The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01730

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"Jewish Flondian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 35 Number 13
Miami, Florida, Friday, March 30, 1962
Three Sections Price 2C<
SEE SUPPLEMENT
SEC. C
Jewish Welfare Board
Biennial Convention
To Open Wednesday
Arrangements have been concluded here for the hundreds of dele-
Hausner Asks High Court
To Nix Eichmasm Appeal
SERVATIUS WANTS GlOBKf AS WITNESS ... PAGE 16 -A
JERUSALEM(JTA)Slashing at every contention entered on ap-
. peal by the defense counsel for Adolf Eichmann, Attorney General
ates who will be arriving next week from Jewish Community Centers Gideon Hausner Monday requested Israel's five-man Supreme Court
nnd YMHAs throughout the country to attend the biennial convention [ Panel, before which Eichmann is trying to save himself from hanging.
,i the National Jewish Welfare Board. The Greater Miami Jewish to reject all the defense claims and uphold the judgment of guilty
Community Center, as host agency, is in charge of local arrangements handed down last December by the District Court here.
... .__________________-------------------------------------- Patmdinff succcssfi
for the five-day conference, which
will take place at the Deauville
hotel, beginning next Wednesday.
I.ecn Kanlan. National Jewish
v\ elf are "Board vice president, is
serving as local convention chair-
man. Mrs. Milton Sirkin, president-
elect of the JWB Southern Section,
is arrangements chairman for all
local committees. Mrs. Louis Glas-
set is in charge of preparations for
;ill functions dealing with Armed
services work. Staff coordinator is
(.'inter executive director Efraim
11 Gale.
On Wednesday morning, the
Women's Division of the Miami
Beach YMHA Branch will hold
a brunch for delegates from all
Center women's groups, with
Mrs. Norman Giller, Division
president, in charge. Mrs. How-
ard Dunn, of tne North County
Branch, will offer a dramatic
Sabbath reading at the Oneg
Shabbat program scheduled for
Saturday, Apr. 7, at 3:30 p.m.
The program will include dance
interpretation by Mrs. Olga
Suarez, Center dance director.
Cantor Jacob Bornstein, of Tem-
ple Israel, will also participate
in the program.
Dinner and workshop sessions
throughout the convention will cul-
minate in a gala banquet on Sat-
urday night, Apr. 7. at 7:30 p.m.
A major address will be delivered
by Ambassador Philip M. Klutz-
Continued on Page 10-A
FRAGILE PEACE PREVAILS
State Dep't. Calls Israel,
Syria to Discuss Clashes
Pounding successfully at every
point raised in the appeal by Dr.
Robert Servatius, of Cologne, chiet
of Eichmann's counsel, Hausner
upheld Israel's right to try the for-
mer Gestapo colonel convicted of
directing the slaughter of 6,000,000
European Jews. He maintained
that Eichmann had virtually con-
WASHTINGTON (JTA) Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman
and Syria's Charge d'Affaires here, A. Aziz Allouni, were called to the
State Department this week and told that the United States was con-
cerned over the renewed border fighting between the two nations.
Later, at a news briefing, State.
Department news chief Lincoln!
White told reporters that Philip:
Talbot. Assistant Secretary of State j
for Near Eastern Affairs, had toldi
both the Israeli and Syrian envoys
that the State Department hoped |
the cease-fire worked out by the
UN over the weekend "would be;
observed." At the Israel Embassy,
a spokesman said that Ambassador;
Harman "had taken the opportun-!
ity in his discussion with Assistant
Secretary Talbot to reiterate Is-
rael's position on the situation."
Matzoh Given
Run Around
By Red Leaders
Meanwhile, a fragile peace pre-
vailed on the Israel-Syrian border
in the Lake Tiberias area this
week after several new harass-
ments by Syrian gunners as the
United Nations Security Council
prepared to take up the issue.
An area that had been relatively
Continued on Page 16-A
rWO-MKT F0RMUU DfVISEO
Bill to Revise Immigration
Quotas Offered in Capital
By Special Report
WASHINGTON Sen. Philip A.
Hart, with Senators Keating, Clark,
Proxmire, Javits. Neuberger. Mc-
Namara and Humphrey, announced
they introduced a bill Mar. 20 com-,
inehcnsivcly revising the immigra-
tion quota system.
The bill departs from the present
national origins quota system and
sets up a two-part formula based
on population ratios and the pat-
tern of immigration over the last:
15 years.
A major objective of the bill is
to eliminate nat'onal and racial
discrimination from general U.S.
immigration statutes. The new
quotas are closely related to actual
immigration experience of recent
years.
Sen. Hart stated that "the
many special acts of Congress
for nonquota admissions have
drastically changed our immigra-
tion patterns" and that "the quo-
ta system of the Immigration
and Naturalixation Act of 152
no longer reflects actual immi-
gration policy."
Sen. Hart stated that the bill re-
flects the work of many months of
Continued on Page 5-A
WASHINGTON (JTA)-Amer
ican Jewish offers to supply mat-i
zchs to Moscow's Jews and trum-
pets of Congressional wrath over
the reporter ban by the Soviet Gov-
ernment on matzohs for Passover
this year prompted the Soviet Em-
bassy here this week to indicate it
was looking into the matter.
A spokesman for the Soviet Em-
bassy told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that requests for interven-:
tion in >he situation voiced in Con-
gress were being studied and "may
be acted on." The spokesman ;
added, however, that "there is con-1
siderable doubt" that such a ban
had been imposed.
The source of the report ap-
peared to be trustworthy. Chief
Rabbi Yehuda Leib Levin, of
Moscow, so informed his congre-
gation last week. He said'that be-
cause of the ban, Passover die-
tary law restrictions would be re-
laxed this year.
Rabbi Levin was quoted in the
American press as having said that
state bakeries last year made 120
tons of matzohs for Moscow's 500,-
000 Jews and that smaller amounts
were made by state bakeries in
other Russian cities. He said this
Continued on Page 3-A
$10,075,000
Claims Confab
Reveals Figure
For 1962 Aid
PAYMENT EXTENSION PAGE 7-A
COPENHAGEN(JTA)The dis-
victcd himself during the 1,000.000- i tribution of $10,075,000 in 1962. for
word interrogation conducted by ; the benefit of 170,000 Jewish vie-
the Israeli police prior to last! tims of Nazism in 25 countries, was
year's trial. approved at the annual meeting of
The Attorney General tore apart! the board of directors of the Con-
the defense insistence on Eich-1 ference on Jewish Material Claims
Against Germany, which concluded
its three-day sessions here.
Jacob Blaustein, senior vice-
president of the Claims Conference,
made the budget presentation to
the 37-board members present rep-
resenting 23 Jewish world organi-
zations. This year's allocation
brings to $90,000,000 the sum the
Claims Conference has allocated
for Nazi victims outside of Israel
since t h e original reparations
agreement was reached with the
Bonn Government in 1952.
"Requests for aid are continu-
ing to run well beyond our re-
sources," Blaustein said. "The
Continued on Page 6-A
mann's having been a "mere trans-
port officer" in Hitler's Gestapo.
He ripped into the defense claims
that Eichmann's "low rank" had
been indicated in his "modest man-
ner of living."
Concerning Israel's jurisdiction,
Hausner told the high tribunal,
the fact is that, under interna-
tional law, a court nd not be
concerned with the manner in
which the prisoner had been
brought before the court if his
offense is against the law. Thus
the Attorney General replied to
Dr. Servatius' contention that
Eichmann was not subject to an
Continued on P*.ne 7-A
New York OK's Permit
For Rockwell Nazi Rally
NEW YORK(JTA)-The City
of New York, under court order to
provide Nazi George Rockwell with
a site for a public rally, notified
him this week that he could use
a small park at the foot of Man-
hattan for that purpose on Apr. 20.
Park Commissioner Newbold
M
The Commissioner declared
that Apr. 20, which Rockwell
wants to celebrate as Hitler's
birthday, is "a business day" in
Union Square which is heavily
used by neighboring office work-
ers and store employees."
The Supreme Court of New York
r a i wiiiiiiuoreiin "-------, -|-ne supreme inun OI new iure
orris, replying to a Rockwell re-, last vear upheld a decision of lower
l for -i ruirmit In hftlri his rallv ____.- .u. ik. o__- nn.ilH
quest for a permit to hold his rally
at Union Square Park in the heart
of Manhattan, denied the request
and offered Jeanette Park on the
waterfront. The Commissioner in-
formed the head of the American
Nazi Party that the park could ac-
commodate about 1,200
courts that the Commissioner could
not deny Rockwell a permit "un-
less it is demonstrated" that "such
expression will immediately and
irreparably injure t h e public
weal." The issue was taken to the
Rockwell, aided by the
courts by
people: American Civil Liberties Union,
and has adequate comfort station unen Rockwell's initial application
facilities." A speakers stand was
promised. Continued on Page 5-A
Nazis Took $27 Billion from European Jewry
By Special Report
NEW YORK European Jewry
was despoiled by the Nazis of
about $27 billion, at values then ap-
plicable, in property, assets and
income, according to a study made
by the World Jewish Congress in
New York.
The value of restituted property
and payments in reparations, resti-
tution and compensation, princi-
pally by West Germany, is about
$6 billion. The actual value of
the despoiled property today would
be 60 to 80 percent higher than
the estimated $27 billion.
The figures for damages suf-
fered by the Jews are contain-
ed in a new pamphlet, "Spoilia-
tion and Remedial Action," that
has just been issued in New York
by Dr. Nehemiah Robinson, di-
rector of the World Jewish Con-
gress Institute of Jewish Affairs.
The main targets of Nazi and
Fascist spoiliation were the avail*"
able assetsreal estate, business-
es, valuables, furniture, money
mostly by direct confiscation or by
forced sale. The Nazis were not
satisfied. Robinson notes, with
iwhiuii>w Jewish assets in the respective
sponsible at the end of World War countries and they forced many
II for placing Jewry's human |
losses under Nazism at 6.000,000. Continued on Page 11-A
The Wold
global body
communities
Jewish Congress, a
representing Jewish
in 64 lands, was rc-

.


Page 2-A
'Jm1$t> ftorktiain
Friday, March 30. 1962
I

Bible Contest
Winners Named
Winners ot the Florida district
of the National Bibli- Contesl weft
announced this week by M. A. Bas
kin, president of the Bureau ot
Jewish Education,
The contest was held at the Bu-
reau building on Mar 18. Rich
v\alzer. of Temple Beth Sholom,
received the highest mark, followed
by Robert Belmaker, ol the Central
Hebrew High School and Young Is-
rael Synagogue; D idle Fait, of
Beth Sh .i
oi Hebre v High S I and Temple
Jiidea Siev lershey, Sam lei
L'nger a ol Temple
Bi ih Sh Ion fifth
These winners of the district
contest will now participate in
the regional cor.test. The Flor-
ida section will be held at the
Bureau bu'lding on Sunday,
Apr. 8.
Other sections I th Southi :
u gion will hold contests k
t;i and Savanriah, Ga
The two .....
South) rn regioi
the S
resi nta ivi s in N
City to p
finals
LONCDISTANCl
DAILY PICK-UPS New York, New Jer
fey, Philadelphia. Baltimore. Wash-
ington, Boston all other points.
DIAL JE 8-8353
M. lleberman & Sow
6SS COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH
RETURN LOAD RATES
&*Lw**
&UHCC
PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS
FASr- T\ CE\TER
OF THE SOUTH
Largest Selection in Latest
Styles for Men and Women
FREf PARKING SPACE IH REAR
CONVENIENT TO BUSES
728 LINCOLN ROAD
'On the Moll'
Phone JE 8-0749
OCULISTS' PRliCHIPTIONS FflUO
CONTACT LENSES
National Council oi the National Honor Society was granted
to the Mesivta High School's new chapter to be
called Hamasid. Students ol the Mesivta eligible for admis-
sion to the chapter are left to right Stuart Werner, Larry Ci-
i Ivc n Esterm
Jewish Wire Service Picks
'Representative' Board
XE\v YORK (JTAi Organ-
ization Of a new board of directors
of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
lepresentative of the American
Jewish community, was announced
this wees by Eieazar Lipsky. presi-
dent of the 45-year-old worldwide
news service The board will con-
trol and direct the entire JTA op-
eration throughout the world
Lipsky said the 25 men and
women lected to the board would
serve li Individual capacities
II elements
Jewish community
pre-.- Additional members
he said, to expand
he board's' <. resenti ti*e charac-
he new board
prominent
in th publis Id
Th/ nev ; gency executive
head calle tent of the
new board "a major step in the
I ot JTA. which
should permit us to develop the
maximum potential usefulness of
this unique service in the best in-
ti rests of the community." He said
that "the character of the new
board is the best possible assur-
ance the American Jewish commu-
nity can have thai the JTA will
function independently as an ob-
jective, effective news service for
the entire Jewish community."
He pointed out that a proposed
increased flow of domestic news
would not cause a reduction in
the volume ol news from Israel and
elsewhere abroad "We will con-
tinue to provide a comprehensive
picture of Jewish life in Israel and
abroad." Lipsky said.
LET'S MAKE ISRAEL
ECONOMICALLY SECURE
BUY THE SAFEST BONDS
ISRAEL BONDS and
GIVE TO THE CJA
MAYSHIt FRIEOBEKG
Purim Party Slated
Esther group of Hadassah will
hold a Purim party luncheon at
the home of Dr. and Mrs. Jack It
Schwartz, 7525 Adventure ave
Treasure Island, on Apr. 4. Mrs.
Jean M. Emil. of 65 Washington
ave.. i5 in charge of-reservations.
PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
"Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers"
Serving rh Jswish Community Since 1925
MIAMI'S ONI
AND ONLY
JEWISH
MONUMENT
BUILDERS
CATERING
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GUARANTEED
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AT LOWEST PRICES
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GRAVE MARKERS
HEADSTONES
FOOTSTONES
Only $35.00
Why Pay More? Boy for less at Palmer's and Save I
Ail Monuments Custom Made In Our Own Shops within 3 Days I
3277-79-81 SOUTHWEST 8th STPH
Neil to Corner of 33rJ Avenue
PHONES
'I
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HI 4-0922
PERSONALIZED MEN'S
HAIR STYLING
by DAVID ROSE ol the
BISCAYNE TERRACE HOTEL
BARBER SHOP
For Appf. Coll FR 48779
'poi mpjn *>S& iyov l-m
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
94S MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
Phone JE 1-3595
ROOF LEAK?
CALL
VICTOR COIVIV
Let us repair it or apply
a new one. For free
estimate phone:
*TV. ACME
^ ROOFING
CO.
JE 8-7255
JWV Post Sets Joint Installation
Murray Solomon Post 243. Jew-
ish War Veterans and Ladies'
Auxiliary of Coral Gables, will
hold their annual joint installation
on Sunday evening at Minyonaires
Hall, 3737 Bird rd.
Guest speaker will be Scott
kVtr'_<;i!'l" SeBaton.Jrom l'uuu
county, and former Mayor of Lake-
land, who will discuss "Problems
of Urban Government in Florida.''
Installation ceremony will be
conducted by State Commander
Henry Norton. State first junior
vice commander, Ainslee R. Fer
die. and Stale officer of the day,
Norman Levine. Norton and Le
Vine are past commanders of the
Murray Solomon Post.
Also officiating will be State
Auxiliary president, Mrs. Evelyn
Levine, and ladies' State chaplain.
Mrs Jennie Golub. of the Auxil-
iary.
Officers to be installed by the
posl are Mrs. Selma Tucker, com
mender; Michael Schechter, senior
vice commander; Harry Rosi n
stein, junior vice commander;
Howard Melnick, quartermaster
Norman Levine, officer ol Ihe da]
Phil Cantor, judge advocate; I
ry Nathanson, chaplain; and Lei
Ciment, Sy Sutta, Al ( instantin.
trustees
New Auxiliary officers are Mes-
lames Lena Cohen, preside:,t. :.II
ya Levine, senior vice commander;
Lillian Suiia. junior vice comman-
der; Evelyn Ferdie, treasurer:
Gussie Hedgebow, conductress
Bertha Nathanson, guard: Ruth
Roth, patriotic instructress; and
Anne Seidel. chaplain.
SAFETY
HARBOR
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Florida's newost and largest Hea't"
and Baths Pavilion, Now Lun
mineral water pool, p.itio. solaria
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OUR 17th YEAR
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Larrie S. Blasberg. Funeral Director
Abe Eisenberg Leonard Zilbert


Friday. March 30, 1962
*Jewisti fk>ri'dlan
Page 3-A
US Matzah Frightens Red Rulers
Continued from Page 1-A .
was the first year the Government
h;,d iuued such a ban and that the
Government also barred private
baking of matzohs by Soviet Jews
as a form of commercial enter-
prise.
The report touched off heated
protests in Congress. Sen. Kenneth
Keating. New York Republican,
sent a telegram to U.S. Ambassa-
dor Adlai Stevenson, urging him to
call on the United Nations Human
Hights Commission to look into
what might be done.
Mrs. Harry Koretzky, of Miami Beach, accepts her National
Community Leadership Award from Dr. Max Arzt, vice chan-
cellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, at a
luncheon of the National Benefactors Society of Torah Fund at
the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York. The award was given
to Mrs. Koretzky for "exemplary leadership in all endeavors
to enrich the life of her community." Torah Fund was estab-
lished 20 years ago by National Women's League of the
United Synagogue of America as a fund-raising arm of the
Seminary, which is the central institution of Conservative
Judaism. _______^__^_
Ribicoff Aide Will Address
Senior Citizens' Pre Conference
Dr. Donald P. Kent, special as
on :;. to Secretary Abra
ham A. Ribicoff, of the Depart-
I of Health
1,-jtioii and
Welfare, will 1"'
principal speaker
before delegates
to a special eon
ference for sen-
ior citizens on
Apr. 2 to 4 at
Waldman's hotel
Dr. Kent wil
speak on "New
Patterns for l.iv- DR- KiNT
ing for the Senior Citizen." Senior
citizens from Jewish Community
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGFD
needs for its
THRIFT SHOP
All your furniture, clothing,
linens, dishes, drapes, etc.
All procMds go towards rapport of
ho Horn* You may contribute, tako
a tan deduction or wo will pay end
?or tamo. Ramambor ... wa aro NOT
a profit-making organiiation .. Wo
aro harping your community to kaop
rh dignity By helping other, you
are helping yoursoK! Manufacturer!
and jobbera-romemborwo coo OM
oil yowr ewtcaoH or mifil
o-nse call us for eaiiv
oick-up
TH* JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
THRIFT SHOP
5757 N.W 27th Avonue
ME 3-2338
Closed Saturdays
Centers throughout the Soutl
well as from other parts i
countrj will attend the confi
The conference will be held im-
mediately prior to the Jewish Wel-
fare Board 19ti2 national biennial
,. nvention I for Apr. 4 to 3 at
the D> Buviale hotel.
Miss Miriam R. Ephraim, pro-
gram director of JWB'a Jewish
Community Center Division, will
speak on The Obligation of the
Senior Citizen to His Commu
Mrs. George Simon, of Miami.
is chairman of the senior citizens
conference.
Mrs. Simon. Florida confer-
ence chairman, is vice presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish
Community Center, president of
the Miami YMHA Branch, and a
member of the board of governors
of JWB's Southern Section.
Others on the planning commit-
tee include David Goldberg, Char-
leston. S.C., president, JWB's
Southern Section; A. Budd Cutler,
president, Greater Miami Jewish
Community Center; Mrs. William
Rafkind, Mrs. William Heckler,
Mrs. Da.u J. Sachs, Mrs. Norma
Gordon, .....tn Balsam, Dr. Eman-
uel Pushkin. Howard Dunn and
Aaron Goo, of Miami; Mrs. Email-
uel Es......ashville, Tcnn.; Mrs.
William I pel, jr., New Orleans,
La.; A) enberg, San Antonio,
Tex.; Efraim H. Gale, executive
directoi attar Miami Jewish
Comm Center; Charles Plot-
ton, d Service to Senior
Citizci i Iter Miami Jewish
Commu ; Center; and Nathan
..,-ha:, admin trative field secre-
cy I ern Section.
Spaet Names
Campaign Official
County Commissioner Harold B.
Spaet. candidate for Circuit Judge
in Group 1. has announced the ap-
pointment of E. C. Fogg III as hi-
enmpaign treasurer. 'i
. a dairy executive, served
I.- Spaet's treasurer during bis
campaigns for County Commission
ach City Council
t Vice Mayor and
M;.., ,.t... .'.. ii Mil mi Beach.
i- [ ttai reputation 1
of beii on i Dane county's harci-
g campaigner: Fogj

-,: ......- n all partsi ;
thus far 'i:--
". i tester and North Miami
-peakinp.
-
pt'O] All
th;- > his
es and m :'cis oi
The 54-yi Dade
s been a prac-
ticing I n 2 years. He is
h< Miam Beach
r. ent of tht
Florida League of Municipalities,
past president of the DJe County
, oi "..'. alities. and vice
i >< sident oi the Florida State Elks
Assn.
He is also a trustee of Mt. Sinai
Hospital and a director of the
Children's Home Society of South-
eastern Florida.
Hep. Leonard Farbstein, New
York Democrat, appealed to Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk to ap-
peal to Soviet leaders "on humane
grounds" to permit importation
of matzohs. In a speech on the
House floor. Rep. Farbstein called
the ban "the crudest act of all."
Rep. Jacob Gilbert, another New
York Democrat, sent a telegram to
Anatoly Dobrynin, the Soviet Am-
bassador to the United States ask-
ing him to intervene. Rep. Gilbert
said the ban could only be consid-
ered "one more harassment and
bitter Dlow inflicted upon the Jews
of Ru=sia." Rep. Steven Derounian,
New York Republican, also wired
the Soviet envoy a request that he
intervene.
Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York
Republican, was another Con-
gressman to confact the Soviet en-
voy. He asked that Soviet offi-
cials be induced to allow ship-
ment of American-baked matzohs
and said he had been assured by
a number of American firms they
would donate the mstxeh.
The B'nai B'rith made a similar
(fler "as a simple act of Jewish
brotherhood." Label A. Katz, B'nai
B'rith president, made the offer
in a telegram to the Soviet Council
for the Affairs of Religious Cults
through the office of Ambassador
Dobrynin. Katz cited the draft
principles on freedom of religious
rights and practices now on the
agenda of the UN Commission on
Human Rights and declared that
Russia's denial of matzohs was "in
direct conflict" with those princi-
ples. The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee for years has shipped mat-
zohs to Russian Jews and others.
Chief Rabbi Levin reacted deli-
cately to the American offers, say-
ing that they were a matter "not
for us alone" but for the Soviet
authorities to decide.
Anne frank Chapter
Anne Frank chapter of B'nai
B'rith held a luncheon in the Dea -
ville hotel's Charlemagne room
sday noon. Mrs. Tena Kata
was in charge of arrangements.
Dade Heights Has
Active Calendar
Dade Heights Jewish Congrega-
tion will present Ivan Kivitt's
' "Merry-Go-Round Playhouse" in a
production of "Rumpelstiltskin" on
Sunday, Apr. 8. at 2 p.m.
Senior USY of the congregation
I is having a membership drive. All
teen-agers from 14 to 10 are in-
Ivited to the annual meeting Wed-
[ nesday from 8 to 9 p.m.
Camp Judah, Dade Heights' sum-
! mer day camp, will be open from
(June 25 through Aug. 17 for chil-
dren from 4 to 12.
Activities will Include swim-
ming, field trips, bowling, crafts.
music, drama and dancing. The
air-conditioned premises will be
used for the additional comfort of
the children, and meals will be
prepared in the congregation's
kosher kitchen.
The Temple will be open for
registration from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
daily.
Complete end Dependable Tif.p Service
MIAMI TITL
& Gkttact Co.
34 YEARS OF ^iTLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS
* ABSTRACTS
* TITLE INSURANCE
124 SECURITY TRUST BUILDING and
136 N.E. FIRST STREET
Telephone FRanklin 3-8432
REMEMBER
The memories of Passovers gone by-the IMWH^fr^JK^JJ&Tgg
poking around the kitchen, making the horseradish and theChches-puttinj on the
rmw suit of clothes and shoes-pockets full of hazel nuts-and almondsarixtousy
waiting for the Seder to start-Uncle Joe and Aunt Sad* were always late- he whole
family together-Grandpa looking like a king propping the pillow on he chair bes.de
him-Grandma tired after baking and cooking all day but "Mv Malta" my queen, ha
c ned her-lhe Kiddush and then my turn for "Ma Nishtanah'' and the answer given
with Grandpa's voice ringing out over allthe first half of the Mapdah ***-
even the bitter herbs tasted so good-Passom it was always "srong -all were com-
celled to eat it otherwise we could not get the hard boiled egg and salt water-and
then the meal-nobody, but nobody, could cook betterthan grandma-we ate-and
ate and then the "e*ncW'-and the rest of the Haptfih-and some more cups of
tine and the opening of the door-and the stories of how in the old country someone
mgnten*the whole Lily by appearing at that door-tat best of aII the son*; with
which the second half of the Hagadah abound-and the feeling of drowsiness-content-
ment-and the thought that tomorrow the same thing once more........
MANISCHEYYITZ WINE COMPANY, N. Y.
Producers of Traditional Passover Wines
s*2
crv* U1.WT IMF ,Jr
&6
One of the Notion's
Oldest anal Largest"
0ade Federal
Ravings and Loan Association of Miami
%
JOSEPrl M_ UPTON. PiestrJenl

4V4%
Per Annum
Current
Dividend
Rate
PAID
QUARTERLY
ON SAVINGS


Page 4-A
* im ist- fhrkBan
Friday. March 30, 1962
"^Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
MM 396
FRED K. SHOCHET..............Editor and Pui'.isher
LEO MINDLIN..............................Executive I itac
SELMA M. THOMPSON..........Asst. to Publisher
-.EL BUREAU
ratal Hotel Tel Aw.. Israel
RAY U. BINDER___________Con
Published tttrr Friday *-!C J*?7 by The Jew!h Floridlaa
at 1 S E. Sixth Street. Miami 1. Florida.
Second-Class Posts*-' Paid at Miami. Florid*.
The Jewish Floridian hat abso-bed the Jewish Unity and
the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service. National Editorial Ann.. American Assn. of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
B hrutk
: I
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Local A-ea
One Year MOO ThrsM Years f. CO
O-t c* Town Upon Request
Volume 25
24 E Acer 5722
Friday March 30, 1962
Number 13
JWB's Biennial
Opens Wednesday
National bier.nia! csr.ver.:icr. -.:
the Beard v.-.;.
- next V
cut the L already
Corrj
nationwide character oi the Cen-
ter progrcm cr.-J. the key role ci
.-.em Jewish communities In
its work.
In serving the religious, morale
end welfare needs of Jews in the
U.S. Armed Forces and VA hos-
pitals, as well as their depen-
dents, the Jewish Welfare Board
is making a unique contribution
to the spiritual strength of our
military, which President Ken-
nedy has called "heartening."
In providing guidance and
service to the expanding national
Jewish Community Center move-
ment, which today boasts a mem-
bership of more than 700,000 men, women and
children, JWB ie contributing to the establish-
ment of a vital community life, with partic-
ularly laudable work being done in the "prob-
lem" areas of teen-age and senior citizen serv-
ice.
The convention here will be noteworthy
for two major events: the offering of recom-
mendations of the Committee on Reappraisal
and Planning, which for more than a year has
been studying how JWB can strengthen the
Center movement and its programs; and the
in the year-long observance of
the centennial of the Jewish military chap-
icy in the U.S. Armed Forces.
The Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center is a clear example of the contribution
of the JWB approach to Jewish communities
throughout the nation. With an eye toward
the needs of every age grouping, the Center
offers programs of worth for tots, teens, young
adults, mature men and women, and the senior
citizen all incorporated within the context of
the Center movement.
Because the delegates to JWB's 1962 bien-
nial from cities very much like our own across
the land will play a key role in determining
JWB's pattern of service during the years
ahead, thus helping to shape major areas of
Jewish communal programming, the conven-
tion opening here next Wednesday is of genu-
ine national interest.
Greater Miami Jewry welcomes the con-
vention, and wishes its delegates a success-
ful session.
bringing Eichmann to justice, the nation's court
will be a free agent in pronouncing sentence
upon him without the benefit of assistance
from the gallery. And Israel will be speaking
not alone for herself but for the spirits of the
six million men, women, and children, whose
brutal and purposeless slaughter Adolf Eich-
mann helped mastermind.
Adolf Eichmann's Plea
Adolf Eichmann is fighting for his very
life. Once again. Dr. Robert Servatius, his
defense counsel, has brought forth the argu-
ment that Eichmann was nothing more than a
cog in a wheel, a simple soldier carrying out
the orders handed down to him.
It is doubtful if the high Israel court hear-
ing the Eichmann appeal will give it much
credence. Still, there is an increasing amount
of sentiment around the world that Eichmann's
life should be spared if only to make his pun-
ishment more clear no less than more mean-
ingful both to the prisoner himself and to
those who harbor his beliefs today.
But just as Israel was a free agent 'n
New Immigration Attempts
Once more, a concerted effort is being
made in Washington to deal v/ith the scan-
dalous nature of the U.S. immigration program.
Immigration reform was a basic concept
incorporated within the fabric of the Eisen-
hower Administrations. From the very begin-
ning^ Mr. Eisenhower made several genuine
attempts to eradicate the evils of this blot on
American democracy. And, from the very
beginning, there were many outrageously-
motivated forces intent on frustrating these
attempts.
Now, again, during the early years of the
Kennedy Administration, new pressures are
being brought to bear to do away with the na-
tional origins quota system, which since 1924,
has mocked the spirit, as well as the letter, of
the motto inscribed on the foot of the Statue
of Liberty.
For, under this system, America may ask
the world to send its "tired" here refugees
from hatred and oppression but the sad fact
is that they are largely denied entry.
The quota system puts a premium on the
number of immigrants allowed here, depend-
ing on their national origin. Some countries
are denied quotas entirely. The quotas thus
set an arbitrary value on the quality of human
misery, with the clear implication that people
born in certain lands are more desirable and
welcome here than others.
That the system works to the detriment of
American prestige abroad is beyond question.
That it works to the detriment of basic prin-
ciples of individual dignity is equally clear.
From both points of view, with traditional U.S.
democratic beliefs hanging in the balance, it
is about time that the national origins method
of determining who and who shall not be
granted haven in the U.S., fall once and for
all by the wayside.
daring the week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
BSlllllVSMSSffK'
A READER in New Mexico
" has completely misinterp-
reted a recent column of mine
in which I commented on Is-
rael's revaluation of U.S. for-
eign policy in the Middle East.
The substance of the column
was that U.S. Jewry has been
left far behind in its repeated
criticism of the State Depart-
ment for. in Israel's view, our
government's attitude toward
the Arabs seems increasingly understandable as a pragmatic expres-
-***m-a.diplomatic maneuvering: wkJhMo-eome-Jews here. stM fired
by the Zionist ideals that brought Israel into being, the attitude is
crass and immoral one taking no consideration of the needs of the
weak because Arab oil, among other things of prestige, dictates
against it.
This was meant as no attack against Israel, which must dearly
be more sophisticated in its dealings than individual middle class
U.S. Jews particularly if -he is to survive in the boiling cauldron
of international realities. I have time and time again exp>
lai views in the past, merely suggesting that government affair-.
Israeli or any other variety, seem to be the rx-tter part of what He-
brew morality deplores as improper forms of human behavior. Thf
clear dilemma here ha- been that Israel, in her urgent adoption of
recalls the misgivings of the prophet. Nathan,
who found foreboding in ancient Jewry's sudden yen for an earthly
Ui i
In oil rgence of Israel as a secular en-
today dor be perceived, to the more n
spiritual entit
:' re-
. .
_lm of di
.
AS A PRINCIPAL
e to att
' f Israeli foi
; in her beh : when I
e several years back, j
Lv< ;: Israel is ever I
in the market pi ad.
In the business of running a government, one must be foolish
indeed to expect the standard forms of moral principle to obtain. But
isolated from such considerations a luxury which as a nation Israel
can not afford but in which a diaspora Jew can easily indulge him-
self the deal emerges in less defensible terms.
It is this distinction my avid New Mexico reader was impatient
to understand however unpleasant it may be. The unpleasantness
can. indeed, be carried further: With Israel emerging as a nation,
will the Jews survive as a people? This may be a terrifying question,
but it is hardly an academic one. Its roots lie in Jewish history
in the foreboding expressed by Nathan to which I previously referred.
For what can a Jewish State hope to be, no less than to represent,
without the spiritual source of Judaism as an integral element gov-
erning her deliberations?
Other people merely require a palpable national heritage to sug-
gest their continuum, but Jews have through the centuries of their
travail repeatedly demonstrated that they depend upon somewhat
more. The "somewhat more" is obviously that which kept them
going when they had no nation of their own an unswerving iden-
tification with the precepts of their faith.
< .*.
IF HISTORY DOES not necessarily demonstrate that nationhood
guarantees survival, it certainly proves the Jewish ability to man-
age without it. In addition, history now raises the ugly doubt that
nationhood may very well he the single challenge to Jewish survival
which it can not succes.-fully me< ationhood, by definition, com-
promises the mystic source oi Jewish vict try over repeated intimida-
tion by threats and
The sale of a:: a cn-r in point, which must be
principally regan ness in weapons ol lestruc-
The sin would be the Israel to engage in mun
' England, i. Belgium, or ride.'.),
oilier nation. Fir such commerce inherently lowers I lei to
th< lev* l of her pi i
s < argument whatever diplomatic or
commercial advanti the sal < have brought Israel, il
that Jew.- have alwi ;. n symbolic of a sphere <-f human
apart from other found elsewhere, and that the violence
done to this view of (he J< as keeper of the world's conscience holds
out dim nope for the future. Since Israel has assumed the character
of her neighbors, how much worse can now be expected of the
neighbors?
I must repeat: I offer here no double standard of international
morality which Israel should adopt that she should hope to sur-
vive as a nation while shunning the best principles of commerce and
trade. Once having gone into the business of nationhood. Israel must
also act according to these principles. But it does behoove us to
recall that the millenia of our survival in the dispersion were based
more on morals than management.
+
pOR JEWS ARE an irritant to the conscience of others, and should
remain an example of good to those gone astray. Expecting from
Israel the highest level of moral behavior, we must be willing to ex-
amine the basis of national self-interest as an issue central to the
question of good and evil.
Lest this reasoning be considered the work of an impossible
idealist, who demonstrates no practical concern for Israeli survival,
it should here be mentioned that many citizens of the Jewish State
have at one time or another adopted a similar position. Some long
ago argued that their country must have no army. In the name
of a personal brand of morality, others sought to sabotage military
actions during the War of Liberation that unintentionally desecrated
the Sabbath. Still others destroyed valuable canned foods because
they were not kosher even as the threat of starvation loomed for
the infant nation in siege.
These examples, odious though they may be, highlight the un-
wil ingness to compromise principle in the name of national survival
rather than Jewish survival, and suggest a serious doubt in the minds
of many that both are necessarily one and the same
Where expediency transcends decency, justice has been maimed.
This certainly holds true in the international sale of arms The search
to assure the continuation of Israel as a secular entity must inevitably
lead to the adoption of standards foreign to those principles that
achieved the spiritual triumph of Jewry over travail even unto the
days of Hitler.

i




Friday, March 30, 1962
vJkwisti WcridHaiin
Page 5-A

Bill Offered to Revise Quotas Law
Continued from Page 1-A
residence through the third degree
. of consanguinity, their spoil-es and
i commutcc of immigration ex-; thildren ,. The remaining 40 p,r.
cent is available to other qualified
immigrants.
Persons born in the Western
Hemisphere remain non-quota. AI-
Edwnrd A. Stern (right) is being congratulated by Charles
Seiavitch. outgoing executive secretary of the South Florida
Council ot B'r.ai B'rith Ledges, on his installation as president
of the Council.
Florida Council Elects Stern
perts from organizations affiliated
with the American Immigration
and Citizenship Conference.
Sen. Hart stated that the bill
would eliminate the need for such
bpecial enactments on immigration
which Congress has found neces-
sary in recent years. The major
provisions of the bill are as fol-
lows: 250,000 quota visas are au-
thorize! per year, of which 50.000
i. le available to refu-
in'l/or escapees without re-
The remain-
I quota visa
ountries under i
tion,
. 80.000 quota visas ?re to be
j counti i ropor-
i the si/.:- of their population
:o world population but no one
country is to get more than 3,000
lumbers under this category.
And 120.000 quota visas are to be
allocated to countries based on the
so non-q-iota status is expanded to
include the parents of a U. S. citi-
zen and persons with special skill3
i including spouse and children).
The bill automatically eliminates
the Asia-Pacific Triangle provi-
sions. Sen, Hart stated that the
bill would lie on the desk of the
President of the Senate for ont
week to permit additional Senators
to join in co-sponsorship.
Zionist Unit Will
Honor Israeli
Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz, i
h Florid th
I the
tail reception in ho c I
l -. lei Consul ol
direi ir ol ra( I Informi
l p.m.,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Z. Si
. -i st.
The South Florida Zionist Youth
Commission, composed of dele-
gates from the Miami and Miami
Beach chapters of Hadassah, Hoi-
Edward A. Stern, president of
Gilbert J. Balkin Ixidgc of B'nai
B'rith, has been elected president
of the South Florida Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges.
Other officers elected were M. J.
Finegold. of Coral Gables Lodge,
president-elect; Eli Hurwitz. Sho
lem Lodge. Murray Skop, North
Dado, Irving Schatzman, Miami
Beach, Jack Wilson, North Shore,
and Ansel Wittenstein, Sunshine,
vice presidents.
Also Frank Kershner, Flamingo
Lodge, executive secretary; Ar-
thur Horwitz, North Dade Lodge,
treasurer; and Charles Seiavitch.
Gilbert Balkin Lodge, Samuel Nei-
|berg. Coral Gables Lodge, and
Jack Fink, Miami Beach I-odge,
trustees.
Stern, a local attorney, is co-
chairman of the Florida Federa-
tion of B'nai B'rith for its em-
ployment of the handicapped pro-
gram and chairman for new
I lodges.
.ywood chapter of Hadassah, and
proportion of their immigration to (he zionist Districts of South Flor-
the U. S. over the past 15 years to ida sponSor 31 Young Judaea
total of all immigration to the Uni-
ted States for the same period.
No quota area shall get less than
it got under the old law, except
that the maximum is 25,000. The
minimum quota is 200.
UTTER TO TH! EDITOR-
Reader Calls Columnist's
View of Israel 'Immature'
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Leo Mindlin's discourse on Is-
rael's worthiness in your Feb. 16
issue seems rather immature in
its approach, it seems unreason-
able to me that Israeli officials
and citizens should share the
American Jews' cutlook as Inti-
mately and completely as Mr.;
Mindlin appears to desire. Cer-
tainly, the context of our interpre-
tation is vastly different; we are:
rather remote from the pressures
of Israel's existence.
An economic contribution is ]
hardly a bilateral attachment, and
it is easy for me to see how some
element of resentment can be gen-
erated in the Israeli by our ap-
parent willingness to consider fi-
nancial contributions as the ulti-
mate service. We do not share
any of the hardships or tensions
caused by Israel's precarious posi-
Rockwell Rally
OK'd for Small
Park in N.Y.
Continued from Page 1-A
for a permit was rejected by May-
or Wagner.
The University of Pittsburgh of-
ficials meanwhile offered a "no
comment" this week on Rockwell's
unsuccessful bid for an invitation
to address students on the Pitts-
burgh campus
One university spokesman said |
the matter was strictly a student
union affair and that a refusal by
that group "ended the incident."
The Nazi had sent one of his
troopers, Clifton Ridenour, of Ar-
lington, Va., to arrange for his ap-
pearance on the compus. Student
union officials rebuffed both the
bid and an effort by the trooper to
sell Rockwell's anti-Semitic book,
"This Time the World."
tion in the Middle East, except in
a secondary sort of way an iden-
tification at best.
If Israel's survival dictates
that she sell munitions to the
Germans, then that must be
done. Have we, as diaspora
Jewry, gotten so moralistic that
we no longer buy any German
products, or British products
for that matter?
Somehow, we also manage to
sleep each night, knowing that
Germany is now a trusted ally of
the United States, and supported in
its recovery by our tax dollars,
diaspora Jewry's included.
As what does Mr. Mindlin de-
fine "traditional Judaism" in the
United States a growing tenden-
cy to become ruled by the most
materialistic aspects of life, an
eroding loss of respect for educa-
tion in its real sense not fratern-
ity parties and a learning and
culture among our young Jewish
people? An increase in adaptation
to common social behavior, such
as vastly increased Jewish divorce
rates?
Before Mr. Mindlin so easily dis-
misses Israel as an important and
vital portion of our heritage, he
had best look about him. Israelis
are not heaven-sent. But who can
objectively deny Ben-Gurion's
statement that Israel has made the
American Jew's back straighter?
ROBERT RECHTER
Albuquerque, N.M.
Quotas are allocated to appli-
cants either by country of birth
or by country of citizenship, pro-
vided he has been domiciled for
ten years or more in the place of
citizenship.
All unused quota numbers at the
end of the year are pooled and di-
vided among quota areas having a
backlog of applicants waiting for
immigration visas. No quota area
shall get from this pool a number
of visas greater than its regular
annual quota and no more than
100,000 numbers may be used from
the pool in any one year.
Quotas under the bill will be re-
vised every five years based on
latest data. Within the quotas 60
percent are available to "blood
relatives of a citizen or of an alien
lawfully admitted for permanent
groups in the Dade-South Broward
area, representing over 800 chil-
dren.
AVIAD YAftH
Yafeh taught secondary school in
Jerusalem until he enrolled in the
diplomatic course given by the Po-
litical Department of the Jewish
Consul Yafeh, born in Palestine
in 1923, was graduated from the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem in
1945, where he majored in history,
Hebrew philology and pedagogy.
He was national leader of "Young
Maccabee," the Jewish sport edu-1
cation movement, and also a mem- fe y"
ber of the National Basketball team He joined the Hagana in 1936,
from 1940 to 1942. playing tourna- \ and during the Israel War of lnde-
ments in Egypt and other neigh- pendence saw action in beseiged
boring countries. Jerusalem.
Day Camp Set At Beth Am
Temple Beth Am's third season I dancing, drama and a complete
of day camping will start June 18' athletic program,
and run for eight weeks. Trips to unusual and interesting
_, _____places are planned, and special ac-
The new and enlarged program i JV^eg $uch as bowlmg| skating
for 4 through 12-year-olds includes all(j horseback riding are available.
daily Red Cross swimming instruc- The carefully-planned day starts at
tion. arts and crafts, canoeing, 9 a.m., and closes at 4 p.m. The
camp craft and overnight camping, fully-trained staff is guided by Mrs.
archery, nature study, fishing. John Balkany.
L'CHAYIM
to the American quality of greatness!
Dr. Woltson in Talk
"Spinoza and Judaism" was the
topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham
Wolfson, author of "SpinozaLife
of Reason," on Thursday noon be-
fore the Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai of Hollywood. Rabbi David
Shapiro, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Sinai, introduced the speaker
and conducted the discussion period
which followed the lecture.
1.. ..
Mordecai Sheftatl
Soldier and Patriot
Living in Savannah at the
time of the Revolution,
Sheftall defied the royal
regime and came out for
liberty and freedom. He
served in commissary work
for the armies of Georgia
and the Carolinas, often
advancing personal funds
for vital provisions; and at
the same time served as
staff officer in the Georgia
Brigade. His quality of
greatness rests securely i.i
the history of our nation.
LORD
CALVTRT
-*-
ssss
The L'Chayim Whiskey...
Lrd CalveiCT
Truly the American Whiskey of Distinction
Uncompromising people make Lord Calvert;
disc or neople enjoy It
K NOW 31% MM* WHMIU <* **"' **" **"* ttmm' ^ ""
m


Page 6-A
+Jtni ftcrldHairt
Friday, March 30. 1962
Talking over plans for the Israel anniversary dinner dance,
sponsored by the American Friends of the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, to be held May 5 aboard the Calypso Liner are
{left to right) Louis Rudnick, national vice president of the
Zionist Organization of America; Jack S. Popick. president,
and Herbert S. Shapiro, honorary president of the South Flor-
ida Division of the American Friends; and Michael M. Nissel-
son, of New York, executive vice president of the national
Hebrew University organization.
Greater Miamians to Celebrate Israel's
Anniversary Aboard Calypso Liner May 5
Some 400 Greater Miami com-
munity leaders will celebrate the
14th anniversary of the independ-
ence of the State of Israel on the
high seas May 5.
The American Friends of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
will hold a community-wide dinner
end dance aboard the M.S. Calypso
Liner on May 5, according to Jack
S. Popick and Mrs. Samuel Simon-
hoff, co-chairmen of the anniver-
sary fete.
The Calypso Liner, formerly the
190-ft. German vessel, the Rustri-
gen, is operated by a subsidiary of
Canaveral International Corp. on
a daily run from Miami to Bimini
l?!and in the Bahamas.
The vessel has been fully air
conditioned and refurnished.
mcng shipboard features are a
free port shopping center, con-
gruous music, dancing, cocktail
lounges and dining salon, all of
which will be in operation dur-
ing the Saturday night cruise set
to depart from Miami at 8:45
p.m.. May 5.
A native band will provide the
famed calypso music for which the
sleek vessel is named.
Although the three-deck vessel
can accommodate some 600 pas-
sengers, it has no staterooms to
allow for maximum public space,
and reservations will be limited to
400 persons, according to Popick.
Information on reserving invita-
tions to the black tie affair may be
obtained from the office of the
American Friends at 940 Lincoln
rd.
The function also will mark the
13th anniversary of the admission
of Israel into the United Nations.
Committee meetings planning the
dinner dance already have been
held at the homes of Mrs. Oida
Rubin. Mr. and Mrs Emil Fried-
lander, Mrs. Jennie Grossinger,
and Mr. and Mrs Popick.
TRAVEiING! nS-i
s Call
\ GUS
^J SHAW
SHAW IRAVEl SERVICE. Inc.
R.-V. .-Oll.it
AIR
HIAM'.HIK
MOTU
149 N.E. 1st St., Miami, FR 4-2604
Scouts to Collect
Goodwill Bags
Good Turn Day this year is Mar.
31. when 19.000 Boy Scouts. Cub
Scouts and Explorer Scouts in
South Florida combine their ef-
forts with the Junior Chamber of
Commerce to help the handicapped
served by Goodwill Industries in
Miami.
The Boy Scouts and the Junior
Chamber of Commerce will work
with Goodwill to collect 100,000
bags of repairable clothing and
ether small items. This collection
will provide jobs and training for
| those afflicted by the misfortunes
i of illness, injury and old age.
Last year. Boy Scouts collected
i more than 50.000 bags of repairable
discards for Goodwill serving the
handicapped of South Florida.
Their Good Turn gave training and
employment to more than 200 hand-
icapped men and women last year.
THi ONLY
MAJOR LEAGUl JM-ALAI
action!
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Claims Confab Reveals Aid Figure
Continued frem Page 1 A
volume of application* submitted
has failed to shrink over the
years, notwithstanding the great
number of allocations granted in
earlier years. In point of fact,
applications actually increased
by seven percent in 1962, with
433 applications requesting con-
siderably over $20,000,000 coming
from 33 countries, where Nazi
victims are making their homes.
You will appreciate that the task
of scaling down those huge de-
mands to the approximately $10,-
000,000 available has raised an
exceptional volume of difficul-
ties."
Distribution of this year's funds
were calculated by Blaustein as
follows: Relief and Rehabilitation.
$7,836,409. of which $7,000,000 are
going for the continent of Europe.
Australia and to other programs
for Nazi victims; Cultural and Edu-
cational Reconstruction, $1,863,-
776; Administration relay of ex-
penditures and contributions for
the Israel Purchasing Mission,
$375,000.
An increase of the Claims Con-
ference grant to United Hias Ser-
vice Jewish Immigration Agency
from $375,000 in 1961 to $450,000
this year was voted by the board.
During the past year United Hias
has helped move 2.100 Jews from
Cuba, of whom more than one-third
were Nazi victims. In addition it
helped nearly 3,000 Nazi victims to
migrate from Europe.
Since the initiation of the Con-
ference, there has been a steady
rise in the budget for Cultural and
Educational Reconstruction, rising
to a new high in 1962, reaching 23
percent of the total budget. As evi-
dence of this steady growth, Mr.
Blaustein gave figures in Europe
since the first budget was prepared
in 1954. In that year European
countries received $200,000 under
this category. This jumped to
S500.000 by 1955. $640,000 in 1957.
$720,000 ill 1959. S796.000 111 1961.
and $856,000 this year.
The importance of these cul-
tural grants cannot be over-esti-
mated." Blaustein stated. "The
Jewish schools, which Nazi perse-
cution had laid waste, had been
rebuilt with L'onierence aid or are
currently in construction wherever
the need for them is urgent. At
the same time a new generation of
children horn in years of the mid-
dle titties has begun to knock on
school doors.
"Conference allocations over
the years for the rebuilding of
Jewish schools in Europe have
reached truly formidable propor-
tions," Blaustein emphasized.
No Dade Camp
Now Registering
Camp Ha-Ge-Gah. summer day
camp of Beth Torah Congregation,
announces registration is open to
all North Dado residents.
Mrs. Robert Schwartz is camp
committee chairman. The day
camp will run for a period of eight
weeks, beginning June 25.
Activities such as swimming,
arts and crafts, dancing, dramatics
and athletics will be incorporated
in the daily schedule.
"They dosorvo to be appraised in
term* ranging beyond m o r
quantity alone. In the entire en-
nels o* our history no epoch has
ever witnessed before a transfu-
sion of one so massive for the ro1
building of the fiscal Jowish
school plans, which had been de-
stroyed. In the generations to
come I am confident it will stand
out as an enduring monument of
Conference activities and will
take its rank in the forefront of
the Conference achievements,"
Mr. Blaustein declared.
A check for $10,000 was presented
Monday to King Frederick IX by
senior officers of the Conference on
Jewish Material Claims Against
Germany at a private audience.
The check was presented to the
King "as a token of the* gratitude
of the Jews of the work) for the ex-
ceptional events of the Danes dur-
ing the Nazi occupation to save the
lives of their Jewish fellow citi-
zens, with a recommendation tha'
it be used for scholarships to chil-
dren of the heroic resistance fight-
ers."
Participants in the audience a;
Amaligenborg Palace included Dr
N.ihum Gnidmann. Mr. Blaustein
and Moses Leavitt, treasurer of the
Conference. They were accompa
nied by Otto Levison, president ot
the Copenhagen Jewish community
and were presented to the King b
United States Ambassador William
MacBlair. Jr.
NCCJ to Sponsor Miami Institute
On Human Relations in Business World
A six-hour institute on "Human
Relations in the Business World"
has been announced for Apr. 5 by
the co-chairmen of the Florida re-
gion of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews.
Mitchell Sirgany, Dr. C. Doren
Tharp. and Richard Wolfson. who
share the office of regional chair-
man of Ihe NCCJ, hailed the proj-
ect as the first of a long-range ser-
ies of educational programs for
management and labor leaders
Scheduled for the hours of 4 to
10 p.m., the Institute will be held
at the Dupont Plaza hotel.
J. O. Jarrard, Eastern Airlines
vice president for industrial re-
lations, wilt speak on "What Man-
agement Expects from Labor."
The labor statement of expecta-
tions from management is to be
given by Walter Beirwagon, in-
ternational vice president of
street railway and motor coach
employees union.
Opening lectures will be given
by two NCCJ staff members. "This
Changing World" will he discussed
by Dr. Gordon W. Lovejoy. sociolo-
gist, from Greensboro, NC. "The
Challenge of Good Employer-Em-
ployee Relations" i* the topic for
Dr. Leonard P. Aries. Washington,
DC, director of the NCCJ Com-
mission on Labor-Management Or-
ganizations, which is sponsoring
similar programs throughout the
nation.
Members of the planning com-
mittee who organized the program
loi Greater Miami are William W.
| Dohany, Robert Gardner. David
, Herman, William Owens, Frank
' Roche. Malcolm Ross, Dr. James
Yudakin. Ed Yarnell. Sen. Harry
Cain. Sirgany. Dr. Tharp. and
i Wolfson.
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Friday. March 30. 1962
fJewisti flerkfiain
Page 7-A

High Court Asked to Deny Appeal
Left to riqht are Frank H. Kravit, trustee, Joseph B. Gorinstein.
-.-.resident of Hatikvah Lodqe, B'nai B'rith, and Jack R. Giick,
installing officer. Some 400 persons attended installation
reremonies of the new B'nai B'rith organization on Mar. 18
at the Carillon hotel.
DR. GOLDMANN IN TALK
Claims Unit Seeks Bonn
Extension of Payments
COPENHAGEN(JTA)Immediate action by the West German
overnment in extending the restitution law in order to assure prompt
handling cf the remaining 900,000 claims for individual restitution still
;ending, was demanded here Monday by Dr. Nahum Goldmann. chair-1
man of the Conference of Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, j
;: the annual meeting of the board---------------------
11 directors of the Claims Confer-, 200,000 Jewish men. women and
tncc I children had benefited from this
Addressing the opening session.; distribution. In 1961 the Confer-
jr. Goldmann said that such a law I er.ee dis ribuled $10,108,000.
also was nee Jed to extend the ben- The total amount which the
dits of exisung West German law Claims Conference is to receive
: other victims of Nazi persecu- fiom the West German Government
:.on. especially those who have re-, uinler the restitution agreement is
cently come from Iron Curtain, to reacn $107,000,000. he reported
uiintri-s. He emphasized that the' The Claim* Conference is recog-
ced tor immediate action was un- r,nj*ed by (he West German Govern-
pcrative because the present Bed- ...meat .as the official spokesman for
i ral indemnification law was, the Jews throughout the world who
'heduied to expire next Dec. 31. are entitled to individual restitu-
Dr. Goldmann pointed out that 'turn under >";* *JjJjfJjl
- any Jews are entitled to compen- Federal Government and various
ation although Ihey are not at West German states.
ent covered by the German Dr. Goklmann opened his address
: w. which set October, 1953. as a wjtn a tribute to the Danish people
off date. Nazi victims who. aIK} the Government lor their he-
tould not leave Iron Curtain coun-L l0jc rescue of their Jewish fellow
Iriea before that date do not WSl-Uiyjens during the Nazi occupa-
lj for compensation under the tion. He recalled that, of the 7,000
Continued from Page 1-A
Israeli court because he had been
abducted in Argentina. Even if
those who abducted the man are
liable to arrest, trial or.damage
suits, Hausner said, the validity
of the prosecution's case is not
affected.
The defense had claimed that
Lichmann could not possibly have
remembered fully all details ot
events thai had transpired 20 yea -
earlier Hausner pointed out that
the l.ooo.ooo-word police interrogo-
tion transcript had been preceded
Eichmann's recital ot many
major facts to a Nazi friend. Wil-
!om Stassen, when he was >'ill in
'. gentina. Thus, said Mr. H.aus-
Di r, Eichmann had undergone, our-
i! g the months he dictated his
storj to Stassen, "a full-dress re-
b i sal" that refreshed his mem-
ory several years before he told
many of the same facts to the Is-
raeli police questioning him.
Hitting hard at the 'transport
Officer" claim by Eichmann. the
. Attorney General showed that the
! liirmer Gestapo colonel was the
lit-tapo's "referant." or principal
expert on the Jewish question. All
matters alfecting Jews were re-
ferred to Eichmann. Hausner re-
called The International Red
truss. Hausner pointed out. had
described Eichmann as the "key
man on all matters pertaining to
Nazi dealings with Jews."
Mr. Hausner recalled Eichmann s
over-ruling of other officials when
he had Jews sent to concentration
camps. "He was not a mere trans
port officer of or keeper of the
time-tables,'1 sa Hausnei "He
was 11 s< ssed ith the task ot
ext< rmina inj ...-. Eich-
mann did not give the direct or-
ders for throwing cyclon gas into
each gas chamber where naked
men, women and children stood
with tKF fc*nF"of "8?SiTr in ffieif
eye- But everybody knew mat as
refer int." he- was not d
.:. cult) re or s
v.i..,.:- He c.t alt in death."
The Ssrvatius argument about
Eichmain's 'modest" life was
attacked by Havener, who show-
ed 'hit the Naii s quiet manner
c' fam: y living applied only to
the per?=d he was hiding in Ar-
gentina. During the height of
his splendor," the Attorney Gen-
eral noted, citing testi.-nony pre-
viously entered in the trial,
"Eichmann lived in a private vil-
la, commanded three automobiles
arid two chaeffeurs, had at least
two known mistresses."
As Hausner continued slashing
,t the arguments presented to the
feme Court panel last week by
Dr. ServaDus, the prisoner sat
n his glassy-enclosed, bul-
dock. Taxing voluminous
notes, every once in a while send-
ing a hastily scribbled note to his
counst i
Mr Hausi er, who had begun his
i.; uttal Friday, did not quite com-
; |i :.- : i ises to Dr. Servatiua
at Tuesda: 's session He was ex-
pected ti finish Wednesdayafter
which, under the court's rules. Dr.
- rvatius will hav< an opportunity
.. :,;..;,. -:,.-, ment, Then
tbe appeal will be in the hands of
> country's court, which
- not expected to rule on it for at
least a mtnth.
Cafeteria Will Be Dedicated
The d< cafeteria In the
Hebrew Academy of Greater .\ii-
ami will be dedicated Sunday, ii
a.m. at the site of the newly-
constructed school. 24th st. and
i in< Tree dr.
The huge cafeteria will be called
the Max Silverberg Dining Hall, in
memory of Max Silverberg. one
of the founders of the Hebrew
Academy over 14 years ago. and
a past vice president of the school.
A philanthropist and civic work-
er, he was a member of the board
ot directors of the National Car-
diac Hospital, the Jewish National
Fund of Chicago. Mt. Sinai Hospila".
,' Greater Miami, and Mercy Hos-
of Miami, to which he do-
nated a room, lie was a Mason and
a member of Miami Reach Elks.
Maurice Cohn. chairman of the
event, and a close friend of the
Silverberg family, will introduce
Mrs. Virginia Silverberg. wife, and
children, Susan, 13 and Mark, 8,
who will dedicate the room.
Speaking at the dedication cere-
mony will be B. I. Binder, presi-
dent. Hebrew Academy, and Carl
Hoffman, local attorney. Susan Sil-
verberg. will deliver the invoca-
tion and Mark Silverberg will say
grace.
present German law. The law also
iixed October l. 1953, as tbe cut-off
ate tor stateless persons.
Those now ineligible under the
German law, said Dr. Goldmann,
.nelude thousands of Jewish vic-
tims of Nazism who fled Hun-
gary after the 1956 uprising in
that country, as well as thous-
ands of others who reached West-
ern Europe from East European
countries in recent years. "On
numerous occasions," said Dr.
Goldmann, "we have called upon
the German authorities to piace
these refuses upon an equal
footing with the pre-1953 claim-
ants, and to compensate them for
incarceration n concentration
camns and for the loss of life and
health."
Jews residing in Denmark at the
time, only 475 fell into Nazi hands.
In an accounting of individual
restitution payments to date, he
said "indemnification payments
under present Federal law reach-
ed $2,598,000,000 on December 1,
1961. In addition the West Ger-
man states paid out $17,938,000
before the Federal law was en-
acted in 1953 to reach a grand
total of some $2,772,000,000. Of
the total sum about $556,000,000
came in 1961, preliminary figures
indicate."
H sail that the record "makes
impressive reading but it must be
weighed against the cost of the
entire indemnification program.
Those costs will run to $4,300,000.
000. West German authorities have
He emphasized that payment of estimated. Should the figure prove
these claims was entirely separate correct, only 60 percent have been
liom the money received by the paid to date."
Claims Conference for global dis
frihution to needy Jews through-
out the world, lie reported that, to
date, S79.56B.000 had been distrib-
uted for the benefit of surviving
ins in 30 countries by the
Claims Conference, and that some
NOTICE:
I stand as a citizen, utterly op-
posed to the so-called Crondon
amendments, and offer to speak or
debate on this matter any place,
any time. I take my stood without
reservation, and in (all rececattion
of the ability of the apposition. I
hope my stand will be edited by
many, many other cinic leaders.
REUBEN GUBERMAN
HI 8-6082
Moses Leavitt, treasurer of the
Claims Conference, reported that.
of the sum received in 1961. S7.-
795.000 went for relief and rehabili-
tation of needy Nazi victims: SI.-
904.000 was spent lor cultural and
educational reconstruction; and
F408.0OO for various special pro-
jects.
In the field of community recon-
struction, Mr Leavitt listed the
following project- made possible in
1961 throi.yh claims Conference
funds: six homes for the aged in
Belgium, Italy. Uruguay and Aus-
tralia; eight community centers in
Belgiljuil, France and Italy: repair
reconstruction of synagogues in
Copenhagen, Amsterdam. Bologna
and Naples In addition, he report-
ed, capital grants have been made
!o Jewish schools throughout the
world.
RENOWNED FOR KASHRU1H AND QUALITY SINCE 1884
DISTRIBUTED BY:
lAKM I&ISTKIBB TOUS. INC.
373 N.E. 61st Street Miami, Florida


Page 8-A
IJmfeflfkrkMan
Friday. March 30. 1962
..! I
NEW
-a
r

GJEgJUfr.*
ti*.
-*wr
,*.
i.~
92

I--
Leonard Rosen (right), chairman of Hie CJA Over the Top Com-
mirfee, discusses Business Week plans with Bernard Stevens,
one of the hosts for the five-day drive.
Dr. Carl Baumann (left), vice chairman of the Dentists Group,
receives a New Horizons Award from Leon Kaplan, chairman of
the CJA Professions Division.
Jerry Blank (left), co-chairman of the Food and Hotels Division,
congratulates Larry Silverman, chairman of the Motels Group,
for outstanding work in the New Horizons campaign.
Don Kaplan (left), vice chairman of the Builders Group, receives
his New Horizons Award from Hy Rifas, chairman of the CJA
Trades and Professions Council.
You've got to go where the prospects are, ac-
cording to Max Goldstein (right), vigorous co-
chairman of the CJA Construction Division. He
CJA Awards Go
To Volunteers
New Horizons Awards went to
eight outstanding volunteers in
the Food and Hotels and Profes-
sional Divisions at the second in
a series of Leadership Report
meetings of the 1962 Combined
Jewish Appeal, according to CJA
Chairman Cal Kovens.
Singled out for honors were
Jules Arkin. vice chairman of the
Lawyers Group; Harry Zuker-
nick, of the Lawyers Group; A.
B. Wiener, chairman of the Ac-
countants Group; Dr. Carl Bau-
mann. vice chairman of the Den-
tists Group; Joseph Dallet. of the
Hotel Group; and Larry Silver-
man, chairman of the .Motels
Group.
Two men whose divisions wore
honored at the previous meeting,
but who could not be on hand
then, received their awards this
week. They were Sol Megdcll.
of the Real Estate Group; and
Don Kaplan, vice chairman of the
Builders Group.
High prajse for the vigorous
efforts of the men came from both
Kovens and Hyland Rifas, chair
man of the Trades Professions
Council,
"It's men like these who are
behind any successful enterprise
whether it's a business or a
Combined Jewish Appeal," Rifas
commented.
Other divisions of the New
Horizons campaign continued
working their way into the final
phases of the drive, aiming to-
ward the concentrated effort of
Business Week.
went right to the building site to get a pledge
from Neil Schiff (left).

Richard Horwich (left), associate vice chairman of the Trades and
Professions Council, chats with B. B. Goldstein, chairman of the
CJA Services Division.
Jacob Fishman (left), volunteer leader in the Hotels Group, is
shown with Fred Diamond, vice chairman of the Insurance Group.


ttdoy, March 30. 1982
+Jewish norkMian
Page 9-A
RIZONS
.....-..._..

; :
*k
' > f
* ^ I *"
1
*-
'B-_ f t
* m
2
*
* m
ysiness Week Launches "Over the Top' Push
Experts Will
Bring QlAppeal
To Top Leaders
A board of experts made up en-
tirely of veterans of the philan-
thropic wars will be on hand as
to those working in the
Business Week drive.
Ill outstanding leaders of
: eater Miami community are
acting ; hosts for the five-day
"crash coverage" campaign, and
!! be ready with advice and
counsel where it's needed.
They are Leonard Rosen, "Over
the Top" chairman Sam J. Hei-
man, Joseph If. Lipton, Nathan
Gumenick, Ernest Janis, Sidney
Ansin, Jay Kislak, and Bernard
Stevens.
These men s&e all extremely
knowledgeable about their com-
munity, to say the least.
The proper time for approach-
ing a particular prospect may be
in doubtshould he be visited in
the early morning, at lunch, or
late afternoon? Chances are the
ho>t for the day knows the pros-
pect, and what his business
.-chedule is.
Which of Federation's agencies
is another prospect most interest-
ed in? And what are that par-
ticular agency's plans for the
coming year? Again, the chances
are excellent that the host for the
1 aj will have this information
right on tap.
Whether it's the present immi-
grant situation in Israel, or the
problems facing the Greater Mi-
ami community, these hosts are
civic minded men who will be
i eady to supply workers with the
v. capons they need.
A community effort as inten-
sive as Business Weekwhere the
uork of many weeks will be con-
centrated into five daysrequires
concentrated leadership. These
eight men are providing that
leadership.
Women Plan
Telephone Unit
Mrs. Charles Feinberg, Wom-
en's Chairman of the CJA Gener-
al Solicitations Division, has an-
nounced the formation of a "Tele-
phone Brigade," which will go
into full swing next week.
Theirs is the job of spurring
volunteer workers into comple-
tion of all cards they hold, Mrs.
Feinberg explained. They'll start
dialing on an eight-hour a day
basis until all workers are con-
tacted.
tV
The Jewish Home for the
Aged, the community's non-
profit institution serving aged
residents regardless of their
financial status, has a long
waiting line of applicants.
SAM J. HEIMAN
LEONARD ROSEN
JOSEPH M. LIPTON
NATHAN GUMENICK
Xmsh Coverage' to Open
Intensive Concluding Phase
Of Humanitarian Campaign
A one-week d'ive aimed at "crash coverage" of previous
contributors will be staged under a "Business Week" banner be-
ginning Apr. 9, according to CJA Chairman Cal Kovens.
Heading up the important "Over the Top" drive, according
to Kovens, is Leonard Rosen, well-known civic and community-
leader.
Business Week, Rosen explained, is aimed at "a whirlwind
wind-up of that phase of the New Horizons concerning previous
contributors who haven't yet been contacted this year."
Rosen Said different hosts will preside each of five morn-
ings beginning Apr. 9 at Temple Israel, from 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Selected businessmen are being asked to stop by Temple Is-
rael for five minutes one morning and select a maximum of three
cards.
They are asked to cover those cards during the day, and re-
turn them to Temple Israel the following morning, Rosen explain-
ed. Buffet breakfasts will be available.
Serving as hosts, according to Rosen, will be Sam J. Heiman,
Joseph AA. Lipton, Nathan Gumenick, Ernest Janis, Sidney Ansin,
Jay Kislak, and Bernard Stevens.
"I doubt if there is a single more crucial week in the entire
campaign," Rosen said. "This is the week during which all of
our leadership will be asked to do its utmost to take the cam-
paign over the top."
Kovens said there is a "large group" of Greater Miami
businessmen who contributed to the Combined Jewish Appeal,
but who have not yet been contacted for the New Horizons
campaign.
"We feel sure that these men are ready and willing to con-
tribute, but they just haven't been asked this year," Kovens ex-
plained. "That's the purpose of Business Week."
SIDNEY ANSIN
'
BERNARD STEVENS
JAY KISLAK
CJA Chairman Cal Kovens (left) confers with Robert Macht, Jor-
dan Marsh president, and chairman of CJA Mercantile Division.


