0t, ma"y J.6W8 in ,,le Countries where it
produced Jews in America may not be able to esca
involvement in the dispute because of the large
of Jews resui.ng in this country. Also, becau
lean producer is Billy Rose, and its director is Herman
Shumlin. both Jewish.
Several Catholic diocesan papers in this country have
already editorialized on the subject in tones affecting
Jews, and it becomes more and more obvious that this
disruptive issue will provoke an exchange of charges and
countercharges which may lead to diminishing the amitv
in interreligious relations now prevailing in the United
m'i J I" IS at re"PMlbta 'ewWl organization.
would like to prevent without suggesting that the fat,
lut'hT'o'r SrnUFing..the, N:ui Peri0d be by^ssed. The
author of ll,e Deputy' ei;ii,s that Pope Pis XII re-
trained from making a i ublic protest against genocide of
the Jews for political ids,,,,. B^ciae m
Pono^-l'r?1'" '" ,he olher hand- *r* Hut the
KrilT'h '.....' "ll,,lK' Utcry bccausc *"**
have made the situ. tin,, worse for the Jews, since ,. would
; ; ;;! "taW retaliation against them, m .>
the-tIT',' "'" A""m'"1 Jewl* orMniiattonV
pc lius\P,l!l^ ':'"-i"-" ^e relationship betw,
non complete ,V'" ;'ull,or,,,ts and J* '* far


Idcy, August 2, 1963
ft* km /# ffrririfon
Page U-A
LEGAL NOTICE
Circuit court, uth judicial
ici^ciit. daoe county, fla.
in chancery
No. 63C 6135
rDMiMU
|-!.iin'.'n,
I
;SBY o'uiLFt 'l:l'.
'NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
. u m:V UCILFORD.
Iy'ih', henry iiriiioitD, n ,, nknown, w notified ti serve
,.; ,: your answer to Divorce
r ..Mipl-tlTit filed stains! you on Plain-
lifts attorney, GEORGE XH'll"l..vs
II" N'VV 12th Ave., Miami. Fin., and
original ivitn < lerk thin Court
,,,- before Angus! .'. l:'.::. other-
l, ,,, plain! will I"- confessed i>>
"i".\t- n July is, IMS.
i: VTHERMAN. Clerk
H. : K M I.Y.MAX.
I'.pnti I'leik
7/18-86, 2-9
BY HENRY LEONARD
NOTICE UNDER
F.CTITIOUS NAME LAW
Is HKRKBT OIVKN Ihnl
inert, desiring in encase In
.. del the fictitious name -i
|\l\ Ful Run Dept. at 1(905 N.W.
Awe., X- rih Miami: 18501 8. Dixie
| luhway, Hade Counts Intends lo
i-clstcr ..'l name with the Clark ,.f
i h Court "i Dade Count).
[i i .:. DISC! n"\r FI'RNITl RE,
. i.i I'la Corp.)
J-9-16-2."
NOTICE UNDER
F CTITIOUS NAME LAW
: i.~ IIKKKI'.Y tllVEN thai
gned, desiring to engage In
i. inder the fictitious name "i
ASAl i INCA KRAl'TY BIIOP .11
I ri* Avenue, Miami Bench In-
, ,|,| t. glster said name Ith the
the CI'CUll Court "I Dade
I rids
;i\VARI> KLEIN
hki.k.n MAY KLEIN
i mil 'HE A Rt iDBlNH
. Applicant*
It SI Hill leu II
- 2-8-16-S2
JN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
fllTH ,'i.DICiAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 8054
|vvii :i i.i ill:i> r. An Executor
l Will and Testament ..I
MtiilNl \ -i.\imi:i:s.
I' ff,
l i-\xi;i,in and JENNIE
fc.VNKLIN, his wife: 8ARAH B
J: \.\K i.IN and, n Man lea, In i
il, Whose Christian Name I*
I .Ti. If any of the aforesaid
I nil dead, their respective
i ..iis. a, heirs, devisees,
leei assignees, irranteea, cred-
i*therwlae. natural or oorpor-
hn\ claiming any Intereal
| :i vh, under or ggatnst an> . .. id defendant"; the im-
i.w ii -: uusi s ..f an) of the nbove-
f ed def, -,.lant-: ami all pal til
-a i, i,r unknown, having or claim-
| i .. an) right .a lnt n -1 In
id, i. ..I |.i..j. > i> .i. hi i ii'.-.i In
la I I *
NOTiCE BY PUBLICATION
\ i i: AX KLIN and JENNIE
! I: '.:, I.IX, his w ii- SARAH II
. K l.l.N". an.I. ii niar" i. .1. hi
v\ iioei hi 1st Ian nn
own.
. .,.. i, .1 defi nl.'iii-
"I just can't take it anymore,
Molly ... I'm throwing in the Tallisl"
Copr. 1963, Doyenw Ptodut^oftf
J
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLOR DA. IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 7859
II MM 11! I i Ki i/.AN.
Plaintiff.
.Ii iSKI'll Ki / \\,
I i.-i. ndant.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
Til: Jl ISEPH Ki ''/.AN
> .. Pai bai.. i 'i'.in.-
2 Pren! Ice At enue
Auburn, Massachusetts
Yi.r ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED to
nerve a cops ..i youi Answer i>. the
1:111 of Complaint for Divorce filed
.mains! Mm. on lit* 1'laintlff'n attor-
,i,i, ItKRNSTKIX .v MILLER, 1111
Congress Bulkltng, Miami 12. Florida,
and lo file ili<- original thereof with
rhe t'lerk "f the above Court, on or
before the ::->tli day of August 1918.
otherwise a l*e,-i*'.- Ti,, Coafesso will
be entered aaaln-t you.
Dated at Miami, [hide County, Flor-
ida, tills 22nd da) ,.i Jul), Ie3.
i:. b. i.i:a iiikkmax
Clerk ..i the Circuit Court
l;\ i- I', i ul'I.I.A.NIi
I >ei>ul) i Jerk
7 28, 8 '.'-'.i-Hi
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 45424-A
in RE Bi late
ih;hm is i' itriiix,
I ii ceased.
NOT CE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
ii i. pective unknown application for distribution
devisees, legatees, AND FINAL DISCHARGE
.....litiirs, .a "ii" n'i ill'il i> h.i.i.v xlven that I have
.. porate, having rilea ni) mid '".i Petition foi
luteresl by, through, lilstrlimtioii and Final Discharge as
llldi ri -; lln) .!" Hi.- Bfol -.i 111
ii ii nd i" the pi "! n >
. in m. ... scribed:
.vn spouses "f an) of the
|i.. -i id defendants and ill par-
unknou n, lia\ Ing ui
i have an) i Ight, title "
I ..i i,. the follow Ing ii.
erty, situate In I >ade Coun-
i i i-wlt:
I Hli* '.i. of KUAN K UN
BCIil \ i.-ii N, accordlna to the
a. i ..nl. .1 III I'lal
ai I-age :i of the Public
1 oi i >...i.- County, Florida.
id each of you, art- hereby
il 111 i.as been brought
ruliiH ,.u in id, Circuit I'.mri of
Hi i mnty, I lorldn, b) DAVID C
pi'liuisT. as Executor ,.f the l.a 111 iitid Test.imenl ,.l VIRGINIA
MMKIts, plaintiff. The nature ..f
- to (|Uii i title to Hi,- prop-
I" hi-n-inabove described, and you
[lIBItKUY FT RT II K i; NOTIFIED
l-Ni. i:-.-..i 11: t-: i. i wrVe a copy of
' i ver lo the Hill of Complain!
"Id ii is< on Hi. plaintiff's attor-
- KWITNEY .\ ANKl'8, 1211 l.in-
.....;' d. Miami Item li. Florida, a n
.1 In il..- i ifii.-.- .a the
1 lit O in i !' I larti
"}. Miami, F loi Ida, on or bi
mi :. ,.f s..|.,,.,i ,-,.r-, nthel
," alleg 11 ion- ..: -,,|.| I. i 11 of
".i..... taki n a.
liU.
.Aiiimiiir. hi \ i r i "i ill.- utate
ll.i in ,n i Itubin, ill i .. 'I Hi
inal ..n tin -'"Hi da) "i August, 1883,
a in uppl) !>> iln Honorable Count)
ludgtv .a Dnde County, Florida, (or
approval of said I'm..! !te|H>rt and for
dlsirlbution ami final diecharg* as
\ niiini-iiaii is. C.T.A. .! the estate
..i in.- ali..v, -n.in.,-.1 decedent. Tills
I'lli da) .'f Jul). 1863
nii:i:i:.-.\ i:. kin
. Administratrix, C.T.A. of the M-
i.u. ..i ii, iin.ui C Kni.in. de-
ceased,
M.\i;v i.n i. v\ ii:m:i:
Alt,.111.1 fol Aoiiini.sil'all i\ i'TA
of estate of Herman Rubin, d> cd,
818 Alnsle) Ftldg
Miami .... I-la.
T 26, s 2-8-18
NOTICE UNDFR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice is ni:i:i:i'.v GIVEN ihat
id.- mi.i. rslgned, deelrlng to eiuiase In
business undei the flctltloua name ..f
MIDAB I1RAKE ,\ ALIGNMENT
Slli i|' ai "... N X\ "Bill Si., .*:.....
Intends to reglstel -..... nunii "iili thi
I, :. ,.| III,- I'll-, ml I'.-Ill I oi Pail.
i '.. mi 11..i i.la
III! \Ni 'I i. INi' FL V (I IRP
7 ls-26, S 2-8
NOTICE UNDER
,.,. ,,..1 FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NtiTICE IS HEREBl '11V I.N that
his Notlci shall I-. published for the undersigned, desiring to engage In
',. 'V, "'".....Iv* "'- In THE bimlneas undei 'he flctltbms name M
iMSII |.'l.n|;iii|.vN >i'i- kmhimIHF:R1 .\ ~' \IAJ
yi 'I '! I his 20th ,, ., ..,' .in,,,., igfs,
I i '"i'- I'nunti, Florida
,: l-EATHKKMAN
"I Hi. Circuit Court
i inrti County, Florida
By: c. iv i ni-Kl.AXn
[n.NKl .v AM<1 S
triii fr Plaintiff
I'-.......in Road
>" i'-.- h, Florida
| t'aui hwltney
s 2-8-K-M
ART FJMHRi HDFjRY -' '
i -i i ii nimili- i >19 N-J*. -
in thi <"ii> of Ml"" I. I'-'M--. ;:-
Ui i-. ilster the mid nami 1'"' "'
,i,.,k of the Circuit Court of Dadt
''i'lr./ai'M'..... Florida, tin- 9th
'^"''h'eNRY3;......'ERMAN
LEEF* ANKIS
Atorneys for Apjilh-ant
(20 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Worlda
T 19-26. S'2-9
SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS
MANUFACTURERS OF SUPERIOR RUBBER STAMPS
Corporation Seals and Supplies
CHARLIE MERZ, Owner
13 N.E. 1st Ave.
FR 4-1034
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
Mi.- undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the following fi>*-
niii.ns names ai riie ad4reasvs bi i
opposite their respective names:
State Liquors, >.^^ S.\V. r.Tth Avenue,
Miami:
Gas-Light inn. >m S'.W. 57th Avenue,
Miami:
Suit.- l.i.in. vs. 6203 N.W. -Till Ave-
nue, Miami:
State IJquora, 8458 B.W. --nd St..
Miami:
State Liquors, 11880 N.W, Tih Ave-
nue, Miami:
State Liquors, .".".". N.B. 167th Street,
North Miami:
State Liquors. Wi". s\\V. 4nih St.,
South Mia mi:
Stati Liquors, 8885 v. Hibiscus si.
r. rrlne;
State Liquors, 15180 Bo. lii\i>- llicli-
wuv, Miami:
Rockilale Bar, 18110 s... Dixie EUtlt-
Way, Miami:
State Liquors, 8100 N, Miami Avenue,
Miami:
Mate Liquors, 8715 N.W 167th Street,
.Miami:
Carol City Liquors, 3713 N.W, 167th
Strei :. Miami:
State Liquors, Avis-ido Drive .< So
I ilxle 11 > II..in- stead.
Itertlanrt Tavern, Avocado Drive &
>< I mm.- Hwy,, I l.iin.si.-a.l.
State 1.1.in-.is, K. vili St. a l"ili Ave .
II nleah:
Flamingo Liquors, I-: '"li St. A l"th
Avi Hiali
r.si Inn, 280H w 2nd Avenue, Hla-
I. ah:
Post Pin kugi I l-:. nil w.-, Hla-
leah:
Hldeawav, i"".". i:. 18th Street, Hla-
l.-ah:
Boots ft Saddles, 2100 Palm Ave-
nue. Hlnli a'n:
.,, n.i Liquors, 137 N W. lltb
Strei I. Miami.
hlarmon) Lounge, 1*13 K. 4'.'th Street,
Hlalenh;
Park Bar, 2500 Palm Avenue, Fua-
l.-ali:
.leffer.ion Liquor, 800 N. Miami Beach
Blvd., N. Miami Beach;
i.l' Bar, '"" E. nth Street, Hlaleuh:
Mar-Tab Vending, 16385 N.W. l"ih
Avenue, Miami:
Intends register said names with
the Clerk ol the Circuit Court of
lia.l. County, Florida.
I "A ST I. i:\Vl a Hi IN IKKNATInNAI.
CORP.
B) : DAVID 1- SLINKY.
Vice President
HARRY ZITKERN1CK,
An..int> for Applicant
180 Lincoln KinuI
Miami Beach, Florida
7 26, 6 2-8-H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhal
ih, undersigned, desiring i" engage In
business under the 'h tltious ni..... ol
TOI'PM VITAMINS *i COSMBTIC8 at
133 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables Intends
to register said ram.- with the Clerk
ol the i ii-.-nii Com i of Dade County,
Florida.
11 IPPK DISCI ICNT ENTER8-
i-..i:ai. gabi.es. ixc
Kl >VNi:i: ,\ MANNHElMER
At toi ne) for Topisj I tiacuunl
Centers-Coral Gables, Inc.
: 26, S '
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
APPLY FOR CHANGE OF NAME
Chancery No. 63C-6370
To \vh..in it Ma\ Concern:
Notice la hereby given that the
undersigned petitioner*, GAR*
I i|-:i 'TSi'll. some times known ns
GARY PAY Lull, and KTHBL
I i|:i"l'Si'll. some times known us
ETHEL TAYiiOi: whoM resWenoe
address is 34.", Meridian Avenue in the
i-itv of Miami Beach, Dade County,
Florida, Intend to apply to the Hon.
rable HENRY L IJAI.AHVN. .ludi-e
of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, in
and for Dade Count)', at Ills office in
tin- County Court lions,-, nt 8:8C
O'clock A.M.. on the 27th day of Aug-
ust, 1963, or a* soon thereafter as
they may be heard, for mi ordar
lutnglnK their names from GAR Y
DEVT8CH and i:tiii:i. DECTSCH to
GARY TAYI.olt and KTIIII. TAT*
l^>R by Which names they shall
thereafter he known.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this [m
day of July, a.i >. ii"'.'-..
// GARY DBl'THCH
-. ETHEL DBI'TSCH
Petltlonei -
Attorney FTYMAN P. GALBl'T
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOT1CK IS IIKItKltY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t. eiigugu in
business under the fictitious name of
B1ROTEX aCORSET CORNER at 8SS1
Bahtedo street. Coral Gables, Florida
Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dude t'ounty, Florida.
NAT GRERNBERG
Sole Owner
TRKD & NEWMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
106 Dade Federal Btdg.
" 12-18-26, i I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HF:ilEBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
85th AVENUK ASSOCIATES at 7180
N.W. .'.".ih Avenue. Miami 17. Florida
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
33th AVBNl'E lll'.M.TV CORP.
By: si.iii.-i ll. Hubermun, Pres
7 26, N 2-8-16
NOTICE UNDER'
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, di siring to engage In
business under the fictitious name ol
I.KWIS POMERANTZ .V CO., at 1401
S.W. First Street, Suite -'"7. Miami,
Florida, intend to register said name
with tin. Clerk of the circuit Court <>r
Dade i oiniiv. Florida
LEWIS PUMERAXTZ
MYK'i.N K MIN
LEWIS I". COHEN, Esq.
Attorney for Lewis Pomerantl A *.'.
7 88, B L'-!i-lfi
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ih.- undersigned, desiring to engage In
Business under the fictitious name .(
TOPI'S I'lM'nI'NT CENTERS at 138
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the I'ireiiii Court of lia.le Cnuutv,
Florida.
TOPP8 DI8COITNT CENTERS-
CORAL t!ABLF;s, INC.
KOVNBR tt MANNHEIM FIR
Attorneys for Tofips Discount
i', in, i s-i 'oral i tables, Inc.
7 18-26, 8 2-8
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!.
^Jewisli Fk,ridH solicits your legal notices*
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee*
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial FR :i- HJOS
for messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 58795-A
IN RE: Estate ..'
A URAHAM IHNSBl'RCI
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims ,.r Demands Against Said
Estate:
Yon are hereby notified and re-
,|iiired t.. present any claims and de-
mands which win ma\ haie against
the .-stale ..f ABRAHAM tllNSBCRC
ii. i.a-e.i late of Hade County, Flor-
ida, to tin Count) Judges of Dade
County, and file the same in dupli-
cate and a> provided in Section 738.16,1
Florida statutes, in their offices in
the t'ounty Courthouse in Dade i
County, Florida, within si\ calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same ill
hi- I.aired.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 21st
daj of .Ian,-. A D. 1863.
i'ii si publication of t'ds notice on
the 12th das of Jul>. 1863.
BARRF7TT M Ri iTHENBERt i
As vdmlnistrator '.T. v.
CAIDIN A I'.1 iTHFiNBl Hi;
Atorneys t..' Artniinistratot C.T.A.
305 His. i ^ ii. Itu lid lug
Miami ::.', Floi la
7 12-18-26, 8 :'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1ITH JUDICiAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 7400
H'STINK II I TAL an.I BE VTRICE
I'TA L, his He.
Plaintiffs.
JACK ROSEN, ROBERT MARKO-
WITZ and MARKOW1TZ.
his wile.
Defendants.
SUIT FOR BREACH OF LEASE
TO: .la. k Rosen
#2 West '.'.'.111 Stl.....t
Baltimore, Maryland
You are herebj notified thai Bill
of Complaint for Breach of Leas,- has
been filed agaiusl you, and you are
required t>. serve a copy of your An-
swer or Pleading to the Bill ..t Com-
plaint on the Plaintiff's Atorneys,
SHEVIN, GOODMAN ft HOLTZMAN,
M6 Seybold Building, Miami. Florida,
snil file the original Answer or Plead-
ing in the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade t'ounty, Florida
on or before the 12th das of August
A.I'.. 1888. ll >oii fail t.. do SO,
judgment by default will be taken
This notice shall be published once
:>< li week for fout consecutive weeks
in TIIK JEWISH ELOHIDIAN.
DONE AND tiRDERED nt Miami,
li.nl. County, Florida this 9th day of
July, A.I'..
K 11 I.RATFTERM \N
Cli rk of the 'Iwult I -n rt
l i.i.i. Counts Florida
(seal) By: C P, ti 'ici.AN'li.
Deputj Clerk
SHEVIN. (1......MAN ,\ HOLTZMAN
A tin li, > s f..| Plaintiff
'h: Sej hold Building
Miami :::. Florid -
By: Ham M. I:. 7 12-18-28, 8/8
I..
Ifth Street
Miami Reach. Fla JE 8-Mlf
- 2-8-1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 62C 136S7
ZAIDA mi.iai:i:s,
Plaintiff.
vs.
VIKC.II.Hi ll. MI.IAP.I->'.
l>ef,-ndant.
NOTiCE OF PUBLICATION
TO: VHMULIOil. MUARES
Address l*nkn..w n
Yi'C, VIRGIUOO. MUARES, pres-
ent residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the complaint for
dlvorco, with the t'lerk of the above
Court, ami serve b copy thereof upon
Glno p. Negretti, Attorney, 810-11
Congress Building, lit N i: 2nd Ave.,
Miami. Florida, on oi l.etor. the 11th
das of August, 1883, or else complaint
will be taken as confessed.
Dated this Mh day of July, 1888,
B. P. i.i'A i ili:i:M an. Cli i k.
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
IN THE COUNTY JU DC E'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. S7800-C
l.N RE: Estat.....
RUDOLF II. SCHMITT
I',-eased
NOTiCE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is herebj given that I havi
fil.d my Final Report and Petition for
l Istrlbutlon and l Inal IMseharge as
Executor of the estate of lll'txiLF' H
SCHMITT, deceased: and th.it on th.
26th ,la> of August, 1863, will appl)
to th.- ii..ii..rai.i. Counts Judges < Dade County, I loiida, for approval ot
said Final Report and for nistrlbutloi
and final dlscliarge as FIxecutor of
the estate ..I the above-nnmed di
dent. This 24th day of .ini' is-;.:
.li iSII RF:PHl'N, As Ex, It il
.li >SII REPHl'N
Attornes
1870 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Florida
1-16-23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
UTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C-7603 (Leo
IN RE: APPIJC VIH i.N i IK
AI 'A MAE SINCLAIR,
TO BECOME A FREE DEAI HR
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
FREE DEALER'S LICENSE
NOTICE is hi:i:i:i:y (ilVE.N that
the nnd.rsimi.il. ADA MAE SIN-
CLAIR, will, on the 4th ua> of Sep-
tember, 1863, at the hour of 8:00
o'.-loek A.M.. r as soon thereafter as
counsel can be heard, appl) t.. one
oi the Judges of the Circuit Court in
and for Dade County, Florida, for a
license t" manage, take charge ol and
control her properly, and t" become a
free dealer In every respect.
ARTHUR R. STARK
Attorney for Pi tltlonei
1133 Alfr.-d I. rtuPont Hulldlng
Miami 82, Florida
___________ '-l'i-2::
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY ti IVI N that
the undersigned, desiring to ens
huslness under iln fictitious name >'
BOB EHMAXX PONSTRI'CTION -it
10750 S.W 82nd \y nui. Ml
i.i.i intends t<> reglstet -.. il i
thi i 'li ii. of the '""'. nil i ..ii -a I i.i -i
i'. nun-. Ktorlda.
RC 'BERT K l-'.IIM VNX, INC.
a I loi id., i < iiorai
HARRIS .v. RI iBIXSI ..\
Attorues \i'i cain
l.'th I-1..... I i.i.l. I ertet i i
Miami .:.'. l-'...ii.l..
_________________
IN THE COUNTY JUOOt'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60093-A
IN RE: Estl.....i
RUDOLPH I-'Kl.l'Si lll'll
I i.-. eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Person, Hal -
Ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are herebj notified and re-
quired to present ans claims and de-
mands which you mas have against
the estate of RCDOI ill I'ii.h
SCHl'H deceased late of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, to tin- Counts Judges of
I'nil,- County, and file the same in
duplicate and as provided In Section
88.16, Florida Statutes, in their of-
fices in th. County Courthouse in
lade County, Florida, with u s.\ cal-
endar months from the time of thei
first publication hereof, or it-., same
will be barred.
Hat.-d at Miami. Florida, this 2nd
.lav of July, A.I'. 1868.
HENRY Nl RTl >N
SAM PEL KKLl'Silll'll
As Co-Executors
First publication ol this nolle, on
the 19th day of Jul). 186S
HENRV NORTON
Attornes for Co-Exei I
1106 I tiscas in Bldg., M -
i
NOTiCE BY PUDLILMTlON
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 723=
P. C. JONES,
I'lain I iff.
v s.
ill. IE JONES,
1 'el'endallt.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
Ti I: JULIE JONES
:'.ms Michigan street
Kansas City, Missouri
You. JI'LIE JONES,
tifieii that a Complaint foi
has been filed against
an- requin .1 i serve
Answer or Pleading to
(seal)
B) K M l.YMAN.
I ebv- n--
i Hvorct
you. and you
cops '*i your
the lolllplaint
on ttie plaintiff's attorney. J. David
Llelmian, li:'.:: North Kr....... \v.-nu,-.
Honiest.a.l. Florida, and file the orig-
inal Answer or Pleading In the office
of the t'lerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 18th day of August.
1H6.1. If von fall to do s,,. judgment
h> default will be taken against yon
tor th.- relief demanded i h..- Com-
plaint.
DONE AN'P ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 8th das July, A.P.
1088
I-:. B. LBATHERM VN. I 'lerk,
Circuit Court, Dadi I mi FToi Ida
(seal) Bj l< M i FMAN,
l'e|.llty I
.1. DAVID LIEBMAN
Aiorm-v f..r Plaintiff
i
Sorl h Kr.'in A v
Deputs Qlerk
Homestead, l-T-ai
la
12-1S-26, S 2
:.-i..-:- s :


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Friday. August 2. 1953
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<;
w
otnan s
"World
"dTewislri Floiridiaitu
Miami. Florida. Friday. August 2. 1963
Section B '
Y Child Program Names Chief
Mrs. Morris Skop (left) presents ceramic sculpture piece depict-
ing a Rabbi and Bar Mitzvah boy to Mrs. Esther Yagoda, pres-
ident of the Sisterhood at Beth Shirah.
Beth Shirah Women Get
Ceramic Sculpture Piece
Mrs. Morris A. Skop. art in-
-r ; I r in the Dadc County Pub-,
ic School System, and director of!
I hi Vrls and Crafts Department
at Temple Beth Shirah. this week1
True Sisters
Will Celebrate
Miami 43. United Order of True
j, will celebrate at a meet-
.! here Wednesday at the Al-
- Hotel. Mrs. Morris Wein-
its will be chairman of the day.
ted Order is a 115-year-old
ational organization.
The meeting here will be in ac-
nee with the organization's
i that True Sisters and
I hi riends gather together on
the !ir-l Wednesday of every Au-
.ii-i
presented a ceramic sculpture
piece depicting a Rabbi and Bar
Mitzvah boy to Mrs. Esther Ya-
goda. Sisterhood president of the
Temple.
The decorative piece will be
used as a table decoration at Bar
.Mitzvah Kiddush on the Sabbath.
Another companion piece is being
finished of a bride and groom to
be used at the Kiddush Table dur-
ing wedding celebrations.
A number of Mrs Skop's pupils
have won prizes at local art ex-
hibits, and a show of 18 paintings
sketched during a trip to Israel
and Europe will be featured at
new Temple Beth Shirah follow-
ing dedication ceremonies on Sep*.
8.
Mrs. Skop is the wife of Rabbi
Morris A. Skop. of Beth Shirah.
She is a graduate of the New York
Academy of Design and the Uni-
versity of Miami.
Mrs. Stanley Cohen has been
appointed chairman of the coun-
ty-wide committee for the early
childhood development program
ol the YM and YWHA of Greater
Miami, it has been announced by
A Budd Cutler. Mrs. Cohen is
a past president of the PTA tor
this program at the North Coun-
ty YMHA Branch.
Other PTA chairmen are Mrs.
Samuel Gordon, Miami Beach;
Mrs. Roland Kohen, Miami Beach
Branch; Mrs. Evan Katz. South-
west Branch; and Mrs. Sidney
Roberts, North County Branch.
Other members of the county
committee include Mrs. Philip
Samet, a past chairman, and Mrs.
Solomon Kann, who has been ap-
pointed special projects chair-
man.
The committee, which is respon-
sible for the policy-making and
MIS. STANLEY COHEN
planning for four nurserj BCb >i
programs conducted by the "Y"
at different locations in Da e
County, has already begun meet-
ing! to make plans for the com-
ing year. Special consideration
will be given to the need lor re-
cruiting trained and skilled teach-
ers. The committee will al>o un-
dertake to interpret the program
to the community through coffee
meetings to be held in the homes
ol various parents in the different
areas. Plans are also underway
for a family life education insti-
tute for parents of children un-
der six.
The four nursery schools are
Conducted at Miami Branch. 450
SW 16th Ave.; Miami Beach
Branch, 1536 Bay Rd.; North Coun-
ty Branch, 14036 NE 6th Ave.;
;-nd Southwest Branch. 7215 Coral
Way.
n
J
ALITE
by ISABEL GROVE
Rabbi and Mrs. Bernard
ol Sarasota. visiting here
Mrs. Shotcr's parents. Mr.
ii- Nat Ktusch The
family reunion also in-
>:rth ay party at Chip-
lh Gablcj .
i Fleischer and his wife.
left Morday for a
trip to Europe .
who only recently built a
""in in South Miami, hopes
I to his art collection in
galleries ol England, France,
Germany, Switzerland and
the Netherlands Holding
the home fires with their
' Phyllis 16 and Arthur
his secretary, Carol Nol-
The trio are now doing
circuit of the Eastern horse
1
*
Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Zalka. 6881 Bay Dr., Miami.
We twin beauties, Barbara and
Sandra Wohl, 16, daughters of
Mr and Mrs. Milton Wohl, of
Saten Island, N.Y. ... The
Wls, who have appeared on
Bich television programs as
"Naked City," will be here un-
til they return up North in time
for the opening of school .
*T>ile in Miami Beach, they're
ho visiting with their grand-
JUWiU, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Mil. of 2250 Bay Dr. .
Martha and Rudy Lobel. of
Harbor House, have sent word
<<> their friends, Mr. and Mrs.
*ank Burg, that Denmark,
n and Norway are beauti-
J,'1 Now traveling through
Europe, they'll be back in Au-
Wftt in time to take up their
busy schedule of activities at
Beth Torah.
i *
Three local couples, friends of
long standing, are off on a Dy-
ing '.rip to Mexico, California.
Las Vegas and New Orleans .
The trio will be celebrating 80
years of marriage during their
month's tour They are Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Sommers. 30th
anniversary; Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Cohen. 25th adversary; and Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Feiss. also mark
iny their silver we ding .
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wald. of
Brooklyn, N.Y.. are here lor
their tenth summer visit and
staying at the Sterling Hotel .
Mrs. Wald. honorary vice presi-
dent of the Mizrachi Women's
Organization of America, is
scheduled to address several Hit-
rachi chapters while in the
Greater Miami area And
Lou's listed in "Who's Who in
World Jewry" and "Leaders in
American Science" Last
summer, the Walds made their
fifth visit to Israel.

The Lester Reiners back home
alter vacationing herealso at
the Sterling
Wig designer. Mrs. Frieda
Kozini. mother of Ruth Regina.
returned from Chicago several
ago, where she visited with old
friends and relatives .
Edith and Max R. Silver en-
joving their trip Friends re-
ceiving cards from Gatlmburg.
Tenn reporting their breakfast
with Claire and Mike Gett.nger.
oretime staffer with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
YOUR BIG OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE ON
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72x108" twin flat,
twin fitted bottom
or foam fitted twin
I
99
reg. 2.89
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double fitted, reg. 3.29 2.39
double foam, reg. 3.29 2.39
42x38' pillow case, reg 79c 69c
V\any other sizes at similar savings.
108x122" king, reg. 6.98
king fitted, reg. 6.98 .
king foam, reg. 6.98
42x48' bolster case, reg. 1 09
6.49
6.49
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163id STREET. FT IAUDEROAIE. WEST FALM BEACH.
....... **' "" .


Page 2-B
* Icnlsti nrridirin
Friday, August
c
orner
4 cup fresh lime juice
< cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons minced dried onion
b teaspoon salt
r teaspoon white pepper
Today we present two recipes
for chicken which are particularly
suited to summer eating. The
first i. a broiled chicken dish with
Select a broiler of about 2: i lbs.
eviscerated weight. Cut it into
quarters. Wipe the pieces dry with
a paper towel. Press the wings
flat, away from the breast meat.
Combine all remaining Ingredients
hallow dish, and dip each
chicken soup until soft, then flu,
.thoroughly. Beat the soaked hrea
nuts, onion. papitkawassAd s,,\t
^cther until modth. Spr
sauce over the cjbic,
'.v IU i -4 1 ui; ui\. i-;11 h e r
This amount makes 4 serv.
rS&rt h
portable ccokers which can be set
up on a few square feet of lawn! in a
or terrac \ Broiled chicken used ; piece of chicken into the mixture.
to be regarded as a specialty of Coat it completely. Place the thigh
New! AJAX
all purpose cleane
with ammonia
... < Ulvunl vmtMsu uiiD wim ui- ii......i,i u a =,,.w. .v coat it completelv. I'lace tlie tlimli
a bareb perceptible taste of lime, spring, and tried chicken of sum- .
I The second is a most unusual way Pier. But now the ease ot prepa- and leg <"** sk,n wde dowB' .A
of presenting cold chicken. | ration. low calorie coun', and or. the rack of a broiler It cook- Y Y
Outdoor cooking has become so adaptability ol the broiled have tag indoors, have the tops about \/'
_%_________________a... -____i_ :l_______i ._ i ___ ___i A inAhtic i i -. i ,. 11 i D t-t\ I ^
4 inches from the heat. Broil 5
MRS. *H[A GLADWIN
Mrs. Gladwin
Named to Posts
Mrs. Rhea Cashman Gladwin
has been appointed to serve as
Outdoor cooking has become so
much an accepted part of our sum- made it popular at every season.!
When a larger broking chicken is] minutes, then arid the whit" meat
used, as in today's recipe, the)pieces, also skin side down. Con-
darker meat requires a little long-, ttoue broiling until the flesh is
er cooking time than the white, i delicately brown, and baste from
For best results, cut the chicken
into quarters and put the thigh
<
mer living that each pleasant day
finds whole segments of the popu-
lation concentrating over fire-
places or grilles. Even apartment
dwellers who live alone have tiny
To be Delegate
Mrs. Isaac
ami Beach.
Offenhcnden, of Mi-
president of Beba
time to time with the remaining
lime mixture. Turn the pieces over
and continue to broil and baste
cleans everything
from the floor up!
an ex-officio member of the exec- convention of Pioneer Women
breast and wings. The total cook-
ing time needed cannot be given
as the intensity of the heat of the
Idelson Chapter, will represent various units differs greatlv. It
the chapter at the 18th national may vary from twentv minutes t0
convention of Pioneer Women in __ ... .. .
. ..r ,. ".. ana continue to i
and leg pieces on the cooking unit i _,;, ,. .,
about 5 minutes before adding the ""' ,lLe ^ '* a h~.i ,nrf .innK Th ,, Lt. brown. Exact cooking Ume cannot
di me exec- convention of Pioneer Women in i an hollr Until vou ^ f an
'r of Com'; i4Ct ^ t0i ^iar w.th your own broiler, fire-' ^J
utive committee of
Dade County Chamber of Com- 14.
merce Tourist and Convention
Council.
, She will represent the Women's
Committee of the Chamber on
the council, and act as liaison for
the Chamber of Commerce of
Surfside, Bal Harbour and Bay
Harbor Islands, of which she was,
a member of the board for seven
years and chairman of the Hotel
and Motel Division.
At the same time. .Mrs. Glad-
win was appointed to a three-,
year term as member of the
Metropolitan Dade County Lib-1
rary Advisory Board. In this
capacity, she will serve as a mem-1 The new edition contains
ber of the public information and pages, the largest issue in the his-'
finance committees. I tc.ry of the publication. A rec-l
Mrs. Gladwin is a trustee rcp-;0rd number of more than 2,000,
resenting Surfside on the board, rabbinieally certified kosher foods
of the Surf-Bal-Bay Library, of and related products is listed. I
which she was a founder in 1956.
Kosher Products
Listing Available
By Special Report
NEW YORKThe 1963 Summer-
Fall issue of the Kosher Products
Directory of the L'nion of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations of
America is now off the press.
Copies arc available without
charge on request to Orthodox
Union. 84 Fifth Ave., New York
11.
place, or grille, plan to eat when-
! ever the chicken is ready, rather
than at a specified time, and plan
I the rest of the menu so that it w ill
keep until the chicken is done.
The second recipe, Caucasian
Chicken, is considered one of the
gourmet delicacies of the Near
East. Cold cooked chicken, either
roast or simmered, is sliced and
covered with an uncooked sauce
containing walnuts and almonds.
When made in a blender, the sauce
is not only beautifully smooth, but
can be prepared in seconds. The
taste is somewhat rich and no\?l.
so when you first try it. you might
like to serve the sauce separately.
Broiled Chicken With Lime
1 large broiling chicken
I be given because of the difference
in the intensity of heat in Individ-
ual units. Teal for doneness by
making a small cut into the flesh
at the joint of the leg and thigh.
The flesh should appear juicy, but
should be no pinkness of
either flesh or bone. This amount
serves 4.
Chicken Caucasian
l cold boiled or roasl chicken
: i nip soft white hrea,I CUDCS
v.i cups cold chic ken -1 up
1 cup walnut meats
(i blanched almonds
l teaspoon finely minced onio 1
teaspoon paprika
Salt to last
Slice the chicken and arrange
tin meat on a platter. Remove
the cntStS from the bread I). Kii
measuring. If you have a blender.
place all the ingredients except the
chicken in .t. and whirl until thick
and smooth. If not. grind the mils
very fine. Soak the bread in the

Product
of
Coim"
iPalinol.e
She is executive vice president of
the Women's Division. American
Friends of the Hebrew University.
South Shore Citizens
Louis Shafkin, president of the
South Shore Citizens Club, will
hold a meeting Tuesday evening
at Washington Federal Savings
an.1 Loan Auditorium, 1231 Wash-
ington Ave. Honored will be May-
or Melvin Richard and Police
Chief Rocky Pomerance. Mes-
dames Elsie Tulin and Ceil Blum
will be in charge.
Also included is a new page of
material describing various aspects
of the 38-year-old kosher certifica-
tion program.
Punched again, for easy kitch-
en hanging, the Directory identi-
ties ajl items as to whether they
contain milk or meat ingredients
or neither.

