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The Jewish Floridian ( July 26, 1963 )

UFJUD

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iJewish Floridian Combining THE JMISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY Volume 36 — Number 30 Miami, Florida. Friday. July 26. 1963 Two Sections — Price 2C" Cabinet Crisis Avoided As Peres Withdraws Demand for Top Role TEL AVIV — (JTAi — The poschit Avodah expressed satisfaction ; tiility of a Cabinet crisis over with Peres withdrawal, •he (iemand of Deputy Defense .Minister Shimon Peres for Inclusion as a lull member of the CabiKt Committee for Security Affair-, faded here when the olfiiial withdrew his demand. Mr Peres, a leading member .I the "Young Turks" in the Ifspai I'arty, who reportedly are chafing a! the continued dominanci of the older leadership dating back to the Mandatory period, withdrew his demand in a letter to Prime Minister Levi Eshkol. The demand had been opposed by the leftist Achdut .Avodah. Mr. Pent asserted in his letter that the Premier had given him a promise for such Cabinet committee membership "on the evi ol my taking up office in he present Government." AchIn his letter, Mr. Peres wrote that "my decision does not arise from the Achdut Avodah stand, but because I wish to avoid difficulties. Achdut Avodah's arguments cannot stand up to examination. The regulations on which the party bases its case Continued on Page 6 A CITES SIX ABDUCTIONS OK. MAX NUSSBAUM .. retlteft* preiidenl HISTORIC-RELIGIOUS TIES Golda Confers With UN Chief On Border Tiff JERUSALEM — — Foreign tion. Six persons — thi &f ?• Minister Golda Meir demanded and three Israelis — v &f •• on the Sunday night that the United Nalake in a motor boat which hue. ,tions effect the immediate release apparently, been disabled Syrian by Syria of six persons abducted I Army men and civilians ;.ded inZionists Adopt Six-Point Program at Israel Confab f *v* *-* JbflsW -^KLaaK 1 a' mm0 '' i 1 %  by Syria on Israel's Lake Tiberias a week ago. She made the request in a conference in her office with Maj. Gen. Odd Bull, chief of staff I of the UN body. She warned that Israel would have no alternative 1 but to react forcefully — as Israel has done in thy past — if Syrian armed forces entered the current dispute. The kidnaping occurred a week TEL AVIV—(JTA)—A six-point declaration of modern Zionist prini ago. Sunday, it developed that ciples was adopted at the closing session of the 66th annual conven-' United Nations military observers. tion of the Zionist Organization of America, the first to be held in Is-; occupying an observation post in rael. The 1.000 delegates also reelected Dr. Max Nussbaum to a secthe Syrian hills overlooking Lake ond term as president. The declaration, setting forth I guidelines for future ZOA activi-1 ties, declared that Zionism "rests on the fundamental thesis, enunciated by the immortal Theodor Herzl, that Jews constitutes a people—one people" and that Jews, whether living outside of Israel or in it "are bound together by historic religious and cultural ties. Tiberias, had witnessed the abelucSentencing of Russian Jews Hit Sharply on Capitol Hill to the water and forcibJj -.ragged the small craft with its occupants to the shore. Mrs. Meir emphasizec' tc Gen. Bull that the lake is entirety in Israeli territory. She Stressed the fact that there is ir Israeli fringe of about 30 fee? c' land on the lake's eastern i-t-t'ine. so that there be no dee* that the entire lake is within tit eel's sovereignty. Noting Htet Israel has permitted Syrian fishermen to cast their nets on HM lake, Mrs. Meir pointed out t-jt such fishing was tolerated t %  Israel so as not to endanger the livelihood of the Syrian fishtr-tn, or punish them for their ce.-try's leaders' engagement if power politics. Syria's abduction fiu. • prominent ly Monday, when A .-ador .Michael S. Comay, I>:; I • pel 1118' WASmNGTON-MTA)-Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York Repubnent representative tu United The Zionist movement is "can, drew the attention of the Senate this week to the Soviet trial 9 I JJSJ^JJJJi y Tha:' t. KepreI been SHIMM PlRtS premise unfulfilled I he embodiment of this idea and our Jewt, three of whom were sentenced to prison, after Moscow trials of the sentiment of the Jewish or selling home-made matzoth. All lour Jews were convicted by a nation "Peoples Court" on charges of having profited from the sale of matzoth prior to last Passover, but one The declaration said that Zionwas freed because of his age and ,; iaya Blvakhman 52, and Malka ism also rested on the premise poor health. Brjo M ^ gix months ^ ** .*£. 'S^LrJ^JSZ Golko Bogomolny. a shochet. Kmil Kat2f 82 lhe so cal ed ..„ ng ,sh people can only be assured ^ ^ a ^^ prjson erm ^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ Continued on Page 7-A I Two women d efen dants, Kla vis an inva y ld Tne court ordered that the four months already spent in prison be deducted from the sentences of the three who were given prison terms. Britain Sees No End of Mid-East Arming; .Charge U.S. Opposes Bonn Scientist Exit FEDERAL OUSTERS Black Muslims Losing Jobs IGYPT UNVfHS NIW KOCKIT PAGE 2-A I ONDON—(JTA)—The arms race the arms balance in the Mid_ i i ... die East. This, they said, is the between Egypt and Israel can be • JJ of t he \ wo ,,„,.solved only if a gcnesal agreement tivM s|nee notning h „ „> f, r to this affect is reached between ^NH done to bring about joint the Western powers and the Soviet action on the part of the Soviet Union British officials indicated Union and the Western power* 1 Mond ,y. to put an end to the arms r.ce "The civilized world cannot remain silent in the fact of this act of the Soviet Government, which is bound to stir up religious prejudice and dangers of persecution," Sen. Javits told the Senate. He said that "protests should be made by leading citizens and organizations in all countries where men prize freeContinued on Page 8 A %  '• \-iilNGTON %  (JTA) — The Their observations were made in connection with reports from between Nasser and Israel. Foreign office officials also stating that Tuesday would stressed the fact that the Tripartite "ii train Federal jobs. The ex, 11'tmi-ls — %  : -> were dismissed from Government employment because red from the Soviet Union. \ been called off and is still forwas Egypt's "Indepenmally speaking, intact. At the • same time, they emphasized that no one knows how effective this agreement could be in any emergency, adding that "this would not be the fault of Britain." Tuesday aence Day" which was celebrated —— a ence uuv v. men ir* w,.. — .<— mey indicated their first allegiance wjth „ disp i av 0 f supersonic Jetwas to the Nation of Islam" rathfi ,, n(t r ^ Hussian-made air rockets W than the United States. „,, K omar rocket ships of Soviet Th<' Civil Service Commission make. -led that the discharged cm, „. Ployee. declared that they would £•*•" ^ | tt Jhe 'upport the "Nation of Islam" in j P?*** 1 '"'. 2f sTJ any conflict with the United States %  Uni !" S 'V*' 'uTnritam. re 'departure of the German scientists % %  mment. and would refuse to 1 ^j^SJ^ e^ns. Continue* en Pane 7-A we*pcm, with a view t. heepiet A report from Cairo published | here said that American diplomats | in Egypt would not like to see the! | Continued en Paige 5-A SIM. 1AC0B JAVITS tktm sentations on that issUf Continued on Pace i A APOLOGIES ACCEPTED U.S. Overflight Is No Incident, Cabinet Told JERUSALEM— incident in which fo I nited States weather SUTvej %  were forced down over Israt. ;; • .' %  diplomatic incident, Mrs. (. Meir, Israel's Foreign Minis'. told the Cabinet meeting Sundaj. She said tha the e: • of the violation of Israeli ;: I Q on Friday was a DtiSUlM • anding. pnd that the American i • mander 11 the flight had given I %  apology. Replying to questions. -< said that ;in inspection of tl I grounded planes proved that the p anes had not photographed anything while they were living over 1-:. 11, • (The State Departmcn* i


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Page 2-A vjewist ncridlian Governors Conference Pushed to Rights Ism Tlie NaTional Governors Conferlarly for tea parties £LjSn cnce, meeting this week at the shuns controversy and responsib^Daawirte^otel orr-Wiamt^Mrt^i.r'^'her than'-. nataaaal forum defeated a move by New York on important issues. Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to have But by the end of the eonfera showdown talk on the civil j cnce 0 n Tuesdav. a new vote of right issue. .38-3 instructed the executive comu A A K mittee of the group to give top The conference, headed by iori during the yea r ahead to Democratic Party chiefs of sta c. ^ QiX i 0Tk of civil rights. \oted 33-16 to abolish the ResoluGQ winiam A Ega n, of (ions Committee of the confer. la


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Friday; Wy. 28. 1S63 • %  *JmistittcrMlan -rtrat TERMITES? ROACHES? ANTS? Safe, positive peat control with regular service for the home TRULY NOLEN EXTERMINATORS "The Sign of Good Housekeeping'' COSTS LESS THAN YOU THINK ^ FR 7-1411 y Crwtr Miami's Lara*" IxttrmlaattF A *AlHC /A %  IIHT mi" 1 •esfefr D ; life i*i 't'LN *.,* --* %  .< i. l %  6 CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVE DADE COUNTY MAIN OFFICE Allapattah Branch North Miami Branch Tamiami Branch Edison Center Branch Kendall Branch 101 E. Flotjler St. 1400 N.W. 36th St. 12370 N.W. 7th Ave. 1901 S.W. 8th St. 5800 N.W 7th Ave. U.S. 1 at S.W. 104th St. i



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Page 4-A vJewistiFlcrkflan Friday. July 26. 1963 Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications'Miami TWX MMM"~ Public VHTt rate 8lr.ce MM jtf Tl !' J 'r' | d ? ortdU >,i 1M N.B. Sixth Street, Miami 1. FlorJO*. Second-Class Tontase Paid at Miami, Florin*. Th. Jewish Florldlan ha. abeorbecI the .^ •'!""£.'/, Jh"ie ii,. i.with werklv Member Of the Jewish Teieflrepnm \%£?XZ "ASS Future Syndicate %  WoH<.d. New. Servici. National Editorial Assn., *?""" r *"a„ n Enflhsh-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florid* frees Assn. FRED K. SHOCHET. .Editor and Publisher LEO MINDLrN .'.Executive Editor JELMA 1M THOMPSON .:As*t to Publisher ISRAEL BUREAU Sheraton Hotel — Td Aviv, Israel %  AY U. BINDER Correspondent Zionism Needs An Audience The program set forth by the Zionist Organization of America at its convention in Israel was predictable. The many statements, including those recognizing the Zionist movement as a major asset to Israel in her role as the "pivot of Jewish destiny," have been made before. But Dr. Emonuel Neumann, member of the Jewish Agency executive, hit the nail squarely on the head when he warned: "It will not be enough for us to regard ourselves as teachers and preachers of Zionism, leaving the hard task of fund-raising to others." This is perhaps the first time that a leading Zionist has publicly coped with the problem principally ailing the Zionist movement since the establishment of the State of Israel. The sad thing is that the problem does not, in fact, stem from an inherent weakness in Zionism, itself; the weakness is rather an overwhelming symptom characteristic of the American Jewish community as a whole. Nevertheless, as such, it reflects sufficiently on Zionism to have left the movement crippled and near-abandoned for something like a decade or more. What Dr. Neumann's warning recognizes is that American Jewry's most vital leadership interests are rooted today in philanthropic endeavor — in the kind of projects mainly concerned with overseas immigration needs to Israel, institutions in Israel, and Israel herself as a national Jewish homeland. It was, throughout the years, the major task of Zionism to supply the ideological impetus for the establishment of the Jewish State. Once having achieved this, it has lost its significance to other organizations dedicated to more immediate goals—the nurturing of the Zionist dream now fulfilled. It is to Dr. Neumann's credit that he recognizes Zionism must also begin to lend a hand in the nurturing process. The American Zionist movement's more important task may be teaching and education in the principles of modern Zionism and Judaism, but without an audience there will be no one left to teach. This is what Dr. Neumann means. The Jewish norldlsn does not e-uarante* the Roahruth of the nii-i vhandfawadvertised in ite columns. SUBSCRIPTION flATtl: Local Area .„ One Yeir *00 Three Years 110.00 Out ef Tawn Upon Bequest Volume 36 Number 30 Friday, July 26. 1963 5 Av 5723 Committee. Said Gov. Bryant: "What I came to the conference for is to learn how to be a better governor, not a better congressman or a better president." This may be an oblique slap at Gov. Rockefeller's motivations, but it suggests that Gov. Bryant believes only congressmen and presidents should be concerned with civil rights. All of us should be concerned with civil rights, particularly men in such high executive position as governors. For on the proper solution of the problem depends our future as a free nation based on respect for the principles of liberty that are inherent in its foundationstones. -i Respect for Principles It is sad that the Governors Conference, meeting on Miami Beach, has taken the low road to the detriment of the advancement of civil libertarian endeavor in our nation as a whole. New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller has made the civil rights issue virtually his own. The difficulty here is that it magnifies the political implications of the issue beyond its far more humanitarian no less than constitutional considerations. For what has been achieved is a presumable ideological statement between me Governor and his principal contender for the GOP nomination in 1964, Sen. Barry Gold water, of Arizona. Nevertheless, Gov. Rockefeller achieved his purpose: he look the lead in pressing for an all-Governors' position on the status of civil rights today; that be was denied, did not in fact hamper his more immediate political goal. Adding to the confusion was the statement by the convention's host, Florida Gov. Farris Bryant, who joined the general Democratic move to duck an open discussion of civil rights by abolishing the conference's Resolutions The Ninth Day of Av The observance of Tisha B'Av, the ninth day in the Hebrew month of Av, will begin here Monday evening and continue all day Tuesday. The day is traditionally marked by the reading of "Kinot," the Lamentations from the Prophet Jeremiah, and is one of the darkest in Jewish history. On Tisha B'Av, the first temple was destroyed in Jerusalem in 586 B.C.E. According to tradition, the second temple was destroyed the same day in the year 70 C.E. To mark'the occasion, synagogues throughout the world will dim their lights; and fasting men will remove their shoes, seat themselves on benches, and mourn the occasion. The American Diplomat The American diplomat abroad quoted this week to the effect that the U.S. taxpayer has a "very cheap deal" in the Middle East should be withdrawn as quickly as possible .u I J j P decd to whk te r efen are the hundreds of millions we are pourinq into Nassers coffers to encourage him away from the Kremhn. The "deal" is a phony, as Nas3 X A !" 1 *? GS ? nd ,her laments Proves. But the diplomat's high undiplomatic talk is also a slap at Israel. ri-hft ^ H V WOuld *• Perfectly all right to push Israel into the sea in a mass accommodation of Nasser's ultimate goal £ order to maintain a purpose that the UAR chief has long since abandoned-friendship with the Gentian Prosecutor Who Called the Shot is Mow Under Fife By JOHN DORNBERG Frankfurt. ( F THERE'S ONE thing the Germans can't stand it's to be told they are incorrigible, are still anti-Semitic and would -probably welcome Hitler again if he were to reappear on the scene. When this charge is leveled by an outsider, it is usually waved off haughtily as blind jealousy on the part of those who begrudge West Germany her booming economy and flowering export business. The same allegation, made by a German, usually results In his ostracism as a Communist or tool of the East. And if that German —rare as such cases are—happens to be a prominent public official, he'll soon find himself the object of a full-scale government invest igation and the target of a barrage of tenomous criticism. This, in essence, is What Is happening to Dr. Fritz Bauer, the Trosecutor General of the State of Hesse. Bauer. Hesse's highest ranking legal authority, has made a name for himself with his relentless pursuit of ex-Nazis, his search for war criminals-in-hiding, and his outspoken views on such subjects as resurgent anti-Semitism and teaching German youth more about the Third Reich. PMMcnMH or nun mewtmm DAYS' H e HAS PLAYED a major role in preparing the case for the government in the massive Auschwitz concentration camp trial expected to come up in Frankfurt later this year. At the height of the Spiegel magazine crisis last November. Bauer was virtually the only jurist to stand up and criticize the federal government's actions. In a widely distributed article, he sharply attacked the archaic German security laws which enable the government to bring treason charges against virtually anyone on the slightest pretext. The other day. a Danish boulevard paper. B.T., published an interview with Bauer. In it he was quoted as saying that if Hitler were to return to the German scene today, his "one hundred days'" would last a great deal longer than Napoleon's. "If Hitler were to reappear in Germany today, the German people would not reject him." he was quoted as saying. 'T doubt whether Germany's young democracy would be strong enough to resist him. "I don't think you could persuade a German today to give you his real opinion of Jews. Although there is no Jewish problem in Gcrmany, anti-Semitism still glimmers underneath the surface. The dominant influence of the Jews in Germany's economic and cultural life has been broken. But the hate is still the same. Today people wouldn't say 'pig' to a Jew in Germany. They merely say, 'we forgot to gas you'." •:• •:• •:• A DEFAMATION Of GERMANY QNE DAY AFTER news of the published Danish interview reached *' Germany. Bauer was a man on the run. Insisting all the while that he had been misquoted and that statements attributed to him in the interview had been invented or taken out of context, Bauer iie^l came the center of a swirling controvery. The German federal government expressed its "indignation' over Bauer's remarks. The leader of the Christian Democrats (CDC) in Hesse. Dr. Wilhelm Fay. demanded the immediate suspension of Bauer, a Social Democrat (SPD). Willy Meyer, interior minister of the state of Northrhine-W H -' %  phalia, and a spokesman for the Free Democrats (FDP). Germany's third party, described Bauer's remarks as defamation which would harm Germany's image abroad. "The spirit of democracy,"' said Meyer, has never had deeper roots in the German people than DOW." Even Bauer's own party, the Sl'D. took potshots at him. Franz Barsig. the SPD's official spokesman, said the prosecutor generals statements represented a 'distorted'' view of conditions as they reallv are in Germany. At the weekend, an investigation by the Hessian state parliament was pending. All Bauer could say, other than reiterate his claim that he had been misquoted, was to emphasize that the Danes, alter all. were not ignorant of conditions in West Germany. "They know very well what is going en here," he said. "No one has to tell them anything about us." Support for Bauer came as usual — onlv from a handful of liberal newspapers. •!• •?• .;. PROSECUTORS DAYS MAY BE NUMBERED JHE FRANKFURTER RUNDSCHAU, for example, said that Germany, like some uncivilized tribe in deepest Africa had developed a "cult of unreliability." "Certain subjects, discussion of which is essential to the creation oi a self-sufficient democratic society, are taboo in the Federal Republic said the paper. "Anyone who dares to violate the taboos will jeopardize his entire social position." The public reaction when they are violated, said the Rundschau, is one of hysteria. The issue in the Bjuer case, said the paper, was not whether or not theprosecutor general had made the remarks, but the WCt that the story in the Danish daily touches on matters wh.ch no one in Germany wants to discuss. K„„ Whil e u ,hcre is no Jewish Problem" in Germany today, primarily Because there are so few Jews and those who do live here are packed uuSfESEL L fragilc trcasur <*. basic feelings have not changed, said the Kundschau. ulo„ s h C 0 ii S f n ?w !&iW with our sflves. Lets overcome the ridicheads ih" K ht '? (:crman y' s im *8e abroad by sticking our ii. m< J i Sa d ,hc paper But oth( r ,han ^ted cdi,or iais like this outspoken example, there was little support of Bauer. dsred to P roS t0 rgenerals %  *. *e those of others who have mimbered ^ f th r apathv and ,heir ^ may be THOSl GERMAN XimiStS AGAIN J U e! !" rt C A IJ. AN the West GCTI !" Government do about its rocket Bund>^ P C hnL SChm i d ,he Social Dem cratic vice president of the •Jieves wha, thTr *" made more ete Mtlon. He beM of the cderaT!2E T d ing E W* ^tion <* *** designed^rtE foTthl WhiC h eXpr<,SS, V P rohibit8 any acHOn the peaceful retail !" h PWPOSe disturbi 'he peace, disrupting of akgressTve war nS betWCcn nations or fading o the preparation



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Friday. July 26. 1963 ... +Jewish fhrMton "Page 5-A Deep Flaws Beneath Mirror of Nasser Progress By Special **Pr ^ ^ eial. educational and health fleWs," Disease-ridden poverty." an ariAy'^ !" "-"* t Wson s,a,os m,t a<,M s: "StJrely. there are new and modern ol illiterate unemployed, a breadonions and-tea diet, and a sltaky economy bolstered by maSsrve for eiyn aid — those are {ft factor* that tarnish the gHttering picture ol an Egypt snpp*'rity of CafrO's ahoot %  J.fJWi.OOft inhabitants live, one rs happy if one' can btty a pair of sfro?s and some European etoth Hn*. Thv diet corfsfsts of a few contained in a ne# report pre-jP^ ce ? r friTit *"& bread: the pfo-1 pared by the World Jevrfcth Cori-lP* ,,vc in tmbeflevaMy crowded i gress in New Yof k. TfrWt are | ^"^-V ; ; some of the facts the v?JC survey : Tm? 2.0DO,flTO population today reveals: • 7C" of Egyptians cannot read 01 write. • 80% of Egypt"s males are physically nrifft for mifftaTy service. • After 19. their heatfh declines J C rapidly that they are old by 40. • Egypt's 20 million fellahin (peasants) use basically the same primitive type of tools as their ancestors 4,000 years ago. • The bulk of Egypt's work force is happy to get the legal minimum wage — 60 cents a day. • Agricultural development cannot keep up with the population growth. • Industrial development is hampered by bureaucracy. The report, prepared by Dr. Nehemiah Robinson, director of the World Jewish Cor/jress Institute of Jewish Affairs, and based on reliable sources, analyzes the situation of Egypt since Nasser came to power and notes that both Washington and Moscow have committed considerable sums in economic aid to Cairo in recent years. Since 1952, the U.S.A. has supplied Egypt with about $900,000,000 in economic aid, with a similar amount provided by the USSR. In addition, Moscow is estimated to have supplied, since •1955, $700,000,000 worth of arms to Nasser. compares Vrith 23,000,000 in I99. infl Ifl.flOW.OOO m 1947. At the of£


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Fsgo 6-A vjewistifkrkfian Friday. July 26, 1963 • • The Red Split By MAX LERNER Beach Dentist At Convention In Jerusalem By Special Report the Dr. Meyer Eggnatz, past president of Alpha Omega Dental Frati crnity, is at present in Israel as a member of the Alpha Omega Fraternity Pilgrimace. which is Bellaio Italy I holding a convention in Jerusalem. No verse setting could have been imagined for the opening of; He is accompanied by his wife. Simo-Russlan peace conference than the one that the Chinese and Alpha Omega has chapters 3 -sum k'vJers have provided lor it. If they had calculated on wreck-! throughout the United States and in* it from the start they could not have acted more destructively. | Canada, and 85 members are parThe Russians, through the recognized Communist principle of ticipating in the pilgrimage. press control, refused to publish the text of the 25-point Chinese man] Alpha Omega, together with the %  lc-to. The Chinese, through the recognized Communist principle of. Hadassah Women's Zionist Ora;;>eaUiig over the heads of the enemy leaders to the rank and file, ganization of America and the Hetried to distribute their manifesto to the Russian people in leaflet brew University of Jerusalem, form. The Russians gave the only possible Communist answer to this established the Hebrew Univertactic: tti> expelled five members of the Chinese embassy staff from J sity-Hadassah School of Dentistry. Moscow, j"d published an attack on China in a speech by Khrush-jThe fraternity is now providing c.uv to the Central Committee. The Chinese resisted the temptation $1.5 million to erect a new dental t Kuttte tiie meeting, and sent their delegation to a peace confer-1 school as part of the Hadassaheoce which can only be a stage for a battle of dogma and programs. | Hebrew University Medical CenIt mi !t be clear now, if it was not earlier, that the Chinese-Ruster complex, v 1 break lias gone beyond the point of no return and has become irrepai 111 • The dialectic of history has operated in the Communist W'Tid just a> sharply as I.e.111 used to say it would operate in the (. italist domocratic world, and has pitted Communist power against Communist power in a war of conflicting' imperialisms. It is highly unlikely that actual military conflict will break out between the Rus.r.. n ami the Chinese imperialisms. But short of military war this is a frctricufal struggle, a bloodless but no less intense battle of dogmas. "The new dental building is making wonderful progress," said Dr. Eggnatz, of 500 South Shore, Dr., Miami Beach, when he visited the Hadassah Medical Center. "Today I can say that the dream of the Alpha Omega Dental School has become a reality. With the new facilities which this building will provide, I am sure that within a few years the dental school in Israel will become one of the leading centers of teaching and research in the Middle East." Dr. Gilbert Robin, president of Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity, Prof. Ino Sciaky, principal of the Israel School of Dentistry. Dr. Marvin Goldstein, president-elect of Alpha Omega, and Dr. Meyer Eggnatz, past president of Alpha Omega, visit the new building of the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Dentistry founded by the fraternity. Kn'-iSchev's speech to the Central Committee of his party lead[. lifted % %  last bit of the secrecy curtain that had recently shroudt -fie Chinese-Russian bitterness. From this point on no formal peace c mmunique* which seeks to gloss over the points of conflict can be t: sted. An observer, writing reflectively from the distance amidst the r cefulness of this Italian lake town, takes some risks in trying to si m up i hat the Chinese-Russian break may mean. But the risks are) During the convention, the 1963 v !" I dental pilgrimage was given a reItem The confusion in the Communist camp today is more in-|ception by Eliahu Elath. president tense sod more widespread than it has ever been in the history of of the Hebrew University of Jeruw rid OWE • lunism. It reaches to every corner of the world, from Al-'salem. I and Romania to Korea, and from Indonesia to Cuba. Its inten-j The Hadassah-Hebrew Univer.-.-!,.,: • that it cannot be contained by any peace conference. And.isitv Medical Center built and I n more important, the confusion is growing, and it is likely to bemaintained by Hadassah the C. is a good deal greater. | Women's Zionist Organization of Item :.' has been said in some of the Western commentaries that America. is the largest medical x are i? two great poles of Communist struggle. Item: The struggle has come earlier and in a far more severe form than any expert on communism had expected or foretold. The i eces-i of the Russians in rocketry and science and the prosperity CriSIS IS AVCrtcd Democrats Will Meet in Gables Coral Gables Young Democratic Club will meet on Monday. 8:30 p.m.. on the second floor of the Coral Gables Federal Savings and Loan Assn.. on Andalusia Ave. Election of officers will be held, and a discussion of the forthcoming campaigns is also on the agenda. President Ainslee R. Ferdie will report on the Dad County Youns Democrats. All persons between the ages of 18 and 41 who support the Deni I cratic Party are eligible for mem ber.ship and invited to attend New members include Richar I Black. 3408 Toledo St.. Corj, Gables, and Jay J. Lewis. 693 Tordera, Coral Gables. complex in the Middle East and embodies the latest ideas in the design of hospitals. Peres~WJthdraws Top Job Demand; *\ c: their economy seemed to make their position inside world comrr_ni.sm • pregnable, and the youthfulness of the Chinese Communist state led o servers to believe that its challenge would not come for! i.' sther de-cade. They have been proven wrong on both counts. Continued from Page 1-A are not constitutional but a mat. ter of convention which can easily be changed. Hem: The reasons behind this struggle are in part rationalist: Russians have been following their own national interest and i do not re „ ard mv 4411 RIVIERA DRIVE. Coral Gables MO 6-3465 > LARGE HALL CENTER Of SOUTH MIAMI IEACH FOR RENT to be used a Synaooaue EOR THE HIGH HOLIDAYS CALL Harry Friedkin JE 8-3054 With a Living Trust at Mercantile National Bank of Miami Beach you can observe our management of your trust property you can provide income for someone who now dej>ends upon you for support... you can transfer property without publicity ... you can protect a reserve fund for your family that will not be subject to future business ventures...and you may get beneficial tax treatment under certain conditions. If the results are not what you hope for. you can change the plan or cancel it while you are living. For all the details, contact your lawyer and one of the Trust Officer* of Mercantile Notional Bank of Miami Beach. MERCANTILE C^ NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI BEACH 426 LINCOLN ROAD MALL-PM. JE t-7t3l >



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Friday. ]->/ 26. I9S3 +Jenistirk)ridUan Page 7-A Z/o/i/ta dcYopf 5/> Pci/if /Voc/ram Co?' i*d from Page 1-A by Hx txistence and development c* •"^e" State "ofltraSlT* the "pivot s-' Jewish destiny." Tho declare Ml described Israel as "more —.an a mr* political entity" ti-c said it must remain "the MttMMl home of the whole Jewist 1 rcple as its spiritual center." The 1. nlal movement, the statement rael as "separate entities b. equal partners in the struggk r Jewish survival and historic i linuity." Muc ; x' the statement stemmed frewi mn eight-point program t.:mitted earlier in the convent-ii by Dr. Emanuel Neum*-ZOA leader and member of *• Jewish Agency executive, w*< cited "the unique nature c Jewish identity stemming frcetl our past history and Jewisr :-atehood as a spiritual fact." UM Professor To be Speaker Prof '.'i.rge K. Smart, of the University of Miami, will discuss "The Ko-r Against Colonialism" V %  •' ; < meeUBg of the South Shore Rranch of the American Association of tt ( United Nations. Prograra will be held Monday, 8 p.m., H Washington Federal Savings ..tt Loan Association, 1234 WashiflgtOt Ave. Chaim Rose, viee pr*-^ticnt, will conduct the discussion. Also scheduled is a film, "The Questiot Togoland," featuring the UN i-lebiscite that brought Togo into "he newly-formed State of Ghan. RENT A CAR *iom $2J0 per day 115 p '• u k. A M %  •. rajre charge AWTT MOTORS, Inc. 1451 W. FLAGLER ST. fhone FR 3-0M6 He set forth his program as 1 calling for the education of fel-| t-eaer ai o wi rtn and all friends of Is-1 I net to a fuller and clearer realisation of "the nature of our Jewj I ish identity, of the meaning of' i Jewish nationhood and its impliCations in thought and action." I Second, he urged the eontinuaI lion and expansion of all practical ; programs of aid to Israel. "It will not be enough for us to regard ourselves as teachers and preach-j j ers of Zionism, leaving the hard I task of fund raising to others." he said. Third, he proposed renewal and. intensification of efforts to inform the American people of the critical problems Israel faced in economic development, international relations and. above all. its urgent security problems His other points included fostering and spreading knowledge of He-! brew, development of Zionist ; youth movements to reach "even larger circles," encouragement ol aliyah. •moulding and shaping" the character of the American Jewish community, and keeping open and developing lines of communication between Israel and I Jews outside of Israel. Jacques Torczyner. chairman of the ZOA national advisory board, asserted that "the continuous weakening influence" of the World Zionist Organization during the past 15 years had resulted in the erection of "an invisible wall" between Jewish youth in Israel and those outside of Israel. This had happened, he said, because Jewish youth in Israel were under the constant burden of the struggle for economic independence and security, and had no time to look toward the outside Jewish world. At the same time. Jewish youth in the United States were enjoying unprecedented economic prosperity and were taking Israel for. granted while become more inte'. grated into an assimilated envirj onment Asserting that there was a j strong tendency toward assimilation among Jewish youth in the United States, he called for an intensified education and cultural program and direct intimate cooperation between Israli youth leadership and Jewish youth outside of Israel to assist the Zionist movement to develop leadership for the futore. Abba Eban, Deputy Prime Minister, said that American Zionism must adapt itself to a new system of priorities centered on j education and immigration. These activities however, he cautioned, must engage-the ZOA "in addition to, not instead of, public activity in support of Israel's right." "While Israel is sovereign in the responsibility of framing and executing its own politics," he said, "and can in no way share this responsibility, it is still the task of American Zionism to get more friends for Israel. Many governments tend to accept public opinion in forming their attitures, therefore, the rallying of friendship for and support of Israel is essential for Israel," he stressed. Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's Foreign Minister, told the convention that she was certain "Israel docs not have a greater and more sincere friend than the United States Government and people." She made that statement in reply to questions from the floor after she and Prime Minister Levi Eshkol addressed the convention. At the same time she conceded that the State Department in Washington and Israel "agree that they disagree on American policy in the Middle East," and she told the American Zionists that there are j certain differences and problems j between Isreal and the U.S.A.. "that should be ironed out between! the two countries." She said that in spite of Israel's "keen desire." Russia docs not want improve-1 ment of Israeli-USSR relations. She pointed out that there arc noi trade relations "whatsoever be twecn Israel and the USSR. Mr. Eshkol told the convention that "if things contirue as they have been, we may, by the end of the SCs reach the com| pletion of the ingathering of | those Jews from certain countries who cannot live freely as Jews—and this does not include our brethren in Russia." By the end of the decade, he said, Israel's population will reach 3,000,000. The population increase will result from new immigration as well as from births. 'The Zionist responsibility," he declared, "did not end with the State's establishment, nor will it end when we succeed in concentrating 3,000.000 Jews here. It is our joint responsibility to enlarge Israel's population and enrich our cultural and spiritual life by a strong stream of immigrants from Western countries." Black Muslims Losing U.S. Jobs % BAAL TFILAH AND READER Continued from Page LA DISI0UNT PROCESSING K0DACHKOMI MM *;• 1.00 -.5.20MI 1.00 t27-20-i20 E-*I 44, "XA. w ^ i ,„_,„ The Justice Department recent EXPERIENCED PET DEALERS \\ \y revealed to the Jewish War EXPERT DOC GROOMING BOARDING ANIMAL KINGDOM PET SHOP JI Veterans that an investigation of: the activities of both the "Black : < 1105 NW 119th ST. MU 8-3021 4 % 1105 MW llytfc ST. *^ tt*-* -• %  -* %  *•->-*.*Muslims" and the American Nazi 4 ] Party is under way in connection I with current integration tensions. GORDON ROOfING AND SHEE7 METAl WORKS INC 2148 M.v 10 Ave. Ft 3-7ISO H i*?. yo roof reaaired now; you •"•I M>c on a new roof later '".. '.factory Work by Experienced Men" SEXTON TtMPlf NK TAMID SEEKS SEXTON. For fell Partkulers Call UN 6-8345 Malcolm X, the leader of the Muslim group, has denounced the American Jewish community. FHA-VA RESALES IN PERFECT CONDITION DADE t\ BROWARD COUNTY From $150.00 down $50.00 Mo. ALTMAN INSURANCE t tEAl ESTATE 7 NW 3rd ST. FR 1-2421 We NeneVe tatwreoce ef All Kindt TWIN CITY GJ.ASS CO. UAMAMTH* MMffOtS STORI WONTS MRNITRRt TOM ANTNMIE MSWOIT RE-SIIVIBIN0 AB1Q MASS IMSTAIUD WHILf 700 WAIT 12>! left Street, *tf. Closed Saturey$ leL JI14141 YOUR TELEPHONE PROPERLY ANSWERED IS YOUR GREATEST BUSINESS ASSET Answerite, Inc. Telephone Answering Service SERVING JEfferson — Union Highland FRanklin Executive Office FR 3-5581 MAIN STOtSi $ J00 N.W. STtfc AVI. ORSM M Novas a AH o*r tuNotr NORTON TIRE CO, B.FGoodrich Vitlt Oar Newest Cer Service Center: 1130 West Ir.word Slvd. Ft. Leederelele UFESAVER CLEARANCE SALE Cheek Thes. Sol. P'ic* On Oor Finest Tire Nylon Premium lifesaver ,s M l.^•w Mr • nM *'" ,,, Guaranteed for Ufa*""* """„. „..> ••• ••••"'•,...„ t, :• tS"' +-•"*•' r~s>' | > CM**" SIZE Hio.14 a 55w lioo.i* ,0, ltsosu _2ttS!i. ltooi laoo.'s A WRITTEM BUARAHTEE WITH EACH TIRE UtteSM* mfiES ........ %  • -^J MITiD QUAHTlTltf '-^SL v*.>'-*, 'otck •" W, tk "4ei t 7J *$, •"/Auto*. *•"' P ci,, fom VACATION CREDIT TIRMS Buy Now-Poy When Yow Return From Vocation ?r P •y t. 1 I SstnAM o S300 N.W. 27th Avenue e 500 West Flagler Street • 6779 S.W. Sth Street MIAMI BEACH a 1454 Alton Road NORTH MIAMI e 13300 N.W. 7th Avenue SOUTH MIAMI-693Q South Dixie Highway HALL AN DALE2 9 North Dixie Highway W. HOLLYWOOD a 6017 Hollywood Blvd. at State Wd. 7. YU 7-04-50 HOMESTEAD • 30100 South Federal Highway FT. LAUDERDALE a 1830 Weil Broward Blvd. 2832 Weit Broward Blvd. KEY WEST -540 Green Street



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Pcrcg 8-A vjewistnorldften Friday. July 26. 1963 TW wsoW MfDICAl CtJNIC IN MOMoK ojj, SA„.1£BKCA RINSTBN 'Matzoth' Sentences Hit in Senate %  Mr. and Mrs. Sam Feinstein. of Miami Beach, are shown at rscar.t dedication ceremonies of the clinic in their honor at EU'.ovot. Miami Beach Couple Dedicate Clinic; Histadrut Dignitaries Attend Israel Fete Attending were dignitaries representing the Israel Ministry of Health, the leadership of Kupat Holim. which is the medical arm of Histadrut, and representatives of the Histadrut Vaad Hapoel. Following the dedication, the gathered guests went to Kaplan Hospital in Rohovot to attend a luncheon in the Felrstein's honor. Greetings at the luncheon were extended by such leading dignitaries as Isaac Hamlin and Israel Stolarsky. A. lllanii Beach couple recently dedicated a medical clinic in Isrjel T.-.ey are Mr. and Mrs. Sam Feinsfcin, who were feted at a functioat the Fontainebleau Hotel o : the eve of their departure. Keifibe'rs of the Greater Miami Israel i>:istadrut Committee were haits at the function. Mr. and Mrs. F-instein are members of (be iidard. Dedication of the medical clinic in RdnorOt took place June 26. Continued from Page 1-A Horn aRcTrne rla^rto^worship* God without restriction or restraint." Sen. Javits charged that "Jews are being made the scapegoats for the Soviet Union's economic difficulties, and have been the prime targets of Soviet persecution." He stressed that "the Jewishness of the defendants is emphasized by the Soviet press, and they are described in the crudest stereotypes generally used in anti-Semitic campaigns." According to the reports from Moscow, two defense attorneys, Mikhail Lozinsky and Matvey Sokolovich, denounced the investigation of the case, which had been under way for four months. They told the court that they see "no crime committed," and that the case should never have gone to court. The defense insisted that the women had tried to dispose only of the surplus matzoth they had baked and had not engaged in "large sale" operations as charged. "All churches," said Mr. Sokolovich, "sell candles and wafers at high prices, and nobody holds them for criminal respongipility.'l • J • •--"•• Mr. Sokolovich denied the accused sold matzoth for personal profit, insisting they did it "for their religious boliefs," and pointing out that they used no hired labor." He pleaded for the release of Mrs. Blyakhman, who, he said, had already spent four months in jail "without committing any crime at all." Chief Rabbi Levine had been called as a prosecution witness, j Mr. Lozinsky recalled that the Chief Rabbi had testified that he had had a conversation prior to Passover with a man named Andreev, an official of the State Committee on Religious Cults. The attorney told the court that Mr. Andreev hald told RabbiLevine: "Unfortunately, this state cannot provide you with matzoth. at the moment because it has neither place nor equipment for it, but has nothing against the Jewish community doing it itself We asked the court," said Mr. Lozinsky, "to summon Andreev, but it never did." This Emblem Identifies Your Welcome Wagon Sponsors^ AERIAL SIGN CO. AUIP1.ANE BANNER TOWING •' %  i 'Hound Gold Coast Coverage Cavers your Selling Area Wl 5-1602 GELB MONUMENTS INC. Open (Very Doy • Closed Sabbath 140 SW 57th Ave. MO 1-8583 TOC9 "nc ^tcat? nn BETH DIN OFFICE ItABBI DR. TIBOR H. STERN 106T Michigan Ave., Miami Beach JE 1-1969 JE 1-6150 Hamlin. who is director of the Israel Histadrut campaign in the United States, with offices in Tel Aviv, had greeted the Feinsteins on their arrival in Israel, and accompanied them on a tour of the country as a whole. Hamlin House in Tel Aviv is named in his honor. No other public institution in Israel is named after a living personality. At the luncheon following the medical clinic dedication, Feinstein announced his contribution of $1,000. making him a founder of the medical center now being erected in Beersheva, a project of the Greater Miami Business and Professional Council of Histadrut Also in honor of Hamlin, Feinstein announced the contribution of a scholarship in one of Histadrut's many trade schools throughout Israel. WE SPECIALIZE in CONDOLENCE BASKETS From $7.50 We Deliver FRUIT CIRCUS 1789 BISCAYNE BLVD. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783 Firms of prestige in the business and civic life of your community. FIRMS INTTKSTfD IN SPONSORSHIP, PLEASE CALL HI 8-4994 •dtw VBN yn TO. *jJot'pm ^Sin^ov toft Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky Phone JE 1-3595 MS MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH Optometrists Have Banquet The Dade County Optometric Association will hold a banquet Saturday evening in the Cavalier; Room of the Deauville Hotel. i Some 60 persons are expected by Dr. Jack Wolf, in charge of ar,, •-, r t ,,ff. rangements. C^OK/CI* j-itneral ulc omc EMAMPL GORDON. Pounder, Deceased HARRY GORDON IKE GORDON I tMBI B. GORDON A Good Name Is Far Better Than Great Riches. will enjoy the real at Ihe new and eliciting Shclton Towers Finest East-Side location midway between United Nation* and Rockefeller Center, close to all transportation and terminals. Beautiful air-conditioned rooms and suites with television — at mot moderate ratetl OUTDOOR HOOP GARDEN AND SUN DICK REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Greater Miami's Largest It Oldest Supplier for Synagogues, Hebrew t Sunday Schools. Wtolesole A Retail ISRAEL. GIFTS AND NOVMIIS 417 Washington A*. 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Friday. July 28. 1963 HJmisto Flcrjdtiatr? Pcce 9-A aw % %  • I BRaaSMMI Bjj ym GEMS OF WISDOM Get one by trade, rather ilian a thousand as gift*. AMI I II IIA MACID, i Trie ffee man. u-liu I nV." among I the ignorant, strives, as /ur aj| he can. to avoid rflOfMng fawn from j tliftn. SPINOIA. j • • More tltdn the cal/ HMntt to mQ\. I the CPU> teams O vuclrle. -AKliiA. All God's creations borrow from each other: day from night and I night from day. the moon from the I tttn ond thf jtarj from the moon. | thf sky from the earth and the I • farth from thf i^y. ;. nxonus RAHBA. fc • e • A Wati^f t u'jrm, a penon. but, not a store. — I. FRIEDMAN. 5 • • • Lore that il hoarded molds at I last, until tee ^noi<> some dov the I only thing ur ever hair 1* mhat I we Rite .:: %  ..-,. — I.INSBI:RI;. • • By the hand uli'iie a hand il tra>hrd. UHMIMS1 thou tal{c. then thou must gue. 111.INK. I \V hat we net our 0/ lije il i>ideed in proportion to uh.n we put Jn IL T&JU GfJMi lami 9 r^eligioids ity of Hungary to come to the Uni-1 led States since World War II. Chief Rabbi of Antwerp Dead \NTWERP-;JTA>— Funeral ser vices were held here this week for the late Dr. S. Sapira. chief rabbi "I Antwerp, who died at the age of ~2. The Mayor of Antwerp and the Governor of the province embracing that city were among the prominent mourners. Born in Rumania, and the holder of a doc ti rate in philosophy and theology from the University of Berlin. Dr. i Sapira lived in Belgium since 1935, except for the war years, which he I spent in Cuba. Weinstein President of College CHICAGO — (JTA) — Dr. David Weinstein, associate in education j al Harvard University, and 'field whether the name itself is origin and budget director of Harvard ', a \\ y Jewish is questionable. Itis'i 1 rm.rsity's language teaching proj„t cr e.sting to note, however, how gram in Israel, was elected pres-! the Jews came to use this name. the College of Jewish T h c Jews of the renaissance period in Italy led. ,vhat might be ahead of the requirements of their children, they were punished by being exiled more than a century earlier than the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, who lived west of the Jordan. The reasons which prompt people to leave their native home and to settle in a new land prove to he important factors in the development of their attitudes. The Pilgrims left their native England because they suffered from religious oppression. They desired greater spiritual freedom. In the course of time, they prospered materially. They sought God an.I they found gold. By contrast, the countries of South America were occupied by peoples who sought material wealth which they did not find, but their spiritual life was weakened. They sought gold and lost their God. Jews who migrated to America from Ruropean countries during the past century came to these shores in search of more adequate living conditions. In their European homes, most of them found it impossible to eke wit an existence. When they came here, they realized the tremendous opportunity which America offered, and they concentrated upon material gains. For the most part, they neglected the education of their children and the development of their spiritual life. An entire generation was lost to Judaism when the religious education of the children failed to keep pace with their secular cultural growth. Fortunately, American Jewry has been aroused. A new generation of Jewish leaders has given our people a completely new perspective of their Jewish potential. Ser VI CC5 we Have I'rophela Today?" Tuesday ~> : %  %  '< a.m. BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th ave. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bernstein. Friday ::til |i.in. Saturday s:ir, a.m. j "Rthioa 1 if tin Rather*" ".:.:" p.m. ISvrmon: "The Final Challenge." BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave. Orthodox. Ralph Krieger, secretary. BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky. e BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip. •ehitz. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum. Friday 6:13 p.m. Saturdaj 8:15 a-m. %. CONGREGATION ET2 CHAIM. 1544 Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Strassfeld. • — DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGREGATION. 1401 NW 183rd st. Conservative. Rabbi Harold Flchter. Cantor Emanuel Manael. Ktlihiy s p.m. limsi sneaker: Cantor Bmanuel Mandel, Topic: "Weeklj Portion*" Saturday s:;t-: "w Jcwuhomination. 9 9 O Abot dc-R. Nathan, It A scholar trhd has fftlcHi I .'. ;•! I ahaiidonrd his lr.irniti!; canned %  for a share in the World-:: %  Midrash Shemucl, 29 // a scholar engages in .. l| .3 and is not too successful. .: .u KOod omen for him. God '.. I iMrtttng uud docs' ttol wu I i : rich 'urn. • Sotth, 47 1/ tun scholttri lain, ; i .. ,:\ do agr C0tlC< I IJJ.'I. .>:udiet and the i is cilcd. Sanhedrin. 29 Tic.• scholar) mho .i;• -.i h other shall not sit togi • %  .. s fudges at a trial. •i Sanhedrin. 17 A Disciple of the Sages I aul> in a ritjl uit/i these : %  %  j court, a police depar. .: a chanty organisation, a g .• a bath, a pkysfcian, a nl • .1 i druggist, a icritcr. and tchtfbl teacher. pi. Conservative. Rabb enfeld. Cantor George Goldberg. leh Communities." Canti Kilily 6:30 p.m. Hatun-la) S:S(V a.m. Royal will render the Mi •n the Tlshn B'.\\ Monday 7 a.m. I'.iu. Tiusda> <-J\.now Lfotif n Orthodox group, went on record i original Hebrew name. An interthis week as opposing Bible-readesting manifestation of this was '"8 in the public schools. This the name Leo. which was used as BABBI MAX A. LIPSC1IITZ Coordinator Contributor: RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF Gems of Wisdom Under this assumption one may say that smoking a cigarette in was such as in the loan banks in which he t cn)cloI v is f orbidr | en since 1( %  is being done in the presence of the dead. # • Why are holy Scrolls (Sifre Torah) and phylacteries (Tefillin) buried in earthen vessels, when they can no longer be used? The essential requirement is that they are not to be destroyed. i announced here by Rabbi a substitute for Judah, because Ratiier they are to be preserved ***y Greenberg, president of the judah was symbolized by the fig roup, at the organization's annual I llre 0 f a lion in the Biblical blesstonvention. He stressed, however, jug. that "under no circumstances, are Wt against mm .denominational prayers" in the public schools. TJir );IHK by mstice establishes t'ic land, but he who .extract* gifts •"cnhrows it. • — PROVBRBS. • • The receiver of a gift is not-the Waeajr, --A. BRAVANEL. • A gift is good from an owner. not from.a robber. — J'ROVERBS. Is W permissible to smoke in the cemetery? There is a general prohibition against eating or smdking in the present of the dead (S'dei Cbcmed, Aveluth 116). This comes under the general category of prohibitions which restrain the Hv ing from performing overt acta :in front of the dead which the dead .can no longer do. This is like teasing the poor by enjoying luxuries in front of them; as long as possible. It was thought that burial in earthen vessels would preserve their physical existence as long as possible, and thus the tradition-was established to bury them in earthen vessels. For this reason, it is possible to understand why -the Dead Sea Scrolls were buried or hidden in caves in earthen vessels. There are various authorities who say it is better to hide them in special places In the synagogue. It is known that ancient synagogues had special rooms (and in some eases, special vaults) where these holy articles -were kept. HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. C a nt o r Yehudah Heilbraun. ISRAELITE CENTER 3175 SW 25th St. Conse r vative. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen. i-vi.iny 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield. Cantor Abraham ~8eif. MINYONAIRES. 3737 Bird rd. Modern Traditional. e OHEV SHALOM 911 Normandy dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weberman. e SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645 Collins ave. Cantor S. Nachmias. s — SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein. — e TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN 1025! NE 183rd st.. Miami Gardens rd. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor Morris Berger. — 0 TEMPLE BETH AM. 5S50 N. Kendall dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles. Kodner. lYi'iny :sn p.m. Dues! apeaker: Dr. I Maxwell Liauer, • i vice. TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLYI WOOD. 1351 S. 14 ave. Reform I Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. TEMPLE BETH SHIRAH. Suniland Hall. 115S9 So. Dixie hwy. Reeenstructionist. Rabbi Morris Skop Cantor Herman Gottlieb. • —— TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Hollywood. 172S Monroe at. Conservative Rabbi Samuel Mendelowiti. Cantor Ernest Steiner. l'ri'iav 8:3o p.m. 'iii.-st sneaker: Jack Kaplan. < m.'x Khahnat noata: M.-n.born of SlSteckeadi witu service by July OtVcle. Saturuay youth aervtce :30 am — • — TEMPLE B'NAt ABRAHAM. 387 NE 167th St. Conservative. Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitmsn. Canter Ben Qreeabcrf. l-'riday s:n> p.m. Sermon: "The Sabbath of It. %  Imke." TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chat* ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kremsh Canter David Convlser. TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi 8 M. Machtel. Friday s:lj p.m. Uuust spiritual leadiI sence >rl Ion I ai n Ii % %  Monda] '.':::" p.m. %  tla; I a,m. TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamt\ra ve. Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Cantor Ben Diekson. Friday 8:18 p.m. Saturday i .tin. TEMPLE 2ION. 5720 SW I'.'ri et, Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Cantor Seymour HinVea: TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami ave. Conservative. Rabbi Hbnry Wernlck. Cantor Albert 0 ;• ;. YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. CBxl* hwy. Conservative. Canter MSurioe Neu. YOUNO ISRAEW. WIO NE (71. at. Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin dtaeber. Friday 7 p.m. .-alurday S ,..'t\. rtcrntoir -We.kly IVirtlon." hi 1 p.m., fi.iiow.ci by Bhatoa Be n %  ';. '" i'T :ii:iii! ^ j ^ CANDLIUGHTING VMi 5 Av — 6:53 pjm.



