The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01655

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"(Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WWO.1
Volume) 33 Number 43
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 21, 1960
Two Sections Pi ice 20*
'BAYVILLE SURVEY' BEGINS IN THIS WEEK'S ISSUE
What Does Dade Jewry Believe?
By MANHEIM S. SHAPIRO
How do the adult Jews who are
titled residents of Dade county
eel about Judaism, about their
vn Jewishness, about the world
ground them? How do they re-
tard their neighbors, both Jewish
fml non-Jewish? What are their
tstimates and experience of anti-
imitism, here and elsewhere?
How do they think Jews should
act, publicly and privately? What
is their opinion about certain pub-
lic issues like religious practices
in the public schools and deseg-
regation? What is their feeling
about Israel and about Jewish
and non-sectarian charities?
These were some of the ques-
tions in the minds of the leaders
of the Miami chapter of the Amer-
_. .-...
id n !? : I 'I -ill
The Jcuish Flondion begins tins week the
first m an rxclu.su'* series on a study of the
attitudes of the Jews oj Dade county toward a
wide variety oj religious and social issues. Sta-
tistical data based on the findings of tlie "Bay
ville Survey" BayviUc being a fictitious name
for Dade county inquiring into the beliefs
end activities of affiliated Jews in the Greater
Miami area. Author of the series is Manheim
Shapiro, national director of the Jewish Com-
munal Affairs Department of the American few
ih Committee. (See Page J-A.)
ican Jewish Committee when they
decided in June, 1958, to conduct
a survey of the attitudes, opinion.-
and activity of Dade county Jew
ry. The American Jewish Com
mittec has been interested in ob-
taining such information about
the views of American Jews be-
cause it serves as a basis for
judging how the future of the
American Jew is likely to evolve,
and as an index to one aspect of
the relations between Jews and
non-Jews.
The national organization of the
GOP Organ Picks
Top Arab Leader
To Advise Ticket
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON American Jewish'committee had I lished by the Republican National Committee, has officially designated
conducted or assisted in the carry- the American Arab leader who testified against Israel at platform hear-
ing out of similar surveys in sev- mgs of both parties to be an official advisor to Nixon and Lodge. He is
oral oHior parts of tho Unitod Norman Raies, of Portland. Ore.
States and tho reaction* of Miami +------------------------------------------------.
Jows will help fill out tho picture.
The local chapter believes that
its own program, and that of other
Jewish organizations in the com-
Continuod on Pago 9-A
olda Strikes Back at Arab Charges in UN;
leaf firms Urgent Plea for Peace in Mideast
MCf 7-A
UNITID MATIOMS DiUGATIONS MPMSSfO
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) due for this organization to remind
Israeli Foreign Minister Golda^ Arab state, of their basic ob-
*eir this week thrust back at a,,a,,ons-
series of anti-Israeli attacks made In tones of biting irony, Mrs.
rre by Arab leaders in the lastMeir apologised -to the Assembly
I month before the General Assem-for having to take up its time to
bly. Exercising her right of reply.reply to the Arab attacks. "We
I she told the Assembly, in a fight-should have, of course, known from
ing speech, that "the time is over-past experience that nothing
Raies. for many years a leadins i
partisan of the Arab cause, simul-1
taneously announced in the G.O.P.
publication that a national Leban-
ese and Syrian "Committee for
Nixon-Ixxlge has been launched by
Americans of Arabic-speaking ori-
gin."
Tho now group "unanimously
voted to communicate with every
American of Lebanese and Syrian
ancestry in tho nation, urging
support of the Nixon-Lodge tickot
based on tho Eisenhewer-Nixon-
Lodgo record of positive achieve-
ment in tho 'vital, strategic Mid-
dle East area'."
an-
Sharett, Dayan Now Figure
In Probe of Hot Lavon Case
JERUSALEM(JTA)Pinhas Lavon appeared Monday before the
Foreign Affairs and Security Gommittee of the Knesset, Israel's Parlia-
ment, as that body resumed hearings in connection with the resignation
of Mr. Lavon in 1955 from his post as Defense Minister in the Cabinet
of former Prime Minister Moshe Sharett.
The committee had postponed*--------------'-
gers the representatives of Arab
States more than a call for peace,"
she explained. "But we promise The Republican National Com-
faithfully not to give up this callI mittec designated, among mem-
until there is peace-In the Middle; bcrs of its new advisory commit-
East. We know it will come, it must j tee, a number of organisers ol the
come, and we are convinced that | "Arabs for Nixon-Lodge" group,
it is for the good of all concerned I Included were Raies; George N.
that it should come soon. The soon-1 Bashara. of Detroit, Mich.; who
er the better." | served as Honorary Consul of Leb-
anon; Burt C. Haddad, of Cleveland,
its hearings Sunday in anticipation
of the release of the findings of a
special investigating committee ap-
pointed by Premier David Ben-
Gurion and headed by Supreme
Court Justice Haim Cohen. The
special committee which is inves-
tigating charges alleging forgery
by two high-ranking officers, com-
pleted its inquiry and has present-
ed its findings to Chief of Staff
Haim Laskov, to be passed on to
Mr. Ben-Gurion.