Page 10-A
mjmis9> fhr*Man
Friday. March 30. 1962


UN Stud) Group Beathea, inslrutlu of social sci- fri(
United Ntions study group of enccs it Univerptj Collage, Uni-
Miami Beach will have a discus- versity of :'...... next T,ue
sion on Red Chirm led by .'ohn 'at the Mia-, Beach Feieul Mils'
local planners for the biennial convention of
the National Jewish Welfare Board make final
arrangements for the incoming delegates from
Jewish Community Centers and YMHAs, who
will be arriving next week horn all parts of
Ihe country to attend sessions beginning on
Wednesday. Hospitality arrangements are
being handled by the host agency, the Great-
er Miami Jewish Community Center. Seated
(left to right) are Arnold Piskin, Milton Bal-
sam. Hyman Kam, and Leon Kaplan, JWB
vice president in charge of local arrange-
ments. Standing (left to right) ere Louis Shatz.
Sam Pascoe, A. Budd Cutler. GMJCC presi-
dent, Efraim H. Gale, GMJCC executive direc-
tor, Mrs. Milton Sirkin, local convention co-
chairman, Meyer Kronenberg, and Mrs. Louis
Glasser, Armed Services chairman.
Jewish Welfare Board Confab Set
Continued from Page 1-A
nick. U.S. representative to the
United Nations Economic and So-
cial Council. He will talk on "Goals
ior American Jewry in the 60s."
Local arrangements have also
teen completed for all sessions
dealing wilh the Armed Forces,
ivh.ch have been scheduled as a
major par! of the forthcoming con-
vention. Mrs. Glasser said that the
.^ehlight of this phase of the con-
tention will be a dinner scheduled
for Wednesday night. 7 p.m.. at
the Deauville. when Maj. Gen.
Frank A. Tobey. Chief of Chap-
Jains. U.S. Army, wiil be main
speaker in observance of the 100th
anniversary of the Jewish military
chaplaincy in the United States.
>rr. Glasser. in charge of the
year-round work in GreaU'r Miami
en behalf of Jewish servicemen
stationed at nearby locations, said
that three additional programs
have been prepared for delegates
coming from all parts of the coun-
try.
A luncheon has been arranged
Wednesday tor the JWB Armec"
Services Committee of the Third
Army Area District, under the
chairmanship of Herbert Elsas,
of Atlanta. On Friday morning,
Apr. 6, there will be a workshop
entitled "Programming for the
Armed Forces in Light of the
New Needs." Moderator will be
Dr. Marvin C. Goldstein, of At-
lanta, ard the discussants will
include Elsas, Mrs. Glasser, Rab-
bi Nathan Witkin, Canal Zone,
and Col. Lexy Ford, jr., Atlanta.
Serving as consultant to this
panel will be Leon Goldberg, At-
Heschel's Works to be Discussed
The works of Dr. Abraham
Heschel, a modern philu.-ophcr o!
-: traditional mysticism, will
vl bj Rabbi Harold Rich-
'.er. spiritual leader (! I Jaclc
..- Jewish Congregation, ai
Ihi I llegi ol Jew ish Studies con
ducted at Beth Tcrah Congrega-
on : lay evening, Apr. 5.
Rabbi Heschel is now processor
o: Jewish theology at the Jewisl
Theological Seminary. He is the
author of "Man is Not Alone."
The Sabrnlh," and "God in
Search of Man."
Rabbi Richter is a graduate of
the Mesifta Talmudical Seminary
Torah V'Daas and has held pulpits
n the Wilkes-Barre and Scranton
areas of Pennsylvania and South
Dort-n. Mich.
r
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!
CA N T O R
Ben Grossberg
CONDUCTING PASSOVER
SEDER SERVICES
PAS-*OVJi.K KATI&
STfcCTLY KOSrtER 2 SEPARATE KiTCHENS
fcf: VUfHIS SE*V!CKS
FULL-TIME MASH:. .H
NATIONALLY FAMOUS...
FOR 50 YEARS
THE FAIULOUS ZEIGER
KOSHER CUISINfl
fAMOUS
LYRIC TENOR
AND CASTOR
JE 8-5711
Call: JE 1-6549
M
the Now HOTEL
7cincpot RESIDENT
^B,**e,x** MASHSIACH
RilzPlaza,
"OIll ROOt CAUNA CUM .
RESERVE NOW
FOR
TRADITIONAL
PASSOVER SEDERS
Conducted by the Eminent
CANTOR M0RDECAI YARDEINI
nd Ihe
10SEPH SCHREIBMAN CHOIR
Reservations:
Mrs. Hoffman
JEfferson 16881
IN THE OCEAN IT 1 7th ST. MIAMI BEACH. Ft*
Etj> AIR CONtlllONII
tOVflL PHLIfi
ION THE OCEAN
1741 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
r.
HOTEL
RESERVE FOR
i3fi-,i.rv:v umiak-: ho'^'J,
843 EUCLID AVENUE JE 1-1103
Make your reservations now for a strictly
KOSHER PASSOVER HOLIDAY
SPECIAL 8 DAYS' RATE CALL NOW.
TRADITIONAL
PASSOVER
SEDER
Strictly Kosher Cuisine
Conducted fay
Cantor Moysh- Sffmr
Reiervitlani; CaII JE I-MM
On Ihe Ocean ColUni Ave.
Off Lincoln Rd.. Miami Be(b
lanta; Julius Cohen, Los Angeles;
and Jerrold Paley, Denver.
A typical G. I. Sabbath service ;
will be presented on Saturday
morning. Apr. 7, at 10 a.m.. to be
conducted by Maj. Kalman L. Lev-
itan. Command Chaplains Office,
Hq. Air Training Command, Ran-
dolph Air Force Base. Tex. The
sermon will be delivered by Rab-
bi Aaron 11. Blumenthal. Mt. Ver- [
non, chairman. JWB Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy.
A special breakfast has been ar-
ranged for armed service person-
nel stationed at the Homestead Air
Force Base for the final morning
cf the convention. Saturday. Apr. 8.
Families of these servicemen have
been invited to spend the rest of
the day at the beach. It was also
announced by Mrs. Glasser that
Hyman Kam. local chairman of
the JWB Volunteer Service to the
Veterans Administration, will be a
delegate to the Armed Services
Division at the convention.
FOR THE PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
RETURN BY POPULAR DEMAND I
Rabbi IV?ctur.ee Klein and Choir
Wl-i CONDUCT THE PASSOVER SZDSRS
HARFENtST -RESTAURANT
1381 V*'ASK*NGTON AVE.
K0Jl.il? MASHC-IACH 0*1 tKlW.lli
MEAT S. DAIRY MfiNU Serving Daily 8 A.M. to 10 P.M.
TWO SEDERS.....$15 Pe; Person
Si RS FLUS SIX DINAH -
DURING PASSOVER WEEK $32 Per Fe.-son
RESERVE IMMEDIATELY
Call JE 8-2055 or JE 8-2058
monmaan
ABE
GEFTER'S
NEW KOSHER
NEWLY
DfCOROTEtl
ROMWELL
HOTEL
OCEANFRONT AT 20th STREET
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ABE G
Came j..cou KomnsLtrg
World-famous Cantor Jacob Konigsterg i Convise s fC-VOica Sympnony
choir will officiate on Passover with the religious ft-, zt* & S*Jers
OCEA!NJFRO\T AND OCEAJNVIEW ROOMS & EVERY CTHER ROOM
IN THE HOUSE ONE PRICE NONE HIGHER FIRST COVE
FIRST SERVEDFull American Plan- April 17 to As 27 Reasonable
March, April & Passive' Rates Special Discount on Extended Stay.
>
Tt.....v..c
JE 4-2141
Chaise lounr.es and Mats 21" TV and Radla im
Each Room free Stll-Paiair.f AOjCuis Hold
Wiener Roasts Movies Camtt Enttrtainmnl
Nifhtl Many Other linen
tlitan, Lm ml Sakkath Strictly (cuntd fll|lwa
f.i cfi Daily. Fill Tim UasHilact l> fwlin.
i,,... o ouga Fre i_- i-..
\o Extra Ci arge for SteaksC*"-cc; Roasts.
Kosher Poolside Snac* Ea*.
CMfTftAUy HEATED & AIR C0.V.\ Ind. Cont.i
ti/ c omru t ^v
eville
MIAMI BEACH S MOST BEAUTIFUL
PASSOVER FAMILY SEDER
Wednesday Ever *j
Apri, l
Thursday E f -vg
April IS

X.....J
Conducted by
CANTOR
HERMAN K. GOTTLIEB
and a
Professorial Chair
H-75
e- prson
"AX 4. TIP
..SCLUDED
RtSlRVATiOHS f0< FOTH CMOS
$22.03 FIR PIRS0N
chiumih wmta 10
S7.50 Ptf hlGXT
Seville
RESERVATIONS!
""> Islella faiok, Con t, i*or.
H 2-2511
C .t-onl.onl ol 2lh Sn<, Miami
B
Cm
to I
W0(
Bf;
rae
ulu
Be!
brii
J>r;
T
Aw;
ed
Ch;
Hoi
Wu
C
Jer
r
RESERVE FOR
PASSOVER
Services Will fie
Conducted by o
Well Known Cantor
smmMviH
| Ntwly Dicorofeo1
I Directly on the Oceon
(411 OCEAN DRIVE
MIAMI BEACHES
GLATT KOSHER DINING ROOM
'\
Diefory lows and Sobbolb Jtn'c/y Ohseryed
PASSOVER SPECIALS 3 MEALS DAIL1-
S100 ond up April 18-April 26 (8 Dciys) per pers. CDbl. Oct.
S12u urtdupAjj.il 18-April 29 (11 Da/5 DH. 0c:.P r P
Swimming Pcol 7fWo Air Cc;i.",ionp-
fr/yole Beach Synagooue on Premises
NATriAN CINSBURG Owner Mcnogetnont
vt
ii i t n
w
Strictly Kosher
PASSOVER SEDDURIM
RABBI OR. MAYER I. HERMAN
Worid Renowned Cantor
SAMUEL VIG0DA & CHOIR
Will Officiate
$
>
3
$
$
$
lOf per person
^3 for 2 Seddurim
'15
per pe-son
for 1 Seder
PHONE
JE 1-0761
.^f.i.'in-iiiiM-iniw;


962
sci- |Friday, March 30. 1962
L'ni-
lay,
ids,
f-Jenisti fk>ridT/^r>
Page 11-A
c" .. sBB
A ^--^H '^^1 ~"k' ^1
^1 .^1 Lf ^
' *' ^ " '' -f^ :.
| ........ i 1 1
r fl I^V
Jen^A losses 5ef df 527 fl////b/7
i
Bearr..ng over Miami's selection as the nation's fourth "clean-
est tcwn" in its population category are (from left) City Man-
agei M. L. Reese; E. Albert Pallot, chairman of the city beauti-
fication committee; Mayor Robert King High; and Vice Mayor
Henrv L. Balaban. The certificate of achievement represents
the second consecutive award Miami won for its clean-up,
paint-up, fix-up campaign. Last year it placed third.
Broward District Cites Heatter
Brou.rd District of the Zionist
Organization of America was host
to th ."'wish community pf Holly-;
wood. Ft. Lauderdale and Golden
Beach a: its annual "Salute to Is-
rael Celebration" on Wednesday,
when me 500 packed the Temple
Beth Fi Auditorium to hear Ga-
briel Heatter discuss the current
Israel situation.
The Third annual Kfar Silver
Award of the district was present-
ed to Heatter by Dr Myron Segal.
Chairman of the evening was Jacob
Harrison, and toastmaster was
Murray Simons
Greetings were extended by Mrs.
Jennu irossinger, recipient of
last year's award; Louis B. Rud-
r;ick, national vice president ot the
ZOA; and Mortimer May, past na-
tional president. A musical pro-
gram featured Asako Tomita and
Esther Barrett.
Also participating in the program
were Rjbbi Samuel Mendelowitz,
president of the Broward District,
Ben Salter, Rabbi David Shapiro.
Dr. A. K. Colin. Rabbi Samuel Z.
Jaffe. Gil Rappaport and Rabbi
Richard M. Leviton.
Assisting Harrison and Simons
were Morris Kristal, Jacob Dri-
mer, David Harris. Julius W. Har-
ris, Irving Oxenhorn and Max
Eichner.
Continued from Page 1-A
Jews to transfer foreign holdings
to thorn.
There were other means of spoili-
ation such as huge taxes imposed-
on entire communities: the Jewish
levy and emigration tax in Ger-
many, and a billion franc tax on
the Jewish community of France,
just to mention a few; ransom:
vast rams, sometimes as much as
a million dollars, to allow certain
families or groups to escape.
Even when the Jews arrived at
the concentration camps they were
plundered.
"Nothing was too small for
them (the Naiis), not even mo
hair of the victims," Robinson
notes, acMfag at gold bridges
and fillings from victims' teeth
provided 17 tons of gold for the
Nazis.
"Even deportations and killings
became a source of income for the
Nazis," the pamphlet states. "The
Germans were paid large amounts
for deporting Hungarian Jews.
Cases are known where the Jew-
ish community was forced to pay
to the Germans the value of the
bullets used to kill part of the com-
munity or for the urns containing
the ashes of deported and gassed
leaders."
Robinson, who is the World Jew-
ish Congress expert on the Nazi
era, puts Jewish losses in property
and other identifiable assets at
about S12 billion, according to val-
ues at that lime.
But there was also a consider-
able loss in income. There is lit-
tle detail available as to the value
of lost earnings of Jews but. after
a study of all available informa-
tion and Statistics, Dr. Robinson
states that "the amount of lost in-
come may be estimated at be
tween S10 and $15 billion," at
prices of that time.
Remedial action to offset Jew-
ish losses fell into four categor-
ies: g e n e r a I- indemnification;
restitution; compensation for
losses; reinstatement, principal-
ly to positions previously held.
In all, Robinson estimates that
restitution anal compensation to
the extent of about So billion
have been paid or are being paid,
principally by West Germany, in
reparations, restitution and com-
pensation to the victims of Na-
zism.
Commenting on restitution legis-
lation. Dr. Robinson notes, "no-
where were the remedies as com-
plete as the spoliation. In most
cases they were restricted to resti-
tution (restoration) of the alienated
or confiscated property which was
still available at the time of res-
titution, leaving unrecompensed
the values of dissolved enterprises
and the damages inflicted on re-
turnable property, failing to pro-
vide remuneration for non-receiv-
able assets."
Individual compensation claims
filed by Dec. 31, 1961 in West Ger-
many totalled 3,071.662. and in
2.200.000 cases which have been
adjudicated by the administrative
authorities. West Germany has
paid, under the various laws, about
three-and-a-half billion dollars in
compensation. The total amount
paid in restitution and reparations
| as distinct from compensation Is
about two-and-a-half billion dollars,
giving a total of S6 billion for the
spoliation that took place.
Dr. Robinson's survey is part
of a book. "The Institute Anniver-
sary Volume," due to be published
shortly. The survey was issued as
a special pamphlet in connection
with a gathering of Jewish leaders
in Copenhagen last weekend (Mar.
24-25) attending a session of the
administrative committee of the
World Jewish Congress, a board
meeting of the Conference on Jew-
ish Material Claims Against Ger-
many, and a meeting of the Con-
ference of Jewish Organizations.
Dental Week
At Beth Torah
It was "Dental Health Week" a;
Beth Torah Congregation pre-
school this week, when Dr. Morton
Reiss paid his annual visit to
check the teeth of 100 students in
the school.
His visit was part of the good
jihysical health program carried on
during the year by the staff of the
school under the direction of Mrs.
Sidney Kay, preschool supervisor.
Also forthcoming this week was
a unit in social studies of people
of the community, including neigh-
bors, friends, and merchants.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS & COLLEGES
SUMMER CAMPS-ACCREDITED
ALL OVER U.S.
^> Bof-ciing, Military, Technical, Tutorial, Professional Trade,
Secretarial, Boarding Business Colleges Retarded Colleges
14 YR.), Junior Colleges (2 YR.).
TO Me ST IND'VIDUAL REQUIREMENTS
INFORMATION & CATALOGS FREE
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE SPANISH SDOKEN
AMERICAN S1M1MLS M'REAI'
36 N.E. 1st STREET, MIAMI
M CHAEL RICHARDSON, Dir. _____________ PR 1-0812
Camp Avir
Plans Progrcn
Henry Gilhi 11, president t I
gregaticn Vehudah Moshe, has ai
nounceci the lip :
Center's C mp vir I r i;
enth year.
liy Ro Its has b n appointed
as camp din itor. Rothstein is cur-
rently ;i physical education teach-
er in the Dade county school sy
tern, and has had many years ot
experience in working with chil-
dren.
The program planned for the
eight-week camp season will en-
compass swimming daily under the
supervision ot a qualified Red
Cross instructor, arts and crafts,
and a variety of athletic sports.,
with competitive teams. Daily
trips to places of general interest
will be taken throughout the sum-
mer.
Dramatic skits, staged and en-
acted by the entire group of camp-
ers, will be presented at least
twice, under the direction of a
counseler majoring in drama and
English,
Mewea tttaat ^
Business Wlssllns* Banquet, or &
f
Special Occasion
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Ruboiyat Rooms, be H for
wedding or o private party I
it thi
&
* i
3
icrs #
* mm
or Informations
HAZEL ALLISON
CATERING DIRECTOR
JE 1-6061
In at. Collins Sre.
Temple Stages
Musical Here
Tickets are now available to the
public for the performance of
"Good Yom Tov" an original musi-
cal production featuring more than
30 students of the Temple Emanu-
El religious school.
The show was written and di-
rected by Trixie Levin, who is be-
ing assisted by Florence Goldnng.
II will be staged at the Miami
Beach Senior High School auditor-
ium on Sunday afternoon, Apr. 29.
"Our PTA is sponsoring this
highly entertaining show," says
Mrs. Elliott Harris, president of
the group, "as a means of bring-
ing to the attention of the commu-
nity the talented children who are
studying in our school."
All proceeds will be used by the
PTA in improving the facilities of
the school.
CATERING.
'afo
DIPLOMAT
Luncheons. Teas. Receptions. Banquets. Parties,
Dinners .from 20 to 2000 catered in the
manner ot The Diplomat ... an unhurried,
Z2*>
\JGUST BROS Rv
HOLLYWOOD: WA 3-8111
miami FR 1 -0781
Information :
Miss Jian, Catering Manager
DIPLOMAT
RESORTS & COUNTRY CLUB
1200 feet of Ocean Privacy
Molly wood -t>y- the -Sea. Florida
IS the BEST".'
NEW FUND-RAISING IDEA
cr/ no cost
to your
organization!
HOTEL
I
We supply the entertainment, the place and the
party atmosphere. All you do is supply the
people and reap the profits. Interesting' Phone
Herb Parker, Catering Manager at UN 515(1.
Oceanfront at
68th Street


Page 12-A
*Jewist noridHain
Friday, March 30. 1962

NEW TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD SANCTUARY TO BE DEDICATED SUNDAY.
Hollywood Temple Dedication Set
On Sunday, at 7 p.m.. Temple
Sinai of Hollywood will dedicate
its new sanctuary. In song and
speech, pageantry and prayer.
Rabbi David Shapiro and h'.s con-
gregation will see the culmination
of the Temples two-decade dream.
More than 1.200 guests are ex-
pected to attend A huge tent will
be erected over the west lawn to
house the gathering. Among in-
vited dignitaries are United States
Sen. George A. Smathers, who will
deliver the dedication address.
A Torah procession will be one
of the highlights of the program.
Escorted by the Temple youth.
bearing lighted tapers and waving
flags, the six sacred Scrolls of the
Tpmple will be consecrated under
a Chupah.
Greetings will be extended by
the president of the Temple, Her-
man Lawrence Beller; by the
City of Hollywood through City
Commissioner Maynard Abrams;
and by Fred P. Greene and Sid-
ney Kay, dedication co-chairmen.
William D. Horviti, chairman of
the building fund, will express
his appreciation "for the concrete
realization of all the planning
and the work that made the build-
Weissel Given U of M Honor
Sam Weissel, pioneer Coral Ga-
bles resident and builder, was Tues-
day tapped for ODK at a meeting
of the University of Miami affiliate 1
of the national honors organization.
Wi issel, 74. was invited to a
luncheon at the Student Club. Hon-
orary membership in the organiza-
tion came as a surprise to him.
Weissel is a long-time "benefactor
of the university He is a member
of the UM special committee.
Among his other affiliations,
Weissel is head of the Coral Ga-
bles draft beard, on the board of
the Dade County Department of
Waters and Sewers, and current,
ly serves on the Citizens Com-
mittee of the City of Coral Ga-
bles. He is a past president of
Temple Judea.
His son. Buddy, a University of
Miami graduate, and president of
ODK during.his student days, also
attended the Tuesday surprise
luncheon.
Weissel was also scheduled to
be honored by the Coral Gables
Junior Chamber of Commerce on
Wednesday as 'Outstanding Citi-
ien" at a function in Coral Gables
Country Club
Mr and Mrs. Weissel have an-
other son. S. Roy Weissel. an in-
terior decorator and member of
NAID.
ing possible." He is currently
being assisted by Paul Anton
and I. Abe Durbin, with a pro-
jected additional Youth and Ed-
ucational Wing.
The Senior and Junior Choirs
will add their voices to the pro-
gram, and vocal selections will be
offered by a soloist. Mrs. May Go-
her Gray. Cantor Yehuda L. Heil-
braun, together with Martin Smith,
are coordinators of the musical
presentation.
Sisterhood president. Mrs. Sey-
mour Mann, and a committee of 40
women, are preparing the recep-
tion. Matthew Grad and Sheldon
Garson will handle a corps of 20
ushers.
Harry Kaplan, executive direc-
tor, will be in charge of props.
Mrs. Natalie B. Freedman is in
charge of publicity and program
Miami Temples
Send Delegations
To Union Confab
Five synagogues in the Miami
area are expected to send delega-
tions to the Southeast regional con-
vention of the Union of Orthodox
J.nvish Congregations of America
to be held in New Orleans Mar. 30
to Apr. 1.
The Miami synagogues to be rep-
resented at the three-day meeting
pro Beth El. Be'.h Israel. Beth Ja-
cob. Beth Tfilah and Kneseth
Israel.
ReDreser:tat;ves of synagogues
in other Florida cities, as well as
patient frcm Alabama, Geor-
gia. Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee and
Louisiana, will participate in the
regional conclave cf the UOJCA,
i Vonal organization when
serves 3,100 Jewish congregations
throughout the United States and
Canada.
Among the national Jewish lead-
ers who will address the conven-
tion are Moses I. Feuerstein. pres-
ident of the Orthodox Union; Dr.
Joseph Kaminetsky, director of
Ti-rah Umesorah, national society
for Hebrew Day Schools; Reuben
E. Gross, attorney and author; Dr.
Samson R. Weiss, executive vice
president of the Orthodox Union;
and Saul Bernstein, UOJCA admin-
istrator and editor of Jewish Life.
The delegates will deal with vari-
ous aspects of synagogue and com-
munal affairs at the convention
sessions, which will include Sab-
buth services, a Friday evening
symposium, a public assembly on
Saturday evening workshop meet-
ings and a banquet session on Sun-
day evening.
Tiiereth Israel Bazaar
-Tifereth Israel Sisterhood v ill
hold a bazaar in the Social Hall
6500 N. Miami ave., on Saturday,
Apr. 7, starting at 7:30 p.m., and
on Sunday. Apr 8, all day. Mer-
chandise to be sold is new.
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools &. Private Use
ISRAELI 4 DOMESTIC GIFTS
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Greater Miami's Largest & Oldest
Supplier for Synagogues,
Hebrew & Sunday Schools.
Wholesale S, Retail
ISRAELI GIFTS AND NOVELTIES
417 Washington Ave. JE 1-9017
Palmer
Memorials
"Miami's Only
Jewish
Monument 4i m [ |
Builders" SidRFalmei
Exclusive Dealer
"ROCK OF AGES"
FAMILY MEMORIALS
To Live in
Hearts W*
leave Behind
is to i;wo
Forever.
wan evam
Scheduled Unveiling*
SUNDAY, APRIL 1
Ml. Sinai Cemetery
SAMUEL BEHAR, 10 a.m.
SALLY AND MORRIS BENATAN
1 p.m.
Rdbbi Sad: Xahm-.dS
Mt. Nebe Cemetery
JACOB MAER, 2 p.m.
Rabbi S. M. Machtei
Lakeside Cemetery
SELMA SILVERMAN, 1 p.m.
Rubbi Mayer Abramiiwitz
"May Their Souls Repose
in Eternal Peace.'"
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
3279 S.W. 8th Street
HI 4-0921 Phones HI 4-0922
Shabba
A I
ktf't.
fcohar.
wife '
IV-..!-
He
.
He


'Ji
COHEN UNVEILING
The Unveiling fn the
Memory o/ m\ late Husband
MAX COHEN
u-ill be held al
Key West Cemetery, Key West,
on April 8th, at 2 P.M.
unit Rabbi Jacob Su/Va.
oj B'nai Zion. officiating.
Friends and relatives
are a.'ked to attend.
Rabbi Richer in Review
A review of "On Becoming a
Person." by Carl R. Rogers, was
given by Rabbi Harold Richter for
i the Emma Lazarus B'nai B'rith
1 V. omen's chapter last Thursday at
I Lindsey Hopkins.
NZWMZN
FUNERAL HOME
333 DADE BOULEVARD
MIAMI BEACH
JEfferson 17677
Edward T. Newman
funeral Director
Lakeside
MEMORIAL PARK
AND
GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
"THE SOUTH'S
MOST BEAUTIFUL
JEWISH CEMETERY"
N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE.
TU 5-1689
WE SPECIALIZE in
CONDOLENCE
BASKETS
From $7.50 We Deliver
FRUIT CIRCUS
1789 BISCAYNE BLVD.
FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783
\


i
GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS
(Jewish Division of)
THURMOND MONUMENT CO.
INVITES YOU TO VISIT THEM SHOWROOMS AND DISPLAY
look rot
TWOSTOKY
WHITE BUILDING
MAY WE SUVt
YOU AS WE HAVC
SO MANY OTHERS
3253 S.W. 8th STREET HI 4 1614-HI 4-2157
MEMORIALS Of BEAUTY DIGNITY AND PERMANENCY
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Ha.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Here, memory
is forever
enshrined in beauty
Mount Nebo, Miami's oldest and v
finest Jewish cemetery can be your
onl\ choit e .. Ju?.t a* it has
already been for over 4.000 other
highl) esteemed Jewish families.
A Perpetual Care Fund exceeding
1100,000 is your assurance of
its never-changing beauty ... And
there are no la\e-. assessments
or maintenance costs. Your initial
t o-t need he your nnl\ one.
Details will gbdlj furnished, in ,
your hume, b) mail or phone.
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERY
5S05 Northwest 3rd St. Phone MOhawk 1-7693
......... FOR DETAILS WRITE TO...............
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.W. 3rd Street, M.omi, Florida
Please send me. uilhout obligation, full details on Family Burial
Estates in Mount .\ebo.
Name......................'. ...:......:............

Address..............................................
e
City............... Zone... State..........


t, March 30, 19B2
*Jmtaii mhr/dHmti
Page 13-A
. '. :'l :'...... 'II,
1962 f FROM THE TALMUD
I w il
Hall,
>rda
.. and
Mer-
Shabbat, 152.
A wife is the )y f a man s ~
Zohar. I33.
When the husband is blessed, his
,,,<< is aho blessed thereby.

50,
^ \s for the earning
M Ins wife sees never a jrfn frf-
h, 5. I
flt. | .,.: : .' wife's de.uh
\er possessions
-. '.cr.
* *
.. \fe live* with*
hi without
und without
3n OLe TQeaL Of JHt
lavni 9

I ih.lrcw \,cn\ergation
-:-;- V7'-''? I1?'7? ">9
:.--- nxesna n~;-
i1wa n:r::r
r "T tt:~ -:
Vy nci] .li^xnn rmn ova
-It T v T
CD'j D1?^ T"IX "HS
: I t It
,n'Dn-nam *nsxn im
t- : : t : :
^n"? D^nnDn one'
T 1 -
v T: T
n- ,n-ixan h-t anynn
"nnn "?3 Di7 n&wn na
t : i T v -: -
ryn) ^id; ?jrx nn ??j*pc*
ntn 3D!sn nx ^xn^a
rx n^r n^aniDrxn* -
r I I v t : : : t
K^in1? ^ nr""ia phn-
"nnn ^s nx px^-pn'?
.mlp *73 -^a angina
|n:- -m:'? nxtfj i#a'r -
T T I T ; -
;an-^a rnan ,-nns:
"cia s-inV ,*rjri )?xa
kVi "?sag "n*? nnr1?!.
T T S -
TJMrVSlATIOiY -
The Just Deed is What
Leads Us Closer to God
By
RABBI HERBERT BAUMGARD
Temple Beth Am
The portion which we will read
from the Torah this Sabbath seems
to be completely concerned with
priestly problems of a ritualistic
nature. Since the Temple and the
active Priesthood no longer exist,
il would seem that the reading of
this portion has little value for
modern times. He who reads close-
ly from "Sh'mini" (Lev. 9:111:46)
discovers a dynamic thought, how-
ever.
At the conclusion of the priestly
'lii issions, there is the injunctii n,
"For I am holy ye shall there-
fore be holy ." Tic main i

in the i
!
': a i
;
: ...
nes The value of Jud n s thai
. e wi
1 >nc reality. 11 ..
- :'s we picture Kim, because we have conversed with Him. be-
cause we have ed with Him, because we have been the recip-
ients of His bountj a.-- a people.
This knowledge, gained through experience, gives us the tor-
tainty that God is merciful, just, and a very present help in time of
need. All of these living attributes of God add up to His holiness." j
and we are asked to imitate Him. We are not asked to imitate God in
the least of His qualities, but in the greatest of His qualities.
This is the dynamic message undergirding the discussion of ritual-
istic detail in this week's "parsha." This is the diamond in the coal
mine. Let us hold it up for all to admire and to absorb. We are Jews
only insofar as we seek "to make a difference between the unclean
and the clean." to quote the text further, between what exalts man and i
what debases him. This ability to distinguish between what lifts man
and what smothers his soul is the essence of the religious nature. The
day-to-day living in terms of mercy and love is what strengthens our
holiness. The just deed is what leads us closer to God. The act of
forgiveness is the "God-imitating" deed which enflamcs the divinity
within us.
-S
r^eligious J-^ijc
J hi 9 (A/e e k e n J
e r v i c e s
Information to be included in the Religious Services column
mi,st be in the News Room of The Jewish Floridian not later
than Friday, a.m., preceding the week of publication. All re-
leases received after that time will be returned as proof of
their lateness.
t.....
i_______.......
RABBI HERBERT BAUMGARD
. His h.-':ncss
Mr. Miller Invtsts in Israel
"In what way is their help prac-
icall) expressed?" 1 asked. "First
r all, the large building I shall
onstruct in the industrial one will
?o free from urban property tax
or five years. Second: According
o the law for encouraging capital
'vestments, I shall not have to pay
come tax for five years, from the
ate of the first profit. In addi-
on to this, I shall not need to pay
uty on equipment and building
aterials which are essential for
he erection of my enterprise."
"This is an very well," my friend
he host intervened, "but what will
>uu do with all your profits? Sure-
y you cannot take them out of Is-
rael in foreign currency!"
"Your information is not exact,"
-Mr. Miller explained. "The law
Permits me to take abroad all the
profits in dollars without any dif-
ficulties."
"Now there is one thing left,"
the host festively proclaimed, "to
1'fl up our glasses and drink to
the enterprise and its success!"
Published by Brit Ivrit

By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do some people recite the Ten
Commandments after the daily
morning service?
The M shnah (Tamid, 51
that it was the practice in
the days the Temple to have the
Tin Commandments publicly re-
cited daily in the Temple. H
. -..:-. because of a deviationIs1 i 11
which later claimed that only |
Ten Commandments were divinely.
revealed and nothing else, this pub-.
lie practice fell into disuse,
the people might erroneously think
that the public recital of the Ten
Commandments was an indication
of agreement with this opinion.
They still are recited privately af-
ter the prayers have been com-
pleted, because they are regarded
1 as very significant laws of our
' faith, and a Jew should ever be
1 mindful of them. Some claim that
all the commandments can be in-
ferred somehow from these Ten
Commandments.

Why srg the 13 principles of th#
faith recited daily after the
service?
These are the 13 principles of
faith depicted by the famous Mai-
monides. It is possible that their
recitation was made a private
practice in the days when persecu-
tions were prevalent, and Jews
were being forced to accept other
faiths and to proclaim other dog-
mas. It then became a wise thing
to keep repeating the principles of
our own faith daily, so as not to be
convinced of the logic and philoso-
phy of other faiths.

Why do some people recite the oc-
currence of special historical
events in Jewish history after
the daily service?
r.
This /vice is prepared in co- P
3 operation with the Sj intual head' f
i ers of tlie Greater Miami Rabbin- t
I cal Ann.
RAUBl MAX A. L1PSCH1TZ
Coordinator
Contributor:
RAHliI 501 OMON SCI11FP
Cims oi Wisdom
These are called "Zechiroth"
(Itemembranccs). It is a matter of
reciting the six Biblical verses that
command us to remember certain]
instances in our history. The oc- p
casions are: The Exodus from
Egypt, The Revelation at Sinai,
the vicious attack of the arch-fiend )
Amalek; the consequence suffered
by Miriam; the Sabbath Day; and
the wrathful punishment the Al-
mighty inflicted on our ancestors
when they fell short of their faith
during the course of their wander-
ing in the wilderness. Remember-
ing the episode at Sinai (Deuter
onomy 4:9) makes us reflect upon
the sanctity of our commandments.
Remembering the Exodus from
Egypt (Deuteronomy 16:3) makes
us appreciate our freedom. Re-
membering Amalek (Deuteronomy
25:17) makes us appreciate the
fact that only the Almighty's provi-
dence saves us from the destruc-
tion intended for us by foes. Re-
membering the Sabbath (Exodus
20:8) makes us keep in mind the
Divine purpose of our labors. Re-
membering the consequence suf-
fered by Miriam (Deuteronomy
24:9) makes us realize the serious-
ness of the sin of speaking evil.
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlylt ave.
Orthodox. RobDi Isaac Ever.
8 p.m. Satu (0 a.m.
Sermon: "The Intri durtlon to tb<
treat Festival of 1 n tlon
e
BETH DAVID. 2S SW 3rd tve Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor William W. Lipson.
F *:1j p.m. 1:...- Mllzv,
.....ichter ol Mr. "i M A thu
i. i i .!:...
i .. Ii. Services con-
tudtnts of reltgl
e
BETH EL. 500 SW i/m ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff.
p.m. Saturday S 30 .
Sermon: < Ion of 1
BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rcttman.
e
BETH JACOB. 30'.311 W-shinpton
Orthodox. Hafui Ticor Stern.
Canter Va'-.r.ce Mamchet,
--
I3ETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3-d ave.
OrUvjGvX. Jul 0, president.
15 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabfc r. Rackovsky. .

BETH TOR/ n si. a* d NE -
ave. C I .
BChitz. Cantor B-.-n-Zion Kitschen.
tlie Mil i <'i'-
:
.: son Mr.
.Mi-.-. Al

CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER.1
8755 SW 16th st. Miami. Rabbi Sam-
uel April. Cantor Cershon Levin.
Friday 6:16 and >::'>" p.m. Service in
honor of Center's young adults. Ser-
mon: "Month of Miracles." Saturday
9 a.m.

DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 1401 NW 183rd st. Con-
servative. Rabbi Harold Richter.
Cantor Emanuel Mandel.
FMday 8:15 p.m. Hadassah Sabbath.
Sermon: "Passport to the Future."
Quest speaker, Mrs. Norman Chasin,
vice president of Miami Chapter Ha-
dasssJi. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sermon:
"Portion of the Week.''

FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
pi. Conservative. Samuel Hollander,
president. Cantor George Goldberg.
Friday 5:S0 and vl". p.m. Quest
speaker, Judge Sam Silver, will talk
n "Voting and Freedom." Saturday
- 10 a.m.
e
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201
Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah
Heiibraun.

ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
FVIrtay .; and v.'' p.m. Sermon: "A
Moil .. -! l t' p..: m ss f< : i
Onegj Shahhnt host*: Air. and
DeHi ... onor of Ha )

KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfieid.
Cantor Abraham Seit.

Il S3."

MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION
itoi s.v 12th ave. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Max Shapiro. Cantor
Fred Bernstein.
a. Sermon: "The
8:45 ...in. b'i r
iii. ii: ..' Law."
e
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 643E SW 8th
st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
e
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. 1025
NE 183rd St.. Mi-.nu Gardens rd.
Rabbi Max Zuckr.r. Cantor Abra-
ham Reisman.
FTiday v:: p.m. Quest speaker,
Judge Gene Williams, on "Crime and
Punishment In the Administration of
Justice." Saturday 'J a.m. Sermon:
"Birth of a People."
GEMS OF WISDOM
The greater the man. the great-
evil inclination. TALMUD. -
* #
A piotu "i^ >'. to victorious
veterans rei from battle. |
r.jmp yourselves /or tiie
.: war." "And u>hi is that?"
...I. "The uar
----BA1IYA.
*
e inner thief,

HAS1D1M Zl : \
*
I




I

... '

.. ..
El il Will. TALMUD.
... i

TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall
dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard. Canto- Charles
Kodner.
Friday S:30 p.m. Sermon: "How
Should We Think of Cod?" Saturday
10:1 j a.m. Har Mltzvah: Michael, .son
of Air. and Mrs. Peter ROSS.

TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLY-
WOOD. 1S51 S. 14 ave Reform
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
FYldny 8:16 p.m. Youth Sabbath serv-
ice. Oneg siii.lili.ii hosts: Junior and
senior youth groups* Saturday 10:4o
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHIRAH. Sunlland
Hall, 11539 So. Dixie hwy. Recon-
structioniat. Rat-i.f Morris Skop.
Cantor Herman Gottlieb.
Friday 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker Louis
Schwartsman, director Qreater Mi-
ami Bureau of Jewish education, WlB
talk on "Raising Informed Jews hi
Democratic America." Saturday 10:30
a.m. Bar Uitsvah: Edward, son of
Mrs. Mildred Cohen,
-
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1725 Monroe st. Conservative.
Rabbi Samuel Mendelowitz.
I ridm 8:S0 p.m. Mer Tamid award
nielli Saturdaj 9 a m,
*
TEMPLE BETH SKO'.OM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser.
; i .vi."i p.m. Guest speaker: Rab-
bi William Sajowlts, regional direc-
tor, southeast council, Union Ami i in il. bri w Congiegatlons. Sat-
in day 10:15 a.m.

TEMPLE B-NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabb. Henry
B. Wernick.
Friday S:30 p.m. Guest speaker. Sen.
Claude lVpner. Sat,inlay 9:30 a.m.
Bar Mitsvan: John Van Berkel

TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Hirsch Adler.
-
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th St.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot.
Cantor Jacob Bornstem.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Lost
Jews of India and their Sad Plight in

TEMPLE JUDEm. 320 Palermo ave.
Liberal. Rabbi Mordecai Podet.
n. tiiiiKii wise Sab-
.-....... "1 .- Vchli ementa
;,l w Sti phi ii Wise."
Bar Mil
0 I Mrs. Si

e
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitr Cantor Edward Klein.
-.
Snturd s.-r-
i aw."
e
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th st. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern T'adi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel G.imberg.
Sermon: "Words
Sat-
rday f
son ; Mr.

TEMPLE SNAI OF NORTH MIAMI.
12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi
Benno M. Wallach.
F*i non: A Rabbi
:i Tour."

TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Nathan
Zwitman. Cantor Albert Glantz.
Fiiiii> vi'.'i p.m. Sermon: "The Sing
Sons." Oneg shaidMi host: sis-
r.:i<.....i. Saturday '.' a.m. Sermons
Blessing the Month .>f Freedom."
--------
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 951
Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi
Leo Heim.
Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Four Spp-
. iiil Sabbaths Preceding the Festival
of Freedom." Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Weekly Portion of the Law."

TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th it.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man.
Friday 8:80 p.m. Sermon: "Judaism
explained." OnegShabbal host: Adult
Hebrew class in honor of Rabbi Al-
fred WaMiian. Saturday 9::'0 a.m.
liar Mltgvah: Steven, son, of Mr. and
Mill.hi Chait.

YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie.
hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon
Steinmetz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Only for
the Children." Oneg Shabbat host:
Sisterhood. Saturday 9 a.m.
'-::.:!: n:.;i:ran:,:rxi.i
-'4MOUUGH7WG TIMf
24 II Adcxx 6:22 p.m.
4:
'6
V<
I


Page 14-A
+Jewisii ncridfian
Friday, March 3Q. 1962

Browsing With Books: By HIIARY fTilHPLIN
Key to a Rich Storehouse of Religious Understanding
THE BIBLE IS FOR YOU. By Stuart E. Rosenberg. 179
pp. New York: Longmans, Green. $3.75.
"THE HEBREW BIBLE, in our day. remains a closed
' book for most average adults (It) survives today
at the edges of two extremes: as a book of religious in-
, stxuctioR for children, and as a mine to be quarried by
the technician the scholar-specialist. The average
man, however, has precious little contact with it in an
intimate, existentialist fashion." Thus Dr. Stuart Rosen-
berg, rabbi of Toronto's Beth Tzcdec. introduces his en-
tirely too brief examination of a few parts of the Testa-
ment. While this lack of contact is possibly not as true
for Jews observant Jews, that is as for others, there
are doubtless few people who read and experience the
Bible with the "considerable immediacy" of which the
author speaks, or who are able to sense in both its strange
omissions and puzzling repetitions the vital" knowledge
which is being conveyed.
The first part of the book surveys in fairly rapid
highlights the course of Biblical scholarship to date, in-
cluding the numerous translations and the influences of
the Testament, the impact of archaeological discoveries
like the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the directions of such mod-
ern philosophers as Buber. Tillich and Niebuhr. In an
especially exciting chapter on theology and psychology.
Dr. Rosenberg points out that the Bible is not itself a
theological book that is. it is not concerned with belief:
it assumes belief. In fact, he writes, th? Hebrew Bible
does not kr.nw the word "faith" as theological belief,
which is the way Christians read it. but only as faithful-
ness to God. as living faithfully. "The Biblical impera-
Between You and Me: By BORIS SMOLAR
Evolution of Jewish Chaplains in the U.S.
IT IS 100 years ago this month
that the Senate approved a pro-
posal by President Lincoln which
gave rabbis tl e right to Berve as
chaplains in th< An
L'r.til the time nt the
Civil War, i i
tian i pern
serve as i i ijor
I Jewish oi ive, therefore, com-
ition by Amer-
ie Jewish Chaplain-
cy, 1 the National
i\ responsible
for thi rvice will be ii ted in
Jewish communities act nation on Apr. 1.
It will oom lude in July. 1P62 with the centen-
nial observance of the Battle of Gettysburg, when
Off the Record:
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Religion in New Age
>R. LOUIS Finkelstcin. of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, has recently sounded a
warning that the "unprecedented
shortage" of rabbis was making it
Impossible to meet the religious
and cultural needs of the Jewish
communities throughout the world,
particularly in Latin America and
in some countries of Europe. A "count of empty
pulpits and uncovered classrooms," he said, "does
not begin to tell the story, since no one can say
how many congregations have not been formed be-
cause trained personnel was unavailable." On the
very day this item appeared under a Miami date-
line, the New York Times carried a report from
Rome that the Pope too had complained of a dearth
of priests, particularly in Latin America, an area
of almost absolute Catholic concentration.
This coincidence has more than parochial under-
tones. It goes perhaps to the very root of religion in
the space age. If the declining interest in the rab-
binate and priesthood is a consequence of the great-
er monetary attraction many young people now find
in the popular professions of the day. the situation
is not beyond solution. But the dearth of rabbis
and priests and ministers could reflect a crisis of
dangerous magnitude in religion itself. It is this
corner's fear that the religious leaders of the world
have not fully grasped the meaning of the muta-
tions that are going on in men's minds as a result
of the weapons of terror which are taking the place
of the fear of God.

Thinking Aloud
By the time this appears in print, the Governor
of Virginia will have signed a legislative bill re-
voking the charter of the American Nazi Party e
hear Rockwell, the anti-Semitic founder of the par-
ty, la planning to file a pelition for a charter under
a new name. We hope Virginia will not let itself
be outwitted by that inailr an.
We have no rod In wh ch to measure the i -
pact of Ed Cherry's usl I ainst Rockwell's chin.
But there e;:n be BO dot III Ul the impa '. .
althougl tlieved in freedo
h and freedom ol on, be was ni
situtional tri >i speech c >
preaching :>i bate or ti; it others." [t
I i he J< v isfa vnii
I a punch 11 B whet tl s
Diego SI College students
jazi atrocitie I .lews as greaslj ex-
I. Till Si: ..( the I
.'.i i. young i rhose w
c irni i-'s o -1 e pout m i (re-m
i on i.' I ground tb n the
s who h(p '
the first Jewish combat chaplain was severely
wounded. President Lincoln submitted his proposal
- 55 -and signed it into law on July 17.
1862 after the first Jewish chaplain, a young
ti cher, Michael Allen, was
. bet ise it was discovered that he
istian, His resignation was ordered
by the en ary oi War despite the fact that the
officer of tl it 1 rhich he
, : : v. as a Jev Col Jax Eii teir .
ly of the i nt.
there are ah full-time Jev
ersi I 261 i lime
u ling 31 I -\ -.. (an i rabbis
who were on active dut) i during World
War II. there have been C42 rabbis in the chaplaincy
in thi past 20 ye
Of the 311 chaplains, 250 had overseas service
during the war on the European, Pacific and Afri-
can fronts. The largest number of Jewish chaplains
on duty at one tune during World War II was about
265. There wa approximately one Jewish chaplain
in service for every 2.000 Jewish personnel, as com-
pared with the average of one non-Jewish chaplain
for every l.ooo non-Jewish personnel. Since 1950.
there has been in the U.S. Armed Forces a Jewish
chaplain for every estimated 1,000 Jewish men.
Jewish Heritage: More and more books bring-
ing to the American reader the treasures of our
Jewish cultural heritage are now being published in
this country. The latest is "An Anthology of Me-
dieval Hebrew Literature," edited by Abraham E.
Milligram, published by Abelard Schumann. This
anthology is a most valuable contribution to the
Judaica literature which is attracting increasingly
the attention of serious-minded. American-born Jews.
The, volume includes not only literature written in
Hebrew, but also translations from Jewish literature
written in Arabic, German and early Yiddish, be-
tween the eighth and eighteenth centuries.
Thus we are presented with translations of the
poetry of Jehuda Halevi, Solomon Ibn Gabirol,
Moses and Abraham Ibn Ezra, as well as with trans-
lations from the "Ma'aseh Book." We have the
philosophic views of Saadya Gaon, of Moses Maimon-
ides, and other great personalities. We have a chap-
ter on the Zohar the "Bible" of the Jewish mys-
tics which brought vigor into the hopeless existence
of medieval Jewish life but at the same time also
confused the minds of many Jews.
The book is presenting the reader with the
greatest Jewish thinkers of the Middle Ages, giving
also short biographical data on each of them. It
depicts the influence which their works had on Jews
in their own generation and for many generations
that followed.
Panorama:
Frid
(
tive is not to believe in a belief in God but rather u
paiticipate in lioa, with one's whole person."
Moving forward from this excellent analysis, the
author explores a number of Biblical stories, filling jn
as it were, the "empty spaces" of the narrative, and inn!
eating with great skill the way to become sensitive
-symbols and style, to fmd thp key to the "hidden suggei
tive, ethical implications of the scenes depicted and the
tales narrated." So. for example, those strange words of
God's to Jonah in which He defends his pity for the six
score thousand persons of Nineveh "and also'mueh cattle
disclose the basic insight of the whole episode, in which
God seeks to teach Jonah, who is a man without Lave thel
meaning of love.
Dr. Rosenberg's succinct discussion of the Book of
Job places in fascinating perspective all its tremendous
themes the lesson of humility ("Where wast thou when
I laid the foundations of the earth?"i in which Job under-
stands that what happens to him is really inconsequential
in the larger scheme of things, and the triumph ("Gird up
thy loins now like a man") from which man is to leai
that what is important arc not the answers, hut "the waj
in which we undertake to live with the problems."
And sr. on. in the endless exploration of man's r<
tionship with God which is the rock on which the Bi
-' ni Jews who knov the Comn know \u><
the Bible, of course: this bo k .
r all othi rs, it will be liki a k<
se oi religious ur.(i, -, g thai
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
From Hollywood:
HERBERT G. LUFT
A Tribute to Zukor
Hollj
TRIBUTE WAS asl Sa
1
st 1 ion i p i
bj i). b Hope v. .:, iei
Producers Guild M
The setting was 1
I troom of the swank Bevi
H ton Hotel in Beverly Hills where
the Guild's presieti I Walter M, Miri&ch, shan
dais with Zukor and other dignil ries. Shaking
hands with the slim, frail old man who had Down
in for the event from New York, I couldn't help but
think of the career ol Adolph Zukor, founder oi
Paramount Pictures, who after sixty years in the
cinema ha- remained active in the industry.
Zukor arrived in this country from Hungary as
a boy of 15. His interest in films was awakened a-
early as 1902 when lie was operating ;. penny arcade
in New York. Untiled by the new medium, he turn-
ed his enterprise into a nickelodeon lor the showing
of one and two reel flickers, mostly crude comedies
of the slapstick variety. In association with Marcus
Loew, then a big wheel in the amusement field.
Zukor started to exploit the idea in other commun-
ities. While Loew continued with the penny arcade
and nickelodeon business, Zukor later switched his
field of endeavors to the operation of Hale's Tours,
a chain of imitation railroad cars displayed at fair
grounds, which jolted and creaked realistically,
while on a screen scenic pictures were projected
giving the patron the illusion of speeding in a train
across the American landscape.
When the novelty of the venture wore off, Zukor
opened a chain of five-cent "store shows" of movies.
As exhibitor, Zukor campaigned for better pictures
of greater length. In 1912, he went on his own to
bring more important films to the public. His im-
portation from France of "Queen Elizabeth" star-
ring Sarah Bernhardt paved the way for the aban-
donment of crude flickers and the adoption of fea-
tures with a distinct story line. In association with
showman Daniel Frohman, Zukor then founded his
earliest production firm, Famous Players Film Com-
pany, with the slogan "Famous Players in Famous
ures."
Tl
-


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A Whole Month of Yom Kippur Hard to Take
THE SEASON OF Ramadan is ju
over. President Bourguiba. the III
)em ruler of Tunisia, the other day u
the papers, expressed some ipleftsti
with it. The Arabs fast for thirty day
neither eating, drinking, ni
ng Ramadan and this .
makes them irritable and |
to good work.
A mouth of Y Kipp
associated considerably wi
- Era i the Abi
nnd many other |
Ai abs. it tot Sabl langed it to Fridi
Even some
rg person has ., m one Ihe
Moslem legend has
ar idise will have 320 beau
from being borec.
Much of what they took over was good and contril"
tiled to the Arab civilization, although for some time tha
civilization has stagnated. Culture like trade needs com
petition. A great rabbi said that the reason God mac-
I of one big man was thai, when you ait
alone, you don't see your faults. When the second man!
appears, the first begins to study himself.
1 have no doubt that the Arabs, for all of their pre
position to Israel, will copy many things from Ispai'
id. The establishment of Um
oi 1st el was probably the best thing that coui-
' f'er the first World Wai
aadeoee
Fi il, cai ana
' We neic
I he Ji
To 1<
icialh
'" I art


I Friday. March 30. 1962
* t<**U*nrlr1in,r
Page 15-A
IT t(
the
i ir.
indiJ
e :o
es
the
is of
six-
[tie"'
hich
, the
k of
[Ions
Ik '.
ider-
titi
\ up
jam
waj
'
;
: r
.
Common Market Role
For Israel's Future? -
Part I in New Series
By BOW N EYTAN
Brussi -
-fl,( | 0st. n r se over a
througl
G nd Bel
; rred cities.
bodi
accusing
Nevei
,rj r had
ii :
; Not a sn
as it a field
ni -:
.: r sou bj
v] ii s the
ration."

'-
. w- |
-
non
I
s ruins, two
jeo v.
theii and nuclear
...., act "levied conn-
: nl.
Tu insure '>' Europe had
> achieve tv o things, neither of
:'iem easy: wipe out internal trie-
litional quarrels; and
' lild itself into j third world force
to defend its traditional val-
ues and civilizati
Today, less than 20 years later.
: European Economic Commu-
nity known as the Common Mar-1
ket -lands strong and recon-l
l......rtsts of France.
si Germany, Italy. Belgium.
Holland and Luxembourg, with
due t < loin
Geographically insignicant, the
Community i* an industrial giant.
ifs population1, including Brit-
ain's, is larger r'-an eitner Rus-
lia'a or America's; it produces
r-ore steel and cjal than either
of them, and consumes more en-
ergy than the Bbvlef Union. It
is the world's largest Importer of
raw materials, and the world's
second producer of industrial
goods. Its industrial expansion is
the world's highest. In a still
hungry world, it remains one of
humanity's main food producing
areas, with enough surplus to
feed tens of millions now faced
with starvation in underdevel-
oped countries.
Mori important than its econom-
1 achievements, it has become, in
State Israel
ii nely among
.. .
I I by the foi m i
political blocs
: ng in the v.u-
eliness repre-
to the conn-
fpmenl and se-
issi might oi
he Ai -
- irriers
' "associa-
underwent a
- lev
her to 70 rcent,
i hit every Isr idi
.. and com-
. ritten
-- Common
is lot ate I, and

ies to ex-
-
5 at s
\... !' Hall-
it i in, its Executive
Commission, a "federation in the
making." the embryo of a new
countryThe United Stale.- ol Fur
ope
I went to see its large, modern.
streamlined offices in the heart of
Brussels, where 3.ooo people. Eur-
ope's first continental civil ser-;
vaflts, already sit at work. I saw
the heavy steel gates at which Is-
rael is knocking with the strength
of despair and the horse-shoe table
at which 'he Minister's Council will
in ju 'men! on Israel's applies-
in for association" with the six-
mlty.
I -i' the new car plates on
word: EUROPA and six
- art engraved, the elec-
tronic machine which will soon cal-
: continental econom-
ic poli il Hall in which
the nitre-man Executive Commis-
sion; responsible to no nation and
mmunity a.- a whole.
rjeMro iti II is i picture ol great-
ness in l strength;
Six Imaginative Men
started with six men. all
possessed by the traditional Euro-
j ear. liberal outlook, all fed on the
Continent's traditional civilization:
de Gasperi, Sforza. Schumann. Ade-
nauer, Monnet and Spaak m 1950
| convinced that cooperation and dis-
cussion, though necessary, are not
sufficient, they made a bold and
startling move toward unification.
Prepared to abandon their tradi-
tional national interests for the
sake of the whole, they created a
common economic undertaking, the
European Coal and Steel Commu-
nity, which pool.-- these basic com-
modities among the six partners
lot their common industrial expan-
sion. The European revolution
\ Inch. \\.U one .day .lead,, to (be
United States of Europe had be-
gun.
As the Coal ar.d Steel pool be-
came a financial and social suc-
cess, many of ths six nations'
statesmen felt ihat Europe could
still h^ve an ;mportant role to
p'ay in vor'd affairs. Plans were
drawn up for iho European army
and a common defense industry.
This plan, however, came to a
Grinding halt, as the French Na-
tional Assembly rejected the pro-
ject, due tc internal political rea-
sons centered arour.d the Indo-
Chinet* war.
The rejection did not stop Euro
pean development; it channeled il
into i i integration. On
March 25, 1957, in the marble-
ailed palace which crowns the
ne Pill in Rome, the six na-
tions signed the Rome Treaty
heir Community's constitution, l;
I i o\ ides for the creation of a sin-
gle vasl market for all products,
with no in ernal customs barriers
and a common external tariff, 8
common economic policy, and the
enl ol a common atomic
agency, ill;.ATOM, which will
ensure thai Europe does not lag
: hind '" B g Tun in nuclear re-1
search and the practical applica-
tions oi atomic power,
NEXT WEEK Benefits Foreseen
Religious Students Mark Purim
Bernard Ginsberg was crowned
King, and Barbara Halbrich and !
Gilda Abramowitz. Queens, at the
annual Purim celebration of the
Beth Torah religious school last
week.
Queen of the float, which was
part of the,, r,oval: cavalcade of
coaches that delivered "Shalach
MandS," traditional Purim gifts
to members of the adult congrega-
tion, was Linda Kaufman, with her
court including David Halberg,
Libby Blasberg, Ellen Liebman
and .ludy Bfower.
Appearing in the performance
.'or over 300 students were Judy
lirower. Ellen Liebman, Nancj
Liebman. Judy Wishneff, Joel
Shweky, Sharon Ross, Henrietta
Langer. Sandy Krugel, Bonnie
Platt and Shelley I.abalon.
The day's activities were capped
with a Purim feast, served by the
Congregation PTA, headed by Mrs.
David Liss and Mrs. Nathan Glaz-
er, holiday co chairmen.
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Charter Members
To be Honored
Charter members of Young Is-
rael of Greater Miami will be hon-
ored at a cocktail party and dinner
at Waldman's hotel on Sunday eve-
ning at 8 p.m.
A special plaque will be dedi-
cated in honor of charter members
Ben Lerner. Louis Merwitzer. and
Samuel Reinhart. founders of the
i ongregation.
Rabbi Sherwin Stauber, spirit-
ual leader of Young Israel, will
deliver the testimonial address.
Now in its fourth year of service
to the North Miami Beach Jewish
community. Young Israel provides
a nursery, kindergarten, and He-
brew school program, youth activ-
ities and study groups, daily. Sab-
hath, and holiday services, in
which opportunities are provided
for the participation of young peo-
ple in the life of the synagogue.
Young Israel of Greater Miami
is affiliated with the National
Council of Young Israel of America.
DELIGHT YOUR FRIENDS
UP NORTH WITH
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GIFT FRUIT
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Entertainment '


Page 16-A
fJewisli ftoridHar
Friday. March 30, 1962

HOSPITAL *

Although 108 beds of Cedars oi Lebanon Hospital are now in
use, the top three floors are still incomplete, hospital presi-
dent. Samuel T. Sapiro (right), points out to Emil J. Gould, who
is chairman of the "President's Dinner" on Apr. 28. The two
community leaders are seen at the site of the first outdoor
billboard installed at the intersection of NW 7th ave. and 5th
St., as part of the Cedars spring fund drive. Others are plan-
ned for display throughout Dade county to call attention to
the Cedars dinner Apr. 28 at which Secretary Abraham Ribi-
coff will be guest speaker.
Invitations Out To Cedars Fete
Invitations to thousands of Dade
county's leading citizens went into
the mail this week to attend a coin-
munity dinner honoring Samuel T. i
Sapiro. on Apr. 28 at the Deauville
hotel.
Called the first "Presidenfs Din-1
ner,'* the testimonial banquet is
being sponsored as a tribute to
Lear School
Has Science Fair
Art and Science Fairs are being
sponsored by the students of Dade I
county during the month of March. I
The Lear School student body |
has worked diligently to make its
Art and Science Exhibit a success.'.
The exhibit opened Mar. 13 in the !
Lear School Auditorium, when the
scientific projects, equipment and
displays of art work were viewed
by over 100 parents and teachers.
Nursery and kindergarten dis-
plays were also on view.
the president of Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital who has served two terms
at the helm of Dade's newest medi- I
cal facility.
Distinguished guest speaker at
the dinner will be U.S. Secretary
of Health, Education and Wei-
fare, Abraham A. Ribicoff, who
will make a special flight to
Miami Beach for the occasion.
Sapiro will receive recognition
as a "Volunteer of Valor" of the
new hospital. He has been per- (
sonally responsible for obtaining
financial support exceeding $50,000
toward the completion of the six-j
s.ory four-and-a-half million dollar
structure.
Invitees will greet Mr. and Mrs.
Ribicoff at a cocktail party and re-
ception in the Deauville preceding
the dinner, according to the com-
mittee.
Prominent bivilder and devel-
oper, Emil J. Gould, is chairman
of the dinner.
Servatius Wants
Globke to Tell
Nazi Era Story
JERUSALEM(JTA)Dr. Rob- |
trt ServJtius has opened before an |
appeals court his fight to save I
Adolf Eichmann from the hang- j I
man's noose. Because of Israeli 11
legal restrictions against introduc- 1
ion of rew evidence at appeal'
hearing, he was limited ifrgely to
1 the arguments he used during the
four-month trial of the Nazi last'
summer. | -_:_
He did ask that Dr Hans Globke, I
state secretary to West German -
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, be
called as an "expert witness" of I
the Nazi era. This proposal was
j made in support of his basic con-
\ tention that Eichmann had been !
J merely a transport officer in the
; vast Nazi murder machine and had
! simply carried out orders which
were his sworn duty.
The Cologne attorney also
; hinted that a Nuremberg war
crimes trial document implicat-
ing Eichmann in the develop-
ment of the use of poison gas for
, the murder of Jews might have
been falsified.
He retreated promptly, however.
j when he was asked by one of the
five Supreme Court justices con-
stituting the appeals tribunal if he
was suggesting that the American
prosecution at the Nuremberg
trials had faked the document.
He also declared he would appeal
to the Council of Europe, an ad-
visory body with which Israel is
not associated, if Eichmann was
not extradited to West German for
trial. It was not clear just how
meaningful this was, since the
West German Government has
made it plain it has no interest
whatever in extraditing the former
Gestapo colonel and the Bonn For-
eign Office last year rejected Eich-
mann's request for intervention.
HBS1B
GRAND
OPENING
NORTON TIRE CO.
6017 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.WEST HOLLYWOOD
OPEN EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT TILL 9 P.M.
Sale Prices In Effect At All Stores
Throughout S. Florida # See Addresses Below
SALE
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History on our
Safety-5
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MARION COUNTY
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WRITE FOR INFORMATION
Florida State Finance Co.
807 OLYMPIA BLDG., MIAMI, 32
State Dep't. Calls
Syria and Israel
For Conferences
Continued from Page 1-A
peaceful for some time became the
scene of renewed clashes when the
! Syrians began a campaign last Feb.
1 of shooting at Israeli fishermen
on the lake, which is entirely with-
in Israeli territory. Syrian gun po-
sitions, which are on a higher level
than the lake area, dominate the
strategic scene.
Early en Mar. 17. Israel staged
a brief but powerful raid on the j
Syrian gun positions knocking them ;
tut. Subsequently, Syrians fired j
sporadically at Israeli fishing boats
and at police launches. Several pol-
ice were wounded in the shootings.
The affrays also were marked by
iet clashes as Israeli fighters kept
a patrol against incursions of So-
viet-made Syrian jets.
Syria then decided to ask for
a meeting of the Security Coun-
cil, and Israel replied with a
similar request, both sides charg-
ing aggression. The Israeli re-
quest contained a direct warning i
to Syria that if the aggressive ac-
tions continued, "Israel, in ex-
ercise of its rights of self-defense,
will have to use all the means at
its disposal to prevent the contin-
uance of such actions."
Prime Minister Ben-Gurion told
an emergency Cabinet meeting that
Israel could not permit Syria to
alter by force the status quo of
Lake Tiberias. He also expressed
| the belief that the renewed Syrian
: attacks were aimed at Israel's
i plans to use some Jordan River
| Water .for its irrigation projects.
In a second letter to the Security
Council last week, the Israel dele-
gation said there had been renewed
Syrian attacks, including machine-
gun fire on Mar. 21 at Tel Kapzair,
heavy firing at Mishmnr Hayardin
and Gadot. and at Israeli workmen
near Shear Yeshuv on Mar. 22.
ALL B. F. GOODRICH
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SALE PRICED!
ALL TIRES GUARANTEED
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&1U
ovnan s
W/oM
GROVE
Apr. 7 a red letter day for Lynn Kanov It's the day she'll
i, Sweet Sixteen Her parents, Mr. anil Mrs. Theodore Kanov,
ill make it special with a luncheon in her honor on Sunday at
'he Algiers Decor will be orange and white, so the birthday
will wear an orange linen suit with print blouse Among the
ts will be Lynn's grandmother. Mrs. Marie Brickor. her daugb-
the talented Trixie Levin, and daughter. Mrs. Lennie Kaplan
An accordionist will provide the music for singing and twist-
A Sweet Sixteen party for another young lady Saturday eve-
ning at Westbrooke Country Club Mr. and Mrs. Mike Sasloe,
430 SW 54th St., will entertain for their daughter. Rhoni. and her
'ends in the Carousel room there Disc jockey Charlie Mur-
dock will be on hand to emcee the show .
Westbrooke also the scene of the Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity
reunion the first week in April Got an early start when Ron
.it entertained the Richard Prevers, of Ne York, at Sunday
jffel dinner Other early bird fraternity brothers dining at the
. lib. Burt Levey and wife, Fran. Arnold Glantz and his Beverly ...
Meanwhile, the Westbrooke band stomping out that mad beat
for the next Saturday night dance ... On orders from Mrs. Harold
Pomerantx and Mrs. Sheldon Kay, co-chairmen of the Mar. 31 af-
lair, who expect the evening to be devoted solely to the twist and
, Inilly-gully.
-
Parents of local girls attending Sophie Newcomb College, all
members of Sigma Delta Tau. have received word that all have
made Dean's List Outstanding sorority sisters are Linette
Albert, Virginia Gordon, Bonnie Kaplan, Roberta Daum, Marcia
Angel and Judith Kazer The last two, sophomore and fresh-
lan respectively, also won the Big and Little Sister award given
v SDT Sandy Applebaum and Lois Cohen, both of Miami
Beach, are spending their junior year studying in England .
Houseguests last weekend at the home of Mollie and Maury
in, daughter Linda and her suite-mates, all sophomores at
thio State University on their quarter break During the visit,
ludi Paikin Hew to Nassau to join her parents of Toronto. Can.,
i kbrating their wedding anniversary there First visit for
Karen Friedlander, who kept her eyes and mouth open at the
ity here She and Maxine Arenswold. both from Cleveland
hts, O., tremendously impressed with the University of Miami.
-
Mere about students who seem to be making much of the news
-( days Trudi Gertler. of Miami Beach High, was the win-
of the dramatic interpretative speaking contest of the National
ensic League three-day statewide tournament held last week-
:it Stetson University Daughter of Judge and Mrs. Charles
rtler, Trudi gave here impression of four characters in the
racie Worker'' She will now represent the state in national
l>etitions to be held in Montana this summer Mrs. Richard
n, in charge of the Forensic League at Beach High, who ac-
ipanied the students to DeLand, mighty proud of the showing
le there.
-
An unexpected but very welcome guest last week was Edwin
-burg, who drove down from Gainesville to surprise and con-
ulate his parents. Ruth and Ben Zion Ginsburg, on their 32nd
edding anniversary Had some exciting news of his own to
: art Another in the long line of academic honors heaped on
Eddie, now attending law school at the University of Florida,
:ll receive an award next month at Honors Convocation for hav-
- ihe highest scholastic rating in his major at the College of
ness Administration from which he graduated, with honors,
.Tune .
His visit here was just in time, too. to attend a party given by
th's sister and brothci in law, Irene and Leo Cohen, in their
le on 22nd rd. Guests of honor wen Ben's sister and her
,and. Lily Ann and Herman Altschul, here from Chicago to
i] e the fierce northern cold and snow.
.
A tradition Started many years ago had its Bar Mitzvah cele-
lion las! week at the home of Mr. and Mrs, Nathan Ostrov,
re it all began The 13th Purim get-together ol friends from
vidence, R.I., living or visiting in the area, again stressed the
e that all would see one another the following year .
Localites enjoying the reunion: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chact.
. Eva Haymen. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Salk and Mrs. Bessie
esi Here from Providence, the Sclomon Lightmans. the Max
' Richters ami Mrs. J. Shukovsky Mrs. J. S. Eisenberg. from
i River. Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Harry 1. Elkies. of Slamtord.
mi ; Mrs. Harry Shatkin. Cranston, R.I.; and the William D.
of Miramar.
-
Former Miami Beaehite, Cy Robins, has gon<- from serving
fine food to growing it Part owner of the Embers restaurant
-ome years ago, Cy is now head of the world's largest hydroponic
farms, with sites in Puerto Rico, Fort Myers and Aruba ... His
uncle, Joe Cohen, with whom he was associated in the Embers.
w has the unique Rathskeller at the Congress Airport Inn .
Oh. yes, hydroponics is the soilless growth of plants .
Here trom New York for a few weeks which will combine
business and pleasure is Larry Grossberg, an executive with River-
side Memorial Chapels .
Also down from the north to visit with his grandparents is
Bruce 9, and his mother, Mrs. Arlene Malamut They're house-
gueata of Arlene's mother. Mrs. Frances Linn Completing the
family group, Mr. and Mrs. Max Malamut vacationing here from
Atlantic City.
-
Guests of honor at an engagement party in the home of Mrs.
Gertrude Seidner. 1315 Flamingo Way. last Saturday evening were
daughter Deborah and her tiance Stanley D., son of Mrs. Max
Cohn, of Miami Beach Both graduates of the University of
Miami, the future bride is now teaching at the Buena Vista School
. Stanley, a CPA, is associated with Levinc. Cohn and Shenk-
man ... A June wedding is being planned .
Off to Tonawanda, NY., to attend the Bar Mitzvah of their
oldest grandson. Steven Leslie Venet, are the Bernard I. Gelberts.
of 1810 SW 24th avc., and the paternal grandmother. Mrs. Myer
Venetsky Ceremony will be held on Saturday at Temple Beth
El Suburban The celebrant and his family are former Miam-
ians. .____
"eJewish Florldian
Miami, Florida, Friday, March 30, 1962
Section 3
Enthusiastically discussing plans for the first witz, Mrs. Rudolph Drosd. Mrs. Jack Rackear
Arts and Crafls Exhibit at Temple Beth Sho- and Mrs. David Drucker. Sponsoring the first
lorn are these members of the art appreciation exhibit is the Sisterhood of Temple Beth She-
committee. Left to right are Mrs. Arthur Horo- lorn. President is Mrs. Harvey E. Kramer.
Beth Sholom
Plans Art Show
First Arts and Crafts exhibit,
featuring the works of Beth Sho-
lom members and staff, will be
sponsored by the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Sholom on Apr. 13 to
If) and 20 to 22 in the almost-com-
pleted Art Gallery of the new Beth
Sholom Community House. 4130
Chase avc.. according to an an-
nouncement bv Mrs. Harvey E,
Kramer. Sisterhood president
Mrs. David Drucker and Mrs.
.lack Rackear are serving as co-
chairmen of the (unction. "Even
though cur new Art Gallery is not
completely finished, we are ex-
cited about uing i 'o house our
first exhibit." they said. <
"We hope this win be followed
by many oilier exhibits of artists,
professional and amateur, in our
communi'y. We are limiting the
lust exhibition of paintings and
arts and crafts to Beth Sholrrm
members, but we plan to expand
our art appreciation program to
include all local artists."
The exhibit will open to the pub-
lic immediately after services on
Apr. 13. Other members of the
Beth Sholom Arts Council are Mrs.
Zachary F. Bailey, Mrs. Louis
Stoff. Mrs. Arthur Horowitz. Mrs.
Herbert C. Bloom, Mrs. Irving B.
Kaplan, Mrs. Rudolph Drosd, Mrs.
David Muskat, Mrs. Theodore Ep-
stein and Mrs. Charles Greene.
Discussing efforts of Miami's women on behalf of Israel Bonds
are (left) Mrs. Sam F. Danels and Mrs. Samuel Beckerman.
Mrs. Danels is hosting a brunch for members of the hostess
committee of the Bond-With-Israel luncheon to be sponsored
by the Israel Bond Women's Division on Thursday, Apr. 12.
The brunch meeting will take place Monday at Tony Sweet's
new fish restaurant on the 79th st. causeway.
Luncheon Plans To be Finalized
Sit KtlbflD STORY
Preparations for the Bond-With-
Israel luncheon to be given by the
Women's Division of the Israel
Bond Organization will be com-
pleted at a brunch Monday at Tony
Sweet's new fish restaurant.
Hosting the brunch will be Mrs.
Sam F. Danels. Chairman of the
Bond-With-Israel luncheon is Mrs
Jennie Grossinger.
A highlight of the luncheon, to
take place at the Doral Country
Club on Apr 12, will be the presen-
tation of Standard Bearer Awards
to the women Trustees of Israel of
1961 "for their pace-setting efforts
in Israel's Bar Mitzvah Year."
Among those who will be honored
PAGE 6-B
are the Mesdames Elise A. Adams.
James M. Albert. Sidney D. Ansin.
Max Bauer, Ruth J. Bcrger, Sam
Blank. William Bornstein. Jack A
Cantor, Charles Charcowsky. Sarah
Czech, A. C. Fine, Abram Fox.
Ben Frankenstein. Samuel Fried-
land. Samuel Goldfarb, Jennie
Grossinger, Isadore Hecht, San-
ford Kean, Samuel Kipnis, Harvey
Lee. David J. Light, Dave Mar-
'.'iilies. Benjamin Meyers, Max Or-
ovitz. Jack S. Popick, Maurice
Revitz. Phil Revitz, Jacob Riikin,
Ira Rosen, Raymond Rubin. Louis
P. Rudnick. Samuel T. Sapiro.
Harry Silver, Fred Somerstein. Jo-
seph Stein. Nat Waldman, Carl
Wemkle, and Max Weitz.
Ner Tamid
Donor Luncheon
Mrs. Eugene Schwarz this week
announced the completion of donor
year for Temple Ner Tamid Sis-
terhood.
Completion will be marked with
an annual celebration and rewards
luncheon in the form of a theatre
party on Apr. 11.
The function will feature a lunch-
< on and matinee at the Coconut
Grove Playhouse, starring John
Payne in "Tender Loving Care."


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Friday. March 30. 1962
*Jmist> ftmridlifttf
Page 3-B
Young Adults
Plan Dance
MV Women See Show
Jewish War Veterans Ladies*
Auxiliary Post 682 met for dinner
and the show starring Brenda Lee
and Jack Carter at the Deauville
hotel Saturday evening. Mrs. Ceil
Zucker was in charge of arrange-
ments.
Young Adult Friends of Israel
will be host to an "April Fool"
dance on Sunday evening in the
Starlight room of the Shelborne
hotel.
Young adults between the ages'
of 21 and 35 are invited to attend, j .
according to Martin Cohen, fund- Bo'l SCT Her
raising vice president of the group.'
There will be dancing to Alan Kole
and his orchestra, floor show, and
prizes.
Artists Models
Assisting Cohen with arrange-
ments are Stuart Miller, Stan
Karp, Paul Raymond. Shelley
Schrold, Donald Kaplan. Sue Fab-
ncant, Hallie Colin, Charles Bloom,
;.nd Eddie Landv.
Mrs. Joseph Wilkes, president of the South-
eastern Florida reqion of Women's American
ORT, places the Queen Esther Crown on Mrs.
Aaron Green, of Islanders chapter. Mrs. Green
was the greatest ticket seller at ORT's Purim
Garden Mart held last week at the Roney
Plaza hotel. Shown with runner-ups are (left
to right) Mrs. Arthur Winton, Greynolds Park
chapter; Mrs. Samuel Silvers, Greater Miami
chapter; Mrs. Wilkes; Mrs. Green; Mrs. Sam-
uel Avrach, chairman of the day; Mrs. Felix
Wolf. Bay chapter; and Mis. Nathan Lippman,
Greater Miami chapter.
Ida Appel Auditorium to be Dedicated
At Hebrew Academy Event Wednesday
Dedication of the Ida Appel Aud-
itorium in the newly-constructed
Hebrew Academy of Greater Mi-
ami will be held Wednesday noon
at the site of the school. 24th st.
and Pine Tree dr.
Funds for the auditorium were
raised by the Hebrew Academy
Women who will
dedicate it in
memory of Id;
Appel, one of th
founders of the
Hebrew Ac ad
einy. and past
president of the
Hebrew Acad
emy Women.
The late Mrs.
Appel was also
ire II-known for MRS. ROStN
her activities in the Jewish Home
for the Aged as its president for
many yean, Hadassah, and the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Soon $50,000 nave l een raised
during the past eight years to build
iMy hall.
.' isi ;-!i s. o, tin sident
o the Heb r \ >my Women,
and chairtn in of ll in;
ing) campaign i rs bj o,
said th;ii. "realizati n of the new
auditorium after man year: of
work i- .i gi o I ex imi le '
1 great interest the community
has in Ok Hebrew Academ; ,"
Assisting In the iuml-rai-ing was
the brick campaign organized a
year ago. The campaign had as
its motto "a brick for life," with
Donor Installation Set
Donor and installation luncheon
ol the Greater Miami Hemophilia
Auxiliary, Miami Beach, will be
held next Thursday noon at the
Algiers hotel.
each brick costing $18. the Hebrew
word for "Chai," which is 'life."
Mrs. Leonard Rosen is toast-
master for the dedication cere-
mony and chairman of the brick
campaign.
The event will include a ribbon-
cutting ceremony, luncheon, a
playlette by Hebrew Academy stu-
dents, and a contest for a 1962 Cor-
vair. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Pertnoy.
daughter and son-in-law. and Mr.
Benjamin Appel, husband, will
have the honors in the ribbon cut-
ting ceremony.
Second grade students will act
out The Land of Milk and Honey"
in Hebrew and English. The play-
lette is an adaptation of the Broad-
way show by Hebrew Academy
second grade teachers. Mrs. Alfred
Cosman and Mrs. Edith Sommer.
Program chairman, Mrs. Nathan
Spiegelman, vice president of He-
brew Vcademy Women, will intro-
duce ;. .' bi \ S Gi --
I ri ii pal, who will dedicate the
.an urn.
D< nittee also In-
cludes Mrs. ick Buchsbaui i, i
chairm in, Bin; in Bank chairmen.
',,:. luliuS RO :' tein .illll Mrs.
Arthur A. B rgman, and Mi -
dames Zvi Berger, Murray Berko-
witz, Jerome Bienenfeld, Charles
Bogin, Louis A Butrm, Jonah A.
Caplan, Louis Ciment, Samuel Par-
her. Irving Firtel, .lack Gerson.
Alexander S. Gross, Harry (Cap
Ian, Jacob -Katz, Frieda L. Koch.
Alexander Kogan, Aaron S. Lauer,
Alex Miller. Al Osheroff, Henry
Penchansky, Joseph E. Rackovsky.
|,.............i,,ii... .-co Keinhard,
Samuel Reinhard. M. H. Roscn-
\ house, Samuel Rosner, Murray
Rosenberg, Sidney Rubinowitz.
David Seid, Saul Solomon. Edward
'Snyder, Jerry Sussman, Abraham
Steinberg. Jerry
Zuckerman, and
Berkowitz.
Wittels, Matthew
Ann and Sue
Harmony Chapter
Gives Trophies
Harmony chapter. B'nai B'rith,
met Saturday evening at the Deau-
ville hotel.
Following the awarding of tro-
phies, the meeting adjourned to
the Casanova room for a donor
dinner party and the show starring
Brenda Lee and Jack Carter.
Mrs. H. Hornreich was in charge
of arrangements.
The fourth annual artists and
models ball will be held Saturday
evening, Apr. 14, in the Deauville
hotel.
Miami's mardi gras. the theme
for the 1962 extravaganza is "Sci-
ence Fiction and Outer Space," and
the hundreds who attend yearly are
already applying out-of-this-world
ideas in costume design to con-
form.
A special runway has been in-
stalled in the (Iran,! ballroom of
the Deauville for easy viewing of
the night's activities, which in-
clude a full program of entertain-
ment starring supper club talent;
the costume p.tiade; and the par-
ade of the models. There will also
be an art exhibit.
Sponsored by Lisa-Marc Enter-
prises, and dir.cted by Bunny Yae-
ger, photographer, the ball pro-
vides scholarships at the Miami
Artists School uc.d Gallery.