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Page10-A *>Je*isl>ncridkui Friday; July 2V 1963 Copif 0/ Spotlight : State Dep't. Officials Behind By WILTON FKIEDMAH Resurrected iectionable to were drafted Washington. S TATE DEPARTMENT professionals, arrogating to themselves a role in legislative policy making, were behind the resurrection of the dangerous Johnson Arab refugee proposals in a recent Senate subcommittee report. The proposals, abandoned last year by the Administration, were ob both the Arabs and Israelis. They by Dr. Joseph E. Johnson, special representative of the United Nations Palestine Conciliation Commission. The United States is a memher of the PCC. Dr. Johnson's proposals were not officially reported out or adopted by the PCC. The White House c'ropped the idea after realizing it would turn the Near East into even worse chaos. But the State Department kept the file open, looking for a new chance. Everyone thought the plan was dead when a mischievous and vigorous ghost emerged in the report of the unwary Senate Subcommittee on Refugees and Escapees. Chairman Philip Hart, Michigan Democrat, is an old-time friend of Israel and former member of the American Christian Palestine Committee. Sen. Hart was embarrassed tj learn that his insufficiently alert staff, and his own negligence, had permitted crafty State Department professionals to slip the Johnson revival into the report published under the imprint of his subcommittee. The Hart subcommittee report generally endorsed the Johnson proposals, terming them "a carefully coi-ceived and detailed plan for progress." foreign News letter By JOSHUA JUSTMAW A Silent Revolution Jerusalem %  kJAKING THE desert %  bloom"' has been the task which the pioneers have set for themselves when they first came to the shores of Palestine; and indeed, the revival of the land — neglected for centuries—crowns their efforts and achievements. Yet. few realize the extent to which this still remains an unaccomplished task. Few are aware of the fact that only one-fifth Of Israel's territory is now under cultivation, and that while all the growth and expansion thai have transformed the country into a state if modern agriculture and booming industry, the "creation" of the land still remains one of the most central goals and the focus of much pioneering effort For several days now we have been traveling through the country and have seen the vast areas awaiting to be brought to life, and have seen the work that goes on to bring this about on a scale unprecedented in the country's young history. Until 1048, that is, until the establishment of the State, altogether 50,000 dunams of land had been restored. Since that year, the reclaimed area had grown to nearly half a million dunams, not including 360,000 dunams of ameliorated swamp areas and 240,000 dunams of afforested land. These figures illustrate the tremendous achievements in the short span of the past fifteen years. However, against these figures there stands out the figures of two and a half million dunams of land —extending from Safed in the North down to Eilat in the South—that still await reclamation: 780,000 dunams for agriculture, and the rest for afforestation. And this is a task which will have to be carried out. Small Israel can ill afford to leave all that vast area barren, especially since besides the important economic aspect, there is also involved the aspect of security. Israel's borders are 590 miles long, and while elongated borders always create difficulties, in Israel's case there are hostile neighbors all along them. Most of the borders run through either desert or wild hill regions, and eflicient border defense calls for a closely knit population rooted in the soil. It is for this reason that the Jewish National Fund, which conducts this vast project, considers border reclamation as its foremost task. The projected reclamation of the two and a half million dunams—including the building of 3.000 kilompters of roads—will require eleven million work days in the course of the next twenty yen is. and entail an estimated cost of about $200 mijlion. It is an ambitious plan, requiring, in Israel's eroded hills and stark deserts, not only large investments in machinery, but also much human labor. Slopes have to be cleared of surface bouldThis gave the State Department ammunition for use against Israel. Department officials could cite the Senate report, telling Israel that it was the view of Congress that Israel should surrender to its recommendations. Having failed to sell the Johnson concept to ihc White House, the State Department infiltrated i' into Congress. Rep. Seymour Halpern, New York Republican, is an old hand at spotting the trick maneuvers of the State Department in the legislative jungle. He 8rose on the floor of the House to expose the whole affair. Th-j Halpern philosophy is that American policy in the Near East should reflect the views of the American people, reflected through Congress, rather than the personal whims of a few diplomats. Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDUN Unselfconscious Treat in Store THE CONVERSION OF CHAPLAIN COHEN. By Herbert Trr. 341 pp. New York: Bernard Geis Associates. $4.95. "JNAVID COHEN, who lived all his life in New York City, was so provincial that when, after an hour of milling around with some two hundred other unclothed males undergoing a physical examination for the Army, his eyes told him that he was the only Jew in the huge room, all of a sudden he felt naked. And all he held in his hand was a threeby-five inch index card Lifting his eyes upward, he fiddled self-consciously with his navel as he glanced around the drafty room This was the first time in his life that it had been borne home to him in so graphic a fashion that he was indeed a member of a minority group." So begins Herbert Tarr's warmhearted novel about a Jewish chaplain in the Air Force. Rabbi Tarr, formerly at Temple Beth Zion in Buffalo, now spiritual leader of the Westbury Temple of Long Island, knows whereof he writes; he has lived that role. But the yawning pitfalls of the autobiographical first novel can claim no victims here. The book has a story and characters who are sustained by honesty and clean, sometimes brash, writing. The humor is persistent and pleasant, cropping up unexpectedly, as it does in life. Rabbi Tanrarely writes straight toward a joke, which is another of the novice's errors, but he weaves them through characters and incidents with a steady eye for the pattern of his story. Chaplain Cohen is, for one thing, terrified of flying; the very thought of it sends him to the men's room. For another, his nose tends to bleed if handled ungently. He is neither schlemiel nor buffoon, however: it is undoubtedly credit to the author's skill that he can create a hero with such anheroic traits and have him retain both stature ;.nd dignity still. It is an unpretentious book which nonetheless slips in a quantity of good talk and even more good emotion. The section which takes place in the Chaplain Training School, amid chaplains of all faiths, offers interesting sideglances into the young clergy. The novel itself, in fact, thoroughly humanizes the rabbinate, especially where it tackles, via its story, Rabbi Cohen's problem of being treated by his dates like a cross between an angel and a saint. It is a book which is pleasant to read, happily Jewish with an unselfconscious enjoyment of Jewishness and all that it implies. OH the Record: Johnson Report Rep Halpern charged that "State Department elements hive sought to push these ill-adv--l proposals even though they were abandoned :>y the White House and the Administration." He said that "instead, we should have I true initiative for a general peace settlemen This would be a more sensible approach for t I State Department to push." Hope was expressed by Rep. Halpern it the Senate "return the ghost of the past to I restful grave." He said "there are enough current ->roblems in the Near East without digging up | oat*." He pomted out that the Johnson proposals were especially dangerous to Israel's security. 'Arabs, m great numbers, in hostile Arab states s.-rounding Israel would be granted an option of mwutg to Israel despite the fact that many are not tnentic refugees and some never lived in Israel tt all," he said Stressing thai the Arab refugee probk) could only be solved in the context of a general vieace settlement, Rep. Halpern asked: "How ca srael be told to admit potential fifth columnists, many of whom are adherents of the Arab Communist party?" He told Congress it was "obvious that 1 • tee is a prerequisite to any massive scheme for n wing mobs of bitter people across disputed I iers. They would not come as peaceful immigrants, but as mortal enemies dedicated to Israel's destruction." He noted that the Arabs despise Israel • BUCfe they rejected the Johnson proposals beca. • even repatriation would not satisfy their "brut.. Objective of driving the Jews into the sea ana wiping out Israel." % Panorama: By DAVID SCHWARTZ Growth of Bigotry lAfOULD GEORGE WASHMO"• ton. the father of his country, be proud of his children today? They have become more 1 numerous and a father :always j pleased at that. Also, t 16 couniry has greatly advance I technologically and Washing ton ed a keen interest that \ iy, but I Washington was Ch.nrm if the Convention which formulated the Constitution >£ the United Stales, and if he knew what some are try ii that today, he probably would ot feel uig lo do happy. There is a widespread, underground rewrite th.' Constitution with a variety ol ments "f i reactionary nature, to curb i of the .Supreme Court, to establish minoi and there is talk of amending the BUI <>: and to nullity the Supreme Court's decisii religion in the public schools. We stem to be departing from the id the founding fathers. Bigotry is growing were plenty of bigots in the earlier days the point is thai the Washington. Jefferson, Ham iltons. Palnes and Franklins had control son tells of some church leaders trying to J %  from They •ive to imendi, t t rule. [hts, OUl ol There 10. but Washington a commitment about religion knew that Washington was averse to the SCI ot church and Mate. He didn't like that omelette. They went about it a bit underhanded! presented a questionnaire on various topic-, ing one of religion, but Jefferson noted '•: wilyfox" (meaning Washington) answered all questions but the one on religion. i .ibling iid of They includBy NATHAN ZIPRIN Collapse of the Jewish World in Eastern Europe THE COLLAPSE OF the Jewish world in Eastern Europe under the blows of the unmentionables is ons of those tragedies whose grasp is beyond containment of ordinary pen and word. To be sure, the horror story had ils raconteurs, but with lew exceptions they were editorialists lacking in depth of pen, writers with limited vision, scribes without adequate tools. jgf... IK. What kind of Jewish world was it that Hitler destroyed? The men of the social sciences have ready answers—in terms of population, religion, customs econ(in.es and the rest of the tangibles that make for communal living in all forms of society. But there is a dimension in living that is beyond the discernment of the historian and the sociologist, a deprb whose measurement is only within the scope of the artistic rod To grasp the tragedy that descended upon our people in Europe one must understand what kind of people it was Hitler destroyed, their unique civilization, ielr striving for radiance, their faith, their creativity. !,ieir outlook on living, on themselves and on the wo Id that regarded them as strangers. Infortunately most of the iterature mirroring that life is in a tongue that is largely strange to the ear of the American Jew excepting for that altogether too brief portion that has comedown to us in translation, mostly from the trio of Yidd, .1) classicMs— -Mendel,.. Shelem Aleichcm and Pcrelz. The prosaic truth is that the realitv and the poetry of Jewish life in the enclaves of eastern Europe are to be UTy in the writings of the Yiddisl moderns, found who not only could evaluate that living against the background Of the new century but who seemed to be possessed Of a feeling that the world of their art v. ..; near.nl eclipst and that :t must therefore be encompa; ,-tl before 'evp.'! 1 v .V i S "" s "' a, bes,ac coun,s P^haPs for te feverish \iddish creativity i„ the past live decades both in inis country and abroad.



PAGE 1

7 riday. July 26, 1963 LEGAL NOTICE *. kplsli noridliiain Page ;Vi IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR.DA, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY IN CHANCERY No. 63C 7859 I ||\TMII-: D. Ki i/.AN. I lain jiff, vS JOSEPH KOZAN. I ii I.ndaiit. NOTICE OF PUBLICATION JOSEPH Ki >ZAN ,, Barbara Uloane i 'T, mIi Avenue Auburn, Massachusetts Yi.l ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to „ n r a copy of your Auawer to the lull at Oomiilalnt f"r Divorce filed i MMI. "ii iluPlalntlfl'i HIIOI,:,,>, RBR.NSTE1N A.Alll.l.l'.K, 1114 %  ..,,_ -..-s Bullulng, Miami ;:.. Florida, ,H.,I .,, in.the original thereof with in.Clerk oi Hiabovi Court, mi OJ lK-i.Tr th.80th day of August ('."is. utherulee • Decree Pro Comeaso win lii i,,.-Mil against you. i >., t %  .. Baaed. NOTiCfe OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE XoTICE IS hei.ii> riven tnat I bave filed my Final Report ami Petition fur button ami Final Discharge ax %  iacratiix, C.T.A. <>t the estate Merman <". Rubin, deceased: ami •i ihSoth da) "i August, IMS, ppl) i.. the Honorable County t!" I'.i*l,' County, Florida, for ii ol said Final Report and fur itlon and final discharge as • stratrlx, C.T.A, of the estate ..i ill. above-named decedent. This i) ..f .Inly. 1963. THF:BE8A RUBIN Idinlmslrati ix. C.T.A. of the .-. i ii-1 man C. Rubin, dei ised, N I WIENER • :• Admlnlsti. i* i\ i'T.\ ill. mi. HI i Rubin, di %  'I \ %  le) Illdg. A -, l!.i. 7 16, 8 2-9-1* 'Your Honor, my client would like to change his name from Gaines fo Ginzfourg." Copr. 1565, Dartnu ritducMwil LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW %  i: is III:I:I:I'.Y I;I\ i:\ thai %  %  %  • il d< i Ing to engage in indi r the fictitious name %  lnYA AI.IMINIM PRODPCTS al w 17th Court, M In nil, FTa into reglsti r said name Ith the hi Circuit Court uf Dadi : MICHAEL OIOIA Sole i la II, r 7 3-12-11-26 NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW XOTICE is HEREBY niVEN that the undersigned, de* ring to engage in business under the fictitious name oi ZHAHARAZADE it 1698 N W 79th Ktrei t, Miami, I >ade County, Florida Intends to reglstt-i said nun, with the '"• ik uf the Cln .i; Court of Dade Count). Ploi Ida. M1LDRF;D i. wvitENCB Sole i Iwner IIICIIARM W. WASSERMAN Attorne) for Applicant I2n I.inc..In Road Miami Beach, Fluslda 7 i-12-19-26 LEGAL NOTICE r NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW KoTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai • Kin .i. d< Ing to engage In ndi %  the flctlt'ii I1RAKE A ALIGNMENT %  %  ". N.W. 76th St.. Miami said name with the ol lhi in uit Court uf Dade Florida. It VNoD, INC. V FLA. CORP. 7 19-26, 8 2-9 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW ICE IS HEREBY iSIVEN thai %  % % % %  signed, desli Ing to engagi In undet the fictitious name of EMBROIDERY & M'AI.I.HI'IM: %  %  II number 2319 N.W. 2nd Avenue %  Citj of Miami. Florida Intends i ii;' tit,, said n.i iii-with the thi Circuit Court of Dadi Floi Ida i a Miami, Plot Ida, this 91 h %  till-.. I'M;::. HENRY COOPERMAN I.EEF' & WKIS i i %  v ilii ant • nln Road Ml.mil Bes h, Florida 7 19-26, 8 2-9 Vol' CIRCUIT COURT, HTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLA. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 6135 tTRR'E 'jl'ILPORD, %  IENRY HI ILF'l IRD. I fendnnt. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION HKXK1 HI ll.F'ORD, HENRY tiriLl oitn. Real%  %  %  ivn 'i i lot!fled to servi war to DI I %  %  on • ittorney, HEl IRUE Nil 'Hi 'I.AS. N v\ 12th \\. .\i iml, i..i and with "Ii ik ni this i mgusl I, 1963, othel • on |i ,,,M u ill be i onfi used b) HATED -1.11 > 15 I'., : I I HERMAN, Clerk ") 11} K M I.V.MAN. I '< i • u t > Clerk 7 19-26, 8 2-9 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AMD FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 60093-A • %  %  I Lit.of 'V IK>I,PH FELDSCHL'H 11, ccasi il. NOTICE TO CREDITORS J! '. "'"" '" -'i"! All Pel suns Havis or Demands Against s.ii.l IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR.DA IN PROBATE No. 59937 C IN RE: Estate of SI M,I IMON CRAMER l leceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Credlto s ami til Pi i sons i ln> Inn claims or Demands Agatnsl Said i :-'.it.-. Y'.u ait' hareby notified and required t" presenl nj lulms and demands which you m.i\ have agafnsl the estate nf SOI.OMON CRAMER %  \ late of l lade i 'nunt>, Florida, in the Count) Judges of Dade County, and file th,same in duplicate and as provided in Section 7SS.16. Florida Statutes, In their • "flees In the Count) Courthouse In Dade Couniv, Florida, within six calendar months from the time "f the first publication hereof, HI the sum,, will i.' barred* Dated at Miami, Florida, this 27th day of June, \.1>. ]";T SARAH li CRAMER \~ rati • iitrlx MAC MERMELL \ • %  .,....., f,,,|.v ..,.„(-i l?0 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami. 7 .-,-12-19-26 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, .. No. 63C 7232 1 ONNIE SORENSEN. Plaintiff, vs. 1,1:11SIH;I:\SI:N. 1 'if, mlant. SUi r FOR DIVORCE TO: LEIP SORENSEN •• p Dr. Richard K. BlaisdeU ii... I-.. :.:.tii Place Chicago -7. Illinois Yi.ii are herebj notified thai R Complaint for Divorce has hi n filed against you, and you are required to s. i-v,. a cops ..f your Answer "iPleading to the Complaint on the Plaintiffs nttorney, PHYLLIS 8HAMPANIER, M"! Biscayne Blvd., Miami :i, Fla and file the original Answer or Pleading in the office "f the Clerk of the circuit Court on or i" u !-• %  the 5th day "i A igust, 1962, If you fall to 'I" so, Judgement by default will be taken '-.. list von f,,i the relief demanded in rIi.i'ompkilnt. DUNE AND ORDERED u Miami, Florida, this Jrd day of July. A.D. 1968. i: B I.EATHF:RMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court, Dade County, l lorida (seal) By: K. M. I.YMAN. DI put) i'l. rk 7 5-12-19-26 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE Ls HEREBY UIVEN thai the undersilQied, desiring to engage In l.llslness Ullt>%llle fictitious ll.ltlle of 81ROTBX igtBisK'r CORNER nt 2261 I Balsedo StreVfT Coral Gables, Floi Intend* to register saiil name ith I the Clerk of the Circuit Court of' Daile County, Florida. NAT GREENRERQ Soli 11 m r PRED & %  NEWMAN Attorneys for Applicant •>".". Hade Federal llldg. 7 12-19-26, v i IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 4615 MARTA OCEQUBRA, Plaintiff, vs. SERGIO O. OCEGUERA, Defendant. NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO: SERGIO O. OCEGUERA San Rafael 1477 Parada 22, Banturce, Puerto Rico. You, SERGIO ii. OCEGDERA. S. Rafael 1477 Parad.i 22 Banturoe, PR, ar,. required to file your answer to tinComplaint for divorce, with the Clerk of the above Court, and serve a copy thereof upon Glno P. Negretti, Attorney 910-11 Congress Blilg.. Ill N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Florida, on or before the 6th day of Auciist. 1962, or ana complaint will be taken an confessed. Dated this 27th day of June, 1963. E. B. LEATIIKHMAX. Clerk. circuit Court. Dade County, Florida (seal) By: N. A, HBWETT, Deputy Clerk 7/6-12-19-26 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! +Jewist thxrkHom %  olicitg your legal notice*. W appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates Dial FR :in,er for messenger senrice i\ N [IIIK I 1 -t.lt l„, "'' '• "' %  > notified ami fa•'l to present any claims and deI,,,' "" "hu-li you mav have against K. ,'i, ',"",'•'!•• r ItlHiil.lMl PEL-D%  "ii.ii deceased late <.f Dade Coun.i-ioi Ida, t„ ,| lr County Judges of '" %  ounty, and file the name In te ami ; ,s provided in Section '; % %  "•• riorlda Statutes, in their ofin th.. County Courthouse in %  ""iv Ploi Ida, within six cal.,'";" months from the llm of the ';'.', '"jn-lcntlon hereof, or Hi same i HI tie barn >l ""'•'i it Miami, Florida, this 2nd I "' i II) \ I). I'u,: HFINRY NORTON BAMfEL, li:i.|iscinn .... As Co-Ehcecutors lu.i 1 "! 1-1 '•"""' "i ibis notice on ,\', ," '' %  • %  %  July, I24S. i"-M.\ NORTON nej fi r i',, U| -Kxecutors II Bldg., .Miami, l-'la. NOTICE UNDFR FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai Hi. mid. • signed, di sli Ing to i in business tinder the following fictitious II imes .it ihe addresses set itl ;lo il i si-— • I I v.i • .-: Stae l.i'iuors, si S.W, .'.7th Avenue, Miami: tlSH-l.ivhl Inn, sss S.W. 57th Avenue, Miami: Stati I Iquors, 6205 nue, Mi.i st.i %  llquoi M ami. Slat.' i him '-. i' ,xl mi.. Miami. Si '• %  Liquors, Nortl M n I. nui %  • -. "•."•!•. %  South Mi.mil. St n 11 I i q uoi s, • -'' Pert %  || I i not s, tvay, Mini K %  151 ii.n. Miami; ~. Sllli Miami .liel.i.|ii.-i -, 2713 Mia Carol i'u'. i.i'i Stree Mia il: Stati Liquors \ da Drive A Dixie ll \ H Redlan I Tin. i n, Avocado I'm. Ho. I'i': 11" > I lamest i ."I. SI tti Mquol -. i: h -'t .v 10th Ave., Hlaleah Ilamingo I .iquors, Ave., Hi ill Ii. Post Inn, 2900 \V. -'ml Avi nue, hah: Pool PBi kage, %  : R. lib Ave., I,.ih Hideaway. 1006 E. 19th Street, lean. It •' ^,.1,11,, _'i,„i calm nue, Hlaleah; DUieianu L. quora, 127 N.W. Street, Miami! Harmony Lounge, 1006 B. ti'th Bl Hlaleah: Park liar, 27.00 Palm Avenui hah: Jefferson Liquor, l" 1 N. .Miami Beach Blvd., N. Miami Reai h; 62 Bar, 600 l-:. Mh Street, Hlaleah: Mai Tab Vi nd ng, 1656 i N.W. 15th Avenue, Miami: Intends to register snld names with Ih, i -|, rg ,,i in, Otrcull Court of Dadi County, Florida CAST LEWI K)D INTERNATION M. CORP Bj DAVID I. SLINEY, Vice Pr< -id. in. HARRY ZI'KERNICK, Attorney for Applli mt N.W. 27th ivert 22nd St., \ w 7th Avi N i:. 167th Street, %  w 10th St., i: il him us Si So |i \ HighDixie HighMiami Avenue, '. n I67tti Stri ::7I". N i\ %  v 'ii Ii St. .< %  nub lii.iHia 111:.Avel ith ret. lli.lIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 63C 7218 SAM LONDON, Plaintiff, vs. FRIEDA LONDON, Defendant. NOTICE OF SUIT TO: FRIEDA l.< 'NDON :':• laist II, in %  } Clay Whlteflsh Bay Miiw.iukee, Wisconsin You are hereby notified thai a Complain! for Divorce has been filed in the above styled Court against you and you are required to serve a oops of your Answer or Pleading to the Complaint on the I'la in tiff's attorney, ABB si'lU'M i:i.n. 275 Northslde Plata, Northslde i enter, Miami. Florida, and ii'' the original Answer "i I'leading In tin office of the Clerk of the circuit Com t in Dade County, 1lorida, on oi '>• foi •• the Ith day of VIIL-USI. |662. if "'i fall to do so. Judgment by Default will i' taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, tinJrd day of July, l: i: l.KA'llll.it.M AN, Clerk, Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida (seal) By: K. M. I.V.MAN. Deputy Clerk \ BE SI 'Hi INF ELD Attorni v for Plaintiff L'7:. North Norl li.-iilii'i in. i. M lainl, Fla. 7 5-12-19-26 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW "NOTICE IS HEREBY UIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of TOPPB DIKCtlCNT CENTERB at 125 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, int.mis to register s:,i.i name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Couutv, Florida, TOPPB DISCOUNT CENTERSCORAL OAI1LES, INC, KOVNER 8 MANNHE1MER Attorne) for Topps Discount Centei s-i Joral I labli -, in,-. 7 10-26. S 9 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 58795-A IN RE: Estate ..' IBBAHAM G1NRBURQ I li i eased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having claims or Demands Against Said Kst.'it, : You are hereby notified and required to present an) claims and demands which you maj have against the estati "I ABRAHAM QINSHCRd deceased late of Dade County, Florida, i" th, Co ints Judges of I de County, ami file the same In duplicate and as provided in Section 733.16, Ftorlds Stal ites, In thi Ir offlci %  In the Count) Courthouse in Dade County, Florida, within six calendar months from the tin r Ihi fl si publication hereof, or ih, same ill I,.barred. Dated .it Miami, Florida, this 21sl dny "f June, A.D. : >6 I, i'i M publh .iti.'ii of this notice mi the 12th .1 iv of July, 1962. BAHRFiTT M. ROTHENBERC .\s Administrator %  .T.A. CA1DIN • ROTHENRFJRG Atorneys for Administrator C.T.A. 105 Blsc i •> ne Building Miami :;:. Florida 7 12-16-26, 6 -2 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COUPT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATL No. 48174 C IN RE: Estate of IIAKRY HF:CK a'k a %  ERR1 BECK, Deceased. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO "IAe E APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE Is hereby given that wn have filed mir I'inal Iti-port and Petition for Distribution and Final Discharge at Co-Executors of estate 'it HARRY" 1!F:I"K iizk HERRI DECK, deceased: and that • -tie 5ih day of August, 1962, "ill .only to the Honorable County Judged of Dade County, Florida, for approvj of said Final Report and for distrll itlon and final discharge :is Co-Exe ito the estate "t thi above-ns • .i di • dent. This Mli day of .1 ulRENEE JAFFE BEl IRVING BECK us Co-Executors of thi *• i HARRY It EC K a k BECK, Deceased. SIMi IN, HAYS & URCNDW1 AI torney :',"l Alnsley Building Miami 22, Florida 7 1.'. %  NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME L' .V NOTICE IS HERF:UY til the undersigned, desiring t" -• business undi i the flctitiouBARBARA JANE DRESS %  I -!-I Coral w :i>, Miami, l tends to register said nami I the Clerk of the Circuit %  'out I County, Florida. ULADTBT APPARELS C By: I, R. Mayers, I 'i i I R. MAYERS Attorney for < III ds s' Appan 1612 Congri -Building Miami 22, Florida 7 ISO Llm "in Road Miami Beach, FIOI I li 7, l>-2, I t-l T 26, 8 2-6-16 NOTiCE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA iN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No. 63C 7285 P. C. .Ii INKS, Plaintiff, \ s. JULIE JONES, li< fendnnt. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: JC14E JONES 3o4S .Michigan Street Kansas u> M.MSOUI i i Y'ou, JULIE JONEB, are hereby notified that a Coniidnlnt for Divorce ins I,.-, n filed against you, and you jare required lo serve a copj of your Answer or Pleading to the Complaint on the Plaintiff's attorney, J. David .l.i.-liiii.tn. 622 North Krone Vvcnue, Homestead, Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the cireuit Court on .,1 bofore thi 12th day of August. ,1662. it you fall t" do so, judgim il hy it, fault will li,' t:ik,'il ami, list \ on for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DONE AND ORDERFJD at Miami, Florida, this 5th dny .,f July, A.l). 1962 i: i: LEATHERM \N. Cli rk, Circuit Court, Ihide County, Florida (seal) Bj : K M. LTMAN, Deputs Clerk .1 DAVID LIBBM \N 6 .: .\' r ll l\l "in, A\ ,11110 I lone stead, Florida Atorne) i"i Plaintiff 7.12-19-26, 3 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 63C 7400 .I1STINI-: ii. I'TALand BEATRICE I'I'AI.. his wife, Plaintiffs, \ B. JACK ROBEN, RtlBERT MARKOW1TZ and MARKOW IT/.. his Ifi. Defendants. SUIT FOR BREACH OF LEASE 'I'i i. .hi, i, Rosen tti \v. HI I'-ih Street Baltimore, Man bind You are hereby notified thai s Bill of Complaint for Breach of Lease has been filed againsi you, and >ou an required t" nerve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Com-' plalni "ii I hi Plaintiff's ttorm \ s, 8HEYIN, GOODMAN & HOLTZMAN, 246 Seybold Building, Miami, I lorida, and file the ..iiuiii.il Answer or Pleading II t) i ii • of the i'lerk of the >'r. uit i "ourl of I lade I 'ount>. F'lorida on oi before thi 12th day of August A.D., 1962. If you fail I so, Judgmi M i" ,:, fault ill i"taken, This notice shall he published once each week or foil consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH PLORID1AN I INE AND i il'.l lERED II Miami. I 'lei,' i 'ountj. ior .la this Bth dai ol July, A.D., i: II. l.i: VTHERMAN rk nf thi %  uit i 'ourt I lade County, Florida (seal) By: C P, Ci "PELAND, i'. i ut) Clerk SHEVIN, GtHtDMAN \ HOLTZMAN A torn, \.foi Plaintiff 246 Sej In,Id Hulldl Miami B] : llmi; M. Rosen NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME L* .V NOTICE IS HEREBY i:i\ the undersigned, desiring to < i buslni ss II II. I. :• ihe flititiou11:• nix MENS SHOP at ". Ilns Ave., Miami, Fla., Intem • to reg. 1st) ilid name n Ith the i' Cireuit Court of Dade Couni AL-GEN, INC, SouOwner 7 %  NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NII'III'K IS HEREBY i!IV 'I that th, undersigned, desiring t" • gagi business under the fictltlout .MAKI.IMJ'S FASHIONS al 17th St.. Miami. Fla., Inten* Isti r -aid nani. with the Cli r Circuit Court of Dade Count MARID LEWIS HATTEN & SALEM Attorneys for Marid 1.. "is 7/12IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COl : ~ IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR.DA IN PROBATE No. 60017 C IN RE: Estate of JUNE MARION KATZ ased NOTICE TO CREDITOPS To All Credltoi and All iv> -• Ing Claims or Demands At. Estate: You are hi 'i by notified quired to pri -• i I any claln mands which you may havi thi %  tate of JUNE MARK i..-. ., -. .1 late "• l lade Cou i'i.i. to the County Judges County, and file the sami at. and as i • Ided In Seel i i la Statutes, in their • the i "-••• i,t> i "oni ihous. in 11 >. Florida, w ii hln six calem ti..in the tlm the I i l hi ri of, or : ii'same will Dated al Miami. Florida, da) ol i mi AM. 1962. MILTON A. FRIEDM 11 I l Alnsle) Bldg., Mi. mi ... As E!xecutor MILT IN A. l'KllM'MAN Attot n, for .line Marlon K llll Alnsle) Bldg., Miami 22, I 12-16IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY No. 62C 136S7 ZAIDA Ml.l.\l:i>, Plaintiff, vs. VIROILLO 'I. MIJARES, I left lulant NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO: V1RG1LIO O. MIJARES Addrens PnknoM n Yiil'. V1RGILIOQ. MIJARES, preaant residence unknown, are required to file youi answer tn the complaint for divorce, with the Clark of the above Court, and serve a copy thereof noon Glno P. Negretti, Attorney, '.'lii-ll Congress Building, 111 N E nd Ave., Miami, i lorida, on or he for, i He 12th day of August, 1962, % %  i romptalnt will i„ taken a confi ii. I ini, .1 this -:li d) of .mli. 1962, i: Fl LEATHERM \N. Clerk, Circuit Court, i '.'i.ie •'.mm Florida (si al) B) K M I.YM \N, Deput) Cluk 12-19-26, v _' IN THF COUNTY JUDGE'S CCl r-T IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 59964.C IN RE: Estol HARRIET D. WEXLER I leceased. NOTICE TQ CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Pi i iii^ Claims or Demands Ana. Estate: You are hereby notified ii' Ired i" pi eat m any ola Imi mai ds which you may havi the estate "t HARRIET D. V di %  • aaed lati ol 1 lade Counl ida. to the Counts Judges Dadi County, and file the same i i cr Ie and as provid. ,1 in Seel Florida statutes, in thenofl lie cnnty i'ourthousi in Dadi 'v. F'lorida, within six calends i'i mil the time of the flrsl p hi ri of, or thi u me w ill bi Dated at Miami, Florida, i I da) ". June \ 11 1962 MORRIS WEXLER S l". -i 76th Sir,-, t New Yi rk, N. York Vs Executoi l.n INEL T,. 111.IN Al tornei for F7xi cutor 'ini.in, ..in i: I. Bldg. Miami I'., aek. Floi Ida



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Page 12-A vJewisti ftcridifan Fiidcy, July 28, 1963 %  PEPSI-COLA COMPANY ANNOUNCES New! A sugar-free cola with rewarding true-cola taste!! PATIO DIET COW FIGURE EXPERT DEBBIE DRAKE says: I 'GREAT TO YOUR WAIST!" 'SUGAR-FREEONLY 1 CALORIE PER SERVING!" "Now you can satisfy that natural yearning for refreshment and still stay slim. New Patio Diet Cola contains only one calorie per serving. It's absolutely sugar-free, yet it tastes delicious. Gives you truecola taste because it's made with true-cola ingredients by Pepsi-Cola Company. Be modern...look modern. Try it today. It's the refreshing way to stay slim. New Patio Diet Cola." THE REFRESHING WAY TO SfAY SUM'" m REWARDING TRUE-COLA TASTE!" ff PATIO DIET COLA AVAILABLE AT YOUR DEALER'S NOW Or Call 635 6*51 BOTTLED BY WSI-COtA BOTUERS Of MIAMI. ,NC, .251 N.W. 3fth STREET. UNDER ANOINTMENT MOM fmx** CONMfff N.Y.. N v



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*.mu, ornan s UUorU tJewish Floridia Miami. Florida, Friday, July 26, 1963 n 5 Local Pioneers to Join Convention "Break-through at Cedars" finds Bette Rosenberg (right) mov.ng merchandise from the Gift Shop just ahead of the wrecking crew's sledge hammers. The shop will be tripled in size aner construction now under way is completed. Mrs. Alice Cole deft), chief receptionist, lends a hand with the moving *ob which is nart of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital's expansion program to add 174 new beds, complete the upper three floors, and expand laboratory and surgical areas. ...SOCIALITE by ISABEL GROVE II was a fifteenth wedding anniversary for Mr. ami Mrs. Jacob Mary) Scher and a family party al their Belle Tower apartment "..'i-Isle ... So a happy group of thirty gathered for cocktails, and then up cruised a pleasure boat to the Belle Tower dock. tii re the private party hoarded an inland waters ride and ft dinner Mary, incidentally, is now in H dersonvUle with her sister. Mrs. Martha Tipins. for ten days sit the Tippins youngsters at p there They lett Irom ii on Monde), Mr. and Mrs. Bugene Dynner, 520 Ancona Ave., (oral Gables. mtertained Friday night at a tamily dinner honoring' the rei. of Dr. and Mrs. Martin H. nee Judith Ann Dynner) Dr. Mat/, has been in charge of I i obstetrical Department at Blylheville Air Force Base Hospital in Arkansas He will no \ open an office for private ice in No. Miami Beach... Bi fore leaving BIytheville. h u as honored by the OffiVives Club for her "outservice to the communShe taught Sunday School • tevilie Synagogue, gave unMp Red Cross flrst-aW cour and wrote for the Blythe i -paper She will be ing at Carol City Elemental School this eoming year Also honored at the family dinner were Alan Dynner and his new bride. Nancy, visiting in Miami before returning from their honeymoon to New Haven, Connwhere Alan is a student at Yale Law School. %  > a I Celebrating their wedding anniversary at dinner with friends. Milt and Maicia Balsam admitted their camping twins. Nina and Alan, would have made the evening complete But the little ones remembered, and later called from Sky Lake in Sautee. Ga.. to sing a "Happy Anniversary" duet to their beaming parents The Harry W. Beyers, of 19720 NW 12th Ave., have left for their summer cottage at Lake Geneva. Keystone Heights, a resort near Gainesville Joe and Hazel Dallet writing friends from Norway that "this is the life"' Harvey and Jean Fleischman, accompanied by son Richard, are back from a three and a halfweek cruise in the Bahamas aboard their boat. "Doc"' Ed Kowarsky, of the Dul'ont Health Club, has heard from his friends. Dr. and Mrs. Leo Levin, visiting Switzerland, Norway. Denmark. Holland and France Sheldon Kay and his Evelyn oil from the Miami area for a Continued on Pgt 4-B By Special Report "Today's Woman in Tomorrow's World" will be theme of the 18th biennial convention of Pioneer Women, the Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America, to be held in Detroit, Mich., on Aug. U to 14, Mrs. Sidney Leff, national preaident, announced this week. Delegates attending will include Mrs. Moses Meyers and Mrs. Sarah Shapoff, representing the Greater Miami Council of Pioneer Women; Mrs. Isaac Pushkin, president, and Mrs. Anna Sorin Bild, publicity, Golda Meir Club; Mrs. Jack Sills, president, Kadimah Chapter; Mrs. Dora Offenhenden, president, Beba Idelson Club; Mrs. Sofia Krantz, president, Club 1; and Mrs. Sally Grecnberg and Mrs. Frieda Sack. Club 2. Highlighting the theme will be addresses by two leading women SSSSEL legislators, Beba Idelson, deputy speaker of the Israel Parliament, and Martha Griffiths, Congresswoman from Michigan. "Women's Role in Israel" will be discussed by Mrs. Idelson, who is also secretary of Israel's largest women's organization, Moetzct Hapoalot (sister organization of Pioneer Women). Cong. Griffiths, who is the first woman ever to be elected to the House Ways 'and Means Committee, will discuss "American Women's Role in Tomorrow's World." Over 600 delegates, representing 50.000 members throughout the United States and Canada, will at tend workshops and discussion sessions as they seek to define the role and responsibilities of the modern American Jewish I woman in world affairs, and to plan Pioneer Women's social service and educational programs in the United States and Israel .' the next two years. Other special speakers elude Walter Reuther. v W • ident, A.F. of L.-C.I.O. aa pw dent. United Automobilt w'Offa of America; Hon. Ogdei He: Congressman from New Y a! former Ambassador to laM Mrs. Ora Goitein, Wome-'s Aftache. Israeli Embassy, ton; and Mrs. Sidney Lef:. national president, Pioneer Worren. Golden Ring Golden Ring Club 01 Peach will hold a part> members who are 70 aril older at a function Saturday. ; the Farband Center. 842 Wi ton Ave., according to B. Cohen, chairman of am • nenu. Charles Zellers, president of the South Florida Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, accepts a check presented by Mrs. Saul Iarrett, vice president in charge of fund-raising of the George Gershwin Knights of Pythias Ladies' Auxiliary, at Hibiscus Temple. Other officers include Mrs. Jack Hennan AUTHENTIC BLEEDING MADRAS SHIRTS BY COS COB For school, for chic our India madras shirt that's guaranteed to bleed and mellow with every washing! Select this classic in a variety of tones; sires 30 to 36. BLOUSES, MIAMI (SECOND FLOOR). AlSO DADELAND. MIAMI BEACH.' )63'd StREET. fl. tAUOERDAlE. WEST PAIM BEACH. N m



