The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01657

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text

"Jewish Floridlan
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 33 Number 45
Miami. Florida. Friday, November 4. 1960
Two Sections Price 20'
andidates in Pre-Election Pleas for Support
"BAYVILLE' SURVEY: PART III
Jews are Joiners/
But Tend to Favor
All-Jewish Groups
Kennedy Pledges to Seek Mid-East Peace;
Lodge Vow Friendship With Israel
By MANHEIM S. SHAPIRO
American Jews live in a world
which most of their fellow-
[itizens are oi another religion,
addition, they are aware, of
th a history, and at least, in
art a present, in which various
Brms of hostility and exclusion
|rere directed at themselves or
heir co-religionists. Their view of
be world and their response to it
re therefore likely to be iriflu-
iced by these factors. The "Bay-
lie Survey" made an attempt to
tamine the attitudes and the ae-
ons of affiliated Jews in Miami
^rtaining to relationships with
eir non-Jewish neighbors.
Last week, we reported that the
|ws of Dade county whom we
lerviewed are "joiners." They
however, less likely to join
-sectarian organizations than
vish organizations. This is re-
lied by the fact that while at
three out of four belong to
least one Jewish organization,
out three out of five belong to
least one non-sectarian organ-
Ition. Put differently, while
1% revealed they belong to no
^wish organization, 38% indi-
B they belong to no non-sectar-
organization.
IWhile 33% of the men report
longing to no non-sectarian or-
inization. 44% of the woman say
th* same. This last difference
Him t* be accounted for by th*
fact that a larg* proportion of th*
non-sectarian organizations re-
ported by the men are business,
trade and professional associa-
tions of various types.
The members of Reform con-
gregations are more likely to be-
long both to Jewish and to non-
sectarian organizations than the
members of either Conservative
or Orthodox congregations. Those
affiliated with Orthodox syna
gogues are least likely to belong
to either Jewish or non-sectarian
organizations.
Philanthropic Index
About half of our respondents
report attending meetings of each
of three different types of organ-
ization*: synagogue-related, other
Jewish organizations, and non-
sectarian organizations. Just
about equal proportions (38% and
37%) report having been engag.-
ed in fund-raising efforts for Jew-
ish causes and for non-sectarian
causes.
Of those who raised money for
both types of philanthropy, 56%
said they devoted more time to
the Jewish causes, 22% more
time to non-sectarian charities,
and 22% "about the same to
Continued on Page 11-A
WASHINGTON(JTA> Henry Cabot Lodge, the
Vice Presidential candidate, was quoted this week as
stating that "the cause of Israel is very dear to my
heart and to that of Vice President Nixon" and that,
in the event of their election, they would continue a
policy of friendship and cooperation
with Israel. Mr. Lodge's statement,
"lade in Cleveland following a
meeting with Rabbi Abba Hillel
Silver, was released here by the
Republican National Committee.
"The United States has a close
attachment to the State of Israel."
Lodge declared. "This is our policy
and will continue to be so. We
attach great importance to the in-
dependence and progress of the Is-
raeli government. Our attachment
to this tiny land and its freedom-
lov every viewpoint."
The Republican candidate said
that "not withstanding any disap-
pointments, th* record has been
an impressive record of achieve-
ment. Our continued efforts to
open the Sues Canal to Israeli
shipping, our unceasing bonds of
common effort hero, in Israel
and in the United Nations, th*
Continued on Page 3-A
Who is Myer Feldman? The
bigots have branded him as
"the Jew behind Sen. John F.
Kennedy." See Milton Fried-
man's exciting report to you
horn Washington on Page
14-A in this week's issue.
DETROIT (JTA) Sen. John F. Kennedy, the
Democratic Presidential candidate, pledged Monday
that, if elected on Nov. 8, he would "use all the
authority of the White House to seek peace and im-
plement our moral commitments in the Middle East "
His pledge was contained in a mes-
sage to the 32nd national conven-
tion of the Labor Zionist Organiza-
tion of America. The convention
unanimously approved earlier ac-
tion by the organization's central
committee, endorsing the Kennedy-
Johnson ticket.
The convention adopted a resolu-
tion calling on the United States
government not to support, under
any circumstances, the candidacy
of the United Arab Republic for
membership in the United Nations
Security Council. The resolution de-
clared that the United States should
bring all its influence to bear to
prevent any UN member from ob-
taining a seat on its highest peace
tribunal who persists in avowing
' that it is in a slate of war with
another member, and continues to
j ignore resolutions of the Security
I Council.
(Foreign Minister Gold* M*ir
Continued on Page I0-A
Montreal Attorney General Told
To Quiz Growing Nazi Party
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
, MONTREALThe Quebec Attorney General has been instructed to
lestigate the activities of Henri Bellefeuille, the avowed Canadian
^cist. Premier Jean Lesage told the 35th Canadian Zionist conven-
here Tuesday.
Bellefeuille. a Sore!. Quebec draftsman, appeared Sunday night on
anadian national television pro *-------- -
m, which also featured George, pro-Nazi implications.
(Emanuel Coke, an attorney and
a member of the CJC Council, told
the court where the youths were ar-
raigned: "These assaults and the
circumstances surrounding them
have caused a great deal of dis-
satisfaction in certain parts of the
community in Montreal. We must
make these people understand that
they cannot come over here, and
attack citizens, threatening them
with death and the coming of the
Nazis and Hitler.")
The Quebec Premier told the con-
vention that Canada's history is a
1 history of minorities because all
Continued on Pag* 3-A
Ben-Gurion Victorious in Parliament Tiff;
Beats Back Censure on Lavon Investigation
AVOW KFOftTED SATISfllD MCI 12-4 ?
JERUSALEM(JTA>Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion beat back j
four opposition attempts in the Knesset Monday to censure his govern-.
ment for its handling of the Lavon affair, and emerged from the debate
with a solid coalition vote for a resolution which "took note" of the Prime
Minister's state of the nation address.
Critical resolutions, offered by
the Herat Party, the General Zion-
ists, the Communists and the Agu-
dath Israel, had to be watered down thority,.
hcoln Rockwell, the Virginia self
ointed leader of the so-called
nerican Nazi Party. The Sorel
aftsman claims to be the leader
Ja group of 400 to 500 native Ca-
Jdians who meet in Montreal each
J)nth. Bellefeuille has been quoted
| declaring "I am anti-Semitic and
oud of it."
ix youths, all Hungarian refu-
S, ere under arrest here, fol-
ving a street brawl in which
shouted "Hitler is coming."
rhe Canadian Jewish Congress
las requested the Dominion De-
partment of Citizenship and Im-
migration to investigate th* brawl
ecaus* of its anti-Semitic and
when the Speaker of the House
refused to submit to a vote any
resolution referring directly to the
security mishap" in 1954 which
brought about the resignation of
Pinhas Lavon as Defense Minister
in 1955. and precipitated the cur-
rent affair.
The opposition parties also
failed in their attempts to put
through a resolution which would
instruct the Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee
to continue its consideration of
th* "affeir."
The Knesset votes came Monday
night after Mr. Ben-Gurion had re-
plied to the general debate in a
j 90-minute speech that ranged over
i several areas in which his regime
had been criticized before he took
I up the Lavon affair. Even then, he
|did not discuss the general impli-
cations of the affair, which he had
j ignored in his state of the nation
I address. Instead, he limited him-
JDC Announces
Pilot Project
For the Aged
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
\
GENVAA pilot project to as-
sure a minimum lifetime mainten-
Army with vigor and some heat.; ance on an annuity basis for aged
He told the Knesset that the Army j refugees from Nazi persecution in
self to replies to suggestions that
;he Army might have been acting
independently of the civilian au-
Mr. Ben Gurion defended the
regarded itself solely as an execu-
tive arm of the civilian authorities.
It had never occurred to the Army
leaders and. he was certain, he
said, it never would, that they
should take any kind of action of
their own free will.
Neither the Army nor the Gov-
ernment, he noted ironically, was
composed exclusively of angels
five European countries was an-
nounced Tuesday at the 15th an-
nual overseas conference of the
Joint Distribution Committee.
Charles H. Jordan, overseas di-
rector of the JDC, said that the
availability of funds from World
Refugee Year collections made the
experiment possible. Funds also
will be provided by the United Na-
and.Te^ce "here may nave been "ons High Commissioner for Refu-
some unfortunate cases and charges
against individual officers some of
whom were currently under deten-
tion. He stressed, however, that
this in no way reflected on the
officers' corps.
Th* Pr*mi*r reviewed th* de-
velopment of th* Israeli Army
and disclosed that, prior to his
retirement to Sd* Boker in 1953,
he had drafted a three year plan
Continued on Pag* 16 A
Ys Your Duty as a Citizen to Vote on Tuesday
gees.
Saul Kagan, of New York, sec-
retary of th* Conference on Jew-
ish Material Claims against Ger-
many, reported to the conferenc*
that in addition to $70,000,000
received by the Claims Confer-
ence for relief of needy Nazi vic-
tims during seven years of op-
eration, more than 5100,000,000
had been paid in individual Jew-
ish indemnification claims under
legislation negotiated by the con-
ferenc* and approved by th*
West German government.
In describing the annuity project.
Continued on Pag* 3-A
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Miami Leaders
Off to Assembly
Four Miami Jewish leaders are
planning to play major roles at
MM 28th General AsMimbir of the
Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds, it was announced
this week by Irving Kane, of
Cleveland. Council president.
The Assembly will take place in
Detroit at the Statler Hilton hotel
on Nov. 10 to 13.
Sam Heiman la scheduled to lead
a discussion on the role of tetter-
alion presidents.
Harold Thurman win be chair-
man of the Large City Budgeting
Conierence joint budget review
session, with representatives of
the National Jewish Welfare Board.
Stanley C. Myers expects to be
chairman of the Oneg Shabbat,
and Mrs. Myers will be the dis-
union opener at the workshop ses-
sion on the relation of Federations
to its agencies.
Other Miami Jewish leaders who
plan to attend the Assembly are
Dr. Morris Goodman, a former
CJA chairman: Mrs. Goodman,
chairman 1961 Women's Division:
Fred K. Shochet. publisher of The
Jewish Floridian: and Arthur S.
Rosichan. executive director of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed
eration.
Friday, Novemb^ 4
Record Number Will Vote Tuesday
A total of 407.888 Dade count- eral. Richard
lar.s are eligible to vote in na- Carl V
tional. stale, and local elections on
Ervin. Democrat. preme Court throuoK .
Winner jr.. Republican. ^*" conU.
I immmnq. THev will be joining some superintendent ot public Vice President. V7c3**l
80 muiion Americans across the schL'n>mR ".1l_ *\ Demo<:^ Candida.,. ml ^
W) million Americans across uir ----- -------- ......u.uuic- niav k.
nation ,n h.l i. preduted lo be ?"?'; ^J., ^"^ Pfct^ to sweep ,0 v.cto*\**&
. record turnout tor Election Day. K'P^l'ean: railroad and pub- been traditional throu^?^
Sreater Mlamians will be vot- 1C u'llUes commissioner Edin, bouihern states in tne ,' *
.,','.' ,,___i;jj Lee .Mason. Democrat. Victor A.
ing on a ballot listing 14 undecided R-m-hlman
contests, a. well as on six Florida Rul- "epuolicin.
constilutiiMial amendments.
Contests aro headed by the
Presidential race, featuring John
F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. John-
son, nominees of the Democratic
party, and Richard M. Nixon
and Henry Cabot Lodge, Repub-
licans. The Florida gubernator-
ial campaign pits Ferris Bryant,
Democrat, against George C.
Peterson, Republican.
IS
i
XvJGUST BROS. R>7
li t*< BEST *

Miami Beach Councilman
Harold B. Spaet was this
week elected president of the
Florida League of Municipal-
ities at a meeting of the
League in the George Wash-
ington hotel in West Palm
Beach. During the past year.
Spaet has served as first vice
president of the League and
president of the Dade League
of Municipalities. Spaet is
currently a candidate for the
new Metro seat of Miami
Beach.
State senator, 14th Senatorial!
District, Cliff Hen-ell, Democrat.
F.dythe Rogers. Republican: House
of Representatives. Group 1,1
George L. Hollohan. jr.. Demo-
crat. Thomas E. Walsh. Republi
can. House of Representatives.-
Group 2. David C. Eldridge. Dem
OCrat, William M. Porter. Republi-
can; House of Representatives,
Group 3. Carey Matthews. Demo-
crat. Albert E. Schrader. jr.. Re-
Other conies; s here include con- ] publican: County Board of Public
[ gressiuaal representative. Fourth Instruction at Large. Group 1, Jane
Congressional District. Dante B.'S. Roberts. Democrat. Bernard M.j
Fascell. Democrat. Hugh M. Tar- Shotkin, Republican: Board of'Pub-
taglia. Republican: secretary of lie Instruction-at-Large, Group 2J
state of Florida. Tom Adams. Dem- Jack D. Gordon. Democrat, and
ocrat. Percy \\ Thompson, Repub Arthur A. Atkinson. Republican,
lican: state treasurer. J Edwin
Larson. Democrat. Charles R. Uncontertad are 34 ether races.
AM llox
MEANS"
ACTION!
Phone FR 4-4151
We w.ni RM| Eue M
" Pi-Mr
CompariNv. bidding brin9, ,op9y
DAILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
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LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
NEW JERSEY a MmADELPHIA a BALTIMORE
ALBANY WASHINGTON a BOSTON
FBOVIDENCE aaa* all other ,.i.t. Weekly Service
fke Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
655 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Dial JE S-8353
1 Fischer. Republican: attorney gen-
Heiman Helps
Jax Jewish Drive
Sam J. Heiman. president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
visited Jacksonville last week to
assist Jewish leaders in organizing
the United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign there.
At a dinner meeting. Heiman con-
ferred with Alvin Leitman. local
campaign chairman and a number
of top businessmen.
Jacksonville s campaign kickolf
will take place next week with
Samuel H. Daroff of Philadelphia,
a national chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal, as guest speaker.
from Justice of the Florida Su-
<^i*y>
etcHCe
Prescription Specialists
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Friday. November 4, 1960
Jenisti fhrHitn
Page 3-A
Montreal Eyes Growing Nazi Party
Continued from Pag* 1-A
Canadians are members of minori-
ties and recognize the need for ac-
commodations between the various
groups. He said Jews were saved
Dr. Stanley Frehling, chairman of the Brandeis University Club
dinner honoring Pierre Mendes France at the Eden Roc hotel
on Nov. 21, shows dinner invitation to Edward Cowen as co-
chairman Harold Turk (left) and Mortimer Wien look on. The
black-tie affair will also feature Dr. Abram Sachar, president
of Brandeis University.
United Fund Kicks Off Drive
-"-it's United Fund time.
The public phase of the United
JTund 1961 campaign to raise S3.-
225.445 was officially kicked off
Tuesday.
Highlight of the day was an ad-
vance gifts dinner for donors of
$500 or more to the United Fund.
On Sunday, house-to-house vol-
unteer canvassers will begin
ringing doorbells and knocking
on doors for the housewives'
contribution. The money raised
is distributed to 54 health and
welfare agencies offering oVer
400 services to all residents of
Dad* county. Last year, 275,029
residents of Dade county were
aided by a United Fund agency.
In 1961. even more people of
the exploding Dade county popu-
lation are expected to be served
if the money need- are met.
Arthur J. Gucker, 1961 campaign
chairman, urged all citizens of
Dade county to contribute their
fair share to Che United Fond.
He also stressed the continuing
need for volunteers, who may re-
ceive information at the United
Fund at FR 7-2501.
Sheriff Kelly Gets Award
Sheriff Thomas J. Kelly received
the Good Government Award of the
i Junior Chamber of Commerce at
; a banquet Tuesday at the Biscayne
! Terrace hotel. Sheriff Kelly was
recognized by the Jaycees for his
j endeavors preceding and immedi-
ately following Hurricane Donna.
staWMwal
It 31
Horn* Owned
Horn* Operated
TERMITES? \
ROACHES? ANTS?
Safe, Positive Control With Every
Other Week Service For The Home
TRULY NOLEN ~
"Trie Sign of Good Housekeeping"
COSTS LESS THAN
YOU THINK
CALLFR 7-1411
reefer Mtaai't Law fest IxternhMrter
Nixon, Lodge
Promise Ties
Continued from Pea* 1-A
warm climate of friendship be-
tween our government and our
people and the government of Is-
rael and the people of Israel, the
tremendous financial assistance
which the State of Israel has re-
ceived during these past seven
and a half years these are only
a few examples of the spirit that
exists between our countries."
Lodge said he and Nixon were
"honored to have had a part in the
policies which, have meant so much
to Israel during these past seven
and a half years" and declared
"you can be sure that these evi-
dences of friendship and coopera-
tion will be continued by Mr. Nixon
and by me in case we shall be
chosen as your national leaders."
Meanwhile, Lodge said that the
United States should not support
the election of the United Arab Re-
public to a seat on the United Na-
tions Security Council.
The former head of the American
delegation to the United Nations'*
said in a Cleveland press confer-
ence, in response to a question: "I
have always taken the position that
nations should not be elected to the*
Security Council that are not con-
fined within United Nations resolu-
tions. 1 think if a member is go-
ing to be elected to the Security
Council, it ought to be in compli-
ance with United Nations resolu-1
tions."
Mr. Lodge pointed out the "the
UAR is not complying with United
Nations resolutions on the subject
of free navigation of the Suez
Canal" and declared that "there-
fore, I would not think we should
support the election of the UAR to
the Security Council." He said he
had no alternate candidate to the
UAR.
from absolute merger with Cana
da's dominant groups by their right
to religious and ethnic indepen-
dence within the common frame-
wockflf the-the search for freedom.
He said that the abilities of Cana-
dian Jews enable them to enter
either French-speaking or English-
speaking groups at will. He added
it was the task of cultural, business,
and political leadership to be aware
of excessive delays in the rise of
minority groups to full participa-
tion in Canadian life because of
prejudices.
He said the plan of minority
protection through laws and trea-
ties characteristic of other coun-
tries did not apply in Canada,
and the pressure of such groups
for full participation met resis-
I fance from the established dom-
j inent groups "which do not yet
see the new picture of Canada."
Prof. Salo Baron, of New York,
I said the interplay of Israel and the
lands of Jewish dispersion would
be a permanent aspect of the Jew-
ish scene for the indefinite future.
He said this could be beneficial to
the Jewish people and also to the
world at large.
Alan Bronfman, president of the
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew
University, told the delegates that
the Jewish people did not need an
Etchrnann trial to remind them of
atrocities. He said "our wounds-
are healing but will continue for
many more years. Who in their
nrinds or hearts can accept the
enormity of Germany's crimes
against Jewry?"
J DC Announces
Pilot Project
Continued from Page 1-A
Jordan said that estimated costs for
a first group of MX) men and wom-
en averaging 77 years of age would
be$250,00O.
T*e refugees to be benefitted live
in Italy, Austria, Germany, Spain,
and France. He said preliminary
tests of the idea had been carried
out in Italy by the intergovern-
mental committee for European
migration, the UN High Commis-
sioner, and the JDC.
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All your furniture, clothing,
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All proceeds go towards support of.
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Closed Saturdays
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SE3QUHRIUm TO
44


Pag 4-A
+Jmlsti thrkHan
Friday, November 4,
* Je wish Floridian
OFnCE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
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Published every Friday lnc-e 1Z7 by The lewlah FlorldUn
at 120 \" E. Sixth Street, Miami 1. Florida. Entered ai
aecond-rlaas matter July 4, 1930. at Post Office of Miami.
Florida, under the Act of March. 3. 1S7S.
The Jewish Floridian ha* absorbed the Jewish Unity and
SSSBM afjsjpjpjji
FRED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
(he week
.. as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
Engl
The Jewish Floridian docs nut Kuanamre Hie Kashrulu
nf the merchandise ndvert|ed In lt <-#.|timn*
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ISRAEL BUREAU
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AY U. BINDER----------------------Correspondent
One vr $5 00
Three Vesrs 10 00
Volume 33 Number 45
Friday, November 4, 1960
14 Heshvan 5721
Kennedy's
The Jewish Floridian endorses the candi-
dacy of Sen. John F. Kennedy in next Tuesday's
Presidential election.
It is not the general practice of this news-
paper to support individuals in political cam-
paigns. Where the importance of a race war-
ranted it, we have, in the past, editorialized on
the specific issues involved, motivated by the
belief that sound journalism must instruct as
well as report.
These columns have, however, on key
occasions departed from their regular editorial
custom, recognizing that the political arena in
a Presidential election year fastens upon the at-
tention of every American, no matter what his
laith.
In line with this, we are urging the support
of Sen. Kennedy's candidacy, for we believe
this is just such a key occasion.
Both Presidential hopefuls spotlight foreign
policy as the major issue in the present cam-
paign. We agree with them but go one step
further: It is our contention that foreign policy
has been a major issue all along particularly
in the 1952 and 1956 campaigns.
The 'Unfair' Charge Again
Since his capture, there have been all sorts
of unfounded rumors to prove the allegation
that Israel is not fit to try Adolf Eichmann.
Most of these rumors have dealt with the
physical mistreatment" the murderer of six
million Jews is being accorded.
Yet there is every evidence that Israel has
been scrupulous in every detail in the matter of
Eichmann's comfort and survival. Israel does
not seek mere retribution. The trial scheduled
to start early next spring has as its aim a world-
wide object lesson in moral human behavior.
Abuse of the defendant would certainly not
help to achieve this end.
In addition, Robert Servatius, his Cologne
attorney, is personification of Israel's intention
to be fair and impartial in matters of legal pro-
cedure. The special law passed by the govern-
ment to permit Eichmann to receive German
counsel is a case in point.
Servatius himself, attested to Eichmann's
well-being following the lawyer's first meetings
with his client.
The announcement this week that the Israel
Bar does not intend to act as advisor to Servatius
again raises the cry that the Nazi butcher is not
being treated fairly. Fact is that individual
Israeli attorneys have not been denied the priv-
ilege of offering assistance. It seems that the
critics of Israel all but expect Eichmann to be
released on technical grounds before they will
x>e satisfied.
They make no mention, however, of Eich-
mann s own method of dealing with those he
convicted of the crime of being Jewish in the
days when he stalked Europe.
Nasser's Role Exposed
If the reports ore true that the flow of Soviet
weapons to the United Arab Republic is increas-
ing and that Red China plans to use Egypt as
an arms dump." then the role Game! Abdel
Nasser played during his recent appearance at
ihe United Nations is a pure farce
Nasser had the gaul to offer himself as
mediator between East and West to urge the
adoption of an Africa-sponsored move that
Khruschev and President Eisenhower set aside
heir differences and resume the peace negotia-
Uons disrupted by the Soviet dictator before
they even got under way in Paris last June
Nasser's role as "neutral" and "peace-
loving seemed particularly irreconcilable with
his own refusal to meet Israel half-way
The arms reports this week indicate that
Nasser is becoming more and more enmeshed
in the Communist empire network. His jaunty
prancing about at the United Nations several
weeks ago is in retrospect an absurdity beyond
Insight into the Future
Over the past eight years, therefore, our
editorial columns -have drawn a clear record
of the nation's foreign relations with partic-
ular emphasis on the European and Middle
East scenes. And what the record shows is an
America less sparkling, less energetic, less cre-
ative than her role in world affairs currently
demands if we are to meet the challenge of
the future.
Sen. Kennedy speaks with persuasive in-
sight about that future. His experience in the
Senate as a member of the Foreign Relations
Committee naturally predisposes him to this
most important issue an issue with which
the next President of the United States will have
to deal vigorously and forthrightly.
The Democratic nominee's sense of history
is an indelible mark of his personality, which
lays emphasis on his hope for the manifest
destiny of the American people to be strong
and self-confident in the battle for freedom.
Sen. Kennedy's stance is one marked by
plan rather than platitude, by an emphasis on
specific detail rather than fine-sounding
"homey" phrases. In a world that increasingly
demands rigorous thought and national appli-
cation as a prerequisite for survival, he realis-
tically appraises our individual responsibilities
in the achievement of this end.
He does not tell us what we want to hear
to indulge us but what we should hear to
mobilize us. These and other of Sen. Kennedy's
attitudes, also demonstrated in his considera-
tion of such domestic problems as housing,
health, and education, commend Sen. Kennedy
as the voter's choice on Nov. 8.

Go to the Polls Tuesday
Many of the key issues of the present elec-
tion nationally, in Florida and Dade county
would be foreign to the ears of nations and
peoples abroad; for it is an incontrovertible fact
that a fair number of them don't even have the
right to express their political opinions via a
secret ballot.
All of us are privileged to do just that. It
is one of our guaranteed rights as free citizens
of the greatest democracy on earth.
Many of the oppressed nations and peoples
have already begun the battle for their liberty.
But others are a long way behind. They would
think us wasteful and irresponsible if we failed
to vote on Tuesday. They would think us un-
deserving of the privilege.
Exercise your democratic heritage. Disuse
of civil rights is a danger to freedom. Don't let
your community, your state, and your nation
down. Speak your mind at the polls on Nov. 8.
INTERESTING .bout thePres.
during (he week ^ISSSSg
dictable certainty. mJsHT
son never even managed
strike a telling blow iV S
^*Uk*tm miLiZ,*^;*
1956 at Miami Sprines vm
where Stevenson sat laboriously writing a foreign policy statem
publication in this newspaper a statment he refused to rcleasp T 'r
at the same time that he finished it. The reason for his sudden 0st
He didn't want to "embarrass" the Administration. sw'tch?
It seemed almost as if the writing of it were enough and i u ^
the feeling then that running for the Presidency was, in Mr Stev
eyes, also just enough. He never considered victory a rt^igtj^^'l
bility. Indeed, victory might well have overwhelmed him *"
But there is no such one-sided favorite in 1960 as Mr Fini,
proved to be in 1952 and 1956. Turning the tables in the present"
paign. Sen. Kennedy is peppering his rival with the will to win KclT'
did Mr. Nixon expect an easy time of it. He early warned the cno
leadership, adjusted to eight years of easy living and unaccusinm^.,
criticism, that this election effort would be a rough one And
ciscly here has lain the difference between the two candidate, ill?,"
thus far largely constitutes the Democratic margin of favor.
Sen. Kennedy launched his drive for the Presidency einppri
graceful in his onslaught against the Administration, careful to "a*
an attack that might be construed as disrespect of'Mr Eisenho
To the surprise of the nation, Mr. Nixon adopted a similarly delir?/""
stance but with a clearly different intent: to erase the dehawH
image of himself that is an inherent part of American public onink.
By the conclusion of their opening television debate, the Vice Present"
seemed cast in the role of gentle "yes-man." The propagandists V.
suits were devastating. re"
- :- .*.
making w ton tosr imt
BERHAPS THE GREATEST achievement of the Eisenhower Admin
istration has been its successful adaptation of Madison ave nublir
relations techniques to the grime of the political arena Mr Nix
inherited the hucksters' whitewash of his record as a dirty Butter
fighter. Emerged purified, the Republican Parsifal, he is now obliged
to face his admittedly formidable foe with a restricted choice of wea
pons at his command weapons not altogether familiar to him This
virtually means that the Vice President is fighting with one hand tied
behind his back.
Should he lose, the irony would lie in the fact that Mr Nixon's
new image was his last image; the Madison ave. that made him also
destroyed him. But it is clear that the Republican candidate under-
stands these things. The burden of gentleness is an almost unbearable
one and a far cry from the campaign he waged against Helen
Gahagan Douglas. If nothing else, his television debates with Sen
Kennedy indicate that he should never have acquisced to them A
blanket refusal at the outset, based on a politically sage unwillingness
to give free exposure to his relatively "unknown" opponent, would
have hurt Mr. Nixon less in the long run than his reeent decision to
refuse a fifth encounter.
All these odds against him, it should be expected that the final
days of the race will find the Vice President cautiously untying the
hand behind his back, poising it, and waiting to let fly a fist armed with
the cunning of the curbstone arena, where he is a proven master in
a last-minute effort to recoup what he lost on the forensic platform.
TNt MOTIVATION TO sVffTE A ICTtt
s^ORTIMER MAY, former president of the Zionist Organization of
America, has written me a letter from the Friends of Nixon and
Lodge headquarters in New York a letter marked by restrained
anger. Mr. May takes vigorous exception to my column of Sept. 30. in
which I appraised Ambassador Lodge's voting record at the United
Rations on Suez and Eichmann vis-avis Israel. But the bulk of Mr
May s reply does not touch upon this at all. What it does is to attempt
a confused defense of Vice President Nixon's visits at the Key Bis-
cayne hotel by drawing an even more confused parallel between these
visits and former President Truman's stay on the Keys last year.
vi- # .w I dec,ares "' an> wondering What you would say if
,^'t! j a record in matters Jewish like Joseph Kennedy
n,u C0"eludeLs w"h: we are not helping ourselves by con-
stantly regarding the Republican Party and its candidates as our foes
nf .v." e Democratic party as our constant advocate.-. This is
not the way to political security in the United States
v, !**" writ,n my column in The Jewish Floridian for many
years, touching on such issues as culture, history, problems of sur-
vival, music, art. literature, and the Zionist movement, among others.
r,LrKeTf 1" Z,onism- have been both its sharp critic and its
as nr^f"^ ,Vhe CCaSi0n 0f Mav's own two terms in office
* f, ,h,e Z0A' some of ,hese columns reached their most
n,, e" f Critical cmment. During all of this time, I have
to 7nv ^K a S'n*Ie oomment from him. pro or con, with respect
to any of these issues.
mhtJ!0 Scdd,en^'- COmes a leXter written by Mr. May. who complains
;"Tnmy- bept 30 co'umn. the substance of which he finds 'entirely
iTa^n,1" m6 ,0 d,scuss m dt'tail," but the posture of which he feels
is altogether incorrect.
-t-
43rd ANNIVERSARY 0E A LETTER
WHITEWASHING A tfCtfJ Of NON-ACNItYiMtNT
pERHAPS THE SHARPEST criticism I will ever be able to level
h*s taSfTLTL May is that l eould not move him to respond during
but th., ,r VS K?8ident of the Zionist Organization of America,
perhans hJEFff P'"iCal camPai8" Prom** him to react sharply;
KM r,S 'S H blique and a>t criticism of the ZOA, itself
mv Sent in a,,Sether wearying to report the substance of
mit m ;,S ? CXCept bv wav <* hyperthyroid generalization, per-
m,rl ,0.K,r"h,s weariness in kind. I do not intend to defend my
Sfes iXhh M, *?** and Mr- Nixon, none of which his letter
refu !ihpB r do ,he anRr>' letters of other Republican spokesmen
quole from anXCeW ",el1" me more abo"' Mr- Kennedy's father;
?s an arTn. n ass"sment of Lodge by Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver, who
as an S3 21 ^bUcan- take GOP credit for the opening of Elath.
"pedal assL, T J me tTom Moses Schonfeld. recently appointed
manages nealty t0 do C Republican candidate tor Vice President,
" ^worSi?7evSiVe *"?bit ot ** m*'* te te his ooening ne:
Party vouHn Z7 you"Ml to advance the interests of the Democratic
Patent nonsense "fffra*- Welfa^ of ,he Jewi,h Wle-" ^
the amnnitnl!,-! he k,.nd U gr0Ss P*a8an* thinking that exemplifies
otneJreason nl^'Sm fJ,he presenl Administration which, if for no
omer reason, needs repudiation.
bave no particular "z*ai" to advance the interests of either
Continued en Pat* *-A


Jfovember-4. 1960
'"'--------- i ----- --.....
K *.
+Je*isiifkr*m*rt
Page 5-A

ti
We Stand Today on the Edge of a New Frontier'
Needed Leadership
in the 60s
Our country must have vigorous, decisive leadership now. Our
economy cannot afford to remain stagnant. A "New Frontier"
awaits our people. Tomorrow promises an abundance of goods to
fill the needs of an expanding and employed population. Today, all
Americans pray for world peace to achieve these goals.
The future is here-the opportunity is now.
Our country, the world, demands a man who can provide imagina*
tive and aggressive leadership. Woodrow Wilson was one such mani
Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman were such men.
We, the undersigned, urge you to restore America to this great1
tradition!
VOTE FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL TEAM OF
JOHN F.KENNEDY/LYNDON B.JOHNSON
IU8INESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN AND WOMEN FOR KCNNSDV/jOHNSON
Stanley Andrews
Seorge Backer
Sam Belsky
Thomas Hart Benton
Harry Belafonte
Milton Berle
Theodore Bikel
Morris Black
William Bornstein
Moe Brody
Van Wyck Brooks
Or. Eugene Burdick
Sammy Cahn
Eddie Cantor
Rachel Carson
Jeff Chandler
A'bert E. Chisling
Joseph Cohen
Marc Connefly
Arthur J. Courshon
Jonathan Daniels
Befte Davis
Angier Biddle Duke
Irving M. Engel
David Emmer
Philip Evergood
Abraham Feinberg
Raymond E. Feiner
Paul A. Freund
Prof. John Kenneth Galbraith
Milton Gaynor
Jules Gillette
Ben Zion Ginsberg
William Goetz
Harry Golden
iack Gordon
Dr. Israel Goldstein
Edward Greenberg
Walter A. Gropius
Philip Hamburger
Lennie Hayton
Dan Herman
Harry Hershfield
Lena Home
Sol Hurok
Ernest Janis
Jack Kanter
Jack Katzman
George S. Kaufman
Nathaniel J. Klein
Philip M. Klutznick
Jack Korenblit
Max Krauss .
Arthur B. Krim
Prof. Harold Lasswell
Max Lerner
William Lescaze
Warner LeRoy
Louis Lipsky
George London
Myrna Loy jj.
Robert M. Maclver
Elaine Malbin
James Michener
Hans Morgenthau
Paul Muni
Paul Newman
Reinhold Niebuhr
Clifford Odets
Judge Isaac Pacht
Shad Polier
Jack S. Popick
Earl Portnoy
Louis Reinstein
Quentin Reynolds
Judge Simon H. Ri
Eugene V. Rostow
W. W. Rostow
Maurice Samuel
Dore Schary
Nat Serota
Roger H. Sessions
Lillian Smith
Dr. Benjamin Spock
Abe Stark
Dewey D. Stone
Louis Untermeyer
Selman A. Waksman
Robert Penn Warren
Sidney Wasserman
Prof. Jerome B. Weisner
Jerome Wiedman
fkindShelley Winters
Prof. Jerrold R. Zacharias
Paid l-ol. Ad*;