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COLLEGE PREPARATORY HIGH SCHOOL
LEAR SCHOOL SUMMER DAY CAMP
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.-age 4-B
+Jmisl> fhrkfiar
Friday, March 30. 1962

Hadassah Offers
Bible Study Group
Miami chapter of Hadassah Bible
Study group will meet Thursday
morning. Apr. 5.. 10:30 a.m., at
the home of Mrs. Louis Goldman,
6501 Granada blvd.. Coral Gables.
Mrs. Sanford Jacobson. educa-
tion chairman of the Florida region
of Hadassah, is leader of the
group. She has been trained in
th^ capacity at a Bible Study sem-
inar in Stamford. Conn., conducted
by the World Bible Study Assn.
According to Mrs. Jacobson, "the
approach of our group is intellec-
tual and non-denominational, with
the Bible studied as historic liter-
ature.'-
Women interested in attending
may contact Mrs. Norman Lyons
or Mrs. Fanny Frommer.
- of Tru
.ts crusade <
Fred Fuller
>pe equipment in Ce Lei ........
Deparl
rry Sorrosky
National Council of Jewish Women Will
End Season with Meeting Wednesday
Greater Miami Section. National
C ouncil of Jewish Women's nine di-
> .sions will meet Wednesday for the
!.st time this season to elect offi-
cers, hear reports from returning
t ^-legates to the recently-held
^juthern interstate regional con-
i i-ntion, and to enjoy a variety of
ograms, according to an an-
:...uncement by president, Mrs. Sid-
. ey Lewis.
The newly-elected officers will
"'? installed at a joint ceremony on
:May 2.
r-
"The Woman of the Year," a
musical salute to Council volun-
. irs in various service projects,
ill feature the meeting of Sunset
Division at the Hillel House on the
University of Miami campus at
:2:30.
*
Bay Division will hear a book re-
Lew on "A New Life." by Bernard
"KEDEM" KOSHER
CRAPE JUICES I
RASPBERRY SYRUPS,
3re now available in yo--'
-e.ghoorhood superma--
-el and grocery, Kosher
for Passover ur-.j
oersoru! superv's
Rabbi L. I. Greenwal^
ibi of Ne/.
3
I lor Kiddush
Pttsovw Sd.
a Sacramental purposes.
Try our 100'i P.-*
Raspberry Syrup KosHe-
for Passover, thi J
one o' Its kind on the
Mo Color or Fla-
vor is added. It's PURE
Distributed by
UVINSON'S FOOD SPECIALTIES
4570 E 10 lane, Hlaleah. MU 1-3578
Malamud, given by Mrs. Dorothy
Krieger Fink. The meeting will be
held at Washington Federal on
Normandy Isle at 12:15.
3
Biscayne Division will meet at
Pythian Lodge, W. Flagler St.. at
12:30 p.m. "A Salute to Biscayne"
will be presented.
s *
Evening Division will meet at
Toby's Cafeteria, 27th ave. and the
Trail, at 7:30 p.m. After the South-
ern interstate regional conference
reports, they will hold an auction.
Proceeds will be used to purchase
a large-type typewriter needed for
Council's Sight-Handicapped pro-
gram.
* *
Indian Creek Division will pre"
sent "Ernie Goes to Council's Con-
vention." a characterization of
Mrs Joseph Klein, president. The
ting will bo called to order at
I at Algiers hotel.
Islands Division will meet at
tian motel at 11 a.m. to hear
m of the Southern Lnl
ional com
Lincoln D'vision will hear a book
ij Mr VI
p m.
*
Shores Division will meet at
Westview Country Ciub at noon.
The program, "Council Orbits the
Globe." will be followed by a fash-
ion show given by Lewis Fashions,
ot Lincoln rd.
e
South Dade Division will meet at
th( home of Mrs. Jack Schenknian.
C605 SW 109 St., at 9:30 a.m. "The
Year in Revue," featuring officers' t
reports and Southern Interstate re-
gional reports, will highlight the
meeting.
Gobies Girl Wins
In Science Fair
Lorraine Lieberman has been
0 sch ilarship by the
itj VI her
i. t, Analysis ol
Vsnects ittr
Flour B errd
-

e is
-
e Fail ..i on Wed-
j
Passover Will
Be Demonstrated
A Passover workshop will he con-:
ducted by Rabbi and Mrs. Morde- j
cai Podet at Temple J'udea on Sun-
day at 9.30 a.m., and again at,
11 am
Traditional foods, table settings,
ceremonial objects and the Seder
will be discussed, explained and
demonstrated.
Members and friends are wel-
come.
MRS. SANfORD JACOBSON
TETLEY
TEA
A TRADITION
IN JEWISH
HOMES
SINCE 1837
Yes, there's Yom Tov spirit in
this fine tea..."flavor crushed"
for fullest strength and stimu-
lation ... richer taste and pleas*
ure with your fleishigs and
milchigs and between meal
refreshment...
tUSHISIU
^Tj Recommended or diit-ti'cs. ovErtae:,;'1!; a-j o-ci*-
or e d efi. Use lor te < mn.
tfttMJrtt, ccoknt, Pjrt. Com-
pletely harmltij. 4 u. !%
SURNTfE0 N0N fATUNINe
at voee STOtUU SVCUVWHENI
HOLLAND HONEY CAKE
IS AN OUTSTANDING, DELICIOUS
HEALTH FOOD
MADE WITH HONEY, MILK AND RYE FLOUR
ALSO SALT FREE
NO FAT NO SUGAR # NO SYRUP USED
ASK FOR
HOLLAND HONEY CAKE
AT YOUR MARKET
DISTRIBUTED BY:
PALM DISTKI111 TORS, IXC.
373 N.E. 61st Street Miami, Florida


Friday, March 30, 1962
+Je*ist>ncric&vi
Page 5-3
JFK Hails Hadassah's 50th Jubilee
NEW YORK (JTA) Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy greeted Ha-
cassah this week on the 50th anni-
vtrsary <>t its founding, and charac-
terized it as an organization which
ras found "a vital place in human
..llairs The message was read by
Mrs. Arthur J. Goldberg, wife of
the United States Secretary of La-
i.or, before more than 1,200 leaders
and members of Hadassah at a
i,olden Jubilee Luncheon. The
event inaugurated a year-long cele-
bration of Hadassah's Golden Ju-
bilee.
Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, na-
tional president, based her address
n the theme of the Festival of
Purim, since it was on Purim 1912
i id ih was founded in New
rh Cit! and Ihe name Hadassah
- the Hi bi for Esther. Pointing
,i that Pui con memorates the
nnihilation of anti-Semitic elc-
lents in ancient Persia, Mrs. Kra-
.- ,-irsky stated:
"Whenever the venom of anti-
Semitism seeps into a society,
whether it be instigated by a
Himin in Persia, by a Hitier in
Germany, by Communists or
Nazis the echo of Mordecai's
injunction to Esther is a call to
action. And the Jewish people
throughout the ages have re-
sponded even as Esther did."
Mrs. Rose L. Halprin, national
chairman of Hadassah's Golden
Jubilee Committee, outlined a cre-
do for Hadassah which, she said,
"leads us along the broad highway
that is entry to the next 50 years."
Mrs. Halprin, who is a former na-
tional president of Hadassah, de-:
clared:
"We believe that the Jewish peo-
ple is an eternal people; that it is
one people; and that to insure its
survival and its unity must be the
task of every successive genera-
tion. We believe that Israel reborn
and the neople of Israel settled on
its own soil can create its own im-
a develop its own character,
strive for its own perfection in a
way that is impossible for any com-
munity in the Diaspora and that to
aid Israel in this task is the re-
sponsibility of all of us.
"We believe that the Diaspora
Women Honor Judge Berkman
Some coo women, lepresenung, otner .-peaxc.-s at tne luncheon
very phase of community life, j vere Mrs. David Miller, who serv
gathered at Ihe Ivory Tower of the ed as chairman, Mrs. Earl Pertnoy,
Saxony hotel on Tuesday to attend ; ;,|1(i Simon Rubin, campaign chair-
. Luncheon honoring Judge Jason man for Judge Berkman. Mrs.
Berkman, I Alexander Kogan delivered the in-
E. Albert Pallot. a former assist-1 vocation.
. i.t attorney general tor Ihe State
ol Florida, introduced Judge Berk-
Hostesses were Mesdames Jack
Buchsbaum, Raymond Feiner, Ber-
man, stating that "Judge Berkman nard Fuller, Samuel Hirseh, Alex-
t the type of man we of the 5th ander Kogan, Irving Miller, Joseph
District need to sit on the bench' 1'ardo, Simon Rubin, Rocky Pom-
10 hear the cases that are continu-. i ranee, D. Murray Sonnett, and
, ily brought before this court." Jerome Greene.
can be creative, that Jewish life
can become more deeply rooted,
that we can put the brakes on
against the trend to ignorance. To
this task we must dedicate our-
selves for it would be a historic
tragedy if the State of Israel were
to be reborn and the Jewish people
lost. We believe that Jewish com-
munities everywhere and the Jew-
ish community of Israel must be
partners in the great task of sur-
vival."
Presfttent Kennedy, in his
greeting, said: "Hadassah has
demonstrated for more than a
generation that our society re-
ceives in giving. Our significance
as a nation is often more visible
in the hopes and aspirations that
ethers entertain for us than in
our own estimates of ourselves.
"For many years, immigrants to
these shores constantly rekindled
the vision of opportunity and free-
dom that inspired our first set-
tlers. Now the tide runs in new
channels. For all men everywhere
are immigrants to freedom and op-
portunity; as our nation bends its
strength and lends its hand to help
them achieve this horizon in the
spirit, in that act free men dis-
cover their own worth.
"Hadassah has realized this
great truth lor many years. It has
brought not only help to others,
but awareness to our own nation.
For that, you are to be thanked and
commended. As the world strug-
gles from the dark ways of the
past, and seeks the destiny of
peace in freedom, organizations
like Hadahhas will continue to find
a vital place in human affairs."
Mrs. Sally Barr (left), of Pioneer Women's Club 2, is presente:
with a pin and a three-day cruise to Nassau for brinqinq :.-.
44 new members to the orqanization by Mrs. Milton Gree.\
president of Pioneer Women's Council of Greater Miam:.
Temple Fund Lists Speaker
Mortimer J. Oaplin, United
States Commissioner of Internal
Revenue, will be guest of honor at
a dinner of the Foundation Fund
of Temple Israel of Greater Miami
on Sunday, Apr. 29.
The dinner, under the chairman-
ship of Sidney Meyer, will official-
ly introduce the Foundation Fund
to members of Temple Israel. The
evening will be educational in pur-
[pose. to explain the goals and
; values of the Foundation Fund cre-
ated by the congregation, and will
involve no fund-raising of an> si
Henry E. Wolff is president i !
the board of the Foundation. S -
ney Meyer and Morris Klass r-. 3
vice presidents; Sam C. Levens -,
treasurer; Lewis I. Serbin. sec-
tary; Edward Cohen, assistant S3
retary; and David P. Catsm
general counsel.
Members of the board are S
A. Goldstein, A. J. Harris, X..X
Orovitz, William D. Singer. I
W. Slote, Harold Thurman. .
Louis E. Wolfson.
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Pane 6-B
*.tewist FVcridnan
Friday, March 30, 1962
Cora! Way Jewish Center Sisterhood will hold its annua
donor luncheon on Sunday noon, Apr. 8, at the Deauville ho
lei. Left to right are Mrs. Eli Kina, donor chairman; Mrs. Har
vey Rashkind, co-chairman; and Mrs. Marvin Weiner, presi
dent of Sisterhood. Donor this year is "Chai," meaning 'life'
in Hebrew, as well as "eighteen."
; ';
Career women of Dade county are cited by the Hospital Chief
Engineers Assn. of Florida for "distinguished community serv-
ice" at ceremonies held in Miami's new Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital. Shown receiving Certificates of Honor from associ-
ation president, Frank A. Sansone, sr., are (left to right) Mrs.
Clara Wise, assistant administrator at Cedars Hospital; Mrs.
Morris B!au, chairman of the Lobby Shop; Mrs. Nathaniel
Levin, president of Cedars Auxiliary; and Mrs. Evelyn Mit-
chell, secretary to Arthur Vining Davis.
Molly Picon's
MISH-MASH
that I'm on Broadway, my friends ask me, "What's the
Bro [way and Second Avenue?" I answer
them in one word. "Money." On Broadway, everything's a
luction. For instance, the musical I'm in now, "Milk and
," they tell me cost $400,000 before the curtain oven
wxnt up. On Second Avenue, we would have been happy
ike IX that much at the end of a long successful run
linds me of a story my cousin used to tell. Her hus-
; ], vi r made more than a modest living. Once, after
had dinner at his boss's house, he came home raving.
"You should see the house Mr. Werner lives in. And
Is his wife a cook! She made a tzimis (that's a Jewish
e) out of eggs and honey and cream and cheese and
raisins. Why can't you cook like that?" To which my cousin
replied, "I can. Just give me money for eggs." "Leave out
the eggs," he cried. "Hut I have to buy the honey," she said.
"Who needs honey?" Well, as you've guessed by now, she
was forced to make the tzimis wihout the eggs, honey, cream,
cheese and raisins. When she put it in front of him he took
one taste and said, "Pfui! This is what rich people eat?"
I've often wondered what my poor cousin did put into that
tzimis. You know, you can't make something out of nothing.
The more I serve Rokeach Gefilte Fish, the more I realize it.
Believe me, there's a dish that's something. Naturally,
Rokeach doesn't skimp on ingredients. They use only fresh-
caught whitefish, carp and pike ... the very finest. Then it's
seasoned and cooked just right, and you get it with plenty of
that jelled broth for which Rokeach is so famous. Who ever
heard of a traditional Friday night dinner without gefilte
fish? Or, for that matter, without chicken soup with matzo
balls? That's another wonderful Rokeach specialty. But
don't get me started. Like any woman, I never know when
to stop.
hn^fc/
Noted Socialite to be Honored at Israel
Bond Luncheon in Doral Country Club
Mrs. Elise A. Adams. Miami so-
cial and philanthropic leader, will
be honored at the premier Bonel-
With-Israel luncheon to be held
Thursday, Apr. 12, at the Doral
Country Ciub under auspices of the
Israel Bond Women's Division,
with Mrs. Jennie Grossinger as
luncheon chairman.
One of Miami's best-known social-
ite leaders. Mrs. Adams will be
presented with the highest award
which the State of Israel can bo-
stow upon a woman, the Woman of
Valor Award, in recognition of her
"service and devotion to the cause
of Israel and her exemplary leader-
ship in the Israel Bond issue."
Announcing the award to the na-
tional board of governors. Dr. Jos-
eph J. Schwartz, worldwide head
of the Israel Bond Organization,
pointed out that only a handful of
women have received the coveted
Woman of Valor Award prior to
Mrs. Adams. Among these is Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt.
A native of Istanbul. Turkey.
Mrs. Adams has resided in Lon-
don, Paris, and Rome, and has
maintained her home in Miami for
the last 25 years. A seasoned
world traveler, she has visited Is-
rael on several occasions.
A. F. Adams, her late husband.
head of General Telephone Corpo-
ration, was invited by the Israel
Government to institute the Israel
telephone system immediately aft.
cr the.new s:ule. was established.
In addition to her activities on
behalf of man; worthy community
causes, Mrs Adams is noted as a
patron of 1. ( music and the, art.s.
Las! May. Mrs. Adams was hon-
orary chairman of the Israel Bond
Women ion Sabra luncheon.
Mrs. Adams active in Hartassah,
the Hear; I. ite "I Greater Mi.
ami, Mt, S Hospital, and Varf.
1 Hospital.
Co-chairmi n 01 the Bond-With-
Israel lunche m :n addition to Mrs.
CiM.-siiv.ev. Mrs. Joseph M.
I.ipion. Mrs, ik S. Popick and
Mrs. Max Wi
A speci; esl at the luncheon
will be John Pi yne, colohrn'ed star
of the theatre and motion pictures.
The luncheon will also mark the
official public opening of the Doral
Country Club.
The luncheon will serve as a
tribute of Miami's women to the
craft industries of Israel As a
token of appreciation for the part
which Miami's women have taken
in helping to develop Israel's in-
dustry, the craft guilds of Israel
are sending pit diamonds which
will be presented at the luncheon.
Luncheon Plans
To be Finalized
Final plans are being readied for
a second "Harvest-for-Health" lun-
cheon on Thursday. Apr. 5. at the
home of Mrs. Jack Furman, 2300
SW 4th ave., with proceeds going
to support the Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital development fund.
Residents of the southwest area
of Dade county are being invited
by Mrs. Furman to join in the
spring campaign.
The Women's Division, under the
leadership of Mrs. Samuel T. Sa-
piro, and Auxiliary president. Mrs
Nathaniel Levin, will sponsor 16
coffees and luncheons throughout
Dade county for the purpose of ac-
quainting women with the newest
hospital '.n their community.
If you like
KREPLACH
^CHEESE-.
Ravioli
IN SAUCE
You'll love
CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
CHEESE RAVIOLI
Hear family, guests, cheer for
that real Italian flavor created by
famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender
little macaroni pies...filled with
tangy Italian Cheese...simmered
with savory tomato sauce and
cheese...seasoned the real Ital-
ian way. So much tastier and
easier than the frozen kind. So
much thriftier, toocosts only
aoout 15c per serving!
Sabbath
Dinner
Holidays
and every day
Kosher your
meat and
fowl with
Diamond
Crystal
Kosher
Salt!
Three generations of Jewish housewives have put their
fullest confidence in this famous salt for purity and quality.
Its compliance with Dietary Law is absolute. Neither too
coarse nor too fine, it is easy to sprinkle and wash off. Perfect,
too, for all your seasoning. Today for your holiday cooking
and baking get a FRESH NEW BOX of Diamond
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makes crispier salads
Ordinary salt melts fast, wilts greens. Not so with Dia-
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Do all your seasoning with
DIAMOND CRYSTAL COARSE
KOSHER SALT
Diamond Crystal Salt Company


Friday, March 30. 1962
9-Jewlsfi fk>rlcfiatr)
Page 7-B
Beach High PTA Meeting Tuesday
PTA of Miami Beach Senior
High School will hold an election
meeting Tuesday, 2 p.m., in the
school cafeteria.
The nominating committee will
submit to the general membership
the slate of officers for the year
1962-63. and election will follow.
Irvin VV. Katz. principal, to Mrs.
Louis Nadler and Mrs. Lee Hauser,
mothers who have rendered serv-
es and devotion to the PTA o\ i a
period of years
Mrs. Ben Samuels, incumbent
Highlighing the afternoon wil' : PTA president, will conduct
be the presentaton of awards by neetiif?.
Planning National Council of Jewish Women's tour abroad
ore (left to right) Akiva Goffer, Southern manager, Zim Lines;
Aaron Farr, of Farr Tours; Mrs. Raymond Rubin, vice presi-
dent of administration for Council; and Jacques E. Turner,
regional manager, Air France.
Council Planning
Exciting 3-Day
Trip Abroad
lust of all, we will go to Is-
y.H i lo iee the fruits of our work,
institutions like the John Dewey
School oi Education, supported by
Council, and the building of the
new Hebrew University High
i on the campus ot the He-
i liversity in Jerusalem, and
\i-ii the Ministries ot Education
j Welfare."
The speaker was Mrs Raymond
R, Rubin, vice president of admin-
istration of National Council of
Jewish Women, the community
btrvice organization whose local
divisions number 2.200 members
and comprise 18 international af-
filiates including Iran. Australia.
and England.
The occasion was a meeting to
discuss plans for the NCJW-spon-
jored tour of Europe and Israel,
to depart New York on July 20 for
3d i ays of vacationing via luxury
lin<-r> and jet planes to -ome of the
World's most cherished sights.
Also present were leading travel
authorities who planned the itiner-
i'-ry: Aaron Farr. of Farr Tours;
Jacques K. Turner. Consul of
France and regional manager of
Air France; and Akiva Gofter,
Southern manager of Zim Lines.
Part ot the journey will be made
aboard the SS Jerusalem. Other
h.ghliahs include opportunities to
meel trllow-members and officers (
hi NCJW abroad.
Limited to 140 passengers, the
tour will depart from Idlewild In-
ternationa! Airport by jet to Eu-
rope Three days will be spent in
Taris, include sightseeing, excur-
sions, night entertainment and
shopping. On the evening of the
23rd, an overnight train will be tak-
en to Venice, where the following
day. there will be a tour of this
City. On the 24th. the Miamians
will board the SS Thcodor Herzl
for the sea voyage to Israel.
Five days on board ship will con-
clude with travel to Haifa and Tel
Aviv Here, for four days, mere
will be trips to settlements and
public buildings, and time for in-
dividual exploring,
On Aug. 1. a lull-day excursion
to Jerusalem, with visits to his-
torical places is planned. The fol-
low, ng day, under the supervision
ol a NCJW representative in Israel.
;ll NCJW projects will be visited.
Tho next two days will include a
continue, excursion of the Galilee
;:nci step-overs in Tiberias and
Haifa. On the morning of Aug. 5.
the travelers will board the SS Je-
rusalem bound for Italy.
Three days on the Mediterranean
will end with arrival in Naples on
Aug. 8. From here by motor-coach
to Rome for two days.
On Aug. 11. the tour will depart
from Rome by air to Zurich, where
the group will proceed by motor-
coach to Lucerne for two days c?l
sightseeing. On Aug. 14. they will
be boardin1: a flight for London fo'r
tin final three days of the trip.
Departure fo New York by jet is
on Aug. 18.
The tour, including transporta-
tion, hotel accommodations, meals,
and taxes, will cost $995 a person.
Farr Tours are in charge of travel
arrangements.
Dr. Lehrman
To be Heard
On Friday evening. Dr. Irving
Lehrman will discuss the juvenile
problem in the community. He
will highlight some of the meas-
ures that are being taken to stem
the tide of delinquency and the
gradual distintegration of family
and home, America's first line of
defense.
His subject will be "Honor Thy
Father and Thy Mother A Chal-
lenge to Parents." He will speak
at Temple Emanu-El.
00
1 eup cooked
Wolff s Kashi.
1 can mined
egetable
1 tgg, beaten
WIN $25
FOR YOUR KASHA RECIPE
And delight your family with the
dish you make! All you do is submit
your favorite recipe for using Wolff s
Kasha...for stuffing chicken, derma
...making knishes, varnishkas,
soups...side dishes with onions,
Chopped mushrooms, peppers or any
other tasty use for this all-time
favorite.
YOU GET $25.00
Send your own original recipe with
a Wolft's Kasha box top to: Phyllis
Wolff, Penn Yan, N. Y. We will pay
$25.00 for every recipe published;
tout every entrant receives a FREE
Kasha Cookbook and all recipes be-
come Wolff's property.
-IMiKASH
deliCtiHtAs Brown Buckwheat Groats
Mrs. larhari Twerslcy, H. MMcft
St., Philadelphia. Pa., won $25 tor
her tasty parve Vegetable Steaks.
VEGETABLE STEAKS
1 small onion
.1 tbs. cooking 0*.
1/4 cup matzo meal
1 lbs. salt
dash pepper
1 can diced mushrooms (optional)
Mash mixed vegetables. Add beaten eggs.
Kasha and seasoning. Brown onions and
mushrooms slightly In oil. Mix. Then
odd matzo meal and mix thoroughly.
Fein into six large patties and fry.
Also enjoy
Wolff's Creamy
Kernels (grits)
Kasha N' Gravy
Kasha.. j
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on Holidays
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Prg B-B
+Jewistncr*&*r
Friday, March 30. 1962
Miss Rochelle Stern Becomes Bride
In Traditional Wedding Ceremony
MIAMI
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
It is the highest tribute for a sister-in-law to say that the girl her
her married is without doubt the kindest, sweetest etc. That
- exactly what Esther Mrs. Donald* Rubin says about Melanie. her
her Harcl Thurman's wife. The name Melanie elicits thoughts of
- irthen belle, and that is Melanie to a "T." because St. Louis, where
vias born and raised, is South.of the Mason-Dixon Line.
A- a rabbi's daughter. Melanie realized that much was expected
r the rabbi's children are always in the eye of the corsresation.
___________ Her father influenced her life in many ways.
tetanic feels, and today she believes more
than ever that her father is a true spiritual
leader: He practices what he preaches.
Her father, incidentally, was the Brat
rabbi ever to gh the invocation at a Prc-si-
Rabbi Samuel Thur.ar.
~tiil is. a dear friend cf Harry Tru-
man, and the whole family went to Washing-
to see and hear him a; the Truman In-
augural.
Hi inie is often teased about how many
different colleges she attended She b'-camc
a teacher and taught in the Shrine Hospital
for Crippled Children in St. Louis. A year
later, she went to Harvard to take a course in
"Individual Development." which she certain-
ly did because she married Harold and
moved to Boston There, she took part in a
good deal of community activity, including
Scouts PTA. National Council of Jewish Women, Hadassah. Fed-
,on Brandeis University, ard many others.
When the Thurmans moved to Miami 12 years ago. Melanie con-
tu ed with these same organizations, plus a feu more, like Temple
: ^el Sisterhood. Bonds for Israel, and became the first Jewish presi-
dent of Welcome Wagon. And. as a member of the Banyan Garden
Melanie just this week won her first blue ribbon for an African
*v : et arrangement.
Melanie is proud that Harold is the Man of the Family, and be-
L< .es he gives the best advice on every subject. With all their many
accomplishments, civic and otherwise, it is hard to believe that the '
Tr. .rmans have never been to Europe. Every time they start think-j
j-f about a trip to the continent, their daughter Jane, now Mrs. Al
Sharon, would present them with a new grandchild for them to visit up
New England way.
Al is an Israeli, and this year Israel will come to St. Louis, where
'.-- Sharcns have just moved, in the form of Al's parents so no trips
i' jad for the Thurmans next summer either. Perhaps, when Debby.
thi r 17-year-old, graduates, Harold and Melanie and Melanie's folks
take that long-delayed trip across the seas.
* *
WEARING OF THE GREEN AT WESTVIEW COUNTRY CLUB
It was Irish Stew and Corned Beef and Cabbage on the gaily-dec-
Or&ted buffet tables at Westview. The men wore bright green bow ties
o- green derbies. But the women didn't wear any St. Patrick's Day
finery. It might have marred the locks of their gorgeous cocktail
g ns. The entertainment was extra-good, including an Irish tenor.
<. and Mrs. Larry Rosenberg hosted a group from out-of-town. Harry
a: Ben Markowitz and families. Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Schlapik. Dr. and
Mis. Lester A. Russin, Mr. and Mrs. David Hochberg. Mr. and Mrs.
b : Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Danner all helped celebrate.
There is quite a flurry of excitement about the Spring Formal.
7 invitations will soon be out for this yellow-and-whitc affair on Apr.
2i First-hand report about Bob Hope and Abe Ribicoff. who played
- I at the club as the guests of Col Jake Arvey came irom Sarah
Lester) Russin and Harriet (Mis. Henry) Williams. They were
t -> the phone next to the grille where the two men were eating lunch.
Sarah said Bob Hope doesn't seem to know that he is being funny
o.'t quip came tumbling right after another as he was eating his ham-
- -tr. Harriet, incidentally, was entranced with Ribicoff's eyes
tity're that beautiful.
* *
CSE TWO THREE
St. Patrick's Day decorations and the Twist combined to make
. first of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Gumenick's dinners-at-home a huge
- cess. It was planned for outdoors, but had to be brought in because
;he weather. An accordionist put everyone in the mood for a fun
- ning. With professional help, everyone learned the Twist. They
- re all good, but Mr. and Mrs. Max Matz were extra special. Among
thirty-five guests were Mr. and Mrs Edward Kahn, Mr. and Mrs.
Iney Weintraub. the Rittcr Levinsons. and Hrb and Susy Gimbel.
I: itations are cut for the second dinner party on Apr. 11, and the
d in the series will be around the first of May.
* *
s = VER NO MORE TO ROAM
"Don't ever do this to me again." said little Karen Brickman in
uncertain tones when her mother and father, Richard and Linda.
jrned from a trip to New York and Boston. Dick went on business,
a* 1 Linda went along for the ride. Incidentally, they attended Beverly
K.iem and Herbert Sttirman's wedding. They only had a few hours
- Washington, just long enough to get a glimpse of the White House
. to eat at a restaurant that Dick had been raving about. Next year,
ti -. children will no doubt be included on the trip. The honeymoon is
- r.
* -ft
CONGRATULATIONS
The inscription on the fly leaf reads "For Mother and Dad. with
t and thanks." It was written in a new book that has just been
p, Dlished by Dr. Morton H. Maxwell and sent to his parents, Dr. and
s. William Maxwell. Of course, they are terribly proud of it. The
ne of it is "Clinical Disorders of Fluid and Electrolyte Metabolism."
I have to be almost as smart to read it as to write it.
In a ceremony performed under
a choopah canopy pool-side at the
Deauvilie hotel. Miss Rochelle Lila
Stern and Stephen Leon Kevelson
exchanged mamage vows Tuesday,
Mar 27 A reception in the Napoleon
loom followed the 6 o'clock rites.
which were carried out according
to ancient Jewish 'raditions.
Officiating were Rabbi Abraham
Couple to Live
In San Francisco
Carol Friedberg and Joel
Schwartz were united in marriage
Saturday evening, Mar 24. at
Westbrooke Country Club, with
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro and
Cantor William Lipson officiating.
For the ceremony, the bride
chose a white chantilly lace full-
length gown with a cathedral train,
and carried a white B:ble with a
cascade of white crchida and lily-
of-the valley
Marsha Friedberg was maid of
honor for her sister, and brides-
maids were Sheila Sandier. Bar-
bara Adler. Yvonne Uriel and
Pearl Kopel.
Daughter of Mr and Mra Mur-
ray Friedberg. 5345 Twin Lakes
lr.. the bride graduated from Mi-
ami Senior High and Florida C
lege of medical technology She
was a member cf B'nai B'rith
Debs.
Parents of the bridegroom arc
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schwartz, of
Sunnyvale. Calif., where Joel at-
tended school. A major in elec-
tronics, he is presently with the
research department of Stanford
University.
Best man was Stan Friedberg.
Ushers were Michael Krassner..
Barry Goldbaum. Michael Miller.
Arnold Adler. Robert Friedberg
and Neil Kopel.
After a honeymoon in Carmel.
the newlyweds will live in San
Francisco.
9
Weinschneider. grandfather of the
bride. Rabbi Isaac Hutner, dean of
Talmudie Seminary'. New York,
Rabbi Sidney Weinschneider. Rabbi
Solomon Scharfman. Rabbi Tibor
H. Stern, father of the bride, Rabbi
Bernard Bergman, and Rabbi
Nathan Kohler.
Assistimi-were Nathan Kevelson,
father of the bridegroom. Alter
kevelson. his brother. Simon Han-
ai,, of Mexico City. Nicolas Stern,
and Louis Stern, all uncles of the
bride.
Cantor Maurice Mamches and
Cantor Abraham Self chanted the
welcoming song for the bride. Also
in attendance were Rabbis Joseph
Rabinowiu. Alexander S. Gross.
Phineas Weberman. Abraham Korf.
David Lehrfield. Solomon Schlff,
A. Mendeiowitz. A. Weinreb. Morns
Hurwitz, N Schapiro. Morris Skop.
.Max Lipschitz, Eugene Labovitz.
Tmcha? Bryskman. M. Safra. A. J
Safra. S. Radwin. Jacob Katz. and
L. Mar tl
Dean of the Rabbinical Seminary
Chaim Berlin. Rabbi Isaac Hutner.
I the bride and the bride-
groom
For her wedding, the bride chose
a gown of pure silk with alencon
lace embroidery featuring a high
neck line, long sleeves, and cathed-
ral train. The French illusion bouf-
lant butterfly veil was held in place
b> a pillbox of alencon lace and
seed pearls.
Maid of honor was Joyce Stern.
sister of the bride, and Tiki Stern
prd Judy Stern, also sisters of the
bride, served as bridesmaids with
Martha Stern and Joy Belle Yu-
dofsky. Robin Kevelson, the bride-
groom's niece, was flower girl
Daughter of Rabbi and Mrs. Ti-
bor H. Stern. 1061 Michigan ave..
spiritual leader of Beth Jacob Con-
gregation, the new Mrs. Kevelson
graduated with honors from Miami
Beach High, attended Stern college
for Women of the Yeshiva Uni-
versity in New York, and is pres-
ently at the University of Miami.
The bridegroom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Kevelson, of
Brooklyn, N.Y. Having studied in
Israel, he is now attending Brook-
lyn College and Chaim Berlin Rab-
binical Seminary. Following his
graduation, he will be associated
with his father in the Empire Ace
Inc.
After a honeymoon in Europe
and Israel, the newlyweds will live
in New York.
; Children's Fashion
Show Slated
} Sisterhood of Temple Tifereth
Jacob will hold a children's fash-
ion show and dinner on Sunday at
5 p.m.
The show will be held at the
Temple at 951 Flamingo Way, Hia-
leah.
Models will be provided by Mrs.
; Faust of the Sophistikids. Enter-
tainment will be included in the
program.
.. ..*'
\\ raw -k.i:
MRS. STEPHEN KCVUSCH
Sunshine Chapter Luncheon
Sunshine chapter. B'nai B'rith
Women, held its third annual donor
luncheon and Purim festival las'
week at the Americana hotel. Mr-
Milton Weinberg. donor chairman,
was in charge of the program.
Specializing
in
Pormals
Cocktail Gowns
Bridal Attire
Mother of the Bn Mother / the Groom Gowns
Bar Mitzvali Gowns
PARSONS
3410 CORAL WAY
Open Monday Nile
Til 9

Wi-rner-Kahn
MRS. lOU SCHWABTl
GOLFERS
LOWER YOUR SCORES!
ton mn have new Grips MisfaMod
Clubs rethtrHel Or reweighfea-
WHILE YOU WAIT!
Wood clubs refinistied like new
All nicks removed, rescored and
name replaced. Also specials on
olf shoes, bags, carts, balls, gad-
ets and accessories. Best selec-
ions.
'EVERYTHING FO* THE OOifW
GOFFS *zssr
1423 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
HI 3-2659 Coral Gables, PI*.
FOR SALE
MiNiATVRE POODLES
CHAMPION SIRED
A. K. C. PEDIGREED
WHITE AND CREAM AAALES AND FEAAALES
ALL SHOTS $150
Call PL 7-0014
Express your feelings to your loved ones .
SEND FLOWERS from the
BLACKSTONE FLOWER SHOPS
One of the oldest in Greater Miami .
Serving you 24 hours ... 7 days .
Just Phone
UNion 6-1233
listen to Radio Station WKAT, 1360 on year dial, every Sunday at -
7:35 P.M., to the comments of the
HONORABLE JUDGE MALVIN ENGUNDER, VICE MAYOR OF MIAMI BEACH


Friday- March 30. 1962
vJewlsii fhrkttar
Page 9-B
FASHION conscious women are
constantly asking what is new
for this season. The question of
hemlines is important, as is the
problem of whether fringe is
fashionable this season or not.
The most important word in fash-
ion is usually the least stressed.
it is always important whether
hemlines and necklines go up or
down, or chiffon is "this sea-
I fabric. That simple basic
word .v '"comfort."
Wl ile watching a fashion show,
may admire the tight, ta-
pered, and short sheath. If you
decide to buy it, stop and think
First if you will be comfortable
in it. Many a model takes a short
step on the runway because the
skirt is too tight for normal walk-
It the skirt is too tight to
sit comfortably in, if it rises far
about your knees when sitting,
if tin re is a possibility of being
embarrassed when getting in or
out of a carthen the dress can-
not possibly be classified as be-
ing comfortable.
No woman can be as socially
poised as she would like to be if
she is uncomfortable in her dress.
More than one party has been
ruined for the hostess because
her gown, while beautiful to look
at. wasn't comfortable because,
P'lhaps. a shoulder strap didn't
fit correctly. Recently, the wire-
photo report of a large Washing-
ton party mentioned that the
well-known hostess was constant-
ly seen adjusting her attached
stole. The degree of her discom-
MIAMI BEACH SURFSIDE
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fort was obvious to all and
simply because she was not com-
fortable in the gown she was
wearing.
*
r\RESSES are shown on manne-
" quins, but they are worn by
a living, moving you. Occasion-
ally, one must sacrifice some de-
gree of aesthetic beauty for the
compensating factor of comfort.
When buying a dress look at
yourself from all angles. The
shops have three-way mirrors for
your convenience. Try sitting in
the dress; walk a little to see if
the line cf the dress is cut so
as to be flattering to your figure.
Is the material comfortable on
your body, or is hopsacking, for
example, not for you? If the
dress looks well in front, but
pulls in the back, why buy it? It
will probably only hang in your
closet for months and months,
until you get tired of it. and give
it away.
The question of hemlines is al-
ways debatable. As of now, just
below the knee seems to be the
most widely-acceptable length.
Most women follow the rule of
thumb which tells them to watch
that their hemlines hit just above
the center of the calf. For your
more elegant dress, drop the
length a trifleabout a half-inch
to an inch. For the dress with
the full skirt, you can shorten the
length to the same perspective.
Again, the rule to follow is sim-
ply that it must feel comfortable
to the wearer. If you do not
have to think about the length of
your dress when you are wearing
it, then it is comfortable from
the standpoint of length.
Necklines are also a factor to
consider. If a sales person has
convinced you that a decollete
neckline is for you, and you feel
half undressed with the low cut
line, it is unreasonable to expect
you to be comfortable when wear-
ing the dress.
* t
PRESSES reflect your person-
" ality; they are part of you.
You move in them, you visit in
them, wear them shopping and
Knit W Needle
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ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
mODlRH EQUIPMENT I fURNISMNGS FIREPROOF BVILMN0
to formal balls. You do not wear
dresses to be constantly thinking,
"Is my skirt hiked up in pack?"
"Why did I have it tapered so
much?"
You should select your clothes
very carefully. Every dress in
your wardrobe should do some-
thing positive for you. With a
basic knowledge of color and ac-
cessory coordination, there should
be no excuse for a woman's open-
ing up the door of her closet, see
it full of clothes, and yet be able
to say, "But I haven't a thing to
wear." The culprit is usually
the lack of the most important
word in fashion comfort.
A careful balance of selecting
clothes that are fashionable, that
display your figure to your best
advantage, and are comfortable
to wear is easier said then done.
It takes a considerable amount
of conscious effort. The best
suggestion that has been offered
is to look through your present
wardrobe, select the few dresses
that always bring you compli-
ments when you wear them, and
then analyze them with the idea
in mind qfjasic style, color, line,
and the optical illusion they cre-
ate. Combine these with the fact
that in order to be comfortable,
you must enjoy wearing them,
and your balance is all but
achieved.
Sturman. Katims ;
Exchange Vows
Miss Beverly Katims and Her-
bert Sturman were united in mar-
riage on Thursday, Mar. 8, at the
Croydon hotel in New York City.
Rabbi Benjamin Kreitman and
Rabbi Israel Lebendiger officiated
at the ceremony, which was fol-
lowed by a reception and dinner.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride wore a gown of white
bouquet taffeta with portrait neck-
line of reembroidered alencon lace
and seed pearls.
Mrs. Raymond Shainberg, sister
ter of the bridegroom, was matron
of honor. Marvin Maitzman serv-
ed as best man.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Her-
! man Katims, 2042 SW 14th ter.,
| the new Mrs. Sturman is a grad-
uate of Columbia University school
of dental hygiene, and was employ.
Her husband is the son ol Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Sturman, of Liber*
ty, N.Y. A graduate of Columbia
College and Columbia law school,
I he is presently employed in the
office of the United States Attor-
ney in Los Angeles, Calif., where
he and his bride will live after *
cross-country honeymoon trip.
"ADON-OLOM"
(LORD Of THE UNIVERSE)
IN HEBREW AND ENGLISH
ON ONE RECORD- $1.50
Partial Proceeds to Hhrew
University of Jerusalem
Will Send Postage-free to
Any Part of the Country
MAYFIELD'S RECORDS
1461 Drexel Ave. JE 8-9840
A novel blend of dance and poetry to interpret the Sabbath
will be presented by dancer Olga Suarez (left) and dramatic
reader Mrs. Howard Dunn (right) at the Oneg Shabbat pro-
gram scheduled for Saturday, Apr. 7, 3:30 p.m., as part of the
biennial convention of the National Jewish Welfare Board at
the Deauville hotel. Mrs. Dunn i6 a member of the board of
directors of the North County Branch of the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center, which is host to the convention.
Mrs. Suarez is the Center's dance director.
Pioneer Women
To Honor Couple
Pioneer Women, Club 1, will hon-
or Mr. and Mrs. Philip Weiss at a
banquet Saturday evening, with
Mrs. Joseph Krantz, president, in
charge of arrangements.
Event will be held at the Royal
Hungarian restaurant, 731 Wash-
ington ave., owned by Mr. and Mrs.
Weiss.
Residents of Miami Beach for
the past 16 years, Mr. and Mrs.
Weiss have participated in many
phases of Jewish community life.
They have been patrons of all Pio-
neer Women's projects, lending
their complete support to the Child
Rescue Fund.
Weiss serves as vice president of
Kneseth Israel Congregation and of
the Religious Zionists of Greater
Miami. He is also a member of
tS5g& 310 Collins Avt. Ph. JE 2 3571
Miami Beach
Diamonds Reveal
Daughter's Troth
Mr. and Mrs. I Chip Diamond,
of 2322 Lincoln ave., Coconut
Grove,' announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of their
daughter, Sharon Elaine, to Robert
J. Black, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Black, of Swampscott, Mass.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Miami Senior High and will gradu-
ate in June from Ohio State Uni-
versity. Her sorority is Sigma Del-
ta Tau.
Her fiance is an alumnus of the
University of Miami and is cur-
rently enrolled in the United States
Air Force Officer Training School
in Texas.
The couple plan a July wedding.
MR. AND MRS. PHILIP WEISS
the board of the Hebrew Academy,
where all four Weiss children are
students.
Guest speaker at the tribute din-
ner will be Cantor Mordecai Yar-
df.ini.
HOSTESS
PANTRY
BAKERY
ANNIVERSARIES
BAR MITZVAHS
WEDDING CAKES
PARTY CAKES
THAL BROS.
EPICURE
MARKET
1666 ALTON ROAD M.8.
JE 8-1861
Award to be Mad*
Mrs. Gerald Soltz, past presi-
dent of District 5, B'nai Brith
Women, will present "The Woman
of the Year" award at North Dade
B'nai B'rith Women's donor lunch-
eon.
YOUR CHILD
DEVELOPS FASTER
at CAMP 0CALA
IN FLORIDA'S COOL
OCAIA NATIONAL FOREST
Your boy or girl 5-16 gains confidence and V
has fun learning new skills daily horseback
riding, waterskiing, swimming, boating, arts
.ami crafts, dramatics, athletics and canoe
trips 1 expert counselor to every 2l/i young-
sters (triple the average) 4 and 8 week
sessions Top medical, safety and dietary
staffs Friday night Sabbath services Di-
rectors: Dr. Theo Struhl, Maj. Len WwUman,
Bob Wolhnan, Ben Miller Florida's finest
camp starts June 25 so enroll now.
torn
FREE BROCHURE
MiMHaffict:
1451 N. Boyshore Dr.
FR 1-785*


Page 10-B
vJewisfi Fk>rldrirn
Friday. March 30. 1962


Paul Newman and Shirley Kniqht play the ill-fated young
lovers of "Sweet Bird of Youth," powerful film version of the
Tennessee Williams stage success. Geraldine Page, who star-
red with Newman in the oriqinal Broadway play, repeats her
rcle in the CinemaScope and color picture, now in its third
week at the Carib, Miami, Miracle, Essex and 163rd Street
Theatres.
Cantor Gottlieb
At Seville Seders
Seville hotel, 2901 Collins ave..
has engaged Cantor Herman K.
Gottlieb for a fifth consecutive
year i i i fficiate at Passover Seder
services on Apr. 18 and in., ac-
npan ed bj a ten-voice sym-
phonic choir.
tor Gottlieb is a descendant
.i i > imilj ol r itbis and
cant( i H. stai ted mu lical
career h Latv'a as a choir mem-
ber of the Famous Libau Syna-
- i ue. At th n e ol 17, !.< w as
grante a scho arship al the State
Conservatory i Music i:i Riga.
At the conclusion of h:s studies
at the ro.;so va!or>', he was weM-
received at cencert and cp?ra
performances all ever Europe.
\ iraduale of the Hebrew Union
. olh i i : Sacred Music and Edu-
cation, he has appeared as guest
soloist at man y conferences ot
United Jewish Appeal. Hadassah,
and Histadrut throughout the U.S.
Cantor Gottlieb is a noted in-
terpreter of Hebrew and Yiddish
folk songs. His repertoire is in
nine languages. He is now cantor
at Temple Beth Shirah. 11289 So.
Dixie Highway. Miami.
C-olc Quartet will be featured at a concert of Friends of
Chamber Music of Miami next Wednesday evening, 8:30 p.m.,
c: White Temple Auditorium. Program will feature Quartet
in B flat major, op. 18, No. 6, Beethoven; Quartet No. 3, 1949,
cp. 32, Blacher; and Quartet in C major, K. 465, "Dissonant,"
Mozart. Members of the group include Edward Drolc, violin;
Heinz Boettqer, violin; Siegbert Ueberschaer, viola; and Hein-
tich Majowski, cello.
Concert Slated At Beth Torah
Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum
tv be guest artist at the first an-
Di Cantors Concert at Beth Torah
on Sunday. The concert is ex-
pected to become an annual event.
Cantor Kirschenbaum will offer
a rogram of liturgical. Israeli.
la Traviata'
Repeated by
Popular Request
MAY 6
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
TICKETS AT
DADE COUNTY
AUDITORIUM
$1 to $2.50
Hebrew. Yiddish and operatic
arias.
Other artists appearing will be
guest soprano. Effie Jane Turnboll,
and the Philharmonic String Quar-
tet and Student Chamber Music
Society, first violin. Richard Coff;
second violin. Daniel Oaks; viola,
Robert Westfall; cello, Robert
Oeutsch; accompanist, Vera New-
stead Rowley.
=~ JIMMY -
" ROMA
|jr Xay Caro'e & Tomnr
Bi"v F .v.
Frankie Hyers _^=j
The Cookies
MURRAY
FRANKLINS
211 22nd Sl Miami Beach
Continuous Entertainment
Showtim*
10 p.m. J. 11:10 .m.
Tumultimo 1 to 5 .m.
iervtion -
JE (-7101
cantos hhimmh eorrucB
Beach Pianist
To Perform Here
Ronnie Anne Bromberg. 18-year-
old Miami Beach pianist, will be
featured soloist at the next concert
di the Miami Beach Civic Orches-
tra on Sunday. Apr. 8, in Miami
Beach Municipal Auditorium.
Barnett Breeskin will be on the
podium.
Miss Bromberg will play the
Beethoven piano concerto No. 3.
op. 37. in C minor, using a cadenza
written by the late Ernst von Doh-
nanyi.
Other works to be heard during
the evening are the Overture to
Verdi's "Forza del Destino," Ru-
manian Rhapsody No. 1, by
Georges Enesco, and Capriccio Es-
pagnole. by Rimsky-Korsakov.
i
A music major at Florida State
University, where she studies un-
der Edward Kilenyi, internation-
al ly-known concert artist and
teacher, Miss Bromberg is no
stranger to Dade county music cir-
cles. She played her first solo re-
cital when she was 12 years old at
the Miami Woman's Club. She has
since followed this up with many
appearances here.
Peerce Will
Conduct Seders
Jan Peerce, star of the Metropol-
itan Opera, will conduct the Pass-
over Seders at the Carillon Apr.
IS and 19, according to Jerry Suss-
man, executive director of the
hotel.
Lauded by Toscanini as the
greatest operatic tenor of the gen-
eration, Peerce is also noted for
his recordings of cantorials and
Hebrew melodies.
Throughout his career. Peerce
never conducted a community
Seder until he consented to do so
in Miami Beach several seasons
then, the Peerce Seders at
the Carillon have become a tradi-
tion.
man said lh.it the Seders will
';< held m the Silver Chimes din-
ing room ( I the hotel, with a pro-
fessional choir undi r the direction
i Mrs, Ja I; Do tag Only the
I Sedi r on Apr. 18 will be open
;o the pub
'iapiros to be Hosls
to Know You" fun and
games party will be hosted by Dr.
and Mrs. .Samuel T Sapiros. of 6340
Riveriera (Jr., at 4 p.m Musically
Inscribed personal invitations went
out to trustees and the medical
staff of Cedars of Lebanon Hospi-
tal, of which Mr. Sapiro is presi-
dent.
AJCong. Women
In Purim Fete
Miami chapter. American Jew-
ish Congress Women's Division,
held a Purim luncheon last week
in the Coral Gables Masonic Lodee.
Mrs. Russel Winer is president of
the group.
Simultaneous "Thank-You Lunch-
eons" lor Louise Wise chapter.
1 Women's Division, journal work-
ers were also held
Hostesses were Mrs. Lillian
Hersh, chairman cf the Journal.
Mrs. Lillia l Mam'.et. president of
Women's Divisioi and Mrs. Susan
Fell r, president : Lou'se Wise
chapter.
Mizrachi Groups
To Show Film
Latest documentary movies from
Israel showing progress of chil-
dren in schools and villages oper-
ated by M:zrachi Women's Organ-
ization of America will be shown
this coming week, and the public
is invited to view the pictures, an-
nounced Mrs. Alfred Stone, co-
ordinator.
There will be three showings,
On Monday noon. Hatikvah chan-
ter is hoi ling a mode! Sorter lunch-
eon far members and future mem-
bers, to be followed by a sho
of the film, at Beth Israel Syna-
gogue.
c.i Monday evning, Kinneret
chapter is holding a membership
meeting, also inviting new mem-
bers, and a showing of the film at
Tyler's restaurant, lr>26 Ponce de
Leon l-lvd Coral Cables.
On Thursday, Apr. 5. at 1 p.m..
Miami Beach chapter of Mizrachi
is holding a membcr-bring-a-mem-
bcr meeting at Knesseth Israel
(ongregation.
Mrs. Israel Teitch is president
of Hatikvah chapter. Mrs. Morris
Biencnteld is chairman of the day.
Mrs. Alvin Levcnson is president
<.f Kinneret chapter, and Mrs. Sara
Silverstein is vice president of Mi-
ami Beach chapter.
Music Critic in Talk
"Ancient and Modern Aspects of
Iewish Composers and Th?ir Cre-
ations" was (he subject of a lec-
ture g'ven by Mordecai Yardeini,
author and music critic, at the bi-
weekly forum of the Y. L. Peretz
S"hool on Tuesd-iv evening.
CINIUAICO^ MimOOOUM
RAUL NEWMAN GERALDINE PAGE
BRANDT THEATRES
NO Ml NAT tD fOR| |
ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST PICTURE!
Beit Actor (Maximilian Schell)
Best Actor (Spencer Tracy)
Best Supporting Actor
(Montgomery Clift)
Best Supporting Actress
(Judy Garland)
Best Screenplay (Abby Mann)
Best Director (Stanley Kramer)
Best Art Direction (Black & White)
Best Cinematography
(Black aV White)
Best Costume Design
(Black 4 White)
Best Film Editing
STANLEY KRAMERS
"JUDGMENT at
NUREMBERG"
LINCOLN
LINCOLN RD MIAMI BEACH
LEON SCHACHTER'S
YIDDISH AMERICAN
VAUDFViLLE & P.CTURES
IN HRSON OH STAGE
NAPOLEON
KCEiS scHMriw
PLUS OTHER ACTS
OH OUR SMiX
'LIVE & LAUGH1
MUSICAL REVUE
with the MALASKY FAMILY
MICHELE ROSENBERG
LEO FUCHS
CINEMA
WASHINGTON AVE at 13 Sr., M.B.
SINATRA MARilN DIMS*
SERGEANTS 2
Mcuficun SbtAtde/
#'*- .ioAtlai s\r us.*i *** su*$er
rO 0*0 >V.'-J.V- 'At SOUTH f -M /
Open 6:45 TODAY Pen *'**
The
NOMiNQTED FOR "BEST
GCTQR RCGDEMV ftWGRD
7
HUM KMU
F JTUMt WWTMMI
MSSIBCa
rkway
^theatre
Open 4 45 TODAY

MOTE'S
Xj w*5*
WINNER OF
4 AWARDS!
H. F. P. A. Selected:
'BEST PICTURE"
BEST MUSICAL SCORE"
"BEST DIRECTION"
1
SAMUEL BRONSTOK
CHARLTON SOPHIA
HESTON
\
STUDENTS &
CHILDPEN
UNDER 12
2 SHOWS
90
AT
All
TIMES
DAILY
2:30 P.M. 8:30 P.M.
ROOSEVELT
Tk. Moil teourifnl TMrr OS toy
770 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD
41tt Street, Miami leach
JE 2-2331


Friday. March 30, 1962
* Jewish Fk>rdFiann
Page 11-B
The Courier
ces [i r seats :' the D< no< ra i ul vi m i i I e for I
,..,.. m to hav< i >ti red the ima .. i !o< al (
litical leaders. Mr*. Lewis Olatter, who has held otfic
ev, i major community organ :at'o*.i, is ronn .
lh Venetian Islands .Wally G'uk, pres dent of the : Orrici
i { i- a: -'. and oi th? I n ocra ic I tub I i im enter
[or Di strict 40 comm ci n n, ; ..... n Prei incts l! : M
18, as well as Palm and H;! cu islands Ge-e Berk. '
i | (i Jason Berkman's c< urt, has d* ul the race
. ate co :" tteema fr( n Dade lo conci I his di iricl
,i n Ssphia Enolenier, wi Vice 3 h Ma'vln
Erjlar.d he considered a strong candidate in both rpcei oft her ma
ship of the campaign of President Kennedy [or Miami Beach in
Alan Sheccr, who has been doin,1! a Cine a job of lub thum]
lor J. I. Kislak as he did for Cedars of Lebanon Ho pital, proud
father's report on bipartisan support for United S ates rat i: li<
ili' international Genocide Convention. Senators Fulbright, Met
and Keating wrote Alan's dad. co-chainiuvi of liv American Jew
Congress' commission on international affairs, that a strong V
House push is needed to promote full Senate consideration .
Mark Van Doren's play. "The Last Days of Lincoln." \ hich pre
micred on the FSU campus, has been selected to receive a gold medal
for outstanding contributions to good human relations from the media
committee oi the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

Morris A. S'lenfcer, dynamic chairman of Israel 15 nds tor si :.
and Missouri Democratic power, has secured former President Harry
S. Truman and Israel Ambassador Avraham Human for an Apr. 4 din-
ner in St. Louis, launching the bond drive there and honoring the
v chief executive for his "historic recognition of tl-.e State oi
Israel in l!>48 and for continued encouragement of Israel's
achieve economic independence." Shenker is an annual Miami Beach
winter visitor Philip Roth, author of Goodbye. Columbus;" R^'ph
Ellison, of "The Invisible Man" fame; and Pietro Di Oor.a'.o. who pen-
Christ in Concrete." participated this week in a forum on the
conflict of loyalties in fiction writer? who belong to minority groups.
The symposium was one of several sponsored on the campus by
"i biva University during its Diamond Jubilee year .
Hebrew University i J rus ilem lias 95 Arab and Dri::-:' students
led this yei r a new record The sea- oinj 14th am iversary (>;'
I r.iel dinner-dance is tin brainchild ol Lillian Simer.hoff, new pn -
e Greater Miami rt'omen's Dl\ ion of A r.ds.
A! Mason, Beach furniture dealer, of! to N< \ STork to phi
, ic colle< lion disi b< II b bai
Pomerence's r co r district .. .
en Guberman lia formei Sen. >ppe
: ed bill
G.dcon Straus '
that the Israeli I giant' i
',-. a Hirschman -,
i lews in Europe. I
Home J
X i in r i< iht [ Jews from ; i I
. cites (or ic-n an I cl men
the N eld country. Men

Allen I. Frcchling ankl hi DOSl
r: this sum i
i r. Cincinnati Z ta Beta
i rsitj of Miami's Hiilel House -:
l o dim ':'' ving ... Mr. and Mrs. Irvirg S'hat.....
scni out invita i da; afte "m m (3 h
. nl Jee Malek at the Dil Sch itzn an < cei
. "Jed Trttehin as president of Beach Lodge B'rit '.:
6 ceremonii at the Al |i< is. with Samuel Wiener o I
-sor the following year Mrs. s-ina B -is will
at Ti esday's B*n"ai B'rith luncheon at Lin< estaurant.
Lecr.ard Barr and Sam Lipton' lab st 1 via
i*8are the i ontinuine. bi >nal
ulf Ami rican Li the
s of I Dubbin and Rosen bn th<
in Ui v. and have each gone t in
the first thi !"vid d- s,!:> '"'-'
Bertram w. Kern will receive well-deserved awar -
!i al Societj 11
Sunday '. Ted Lurie, po : <' editi r ol the Jerusa em Post. I een
elected president of the Jerusalem YM and x. \ Larry Birger,
business editor of The I ami New-, doing an o inj b :'. his
nightly WIN/ broadcast for Joseph Upton's Dade Federal.
Gables High Youth Has Future Mapped;
He's Winner of Many Top Awards
Dr. Lehrman (in photo at left), chairman of the
Foundation for the Jewish National Fund,
pledges iu'1-hearted support of "Me Ami" en
behaii ol Greater Miami Jewry. Center aie
Samuel Eiman and Mrs. Sarah Czech, as they
light candles inaugurating Miami's twin city.
Mendel Fisher, retiring executive director of
the Jewish National Fund, in photo at ric.it
lights the 28-candle testimonial cake prepare;
in his honor. Function was last week at t'.-.e
Fontainebleau hotel.
Miami Accepts Challenge to Establish
Israel Twin City at Tribute to Fisher
Miami Jewry last week accepted
the challenge to establish the twin
city of "Me Ami" in Israel at an
inaugural testimonial affair in
honor of Mendel Fisher in the
Fontainebleau hotel.
Fisher, national executive direc-
tor of the Jewish National Fund for
28 years, recently retired from that
post. The Greater Miami JNr
Council hosted the affair at the
Fontainebleau to mark Fisher's re-
tirement and inaugurate the
launching of "Me Ann" in the
Neg< v.
In his a:1 '-ess, F;sh-r paid
tribute to the leadthip of JNF
here. "This is fbe first t:me in
ii-i> history cf the Jewish Nation-
al Fur.-'." he said, "that a com-
I ... ....:. 5 a v i
lacob V
.
at thi Hi tadrut
on Sun-
hot< I
A 6:3 p.m. reci pi n II be fol-
lowed b; the tra nal kosh. r
Sedi r dinner, and musical pro-
..:; ., ; c intoi Sheldon
Ko lm r will bi i during
the festivities.
This year's Sedrr is beir.-j deH-
icatcc1 to the Golden Jubilee of
Kupat Holim-lsrael, which makes
modern science available to
young ar.d old, new immigrants
and veteran settlers alike
throughout Israel.
i ;ha rmt n f the celebration will
he Rab! L< n Kronish. spiritual
remple i:e:h ^hnlom. Mi-
lt, ai loshua 2
local His-
ii i
ft'ein
ol '. hii :
..: raveier, auth ir
cr Hi is curr< ntly ser\
. President Kenm dj 's Com-
ir EEO.
'Tourist Wghf Sarvnfcry
pendi arian American
Civi \ will hold a
turday eve-
tres Zsuzsi
a | iram in live
Th function II be in
honor of I and arriving
Is, am i fei tures Gypi >
nusii The oi in meets at
18;;. v.v No. River ar.
munity in the diaspora has es-
tablished a twin city in Israel.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. pr -:-
dent Of the Jewish .National Bund
Southeast region, pledged that
Miami "will rededicate oursel- is
to see that this dream comes tn "
Chairman of the evening \ is
Leon J. Ell, president of the
Greater Miami JNF Council. A >
participating in the program were
Dr. Irving Lehnmn, chairman f
:be Foundation for Jewish NatiC I
Find, who paid tribute to the gi
ii nor and Rabbi Leon Kronnn,
1 em] Be > Sholom, who g
' the invocation.
ram was olfert
allied al
:; YaslO.
Mrs. Sarah Czech and Sanu1
I lm in p. rticipeted -n the cand
. -:.-'.; (=rem.-ny inaugurati-;
M Ami," which in Hebrew
"City of My People."
er committee included I
,'rs. William Be -
in L. Berman, Mrs. E i
\. lii m Bornstein, Mrs.
Isidore Dickman, Isa e
Donen, Leon J. Ell, Harrj I i
Ezra Finegold, Jacob C. Fis -
man, Abraham Frai lin Mayt s
friedberg, Mrs. Robert Garber,
Sol G ildman, Dr. J. A. Grecnhoi
ibraham Grossman. Max Hex .
Peter Heller, Sam Kagan, Sol K -
holz, Zev W Kogan, Sam LipWr I,
Mrs. Fanny Liebman. Mrs. Al -
ham Mason, Mrs. Miriam I'n .
Rosenstein, Louis Rudni C,
Dr. M. J. Safra. Sam Schach ;,
Al Sherman, Mrs. Wolfe Shkl. ",
Meyer Siegel, Bernard Silver. J. Z.
Stadlan, Mrs Alfred Slor.c
Mrs. Ben Zeigmund.
FLA. KEYS
BIMINI
At 17, Lee Sandier, a senior at
Coral Gables High, knows exactly
what he wants to do in the future
and is methodically concentrating
on the courses and activities which
will best prepare him for that fu-
ture.
Interested in journalism and cre-
ative writing of all kinds, Lee
founded his school's literary so-
ciety, serves as its president, and
is editor of its literary publication.
Winner, during his sophomore
year, of the Florida Scholastic
Press sports writing contest. Lee
has served as sports editor of both
the yearbook and newspaper, and
is presently co-editor of the news-
paper.
Interested in law. as well as jour-
nalism. Lee visualizes a combin-
ation of legal training and writing
ability in a field of journalism re-
lated to political science.
Vice president of Quill and Scroll,
national journalism honorary so-
ciety, the energetic senior also
writes a weekly column for the
Coral Gables Times.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore T.
Sandier. 4841 Biltmore dr., Lee,
almost six feet tall, likes to bowl
in whatever spare time he can
find, even won a first place trophy
with several other boys in a recent
bowling tournament.
CRUISE THROUGH
FLORIDA KEYS
140 MILE TRIP DEEP
THROUGH THE
ROMANTIC
FLORIDA KEYS
Received at Luxurious
"Islamorada Yacht Club"
where every courtesy and
facility will be at your
disposal.
Includes Lunch
Plus Ta
and
Spectacular Show of
The Sea
MORE TIME
"In the
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ON BIMINI .
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... VIA FAST NEW
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TAe Original "Proven"
Biminl Cruiic
DON'T ACCEPT
A SUBSTITUTE.'
DIRECT DOCKING
AT BIMINI
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FR 1-1436
DEPART
MIAMI
DUPONT PLAZA
CENTER
World's fattest, safest passenger boats to
Bimini, American Flagships. Brand new, cus-
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MIAMI OFFICE: DuPONT PLAZA.CENTER e CALL FR 1-1436 c\____


Page 12-B
+Je#lstifkrMttan
vt.
Friday, March 30. 1962
WW
Israel Official
At Beth Torah
Adiad Yafeh, director of the of-
fice of information of the Israel
Government in New York, will be
guest speaker at Beth Torah stu-
dent congregation services Satur-
day morning at 10 a.m. His sub-
ject will be "Youth in Israel."
Following services, a reception
in Yafeh*s honor will be tendered
by the older students of the school.
Rabbis of the congregation are
Mark lladdad and Perry Left";
Merle Maeroff. president; Diane
Gurman, vice president; and Linda
Kaufman, religious chairman.
:il ..... l :'.-.'"!
Pearly Gait j
h
Make Your
Reservations Early
FULL 7 COURSE
SABBATH
DINNERS
. complimentary
Israeli wire
(EVERY FRIDAY)
in the candle-lit elegance
of Morton Towers
Bayiide Dining Room .
Dining Rooms Available
For Private Parties
COCKTAIL HOUR
FROM 5 P.M.
complimentary
Hors d'oeuvres
For Reservations
Ph. JE 2-6426
FREE PARKING
Jljorton T
>

;
!
outers
ON WSCAYNE BAY AI 15th STREET
MIAMI BIACH
'Unusual and Delightful
Old World Atmosphere
LoungeEntertainment
YOUR HOST, JOE COHEN
CATERING
PRIVATE PARTIES
m
CONGRESS AlrtpORT INI*
A DINING PLACE OF DISTINCTION
THE ONLY PLACE FOR I
DOUBLE"
PORTERHOUSE STEAKS
A COMPLETE MENU OF FINE FOODS
None trtter At Any Place
At Any Price
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
Corner 132nd St and S Dl>ie Hwv,
Phone CE S-1621
KING
ARTHUR'S
COURT
The
SINGING STRINGS
DINNER SUPPER
MIAMI
SPRINGS
VILLAS
500 Deer Run TU 8-4521
ART BRUNS, Co-Owner
Action to Fore At Dania Palace
Partido action on Florida Derby
Night highlighted the action this
week at the Dania Jai-Alai Palace
The Diamond Doubles Stakes
elimination rounds wound up
Tuesday and partido play was
begin on Thursday, finishing
Apr. 3 and 5.
on
to
on
by Hal Pearl

WONDERFUL WORLD OF ENTERTAINMENT: Its rare coinci
dence to have a singer in the vicinity whose record is the nation's num-
hor one best-seller at the ame lime. The singer is petite Connie
Francis, and her record is "Don't Break the Heart that Loves You."
So it was quite an opening for Connie at the Eden Roc, where one
of the ringsiders and party hosts was Benny Davis, who wrote the hit
tune for the nation's number one songstress.
Composer of more than 300 songs, Benny Davis is probably more
thrilled over his latest hit than anv he's written before including: "Mar-
gie." "Baby Face," "Carolina Moon," "I Still Get a Thrill" and "With
: These Hands."
Davis started to write especially for Connie Francis a litle less
than a year ago, and so far the collaboration has been a bonanza.
He's already at work on the original music for Connie's first full-
ler.glh movie.
Connie continues at the Eden Roc through Tuesday, supported by
comic Bob Mclvin and th" Maltison Trio, an excellent dance group.
Visiting stars make Copa City a stopover for a night out. One
ni^ht recently, the star of the Dade blvd. nitery. Belle Barth, wel-
comed Virginia Graham, one of Jack Paar's pet guests on his late
show, which by the way. makes its farewell tonight: comic Alan
King, recent star of the Eden Roc: singer Desmond; Kaye Carol, the
ventriloquist-comedienne star of Murray Franklin's, and Dick Brown,
Eva Gabor's spouse. (Eva was doing a play-live-on TV that night)
Milt Trenier's twist version of "Around the World in 80 Days"
is a highlight of his hit singing act in the Belle Barlh show at the
Copa. Belle is booked solid after her record run here for Detroit.
Minneapolis. New York, Atlantic City and Las Vegas. Has she gone
places the past year.
*
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: "April in Foolsville" is a dilly of a
title for a show and it's the one the Props are staging Sunday in the
Pompeii room at the Roc. It's the fourth annual Academy Rewards
dinner and show of that worthy organization that keeps growing and
growing, both in popularity and membership.
Localites, as well as visitors, look forward to the surprise element
of the annual shindig, which is graced by a number of stars in town
at the time, as well as the regular members of the Props.
Patsy Abbott, the talented performer, continues writing the
original material for the Props shows, and her lines ere loaded with
laughs. Producer and indefatigable worker is president founder of
the org, Jerry Kruger Pollak.
"April in Foolsville" will include Marion Colby, Lois De Fee, Sue
Lawton. Trez Frassrand, Miss Abbott, Pat Bromberg, Sheila Barr,
Carol Dunn, Connie Kulak. Olga Pavlova, Erma Podvin, Lillian Malek.
: Cnariene Russell, Tillic Krongold. Ethel Harr and many more.
| The excellent National Ballet of Canada will include "Swan Lake"
in tneir presentation ai the Dade County Auditorium tonight and
j tomorrow. Company numbers 100. Prima ballerina is Lois Smith
and premier danseur is Earl Kraul.
* *
ON THE SCREEN: "Sweet Bird of Youth" has been doing big biz
I at the Cano, Miami, Miracle ana 163rd Theatres. The Tennessee Wil- i
Kin,- drama, well cast with Paul Newman, Geraldine Page, Shirley j
Km: lit and Rip Torn, continues through Tuesday. Next at the four
is "The Day the Earth Caught Fire," a science-fiction thriller
that's been touted as one of the very best.
The Mark" keeps on setting new attendance marks at the May
Dd Sunset. It's powerful movie fare, with Maria Schell and
Stuai Whitman, "Majority ol One," Alec Guiness-Rosulind Russell
romp, opens tomorrow at the Normandie, while 'Murder She Said"
holds :.t the Parkway.
Oiher held over mov:s: "Judgement at Nuremberg," at the
Lincoln; "El CM," at the Roosevelt; "West Side Story," at the Sheri-
c"an; "Dlack Tights," at the Colony; "Windjammer," at the Florida.
Warren Beatty fans, and they are growing in number bv leaps
and bounds, can see him in his most important role to date, "in "All
1 fall Down." Eva Marie S-iinf. femme star of "Exodus," plays oppo-
site Beatty. It's showing at the Flamingo.
-fc -k
FOOTLIGHT FACES: Sam Levene, surrounded by a capable cast.
is starring ai the Coconut Grove Playhouse in the former Broadwav
comedy, "Make a Million." which spoofs TV quiz shows. Local favof-
ites in the show include Jack DeLeon, Monica Mays, Eileen Lawrence
and Ed Crowley.
Former ballet star, Tamara Geva, is directing the pre-Broadway
j tryout of "Tender Loving Care." which stars John Pavne, and opens
Apr. 10 at the Playhouse. Lee Sandman, Susie Kohn, and Sid Cassell
are among the local thespians who will appear in this new drama.
Sunday, Don Cossack Chorus and Dancers make their onlv ap-
: pearancc here at the Dade County Auditorium. Serge Jaroff is the
conductor of the large touring company.
Also, the road show of "The Music Man." starring Harrv H>Vox
continues through Sunday night at the Miami Beach Auditorium.'
I Hickox has been handling the star role since 1958. lie also plays in
the movie version.
* -K *
I ON THE TOWN: Comedian Billy Fraye has joined the Murray
Franklin laugh syndicate. The talented Chicagoan has an original ap-
i proach tc comedy. He shares the spotlight at Murray Franklin's with
' favorites Kay Carole, Jimmy Roma, Ducky Callas and Frankie Hyers
in the hilarious "Blackouts" and the singing team of Cookie and Don
During President Kennedy's recent stay on Miami Beach, the
Epicure Market truck was a frequent visitor to his temporary N Bav
rd. residence. This is a new first for the Epicure Market, and the
Epicure is proud to have taken such an important part in lnaKing tne
President's stay on Miami Beach a pleasant one.
Rabbi Maurice Klein and a choir of six will conduct the Seders
at Harfenist restaurant for the second year. The popular Beach
spot is offering a "package deal" for two Seders and all holiday din-
ners during the entire week of Passover. And, Michel's Kosher Res-
taurant is new accepting reservation for both Seders and also Pass-
over week.
1 "Magic Rudy" Chmehk, host and entertainer at Joe Cohen's Rath-
skeller, is an ex-vaudiv:lhan. Rudy, an accomplished musician and
magician, led a troupe called "The 20 Bavarians" through the Keith
and Pantagcs circuits on the 20s and early 30's.
It won't be long before Art Bruns and his Carriage Club Caravan
take off for a three-week Orient tour. They leave Mav 8. The peri-
patetic Mr. Bruns also has a Munich trip planned for the Fall.
Big Porterhouse, the only restaurant where you can dine and shop
at the same time for (he finest in prime meats, also adding 60 more
, scats to the cocktail lounge. Owner is Herman Sumars.
I Pauline Frederick, television commentator from the United Na-
tions, seen dining at the Pub restaurant.
Phil Richards skating star of Jack Young's "Spice on Ice" show
at the Americana s Bal Masque room, will have his picture on the
I cover of a new album, "Music to Skate By," put out by Roller records
L
Temple Ner Tamid
80th ST. and CARLYLE AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
FOURTH ANNUAL
Passover Sedorim
CONDUCTED BY
RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ
AND
CANTOR SAMUEL GOMBERG
IN OUR BEAUTIFUL SKLAR AUDITORIUM
RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED FOR
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, and THURSDAY, APRIL 19
RESERVATIONS LIMITED CALL NOW!!
UN 6-8345 UN 6-9833
RA3BI MORTON MALAVSKY
Announces PASSOVER SEDERS
of the
ISRAELITE CENTER
3175 S.W. 25th STREET
Catered by
CONTINENTAL "WS CATERERS
For Reservations Call HI 5-1529 or CA 6-1744
IACK SCMWARZ and LEW AKENSTADJ
New Hotel George Washington
516 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH JE 1-6617
PASSOVER
SO P*r y, Per pert., dbl. occ.
3 wks. min. incl. Passover
3 COMPLETE MtAlS
GLATT TO KOSHER "SATMAR" FLEISCH
Well Known Cantor Will Conduct Services
RESTAURANT OPEN FOR EVERYONE
SJL50 per day, per nan. dbl. occ.
until April 17th
3 COMPLETE MEALS
RESERVATIONS
Now Being Accepted
for 1st & 2nd Seders
ALSO EOR THE ENTIRE WEEK
Air-Cond. UN 6-6043 free Pork
940 71st STREET
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth
KATZ's PARADISE RESTAURANT
1451 COLLINS AVENUE HDB7 "MO Phone JE 2-1671
ll For the PASSOVER SE1IERS
$17.50 Per Person Includes Two Seders
Services Conducsted by CANTOR SEYMOUR HINKES
Mashgiach on Premises
Ph. UN 6-6226
SAND-ELL
Ph. UN 6-5278
Strictly Kosher
CATERING
tz BAR MITZVAHS # WEDDINGS U PART E5
7446 Collins Avenue Miami Beach, Fla.
"READV-TO-GO" COOKED E00DS
wms&iz&Z'Sfx.i hm^S
STAR Dairy, Veg. & Fish Restaurant
(,1?t,rl,?i.?NSECUTIVE YEAR Un<1r Sam Management)
OLDi.si wi) BE8T KNOWN DAiuv RESTAURANT
SERVING LUNCH AND DINNER
NATIONALLY KNOWN ROUMANIAN CHEESE BAGELS
JE 1-9182 Jf
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
J^^4MA/ashington Ave.


Friday. March 30. 1962
MmM Her Mian
Page 13-B
Hospital Unit
Names Leader
Mort Feldman, Miami Beach
building contractor and member ot
Ibe board of governors of National
Children1* Cardiac Hospital, has
been named vice chairman of the
liuilding committee of the free
children's heart institution now
, i citing new S2.50O.00O facilities in
Hie Metropolitan Medical Center.
In announcing the appointment.
hospital preSMenr L obs*i**
pointed out that "Feldman's long
, h Florida will assure expert
guid) i a' and counsel for the hos-
11 ill'.- requirements."
Feldman, who studied at Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy and moved here from New
>ork 22 years ago, has been in
the construction field since 1945,
tnd has supervised the building
ot a number of Miami Beach
rpartment houses and hotels.
Kati mal Children's Cardiac Hos-
< ognized for its work in
.;, tret tnv i : i irch
i ind congenital hearl ,. ,
Iren will | rf,eld' real e v '"vestor and
expandi mi mbers
"i ol its rrc J is< son. R,
2
^[jctr As a gift to subscribers, The Jewish Floridian will present free
for the asking a corsage to each mother of a Bar or Bas Mitzvah.
Requests should be addressed to "Corsage tor You," P.O. Box
2973, Miami 1, Fla., one month in advance. Include the name
of the Bar or Bas Mitzvah, date and place of the ceremony,
home address and telephone number. The corsage will be
forwarded to you courtesy of Blacksfone Flower Shops jfljime
for the occasion. *-
Dennis Young
Edwin Ades
A10RT FE10MAN
frfing Serviee SSafss Speaker
it he 9 p.m. Oi
I lay evening al the arpe, ,- ,,, Uves ,
hotel synagogue will be ... ... ,.
.. i : isaic, \ .i He en
: Moskowitz, whose subject
"The Redemption ol the ,lie board '" tlK' UJA. Board of
: Man." Jewish Education, and is a trustee
klofckowitz, founder and chair- of Temple Kmanuel.


bntainebleau
ON THE OCEAN AT 44th STREET
TRADITIONAL
HOTEL
SGOGR
SERVICES
conducted by
t>1l. lRViNQ LebRMAN
and
CANTOR liiRSh At)LeR
under the auspices of
reMpLe eMANU-eL K
SiSTUbOOt) fa
WEDNESDAY, APRIL18 AND
THURSDAY, APRIL T9
Reservations
BANQUET DEPARTMENT
JE 8-8811 i

the
!"]
GDeauville
^^^^^^^ CM IM. OCIN T .Til .TII..T. MIAMI MUCH
presents
ti&itiomi seoea secvices ]
In the beautiful Napoleon Room
April 18th and 19th
conducted by
siC>ok BeURsky
Famou* Concrl Basis
and Renowned Choir
for RMtnmtleMi Phone: UN 6-8811 Citerinj Offie*
0t* person
Second Sedir
Howard Rosenblatt
Rabbi Joseph Rackovsky will of-
ficiate at the Bar Mitzvah of How-
ard .Max Rosenblatt on Saturday
morning, Mar. 31, at Beth Tiilah
Congregation.
The Bar Mitzvah is the son of
Mr. ;in.i Mrs, Irving Rosenblatt,
grandson oi Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Drucker and Mr. and Mrs Benja-
min Goldfarb, and godson of Airs.
Lillie Shaii
A si \ i nl h ; ade honor student at
[da M. Fishi r Junior Hi h. Hoi ir I
I s won awards for high scholastic
h ev im in ijects, a
A rei n the
Edward Cohen
.
erve
-
A stu i' -.1 :.'. Rivii ra J i i
alism and politics.
Hi- mother, Mrs. Mildred Cohen,
and his sister, Cookie Cohen, will
host the Kiddush following the
ceremony.
* *
Dennis Young
Dr. Irving u'nrman will officiate
at the Bar Mitzvah of Dennis, son
oi Mr, and Mrs. Herbert S. Young,
on Saturday morning, Mar. 31, at
Temple Emanu-El.
The celebrant is a seventh grade
student at Nautilus Junior High,
where he is a member of the band.
He will be honored at a Kiddush
following the ceremony, and at a
reception Sunday at the Diplomat
Country Club.
Women to Hold
Bowling Affair
Four chapters of the Brownrd-
I North Dade Council. B'nai B'rith
Women, arc sponsoring '"Spares 'r
Flairs," a bowling affair, on Sat
urday, Apr. 14. 8 p.m., at the Clov-
erleaf Bowling Lanes. 17601 NW
2nd ave.
In addition to a bowling fashion
show and exhibition bowling, then
will be dancing, and refreshments
will be sen
In charge of reservati ins are
At sdames B-.'','. G rret, Sho-
shana chapter; Joyce
tfortn Dade; Mickej I
and Pearl G Holly-
Steven Chait
Saturday morning services. Mar.
31. at Temple Zion will include the
Bar Mitzvah of Steven, son of Mr.
rnd Mrs. Milton Chait, and grand-
son of Mrs. Rebecca Chait. Rabbi
Altred \V;:xman will officiate.
Kiddush in Steven's honor, host-
ed by his parents, will follow serv-
i< es.
>:
Edwin Ades
in. son ol Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph Ade.-. will be Bar Mitzvah on
. Mar. 31, al
Tnr.ple \\r Tamid, with Rabbi En
.....
is a studi '
I
-
Gar]
noui Simo ..
- -al Gal
rvices, Mar. 31.
Rabbi Mordecai Podet will offici-
Gary is a seventh grade honor
student al Ponce de Leon Junior
High, a Boy Scout and an outstand-
ing athlete. He will continue his re-
ligious studies at Temple Judea.
Kiddush will be hosted by his
parents in his honor after the cere-
mony.
t ? *
Shaaron Edelblum
Shaaron Harrietts, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Edel-
tdv/ard Cohen Shaaron Edelblum
blum. will celebrate her Bas 3|itz-
vah on Friday evening. Mar. 30, at
Beth David. Rabbi Norman N. Sha-
piro will officiate.
An eighth grade student at Shen-
andoah Junior High, Shaaron won
an "Excellent Ribbon" in the re-
cent South Florida Science Fair.
Her interests include music and
research in plant life.
An Oneg Shabbat in her honor
will follow the ceremony.
WHEN IT'S TIME TO DINE..
TRY THE CAFE JARDIN SUISSE
Dr. Robbins
To be Honored
Dr. Morton J. Robbins, natior.nl
Zionist leader, will be honored al
Apr. 4 meeting of the Miami
Beach Zionist District Luncheon
Club.
The club meet- every Wednesday
noon at the Rnz Plaza hotel
Program will include a current
events report by Dr. Abraham;
Wolfson, and community singing, j
Jacob C. Fishman and Joseph Ma
! LUNCHEON from $.75
B'--hormues!ispecialty fru:cd cereal .....................
jchengiant crepe, beef iri wine sauce ..............I.tj
Ka;ebu-ger Tos.lnoi.o
Gruyere stuffed cheeseburger, ratatouille ................!
dinner from $1.10
Soupe a l'o'gnon gratlreo................................7S
Wienerli avec ChoucrouteFranks, kraut and potatoes.........1-95
Po Jet en MarmiteFrench chl;ken-in-the-pot................3.73
: BIRTHDAZE :
Anne Michelle was born Mar. 15
to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kcssler.
of 11894 S\V 37th st. Grand parents
are Mr. and Mrs. George Kessler
and Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Marks,
all of Miami. Great parents include
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Podcll, of
F.lkins Park, Pa., and Mrs. B.
Brown, of Brooklyn. N.V.

...J
vOGUST BROS ft>
,v Is the BEST? -
m
From snack to a complete meal...
At any time of the day or night. .,
Swiss-French cuisinaj,
CAB'*' \
UN SUI
:...J ** Vu*
kRKINO *""(; ,;*
23rd Street and Collins Avenue Miami Beach, Florida JE 2-5900


Peg 14-B
+Jmist ThrH&r
Friday, March 30. 1962
Max Orovitz
Will Chair
Abess Dinner
'lax OmkU Miar-.i .
ist and civic leader, has I
r. amed toastirastr-r for the Apr 7
mon:al dinner boa
;. Abeaa to be pre<<
nean Jewish Committee and
Defamati :ue. agencies
- -.r*. j. ,r> Defense Appeal, at
sntainebleau hotel.
Dm owner, '.resr.ze-i to honor
ss "for his mmunity
ice and for hi- continued d
jn to the cause of human
m "warmly re-
ad Uw community, ac-
-!>n2 to David Fleemai
ilani AJ<
Rath, chairman of the board
tnuteai
Dere Schary, not*d film pro-
ducer and playwright, will be
principal :paker at the dlanar.
Schary pioneered the use e'
:cmmercil film as a means to
'-3ht prejudice and win under-
randir-j among people of many
races and religions.
The dinner is being coo;
Maurice Glinert, AJC national
asurer. and Henry- E. Schullz.
AOL national chairman, both of
v.hom maintain Greater Miami
residences.
Leo Robinson has been named
dinner treasurer for the event,
which is being held with the ap-
proval of the Greater Miami Jew-
Federation, many of whose
leaders will be present. Proceeds
from the S50-per-person dinner ill
go to further the efforts of JDA's
constituent agencies for safeguard-
ing democratic rights and combat-
ing bigotry and discrimination.
Cuban Jews Form Organization Here
To hclirde Edocathmri and Cultural AK
MAX csovnz
Beach High Band
Represents Fla.
The Miami Beach High School
chosen from statewide en-
r.y the Florida State Society
of Washington, D C will appear as
r official Florida Slate band at
'h ,~iinual cherry blossom fes-
I in Washington.
Funds i finance the band's trip
e been rjised by the Band
I lb -e member- are
I rents oi banl students. Officers
i i Mr, ami .Mrs. Edward .1
nts; Mr and
[r .. laby, -" retarii
Mrs. Harrj Holtzman, tn
ai -l new ly elected this j
and Mrs, I; Applebaum, vice
lents
40 | irla of the
I 111 leave for Washington by
ami return Sunday

of the ba i
captain, I.'onald Gabj
nl cOndUi ti r, S'ephan Sche
Alexander Pollack.
.m major. Steve Couf; librarian.
.' .na Collette; attendance secre-
tary, Roberta Shulman; quarter-
er, Bob HoPzman; and unt-
il officer, Ian Belson.
Camp Program
Set for Summer
I Emanu-El ha- an-
nnuaced that it will conduct a sum-
mer day camp program for the
filth consecutive year.
A- in the past, the camp will be
under the personal guidance of Dr.
Irving Lenrman. spiritual leader of
the congregation, and under the
oirection of Milton Feinstein.
American history teacher and head
football coach at Miami Beach
Senior High School, who has been
the camp's director since its in-
ception.
Using the Temple's North Branch
a- headquarters, the synagogue-
centered camp emphasizes pro-
cramming in Jewish culture and
spiritual values. There is a weekly
Sabbath service each Friday aiter-
noon. Dramatics, singing and danc-
ing programs are based on Jewish
content, and all activities are de-
I to further each camper's
Jewish education on a formal and
informal basis.
The camp also offers a swimming
program by a certified water-front
i Xpert. Other outdoor and indoor
sports round out the program.
Each week, all ol -he youngsters
..ill be token on a field trip.
An or
tural a
ssistanci a Jews in

Suite 602 of
'he- : -
Cuban H f Mi-
ami is

ich to car:;, forward i:s man>
longr ins
"
y because i

tati
J
A prime ccnsiderst:on will be
establishment of welfare assist-
ance for these in need, as well as
providirg rei'jlcjs services and
an emplsyment bureau for mem-
bers.
Further plans cai: for familiar-
iz : h the law -
and the State of
Florida, a-- well as giving them in-
formation on international aftair>.
!: storation of social activities
afiong Cuban Jews in Miami will
be stimulated by establishing con-
tacts with fraternal and religious
groups m the area, cooperating
with local activities directed to the
state of Israel, and establishing re-
lations with Jewish groups in Latin
America
Further services will include dis-
count centers, and medical and den-
tal care.
Officers of the group art En-
rique Kalut, president; Dr. En-
rique E'ber, James S. Knopfce,
jacrbo Caridi, and Oscar Netter,
vice presidents; Alberto Behar
ara* Joseph Sobie, treasurers;
Eira Menda and Max Garaii, sec-
retaries- Dr. Bernardo Benes and
A- io Kiepach, corresponding sec-
retaries; Oscar A. White, legal
secretary; Dr. Felix H. Reyler
and Julio D'Gabrtel, directors.
In charge of religious actn
are Andres Dworin and Salomon
il activities, Joseph
Juaii Maler. Abraham Za-
,r.d Alfredo Zacrotsky;
All rto Weiss; women -
activities, Raquel Gershkovieh:
youth groups, Natan Kaufman; and
professional groups. Leonardo
l.owmger.
WIDOW DESIRES
ROOM AND BOARD
Congenial Home with Understanding
OX 1-4242
FOR LEASE-900 ACRES
IN PALM BEACH COUNTY
Ramie, Sugar Raising, Grating.
Large or small tracts. No Rocds.
Deep muck. S6 per acre per year.
FR 3 3013
Herbert E. Scher Chapel to be Dedicated
In Ceremonies at Beth David Sunday
RENT A 4 Ul
from $2.50 per day
ABOTT MOTORS, Inc.
1451 W. FLAGLER ST.
Phone FR 3-4765
A-l EMPLOYMENT
DOMESTIC HKP
DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 94401
I the Herbert E
i of Beih
regal ill tal place
v 1959.

II
. five ten
rominent in
gog progi .....- back
. 1920's
Dunnu his in office as
-.-r.t. the ma:n sanctuary was
completed, am r the new
addition formulated
Mr. Scher worked closely with
the S J. Spector family in planning
for the addition which was com-
pleted only last year.
In addition to his activities at
Beth David. Mr. Scher was one of
the organizers of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation, and served
en its executive board and board
o' governors. He also helped organ-
ic aft. Smai Hospital, and served
a> a trustee from its beginning.
He was vice president and treas-
urer of ihe Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service, and was chairman
Of "he budget committee of that
organization at the time of his
death.
Mr. Scher also took an active
part in the affairs of the J< sh
tioni 1 Workshop, for which he
at subsequently cited by |
dent Eisenhower's National
ploj :' lland.i
" ee.
Vronovitz, past pre
is chairman of the
arrangements committee tor the
i 'iication.
Home Life Week
At Barry College
Skills of the homemaker and lee
lures on nutrition and furniture
will be featured during the Home
and Family Life Week on Sunday
through next Saturday, sponsored
by the Home Economics Depart-
ment at Barry College.
Miss Marion K.itchnik, dietition
at Mt. Smai Hospital, will discuss
the principles of nutrition Wednes-
day, at 4 p.m.. in Room 120. On
Thursday. 4 p.m.. same room. Miss
Olga Fcinman, vice president of
Modernage Furniture, and Mrs.
Beatrice Sandier, fashion coordina-
tor, will explain considerations in
buying furniture.
Horse Owners
Eye Victory Here
A victory in Saturday's Siou.ooo
Fioi am Park
ularly satisfying
bn W.
s oi be D
Black Be
hich is scl to i in j
i i threi yi
i (
The Galbreaths over a long per-
il I i.i years have been among rac-
ing porters. They
Ii,.-. nillions in racing
k. and while they
Ii.'.' I much success, they
have yel to come up with an out-
ling threi ear-old,
In Black Beard they may have
He i a son of Swaps, one of
I hi great runner: ol recent years,
which now stands at stud at the
Galbreath farm in Kentucky.
' i>\ Gulfstream during
brilliant career, and in a mile
: event, ei
tablished what was then a world's
record foi the distance with a
1:39 and 3 5 clocking.
Steering committee of Tempie Ner Tamid jour-
nal are seated (left to right) Mesdames Irving
Egel, Henrietta Fine, Jack Gerson, chairman,
Murray Shaw, president, Ann Bernstein, Ralph
Mervis, Cariton Blake, Max Raskin, and Sam-
uel Gcmb^rg. Sisterhood is planning a lunch-
eon in April honoring Mrs. Louis Gold, past
president and trustee.
'Ship' Launched
On Miami Bch.
"S S Miami Beach" was launch-
ed at Flamingo Park on Monday
to celebrate the city's 47th birth-
day ami opining of the spring rec-
reation program. Jock Woody is
recreation superintendent.
Mrs. Kenneth Oka. wife of Miami
Beach's mayor, in a traditional
ceremony, aimed a soda bottle at
the bow of the flag-bedecked vessel
as it slid down the ways to no-1
where. I
Made of pipe and old bleacher)
boards of the crew of the city rec-
reation shops, the ship will now be ,
used as another item of construe- j
live playground equipment.
Children's Choir of Temple Beth Shiran, will
participate in Friday night services of the
Temple this week. Members of the choir are
Michelle Rachline, Rochelle Rachline, Debby
Shkoler, Loie Somberg, Helena Rachline,
Rena Magolnick, Steven Brown, Douglas Man-
cteii, Jeffrey Roth, Bernard Barkow, and David
Shkoler. Guest speaker will be Louis Schwartz-
man, executive director of the Bureau of Jew-
ish Education. Spiritual leader is Rabbi Mor-
ris Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb renders the
musical portions of the liturgy.