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Page 2-B f.knMi Fkridfir>n Friday, July 26. Beach Girl Takes Air Course Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Cadet Second Lieut. EtndS D. "MikTOTTitzT daughter ot .Mr. and Mrs. Manny Miklowitz. of 1345 Drexel Ave., Miami Beach, has completed a 10day Air Force orientation en campment at Orlando, AFB. Cadet Miklowitz, a member of the Miami Beach CAP .squadron. \\'e have many ways to make i tenderizer is used, no salt is need-, n reived briefings on modern misthe tougher cuts of meat tender led, and the meat is best when, siles at the Air Force Tactical an d paltable. We can cook them i cooked from rare to medium, no Missile School here, and on comin liquid or steam them until they longer. bat and support aircraft at nearliterally fall apart. We can grind, i Our recipes today are for two by McCoy Air Force Base. pound, or score them. When we fine dishes using top of the rib The cade; was trained in home soa k ihem in a marinade containor the kosher tenderloin. Both call orner squadron management and the j ng vinegar or lemon juice, the for the unseasoned tenderizer. but Air ForceCAP role in national acu ] ac t s as a tenderizer. From either the regular or instant may defense. She earned a certificate coo ks in Bogota, Colombia, comes be used. The first recipe is a wellof proficiency in her job specialt h e trick of soaking steaks overflavored London Broil for which t\. night in lemon juice to cover, a top of the rib is an ideal cut. For The cadet is a student at Ida simple way to acquire a brand new the second recipe, Beef in Buns,; M. Fisher Junior High School. flavor and extra softness. We can either top of the rib or the tender get more tenderness and loin may be used. Both dishes and spread half the seasoning mixture evenly over the surface. Broil until the side which is near! er the heat is browned. Turn over 2SJ -i s l r gj d wi,n ,hl rc n,ainntg mixture. Complete the broiling, but cook only until rare or 1 medium. To serve, carve diagonally across the grain, both for extra tenderness and to get more geneiWtt slices. Thi> amount serve* 5 to 6. generously. Beef in Buns m lbs. top of rib or kosher tenderloin Unseasoned vegetable tenderizer '4 cup vegetable oil 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons white vinegar U cup tomato juice >4 cup minced onion '4 teaspoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon chicken Lit 6 hamburger buns of the soit inside bread, heat, fill with the meat and just eat gravy to moisten. This anuj >erves 6. Serve'extra gravy hakt;d BOtatge^, STARRING! even Remove nil fat Chaim Weizmann Branch of Added to all these is a newer Farbar.d will install 100 new memway, the use of a commercial tenar.d the thin the meat cbroil by carving them on the bias, est to summer meals. To serve (ions on the package. With a with the knife tilted. | the Beef in Buns at a picnic, slice sharp knife cut the meat into quarand marinate the meat at home, ter-inch thick slices, cutting Wmrmnnn Rmnrh shorten the fibers of cooked Swiss are suitable for indoor or outdoor membrane which covers the mea nciAlHUiiii %  vanVI1 s(eak corncd beef or London coo king, and will add new interTenderize according to the dire Planning Supper Tut the meat and marinade in a slightly on the diagonal. Comline the oil. soy sauce, vinegar, bers at a supper on Sunday. Aug. derizer. This is a vegetable pro-, J ar *J ,i 6 h 1 v an( ?.,? a k ** ," 11, at the Fontainbleau Hotel. duct and kosher. When we use ** "Pf 1 *"* Kecp l hllIod """' '" m; ,U "' n 0n "^ ^"^ In charge of arrangements are it on less choice rib steak or r ib c0O ln S time. Aaron Katz and Irving Sachs, roast, or skirt steak or tenderloin, i Harry Sacks is membership chair-J the meat becomes as fine and soft man, and Moe Levin is president, as a cut of prime quality. And Program will include a speaker when we use the tenderizer as diand several musical numbers. If you like reeled on such cuts as chuck steak or top of the rib. the meal becomes soft enough to boil. From the calachel, also known as the eye of the chuck, we can cut thick 1 small steaks, tenderize them, and London Broil 2'lbs. top of the rib Unseasoned meat tenderizer 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 teaspoon lemon juice teaspoon pepper 1 medium clove garlic, crushed 2 teaspoons minced parsley Pour over the meat and stir to coat the puces. Cover, and refrigerate several hourTurn the meal in the marinade once or tw ice durin this time. Heat the fat in a large frj Ing pan over medium heat, add Ihe meal ade, and stir until Ihe mi il ked from rare to medium, [erred, Do noi cook II the buns almost KREPLACH T' X Ravioli IN SAUCE Select a piece of top of the rib have mock tilet mignons delicious which is al least an inch thick. in flavor and delightfully moderSprinkle it with the tenderizer ac•te in price. The tenderizer may cording to the directions on the be purchased seasoned or unseapackage. Combine the remaining soned, instant or regular. Be sure ingredients No salt is used as to gel the type you wish, and use there is sufficient salt taste in the exactly as the directions state, tenderizer. Place the meat on the .\l>o. remember that when the rack 0/ a broiler, or on a grille. mvn m A GLASS Ot A CUf just ret' eatt You'll love CHEF BOY-AR-DEE CHEESE RAVIOLI Hear family, guests, cheer for that real Italian flavor created by famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender little macaroni pies...filled with tangy Italian Cheese...simmered with savory tomato sauce and Cheese...seasoned the real Italian way. So much tastier and •asier than the frozen kind. So inuch thriftier, too—costs only •bout 15c par sarvingl Delegates Listed Temple Or Olom Meeting Tft r^AnVt^ntlAn Temple Or Olom will have a vOnVcnTIOn ; general membership meeting on The following delegates will repSunda >' evening at the Temple, resent this area as official dele# gates to the four-day convention OpePQ*iOn BiKSni of the free, non-sectarian Chilj %  (Ten's Asthma Research Institute Curhfl.RflrkA^llO and Hospital at Denver on July ^Wim-DQrOeCUe 28 to 31: Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood of Mrs. Irving Miller, president, Beth Torah Congregation will, So. Florida Council of Presidents; sponsor an "Operation Bikini" 1 Mrs. Marvin Sokolow. president, swim and barbecue on Saturday' Breath of Life Chapter; Mrs. Paul evening. Aug. 3, at the Bal Har1 Hershman, president. North Dade hour Hotel. Chapter; Mrs. Albert Weiner. The evening will feature dancing %  president. Greater Miami Chapand swimming under the stars, ter; Mrs. Sidney 1,'ittermen, presv ith games and prizes. A native ident, Miami Beach Chapter; Mrs. Calypso band will provide enter Marvin Guberman, president, Lor-, uiinmcnt ber Chapter; Mrs. Robert Herbert. 1 ,„ ,.„„ of ^ t d f recording -secretary. Peahkin jl:forlll;lI1(111 ;irp Mrs M Chapter; and Mrs. Donald JacobSpont | cr son, guest, Breath of Life ChapR ran ter. Delegates from all over the nation will learn of newest developments in treatment and research TETLEY TEA A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES SINCE 1837 Y, there's Yom To* spirit Is this fine tea..."flavor crushed" for fullest strength and stimu. Utioo... richer taste and pleas. %  re with your flcishigi and %  ilehifts tod bctwen soeai refreshment... with five extra laundratives FAB gets every wash far cleaner than the deter-l gent alone because FA3l lias more than a deter-l gent... adds five extral laundratives to get wash] clean clear through asl the deterge"' alone can-| not do. CLEAN CLEAR THROUGH! KOSHER PARVl PRODUCT OF COLG*T;PALMOli FOR •> STAR < / DISHWASHING N and Mrs. Lawrence total treatment, care, rehabilitation and research center for inin asthma and allergies in this tractable asthmatic children. v Certified Kother **le* anct Rabbinical SvptnUcm ONLY GENUINE SWISS CHEESE IMPORTED FROM SWITZERLAND HAS THIS SEAL ON THE PACKAGE It is your protection against Imilations-your guarantee of excellence in flavor, texture and quality. Look for the word "Switzerland" on the Swiss Cheese you buy...chunk or sliced... CFRTirifO KOSHER PARVE I j\ Sugnnne For real ta'am of Switzerland! Switzerland nmsr-suum CAlOtllltll UOUIB iwmma kfht br.(M MrtwM %  ftenin| — (u'wlMf •ocrot-irnovs 101 DiAima sow ; AIOCI Dim lot rTCH(N 4-0/. iorru omr m no> naaa otimmui GUARANTEED NON-FATTENING! IMPROVE PINK LIQUI 1^ Now stepped up in grease-cutt'fig M Cleans pots and pan$| quick a-i oasy as glasses and plates 1^ And milder than the leading baby soap



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Friday. July 26, 1963 >Jeistinvrii7 Pcfje 3-B it +.Kauffmans Head DAY Units Here Mr. and Mrs. A. Henry Kauff'.man. were recently installed as I commanders of Miami Beach! Surf>ide Chapter and Auxiliary 24 of the Disabled American Veterans. They will host the national con: vention of DAV scheduled at the Carillon Hotel on Aug. 18 to 24. j Past Department Commander Victor Freedman installed the of' %  ficers, together with Department Commander Ross Grayam and %  Senior Vice Commander Carl Hoff. Also installed as officers of the Hadassah pays tribute to Mrs. Marietta P. Tree, special adviser to the United Slates Mission to the United Nations. Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, national president of Hadassah (right), presents Hadassah's "Award of Honor" to Mrs. Tree "in recognition of her ceaseless efforts in advancing the principle of freedom and eguality among all peoples in our own land and throughout the world." Occasion was a luncheon at Hadassah House in New York City, attended by 47 representatives of 35 delegations to the United Nations and members of Hadassah's national board. Couples Plan Theatre Party Young Married Couples Group of Beth David Congregation is planning a theatre party during the month of August. Tentatively scheduled is a per-1 furmance of "Romanoff and Juliet' 1 at the Coconut Grove Play] house on Saturday evening, Aug. I 17, according to Lewis F. Cohen, president, who is accepting reser; v.iiions. The club met at the home of Mi. and Mrs. Don Plotkin. 455 Tivoli, Coral Gables, last Saturday evening. Couples attending included Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Cohen, Mr. and Mrs Sheldon Krantz, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Marks, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Spector. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Bialeck. Mr. and Mrs. David Platt, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Friodland, Mr. %  nd Mrs. Eli Singer, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Pollak. Mr. and Mrs. Joel Leibow, Mr. and Mrs Irwin Messinger, Mr. and Mrs. Sy Schulcm%  on. Mr. and Mrs. Steve Shaw. Mr. and Mrs. Neal Levine. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Singer, Mr. and Mrs Leonard Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Chekanow. Mr. and Mrs. Norman Sirk, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bauer, and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kaplan. Also attending were Rabbi Nor man \. Shapiro, spiritual leader of Beth David, and Mr. and Mrs. Nat Pollack, executive director. chapter were Noah Sinyler, senior vice commander; Max Thurston, Junior vice commander; Earl Hampton, second vice commander; Phil Gallagher, chaiplain; Minnie Hofman. treasurer; Ray Ragland, sergeant alarms; Herbert. Unger, officer of the day; and! Walter Rex. Mitch Reiner, and! Murray Eisenberg, trustees. In addition to Mrs. Kauffman,; officers of the auxiliary are Mes-| dames Pauline Thurston, senior I \ice commander; Helen WiederI hold, chaplain; Rosanne Hampton,| treasurer; Irene Angelillis, adjut ant; Ray Liebenberg, sergeant-at-! | arms; and Dorothy Eisenberg. j telephone. Mayor Melvin Richard present-, 1 ed Keys to the City of Miami Beach to the Kauffmans to mark their dual installation. Miami Beach Mayor Melvin Richard presents keys to the city to Mr. and Mrs. A. Henry Kauffman, incoming command* i of Miami Beach-Surfside Chapter and Auxiliary 24 of D:sc bled American Veterans, at recent officer installation held by the chapter here. Beth Am Units Hold Meetings Carl Harold. 5741 Marius St., Coral Gables, chairman of the Cap ital Funds Committee of Temple Beth Am, held a meeting at his home on Tuesday evening. A special board meeting of the Temple was held last week to hear a final report by the Building Committee. The new sanctuary is < :• tod to be completed by the High Holy Days, according to ehai man of i the committee. Herman Feklman. I The sanctuary will bouse 400 permanent seats, making a total seating capacity of 1.600 •-.' o Etman to Bring Latest Fur Styles Now in its second successful season in this area, me Miami Beach Branch of I. K. Etman Furriers, at the DiLido Hotel, participated in the recent Miss Universe Pageant, presenting to the Zionist Council of South Florida a mink capelet which was given to Mist Israel, Sherine Ibrahim. Etman also presented a white jasmine mink stole to Miss U.S.A., Marite Ozers (Miss Illinois). Etman, whose main fur salon and factory is located at 350 7th Ave., New York City, has been engaged in all phases of the industry for over 30 years. He has presented many of his novelty furs at fashion shows of the noted designer, Sol Vogel. He has also had displays at the Court of Peace at the World's Fair in New York City. In Mi youin. Mr. Etman spent ten years in Israel as a young pioneer, coming to this country in 1930. He has now returned to New York, where he will remain until the opening of the fall season in Miami Beach, at which time he will bring to his DiLido Salon the latest fur styles for 1904. ^^^^^A^^A**^**^**^**^^^^^^^^^^*!**^* MR. I. K. ETMAN PRESENTS HIS te Jasmine Mink Stole AT CROWNING OF MISS USA. MARITE OZERS (Illinois) AT THE CONVENTION HALL BEAUTY PAGEANT OF 1963 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA I. K. ETMAN FURS STYLED AND MANUFACTURED AT 350 7th Avenue, New York, N.Y. Telephone LOngaere 4-8334 Miami Office: I. K. ETMAN FURS DILI DO HOTEL Miami Beach, Florida Phone 531-7114 or 538-0811 kuw u y./ %  %  .^ •twM.'^MVvx*



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Page 4-B vJeHisHtarkUan t^ocialit Continued from Paae Ml few days with a trip to Vero Beach". With them, their three sons, Howard 19. Kichard 13. and Kevin 12 The g'rls irom Cabana Row H at Westbrooke threw a surprise b\f Isabel \^f party for Geri (.Mrs. Ron) Levitt, who has been up North, and Audrey (Mrs. Nate) Frinbcrg, who moved to l'ittshuruli last year.. Party was at the home of Mrs. Martin (Klaine) Bud nick Guests included Mrs. Robert A family separated since the exodus of Jews from Hungary in 1956 is now living together again, thanks to the help of United Hias Service. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Bond (second and fourth left) are shown being happily rejoined with their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Steven Moharos, cfier arriving in New York City from Trieste on the SS Satumia. Moharos, who came to the United States with his wife almost seven years ago with the aid of the worldwide Jewish migration agency, is employed by Western Electric Company as a plant engineer. your next affair *—•* KML tiith a wonderful choice of Miami Beach's Newest Luxury Hotel DORAL BEACH HOTEL A nf-w standard of floganr* on Miami Beach. Superbly planned and executed eliding*... confirmations, luncheons, business meetings ... ranging from 10 to 1000. 4k or A Stunning 2400 Acre Country Club Setting In Miami DORAL COUNTRY CLUB ^ True plushness in a country club setting. Spariousne j if the keynote for your affair amidst the matniSrent decor of the Doral Country Club. Rooms that Ideally accommodate social groups from the most intimate party to banquet* •n the grand scale. For complete details, please call Mr. Hat id Kmrac Doral Bearh IWotol and Country Club JE 2-;tmo Have that Business Meeting, Banquet, or Special Occasion f/t You'll find complete W facilities to exactly satisfy W yout needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a ^ wedding or a private party! It till ^ i lor information! HAZEL ALLISON Catatrtnaj Director, -IE 1-6061 SSU> St. Coll In* tv, rove (Dona) Parent. Mrs. Arnold (Beverly) GUntz, Mrs. Jay (Stephanie) Schreinhaus, Mrs. Philip tHclenc) Proufc Mrs. Al (Flora) Rosen. Mrs. Herb (Eilie) Seltman, Mrs. Martin (Judy) I.ieblinfi, and Mrs. Danny (BarbaraI Schockcn. •No place like home." according to the Edward T. Newmans, back alter a month's vacation in Canada. New York, and Washington, D.C. %  While in Canada. Newman was guest of the mayor of Montreal at his hunting preserve New York stopover was for a Bar Mitzvah. and on Capitol Hill he contoured with Rep. Dante Fascell in his cap.uity as Ner Tamid Day 1 To be Observed Tuesdays will be known as •Temple Ner Tamid Day" from now on for members of the Tern pie Sisterhood. An executive meeting of the women's organization held at the hone of Mrs. Henrietta Fine, moved to inaugurate the weekly observance. '•Temple Ner Tamil Day" will be devoted to meetings in the morning, with the entire afternoon occupied by luncheons and donor games. "We hope these days will give Sisterhood an opportunity to spend some time dedicated entirely to social and religious activities in behalf of Ner Tamid." Mrs. Fine explained. i third vice president of ,he ,'ewish Funeral Din.tors Association. World-famous composer ol "1 love life." Mme. Mana-Zucca, has just completed a new song, •Could Flowers but Speak, and dedicates it to Pansy Flaum A "a\ dinner party at the honu City of Hope To Hear Report Mrs. Lewis Brooks, president of! the Robyn Tubin Chapter of the City of Hope, has just returned from attending a convention of, organizations affiliated with the pilot medical center at Duarte,! Calif. |! Mrs, Brooks will report at the chapter's next meeting on Aug. 8 at the First Federal Savings and Loan Assn., 125th St. and 9th Ave. Her presentation will feature a showing of color slides of programs at the hospital. The chapter was to hold a board meeting Thursday at Washington Federal Auditorium on 167th St., at 8 p.m. Temple Judea Now Registering Temple Judea this week announced that its office is now epen daily to accept registration for the Religious School. Classes will resume on Tuesday, Sept. 3, lor the fall term. The ten-year Sunday School program meets on Saturday and Sunday, with classes from kindergarten through confirmation, .The five-year Hebrew School program holds classes two afternoons week l.v. The office, at 320 Palermo Ave will be open from 9 a.m. through 5 p.m. Friday, July 26. 1963 of Norton and Gloria Pallot wr|. corned State Rep. Murray Dubbin back from bis first session n* Tallahassee Gathered werc^ Mr. and Mrs. Neil Schiff. Mr. and Mrs. Robeti Traurig. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Kolber. Mr. and Mrs. Murray Dubbin. Mr. and Mrs. Morton Segal, and Mr. and Mis. Joe Ga>sen. ForElaaAfit Functtent -'Complete CoUnng Facrlrtia* lor that Spacial "Party served in superb lashion selling ht ( **~f will reflect your good lasta. A CONFIRMATIONS • RECEPTIONS • WEDDINGS, ^ C BANQUETS MEETINGS • PARTIES A Tal.a-t.la or a gala c.lebration with 3.SOO uata. DIETARY LAWS STRICTLY OBSERVED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF RABBI TIB0R H. STERN EAUVILLE aur-iwrUN \-t LL GOIDRIN'3 I ON THE OCI PHONE: UN 5-8511 AN AT emu sTMtrr. MIAMI %  *ACH EVENT-FULL^ r WESTBROOKE LUNCHEONS WEDDINGS BANQUETS FASHION SHOWS MEETINGS RECEPTIONS StHVING ft TO 1100. Plan your Noil Event al the Westbrooke C o o7 8500 ON THE TRAIL • CA 1-8000 Minutes Irom everywhere... jutt oft the Palmetto Jhe Specialty of the Seville in PREFERRED HOTEL CATERING a WEDDINGS a CONFIRMATIONS LUNCHEONS RECEPTIONS a MEETINGS to accommodate 10 or 1,000 XONEALYDC RATED ; IR BANJUL, CATERING AVAILABLE Pleat* C„U ESTELLE D. P0LAK: JE 2-2511 HOTEL, eville OCEAN AT ^9lh STREl.T MIAMI BEACH % %  • Very Special Occas J-woccasions... diplomat fc COUNTRY CLUB'S CALCUTTA ROOM facilities for groumTiwiT ?Tl d T e / alC ^ eri ^ There', no other r^m quite tt'h/rf'?. 7 £*' a week area! Unlimited free parSg. *' Ca CUtta Room ,n th For rmmHm call FR Lom in Miami or WA 3 8m fa m _^^ HOLLYWOOD.BY-THE.8EA



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MM Friday. July 26, 1963 fJenisfi fk>ridliar? Page 5-B Jleach Student Praises Dual Heritage in America By DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN ,,Fron\. tht ..clay. Columoiis discovered the New World and his interpreter. Luis do Torres, a Jew. was the first to touch her soil. Jews have been intimately bound to America. We have grown with this land and witnessed the emergence of a nation. Her :i<'ritane is ours, for our ancestors helped create it. True, at first we Had trouble obtaining religious freedom, but as the American concept of liberty and equality took root, the Jews came into their own and became a <;reat a-set to our land. Although we Jews joined with others in the strenuous task of molding a nation out of promising raw materials, we have maintained our separate identity and remained a unique religion. Two Heritages Judaism expoundthat each Jew should remain loyal to the country in which he abides. There is no greater country for a Jew, or anyone for that matter, to which to pledge his allegiance. The broa concepts, ideals and aspirations of the American people come unbelievably close to those of our religion, both of which contain the most meritorious values and DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN Di thy (1 M-ici'i was the nnnnri in /une of T/ic/eu'isli Flondititi Journalism and Literature Award at r'lc Hebrew Daughter 0 f \| : a „j M William Goldstein. 1070 \'i. SI • 11 sht is •*>• %  A ini' denl jnd goals held by mankind. True peace on earth, freedom and democracy, recognition and respect of the individual and a sincere feeling of brotherhood among men are a segment of the beliefs that denote significance to the lives of Americans and Jews and activate them towards 8 specific goal. Existence in Harmony Mj two heritages are the most perfect dual inheritance any person could possess, for each is a champion of champions in its own allocation—one is the grandfather of all modern religions, and the other is the democratic showcase of the world. I am very grateful for having been born a member of what is to me the mostlogical and soul-satisfying religion of them all, and a citizen of a republic which is a colossus and leader among nations, not only because of her material wealth, but because of her lofty ideals as well. These two separate modes of life do not contradict or antagonize one another. Rather, they exist in harmony, one complementing and clarifying the other. Nor do diversions weaken their bond, for the American freedom and the Jewish tolerance of difference ot opinion only permit the growth of mutual respect for each other. George Washington expressed this thought so beautifully when he said. ". although every citizen must fulfill his social and political responsibilities to his state, he is. nevertheless, responsible to his Maker for his religion and mode of faith." If I could have the genii of Aladdin's lamp grant me any three wishes, my requisitions would be that non-Jewish Americans and American Jews should not retrogress, but advance farther along the road of understanding. These principles should be applied in settling misunderstandings between the peoples of the world. The last wish is undoubtedly a selfish and personal one—the assurance that my -descendants will be privileged to live in this society where two great heritages, Americanism and Judaism, flourish and strengthen side by side. H Pt is ur Robert McClaskey. Jr.. of Miami, a junior at the University of Florida in Gainesville, will parti cipate in a week-long summer study institute conducted by the, B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation* beginning Aug. 27. The institute, held annually for the past n years al Camp B'nai B'rith. Starlight. PS., brings together student leaderOl the Hillel program from some 150 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, lot study seminars, lectures by prominent educator. %  > and Jewish leaders, and group discussions on Jewish culture and issues of current concern in the Jewish community. McClaskey is student president of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at the University of Florida. He is the son ot Mr. aad Mrs. Robert McClaskey. ot 531 NW 38th Ave. j|K.< The B'nai B'rith Hillel movement provides religious and cultural programs for Jewish students on 245 campuses in this country, Canada and abroad. W Also participating will be Vicki Lee Kligerman. of Miami Beach, a junior at the University of Florida. Miss Kligerman is a student vice president of the Hilled Foundation at the University of Fiorina. She is the daughter of Mrs. Sylvia Kligerman, ol 832 15th St. Ask for yiur CHIP INS CATERING ,ih DISTINCTION [ LUNCHIONS • fdlVATI PAPTIIS ORGANIZATIONS • IUSINESS GHOUfS i Open All 'ior %  oM JE 8-UJ2J If you seek the BEST IN DINING. it's Hermans BIG PORTERHOUSE THE KING OF STEAKS on* Sea Food Specialties S,Oinf H. r 1SW IS?nstS*. Cl 01*11 ~ I Continental -rs Kosher Caterers • WEDDINGS • BAR MITZVAHS • BANQUETS UNUMITED At Your Home, Hall or Synagogue Miami's Only "Shomer Shabbos" Restaurant Qualify Par Excellence 8393 BIRD ROAD, MIAMI Phone 226-1744 i X I Salutes The BUSINESS MAN OF THE WEEK BERNI BlANCK Contl lubtaa •• tut coisar 111 Miracle Mile, C.S. Ph 446-7031 for lake-Out Sfic SAXi>-EM.L STRICTLY KOSHER CATERERS OF THE LOMBARDY HOTEL Under Strict Rabb' lical Supervisor,. Mashgiach on Premises. UN 6-6226 KING ARTHUR'S COURT The SINGING STRINGS DINNER • SUPPER MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS 500 Deer Run • TU 8-4521 ART BRUNS. Co Owner THE LERNERS Irtabllshsd WORLD iRENOWNEDj FAMOUS WASHINGTON J&sfaurant DINNERS SERVED DAILY PARKING FACILITIES iE 1-3987 MIAMI BEACH MICHEL'S Kosher Restaurant CATERING FOR All OCCASIONS BAR MITZVAHS OUK SPECIALTY 940-71st STREET UN 6-6043 NORMANDY ISLE (Closed Monday Saturday) I T HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT KOSHER C A I H 11 1 from bori d'oeuvrei fo %  complete beffof TW 170 N.W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR 4-2655 Under the strict supervision of the United Kashrus Association of Greater Miami Suoervising Rabbi: Rabbi Abraham J. Safra. OPEN MOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTION, 1



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Page 6-3 +Je*istrk>ridlton Friday. July 26. 1963 I CHARLOTTl .VOW/4I-* OF THE WEEK Charlotte Simon is a "Yankee" from Springfield, Mass. As a t'lc girl, she always wanted to be a teacher, so she was. She grad,at*d I -• a Columbia University and became an exchange student at Whittier College in Calitornia—former Vice President Nixon's alma ,tei She was the youngest member of the staff at Vassar, teach:g eari childhood education. At camp in Connecticut, she met her Ufeai be, George Simon, where they were both counselors. George went right into service, but as soon as he returned, they were married and moved to Miami, where they have lived ever since. Charlotte was director of one of the Y nurseries until Cathy was born; then came Andy. Busy with her home and children, Charlotte found time and is still taking an active part in her community. So does George. As president of Menorah Group of Hadassah, she went on to regional work. First woman president of the Town Y, she alw is on the regional Jewish Welfare Board. She M^ r \ chaired the Senior Citizen Conference for the Soul hern Region, and Greater Miami Jewish Federation has also come in for its share of Charlotte's attention—she was on the Board of Governors and the Budget Committee, and is also active with the Federation of Jewish "Women. Charlotte admits that either her hands or her mouth must be go;; ;. • %  times. She sews and knits, always having a piece of work I her hands. One of her hobbies is raising flowers, and has received a nl>lK. lor her violets. Travel is another hobby which she shares witn her husband. On one never-to-be-forgotten trip to Europe, Chariott< had her own guide with her the whole time—none otheV than .reortjf. ho is a Belgian and speaks five languages. It was a snap as iJxfty drove about Europe, including a visit to Holland to see relatives. Prv-?ntly, Charlotte is having fun with the children; they are just the ritj'ic age. There is much to do, what with boat rides and sailing Itwnuni. ^r.d they are learning tennis with the same racquet that their mHv used when she was on the college tennis team. As for swimning, it's still the same as when Charlotte was first certified as a Hed CtOSS swimming instructor. Some things never change; happily, it secirs Charlotte's joy in her husband, children and life always remaid toe same. %  + -wav WERE so PROUD EBUevi (Mrs. David) Schine and the Senior Schines, Hildegarde iud Meyer, their daughter, Mrs. Doris Maxwell, of Los Angeles, along vitli Rabbi and Mrs. In-ing Lehrman sat at the Schine table at the Sund,.. sight Pops concert beaming while David was guest conductor Ear 'FtnlandU," by Sibelius. Afterwards, Hillevi had a reception at El Ontro in the McAllister Hotel to honor him, as well as Maestro Arthur Fiedler and Marie Volpe. Interesting talk and an interesting buffet table kept the guests busy way past time for a reception to end. [ecluded among the hundred or so guests were Mr. and Mrs. j Lawrence Porter. Mrs. Sailing Buruch, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Gordon, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Weintraub, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs, Ronald Fine. Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Alterman, Mr. and Mrs.: RolfeKetll. Mr. and Mrs. William Seaman, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Moore, I Dr and Mrs. Henry King Stanford, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stone, j • • LSaS*NT WEEKENO E vile and Bill Brenner went to the Doral Country Club for a golfing eekend. Sue and Alan Cutler were there too, golfing like mad, also BeQe and Milton Levy Just back from seeing one of her offspring at Camp Judea in Hendorsonville is Roz (Mrs. Gerald) Soltz. She went with Flo and Bernie 31oom. While enjoying the cool Carolina breezes, she saw id.. ,r d .Manny Lobeli. Sylvia and Irving Genet, and Bobby and Gene Hyman. • RGIGT JOURNEY Ruth and Abe Frankel are off to Europe on the SS Leonardo Da VUICI Since they are veterans of this European bit, they didn't have' to practice packing their bags. From Genoa, they change ships and' 40to the Greek Islands. They want to buy some paintings for their' new apartment in the King Cole, and that is what they will do when they Re. to Florence. In Israel for the third time, they are looking fonvdic -o seeing the progress thathas been made. Before they return they'll s end some time at a health spa that is a favorite with MiamuH • StLVB* THIS TIME SdSan and Sam Smith had a cocktail party at their home in honor it the ^')th anniver-ary of Susan's parents. No one could miss the big silver and white Happy Anniversary sign on the well or the hoge OOMlBg cake. Among guests there to wish Natalie and Leonard Egert oongratuiations on their first twenty-five years of married life were Fay? and Herman Rubin, Alice and Nat Furman, Milhcent and Leonard Sell ner, Sylvia and Irving Rattier, Marilyn and Harry Smith, iiid AJiie and Bernard Schoninger. • a SOASSRSTEIN AND SOMERSTEIN A card from Monte Carlo from Rena and Fred Somerstein. They a/are doing what you're supposed to be doing in Monte Carlo. Before they left the two Somersteins, Helen (Mrs. Seymour) and Myrna (Mrs. Robert), gave a nautical Bon Voyage party for their mother-in-law. GoeatS vere members of Rena's Monday and Saturday card games, Ruth (Mrs. Georgei Wangler, Edna (Mrs. James) Chapman, Evey (Mr.; Albert) Barmack, Rossi (Mrs. Joseph) Gleicher, and Lil (Mrs. (Irving) Blasberg. Kulvin, Myers Exchange Vows Dale G. Myers became Mrs. Stephen M. Kulvin in 12 noon rites on Sunday, July 21, at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Rabbi Morris Graff officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin EL Myers, 431 E. San Marino Dr.. Miami Beach. For her wedding, the former Miss Myers chose a white peau de soie gown featuring the empire style. She carried a bouquet of calla lilies. The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Max M. Kulvin. 1881 SW 36th Ct., Miami. His best man was Thomas R. Akin III. Ushers included R. Todd Lappin, Douglas M. Myers, Michael Feidelson, Lewis Kairys, and Richard Essen. The bride was attended by Mrs. Thomas R. Akin III as matron of honor. Miss Carol S. Kup! per was maid of honor. Newiywed Mrs. Kulvin graduat' ed from Miami Beach High School. attended Emerson College in Bosjton, Mass., and will go to Duke University in the fall. The groom is a graduate of Coral Gables High and Duke University, where he was a member of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity and Old Trinity Club. He is now a 1 third year student at Duke Medical School. The couple will live in Dur 'ham, N.C. W E. Allen Becki 1 MRS. STEPHEN KUIVIH MRS. JACOB BECKER / Miss Sockloff Weds Dentist Miss Elinor Sockloff. of Queens. N Y.. became the bride of Dr. Jacob Becker, of Brooklyn. N.Y.. in June 30 rites at the East Midwood Jewish Center in Brooklyn The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Sockloff, 411 Malaga, Coral Gables The groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Sam Becker, of Brooklyn. Maid of honor was Miss Judith Sockloff, sister of the bride. Mrs. Norman Riegel. sister of the groom, was matron of honor. For her wedding, the bride chose a shapely dress of silk peau de soie with long sleeves, MISS JUDITH GERTIES Gertlers Tell Judith's Troth Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gertler. 16811 NE 6th Ave., No. Miami Beach, announce the engagement of their daughter, Judith Elaine. The groom-to-be is Michael William Alpern. He is the son of Mr. Joseph Alpern, 16031 NE 19th Ct.. and the late Mrs. Sally Alpern. The couple are planning to be married in June, 1964. Miss Weine Will Wed Law Student Mrs. Eugene E. Weine, 630 79th St., Miami Beach, announces the engagement and forthcoming marriage of her daughter, Philippa, to Michael Kenneth Feldman. The bride-elect is a graduate of: Miami Beach High School. She: attended the University of Florida and is now a senior in the School ol Education at the University of Miami. Her fiance, son of Mrs. Albert Feldman, 1535 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach, is also a graduate of Miami Beach High School. He attended the University of Florida, where he is a member of Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity, and graduated from the University of Miami, where he will enter law school in September. | flat fringed bow, and a long train. Her crown was of crystals and rhinestones, and featured a fin pertip veil. Elliot Becker, the groom's broth er. was best man. Ushers includ ed Norman Riegel. Seymour Kram ei. Seymour Jotkowitz. Joel Blaz er. Alan Sockloff, and Alay Jay Rabbis Samuel Mirsky, Harry' L Wohlberg and Israel Short of fie lated. The bride attended the Univer sity of Florida, graduated from the University of Miami, and is now working on a Master's degree at New York University. Mr. Becker graduated from i New York University, where he was on the Dean's List, and NYU Dental School. He interned at Beth Israel Hospital. Reception and dinner followed : the ceremony. After a 9ix-week 1 honeymoon in Europe and Israel, • the couple will be at home in Long Island, N.Y. Greene, Solosko To be Married Ua Z. Greene and Abe Solosko will be married on July 30. with Rabbi Irving Lehrman official log. After a honeymoon in New York, the couple will return in mid-August to live at the Morton Towers. The bride-to-be was Mr. solosko's first secretary when he opened his insurance business here in 1949. ratiada Ml! MESIMAN ATE. MUMI auca YEARLY BASIS %  JP>MJ Per Month %  J I Per Person w Double Occ. Including 3 KOSHER MEALS DAILY Eve antf Terry Spe-nder Phone JE 1-0496 THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED MHOS FOR ITS THRIFT SHOP AW Y—r Fur nit ore, Clef Hag, Irneni, Dishes, RrtMWS, If c. PIE ASE CALL US FOR PKK UP THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 7331 N.W. 27th AVENUE Ph. 696-2101 Closed Saturdays The Family of the late MARK LACHMAN Wishes to express their sincere thanks for the many kindnesses shown them in their recent bereavement. Mrs. Mark Lachman and Family. Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231 "YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT" for an AFFAIR to REMEAABER BLOSSOM SHOP 1372 Washington Ave., Miami Beach There IS a Difference in Flowers-TRY OURS WEDDINGSBAR MITZVANJ-GARDEN FAITHS %  IITHDAV ANNVUSART A HOSPITAL lOUOtJCTS fREE DELIVERY ALL GREATER MIAMI



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Friday, J-Ly 26. 19S3 \ *>JmMifkrldlctr Page 7-B THE Kiss UniMT.-f Coronation %  Charity Ball was held Sun< ay ir tilt Grand Ballroom of the floirtl icbleau Hotel, and the twnir.t eombloed clamor and elei,ar>cc in a most pleasing manner. Contestant!, including Miss Universe, mingled with the formally-drt tted guests, and floorlength BJOwna, long white gloves, magnificent jewelry, and escorts in tuxedoi made it difficult to realist that this was our town in the middle of the summer. The twc charities sponsoring the hall were the Auxiliary of the Human* Society and the National Multiple Sclerosis Southeast Floric.i t. hapter. Chain an for the evening was Mrs. l"'de Morse, president of the Ai liary of the Humane Society. Her gown was a full lengtl '-I lime chiffon worn with a pink satin stole. The colon beautifully set off her superb i>erald necklace. The organization's executive direc tor, Mrs. Dorothy White, chose an imported French fabric of sheer white metallic with heavy gold embossing, Co-chairman for the event was Mrs. Alexander Kogan, whose % %  n featured a fitted bodice of %  "lil satin with a pair of self-fabric diamond-shaped appliquts tt the neckline. Her floor length skirt was in silver, completely covered with silver sequin-., and the sequins covered wtth It.ng drop fringes of silverttsed cavier crystals. Her guests i-: eluded Mrs. Jules Channing, wttt wore a full-length gown with a black satin sheath skirt zvr. low scooped-oecklined hlouson bodice encrusted with costal treads. Her long-sleeved matching beaded jacket featured white i ink cuffs. • LJR( >imon Rubin chose a ^^ go!i brocade floor-length >heath ith an unusual modified haltt: tikline. Mrs. Max Bodennan's white silk crepe sheath was also lull-length, and topped with matching jacket styled in a capeletU effect. The jacket was beaut., y embroidered with gold sequins and lined with gold lam. Mrs. Milton Smith's choice -.as a floor-length black satin with shocking pink roses <>l r.i ; -"< velvet woven into the fabric. Her gown featured a high neckline in front and dipped to a decollete back. Mrs. Max Weitz wore a lilaccolored satin gown with a plunging "V" neckline. Her sheath skirt was encased in a shellshaped ovcrskirt. Mrs. Robert Weitz selected a white silk crepe sheath accented with silver-lined bugle beads at the neckline in a deep Cleopatra-style and at the hemline in a wide band embroidere.l horizontally. White Italian straw on net was worn by Mrs. Sol Cohen. The straw was embroidered in a floral motif on both her sheath and tapelette. White fox swirled around the capelette. beginning at the neckline and banding it across the bottom. White chantilly lace over muted gold was the choice of Mrs. Abbott Harle. Her full-length gown was high necked in fleshcolored illusion also used for the long sleeves. The tunic overskirt was in a figure-molding sheath. Mrs. Harry Smiths twopiece black silk organza was floor-length, with a flared tunic overblouse accented with an exaggerated bateau neckline of white silk organza. A full-length brocade sheath of gold, tangerine, pink and green was chosen by Mrs. Robert Koeppel. Her back pannier was in a modified court-train style. Mrs. William Pallot's color choice was Israeli verdant in a satin sheath. It was heavily jeweled at the neckline in red and green cavier beads and drop crystals. The jeweled treatment was repeated in a band which dropped slightly below the waist. f %  ulRS. Joseph Upton, just back %  from Paris, chose a magenta sheath almost completely covered with hand-embroidered turquoise crystal minatures. White chantilly lace over blush pink was worn by Mrs. Lillian Pass. The lace was rcembroidered with white silk ribbon lace and! iced with iridescent sequins. Mrs. Frances Beckerman's gown was in muted shocking pink with embroidered Italian lace at the neckline and hemline. A match-] ing colored satin band was! asymetrieally slashed from the neckline to the hemline. Wife of Miami Beach Mayor Melvin Richard wore a fulllength white satin gown. Her overblouse was embroidered inj gold sequins in a tear-drop de-, sign. Mrs. David Miller's floorlength sheath was covered with' iridescent pastel sequins and silver-lined bugle beads. It fol-i lowed the modified Grecian line of covering only one shoulder.' A warped silk taffeta of summer florals on white in a full-length sheath was the choice of Mrs. Donald Kaplan. Emerald green brocade in a two-piece ensemble was worn by Mrs. George Hirsch. | Her hip-length jacket and sheath were in a semi-Oriental styling. Mrs. Simon Hirschberg's sleeveless sheath was in a black Italian ribbon knit. Her dress followed the classic lines with a slashed bateau neckline. |u|RS. Norton Pallot's color %  choice was frosted gold.! Her fitted bodice was in alencon | lace with a high neckline, trim-! med with a small draped jabot, and with a dropped waistline.1 The same color continued in her | full chiffon skirt. Pink peau dc soie in full-length elegance was worn by Mrs. Neil Schiff. The overblouse fitted bodice was covered with crystal cavier beads and satin-lined bugle beads. White satin was the choice of Mrs. Martin Fine. Her floorlength gown was strapless, and heavily encrusted with satinlined bugle beads, rhinestones and pearls. Philip M. Klutznick, former international president of B'nai B'rith, visits the National Jewish Hospital at Denver to tour the hospital's $2 million Children's Treatment Center located in the B'nai B'rith building. Klutznick was in Denver to address a banquet given by Regis College. He is a former member of the United States mission to the United Nations and served as principal advisor on economic and social affairs. Brezin to Head Med Education Belous, Katzman In Private Rites Temple Beth Torah was the site of the marriage of Pearl Katzman and Bernard Belous on Monday evening. July 8. Rabbi Max Lipschitz officiated at the private ceremony in his study. The bride is the daughter of Mr.' and Mrs. H. Katzman. 873 NE 164th St., No. Miami Beach. The groom is the son of Mr. and .Mrs. M. Belous. 1918 Liberty Ave„ | Miami Beach. After a honeymoon in the moiin-l tains of North Carolina, the couple are at home in North Miami Beach. Board of Trustees of Mt. Sinai Hospital, at an Executive Board meeting July 18, announced the appointment of Dr. David Brezin to the post of director of medical education for the hospital. Dr. Brezin has been associated with Mt. Sinai Hospital since 1949, during which time he was one of the section chiefs on general surgery. A graduate of the University of Michigan in 1937, he interned at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C., completed his surgical residency at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, and was a Rockefeller Fellow in physiology research at the University of Michigan. He served five years as a surgeon in the Army during World War II in charge of general surgery on both General Hospitals overseas and Station Hospitals in the United States. After his discharge. Dr. Breiin moved to Miami, where for the past IT years he has been a general surgeon in private practice. Refresher Course to Start I Summer refresher course for students of the Beth Kodesh He-1 brew School will begin Monday! morning, Aug. 5. The summer | course will last for four weeks. > ^uttifegittas EEAUTY SALON WIGS H.J.+, Fashion Hair Pieces WOBIEM PIECES I •ssaeatiMa wi •••mm W COLLINS AVENUE W Ml 4-1224 Or ON S-?1S7 Arlene Ash Betrothal Told The engagement of their daugh-, i ler. Arlene Ruth, is announced by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ash. 4465 No. Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach. 1 The groom-to-be is Arnold Clif! ford Newman, son of Mr. and \ Mrs. Joseph New man. of New | Garden Hills. NY. No date has been set for the wedding. Marc Scott Rubin Arrives Here Marc Scott Rubin made Mr. and Mrs. Lcn Zilbert. 7800 Beach View Dr., No. Bay Island, grand-' parents for the first time. Parents are Mr. and Mrs. Murray Rubin, of New York and Miami Beach. Mrs. Rubin is the daughter of the Zilberts. Bris was performed Wednesday at Temple Ernanu-El. with Rabbi Irving Lehrman and Rev. Abraham Seif officiating. \ms CONVALESCENT HOME MIAMI'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOME built expressly for individual care of the convalescent, chronic and geriatrics patient. Completely air-conditioned • The finest nursing staff Spacious, garden-like grounds • Moderate rates Recreational areas indoors and outdoors Member National Geriatrics Society. SAMUEL E. REDFEARN. Administrator. AUTHORIZED DEALER SUNDAY EVENING, JULY 21th, AT 1:30 P.M. HOWARD BARLOW CONDUCTOR ROBERT MUELLER M LrJXT'S "Piaa* Concerto in E-FUt Majer 6UCENE DUBOIS. Violinist TIOKtTS $1.23 to $2.75 UM gym. Off.. MO 1-490; MB. And.. JE 1.0477; PKl.lf in Miami, FR 4-S1S1; Allegro Muie House in Coral Cables. "' H8'81; Harmony Music Shops in Oadeland and 163rd St. Shoo. Ctrs. Quality HEARING AIDS $50 to $285 Service AH Makes Bollcrin — Melds STANLEY GOULD 12M l.ii.C.n Rtld (at sites M.) Tests—Trsdei—Trials—Terms %  traits JE S-79U A-l EMnOrMENT DOMESTIC HOP DAY WORKERS Ph. PR M401 14601 Northeast 16th Ave., at W. Dixie Hwy. Miami 61, Florida LEO HOHAUSER PLUMBING CONTACTING • KIPAIKING Serving Deate County Over 25 Years 1811 S.W. 14th ST. HI 6-9*04 Cleaning-Laundry Storage 1201 20th Str.et Miami Beach JE 8-6104 OflN 7 AM. %  9 fM. Smme Omy Service Never An txtrm Charge.