Page S-A
+Jmlsl>RarA0M7
Friday, November 4. I960
UTTER TO THE EDITOR -
AJCongress Defends Press Survey
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In the interest of fair play, I
hope you will permit me to reply
to Leo Mindlin's column of Oct.
21 taking issue with a number of
points contained in the American.
Jewish Congress summary of press
coverage in the Miami religious
practices case.
(Mr. Mindlin concedes this to be
a "well-founded assertion ''
2) Editorial comment expressed
oo opinion for or against either
side in the case. (The Herald called
the memorandum but overlooked
by Mr. Mindlin in his column. Mr.
Mindlin admits the statistics but
asserts that. letters from Jews
should be disqualified in any such
After all of Mr. Mindlin's sound and to guarantee a calm and fair
and fury, these facts remain veri-
fied and admitted by your column
ist:
1) News coverage of the trial by
Miami dailies was eminently fair
interest in the, trial "a healthy reckoning. Way should, they? Are;
sign" and the issue."the lofty kind|Jews not part of the community?
which fired the founding fathers to, Would he have disqualified Rabbi,
eloquence." The News stressed the Tibor Stern's statement publicly
need "to guard against a circus {opposing the Jewish plaintiffs
decision.")
3) Letters to the editor ran ap-
or In* own commeuu against the,
advisability of the litigation in
any accounting of how the com-
proximately 50-50. The authority j munity in its totality felt about the
for this is Luther Voltz, in charge lease?
of letters to the editor for the Mi-
and gave both sides of the picture ami Herald, a fact mentioned in
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: .Court in a criminal case, unlike
I a civil case, would still have juris-
1 read with much interest in The dic(ion over nis person, as long as
Jewish Floridian of Oct. 14 where hc was physically present at the
the Eichmann defense attorney, trial"
Hubert Servatius. of Germany, stat-
ed that while he had "full conti- With respect to the right of
dence" in Israeli courts, he would Eichmann to select counsel outside
have "preferred an international, ol Israel. I point out the treatment
court to try my client."
Mr. Mindlin next speaks of
"bold headlines that chronicled
the day-by-day occurrences in i
the religion-in-the-schools hear-
ing and their destructive mean- j
ing to Greater Miami Jewry."
The astute reader will not eas-
ily be led into agreeing that
"bold headlines" must of neces- I
sity hav*. a "destructive mean-
ing" to Greater Miami Jewry. By
what process of reasoning, by
accorded Francis Gary Powers.! what feet of mental.agility doe*
i pilot of our U-2 Plane, which was j Mr. Mindlin take this giant step?
Much has been said and written shot down over Russia. He had to. We are in doubt, for he offers
regarding the manner in which: stand trial as a spy against the no clue. Perhaps a study of the
Eichmann was captured in Argen-1 Soviet Union in Moscow without
tina. and taken to Israel, the right j the benefit of an American Jawyer
ol Israel to try him and his right! t0 defend him. As the Miami News
to the selection of a defense at. pointed out in an editorial on Aug.
lorney, who is not a member of g of tnis year, courtrooms without
the Israeli Bar.
For the interest of your read-
ers. I would like to point out two
United States cases recently
mentioned in the New York
Times which justify Eichmann's
capture, *n4 the right of Israel
to try him. In one case, the Unit-
ed States Supreme Court upheld
the conviction by the State of
Michigan of an Illinois resident
who claimed that, while he was
living in. Illinois, "Michigan of-
ficers forcibly seised, handcuff-
ed, blackjacked and took him to
Michigan." The Supreme Court
ruled: "This Court has never
departed from the rule an-
nounced in Ker v. Illinois, 119
U. S. 436, that the power of a
Court to try a person for crime
is not impaired by the fact that
he had been brought within the
Russian defense lawyers The
Russians are no more obliged to
permit an American lawyer to de-
fend an American in their court-
rooms than we are to permit a
Russian lawyer to defend a Rus-
sian in ours."
As a matter of feet, just the
other week-an American by the
name of Fuller was shot down
by Castro's Cuban firing squad
while hit American family and
the U.S. Government stood by
powerless to do anything about
the situation.
Getting to the point, the sover-
eign powers of each nation per
"bold headlines" might improve
our understanding. Here is,, a
selection of some of the,, "bold.
headlines" frotn which Ma, Mind-
lin apparently shrinks:
Bible Case Judge lectures Youth on "Un
truth" (Herald. July 22)
Six Days Set to Hear Out Bible Suit (Her-
aid. July 23)
Pastor Says Lord's Prayer is Sectarian
(Ne.ws.JuJ* 21)
Students in Dade Hear Prayers. Educator
Testifies (Herald. July 20)
Bible in-School Foes Get 3 More Days
(News. July 22)
2 Students Testify Religious Activities
Were Required (Herald, July 21)
Angel Story Hurl Gwl, Agnostic Tells Court
(Herald, July 19)
Time Runs Out For Bible 'Foes' (News.
July 20)
"Bap School Reljgion" Plea Going to Court
(News. July IS)
Bible Trial Spectator Winds Up a Witness
(Herald. July 19)
mit It to make and enforce all j.wjsh G,r| ,, Offended By Prayers (News.
laws within its borders. Conse-
quently, in this instance, the Is-
July 19)
As the author of the memoran-
- right to hold and try Eichmann, *um, >yng press coverage of
Court's jurisdiction by reason of and is being extremely generous lhe t"1' \Te^ ,hf* cannot *>
e 'forcible abduction'." in permitting this Nazi butcher to Mr Mindlin in his Herculean leap
. ,. ,. select German defense counsel.!1/0"1 reading these headlines to
J'1,"' CiT ?k ,S.Vehrn' Based on precedent, this is some- deDlorin8 lh,'r "destructive mean-
S r,Ph? ,l""' hfnl' h3S thing to which he ,s not particular- |ln* < Greater Miami Jewry"
the right to try a Communist spy ,-.i j
allegedly kidnapped on foreign ter- emll,ea- ""egret too, that Mr. Mindlin.
ritory with American connivance bA,w '' 5,LVE,C:presumably because of a lack of
Morton Sobell. arguing that he had _________________MiasBJ__________I space, neglected to tell his read-
been so kidnapped in Mexico,'
claimed that "his conviction would,
be a nullity if it were proved that
the Government thus secured jur-
isdiction over his person in viola-1
tion of United States law and in-
ternational agreement. The Qoy-I
eminent answers that, even if Unit-j party I may show inclination to-
ed States officials had participated1 ward an individual candidate, but
in Sobell's alleged kidnapping, the ihat is my prerogative as an Amer-
ican much as Mr. May's is to
speak up in behalf of Mr. Nixon.
On what basis does he presume to
THE WEEK... US I SEE II
Continued from Page 4-A
FRENCHY R. MARSAN
SOD FOR SALE
560 N.W. 79th STREET
PL 7-7471
EVENINGS PL 1-7738
Oct. 24 has gripped my imagination
with such positive force, that I am
now phoning all my friends and
asking them to use Burma Shave."
Or I might, alternatively, observe:
"Dear Mr. May: It is the anti-intel
lectualism your letter reflects in
ers of some of the other highlights,
in the memorandum which dealt
with press coverage ,of the trial-
not only in Miami but around the
nation. For example, he might
have cited the editorial, in the,
--Jlicbigaa Catholic" lotfigjaj D10-.
cesan newspaper of Detroit) stat-
ing that "We believe that beth in
law and in natural justice J.ne sec-,
ularists in tbe Florida matter have
the stronger case." He might ha\e
quoted the editorial in.the "Chris-,
tian Century" (influential. lnterde-.(
nonunational Protestant weelfrly)
stating that "We hope Protestants
have the grace to acknowledge .thai,
they have been in the wrong and
the will to find legal ways to give
the religious instruction which is
the right of every child."
He might have mentions*! the
near-unanimous Support of,, thou
case in the Anglo-Jewish press
around the country. He might ,
even have been neighborly
enough to quote "Our Voice," of.
West Palm Beach, which wrote
'that "for stepping into the Dade
county case, the American Jew-,
ish Congress merits' the highest
praise, for the issue gee* to
the.very root of our democratic
process,"
However, the memorandum was,
guilty for attributing to Mr. Mind-
lin a statement in the editorial col-
umn of The Floridian expressing
ambivalence on the case. Apologia*
are offered herewith for what we.
hope will be considered an, under*
standafele error. It is good to .know
that Mr. Mindlin is neither ambi-
valent nor inconsistent in his opm-
ion of the case. It is good .to know,
too. that his suggestion that the
suit should have been filed ."in a
more favorable climate"" is not
shared by The Jewish Floridian.
For its editorial endetaeetent
of the principle for which the
American Jewish Congress is
fighting es "a just one," and.for
its wish that the AJCongress ac-
tion were "joined by the other
Jewish defense agencies end Jew-
ish community organs of civic
expression," the American. Jew-
ish Congress is grateful to The
Jewish Floridian. If the Jewish
community in general and Mr.
Mindlin in particular paid closer
heed to The Jewish Floridian ed-
itorials, things might be
all around.
One final quotation may be of!
some significance. In reviewing the ,
trial after it had been suspended!
for oil heating
SOS
(Service Or Sales)
call SOS
(Siegel Oil Service)
As near as your phonea
modern, completely equip*
ped SIEGEL service truck
and trained, experienced
mechanics. Don't put it off
be Winter-ready nowl
because ol a death in the family
of the presiding judge, the Miami
News (July 24*. made this com.
meat:
"While amateur legal opinions
could, be picl^ed. up .pn any Dade
cui-pStoriaH rnosf observers' werT
thankiul the issue was being set.
tied m a court of law,"
If. this be "destructive'' of Great-
er Miaou Jewcy, let Mr. Mindim
make the most of it.
RlCHAiD.-COHJigW,
Dtreciax otJsaj*ic Relation*
Aaneaucen Jewish Congress
Neay.Yeck.Crty
Ro+b, W.wm is Goes!
"Still Small Voice." television
program sponsored by the Rabbin-
ical Assn. of Ureater Miami, will be
hosted by Rebbi Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader, of In* Israelite
Center, on Sunday, 10 a.m., over
WCK.T ch. 7. Guest will be Rabbi
Alfred Waxman, of Temple Zion,
in a discussion of "Development of
Judaism,"
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challenge mine except his aston-i the present Administration that
i-hinu bit about 'political security," urges me to sense the need for a]
which is an altogether massive as-
sault against everything that
shapes the democratic traditions of
this nation, and are an absurdity
coining from a Zionist?
e
I might calmly reply in this fash-
ion: "Dear Mr May: Your letter of
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change. Since change would mean'
at repudiation of the Ad,mlnistra
tion. it is for this reason mainly
that the GOP suggests there is lit-1
tie difference between the candi j
dates, knowing full well there is a '
ureat difference. A Nixon victory-
is an absolute prerequisite to a
whitewash of the Eisenhower 'tab
ula rasa.' On the other hand, a
Kennedy victory is an absolute pre-
requisite to a return of the Amer-
ican image. And images are some-
thing the Vice President certainly
understands."
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Friday, November
+Jewisti fk>ridHrri
Page 7-A
New Temple Menorah Social Hall Will
Be Dedicated in Ceremonies Sunday
afford the community at large
an efficient library service.
I
Members of the executive board oi the Stale
of Israel Bonds-meet in joint session with the
Exodus Diplomatic Ball commillee to make
Kennedy, Kixon, Mrs. FDR are Added
To Committee for 'Ewdtw' Bait Here
plans for the upcoming
Fontainebleau hotel.
event Dec. 3 at the
Sen. John F. Kennedy. Vice Pres-
ident Richard Nixon, and Mrs. Elea-
nor Roosevelt head the distinguish-
ed list of prominent national and
local personalities serving on the
honorary committee for the "Ex-
odus" Diplomatic Ball,
The formal ball, which will be
the concluding function of the State
of Israel Bond drive this season.
idians on the list include Sena-
tor* George A. Smathers and
Spessard L. Heiiand, Representa-
tives D. R. Maihews and Dante
Fascell, Attorney General Rich-
ard Irvin and Supreme Court Jus-
tice Elwyn Thomas.
Locally. County Commissioners
Robert Haverfiel.i. Charles "Chuck"
is scheduled, for Dec. 3 in the Grand j """ an,d Arthur Patten. Surfside
Ballroom of the Fontainebleau ho-
tel.
Heading the honorary committee
is former Ambassador James G.
McDonald, who served as first Unit-
ed States .representative to Israel.
Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins, who
Mayor Irving Schulman and the
Reverend Mother Mary Gerald of
Barry College are serving.
Ambassador McDonald pointed
out that the committee is still in
formation, and a number of addi-
tional names are anticipated.
This year, the ball is tied in
last year served as honorary cha.r- wilh ,he opcning of lhc fjlms ..Ex.
man. is on the committee once,odus.. (he screen versjon of Leon
aKa,n- ; Uris' famed novel about the birth
of the State of Israel.
Admission to the ball is limited
to purchasers of $1,000 bonds. Res-
ervations are $15 per plate, and
this sum includes a ticket for one
of the opening nights of "Exodus."
The film is scheduled to open on
Dec. 21 at the Sheridan Theater.
Serving with these well know
leaders arc senators and repre-
sentatives from. 23 states. Flor-
Wemderfut break is now avail-
able to anybody -who trtiye Liv-
ing Insurance of H,000 or
more. A result of Equitablr'l
*0tr (Traded premium system.
Solid savings. Sound insurance.
Cell:
SIONfY S. KRAEMER
LIFE UNDERWRITER
FR 1-5691 UN 6-1875
Powers Flight
On TV Special
A minute-by-minute chronology
of Francis Gray Powers' ill-fated
U-2 flight over the Soviet Union
earlier this year, whieh will dis-
close hitherto unrevealed facts
about the incident, is the first in
a series of six "NBC White Paper"
television specials.
The program will be telecast by
WCKT ch. 7" on Tuesday, Nov. 29,
10 to 11 p.m. Irving Gitlin, execu-
tive producer, will supervise the
series, with Albert Wasserman as
producer. The first program, titled
'The U-2 Affair," will also deal
with the collapse of the summit
talks and Powers' subsequent trial
by a Soviet court.
Chet Huntley will be narrator
of the series.
Complete and Dependable Tlile Service
IAMI TITLE
34 YEARS Of TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TIRE INSURANCE
Title Insvraace Polities el
Kansas City Title lr.swa.ee Ce.
Capital, Surplus t leservts
Exceed iSflOeflO*
124 SIC WITT TRUST BUrlDING and
134 NX H"fT STRKT
TEIEPHONE FReaklla 3-4432
personalized serici at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
24-hour service except rosh hashono and yoin kippur
Miami Hebrew Courses
Milton Weiner. president of Mi-
ami Hebrew Congregation, an-
nounces that a program of adult
education will be held at the con-
gregation under the guidance of
Rabbi Abraham Levitan.
Classes will be held Thursdays,
beginning Nov. 10, at 8 p.m.
Courses offered this semester are
"Basic Judaism as Defined by the
Bible and Interpreted by the Tal-
mud" and "Biblical Commentaries."
Newly-constructed Social" Hall of.
] Temple Menorah, formerly North
Shore Jewish Center, will be dedi-l
c;itfd Sunday evening at a dedica-,
tion banquet, Maurice Revitz, pres-
ident announced.
Highlighting the dedication cere-
monies will be the unveiling of
a bronze plaque as a tribute to
members of the Conservative con- the growth of the Temple in words
gregation whose pledges made pos- and music.
ible the building of the Social Hall. \ _
The Social Hall, which has a seat-
Rabbi Mayer Abramowi'.z, spiri- ing capacity of 750, was designed
tual leader, will officiate at the by architect David Leslie, and con-
ceremony and pay tribute to the structed by David Rothlein, Inc.
congregation leaders who, "despite ____________
the many difficulties, have helped
make the Youth Center a reality." i Surfside Officials at Confab
Revitz is chairman of the dedi-
cation banquet, which will feature
dancing to the orchestra of Arne
Barnett and entertainment by Pat-
sy Abbott, well-known comedienne.
The Temple's "Menorah Players"
will present a musicale, tracing
Constructed at a cost of over
a quarter of a million dollars, the
new social Hall has fully equip-
ped stage and catering facilities.
To serve the young people of
the community, a spacious Youth
Lounge, club rooms and nursery
room are incorporated in the
new building. A library room
with a S.OOObook capacity will
Surfside town officials are at-
tending the 34th annual convention'
of the Florida League of Munici-
palities this week in West Palm.
Beach. Heading the Surfside dele-
gation are Mayor Irving Shulman,
Councilman Louis Hoberman and.
Sydney King. Judge Louis Stall-
man. Town Manager Fred Bowen,
and Town Atly. Frank Kelly.
Take A Second
A logical interest for all of us is put ting, our money to
work where it can earn the highest- possible return, and there
can be no argument against such a purpose. But, if you are
not one of those in the fortunate position of being able to
accept possible losses-without regret, their. your first
concern should be the safety of your money.
It is not our intention to disoourage proper and worthwhile
investment*, but wedo believe that any proposed investment
requires a second look. The New York Stock Exchange warns
prospective investors to ."Investigate before you invest!"'
. which is a commendable suggestion that should apply to
ah1 forms of investing. Get rich quk-k ideas that really fulfill
dreams of wealth are not generally offered to the public.
So, we say, TAKE A SfiCOND LOOK! Your funds in a
Dade Federal Savings account are insured to $10,000 by the
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, Washing-
ton, D. G., and earn dividends for you twice-a year at the
current rate of 4% per annum.
\ If the promise of a little higher earnings may prompt you
to send your money elsewhere, TAKE A SECOND LOOK!
Will your investment carry a risk you can't afford to take7
Will it have insured protection through an- agency of. our-
Federal Government, or just a promise of safety? Does it help
keep your community growing and prosperous by creating
employment; new services and provide home* for present andl
new residents? Ad, does that extra, return you hare- in
mind offset the advantage of having your hard-earned money
close at hand and readily available to you when you want-
it? .. These advantages Federal Savings Account.
:
OPEN er ADD
to Veer Dode
Federal Savings
Account by
Thursday, NOV.
roth list
rsr.l TRANSFER OF FUNDS FRtM
ANY POINT IN THE U.S.A.
Dade Federal maliai no charge
for thi service.
'One o' fhe N-.tlio "
Old. ,1 a
]Dade Federal
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e MAIN OFFICE101 East FlegUi Street
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NORTH MIAMI BRANCH-12370 N.W. 7th Avenue
OUR RESOURCES EXCEED IS5 MILLION DOLLARS


Page 4-A
Page 8-A
* Jewish f1crkk*n
Friday. November 4, \%n
About Bigotry in American Elections
\
By HARRY SIMONHOFF
Minority groups are watching
Ihe Presidential election with
interest. To them, John F. Kenne-
dy is a symbolic figure. They ex-
UTience a sense of "elation at the
prospect of a member of a mi-
nority religion reaching out for
the Presidency. But they also suf-
fer from a certain frustration on
hearing about the bigotry and
hate unleashed against a candi-
date on account of the religion
he professes.
Each minority is inclined to
think that it alone has encounter-
ed the tyranny of the majority.
Few Jews realize that when the
Federal Constitution was draft-
1 Catholics were permitted to
vote only in Maryland. Delaware,
and Pennsylvania. Compared
with the treatment meted out to
Catholics at various times in the
United States, the Jewish minor-
ity, by no means secure from
harassment, has almost enjoyed
a picnic.
The colonists brought over from
England their hatred of "Pop-
cry," a vulgarism commonly
used in the 17th and 18ih cen-
turies. The laws of few Colonies
permitted t h e settlement of
Catholics. These restrictions and
cisabilities recall the treatment
of Jews in Europe for 1,000 years.
English Catholics were arrested
and fined for not attending Prot-
estant services, for keeping arms
in their homes, for educating
their children abroad, for using
schoolmasters of their own faith,
for making converts, for burying
the dead in their own church-
yards.
To ease these burdens Lord
! more founded Maryland as
a Catholic refuge. The liberal
r permitted the entrance
(i other Christian denominations,
which soon became strong
1 h to abolish for a time the
voting franchise <>t "Papists.
The founding lathers, includ-
ing George Washington, were In-
clined to give no sanction tn big-
otry, 'ihe Constitution guaranteed
every one freedom to worship in
his own fashion. Yet hatred of
Catholicism continued to flour-
ish. Resentment against Irish
immigrants was especially vici-
ous. In 1834, the lirsuline Con-
vent of Charlestown, Mass.. was
burned by a mob, with the author-
ities and police looking on. No
one was convicted except a boy.
whom the Governor immediately
pardoned.
Violence and Bloodshed
In Philadelphia, native Prot-,
? slants made furious attacks upon
Irish neighborhoods. The Mili-
tary and Marines were called out
to protect life and property. Riots
lasting for days resulted in blood
shed and loss of life to both
Uncle ltd gave the best weO-
ding- preeetit, tool A mow Liv-
ing: Inruraaee policy from
Eq*itable that permita the -
twity-tw<-year-old groom o
got more insurance in the fu-
ture regardless of his health at
that time. No physical exam,
?io questions aiked. For infor-
mation, call The Equitable
J-ife Assurance) Society of the
United States.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
LIFE UNDERWRITER
FR 1-5691 UN 6-1875
245 S.E.- 1st StreetMiami, Fla.
HARRY SIMONHOff
sides. Fire consumed 54 homes.
Irish stores were rilled. Catholic
churches and school houses, a
seminary, library, and priest's
dwelling were all burned to the
ground.
Cannon had to be posted in the
streets, and soldiers ordered to
tire on mobsters before order
could be restored. Murder and
anarchy, pillage and arson broke
out in New Y 0 i" k. Baltimore,
Brooklyn, Buffalo, Louisville.
Kentucky, Sidney, O., Bath and
Bangor. Me.
"For 48 hours," a St. Louis
newspaper reported, "the city
has been the scene of one of the
most appalling riots that has ever
taken place in the country. Men
have been butchered like cattle,
property destroyed, and anarchy
reigned supreme The military
and police have thus far been un-
able to check the onward march
of lawlessness and crime."
The public was now in a recep-
tive mood for a series of trashy
books, calculated to inflame anti-
Catholic passions. The vilest
creed among them was "Awful
Disclosures Of Maria Monk. As
Exhibited In A Narrative Of Her
Sufferings, During A Residence
Of Five Years As A Novice. And
During Two Years As A Black
Nun. In The Hotel Dean Nunnery
At Montreal.*' People swallowed
greedily the salacious details of
orgies in convents, with priests
participating, of young nuns dis-
appearing in mysterious subter-
ranean passages, their babies de-
stroyed in quicklime.
At the invitation of the Bishop,
representative Protestants of New
York went to investigate the Mon-
treal Convent and interview 21-
year-old Maria Monk, already on
the road to infamy and prostitu-
tion. But the public paid little
attention to their objective report
which branded the infamous book
a pack of lies. Aroused emotions
seldom listen to the voice of rea-
son.
The upper level of intolerant
Protestant nativists received in-;
tellectual stimulus from the in-
ventor of the telegraph. Samuel
F. B. "Morse, open-minded to sci-
entific investigation but a bigot;
in religious and social thinking, 1
wrote a book that repeated every |
libel and slander leveled against |
the Church of Rome since the Re-|
formation. The prestige of the;
great inventor gave authority and,
credence to his "Foreign Con-1
spiracy Against the Liberties of!
the United States." The situaj
tion was now ripe for politicians
to exploit public gullibility. Re-
ligious prejudice galvanized polit-
ical action.
The American Party
Out of the moribund Whig Par-
ty, the Grand Council of the Unit-
ed States of North America
arose. A secret organization, it
had the ritual, grips, passworo
and oath always dear to Ameri-
can yoRflry. Members invariably
answered all questions "1 don't
know." Branded "Know Noth-
ings." they battened onto the
puerile need of belonging to a
secret band. They stirred up the
dormant instincts of native big-
otry against "Romanism;" they
would have had the gates of
America closed to large scale
immigration; they sought to im-
pose a 21-yoar wait for citizen-
ship; they preached the dogma
of hate toward the alien.
Coming out openly as the Amer-
ican Party, they mushroomed
rapidly and elected governors
and congressmen. In 1855. .New
York. Massachusetts, Ohio and
Connecticut legislated some spiWr
ful anti-Catholic measures. Back-
ing Millard Filmore for the Pre*
idency, they piled up 814.534
votes and lost.
There is no telling into what
depths fanaticism and intolerance
would have plunged the nation
had the temper of the times not
veered towards abolishing sl.iv
ery and preserving the Union.
Know Nothingism was checked
and soon drowned in the titantic
blood bath of Civil War. The two
subsequent anti Catholic move-
ments of A.P.A. and K.K.K. nev-
er attained the hysteria or mo
mentum of Know Nothingism.
Had the warped, narrow heads
prevailed, the American Union
would have congealed into a pro-
vincial ochlocracy, with an es-
tablished church, closed to the
surge of vast immigration that
enabled the United States to be-
come the leading world power
within a century.
'Living Hebrew1 Resumes on TV
"Living Hebrew," television 1
broadcast sponsored by the Bu-1
reau of Jewish Education for the
third year, is scheduled for Thurs-
day evenings from 6:30 to 7 p.m.,!
beginning Nov. 10 over Station!
WTHS ch. 2.
This year, "Living Hebrew" will
attempt a more functional ap-
proach to the teaching of the He-
brew language. The program will
deal with a vocabulary of Jewish
life, explore the growth of the lan-
guage, grammatical structure, pho-l
Federation Bldg.
To be Dedicated
Dedication of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation CJA bldg. will
be held on Sunday, Nov. 27.
The central Jewish fund-raising
and community planning agency,
now in its 23rd year of operation,
moved into its permanent head-
quarters in June.
Acquistion of the site followed
several years of search by a per
mancsol headquarters committee
of Federation headed by Stanley
C. Myers, chairman.
Fred K. Shochet, publisher of
The Jewish Floridan, found and
recommended purchase of the
building at 1317 Biscayne blvd.
Sam J. Heiman, president of
Federation, said that an Open
House celebration will follow the
dedication cermonies.
netic reading, and Hebrew term-
inology involved in the Jewish fes-
tivals.
Instructor for the 19 broadcasts
will be Louis Schwartzman, now
serving for the 11th year as ex-
ecutive director of the Bureau of
Jewish Education of Greater Mi-
ami.
The Bureau's special television
committee includes Dr. Nathaniel
Soroff, Herbert Berger, Mrs. Mir-
iam Anisfeld, Mrs. Fay Feinstein,
Gregory Rosenkranz, who provides
the art material for the program.
Benjamin Udoff, and Schwartz-
man.
NEW YORK CITY
for important business
and leisurely pleasure
TIMES SQUARE
Dor 'round-thfc\ac\ entertainment
and ci'.y-u'ide Convenience
HOTR WOODSTOCK
* for to/v/hgiit tuvommodaDoHS
O sfftttt
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129 WEST 43 ST.
for full color brochure
W.,U.: U-U SwUw $10. $13
JUDSON 2-5000
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z E&BB9PS
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and your old tire regardless of condition
EASY CREDIT
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Friday. November 4, 1960
*hnistifhridicnn
Page 9-A
WHY NIXON-LODGE?
BECAUSE
We unequivocally believe with
perfect faith the following to be true:
THIS PICTURE WAS TAKEN OF NIXON AS DINNER HOST TO
BEN-GURION IN WASHINGTON, D.C., AT VICE PRESIDENT'S HOME
We, the undersigned, solely concerned for the best
interest of our beloved country, urge you to give
these 10 points your earnest consideration and are
certain that if you do so, you and your friends will
vote for Nixon and Lodge.
"-
1 Barney Balaban Ralph Spero
Abraham Goodman Benjamin Zimmerman
* -Mortimer May Helen Hoffman
Mendel Sihrerbera Paul R. Gordon
Robert Saltaan Home Gordon
Judae Harry A. Grsenberg L C. Greenberq
BJmiilii Bronston Morris Hoffman
Leo Robinson Leon J. HI
Sidney Anein
|. We concur in President Eisenhower's statement,
quote: "Nixon and Lodge are the BEST QUAL-
IFIED and PREPARED men for their respective offices
that have ever been presented by either parly
throughout the history of the United States."
2. Mr. Nixon will bring to the Presidency the same
zeal, vigor and dedication that has made him
the most active Vice President in the history of our
country.
;|. Mi. Nixon's record is one of ACCOMPLISHMENT
AND ACTION. Our future desperately requires
this type of efficiency and dynamic personal leader-
ship, seasoned and deliberate.
/j. Mr. Nixon and Ambassador Lodge have been
constant fighters for Civil Rights and against
discrimination in government contracts and service,
and their records disclose that they have acted in be-
half of Civil Rights and not just talked about it.
5. We believe that the election of Nixon and Lodge
will keep Mr. Eisenhower close to the Adminis-
tration as an advisoi on our mi'itary needs, keeping
us strong, without needlessly allowing to spend our-
selves into economic exhaustion and thereby lose
our struggle even before we have a need to use our
military defensive power.
|J# We believe that the election of a Democratic
Administration at this time will create a political
interlude that might expose us to dangerous inter-
national conseguences.
&m We believe that a change of Administration and
the fear of a "give away" program, and infla-
tionary policy, will UNDERMINE THE CONFIDENCE
OF CAPITAL AND INDUSTRY FOR EXPANSION,
which is absolutely necessary if our economy is to
grow, and may cause a depression that could be
more harmful to our welfare and international
prestige than any Communist propaganda.
M| The record shows that Mr. Nixon and Ambassa-
dor Lodge AFFIRMATIVELY BELIEVE that
Israel is not only here to stay, but that it is to the
best interest of the United States that she be kept
strong and helped economically, and that she is
a Democratic outpost in a despotic desert area.
i|# How can we believe Kennedy? He says that
he is concerned with the aged, yet, as a
member of the Subcommittee on the Problems of the
Aged, he failed to attend any of the 20 meetings
that Subcommittee held since its inception. He
claims to be a "liberal" now, but in an article by
Healy in the Saturday Evening Post. 1956, with
respect to accusations that Jack Kennedy was not
a true "liberal" (Burns, pp 134-5), lack Kennedy said.
"I would be very happy to tell them that I am not
a liberal at all. I never joined the Americans for
Democratic Action or the American Veterans Com-
mittee. I AM NOT COMFORTABLE WITH THOSE
PEOPLE."
|0. Kennedy promises everything to everybody,
but performance is something else, and it is
just as likely that he will emulate the Labor Party of
England and repudiate his platform plank vis-a-vis
Israel, and follow the dictates of Senator Fulbright,
Democrat, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Com-
mittee.
Pd. Pol. Adv.


I
Paqe 10-A
+ Jen 1st flcriifiar?
Friday, November 4, I960
Miamian Gets Civil Defense Award
A Miamian is one of three den-
tists across the nation to receive
an.award for outstanding contribu-
tions in the field of non-military
defense.
He Ls Pr. Will. >.m M. Schiff, o\
5l5?Cfc 15th%t..'te^etia,n'\Vay: "
The three dentists were joined
by 59 physicians nurses, hospital
administrators and nuclear sciert
tlsts who received similar citations
given by the Pfizer Pharmaceuti-
cal Co. at a recent, convention of
the United States Civil Defense
Council held recently in Minnea-
polis with the medical health com
mittee of the organization.
One other Dade countian was
similarly honored: Mrs. Martha
Wolfe, of the D;.(Jt Civil Defense
USCDC is the overall body ot
c:>-county Civil Defense directors,
vho annually mee' to discuss the
latest developments In chemical,
biological, and radiological war-
fare potential, and to receive a
thorough analysis of the mobiliza-
tion program of the L'nite.i Slates
Public Health Service.
Dr. Schiff, Miamian for over
2C years, and a graduate of Mi-
ami Beach Senior High School
and the University of Miami'
has a long and impressive rec-
ord in local Civil Defense activi-
tie*. Currently, he is setting up
a CD emergency plan for dentists
of the Ml. Sinai Hospital staff to
assist physicians in the event of
disaster.
"Should a Iart,e city like ours be:
the target of an atomic attack. |
there will be thousands of casual-
tics requiring immediate care to
prevent death. Certainly, at the
time of such catastrophe, dentists
the largest and most available
group with a thorough training in
th< medical sciences and then-
practical experience in handling
patients in pain." ,
Dr. Schiff received his own
dental degree from Ohio State
University. A 15-year member
of Temple Israel, he was active
for a time in the Men's Club of
the Temple and Couples Limited.
He lives with his wife, Trudi,
and children, Carol, It, and John,
8, at 236 Candia avo.. Coral Ga-
bles. "
He jv, a member of the Florida
State Dental Society and East
Coast Denial Society
committees. He was
five ycarS of the dn
society Civil Defense committee, (
Civil Defense Council in the Hos.
pital Medical Division.
lie is the author of "The Role
age-
at
of the Dentist in Sle fcal Manai
ment of Mass Casualties in Nude
Warfare "
Kennedy Tells Labor Zionists
He'll Press Mid-East Accord
published in the Journ-
chairman for al of Florida State Dental So-
istrict dental Icle,v- ,<
Recently ; h.ff conducted a
and member and chairman of the! state survey to determine the tvoe
state dental society CD committee. I ot Civil Defense training received
I)r Schiff is a member of the | b,v ,mfn in F'_rida Combining these
- statistics with those he compiled
in 1958 and 1959 as chairman of
the district society CD committee,
he published his combined results
in the Journal of the Florida State
Dental Society in the.Winter, 19m
issue.
disaster committee of the Dade
county chapter of the American
Red Cross, was formerly first aid
station chairman of Dade County
Continued from Page 1-A
of Israel told members of the
United Jewish Appeal study mis-
sion in Jerusalem Saturday night
that Israel hoped that whoever
was elected President of the Uni-
ted States on Nov. 8 would con-
tinue a pel icy of friendship to-
ward Israel and would work to
bring about direct Arab-Israeli
talks. Mrs. Meir stressed that
Israel wanted help only in get-
ting direct talks wfrth the Arabs
and weoW not agree to any arbi-
tration or mediation.)
The l^bor Zionists also urged
the United States government to
provide Israel and all other peace-
loving nations with firm guarantees
against aggression; to refuse to
acquiesee in any illegitimate acts
of boycott, blockade or denial of
just rights committed against Is-
time of such catastrophe, dentists sees if. "medical men "'cognize
will not be called upon to fill teeth.! the need for the development of I ?*' **rte "g"1""
If they are to serve ,n a profession- auxihary aides. Dentists constitute! d;scr,m,^tions wM th^AraJ
Jews and American firms doing
JVS Officials Attend Confab
JR. WIUIAM SCH'.ff
al capacity, it must be outside of
their usual practice and training,"'
in Dr. Schiff's view.
"While the responsibility of car-
ing for injured persons definitely
i rests with the medical professions,
the call upon their services will
be fantastically out of all propor-
tion to their number. An unprece-
dented number of casualties will
require unprecedented methods to
deal with them," Dr. Schiff ex-
plained.
As the Miami dental authority
Itutions," was adopted at the closing
session. The convention also urged
the government of the USSR to
make it possible for Russian Jews
desiring to immigrate to Israel to
leave the country.
Another resolution urged Amer-
ican Labor Zionists to participate
more actively in Jewish communal
activities related to the support of
I Israel and the strengthening of
'Jewish life in the United States.
Two officials ot Jewish Voca-
tional Service attended the annual
conference of the Florida Rehabil-
itation Assn. at Palm Beach this
week.
Dr. Michael Goodman, executive
director, presente I a paper on
"Rehabilitation of the Geriatric
Client Through the Use of a Shel-
tered Workshop."
At the conclusion of the con-
ference. Dr. Goodman and Don-
ald S. Block, workshop director, ,
also attended the annual confer-
ence of the Fterida Ann. of I
Sheltered Workshops, of which
Black is trea**eer.
Lloyd Ruskin. JVS president, said
that JVS has entered into a coop-
erative agreement with the Uni-
versity of Houston. Students work-
ing on Master's degrees in re-
habilitation conseling will serve
a four-month internship with the
Miami agency.
The fir.-t trainee is Wayne Gray \
Alfred, who received his BA from
Centenary College in Louisiana in
1956. and his MA from the Uni-
versity of Houston in 1960.
A resolution protesting, attains!
"continued discrimination by the
Soviet Union against its Jewish pop-
ulation." and appeantnWf all jus-
lice- loving peopte te join in de-
: mands that Soviet Jews be granted
the elementary right of maintaining
i their cultural and communal intti-
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Friday. November 4. I960
i
+Je*istnar*Man
SURVEY TESTS ATTITODH OP i>ADE .COUNTY. iwv. pi.t ,
/en* fawr AIMewish, Affiliation-Bayville Poll
Cantfasuad- fMM P.O. 1
Continued from Pig. 1-A
each." Of.their own personal con-
tributions to charity. 70%"say
they gave more to Jewish drives,
18% say they gave more to non-
sectarian campaigns, and 8% say
they gave about the same to each.
(In considering the meaning of
these findings, it is important to
[,-member lha,t this does not nec-
essarily represent a "preference"
for Jewish- charities, but is also
related to.such factors as the ef-
ficiency of organization of the
various drives, the. extent to
which Jewish givers were ap
proached, the expected level of
contribution in the various cam-
paigns, the degree to which don-
ors see themselves as direct ben-
eficiaries of a particular welfare
effort, and a generally-accepted
American pattern of giving to
agencies of one's own religious
grouping.)
Almost all the respondents
(95%) say, there is anti-Semitism
in the United States. The amount
ol such anti-Semitism is estimat-
ed as "a little" by 15%, "some"
by 43%, and "a lot" by 3$%. Al-
most all, though, believe there
is less anti-Semitism in America
now than there used to be in the
past. However, in contrast with
this image of anti-Semitism in
the United States as a whole, only
40' o say there are "hostile groups
in this area." thai is. Dade coun-
ty.
About half, 49%. My there are
no hostile group* hero. Again,
asked in another question about
relation* between Jews and norv
Jews in the Miami area, only 2%
consider these relations "very
strained," 43% say they are
'somewhat strained," and 39%
say they are "not at all strained."
Asked about actual experiences
of anti-Semitism, 60% say they
have "heard of anti-Semitic inci-
dents in Dade county in recent
years," but only 20r; say they or
members of their families have
personally experienced some anti-
Semitic act. As to the kinds of
anti-Semitic action, those who
have heard of it most frequently
mention attacks on synagogues
(interviewing was done in the fall
'H .- ,. .-I. ... ....,..,