CLEANS LIKE
WHITE TORNADl
the first all purpose cleane
good enough to be
called Ajax!
You'll see a white tornado of powe
that cleans everything in Its pa!'
Even corners, where dirt and wa
build up, come sparkling clean with!
out scraping. And you don't need ta
nnsel New Ajax All Purpose Cleane
with ammonia leaves a fresh, clea
smell that proves it's really don
thejobl
Jack Woody to Speak
Chai Chapter, B'nai B'rith
Women, will have a member-
bring-a-member meeting Tuesday
evening at the Bel-Aire Hotel.
Jack Woody will be guest speaker.
THE FRESHeFt CREAMED HERRING IN FLORIDA
Only NOVIE Packs QUALITY
SELECTED HERRING in PURE
RICH GOOD SOUR CREAM DAILY
in MIAMI BEACH.
IT'S GOT TO B FtfSNI
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We Cater to Hotels, Restaurants
and Institutions.
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i

4













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this authentic Italian sauce adds a touch of
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TRY NEW PALMOLIVE SOAP
IN PASTEL GREEN
OR PINK
fifi iIQ riMi mil 5


Friday. Augurt 2. 1963
Pe*;e> 3-B
Beth Torah
Registering Now
Aug. 1 was "R Day" at Beth
'lnrah Congregation, when regis-
tration was opened for all depart-
ments of the synagogue's Reli-
gious School, Joseph Schmicr,
president, announced.
Beth Torah offers a complete
educational program from ages 3
to 18, including a daily pre-school,
Sunday School, Hebrew Thru Fun,
Hebrew School, Junior and Senior
High School, Hebrew and General
Studies program. Bar and Bas
Mitzvah instruction, and confir-
mation.
Complementing these classes;
are co-curricular activities, includ-j|
the student and Alef congrega- j |
tion. teen-age services, junior and
senior choir. Torah reading groups,
honor society. Student Council,
Keren Ami Council, United Syna-
gogue Youth, and Young Judaea.
Among the first to register were
two of the youngest and oldest
students at Beth Torah. Elissa
Shantzis 3, will be among the 100
pupils in the daily nursery and
kindergarten division, which pro

Abraham I. Gittelson, education director, registers one of the
youngest and oldest students for Beth Torah Congregation Re-
ligious School. Elissa Shantzis 3, will enter the pre-school.
Diane Keshlansky 16. will attend the Beth Toiah branch of
the Junior College sponsored by the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion. Registration opened this week.______________________
American composer Richard Rodgers (center) and his it
listen attentively as Prof. Jack Gross, head of the Hebrew Uxu
versity's Department of Experimental Medicine and CoJJCCO
Research, explains scientific studies being conducted at tl I
university in the fight against cancer. In Jerusalem, Bodgen
presented the Hebrew University with a check for $200,OD(
in behalf of the National Committee for the Rodgers and l-Lnm
merstein Wing in Experimental Medicine and Cancel' Re-
search which will be established on the new medical camp
vides a complete readiness pro- j Qf the Hebrew University in honor of Mr. Rodgers and his krte
gram with music, crafts, rhythms, collaborator, Oscar Hammerstein, II.
dramatics, and dancing. ,_--------------------------------------------------------------
Diane Keshlansky 16, will study ...._, ... M _, _. ,
Biblical and Modem Hebrew in J WV AllXIIIOrV n' C"'n tlected
The Peoples National Bank of
North Miami Beach this week an
the Beth Torah Branch of the Jun- _
ior College, sponsored by the Bu- PlCHIIIinCI COIlf GD
reau of Jewish Education, follow-i ":. ..
ins her graduation from the com-j National Ladies Auxiliary ot ncunwd that Mrs rjuian Chasm
V _______I- T*> for r I munity-wide Hebrew High School.; ^ Jewish, War.Veterans of the' cIcctcd an ^.^ rf
Young Matrons In Tea tor CJA The Sunday school program m jjjmw^ wj jj j|!the bank at a Board of D .f,tors
Continuing the summer program! presentation of the "Coloring; JJ* ^.JTHetSwlbool ^reham Hotel in Washington,; meeting held JfJj^J^
Of evenL. held by the Young Ma-' Book." which deals with redera- c)awe8 or elementary and Junior .B.C. J *'BM i> presioent ana ^na.
trons Division of the Combined; tion, its agencies and a quarter-; High School students will provide | Mrs. Bernard Wander, president _______\
Jewish Appeal Women's Division, j century of service to the eommun- the skiU and facility for partici-;0f the Department of Fla., Mrs.
., dessert tea .it the home ol Mrs. ity, were Mrs. Aaron Farr, Mrs. ,,., ,he synagogue services, Ben Habcrman, past national pres- 7cW10rCI ODCilS
Harold Unger on DiLido Island,Thomas Gerard. Mrs. Rocky Pom-as weU as the ability to conversei ident, formerly of New York, and. r
Registration Here
Temple Zamora announces tli
last week produced $1,000 in checks
and pledges for the 1963 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal.
erance and Mrs. Stanley Arkin. m and understand modern He-!now a member of the North!
Millie Draiiar, accompanist, was Drew Shore Auxiliary, and Mrs. Ted I
again on hand lo provide the ac-( Tnig vear wilj ,.], ine first: Lingaton, national historian and|
Mrs Inez Krenskv. chairman of companiment. and also to perform Hign Scn0oI General Studies grad- past department president, who is; opening of registration in the >!if-
the Women's Division, and Mrs. i several vocal numbers. Trixie llaling ciass 0f Beth Torah, includ-j presently a candidate for national brew, Sunday, and Nurser* BchOOl
Benedict Silverman, chairman of Levin provided the introduction. ; mg stluients who have attended!.junior vice president, will be; Departments.
1he Young Matrons Division, call- Co-chairmen were Mrs. Mar- the High School division for three among the local delegates. [ RaDbj Hershel Brooks, Spiritual
erl the ifternoon function, which shall Berkson. Mrs. Lawrence years. j I leader, will again ">!"'h '"' He-
was attended by voung matrons Porter. Mrs. William Binder and a full youth program is provid-1 brew Department,
living in the areas of Miami. Mrs Harry B. Smith. Mrs. Porter 0d for all students from the 3rd tending the LeadershipTraining
Beach, up to list St. and the low-] welcomed guests on behalf of the
jrou
"a most
er islands,
i vent."
The tea was also highlighted by
the presentation of the "Federa-
tion Coloring Book" hit musical
written bj Trixie Levin, which
,.- : at red at lh 25th anniver-
I i iih'i ting "t i i
tion !
Taking a leading part in the
successful committee and hostess. Mrs.
ger
in.
'o. tor an siuacnis irvm w oiu mmiug >,_<.... o...K ..-......B ... .
trade and members of the USY Institute in North Carolina at the Pro-confirmation and COX.'um.--
ip of Beth Torah will be at- conclusion of summer. tion classes wil
New Softball Tean
Temple Zamora Brotherhood
h;:- announced th ,:i I
Softball team as p I he rem
pie League In chi rge is In in j
Riemer.
Perfect A
itsiver
TO LOW
CALORIE MEALS
Solve that weighty problem .
servo plenty of nutritious, flavorful
August Bros. Sread made
from select spring wheat flour .
contains no shortening.
PUMKRWK1KI BOHEMIAN RYI
BAGELS VIENNA EGG TWIS1
FRENCH BREAD EGG ROILS
HARD ROILS
Tell your husband
you made them yourself.
(Just don't forget to throw out the empty box)
AVAILABLE AT FROZEN FOOD CABLETS EVERYWHERE.
i
*


Page 4-B
*. /mist nurktem
Friday, August 2. 1963
What Kind of Family is Young Jewish 'Nazi's':
By SAMUEL SCHREIG
NEW YORKIan Lehr will have
to raUe.,$5JjOO for bail -if he cares
to attend his brothers Bar Mitz-
vah this coming week. Ian and
seven others was arrested on
charges of "Conspiracy, attempt-
ing to incite a riot, Sullivan Law
Violation and Anarchy." The
"Anarchy" charge stepis from
Ian's association with the Neo
Nazi, National Renaissance Party,
the anti Semitic organization
which touched off a near-riot in
the Yorkville section of Manhat-
tan last May.
The NRP has been dubbed a
"Subversive organization that ad-
vocates the overthrow of the gov-
ernment.*'
The trouble began when three
members of the NRP, counter- '
picketing at the racially embat-
tled "White Castle" diner in. the
Bronx, complained to police that
their truck's window had been
broken by angry CORE mem- |
bers who had been the target
of the Nazi hoods. Amazed
cops, sent out to investigate the
damage, found the panel truck
to be a small arsenal of deadly
weapons, as well as a mobile
library filled with anti-Jewish
and anti-Negro hate literature.
The complainants were imme-
diately taken into custody. The'
rest of the Nazis were soon pick-
ed up in their homes. Police
found additional weapons and am-1
munition in the home of another
Nazi, Peter Krauss. James H. |
Madole, the 36-year old bachelor,
head of. the NRP, was, picked'up i
at his home at 10 West 90th St., j
Manhattan. Soon, police had eight j
Nazis in custody, all charged as
"consiprators" in the plan to in-
cite a not at the "White Castle"
site. The eight Nazis had taken
part in a "war council" in Ma-
dole's apartment before the pick-
eting.
Bronx Criminal Court Judge!
Ambrose J. Haddock slapped a!
$7,500 bail fee on Madole and
tagged the others for $5,000. The
Nazis as of now have been un-
able to raise bail.
Reporters at the Bronx Crimi-
nal Court were ready to file their,
sioiies when the real shocker,
came. Sidney Lehr, father of 21-
year old Ian Lehr, rushed into
court with his wife and filled with j
emotion pk-aded: "No, I can't be-
lieve it. Ian is a nice 'Jewish
boy." He went to Talmud Torah
when lie was younger and used
to go to Shul with his grandfather.'
I don't believe it," he sobbed.
"My son wouldn't do it. That's
the Gods honest truth." Mrs. I
Lehr. who unlike her husband did
not succumb to tears, refused to I
discuss the matter with reporters j
other than to say: "My son is in-1
nocent. Ho is not guiltythat's
all."
The following morning the Lehr
retider;e at 630 Schencctady
Ave., a predominantly Jewish
j
who identified himself as a close
friend of the family" said that he
doubted whether the.BarMitzvah
of Ian's brother would take place
as scheduled. "They probably
will have to postpone it indefinite-
ly, otherwise there may be more
reporters for 'Kiddush' than
guests." The Lehrs have another
child, a 9-year-old boy.
It is a well known fact that
there are some Jewish people
involved in Nazi activities, par-
ticularly in Rockwell's camp.
Psychologists say these people ;
r* obsessed with "sejf-hate"
ar.d yearning for oVstruction.
They are "skk people in des-
perate need of medical care^TV
Jewish organizations involved
in the bigotry-fighting front pre-
fer to "sweep the dirt under the
rug" for fear that publicity in
the general press would serve to
strengthen, the Nazi cause. .
Be it a mental case or a crimi-
nal case, the Ian Lehr headline]
are uppermost in the minds of
New York Jewry these days. N York cabbies are noted for their
untutored philosophical abilities-,
and one such philosopher summed
up the whole affair in, one short
sentence: "A Jewish boy a- Nazi,
Nu, Nuonly in America."
your next affair
with a u onderful choice of
Unique 20th century Torah Ark for the home, made entirely
of silver and encrusted with semi-precious stones, has been
donated to the Jewish Museum by Dr. Harry G. Friedman, of
New York City. The Ark measures 25 in. high and 18'z in.
wide. Fittings are intact and include, in addition to a Torah
scroll covered with a mantle, two Torah headpieces, a Torah
breastplate, and a Torah pointer.
neighborhood in the Flat bush
.section of Brooklyn, was sur-
rounded by newsmen, camera-
men and photographers. No
comment was forthcoming from
the Lehr household, and news-
men were refused admittance.
The Lehrs were instructed by
their attorney, F. Rosenthal, to
avoid all contact with the press.
The lovely Lehr residence is a
one-family house immediately
across the street from the Jew-
ish Chronic Disease Hospital.
Their HYacinth 3-1223 telephone
number has been changed to an
"unlisted number." Shades at
. o3t Schenectady Ave. are down,
no one enters, no one leaves.
This reporter sought the neigh-
bor's reaction. "I can't believe
it." said a pretty 18-year-old girl.
"Come to think of it, he never
dated any of us, Jewish girls,"
she added. Another neighbor ex-
pressed concern for the family:
"They are such nice and quiet
people. I guess now they will
have_ to sell out and move to a
different neighborhood where they
are not known." "They ought to
hang that young creep," an elder-
ly passerby commented. A man
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Friday. August 2, 1963
+Jelst>naridrtor7
Page 5-B
iety
*

Reed, Carpel
Exchange Vows
Miss Su-an Lou Carpel became
the bride of Bert Hcnrv Heed Jr
m 6 p.m. rites on July 28 at the
Eden Rot Hotel. Rabbi Joseph R
Narol i fficlated.
The bride is the daughter of
M' .Hid M. Lionel Carpel, 122
E. San Marino Dr.. Miami Beach.
Hi. -mom's parents are "Dr and
Mrs Bnt ||. Reed. of Taunton,
Mass
Maid of honor was Annette
Reed. Bridesmaids included Ro-
berta Bendell. Marcia Klein and
Linda Zahler.
Beat man for the groom was Dr.
V. Stanley Weinkle. l>hers in-
clude.I Leonard Bendell. Leslie
Klein. Eugene Fleischer, and Nor-
man Antopolsky.
For her wedding, the bride
chose a long white chant illy lace
over bridesmaid satin gown. Her
bouquet was of white roses, white
sUphanotis. and white orchids.
Newly-wed Mrs. Reed is a grad-
ate of Miami Beach High School
and the University of Miami,
where she belonged to Phi Sigma
Si urn a Sorority.
The groom, a graduate of New
Smyrna Beach High, is now a
student at the U of M. i ,_ .
Reception followed the wedding! 174 CXITd BeOS
at the Eden Roc. Following a m ~ .
Mrs. selma levy, ;t the Rio three-week honeymoon in Europe. Stated TOP CedarS
Hotel, announces the marriage of the c-mml.. win h *t k^ ,, ,. ^
her daughter. Marsha Deanne \SjSt ] Sri! EL* "I Some 50.000 sq. ft. of additional
Brown, to iDr. Myron H. Coulton,______________
son of Mr. and Mr-. Nathan Coul- ft D
ton. 2775 SW 29th Ave.. Miami. COIITOr DmnWier
MRS. MYRON COtllTON
Marsha Brown
Weds Dr. Coulton
Werner-Kahn
MRS. BfRT REED
space will be made available to
Cedars of Lebanon Hospital with
the completion of the upper three
floors, it was announced Wcdnes-
day by Harry L. Lewis, president.
Cantor Phillip Brummer will of-
ficiate at services held by former "We're getting 174 extra beds,
members of the Havana Jewish to bring our total to 282." he said.
Community Center this Saturday. The job should be completed by:
9 a.m., at Washington Federal Dc 1.
Savings and Loan Association, _,,.
1234 Washington Ave. I. re Cantor Brummer. who now lives f rmforcod. terete and
Miami Beach Senior High School, Coral Gables, served at the 22? ^SS^SU^% fli
attended the University of Flor- Havana Center, and previously W,th equipment,
ida. and is a legal secretary for cantor at Temple Emanu El
the firm of Turner. Hendrick. bore.
Fascell and Guilford in Coral
Tlie June 16 wedding was held Wll Offiria + f
at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Gold. 1710 SW 92nd Ave.
Mrs. Gold, twin sister of the bride.
was matron of honor, and Mr.
Gold served as best man. Rab-
Bj Max Shapiro officiated at the
ceremony.
The bride is a graduate of.
total job will come to a round $1
million.
Gablei
. Sertoma International. He is ac-
The bridegroom is a graduate lively engaged in the practice of
ol Miami Senior High School, re- general dentistry in the South
ceiyed his BA degree from the Miami area.
University of Florida, and DDS! A European honeymoon is plan-,
degree from the University of ned for the couple so they may
Maryland School of Dentistry. Dr. revisit many of the countries I
Coulton is a member of Pi Lamb- where Dr. Coulton waa Stationed
In addition to a complete car-
diac section on the fourth floor,
enlarged maternity sections, ex-
panded laboratory ani out-pat-
ient departments, there will be
new teachirj auditorium, con- i
ference room, gift shop, and
administrative office.
Nursing stations on each floor
Real 'Pops' Fare
Set for Sunday
A "Pops"* concert program de-
signed to appeal to all musical
l tastes will be presented by the
University of Miami Summer Sym-
phony Orchestra this Sunday
evening at Miami Beach Auditor-
ium.
Raymond Paige, music director
and conductor of the Radio City
Music Hall Symphony Orchestra,
will be featured guest conductor
on the ninth concert in the cur-
rent 'Pops" concert series.
Two soloists, baritone Warren'
Galjour, who will also act as nar-
rator, and Bobby Domenic. ban-]
joist, together with the 60-mem-'
ber University of Miami Choral
Ucloo, coached by director Glenn
Draper's assistant, Joyce McGrew,
will be featured on the "High-
lights from Radio City Music
Hall" program. The Choral Union
will be making its debut at these;
summer concert programs.
Program highlights include ex-'
cerpts from Beethoveen's Fifth
Symphony, Moonlight Sonata and
Symphony No. 9; Kling's "EIe-|
phant and the Fly," with tubal
player Constance Bennitt and pic-i
colo player Lilburn Knowland as
featured soloists; Stephen Fos
tor's "Swanee River" and "Camp-
town Races;" and Wieniawski's
"Adagio-Romance," with UM Sym-,
phony Concertmaster Eugene Du-
bois as soloist.
Galjour will sing several pop-
ular tunes accompanied by the
Choral Union. These include An-
thony Newly's "What Kind of a
Fool Am I?" from "Stop the
WorldI Want to Get Off;" "Moon :
River," by Henry Mancini; "I
Met a Girl." from Jule Styne's
"The Bells Are Ringing;" and
"Never on Sunday," a parody by
Al Stillman, which is dedicated
to the mail carriers of Greater
Miami.
Additional program highlights
include a "HootenannyFolk Fes-
tival" presentation featuring Gal-!
jour, Miss McGrew, a soprano,
and the chorus. Paige's own ar-
rangement of The Roaring Twen-
ties" will also be presented with
Domenic in a banjo solo. Louis
Spielman at the honky-tonk piano.
If you like
Membership Committee Meet
A Temple Beth Am committee,
under the chairmanship of Irving
Lax, will hold a membership
"Koffee Klatch" at the Temple on
Tuesday evening.. Prospective
members will be taken on a tour
of the building, and will have a
ouestion-and-answer session with
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. A mem-
bership brunch will also be held
in the Temple Social Hall on Sun-
day morning, Aug. 18.
Catholics Feature
Articles on Jews
By Special Report
"Ramparts." a Catholic lay-
man's journal, has announced the
appearance in the forthcoming
Autumn issue of a symposium on
the contemporary American Jew.
The symposium is entitled "The
Jew in American Culture." Con-
tributors include:
Maxwell Geismar, "The Jewish,
Heritage in Contemporary Ameri-
can Fiction:" Leslie Fiedler, "The
Jew as Mythic American;" Arthur
Cchen, "The Jewish Idea;" Harold
Ribalow, "The Jewish Side of
American Life;" Karl Shapiro,
"The Synagogue;" and Leonard
Nathan, 'iTwo Doors" and "The
Pilgrimage."
and Charles Knight, euphonium
soloist. The program will con-
clude with Albert Hay Maylotte's
'The Lord's Prayer," featuring
the entire company.
f NOWJ :
: for moglc-eosM meals..*
I^TOlMO !
: 1 m kosher :
SLICED BOLOGNA:
KREPLACH
-ffeshfyeMl vJwjumhacteH
fRIENDLY, GENTLE CARE FOR THOSE YOU LOVE
da Phi Alumni As>ociation, Alpha while serving two years of active will be enlarged to handle more
Omeuu Dental Fraternity, and duty with the Air Force. patieris and accommodate more
personnel. The intensive heart-
care unit on the fourth floor will
include an electronic "heart sav-
er," a TV like gadget which rec-
ords the heart action of cardiac
patients, and warns the nurse
whenever the heart goes above or
below the normal number Of beats
per minute.
<
Coral
Gables
Convalescent
Home
NON.sfcr*iAM
70SO S.W. 8th STREET
(on Iht U- in r,i)
MIAMI, FLORIDA
rVoinanUH Rent,,,,,
Ownf r-D.r.ctor
''' Alt') oirl.r
Ml Vrui H*- Clfwl J,
Si,d^,;:"\Mo"",r
*OTO. Pill (.,
Especially designed and
equipped lor the care of the
elderly and chronically ill
e Special diets observed
Nursing staff on duty 24
hours a day under super-
vision of registered nurses
Recreation, occupational
therapy
Beautiful screened-in-patio
Phone: CA 6-1363
- T
WATERMELON TIME
IS HERE!
Enjoy Ice-Cold Slices at Our Tables
.. Or Take Outl
ALSO HALVES & WHOLE
It
TAC.IH.CUS
1789 Biscayne Blvd. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783
Other new installations include:
a third bank of elevators, a
nurses' call system which enables
her to converse with tier patient i
by a "pillow speaker." a Vac Pad
oxygen unit in each room, auto-
mated lab testing equipment, in-
dividual heating an.l air-condi-i
tioning controls in each room, and
aluminum solar fins to direct orj
I divert the sun's rays.
Included in the sweeping im-
provements are construction of a
| larger cafeteria space and moving
the emergency ramp closer to thei
j entrance driveway for speedier
! handling of emergency cases.
Bowlers Plan
Meetings Ahead
Temple Beth Am Brotherhood
Bowling League will meet at the
University Lanes on Thursday
evening for the 196S-64 season.
The bowling committee includes
Kenneth Kasselman, Alex Reiken,
Jerome Goldsmith and Jess Freed.
Mrs. Herbert Goldberg is the
| president of the Sisterhood Bowl-
I ing League, which will also meet
i at the University Lanes.
CHEF BOY-AR-DEB
CHEESE RAVIOLI
Hear family, guests, cheer for
that real Italian flavor created by
famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender
little macaroni pies...filled with
tangy Italian Cheese...simmered
with savory tomato sauce and
Cheese. ..seasoned the real Ital-
ian way. So much tastier and
aasier than the frozen kind. So
much thriftier, toocosts only
bout 15c par orvingl
WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicago)
MIAMI BRANCH
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Phone FR 1-6551
a*
14*
Old
Milwauke-
HENRY E. MANGELS CO.
3550 N.W. 58th ST.
Miami, Florida
L


Fage 6-3
v.knisti HcrMHun

bHumt
jMiN OF THE WEEK
Rabbi Marius Ranson and his wife. Annette, had friends over for
- t evening. There was an overwhelming feeling of love and content-
i got ;.n that pleasant living room. Before the late refreshments were
t rved. the Rabbi said a few simple words blessing the food and the
. ests. Somehow it made the world seem a better place. Who is
A inette Ranson, what has been her life that she can create that warm
ding of friendship?
Annette was born in Boston, an independent, only child. Because
>r parents were active in the affairs of the community, Annette sur-
rounded herself with petsa prize collie, cats,
even a monkey. During her teens, she was
resentful of the time her mother spent in or-
ganizational work, but as she became older,
she realized what an admirable quality it was,
and stepped into the same kind of community
work where her mother left off.
After high school. Goucher College, in the
midst of a warm friendly Jewish community.
awakened in Annette a religious feeling. From
there she went to Simons College, where she
majored in social work. As a student, she
was affiliated with the Judge Baker Founda-
tion. She went to Chicago, and became active
in the Leopold Loeb case, and from there to
Denver, to work with Judge Lindsay on his
book on companionate marriage. She received
a Master's degree at the New School of Social
Research in New York City.
Annette had the idea that rabbis were
I rious all of the time. When she met her own. for the first time, she
i and it hard to believe that he could be such a marvelous dancer. He
nposed the next day by letter, but she wasn't quite sure that she
to be a rabbi's wife, so it was a few years until they were
I lined.
ie Ransons lived in East Orange for eighteen years, during which
n? s >e organized the National Federation of Temple Youth for the
E ate o: New Jersey. During the war years. Annette owned and direc-
dtuo camps for children. In 1948. they moved to Ft. Lauderdale,
?." e became spiritual leader of Temple Emanuel. Two years ago,
.e Pi i)i retired and they moved to Bay Harbor. The pets have long
Mo disappeared. Annette says. Business is her hobby she's a
' natural" for real estate. They both like music and read a great deal,
. id efch is writing a book. Daughter Joan is now Mrs. John Tabor.
;.Td lives in Buffalo with their two children.
* *
THI FOURTH BIRTHDAY CAKE
It v as Bea (Mrs. Sam) Blank's birthday. She knew that she had a
birthday, all right. The celebrations went on and on. The final one
as a tamily dinner in the Mona Lisa Room at the Eden Roc Hotel,
with her fourth birthday cake. "Just family" included Dr. and Mrs.
Stanley Frehling and son Robert, Mr. and Mrs. Sandford Kramer and
Mighter Judy, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blank, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Blank,
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Blumberg, David Blank and Mrs. Terry Miller.
*
TOTAL 1,994 MILES
Fhat's the number of miles the SS Ariadne sailed on a seven-day
to Puerto Rico and St. Thomas. And who were at the captain's
Myra and Aaron Farr, of course. Among the other Miamians
were Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Rudolph and Mis. Ruby Epstein.
*
WHAT KIND OF A PARTY?
For six weeks the invited guests got all kinds of invitations from
Iii')',1'; and Kurt Wallach. But none of the teasers told just what
kind uc a party to expect when they arrived on the dot at the Wallach
[I was a scavenger hunt, with the clues written in poetry. After
cne for the road, and putting on masks, the teams started out. Much
; tg went on after they returned as to who should get the prjzes.
Zurto". Coldberg got the booby prize. Swimming in the pool included
. watery baseball game. Among guests were Joyce and James Roden-
berg, Louise and Morton Stubuis, Debby and Larry Hoffman, Lois and
.-.in); Greene. Anita and Philip Pearlman. Dr. and Mrs. Donald Lev-
nson. Dr. and Mrs. Stanford Cooke, the Lester Ettmans, the Bernie
Landels, the Carl Liptons, the Ralph Robins, and Burton Goldbergs.
There was a birthday cake for Bernie Sandel as a final surprise for
Lie evening.
* *
LONG THE GRANDMA FRONT
Edie and Carl Lundy left for Hnersonville to see their son Howard
at camp. They will motor leisurely back, taking their time because
:: iiw that grandma. Anne (Mrs Max) Dryer, is keeping a weather
ye out for Donna and Mark who aren't of camp age yet .
Tiiat broken arm that Dorothy Kreiger Fink is walking around
"with. all done up in a huge cast is a result of tripping when she ran
ifcer ier youngest grandchild. Naomi and Richard went to Las Vegas
nd Mint* west to celebrate their tenth anniversary, while Dorothy
' minded" the children.
* *
Frances (Mrs. Samuel) Beckerman held a luncheon for her daugh-
jw. Diane, who was married to son Kenneth last November. They
catre in from Pittsburgh to attend Judge Wallace's wedding. Frances
avife-J all her friends, who had not yet met Diane, but know Kenneth
wi he was a boy. Among guests were Mrs. William Givner, Mrs.
Leoc&rd Beldner, Mrs. Morris Rubin. Mrs. Rose Samson, Mrs. Joseph
Rose and Mrs. Jack Popick.
* *
A FAMILY AFFAIR
Eva and Meyer Don held a family dinner to celebrate their son
Roi i's 26th birthday. To help him blow out the candles were his
vi/<> Barbara, his sister Dedee and her husband Alan Cohen, and Bar-
bara's family. Mr. and Mrs. Max Boderman and Miss Florence Boder-
IllC.'!
Weinthals Will
Live in Gables
Riva Glasgow and Sidney M.
Wcinthal exchanged wedding vows
in 8 p.m. ceremonies at the Deau-
villc Hotel on July 27. Rabbi Mor-
ris Skop officiated.
For the wedding, the bride
chose a gown fashioned entirely of
French lace. The bodice featur-
ed a sabrina neckline and three-
quarter sleeves. The sheath skirt
was floor-length, with an easy
fullness at the back of the waist
formed of shadow pleats.
Down the entire front of the
grown were clusters of tiny cry-
stal beads. The organza over-
skirt had scattered lace appliques
and fell to an aisle-wide train. The
multi-tiered illusion veil fell from
a lace and pearl coronet. The bride
carried white orchids on a Bible.
Newly-wed Mrs. Weinthal is the
daughter of Mrs. Rose Glasgow,
6394 SW 41st St., and the late
David Glasgow. The groom is the
son of the Murray Weinthals, 6200
NW Miami PL
Maid of honor was Miss Judy
Levine. Mrs. Lenore Neuman
was bridesmaid. Joseph Weinthal
acted as best man. and ushers in-
cluded Al Koch and Howard
Wrubel.
The bride graduated from Mi-
ami Senior High, and attended the
University of Miami. The groom
attended Emory University, and is
a graduate of the U of M.
;>
Vtvi-nrr-Kilin
Friday, August 2, 1963
Alan Laibson
Plans Rites With
Washington Girl
Mr. and Mrs. Eduterd.fH.ramar
of. Silver Serins*, iW- tjonouqe.'
the engagement of their daugh
ter. Patricia, to Alan Jay Laib
son, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Laibson, of 8230 Hawthorne Ave.
Miami Beach.
The young couple were recent
ly feted at a reception in honor
of their engagement. A cocktail
party was given by Mr. and Mrs
Walter Bauer, grandparents of the
bridegroom-elect, at the Laibson
home.
Among the many guests and
relatives were long-time friends
of both the Laibsons and Bauers
Miss Kramer went to school in
I Washington, D.C., and attended
the University of Maryland. Mr
Laibson graduated from Miami
Beach High School, attended the
University of Florida, Dade Coun ,.
: ty Junior College, and will entei ^
Benjamin Franklin School of Ac
; counting in Washington this fall
The couple plan a June. 196'
wedding in Washington.
MRS. SIDNir WEINTHAL
Following a dinner at the Dean-
ville Hotel, the couple left for a
honeymoon tour of New York and
New England. They will be at
home in Coral Gables.
Camp Avir Will
Present Show
Camp Avir. under the irection
of Gary Canner. will present its
sixth annual variety show. "Camp
Terrific." on Tuesday. Aug. 6. at
7:30 p.m.
The production, performed by
the campers, will feature the music
of a favorite Broadway show, with
scenery and costumes following
the same theme.
The show will be under the di-
rection of Mrs. Shirley Rothlein.
Bris and Naming
For Family Here
Rabbi and Mrs. Morris A. Skop
Of 3."11 Riviera Dr.. Coral Gables
were host this week at the bn-
ceremonies for their grandson
Neal Franklin, born to Raphael
ard Aha Skop. 7715 Red Rd. Can
lor Herman K. Gottlieb was the
mohel.
Naming of their first gr:.n,i
child, Meryl F.lise Heilberu. bun
in Shiran and Louis Heilberg, will
be held at the first Ki dush in
the new Temple Beth Siiirah ar
7500 SW 120th St.
Two great-grandfathers nartici
patcd in the ceremonies for Nea!
Franklin. Abraham L. Skop 87,
and Adolph Kornbluh 85. Tw
Bibles were inscribed for the new
Temple in honor of their great _
grandchildren.
MISS lOYCt MKHVM10
Buchwald, Palgon
Betrothal Told
Miss Joyce Buchwald and Man-
ny Palgon are engaged. The
couple's betrothal is announced
by the parents of the bride-elect.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Buchwald,
2365 SW 21st Ave.
The groom-to-be is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Palgon, 2645
SW 34th Ct.
Miss Buchwald graduated from
Miami Senior High, where she was
president of Omega Delta Psi
Sorority. Mr. Palgon is a grad-
uate of the Dade County School of
Dental Technology.
The couple are planning a
spring wedding.
Maiffctuyi $u*ta&t 'JUC
KL^ILKSEfci
SUNDAY EVENING, AUGUST 4th, AT 8:30 P.M.
RAYMOND PAIGE, conductor
"HIGHLIGHTS FROM RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL"
WARREN GALJOUR, Baritone BOBBY DOMENIC, Banjoisl
AND UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CHORAL UNION
TICKETS St.25 to S2.75 UM Sym Off., MO 1-4960: MB. And.. JE 10477:
uV"*B'.V ln M,ami' FR 4-5181; Allegro Music HouH in Coral Cables.
Ml 4-8181; Harmony Music Shops in Dadeland and 163rd St. Shop. Ctrs.
MIS MtaiBiA-. AVI,
MIAMI MAC*
YEARLY BASIS
J1P1 Per Month
SI Per Person
Double Occ
Including
3 KOSHER MEALS DAILY
Eve and Terry Sponder
Phone JE 1-0496
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AOEO
hhas rat ITS
THRIFT SHOP
AH Your f,milr, Ctofftkf,
linens, Dishes, Drapes, Ifc.
Pit ASE au US FOR PICKUP
THE JEWISH HOME FOR
THE AGED THRIFT SKOP
7331 N.W. 27* AVENUE
Ph. 696-2101
Cloied Saturdays
Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231
"YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT"
for an AFFAIR to REMEMBER
BLOSSOM SHOP
1572 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
Tliere IS a Difference in Flowers-TRY OURS
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BIRTHDAY ANHVIRSARY
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Cleaning-Laundry
Storage
1201-20th Street
Miami Beach
JE 8 6104
.^.f??1 7 *" fM- Omy Service Navtr An txUa Cfcarae.