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Page 8-B *L*,uJinnrkiiar) Friday. July 26. 1963 Rabbi Gross Back from Tour of Israel; Presses for Specially-Trained Teachers Knitting champs from the Bay Harbor area between the ages of 7 and 10 are seen pooling :;:?:: efforts 1o make an afghan for "some little patent" at Variety Children's Hospital. They ir.ae weekly with instructress Mrs. Si Cohen (ricjht'. a former Rockette, who now conducts knitting classes in the Trevi Building in Surfside. Seen preparing to hand in their sixinch knitted squares are (left to right) Patricia Linsky, Nancy Fisher. Leslie Oppenheim. Eileen Weinmann. Mrs. Cohen. Diane Koch, and Ann Rubin. Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principal oTtne Iii-brew Academy, relumed this week from a four week irip to Israel. During his stay. Uabbi Gross attended the ZOA .•onvention recently held in Jeruialem and Tel Aviv. At the education session held ast Sunday. Rabbi Gross present•d a proposal that a high school >e established in Israel which will ucommodate day school students l high school age. Hreported that "there art many graduates of high school* and day schools who would want to spend a year in Israel to learn the language and to become better acquainted with the problems of th State. "Such a high school would open I an important lane in the educa' tional bridge between America T Camps Press Active Programs %  oral i B. Spaet (right), vice chairman of the Metro Dade County '-or.'.mission, presents an "Award of Appreciation" to Robert L Turchin during last week's regular commission meetTurchin, recently elected to the Miami Beach City Council rjreived the award for "performing an important service :o the citizens of this area" during his membership on the sour.-• 5 buildinq contractors examining board from February, |959 5 June. 1S63. Opti-Mrs. Has Summer Program ,0'i -. Club of Miami Beach Ihi : elected to continue its i during the summer iricj The club is presently engaged in operatic a refreshiae%  ind ;n conjuncnon with the Chkago Club to Meet P-; ir meeting of the Chicago Cluii \ ill be held at 8 p.m.. Sunday, ii 'lie Cavalier Room of the Dei'. j Hotel. According to Hen'.apian, in ch.uge of arrange tents, some 200 persons are en>e: North Shore Optimist Club at North Shore Park during the Little League baseball season. Proceeds will be shared equally, with me men's half going to their club-sponsored Little League teams, and the women's share to the Opti-Mrs. scholarship fund for emotionally disturbed children. Opti-Mrs. first board meeting of the fiscal year will be held on July 30 at the home of Mrs. Murray Sonnett, president. 1360 Stillwater Dr.. when fund-raising plans for the coming winter season will be discussed, A trip to Israel, a hootenanny. and a Broadway show theme are among the special attractions on lap next week at the three day camps conducted by the YM and YWHA of Greater Miami, it was announced by A. Budd Cutler, presii ent. At Camp Shalom, conducted by the Beach "Y." the general theme for the week will be -Let's Take a Trip." for which each group will select a nation and then prepare decorations, food, dances and .-< ngg that are appropriate. As a windup lor this program, all of the groups will get together for the regular Friday afternoon joint program in the form of "A Trip to Israel.'" This week. Camp Shalom is featuring a nautical theme entitled "Davy Jones' Locker," including a water carnival and a trip to the Seaquarium. The boys and girls of Camp MaKaBee at the Miami "Y" will begin preparations next week for a camp hootenanny, camp show and art exhibit, which will be the climactic events for this camp during the final week of the season. With a general emphasis on all of the arts, there will be special attention paid to folk singing, folk darting, dramatics and fine arts. The camp show for parents is scheduled for Wednesday night, Aug. 7, and the hootenanny will close camp on Aug. ?. This past week, Camp MaKaBee was involved in a "Gold Rush" with the "Y" grounds turned into a western town. At Camp Noar. conducted by the North County "Y." the boys and girls v ill begin active preparations for the annual camp show set for Thursday evening, Aug. 1, for the entertainment of parents and friends. This show will take the form of a series of parodies on famous Broadway musicals. These programs are made possible throuuh the support the "Y" receives from the United Fund and the Greater Miami Jew ish Federation. ^nd Israel, about which so much discussion is taking place these clays—at every conference and convention." Rabbi Gross also met Abba Eban, former Minister of Education, and heads of teachers' training seminaries to discuss the prob lem of the acute Hebrew teacher shortage in the United States. He proposed that the seminaries in Israel prepare specially trained teachers fur the American Day School, with specific orientation of the American milieu and the American student. "American Hebrew education has its unique problems and requires speciallyoriented ann highly-trained teachers." he said. An enrollment oi more than 400 students is expected for the coming semester in the Hebrew Academy, which now has a nursery, kindergarten and complete elementary and Junior High Departments. "The Board of Admissions is meeting daily to review the students requesting scholarships. he said. "Many scholarships are being granted each year to needy and able students." Academy officials said this week Rabbi Gross also announced that a special class will be epeneel this year for Junior High Students who do not have Hebrew background. Flamingo Chapter Barbecue Flamingo Chapter of the American Medical Center at Denver will sponsor a chicken barbecue on Saturday evening at 973 79th Ter., Miami Beach. Program will include games and prizes. In charge of reservations is Mrs. Joseph Silow. Mcuifou* Stvno&t 'TU! %  ;..!•-( I *T • .|. ., I fit pSCAYX KVD I 16 I SO Mf*^ „ $ L'& pen 6:< normandie parkway ICOUJm AVt „ ] MIAMI HACH -Open 1.45COtAl WAr M lt I Open 6 45 Dr. Samet on Radio Dr. Philip Samet will discuss the "Relationship of Heart and Lung Diseases" on WIOD this Saturday at 11:35 p.m. The 25-minutc Heart Association-sponsored program will be moderated by Dr. David J. Becker, radio chairman Of the Heart Association's Public Education Committee. GREYHOUND RACING vor ^R^.w.;-*• Paddock Room R0o'O*t • A Ccr • oned Gtft> Movt* | • C0C*'O<> lounoo • Vo ft 9o*k


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Friday. July 26. 1963 vjewist) flbridFia/7 Tc.cje 9-B Couple Find Ireland Most Charming Adlai E. Stevenson, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, is awarded the American Jewish Committee's American Liberties Medallion for "exceptional advancement ot the principles of human liberty." Making the presentation at the Committee's 56th annual meeting is Jacob Blaustein, industrialist of Baltimore, and honorary president of the Committee. Blaustein. a former recipient of the Medallion, was a member of the United States delegation to the tenth General Assembly of the United Nations. Newly-elected Miami Beach City Councilman Hyman Galbut is tapped by the "Dr,ess. Right" Committee of the Men's and Boys' Apparel Club of Florida, the Men's Fashion Guild of Miami Beach, for this week's Golden Hanger Award. Galbut left) receives the award from Maurice Unqer (right), member oi the Board of Directors of the Lincoln Road Merchants Guild. Army Nurse Named by Home A former Army Nurse Corps Hirst lieutenant has been appointed director of nurses at Jack-on tanor Nursing Home in Miami, the 159-bed facility scheduled for official opening Aug. 11. Charles Gottlieb, president of he $1,000,000 home at NW 8th iA\ %  and I8t'i Tcr., named Mrs (athryn Fitzpatrick, of Miami, to fill the director's post. Mrs. Fit/pat rick, who has been a staff nurse for Eastern Air lines and the Dade County Pub lie Health Department in Miami. s< rved in Europe for three years during World War II. A graduate ot the University Of Pennsylvania, she was a nursing education major OP***' 1 *&**^*r* 1*0 For rea^ettona, •• y Trawl A***, or STIAMSHIP CO. Pier Me. 2. —** § "to*: SFlaJtor System) Miami 1, Florida • FRanM.n 9-3836 -70 yews %  k t n~ner tte.mihip erv.cojj A Miami couple, who spent one month touring Europe, are enchanted with Ireland. They have V.ood reason. Mr. and Mrs. Lester Rogers, of 840 NE 31st St., ilew to the continent on June 17, and traveled through Germany, Switzerland, Italy, England, and Ireland. "While we were in Rome," Rogers said, "we saw President Kennedy three times—all quite by accident. The last time, we yelled out: 'Florida voters here,' and the President, startled, turned around.'' "Next thir3 we knew," pretty Leona Rogers exclaimed, "Mr. Kennedy smiled at us and waved." Also while in Rome, the couple said, archaeologists uncovered some remains that are considered at least 2,000 years old. "And among them." Rogers explained, "they found symbols in stone definitely proving the existence of a. synagogue and a Jewish community there that far back." In Germany, the young Miami couple found "no scars of war anywhere."' The youthful Miami attorney was last in Germany from 1930 to 1952. "The changeover is fantastic. Prices of food and clothing are entirely comparable to those in the U.S. The people are so wealthy that they import people from Spain and Italy to do certain kinds of lesser labor." But it was ir Ireland where Mr. and Mrs. Rogers lost their hearts—and well they might. "In the first place," Mrs. Rogers said, who formerly worked for en airHno, "they genuinely love Americans. There's hardly a soul we met who doesn't have a relative in the U.S. And they all sound like Barry O'Sullivans." But the most important thing. Rogers recalled, was their chance meeting with Robert Briscoe, the Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin on two recent occasions, and who Dubliners are trank to confess, will probably make it again a third time. "He look us on a visit to the Dial—the Irish Parliament—and later in the evening invited US to his home for dinner.'' the couple said. "Right now, the Briscocs are most proud of their son. who has just won a scholarship to Johns Hopkins University." chopped liver an<: Khma'z.' Tht / were both absolutely Iov< Also in Ireland, ney -."up' with President Kennedy again, h had just bean given two benpzgry degrees, one Irom Trin.::. (Catholic), and one from National (Pr tc-stant). Recall the two diar • inns: "When the Presided w; asked what he would do at a J'ocbtJl game, he replied: 'I guefcs I' I just have to pray for T. ', ar i cheer for Nation: **' Religious School Register? ion LiSfCR AND LEON A RQGEKS Hebrew :,nd Sunday ScoooJ rei-.tration will begin z: Dad Mrs. Rogers noted that "Bris i Heights Congregation on Sunday, coe is intensely proud of being, ** *£ !" ^ in <^ ?£ Jewish, and when we left, both of them embraced us, saying: "Now you have a home in Ireland. Next time you come, we'll have noon. day through Wednesday. Aag, 1 to 21. from 7 to 9 p.m.. and agai I on Sunday. Aug. 25, from 9 to A NEW SERVICE AIRLINE TICKETS BY Raft All Any airline %  I Vint I 1M to anywhere 1. CALL TRAVEL UNLIMITED GIVE US YOUS DEST TION, NAME, ADDRESS AND TELEP-C\E JMEER. 2. YOUR TICKETS WILL BE SENT TO YOU BY rV ML. -: E THIS CONVENIENT SERVICE TO TRAVEL ANYWHERE. 3. THERE ARE NO ADDITIONAL CHARGES FC : MRl E TICKETS TO YOU IN USING THIS SERVICE TRAVEL -| f £> Ea 667-2546 ^^^^J Unlveralty National Bank Building UNLIMITED University National Bank Building -I190 South DIxlO Highway iAsst NEW HEALTH with every LUXURY Some people woirt •van/thing...ond find It of Tne Arlington! Swim In our new tempetature-oontrolled twi coicade pools, enjoy our potlo and sun deelai.. .dina on gourmet food.. .donee ond bo | antw1ained...o^lfonourrwol8-holeaiompionihipeourfeii. %  All iporti ond recreotlons In Hot Springs Including excellent fishing %  nd pWnly of exoitlng sight life with big nome enHrtolneraJn the neonSy Supper Clubs. Bath, awoy Oil yourocho. and patn, due to fatigue b. rb. superb botHhoue. right In The Arlington...roKevO %  %  nll'l. ortbrltU ond high blood pnwsure. Com. to the Arlington for Hoolth ond Funl < al ,.,.rtJ !" .WC*W.-W'. 6DSM .-5" n, A,li„ g to. He'*' H 0 SO-,, A.



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Page 10-B Although this is the season of the year for vacationing and relaxation, "business" qoes on as usual for a volunteer group of Temple Menorah members. Their usual working guarters is in the main Temple buildina, now under reconstruction, but they have managed to find temporary space in the Social Hall to carry on their important jobs. Pictured here are Goodman Lyons and Isadore Fischer, two members of the GoldenAgers which meets several times each week throughout the year to mend prayer books and inspect praye r shawls New E! Al Building Opens In Tel Aviv By Special Report Newest and tallest building in Tel Aviv is the 12 story, air-conditioned El Al Building, just completed and housing the reception, booking and cargo offices of the Israel Branch of El Al. The main motif of the bright and spacious new offices is a dramatic, white-sculptured concrete wall. The Israeli touch is evident throughoul in the materials used in the functional decor, and every component in the 12-story building, from the cement to the aluminum window frames, was jrade in Israel. A novel feature ol the Reserva-1 (ions Office is its own •"visual" Itlephone exchange, which imme' partment. is now open for members of the Temple. The school ing includes kindergarten through confirmation class in the 9th grade, and a High School Department which meets on .1 regular weekly basis throughout the en tire school year. Friday, Iu ly 25, 1963 Final Open Stake Saturday Fieht survivors from ftfl original field of 52 got the post at Flagler Saturday night in 'he '' na s ,l,o track's S25.000 G-eyhouiid Open Stake, with John (MMltl sonda ruling a strong favorite to take down the $12,500 dinners end of the purse. A triumph Saturday w Id swell her earnings to $35,000 UJ little more than ;. year of 1 ng and dive her her fourth ml W stake victory in lour tries. Her principal threa' in tne championship finals appear to be Jester Cole's Perfect Tip, winner of more than S20.000 ir. la jrearold career. F. B. (Hap:) Stulz Grumbler, and Musick I Spruclling's steady-going Cotto Boy. Next Saturday. Aug. S the -< C ODd of Flagler's rich stakes, the third annual S8O.0OO Int national Classic, gets under wa with a field of 49 competing over the 3 ths mile Flagler cou; ?. &f *'. AMERICAN ISRAELI Religious Stor-s Now ready to tokt order! *• your Synagogue. Bio selection %  • Tallesim, school cop* oid all i'royer Books lor High Holidays, "tease call S. Schwortz ot JE 1-7722 1357 Washington Avr* WANTED SALESMAN FOR PART-TIM = With Some Men's Go--ing Selling Experience THRIFT SHOF 7331 N.W. 27th A = Jacob Schachter's Yiddish Program ~ MONDAY thru FRIDAY 11:00 A.M. 12 Noon & SUNDAY 3:15 4:15 P.M. On WEDR-FM 99.1 MEG On Your FM Dial Now on Radio Station WEDR-FM, a new FM Station, Mr. Jacob Schachter, for over 30 years popular Yiddish Broadcast ing star, will enlarge his Yiddish program activities to a full hour daily. Mr. Schachter will also continue his broadcast ing on WMIE-AM, 1140, Sunday afternoons. Yiddish radio in Miami has taken a great step forward with the enlargement of Mr. Schachter's program. Now, Miami and Miami Beach Jewish population can hear the music they love every week day at 11:00 a.m. 12 Noon, Monday thr j Friday and Sunday at 3:15-4:15 p.m. on WEDR-FM, 99.1 meg. on your FM dial "The Voice of the People." NOW LIVE DAILY FROM THE BLACKSTONE HOTEL-800 WASHINGTON AVE, MIAMI BEACH



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Friday. July 26. 1963 W %  -** iigg, norSdliiciin Pcge-H-B = bbi Nathan Witkin (left), director of the National Jewish Welfare Board's Armed Forces Service Center in Balboa, Canal Zone, helps a young GI transmit a message home to the States via the Center's amateur radio station. The station, in operation for more than 10 years, has been hailed as an activity "unique value" with the "qreutest interest and need to the service man" by Maj. Gen. Daniel A. O'Connor, Chief of Staff of the Army's Caribbean Command. I hope Grandn flower X K Dignified, beautiful and reverently cared for surroundings for our departed loved ones are a source of very real comfort to all. Registration Tc!d At Ner Tcmid Ri .-iraiion for Hie ensuing JI ir in the Temple Ner Timid Hebrew and Sunday Schoola is now < pen at th.' Temple The office is available tor con sultation and registration each day, Slondm through Sunday. Membership to th.' Temple "ill once again permit children of members to attend Religious School and Sunday School without tuition. The Membership Committee, with Dan Piver as chairman, and! Joseph Sih crnian, co-chairman, has announced that the Temple ialso open now for High Holiday reservations. Rev. Gibson to Speak Rev. Theodore Gibson, president of the Miami Chapter of the NA.ACP, wjll be,.guest.speaker at a meeting of the Brotherhood of I Temple Beth Sholom on Sunday' at 10.30 a.m. David Drucker, chairman, said that Rev. Gibson I will discuss "Civil Rights and the Negro in Dade County." President is Dr. Harry Wolk. Rabbi Albert M. Shulman (left), national chaplain of the American Legion, arrived in Miami Beach this week to discuss patriotic and memorial phases of the 1963 national convention which gets underway here Sept. 6 to 12. One of his first tasks was to go over plans of the city's huge Convention Hall with Lawrence E. Hoffman, president and general chairman of the 1963 Convention Corporation. Chaplain Shulman is spiritual leader of Temple Beth-El in South Bend, Ind. Howard Barlow Due on Pops Podium Sunday Famed radio and television music director Howard Barlow Will return for the sixth successive year a guest conductor of the I niversity of Miami Summer Symphony "Pops" Orchestra this Sunday at Miami Beach Auditorium. The concert, which will feature the pianist. Robert Mueller and violinist, Eugene Dubois. is the eighth in the current series of I ten summer programs. Long a familiar figure on 'The Voice of Firestone" radio and TV series, Mr. Barlow has scheduled Massenet's Overture to "Phedre," SaintSaens' Bacehanale from "Samson and Delilah." the Brahms Hungarian Dances Nog. 5 and ti. and such popular favorites as Le-1 roy Anderson's -Belle of the Ball." 'Mine Tango" and "Fiddle Fad die, Al Datz' "Double Slop Polka, Deems Taylors "Through a Looking Glass," and symphonic impressions from Meredith Will son's "Music Man Mueller will perform Franz I iano Concerto No. I. Dubois, the l M Symphony Orches concertmaster, uiii b< ti red soloists in .',. ssenet's Meditation Horn "Thais." For many years. Barlow directed ami conducted the Philco Radio Hour, Harvest of Star-, and the Voice of Firestone Hour musical presentations. He has also conducted the nation's outstanding symphonic organizations, including the \ew York Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Detroit, Baltimore. Chicago and Los Angeles Symphony Orchestras. Louis August Felled at 53 Lou is Augu st, a partner in Au-j gust riVosrBakery of Miami, died' here Thursday, July 18. He was! 53. Mr. August came to Miami 40] years ago with his family, which founded the bakery in 1922. He was.a member of the Knights of Pythias and Beth David Synagogue. Mr. August is survived by his wife, Sara; two sons, Herbert and Nelson; and two daughters, Mrs. Francene Swart z and Miss Jane August. Services were Frjday. July 19, at Gordon Funeral Home. Morris Berk, 92 Passes Away Morris Berk, of 4301 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, died here Fridav. July 19. Mr. Berk, 92, came here 33 years ago from New York. He was an organizer and charter member of Temple Emanu-El. The organizational meeting of the Temple had been held in his home here in 1940. In addition, Mr. Berk was a member of Beth Israel Congregation, the Hebrew Academy, and Miami Beach District of the Zionist Organization of America. Surviving are two sons-, including Herman, Miami Reach, a daughter, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Services were Sunday. July 21. at Riversi.ie Uton Rd, lOth Rd, gervleei in MM4bMgn. Gordon. MORTENSEN, Mi'.. II.!.' of 2io NE 1*1 St. Ola*a. SCHAEFLER, Hlsraund .1.. f M ) llaritlnu Ave. Service* n Ne / H —i n n. OM*IT>. ewiiinil. M, SOHMER. Mrs. Evelyn, M23 Collins Ave. Services In .' %  • < 7or... Rtvi raid.. GREENSTONE, Bamoel i Ksa s\v I3nd St. Gordon. ROTHMAN, Jacob, 'II. Of '/ 211 Rd. Oh r.lmi. SCH LOS-SB ERG. Max. (0, Cer.ter Inland, <;..i li n Beac t • r ,-iiin Chicago. Riverside. GREENBLATT, Loull V < %  ( Dundee, ill., and Miami h Be vices In Skokie. 111. LEIFMAN. Fannli. 87, .-:' I oMns Ave., died July l;• Sen In B Paul, Minn. Rlvi n de. ROSENBLUM. Hurry B., I : mw iDr., died Jul] i Hfcrtford, ENGLANDER. Mrs Rose, • l|r8 Pennsylvnnlii Ave. Bi in D-troll Rl.. '•de, GINSBERG. Charles, 7S, .' S. 2nd St. s. i-vices in Bn Hlavberff. ALTERSON. Vufrust, r-". • 29 Bu<-liii Ave. .-. rvlces in I OUIK, Rlv.r-ld.-. GURFE.N. I ..uis. >.;. ,.f • ,, ,.,v vania A I %  -. Services I fork. Rlvei -i.I. LIEBMAN. I' i,. si \ >;. ', NVV I Mh Ter, Riversiile, PINTSCHUK, Adoluh, T I.V Lenox Ave. Sen lei si >ili ihn ron, Del. Riverside. STROLOVITCH. Mrs. Ai 12, of BS39 Lia> ne Blvd. Rl• WEISS. I ank, 83. of :-. ", 8 Miami Beach. Servlci keepsle, \ y. Blasbera GOTTFRIED. Mini-. 7S, M.. Mliiin B. ,. h, died J erslde TURCK. Mrs. 1-l.r. n. M -" N. Ba> H i -n. .1 July IT WEISS. Mrs llrnee, 70, Rl Ba> Harlmi .; -.. i .i ei -ill. I "Ugh2 Ml 1 RJVol 2s:t %  ; i">• %  ":< ,,.,., MO 1-7693 Optometrists Have Banquet The Dade < HI ty Optometric \--c i iii i-i uill h ild a banquet Saturd 13 evei ii n th • Cavalier 1 mi of ihe Deauville Hotel. Some *;< personi are expected by Dr. Jack Wolf, in charge of arrangements, able to Egypt. To Bar Aid From Aggressors WASHINGTON (JTA) The House Foreign Affairs Committee adopted this week an amendment introduced by Rep. Leonard Farostein. New York Democrat, which would deny aid to nations like Egypl uh.ch prepare for military aggression against neighboring Males. The amendment, as finally accepted by ihe committee, was less specific than the proposed Keating Halpern amendment, although its implementation is more strongly assured. The Keating-Halpern measure. ,iincorporated into yeai Foreign .\--istance Act. referred to nations being denied aid if they divert their own resources lo purchase of Soviet arms. The lieu measure, as ap\cil. makes no mention of So\ iei annsources. Rep. Farbstein pointed out that "although final determination must be made by the President, the guidelines of policy are set forth in the amendment.". He said his amendment was actually the strongest expression of Congressional opinion yet on military efforts outlawed by the amendment and should be denied aid forthwith. But he conceded that the State Department and the President may not interpret the situation that way. Rep, Farbstein cited to the com m it tee the latesl Soi iel Egyptian arms deal and Ihe rocket tests currently being conducted in The vote mi the amendment w as reportedly 22 to 7 Other committee members com mented that they did not regard ihe amendment a.soley appilcBeach Dentist, Dr. Firkel, 59 Services were held Sunday, July 2!, lor Dr. David K. Finkel, 59 .Miami r. i lentist, who die.l on July 19. Dr. Finkel was a 32nd decree Mason, member of Hibiscus Lodge, and a member of Knights of Pythias. He came here 17 years ago frc-n Pittsb .'rcth, and lived at 2855 Royal Palm Ave. Surviving are his wife. Mar garet; a son. Ted S ; three brothers, including Samuel, Miami Beach; a sister, and one grandchild. Services were in Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton Rd. TURKFL. Samuel, T\ nf 5S!i W Si ,ii..l hi \ SI, Rlvi I -Hi.BAUER. Tin -"I ri s BS, ..f ITOftl lMli Ave. S. -\ i-eM in Nyack, XV Rlvel -'-IBERKOVVITZ, I %  ...: %  !. S3, -t .-"• SW LEGAL NOTICE CERT FICATE O^ CORPORATE DISSOLL" Til M.I. TH VVHi'M SKXTS I'll. VI NVIIKItl VS, RICH II \ i! a: i vi >. i niiTlNO -' %  < VII i.i' > v n the : Ith ll'f : I.Vi I l!i 'i : -. I V \ %  f ; I -, %  :;,.-., %  • -' kmendi -. j-. 'HE VIIJ.Ai mi.I HIM INC. Illlrl hl-( i, le fill • • i i-ntai -. ~ %  %  >hu\ ei iiioral -II .V-.U |hl !.!.-. I |... State il.-s herebj ertlfj I ^..iiur and Mi.-u i i ..., %  ,.. !' %  %  IIIIIVIII, 111,.| (hi i*omplled with iv \\ r -M:SS HI In i. unto -. i mj hand ai rixi I th< i in .ii .--, al nl of Plo Ida, al T i < %  inii.il •>•!the .'Tin ,1 A.D., IM .ill Ti I.M \| I.\ \jSi en tan 'f SI RICHARD M SKIM.KR, I-:Ii ii Hialeah I -.-.;-. i ... in, u -i the fictltloi i %  %  i %  I VNAMAR -i IRF. .1 Ii n I -YNA.M \i: BOAT YARD nl ISS2 V VV So Rlvel irli • Miami, Kin., nt< nd tel -:• iM IKIIII. IVlth I Ii. i "Ii yk Circuit i '-.in i of 11 i" luntj. Kloi Ida. DYN \ M.II: IT>I:I' s ile i •" .i I.Ri I.N'ARD .1 l< VI.ISH lul'ont Rulldlnc, Miami, I i An.ii n. j for \|.|iti. .mi ... %  NOT CE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME Lvi'Ti.-i-: is IIKI;I:I:Y %  %  .,< iii. undei-Blaned, der rlna •• age In %  mini -s und< r the flctltln .• m • 'ASTI.KW. ml. I-I.VTI i: : : ,., v \\ 75th sn.. i. Miami to realMei wild n imi iih i [hi Circuit Court ..I I-. mtv, ii. .I Ida >SIT.I-:\\III ID INTERN i. c ii:i'. Iv: David l. s|. \ „ u HARRY Zl'KKRXICK Alt..in. •. f... i-'i I Incoln ii'Hi.1 Miami R. Hi II. I NOT.CE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LNOTICK IS II [{I 1 del %  j i ..-.%  inn!Ti K ..VITAMINS Ci .,i I, .1 ... r %  In ill Court of I I i il'l'.-' I HSO ifNT ("EN i-in: M. UARI !.s. %  N'Elt C UANNI1EIMEI! %  il.l. -. In.-. .'16 NOTICE OF .NTENTIC APPLY FOR CHANGE 01 Chancery No. 63C t I' \\ !i i || v Con Not .. iin i I., vtvi the inderalyned i' iiloni l .|-:i I'si 'il. some • i ne* as fi AR Y T A Y I.. i: .i n I .|".i "I'S. 11, mum i :i-i I rillM. TAYLOR whom nl.li-i -s I. .: "i M< i'ii .11 A %  the> NOTICE UNDER FICTIT. OUS NA.IL LAW NOTICE IS HKREHY OIVEN that Ihe mi.. l.ii-in. mi.ii i Ihi %  HOB EHM V.v.v CONS fill ITII i\ II s H I .\\enue. Ml-im Ihe 'l.-rU -.f it, i ".i. u| '. inn. l'i Ri UtERT IEHMAXM INC a I in: iila col HARRIS Rol Allm i „• %  'th I1 I '"Ii eili ral III Ml orlda Citj nl Miami Beiu 'i. I > • I i'i In int. ml to anjilv : iii HENRY I. I\I idito of the I"> • -iii Ti inn clal i t, n ami for Dade O n iii. Count) Court i lous ... lm k A .\l n th. 27th VtlBI9S3, "i a• i der .in" their nn l< Y I'KirSCIl .in i El '1 In UAHY TAYLOR nnd ETII LOR I" \\ Ii i Ii la M. it. r be kn Dated at \i i IJARV l>l I T.ETHEL DEl'TS I'.iiil.u \tti.i n, j HVMAN I' LiAI.l .'in I-. %  ii



PAGE 1

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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 26, 1963

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01799

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 26, 1963

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01799

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
iJewish Floridian
Combining THE JMISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 36 Number 30
Miami, Florida. Friday. July 26. 1963
Two Sections Price 2C"
Cabinet Crisis Avoided
As Peres Withdraws
Demand for Top Role
TEL AVIV (JTAi The pos- chit Avodah expressed satisfaction
; tiility of a Cabinet crisis over with Peres- withdrawal,
he (iemand of Deputy Defense
.Minister Shimon Peres for Inclu-
sion as a lull member of the Cabi-
Kt Committee for Security Af-
fair-, faded here when the olfiiial
withdrew his demand.
Mr Peres, a leading member
.I the "Young Turks" in the
Ifspai I'arty, who reportedly are
chafing a! the continued domi-
nanci of the older leadership dat-
ing back to the Mandatory period,
withdrew his demand in a letter
to Prime Minister Levi Eshkol.
The demand had been opposed by
the leftist Achdut .Avodah.
Mr. Pent asserted in his let-
ter that the Premier had given
him a promise for such Cabinet
committee membership "on the
evi ol my taking up office in
he present Government." Ach-
In his letter, Mr. Peres wrote
that "my decision does not arise
from the Achdut Avodah stand,
but because I wish to avoid dif-
ficulties. Achdut Avodah's argu-
ments cannot stand up to ex-
amination. The regulations on
which the party bases its case
Continued on Page 6 A
CITES SIX ABDUCTIONS
OK. MAX NUSSBAUM
. .. retlteft* preiidenl
HISTORIC-RELIGIOUS TIES
Golda Confers
With UN Chief
On Border Tiff
JERUSALEM Foreign tion. Six persons thi? ?
Minister Golda Meir demanded and three Israelis v ?. on the
Sunday night that the United Na- lake in a motor boat which hue.
,tions effect the immediate release apparently, been disabled Syrian
by Syria of six persons abducted I Army men and civilians ;.ded in-
Zionists Adopt Six-Point
Program at Israel Confab
f *v* *-* JbflsW
-^K-
LaaK 1 a' mm0'' i 1

by Syria on Israel's Lake Tiberias
a week ago. She made the request
in a conference in her office with
Maj. Gen. Odd Bull, chief of staff I
of the UN body. She warned that
Israel would have no alternative
1 but to react forcefully as Israel
has done in thy past if Syrian
armed forces entered the current
dispute.
The kidnaping occurred a week
TEL AVIV(JTA)A six-point declaration of modern Zionist prin- i ago. Sunday, it developed that
ciples was adopted at the closing session of the 66th annual conven-' United Nations military observers.
tion of the Zionist Organization of America, the first to be held in Is-;occupying an observation post in
rael. The 1.000 delegates also reelected Dr. Max Nussbaum to a sec- the Syrian hills overlooking Lake
ond term as president.
The declaration, setting forth I
guidelines for future ZOA activi-1
ties, declared that Zionism "rests
on the fundamental thesis, enun-
ciated by the immortal Theodor
Herzl, that Jews constitutes a
peopleone people" and that
Jews, whether living outside of
Israel or in it "are bound together
by historic religious and cultural
ties.
Tiberias, had witnessed the abeluc-
Sentencing of Russian Jews
Hit Sharply on Capitol Hill
to the water and forcibJj -.ragged
the small craft with its occupants
to the shore.
Mrs. Meir emphasizec' tc Gen.
Bull that the lake is entirety in
Israeli territory. She Stressed
the fact that there is ir Israeli
fringe of about 30 fee? c' land
on the lake's eastern i-t-t'ine.
so that there be no dee* that
the entire lake is within tit eel's
sovereignty. Noting Htet Israel
has permitted Syrian fishermen
to cast their nets on HM lake,
Mrs. Meir pointed out t-jt such
fishing was tolerated t Israel
so as not to endanger the liveli-
hood of the Syrian fishtr-tn, or
punish them for their ce.-try's
leaders' engagement if power
politics.
Syria's abduction fiu. prom-
inent ly Monday, when A .-ador
.Michael S. Comay, I>:; I pel 1118'
WASmNGTON-MTA)-Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York Repub- nent representative tu United
The Zionist movement is "can, drew the attention of the Senate this week to the Soviet trial 9 I JJSJ^JJJJi y Tha:' t. Kepre-
I been
SHIMM PlRtS
. premise unfulfilled

I he embodiment of this idea and 'our Jewt, three of whom were sentenced to prison, after Moscow trials
of the sentiment of the Jewish 'or selling home-made matzoth. All lour Jews were convicted by a
nation "Peoples Court" on charges of having profited from the sale of matzoth
prior to last Passover, but one-------------------------------------------------
The declaration said that Zion- was freed because of his age and ,;iaya Blvakhman 52, and Malka
ism also rested on the premise poor health. Brjo M ^ gix months ^
** .*. 'S^LrJ^JSZ Golko Bogomolny. a shochet. Kmil Kat2f 82, lhe so.cal,ed ..ng.
,sh people can only be assured ^ ^ a ^^ prjson ,erm ^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^
Continued on Page 7-A I Two women defendants, Klav- is an invayld Tne court ordered
that the four months already
spent in prison be deducted from
the sentences of the three who
were given prison terms.
Britain Sees No End of Mid-East Arming;
.Charge U.S. Opposes Bonn Scientist Exit
FEDERAL OUSTERS
Black Muslims
Losing Jobs
IGYPT UNVfHS NIW KOCKIT PAGE 2-A
I ONDON(JTA)The arms race the arms balance in the Mid-
_ i__i... die East. This, they said, is the
between Egypt and Israel can be JJ of'the\wo ,,,.-
solved only if a gcnesal agreement tivM s|nee notning h > f,r
to this affect is reached between ^nh done to bring about joint
the Western powers and the Soviet action on the part of the Soviet
Union British officials indicated Union and the Western power*
1 Mond,y. to put an end to the arms r.ce
"The civilized world cannot re-
main silent in the fact of this
act of the Soviet Government,
which is bound to stir up reli-
gious prejudice and dangers of
persecution," Sen. Javits told
the Senate. He said that "pro-
tests should be made by leading
citizens and organizations in all
countries where men prize free-
Continued on Page 8 A
'' \-iilNGTON

(JTA) The
Their observations were made
in connection with reports from
between Nasser and Israel.
Foreign office officials also
stating that Tuesday would stressed the fact that the Tripartite
"ii train Federal jobs. The ex- ,
11'tmi-ls ..... -:-----'------> *-------'
were dismissed from
Government employment because
red from the Soviet Union. \ been called off and is still for-
was Egypt's "Indepen- mally speaking, intact. At the
same time, they emphasized that
no one knows how effective this
agreement could be in any emer-
gency, adding that "this would not
be the fault of Britain."
Tuesday
aence Day" which was celebrated
, *------- ------------aence uuv v. men ir* w,.. .<
mey indicated their first allegiance wjth dispiav 0f supersonic Jet-
was to the Nation of Islam" rath- fi,,n(t.r^ Hussian-made air rockets
W than the United States. ,, Komar rocket ships of Soviet
Th<' Civil Service Commission make.
-led that the discharged cm- _
Ployee. declared that they would *" ^,|!. tt Jhe
'upport the "Nation of Islam" in j P?*****1 '"'. 2f sTJ
any conflict with the United States Uni S'V*' 'uTnritam. re 'departure of the German scientists
' mment. and would refuse to1 ^j^SJ^ e^ns.
Continue* en Pane 7-A we*pcm, with a view t. heepiet
A report from Cairo published |
here said that American diplomats |
in Egypt would not like to see the! |
Continued en Paige 5-A
SIM. 1AC0B JAVITS
tktm
sentations on that issUf
Continued on Pace i A
- -
APOLOGIES ACCEPTED
U.S. Overflight
Is No Incident,
Cabinet Told
JERUSALEM Government does not ..' th>
incident in which fo I nited
States weather SUTvej were
forced down over Israt. ;; .' diplo-
matic incident, Mrs. (. Meir,
Israel's Foreign Minis'. told the
Cabinet meeting Sundaj.
She said tha the e: of the
violation of Israeli ;: I Q on
Friday was a DtiSUlM anding.
pnd that the American i mander
11 the flight had given I apology.
Replying to questions. -< said
that ;in inspection of tl I grounded
planes proved that the p anes had
not photographed anything while
they were living over 1-:. 11,

(The State Departmcn* i Washington that the c ; '*: had
been involved in an ertvr, or a
misunderstanding of flictht plans.
State Department prx. officer
Richard Phillips said that the
planes had filed a flight ptan
that included a crossing ever !
rael, but that the planes tad net
Continued on Ppftc 3-A


Page 2-A
vjewist ncridlian
Governors Conference Pushed to Rights Ism
Tlie NaTional Governors Confer- larly for tea parties LjSn
cnce, meeting this week at the shuns controversy and responsib^-
Daawirte^otel orr-Wiamt^Mrt^i.r'^'her than'-. nataaaal forum
defeated a move by New York on important issues.
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to have But by the end of the eonfer-
a showdown talk on the civil jcnce 0n Tuesdav. a new vote of
right issue. .38-3 instructed the executive com-
u a a k mittee of the group to give top
The conference, headed by iori, during the year ahead to
Democratic Party chiefs of sta c. ^QiXi0Tk of civil rights.
\oted 33-16 to abolish the Resolu- Gq* winiam A Egan, of
(ions Committee of the confer- .la ence. In effect, this sidestepped ^ ^m ,he RepubiIcans against
the possibility of raising the con- abolition 0f the Resolutions
troversial civil rights question. |Commi|(ce .., {eel that segrega-
Repufalican Governor* here, \ tionists won a victory here today,"
headed by Gov. Rockefeller, i he said, adding that the issue of
charged that the convention hed civil rights was far more lm-
been "gagged." The Democrat-
ic stand was led by Gov. Grant
Sawyer (Dem.-Nev.), who press-
ed for me abolition of the com-
mittee-. Rockefeller had been
aided in his pressure for a
showdown by Gov. Mark Hat-
field, of Oregon.
Rockefeller charged that the
conference thus became "a gen-,
| portant than -politics."
Host to the convention, Florida
Gov. Farris Bryant, charged that
all a resolution on the explosive
question would do is "express a
composite opinion."
He said that "What I came to
the conference for is to learn
what other governors are doing
and how they are doing it ... to
tlemen's club which meets regu- learn how to be a better governor,
UAR Unveils New Rocket
By Special Report
CAIRO The United Arab Re-
public Tuesday unveiled several
new missiles at 11th anniversary
Independence Day ceremonies
here. Included among them was
a two-stage guided rocket experts
believe will be capable of reach-
ing Israel.
Gamal Abdel Nasser's parade of
power, beefed up by massive Sov-
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funds received from the United
States, was one part of the cele-
bration. Almost simultaneously,
Egyptian and Israeli fighter planes
clashed in a dogfight over the
Sinai desert.
According to government spokes-
men in Cairo, one Israeli plane
was shot down. But Israeli au-
thorities in Tel Aviv declared
that one MIG jet was hit and that
all Israeli planes returned un-
damaged.
From Jerusalem came a report
that the battle started when two
Soviet-made UAR jets crossed
over into Israeli air space near
Nitzana.
not a better congressman, or a
better president."
" Attacking 'the outcome of the
civil rights qoestior at the con-
ference, Gov. Rockefeller blam-
ed President Kennedy for alleg-
edly failing to line up Democrat-
ic support among the convening
governors. "It is incredible to
me," he declared, "that the
Presidentthe leader of the
Democratic Partydid not raise
a voice against the action of the
Democratic governors. He had
enough cabinet members here to
have his view made kr.own if he
had chosen to do so."
Applauding the committee aboli-
tion was Gov. Orval Faubus. of
Arkansas, who said it "cut off
needless and unnecessary debate,"
and that his state had no money
to send him to conferences "if
all they were to do was get into
matters of controversy."
Pro-civil rights Democratic
Party leaders, seemingly meeting
Gov. Rockefeller's charge head-
on, galvanized the convention into
its' vote to study the controversial
question following the appearance
at the conference of Vice President
Lyndon Johnson. The Vice Pres-
ident told the governors that "it
is wrong that taxpaying. arms-
bearing, vote-casting Americans
should be unable to find a bed
Albert Einstein Luncheon
Albert Einstein Group of Ha-
dassah was to host a dessert
luncheon and card party at the
home of Mrs. Charles Hersh. 831
NE 182nd St., No. Miami Beach,
on Thursday at 1 p.m. Mrs.
Maurice Rosenfeld, membership
vice president, said this was to
be another in a series of mem-
bership events aimed at introduc-
ing prospective members to Ha-
dassah.
for the night or meals for their
children along the highways of
ouriree and decent society
Added Johnson: "It is wrong
that Americans who fight along-
side other Americans m war
should not be able to work along-
Friday, July JS. 1963
side the sapxe Americans, wash
up alongside them, oak alongside
them, win promotions alw,g-i them, or ~end their children i|
sit in schools alongside the chil.
dren of other Americans."
The'K3 vote earne- afW Cov,
Rockefeller had tried to have the
conference form a special civil
rights committee to study the
question. The governors defeat-
ed his move 25-7.
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Friday; Wy. 28. 1S63
...... !
*JmistittcrMlan
-r , TEP Leaders Plan National Confab
prominent South Florida
sonalitics are now planning for
the national convention of Tau
Epsilon Phi Fraternity which will
be held at the Carillon Hotel, Mi-
ami Beach, from Aug 25 to 29.
Some 300 TEP's in the Greater
Miami area were to hold a com-
mittee meeting Thursday evening,
7 p.m., at the Carillon for finaliz-
ing all details of the convention,
with Sidney Suntag, national exec-
per-1 utive director of the fraternity,
expected to arrive here from New i
York to attend the session.
Tau Epsilon Phi has chapters at
Florida State University, Univer-
sity of Tampa, Florida Southern, i.
University of Florida, and Uni-1
versity of Miami.
Greater Mi-
ami members of tho fraternity
re Stanley C. Myers, Max Oro-
viti, end Aaron Ki
U of F and U of M chapters
will be hosts to the convention.
First chapter in Florida was at
U of F, established in 1927.
Jerry Greene, Frank Solomon,
Jack Furman, Ben Clein, Edward
Waronker, Stuart Biumberg, Mar-
tin Shapiro, William Iklchleir,
and Richard Kanncr, i^.fr/.ntior.s
chairman.
Heart Saver1 Due at Cedars
A new gadget, which tracks the The
heart beats of cardiac patients' an attendant will rush in and be-
and automatically stimulates the ex,erna,
heart if it fails, may save up to b
keep the patient's heart beating.
40 per cent of the heart patients
ho died while under hospital
.reatment.
The devices are being installed
at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in
four private rooms and linked by
wires to the central nurses' sta-
iion. Patients in the rooms will
have electrodes attached to their
chests, which will flash reports of
iheir heart action to the central
unit.
The unit will constantly rec-
ord the patient's heart action
and having a warning device
that flashes and buxtes should
the heart either go above or be-
low the normal number of beats
per minute.
Other prominent members here
include Judge Albert Dubbin,
State Rep. Murray Dubbin, Miami
Beach Councilman Bernard Frank,
Louis Heiman, and Sam Heiman.
A full program has been set up
for the convention here, with reg-
istration on Sunday. Aug. 25. On
Monday, there will be a business j
session in the morning, with a
Hawaiian luau scheduled for the j
moment the alarm sounds, evening. An award dinner dance I
will be held Tuesday evening.
Aug. 27. More business sessions
follow on Wednesday, Aug. 28,
with the final formal TEP ban-
quet in the evening.
Local committee in charge of
arrangements includes Aaron If.
Kanncr, general chairman, Theo-
dore Sakowitz, president of the
Miami Alumni, and Judge Sidney
Segall, Burnett Roth, Norman
Rutkin, Alex Jaret, Burton Kahn,
Jesse D. Schwartz. Jack Mintzcr,
A pacemaker, an electronic device
which stimulates the heart with
tiny electric shocks, also will go
into action immediately after the
alarm.
Hospital president, Harry L.
Lewis, says the unit, to be locat-
ed on the fourth floor of the hos-
pital, will Ik- ready Dec. 1.
Overflight
Apology OK'd
Continued from Page 1 A
.--.dually obtained clearance from
Israel authorities.)
The 32 crew members were taken
to the airport restaurant and given
lunch. The crew members and the
planes were released the same day.
Mnariv, an independent daily
newspaper, praised the Israeli Air
Force for intercepting the planes
and said that, while Israel had no
Utter friend than the United
States, it was appropriate to re-
mind the United States that friend-
.hip was one tiling and violation of
Israel's air space, another. The
daily added that Israel's meteoro-
ugical services were quite affec-
tive, and its weather reports read-
ily available to American meteor-
logista without the need for them
1o send planes into the sensitive
Middle East area.
The llerut newspaper comment-
ed that "we cannot escape the im-
pression that the civilian planes
nli photographic equipment that
lost their way' in the skies over
ihe N'cgev came with the intention
of making sure that we were be-
having ourselves."
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i