Nearly all of Israel's morning
papers appeared Monday with
blank spaces in thoir pages re-
sulting from censorship of re-
ports on tho findings of tho spe-
cial committee, which have boon
barred from publication until an
official communique is issued.
Prime Minister Ben-Gunon him-
self has sent a number of ques-
tions to the Knesset committee to
Mrs. Moir acusod tho Arab
spokesman in tho General As-
sembly of having produced "a
series of most fantastic accusa-
tions the! distort both tho ancient
and tho modern history of our
area and our people" because
thoir position in refusing to ne-
gotiate with Israel was unten-
able. She then took up tho Arab
accusations against Israel one-
by.one and replied to thorn.
Mrs. Meir first turned her at-1
tcntion to charges of "nazism" lev-:
cled against Israel by the Saudi
Arabian and Lebanese delegates:
last week. She replied by asking
O.. G.O.P. campaign worker active
in Arab-American groups; Lester
M. Haddad, Bethesda. Mil., attor-
ney concerned with Arab-American
affairs: Frank Maria, Lowell,
Continued on Pago 9-A
Nab US Nazis
As They Picket
Kennedy Offices
WASHINGTON (JTA)An anti-
| Kennedy demonstration by uni-
l tormed "storm troopers" of Lin-
jcoln Rockwell's Nazi, Party, in
I front of the National Democratic
| Headquarters here this week, led
to a near-riot and the arrest of
i Rockwell and six of his swastika-
; wearing Nazis. It was the second
demonstration of the kind in two
days.
The Nazis carried placards pro-
claiming "Nazis for Nixon" and
"Kikes for Kennedy." A crowd of
more than 500 became incensed,
and a riot appeared imminent as
police squads and FBI agents stood
by.
Police finally broke up tho pic-
keting, described as tho most no-
torious and public injection of
Continued on Page 5 A
Nixon Workers Cite Israeli
Paper's Drive for Support
WASHINGTON(JTA)The campaign headquarters of Vice Prcsi-
thom what their attitude had been'dent Nixon issued a statement this week citing approvingly an editorial
towards Haj Amin el-Hussein, one- m an israe] newspaper urging Israeli Jews to induce American Jews to
time Mufti of Jerusalem, when vo(e for Nixon for President. The statement evoked a prompt Jewish
he went to Germany during World ro,est +------------------------------------------------
War U and worked with Hitler. y
She reminded the Assembly of The statement was issued by Her-1
be put to Mr. Lavon in the course I Hitler's racial policies, particularly bert G. Klein, press secretary to
. .__.=____ ;. i-.rt.iv,at "Nee-roes were not even to the Republican candidate tor Pres-
onv t was learned that "Negroes were not even
nireFwmer Premier Sharett was | be considered human." and asked: ident, who cited an editorial that
also due to tesiify before the Knes- These Arab representatives who appeared recently in a Tel Aviv
set bodv and Deputy Defense Mm- now appear here as crusaders for newspaper, "Yed.oth Achronotb.
ister Shimon Peres was scheduledj the equality of all peoples, what The newspaper is a non-party daily.
Continued on Pago e-A
Continued on Pago 5-A
Death of Rabbi Toledano Mourned
the
a, noon, as .eaders of thejovern-, ^Many^ ^ ^ ^ ^
and thousands of others
JERUSALEM (JTA) All Is-, at noon, as .eaaers o, tHou-nd, passed by
rael is mourning the passing oflment, from President ""-""" i
Rabbi Yaacov Moshe Toledano,, Zvi and Pr,me "'m^rttV/\n,i Lncd" theTuneraf procession to the | icon Jew. without regard to petit
Minister for Religious Affairs, who Gurion on "^Vedano i"' und8 atop Har Hamenu- id affiliation,
died suddenly Saturday at his services for Rabbi Toledano.
Three eminent American Jew-
ish leadersPhilip M. Klutxnick,
Irving M. Engel and Rabbi Israel
Goldsteintelegraphed Nixon call-
ing upon him to repudiate tho
Klein statement. They said:
"This shocking appeal for votes
from Americans of tho Jewish
forth is an insult to our faith and
to tho political integrity of Amor-
suddenly
home here at 79.
Flags flew at half-mast over all I
government buildings, the Cabi-|
net's customary Sunday session]
*as devoted to eulogies of the re-'
?ered minister, and all government |
ana other civic offices were closed I
Tho entire diplomatic corps
joined tho ftHI cabinet and lead-
ers of all religious communities
in Israel a* tho funeral. Services
wore spoken by Mr. *-""
and by Tel Aviv's Chief Rak*i
Issor Yehudoh Untorman.
I burial grounds atop
chot, where the late Minister's re-
| mains were laid to rest.