Friday. August 2. 1963
*JfeMfeJirkrkji&r
Page 7-B
pASKiON new from Paris is.
finally "news" with the pres-
entation of the fall collections.
Hera li"t> have droppedand so
have necklineain fact, quite
daringly in several collections.
Many of the designers have also
moved '.heir waistline back up
in the Empire line.
Here in Greater Miami, Mrs.
Jay JayaOB was emphatic about
the fact that she prefers the
current rtyle of short skirts.
Women :th good legs seem to
wear their skirts shorter, regard-
lesa i" "..' the prevailing fash-
ion dii;.;i-. If the longer hem-
lines ( Income the accepted
style, Jayson says she will
go aloce, "but I'll probably be
one <: last."
Mr- S; bil Zimmerman found
the r- and sketches of the
proposi change quite Interest-
ing. Her all, the longer hem-
line t to have the chic feel-
ing of Ihl well dressed woman."
But hastened to add that
she c esn't like an extremely
long hi line.
Mr- ".ik Block also prefers
today's ength. "I'm afraid that
the tit'< will take us back to
the extreme length of 1947.
whit! o. little for the figure.
Tin' dropped neckline and raised
waistlkri ::re al.-o out from my
point .: view, although some
u'Omez look well in this sil-
houette
* i
EftOM the professional point of
view, Mrs. Bea Gertz, who is
noted fine dressmaker, feels
;i dress should be designed and de-
veloped '.<> enhance the feminine
figUM a*.d make a woman more
beauvul. She feels that the
"new took" is not "new," but
a repetition of what she studied
yean ago, and that this "look"
i- definitely more feminine and
elegant "'ian the current shift.
"I liki i< see the feminine fig-
ure f!o n, and especially like
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the longer silhouette. There
should be a distinction between!
day, evening, and almost-even-
ing, and the elegance of the
longer gowns takes us beyond
the simple dress worn during the'
day."
Don Mullen, of the fine worn-1
en's shop on Miracle Mile in'
Coral Gables, finds the Paris
showings startling. He has just-
returned from the New York
MISS (LAINE CONSTANTIN
Elaine Constantin
Eyes 1964 Rites
Engagement of Miss Elaine
(Dusty) Constantin to Martin
market, where there was no evi- Douglass Baloff is announced here
deuce of a new look. "I am by the bride-elect's parents, Mr.
personally delighted with the, and Mrs. Al Constantin, 5750 Twin
change, because it wdl take us Lakes Dr.
out of the current state of fash- .,-, tn ,K ,
ion st->on->ti,n Tk.,.. u T"c Rroom-tobe is the son of
J.'Sr, trhe ^s been Mr and Mrs ^^ ,off nm
..tic change in fashion during sw 62nd Av0
the past tew years, with the ex-
ception of the shitt, and any- The couple are planning to be
thing new will be exciting and married in the summer of 1964.
stimulating."
Miss Rabinovitz
Now Mrs. Lurio
Maxine Rabinovitz, of 7640 Dick-
ens Ave., became the bride of
Sidney Franklin Lurio at Temple
Or Oiom ori July 6V RaJ>ly Sam-
uel April officiated af the 8:30 p.m.
rites.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rabinovitz,
of Pittsburgh, Pa. The groom is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert S.
Lurio, 605 Euclid Ave., Miami
Beach.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Stan-
ey Oringer, sister of the bride.
Stanley Oringer, his brother-in-
aw, acted as the groom's best
man.
Newlywed Mrs. Lurio is a re-
cent graduate of the University
of Miami, where she belonged to
Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority. She
will teach in the Dade County
' schools this fall.
The groom graduated from
Pennsylvania Military College,
and is a second lieutenant in the
: U.S. Army. He is a life under-
writer for Equitable.
Following a one-week honey-
, moon in Jamaica at the Arawa'k
Hotel, the couple arc at home at
8210 Byron Ave., Miami Beach.
r..'*"
Tennis Field
Narrows at Club
IRVING Newman, of Lewis
Fashions on Miami Beach, is
interested in fashion change,
"but I prefer not to commit my-
self until some of the most prom-
inent designers have shown their
collections. There is always a
trend to stay with Dior and Ba-
lenciaga and their new collec-
tions have not yet been reveal-
ed."
Mrs. Alfred Long represents
both a professional and personal
viewpoint. Her Barbara Jane
Shop on Coral Way shows that
The field narrowed in the Wcst-
brooke Country Club's summer
doubles tennis tournament as
quarter finals play began.
Bob Sussman and Marvin Wern-
er teamed to defeat Don Zucker-
man-Arthur Hertz 6-3. 6-1, while
her customers are reluctant to
accept the change. "A few new
dresses have come in with a
slightly longer hemline, and
while the change is inevitable.
it will be slow." to her way of
thinking She also believes the top-ranked Jack Davis-Joe Haber
figure should be seen, and that defeated Al Kurzweil-Richard Beh-1
MRS. SIDNtY LURIO
the shift silhouette belongs in
the house or on the beach. "As
far as myself. I like the shorter
skirts because a woman should
ren 6-0. 6-0. Both were quarter Day Camp Extension
final matches.
Other quarter finals to be play-: Temple Sinai of North Dade
ed this weekend pit Ed Horwitz this week announced the possibil-
ity of extending the Temple's sum-
mer day camp for two weeks at
the conclusion ol its regular pro-
show her legs. A woman's and Sy Goldstein against Murray-
greatest asset is her feminity, and Wally Mandell and Hank
and she should do everything! Lubow and Barry Rothenberg
possible to enhance it." i acainst Chuck and Mitch Lipcon. gram on Au
IX I Hi: FALL, EUROPE IS LIKE
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OF EUROPEAN ADVENTURE AT
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KOI \ll-l HIP JET ECOXOMY
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LONDON 465.90
ROME .... $608.40
COPENHAGEN 545.70
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INCLUDING STAYS AT BEAUTIFUL HOTELS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM.
Shaw Travel Service
Suite 101 245 S.E. First Street
FRanklin 4-2604
We arrange all types of domestic and foreign travel.
I


iaq&
8-B
+ lfmi*tnmridk*r>
Friday. Augmt 2, 1963
-
Jewish Organizations Praise Supreme Court Ruling
NEW YORK (JTA^ Amer-
ican Jewish organizations ex-
pressed satisfaction with the de-
cision by the United States Su
preme Court outlawing Bible'
reading and prayers from public
schools.
The American Jewish Commit-, .
tee expressed the hope that the1'sh Labor Lomnnttee Jewish War
..;.........i.i; .. ...h.,i- ...iii Veterans of the I .S.A.. Union of
he understanding of the Court's ill-advised to hand them over to
decisions and their meaning for I the public schools which must
our chile ren, our religious inheri- j abide by the American tradition
tnnce and our country's tradition j of separation of Church and State."
of reli*iou* libeft.w'1 *-..
The six national organizations
affiliated in the NCR AC are:
American Jewish Congress, Jew-
American public as a whole will
i'liderstand the basic issues involv-
American Hebrew Congregations,
cd in the decision, which it said l n'n ot Orthodox Jewish Congre-
ss a reaffirmation of the historic a,lons ^d Unted Synagogue of
American principle of separation, America. The si* national or-
of church and slate." The Com- ganltttions and o, of the commun-
mittee said the decision should en-. ">' council:
courage religious groups and in-
Which- Lewis is which? Both are presidents of hospitals,
I, Gerald Lewis (left) at Mt. Sinai, and Harry L. Lewis at
Cedctca of Lebanon. They get each other's mail, phone calls,
and. occasionally, bills. But they're good natured about it all,
and don't mind the confusion one bit. In fact, they confer
frequently, as they are doing here, about the complex job
of mining a big community hospital.
Big 3 Talks Can be Model
For Israel-Arab Meeting
TEL AVIV (JTA) The sue-
cjss of the direct talks in Mos-
cow be'v'een the United States,
'"rent Britain and the Soviet
[TolM o". the banning of atomic
; -?st.s ii the air and under water
vap cited here by Prime Minister
i-evi Eshkol as best proof for the
'eed ')':' direct Arab-Israel nego-
Uatio:-) to achieve Arab-Israel
)>ea';'-' .
Spe at a press conference
here, the Israeli Prime Minister
airi I '- successful results of the
1<> "..Iks encourage Israel to
:-o'r > ask for direct negotia-
tion- n-lth the Arabs. Direct
taflB, te stressed, bear the best
iesukv "I clo not know of a bet-
iar solution to the Arab-Israel
problem than direct negotiations,"
lie <1 Tared. The Big Power
treat/ initialed in Moscow last
veefc. ;- said, should be regarded
-. a gateway to more understand-'
rig -heti een opposing blocks, but
it la to be seen if it has any
ear: : >n the situation in the
Middle East.
H;;i.-iing Israel's relations
wt Hm Soviet Union, Mr. Esh-
kol ;i'4 Israel had tried on a
nurm-ir of occasions to achieve
an Itsrovement here, but thai
tsrar* *aond r.o listening ears.
Similarly, he said Israel had also
ry!*dl its good will toward
Communist China, but "we want-
ad and still expect a more posi-
tive i-iJction."
Wi -^ard to the threat voic-
:d by Egypt's President Nasser
last : at the miliiary parade
ia Cairo, in which he emphasized
lhat is preparing "to free
Pa&Mtuie of Zionists," Mr. Esh-j
i.ol Bai hat Israel'i reply to this!
tomel will be military prepara-
: on:-
"The best reply to preparations
is preparations," he stated. "I
am often blamed for speaking too
much of peace. Yet this does not
come instead of alertness and pre-
paredness. There will be no easy
going about this."
Regarding atomic research in
Israel, Mr. Eshkol said the atomic
rtactor in Dimona is progressing
according to plan, though there
are the normal delays of engineer-
ing and construction adjustments.
He said he does not contemplate
any visit or meeting with heads
of state outside Israel in the next
few months, and that Foreign
Minister Mrs. Golda Meir would
head Israel's delegation to the
United Nations General Assembly,
scheduled to convene in Septem-
ber.
The Prime Minister said he
favors the introduction to Israel
of educational television and, in
due course, might consider the
establishment of a general tele-
vision network for the country. As
to proposals to bring the remains
of the late Zionist Revisionist
leader, Zeev Jabotinsky, to Israel
for reburial, Mr. Eshkol said he
does not consider dealing with this
question in the near future. Mr.
Jabotinsky had requested in his
will, prior to his death in 1940.
that the Jewish State, which he
foresaw, bring his remains to the
State for reburial.
dividual*- to intensify their spiri-
tual and educational activities in
church, synagogue, home and re-
ligious school.
The American Jewish Con-
gress welcomed the Court's de-
cision "as one that will prove
of significant benefit to the
cause of religion and religious
freedom in America." The
Congress statement said the
Court's decision strengthened
the public school system "as the
symbol of American democracy"
and that the majority opinion is
consistent with previous rulings
safeguarding American religious
institutions from interference by
the state and state institutions
from intrusions by the church.
The National Communitv Rela-
tional Community Relations Ad-
visory Council had joined in sub-
1 mining a brief amicus to the Su-
preme Court in these cases.
The Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith said in a statement
lhat the ruling of the Supreme
Court "is a strong reaffirmation
of the principle of church-state
separation. It preserves public
schools from involvement in reli-
gious conflicts and competition
and adds another safeguard for
treedom of religion in the United,
States."
The New York Board of Rabbis
concurred in the decision of the
Supreme Court. "It is our con-
viction that moral and spiritual
education is much too important
and too sensitive to be diluted
and to be entrusted to a school i
I cuncmions mivATi ?*tii
ORGANISATIONS (USistSS Ct 91 r> I
Open All Ytor
Coll IE 8 0523
climate where the very atmos-l
Tn\tT T B PUcy' i'herc and P! <* Pray" *>"<<
Manning and coordinating agency (leep commitment t0 a personal
for six major national Jewish or-
ganizations and Jewish commun-
ity councils in cities throughout
the United States, welcomed the
Court's ruling as "a victory for
religion and for religious free-
dom."
"We believe that it will also be
Ltst for American education and
American democracy." the
\CRAC said in a statement. "We
pledge our cooperation with all re-'
ligious faiths to help broaden pub-;
KING
ARTHUR'S
COURT
The
SINGING STRINGS
DINNER SUPPER
are lacking." the Board
faith
said.
"Prayer ard the Bible are so',
sacred to us that we consider it
Ask -far your CHIP-INS ;
Bowling Party Scheduled
North Dade Chapter B'nai B'rith
Women will hold a bowling party
Sunday, Aug. 11. at Congress Bowl.
1650 NE 14th St. In charge of in-
formation are Mrs. Frank Brandt
and Mrs. Harry Friedman.
MIAMI
SPRINGS
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500 Deer Run TU 8-4521
ART BR.UNS, Co Own.r
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Fo Tike-Out Service
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940-7U. STREET UN 6^043


Friday. August 2, 1963
Hebrew Academy
Lists Services
The Hebrew Academy will hold "<
liipb. Holi.iay services for the
first time in its 650-seat, air-con-
ditioncd auditorium, Jacob Cohen,
synagogue chairman, announced
this week.
A prominent New York cantor
will conduct the services on the
first and second days of Rosh
llashona, Sept. 19 and 20, and Yom
Kippur, Sept. 28.
Students of the Junior High
Department of th* Hebrew
Academy will road the Torah
and explain many of the holiday
prayers. Rabbi Alexander S.
Grots, principal. Mid.
P'v
>V*tic#? nrridHimn
Pegs 9-B
Cohen announced the following
members serving on his commit-
tec: Carl Brandes, Jerome Bien
< nfejd, Harry Gcoet, Joseph Gon-1
slior, Oscar Mamber, Henry Pen-
chansky, Samuel Reinhard and
.lulitis Rosenstein.
Louis Merwitzer, president, said
ihat seals may be reserved by
calling the Hebrew Academy.

Moscow Rabbi's Charge Questioned
<.. \
Rabbi Landau
In New Pulpit
The brother Of a Miami woman.
Mrs. Nathan Glover, has assum-
ed a new post as co-spiritual lead-
er ot Park Synagogue in Cleve-
land. O.
lie is Rabbi Sol Landau, who
will share the pulpit there with
Rabbi Armond E. Cohen.
Associate rabbi of Park Syna-
gogue from 195* to 1960, Rabbi
Landau left to become spiritual
leader of the newly-formed Beth
Hillel Congregation, the first to I
be organ*led in Wilmette, III.
Rabbi Landau also previously
scrved as a member of the Exec-
utive Council of the Chicago Board
"f Rabbis and chairman of the
Adult Education Committee of the
Rabbinical Assembly's Chicago
Region.
Rabbi Landau is German-born
and descended from a family
with an unbroken 200-year-long
ihairi of rabbis. He is the author
"I Length of Our Davs."
Nate Perlmutter, executive di-
rector of the Florida Office of
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, will spend the
month of September in West
Germany as a guest of the
Bonn Government. Perlmut-
ter will be joining a group of
ten ADL executives across the
nation invited by West Ger-
many to study the program
against anti-Semitism con-
ducted in the Bonn govern-
ment cgencies, army, and
schools.
SeaBees Will I
Convene Here
Members of tho SeaBees Vet-'
crans of America, organization of!
I U.S. Naval Construction battalions I
\ ho served in World War II and |
the Korean War, will hold their i
17th annual convention at the j
Dcauville Hotel, starting Friday,!
Aug. 8.
More than 400 persons will at-
tend the meetings. Edward Kip-
l'le, Streamwood, III., national
president, will convene the meet
ing.
Harry I. Tucliman, convention
chairman, aud a national vice,
president of the SeaBees, will in
troduce Ben F. Lowe, president of
Miami Island XI. Lowe will in-!
troduce Miami Beach Mayor Mel-1
vin Richard who will extend the
welcoming address to the conven-
tion.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is
raeli Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Nissim
this week categorically rejected
allegations by Chief Rabbi Ye-
huda Leib Levin of Moscow that
the Israel Embassy in the Soviet
capital had "disturbed" the peace
of the city's Jewish community
by distributing religious articles
in the synagogue there.
Rabbi Levin's allegations were
contained in a letter protesting
the Embassy's alleged distribution
of religious articles which was sub-
mitted to the Embassy. The let-
ter was sent in Rabbi Levin's
name and in the names of the cld-
I ers of the Central Synagogue in
! Moscow.
In his letter of reply to the
Moscow rabbi. Chief Rabbi Nis-
sim expressed "regret and deep
hurt" over the fact that reli-
gious leaders of the Moscow Jew-
ish community protested to the
Israeli Embassy.
$5,000 Finals
Due at Flagler
Finals of the $5,000 American
Hurdle Championship and start of
the third annual SS0.000 Interna-
tional Classic will make this week-
end the biggest of the summer
season thus far at Miami's Flag-
ler Kennel Club.
The hurdle event, with Oscar
Evers' Hi Spence as the stand-
out favorite, is scheduled Friday
night, with the $80,000 Classic
getting under way Saturday.
' A field of 40 will go to the post
in seven different races at the
start of the International, with
John Prevatt's sensational Sonda
looming as the favorite just as she
was in the $25,000 Open, which
wound up last weekend.
The classic will be contested
over the 3 8ths mile Flager
Course, but Sonda was known pri-
marily as a distance running star
before gelling hot on the 5/16ths
mile sprint course after moving
to Flagler.
"Even if the Embassy officials'
did provide the members of the
synagogue in Moscow with reli-
gious articles, how could this be
regarded as a disturbance?'' Rab-,
bi Nissim argued in his letter.
Pointing out that it is generally
known that there is a great short-
age in the Soviet Union of pray-
erbooks, prayer shawls, mezuzot
and other Jewish religious ar-
ticles, Rabbi Nissim expressed,
hope that "by Divine intervention, |
all barriers to our Soviet breth-J
ren in obtaining needed religious,
articles will be lifted."
i
He added that "if Israel Em-i
bassy officials did alleviate the
dire shortage of such articles,
they should be blessed rather than
censured."
In his letter. Rabbi Levin had
urged the Israel Embassy to
halt the distribution of the re-
ligious articles, saying they
were not needed by the congre-
gation, and asking the Em-
bassy to desist from such further
gifts.
The letter had ehargei1.") <: Em-
bassy with abusing the hospital-
ity of the Moscov synagogue) by
"sowing confusion and b.'.'. among the worshippers. Vnlil
the Embassy officials 'appeared
on the scene, the letter state I.
synagogue prayers were carried
out in joy and holy spleni oi.
----------------------i
Summer Refresher Covne
Summer refresher ecu;f o for
students of the Hebrew School at
Beth Kodesh Congregate* aril]
begin Monday morning ztii .run
four weeks. Reservat.OM arc
now also being taken .-'or-High
Holiday seating.
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Page 10-B
+Jewish rhrktiar)
Friday. August ,2. 1963
Bonn Moves to Liberalize Indemnification Laws
BONN (JTA) The Wfsti The amendment te the in-
German Cabinet approved this damnification law appreved by
week an amendment to liberalize : Mm Cabinet provides for an ad-
the existing indemnification laws | ditioral $750,000,000 for liberali-
for Nazi victims by incl'iding also xation of payments. This sum
persons who suffered from Nazism included $150,000,000 marked as
but were unable to file their claims
before October 1. 1953the cut-
off date in the original indemnifi-
cation lawbecause they were
then in iron Curtain countries.
a special hardship fund for pay-
ment of compensation to those
who were unable to submit their
claims by October 1, 1953, as
well as increased pensions and
other payments to individual
victims of Nazism.
The amendment is the second
The claims of such persons, most
Of them Jews, will he recognized
only if th y have in the mean- j
time left the Soviet bloc countries approved by the Cabinet to lib-
and are now living in other coun- eralize the existing compensation
tries. West Germany does not law. Last week, the Cabinet ap-
recognize claims of persons liv- proved an amendment to the 1957
law on restitution for claims for
certain types of movable property
confiscated by the Nazis. This in-
cluded bank accounts, jewelry. |
ii-rniture and similar property,
the location of which is unknown.
That amendment includes a
Rabbi Tibor II. Stern will of- special hardship fund of $100,000,-
ficiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Mark -------
ing in the Soviet countries.
Mark Eichel Will
Be Bar Mitzvah
Soviets Execute
Three Jews
LONDON(JTA)Three persons
with apparently Jewish names
Mark ficfcef
Gerard Eichel. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Eich-
el, 324 Washing-
ton Ave.. on Sat-
urday morning,
Aug. 3. at Beth
Jacob Congrega-
tion Cantor werc among five Leningrad men
Maurice Mam-; w'n0 nave becn executea D>' tno
ches will chant Sovict Government on charges ofi
the Sabbath lit- misappropriating S200.000 worth
urgv I of pencils, fountain pens, rulers !
and other office equipment, ac-
Mark is in the cordjng t0 tne newspapcr Soviet
eighth grade ol Russi it reported here from
Ida at. Fisher Junior High School. Moscow
He is actively interested in all;
sports. The executions were announced
Relatives from out-of-town will in bf Si in ""JW*
attend the occasion, among them lt J* ^.^ ***! men"
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Crowley,! fSLa m'n T
West Palm Beach. '^ -ounding names were I Zinger.
y. Kazakevitch and S. Knipkin.
Kiddush will follow the cere- The five were convicted last Feb-
mony in the Whitman Social Hall ruary after a four-month trial in
of Beth Jacob. which 300 witnesses were heard.
FURNISHERS ft INSTALLERS
Inlaid Linoleum Asphalt Til*
Rubber Tile
"EVERY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED"-Phone for free Estimates
2465 N.W. 76th STREET OX 6-3202
000 for victims who never filed
nlaims for restitution because the
| original law placed the burden of
' proof on the claimants that the lost
movable property was actually
j fhipped to Germany from the var-
1 ious occupied countries. Such vic-
itims. particularly those in East
European countries, were told by
Miamian Will
Attend Inaugural
Two South Florida residents
will attend the cornerstone laying
and dedication of the new build-
ii.g for the School of Pharmacy
at the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem.
Ben Saks, secretary-manager of
t h e Southeast
Florida Pharma-
ceutical Associa-
tion, will be
present at the
inaugural cere-
monies Aug. 17
on the Hebrew
University cam-!
pus.
Saks was state-;
wide chairman
of a fund-raising
venture here to help launch the
building. The campaign opened
locally in 1957.
Jacob Pulv'er will attend the
dedication with Saks. Both were
named delegates to represent the
association at a recent meeting
here. Pulver is already in Israel,
and Saks was due to arrive there
on Thursday.
attorneys that it would be im-
possible'to provide such proof and
therefore did not file claims.
After the law was enacted, the
West German Government drop-
ped the requirement met vic-
tims would have to furnish proof.
That agreement, however, did
not help those victims who had
not, in good faith, filed claims
under the orginigal burden-of-
preof requirements. The $100,-
000,000 hardship fund in the
amendment to the restitution
law was set up to pay claims
for restitution in such cases.
The amounts of $150,000,000 and
100,000.000 in the two special
hardship functe in the amendments
are in addition- to the $3^00,006,- _
000 already paid out by West Ger-V*
many as well as in addition to the
sums scheduled to be paid out un-
der the indcjonificajioo .and resti-
j tution laws. The amendments will
lie submitted to the West German
Parliament soon and are expected
to be enacieti into law before the
end of 1963.
WIDOW DESIRES
TO MKT Iv I'EIf GENTLEMAN
ACE 55-65. Pfotit cell after :i o'clock
758-4294
SAKS
ATTRACTIVE WIDOW
Has Own Home, would like to meet
a respectable retired, or business
gentleman. Call after 1 p.m.
532-5298
WANTED KITCHEN
HELPER FEMALE
Jewish Institution.
Do not call Saturday.
Ph. 532-1174
WANTED
SALESMAN
FOR PART-TIME
With Scrr.e> Men's Clothing
Selling Ixperienc3.
THRIFT SHOP
7331 N.W. 27th AVE.
COTTAGE FOR RENT
SI5 WEEK
Cozy Clean.
577 NW 50th St. Ph. 757-WtO
ton Bfmi NfALTN VISIT TNE
MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE
PHYSICAL THERAPY
BOOT CONDITIONING
GENERAL DIAGNOSIS I X-RAY
COtONIC IRRIGATIONS
ULTRA SONK TNCRAPT
CAMNfTS end MASSACf
7235 Biscayne Blvd.
Phone PL 7-7234
- "PROMPT DAY and NIGHT SERVICE" ------
Mi (oioiirk-isovin
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
FOR SALES, SERVICE or REPAIRS Phone PL 7-0606
9443 PARKWAY DRIVE MIAMI SHORES, FLA.
IrpUITOrV/ II MARINARA ] works wonders
II SAUCE 1 1 AMI ** wild Stew J
BUITONI MARINARA SAUCE u
Miller Electric Co.
of Miami, Inc.
QUALITY CONTRACTING I SERVICE
3905 N.W. 37th Ct.
Ph. NE 3-2686
Welcome
Wagon
Remembers
Special Family
Occasions'
Carrying on our rommtmity s -
traditional hospitality,'
Welcome Wagoa Calls
are made when your
family celebrates a
sixteenth birthday,
announces an
engagement or
the birth of
a new bib1
or mo\ et.
to a new
home.
When the Btfli crises, phone
HE -4994
HEAR
Jacob Schachter
Play Your Favorite Yiddish Music
MON.-FHI. II A.31.- 12 NOON & SIX. 3tlS-4t! F.M.
HEAR SUCH ALLTIME FAVORITES AS
.IAN PlliiHIs CANTORIAL MASTERPIECES
RHYTHM & SONGS OF ISRAEL
DAVID Kl SKYITSKY S GEMS OF THE SYNAGOGUE
SING ALONG WITH ME, featuring IIIXAII LANDAU
SinOR IIELARSKY'S JEWISH FOLK SONGS
MIRIAM KRESSYN
* AND MANY OTHERS
ON WEDR-FM 99.1 MEG. ON YOUR FM DIAL
YOU LIVE BA1LY FROM THE BLACKSTONE HOTEL. 800 WASH. AVF MA


'. -!.'i
Fri3ay, August 2. 1963
*Jen>isli ftcridfiiaun
Page 11-3
LEGAL NOTICE
Jennie Cypen Dies Here at 72
-#
Services were Tuesday, July 30,1 died at the age of 72 on Sunday,
for Mrs. Jennie Cypen, of 7901 July 28. I
Nor.e.qiitf Aye,, Miajni Beach'! Mrs. Cypen came here a. yeaj-J
Mrs. Cypen. mother of Miami and a half ago from Tucson, Ariz..
Beach Attorney and former Cir-iand was a member of B'nai B'rilh
cult Court Judge Irving Cypen,! and Hadassah.
In addition to Judge Cypen, sur- i-imi.
Scopus Summer Festival I yiving are two other sons, Ben- qUfc IN THE.COUNTY JUDGE S C CURT
IN AND FOR DADECO. '"V,
FLORIDA. INPROEATE
No. 6C342-A
IN RE: BqUtte of
\ t.l > I'.i >l Tl.!>*
Dereasi .1
NOTICE TO CREDITCrS
To aii -i-.-.i:tora and \n p
Ins claim.- in Detnanda A-.
'I.IV-
. Said
three
dren.
sisters, and 13 grandchil-
i viv
ijamin and Harry; a daughter.
Mt. Scopus Summer Festival1 ??rs- Bot,.>" Ro^stein; a brother,
continued with its weekly meet-
ings at Park Lane Cafeteria,
Coral Way, on Monday, featuring! Services were at Riverside Mem
a Dutch treat luncheon. The' orial Chapel, Alton Rd.
Miami Chapter of Hadassah group
gives proceeds to Hadassah Med-
ical Organization. President of
Mt. Scopus is Mrs. Louis Alex-
ander. Mrs. Harry Jampol is
chairman of the series.
I re
d ii.
manda hli h ou ma)
the state of AM "> Bi il I d<
ceased late of I *ade Coum Wot Ida
in the Countj Judgi i ol H .. mtj .
and file thv same In dupll "\ Ided In Section 733 I lorMo
Statute*, in their office* nun
tj Courthouse In Dade Cou J.'Ior-
Ida, within six calendar no frot"
tii. time 'if 'he first publl i 11
Scholarship winners Steve Franzblau (center). 11525 NE 12th Law firm Announced.
Ave.. and Michael Dresner (right), 5760 SW 10th St., receive
the good news from Dr. Arthur Helfman, president of the Dade
County Optometric Association. The two recipients of the
lax-supported scholarships will attend Southern College of
Optometry in Memphis, Tenn., for three years. SI.000 per year
is awarded annually to deserving young applicants selected
by the Florida State Board of Optometry.
Mrs. Ellen Kaye
Passes Away, 52
Mrs. Ellen Kaye. well-known
.civic worker in the South Florida
area, died Thursday, July 25, at
the age of 52.
Alvin N. Weinsteui and Lee She.was the wife of L*0" Kaye,
Weissenborn announce the forma- Mia ^each real estate dealer,
tion of a partnership for the gen-]and 1,ved at 725 51st St.
eral practice of law under the I Mrs. Kaye came here 20 years ,N n,... ,.,* 56391
firm name of Weinstein and Weis-ago She was an honorary life
senborn, Suite 311, Biscayne Bldg., member of the Dade County PTA,
of, or the lame ill be bi
I >Ml.- I ;i t ,\1 .i mi, I- 1 i
day <>r July, A.D. ik:;
SANFi >RD s PAUJ
\s Executor
l-',rst publication of thl*
the I'lnl da} of Auftuat, !:>'
FAUNCE, PINK A FORM .
Attorneys foi the Ex< i utor
i mil' Conari -- Bldg.
Miami 82, Pla.1 l( 1-5471
.911

IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COL MTV,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
Miami.
MP's Question British Military Aid to Mid East
London UTA) A state-
ment by Lord Privy Seal Edward
Heath in the House of Commons
a brief flurry this week Middle East, but at the same time
nterpreted to there are indications
were already there."
caused
when
mean that Heath implied there
were operational nuclear weapons
in the .Middle Ea-t.
Heath was asked whether Brit-
ain planned to bring up in the
(iincnt Moscow' talks on a ban
on nuclear weapons testing the
current Middle Easl arms race.
lie replied that Ihe British were
trying, along with other countries,
"to limit the supply going to the
that some
The Foreign Office, respond-
ing to the misinterpreation, lat-
er said that Heath meant only
to say that there were now in
the area missiles which had
nuclear warhead capabilities
but not "that nuclear warheads
are in the possession of any
Middle East country."
and had servd as publicity direc-
tor of the Dade PTA Council.
She was a member of Mt.
Sinai Hospital Auxiliary, the
Auxiliary of National Children's
Cardiac Hospital, and the Miami
Heart Institute Auxiliary.
Mrs. Kaye was a member of
Timple Beth Sholom, as well as
ol the Sisterhood there.
Surviving are her husband, ;i
son. Fred, and one sister, Mrs.
Charles Brenner.
Blasberg Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.
Si
Dignified, beautiful and
reverently cared for
surroundings for our
departed loved ones are
Miami sexci /IK* .'t up\
AN0C0MMUNH1 MA 11 1Mb'
'> "iininMiio.1 MO 1-7693
YOUR
TELEPHONE
PROPERLY
ANSWERED
IS YOUR GREATEST
BUSINESS ASSET
Answerite, Inc.
Telephone Answering
Service
SERVING
JEfferson Union
Highland FRanklin
Executive Office
FR 3-5581
In
tion.
MI'.
KOHN. Kabbl Abraham,
Park vi' 11 'i
., .... I Brooklj n. 11 .. i side
another phase of the situa- levine. Harry. :.. uf ,m Went Avi
Stephen Swingler. a Labor was^erman^-V';.,, :
m-irlo i fntilo nffm-t in find Michigan Ave Riven
mane a mine enoit to nna ARONS Samuel, :.. ..f I48n Wesi
out how many weapons have been Ave,- ',1'''1 J,,,!>' -:'- tfc-rvicea in N *
sold by Britain in the past three leichtman. irthvr Philip, 113, of
,,.,,, 1911 SW 8th St., died Jul) 2. Itiv-
\ears to Middle Last countries.1 erside,
i- r-_ .. iv,- i JCOLOMAN, landor, SI, of TSI I Hard-
Alan Green. Joint Minister of in, kv, s. ,-ive.I inChicago New
State of the Board of Trade, said! chezar, i..... r.i, f mo sw ,
in a written reply it was not "our St., died July 27. Riveralde,
policy to disclose the total value 'tftfR' ft} J3*' g ftKK
or details of the kind of arms ex- shulman. m<> .:. of .' s
ported lo other countries." zaLmONOFF.'' IS? Itae '-'Tfrn
In still another development, Matwiiu In-., died lulj 88. .-
the Cairo Information Bulletin de- osi.^^ o'f'm.Bi.,,,., Dr.
clared that Egypt's new ground-to-
air rocket, which was launched
last week, was intended to be a
weapon against Israel.
WKAT-FM
FROM
TO
BRAHMS
BARTOK
You'll Hear the World's Finest Music on
WKAT-FM
93.1 on your FM dial
MIAMI'S ONLY PURE
CLASSICAL MUSIC STATION
Programming MORE LIVE Concerts!
WKAT-FM
Klverslil
ROSEN, Ml (VI n, K2, 1' MfJ I. b-
i ly \' el i .1 d) it Rl> Idi
FRANK. Benjamin, WS, i.f !2S \>'.-h-
invii.n \\. died -liiiv :';. ItlverMlde.
Schwartz, sidnej \.. nt ::ik,n-
Pnrk. Pa died Julj :'". Sei .1 ~ In
Philadelphia,
BERMAN. .Mrs. I!, II.,. .;;. ,.| :;: Mi, h-
Ican Ave i:
n.j. n__ij n ,. ,. .,, FINE. Mi- I".,nli I ", mi of I'l" N \V
Beth David Young Adults will 2sth Ave, .;;i--
present Judge Milton A. Fried- Rosen. Joneph, s2, ..r m: un-
man, of the Municipal Court, in; ^ "mveSSef1 S""'
a talk on "A Day in Court." Pro-I taubman. Jacob, .-.
13th SI died Jul; 23.
Pefh David Young Adults
gram is Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.. at
Beth David Synagogue.
af 3640 MV
Servlcea In
FOSTER ELECTRIC
COMPANY, INC.
Electrical Contractors
residentim. commercial
industrial alterations
maintenance
PAUL FOSTER, president
AIR CONDITIONING .ind
ADEQUATE WIRING
2264 W. FUGLES ST. HI 8-2671
Nights, Sund,i>s Holidays Dial
HI 3-0922
St. I..'.ii.-. Rivi i--;.i.
AUSLANDER. .1 ,.,.pli 73, ill 17 : I N W
i'.i. lei Tel l:.\ -i .
SCHIFF. Mi- i.iiin. S?, ..i IC31 SW
l2nd Ave. tii .Ii.m.
FELDMAN. .Hi:,.-. :;. ,,| ;.,.;., -\\
24th i.ilv :i I: ,. r Ide
GORDON. Mra. Si rah. 72, of I I
\\ aahinyton Ave., lili d Ju 2 I i.i\
de
ISIIm IRE A ft ON I i\'ITZ
I'ec-ias, NOTICE OF INTENTION TC '"(KE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE I- hereby trlven that 1 hav.
filed my Final Report and n foi
Distribution and Final I'- i,--- a-
AdmlnlatiHtrlx, CTA "f th- ol
IHDORE AROXOVITZ, d--. and
that on tin- :(iii day of : > mb-r,
IfSS, will a)ip>y to the oraM<
County Juda;ea of Dada i Flor-
ida, for approval of .--. i. i r pot I
and tor dlatrlbutlon and
chat-Ke pa Admlnlatratrix, tin
eatate "i the abovi -nam< nt.
This I 'Hi da} ..r July, li
i-aiuxi: ari i.m >\' Z
l-VK' i\ I. SI' VRUEI1
Attorney
i-'" Uncoln Road
Miami Beai h, Florida
-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0- "HE
1ITH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT D
FOR DADE COUNTY. FL1- DA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 8175
M ART ELIZABETH tll'RXS,
Plaintiff,
\ -
I i: \.\rKS Bl'RNS,
I lefendant.
NOTICE B/ PUBLICATION
l'i I- i:.\\'i"KS BURNS
i Mr-. John Ha\ hui -1
>'.', Pa il Placi
Buffalo, Ni w Vorfc
Vim are herebj notlfla I ;>.
Complaint for Dlvoree haa
nsralnat you, an l you an
quired to -ii \ e h i opy of u
mn i- in the "omplalnl on I
II .hi., ii. v LESTER ii.-
uhnxe addreaa Is S21 N.W. S1 oet,
Miami, Klorida, and Oli
Anawer with th.- office of
of the Eleventh Judicial Is
nnd for l lade 'ountj. f lor oi
bi tore the 3rd day of Septi i -. i96:i,
in .l.-i.iiili of 1>|. Ii the Com .vin
i..- taken aa confeaai .1 b}
l latvd thia ::"ih day of .i I.
R B. LEATHERMAN
i'l.- k i.f the Circuit '".
11} : K. E, ORI I. I,
I '.pun Cl< rk
- ;-:<
NOTICF UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Ni .'I'll i: IS HEREBY Hl\ hat
the underpinned, deairina to m>.K< In
bualni ss im.li r the fictitii e ol
I'VNAMAIt Ct)RP, ii Ii a I MAK
B< IAT V.Mtl' nt 1882 N.W, Si River
Drive, Miami, Fla., Inten -
i.i said name iili the C
Circuit Court "f I'.. C
Ida.
DYNAMAR rORP
Hi le Own< i
LEONARD KAI.I.-II
1(129 duPont Bld( Ml ml, I
Attorney for Appll
: .