Page 4-A
vJewistiFlcrkflan
Friday. July 26. 1963
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications'Miami TWX
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FRED K. SHOCHET..............Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLrN.............................'.Executive Editor
JELMA 1M THOMPSON.........:As*t to Publisher
ISRAEL BUREAU
Sheraton Hotel Td Aviv, Israel
AY U. BINDER__________! Correspondent
Zionism Needs
An Audience
The program set forth by the
Zionist Organization of America
at its convention in Israel was
predictable. The many state-
ments, including those recogniz-
ing the Zionist movement as a
major asset to Israel in her role
as the "pivot of Jewish destiny,"
have been made before.
But Dr. Emonuel Neumann,
member of the Jewish Agency
executive, hit the nail squarely on
the head when he warned:
"It will not be enough for us
to regard ourselves as teachers
and preachers of Zionism, leaving
the hard task of fund-raising to
others."
This is perhaps the first time
that a leading Zionist has publicly
coped with the problem prin-
cipally ailing the Zionist move-
ment since the establishment of
the State of Israel. The sad thing
is that the problem does not, in
fact, stem from an inherent weak-
ness in Zionism, itself; the weak-
ness is rather an overwhelming
symptom characteristic of the
American Jewish community as
a whole.
Nevertheless, as such, it reflects suffici-
ently on Zionism to have left the movement
crippled and near-abandoned for something
like a decade or more.
What Dr. Neumann's warning recognizes
is that American Jewry's most vital leadership
interests are rooted today in philanthropic en-
deavor in the kind of projects mainly con-
cerned with overseas immigration needs to Is-
rael, institutions in Israel, and Israel herself as
a national Jewish homeland. It was, through-
out the years, the major task of Zionism to sup-
ply the ideological impetus for the establish-
ment of the Jewish State. Once having
achieved this, it has lost its significance to
other organizations dedicated to more imme-
diate goalsthe nurturing of the Zionist dream
now fulfilled.
It is to Dr. Neumann's credit that he rec-
ognizes Zionism must also begin to lend a hand
in the nurturing process. The American Zionist
movement's more important task may be teach-
ing and education in the principles of modern
Zionism and Judaism, but without an audience
there will be no one left to teach. This is what
Dr. Neumann means.
The Jewish norldlsn does not e-uarante* the Roahruth
of the nii-i vhandfaw- advertised in ite columns.
SUBSCRIPTION flATtl:
Local Area .
One Yeir *00 Three Years 110.00
Out ef Tawn Upon Bequest _____
Volume 36 Number 30
Friday, July 26. 1963
5 Av 5723
Committee. Said Gov. Bryant: "What I came to
the conference for is to learn how to be a
better governor, not a better congressman or
a better president."
This may be an oblique slap at Gov.
Rockefeller's motivations, but it suggests that
Gov. Bryant believes only congressmen and
presidents should be concerned with civil
rights.
All of us should be concerned with civil
rights, particularly men in such high executive
position as governors. For on the proper solu-
tion of the problem depends our future as a
free nation based on respect for the principles
of liberty that are inherent in its foundation-
stones.
-i
Respect for Principles
It is sad that the Governors Conference,
meeting on Miami Beach, has taken the low
road to the detriment of the advancement of
civil libertarian endeavor in our nation as a
whole.
New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller has
made the civil rights issue virtually his own.
The difficulty here is that it magnifies the polit-
ical implications of the issue beyond its far
more humanitarian no less than constitutional
considerations.
For what has been achieved is a presum-
able ideological statement between me Gov-
ernor and his principal contender for the GOP
nomination in 1964, Sen. Barry Gold water, of
Arizona. Nevertheless, Gov. Rockefeller
achieved his purpose: he look the lead in
pressing for an all-Governors' position on the
status of civil rights today; that be was denied,
did not in fact hamper his more immediate
political goal.
Adding to the confusion was the statement
by the convention's host, Florida Gov. Farris
Bryant, who joined the general Democratic
move to duck an open discussion of civil rights
by abolishing the conference's Resolutions
The Ninth Day of Av
The observance of Tisha B'Av, the ninth
day in the Hebrew month of Av, will begin
here Monday evening and continue all day
Tuesday.
The day is traditionally marked by the
reading of "Kinot," the Lamentations from the
Prophet Jeremiah, and is one of the darkest in
Jewish history.
On Tisha B'Av, the first temple was de-
stroyed in Jerusalem in 586 B.C.E. According
to tradition, the second temple was destroyed
the same day in the year 70 C.E. To mark'the
occasion, synagogues throughout the world
will dim their lights; and fasting men will re-
move their shoes, seat themselves on benches,
and mourn the occasion.
The American Diplomat
The American diplomat abroad quoted
this week to the effect that the U.S. taxpayer
has a "very cheap deal" in the Middle East
should be withdrawn as quickly as possible
.u I j jP decd" to whk* te refen are
the hundreds of millions we are pourinq into
Nassers coffers to encourage him away from
the Kremhn. The "deal" is a phony, as Nas-
3 X A1*? GS' ?nd ,her laments Proves.
But the diplomat's high undiplomatic talk is
also a slap at Israel.
ri-hft ^ H V WOuld Perfectly all
right to push Israel into the sea in a mass
accommodation of Nasser's ultimate goal
order to maintain a purpose that the UAR chief
has long since abandoned-friendship with the
'
Gentian Prosecutor Who Called
the Shot is Mow Under Fife
By JOHN DORNBERG
Frankfurt.
(F THERE'S ONE thing the Germans can't stand it's to be told
they are incorrigible, are still anti-Semitic and would -probably
welcome Hitler again if he were to reappear on the scene. When
this charge is leveled by an outsider, it is usually waved off haughtily
as blind jealousy on the part of those who begrudge West Germany
her booming economy and flowering export business.
The same allegation, made by a German, usually results In his
ostracism as a Communist or tool of the East. And if that German
rare as such cases arehappens to be a prominent public official,
he'll soon find himself the object of a full-scale government invest i-
gation and the target of a barrage of tenomous criticism.
This, in essence, is What Is happening to Dr. Fritz Bauer, the
Trosecutor General of the State of Hesse.
Bauer. Hesse's highest ranking legal authority, has made a
name for himself with his relentless pursuit of ex-Nazis, his search
for war criminals-in-hiding, and his outspoken views on such subjects
as resurgent anti-Semitism and teaching German youth more about
the Third Reich.
PMMcnMH or nun mewtmm days'
He HAS PLAYED a major role in preparing the case for the gov-
ernment in the massive Auschwitz concentration camp trial ex-
pected to come up in Frankfurt later this year. At the height of the
Spiegel magazine crisis last November. Bauer was virtually the only
jurist to stand up and criticize the federal government's actions. In
a widely distributed article, he sharply attacked the archaic Ger-
man security laws which enable the government to bring treason
charges against virtually anyone on the slightest pretext.
The other day. a Danish boulevard paper. B.T., published an
interview with Bauer. In it he was quoted as saying that if Hitler
were to return to the German scene today, his "one hundred days'"
would last a great deal longer than Napoleon's.
"If Hitler were to reappear in Germany today, the German
people would not reject him." he was quoted as saying. 'T doubt
whether Germany's young democracy would be strong enough to
resist him.
"I don't think you could persuade a German today to give you his
real opinion of Jews. Although there is no Jewish problem in Gcr-
many, anti-Semitism still glimmers underneath the surface. The
dominant influence of the Jews in Germany's economic and cultural
life has been broken. But the hate is still the same. Today people
wouldn't say 'pig' to a Jew in Germany. They merely say, 'we for-
got to gas you'."
: : :
A DEFAMATION Of GERMANY
QNE DAY AFTER news of the published Danish interview reached
*' Germany. Bauer was a man on the run. Insisting all the while
that he had been misquoted and that statements attributed to him in
the interview had been invented or taken out of context, Bauer iie^l
came the center of a swirling controvery.
The German federal government expressed its "indignation'
over Bauer's remarks. The leader of the Christian Democrats (CDC)
in Hesse. Dr. Wilhelm Fay. demanded the immediate suspension of
Bauer, a Social Democrat (SPD).
Willy Meyer, interior minister of the state of Northrhine-WH -'
phalia, and a spokesman for the Free Democrats (FDP). Germany's
third party, described Bauer's remarks as defamation which would
harm Germany's image abroad. "The spirit of democracy,"' said
Meyer, has never had deeper roots in the German people than DOW."
Even Bauer's own party, the Sl'D. took potshots at him. Franz
Barsig. the SPD's official spokesman, said the prosecutor generals
statements represented a 'distorted'' view of conditions as they reallv
are in Germany.
At the weekend, an investigation by the Hessian state parliament
was pending. All Bauer could say, other than reiterate his claim
that he had been misquoted, was to emphasize that the Danes, alter
all. were not ignorant of conditions in West Germany. "They know
very well what is going en here," he said. "No one has to tell them
anything about us."
Support for Bauer came as usual onlv from a handful of
liberal newspapers.
! ? .;.
PROSECUTORS DAYS MAY BE NUMBERED
JHE FRANKFURTER RUNDSCHAU, for example, said that Ger-
many, like some uncivilized tribe in deepest Africa had devel-
oped a "cult of unreliability."
"Certain subjects, discussion of which is essential to the creation
oi a self-sufficient democratic society, are taboo in the Federal Re-
public said the paper. "Anyone who dares to violate the taboos will
jeopardize his entire social position." The public reaction when they
are violated, said the Rundschau, is one of hysteria.
The issue in the Bjuer case, said the paper, was not whether
or not the- prosecutor general had made the remarks, but the
WCt that the story in the Danish daily touches on matters wh.ch
no one in Germany wants to discuss.
KWhil.eu,hcre is no "Jewish Problem" in Germany today, primarily
Because there are so few Jews and those who do live here are packed
uuSfESEL L fragilc trcasur<*. basic feelings have not changed,
said the Kundschau.
ulos hC0iiSfn?w !&iW with oursflves. Lets overcome the ridic-
heads ih" K ht'? (:crmany's im*8e abroad by sticking our
ii. m<.J i Sa'd ,hc paper But oth("r ,han ^ted cdi,or-
iais like this outspoken example, there was little support of Bauer.
dsred toProSt0r- generals *. *e those of others who have
mimbered ^ f th"r apathv and ,heir ^ may be
THOSl GERMAN XimiStS AGAIN
JUe!rtCAIJ.AN the West Gcti Government do about its rocket
Bund>^PChnLSChmid' ,he Social Demcratic vice president of the
Jieves wha, thTr *" made more ete Mtlon. He be-
M of the cderaT!2E T ding EW* ^tion <* ***
designed^rtE foTthl WhiCh eXpr<,SS,-V Prohibit8 any acHOn
the peaceful retail h PWPOSe disturbi" 'he peace, disrupting
of akgressTve war nS betWCcn nations or fading o the preparation


Friday. July 26. 1963
...
+Jewish fhrMton
"Page 5-A
Deep Flaws Beneath Mirror of Nasser Progress
By Special **Pr ^ ^ eial. educational and health fleWs,"
Disease-ridden poverty." an ariAy'^"-"*t*Wson s,a,os m,t a<,Ms:
"StJrely. there are new and mod-
ern
ol illiterate unemployed, a bread-
onions and-tea diet, and a sltaky
economy bolstered by maSsrve for
eiyn aid those are {ft factor*
that tarnish the gHttering picture
ol an Egypt snpp*' The fads behind the facade are
buildings in Cairo for the
weafthy btrt in the mrarters where
fherreat ma#>rity of CafrO's ahoot
J.fJWi.OOft inhabitants live, one rs
happy if one' can btty a pair of
sfro?s and some European etoth
Hn*. Thv diet corfsfsts of a few
contained in a ne# report pre-jP^ce? r friTit *"& bread: the pfo-1
pared by the World Jevrfcth Cori-lP* ,,vc in tmbeflevaMy crowded i
gress in New Yof k. TfrWt are | ^"^-V ; ;
some of the facts the v?JC survey : Tm? 2.0DO,flTO population today
reveals:
7C" of Egyptians cannot read
01 write.
80% of Egypt"s males are
physically nrifft for mifftaTy serv-
ice.
After 19. their heatfh declines
J C rapidly that they are old by 40.
Egypt's 20 million fellahin
(peasants) use basically the same
primitive type of tools as their
ancestors 4,000 years ago.
The bulk of Egypt's work
force is happy to get the legal min-
imum wage 60 cents a day.
Agricultural development can-
not keep up with the population
growth.
Industrial development is ham-
pered by bureaucracy.
The report, prepared by Dr.
Nehemiah Robinson, director of
the World Jewish Cor/jress In-
stitute of Jewish Affairs, and
based on reliable sources, ana-
lyzes the situation of Egypt since
Nasser came to power and notes
that both Washington and Mos-
cow have committed consider-
able sums in economic aid to
Cairo in recent years. Since
1952, the U.S.A. has supplied
Egypt with about $900,000,000 in
economic aid, with a similar
amount provided by the USSR.
In addition, Moscow is esti-
mated to have supplied, since
1955, $700,000,000 worth of arms
to Nasser.
compares Vrith 23,000,000 in I99.
infl Ifl.flOW.OOO m 1947. At the
of {here win be twice as many Egyp-
tfanfs as there are now.
Bot while the population has
agrfeutfure has not kept pace.
The cultivated area has increas-
ed only by 15% so that wheat
production per capita dropped
from 90 kilograms in 1942 to 50
in 1962. The agrarian reform
carried through by Nasser has
not done much to improve the
lot of the Egyptian peasant who
constitutes three-quarters of the
population.
Or. Robinson describes Egypt
as*"an "officer state" *"afclmin-
istrared by and through "and, in
a sense, for the officers. The
army is Nasser's ally, his con-
stituency and probably also his
boss. It has been the regime's
foundation. It has penetrated
everywhere." There is a 300,000-
man bureaucracy "inefficient
and slow-moving. Since the
whole economic life is now state
regulated, this inefficiency and
slowness must impede whatever
progress could be madeV'
Cairo where they receive,
sumably funds to continue
fight against Ben Bella."
The WJC report states that Nas-
iser's skillful propaganda has made
liim "the hero of the Arab world,
| although this propaganda is ap-
parently more successful abroad
than in Cairo." When the recent
Arab Union Charter was signed
, there were only 2.000-3.000 per-
sons on Cairo's streets instead of
the 40.000 "dehrtons demonstra-
tors of which the Cairo papers
I boasted." The crowds in Damas-
cus and Baghdad were larger and
! more enttmsiastit.
Although. Dr. Robinson states,
Nasser's 'hereditary enemy is Is-
The World Jewish Congress
report compares the patent mis-
ery of child labor (at the "age of
six, seven or eight" Egyptian
children work for eight to ten
hours at a stretch in the blazing
sun. .") with the country's mil-
itary might: a standing army of
100,000, "a luxury which a poor
country like Eygpt cannot af-
ford ."
ians, French,. Greeks, Swiss) which
had so greatly contributed to the
culture and economy."
Today in Egypt only the official
_rc. i line is tolerated "although no open
. terror is seen. Repression is muf-
r fled and usually bloodless, but
thrcugh political control and police
surveillance, the opposition is ef-
fectively stifled."
The World Jewish Congress
pamphlet, distributed to the or-
' ganization's global executive, is
'entitled "Nasser's Egypt A Re-
'port on the Present Position.-'
Gittelsons at Silver Springs
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Git-
. I telson and family, of 970 NE 172nd
It notes the ineptitude of H U were rccent visltors at ejj.
administration and describes the : ver Springs, Fla., where they ex-
dictatorial atmosphere in a coun- plored the site on a glass-bottom
try which has thrown out all "for- \ boat. Gittelson is education di-
etgn elements (Jews, British. Hal- rector of Temple Beth Torah.
See No End to Arms Race
Continued from Page 1-A
helping Nasser to develop his rock-
et program. According to the re-
port, the American diplomats in
Cairo feel that this might under-
mine the Western influence on
then turn
clinicians.
thousand years except that the end
, is now made of steel. The prim-
| spade, barrow or cart. The prim-
itive plough is the same as seen
ton the thousands of years old
murals, except for the steel share."
Turning to Nasser's efforts to
: spur on educational development
! programs. Dr. Rbbinson notes that
even if Nasser's claim is correct
But with all the help. Dr. Rob-' that he is building schools and
inson notes, "Egypt possesses no clinics in the rural areas at the
reserves. A country of some 28 i rate of one a day, it will take 40
million people, she has a foreign years to meet the needs of Egypt's
exchange reserve hardly exceed-! rural population located in 14.000
ing seven million E g y p ti a n villages, at the country's present
pounds." At the end of World War population figures'At present over
II. Cairo had a credit of 450 mil- .70'.; of the population cannot
lion pounds sterling in London. | write. In Cairo alone there are I
"Egyptian propaganda and some 825.000 illiterates. The Minister I
reports in the foreign press paint. of Education has reported that
a bright picture of Nasser's ac- most young people leaving pri-
eomplishments in the economic, so- Imary schools are almost illiterate.
Golda Talks to Truce Chief
reel and the Jews at large, "he
The fellah, the Egyptian peasant, 'does not relax his war of nerves I Nasser, shire he might
('wells in "houses that are almost j towards all his Other enemies, in j to Moscow for Soviet te
the same as they have been for; particular the Western imperial-
thousands of years, made of crude is,s and the Arab and Moslem re-
bricks mixed with mud and straw, gimes which are not willing to
or shanties fashioned from scrap i submit to his proclaimed policies."
and flattened cans. They are I Nasser's foreign policy is exemp-
filthy and littered with droppings lified by his professing friendship
from livestock living in the same fr President Ben Bella of Algeria
shelter as their owner. The fel- cn the one hand and. on the other,
lah's working tools are the short- welcoming Ben Bella's enemies to
handled hoes, the same for four
One American diplomat In
Cairo was quoted in the report
as stating: "We have an influ-
ence here and a presence and
that is worth something if you
are trying to keep the peace.
What is more, the Middle East
is a very cheap deal for the
' American taxpayer. That is why
I anything which upsets the area
! like the attempt to bar Ger-
man scientists must be care-
i fully examined to see what its
effect may be on stability in the
! rea."
A Moscow report by the Soviet
news agency. Tass. on Monday, re-
1 vealed that Soviet technicians are
to start work soon on a new, 740-
; mile network of high-voltage elec-
tric transmission lines in Egypt.
The lines will stretch from Aswan
,to Cairo, and from the Nile to the
JRed Sea, the Tass report stated.
I HAVE HEARD
ABOUT
Continued from f age 1-A
made to the UN last week on Is-
rael's behalf by a member of Is-
rael's permanent mission. Col.
^faacov Monbaz.
The Comay-Thant conference
had been scheduled prior to the
development of the latest Syrian
incident, since Mr. Com ay is about
to depart for a month's stay in
Israel to consult with his Govern-
ment about issues to arise at the
next session of the General As-
sembly. The latter body will open
its annual, regular session Sept. 17.
Com ay was to leave for Israel on
Wednesday. In addition to discus-
sing the Syrian incident, the Israeli
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diplomat and the UN chief talked
ISO about other current Middle
Cast problems in general.
At the same time. Comay pre-
sented to Than! the new Israeli
deputy permanent representative
to the United Nations. Yoel Bar-
romi.
Barromi, born in Italy, and hold-
ing doctorates in jurisprudence
from Rome University and the
Hebrew University, emigrated to
Palestine in 1939. served during
World War II in the British Army,
served in the Israeli Army in 1948-
48, and later held posts in the Is-
rael Foreign Ministry as head of
the Latin American and Western
Affairs desks.
METRO RIGHTS
FEDERAL RIGHTS
STATE RIGHTS
BUT VERY
LITTLE
ABOUT
CITY RIGHTS
NOW IT'S
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END OIL CHANGES
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WITH A
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You Buy this Miracle Filter with
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Replacement Cartridge Can Be
Bought at Your Corner Crecer
for 15c.
D/ST/BUrfD BY
Morton Schoenfeld
PI 84991
660 W. FLAGLER ST., MIAMI
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
Mr. & Mrs. John Q. Public


Fsgo 6-A
vjewistifkrkfian
Friday. July 26, 1963

The
Red Split
By MAX LERNER
Beach Dentist
At Convention
In Jerusalem
By Special Report
the
Dr. Meyer Eggnatz, past presi-
dent of Alpha Omega Dental Frat-
i crnity, is at present in Israel as
' a member of the Alpha Omega
Fraternity Pilgrimace. which is
Bellaio Italy I holding a convention in Jerusalem.
No verse setting could have been imagined for the opening of; He is accompanied by his wife.
. Simo-Russlan peace conference than the one that the Chinese and Alpha Omega has chapters
3 -sum k'vJers have provided lor it. If they had calculated on wreck-! throughout the United States and
in* it from the start they could not have acted more destructively. | Canada, and 85 members are par-
The Russians, through the recognized Communist principle of ticipating in the pilgrimage.
press control, refused to publish the text of the 25-point Chinese man] Alpha Omega, together with the
lc-to. The Chinese, through the recognized Communist principle of. Hadassah Women's Zionist Or-
a;;>eaUiig over the heads of the enemy leaders to the rank and file, ganization of America and the He-
tried to distribute their manifesto to the Russian people in leaflet brew University of Jerusalem,
form. The Russians gave the only possible Communist answer to this established the Hebrew Univer-
tactic: tti> expelled five members of the Chinese embassy staff from J sity-Hadassah School of Dentistry.
Moscow, j"d published an attack on China in a speech by Khrush-jThe fraternity is now providing
c.uv to the Central Committee. The Chinese resisted the temptation $1.5 million to erect a new dental
t Kuttte tiie meeting, and sent their delegation to a peace confer-1 school as part of the Hadassah-
eoce which can only be a stage for a battle of dogma and programs. | Hebrew University Medical Cen-
It mi !t be clear now, if it was not earlier, that the Chinese-Rus- ter complex,
v 1 break lias gone beyond the point of no return and has become
irrepai 111 The dialectic of history has operated in the Communist
W'Tid just a> sharply as I.e.111 used to say it would operate in the
(. italist domocratic world, and has pitted Communist power against
Communist power in a war of conflicting' imperialisms. It is highly
unlikely that actual military conflict will break out between the Rus-
.r.. n ami the Chinese imperialisms. But short of military war this is a
frctricufal struggle, a bloodless but no less intense battle of dogmas.
"The new dental building is
making wonderful progress,"
said Dr. Eggnatz, of 500 South
Shore, Dr., Miami Beach, when
he visited the Hadassah Medical
Center. "Today I can say that
the dream of the Alpha Omega
Dental School has become a real-
ity. With the new facilities
which this building will provide,
I am sure that within a few
years the dental school in Israel
will become one of the leading
centers of teaching and research
in the Middle East."
Dr. Gilbert Robin, president of Alpha Omega Dental Fratern-
ity, Prof. Ino Sciaky, principal of the Israel School of Dentistry.
Dr. Marvin Goldstein, president-elect of Alpha Omega, and
Dr. Meyer Eggnatz, past president of Alpha Omega, visit the
new building of the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of
Dentistry founded by the fraternity.
Kn'-iSchev's speech to the Central Committee of his party lead-
[. lifted last bit of the secrecy curtain that had recently shroud-
t -fie Chinese-Russian bitterness. From this point on no formal peace
c mmunique* which seeks to gloss over the points of conflict can be
t: sted.
An observer, writing reflectively from the distance amidst the
r cefulness of this Italian lake town, takes some risks in trying to
si m up i hat the Chinese-Russian break may mean. But the risks are) During the convention, the 1963
v I dental pilgrimage was given a re-
Item The confusion in the Communist camp today is more in-|ception by Eliahu Elath. president
tense sod more widespread than it has ever been in the history of of the Hebrew University of Jeru-
w rid OWE lunism. It reaches to every corner of the world, from Al-'salem.
I and Romania to Korea, and from Indonesia to Cuba. Its inten-j The Hadassah-Hebrew Univer-
.-.-!,.,: that it cannot be contained by any peace conference. And.isitv Medical Center built and
I n more important, the confusion is growing, and it is likely to be- maintained by Hadassah the
C. is a good deal greater. | Women's Zionist Organization of
Item :.' has been said in some of the Western commentaries that America. is the largest medical
x are tfc-flfc Ibis is the best way of putting it. World communism may even-
t. .Tty become plural, but at this moment the most notable thing
a out it is :hat it is dual. True, every Communist country and every
communist moment has problems of its own. But within the frame
c" the Ci'.iiiese-Russian conflict these problems are being polarized
: iDd t>i? two great poles of Communist struggle.
Item: The struggle has come earlier and in a far more severe
form than any expert on communism had expected or foretold. The i.
eces-i of the Russians in rocketry and science and the prosperity CriSIS IS AVCrtcd
Democrats Will Meet in Gables
Coral Gables Young Democratic
Club will meet on Monday. 8:30
p.m.. on the second floor of the
Coral Gables Federal Savings and
Loan Assn.. on Andalusia Ave.
Election of officers will be held,
and a discussion of the forthcom-
ing campaigns is also on the
agenda. President Ainslee R.
Ferdie will report on the Dad
County Youns Democrats.
All persons between the ages of
18 and 41 who support the Deni I
cratic Party are eligible for mem
ber.ship and invited to attend
New members include Richar I
Black. 3408 Toledo St.. Corj,
Gables, and Jay J. Lewis. 693
Tordera, Coral Gables.
complex in the Middle East and
embodies the latest ideas in the
design of hospitals.
Peres~WJthdraws ,
Top Job Demand;
*\
c: their economy seemed to make their position inside world com-
rr_ni.sm pregnable, and the youthfulness of the Chinese Communist
state led o servers to believe that its challenge would not come for!
i.' sther de-cade. They have been proven wrong on both counts.
Continued from Page 1-A
are not constitutional but a mat.
ter of convention which can
easily be changed.
Hem: The reasons behind this struggle are in part rationalist:
Russians have been following their own national interest and i do not reard mv V ;ng to npose it on the world Communist movement, and the Chi-ling 'deprived' bv taking this stand
nese In turn are expressing the long historic Chinese anger at Russian' because I preferred that security
ttrriror:.,! annexations and their resentment at the uppishness of the matters be conducted according
creign "barbarians." But there is more to the struggle than the dif- to the country's needs and not on
ferences o" national interests. This is a struggle for very high stakes. tne basis of factional interests."
II .s a Struggle to decide not only what nation will run the Commun-',ne DePuty Defense Minister con-
.-- show, but what principles will govern the revolutionary movements tmued: "My participation in the
ir the next decades. Thus the ideological conflict is not merely a comm,,tee will be determined ac-
fscreen lor national ambitions. It must be taken seriously"for cordin8 ,0 ,nis rule." He also
itself as well. i said that he preferred that his
Bern: Since the Chinese have made themselves the champions152tt^i!!2 T*%J*
III the insulted and the injured among Communist countries they ?member anHn.ii dU,ICS
appeal to every grievar.ce-group in the Communistic world. This adds nrS \. d ,5? a"?* of
Imneasvrably to Khrushchev's burdens and difficulties, as witness the ,." coa"tion considera-
te.-d time -ie is now having ,vith Romania and Czechoslovakia. ,
NOW!
Item: The best course for America to pursue is to remain neutral
ir the I '. ,Ie. and let the two contending Communist powers do the
maximum (lumage to each other and to the world Communist move-
Another dispute involving the
"Young Turks" concerning Moshe
Dayan's determination to resign
as Agriculture Minister, also muv-
mmtl do t believe that America would risk a war on such a policv. "d tSSaZJZ
The tune nay come when it will have to take sides, but I don't hi 1 ed t(mard solutl0n
Leve tli" t.,;ie is now.
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>


Friday. ]->/ 26. I9S3
+Jenistirk)ridUan
Page 7-A
Z/o/i/ta dcYopf 5/> Pci/if /Voc/ram
Co?' i*d from Page 1-A
by Hx txistence and develop-
ment c* "^e" State "ofltraSlT* the
"pivot s-' Jewish destiny." Tho
declare Ml described Israel as
"more .an a mr* political en-
tity" ti-c said it must remain
"the MttMMl home of the whole
Jewist1 rcple as its spiritual
center."
The 1. nlal movement, the
statement cated to "- historic task of pro-
riding i meland and helping
the ingathering of homeless and
oppresset .lews." The statement
added f. "large segments" of
Jewry mm d continue to dwell in
"the fore teable future outside of
Israel." Jews outside of Israel
should t' J the right "to live
j- Jewt any free society, to
make tlit if contributions to con
% temporary civilization while ful-
filling tbeir responsibilities to-
ward fe low Jews in Israel and
Hirougho the world."
The Zloristi said they did not
regard the Jewish people in and
outside ; :>rael as "separate en-
tities b. equal partners in the
struggk r Jewish survival and
historic i linuity."
Muc; x' the statement stem-
med frewi mn eight-point pro-
gram t.:mitted earlier in the
convent-ii by Dr. Emanuel
Neum*-- ZOA leader and mem-
ber of Jewish Agency execu-
tive, w*< cited "the unique na-
ture c Jewish identity stem-
ming frcetl our past history and
Jewisr :-atehood as a spiritual
fact."
UM Professor
To be Speaker
Prof '.'i.rge K. Smart, of the
University of Miami, will discuss
"The K- o-r Against Colonialism"
V ;< meeUBg of the South Shore
Rranch of the American Associa-
tion of tt ( United Nations.
Prograra will be held Monday,
8 p.m., H Washington Federal
Savings ..tt Loan Association, 1234
WashiflgtOt Ave. Chaim Rose,
viee pr*-^ticnt, will conduct the
discussion.
Also scheduled is a film, "The
Questiot Togoland," featuring
the UN i-lebiscite that brought
Togo into "he newly-formed State
of Ghan.
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He set forth his program as1
calling for the education of fel-|
t-eaer aiowirtn and all friends of Is-1
I net to a fuller and clearer reali-
sation of "the nature of our Jew- j
I ish identity, of the meaning of'
i Jewish nationhood and its impli-
Cations in thought and action."
I Second, he urged the eontinua-
I lion and expansion of all practical
; programs of aid to Israel. "It will
not be enough for us to regard
ourselves as teachers and preach-j
j ers of Zionism, leaving the hard
I task of fund raising to others." he
said.
Third, he proposed renewal and.
intensification of efforts to inform
the American people of the criti-
cal problems Israel faced in
economic development, interna-
tional relations and. above all. its
. urgent security problems His
other points included fostering
and spreading knowledge of He-!
brew, development of Zionist
; youth movements to reach "even
larger circles," encouragement
ol aliyah. moulding and shaping"
the character of the American
Jewish community, and keeping
open and developing lines of com-
munication between Israel and
I Jews outside of Israel.
Jacques Torczyner. chairman of
the ZOA national advisory board,
asserted that "the continuous
weakening influence" of the World
Zionist Organization during the
past 15 years had resulted in the
erection of "an invisible wall" be-
tween Jewish youth in Israel and
those outside of Israel. This had
happened, he said, because Jew-
ish youth in Israel were under the
constant burden of the struggle
for economic independence and
security, and had no time to look
toward the outside Jewish world.
At the same time. Jewish youth
' in the United States were enjoy-
ing unprecedented economic pros-
perity and were taking Israel for.
granted while become more inte-
'. grated into an assimilated envir-
j onment
Asserting that there was a j
strong tendency toward assimi-
lation among Jewish youth in
the United States, he called for
an intensified education and cul-
tural program and direct inti-
mate cooperation between Is-
rali youth leadership and Jew-
ish youth outside of Israel to
assist the Zionist movement to
develop leadership for the fu-
tore.
Abba Eban, Deputy Prime Min-
ister, said that American Zion-
ism must adapt itself to a new
system of priorities centered on j
education and immigration. These
activities however, he cautioned,
must engage-the ZOA "in addition
to, not instead of, public activity
in support of Israel's right."
"While Israel is sovereign in the
responsibility of framing and
executing its own politics," he
said, "and can in no way share
this responsibility, it is still the
task of American Zionism to get
more friends for Israel. Many
governments tend to accept pub-
lic opinion in forming their atti-
tures, therefore, the rallying of
friendship for and support of Is-
rael is essential for Israel," he
stressed.
Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's For-
eign Minister, told the convention
that she was certain "Israel docs
not have a greater and more sin-
cere friend than the United States
Government and people." She
made that statement in reply to
questions from the floor after she
and Prime Minister Levi Eshkol
addressed the convention. At the
same time she conceded that the
State Department in Washington
and Israel "agree that they dis-
agree on American policy in the
Middle East," and she told the
American Zionists that there are j
certain differences and problems j
between Isreal and the U.S.A..
"that should be ironed out between!
the two countries." She said that
in spite of Israel's "keen desire."
Russia docs not want improve-1
ment of Israeli-USSR relations.
She pointed out that there arc noi
trade relations "whatsoever be '
twecn Israel and the USSR.
Mr. Eshkol told the conven-
tion that "if things contirue as
they have been, we may, by the
end of the SCs reach the com- |
pletion of the ingathering of |
those Jews from certain coun-
tries who cannot live freely as
Jewsand this does not include
our brethren in Russia." By the
end of the decade, he said, Is-
rael's population will reach 3,-
000,000. The population increase
will result from new immigra-
tion as well as from births.
'The Zionist responsibility," he
declared, "did not end with the
State's establishment, nor will it
end when we succeed in concen-
trating 3,000.000 Jews here. It is
our joint responsibility to enlarge
Israel's population and enrich our
cultural and spiritual life by a
strong stream of immigrants
from Western countries."
Black Muslims
Losing U.S. Jobs
? BAAL TFILAH AND READER Continued from Page LA
DISI0UNT PROCESSING
K0DACHKOMI
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t27-20-i20 e- (OtMCOtO* IUB0 HINTS
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defend or serve the United States.
A number of Muslims have refus-
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Pcrcg 8-A
vjewistnorldften
Friday. July 26. 1963
tW
wsoW
MfDICAl CtJNIC *
IN MOMoK ojj,
SA.1BKCA RINSTBN
'Matzoth' Sentences Hit in Senate

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Feinstein. of Miami Beach, are shown at
rscar.t dedication ceremonies of the clinic in their honor at
EU'.ovot.
Miami Beach Couple Dedicate Clinic;
Histadrut Dignitaries Attend Israel Fete
Attending were dignitaries repre-
senting the Israel Ministry of
Health, the leadership of Kupat
Holim. which is the medical arm
of Histadrut, and representatives
of the Histadrut Vaad Hapoel.
Following the dedication, the
gathered guests went to Kaplan
Hospital in Rohovot to attend a
luncheon in the Felrstein's hon-
or. Greetings at the luncheon
were extended by such leading
dignitaries as Isaac Hamlin and
Israel Stolarsky.
A. lllanii Beach couple recently
dedicated a medical clinic in Is-
rjel T.-.ey are Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Feinsfcin, who were feted at a
functio- at the Fontainebleau
Hotel o : the eve of their depar-
ture.
Keifibe'rs of the Greater Miami
Israel i>:istadrut Committee were
haits at the function. Mr. and
Mrs. F-instein are members of
(be iidard.
Dedication of the medical clinic
in RdnorOt took place June 26.
Continued from Page 1-A
Horn aRcTrne rla^rto^worship* '
God without restriction or re-
straint."
Sen. Javits charged that "Jews
are being made the scapegoats for
the Soviet Union's economic dif-
ficulties, and have been the prime
targets of Soviet persecution." He
stressed that "the Jewishness of
the defendants is emphasized by
the Soviet press, and they are de-
scribed in the crudest stereotypes
generally used in anti-Semitic
campaigns."
According to the reports from
Moscow, two defense attorneys,
Mikhail Lozinsky and Matvey
Sokolovich, denounced the investi-
gation of the case, which had
been under way for four months.
They told the court that they see
"no crime committed," and that
the case should never have gone
to court. The defense insisted
that the women had tried to dis-
pose only of the surplus matzoth
they had baked and had not en-
gaged in "large sale" operations
as charged. "All churches," said
Mr. Sokolovich, "sell candles and
wafers at high prices, and nobody
holds them for criminal respon-
gipility.'l j --"
Mr. Sokolovich denied the ac-
cused sold matzoth for personal
profit, insisting they did it "for
their religious boliefs," and
pointing out that they used no
hired labor." He pleaded for
the release of Mrs. Blyakhman,
who, he said, had already spent
four months in jail "without
committing any crime at all."
Chief Rabbi Levine had been
called as a prosecution witness, j
Mr. Lozinsky recalled that the
! Chief Rabbi had testified that he
had had a conversation prior to
Passover with a man named An-
dreev, an official of the State
Committee on Religious Cults.
The attorney told the court that
Mr. Andreev hald told Rabbi- Le-
vine: "Unfortunately, this state
cannot provide you with matzoth.
at the moment because it has
neither place nor equipment for
it, but has nothing against the
Jewish community doing it itself
We asked the court," said Mr.
Lozinsky, "to summon Andreev,
but it never did."
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Hamlin. who is director of the
Israel Histadrut campaign in the
United States, with offices in Tel
Aviv, had greeted the Feinsteins
on their arrival in Israel, and ac-
companied them on a tour of the
country as a whole. Hamlin
House in Tel Aviv is named in his
honor. No other public institu-
tion in Israel is named after a
living personality.
At the luncheon following the
medical clinic dedication, Fein-
stein announced his contribution
of $1,000. making him a founder
of the medical center now being
erected in Beersheva, a project of
the Greater Miami Business and
Professional Council of Histadrut
Also in honor of Hamlin, Fein-
stein announced the contribution
of a scholarship in one of Hista-
drut's many trade schools through-
out Israel.
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Optometrists Have Banquet
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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1963
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JOSEPH YAMPOlSKr, 10 a.m.
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M0 1-769


Friday. July 28. 1963
HJmisto Flcrjdtiatr?
Pcce 9-A
aw
I BRaaSMMI.......Bjj ym
GEMS OF WISDOM
Get one by trade, rather ilian a
thousand as gift*.
AMI I II IIA MACID, i
Trie ffee man. u-liu I nV." among I
the ignorant, strives, as /ur aj| he
can. to avoid rflOfMng fawn from j
tliftn. spinoia. j
*
More tltdn the cal/ HMntt to mQ\. I
the cpu> teams o vuclrle. -AKliiA.
' *
All God's creations borrow from .
each other: day from night and I
night from day. the moon from the I
tttn ond thf jtarj from the moon. |
thf sky from the earth and the I
farth from thf i^y. ;.
nxonus rahba. fc
e
A Wati^f t u'jrm, a penon. but,
not a store. I. Friedman. 5

Lore that il hoarded molds at I
last, until tee ^noi<> some dov the I
only thing ur ever hair 1* mhat I
we Rite .::..-,. i.insbi:ri;.
*
By the hand uli'iie a hand il
tra>hrd. UHMIMS1 thou tal{c. then
thou must gue. 111.INK. I
\V hat we net our 0/ lije il i>i-
deed in proportion to uh.n we put ,
Jn IL T&ju GfJMi
lami 9
r^eligioids Search for the Material
Blinds Us to the Spiritual
,
LI IIMAN.
1
fKclicjion
<77,c
1 l let het
ft
f
*_/ wetws
By RABBI HERMAN M. COHEN
Rabbi Emeritus, Tempi* of Aaron
Congregation, St. Pawl, Minn.
The penetrating insight which
our sages exercised in their
analysis of the BiWe, is evi-
denced in- an episode describe.1
in the scriptural portion of this
week. We are told that the chil-
dren of Israel, in the fortieth
year of their desert wandering,
occupied the land of the Amor-
itcs, east of the Jordan. The
land was particularly suitable
for cattle grating. Two and
a half tribes Reuben. Gad,
and half of the tribe of
M a nassehpetitioned Moses to
allow them to settle on that ter-
ritory, because they possessed
large flocks of sheep and herds
of cattle. When Moses charged
them with being slackers and de-
serters who desired to shirk their
responsibility of Joining their fel-
ine land west of the Jordan, they
the lant west of the Jordan, they
replied that they were willing to
take their place in the forefront
of the fight. Moreover, they
said, "We will build here sheep-
folds for our flocks and towns
for our children."' Moses ac-
cepted their offer, and in repeat-
ing the terms on which they
were to be allowed to settle on
the already conquered land, he
said, "Build towns for your chil-
dren and shcepfolds for your
flocks."
Our sages noted the reverse
order in Moses' statementmak-
ing the towns for the children
primary, and the shcepfolds for
the flocks secondary'- Although
the two and a half tribes ac-
cepted Moses' version by say-
ing. "Whatever the Lord has
spoken concerning your servants,
that we we do." yet because
in their original proposition they
placed material possessions
Hungary Jews Active
NKW YORK(JTA)The Jews
in Hungary lead an actively Jew--
ish iife and are being helped by
the Hungarian Government in
their efforts to do so," Prof. Alex-
ander Schcibcr, director of the;
Hungarian Rabbinical Seminary in
Budapest, declared at a press con-
ference here this week. Prof.
vbriber is the first official rep-;
resentativc of the Jewish commun->
ity of Hungary to come to the Uni-1
led States since World War II.
Chief Rabbi of Antwerp Dead
\NTWERP-;JTA> Funeral ser
vices were held here this week for
the late Dr. S. Sapira. chief rabbi
"I Antwerp, who died at the age of
~2. The Mayor of Antwerp and
the Governor of the province em-
bracing that city were among the
prominent mourners. Born in Ru-
mania, and the holder of a doc
ti rate in philosophy and theology
from the University of Berlin. Dr. i
Sapira lived in Belgium since 1935,
except for the war years, which he I
spent in Cuba.
Weinstein President of College
CHICAGO (JTA) Dr. David
Weinstein, associate in education j
al Harvard University, and 'field whether the name itself is origin
and budget director of Harvard ', a\\y Jewish is questionable. Itis'i
1 rm.rsity's language teaching pro- jtcre.sting to note, however, how
gram in Israel, was elected pres-! the Jews came to use this name.
the College of Jewish Thc Jews of the renaissance per-
iod in Italy led. ,vhat might be
ahead of the requirements of
their children, they were punish-
ed by being exiled more than a
century earlier than the tribes of
Judah and Benjamin, who lived
west of the Jordan.
The reasons which prompt
people to leave their native home
and to settle in a new land prove
to he important factors in the
development of their attitudes.
The Pilgrims left their native
England because they suffered
from religious oppression. They
desired greater spiritual free-
dom. In the course of time,
they prospered materially. They
sought God an.I they found gold.
By contrast, the countries of
South America were occupied by
peoples who sought material
wealth which they did not find,
but their spiritual life was weak-
ened. They sought gold and lost
their God.
Jews who migrated to Amer-
ica from Ruropean countries dur-
ing the past century came to
these shores in search of more
adequate living conditions. In
their European homes, most of
them found it impossible to eke
wit an existence. When they
came here, they realized the
tremendous opportunity which
America offered, and they con-
centrated upon material gains.
For the most part, they neglect-
ed the education of their chil-
dren and the development of
their spiritual life. An entire
generation was lost to Judaism
when the religious education of
the children failed to keep pace
with their secular cultural
growth. Fortunately, American
Jewry has been aroused. A new
generation of Jewish leaders has
given our people a completely
new perspective of their Jewish
potential.
Ser
VI CC5
Information to be included in the Religious Services co:-. rn
must be in the News Room of The Jewish Floridian not Jater
than Friday, a.m., preceding the week of publication. A I e-
leases received after that time will be returned as procV of
their lateness.
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlylt (v.. aBanmr.ja'u.'
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
------- A __
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th ave.
Conservative. Joseph Picus, pres-
dent.
. 7.......... -un
BETH OAVID. 2625 SW 3rd ave. Con
r
FROM THE TALMUD
Yoma, 72
A scholar who is not tkt wne
servative Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro. |- mu-drdlv as he ,j outward.; ,.-i
Cantor William W. Lipson. .
I'rirliiy ; |,.in. Saturday 9 a.m.
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox-
Rabbi Solomon Schiff.
BETH EMETH. 12250 NW 2nd ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Simon April.
Cantor Hyman Fine.
BETH ISRAEL. 400 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox. Rabby H. Louis Rottman.
------- O
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamches.
Friday i:3o p.m. Saturday S:S0 a.m.
Tlahfl B'Av Monday 7 p.m. Sfrrm'tn:
"Ii.> we Have I'rophela Today?"
Tuesday ~> :''< a.m.
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bernstein.
Friday ::til |i.in. Saturday s:ir, a.m.
j "Rthioa 1 if tin Rather*" ".:.:" p.m.
ISvrmon: "The Final Challenge."
' BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
Orthodox. Ralph Krieger, secre-
tary.
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky.
------- e -------
BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE 11th
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip.
ehitz. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschen-
baum.
Friday 6:13 p.m. Saturdaj 8:15 a-m.
------- %.-------
CONGREGATION ET2 CHAIM. 1544
Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Strassfeld.
----
DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 1401 NW 183rd st. Con-
servative. Rabbi Harold Flchter.
Cantor Emanuel Manael.
Ktlihiy s p.m. limsi sneaker: Cantor
Bmanuel Mandel, Topic: "Weeklj
Portion*" Saturday s:;t FLAGLER GRANADA. 60 NW 51st | r: Rabbi Michael Qoulaton.
il David- Ros- fhctter, Knaiand. "I"-: "w Jcw-
uhomination.
9 9 O
Abot dc-R. Nathan, It
A scholar trhd has fftlcHi I .'. ;!
I ahaiidonrd his lr.irniti!; canned
* for a share in the World-::
* *
Midrash Shemucl, 29
// a scholar engages in .- l|
.3 and is not too successful. .: .- u
KOod omen for him. God '..
I iMrtttng uud docs' ttol wu I i
: rich 'urn.
*
Sotth, 47
1/ tun scholttri lain, ; i .-
. ,:\ do agr C0tlC<
I Ijj.'i. .>:u- diet and the i is
, cilcd.
* *
Sanhedrin. 29
Tic. scholar) mho .i;- -.i h
other shall not sit togi ..
s fudges at a trial.
i
Sanhedrin. 17
A Disciple of the Sages -
I aul> in a ritjl uit/i these :. !
j court, a police depar. .: a
chanty organisation, a g .
* a bath, a pkysfcian, a nl .1
i druggist, a icritcr. and tchtfbl
teacher.
pi. Conservative. Rabb
enfeld. Cantor George Goldberg.
leh Communities." Canti

Kilily 6:30 p.m. Hatun-la) S:S(V a.m. Royal will render the Mi n the
Tlshn B'.\\ Monday
7 a.m.
I'.iu. Tiusda>
<-J\.now Lfotif FT. LAUDERDALE EMANU-EL. 1801
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
Richard M. Leviton.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pinetree
dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross.
HIALEAH REFORM JEWISH CON-
GREGATION. 555 W. 49th St., Hia-
leah Reform.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Is the name "Leo" to be consid-
ered a Jewish name?
The name "Leo" means a "lion."
4
.
, I
This page is prepared in
: cooperation with the Spiritual
Leaders of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Assn.
Studies here. He is expected to as-
sume hit office next February. Dr.
called, double lives. One life was
that which was experienced in
purely Jewish Circles, such as the
synagogues. The other was ex-
perienced In the business world-
Weinttein has been assistant to the
dean and regaatrar at the Hebrew
teachers College in Brookline.
I!* also served in thc same
institution as professor of langu-
age education, and as director of
the department of adult studies. mm w0,.,d Jexvs uslH) 0ne name
... J : _, for their administrative docu-
B.ble-Read.ng Opposed ,ents-this name was an Italian
KERNDALE. N.Y. (JTA) The sounding one. In the synagogue,
Kabbmical Alliance rf America, I the Jew was referred to by his
;>n Orthodox group, went on record i original Hebrew name. An inter-
this week as opposing Bible-read- esting manifestation of this was
'"8 in the public schools. This the name Leo. which was used as
BABBI MAX A. LIPSC1IITZ
Coordinator
Contributor:
RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
Gems of Wisdom
.
Under this assumption one may
say that smoking a cigarette in
was
such as in the loan banks in which ,he t.cn)cloI.v is forbidr|en since 1(
is being done in the presence of
the dead.
# *
Why are holy Scrolls (Sifre Tor-
ah) and phylacteries (Tefillin)
buried in earthen vessels, when
they can no longer be used?
The essential requirement is
that they are not to be destroyed.
i announced here by Rabbi a substitute for Judah, because Ratiier they are to be preserved
***y Greenberg, president of the judah was symbolized by the fig
roup, at the organization's annual I llre 0f a lion in the Biblical bless-
tonvention. He stressed, however, jug.
that "under no circumstances, are
Wt' against mm .denominational
prayers" in the public schools.
TJir );ihk by mstice establishes
t'ic land, but he who .extract* gifts
"cnhrows it. proVBRBS.
*
The receiver of a gift is not-the
Waeajr, --a. bravanel.