Tins it f/if third m an exclusive ferial ot
lews, Florid*.,, article, by Manlieim Shop.ro
based on the frndrngs of the "BeyiiHe- Survey."
Launched her, m June. I9M by the American
lewuh Committee, the study probes the attitude
f ihe lews o/ Dade county toward then "Jew
ishness. Bayxdle i, the surveys code name for
Miami, The author of the series ., national
director of th A/C.v Jewish Communal Affairs
Department.
U''':.n i...
of 1959> and "anti-Semitic re-
marks;" whereas in personal ex-
perience, what was mentioned
most frequently were "remarks"
by adults or children, occasional-
ly some type of discrimination in
employment or business, and only
two mentioned such matters as
exclusion from a hotel, club or
residence.
Contacts With Non-Jews
While estimates of anti-Semit-
ism and hostility provide one in-
dex to the image the Jews in our
study have of themselves in rela-
tionship to non-Jews, their actual
direct contact with non-Jews pro-
vides a different kind of indica-
tor. Almost two-fifths of our re-
spondents say they have "much"
opportunity for contact with non-
Jews, one quarter say they have
a "moderate" amount ot oppor-
tunity, somewhat less than a third
"little," and under one-tenth
"none."
More than half say they would
like to "know more non-Jews on
a friendly basis." Most frequent-
ly mentioned as the source of
contacts with non-Jews are busi-
ness, neighbors, social contacts
through friends, work in organiza-
tions, and activities connected
with children (like PTA, Scout
work, etc.)
As to clearly social contact,
two-thirds of our interviewees say
they have spent a social evening
in the home of a non-Jew at least
once during the last year, and
slightly more have had non-Jews
for a social evening in their own
homes. On the other hand, just
e little over one half have been
Zionist District Lists Chairmen
J. n. -. id Liebman, president of
the Miami-Gables Zionist District,
announced Wednesday the follow-
LONG DISTANCE
MOVING
to all points in the country
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
ACER.B.VAN
LINES, INC.
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
For Information Call MR. ROSS
NE 5-6496 MIAMI
lor
ing committee appointments
the coming year:
Harold George Shapiro, public re-
lations: Moc Meyer, membership
and retention; Morris Simon and
Louis Rudnick. co-chairmen, Amer-
ican Zionist Fund; Louis Rudnick,
Bonds for Israel; Ephraim Collins,
program; Hy Sootin, education;
Isadore Dickman, youth activities.
Mrs. Morris Simon, publications;
Meyer Fine, newspaper publicity;
Murray Levine, United Jewish Ap-
peal; Mrs. I. B. Sacks, telephone;
Mrs. David Nerove, sunshine fund.
Sam Levine, fund-raising; Har-
vey Sootin. world Zionist aftairs;
Mrs. Meyer Fine, hospitality.
Installation will be under the
chairmanship of Moses Meyer.
Also planned is a card party under
the direction of Ephraim Collins.
MR. B. V. SCOTT
LAND PLANNING CONSULTANT
Announces the Opening
ot OttieeH in the
FAIRMONT BUILDING
1100 N.E. 125th STREET North Miami, Fla.
Phone PI 7-7643
SPECIALISTS IN PLANNING:
SUBDIVISIONS .
GOLF COURSES .
CITY and TOWN PLANNING .
at a party jn a non-Jewish home
where there was a mixture of
Jews and non-Jews, and only two-
fifths have had such parties in
their own homes.
When we examine how our in-
terviewees respond to questions
concerning relationships between
their own children and non-Jew-
ish children, we find some reveal-
ing patterns* It is apparent from
their answers that most would
like their children to be in schools
and in various types of youth ac-
tivities (such as Scouting) where
the group is about equally divided
between Jews and non-Jews.
Since, for the county as a
whole, Jews form an estimated
ten percent of the population, this
seems like an unrealistic aspira-
tion. But it is probably one of the
driving forces of Jewish parents
to want to protect their children
from a sense of minority status.
Frequently, this leads here, as
elsewhere, to a concentration of
Jews in particular neighborhoods
or particular schools.
Mixed Friendships
On the other hand. Jewish par-
ents generally are somewhat con-
cerned over the possibility that
their children will inter-marry
probably as much over fear that
a mixed marriage will not be a
happy marriage as for other rea-
sons. This second impulse be-
come* manifest in the answers to
severaL questions. Even with pri
mary grade children aged 6 to
12/more parents approve or have
no objection-to the, children's hav-
ing non-Jewish friends of their
own sex (95%) than, of the oppo-
site sex (85%). But the higher
the age-range of the children, the
smaller the percentage of approv-
al for friendship between the Jew-
ish children and the children of
other religious groups and al-
ways there is a smaller propor-
tion approving of such friendships
with children of the opposite sex.
Questioned directly about inter-
dating, three-quarters of the par-
ents of teen-age children say they
would approve or not care if their
child never dated a non-Jew. On.
the other hand, about half say
they would approve or not care
if the child sometimes dated a
non-Jew. Less than two out of
ten would approve or not care
if the child dated a non-Jew most
of the time.
Nine out of ten would disap-
prove of their child's marrying a
non:Jew. Three-quarter-, of these .
would "strongly" disapprove.
Less than one out of ten thought
it would make no difference.
Concern About Impressions
The effects oLJiving in a world
in which anti-Semitism has been
one of the facts of life is visible
in responses to another type ot
questeioo we. asked. There ap-
pears a self-consciousness about
the behavior of "other" Jews
and a feeling that improper be-
havior by Jews causes anti-Semit-
ic attitudes. (It should be noted
in passing that social psycholo-
gists recognize that one of the
problems created by prejudice is
that members of the group
against whom the prejudice is di-
rected tend to accept the view
of themselves expressed by the
prejudiced.)
Page ll-A*
Thus, we find thet half of our.
respondents say y*s to the qu.
tion "Do you think there ere
groups of Jews who cause non-
J.ws to ftel. anti-Semitic?" Many
more, seven out of ten, soy they,
are sometimes "embarrassed" by;
the activities of other Jews. When-
asked to tell us (at different-
points in the interview) about
the kinds of Jews who embarrass*,
them on who they think cause anti-
Semitism, the answers are almost,
exactly parallel.
The range of answers boils
down to a series of categories
which may be summarized as fol-
lows: Jews who display bad man-
ners or had taste, Jews who are
unscrupulous or unethical in busi-
ness. Jews who appear to be "dif-
ferent" from the general, popula-
tion, Jews who are unfriendly to
non-Jews, those who do, not parti-
cipate in general community ac-
tivity, and Jews who deny or con-
ceal their Jewishness or do not
observe religious requirements.
It must be remarked here that
this list of categories incorpor-
ates many- of the accusations
made against Jews by Anti-Se-
mites. It must also be said that
our respondents always attributed ,
these faults to -other" Jews than
themselves.
As further demonstration of the -
same phenomenon, we found in
another question in which we
gave the respondents a list of
items of what Jews should or
should not do, two-thirds, of our
respondents agreed that "Jews
should be specially careful to
have good manners." although in
the other items (to be discussed .
later) there were large majorities
saying that Jews should act free-
ly like other Americans.
Earlier, we referred to the
image Jews have of themselves
in the world around them. In the
next portion of the report, we
shall look at the ways in which
this self-image is reflected in re-
sponses, to questions about cer-
tain public issues, about their re-
actions to other minority groups
in the community, and about the
responsibilities they believe Jews
have in the community at large.
Vofe for Proven Leadership, Experience
and Teamwork
Ferris
BRYANT
Governor
Tom
ADAMS
Secretary
of Slats
VOTE FOR
Richard W.
ERVIN
Alforney General
Ray E.
GREEN
Comptroller
YOiiit Ix] VOTE
COUNT!
r;
J. Edwin
LARSON
Treasurer
Tom D.
BAILEY \
State \
Superintendent
of Public
Instruction
Edwin L. (Ed)
MASON
Railroad & Public
' Utilities Commissioner
Doyle I.
CONNER
Commissioner
of
Agriculture
Ibis aaVertiM/ntat paid far Jjy Ao Florida Star* Democratic Commkt


Page 12-A
Jelstncrl(Ji!M
Friday. November 4, 1960
Your CJA Leaders: 1960-61
MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY
JERRY BLANK and HAROLD FRIEDLAND: No. 14 in a Series.
Gabriel Heatter At Beth Sholom
?:.
For a long time, nearly
two decades, the activities ot
the Sam Blank and Samuel
Friedland families have been
interwoven into the fabric ot
the Greater Miami Jewish
community.
Today, their sons, Jerry
HAROLD fMlOLAND
Blank and Harold Friedland.
are also demonstrating the
same sense of community re-
sponsibility and the urge to
lead in achieving good works
in behalf of others.
This week they assumed an
important job in the Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal as co-
chairmen of the Food and
Hotels Division, one of the
big and complex trade units
in the campaign. Both indus
tries have been considered by
many the economic backbone
of this area's tourist and
hotel business.
Blank and Friedland have
been accustomed to handling
tough assignments, and turn-
ing them into positive results.
Last year, together with
Charles Gottlieb, they headed
up the Food Division, which
produced pledge increases at
one meeting ol nearly 42 per
oral over the previous cam
palgn.
Friedland is a member of
Temple Emanu El. Miami's
New Standard Club, the Mi-
ami Chamber of Commerce
and many trade associations.
JtRKY Bid NX
Blank is also a member of
Temple Emanu-El. and is ac-
tive in the Miami Beach Elks
and Bavshore Exchange Club.
The co-chairmen (bare the
opinion thai Miami business-
men should play a more as-
sertlve rule in CJA, and thus
strengthen the very commun-
ity in which their industries
thrive.
They intend to do their part
through personal leadership
and a fusion of their energies
towards this common goal.
Gabriel Heatter, news commen-
tator and author of "There's Good j
; I News Tonight,", will be featured,
[speaker at the annual Book Donor j
i luncheon of the JTA and Stater-
Hood of Temple Beth Sholom, ac-|
I cording to an announcement byi
Mrs. Joseph Pardo, PTA president.!
The luncheon will taKe place in;
the Temple Auditorium on Wed-
nesday, Nov. 16. Chairman of the
| program committee of the PTA,
is Mrs. Murray Gilden. Chairman I
! of the program for the luncheon is I
Mrs. Marvin Meitus.
In charge of tickets is Mr. Rich-
ard Shapiro. Heading the luncheon1
arrangements are Mrs. Robert
Goodman and Mrs. Hyman Gold- i
stem, with Mrs. Martin KJeiman
and Mrs. Ben Harvey in charge of;
visual technique, and Mrs Allan
Wil-on and Mrs. Eugene Green in
charge of hospitality.
The annual Book Donor luncheon
promotes the library work of the
Temple, and honors Jewish Book
Month.
Rabbi Leon Kronish is spiritual
leader of t h e congregation, and
Herbert C. Bloom is director of
education. Judge Harry Arthur
Greenberg is president of the
congregation, and Mrs. Jeon J. En
is chairman of the board of educa-
on.
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Greater Miami's largest I Oldest
Supplier for Synagogues,
Hebrew A Sunday School*.
Wholesale A leraH
ISKAfU CI'TS AND NOVEITIES
417 Washington Art. JE 1-W17
i
ToZL
AUGUST BROS Rw
IS thr BEST' C
n
I
Mi :* '. MMap !

Lavon is 'Satisfied' With Rehabilitation
JERUSALEM (.ITAi Pinhas Lavon. secretary general of the Hista- i
drut. Israel's Labor Federation, declared himself satisfied this week in;
his fight for rehabilitation, but the "unfortunate affair" in Israel's se
curity which led to Lavon's forced resignation as Minister of Defense in
1955 appeared far from settled.
Lavon said he was "contented''
with a statement by Moshe Sharelt.
who was Prime Minister in 1955.
which he said cleared him of re-
sponsibility for the security ques-1
lion. Lavon said Sharett's "Clear-
ance" statement was included in
a comment bv Attorney General
'Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 8-J840
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools A. Private Use |
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
Lakeside
MEMORIAL
PARK
"The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minutes from the Beach Via
The New 36th St. Causeway
TU 5-1689
Gideon Hausner on a report by a
.special investigation commission
looking into the 1955 incident.
Censorship, however, prevented
disclosure of the text of Sherett's
statement, the report by the
commission headed by Supreme
Court Justice Haim Cohn, or the
Attorney General's comments.
The Cohn commission probe was
the second into the incident and
neither commission's investiga-
tion findings have ever been made
public.
The battle continued at various
levels in Israel's Parliament,
among parties which are partners
[ of Prime Minister David Ben-Gur-
ion's dominant Mapai party and
even inside Mapai.
The Prime Minister intervened in
debate in Parliament on his state
i of the nation address to insist that
: he would not. in his reply, discuss
the 1955 incident. He argued that
it had no place in the debate,
since he did not refer to it in his
report.
Reports reaching the United
States on Hausner's opinion on
the Cohn commission report in-
dicated that the Attorney General
had recommended to Ben-Gurion
that "appropriate bodies" should
look into the question as to
whether the services of a regular
Army officer involved in the
incident should be retained. The
regular offtcer and a reserve of-
ficer neither of whom has been
publicly identified were in-
volved in charges of forgery, per-
il ry and subornation of perjury
in connection with the case.
The Attorney General also recom-
mended continuation of the probe
into the question of possible for-
geries, holding that the Cohn com
mission had not been able to com-
plete its investigation of this phase
of the case. He added that the Cohn
committee findings indicated there
might be grounds for filing charges
of perjury against the reserve of-
ficer.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 WASHINGTON AVENUE
ANNOUNCES
file opening of late friday Evening Services
FOR THE 1960-61 SEASON
Thh friday evening, November 4 8:30 p.m.
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
WILL PREACH ON THE SUBJECt:
'The Sermon from Tallahassee a Tribute and a Challenge"
on the Occasion of Governor Collins' Pro CANTOR HIRSH ADLER WILL CHANT ASSISTED BY THE TEMFIE CHOIR
N,.
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
1357 Washington Ave. JE 1-7722
ALL HEBREW SUPPLIES FOR
SYNAGOGUES A JEWISH HOMES
We Carry Bar Mitivah Records
There is! 11 Hght way and a wron^ way
NEWMZN
FUNERAL HOME
333 DADE BOULEVARD
MIAMI BEACH
JEfferson 1-7677
Edward T. Newman
Funeral Director
Certainly you would not wail for an urgency
to force you into taking out life insurance this
i- -mnething you consider calmly, ajtd
decide on after thorough investigation. Doean I
election of .your family Memorial Plot merit llie same
judicious concern? Of course..That's why you'll
w ml to find out about Miami's fine-l ami
(tide-1 J.-wi-li crtnetcry today. Mount Nebo's
Perpetual Care Fund (largest of any local Jewish
cemetery), already exceeds I10Q.000.
NT.niiN and loveliness is its keynote ... a place
of comfort and inspiration for you ... a lender
Memorial el love lor those departed Details will he
gladly given, in your home or by mail.
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERV
Mount Ne'oo Cemetery, 5505 N.W. 3rd It, Miami, Fla.
Pirate send me, mthaul obligation, full inform*
lion on Family Burial Estates in Mount A ./..
Name......,.........
Address..............
Ci,y........... Zone State.....
J! b///// JJ'fa &*&nt
5SOS Northwoet 3rd Street-
rhesie MOhowk 1-7*93


I November 4, 1960
......... |
JEMS OF WISDOM
Het'JeWfrf-ihe bosom of !,.',
_. ^ WCI I
pigrr ^tlU [he foolish man.
----JOB |
+Jtnisl> Meridian
ige-r (i blmdnrvi.
.....a
APOCRYPHA. !
rhrough anger heroes fall.
EZOBi. I
R BeRim umh muJns. nH
lAnger in a house u lifc,c a worm :
I a f'""'- sota. ;

[Getting angry ,s },\r worshippint
MIDRASH. I

I Anger and temper are death si
utitmers. MIDRASH. I
.
Attempt not to placate a man ar ij
le frme \>f hu rage. ABdr 9
.
I Anger deprives a sage of his wis-
a prophet of his vision.
HFU, I
Loss of temper is disrespect /or|
he Dirme Presence.
f.....*"' >""' T---.V.....ii
iami s
We Must Look Beyond s,r
Travail to Glowing Future
Page 13-A
r^eligioits JL^ite
threw By RABBI SOLOMON SCCHIFF
Beth El C0tt.ce9.H0r.
The story 01 iho "Akedah" has
always served as a dramatic les-
son of how far one is to go in
the service of God. Abraham, at
his Creator's bidding, brought his
son, Isaac, to Mt. Moriah to offer
him up as a sacrifice to God After
passing his "loyalty test," Abra-
ham was excused from going
through with the final act, and
Isaac was spared.
Our Rabbinic lore relates that
during the solemn procession to
Moriah, Abraham asked his son
"Do you see what I see?" To which
Isaac replied, "I see a beautiful
mountain, with a cloud hovering
g over it." Abraham then asked his
5 servants, "Do you see anything?"
To which they replied, "We see
only wastelands." Abraham then
said to his servants, "Remain here
with the donkey, and I and the boy
will continue on our journey."
In this brief account. I see re-
v t c e g
Uhi a (A/e efoenJ
* U..A ,SR*EL. 7801 Cariyla ,v.
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Ever.
Friday S:zn n.m. hatnrrlav R:Si> am
Sermon: -The Two Contracted Scenes
I i -nilliiK aim 1>.'iiiHiMilm: u.e I:l...i ,,,
strangers."
ANSHE EMES.
Conservative,
piesident.
- -----
2S33 SW 19th ave.
Maxwell Silberman,
aVBMM M '
l
TALES OF MORALS
I -IT
Mp ,-VfH nxnan-n-a
i*?n o,J?Dsn ^aa .lixn
V T T 1 T I |
nwn traafinn nasr
j- T :--
.o-ttrrnn
..-jmi-rr-D- nx mi
"IT I" V r' T I
:na roop> n^np ^tfa1?
-nrroioV irs nn'pitf pnfr
-nnbTji^ o^ai ,o*y\v mas
Dip^ noian-ira .any
' T v v : t :
,n*rjj? nirr manna
-ninn^n- *r\p fa o-orrn
a^n aafin "?ax ,0*915 03
a^xaxi; nrn"7 a^xin vhnn
t : : 1 ...
.njrnrn Tn m a-nan
t*-t "t n T ..
(irthtU ir-ias ma nioina)
TRANSLATION -
Jewish Naiareth
Soon a synagogue is to be built,
a large rest-house, a cinema etc.
In all of these enterprises the new
Jewish inhabitants will work.
The Jews of abroad are helping
to establish Kiryat Nazareth.
For example a small community
in New York is sending equipment
for the various public institutions,
and instruments for a children's
orchestra. The synagogue will be
erected with the contributions of
Jews of Canada.
The relations between the two
Nazareths are good, but the in-
habitants of the new settlement
wish to be independent and sep-
arate from the old City.
(Published by Brit Ivrit Olamit)
KABU SOIOMON SCHIff
... luif aim'ng power
SfH^f l"S!!!T_f JWCr of ,he t- ^e nations look at the Jew
--------------- -~* -.* omi*iv,ii. nicy
"Howanthf 1<*structions mounting with ever increasing momentum.
SlfP.1***? "**2.$* ****** ^ce of oppression brought upon
mm from cverv direction'" thv act "^ *""'
and see no chance for his survival. They see only "wilderness" only
s mounting
I the grindi;
every direction?" they ask.
MM^laSj ^SS SCeS ,hr0Ugh ,he dark and dism doud a beau-
s irSnl H?efckn0W.Kth.at J1 dUd iS ,rnsitory. "Me a mountain
iEESS. Ac ?rh J thaladversi,y mu*t give way to salvation and
S%TL ?S,d'C 1abbl "Ce *, "The Jewish people are
lin. ^. f C^ku At ne m0ment',hev are down. butiaSn they
point upward to new heights of achievement."
iH ?",? S?1Jlian b,?dagC Was fol|owed by the entrance into the prom-
il .1 ?* SS f ,thC SeC"d Temp,e was foUowed >y the Babylonian
age, with its great cultural development. In our own age the Nazi hoS
caust marked the darkest period in our history. artoTet while the natio
lkeHT,hWKe M*dyi rCCiie Kaddish" over the Jewish people, we
looked to the brighter day, which we knew was sure to follow Our
confidence was once again realized. For the dark cloud passed, and the
beautiful mountain of Zion reborn came into glorious focus.
This philosophy applies to our personal lives as well. When adversity
strikes, be it a personal loss, or an economic reversal, one would do
well to realize that a cloud passes and the mountain reappears that
disappointment will give way to a brighter day. It is this hopeful out-
look which sustained us as a people, and which could strengthen us as
individuals as well.
Did Moms leave a last will? i -
Indeed, he did. Vou will find it i
III." ,..!! II I I I I'M! I IJI
Temple Judea
Slates Meeting
Tilden Corenblum, president of
Temple Judea. will conduct the
first fall meeting of the congrega-
tion on Sunday evening.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop will speak.
A special welcome has been ar-
I ranged for new members and brief
j committee reports will be read by
I the chairmen.
At the completion of the meeting,
social will be held for the mem-
bership.
divided in two parts. The first part
consists of Deuteronomy, chap. 32,
known as the Farewell Song of
Moses; and the second part con-
sists of Deuteronomy, chaps. 33
and 34, known as the Blessings of |
Moses. The three chapters should
be read and studied by every think-
ing Jew.
What is the meaning of the terms
"Groom of Torah" and "Groom
of Bereshis"?
They refer to the adult Jews
(males) who are honored in the
synagogue on a Simchas Torah (the
last day of Succoth) by being call
e.i to two special Alijahs ("going
up to Torah readings").
Groom of the Torah is he who
recites his Torah benedictions over
the last portion of the Five Books
of Moses. "Groom of Bereahis" ii
he who recites his torah benedic-
tions over the very first portion
of the Pentateuch, known as "Bere-
shis" or "Genesis"
Thii page is prepared in co-
I operation with the Spiritual Lead-
ers of the Greater Miami Rabfam-
I icol Aisn.
Rabbi David Herson
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Herson
Tales of Moral
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwits
Know "four Heritage
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Cems of Wisdom
mor circulated that the Jews had
poisoned the wells and the Rhine
ETH DAVID. 3438 SW 3rd ave. Con.
aervative. Cantor William W. Lip.
son. K
Sd*,,J:,i5!,B- *urday 9 a.m. Bar
Mltzvah: Robert, son of Mr and Mrs.
Kdward >;., 1,11,,,,: Ou.'t Ilalibi Her-
man Cohen.
H.!M.*g JOO SW 17tn ave. Orthodox
Rabbi Solomon Schiff.
FVlday 5:3n |..m. Saturday I a.m Bar-
mon: -Abraham. Our Koiindine: Fa-
ther.
BETH EMETH. 1Z2S0 NW 2nd avs.
oonservacive. Rabbi Oavid W. Her-
son. Cantor Hyman Fsln.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Snni.m: "The Prin-
ciple of Hospitality." Saturday a.m
Bar Mltzvah: 1'hillp. sun of Mr. and
Mrs, Leonard Vova.
ETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave. Or.
thodox Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
ETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
avs. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mimchai.
I-'iiday 5:46 p.m. Saturday 8:31) a.m
Sermon: The Meaning- of Am.ri.an
Prextlse.
e
BT.M RAPHAE"-. 13 NW 3rd ave.
orthodox. Julius Sapero, president.
fTH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or.
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovaky.
BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE 11th
ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
schitz. Cantor Ben.Zion Kirschen-
baum.
Friday S:4fi and 8:1.1 p.m. lias Mltzvah-
Janette, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joel
l-eldnian. Saturday 8:4.-, a.m. Bar
,.V!?,V',,,: RJ-hrd. son of Mr. and Mrs.
I hlllp Annis; Richard, son of Mr. and
Mrs. George Krakow.
CONOREOATIOrrVfz CHAIM. 40t
16th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim
Karlinsky.
CORAL WAV~JEw7sH CENTER.
>9b aW 16th st., Miami. Rabbi Sam-
uel April. Cantor Meyer Oisser.
Friday 7:J0 p.m. Sermon: "The Su-
preme Sacrifice of Isaac." Satuidai
9 a.m. Bar Mltzvah: Paul, son of Mr
and Mrs. Sam Newman, who will host
a KldduKh In his honor.
OAOE HEIGHTS CENTER. 1401 NW
183rd st. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Zucker. Cantor Emanuel Mandel.
FLAOLER-QRANAOA. 80 NW 51at
pi. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard
Shoter. Cantor Fred Brnetein.
Friday 3 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
----
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
Friday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Alibis."
Saturday 9 a.m.
KNESETH ISRAEL."1415 Euclid avs
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self.
Friday 5:80 p.m. Saturday S:3n a.m.
Sermon: "The Dignity of Man."
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Traditional. Can.
tor Ben Grossberg.
80UTHWEST~CENTER. 643a SW 8th
at. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Rendez-
vous with Destiny." Saturday 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. 2320
NE 171st st. Rabbi Jonah Caplan.
Friday 8 p.m. Sermon: "A Sacrifice
for Love." Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM. M50 N. Kendall
dr., S. Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner.
mday 7:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Goat
that Went to Israel."
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1645 Polk at.,
Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
Among the Sages of Israel. Rabbi
Joshua ben Hdnamah was consid'
ered one of the greatest. His physi
cal appearance, however, was both
ugly and deformed. One day. while
in conversation with the princes* of
the realm, she turnedl to him and
as^ed. "7s|o one can deny that you
are a great sage. But why are you so
ugly7 How was it possible for God
to pour so much wisdom into so ugly
a vessel1"
Rabbi Joshua, by way of reply.
I as^ed ihe princess in uihat vessels
her father, the Emperor. k.ept his
I mine. And she replied. "In earthen-
I ware, of course." To which Rabbi
| Joshua expressed extreme surprise.
"Is it possible, then, that your fa-
\ ther. the Cmperor. \eeps his wine in j
ugly enrthemcare when he can well
I afford to k,eep his unne in beauti
I fully-ornamented silver and gold
I vessels'"
The princess immediately ran to
her father and complained. "It is
-not fitting." she said, "that you.
the mighty Emperor, should Ijeep
your u'me in common earthenware
vessels, the same as the common
citizen." The Emperor ordered that
the wine be changed into beautiful
gold vessels befitting the honor and
dignity of his office.
The inevitable occurred and the i
. wine turned sour. Whereupon the I
Emperor approached his daughter
and demanded to l^now who gave
her such foolish advice.
The Emperor summoned Rabbi
Joshua and demanded to \now of
him why he misled the princess.
Whereupon Rabbi Joshua replied:
"This was my may of teaching the
princess that precious wine can best I
be contained in ugly earthenware 1
better than in a beautiful one."
"I* it possible then, that beauty :
and wisdom cannot exist in the same
person.7"
"No." replied the sage, "but even \
the wise. handsome individual I
would be much wiser i/ he u>as less
handsome."
MORAL: Judge not a boo^ by
I its cover nor an individual by hi* I
external appearance.
if Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kenster. who will
host the Kiddush following services.

TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Edward Klein.
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th at. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel Gombera.
FTlday 8:13 p.m. Sermon: "Traits and
chai Heuristics of Our Forefathers."
Saturday l:*t a.m.
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
M. Wallach.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly
wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernesi
Schreiber.
Friday Spin Sermon: "Democracy in
Action." Saturday 9 a.m. I'.ai Mltavah:
Edward. Henry, son Ol Mr and Mrs.
Morris Delafuente.
What were the Cenversionist Ser-
mons?
It was the method of persuading
the Jews to convert to Catholicism,
used by Pope Benedict in 1450. The
Jews were compelled to listen to
sermons dealing with themes such
as "the true Messiah has already
come." "the heresies of the Tal-
mud," "the punishment of the Jews
for not believing in Jesus," etc.

Which Pope defended the Jews in
the Middle Ages?
Pope Clement VI. During the
Black Death in 1348-49, a wild ru-
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisn
Cantor Davla Convlser.
Friday Sir, p.m. Sermon: 'The Bym-
and the Danube Rivers in order to,!'"1'"'1 "' Sodom." |laturday 10:1
till ntt .11 r-u .. ln?H **: Leslie Elian. iJauxhtei
Kill on all Christians at one blow.' Mr. and mis Prank Alter. Bar
This savagery alarmed Pope Clem-,'nd",!-s:&ZS sheid"^ '"n "T
ent VI, and he issued the declara-
tion that the well-poisoning charge
was a fabrication. Regretfully,
iis declaration had little effect on
the mobs.

What is the meaning of the phrase
"Keni-Lemel"?
It is a fictitious name created
by the Yiddish playwright Abra-
ham Goldfaden, the "father" of
the modern Yiddish theatre. As
one enjoys his Yiddish play, "The
Two Koni-Lemels," one recognizes
in Koni-Lemel a character below
the level of a Schlemiel. One is
likely to arrive at the conclusion
that the. Scblemliel is the aristo-
crat of the Koni-Lemel family.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi Shel-
don Edwards. Cantor Seymour
Hinkes.
FYiday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m.
oneit Shabbat follows services.
--------
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing
ton avs. Conservative. Rabbi Irvine
Lehrman. Cantor Hirsch Adler.
Friday, first late service of -
s:S0 p.m. Sermon: "Sermon from T.,l-
lahassee Tribute and Challeiiu,
Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mitsvah: Joelf
(Bsra BUhorT, son of Mrs. Miriam Anls-
feld and Isidore Solkoff.
TEMPLE ISRAEL. "t37 NK Itth st
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot
Cantor Jacob Bornatein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Do We
Really Know What We are Votina;
FY>r?"
TFMDLE JIIDE... 320 Palermo avs
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Canto-
Herman Gottlieb.
Friday h:15 p.m. Sermon: "Jewish Im-
a's." first in a series. Saturday
.m, Bar Mltzvah: Jeffrey, son
10.30
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. SSI
Flamingo Way. Conservativs. Rabbi
Lao Helm.
FYlday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "Sacrifice.
or offeringsWhich?" Saturday 9 a.m.
-----o-----
TEMPLE 2AMORA. 44 Zamora avs.
Conservative. Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitz.
------a------
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th at.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb.
PVida) 8:30 p.m. Samoa: 'Have We
Not one i!irf?" Saturday !':30 a.m. Bar
Mltzvah: Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Mas Rubin.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
v oj.hr,' Nathan Zwitman. Can-
tor Albert Glantx.
1- ...- u u. M'imon: "AlminR at
Wlrkedneaa and Deatroylna; the wick-
ed." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "When
< lod Aip .ir.ii to Man."
YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie
hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon
Steinmeta. Cantor Morria Berger.
FYlday *s.:13 ii.ni. Sermon: "'Education
and Klcrtfn" Satunlay 9 a.m. Bar
Mltrvah: Mark, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Call 1U. .-!. r.
e
YOUNG ISRAEL. t90 NE 171st st.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shcrwin Stauber.
Friiljiv .i' p ii .-.iiiihim : a.m. Ser-
mon: Vision of the Future." Bar
Miizvah. Marc Cohen.
CANDUUGHTING T//ME
14 Heshvan5:23 pan.
10/11-81-28.11/4'
10/81-28. 11/4-11


Page 14-A
+Jeisti ncrkfian
Friday. November 4, 1960
Capitol Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Man the Anti-Semites Call 'the Jew Behind Kennedy'
- Washington
WHO IS MYER Feldman. the man branded by the
anti-Semitic underworld as "the Jew behind Ken-
nedy?"
Gerald L. K. Smith has denounced Sen. John F.
Kennedy, the Democratic Presidential nominee, as
Jew controlled." Smith ruled that "no honest Chris-
tian patriot" could back Kennedy.
Attacking the whole Kennedy family as injected
by Jewish associations. Smith said "Joseph Kennedy
sent two of his sons to study at the feet of the most
satanically evil Jews that ever lived upon his earth
... the whole (Kennedy) clan is dedicated to furth-
erance of the Laski-Frankfurfer-Nile plan." Smith
decided that "compared to Kennedy. Nixon looks
like George Washington. Thomas Jefferson and Abra-
ham Lincoln rolled into one."
Lincoln Rockwell's uniformed thugs recently pic-
keted the Kennedy headquarters, bearing signs pro-
claiming "Nazis lor Nixon." and denouncing "Kik. s
for Kennedy." Meanwhile, the notorious hate sheet,
Common Sense, carried the headline: "Behind Ken-
nedy Stands the Jew." According to Common Sense,
the Senator is controlled by "Zionist Jew-.' since
Kennedy's administrative assistant is Myer Feld-
man."
A Philadelphia lawyer who serves as coordinator
for Sen. Kennedy and Sen. Johnson with Pie Demo-
cratic National Committee. "Mike" Feldman worked
1957 lor Sen. Kennedy. He Joined the Kennedy
s'.aif a- legislative assistant. In that capacity, Feld-
i,eip ' ;i programs and politic peeches
. ot the live
or six men closest to the Senator.
After Sen. Kenned) was nominated, Feldman
in m n to head the vital research task fori e. He
h ies in the Senator's television de-
......DSl Vice President Nixon. Feldman pre-
.....ilyzes debate material, recalling and
... up i Id bil i irati ric value.
His friei dil Feldman's keen Talmudic Insights
as a ft .. him deftly to seize on the other
d< nsisti i Ies.
rn in Philadelphia in 1917. When
he was only three, his lather died. His mother strug-
to prcvidi a good education. He attended Gi-
r.iid i an institution providing for underpriv-
ili ed -' lents A graduate of the University of
Ivania's Wharten School of Finance and Com-
merce, and of the university's law school. Feldman
was awarded a fellowship and taught at the uni-
versitv.
Overseas Newsletter:
By ELIAHU SALPETER
Adolf's Defense Plan
Jerusalem
THE PLUMP, 60-year-old. blue-eyed
German lawyer was back in his of-
fice in Cologne after spending about a
week in Israel to meet his client. Robert
Servatius. who agreed to act as defense
counsel for Adolf Eichmann. looks more
like a smalltown German businessman
than an attorney defending one of the
greatest Nazi war criminals. He is of pink complexion, af-
fable, quiet-talking man who prefers to use the expression
"my client" rather than calling him by his name.
During his stay in Israel. Servatius was protected by
a number of plainclolhes policemen, one of whom never
left his side. While the Israel public clearly understands
that a lawyer's willingness to act for his client has nothing
to do with his personal feelings and sympathies, but may
be a purely professional and business relationship, the
Israel authorities did not want to take any chances on
some crackpot or zealot doing something foolish. Israel
is determined that the Eichmann trial, and everything
about it. should be conducted with the maximum respect
for law possible in a civilized country even if the defendant
is Adolf Eichmann.
Mr. Servatius was quite willing to talk to correspond-
ents possibly because of "public relations." In the num-
erous interviews and talks to correspondents, he gave the
impression that the main points of his defense will in-
clude the following four objections: a. The law (for the
punishment of Nazis and their collaborators) under which
Eichmann is to be tried is "illegal" since it is an "ex post
facto" law. i.e. legalized after the crimes charged under
it were committed; b. Eichmann was brought to Israel
illegally and therefore cannot be legally tried here; c.
the acts charged against Eichmann were committeed out-
side Israel, therefore Israel courts are not competent to
try the defendant: d. the defendant acted under orders
of his superiors and not on his own initiative.
While the second point, and to some extent the fourth
point, is specifically designed for the Eichmann case, the
other two points seem to confirm some earlier statements
by Mr. Servatius to the effect that he considers the Eich-
mann trial to have a broader significance: He intends to
use it in an attempt to obtain revision for some of the prin-
ciples which were established during the Nuremberg trials
of the Nazi war criminals, some of whom he defended.
Legal experts in Israel, however, do not attach any major
importance to these objections since from a strictly for-
mal point of view as well as from the point of view of
previous precendents, Israel's right to try Adolf Eichmann
seems to be fairly clear.
In 1942, he entered the Army Air Force and serv-
ed as a stajf sergeant. When he left the service, m
1946. he was employed by the U.S. Securities and
exchange Commission.
Feldman worked industriously, attaining the
highest staff position in that agency executive as-
sistant to the chairman. As part of his duties, he
helped auhorize the sale of State of Israel Bonds
in the United States.
He served as liaison between the Truman and
Eisenhower Administrations with the S.E.C. Then
Browsing With Beofcs: H*ARY"MINDUN
The Sophistication
Of a Young Poet
A CORRESPONDENCE
OF AMERICANS.
By Jack Hirschman.
60 pp. Indiana
University Press:
Bfoominaton, Ind.
$275.
THIS FIRST BOOK by a young poet promises
to be a stand out in the Indiana University
Poctiy Series, of which it is the nineteenth: and
there have already boon some fine volumes of
other number*. Jack Hirsthman is sophisti-
cated without being a sophisticate, modern
without being a modernist, an cchoer but not
an imitator. In other words, he writes hones'
poetry, and that in itself is so spectacular in
thi year as to seem almost
unbelievable. One is afraid to look too hard
leal it not be so.
Start with 'he humor, say. First of all.
there is a lot of it. and it is not the poseur's
sere wit. twisting and contorting to a rattling
laugh of dead leaves, eitner. Oh, it's clever
enough; and not so much clever as amusiic;
and not even that so much as pure deep fun.
From "Birds." for example: "All come out with
hool And howl, with chitter of wing/ And
tittering strut/ And God Knows what/ Hell is
this parliament of fowl>." Like pinching is fun.
Or here, cleverness and fun. flaming out
to devastating comment: why did they ever say
a "gentle poet"? "Non-Objective Painting of
America" read the title both ways, of course;
then within the poem, behind the fun with the
structure of language, with words and even
with single letters, the double image throws
the light back and forth between the twin walls
of the poem.
To talk of the poems themselves, they are
of love, a good swinging love, healthy and un
self conscious, sardonic and sweet. They are
of death the deaths of many things, of friends
and symbols and old worlds and the coming
deaths of new ones. He is not sentimental, in
spite of what the introducer. Karl Shapiro,
says; he can be sad, as the past is always sad,
sunset-tinged.and regretted. But Karl Shapiro
is right in other things, calling it a "goodbye
to the nonsense of exile and all the pseudo
epigraphy of modernism," lauding its natural
ness as poetry in spite of the "sickly literary
atmosphere."
I must mention, to be proper, that Mr.
Hirsehman is at ease With his rhythms; where
in other poets a conflict between the poem and
the meter becomes a battlefield on which the
poem soon lies dead, here the poet generously
gives in with artful grace. I should mention,
too. that where there are flaws, it seems to be
in the transportation from private to public
communication; across that abyss I lose some
symbols to the dark air.
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
he was appointed counsel to the Senate Banking and
Currency Committee. His work on the stock market
investigations of 1995 attracted notice on Capitol
Hill.
Feldman was appointed a professor of law at
American University here in 1956. He has edited
and written a number of authoritative legal works.
While in Philadelphia, Feldman helped organize
and was the lirst treasurer of the Jewish Youth Com-
munity, a city-wide organization of Jewish groups.
He is now a member of Washington's Temple Sinai!
His wife, the former Silva Moskowitz, is vice pres-
ident of Temple Sinai Sisterhood.
A human sparkplug, Feldman often works 16-
hour campaign days. His office is a nerve center
of the campaign. He is like the chief intelligence of-
ficer in the headquarters command post. Words and
facts are weapons which he marshals. Despite the
ceaseless tension, Feldman retains a warm human
touch and a subtle sensa of humor.
This is the "dangerous" Mr. Feldman. denounced
by the anti-Semites, who has counselled Sen. Kenne-
dy on immigration revision. Middle East issues, and
civil rights, as well as on general legislative matters.
If Kennedy is elected. Feldman will probably serve
in the White House, a member of the inner circle,
as a top assistant to the President on legislative and
congressional affairs. -
Off the Record
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Very Mobile People
SOCIOLOGISTS HAVE commented fre-
^ quently that Americans are one of
the most mobile peoples in the world,
a condition which reached news peak i
movement in the mass shifts of popula-
tion since the end of World War II. a
change familiarly described as the ex-
odus to the suburbs.
Equally dramatic though less publi-
cized shifts have taken place within our great urban cen-
ters, as well as to their surburban outskirts.
American Jew s have been profoundly involved in these
shifts, with still largely unmeasured impact on every
phase of American Jewish communal life. The enormous
boom in synagogue and Jewish center building has, to
some degree, been a consequence of the fact that Jewish
neighborhoods have virtually disappeared in many urban
areas as Jews raced out to what they hoped would be
better living conditions for their children and themselves.
Among the still unalyzed results is the ellect on Jew-
ish religious ideological loyalties. ,
It is true that Jews moving to suburbia have created
an immense new physical plant in the form of houses of
worship. What is not clear is what the shifts have done to
American Jewish loyalties to Reform, Conservative aDd
Orthodox Judaism.
One of the first major efforts to obtain a systematic
look at suburbia and its impact on such loyalties, we are
told, will be undertaken by the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations at the organization's 62nd anniversary con-
vention in Atlantic City on Nov. 9 to 13.
A wide variety of Jewishly-oriented sociologists and
psychologists are scheduled to report on the many aspects
of this new challenge. From their reports and out of the
deliberations of the delegates, the Orthodox Union hopes
to develop a program to safeguard the status of institu-
tional Orthodox Judaism under the new and unprecedent-
ed conditions which these population shifts have wrought
and to increase the numbers and effectiveness of Ortho-
dox congregations in these new areas of Jewish resettle-
ment.
It has been widely asserted that the Jewish denomina-
tion which best accommodates itself to the great social
changes in American life will emerge as the dominant
pattern in the Jewish religious weave of the country.
If the Orthodox Union convention can assemble a
substantial picture of what these changes mean to Ameri-
can Jewish religious life, it will be a combination of &1
positive value to all American Jews, regardless ot tneir
religious affiliation.
A Vegetarian Seeks the Office of President
IN VIEW of world conditions, the man
in the White House for the next four
years must know his onions. Who is bet
ter qualified in this respect than Symou
Gould, the Vegetarian Party nominee
the only Jew ever to be nominated for
that high office? '
According to Mr. Gould, the real is'
sue at stake in the election is steak.1 -
Should he be chosen, he says, one of his first acts will
be to appoint a Secretary of Peace (not peas) in his cab-
inet. "Our party," says Mr. Gould, "is the only real peace
party. All the rest are phonies. We are for the ending of
all killing, whether it is of man or animals."
The Vegetarian nominee is a blunt speaking man No
baloney for him.
Mr. Gould maintains that the victory of his party would
also be the true solution for the problem of the aged.
"All this fuss about medieal care for the aged. cunn
their arthritis, bursitis and fallen arches. If they were
vegetarians, they would not suffer from these dlsca^s;
It is the uric acid poisoning from meat which brings about
these maladies. Vegetarians are healthy and strong.
"Hold. Mr. Gould," I remonstrated, "the lion is pretty
strong. Do you know any animal that lives on vegetables
who could stand up to him?" ,
Mr. Gould said "ha-ha. Were you ever in the jungle
The lion is deathly afraid of the elephant which eats no
meat. He knows that if the elephant puts his snoot around
him. he'll break him in two.
"And the elephant outlives the lion. Elephants live
to be 200 years old, while all the carniverous animals are
shortlived. Animals that live on vegetables also are
fleeter."
If Mr. Gould runs as well as the horse, which is veg-
rtarian, he should be our next President.