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDtH
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY HIV EN
h, underalxm
i.iisin.-- uiiil. i the l tltioua nami
MARLOU'S !' vsiiii ,\s .,i 3d N.E.
17th 81 Mi.nr Pla., Intends t<> rea;-
i.i ;i .i nami mi the Clerk of the
t'lrcull Courl of i ..i.i. Count}, Florida.
MARID I :\\ is
IIATTKX ft SALEM
Attorne).- tor Ma rid l.. n la
: is i...:'.-,. .
Baby Die-Dee Diaper Service
"GREATER MIAMI'S FIRST"
An Exclusive Laundry tor Diapers and Baby Clothes
2111 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 95593
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N iTM'i: IS HEREBY 'II >
ih. iiiuli-i-*-_iu .1. deail Ing I
iii-iii. -.- unil. i the ii. i ili.i -
that \si'i.i:\\. i, i| i i |XT1 i:i>
n N.W. 75lh Strei t, kflaml
-aiil n inn wii h
the Circuit Court of Dn
Florl la.
CASTLEAVi >H INTERN '
CORP
B} : 1 :. v i I I si; ie} \ i, cat
ll \i:i:v S5CKEJINICK
Attornej for Applicant
120 l.ii.....in Road
.Mi in i Beach, Fla
7 >- If,
. .. in
- to
i


V-^~V"K^-V
ROOFING
REPAIRS AND RE-ROOFING
SINCE 1920
PALMER'S ROOFING
1731 N. MIAMI AVE.
PHONE
FR 3-6244
r
?
?
i
KIX4* FINISH lLA.STI-:i( I'O.
LIME COLORED PLASTER
Phone 635-4195
260 N.W. 27th Street Miami, Fla.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COL'N~Y,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 48174 C
l.\" RE; Batata of
HAliltY BECK a i. a
HERRI BECK,
I '...-.-a -. .I
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO UAKC
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBLTION
AND FiNAL DISCHARGE
notice |.< hereb) irlven I ve
ha> filed our Final Repoi pe-
tition for Distribution and F Dls-
eaMjurse as i'n-l-:.\.. iii.ii- of -tatc
..r H A R R Y BECK aak iu:i
RECK, deceased: ami that i 6th
ii.,\ i.f Auvuat, I96S, ii i 11 i ly to
the Honorable County Judder i>ad
County, i-'lfi'lila. f< r- a|.|.v<-\ suiil
I'mal l;,|...ri ami for dial nnd
final discharge as Co-Exe. ore uf
l Ii.- .-lal.' .-f ill.' .i I..-V -ii.- .-.'-
dent. This -Mi da; of Jul}.
RENKE A1 l'i: BECK
IRVING RECK
as Co-Executora of th. -tnte of
II A it It V R EC K a 1.
BECK, 11. .< a.-.-.l
SIMi 'N. ll.ws *,- (;i:r\ii\\ i: ;
Attorimv
3(11 Ain-l,y llmldinn
Uuunl 32, Florida


Page 12-B
* Jen is* nurUkMI
Friday. Augus' 2. 1963
UNDER THE STI/CT AND CONSTANT LOCAL RAB.lNICAl SUPttVISION Of RABBI TIBOK H. SUM
Extra FREE
MERCHANTS
GREEN STAMPS
FREE! FREE!
FREEZER SALE!
There's one sure guide to more enjoyable eating: choose your
meats and poultry at your nearest Food Fair Kosher Meat Store.
You'll get SELECT QUALITY at ECONOMY PRICES, while the cut
and trim assure you of better cooking and tastier meals. For
maximum SAYINGS, stock your freezer during this sale!
We will CUT and WRAP your freezer purchases at no extra charge. Please place your order
EARLY for the wholesale CUTS you desire.
Every Pound of Meat Sold with a Money-Back Guarantee!
KOSH-R-BEST
Chicken or Turkey
CROQUETTES
69?
JUST HEAT AND SERVE
WHOLE RIB
OF BEEF
Ttwiwl
Delkious!
Wholesome 1
Guaranteed
Kosher
Better VoImI
More meat
per pound I

KOSH-R-BEST
DRUMSTICKS
with THIGHS
I39
Packed in 2 Lb. Boxes
KOSHER MADE Per 2 lb. 3dx
BREAST
OF BEEF
89
lb.
30 to 35 POUND AVERAGE
WHOLE .... 10 to 12 LB. AVERAGE
PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
RACK OF
LAMB
5 to 6 LB.
AVERAGE
79
c
lb.
PLUS 25 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
CHUCK OF
LAMB
15 to 20 LB.
AVERAGE
59
lb.
PLUS 50 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
ZEON KOSHER POULTRY
THE MARK OF QUALITY!
. The Brand Used By the Finest Kosher Hotels, Restaurants
and Caterers .. Now on Sale at Your Food Fair Kosher Markets
CRYOVAC PACKED KOSHER MADE PAN READY
PULLETS
ROASTERS
BROILERS
53c
lb.
PRICES IN THIS AD EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 9
NOW FIVE KOSHER MEAT STORES TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER
2091 CORAL WAY I S"5" I ,63fd SHOPPING CENTER
MIAMI AT **w- *'*n AVE. I
WUAWU I We*ch.t.r Shopping Pl.x. | NO. MIAMI BEACH
19th ST. at ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE
AT MIAMI BEACH
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR


Full Text

PAGE 1

Fage 6-3 v.knisti HcrMHun bHumt %  jMiN OF THE WEEK Rabbi Marius Ranson and his wife. Annette, had friends over for t evening. There was an overwhelming feeling of love and contenti got ; .n that pleasant living room. Before the late refreshments were t rved. the Rabbi said a few simple words blessing the food and the ests. Somehow it made the world seem a better place. Who is A inette Ranson, what has been her life that she can create that warm ding of friendship? Annette was born in Boston, an independent, only child. Because >r parents were active in the affairs of the community, Annette surrounded herself with pets—a prize collie, cats, even a monkey. During her teens, she was resentful of the time her mother spent in organizational work, but as she became older, she realized what an admirable quality it was, and stepped into the same kind of community work where her mother left off. After high school. Goucher College, in the midst of a warm friendly Jewish community. awakened in Annette a religious feeling. From there she went to Simons College, where she majored in social work. As a student, she was affiliated with the Judge Baker Foundation. She went to Chicago, and became active in the Leopold Loeb case, and from there to Denver, to work with Judge Lindsay on his book on companionate marriage. She received a Master's degree at the New School of Social Research in New York City. Annette had the idea that rabbis were I rious all of the time. When she met her own. for the first time, she i and it hard to believe that he could be such a marvelous dancer. He nposed the next day by letter, but she wasn't quite sure that she to be a rabbi's wife, so it was a few years until they were I lined. ie Ransons lived in East Orange for eighteen years, during which n? s >e organized the National Federation of Temple Youth for the E ate o: New Jersey. During the war years. Annette owned and direcdtuo camps for children. In 1948. they moved to Ft. Lauderdale, %  ?. e became spiritual leader of Temple Emanuel. Two years ago, .e Pi i)i retired and they moved to Bay Harbor. The pets have long Mo disappeared. Annette says. Business is her hobby — she's a natural" for real estate. They both like music and read a great deal, id efch is writing a book. Daughter Joan is now Mrs. John Tabor. ;.Td lives in Buffalo with their two children. THI FOURTH BIRTHDAY CAKE It v as Bea (Mrs. Sam) Blank's birthday. She knew that she had a birthday, all right. The celebrations went on and on. The final one %  as a tamily dinner in the Mona Lisa Room at the Eden Roc Hotel, with her fourth birthday cake. "Just family" included Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Frehling and son Robert, Mr. and Mrs. Sandford Kramer and Mighter Judy, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Blank, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Blank, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Blumberg, David Blank and Mrs. Terry Miller. • • TOTAL —1,994 MILES Fhat's the number of miles the SS Ariadne sailed on a seven-day • to Puerto Rico and St. Thomas. And who were at the captain's Myra and Aaron Farr, of course. Among the other Miamians were Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Rudolph and Mis. Ruby Epstein. WHAT KIND OF A PARTY? For six weeks the invited guests got all kinds of invitations from Iii')', 1 ; and Kurt Wallach. But none of the teasers told just what kind u c a party to expect when they arrived on the dot at the Wallach [I was a scavenger hunt, with the clues written in poetry. After cne for the road, and putting on masks, the teams started out. Much ; tg went on after they returned as to who should get the prjzes. Zurto". Coldberg got the booby prize. Swimming in the pool included watery baseball game. Among guests were Joyce and James Rodenberg, Louise and Morton Stubuis, Debby and Larry Hoffman, Lois and .-.in); Greene. Anita and Philip Pearlman. Dr. and Mrs. Donald Lev••nson. Dr. and Mrs. Stanford Cooke, the Lester Ettmans, the Bernie Landels, the Carl Liptons, the Ralph Robins, and Burton Goldbergs. There was a birthday cake for Bernie Sandel as a final surprise for Lie evening. • LONG THE GRANDMA FRONT Edie and Carl Lundy left for Hnersonville to see their son Howard at camp. They will motor leisurely back, taking their time because :: iiw that grandma. Anne (Mrs Max) Dryer, is keeping a weather ye out for Donna and Mark who aren't of camp age yet Tiiat broken arm that Dorothy Kreiger Fink is walking around "with. all done up in a huge cast is a result of tripping when she ran ifcer ier youngest grandchild. Naomi and Richard went to Las Vegas nd Mint* west to celebrate their tenth anniversary, while Dorothy minded" the children. Barbara, his sister Dedee and her husband Alan Cohen, and Barbara's family. Mr. and Mrs. Max Boderman and Miss Florence BoderIllC.'! Weinthals Will Live in Gables Riva Glasgow and Sidney M. Wcinthal exchanged wedding vows in 8 p.m. ceremonies at the Deauvillc Hotel on July 27. Rabbi Morris Skop officiated. For the wedding, the bride chose a gown fashioned entirely of French lace. The bodice featured a sabrina neckline and threequarter sleeves. The sheath skirt was floor-length, with an easy fullness at the back of the waist formed of shadow pleats. Down the entire front of the grown were clusters of tiny crystal beads. The organza overskirt had scattered lace appliques and fell to an aisle-wide train. The multi-tiered illusion veil fell from a lace and pearl coronet. The bride carried white orchids on a Bible. Newly-wed Mrs. Weinthal is the daughter of Mrs. Rose Glasgow, 6394 SW 41st St., and the late David Glasgow. The groom is the son of the Murray Weinthals, 6200 NW Miami PL Maid of honor was Miss Judy Levine. Mrs. Lenore Neuman was bridesmaid. Joseph Weinthal acted as best man. and ushers included Al Koch and Howard Wrubel. The bride graduated from Miami Senior High, and attended the University of Miami. The groom attended Emory University, and is a graduate of the U of M. ;> Vtvi-nrr-Kilin Friday, August 2, 1963 Alan Laibson Plans Rites With Washington Girl Mr. and Mrs. Eduterd.fH.ra mar of. Silver Serins*, iWtjonouqe.' the engagement of their daugh ter. Patricia, to Alan Jay Laib son, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Laibson, of 8230 Hawthorne Ave. Miami Beach. The young couple were recent ly feted at a reception in honor of their engagement. A cocktail party was given by Mr. and Mrs Walter Bauer, grandparents of the bridegroom-elect, at the Laibson home. Among the many guests and relatives were long-time friends of both the Laibsons and Bauers Miss Kramer went to school in I Washington, D.C., and attended the University of Maryland. Mr Laibson graduated from Miami Beach High School, attended the University of Florida, Dade Coun ,. : ty Junior College, and will entei ^ Benjamin Franklin School of Ac ; counting in Washington this fall The couple plan a June. 196' wedding in Washington. MRS. SIDNir WEINTHAL Following a dinner at the Deanville Hotel, the couple left for a honeymoon tour of New York and New England. They will be at home in Coral Gables. Camp Avir Will Present Show Camp Avir. under the irection of Gary Canner. will present its sixth annual variety show. "Camp Terrific." on Tuesday. Aug. 6. at 7:30 p.m. The production, performed by the campers, will feature the music of a favorite Broadway show, with scenery and costumes following the same theme. The show will be under the direction of Mrs. Shirley Rothlein. Bris and Naming For Family Here Rabbi and Mrs. Morris A. Skop Of 3."11 Riviera Dr.. Coral Gables were host this week at the bnceremonies for their grandson Neal Franklin, born to Raphael ard Aha Skop. 7715 Red Rd. Can lor Herman K. Gottlieb was the mohel. Naming of their first gr:.n,i child, Meryl F.lise Heilberu. bun in Shiran and Louis Heilberg, will be held at the first Ki dush in the new Temple Beth Siiirah ar 7500 SW 120th St. Two great-grandfathers nartici patcd in the ceremonies for Nea! Franklin. Abraham L. Skop 87, and Adolph Kornbluh 85. Tw Bibles were inscribed for the new Temple in honor of their great grandchildren. MISS lOYCt MKHVM10 Buchwald, Palgon Betrothal Told Miss Joyce Buchwald and Manny Palgon are engaged. The couple's betrothal is announced by the parents of the bride-elect. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Buchwald, 2365 SW 21st Ave. The groom-to-be is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Palgon, 2645 SW 34th Ct. Miss Buchwald graduated from Miami Senior High, where she was president of Omega Delta Psi Sorority. Mr. Palgon is a graduate of the Dade County School of Dental Technology. The couple are planning a spring wedding. Maiffctuyi $u*ta&t 'JUC KL^ILKSEfci SUNDAY EVENING, AUGUST 4th, AT 8:30 P.M. RAYMOND PAIGE, CONDUCTOR "HIGHLIGHTS FROM RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL" WARREN GALJOUR, Baritone BOBBY DOMENIC, Banjoisl AND UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI CHORAL UNION TICKETS St.25 to S2.75 UM Sym Off., MO 1-4960: MB. And.. JE 10477: uV"* B '.V ln M,ami FR 4-5181; Allegro Music HouH in Coral Cables. Ml 4-8181; Harmony Music Shops in Dadeland and 163rd St. Shop. Ctrs. MIS MtaiBiA-. AVI, MIAMI MAC* YEARLY BASIS J1P1 Per Month %  SI Per Person Double Occ Including 3 KOSHER MEALS DAILY Eve and Terry Sponder Phone JE 1-0496 THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AOEO HH as rat ITS THRIFT SHOP AH Your f,mil r, Ctofftkf, linens, Dishes, Drapes, Ifc. Pit ASE au US FOR PICKUP THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SKOP 7331 N.W. 27* AVENUE Ph. 696-2101 Cloied Saturdays Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231 "YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT" for an AFFAIR to REMEMBER BLOSSOM SHOP 1572 Washington Ave., Miami Beach Tliere IS a Difference in Flowers-TRY OURS WEOOINGS-tAR MITZVAHS -GARDEN PARTIES BIRTHDAY ANHVIRSARY A HOSPITAL BOUOUtTS FREE DELIVERY Ail GREATER MIAMI r Cleaning-Laundry Storage 1201-20th Street Miami Beach JE 8 6104 .^.f?? 1 7 %  %  fM *••• Omy Service Navtr An txUa Cfcarae.



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Page 12-B Jen is* nurUkMI Friday. Augus' 2. 1963 UNDER THE STI/CT AND CONSTANT LOCAL RAB.lNICAl SUPttVISION Of RABBI TIBOK H. SUM Extra FREE MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS FREE! FREE! FREEZER SALE! There's one sure guide to more enjoyable eating: choose your meats and poultry at your nearest Food Fair Kosher Meat Store. You'll get SELECT QUALITY at ECONOMY PRICES, while the cut and trim assure you of better cooking and tastier meals. For maximum SAYINGS, stock your freezer during this sale! We will CUT and WRAP your freezer purchases at no extra charge. Please place your order EARLY for the wholesale CUTS you desire. Every Pound of Meat Sold with a Money-Back Guarantee! KOSH-R-BEST Chicken or Turkey CROQUETTES 69? JUST HEAT AND SERVE WHOLE RIB OF BEEF Ttwiwl Delkious! Wholesome 1 Guaranteed Kosher Better VOIMI More meat per pound I KOSH-R-BEST DRUMSTICKS with THIGHS I 3 9 Packed in 2 Lb. Boxes KOSHER MADE Per 2 lb. 3DX BREAST OF BEEF 89 lb. 30 to 35 POUND AVERAGE WHOLE .... 10 to 12 LB. AVERAGE PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS RACK OF LAMB 5 to 6 LB. AVERAGE 79 c lb. PLUS 25 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS CHUCK OF LAMB 15 to 20 LB. AVERAGE 59 lb. PLUS 50 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS ZEON KOSHER POULTRY THE MARK OF QUALITY! The Brand Used By the Finest Kosher Hotels, Restaurants and Caterers .. Now on Sale at Your Food Fair Kosher Markets CRYOVAC PACKED KOSHER MADE PAN READY PULLETS ROASTERS BROILERS 53c lb. PRICES IN THIS AD EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 9 NOW FIVE KOSHER MEAT STORES TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER 2091 CORAL WAY I S"5" I ,63fd SHOPPING CENTER MIAMI AT ** w *'* n AVE. I WUAWU I We*ch.t.r Shopping Pl.x. | NO. MIAMI BEACH 19th ST. at ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH 10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE AT MIAMI BEACH MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR



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Friday. August 2. 1963 *JfeMfeJi rkrkji&r Page 7-B pASKiON new from Paris is. %  finally "news" with the presentation of the fall collections. Hera li"t> have dropped—and so have necklinea—in fact, quite daringly in several collections. Many of the designers have also moved '.heir waistline back up in the Empire line. Here in Greater Miami, Mrs. Jay JayaOB was emphatic about the fact that she prefers the current rtyle of short skirts. Women :th good legs seem to wear their skirts shorter, regardlesa i" %  %  .' the prevailing fashion dii;.;i-. If the longer hemlines ( Income the accepted style, • Jayson says she will go aloce, "but I'll probably be one <•: • last." MrS; bil Zimmerman found the r • and sketches of the proposi change quite Interesting. Her all, the longer hemline t • to have the chic feeling of Ihl well dressed woman." But • hastened to add that she c esn't like an extremely long hi line. Mr".ik Block also prefers today's ength. "I'm afraid that the tit'< will take us back to the extreme length of 1947. whit! o. little for the figure. Tin' dropped neckline and raised waistlkri ::re al.-o out from my point .: view, although some u'Omez look well in this silhouette i EftOM the professional point of view, Mrs. Bea Gertz, who is noted *• £ fine dressmaker, feels ;i dress should be designed and developed '.<> enhance the feminine figUM a*.d make a woman more beauvul. She feels that the "new took" is not "new," but a repetition of what she studied yean ago, and that this "look" idefinitely more feminine and elegant "'ian the current shift. "I liki i< see the feminine figure f!o n, and especially like BEAUTY SALON WIGS H.fj*i Fashion Hair Pieces OBlEM PIECES I l rt i rations — Wi§ tusintst 7437 COUINS AVENUE MM M 6-1226 Or UN 5-9157 psaai AUTHOSIZEO >eu* |*£/HEA1NG AIDSl I JMJ $50 to $285 %  STANLEY GOULD| I 1231 Imctk tutf (tt itM u.) %  aMM r*~* K -TIS A-1 EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. PR *4401 JIO HOHAUSER PLUMBING coMnracrwc • Rtr AIRIMG *•"'•• D.J. Cau-'.. 0*r 25 Vn 1*11 S.W. 14th ST. Nl 6-9*04 the longer silhouette. There should be a distinction between! day, evening, and almost-evening, and the elegance of the longer gowns takes us beyond the simple dress worn during the' day." Don Mullen, of the fine worn1 en's shop on Miracle Mile in' Coral Gables, finds the Paris showings startling. He has justreturned from the New York MISS (LAINE CONSTANTIN Elaine Constantin Eyes 1964 Rites Engagement of Miss Elaine (Dusty) Constantin to Martin market, where there was no eviDouglass Baloff is announced here deuce of a new look. "I am by the bride-elect's parents, Mr. personally delighted with the, and Mrs. Al Constantin, 5750 Twin change, because it wdl take us Lakes Dr. out of the current state of fash.,-,„ „ — tn %  K ion st->on->ti,n Tk.,.. u„ T c Rroom-tobe is the son of J.'Sr, !" tr h e ^s been Mr and Mrs ^^ „ off nm ..tic change in fashion during sw 62nd Av0 the past tew years, with the exception of the shitt, and anyThe couple are planning to be thing new will be exciting and married in the summer of 1964. stimulating." Miss Rabinovitz Now Mrs. Lurio Maxine Rabinovitz, of 7640 Dickens Ave., became the bride of Sidney Franklin Lurio at Temple Or Oiom ori July 6 V RaJ>ly Samuel April officiated af the 8:30 p.m. rites. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rabinovitz, of Pittsburgh, Pa. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert S. Lurio, 605 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach. Matron of honor was Mrs. Staney Oringer, sister of the bride. Stanley Oringer, his brother-inaw, acted as the groom's best man. Newlywed Mrs. Lurio is a recent graduate of the University of Miami, where she belonged to Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority. She will teach in the Dade County schools this fall. The groom graduated from Pennsylvania Military College, and is a second lieutenant in the : U.S. Army. He is a life underwriter for Equitable. Following a one-week honey, moon in Jamaica at the Arawa'k Hotel, the couple arc at home at 8210 Byron Ave., Miami Beach. r..'*" Tennis Field Narrows at Club IRVING Newman, of Lewis Fashions on Miami Beach, is interested in fashion change, "but I prefer not to commit myself until some of the most prominent designers have shown their collections. There is always a trend to stay with Dior and Balenciaga and their new collections have not yet been revealed." Mrs. Alfred Long represents both a professional and personal viewpoint. Her Barbara Jane Shop on Coral Way shows that The field narrowed in the Wcstbrooke Country Club's summer doubles tennis tournament as quarter finals play began. Bob Sussman and Marvin Werner teamed to defeat Don Zuckerman-Arthur Hertz 6-3. 6-1, while her customers are reluctant to accept the change. "A few new dresses have come in with a slightly longer hemline, and while the change is inevitable. it will be slow." to her way of thinking She also believes the top-ranked Jack Davis-Joe Haber figure should be seen, and that defeated Al Kurzweil-Richard Beh-1 MRS. SIDNtY LURIO the shift silhouette belongs in the house or on the beach. "As far as myself. I like the shorter skirts because a woman should ren 6-0. 6-0. Both were quarter Day Camp Extension final matches. Other quarter finals to be play-: Temple Sinai of North Dade ed this weekend pit Ed Horwitz this week announced the possibility of extending the Temple's summer day camp for two weeks at the conclusion ol its regular proshow her legs. A woman's and Sy Goldstein against Murraygreatest asset is her feminity, and Wally Mandell and Hank and she should do everything! Lubow and Barry Rothenberg possible to enhance it." i acainst Chuck and Mitch Lipcon. gram on Au IX I Hi: FALL, EUROPE IS LIKE Ol It OWN XKW i:\I.LAMI — COOt.. 1NCROWDEO. COLORVi U Imagine yourself in the Louvre Gardens, strolling through Copenhagen's Tivoli Park, and sailing up the Thames River past Tudor Palaces. OF EUROPEAN ADVENTURE AT iti in 4 in COSTS tuj,i\ OCTOHEK #*/. KOI \ll-l HIP JET ECOXOMY TRANSPORTATION FROM MIAMI TO: PARIS $50770 LONDON 465.90 ROME .... $608.40 COPENHAGEN 545.70 WE WILL BE GLAD TO ARRANGE YOUR ENTIRE ITINERARY INCLUDING STAYS AT BEAUTIFUL HOTELS WITH OLD WORLD CHARM. Shaw Travel Service Suite 101 245 S.E. First Street FRanklin 4-2604 We arrange all types of domestic and foreign travel. I % 



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Page 4-A Jewish ftoridlair Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 Published *v,ry Friday staoe 1K7 by ^ 1 *#M" oH ** at 12" N.M Sixth Street, Miami 1. WMJ. Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Florida. Tha sMBfe Floriplan hat absorbed the Je w sh _""',V',nr?lo ilSr lawlS Weekly Membar of the Jewish Teleo,rP nt0 %Jm vSlrSJ ArU FeYEr. Syndicate, Worldwide New. SeVvici National Editorial Assn., Amarican **?tJL Engl.sh-Jewith Newspapers, and the Florida P-ees Assn. • FRED K. SHOCHET Editor and Publisher LEO MJNDLINExecutive Editor iELMA M. THOMPSON Asat to Publisher The Jewish Floridian does not guarantee the Kaahrutfc of the merchandise advertised In Its columns. SUBSCRIPTION HATH; Local Arst One Year $5.00 Three Years $12.00 Out of Town Upon Request __ ISRAEL BUREAU Sheraton Hotel — Tel Aviv, Israel MAY U. BINDER Correspondent Volume 36 Number 31 Friday, August 2, 12 Av 5723 1963 Quota System Must be Abandoned President Kennedy is to be congratulated for the positive stand he has taken on the nation's cntiguated McCarran-Walter Immigration Act. The act has been a sore point of controversy ever since it went through Congress over President Truman's veto some 13 years ago. In the intervening decade President Eisenhower made a public commitment to its amendment, and now Mr. Kennedy suggests an across-the-board abolition of me national origins quota system. The statistics the President brings to bear in accord with his request are irrefutable: They show the existence of an unreasonable fear of the newcomer in our midst, and clearly suggest we can no longer afford such immature emotions %  — certainly not in a world v/here fee thorny walls of national antagonisms must be lowered if men can hope to survive. Apart from the question of cownright bigotry, the President demonstrates the utterly inequitable purpose and practice of the quota system. It is to be hoped that Congress will finally see the error of its ways. The growing era of McCarthy terror in the early '50's was largely the impetus behind the passing of the McCarran-Walter Act. The tide has done more than turn since then; it has presented us with a broad variety of necessary coals of challenge, the successful achievement of which require amity rather than disparity cmong men. They also require our nation's overall reversal of the quota system psychology, and it is this President Kennedy's stand so clearly expresses. CW* ANOPUMtfiHMWt* The President's Awareness The vague leport listing the agenda between Jewish War Veterans National Commandei Morton London and President Kennedy ends on a happy note, which assures the President's awareness of the missile buildup in Egypt. But the parade last week in Cairo celebrating Nasser's 11th anniversary of succession to power speaks another language. If the President is well aware of the probDade County's New Community Relations Board Continued from Page 1-A *ee has long felt the need to discuss human relations problems beyond the specific incidents wringing the problem to a head. For years now, they have lookad to ttoe time when Negro leaders would press for full implementation of the 1S54 Supreme Court ruling on integration. Behind t)|e scenes in Dade County, AJCommittee has worked pat .ently w in 8 recognition that too EaZJFSJTw Pa S9ed in stubborn rehanc o ** !" community travai ufa^n,J *v f .! hPir taad *iP amounts to virtual betellLr/ rL Vt anothlT as some Federation leaders are now on demand T^ a s,r,?n *hening of purpose to tighten up Z^JTJffiSE^" 9 ^ n o matter wh0 sks for a J2JE?**!* o£ an American Jewish Committee bid for such taK? Ws ,n nt 2*7 ta ,he wlnd Although AJCommrttee cerOCCUDUST 1 ", Uent ,eadersh *P. has not generally speaking moTsou^ thl r r le *!! Federati onThus, the denial,* Perhaps monlh ahead "M^ ^ n tkt *"* te8t W,U "* < urin th0 for more on this, another time. 0



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Page 4-B *. /mist nurktem Friday, August 2. 1963 What Kind of Family is Young Jewish 'Nazi's': By SAMUEL SCHREIG NEW YORK—Ian Lehr will have to raUe.,$5JjOO for bail -if he cares to attend his brothers Bar Mitzvah this coming week. Ian and seven others was arrested on charges of "Conspiracy, attempting to incite a riot, Sullivan Law Violation and Anarchy." The "Anarchy" charge stepis from Ian's association with the Neo Nazi, National Renaissance Party, the anti Semitic organization which touched off a near-riot in the Yorkville section of Manhattan last May. The NRP has been dubbed a "Subversive organization that advocates the overthrow of the government.*' The trouble began when three members of the NRP, counter' picketing at the racially embattled "White Castle" diner in. the Bronx, complained to police that their truck's window had been broken by angry CORE mem| bers who had been the target of the Nazi hoods. Amazed cops, sent out to investigate the damage, found the panel truck to be a small arsenal of deadly weapons, as well as a mobile library filled with anti-Jewish and anti-Negro hate literature. The complainants were immediately taken into custody. The' rest of the Nazis were soon picked up in their homes. Police found additional weapons and am-1 munition in the home of another Nazi, Peter Krauss. James H. | Madole, the 36-year old bachelor, head of. the NRP, was, picked'up i at his home at 10 West 90th St., j Manhattan. Soon, police had eight j Nazis in custody, all charged as "consiprators" in the plan to incite a not at the "White Castle" site. The eight Nazis had taken part in a "war council" in Ma%  dole's apartment before the picketing. Bronx Criminal Court Judge! Ambrose J. Haddock slapped a! $7,500 bail fee on Madole and tagged the others for $5,000. The Nazis as of now have been unable to raise bail. Reporters at the Bronx Criminal Court were ready to file their, sioiies when the real shocker, came. Sidney Lehr, father of 21year old Ian Lehr, rushed into court with his wife and filled with j emotion pk-aded: "No, I can't believe it. Ian is a nice 'Jewish boy." He went to Talmud Torah when lie was younger and used to go to Shul with his grandfather.' I don't believe it," he sobbed. "My son wouldn't do it. That's the Gods honest truth." Mrs. I Lehr. who unlike her husband did not succumb to tears, refused to I discuss the matter with reporters j other than to say: "My son is in-1 nocent. Ho is not guilty—that's all." The following morning the Lehr retider;e at 630 Schencctady Ave., a predominantly Jewish j who identified himself as a close friend of the family" said that he doubted whether the.Bar—Mitzvah of Ian's brother would take place as scheduled. "They probably will have to postpone it indefinitely, otherwise there may be more reporters for 'Kiddush' than guests." The Lehrs have another child, a 9-year-old boy. It is a well known fact that there are some Jewish people involved in Nazi activities, particularly in Rockwell's camp. Psychologists say these people ; r* obsessed with "sejf-hate" ar.d yearning for oVstruction. They are "skk people in desperate need of medical care^TV Jewish organizations involved in the bigotry-fighting front prefer to "sweep the dirt under the rug" for fear that publicity in the general press would serve to strengthen, the Nazi cause. Be it a mental case or a criminal case, the Ian Lehr headline] are uppermost in the minds of New York Jewry these days. N