A gift is good from an owner.
not from.a robber. J'rOveRbs.
Is W permissible to smoke in the
cemetery?
There is a general prohibition
against eating or smdking in the
present of the dead (S'dei Cbcm-
ed, Aveluth 116). This comes un-
der the general category of pro-
hibitions which restrain the Hv
ing from performing overt acta
:in front of the dead which the
dead .can no longer do. This is
like teasing the poor by enjoy-
ing luxuries in front of them;
as long as possible. It was
thought that burial in earthen
vessels would preserve their phy-
sical existence as long as pos-
sible, and thus the tradition-was
established to bury them in earth-
en vessels. For this reason, it is
possible to understand why -the
Dead Sea Scrolls were buried or
hidden in caves in earthen vessels.
There are various authorities who
say it is better to hide them in
special places In the synagogue.
It is known that ancient syna-
gogues had special rooms (and in
some eases, special vaults) where
these holy articles -were kept.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. C a nt o r Yehudah
Heilbraun.
ISRAELITE CENTER 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
i-vi.iny 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham ~8eif.
MINYONAIRES. 3737 Bird rd. Mod-
ern Traditional.
------- e -------
OHEV SHALOM 911 Normandy dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas Weber-
man.
------- e-------
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins ave. Cantor S. Nachmias.
----s
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th
st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
e-------
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN 1025!
NE 183rd st.. Miami Gardens rd. '
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Cantor
Morris Berger.
- 0 -------
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5S50 N. Kendall
dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles.
Kodner.
lYi'iny :sn p.m. Dues! apeaker: Dr. I
Maxwell Liauer, Radiology, I niveialt) ol Miami. Top-
ic: "A l..'"l; hi Hctenoe." Kai-hiii I'.l.ll ;
in lead > i vice.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY- I
WOOD. 1351 S. 14 ave. Reform I
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
TEMPLE BETH SHIRAH. Suniland
Hall. 115S9 So. Dixie hwy. Reeen-
structionist. Rabbi Morris Skop
Cantor Herman Gottlieb.
-
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 172S Monroe at. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Mendelowiti. Can-
tor Ernest Steiner.
l'ri'iav 8:3o p.m. 'iii.-st sneaker: Jack
Kaplan. < m.'x Khahnat noata: M.-n.-
born of SlSteckeadi witu service by
July OtVcle. Saturuay youth aervtce
:30 am
.
TEMPLE B'NAt ABRAHAM. 387
NE 167th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan H. Zwitmsn. Canter Ben
Qreeabcrf.
l-'riday s:n> p.m. Sermon: "The Sab-
bath of It.Imke."
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chat*
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kremsh
Canter David Convlser.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22 ave. Conservative. Rabbi 8
M. Machtel.
Friday s:lj p.m. Uuust spiritual lead-
iI sence > [10:1", a.m.
TEMPLE EM'NU-EL. 1701 V. ,-,r hing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman Cantor Hirsh Aoler.
Pi ill.i ^ ii p.in. Saturday :
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NS o*h at.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. 'jarot.
Cantor Jacob Bornstein.
-------e-------
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 P.-'c i live.
Liberal Reform. Rabbi -Mornecal
Podet.
Kriday 8:11 p.ni. Gueat apei fttel-
\ i n Fi'umki Topic: "Ho I
Retrard Their Chrlatlan N< -
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 Trih at.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abriim-
owitz. Cantor Edward K n,
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80fi !.t. and
Tatuin Waterway. Mode-- Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugens -iitvtz
Cantor Saul H. Breeh.
TEMPLE OR OLOM. Center vative.
8755 SW 16th St. Miam^ Rabb,
Samuel April. Cantor Gersnoi Levin.
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH fi.AMI,
12100 NE 15th ave. Refor Rab-
bi Daniel M. Lowy.
rXday S:1S p.m Service .
ducted l'\ Samuel Bloom i luidKH
Htanle) Pred in the abaem i '
Luwy.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 951
Flamingo Way. Conierva* RRbbl
Hyman Gross. Cantor Jack Lerner.
Klein.
r i i.l.iy s:|", p.i s.,i arday
.....n: "Weekb l*>rl Ion I
ai n Ii Monda] '.':::" p.m. tla;
I a,m.
temple zamora. 44 Zamt\ra ve.
Rabbi Herschel Brooks. Cantor Ben
Diekson.
Friday 8:18 p.m. Saturday i .tin.
TEMPLE 2ION. 5720 SW I'.'ri et,
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Seymour HinVea:
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Hbnry
Wernlck. Cantor Albert 0 ; ;.
YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. CBxl*
hwy. Conservative. Canter MSur-
ioe Neu.
YOUNO ISRAew. wio NE (71. at.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin dtaeber.
Friday 7 p.m. .-alurday S ,..'t\. rtcr-
ntoir -We.kly IVirtlon." hi 1
p.m., fi.iiow.ci by Bhatoa Be
n......';. '" i'T :ii:iii! ^
j ^
CANDLIUGHTING VMi
5 Av 6:53 pjm.



Page- 10-A
*>Je*isl>ncridkui
Friday; July 2V 1963
Copif 0/ Spotlight:
State Dep't. Officials Behind
By WILTON FKIEDMAH
Resurrected
iectionable to
were drafted
Washington.
STATE DEPARTMENT profes-
sionals, arrogating to them-
selves a role in legislative policy
making, were behind the resurrec-
tion of the dangerous Johnson
Arab refugee proposals in a re-
cent Senate subcommittee report.
The proposals, abandoned last year
by the Administration, were ob
both the Arabs and Israelis. They
by Dr. Joseph E. Johnson, special
representative of the United Nations Palestine Con-
ciliation Commission. The United States is a mem-
her of the PCC.
Dr. Johnson's proposals were not officially re-
ported out or adopted by the PCC. The White House
c'ropped the idea after realizing it would turn the
Near East into even worse chaos. But the State
Department kept the file open, looking for a new
chance.
Everyone thought the plan was dead when a
mischievous and vigorous ghost emerged in the
report of the unwary Senate Subcommittee on
Refugees and Escapees. Chairman Philip Hart,
Michigan Democrat, is an old-time friend of Israel
and former member of the American Christian
Palestine Committee. Sen. Hart was embarrassed
tj learn that his insufficiently alert staff, and his
own negligence, had permitted crafty State Depart-
ment professionals to slip the Johnson revival into
the report published under the imprint of his sub-
committee.
The Hart subcommittee report generally en-
dorsed the Johnson proposals, terming them "a
carefully coi-ceived and detailed plan for progress."
foreign News letter By JOSHUA JUSTMAW
A Silent Revolution
Jerusalem
kJAKING THE desert
" bloom"' has been the
task which the pioneers
have set for themselves
when they first came to
the shores of Palestine;
and indeed, the revival of
the land neglected for
centuriescrowns their ef-
forts and achievements.
Yet. few realize the
extent to which this still
remains an unaccom-
plished task. Few are aware of the fact that only
one-fifth Of Israel's territory is now under cultiva-
tion, and that while all the growth and expansion
thai have transformed the country into a state
if modern agriculture and booming industry, the
"creation" of the land still remains one of the most
central goals and the focus of much pioneering
effort
For several days now we have been traveling
through the country and have seen the vast areas
awaiting to be brought to life, and have seen the
work that goes on to bring this about on a scale
unprecedented in the country's young history.
Until 1048, that is, until the establishment of
the State, altogether 50,000 dunams of land had been
restored. Since that year, the reclaimed area had
grown to nearly half a million dunams, not includ-
ing 360,000 dunams of ameliorated swamp areas and
240,000 dunams of afforested land.
These figures illustrate the tremendous achieve-
ments in the short span of the past fifteen years.
However, against these figures there stands out the
figures of two and a half million dunams of land
extending from Safed in the North down to Eilat
in the Souththat still await reclamation: 780,000
dunams for agriculture, and the rest for afforesta-
tion.
And this is a task which will have to be carried
out. Small Israel can ill afford to leave all that
vast area barren, especially since besides the im-
portant economic aspect, there is also involved the
aspect of security. Israel's borders are 590 miles
long, and while elongated borders always create
difficulties, in Israel's case there are hostile neigh-
bors all along them. Most of the borders run
through either desert or wild hill regions, and ef-
licient border defense calls for a closely knit popu-
lation rooted in the soil. It is for this reason that
the Jewish National Fund, which conducts this vast
project, considers border reclamation as its fore-
most task.
The projected reclamation of the two and a
half million dunamsincluding the building of
3.000 kilompters of roadswill require eleven mil-
lion work days in the course of the next twenty
yen is. and entail an estimated cost of about $200
mijlion.
It is an ambitious plan, requiring, in Israel's
eroded hills and stark deserts, not only large in-
vestments in machinery, but also much human
labor. Slopes have to be cleared of surface bould-
This gave the State Department ammunition
for use against Israel. Department officials could
cite the Senate report, telling Israel that it was
the view of Congress that Israel should surrender
to its recommendations.
Having failed to sell the Johnson concept to
ihc White House, the State Department infiltrated
i' into Congress.
Rep. Seymour Halpern, New York Republican,
is an old hand at spotting the trick maneuvers of
the State Department in the legislative jungle. He
8rose on the floor of the House to expose the whole
affair. Th-j Halpern philosophy is that American
policy in the Near East should reflect the views of
the American people, reflected through Congress,
rather than the personal whims of a few diplo-
mats.
Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDUN
Unselfconscious
Treat in Store
THE CONVERSION OF CHAPLAIN COHEN. By
Herbert Trr. 341 pp. New York: Bernard Geis
Associates. $4.95.
"JNAVID COHEN, who lived all his life in New
" York City, was so provincial that when, after
an hour of milling around with some two hundred
other unclothed males undergoing a physical exam-
ination for the Army, his eyes told him that he was
the only Jew in the huge room, all of a sudden he
felt naked. And all he held in his hand was a three-
by-five inch index card Lifting his eyes upward,
he fiddled self-consciously with his navel as he
glanced around the drafty room This was the
first time in his life that it had been borne home
to him in so graphic a fashion that he was indeed a
member of a minority group."
So begins Herbert Tarr's warmhearted novel
about a Jewish chaplain in the Air Force. Rabbi
Tarr, formerly at Temple Beth Zion in Buffalo, now
spiritual leader of the Westbury Temple of Long
Island, knows whereof he writes; he has lived that
role. But the yawning pitfalls of the autobiograph-
ical first novel can claim no victims here. The
book has a story and characters who are sustained
by honesty and clean, sometimes brash, writing.
The humor is persistent and pleasant, cropping
up unexpectedly, as it does in life. Rabbi Tan-
rarely writes straight toward a joke, which is an-
other of the novice's errors, but he weaves them
through characters and incidents with a steady eye
for the pattern of his story.
Chaplain Cohen is, for one thing, terrified of
flying; the very thought of it sends him to the men's
room. For another, his nose tends to bleed if
handled ungently. He is neither schlemiel nor buf-
foon, however: it is undoubtedly credit to the au-
thor's skill that he can create a hero with such an-
heroic traits and have him retain both stature ;.nd
dignity still.
It is an unpretentious book which nonetheless
slips in a quantity of good talk and even more good
emotion. The section which takes place in the
Chaplain Training School, amid chaplains of all
faiths, offers interesting sideglances into the young
clergy. The novel itself, in fact, thoroughly human-
izes the rabbinate, especially where it tackles, via
its story, Rabbi Cohen's problem of being treated
by his dates like a cross between an angel and a
saint.
It is a book which is pleasant to read, happily
Jewish with an unselfconscious enjoyment of Jew-
ishness and all that it implies.
OH the Record:
Johnson Report
Rep Halpern charged that "State Department
elements hive sought to push these ill-adv--l pro-
posals even though they were abandoned :>y the
White House and the Administration."
He said that "instead, we should have I true
initiative for a general peace settlemen This
would be a more sensible approach for t I State
Department to push."
Hope was expressed by Rep. Halpern it the
Senate "return the ghost of the past to I restful
grave." He said "there are enough current ->rob-
lems in the Near East without digging up | oat*."
He pomted out that the Johnson proposals were
especially dangerous to Israel's security. 'Arabs,
m great numbers, in hostile Arab states s.-round-
ing Israel would be granted an option of mwutg to
Israel despite the fact that many are not tnentic
refugees and some never lived in Israel tt all,"
he said
Stressing thai the Arab refugee probk- ) could
only be solved in the context of a general vieace
settlement, Rep. Halpern asked: "How ca srael
be told to admit potential fifth columnists, many of
whom are adherents of the Arab Communist
party?"
He told Congress it was "obvious that 1 tee is
a prerequisite to any massive scheme for n wing
mobs of bitter people across disputed I iers.
They would not come as peaceful immigrants, but
as mortal enemies dedicated to Israel's destruc-
tion."
He noted that the Arabs despise Israel BUCfe
they rejected the Johnson proposals beca. even
repatriation would not satisfy their "brut.. Objec-
tive of driving the Jews into the sea ana wiping
out Israel."
%
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Growth of Bigotry
lAfOULD GEORGE WASHMO-
" ton. the father of his coun-
try, be proud of his children to-
day? They have become more
1 numerous and a father :- always
j pleased at that. Also, t 16 coun-
iry has greatly advance I tech-
nologically and Washing ton
ed a keen interest that \ iy, but
I Washington was Ch.nrm if the
Convention which formulated the Constitution > the
United Stales, and if he knew what some are try
ii that today, he probably would ot feel
uig lo do
happy.
There is a widespread, underground
rewrite th.' Constitution with a variety ol
ments "f i reactionary nature, to curb i
of the .Supreme Court, to establish minoi
and there is talk of amending the BUI <>:
and to nullity the Supreme Court's decisii
religion in the public schools.
We stem to be departing from the id
the founding fathers. Bigotry is growing
were plenty of bigots in the earlier days
the point is thai the Washington. Jefferson, Ham
iltons. Palnes and Franklins had control
son tells of some church leaders trying to J from
They
ive to
imend-
i, t
t rule.
[hts,
! OUl
. ol
There
10. but
Washington a commitment about religion
knew that Washington was averse to the SCI
ot church and Mate. He didn't like that
omelette.
They went about it a bit underhanded!
presented a questionnaire on various topic-,
ing one of religion, but Jefferson noted ': wily-
fox" (meaning Washington) answered all questions
but the one on religion.
i .ibling
iid of
They
includ-
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Collapse of the Jewish World in Eastern Europe
THE COLLAPSE OF the Jewish world
in Eastern Europe under the blows
of the unmentionables is ons of those
tragedies whose grasp is beyond con-
tainment of ordinary pen and word.
To be sure, the horror story had ils
raconteurs, but with lew exceptions they
were editorialists lacking in depth of
pen, writers with limited vision, scribes
without adequate tools. jgf... IK.
What kind of Jewish world was it that Hitler de-
stroyed? The men of the social sciences have ready
answersin terms of population, religion, customs econ-
(in.es and the rest of the tangibles that make for com-
munal living in all forms of society. But there is a dimen-
sion in living that is beyond the discernment of the his-
torian and the sociologist, a deprb whose measurement
is only within the scope of the artistic rod
To grasp the tragedy that descended upon our people
in Europe one must understand what kind of people it
was Hitler destroyed, their unique civilization, ielr striv-
ing for radiance, their faith, their creativity. !,ieir out-
look on living, on themselves and on the wo Id that re-
garded them as strangers. Infortunately most of the
iterature mirroring that life is in a tongue that is large-
ly strange to the ear of the American Jew excepting for
that altogether too brief portion that has comedown to
us in translation, mostly from the trio of Yidd, .1) classic-
Ms -Mendel,.. Shelem Aleichcm and Pcrelz.
The prosaic truth is that the realitv and the poetry
of Jewish life in the enclaves of eastern Europe are to be
UTy in the writings of the Yiddisl moderns,
found
who not only could evaluate that living against the back-
ground Of the new century but who seemed to be possess-
ed Of a feeling that the world of their art v. ..; near.nl
eclipst and that :t must therefore be encompa; ,-tl before
'evp.'!1! v .V iS ""s "'a, bes,ac coun,s P^haPs for te
feverish \iddish creativity i the past live decades both
in inis country and abroad.


7riday. July 26, 1963
LEGAL NOTICE
*. kplsli noridliiain
Page ;Vi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLOR.DA, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 7859
I ||\TMII-: D. Ki i/.AN.
I lain jiff,
vS
JOSEPH KOZAN.
I ii I.ndaiit.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
, JOSEPH Ki >ZAN
,, Barbara Uloane
. i't, mIi Avenue
Auburn, Massachusetts
Yi.l ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to
nr a copy of your Auawer to the
lull at Oomiilalnt f"r Divorce filed
i mmi. "ii ilu- Plalntlfl'i hiioi-
,:,,>, RBR.NSTE1N A.- Alll.l.l'.K, 1114
, ..,,_ -..-s Bullulng, Miami ;:.. Florida,
,h.,i .,, in.- the original thereof with
in.- Clerk oi Hi- abovi Court, mi oj
lK-i.Tr th.- 80th day of August ('."is.
utherulee Decree Pro Comeaso win
lii i,,.-Mil against you.
i >., t 1,1a, thla -'-'mi day "i Juiy, iwui,
i; B LBATHKRMAN
Clerk of the Cireuit Court
..ii) By: i'. P. < uri-.i.AND
Deput) flcrs
7 U6, S/2-9-16

BY HENRY LEONARD
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 45424-A
IN RE: Estate "t
I1ERM \x '' RUBIN,
>.. Baaed.
NOTiCfe OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
XoTICE Is hei.ii> riven tnat I bave
filed my Final Report ami Petition fur
button ami Final Discharge ax
iacratiix, C.T.A. <>t the estate
Merman <". Rubin, deceased: ami
i ih- Soth da) "i August, IMS,
ppl) i.. the Honorable County
t!" I'.i*l,' County, Florida, for
. ii ol said Final Report and fur
itlon and final discharge as
stratrlx, C.T.A, of the estate
..i ill. above-named decedent. This
i) ..f .Inly. 1963.
THF:BE8A RUBIN
Idinlmslrati ix. C.T.A. of the .-.
i ii-1 man C. Rubin, de-
i ised,
N I WIENER
: Admlnlsti. i* i\ i'T.\
ill. mi.hi i Rubin, di 'I
\ le) Illdg.
A -, l!.i.
7 16, 8 2-9-1*
'Your Honor, my client would like to change his
name from Gaines fo Ginzfourg."
Copr. 1565, Dartnu ritducMwil
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
i: is iii:i:i:i'.y i;i\ i:\ thai
il d< i Ing to engage in
indi r the fictitious name *
lnYA AI.IMINIM PRODPCTS al
w 17th Court, M In nil, FTa in-
to reglsti r said name Ith the
hi Circuit Court uf Dadi
:
MICHAEL OIOIA
Sole i la ii, r
7 3-12-11-26
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
XOTICE is HEREBY niVEN that
the undersigned, de* ring to engage in
business under the fictitious name oi
ZHAHARAZADE it 1698 N W 79th
Ktrei t, Miami, I >ade County, Florida
Intends to reglstt-i said nun, with the
'" ik uf the Cln .i; Court of Dade
Count). Ploi Ida.
M1LDRF;D i. wvitENCB
Sole i Iwner
IIICIIARM W. WASSERMAN
Attorne) for Applicant
I2n I.inc..In Road
Miami Beach, Fluslda
7 i-12-19-26
LEGAL NOTICE
r
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KoTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
Kin .i. d< Ing to engage In
ndi the flctlt'ii "
- I1RAKE A ALIGNMENT
"". N.W. 76th St.. Miami
said name with the
ol lhi in uit Court uf Dade
Florida.
It VNoD, INC. V FLA. CORP.
7 19-26, 8 2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
ICE IS HEREBY iSIVEN thai
signed, desli Ing to engagi In
undet the fictitious name of
embroidery & m'ai.i.hi'im:
ii number 2319 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Citj of Miami. Florida Intends
i ii;' tit,, said n.iiii-- with the
thi Circuit Court of Dadi
. Floi Ida
i a Miami, Plot Ida, this 91 h
till-.. I'm;::.
HENRY COOPERMAN
I.EEF' & WKIS
i i v ilii ant
nln Road
Ml.mil Bes h, Florida
7 19-26, 8 2-9
Vol'
circuit court, hth judicial
circuit. dade county. fla.
in chancery
No. 63C 6135
tTRR'E 'jl'ILPORD,

IENRY HI ILF'l IRD.
I fendnnt.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
HKXK1 HI ll.F'ORD,
HENRY tiriLl oitn. Real-
ivn 'i i lot!fled to servi
war to DI
I on
ittorney, HEl IRUE Nil 'Hi 'I.AS.
n v\ 12th \\. .\i iml, i- ..i and
with "Ii ik ni this i
mgusl I, 1963, othel -
on |i ,,,M u ill be i onfi used b)
HATED -1.11 > 15 I'., :
I I HERMAN, Clerk
") 11} K M I.V.MAN.
I '< i u t > Clerk
7 19-26, 8 2-9
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AMD FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 60093-A
I Lit.- of
'V ik>i,ph FEldscHL'H
11, ccasi il.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
J! '. "'"" '" -'i"! All Pel suns Hav-
is or Demands Against s.ii.l
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLOR.DA IN PROBATE
No. 59937 C
IN RE: Estate of
SI M,i IMON CRAMER
l leceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Credlto s ami til Pi i sons i ln>
Inn claims or Demands Agatnsl Said
i :-'.it.-.
Y'.u ait' hareby notified and re-
quired t" presenl nj lulms and de-
mands which you m.i\ have agafnsl
the estate nf SOI.omoN CRAMER
\ late of l lade i 'nunt>, Flor-
ida, in the Count) Judges of Dade
County, and file th,- same in dupli-
cate and as provided in Section 7SS.16.
Florida Statutes, In their "flees In
the Count) Courthouse In Dade Coun-
iv, Florida, within six calendar months
from the time "f the first publication
hereof, hi the sum,, will i.' barred*
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 27th
day of June, \.1>. ]";t
SARAH li CRAMER
\~ rati iitrlx
MAC MERMELL
\ .,....., f,,,- |.-v..,.(-i
l?0 S.W. 3rd Ave., Miami.
7 .-,-12-19-26
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
.. No. 63C 7232
1 ONNIE SORENSEN.
Plaintiff,
vs.
1,1:11- sih;i:\si:n.
1 'if, mlant.
SUi r FOR DIVORCE
TO: LEIP SORENSEN
p Dr. Richard K. BlaisdeU
ii... I-.. :.:.tii Place
Chicago -7. Illinois
Yi.ii are herebj notified thai r Com-
plaint for Divorce has hi n filed
against you, and you are required to
s. i-v,. a cops ..f your Answer "i- Plead-
ing to the Complaint on the Plaintiffs
nttorney, PHYLLIS 8HAMPANIER,
M"! Biscayne Blvd., Miami :i, Fla .
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing in the office "f the Clerk of the
circuit Court on or i" u !- the 5th day
"i A igust, 1962, If you fall to 'I" so,
Judgement by default will be taken
'-.. list von f,,i the relief demanded
in rIi.- i'ompkilnt.
DUNE AND ORDERED u Miami,
Florida, this Jrd day of July. A.D.
1968.
i: B I.EATHF:RMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, l lorida
(seal) By: K. M. i.yman.
Di put) i'l. rk
7 5-12-19-26
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE Ls HEREBY UIVEN thai
the undersilQied, desiring to engage In
l.llslness Ullt>%llle fictitious ll.ltlle of
81ROTBX igtBisK'r CORNER nt 2261 I
Balsedo StreVfT Coral Gables, Floi
Intend* to register saiil name ith I
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of'
Daile County, Florida.
NAT GREENRERQ
Soli 11 m r
PRED & NEWMAN
Attorneys for Applicant
>".". Hade Federal llldg.
7 12-19-26, v i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 4615
MARTA OCEQUBRA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SERGIO O. OCEGUERA,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: SERGIO O. OCEGUERA
San Rafael 1477 Parada 22,
Banturce, Puerto Rico.
You, SERGIO ii. OCEGDERA. S.
Rafael 1477 Parad.i 22 Banturoe, PR,
ar,. required to file your answer to
tin- Complaint for divorce, with the
Clerk of the above Court, and serve
a copy thereof upon Glno P. Negretti,
Attorney 910-11 Congress Blilg.. Ill
N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Florida, on or
before the 6th day of Auciist. 1962, or
ana complaint will be taken an con-
fessed.
Dated this 27th day of June, 1963.
E. B. LEATIIKHMAX. Clerk.
circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: N. A, HBWETT,
Deputy Clerk
_______________________7/6-12-19-26
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
* +Jewist thxrkHom
olicitg your legal notice*.
W appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial fr :i- n,er
for messenger senrice
i\
-
N
[IIIK
I 1 -t.lt
l, "'' "'> notified ami fa-
'l to present any claims and de-
I,,,' "" "hu-li you mav have against
K.,'i,',"",''! "r ItlHiil.lMl PEL-D-
"ii.ii deceased late <.f Dade Coun-
.i-ioi Ida, t ,|lr County Judges of
'" ounty, and file the name In
te ami ;,s provided in Section
';" riorlda Statutes, in their of-
- in th.. County Courthouse in
""iv Ploi Ida, within six cal-
.,'";" months from the llm of the
';'.', '"jn-lcntlon hereof, or Hi same
i hi tie barn >l
""''i it Miami, Florida, this 2nd
I "' i II) \ I). I'u,:
HFINRY NORTON
BAMfEL, li:i.|iscinn
.... As Co-Ehcecutors
lu.i1"!1-1 '"""' "i ibis notice on
,\', ," '' July, I24S.
i"-M.\ NORTON
" nej fi r i',,
U|
-Kxecutors
II Bldg., .Miami, l-'la.
NOTICE UNDFR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
Hi. mid. signed, di sli Ing to i
in business tinder the following fic-
titious ii imes .it ihe addresses set
itl ;lo il i si- I I v.i .-:
Stae l.i'iuors, si S.W, .'.7th Avenue,
Miami:
tlSH-l.ivhl Inn, sss S.W. 57th Avenue,
Miami:
Stati I Iquors, 6205
nue, Mi.i
st.i llquoi
m ami.
Slat.' i him '-. i',xl
mi.. Miami.
Si Liquors,
Nortl M n
I. nui -. "."!.
South Mi.mil.
St n 11 I i q uoi s, -''
Pert
- || I i not s,
tvay, Mini
K 151
ii.n. Miami;
. ~. Sllli
Miami
.- lie- l.i.|ii.-i -, 2713
Mia
Carol i'u'. i.i'i
Stree Mia il:
Stati Liquors \ da Drive A
Dixie ll \ H
Redlan I Tin. i n, Avocado I'm.
Ho. I'i': 11" > I lamest i ."I.
SI tti Mquol -. i: h -'t .v 10th Ave.,
Hlaleah
I- lamingo I .iquors,
Ave., Hi ill Ii.
Post Inn, 2900 \V. -'ml Avi nue,
hah:
Pool PBi kage, : R. lib Ave.,
I,.ih
Hideaway. 1006 E. 19th Street,
lean.
It...... ^,.1,11,, _'i,i calm
nue, Hlaleah;
DUieianu L. quora, 127 N.W.
Street, Miami!
Harmony Lounge, 1006 B. ti'th Bl
Hlaleah:
Park liar, 27.00 Palm Avenui
hah:
Jefferson Liquor, l"1" N. .Miami Beach
Blvd., N. Miami Reai h;
62 Bar, 600 l-:. Mh Street, Hlaleah:
Mai Tab Vi nd ng, 1656 i N.W. 15th
Avenue, Miami:
Intends to register snld names with
Ih, i -|, rg ,,i in, Otrcull Court of
Dadi County, Florida
CAST LEWI K)D INTERNATION M.
CORP
Bj DAVID I. SLINEY,
Vice Pr< -id. in.
HARRY ZI'KERNICK,
Attorney for Applli mt
N.W. 27th ive-
- rt 22nd St.,
\ w 7th Avi
n i:. 167th Street,
w 10th St.,
i: il him us Si
So |i \ High-
Dixie High-
Miami Avenue,
'. n I67tti Stri
::7I". N i\
v
'ii Ii St. .<
nub
lii.i-
Hia
111:.-
Ave-
l ith
ret.
lli.l-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 63C 7218
SAM LONDON,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRIEDA LONDON,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: FRIEDA l.< 'NDON
:': laist ii, in} Clay
Whlteflsh Bay
Miiw.iukee, Wisconsin
You are hereby notified thai a Com-
plain! for Divorce has been filed in
the above styled Court against you
and you are required to serve a oops
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Complaint on the I'la in tiff's attorney,
ABB si'lU'M i:i.n. 275 Northslde
Plata, Northslde i enter, Miami. Flor-
ida, and ii'' the original Answer "i
I'leading In tin office of the Clerk of
the circuit Com t in Dade County,
1- lorida, on oi '> foi the Ith day of
Viil-usi. |662. if "'i fall to do so.
Judgment by Default will i' taken
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, tin- Jrd day of July,
l: i: l.KA'llll.it.M AN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: K. M. I.V.MAN.
Deputy Clerk
\ BE SI 'Hi INF ELD
Attorni v for Plaintiff
L'7:. North
Norl li.-iili- i'i in. i. M lainl, Fla.
7 5-12-19-26
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
- "NOTICE IS HEREBY UIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
TOPPB DIKCtlCNT CENTERB at 125
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, int.mis
to register s:,i.i name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Couutv,
Florida,
TOPPB DISCOUNT CENTERS-
CORAL OAI1LES, INC,
KOVNER 8 MANNHE1MER
Attorne) for Topps Discount
Centei s-i Joral I labli -, in,-.
________________________7 10-26. S 9
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 58795-A
IN RE: Estate ..'
IBBAHAM G1NRBURQ
I li i eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Against Said
Kst.'it, :
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present an) claims and de-
mands which you maj have against
the estati "I ABRAHAM QINSHCRd
deceased late of Dade County, Flor-
ida, i" th, Co ints Judges of I de
County, ami file the same In dupli-
cate and as provided in Section 733.16,
Ftorlds Stal ites, In thi Ir offlci In
the Count) Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within six calendar
months from the tin.....r Ihi fl si
publication hereof, or ih, same ill
I,.- barred.
Dated .it Miami, Florida, this 21sl
dny "f June, A.D. : >6 I,
i'i m publh .iti.'ii of this notice mi
the 12th .1 iv of July, 1962.
BAHRFiTT M. ROTHENBERC
.\s Administrator '.t.a.
CA1DIN ROTHENRFJRG
Atorneys for Administrator C.T.A.
105 Blsc i > ne Building
Miami :;:. Florida
7 12-16-26, 6 -2
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COUPT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATL
No. 48174 C
IN RE: Estate of
IIAKRY HF:ck a'k a
ERR1 BECK,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO "IAe E
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that wn
have filed mir I'inal Iti-port and Pe-
tition for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge at Co-Executors of estate
'it HARRY" 1!F:i"K iizk HERRI
deck, deceased: and that -tie 5ih
day of August, 1962, "ill .only to
the Honorable County Judged of Dade
County, Florida, for approvj of said
Final Report and for distrll itlon and
final discharge :is Co-Exe ito
the estate "t thi above-ns .i di
dent. This Mli day of .1 ul-
RENEE JAFFE BEl
IRVING BECK
us Co-Executors of thi i "
HARRY It EC K a k
BECK, Deceased.
SIMi IN, HAYS & URCNDW1
ai torney
:',"l Alnsley Building
Miami 22, Florida
7 1.'- .
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L' .V
NOTICE IS herf:uy til
the undersigned, desiring t" -
business undi i the flctitiou-
BARBARA JANE DRESS I
-!-I Coral w :i>, Miami, l
tends to register said nami I the
Clerk of the Circuit 'out I
County, Florida.
ULADTbT APPARELS C '
By: I, R. Mayers, I 'i i -
I R. MAYERS
Attorney for < III ds s' Appan -
1612 Congri -- Building
Miami 22, Florida
7 -
ISO Llm "in Road
Miami Beach, Fioi I li
7, l>-2, I t-l
T 26, 8 2-6-16
NOTiCE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA iN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 7285
P. C. .Ii INKS,
Plaintiff,
\ s.
JULIE JONES,
li< fendnnt.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: JC14E JONES
3o4S .Michigan Street
Kansas u> m.msOUI i
i Y'ou, JULIE JONEB, are hereby no-
tified that a Coniidnlnt for Divorce
ins I,.-, n filed against you, and you
jare required lo serve a copj of your
Answer or Pleading to the Complaint
on the Plaintiff's attorney, J. David
.l.i.-liiii.tn. 622 North Krone Vvcnue,
Homestead, Florida, and file the orig-
inal Answer or Pleading In the office
of the Clerk of the cireuit Court on
.,1 bofore thi 12th day of August.
,1662. it you fall t" do so, judgim il
hy it, fault will li,' t:ik,'il ami,list \ on
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
DONE AND ORDERFJD at Miami,
Florida, this 5th dny .,f July, A.l).
1962
i: i: LEATHERM \N. Cli rk,
Circuit Court, Ihide County, Florida
(seal) Bj : K M. LTMAN,
Deputs Clerk
.1 DAVID LIBBM \N
6 .: .\' r ll l\l "in, A\ ,11110
I lone stead, Florida
Atorne) i"i Plaintiff
7.12-19-26, 3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
No. 63C 7400
.I1STINI-: ii. I'TALand BEATRICE
I'I'AI.. his wife,
Plaintiffs,
\ B.
JACK ROBEN, RtlBERT MARKO-
W1TZ and MARKOW it/..
his Ifi.
Defendants.
SUIT FOR BREACH OF LEASE
'I'i i. .hi, i, Rosen
tti \v. hi I'-ih Street
Baltimore, Man bind
You are hereby notified thai s Bill
of Complaint for Breach of Lease has
been filed againsi you, and >ou an
required t" nerve a copy of your An-
swer or Pleading to the Bill of Com-'
plalni "ii I hi Plaintiff's ttorm \ s,
8HEYIN, GOODMAN & HOLTZMAN,
246 Seybold Building, Miami, I lorida,
and file the ..iiuiii.il Answer or Plead-
ing ii t).....i ii of the i'lerk of the
>'r. uit i "ourl of I lade I 'ount>. F'lorida
on oi before thi 12th day of August
A.D., 1962. If you fail I...... so,
Judgmi m i" ,:, fault ill i"- taken,
This notice shall he published once
each week or foil consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH PLORID1AN
I INE AND i il'.l lERED II Miami.
I 'lei,' i 'ountj. i- or .la this Bth dai ol
July, A.D.,
i: II. l.i: VTHERMAN
rk nf thi uit i 'ourt
I lade County, Florida
(seal) By: C P, Ci "PELAND,
i'. i ut) Clerk
SHEVIN, GtHtDMAN \ HOLTZMAN
A torn, \.- foi Plaintiff
246 Sej In,Id Hulldl
Miami
B] : llmi; M. Rosen
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L* .V
NOTICE IS HEREBY i:i\
the undersigned, desiring to < i
buslni ss ii ii. I. : ihe flititiou-
11: nix MENS SHOP at ".
Ilns Ave., Miami, Fla., Intem to reg.
1st) i- lid name n Ith the i'
Cireuit Court of Dade Couni
AL-GEN, INC,
Sou- Owner
7 ..
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Nii'IIi'K IS HEREBY i!IV 'I that
th, undersigned, desiring t" gagi
business under the fictltlout
.MAKI.IMJ'S FASHIONS al
17th St.. Miami. Fla., Inten* -
Isti r -aid nani. with the Cli r
Circuit Court of Dade Count
MARID LEWIS
HATTEN& SALEM
Attorneys for Marid 1.. "is
7/12-
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COl :~
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLOR.DA IN PROBATE
No. 60017 C
IN RE: Estate of
JUNE MARION KATZ
.....ased
NOTICE TO CREDITOPS
To All Credltoi and All iv> -
Ing Claims or Demands At.
Estate:
You are hi 'i by notified
quired to pri i I any claln -
mands which you may havi
thi tate of JUNE MARK
i..-. ., -. .1 late l lade Cou
i'i.i. to the County Judges
County, and file the sami
at. and as i Ided In Seel
i i.....la Statutes, in their
the i"- i,t> i "oni ihous. in 11
>. Florida, w ii hln six calem
ti..in the tlm..... the I i l
hi ri of, or : ii'- same will
Dated al Miami. Florida,
da) ol i mi am. 1962.
MILTON A. FRIEDM
11 I l Alnsle) Bldg., Mi. mi ...
As E!xecutor
MILT IN A. l'KllM'MAN
Attot n, for .line Marlon K
llll Alnsle) Bldg., Miami 22, I
.
12-16-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No. 62C 136S7
ZAIDA Ml.l.\l:i>,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VIROILLO 'I. MIJARES,
I left lulant
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: V1RG1LIO O. MIJARES
Addrens PnknoM n
Yiil'. V1RGILIOQ. MIJARES, prea-
ant residence unknown, are required
to file youi answer tn the complaint for
divorce, with the Clark of the above
Court, and serve a copy thereof noon
Glno P. Negretti, Attorney, '.'lii-ll
Congress Building, 111 N E nd Ave.,
Miami, i lorida, on or he for, i He 12th
day of August, 1962, i romptalnt
will i taken a confi ii.
I ini, .1 this -:li d) of .mli. 1962,
i: Fl LEATHERM \N. Clerk,
Circuit Court, i '.'i.ie '.mm Florida
(si al) B) K M I.YM \N,
Deput) Cluk
12-19-26, v _'
IN THF COUNTY JUDGE'S CCl r-T
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 59964.C
IN RE: Estol.....
HARRIET D. WEXLER
I leceased.
NOTICE TQ CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Pi i -
iii^ Claims or Demands Ana.
Estate:
You are hereby notified
ii' Ired i" pi eat m any ola Imi .
mai ds which you may havi .
the estate "t HARRIET D. V
di aaed lati ol 1 lade Counl
ida. to the Counts Judges Dadi
County, and file the same i i
cr Ie and as provid. ,1 in Seel
Florida statutes, in then- ofl
lie cnnty i'ourthousi in Dadi
'v. F'lorida, within six calends
i'i mil the time of the flrsl p
hi ri of, or thi u me w ill bi
Dated at Miami, Florida, i I
da) ". June \ 11 1962
MORRIS WEXLER
S l". -i 76th Sir,-, t
New Yi rk, N. York
Vs Executoi
l.n INEL T,. 111.IN
Al tornei for F7xi cutor
' 'in- i.in, ..in i: I. Bldg.
Miami I'., aek. Floi Ida
.