November 4, 1960
+Jew/str fie rid/for
Page 15-A
LEGAL NOTICE
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
*NTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
}RIDA iN AND FOR DADE
)UNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. OC 9725
U'KT ii RWITZ.
Linurr.
_ERT rtORWITZ,
If.'n in in.
NOTICE TO DEFEND
tBRBERT II' iRWITZ
lo Mrs. l" tha HorwJU
MS filUyw-.-.ltlt Avenut1
Ivlngtou. New Jerse>
ARK 11 i:itl:i:V NOTIFIED II.n
pi Complaint for Divorce has
lied u-ain.-t you, IIEKIIEPT
7lTZ, and you an- hereby re-
10 -er\- a 0Of>) of vui OnsWel
Hill of, Complaint on pbfintlfl -
py, anil 1*11*- the original ntisHtr
office uf the riftk of the Clr-
nn on or before November l"t,
|n default of which the IUII of
lint will bo taken aa oonfessod
October 7. 1*60
B. LKATHRRMAN', Clerk
of Circuit Court. ,
B) \\.\i w 8TOCKINO,
Ofputy clerk
JIB. SPAET
> Cor Plaintiff
In Eti a
aoh. Florida
10/t4-2l-2S. ll/i
vDAytNU
BY HENRY LEONARD
In THE CIRCUIT COURT.
IVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
>ADE COUNTY. ELORIDA
No. 60C10S62
VNMEIl COSTA,
kintlff.
PH1NE COSTA.
tfendant
HOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Josephine Costa, address and
|nee t/0 K. A. Costa. 346 Chent-
Kvenuei Wonliynne. New Jeree).
Nltilrecl to file your answer to the
Ja m with, the clerk of the above
i ml serve a copy thereof to
(an Cohen. Attorney. 1*1". Con-
I'.ntldlng. Mliimi 12, Florida, on
>fore November 2.1. I960, or else
viII be taken as confessed. Paled
bet 25, 196i).
10 B. I.I'ATIIKRMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
.seal) By: I. BNEEDEN,
Deputy Clerk
10/28. 11/4-11-18
[notice by publication
Ithe Circuit court of the
eventh judicial circuit of
"xorida in and for dade
county. in chancery,
No WC 9831
1Y I'.YMKR.-' WALTERS,
plaintiff.
Vs.
lTF.lt A. WALTERS,
I >efi ii lant.
SUIT FOR D.VORCE
I I.I STEP. A WALTERS
IM06 Boxwood Road
Toledo 13, I 'ho
Ion LESTER A. WALTERS ar,-
hy notified that a Bill of Com-
|lnt for Dlvori- has been tiled
Must you, and you aie required to
|ye a copy of your Answer or Plead -
to the Bill ->f Complaint on the
llntlff's Attorney, THEODORE M.
lUEHlN, 421. Lincoln Road, Miami
Inch, Fla., and liie the original An-
rer or Heading In the office of thi
erk of the Circuit Court on or btlfore
14th day of November. 1969. If
In fall to do so. judgment by dtlault
III be tflken against you for tha re-
If demanded In lhe BUI of Complaint.
[This notice shall be published once
ch week for four consecutive weeks
THE JEWISH HiJRUHAN.
pHi.N'E AND ORDERED at Miami.
nrlda, this 10th day of October, A.D.
to.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
-ircult Court, Dade Countv, Florida
eal) By: R. H RICE. JR.
Deputy Clerk
rEODORE M. TIUSUIN
|(> IjIik oln Road
iaioi Reach 39. Fla.
KtOlM) (or Plaintiff
10/14-21-18, 11/4
"I don't like to either, David, but we have to
for our children's sake."
C*r. i60. Box** rreMt;ni
LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREHY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fietitious name of
IIERSHEY WINDOW SERVICE al
1853 Bay Road. Miami Reach. Florida
intends t" register said name with the
'lerk of the i'ircult Court of Dade
County. Florida.
MICHAEL COTTONK
LEONARD KAI.ISH
Attorney for Applicant
tun duPont Bldg.
10/14-21-28. 11/4
|IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
Nj. 60S4S-C
RE: Estate of
PC! I ll\ H. LEW
Deceai 'I
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
i All Creditors md All Persons Hav-
le Claims or Demands Against Said
state: .
|Y'ii are hereby r. .tided and requlr-
to present au> claims and demands
Itoh you may have against the es-
|e of BERTHA B LEVY. .1.-.eased
ol Dade County, Florida, to the
|unty Judges .,f Dade County, and
the same In their offices in the
|tinty Courthouse In Dade -County,
?rida. within eight calendar months
|m the date of tlie first publication
eof, or the same will be barred.
// MORHA.N I. LEVY
/*/ J. N. MORRIS'
Executors
J. N. MORRIS
rirney
llnsraham Rl Ig.
Iml 32, Florida
10/14-21-28. 11/4
NOTICE UNDER
"FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
PICB IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I undersigned, desiring to engage In
|nesH tinder the fictitious name of
BAR at 2'.00 Palm Avenue.
|eah, Intend* > --<- *.....
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
> County Fiorina.
MOSAM CORP.
100. E. 49th St., Hlaleah
JtRV ZIKERNICfc
|rney for Purchaser
iieoln Road
i\\ Bea<-h, Fla.
10/21-BS. 11/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
riCTITIOUS NAME LAW
feriCM IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Bderslnned, desiring to engage In
s*s under the flelltious name of
JF & SADDLE BAR at 240 1 PahJl
S. Hialeah Intends to reglstei
me -With the Clerk of the CTr-
ourt of Dade County. Florida.
MoSAM .'I >RP
J<(>.-. k 4.th St.. Hlaleah
ZUKERNICK
^y for Purchaaer
coin Road
Beach, Fla
10/21-23, U/i-U
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name ol
I'll-TH AVENUE ORIGINALS al
number Z4H0 NW Bth Avenue" in the
City of Miami, Florida Intends to reg-
ister tli.- -aid name with the Clerk of
tha Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
CINDY LI' OF MIAMI
I :> .lack Weinstelii. President
TADIANOFFA WALLER. Attys.
SO Lincoln Rd., Miami Reach
in/U-21'. n l
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. **J CHANCERY.
No. WC 9798
JERRY H. fciMl'SON.
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARGARET SIMPSON,
Defendant.
ORDER TO APPEAR
YOU. MARGARET SIMPSON. 98
Franklin St.. Concord. North Carolina,
are herf-by required to serve a OOP) Of
your answer to a complaint for divorce
on plaintiff's attorney Claude M.
Ilarnes. 18 N E :ird Ave., Miami. Fla..
on or before the U.th day of Novem-
ber. 1960, and file the original In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, otherwise a default will be en-
tert-d against you.
Dated ''. tabor 10. I9B0.
E B. I.KATI1ERMAN. Clerk
of Circuit Curt,
(seal) By, K M I.YMAN,
Deputy Clerk
10/I4-21-2S. II '4
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 50777-C
IN RE Estate of
ALEX i.som.-times known as
~ ALEXANDER) POLLACK.
Deceaai I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against tlo ,s-
tat- of ALEX (sometimes known as
ALEXANDER) POLLACK, deceased
late of DADE County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same In their offices In the
County Courthouse In Dade County.
Florida, within eight calendar months
from the date of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred.
DAVID D. POLLACK.
Executor
EDWARD H. LEVIN,
Attorney for Executor
1S02 Congress Building
Miami 32. Fla.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 50686 C
in RE: Instate of
GOLDA BAKER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Eslate: ,
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and (Kenan It
which you may have against the es-
tate of GOLDA BAKER deceased late
off DADE County. Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same In their offices In the
County Courthouse In Dade Countv,
Florida, within eight calendar month!
from the date of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be burred.
SAMIEL C. BAKER
Administrator
MARK SILVERSTE1N
Attorney
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
10/14-21-28,
WO Tiot UNDtR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat
the undersigned, desiiiim to engage In
business under the tlatltlous llano- of
Pal Vallee Placement Bureau; Pat
Va lae Office etrlat I'm- Vallee Bm-
l.lovimnl AffeilC) at Had.- County.
Fla Intendi to reaio1 mi -
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dude Counts. Florida
ETHEL Y VALLE. Sole owner
SIDNEY EFRONSON
Attorney for Applii
241 Security Trust Klclt.
: i OT, ii 4-11- is
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE I.-1 HEREBY OIVEN Hint
the undersigned, del \ge In
>li i-r the fictitious nan
FOOD STYLES DISTRIBUTORS al
moi S.W. ace, Miami. In-
tends t" regleter said name with the
clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad<
i iunty, cio: id c
ALBERT i;.\t" it,
l" :i-2s. 11/4-11
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
i'Jen'isti Meridian.
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guaranto*
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial FR :- IWK5
for messenger service
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of ,
P I' PROVISIONS at ion N W tSrd ',,m,;ii,,
St.. Miami Intends to register said '
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
PAUL FARRERMAN
PROVISIONS. INC.
a Fla. oorp,
NORMAN KOUT
Attorney for Applicant
42" Lincoln Road
10'21-2s. II '4-11
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C-RCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C103-6
SHIRLEY KAMINSKY.
I" i ntlif.
va.
ABRAHAM KAMINb'KY.
I >eiendant
SUIT FOR D.VORCE
To: ABRAHAM KAMIX.-KY
Residence and Address Unknown
You are ha ebj notified that a Bill
of Comp'alnt for Divor..' has been
filei ejjjalnat you. and you are reoutred
to scrv.. a oopy of your Anw,-r 01
Pleading to the Rill f Complaint on
the plaintiffs Attorney, JOSEPH W.
MALEK. 4i'T Lincoln Roa i. Miami
Beach. Florida and tile th,- orieioal
Answer or Pleading in the office of
tlie clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 28th day of November, l'lOo.
If you fall to do so. Judgment b} de-
fault will be taken against you for
demanded In. the BUI
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE LNOER
FICTIT.OUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN ihit
the undersell.-1. desiring t.> engage In
Uusiness under the tictitlous name of
pai'iimaN-wi :si h-ki:.- inscraNCH
AGENCY al 110 '..th Street. Miami
ivaih. Florida intends to rajslster aoid
name irWh the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv, Florida
JACK IVI'HMAN REALTY CO.. INC.
LEONARD KAI.ISH
attorney for Appiieunt
1629 duPont Bldg.
10/28. 11/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
seines" i'."i.-r the tictii'cs name of
SPY AGENCY at U01 N.E. 7th St.
Miami Intends to register nld nano
with the Clerk of th- Circuit Court Of
I lade i 'ounty. Florida
l-r
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undorelgned, dealrlna to ensage is
business under the fictitious "ame of
ARBORDALE I.olsn: MOTEL at
10800 Blacayne Boulevard Intel
register said name with the Clerk n(
the Circuit Court of Hade County,
Florida.
COLEMAN INSTITUTE, INC.
a Fla. corp.
MARX FABER
Attorney for Applicant
1612 Congress Bldg.
10'21-2'. 11/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
(he undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DAUB WASSON RECORD Sllol' at
13020 N.W. ?th Avenue. North Miami.
Florida intends to register said name
with the Clerk of- the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JOSEPH MOSCARDINO
10/I4-E1-2X. 11/1
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 50677
IN RE: Estate of
CARL GRASER
Dei-eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have agalnat the -
tnte of CARL QRASER d,-< .as. I lati
of Dude County, Florida, to the Count)
Judges of Dade County, and file the
sain,' ill their offires ill the Count)
Courthouse in Iiade County, Florida,
within eight calendar months from the
I the first publication hereof, or
the same will be barred.
PAUL KWITNEY
As E\. it,.r of the Estate
of Carl Graser.
PAIL KWITNEY
Attorney
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Reach. Florida
10/21-28. 11/4-11
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUOIC.AL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C10173
MARY V."ERBERGER WAIN.
Plaintiff.
JACK W. WAIN,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: JACK W. WARM
General Delivery
Melbourne. Florida
'You JACK W. WAIN are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce hs been filed against you.
and you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the Rill
of- Complaint on the Plaintiffs Attor-
ney. ARNOLI> H. POIJjOCK of WKI.-
IJSCH. DOUGHERTY AND ZA1AC.
1414-19 Congress Building, Miami.
Florida, and file the original Answer
or Pleading In the office of'the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
list day of November. I960. If you
tall to do so, judgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Hill of Complaint
This notioe shall'be published nn.e
each week for [our consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH rt-ORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 19th day of October. A.I).
I960.
E. B LRATHERMAN. Clerk. '
Clruult Court. Dade County. Florida
(eeal) By : K. M. I.YMAN.
Deputy Clerk
ARNOLD H. POLLOCK
Attorney of Counsel
Welllsch. Dougherty and Zalac
1414-19 Congress Building
Miami Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
This notice shall be published once
ac h weeU I'or four conseeutlv, weeks
in 'I'1"-' JEWISH FLORID1AN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this -'.th day ,,f October. A.I>
96".
K l: LBATHBRMAN, Clerk.
Cr i uij i irt, I ol.- 'nunl I. Florida
i:, P.. II RICE, .IP...
I iutj
lOSEI'H \\ MALEK
IU7 Llm id R
Miami Bea h, Fli -rida
Attorney tor Plaintiff
m M. u 4-11-1**
Sol'THKKN DIVISION. INC.
a Fla Corp
Kastenhaum. Mamber. Gopnutn &
KuateinAtnr"evs for Applicant
OI 1 Lincoln Rd.. Btdg.
1 28, IW4-1I-I8
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 49395-B
In RE: Eal I
ALEX \N i IER LEVIN
I. > .
NOTICE TO CREO TORS
To All Creditor- and All Poraoni Hav-
ing Claims or Demand- Agalnsl Said
Estate:
l'oii. and eai h ir' you us '
notified and roQUlrOd lo present any
claims and demand.- which y>u. or
-itlier of you, ma\ ha\.- against tiie
estate of ALEXANDER LEVIN de-
ceased late of Dade County. Florida,
to the Honorable i/uunty Judge* of
1 iade County, and file the same In
their offices In the County Courthouse
In Dade County. Florida, within ei-th!
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof, bald claim- M
demands to contain the legal address
of the claimant snd to be sworn to
and presented as aforesaid, or same
will be burred. See Section 733.16 of
the lM.'i i'robate Act.
Dated October 20. A.D. I960.
CARL A PINS LEVIN
As Administratrix cum Testamento
of the Last Will and Testament of
ALEX ANDER LEVIN. He, ,-ed.
KOVNER : MANNHEIMER
Attorney for Administratrix
CUm te.-taniento annexo
10/28. 11/4-11-18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE C RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. OOC 9815
JAMES D MacfcAE, JR..
Plaintiff.
HARRIET M MacRAE.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR D VORCE
You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint foj DlVorce lias been
filed against you. and you ar. re-
qulrod to serve a copy of your An.-w. i
or Pleadlne to the BUI of Com-'-'-t
on the plaintiff's Attorney. RICH-
MOND & F'ARBER. One Lincoln Road
Bulldin--. Miami. Florida anu (lie me
original Answer or Pleading in the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the 15th day of Novem-
ber, 1960. If you fail to do so. Judg-
ment by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once-
each week for four consecutive s/aohg
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Flortla. this 10th day of October, A.D.
I960.
E B. I.BATHKRMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
(seal) By; R. H. R.1CE. JR.
Deputy Clerk
DONALD S. FARBER
Attorney for Plaintiff
10/14-81-28,11/4
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PRIMATE
No. 50911.C
in RE Estate of
i ii um.es H. WEBBR
11.. .-a-
NOTICE TO CRED TORS
To All Creditors and All Persons lliv-
'lg Claims or Ii.-mand- Agalnsl Said
Estate
Y,.u are hereby notified and requir-
...i i.. present any cuvisBS and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of CHARLES M v> iiii-o ,1
ceased late of Cook County, Illinois,
to the Count) Judges of Dade County,
md file the aame In 'lour ,,fi.. m
the County Courthouse in ENuae Coun-
ty. Florida will n eight calendar
month- from the date >< th* firs* pub-
lication hereof, m the same will be
barred
MERCANTILE NATIONAL HANK
OP MIAMI PEACH
p. : (s) Clarenc J, oi-.-n.
Trust Officer
BERNARD I: WEKSI.EI'.
AMornei
..uii Industrial Natieaa.1 ii.uk Bldg.
Miami ?.2. Florida
10'iS. 11/4-11-18
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR OAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCMY,
No. 00C1O035
MORRIS n-:LTENS4TF:tN.
Plaintiff.
NELLIE FEl.TENSTEeN.
ilefendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: NEI.UK FEl.TENSTEIN
110 Montgomery Street
N.-w Brunswick, New 'Jersey
TOP ARE HHKFRY Ni niFI ED that
i Complaint for Divorce has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or other
pleadings on Plaintiff's attorney.
UEORGE N MacDONELL, S'H Bin-
payne Pudding, M.ani'. Florida, and
file the original In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Cue '.f Dado
County. Flcrlda on or before the 21st
day of November, IM0, In defa I
which the Complaint will be taken
'. oil
l> \tei '. Miami, i lade County,
Florida, this uth day of October, A.D.
IMO.
i: P. LEATHERMAN,
Olerk of the fjlrotilt Court
in and for I iade 'ounty
(seali B) B ii LAN", AY.
DeniiU clerk
10/21-28. 11/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR OAOE
COUNTY. INCH4NCERY,
No. 0C10191 J
RALPH TEXOELL. Plaintiff. .
A I.ICE. CAMII.LE TKXCELL.
Ilefendant. _____
Yol ALICE CAMII.LE TEXCELL,
ARF: HEREBY NOTIFIED to file your
defense pleadings to this suit with this
Court- Clerk, and serve a copy on
Plaintiffs attorney, RICHARD ALT-
SHIXER. 504 Heybold Building. Mi-
ami. Florida, on or before November
23. 1960: else the Complaint will be
taken as confessed by you.
DATED: October 19. 194MI
f: B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Clruult Court. Dade County. Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LYMAN.
Deputy Clerk
10/11-18. 11/4.11
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Page 16-A
*Je#lsiifk>ri(J&n
Friday, November
Election
Crystal Ball
By MAX LERNER
There is never a good time for making predictions. "The owl of
Minerva," in Hegel's (amous sentence, "spreads its wings only with
the falling of the dusk." And the dusk, of course, is exactly when men
can't see. But there is an itch in us to pierce the darkness of the future,
even if we have to shoot wildly to do it. So here are some shots in ths
dark, on the election and related matters.
-* af- -*-
11 Start with the quasrion of how close the election will be. My
uninformed guess is that it won't be particularly close. Very few elec
tions have been close in recent times, and I see few reasons except
for the incalculable religious issue why this one should be. I should
guess that Kennedy will have a margin of several million popular votes
and at least a hundred electoral votes. It may or may not be a landslide
victory, but it will be a substantial one.
How do I figure this? Not by any scientific polling nor by studying
selected counties or urban districts, but quite simply by talking, talking.
talking with ordinary people across the nation. Some are depth con
versations, some surfacy. They are too few to form a sample. But the
signs are there.
I thought for a couple of days that Nixon might make political
capital out of the too-candid Kennedy anti-Castro statement. But he
is himself vulnerable on foreign affairs, and besides it would be con-
fusing for Nixon in the same campaign to call Kennedy an appeaser or.
Ouemoy-Matsu aad an inciter on Cuba. Anyway the decisive moment for
pouring on the heat has passed.
-it *- it
2When he leaves the White House. Dwight Eisenhower will no:
retire but will take a high advisory business job. with some compan>
like General Motors. It would make a lot of sense for Congress tc
provide that each retiring President would automatically become a
member of the Senate, not from his state but as a Senator-at-large
and serve until he slips into either death or dotage. It would be good
to have Hoover, Truman and Eisenhower in the Senate.
3Nixon will have no difficulty in getting a high executive post ir
business. But being young he will keep himself, even with a busines>
job. ready for the historic moment when his party will again call hirr
to some notable post. He will end up in the Cabinet of the next Repub
lican administration.
4 Both Houses of Congress will remain Democratic. The Senate
Majority Leadership will be placed in more militant hands than l.yndoi
Johnson's, and efforts will be made toward a withering away of tht
present Southern domination of the committee system.
5Adlai Stevenson will be made head of the American delegatior
to the UNa case where the perfect job and the perfect incumbent wil!
meet. My crystal ball doesn't tell me who will be Secretary of State.
it it it
6There will be another summit meeting by April or May. 1361
perhaps earlier. The Kennedy commitment to make one more effort
to get argeement on disarmament or some other major issue, am
Khrushchev's troubles with China, make this a safe bet. unless ba(
trouble breaks out before that date in Cuba or Berlin.
7If the real trouble breaks, it will in all likelihood be in Cuba
Since it would involve both America and Russia, and thus render un
thinkable the early summit which both sides wish. I would guess that
some sort of civil war in Cuba would be postponed until next summei
or fall. I doubt whether it can be avoided or averted.
8China will finally get the votes it needs for admission to the
lrN, sometime during the next few years. This does not necessanh
mean the exchange of recognitions by China and the U.S. for some timi
to come.
-iz it -it
9There will be a recession in 1961. whichever candidate and part>
wins, ut a Democratic administration will come up with some fresl
ways of cushioning its shock and shaking the nation loose of it.
10The institution of the TV Presidential debate is here to stay
and will be back in 1964
11Kennedy will act with vigor, surround himself with a Brail
Trust much like that of FDR., and bring fresh energies into Wash
ington. I suspect he will be an effective if not a great President.
12The 1964 campaign will pit Rockefeller against Kennedy, bu
the Republican Party will have to be reorganized in the next four
years if that is to he the line-up.
-it ir- it-
P.S.: I guessed terriMy in 1948. Except for that I didn't do to<
badly between 1932 and 1956 Try some predictions of your own. am
let's compare them when the harvest is in.
FREE
A stimulating guide
for youngsters and
adul is on the customs,
traditions and observ-
ances of Judaism.
Jprlhg
"YOUR JEWISH
HERITAGE''
If printed in Englishaa
inspiring booklet for
every home and every-
one in it
FOt FREI COPY, tend re-
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Kraft Foods Company, 99
Park Avenue, New York
16, N. Y.
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Oolt. O.c '
Gurion Beats Back Censure Move
Continued from Peeje 1-A
to strengthen Israel's security.
Thi. plan, he said. <*e carried
out, and the Sinai campaign of
1956 was proof of its sueeets. The
Prime Minister cited the report
of officers "of a not particularly
friendly nation," stating that the
Israeli Army was the best In the
Middle East, and that the Sinai
campaign was one of the finest
achievements in military history.
The report to which Mr. Ben-
Gurion referred was believed to
have been made to the Soviet
General staff.
Prior to the Knesset session, an
inter-party fight over the composi-
tion of a ministerial commission to
investigate all aspects of the La-
von affair was resolved at an hour-
long special meeting of the Cab-
inet. The original five-man com-
mission was expanded to seven,
adding one Mapan and one Agudist
representative.
A Government crisis had threat-
ened Sunday, when the two Map
im Party members of the Cabinet
walked out of its regular session
UM Prof. Will
Speck on Tour
Of Israel Nov. 16
Dr. Bryce Ryan, chairman of the
iepartment of sociology and an-
thropology at the University of Mi-
ami, will give a "Sociologist's Trav
elog of Israel" at the Nov. 16 meet-
ing of the South Florida chapter
it the American Friends of the He-
brew University. The gathering,
open to the public, is scheduled for
'.he Algiers hotel at 8 p.m.
Dr. Ryan visited Israel this sum-
mer on a trip sponsored by the
American faculty committee on
the Israel Fellowship Program.
The program is one of the ac-
ivities of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University in Jerus-
alem.
Mrs. Max Weitx and Mrs. Emil
Friedlander are program chair-
men. They reported that almost
every Greater Miami tourist to
Israel has visited the university,
but asked that those who wish
a conducted tour of the campus
contact the Miami Beach office
well in advance of their trip.
Herbert S. Shapiro, chapter pres-
dent, reported that studies in crim-
;nolgy have been added to the
Hebrew University curriculum for
"he academic year, which began
)ct. 30. More than 7.500 students
enrolled for the year by far
2 record number, he said.
The two-year diploma course in
criminology is open to holders of
3 Bachelor's degree, to graduates
in law or medicine, and to a limit
ed number of high government of-
icials from various ministries.
to protest their party's exclusion
i from the commission me Achdut
Avodlh representative then re-
i fused to accept his designation to;
the commission in support of the
Mapam ministers.
Mr. Ben Gurion. who did not
vote in the Cabinet discussion Sun-
day on the form the investigation;
was to take, objetCeu to Mapam
representation because a Mapam >
spokesman had likened the Lavon,
aftair to the Dreyfus case. Mon-i
Jay morning, the Mapai Party!
agreed to enlarge the commission,,
.i:d give a seat to Mapam. Israel
Barzilai. the Minister 0f Health
was named as the Mapam memb
of the commission and Benjamin
Mint*, Minister of Posts, to
sent Poale Aguda.
rPtt
Mr. Ben-Gunon staunchly defeM.
ed the Army last weekend. Spejj
ing at the graduation ceremony tf
an officers' training school son*
where in Israel, he said emphafc.
cally that "Israel's Army was ana
always will be subordinated m ,
civilian regime. The Army oer
dared, and would never dare, \
do anything without the permuim
jf civilian authorities"
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OL.SOCIAUIE
the
w
oman s
"World
Paul Goldsmith, a young 78. sailed Oct. 17
on the SS Israel for his third visit to Israel...
Father of Mrs. Judith Chernoff. 1601 SW 23rd
ave., he made his first trip to Israel in 1951...
Accompanying him then was his granddaughter,
Dolores "Deedy" Chernoff. now Mrs. Edward L.
Eisenson, of Norfolk. Va.. in the first Young Ju-
daen tax sponsored by ZOA and Hadassah Paul sailed again
in 1955. and remained for eight months When he left for this
third trip, he blithely announced: "This may be permanent. I will
write ar.d let you know."
MM
Mrs. Mickey Kraus was planning to pack Sunday afternoon for
her imminent trip to Europe, but her husband and daughter. Nikki,
had ot.w.er plans .. When Yvctte returned from a contrived lunch-
eon appointment, she was greeted by a chorus of "surprise, suprise"
and found herself surrounded by friends, assembled to wish her
and Mickey "Happy Anniversary." their 22nd Mrs. Leo E.
Elliot back at her apartment in the new Beaux Arts bldg. alter
a visit with her children, Col. and Mrs. W. D. Preston, and family
in Louisiana .
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Greenberg had a double celebration on
their visit to New York their grandson's Bar Mitzvah and their
own wedding anniversary on the same day .
Mr. and Mrs. Murray (Ruth) Firtel, 431 62nd St.. are back
from a five-day cruise to Jamaica and Haiti on the Hensiatic...
On board also were Mr. and Mrs. Nat Hankoff, and Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Berman.

Birthdaze: "And baby makes three" three little ones, that
is, since Saturday when Kenneth Alan. 8 lbs., joined Diane and
Robert, all belonging to Barbara and Ronald L. Fine Father
is director of Food Fair Properties The happy grandparents
are Dr. and Mrs. Jack Falk he's on the staff of Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fine ... In honor of the new ar-
rival, the Fines are giving a cocktail party from 2 to 5 on Sun-
day at "heir home, 4465 N. Bay rd .
A first son. David Lawrence, born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wein-
thal, oi 60 NE 78th st., on Oct. 23 at St. Francis Hospital Proud
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Arm and Mr. and Mrs.
Murray Weinthal... Murray, incidentally, is on the board of direc-
tors of Temple Tifereth Israel...
The Dr. Daniel Stones had another girl a big one, 9 lbs. .
He's en the staff at Mt. Sinai.
M M MM.
Alan and Dorothy Gale have a novel idea for decorating the
Copa City Theater of Stars programs from the early 1900s
featuring the names of Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Belle Baker, Sophie
Tucker, and others ..
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob C. Fishman, of 5334 La Gorce dr., have
just re".iimed from New York where they met their brand new
grand- :i, Jonathan, born to-Goldie and Sandy Antlron on Oct.
10 .' Sharing their delight are paternal grandparents. Dr. and
Mrs. David Andron ... .
Tc -ome. it may seem that stepping from the presidency ol
Hadasssh to a career as a real estate broker was quite a jump. ..
But Bee Rothfeld did it without even ruffling her coifture She's
with Murray N. Sheldon ...
First in the round of festivities in honor of the forth-coming
marriage ot Louise Hess to Edward Rudnick was a lingerie shower
given by Florence Kutzen, concert pianist, at the Seville hotel on
Sunday Pink and white color scheme was carried out in every
detail cf the flowers and table decorations Another party is
planne;; for Dee. 6 at the Everglades hotel Louise and Edward
will be married at the Fontainebleau hotel on Jan. 28. which is
also the date of the 26th wedding anniversary of her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. David (Carolyn) Hess.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Glasser are in Brunswick, N.J.. to attend
the Bar Mitzvah of their grandson. Mark, whose parents are Dr.
and Mrs. Benjamin F. Glasser While up North, Bess will stop
in New York for a meeting of the National Jewish Welfare
Board .
Alan AppleBaum entertained 20 guests in his home at a costume
party in honor of his birthday over the weekend .
Dr. J. A. -Greenhouse attended Homecoming at the University
of Iowa and saw Iowa beat Purdue last week : Got home just
in Umt to repack and leave for Cleveland for a convention
L.-.rrie Blasberg, Riverside Memorial executive, of 19450 NE
19th pi., busy these weekends taking golf lessons at Westview Coun-
try Club, where he recently became a member .
rTiends ot Joe (Luau) Cohen,'perennial bachelor, fear he may
be slipping ... He was out two nights in a row with the same
beauty .
Gtrt and Al Rosenthal dropped a card to say the cruise on the
SS Atlantic is "wonderful" .
Ml Ml Mi
Card from Joe Dallet urging all his friends to "come and see
for themselves what has been accomplished in a short time in Tel
Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem" .
Mrs. Harold (Rose) Robin, sharing with her students everything
she heard at the Florida State Music Teachers convention held at
the Eden Roc hotel last week .
Harry and Anne Salter back from a European trip Also
home: Sam and Jean Miller, from their trip to the Orient ... All
live at the Belle Towers .
Mt. Sinai Hospital Garden Club meeting on Monday at the
home of Mrs. Ben (Loretta) Lend Louis J. Daigle. authority
on plants, will be guest Friends are certain that he will be im-
pressed with Loretta's floral decorations .
Dr. Joseph Ketzkey and his Madeline planning an election cele-
bration in their beautiful apartment in Blair House Problem:
how they'll know in advance whether to have Democratic or Re-
publican guests .
Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. (Goldie) Press surprised their twin
daughters, Annabelle and Elaine, with a sweet sixteen birthday
party Sunday at their home, 1650 S. Treasure dr Both girls
attend the Miami Conservatory and entertained with music and
dancing Elaine and Annabelle are juniors at Miami Beach
High School.
- a-c >-
Florence (Mrs. Charles) Amdur and her brother. Ben Weis
berg, went north to visit the family and also to see the Pittsburgh
Pirates win the World Series ...
Sisterhood of Ner Tamid entertained last Wednesday at a meet-
ing, with Belle Barth singing songs h>r mher taught her The
Continued on PaM 9-B
T dfewjisli Floridian
Miami. Florida, Friday, November 4, 1960
Section B
'Bonus' Features at Israel Fashion Show
To Highlight Stellar Function Wednesday
Maurice Rentner floor-length
sheath evening gown with a
matching fringed stole. The
fabric is a black-and-white
cotton print of an abstract
geometric design. Fabric print
is by Batsheva, Ltd., of Tel
Aviv. Dress is by Bill Blass.
who has carried on the name
and work of Rentner House
since the designer's death
several years ago.
Guests attending the "Israel
Fashions, USA" show and luncheon
at noon on Wednesday in the new
grand ballroom of the Americana
hotel can look forward to several
"bonus" features planned by the
sponsoring Women's Division, State
of Israel Bonds.
In addition to viewing a breath-
taking collection of 42 creations,
which represent the best efforts of
American and Israeli designers,
they'll see a "sneak" film preview
of the film "Exodus," and one
among them will become the winner
of a free trip.
The film is a ten-minute reel
which shows Otto Preminger and
his star-studded cast, led by Paul
Newman and Eva Marie Saint,
making "Exodus" on location in
Cyprus and Israel.
The film is tied in with another
Israel Bond function, the "Exodus''
Diplomatic Ball on Dec. 3 at the
Fontainebleau, for which the $15-
per-plate fee will include a free
ticket for one of the film's opening
nights beginning Dec. 21 at the
Sheridan Theater.
Winner of the all-expense United
States fashion tour will be decided
by a contest following the luncheon.
The lucky ticket holder will fly via
TWA to New York. Chicago. Las
Vegas. San Francisco. Los Angeles
and St. Louis, visiting fashion cen-
ters in every city and meeting top
names in the field. Hilton Hotels
are providing acommodations, and
Universal Tours has arranged the
itinerary and flight transportation.
As the highlights of the Women's
Division's functions, this fashion
luncheon has created tremendous
interest in the community. Mrs.
Jack Katzman. Women's Division
'Music Notes' Column by Lillian Kraff
Joins Jewish Floridian's Feature Array
"Music Notes" is the name of
a new column which joins the ar-
ray of features appearing regularly
in The Jewish Floridian. Author of
the column, which makes its first
appearance in this week's issue
(see Pg. ??). is Lillian Gast Kraff.
Mrs. Kraff has a wide musical
background^jncluding appearances
in opera. In addition, she is a for-
mer member of the editorial staff
of "Musical Courier," one of the
best-known music magazines in the
nation, to which she contributed
Hadassah Groups
Plan Meetings
Menorah group of Hadassah
plans to utilize the direct dialing
system at its meeting Monday
now at Hillel House on the Uni-
versity of Miami campus.
At the other end will be Mrs.
Raphael Tourover, national Had-
assah representative in Washing-
ton. From her Washington office,
she will answer questions sent to
her by the. group in Coral Gables.
Prizes during the afternoon will
include two free long distance tele-
phone calls to anyone anywhere in
the United States.