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Friday. August 2, 1963 +Jelst>naridrtor7 hers include. I Leonard Bendell. Leslie Klein. Eugene Fleischer, and Norman Antopolsky. For her wedding, the bride chose a long white chant illy lace over bridesmaid satin gown. Her bouquet was of white roses, white sUphanotis. and white orchids. Newly-wed Mrs. Reed is a gradate of Miami Beach High School and the University of Miami, where she belonged to Phi Sigma Si urn a Sorority. The groom, a graduate of New Smyrna Beach High, is now a student at the U of M. i ,_ Reception followed the wedding! 174 CXITd BeOS at the Eden Roc. Following a • %  • m ~ Mrs. selma levy, ;t the Rio three-week honeymoon in Europe. Stated TOP CedarS Hotel, announces the marriage of the c-mml.. win h *t k„^„ ,, ,. ^ her daughter. Marsha Deanne \SjSt ]£ Sri! EL* "I Some 50.000 sq. ft. of additional Brown, to iDr. Myron H. Coulton, son of Mr. and Mr-. Nathan Coulft %  D ton. 2775 SW 29th Ave.. Miami. COIITOr DmnWier MRS. MYRON COtllTON Marsha Brown Weds Dr. Coulton Werner-Kahn MRS. BfRT REED space will be made available to Cedars of Lebanon Hospital with the completion of the upper three floors, it was announced Wcdnes%  day by Harry L. Lewis, president. Cantor Phillip Brummer will officiate at services held by former "We're getting 174 extra beds, members of the Havana Jewish to bring our total to 282." he said. Community Center this Saturday. The job should be completed by: 9 a.m., at Washington Federal Dc 1. Savings and Loan Association, _,,. 1234 Washington Ave. I. !" re< l new l W '1 gS are bcmg Cantor Brummer. who now lives ££ £ f r mforcod terete and Miami Beach Senior High School, Coral Gables, served at the £22? ^SS^SU^ % fli attended the University of FlorHavana Center, and previously W,th equipment, ida. and is a legal secretary for % %  cantor at Temple Emanu El the firm of Turner. Hendrick. bore. Fascell and Guilford in Coral Tlie June 16 wedding was held Wll Offiria + f at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Gold. 1710 SW 92nd Ave. Mrs. Gold, twin sister of the bride. was matron of honor, and Mr. Gold served as best man. RabBj Max Shapiro officiated at the ceremony. The bride is a graduate of. total job will come to a round $1 million. Gablei Sertoma International. He is acThe bridegroom is a graduate lively engaged in the practice of ol Miami Senior High School, regeneral dentistry in the South ceiyed his BA degree from the Miami area. University of Florida, and DDS! A European honeymoon is plan-, degree from • the University of ned for the couple so they may Maryland School of Dentistry. Dr. revisit many of the countries I Coulton is a member of Pi Lambwhere Dr. Coulton waa Stationed In addition to a complete cardiac section on the fourth floor, enlarged maternity sections, expanded laboratory ani out-patient departments, there will be %  new teachirj auditorium, coni ference room, gift shop, and administrative office. Nursing stations on each floor Real 'Pops' Fare Set for Sunday A "Pops"* concert program designed to appeal to all musical l tastes will be presented by the University of Miami Summer Symphony Orchestra this Sunday evening at Miami Beach Auditorium. Raymond Paige, music director and conductor of the Radio City Music Hall Symphony Orchestra, will be featured guest conductor on the ninth concert in the current 'Pops" concert series. Two soloists, baritone Warren' Galjour, who will also act as narrator, and Bobby Domenic. ban-] joist, together with the 60-mem-' ber University of Miami Choral Ucloo, coached by director Glenn Draper's assistant, Joyce McGrew, will be featured on the "Highlights from Radio City Music Hall" program. The Choral Union will be making its debut at these; summer concert programs. Program highlights include ex-' cerpts from Beethoveen's Fifth Symphony, Moonlight Sonata and Symphony No. 9; Kling's "EIe-| phant and the Fly," with tubal player Constance Bennitt and pic-i colo player Lilburn Knowland as featured soloists; Stephen Fos tor's "Swanee River" and "Camptown Races;" and Wieniawski's "Adagio-Romance," with UM Sym-, phony Concertmaster Eugene Dubois as soloist. Galjour will sing several popular tunes accompanied by the Choral Union. These include Anthony Newly's "What Kind of a Fool Am I?" from "Stop the World—I Want to Get Off;" "Moon : River," by Henry Mancini; "I Met a Girl." from Jule Styne's "The Bells Are Ringing;" and "Never on Sunday," a parody by Al Stillman, which is dedicated to the mail carriers of Greater Miami. Additional program highlights include a "Hootenanny—Folk Festival" presentation featuring Gal-! jour, Miss McGrew, a soprano, and the chorus. Paige's own arrangement of The Roaring Twenties" will also be presented with Domenic in a banjo solo. Louis Spielman at the honky-tonk piano. If you like Membership Committee Meet A Temple Beth Am committee, under the chairmanship of Irving Lax, will hold a membership "Koffee Klatch" at the Temple on Tuesday evening.. Prospective members will be taken on a tour of the building, and will have a ouestion-and-answer session with Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. A membership brunch will also be held in the Temple Social Hall on Sunday morning, Aug. 18. Catholics Feature Articles on Jews By Special Report "Ramparts." a Catholic layman's journal, has announced the appearance in the forthcoming Autumn issue of a symposium on the contemporary American Jew. The symposium is entitled "The Jew in American Culture." Contributors include: Maxwell Geismar, "The Jewish, Heritage in Contemporary American Fiction:" Leslie Fiedler, "The Jew as Mythic American;" Arthur Cchen, "The Jewish Idea;" Harold Ribalow, "The Jewish Side of American Life;" Karl Shapiro, "The Synagogue;" and Leonard Nathan, 'iTwo Doors" and "The Pilgrimage." and Charles Knight, euphonium soloist. The program will conclude with Albert Hay Maylotte's 'The Lord's Prayer," featuring the entire company. f NOWJ : : for moglc-eosM meals..* I^TOlMO : 1 m KOSHER : • SLICED BOLOGNA: KREPLACH -ffeshfyeMl vJwjumhacteH fRIENDLY, GENTLE CARE FOR THOSE YOU LOVE da Phi Alumni As>ociation, Alpha while serving two years of active will be enlarged to handle more Omeuu Dental Fraternity, and duty with the Air Force. patieris and accommodate more • personnel. The intensive heartcare unit on the fourth floor will include an electronic "heart saver," a TV like gadget which records the heart action of cardiac patients, and warns the nurse whenever the heart goes above or below the normal number Of beats per minute. < Coral Gables Convalescent Home NON.sfcr*iAM 70SO S.W. 8th STREET (on Iht Uin r,„i) MIAMI, FLORIDA rVoinanUH Rent,,,,, Ownf r-D.r.ctor '•'' Alt') oirl.r Ml Vrui H *Clfwl J, Si,d^,;:"\ Mo "" ,r *OTO. Pill %  (., • Especially designed and equipped lor the care of the elderly and chronically ill e Special diets observed • Nursing staff on duty 24 hours a day under supervision of registered nurses • Recreation, occupational therapy • Beautiful screened-in-patio Phone: CA 6-1363 T WATERMELON TIME IS HERE! Enjoy Ice-Cold Slices at Our Tables • .. Or Take Outl ALSO HALVES & WHOLE It TAC.IH.CUS 1789 Biscayne Blvd. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783 Other new installations include: a third bank of elevators, a nurses' call system which enables her to converse with tier patient i by a "pillow speaker." a Vac Pad oxygen unit in each room, automated lab testing equipment, individual heating an.l air-condi-i tioning controls in each room, and aluminum solar fins to direct orj I divert the sun's rays. Included in the sweeping improvements are construction of a | larger cafeteria space and moving the emergency ramp closer to the i j entrance driveway for speedier handling of emergency cases. Bowlers Plan Meetings Ahead Temple Beth Am Brotherhood Bowling League will meet at the University Lanes on Thursday evening for the 196S-64 season. The bowling committee includes Kenneth Kasselman, Alex Reiken, Jerome Goldsmith and Jess Freed. Mrs. Herbert Goldberg is the | president of the Sisterhood BowlI ing League, which will also meet i at the University Lanes. CHEF BOY-AR-DEB CHEESE RAVIOLI Hear family, guests, cheer for that real Italian flavor created by famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender little macaroni pies...filled with tangy Italian Cheese...simmered with savory tomato sauce and Cheese. ..seasoned the real Italian way. So much tastier and aasier than the frozen kind. So much thriftier, too—costs only •bout 15c par •orvingl WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO. (of Chicago) MIAMI BRANCH 2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 1-6551 a* 14* Old MilwaukeHENRY E. MANGELS CO. 3550 N.W. 58th ST. Miami, Florida L



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Prjge 8-A vJwisti FhrMian Friday. August 2. 1963 Pa Mmij,,. :..:, ui>'..-ital Kuwio. i*iiuuui.ii The Rootless By MAX LERNER i' • %  %  Bellagio. Italy. The sensation over the disclosure that Harold Philby was the -third man" in the McLean-Burgess spy case, and had himself been a Soviet spy since at least 1946, should not obscure the deeper and more sober meaning of the whole sequence of the current Soviet spy incidents. Include here the Wonnerstrom case in Sweden, the earlier Vassall case in I he British Admiralty, the 1961 case of George Blake in ttie British Foreign Office, the connection (whatever it may have been) of Captain Ivanov with the'current Ward-Keeler-Profumo complex, as well as the McLean-Burgess-Phflby spy triangle. Obviously and on the surface they raise the security issue in an age of overkill weapons. One hapless result of the rash of British spy incidents is likely to be a greater resistance of the American security services to sharing overkill secrets with the British nuclear establishment—or. for that matter, with any European nuclear establishment that may emerge in ihe remainer of the decade. It can be argued that European nations must tighten ttieir security apparatus, but I trust that this will not lead to the argument that Americans .-hoold ignore the need for some kind of European nuclear network (with American help) as the basis for an integrated European economic and political system. Nor can the Labor Party people in Great Britain reasonably get much political ammunition from the latest news about the Philby case or the Wennerstrom case in Sweden. Philby was in the British Foreign Service during Labor and Conservative ministries alike. Even Herbert Morrison (now Lord Morrison), who complained in the House of Lords about the "longhaiied journalists"—the Observer and the Economist—who employed Philby as their Miadle East correspondent after his dismissal from the Foreign Office, was himself Foreign Minister during part of the Philby espionage service. • • • Harold Wilson has decided that the coming Labor government (and a Labor victory is growing more certain with every scandal) will opt out of tin nuclear effort. I >u.-pect that the American security chiefs will'sigh with relief when that happens, whatever the American delense Chiefs may feel about it. Yet that will not resolve the deeper! problem of Soviet spy recruiting, which depends less on governmental policies in the West than on the question of roots and rootlessness. committtent and emptiness, selfhood and the disintegration of self. When Newsweek speaks of the current spy cases as pointing to the rise of a "new pornocr.u-y," the phrase is clever, but the sex aspect is not the crucial one. Eros marks only one of the ways in which the Russians tried to exert pressures on their chosen victims. The dangerous spy recruits are less whose who are won over by sexual largesse or sexual blackmail than those who come over because a free society somehow has lost its hold on their allegiance, and who arc'therefore pushovers when the Soviet recruiting agents touch their j vulnerable point. It i? interesting that most of the people -involved in the recent European spy cases—McLean, Burgess, Philby and Wennerstrom arc instances—felt that they were not selling out anything very important to them when they sold out 'heir country, as compared with whatever^ it was that went beyond their country and their culture. Anyone who has'had some contact with European education, especially in the university system in the 1980s and 1940s, knows that the main drift of it was to corrode some of Ihe great values that Europe built up in the centuries before the WorM Wars—the idea of freedom, of dissent. of religious and political tolerance, of man himself as the root of values. • • • To be or the left in Europe, whether in labor parties or Socialist parties, baa not always kept this erosion from beeoming destructive. The case of McLean and Bujrgess and Philby illustrates that a man could be highly literate with every resource of the society at his command, and even have acquired some vague notions of equality as the prime value, and yel be empty as a person and morally sick unto death. The Communists try to resolve the problem of their own youth by attempting complete control of the educational system, by party discipline and penalties, by stressing Soviet triumphs and ultimate victory, by drilling into their youth the enormity of betrayal. They throw out a Xekrasov from the party because he dares write an account of his American journey in which he confesses that he enjoyed some, things about it. and that not all America is a wasteland. They humiliate a Ycvtushcnko for talking of the difference in outlook between the generation of the fathers and that of the sons. There are better ways, lor the Western cultures, of holding the allegiance of the sons—not by penalties and excommunication but by raising the sons to struggle in their own way for their own goals, as rebels or conservers or both, hut always to struggle as men with an unassailable core of self, and with roots reaching to the soil of their culture or sub-culture. The niverities cannot do what the parents and community, by behavior as well as precept, fail to do; nor can the univerities undo what the parents and community do well. Ft. Lauderdale Temple Elects Burnstine Prexy Kenneth Q. Burnstine has been clecte.i president "St Temple Lmanu-El of Ft. Lauderdale. Other officers named at a recent meeting of the congregation j include Dr. Robert A. Uchin. first vice president; Leo J. Moss, second vice president; Mack Katz. treasurer; Hyman Lipshires, financial secretary; and Elliott B. Barnett, recording secretary. Board of directors includes Dr. Alvin Colin, Morris Golden, Alvin ; Gross. Siegfried Herz, Sam Katz, Mrs. Peter Lawson. Gilbert Mallinger. Joseph Novick, George j Overbrook, Simon Ruden, Dr. 'Henry I. Thanz. Irwin Weiscr.j Marvin Wolff, and Martin Yohal-i em. President of the Brotherhood is Henry Stcrngold. Mrs. Alvin Colin is president of Sisterhood. Harry Ozer and Stuart Gardner are president of the Thirty-Niners and Youth Group, respectively. y ^ >\ U OAOC IOUUVMO MIAMI IIACH. FLORID* JlrflMON 3 002-4 t*"H a. •LI-JIEK* PUNKRAk OiWCCTOn A GELB MONUMENTS INC. Open Every Day • Closed Sabbath 140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583 Attend services tab week at if our awn place of worsEib KENNETH BURNSTINE Bible Class Resumed Rabbi David Rosenfield will re sumc the meeting of Bible classes at Flagler-Granada Jewish Center beginning Saturday at 6 p.m. B'nai B'r'rth Social Singles B'nai B'rith Social Singles will j hold a night club affair at the Balmoral Hotel on Saturday even-1 in J The organization, now in its i seventh year, is inviting single adults from 35 to 55. PALMER "Miami's Only Jewish Manwntnt %  •IMert" SID H. PALMER Exclusive "ROCK OF AGESFAMILY MEMORIALS •/APW*% T. liv. IA Heart* Wo tv BoWim!... I. liv. Fory.r rnat? maw Scheduled Unveiling* SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 1*>3 Laknide Mrmoriml Pn HARRY ZIMMERMAN, 11 aan. Rjhbi Mortem MaUvikj "May Tlifir So-.ili Repose in E.cmcl Pe*ct' PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. 3279 S.W. 8th Street HI 4-0921 Phenei Nl 4-0*21 pyttv '-:;2 7WW ;in BETH DIN OFFICE RABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN 1061 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach JE 1-1969 JE 1-6150 REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Greater Miami's largest A Oldest Supplier far Snagogaes, Hebrew A Sunday Scbeehk Wht/es./e t Retail ISRAEL, GinS AMD M0VUTUS 417 Washing ten A,t. JEVW7 American-Israeli w Religious Store Now ready to tahe orders for your Synagogue. Big selection of Tallesim, skull caps and all Prayer Boohs for High Holidays. Please call S. Schwartz at JE 1-7722. 1357 Washington Avenue (tabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky Phone JE 1-3595 •45 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH WE SPECIALIZE m CONDOLENCE BASKETS From $7.50 We Deliver FRUIT CIRCUS NATIONAL MONUMENT CO* PERSON AWED MEMORIALS INC MONUMENTS MAUSOLEUMS GRANTTE BRONZE! MARKERS MARBLE BENCHES ft VASES HI 6-6009 32SQ S.W. ST., MIAMI WELCOME WAGON HI 8-4994 \^M£mo^T^an^ x V i t r fit uiLtiit 8. COMMUNITY MAUSOUUM "The Tnit Looks Like A Ci'dcn" jiwisM ciMimiis TU 5.689 tWBI H. W. T. 1789 BISCAYNE BLVD. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783 YOU GET MORE CALLS mm YOUR PHONE IS ALWAYS ANSWERED Jh!r. C n,W,r iT^ r ph ? n • in r •*" me. Less then *5 per week for full time Telephon. Secret."/ ANSWERITE, INC. TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE Phone JEfferson 8-0721 fiTffiHli&bMijtHkJtaBi reverently cared for surroundings for our deported loved ones era) i


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Page" 6-A *Jewl$t rtorkjian Friday, August Z, 1963 Israel Bonds Point the Way to Development No Road Signs Needed To Demonstrate Progress; Country Proves the Point By LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor The Jewish Floridian Drive along the roads of Israel, and you will see occasional blue and white signs erected on the way that tell you Israel Bonds help build the country. For the sharper eye, the signs are not necessary: the country itself declares the significance of bond funds at every passing mile. I spent nearly a week in the Negev of Israel during my recent visit there. A week out of a total five-week stay is perhaps a long time: but it was barely long enough reckoned in terms of the significance of this part of the country' to its ultimate development. For here is Israel's new horizon; here lies her future. Return to the Desert Just south of Boershcba and Dimona. the desert is gentle, with its swelling sand dunes the backdrop for Arab beduin who. at least at a distance, appear to be playing the romantic role of a iong-forgotten world in a low budget movie. Further south, near Mitzpa Ramon, and from there to Israel's southernmost point, Eilat. the landscape takes on a frightening and awe-inspiring presence, where you might perhaps be making a return trip to a part of the globe atom-blasted several hundreds of years before, and since lying deserted, bereft of the signs of men and their civilization. Civilization on Sand It is to this heated, violet-colored world, for the desert seems a variety of shades of violet that Israelis are taking today in their latest bid to conquer the land they won on the field of battle in 1948. Ask any Israeli acquainted with current afairs. and he will tell you that everything in his country is one-third Israel Bonds. This means that roughly a third of the capital investment for economic and industrial progress comes from Israel Bond development funds. But sights show more than statistics. It is perhaps a forty-minute drive from Beersheba to Arad, a new town literally rising out of the desert sands. At a distance, in the descending sun, I came upon Arad to view it from the perspective of a Georgia O'Keefe painting: a narrow line of civilization, of buildings, silver and concrete and gardencolored, spreading out upon the horizon. To Arad will increasingly be moving pioneer families to make of that part of the desert a verdant enclave. It is Israel Bond funds that are helping to achieve this, as in other areas of the Negev. which serve to shore up the nation's huge southern area — an area belonging to Israel on the map. but which must in fact be made a part of Israel by incoming settlers and incoming industry. Salt and the Sea Starting from Beersheba again, in another direction, lies the Dead Sea. with Sdom and its huge Bromine Works. The plant currently produces some 3,000 tons annually, most of which is exported. The salt mines here are huge jagged walls of mineral rising from the highway. Stop on the way. pick up a rock and taste it, and you have returned to the world of Lot and his wife. But bond funds have returned there, as well, as even the solid highway on which you drive straight to Eilat. one of the most marvelous Israel Bond achievements, proclaims in the song beneath your ringing tires, cutting the silence of a desert-soon to give way to the ingenuity of men bent on building a new nation. With a massive assist from Israel Bonds, an immigrant boy (left) in the northern Negev is trained to handle a tractor. Right are Israel's own airplane repair facilities at Lydda Airport. The Israel Bond drive, which hcsabroad"raised more than S600.000.000 for economic development, is seeking to obtain $75,000,0CC in 1963 to further the country's economic pro-tress. EMERGING HORIZONS OF A VIGOROUS NATION Negev Yields to Conquest Today If Israel's Negev desert is to become a viable part of the nation, what must be brought there are water, housing, harbors, roads, communication, industry and agriculture. Signs of Israel Bond assistance in the achievement of these seemingly impossible goals are everywhere apparent. Dimona, a lovely new city south of Beersheba. is growing apace. I stopped on the highway one morning, about 7:15, to pick up a teacher hiking to her class in Dimona. Arrived at her school. I beheld a host of children of all ages trudging to meet the bell in a world of new housing and public accommodations standing everywhere on sand. Israel Bond funds have here, too, been helping to make the difference, not alone in capital investments in the growing textile industry, but in the phosphate deposits there, as well as at other sites in Israel, where some $7 million in allocations are being applied in the direction of developing the mines and quarries. Key is Water But the principal key is water, as exemplified by the fact that during the current year some $27.5 million in development budget funds have been earmarked for the Jordan Rivcr-Negev irrigation project. Israel's national water project is expected ultimately to span some 100 miles and cost in the neighborhood of $200 million, adding 320 million cubic meters of water to the country's annual capacity for urban and industrial use, and bringing an additional 100.000 acres of land under irrigation. Thus, even in the north of the country, the impact of bond investment dollars is felt. I drove down to Tiberias one day, and coming from the mountains. a?* ipN 1 Work nears completion on the Wadi Amud section of the Israel national water project, being built with the aid o: Israel Bond funds, which will bring 100,000 additional acres in the Negev under irrigation. The concrete pipes shown ~bcve, which are nine feet in diameter, will feed water i:om the Sea of Galilee into a ten-mile open channel to the Zalmc.i Reservoir. Israel Bonds are the principal source c: funds ::r the economic development of the Negev. could see Lake Kinneret in the distance. At either side of the road. Stretching hundreds of yards back, there were excavations and pipe-laying crews. How would the water get from one mountainside to the other? Not by pump, but by the syphon principle, the water on the sec ond side naturally seeking the level of its original source. 'How' of Housing It is this kind of ingenuity that will be bringing water to such new points of development in Israel's southland as Arad and Ashdod, ultimately to be the country's third important deep-water port after Haifa and Eilat, a project certainly to cost in the neighborhood of $75 million, including a S27.5 %  ; :ion lc in from the World Bai Who will Ij • .n the c new cities rising i i the d ssert? The question ess "wb >" than "how." for noosing remains a principal problem in an expanding nation such as Israel it has been estimati that In 1963. alone, Israel v jiild be -pending -some $61.5 million, o. which more than S2t. have been allocated by Israel Bond development funds. Tin goal? The erection of more than liO.OOC housing units in 1963 and c iefly in the Negev, The blasted '.; nd I s.iw, Ihe moonscape horizon, is being rolled back for it -,ilux of people and their industry, and israel Bond dollar. • wiping to do the Job. Window on Africa Major Recipient of Bond Aid Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, then Minister of Finance, launches Israel's first gas pipeline as Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice president of the State of Israel Bond Organization, looks on. Israel's "window on Africa" is the city of Eilat, at the southernmost point of the country. Eilat figured prominently in the 1956 Suez-Sinai campaign; for out of that campaign came the liberation of the port from the shipping barricade Egypt had set up on the Straits of Tiran and Sharm el-sheikh, an encampment in the Red Sea. Shipping to and from Eilat now free, the city has begun to grow by leaps and bounds. Mayor Joseph Levy will tell you that, like Beersheba, he hopes some day for a population of 50,000 and more; and, in fact, both Eilat and its port show signs that the mayor has good reason for his ambition. Copper Cement Despite its sensitive and strategic position — you can see Aqaba in Jordan and the silver oil tanks of Saud Arabia just a few miles south on the border — the port burgeons with trade. And the impact of Israel Bond funds is everywhere apparent. To begin with, bond funds have contributed to the development of the port itself, as well as its housing projects. Just north of the city arc King Solomon's mines and the Timna copper works. The storv of the rediscovery of the mine I by Dr Nelson Glueck in the late 1920's is a fascinating one. which involved total reliance on the accuracy of the Bible; but the copper works today arc mere than m archaeological curiosity. They are big business, involving millions of dollars annually of some B8 percent pure copper cement • xport — a venture to which Israel Bond fundi have cor.'.ributcd substantially. Tnus, when \ .one goes in Israel, the sign.' ; re everywhere apparent in the land of Israel Bond assistance, whether in the 108 in. pipeline, whose shoulder from the Yarfcoa in the nnrth st'll needs Unking, to the stone and chemical c.carries of the desert in the sotrtn, the road through the Negev on which you drive, and the Port of Eilat at the Red Sea. In industry, in % housing, in .( iltare, in com' merce, Israel Bonds daily play a vital role.



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Friday, August 2. 1963 Jewisti norktaam Page 9-A IWniHtil—IWtf i imiilWMWMill" GEMS OF WISDOM Water, having paw st r ated the earth, •< ' %  •-. forth plants, thtu f one glorious fha:n of love, o/ git f ing And refewrrig. unites all ereI attires; '.one i bj or /or itself, but '] Pr all tni-.gs exrr hi omnnmil reZ §' siproful actitt*-, one for all. arul I ^ all for vie one s. R. HIRSCII. £ *. • What ue get MM of lift it in I 'direct p nt a sf ti' o n to what we put} 1.1(0 it. -HUMAN • • • If yo:. doni g e faath ynu gjeja I I £sau.. —l-ROVtRiis. < %  The icJ[ ui. ass), the ueil you,' < %  !£. >.U>LOM ALElCltkM. • • • \ot a hanJ/u! of rum descends* |rom acute ui: ->:.: iJje earth send-I mg up Oca hsndfull of moisture to f f meel it. —GENESIS RABBA. • I ulu'avj g:ie tnucli au'ay. and* ...".rr IhlpJttfMM msteadof pleasI I' < VARNHAHEN. Ffcajl !':• : ;• Imping to rer Ch t or honor, are M% bargain. — PJIII.O .& C7X. %/ Of JH t Let the Bible Artists Go Back to Study the Source iami s r^cligious o many Jewish people. One of the poems lanionU the public burning of Talpiudic 'actates in France during the 13!a century. Naturally, the most common theme is the destruction of 'he Temple. This collection read on Tislia B'Av. Perhaps "most popular of' the poems are Ithose written by Judah Halevi in the llta centur>. who expressed |his deep sentiments for Zion. Why en some Jews observe some decree of mourning even on the day .Her Tisha B'Av? Th.re is a \ery authorative Opinii n which holds that the Temple was destroyed on the tenth day Ol A. Therefore, the very pious Observe some measure of mourning on 'his day. besides the customers day of mourning on the ninth o Av. Why ar penitential prayers such "ichnun omitted from the prayers on Tisha B'Av? Tisha B'Av, while it is recognized a day of mourning for the destruc on of the Temple and u.ilui Lr*g4c Jewish events, is also Tons:. | BS ;i type of holiday. '"he -i.ih is said to have been born oo Tisha B'Av. In general. no Jewish tragedy is without some lines i of hope. Actually, when all u. e full> realized and events will |. jiupletely understood, the tragi it in our personal life as will our communal lives, will be seci u have been a blessing in | disguisThu:: ,t i s claimed that penitential prayers are omitted on Tisha jB'Ay tfl strike %  remote symbol of I festivity. Furthermore, on occasions Iw e Tisha B'Av, the spirit of | mourning brings about penitence, even without formal reminders and thus claim the penitential |Prayetu re not omitted. BVrakot. 4 lb. Six :-.mgs are a disgrace to an educalrd person: 1. To u-ali. on the wrfet perfumed. 2. -Te u/dk ahnt t v night. 3. To uwr old dout.rf Wiae*. 4. To tal^ seith a ieoma.i overlong in the atreet. 5. | J %  m tabit j 7 !i itbterate men. • 7 "r Idie at the sywagogue. • | Bibs Met:i, 8$. H a -tan. his sonamd grandson. J'lolars, ehe Torah iciH not % •^ong hu ittttndmu. By RABBI NORMAN N. SHAPIRO Beth David Congregation Of late there has been a return to the Bible: the new books the literary market, the new movies, the increase in Biblical radio programs, and eyen ah attempt to present Biblical drama on television. Pictorial presentation has a great and. good effect upen both adults and children.' There is only one danger—either of omissionor commission of Biblical facts as they are. For some reason, there seems to be a concerted attempt to sugar-coat, cover, and misrepresent history. Technical advisors forget that the public, while it may be backward in some areas, is more familiar with the Bible as a whole than any other literature. i To attempt to gloss the facts and present them in such a way as to add romantic and modern values has robbed the pictures, books and programs of a dynamic punch. The heroes become too heroic and the tyrants receive just punishment for their errors. This is not always true in Biblical telling. The appeal of the Bible lies in the fact that, though some of the stories are based on fiction, romanticizing them does not emphasize their moral anneal, Thcatr? and radio and literature have a magnificent opportunity to complement the job begun by the rabbi or the minister. They can make it easier for him to draw analogies, knowing that there is background in the mind of the congregation. But my complaint is that they have instead added situations and characterizations which do not exist and, in some cases, have gone along more dangerous ground and changed the philosophy and the morals of the point in question in order to increase the entertainment and spectacular values. In toe cane of the Biblical movie, it is necessary that the sacrcdness of the text be preserved and respected. There should be not one but a panel of technicians to see that there will be no offense committed. Today more than ever we are seekers of truth. We must see to it in an atomic age that the beauty and sanctity of the Bible are preserved. It is a sad state of events when liberties are taken with the word of the law. In our perusal of Biblical novels, movies, radio porgrams and television productions, it would be well for us if we could find the time to reread our Bibles in order to get a clear picture of the morals and patterns of human behavior as they affect us today. It is well that the Bible has been brought into the foreground. Let us make it a policy to follow our Bibles as closely as we follow the books and music and theatre and related fields of entertainment, and make it as natural a part of every day living as possible. Information to be included in the Religious Services column must be in the News Room of The Jewish Floridian not later than Friday, a.m., preceding the week of publication. AH releases received after that time will be returned as proof of their lateness. AGUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave.. anHiiiiiiuii.:iBk:..miUi!.rjanj: MILE IM Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever. r^elicjion — The Amer; j ican Jewish community, which has been involved in the quest for civil rights for a long time, has now developed "a new sense of urgency regarding inequality to the Negro." a representative of the Reform rabbinate told a Catholic conference here. This view was expressed by Rabbi Balfour Bricknor. director of the lie schools was criticized Commission on Interfaith Activiweekend by the Vatican newspapties of the Union of American Hee[ L 0sst rva t 0 re Romano. The brew Congruous in at .address o{ Hon bctwC( n before the Na .onal Catholic^ C onP P £ ference ior Interracial Justice. ^^ ^ newspaper saidi ..„ tending to become, also legally. This page is prepared in cooperation with the Spiritual Leaders of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn. BABBI MAX A. LIPSCHITX Coordinator Contributor: RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF Gems of Wisdom *NSME EMES. 2533 SW 19th ave. Conservative. Joseph Picus, prescient. • BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd ave. Conservative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro. Cantor William W. Lipson. fcVidu.i 6 p.m. S;*!uil.i> If .. i • BETH EL. 500 SW 17tn ave Orthodox, Rabbi Solomon Schiff. BETH EMETH %  YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie Hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Simon April. Cantor Hyman Fine. Kri*l;i\ s:ir, p.m. Kernmn: "Confesvtoa of l\.iih." Saturday s:ir. a.m. BETH ISRAEL. 400 Prairie ave. Orthodox. Rabby H. Louis Rottman • < BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern. Cantor Maurice Mamches. I-'I iila.x 6:,1o p. III. Saturdaj S:"(i u.m. Bar Mltsvah: Mark, on of Mr. und ,\li>. Juck i-li* %  li.-l. Beemon: "True ami K, listS..' BETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th ave. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bernstein. I ri.lai 6:10 pin. Paturda> <:45 u.m "Kihiis of the I'.Hlit i>' at .".::'." p.m. Sermon: "Wi are Comforted." BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave. Orthodox. Ralph Krieger, secretary. BETH TFILAH, 935 Euclid ve. Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky. BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE slth •va. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip•chits. Cantor Ben-Zion Xirschenbaum. Friday 6:18 p.m. Saturday :l" a.m. Bar Miizvali: Lester, *'n of Mr. and Mi> Max Hirst CONGREGATION ET2 CHAIM. 15441 Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Strassfeld. FROM THE TALMUD Pesahim. 112. Reside not in a town, whose I mayor is a Disciple of the Wise. i He icill hare no time to attend to I municipal affairs, being occupied with his ttmlies. • Shcmot Rahbah, 41:5. As the bride is anointed U'lth [iicniv-juiir ^inds of cosmetics, so I should tjir Disciple of the Sa?es be acquainted uilh the firentyfour boos,.s of the Bible. • Zohar Hadash, Tikkun, 70. A pseudo-sage is lil(e a donkey thai curries a lotfd ('} b<' • s Kohelet Rabbah, Who it .i Disciple of the Sa^.< He iclii> considers Ins studies more important than his business. %  Kallah Rabbati, 5 Humility and lowliness of spirit mariy the manner of the Disciples of the Sages. • Taanu, 7. Why is Torah lil(e a piece of | uciod.' As a small piece of wood I Ijmdle. the lii so a minor scholar I sharpeiu the mind of the greater. • c Ln.Uin. 54. As u-tji perfume, any one who desires may be made fragrant by it. 10 the scholar .should be willing t,> teach any one who desires to pro. fit by his leuriunx. In such a case. DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGRE CATION. 1401 NW 1S3rd st. Con aarvative. Rabbi Harold Richter. his learning wvl be retained by h Cantor Emaauel Mandel. tviiitiy at lunonwi. s.i in.iii: "Portion i the ft'eek." Saturday S:S0 a.m. FLACLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51ot pi. Conservative. Rabbi David Rosenfeld. Cantor George Goldberg. Friday SMS p.m. S.iuir S:8U a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." aiFMuiiiiiM'' JOT ii—sniimniii'iiiinmam ue cheater, Knelnnil. Sermon: "Woriii .i. wi-h Communities." Baturday 10:4" a in. Cantor VVUUain Ro*aJ renders the iiiusi.al portions of tb.ntursy in the abaonce of Cantor Convtoer, FT. LAUDERDALE EMANU-EL. 1801 TEMPLE B NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi 22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi S. Richard M. Leviton. M. Machtei. • I Friday s.:;n p.m. Onao. BhaWiat to HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree honor Rabbi ami Mrs. M Iit.-i, who dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S. Gross. HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. —i— • ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton MaJavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave. Orthodox Rabbi David Lehrfield. Cantor Abraham Seif. MINYONAIRES. 3737 Bird rd. em Traditional. Modi last Facsimile of Psalm Book JERUSALEM — (JTA) — A facsimile of a Psalm Book published in 1649. the first to be printed in the United States, was presented to Prime Minister Levi Eshkol here by Harry Zaidenburg, on behalf of an Israel Bond leadership group from Chicago. Premier Eshkol, who was given a standing ovation by the group at a reception in his office, told the visitors that it was a source of great agnosticism." Intermarriage in So. Africa Rising JOHANNESBURG — (JTA) — Intermarriage between Jews and non-Jews in South Africa is on the increase "to an appreciable degree," the Federation of Synagogues of the Transvaal and the Orange Free State declared in its annual report here. The report has been readied tor submission to the third national Conference joy that Israel was repaying the ^ orthodox Hebrew Congrega 1951 bonds "through the toil and *___ .._ u ,, ^ "\.r_, achievements of Israel's populace." He added, however, that this did not signify the end of the country's development needs. Vatican Crltklfes Cot#rH Ban ROME — (JTA) — The United tions, to be convened here next month. According to the report, intermarriage in South Africa "is assuming disquieting proportions." The report also noted that there is a shortage in this country of rabbis and other Jewish religious functionaries, and urged expan States Supreme Court's decision sion of training for such posts by banning the Lord's Prayer in pub-1 local Jewish institutions. OHEV SHALOM. 911 Normandy dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weberman. • SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645 Collins ave. Cantor S. Nachmias. • — SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th St. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein. • TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN 1025 NE 183rd st.. Miami Gardens rd. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor j Morris Bergar. l-ridav i, p.m. >atlirail> 7.!.". a.m. TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall dr.. So. Miami." Reform. Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodoer liMav s %  ::,! p.m. fined! speaker: Byron I'II. rk-iM. executive \i->preas8:.14i p.m. Beta fAmbrto OHta Fraternity MudenU at-tho Untvaudty ol Miami to assist in conductluK Saliluiih ,1" i\niifi.r and Connotation servlre. Sernpin: "Israel's Klaht of Ae••e.-Fi to the WailluK Wall." Oneg Slmlib.x basts! Member* of Meter* hoot). TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase IVI. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish C an t si David Cenvlser. Frtdsv' 8:1* p*tn. Mummer Assistant TtaVbt: Mtcnaflt -Ct-utstoiT,ot -MUn'have Jusl returned from abroad. Youth service Saturdaj 9:80 a.m. TEMPLE EM'NU-EL. 1701 Washington ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving Lehrmae. Cantor Hirah Adlar. lYiday ii p.m. Saturday ^ a.m. TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NS 19th St. Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. Cantor Jacob Bornstein. TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Mordacal Podet. Cantor Gordon Richards. Frlda) R:IS p.m. Rabm l'odet to preaoh. i men Bhabbat will follow. TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th st. Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. Cantor Edward Klein. • TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and Tatum Waterway. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Eugene Laboviu. Cantor Saul H. Breeh. TEMPLE OR OLOM. Conservative. 8755 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor Gershon Levin. • TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH MIAMI. 12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Daniel M. Lowy. I*i aia;s;i.", p.in. S.'rnmn: "i 'an th.Ilelle? in One Ood Kurvlve tha Space Aare?" TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 51 Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Hyman Gross. Cantor Jack Lerner. Klein. TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave. Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Canter Ben Dickeon. Friiuiy r.::t0 p.m. Saturday S.lj a.m. Suniland TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th St. Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Cantor Seymour Hinkes. TIFERETH ISRAEL. 8500 N. Miami ave. Conservative. Rabbi Henry Wernick. Cantor Albert Glanta. YOUNG ISRAEL. WI NE 171 It Orthodox. Rabbi herwm StauSar. Friday 7 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." Ji t. T::II %  BaraaHsaaBHaRsa:wa^svesiB>L I MDUUGHWIG Tim 12 Av —6:49 p.m. I