Page 12-A
vJewisti ftcridifan
Fiidcy, July 28, 1963

*
PEPSI-COLA COMPANY ANNOUNCES
New! A sugar-free cola with
rewarding true-cola taste!!
PATIO DIET COW

FIGURE EXPERT
DEBBIE DRAKE says: I
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'SUGAR-FREE-
ONLY 1 CALORIE PER SERVING!"
"Now you can satisfy that natural yearning for refreshment and still
stay slim. New Patio Diet Cola contains only one calorie per serv-
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cola taste because it's made with true-cola ingredients by Pepsi-Cola
Company. Be modern...look modern. Try it today. It's the refreshing
way to stay slim. New Patio Diet Cola."
THE REFRESHING WAY TO SfAY SUM'"
m
REWARDING TRUE-COLA TASTE!"
ff
Patio
DIET COLA
AVAILABLE AT
YOUR
DEALER'S NOW
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BOTTLED BY WSI-COtA BOTUERS Of MIAMI. ,NC, .251 N.W.
3fth STREET. UNDER ANOINTMENT MOM fmx** CONMfff N.Y.. N.v.


*.mu,
ornan s
UUorU
' tJewish Floridia
Miami. Florida, Friday, July 26, 1963
-
n 5
Local Pioneers to Join Convention
"Break-through at Cedars" finds Bette Rosenberg (right) mov-
.ng merchandise from the Gift Shop just ahead of the wreck-
ing crew's sledge hammers. The shop will be tripled in size
aner construction now under way is completed. Mrs. Alice
Cole deft), chief receptionist, lends a hand with the moving
*ob which is nart of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital's expansion
program to add 174 new beds, complete the upper three floors,
and expand laboratory and surgical areas.
...SOCIALITE
by ISABEL GROVE
II was a fifteenth wedding an-
niversary for Mr. ami Mrs. Jacob
Mary) Scher and a family party
al their Belle Tower apartment
"..'i-- Isle ... So a happy
group of thirty gathered for cock-
tails, and then up cruised a pleas-
ure boat to the Belle Tower dock.
tii re the private party hoarded
an inland waters ride and
ft dinner .
Mary, incidentally, is now in
H dersonvUle with her sister.
Mrs. Martha Tipins. for ten days
sit the Tippins youngsters at
p there They lett Irom
ii on Monde),
Mr. and Mrs. Bugene Dynner,
520 Ancona Ave., (oral Gables.
mtertained Friday night at a
tamily dinner honoring' the re-
i. of Dr. and Mrs. Martin H.
nee Judith Ann Dynner) .
Dr. Mat/, has been in charge of
I i obstetrical Department at
Blylheville Air Force Base Hos-
pital in Arkansas He will
no \ open an office for private
ice in No. Miami Beach...
Bi fore leaving BIytheville.
h u as honored by the Offi-
Vives Club for her "out-
service to the commun-
She taught Sunday School
tevilie Synagogue, gave
unMp Red Cross flrst-aW
cour and wrote for the Blythe
i -paper She will be
ing at Carol City Elemen-
tal School this eoming year .
Also honored at the family din-
ner were Alan Dynner and his
new bride. Nancy, visiting in Mi-
ami before returning from their
honeymoon to New Haven, Conn-
where Alan is a student at Yale
Law School.
> a I
Celebrating their wedding an-
niversary at dinner with friends.
Milt and Maicia Balsam admit-
ted their camping twins. Nina
and Alan, would have made the
evening complete But the
little ones remembered, and later
called from Sky Lake in Sautee.
Ga.. to sing a "Happy Anniver-
sary" duet to their beaming par-
ents .
The Harry W. Beyers, of 19720
NW 12th Ave., have left for their
summer cottage at Lake Geneva.
Keystone Heights, a resort near
Gainesville .
Joe and Hazel Dallet writing
friends from Norway that "this is
the life"' .
Harvey and Jean Fleischman,
accompanied by son Richard, are
back from a three and a half-
week cruise in the Bahamas
aboard their boat.
* *
"Doc"' Ed Kowarsky, of the
Dul'ont Health Club, has heard
from his friends. Dr. and Mrs.
Leo Levin, visiting Switzer-
land, Norway. Denmark. Holland
and France .
Sheldon Kay and his Evelyn
oil from the Miami area for a
Continued on Pgt 4-B
By Special Report
"Today's Woman in Tomorrow's
World" will be theme of the 18th
biennial convention of Pioneer
Women, the Women's Labor Zion-
ist Organization of America, to
be held in Detroit, Mich., on Aug.
U to 14, Mrs. Sidney Leff, national
preaident, announced this week.
Delegates attending will include
Mrs. Moses Meyers and Mrs.
Sarah Shapoff, representing the
Greater Miami Council of Pioneer
Women; Mrs. Isaac Pushkin, pres-
ident, and Mrs. Anna Sorin Bild,
publicity, Golda Meir Club; Mrs.
Jack Sills, president, Kadimah
Chapter; Mrs. Dora Offenhenden,
president, Beba Idelson Club;
Mrs. Sofia Krantz, president,
Club 1; and Mrs. Sally Grecnberg
and Mrs. Frieda Sack. Club 2.
Highlighting the theme will be
addresses by two leading women
SSSSEL
legislators, Beba Idelson, deputy
speaker of the Israel Parlia-
ment, and Martha Griffiths, Con-
gresswoman from Michigan.
"Women's Role in Israel" will be
discussed by Mrs. Idelson, who
is also secretary of Israel's larg-
est women's organization, Moetzct
Hapoalot (sister organization of
Pioneer Women).
Cong. Griffiths, who is the first
woman ever to be elected to the
House Ways 'and Means Commit-
tee, will discuss "American Wom-
en's Role in Tomorrow's World."
Over 600 delegates, represent-
ing 50.000 members throughout the
United States and Canada, will at
tend workshops and discussion
sessions as they seek to define
the role and responsibilities of
the modern American Jewish
I woman in world affairs, and to
plan Pioneer Women's social ser-
vice and educational programs in
the United States and Israel .'
the next two years.
Other special speakers '
elude Walter Reuther. v W
ident, A.F. of L.-C.I.O. aa pw -
dent. United Automobilt w'Offa
of America; Hon. Ogdei He:
Congressman from New Y a!
former Ambassador to laM
Mrs. Ora Goitein, Wome-'s Af-
tache. Israeli Embassy,
ton; and Mrs. Sidney Lef:. nation-
al president, Pioneer Worren.
Golden Ring
Golden Ring Club 01
Peach will hold a part>
members who are 70 aril older
at a function Saturday. ;
the Farband Center. 842 Wi
ton Ave., according to B.
Cohen, chairman of am nenu.
Charles Zellers, president of the South Florida Chapter of the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, accepts a check presented by Mrs.
Saul Iarrett, vice president in charge of fund-raising of the
George Gershwin Knights of Pythias Ladies' Auxiliary, at
Hibiscus Temple. Other officers include Mrs. Jack Hennan
AUTHENTIC BLEEDING
MADRAS SHIRTS
BY COS COB
For school, for chic our
India madras shirt that's guaranteed
to bleed and mellow with
every washing! Select this classic
in a variety of tones;
sires 30 to 36.
BLOUSES, MIAMI (SECOND FLOOR).
AlSO DADELAND. MIAMI BEACH.' )63'd StREET.
fl. tAUOERDAlE. WEST PAIM BEACH.
N
m



Page 2-B
f.knMi Fkridfir>n
Friday, July 26.
Beach Girl
Takes Air Course
Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Cadet
Second Lieut. EtndS D. "MikTOTTitzT
daughter ot .Mr. and Mrs. Manny
Miklowitz. of 1345 Drexel Ave.,
Miami Beach, has completed a 10-
day Air Force orientation en
campment at Orlando, AFB.
Cadet Miklowitz, a member of
the Miami Beach CAP .squadron. \\'e have many ways to make i tenderizer is used, no salt is need-,
n reived briefings on modern mis- the tougher cuts of meat tender led, and the meat is best when,
siles at the Air Force Tactical and paltable. We can cook them i cooked from rare to medium, no
Missile School here, and on com- in liquid or steam them until they longer.
bat and support aircraft at near- literally fall apart. We can grind, i Our recipes today are for two
by McCoy Air Force Base. pound, or score them. When we fine dishes using top of the rib
The cade; was trained in home soak ihem in a marinade contain- or the kosher tenderloin. Both call
orner
squadron management and the jng vinegar or lemon juice, the for the unseasoned tenderizer. but
Air ForceCAP role in national acu] acts as a tenderizer. From either the regular or instant may
defense. She earned a certificate cooks in Bogota, Colombia, comes be used. The first recipe is a well-
of proficiency in her job special- the trick of soaking steaks over- flavored London Broil for which
t\. night in lemon juice to cover, a top of the rib is an ideal cut. For
The cadet is a student at Ida simple way to acquire a brand new the second recipe, Beef in Buns,;
M. Fisher Junior High School. flavor and extra softness. We can either top of the rib or the tender
get more tenderness and loin may be used. Both dishes
and spread half the seasoning
mixture evenly over the surface.
Broil until the side which is near-
! er the heat is browned. Turn
over 2SJ -isl'rgjd wi,n ,hl" rc.n,ain-
ntg mixture. Complete the broil-
ing, but cook only until rare or
1 medium. To serve, carve diagon-
ally across the grain, both for
extra tenderness and to get more
geneiWtt slices. Thi> amount
serve* 5 to 6. generously.
Beef in Buns
m lbs. top of rib or kosher
tenderloin
Unseasoned vegetable tenderizer
'4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons white vinegar
U cup tomato juice
>4 cup minced onion
'4 teaspoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon chicken Lit
6 hamburger buns
of the soit inside bread, heat,
fill with the meat and just eat
gravy to moisten. This anuj
>erves 6. Serve'extra gravy
hakt;d BOtatge^, _
STARRING!
even
Remove nil fat
Chaim Weizmann Branch of Added to all these is a newer
Farbar.d will install 100 new mem- way, the use of a commercial ten-
ar.d the thin
the meat
c-
broil by carving them on the bias, est to summer meals. To serve (ions on the package. With a
with the knife tilted. | the Beef in Buns at a picnic, slice sharp knife cut the meat into quar-
and marinate the meat at home, ter-inch thick slices, cutting
Wmrmnnn Rmnrh shorten the fibers of cooked Swiss are suitable for indoor or outdoor membrane which covers the mea
nciAlHUiiii vanVI1 s(eak corncd beef or London cooking, and will add new inter- Tenderize according to the dire
Planning Supper
Tut the meat and marinade in a slightly on the diagonal. Com-
line the oil. soy sauce, vinegar,
bers at a supper on Sunday. Aug. derizer. This is a vegetable pro-, Jar- *J ,i6h'1-v- an(?.,?a'k ** ,"
11, at the Fontainbleau Hotel. duct and kosher. When we use ** "Pf1*"* Kecp l'hllIod """' '"m;" ,U"'- n'0n- "^ ^"^
In charge of arrangements are it on less choice rib steak or rib c0O*lnS time.
Aaron Katz and Irving Sachs, roast, or skirt steak or tenderloin, i
Harry Sacks is membership chair-J the meat becomes as fine and soft
man, and Moe Levin is president, as a cut of prime quality. And
Program will include a speaker when we use the tenderizer as di-
and several musical numbers.
If you like
reeled on such cuts as chuck
steak or top of the rib. the meal
becomes soft enough to boil. From
the calachel, also known as the
eye of the chuck, we can cut thick
1 small steaks, tenderize them, and
London Broil
2'- lbs. top of the rib
Unseasoned meat tenderizer
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
' teaspoon pepper
1 medium clove garlic, crushed
2 teaspoons minced parsley
Pour over the meat and stir to
coat the puces. Cover, and re-
frigerate several hour- Turn the
meal in the marinade once or
tw ice durin this time. Heat the
fat in a large frj Ing pan over
medium heat, add Ihe meal
ade, and stir until Ihe mi il
ked from rare to medium,
[erred, Do noi cook
II the buns almost
KREPLACH
T'
X
Ravioli
IN SAUCE
Select a piece of top of the rib
have mock tilet mignons delicious which is al least an inch thick. "
in flavor and delightfully moder- Sprinkle it with the tenderizer ac-
te in price. The tenderizer may cording to the directions on the
be purchased seasoned or unsea- package. Combine the remaining
soned, instant or regular. Be sure ingredients No salt is used as
to gel the type you wish, and use there is sufficient salt taste in the
exactly as the directions state, tenderizer. Place the meat on the
.\l>o. remember that when the rack 0/ a broiler, or on a grille.
mvn
m a glass
Ot A CUf
just
ret'
eatt
You'll love
CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
CHEESE RAVIOLI
Hear family, guests, cheer for
that real Italian flavor created by
famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender
little macaroni pies...filled with
tangy Italian Cheese...simmered
with savory tomato sauce and
Cheese...seasoned the real Ital-
ian way. So much tastier and
asier than the frozen kind. So
inuch thriftier, toocosts only
bout 15c par sarvingl
Delegates Listed Temple Or Olom Meeting
Tft r^AnVt^ntlAn Temple Or Olom will have a
' vOnVcnTIOn ; general membership meeting on
The following delegates will rep- Sunda>' evening at the Temple,
resent this area as official dele- #
gates to the four-day convention OpePQ*iOn BiKSni
of the free, non-sectarian Chil- j
(Ten's Asthma Research Institute Curhfl.RflrkA^llO
and Hospital at Denver on July ^Wim-DQrOeCUe
28 to 31: Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood of
Mrs. Irving Miller, president, Beth Torah Congregation will,
So. Florida Council of Presidents; sponsor an "Operation Bikini" 1
Mrs. Marvin Sokolow. president, swim and barbecue on Saturday'
Breath of Life Chapter; Mrs. Paul evening. Aug. 3, at the Bal Har-1
Hershman, president. North Dade hour Hotel.
Chapter; Mrs. Albert Weiner. The evening will feature dancing
president. Greater Miami Chap- and swimming under the stars,
ter; Mrs. Sidney 1,'ittermen, pres- vith games and prizes. A native
ident, Miami Beach Chapter; Mrs. Calypso band will provide enter
Marvin Guberman, president, Lor-, uiinmcnt
ber Chapter; Mrs. Robert Herbert. 1 ,. of ^ t d f ,
recording -secretary. Peahkin jl:forlll;lI1(111 ;irp Mrs M
Chapter; and Mrs. Donald Jacob- Spont|cr
son, guest, Breath of Life Chap- Rran
ter.
Delegates from all over the na-
tion will learn of newest develop-
ments in treatment and research
TETLEY TEA
A TRADITION
IN JEWISH
HOMES
SINCE 1837
Y, there's Yom To* spirit Is
this fine tea..."flavor crushed"
for fullest strength and stimu.
Utioo... richer taste and pleas.
re with your flcishigi and
ilehifts tod bctwen soeai
refreshment...
with
five
extra
laundratives
FAB gets every wash far
cleaner than the deter-l
gent alone because FA3l
lias more than a deter-l
gent... adds five extral
laundratives to get wash]
clean clear through asl
the deterge"' alone can-|
not do.
CLEAN
CLEAR
THROUGH!
KOSHER PARVl
PRODUCT OF COLG*T;PALMOli
FOR
> STAR <
/ DISHWASHING N
and Mrs. Lawrence
total treatment, care, rehabilita-
tion and research center for in-
in asthma and allergies in this tractable asthmatic children.
v
Certified Kother
**le* anct Rabbinical SvptnUcm
ONLY GENUINE SWISS CHEESE IMPORTED FROM
SWITZERLAND HAS THIS SEAL ON THE PACKAGE
It is your protection against Imilations-your guarantee of excellence in flavor, texture and
quality. Look for the word "Switzerland" on the Swiss Cheese you buy...chunk or sliced...
CFRTirifO
KOSHER

PARVE
I
j\
Sugnnne
For real ta'am of
Switzerland!
Switzerland
nmsr-suum
CAlOtllltll
uouib iwmma
* kfht br.(M MrtwM
ftenin| (u'wlMf
ocrot-irnovs
101 DiAima
sow ;aioci Dim
lot rTCH(N .
4-0/. iorru
omr
m no> naaa
otimmui
GUARANTEED NON-FATTENING!
IMPROVE
PINK LIQUI
1^
Now stepped up in
grease-cutt'fig M
Cleans pots and pan$|
quick a-i oasy as
glasses and plates
1^ And milder than
the leading baby soap


Friday. July 26, 1963
>Jeistinvrii7
Pcfje 3-B
it
+.-
Kauffmans Head
DAY Units Here
Mr. and Mrs. A. Henry Kauff-
'.man. were recently installed as
I commanders of Miami Beach-
! Surf>ide Chapter and Auxiliary 24
of the Disabled American Vet-
erans.
They will host the national con-
: vention of DAV scheduled at the
Carillon Hotel on Aug. 18 to 24.
j Past Department Commander
Victor Freedman installed the of-
' ficers, together with Department
Commander Ross Grayam and
Senior Vice Commander Carl Hoff.
Also installed as officers of the
Hadassah pays tribute to Mrs. Marietta P. Tree, special ad-
viser to the United Slates Mission to the United Nations. Mrs.
Siegfried Kramarsky, national president of Hadassah (right),
presents Hadassah's "Award of Honor" to Mrs. Tree "in rec-
ognition of her ceaseless efforts in advancing the principle of
freedom and eguality among all peoples in our own land and
throughout the world." Occasion was a luncheon at Hadas-
sah House in New York City, attended by 47 representatives
of 35 delegations to the United Nations and members of Ha-
dassah's national board.
Couples Plan Theatre Party
Young Married Couples Group
of Beth David Congregation is
planning a theatre party during
the month of August.
Tentatively scheduled is a per-1
furmance of "Romanoff and Jul-
iet'1 at the Coconut Grove Play- ]
house on Saturday evening, Aug. I',
17, according to Lewis F. Cohen, '
president, who is accepting reser-;
v.iiions.
The club met at the home of
Mi. and Mrs. Don Plotkin. 455
Tivoli, Coral Gables, last Satur-
day evening. Couples attending
included Mr. and Mrs. Lewis
Cohen, Mr. and Mrs Sheldon
Krantz, Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Marks, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Spec-
tor. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Bialeck.
Mr. and Mrs. David Platt, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Friodland, Mr.
nd Mrs. Eli Singer, Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry Pollak. Mr. and Mrs. Joel
Leibow, Mr. and Mrs Irwin Mess-
inger, Mr. and Mrs. Sy Schulcm-
on.
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Shaw. Mr.
and Mrs. Neal Levine. Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Singer, Mr. and Mrs
Leonard Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Chekanow. Mr. and Mrs.
Norman Sirk, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Bauer, and Mr. and Mrs. Allen
Kaplan.
Also attending were Rabbi Nor
man \. Shapiro, spiritual leader
of Beth David, and Mr. and Mrs.
Nat Pollack, executive director.
chapter were Noah Sinyler, senior
vice commander; Max Thurston,
Junior vice commander; Earl
Hampton, second vice command-
er; Phil Gallagher, chaiplain; Min-
nie Hofman. treasurer; Ray Rag-
land, sergeant alarms; Herbert.
' Unger, officer of the day; and!
Walter Rex. Mitch Reiner, and!
Murray Eisenberg, trustees.
In addition to Mrs. Kauffman,;
officers of the auxiliary are Mes-|
dames Pauline Thurston, senior
I \ice commander; Helen Wieder-
I hold, chaplain; Rosanne Hampton,|
treasurer; Irene Angelillis, adjut
ant; Ray Liebenberg, sergeant-at-!
| arms; and Dorothy Eisenberg.
j telephone.
Mayor Melvin Richard present-,
1 ed Keys to the City of Miami
Beach to the Kauffmans to mark
their dual installation.
Miami Beach Mayor Melvin Richard presents keys to the city
to Mr. and Mrs. A. Henry Kauffman, incoming command* i
of Miami Beach-Surfside Chapter and Auxiliary 24 of D:sc bled
American Veterans, at recent officer installation held by the
chapter here.
Beth Am Units Hold Meetings
Carl Harold. 5741 Marius St.,
Coral Gables, chairman of the Cap
ital Funds Committee of Temple
Beth Am, held a meeting at his
home on Tuesday evening.
A special board meeting of the
Temple was held last week to hear
a final report by the Building Com-
mittee.
The new sanctuary is < : tod
to be completed by the High Holy
Days, according to ehai man of
i the committee. Herman Feklman.
I The sanctuary will bouse 400
permanent seats, making a total
seating capacity of 1.600 -.'
o
Etman to Bring
Latest Fur Styles
Now in its second successful
season in this area, me Miami
Beach Branch of I. K. Etman Fur-
riers, at the DiLido Hotel, parti-
cipated in the recent Miss Uni-
verse Pageant, presenting to the
Zionist Council of South Florida a
mink capelet which was given to
Mist Israel, Sherine Ibrahim.
Etman also presented a white
jasmine mink stole to Miss U.S.A.,
Marite Ozers (Miss Illinois).
Etman, whose main fur salon
and factory is located at 350 7th
Ave., New York City, has been
engaged in all phases of the in-
dustry for over 30 years. He has
presented many of his novelty
furs at fashion shows of the not-
ed designer, Sol Vogel. He has
also had displays at the Court of
Peace at the World's Fair in New
York City.
In Mi youin. Mr. Etman spent
ten years in Israel as a young
pioneer, coming to this country in
1930. He has now returned to
New York, where he will remain
until the opening of the fall sea-
son in Miami Beach, at which
time he will bring to his DiLido
Salon the latest fur styles for
1904.
^^^^^A^^A**^**^**^**^^^^^^^^^^*!**^*
MR. I. K. ETMAN
PRESENTS HIS
te Jasmine Mink Stole
AT CROWNING OF
MISS USA. MARITE OZERS
(Illinois)
AT THE CONVENTION HALL
BEAUTY PAGEANT
OF 1963
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
I. K. ETMAN FURS
STYLED AND MANUFACTURED AT
350 7th Avenue, New York, N.Y.
Telephone LOngaere 4-8334
Miami Office:
I. K. ETMAN FURS
DILI DO HOTEL
Miami Beach, Florida
Phone 531-7114
or
538-0811
kuwuy-./*. .......^twM.'^MVvx*


Page 4-B
vJeHisHtarkUan
t^ocialit
Continued from Paae Ml
few days with a trip to Vero
Beach". With them, their three
sons, Howard 19. Kichard 13. and
Kevin 12 .
The g'rls irom Cabana Row H
at Westbrooke threw a surprise
b\f Isabel \^f
party for Geri (.Mrs. Ron) Levitt,
who has been up North, and Aud-
rey (Mrs. Nate) Frinbcrg, who
moved to l'ittshuruli last year..
Party was at the home of Mrs.
Martin (Klaine) Bud nick .
Guests included Mrs. Robert
A family separated since the exodus of Jews from Hungary in
1956 is now living together again, thanks to the help of United
Hias Service. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Bond (second and fourth
left) are shown being happily rejoined with their daughter
and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Steven Moharos, cfier arriving
in New York City from Trieste on the SS Satumia. Moharos,
who came to the United States with his wife almost seven
years ago with the aid of the worldwide Jewish migration
agency, is employed by Western Electric Company as a plant
engineer.
your next affair
** KML
tiith a wonderful choice of
Miami Beach's
Newest
Luxury Hotel
DORAL
BEACH HOTEL
A nf-w standard of floganr*
on Miami Beach. Superb-
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eliding*... confirmations,
luncheons, business meet-
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or A Stunning
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club setting. Spariousne j
if the keynote for your
affair amidst the matniS-
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Country Club. Rooms that
Ideally accommodate social
groups from the most in-
timate party to banquet*
n the grand scale.
For complete details, please call
Mr. Hat id Kmrac
Doral Bearh IWotol and Country Club
JE 2-;tmo

Have that
Business Meeting,
Banquet, or
Special Occasion
f/t You'll find complete
W facilities to exactly satisfy
W yout needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
^ wedding or a private party!
It till
^
i
lor information!
HAZEL ALLISON
Catatrtnaj Director,
-IE 1-6061
SSU> St. Coll In* tv,
rove
(Dona) Parent. Mrs. Arnold (Bev-
erly) GUntz, Mrs. Jay (Stephanie)
Schreinhaus, Mrs. Philip tHclenc)
Proufc Mrs. Al (Flora) Rosen.
Mrs. Herb (Eilie) Seltman, Mrs.
Martin (Judy) I.ieblinfi, and Mrs.
Danny (BarbaraI Schockcn.
No place like home." accord-
ing to the Edward T. Newmans,
back alter a month's vacation in
Canada. New York, and Washing-
ton, D.C. While in Canada.
Newman was guest of the mayor
of Montreal at his hunting pre-
serve New York stopover was
for a Bar Mitzvah. and on Cap-
itol Hill he contoured with Rep.
Dante Fascell in his cap.uity as
Ner Tamid Day1
To be Observed
Tuesdays will be known as
Temple Ner Tamid Day" from
now on for members of the Tern
pie Sisterhood.
An executive meeting of the
women's organization held at the
hone of Mrs. Henrietta Fine,
moved to inaugurate the weekly
observance.
'Temple Ner Tamil Day" will
be devoted to meetings in the
morning, with the entire after-
noon occupied by luncheons and
donor games.
"We hope these days will give
Sisterhood an opportunity to spend
some time dedicated entirely to
social and religious activities in
behalf of Ner Tamid." Mrs. Fine
explained.
i third vice president of
,he ,'ewish Funeral Din.tors
Association.
World-famous composer ol "1
love life." Mme. Mana-Zucca,
has just completed a new song,
Could Flowers but Speak, and
dedicates it to Pansy Flaum .
A "a\ dinner party at the honu
City of Hope
To Hear Report
Mrs. Lewis Brooks, president of!
the Robyn Tubin Chapter of the
City of Hope, has just returned
from attending a convention of,
organizations affiliated with the
pilot medical center at Duarte,!
Calif. |!
Mrs, Brooks will report at the
chapter's next meeting on Aug. 8
at the First Federal Savings and
Loan Assn., 125th St. and 9th Ave.
Her presentation will feature a
showing of color slides of pro-
grams at the hospital.
The chapter was to hold a
board meeting Thursday at Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium on
167th St., at 8 p.m.
Temple Judea
Now Registering
Temple Judea this week an-
nounced that its office is now
epen daily to accept registration
for the Religious School. Classes
will resume on Tuesday, Sept. 3,
lor the fall term.
The ten-year Sunday School
program meets on Saturday and
Sunday, with classes from kinder-
garten through confirmation, .The
five-year Hebrew School program
holds classes two afternoons week
l.v.
The office, at 320 Palermo Ave .
will be open from 9 a.m. through
5 p.m.
Friday, July 26. 1963
of Norton and Gloria Pallot wr|.
corned State Rep. Murray Dub-
bin back from bis first session n*
Tallahassee Gathered werc^
Mr. and Mrs. Neil Schiff. Mr. and
Mrs. Robeti Traurig. Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Kolber. Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Dubbin. Mr. and
Mrs. Morton Segal, and Mr. and
Mis. Joe Ga>sen.

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A CONFIRMATIONS RECEPTIONS WEDDINGS,
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A Tal.a-t.la or a gala c.lebration with 3.SOO uata.
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a MEETINGS to accommodate 10 or 1,000
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For rmmHm call FR Lom in Miami, or WA 3.8m fa m
_^^ HOLLYWOOD.BY-THE.8EA


MM
Friday. July 26, 1963
fJenisfi fk>ridliar?
Page 5-B
Jleach Student Praises Dual Heritage in America
By DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN
,,Fron\. tht ..clay. Columoiis dis-
covered the New World and his
interpreter. Luis do Torres, a
Jew. was the first to touch her
soil. Jews have been intimately
bound to America. We have
grown with this land and wit-
nessed the emergence of a na-
tion. Her :i<'ritane is ours, for
our ancestors helped create it.
True, at first we Had trouble
obtaining religious freedom, but
as the American concept of lib-
erty and equality took root, the
Jews came into their own and
became a <;reat a-set to our
land. Although we Jews join-
ed with others in the strenuous
task of molding a nation out of
promising raw materials, we
have maintained our separate
identity and remained a unique
religion.
Two Heritages
Judaism expound- that each
Jew should remain loyal to the
country in which he abides.
There is no greater country for
a Jew, or anyone for that mat-
ter, to which to pledge his alle-
giance. The broa concepts,
ideals and aspirations of the
American people come unbeliev-
ably close to those of our reli-
gion, both of which contain the
most meritorious values and
......
DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN
Di thy (1 M-ici'i was the
nnnnri in /une of T/ic- /eu'isli
Flondititi Journalism and Liter-
ature Award at r'lc Hebrew
Daughter 0f \|: aj
M William Goldstein. 1070
\'i. SI 11 sht is *> A ini'
denl jnd
goals held by mankind. True
peace on earth, freedom and
democracy, recognition and re-
spect of the individual and a
sincere feeling of brotherhood
among men are a segment of the
beliefs that denote significance
to the lives of Americans and
Jews and activate them towards
8 specific goal.
Existence in Harmony
Mj two heritages are the most
perfect dual inheritance any per-
son could possess, for each is a
champion of champions in its
own allocationone is the grand-
father of all modern religions,
and the other is the democratic
showcase of the world. I am
very grateful for having been
born a member of what is to me
the most- logical and soul-satis-
fying religion of them all, and
a citizen of a republic which is
a colossus and leader among
nations, not only because of her
material wealth, but because of
her lofty ideals as well.
These two separate modes of
life do not contradict or antag-
onize one another. Rather, they
exist in harmony, one comple-
menting and clarifying the other.
Nor do diversions weaken their
bond, for the American freedom
and the Jewish tolerance of dif-
ference ot opinion only permit
the growth of mutual respect for
each other. George Washington
expressed this thought so beau-
tifully when he said. ". al-
though every citizen must ful-
fill his social and political re-
sponsibilities to his state, he is.
nevertheless, responsible to his
Maker for his religion and mode
of faith."
If I could have the genii of
Aladdin's lamp grant me any
three wishes, my requisitions
would be that non-Jewish Amer-
icans and American Jews should
not retrogress, but advance far-
ther along the road of under-
standing. These principles
should be applied in settling mis-
understandings between the peo-
ples of the world. The last wish
is undoubtedly a selfish and per-
sonal onethe assurance that
my -descendants will be privileg-
ed to live in this society where
two great heritages, American-
ism and Judaism, flourish and
strengthen side by side.
H
Pt
is
ur
IB
re
l,
Lords Drop Bias Amendment
c
.: ,i i r edita
the tchool papi
LONDON (JTA) An amend-
ment to the Public Order bill to
make uttering or publishing of
words constituting an incitement
to hatred on grounds of religion,
race, or color, a criminal offense
was proposed and withdrawn here
during consideration of the bill in
committee in the House of Lords.
The amendment was offered by
Lord Walston. who said he could
not understand how Britain could
seek to guide other nations when
JM Splash Party
not only racial discrimination, but
actual incitement to racial hatred
was permitted to go unchecked in
the country. The bill would
strengthen existing provisions of
the Public Order act. but it does
not specifically make incitement
to religious or racial hatred a
criminal offense.
Lord Chancellor Dilhorne, speak-
ing against the amendment, as-
serted that Us approval would
make a- criminal offense of any
words used in private conversa-
tion which were held to constitute
Harry H. Cohen Post 723. Jew-
ish War Veterans and Auxiliary,
will hold a .splash party and lunch-
con at the New Yorker Hotel on
Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Mrs. Harry H. Cohen, of the New
Yorker, will serve as hostess at
the luncheon
[ Mimi Baoeh
'"^f^RANI
Visit the fabulous
STARLIGHT
ROOF
America's Smartest
Supper Club
for
Superb Dining and
Delightful Dancing to
MAL
MALKIN
His Piano and
His Orchestra
COMPLETE DINNERS
from J5.50
Viil the Slarlii/hl Rnnf
/ur a tpeetacu'ar I lew
o/ the (lotJ Coses'
ML
BEACH HOTEL.
On the Ocean at 4Slh SI.
MS8BBVATIONS:
Benni JE 2-3600
A bust of Henrietta Szold. founder of Hadassah, is presented
to P.S. 134 on New York's Lower East Side. The school,
named for Miss Szold, is believed to be the only one in New .
York's public school system bearing the name of a leading ,
Zionist personality. Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, national pres- j
ident of Hadassah, presents the bronze work to 12-year-old
Angela Tropani, a sixth grader, as Louis Stoller. principal,
looks on.
Local Students Off to Institute
> Robert McClaskey. Jr.. of Mi-
ami, a junior at the University of
Florida in Gainesville, will parti
cipate in a week-long summer
study institute conducted by the,
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation* be-
ginning Aug. 27.
The institute, held annually for
the past n years al Camp B'nai
B'rith. Starlight. PS., brings to-
gether student leader- Ol the Hillel
program from some 150 colleges
and universities in the United
States and Canada, lot study sem-
inars, lectures by prominent edu-
cator.> and Jewish leaders, and
group discussions on Jewish cul-
ture and issues of current concern
in the Jewish community.
McClaskey is student president
of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion at the University of Florida.
He is the son ot Mr. aad Mrs.
Robert McClaskey. ot 531 NW 38th
Ave. j|K.<
The B'nai B'rith Hillel move-
ment provides religious and cul-
tural programs for Jewish stu-
dents on 245 campuses in this
country, Canada and abroad.
W Also participating will be Vicki
Lee Kligerman. of Miami Beach,
a junior at the University of Flor-
ida.
Miss Kligerman is a student
vice president of the Hilled Foun-
dation at the University of Fior-
ina. She is the daughter of Mrs.
Sylvia Kligerman, ol 832 15th St.
Ask for yiur CHIP INS
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oM JE 8-UJ2J
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UN 6-6226
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The
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ART BRUNS. Co Owner
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DINNERS SERVED DAILY
PARKING
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iE 1-3987
MIAMI
BEACH
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CATERING FOR All OCCASIONS BAR MITZVAHS OUK SPECIALTY
940-71st STREET UN 6-6043
NORMANDY ISLE (Closed Monday Saturday)___________
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from bori d'oeuvrei fo complete beffof
TW
170 N.W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR 4-2655
Under the strict supervision of the United Kashrus Association of
Greater Miami Suoervising Rabbi: Rabbi Abraham J. Safra.
OPEN MOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTION,
1


Page 6-3
+Je*istrk>ridlton
Friday. July 26. 1963
I
CHARLOTTl
.VOW/4I-* OF THE WEEK
Charlotte Simon is a "Yankee" from Springfield, Mass. As a
t'lc girl, she always wanted to be a teacher, so she was. She grad-
,at*d I a Columbia University and became an exchange student at
Whittier College in Calitorniaformer Vice President Nixon's alma
,tei She was the youngest member of the staff at Vassar, teach-
:g eari childhood education. At camp in Connecticut, she met her
Ufeai be, George Simon, where they were both counselors.
George went right into service, but as soon
as he returned, they were married and mov-
ed to Miami, where they have lived ever
since.
Charlotte was director of one of the Y
nurseries until Cathy was born; then came
Andy. Busy with her home and children,
Charlotte found time and is still taking an
active part in her community. So does
George. As president of Menorah Group of
Hadassah, she went on to regional work. First
woman president of the Town Y, she alw is
on the regional Jewish Welfare Board. She
M^r \ chaired the Senior Citizen Conference for the
Soul hern Region, and Greater Miami Jewish
' Federation has also come in for its share of
Charlotte's attentionshe was on the Board
of Governors and the Budget Committee, and
is also active with the Federation of Jew-
ish "Women.
Charlotte admits that either her hands or her mouth must be go-
;; ;. times. She sews and knits, always having a piece of work
i her hands. One of her hobbies is raising flowers, and has received
a nl>lK. lor her violets. Travel is another hobby which she shares
witn her husband. On one never-to-be-forgotten trip to Europe, Char-
iott< had her own guide with her the whole timenone otheV than
.reortjf. ho is a Belgian and speaks five languages. It was a snap as
iJxfty drove about Europe, including a visit to Holland to see rela-
tives.
Prv-?ntly, Charlotte is having fun with the children; they are just
the ritj'ic age. There is much to do, what with boat rides and sailing
Itwnuni. ^r.d they are learning tennis with the same racquet that their
mHv used when she was on the college tennis team. As for swim-
ning, it's still the same as when Charlotte was first certified as a
Hed CtOSS swimming instructor. Some things never change; happily,
it secirs Charlotte's joy in her husband, children and life always re-
maid toe same.
* + *
-wav were so proud
EBUevi (Mrs. David) Schine and the Senior Schines, Hildegarde
iud Meyer, their daughter, Mrs. Doris Maxwell, of Los Angeles, along
vitli Rabbi and Mrs. In-ing Lehrman sat at the Schine table at the
Sund,.. sight Pops concert beaming while David was guest conductor
Ear 'FtnlandU," by Sibelius. Afterwards, Hillevi had a reception at
El Ontro in the McAllister Hotel to honor him, as well as Maestro
Arthur Fiedler and Marie Volpe. Interesting talk and an interesting
buffet table kept the guests busy way past time for a reception to
end. [ecluded among the hundred or so guests were Mr. and Mrs. j
Lawrence Porter. Mrs. Sailing Buruch, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Gordon,
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Weintraub, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Baldwin, Mr. and
Mrs, Ronald Fine. Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Alterman, Mr. and Mrs.:
Rolfe- Ketll. Mr. and Mrs. William Seaman, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Moore, I
Dr and Mrs. Henry King Stanford, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stone, j
*
LSaS*NT WEEKENO
E vile and Bill Brenner went to the Doral Country Club for a
golfing eekend. Sue and Alan Cutler were there too, golfing like mad,
also BeQe and Milton Levy ,
Just back from seeing one of her offspring at Camp Judea in
Hendorsonville is Roz (Mrs. Gerald) Soltz. She went with Flo and
Bernie 31oom. While enjoying the cool Carolina breezes, she saw
id.. ,r d .Manny Lobeli. Sylvia and Irving Genet, and Bobby and Gene
Hyman.
*
RGIGT JOURNEY
Ruth and Abe Frankel are off to Europe on the SS Leonardo Da
Vuici Since they are veterans of this European bit, they didn't have'
to practice packing their bags. From Genoa, they change ships and'
40- to the Greek Islands. They want to buy some paintings for their'
new apartment in the King Cole, and that is what they will do when
they Re. to Florence. In Israel for the third time, they are looking
fonvdic -o seeing the progress thathas been made. Before they return
they'll s end some time at a health spa that is a favorite with Mi-
amuH
StLVB* THIS TIME
SdSan and Sam Smith had a cocktail party at their home in honor
it the ^')th anniver-ary of Susan's parents. No one could miss the
big silver and white Happy Anniversary sign on the well or the hoge
OOMlBg cake. Among guests there to wish Natalie and Leonard Egert
oongratuiations on their first twenty-five years of married life were
Fay? and Herman Rubin, Alice and Nat Furman, Milhcent and Leon-
ard Sell ner, Sylvia and Irving Rattier, Marilyn and Harry Smith,
iiid AJiie and Bernard Schoninger.
* a
SOASSRSTEIN AND SOMERSTEIN
A card from Monte Carlo from Rena and Fred Somerstein. They
a/are doing what you're supposed to be doing in Monte Carlo. Before
they left the two Somersteins, Helen (Mrs. Seymour) and Myrna (Mrs.
Robert), gave a nautical Bon Voyage party for their mother-in-law.
GoeatS vere members of Rena's Monday and Saturday card games,
Ruth (Mrs. Georgei Wangler, Edna (Mrs. James) Chapman, Evey
(Mr.; Albert) Barmack, Rossi (Mrs. Joseph) Gleicher, and Lil (Mrs.
(Irving) Blasberg.
Kulvin, Myers
Exchange Vows
Dale G. Myers became Mrs.
Stephen M. Kulvin in 12 noon rites
on Sunday, July 21, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Rabbi Morris
Graff officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin EL Myers,
431 E. San Marino Dr.. Miami
Beach.
For her wedding, the former
Miss Myers chose a white peau
de soie gown featuring the em-
pire style. She carried a bouquet
of calla lilies.
The groom is the son of Dr.
and Mrs. Max M. Kulvin. 1881 SW
36th Ct., Miami. His best man
was Thomas R. Akin III. Ushers
included R. Todd Lappin, Doug-
las M. Myers, Michael Feidelson,
Lewis Kairys, and Richard Es-
sen.
The bride was attended by
Mrs. Thomas R. Akin III as ma-
tron of honor. Miss Carol S. Kup-
! per was maid of honor.
Newiywed Mrs. Kulvin graduat-
' ed from Miami Beach High School.
attended Emerson College in Bos-
jton, Mass., and will go to Duke
University in the fall.
The groom is a graduate of
Coral Gables High and Duke Uni-
versity, where he was a member
of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity and
Old Trinity Club. He is now a
1 third year student at Duke Medi-
cal School.
The couple will live in Dur
'ham, N.C.


W
E. Allen Becki 1
MRS. STEPHEN KUIVIH
MRS. JACOB BECKER
/
Miss Sockloff Weds Dentist
Miss Elinor Sockloff. of Queens.
N Y.. became the bride of Dr. Jac-
ob Becker, of Brooklyn. N.Y.. in
June 30 rites at the East Midwood
Jewish Center in Brooklyn
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Max Sockloff, 411 Ma-
laga, Coral Gables The groom's
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Becker, of Brooklyn.
Maid of honor was Miss Judith
Sockloff, sister of the bride. Mrs.
Norman Riegel. sister of the
groom, was matron of honor.
For her wedding, the bride
chose a shapely dress of silk
peau de soie with long sleeves,
MISS JUDITH GERTIES
Gertlers Tell
Judith's Troth
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gertler.
16811 NE 6th Ave., No. Miami
Beach, announce the engagement
of their daughter, Judith Elaine.
The groom-to-be is Michael Wil-
liam Alpern. He is the son of Mr.
Joseph Alpern, 16031 NE 19th Ct..
and the late Mrs. Sally Alpern.
The couple are planning to be
married in June, 1964.
Miss Weine Will
Wed Law Student
Mrs. Eugene E. Weine, 630 79th
St., Miami Beach, announces the
engagement and forthcoming mar-
riage of her daughter, Philippa,
to Michael Kenneth Feldman.
The bride-elect is a graduate of:
Miami Beach High School. She:
attended the University of Florida
and is now a senior in the School
ol Education at the University of
Miami.
Her fiance, son of Mrs. Albert
Feldman, 1535 Michigan Ave..
Miami Beach, is also a graduate
of Miami Beach High School. He
attended the University of Florida,
where he is a member of Alpha
Epsilon Pi Fraternity, and grad-
uated from the University of Mi-
ami, where he will enter law
school in September. |
flat fringed bow, and a long train.
Her crown was of crystals and
rhinestones, and featured a fin
pertip veil.
Elliot Becker, the groom's broth
er. was best man. Ushers includ
ed Norman Riegel. Seymour Kram
ei. Seymour Jotkowitz. Joel Blaz
er. Alan Sockloff, and Alay Jay
Rabbis Samuel Mirsky, Harry' L
Wohlberg and Israel Short of fie
lated.
The bride attended the Univer
sity of Florida, graduated from
the University of Miami, and is
now working on a Master's degree
at New York University.
Mr. Becker graduated from
i New York University, where he
was on the Dean's List, and NYU
Dental School. He interned at
Beth Israel Hospital.
Reception and dinner followed
: the ceremony. After a 9ix-week
1 honeymoon in Europe and Israel,
the couple will be at home in
! Long Island, N.Y.
Greene, Solosko
To be Married
Ua Z. Greene and Abe Solosko
will be married on July 30. with
Rabbi Irving Lehrman official
log.
After a honeymoon in New
York, the couple will return in
mid-August to live at the Morton
Towers.
The bride-to-be was Mr. solosko's
first secretary when he opened
his insurance business here in
1949.
ratiada
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Ph. 696-2101
Closed Saturdays
The Family of the late
MARK LACHMAN
Wishes to express their sincere thanks for the many
kindnesses shown them in their recent bereavement.
Mrs. Mark Lachman
and Family.
Call SYLVIA MILSEN JE 2-3231
"YOUR PERSONAL FLORAL CONSULTANT"
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Friday, J-Ly 26. 19S3
\
*>JmMifkrldlctr
Page 7-B
THE Kiss UniMT.-f Coronation
Charity Ball was held Sun-
< ay ir tilt Grand Ballroom of
the floirtl icbleau Hotel, and the
twnir.t eombloed clamor and
elei,ar>cc in a most pleasing man-
ner. Contestant!, including Miss
Universe, mingled with the for-
mally-drt tted guests, and floor-
length BJOwna, long white gloves,
magnificent jewelry, and escorts
in tuxedoi made it difficult to
realist that this was our town
in the middle of the summer.
The twc charities sponsoring the
hall were the Auxiliary of the
Human* Society and the Nation-
al Multiple Sclerosis Southeast
Floric.i t. hapter.
Chain an for the evening was
Mrs. l"'de Morse, president of
the Ai liary of the Humane So-
ciety. Her gown was a full
lengtl '-I lime chiffon worn
with a pink satin stole. The
colon beautifully set off her
superb i>erald necklace. The
organization's executive direc
tor, Mrs. Dorothy White, chose
an imported French fabric of
sheer white metallic with heavy
gold embossing,
Co-chairman for the event
was Mrs. Alexander Kogan,
whose n featured a fitted
bodice of "lil satin with a pair
of self-fabric diamond-shaped ap-
pliquts tt the neckline. Her
floor length skirt was in silver,
completely covered with silver
sequin-., and the sequins cover-
ed wtth It.ng drop fringes of sil-
verttsed cavier crystals. Her
guests i-: eluded Mrs. Jules Chan-
ning, wttt wore a full-length
gown with a black satin sheath
skirt zvr. low scooped-oecklined
hlouson bodice encrusted with
costal treads. Her long-sleeved
matching beaded jacket featured
white i ink cuffs.