Mt. Scopus group of Hadassah
will have a film presentation on
youth rehabilitation in Israel at its
regular meeting on Monday, 1 p.m.,
at the Coral Gables Masonic Hall,
41 Valencia.
Regular meeting of the Chai
group of Hadassah will be held on
Monday. 8:30 p.m., at the Voyager
motel. A film on Youth Aliyah will
be shown entitled "A Boy Named
Ami."'
numerous feature stories and re-
views through the 1959 period.
A long-time Miamian, she stud-
ied voice with Prof. Johannes Ad-
ler-Selva, teacher of Frieda Hem-
pel. Lotte Lehman, and many oth-
er operatic luminaries. Mrs. Kraff
also studied opera with Eugene
Plotnikoff. first conductor of the
Imperial Opera Company of Mos-
cow, and Gregory Ashman, of the
Juilliard School of Music.
She has performed in leading
roles in "Carmen." "Faust," "But-
terfly." "Pagliaci," "Manon," "La
Boheme." "Martha," "Hansel and
Gretel," and "Fledermaus."
Winner of a nationwide contest,
Mrs. Kraff was prima donna on a
major New York radio program
for a year. She was also winner
of a New York Light Opera Guild
nationwide competition, and has
appeared with the Hippodrome Op-
era Company, Brooklyn Opera Com-
pany, R.K.O. Vaudeville Company,
and in concert with such renowned
singers as Jan Peerce and Richard
Tucker, of the Metropolitan Opera.
Mrs. Kraff s column, which will
appear regularly in "The Jewish
Floridian," will deal with many
of the interesting music and the-
atrical events on the Greater Mi-
ami scene during the 1960-61 sea-
son.
Mrs. Kutvn is Hostess
Mrs. Pearl Kutun will sponsor a
swim luncheon and card party at
her home, 14955 S. Biscayne River
dr., for Tifereth Israel Sisterhood
on Friday, Nov. 18, at 11:30 a.m.
Sisterhood is also planning an eve-
ning of cards on Wednesday, Nov.
16. Donor credit will be given for
each guest brought.
chairman who is also heading this
event, reports that reservations be-
gan to come in even before invi-
tations were put into the mail.
"I guess many women remem-
bered what a marvelous success
last year's show was with the
French-Israeli theme, and they
want to be sure of attending this
year," she commentel.
The fashion collection as a whole
reflects Israel's progress in the
design and textile fields, while the
contributions of the 10 American
designers prove how versatile and.
universally acceptable are these
Israeli products.
The Americans, each of whom
contributed one original design us-
ing the Israeli loomed and process-
ed fabrics, include Ceil Chapman,
Hairy Frechtel, Mollie Parnis, Pat-
ul'o-Jo Copeland. Hannah Troy,
Scaasi. Maurice Rentner, Vera
Maxwell Pauline Tngere and Adele
Simpson.
The Israeli fashions come from
Lola Beer, Lilly Schleifer. Finny
Leitersdorf. Stefan Braun. and the
houses of Maskit. Matzkin, Aied
and Batsheva, Ltd.
Commentary for the fashions as
they are modeled will be provided
by Maggi McNeills, New York fash-
ion personality and radio and tele-
s ision star. Saks Fifth Avenue, Mi-
ami Beach, is handling the coordi-
nation and accessories, under the
direction of Mrs. Irene Gracia.
Admission to the function is by
purchase of one $100 Israel Bond,
or the sale of three.
UWAH KRAFF
Miami Woman
Attends Institute
Mrs. Robert Schwartz represent-
ed the Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
at the NCJW's fourth annual Unit-
ed Nations Institute in New York
City on Monday.
Ambassador Michael C o m a y,
permanent representative of Is-
rael to the United Nations, spoke
on Israel's role at the UN. Also
highlighting the two-day program
were addresses by Mrs. Eleanor
Roosevelt; Paul G. Hoffman, man-
aging director of the United Na-
tions Special Fund; Francis O.
Wilcox, U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State for International Organiza-
tion Affairs; Frank Aiken, Ire-
land's Minister for External Af-
fairs; and K. B. Asante. senior as-
sistant secretary of the Ghana del-
egation to the UN.


Pat
Page 2-B
Jewistincrldtor
Friday. November 4, \<^
Spiced Quinces a Happy Memory
By LEAH LEONARD
l':ipp> momgrv brings to mind
bo nettling that looked tempting
and tasted heavenly yet was no!
too syrupy. It was brought out
whenever "company" came foi
at'einoori tea cr coffee, along With
toasted fingers of white bread In-
stead off crackers. You'll w
have some on hand on your pantry
shelf for such occasions.
Spiced Quiices
5 pounds unblemished quinces
(about 101
3 pounds granulated III
IQ wfcele clove.-,
4 sticks off cinnamon (3-inch
pieces*
Peel on lemons, cut thin or
finely chopped
Wash quini >'-. p it dry an
a sharp leni ......w e ikhv -
thin. Add cold water to coi
way up the pan la which the
quinc re to be cooked < lover
and cook over moderate heal fi t
io minutes or till the slices a"e al

most tender enough to pierce with
! a toothpick. Drain, measuring
I cups jj _J.ii- syrup nun. anj)lht'r
cooking pan tad add the sugar,
spici and prepare*! lemon pee'
Stir, .over anil let cook at a mod-1
erate boil about 5 minutes 'her
dd the drained slice I quinces that
have been partially cooked. Shake
pai md continue eookin i until
the siiee- are soil and transparent,
approximate!) l- to 15 minutes.
Have h l| I erile pint jar- 'vid<
fdhr.g. Spoon in the fruit, re-
moving the cloves and cinnamon
sinks if desired, into the hot jars
We like to leave stick of cinna-
mon in each Jar. PHI with the hot
syrup and seal jars a: once. Yields
4 pints.
Sweefeeiata Balls
M cup sifted flour
V/i teaspoons baking powder
1 4 teaspoon salt
1 cup mashed, cooked sweet
potatoes
2 eggs
1 teaspoon grated
tional
onion, op-
2 tablespoons finely chopped
celery
'4 cup finely chopped pecans
:t tablespoons fine cracker
crumbs
Va [etable shortening or oil for
deep frying
Sift together flour, baking pow
ier and salt into a mixing bowl. |
Add the mashed potatoes and eggs (
and beat with a heavy fork to.
combine thoroughly, stirring in the j
grated onion and celery, then the
nuts. Heat the shortening in a
oeavy trying pan and drop this
nixturt la b> the tablespoon 01
form Into i balls of equal sin
men roll them In the crumbs. Fry
till golden brown on all sides. Lift
out with a perforated spoon onto!
beav) paper or paper towels to
drain off excessive fat. Keep warm
In oven or reheat at' serving tune.
Yields Id balls, approximately.

Chicken-in-Sauee
New England Style
2 broiier size chickens, disjoint-
ed or cut into quarters
3 to 5 tablespoons fine crumbs
or flour
Seasonings: Salt, pepper, pap-
rika in desired amounts
Roll each piece of prepare
chicken in the combined dry Z
.redients. Prepare sauce a/
5 tablespoons lemon juice
1 1 cup cold water
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon minced or en,*,
III SJBlMl
Combine well in a shallow bowl
Heat about 3 tablespoon- oil
vegetable shortening in a heavr
frying pan and brown the sectujn,
ol chicken on both sides till ai|v
prepared. Use two pan- if nMe>
sary. Add the blended sauce, cot
and let simmer about 40 minuta
or till tender when tested wift
fork. Cover after turning off beat V
and re-heat if necessary in a m<&
erate oven before serving Serve
6 to 8.
lorber chapter. Jewish National Home for Asthmatic Children.
ill hold its annual dinner dance in Cafe Pompeii ol the Eden
Roc hotel on Saturday, Nov. 19. Shown with some of the unique
dolls which will be used to raise money for the Home are tlsft
to right) Mrs. Jeffrey Wershil, donations chairman; Mrs. Lee
Poliner. president; and Mrs. Don Kohner, chairmen of the
dinner dance.
You're Rich ,
When You're Healthy!
SPOON
YOUR WAY
TO HEALTH
with
Parents to Meet
Acad. Teachers
Hebrew Academy parents will,
have an opportunity for the first'
time to meet with Hebrew and
English instructors Tuesday, Mrs.
Jack Buehsbaum, president of the
PTA, announced.
Special conferences are being
scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. There will be no school ses-'
sions all day.
Members of the faculty will give'
a projected view of the year's ed-'
ucational program and also discuss
the progress of individual students
Rabbi Morris Horovitz. assistant
principal. Hebrew Department, and
Donald Swartz. assistant principal.
English Department, are in charge
of rrangaOMtta tor the conference.
Rabb: Alexander S Gross la prin-
cipal
Responsibilities
Of Children
Key PTA Meeting
A study of four }.-.ases of family
living at the Parent and Family!
Life Study Course was held Wed-
nesday at the Christ Lutheran
Church. 12800 NE 6th ave. No. Mi-
ami.
The course is sponsored by the
Dade County Council of Parent-
Teacher A- -
Miai Margaret dilkey. supervisor
of guidance services lor the Dade
county schools, set t.he pace "For
a Happy, Healthy Family Lite "
Program included Dr. James
, Parrish. vice president of Stetson
L'niversity; Mrs. Hazel Nowakow-
ski. former supervisor of recrea-
tion of the Dade County Board of
Public Instruction; Mrs. John Hall
Jones, former teaO.er in parent
and family life education at Birm-
ingham. Ala., who now resides
here; and Dr. Marvin S. Allen. Hol-
lywood.
Mrs. Grover Angell. character
and spiritual education chairman
for Florida Congress of Parents
and Teachers, gave the inspiration-
al closing for the study course.
Coordinating the day's program
was Mrs. John L. Baggs. jr.. parent
and family life chairman for Dade
County Council of PTAS.
Assisting in the planning were
Mrs Milton Weiss, president of
Council, and Mrs Harrv Bethea.
Mrs. C C. Chiton. Mrs Guy M.
Yehudah Moshe Meetings
The Senior Group of Congrega
tion Yehudah Moshe will meet n
Popiel Hall on Sunday at 7:15 p.m.
Rabbi Sheldon H. Steinmetz said
that the Intermediate Croup met
on Tuesday.
r
.
Smorgasbord Luncheon
Temple Zion Sisterhood's annual
smorgasbord luncheon and card
party will be held Wednesday. Pre-
school children are invited to be
piesta of the Sisterhood, and there
will be baby sitters in attendance.
Mrs. Mmm.' Samuels is chairman
oi the day.
Opti-Mrs.
Given Award
North Shore Opti-Mrs. was re-
cently presented with a community
service award from the National
Cystic Fibrosis Research Founda-
tion for aid in the Greater Miami
area during the Foundation's drive
Mrs. Lawrence A. Weston pre-
sided at the presentation at the
home of Mrs. Samuel Hirsh, 3325
Pine Tree dr.
Plans were formulated for a
surprise affair at the Seville hotel
in January. Mrs. Ralph Hall, vice
president, la ways and means chair-
man. Mrs. Murray Sonnet is chair-
man.
In charge of reservations for the
January affair is Mrs. William
\ Carme. Others are Mrs. Hirsh and
Mrs. Louis Pilzer. tickets: Mrs.
Leonard Platt. decorations; and
Mrs. James Levenson, publicity.
Perry, jr.. Mrs. Alfred D. Berbien.
Mrs. Louise Bandel and Mrs. H. O.
Morris
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On a baking sheet, cover pancakes with hot creamed Chicken
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cover with cheese sauce! Serve with mixed vegetables.
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39.


Friday. November 4. 1960
-Jmistineridian
Page 3-B
George Jesse) to be Toastmaster
Of Tribute to Harry Gordons Nov. 13
Veteran shQwman George Jessel
will serve as toastmaster at a
champagne supper snack on Sun-
day, Nov. 13, at theDupont Plaza
hotel in honor of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Gordon.
Jessel, who is known as "Toast-
master General of the United
States," has appeared at many
functions all over the world. Dur-
ing his half-century in show busi-
ness, he has performed in vaude-
ville, night clubs, theaters, mpvies,
and television. He produced and
acted in a score of BroadwayI
shows, and has written a series of
short stories.
For a time, he was associated:
with another popular show business
figure, Eddie Cantor, who also is (
noted for his generosity in con-
tributing time and talent.
The tribute to the Gordons it
sponsored by the Miami Division
f the State of Israel Bonds.
Harold Thurmin, division chair-
man, is head of the planning
committee. Serving with him as
vice chairmen are Philip Berko-
witz, Abram Fox and Louis Rud-
nick.
vThe Gordons are being recog-
nized for their unselfish and out-
standing service to the community,
their temple and the State of!
Israel.
They just returned from a six-
week trip to Israel on behalf of
the bond organization and Hi-
Iradrut. They toured the country.
Three-Way Fete
At North.Beach
School Nov. 11
Plans are in the offing for a sil-
ver anniversary celebration at
North Beach Elementary School.
[4100 Prairie ave.
The celebration will honor Mrs.
Mabel T. ilisner, principal, the
; school itself, and the forming of
[the Parent Teacher Assn. All ar-
[ rived at the same time, 25 years
I ago.
The function will be at a lunch-
leon on Friday noon, Nov. 11, at
[the Seville hotel.
"A Solute to Mabel" will be the
[theme of the variety musical pro-
gram to be presented at the lunch-
leon, with a cast of 25, written by
[Mrs. Maurice Serotta and Mrs.
[Donald Smith, past PTA presidents.
[The program is directed by Mrs.
JRoslyn Sakrais, who ah>o staged
[the choreography.
Mrs. Theodore Kipnis is overall
[chairman of the luncheon. Reser-
vations may be secured from Mrs.
Alexander Libow, ticket chairman,
[Mrs. Lewis Capland and Mrs. Nor-
man Russ, co-chairmen.
In charge of seating is Mrs. Rob-
[ ert Robinson. Luncheon decorations
are being' handled by Mrs. Jack
Coursnon, and the piano acompan-
| ist is Mrs. Marie Marcus.
Included in the cast are moth-
ers, fathers and some of the fac-
ulty of the school. Mrs. Sherman
[.Kaplan is PTA president.
Over 500 people are expected to
I attend.
met many Israeli leaders, and
were honored at a number of
functions.
Gordon is a member of the Zi-
onist Organization of America,
and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He is on the board of
trustees of Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital, and serves locally in
Histadrut as chairman of the Busi-
ness and Professional Group.
He also is a member of the Elks,
Knights of Pythias, Scottish Rite
Temple of the Shriners, and Hi-
biscus Lodge of the Masons.
Like her husband, Jennie Gor-
don is equally busy in many or-
ganizations. She is a charter
member and former president of
B'nai B'rith Women, Sholem
Lodge, charter member of Torah
group of Hadasuh, and formerly
served as president of Junior j
Hadassah.
Mrs. Gordon is also a member of I
the Counsel of Jewish Women's!
Organizations, Asthmatic C h 11 -
dren's Home of Denver, and the
Jewish Home for the Aged.
Both are members of Beth Da-
vid congregation, where Mr. Gor-
don served as president 1953 to
1955, and Mrs. Gordon headed the!
Sisterhood for five terms, the first
time in 1936.
Beth Emeth
Women Meet
Beth Emeth Sisterhood was to
meet Thursday, 8:30 p.m., at 12250
NW 2nd ave.
Mrs. Stanley Glatter was to
speak on "Do You Wonder How
Jews in Other Countries Live?"
On Sunday, at 8:30 p.m., the
Sisterhood will hold a dance, with
music by the Mellotones.
MR. AND MRS. HAWtY GORDON
Miami Woman's Work on Exhibit
Miami artist Edna Glaubman
has been selected for the opening
show of New York's newest art
gallery, the Park South, in world-
famous Carnegie Hall.
Mrs. Glaubman's work is well
known here, and has been exten-
sively used in the decor of the new
addition to the Americana hotel
and at Indies House at Duck Key.
Last March. Granville Galleries
featured a one-man exhibition of
! her work, which was also seen at
| the Lowe Gallery.
Mrs. Glaubman studied at the
! Art Students League. Parsons and
j with Jacques Maroger, curator of
i the Louvre in Paris. Her work has
i been shown at the Julien Levy
land Roosevelt Galleries in New
I York.
OUT Schedules |
Two Affairs
Greater Miami chapter of Wo-
men's American ORT will hold a
meeting on Tuesday at the Dcau-
ville hotel.
Herzl Honor, education director
of Temple Menorah. will review
"Goodbye Columbus," by Phillip
Roth.
Greater Miami chapter is also
planning a moonlight cruise on the
Yacht "Dreamboat" on Nov. 12.
The "Dreamboat" will leave from
Pier 10, City Yacht Basin, at 8 p.m.
Funds raised will enable ORT to
continue its program of rehabilita-
tion and vocational training to dis-
placed persons. ORT maintains 663
vocational training centers, schools
and workshops in 19 countries.
Mesdames Miriam Weissman and
Florence Slossberg are in charge
of reservations for the cruise.
P 4 'V>
jZamora Ladies
[Annual Dinner
Sisterhood of Temple Zamora is
thaving its annual dinner on Sun-
jday at 6:30 p.m.
Larry Blue and bis accordion
will entertain. Mesdames Nathan
land Irving Davidow are chairmen
[for the evening.
At its regular meeting on Nov.- 9,
fill.- Sisterhood will hear Mrs. Mol-
Bie Glazer, of the Bureau of Jewish
[Education, review "The Tongue of
line Prophets," by Robert St. John.
| Memorial fo Mrs. Goldberg
Sisterhood Chesed Shel Ernes
will hold a memorial meeting Mon-
pday in honor of Mrs. Israel Gold-
erg, president of the organization
or nine years, who passed away
el The meeting will take place
. Jday, 1 p.m., at Beth El Con-
gregation, 800 SW 17th ve., Mi-
lmi.


Page 4-B
*Je*istncricttan
Friday. November 4,
1980
MD Questions Jewish
Submission to Nazis
"Meeting in Music" is the title of a play pre-
sented at the first meeting of the season of
the Women's Division of the Chamber of Com-
merce of Surfside, Bal Harbour and Bay Har-
bor Islands at the Singapore hotel. Participants
were (left to right) Mesdames Sally Glass, Rhea
Cashman Gladwin, Henry Blesky, Charles
Rothman, Stanley Levitch, Nathan Perlmutter,
Trixie Levin, Milton Levinsohn, Bertram
Schrank, George Israel, and Edith Michaels.
Mrs. Levin wrote and directed the play for the
organization whose membership now numbers
some 400. The division sponsors the Surf-Bal-
Bay Library Assn.
Discussing results of the "Back to School" night
sponsored by the PTA of Temple Beth Sholom
on Tuesday are Mrs. Marvin Cooper, chairman
of the program; Herbert C. Bloom, director of
education; Mrs. Bloom, nursery director; Rabbi
Leon Kronish, spiritual leader of Beth Sholom;
and Mrs. Kronish, board member of the PTA.
Mrs. Joseph Pardo is PTA president, and Mrs.
Leon Ell is president of the religious school
board of education. PTA program chairman is
Mrs. Murray Gilden. Serving on the committee
for the Tuesday function were Mrs. Carol Mil-
ler, chairman of Room Mothers; Mrs. Allan
Wilson; and Mrs. Eugene Weine, chairman of
hospitality.
Copa City Change Is Huge Task
Changing Copa City night chib constantly to get the largest seat-
over into a theater involves a I ing capacity possible,
huge number of renovations. Since j AU night cIub tables and chairs
Alan Gale took over the glamorous | have been removed. The luxurious
spot, carpenters have been working; divans attached to the walls are
Unmatched
For Delicious Flavor!
.................1 ..........V
vt*Si NO Sugar
1M% NO Spices
.. ,.,M NO Shortening
no more. The original layout is
ideal for a theater with its split
level and side sections set off by
wrought iron. One of the biggest
problems was constructing a slant-
ed floor to assure visibility of the
stages from any seat.
When the night club furnishings
were removed it was found Gale
would have space for 911 theater
seats. Haywood Wakefield, of Men-
ominee, Mich., is constructing the
seats which will be covered with
rich gold fabric to harmonize with
the red and gold decor. It is ex-
pected the installation of the seats
will be completed early next month.
Gales plan of offering star tal-
ent at popular prices is based on
volume patronagle. Each week's
show will feature four or more acts,
Dave Tyler's 15-piece orchestra
and the Boots McKenna dancing
chorus.
iay^oocial Report* -*-
NEW YORK Why did millions
of Jews quite passively go to their
death in Nazi concentration camps'.'
Why did they not fight tack?
Bruno Bettelheim, a prominent
psychiatrist who is now director
of the Othogenic School at the Uni-
versity of Chicago, explores the
psychological motivation of per-
secuted Jews in the November is-
! sue of Harper's Magazine.
Dr. Bettelheim was himself im-
prisoned in the Buchenw Id and
Dachau concentration camps dur-
ing 1938 and 1939.
He believes that most Jews be-
lieved too strongly in the fact that
their life would always go on as
usual. They refused to face the |
j danger singals that were engulfing 1
Hum and made no preparations
for the horrors that were to come, i
"When a world goes to pieces,:
when inhumanity reigns supreme, j
man cannot go on with business as
usual." he writes. "One must then|
radically revaluate all of what one
has done, believed in, stood for. In
short, one has to take a stand on
the new reality a firm stand,
and not one of retirement into an
even more private world."
Dr. Bettelheim cites Anne -Frank
and her family as an example. Hej
considers that their fate was not
only not necessary, but was sense-
less, because they tried to carry
on their normal lives in an abnor-
mal world.
"The Franks coo Id have faced
th* fact* as olid many Jaws living
in Holland/' he says. "Anna could
have had a good chance to sur-
vive as did many Jewish children
in Holland. But for that she would
have had to be separated from
her parents and gone to livo with
Dutch family as their own
child."
Why did the Franks not provide
themselves with a gun? Why did
they select as a hiding place an
attic that was a trap without an
outlet? Why did they not try to
build an emergency escape route?
"Anne Frank died because her
parents could not get themselves
'o believe in Auschwitz." states
ieim. "Ane-H."-^
found wide acclaim because for us
too, it denies implicitly that Ausch-
witz ever existed. 1} all men are
good, there was never an Auscb-
witz."
Ho explores, too, the fact-thai
tha Jaws, having once rsaliied
that their life could not 30 on
as in the old days, and laving
faced the harsh realities of ih,
concentration camps, surrendered
so meekly to tha Naiis.
"Millions of the Jews of Europe
who did not or could not escape
in time or go underground as many
thousands did. could at lea ; have
marched as free men against the
SS, instead of groveling \ first;
then, waiting to be roundc upjor
their own extermination; jnd iin.
ally, walking to the gas chambers.
Goodwill luncheon Hers
Goodwill Group of Create: Miami
will hold a luncheon and card party
on Thursday noon, Nov. 10. at
Beth El Congregation. Mr-. Frank
Hoffman is president
Tonight as you watch TV enjoy the
distinctive nutty flavor of Swiss Knight
cheese. Great for snacks with crackers
and fruit. 6 handy "zip open" wedges.
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Beth Sholom Breakfast
Brotherhood of Temple Beth
Sholom of Miami Beach held'its
monthly breakfast on Sunday. Alex-
I ander C. Hardy, vice president of
National Airlines and a former
trial counselor at Nuremberg, spoke
on "The Nuremberg Process or the
Rights of the Accused." David
Drucker is president of the Broth-
erhood, which supports the Youth
I program of the Temple.
Q
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-----


Friday, November 4, 1960
*Jeist fhrldUam
Page 5-B
Mrs. Milton Green, president of the Greater Miami Council of
Pioneer Women, presents a national membership award to
Mis. Molly Goldschein, membership chairman of Bebe Idel-
son Club. The award, one of six Israeli Bibles throughout the
nation, is ornamented with silver filigree and inscribed by
Rahe; Ycnait Ben-Zvi, First Lady of Israel. Presentation was
at a Pioneer Women's training session Oct. 18 at the Algiers
hotel.
Trick-or-Treat
Funds for UNICEF
A Dade county committee has
been formed in behalf of the Unit-
ed Nations- International Child
Kraergrncy Fund.
UNICEF iji a major UN agency.
H. B. NoVinson has been announc-
ed as *nairmlui of the Dade com-
mittee.
The Dade group Joins others
throughout.the country, which last!
year collected over $1,500,000 in
pennies on Halloween through a
Children's "trick-or-treat" doorbell:
campaign.
Novinson saii that 10,000 Dade!
county children joined the drive'
Mond;i> evening in cooperation
with some 50 synagogue and
church Sunday schools.
Ravioli
N SAUCe
Pioneer Women
Plan Functions
Mrs. William Beckwith. presi-
dent of Golda Meir Pioneer Wom-
en's Club, will conduct a regular
meeting Tuesday evening at Beth
El Congregation.
Mrs. Nathaniel So r off is in
charge of the cultural program,
which will feature Louis Schwartz-
man, executive director of the
Bureau of Jewish Education.
In honor of Jewish Book Month,
Schwartzman will review Benja-
min Siegel's "The Sword and the
Promise."
Mrs. Sam Osipow, chairman of
the social hour, will be assisted by
Mrs. Israel Cirtzenberg and Mrs.
Anna Sorin Bild.
< *
Mrs. Irving Liftman, president
of Club 2, announces that the club
will celebrate Pioneer Women's
35th birthday in conjunction with
a banquet in .honor of Mr. and
Mrs. William Malmuth. who have
been active members of the Zion-
ist movement for over 50 years.
, The affair will be held on Sun-
day, Nov. 13, 6 p.m. at the Royal
! Hungarian restaurant.
| A young student in Israel will
I be presented with a $500 scholar-
ship by Club 2 in honor ot the
Malmuths.
Jacob Fishman. toastmaster, will
present Rabbi Tibor Stern, spiri-
tual leader of Beth Jacob Congre-
I gation, as guest speaker. Mrs. Son-
;ja Weiss will entertain with folk
songs.
Beth David Ladies
Meet Wednesday
Beth David Sisterhood will meet
on Wednesday noon at the auditor-
Guest speaker will be Mrs. Henry
B. Wernick. organizing president
of Southgate Hadassah, and serving
on the board of the Seaboard Brancn
of National Women's League.
Mrs. Wernick's topic will be "Pjr
view of Genesis," delivered in nar-
rative form, with musical back-
ground by Mrs. Harold Berney.
Mrs. Moe Feingold will give a
dramatic reading in acknowledge-
ment of Jewish Book Month.
Mrs. Irma Graff, chairman of
rummage of the Greater Mi-
ami Council of Pioneer Wom-
en, recently received this cer-
tificate in recognition of "her
long years of devotion and
service to Moetzet Hapoalot,"
Working Women's Council in
Israel, at a Leadership Train-
ing Seminar of Pioneer Wom-
en in the Algiers hotel.
Patsy Abbott
Entertains Unit
Patsy Abbott was featured en-
tertainer at a luncheon sponsored
by the Shore Unit of the Woman's
| Corps of the Cancer Institute at
i Miami on Monday noon at the
1 Fontainebleau hotel.
Mrs. S. Sidney Raffel is presi-
I dent of the Woman's Corps, which
| ordered a Chinese menu.
Program chairman was Mrs. Sam
! Brody. Ticket co-chairmen were
I Mrs. Pearl Hyams and Mrs. Flor-
j ence Nadler. Proceeds go to the
[Cancer Institute at Miami.
Mrs. Ann Sklar shows her
award of merit "for devoted
service to Moetzet Hapoalot."
Mrs. Sklar is an active mem-
ber of the Coral Gables Pio-
neer Women's Cl"b. Presen-
tation was Oct. 18 at the Al-
giers hotel, where the Greater
Miami Council met for a
Leadership Training Seminar.
Orthodox Women
Plan Convention
Women's Branch of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations of
America will hold its 37th annual
national convention Nov. 14 to 16
at the Chelsea hotel in Atlantic
City, N.J.
Mrs. Harry Personik. president
of the Florida chapter, said that
some 700 delegates throughout the
.United States and Canada will at-
tend the three-day convention.
Theme is "The Wisdom of Wom-
en Buildeth Her Home." The con-
vention will review the role of the
organization in advancing t h e
cause and goals of traditional Ju-
daism.
In addition to Mrs. Persopik. of-
ficers of the Florida chapter of
the Women's Branch include Mes-
dames Jack Shapiro, vice presi-
dent; Hyman Galbut. recording
secretary; Philip Kostick, corres-
ponding secretary; Sol Weger. fi-
nancial secretary; and Max Rap-
paport, treasurer.
ryv-
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JEWISH HOMES
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Served in a glass or a cup...
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yet are Delicious, Tasty, and Good }
i
Handwriting Analyst
August bros uy,'
Is the t\r si '
Miami Beach Afternoon chapter
of Women's American ORT will
hold a luncheon meeting at noon
on Wednesday at the Bel Aire ho-
tel. Mrs. Charlotte Leibel. hand-
writing analyst, will give person-
ality analyses of various types of
penmanship.
ASK FOR THEM IN YOUR FOOD STORE OR HEALTH FOOD SHOT.
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f:.f


Page 6-B

+Jeist>nor*fforr
Friday. November 4. ige0
Rabbi and Student, Dr. Narot Marks Anniversary
Dr. Joseph R. Narot is marking
'he beginning of his second dec-
ade with Temple Israel of Great-
er Miami in a manner which
'hose who know him best feel
18 Rabbi Narot at his best
'caching and building Reform Ju-
daism.
Since the beginning of the New
Year, Dr. Narot has written a
eries of "What I Believe "
betters in Temple Israel's weekly
. ulletin. which admirers and
iritics alike consider to be both
< compendium and a continued
txploration of his philosophy of
Judaism. For the past three
; cars, these weekly letters have
been a source of inspiration and
(ebate for members of Temple
Nrael and hundreds of rabbis and
laymen throughout the country.
\ ho await eagerly his comments
"> the modern world. For. wheth-
t r there is agreement or disagree-
rient with what he says, it is a
lelt that everything he write- ll
Simulating.
H I
DR. JOSIPH NAROT
On Nov.
rmmity at
18 and 19, the com
large will join with
Temple Israel's 1,350 family
members in honoring Dr. Narot
on two significant anniversaries.
The Sabbath eve services at Tem-
ple Israel on Nov. 18 will be ded-
icated to observance of his 20th
year as a rabbi, and the following
night, tribute will be paid to him
at a tenth anniversary dinner to
be held in the Americana hotel.
As rabbi of one of the Souths
largest synagogues. Dr. Narot has
spent a decade combining with
rare sucess the components of a
modern-day rabbi. He is a pastor
and counsel to the large member-
ship, not only from his office,
but on his daily visits to the hos-
pitals and the homes of sick or
sorrow bound families. He is a
preacher known not only for his
eloquence, but his careful prepa-
ration of text, and a teacher of
both adult and juvenile classes
whose lectures are consistently
inspiring.
In the Jewish community, his
leadership is exerted as chairman
of the Joint Advisory Council on
Religion in the Public Schools,
as a board member of American
Jewish Committee, Federation.
Jewish Vocational Service, past
president of the Rabbinical Assn.,j
and other organizations. In the
Greater Miami community, he
serves on the boards of the Wel-
fare Planning Council, Mental
Health Society, Rotary Club, and
a number of other committees
where the voice of Jewish leader-
ship is sought.
With it all, he has managed to
maintain a writing schedule with
lengthy weekly articles for the
Temple Israel Bulletin. American
Judaism, the Reconstructionist,
Liberal Judaism, the CCAR
Journal, and other publications de-
voted to the cause of modern Re-
form Judaism.
A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of
Western Reserve University, Rab-
bi Narot was ordained at Hebrew
Union College in Cincinnati in
1940, and immediately assumed
the pulpit at Temple Beth Israel
in Atlantic City, N.J., the only
other pulpit he held before com-
ing to Miami in 1950. There, he
was chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal for three consecutive
years, and also headed the Atlan-
tic City Forum. In 194*, he earn-
ed the degree of Doctor of He-
brew Letters at Hebrew Union
College.
The decade at Temple Israel
has been one -of unparalleled
growth, which many attribute in
great part to the personality of
Dr. Narot. During the ten years,
the congregation grew from one
of less than 500 families to its
present peak of 1.350. and in na-
tional stature arising as much
from its leadership as from its
size.
Temple Israel is the only syna-
gogue in the country which has
three members on the national
board of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, parent
body of the Reform Jewish move-
ment Henry E. Wolff, a vice
president, and Sam A. Goldstein
and Louis E. Wolfson. Sam c
Levenson, like Wolff, a past pre ident of Temple Israel, is nation-
al vice chaiunan of thccombined
Campaign for American Reform
Judaism.
The esteem in which Rabbi Nar-
ot is held nationally was shown
recently when he was invited to
give the sermon at Rodeph Sho-
lom in New York as part of the
ceremonies highlighting the ded-
ication of the House ol Living
Judaism, headquarters of the Un-
ion of American Hebrew Congre-
gations, and his selection last
year to give a special series ol
lectures on the techniques of ser-
mon preparation at his alma
mater.
The decade of "ingathering"
ha* been one of patient and prin-
cipled teaching by Dr. Narot, *f
bringing) hi* message in belief gf
Reform Judaism to thousands
who heal drifted away, or broken
then* tie* altogether, with the
Judaism of the pest.
It is a measure of this patience,
perhaps, that the end of the dec-
ade, one of Dr. Narot's great sat-
isfactions is that one of the chil-
dren he taught has begun to study
for the rabbinate at Hebrew Un-
ion College a boy who was
born the year he was ordained at
the same school.
Hadassah Hears
show is "Blue Denim." and pro-
ceeds will go to the nursery school
program.
|PTA Theatre Party
PTA of the Southwest YMHA's |craf|| Dirt>r4>Ar
early childhood development pro-' *-wl 'Iwl
gram is planning a theatre party Lucient Harris was guest speak
Sunday, Nov. 27, at Studio M. The er at an Oneg Shabbat on Saturday
at the home of Mrs. Sam
1444 So. Biscayne pt. rd.
The Oneg Shabbat was sponsored
by board members of the Miam
and Miami Beach chapters of Ha-
dassah.
to banquets, parties, wed-
dings any social function
with superb cuisine and serv-
ice. Plus the talents of an
imaginative staff and luxuri-
ous surroundings.
Have
Business M
Banquet,
Special Oe
#
You'll find complete
facilities to erectly satisfy
yoer needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Robaiyot Reoms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I