Friday. March 30. 1962
Jm>lsli f/oridfiar
Page *w-d
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICF
Mrs. Jonas Brotman (center) receives plaque irom Mrs. A. Les-
ter Stepner (left), president of the Mt. Sinai Hospital Garden
Club, for having made her home available as a setting for
the club's recent flower show. Presentation was at a victory
brunch hosted by Mrs. Stepner and Mrs. Hany Moscoe (right),
club vice president, at the home of Mrs. Seymour Rubin.
Home Mortgages Near Top Figure
Home-purchase mortgages re-
(orded in Florida last year num-
( red 189.929 and involved a total
I $1,527,149,000, the Florida State
h amber of Commerce said here.
Both number and amount of
n ui!L':r^cs last year were the Ihird
highest on record, 1959 being top
Oli
11 ii a i* / c ?
HYM/-IM SIEGEL
13 NR Bth I'! No V' ii"
i, died Mar. 24, He came here
' fi om X. \\ York Rnd wa -
rtlred rei tauranl on n< r
i wife, Ruth: I ^ <> ..it-..
ierl Hn i T...... and iln shti r
--. ... re Mai 25 in Gor-
! i mt. ral i lome.
yt-ar. Compared with 1960. last
year's number of mortgages drop-
ped 7 percent and the amount. 6
percent. Nationally, there was a
o percent gain in the dollar volume
of these home purchase mortgages.
"Mortgages included in these
figures are those 'if $20,000 or less
'as reported to the Home Loan
Bi'nk Board) and are secured al-
most entirely by residential prop-
erties, ilthough some small busi-
ness properties are also included."
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLOR DA. IM PROBATE,
No. 55594.A
IN UK i: tale nl
< i r ri > a. r kssi.i 'i !".
Ill ...,.-.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All I i .urn All Pi r.....H Hav-
ing Claim* Demands Against ^iii'
Bstuti :
V. ii ni he'-eb in.i.f ,1 and requir-
ed 1" |i tSelll .i ;i> i lit! 118 ;i Ti-1 de-
manl* which vou ma) have against
the estate ol (1TTO A. IWSSLOF !'
i ii lati of I lade County, Flor-
ida, to ii" Count} Judges of Dade
Count; ii i i the m ime In dupli-
cate .mil nw provided i" Section T:i" it>.
Florida Statutes, In their nffli
Hi" Count >- Courthouse in I lade i 'oun-
ty, I .". Ida, witlil Ix i nlendar
months fri thi nf the ii.>i
pulii ca of, o :!" Name w iil
be ban d
Daii >l itl Mlnm I rlda, thb 23rd
In y of M \
\lc II.I.IE S I' \SSI.I il- F
,- i;>..
ARONOVITZ SH VI'B & SCHER
Al lorni ys < I Exi i tl Ix
n i7 A'ln-ley irull ling
Miami J2, Florida
3 SO, I 6-13-20
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLOR.DA. IN PROBATE.
No. 55561-A
IN" RE: Estate of
THI-'.i IDORE ROI" VN'I'i INAKI
I ii ,-, ., i .
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Ha' -
in:: I'l.iiin- in Demands Attains! Said
Kst.il.
You are l.....I" no! II .1 and requir-
ed to present any i lalms and de-
mands which yon ave against
|nP pstati of THEODORE ROHAN-
TON \KI deceased Int. of Hade Coun-
ty, Klorlda, lo the i 'ount} li"! i
Dade Count' and i Hi the Bame In
dind'cate nnd ;". provided in Section
- ; is, pic H la St itutc n, in thell ol -
ii ., i,c ii,. i ii i 'niirthou c
, u Ithlu six cil-
indnr months from the tlnu ol In
l,ul Rtlon h col or the name
hi i, rred
; H| .\i i. PI rlda, this
M ..-. x I |i.-J
jl i: y |>nsA XT! IN 'KM iAI.AM '
\ Bxi ul r v
:: JO, I G-ia-2ll
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
iln- undersigned, desiring to i
in.sin.>sk under til-- fictitious nami ol
RICHARD R. TENZEL, M.D.. at 111"
N E. I' r i St., No. Miami Beach, in.,
intends lo resistor said nam< with tin-
Clerk of tin- I 'ii .--lit i ... i ol I m.i.
Count'. I "".I Ida.
TENZEL PRnPEKSIONAL-
ASSOCIATION
. _t.i i-'l.i i :ni.l t:.,ru.i-
s '. owner
Levy, Leventhal, Goldsti n & Kraasner
Attoi neys for Applicant
11 m N.E. I65rd St., N. M B
.', 23-30, I 8-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I AW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
lit.- undei si: ned, i.iiv i.. .~ nndei the fictitious nan
l 'I 'i i-i 'i il.i i : ASS'' l ATI > IH't i-
Ci iUR PRINTERS: I V A N II O E
PRINTERS & I.ITIIi UlRAPHBRS in
691 N.E. I2."ith Stri i I, North Miami
Intends to register said names with
the Cleric of the Circuit Court of Dade
('..null. Flol "hi
IVAN M. Ki IENII ISBERli
Role 11 ller
HENRY A K VMP, Attorni y
1221 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, I la, JE l-:'.::M
.; 10, I 6-13-2H
.
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
vJwisfi ITiinrffdffjun
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service al legal
rates .
IP'uil Vl\ 3-1605
for messenger service
rV#\*J3M
LEGAL NOTICE
MRS. BERTHA EPSTEIN
( .!" West ave died Mar. 21
- came here 10 years ago from
lelphla. Sni vl\ Ing lire Ihrei
Including Martin; three daus/h-
Mra. s.li.in T.iiin. ni num. Mr.-..
r.uth Shlndler and M s Pay Qold-
.'..ii. nnd 15 grandchildren. Services
Mar. 23 in Riverside Memorial
.;>!. N..I mandy Isle.
ISAAC FRANK
;. ..f ".! I', n-na-na dr Hlalt ah, '-'
Mai 21. H" came here 17 years ago
New London, Conn., and was
vner of a cutlery company. Sur-
viving are his wife. Yetta; four
I ters, Mrs. Anna Busby, Mrs.
" lared I'..!.... Mi-s Doris l iimii and
M -. Helen Goldstein; three brother!
Including Martin and Ahe: :i slater
..".1 five grandchildren. Services were
m.i ."', in Gordon Funeral Home.
LOUIS SILVERMAN
. of 1240 N'H 180th St., died Mar.
. in Atlanta. He came i"i" "i-^iit
- ago from New York ami was
ihi Hoi-Ida representative ni the Cats
lint Rubber Co. 11" was n member
the North Miami Beach Knlghta "f
Surviving are his if",
- i ii daughter, Mrs. Harriet
Brandt; a son, Dr Gilbert Sllvernian
and five giandchildren Service* wen
Mar. :':i in Beyer Funeral Home,
NORMAN H. 8EIL
of 7733 SW 33rd tor., died M
Hi ....... h i. I; \. rs ago fioni
.ii ,i ml w .is mi Industi lal elec
iali in.ni. il" wag .i vi :!.ni
"I tin- Korean War: .i member of the
bwisli Win- Veterans, the Knlghta "'
- and iln- Coral Wit. Jew sh
S n \ i\ i"" are ii s i>at nt
rid Mrs. Martin Bell: his wife,
;. I i oth< i. I..'- is. Set
ivere Mar. J. in Gordon Puneral
Home.
MRS. SOPHIE ASKOWITZ
..... 1323 Euclid ave 11.- I Mar 23
ni" here !." years as" from i1"-
.11. Surviving are in sons, Lewis
nnd Albert; two daughters, Mrs Rosa
Towlen and Mrs. EBvaiine LIpchlnsK},
"l"liii i. .ii and l^ rent '
hitdren Sei vi i Vlai 26 In
.1. Mi im..ri il i li..|.. I. Alton rd
MRS. ELIZABETH RE1CII30N
". in 371 NE 180th dr.. .1 ed Mar. 23.
She ame here 12 s
n Surviving are .i dnughter,
Mrs. Bus,- Pi li-.niil:. r ft I -
r i i ndchlldren and .i gres i I
. bil.i Services Wei's Mat -i> In Beyer
Puneral Home.
LEGAL NOTICE
.N THE COUNTY JUDGF'5 COURT '
IN AND FOP. DAD= rOIJNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 5M74-C
IN RE: Estate "i
HENRY A I.ASK. i.
I i. c, ii^.-.!.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate;
A".. 11 are hereby notified and r<
ed to in. nt uni lalms and i
manda which you ma} havi
the -till" of HENRY A I VSKt i
. ;i-. .I late of I lade Count] Floi i Ii .
to tin County Judges "f Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.16, Klo Idi
Statutes, in their offices ;n the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade County, Fiot
Ida, within six calendar .....nths from I
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
liated at Miami, Florida, this 13th
day "f March, A.D. 1962.
OSCAR L. I.ASK'i i
As Executor
TALIANOl F, WALLER ci L1TMAN
Attorne} s (. r Executor
120 Lincoln ltd.. Miami Beni h, Fla.
: 10, i
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLOR DA. IN PROBATE.
No. 55347-B
IN RE Hstati
. i his A. SAMI 'ELS,
It, cased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To Ml Creditors and \n r.-r .."- ''
Ing CldTms or Demands Agalnal s'.ii.l
You in" hereby notified and requtr-
, ,i |,i |n... i ni> i.iims and di -
mands which may have against
:li, estate of I.'H'IS A. SAMI'El.S
. aseil late of I lade County, P lor-
Ida, '" ih" County Judges of Dadi
. mil. and ill.- il"- f .ni" In dupli-
cate .mil us provided in Section 733 Is,
.'.. statutes, In their offices in
the C.....It}' ("..lull"."- III I'.i.l"
Cntintv, Florida, within six calendar
ni .nths from tin- time of tl"- first
i.li. .iiii.n hereof, or ih" same will
111 li:nr"il.
I i it, ,i ri \i mil, Florida, this _';:i-il
daj of March, A D 196 '
RI is M.I VI W, S < Mll'.I.S
v- Executrix
ABE SCHt INFELD
-. for Exi
In Lincoln Rd Miami \'-- '<. I la.
:'. 30, -I 8-13-20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C.RCUIT OF
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADL
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 62C 3098
JOSEPH C STt IKES,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANN .1. STt IKES,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
Tl i ANN I s l'i IKES
267 Lakeview Vvi
i 'amhrldgi M
You, ii i I" "1" noi Ii -i I hat .' Bill
of Complaint i"i i >i* oi ce hs
filed ag Insl < i i and lou a
.i ,n. .i to si rve .........f >
ver i t to the Hill "om
plain) on il" I 'lalnl ffs n I urn. ; .
Nll'IMA V S I' M .1.1 IT I I"
H da Miai 11a and ri tin m i-
ini.l Answer oi Pli i In tit
of the Clerk of i !" Clrr It Co I
,,r before !!" 30th da I of Iprll, I9i 2.
|| .,.11 lull In ii.. i .. .i id n
i:i -iH v. ill be taki n aga lust j ".i f. ir
he n Ii"1' den andi .1 in i !" Bill of
i 'onipliifnt.
T..... ill be publishi d "i1 i
each week for four consecutive weeks
il THE IKWI H I- Li IRI1 HAN.
\\|i ORDERED .ii M
:. this 22nd da} of March, A.I).
1902.
E R LB \THERMAN, C
circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
seal) B} K. M. i.V.man.
I lenuty Clei k
:: :n>, I fi-i::-L'n
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage n
business under Hi" fictitious name of
FI'N i- mi: bkstai bant at i .-.
T'mIi Kit'eel Causeway, North Bay
Vil age, l in.. Intends to registi
nun with the Clerk of tin fir
i "ottrl of l lade i 'nunty, Fli rlda.
DAVID KLKIMAN. INC
n Fla. i 'in :.
1 '.i i.l K N man, I 'resident
i .i.i Klclmnn. Secrctai
ARtlXllVITZ. SILVER & SCHE
Ai ;..i ii. ys !'-. Applicant
. n-l. v Bull tin.-
:: 10 Cti-13 -"
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN TPOBATE
No. 5:>327-C
IN RE Esl......i
MAl'RICl ill BRENNER
! .. ...
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persm ll.iv.
i. a 'lalms oi l i in ds \- im Said
' i tit
v.. mi i each of \ ..ii are I
I i.inl required to pi esent an>
claim .ni demnndi wiiich
ii her "t" you, nia} liii t e ag lust thi
of \l ll'RICE II BRENNER
,1 late "f I'A I >E Count I
Ida, In '!" Honorable County Judges
"f I lade Count} and t iI Hi......
their offlci .- in the I' Hint} i
housi in I ii i. Colt i Flol .. lth-
iti six < ileni in months from tl"- date
first publication h.....I s.ii'i
claims ni "! lands t" contain the
address '* ihe claimant un.l i.>
... > a rn i.i ii nd |iri si nt ed as a fori -
said, "i same u ;ll he barred.
Dated March 21, A.D. 1962
REBECC \ L. BRENNER
As I :.. iilrfx of thi I ..- Will an I i
Ti -I imi ill of Ma ell Bret
Deceased.
DANIEL NEAI. HELLER
RIO Ainslei Rulldlng
Miami 32, l- im Ida
An..! ii,-v for Executrix
: 23-30, 1,6-13
NOTICE BY PUBi.'CAT.CN
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA N AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 62C 290b
VIOL \ Bl'B,
Plaintiff,
\ -
OSCAR Bl'B,
1 '..;. ml.i '
SU'T FOR DIVORCE
Tl I: ISCAR Bl'B
\\ j Hill Apartment's, Apt. 13E
I'm Ml. Win m Placi
Newai li. New Jersey
You, OSCAR Bl'B, are hereby i">-
iiii..ii that ii Bill of Complaint f"i Dl-
i..... has in "ii filed agalnal you, and
you ni ........'! i" sen a cop} "f
your Answ.r or Pleading to the BUI
plaint "ii th" Plaintiff's attor-
ney. ANOELO A. ALL 100 Alnsley
Building, Miami ::J. I ioi Ida, and file
the original Answer ..i Pleading in
the office ni' the Clerk of the On ult
i ,,uii .. ... before the 23rd iim of
1962. If you fall ." Juda -
in. m h; ilermilt will be taken against
v, i for i I. relief in munded In the
;:i : ,,t i 'on |i a nt.
This ii- shall i ublishi once
i mil ei f.n i" ii c !-". utlve u^. ks
In THE .. i :WI8H FLi 11*11 'IAN.
DUNE L\|i iiRDERED al Miami,
i.....f Ml h, A 11,
E I! I.i: VTHERMAN, Clerk,
It Court, l'i"i" i' mnt}, Flo
isi .i.i 11} HELEN KKS.-I.KI:
I ii [iut s Clerk
VNdELl A ALI
'lalntlff
ihi \ : Building
HI mi j. Klorlda
: 6-13
MRS. MATILDA SILVERMAN
il, of 7S21 Abbott ave. died Mar. :'".
she clime h, i,. IS \ers ago from
Ncwiu-k, n i mi.i wne n member ol
the Hotel Qreetera Assn. Burvivlng
is one son. Servloei w. re in Newark
with Biv.rshii. Memorial Chapel, Al-
ton ni in charge local!)
MRS IRMA WERTHEIM
I, "f 7;m Pennsylvania ave., died
Mar, L'i. sh.. came her. 12 igo
from New York. Surviving la her
hii-tiand Carl. Services were Mar.
26 in Riverside Memorial Chapel, Al-
t.....d.
BENJAMIN J. ZINO
63. or ibii., Daytonla rd., Minn Beach,
die il.Mnr. l'o He came here 10 years
ago i'i. .in Chicago and was ;i retired
i".st office employee, ii. was b vet-
'ja..... \v. i,i w:,, ii, at
I Temple Iimanu-El, he >'
Society and the Amarinan i a life member of the Miami Beach
Opera Society. Surviving are three
sisters and .i brother. Services were
Mar. la In Riverside Memorial <"ha-
I'cl. NOI nian.lv Isle.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVKN Hint
the llll.lel simiell, ilesirillii In engilge ill
business under the fictitious name ol
tola APARTMENTS at I6t>0 Penn-
sylvania Avenue, Miami B.ach. Flor-
ida, intend to reglater said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv, Florida.
ARON SNI.\n
COLA SN'l.M"
HAROLD SHAPIRO
Attorne) s for
Aron Snlad A Pola Snlad
!/80, 1/6-18-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
MOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
11,, mdi .in d "" Irlng i" en
1 In nder I !" flcl n lous ".. me i I
A HEM i. m ni 1180 Palm Avenue,
m.i..i. Mn. intend to reglater said
:i.iiin with the Clerk "f the Circuit
Court ni 11 nie Counts. Fl i Ida.
CHARLES l-.M.MAN
INEZ AIM vn
j, :;u. i t-U-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY HIVEN that
in". > .. i .....Irlns to engi
... i rict tlous name of
\l \\ s CLEANERS at 2922
i 'oral ffaj. Mil ml, l- lot Ida Intend to
i .mi nami with l he i '! rk of
i ..i,i Court of I lade i'
Kl li.l.i.
RKN.IA MIN BEl "K
TllnM VS i BRANDYS
I i'. iNi IVITS5, SIL\ I :R .v SCHER
... leu n t s
itiiT All
Miami I
I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
\. iTIi ': is HEREBY ilVEN that
Ii ii. d, ..." Irina '< ngagi In
!. ii Iness ui ne n'
AI.S'i RVE AIM IITMENTS al 6-til 8th
-.. i. \' ml Bi ai Ii. I "1 rlda
i ,! n.iii u i'h il"- i "i. k
Court il l 'a ii Conn y,
SAMl'EL Y \.V' IW1TZ
MINNIE YANt i\\ ITZ
tt & MANNHI .IE11
Vpii '.....in-
. '
MOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE C'P.CU\' COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CiRCUIT OF
OF FLORIDA IN AND TOR DM5E
COUNT" I-' <-" "VNCERY.
No. 62C 3311
DOROTHY MAY 1 I R.N EH,
Plaintiff,
ROBERT Wll SON TI'RNBR,
Defendant,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ROBERT U ll.Sn.N TI'RNER
. ii Niitiiiii.il Publishing Co.
Washington. D.C.
You. ROBERT WILSON TURNER,
are nereb) notified that a Bill of
Complaint for Divorce has been filed
against you, and you are required i"
serve a cop) ol your Answer or Plead-
ing in the Bill ni Complaint on the
Plaintiff's attorney, CHARLES M.
KELLY, 1328 E. Itli Ave.. Hlaleah,
Florida, and file the oiisinai Answer
or Pleading in !h. office of tl" Clerk
of the i 'ii ""ii '..ui i mi or before the
80th dm ..f April, 1962. if you fall i"
lo so, judgment b) default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
man led in ih" BUI ni' t'omplaint.
Tins until.- shall be published once
, ich week i" four consecutive weeks
in i in: JEWISH FI.OR1DIAN,
DONE AND ORDERED .it Miami,
Florida, this 87th day of March A.D.
IM2,
K B LKATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
li> : K. M. I.V.M \N.
1 teputy i 'lei k
.., i/6-13-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to encage In
business uniie: tl" fictitious name of
REMARK iixsis RESTACRANT at
nil" S.W, I",in A>. i.ii. Miami In-
tends t.. register said name with the
i i, ik .' il" Oil ult "ii i "i Dude
i 'mint *. Florida .
tSEl Utl'.E P. KRAMER
Sole i\> mi
:: 23-3H, 1
IN THE C RCl'IT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 62C 3008
SAI HE I.AI'II il >.
Plaintiff,
OKI IRI SE LAPIDI S. I lADE 1- El -
i:i:.M. SAV INllS A N I I.i IAN
ASSl ii 'I VTH IN >F Ml VMI,
tiREATER MIAMI FEDERAL
s VVINi IS AND Ll>AN ASSl iCIA-
Tll IN. .mil AMERIi "AN S.W IM ;S
AND I.i IAN .'.SSI ii 'IATION,
i '. i ';..ins.
NOTICE IV PUBLICATION
TO DEFEND
You. flEi iRiiE i. v l'i I il'.-. in here-
Ii; ni ii fled l hat .i "omplalni for I Us
c..\. y, : I-I ire Mi : tgage i
s -11 i. : .....
Trust and
.... been I 111 .1 aga Insl -.....
I to s .....
nswei in l". ading lo tl
on the Plaintiffs atti rne}. MILTI >N
ARTHI i: FRIED, SI I \ Build-
ing, Miami 32, Florida, and I
. ling In il"
,,ri,,., ni hi 'li h "i h. 'ii nil
Court mi "i i" fore 11" 1 Ird day of
April, 1962 If you fall i" do s".
judgment bj default will be taken
against >.....'or i he 11 liel demandi !
in the I "omplaint.
This notice shall be published onee
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED al Miami,
Florida, this 21st day of March, A.D.
1962.
E, B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
Circuit Court, lin.le Counlyi Florida
(seal) By: HELEN KEKSLER
Deput) Clerk
MILTON ARTHUR FRIED
sin Alnsle) Building
Miami ::.'. Florida
Attorney for plaintiff
10, i 1-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engagfi in
business under the fictitious name of
11 \ s ASSOCIATES ni 7680 Blscayne
Boulevard, Miami, Florida intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
ih. Circuit Court "f Dade County,
i-1..i ida.
NORMAN .1. DAVIDSON
WILLIAM S1EOEL
MARTIN FINE
Atioi ne) Im Applicants
i t-18
NOTICE TO DEFEND or
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 62C 2973
ELI 'KB I5EIIRGE illl-'l-'.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ELIZABETH Ht'rF,
I ii fl n.lalit.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
Tl l: ELIZABETH Hl'Fr
Apt. 120; :':i4 W. Adams Blvd.
Los Angeles, California
You, ELIZABETH Hl'Fr. are here-
by notified that ,i Bill of Complaint
for Divorce lias been filed against
you. .ni.I you an required to serve
a cop) oi your aiis.mi or Pleading to
the li.H "i Complaint on t iw Plaint-
iff's Attorney, Sanford M. Bwerdlln,
-in Seybold Building, Miami :!:'. Flor-
ida and t.i" the original Answer or
Ph adlng In the office "i tin clerk .if
Hi, in. nit I'liin t on "i before the
23rd da) of April, 1982. n you fall t"
.in s... judgment by default will he
taken against you foi the relief de-
manded in the Bill Ol i".....plaint
This notice siiall be published onoe
each we.k for Tour consecutive weeks
in TDK JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, H>l- 20th da) "l March A.I).
1962.
i: B. LKATHKRM \N, Cl< rk.
Circuit i ''.nt, I lade C.....it) Florida
11} : HE1 EN KESSLER
I ii put) i "lerk
3 : 1-30, I 6-18
-'<"
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 5-1786
in RE Estate of
IA TANNER
i i easi ii.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To .Ml i 'reditoi a and All Pel so is I l.iv -
- ..! Demand? Against Said
:: late:
... not li li .1 .im! i 'i ilr-
,',l in |^i .ii, i n> 'n in- and di mands
u In. h i "ii ma) i nsl the i s-
BEN'IA T \NNEH leci .-. .1
loseph County, I lorlda, to
>h. Count) Judges oi County,
. i,.l tlie tl" same i dupltcati .i'"1 as
pros i.i,,i In s. lion ". Florida
Statutes, in Ihi i ni ei In the Coun-
> Courtliousi in l 'a le Count). Flor-
ida, within six calendar months from
the I "i in. rust publication hero-
of, >r t ii. sa me will '. barred.
Dated al Miami, Florida, this nh
da) "f Februar), A.D, I9C2.
BERNARD i IPPBRMAN
As Administrator
MILTON A. FRIEDMAN s
Attorne) for Estate of Oenla Tanner
nil Amsli s Building
Mi,.mi :'. l-Ti.ri.lii
3 13-80, i b-13
100 COPIES-$2
(PHOTO OFFSET)
ANY DOCUMENT
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WHILE YOU WAIT!
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Page 16-B
* Jewish ncrM/ar
Friday, March 30, 1962
UNDER THE JTBICT AND CONSTANT IOCAI RABB INICAl SUPIKVISION Of RABBI TIBOR H. SURN
Quantity
Rights
Reserved
19th DAY
APRIL
WE SEll
U.S. CHOICE
and U.S. PRIME
MEATS ONLY
15th DAY
NISAN
TO INSURE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY OF THE FINEST IN KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY FOR THE COMING
PASSOVER, OUR STORES WILL BE KOSHER L'PESACH THE 25TH OF MARCH.
May we suggest that your Holiday shopping be done early ... to insure faster service and the maximum in
savings! You may be sure we carry only the finest Kosher Meats and Poultry! YOU MUST BE SATISFIED OR
YOUR MONEY BACK.
fiDS? 1^3 SPECIALS
fe
*
1 A>
Li
/
GENUINE WHITE ROCK
KOSHER MADE
PAN READY
CAPONS
PULLETS
OR
YEARLINGS
The Finest Fresh Killed Kosher Chickens
Delivered to Our Markets 5 Times Daily!
FAMOUS ARBOR ACRES
MASTERS, BROILERS
OR SPRINGERS
KOSHER-BEST OR
LADY ESTHER
TURKEYS
DUCKS
OR ROCK
CORNISHHENS
NOW SIX KOSHER MEAT STORES TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER
2091 CORAL WAY I CORAL WAY I 163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER
AT S.W. 87th AVE.
MIAMI Westchester Shopping PUi, NO. MIAMI BEACH
2662 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
IN HOLLYWOOD
19th ST. at ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE
AT MIAMI BEACH
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR


B2
JWB Convention Opens Wednesday
Jewish FloridiaXl Ambassador Klutznick Will
Address Banquet Session;
24 Workshops Scheduled
Miami. Florida. Friday. March 30. 1962
Section C
LOUIS STERN
. critical committee
SOIOMON LITT
. president's report
4MB4SSA00R KLUTZNICK
. guest speaker
FROM THE DAYS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
President Kennedy Offers Greetings
the eve of the national con-
tion here. President John F.
nedy declared in a statement
i m the White House that "it is
arteriing to have the as . ee" that 'young people in urn-
i :m will be linked to home and
-ion through the essential ac-
ties and programs of such
ncies as the National Jewish
Ifare Board."
is statement will be upper-
st in the minds of the dele-
gates to JWB'l national biennial
vention in Miami Beach on
r. 4 to 8.
JWB's remobilization of re-
tirees and manpower to meet
i Iditional demands for religious
and welfare services to Jewish
i ilitary personnel and their de-
.ndents resulting from the build-
I the nations Armed Forces
- particularly important." Mr.
i nnedy said.
During the convention, the dele-
let will take steps to speed up
( current drive for additional
ish military chaplains and to
expand JWB Armed Services
mmittes at all points where the
mated military installations
have brought increased numbers
Jewish military personnel.
The quota for Jewish chaplains
DOW 90. and it has to be met by
PRESIDENT KENNEDY
. historic view
June. 1962. There are 75 Jewish
chaplains on active duty, and IS
more are needed immediately, to-
gether with an additional 32 to
replace those who will complete
their tours of duty before June 1.
Statement follows: addressed
to Solomon Litt. president of
JWB.
"One hundred years ago. Presi-
dent Lincoln signed into law a
bill permitting any regularly-or-
dained minister of any religious
denomination to serve as a mili-
tary chaplain. This was one ol
(he landmarks in the road to
complete religious equality.
"In the ensuing centry. nearly
7O0 rabbie have served in our
country's uniform in w a r and
I. ace, at home and abroad, with
great devotion, dedication and
valor. Wherever our forces have
been summoned to fight, the Jew-
ish chaplains were at their side.
And they are there today, at
every outpost of freedom in the
struggle to keep the world free.
"It is most appropriate that the
year-long observance of the 100th
anniversary of the Act that led to
the appointment of the first Jew-
ish military chaplain should be-
j:in at the national convention Ol
the National Jewish Welfare
Board. Since 1917. your organi-
zation has played a unique and
important role in every war as
the agency which our Govern-
ment has accredited for provid-
ing religious, morale and welfare
services to Jewish military per-
sonnel. As I wrote your presi-
dent in August. 1961. it is hearten-
ing to have the assurance that
young people in uniform arc being
linked to home and religion. This
work, together with the equally
significant efforts of your affili-
ated Jewish Community Centers
and YM-YWHAs. contributes ma-
terially to the national health,
welfare and morale. It is a great
pleasure to pay tribute to the Jew-
ish chaplaincy on this centennial
year and to wish your convention
all success in its deliberations
and actions on far-reaching spiri-
tual, cultural and welfare issues."
Representatives oi communities
throughout the U.S. and some
from oversei S will converge on
Miami Beach Wednesday. Apr 4.
for the 1962 national biennial eon
vention of the National ^Jewish
Welfare Board at the Deauville
hotel. The convention will con-
tinue through Sunday. Apr. 8
Ambassador Philip M. Klutz-
nick, member of the permanent
U.S. delegation to the United Na-
tions and the United States rep-
resentative on the UN Economic
and Social Council (ECOSOC'.
will address the Saturday night
convention banquet on Apr. 7. On
that occasion, the 1962 Frank L.
Weil Awards will be presented,
and JWB president. Solomon Litt,
will deliver the President's Re-
port.
American Jewry will he watch-
ing JWB's convention, the first to
be held in the South, with partic-
ular interest this year, with JWB
officials declaring it to be one ol
the most important in the organi-
zation's history. A year-long, in-
tensive study of JWB's organiza-
tional structure, program and
community relationships has been
conducted by a committee, and
action on the lindings and recom-
mendations of the committee will
be taken at the convention.
Chairman of the committee is
Louis Stern, South Orange. N.J..
a national vice president of the
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds (CJFWF) and
also of JWB. who will present
the results of the study at a din-
ner meeting on Thursday. Apr. 6.
If the recommendations are
adopted, there will be a more
unified and specialized approach
by JWB in serving the social, cul-
tural, recreational and informal
educational needs of the Jewish
community, and the organization-
al structure will be streamlined,"
JWB officials note.
The 100th anniversary of the
nation's Jewish military chap-
laincy will be marked at the con-
vention's opening session Wednes-
day evening. Apr 4. Maj. Gen.
Frank A. Tobey, Chief of Chap-
lains. L'.S. Army, and chairman
of the Armed Forces Chaplaincy
Board, and Dr. Bertram W. Korn.
noted authority on Jewish partici-
pation in the Civil War and rabbi.
Reform Congregation Keneseth
Israel. Philadelphia, will address
the session. JWB's Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy recruits,
gives ecclesiastical endorsement
to and serves Jewish chaplains
in the military.
A Sabbath service, similar to
those conducted for Jewish ser-
Continued on Page 2-C
BARNUT I. SHUR
. convention chairman
P.. .!> ",T
SANFORD SOtENDER
. executive vice president
PROf. KORN
. noted historian
A VAST NETWORK Of COMMUNITY CtNTtRS
JWB's Complex Program Today
A visit to the bedside ol a disabled veteran is a traditional
"mitzvah" for the Jewish chaplain. Alone, or accompanied
by a JWB volunteer committee, the Jewish chaplain is always
a welcome visitor. He may bring gilts, personal necessities
oi the warmth of his friendship, but he always leaves the
knowledge that a veteran's sacrifice lor his country has not
been loi gotten.
The National Jewish Welfare Board, which
most people know as JWB. is the
National Assn. of YM and YWHAs and
Jewish Community Centers.
Government authorized agency for meet-
ing the religious, morale and welfare needs
of Jewish personnel in the U.S. Armed
Forces and veterans hospitals and their
dependents. In addition, as a member
agency of I'.S.O it helps serve members
of all faiths.
Sponsor of the Jewish Book Council of
America, the National Jewish Music Coun-
cil and the Jewish Center Lecture Bureau.
all three of which are dedicated to the
development of a vibrant Jewish culture in
America.
Affiliated with JWB are 447 YM anud YWHAs.
Jewish Community Centers, their branches,
camps r.nd other agencies. These JCCs and Ys,
staffed by 1,600 professional workers, serve groups
Of people of all ages and both sexes in the areas
of culture informal education, health and recre-
ation. They serve nearly 700.000 of their own
members and others in the community. Their
membership is open to all Orthodox. Conserva-
tive. Reform and others Among their major
objectives are the development of character and
Continued on Page 5-C


Page 2-C
*J&*isti fhrHimr,
Friday, March 30, 1962

IfON KAPLAN
Greater Miami chairman
MRS. MILTON SIKKIN
. arrangements
Nat'l. Leaders
In Greetings
To Delegates
Leon Kaplan, chairman of the
f.reater Miami JWB convention
committee, issued greetings to the
arriving delegates here on the
eve of the convention. Speaking
jn the name of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Community Center,
and the Jewish community here,
be declared:
"It is a great pleasure to wel-
come the 1962 biennial national
I vention ol JWB to Greater Mi-
This is the first time JWB
held a national convention in
the South, and we are proud to
V>sts to this great organiza-
JWB has ;i distinguished and
ihonci rd of service to
American Jewry, and the Greater
Miami Jewish community is hap-
: hat the leaders of Jewish
Community Center and Armed
ices work from all corners
country arc coming here to
: mine the future of their pro-
e are confident that in Great-
liami the delegates will find
the inspiration, the atmosphere
and the hospitality they need to
make this the best JWB conven-
tion of all time."
* *
Said Solomon Litt. president of
the National Jewish Welfare
Board:
"No national convention of JWB
since 1948. when we adopted the
now historic Janowsky report, will
be mere important in the deci-
sions it faces and the actions it
v ill have to take than the 1962
Biennial in Miami Beach.
"Every Jewish community and
thousands of Jewish families will
be affected by our decisions on
how lo cope with the vastly in-
emands for service to
Continued on Page 3-C
A PROGRAM FOR BETTERMENT
JWB Commitments:
Outgrowth of Busy
History Since 1917
When the National Jewish Welfare Board's 1962 national
bifi'nial convention opens at the Deauville hotel on Apr. 4. it will
be the first time that the organization has convened anywhere in
the South. JWB has four broad commitments:
To meet the religious, welfare and morale needs of Jewish"
personnel and their families in the United States Armed
Forces and in V'A hospitals.
To serve as the National Association of Jewish Community
Centers and YM-YWHAs.
To contribute to the enrichment of Jewish cultural life in
the United States.
To aid in the development of Jewish Community Centers in
the free world as a means of strengthening the forces ot
Jewish survival.
These commitments are an outgrowth of the organization's
history. JWB was founded in 1917 by the American Jewish com-
munity at the express request of the then Secretaries of War and
Navy to meet the World War I religious and welfare needs of Jews
in the American Armed Forces. It was. and is. recognized by the
I'n-ted States Government and its military establishment as the
single, united representative agency of the Jewish community
for discharging this responsibility, in war and in peace, at home
and abroad.
JWB continued to fulfill this obligation between the two wars.
During World War II. it was the channel through which American
Jewry served Jewish military personnel. As a founder and mem-
ber of the United Service Organization (L'SO). of which it is still
a member, JWB participated in the services of that agency. JWB
contracted but did not lismantle its service structure after World
War II. When the cold war began and later, when fighting broke
out in Korea, JWB's standby machinery was activated as the Jew-
ish community again mobilized under JWB leadership. As a re-
sult of the new military buildup in 1961, JWB took the additional
steps required to meet this situation.
Some Leading Founders
In 1921, JWB had also become the National Association of Jew-
ish Community Centers and YM-YWHAs when it merged with the
National Council of Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Associa-
tions. This agency, the first permanent national organization of
Centers and Ys, had been formed in 1913 by such eminent leaders
of American Jewry as Jacob H. Schiff, Felix M. Warburg, Dr.
Cyrus Adler, Louis Marshall, Dr. Judah L. Magnes, Judge Julian
W. Mack, Julius Rosenwald, Judge Irving H. Lehman and Dr.
Solomon Schechter. Most of these figures, together with Morti-
mer Schiff, Henry Morgenthau. Abrara I. Elkus, Herbert H. Leh-
man. Felix Fuld, Louis Bamberger, Sidney Hiliman, Dr. David de
I Sola Pool and Marcus Sloss, were also among founder of JWB.
Since 1921, JWB has spearheaded the growth of the Jewish
Community Center movement by giving leadership and direction
to this only made-in-America institution in Jewish life. To foster
the development of similar agencies in Israel, Europe, Canada,
La'.in America, Western Europe and Australia, JWB helped create
the World Federation of YMHAs and Jewish Community Centers
in 1947. Its headquarters are in the JWB offices.
The fact that JWB is the national body of Centers and Ys,
and the Jewish community's agency to serve the military, is ex-
Continued on Page 4-C
Confab Set Wednesday
Continued from Page 1-C
vicemen and their families, will
be held Saturday morning, Apr.
7. Rabbi Aaron H. Blumenthal,
chairman of JWB's Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy, will preach
I'll' sermon, and Chaplain (Maj.)
Kalman Levitan. Randolph Air
Force Base. Tex., will conduct
the service.
Delegates will adopt the organ-
ization's 1963 and 1964 budgets,
consider the Community Fair
Share Plan for helping to finance
its work, and pass a series of
resolutions at a plenary session
on Sunday morning, Apr. 8. San-
ford Solendcr. Mount Vernon,
N.Y.. JWB executive vice presi-
dent, will be the closing speaker.
In 24 workshops, delegates will
discuss services to senior citi-
zens, teen-agers, young adults,
children, adults and military per-
sonnel and a wide variety of other
matters. There will also be an
institute on women's groups in
YM YWHAs and Jewish Com-
munity Centers, a Presidents'
Club luncheon, an Oneg Shabbat
program, a series of group meet-
ings and a number of receptions.
Barnett I. Shur, Portland, Me.,
8 general convention chairmai
Harold Levy, Perth Amboy, N.J.,
is program chairman and Leon
Kaplan. Miami, is chairman of the
Greater Miami convention com-
mittee. Other convention com-
mittee chairmen and co-chair-
men are Mrs, Robert M. Klein,
New York, chairman, and Mrs.
Milton Sirkin, Miami, vice-chair-
man, arrangements; Morton H.
Wilner. Washington, D.C., chair-
man, and Joseph J. Kaplan, Louis-
ville, co-chairman, attendance;
Col. Paul Akst, New York, pro-
gram co-chairman; Leonard Kap-
lan, Boston, resolutions; Jerome
L. Markowitz, Philadelphia, eval-
uation; Robert M. Levison, San
Francisco, credentials; H. H.
Nordlinger, New York, rules; and
Mrs. William Alter, San Antonio,
exhibits.
JWB is the national association
of YM and YWHAs and Jewish
Community Centers, the govern-
ment-authorized agency for serv-
ing the religious, morale, recre-
ational and welfare needs of Jew-
ish personnel in the military and
in Veterans Administration hospi-
tals and their dependents, and the
sponsoring agency of the National
Jewish Music Council, the Jewish
Book Council of America, and the
Jewish Center Lecture Bureau. It
A pair of teen-age artists at a Jewish Community Center put
the finishing touches on a "stained-glass" window made of
plastic sheets depicting the story of Moses. Program guid-
ance for activities involving special skills or interests is pait
of the service which JWB gives its affiliated Centers.
Ancient traditions of the Passover Seder settina find a new
dimension in the Jewish Community Center, where women's
groups learn about the meaning of the symbols and the holi-
day in preparation for the community and home Seder.

. '.:$*..:''.:.i. ,...*....wti-. .

Jewish Community Center camping is for grandma and grand-
pa, too. In an exciting new development, camps are pro-
viding older adults with an opportunity to enjoy arts and
crafts, boating, fishing, discussions, tab'e games and other
activities in an outdoor setting all guided by trained and


Friday, March 30. 1962
*Jenis ft Fhridlian
Page 3-C
NATIONAL COUNCIL IS SUPREME GOVERNING BODY
Jewish Welfare Board Activities Cut
Across Every Area of identification
Every aspect of JWB's pro
nits across ideological and
sectarian differences in the Jew-
uiiimunily. For its special-
i i nter services, the Jewish
are Board has 537 affiliated
unit- in the U.S. including con-
stituent Jewish Community Cen-
lei and YM-YWHAs ami their
ma "i" branches, Synagogue-Cen-
[ei I ifiliales and resident camps
_ with an aggregate member-
ship of more than 700,000. Sev-
eral hundred local JWB Armed
Servicves Committees and Serve-
A-Commlttees representing hun-
dreds of local, Jewish groups.
many thousands of volunteers
and 40 national Jewish organiza-
ihit:- are affiliated with JWB's
work on behalf of the Armed
Forces and hospitalized veterans.
i
Also part of JWB's nationwide
representative constituency, is the
Presidents' ('"..'i ma 'e up of hun-
dreds of former an i incumbent
presidents ol Jewish Community
tenters >\ ho ha', e banded to-
gether in a fella I > u:rther
the objectives of the Center
movement and JnB.
JWB Financing
The supreme g erning body
of JWB is a national council,
which meets in c nvention bien-
n.ally It is composed of dele-
gates from member (.'inters af-
filiated natiiin.il organizations,
local Armed Services and Serve
A-Committees, the eight regional
Sections and the six Armed Serv-
ices Regional areas ol JWB and
members of JWB's board of di-
Senior Citizens Conference Will
Precede Biennial Meeting Here
Leaders of senior citizens
clubs affiliated with Jewish
Community Centers in all
ections of the country will
take part in a senior citizens
conference sponsored by the
JWB Southern Section in Mi-
ni i Beach just prior to the
JWB biennial conference.
The program of the confer-
i nee will center a r o u n d
three areas of major interest
to the older adult and his
club: club organization, com-
munity service and personal
needs. The conference will
iie held on Apr. 2 to 4 at
Waldman's hotel in Miami
Beach.
Mrs. (George1 Charlotte
Simon, vice president of the
Greater Mi.u:.: Jewish Com-
munity Center ill be chair-
man of the senior citizens
conference. Among :ii<>-t' in-
volved in the planning for
the meeting are A. Budd
Cutler, president of the
Greater Miami JCC; Efraim
II Gait. Center executive di-
rector; Emanuel Tropp. as-
sociate director of the Cen-
ter; Charles IMotkin. director
of services to senior citizens
at the Center; David Gold-
berg. Charleston, S.C., pies
.'lent of the JWB Southern
Section; and Nathan Loshak.
Atlanta, administrative field
secretary of the Section.
In addition to plenary ses-
sions and a series of con-
current workshop discus-
sions, the conference pro-
gram includes a number of
social gatherings.
rectors. Between biennial Coun-
cil meetings and annual sessions ,
of the board, an executive com-
mittee catries on the work of the
organization. The various divis-
ions. Councils, Sections and Arm-
ed Services Regional committees
meet annually or biennially.
All JWB activities except those
assigned to JWB by USO are fi-
nanced through funds provided
by the Jewish communities of
America. In the New York metro-
politan area. JWB is a bene-
ficiary of the United Jewish Ap-
peal of dealer New York. In
communities having united Jew-
ish fund-raising agencies anil
Jewish Community Centers. JWB
receives its funds through the
operation of the Community Fail-
Share Plan. By a carefully de-
vised formula, this Plan links
JWB's annual budgetary require-
ments to the amount raised by-
local Jewish welfare funds and
federations and to the size of the
annual local Center budgets.
The welfare fund is the prin-
cipal source for meeting the fair
share requirement. Centers also
participate through per capita
dues plans, grants from commun-
ity chests and other means. In
communities without Jewish
Community Centers, JWB gets
annual allocations from the local
united Jewish fund-raising body.
In unorganized communities JWB
receives grants from many kinds
of local agencies and from in-
dividuals. Individuals who want
to identify themselves with the
work of JWB do so through an
annual membership in the JWB
Associates.
Immediately after World War
Continued on Page 5-C
A Jewish chaplain in the U.S. Army in France helps unload
a shipment of matzos flown in for the Passover festival cele-
bration. Across the world, wherever Jewish men are on duty
in the U.S. Armed Forces, Passover Seders are held through
arrangements made by Jewish chaplains recruited, endorsed
and served by the National Jewish Welfare Board, using
kosher foods, wine and Haggadahs supplied by JWB.
Crew members of the USS Ranger hold the Passover Seder
while the ship is at sea. Months before the festival, supplies
for the observance had been shipped by the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board, the organization authorized by the gov-
ernment to meet the religious, morale and welfare needs of
Jews in uniform. -*>
A. BUDD Cl/TUR
. Miami president
LEADERS IN EVERY HELD Of NATIONAL ENDEAVOR
Among Prominent Personalities Due
i
.
Greetings
tPHRAIM GALt
, Miami director
Solomon Litt. president of the
National Jewish Welfare Board,
who will deliver the President's
Report at the Saturday night
banquet, served on the JWB
executive committee under four
of his predecessors. He was
elected to his present post in
June, 1958.
Litt is a product of the Jewish
Community Center movement.
Born of immigrant parents on
New York's lower East Side, he-
was an active member of a boys'
club at the Educational Alliance,
one of Americas oldest Centers.
He became active in JWB in
1944. as chairman of the newly-
organized budget and finance
committee. Shortly after, he be-
came a member, then chairman,
of the JWB executive committee.

Continued from Page 2-C
Jewish military personnel result-
ing from the military buildup.
What we do about the major
changes in JWB to be recom-
mended by the committee on re-
appraisal and planning will have
an impact on broad anas ol
American Jewish lite lor the next
ten years.
"How wisely we deal with the
growing needs of the expanding
Jewish Community Center move-
ment will mean much to the ef-
fectiveness of this essential force
in hundreds of communities.
"I am confident that the dele-
gates, by their voice and vote, will
make this a memorable conven-
tion."

And, as Barnett I. Shur, of Port-
land, Me., chairman of the 1962
L Continued on Page 4-C
MRS. GORG SIMON
it
i. <
CHARUS PIOTKIN
. .. senior citizens
He was a member of the exec-
utive committee which adopted
plans for the historic JWB Sur-
vey, mapped plans for JWB post-
war programs and launched JWB
on the sponsorship of major cul-
tural projects. He has been ac-
tive in the United Jewish Appeal.
Jewish Board of Guardians. Jew-
ish Big Brothers, and the New
York Federation of Jewish Phil-
anthropies.
A partner in the Wall Street
firm of Asiel & Co., a brokerage
house where he began as a run-
ner at the age of 14, he is a
member of the board of arbitra-
tion of the New York Stock Ex-
change and a governor of the
American Stock Exchange.

Philip M. Klutznick, speaker at
the Saturday night banquet, is a
member of the U.S. delegation to
the United Nations with the rank
of Ambassador. He is deputy to
Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson
and represents the United States
on the UN Economic and Social
Council. An attorney who has
served his country in a number
of important posts, he has had a
parallel career of statesmanship
in the Jewish community.
Klutznick is a former interna-
tional president and now honor-
arv national president of B'nai
B'rith. He was a vice president
of the National Jewish Welfare
Board and chairman of its Jew-
ish Community Center Division.
He is now on the JWB executive
committee and board of direc-
tors. He is a former president
of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University and was at
one time chairman of the Pres-
idents' Conference, a coordin-
ating group representing 16 ma-
jor Jewish organizations.
He served under Presidents
Roosevelt and Truman as Com-
missioner of the U.S. Federal
Public Housing Authority. Pres-
ident Eisenhower appointed him
a member of the U.S. delegation
to the UN General Assembly, an
appointment which President
Kennedy repeated.
Klutznick is author of the boo^
"No Easv Answers."
* *
Louis Stern, a vice president of
the National Jewish Welfare
Board, who will deliver the re-
port of the JWB committee on.
reappraisal and planning at a
Thursday evening pre-dinner ses-
sion, is a member of the JW*
executive committee and chair>
man of the committee on reap-
praisal and planning. The com-
mittee has completed a year-long;
study of JWB's programs, oper*.
ations and organizational struo*
ture. The report and recommend
dations will be the major busk
ness of the biennial convention.
A member of the Rockefeller
Foundation Commission to Study
Voluntary Health Agencies. Sterm
is an expert on community wel-
fare activities. He is a former
chairman of the JWB Jewish.
Community Center Division and
is former president of the Essex
County (N.J.) Jewish Community
Center and Jewish Commur.iy
Council.
He is a vice president of I >ff
Council of Jew ish Federati ir
and Welfare Funds. In 1957. l
received JWB's Frank L. V- I
Award for outstanding contrib*
turn to the Jewish Community
Center movement. For many
years, he has held key posts in
the campaigns of the UJA of Es-
sex county.
He is a native of Newark, now*
living in Sauth Orange. N.J.. an*
is a member of the New York;
Continued on Page 5-C _^Bj


Page 4-C
*Jewlsti Her Mian
Friday. March 30. 1962

Key Administration Figures Note
Values in Community Center Works
Government leaders have re-
cently applauded the Jewish
Community Center movement as
a "constructive factor"' in Amer-
ican communal life.
Within the past few months,
key figures in the Kennedy Ad-
ministration noted the "values
inherent in Jewish Community
Center participation and serv-
ice."
This is in keeping with the at-
titude of previous administration
leaders, who frequently indicate
that JCCs and YM-YWHAs affil
iated with and served by the
National Jewish Welfare Board
"have enriched the lives of peo-
ple of all ages, and have given
lung and constructive service to
their communities "
Declared Abraham Ribicoff.
Secretary of Health. Education
and Welfare: "Jewish Commun-
ity Centers and the Young Men's
and Young Women's H e b r e w
Associations affiliated with the
National Jewish Welfare Board
provide significant community
service by helping people of all
ages to use their leisure hours
constructively for their develop-
ment as active citizens of our
land. These local organizations
are doing a wonderful job in pro-
viding social, recreational and
educational facilities for their
members, and have my best
wishes for the continued success
of their programs."
Arthur S. Goldberg. Secretary
of Labor, said that "It is a fun-
damental responsibility of any
society to develop its youth into
mature, well-balanced adults, and
to provide for the social needs of
all its citizens. Under the Amer-
ican democratic system a large
share of this responsibility is
borne by private organizations.
The Jewish Community Centers
and YM-YWHAs affiliated with
the National Jewish Welfare
Board have made important con-
tributions to these ends through
their social, welfare and recre-
ational facilities. Their efforts
are vital to the maintenance of
a strong, vigorous and free so-
ciety, and essential to the demo-
3'W *H*fit. *4U *4g
cratic process itself."
As Newton N. Minow. chair-
man of the Federal Communica-
tions Commission, sees it: "All
Americans participating in civic
affairs are extraordinarily aware
of the need for the constructive
use of leisure time. The tremen-
dous increase in leisure time can
provide value both to the individ-
ual and to the community. By
using our free time wisely, each
one of us can enhance personal
skills and at the same time par-
ticipate actively and responsibly
in contributing toward the wel-
fare of the total communitv.
"As a member of the board of
directors of the Jewish Commun-
ity Centers of Chicago. I had the
opportunity to see at close range
how leisure time was actually
used for these individual and
community objectives. It seem-
ed to me that the constructive
group activities in which individ-
uals engaged also had a preven-
tive aspect. Undoubtedly, young
people, perhaps particularly teen-
agers, who are given the oppor-
tunity and guided to engage in
meaningful and satisfying activ-
ity are less likely to seek unde-
sirable means as an outlet for
their energies.
"May I say that my experience
as a member of the board of the
Jewish Community Centers of
Chicago made a deep impression
on me. Through that experience,
I saw the degree to which dozens
of busy business and professional
men and women devoted time,
energy and thought to an organ-
ization concerned with the fruit-
ful leisure-time needs of individ-
uals of all ages. In doing so they
gave of themselves to their fel-
low-citizens and to their city.
This kind of dedication to individ-
ual and community welfare is in
the best tradition of American
democracy and freedom."
A very young member of the "People of the Book" cele-
brates Jewish Book Month in a symbolic setting at a
Jewish Community Center. Jewish Book Month and
Jewish Music Festival are two annual events sponsored
by JWB to help keep alive an awareness of our cultural
heritage.
Older adults enjoy a meeting of their group at the Jew-
ish Community Center. Whether it's having fun, or work-
ing on a community project, older folks like the feeling
of being needed and appreciated which comes from
talcing part in activities at Jewish Community Centers
affiliated with and served by the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board.
Greetings
........
"i
Continued from Page 3-C
convention, sees it: "JWB's 1962
national convention has been
planned as a stimulating and ex-
citing experience.
"Workshops and plenary ses-
sions will provide opportunities
for measuring how far we have
come and for charting the road
ahead. The debate over the
recommendations of the commit-
tee on reappraisal, the opening
event in the nationwide celebra-
tion of the Jewish military chap-
laincy centennial, the proposals
of the public affairs committee
and the annual Frank L. Weil
Awards are among the scheduled
sessions that will add up to an
inspiring and octive four days."
The delegates and visitors from
every corner of the country and
from a number of foreign lands
will, we hope, leave Miami Beach
enriched by new ideas, animated
with a new will to service, and
encouraged by a new understand-
ing of the work of the National
Jewish Welfare Board.

According to Mrs. Milton Sir-
kin, of Miami Beach, vice chair-
man of arrangements:
"Preparations are underway to
greet the delegates coming to the
biennial meeting of the National
Jewish Welfare Board. The ar-
rangements committee, is exert-
ing every effort to assure the
comfort and happiness of the hun-
dreds of people who will be at-
tending the convention.
"We are involving scores of our
own local Jewish Community
Center members on this commit-
tee to guarantee the success of
our efforts. Our committee is de.
lighted to be responsible for sup-
plying the volunteers for registra-
tion, room hospitality, transpor-
tation, receptions, information,
and the myriad of details that go
into the smooth running of a ven-
ture this size."
This chaplain blowing the Shofar is typical of the 350 fu.
time and part time Jewish chaplains who will conduct Higb
Holy Day services for 150,000 Jewish servicemen and hos-
pitalized veterans at U.S. military posts on four continent?
The chaplains are recruited, endorsed ecclesiastically ar. ]
served by the National Jewish Welfare Board's Commission,
on Jewish Chaplaincy, which represents the Rabbinical As-
sembly of America (Conservative), Rabbinical Council of
America (Orthodox) and Central Conference of American Ran
bis (Reform).
JWB Commitments
Continued from Page 2-C
pressive of the common elements of these areas of work The
original decision to place these tasks together recognized the
basic similarity of their function, objectives, auspices, constituen-
cy, personnel, methods and program.
Work with the military and Center work both aim to advance
the personnel adjustment and development, Jewish identification
and participation, and citizenship of the persons they serve. Each
is an instrument of the total Jewish community, representing and
serving the broadest cross section of people. While concerned for
children, youth and adults, both have particular competence in
work with Jewish youth Each requires the capacities of profes-
sional social workers with special ability to work with groups and
communities. Both involve varied social, cultural and athletic
programs in all types of groups. Both require cooperative efforts
by professionals and volunteer lay people.
Armed Services Program
JWB's Armed Services work involves the operation of direct
services to military personnel, while its Center functions consist
of providing advisory and technical service to organizations and
communities. Nevertheless, because of their elements in com-
mon, sound social planning and allocation of functions in the Jew-
ish community commend their being carried on, locally and na-
tionally, under the aegis of a single functional agency.
JWB serves military personnel, hospitalized veterans and
their dependents through three operating divisions. The Armed
Services Division, functioning through hundreds of local commit-
tees, consisting of representatives of the principal Jewish or-
ganizations, and a trained field staff, provides welfare, cultural,
recreational and morale programs at military installations and VA
hospitals and large quantities of Jewish religious literature, edu-
cational materials and kosher food supplies.
The Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy is the operating divi-
sion through which JWB recruits, gives ecclesiastical endorsement
to and serves all Jewish chaplains in every branch of the military
as well as in the Veterans Administration, Civil Air Patrol anJ
Continued on Page S-C
i

i
Maj. Gen. Frank A. Tobey (left). Chief of Chaplains. Depart- '
ment of the Army, will be a principal speaker at a dinner
meeting on "100th Anniversary of the Jewish Chaplaincy"
scheduled for Wednesday, 7 p.m. Rabbi Aaron H. Blumen-
thal, chairman. JWB Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, will.
officiate at Sabbath services, Apr. 7. _J


Friday. March 30. 1962
fJenirtMcrid&r
Page SC
Prominent Personalities Slated
Continued from Page 3-C
brokerage firm of Stern and
Byck. (
Kabbi Aaron H. Biumenthal,
spiritual leader of Congregation
Emanu-El, Mount Vernon, N.Y.,
who will deliver the sermon at
Saturday morning services, is
chairman of the National Jewish
Welfare Board Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy. He is a for-
mer Army chaplain, having serv-
ed in uniform during World War
II at Halloran General Hospital,
Staten Island, N.Y.. where he
was part t'f a tri-faith team
Imh welcomed back to Amer-
ii i over 150,000 battle casualties
from all theatres of operations.
A native of Montreal, Canada,
he was ordained as rabbi in 1932
by the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary of America. He was, from
1956 to 1958. president of the
Rabbinical Assembly of Amer-
ica He is a member of the board
of directors of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America and
a member of the Rabbinical
Assembly's Committee on Jewish
Law and Standards.
Rabbi Biumenthal has been
designated by the Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy to go on sev-
eral overseas missions sponsored
by the Armed Forces to conduct
Jewish religious retreats and Tor-
ah convocations for Jews on mil-
itary duty in various parts of the
world.
*
Sanford Solender closing spcak-
: iit the Sunday morning plen-
ary session, became executive
vice president of the National
Jewish Welfare Board climax-
ing a distinguished 25-year career
in Jewish communal work. He
recently headed the ad hoc com-
mittee of social work experts
named by Secretary of Health.
Education and Welfare Ribicoff
to study and report on the Fed-
eral Government's welfare pro-
grams.
He is president-elect of the Na-
tional Conference of Social Work,
a former president of the Na-
tional Assn. of. Jewish Center
Workers, and a committee chair-
man of the National Assn. of So-
cial Workers. In 1958. Mr. Sol-
ender received the Joseph E.
Kappel Award of the National
Assn. of Jewish Communal Serv-
ice.
In 1959. he was chosen the
'most distinguished citizen'' of
Mount Vernon, NY., Where he
has served as president of the
Board of Education. Solender is
a member of a family now in
its third generation of service in
the Jewish Community Center
field. His father, the late Sam-
uel Solender, was executive di-
rector for a quarter-century of
the Washington Heights Inwood
YM-YWHA in New York City
and his son, Stephen, is now do-

ing field work in preparation for
a career in Center work.
*
Chaplain (Maj. Gen.) Frank A.
Tobey, speaker at the Wednes-
day evening opening session, has
satisfied two seemingly conflict-
ing boyhood dreams to be a
soldier and to serve as a clergy-
man. He is Chief of Chaplains
of the U.S. Army, a post to which
he was appointed in November.
1958, after having served in the
office. Chief of Chaplains, for
five years.
Chaplain Tobey served in the
South Pacific during World War
II. During the Korean Conflict,
he participated in the invasion of
Inchon and became the first Uni-
ted Nations Chaplain in Korea.
After that assignment, he return-
ed to the United States for a tour
of duty which led to his present
post. Chaplain Tobey entered the
military service via the National
Guard, enlisting as a private at
the age of 19.
Two years later, he received a
commission as a lieutenant in
the Organized Reserve Corps.
After his ordination as minister,
he became a chaplain, and was
assigned to the 43rd Division in
1940. Before coming on active
duty in 1941. he served two par-
ishes in New England. He is a
native New Englander.
Chaplain Tobey holds the
Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf
Cluster and was awarded the
Bronze Star Medal. He has won
a number of service medals and
ribbons.

Rabbi Bertram W. Korn. speak-
er at the Wednesday evening
opening session, is rabbi of Re-
form Congregation Knesseth Is-
rael in Philadelphia and is a rec-
ognized authority on American
Jewish history. He is a former
president of the American Jew-
ish Historical Society and a mem-
ber of the advisory council of
the Civil War Centennial Com-
mission.
He served as assistant profes-
sor of American Jewish History
at Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion while also
acting as assistant to the presi-
dent of HUC-JIR. A former Navy
chaplain, he is a member of the
national Jewish Welfare Board's
Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy.
He was ordained rabbi in 1943
by the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
where he received the degrees of
M.H.L and D.H.L. He has serv-
ad as an officer, board member
or trustee of a large number of
Jewish and general organizations.
Among his major works are
"American Jewry and the Civil
War," "Studies in 19th Century
American Jewish History," and
"Jews and Negro Slavery in the
Old South."
Every Identification
Continued from Page 3-C
II, JWB voluntarily submitted it-
self to an unprecedented, search-
ing inquiry by an independent
commission of experts headed by
Dr. Salo W. Baron. The director
of the JWB Survey, Dr. Oscar
Janowsky, devoted two years to
a painstaking study of JWB's sta-
tus and functions in relation to
its major spheres of operation.
The Survey Commission's report
(published in full in a 490-page
volume), submitted to and adop-
ted by the 1947 JWB convention,
contained 22 recommendations.
A broad directive guiding JWB
in the development of its post-
war program these recommenda-
tions have now been implemen-
ted. At their heart was a pro-
posal that JWB formulate a
Statement of Principles defining
the basic Jewish purposes of the
Jewish Community Center. Out
of a full year of earnest debate,
discussion and review, in which
scores of Centers and hundreds
of community leaders were in-
volved, came a definitive credo
which was adopted by the Na-
tional Council delegates to the
1948 convention. That credo is
now known as the Statement of
<_J~Lave 'Will VravJ
These cartons of Bibles and prayer books were contributed by |
the nation's three major religious faiths to the U.S. Office of: j
Civil and Defense Mobilization for use in the event of an j
attack on the United States. Included are 10,000 copies of: j
"Abridged Prayer Book for Jews in the Armed Forces," pro- r
vided by the National Jewish Welfare Board (JWB). J
Principles on Jewish Community
Center Purposes.
Far-reaching changes at home
and abroad since the end of
World War II and since the adop-
tion and implementation of the
recommendations of the JWB
Survey Report have had a pro-
found impact on JWB's program
on behalf of the Armed Forces,
its services to and leadership of
the vastly expanded Jewish Com-
munity Center field and its stim-
ulation of Jewish cultural activ-
ities.
The findings and recommenda-
tions of this committee, which
has been at work for more than
a year, will constitute the major
subject of discussion and action
at JWB's convention here this
week.
The Greater Miami area, which
has provided leadership and sup-
port to JWB for many years and
which has seen the impact of
JWB services and programming
through the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Community Center and the
Greater Miami Armed Services
Committee, provides a unique
opportunity for getting to under-
stand and appreciate one of the
most significant organizations in
American Jewish life.
...... ......
A Complex Program for Today's Needs
Continued from Page 1-C
good citizenship, the blending of the best of both
Americanism and Judaism, and the training ot
people for community leadership.
It is the job of JWB to help these Centers and
Y- to serve their members at maximum effective-
ness It does this by helping the Centers and Ys
recruit and train professionally-qualified person-
nel, consulting with them to see that they get the
right kind of building and equipment to meet
their needs, providing them with specialized ser-
vices in the fields of community surveys, admin-
istration, programming, camping, health and phy-
sical education, and public relations, booking lec-
turers, artists and other entertainers for them,
publishing a variety of publications and other ma-
terials for their use, and conducting intercom-
munity, regional and national institutes, confer-
ences and tournaments.
In this area, the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center and its branchesMiami YMHA,
Miami Beach YMHA, North County YMHA and
Southwest YMHAare affiliated with the Nation-
al Jewish Welfare Board.
JWB serves military personnel, hospitalized
veterans and dependents directly. Through its
Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, it recruits
Jewish chaplains, gives them ecclesiastical en-
dorsement, and serves them. Through commit-
tees of volunteers in communities across the
country and through its professional Armed Ser-
vices field work staff, it carries on a wide variety
of morale and welfare activities for military per-
sonnel, hospitalized veterans and their families.
There are 100,000 Jewish men in military service,
20,000 patients in VA hospitals and a like number
of their dependents who are served by JWB.
In Florida, morale efforts are carried on un-
der the JWB banner for personnel at 14 Air Force
Bases and Naval Air Stations. JWB Armed Ser-
vices Committees are located in Greater Miami.
Ft. Walton Beach (Greater Eglin), Homestead,
Cocoa Beach (Brevard County), Jacksonville, Key
West, Orlando, Panama City, Pensacola, Tallahas-
see and Tampa. JWB Women's Organizations'
Division Committees also serve at Bay Pine VA
Hospital and Coral Gables VA Hospital.
Welcoming the New Year, the congregations of GIs and their j
dependents overseas take part in the traditional observance* !
of Rosh Hashona. A
Commitments of JWB
Continued from Page 4-C
various Federal installations. Composed primarily of represe*.
tatives of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the Ran-
binical Assembly of America and the Rabbinical Council of Ameri-
ca, the Commission serves full and part-time chaplains on duty
throughout the world and is responsible for giving religious cover*
age to every military installation and VA hospital.
The Women's Organizations' Division is an alliance of nitio
national Jewish women's organizations that have united under
JWB's banner to provide a unique kind of morale service to th
Armed Forces and hospitalized veterans. Through its "Serve-A.-
Committee" program, local groups across the country providu
shipments of comfort items to remote and isolated camps and hos-
pitals and to Jewish chaplains. Direct personnal service to ho*-
pitalized veterans is given through this Division's representative*
on local VA hospital advisory committees. ;
Continuing Field Service
M
..
:<|<,UIMMHI
intmuiiHiiiHiawMiuiMiitwiailaawlliiiniinMnnneMnwaiitHmMBitMfftt"! ^ '>
The Jewish communities, whose sons and daughters in uni-
form are cared for by JWB's Armed Forces program, also depend
on JWB for service to hundreds of Jewish Community Centers,
Through the Jewish Community Center Division's national and
field staff of experts and through eight regional sections of *<
filiated Centers, JWB makes available to Centers in all parts of
the United States year-round field service and technical help and.
guidance. This includes aid in programming, camping, health and.
physical education, administration, youth service, Jewish activi-
ties, building construction, planning and equipment; community-
surveys, development of book, music and dramatic activities;
nursery schools, old age programming and public relations. JWB'fl
Bureau of Personnel and Training is the American Jewish com-
munity's primary source for recruiting and placing trained Cen.
ter workers.
All JWB services and programs are available to meet th
special needs of every type of community, from the very smalt
town to the large metropolitan area. In communities where there
are no Centers but where there is a desire for commumty-widft
cultural and youth programs. JWB helps local groups fill the need
through utilization of existing resources and cooperative undertak-
ings with nearby communities. In serving the unique Jewish
needs of its constituency, JWB stimultaneously engages in a pro-
gram of training for American citizenship, thereby aiding the in-
dividual American Jew to function wisely and well in our Amen-
can democracy.
JWB's official publication is the JWB "Circle," published
.seven times a year. The "Circle" has two cultural supplements:
"In Jewish Bookland," issued by the Jewish Book Council ot
America, and "Jewish Music Notes," issued by the National Jew-
ish Music Council. "Jewish Community Center Program Aids,"
the Women's Division's "Guideposts" and the "Personnel Report*
er" are each publshed several times a year. j


Page 6-C
*Jew 1st florid law
Friday. March 30. 1962
Young People Contribute to Their
Communities Through Center Clubs
A primary objective Of the Jew-
ish Community Centers anil YM-
YWHAs affiliated with and serv-
ed by the National Jewish Wel-
fafe Board is to develop within
young people a .sense oi respon-
sibility to community. There is
the feeling that the young people
today are the civic leaders of to-
morrow, hut this is only part ol
the story. While it is recognized
that among groups oi teen-agers
and young adults there are indi-
viduals who have trait.- ol leader-
ship which should be nurtured. II
is also emphasized that every
member of the group has a role
in serving his community. There-
fore, programs are stressed which
provide every member of the
group with an opportunity to par-
ticipate in constructive activity.
This has been going on for a
long timewell before the current
concern with 'juvenile delinquen-
cy." YM-YWHAs and Jewish
Community Centers began, more
than 100 years ago. as associa-
tions in which young people might
(among other things) take part
in communal projects. The Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board, as
the national association of more
than 300 Ys and Centers, has al-
ways stressed this aspect of pro-
gramming. As the national as-
sociation. JWB suggests and de-
velops programs for its member
Centers; it also reports on locally-
planned activities, so that Cen-
ter- in all parts of the country
maj benefit from experiences
which individual Centers Have.
About the Young
Young people at the Center .en-
gage in community service in two
broad general areas. They under-
take specific projects to aid spe-
cific causes; they also conduct
their own seminars, conferences
and workshops to discuss current
communal problems and ques-
tions, and how. as young people.
they are affected.
Examples of specific projects
undertaken in recent years in-
clude;
In Hartford, Conn., a teen-age
girls group provided volunteer
clerical service during a local
Tuberculosis Association cam-
paign.
In New Haven. Conn., teen-
agers at the Jewish Community
(enter formed a Teen Service
Club to work on community proj-
ects. In addition to aiding the
local March of Dimes, and Heart
Fund, they ran parties and other
recreational activities for phy-
sically handicapped youngsters.
In Philadelphia, the Neighbor-
hood Center Northeast inaugu-
rated a program in which teen-
agers receive training at social
work agencies for community ser-
vice. Beginning with a series of
visits to representative agencies
for seventh-grade youngsters, the
program involves increasing re-
sponsibility until, when they are
at the twelfth-grade level, the
young people actually put in three
or four months actual work at the
Center. With a choice of differ-
ent kinds of social agencies to
work in. the teenagers have close
professional supervision and con-
duct their own discussion ses-
sions on the progress of the proj-
ect.
In Miami, as part of a whole
Jewish Community Center pro-
gram of aid to refugees from Cu-
ba, teen-agers have taken part in
easing the adjustment of Cuban
youngsters in -their new environ-
ment. They are learning Span-
ish and helping their friends
At a service held on a military post, the son of one of the
servicemen lights a candle on the first night of Chanuka
as his father and a group of other GIs look on. The scene
is repeated at U.S. bases around the world where Jewish
chaplains. GIs and their families attend Jewish services
the year round arranged by the National Jewish Welfare
Board.
JWB supplies for the Jewish men in the field travel atx jet
speed. The link with home which JWB services provide is
considered so important a morale factor by military leaders
that the Armed Forces give every assistance to help JWB in
its work.
learn English, and are helping
Cuban youngsters get the most
out of the Center program
Teenagers in the arts and
crafts unit of the West Bronx
Jewi-h Community Center devot-
ed a month to turning out useful
articles for patients at nearby
Kingsbridge Veterans Admini-
stration Hospital. Included were
key cases, book marks, wallets.
comb eases and stationery hold-
ers The articles were distribut-
ed by the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board Armed Services Com-
mittee at the hospital. High
schoolers interested iu a career
of community service through
professional social work formed
a club at the Jewish Community
Center of Chicago. Interest in
careers such as family counsel-
ling, group work, medical social
work and community organiza-
tion is backed up by a program
designed to give the club mem-
bers accurate information about
the work and the career poten-
tial.
Help New Building
Teenage members of a fratern-
ity in Worchester. Mass., got be-
hind community efforts for a new
Jewish Community Center build-
ing with a campaign of their own.
Forming a city-wide committee,
they began a drive to arouse local
interest in the new building Part
of their job included a letter to
hundreds Of Jewish families, tell-
ing them why a new building is
needed.
Teen-agers at the Philadelphia.
YM-YWHA set up their own em-
ployment agency to handle appli-
cations /for baby-sitting, clerical
and sales work Job-seekers
must be members of the Y and
have social security cards.
A seventh-grade girls' club, the
Dolls, at the Buffalo, N.Y.. Jew-
ish Community Center is engaged
in a program of service to other
community groups. First project
for the girls was a party given at
a local old age home, for which
the girls served refreshments, led
singing and dancing, and put on
a show for the older people. The
club made corsages and bouton-
nieres for the people at the par-
ty
In order to raise funds for the
YM-YWHA in Jerusalem. Israel,
teen-agers at the YM-YWHA in
Winnipeg, Canada, annually take
on a variety of jobs. The pro-
ceeds of their baby-sitting, car-
washing, snow-shovelling, candy
sales and shoe-shining have pro-
vided over $250 each year for the
Y in Jerusalem. Rules set down
by the youngsters require that
the services must be provided by
the teen-agers themselves, that
customers must receive value for
their money, and that raffles,
drawings and similar devices may
not be used.
In the Jewish Community Cen-
ter in Miami, teen-age groups are
striving to win an award which
is regularly given for community
serviceany kind of community
service.
In Stamford, Conn., memDers
of the Center-sponsored Jewish
Youth Council put in more than
12 hoy-and-girl hours each to help
get the newly-formed United
Fund rolling. The typing, addres-
sing, folding and mailing services
which they performed were dup-
licated in countless communities
around the country where cam-
paigns got underwa).
Youth Service Award
The teen-agers at the St. Louis
YMYWHA are hosts annually to
an interfaith brotherhood confer-
ence under the sponsorship of the
National Conference of Christians
and Jews. Initiated years ago,
this program now attracts some
1.5O0 high school students of all
faiths, from all neighborhoods of
St. Louis, and a film for national
distribution is now being pro-
duced on the work of these young-
sters.
The Newark, N.J., YM-YWHA
Trie
Hundereds of books of Jewish interest from the classics to
stories for children are being sent to Jewish chaplains for
use by the Jewish GIs and their families on duty with the
U.S. Armed Forces overseas. Books are shipped by the JWB
Women's Organizations Division. Here, a Jewish chaplain
visiting the JWB headguarters examines some of the books
with one of the women engaged in the project.
Across the generations, the Jewish Community Center
serves people with activities for all ages. When an op-
portunity comes for grandfather and grandson to share
a quiet hour, the family bond is strengthened.
Teen Council received a youth
service award from the Council
of Social Agencies in Essex Coun-
ty for its contributions to the
Newark community. The teen
council has participated in fund-
raising drives for the mentally-
retarded and mentally-ill. and has
played an active part in the Uni-
ted Jewish Appeal campaign. It
has also encouraged many of the
Y friendship clubs to plan and
execute community service proj-
ects of their own, leading to these
clubs making toys and other
items for children's hospitals,
visiting children's wards and pre-
senting plays for children.
In Detroit, teen-agers learned
how a city government operates
and had a practical lesson in law-
making. Local newspapers an-
nounced that a group of citizens
were going to propose a curfew
for teen-agers. Teen groups meet-
ing at the Jewish Community
Center's Ten Mile Branch dis-
cussed the matter at their club
sessions, guided by club leaders
who had been briefed by staff
members of the club department
of the Center. Deciding that a
curfew was neither necessary nor
desirable, the teen-agers voted to
present their views to the City
Council on the night when the pe-
tition was to bo presented. One
by one at the City Council meet-
ing teen-agers arose to express
their views, without heat or emo-
tion. After a half-hour of this,
the Mayor asked the petitioners
to express their views. No one
arose, and the petition for cur-
few was dismissed.
A group of sixteen-year-old
girls at t h e YM-YWHA of the
Bronx took on the task of collect-
ing and distributing toys during
Chanuka week for hospitalized
children in three Bronx hospitals.
For its "Operation Toys" the
group produced an attractive
leaflet explaining the purpose o
the project and asking coopera-
tion. Club members visited every
group w hich meets at the Y. Signs
and posters were prepared for
display in the Y lobby, where two
large waste baskets, borrowed
from the N.Y.C. Department of
Sanitation, were decorated and
placed to receive contributions.
The Y Young Teen, Teen and
Young Adult groups sponsored
dances at which the price of ad-
mission was a new toy. Later,
members of the group contacted
local stores for contributions of
toys. They then sorted out all of
the toys, boxed and sealed them
and distributed the more thau
1.000 toys they had collected.
Other Achievements
The Intermediate Teen Service
Group of the YM-YWHA of Win-
nipeg, Canada, set up an ambi-
tious schedule of community ser-
vice projects for its members and
carried them through. Included
in the group's activities were
preparing and presenting a skit
at a social in an old folks' home;
helping patients at a home tor
emotionally-disturbed boys dee >
rate for a holiday party; canvas*
sing for the March of Dune-;
serving as song leaders at agency*
wide religious programs; sen
as a guest panel on a local I
show to interest other teen- I
community service; hearing guest
speakers from the local volunteer
bureau tell how teen-agers can
offer service. After a year ot this
program the members of thJ
group (all were girls) developed
a "Big Sister" movement through
which they took in girls slightly
> ounger than themselves to carry
on the program as the original
members dropped out for school
or other reasons. ._,



Tnday. March 30, 1962
, #ph 'Isti ftrridHirtin
Page 7-C
LEGAL NOTICE
tl
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Tl,|- IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ndersigned, desiring to engage in
<. under tl"- flctlUoui name of
."Iv liTiCKKY SURPLUS PRODUCTS
'. ''': v \v :i;th Court, Hlaleah In-
.,; r.ei.-t.r said name with the
,.,- ,,. circuit Court ol Dade
,,'in Florida.
'" T .i ROCKET. Sole owner
<. idmaii. Goldstein & Pacster
V ,'rneysfmJU*is>r.tul
w Flagler Street
' K'"'i'lil /l--30, 4 6
LEGAL NOTICE
-. THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 55458-B
is RE Estate "f
' JOSEPH DANZKJ
'" NOTICE TO CREDITORS
-i ui creditors and All Persons Hav-
|IM1> or Demands Against bald
-, hereby notified and requlr-
w] ,,. present any claims an.l demands
.,.,, may have ajralnst the ee-
, JOSEPH DANZKJ deceased
, .,,- Dade County, Florida, to the
judges Of Dade County, and
.,,. game in their offices n the
, ,,v Courthouse In Dade County,
, within six calendar months
from the date of the first publication
,...,.( ,.r the same win be barred,
IRENE DANZIG, Executrix
1153 S.W. 1.1th Avenue
Miami. Florida
1i ROBERT Kol.TNoW. Attorney
i lagler Bt.
1 J 16-23-80. 4 8
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT ]
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
No. 55421-A
IN RE: Estate of
HARRV .1. Ll'KT.
Deceasi tl,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
Tou are hereby notified and rt -
quired to pri sent any claims and de-
iiiaflils which v."i may ha\.-"iil'aTtisi
the estate of HARRY .1 LUFT de-
ceased late of Datle County, Florida,
to the Count) Judges ,-f Pad, County,
and file the Battle In duplicate and .,s
provided In Section 7:13.18, Florida
Statutes, In their nfilces in the Coun-
ts Courthouse in Pad,- County, Flor-
ida, within si\ calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will !" haired.
Dated at Miami. I u.rlda, this 7th
day of March, A D, 1962,
ANNA l.l'I'-r
As Admlnlali atrlx
ARONOVTTS, SiL'.'H & SCHER
Attorneys for Administratrix
(07 Alnsley Building
> :.-ib.2':-^ii
9MM
LEGAL NOTICE
i
N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 55464
Estate of
,i il KENDALL
k ;, i.i'.K HAROLD KENDALL
'NOTICE TO CREDITORS
l, \n en illtors and All P< rsona Hav-
.,,,,- l lemands Against Saw
. i ar< hereby notified and requlr-
, :. pn nl anj claims and demand*
maj have against ih< es-
i,i:i: n KENDALL a I; a
ll vRt ILD KEN1 'Al.l. di asi il
Hade County, Florida, to the
judges of Bade County, and
, name In their offlci b in thi
Courthouse In Pad.- County,
within fix calendar months
ll date of the first publication
hi the same will be barred
MARTIN P. VON /.AMI- I'.
Executor
\ ZAMFT & KRAVITZ
....
o|n Rd Miami Beach, Fla.
3 16-23-30, 4 6
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
No. 55402-C
IN RE: Estate of
TETTA K A MINSK Y.
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO All Creditors and All persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Bald
Estate:
Yon are hereby notifed and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
I the estate of YETTA KAMINSKY de-
ceased late of Pad.- County, Florida,
; to the County Judgi s of Dade County,
and file the sami In their offices in
the County Courthouse in Pad.- Coun-
ty, Florida, within fix calendar
months from the date ol the tirst
publication her.-of. or the same win
be barred.
NATHAN KAMINSK1
1 '\. c itoi
il itoitKitT Kol.TNoW. Attorney
529 W, si l lagh r Street
M ami, Florida
:; 9-1.23-30
"And next week our services will feature a
Kiddush chanted by Cantor Blackstein in
three dimensional stereo."
Copr. 1962. Oornu Produtlioni
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring !- engage In
huslm i the fictitious name of
RICHARD K TBNZEL at 111" N.B.
I3rd Bl So. Miami Beach, Fla., In-
tends to res -'.i said name with the
Clerk ol the Circuit Court of I'ade
i 'ounty, Florida.
TENZEL PROFESSIONAL
ASSOCIATION
la Fla. Pi'ofi ssional Corp. i
s,,le < Iwner
Levy. Leventhal, tjoldsteln a- Krassne*
Attorney s foi Applicant
ill" N.E 163rd si.. N M. B
:i 23-30, I. 6-19
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
| the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business untlet the fictitious name ol
FRKEDMANb CLEANERS al 1718
79th St, Causeway, Miami. Florida in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk ol lh< "In -di Court of Pad.:
Count). Florida. .....
KKEEDMAN s DRY CLEANERS
& LAUNDRY CORP.
Sole iwner
' HAR< d.l' STRUMPF
Attorney for Applicant
:: _'::-:!". t t-13
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE

\ THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 52031-C
;n RE: Estate of
M VURICE I.- KAITI.OW
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that I have
riled my Final Report and Petition
foi Distribution and Final Discharge
a Administrator, C.T.A. "f the es-
tate of MAURICE L. KAPI'l.oW, de-
ceased: and that on the 9th day of
April, 1962, will apply to the Honor-
aid.- County Judges of Dade County,
Florida, for approval of said Final
Report and for distribution and final
discharge as Administrator. C.T.A. of
thl .slat.- of the above-named dere-
d. nt. This 13tb day of March. 19b2.
MEYER CHAIKEN
KOMMEL A.- Roc.F.KS
Vtloi n. > s
4^" Lincoln Road
.Miami H.-ach 3s, Florida .
3'16-23-30, 4/6
NOTICE BY PuBL.CATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIOA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 62C 2288
CONSTANCE LAVERNE SHIVERS,
Plaintiff,
CHARLIE SHIVERS
I tefendant,
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO! CHARLIE SHIVERS
You CHARLIE SHIVERS, are here-
by notified thai a Bill of Complain
for Divorce has bet n filed aga nsl
you, and you ar.- required to serve s
cop) of your Answer or Pleading to
the" Hill of Complaint on the Plaint-
iffs Attorney, I.M'I. KWITNKY. 426
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida,
ll-: 1-5556, and file the original An-
iwer or Pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or be-
fore the 1-th day of April. 1962. If you
f;iil to do so. Judgment by default will
be taken against you for the reitei
demanded In the Bill of CompWnt.
This notice shall be published once
each week for lour consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH PLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 2nd day of March AD.
1JI>*"e It. LBATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court, Pade County, Florida
(seal) r> K. M LYMAN.
Denutv Clerk
' 3/9-16-23-3fi
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
No. 55459-C
IN RE: Estate of
ABRAHAM Ct (HEN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against said
Estate
You are herebj notified and requir-
ed to present any .claims and di
mantis which you may have against '
the estate of ABRAHAM COHEN de-
ceased late of Pad.- County, Florida,
to-the County Judges of Pad.- < min-
iv. and file the same In their offlceR
In the County Courthouse in Dade
County, Florida, within si\ cult-nun
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desli ing to si tage
in business under the fictitious name
,.f SALON D"ARTISTE al 8480 Hard-
ing Avenue, Surfslde, Miami Beach
Intends to reglstei said name with
.-, cierk -i l he Cln til Court ol
i >.,,:. i 'ouni c. Florida.
JOSEPH OF LINO >LN ROAD, IN .
A Fla. Corp.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dcslrlpg to engagi In
l.usln. ss undei the fictitious name of
INSTALCO at 369S B. Uth Avenue.
. I-la.. Intends to register lid
,,.,,,., with ilc Clerk of the Circuit
Court oi l lade County, I lorlda
INTERNATM "NAL STRUCTl RAL
ALUMINUM CORPORATION
. a Mli higan 'oi p.
Calvin Sllber, Pres. Sole Ownei
ALBERT I. ROSEN
Attoi m i for Applicant
-.I" I.in. .-In Rpad
:: 23-30, i >:-U
.!..
th
,f the
same
firM
will
of
months from the
publication hereof,
i. barred,
DAVID col.1.IN
Administrator of Estat)
Abraham Cohen
FAUNCE, KINK A FORMAN
By: Sanford S. l-'aun. e
Attorneys for Administrator
i'.hl' Congress r.uildlng.
M,Wn"3:Fta-FR1-Mn3/16-28-J0.4/
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 62C 1433
JUANITA MARION la 'V. MAN.
Plaintiff,
JESSE JtiEL 1-oWMAN.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
T<' JESSE li 'El. LOWMAN
RFD -'. I' I Box i""
si. Augustine, Florida
You .!...- Joel Lawman, <-
bj notified that a Bill of Co
for Divorce has been filed agninsi
you, : copy of your Answer or Pleadln
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
Probate No 46677-B
IN RE
tiu.iril
S.'.NI '-1
NOTICE
l>LKASI -' a ~ ;l 'bal 'ho
... new guardian
ha> in- ml1 "'
.n Ihi state i
si..-, of Ne-.\ v rk. the und. rslgned
the ''."ui to
Iransfet II funds the New York
uardlan an attorne.% fee ami
therwise, i ui I i" (Ithln mat-
;, r ,.n th> ll ill ol Vprll. 1*82.
MIl.ToN A. FRIEDMAN
nej Kstate
1111 klnsli Building
M a 12 Floi da
3 23-80, l 8-U
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
\ IS HEREB\ GIVEN that
di nil Ing :.....gage in
, ; lit. i titious name of
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 61C 13451
- mi: valentb,
Plaintiff,
MILDRED REGINA POWELL
KNTE,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MILDRED REGINA
POWELL VALENTE
I,. Box in. WhlteHouse
Jacksonville, Florida.
- il MILDRED REGINA I u -
I.L VALENTE, P.O. Box 111. White-
. Jacksonville, Florida, are re-
- -. a I., til,- your answer ti the com-
i ..in for divorce, with the Clerk oi
above Court, ami serve copy
: upon Glno P. Negl ettl, At-
n,.y, 910-11 Congress Bldg., in
i: 2nd Avenue. Miami. Florida, on
bi fore April l, 1962, or else corn-
will I..- tak.n ..s confessed.
Dated this 9th day of March, H't-^
I-:. It LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit court, Pad.- County, Florida
i Bj K M. I.YMA.N.
Deputy Clerk
j/16-28-80, 4'fi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 62C 2660
( AKI.OS P. GUERRA
Plaintiff.
EMMA C. GONZALEZ UUERRA
1 N-fendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: EMMA GONZALEZ GUERRA
San Uizaro 170, 3rd plso, Apt. In
e/ Agulln y Crespo.
Halianu, H.-p. de Cuba. __
YOU, EMMA C. GONZALEZ GUER-
RA, San Laaaro 17". :ir.l plso, Apart:
lo, between Agulla and Crespo, Ha-
ni, it.-n de Cuba, are required to
your answer to the complalnl for
.-orce, with the Clerk of the above
i I. and serve a copy thereof upon
Glno P. Negrettl, attorney H10-I1
i ongress Hldg,, 111 N.E. 3n.l Avenue,
Miami. Florida, ISA., on or before
April 16, 1962, or else complaint will
bi taken as confessed.
Pai.,1. this 13th day of March, 1962.
" '"-......" >' '"-rk,
'lorlda
IN THE COUNTY JUDOE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
No. 55343-A
IN RK: Kstate of
BENJAMIN SIKC1.ER.
D<'not,ce TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All IVIsonsi Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against bald
10 You' are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and .1. -
mands which you may b?4''".8*''"'j'
,, eBtate of BENJAMIN sIKt.LKK
deceased la I e of Pad.- I ounty. FU'l-
Ida, to the county Judges of Dade
County, and file the same in then
..,,,,,; in the County courthouse in
Pad.- County, Florida, within six cal-
endar months from the date of the
rtrei publication hereof, or the same
W,,,C?HARLES SIBGLER Executor
11 i;. iBERT KOLTNOW, Attorney
;,-.';i w.si Flaglei Street
Miami. Florida 9.i.23-80
the
in-
"------ NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SUNRISE APARTMENTS at fOO-ilO-
;',. i..nox Avenue. Miami Beach.
Ftorlda Intend to MfMer ""
with the Clerk of the Ircult t ourt
of Pad.- County Florida.
NATHAN i:\PAT
REBECCA BADA1
JACK P BURR1S
\iii n, v 120 Llnocln Rd.
Miami Beach 89. Fla. ., 1B.,,.1.:1. 4 ,;
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 62C 2709
J. I. K1S1.AK MORTGAGE
CORPORATION OK FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
MIGUEL P. DE LEON and HELEN
G. DE LEON, his wife, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: MIGUEL P, DE LEON and
HELEN O. DE LEON, his wife,
and all parties claiming by
through or under them, If dead
or alive and if dead their un-
known heirs, devisees, legatees,
grantees, assignees, lien.us, cred-
itors, trustees and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property herein described
Residence Unknown.
You are hereby notified that
above caption.-.I action has I.e.II
Btituted against you in the i Ircult
Court of the judicial Circuit of Flor-
ida in and for Dade County to torc-
, los, a mortgage upon the following
described real property. _,,_.on
Lot I In Block 32a of I RT18S
i'\i!K according to the Plat thi ro-
of, recorded in Plat Book B0 al
Page 1 of th.- Public Records ol
l .ad.- Counts Florida,
Yon are required to file your an-
swer to plaintiff's- complalnl with the
clerk of the aforesaid Court, and
serve a copv thereof upon plaintiff's
attorney, MARTIN FINK, nth Floor
Dade Federal Building. Miami ...
Florida, not later than Huh day ol
April. 1962, or a Decree Pro Confesso
will be entered agalnal yu.
Dated: March 13, 1962.
K i: LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Curt. Dade County. Klor'rt'a
(gem) By: HELEN M-.SSI.l-.R
I i.-iuity Cl.-ik
MARTIN KINK
Attorney for Plaintiff
nth Floor Pad.- Federal Bldg.
Miami 82, Florida ,; ^.,,^ ,
iv al 99 N.w. 64th
th.- Hill of Complaini on the Plaint- S( Miami, Fla., Intends to
I iff's attorney. George A O Brlen ...i "j ., A-ith the Clerk of
Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables, ii.-n.ia ^.^ ,-,,,,^1 courl of Pad.- County,
and file the original Answer oi Plena- i,..,,,!,. Dated al Miami, Fla.. this
Ing in th. office of th.- Clerk ol th
Circuit Court on or before the 16th
dav of April. 1962. If yon fail to do
s, judgment by default will i- lakeii
against von for the relief demanded
In ilu Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH KI.OKIPIAN
DONE AM' ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 12th day of March, A P
K B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court, i ade Counts. Floi Ids
(seal) By: HELEN KES8LER,
I ii i.uiy Clerk
GEORGE A. O'BRIEN
223 Aragon Avenue
Coral Gables, Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
3 '16-2 .41
. I lorlda.
I iih das
Mar. h. '.:''-'
EDWARD W. KLE1D
8 i':'.-30, 4/6-19
l\ TME COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AM3 FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 55448-B
i N RE: Kstate of
u ; I.LIA.M .1 ANDREI.I.
P

'--...-.I. mis i.im .ia> ... hmvhi
B B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
circuit Court. Dade Couniy, Plor
(seal) By: K. M. I.Y.MAN
Deputs' Clerk
"IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 62C 2548
.HAN ANTONIO VAZQUEZ
Plaintiff.
I'.OSA VA/Ad'K/.
"NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: ROBA VAJQUBZ
3106 Ml IM.-asant St.. N.W.
yor^^A^l'KZ. .166 N.W.
Ml I'leasani Bt., Washington. D.C.,
a,.- required to file your answe,-to
Hie Complllnt for Divorce. With the
Clerk of the above Pom I and MTV
a copy thereof upon Glno P. |rattl.
Attorney. :'li.-ll Congress Bldg.. Mi-
ami. Wotida. on or before Aptil is.
1962, or else complaint will be taken
''Yiai'ed at Miami. Florida, this Sth
,la\ Of March. 1962.
E II. 1.KATHKltMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
,seal) By: K M I.Y.M -\N.
Deputy Clerk
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 55328-A
1MHJeORD*CHARLBS BTBINHARDT
a/k/a C. Btelnhai dt,
a/k/a Max Btehihardt,
1 leceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified ami requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of MILFORD CHARLES BTBIN-
HARDT dcceas.,1 late of Dade l.oun-
tv Florida, to the County Judges ol
I'ade County, and file the same in
their offices In the County Courthouse
in Dade County. Florida, within six
calendar months from lb.- dale .a the
first publication hereof, or the sain,
will be barred _____
KVA STEINHARDT.
Admlnistratrlx
SIDNEY BPRONSON
Attorney for Administratrix
1\\ Security Trual Hldg.
Miami 32, Florida
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
No. 60701 George T. Clark
IN RE: Estate of
HENRY DBWEY IACOB1 .
'''NOTICE TO CRED TORS
To ah Creditors
ing Claims or D.
I
Yon are I
red I pri
man,Is Which -' ',';
the estate of HENRI ,A
com ......
Florida, in lln
c.unP
cate and as provl
Florida Stal lei [flees in
ii Counts '
tv 1-lorlda. w thin MS : ii .
from lln tlm. Ol thl I
hereof, or same will be 1
Dated i- Ml > -v ''
dav of l- bi ary. A.l
I'HEU "|OL
V s A N
BERN S Ml 1-1
By: Mill
All-nil-
1414 Congn
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COLNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
No. 55377-B
IN RE: Estate of
IDA KKI.PMAN.
p, i i ..
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claim- -a Demants Against sani
Kstat i-
You are hi i I notified and re-
uuiie.l to present
aiands which N
the estate of IDA FELDMAN d.
,;.,! iat< of Dade County. Florida,
,,, th. County '''" "'' Dnre """',
u i,n.I fill thi duplicate and
as l>ro> i'l. rida
Statutes, in
iv Courthouse iii Dad. Countj
Id i within six calendar month
the tm -
of or the same will
Paled Bl '
day '-I !' bruary. a p
con FBI i
As l-'.\- .
MORRIS Ci .HEN
Attoi ill | foi .la- Fell
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
:nu ci.,, Demands Against Said
Estate:
1 ,;, hen bs notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which inn mas have against the es-
tate of WILLIAM .IANPKK1.I. iH-
. ... ., late f Dade Counts Florida,
luil-i s OI Pail, coun-
ty, and ui- the same in their offices
in -l '. ants Courthouse in Dade
1 w ithln six calendar
from the dale of the first
publication hereof, or the same will
i hai I
Pill I.IS.- 1KSIN
.1 ,\
< Wtorn.

2 10, 11-13
CE PNDER
MAME LAW
\ rt HEREBY GIVEN that
INI\ m: noli: CLEAN-
N v 'venue, Mi-
ami. I -1 : I-n''
; thl Circuit
Ida.
THOMAS BRAND YS
II \ br (j SCHER

I |f>, i I 13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
SoTlCI IS HEREB! RIVEN that
the indi ring- to engage in
husln. the flctll lous name of
\-.\-\ PRINTERS at 32 N.W. 20th
Street. Miami, Pad.- County, Florida
In.....i- .. .- i|d name with
thi Cl.-rk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Counts. i-.
aim -I.PIIK .1 ROSMAN
Sol,- Owner
Ri IBERT I. BPIEOELMAN
809 Blscas n- Building
IS w si Flagler Street
Miami .'.' I-', i,l .
. y for Api '
8 l'-lt;-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY HIVEN that
the nil-.- age in
business under the fictitious name of
THE FLORENCE APARTMENTS al
Miami Peach. Fla,,
- with
I 'ad.

V.
intends to i glster said name
ui Court ot
i
IENCE QREENBERG
PA I'l KW1TNEY
oln '' ad -, -


Page 8-C
+ knist ffcridfiarr
Friday. March 30. 196M
Recent seminar at Temple Emanu-El on "Teen-
agers Question Jewish Education," sponsored
r v the Council of Parent Teacher Assns. of the
Pureau of Jewish Education shows (left to right)
Myron Maas, B'nai B'rith Youth Organization;
Leon Firtel, United Synagogue Youth; Alida
Krcvetz. Bureau Central Hebrew High School;
Raphael Yunes, Temple Emanu-El; Dr. Martin
Rosenthal, Dade County Child Guidance Clin-
ic; and Louis Schwartzman, executive direc-
tor, Bureau of Jewish Education.
WKAT-FM
from BRAHMS
TO
BARTOK
You'll Hear the World's Finest Music on
WKAT-FM
93.1 on ycjr FM dial
MIAMI'S ONLY PURE
CLASSICAL MUSIC STATION
Programming MORE LIVE Concerts!
WKAT-FM
Parley Views
Anti-Semitism
In W. Germany
ROME (JTA) Anti-Semitic
iorces are increasingly active in
efforts to undermine the democra
tic system in West Germany and
other countries, members of the
European executive of the World
Jewish Congress agreed this week.
Meeting at Milan, the executive
called attention to the continuing
growth of Nazi anti-Semitic ele-
ments conducting open large-scale
propaganda.
In a strong resolution, the ex-
ecutive members fully endorsed
the recent warning issued by the
Central Council of Jews in Ger-
many concerning the dangers in-
volved in the freedom with which
neo-Nazi organizations in West
Germany were able to dissemi-
nate propaganda to poison the
minds of Germans, particularly
German youth, against Jews.
The resolution cited slanderous
rttacks keyed to the argument that
the Nazis did not murder 6.000.000
European Jewish men. women and
children during World War II.
It called on the West German
federal government to take imme-
diate steps to eradicate Nazi in-
fluence by applying 'sternly" and
effective legal and administrative
measures available for that pur-
pose.
Chagall Plants
JNF Sapling
By Special Report
Marc Chagall, world renowned
painter and sculptor, recently
placed the first pine sapling in the
lO.OOO-tree Jewish National Fund
forest on the grounds of the lladas-
sah Hebrew University Medical
Center near Jerusalem. The forest
is a tribute by the Fund. Israel's
land reclamation and afforestation
agency, to Iladassah, largest Ameri-
can Women's Zionist Organization,
on its 50th anniversary.
Chagall, accompanied by his
wife, came to Israel from Paris to
attcn.i the dedication of the mag-
nificent stained-glass windows he
designed for the synagogue in the
Center. Born in Vitebsk. Russia,
in 1877. this great artist has ab-
sorbed t h e environment of his
childhood and the traditions of Ju-
daism into his intensely colorful
and imaginative style of painting
and sculpture.
Jacob Tsur. world ctiairman of
Keren Kayemeth in Jerusalem, pra-
' siding at the dedication ceremon-
ies, expressed Israel's appreciation
for what Hadassah has done in
*!

MARC CHAGALL
to help the country push back U
the past and will do in the future desert by planting trees.'
Jbra perfect
fteaftk^ijiinhodhai) -
In this picturesque and delightful setting,.experience
the most beneficial and enjoyable holidoy you
hove ever known as you luxuriate at The Arlington.
Bathe away all your aches and pains due to
tension and fatigue in the world-famous, radioactive*
thermal waters of Hot Springs right in The Arlington...
relieve rheumatism, arthritis and high blood pressure.
Swim in our fabulous, twin-cascade, temperature-
controlled pools.. .dance.. .and be entertained.
Golf at its best with Club privileges on three
18-hole courses new brilliant Tifton greens. Fishing
and all water sports on three nearby lakes.
Plenty of night life In Hot Springs.. .galaxy of
name entertainers.
for law rain and beautiful color brocW*
wiiii to Eogot May, Manager

HOT SPRINGS
NATIONAL PARK ARKANSAS
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC.
2148 N.W. 10th Ave. FR 3-7180
Have your roof repaired now: you
will i.ive on a nw roof later.
"Satisfactory WorkJ>y
Experienced Men"
I represent the
METROPOLITAN UFE INSURANCE C(
1 Madison Ave., New York 10. N.
-a good friend in time of need.
NAT CANS
3200 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
Phones FR 3-4616 or HI 69981
When you move
to town...or to
a new home...
Your Welcome Wagon
Hostess will call with a
basket of gifts... and
friendly greetings from
our religious, civic and
business leaders.
i
If you, or others you
know, are moving, be
sure to phone. Welcome
Wagon.''
HI 84994
WELCOME WAGON


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday. March 30. 1962 Jm>lsli f/oridfiar Page *w-d LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICF Mrs. Jonas Brotman (center) receives plaque irom Mrs. A. Lester Stepner (left), president of the Mt. Sinai Hospital Garden Club, for having made her home available as a setting for the club's recent flower show. Presentation was at a victory brunch hosted by Mrs. Stepner and Mrs. Hany Moscoe (right), club vice president, at the home of Mrs. Seymour Rubin. Home Mortgages Near Top Figure Home-purchase mortgages re(orded in Florida last year num( red 189.929 and involved a total • I $1,527,149,000, the Florida State • h amber of Commerce said here. •Both number and amount of n ui!L':r^cs last year were the Ihird highest on record, 1959 being top Oli 11 ii a i* / c ? HYM/-IM SIEGEL • '• %  • 13 NR Bth I'! No V' ii" i, died Mar. 24, He came here %  fi om X. \\ York Rnd wa rtlred rei tauranl on n< r i wife, Ruth: I ^ <> ..it-.. ierl Hn i T and %  iln shti r --. %  ... re Mai 25 in Gor! i mt. ral i lome. yt-ar. Compared with 1960. last year's number of mortgages dropped 7 percent and the amount. 6 percent. Nationally, there was a o percent gain in the dollar volume of these home purchase mortgages. "Mortgages included in these figures are those 'if $20,000 or less 'as reported to the Home Loan Bi'nk Board) and are secured almost entirely by residential properties, ilthough some small business properties are also included." IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR DA. IM PROBATE, No. 55594.A IN UK i: tale nl < i r ri > A. r kssi.i 'i !•". Ill ...,.-. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All I i .urn All Pi r H Having Claim* • Demands Against ^iii' Bstuti : V. ii ni • he'-eb in.i.f ,1 and required 1" |i tSelll .i ;i> i lit! 118 ;i Ti1 demanl* which vou ma) have against the estate ol (1TTO A. IWSSLOF %  i ii lati of I lade County, Florida, to ii" Count} Judges of Dade Count; % %  II i i %  the M ime In duplicate .mil nw provided i" Section T:i" it>. Florida Statutes, In their nffli Hi" Count >Courthouse in I lade i 'ounty, I .". Ida, witlil Ix i nlendar months fri thi nf the ii.>i pulii ca of, o :!" Name w iil be ban • d Daii >l itl Mlnm I rlda, thb 23rd •In y of M \ \lc II.I.IE S I' \SSI.I ilF ,i;>. ARONOVITZ SH VI'B & SCHER Al lorni ys < I Exi i tl Ix n i7 A'ln-ley irull ling Miami J2, Florida 3 SO, I 6-13-20 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR.DA. IN PROBATE. No. 55561-A IN" RE: Estate of THI-'.i IDORE ROI" VN'I'i INAKI I ii ,-, ., i NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Ha' in:: I'l.iiinin Demands Attains! Said Kst.il. You are l I no! II • .1 and required to present any i lalms and demands which yon ave against | nP pstati of THEODORE ROHANTON \KI deceased Int. of Hade County, Klorlda, lo the i 'ount} li"! i Dade Count' and i Hi the Bame In dind'cate nnd ;". provided in Section %  ; %  is, pic H la St itutc n, in thell ol ii ., i,c ii,. i •. ii i 'niirthou c u Ithlu six cilindnr months from the tlnu ol In l,ul Rtlon h col or the name hi i, rred ; H | .\i i. PI rlda, this %  M „ ..-. x I |i.-J jl i : y |>nsA XT! IN 'KM iAI.AM \ Bxi %  ul r v :: JO, I G-ia-2ll NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ilnundersigned, desiring to i in.sin. >SK under til-fictitious nami ol RICHARD R. TENZEL, M.D.. at 111" N E. I' r i St., No. Miami Beach, !• in., intends lo resistor said nam< with tinClerk of tinI 'ii .--lit i ... i ol I M.I. Count '. I "".I Ida. TENZEL PRnPEKSIONALASSOCIATION _t.i i-'l.i i '— :ni.l t:.,r u.is '. owner Levy, Leventhal, Goldsti n & Kraasner Attoi neys for Applicant 11 m N.E. I65rd St., N. M B .', 23-30, I 8-13 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME I AW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai lit.undei si: ned, IH't iCi iUR PRINTERS: I V A N II O E PRINTERS & I.ITIIi UlRAPHBRS in 691 N.E. I2."ith Stri i I, North Miami Intends to register said names with the Cleric of the Circuit Court of Dade ('..null. Flol "hi IVAN M. Ki IENII ISBERli Role 11 ller HENRY A K VMP, Attorni y 1221 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, I la, JE l-:'.::M .; 10, I 6-13-2H %  ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! vJwisfi ITiinrffdffjun solicits your legal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service al legal rates IP'uil Vl\ 3-1605 for messenger service rV#\*J3M LEGAL NOTICE MRS. BERTHA EPSTEIN ( .!" West ave died Mar. 21 %  came here 10 years ago from %  lelphla. Sni vl\ Ing lire Ihrei Including Martin; three daus/hMra. s.l i. in T.iiin. ni num. Mr.-.. r.uth Shlndler and M s Pay Qold.'..ii. nnd 15 grandchildren. Services Mar. 23 in Riverside Memorial .;> %  N..I mandy Isle. ISAAC FRANK %  ;. ..f ".! I', n-na-na dr Hlalt ah, •'-' Mai 21. H" came here 17 years ago New London, Conn., and was vner of a cutlery company. Surviving are his wife. Yetta; four I ters, Mrs. Anna Busby, Mrs. lared I'..!.... Mi-s Doris l iimii and M -. Helen Goldstein; three brother! Including Martin and Ahe: :i slater ..".1 five grandchildren. Services were M.I ."', in Gordon Funeral Home. LOUIS SILVERMAN of 1240 N'H 180th St., died Mar. in Atlanta. He came i"i" "i-^iit ago from New York ami was ihi Hoi-Ida representative ni the Cats lint Rubber Co. 11" was n member • • the North Miami Beach Knlghta "f Surviving are his if", i ii daughter, Mrs. Harriet Brandt; a son, Dr Gilbert Sllvernian and five giandchildren Service* wen Mar. :':i in Beyer Funeral Home, NORMAN H. 8EIL of 7733 SW 33rd tor., died M Hi ....... h i. I; \. rs ago fioni .ii ,i ml w .is mi Industi lal elec iali in. ni. il" wag .i vi :• %  !.ni %  I tinKorean War: .i member of the %  bwisli WinVeterans, the Knlghta "' and ilnCoral Wit Jew sh S n \ i\ i"" are ii s i>at • nt rid Mrs. Martin Bell: his wife, ;. I i oth< i. I..'is. Set ivere Mar. J. in Gordon Puneral Home. MRS. SOPHIE ASKOWITZ 1323 Euclid ave %  11.-• I Mar 23 ni" here !."• years as" from i 1 ".11. Surviving are in sons, Lewis nnd Albert; two daughters, Mrs Rosa Towlen and Mrs. EBvaiine LIpchlnsK}, "l"liii i. .ii and l^ %  rent %  %  hitdren Sei vi i Vlai 26 In .1. Mi i M. .ri il i li..|.. I. Alton rd MRS. ELIZABETH RE1CII30N "•. in 371 NE 180th dr.. .1 ed Mar. 23. She %  ame here 12 s n Surviving are .i dnughter, Mrs. Bus,Pi li-.niil:. r ft I R i i ndchlldren and .i gres i I bil.i Services Wei's Mat -i> In Beyer Puneral Home. LEGAL NOTICE .N THE COUNTY JUDGF'5 COURT IN AND FOP. DAD= rOIJNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 5M74-C IN RE: Estate "i HENRY A I.ASK. i. I i. c, ii^.-.!. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate; A".. 11 are hereby notified and r< ed to in. -• nt uni lalms and i • manda which you ma} havi the • -till" of HENRY A I VSKt i ;i-. .I late of I lade Count] Floi i Ii to tin County Judges "f Dade County, and file the same in duplicate and as provided In Section 733.16, Klo Idi Statutes, in their offices ;n the County Courthouse in Dade County, Fiot Ida, within six calendar nths from I the time of the first publication hereof, or the same will be barred. liated at Miami, Florida, this 13th day "f March, A.D. 1962. OSCAR L. I.ASK'i i As Executor TALIANOl F, WALLER ci L1TMAN Attorne} s (. r Executor 120 Lincoln ltd.. Miami Beni h, Fla. %  : 10, i %  IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOR DA. IN PROBATE. No. 55347-B IN RE Hstati i HIS A. SAMI 'ELS, It, cased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To Ml Creditors and \n r.-r .."'' %  • Ing CldTms or Demands Agalnal s'.ii.l You in" hereby notified and requtr, ,i |,i |n... i ni> i.iims and di mands which • %  '• may have against :li, estate of I.'H'IS A. SAMI'El.S aseil late of I lade County, P lorIda, '" ih" County Judges of Dadi mil. and ill.il"f .ni" In duplicate .mil us provided in Section 733 Is, .'.. statutes, In their offices in the C It}' ("..lull"."III I'.i.l" Cntintv, Florida, within six calendar ni .nths from tintime of tl"first • • i.li. .iiii.n hereof, or ih" same will 111 li:nr"il. I i it, ,i RI \i mil, Florida, this _';:i-il daj of March, A D 196 RI is M.I VI W, S < Mll'.I.S vExecutrix ABE SCHt INFELD -. for Exi %  In Lincoln Rd Miami \'-% % %  '<. I la. :'. 30, -I 8-13-20 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C.RCUIT OF OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADL COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 62C 3098 JOSEPH C STt IKES, Plaintiff, vs. ANN .1. STt IKES, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE Tl i ANN I s l'i IKES 267 Lakeview Vvi i 'amhrldgi M You, II i .• I" "1" noi Ii -i I hat .' Bill of Complaint i"i i >i* oi ce hs filed ag Insl < i i and lou a .i ,n. .i to si rve f > %  %  ver i t to the Hill % %  %  "om plain) on il" I 'lalnl ffs n I urn. ; Nll'IMA V S I' M .1.1 IT I I" H da Miai 11a and ri tin m iini.l Answer oi Pli i %  In tit of the Clerk of i !"• Clrr It Co I ,, r before !!" %  30th da I of Iprll, I9i 2. || .,.11 lull In ii.. i .. .i id n • i:i -iH v. ill be taki n aga lust j ".i f. ir he n Ii" 1 den andi .1 in i !" %  Bill of i 'onipliifnt. T • ill be publishi d "i 1 i each week for four consecutive weeks il THE IKWI H ILi IRI1 HAN. \\|i ORDERED .ii M :. this 22nd da} of March, A.I). 1902. E R LB \THERMAN, C circuit Court, Dade County, Florida seal) B} K. M. I.V.MAN. I lenuty Clei k :: :n>, I %  fi-i::-L'n NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage n business under Hi" fictitious name of FI'N iMI: BKSTAI BANT at i .-. T'MII Kit'eel Causeway, North Bay Vil age, l in.. Intends to registi nun • with the Clerk of tin fir i "ottrl of l lade i 'nunty, Fli rlda. DAVID KLKIMAN. INC n Fla. i 'in :•. 1 '.i i.l K N man, I 'resident i .i.i Klclmnn. Secrctai ARtlXllVITZ. SILVER & SCHE Ai ;..i II. ys !'-. Applicant n-l. v Bull tin.:: 10 Cti-13 -" IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN TPOBATE No. 5:>327-C IN RE Esl i MAl'RICl ill BRENNER .. ... NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persm ll.iv. i. a 'lalms oi l i in ds \im Said i tit v.. mi i each of \ ..II are I I i.inl required to pi esent an> claim .ni demnndi wiiich • •ii her "t" you, nia} liii t e ag lust thi of \l ll'RICE II BRENNER ,1 late "f I'A I >E Count I Ida, In '!" %  Honorable County Judges "f I lade Count} and t iI Hi their offlci .in the I' Hint} i housi in I II i. Colt i ••. Flol %  .. lthiti six < ileni in months from tl"date %  first publication h I s.ii'i claims ni "!• lands t" contain the address ••'* ihe claimant un.l i.> ... > A rn i.i ii nd |iri si nt ed as a fori said, "i same u ; ll he barred. Dated March 21, A.D. 1962 REBECC \ L. BRENNER As I :•.••. iilrfx of thi I ..%  Will an I i Ti -I imi ill of Ma ell Bret Deceased. DANIEL NEAI. HELLER RIO Ainslei Rulldlng Miami 32, lim Ida An..! ii,-v for Executrix •: 23-30, 1,6-13 NOTICE BY PUBi.'CAT.CN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA N AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 62C 290b VIOL \ Bl'B, Plaintiff, \ OSCAR Bl'B, 1 '..;. ml.i SU'T FOR DIVORCE Tl I: %  ISCAR Bl'B \\ j Hill Apartment's, Apt. 13E I'm Ml. Win m Placi Newai li. New Jersey You, OSCAR Bl'B, are hereby i">iiii..ii that ii Bill of Complaint f"i Dli has in "ii filed agalnal you, and you ni % %  • %  '! i" sen %  • a cop} "f your Answ.r or Pleading to the BUI plaint "ii th" Plaintiff's attorney. ANOELO A. ALL 100 Alnsley Building, Miami ::J. I IOI Ida, and file the original Answer ..i Pleading in the office ni' the Clerk of the On ult i ,,uii .. ... before the 23rd iim of 1962. If you fall %  ." %  Juda in. m h; ilermilt will be taken against v, i for i I. relief in munded In the ;:i : ,,t i 'on |i a nt. This ii' shall %  • i ublishi %  once i mil ei f.n i" ii c !•-". utlve u^. ks In THE .. i :WI8H FLi 11*11 'IAN. DUNE L\|i iiRDERED al Miami, %  i f Ml h, A 11, E I! I.i: VTHERMAN, Clerk, It Court, l'i"i" i' mnt} Flo isi .I.I 11} HELEN KKS.-I.KI: I ii [iut s Clerk VNdELl A ALI 'lalntlff IHI \ : %  Building HI mi J. Klorlda %  : 6-13 MRS. MATILDA SILVERMAN il, of 7S21 Abbott ave. died Mar. :'"•. she clime h, i,. IS \ers ago from Ncwiu-k, N i mi.i wne n member ol the Hotel Qreetera Assn. Burvivlng is one son. Servloei w. re in Newark with Biv.rshii. Memorial Chapel, Alton ni in charge local!) MRS IRMA WERTHEIM %  I, "f 7;m Pennsylvania ave., died Mar, L'i. sh.. came her. 12 igo from New York. Surviving la her hii-tiand Carl. Services were Mar. 26 in Riverside Memorial Chapel, Alt d. BENJAMIN J. ZINO 63. or IBII., Daytonla rd., Minn Beach, die il.Mnr. L'O He came here 10 years ago i'i. .in Chicago and was ;i retired i".st office employee, II. was B vet'ja \v. i,i w •:,, %  II, at • •I Temple Iimanu-El, he >' Society and the Amarinan i0 Pennsylvania Avenue, Miami B.ach. Florida, intend to reglater said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida. ARON SNI.\n COLA SN'l.M" HAROLD SHAPIRO Attorne) s for Aron Snlad A Pola Snlad !/80, 1/6-18-20 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW MOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that 11,, mdi .in d "" Irlng i" en 1 In nder I !" %  flcl n lous ".. me i I A %  HEM i. M %  ni 1180 Palm Avenue, M.I.. i. Mn. intend to reglater said : I.I iin with the Clerk "f the Circuit Court ni 1 1 nie Counts. Fl i Ida. CHARLES l-.M.MAN INEZ !• AIM VN j, :;u. i t-U-20 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY HIVEN that in". %  > %  %  .. i I rlns to engi ... i rict tlous name of \l \\ s CLEANERS at 2922 i 'oral ffaj. Mil ml, llot Ida Intend to i .mi nami with l he i '!• rk of i ..i,i Court of I lade i' Kl li.l.i. RKN.IA MIN BEl "K TllnM VS i BRANDYS I i'. iNi IVITS5, SIL\ I :R .v SCHER ... leu n t s itiiT All Miami I I NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW \. iTIi %  : is HEREBY ilVEN that Ii %  %  II. d, ..." Irina '< %  %  ngagi In !. ii Iness ui • ne n' AI.S'i RVE AIM IITMENTS al 6-til 8th -.. i. • \' ml Bi ai Ii. I "1 rlda %  i ,! n.iii • %  u i'h il"i "i. k Court il l 'a II Conn y, SAMl'EL Y \.V' IW1TZ MINNIE YANt i\\ ITZ tt & MANNHI .IE11 Vpii in. MOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE C'P.CU\'• COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CiRCUIT OF OF FLORIDA IN AND TOR DM5E COUNT" I-' <-" "VNCERY. No. 62C 3311 DOROTHY MAY 1 I R.N EH, Plaintiff, ROBERT Wll SON TI'RNBR, Defendant, SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ROBERT U ll.Sn.N TI'RNER II Niitiiiii.il Publishing Co. Washington. D.C. You. ROBERT WILSON TURNER, are nereb) notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you, and you are required i" serve a cop) ol your Answer or Pleading in the Bill ni Complaint on the Plaintiff's attorney, CHARLES M. KELLY, 1328 E. Itli Ave.. Hlaleah, Florida, and file the oiisinai Answer or Pleading in !h. office of tl" Clerk of the i 'ii ""ii '..ui i mi or before the 80th dm ..f April, 1962. if you fall i" • lo so, judgment b) default will be taken against you for the relief deman led in ih" BUI ni' t'omplaint. Tins until.shall be published once ich week i" four consecutive weeks in i in: JEWISH FI.OR1DIAN, DONE AND ORDERED .it Miami, Florida, this 87th day of March A.D. IM2, K B LKATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida li> : K. M. I.V.M \N. 1 teputy i 'lei k .., i/6-13-20 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to encage In business uniie: tl" fictitious name of REMARK iixsis RESTACRANT at nil" S.W, I", in A>. i.ii. Miami Intends t.. register said name with the i i, ik .' il" Oil ult "ii i "i Dude i 'mint *. Florida tSEl Utl'.E P. KRAMER Sole i\> mi :: 23-3H, 1 IN THE C RCl'IT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 62C 3008 SAI HE I.AI'II il >. Plaintiff, OKI IRI SE LAPIDI S. I lADE 1El •i:i:.M. SAV INllS A N I I.i IAN ASSl ii 'I VTH IN >F Ml VMI, tiREATER MIAMI FEDERAL s VVINi IS AND Ll>AN ASSl iCIATll IN. .mil AMERIi "AN S.W IM ;S AND I.i IAN .'.SSI ii 'IATION, i %  • '. i ';..ins. NOTICE IV PUBLICATION TO DEFEND You. flEi iRiiE i. v l'i I il'.-. in hereIi; ni ii fled l hat .i "omplalni for I Us c..\. y, : %  I-I ire Mi : tgage i s • -11 i. : Trust and .... been I 111 .1 aga Insl • I to s ..... •nswei in l". ading lo tl %  on the Plaintiffs atti rne}. MILTI >N ARTHI i: FRIED, SI I \ Building, Miami 32, Florida, and I ling In il" ,,ri,,., ni hi 'li h "i h. %  'ii %  nil Court mi "i i" fore 11" 1 Ird day of April, 1962 If you fall i" do s". judgment bj default will be taken against > 'or i he 11 liel demandi •! in the I "omplaint. This notice shall be published onee each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED al Miami, Florida, this 21st day of March, A.D. 1962. E, B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk Circuit Court, lin.le Counlyi Florida (seal) By: HELEN KEKSLER Deput) Clerk MILTON ARTHUR FRIED sin Alnsle) Building Miami ::.'. Florida Attorney for plaintiff 10, i 1-18 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engagfi in business under the fictitious name of 11 \• s ASSOCIATES ni 7680 Blscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida intend to register said name with the Clerk of ih. Circuit Court "f Dade County, i-1..i ida. NORMAN .1. DAVIDSON WILLIAM S1EOEL MARTIN FINE Atioi ne) Im Applicants i t-18 NOTICE TO DEFEND or ORDER OF PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 62C 2973 ELI 'KB I5EIIRGE illl-'l-'. Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH Ht'rF, I ii fl n.lalit. SUIT FOR DIVORCE Tl l: ELIZABETH Hl'Fr Apt. 120; :':i4 W. Adams Blvd. Los Angeles, California You, ELIZABETH Hl'Fr. are hereby notified that ,i Bill of Complaint for Divorce lias been filed against you. .ni.I you an required to serve a cop) oi your AIIS.MI or Pleading to the li.H "i Complaint on t iw Plaintiff's Attorney, Sanford M. Bwerdlln, -in Seybold Building, Miami :!:'. Florida and t.i" the original Answer or Ph adlng In the office "i tin clerk .if Hi, in. nit I'liin t on "i before the 23rd da) of April, 1982. n you fall t" .in s... judgment by default will he taken against you foi the relief demanded in the Bill Ol i" plaint This notice siiall be published onoe each we.k for Tour consecutive weeks in TDK JEWISH FLORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, H>l20th da) "l March A.I). 1962. i: B. LKATHKRM \N, Cl< rk. Circuit i ''.nt, I lade C it) Florida 11} : HE1 EN KESSLER I ii put) i "lerk 3 : 1-30, I 6-18 -'<" IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 5-1786 IN RE Estate of IA TANNER i i easi ii. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To .Ml i 'reditoi a and All Pel so is I l.iv ..! Demand? Against Said :: late: ... not li li .1 .im! i • 'i ilr,',l in |^i .ii, i n> 'n inand di mands u In. h i "ii ma) i nsl the i sBEN'IA T \NNEH leci .-. .1 loseph County, I lorlda, to >h. Count) Judges oi County, i,.l tlie tl" same i dupltcati .i '"1 as pros i.i,,i In s. %  lion ". Florida Statutes, in Ihi i ni ei In the Coun> Courtliousi in l 'a le Count). Florida, within six calendar months from the I "i in. rust publication heroof, >r t ii. sa me will '. barred. Dated al Miami, Florida, this nh da) "f Februar), A.D, I9C2. BERNARD i IPPBRMAN As Administrator MILTON A. FRIEDMAN s Attorne) for Estate of Oenla Tanner nil Amsli s Building Mi,.mi :'£. l-Ti.ri.lii 3 13-80, i b-13 100 COPIES-$2 (PHOTO OFFSET) ANY DOCUMENT (ClUB BOttf TINS 1ETTIR gfrarr pit a DINGS) (SVftxIl or aj.*14Black & White) Reproduced On Bond Paper WHILE YOU WAIT! CASH CARRY SUNSHINE PRESS 95 N.E. 13th Street Phone FR 1-0815



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V + iemist rVrHfrtr ~ H 1 Cooking v Corner _: !UUii I ;—.%  •. %  *: ••' %  !'* %  %  % % % %  • %  :a %  %  %  %  %  -__;:%  • %  • PrvVry. Marco 30. 1962 -VJI Hneoth ar. J iw>m wiiti • %  *= -a.', / : i P "%  91 -;a -npu i %  %  %  ... i %  %  7 %  %  %  •%  %  %  New! WAX il pvpsse deaaa •• • x ) c • • • ckans everytfmi .';:ITS:::: .;.' %  %  U -• LI VI %  IBBKI mr_ .. ~i *-: niw --" I %  "•' %  • • .: TIMBXS -i.i.%  l True Sisters Assist Clinic %  L*E Ka 7 ..." .; see "T-aae at X TI .. 3*t. < Ti u jut :• a l ci *-. Esfcr tar Fissiftr. hbti mia tW sapnisiM of Rabbi Mendel Chodrow %  £ E : -: = **T W" B.W. *5H $u MMH FW. Nk •! 14M2



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Page 4-C *Jewlsti Her Mian Friday. March 30. 1962 Key Administration Figures Note Values in Community Center Works Government leaders have recently applauded the Jewish Community Center movement as a "constructive factor"' in American communal life. Within the past few months, key figures in the Kennedy Administration noted the "values inherent in Jewish Community Center participation and service." This is in keeping with the attitude of previous administration leaders, who frequently indicate that JCCs and YM-YWHAs affil iated with and served by the National Jewish Welfare Board "have enriched the lives of people of all ages, and have given lung and constructive service to their communities Declared Abraham Ribicoff. Secretary of Health. Education and Welfare: "Jewish Community Centers and the Young Men's and Young Women's H e b r e w Associations affiliated with the National Jewish Welfare Board provide significant community service by helping people of all ages to use their leisure hours constructively for their development as active citizens of our land. These local organizations are doing a wonderful job in providing social, recreational and educational facilities for their members, and have my best wishes for the continued success of their programs." Arthur S. Goldberg. Secretary of Labor, said that "It is a fundamental responsibility of any society to develop its youth into mature, well-balanced adults, and to provide for the social needs of all its citizens. Under the American democratic system a large share of this responsibility is borne by private organizations. The Jewish Community Centers and YM-YWHAs affiliated with the National Jewish Welfare Board have made important contributions to these ends through their social, welfare and recreational facilities. Their efforts are vital to the maintenance of a strong, vigorous and free society, and essential to the demo3'W£ £*H*fit. *4U *4g cratic process itself." As Newton N. Minow. chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, sees it: "All Americans participating in civic affairs are extraordinarily aware of the need for the constructive use of leisure time. The tremendous increase in leisure time can provide value both to the individual and to the community. By using our free time wisely, each one of us can enhance personal skills and at the same time participate actively and responsibly in contributing toward the welfare of the total communitv. "As a member of the board of directors of the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago. I had the opportunity to see at close range how leisure time was actually used for these individual and community objectives. It seemed to me that the constructive group activities in which individuals engaged also had a preventive aspect. Undoubtedly, young people, perhaps particularly teenagers, who are given the opportunity and guided to engage in meaningful and satisfying activity are less likely to seek undesirable means as an outlet for their energies. "May I say that my experience as a member of the board of the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago made a deep impression on me. Through that experience, I saw the degree to which dozens of busy business and professional men and women devoted time, energy and thought to an organization concerned with the fruitful leisure-time needs of individuals of all ages. In doing so they gave of themselves to their fellow-citizens and to their city. This kind of dedication to individual and community welfare is in the best tradition of American democracy and freedom." A very young member of the "People of the Book" celebrates Jewish Book Month in a symbolic setting at a Jewish Community Center. Jewish Book Month and Jewish Music Festival are two annual events sponsored by JWB to help keep alive an awareness of our cultural heritage. Older adults enjoy a meeting of their group at the Jewish Community Center. Whether it's having fun, or working on a community project, older folks like the feeling of being needed and appreciated which comes from talcing part in activities at Jewish Community Centers affiliated with and served by the National Jewish Welfare Board. Greetings • "i Continued from Page 3-C convention, sees it: "JWB's 1962 national convention has been planned as a stimulating and exciting experience. "Workshops and plenary sessions will provide opportunities for measuring how far we have come and for charting the road ahead. The debate over the recommendations of the committee on reappraisal, the opening event in the nationwide celebration of the Jewish military chaplaincy centennial, the proposals of the public affairs committee and the annual Frank L. Weil Awards are among the scheduled sessions that will add up to an inspiring and octive four days." The delegates and visitors from every corner of the country and from a number of foreign lands will, we hope, leave Miami Beach enriched by new ideas, animated with a new will to service, and encouraged by a new understanding of the work of the National Jewish Welfare Board. • • • According to Mrs. Milton Sirkin, of Miami Beach, vice chairman of arrangements: "Preparations are underway to greet the delegates coming to the biennial meeting of the National Jewish Welfare Board. The arrangements committee, is exerting every effort to assure the comfort and happiness of the hundreds of people who will be attending the convention. "We are involving scores of our own local Jewish Community Center members on this committee to guarantee the success of our efforts. Our committee is de. lighted to be responsible for supplying the volunteers for registration, room hospitality, transportation, receptions, information, and the myriad of details that go into the smooth running of a venture this size." This chaplain blowing the Shofar is typical of the 350 fu. time and part time Jewish chaplains who will conduct Higb Holy Day services for 150,000 Jewish servicemen and hospitalized veterans at U.S. military posts on four continent? The chaplains are recruited, endorsed ecclesiastically ar. ] served by the National Jewish Welfare Board's Commission, on Jewish Chaplaincy, which represents the Rabbinical Assembly of America (Conservative), Rabbinical Council of America (Orthodox) and Central Conference of American Ran bis (Reform). JWB Commitments Continued from Page 2-C pressive of the common elements of these areas of work The original decision to place these tasks together recognized the basic similarity of their function, objectives, auspices, constituency, personnel, methods and program. Work with the military and Center work both aim to advance the personnel adjustment and development, Jewish identification and participation, and citizenship of the persons they serve. Each is an instrument of the total Jewish community, representing and serving the broadest cross section of people. While concerned for children, youth and adults, both have particular competence in work with Jewish youth Each requires the capacities of professional social workers with special ability to work with groups and communities. Both involve varied social, cultural and athletic programs in all types of groups. Both require cooperative efforts by professionals and volunteer lay people. Armed Services Program JWB's Armed Services work involves the operation of direct services to military personnel, while its Center functions consist of providing advisory and technical service to organizations and communities. Nevertheless, because of their elements in common, sound social planning and allocation of functions in the Jewish community commend their being carried on, locally and nationally, under the aegis of a single functional agency. JWB serves military personnel, hospitalized veterans and their dependents through three operating divisions. The Armed Services Division, functioning through hundreds of local committees, consisting of representatives of the principal Jewish organizations, and a trained field staff, provides welfare, cultural, recreational and morale programs at military installations and VA hospitals and large quantities of Jewish religious literature, educational materials and kosher food supplies. The Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy is the operating division through which JWB recruits, gives ecclesiastical endorsement to and serves all Jewish chaplains in every branch of the military as well as in the Veterans Administration, Civil Air Patrol anJ Continued on Page S-C i i Maj. Gen. Frank A. Tobey (left). Chief of Chaplains. Depart' ment of the Army, will be a principal speaker at a dinner meeting on "100th Anniversary of the Jewish Chaplaincy" scheduled for Wednesday, 7 p.m. Rabbi Aaron H. Blumenthal, chairman. JWB Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, will. officiate at Sabbath services, Apr. 7. _J



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Page 2-C *J&*isti fhrHimr, Friday, March 30, 1962 %  IfON KAPLAN Greater Miami chairman MRS. MILTON SIKKIN arrangements Nat'l. Leaders In Greetings To Delegates Leon Kaplan, chairman of the f.reater Miami JWB convention committee, issued greetings to the arriving delegates here on the eve of the convention. Speaking jn the name of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, and the Jewish community here, be declared: "It is a great pleasure to welcome the 1962 biennial national I vention ol JWB to Greater MiThis is the first time JWB held a national convention in the South, and we are proud to V>sts to this great organizaJWB has ;i distinguished and ihonci rd of service to American Jewry, and the Greater Miami Jewish community is hap: hat the leaders of Jewish Community Center and Armed ices work from all corners country arc coming here to : mine the future of their proe are confident that in Greatliami the delegates will find the inspiration, the atmosphere and the hospitality they need to make this the best JWB convention of all time." Said Solomon Litt. president of the National Jewish Welfare Board: "No national convention of JWB since 1948. when we adopted the now historic Janowsky report, will be mere important in the decisions it faces and the actions it v ill have to take than the 1962 Biennial in Miami Beach. "Every Jewish community and thousands of Jewish families will be affected by our decisions on how lo cope with the vastly inemands for service to Continued on Page 3-C A PROGRAM FOR BETTERMENT JWB Commitments: Outgrowth of Busy History Since 1917 When the National Jewish Welfare Board's 1962 national bifi'nial convention opens at the Deauville hotel on Apr. 4. it will be the first time that the organization has convened anywhere in the South. JWB has four broad commitments: • To meet the religious, welfare and morale needs of Jewish" personnel and their families in the United States Armed Forces and in V'A hospitals. • To serve as the National Association of Jewish Community Centers and YM-YWHAs. • To contribute to the enrichment of Jewish cultural life in the United States. • To aid in the development of Jewish Community Centers in the free world as a means of strengthening the forces ot Jewish survival. These commitments are an outgrowth of the organization's history. JWB was founded in 1917 by the American Jewish community at the express request of the then Secretaries of War and Navy to meet the World War I religious and welfare needs of Jews in the American Armed Forces. It was. and is. recognized by the I'n-ted States Government and its military establishment as the single, united representative agency of the Jewish community for discharging this responsibility, in war and in peace, at home and abroad. JWB continued to fulfill this obligation between the two wars. During World War II. it was the channel through which American Jewry served Jewish military personnel. As a founder and member of the United Service Organization (L'SO). of which it is still a member, JWB participated in the services of that agency. JWB contracted but did not lismantle its service structure after World War II. When the cold war began and later, when fighting broke out in Korea, JWB's standby machinery was activated as the Jewish community again mobilized under JWB leadership. As a result of the new military buildup in 1961, JWB took the additional steps required to meet this situation. Some Leading Founders In 1921, JWB had also become the National Association of Jewish Community Centers and YM-YWHAs when it merged with the National Council of Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Associations. This agency, the first permanent national organization of Centers and Ys, had been formed in 1913 by such eminent leaders of American Jewry as Jacob H. Schiff, Felix M. Warburg, Dr. Cyrus Adler, Louis Marshall, Dr. Judah L. Magnes, Judge Julian W. Mack, Julius Rosenwald, Judge Irving H. Lehman and Dr. Solomon Schechter. Most of these figures, together with Mortimer Schiff, Henry Morgenthau. Abrara I. Elkus, Herbert H. Lehman. Felix Fuld, Louis Bamberger, Sidney Hiliman, Dr. David de I Sola Pool and Marcus Sloss, were also among founder of JWB. Since 1921, JWB has spearheaded the growth of the Jewish Community Center movement by giving leadership and direction to this only made-in-America institution in Jewish life. To foster the development of similar agencies in Israel, Europe, Canada, La'.in America, Western Europe and Australia, JWB helped create the World Federation of YMHAs and Jewish Community Centers in 1947. Its headquarters are in the JWB offices. The fact that JWB is the national body of Centers and Ys, and the Jewish community's agency to serve the military, is exContinued on Page 4-C Confab Set Wednesday Continued from Page 1-C vicemen and their families, will be held Saturday morning, Apr. 7. Rabbi Aaron H. Blumenthal, chairman of JWB's Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, will preach I'll' sermon, and Chaplain (Maj.) Kalman Levitan. Randolph Air Force Base. Tex., will conduct the service. Delegates will adopt the organization's 1963 and 1964 budgets, consider the Community Fair Share Plan for helping to finance its work, and pass a series of resolutions at a plenary session on Sunday morning, Apr. 8. Sanford Solendcr. Mount Vernon, N.Y.. JWB executive vice president, will be the closing speaker. In 24 workshops, delegates will discuss services to senior citizens, teen-agers, young adults, children, adults and military personnel and a wide variety of other matters. There will also be an institute on women's groups in YM YWHAs and Jewish Community Centers, a Presidents' Club luncheon, an Oneg Shabbat program, a series of group meetings and a number of receptions. Barnett I. Shur, Portland, Me., 8 general convention chairmai Harold Levy, Perth Amboy, N.J., is program chairman and Leon Kaplan. Miami, is chairman of the Greater Miami convention committee. Other convention committee chairmen and co-chairmen are Mrs, Robert M. Klein, New York, chairman, and Mrs. Milton Sirkin, Miami, vice-chairman, arrangements; Morton H. Wilner. Washington, D.C., chairman, and Joseph J. Kaplan, Louisville, co-chairman, attendance; Col. Paul Akst, New York, program co-chairman; Leonard Kaplan, Boston, resolutions; Jerome L. Markowitz, Philadelphia, evaluation; Robert M. Levison, San Francisco, credentials; H. H. Nordlinger, New York, rules; and Mrs. William Alter, San Antonio, exhibits. JWB is the national association of YM and YWHAs and Jewish Community Centers, the government-authorized agency for serving the religious, morale, recreational and welfare needs of Jewish personnel in the military and in Veterans Administration hospitals and their dependents, and the sponsoring agency of the National Jewish Music Council, the Jewish Book Council of America, and the Jewish Center Lecture Bureau. It A pair of teen-age artists at a Jewish Community Center put the finishing touches on a "stained-glass" window made of plastic sheets depicting the story of Moses. Program guidance for activities involving special skills or interests is pait of the service which JWB gives its affiliated Centers. Ancient traditions of the Passover Seder settina find a new dimension in the Jewish Community Center, where women's groups learn about the meaning of the symbols and the holiday in preparation for the community and home Seder. '. %  :$*..:''.:.i. ,...*... wti-. Jewish Community Center camping is for grandma and grandpa, too. In an exciting new development, camps are providing older adults with an opportunity to enjoy arts and crafts, boating, fishing, discussions, tab'e games and other activities in an outdoor setting — all guided by trained and



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Peg 14-B +Jmist ThrH&r Friday, March 30. 1962 Max Orovitz Will Chair Abess Dinner 'lax OmkU Miar-.i ist and civic leader, has I r. amed toastirastr-r for the Apr 7 mon:al dinner boa ;. Abeaa to be pre<< nean Jewish Committee and Defamati :ue. agencies -.r*. j. r > Defense Appeal, at sntainebleau hotel. DM owner, '.resr.ze-i to honor ss "for his mmunity ice and for hicontinued d jn to the cause of human • m "warmly read Uw community, ac-!>n2 to David Fleemai ilani AJ< Rath, chairman of the board tnuteai Dere Schary, not*d film producer and playwright, will be principal :paker at the dlanar. Schary pioneered the use e' :cmmercil film as a means to '-3ht prejudice and win underrandir-j among people of many races and religions. The dinner is being coo; Maurice Glinert, AJC national • asurer. and HenryE. Schullz. AOL national chairman, both of v.hom maintain Greater Miami residences. Leo Robinson has been named dinner treasurer for the event, which is being held with the approval of the Greater Miami JewFederation, many of whose leaders will be present. Proceeds from the S50-per-person dinner ill go to further the efforts of JDA's constituent agencies for safeguarding democratic rights and combating bigotry and discrimination. Cuban Jews Form Organization Here To hclirde Edocathmri and Cultural AK MAX csovnz Beach High Band Represents Fla. The Miami Beach High School chosen from statewide enr.y the Florida State Society of Washington, D C will appear as r official Florida Slate band at '•h ,~iinual cherry blossom fesI in Washington. Funds i finance the band's trip e been rjised by the Band I lb -e memberare I rents oi banl students. Officers i i Mr, ami .Mrs. Edward .1 nts; Mr and [r .. laby, -"• retarii Mrs. Harrj Holtzman, tn ai -l new ly elected this j and Mrs, I; Applebaum, vice lents 40 | irla of the I 111 leave for Washington by ami return Sunday • of the ba i captain, I.'onald Gabj nl cOndUi ti r, S'ephan Sche Alexander Pollack. .m major. Steve Couf; librarian. .' .na Collette; attendance secretary, Roberta Shulman; quarterer, Bob HoPzman; and until officer, Ian Belson. Camp Program Set for Summer I Emanu-El haannnuaced that it will conduct a summer day camp program for the filth consecutive year. Ain the past, the camp will be under the personal guidance of Dr. Irving Lenrman. spiritual leader of the congregation, and under the oirection of Milton Feinstein. American history teacher and head football coach at Miami Beach Senior High School, who has been the camp's director since its inception. Using the Temple's North Branch aheadquarters, the synagoguecentered camp emphasizes procramming in Jewish culture and spiritual values. There is a weekly Sabbath service each Friday aiternoon. Dramatics, singing and dancing programs are based on Jewish content, and all activities are deI to further each camper's Jewish education on a formal and informal basis. The camp also offers a swimming program by a certified water-front i Xpert. Other outdoor and indoor sports round out the program. Each week, all ol -he youngsters ..ill be token on a field trip. An or tural a ssistanci a Jews in %  Suite 602 of 'he: %  Cuban H f Miami is %  ich to car:;, forward i:s man> longr ins y because i %  tati J A prime ccnsiderst : on will be establishment of welfare assistance for these in need, as well as providirg rei'jlcjs services and an emplsyment bureau for members. Further plans cai: for familiariz -• : %  h the law and the State of Florida, a-well as giving them information on international aftair>. !:• storation of social activities afiong Cuban Jews in Miami will be stimulated by establishing contacts with fraternal and religious groups m the area, cooperating with local activities directed to the state of Israel, and establishing relations with Jewish groups in Latin America Further services will include discount centers, and medical and dental care. Officers of the group art Enrique Kalut, president; Dr. Enrique E'ber, James S. Knopfce, jacrbo Caridi, and Oscar Netter, vice presidents; Alberto Behar ara* Joseph Sobie, treasurers; Eira Menda and Max Garaii, secretariesDr. Bernardo Benes and AIO Kiepach, corresponding secretaries; Oscar A. White, legal secretary; Dr. Felix H. Reyler and Julio D'Gabrtel, directors. In charge of religious actn are Andres Dworin and Salomon il activities, Joseph Juaii Maler. Abraham Za,r.d Alfredo Zacrotsky; All • rto Weiss; women activities, Raquel Gershkovieh: youth groups, Natan Kaufman; and professional groups. Leonardo l.owmger. WIDOW DESIRES ROOM AND BOARD Congenial Home with Understanding OX 1-4242 FOR LEASE-900 ACRES IN PALM BEACH COUNTY Ramie, Sugar Raising, Grating. Large or small tracts. No Rocds. Deep muck. S6 per acre per year. FR 3 3013 Herbert E. Scher Chapel to be Dedicated In Ceremonies at Beth David Sunday RENT A 4 Ul from $2.50 per day ABOTT MOTORS, Inc. 1451 W. FLAGLER ST. Phone FR 3-4765 A-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HKP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 94401 I the Herbert E i of Beih regal ill tal % %  place v 1959. II five ten rominent in gog progi back 1920's Dunnu his in office as -.-r.t. the ma:n sanctuary was completed, am r the new addition formulated Mr. Scher worked closely with the S J. Spector family in planning for the addition which was completed only last year. In addition to his activities at Beth David. Mr. Scher was one of the organizers of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and served en its executive board and board o' governors. He also helped organic aft. Smai Hospital, and served a> a trustee from its beginning. He was vice president and treasurer of ihe Jewish Family and Children's Service, and was chairman Of "he budget committee of that organization at the time of his death. Mr. Scher also took an active part in the affairs of the J< sh tioni 1 Workshop, for which he at subsequently cited by | dent Eisenhower's National ploj :•' lland.i ee. Vronovitz, past pre is chairman of the arrangements committee tor the i 'iication. Home Life Week At Barry College Skills of the homemaker and lee lures on nutrition and furniture will be featured during the Home and Family Life Week on Sunday through next Saturday, sponsored by the Home Economics Department at Barry College. Miss Marion K.itchnik, dietition at Mt. Smai Hospital, will discuss the principles of nutrition Wednesday, at 4 p.m.. in Room 120. On Thursday. 4 p.m.. same room. Miss Olga Fcinman, vice president of Modernage Furniture, and Mrs. Beatrice Sandier, fashion coordinator, will explain considerations in buying furniture. Horse Owners Eye Victory Here A victory in Saturday's Siou.ooo Fioi am Park ularly satisfying bn W. s oi be D Black Be hich is scl to i in j i i threi yi i %  ( %  The Galbreaths over a long peril I i.i years have been among racing porters. They Ii,.-. nillions in racing k. and while they Ii.'.' I much success, they have yel to come up with an outling threi • ear-old, In Black Beard they may have He i a son of Swaps, one of I hi great runner: ol recent years, which now stands at stud at the Galbreath farm in Kentucky. i>\ Gulfstream during brilliant career, and in a mile : event, ei tablished what was then a world's record foi the distance with a 1:39 and 3 5 clocking. Steering committee of Tempie Ner Tamid journal are seated (left to right) Mesdames Irving Egel, Henrietta Fine, Jack Gerson, chairman, Murray Shaw, president, Ann Bernstein, Ralph Mervis, Cariton Blake, Max Raskin, and Samuel Gcmb^rg. Sisterhood is planning a luncheon in April honoring Mrs. Louis Gold, past president and trustee. 'Ship' Launched On Miami Bch. "S S Miami Beach" was launched at Flamingo Park on Monday to celebrate the city's 47th birthday ami opining of the spring recreation program. Jock Woody is recreation superintendent. Mrs. Kenneth Oka. wife of Miami Beach's mayor, in a traditional ceremony, aimed a soda bottle at the bow of the flag-bedecked vessel as it slid down the ways to no-1 where. I Made of pipe and old bleacher) boards of the crew of the city recreation shops, the ship will now be used as another item of construej live playground equipment. Children's Choir of Temple Beth Shiran, will participate in Friday night services of the Temple this week. Members of the choir are Michelle Rachline, Rochelle Rachline, Debby Shkoler, Loie Somberg, Helena Rachline, Rena Magolnick, Steven Brown, Douglas Mancteii, Jeffrey Roth, Bernard Barkow, and David Shkoler. Guest speaker will be Louis Schwartzman, executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education. Spiritual leader is Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb renders the musical portions of the liturgy.



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&1U ovnan s W/oM GROVE Apr. 7 a red letter day for Lynn Kanov It's the day she'll i, Sweet Sixteen Her parents, Mr. anil Mrs. Theodore Kanov, %  ill make it special with a luncheon in her honor on Sunday at 'he Algiers • • • Decor will be orange and white, so the birthday • will wear an orange linen suit with print blouse Among the ts will be Lynn's grandmother. Mrs. Marie Brickor. her daugbthe talented Trixie Levin, and daughter. Mrs. Lennie Kaplan An accordionist will provide the music for singing and twistA Sweet Sixteen party for another young lady Saturday evening at Westbrooke Country Club Mr. and Mrs. Mike Sasloe, 430 SW 54th St., will entertain for their daughter. Rhoni. and her '••ends in the Carousel room there Disc jockey Charlie Murdock will be on hand to emcee the show Westbrooke also the scene of the Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity reunion the first week in April Got an early start when Ron .it entertained the Richard Prevers, of Ne York, at Sunday jffel dinner Other early bird fraternity brothers dining at the lib. Burt Levey and wife, Fran. Arnold Glantz and his Beverly ... Meanwhile, the Westbrooke band stomping out that mad beat for the next Saturday night dance ... On orders from Mrs. Harold Pomerantx and Mrs. Sheldon Kay, co-chairmen of the Mar. 31 aflair, who expect the evening to be devoted solely to the twist and Inilly-gully. • %  Parents of local girls attending Sophie Newcomb College, all members of Sigma Delta Tau. have received word that all have made Dean's List Outstanding sorority sisters are Linette Albert, Virginia Gordon, Bonnie Kaplan, Roberta Daum, Marcia Angel and Judith Kazer The last two, sophomore and freshlan respectively, also won the Big and Little Sister award given v SDT Sandy Applebaum and Lois Cohen, both of Miami Beach, are spending their junior year studying in England Houseguests last weekend at the home of Mollie and Maury in, daughter Linda and her suite-mates, all sophomores at thio State University on their quarter break During the visit, ludi Paikin Hew to Nassau to join her parents of Toronto. Can., i kbrating their wedding anniversary there First visit for Karen Friedlander, who kept her eyes and mouth open at the ity here She and Maxine Arenswold. both from Cleveland hts, O., tremendously impressed with the University of Miami. • Mere about students who seem to be making much of the news -( days Trudi Gertler. of Miami Beach High, was the winof the dramatic interpretative speaking contest of the National ensic League three-day statewide tournament held last week:it Stetson University Daughter of Judge and Mrs. Charles rtler, Trudi gave here impression of four characters in the racie Worker'' She will now represent the state in national l>etitions to be held in Montana this summer Mrs. Richard %  n, in charge of the Forensic League at Beach High, who acipanied the students to DeLand, mighty proud of the showing le there. • An unexpected but very welcome guest last week was Edwin -burg, who drove down from Gainesville to surprise and conulate his parents. Ruth and Ben Zion Ginsburg, on their 32nd edding anniversary Had some exciting news of his own to : art Another in the long line of academic honors heaped on Eddie, now attending law school at the University of Florida, :ll receive an award next month at Honors Convocation for havihe highest scholastic rating in his major at the College of ness Administration from which he graduated, with honors, .Tune His visit here was just in time, too. to attend a party given by th's sister and brothci in law, Irene and Leo Cohen, in their • le on 22nd rd. Guests of honor wen Ben's sister and her ,and. Lily Ann and Herman Altschul, here from Chicago to i] e the fierce northern cold and snow. • A tradition Started many years ago had its Bar Mitzvah celelion las! week at the home of Mr. and Mrs, Nathan Ostrov, re it all began The 13th Purim get-together ol friends from vidence, R.I., living or visiting in the area, again stressed the e that all would see one another the following year Localites enjoying the reunion: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chact. Eva Haymen. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Salk and Mrs. Bessie esi Here from Providence, the Sclomon Lightmans. the Max Richters ami Mrs. J. Shukovsky Mrs. J. S. Eisenberg. from i River. Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Harry 1. Elkies. of Slamtord. MI ; Mrs. Harry Shatkin. Cranston, R.I.; and the William D. of Miramar. • %  Former Miami Beaehite, Cy Robins, has gon


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Friday. March 30. 1962 *Jmist> ftmridlifttf Page 3-B Young Adults Plan Dance MV Women See Show Jewish War Veterans Ladies* Auxiliary Post 682 met for dinner and the show starring Brenda Lee and Jack Carter at the Deauville hotel Saturday evening. Mrs. Ceil Zucker was in charge of arrangements. Young Adult Friends of Israel will be host to an "April Fool" dance on Sunday evening in the Starlight room of the Shelborne hotel. Young adults between the ages' of 21 and 35 are invited to attend, j according to Martin Cohen, fundBo'l SCT Her raising vice president of the group.' There will be dancing to Alan Kole and his orchestra, floor show, and prizes. Artists Models Assisting Cohen with arrangements are Stuart Miller, Stan Karp, Paul Raymond. Shelley Schrold, Donald Kaplan. Sue Fabncant, Hallie Colin, Charles Bloom, ;.nd Eddie Landv. Mrs. Joseph Wilkes, president of the Southeastern Florida reqion of Women's American ORT, places the Queen Esther Crown on Mrs. Aaron Green, of Islanders chapter. Mrs. Green was the greatest ticket seller at ORT's Purim Garden Mart held last week at the Roney Plaza hotel. Shown with runner-ups are (left to right) Mrs. Arthur Winton, Greynolds Park chapter; Mrs. Samuel Silvers, Greater Miami chapter; Mrs. Wilkes; Mrs. Green; Mrs. Samuel Avrach, chairman of the day; Mrs. Felix Wolf. Bay chapter; and Mis. Nathan Lippman, Greater Miami chapter. Ida Appel Auditorium to be Dedicated At Hebrew Academy Event Wednesday Dedication of the Ida Appel Auditorium in the newly-constructed Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami will be held Wednesday noon at the site of the school. 24th st. and Pine Tree dr. Funds for the auditorium were raised by the Hebrew Academy Women who will dedicate it in memory of Id; Appel, one of th founders of the Hebrew Ac ad einy. and past president of the Hebrew Acad emy Women. The late Mrs. Appel was also ire II-known for MRS. ROStN her activities in the Jewish Home for the Aged as its president for many yean, Hadassah, and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Soon $50,000 nave l een raised during the past eight years to build iMy hall. .' isi ;-!i s. o, tin sident o the Heb r \ >my Women, and chairtn in of ll in; ing) campaign i rs BJ O, said th;ii. "realizati n of the new auditorium after man year: of work i.i gi o I ex imi le 1 great interest the community has in OK Hebrew Academ; ," Assisting In the iuml-rai-ing was the brick campaign organized a year ago. The campaign had as its motto "a brick for life," with Donor Installation Set Donor and installation luncheon ol the Greater Miami Hemophilia Auxiliary, Miami Beach, will be held next Thursday noon at the Algiers hotel. each brick costing $18. the Hebrew word for "Chai," which is 'life." Mrs. Leonard Rosen is toastmaster for the dedication ceremony and chairman of the brick campaign. The event will include a ribboncutting ceremony, luncheon, a playlette by Hebrew Academy students, and a contest for a 1962 Corvair. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Pertnoy. daughter and son-in-law. and Mr. Benjamin Appel, husband, will have the honors in the ribbon cutting ceremony. Second grade students will act out The Land of Milk and Honey" in Hebrew and English. The playlette is an adaptation of the Broadway show by Hebrew Academy second grade teachers. Mrs. Alfred Cosman and Mrs. Edith Sommer. Program chairman, Mrs. Nathan Spiegelman, vice president of Hebrew Vcademy Women, will introduce ;. .' bi \ S Gi %  -%  I ri II pal, who will dedicate the .an urn. D< nittee also Includes Mrs. •' ick Buchsbaui i, • i chairm in, Bin; in Bank chairmen. ',,: %  luliuS RO :' tein .illll Mrs. Arthur A. B rgman, and Mi dames Zvi Berger, Murray Berkowitz, Jerome Bienenfeld, Charles Bogin, Louis A Butrm, Jonah A. Caplan, Louis Ciment, Samuel Parher. Irving Firtel, .lack Gerson. Alexander S. Gross, Harry (Cap Ian, Jacob -Katz, Frieda L. Koch. Alexander Kogan, Aaron S. Lauer, Alex Miller. Al Osheroff, Henry Penchansky, Joseph E. Rackovsky. |,„ i, ,ii... .-co Keinhard, Samuel Reinhard. M. H. Roscn\ house, Samuel Rosner, Murray Rosenberg, Sidney Rubinowitz. David Seid, Saul Solomon. Edward 'Snyder, Jerry Sussman, Abraham Steinberg. Jerry Zuckerman, and Berkowitz. Wittels, Matthew Ann and Sue Harmony Chapter Gives Trophies Harmony chapter. B'nai B'rith, met Saturday evening at the Deauville hotel. Following the awarding of trophies, the meeting adjourned to the Casanova room for a donor dinner party and the show starring Brenda Lee and Jack Carter. Mrs. H. Hornreich was in charge of arrangements. The fourth annual artists and models ball will be held Saturday evening, Apr. 14, in the Deauville hotel. Miami's mardi gras. the theme for the 1962 extravaganza is "Science Fiction and Outer Space," and the hundreds who attend yearly are already applying out-of-this-world ideas in costume design to conform. A special runway has been installed in the (Iran,! ballroom of the Deauville for easy viewing of the night's activities, which include a full program of entertainment starring supper club talent; the costume p.tiade; and the parade of the models. There will also be an art exhibit. Sponsored by Lisa-Marc Enterprises, and dir.cted by Bunny Yaeger, photographer, the ball provides scholarships at the Miami Artists School u c.d Gallery. • %  The LEAR SCHOOL KINDERGARTEN through 12th GRADE Accredited By Florida Stale Department ot Education SMALL CLASS GROUPS ENRICHED ELEMENTARY PROGRAM COLLEGE PREPARATORY HIGH SCHOOL LEAR SCHOOL SUMMER DAY CAMP COMPUTE ATHLETIC and WATER SPORTS PROGRAM FOR BOYS and GIRLS AGES 5 to 15 June 15 — August 21 • REGISTRATION OPEN • 1962-63 SCHOOl YEAR and SUMMER OAY CAMP TRANSPORTATION Greater Miami Area 1010 WEST AVENUE MIAMI BEACH JE 1-0606 carefree batistes charm half-sizes Caldwell's new spring batistes now in drip-dry Dacron polyester cool, wrinkle-resistant, iron shy! A-BORDER FLOWERS, button front coat dress has gored skirt. Lilac, blue, green. 14',2 to 24Vi. B-PEEKABOO NECKLINE, soft touch on all-over floral with easy gored skirt. Green, blue, lilac 14'/2 to 24 !/ 2. DAYTIME PRESSES ALL FIVE BURD/NE'S STORES. IN MIAMI, SECOND FIOOR. CALL FR 3-1111.