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Page 2-B Icnlsti nrridirin Friday, August c orner 4 cup fresh lime juice < cup vegetable oil 2 teaspoons minced dried onion b teaspoon salt R teaspoon white pepper Today we present two recipes for chicken which are particularly suited to summer eating. The first i. a broiled chicken dish with Select a broiler of about 2 : i lbs. eviscerated weight. Cut it into quarters. Wipe the pieces dry with a paper towel. Press the wings flat, away from the breast meat. Combine all remaining Ingredients hallow dish, and dip each chicken soup until soft, then flu, .thoroughly. Beat the soaked hrea nuts, onion. papitkawassAd s,,\t ^cther until modth. Spr sauce over the cjbic, '.v IU i -4 1 ui; ui\. i-;11 h e r This amount makes 4 serv. %  rS&rt H portable ccokers which can be set up on a few square feet of lawn! in a or terrac \ Broiled chicken used ; piece of chicken into the mixture. to be regarded as a specialty of Coat it completely. Place the thigh New! AJAX all purpose cleane with ammonia ... < %  Ulvunl vmtMsu uiiD wim uiii......i,i u a =,,.w. .v %  coat it completelv. I'lace tlie tlimli a bareb perceptible taste of lime, spring, and tried chicken of sum, I The second is a most unusual way Pier. But now the ease ot prepaand leg <"** sk,n wde dowB .A of presenting cold chicken. | ration. low calorie coun', and or. the rack of a broiler It cook• • • • • Y Y Outdoor cooking has become so adaptability ol the broiled have tag indoors, have the tops about \/' — _••%_ %  a... • _i_ :L i ._ i i A inAhtic i i -. i %  ,. 11 i %  D t-t\ • I ^ 4 inches from the heat. Broil 5 MRS. *H[A GLADWIN Mrs. Gladwin Named to Posts Mrs. Rhea Cashman Gladwin has been appointed to serve as Outdoor cooking has become so much an accepted part of our summade it popular at every season.! When a larger broking chicken is] minutes, then arid the whit" meat used, as in today's recipe, the)pieces, also skin side down. Condarker meat requires a little long-, ttoue broiling until the flesh is er cooking time than the white, i delicately brown, and baste from For best results, cut the chicken into quarters and put the thigh • %  •••< mer living that each pleasant day finds whole segments of the population concentrating over fireplaces or grilles. Even apartment dwellers who live alone have tiny To be Delegate Mrs. Isaac ami Beach. Offenhcnden, of Mipresident of Beba time to time with the remaining lime mixture. Turn the pieces over and continue to broil and baste • cleans everything • from the floor up! • an ex-officio member of the exec' %  convention of Pioneer Women breast and wings. The total cooking time needed cannot be given as the intensity of the heat of the Idelson Chapter, will represent various units differs greatlv. It the chapter at the 18th national may vary from twentv minutes t0 convention of Pioneer Women in __ ... .. .• %  .. r ,. ".. ana continue to i and leg pieces on the cooking unit i „_, ; ,. ., • • about 5 minutes before adding the ""' ,l L e ^ '* a Repeat 3 times • day. TRY NEW PALMOLIVE SOAP IN PASTEL GREEN OR PINK fifi iIQ riMi mil 5



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Page 12-A *Je*is} Fkrirfiair Friday. August 2. 1953 n PEPSI GOIA COMPANY BRINGS YOU the sugar-free cola with rewarding true cola taste! PATIO DIET COLA FIGURE EXPERT DEBBIE ORAKE says: 'GREATTO .g "THE REFRESHING YOUR WAIST!"J WAY TO STAY SLIM!" ;•>£ 'PATIO ft/ETCOLft' lii, :ittt I (..all'Mit .1 %  t wi l l "SUGAR-FREEONLY 1 CALORIE PER SERVING!" •REWARDING TRUE-COLA TASTE! % % % %  ^' & %  ,,.sr "Now you can satisfy that natural yearning for refreshment and still stay slim. New Patio Diet Cola contains only one calorie per serving. It's absolutely sugar-free, yet it tastes delicious. Gives you true-cola taste because it's made with true-cola ingredients by Pepsi-Cola Company. Try it today. It's the refreshing way to stay slim. Patio Diet Cola SUGAR mi ""^ DIET COLA mzssszmisssmtsmm On .. %  AVAILABLE AT YOUR DEALER'S NOW Or Call 635-6451 BOTTLED BY PEPSI-COIA BOTTLERS OF MIAMI. INC.. 1251 N.W. 36.h STREET. UNDER APPOINTMENT FROM PEPS.COLA COMPANY MY U Y.



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<; w otnan s "World "dTewislri Floiridiaitu Miami. Florida. Friday. August 2. 1963 Section B Y Child Program Names Chief Mrs. Morris Skop (left) presents ceramic sculpture piece depicting a Rabbi and Bar Mitzvah boy to Mrs. Esther Yagoda, president of the Sisterhood at Beth Shirah. Beth Shirah Women Get Ceramic Sculpture Piece Mrs. Morris A. Skop. art in-•r ; I r in the Dadc County Pub-, ic School System, and director of! I hi Vrls and Crafts Department at Temple Beth Shirah. this week 1 True Sisters Will Celebrate Miami 43. United Order of True j, will celebrate at a meet.! •_ here Wednesday at the AlHotel. Mrs. Morris WeinITS will be chairman of the day. ted Order is a 115-year-old • ational organization. The meeting here will be in acnee with the organization's i that True Sisters and I hi riends gather together on the !ir-l Wednesday of every Au.ii-i presented a ceramic sculpture piece depicting a Rabbi and Bar Mitzvah boy to Mrs. Esther Yagoda. Sisterhood president of the Temple. The decorative piece will be used as a table decoration at Bar .Mitzvah Kiddush on the Sabbath. Another companion piece is being finished of a bride and groom to be used at the Kiddush Table during wedding celebrations. A number of Mrs Skop's pupils have won prizes at local art exhibits, and a show of 18 paintings sketched during a trip to Israel and Europe will be featured at new Temple Beth Shirah following dedication ceremonies on Sep*. 8. Mrs. Skop is the wife of Rabbi Morris A. Skop. of Beth Shirah. She is a graduate of the New York Academy of Design and the University of Miami. Mrs. Stanley Cohen has been appointed chairman of the county-wide committee for the early childhood development program ol the YM and YWHA of Greater Miami, it has been announced by A Budd Cutler. Mrs. Cohen is a past president of the PTA tor this program at the North County YMHA Branch. Other PTA chairmen are Mrs. Samuel Gordon, Miami Beach; Mrs. Roland Kohen, Miami Beach Branch; Mrs. Evan Katz. Southwest Branch; and Mrs. Sidney Roberts, North County Branch. Other members of the county committee include Mrs. Philip Samet, a past chairman, and Mrs. Solomon Kann, who has been appointed special projects chairman. The committee, which is responsible for the policy-making and MIS. STANLEY COHEN planning for four nurserj BCb >i programs conducted by the "Y" at different locations in • Da e County, has already begun meeting! to make plans for the coming year. Special consideration will be given to the need lor recruiting trained and skilled teachers. The committee will al>o undertake to interpret the program to the community through coffee meetings to be held in the homes ol various parents in the different areas. Plans are also underway for a family life education institute for parents of children under six. The four nursery schools are Conducted at Miami Branch. 450 SW 16th Ave.; Miami Beach Branch, 1536 Bay Rd.; North County Branch, 14036 NE 6th Ave.; ;-nd Southwest Branch. 7215 Coral Way. n J ALITE by ISABEL GROVE Rabbi and Mrs. Bernard ol Sarasota. visiting here Mrs. Shotcr's parents. Mr. iiNat Ktusch • The family reunion also in>:rth ay party at Chiplh Gablcj i Fleischer and his wife. left Morday for a trip to Europe who only recently built a ""in in South Miami, hopes I to his art collection in galleries ol England, France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands Holding the home fires with their Phyllis 16 and Arthur %  his secretary, Carol NolThe trio are now doing %  circuit of the Eastern horse 1 • • Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Albert Zalka. 6881 Bay Dr., Miami. We twin beauties, Barbara and Sandra Wohl, 16, daughters of Mr and Mrs. Milton Wohl, of Saten Island, N.Y. ... The Wls, who have appeared on Bich television programs as "Naked City," will be here until they return up North in time for the opening of school *T>ile in Miami Beach, they're •ho visiting with their grandJUWiU, Mr. and Mrs. Irving %  Mil. of 2250 Bay Dr. Martha and Rudy Lobel. of Harbor House, have sent word <<> their friends, Mr. and Mrs. £*ank Burg, that Denmark, n and Norway are beauti•J,' 1 Now traveling through Europe, they'll be back in AuWftt in ti me to take up their busy schedule of activities at Beth Torah. i Three local couples, friends of long standing, are off on a Dying '.rip to Mexico, California. Las Vegas and New Orleans The trio will be celebrating 80 years of marriage during their month's tour They are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sommers. 30th anniversary; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cohen. 25th adversary; and Mr. and Mrs. Leo Feiss. also mark iny their silver we ding Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wald. of Brooklyn, N.Y.. are here lor their tenth summer visit and staying at the Sterling Hotel Mrs. Wald. honorary vice president of the Mizrachi Women's Organization of America, is scheduled to address several Hitrachi chapters while in the Greater Miami area And Lou's listed in "Who's Who in World Jewry" and "Leaders in American Science" Last summer, the Walds made their fifth visit to Israel. • • • The Lester Reiners back home alter vacationing here—also at the Sterling %  %  Wig designer. Mrs. Frieda Kozini. mother of Ruth Regina. returned from Chicago several ago, where she visited with old friends and relatives Edith and Max R. Silver enjoving their trip Friends receiving cards from Gatlmburg. Tenn reporting their breakfast with Claire and Mike Gett.nger. oretime staffer with the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. YOUR BIG OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE ON FIELDCREST WHITE DURACALE SHEETS 72x108" twin flat, twin fitted bottom or foam fitted twin I 99 reg. 2.89 Sparkling white cotton percale Duracale sheets, woven 186 threads per square inch. All fitted bottom sheets have Fieldcrest s exclusive Lastic-Ease* corners. 81x108" double, reg. 3.29 2.39 double fitted, reg. 3.29 2.39 double foam, reg. 3.29 2.39 42x38' pillow case, reg 79c 69c V\any other sizes at similar savings. 108x122" king, reg. 6.98 king fitted, reg. 6.98 king foam, reg. 6.98 42x48' bolster case, reg. 1 09 6.49 6.49 6.49 99< DOMESTICS MIAMI (FOURTH FLOOR}. AISO DADEIAND, MIAMI BEACH. 163id STREET. FT IAUDEROAIE. WEST FALM BEACH. **' %  ""



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^ Friday. August 2. 1$63 •>h*ist\ncrklian Page 3-A Mid-East Atom Threat is Dismissed Continued frem Pane 1-A an Israel Bond leadership group from C'f icago. Mr. Eshkol also expresse able to rejoin families here, and also come to participate in the workings of society." The nuclear test bin treaty %  &f rttrla'leW in" Moscow last weei by the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union is "not, in itself, enough to affect the Middle East situation," Abba Eban, Israel's deputy Prime Minister, declared in Stockholm. "Later developments," he said, may affect the situation. "But," he added, "the lessening of world tensions will favor our region." Mr. Eban made that statement to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency upon his arrival to attend a meeting of scientists discussing the contributions of science to the welfare of humanity. The Israeli deputy Premier is president of the Weizmann Institute of Science at Rehovot. His first official meeting was with Sweden's Prime Minister Aid to brae! 'Bad Business/ Says Fulbright Continued from Page 1-A and pubic, nearly two billion dollars." Mr. Bell adored that Israel's foreu' exchange reserves have been rising, "so that they are in really quite good shape." Sen. Fulbni-t added that Israel re! serves have been rising, while ; AmeriM's "have been going down." In the opinion of the ehairn.n, on the subject of continuing American loans and grantr, o Israel, "thl is not very i'i-od business." Sen John J. Williams, Delaware Republican, attacked the Administration tor being too slowin phasing out aid to Israel. Sen. Williams told Mr. Bell: "You are loaning about three and a half times as much in 1962. as you did in either of the two preceding years. I don't know what kind of a phasing out that is." Sen. Williams went on to enumerate new loans to Israel. Sen. Fulbright pointed out that Israel has "one of the highest gross national product rates per Lake Worth Rabbi Resigns Rubbi harle, rleilprin, for two yean i ritual leader of Temple Beth Shi >:n at Luke Worth, has resigi • i ils post, according to Dan GOOdmark, president of the Trill, A nati e of England, Rabbi Hcilprin wi a chaplain during World \\'ai I I id h •!. organize servicemen': social programs, for Which I re e high official commendation. Temjtfi Beth 3 lom is the only iynagogi in La ; Worth Humcr, Mind Discussed n iman Mi id" was to be the topic of a lei re by Dr. Abraham \V oil son on Thursday morn ing, 10 'AS a.m i the auditorium ol \\,i ngtol eral Savings and I an Asa n, 1234 Wash ingtoi A e. This marks the seventh in a course >i lectures on tin' "Life ami isophy of Spinoza" the Spinoza Form in I \' DISCOUNT PROCESSING KOOACtffOME 8VM Roll 1 !5x20Mt 1.00 127-620-120 EKTA 1.00 KODACOIOK JUMBO MINTS 12 EXPOSURES 2.00 B4W EXPOSURES .75 Hull or BVMJ th This Ad Crciig's Camera Center 73St S.W. Red Id. Ph. 665-5111 <*A*A^A0)^MMMWMM>0iV*JM* CORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC 2148 NW lOAve. FR 3-7180 Have your roof reoalred now; you will aav* on a now roof later "Satisfactory Work by Exptrlencod Man" RENT A CAR from $2.50 per day 115 prr wk. & in ii-nice chance ABOTT MOTORS, Inc. 1451 W. FLAGLER ST. Phone FR 30326 FHA—VA S6SALES IN PERFECT S :ONDITION DADE 4 BRT rV A '0 COUNTY From (150.00 d i 550.00 Mo. MlTMAN IN$UAIC = 1 REAL ESTATE 768 NW 3rd 5" FR 1-2421 Wo H'H.dte In:• of Ail KMl tXPLHIENCEO % PcT OEALERS EXPERT DOQ ^rOOMiNQ BOAO : AN; MAL KINGDOM PET SHOP 1105 MW llyfi ST. MU 8-3021 4 4 4' 4 4 4 4 J A I capita" in the world. He said that per capita aid to Israel was $39.70, while Mexico got only $2.60. Much of the discussion on phasing out the Israeli program, and criticism of American programs benefiting Israel, was deleted from the transcript made available for "reasons of national security," so that the public is only informed of a censored version of the actual full remarks. Tage Erlander, with whom he ex-, It was Mr. Erlander's first conchanged impressions regarding thejference with a member of the regeneral international situation, cently-formed Israeli Government. 41 Yeea.. bperieaser Home Owac-4 HOM Operate TERMITES? ROACHES? ANTS? Safe, positive pet control with regular service for the home TRULY NOLEN EXTERMINATORS "The Sign of Good Housekeeping" COSTS LESS THAN YOU THINK ^FR 7-1411--' Greartr Miami's Largest Extenaiaater g< *ei 8 roc daj nt e THE PLACE FOR YOUR SAVINGS... the reasons? D Sound, Conservative Management D Resources Exceeding 195 Million Dollars D Reserves Over 14 Million Dollars fl One of the Nation's Oldest and Largest %  Serving Dade County Over a Quarter of a Century B ^ix Convenient Offices %  Intended Dividend Rate on Savings 4 ]/ or Per Annum /• /0 Paid Quarterly Savings Accounts Insured to $10,000 by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, a Permanent Agency of the Federal Government. Savings Accounts opened or added to on or before August 20th can share in a full quarterly dividend September 30th. Once-a-week evening hours: Main Office open Mondays and Branch Offices open Fridays'til 8 p.m. 'One o' the Notion's O/des' and targes'* E)ade Federal ^/A-VINOS ond IOAN ASSOCIATION O> MIAMI MSIPH M IITION. htvitKI 6 CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVE DADE* COUNTY MAIN OFFICE Allapattah Branch North Miami Branch Tamiomi Branch Edison Center Branch Kendall Branch 101 E. Flagler St. MOO N.W. 36th St. 12370 N.W. 7th Ave. 1901 S.W. 8th St. 5800 NW. 7th Ave. U.S. 1 at S.W104th St.



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Page 2-A vJewisti flcricfiar Friday. August 2, 1963 JFK Asks Major Immigration Change u**WAeA^WA^/< Continued from Page 1-A •mtmm a "quota reserve pool" for redis-i nibution. At the end of five years, the old structure would noi longer exist. The President stipulated that no single country would be permitted more than 10 per cent of quota numbers in any one year. He proposed the establishment of I a new seven-member board on immigration matters. He asked authority for the White House to carry.out the board's recommendation-, to reserve up to 50 per cent of unallocated numbers for issuance to persons disadvantaged by change in the quota system, and up to 20 per cent to refugees in cases where sudden dislocation requires special treatment. Beach UF Names Campaign Chiefs Top leadership posts for the %  i:iini Beach Division of the 1963 United Fund campaign have now been completed, it WM announced here. Heading the Beach's efforts will be Capt. "Dick" Merrill. 321 E. Di Lido Dr.. dean of America's pilots. This will be Merrill's first active participation in a United Fund campaign, according to Campaign Chairman Gen. E. A. Evans. Serving as associate chairman will be Mrs. Milton Sirkir., 2024 N. Bay Rd. She has long been ar active United Fund volunteer, and currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. Samuel L. Seltzer, president of Mercantile National Bank, has agreed to serve as chairman of Section I. He will be assisted by Associate Chairman Mrs. Aaron Farr, 936 79th Ter. Heading Section II is realtor A. D. Smith. 260 95th St. His associate chairman is Mrs. George Israel. 10300 W. Bay Harbor Dr. PERPETUATE YOUR NAME FOREVER Through the Foundation of the JEWISH NATIONAL FUND Call JE 8-6464 Mayshie First call on the first 50 per cent of quota numbers would be given to persons whoso admission, by virtue of exceptional skill, training or education, would be especially advantageous to the United States. First call on the next 30 per cent, plus any part of the first 50 per cent not issued to the skilled specialists, is given to unmarried sons and daughters of United States citizens, not eligible lor non quota status, because they are over 21 years of age. First call on the remaining 20 per cent, plus any part of the first 80 per cent not taken by the first two classes, is given to spouses and children of aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence. Any portion remaining is issued to other applicants, with percentage preferences to other relations of, United States citizens and resident aliens, and then to certain classes of workers. Within each class, visas will be issued on a first come, first served basis. These preference provisions, which under present law determine only relative priority between nationals of the same country, will now determine prior! ity between nationals of different • countries throughout the world. In certain oversubscribed countries, a ^registration of registrants would be taken to eliminate those who have died, emi' grated elsewhere, or changed their minds. All who failed to re-register could be eliminated. reregister could be eliminated, viously declined visas would be terminated. One section of the legislation amends the Refugee Relief Act to allow the admission of refugees from North Africa who are unable to return to their countries because of their religion, race, or political views. The act now admits such refugees from "any country within the general area of the Middle East." This is expanded to substitute Morocco for Libya as the western border of the area defined. The 130.000 Algerian refugees in France will not he aftecte;! by the legislation since they are French nationals. BEWARE TERMITES WE INSTALL GLASS I OR EVERY I'i RPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS furniture Tops, Beveled Mirrors and Ro silvering Our Specialty L. & G. 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Page 10-A 9Jewistfhridian Friday, August 2, 1963 3 Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDLIN Powerful Story About Papacy, Told in Human Terms THE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN. By Morris L. West. 374 pp. Morrow. $4.95. T HE TENDENCY IS to forget that this is fiction, and to read it literally, as history or chronicle. That is how good a job Morris West has done with his novel of the Ukrainian who becomes Pope. With his scene the awesome splendour of the Vatican and his time the present moment, West, author of 'The Devil's Advocate." has managed one of the most difficult feats in modern fiction, a novel about the Papacy which is neither offensive, silly, nor incredible. Drawing from his twelve years as a postulant of the Capitol Spotliqht: Christian Brothers order in Australia and his stint as Vatican correspondent for the London "Daily Mail," as well as from what can only be called sheer brilliance of conception and technique. West's Pope is a holy manbut very much a human, subject to fears and doubts, needful ol love. Kiril Lakota is also a liberal Pontiff, deeply dedicated to making both the Faith and the power of the Church meaningful in a bomb-terrorized world. Thus the book moves ceaselessly between the Vatican and the world outside the Church. The most evil spectre, godless Communism, is of course the major problem, and one for which Kiril is particularly qualified; he has spent Bv MILTON FRIEDMAN Liberals Now Seeking to Defend Black Muslims Washington! IS THE "CULT of c'vil liberties" pro%  viding a cloak for the gutter tactics] on anti-Semites oposed to religious and racial freedom? Efforts of Federal and local authorities to prevent racist bigot; from exploiting the current civil rights | crisis have in some instances been thwarted by well-intentioned liberals. One police official stressed that the right of law-abiding American citizens to safety and freedom outranked the alleged "right" of Nazis or others to shout "gas the kikes" or "kill the niggers" and foment violence. Off the Record: By NATHAN ZIPRIN Summer Thoughts rORMER PREMIER David Ben%  Gorton, in his first public appearance since his resignation more than a month ago. told the TOA convention in Tel Aviv that Israel is "the collective creation j( the entire Jewish people" but that the work of creation must yet je completed. Since Zionists had something to do with the pre-natal history of Israel, stood at its birth and lent a lender hand in its nurturing, can it be assumed that what the former Premier meant was that the Zionisl movement still has a historic role to play in the consummation of the work of creation? If so. the parley may well have witnessed a significant change of thinking on the part of the fiery Ben-Gurion, who in the past rarely missed an opportunity to lambast the Zionist movement, particularly the American brand. If this surmise is corect. the ZOA may well find a better climate for rejuvenation when its leaderreturn from the convention. Just an Idea In recent months, much has been written about the deplorable lack of rabbis, social wrokers, teacherand othei functionaries in the Jewish communities of America. Overlooked in almost all assessments of the Jewish scene, has been the AngloJewish writer, whose business it is to report on and interpret the Jewish scene in America. Editors of important Jewish journals have recently told this writer that the situation has reached a point where it has become impossible to fill the pages of a publication with Jewish authors. In another decade, one well-informed Jewish journalist told me, the field of Jewish writers will have dried up completely. It seems to this corner, that the problem merits study by our Jewish universities and other institutions of higher learning. • Question Mark Is an important Jewish source sitting on an explosive report about the status of the Jewish community in America? The study, I hear, has been completed, but it has not been released allegedly because the control figures have not yet been properly checked. Was the control study part of the original plan, or were the original disclosures so shocking as to be unbelievable? • Falling Apart The American Council for Judaism is on the lookout for deviationists among its members who give furtively to Israel — an unforgivable sin in the Council's theological lexicon. The latest "scandal" to hit the Council was disclosure that one of its most prominent members in the South had bought a $1,000 Israel bond. This writer wouldn't know whether the Council has hired detectives to trail the sinner, but if they did he would like to tip them off that the "sinner" confessed his transgression to a rabbi of one of the Jewish religious denominations in his city. The American Civil Liberties Union, which has many achievements to its credit, bewildered its membership a few years ago. by rushing headlong to the defense of Nazi street brawlers. This did not involve classic defense of free speech in all cases. Once the issue hinged on a question of violent assault. Even the defended Nazis were amused and made lewd jokes about being defended free by the "Jew lawyers" of the ACLU. Within the ACLU, the tendency to "lcan-over-backwards" to defend Nazis was debated bitterly. Gradually, leaders moderated their doctrinaire and dogmatic civil liberties interpretation. It was conceded that crafty bigots were cynically trying to make wholesale use of the good lawyers of the ACLU. Today, the ACLU is again advertising for free clients. This time it is seeking adherents of the fanatic anti-Semite and anti-white sect, the Black Muslims. The Black Muslims claim a portion of the United States on which to establish a "Nation of Islam." Muslims refuse to serve in the American Armed Forces and to register for selective service. When asked by the U.S. civil service. Muslims said thir first loyalty was to the "Nation ol Islam" rather than to America. The civil service commission made known that the fanatacism of twelve Muslims was so extreme that they were fired from Federal jobs. They would support their Islam rather than America in event of conflict. Employing a Negro chauvinist version of Hitler's Aryan supremacy concept, the Black Muslims are trying to stir the Negro masses against the "white dogs" and especially against persons of Jewish faith. Malcolm X, their articulate leader in Washington, has openly denounced American Jewry and justified Muslim contacts with American Nazis. The ACLU feels it does not matter, in terms of Federal employment, that the Muslims swear to uphold the flag of Islam, rather than the Stars and Stripes. Lawrence Speiser, manager of the ACLU Washington office, announced: "We would be interested in hearing from any Black Muslims fired. We would offer them legal aid ." The ACLU national headquarters concurred. The U.S. Department of Justice, citing the Nazis and the Black Muslims, has expressed concern about "the activities of extremist groups which attempt to arouse racial emotions." In a letter to the Jewish War Veterans, the Department revealed the Nazis and Black Muslims have been under close Federal scrutiny. The letter was in reply to a communication from the Jewish veterans drawing attention to recent attempts by the extremists of both races to ignite explosive racial tensions. The department, speaking through Oran Waterman, chief of the civil section, made clear its disapproval of both Nazis and Black Muslims. He revealed that thought has been given to declaring the groups subversive, but complications were encountered. The Black Muslims, claiming themselves a religion, seek the constitutional shelter afforded all faiths. The Nazis would exploit subversion hearings to broadcast what Mr. Waterman termed their "obnoxious doctrines." An irony exists. The West German Government deplores American neo-Nazism, while the United Arab Republic feels the Black Muslim's racist hate goes too far. seventeen years in a Communist prison, and he carries the marks of torture inflicted by the man who now head., the Soviets. Kamenev. Like Milton's Satan, Kamenev strikes off sparks of sympathy with chilling insistence his logic as perfect and honest for his terms as the Chris tian ethic is in rebuttal. "A sublime folly," Kamenev calls it. "What is your heaven but a carrot to make the donkey trot? What is your hell but a rubbish heap for all your failures—God's failures, my friend! And yov say He's omnipotent %  *' What is important, however, is not what is said, but that the dialogue occurs. And so it does in other ways too. in the constant confrontation of science and mat erialism with the Church. The Pope's dearest and only I-iend is a Jesuit scholar, Jean Telemond, whose life work is a book wedding evolutionary theory to Catholic theology. When the Holy Office orders him to "reexamine" it. he submits, but the agony is mortal, and he dies. Thus Kiril. too, is bereft, and must submit. There is the Jewish woman. Ruth Lewin. a one-tinfV convert to Catholicism; there are the monster babiebnrn in Rome, victims of drugs, and mercy-killed by the delivering doctor; there is an Italian politicians divorce In all these rooms, the Church must speak. Her voice is especially fascinating to non-Christians, for whom the terms and mechanics of this faith are new. It is mes merizing to note that the logic is so often Talmudic while the atmosphere is psychologically so strange. The apparent paradox of continual humility coupled with the egotism of con-it ant concern for the salvation of one'own soul interests those who view the man-God relation ship so differently. West's novel :s a powerful story of the loneliness and sincerity of a possible Pope. Ponoromo: Bv DAVID SCHWARTZ Tidbits and People w i JANT TO LEARN Hebrew"' The easy way is to become a child. Congressman Ogden Reid was Ambassador to Israel for a relatively ;|iort time, but his children, he lays, continue to greet him in the norning with "Boker Tov" instead i "Good Morning." They speak lebrew well. (My ov\n nieces and ephew spent only a year in Israel, ami speaK a fine Hebrew. I have been wrestling with the language for yearand can't speak it.) James Waterman Wise, son of the great Stephen Wise, now li'. ein Paris and is an art dealer, (After all. there is a kinship between art and religion Heine maintained thai Muses wai ,i great artist, but he worked fashioning a people, instead of dead clay.) Edward G. li ibinson, the actor, has been having a try .it art and ii< says, "I've gotten -o thai I can always hit Ihe canvas when 1 throw some paint or, it." Harry Simonhoff, of Miami, who has turned out five or six books ol Jewish histories and essays, is soon to have a work of fiction published. The pubUsher is Yoseloff. Simonhoff was once a member of the South Carolina Legislature. His father was cantor in the Charleston synagogue, and he had a beauv< tiful voice. Edna Ferber was so disappointed in the first book she wrote, she refused to send it to a publisher, but her mother, without her knowledge, sent it. It proved quite a success. Between You and Me: By BORIS SMOIAR Drama May Disrupt Jewish Catholic JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS in this] ** country arc beginning to show signs | of nervousness over the play "The Deputy" which is scheduled to be produced | on Broadway this autumn. The play.! written by a German author named Rolf I Hoehbut. disparages the failure of Pope Pius XII to issue a public statement condemning the Nazi mass-murder of Jews. The author's portrait of Pope Pius XII La is unsympathetic, ascribing the Pope's failure to a the Nazi anti-Jewish atrocities publicly to political motivation. The play has caused interrcligious control i rope, and some fear that it may become a source ol d cord between religious groups in the United Stat. when produced in this country while in I versy was largely a Catholic-Protestant one i iHHS. "A 0t ma y J 6W8 in ,,le Countries where it produced Jews in America may not be able to esca involvement in the dispute because of the large of Jews resui.ng in this country. Also, becau lean producer is Billy Rose, and its director is Herman Shumlin. both Jewish. Several Catholic diocesan papers in this country have already editorialized on the subject in tones affecting Jews, and it becomes more and more obvious that this disruptive issue will provoke an exchange of charges and countercharges which may lead to diminishing the amitv in interreligious relations now prevailing in the United „ %  M'I J I" IS at r e "P Mlbta 'ewWl organization. would like to prevent without suggesting that the fat, lut'hT'o'r S r n UFing .. the N:ui Peri0d be by^ssed. The author of ll,e Deputy' ei ;i i,„ s that Pope Pi„s XII retrained from making a i ublic protest against genocide of the Jews for political ids,,,,. B^ciae m Pono^-l'r? 1 '" '" ,he olher hand r !" Hut the KrilT'h ll,,lK Utcry bccausc *"** have made the situ. tin,, worse for the Jews, since ,. would ; ; ;; "taW retaliation against them, m .§> the-tIT',' "'" A "" m 1 Jewl orMniiattonV •PC lius \ P l !l^ ':'"i "-" ^e relationship betw, non complete ,V '" ; ull,or,,,ts and J '* far