LJR( >imon Rubin chose a
^^ go!i brocade floor-length
>heath ith an unusual modified
haltt: tikline. Mrs. Max Bod-
ennan's white silk crepe sheath
was also lull-length, and topped
with matching jacket styled in a
capeletU effect. The jacket was
beaut., y embroidered with
gold sequins and lined with gold
lam. Mrs. Milton Smith's
choice -.as a floor-length black
satin with shocking pink roses
<>l r.i;-"< velvet woven into the
fabric. Her gown featured a
high neckline in front and dip-
ped to a decollete back.
Mrs. Max Weitz wore a lilac-
colored satin gown with a plung-
ing "V" neckline. Her sheath
skirt was encased in a shell-
shaped ovcrskirt. Mrs. Robert
Weitz selected a white silk crepe
sheath accented with silver-lined
bugle beads at the neckline in
a deep Cleopatra-style and at
the hemline in a wide band em-
broidere.l horizontally. White
Italian straw on net was worn
by Mrs. Sol Cohen. The straw
was embroidered in a floral
motif on both her sheath and
tapelette. White fox swirled
around the capelette. beginning
at the neckline and banding it
across the bottom.
White chantilly lace over mut-
ed gold was the choice of Mrs.
Abbott Harle. Her full-length
gown was high necked in flesh-
colored illusion also used for the
long sleeves. The tunic over-
skirt was in a figure-molding
sheath. Mrs. Harry Smiths two-
piece black silk organza was
floor-length, with a flared tunic
overblouse accented with an ex-
aggerated bateau neckline of
white silk organza. A full-length
brocade sheath of gold, tanger-
ine, pink and green was chosen
by Mrs. Robert Koeppel. Her
back pannier was in a modified
court-train style. Mrs. William
Pallot's color choice was Israeli
verdant in a satin sheath. It
was heavily jeweled at the neck-
line in red and green cavier
beads and drop crystals. The
jeweled treatment was repeated
in a band which dropped slight-
ly below the waist.
f *
ulRS. Joseph Upton, just back
" from Paris, chose a magen-
ta sheath almost completely cov-
ered with hand-embroidered tur-
quoise crystal minatures. White
chantilly lace over blush pink
was worn by Mrs. Lillian Pass.
The lace was rcembroidered
with white silk ribbon lace and!
iced with iridescent sequins.
Mrs. Frances Beckerman's gown
was in muted shocking pink with
embroidered Italian lace at the
neckline and hemline. A match-]
ing colored satin band was!
asymetrieally slashed from the
neckline to the hemline.
Wife of Miami Beach Mayor
Melvin Richard wore a full-
length white satin gown. Her
overblouse was embroidered inj
gold sequins in a tear-drop de-,
sign. Mrs. David Miller's floor-
length sheath was covered with'
iridescent pastel sequins and
silver-lined bugle beads. It fol-i
lowed the modified Grecian line
of covering only one shoulder.'
A warped silk taffeta of summer
florals on white in a full-length
sheath was the choice of Mrs.
Donald Kaplan. Emerald green
brocade in a two-piece ensemble
was worn by Mrs. George Hirsch. |
Her hip-length jacket and sheath
were in a semi-Oriental styling.
Mrs. Simon Hirschberg's sleeve-
less sheath was in a black Ital-
ian ribbon knit. Her dress fol-
lowed the classic lines with a
slashed bateau neckline.
* *
|u|RS. Norton Pallot's color
" choice was frosted gold.!
Her fitted bodice was in alencon |
lace with a high neckline, trim-!
med with a small draped jabot,
and with a dropped waistline.1
The same color continued in her |
full chiffon skirt. Pink peau dc
soie in full-length elegance was
worn by Mrs. Neil Schiff. The
overblouse fitted bodice was cov-
ered with crystal cavier beads
and satin-lined bugle beads.
White satin was the choice of
Mrs. Martin Fine. Her floor-
length gown was strapless, and
heavily encrusted with satin-
lined bugle beads, rhinestones
and pearls.
Philip M. Klutznick, former international president of B'nai
B'rith, visits the National Jewish Hospital at Denver to tour the
hospital's $2 million Children's Treatment Center located in
the B'nai B'rith building. Klutznick was in Denver to address
a banquet given by Regis College. He is a former member of
the United States mission to the United Nations and served as
principal advisor on economic and social affairs.
Brezin to Head Med Education
Belous, Katzman
In Private Rites
Temple Beth Torah was the
site of the marriage of Pearl
Katzman and Bernard Belous on
Monday evening. July 8. Rabbi
Max Lipschitz officiated at the
private ceremony in his study.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.'
and Mrs. H. Katzman. 873 NE
164th St., No. Miami Beach.
The groom is the son of Mr. and
.Mrs. M. Belous. 1918 Liberty Ave |
Miami Beach.
After a honeymoon in the moiin-l
tains of North Carolina, the couple
are at home in North Miami
Beach.
Board of Trustees of Mt. Sinai
Hospital, at an Executive Board
meeting July 18, announced the
appointment of Dr. David Brezin
to the post of director of medical
education for the hospital.
Dr. Brezin has been associated
with Mt. Sinai Hospital since 1949,
during which time he was one of
the section chiefs on general sur-
gery. A graduate of the Univer-
sity of Michigan in 1937, he in-
terned at St. Elizabeth's Hospital
in Washington, D.C., completed
his surgical residency at Mt. Sinai
Hospital in New York, and was
a Rockefeller Fellow in physiology
research at the University of
Michigan.
He served five years as a sur-
geon in the Army during World
War II in charge of general sur-
gery on both General Hospitals
overseas and Station Hospitals in
the United States. After his dis-
charge. Dr. Breiin moved to
Miami, where for the past IT
years he has been a general sur-
geon in private practice.
Refresher Course to Start
I
Summer refresher course for
students of the Beth Kodesh He-1
brew School will begin Monday!
morning, Aug. 5. The summer |
course will last for four weeks. >
^uttifegittas
EEAUTY SALON
WIGS
H.J.+, Fashion Hair Pieces
WOBIEM PIECES
I ssaeatiMa wi mm
W COLLINS AVENUE
W Ml 4-1224 Or ON S-?1S7
Arlene Ash
Betrothal Told
The engagement of their daugh-,
i ler. Arlene Ruth, is announced by
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ash. 4465
No. Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach.1
The groom-to-be is Arnold Clif-
! ford Newman, son of Mr. and \
Mrs. Joseph New man. of New |
Garden Hills. NY.
No date has been set for the
, wedding.
Marc Scott Rubin
Arrives Here
Marc Scott Rubin made Mr.
and Mrs. Lcn Zilbert. 7800 Beach
View Dr., No. Bay Island, grand-'
parents for the first time.
Parents are Mr. and Mrs. Mur-
ray Rubin, of New York and
Miami Beach. Mrs. Rubin is the
daughter of the Zilberts.
Bris was performed Wednesday
at Temple Ernanu-El. with Rabbi
Irving Lehrman and Rev. Abra-
ham Seif officiating.
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Page 8-B
*L*,uJinnrkiiar)
Friday. July 26. 1963
Rabbi Gross Back from Tour of Israel;
Presses for Specially-Trained Teachers
Knitting champs from the Bay Harbor area be-
tween the ages of 7 and 10 are seen pooling
:;:?:: efforts 1o make an afghan for "some little
patent" at Variety Children's Hospital. They
ir.ae- weekly with instructress Mrs. Si Cohen
(ricjht'. a former Rockette, who now conducts
knitting classes in the Trevi Building in Surf-
side. Seen preparing to hand in their six-
inch knitted squares are (left to right) Patricia
Linsky, Nancy Fisher. Leslie Oppenheim.
Eileen Weinmann. Mrs. Cohen. Diane Koch,
and Ann Rubin.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, prin-
cipal oTtne Iii-brew Academy, re-
lumed this week from a four week
irip to Israel. During his stay.
Uabbi Gross attended the ZOA
.onvention recently held in Jeru-
ialem and Tel Aviv.
At the education session held
ast Sunday. Rabbi Gross present-
d a proposal that a high school
>e established in Israel which will
ucommodate day school students
l high school age.
H- reported that "there art
many graduates of high school*
and day schools who would want
to spend a year in Israel to learn
the language and to become bet-
ter acquainted with the problems
of th State.
"Such a high school would open
I an important lane in the educa-
' tional bridge between America
T Camps Press Active Programs
oral i B. Spaet (right), vice chairman of the Metro Dade Coun-
ty '-or.'.mission, presents an "Award of Appreciation" to Rob-
ert L Turchin during last week's regular commission meet-
Turchin, recently elected to the Miami Beach City Coun-
cil rjreived the award for "performing an important service
:o the citizens of this area" during his membership on the
sour.- 5 buildinq contractors examining board from February,
|959 5 June. 1S63.
Opti-Mrs. Has Summer Program
,0'i -. Club of Miami Beach
Ihi : elected to continue its i
during the summer
iricj. The club is presently
engaged in operatic a refresh-
iae- ind ;n conjuncnon with the
Chkago Club to Meet
P-; ir meeting of the Chicago
Cluii \ ill be held at 8 p.m.. Sun-
day, ii 'lie Cavalier Room of the
Dei'. j Hotel. According to
Hen- '.apian, in ch.uge of ar-
range tents, some 200 persons are
en>e:
North Shore Optimist Club at
North Shore Park during the Lit-
tle League baseball season.
Proceeds will be shared equal-
ly, with me men's half going to
their club-sponsored Little League
teams, and the women's share to
the Opti-Mrs. scholarship fund for
emotionally disturbed children.
Opti-Mrs. first board meeting of
the fiscal year will be held on
July 30 at the home of Mrs. Mur-
ray Sonnett, president. 1360 Still-
water Dr.. when fund-raising plans
for the coming winter season will
be discussed,
A trip to Israel, a hootenanny.
and a Broadway show theme are
among the special attractions on
lap next week at the three day
camps conducted by the YM and
YWHA of Greater Miami, it was
announced by A. Budd Cutler,
presii ent.
At Camp Shalom, conducted by
the Beach "Y." the general theme
for the week will be -Let's Take
a Trip." for which each group
will select a nation and then pre-
pare decorations, food, dances and
.-< ngg that are appropriate. As a
windup lor this program, all of
the groups will get together for
the regular Friday afternoon
joint program in the form of "A
Trip to Israel.'" This week. Camp
Shalom is featuring a nautical
theme entitled "Davy Jones' Lock-
er," including a water carnival
and a trip to the Seaquarium.
The boys and girls of Camp
MaKaBee at the Miami "Y"
will begin preparations next
week for a camp hootenanny,
camp show and art exhibit,
which will be the climactic
events for this camp during the
final week of the season. With
a general emphasis on all of the
arts, there will be special atten-
tion paid to folk singing, folk
darting, dramatics and fine
arts. The camp show for par-
ents is scheduled for Wednes-
day night, Aug. 7, and the hoot-
enanny will close camp on Aug.
?. This past week, Camp Ma-
KaBee was involved in a "Gold
Rush" with the "Y" grounds
turned into a western town.
At Camp Noar. conducted by
the North County "Y." the boys
and girls v ill begin active pre-
parations for the annual camp
show set for Thursday evening,
Aug. 1, for the entertainment of
parents and friends. This show
will take the form of a series of
parodies on famous Broadway
musicals.
These programs are made pos-
sible throuuh the support the "Y"
receives from the United Fund
and the Greater Miami Jew ish
Federation.
^nd Israel, about which so much
discussion is taking place these
claysat every conference and
convention."
Rabbi Gross also met Abba
Eban, former Minister of Educa-
tion, and heads of teachers' train-
ing seminaries to discuss the prob
lem of the acute Hebrew teacher
shortage in the United States. He
proposed that the seminaries in
Israel prepare specially trained
teachers fur the American Day
School, with specific orientation
of the American milieu and the
American student. "American
Hebrew education has its unique
problems and requires specially-
oriented ann highly-trained teach-
ers." he said.
An enrollment oi more than 400
students is expected for the com-
ing semester in the Hebrew Acad-
emy, which now has a nursery,
kindergarten and complete ele-
mentary and Junior High Depart-
ments. "The Board of Admissions
is meeting daily to review the
students requesting scholarships.
he said.
"Many scholarships are being
granted each year to needy and
able students." Academy officials
said this week Rabbi Gross also
announced that a special class
will be epeneel this year for Jun-
ior High Students who do not have
Hebrew background.
Flamingo Chapter Barbecue
Flamingo Chapter of the Amer-
ican Medical Center at Denver
will sponsor a chicken barbecue
on Saturday evening at 973 79th
Ter., Miami Beach. Program will
include games and prizes. In
charge of reservations is Mrs.
Joseph Silow.
Mcuifou* Stvno&t 'TU!
;..!-( I *T .|. ., I fit
pSCAYX KVD I 16 I SO Mf*^ $ -
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pen 6:<
normandie parkway
ICOUJm AVt ]
MIAMI HACH
-Open 1.45-
COtAl WAr m lt I
Open 6 45
Dr. Samet on Radio
Dr. Philip Samet will discuss
the "Relationship of Heart and
Lung Diseases" on WIOD this Sat-
urday at 11:35 p.m. The 25-min-
utc Heart Association-sponsored
program will be moderated by Dr.
David J. Becker, radio chairman
Of the Heart Association's Public
Education Committee.
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Weinstein Is
Named Constable
Florida Gov. Karris Bryant has
appointed .Miami Beach Attorney
Leonard 0. Weinstein as constable
Of District 5.
Weinstein fills the post recently
vacated by Rocky I'omerance.
who was named Miami Beach
Chief of Police by the City Coun-
cil on July 3.
Weinstein said he would not give
up his law practice at 420 Lin-
coln Rd.. sirce "there is no con-
flict of interest."
Weinstein and his family live
at 615 Fairwav Dr.
1%


Friday. July 26. 1963
vjewist) flbridFia/7
Tc.cje 9-B
Couple Find Ireland Most Charming
Adlai E. Stevenson, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations,
is awarded the American Jewish Committee's American
Liberties Medallion for "exceptional advancement ot the prin-
ciples of human liberty." Making the presentation at the Com-
mittee's 56th annual meeting is Jacob Blaustein, industrialist
of Baltimore, and honorary president of the Committee. Blau-
stein. a former recipient of the Medallion, was a member of
the United States delegation to the tenth General Assembly
of the United Nations.
Newly-elected Miami Beach City Councilman Hyman Galbut
is tapped by the "Dr,ess. Right" Committee of the Men's and
Boys' Apparel Club of Florida, the Men's Fashion Guild of
Miami Beach, for this week's Golden Hanger Award. Galbut
left) receives the award from Maurice Unqer (right), member
oi the Board of Directors of the Lincoln Road Merchants Guild.
Army Nurse Named by Home
A former Army Nurse Corps
Hirst lieutenant has been appoint-
ed director of nurses at Jack-on
tanor Nursing Home in Miami,
the 159-bed facility scheduled for
official opening Aug. 11.
Charles Gottlieb, president of
he $1,000,000 home at NW 8th
iA\ and I8t'i Tcr., named Mrs
(athryn Fitzpatrick, of Miami, to
fill the director's post.
Mrs. Fit/pat rick, who has been
a staff nurse for Eastern Air
lines and the Dade County Pub
lie Health Department in Miami.
s< rved in Europe for three years
during World War II. A graduate
ot the University Of Pennsylvania,
she was a nursing education
major

. *
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A Miami couple, who spent one
month touring Europe, are en-
chanted with Ireland. They have
V.ood reason.
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Rogers, of
840 NE 31st St., ilew to the con-
tinent on June 17, and traveled
through Germany, Switzerland,
Italy, England, and Ireland.
"While we were in Rome," Rog-
ers said, "we saw President Ken-
nedy three timesall quite by ac-
cident. The last time, we yell-
ed out: 'Florida voters here,' and
the President, startled, turned
around.''
"Next thir3 we knew," pret-
ty Leona Rogers exclaimed,
"Mr. Kennedy smiled at us and
waved."
Also while in Rome, the couple
said, archaeologists uncovered
some remains that are considered
at least 2,000 years old. "And
among them." Rogers explained,
"they found symbols in stone defi-
nitely proving the existence of
a. synagogue and a Jewish com-
munity there that far back."
In Germany, the young Miami
couple found "no scars of war
anywhere."' The youthful Miami
attorney was last in Germany
from 1930 to 1952. "The change-
over is fantastic. Prices of food
and clothing are entirely compar-
able to those in the U.S. The
people are so wealthy that they
import people from Spain and
Italy to do certain kinds of lesser
labor."
But it was ir Ireland where
Mr. and Mrs. Rogers lost their
heartsand well they might.
"In the first place," Mrs. Rog-
ers said, who formerly worked
for en airHno, "they genuinely
love Americans. There's hard-
ly a soul we met who doesn't
have a relative in the U.S. And
they all sound like Barry O'Sul-
livans."
But the most important thing.
Rogers recalled, was their chance
meeting with Robert Briscoe, the
Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin on
two recent occasions, and who
Dubliners are trank to confess,
will probably make it again a
third time.
"He look us on a visit to the
Dialthe Irish Parliamentand
later in the evening invited US to
his home for dinner.'' the couple
said. "Right now, the Briscocs
are most proud of their son. who
has just won a scholarship to
Johns Hopkins University."
chopped liver an<: Khma'z.' Tht /
were both absolutely Iov<
Also in Ireland, ney -."up'
with President Kennedy again, h
had just bean given two benpzgry
degrees, one Irom Trin.::. (Cath-
olic), and one from National (Pr -
tc-stant). Recall the two diar
inns: "When the Presided w;
asked what he would do at a J'oc-
btJl game, he replied: 'I guefcs I' I
just have to pray for T. ', ar i
cheer for Nation:
**' Religious School Register? ion
LiSfCR AND LEON A RQGEKS
Hebrew :,nd Sunday ScoooJ re-
i-.tration will begin z: Dad
Mrs. Rogers noted that "Bris i Heights Congregation on Sunday,
coe is intensely proud of being, ** *^in<^ ?
Jewish, and when we left, both
of them embraced us, saying:
"Now you have a home in Ireland.
Next time you come, we'll have noon.
day through Wednesday. Aag, 1
to 21. from 7 to 9 p.m.. and agai I
on Sunday. Aug. 25, from 9 to
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All iporti ond recreotlons In Hot Springs Including excellent fishing
nd pWnly of exoitlng sight life with big nome enHrtolneraJn the neonSy Supper Clubs.
Bath, awoy Oil yourocho. and patn, due to fatigue b. rb. superb botHhoue. right In The Arlington...roKevO
"nll'l. ortbrltU ond high blood pnwsure. Com. to the Arlington for Hoolth ond Funl


Page 10-B
Although this is the season of the year for vacationing and
relaxation, "business" qoes on as usual for a volunteer group
. of Temple Menorah members. Their usual working guarters
is in the main Temple buildina, now under reconstruction, but
they have managed to find temporary space in the Social
Hall to carry on their important jobs. Pictured here are Good-
man Lyons and Isadore Fischer, two members of the Golden-
Agers which meets several times each week throughout the
year to mend prayer books and inspect prayer shawls._____
New E! Al
Building Opens
In Tel Aviv
By Special Report
Newest and tallest building in
Tel Aviv is the 12 story, air-condi-
tioned El Al Building, just com-
pleted and housing the reception,
booking and cargo offices of the
Israel Branch of El Al.
The main motif of the bright
and spacious new offices is a
dramatic, white-sculptured con-
crete wall. The Israeli touch is
evident throughoul in the materials
used in the functional decor, and
every component in the 12-story
building, from the cement to the
aluminum window frames, was
jrade in Israel.
A novel feature ol the Reserva-1
(ions Office is its own "visual"
Itlephone exchange, which imme-
ing clerk. This, together with
telex service, ard an automatic
conveyer system (or reservations,
facilitate.- streamlined and speedy
handling of reservations and in-
quiries.
EL AL TEL AVIV
Dr. Wolfson in Talk
'Human Emotions and the Pur-
suit of Happiness" was to be the
topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham
Wolfson, ('irector of the Spinoza
Forum for Adult Education, on
Thursday morning, 10:45 a.m., at
the Auditorium of the Washington
Federal, 1234 Washington Ave.
Savings Society
Elects Miamian
Erwin Allen, vice president and
controller. Dadc Federal Sayings
and Loan Association of Miami,
was elected governor of District 5,
Society of Savings and Loan Con-
trollers, at the Society's national
convention held in Chicago re-
cently.
District 5 covers the states of
Alabama. Florida, Georgia, North
Carolina, South Carolina and
Puerto Rico. More than 600 sav-
ings and loan controllers attended.
Allen is past chairman of the
Federal Taxation Committee of
the Savings and Loan Controllers,
and has been a member of the
committee for the past three
years. He is a past president of
the South Florida Chapter of the
Society of Savings and Loan Con-
trollers, and a member of the
American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants, and Dade
County Chapter of the Institute of
Certified Public Accountants.
Allen is a 1948 graduate of the
University of Miami. He is mar-
ried and lives in North Miami.
IRWIN ALUN
Austria Extends
Prosecution Time
VIENNA (JTA) The Aus-
trian Parliamentary Committee
for Justice Affairs complied this
weekend with appeals from sur-
vivors of tht Nazi era in Austria
by extending the statute of limita-
tions for prosecution of Nazi war
crimes.
The date for prosecution of
crimes committed under the Nazi
regime has been changed to June
29, 1965, which means that the per-
iod in which charges may be filed
will not end before June, 1965.
Meanwhile, the Austrian Su-
preme Court was expected today
to take up for consideration soon
an appeal to nullify the recent
acquittal by a Graz court of Franz
Murer, the former Nazi charged
with the murder of many Jews
in Nazi-occupied Vilna during the
war. The appeal for a new trial
was based on the fact that the
Graz court rejected charges of
the prosecution because wit-
nesses who could have testified in
support of the charges failed to
arrive in time to appear at the
trial.
A protest against Murer's acquit-
tal was voiced by the Federation
ol Social Freedom Fighters, which
also criticized the failure of the
court to take action against spec-
tators who lauded the defendant
during the trial.
Temple Israel
Keren Ami Fund
Distributes $2,000
Close to S2.000 in Keren Ami
funds were distributed this week
by the Religious School of Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami.
Eighteen local, national and in-
ternational agencies were the re-
cipients of checks which repre-
sented a year's collection of week-
ly offerings by the 900 children
of the school. An important part
of the learning experience, the
gifts to charity were decided by
the children, themselves, through
a representative Keren Ami Coun-
cil.
The recipients of the children's
gifts were Combined Jewish Ap-
peal, United Fund, St. Alb.in's
Nursery, Leo Baeck School in Is-
rael, Jewish Chatauqua Society,
American Jewish Archives, Radio
Free Europe, American Cancer
Society, Heart Association of
Greater Miami, National Chil-
dren's Cardiac Hospital, Variety
Children's Hospital, Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Youth Aliyah. Jewish National
Fund, Cerebral Palsy Association,
CARE and Hope Ship.
Registration lor Temple Is-
rael's Religious School, which in-
cludes a mid-week Hebrew l)>'
partment. is now open for mem-
bers of the Temple. The school
ing includes kindergarten through
confirmation class in the 9th
grade, and a High School Depart-
ment which meets on .1 regular
weekly basis throughout the en
tire school year.
Friday, Iuly 25, 1963
Final Open
Stake Saturday
Fieht survivors from ftfl original
field of 52 got the post at Flagler
Saturday night in 'he '' na's
,l,o track's S25.000 G-eyhouiid
Open Stake, with John (MMltl
sonda ruling a strong favorite to
take down the $12,500 dinners
end of the purse.
A triumph Saturday w Id swell
her earnings to $35,000 UJ little
more than ;. year of 1 ng and
dive her her fourth ml W stake
victory in lour tries.
Her principal threa' in tne
championship finals appear to be
Jester Cole's Perfect Tip, winner
of more than S20.000 ir. la jrear-
old career. F. B. (Hap:) Stulz
Grumbler, and Musick I Sprucl-
ling's steady-going Cotto Boy.
Next Saturday. Aug. S the -< C
ODd of Flagler's rich stakes, the
third annual S8O.0OO Int national
Classic, gets under wa with a
field of 49 competing over the
3 ths mile Flagler cou; ?.
?*'.
AMERICAN ISRAELI
Religious Stor-s
Now ready to tokt order! your
Synagogue. Bio selection Tal-
lesim, school cop* oid all i'royer
Books lor High Holidays, "tease
call S. Schwortz ot
JE 1-7722
1357 Washington Avr*
WANTED
SALESMAN
FOR PART-TIM =
With Some Men's Go--ing
Selling Experience
THRIFT SHOF
7331 N.W. 27th A =
Jacob Schachter's Yiddish Program
~ MONDAY thru FRIDAY 11:00 A.M. 12 Noon & SUNDAY 3:15 4:15 P.M.
On WEDR-FM 99.1 meg On Your FM Dial
Now on Radio Station WEDR-FM, a new FM Station, Mr. Jacob Schachter, for over 30 years popular Yiddish Broadcast
ing star, will enlarge his Yiddish program activities to a full hour daily. Mr. Schachter will also continue his broadcast
ing on WMIE-AM, 1140, Sunday afternoons.
Yiddish radio in Miami has taken a great step forward with the enlargement of Mr. Schachter's program. Now, Miami
and Miami Beach Jewish population can hear the music they love every week day at 11:00 a.m. 12 Noon, Monday thr j
Friday and Sunday at 3:15-4:15 p.m. on WEDR-FM, 99.1 meg. on your FM dial "The Voice of the People."
NOW LIVE DAILY FROM THE BLACKSTONE
HOTEL-800 WASHINGTON AVE, MIAMI BEACH



Friday. July 26. 1963
W *-** iigg, norSdliiciin
Pcge-H-B =
bbi Nathan Witkin (left), director of the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board's Armed Forces Service Center in Balboa, Canal
Zone, helps a young GI transmit a message home to the States
via the Center's amateur radio station. The station, in oper-
ation for more than 10 years, has been hailed as an activity
"unique value" with the "qreutest interest and need to the
service man" by Maj. Gen. Daniel A. O'Connor, Chief of Staff
of the Army's Caribbean Command.
I hope
Grandn
flower
X
K
Dignified, beautiful and
reverently cared for
surroundings for our
departed loved ones are
a source of very real
comfort to all.
Registration Tc!d
At Ner Tcmid
Ri .-iraiion for Hie ensuing
ji ir in the Temple Ner Timid
Hebrew and Sunday Schoola is now
< pen at th.' Temple
The office is available tor con
sultation and registration each
day, Slondm through Sunday.
Membership to th.' Temple "ill
once again permit children of
members to attend Religious
School and Sunday School with-
out tuition.
The Membership Committee,
with Dan Piver as chairman, and!
Joseph Sih crnian, co-chairman,
has announced that the Temple
i- also open now for High Holiday
reservations.
Rev. Gibson to Speak
Rev. Theodore Gibson, president
of the Miami Chapter of the
NA.ACP, wjll be,.guest.speaker at
a meeting of the Brotherhood of I
Temple Beth Sholom on Sunday'
at 10.30 a.m. David Drucker,
chairman, said that Rev. Gibson I
will discuss "Civil Rights and
the Negro in Dade County." Pres-
ident is Dr. Harry Wolk.
Rabbi Albert M. Shulman (left), national chaplain of the Amer-
ican Legion, arrived in Miami Beach this week to discuss
patriotic and memorial phases of the 1963 national conven-
tion which gets underway here Sept. 6 to 12. One of his first
tasks was to go over plans of the city's huge Convention Hall
with Lawrence E. Hoffman, president and general chairman of
the 1963 Convention Corporation. Chaplain Shulman is
spiritual leader of Temple Beth-El in South Bend, Ind.
Howard Barlow
Due on Pops
Podium Sunday
Famed radio and television
music director Howard Barlow
Will return for the sixth successive
year a guest conductor of the
I niversity of Miami Summer
Symphony "Pops" Orchestra this
Sunday at Miami Beach Auditor-
ium. The concert, which will fea-
ture the pianist. Robert Mueller
and violinist, Eugene Dubois. is
the eighth in the current series of
I ten summer programs.
Long a familiar figure on 'The
Voice of Firestone" radio and TV
series, Mr. Barlow has scheduled
Massenet's Overture to "Phedre,"
SaintSaens' Bacehanale from
"Samson and Delilah." the Brahms
Hungarian Dances Nog. 5 and ti.
and such popular favorites as Le-1
roy Anderson's -Belle of the Ball."
'Mine Tango" and "Fiddle Fad
die, Al Datz' "Double Slop Pol-
ka, Deems Taylors "Through a
Looking Glass," and symphonic
impressions from Meredith Will
son's "Music Man "
Mueller will perform Franz
- I iano Concerto No. I. Du-
bois, the l M Symphony Orches
- concertmaster, uiii b<
ti red soloists in .',. ssenet's Medi-
tation Horn "Thais."
For many years. Barlow direc-
ted ami conducted the Philco Ra-
dio Hour, Harvest of Star-, and the
Voice of Firestone Hour musical
presentations. He has also con-
ducted the nation's outstanding
symphonic organizations, includ-
ing the \ew York Philharmonic,
the Philadelphia Orchestra, and
the Detroit, Baltimore. Chicago
and Los Angeles Symphony Orch-
estras.
Louis August
Felled at 53
Louis August, a partner in Au-j
gust riVosrBakery of Miami, died'
here Thursday, July 18. He was!
53.
Mr. August came to Miami 40]
years ago with his family, which
founded the bakery in 1922.
He was.a member of the Knights
of Pythias and Beth David Syna-
gogue.
Mr. August is survived by his
wife, Sara; two sons, Herbert and
Nelson; and two daughters, Mrs.
Francene Swart z and Miss Jane
August. Services were Frjday.
July 19, at Gordon Funeral Home.
Morris Berk, 92
Passes Away
Morris Berk, of 4301 Alton Rd.,
Miami Beach, died here Fridav.
July 19.
Mr. Berk, 92, came here 33
years ago from New York. He
was an organizer and charter
member of Temple Emanu-El.
The organizational meeting of the
Temple had been held in his home
here in 1940.
In addition, Mr. Berk was a
member of Beth Israel Congre-
gation, the Hebrew Academy,
and Miami Beach District of the
Zionist Organization of America.
Surviving are two sons-, includ-
ing Herman, Miami Reach, a
daughter, seven grandchildren,
and two great-grandchildren.
Services were Sunday. July 21.
at Riversi.ie Uton Rd,
lOth Rd, gervleei in MM4bMgn.
Gordon.
MORTENSEN, Mi'.. II.!.' of 2io
NE 1*1 St. Ola*a.
SCHAEFLER, Hlsraund .1.. f M )
llaritlnu Ave. Service* n Ne /
H inn. Om*it>. ewiiinil. m,
SOHMER. Mrs. Evelyn, M23
Collins Ave. Services In .' < 7or...
Rtvi raid..
greenstone, Bamoel i Ksa
s\v I3nd St. Gordon.
ROTHMAN, Jacob, 'II. Of '/ 211
Rd. Oh r.lmi.
SCH LOS-SB ERG. Max. (0, Cer.-
ter Inland, <;..i li n Beac t r ,-ii-
in Chicago. Riverside.
GREENBLATT, Loull V <(
Dundee, ill., and Miami h Be
vices In Skokie. 111.
LEIfman. Fannli. 87, .-:' I oMns
Ave., died July l; Sen In B .
Paul, Minn. Rlvi n de.
ROSENBLUM. Hurry B., I : .
mw i- Dr., died Jul] i Hfcrt-
ford,
ENGLANDER. Mrs Rose, l|r8
Pennsylvnnlii Ave. Bi in D--
troll Rl.. '- de,
GINSBERG. Charles, 7S, .' S.
2nd St. s. i-vices in Bn Hlav-
berff.
alterson. Vufrust, r-". 29 Bu-
<-liii Ave. .-. rvlces in I ouIk,
Rlv.r-ld.-.
GURFE.N. I ..uis. >.;. ,.f ,, ,.,v -
vania A i -. Services I fork.
Rlvei -i.I.
LIEBMAN. I' i,. si \ >;. ', NVV
I Mh Ter, Riversiile,
PINTSCHUK, Adoluh, T I.V
Lenox Ave. Sen lei si >ili ihn
ron, Del. Riverside.
Strolovitch. Mrs. Ai 12, of
BS39 Li- a> ne Blvd. Rl-
weiss. I ank, 83. of :-. ", 8 .
Miami Beach. Servlci -
keepsle, \ y. Blasbera
GOTTFRIED. Mini-. 7S,
m.. Mliiin B. ,. h, died J
erslde
TURCK. Mrs. 1-l.r. n. M -"
N. Ba> H i -n. .1 July IT
WEISS. Mrs llrnee, 70,
Rl Ba> Harlmi. .; -.. i .i
ei -ill..
I "Ugh-
2 Ml 1 RJV-
ol 2s:t ;i LEGAL NOTICE
>">":< ,,.,.,
MO 1-7693
Optometrists Have Banquet
The Dade < hi ty Optometric
\--c i iii i-i uill h ild a banquet
Saturd 13 evei ii n th Cavalier
1 mi of ihe Deauville Hotel.
Some *;< personi are expected by
Dr. Jack Wolf, in charge of ar-
rangements, able to Egypt.
To Bar Aid
From Aggressors
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
House Foreign Affairs Committee
adopted this week an amendment
introduced by Rep. Leonard Faro-
stein. New York Democrat, which
would deny aid to nations like
Egypl uh.ch prepare for military
aggression against neighboring
Males.
The amendment, as finally ac-
cepted by ihe committee, was less
specific than the proposed Keat-
ing Halpern amendment, although
its implementation is more strong-
ly assured. The Keating-Halpern
measure. ,i- incorporated into
yeai Foreign .\--istance Act.
referred to nations being denied
aid if they divert their own re-
sources lo purchase of Soviet
arms. The lieu measure, as ap-
\cil. makes no mention of So\ -
iei ann- sources.
Rep. Farbstein pointed out
that "although final determina-
tion must be made by the Presi-
dent, the guidelines of policy are
set forth in the amendment.".
He said his amendment was ac-
tually the strongest expression
of Congressional opinion yet on
military efforts outlawed by the
amendment and should be de-
nied aid forthwith. But he con-
ceded that the State Depart-
ment and the President may not
interpret the situation that way.
Rep, Farbstein cited to the com
m it tee the latesl Soi iel Egyptian
arms deal and Ihe rocket tests .
currently being conducted in
The vote mi the amend-
ment w as reportedly 22 to 7
Other committee members com
mented that they did not regard
ihe amendment a.- soley appilc-
Beach Dentist,
Dr. Firkel, 59
Services were held Sunday, July
2!, lor Dr. David K. Finkel, 59
.- Miami r. i lentist, who die.l
on July 19.
Dr. Finkel was a 32nd decree
Mason, member of Hibiscus Lodge,
and a member of Knights of
Pythias.
He came here 17 years ago
frc-n Pittsb .'rcth, and lived at
2855 Royal Palm Ave.
Surviving are his wife. Mar
garet; a son. Ted S ; three broth-
ers, including Samuel, Miami
Beach; a sister, and one grand-
child.
Services were in Riverside Mem-
orial Chapel. Alton Rd.
TURKFL. Samuel, T\ nf 5S!i W
Si ,ii..l hi \ SI, Rlvi I -Hi.-
BAUER. Tin -"I ri s BS, ..f ITOftl "
lMli Ave. S. -\ i-eM in Nyack, XV
Rlvel -'-I-
BERKOVVITZ, I ...:!. S3, -t .-" SW
LEGAL NOTICE
CERT FICATE O^
CORPORATE DISSOLL"
Til M.I. TH VVHi'M
SKXTS I'll.VI
NVIIKItl VS, RICH II
\ i! a: i vi >. i niiTlNO
-''-< VII i.i' > v n
the : Ith
'
ll'f
: I.Vi
I
l!i 'i : -. I V \
' f
-
; I -
-,:;,.-.,
-'
kmendi -. j-.
'HE VIIJ.Ai
mi.I HIM
INC. Illlrl hl-( i, .
le fill
-
i i-ntai
-. .
~ >hu\
ei iiioral -ii
.V-.U |hl !.!.-. I |... -
State il.-s herebj ertlfj I
^..iiur and Mi.-u i i ...,,.- .
!' IIIIIVIII, 111- ,.| (hi
i*omplled with
iv \\ r -m:ss hi
In i. unto -. i mj hand .
ai rixi I th< i in .ii .--, al nl
of Plo Ida, al T i
!- the .'Tin ,1
A.D.,
IM .ill Ti i.M \| i.\ \j-
Si en tan 'f SI
RICHARD M SKIM.KR, I-:-
Ii ii Hialeah I I ih, I loi i.l.i
I !(l -
-
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.
II
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th<

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NOTICE UNDER
FICTIT OUS NAME LAW
VnTli'K IS IIKRKIIY OIVKX Ihiil
llu undi ..... nenai In
Ii Him r :. : .
i: -ii AVK.N'I r SS" 'I VTES nl "\M
N w ih vventii M ami :. I
Inli mi.- il ii i le n Ith ih
Court f I hide
i --.11111 v. I im Ida.
\ I \i I? KI VI.TY CORP.
It) Slilm v il Hi.- nui n i'i -
; l'i
notice under
fictit ous name law
.NMTI.'i: IS IIKHKHY lilVKN
i he II el
I.KWIS l'i \l! .1: iM \'7. CO.,
.- w i-'n -i si i s Miami
i n it
V l 11 .' .
II IRAN i'/.
MYRi 'N K.vll.N

\ii..in. i.-i i.. a.- r<.ni. r.ihi/ .v c.i
-. '
NOT'ClT UNDf.H
FICTIT.OUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS i.Kl.i'l.Y lilVRN h
ihi- undei si :ni'il, d*> -.-.;-. i
... in, u.....-i the fictltloi i i .*
I VNAMAR -i IRF. .1 Ii n I -YNA.M \i:
BOAT YARD nl ISS2 V VV So Rlvel
! irli Miami, Kin., nt< nd
tel -: iM ikiiii. IVlth I Ii. i "Ii yk
Circuit i '-.in i of 11..... i" luntj. Kloi -
Ida.
DYN \ m.ii: it>i:i'
s ile i .i
I.Ri I.N'ARD .1 l< VI.ISH
lul'ont Rulldlnc, Miami, I i
An.ii n. j for \|.|iti. .mi
. ...
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L-
vi'Ti.-i-: is iiki;i:i:y *.,<
iii. undei-Blaned, der rlna age In
mini -s und< r the flctltln m
'ASTI.KW. ml. i-i.vti i: :.:,., ,
v \\ 75th sn.. i. Miami to
realMei wild n imi iih i
[hi Circuit Court ..I I-. mtv,
ii. .I Ida
. >sit.I-:\\iii iD INTERN i.
c ii:i'.
Iv: David l. s|. \ ,u
HARRY Zl'KKRXICK
Alt..in. f... '
i-'i I Incoln ii'Hi.1
Miami R. Hi Ii. I ,
NOT.CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L-
NOTICK IS II [{I 1
del j i
..-.- inn!-
Ti K ..- VITAMINS Ci .,i
I, .1 .
... r
In ill Court of I
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i-in: M. UARI !.s. -
' N'Elt C UANNI1EIMEI!
.
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NOTICE OF .NTENTIC
APPLY FOR CHANGE 01
Chancery No. 63C t
I' \\ !i i || v Con .
Not .. i- in i I., vtvi the
inderalyned i- 'iiloni
l .|-:i I'si 'il. some i ne* as
fi AR Y T a Y I.. i: .i n
I .|".i "I'S. 11, mum i :i-i
I rillM. TAYLOR whom
nl.li-i -s I. .: "i M< i'ii .11 A the>
NOTICE UNDER
FICTIT.OUS NA.IL LAW
NOTICE IS HKREHY OIVEN that
Ihe mi..
l.ii-in. mi.ii i Ihi
HOB EHM V.v.v CONS fill ITII i\
II s H I .\\enue. Ml-im
.
Ihe 'l.-rU -.f it, i ".i. u|
. '. inn. l'i
Ri UtERT I- EHMAXM INC
a I in: iila col
HARRIS Rol
Allm i
''th I-1..... I '"Ii eili ral III
Ml
orlda
Citj nl Miami Beiu 'i. I >
I i'i In int. ml to anjilv :
iii HENRY I. i\i idito
of the I"- > -iiiTi inn clal i t, n
ami for Dade O n
iii. Count) Court i lous
... lm k A .\l n th. 27th VtlB-
I9S3, "i a- i
. der
.in" their nn l< Y
I'KirSCIl .in i El '1 In
UAHY TAYLOR nnd ETII
LOR I" \\ Ii i Ii la M. -
it. r be kn
Dated at \i
i
- IJARV l>l I T.-
- ETHEL DEl'TS
I'.iiil.u .
\tti.i n, j HVMAN I' LiAI.l
.'in I-.


ii


Page 12-B
" If wisl fhrkMoun
F::day. July 28. 1963
UNDER
THf SWCT AND CONSTANT 10C41 RABBINICAL SUKRVMON Of RABBI TIBOR H. SJOM
Food Fair Kosher Meat /
Stores are Pledged to Give the /A
Best Quality at the Lowest Pricey
,or Your Money Back /'
wm
meat and poultry
Extra FREE
MERCHANTS
GREEN STAMPS
FREE! FREE!
FREEZER SALE!
There's one sure guide to more enjoyable eating: choose your
meats and poultry at your nearest Food Fair Kosher Meat Store.
You'll get SELECT QUALITY at ECONOMY PRICES, while the cut
and trim assure you of better cooking and tastier meals. For
maximum SAYINGS, stock your freezer during this sale!
We will CUT and WRAP your freezer purchases at no extra charge. Please place your order
EARLY for the wholesale CUTS you desire.
Every Pound of Meat Sold with a Money-Back Guarantee!
KOSHRBEST
Chicken or Turkey
CROQUETTES
69?
JUST HEAT AND SERVE
K I fill II..." OM-4"J"
Delicious! IIJ Jc...-.-.....*......'
Wholesome I
WHOLE RIB
OF BEEF
prime
quality
69
Guaranteed
Kosher
letter Volet!
More meat
per pound!
KOSHRBEST
DRUMSTICKS
with THIGHS
I39
Packed in 2 Lb. Boxes
KOSHER MADE Fer 2 Lb. :.
c
lb.
BREAST
OF BEEF
89
c
lb.
30 to 35 POUND AVERAGE
WHOLE .... 10 to 12 LB. AVERAGE
PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
PLUS 100 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
'
RACK OF
LAMB
5 to 6 LB.
AVERAGE
79
c
lb.
PLUS 25 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
CHUCK OF
LAMB
15 to 20 LB.
AVERAGE
59
lb.
PLUS 50 MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS
ZION KOSHER POULTRY
THE MARK OF QUALITY!
. The Brand Used By the Finest Kosher Hotels, Restaurants
and Caterers ... Now on Sale at Your Food Fair Kosher Markets
CRYOVAC PACKED KOSHER MADE PAN READY
PULLETS c %
ROASTERS DJC
BROILERS lb.
PRICES IN THIS AD EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 2
NOW FIVE KOSHER MEAT STORES TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER
2091 CORAL WAY I CORAL WAY i ..
AT SWftTrih Li 163rd ST* ^O^'NG CENTER
MIAMI b,w- 87tn AVE-
__________________________________' H*LJ_ Shopping pi. | no. MIAMI BEACH
19th ST. at ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE
AT MIAMI BEACH

AT FOOD FAIR