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Friday, March 30. 1962 9-Jewlsfi fk>rlcfiatr) Page 7-B Beach High PTA Meeting Tuesday PTA of Miami Beach Senior High School will hold an election meeting Tuesday, 2 p.m., in the school cafeteria. The nominating committee will submit to the general membership the slate of officers for the year 1962-63. and election will follow. Irvin VV. Katz. principal, to Mrs. Louis Nadler and Mrs. Lee Hauser, mothers WHO have rendered serves and devotion to the PTA o\ i a period of years Mrs. Ben Samuels, incumbent Highlighing the afternoon wil' : PTA president, will conduct be the presentaton of awards by neetiif?. Planning National Council of Jewish Women's tour abroad ore (left to right) Akiva Goffer, Southern manager, Zim Lines; Aaron Farr, of Farr Tours; Mrs. Raymond Rubin, vice president of administration for Council; and Jacques E. Turner, regional manager, Air France. Council Planning Exciting 3-Day Trip Abroad lust of all, we will go to Isy.H i lo iee the fruits of our work, institutions like the John Dewey School oi Education, supported by Council, and the building of the new Hebrew University High i on the campus ot the Hei liversity in Jerusalem, and \i-ii the Ministries ot Education j Welfare." The speaker was Mrs Raymond R, Rubin, vice president of administration of National Council of Jewish Women, the community btrvice organization whose local divisions number 2.200 members and comprise 18 international affiliates including Iran. Australia. and England. The occasion was a meeting to discuss plans for the NCJW-sponjored tour of Europe and Israel, to depart New York on July 20 for 3d i ays of vacationing via luxury lin<-r> and jet planes to -ome of the World's most cherished sights. Also present were leading travel authorities who planned the itineri'-ry: Aaron Farr. of Farr Tours; Jacques K. Turner. Consul of France and regional manager of Air France; and Akiva Gofter, Southern manager of Zim Lines. Part ot the journey will be made aboard the SS Jerusalem. Other h.ghliahs include opportunities to meel trllow-members and officers ( HI NCJW abroad. Limited to 140 passengers, the tour will depart from Idlewild Internationa! Airport by jet to Europe Three days will be spent in Taris, include sightseeing, excursions, night entertainment and shopping. On the evening of the 23rd, an overnight train will be taken to Venice, where the following day. there will be a tour of this City. On the 24th. the Miamians will board the SS Thcodor Herzl for the sea voyage to Israel. Five days on board ship will conclude with travel to Haifa and Tel Aviv Here, for four days, mere will be trips to settlements and public buildings, and time for individual exploring, On Aug. 1. a lull-day excursion to Jerusalem, with visits to historical places is planned. The follow, ng day, under the supervision ol a NCJW representative in Israel. ;ll NCJW projects will be visited. Tho next two days will include a continue, excursion of the Galilee ;:nci step-overs in Tiberias and Haifa. On the morning of Aug. 5. the travelers will board the SS Jerusalem bound for Italy. Three days on the Mediterranean will end with arrival in Naples on Aug. 8. From here by motor-coach to Rome for two days. On Aug. 11. the tour will depart from Rome by air to Zurich, where the group will proceed by motorcoach to Lucerne for two days c?l sightseeing. On Aug. 14. they will be boardin 1 : a flight for London fo'r tin final three days of the trip. Departure fo New York by jet is on Aug. 18. The tour, including transportation, hotel accommodations, meals, and taxes, will cost $995 a person. Farr Tours are in charge of travel arrangements. Dr. Lehrman To be Heard On Friday evening. Dr. Irving Lehrman will discuss the juvenile problem in the community. He will highlight some of the measures that are being taken to stem the tide of delinquency and the gradual distintegration of family and home, America's first line of defense. His subject will be "Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother — A Challenge to Parents." He will speak at Temple Emanu-El. 00 1 eup cooked Wolff s Kashi. 1 can mined egetable 1 tgg, beaten WIN $ 25 FOR YOUR KASHA RECIPE And delight your family with the dish you make! All you do is submit your favorite recipe for using Wolff s Kasha...for stuffing chicken, derma ...making knishes, varnishkas, soups...side dishes with onions, Chopped mushrooms, peppers or any other tasty use for this all-time favorite. YOU GET $25.00 Send your own original recipe with a Wolft's Kasha box top to: Phyllis Wolff, Penn Yan, N. Y. We will pay $25.00 for every recipe published; tout every entrant receives a FREE Kasha Cookbook and all recipes become Wolff's property. -IMiKASH deliCtiHtAs Brown Buckwheat Groats Mrs. larhari Twerslcy, H. MMcft St., Philadelphia. Pa., won $25 tor her tasty parve Vegetable Steaks. VEGETABLE STEAKS 1 small onion .1 tbs. cooking 0*. 1/4 cup matzo meal 1 lbs. salt dash pepper 1 can diced mushrooms (optional) Mash mixed vegetables. Add beaten eggs. Kasha and seasoning. Brown onions and mushrooms slightly In oil. Mix. Then odd matzo meal and mix thoroughly. Fein into six large patties and fry. Also enjoy Wolff's Creamy Kernels (grits) Kasha N' Gravy Kasha.. %  J S" .-" for almost 40 years on Holidays and every day MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE has brought cheer into far more Jewish homes than any other brand because that Good-to-the-last-drop flavor means... It's a Mechayeh! all the way down! INSTANT MAXWELL HOUSE .•" T\* *• *• %  i ?• *? I* v/' %  • Ctf£ •*?. K* s*t 3^~M2 S QD ftlfl* •^-v =M> wPi -Xy /* THE "SABBA TH COFFEE for instant enjoyment every day! In 2 Oz.,6 0z.,and 10 Oz. jars. Get today's Instant Maxwell Houseflavor sealed in this distinctive new jar! 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Page 12-B +Je#lstifkrMttan %  v t. Friday, March 30. 1962 WW Israel Official At Beth Torah Adiad Yafeh, director of the office of information of the Israel Government in New York, will be guest speaker at Beth Torah student congregation services Saturday morning at 10 a.m. His subject will be "Youth in Israel." Following services, a reception in Yafeh*s honor will be tendered by the older students of the school. Rabbis of the congregation are Mark lladdad and Perry Left"; Merle Maeroff. president; Diane Gurman, vice president; and Linda Kaufman, religious chairman. :il %  l : %  %  %  '"! Pearly Gait j h Make Your Reservations Early FULL 7 COURSE SABBATH DINNERS complimentary Israeli wire (EVERY FRIDAY) in the candle-lit elegance of Morton Towers Bayiide Dining Room Dining Rooms Available For Private Parties COCKTAIL HOUR FROM 5 P.M. complimentary Hors d'oeuvres For Reservations Ph. JE 2-6426 FREE PARKING Jljorton T > ; outers ON WSCAYNE BAY AI 15th STREET MIAMI BIACH 'Unusual and Delightful Old World Atmosphere Lounge—Entertainment YOUR HOST, JOE COHEN CATERING PRIVATE PARTIES m CONGRESS AlrtpORT INI* A DINING PLACE OF DISTINCTION THE ONLY PLACE FOR I •DOUBLE" PORTERHOUSE STEAKS A COMPLETE MENU OF FINE FOODS None trtter At Any Place At Any Price COCKTAIL LOUNGE Corner 132nd St and S Dl>ie Hwv, Phone CE S-1621 KING ARTHUR'S COURT The SINGING STRINGS DINNER • SUPPER MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS 500 Deer Run • TU 8-4521 ART BRUNS, Co-Owner Action to Fore At Dania Palace Partido action on Florida Derby Night highlighted the action this week at the Dania Jai-Alai Palace The Diamond Doubles Stakes elimination rounds wound up Tuesday and partido play was begin on Thursday, finishing Apr. 3 and 5. on to on by Hal Pearl %  WONDERFUL WORLD OF ENTERTAINMENT: Its rare coinci dence to have a singer in the vicinity whose record is the nation's numhor one best-seller at the ame lime. The singer is petite Connie Francis, and her record is "Don't Break the Heart that Loves You." So it was quite an opening for Connie at the Eden Roc, where one of the ringsiders and party hosts was Benny Davis, who wrote the hit tune for the nation's number one songstress. Composer of more than 300 songs, Benny Davis is probably more thrilled over his latest hit than anv he's written before including: "Margie." "Baby Face," "Carolina Moon," "I Still Get a Thrill" and "With : These Hands." Davis started to write especially for Connie Francis a litle less than a year ago, and so far the collaboration has been a bonanza. He's already at work on the original music for Connie's first fulller.glh movie. Connie continues at the Eden Roc through Tuesday, supported by comic Bob Mclvin and th" Maltison Trio, an excellent dance group. Visiting stars make Copa City a stopover for a night out. One ni^ht recently, the star of the Dade blvd. nitery. Belle Barth, welcomed Virginia Graham, one of Jack Paar's pet guests on his late show, which by the way. makes its farewell tonight: comic Alan King, recent star of the Eden Roc: singer Desmond; Kaye Carol, the ventriloquist-comedienne star of Murray Franklin's, and Dick Brown, Eva Gabor's spouse. (Eva was doing a play-live-on TV that night) Milt Trenier's twist version of "Around the World in 80 Days" is a highlight of his hit singing act in the Belle Barlh show at the Copa. Belle is booked solid after her record run here for Detroit. Minneapolis. New York, Atlantic City and Las Vegas. Has she gone places the past year. • BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: "April in Foolsville" is a dilly of a title for a show — and it's the one the Props are staging Sunday in the Pompeii room at the Roc. It's the fourth annual Academy Rewards dinner and show of that worthy organization that keeps growing and growing, both in popularity and membership. Localites, as well as visitors, look forward to the surprise element of the annual shindig, which is graced by a number of stars in town at the time, as well as the regular members of the Props. Patsy Abbott, the talented performer, continues writing the original material for the Props shows, and her lines ere loaded with laughs. Producer and indefatigable worker is president founder of the org, Jerry Kruger Pollak. "April in Foolsville" will include Marion Colby, Lois De Fee, Sue Lawton. Trez Frassrand, Miss Abbott, Pat Bromberg, Sheila Barr, Carol Dunn, Connie Kulak. Olga Pavlova, Erma Podvin, Lillian Malek. : Cnariene Russell, Tillic Krongold. Ethel Harr and many more. | The excellent National Ballet of Canada will include "Swan Lake" in tneir presentation ai the Dade County Auditorium tonight and j tomorrow. Company numbers 100. Prima ballerina is Lois Smith and premier danseur is Earl Kraul. ON THE SCREEN: "Sweet Bird of Youth" has been doing big biz I at the Cano, Miami, Miracle ana 163rd Theatres. The Tennessee Wili Kin,drama, well cast with Paul Newman, Geraldine Page, Shirley j Km: lit and Rip Torn, continues through Tuesday. Next at the four is "The Day the Earth Caught Fire," a science-fiction thriller that's been touted as one of the very best. The Mark" keeps on setting new attendance marks at the May Dd Sunset. It's powerful movie fare, with Maria Schell and Stuai Whitman, "Majority ol One," Alec Guiness-Rosulind Russell romp, opens tomorrow at the Normandie, while 'Murder She Said" holds :.t the Parkway. Oiher held over mov:s: "Judgement at Nuremberg," at the Lincoln; "El CM," at the Roosevelt; "West Side Story," at the Sheric"an; "Dlack Tights," at the Colony; "Windjammer," at the Florida. Warren Beatty fans, and they are growing in number bv leaps and bounds, can see him in his most important role to date, "in "All 1 fall Down." Eva Marie S-iinf. femme star of "Exodus," plays opposite Beatty. It's showing at the Flamingo. -fc -k FOOTLIGHT FACES: Sam Levene, surrounded by a capable cast. is starring ai the Coconut Grove Playhouse in the former Broadwav comedy, "Make a Million." which spoofs TV quiz shows. Local favofites in the show include Jack DeLeon, Monica Mays, Eileen Lawrence and Ed Crowley. Former ballet star, Tamara Geva, is directing the pre-Broadway j tryout of "Tender Loving Care." which stars John Pavne, and opens Apr. 10 at the Playhouse. Lee Sandman, Susie Kohn, and Sid Cassell are among the local thespians who will appear in this new drama. Sunday, Don Cossack Chorus and Dancers make their onlv ap: pearancc here at the Dade County Auditorium. Serge Jaroff is the conductor of the large touring company. Also, the road show of "The Music Man." starring Harrv H>Vox continues through Sunday night at the Miami Beach Auditorium.' I Hickox has been handling the star role since 1958. lie also plays in the movie version. -K I ON THE TOWN: Comedian Billy Fraye has joined the Murray Franklin laugh syndicate. The talented Chicagoan has an original api proach tc comedy. He shares the spotlight at Murray Franklin's with favorites Kay Carole, Jimmy Roma, Ducky Callas and Frankie Hyers in the hilarious "Blackouts" and the singing team of Cookie and Don During President Kennedy's recent stay on Miami Beach, the Epicure Market truck was a frequent visitor to his temporary N Bav rd. residence. This is a new first for the Epicure Market, and the Epicure is proud to have taken such an important part in lnaKing tne President's stay on Miami Beach a pleasant one. Rabbi Maurice Klein and a choir of six will conduct the Seders at Harfenist restaurant for the second year. The popular Beach spot is offering a "package deal" for two Seders and all holiday dinners during the entire week of Passover. And, Michel's Kosher Restaurant is new accepting reservation for both Seders and also Passover week. 1 "Magic Rudy" Chmehk, host and entertainer at Joe Cohen's Rathskeller, is an ex-vaudiv:lhan. Rudy, an accomplished musician and magician, led a troupe called "The 20 Bavarians" through the Keith and Pantagcs circuits on the 20s and early 30's. It won't be long before Art Bruns and his Carriage Club Caravan take off for a three-week Orient tour. They leave Mav 8. The peripatetic Mr. Bruns also has a Munich trip planned for the Fall. Big Porterhouse, the only restaurant where you can dine and shop at the same time for (he finest in prime meats, also adding 60 more scats to the cocktail lounge. Owner is Herman Sumars. I Pauline Frederick, television commentator from the United Nations, seen dining at the Pub restaurant. Phil Richards skating star of Jack Young's "Spice on Ice" show at the Americana s Bal Masque room, will have his picture on the I cover of a new album, "Music to Skate By," put out by Roller records L Temple Ner Tamid 80th ST. and CARLYLE AVE. MIAMI BEACH FOURTH ANNUAL Passover Sedorim CONDUCTED BY RABBI EUGENE LABOVITZ AND CANTOR SAMUEL GOMBERG IN OUR BEAUTIFUL SKLAR AUDITORIUM RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED FOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, and THURSDAY, APRIL 19 RESERVATIONS LIMITED CALL NOW!! UN 6-8345 UN 6-9833 RA3BI MORTON MALAVSKY Announces PASSOVER SEDERS of the ISRAELITE CENTER 3175 S.W. 25th STREET Catered by CONTINENTAL "WS CATERERS For Reservations Call HI 5-1529 or CA 6-1744 IACK SCMWARZ and LEW AKENSTADJ New Hotel George Washington 516 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH JE 1-6617 PASSOVER SO P* r y, P er pert., dbl. occ. !" 3 wks. min. incl. Passover 3 COMPLETE MtAlS GLATT TO KOSHER "SATMAR" FLEISCH Well Known Cantor Will Conduct Services RESTAURANT OPEN FOR EVERYONE SJL50 per day, per nan. dbl. occ. until April 17th 3 COMPLETE MEALS RESERVATIONS Now Being Accepted for 1st & 2nd Seders ALSO EOR THE ENTIRE WEEK Air-Cond. UN 6-6043 free Pork 940 — 71st STREET Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth KATZ's PARADISE RESTAURANT 1451 COLLINS AVENUE HDB7 "MO Phone JE 2-1671 ll


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962 sci| Fri day, March 30. 1962 L'nilay, ids, f-Jenisti fk>ridT/^r> Page 11-A c" .. sBB A ^--^H '^^1 ~" K ^1 ^1 .^1 Lf • ^ %  *' ^ '' %  -f^ %  •:. %  • | ........ i 1 1 • r fl I^V Jen^A losses 5ef df 527 fl////b/7 i Bearr..ng over Miami's selection as the nation's fourth "cleanest tcwn" in its population category are (from left) City Managei M. L. Reese; E. Albert Pallot, chairman of the city beautification committee; Mayor Robert King High; and Vice Mayor Henrv L. Balaban. The certificate of achievement represents the second consecutive award Miami won for its clean-up, paint-up, fix-up campaign. Last year it placed third. Broward District Cites Heatter Brou.rd District of the Zionist Organization of America was host to th ."'wish community pf Holly; wood. Ft. Lauderdale and Golden Beach a: its annual "Salute to Israel Celebration" on Wednesday, when me 500 packed the Temple Beth Fi Auditorium to hear Gabriel Heatter discuss the current Israel situation. The Third annual Kfar Silver Award of the district was presented to Heatter by Dr Myron Segal. Chairman of the evening was Jacob Harrison, and toastmaster was Murray Simons Greetings were extended by Mrs. Jennu irossinger, recipient of last year's award; Louis B. Rudr;ick, national vice president ot the ZOA; and Mortimer May, past national president. A musical program featured Asako Tomita and Esther Barrett. Also participating in the program were Rjbbi Samuel Mendelowitz, president of the Broward District, Ben Salter, Rabbi David Shapiro. Dr. A. K. Colin. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. Gil Rappaport and Rabbi Richard M. Leviton. Assisting Harrison and Simons were Morris Kristal, Jacob Drimer, David Harris. Julius W. Harris, Irving Oxenhorn and Max Eichner. Continued from Page 1-A Jews to transfer foreign holdings to thorn. There were other means of spoiliation such as huge taxes imposedon entire communities: the Jewish levy and emigration tax in Germany, and a billion franc tax on the Jewish community of France, just to mention a few; ransom: vast rams, sometimes as much as a million dollars, to allow certain families or groups to escape. Even when the Jews arrived at the concentration camps they were plundered. "Nothing was too small for them (the Naiis), not even mo hair of the victims," Robinson notes, acMfag !" at gold bridges and fillings from victims' teeth provided 17 tons of gold for the Nazis. "Even deportations and killings became a source of income for the Nazis," the pamphlet states. "The Germans were paid large amounts for deporting Hungarian Jews. Cases are known where the Jewish community was forced to pay to the Germans the value of the bullets used to kill part of the community or for the urns containing the ashes of deported and gassed leaders." Robinson, who is the World Jewish Congress expert on the Nazi era, puts Jewish losses in property and other identifiable assets at about S12 billion, according to values at that lime. But there was also a considerable loss in income. There is little detail available as to the value of lost earnings of Jews but. after a study of all available information and Statistics, Dr. Robinson states that "the amount of lost income may be estimated at be tween S10 and $15 billion," at prices of that time. Remedial action to offset Jewish losses fell into four categories: g e n e r a Iindemnification; restitution; compensation for losses; reinstatement, principally to positions previously held. In all, Robinson estimates that restitution anal compensation to the extent of about So billion have been paid or are being paid, principally by West Germany, in reparations, restitution and compensation to the victims of Nazism. Commenting on restitution legislation. Dr. Robinson notes, "nowhere were the remedies as complete as the spoliation. In most cases they were restricted to restitution (restoration) of the alienated or confiscated property which was still available at the time of restitution, leaving unrecompensed the values of dissolved enterprises and the damages inflicted on returnable property, failing to provide remuneration for non-receivable assets." Individual compensation claims filed by Dec. 31, 1961 in West Germany totalled 3,071.662. and in 2.200.000 cases which have been adjudicated by the administrative authorities. West Germany has paid, under the various laws, about three-and-a-half billion dollars in compensation. The total amount paid in restitution and reparations | as distinct from compensation Is about two-and-a-half billion dollars, giving a total of S6 billion for the spoliation that took place. Dr. Robinson's survey is part of a book. "The Institute Anniversary Volume," due to be published shortly. The survey was issued as a special pamphlet in connection with a gathering of Jewish leaders in Copenhagen last weekend (Mar. 24-25) attending a session of the administrative committee of the World Jewish Congress, a board meeting of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, and a meeting of the Conference of Jewish Organizations. Dental Week At Beth Torah It was "Dental Health Week" a; Beth Torah Congregation preschool this week, when Dr. Morton Reiss paid his annual visit to check the teeth of 100 students in the school. His visit was part of the good jihysical health program carried on during the year by the staff of the school under the direction of Mrs. Sidney Kay, preschool supervisor. Also forthcoming this week was a unit in social studies of people of the community, including neighbors, friends, and merchants. „ PRIVATE SCHOOLS & COLLEGES SUMMER CAMPS-ACCREDITED ALL OVER U.S. ^> Bof-ciing, Military, Technical, Tutorial, Professional Trade, Secretarial, Boarding Business Colleges Retarded Colleges 14 YR.), Junior Colleges (2 YR.). TO Me ST IND'VIDUAL REQUIREMENTS INFORMATION & CATALOGS FREE 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE — SPANISH S D OKEN AMERICAN S1M1MLS M'REAI' 36 N.E. 1st STREET, MIAMI M CHAEL RICHARDSON, Dir. PR 1-0812 Camp Avir Plans Progrcn • Henry Gilhi 11, president t I gregaticn Vehudah Moshe, has ai nounceci the lip : Center's C mp vir I r i; enth year. liy Ro Its has b • n appointed as camp din itor. Rothstein is currently ;i physical education teacher in the Dade county school sy • tern, and has had many years ot experience in working with children. The program planned for the eight-week camp season will encompass swimming daily under the supervision ot a qualified Red Cross instructor, arts and crafts, and a variety of athletic sports., with competitive teams. Daily trips to places of general interest will be taken throughout the summer. Dramatic skits, staged and enacted by the entire group of campers, will be presented at least twice, under the direction of a counseler majoring in drama and English, Mewea tttaat ^ Business Wlssllns*

£\JGUST BROS Rv £ HOLLYWOOD: WA 3-8111 MIAMI FR 1 -0781 Information : Miss Jian, Catering Manager DIPLOMAT RESORTS & COUNTRY CLUB 1200 feet of Ocean Privacy Molly wood -t>ythe -Sea. Florida IS the BEST".' NEW FUND-RAISING IDEA cr/ no cost to your organization! HOTEL I We supply the entertainment, the place and the party atmosphere. All you do is supply the people and reap the profits. Interesting' Phone Herb Parker, Catering Manager at UN 515(1. Oceanfront at 68th Street



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Prg B-B +Jewistncr*&*r Friday, March 30. 1962 Miss Rochelle Stern Becomes Bride In Traditional Wedding Ceremony MIAMI WOMAN OF THE WEEK It is the highest tribute for a sister-in-law to say that the girl her her married is without doubt the kindest, sweetest etc. That exactly what Esther Mrs. Donald* Rubin says about Melanie. her her Harcl Thurman's wife. The name Melanie elicits thoughts of irthen belle, and that is Melanie to a "T." because St. Louis, where vias born and raised, is South.of the Mason-Dixon Line. Aa rabbi's daughter. Melanie realized that much was expected r — the rabbi's children are always in the eye of the corsresation. Her father influenced her life in many ways. %  tetanic feels, and today she believes more than ever that her father is a true spiritual leader: He practices what he preaches. Her father, incidentally, was the Brat rabbi ever to gh the invocation at a Prc-siRabbi Samuel Thur—.ar. ~tiil is. a dear friend cf Harry Truman, and the whole family went to Washingto see and hear him a; the Truman Inaugural. Hi inie is often teased about how many different colleges she attended She b'-camc a teacher and taught in the Shrine Hospital for Crippled Children in St. Louis. A year later, she went to Harvard to take a course in "Individual Development." which she certainly did — because she married Harold and moved to Boston There, she took part in a good deal of community activity, including Scouts PTA. National Council of Jewish Women, Hadassah. Fed,on Brandeis University, ard many others. When the Thurmans moved to Miami 12 years ago. Melanie contu ed with these same organizations, plus a feu more, like Temple :• ^el Sisterhood. Bonds for Israel, and became the first Jewish president of Welcome Wagon. And. as a member of the Banyan Garden Melanie just this week won her first blue ribbon for an African *v : et arrangement. Melanie is proud that Harold is the Man of the Family, and beL< .es he gives the best advice on every subject. With all their many accomplishments, civic and otherwise, it is hard to believe that the Tr. .rmans have never been to Europe. Every time they start think-j jf about a trip to the continent, their daughter Jane, now Mrs. Al Sharon, would present them with a new grandchild for them to visit up New England way. Al is an Israeli, and this year Israel will come to St. Louis, where '.-Sharcns have just moved, in the form of Al's parents — so no trips i' jad for the Thurmans next summer either. Perhaps, when Debby. thi r 17-year-old, graduates, Harold and Melanie and Melanie's folks take that long-delayed trip across the seas. WEARING OF THE GREEN AT WESTVIEW COUNTRY CLUB It was Irish Stew and Corned Beef and Cabbage on the gaily-decOr&ted buffet tables at Westview. The men wore bright green bow ties ogreen derbies. But the women didn't wear any St. Patrick's Day finery. It might have marred the locks of their gorgeous cocktail g ns. The entertainment was extra-good, including an Irish tenor. <. and Mrs. Larry Rosenberg hosted a group from out-of-town. Harry a: Ben Markowitz and families. Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Schlapik. Dr. and Mis. Lester A. Russin, Mr. and Mrs. David Hochberg. Mr. and Mrs. b : Cooper, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Danner all helped celebrate. There is quite a flurry of excitement about the Spring Formal. 7 -• invitations will soon be out for this yellow-and-whitc affair on Apr. 2i First-hand report about Bob Hope and Abe Ribicoff. who played I at the club as the guests of Col Jake Arvey came irom Sarah Lester) Russin and Harriet (Mis. Henry) Williams. They were t -> the phone next to the grille where the two men were eating lunch. Sarah said Bob Hope doesn't seem to know that he is being funny — o.'t quip came tumbling right after another as he was eating his ham-tr. Harriet, incidentally, was entranced with Ribicoff's eyes — tity're that beautiful. CSE TWO THREE St. Patrick's Day decorations and the Twist combined to make %  first of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Gumenick's dinners-at-home a huge cess. It was planned for outdoors, but had to be brought in because ;he weather. An accordionist put everyone in the mood for a fun ning. With professional help, everyone learned the Twist. They re all good, but Mr. and Mrs. Max Matz were extra special. Among thirty-five guests were Mr. and Mrs Edward Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. £ Iney Weintraub. the Rittcr Levinsons. and Hrb and Susy Gimbel. I: itations are cut for the second dinner party on Apr. 11, and the d in the series will be around the first of May. s = VER NO MORE TO ROAM "Don't ever do this to me again." said little Karen Brickman in uncertain tones when her mother and father, Richard and Linda. jrned from a trip to New York and Boston. Dick went on business, a* 1 Linda went along for the ride. Incidentally, they attended Beverly K.iem and Herbert Sttirman's wedding. They only had a few hours Washington, just long enough to get a glimpse of the White House to eat at a restaurant that Dick had been raving about. Next year, ti -. children will no doubt be included on the trip. The honeymoon is r. -ft CONGRATULATIONS The inscription on the fly leaf reads "For Mother and Dad. with t and thanks." It was written in a new book that has just been p, Dlished by Dr. Morton H. Maxwell and sent to his parents, Dr. and s. William Maxwell. Of course, they are terribly proud of it. The ne of it is "Clinical Disorders of Fluid and Electrolyte Metabolism." I have to be almost as smart to read it as to write it. In a ceremony performed under a choopah canopy pool-side at the Deauvilie hotel. Miss Rochelle Lila Stern and Stephen Leon Kevelson exchanged mamage vows Tuesday, Mar 27 A reception in the Napoleon loom followed the 6 o'clock rites. which were carried out according to ancient Jewish 'raditions. Officiating were Rabbi Abraham Couple to Live In San Francisco Carol Friedberg and Joel Schwartz were united in marriage Saturday evening, Mar 24. at Westbrooke Country Club, with Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro and Cantor William Lipson officiating. For the ceremony, the bride chose a white chantilly lace fulllength gown with a cathedral train, and carried a white B:ble with a cascade of white crchida and lilyof-the valley Marsha Friedberg was maid of honor for her sister, and bridesmaids were Sheila Sandier. Barbara Adler. Yvonne Uriel and Pearl Kopel. Daughter of Mr and Mra Murray Friedberg. 5345 Twin Lakes •lr.. the bride graduated from Miami Senior High and Florida C lege of medical technology She was a member cf B'nai B'rith Debs. Parents of the bridegroom arc Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schwartz, of Sunnyvale. Calif., where Joel attended school. A major in electronics, he is presently with the research department of Stanford University. Best man was Stan Friedberg. Ushers were Michael Krassner.. Barry Goldbaum. Michael Miller. Arnold Adler. Robert Friedberg and Neil Kopel. After a honeymoon in Carmel. the newlyweds will live in San Francisco. •9 Weinschneider. grandfather of the bride. Rabbi Isaac Hutner, dean of Talmudie Seminary'. New York, Rabbi Sidney Weinschneider. Rabbi Solomon Scharfman. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, father of the bride, Rabbi Bernard Bergman, and Rabbi Nathan Kohler. Assistimi-were Nathan Kevelson, father of the bridegroom. Alter kevelson. his brother. Simon Hanai,, of Mexico City. Nicolas Stern, and Louis Stern, all uncles of the bride. Cantor Maurice Mamches and Cantor Abraham Self chanted the welcoming song for the bride. Also in attendance were Rabbis Joseph Rabinowiu. Alexander S. Gross. Phineas Weberman. Abraham Korf. David Lehrfield. Solomon Schlff, A. Mendeiowitz. A. Weinreb. Morns Hurwitz, N Schapiro. Morris Skop. .Max Lipschitz, Eugene Labovitz. Tmcha? Bryskman. M. Safra. A. J Safra. S. Radwin. Jacob Katz. and L. Mar tl Dean of the Rabbinical Seminary Chaim Berlin. Rabbi Isaac Hutner. I the bride and the bridegroom For her wedding, the bride chose a gown of pure silk with alencon lace embroidery featuring a high neck line, long sleeves, and cathedral train. The French illusion bouflant butterfly veil was held in place b> a pillbox of alencon lace and seed pearls. Maid of honor was Joyce Stern. sister of the bride, and Tiki Stern prd Judy Stern, also sisters of the bride, served as bridesmaids with Martha Stern and Joy Belle Yudofsky. Robin Kevelson, the bridegroom's niece, was flower girl Daughter of Rabbi and Mrs. Tibor H. Stern. 1061 Michigan ave.. spiritual leader of Beth Jacob Congregation, the new Mrs. Kevelson graduated with honors from Miami Beach High, attended Stern college for Women of the Yeshiva University in New York, and is presently at the University of Miami. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Kevelson, of Brooklyn, N.Y. Having studied in Israel, he is now attending Brooklyn College and Chaim Berlin Rabbinical Seminary. Following his graduation, he will be associated with his father in the Empire Ace Inc. After a honeymoon in Europe and Israel, the newlyweds will live in New York. ; Children's Fashion Show Slated } Sisterhood of Temple Tifereth Jacob will hold a children's fashion show and dinner on Sunday at 5 p.m. The show will be held at the Temple at 951 Flamingo Way, Hialeah. Models will be provided by Mrs. ; Faust of the Sophistikids. Entertainment will be included in the program. • „.. ..*'• \\ • raw -K.I: MRS. STEPHEN KCVUSCH Sunshine Chapter Luncheon Sunshine chapter. B'nai B'rith Women, held its third annual donor luncheon and Purim festival las' week at the Americana hotel. MrMilton Weinberg. donor chairman, was in charge of the program. Specializing in Pormals Cocktail Gowns Bridal Attire Mother of the Bn


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Page 16-A fJewisli ftoridHar Friday. March 30, 1962 HOSPITAL Although 108 beds of Cedars oi Lebanon Hospital are now in use, the top three floors are still incomplete, hospital president. Samuel T. Sapiro (right), points out to Emil J. Gould, who is chairman of the "President's Dinner" on Apr. 28. The two community leaders are seen at the site of the first outdoor billboard installed at the intersection of NW 7th ave. and 5th St., as part of the Cedars spring fund drive. Others are planned for display throughout Dade county to call attention to the Cedars dinner Apr. 28 at which Secretary Abraham Ribicoff will be guest speaker. Invitations Out To Cedars Fete Invitations to thousands of Dade county's leading citizens went into the mail this week to attend a coinmunity dinner honoring Samuel T. i Sapiro. on Apr. 28 at the Deauville hotel. Called the first "Presidenfs Din-1 ner,'* the testimonial banquet is being sponsored as a tribute to Lear School Has Science Fair Art and Science Fairs are being sponsored by the students of Dade I county during the month of March. I The Lear School student body | has worked diligently to make its Art and Science Exhibit a success. The exhibit opened Mar. 13 in the Lear School Auditorium, when the scientific projects, equipment and displays of art work were viewed by over 100 parents and teachers. Nursery and kindergarten displays were also on view. the president of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital who has served two terms at the helm of Dade's newest mediI cal facility. Distinguished guest speaker at the dinner will be U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Weifare, Abraham A. Ribicoff, who will make a special flight to Miami Beach for the occasion. Sapiro will receive recognition as a "Volunteer of Valor" of the • new hospital. He has been per( sonally responsible for obtaining financial support exceeding $50,000 toward the completion of the six-j s.ory four-and-a-half million dollar structure. Invitees will greet Mr. and Mrs. Ribicoff at a cocktail party and reception in the Deauville preceding the dinner, according to the committee. Prominent bivilder and developer, Emil J. Gould, is chairman of the dinner. Servatius Wants Globke to Tell Nazi Era Story JERUSALEM—(JTA)—Dr. Rob| trt ServJtius has opened before an | appeals court his fight to save I Adolf Eichmann from the hangj I man's noose. Because of Israeli 11 legal restrictions against introduc1 •ion of rew evidence at appeal' hearing, he was limited ifrgely to 1 the arguments he used during the four-month trial of the Nazi last' summer. | -_:_ He did ask that Dr Hans Globke, I state secretary to West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, be called as an "expert witness" of I the Nazi era. This proposal was j made in support of his basic con\ tention that Eichmann had been J merely a transport officer in the ; vast Nazi murder machine and had simply carried out orders which were his sworn duty. The Cologne attorney also ; hinted that a Nuremberg war crimes trial document implicating Eichmann in the development of the use of poison gas for the murder of Jews might have been falsified. He retreated promptly, however. j when he was asked by one of the five Supreme Court justices constituting the appeals tribunal if he was suggesting that the American prosecution at the Nuremberg trials had faked the document. He also declared he would appeal to the Council of Europe, an advisory body with which Israel is not associated, if Eichmann was not extradited to West German for trial. It was not clear just how meaningful this was, since the West German Government has made it plain it has no interest whatever in extraditing the former Gestapo colonel and the Bonn Foreign Office last year rejected Eichmann's request for intervention. HBS1B GRAND OPENING NORTON TIRE CO. 6017 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.—WEST HOLLYWOOD OPEN EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT TILL 9 P.M. Sale Prices In Effect At All Stores Throughout S. Florida # See Addresses Below SALE Lowest Price in History on our Safety-5 B.F.G. TIRES 670x15 Blackball Tube-type Plus Fed. Tox ot $1.98 ond your old recappable tire or odd $3 • All factory-new Not Seconds — Not Discontinued Stock — Not Retreads • 12month written, Nation-Wide Road Hazard Guarantee • Full 7-Rib Tread Whitewalls and Other Sixes Slightly Higher NO MOUNTING CHARGE DURING THIS SALE OK AN f TIMEAT NORTON TIRE CO. CENTRAL FLORIDA 100 LOTS MARION COUNTY NORTH SILVER SPRINGS Must Sell All '50 EACH • TITLE POLICY • WARRANTY DEED • 3 LAKES ON SUB-DIVISION WRITE FOR INFORMATION Florida State Finance Co. 807 OLYMPIA BLDG., MIAMI, 32 State Dep't. Calls Syria and Israel For Conferences Continued from Page 1-A peaceful for some time became the scene of renewed clashes when the Syrians began a campaign last Feb. 1 of shooting at Israeli fishermen on the lake, which is entirely within Israeli territory. Syrian gun positions, which are on a higher level than the lake area, dominate the strategic scene. Early en Mar. 17. Israel staged • a brief but powerful raid on the j Syrian gun positions knocking them ; tut. Subsequently, Syrians fired j sporadically at Israeli fishing boats and at police launches. Several police were wounded in the shootings. The affrays also were marked by iet clashes as Israeli fighters kept a patrol against incursions of Soviet-made Syrian jets. Syria then decided to ask for a meeting of the Security Council, and Israel replied with a similar request, both sides charging aggression. The Israeli request contained a direct warning i to Syria that if the aggressive actions continued, "Israel, in exercise of its rights of self-defense, will have to use all the means at its disposal to prevent the continuance of such actions." Prime Minister Ben-Gurion told an emergency Cabinet meeting that Israel could not permit Syria to alter by force the status quo of %  Lake Tiberias. He also expressed | the belief that the renewed Syrian : attacks were aimed at Israel's i plans to use some Jordan River | Water .for its irrigation projects. In a second letter to the Security Council last week, the Israel delegation said there had been renewed Syrian attacks, including machinegun fire on Mar. 21 at Tel Kapzair, heavy firing at Mishmnr Hayardin and Gadot. and at Israeli workmen near Shear Yeshuv on Mar. 22. ALL B. F. GOODRICH TIRES AND BATTERIES SALE PRICED! ALL TIRES GUARANTEED IN WRITING BY B. F. GOODRICH AND NORTON TIRC CO. ALL SALE PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE COUPON FROM NORTON'S FREE DISCOUNT BOOK — DRIVE IN AND ASK FOR YOURS! BRAKE & FRONT END ALIGNMENT STAR LOCATIONS ONLY SPECIAL 9 95 CHECK, ADJUST, TEST BRAKES REPACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS ALIGN FRONT END ADIUST STEERING BALANCE All 4 WHEELS %  RM YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD AT ANY NORTON STORE-OPEN A NORTON CHARGE ACCOUNT -IT'S GOOD FOR A LIFETIME. 17 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 5300 N.W. 27th Ave. Open 24 Hours and All Day SNiwIay %  ~ : h MIAMI SM* N. W. 171k Av. Mt Wit FUaltr SI. MM N.W. tod Avt. i WMI nnitr St. tro s. w. Mk St. MO mil MIAMI • %  ACM 1S4 Allan Road HALLANDALE It N.rth DIXH Hwy. KIY WIST M Oraan St. HOLLYWOOD Ml Sautk Fad. Hw. KOMISTEAD !•• S. Fid. HWY. CAROL CITY 4t5 N.W. i7ik SI. PT. LAUDCRDAJ-1 • IN* SWt* Fad. Hwv. JA urn >7* swttn Davta Blvd. MB W..I •raward %  tvd. N. MIAMI 11M* N.W. TMl Avt. W. MOLLYWOOD *" Hatlvwaad %  av hoard At stat* • *r S. MIAMI Stlt s. Mai* HWY. % % 



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.-age 4-B +Jmisl> fhrkfiar Friday, March 30. 1962 Hadassah Offers Bible Study Group Miami chapter of Hadassah Bible Study group will meet Thursday morning. Apr. 5.. 10:30 a.m., at the home of Mrs. Louis Goldman, 6501 Granada blvd.. Coral Gables. Mrs. Sanford Jacobson. education chairman of the Florida region of Hadassah, is leader of the group. She has been trained in th^ capacity at a Bible Study seminar in Stamford. Conn., conducted by the World Bible Study Assn. According to Mrs. Jacobson, "the approach of our group is intellectual and non-denominational, with the Bible studied as historic literature.' Women interested in attending may contact Mrs. Norman Lyons or Mrs. Fanny Frommer. of Tru .ts crusade < %  Fred Fuller >pe equipment in Ce Lei Deparl rry Sorrosky National Council of Jewish Women Will End Season with Meeting Wednesday Greater Miami Section. National C ouncil of Jewish Women's nine di> .sions will meet Wednesday for the !.st time this season to elect officers, hear reports from returning t ^-legates to the recently-held ^juthern interstate regional coni i-ntion, and to enjoy a variety of %  ograms, according to an an:...uncement by president, Mrs. Sid. ey Lewis. The newly-elected officers will "'? installed at a joint ceremony on :May 2. r• • "The Woman of the Year," a musical salute to Council volun. irs in various service projects, • ill feature the meeting of Sunset Division at the Hillel House on the University of Miami campus at :2:30. Bay Division will hear a book reLew on "A New Life." by Bernard "KEDEM" KOSHER CRAPE JUICES I RASPBERRY SYRUPS, 3 r e now available in yo--' -e.ghoorhood superma--el and grocery, Kosher for Passover ur-.j oersoru! superv's Rabbi L. I. Greenwal^ •ibi of Ne/. 3 I lor Kiddush Pttsovw Sd. a Sacramental purposes. Try our 100'i P.-* Raspberry Syrup KosHefor Passover, thi J one o' Its kind on the • Mo Color or Flavor is added. It's PURE Distributed by UVINSON'S FOOD SPECIALTIES 4570 E 10 lane, Hlaleah. MU 1-3578 Malamud, given by Mrs. Dorothy Krieger Fink. The meeting will be held at Washington Federal on Normandy Isle at 12:15. •3 • Biscayne Division will meet at Pythian Lodge, W. Flagler St.. at 12:30 p.m. "A Salute to Biscayne" will be presented. s Evening Division will meet at Toby's Cafeteria, 27th ave. and the Trail, at 7:30 p.m. After the Southern interstate regional conference reports, they will hold an auction. Proceeds will be used to purchase a large-type typewriter needed for Council's Sight-Handicapped program. Indian Creek Division will pre" sent "Ernie Goes to Council's Convention." a characterization of Mrs Joseph Klein, president. The ting will bo called to order at I at Algiers hotel. Islands Division will meet at tian motel at 11 a.m. to hear %  m of the Southern Lnl ional com Lincoln D'vision will hear a book IJ Mr VI p m. Shores Division will meet at Westview Country Ciub at noon. The program, "Council Orbits the Globe." will be followed by a fashion show given by Lewis Fashions, ot Lincoln rd. • e South Dade Division will meet at th( home of Mrs. Jack Schenknian. C605 SW 109 St., at 9:30 a.m. "The Year in Revue," featuring officers' t reports and Southern Interstate regional reports, will highlight the meeting. Gobies Girl Wins In Science Fair Lorraine Lieberman has been 0 sch ilarship by the itj VI her i. t, %  %  Analysis ol Vsnects ittr Flour B errd %  e is e Fail ..i on Wed• • %  j Passover Will Be Demonstrated A Passover workshop will he con-: ducted by Rabbi and Mrs. Mordej cai Podet at Temple J'udea on Sunday at 9.30 a.m., and again at, 11 am Traditional foods, table settings, ceremonial objects and the Seder will be discussed, explained and demonstrated. Members and friends are welcome. MRS. SANfORD JACOBSON TETLEY TEA A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES SINCE 1837 Yes, there's Yom Tov spirit in this fine tea..."flavor crushed" for fullest strength and stimulation ... richer taste and pleas* ure with your fleishigs and milchigs and between meal refreshment... tUSHISIU ^Tj Recommended or


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Friday. March 30, 1962 Jewish Fk>r£dFiann Page 11-B The Courier ces [i r seats : the D< no< ra i ul vi %  m i i I e for I ,.., %  .. • • m to hav< i >ti red the ima .. i !o< al ( •• litical leaders. Mr*. Lewis Olatter, who has held otfic ev i major community organ :at'o*.i, is ronn lh Venetian Islands .Wally G'uk, pres dent of the : Orrici i { ia : -'. and oi th? I '• n ocra ic I tub I i im enter [or Di strict 40 comm ci n n, ; n Prei incts l : M 18, as well as Palm and H ; cu islands Ge-e Berk. i | % %  (i Jason Berkman's c< urt, has d* ul the race ate co :" tteema fr( n Dade lo conci I his %  di iricl ,i n Ssphia Enolenier, wi Vice 3 H Ma'vln Erjlar.d48 and for continued encouragement of Israel's achieve economic independence." Shenker is an annual Miami Beach winter visitor Philip Roth, author of •Goodbye. Columbus;" R^'ph Ellison, of "The Invisible Man" fame; and Pietro Di Oor.a'.o. who penChrist in Concrete." participated this week in a forum on the conflict of loyalties in fiction writer? who belong to minority groups. The symposium was one of several sponsored on the campus by "i biva University during its Diamond Jubilee year Hebrew University i J rus ilem lias 95 Arab and Dri::-:' students led this yei r a new record The seaoinj 14th am iversary (>;' I r.iel dinner-dance is tin brainchild ol Lillian Simer.hoff, new pn e Greater Miami rt'omen's Dl\ ion of A r.ds. A! Mason, Beach furniture dealer, of! to N< \ STork to PHI • ic colle< lion disi b< II b • bai Pomerence's r co r district .. en Guberman lia formei Sen. >ppe : ed bill G.dcon Straus %  that the Israeli I giant' • i ',-. a Hirschman -, i %  %  lews in Europe. I Home J X i in r i< iht [ Jews from ; i I cites (or ic-n an I cl men • the N eld country. Men • • • Allen I. Frcchling ankl hi DOSl r: this sum i i r. Cincinnati Z ta Beta • i .• rsitj of Miami's Hiilel House : • l o dim • ': %  %  %  ving ... Mr. and Mrs. Irvirg S'hat scni out invita i da; afte "m m (3 h nl Jee Malek at the Dil Sch itzn an < cei "Jed Trttehin as president of Beach Lodge B'rit '.: 6 ceremonii at the Al |i< is. with Samuel Wiener %  o I -sor the following year Mrs. s-ina B %  -is will at Ti esday's B*n"ai B'rith luncheon at Lin< estaurant. Lecr.ard Barr and Sam Lipton'— lab st 1 via i*8— are • the i ontinuine. bi >nal ulf Ami rican Li the s of I Dubbin and Rosen bn th< in Ui v. and have each gone %  t in the first thi vid d s,!: > '"'-' Bertram w. Kern will receive well-deserved awar !i % %  %  al Societj 11 Sunday %  '. Ted Lurie, po : % %  <' editi r ol the Jerusa em Post. I een elected president of the Jerusalem YM and x \ Larry Birger, business editor of The I ami New-, doing an o inj b %  :'. his nightly WIN/ broadcast for Joseph Upton's Dade Federal. Gables High Youth Has Future Mapped; He's Winner of Many Top Awards Dr. Lehrman (in photo at left), chairman of the Foundation for the Jewish National Fund, pledges iu'1-hearted support of "Me Ami" en behaii ol Greater Miami Jewry. Center aie Samuel Eiman and Mrs. Sarah Czech, as they light candles inaugurating Miami's twin city. Mendel Fisher, retiring executive director of the Jewish National Fund, in photo at ric.it lights the 28-candle testimonial cake prepare; in his honor. Function was last week at t'.-.e Fontainebleau hotel. Miami Accepts Challenge to Establish Israel Twin City at Tribute to Fisher Miami Jewry last week accepted the challenge to establish the twin city of "Me Ami" in Israel at an inaugural testimonial affair in honor of Mendel Fisher in the Fontainebleau hotel. Fisher, national executive director of the Jewish National Fund for 28 years, recently retired from that post. The Greater Miami JNr Council hosted the affair at the Fontainebleau to mark Fisher's retirement and inaugurate the launching of "Me Ann" in the Neg< v. In his a: 1 %  '-ess, F ; sh-r paid tribute to the leadthip of JNF here. "This is fbe first t : me in ii-i> history cf the Jewish National Fur.-'." he said, "that a comI ... ....:. 5 a v i • lacob V at thi Hi tadrut on Sun%  hot< I A 6:3 p.m. reci pi n II be followed b; the tra nal kosh. r Sedi r dinner, and musical pro..: %  ; ., ; c intoi Sheldon Ko lm r will bi i during the festivities. This year's Sedrr is beir.-j deHicatcc 1 to the Golden Jubilee of Kupat Holim-lsrael, which makes modern science available to young ar.d old, new immigrants and veteran settlers alike throughout Israel. i ;ha rmt n • f the celebration will he Rab! L< %  n Kronish. spiritual remple i:e:h ^hnlom. Milt, ai loshua 2 local HisII i ft'ein ol '. hii : .. %  %  : %  raveier, auth ir cr Hi is curr< ntly ser\ President Kenm dj 's Comir EEO. 'Tourist Wghf Sarvnfcry pendi arian American Civi \ will hold a turday evetres Zsuzsi a | iram in live Th • function II be in honor of I and arriving Is, am i fei tures Gypi > nusii The oi in meets at 18;;. v.v No. River ar. munity in the diaspora has established a twin city in Israel. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. pr -:dent Of the Jewish .National Bund Southeast region, pledged that Miami "will rededicate ourselis to see that this dream comes tn Chairman of the evening \ is Leon J. Ell, president of the Greater Miami JNF Council. A > participating in the program were Dr. Irving Lehnmn, chairman f :be Foundation for Jewish NatiC I Find, who paid tribute to the gi ii nor and Rabbi Leon Kronnn, 1 em] Be > %  Sholom, who g the invocation. ram was olfert •allied al •:; YaslO. Mrs. Sarah Czech and Sanu1 I lm in p. rticipeted -n the cand % %  -:.-'.; (=rem.-ny inaugurati-; M Ami," which in Hebrew "City of My People." er committee included I • ,'rs. William Be in L. Berman, Mrs. E i \. lii m Bornstein, Mrs. Isidore Dickman, Isa %  e Donen, Leon J. Ell, Harrj I i Ezra Finegold, Jacob C. Fis •man, Abraham Frai lin Mayt s friedberg, Mrs. Robert Garber, Sol G ildman, Dr. J. A. Grecnhoi ibraham Grossman. Max Hex Peter Heller, Sam Kagan, Sol K holz, Zev W Kogan, Sam LipWr I, Mrs. Fanny Liebman. Mrs. Al ham Mason, Mrs. Miriam I'n Rosenstein, Louis Rudni C, Dr. M. J. Safra. Sam Schach ;, Al Sherman, Mrs. Wolfe Shkl. ", Meyer Siegel, Bernard Silver. J. Z. Stadlan, Mrs Alfred Slor.c Mrs. Ben Zeigmund. FLA. KEYS BIMINI At 17, Lee Sandier, a senior at Coral Gables High, knows exactly what he wants to do in the future and is methodically concentrating on the courses and activities which will best prepare him for that future. Interested in journalism and creative writing of all kinds, Lee founded his school's literary society, serves as its president, and is editor of its literary publication. Winner, during his sophomore year, of the Florida Scholastic Press sports writing contest. Lee has served as sports editor of both the yearbook and newspaper, and is presently co-editor of the newspaper. Interested in law. as well as journalism. Lee visualizes a combination of legal training and writing ability in a field of journalism related to political science. Vice president of Quill and Scroll, national journalism honorary society, the energetic senior also writes a weekly column for the Coral Gables Times. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore T. Sandier. 4841 Biltmore dr., Lee, almost six feet tall, likes to bowl in whatever spare time he can find, even won a first place trophy with several other boys in a recent bowling tournament. CRUISE THROUGH FLORIDA KEYS 140 MILE TRIP DEEP THROUGH THE ROMANTIC FLORIDA KEYS Received at Luxurious "Islamorada Yacht Club" where every courtesy and facility will be at your disposal. Includes Lunch Plus Ta and Spectacular Show of The Sea MORE TIME "In the <|ffi ON BIMINI Bahamas" ... VIA FAST NEW EXPRESS BOATS TAe Original "Proven" Biminl Cruiic DON'T ACCEPT A SUBSTITUTE.' DIRECT DOCKING AT BIMINI QUIET PROTECTED \ WATERS PHONE FR 1-1436 DEPART MIAMI DUPONT PLAZA CENTER World's fattest, safest passenger boats to Bimini, American Flagships. Brand new, custom built tor Bimini shallow waters. V.5. Coast Guard Approved. Radar, Ship to Shore Radio. "On Time" Schedule. Duty-Free Shopping. Free Layover Privilege. MIAMI BEACH C. OF C. DOCKS FLORIDA BAHAMA LINES LTD, MIAMI OFFICE: DuPONT PLAZA.CENTER e CALL FR 1-1436 c\ •



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"Jewish Flondian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY Volume 35 — Number 13 Miami, Florida, Friday, March 30, 1962 Three Sections — Price 2C< SEE SUPPLEMENT SEC. C Jewish Welfare Board Biennial Convention To Open Wednesday Arrangements have been concluded here for the hundreds of deleHausner Asks High Court To Nix Eichmasm Appeal SERVATIUS WANTS GlOBKf AS WITNESS ... PAGE 16 -A JERUSALEM—(JTA)—Slashing at every contention entered on ap. peal by the defense counsel for Adolf Eichmann, Attorney General ates who will be arriving next week from Jewish Community Centers Gideon Hausner Monday requested Israel's five-man Supreme Court nnd YMHAs throughout the country to attend the biennial convention [ Panel, before which Eichmann is trying to save himself from hanging. ,i the National Jewish Welfare Board. The Greater Miami Jewish to reject all the defense claims and uphold the judgment of guilty Community Center, as host agency, is in charge of local arrangements handed down last December by the District Court here. ... • • Patmdinff succcssfi for the five-day conference, which will take place at the Deauville hotel, beginning next Wednesday. I.ecn Kanlan. National Jewish v\ elf are "Board vice president, is serving as local convention chairman. Mrs. Milton Sirkin, presidentelect of the JWB Southern Section, is arrangements chairman for all local committees. Mrs. Louis Glasset is in charge of preparations for ;ill functions dealing with Armed services work. Staff coordinator is (.'inter executive director Efraim 11 Gale. On Wednesday morning, the Women's Division of the Miami Beach YMHA Branch will hold a brunch for delegates from all Center women's groups, with Mrs. Norman Giller, Division president, in charge. Mrs. Howard Dunn, of tne North County Branch, will offer a dramatic Sabbath reading at the Oneg Shabbat program scheduled for Saturday, Apr. 7, at 3:30 p.m. The program will include dance interpretation by Mrs. Olga Suarez, Center dance director. Cantor Jacob Bornstein, of Temple Israel, will also participate in the program. Dinner and workshop sessions throughout the convention will culminate in a gala banquet on Saturday night, Apr. 7. at 7:30 p.m. A major address will be delivered by Ambassador Philip M. KlutzContinued on Page 10-A FRAGILE PEACE PREVAILS State Dep't. Calls Israel, Syria to Discuss Clashes Pounding successfully at every point raised in the appeal by Dr. Robert Servatius, of Cologne, chiet of Eichmann's counsel, Hausner upheld Israel's right to try the former Gestapo colonel convicted of directing the slaughter of 6,000,000 European Jews. He maintained that Eichmann had virtually conWASHTINGTON — (JTA) — Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman and Syria's Charge d'Affaires here, A. Aziz Allouni, were called to the State Department this week and told that the United States was concerned over the renewed border fighting between the two nations. Later, at a news briefing, State. Department news chief Lincoln! White told reporters that Philip: Talbot. Assistant Secretary of State j for Near Eastern Affairs, had toldi both the Israeli and Syrian envoys that the State Department hoped | the cease-fire worked out by the UN over the weekend "would be; observed." At the Israel Embassy, a spokesman said that Ambassador; Harman "had taken the opportun-! ity in his discussion with Assistant Secretary Talbot to reiterate Israel's position on the situation." Matzoh Given Run Around By Red Leaders Meanwhile, a fragile peace prevailed on the Israel-Syrian border in the Lake Tiberias area this week after several new harassments by Syrian gunners as the United Nations Security Council prepared to take up the issue. An area that had been relatively Continued on Page 16-A rWO-MKT F0RMUU DfVISEO Bill to Revise Immigration Quotas Offered in Capital By Special Report WASHINGTON Sen. Philip A. Hart, with Senators Keating, Clark, Proxmire, Javits. Neuberger. McNamara and Humphrey, announced they introduced a bill Mar. 20 com-, inehcnsivcly revising the immigration quota system. The bill departs from the present national origins quota system and sets up a two-part formula based on population ratios and the pattern of immigration over the last: 15 years. A major objective of the bill is to eliminate nat'onal and racial discrimination from general U.S. immigration statutes. The new quotas are closely related to actual immigration experience of recent years. Sen. Hart stated that "the many special acts of Congress for nonquota admissions have drastically changed our immigration patterns" and that "the quota system of the Immigration and Naturalixation Act of 152 no longer reflects actual immigration policy." Sen. Hart stated that the bill reflects the work of many months of Continued on Page 5-A WASHINGTON (JTA)-Amer ican Jewish offers to supply mat-i zchs to Moscow's Jews and trumpets of Congressional wrath over the reporter ban by the Soviet Government on matzohs for Passover this year prompted the Soviet Embassy here this week to indicate it was looking into the matter. A spokesman for the Soviet Embassy told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that requests for interven-: tion in >he situation voiced in Congress were being studied and "may be acted on." The spokesman ; added, however, that "there is con-1 siderable doubt" that such a ban had been imposed. The source of the report appeared to be trustworthy. Chief Rabbi Yehuda Leib Levin, of Moscow, so informed his congregation last week. He said'that because of the ban, Passover dietary law restrictions would be relaxed this year. Rabbi Levin was quoted in the American press as having said that state bakeries last year made 120 tons of matzohs for Moscow's 500,000 Jews and that smaller amounts were made by state bakeries in other Russian cities. He said this Continued on Page 3-A $10,075,000 Claims Confab Reveals Figure For 1962 Aid PAYMENT EXTENSION PAGE 7-A COPENHAGEN—(JTA)—The disvictcd himself during the 1,000.000i tribution of $10,075,000 in 1962. for word interrogation conducted by ; the benefit of 170,000 Jewish viethe Israeli police prior to last! tims of Nazism in 25 countries, was year's trial. approved at the annual meeting of The Attorney General tore apart! the board of directors of the Conthe defense insistence on Eich-1 ference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, which concluded its three-day sessions here. Jacob Blaustein, senior vicepresident of the Claims Conference, made the budget presentation to the 37-board members present representing 23 Jewish world organizations. This year's allocation brings to $90,000,000 the sum the Claims Conference has allocated for Nazi victims outside of Israel since t h e original reparations agreement was reached with the Bonn Government in 1952. "Requests for aid are continuing to run well beyond our resources," Blaustein said. "The Continued on Page 6-A mann's having been a "mere transport officer" in Hitler's Gestapo. He ripped into the defense claims that Eichmann's "low rank" had been indicated in his "modest manner of living." Concerning Israel's jurisdiction, Hausner told the high tribunal, the fact is that, under international law, a court n—d not be concerned with the manner in which the prisoner had been brought before the court if his offense is against the law. Thus the Attorney General replied to Dr. Servatius' contention that Eichmann was not subject to an Continued on P*.ne 7-A New York OK's Permit For Rockwell Nazi Rally NEW YORK—(JTA)-The City of New York, under court order to provide Nazi George Rockwell with a site for a public rally, notified him this week that he could use a small park at the foot of Manhattan for that purpose on Apr. 20. Park Commissioner Newbold M The Commissioner declared that Apr. 20, which Rockwell wants to celebrate as Hitler's birthday, is "a business day" in Union Square which is heavily used by neighboring office workers and store employees." The Supreme Court of New York r a i wiiiiiiuoreiin ••" -|ne supreme inun OI new iure orris, replying to a Rockwell re-, last vear up held a decision of lower „„l for -i ruirmit In hftlri his rallv ..u„. ik. o__nn.ilH quest for a permit to hold his rally at Union Square Park in the heart of Manhattan, denied the request and offered Jeanette Park on the waterfront. The Commissioner informed the head of the American Nazi Party that the park could accommodate about 1,200 courts that the Commissioner could not deny Rockwell a permit "unless it is demonstrated" that "such expression will immediately and irreparably injure t h e public weal." The issue was taken to the Rockwell, aided by the courts by people: American Civil Liberties Union, and has adequate comfort station unen Rockwell's initial application facilities." A speakers stand was promised. Continued on Page 5-A Nazis Took $27 Billion from European Jewry By Special Report NEW YORK — European Jewry was despoiled by the Nazis of about $27 billion, at values then applicable, in property, assets and income, according to a study made by the World Jewish Congress in New York. The value of restituted property and payments in reparations, restitution and compensation, principally by West Germany, is about $6 billion. The actual value of the despoiled property today would be 60 to 80 percent higher than the estimated $27 billion. The figures for damages suffered by the Jews are contained in a new pamphlet, "Spoiliation and Remedial Action," that has just been issued in New York by Dr. Nehemiah Robinson, director of the World Jewish Congress Institute of Jewish Affairs. The main targets of Nazi and Fascist spoiliation were the avail*" able assets—real estate, businesses, valuables, furniture, money— mostly by direct confiscation or by forced sale. The Nazis were not satisfied. Robinson notes, with IWHIUII>W • •" ——• Jewish assets in the respective sponsible at the end of World War coun t r i es and they forced many II for placing Jewry's human | losses under Nazism at 6.000,000. Continued on Page 11-A The Wold global body communities Jewish Congress, a representing Jewish in 64 lands, was rc.



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Friday. March 30. 1962 fJenirtMcrid&r Page SC Prominent Personalities Slated Continued from Page 3-C brokerage firm of Stern and Byck. ( Kabbi Aaron H. Biumenthal, spiritual leader of Congregation Emanu-El, Mount Vernon, N.Y., who will deliver the sermon at Saturday morning services, is chairman of the National Jewish Welfare Board Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. He is a former Army chaplain, having served in uniform during World War II at Halloran General Hospital, Staten Island, N.Y.. where he was part t'f a tri-faith team Imh welcomed back to Amerii i over 150,000 battle casualties from all theatres of operations. A native of Montreal, Canada, he was ordained as rabbi in 1932 by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. He was, from 1956 to 1958. president of the Rabbinical Assembly of America He is a member of the board of directors of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and a member of the Rabbinical Assembly's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards. Rabbi Biumenthal has been designated by the Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy to go on several overseas missions sponsored by the Armed Forces to conduct Jewish religious retreats and Torah convocations for Jews on military duty in various parts of the world. Sanford Solender closing spcak: iit the Sunday morning plenary session, became executive vice president of the National Jewish Welfare Board climaxing a distinguished 25-year career in Jewish communal work. He recently headed the ad hoc committee of social work experts named by Secretary of Health. Education and Welfare Ribicoff to study and report on the Federal Government's welfare programs. He is president-elect of the National Conference of Social Work, a former president of the National Assn. of. Jewish Center Workers, and a committee chairman of the National Assn. of Social Workers. In 1958. Mr. Solender received the Joseph E. Kappel Award of the National Assn. of Jewish Communal Service. In 1959. he was chosen the 'most distinguished citizen'' of Mount Vernon, NY., Where he has served as president of the Board of Education. Solender is a member of a family now in its third generation of service in the Jewish Community Center field. His father, the late Samuel Solender, was executive director for a quarter-century of the Washington Heights Inwood YM-YWHA in New York City and his son, Stephen, is now do%  ing field work in preparation for a career in Center work. • Chaplain (Maj. Gen.) Frank A. Tobey, speaker at the Wednesday evening opening session, has satisfied two seemingly conflicting boyhood dreams — to be a soldier and to serve as a clergyman. He is Chief of Chaplains of the U.S. Army, a post to which he was appointed in November. 1958, after having served in the office. Chief of Chaplains, for five years. Chaplain Tobey served in the South Pacific during World War II. During the Korean Conflict, he participated in the invasion of Inchon and became the first United Nations Chaplain in Korea. After that assignment, he returned to the United States for a tour of duty which led to his present post. Chaplain Tobey entered the military service via the National Guard, enlisting as a private at the age of 19. Two years later, he received a commission as a lieutenant in the Organized Reserve Corps. After his ordination as minister, he became a chaplain, and was assigned to the 43rd Division in 1940. Before coming on active duty in 1941. he served two parishes in New England. He is a native New Englander. Chaplain Tobey holds the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal. He has won a number of service medals and ribbons. • Rabbi Bertram W. Korn. speaker at the Wednesday evening opening session, is rabbi of Reform Congregation Knesseth Israel in Philadelphia and is a recognized authority on American Jewish history. He is a former president of the American Jewish Historical Society and a member of the advisory council of the Civil War Centennial Commission. He served as assistant professor of American Jewish History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion while also acting as assistant to the president of HUC-JIR. A former Navy chaplain, he is a member of the national Jewish Welfare Board's Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. He was ordained rabbi in 1943 by the Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute of Religion, where he received the degrees of M.H.L and D.H.L. He has servad as an officer, board member or trustee of a large number of Jewish and general organizations. Among his major works are "American Jewry and the Civil War," "Studies in 19th Century American Jewish History," and "Jews and Negro Slavery in the Old South." Every Identification Continued from Page 3-C II, JWB voluntarily submitted itself to an unprecedented, searching inquiry by an independent commission of experts headed by Dr. Salo W. Baron. The director of the JWB Survey, Dr. Oscar Janowsky, devoted two years to a painstaking study of JWB's status and functions in relation to its major spheres of operation. The Survey Commission's report (published in full in a 490-page volume), submitted to and adopted by the 1947 JWB convention, contained 22 recommendations. A broad directive guiding JWB in the development of its postwar program these recommendations have now been implemented. At their heart was a proposal that JWB formulate a Statement of Principles defining the basic Jewish purposes of the Jewish Community Center. Out of a full year of earnest debate, discussion and review, in which scores of Centers and hundreds of community leaders were involved, came a definitive credo which was adopted by the National Council delegates to the 1948 convention. That credo is now known as the Statement of <_J~Lave The Jewish communities, whose sons and daughters in uniform are cared for by JWB's Armed Forces program, also depend on JWB for service to hundreds of Jewish Community Centers, Through the Jewish Community Center Division's national and field staff of experts and through eight regional sections of *•< filiated Centers, JWB makes available to Centers in all parts of the United States year-round field service and technical help and. guidance. This includes aid in programming, camping, health and. physical education, administration, youth service, Jewish activities, building construction, planning and equipment; communitysurveys, development of book, music and dramatic activities; nursery schools, old age programming and public relations. JWB'fl Bureau of Personnel and Training is the American Jewish community's primary source for recruiting and placing trained Cen. ter workers. All JWB services and programs are available to meet th special needs of every type of community, from the very smalt town to the large metropolitan area. In communities where there are no Centers but where there is a desire for commumty-widft cultural and youth programs. JWB helps local groups fill the need through utilization of existing resources and cooperative undertakings with nearby communities. In serving the unique Jewish needs of its constituency, JWB stimultaneously engages in a program of training for American citizenship, thereby aiding the individual American Jew to function wisely and well in our Amencan democracy. JWB's official publication is the JWB "Circle," published .seven times a year. The "Circle" has two cultural supplements: "In Jewish Bookland," issued by the Jewish Book Council ot America, and "Jewish Music Notes," issued by the National Jewish Music Council. "Jewish Community Center Program Aids," the Women's Division's "Guideposts" and the "Personnel Report* er" are each publshed several times a year. j



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Friday, March 30, 1962 +Je*ist>ncric&vi Page 5-3 JFK Hails Hadassah's 50th Jubilee NEW YORK — (JTA) — President John F. Kennedy greeted Hacassah this week on the 50th annivtrsary <>t its founding, and characterized it as an organization which ras found "a vital place in human ..llairs The message was read by Mrs. Arthur J. Goldberg, wife of the United States Secretary of Lai.or, before more than 1,200 leaders and members of Hadassah at a i,olden Jubilee Luncheon. The event inaugurated a year-long celebration of Hadassah's Golden Jubilee. Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, national president, based her address n the theme of the Festival of Purim, since it was on Purim 1912 • i id ih was founded in New rh Cit! and Ihe name Hadassah the Hi bi %  for Esther. Pointing ,i that Pui con memorates the nnihilation of anti-Semitic elclents in ancient Persia, Mrs. Kra.,-irsky stated: "Whenever the venom of antiSemitism seeps into a society, whether it be instigated by a Himin in Persia, by a Hitier in Germany, by Communists or Nazis — the echo of Mordecai's injunction to Esther is a call to action. And the Jewish people throughout the ages have responded even as Esther did." Mrs. Rose L. Halprin, national chairman of Hadassah's Golden Jubilee Committee, outlined a credo for Hadassah which, she said, "leads us along the broad highway that is entry to the next 50 years." Mrs. Halprin, who is a former national president of Hadassah, de: clared: "We believe that the Jewish people is an eternal people; that it is one people; and that to insure its survival and its unity must be the task of every successive generation. We believe that Israel reborn and the neople of Israel settled on its own soil can create its own ima • develop its own character, strive for its own perfection in a way that is impossible for any community in the Diaspora and that to aid Israel in this task is the responsibility of all of us. "We believe that the Diaspora Women Honor Judge Berkman Some coo women, lepresenung, otner .-peaxc.-s at tne luncheon %  very phase of community life, j vere Mrs. David Miller, who serv gathered at Ihe Ivory Tower of the ed as chairman, Mrs. Earl Pertnoy, Saxony hotel on Tuesday to attend ; ; ,| 1( i Simon Rubin, campaign chair. Luncheon honoring Judge Jason man for Judge Berkman. Mrs. Berkman, I Alexander Kogan delivered the inE. Albert Pallot. a former assist-1 vocation. i.t attorney general tor Ihe State ol Florida, introduced Judge BerkHostesses were Mesdames Jack Buchsbaum, Raymond Feiner, Berman, stating that "Judge Berkman nard Fuller, Samuel Hirseh, Alext the type of man we of the 5th ander Kogan, Irving Miller, Joseph District need to sit on the bench' 1'ardo, Simon Rubin, Rocky Pom10 hear the cases that are continu-. i ranee, D. Murray Sonnett, and ily brought before this court." Jerome Greene. can be creative, that Jewish life can become more deeply rooted, that we can put the brakes on against the trend to ignorance. To this task we must dedicate ourselves for it would be a historic tragedy if the State of Israel were to be reborn and the Jewish people lost. We believe that Jewish communities everywhere and the Jewish community of Israel must be partners in the great task of survival." Presfttent Kennedy, in his greeting, said: "Hadassah has demonstrated for more than a generation that our society receives in giving. Our significance as a nation is often more visible in the hopes and aspirations that ethers entertain for us than in our own estimates of ourselves. "For many years, immigrants to these shores constantly rekindled the vision of opportunity and freedom that inspired our first settlers. Now the tide runs in new channels. For all men everywhere are immigrants to freedom and opportunity; as our nation bends its strength and lends its hand to help them achieve this horizon in the spirit, in that act free men discover their own worth. "Hadassah has realized this great truth lor many years. It has brought not only help to others, but awareness to our own nation. For that, you are to be thanked and commended. As the world struggles from the dark ways of the past, and seeks the destiny of peace in freedom, organizations like Hadahhas will continue to find a vital place in human affairs." Mrs. Sally Barr (left), of Pioneer Women's Club 2, is presente: with a pin and a three-day cruise to Nassau for brinqinq :.-. 44 new members to the orqanization by Mrs. Milton Gree.\ president of Pioneer Women's Council of Greater Miam:. Temple Fund Lists Speaker Mortimer J. Oaplin, United States Commissioner of Internal Revenue, will be guest of honor at a dinner of the Foundation Fund of Temple Israel of Greater Miami on Sunday, Apr. 29. The dinner, under the chairmanship of Sidney Meyer, will officially introduce the Foundation Fund to members of Temple Israel. The evening will be educational in pur[pose. to explain the goals and ; values of the Foundation Fund created by the congregation, and will involve no fund-raising of an> si Henry E. Wolff is president i the board of the Foundation. S ney Meyer and Morris Klass r-. 3 vice presidents; Sam C. Levens -, treasurer; Lewis I. Serbin. sectary; Edward Cohen, assistant S3£ retary; and David P. Catsm general counsel. Members of the board are S • A. Goldstein, A. J. Harris, X..X Orovitz, William D. Singer. I W. Slote, Harold Thurman. Louis E. Wolfson. PARK FREE! SHOP MONDAY 10 'TIL 9:30 ^s I{ StOKt WltH THl flOHICA flAI at jin's travel bureau • • • one rail does it all World travel is at your fingertips, with JM's simple one-call travel service. Phone us, our Easter basket's full of exciting tours. CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE! FUGAZY MANAGEMENT, FIRST FLOOR, MIAMI •Plus Air Fare. Rates per person, double occupancy, effective ) 0 May I



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Page 6-C Jew 1st florid law Friday. March 30. 1962 Young People Contribute to Their Communities Through Center Clubs A primary objective Of the Jewish Community Centers anil YMYWHAs affiliated with and served by the National Jewish Welfafe Board is to develop within young people a .sense oi responsibility to community. There is the feeling that the young people today are the civic leaders of tomorrow, hut this is only part ol the story. While it is recognized that among groups oi teen-agers and young adults there are individuals who have trait.ol leadership which should be nurtured. II is also emphasized that every member of the group has a role in serving his community. Therefore, programs are stressed which provide every member of the group with an opportunity to participate in constructive activity. This has been going on for a long time—well before the current concern with '•juvenile delinquency." YM-YWHAs and Jewish Community Centers began, more than 100 years ago. as associations in which young people might (among other things) take part in communal projects. The National Jewish Welfare Board, as the national association of more than 300 Ys and Centers, has always stressed this aspect of programming. As the national association. JWB suggests and develops programs for its member Centers; it also reports on locallyplanned activities, so that Centerin all parts of the country maj benefit from experiences which individual Centers Have. About the Young Young people at the Center .engage in community service in two broad general areas. They undertake specific projects to aid specific causes; they also conduct their own seminars, conferences and workshops to discuss current communal problems and questions, and how. as young people. they are affected. Examples of specific projects undertaken in recent years include; In Hartford, Conn., a teen-age girls group provided volunteer clerical service during a local Tuberculosis Association campaign. In New Haven. Conn., teenagers at the Jewish Community (enter formed a Teen Service Club to work on community projects. In addition to aiding the local March of Dimes, and Heart Fund, they ran parties and other recreational activities for physically handicapped youngsters. In Philadelphia, the Neighborhood Center Northeast inaugurated a program in which teenagers receive training at social work agencies for community service. Beginning with a series of visits to representative agencies for seventh-grade youngsters, the program involves increasing responsibility until, when they are at the twelfth-grade level, the young people actually put in three or four months actual work at the Center. With a choice of different kinds of social agencies to work in. the teenagers have close professional supervision and conduct their own discussion sessions on the progress of the project. In Miami, as part of a whole Jewish Community Center program of aid to refugees from Cuba, teen-agers have taken part in easing the adjustment of Cuban youngsters in -their new environment. They are learning Spanish and helping their friends At a service held on a military post, the son of one of the servicemen lights a candle on the first night of Chanuka as his father and a group of other GIs look on. The scene is repeated at U.S. bases around the world where Jewish chaplains. GIs and their families attend Jewish services the year round arranged by the National Jewish Welfare Board. JWB supplies for the Jewish men in the field travel at x jet speed. The link with home which JWB services provide is considered so important a morale factor by military leaders that the Armed Forces give every assistance to help JWB in its work. learn English, and are helping Cuban youngsters get the most out of the Center program Teenagers in the arts and crafts unit of the West Bronx Jewi-h Community Center devoted a month to turning out useful articles for patients at nearby Kingsbridge Veterans Administration Hospital. Included were key cases, book marks, wallets. comb eases and stationery holders The articles were distributed by the National Jewish Welfare Board Armed Services Committee at the hospital. High schoolers interested iu a career of community service through professional social work formed a club at the Jewish Community Center of Chicago. Interest in careers such as family counselling, group work, medical social work and community organization is backed up by a program designed to give the club members accurate information about the work and the career potential. Help New Building Teenage members of a fraternity in Worchester. Mass., got behind community efforts for a new Jewish Community Center building with a campaign of their own. Forming a city-wide committee, they began a drive to arouse local interest in the new building Part of their job included a letter to hundreds Of Jewish families, telling them why a new building is needed. Teen-agers at the Philadelphia. YM-YWHA set up their own employment agency to handle applications /for baby-sitting, clerical and sales work Job-seekers must be members of the Y and have social security cards. A seventh-grade girls' club, the Dolls, at the Buffalo, N.Y.. Jewish Community Center is engaged in a program of service to other community groups. First project for the girls was a party given at a local old age home, for which the girls served refreshments, led singing and dancing, and put on a show for the older people. The club made corsages and boutonnieres for the people at the party In order to raise funds for the YM-YWHA in Jerusalem. Israel, teen-agers at the YM-YWHA in Winnipeg, Canada, annually take on a variety of jobs. The proceeds of their baby-sitting, carwashing, snow-shovelling, candy sales and shoe-shining have provided over $250 each year for the Y in Jerusalem. Rules set down by the youngsters require that the services must be provided by the teen-agers themselves, that customers must receive value for their money, and that raffles, drawings and similar devices may not be used. In the Jewish Community Center in Miami, teen-age groups are striving to win an award which is regularly given for community service—any kind of community service. In Stamford, Conn., memDers of the Center-sponsored Jewish Youth Council put in more than 12 hoy-and-girl hours each to help get the newly-formed United Fund rolling. The typing, addressing, folding and mailing services which they performed were duplicated in countless communities around the country where campaigns got underwa). Youth Service Award The teen-agers at the St. Louis YMYWHA are hosts annually to an interfaith brotherhood conference under the sponsorship of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Initiated years ago, this program now attracts some 1.5O0 high school students of all faiths, from all neighborhoods of St. Louis, and a film for national distribution is now being produced on the work of these youngsters. The Newark, N.J., YM-YWHA Trie Hundereds of books of Jewish interest — from the classics to stories for children — are being sent to Jewish chaplains for use by the Jewish GIs and their families on duty with the U.S. Armed Forces overseas. Books are shipped by the JWB Women's Organizations Division. Here, a Jewish chaplain visiting the JWB headguarters examines some of the books with one of the women engaged in the project. Across the generations, the Jewish Community Center serves people with activities for all ages. When an opportunity comes for grandfather and grandson to share a quiet hour, the family bond is strengthened. Teen Council received a youth service award from the Council of Social Agencies in Essex County for its contributions to the Newark community. The teen council has participated in fundraising drives for the mentallyretarded and mentally-ill. and has played an active part in the United Jewish Appeal campaign. It has also encouraged many of the Y friendship clubs to plan and execute community service projects of their own, leading to these clubs making toys and other items for children's hospitals, visiting children's wards and presenting plays for children. In Detroit, teen-agers learned how a city government operates and had a practical lesson in lawmaking. Local newspapers announced that a group of citizens were going to propose a curfew for teen-agers. Teen groups meeting at the Jewish Community Center's Ten Mile Branch discussed the matter at their club sessions, guided by club leaders who had been briefed by staff members of the club department of the Center. Deciding that a curfew was neither necessary nor desirable, the teen-agers voted to present their views to the City Council on the night when the petition was to bo presented. One by one at the City Council meeting teen-agers arose to express their views, without heat or emotion. After a half-hour of this, the Mayor asked the petitioners to express their views. No one arose, and the petition for curfew was dismissed. A group of sixteen-year-old girls at t h e YM-YWHA of the Bronx took on the task of collecting and distributing toys during Chanuka week for hospitalized children in three Bronx hospitals. For its "Operation Toys" the group produced an attractive leaflet explaining the purpose o£ the project and asking cooperation. Club members visited every group w hich meets at the Y. Signs and posters were prepared for display in the Y lobby, where two large waste baskets, borrowed from the N.Y.C. Department of Sanitation, were decorated and placed to receive contributions. The Y Young Teen, Teen and Young Adult groups sponsored dances at which the price of admission was a new toy. Later, members of the group contacted local stores for contributions of toys. They then sorted out all of the toys, boxed and sealed them and distributed the more thau 1.000 toys they had collected. Other Achievements The Intermediate Teen Service Group of the YM-YWHA of Winnipeg, Canada, set up an ambitious schedule of community service projects for its members and carried them through. Included in the group's activities were preparing and presenting a skit at a social in an old folks' home; helping patients at a home tor emotionally-disturbed boys dee > %  rate for a holiday party; canvas* sing for the March of Dune-; serving as song leaders at agency* wide religious programs; sen as a guest panel on a local I • show to interest other teenI community service; hearing guest speakers from the local volunteer bureau tell how teen-agers can offer service. After a year ot this program the members of thJ group (all were girls) developed a "Big Sister" movement through which they took in girls slightly > ounger than themselves to carry on the program as the original members dropped out for school or other reasons. ._,