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Eriday, August 2. 1963 +Jkwislh fhrBdttan Rabbi Greenwald # Takes Southwest Center Pulpit \ Southwest Jewish Center win hnve-sr new spiritual leader as of Aug. 15. Jerome Simms, president, this week announced the appointment of Rabbi Zevi I. Greenwald to the pulpit. He succeeds Kabbi Max Klein. Kabbi Greenwald comes to Mi..mi from Philadelphia, where for ten years he was spiritual lead• i of the Kensington Synagogue .•nd Jewish Center. Previously, he held other pulpits ..I Congregation Etz Chaim, Bidciford, Me., for four years, and i ongregation Anshe Israel -Km Jacob, Newark, N.J., for live yean. He Was ordained by th* Yav%  nh Rabbinical Seminary in %  New York. Born in Prossburg, | Czechstovakia, he received his rabbinic background and trainI irg at Hi* Yeshiva Chasam SofI er in Pressburg and tho Dr. Jos| eph Breuer Rabbinical School in F rankfurt-a m-Ma in. Rabbi Greenwald holds secular degree) from the University of Frankfurt, the Sorbonne in Paris, and is a graduate of Dropsie College in Philadelphia, where he is now a candidate for the PhD degree While in Maine, Rabbi Greenuald conducted a regular radio program. He has contributed to rarioui nationally-known publications, including the National Jewish Monthly, Chicago Sentinel, and Boston Advocate. lie and his wife have a daughler, Penina ll. Mrs. Greenwald i graduate kindergarten teachAdath Yeshurun Making Plans School registration for the fall term is now in progress at Temple Adath Yeshurun, 1025 NE Miiami Gardens Dr. Yehuda Segal, newly-appointed education director will supervise the Nursery, Kindergarten, Hebrew School and Sunday School, and will also be in charge of the Sabbnth morning junior congregation services and youth activities. There will be a special junior congregation service for the High Holy Days. Joseph Licdman. president of the congregation, announced that sealing arrangements for the High Holy Days in the newly-decorated main sanctuary are now completed, and that reservations are being accepted. Nasser Displays Weapons Muscle Continued from Page 1-A also announced its first domestically-built submarine which will start trial runs in 15 days. There were at least four new Vanguard rockets, six Zafir rockets which have a range of 220 miles, six Kaher rockets, and six Soviet-made SA-2, anti-aircraft rockets. The Vanguard appeared to be an advanced model of Egyptian rockets shown earlier. Also displayed were MIG-21 jet fighters, built by the Soviet Union, turboprop troop transports designed and built in Egypt by German scientists, and jet trainers. The Russian MIG-21's are capable of flying at supersonic speeds. In a speech in Cairo, Col. Nasser declared that the Arabs failed in their 1948 war against the then new State of Israel, "because we were seven nations." Plans to 'liberate Palestine," he said, depended "not on words alone but ] on one plan, with armies, with missiles, with everything." Insurance Costs To be Surveyed "Rising Insurance Costs—Who is to Blame?" will be discussed at the People Speak, year-round Town Hall Forum, at Washington Federal, 1234 Washington Ave.. on Inday at 8 p.m. The talk will be based on a recent Miami News series. Milton Kclner will represent the National Association of Claimant Attorneys. Edward Atkins, attorney, will present the views of the largest U.S. insurance firm in the field. Chaim Rose, president of the group, will moderate. WOLPERT FURNITURE CO. OFFERS YOU The BIGGEST choice ever! %  v ., ^ _*_ • • *"\l J00% Foam Rubber or Innerspring [win r Double Size %  i .. 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Page 10-B +Jewish rhrktiar) Friday. August ,2. 1963 Bonn Moves to Liberalize Indemnification Laws BONN — (JTA) — The Wfsti The amendment te the inGerman Cabinet approved this damnification law appreved by week an amendment to liberalize : MM Cabinet provides for an adthe existing indemnification laws | ditioral $750,000,000 for liberalifor Nazi victims by incl'iding also xation of payments. This sum persons who suffered from Nazism included $150,000,000 marked as but were unable to file their claims before October 1. 1953—the cutoff date in the original indemnification law—because they were then in iron Curtain countries. a special hardship fund for payment of compensation to those who were unable to submit their claims by October 1, 1953, as well as increased pensions and other payments to individual victims of Nazism. The amendment is the second The claims of such persons, most Of them Jews, will he recognized only if th y have in the meanj time left the Soviet bloc countries approved by the Cabinet to liband are now living in other couneralize the existing compensation tries. West Germany does not law. Last week, the Cabinet aprecognize claims of persons livproved an amendment to the 1957 law on restitution for claims for certain types of movable property confiscated by the Nazis. This included bank accounts, jewelry. | ii-rniture and similar property, the location of which is unknown. That amendment includes a Rabbi Tibor II. Stern will ofspecial hardship fund of $100,000,ficiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Mark ing in the Soviet countries. Mark Eichel Will Be Bar Mitzvah Soviets Execute Three Jews LONDON—(JTA)—Three persons with apparently Jewish names Mark ficfcef Gerard Eichel. son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Eichel, 324 Washington Ave.. on Saturday morning, %  Aug. 3. at Beth Jacob Congregation Cantor werc among five Leningrad men Maurice Mam-; w n0 nave becn executea D >' tno ches will chant Sovict Government on charges ofi the Sabbath litmisappropriating S200.000 worth urgv I of pencils, fountain pens, rulers and other office equipment, acMark is in the cordjng t0 tne new spapcr Soviet eighth grade ol Russi it reported here from Ida at. Fisher Junior High School. Moscow He is actively interested in all; sports. The executions were announced Relatives from out-of-town will in b !" f Si in *• %  ""JW* attend the occasion, among them lt J* ^.^ ***! men Mr. and Mrs. Walter Crowley,! fSLa m n T £ West Palm Beach. '^ -ounding names were I Zinger. y. Kazakevitch and S. Knipkin. Kiddush will follow the cereThe five were convicted last Febmony in the Whitman Social Hall ruary after a four-month trial in of Beth Jacob. which 300 witnesses were heard. FURNISHERS ft INSTALLERS Inlaid Linoleum — Asphalt Til* Rubber Tile "EVERY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED"-Phone for free Estimates 2465 N.W. 76th STREET OX 6-3202 000 for victims who never filed nlaims for restitution because the | original law placed the burden of proof on the claimants that the lost movable property was actually j fhipped to Germany from the var1 IOUS occupied countries. Such vicitims. particularly those in East European countries, were told by Miamian Will Attend Inaugural Two South Florida residents will attend the cornerstone laying and dedication of the new buildii.g for the School of Pharmacy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Ben Saks, secretary-manager of t h e Southeast Florida Pharmaceutical Association, will be present at the inaugural ceremonies Aug. 17 on the Hebrew University cam-! pus. Saks was state-; wide chairman of a fund-raising venture here to help launch the building. The campaign opened locally in 1957. Jacob Pulv'er will attend the dedication with Saks. Both were named delegates to represent the association at a recent meeting here. Pulver is already in Israel, and Saks was due to arrive there on Thursday. attorneys that it would be impossible'to provide such proof and therefore did not file claims. After the law was enacted, the West German Government dropped the requirement met victims would have to furnish proof. That agreement, however, did not help those victims who had not, in good faith, filed claims under the orginigal burden-ofpreof requirements. The $100,000,000 hardship fund in the amendment to the restitution law was set up to pay claims for restitution in such cases. The amounts of $150,000,000 and £100,000.000 in the two special hardship functe in the amendments are in additionto the $3^00,006,_ 000 already paid out by West Ger-V* many as well as in addition to the sums scheduled to be paid out under the indcjonificajioo .and restij tution laws. The amendments will lie submitted to the West German Parliament soon and are expected to be enacieti into law before the end of 1963. WIDOW DESIRES TO MKT Iv I'EIf GENTLEMAN ACE 55-65. Pfotit cell after :i o'clock 758-4294 SAKS ATTRACTIVE WIDOW Has Own Home, would like to meet a respectable retired, or business gentleman. Call after 1 p.m. 532-5298 WANTED KITCHEN HELPER FEMALE Jewish Institution. Do not call Saturday. Ph. 532-1174 WANTED SALESMAN FOR PART-TIME With Scrr.e> Men's Clothing Selling Ixperienc3. THRIFT SHOP 7331 N.W. 27th AVE. 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i aq& 8-B + lfmi*tnmridk*r> Friday. Augmt 2, 1963 Jewish Organizations Praise Supreme Court Ruling NEW YORK — (JTA^ — American Jewish organizations expressed satisfaction with the decision by the United States Su preme Court outlawing Bible' reading and prayers from public schools. The American Jewish Commit-, tee expressed the hope that the 1 sh Labor Lomnnttee Jewish War ..;... i.i;„ .. „ ...h.,i...iii Veterans of the I .S.A.. Union of he understanding of the Court's ill-advised to hand them over to decisions and their meaning for I the public schools which must our chile ren, our religious inherij abide by the American tradition tnnce and our country's tradition j of separation of Church and State." of reli*iou* libeft.w' 1 %  *•-.. The six national organizations affiliated in the NCR AC are: American Jewish Congress, JewAmerican public as a whole will i'liderstand the basic issues involvAmerican Hebrew Congregations, cd in the decision, which it said l n n ot Orthodox Jewish Congress a reaffirmation of the historic a,lons ^d Unted Synagogue of American principle of separation, America. The si* national orof church and slate." The Comganltttions and o, of the communmittee said the decision should en-. ">' council: courage religious groups and inWhichLewis is which? Both are presidents of hospitals, I, Gerald Lewis (left) at Mt. Sinai, and Harry L. Lewis at Cedctca of Lebanon. They get each other's mail, phone calls, and. occasionally, bills. But they're good natured about it all, and don't mind the confusion one bit. In fact, they confer frequently, as they are doing here, about the complex job of mining a big community hospital. Big 3 Talks Can be Model For Israel-Arab Meeting TEL AVIV — (JTA) — The sueCJSS of the direct talks in Moscow be'v'een the United States, '"•rent Britain and the Soviet [TolM o". the banning of atomic ; -?st.s ii the air and under water vap cited here by Prime Minister i-evi Eshkol as best proof for the 'eed ')':' direct Arab-Israel negoUatio:-) to achieve Arab-Israel )>ea';'-' Spe at a press conference here, the Israeli Prime Minister airi I '• %  successful results of the 1<> "..Iks encourage Israel to :-o'r %  > ask for direct negotiationn-lth the Arabs. Direct taflB, te stressed, bear the best iesukv "I clo not know of a betiar solution to the Arab-Israel problem than direct negotiations," lie <1 Tared. The Big Power treat/ initialed in Moscow last veefc. ;said, should be regarded -. a gateway to more understand-' • rig -heti een opposing blocks, but it la to be seen if it has any •ear: : >n the situation in the Middle East. H;;i.-iing Israel's relations wt HM Soviet Union, Mr. Eshkol ;i '4 Israel had tried on a nurm-ir of occasions to achieve an IT srovement here, but thai tsrar* *aond r.o listening ears. Similarly, he said Israel had also ry!*dl its good will toward Communist China, but "we wantad and still expect a more positive i-iJction." Wi -^ard to the threat voic:d by Egypt's President Nasser last : at the miliiary parade ia Cairo, in which he emphasized lhat is preparing "to free Pa&Mtuie of Zionists," Mr. Esh-j i.ol Bai hat Israel'i reply to this! tomel will be military prepara: on:"The best reply to preparations is preparations," he stated. "I am often blamed for speaking too much of peace. Yet this does not come instead of alertness and preparedness. There will be no easy going about this." Regarding atomic research in Israel, Mr. Eshkol said the atomic rtactor in Dimona is progressing according to plan, though there are the normal delays of engineering and construction adjustments. He said he does not contemplate any visit or meeting with heads of state outside Israel in the next few months, and that Foreign Minister Mrs. Golda Meir would head Israel's delegation to the United Nations General Assembly, scheduled to convene in September. The Prime Minister said he favors the introduction to Israel of educational television and, in due course, might consider the establishment of a general television network for the country. As to proposals to bring the remains of the late Zionist Revisionist leader, Zeev Jabotinsky, to Israel for reburial, Mr. Eshkol said he does not consider dealing with this question in the near future. Mr. Jabotinsky had requested in his will, prior to his death in 1940. that the Jewish State, which he foresaw, bring his remains to the State for reburial. dividual*to intensify their spiritual and educational activities in church, synagogue, home and religious school. The American Jewish Congress welcomed the Court's decision "as one that will prove of significant benefit to the cause of religion and religious freedom in America." The Congress statement said the Court's decision strengthened the public school system "as the symbol of American democracy" and that the majority opinion is consistent with previous rulings safeguarding American religious institutions from interference by the state and state institutions from intrusions by the church. The National Communitv Relational Community Relations Advisory Council had joined in sub1 mining a brief amicus to the Supreme Court in these cases. The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith said in a statement lhat the ruling of the Supreme Court "is a strong reaffirmation of the principle of church-state separation. It preserves public schools from involvement in religious conflicts and competition and adds another safeguard for treedom of religion in the United, States." The New York Board of Rabbis concurred in the decision of the Supreme Court. "It is our conviction that moral and spiritual education is much too important and too sensitive to be diluted and to be entrusted to a school i I CUNCMIONS • mivATi % *TII ORGANISATIONS • (USistSS Ct 91 r> I Open All Ytor Coll IE 8 0523 climate where the very atmos-l %  Tn \tT T %  B P Ucy i' herc and P! <* Pray" *>"<< Manning and coordinating agency (leep commitment t0 a personal for six major national Jewish organizations and Jewish community councils in cities throughout the United States, welcomed the Court's ruling as "a victory for religion and for religious freedom." "We believe that it will also be Ltst for American education and American democracy." the \CRAC said in a statement. "We pledge our cooperation with all re-' ligious faiths to help broaden pub-; KING ARTHUR'S COURT The SINGING STRINGS DINNER • SUPPER are lacking." the Board faith said. "Prayer ard the Bible are so sacred to us that we consider it Ask -far your CHIP-INS ; Bowling Party Scheduled North Dade Chapter B'nai B'rith Women will hold a bowling party Sunday, Aug. 11. at Congress Bowl. 1650 NE 14th St. In charge of information are Mrs. Frank Brandt and Mrs. Harry Friedman. MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS 500 Deer Run • TU 8-4521 ART BR.UNS, Co Own.r ••* %  I 1 %  JlL )u. Salutes The BUSINESS MAN OF THE WEEK FRANK B. ROtFES r.oltVi opii.-tti I i|sT*ene&ry on tie comei 111 Miracli Mile C.I. Ptl. 444-7031 Fo Tike-Out Service Visit the fabulous STARLIGHT ROOF America's Smartest Supper Club for Superb Dining and Delightful Dancing to MAL MALKIN Jits Piano and His Orchestra COMPLETE DINNERS from $ 5.50 V'ml 0* Starlight Roof /or a Bpett(wu r ar view o/ the llold Coaut WML BEACH HOTEL On tht Octan a: 4SlM SI. RESERVATIONS: Renni JE 2-3600 ) If you seek the BEST IN DINING... it's llfriimn's BIG PORTERHOUSE THE KING OF STEAKS "< Seo Food Specialties %. 0..,. H. r III). | Jl„rf J,. Cl S-I41I *-.... cor bprMI D>^rTl.b • onqwvt Feftllltfm Ava.lsbl* SANB-ELL STRICTLY KOSHER CATERERS OF THE LOMBARDY HOTEL Under Strict Rabcv lical Supervision. Mashgiach on Premise*. UN 6-6226 GREYHOUND RACING THE LERNERS %  irabllih.r! hi 1945 •JewUk-Amrlc-ij WORLD RENOWNED, FAMOUS 671 WASHINGTON AVE. JE I -3987 PARKING MIAMI FACILITIES BEACH Jfesfaurant DINNERS SERVED DAILY SEPT. 16 ^


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' -!. i Fri3ay, August 2. 1963 *Jen>isli ftcridfiiaun Page 11-3 LEGAL NOTICE Jennie Cypen Dies Here at 72 -# Services were Tuesday, July 30,1 died at the age of 72 on Sunday, for Mrs. Jennie Cypen, of 7901 July 28. I Nor.e.qiitf „ Aye,, Miajni Beach'! Mrs. Cypen came here a. yeaj-J Mrs. Cypen. mother of Miami and a half ago from Tucson, Ariz.. Beach Attorney and former Cir-iand was a member of B'nai B'rilh cult Court Judge Irving Cypen,! and Hadassah. In addition to Judge Cypen, surI-IMI. Scopus Summer Festival I yiving are two other sons, BenqU fc£ I'.i >l Tl.!>* %  • Dereasi .1 NOTICE TO CREDITC r S To AII • -i-.-.i:t ora and \n p Ins claim.in Detnanda A-. 'I.IV. Said three dren. sisters, and 13 grandchili viv ijamin and Harry; a daughter. Mt. Scopus Summer Festival 1 ?? rs Bot, .>" Ro^stein; a brother, continued with its weekly meetings at Park Lane Cafeteria, Coral Way, on Monday, featuring! Services were at Riverside Mem a Dutch treat luncheon. The • orial Chapel, Alton Rd. Miami Chapter of Hadassah group gives proceeds to Hadassah Medical Organization. President of Mt. Scopus is Mrs. Louis Alexander. Mrs. Harry Jampol is chairman of the series. I re d ii. manda hli h ou ma) the state of AM "> Bi il • %  I d< ceased late of I *ade Coum Wot Ida in the Countj Judgi i ol H .. mtj and file thv same In dupll Ml.I ;i t ,\1 .i mi, I1 i day <>r July, A.D. IK:; SANFI >RD s PAUJ \s Executor l-',rst publication of thl* the I'lnl da} of Auftuat, !:>•' FAUNCE, PINK A FORM Attorneys foi the Ex< i utor i MIL' Conari -Bldg. Miami 82, Pla.—1 l( 1-5471 .911 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COL MTV, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE Miami. MP's Question British Military Aid to Mid East LONDON — UTA) — A statement by Lord Privy Seal Edward Heath in the House of Commons a brief flurry this week Middle East, but at the same time nterpreted to there are indications were already there." caused when mean that Heath implied there were operational nuclear weapons in the .Middle Ea-t. Heath was asked whether Britain planned to bring up in the (iincnt Moscow' talks on a ban on nuclear weapons testing the current Middle Easl arms race. lie replied that Ihe British were trying, along with other countries, "to limit the supply going to the that some The Foreign Office, responding to the misinterpreation, later said that Heath meant only to say that there were now in the area missiles which had nuclear warhead capabilities but not "that nuclear warheads are in the possession of any Middle East country." and had servd as publicity director of the Dade PTA Council. She was a member of Mt. Sinai Hospital Auxiliary, the Auxiliary of National Children's Cardiac Hospital, and the Miami Heart Institute Auxiliary. Mrs. Kaye was a member of Timple Beth Sholom, as well as ol the Sisterhood there. Surviving are her husband, ;i son. Fred, and one sister, Mrs. Charles Brenner. Blasberg Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Si Dignified, beautiful and reverently cared for surroundings for our departed loved ones are MIAMI SEXCI /IK* %  .'t UP\ AN0C0MMUNH1 MA 11 1MB' %  •> "iininMiio.1 MO 1-7693 YOUR TELEPHONE PROPERLY ANSWERED IS YOUR GREATEST BUSINESS ASSET Answerite, Inc. Telephone Answering Service SERVING JEfferson — Union Highland FRanklin Executive Office FR 3-5581 In tion. MI'. KOHN. Kabbl Abraham, Park v i' 11 • 'i ., .... I Brooklj n. 11 .. i side another phase of the situaLEVINE. Harry. :. %  uf ,m Went Avi Stephen Swingler. a Labor WAS^ERMAN^V ';.,, : m-irlo i fntilo nffm-t in find Michigan Ave Riven mane a mine enoit to nna ARONS Samuel, :.. ..f I48n Wesi out how many weapons have been A ve ,', 1 ''' 1 J, !>' : 'tfc-rvicea in N sold by Britain in the past three LEICHTMAN. irthvr Philip, 113, of ,,.,,, 1911 SW 8th St., died Jul) 2. Itiv\ears to Middle Last countries. 1 erside, i„r-_ .. IV,. i %  • JCOLOMAN, landor, SI, of TSI I HardAlan Green. Joint Minister of in, kv s. ,-ive.I inChicago New State of the Board of Trade, said! CHEZAR, i..... r.i, f mo sw %  in a written reply it was not "our St., died July 27. Riveralde, policy to disclose the total value 'tftfR' ft} J3*' g ftK K or details of the kind of arms exSHULMAN. M<> •.:. of • .'• s ported lo other countries." ZALMONOFF.'' IS? Itae '-'Tfrn In still another development, Matwiiu In-., died lulj 88. .-• the Cairo Information Bulletin deosi. !" ^^ o'f'm.Bi.,,,., Dr. clared that Egypt's new ground-toair rocket, which was launched last week, was intended to be a weapon against Israel. WKAT-FM FROM TO BRAHMS BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music on WKAT-FM 93.1 on your FM dial MIAMI'S ONLY PURE CLASSICAL MUSIC STATION Programming MORE LIVE Concerts! WKAT-FM Klverslil ROSEN, Ml (VI n, K2, %  •! 1' MfJ I. b%  •i ly \' • el i .1 d) it Rl> • Idi FRANK. Benjamin, WS, i.f !2S \>'.-hinvii.n \\. died -liiiv :'•;. ItlverMlde. SCHWARTZ, sidnej \.. nt ::ik,nPnrk. Pa died Julj :'". Sei .1 %  ~ In Philadelphia, BERMAN. .Mrs. I!, II.,. .;;. ,.| :•;: Mi, hIcan Ave i: •. • n.j. n IJ n ,. ,. .,, FINE. MiI".,nli I %  ", MI of I'l" N \V Beth David Young Adults will 2sth Ave, .;;i-present Judge Milton A. FriedROSEN. Joneph, s2, ..r M: •• %  unman, of the Municipal Court, in; ^ "mveSSef 1 S ""' a talk on "A Day in Court." Pro-I TAUBMAN. Jacob, .-. 13th SI died Jul; 23. Pefh David Young Adults gram is Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.. at Beth David Synagogue. af 3640 MV Servlcea In FOSTER ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC. Electrical Contractors RESIDENTIM. COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS MAINTENANCE PAUL FOSTER, president AIR CONDITIONING .ind ADEQUATE WIRING 2264 W. FUGLES ST. HI 8-2671 Nights, Sund,i>s £ Holidays Dial HI 3-0922 St. I..'.ii.-. Rivi i--;.i. AUSLANDER. .1 ,.,.pli 73, ill 17 •: I N W i'.i. lei Tel l:.\ %  -i SCHIFF. Mii.iiin. S?, ..i IC31 SW l2nd Ave. tii .II.M. FELDMAN. .Hi:,.-. : %  ;. ,,| ;.,.;., -\\ 24th i.ilv :i I: ,. r Ide GORDON. Mra. Si rah. 72, of I I \\ aahinyton Ave., lili d Ju 2 I I.I\ de ISIIM IRE A ft ON I i\'ITZ I'ec-ias, mb-r, IfSS, will a)ip>y to the %  oraM< County Juda;ea of Dada i %  Florida, for approval of .--. i i r %  pot I and tor dlatrlbutlon and chat-Ke pa Admlnlatratrix, • • tin eatate "i the abovi -nam< • %  nt. This I 'Hi da} ..r July, li I-AIUXI: ARI I.M >\' %  Z l-VK' i\ I. SI' VRUEI1 Attorney i-'" Uncoln Road Miami Beai h, Florida IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0"HE 1ITH JUDICIAL C'RCUI T D FOR DADE COUNTY. FL1DA IN CHANCERY No. 63C 8175 M ART ELIZABETH tll'RXS, Plaintiff, \ I i: \.\rKS Bl'RNS, I lefendant. NOTICE B/ PUBLICATION l'i Ii:.\\'i"KS BURNS %  %  i Mr-. John Ha\ hui -1 >'.', Pa il Placi Buffalo, Ni w Vorfc Vim are herebj notlfla I ;>. Complaint for Dlvoree haa nsralnat you, an l you an quired to -ii \ e H I opy of •'• u mn iin the "omplalnl on I II %  .HI., ii. v LESTER ii.uhnxe addreaa Is S21 N.W. S1 oet, Miami, Klorida, and Oli Anawer with th.office of of the Eleventh Judicial Is nnd for l lade 'ountj f lor %  oi bi tore the 3rd day of Septi i •-. i96:i, in .l.-i.iiili of 1>|. Ii the Com • .vin i..taken aa confeaai .1 b} l latvd thia ::"ih day of .i I. R B. LEATHERMAN i'l.k i.f the Circuit '". 11} : K. E, ORI I. I, I '.pun Cl< rk %  %  %  ;-•:< NOTICF UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW Ni .'I'll i: IS HEREBY Hl\ hat the underpinned, deairina to m>.K< In bualni ss im.li r the fictitii e ol I'VNAMAIt Ct)RP, ii Ii a I MAK B< IAT V.Mtl' nt 1882 N.W, Si River Drive, Miami, Fla., Inten i.i said name iili the C Circuit Court "f I'.. • C Ida. DYNAMAR rORP Hi le Own< i LEONARD KAI.I.-II 1(129 duPont Bld( Ml ml, I Attorney for Appll : LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDtH FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY HIV EN •h, underalxm i.iisin.-uiiil. i the l tltioua nami MARLOU'S !•' vsiiii ,\s .,i 3d N.E. 17th 81 Mi.nr Pla., Intends t<> rea;• I.I ;i .i nami mi the Clerk of the t'lrcull Courl of i ..I.I. Count}, Florida. MARID I :\\ is IIATTKX ft SALEM Attorne) .tor Ma rid l.. n la : is i...:'.-,. Baby Die-Dee Diaper Service "GREATER MIAMI'S FIRST" An Exclusive Laundry tor Diapers and Baby Clothes 2111 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 95593 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW N iTM'i: IS HEREBY 'II > ih. iiiuli-i -*-_iu .1. deail Ing I iii-iii. -.unil. i the ii. i ili.i that \si'i.i:\\ i, i| i i |XT1 i:i> n N.W. 75lh Strei t, kflaml -aiil n inn wii h the Circuit Court of Dn Florl la. CASTLEAVi >H INTERN CORP B} : 1 •:. v i I I„ si; ie} \ i, cat ll \i:i:v S5CKEJINICK Attornej for Applicant 120 l.ii in Road .Mi in i Beach, Fla 7 %  >If, .. in to i %  %  V-^~V—"K^-V • ROOFING • REPAIRS AND RE-ROOFING SINCE 1920 PALMER'S ROOFING 1731 N. MIAMI AVE. PHONE FR 3-6244 r % % i KIX4* FINISH lLA.STI-:i( I'O. LIME • COLORED PLASTER Phone 635-4195 260 N.W. 27th Street Miami, Fla. IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COL'N~Y, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 48174 C l.\" RE; Batata of HAliltY BECK a i. a HERRI BECK, I '...-.-a -. .I NOTICE OF INTENTION TO UAKC APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBLTION AND FiNAL DISCHARGE NOTICE |.< hereb) irlven I ve ha> • %  filed our Final Repoi petition for Distribution and F DlseaMjurse as i'n-l-:.\.. iii.iiof • -tatc ..r H A R R Y BECK aak IU:I RECK, deceased: ami that i 6th ii.,\ i.f Auvuat, I96S, ii i 11 i ly to the Honorable County Judder i>ad County, i-'lfi'lila. f< ra|.|.v<-\ suiil I'mal l;,|...ri ami for dial nnd final discharge as Co-Exe. ore uf l Ii..-lal.' .-f ill.' .i I..-V -ii.. .-.'dent. This -Mi da; of Jul}. RENKE A1 l'i: BECK IRVING RECK as Co-Executora of th. -tnte of II A it It V R EC K a 1. BECK, 1 1. .< a.-.-.l SIMi 'N. ll.ws *,(;i:r\ii\\ i: ; Attorimv 3(11 Ain-l,y llmldinn Uuunl 32, Florida