Friday, November 4, 1960
CjfeWfftf) rtrridTtrtjn
*
Page 7-B
The musical season opened on Oct. 23 wish a pala concert
by the University of Miami Symphony Orch(tra. A record
attendance ttMmd a brilliant performance by Fabien Sevitzy
and the orchestra and the gifted young American pianist, Gary
Graffman.
We all know music to he one of the great joys of life. This
reviewer is privileged and pleased to note that the coming
months will present such artists as Blanche ThebOTi and Dorothy
Kirsten, beautiful stars of the Metropolitan Opera Company; our
own immensely talented and exciting violinist, Joan Field, who
is returning from a concert tour of Europe: a performance of
"Andrea Chenier'" by the Opera Guild of Miami, featuring the
lovely and gracious Renala Tebaldi, acclaimed- as the world's
greatest soprano; the virile Jose Greco and his Spanish Dance
Company; and many other super artists and attractions.
CALENDAR FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER
. Tuesday. Nov. 1. marked the debut of the newly formed
.Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, with Carmen Nappo as con-
ductor. And the remainder of the month of November ushers in
the following musical fare:
Now. 6, Sunday, the first- concert of the season of the
Miami Beach Civic Orchestra, Barnett Breeskin, conductor,
wilt feature Beethoven's Symphony No. 8 in F major. The 65-
voiee choir of Miami Beach Senior High School, directed by
William Triplett, will also perform on the program scheduled
for the Beach Auditorium.
Nov. 11 is the opening date of the Civic Music Assn., and will
present the famous pianist. Friedrich Gulda, with the Vienna
Philharmonic Winds. The Civic Music Assn., tickets by member-
ship only, has had a waiting list for years. The need for a similar
series sparked the formation of the Community Concert Assn..
which has a limited number of regular memberships available,
and has recently innovated a student membership plan.
(The noted Israeli violinist, Zvi Zeitlin, will be the first artist
on Community Concerts starting Dec. 7.)
The University of Miami Symphony Orchestra's second con-
cert of the season on Nov. 13 and 14 will feature the brilliant
artistry of the duo-pianists, Luboshutz and Nemenoff. The noted
piano team (Mr. and Mrs. in private Hfe) have recently returned
from Israel, where they performed for Queen Elizabeth of
Belgium.
Barry College opened its Culture Series with Nell Rankin,
glamorevs mono-sowi ano of the Metropolitan Opera Company,
and for second concert on Nov. 20 will present George Roth,
pianist.
The Hillel Foundation of the University of Miami will present
the Hillel String Sinfonietta, Robert Strassburg, conductor, on
Nov. 27, featuring a first performance in this area of the Dvorak
String Serenade, op. 22, and Strassburg's "Israel Pastorale" for
flute and strings.
ON WINGS OF SONG
We are all familiar with the lives of composers, who reached
new forms of expression, driven by some inner urge to break
through the confining forms of their day, or the hampering cir-
cumstances of their lives.
We, who are not gifted to be creators, can nevertheless be
Inspired When we Hear great music presented and interpreted by
the finest artists available. And so we look forward to a musical
season that can lift us out of the prosaic world, and take us on
its magical carpet of sound to a world of infinite beauty and
excitement.
Austria Vtites Compensation
For Destroyed Synagogues
VIENNA(JTA)The Austrian Parliament approved unanimously
this week a bill providing for 30 million schillings ($1,200,000) compen
sa^ion to the Jewish community for the destruction of synagogues and |
cemeteries by the Nazis in 1938 In addition, the bill provided for annual
government payments to the Jewish community of 1,800,000 schillings'
(about $70,000) for operation of community facilities.
During the debate, eai
He declared that net only n>
told Parliament that Austria had
a moral obligation to pay retfftu-
tion to Jews as viettms of Nariem.
Germans who were here Curing
the Nazi retime, he* the 'Awtr-
latrts as well, '?ere i isBOWthU fer
the anti-Jewish atreeirtee."
A bill providing for coropensu
tion to Jewish victims of Nazism
in Austria is pending in Parlia-
ment, but is making slow progress.
It i> still not certain whether the
Austrian Government will assume a
major share of the cost of stich
a compensation program, or will
expect West Germany to shoulder
most of Hie costs.
It is also Vnccrtain whether the
I envernment plans to extend such |
(payments, when and if they are
) made, to former Austrian Jews
living abroad, or to confine the pay-
ments only to those Austrian Jew-
i ish victims of Nazism living in this
country now. There are about 3,000 |
j of these victims in Austria, and
I about 30,000 abroad.
Making plans for the Florida B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation are (left to right) Bruce Rappaport and
Diane Battiste, representing the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization here; Burnett Roth, national
trustee of the Foundation; Maurice Revitz, pres-
ident- of the Florida unit of the organizatior;
and Joy S'.ein and Mel Hecht. representing
Hillel House at the University of Micmi.
Members of the Hebrew Academy Patrol re-
ceive special instructions in patrolling school
area and school safety from Patrolman Richard
Procky, of the Miami Beach Police Department.
Left to right are Marc Sommer, sergeant; Israel
Use 'C-Number' Veterans Urged
Far too many of the 200 million i names are not enough, C. W. Boggs,
Porush, lieutenant; Martin Finkel, captain; and
Richard Rothstein, sergeant. Members not
shown are Maxine Zisquit, Max Corndorf, Nor-
man Solomon and Scotty Choos, patrolmen.
pieces of mail that flow through
the Veterans Administration each
year cannot be properly identified,
the VA disclosed Wednesday.
Too many veterans and their
dependents merely sign t K e i r
names to correspondence, and
officer in charge of the VA office
at 984 W. Flagler St., pointed out.
Almost all of the 30 million
names in VA's master index file,
are duplicated. As might be ex-1
peeled, there are more than 300.-
MO Smiths and almost 200,000
Johnsons, but most other names
are duplicated scores of times.
The veteran's claim number or
"Cnumber" and his insurance
number are his alone, Boggs ex-
plained. Inclusion of these num-
bers in correspondence will insure
prompt and efficient service, and
save the time and cost of addition-
al correspondence.
i
I
THE SWING is to
KENNEDY
ELECT DEMOCRATS
From the COURT HOUSE to the WHITE HOUSE
ON
KENNEDY JOHNSON
FASaiL BRYANT
NOVEMBER 8
1M Pol. Adv.
J


Page 8-B
+Jewist> Hcricfian
Friday, November 4, i960
WHY PEOPLE MOVE
The secret is out. I always wondered why people in apartments
move so often. Now I have found out. They don't want to have their
apartments painted. Ours was just painted. We kept putting it off
and in retrospect its easy to sec why. First of all,
I never had the time, and secondly, it makes all
the furniture look so decrepit. We finally made the
time to have the inevitable done and so, of course,
the furniture looks terrible.
The things I threw away it's unbelievable what
you save. I found a belt from a dress that I gave to
the National Council of Jewish Women's Thrift Shop
five years ago. I came across ten little date books
from 1952 and a wonderful collection of chipped un-
matched dishes a complete set.
At this point, my house is in perfect condition '
to eat off the floor, as the saying goes. Of course'
mo one ever does, but that seems to be the measure of household ex-l
tc Hence these days.
Esther (Mrs. Donald) Rubin has moved. She moved from one apart-
ment to another in the same building. Esthers one of the smart ones.
The new apartment was freshly-painted. From now on, that's for me.
FSTHf*
Miss Caldwell
Will Wed Doctor
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Caldwell,
of 517 Miller rd., Coral Gables, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Ravon Lee, to Dr. Ken-
neth C. Molkner. son of Mrs. Clem-
ent Molkner and the late Mr. Molk
ner, of Atlanta, Ga.
Miss Caldwell was graduated
from the University of Miami, and
received a Master's degree from
the University of California. She is
a member of. Phi Kappa Phi nation-
al scholastic honorary, Nu Kappa
Tau leadership honorary. Gamma
Sigma Sigma service sorority, and
Radio-TV honorary.
She is listed in "Who's Who in
American Colleges and Universi-
ties," and was graduated top wom-
an in her class.
Dr. Molkner attended Emory Un-
iversity and was a member of Tau
Epsilon Phi. He graduated from
Yale University school of medicine,
is interning at the Grady Memor-
ial Hospital in Atlanta, and will be-
gin a residency in psychiatry this
summer.
i
The wedding will take place Feb.
12, 1961. i
Left to right are Mrs. Yvette Silberger, Mrs. Carlton Blake, cm Mrs. Ezra Finegold as they plan for a "member-bring-c-mem-
ber" luncheon for Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood on Th_ sdcy
noon, Nov. 10, at Mrs. Finegold's home, 1305 No. Bi3-vne
pt. rd.
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Little did she think that the experience she got when she worked
in the Public Relations Administration Division of (he Tom Home
Permanent Company would help her later in her community volunteer
activities.
But Lois ( Mrs. A. Herbert) Mathes actually feels that the experience
I ive her the background needed to run the Women's Auxiliary of Mt.
Sinai Hospital, of which she is currently president. Toni was a young;
(r^anizution at the time and encouraged the young
personnel to express themselves freely. She re-
ceived an extensive course in the correct procedures
of a well-run organization, which she is translating
into the terms of her own hospital auxiliary.
Lois loves to travel with her architect husband,
loih in the United States and abroad. She never
misses a chance to inspect hospitals in whatever city
she's visiting. She also goes with Herb when he in-
spects the basic building principles of all of the old
European building and ruins.
Lois has just returned from Europe and says
there is one thing that she envies. Everyone in Eur-
ope, including the littlest children, seem to be aule to speak five lan-
guages fluently. Her 92-word Spanish vocabulary and little bit of French
aren t enough as tar as she's concerned. Both Lois and Herb have de-
cided to take French lessons.
At home, Lois keeps up with her music and plays the piano for
the delight of her family. This complements well Herb's serious interest
in collectors' records These are two very stunning people
Youngs Reveal
Judith's Troth
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Joseph
Young, 2416 SW 23rd st., announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Judith Helen, to Sidney, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Margolis, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
Miss Young graduated from Mi-
ami High School, attended the Uni-
versity of Florida, and was presi-
dent of Hillcl B'nai B'nth Girls.
She is presently a legal secretary.
The groom-to-be graduated from
Temple University and Gratz Col-
lege. He is president of Rho Pi Phi
pharmaceutical fraternity, and a
pharmacist at Westwood Lake
Pharmacy.
LOIS
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
Joy May lixed up the bathroom in their new home on So Hibiscus
proved of everything. He saw a tray of thin mints, he thought! on the'
M bathroom dressing room table. Well, this 1 have never seen be-
fore." and he popped one into his mouth. The thin mints were of i
course, those new guest room individual soaps. He recovered in time I
lor the family party that Joy arranged for his birthday. His in-laws
MM and Git Benck. and son. Frank, came over from the Beach, and'
as a special concession their grandchildren, Ricky and Debbie were'
allowed to stay up later than usual in honor of Daddy's birthday."
* +
Another birthday party was a surprise. Mildred Silverman really
kept the secret. It was for her husband, Bernard (Bob), and it was to
celebrate a milestone birthday, sixty. The party was at the home ot
Benedict and Garry Lou Silverman. As an extra surprise, daughter
(.lona (Mrs. David) Pass arrived from San Francisco with Stephanie.
The party was for the family and a few very close friends.
I met Dianne Treister, a Silverman daughter, in the dressmakers
with her small son, Arthur. She told me about the party Afterward
1 wondered how they ever kept it a secret. Arthur was simply adorable'
a very handsome youngster, and so friendly. When he left to buy a
birthday present for Grandpa, it seemed as if the sun had gone down.
* *
OH, THAT APPLI
Received a lovely invitation from the officers and board of direc-
tors of Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Philadelphia for the Oneg
Shabbat welcoming Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg.
I'll never forget the Sukkah we went to at the Rosen-
berg house in Miami last year. Their fruit was the
biggest I had ever seen. I was sorry that I didn't
eat an apple, at least, but I told Devorah that I
would for sure next Sukkath. It only goes to show
that you should do what you want right away the
Rosenbergs didn't celebrate the "next Sukkoth"
here, but in Philadelphia. I'll never forget that ap-
ple, which gets bigger everytime I think about it.
* *
A MEETING?
Falick, Shein
Betrothal Told
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Falick, of
945 79th ter., announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Ju-
dith, to Barry Shein.
The groom-to-be is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Shein, of
2932 Prairie ave.
The young couple have been
sweethearts since their Miami
Beach High School days. Judith is
at present a dental assistant, and
Barry is majoring in acounting at
the University of Miami.
No date has been set for the wed-
ding.
Pioneer Women, women's Labor Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, has set as its goal a total of $15,000,000 in Israel Bond
sales during the first ten years of the bond drive, whic.i will
celebrate its 10th anniversary next May. Shown discussing
plans for the effort with Levi Eshkol, Israel's Finance M uster.
during his recent visit to the United States are (left to -ighl)
Dr.Sara Feder, past president of Pioneer Women; Cla:: L*f/.
president; and Dvorah Rothbard, national Israel Bond cectoi
lor Pioneer Women.
Hialeah Sisterhood Supper
Temple Tifereth Jacob sister-
hood will hold a supper at the Tem-
ple, 951 Flamingo Way, Hialeah,
on Sunday. In charge of tickets is
Mrs. Max Lcbowitz. Entertainment
will be by the Fred and Rheta
Rapps Dance Academy.
JYS Names
Committee Here
Clemen J. Ehrlich, vice president
Jewish Vocational Service, this
week announced the appointment
of committee chairmen.
Barney Bernstein was named ad-
ministrative chairman. These are
Harold Goldfarb, employers advis-
ory; Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg,
personnel practices; Mrs. Eugene
Ileiman, publicity and public re-
lations; Marshall S. Harris, nomi-
nating and membership.
Dr. Jess Spirer. workshop; Clem-
en J. Ehrlich, individual and group
guidance; Harris Klein, insurance;;
Albert J. Hirsch, Jewish Home for
the Aged contract; Sam J. Hei-
man. Aged Home liaison; and Mor-
ris Hoffman. JVS-Baron deHirsch
Loan fund liaison.
Llyod Ruskin is president of
Jewish Vocational Service.
SEE IT NOW!
PADDYOHAYEFSKY* HIT
THE TENTH MAN
D....1* TYRONE GUTHRIE
" ;>.. Tm. i .25- '".f u' M ', to.
ItS-.'J?,1??,* w *" v 4-
J.M. S 00. 7 SO 'Til in, 1 i. [K|. ,, MttrivM
MMM tfto. md n>U"t 3 MttfiitU fetci
BOOTH THEATRE.4S U *
ENLARGEMENT OF YCUR
FAVORITE NEGATIVE only $1
iBtWjto Sx'C Morn! I,
PROFESSIONALLV riNISHED.
Mail or Br,nrj to
LIPSON LAB., 163 Ar.go^ A.
Coral Gablct, r" 5 3424
A-l EMPLOYMENT
DOMESTIC HELP
DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 04401
DfVOtAN
Maurice Pcarlstein and Judge Irving Cypen think
that they went to New York to attend a conference on the aging Maybe
they did, but Hazel and Carol, who went along, had some different ideas
They had connecting rooms at the Waldorf and tickets for "The Miracle
Worker,-' The Sound of Music," "The Best Man" and "Gypsy."
Brandeis Group
To Meet Here
Open board meeting of Brandeis
I University National Women's Com-
! mittee, will be held Thursday, Nov.
10, 10 a.m., at the Venetian Isle
motel.
In charge of reservations is Mrs.
Sam A. Goldstein, 5185 Alton rd.
Plans for the forthcoming Bran-
,deis University National Women's
Committee luncheon on Dec. 16
will be announced.
CORAL GABLES
COHVALESC[HT HOME
DAY CARE AVAILABLE
"A Friendly and Gentle Atmo^here
For Those You Love''
I ItJ!?.U, IO,$TiEt NURSING SERVICE
SPECIAL DIETS OSSERVED
All ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR
PRIVATE BATHROOMS
SPACIOUS GROUNDS t SCREENED PATIO
F.rdin.nd H. Ro.enthil. Oir.ctor-Own.r
H Jewlnh H..,. tor Aim, PlttHl.uryh
7060 S.W. 8th ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA
CA 6-1363
De Conna Ice Cream
FLORIDA'S KEY TO GOOD EATING
WHOLESALE SUPPLIERS TO
Hotels .Schools Hospitals Institutions
<-aletenas Restaurants Etc.
yr,U?r/ AND ICE CREAM NOVELTIES ALSO HOME DELIVERY
De Conna Ice Cream
125? N U7 TO.l_ r*.
3292 N.W. 38th St
Phone NE 5-4832


Friday, November 4, 1960
+Jmlsl) nrrldtirtr
Page 9-B
cm
ctrmtn
db
yours,

v
C^dit/i ppl
>ctum
SATURDAY night at Westvicw
* Country Club was fun night,
in capital letters, for members
and their guests. A gay, colorful
evening, with a majority of guests
in costume, began with a walk
down a dimly-lit corridor filled
with real pumpkins whose faces
were cut out and what seemed
Jike spider webs dangling from
the ceiling.. A double checking
showed the "webs" to be only
strings.
Mrs. James Cohen was dressed
as "Miss Mctrecal," all in black
and with a life-size paper skele-
ton attached to the front of her
costume. "Jack Kennedy" made
"his" appearance through the
courtesy of Mrs. Irving Libby.
All was fine until she arrived on
the dance floor with her husband
when for a startling mometn
it appeared as though two men
were dancing together.
"The Morning After" was por-
trayed by Mrs. Clara Spitz, and
the card-loving set was enshrined
by Mrs. Sidney Meyer, who
came as "Miss Canasta." Dr. and
Mrs. Norman Jaffee came as an
Apache dancer with his wife as
ins little black kitten. She had a
long tail attached with a green
bow, and two pointed ears tucked
into her hair.
Our new Stale of Hawaii was
honored by Dr. and Mrs. Marshall
Pepper, as they appeared in na-
tive dress. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Roth portrayed the "Shotgun
Wedding." And Mrs. Marvin Sil-
vers wore the "Original Sack"
a huge feed bag with a tremen-
dous head.
Among guests not in costume
were the Charles Kahns. She wore
BAR MITZVAH
Preparation ft Hebrew Instruction
given privately by retired Rabbi.
Scfhfmctimi guaranteed.
HI 8-3664
ABC SHORTHAND, GREGG, PI i MAN
Compfomcrry, PBX, IBM. NCR, otc.
For other courses please consult
YELLOW PAGE 654, PHONE BOOK
An P I P U I WSINESS AND
U K TUTORING SCMOOl
Attendance accepted by Dade County
Board of Public Instruction.
500-526 N.E. 79th Street
Near Biscayne Blvd.
PL 77623 MU 1-3S6*
a moygashel linen sheath in the
interesting shade of coconut palm
taupe and a beautiful scarf from
Hermes of Paris. Mrs. Michael
Bright selected a black silk crepe
sheath for the evening as did Mrs.
James Furlong.
Mrs. Al Lcvinson chose a navy
blue moygashel linen sheath with
matching velvet scroll trim on
her V neckline. Mrs. Abe Waxen-
berg, of Golden Beach, wore a
silk print featuring tones and
shades of greens in a foliage mo-
til. Visiting from Houston, Tex.,
was Mrs. Edward Wayne, who
selected for the party a lilac silk
chiffon short formal.
* *
lulRS. Jack Fisher chose a suit
" featuring a mosaic print of
black, blue and white. In a bril-
liant carmen red peau de soie
sheath was Mrs. George Gold-
berg, while Mrs. Sam Lipton wore
a Balenciaga black silk sheath
with the tunic overskirt and a
mall band of fine pleats near the
hemline.
A warped silk tafleta print was
selected by Mrs. Jack Werst.
Tones and shades of blues on white
were featured on her gown, which
had a low cut squared neckline.
Mrs. James Albert chose a black-
and-white foliage print of silk,
with a black peau de soie cum-
merbund. Yellow peau de soie
and chiffon were the choice of
Mrs. Jesse Schwartz..
Angels with halos were all over
the club. In this disguise were
the David Catzmans and Dr. and
Mrs. Harold Rand. A black cat,
complete with a jeweled leash,
was Mrs. Michael Tobin, while
Mrs. Ernest Halpryn came as
"Mr. Pants." AH dressed up as
a pair of Beatniks were the How-
ell Kases.
The Sprintz family were pres-
ent in full force. The Charles
Sprintzes were costumed as
French Apache dancers he
with a red beret and a curled up
moustache, and she in a shiny
satin skirt and a sequined top.
Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Sprintz,
came as "Eloise and Nana." with:
Sanford as the buxom, grey hair-
ed "Nana" and his wife in a
short black jumper with a yellow
wig of yarn, clutching the perpet-
ual doll.
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Haimes
(she's the former Bobbie Sprintz)
were dressed as a pair of Beat-
niks she in a black yarn wig
and carrying a foot-long silver
cigarette holder, and he in a black
goatee and beret.

|u|RS. Lester Russm was dress-
m ed as "Little Miss Black and
Green Riding Hood," while Dr.
Russin's costume was that of a
black witch. Mrs. Denis yuitner
came as a French Vampire. Her
mask was of a special material
projecting an eerie look. Her hair
was messed over a mask, and she
carried an unusually elongated
gold cigarette holder. Mr. Quitner
was dressed as a sheik, and dub-
bed "Moishe Pipik."
The evening would not have
been complete without a pair or
battle fatigues and the Arnold
Strausses came complete with
beards and signs on their backs
which read "Castro Converti-
bles!"
h
t^ocialiie
Continued from Page IB
chuckles came from the songs her
mother didn't teach her .
It's another trip for Lane (Mrs.
Milton) Toleman, of International
Tours She and the children
are on the SS Atlantic, cruising in
the Mediterranean .
Dr. and Mrs. Milton Jacobson,'
and Dorothy, Eli and Prances Melt-1
zer are on the same cruise .
Alyce (Mrs. Leon) Eil and Inez
Krensky presented a Perkins Brail-
er to Christine Little, a blind child
Krcvitz Named
Bar President
Harold Kravitz, Hialeah attorney,
was named president of the Hia-
leah Miami Springs Bar Assoc. at
a meeting here last week. Kravitz,
legal attache to the Dade county
delegation in Tallahassee in the
1955-57 legislative session, is a
member of the board of directors
of the Bank of Miami Beach and
Marathon State Bank, and secre-
tary of the National Capital Corp.
He is also a past president of
Tempie Tifereth Jacob.
He lives with his wife, Betty, and
children, Shelley and Ricky, at
; 234 To-To-Lo Chee dr.. Deer Park,
Hialeah.
Mrs. Kravitz, is a board member
i of the Aviva group of Hadassah.
MRS. I. SlANltf LtVIki
Mrs. Levine
Named Chairman
Mrs. I. Stanley Levine, 2033
Calais dr., has been appointed over-
all area chairman of the Mothers
March on Polio by Mrs. Marvin
Kuvin, Dade county chairman.
A cotfee for members of the ex-
ecutive committee will take place
Tuesday, Nov. 15, at the home of
Mrs. Sherwin Levine, 1135 Bay dr.
On the committee are the following:
Mesdamcs Sherwin Levine,
Goerge Levenson, George Kasten-
baum, Stanley Levenson. Sondra
Frankel, Adcle Belaire, Vetta Vir-
ra, Sheldon Dubler, Julius Perl-
mutter, Jerry Warren.
Mesdames Peter Wolf, Josephine
Grimes, Fred Aaronson, and Sam-
uel Katz.
National Polio Foundation, of
which the Mothers March is an
arm, has been extending its re-
search activity into arthritis and
crippling birth defects.
Miamians Enroll
At Yeshiva U.
Two Miami students are includ-
ed in the 30-man class recently en-
rolled in Yeshiva University's Rab-
bi Isaac Elchanan Theological Sem-
inary in New York. The two have
started a three-year program of
study which will lead to ordination
as rabbis.
The Miami students are Harvey
Dickman, 1919 SW 31st St.; ami
Melvin Sachs, 123 SW 31st st.
The Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary is an outgrowth
of the first yeshiva in the United
States and the pioneer unit from
which Yeshiva University evolved.
It is the leading school in the na-
tion for the training of Orthodox
rabbis.
in the second grade last Friday at
Tropical Elementary School .
The money was raised from the
sales of Krel (Krensky-Ell), spe-
cializing in Dainty Dryers and
Canasta stop cards .
Mrs. Al (Ruth) Bernard would
seem to be flying off in all direc-
tions Planned to leave for Mex-
ico changed her mind, ended
up cruising in the Mediterranean
on the Santa Rosa.

Leon Ell greeted Maxwell Rahb
at the airport when he arrived re-
cently to speak at Beth David .
Until recently he was secretary to
President Eisenhower's cabinet .
The children of Samuel and Rose
Seltzer seem to reflect the talents
and abilities of their parents in
equal proportion ... Samuel is an
attorney, as well as president of
Mercantile National Bank Ro-e
is a Pink Lady at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital and a fine pianist, too Son
David writes music, some of which
has been published, and has been
working with Benny Davis, the
song writer...
Recently, Rose traveled to Chi-
cago to see David in the lead role
of a pre-Broadway showing of a
play at the Northwestern Univer-
sity Theater Daughter Betty-
ann just won an art scholarship
from the Music and Art League of
Miami Oldest son, Roger, is
doing graduate work at the Har-
vard Graduate School of Business
. He worked last year for CBS
in California, and hopes to combine
business with the world of enter*
lainmcm Quite a family.
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1821 East 4th Avenue Hialeah, Fla.
Harvest Moon Festival
Jewish War Veterans, North
Shore Post and Ladies' Auxiliary,
are planning a "Harvest Moon
Festival" and masquerade on Sat-
urday, 9 p.m. at Hibiscus Lodge
Auditorium. The evening will fea-
ture a smorgasbord table, prizes,
music and entertainment. Pro-
ceeds are for the veterans' rehabil-
itation program Chairmen are
Mrs. David Weisman and Harry
Peldman. Mrs. Bertram Whitman
is auxiliary president, and Paul
Grand is post commander.
Board Reelects Feinberg
By Special Report
WALTHAM. Mass New York
industrialist Abraham Feinberg has
been re-elected chairman of the
Brandeis University board of trus
tees at a meeting of the 29-member
board held recently in New York
City. He is chairman of the board
of Kayser-Roth Corporation. Also
re-elected were Norman S. Rabb,
of Newton, Mass., vice chairman;
Joseph F. Ford, of Brookline,
treasurer; and Samuel L. Slosbcrg,
Brookline, secretary. Feinberg has
served as chairman of the Bran-
deis board since 1954.
Travelers Aid Chief Talks
Miami Beach B'nai B'rith Lodge
will hold its luncheon meeting on
Tuesday at the Ritz Plaza hotel.
Clarence Hille, executive director
ol Travelers Aid Society, will speak
on "Strangers in Town." Gershon
S. Miller is chairman of the lunch-
eon.
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Po
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Page 10-B
+Jeisfi Fk>ri(Jlan
----------.
Friday. November 4, i;


Gait
P e a r ly
by Haf Pearl
Hal Pear
"Pearly Gait"

s father has passed away.
will be resumed here next week.
Sociologists to Address Orthodox Union
Conference in Atlantic City Nov. 9-13
By Special Report
NEW YORK Dr. Marshall
Eklare, dirc< tor Depi tmenl
J >h Committee, Dr.
Leo Jui -. i n lent : th
Aca Si nci -. and
I David d editoi
i i ntly-pubUs
. mal Praj
dr< thi 82nd aniiJver-
onvention
( the i nlon of Orthodox Jewish
< r< ationa >i America, it bai
I i n announced by Harold M. Ja-
i New i ork, general chair-
man df the convention.
The convention of the LN
r tional body oi tra lltional conj
gations throughout the United
Slates and Canada, will be held
at the I'heNra hotel in Atl.i
< t) i n Nov. 9 to 13. \n anticipal
l BOO delegates will attend the
live-day conclave from 40 states
and three provinces oi Canada.
Hoffman Opens
Beach Campaign
Declaring that "the time had
come for strong leadership in gov-
ernmental matters to assure the
future economy and prosperity of
Miami Beach,"' Irving Hoffman,
biumfcynan and attorney, Jtas jfj
nounced his candidacy for the City
Commission of Miami Beach.
Stating that the platform on
which he will seek the office of
' county commissioner will be an-
', nounced shortly. Hoffman declared
'Btl pa must he taken to rejuvenate
Miamo Beach as the nation's lead-
ing tourist attraction."
Hoffman, an active realtor in
Miami Beach, is former chairman
of the arbitration committee of the
Miami Beach Board of Realtors.
H also a member of the New
York and Florida Bar. B'nai B'rith,
American Legion Post 83. Fratern-
al Order Police Assn., life member
of Optimist International. (lover
nor'a International Rescue Commit-
tee. Miami Showmen's Assn..
board of directors of the Parkinson
Disease Federation.
He was former special deputy
attorney general of New York, and
also holds membership in many
other civil, religious and fratenal
organization-
Hoffman served in the I'.S. Arm
ed Forces for three years under
the Judge Advocate General.
IKVING MOffMAN
First Luncheon Meeting
Beth El Sisterhood wiii hold its
first luncheon meeting of th
-on on Tiies.lay. 12:30 p.m.. at the
Dora August Memorial Hall.
ROYAL HUNGARIAN
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ISAAC WOlfSOS
The 37th national convention
of the Women's Branch of the
LOJCA, with an expected at-
tendance of 700 delegates, will
te he'd at the Chelsea hotel on
Nov. 14 to 16, immediately fol-
lowing the UOJCA convention.
Dr William Brlckman, profess* r
of education at New York Univer-
sity and editor of School and So-
net} Dr. Marvin Fox, professor
of philosophy at the University of
01 o; Dr. Solomon H. Green, as-
prWessor at the School of
I Work of Yeshiva University;
Dr. Elmer Olfenbacher. associate
professor of physics at Temple Un-
iversity and president of the Asm
of Orthodox Jewish Scientists;
Rabbi Bmanuel Rackman. immedi-
ate pas! president eif the Rabbini-
cal Council of America and others.
Dr. Sklare will Bpeak at the Orel
convention symposium Nov. 9 on
"Mas- Mo\cment to New Commit
littles How Will ii Affect Re-
ligious .le*r\ in the Next Decade?"
He will be joined in (till discussion
by Dr. Bernard Lander, director Speakers on other phases of the
of the Bernard Revel Graduate! convention agenda will include Av-
Sehool <,f Yeshiva University of raham Harman. Israel's Ambassa-
r*eu york. |dor to (he i_-mted states; Rabbi
The two sociologist- are among Ufi Miller, of Baltimore, a vice
a r.umher of experts who will speak 'President of the Synagogue Coun-
at various sessions, panels and f'' "' America; and Rabbi Imman-
virksbops on aspects of the im-:e' -lakobovitz, former Chief Rabbi
pad of the mass population shifts'"' Ireland,
of the past decade on the future
New Luby Headquarters
Sam Lubv, jr.. president of Luby
Chevrolet, has announced that the
firm of R. M. Thompson is award-
ed the contract to erect the new
, Luby Chevrolet sales and service
center. Ground will be broken early
in November for the new building
to be loeated between 91st and
93rd sts. on NW 27th ave. Designed
by architect A. Herbert Mathes,
the new building will house Luby's
new car sales and service depart-
ments, used car department, fleet
sales and service, paint and body
siiop. new and used truck sales and
service, parts department and ex-
ecutive offices. Occupancy is
scheduled for early spring.
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of traditional Judaism in the Unit-
ed States. The delegates will be
e ailed on to develop a program to
deal with this challenge.
Other authorities who will dis"
toss this topic in relation to var-
ious facets of Jewish life on the
American and world scene are
The annual convention banquet
on Nov. 12 will be the occasion for.
the presentation of a series of
awards for outstanding achieve-
ment in various fields. Isaac Wolf-
son. British industrialist and phil-.
anthropist. will be presented with <
the UOJCA Service to World Jew-1
r> Award.
ARNOLD DOVER ^HttUfi^
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DEC. 29-JAN. 4
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Friday. Norembw 4. 1960
* Jewish Dor Mian
Page 11 B
COMPULSION MAJOR ISSUI
School Case in Court;
Conciliation Try Fails
Dade county's religion-in-the-schools case returned to Circuit Court
On Monday. Judge J. Fritz Gordon resumed hearing of the plaintiffs
argument that Bible-reading in the schools, along with such sectarian
practices as recitation of the Lords Prayer and Grace and celebration
of holidays like Easter and Christmas, are violations of the Feriprsi
safeguard of separation of church -------------------------_______________
and state.
_ _. ... _. making a child conform to the of-
Thecase. brought to court by the ficially "unenforceable rule."
Florida Civil Lioerties Union and