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Page 6-A +Jtni ftcrldHairt Friday, March 30. 1962 Talking over plans for the Israel anniversary dinner dance, sponsored by the American Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, to be held May 5 aboard the Calypso Liner are {left to right) Louis Rudnick, national vice president of the Zionist Organization of America; Jack S. Popick. president, and Herbert S. Shapiro, honorary president of the South Florida Division of the American Friends; and Michael M. Nisselson, of New York, executive vice president of the national Hebrew University organization. Greater Miamians to Celebrate Israel's Anniversary Aboard Calypso Liner May 5 Some 400 Greater Miami community leaders will celebrate the 14th anniversary of the independence of the State of Israel on the high seas May 5. The American Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem will hold a community-wide dinner end dance aboard the M.S. Calypso Liner on May 5, according to Jack S. Popick and Mrs. Samuel Simonhoff, co-chairmen of the anniversary fete. The Calypso Liner, formerly the 190-ft. German vessel, the Rustrigen, is operated by a subsidiary of Canaveral International Corp. on a daily run from Miami to Bimini l?!and in the Bahamas. The vessel has been fully air conditioned and refurnished. £mcng shipboard features are a free port shopping center, congruous music, dancing, cocktail lounges and dining salon, all of which will be in operation during the Saturday night cruise set to depart from Miami at 8:45 p.m.. May 5. A native band will provide the famed calypso music for which the sleek vessel is named. Although the three-deck vessel can accommodate some 600 passengers, it has no staterooms to allow for maximum public space, and reservations will be limited to 400 persons, according to Popick. Information on reserving invitations to the black tie affair may be obtained from the office of the American Friends at 940 Lincoln rd. The function also will mark the 13th anniversary of the admission of Israel into the United Nations. Committee meetings planning the dinner dance already have been held at the homes of Mrs. Oida Rubin. Mr. and Mrs Emil Friedlander, Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, and Mr. and Mrs Popick. TRAVEiING! nS-i s Call \ GUS ^J SHAW SHAW IRAVEl SERVICE. Inc. R.-V. .-Oll.it AIR HIAM'.HIK MOTU 149 N.E. 1st St., Miami, FR 4-2604 Scouts to Collect Goodwill Bags Good Turn Day this year is Mar. 31. when 19.000 Boy Scouts. Cub Scouts and Explorer Scouts in South Florida combine their efforts with the Junior Chamber of Commerce to help the handicapped served by Goodwill Industries in Miami. The Boy Scouts and the Junior Chamber of Commerce will work with Goodwill to collect 100,000 bags of repairable clothing and ether small items. This collection will provide jobs and training for | those afflicted by the misfortunes i of illness, injury and old age. Last year. Boy Scouts collected i more than 50.000 bags of repairable discards for Goodwill serving the handicapped of South Florida. Their Good Turn gave training and employment to more than 200 handicapped men and women last year. THi ONLY MAJOR LEAGUl JM-ALAI action! THRIlt TO PARI MUTUEL BETTING ON THE WORLD'S FASTEST, MOST DANGEROUS SPORT RESERVATIONS: MIAMI Wl 5 4345 "*" %  — HOLLYWWD. FT. UUMMULE WA 3 1511 CA BUSES: MIAMI, MIAMI BEACH FR 3-6371 ^*^* U.S. 1 AT DANIA POST TIME 7:45 JDAJVM PALACE tf JAI-ALAT WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PARI-MUTUEL SHOWPLACE FREE! HANDY POCKET-SIZE PASSOVER DIRECTORY Take It Along On Your Passover Shopping Write: ORTHODOX UNION. DEPT. EJ 84 Fifth Ave., Nw York 11, N.Y. Claims Confab Reveals Aid Figure Continued frem Page 1 A volume of application* submitted has failed to shrink over the years, notwithstanding the great number of allocations granted in earlier years. In point of fact, applications actually increased by seven percent in 1962, with 433 applications requesting considerably over $20,000,000 coming from 33 countries, where Nazi victims are making their homes. You will appreciate that the task of scaling down those huge demands to the approximately $10,000,000 available has raised an exceptional volume of difficulties." Distribution of this year's funds were calculated by Blaustein as follows: Relief and Rehabilitation. $7,836,409. of which $7,000,000 are going for the continent of Europe. Australia and to other programs for Nazi victims; Cultural and Educational Reconstruction, $1,863,776; Administration relay of expenditures and contributions for the Israel Purchasing Mission, $375,000. An increase of the Claims Conference grant to United Hias Service Jewish Immigration Agency from $375,000 in 1961 to $450,000 this year was voted by the board. During the past year United Hias has helped move 2.100 Jews from Cuba, of whom more than one-third were Nazi victims. In addition it helped nearly 3,000 Nazi victims to migrate from Europe. Since the initiation of the Conference, there has been a steady rise in the budget for Cultural and Educational Reconstruction, rising to a new high in 1962, reaching 23 percent of the total budget. As evidence of this steady growth, Mr. Blaustein gave figures in Europe since the first budget was prepared in 1954. In that year European countries received $200,000 under this category. This jumped to S500.000 by 1955. $640,000 in 1957. $720,000 ill 1959. S796.000 111 1961. and $856,000 this year. •The importance of these cultural grants cannot be over-estimated." Blaustein stated. "The Jewish schools, which Nazi persecution had laid waste, had been rebuilt with L'onierence aid or are currently in construction wherever the need for them is urgent. At the same time a new generation of children horn in years of the middle titties has begun to knock on school doors. "Conference allocations over the years for the rebuilding of Jewish schools in Europe have reached truly formidable proportions," Blaustein emphasized. No Dade Camp Now Registering Camp Ha-Ge-Gah. summer day camp of Beth Torah Congregation, announces registration is open to all North Dado residents. Mrs. Robert Schwartz is camp committee chairman. The day camp will run for a period of eight weeks, beginning June 25. Activities such as swimming, arts and crafts, dancing, dramatics and athletics will be incorporated in the daily schedule. "They dosorvo to be appraised in term* ranging beyond m o r • quantity alone. In the entire ennels o* our history no epoch has ever witnessed before a transfusion of one so massive for the ro 1 building of the fiscal Jowish school plans, which had been destroyed. In the generations to come I am confident it will stand out as an enduring monument of Conference activities and will take its rank in the forefront of the Conference achievements," Mr. Blaustein declared. A check for $10,000 was presented Monday to King Frederick IX by senior officers of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany at a private audience. The check was presented to the King "as a token of the* gratitude of the Jews of the work) for the exceptional events of the Danes during the Nazi occupation to save the lives of their Jewish fellow citizens, with a recommendation tha' it be used for scholarships to children of the heroic resistance fighters." Participants in the audience a; Amaligenborg Palace included Dr N.ihum Gnidmann. Mr. Blaustein and Moses Leavitt, treasurer of the Conference. They were accompa nied by Otto Levison, president ot the Copenhagen Jewish community and were presented to the King b United States Ambassador William MacBlair. Jr. NCCJ to Sponsor Miami Institute On Human Relations in Business World A six-hour institute on "Human Relations in the Business World" has been announced for Apr. 5 by the co-chairmen of the Florida region of the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Mitchell Sirgany, Dr. C. Doren Tharp. and Richard Wolfson. who share the office of regional chairman of Ihe NCCJ, hailed the project as the first of a long-range series of educational programs for management and labor leaders Scheduled for the hours of 4 to 10 p.m., the Institute will be held at the Dupont Plaza hotel. J. O. Jarrard, Eastern Airlines vice president for industrial relations, wilt speak on "What Management Expects from Labor." The labor statement of expectations from management is to be given by Walter Beirwagon, international vice president of street railway and motor coach employees union. Opening lectures will be given by two NCCJ staff members. "This Changing World" will he discussed by Dr. Gordon W. Lovejoy. sociologist, from Greensboro, NC. "The Challenge of Good Employer-Employee Relations" i* the topic for Dr. Leonard P. Aries. Washington, DC, director of the NCCJ Commission on Labor-Management Organizations, which is sponsoring similar programs throughout the nation. Members of the planning committee who organized the program loi Greater Miami are William W. | Dohany, Robert Gardner. David Herman, William Owens, Frank Roche. Malcolm Ross, Dr. James Yudakin. Ed Yarnell. Sen. Harry Cain. Sirgany. Dr. Tharp. and i Wolfson. /GULFSTREAM %  ULMMMa, none* # %  MCE M5 • KK._ Ml AM 1 : 9414291 BOLLYWOOD 1 FT. LAUDERDALE: 927-1711 %  ttOAl MM. (2.00 • CLUBHOUSE HOB YOUR TELEPHONE PROPERLY ANSWERED IS YOUR GREATEST BUSINESS ASSET Answerite, Inc. Telephone Answering Service SERVING JEfferson — Union Highland FRanklin Executive Office FR 3-5581 BBaeaeaeaeafl magnificent FIRST RACK 8:15 P.M. MIAMI s^or^TeX Kennel Club X A DOG RACING NIGHTLY (Except Sumdmyt) • NO MINORS — i.. 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Pane 6-B *.tewist FVcridnan Friday, March 30, 1962 Cora! Way Jewish Center Sisterhood will hold its annua donor luncheon on Sunday noon, Apr. 8, at the Deauville ho lei. Left to right are Mrs. Eli Kina, donor chairman; Mrs. Har vey Rashkind, co-chairman; and Mrs. Marvin Weiner, presi dent of Sisterhood. Donor this year is "Chai," meaning 'life' in Hebrew, as well as "eighteen." ; %  ; Career women of Dade county are cited by the Hospital Chief Engineers Assn. of Florida for "distinguished community service" at ceremonies held in Miami's new Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. Shown receiving Certificates of Honor from association president, Frank A. Sansone, sr., are (left to right) Mrs. Clara Wise, assistant administrator at Cedars Hospital; Mrs. Morris B!au, chairman of the Lobby Shop; Mrs. Nathaniel Levin, president of Cedars Auxiliary; and Mrs. Evelyn Mitchell, secretary to Arthur Vining Davis. Molly Picon's MISH-MASH that I'm on Broadway, my friends ask me, "What's the Bro [way and Second Avenue?" I answer them in one word. "Money." On Broadway, everything's a luction. For instance, the musical I'm in now, "Milk and ," they tell me cost $400,000 before the curtain oven wxnt up. On Second Avenue, we would have been happy ike IX that much at the end of a long successful run linds me of a story my cousin used to tell. Her hus; ], vi r made more than a modest living. Once, after %  had dinner at his boss's house, he came home raving. "You should see the house Mr. Werner lives in. And Is his wife a cook! She made a tzimis (that's a Jewish e) out of eggs and honey and cream and cheese and raisins. Why can't you cook like that?" To which my cousin replied, "I can. Just give me money for eggs." "Leave out the eggs," he cried. "Hut I have to buy the honey," she said. "Who needs honey?" Well, as you've guessed by now, she was forced to make the tzimis wihout the eggs, honey, cream, cheese and raisins. When she put it in front of him he took one taste and said, "Pfui! This is what rich people eat?" I've often wondered what my poor cousin did put into that tzimis. You know, you can't make something out of nothing. The more I serve Rokeach Gefilte Fish, the more I realize it. Believe me, there's a dish that's something. Naturally, Rokeach doesn't skimp on ingredients. They use only freshcaught whitefish, carp and pike ... the very finest. Then it's seasoned and cooked just right, and you get it with plenty of that jelled broth for which Rokeach is so famous. Who ever heard of a traditional Friday night dinner without gefilte fish? Or, for that matter, without chicken soup with matzo balls? That's another wonderful Rokeach specialty. But don't get me started. Like any woman, I never know when to stop. hn^fc/ Noted Socialite to be Honored at Israel Bond Luncheon in Doral Country Club Mrs. Elise A. Adams. Miami social and philanthropic leader, will be honored at the premier BonelWith-Israel luncheon to be held Thursday, Apr. 12, at the Doral Country Ciub under auspices of the Israel Bond Women's Division, with Mrs. Jennie Grossinger as luncheon chairman. One of Miami's best-known socialite leaders. Mrs. Adams will be presented with the highest award which the State of Israel can bostow upon a woman, the Woman of Valor Award, in recognition of her "service and devotion to the cause of Israel and her exemplary leadership in the Israel Bond issue." Announcing the award to the national board of governors. Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, worldwide head of the Israel Bond Organization, pointed out that only a handful of women have received the coveted Woman of Valor Award prior to Mrs. Adams. Among these is Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. A native of Istanbul. Turkey. Mrs. Adams has resided in London, Paris, and Rome, and has maintained her home in Miami for the last 25 years. A seasoned world traveler, she has visited Israel on several occasions. A. F. Adams, her late husband. head of General Telephone Corporation, was invited by the Israel Government to institute the Israel telephone system immediately aft. cr the. new s:ule. was established. In addition to her activities on behalf of man; worthy community causes, Mrs Adams is noted as a patron of 1. ( music and the, art.s. Las! May. Mrs. Adams was honorary chairman of the Israel Bond Women ion Sabra luncheon. Mrs. Adams active in Hartassah, the Hear; I. ite "I Greater Mi. ami, Mt, S Hospital, and Varf. 1 Hospital. Co-chairmi n 01 the Bond-WithIsrael lunche m :n addition to Mrs. CiM.-siiv.ev. Mrs. Joseph M. I.ipion. Mrs, • ik S. Popick and Mrs. Max Wi A speci; esl at the luncheon will be John Pi yne, colohrn'ed star of the theatre and motion pictures. The luncheon will also mark the official public opening of the Doral Country Club. The luncheon will serve as a tribute of Miami's women to the craft industries of Israel As a token of appreciation for the part which Miami's women have taken in helping to develop Israel's industry, the craft guilds of Israel are sending pit diamonds which will be presented at the luncheon. Luncheon Plans To be Finalized Final plans are being readied for a second "Harvest-for-Health" luncheon on Thursday. Apr. 5. at the home of Mrs. Jack Furman, 2300 SW 4th ave., with proceeds going to support the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital development fund. Residents of the southwest area of Dade county are being invited by Mrs. Furman to join in the spring campaign. The Women's Division, under the leadership of Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro, and Auxiliary president. Mrs Nathaniel Levin, will sponsor 16 coffees and luncheons throughout Dade county for the purpose of acquainting women with the newest hospital '.n their community. If you like KREPLACH ^CHEESE-. Ravioli IN SAUCE You'll love CHEF BOY-AR-DEE CHEESE RAVIOLI Hear family, guests, cheer for that real Italian flavor created by famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Tender little macaroni pies...filled with tangy Italian Cheese...simmered with savory tomato sauce and cheese...seasoned the real Italian way. So much tastier and easier than the frozen kind. So much thriftier, too—costs only aoout 15c per serving! Sabbath Dinner Holidays and every day Kosher your meat and fowl with Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt! Three generations of Jewish housewives have put their fullest confidence in this famous salt for purity and quality. Its compliance with Dietary Law is absolute. Neither too coarse nor too fine, it is easy to sprinkle and wash off. Perfect, too, for all your seasoning. Today for your holiday cooking and baking get a FRESH NEW BOX of Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt I makes crispier salads Ordinary salt melts fast, wilts greens. Not so with Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt. It's coarse. So it doesn't melt readily. Just sprinkle on crisp greens. Then shake off. Greens are perfectly seasoned and stay crisp for your favorite dressing. Build your reputation from Cook to Chef!' Do all your seasoning with DIAMOND CRYSTAL COARSE KOSHER SALT <££ % Diamond Crystal Salt Company



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Friday, March 30. 1962 *Jenis ft Fhridlian Page 3-C NATIONAL COUNCIL IS SUPREME GOVERNING BODY Jewish Welfare Board Activities Cut Across Every Area of identification Every aspect of JWB's pro nits across ideological and sectarian differences in the Jewuiiimunily. For its speciali i nter services, the Jewish are Board has 537 affiliated unitin the U.S. — including constituent Jewish Community Cenlei and YM-YWHAs ami their ma "i" branches, Synagogue-Cen[ei I ifiliales and resident camps with an aggregate membership of more than 700,000. Several hundred local JWB Armed Servicves Committees and ServeA-Commlttees representing hundreds of local, Jewish groups. many thousands of volunteers and 40 national Jewish organizai HIT: are affiliated with JWB's work on behalf of the Armed Forces and hospitalized veterans. i Also part of JWB's nationwide representative constituency, is the Presidents' ('"..'i ma 'e up of hundreds of former an i incumbent presidents ol Jewish Community tenters >\ ho ha', e banded together in a fella I > u:rther the objectives of the Center movement and JnB. JWB Financing The supreme g •erning body of JWB is a national council, which meets in c nvention bienn.ally It is composed of delegates from member (.'inters affiliated natiiin.il organizations, local Armed Services and Serve A-Committees, the eight regional Sections and the six Armed Services Regional areas ol JWB and members of JWB's board of diSenior Citizens Conference Will Precede Biennial Meeting Here Leaders of senior citizens clubs affiliated with Jewish Community Centers in all ections of the country will take part in a senior citizens conference sponsored by the JWB Southern Section in Mini i Beach just prior to the JWB biennial conference. The program of the conferi nee will center a r o u n d three areas of major interest to the older adult and his club: club organization, community service and personal needs. The conference will iie held on Apr. 2 to 4 at Waldman's hotel in Miami Beach. Mrs. (George 1 Charlotte Simon, vice president of the Greater Mi.u:.: Jewish Community Center ill be chairman of the senior citizens conference. Among :ii<>-t' involved in the planning for the meeting are A. Budd Cutler, president of the Greater Miami JCC; Efraim II Gait. Center executive director; Emanuel Tropp. associate director of the Center; Charles IMotkin. director of services to senior citizens at the Center; David Goldberg. Charleston, S.C., pies .'lent of the JWB Southern Section; and Nathan Loshak. Atlanta, administrative field secretary of the Section. In addition to plenary sessions and a series of concurrent workshop discussions, the conference program includes a number of social gatherings. rectors. Between biennial Council meetings and annual sessions of the board, an executive committee catries on the work of the organization. The various divisions. Councils, Sections and Armed Services Regional committees meet annually or biennially. All JWB activities except those assigned to JWB by USO are financed through funds provided by the Jewish communities of America. In the New York metropolitan area. JWB is a beneficiary of the United Jewish Appeal of dealer New York. In communities having united Jewish fund-raising agencies anil Jewish Community Centers. JWB receives its funds through the operation of the Community FailShare Plan. By a carefully devised formula, this Plan links JWB's annual budgetary requirements to the amount raised bylocal Jewish welfare funds and federations and to the size of the annual local Center budgets. The welfare fund is the principal source for meeting the fair share requirement. Centers also participate through per capita dues plans, grants from community chests and other means. In communities without Jewish Community Centers, JWB gets annual allocations from the local united Jewish fund-raising body. In unorganized communities JWB receives grants from many kinds of local agencies and from individuals. Individuals who want to identify themselves with the work of JWB do so through an annual membership in the JWB Associates. Immediately after World War Continued on Page 5-C A Jewish chaplain in the U.S. Army in France helps unload a shipment of matzos flown in for the Passover festival celebration. Across the world, wherever Jewish men are on duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, Passover Seders are held through arrangements made by Jewish chaplains recruited, endorsed and served by the National Jewish Welfare Board, using kosher foods, wine and Haggadahs supplied by JWB. Crew members of the USS Ranger hold the Passover Seder while the ship is at sea. Months before the festival, supplies for the observance had been shipped by the National Jewish Welfare Board, the organization authorized by the government to meet the religious, morale and welfare needs of Jews in uniform. -*> A. BUDD Cl/TUR Miami president LEADERS IN EVERY HELD Of NATIONAL ENDEAVOR Among Prominent Personalities Due i Greetings tPHRAIM GALt Miami director Solomon Litt. president of the National Jewish Welfare Board, who will deliver the President's Report at the Saturday night banquet, served on the JWB executive committee under four of his predecessors. He was elected to his present post in June, 1958. Litt is a product of the Jewish Community Center movement. Born of immigrant parents on New York's lower East Side, hewas an active member of a boys' club at the Educational Alliance, one of Americas oldest Centers. He became active in JWB in 1944. as chairman of the newlyorganized budget and finance committee. Shortly after, he became a member, then chairman, of the JWB executive committee. Continued from Page 2-C Jewish military personnel resulting from the military buildup. What we do about the major changes in JWB to be recommended by the committee on reappraisal and planning will have an impact on broad anas ol American Jewish lite lor the next ten years. "How wisely we deal with the growing needs of the expanding Jewish Community Center movement will mean much to the effectiveness of this essential force in hundreds of communities. "I am confident that the delegates, by their voice and vote, will make this a memorable convention." • • • And, as Barnett I. Shur, of Portland, Me., chairman of the 1962 L Continued on Page 4-C MRS. G£ORG£ SIMON it i. < %  CHARUS PIOTKIN .. senior citizens He was a member of the executive committee which adopted plans for the historic JWB Survey, mapped plans for JWB postwar programs and launched JWB on the sponsorship of major cultural projects. He has been active in the United Jewish Appeal. Jewish Board of Guardians. Jewish Big Brothers, and the New York Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. A partner in the Wall Street firm of Asiel & Co., a brokerage house where he began as a runner at the age of 14, he is a member of the board of arbitration of the New York Stock Exchange and a governor of the American Stock Exchange. • • • Philip M. Klutznick, speaker at the Saturday night banquet, is a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations with the rank of Ambassador. He is deputy to Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson and represents the United States on the UN Economic and Social Council. An attorney who has served his country in a number of important posts, he has had a parallel career of statesmanship in the Jewish community. Klutznick is a former international president and now honorarv national president of B'nai B'rith. He was a vice president of the National Jewish Welfare Board and chairman of its Jewish Community Center Division. He is now on the JWB executive committee and board of directors. He is a former president of the American Friends of the Hebrew University and was at one time chairman of the Presidents' Conference, a coordinating group representing 16 major Jewish organizations. He served under Presidents Roosevelt and Truman as Commissioner of the U.S. Federal Public Housing Authority. President Eisenhower appointed him a member of the U.S. delegation to the UN General Assembly, an appointment which President Kennedy repeated. Klutznick is author of the boo^ "No Easv Answers." Louis Stern, a vice president of the National Jewish Welfare Board, who will deliver the report of the JWB committee on. reappraisal and planning at a Thursday evening pre-dinner session, is a member of the JW* executive committee and chair> man of the committee on reappraisal and planning. The committee has completed a year-long; study of JWB's programs, oper*. ations and organizational struo* ture. The report and recommend dations will be the major busk ness of the biennial convention. A member of the Rockefeller Foundation Commission to Study Voluntary Health Agencies. Sterm is an expert on community welfare activities. He is a former chairman of the JWB Jewish. Community Center Division and is former president of the Essex County (N.J.) Jewish Community Center and Jewish Commur.iy Council. He is a vice president of I >ff Council of Jew ish Federati IR and Welfare Funds. In 1957. l received JWB's Frank L. VI Award for outstanding contrib* turn to the Jewish Community Center movement. For many years, he has held key posts in the campaigns of the UJA of Essex county. He is a native of Newark, now* living in Sauth Orange. N.J.. an* is a member of the New York; Continued on Page 5-C _^Bj



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Page 8-A IJmfefl fkrkMan Friday. March 30. 1962 ..! I NEW -a r %  G JE g JUfr.* ••ti*. -*wr ,*.•• i.~ %  92 — %  I-Leonard Rosen (right), chairman of Hie CJA Over the Top Commirfee, discusses Business Week plans with Bernard Stevens, one of the hosts for the five-day drive. Dr. Carl Baumann (left), vice chairman of the Dentists Group, receives a New Horizons Award from Leon Kaplan, chairman of the CJA Professions Division. Jerry Blank (left), co-chairman of the Food and Hotels Division, congratulates Larry Silverman, chairman of the Motels Group, for outstanding work in the New Horizons campaign. Don Kaplan (left), vice chairman of the Builders Group, receives his New Horizons Award from Hy Rifas, chairman of the CJA Trades and Professions Council. You've got to go where the prospects are, according to Max Goldstein (right), vigorous cochairman of the CJA Construction Division. He CJA Awards Go To Volunteers New Horizons Awards went to eight outstanding volunteers in the Food and Hotels and Professional Divisions at the second in a series of Leadership Report meetings of the 1962 Combined Jewish Appeal, according to CJA Chairman Cal Kovens. Singled out for honors were Jules Arkin. vice chairman of the Lawyers Group; Harry Zukernick, of the Lawyers Group; A. B. Wiener, chairman of the Accountants Group; Dr. Carl Baumann. vice chairman of the Dentists Group; Joseph Dallet. of the Hotel Group; and Larry Silverman, chairman of the .Motels Group. Two men whose divisions wore honored at the previous meeting, but who could not be on hand then, received their awards this week. They were Sol Megdcll. of the Real Estate Group; and Don Kaplan, vice chairman of the Builders Group. High prajse for the vigorous efforts of the men came from both Kovens and Hyland Rifas, chair man of the Trades Professions Council, "It's men like these who are behind any successful enterprise —whether it's a business or a Combined Jewish Appeal," Rifas commented. Other divisions of the New Horizons campaign continued working their way into the final phases of the drive, aiming toward the concentrated effort of Business Week. went right to the building site to get a pledge from Neil Schiff (left). Richard Horwich (left), associate vice chairman of the Trades and Professions Council, chats with B. B. Goldstein, chairman of the CJA Services Division. Jacob Fishman (left), volunteer leader in the Hotels Group, is shown with Fred Diamond, vice chairman of the Insurance Group.



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Page 12-A *Jewist noridHain Friday, March 30. 1962 NEW TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD SANCTUARY TO BE DEDICATED SUNDAY. Hollywood Temple Dedication Set On Sunday, at 7 p.m.. Temple Sinai of Hollywood will dedicate its new sanctuary. In song and speech, pageantry and prayer. Rabbi David Shapiro and h'.s congregation will see the culmination of the Temples two-decade dream. More than 1.200 guests are expected to attend A huge tent will be erected over the west lawn to house the gathering. Among invited dignitaries are United States Sen. George A. Smathers, who will deliver the dedication address. A Torah procession will be one of the highlights of the program. Escorted by the Temple youth. bearing lighted tapers and waving flags, the six sacred Scrolls of the Tpmple will be consecrated under a Chupah. Greetings will be extended by the president of the Temple, Herman Lawrence Beller; by the City of Hollywood through City Commissioner Maynard Abrams; and by Fred P. Greene and Sidney Kay, dedication co-chairmen. William D. Horviti, chairman of the building fund, will express his appreciation "for the concrete realization of all the planning and the work that made the buildWeissel Given U of M Honor Sam Weissel, pioneer Coral Gables resident and builder, was Tuesday tapped for ODK at a meeting of the University of Miami affiliate 1 of the national honors organization. Wi issel, 74. was invited to a luncheon at the Student Club. Honorary membership in the organization came as a surprise to him. Weissel is a long-time "benefactor of the university He is a member of the UM special committee. Among his other affiliations, Weissel is head of the Coral Gables draft beard, on the board of the Dade County Department of Waters and Sewers, and current, ly serves on the Citizens Committee of the City of Coral Gables. He is a past president of Temple Judea. His son. Buddy, a University of Miami graduate, and president of ODK during.his student days, also attended the Tuesday surprise luncheon. Weissel was also scheduled to be honored by the Coral Gables Junior Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday as •'Outstanding Citiien" at a function in Coral Gables Country Club Mr and Mrs. Weissel have another son. S. Roy Weissel. an interior decorator and member of NAID. ing possible." He is currently being assisted by Paul Anton and I. Abe Durbin, with a projected additional Youth and Educational Wing. The Senior and Junior Choirs will add their voices to the program, and vocal selections will be offered by a soloist. Mrs. May Goher Gray. Cantor Yehuda L. Heilbraun, together with Martin Smith, are coordinators of the musical presentation. Sisterhood president. Mrs. Seymour Mann, and a committee of 40 women, are preparing the reception. Matthew Grad and Sheldon Garson will handle a corps of 20 ushers. Harry Kaplan, executive director, will be in charge of props. Mrs. Natalie B. Freedman is in charge of publicity and program Miami Temples Send Delegations To Union Confab Five synagogues in the Miami area are expected to send delegations to the Southeast regional convention of the Union of Orthodox J.nvish Congregations of America to be held in New Orleans Mar. 30 to Apr. 1. The Miami synagogues to be represented at the three-day meeting pro Beth El. Be'.h Israel. Beth Jacob. Beth Tfilah and Kneseth Israel. ReD r eser:tat ; ves of synagogues in other Florida cities, as well as patient frcm Alabama, Georgia. Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Louisiana, will participate in the regional conclave cf the UOJCA, i Vonal organization when serves 3,100 Jewish congregations throughout the United States and Canada. Among the national Jewish leaders who will address the convention are Moses I. Feuerstein. president of the Orthodox Union; Dr. Joseph Kaminetsky, director of Ti-rah Umesorah, national society for Hebrew Day Schools; Reuben E. Gross, attorney and author; Dr. Samson R. Weiss, executive vice president of the Orthodox Union; and Saul Bernstein, UOJCA administrator and editor of Jewish Life. The delegates will deal with various aspects of synagogue and communal affairs at the convention sessions, which will include Sabbuth services, a Friday evening symposium, a public assembly on Saturday evening workshop meetings and a banquet session on Sunday evening. Tiiereth Israel Bazaar -Tifereth Israel Sisterhood v ill hold a bazaar in the Social Hall 6500 N. Miami ave., on Saturday, Apr. 7, starting at 7:30 p.m., and on Sunday. Apr 8, all day. Merchandise to be sold is new. Miami Hebrew Book Store 1585 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach — JE 8-3840 Hebrew Religious Supplies for Synagogues. Schools &. Private Use ISRAELI 4 DOMESTIC GIFTS REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Greater Miami's Largest & Oldest Supplier for Synagogues, Hebrew & Sunday Schools. Wholesale S, Retail ISRAELI GIFTS AND NOVELTIES 417 Washington Ave. JE 1-9017 PALMER MEMORIALS "Miami's Only Jewish Monument £4i m [ | Builders" SIDRFALMEI Exclusive Dealer "ROCK OF AGES" FAMILY MEMORIALS To Live in Hearts W* leave Behind is to i;wo Forever. wan evam Scheduled Unveiling* SUNDAY, APRIL 1 Ml. Sinai Cemetery SAMUEL BEHAR, 10 a.m. SALLY AND MORRIS BENATAN 1 p.m. Rdbbi Sad: Xahm-.dS Mt. Nebe Cemetery JACOB MAER, 2 p.m. Rabbi S. M. Machtei Lakeside Cemetery SELMA SILVERMAN, 1 p.m. Rubbi Mayer Abramiiwitz "May Their Souls Repose in Eternal Peace.'" PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. 3279 S.W. 8th Street HI 4-0921 Phones HI 4-0922 Shabba A I ktf't. fcohar. wife IV-..!He He %  %  'Ji COHEN UNVEILING The Unveiling fn the Memory o/ m\ late Husband MAX COHEN u-ill be held al Key West Cemetery, Key West, on April 8th, at 2 P.M. unit Rabbi Jacob Su/Va. oj B'nai Zion. officiating. Friends and relatives are a.'ked to attend. Rabbi Richer in Review A review of "On Becoming a Person." by Carl R. Rogers, was given by Rabbi Harold Richter for i the Emma Lazarus B'nai B'rith 1 V. omen's chapter last Thursday at I Lindsey Hopkins. NZWMZN FUNERAL HOME • 333 DADE BOULEVARD MIAMI BEACH JEfferson 17677 Edward T. Newman funeral Director LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK AND GARDEN MAUSOLEUM "THE SOUTH'S MOST BEAUTIFUL JEWISH CEMETERY" N.W. 25th ST. at 103rd AVE. TU 5-1689 WE SPECIALIZE in CONDOLENCE BASKETS From $7.50 We Deliver FRUIT CIRCUS 1789 BISCAYNE BLVD. FR 4-2710 FR 4-8783 \ i GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS (Jewish Division of) THURMOND MONUMENT CO. 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I Friday. March 30. 1962 t<**U*nrlr1in,r Page 15-A IT t( the i ir. indiJ e :o es the is of six[tie"' hich the k of [Ions IK '. idertiti \ up jam waj %  %  ; : r Common Market Role For Israel's Future? Part I in New Series By BOW N EYTAN Brussi -fl, ( | 0 st. %  n r se over a througl G nd Bel ; rred cities. bodi accusing Nevei %  ,rj r had • II : ; Not a sn as •' %  it a field ni : .: %  r sou bj v ] ii s %  %  the ration." %  %  '. %  • %  w| non I %  s ruins, two jeo v. theii and nuclear ...., act •"levied conn: nl. Tu insure '>'• Europe had • > achieve tv o things, neither of :'iem easy: wipe out internal trielitional quarrels; and lild itself into J third world force to defend its traditional values and civilizati Today, less than 20 years later. : European Economic Community known as the Common Mar-1 ket — -lands strong and recon-l l r tsts of France. %  si Germany, Italy. Belgium. Holland and Luxembourg, with due t < loin • Geographically insignicant, the Community i* an industrial giant. ifs population 1 including Britain's, is larger r'-an eitner Ruslia'a or America's; it produces r-ore steel and cjal than either of them, and consumes more energy than the Bbvlef Union. It is the world's largest Importer of raw materials, and the world's second producer of industrial goods. Its industrial expansion is the world's highest. In a still hungry world, it remains one of humanity's main food producing areas, with enough surplus to feed tens of millions now faced with starvation in underdeveloped countries. Mori important than its econom1 achievements, it has become, in State Israel II nely among .. I I by the foi m i political blocs : %  ng in the v.ueliness repreto the conn• %  fpmenl and seissi might oi he Ai %  irriers "associaunderwent a • %  lev her to 70 rcent, %  i hit every Isr idi .. and com. — ritten -• Common is lot ate I, and %  ies to ex5 at s • \... •!' Hallit i in, %  its Executive Commission, a "federation in the making." the embryo of a new country—The United Stale.ol Fur ope I went to see its large, modern. streamlined offices in the heart of Brussels, where 3.ooo people. Europe's first continental civil ser-; vaflts, already sit at work. I saw the heavy steel gates at which Israel is knocking with the strength of despair and the horse-shoe table at which 'he Minister's Council will • in ju 'men! on Israel's appliesin for association" with the sixmlty. I -i' the new car plates on word: EUROPA and six art engraved, the electronic machine which will soon cal: continental economic poli il Hall in which the nitre-man Executive Commission; responsible to no nation and mmunity a.a whole. rjeMro %  !• iti • II is i picture ol greatness in l strength; Six Imaginative Men started with six men. all possessed by the traditional Euroj ear. liberal outlook, all fed on the Continent's traditional civilization: de Gasperi, Sforza. Schumann. Adenauer, Monnet and Spaak m 1950 | convinced that cooperation and discussion, though necessary, are not sufficient, they made a bold and startling move toward unification. Prepared to abandon their traditional national interests for the sake of the whole, they created a common economic undertaking, the European Coal and Steel Community, which pool.-these basic commodities among the six partners lot their common industrial expansion. The European revolution — \ Inch. \\.U one .day .lead,, to (be United States of Europe — had begun. As the Coal ar.d Steel pool became a financial and social success, many of ths six nations' statesmen felt ihat Europe could still h^ve an ; mportant role to p'ay in vor'd affairs. Plans were drawn up for iho European army and a common defense industry. This plan, however, came to a Grinding halt, as the French National Assembly rejected the project, due tc internal political reasons centered arour.d the IndoChinet* war. The rejection did not stop Euro pean development; it channeled il into i i integration. On March 25, 1957, in the marbleailed palace which crowns the ne Pill in Rome, the six nations signed the Rome Treaty — heir Community's constitution, l; I i o\ ides for the creation of a single vasl market for all products, with no in ernal customs barriers and a common external tariff, 8 common economic policy, and the enl ol a common atomic agency, ill;. ATOM, which will ensure thai Europe does not lag : hind '" %  B g Tun in nuclear re-1 search and the practical applications oi atomic power, NEXT WEEK — Benefits Foreseen Religious Students Mark Purim Bernard Ginsberg was crowned King, and Barbara Halbrich and Gilda Abramowitz. Queens, at the annual Purim celebration of the Beth Torah religious school last week. Queen of the float, which was part of the,, r,oval : cavalcade of coaches that delivered "Shalach MandS," traditional Purim gifts to members of the adult congregation, was Linda Kaufman, with her court including David Halberg, Libby Blasberg, Ellen Liebman and .ludy Bfower. Appearing in the performance .'or over 300 students were Judy lirower. Ellen Liebman, Nancj Liebman. Judy Wishneff, Joel Shweky, Sharon Ross, Henrietta Langer. Sandy Krugel, Bonnie Platt and Shelley I.abalon. The day's activities were capped with a Purim feast, served by the Congregation PTA, headed by Mrs. David Liss and Mrs. Nathan Glazer, holiday co chairmen. ItVIIIM SS in Your Future! Hoir is associated with youth, baldness with age. Wilrov with his 20 years experience, can save ond improve your hoir .-. your youthful appearance ... • Free Examination • Trial Treatment $1 • No Obligation • Complete Privacy Personalized nu-mcthod treatment for both men and women. Weekdays 10 to 7—Sot. 10 til 2. 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Sabhath, and holiday services, in which opportunities are provided for the participation of young people in the life of the synagogue. Young Israel of Greater Miami is affiliated with the National Council of Young Israel of America. DELIGHT YOUR FRIENDS UP NORTH WITH FLORIDA'S FINEST GIFT FRUIT Doittheeasyway-bymall. Mall your orders to Rich Dale Grovtt for prompt handling. GOING ABROAD? NEED A CAR? WE CAN DELIVER ANY MODEL • STYLE • PRICE AT ANY DESTINATION SAVE ENOUGH TO MAKE IT WORTHWHILE CHARLES STUART MOTOR CO. 2757 N.W. 36h ST. NE 5-4407 INDIAN RIVER GRAPEFRUIT •nd RIDGE COUNTIES ORANGES ai M vettty w •• wm OfMiet •r Oraaerrult mnly) In 'fruit protector' gift carton* 00 lb. box flX.fi Full bushel ^ 8.50 Vx bushel f.BO 12 lb. sampler.... f.75 Compare %  uallty and price*. Ya* aa*! beet Rich D.lt (or .up.rbv.Iue.JM*J Induct. d.llv.ry .xc.pt: Add 10% WMe MliilMippl.S2.00 to Canada. Salefe*)e t uarantesd or fruit to replace* er aMM> %  funded. 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Page 10-B vJewisfi Fk>rldrirn Friday. March 30. 1962 Paul Newman and Shirley Kniqht play the ill-fated young lovers of "Sweet Bird of Youth," powerful film version of the Tennessee Williams stage success. Geraldine Page, who starred with Newman in the oriqinal Broadway play, repeats her rcle in the CinemaScope and color picture, now in its third week at the Carib, Miami, Miracle, Essex and 163rd Street Theatres. Cantor Gottlieb At Seville Seders Seville hotel, 2901 Collins ave.. has engaged Cantor Herman K. Gottlieb for a fifth consecutive year i i i fficiate at Passover Seder services on Apr. 18 and in., acnpan ed bj a ten-voice symphonic choir. tor Gottlieb is a descendant %  %  .i i > %  imilj ol r itbis and cant( i H. stai ted %  • mu lical career h Latv'a as a choir member of the Famous Libau Synai ue. At th • n e ol 17, !•.< %  w as grante a scho arship al the State Conservatory i Music i:i Riga. At the conclusion of h:s studies at the ro.;so va!or>', he was weMreceived at cencert and cp?ra performances all ever Europe. \ iraduale of the Hebrew Union olh i i : Sacred Music and Education, he has appeared as guest soloist at man y conferences ot United Jewish Appeal. Hadassah, and Histadrut throughout the U.S. Cantor Gottlieb is a noted interpreter of Hebrew and Yiddish folk songs. His repertoire is in nine languages. He is now cantor at Temple Beth Shirah. 11289 So. Dixie Highway. Miami. C-olc Quartet will be featured at a concert of Friends of Chamber Music of Miami next Wednesday evening, 8:30 p.m., c: White Temple Auditorium. Program will feature Quartet in B flat major, op. 18, No. 6, Beethoven; Quartet No. 3, 1949, cp. 32, Blacher; and Quartet in C major, K. 465, "Dissonant," Mozart. Members of the group include Edward Drolc, violin; Heinz Boettqer, violin; Siegbert Ueberschaer, viola; and Heintich Majowski, cello. Concert Slated At Beth Torah Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschenbaum tv be guest artist at the first anDi Cantors Concert at Beth Torah on Sunday. The concert is expected to become an annual event. Cantor Kirschenbaum will offer a rogram of liturgical. Israeli. la Traviata' Repeated by Popular Request MAY 6 SUNDAY AFTERNOON TICKETS AT DADE COUNTY AUDITORIUM $1 to $2.50 Hebrew. Yiddish and operatic arias. Other artists appearing will be guest soprano. Effie Jane Turnboll, and the Philharmonic String Quartet and Student Chamber Music Society, first violin. Richard Coff; second violin. Daniel Oaks; viola, Robert Westfall; cello, Robert Oeutsch; accompanist, Vera Newstead Rowley. =~ JIMMY ROMA |jr Xay Caro'e & Tomnr Bi"v F .v. Frankie Hyers _^=j The Cookies — MURRAY FRANKLINS 211 22nd Sl„ Miami Beach Continuous Entertainment Showtim* 10 p.m. J. 11:10 .m. Tumultimo 1 to 5 .m. iervtion — JE (-7101 — CANTOS HHIMMH eorrucB Beach Pianist To Perform Here Ronnie Anne Bromberg. 18-yearold Miami Beach pianist, will be featured soloist at the next concert di the Miami Beach Civic Orchestra on Sunday. Apr. 8, in Miami Beach Municipal Auditorium. Barnett Breeskin will be on the podium. Miss Bromberg will play the Beethoven piano concerto No. 3. op. 37. in C minor, using a cadenza written by the late Ernst von Dohnanyi. Other works to be heard during the evening are the Overture to Verdi's "Forza del Destino," Rumanian Rhapsody No. 1, by Georges Enesco, and Capriccio Espagnole. by Rimsky-Korsakov. i A music major at Florida State University, where she studies under Edward Kilenyi, international ly-known concert artist and teacher, Miss Bromberg is no stranger to Dade county music circles. She played her first solo recital when she was 12 years old at the Miami Woman's Club. She has since followed this up with many appearances here. Peerce Will Conduct Seders Jan Peerce, star of the Metropolitan Opera, will conduct the Passover Seders at the Carillon Apr. IS and 19, according to Jerry Sussman, executive director of the hotel. Lauded by Toscanini as the greatest operatic tenor of the generation, Peerce is also noted for his recordings of cantorials and Hebrew melodies. Throughout his career. Peerce never conducted a community Seder until he consented to do so in Miami Beach several seasons %  %  then, the Peerce Seders at the Carillon have become a tradition. man said lh.it the Seders will ';<• held m the Silver Chimes dining room ( I the hotel, with a professional choir undi r the direction i Mrs, Ja I; Do tag Only the I Sedi r on Apr. 18 will be open ;o the pub 'iapiros to be Hosls to Know You" fun and games party will be hosted by Dr. and Mrs. .Samuel T Sapiros. of 6340 Riveriera (Jr., at 4 p.m Musically Inscribed personal invitations went out to trustees and the medical staff of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, of which Mr. Sapiro is president. AJCong. Women In Purim Fete Miami chapter. American Jewish Congress Women's Division, held a Purim luncheon last week in the Coral Gables Masonic Lodee. Mrs. Russel Winer is president of the group. Simultaneous "Thank-You Luncheons" lor Louise Wise chapter. 1 Women's Division, journal workers were also held Hostesses were Mrs. Lillian Hersh, chairman cf the Journal. Mrs. Lillia l Mam'.et. president of Women's Divisioi and Mrs. Susan Fell r, president : Lou'se Wise chapter. Mizrachi Groups To Show Film Latest documentary movies from Israel showing progress of children in schools and villages operated by M : zrachi Women's Organization of America will be shown this coming week, and the public is invited to view the pictures, announced Mrs. Alfred Stone, coordinator. „ There will be three showings, On Monday noon. Hatikvah chanter is hoi ling a mode! Sorter luncheon far members and future members, to be followed by a sho of the film, at Beth Israel Synagogue. c.i Monday evning, Kinneret chapter is holding a membership meeting, also inviting new members, and a showing of the film at Tyler's restaurant, lr>26 Ponce de Leon l-lvd Coral Cables. On Thursday, Apr. 5. at 1 p.m.. Miami Beach chapter of Mizrachi is holding a membcr-bring-a-membcr meeting at Knesseth Israel (ongregation. Mrs. Israel Teitch is president of Hatikvah chapter. Mrs. Morris Biencnteld is chairman of the day. Mrs. Alvin Levcnson is president <.f Kinneret chapter, and Mrs. Sara Silverstein is vice president of Miami Beach chapter. Music Critic in Talk "Ancient and Modern Aspects of Iewish Composers and Th?ir Creations" was (he subject of a lecture g'ven by Mordecai Yardeini, author and music critic, at the biweekly forum of the Y. L. Peretz S"hool on Tuesd-iv evening. CINIUAICO^ MimOOOUM RAUL NEWMAN GERALDINE PAGE BRANDT THEATRES NO Ml NAT tD fOR| | ACADEMY AWARDS %  BEST PICTURE! Beit Actor (Maximilian Schell) Best Actor (Spencer Tracy) Best Supporting Actor (Montgomery Clift) Best Supporting Actress (Judy Garland) Best Screenplay (Abby Mann) Best Director (Stanley Kramer) Best Art Direction (Black & White) Best Cinematography (Black aV White) Best Costume Design (Black 4 White) Best Film Editing STANLEY KRAMERS "JUDGMENT at NUREMBERG" LINCOLN LINCOLN RD„ MIAMI BEACH LEON SCHACHTER'S YIDDISH AMERICAN VAUDFViLLE & P.CTURES IN HRSON OH STAGE NAPOLEON KCEiS scHMriw PLUS OTHER ACTS OH OUR SMiX 'LIVE & LAUGH 1 MUSICAL REVUE with the MALASKY FAMILY MICHELE ROSENBERG LEO FUCHS CINEMA WASHINGTON AVE at 13 Sr., M.B. SINATRA MARilN DIMS* SERGEANTS 2 Mcuficun SbtAtde/ #'*.ioAtlai s€\r • us.*i *£** su*$er rO 0*0 >V.'-J.V'At SOUTH f -M •/ Open 6:45 TODAY P en *'** THE NOMiNQTED FOR "BEST GCTQR RCGDEMV ftWGRD 7 HUM KMU F JTUMt WWTMMI MSSIBCa rkway ^theatre Open 4 45 TODAY MOTE'S Xj w* 5 WINNER OF 4 AWARDS! H. F. P. A. Selected: '•BEST PICTURE" BEST MUSICAL SCORE" "BEST DIRECTION" 1 SAMUEL BRONSTOK CHARLTON SOPHIA HESTON \ STUDENTS & CHILDPEN UNDER 12 2 SHOWS 90 AT All TIMES DAILY 2:30 P.M. 8:30 P.M. ROOSEVELT Tk. Moil teourifnl TMrr OS • toy 770 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD 41tt Street, Miami leach JE 2-2331



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T nday. March 30, 1962 •, #PH 'Isti ftrridHirtin Page 7-C LEGAL NOTICE tl NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW T l,|IS HEREBY GIVEN that ndersigned, desiring to engage in „<. under tl"flctlUoui name of ."Iv liTiCKKY SURPLUS PRODUCTS '. '' %  ': v \v :i;th Court, Hlaleah In.,; r.ei.-t.r said name with the ,.,,„,. circuit Court ol Dade %  %  ,,'in Florida. '" T .i ROCKET. Sole owner <••. idmaii. Goldstein & Pacster V ,'rneysfmJU*is>r.tul w Flagler Street K '"' i lil /l--30, 4 6 LEGAL NOTICE -. THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 55458-B is RE Estate "f JOSEPH DANZKJ '" NOTICE TO CREDITORS -i ui creditors and All Persons Hav|IM1> or Demands Against bald -, hereby notified and requlrw] ,,. present any claims an.l demands .,.,, may have ajralnst the ee, JOSEPH DANZKJ deceased .,,Dade County, Florida, to the judges Of Dade County, and .,,. %  game in their offices n the ,„, v Courthouse In Dade County, within six calendar months from the date of the first publication ,„...,.( ,.r the same win be barred, IRENE DANZIG, Executrix 1153 S.W. 1.1th Avenue Miami. Florida 1i ROBERT Kol.TNoW. Attorney „ i lagler Bt. 1 %  J 16-23-80. 4 8 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT ] IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 55421-A IN RE: Estate of HARRV .1. Ll'KT. Deceasi tl, NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: Tou are hereby notified and rt quired to pri sent any claims and deiiiaflils which v."i may ha\.-"iil'aTtisi the estate of HARRY .1 LUFT deceased late of Datle County, Florida, to the Count) Judges ,-f Pad, County, and file the Battle In duplicate and .,s provided In Section 7:13.18, Florida Statutes, In their nfilces in the Counts Courthouse in Pad,County, Florida, within si\ calendar months from the time of the first publication hereof, or the same will !"• haired. Dated at Miami. I u.rlda, this 7th day of March, A D, 1962, ANNA l.l'I'-r As Admlnlali atrlx ARONOVTTS, SiL'.'H & SCHER Attorneys for Administratrix (07 Alnsley Building %  > :.-IB.2':-^II 9M£M LEGAL NOTICE i N THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 55464 Estate of ,i il KENDALL k ; i.i'.K HAROLD KENDALL 'NOTICE TO CREDITORS •l, \n en illtors and All P< rsona Hav.,,,,, l lemands Against Saw i ar< hereby notified and requlr, :. pn -• nl anj claims and demand* maj have against ih< esI,I:I: n KENDALL a I; a ll vRt ILD KEN1 'Al.l. di • • asi il Hade County, Florida, to the judges of Bade County, and name In their offlci B in thi Courthouse In Pad.County, within fix calendar months ll date of the first publication HI the same will be barred MARTIN P. VON /.AMII'. Executor \ ZAMFT & KRAVITZ .... o|n Rd Miami Beach, Fla. 3 16-23-30, 4 6 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 55402-C IN RE: Estate of TETTA K A MINSK Y. Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO All Creditors and All persons Having Claims or Demands Against Bald Estate: Yon are hereby notifed and required to present any claims and demands which you may have against I the estate of YETTA KAMINSKY deceased late of Pad.County, Florida, ; to the County Judgi s of Dade County, and file the sami In their offices in the County Courthouse in Pad.County, Florida, within fix calendar months from the date ol the tirst publication her.-of. or the same win be barred. NATHAN KAMINSK1 1 '\. c itoi il itoitKitT Kol.TNoW. Attorney 529 W, si l lagh r Street M ami, Florida :; 9-1.23-30 "And next week our services will feature a Kiddush chanted by Cantor Blackstein in three dimensional stereo." Copr. 1962. Oornu Produtlioni NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring !-• engage In huslm i the fictitious name of RICHARD K TBNZEL at 111" N.B. I3rd Bl So. Miami Beach, Fla., Intends to res -'.i said name with the Clerk ol the Circuit Court of I'ade i 'ounty, Florida. TENZEL PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION la Fla. Pi'ofi ssional Corp. i s,,le < Iwner Levy. Leventhal, tjoldsteln AKrassne* Attorney s foi Applicant ill" N.E 163rd si.. N M. B :i 23-30, I. 6-19 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that | the undersigned, desiring to engage In business untlet the fictitious name ol FRKEDMANb CLEANERS al 1718 79th St, Causeway, Miami. Florida intends to register said name with the Clerk ol lh< "In -di Court of Pad.: Count). Florida. KKEEDMAN s DRY CLEANERS & LAUNDRY CORP. Sole iwner HAR< d.l' STRUMPF Attorney for Applicant :: _'::-:!". t t-13 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE \ THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 52031-C ;N RE: Estate of M VURICE I.KAITI.OW NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE Is hereby given that I have riled my Final Report and Petition foi Distribution and Final Discharge a Administrator, C.T.A. "f the estate of MAURICE L. KAPI'l.oW, deceased: and that on the 9th day of April, 1962, will apply to the Honoraid.County Judges of Dade County, Florida, for approval of said Final Report and for distribution and final discharge as Administrator. C.T.A. of thl .slat.of the above-named dered. nt. This 13tb day of March. 19b2. MEYER CHAIKEN KOMMEL A.Roc.F.KS Vtloi n. > s 4^" Lincoln Road .Miami H.-ach 3s, Florida .„ 3'16-23-30, 4/6 NOTICE BY PuBL.CATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 62C 2288 CONSTANCE LAVERNE SHIVERS, Plaintiff, CHARLIE SHIVERS I tefendant, SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO! CHARLIE SHIVERS You CHARLIE SHIVERS, are hereby notified thai a Bill of Complain for Divorce has bet n filed aga nsl you, and you ar.required to serve s cop) of your Answer or Pleading to the" Hill of Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attorney, I.M'I. KWITNKY. 426 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida, ll-: 1-5556, and file the original Aniwer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 1-th day of April. 1962. If you f;iil to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the reitei demanded In the Bill of CompWnt. This notice shall be published once each week for lour consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH PLORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 2nd day of March AD. 1JI> *"E It. LBATHERMAN, Clerk. Circuit Court, Pade County, Florida (seal) r> K. M LYMAN. Denutv Clerk 3/9-16-23-3fi IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 55459-C IN RE: Estate of ABRAHAM Ct (HEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against said Estate You are herebj notified and required to present any .claims and di %  mantis which you may have against the estate of ABRAHAM COHEN deceased late of Pad.County, Florida, to-the County Judges of Pad.< miniv. and file the same In their offlceR In the County Courthouse in Dade County, Florida, within si\ cult-nun NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desli ing to si tage in business under the fictitious name ,.f SALON D"ARTISTE al 8480 Harding Avenue, Surfslde, Miami Beach Intends to reglstei said name with .-, cierk -i l he Cln til Court ol i >.,,:. i 'ouni c. Florida. JOSEPH OF LINO >LN ROAD, IN A Fla. Corp. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, dcslrlpg to engagi In l.usln. ss undei the fictitious name of INSTALCO at 369S B. Uth Avenue. Ila.. Intends to register lid ,,.,,,., with ilc Clerk of the Circuit Court oi l lade County, I lorlda INTERNATM "NAL STRUCTl RAL ALUMINUM CORPORATION A Mli higan 'oi p. • Calvin Sllber, Pres. Sole Ownei ALBERT I. ROSEN Attoi m i for Applicant -.•I" I.in. .-In Rpad :: 23-30, i >:-U .!.. %  • th ,f the same firM will of months from the publication hereof, i„. barred, DAVID col.1.IN Administrator of Estat) Abraham Cohen FAUNCE, KINK A FORMAN By: Sanford S. l-'aun. e Attorneys for Administrator I'.HL' Congress r.uildlng. M,Wn 3:Fta FR1 Mn 3 / 16-28-J0.4/ NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 62C 1433 JUANITA MARION la 'V. MAN. Plaintiff, JESSE JtiEL 1-oWMAN. Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE T<' JESSE li 'El. LOWMAN RFD -'. I' I Box i"" si. Augustine, Florida You .!..—.Joel Lawman, % %  LKASI -' A ~ ;l 'bal 'ho ... new guardian ha> in' ml1 "' .n Ihi state i si..-, of Ne-.\ v rk. the und. rslgned the ''."ui to Iransfet II funds !•• the New York uardlan an attorne.% fee ami therwise, i ui I i" ( Ithln mat;, r ,.n th> ll ill ol Vprll. 1*82. MIl.ToN A. FRIEDMAN nej %  Kstate 1111 k lnsli Building M a 12 Floi da 3 23-80, l 8-U NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW \ IS HEREB\ GIVEN that di nil Ing : gage in ; lit. i titious name of N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 61C 13451 MI: VALENTB, Plaintiff, MILDRED REGINA POWELL KNTE, Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION MILDRED REGINA POWELL VALENTE I,. Box in. WhlteHouse Jacksonville, Florida. il MILDRED REGINA I u I.L VALENTE, P.O. Box 111. White. Jacksonville, Florida, are re-. a I., til,your answer ti the comi ..in for divorce, with the Clerk oi above Court, ami serve %  copy : upon Glno P. Negl ettl, Atn,.y, 910-11 Congress Bldg., in •• i: 2nd Avenue. Miami. Florida, on bi fore April l, 1962, or else cornwill I..tak.n ..s confessed. Dated this 9th day of March, H't-^ I-:. It LEATHERMAN, Clerk, circuit court, Pad.County, Florida i Bj K M. I.YMA.N. Deputy Clerk j/16-28-80, 4'fi IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 62C 2660 ( AKI.OS P. GUERRA Plaintiff. EMMA C. GONZALEZ UUERRA 1 N-fendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: EMMA GONZALEZ GUERRA San Uizaro 170, 3rd plso, Apt. In e/ Agulln y Crespo. Halianu, H.-p. de Cuba. YOU, EMMA C. GONZALEZ GUERRA, San Laaaro 17". :ir.l plso, Apart: lo, between Agulla and Crespo, Hani, it.-n de Cuba, are required to your answer to the complalnl for .-orce, with the Clerk of the above i I. and serve a copy thereof upon Glno P. Negrettl, attorney H10-I1 i ongress Hldg,, 111 N.E. 3n.l Avenue, Miami. Florida, ISA., on or before April 16, 1962, or else complaint will bi taken as confessed. Pai.,1. this 13th day of March, 1962. • •'•"•" • %  >' '"-rk, 'lorlda IN THE COUNTY JUDOE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 55343-A IN RK: Kstate of BENJAMIN SIKC1.ER. D< 'NOT,CE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All IVIsonsi Having Claims or Demands Against bald 10 You' are hereby notified and required to present any claims and .1. mands which you may b? 4 ''". 8 *''"'j' ,,„ eBtate of BENJAMIN sIKt.LKK deceased la I e of Pad.I ounty. FU'lIda, to the county Judges of Dade County, and file the same in then ..,,,,,; in the County courthouse in Pad.County, Florida, within six calendar months from the date of the rtrei publication hereof, or the same W,,, C?HARLES SIBGLER Executor 11 i;. iBERT KOLTNOW, Attorney ;,-.';i w.si Flaglei Street Miami. Florida 9 .i.23-80 the in" NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of SUNRISE APARTMENTS at fOO-ilO; %  ',. i..nox Avenue. Miami Beach. Ftorlda Intend to MfMer %  "" with the Clerk of the Ircult t ourt of Pad.County Florida. NATHAN i:\PAT REBECCA BADA1 JACK P BURR1S \ii„i n, v 120 Llnocln Rd. Miami Beach 89. Fla. ., 1B .,,. 1 :1 „. 4 ; IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 62C 2709 J. I. K1S1.AK MORTGAGE CORPORATION OK FLORIDA, Plaintiff, MIGUEL P. DE LEON and HELEN G. DE LEON, his wife, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SUIT TO: MIGUEL P, DE LEON and HELEN O. DE LEON, his wife, and all parties claiming by through or under them, If dead or alive and if dead their unknown heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees, assignees, lien.us, creditors, trustees and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described Residence Unknown. You are hereby notified that above caption.-.I action has I.e. II Btituted against you in the i Ircult Court of the judicial Circuit of Florida in and for Dade County to torc, los, a mortgage upon the following described real property. _,,„_. on Lot I In Block 32a of I RT18S i'\i!K according to the Plat thi roof, recorded in Plat Book B0 al Page 1 of th.Public Records ol l .ad.Counts Florida, Yon are required to file your answer to plaintiff'scomplalnl with the clerk of the aforesaid Court, and serve a copv thereof upon plaintiff's attorney, MARTIN FINK, nth Floor Dade Federal Building. Miami ... Florida, not later than Huh day ol April. 1962, or a Decree Pro Confesso will be entered agalnal yu. Dated: March 13, 1962. K i: LEATHERMAN. Clerk, Circuit Curt. Dade County. Klor rt a (gem) By: HELEN M-.SSI.l-.R I i.-iuity Cl.-ik MARTIN KINK Attorney for Plaintiff nth Floor Pad.Federal Bldg. Miami 82, Florida ; ^.,,^ iv al 99 N.w. 64th th.Hill of Complaini on the PlaintS( Miami, Fla., Intends to I iff's attorney. George A O Brlen ...i "j ., A-ith the Clerk of Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables, ii.-n.ia ^.^ ,-,,,,^1 courl of Pad.County, and file the original Answer oi Plenai,..,,,!,. Dated al Miami, Fla.. this Ing in th. office of th.Clerk ol th Circuit Court on or before the 16th dav of April. 1962. If yon fail to do s, judgment by default will ilakeii against von for the relief demanded In ilu Bill of Complaint. This notice shall he published once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH KI.OKIPIAN DONE AM' ORDERED at Miami, Florida, this 12th day of March, A P K B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk, Circuit Court, i ade Counts. Floi Ids (seal) By: HELEN KES8LER, I ii i.uiy Clerk GEORGE A. O'BRIEN 223 Aragon Avenue Coral Gables, Florida Attorney for Plaintiff 3 '16-2 .41 I lorlda. I iih das Mar. h. '.:''-' EDWARD W. KLE1D 8 i':'.-30, 4/6-19 l\ TME COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AM3 FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 55448-B i N RE: Kstate of u ; I.LIA.M .1 ANDREI.I. P '--...-.I. mis i.im .ia> ... HMVHI B B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, circuit Court. Dade Couniy, Plor (seal) By: K. M. I.Y.MAN Deputs' Clerk "IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 62C 2548 .HAN ANTONIO VAZQUEZ Plaintiff. I'.OSA VA/Ad'K/. "NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: ROBA VAJQUBZ 3106 Ml IM.-asant St.. N.W. yor^^A^l'KZ. .166 N.W. Ml I'leasani Bt., Washington. D.C., a,.required to file your answe,-to Hie Complllnt for Divorce. With the Clerk of the above Pom I and MTV a copy thereof upon Glno P. |rattl. Attorney. :'li.-ll Congress Bldg.. Miami. Wotida. on or before Aptil is. 1962, or else complaint will be taken ''Yiai'ed at Miami. Florida, this Sth ,la\ Of March. 1962. E II. 1.KATHKltMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida ,seal) By: K M I.Y.M -\N. Deputy Clerk IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 55328-A 1 M HJeORD*CHARLBS BTBINHARDT a/k/a C. Btelnhai dt, a/k/a Max Btehihardt, 1 leceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified ami required to present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of MILFORD CHARLES BTBINHARDT dcceas.,1 late of Dade l.ountv Florida, to the County Judges ol I'ade County, and file the same in their offices In the County Courthouse in Dade County. Florida, within six calendar months from lb.dale .a the first publication hereof, or the sain, will be barred KVA STEINHARDT. Admlnistratrlx SIDNEY BPRONSON Attorney for Administratrix 1\\ Security Trual Hldg. Miami 32, Florida IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 60701 — George T. Clark IN RE: Estate of HENRY DBWEY IACOB1 '''NOTICE TO CRED TORS To AH Creditors ing Claims or D. I Yon are I red I pri man,Is Which -' ','; the estate of HENRI ,A com Florida, in lln c.unP cate and as provl Florida Stal lei [flees in ii„ Counts tv 1-lorlda. w thin MS : II from lln tlm. Ol thl I hereof, or %  same will be 1 • Dated iMl > v '' dav of lbi ary. A.l I'HEU |OL V s A N BERN S Ml 1-1 By: Mill All-nil%  1414 Congn IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COLNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, No. 55377-B IN RE: Estate of IDA KKI.PMAN. p, i i .. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having claim-a Demants Against sani Kstat iYou are hi i I %  notified and reuuiie.l to present aiands which N the estate of IDA FELDMAN d. ,;.„,! iat< of Dade County. Florida, ,,, th. County •' %  ''" "'' Dn r e """', u i,n.I fill thi duplicate and as l>ro> i'l. rida Statutes, in iv Courthouse iii Dad. Countj Id i within six calendar month the tm of or the same will Paled Bl day '-I %  '• bruary. A P %  con FBI i As l-'.\. MORRIS Ci .HEN Attoi ill | foi .la%  Fell NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Hav:n u ci.,, Demands Against Said Estate: 1 ,;, hen bs notified and required to present any claims and demands which inn mas have against the estate of WILLIAM .IANPKK1.I. iH. ... ., late f Dade Counts Florida, luil-i s OI Pail, county, and uithe same in their offices in -l %  '. ants Courthouse in Dade 1 w ithln six calendar from the dale of the first publication hereof, or the same will i hai %  I Pill I.IS.1KSIN .1 ,\ %  < Wtorn. • 2 10, 11-13 CE PNDER MAME LAW \ %  rt HEREBY GIVEN that INI\ M: noli: CLEANN v 'venue, Miami. I %  -1 : I-n '' ; thl Circuit Ida. THOMAS BRAND YS II \ BR (j SCHER %  I |f>, i I 13 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW SoTlCI IS HEREB! RIVEN that the indi ringto engage in husln. — the flctll lous name of \-.\-\ PRINTERS at 32 N.W. 20th Street. Miami, Pad.County, Florida In i.. %  .i|d name with thi Cl.-rk of the Circuit Court of Dade Counts. i-. AIM -I.PIIK .1 ROSMAN Sol,Owner Ri IBERT I. BPIEOELMAN 809 Blscas nBuilding IS w si Flagler Street Miami .'.' I-', i,l y for Api 8 l'-lt;-23-30 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY HIVEN that the nil-.age in business under the fictitious name of THE FLORENCE APARTMENTS al Miami Peach. Fla,, with I 'ad. V. • intends to i glster said name ui Court ot i IENCE QREENBERG PA I'l KW1TNEY oln %  '• ad -,



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Friday. March 30. 1962 fJewisti flerkfiain Page 7-A High Court Asked to Deny Appeal Left to riqht are Frank H. Kravit, trustee, Joseph B. Gorinstein. -.-.resident of Hatikvah Lodqe, B'nai B'rith, and Jack R. Giick, installing officer. Some 400 persons attended installation reremonies of the new B'nai B'rith organization on Mar. 18 at the Carillon hotel. DR. GOLDMANN IN TALK Claims Unit Seeks Bonn Extension of Payments COPENHAGEN—(JTA)—Immediate action by the West German %  overnment in extending the restitution law in order to assure prompt handling cf the remaining 900,000 claims for individual restitution still ;ending, was demanded here Monday by Dr. Nahum Goldmann. chair1 man of the Conference of Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, j ;: the annual meeting of the board 11 directors of the Claims Confer-, 200,000 Jewish men. women and tncc I children had benefited from this Addressing the opening session.; distribution. In 1961 the Conferjr. Goldmann said that such a law I er.ee dis ribuled $10,108,000. also was nee Jed to extend the benThe total amount which the dits of exisung West German law Claims Conference is to receive : other victims of Nazi persecufiom the West German Government :.on. especially those who have re-, uinler the restitution agreement is cently come from Iron Curtain, to reacn $107,000,000. he reported uiintri-s. He emphasized that the' The Claim* Conference is recogced tor immediate action was unr ,nj*ed by (he West German Governpcrative because the present Bed...meat .as the official spokesman for i ral indemnification law was, the Jews throughout the world who '•heduied to expire next Dec. 31. are entitled to individual restituDr. Goldmann pointed out that 'turn under >";*• *JjJjfJjl any Jews are entitled to compenFederal Government and various ation although Ihey are not at West German states. ent covered by the German Dr. Goklmann opened his address : w. which set October, 1953. as a w j tn a tribute to the Danish people off date. Nazi victims who. aIK } the Government lor their hetould not leave Iron Curtain counL l0 j c rescue of their Jewish fellow Iriea before that date do not WSl-Uiyjens during the Nazi occupalj for compensation under the tion. He recalled that, of the 7,000 Continued from Page 1-A Israeli court because he had been abducted in Argentina. Even if those who abducted the man are liable to arrest, trial or.damage suits, Hausner said, the validity of the prosecution's case is not affected. The defense had claimed that Lichmann could not possibly have remembered fully all details ot events thai had transpired 20 yea earlier Hausner pointed out that the l.ooo.ooo-word police interrogotion transcript had been preceded Eichmann's recital ot many major facts to a Nazi friend. Wil!om Stassen, when he was >'ill in '. gentina. Thus, said Mr. H.ausDi r, Eichmann had undergone, ouri! g the months he dictated his storj to Stassen, "a full-dress reb i sal" that refreshed his memory several years before he told many of the same facts to the Israeli police questioning him. Hitting hard at the '•transport Officer" claim by Eichmann. the Attorney General showed that the liirmer Gestapo colonel was the lit-tapo's "referant." or principal expert on the Jewish question. All matters alfecting Jews were referred to Eichmann. Hausner recalled The International Red truss. Hausner pointed out. had described Eichmann as the "key man on all matters pertaining to Nazi dealings with Jews." Mr. Hausner recalled Eichmann s over-ruling of other officials when he had Jews sent to concentration camps. "He was not a mere trans port officer of or keeper of the time-tables,' 1 sa Hausnei "He was 11 s< ssed ith the task ot ext< rmina inj %  .. -. Eichmann did not give the direct orders for throwing cyclon gas into each gas chamber where naked men, women and children stood with tKF fc*nF"of "8?SiTr in ffieif eyeBut everybody knew mat as refer int." hewas not d .:. %  cult) re or s v.i..,.:He c.t alt in death." The Ssrvatius argument about Eichmain's 'modest" life was attacked by Havener, who showed 'hit the Naii s quiet manner c' fam: y living applied only to the per?=d he was hiding in Argentina. During the height of his splendor," the Attorney General noted, citing testi.-nony previously entered in the trial, "Eichmann lived in a private villa, commanded three automobiles arid two chaeffeurs, had at least two known mistresses." As Hausner continued slashing ,t the arguments presented to the feme Court panel last week by Dr. ServaDus, the prisoner sat n his glassy-enclosed, buldock. Taxing voluminous notes, every once in a while sending a hastily scribbled note to his counst i Mr Hausi er, who had begun his i. ; uttal Friday, did not quite com; |i :.: i ises to Dr. Servatiua at Tuesda: 's session He was expected ti finish Wednesday—after which, under the court's rules. Dr. rvatius will hav< an opportunity .. :,;..;,. -:,.-, ment, Then tbe appeal will be in the hands of > country's court, which not expected to rule on it for at least a mtnth. Cafeteria Will Be Dedicated The D< %  cafeteria In the Hebrew Academy of Greater .\iiami will be dedicated Sunday, ii a.m. at the site of the newlyconstructed school. 24th st. and i in< Tree dr. The huge cafeteria will be called the Max Silverberg Dining Hall, in memory of Max Silverberg. one of the founders of the Hebrew Academy over 14 years ago. and a past vice president of the school. A philanthropist and civic worker, he was a member of the board ot directors of the National Cardiac Hospital, the Jewish National Fund of Chicago. Mt. Sinai Hospila". ,•' Greater Miami, and Mercy Hosof Miami, to which he donated a room, lie was a Mason and a member of Miami Reach Elks. Maurice Cohn. chairman of the event, and a close friend of the Silverberg family, will introduce Mrs. Virginia Silverberg. wife, and children, Susan, 13 and Mark, 8, who will dedicate the room. Speaking at the dedication ceremony will be B. I. Binder, president. Hebrew Academy, and Carl Hoffman, local attorney. Susan Silverberg. will deliver the invocation and Mark Silverberg will say grace. present German law. The law also iixed October l. 1953, as tbe cut-off ate tor stateless persons. Those now ineligible under the German law, said Dr. Goldmann, .nelude thousands of Jewish victims of Nazism who fled Hungary after the 1956 uprising in that country, as well as thousands of others who reached Western Europe from East European countries in recent years. "On numerous occasions," said Dr. Goldmann, "we have called upon the German authorities to piace these refuses upon an equal footing with the pre-1953 claimants, and to compensate them for incarceration n concentration camns and for the loss of life and health." Jews residing in Denmark at the time, only 475 fell into Nazi hands. In an accounting of individual restitution payments to date, he said "indemnification payments under present Federal law reached $2,598,000,000 on December 1, 1961. In addition the West German states paid out $17,938,000 before the Federal law was enacted in 1953 to reach a grand total of some $2,772,000,000. Of the total sum about $556,000,000 came in 1961, preliminary figures indicate." H sail that the record "makes impressive reading but it must be weighed against the cost of the entire indemnification program. Those costs will run to $4,300,000. 000. West German authorities have He emphasized that payment of estimated. Should the figure prove these claims was entirely separate correct, only 60 percent have been liom the money received by the pa id to date." Claims Conference for global dis frihution to needy Jews throughout the world, lie reported that, to date, S79.56B.000 had been distributed for the benefit of surviving ins in 30 countries by the Claims Conference, and that some NOTICE: I stand as a citizen, utterly opposed to the so-called Crondon amendments, and offer to speak or debate on this matter any place, any time. I take my stood without reservation, and in (all rececattion of the ability of the apposition. I hope my stand will be edited by many, many other cinic leaders. REUBEN GUBERMAN HI 8-6082 Moses Leavitt, treasurer of the Claims Conference, reported that. of the sum received in 1961. S7.795.000 went for relief and rehabilitation of needy Nazi victims: SI.904.000 was spent lor cultural and educational reconstruction; and F408.0OO for various special projects. In the field of community reconstruction, Mr Leavitt listed the following projectmade possible in 1961 throi.yh claims Conference funds: six homes for the aged in Belgium, Italy. Uruguay and Australia; eight community centers in Belgiljuil, France and Italy: repair reconstruction of synagogues in Copenhagen, Amsterdam. Bologna and Naples In addition, he reported, capital grants have been made !o Jewish schools throughout the world. RENOWNED FOR KASHRU1H AND QUALITY SINCE 1884 DISTRIBUTED BY: lAKM I&ISTKIBB TOUS. INC. 373 N.E. 61st Street — Miami, Florida



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Page 14-A +Jewisii ncridfian Friday, March 3Q. 1962 Browsing With Books: By HIIARY fTilHPLIN Key to a Rich Storehouse of Religious Understanding THE BIBLE IS FOR YOU. By Stuart E. Rosenberg. 179 pp. New York: Longmans, Green. $3.75. "THE HEBREW BIBLE, in our day. remains a closed book for most average adults (It) survives today at the edges of two extremes: as a book of religious in, stxuctioR for children, and as a mine to be quarried by the technician — the scholar-specialist. The average man, however, has precious little contact with it in an intimate, existentialist fashion." Thus Dr. Stuart Rosenberg, rabbi of Toronto's Beth Tzcdec. introduces his entirely too brief examination of a few parts of the Testament. While this lack of contact is possibly not as true for Jews — observant Jews, that is — as for others, there are doubtless few people who read and experience the Bible with the "•considerable immediacy" of which the author speaks, or who are able to sense in both its strange omissions and puzzling repetitions the vital" knowledge which is being conveyed. The first part of the book surveys in fairly rapid highlights the course of Biblical scholarship to date, including the numerous translations and the influences of the Testament, the impact of archaeological discoveries like the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the directions of such modern philosophers as Buber. Tillich and Niebuhr. In an especially exciting chapter on theology and psychology. Dr. Rosenberg points out that the Bible is not itself a theological book — that is. it is not concerned with belief: it assumes belief. In fact, he writes, th? Hebrew Bible does not kr.nw the word "faith" as theological belief, which is the way Christians read it. but only as faithfulness to God. as living faithfully. "The Biblical imperaBetween You and Me: By BORIS SMOLAR Evolution of Jewish Chaplains in the U.S. IT IS 100 years ago this month %  that the Senate approved a proposal by President Lincoln which gave rabbis tl e right to Berve as chaplains in th< An L'r.til the time nt the Civil War, i i tian i pern serve as i i ijor I Jewish oi ive, therefore, comition by Amerie Jewish Chaplaincy, 1 %  the National i\ responsible for thi rvice — will be ii ted in Jewish communities act nation on Apr. 1. It will oom lude in July. 1P62 with the centennial observance of the Battle of Gettysburg, when Off the Record: By NATHAN ZIPRIN Religion in New Age %  >R. LOUIS Finkelstcin. of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, has recently sounded a warning that the "unprecedented shortage" of rabbis was making it Impossible to meet the religious and cultural needs of the Jewish communities throughout the world, particularly in Latin America and in some countries of Europe. A "count of empty pulpits and uncovered classrooms," he said, "does not begin to tell the story, since no one can say how many congregations have not been formed because trained personnel was unavailable." On the very day this item appeared under a Miami dateline, the New York Times carried a report from Rome that the Pope too had complained of a dearth of priests, particularly in Latin America, an area of almost absolute Catholic concentration. This coincidence has more than parochial undertones. It goes perhaps to the very root of religion in the space age. If the declining interest in the rabbinate and priesthood is a consequence of the greater monetary attraction many young people now find in the popular professions of the day. the situation is not beyond solution. But the dearth of rabbis and priests and ministers could reflect a crisis of dangerous magnitude in religion itself. It is this corner's fear that the religious leaders of the world have not fully grasped the meaning of the mutations that are going on in men's minds as a result of the weapons of terror which are taking the place of the fear of God. • • • Thinking Aloud By the time this appears in print, the Governor of Virginia will have signed a legislative bill revoking the charter of the American Nazi Party e hear Rockwell, the anti-Semitic founder of the party, la planning to file a pelition for a charter under a new name. We hope Virginia will not let itself be outwitted by that inailr an. We have no rod In wh ch to measure the i pact of Ed Cherry's usl I ainst Rockwell's chin. But there e;:n be BO dot III Ul the impa '. althougl tlieved in freedo h and freedom ol on, be was ni %  situtional tri >i speech c > preaching :>i bate or ti; it others." [t I i he J< v isfa vnii I a punch 11 B whet tl s Diego SI %  %  College students jazi atrocitie I .lews as greaslj exI. Till Si: ..( the I .'.i i. young i rhose w • c irni i-'s o %  1 e pout m i (re-m i on i.' I ground tb n the s who h( p the first Jewish combat chaplain was severely wounded. President Lincoln submitted his proposal 55 -and signed it into law on July 17. 1862 — after the first Jewish chaplain, a young ti cher, Michael Allen, was bet ise it was discovered that he istian, His resignation was ordered by the en ary oi War despite the fact that the officer of tl it 1 rhich he %  : • : v. as a Jev Col Jax Eii teir ly of the i nt. there are ah full-time Jev ersi I 261 i lime u ling 31 I -\ -.. (an i rabbis who were on active dut) i during World War II. there have been C42 rabbis in the chaplaincy in thi past 20 ye Of the 311 chaplains, 250 had overseas service during the war on the European, Pacific and African fronts. The largest number of Jewish chaplains on duty at one tune during World War II was about 265. There wa approximately one Jewish chaplain in service for every 2.000 Jewish personnel, as compared with the average of one non-Jewish chaplain for every l.ooo non-Jewish personnel. Since 1950. there has been in the U.S. Armed Forces a Jewish chaplain for every estimated 1,000 Jewish men. Jewish Heritage: More and more books bringing to the American reader the treasures of our Jewish cultural heritage are now being published in this country. The latest is "An Anthology of Medieval Hebrew Literature," edited by Abraham E. Milligram, published by Abelard Schumann. This anthology is a most valuable contribution to the Judaica literature which is attracting increasingly the attention of serious-minded. American-born Jews. The, volume includes not only literature written in Hebrew, but also translations from Jewish literature written in Arabic, German and early Yiddish, between the eighth and eighteenth centuries. Thus we are presented with translations of the poetry of Jehuda Halevi, Solomon Ibn Gabirol, Moses and Abraham Ibn Ezra, as well as with translations from the "Ma'aseh Book." We have the philosophic views of Saadya Gaon, of Moses Maimonides, and other great personalities. We have a chapter on the Zohar — the "Bible" of the Jewish mystics which brought vigor into the hopeless existence of medieval Jewish life but at the same time also confused the minds of many Jews. The book is presenting the reader with the greatest Jewish thinkers of the Middle Ages, giving also short biographical data on each of them. It depicts the influence which their works had on Jews in their own generation and for many generations that followed. Panorama: Frid ( tive is not to believe in a belief in God — but rather u paiticipate in lioa, with one's whole person." Moving forward from this excellent analysis, the author explores a number of Biblical stories, filling jn as it were, the "empty spaces" of the narrative, and inn! eating with great skill the way to become sensitive • -symbols and style, to fmd thp key to the "hidden suggei tive, ethical implications of the scenes depicted and the tales narrated." So. for example, those strange words of God's to Jonah in which He defends his pity f or the six score thousand persons of Nineveh "and also'mueh cattle disclose the basic insight of the whole episode, in which God seeks to teach Jonah, who is a man without Lave thel meaning of love. Dr. Rosenberg's succinct discussion of the Book of Job places in fascinating perspective all its tremendous themes the lesson of humility ("Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth?"i in which Job understands that what happens to him is really inconsequential in the larger scheme of things, and the triumph ("Gird up thy loins now like a man") from which man is to leai that what is important arc not the answers, hut "the waj in which we undertake to live with the problems." And sr. on. in the endless exploration of man's r< tionship with God which is the rock on which the Bi -' ni Jews who knov the Comn know \u>< the Bible, of course: this bo k r all othi rs, it will be liki a k< se oi religious ur.(i, %  • -, g thai By DAVID SCHWARTZ From Hollywood: HERBERT G. LUFT A Tribute to Zukor Hollj TRIBUTE WAS asl Sa 1 •st 1 ion i • %  p i bj i). b Hope v. %  :, iei Producers Guild M The setting was 1 I troom of the swank Bevi H ton Hotel in Beverly Hills where the Guild's presieti I Walter M, Miri&ch, shan dais with Zukor and other dignil ries. Shaking hands with the slim, frail old man who had Down in for the event from New York, I couldn't help but think of the career ol Adolph Zukor, founder oi Paramount Pictures, who after sixty years in the cinema haremained active in the industry. Zukor arrived in this country from Hungary as a boy of 15. His interest in films was awakened aearly as 1902 when lie was operating ;. penny arcade in New York. Untiled by the new medium, he turned his enterprise into a nickelodeon lor the showing of one and two reel flickers, mostly crude comedies of the slapstick variety. In association with Marcus Loew, then a big wheel in the amusement field. Zukor started to exploit the idea in other communities. While Loew continued with the penny arcade and nickelodeon business, Zukor later switched his field of endeavors to the operation of Hale's Tours, a chain of imitation railroad cars displayed at fair grounds, which jolted and creaked realistically, while on a screen scenic pictures were projected giving the patron the illusion of speeding in a train across the American landscape. When the novelty of the venture wore off, Zukor opened a chain of five-cent "store shows" of movies. As exhibitor, Zukor campaigned for better pictures of greater length. In 1912, he went on his own to bring more important films to the public. His importation from France of "Queen Elizabeth" starring Sarah Bernhardt paved the way for the abandonment of crude flickers and the adoption of features with a distinct story line. In association with showman Daniel Frohman, Zukor then founded his earliest production firm, Famous Players Film Company, with the slogan "Famous Players in Famous ures." Tl %  %  %  T II Hot bui : .i %  1 : ril kel ST Wi tl 0 %  si Dl ei ii ftMl.mMMMllMMII A Whole Month of Yom Kippur Hard to Take THE SEASON OF Ramadan is ju over. President Bourguiba. the III )em ruler of Tunisia, the other day u the papers, expressed some ipleftsti with it. The Arabs fast for thirty day neither eating, drinking, ni ng Ramadan and this makes them irritable and | to good work. A mouth of Y Kipp associated considerably wi Era i the Abi nnd many other | Ai abs. it tot Sabl langed it to Fridi Even some rg person has ., m one Ihe Moslem legend has ar idise will have 320 beau from being borec. Much of what they took over was good and contril" tiled to the Arab civilization, although for some time tha civilization has stagnated. Culture like trade needs com petition. A great rabbi said that the reason God macI of one big man was thai, when you ait alone, you don't see your faults. When the second man! appears, the first begins to study himself. 1 have no doubt that the Arabs, for all of their pre position to Israel, will copy many things from Ispai' id. The establishment of UM oi 1st el was probably the best thing that coui' f'er the first World Wai aadeoee Fi il, cai ana We neic I he Ji To 1< icialh '" %  I art