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Idcy, August 2, 1963 ft* km /# ffrririfon Page U-A LEGAL NOTICE CIRCUIT COURT, UTH JUDICIAL ICI^CIIT. DAOE COUNTY, FLA. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 6135 rDMiMU |-!.iin'.'n, I ;SBY o'uiLFt 'l:l'. 'NOTICE BY PUBLICATION u M:V UCILFORD. IY'IH', HENRY iiriiioitD, n> "i". \Tn July is, IMS. i: VTHERMAN. Clerk %  H. : K M I.Y.MAX. I'.pnti I'leik 7/18-86, •• 2-9 BY HENRY LEONARD NOTICE UNDER F.CTITIOUS NAME LAW Is HKRKBT OIVKN Ihnl • inert, desiring in encase In .. del the fictitious name -i |\l\ Ful Run Dept. at 1(905 N.W. Awe., Xrih Miami: 18501 8. Dixie | luhway, Hade Counts Intends lo i-clstcr %  ..'l name with the Clark ,.f i • h Court "i Dade Count). [i i %  :. DISC! n"\r FI'RNITl RE, •. i.i I'la Corp.) J-9-16-2." NOTICE UNDER F CTITIOUS NAME LAW : i.~ IIKKKI'.Y tllVEN thai • gned, desiring to engage In i. inder the fictitious name "i •ASAl i INCA KRAl'TY BIIOP .11 I ri* Avenue, Miami Bench In, ,|,| t. glster said name Ith the the CI'CUll Court "I Dade I %  rids ;i\VARI> KLEIN HKI.K.N MAY KLEIN i mil 'HE A Rt iDBlNH Applicant* It SI Hill leu II 2-8-16-S2 JN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE fllTH ,'I.DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C 8054 |VVII :i I.I ill:i> r. An Executor l Will and Testament ..I MtiilNl \ -I.\IMI:I:S. I' %  ff, l I-\XI;I,IN and JENNIE fc.VNKLIN, his wife: 8ARAH B J: \.\K i.IN and, n Man lea, In i %  il, Whose Christian Name I* I .Ti % % % %  •.• If any of the aforesaid I nil %  • dead, their respective i ..IIS. a, heirs, devisees, leei assignees, irranteea, credi*therwlae. natural or oorporhn\ • %  %  •! claiming any Intereal | :i vh, under or ggatnst an> i> .i. HI i ii'.-.i In la I I NOTiCE BY PUBLICATION \ i i: AX KLIN and JENNIE I: %  '.:, I.IX, his W iiSARAH II K l.l.N". an.I. ii niar" i. .1. hi v\ iioei • hi 1st Ian nn own. .,.. i, %  .1 defi nl.'iii"I just can't take it anymore, Molly ... I'm throwing in the Tallisl" Copr. 1963, Doyen w Ptodut^oftf J LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR DA. IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY IN CHANCERY No. 63C 7859 II MM 11! I i Ki i/.AN. Plaintiff. .Ii iSKI'll Ki •/ \\, I I.-I. ndant. NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Til: Jl ISEPH Ki ''/.AN >• .. Pai bai.. i 'i'.in.2 Pren! Ice At enue Auburn, Massachusetts Yi.r ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED to nerve a cops ..i youi Answer i>. the 1:111 of Complaint for Divorce filed .mains! Mm. on lit* 1'laintlff'n attor,i,i, ItKRNSTKIX .v MILLER, 1111 Congress Bulkltng, Miami 12. Florida, and lo file ilitli day of August 1918. otherwise a l*e,-i*'.Ti,, Coafesso will be entered aaaln-t you. Dated at Miami, [hide County, Florida, tills 22nd da) ,.i Jul), Ie3. i:. B. I.I:A IIIKKMAX Clerk ..i the Circuit Court l;\ • iI', i ul'I.I.A.NIi I >ei>ul) i Jerk 7 28, 8 '.'-'.i-Hi IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 45424-A IN RE Bi late % %  IH;HM is i' itriiix, I ii ceased. NOT CE OF INTENTION TO MAKE ii i. pective unknown APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION devisees, legatees, AND FINAL DISCHARGE litiirs, .a "ii" N'I ill'il i> h.i.i.v xlven that I have .. porate, having %  •! rilea ni) mid '".i Petition foi luteresl by, through, lilstrlimtioii and Final Discharge as llldi ri -; lln) .•!" Hi.Bfol • -.i 111 ii II nd i" the pi "!• %  n > in M. ... scribed: .vn spouses "f an) of the |i %  .•. -i id defendants and ill parunknou n, lia\ Ing ui i have an) i Ight, title •" I ..i i,. the follow Ing ii. %  erty, situate In I >ade Coun• i i i-wlt: I • %  Hli* '.i. of KUAN K UN BCIil • \ i.-ii N, accordlna to the a. i %  %  ..nl. .1 III I'lal ai I-age :i of the Public 1 oi i >...i.County, Florida. id each of you, arthereby il — 111 i.as been brought ruliiH ,.u in id, Circuit I'.mri of %  Hi i mnty, I lorldn, b) DAVID C pi'liuisT. as Executor ,.f the l.a> iln Honorable Count) ludgtv .a Dnde County, Florida, (or approval of said I'm..! !te|H>rt and for dlsirlbution ami final diecharg* as \ niiini-iiaii is. C.T.A. .•! the estate ..i in.ali..v, -n.in.,-.1 decedent. Tills I'lli da) .'f Jul). 1863 •nii:i:i:.-.\ i:. KIN Administratrix, C.T.A. of the Mi.u. ..i II, iin.ui C Kni.in. deceased, M.\i;v I.N i. v\ II:M:I: Alt, .111.1 fol Aoiiini.sil'all i\ i'TA of estate of Herman • Rubin, d> cd, 818 Alnsle) Ftldg Miami .... I-la. T 26, s 2-8-18 NOTICE UNDFR FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is ni:i:i:i'.v GIVEN ihat id.mi.i. rslgned, deelrlng to eiuiase In business undei the flctltloua name ..f MIDAB I1RAKE ,\ ALIGNMENT Slli i|' ai "... • N X\ "Bill Si., .* %  : Intends to reglstel nunii "iili thi I, :. ,.| III,I'll-, ml I'.-Ill I oi Pail. i '.. mi 11..i i.la III! \Ni 'I i. INi' FL V (I IRP 7 ls-26, S 2-8 NOTICE UNDER ,.,„. ,,..1 FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NtiTICE IS HEREBl '11V I.N that his Notlci shall I-. published for the undersigned, desiring to engage In ',. 'V, "'" %  • Iv "••' %  •In THE bimlneas undei 'he flctltbms name M iMSII |.'l.n|;iii|.vN >i'iKMHIMIHF:R1 .\ ~' \IAJ yi 'I '!• I his 20th ,, ., ..,' .in,,,., igfs, I %  • i '"i'I'nunti, Florida ,: l-EATHKKMAN "I Hi. Circuit Court i inrti County, Florida By: c. iv i ni-Kl.AXn [n.NKl .v AM<1 S triii f„ r Plaintiff I'in Road >" i'-.h, Florida | t'aui hwltney s 2-8-K-M ART FJMHRi HDFjRY -' i -i i ii nimilii >19 N-J*. in thi <"ii> of Ml"" I. I'-'M--. % %  ;•• %  •:Ui i-. ilster the mid nami • 1 "' "' ,I,.,K of the Circuit Court of Dadt ''i'lr./ai'M' Florida, tin9th '^"''H'ENRY 3 ; 'ERMAN LEEF* ANKIS Atorneys for Apjilh-ant (20 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Worlda T 19-26. S'2-9 SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS MANUFACTURERS OF SUPERIOR RUBBER STAMPS Corporation Seals and Supplies CHARLIE MERZ, Owner 13 N.E. 1st Ave. FR 4-1034 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai Mi.undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the following fi>*niii.ns names ai riie ad4reasvs BI I opposite their respective names: State Liquors, >.^^ S.\V. r.Tth Avenue, Miami: Gas-Light inn. >M S'.W. 57th Avenue, Miami: Suit.l.i.in. vs. 6203 N.W. -Till Avenue, Miami: State IJquora, 8458 B.W. --nd St.. Miami: State Liquors, 11880 N.W, Tih Avenue, Miami: State Liquors, .".".". N.B. 167th Street, North Miami: State Liquors. Wi". s\\V. 4nih St., South Mia mi: Stati Liquors, 8885 v. Hibiscus si. r. rrlne; State Liquors, 15180 Bo. lii\i>llicliwuv, Miami: Rockilale Bar, 18110 s... Dixie EUtltWay, Miami: State Liquors, 8100 N, Miami Avenue, Miami: Mate Liquors, 8715 N.W 167th Street, .Miami: Carol City Liquors, 3713 N.W, 167th Strei :. Miami: State Liquors, Avis-ido Drive .< %  So I ilxle 11 > II..instead. Itertlanrt Tavern, Avocado Drive & >< %  I MM.Hwy,, I l.iin.si.-a.l State 1.1.in-.is, K. vili St. A l"ili Ave II nleah: Flamingo Liquors, I-: '"li St. A l"th Avi Hiali r.si Inn, 280H w 2nd Avenue, HlaI. ah: Post Pin kugi I l-:. nil w.-, Hlaleah: Hldeawav, i"".". i:. 18th Street, Hlal.-ah: Boots ft Saddles, 2100 Palm Avenue. Hlnli a'n: .,, n.i Liquors, 137 N W. lltb Strei I. Miami. hlarmon) Lounge, 1*13 K. 4'.'th Street, Hlalenh; Park Bar, 2500 Palm Avenue, Fual.-ali: .leffer.ion Liquor, 800 N. Miami Beach Blvd., N. Miami Beach; I.L' Bar, %  •"" E. nth Street, Hlaleuh: Mar-Tab Vending, 16385 N.W. l"ih Avenue, Miami: Intends !•• register said names with the Clerk ol the Circuit Court of lia.l. County, Florida. I "A ST I. i:\Vl a Hi IN IKKNATInNAI. CORP. B) : DAVID 1SLINKY. Vice President HARRY ZITKERN1CK, An..int> for Applicant 180 Lincoln KINUI Miami Beach, Florida 7 26, 6 2-8-H NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhal ih, undersigned, desiring i" engage In business under the 'h tltious ni ol TOI'PM VITAMINS *i COSMBTIC8 at 133 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables Intends to register said ram.with the Clerk ol the i ii-.-nii Com i of Dade County, Florida. 11 IPPK DISCI ICNT • •ENTER8I-..I:AI. GABI.ES. ixc Kl >VNi:i: ,\ MANNHElMER At toi ne) for Topisj I tiacuunl Centers-Coral Gables, Inc. : 26, S NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR CHANGE OF NAME Chancery No. 63C-6370 To \vh..in it Ma\ Concern: Notice la hereby given that the undersigned petitioner*, GAR* I i|-:i 'TSi'll. some times known ns GARY PAY Lull, and KTHBL I i|:i"l'Si'll. some times known us ETHEL TAYiiOi: whoM resWenoe address is 34.", Meridian Avenue in the i-itv of Miami Beach, Dade County, Florida, Intend to apply to the Hon. %  •rable HENRY L IJAI.AHVN. .ludi-e of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, in and for Dade Count)', at Ills office in tinCounty Court lions,-, nt 8:8C O'clock A.M.. on the 27th day of August, 1963, or a* soon thereafter as they may be heard, for mi ordar %  lutnglnK their names from GAR Y DEVT8CH and I:TIII:I. DECTSCH to GARY TAYI.olt and KTIIII. TAT* l^>R by Which names they shall thereafter he known. Dated at Miami. Florida, this [m day of July, A.I >. ii"'.' .. // GARY DBl'THCH -. ETHEL DBI'TSCH Petltlonei Attorney FTYMAN P. GALBl'T LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOT1CK IS IIKItKltY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring t. eiigugu in business under the fictitious name of B1ROTEX aCORSET CORNER at 8SS1 Bahtedo street. Coral Gables, Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dude t'ounty, Florida. NAT GRERNBERG Sole Owner TRKD & NEWMAN Attorneys for Applicant 106 Dade Federal Btdg. 12-18-26, i I NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HF:ilEBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of 85th AVENUK ASSOCIATES at 7180 N.W. .'.".ih Avenue. Miami 17. Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. 33th AVBNl'E lll'.M.TV CORP. By: si.iii.-i ll. Hubermun, Pres 7 26, N 2-8-16 NOTICE UNDER' FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, di siring to engage In business under the fictitious name ol I.KWIS POMERANTZ .V CO., at 1401 S.W. First Street, Suite -'"7. Miami, Florida, intend to register said name with tin. Clerk of the circuit Court <>r Dade i oiniiv. Florida LEWIS PUMERAXTZ MYK'i.N K MIN LEWIS I". COHEN, Esq. Attorney for Lewis Pomerantl A *.'••. 7 88, B L'-!i-lfi NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ih.undersigned, desiring to engage In Business under the fictitious name .•( TOPI'S I'lM'nI'NT CENTERS at 138 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the I'ireiiii Court of lia.le Cnuutv, Florida. TOPP8 DI8COITNT CENTERSCORAL t!ABLF;s, INC. KOVNBR tt MANNHEIM FIR Attorneys for Tofips Discount i', in, i s-i 'oral i tables, Inc. 7 18-26, 8 2-8 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!. ^•Jewisli Fk,ridH provided in Section 738.16,1 Florida statutes, in their offices in the t'ounty Courthouse in Dade i County, Florida, within si\ calendar months from the time of the first publication hereof, or the same ill hiI. aired. Dated at Miami. Florida, this 21st daj of .Ian,-. A D. 1863. i'ii si publication of t'ds notice on the 12th das of Jul>. 1863. BARRF7TT M Ri iTHENBERt i As vdmlnistrator • '.T. v. CAIDIN A I'. 1 iTHFiNBl Hi ; Atorneys t..' Artniinistratot C.T.A. 305 His. i ^ ii. Itu lid lug Miami ::.', Floi la 7 12-18-26, 8 :' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 1ITH JUDICiAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C 7400 H'STINK II I TAL an.I BE VTRICE I'TA L, his He. Plaintiffs. JACK ROSEN, ROBERT MARKOWITZ and MARKOW1TZ. his wile. Defendants. SUIT FOR BREACH OF LEASE TO: .la. k Rosen #2 West '.'.'.111 Stl t Baltimore, Maryland You are herebj notified thai %  Bill of Complaint for Breach of Leas,has been filed agaiusl you, and you are required t>. serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill ..t Complaint on the Plaintiff's Atorneys, SHEVIN, GOODMAN ft HOLTZMAN, M6 Seybold Building, Miami. Florida, snil file the original Answer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade t'ounty, Florida on or before the 12th das of August A.I'.. 1888. ll >oii fail t.. do SO, judgment by default will be taken This notice shall be published once • %  :>< li week for fout consecutive weeks in TIIK JEWISH ELOHIDIAN. DONE AND tiRDERED nt Miami, li.nl. County, Florida this 9th day of July, A.I'.. K 11 I.RATFTERM \N Cli rk of the 'Iwult I %  -n rt l i.i.i. Counts Florida (seal) By: C P, ti 'ici.AN'li. Deputj Clerk SHEVIN. (1 MAN ,\ HOLTZMAN A tin li, > s f..| Plaintiff 'h: Sej hold Building Miami :::. Florid By: Ham M. I:. '. l>ef,-ndant. NOTiCE OF PUBLICATION TO: VHMULIOil. MUARES Address l*nkn..w n Yi'C, VIRGIUOO. MUARES, present residence unknown, are required to file your answer to the complaint for dlvorco, with the t'lerk of the above Court, ami serve B copy thereof upon Glno P. Negretti, Attorney, 810-11 Congress Building, lit N i: 2nd Ave., Miami. Florida, on oi l.etor. the 11th das of August, 1883, or else complaint will be taken as confessed. Dated this Mh day of July, 1888, B. P. i.i'A i ili:i:M AN. Cli i k. Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida IN THE COUNTY JU DC E'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. S7800-C l.N RE: Estat RUDOLF II. SCHMITT I', -eased NOTiCE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE Is herebj given that I havi fil.d my Final Report and Petition for l Istrlbutlon and l Inal IMseharge as Executor of the estate of lll'txiLF' H SCHMITT, deceased: and th.it on th. 26th ,la> of August, 1863, will appl) to th.ii..ii..rai.i. Counts Judges <SII REPHl'N Attornes 1870 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, Florida 1-16-23 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C-7603 (Leo IN RE: APPIJC VIH i.N i IK AI 'A MAE SINCLAIR, TO BECOME A FREE DEAI HR NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FREE DEALER'S LICENSE NOTICE is HI:I:I:I:Y (ilVE.N that the nnd.rsimi.il. ADA MAE SINCLAIR, will, on the 4th ua> of September, 1863, at the hour of 8:00 o'.-loek A.M.. r as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, appl) t.. one oi the Judges of the Circuit Court in and for Dade County, Florida, for a license t" manage, take charge ol and control her properly, and t" become a free dealer In every respect. ARTHUR R. STARK Attorney for Pi tltlonei 1133 Alfr.-d I. rtuPont Hulldlng Miami 82, Florida • %  '%  • •l'i-2 :: NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY ti IVI N that the undersigned, desiring to ens huslness under iln fictitious name >•' BOB EHMAXX PONSTRI'CTION -it 10750 S.W 82nd \y %  nui. Ml i.i.i intends t<> reglstet -.. il i thi i 'li ii. of the '""'. nil i ..II -a I i.i -i i'. nun-. Ktorlda. RC 'BERT K l-'.IIM VNX, INC. a I loi id., i < % %  iiorai HARRIS .v. RI iBIXSI ..\ Attorues %  %  \i'i cain l.'th I-1 %  I i.i.l. I ertet i i %  Miami .:.'. l-'...ii.l.. IN THE COUNTY JUOOt'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60093-A IN RE: Estl i RUDOLPH I-'Kl.l'Si lll'll I i.-. eased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Person, Hal Ing Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are herebj notified and required to present ans claims and demands which you mas have against the estate of RCDOI ill I'II.H SCHl'H deceased late of Dade County, Florida, to tinCounts Judges of I'nil,County, and file the same in duplicate and as provided In Section 88.16, Florida Statutes, in their offices in th. County Courthouse in lade County, Florida, with u s.\ calendar months from the time of thei first publication hereof, or it-., same will be barred. Hat.-d at Miami. Florida, this 2nd .lav of July, A.I'. 1868. HENRY Nl RTl >N SAM PEL KKLl'Silll'll As Co-Executors First publication ol this nolle, on the 19th day of Jul). 186S HENRV NORTON Attornes for Co-Exei I 1106 I tiscas in Bldg., M %  i NOTiCE BY PUDLILMTlON IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 723= P. C. JONES, I'lain I iff. v s. ill. IE JONES, 1 'el'endallt. SUIT FOR DIVORCE Ti I: JULIE JONES :'.MS Michigan street Kansas City, Missouri You. JI'LIE JONES, • %  tifieii that a Complaint foi has been filed against anrequin .1 i• %  serve Answer or Pleading to (seal) B) K M l.YMAN. I ebvn-i Hvorct you. and you cops '*i your the lolllplaint on ttie plaintiff's attorney. J. David Llelmian, li:'.:: North Kr \v.-nu,-. Honiest.a.l. Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the t'lerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 18th day of August. 1H6.1. If von fall to do s,,. judgment h> default will be taken against yon tor th.relief demanded i H..Complaint. DONE AN'P ORDERED at Miami, Florida, this 8th das July, A.P. 1088 I-:. B. LBATHERM VN. I 'lerk, Circuit Court, Dadi I mi FToi Ida (seal) Bj l< M i FMAN, l'e|.llty I .1. DAVID LIEBMAN Aiorm-v f..r Plaintiff i Sorl h Kr.'in %  A v Deputs Qlerk Homestead, l-T-ai la 12-1S-26, S 2 :.-i..-:s %  :



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T eJewish Flor idliain Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE WISH WEEKLY am 36 — Number 31 Miami. Florida, Friday, August 2, 1963 Two Sections — Price 20* ennedy Eyes lew Law For Immigration V. Va NGTON — (JTA) — Presml • wedy this week made a geep B move to liberalize the n -Walter Immigration Act, elm: •. the elimination of the itior;. origin quola system and Bur ran of discrimination. %  IT. tnnedy sent proposals to Vth t•• Senate and House. They ire accompanied by the Presi-! pit's personal letter saying that lactrit of the new legislation Bui. help eliminate discrimina MI between peoples and nations." In Ms letters to Congress, president Kennedy declared: The ma of a national origin |uot? system is without basis in kith*' logic or reason and it Leitfcer satisfies a national need Lor accomplishes *n international purpose." He added that "In in age of interdependence kmonc nations, such a system is n anachronism." II'rtent Kennedy recommend that the national origins quota [-ten-:, in effect since 1920. and Ihich denied entry to many ret ^ees from Hitler's Europe, be limi: ited within live years. He! Bated nit that 60,000 quota numfcrs were wasted annually be an-i <: a biased system in which, farther-. European countries were fvorec' Eastern Europe and Mediterranan areas were considered less isirable sources of immigration der the quota system which was %  a-petuEted in the McCarranfalter Act. Un.'er the proposed legisl. •:... 20 per cent of quota Burnt" • .i vear would he put in I Continued on Paoe 2A U.S. Dismisses A-Threat To Peace in Middle East PRESIDENT KENNEDY .. fully owore WASHINGTON — (JTA) — State Department sources said this week that Israel and Egypt have been urged to subscribe to the American-British-Soviet ban on nuclear weapons testing as part of the over1 all policy of the United States and not because the nuclear potential ', of the two countries is being taken seriously. There is no current evidence to! justify either Israeli or Egyptian tw0 countries is within sight of ; fears of nuclear attack from the i nuclcar arms capability, although Other, it was stressed. It was emPhasized that, in the official ^e United States desires aban! American view, nether of the %  %  $ SL mA ob > ecl,ves in the Middle East. fltra Orthodox 'tone Vehicles ]ln Jerusalem JEW '.'..KM (JTA) Ultralialous Orthodox youths <>t the ieturei Karta organisation con|nued -toning buses Sunday night, • bile their elders held an openfcu ma-s meeting denouncing alleged Sabbath violations. The %  Meturei Karta demonstrations, beigiwi Saturday, resulted In the rIrtst


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Friday. August 2, 1963 Hebrew Academy Lists Services The Hebrew Academy will hold "< liipb. Holi.iay services for the first time in its 650-seat, air-conditioncd auditorium, Jacob Cohen, synagogue chairman, announced this week. A prominent New York cantor will conduct the services on the first and second days of Rosh llashona, Sept. 19 and 20, and Yom Kippur, Sept. 28. Students of the Junior High Department of th* Hebrew Academy will road the Torah and explain many of the holiday prayers. Rabbi Alexander S. Grots, principal. Mid. P'v >V*tic#? nrridHimn Pegs 9-B Cohen announced the following members serving on his committec: Carl Brandes, Jerome Bien < nfejd, Harry Gcoet, Joseph Gon-1 slior, Oscar Mamber, Henry Penchansky, Samuel Reinhard and .lulitis Rosenstein. Louis Merwitzer, president, said ihat seals may be reserved by calling the Hebrew Academy. Moscow Rabbi's Charge Questioned • % % %  <.. \ Rabbi Landau In New Pulpit The brother Of a Miami woman. Mrs. Nathan Glover, has assumed a new post as co-spiritual leader ot Park Synagogue in Cleveland. O. lie is Rabbi Sol Landau, who will share the pulpit there with Rabbi Armond E. Cohen. Associate rabbi of Park Synagogue from 195* to 1960, Rabbi Landau left to become spiritual leader of the newly-formed Beth Hillel Congregation, the first to I be organ*led in Wilmette, III. Rabbi Landau also previously scrved as a member of the Executive Council of the Chicago Board "f Rabbis and chairman of the Adult Education Committee of the Rabbinical Assembly's Chicago Region. Rabbi Landau is German-born and descended from a family with an unbroken 200-year-long ihairi of rabbis. He is the author "I Length of Our Davs." Nate Perlmutter, executive director of the Florida Office of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, will spend the month of September in West Germany as a guest of the Bonn Government. Perlmutter will be joining a group of ten ADL executives across the nation invited by West Germany to study the program against anti-Semitism conducted in the Bonn government cgencies, army, and schools. SeaBees Will I Convene Here Members of tho SeaBees Vet-' crans of America, organization of! I U.S. Naval Construction battalions I \ ho served in World War II and | the Korean War, will hold their i 17th annual convention at the j Dcauville Hotel, starting Friday,! Aug. 8. More than 400 persons will attend the meetings. Edward Kipl'le, Streamwood, III., national president, will convene the meet ing. Harry I. Tucliman, convention chairman, aud a national vice, president of the SeaBees, will in troduce Ben F. Lowe, president of Miami Island XI. Lowe will in-! troduce Miami Beach Mayor Mel-1 vin Richard who will extend the welcoming address to the convention. JERUSALEM — (JTA) — Is raeli Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Nissim this week categorically rejected allegations by Chief Rabbi Yehuda Leib Levin of Moscow that the Israel Embassy in the Soviet capital had "disturbed" the peace of the city's Jewish community by distributing religious articles in the synagogue there. Rabbi Levin's allegations were contained in a letter protesting the Embassy's alleged distribution of religious articles which was submitted to the Embassy. The letter was sent in Rabbi Levin's name and in the names of the cldI ers of the Central Synagogue in Moscow. In his letter of reply to the Moscow rabbi. Chief Rabbi Nissim expressed "regret and deep hurt" over the fact that religious leaders of the Moscow Jewish community protested to the Israeli Embassy. $5,000 Finals Due at Flagler Finals of the $5,000 American Hurdle Championship and start of the third annual SS0.000 International Classic will make this weekend the biggest of the summer season thus far at Miami's Flagler Kennel Club. The hurdle event, with Oscar Evers' Hi Spence as the standout favorite, is scheduled Friday night, with the $80,000 Classic getting under way Saturday. A field of 40 will go to the post in seven different races at the start of the International, with John Prevatt's sensational Sonda looming as the favorite just as she was in the $25,000 Open, which wound up last weekend. The classic will be contested over the 3 8ths mile Flager Course, but Sonda was known primarily as a distance running star before gelling hot on the 5/16ths mile sprint course after moving to Flagler. "Even if the Embassy officials' did provide the members of the synagogue in Moscow with religious articles, how could this be regarded as a disturbance?'' Rab-, bi Nissim argued in his letter. Pointing out that it is generally known that there is a great shortage in the Soviet Union of prayerbooks, prayer shawls, mezuzot and other Jewish religious articles, Rabbi Nissim expressed, hope that "by Divine intervention, | all barriers to our Soviet breth-J ren in obtaining needed religious, articles will be lifted." i He added that "if Israel Em-i bassy officials did alleviate the dire shortage of such articles, they should be blessed rather than censured." In his letter. Rabbi Levin had urged the Israel Embassy to halt the distribution of the religious articles, saying they were not needed by the congregation, and asking the Embassy to desist from such further gifts. The letter had ehargei 1 .") <: Embassy with abusing the hospitality of the Moscov synagogue) by "sowing confusion and b.'.'.r lu-lnvm 1'In.letof 11 different tour* "f larnH ABnmpe • Si. nil th.i.st ..f Israel, Italy, Hwltaerhuid, i-i-.m-.• Ten full day* in iHritol, 1.*. mi the Continent • Complete :'". days program from 1927. -M-o special High Hoi) p. Totirx. %  Based on Group Fare for 40 or more, and 10 day Israel program only. STOP IN. WRITE OR CALL: GEORGE KR0NENG0LD TRAVEL SERVICE 540 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD j %  % %  •is Miami Beach ^STA;JE 1-0455 ''Un*' Est. 1924 will enjoy the real at the ne exciting She': "ewers finsst E.-st s;j loocn osM. v. j/ bsfween United Ke-icr.t or.d Rc:kcfel!*r Center; cioie to al! (.wot, c.ld'ion o.id terminals. 6eau iful uir conditioned^ rooms and furies with television — at most modero'e ra.*e*l OUTDOOH HOOF GARDEN] AND SUN DECMWIMHKi:'! mtsim^B Coffee $he*> % %  ••••••Of KVvVwVrVtlT Famous Supper dub ft* 1200 ROOM HM 3mU Islington Avonuo, 41m to *o.i {AS NfW YOtK 17, N. Y.-TB. Float I >!•, or. M iSHE'_TC'S~OWERSl j CMTUI| CM Mtitlin| M U lilt M ratti j nMt_ I MdltIS I LJ'Jl; ftffj $ ':•__ J BEFORE you travel write for your free TRAVEL GUIDE i Travel th* Congress wo/ with this Travel Guide Just the size to carry in your pocket or the glove compartment of your car. Gives rates, locations, facilities of better class motor hotels coast to coast, inspected and approved by Congtess Motor Hotels. Members of Congress Motor Hotels offer free reservation service. We honor Credit Cards. CONGRESS MOTOR HOTELS 1674 Meridian Avenwe Miami, B each 39, Florida NEW HEALTH with ever/ LUXURY Some people want every thing.. .and find it at The Arlington I Swim In our new temperature-control led twin cascade pools, enfojr our patio and sun decks...dine on gourmet food...dance and be entertained. ..golf on our two 18-nole Championship course*. %  All sports and recreations In Hot Spring' Including excellent fishing end plenty of exciting (light life With big name entertainers In the nearby Supper Clubs. Bolhe away all your oohes and pains due.to fatigue In the superb bathhouse right In The Arlington...relieve) rheumatism, arthritis and high blood pressure. Cone to The Arlington far Health and Funl < tD


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Friday. August 2. 1963 •Kk*i.*Hkridteu7 Page 5-A Stubborn Pursuit of Dade's New Community Unit Continued from Preceding Pag* er have to do with their morality, especially when the adult commuuity serves by example in its business, social and sexual practices to impress the young with the presumable viability of a dual code of ethical behavior? Bishop Carroll Holps Examining the issue were such .leaders-as Bishop James Duncan, .Suffragan Bishop of the Diocese of South Florida Episcopal Church; Luther Pierce, executive director of the Greater Miami .Council of Churches; Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, then president of the Welfare Planning Council; Fr. McCarthy, president of Biscayne College; and Virgil Pitstick, director of the Department of Human Relations at the University of Miami. Neither did the efforts end there. Bearing in mind the Statement of Conscience" emerging out of the National Conference on Race and Religion held in Chicago last February, the Greater Miami Chapter of American Jewish Committee sought to sirmoun SAMET ... befcid-t-icenei achieve the formulation of a similar statement here. And so. chapter officials, headed by Seymour Samet, executive director. North Dade Member Tea North Dade Chapter of B'nai B*rith Women will hold a membership tea at the home of Mrs. Al Schwartz, 1030 NE 177th St.. No. Miami Beach, on Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. Program for thj evening will be a film on one of B'nai B'rith's philanthropies. In charge of information are Mrs. Schwartz and Mrs. Ralph Abramson. Panel Talk Set Friday Evening Westbrooke country Club lecture group, the Wisdom Workshop, will have a panel discussion Friday evening on "What is Success?" Dr. Evan Katz, local psychiatrist, will be guest speaker. Ben Lcvitan will be moderator. The Wisdom Workshop meets twice each month at the Club. 8500 on the Trail, with a variety of panel discussions and guest speakers on timely subjects. Ultra-Orthodox Stone Vehicles Continued from Page 1-A to bypass passenger routes through the two districts inhabited by the ultra-Orthodox—Me a Shearim and Bet Yisroel. Of the 18 youths arrested Saturday, 12 were remanded to jail for five days each. They were being held for hearings, and not sentenced, as erroneously reported i Six others were freed on parole. to be tried with the 12. Among the six was 16-year-old Jacob Warhaflig. a son of Dr. Zcrach Warhaftig, Minister for Religious Affairs The youth is a student at an Orthodox yeshiva here. Magistrate Moreno Levy, who heard the police charges of rioting of the arrested youths, order ed those being detained to be givAi facilities in jail to observe Tisha B'Av. went to Bishop Coleman F. Carroll. Would he cooperate? uishop Carroll immediately involved tiuCatholic community with a resounding affirmative — providing the statement would be a strong and meaningful one. Bringing together Bishop Duncan, for the Episcopalians; Rabbi Solomon Schiil. president of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association: Pierce and the Council of Churches; Rev. Theodore Gibson, president of the Miami NAACP; Rabbi Joseph Narot, signing for the American Jewish Committee; and Rev. Edward Graham, of the Ministerial Alliance. Bishop Carroll emerged with his strong statement which declared: "We, the religious leaders of this community, believe on the common basis of our faith in the Fatherhood of God that all men are equal in His eyes. "Therefore we proclaim as inalienable every man's right to equality without discrimination of any kind in: employment, education, housing, hospitals, labor unions, public accommodations, political organizations, job training, recreation and worship. We proclaim that racial prejudice, discrimination and segregation ;>rc a violation of justice and an affront to the dignity of man ..." What of Future? Miami now has its Community Relations Board. What of the future? More as a tribute to his personal abilities than his role in pressing for the board's establishment. Seymour Samet was this week named temporary executive director of the Dade .County. •• Community Relations Board, at the request of the board to national American Jewish Committee, which Monday announced its part-time release of Samet through December. 1963. Samet, who has been at the head of the Greater Miami Chapter of the American Jewish Committee since his arrival here in 1952. is a soft-spoken, hard-wcrking executive, who achieves most of his many accomolishments from behind-the-scenes, and is loathe to talk about himself. Communal Cross-Section Said John Slawson, executive vice president of AJCommittee, in a letter to Bishop Carroll: "We are pleased to lend Mr. Samet's services to the board as AJCommittee's contribution to this unique community achievement." Samet holds a BA degree from the New Jersey State University in Montclair and a Master's degree from the University of Mi ami. Previously, he was assistant director of the Community Relations Comntittee of the Jewish Community Council of Essex County, New Jersey, from 1949 until he came to Miami. He has served as an instructor ;it the Rutgers University Workshop in Human Relations, was coordinator for the Civil Rights audit of Dade County, and consultant to the Puerto Rican Commonwealth on its Workshop on Puerto Rican Affairs in San Juan. He is a resource advisor to the League of Women Voters, Council of Churches, Rabbinical Association, Urban League, Citizens Slum Clearance Committee, and Public Housing Authority. ,. A" jnstr.uctpj at Temple..Israel on "Judaism and Justice," he is affiliated with numerous professional organizations, including the National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials, and Association of Jewish Community Relations. He is married, and he and his wife. Elaine, an instructor at the University of Miami, have two daughters. They live in Coral Gables. Hopefully, prospects for the board look bright now, with a solid cross-section of religious leaders, Negro and white, as well as business leaders represented. Named to two-year terms were William C. Baggs, editor, The Miami News; James L. Keller, accountant with Haskins & Sells; Dr. Henry King Stanford, president, University of Miami; Edward F. Swanson Jr., senior vice president, First National Bank of Miami; John B. Turner, past president, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce and division manager for Cities Service Oil Co.; and Elmer A. Ward, Negro pharmacist and president of Roosevelt Savings and Loan Assn. Named for one-year terms were John H. Halliburton, executive with Eastern Air Line*; John C. Harrison, vice president, Miami-Dade Chamber and an official of M. R. Harrison Construction Co.; Robert Macht, president. Jordan Marsh; Stanley C. Myers, local attorney and long time communal leader; Stuart W. Patton. attorney; Robert Suero, past president of rhe Chamber of Commerce of Cub.i. V I JFK Considers Friendly Role Continued from Page 1-A I the increasing persecution of Jews in Russia. President Kennedy made it ap| parent that he would give the Kussian Jewish situation further thought, and that he was concerned. In his half-hour meeting with i the President, Mr. London also ; cited aspects of the Egyptian military buil.'-up and contended that ; the State Department may not have properly evaluated developments. President Kennedy then revealed that he was following the situation very closely His response was attentive, sympathetic and encouraging. Mr. London Bald after the meeting. 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Friday. Augurt 2. 1963 Pe*;e> 3-B Beth Torah Registering Now Aug. 1 was "R Day" at Beth 'lnrah Congregation, when registration was opened for all departments of the synagogue's Religious School, Joseph Schmicr, president, announced. Beth Torah offers a complete educational program from ages 3 to 18, including a daily pre-school, Sunday School, Hebrew Thru Fun, Hebrew School, Junior and Senior High School, Hebrew and General Studies program. Bar and Bas Mitzvah instruction, and confirmation. Complementing these classes; • are co-curricular activities, includ-j| the student and Alef congregaj | tion. teen-age services, junior and senior choir. Torah reading groups, honor society. Student Council, Keren Ami Council, United Synagogue Youth, and Young Judaea. Among the first to register were two of the youngest and oldest students at Beth Torah. Elissa Shantzis 3, will be among the 100 pupils in the daily nursery and kindergarten division, which pro Abraham I. Gittelson, education director, registers one of the youngest and oldest students for Beth Torah Congregation Religious School. Elissa Shantzis 3, will enter the pre-school. Diane Keshlansky 16. will attend the Beth Toiah branch of the Junior College sponsored by the Bureau of Jewish Education. Registration opened this week. __ American composer Richard Rodgers (center) and his it listen attentively as Prof. Jack Gross, head of the Hebrew Uxu versity's Department of Experimental Medicine and CoJJCCO Research, explains scientific studies being conducted at tl I university in the fight against cancer. In Jerusalem, Bodgen presented the Hebrew University with a check for $200,OD( in behalf of the National Committee for the Rodgers and l-Lnm merstein Wing in Experimental Medicine and Cancel' Research which will be established on the new medical camp vides a complete readiness proj Q f the Hebrew University in honor of Mr. Rodgers and his krte gram with music, crafts, rhythms, collaborator, Oscar Hammerstein, II. dramatics, and dancing. ,—_— — — ———— Diane Keshlansky 16, will study ...._, ... M _, _. Biblical and Modem Hebrew in J WV AllXIIIOrV !" n C "' n tlected The Peoples National Bank of North Miami Beach this week an the Beth Torah Branch of the Jun_ ior College, sponsored by the BuPlCHIIIinCI COIlf GD reau of Jewish Education, follow-i ":. .. ins her graduation from the com-j National Ladies Auxiliary ot ncunwd that Mrs rjuian Chasm V %  I T *>„ for r I munity-wide Hebrew High School.; ^ Jewish, War.Veterans of the' cIcctcd an ^.^ rf Young Matrons In Tea tor CJA The Sunday school program m JJJMW^ wj jj j !" |! t he bank at a Board of D f tors Continuing the summer program! presentation of the "Coloring; JJ* ^.JTHetSwlbool ^reham Hotel in Washington,; meeting held JfJj^J^ Of evenL. held by the Young Ma-' Book." which deals with rederac)awe8 £or elementary and Junior .B.C. J *•' BM i> presioent ana ^na. trons Division of the Combined; tion, its agencies and a quarter-; High Sc hool students will provide | Mrs. Bernard Wander, president \ Jewish Appeal Women's Division, j century of service to the eommunthe skiU and facility for partici-; 0 f the Department of Fla., Mrs. ., dessert tea .it the home ol Mrs. ity, were Mrs. Aaron Farr, Mrs. ,,.„,„„ ,„ he synagogue services, Ben Habcrman, past national pres7cW10rCI ODCilS Harold Unger on DiLido Island,Thomas Gerard. Mrs. Rocky Poma s weU as the ability to conversei ident, formerly of New York, and. r Registration Here Temple Zamora announces tli last week produced $1,000 in checks and pledges for the 1963 Combined Jewish Appeal. erance and Mrs. Stanley Arkin. m and understand modern He-!now a member of the North! Millie Draiiar, accompanist, was Drew Shore Auxiliary, and Mrs. Ted I again on hand lo provide the ac( Tnig vear wil j „,„.], ine first : Lingaton, national historian and| Mrs Inez Krenskv. chairman of companiment. and also to perform Hign Scn0 oI General Studies gradpast department president, who is; opening of registration in the >!ifthe Women's Division, and Mrs. i several vocal numbers. Trixie llaling c i ass 0 f Bet h Torah, includ-j presently a candidate for national brew, Sunday, and Nurser* BchOOl Benedict Silverman, chairman of Levin provided the introduction. ; mg stlu i ents w ho have attended!.junior vice president, will be ; Departments. 1he Young Matrons Division, call%  Co-chairmen were Mrs. Marthe High School division for three among the local delegates. [ R aD bj Hershel Brooks, Spiritual erl the ifternoon function, which shall Berkson. Mrs. Lawrence years. j I leader, will a g ain >! "' h %  %  "' Hewas attended by voung matrons Porter. Mrs. William Binder and A full youth program is provid-1 brew Department, living in the areas of Miami. Mrs Harry B. Smith. Mrs. Porter 0 d for all students from the 3rd tending the LeadershipTraining Beach, up to list St. and the low-] welcomed guests on behalf of the jrou "a most er islands, i vent." The tea was also highlighted by the presentation of the "Federation Coloring Book" hit musical written bj Trixie Levin, which ,.: at red at lh 25th anniver%  I i IIH'I ting "t i i tion Taking a leading part in the successful committee and hostess. Mrs. ger in. 'o. tor an siuacnis irvm w oiu mmiug >,_<.... o... K ..B ... trade and members of the USY Institute in North Carolina at the Pro-confirmation and COX .'um.-ip of Beth Torah will be atconclusion of summer. tion classes wil New Softball Tean Temple Zamora Brotherhood h;:announced th ,:i I % %  Softball team as p I he rem pie League In chi rge is In in j Riemer. 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