the American Jewish Congress, re- j
sumed on the heels of valiant ef-
forts on both sides of the contro-
versy to settle the question ami-
cably and without further litigation.
It was reliably reported here
that attorneys for the ACLU-
AJ Congress had met with attor-
ney* for the school board in an
attempt to resolve the areas of
Backing up this view was Dr.
Granville Fisher, professor of
psychology at the University of
Miami, who declared that a child
excused from the classroom dur-
ing the morning c'evotienel would
find the social pressures involved
"more inimical to his welfare
than if he attended."
Attorney for the nine churchmen
Gordon Says Issue in School Campaign
Is Whether a Liberal Can be Elected
Jack D. Gordon, Democratic Par- "It is a gross misrepresentation
ty nominee to the Dade County to accuse me of wanting "to take
School Board, declared Wednesday Jesus out of the schools.' as my
that "the issue in the present cam- opponent charges." Continued Gor-
paign is whether a relatively liberal don:
candidate can win a seat on the
JACK CORDON
conflict. Apparently, by Wednes- intervening in behalf of the school
Rabbis Will
Exchange Pulpits
board particularly if he is a
Jew."
Gordon faces Arthur Atkinson,
Republican nominee, in the elec-
tion which will be decided on Tues-
day.
Gordon charged his opponent
with campaigning on the platform
that "Bible-reading in the public
schools is the overriding issue."
The Democratic nominee, who
is president of the Washington .
Federal Savings and Loan Assn.,
said that many segregationists
are opposed to his election, and
have been using the Bible-read-
ing controversy "as a disguise."
"My opponent says the main
issue is Bible-reading. I repeat
that it is whether a liberal can-
didate a Jewish candidate
can be elected at this time." The
Democratic nominee then cited
a discussion he recently had with
Dr. Louis Head, pastor of the
Fh-st Methodist Church of Coral
Gables, who openly observed
that "you already have Mrs. An-
na Meyers on the board. Suppose
you get elected then anoth-
er ."
day of last week, major agree-
ment* had been reached in a
joint resolution to eliminate sec-
tarian observance* in Dade coun-
ty's schools, the distribution of
Bibles, and the display of relig-
ious symbols.
The compromise aimed at leav-
ing unchallenged the daily reading
without comment of a passage from
the Bible. Florida statute requires
such readings. It was emphasized
here that spokesmen for both the
plaintiffs and defendants approach
board, E. F. P. Brigham, objected'
to the testimony and was sustained j
by Judge Gordon, when he declared j
that the constitution "does not pro- i
tect one from the embarrassment
that always attends non-conform
ity, whether in religion, politics.!
behavior, or dress."
The defense, which took the cen-
ter of the stage on Tuesday, argued
that religious practices in the Dade
county schools are "educational'
and not religious instruction. Back-
I ing up this stand were four pnn
Gordon asserted that Dr. Head
denied he meant Jews specifically
"but the intent was clear." The
Gordon-Head discussion followed a
Atkinson has attacked Gordon sermon by Dr. Head, which had
i /' JJ i vLallacn sP'rltual, on the basis of his affiliation with been broadcast here on radio, in
leader of Temple Sinai of No. Mi- what he described as such "radi-1 which he called openly lor support
ami, will exchange pulpits with Dr. car organizations as the American of the Republican nominee.
Marius Ranson on Friday, Nov. 11. Jewish Congress.
Dr. Ranson is spiritual leader of1 Congress is currentlv in Dade Atkinson campaign literature is
Temple Emanu-El of Ft. Lauder- CmmfoUL tT2!..L^l**- ** circu-afd h"e V
dale.
His sermon topic at Temple Sinai
County Circuit Court as a co-pros- "S,""1 --------S.S
.., ..;.. n.. c-iij. _n .t members of the Greater Miami
ecutor with the Florida Civil Lib-
erties Union of a case against the
Ministerial Assn., which recently
ed the impasse "with maximum: cipals here: Irvin Katz, Miami
sincerity and an unequivocal
demonstration of good faith" in
the hope that they could end the
case out of court "and in the name
of the resumption of good commun-
ity relations."
The nth-hour, behind-the-scenes
talks apparently bogged down by
late Friday. Observers here are
speculating that members of the
school board may have turned
down the compromise for two
reasons: 1) Criticism by individual
school board members of individual
areas of the compromise in the feel-
ing that the defendants' attorneys
"had given too much away;" 2) con-
cern by the board that a resolu-
tion of the case, which was launch-
ed here on a wave of bitterness
and resentment earlier in the sum
mer, would affect the outcome ol
the school board election on Tues
day.
The election pits Jack Gordon.
Democrat, against Arthur Atkin-
son, Republican, who has accused
Gordon ef affiliation with "the rad-
ical American Jewish Congress"
and the sentiments of the plaintiffs.
It was. indicated here that
some of the school board mem-
bers felt a settlement might "as-
sure" e Gordon victory a pos-
sibility openly frowned upon by
the Greater Miami Ministerial
Assn., which has been using its
mailing privileges to disseminate
Atkinson campaign material
throughout the Dade county area.
The resumption of the case on
Monday found the plaintiffs in theii
last day of testimony. The opening
of their arguments were heard by-
Judge Gordon in July, who re-
[cessed the hearing to Oct. 31 when
la member of his family passed
|away.
On Monday, Dr. Joe Hall, super
|mtcndcnt of schools here, testilied
that daily Bible readings and otner
religious programs are "volunt-
>ry." Attorneys for the school
board backed up Hall with a state-
ment of official pplicy on religious
practices, which attorneys for the
pefense minutes later proved had
been enacted on June 29 after
lie case was filed.
Compulsory participation in re
uipus practices in the schools is
k"ey issue in the litigation. Ap-
ia ring for the plaintiffs on the
Inal day of their argument were
Ir. Baker Hindman. professor of
iueation at the University of Mi-
ii, and t)r. Michael Gilbert, a
kychiatrist. Both testified that.
Fen if Uie schools assure notvcom
Beach High School; Olin Webb, Mi
a me Senior High School; Clyde
Crabtree, Palmetto High School:
Mary K. Hogenmuller, Biscayne
Elementary School.
Katz testified that his school's
annual Christmas-Chanuka pro
gram "teaches about religion
rather than religion" itself, addipg
that "we have always permitted
anyone to be excused."
Webb told Judge Gordon that "it
was his custom to read the Bible
to the entire school every Monday
morning in compliance with Flor-
ida law. On other days, the read
ing is done in each of the school's
individual classrooms."
Asked by Judge Gordon whether
he read from the Old or New
Testament, Webb replied: "I was
brought up that it was the Holy
Bible, rather than the Old Testa-
ment or New Testament."
Crabtree denied earlier testimonj
of a Palmetto High student
Michael Landis, who said he hat
been compelled to attend religion
programs. Also denied was an as
sertion of Jewish parents, whose
.iiilili en attend Biscayne Elemen
tary School, that a book, "Bible
Pictures to Color," featuring
events in the New Testament, is
available at the school's PI A store.
The defense was expected to
wind up its testimony on Wednes
day.
Grossberg Joins
Riverside Here
Larry Grossberg. an executive ol
Riverside Memorial Chapels in New
York City for the past 10 years,
has joined the executive staft ol
the Riverside chapels in Miami and
Miami Beach.
Announcement of Grossberg's
new position was made by Lame
Blasberg. funeral director, and Abe
Eisenberg, treasurer of the River
side chain in this area.
Grossberg is a graduate of the
American Academy of Funeral
Services in New York City.
The Riverside organization,
founded in New York more than
50 years ago, includes chapels on
Washington ave Alton rd., and
Normandy Isle. The newest branch
is on Douglas rd., Miami.
w*zszr^w77^r,Zi-zz^rsrs.'ag* *******
Fear of Nuclear War and Other eliminate violations of the Federa" l* !"" anoo>nlous "*
Fears of This Age?" provision of chnrch and state. a,ong w.lth aa2ET22S2 ,
Dr. Ranson was founder and' Specific targets are Bib.e-reading.; 'SH ". "SS^SSt^
first rabbi of the American Syn- recitation of religious hymns, the ~ tne notiy t0iuesl*a
agogue in New York City. He has. Lord's Prayer and Grace, and cele-
oeen spiritual leader of Temple, bration of such sectarian holidays,
Emanu-El for the past 12 years. I as Christmas, Easter, and Cha-;
He is honorary president of the nulca
Board of Rabbis ol Browar.i Coun-
ty, and is listed in "Who's Who
in America."
"It is a pity," Gordon com-
plained, "that more fundamental
questions pertaining to educa-
tion the business of the school
beard is being spurned by the
opposition."
Agudath Israel
Plans Dinner
Gordon, a graduate oi the Uni.
Gordon reaffirmed Wednesday
that "I don't oppose the Florida I
statue calling for daily Bibleread
ing in the schools. If elected. I will.
uphold the law and assist the
school board in its defense in the j varsity of Michigan, has studied
suit-" school systems in Denmark. Eths-
The AJCongress FLCU hearing i opia, Costa Rica, and Israel. Sev-
Herman Weintraub, president of presumed Monday before Judge J.l eral of his trips to these countries
Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute,; Fritz Gordon after a recess since, were as part of U.S. State De-
this week announced formation ofjlete July. partment missions,
plans for the synagogue's seventh
annual dinner and journal.
Sam Klein, vice president, has
been named dinner chairman, as-
sisted by Mrs. Rose Siegfried, rep-
resenting the Sisterhood.
Morris Feldman is chairman ot
'he entertainment committee.- and
Dr. Milton Siegfried, chairman of
the board, will head the journal
committee.
Sam Brick, recording secretary.
:s chairman of the ticket com-
mittee.
Beachite to Receive Award
Samuel A. Rivkind, 315 E. San,
Marino dr.. Miami Beach, formerly',
if Boston, will be honored at the,
Golden Jubilee convention of the'
Sew England Section of the Na-j
tiona! Jewish Welfare Board this
weekend at the Hotel Somerset in
Boston. Mass. Special plaques will
be presented to persons who have
jiven many years of community
and youth service either as a key
volunteer in a YMHA or Jewish
Community Center or in the JWB
New England Section.
GREYHOUND RACING
NOW
thru
FEB.13
'n
>n - u\k Mm Cwybiuii Sbiopbtt
Dr. rVoMsoft fo Speak
Wv-
Dr. Abraham Wolfson, director
of the Spinoza Outdoor Forum for
Adult Education, will lecture on
"The Great Pythagoras" on Fri-
lsion, other factors like social I day, 8:30 a.m., on the beacli at
ssures are just as persuasive in I 10th st.
| oddolt Sworn Rottowroftt
I A.r -Conditioned Clvo HfWM |
I Codttotl lounoo
I Voltl Forking
RESERVATIONS
HI 8-1711
V t
ENJOY GREYHOUND RACING
this season in Flagler's NEW 620]
| Foot Multi-Million Dollar Racetrack,]
Clubhouse and Restaurant
7,000 seating capacity
POST TIME 8:15 P.M.
37th AVENUE and 7th STREET Northwest MIAMI



Page 12-B
-Jmlsti flcridiair
Friday. November 4,
Simon to Chair Workshop Program
Of American Jewish Committee Dec. 4
Stuart L. Simon will head the
workshop program when the Great,
r Miami chapter. American Jew
ish Committee, meets lor its 8th
annual meeting Dec. 4 at the Du
pont Plaza hotel.
The program will precede a
cocktail hour and dinner, and 1-
entitled "Unfinished Business
Miami."
STUART S'MON
Rummage Sale Donor Credit
Sisterhood of Temple A d a t h
Yeshurun will have a rummage sale
at Steven's Market. NW 62nd st.
and 27th ave.. on Friday Feb. 4,
and Sunday Feb. 12. 1961. Credit
will be given for donating all items
and time. Mrs. Honey Salzman and
Mrs. Claire Dort are in charge of
information.
COMPANION
TO LIVI WITH EIDERIY UDY.
Beach hotel-apt. with maid lervice.
light cooking.
Call JE 4-4341
JEROME I. SUMMERS, D.D.S.
announces the opening
of his offices
for the practice of
DENTISTRY
at Cutler Ridge Professional Bldg.
10700 Caribbean Boulevi.d
Miami 57, Florida
Daily and Evening PHONE
Hours by Appointment CE 5-5*54
The workshops will be divided
into three sections. Each- will en-
amine Miami's unfinished business
from these specific viewpoints^ 1)
Christian community: 2) Negro
affairs; 3) Latin American rela-
tionships.
Heading the workshop on Jew-
ish relationships with the Chris-
t in community is Alvin Cassel.
Philip Heckerling will be mod-
erator of the session dealincj with
the Negro community. William
Gladstone will lead tne discus-
sion of the Latin American
roundtable talk.
Simon has been engaged in the
practice of law here since 1957.
He Was elected to Phi Beta Kap-
pa at the University of Florida,
where he received his AB degree,
magna cum laude. in 1940. He fin-
ished his second year at Yale law
school in 1942, was inducted into
the Armed Forces, and returned
for the LLB degree in 1956.
During the war years he served
as an economic analyst with G-2.
Supreme Headquarters, in London,
where he was awarded a Legion
of Merit and received a field com-
mission.
The 41-year-old attorney is mar-
ried, an;! has three children.
Hostess committee of the
American Jewish Committee an-
nual dinner meanwhile met Tues-
day at the Dupont Plaza under
the chairmanship of Mrs. Charles
Leeds to discuss details of the
Dec. 4 program.
Present were the Mesdames Mel-j
vin Becker. Myron Behrman. Mar-
tin Belle. Helene Berg. Alfred;
Boas, Aaron Farr, Martin Fine. Wil-|
liam Finsten. Allen T. Freehling.|
Melvin Frumke.s. William Glad-j
stone, B. B. Goldstein. Charles
Goldstein. George Graham, Jack'
I. Green, David Hochberg, Arthur:
Horowitz. Robert Hyams, James
It Katzman. Dr. Marcia Klein, Ir-
vin Korar.h. William Leone, Alan
A. Lipton, Max Lorbcr, Milton
Margulis. Eileen Meyer, Arnold
Perlstein, Seymour Samet. Sidney
W. Smith, H. R. Sobel.
Mrs. Peritz Scheinberg was'
named chairman of the annual din-
ner by Col. Nathan B. Rood, chap-
ter president, in an announcement
here last week.
Rabbi Leon Kronish (center) was honored this week for his con-
tribution to the Greater Miami Israel Bond campaign at a
Temple Beth Sholom dinner in the Americana hotel. Left is
Isadore Hecht, chairman of the dinner. Right (center) is Gen.
Meir Amit, chief of the Israeli General Staff, who presented
Rabbi Kronish with the Flaming Sword of Haganah Award.
Right is Greater Miami Israel Bond co-chairman Samuel Oritt.
$10 A WEEK
front bedroom, private bath 4 entrance.
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RENT A CAR
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New Youth Group
Formed in Miami
Bill Pollock, pitcher for the
; Washington Senators, has formed
. a youth group called the Miami
Senators.
The group meets Saturdays and
Sundays at the North Shore Play-
ground Pollock picks up the young-
sters at their homes at 10 a.m. and
returns them at 5 p.m.
Eligible are boys between 8
and 15 year* of age. "We don't
stress athletic ability," Pollock
explained. "Our program is de-
signed to offer youngsters whole-
some, leisure time, organized
and supervised play."
Program includes baseball in-
struction, soeeer. softball. basket-
ball and swimming. Youngsters
bring their own lunch, and Pollock
provides them with drinking re-
freshments. On rainy days, such
indoor activities as bowling and
movies are featured.
Pollock will introduce members
of the Miami Senators to major
league ball players when they come
South for their winter training.
He is currently law -indent at
the University of Miami
Miami Youth
Gets Top Rating
At No. Carolina
A Miami couple have received
notice from the chancellor of the
University of North Carolina that
their son. Kenneth Toppel, was
placed in the "superior 50" group
of entering freshmen at the uni-
versity in Chapel Hill. N.C.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Toppell. of
25 Shore dr. No., were told that
Kenneth was chosen from among
2.000 new students for his straight-
A record.
The special group is dubbed by
the campus citizenry as the "sui-
cide 50" because of the rigorous
scholastic demands placed upon
those assigned to it.
Kenneth has skipped the first
half of the freshman year and
is assigned to the second half as
a result of the high honor.
He is a graduate of Miami High
School, where he was Homeroom
president for three years, and a
tnember of Beta Club, Mu Alpha
Thcta. Tn Alpha, and Quill and
Scroll, which requires an A-aver-
age over a three-year period.
Kenneth was a writer for the
Miami Hi Times and a delegate to
Boy's State in the summer of 1959,
where he was voted chief clerk of
the House of Representatives.
He turned down a scholarship
at Tulane University in order to
enroll at Chapel Hill. In addition
to his other scholastic and leader-
ship awards, Kenneth won a gold
medal in current events during
a national quiz sponsored by Quill
and Scroll, and was in the 99 per
centile group for the National Mer-
it Scholarship.
Brightness seems to run in the
Toppell family. Kenneth's father
was in the top seven of his class
when he received his Master's
degree in economics from the
University of M:imi in 1949
some 20 years after winning a
Bachelor's degree at the Univer-
sity of Ohio.
His mother was a scholarship re-
cipient to New York University in
1940. And an uncle, Dr. Joseph!
Luft. psychologist of San Francis-
co, just won a Fulbright scholar- j
ship to the University of Florence
in Italy.
KtNHtlH TOfPlU
Journal Names
Committee Aides
Dr. William K. Boros. vice pres-
ident of Congregation Ye"hudah
Moshe, and c&airman of the an-
nual Journal announced Wedne>da>
that the following men will serve
on the journal committee:
Henry Gilbert, long active in the
Israel Bond drive; Dr. Abraham
Pemsler. chairman of the Blood
bank; Lester Levine. now serving
on the linance committee; and
Fred Blau, in charge of printing.
Jack August and Levine will act
as liaison and promotional advisors
to the Temple auxiliaries.
I960
Bond Drive Swells
By $305,000 Here
Greater Miami's Israel a,.
drive was jumped more than
000 this week as it headed m^h
homestretch of its 1960 Greater L?
ami appeal. ""
Three m,ior events remain 0n
the bond calendar, culminating ,
the "Exodus" Diplomatic Ball L,
ed for the Fontainebleau hotel on
UCC. o.
Spurring the drive was a bond
dinner held at the Americana ho-
tel on Sunday, in which Rabbi Leon
I Kronish. smntual leader of Temple
j Beth Sholom, received the Flam-
i ing Sword of Haganah, one of It.
j rael's highest awards.
Making the presentation to
Rabbi Kronish for his afforti 0n
behalf of Israel was Gen. M.ir
Amit, head of the Israel! Gtntnl
Staff, and a brilliant young ca-
reer officer to whom much of
; the credit for the 1956 Sinai
campaign has been givtn.
Amit, saluting Rabbi Kronish and
his congregation with "we can not
hope to keep our independence with
guns and rifles .we must be in-
dependent economically." noted
hat "even we were surprised with
the overwhelming success of the
Sinai campaign.
"You are businessmen, and you
know that often business matters
do not work out exactly as you
plan them. The same is true in bat-
tles. However, the Sinai campaign
was executed perfectly ... it went
exactly as planned.'
Amit added that "two major fac-
tors came as a result of the cam-
paign. One was that (Abel Gamal)
Nasser's prestige was hurt badly,
and the second was that Israeli
prestige, throughout the entire
world, soared higher than ever be-
fore."
Toastmaster at the affair s
James Albert. Isadore Hecht was
dinner chairman. Samuel Oritt. gen-
?ral co-chairman with J A Can-
'or of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond campaign, narrated the sec-
tion of the program noting the
building of both the Beth Sholom
-anctuary and religious school and
ind the State of Israel througa
Rabbi Kronish's efforts
3'nai B'rith Social Singles
B'nai B'rith Social Singlei will
hold a dance On Saturday eve-
ning, 9 p.m., at the Roney Plan
hotel. The group is open to single
men and women over 28 years of
aee.
Snow Balls' for Sale
COUPLE WHO
KEEP KOSHER
TO SHARE HOME WITH
ORTHODOX EIDERIY GENTLEMAN
HI 8-7650
Treasure Island Elementary
School PTA is selling "snowballs,"
the old fashioned, sweet, cold, eat-
ing kind, every Friday at 2 and
3 p.m. Sales are handled by room
mother representatives under the
direction of Mrs. Ruth Zimmerman,
chairman of ways and means, and
is part of the PTA fund raising pro-
gram this year.
School Board
Debate Scheduled
Dado chapter of the American
Jewish Coagreaa will sponsor a de-
bate on Thursday evening, Nov. 3,
at Temple Beth Sholom Auditorium.
Jack D, Gordon. Democratic nom-
inee for Dade County School Board,
and Arthur Atkinson. Republican
nominee, will discuss "Religion In
Politic-
Louis B. Hoberman, chapter pres-
ident, said that Leo Pteffer. na-
tional director of the American
Jewish Congress for the commis-
sion on L9W anil social action, will
also i e a Sliest speaker.
Pfeftet* is a consulting counsel to
plaintiffs in the law suit currently
before Judge J. Fritz Gordon on
religion in the schools
Hoberman. councilman of Surl
side, will moderate the discussion
assisted by Haskell Lazere, director
of the South Florida office of the
American Jewish Congress.
5dAY 95 (7)0AY M35|J0^DAY j195
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Friday, November 4, 1960
vJeH'ist) noridUan
Page 13 B
Jjar As a gift to subscribers, The Jewish Floridian will present free
for the asking a corsage to each mother of a Bar or Bas AAitzvah
Requests- should be addressed to "Corsage for You P O Box
2973, Miami" 1 Fla./one month .r73oVar.ce. TncK?de"ffle nam?
of the Bar or Bas Mitzvah. date and place of the ceremony,
home address and telephone number. The corsage will be
forwarded to you courtesy of Blackstone Flower Shops in time
for the occasion.
Steven Sheldon
Steven Howard Sheldon, son ol
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Sheldon, of
4505 Adams ave.. will become Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning, Nov. 5,
hi Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbi
Leon Kronish will officiate.
Steven is a student in the Beth
Sholom confirmation class of 5722.

Jeffrey Fenster
Rabbi Morris A- Skop'will offici-
ate at the Bar Mitzvah of deffery,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Fenster,
tmm
KftKVI
nn Saturday, Nov. 5, at Temple
ludea.
Jeffrey has been a student in
he Hebrew school for four years
.nd attends seven'.h grade at West
Miami Junior High.
Following the services, Mr. and
Mrs. Fenster will be hosts at a
Kiddush in honor of the occasion.
*
Charles Rubin
Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs.
^t;i>: Rubin, will be Bar Mitzvah
m Saturday morning, Nov. 5 at
cmple Zion, Rabbi Alfred Wax-
an will officiate.
Charles is an eighth grade stu-
ent at Kinloeh Park Junior High
hnol, and is in the band.
Mr. and Mrs. Rubin will host
.he Kiddush on Saturday noon,
nd a reception at Pythian Hall,
1 W. Flagler St., Saturday eve-
mg.
*
Leslie Alter
Leslie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Trank Alter, of 9421 Broadview dr.,
fill be Bas Mitzvah during serv-
fces Saturday, Nov. 5. at Temo'e
leth Sholom, Rabbi Leon Kronish
rill officiate.
Leslie is a student in the Beth;
liolom confirmation class of 5722.

Andrew Rafkind
I Bar Mitzvah of Andrew Rafkind
will take place Saturday morning,
Nov. 5, at Temple Beth Am, with
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard officiat-
ing.
Andrew is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. William Rafkind. He is a stu-
dent at Beth Am religious school,
and attends Ponce de Leon Junior
High.
There will be a reception in Ins
honor at Kings Bay Yacht and
Country Club after the Bar Mitz-
vah services.

Joel Solkoff
Temple Emanu-El will be the
site of the Bar Mitzvah of Joel
Ezra Sclkoff on Saturday morning,
Nov. 5, with- Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man officiating.
Joel, son of Mrs. Miriam Anis-
feld and Isidore Solkoff, is an
eighth grade student at the Hebrew
Academy, and attends Temple
Emanu-El religious school.
A reception will be held at the
Ritz Plaza hotel following the Bar
Mitzvah service.

Mark Ressler
Bar Mitzva.h of Mark A. Ressler
will be celebrated on Saturday
morning, Nov. 5, at Congregation
Yehudah Moshe, with Rabbi Shel-
don Steinmetz officiating.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ress-
ler, Mark is a seventh grade student
at North Miami Junior High, and
has attended the Popiel religious
school for several years.
Following services, the Ressler
family will host a Kiddush.
Guests will include Dr. and Mrs.
Alfred Geronemus, of Hollywood,
Fla.; Dr. and Mrs. Morton Rosen-
bluth, No. Miami Beach; and Dr.
and Mrs. Jacob Rosenbluth and
Mrs. Louis Ressler, of New York.

Alan Kurzweil
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of
Alan Kurzweil on Saturday morn-
ing, Nov. 5, at Temple Menorah.
Alan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mar-
tin Kurzweil, 8818 Emerson ave.,
is a graduate of the religious
school, and also attends Nautilus
Junior High.
Dinner and reception in Alan's
honor wiU be held at the Deauville
hotel at 7 p.m.

Philip Vova
Saturday morning services, Nov.
5, at Beth Emeth Congregation will
Bonn Denies Underwriting Defense
BONN(JTA>The West German Foreign Minister insisted this, sian State Attorney General Fritz
week that the government is not paying the costs of defending Adolf
; Eichmann, the Nazi specialist in the mass murder of Jews who is to
face trial soon in Israel.
The statement was made in response to widely publicized specula-
tions throughout Germany and Is-;
rael as to how the impoverished
Eichmann family was meeting the
heavy costs. It had been pointed out
that the Eichmann family said it
had to borrow money for the re-
latively small expenses involved
in conferring at Cologne with Dr.
Robert Servatius. the attorney who
is acting as counsel for Eichmann.
Intimations that the defense
I bills were being met by the For-
jeign Ministry's legal department
have been printed in Der Spiegel,
jof Hamburg, Germany's leading
illustrated magazine.
According to Der Spiegel, Rob-
ert Eichmann, Adolfs brother,
said at his home in Lira, Austria,
that he had not hired Dr. Servat-
ius. Instead, Robert Eichmann is
quoted as saying, Servatius "of-
fered" Ms legal services. Ser-
vatius" fee has been estimated
at 100,000 deutschemarkc (about
$24,000). Der Spiegel says that
Servatius enjoys "close relations"
with the Foreign Ministry's legal
department, and that the money
is "probably" coming from that
source.
In Cologne, Dr. Servatius told re-
porters that, during his recent visit
to Israel he had found Eichmann
"confident of a good outcome of
his trial." The attorney said he
would try to base his defense main-
ly on evidence that Eichmann had
acted under orders. He said he had
been received in Israel "with much
more skepticism but without ani-
mosity. A wall of alert coolness sur-
rounded me."
The Cologne attorney said that,
since assuming Eichrrtann's de-
fense, he had received numerous
include the Bar Mitzvah of Philip
Vova, with Rabbi David Herson of-
ficiating.
Philip is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Vova, charter members of
the congregation. He is a student
at the Beth Emeth Hebrew school,
and attends North Miami Beach
Junior High.
Bauer meanwhile announced in
Frankfurt. Since 1956. the Frank-
furt prosecution office has been in
charge of investigations concern-
ing Eichmann, Auschwitz, the de-
portation of Hungarian Jews and
threatening letters. He said he had
refused a request to defend Ludwig ; executions carried out by the SS-
Zind, a German teacher convicted I Einsatz-Commandos.
of anti-Semitism, and now awaiting ,.,,. ...
an extradition ruling in a prison AnotlJer "eg"11J*?rv6r W,H ,alf<>
at Naples. Italy. The request had *e "n E'chmann trial by
been made by Zind's son, Dr. Ser- entral War Cr,mes Investigation
vatius said. Commission, in Stuttgart-Ludwigs-
j burg. This commission was created
An official of the Frankfurt pro-1 two years ago to coordinate andl
secution office will attend the trial., accelerate war crimes investiga-
of Adolf Eichmann in Israel, Hes-1 tions.
Israel Bar Won't Assist
Eichmann's German Lawyer
TEL AVIV(JTA>The Israel Bar Assn. disclosed this week that
it "does not object" to any of its members advising Dr. Robert Servatius,
who will direct the defense of Nazi extermination specialist Adolf Eich-
mann, on matters of Israel criminal law procedures and laws of evidence.
The Association said, however,
that it would not appoint any mem-
ber to help the Cologne attorney,
and observed that he should make
have indicated their wish to attend
the proceedings. There will prob-
a private agreement with an I* *& be very few seats for the ac-
comodation of the general public.
The trial will be conducted in
Hebrew. But there will be simul-
taneous interpretations in German
for the defense, and in English and
French for the foreign press and
for observers from abroad. The
Government Information Office
will assign a photo unit for still
pictures and films, and these will
raeli attorney.
The trial, to open in Jerusalem
in the spring, is expected by same
Israeli officials to last st least
eight months, possibly one year.
It will be held in the new Jeru-
salem community center, the Beth
Ha'Am, which is being rushed to
completion for this purpose.
.While Israeli officials do not ibe made available to all news
want a "show trial" of the proceed-! media.
ings, they have pointed out that | ------------------
they must have enough room to ac- /Hrs. So/fl at Convention
com muriate at least 350 Israeli and
foreign correspondents who have : Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz, president of
already applied far accreditation to B'nai B'rith Women, District 5,
cover the trial. In addition, about is attending the national execu-
400 seats, they said, must be set tive committee meeting of B'nai
aside for government officials and B'rith Women in Washington this
foreign jurists and lawyers who week at the Mayflower hotel.
IN THE GROOVE
900 ACRE FARM
)EEP muck farm divided into 36|
fields of finest soil suited for pro
auction of sweet corn, lettuce ane
l>ther vegetables, about 100 acres o
I'-.k-h land suitable for cattle. Price
iiete farming equipment. Near Or
Includes several houses, barmj]
I'cking shed with cooier and com-
sndo in Merlon County en a paved
Itate road. About S200.0C0 cash wil'
|andle, balance easy terms.
IN THE GROOVE
GOLD FOR SALE
ACRES of golden oranges U.S. 27
just south of Leesburg in beauti-
i Lake County. The only wot*'*
this is "beautiful." fWOCO cat.
includes this year's fruit.
IN THE GROOVE
HIDEAWAY
ACRES with lake on propertv
&mall new cottage 10 minutes tr
|esburg. A steal at $15,000!
IN IHt GROOVE
1,700 ACRE RANCH
IMTER County c'oae to Tampa
|rd Orlando. Approximately 3
e on U.S. 301 and 2 miles O'
thlocoochee River. Over 1.00'
s improved o-aeeee ideal foi
^le, farming, fishinp and hunt-
. $150 per acre.
IN THE GROOVE
150 ACRE RANCH
1UTIFUL spot witn bio oak
*ti around nice home. All fen
and crote fenced, with beat]
s of improved oraeees. Goor
high and dry land. A rea'
|'n at 1225 per acre!
R. J. GROOVER
REG. BROKER
MO 1-6638 MO 7-1823
3830 S.W. 73rd St.
Curator Stephen S. Kayser (lelt) describes ancient Jewish ob-
ject oi antiquity, an exquisite example of a Menorah, to Ber-
nard Manischewitz, president of the B. Manischewitz Com-
pany, at a conference of food editors at the Waldorf-Astoria
in New York en Oct. 5. The Jewish Museum of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America arranged the exhibit. The
Manischewitz Company was host to the gathering and dis-
played two new crackers, Rye Tam and Onion Tarn, also in-
cluding the familiar Tam Tarns, Fishlets, Gefilte Fish, borscht,
chicken soups, and matzos.
INSURED
MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS
WASHINGTON
.Vaffju
MORTGAGE COMPANY
18 N.W. 1st AVENUE
MIAMI
FRanklin 1-8585
FT. LAUDERDALE: 3238 W. Broward Blvd. LU 1-4660
MIAMI BEACH: 260 Collins Ave. (Suite 18) JE 1-3942
For Details: Phone. Call at Office or Mail Co.poa
| Gentlemen: I would like complete information, without obligation, |
I about your iniured mortgage investments yielding 8% yearly. I
I Name.........................................._..
I Street Address .......................................
I
I City............State......Phone No..............
I (Far FlerMt H.mt.ti Oely let 1st resale te eet-et-ttate resietats)

i


Page 14-B
+Jewlst> ftorUlan
Friday, November 4,
I960
Rabbinical Assn. Resolution Urges Bar
To Ail Religious Tests for Candidates
The Greater Miami Rabbinical
A>sn.. in a resolution here this
week, urged Dade countians to ex-
press their opinions at the polls
Nov. 8 "judging the candidates
solely on their qualifications."
The resolution called for "elimi-
nating the religious issue as a po-
litical factor in the best American
tradition."
The association is competed
of Orthodox, Reform, and Con-
servative rabbis in the Greater
Miami area. Spokesmen for the
organisation Wednesday empha-
siied that "in no way should this
resolution be interpreted as the
rabbis' being for or against any
particular candidate."
The statement was issued "in
the same spirit of clean govern-
ment and fair elections which have
been expressed by the major po-
New Sport Coming Here
Karting. the nation's newest mot-
or sport an.i a pastime olten re-
ferred to as "sports car driving on
a Ludget." has in recent months
shown the possibility of becoming
big business in Dacie county. The
port of karting will shortly be
available at three Greater Miami
locations on a "drive-it-yourself
basis. 'I my :ire the brainchild ot
Miami's K a r L a n d Amusement;
Company, headed by four veteran
amusement, iodustriay executives-
Sidney Meyer, Charles Goldstein
and Roy Schechter, and C. J.
Achee, general manager.
I litical parties, as well as by the na-
tional religious bodies."
The resolution declares that "our
country is on the verge of national
and local elections in which candi-
1 dates of various religions are seek-
ing office, and the Sixth Article
of the Federal Constitution states
| that No religious test shall ever
I be required as a qualification to
: an office of public trust in the
United States.
The resolution emphasizes "that
he suitability of a candidate for
public office be decided in a fair
| election by the people on the basis
: if ability and qualifications."
New Law Firm
Formed on Beach
Irving Schulman. Mayor of Surf-
side, has announced formation of
a law partnership under the namei
of Schulman, W'olfson and Diam-
ond.
The new firm is located in the;
Miami Beach Federal bldg., 407!
Lincoln rd.
Schulman received his law train-
ing at New York 1'niversity and,
Brooklyn Law School.
Richard S. Wolf.son. second mem-
ber of the firm, has been practic
ig law linee 1952. and la a L'ni
ersity of Florida graduate with
3A and llb degreei.
J. Leonard Diamond, who rounds
Kit the triumvirate, is a graduate
of Brown University, Boston Unt-
11 Kiry Law School, and did gradu-
atc work at the University ot Vir-
ginia Law School.
Republican unit of public debate with Democratic Party spokes-
men at Beth David Congregation last week featured Maxwell
Rabb (third from left), who flew here from Washington for the
special occasion. Rabb, former secretary of President Eisen-
hower's cabinet, is special assistant to Leonard Hall, chair-
man of the Republican national committee campaign for Nixon-
Lodge. Looking on (left to right) are H. B. McKay, executive
director of Floridians for Nixon-Lodge; Leon Ell, noted Greater
Miami GOP leader; and C. G. Rebozo, Miami resident and
personal friend of the Republican candidate for the Presidency.
Spaet Named Chairman of 1961 General
Solicitation Division of Combined Appeal
1959. He was associate Munici-
pal Judge of Miami Beach in
1942, and served as president of
the Dade League of Municipali-
ties.
Kaplan Reelected
JWB Official
Leon Kaplan, Miami attorney and
civic leader, was reelected a V1ce
chairman of the Jewish Commurl
Center D.vision of the Nation
Jewish Welfare Board at the 2
Mon-.tw Monday at the Delmonico ZT*
New York. tei ln
Kaplan is a national vice nmi
dent of JWB. pr The Jewish Community Centpr
Division is the agency throush
which JWB serves as the national
association of 334 Jewish Comntun
ity Centers and YM YWnA.
throughout the county.
JWB is also the government.
authorized agency lor meeting ihe
religious, welfare and morale needs
of Jewish personnel and their de-
pendents in the Armed Forces and
in VA hospitals.
' a#A

Aitt L * ^H fcOt
.ludee Harold B. Spaet. Miami
Beach Councilman an;i Jewish com-
munity leader, has been named
chairman of the Combined Jewish
Appeal General Solicitation Divi-
sion.
In announcing Spaet s 'appoint-
ment. .Ernest Janis, vice chair-
man of the CJA. in the absence of
chairman Joseph M. Lipton, com
mended the attorney on his activi-
ties in behalf of CJA. the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, where
he served on the board of gover-
nors, and for his wide range of
tership with local welfare agen-
cies.
"The General Solicitation phase
of our campaign enrolls the larg-
est number of givers and forms a
broad base for the drive and all
funds raised by CJA," said Janis.
Yore than any other division
of the drive. General Solicitation
carries out the concept of total
participation by each and every
Jew in Dade county, and empha-
sizes personal responsibility for
the outcome of our effort."
Active in Jewish communal life
since he moved here in 1932. he
has been a trustee of Mt. Sinai
Hospital, a member of the Miami!
Beach Zionist District and Miami |
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'nth.
He is a director of the National'
Children's Cardiac Hospital in Mi-
ami, and belongs to the Miami
Beach Civic League, Eiks. and Na-
tional Conference of Christians and
Jews.
Agar Book Tells
Of Europe's Jews
By Special Report
NEW YORK Herbert Agar,
who won the Pulitzer Prize with
his "The People's Choice," has
written an acount ot the European
I Jew since World War I, "The
Saving Remnant. An Account of
Jewish Survival." The book is the
result of a trip which Agar made
to Israel, where he was deeply im-
pressed with the vigor of.the new
state and by the stories told him
by people who had lied there from
Europe.
Himself a non-Jew. he turned to
the activities of the American Jew-
ish Joint Distribution Committee
for detailed background material
for his book.
Good Future?
First tickets to the Miami YMHA Branch annual dance sched-
uled for Wednesday evening, Nov. 23. at the Miami Y audi-
torium, 450 SW 16th ave cue received by Branch president
Walter Feltmcn (left) from dance chairman Milton Spool. Over
300 adults attend the get-together each year. Plans are cur-
iently being completed by the dance committee, including
Mrs. Leslie Blumborg, Leo Scherker, Stuart Winston, Phil Kent,
Mr. and Mrs. Herschel Rosenlhal, Mrs. Norman Gladsden.
Mrs. Arthur Stein, Mrs. Jack Amazon, Milton Spool, Walter
Feltman, Hyman Kam.
Long regarded as one of Miami
Beach s outstanding civic and wel-
fare figures. Spaet was active in
the Combined Jewish Appeal At-
torney's Division for several years,
was president of the Jewish Home
for the Aged from 1047 to 1951.
He is a former president of the
Miami chapter, American Jewish
Committee.
During hie eight years on the
Beach Council, he was named
vie* mayor of the city twice, serv-
ing in 195*55 anal from 1957 to
Metro Bark
Lists Dividend
An increase in the capital stock j
of Metropolitan Bank from 165,-1
000 to 181,000 shares and a ten I
percent stock dividend has been
voted by the bank's board of di-l
rectors subject to approval of bank-
ing authorities, it was announced!
here.
Board chairman A. J. Harris
said that if approval is obtained,
the stock dividend will be paid:
' early next year.
"The board's action," said Har-i
ris, was motivated by Metropoli-
tan Bank's continuing growth in.
: deposits, resources and earnings.
i During the past two years. Metro-
politan has been the fastest-grow-
' ing major bank in the United
: States."
Harris also announced approval!
i by the board of a regular quarter
; ly dividend of 20 cents per share
: for the third quarter of 1960 pay-
able on Oct. 28 to stocktioliiers of
record as of Oct. 14. 1960.
Wonderful future!- if you use
the Equitable plan for young
career people. It gives you, the
aright to obtain more Living
Insurance protection in the
futureevery three years from
25 to 40-vjithout additional
exami. No questions asked!
No matter what your health
may be at the .time! Telephone
The Equitable Life Assurance
Society of the United States.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
LIFE UNDERWB TER
FR 1-5691 UN 6-1875
245 S.E. 1st Street-Miami, Fla.
v\JGUST BROS RV
A Is the DtST'
3
Young and new students of Temple Beth Sho-
lom recently consecrated at a special service
by Rabbi Leon Kronish, spiritual leader, are
bottom row (left to right)'Wendy Haft. Michael
Arkin, David Arltin, Ricky Weider, Donny
Jonas, Jo-Ann Rackear, Jennifer Neber. Second
row are (left to. right) Malanie Cohen. Albert
Levin. Pamela Leslie, Donna Sue Lundy, Steven
MaJolin.Susy Lee, Barry Cooper,Thomas Tobin.
Jeffrey Pardo. Matty Bloom, Joel Greenberg.
Judy Gilden, Cathy Erlanger, Karen Uuger.
Third row are (left to riqht) Michael Levine,
Ann Harvey, Nancy Silverman, Jane Benson,
Susan Rubin, Beth Krimman. Leslie Unger,
Jimmy Baker, Lisa Haft, Bari Berkman. Top
row are (left to right) Jonathan Goldberg. Bon-
nie Waller. Dene Weinman. Nancy Fisher, Merri
Krams, Nancy Baker. Jeffrey Sklan, Eton Green-
wald, Barbara Locke, Leighton Hamar. Susan
Rackear, Patti Burk.