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Page 16-B Jewish ncrM/ar Friday, March 30, 1962 UNDER THE JTBICT AND CONSTANT IOCAI RABB INICAl SUPIKVISION Of RABBI TIBOR H. SURN Quantity Rights Reserved 19th DAY APRIL WE SEll U.S. CHOICE and U.S. PRIME MEATS ONLY 15th DAY NISAN TO INSURE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY OF THE FINEST IN KOSHER MEATS AND POULTRY FOR THE COMING PASSOVER, OUR STORES WILL BE KOSHER L'PESACH THE 25TH OF MARCH. May we suggest that your Holiday shopping be done early ... to insure faster service and the maximum in savings! You may be sure we carry only the finest Kosher Meats and Poultry! YOU MUST BE SATISFIED OR YOUR MONEY BACK. fiDS? 1^3 SPECIALS fe 1 A> Li / GENUINE WHITE ROCK KOSHER MADE PAN READY CAPONS PULLETS OR YEARLINGS The Finest Fresh Killed Kosher Chickens Delivered to Our Markets 5 Times Daily! FAMOUS ARBOR ACRES MASTERS, BROILERS OR SP R I N G E R S KOSHER-BEST OR LADY ESTHER TURKEYS DUCKS OR ROCK CORNISHHENS NOW SIX KOSHER MEAT STORES TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER 2091 CORAL WAY I CORAL WAY I 163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER AT S.W. 87th AVE. MIAMI Westchester Shopping PUi, NO. MIAMI BEACH 2662 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD IN HOLLYWOOD 19th ST. at ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH 10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE AT MIAMI BEACH MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR



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B2 JWB Convention Opens Wednesday Jewish FloridiaXl Ambassador Klutznick Will Address Banquet Session; 24 Workshops Scheduled Miami. Florida. Friday. March 30. 1962 Section C LOUIS STERN critical committee SOIOMON LITT president's report 4MB4SSA00R KLUTZNICK guest speaker FROM THE DAYS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN President Kennedy Offers Greetings the eve of the national contion here. President John F. nedy declared in a statement i m the White House that "it is arteriing to have the as % % %  • ",T£ SANFORD SOtENDER executive vice president PROf. KORN noted historian A VAST NETWORK Of COMMUNITY CtNTtRS JWB's Complex Program Today A visit to the bedside ol a disabled veteran is a traditional "mitzvah" for the Jewish chaplain. Alone, or accompanied by a JWB volunteer committee, the Jewish chaplain is always a welcome visitor. He may bring gilts, personal necessities oi the warmth of his friendship, but he always leaves the knowledge that a veteran's sacrifice lor his country has not been loi gotten. The National Jewish Welfare Board, which most people know as JWB. is the — • National Assn. of YM and YWHAs and Jewish Community Centers. • Government authorized agency for meeting the religious, morale and welfare needs of Jewish personnel in the U.S. Armed Forces and veterans hospitals and their dependents. In addition, as a member agency of I'.S.O it helps serve members of all faiths. • Sponsor of the Jewish Book Council of America, the National Jewish Music Council and the Jewish Center Lecture Bureau. all three of which are dedicated to the development of a vibrant Jewish culture in America. Affiliated with JWB are 447 YM anud YWHAs. Jewish Community Centers, their branches, camps r.nd other agencies. These JCCs and Ys, staffed by 1,600 professional workers, serve groups Of people of all ages and both sexes in the areas of culture informal education, health and recreation. They serve nearly 700.000 of their own members and others in the community. Their membership is open to all — Orthodox. Conservative. Reform and others Among their major objectives are the development of character and Continued on Page 5-C


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t, March 30, 19B2 *Jmtaii mhr/dHmti Page 13-A % %  '. :'l :' 'II, 1962 f FROM THE TALMUD I w il Hall, >rda .. and MerShabbat, 152. A wife is the )y f a man s ~ Zohar. I33. When the husband is blessed, his ,,,<< is aho blessed thereby. • 50, %  ^ \s for the earning M Ins wife sees never a jrfn frfh, 5. I fl t | .,.: : .' wife's de.uh \er possessions -. '.cr. .. \fe live* with* hi %  without und without 3n OLe TQeaL Of JH t lavni 9 I ih.lrcw \—,cn\ergation %  -:•-; %  V7'-''? I 1 ?' 7 ? ">9 :.-%  nxesna n~;• i1wa n:r::r •r "T TT:~ ••-: Vy nci] .li^xnn rmn ova -IT • T v T CD'J D 1 ?^ T"IX *• "HS •• : I • T ••.••• IT ,n'Dn-nam *n s xn im T: • %  : T : • : ^n"? D^nnDn one' T 1 • v T: T N,n-ixan H-T anynn "nnn "?3 Di7 n&wn na • t : i T v -: ryn) ^ID; ?jrx nn ??j*pc* ntn 3D!sn nx ^xn^a rx n^r n^aniDrxn* r I I v T : : : • T K^in 1 ? ^ nr""ia phn"nnn ^s nx •px^-pn'? .mlp *73 -^a angina %  |n:-m:'? nxtfj i#a' r T T I T ; ;an-^a rnan ,-nns: "cia s-inV ,*rjri )?xa k Vi "?sag "n*? nnr 1 ?!. T T S TJMrVSlATIOiY The Just Deed is What Leads Us Closer to God By RABBI HERBERT BAUMGARD Temple Beth Am The portion which we will read from the Torah this Sabbath seems to be completely concerned with priestly problems of a ritualistic nature. Since the Temple and the active Priesthood no longer exist, il would seem that the reading of this portion has little value for modern times. He who reads closely from "Sh'mini" (Lev. 9:111:46) discovers a dynamic thought, however. At the conclusion of the priestly 'lii issions, there is the injunctii n, "For I am holy ye shall therefore be holy ." Tic main %  i •• in the i •! : %  a i ; : ... nes The value of Jud n s thai e wi 1 %  >nc reality. %  11 .. :'s we picture Kim, because we have conversed with Him. because we have ed with Him, because we have been the recipients of His bountj a.-a people. This knowledge, gained through experience, gives us the tortainty that God is merciful, just, and a very present help in time of need. All of these living attributes of God add up to His •holiness." j and we are asked to imitate Him. We are not asked to imitate God in the least of His qualities, but in the greatest of His qualities. This is the dynamic message undergirding the discussion of ritualistic detail in this week's "parsha." This is the diamond in the coal mine. Let us hold it up for all to admire and to absorb. We are Jews only insofar as we seek "to make a difference between the unclean and the clean." to quote the text further, between what exalts man and i what debases him. This ability to distinguish between what lifts man and what smothers his soul is the essence of the religious nature. The day-to-day living in terms of mercy and love is what strengthens our holiness. The just deed is what leads us closer to God. The act of forgiveness is the "God-imitating" deed which enflamcs the divinity within us. -S r^eligious J-^ijc J hi 9 (A/e e k e n J e r v i c e s Information to be included in the Religious Services column mi,st be in the News Room of The Jewish Floridian not later than Friday, a.m., preceding the week of publication. All releases received after that time will be returned as proof of their lateness. t..... i RABBI HERBERT BAUMGARD His h.-':ncss Mr. Miller Invtsts in Israel "In what way is their help pracicall) expressed?" 1 asked. "First r all, the large building I shall onstruct in the industrial one will % o free from urban property tax or five years. Second: According o the law for encouraging capital 'vestments, I shall not have to pay come tax for five years, from the ate of the first profit. In addion to this, I shall not need to pay uty on equipment and building aterials which are essential for he erection of my enterprise." "This is an very well," my friend he host intervened, "but what will >uu do with all your profits? Surey you cannot take them out of Israel in foreign currency!" "Your information is not exact," -Mr. Miller explained. "The law Permits me to take abroad all the profits in dollars without any difficulties." "Now there is one thing left," the host festively proclaimed, "to 1'fl up our glasses and drink to the enterprise and its success!" Published by Brit Ivrit By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX Why do some people recite the Ten Commandments after the daily morning service? The M shnah (Tamid, 51 that it was the practice in the days %  •! the Temple to have the Tin Commandments publicly recited daily in the Temple. H -.. %  :-. because of a deviation Is1 i 11 which later claimed that only | Ten Commandments were divinely revealed and nothing else, this pub. lie practice fell into disuse, the people might erroneously think that the public recital of the Ten Commandments was an indication of agreement with this opinion. They still are recited privately after the prayers have been completed, because they are regarded 1 as very significant laws of our faith, and a Jew should ever be 1 mindful of them. Some claim that all the commandments can be inferred somehow from these Ten Commandments. • • • Why srg the 13 principles of th# faith recited daily after the service? These are the 13 principles of faith depicted by the famous Maimonides. It is possible that their recitation was made a private practice in the days when persecutions were prevalent, and Jews were being forced to accept other faiths and to proclaim other dogmas. It then became a wise thing to keep repeating the principles of our own faith daily, so as not to be convinced of the logic and philosophy of other faiths. • • Why do some people recite the occurrence of special historical events in Jewish history after the daily service? r. This /vice is prepared in coP 3 operation with the Sj intual head' f i ers of tlie Greater Miami Rabbint I cal Ann. RAUBl MAX A. L1PSCH1TZ Coordinator Contributor: RAHliI 501 OMON SCI11FP Cims oi Wisdom These are called "Zechiroth" (Itemembranccs). It is a matter of reciting the six Biblical verses that command us to remember certain] instances in our history. The ocp casions are: The Exodus from Egypt, The Revelation at Sinai, the vicious attack of the arch-fiend ) Amalek; the consequence suffered by Miriam; the Sabbath Day; and the wrathful punishment the Almighty inflicted on our ancestors when they fell short of their faith during the course of their wandering in the wilderness. Remembering the episode at Sinai (Deuter onomy 4:9) makes us reflect upon the sanctity of our commandments. Remembering the Exodus from Egypt (Deuteronomy 16:3) makes us appreciate our freedom. Remembering Amalek (Deuteronomy 25:17) makes us appreciate the fact that only the Almighty's providence saves us from the destruction intended for us by foes. Remembering the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8) makes us keep in mind the Divine purpose of our labors. Remembering the consequence suffered by Miriam (Deuteronomy 24:9) makes us realize the seriousness of the sin of speaking evil. AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlylt ave. Orthodox. RobDi Isaac Ever. 8 %  p.m. Satu (0 a.m. Sermon: "The Intri durtlon to tb< treat Festival of 1 n tlon — e — BETH DAVID. 2S SW 3rd tve Conservative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro. Cantor William W. Lipson. F *:1J p.m. 1:...Mllzv, ichter ol Mr. "i M A thu i. i i .!:... i •.. %  Ii. Services contudtnts of reltgl — e — BETH EL. 500 SW i/m ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Solomon Schiff. p.m. Saturday S 30 Sermon: < Ion of 1 BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave. Orthodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rcttman. — e — BETH JACOB. 30'.311 W-shinpton Orthodox. Hafui Ticor Stern. Canter Va'-.r.ce Mamchet, -• — I3ETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3-d ave. OrUvjGvX. Jul 0, president. 15 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabfc r. Rackovsky. • BETH TOR/ %  n si. a* d NE ave. C I BChitz. Cantor B-.-n-Zion Kitschen. tlie Mil i <'i': .•: son Mr. .Mi-.-. Al • — • — CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER. 1 8755 SW 16th st. Miami. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor Cershon Levin. Friday 6:16 and >•::'>" p.m. Service in honor of Center's young adults. Sermon: "Month of Miracles." Saturday 9 a.m. — • — DADE HEIGHTS JEWISH CONGREGATION. 1401 NW 183rd st. Conservative. Rabbi Harold Richter. Cantor Emanuel Mandel. FMday 8:15 p.m. Hadassah Sabbath. Sermon: "Passport to the Future." Quest speaker, Mrs. Norman Chasin, vice president of Miami Chapter HadasssJi. Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sermon: "Portion of the Week.'' — • — FLAGLER GRANADA. 50 NW 51st pi. Conservative. Samuel Hollander, president. Cantor George Goldberg. Friday 5:S0 and vl". p.m. Quest speaker, Judge Sam Silver, will talk %  n "Voting and Freedom." Saturday 10 a.m. — e — HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heiibraun. — • — ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen. FVIrtay .; and v .'' p.m. Sermon: "A Moil .. %  l t' p..: •' m ss f< : •• • i Onegj Shahhnt host*: Air. and DeHi ... onor of Ha ) — • — KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfieid. Cantor Abraham Seit. • Il %  S3." — • — MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION itoi s.v 12th ave. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Shapiro. Cantor Fred Bernstein. a. Sermon: "The 8:45 ...in. b'i r iii. ii: ..' Law." — e — SOUTHWEST CENTER. 643E SW 8th st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein. — e — TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. 1025 NE 183rd St.. Mi-.nu Gardens rd. Rabbi Max Zuckr.r. Cantor Abraham Reisman. FTiday v:: p.m. Quest speaker, Judge Gene Williams, on "Crime and Punishment In the Administration of Justice." Saturday 'J a.m. Sermon: "Birth of a People." GEMS OF WISDOM The greater the man. the greatevil inclination. TALMUD. # A piotu "i^ > % % %  •'. to victorious veterans rei from battle. | r.jmp yourselves /or tiie .: war." "And u>hi is that?" ...I. "The uar BA1IYA. e inner thief, %  HAS1D1M Zl : \ I %  I %  %  ... %  .. .. El il Will. —TALMUD. ... i TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Herbert Baumgard. CantoCharles Kodner. Friday S:30 p.m. Sermon: "How Should We Think of Cod?" Saturday 10:1 J a.m. Har Mltzvah: Michael, .son of Air. and Mrs. Peter ROSS. — • — TEMPLE BETH EL OF HOLLYWOOD. 1S51 S. 14 ave Reform Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. FYldny 8:16 p.m. Youth Sabbath service. Oneg siii.lili.ii hosts: Junior and senior youth groups* Saturday 10:4o a.m. TEMPLE BETH SHIRAH. Sunlland Hall, 11539 So. Dixie hwy. Reconstructioniat. Rat-i.f Morris Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb. Friday 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker Louis Schwartsman, director Qreater Miami Bureau of Jewish education, WlB talk on "Raising Informed Jews hi Democratic America." Saturday 10:30 a.m. Bar Uitsvah: Edward, son of Mrs. Mildred Cohen, • — TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Hollywood. 1725 Monroe st. Conservative. Rabbi Samuel Mendelowitz. I %  ridm 8:S0 p.m. Mer Tamid award nielli Saturdaj 9 a m, TEMPLE BETH SKO'.OM. 4144 Chase ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish. Cantor David Conviser. ; i .vi."i p.m. Guest speaker: Rabbi William Sajowlts, regional director, southeast council, Union vi'.'i p.m. Sermon: "The Sing Sons." Oneg shaidMi host: sisr.:i< i. Saturday '.' a.m. Sermons Blessing the Month .>f Freedom." • TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 951 Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Leo Heim. Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Four Spp. iiil Sabbaths Preceding the Festival of Freedom." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion of the Law." — • — TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th it. Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. Friday 8:80 p.m. Sermon: "Judaism explained." OnegShabbal host: Adult Hebrew class in honor of Rabbi Alfred WaMiian. Saturday 9::'0 a.m. liar Mltgvah: Steven, son, of Mr. and Mill. HI Chait. — • — YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie. hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon Steinmetz. Cantor Maurice Neu. Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Only for the Children." Oneg Shabbat host: Sisterhood. Saturday 9 a.m. '-:•:.:! %  : n:.;i:ran: :rxi.i %  -'4MOUUGH7WG TIMf 24 II Adcxx — 6:22 p.m. 4: '6 V< I



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%  Friday, March 30, 1962 vJkwisti WcridHaiin Page 5-A Bill Offered to Revise Quotas Law Continued from Page 1-A residence through the third degree of consanguinity, their spoil-es and i commutcc of immigration ex-; thildren ,. The remaining 40 p r cent is available to other qualified immigrants. Persons born in the Western Hemisphere remain non-quota. AIEdwnrd A. Stern (right) is being congratulated by Charles Seiavitch. outgoing executive secretary of the South Florida Council ot B'r.ai B'rith Ledges, on his installation as president of the Council. Florida Council Elects Stern perts from organizations affiliated with the American Immigration and Citizenship Conference. Sen. Hart stated that the bill would eliminate the need for such bpecial enactments on immigration which Congress has found necessary in recent years. The major provisions of the bill are as follows: 250,000 quota visas are authorize! per year, of which 50.000 i. le available to refuin'l/or escapees without reThe remainI quota visa ountries under i tion, 80.000 quota visas ?re to be j counti i ropor%  i the si/.:of their population :o world population but no one country is to get more than 3,000 lumbers under this category. And 120.000 quota visas are to be allocated to countries based on the so non-q-iota status is expanded to include the parents of a U. S. citizen and persons with special skill3 i including spouse and children). The bill automatically eliminates the Asia-Pacific Triangle provisions. Sen, Hart stated that the bill would lie on the desk of the President of the Senate for ont week to permit additional Senators to join in co-sponsorship. Zionist Unit Will Honor Israeli Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz, i h Florid th I the tail reception in ho c I l -. lei Consul ol direi ir ol ra( I Informi l p.m., Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Z. Si -i st. The South Florida Zionist Youth Commission, composed of delegates from the Miami and Miami Beach chapters of Hadassah, HoiEdward A. Stern, president of Gilbert J. Balkin Ixidgc of B'nai B'rith, has been elected president of the South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges. Other officers elected were M. J. Finegold. of Coral Gables Lodge, president-elect; Eli Hurwitz. Sho lem Lodge. Murray Skop, North Dado, Irving Schatzman, Miami Beach, Jack Wilson, North Shore, and Ansel Wittenstein, Sunshine, vice presidents. Also Frank Kershner, Flamingo Lodge, executive secretary; Arthur Horwitz, North Dade Lodge, treasurer; and Charles Seiavitch. Gilbert Balkin Lodge, Samuel Nei|berg. Coral Gables Lodge, and Jack Fink, Miami Beach I-odge, trustees. Stern, a local attorney, is cochairman of the Florida Federation of B'nai B'rith for its employment of the handicapped program and chairman for new I lodges. .ywood chapter of Hadassah, and proportion of their immigration to (he zionist Districts of South Florthe U. S. over the past 15 years to ida sponS or 31 Young Judaea total of all immigration to the United States for the same period. No quota area shall get less than it got under the old law, except that the maximum is 25,000. The minimum quota is 200. UTTER TO TH! EDITORReader Calls Columnist's View of Israel 'Immature' EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: Leo Mindlin's discourse on Israel's worthiness in your Feb. 16 issue seems rather immature in its approach, it seems unreasonable to me that Israeli officials and citizens should share the American Jews' cutlook as Intimately and completely as Mr.; Mindlin appears to desire. Certainly, the context of our interpretation is vastly different; we are: rather remote from the pressures of Israel's existence. An economic contribution is ] hardly a bilateral attachment, and it is easy for me to see how some element of resentment can be generated in the Israeli by our apparent willingness to consider financial contributions as the ultimate service. We do not share any of the hardships or tensions caused by Israel's precarious posiRockwell Rally OK'd for Small Park in N.Y. Continued from Page 1-A for a permit was rejected by Mayor Wagner. The University of Pittsburgh officials meanwhile offered a "no comment" this week on Rockwell's unsuccessful bid for an invitation to address students on the Pittsburgh campus One university spokesman said | the matter was strictly a student union affair and that a refusal by that group "ended the incident." The Nazi had sent one of his troopers, Clifton Ridenour, of Arlington, Va., to arrange for his appearance on the compus. Student union officials rebuffed both the bid and an effort by the trooper to sell Rockwell's anti-Semitic book, "This Time the World." tion in the Middle East, except in a secondary sort of way — an identification at best. If Israel's survival dictates that she sell munitions to the Germans, then that must be done. Have we, as diaspora Jewry, gotten so moralistic that we no longer buy any German products, or British products for that matter? Somehow, we also manage to sleep each night, knowing that Germany is now a trusted ally of the United States, and supported in its recovery by our tax dollars, diaspora Jewry's included. As what does Mr. Mindlin define "traditional Judaism" in the United States — a growing tendency to become ruled by the most materialistic aspects of life, an eroding loss of respect for education in its real sense — not fraternity parties — and a learning and culture among our young Jewish people? An increase in adaptation to common social behavior, such as vastly increased Jewish divorce rates? Before Mr. Mindlin so easily dismisses Israel as an important and vital portion of our heritage, he had best look about him. Israelis are not heaven-sent. But who can objectively deny Ben-Gurion's statement that Israel has made the American Jew's back straighter? ROBERT RECHTER Albuquerque, N.M. Quotas are allocated to applicants either by country of birth or by country of citizenship, provided he has been domiciled for ten years or more in the place of citizenship. All unused quota numbers at the end of the year are pooled and divided among quota areas having a backlog of applicants waiting for immigration visas. No quota area shall get from this pool a number of visas greater than its regular annual quota and no more than 100,000 numbers may be used from the pool in any one year. Quotas under the bill will be revised every five years based on latest data. Within the quotas 60 percent are available to "blood relatives of a citizen or of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent groups in the Dade-South Broward area, representing over 800 children. AVIAD YAftH Yafeh taught secondary school in Jerusalem until he enrolled in the diplomatic course given by the Political Department of the Jewish Consul Yafeh, born in Palestine in 1923, was graduated from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1945, where he majored in history, Hebrew philology and pedagogy. He was national leader of "Young Maccabee," the Jewish sport edu-1 cation movement, and also a mem%  fe y ber of the National Basketball team He joined the Hagana in 1936, from 1940 to 1942. playing tourna\ and during the Israel War of lndements in Egypt and other neighpendence saw action in beseiged boring countries. Jerusalem. Day Camp Set At Beth Am Temple Beth Am's third season I dancing, drama and a complete of day camping will start June 18' athletic program, and run for eight weeks. Trips to unusual and interesting _, p laces are planned, and special acThe new and enlarged program i JV^ eg $uch as bowlmg| skating for 4 through 12-year-olds includes all( j horseback riding are available. daily Red Cross swimming instruc%  The carefully-planned day starts at tion. arts and crafts, canoeing, 9 a.m., and closes at 4 p.m. The camp craft and overnight camping, fully-trained staff is guided by Mrs. archery, nature study, fishing. John Balkany. L'CHAYIM to the American quality of greatness! Dr. Woltson in Talk "Spinoza and Judaism" was the topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham Wolfson, author of "Spinoza—Life of Reason," on Thursday noon before the Brotherhood of Temple Sinai of Hollywood. Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual leader of Temple Sinai, introduced the speaker and conducted the discussion period which followed the lecture. 1 .. .. — %  Mordecai Sheftatl Soldier and Patriot Living in Savannah at the time of the Revolution, Sheftall defied the royal regime and came out for liberty and freedom. He served in commissary work for the armies of Georgia and the Carolinas, often advancing personal funds for vital provisions; and at the same time served as staff officer in the Georgia Brigade. His quality of greatness rests securely i.i the history of our nation. LORD CALVTRT -*ssss The L'Chayim Whiskey LRD CALVEICT Truly the American Whiskey of Distinction— Uncompromising people make Lord Calvert; disc or neople enjoy It K NOW 31% MM* WHMIU • !" <* % %  **"' %  %  %  %  %  **" **"* ttmm ^ "•" m



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Page 10-A mjmis9> fhr*Man Friday. March 30. 1962 UN Stud) Group Beathea, inslrutlu of social sci. fri( United Ntions study group of enccs it Univerptj Collage, UniMiami Beach will have a discusversity of : %  '. next T,ue sion on Red Chirm led by .'ohn 'at the Mia-, Beach Feieul Mils' local planners for the biennial convention of the National Jewish Welfare Board make final arrangements for the incoming delegates from Jewish Community Centers and YMHAs, who will be arriving next week horn all parts of Ihe country to attend sessions beginning on Wednesday. Hospitality arrangements are being handled by the host agency, the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. Seated (left to right) are Arnold Piskin, Milton Balsam. Hyman Kam, and Leon Kaplan, JWB vice president in charge of local arrangements. Standing (left to right) ere Louis Shatz. Sam Pascoe, A. Budd Cutler. GMJCC president, Efraim H. Gale, GMJCC executive director, Mrs. Milton Sirkin, local convention cochairman, Meyer Kronenberg, and Mrs. Louis Glasser, Armed Services chairman. Jewish Welfare Board Confab Set Continued from Page 1-A nick. U.S. representative to the United Nations Economic and Social Council. He will talk on "Goals ior American Jewry in the 60s." Local arrangements have also teen completed for all sessions dealing wilh the Armed Forces, ivh.ch have been scheduled as a major par! of the forthcoming convention. Mrs. Glasser said that the .^ehlight of this phase of the contention will be a dinner scheduled for Wednesday night. 7 p.m.. at the Deauville. when Maj. Gen. Frank A. Tobey. Chief of ChapJains. U.S. Army, wiil be main speaker in observance of the 100th anniversary of the Jewish military chaplaincy in the United States. >rr. Glasser. in charge of the year-round work in GreaU'r Miami en behalf of Jewish servicemen stationed at nearby locations, said that three additional programs have been prepared for delegates coming from all parts of the country. A luncheon has been arranged Wednesday tor the JWB Armec" Services Committee of the Third Army Area District, under the chairmanship of Herbert Elsas, of Atlanta. On Friday morning, Apr. 6, there will be a workshop entitled "Programming for the Armed Forces in Light of the New Needs." Moderator will be Dr. Marvin C. Goldstein, of Atlanta, ard the discussants will include Elsas, Mrs. Glasser, Rabbi Nathan Witkin, Canal Zone, and Col. Lexy Ford, jr., Atlanta. Serving as consultant to this panel will be Leon Goldberg, AtHeschel's Works to be Discussed The works of Dr. Abraham Heschel, a modern philu.-ophcr o! -: traditional mysticism, will vl bj Rabbi Harold Rich'.er. spiritual leader (! I Jaclc ..Jewish Congregation, ai Ihi I llegi ol Jew ish Studies con ducted at Beth Tcrah Congregaon : lay evening, Apr. 5. Rabbi Heschel is now processor o: Jewish theology at the Jewisl Theological Seminary. He is the author of "Man is Not Alone." The Sabrnlh," and "God in Search of Man." Rabbi Richter is a graduate of the Mesifta Talmudical Seminary Torah V'Daas and has held pulpits n the Wilkes-Barre and Scranton areas of Pennsylvania and South Dort-n. Mich. r < < < } } CA N T O R Ben Grossberg CONDUCTING PASSOVER SEDER SERVICES PAS-*OVJi.K KATI& STfcCTLY KOSrtER • 2 SEPARATE KiTCHENS • fcf: VUfHIS SE*V!CKS •FULL-TIME MASH:. .H NATIONALLY FAMOUS... FOR 50 YEARS THE FAIULOUS ZEIGER KOSHER CUISINfl fAMOUS LYRIC TENOR AND CASTOR JE 8-5711 Call: JE 1-6549 M the Now HOTEL 7cincpot RESIDENT ^ B, ** e,x ** MASHSIACH RilzPlaza, • "OIll • ROOt • CAUNA CUM RESERVE NOW FOR TRADITIONAL PASSOVER SEDERS Conducted by the Eminent CANTOR M0RDECAI YARDEINI •nd Ihe 10SEPH SCHREIBMAN CHOIR Reservations: Mrs. Hoffman JEfferson 16881 IN THE OCEAN IT 1 7th ST. MIAMI BEACH. Ft* Etj> AIR CONtlllONII tOVflL PHLIfi ION THE OCEAN 1741 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA r. HOTEL RESERVE FOR i3fi-,i.rv:v umiak-: HO'^'J, 843 EUCLID AVENUE JE 1-1103 Make your reservations now for a strictly KOSHER PASSOVER HOLIDAY SPECIAL 8 DAYS' RATE CALL NOW. TRADITIONAL PASSOVER SEDER Strictly Kosher Cuisine Conducted fay Cantor MoyshSffmr Reiervitlani; CAII JE I-MM On Ihe Ocean • ColUni Ave. Off Lincoln Rd.. Miami Be(b lanta; Julius Cohen, Los Angeles; and Jerrold Paley, Denver. A typical G. I. Sabbath service ; will be presented on Saturday morning. Apr. 7, at 10 a.m.. to be conducted by Maj. Kalman L. Levitan. Command Chaplains Office, Hq. Air Training Command, Randolph Air Force Base. Tex. The sermon will be delivered by Rabbi Aaron 11. Blumenthal. Mt. Ver[ non, chairman. JWB Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. A special breakfast has been arranged for armed service personnel stationed at the Homestead Air Force Base for the final morning cf the convention. Saturday. Apr. 8. Families of these servicemen have been invited to spend the rest of the day at the beach. It was also announced by Mrs. Glasser that Hyman Kam. local chairman of the JWB Volunteer Service to the Veterans Administration, will be a delegate to the Armed Services Division at the convention. FOR THE PASSOVER HOLIDAYS RETURN BY POPULAR DEMAND I Rabbi IV?ctur.ee Klein and Choir Wl-i CONDUCT THE PASSOVER SZDSRS HARFENtST -RESTAURANT 1381 V*'ASK*NGTON AVE. K0Jl.il? MASHC-IACH 0*1 tKlW.lli MEAT S. DAIRY MfiNU Serving Daily 8 A.M. to 10 P.M. TWO SEDERS $ 15 Pe; Person Si RS FLUS SIX DINAH DURING PASSOVER WEEK $32 Per Fe.-son RESERVE IMMEDIATELY Call JE 8-2055 or JE 8-2058 %  monmaan ABE GEFTER'S NEW KOSHER NEWLY DfCOROTEtl ROMWELL HOTEL OCEANFRONT AT 20th STREET MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA ABE G Came j..cou KomnsLtrg World-famous Cantor Jacob Konigsterg i Convise s fC-VOica Sympnony choir will officiate on Passover with the religious ft-, zt* & S*Jers OCEA!NJFRO\T AND OCEAJNVIEW ROOMS & EVERY CTHER ROOM IN THE HOUSE— ONE PRICE — NONE HIGHER FIRST COVE FIRST SERVED—Full American PlanApril 17 to As 27 — Reasonable March, April & Passive' Rates — Special Discount on Extended Stay. > Tt v..c JE 4-2141 • Chaise lounr.es and Mats • 21" TV and Radla im Each Room • free Stll-Paiair.f AOjCuis Hold • Wiener Roasts • Movies • Camtt • Enttrtainmnl Nifhtl • Many Other linen tlitan, Lm ml Sakkath Strictly (cuntd fll|lwa f.i cfi Daily. Fill Tim UasHilact l> fwlin. i,,... o ouga Fre i_i-.. \o Extra Ci arge for Steaks—C*"-cc; — Roasts. Kosher Poolside Snac* Ea*. CMfTftAUy HEATED & AIR C0.V.\ Ind. Cont.i TI/ — c omru t ^v eville MIAMI BEACH S MOST BEAUTIFUL PASSOVER FAMILY SEDER Wednesday Ever *j Apri, l Thursday E • f -vg April IS %  %  X J Conducted by CANTOR HERMAN K. GOTTLIEB and a Professorial Chair H-75 eprson "AX 4. TIP ..SCLUDED RtSlRVATiOHS f0< FOTH CMOS $22.03 FIR PIRS0N CHIUMIH wmta 10 S7.50 Ptf hlGXT Seville RESERVATIONS! ""> Islella faiok, Con • t, i*or. H 2-2511 C .t-onl.onl ol 2lh Sn<, Miami B Cm to I W0( Bf; rae ulu Be! brii J>r; T Aw; ed Ch; Hoi Wu C Jer r RESERVE FOR PASSOVER Services Will fie Conducted by o Well Known Cantor smmMviH | Ntwly Dicorofeo 1 I Directly on the Oceon (411 OCEAN DRIVE •MIAMI BEACHES GLATT KOSHER DINING ROOM '•\ Diefory lows and Sobbolb Jtn'c/y Ohseryed PASSOVER SPECIALS — 3 MEALS DAIL 1 S100 ond up April 18-April 26 (8 Dciys) per pers. CDbl. Oct. S12u urtdupAjj.il 18-April 29 (11 Da/5 DH. 0c:.P r P Swimming Pcol 7fWo Air Cc;•i." ionpfr/yole Beach Synagooue on Premises NATriAN CINSBURG Owner Mcnogetnont vt ii i t n • w Strictly Kosher PASSOVER SEDDURIM RABBI OR. MAYER I. HERMAN Worid Renowned Cantor SAMUEL VIG0DA & CHOIR Will Officiate $ > 3 $ $ $ lOf per person ^3 for 2 Seddurim '15 per pe son for 1 Seder PHONE JE 1-0761 %  ^f.i.'in-iiiiM-iniw;



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ttdoy, March 30. 1982 +Jewish norkMian Page 9-A RIZONS .....-..._.. • ; : k %  > f ^ I *" 1 •*•%  • • 'B-_ f t m •2 %  • m ysiness Week Launches "Over the Top' Push Experts Will Bring QlAppeal To Top Leaders A board of experts made up entirely of veterans of the philanthropic wars will be on hand as to those working in the Business Week drive. Ill outstanding leaders of : eater Miami community are acting ; hosts for the five-day "crash coverage" campaign, and !! be ready with advice and counsel where it's needed. They are Leonard Rosen, "Over the Top" chairman Sam J. Heiman, Joseph If. Lipton, Nathan Gumenick, Ernest Janis, Sidney Ansin, Jay Kislak, and Bernard Stevens. These men s&e all extremely knowledgeable about their community, to say the least. The proper time for approaching a particular prospect may be in doubt—should he be visited in the early morning, at lunch, or late afternoon? Chances are the ho>t for the day knows the prospect, and what his business .-chedule is. Which of Federation's agencies is another prospect most interested in? And what are that particular agency's plans for the coming year? Again, the chances are excellent that the host for the 1 aj will have this information right on tap. Whether it's the present immigrant situation in Israel, or the problems facing the Greater Miami community, these hosts are civic minded men who will be i eady to supply workers with the v. capons they need. A community effort as intensive as Business Week—where the uork of many weeks will be concentrated into five days—requires concentrated leadership. These eight men are providing that leadership. Women Plan Telephone Unit Mrs. Charles Feinberg, Women's Chairman of the CJA General Solicitations Division, has announced the formation of a "Telephone Brigade," which will go into full swing next week. Theirs is the job of spurring volunteer workers into completion of all cards they hold, Mrs. Feinberg explained. They'll start dialing on an eight-hour a day basis until all workers are contacted. — TV — The Jewish Home for the Aged, the community's nonprofit institution serving aged residents regardless of their financial status, has a long waiting line of applicants. SAM J. HEIMAN LEONARD ROSEN JOSEPH M. LIPTON NATHAN GUMENICK Xmsh Coverage' to Open Intensive Concluding Phase Of Humanitarian Campaign A one-week d'ive aimed at "crash coverage" of previous contributors will be staged under a "Business Week" banner beginning Apr. 9, according to CJA Chairman Cal Kovens. Heading up the important "Over the Top" drive, according to Kovens, is Leonard Rosen, well-known civic and communityleader. Business Week, Rosen explained, is aimed at "a whirlwind wind-up of that phase of the New Horizons concerning previous contributors who haven't yet been contacted this year." Rosen Said different hosts will preside each of five mornings beginning Apr. 9 at Temple Israel, from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Selected businessmen are being asked to stop by Temple Israel for five minutes one morning and select a maximum of three cards. They are asked to cover those cards during the day, and return them to Temple Israel the following morning, Rosen explained. Buffet breakfasts will be available. Serving as hosts, according to Rosen, will be Sam J. Heiman, Joseph AA. Lipton, Nathan Gumenick, Ernest Janis, Sidney Ansin, Jay Kislak, and Bernard Stevens. "I doubt if there is a single more crucial week in the entire campaign," Rosen said. "This is the week during which all of our leadership will be asked to do its utmost to take the campaign over the top." Kovens said there is a "large group" of Greater Miami businessmen who contributed to the Combined Jewish Appeal, but who have not yet been contacted for the New Horizons campaign. "We feel sure that these men are ready and willing to contribute, but they just haven't been asked this year," Kovens explained. "That's the purpose of Business Week." SIDNEY ANSIN BERNARD STEVENS JAY KISLAK CJA Chairman Cal Kovens (left) confers with Robert Macht, Jordan Marsh president, and chairman of CJA Mercantile Division. %  % 



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Page 8-C + knist ffcridfiarr Friday. March 30. 196M Recent seminar at Temple Emanu-El on "Teenagers Question Jewish Education," sponsored r v the Council of Parent Teacher Assns. of the Pureau of Jewish Education shows (left to right) Myron Maas, B'nai B'rith Youth Organization; Leon Firtel, United Synagogue Youth; Alida Krcvetz. Bureau Central Hebrew High School; Raphael Yunes, Temple Emanu-El; Dr. Martin Rosenthal, Dade County Child Guidance Clinic; and Louis Schwartzman, executive director, Bureau of Jewish Education. WKAT-FM FROM BRAHMS TO BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music on WKAT-FM 93.1 on ycjr FM dial MIAMI'S ONLY PURE CLASSICAL MUSIC STATION Programming MORE LIVE Concerts! WKAT-FM Parley Views Anti-Semitism In W. Germany ROME (JTA) — Anti-Semitic iorces are increasingly active in efforts to undermine the democra tic system in West Germany and other countries, members of the European executive of the World Jewish Congress agreed this week. Meeting at Milan, the executive called attention to the continuing growth of Nazi anti-Semitic elements conducting open large-scale propaganda. In a strong resolution, the executive members fully endorsed the recent warning issued by the Central Council of Jews in Germany concerning the dangers involved in the freedom with which neo-Nazi organizations in West Germany were able to disseminate propaganda to poison the minds of Germans, particularly German youth, against Jews. The resolution cited slanderous rttacks keyed to the argument that the Nazis did not murder 6.000.000 European Jewish men. women and children during World War II. It called on the West German federal government to take immediate steps to eradicate Nazi influence by applying 'sternly" and effective legal and administrative measures available for that purpose. Chagall Plants JNF Sapling By Special Report Marc Chagall, world renowned painter and sculptor, recently placed the first pine sapling in the lO.OOO-tree Jewish National Fund forest on the grounds of the lladassah Hebrew University Medical Center near Jerusalem. The forest is a tribute by the Fund. Israel's land reclamation and afforestation agency, to Iladassah, largest American Women's Zionist Organization, on its 50th anniversary. Chagall, accompanied by his wife, came to Israel from Paris to attcn.i the dedication of the magnificent stained-glass windows he designed for the synagogue in the Center. Born in Vitebsk. Russia, in 1877. this great artist has absorbed t h e environment of his childhood and the traditions of Judaism into his intensely colorful and imaginative style of painting and sculpture. Jacob Tsur. world ctiairman of Keren Kayemeth in Jerusalem, pra' siding at the dedication ceremonies, expressed Israel's appreciation •for what Hadassah has done in %  % %  *! %  MARC CHAGALL to help the country push back U the past and will do in the future desert by planting trees.' Jbra perfect fteaftk^ijiinhodhai) In this picturesque and delightful setting,.experience the most beneficial and enjoyable holidoy you hove ever known as you luxuriate at The Arlington. Bathe away all your aches and pains due TO tension and fatigue in the world-famous, radioactive* thermal waters of Hot Springs right in The Arlington... relieve rheumatism, arthritis and high blood pressure. Swim in our fabulous, twin-cascade, temperaturecontrolled pools.. .dance.. .and be entertained. Golf at its best with Club privileges on three 18-hole courses new brilliant Tifton greens. Fishing and all water sports on three nearby lakes. Plenty of night life In Hot Springs.. .galaxy of name entertainers. for law rain and beautiful color brocW* — wiiii to Eogot May, Manager HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK ARKANSAS GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC. 2148 N.W. 10th Ave. FR 3-7180 Have your roof repaired now: you will i.ive on a nw roof later. "Satisfactory WorkJ>y Experienced Men" I represent the METROPOLITAN UFE INSURANCE C( 1 Madison Ave., New York 10. N. -—a good friend in time of need. NA T CANS 3200 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami Phones FR 3-4616 or HI 69981 When you move to town...or to a new home... Your Welcome Wagon Hostess will call with a basket of gifts... and friendly greetings from our religious, civic and business leaders. i If you, or others you know, are moving, be sure to phone. Welcome Wagon.'' HI 84994 WELCOME WAGON



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Friday. March 30. 1962 MMM Her Mian Page 13-B Hospital Unit Names Leader Mort Feldman, Miami Beach building contractor and member ot Ibe board of governors of National Children 1 Cardiac Hospital, has been named vice chairman of the liuilding committee of the free children's heart institution now i citing new S2.50O.00O facilities in Hie Metropolitan Medical Center. In announcing the appointment. hospital preSMenr L •obs*i** pointed out that "Feldman's long ork 22 years ago, has been in the construction field since 1945, tnd has supervised the building ot a number of Miami Beach rpartment houses and hotels. Kati mal Children's Cardiac Hos< ognized for its work in .;, tret tnv i : i irch i ind congenital hearl ,. Iren will | rf,eld real e v '"vestor and expandi mi mbers "i ol its rrc J is< son. R, 2 ^[jctr 1l. lRViNQ LebRMAN and CANTOR liiRSh At)LeR under the auspices of reMpLe eMANU-eL K SiST€UbOOt) fa WEDNESDAY, APRIL18 AND THURSDAY, APRIL T9 Reservations BANQUET DEPARTMENT JE 8-8811 £i the !"] GDEAUVILLE ^^^^^^^ CM IM. OCIN T .Til .TII..T. MIAMI MUCH presents ti&itiomi seoea secvices ] In the beautiful Napoleon Room April 18th and 19th conducted by SIC>OK BeURsky Famou* Concrl Basis and Renowned Choir for RMtnmtleMi Phone: UN 6-8811 Citerinj Offie* 0t* person Second Sedir Howard Rosenblatt Rabbi Joseph Rackovsky will officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Howard .Max Rosenblatt on Saturday morning, Mar. 31, at Beth Tiilah Congregation. The Bar Mitzvah is the son of Mr. ;in.i Mrs, Irving Rosenblatt, grandson oi Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Drucker and Mr. and Mrs Benjamin Goldfarb, and godson of Airs. Lillie Shaii A si \ i nl h %  ; ade honor student at [da M. Fishi r Junior Hi h. Hoi ir I I s won awards for high scholastic h ev im in ijects, a A rei n the Edward Cohen erve • A stu i' -.1 :.'. Rivii ra J i i alism and politics. Himother, Mrs. Mildred Cohen, and his sister, Cookie Cohen, will host the Kiddush following the ceremony. Dennis Young Dr. Irving u'nrman will officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Dennis, son oi Mr, and Mrs. Herbert S. Young, on Saturday morning, Mar. 31, at Temple Emanu-El. The celebrant is a seventh grade student at Nautilus Junior High, where he is a member of the band. He will be honored at a Kiddush following the ceremony, and at a reception Sunday at the Diplomat Country Club. Women to Hold Bowling Affair Four chapters of the BrownrdI North Dade Council. B'nai B'rith Women, arc sponsoring '"Spares 'r Flairs," a bowling affair, on Sat urday, Apr. 14. 8 p.m., at the Cloverleaf Bowling Lanes. 17601 NW 2nd ave. In addition to a bowling fashion show and exhibition bowling, then will be dancing, and refreshments will be sen In charge of reservati ins are At sdames B-.'','. G rret, Shoshana chapter; Joyce tfortn Dade; Mickej I and Pearl G • HollySteven Chait Saturday morning services. Mar. 31. at Temple Zion will include the Bar Mitzvah of Steven, son of Mr. rnd Mrs. Milton Chait, and grandson of Mrs. Rebecca Chait. Rabbi Altred \V;:xman will officiate. Kiddush in Steven's honor, hosted by his parents, will follow servi< es. >: % %  • Edwin Ades in. son ol Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ade.-. will be Bar Mitzvah on Mar. 31, al Tnr.ple \\r Tamid, with Rabbi En is a studi I Gar] noui Simo .. %  -al Gal rvices, Mar. 31. Rabbi Mordecai Podet will officiGary is a seventh grade honor student al Ponce de Leon Junior High, a Boy Scout and an outstanding athlete. He will continue his religious studies at Temple Judea. Kiddush will be hosted by his parents in his honor after the ceremony. t &f Shaaron Edelblum Shaaron Harrietts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Edeltdv/ard Cohen Shaaron Edelblum blum. will celebrate her Bas 3|itzvah on Friday evening. Mar. 30, at Beth David. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro will officiate. An eighth grade student at Shenandoah Junior High, Shaaron won an "Excellent Ribbon" in the recent South Florida Science Fair. Her interests include music and research in plant life. An Oneg Shabbat in her honor will follow the ceremony. WHEN IT'S TIME TO DINE.. TRY THE CAFE JARDIN SUISSE Dr. Robbins To be Honored Dr. Morton J. Robbins, natior.nl Zionist leader, will be honored al Apr. 4 meeting of the Miami Beach Zionist District Luncheon Club. The club meetevery Wednesday noon at the Rnz Plaza hotel Program will include a current events report by Dr. Abraham; Wolfson, and community singing, j Jacob C. Fishman and Joseph Ma ! £ ,v Is the BEST? m From snack to a complete meal... At any time of the day or night. ., Swiss-French cuisinaj, CAB'*' \ UN SUI :...J ** Vu* kRKINO *""(; ,;*


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Page 4-A im istfhrkBan Friday. March 30, 1962 "^Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 FRED K. SHOCHET Editor and Pui'.isher LEO MINDLIN Executive I itac SELMA M. THOMPSON Asst. to Publisher -.EL BUREAU ratal Hotel — Tel Aw.. Israel RAY U. BINDER C on Published •tttrr Friday *-!C J*?7 by The Jew!h Floridlaa at 1 S E. Sixth Street. Miami 1. Florida. Second-Class Posts*-' Paid at Miami. Florid*. The Jewish Floridian hat abso-bed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Ann.. American Assn. of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn. B hrutk : I SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local A-ea One Year MOO ThrsM Years f. CO O-t c* Town Upon Request Volume 25 24 E Acer 5722 Friday March 30, 1962 Number 13 JWB's Biennial Opens Wednesday National bier.nia! csr.ver.:icr. -.: the Beard v.-.;. next V cut the L already Corrj nationwide character oi the Center progrcm cr.-J. the key role ci .-.em Jewish communities In its work. In serving the religious, morale end welfare needs of Jews in the U.S. Armed Forces and VA hospitals, as well as their dependents, the Jewish Welfare Board is making a unique contribution to the spiritual strength of our military, which President Kennedy has called "heartening." In providing guidance and service to the expanding national Jewish Community Center movement, which today boasts a membership of more than 700,000 men, women and children, JWB ie contributing to the establishment of a vital community life, with particularly laudable work being done in the "problem" areas of teen-age and senior citizen service. The convention here will be noteworthy for two major events: the offering of recommendations of the Committee on Reappraisal and Planning, which for more than a year has been studying how JWB can strengthen the Center movement and its programs; and the in the year-long observance of the centennial of the Jewish military chapicy in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Greater Miami Jewish Community Center is a clear example of the contribution of the JWB approach to Jewish communities throughout the nation. With an eye toward the needs of every age grouping, the Center offers programs of worth for tots, teens, young adults, mature men and women, and the senior citizen — all incorporated within the context of the Center movement. Because the delegates to JWB's 1962 biennial from cities very much like our own across the land will play a key role in determining JWB's pattern of service during the years ahead, thus helping to shape major areas of Jewish communal programming, the convention opening here next Wednesday is of genuine national interest. Greater Miami Jewry welcomes the convention, and wishes its delegates a successful session. bringing Eichmann to justice, the nation's court will be a free agent in pronouncing sentence upon him — without the benefit of assistance from the gallery. And Israel will be speaking not alone for herself but for the spirits of the six million men, women, and children, whose brutal and purposeless slaughter Adolf Eichmann helped mastermind. Adolf Eichmann's Plea Adolf Eichmann is fighting for his very life. Once again. Dr. Robert Servatius, his defense counsel, has brought forth the argument that Eichmann was nothing more than a cog in a wheel, a simple soldier carrying out the orders handed down to him. It is doubtful if the high Israel court hearing the Eichmann appeal will give it much credence. Still, there is an increasing amount of sentiment around the world that Eichmann's life should be spared if only to make his punishment more clear no less than more meaningful — both to the prisoner himself and to those who harbor his beliefs today. But just as Israel was a free agent 'n New Immigration Attempts Once more, a concerted effort is being made in Washington to deal v/ith the scandalous nature of the U.S. immigration program. Immigration reform was a basic concept incorporated within the fabric of the Eisenhower Administrations. From the very beginning^ Mr. Eisenhower made several genuine attempts to eradicate the evils of this blot on American democracy. And, from the very beginning, there were many outrageouslymotivated forces intent on frustrating these attempts. Now, again, during the early years of the Kennedy Administration, new pressures are being brought to bear to do away with the national origins quota system, which since 1924, has mocked the spirit, as well as the letter, of the motto inscribed on the foot of the Statue of Liberty. For, under this system, America may ask the world to send its "tired" here — refugees from hatred and oppression — but the sad fact is that they are largely denied entry. The quota system puts a premium on the number of immigrants allowed here, depending on their national origin. Some countries are denied quotas entirely. The quotas thus set an arbitrary value on the quality of human misery, with the clear implication that people born in certain lands are more desirable and welcome here than others. That the system works to the detriment of American prestige abroad is beyond question. That it works to the detriment of basic principles of individual dignity is equally clear. From both points of view, with traditional U.S. democratic beliefs hanging in the balance, it is about time that the national origins method of determining who and who shall not be granted haven in the U.S., fall once and for all by the wayside. daring the week ... as i see it by LEO MINDLIN BSlllllVSMSSffK' A READER in New Mexico has completely misinterpreted a recent column of mine in which I commented on Israel's revaluation of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. The substance of the column was that U.S. Jewry has been left far behind in its repeated criticism of the State Department for. in Israel's view, our government's attitude toward the Arabs seems increasingly understandable as a pragmatic expres-***m-a.diplomatic maneuvering: wkJhMo-eome-Jews here. stM fired by the Zionist ideals that brought Israel into being, the attitude is crass and immoral — one taking no consideration of the needs of the weak because Arab oil, among other things of prestige, dictates against it. This was meant as no attack against Israel, which must dearly be more sophisticated in its dealings than individual middle class U.S. Jews — particularly if -he is to survive in the boiling cauldron of international realities. I have time and time again exp> lai views in the past, merely suggesting that government affair-. Israeli or any other variety, seem to be the rx-tter part of what Hebrew morality deplores as improper forms of human behavior. Thf clear dilemma here habeen that Israel, in her urgent adoption of recalls the misgivings of the prophet. Nathan, who found foreboding in ancient Jewry's sudden yen for an earthly Ui i In oil rgence of Israel as a secular entoday dor be perceived, to the more n spiritual entit :•'• re. _lm of di %  AS A PRINCIPAL e to att %  f Israeli foi • ;• in her beh : when I e several years back, j Lv< ;: Israel is ever I in the market pi ad. In the business of running a government, one must be foolish indeed to expect the standard forms of moral principle to obtain. But isolated from such considerations — a luxury which as a nation Israel can not afford but in which a diaspora Jew can easily indulge himself — the deal emerges in less defensible terms. It is this distinction my avid New Mexico reader was impatient to understand — however unpleasant it may be. The unpleasantness can. indeed, be carried further: With Israel emerging as a nation, will the Jews survive as a people? This may be a terrifying question, but it is hardly an academic one. Its roots lie in Jewish history — in the foreboding expressed by Nathan to which I previously referred. For what can a Jewish State hope to be, no less than to represent, without the spiritual source of Judaism as an integral element governing her deliberations? Other people merely require a palpable national heritage to suggest their continuum, but Jews have through the centuries of their travail repeatedly demonstrated that they depend upon somewhat more. The "somewhat more" is obviously that which kept them going when they had no nation of their own — an unswerving identification with the precepts of their faith. • < %  .*. IF HISTORY DOES not necessarily demonstrate that nationhood guarantees survival, it certainly proves the Jewish ability to manage without it. In addition, history now raises the ugly doubt that nationhood may very well he the single challenge to Jewish survival which it can not succes.-fully me< ationhood, by definition, compromises the mystic source oi Jewish vict try over repeated intimidation by threats and The sale of a:: a cn-r in point, which must be principally regan • ness in weapons ol lestrucThe sin would be the Israel to engage in mun England, i. Belgium, or ride.'.), oilier nation. Fir such commerce inherently lowers I lei to th< lev* l of her pi i %  s < argument whatever diplomatic or commercial advanti the sal < have brought Israel, il that Jew.have alwi ;. %  n symbolic of a sphere <-f human apart from other found elsewhere, and that the violence done to this view of (he J< as keeper of the world's conscience holds out dim nope for the future. Since Israel has assumed the character of her neighbors, how much worse can now be expected of the neighbors? I must repeat: I offer here no double standard of international morality which Israel should adopt — that she should hope to survive as a nation while shunning the best principles of commerce and trade. Once having gone into the business of nationhood. Israel must also act according to these principles. But it does behoove us to recall that the millenia of our survival in the dispersion were based more on morals than management. •• • + pOR JEWS ARE an irritant to the conscience of others, and should remain an example of good to those gone astray. Expecting from Israel the highest level of moral behavior, we must be willing to examine the basis of national self-interest as an issue central to the question of good and evil. Lest this reasoning be considered the work of an impossible idealist, who demonstrates no practical concern for Israeli survival, it should here be mentioned that many citizens of the Jewish State have at one time or another adopted a similar position. Some long ago argued that their country must have no army. In the name of a personal brand of morality, others sought to sabotage military actions during the War of Liberation that unintentionally desecrated the Sabbath. Still others destroyed valuable canned foods because they were not kosher even as the threat of starvation loomed for the infant nation in siege. These examples, odious though they may be, highlight the unwil ingness to compromise principle in the name of national survival rather than Jewish survival, and suggest a serious doubt in the minds of many that both are necessarily one and the same Where expediency transcends decency, justice has been maimed. This certainly holds true in the international sale of arms The search to assure the continuation of Israel as a secular entity must inevitably lead to the adoption of standards foreign to those principles that achieved the spiritual triumph of Jewry over travail even unto the days of Hitler. •• i



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Friday. March 30, 1962 *Jewisti fk>ri'dlan Page 3-A US Matzah Frightens Red Rulers Continued from Page 1-A was the first year the Government h;,d iuued such a ban and that the Government also barred private baking of matzohs by Soviet Jews as a form of commercial enterprise. The report touched off heated protests in Congress. Sen. Kenneth Keating. New York Republican, sent a telegram to U.S. Ambassador Adlai Stevenson, urging him to call on the United Nations Human Hights Commission to look into what might be done. Mrs. Harry Koretzky, of Miami Beach, accepts her National Community Leadership Award from Dr. Max Arzt, vice chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, at a luncheon of the National Benefactors Society of Torah Fund at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York. The award was given to Mrs. Koretzky for "exemplary leadership in all endeavors to enrich the life of her community." Torah Fund was established 20 years ago by National Women's League of the United Synagogue of America as a fund-raising arm of the Seminary, which is the central institution of Conservative Judaism. ^__^_ Ribicoff Aide Will Address Senior Citizens' Pre Conference Dr. Donald P. Kent, special as %  on :;.• to Secretary Abra ham A. Ribicoff, of the DepartI of Health 1,-jtioii and Welfare, will 1"' principal speaker before delegates to a special eon ference for senior citizens on Apr. 2 to 4 at Waldman's hotel Dr. Kent wil speak on "New Patterns for l.ivDR KiNT ing for the Senior Citizen." Senior citizens from Jewish Community THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGFD needs for its THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, linens, dishes, drapes, etc. All procMds go towards rapport of •ho Horn* You may contribute, tako a tan deduction or wo will pay end &f or tamo. Ramambor ... wa aro NOT a profit-making organiiation .. Wo aro harping your community to kaop rh dignity By helping other, you are helping yoursoK! Manufacturer! and jobbera-romembor—wo coo OM oil yowr ewtcaoH or mifil o-nse call us for eaiiv oick-up TH* JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5757 N.W 27th Avonue ME 3-2338 Closed Saturdays Centers throughout the Soutl well as from other parts i countrj will attend the confi The conference will be held immediately prior to the Jewish Welfare Board 19ti2 national biennial ,. nvention %  I for Apr. 4 to 3 at the D> Buviale hotel. Miss Miriam R. Ephraim, program director of JWB'a Jewish Community Center Division, will speak on •The Obligation of the Senior Citizen to His Commu Mrs. George Simon, of Miami. is chairman of the senior citizens conference. Mrs. Simon. Florida conference chairman, is vice president of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, president of the Miami YMHA Branch, and a member of the board of governors of JWB's Southern Section. Others on the planning committee include David Goldberg, Charleston. S.C., president, JWB's Southern Section; A. Budd Cutler, president, Greater Miami Jewish Community Center; Mrs. William Rafkind, Mrs. William Heckler, Mrs. Da.u J. Sachs, Mrs. Norma Gordon, tn Balsam, Dr. Emanuel Pushkin. Howard Dunn and Aaron Goo, of Miami; Mrs. Emailuel Es •.ashville, Tcnn.; Mrs. William I pel, jr., New Orleans, La.; A) enberg, San Antonio, Tex.; Efraim H. Gale, executive directoi attar Miami Jewish Comm Center; Charles Plotton, d Service to Senior Citizci i Iter Miami Jewish Commu ; %  Center; and Nathan ..,-ha:, admin trative field secrecy I ern Section. Spaet Names Campaign Official County Commissioner Harold B. Spaet. candidate for Circuit Judge in Group 1. has announced the appointment of E. C. Fogg III as hienmpaign treasurer. 'i a dairy executive, served I.Spaet's treasurer during bis campaigns for County Commission ach City Council t Vice Mayor and M;.., ,.t... .'.. ii Mil mi Beach. %  i. [ ttai reputation 1 of beii on i Dane county's harcig campaigner: Fogj • %  -,: n all partsi ; thus far %  %  • %  i: -". i tester and North Miami -peakinp. %  pt'O] All th;> his es and m :'cis oi The 54-yi %  %  Dade s been a practicing I n 2 years. He is h< Miam Beach r. ent of tht %  Florida League of Municipalities, past president of the DJe County oi "..'•. %  alities. and vice i >•< sident oi the Florida State Elks Assn. He is also a trustee of Mt. Sinai Hospital and a director of the Children's Home Society of Southeastern Florida. Hep. Leonard Farbstein, New York Democrat, appealed to Secretary of State Dean Rusk to appeal to Soviet leaders "on humane grounds" to permit importation of matzohs. In a speech on the House floor. Rep. Farbstein called the ban "the crudest act of all." Rep. Jacob Gilbert, another New York Democrat, sent a telegram to Anatoly Dobrynin, the Soviet Ambassador to the United States asking him to intervene. Rep. Gilbert said the ban could only be considered "one more harassment and bitter Dlow inflicted upon the Jews of Ru=sia." Rep. Steven Derounian, New York Republican, also wired the Soviet envoy a request that he intervene. Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York Republican, was another Congressman to confact the Soviet envoy. He asked that Soviet officials be induced to allow shipment of American-baked matzohs and said he had been assured by a number of American firms they would donate the mstxeh. The B'nai B'rith made a similar (fler "as a simple act of Jewish brotherhood." Label A. Katz, B'nai B'rith president, made the offer in a telegram to the Soviet Council for the Affairs of Religious Cults through the office of Ambassador Dobrynin. Katz cited the draft principles on freedom of religious rights and practices now on the agenda of the UN Commission on Human Rights and declared that Russia's denial of matzohs was "in direct conflict" with those principles. The Joint Distribution Committee for years has shipped matzohs to Russian Jews and others. Chief Rabbi Levin reacted delicately to the American offers, saying that they were a matter "not for us alone" but for the Soviet authorities to decide. Anne frank Chapter Anne Frank chapter of B'nai B'rith held a luncheon in the Dea ville hotel's Charlemagne room sday noon. Mrs. Tena Kata was in charge of arrangements. Dade Heights Has Active Calendar Dade Heights Jewish Congregation will present Ivan Kivitt's "Merry-Go-Round Playhouse" in a production of "Rumpelstiltskin" on Sunday, Apr. 8. at 2 p.m. Senior USY of the congregation I is having a membership drive. All teen-agers from 14 to 10 are inIvited to the annual meeting Wed[ nesday from 8 to 9 p.m. Camp Judah, Dade Heights' sum! mer day camp, will be open from (June 25 through Aug. 17 for children from 4 to 12. Activities will Include swimming, field trips, bowling, crafts. music, drama and dancing. The air-conditioned premises will be used for the additional comfort of the children, and meals will be prepared in the congregation's kosher kitchen. The Temple will be open for registration from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Complete end Dependable Tif.p Service M IAMI TITL€ & Gkttact Co. 34 YEARS OF ^iTLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY • ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE 124 SECURITY TRUST BUILDING and 136 N.E. FIRST STREET Telephone FRanklin 3-8432 REMEMBER The memories of Passovers gone by-the IMWH^fr^J K ^ J J & Tgg poking around the kitchen, making the horseradish and theChches-puttinj on the rmw suit of clothes and shoes-pockets full of hazel nuts-and almonds—arixtousy waiting for the Seder to start-Uncle Joe and Aunt Sad* were always latehe whole family together-Grandpa looking like a king propping the pillow on he chair bes.de him-Grandma tired after baking and cooking all day but "Mv Malta" my queen, ha c ned her-lhe Kiddush and then my turn for "Ma Nishtanah'' and the answer given with Grandpa's voice ringing out over all—the first half of the Mapdah %  *£*even the bitter herbs tasted so good-Passom it was always "srong -all were comcelled to eat it otherwise we could not get the hard boiled egg and salt water-and then the meal-nobody, but nobody, could cook betterthan grandma-we ate-and ate and then the "e*ncW'-and the rest of the Haptfih-and some more cups of tine and the opening of the door-and the stories of how in the old country someone mgnten*the whole Lily by appearing at that door-tat best of aII the son*; with which the second half of the Hagadah abound-and the feeling of drowsiness-contentment-and the thought that tomorrow the same thing once more MANISCHEYYITZ WINE COMPANY, N. Y. Producers of Traditional Passover Wines s*2 cr v* U1.WT IMF J r &6 One of the Notion's Oldest anal Largest" 0ade Federal RAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MIAMI % JOSEPrl M_ UPTON. PiestrJenl 4V 4 % Per Annum Current Dividend Rate PAID QUARTERLY ON SAVINGS



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FridayMarch 30. 1962 vJewlsii fhrkttar Page 9-B F ASHION conscious women are constantly asking what is new for this season. The question of hemlines is important, as is the problem of whether fringe is fashionable this season or not. The most important word in fashion is usually the least stressed. it is always important — whether hemlines and necklines go up or down, or chiffon is "this seaI fabric. That simple basic word .v '"comfort." Wl ile watching a fashion show, may admire the tight, tapered, and short sheath. If you decide to buy it, stop and think First if you will be comfortable in it. Many a model takes a short step on the runway because the skirt is too tight for normal walkIt the skirt is too tight to sit comfortably in, if it rises far about your knees when sitting, if tin re is a possibility of being embarrassed when getting in or out of a car—then the dress cannot possibly be classified as being comfortable. No woman can be as socially poised as she would like to be if she is uncomfortable in her dress. More than one party has been ruined for the hostess because her gown, while beautiful to look at. wasn't comfortable because, P'lhaps. a shoulder strap didn't fit correctly. Recently, the wirephoto report of a large Washington party mentioned that the well-known hostess was constantly seen adjusting her attached stole. The degree of her discomMIAMI BEACH SURFSIDE 1104 lineal* Rd. 9473 Harding Ave. Ph. JE 1-3812 Mi. UN 64171 pier re CUSTOM TAILORING 1104 LINCOLN ROAD Miami Beach 9473 HARDING AVE. Surlfide HABERDASHERY 37th fear on Miami Beach fort was obvious to all — and simply because she was not comfortable in the gown she was wearing. • r\RESSES are shown on manne" quins, but they are worn by a living, moving you. Occasionally, one must sacrifice some degree of aesthetic beauty for the compensating factor of comfort. When buying a dress look at yourself from all angles. The shops have three-way mirrors for your convenience. Try sitting in the dress; walk a little to see if the line cf the dress is cut so as to be flattering to your figure. Is the material comfortable on your body, or is hopsacking, for example, not for you? If the dress looks well in front, but pulls in the back, why buy it? It will probably only hang in your closet for months and months, until you get tired of it. and give it away. The question of hemlines is always debatable. As of now, just below the knee seems to be the most widely-acceptable length. Most women follow the rule of thumb which tells them to watch that their hemlines hit just above the center of the calf. For your more elegant dress, drop the length a trifle—about a half-inch to an inch. For the dress with the full skirt, you can shorten the length to the same perspective. Again, the rule to follow is simply that it must feel comfortable to the wearer. If you do not have to think about the length of your dress when you are wearing it, then it is comfortable from the standpoint of length. Necklines are also a factor to consider. If a sales person has convinced you that a decollete neckline is for you, and you feel half undressed with the low cut line, it is unreasonable to expect you to be comfortable when wearing the dress. t %  PRESSES reflect your person" ality; they are part of you. You move in them, you visit in them, wear them shopping and Knit W Needle FEATURING THE FINEST IMPORTED and DOMESTIC YARNS EXPERT STYLING and INSTRUCTIONS 2628 Galiano St. Coral Gables Phone HI 5-5121 BARBARA GREENBERG AIR CONDITIONED BOULEVARD HEALTH SALON SWEDISH MASSAGE • CABINETS • COLONICS MONDAY thru SUNDAY 9 a.m. 7 p.m. 2080 BISCAYNE BLVD. Out-Calls Ph. FR 3-1252 BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Uf>tfr Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaehruth of Florida Rabbi Dr. leaac H. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSINO — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS mODlRH EQUIPMENT I fURNISMNGS FIREPROOF BVILMN0 to formal balls. You do not wear dresses to be constantly thinking, "Is my skirt hiked up in pack?" "Why did I have it tapered so much?" You should select your clothes very carefully. Every dress in your wardrobe should do something positive for you. With a basic knowledge of color and accessory coordination, there should be no excuse for a woman's opening up the door of her closet, see it full of clothes, and yet be able to say, "But I haven't a thing to wear." The culprit is usually the lack of the most important word in fashion — comfort. A careful balance of selecting clothes that are fashionable, that display your figure to your best advantage, and are comfortable to wear is easier said then done. It takes a considerable amount of conscious effort. The best suggestion that has been offered is to look through your present wardrobe, select the few dresses that always bring you compliments when you wear them, and then analyze them with the idea in mind qfjasic style, color, line, and the optical illusion they create. Combine these with the fact that in order to be comfortable, you must enjoy wearing them, and your balance is all but achieved. Sturman. Katims ; Exchange Vows Miss Beverly Katims and Herbert Sturman were united in marriage on Thursday, Mar. 8, at the Croydon hotel in New York City. Rabbi Benjamin Kreitman and Rabbi Israel Lebendiger officiated at the ceremony, which was followed by a reception and dinner. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a gown of white bouquet taffeta with portrait neckline of reembroidered alencon lace and seed pearls. Mrs. Raymond Shainberg, sister ter of the bridegroom, was matron of honor. Marvin Maitzman served as best man. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Her! man Katims, 2042 SW 14th ter., | the new Mrs. Sturman is a graduate of Columbia University school of dental hygiene, and was employ. Her husband is the son ol Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sturman, of Liber* ty, N.Y. A graduate of Columbia College and Columbia law school, I he is presently employed in the office of the United States Attorney in Los Angeles, Calif., where he and his bride will live after cross-country honeymoon trip. "ADON-OLOM" (LORD Of THE UNIVERSE) IN HEBREW AND ENGLISH ON ONE RECORD$1.50 Partial Proceeds to Hhrew University of Jerusalem Will Send Postage-free to Any Part of the Country MAYFIELD'S RECORDS 1461 Drexel Ave. JE 8-9840 A novel blend of dance and poetry to interpret the Sabbath will be presented by dancer Olga Suarez (left) and dramatic reader Mrs. Howard Dunn (right) at the Oneg Shabbat program scheduled for Saturday, Apr. 7, 3:30 p.m., as part of the biennial convention of the National Jewish Welfare Board at the Deauville hotel. Mrs. Dunn i6 a member of the board of directors of the North County Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, which is host to the convention. Mrs. Suarez is the Center's dance director. Pioneer Women To Honor Couple Pioneer Women, Club 1, will honor Mr. and Mrs. Philip Weiss at a banquet Saturday evening, with Mrs. Joseph Krantz, president, in charge of arrangements. Event will be held at the Royal Hungarian restaurant, 731 Washington ave., owned by Mr. and Mrs. Weiss. Residents of Miami Beach for the past 16 years, Mr. and Mrs. Weiss have participated in many phases of Jewish community life. They have been patrons of all Pioneer Women's projects, lending their complete support to the Child Rescue Fund. Weiss serves as vice president of Kneseth Israel Congregation and of the Religious Zionists of Greater Miami. He is also a member of tS5g&


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Page 2-A • 'Jm1$t> ftorktiain Friday, March 30. 1962 I Bible Contest Winners Named Winners ot the Florida district of the National BibliContesl weft announced this week by M. A. Bas kin, president of the Bureau ot Jewish Education, The contest was held at the Bureau building on Mar 18. Rich v\alzer. of Temple Beth Sholom, received the highest mark, followed by Robert Belmaker, ol the Central Hebrew High School and Young Israel Synagogue; D idle Fait, of Beth Sh .i oi Hebre v High S I and Temple Jiidea Siev lershey, Sam lei L'nger a ol Temple Bi ih Sh Ion fifth These winners of the district contest will now participate in the regional cor.test. The Florida section will be held at the Bureau bu'lding on Sunday, Apr. 8. Other sections I th Southi : %  u gion will hold contests k t;i and Savanriah, Ga The two %  South) rn regioi %  the S resi nta ivi s in N City to p finals LONCDISTANCl DAILY PICK-UPS New York, New Jer fey, Philadelphia. Baltimore. Washington, Boston — all other points. DIAL JE 8-8353 M. lleberman & Sow 6SS COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH RETURN LOAD RATES &*Lw** &UHCC PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS FASrT\ CE\ T ER OF THE SOUTH Largest Selection in Latest Styles for Men and Women FREf PARKING SPACE IH REAR CONVENIENT TO BUSES 728 LINCOLN ROAD 'On the Moll' Phone JE 8-0749 OCULISTS' PRliCHIPTIONS FflUO CONTACT LENSES National Council oi the National Honor Society was granted to the Mesivta High School's new chapter to be called Hamasid. Students ol the Mesivta eligible for admission to the chapter are left to right Stuart Werner, Larry Cii Ivc n Esterm Jewish Wire Service Picks 'Representative' Board XE\v YORK (JTAi Organization Of a new board of directors of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, lepresentative of the American Jewish community, was announced this wees by Eieazar Lipsky. president of the 45-year-old worldwide news service The board will control and direct the entire JTA operation throughout the world Lipsky said the 25 men and women lected to the board would serve li Individual capacities II elements Jewish community pre-.Additional members he said, to expand •he board's' <. resenti ti*e charac•he new board prominent in th publis • Id Th/ nev • ; gency executive head calle tent of the new board "a major step in the I ot JTA. which should permit us to develop the maximum potential usefulness of this unique service in the best inti rests of the community." He said that "the character of the new board is the best possible assurance the American Jewish community can have thai the JTA will function independently as an objective, effective news service for the entire Jewish community." He pointed out that a proposed increased flow of domestic news would not cause a reduction in the volume ol news from Israel and elsewhere abroad "We will continue to provide a comprehensive picture of Jewish life in Israel and abroad." Lipsky said. LET'S MAKE ISRAEL ECONOMICALLY SECURE BUY THE SAFEST BONDS ISRAEL BONDS and GIVE TO THE CJA MAYSHIt FRIEOBEKG Purim Party Slated Esther group of Hadassah will hold a Purim party luncheon at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Jack It Schwartz, 7525 Adventure ave Treasure Island, on Apr. 4. Mrs. Jean M. Emil. of 65 Washington ave.. i 5 in charge of-reservations. PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" Serving rh Jswish Community Since 1925 MIAMI'S ONI AND ONLY JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS CATERING EXCLUSIVELY TO THE JEWISH CL/ENTELf GUARANTEED FINEST QUALITY MONUMENTS AT LOWEST PRICES IN MIAMI! GRAVE MARKERS HEADSTONES FOOTSTONES Only $35.00 Why Pay More? Boy for less at Palmer's and Save I Ail Monuments Custom Made In Our Own Shops within 3 Days I 3277-79-81 SOUTHWEST 8th STPH Neil to Corner of 33rJ Avenue PHONES 'I HI 4-0921 HI 4-0922 PERSONALIZED MEN'S HAIR STYLING by DAVID ROSE ol the BISCAYNE TERRACE HOTEL BARBER SHOP For Appf. Coll FR 48779 'poi mpjn *>S& iyov l-m Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky 94S MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH Phone JE 1-3595 ROOF LEAK? CALL VICTOR COIVIV Let us repair it or apply a new one. For free estimate phone: *TV. ACME • ^ ROOFING CO. JE 8-7255 JWV Post Sets Joint Installation Murray Solomon Post 243. Jewish War Veterans and Ladies' Auxiliary of Coral Gables, will hold their annual joint installation on Sunday evening at Minyonaires Hall, 3737 Bird rd. Guest speaker will be Scott %  k V t r'_ <;i! 'l" SeBaton. Jr om l'uuu county, and former Mayor of Lakeland, who will discuss "Problems of Urban Government in Florida.'' Installation ceremony will be conducted by State Commander Henry Norton. State first junior vice commander, Ainslee R. Fer die. and Stale officer of the day, Norman Levine. Norton and Le Vine are past commanders of the Murray Solomon Post. Also officiating will be State Auxiliary president, Mrs. Evelyn Levine, and ladies' State chaplain. Mrs Jennie Golub. of the Auxiliary. Officers to be installed by the posl are Mrs. Selma Tucker, com mender; Michael Schechter, senior vice commander; Harry Rosi n stein, junior vice commander; Howard Melnick, quartermaster Norman Levine, officer ol Ihe da] Phil Cantor, judge advocate; I ry Nathanson, chaplain; and Lei Ciment, Sy Sutta, Al ( instantin. trustees New Auxiliary officers are Meslames Lena Cohen, preside:, t. :.II ya Levine, senior vice commander; Lillian Suiia. junior vice commander; Evelyn Ferdie, treasurer: Gussie Hedgebow, conductress Bertha Nathanson, guard: Ruth Roth, patriotic instructress; and Anne Seidel. chaplain. SAFETY HARBOR ^ ~~5PA Flerido's Famed Mineral Springs Health Resort Florida's newost and largest Hea't" and Baths Pavilion, Now Lun mineral water pool, p.itio. solaria any gymnasium. r 11. health i • illvl lual rtli '• an I |>I All l, l l del I %  %  %  \ i>m, fi -' i''.-. hi i i i OUR 17th YEAR — "Imitated Bit Not Equaled" ONE HOUR BY AIR TO TAMPA A ST. PETERSBURG Telephone 726-1161 P ffl r r '"' 9 f MM U SWARMING TERMITZS WE INSTALL GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS furniture Tops, Beveled Mirrors and Resi/verinf Cur Specially L & G. GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS 136 S.W. 8th ST. Morris Or tin Phone FR 1-1363 INSURANCE ONE STOP AGENCY -40% iW JEWELRY—FURS—MISCELLANEOUS FLOATERS m£ ym AUTOMOIILE LIABILITY A PHYSICAL DAMAftl ^JfrynLfr Limits to meet youi needl ^ % % % %  ^ Too Agency that CAN say YESI Don't let year agent say "It Can't Be Done" ACKERMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. F WJIflS "Progressing with Our Many Satisfied Customers" ANOTHER LOCATION FOR YOUI CONVENIENCE COULTON BROS. "Air"MAUKY" Coral Way & S.W. 27th Ave. "NAT" TOUR TEXACO BOYI 840 S.W. 8th St. 4# ;i AND MOST l Of IMS... '"•-: — en*. DOUGHS HOtO CMUPU M COIAl fc*U Wi A • PAMILY TRADITION Based Vptm •tSicths* ts Sinrlee The Ultimate In Comfsrt SO Years el Experience Most Modem Facilities • crsonallied Attantlea sue Cars te Detail.., / MEMORIAL. CHAPELS 19th t Alton Rd. MIAMI BEACH 1250 Normandy Dr. JEffarton 1-1151 MIAMI Douglas Rd. at S.W 17th St. Highland 3-2121 Larrie S. Blasberg. Funeral Director Abe Eisenberg — Leonard Zilbert