Friday, November 4. 1960
vJewisli Flcridian
Paae 15-B
Me came here so years aao from Moo-
das, Conn, and was a in.mi,, i ,,f (hi
.in-..ri c Lodge, Surviving are hit
viie. Ann*: two sons, ileoi j.,- and M ..
is rive daughters. Including Hn
Sylvia Tn.i. Mis. Florence fireenbera
Mrs. Roalyn Benson and Mrs Reglna
: and nine grandchildren Ser-
rices were Ocl SO al Gordon funeral
I loin.-
LEGAL NOTICE
MRS. MARIAN BROWN
17. 'i Millet mi., i- .mi labli -. die
l let, 18, She came h. re 11 yeai
rrpm Akron, '.. and araa a member
.f Mi.- Rational Council of Jewish
w "in. i: sir \ > Ing are hi hui
Vdolph: two sonji, Mich iei and i ia
her rat hi Mas Hi ini Ick: thre.
lers and s >i other Sei vicea wei
It hi ; rdon Puns i I
HERMAN HASKELL
81, <.f 7'". gan c-
dled i>' I He i ami n< s can
ago 'i..'i. New fork, hi.I was re-
i i i ir Sui
I i'. i:'- Ma ., .lull. In v
."'hiil-. Woo I and two in in Ildien
ee Were hi I I .
..... Mi mortal CIumm !. I ilas rd
HARRY ROBINOWITZ
72, ..f :i m sv, [3th .. -i.-,I in' K
Me .-.mi. here five years a-.. fr..ir.
Hillside, N.J and turn build-
er. Si: :\\ B Hi, Ude hU Wife, Ko.-e.
.' Robin da ighter, Mi>
Ann I'hi.-man; tour srandrhildren
Inters and a brother, Sei vices
-' at i::\ .- de Memoi la;
i l,.'.;,-; ; >uglas rd.
Seventh annual teen-age conclave is the item
under discussion by the General Delegate
Assembly of the Greatoi -Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center. Some 40 teen-agers represent-
ing ever 30 senior high school clubs axe in the
process of planning the convention. Above
are Lynda Stone, Marilyn Silverstein, Larry
Cohen, BObbi Sttrpkin, Sandy Whitman, Ron-
nie Rohan, Stew Miles, Jason Lesser. Vic
Weinstein, Gary Stone, John Berman, Linda
Schwartz, Karel Kutner, Marsha Mack, Bunny
Goldbera, Jeff Platt,' Ed Bud, Miami YMHA
Branch; Bobby Wachtel, Susan Lehrman. Joan
Gilbert, Sandy Rothenberg, Roberta Copper,
Leona Schmuckler, Sandy Sheinheim, North
County YMHA Branch; Judy Podvin, Nancy
Herman, Iris Slofsky, Marcia Tessler, Billy
Gale, Lewis Robinson, Beach YMHA Branch;
Sandy Peyser, Jaki Stahl. Marshall Greenstein,
Caryl Din, Southwest YMHA Branch.
HENRY RUFEISEN
70, .if Quail lti.il Estates. .!.-.! i
126. He eaine here '..'" yean ago from
I Newark] XJ. Survivor* include hl-
rlfe, Irene: two son., two grandchll-
dren, a brother and three sisters. Ser-
vices were held Oct 27 ai Rlverslue
Mi mortal Chapel. lH.uglus rd.
Young Leaders to Hear News Chief
MRS. BELLE OSNOS
88, of 1600 Collins aye., died Oct. Is
She aame from Detroit, where she was
active tn many Jewish onranisatlons.
M.i- name Is Insciibed in Ihe : -1 Book in Israel. She is survived b>
tliree suns. Max. Herman and Ber-
nard; three daua*hten Mrs Isaac
Fredland, Mis Robert Austin an Mis
Oae Flo ttal II gra dchl dren nd sis
gran l.lnl.lr.n
LEGAL NOTICE
By Special Report
NEW YORK Chet Huntley.
noted news commentator for the
NBC-TV netwtork. will be a fea-
tured speaker at the Saturday
light, Nov. 19 banquet session of;
he United Jewish Appeal National
young leadership conference in)
ew York City's Waldorf-Astoria ]
hotel, it has been announced by
Morris W. Bennstein, UJA geaer-
al chairman.
The three-day conference, Nov.
18 to 20, will inaugurate a new na-
tional program by the United Jew-
ish Appeal to. rectgnize and de-
velop community leadership: from
among the 25 tt 40 age group and
to increase the degree, of leader-
ship participation of younger men
on a national level.
Hartley won national pUwdits
far hit reporting, with David
Pharmacists Elect Officers
New officers of the Miami Alum-
ni chapter of Alpha Zeta Omega
pharmaeceutical fraternity were
elected recently. They are David
| Cohen, Sam Rosenblatt, Frank De-
row, Mike Troy, Harry Ratner.
Jack Jabjq, and Jack Davis.
Beth Torch Group Meets
Town and Couutry Clubbers will
| bold a dance Sunday evening at
iBe'.h Torah congregation. There
[will be mu^ic, entertainment, a
"-of show, and refreshments.
Brinkley, of this year's political
conventions. He is regularly seen
on various news programs of the
NBC-TV network, and has a first-
hand knowledge of Israel and the
Middle East.
One of his most notable feature
TV programs was a report which
he filmed in Israel, dealing with
its first decade of existence. Be-
fore joining NBC, he was a news-
paper reporter and foreign corres-
pondent with extensive experience
in the Mfcidle East and in Asia.
Huntley- will be one of a group
of authoritative speakers who will
address young leaders at the con-
ference on problems which face
America's Jewish communities in
Among other outstanding au-
thorities on immigration absorp-
tion in Israel to speak are Am-
bassador Avraham Harman, Is-
rael's envoy to the United States;
Michael Comay, Ambassador to
the United Nations; and Consul-
General Benjamin Eliav.
UJA leaders who will participate
in the discussion of community
problems and the role of UJA in
the American Jewish community's
to aid Jews in Europe. Israel and
other overseas areas will include
Berinstein. Edward M. M. War-
burg, UJA honorary chairman;
Philip M. Klutznick, William Ros-
enwald and Dewey D. Stone, na-
tional chairman; and Herbert A.
Friedman, executive vice chair-
man. -
Presenting aspects- of UJA op-
erations in Europe, the Moslem
Lands and other areas throughout
the world will be Moses A. Leavitt,
executive vice chairman of the
Joint Distribution Committee.
UJA member agency, and Samuel
Haber, JDC assistant overseas di-
rector general in Geneva.
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY fllVEN I
the undersigned, dealil i : enaagi
lei the fictitious ru -
STERLING ORTHODONT
vT'.ry al 1232 Normandy Drive, Ml-
iml B......nten Is to reatster said
the l'! Ii i '
; Count;
CARL STERLING
II l-ll-lft-26
Writer's Father
Passes Away, 74
Edward Pearl. 74, of 9041 Hard-
ing ave., died Oct. 27. He was the
father of Hal Pearl, columnist for
The Jewish Floridian, and came
here from New York 26 year* ago.
Additional survivors are his wife,
Dora; another son, Leonard; a
daughter, and. tour grandchildren.
Services were Oct. 30 in the
Newman Funeral Home.
MRS. RAE ASCHER
75. of .".40 West ave.. died Oct. 30. She
came here seven years ago from Chi-
cago. Survivors Include her hushand.
Harry, and a daughter. Mrs Evelyn
Komack. Services were Oct.
Riverside- Memorial Chapel. Waahing-
ton ave.
DR. PHILIP RITTER
61. of 7*41 I-; 8T., died Oct. 23. Or
Rltter a long-time winter visitor from
New Bnchelle. NY., Is survived by his
wife. Dorothv: two suns, ami two -:>-
ters Sei vices and burial were in New
York with Itlverside Memorial Chapel
In charge of local arrangements.
MORRIS F. PASKOW
v\v 87th ot., died Ocl I
He cam.- h .- L'h \ rs mn f o"i De-
BurvlvUlIt are his wife, V
a daughter, si\ srandchlldren
and i ireat-arandchlld Service* wen
Nov. l at Gordon Funeral ti":
MRS. RAY ROSEN
.". of 410 Tain iii mi (anal rd.. died Oi '
U she came here IS years SCO N. v. York and was a nieinl.t of the
i 'i star. Survivine are her hus-
band, i'aul; a daughter, two brothers,
,i -i-:.-i- .iii.l tliree Kran vices were Nov. 2 at Oordon I
Home.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCU T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLOR'DA IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C10455
MARIE ANNA FLACK.
Plaintiff.
\ -
li BLACK. JR..
i Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO H. FLACK, JR..
Hit sr .nipany.
2nd Rerun .Battalion
2nd Marine Division.
Camp l....leune. North i'uruliiu
You H. FLACK. JR., are hereby no-
tified that a Bill of Complaint for llr
vorce has bee, filed aicainst you, au>l
you are required to serve a com "f
your Answer or Plaadiiuc to the Bill
of Complaint on the plaintiff'* Atti.i-
neys, Slif\in. Hooriman & Hjltsman.
.:m t)e>bold liuildimt. Miami 32. Flw-
Ida and file the original Answer or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk oi
the Circuit Court on-or before the 111
ila> of December. 189. If you fall to
do so. judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded in the BUI of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
u-h tvAek I"' 'i'ir c-ns*H"-Mve weeks
in TUB JEWISH FLORIDIAN
!R>.\r. A.sn olUU'.lti.lJ at Ma hi
Florida, this 27th day of October. A. 1'.
I'."'.i'
E. B. LEATHERKAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County. F.orida
(seal) By: Waf. W STGcKlNO,
l>eput> Clerk
aHBVIN. OOODMAN \- HOLTZMAN
1- S, ;. hold lli.ildlng
Miami S2, Pia.FR J-8TJS1
11 4-1I-1S-2S
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KflTICB is HEREBY tllVEN th:U
the undersigned, desiring to engag* i"
i.iis.ni-.s- under the fictitious name of
' RLl'B in 2721 N.W. Mth Street.
Miami. Florida Intends to register the
-..i.i aasne r'i th.....lenk ..f the Pr-
l -nil .i i iade c,,.-ntv. Fl. i
BROOKS M v\- \i;i:.Mi:y-|- COR
Florldn rporatlon
____________________________II 4-11-'X-2S
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N'OTIPE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
th ,n li Igm i tn ngage la
- mil i i nus im me of
\ in i i; ii yi iri ipi ,\ i, |.-, i:\, ,,
si;. 2nd Aven Mis
- with the Clerk of
tha i 'Up..... ; ..f i iade "unty.
Kloi Id
SAMCEI. '. IVRIf'K
AlHM.I'll nRBENII \l\l
_____________________II I 11-18 23
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Ni'TPK IS HEREBY OIVEN "lit
the inderslgi Ina i engage in
tltlous am* of
HAIR DPFK1N ..i ;". Merrli War,
Cor il Rabli Inten It I
,i i name w II hi
'i t'UII i i ll
DAVKP.LE. INI
(a I la i 'it..
^____________11 .4-11 -18-38
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERBBY (ilVEN that
the underslani I deau*lng to engage in
- under the Hi tltlous ns i I
EDISON F.i'.iN < WASH al S3I3 N W.
2nd Aven ie. Miami. Florida Intend to
i-e-ivi.T ...ii name with the Clerk of
Ihe circuit Court of l'a.lw County.
Florida
AP.K YBRMANOK
BEATRICE rERMANOK
M W l: SILVER
AtTo ney f.>r
Ale and Beatrice Tarmanok
*2 Seybold Bui ding
M ci It, Cl
______________________n.'4-u-is-ai
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HERBBY OH'EN that
the undersigned, desi**lng to engage in
- under i' fictitious n i iv- if
I.A IMI'i IRT CO nl JSSI Fast
I nu< HI r Fl .-ii, nten is
register *ald name wBh Ihi i'!.,rk
..f the Circuit Co Due C .unty,
F orl in
ROGBLIO MIOOTA
Ka^ten bei Gtopi

for Crloll I ,
i oi.- Lin .li
11 4-11 -18-80
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NivnCE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigni I. di Ing t-. engagi in
'
AiKiiliNl'l.v cu. at IIU4H Southwest
".2nd Drive, Miami. Florida Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
'he Clnouk c,.uit of I a.le County,
Florida
(AK.MI.\>: 111 St.. '. -o.,. owii.r
Kasuunliaum. Mumlier. Geiunuu
-. lipsiein. Attorn^.v*
f.H- Alrjjelllilv C
"ii.. Lincoln Rii. Hid*.
Miami Be*h ;'.', Fla.
1144-U-1S-2&
LOUIS MARCUS
11. of 121 E 3rd Ct.. Hibiscus Island
Oct. 29. He came here 88 years
ago from New York and was a n
real eatate developer. He was a mem-
ii.- of the Miami Beach chapter of i
Workmen's Circle, the Hebrew A.ol-
emy. and Beth .Jacob Congregation.
Surviving are his Wife. Rose: three
sons, including Irving: a slater, two
brothers. 14 grandchildren, and six
areat-giandchl'dren. Services were
Oct. 30 at Riverside Memorial Chapel.
Alton rd.
NOT CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN thai
the ',i I, desiring to engage in
mi under the fictitious naji......
FLORIDA ALL DIESEL COMPANY
at 123 s \v *7th Avenue. Miami In-
tends to register said name with the
cierk of e circuit Court of Dada
i 'ountv, F,oi
Till i >l Hit: HF.ll.MAN
i i trlckman, of
Myers, Heltnan and Kaplan
Attorney for Applicant
W let st.
11/4-11-18-26
HS-Te4E.C._,
IN AN4? i
Fi-aiU0A. Ilii-Pj.
N4.S073Z
In Re: Ki*TATK..< >F
sU/IUUti IIL|.>itMAM.
I *coa-cl.
MO^'C*-, T4> CRSDITORS
To All Creditor.- ..ml All Persons Hav-
inet t.'lainu- or I>ei.iauda Against Said
Estate:
Yoj. and each of you are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and danamds which you. or
either of you. may have against the
estate of MORRIS BLOSSOM, de-
ceaaed late of Dade County Florida.
to the Honorable Ciiunty Jmlges of
Dade County, and file the same In
their offices in the County, Courthouse
in Dade County, FlerUkx. within eight
lendar moaaaa fsoai the date of the
riral ii.ii'iratioii hereof Said claims
or demands to contain the legal ad-
.li.-ss of the" claim.in! and to be sworn
to and preaented aa aforesatf, oi
Mil! be barred See Section 733.16 of
the "'' Pi ibati \ l
I late l it di.-r 27. A.I'. l6tl.
LESTER lU.osaOM As Executor
.im.-nt of
MORRIS BLOSSOM, Deceased.
KOVNER .< M VNNHEIMER
Al to: ii. for Kgl I ItOT
11 4-ll-ls-M
DAVID FASTBRNAK
63. of 910 NB 127th st.. died Oct. 27
Il>. came here 10 years ago from New
York, and was a member of the North
Miami l leai h Post of the Jewish War
Veterans. Surviving are his wife.
Jeanne: a son. Albert: a slater and two
grandchildren. Services were pet 3 I
at Itlverside Memorial Chapel. Nor-
mandy Me. ,______
MRS. DAISY BERNSTEIN
62. of lo<7;> Lenox ave.. died Oet. 28 She
i a mo he-'e 30 years ago from Engle-
wood. N.J. Surviving, are her husband.
Julius; a daughter. Mrs. Mary I
three sisters, a son. a brother, and
four srandchlldren. Services were
iv: 21 at Riverside Memorial C
Alton rd.
HARRY GREENBERO
78. of 2H71 Pali-green dr died Oct. 27.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
No. 50792
In Re: estate of
SADIE MANNHBIMBR
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
Inx claims or Demands Against Ssld
Estate:
You. and each of you are hareby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you. or
either of you. may have against the
estate of SADIE M ANN HKl.MKi: de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Honorable County Judges of
Dade County, and file the same in
their offices In the County Courthouse
in Hade Count*, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the date of the
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands to contain the legal ad-
dresa of the claimant and to be sworn
to and preaented as aforesaid, or .-am.
will be barred. See Section 7SS.16 of
the W4S Frobate Act.
Date October 27. A.D. 1960.
CLARA TANNKNUAIM mil
Ml!.ION R. HANNHEIMER As
Rxecutora of the I-ast Will and
Testament of SADIE MANN-
heimek Deceased.
K i\ NKR MANNIIK.IMKl;
Attorneys for Executors
11/4-11-18-2;
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that
by virtue of Chapter 878 lit r
Si.u ihea Annotated (1MU, Ware-
housemen and Warehouse Receipts,
wherein acini: B VAN LINES. INC..
:v Florida con i.v virtue of Its
warehouse Ii i i-. n its possession
rhe following deaaiibed property:
Household Cods As the UfOeai lj>
of MARION canty, ami that on the
,i of December, i960, during the
'.-nai hours of sale matnl) betweea
:, ii -on ami 2:00 In the alter-
ation, at 2136 N.W, 21th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida, the undersigned shall
offer for sale to the highest Iildder for
cash in hand the above described prop-
erty; as the property of Marion Canty.
Dated at Miami. Florida, tills 27th
Aa,! of i eteber, i'>o.
ACB-R.B. VAN LINKS, INC.
11/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage la
business under the fictitious names oi
Mall Towers: Lincoln Mall Towers;
Lincoln Mall Building: Mall Bultdtag;
Lincoln Mall Medical Building: l.in.-.ln
Mall Professional liulldhag: Lincoln
Mall I.awvets r.ull.ltng: Lincoln Mall
Office Building: at 1441 Lincoln Read.
Miami Beach. Florida Intends to reg-
i.-t.-r s lid ii imes with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Floriila.
HONOR PROPERTIB*. INC.
ia t-la. c ira.l
By Hannah rerlmutter. Sec.
JCI.1CS JAY PERLMCTTBR. Es<4.
Attorney for Honor 1'ronertivs. Inc.
4ir7 Lincoln Koad. Miami Beach
10/28. 11/4-11-18


Pa
Pnrta 14.H
Page 16-B
+Jewist Fhrldlan
Friday, November 4, iggo
Priest Affective
through Friday
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
QUANWr
RIGHTS
RESERVED
WE SEll
U.S. CHOICE
and U.S. PRIME
MEATS ONLY
Why Pay a Penalty for "Kosher"?
Prices of Kosher food were like the weather... everybody
talked about them, but nobody did anything about them...
UNTIL Food Fair opened its first Kosher Market. Right then
and there local Jewry learned that Kosher food did not
have to be luxury food. The response was overwhelmingly
in favor of Food Fair. Very recently we opened our sixth
Kosher Market, a complete super market. And there'll be
more. It figures!
BUY IT "KOSHER"... BUT BUY IT THRIFTILY.. AT FOOD FAIR!
HERE'S PROOF.. IT CAN BE KOSHER... AMD ECONOMICAL... TOO!
69
39
BONELESS
Pot Roast
BABY STEER
LIVER
N.Y. STRIP ~m--------
CLUB STEAK |2?
FRESH KOSHER MADE m g^
Ground Chuck O #c,
TRIMMED BONELESS
NECK MEAT or # Q
BEEF CUBES 0 #C.b
CHUCK
STEAK
CROSS RIB or
Shoulder Roast.... lb.
GENUINE WHITE HOCK "(Jum, Esth.r" USD A. INSI.
YEARLINGS
KOSHER
MADE
59
'fib.
CRYOVAC PACKED
PAN READY
NOW 6 FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS! THERE'S ONE NEAR YOU!
2091 CORAL WAY
MIAMI
CORAL WAY
AT S.W. 87th AVE.
Wtstchcsttr Shopping P\lt
163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER
NO. MIAMI BEACH
2662 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
IN HOLLYWOOD
19th ST. at ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
10th STREET and WASHINGTON AVENUE
AT MIAMI BEACH
'


Full Text
Friday, JfoTember-4. -1960
*
T-i-
Paqe 5-A

"We Stand Today pn the Edge of a New Frontier"
Needed Leadership
in the 60s
Our country must have vigorous, decisive leadership now. Our
economy cannot afford to remain stagnant. A "New Frontier"
awaits our people. Tomorrow promises an abundance of goods to
fill the needs of an expanding and employed population. Today, all
Americans pray for world peace to achieve these goals.
The future is herethe opportunity is now.
Our country, the world, demands a man who can provide imagina*
tive and aggressive leadership Woodrow Wilson was one such mani
! Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman were such men.
We, the undersigned, urge you to restore America to this great1
tradition!
VOTE FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL TEAM OF
JOHN F.KENNEDY/LYNDON B.JOHNSON
Business and professional men and women for kennedy/johnson
Stanley Andrews
George Backer
Sam Belsky
Thomas Hart Benton
Harry Belafonte
Milton Berle
Theodore Bikel
Morris Black
William Bornstein
Moe Brody
Van Wyck Brooks
Pr. Eugene Burdick
Sammy Cahn
Eddie Cantor
Rachel Carson
Jeff Chandler
A'bert E. Chisling
Joseph Cohen
Marc Connefly
Arthur J. Courshon
Jonathan Daniels
Betfe Davis
Angier Biddle Duke
Irving M. Engel
David Emmer
Philip Evergood
Abraham Feinberg
Raymond E. Feiner
Paul A. Freund
Prof. John Kenneth Galbraith
Milton Gaynor
Jules Gillette
Ben Zion Ginsberg
William Goetz
Harry Golden
Jack Gordon
Dr. Israel Goldstein
Edward Greenberg
Walter A. Gropius
Philip Hamburger
Lennie Hayton
Dan Herman
Harry Hershfield
Lena Home
Sol Hurok
Ernest Janis
Jack Kanter
Jack Katzman
George S. Kaufman
Nathaniel J. Klein
Philip M. Klutznick
Jack Korenblit
Max Krauss .
Arthur B. Krim
Prof. Harold Lasswell
Max Lerner
William Lescaze
Warner LeRoy
Louis Lipsky
George London
Wyrna Loy _f
Robert M. Maclver
Elaine Malbin
James Michener
Hans Morgenthau
Paul Muni
Paul Newman -
Reinhold Niebuhr
Clifford Odets
Judge Isaac Pacht
Shad Polier
Jack S. Popick
Earl Portnoy
Louis Reinstein
Quentin Reynolds
Judge Simon H. Rr
Eugene V. Rostow
W. W. Rostow
Maurice Samuel
Dore Schary
Nat Serota
Roger H. Sessions
Lillian Smith
Dr. Benjamin Spock
Abe Stark
Dewey D. Stone
Louis Untermeyer
Selman A. Waksman
Robert Penn Warren
Sidney Wasserman
Prof. Jerome B. Weisner
Jerome Wiedman
fkindShelley Winters
Prof. Jerrold R. Zacharias
Pld I'ul. AdT.
!
=ti


Page 4A
MmM ncridian
Friday, November 4,
1960
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
MM 396
FRED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDL1N ........................ Executive Editor
ISRAEL BUREAU
202 Ben Yehuda Tel Aviv, Israel
BAY U. BINDER------------......___Correspondent
Published every Friday ilnce 127 by The lewlah FlorldUn
t 120 N.E. Sixth Street, Miami 1. Florida. Entered at
aecond-clana matter July 4, 1930. at Poat Office of Miami.
Florida, under the Act of March 3. 1S7.
The Jewieh Floridlan hat abtorbed the Jewlth Unity and
the Jewlth Wtekly. Member of the Jewith Telegraphic
Agency, Seven Artt Feature Syndicate. Worldwide Newt
Service, National Editorial Ann., American Attn. or
Englith-Jewlth Newtoapert. Ind the Florida Prett "
The Jewish Floridlan of th merr-hnnrtl-o nrlvertl-erl In Itt column*
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year H 00
RATES: __
Three Vr 10 00
Volume 31 Number 45
Friday, November 4, 1960
14 Heshvan 5721
Kennedy's Persuasive Insight into the Future
The Jewish Floridian endorses the candi-
dacy of Sen. John F. Kennedy in next Tuesday's
Presidential election.
It is not the general practice of this news-
paper to support individuals in political cam-
paigns. Where the importance of a race war-
ranted it, we have, in the past, editorialized on
the specific issues involved, motivated by the
belief that sound journalism must instruct as
well as report.
These columns have, however, on key
occasions departed from their regular editorial
custom, recognizing that the political arena in
a Presidential election year fastens upon the at-
tention of every American, no matter what his
faith.
In line with this, we are urging the support
of Sen. Kennedy's candidacy, for we believe
this is just such a key occasion.
Both Presidential hopefuls spotlight foreign
policy as the major issue in the present cam-
paign. We agree with them but go one step
further: It is our contention that foreign policy
has been a major issue all along particularly
in the 1952 and 1956 campaigns.
The Unfair' Charge Again
Since his capture, there have been all sorts
of unfounded rumors to prove the allegation
that Israel is not fit to try Adolf Eichmann.
Most of these rumors have dealt with the
"physical mistreatment" the murderer of six
million Jews is being accorded.
Yet there is every evidence that Israel has
been scrupulous in every detail in the matter of
Eichmann's comfort and survival. Israel does
not seek mere retribution. The trial scheduled
to start early next spring has as its aim a world-
wide object lesson in moral human behavior.
Abuse of the defendant would certainly not
help to achieve this end.
In addition, Robert Servatius. his Cologne
attorney, is personification of Israel's intention
to be fair and impartial in matters of legal pro-
cedure. The special law passed by the govern-
ment to permit Eichmann to receive German
counsel is a case in point.
Servatius, himself, attested to Eichmann's
well-being following the lawyer's first meetings
with his client.
The announcement this week that the Israel
Bar does not intend to act as advisor to Servatius
again raises the cry that the Nazi butcher is not
being treated fairly. Fact is that individual
Israeli attorneys have not been denied the priv-
ilege of offering assistance. It seems that the
critics of Israel all but expect Eichmann to be
released on technical grounds before they will
be satisfied.
They make no mention, however, of Eich-
mann's own method of dealing with those he
convicted of the crime of being Jewish in the
days when he stalked Europe.
Nasser's Role Exposed
If the reports are true that the flow of Soviet
weapons to the United Arab Republic is increas-
ing and that Red China plans to use Egypt as
an "arms dump," then the role Gama! Abdel
Nasser played during his recent appearance at
the United Nations is a pure farce.
Nasser had the gaul to offer himself as
mediator between East and West to urge the
adoption of an Africa-sponsored move that
Khruschev and President Eisenhower set aside
their differences and resume the peace negotia-
tions disrupted by the Soviet dictator before
they even got under way in Paris last June.
Nasser's role as "neutral" and "peace-
loving" seemed particularly irreconcilable with
his own refusal to meet Israel half-way.
The arms reports this week indicate that
Nasser is becoming more and more enmeshed
in the Communist empire network. His jaunty
prancing about at the United Nations several
weeks ago is in retrospect an absurdity beyond
words.
Over the past eight years, therefore, our
editorial columns -have drawn a clear record
of the nation's foreign relations with partic-
ular emphasis on the European and Middle
East scenes. And what the record shows is an
America less sparkling, less energetic, less cre-
ative than her role in world affairs currently
demands if we are to meet the challenge of
the future.
Sen. Kennedy speaks with persuasive in-
sight about that future. His experience in the
Senate as a member of the Foreign Relations
Committee naturally predisposes him to this
most important issue an issue with which
the next President of the United States will have
to deal vigorously and forthrightly.
The Democratic nominee's sense of history
is an indelible mark of his personality, which
lays emphasis on his hope for the manifest
destiny of the American people to be strong
and self-confident in the battle for freedom.
Sen. Kennedy's stance is one marked by
plan rather than platitude, by an emphasis on
specific detail rather than fine-sounding
"homey" phrases. In a world that increasingly
demands rigorous thought and national appli-
cation as a prerequisite for survival, he realis-
tically appraises our individual responsibilities
in the achievement of this end.
He does not tell us what we want to hear
to indulge us but what we should hear to
mobilize us. These and other of Sen. Kennedy's
attitudes, also demonstrated in his considera-
tion of such domestic problems as housing,
health, and education, commend Sen. Kennedy
as the voter's choice on Nov. 8.
e e e
Go to the Polls Tuesday
Many of the key issues of the present elec-
tion nationally, in Florida and Dade county
would be foreign to the ears of nations and
peoples abroad; for it is an incontrovertible fact
that a fair number of them don't even have the
right to express their political opinions via a
secret ballot.
All of us are privileged to do just that. It
is one of our guaranteed rights as free citizens
of the greatest democracy on earth.
Many of the oppressed nations and peoples
have already begun the battle for their liberty.
But others are a long way behind. They would
think us wasteful and irresponsible if we failed
to vote on Tuesday. They would think us un-
deserving of the privilege.
Exercise your democratic heritage. Disuse
of civil rights is a danger to freedom. Don't let
your community, your state, and your nation
down. Speak your mind at the polls on Nov. 8.
during (he week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
INTERESTING .bout the pre*
ent campaign is the amount
of heat it has managed to g^
erate. In 1952 and 1956 there
was nary a ripple of excite
ment. with the outcome a. JL
dictable certainty. Mr. SUveT "=
son never even managed to
strike a telling blow. rec.,.
With lttlUMa,iminiiULd^a).
43rd ANNIVERSARY Of A LETTER
___ ment a breakfast meetinp u
" 1958 at Miami Springs Villa,
where Stevenson sat laboriously writing a foreign policy statement for
publication in this newspaper a statment he refuted to release almost
at the same time that he finished it. The reason for bis sudden switch'
He didn't want to "embarrass" the Administration.
It seemed almost as if the writing of it were enough, and I h3
the feeling then that running for the Presidency was, in Mr. Stevenson's
eyes, also just enough. He never considered victory a realistic pos$i.
bility. Indeed, victory might well have overwhelmed him.
But there is no such onesided favorite in 1960 as Mr. Eisenhower
proved to be in 1952 and 1956. Turning the tables in the present cam-
paign. Sen. Kennedy is peppering his rival with the will to win. Neither
did Mr. Nixon expect an easy time of it. He early warned the GOP
leadership, adjusted to eight years of easy living and unaccustomed to
criticism, that this election effort would be a rough one. And pre-
cisely here has Iain the difference between the two candidates that
thus far largely constitutes the Democratic margin of favor.
Sen. Kennedy launched his drive for the Presidency gingerly
graceful in his onslaught against the Administration, careful to avoid'
an attack that might be construed as disrespect of Mr. Eisenhower
To the surprise of the nation, Mr. Nixon adopted a similarly delicate
stance but with a clearly different intent: to erase the debased
image of himself that is an inherent part of American public opinion.
By the conclusion of their opening television debate, the Vice President
seemed cast in the role of gentle "yes-man." The propagandists: re-
sults were devastating.
-t- -t- -.
MAKING OP fOK 10ST TIMl
DERHAPS THE GREATEST achievement of the Eisenhower Admin-
' istration has been its successful adaptation of Madison ave. public
relations techniques to the grime of the political arena. Mr. Nixon
inherited the hucksters' whitewash of his record as a dirty gutter
fighter. Emerged purified, the Republican Parsifal, he is now obliged
to face his admittedly formidable foe with a restricted choice of wea-
pons at his command weapons not altogether familiar to him. This
virtually means that the Vice President is fighting with one hand tied
behind his back.
Should he lose, the irony would lie in the fact that Mr. Nixon's
new image was his last image; the Madison ave. that made him, also
destroyed him. But it is clear that the Republican candidate under-
stands these things. The burden of gentleness is an almost unbearable
one and a far cry from the campaign he waged against Helen
Gahagan Douglas. If nothing else, his television debates with Sen.
Kennedy indicate that he should never have acquisced to them. A
blanket refusal at the outset, based on a politically sage unwillingness
to give free exposure to his relatively "unknown" opponent, would
have hurt Mr. Nixon less in the long run than his recent decision to
refuse a fifth encounter.
AU these odds against him, it should be expected that the final
days of the race will find the Vice President cautiously untying the
hand behind his back, poising it, and waiting to let fly a fist armed with
the cunning of the curbstone arena, where he is a proven master, in
a last-minute effort to recoup what he lost on the forensic platform.
THt MOTIVATION TO MMTf A UTTH
|u|ORTIMER MAY, former president of the Zionist Organization of
America, has written me a letter from the Friends of Nixon and
Lodge headquarters in New York a letter marked by restrained
anger. Mr. May takes vigorous exception to my column of Sept. 30, in
which I appraised Ambassador Lodge's voting record at the United
Nations on Suez and Eichmann vis-a-vis Israel. But the bulk of Mr.
May's reply does not touch upon this at all. What it does is to attempt
a confused defense of Vice President Nixon's visits at the Key Bis-
cayne hotel by drawing an even more confused parallel between these
visits and former President Truman's stay on the Keys last year.
The letter also declares: "I am wondering what you would say if
Nixon's father had a record in matters Jewish like Joseph Kennedy
(sic)." It concludes with: ". we are not helping ourselves by con-
stantly regarding the Republican Party and its candidates as our foes
and ... the Democratic Party as our constant advocates. This is
not the way to political security in the United States ."
I have been writing my.column in The Jewish Floridian for many
years, touching on such issues as culture, history, problems of sur-
vival, music, art, literature, and the Zionist movement, among others.
With respect to Zionism. I have been both its sharp critic and its
staunch defender. On the occasion of May's own two terms in office
as president of the ZOA, some of these columns reached their most
outspoken level of critical comment. During all of this time. I ha\e
never received a single oomment from him, pro or con, with respect
to any of these issues.
Now. suddenly, comes a letter written by Mr. May. who complains
about my Sept. 30 column, the substance of which he finds "entirely
too ong for me to discuss in detail," but the posture of which he feels-
is altogether incorrect,
WHirtWASHIHG A KtCORD Of NON-ACMtVtMINT
pERHAPS THE SHARPEST criticism 1 will ever be able to level
against Mr. May is that I could not move him to respond during
ms tenure in office as president of the Zionist Organization of America,
but that a national political campaign prompts him to react sharply:
um '"? is an oblique and aP' criticism of the ZOA. Itself.
n Mr May finds it altogether wearying to report the substance of
m> sept 30 column, except by way of hyperthyroid generalization, per-
mit me to return his weariness in kind. I do not intend to defend my
rHIf m "i! Mr Lodw and Mr Nixon- none of which his letter
rlfni .k ,he angry Iet,ers of olher Republican spokesmen
refute them except to "tell" me more about Mr. Kennedys father;
i a-."1."!! assefsment of Lodge by Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver, who
a. 11, "eDubllcan; or take GOP credit for the opening of Elath.
tr-~J.r: 21 document to me from Moses Schonfeld, recently-appointed
m^niicaSS1S^nt l, lhe Republican candidate for Vice President,
manages neatly to do.
The most offensive gambit of Mr. Mays note is his ooening one:
Pariv ,r '." -'0Ur-waI l<> advance the interests of the Democratic
LtVni rL "0t s*c"fice the welfare of the Jewish people." This is
?he a"Ln^fnSe,~, he ki.nd gross Peant thinking that exemplifies
othe? ri"i !l1Um f the present Administration which, if for no
other reason, needs repudiation.
I have no particular "zeal" to advance the interests of either
Continued on Pag* A


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