Rabbi Toledano who, in addition
to being Sephardic Chief Rabbi at
Tel Aviv was also head of that
city's Rabbinical Center, was nam-
Continwod on Pago 12-A
Klein's statement, sent out from
Nixon-Lodge campaign headquar-
ters here, said:
"A plea to the people of Israel,
calling for the support of the elec
Continued on Pago 10-A
Israel 'Barrier/
Nasser Tells Ike
LONDON (JTA> United Arab
Republic President Gamal Abdel
Nasser told his legislature in Cairo
that he had told President Eisen-
hower, while visiting the American
leader in New York recently, that
Israel "would always remain a bar-
rier" between the UAR and the
U.S.A., according to press dis-
patches received here this week.
The Cairo reports said that Nas-
ser also reported he had complain-
ed to Mr. Eisenhower about West-
ern shipments of arms to Israel, in-
sisting that there "are no defensive
weapons."
The Egyptian dictator presum-
ably told Mr. Eisenhower that his
government was not prepared to
"compromise" its position vis avis
Israel.


Page 2-A
Panel to Eye
Political Arena
Rabbi Arthur Gilbert, of New
York City, director of the national
department of interreiigious co
operation of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith will be one
of three religious leaders who will
appear in a discussion of relig-
ious liberty in politics on Friday
in Miami.
The Florida region of the Na-
tional Conference of Christians and
Jews is sponsoring the luncheon
program, which will be held at
the Ocean Ranch hotel. 200 SE
12th st. The meeting is open to
ail interested persons.
Appearing with Rabbi Gilbert
will be Hi* Rev. CUud D. Met
aoa. New York, farmer execu-
tive director of the department
of religioot liberty of the Na-
tional Council of Churches in the
U.S.A., and William Clancy,
Washington, D.C., editor of
"World View." Moderator of the
panel will be Dr. Cordon W.
Lovejoy, associate director of
the Southeast Division of the
NCCJ.
The group is appearing in Miami
as part of the National Conference
nation-wide program in behalf of
**A Fair Campaign," which seeks
to reduce the expressions of re-
-Jewlsti ncrkllan
Friday, Otcober 21,
Demos, GOP to Air Campaign Issues
RABBI ARTHUR 6/lBf RT
ligious prejudice for or against
candidates for public office.
"We believe this discussion has
particular importance for citizens
of Dade county." said Max Karl,
regional NCCJ director. "In our
midst, we are seeing a flagrant re-
sort to the tactics of religious big-
ots in an effort to influence voters
in their choice of a school board
member. Our trio of Protestant,
Catholic and Jewish leaders can
render a great service by helping
people to sort out real issues from
the false and misleading appeals
to religious prejudice."
DAILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
HiW JEASET e PHILADELPHIA e lALTIMOftf
ALBANY o WASHINGTON IOSTON
t 1 MOVHMNCE and ell ether Batata WeeeJv Service
fke Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
6SS Collins Ave., Miami Beach Dial JE 8 8353
1




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A trio of speakers will constitute
J a panel discussion of the Presi-
' dential election campaign and its
implications to the nation at a
Town Hall Foronr on TuwSUay eve
ning at Beth David Congregation.
Sponsoring the discussion i> the
I Beth David Men's Club.
Representing the Democratic
Brcmdeis Students
On Dean's List
Brandeis University students
from South Florida were named
!to the First and Second Dean's List
for outstanding scholarship during
the 1959-60 academic year.
On the First Dean's List is Har-
vey Glasser, 1960 graduate, son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. Glasser, 6741 SW
69th ter.
Charles S. Kamen. who gradu-
ates in 1961, was named to the Sec-
ond Dean's List. He is the son ol
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kamen. of
2166 SW 21st St.. Miami.
Miami Beach students named to
the Second Dean's List were the
following:
Anne M. Fishbein, 1961 gradu-
ate, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Fishbein. 2535 Pine Tree dr.
Ruth Katz. 1962 graduate,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
1 Katz, 793 West ave.
Jerome Hantman. 1963 gradu-
ate, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Hantmen, 945 Bay dr.
Party point of view will be for- ,
mer United States Senator from
Florida Claude Popper. Maxwell
Rebb is flying here from Wash-
ington to present tha Republican ,
Party positiew.
Dean James A. Burns, of the.
University of Miami school of I
law. will "be moderator. A question
and answer period follows.
Sen. Pepper served Florida in
the U.S. Senate from 1936 to 1951.
During his tenure in office, he
maintained close relations with
ihen President Roosevelt, whose
New Deal policies he staunchly
supported, frequently pressing
them on other legislators from the
South.
Currently a lawyer with practices
in Miami Beach. Coral Gables,
and Tallahassee, Sen. Pepper holds
honorary degrees from McMaster
University. University of Torento,
Rollins College, and University
of Alabama.
Rabb it feraaee Secretary of
President Eisenhower's Cabinet.
Early this week, ho was named
assistant to Leonard Hall, man-
ager of the Republics PtoW]
nation campaign for Vie* pi?
cnt Nixon am) Ambnu,w i
ry Cabot Lodge.
He was an admjnistraU
ant to Sen. Henry Cabot
al
sr., from 1937 to 1943. as !&
;o Sen. Sinclair Weeks. He JU
as a lieutenant in the AtanujuS
phibious Command of Uie j2i
during World War II. I
In 1958, President zum j
appointed Rabb as chairman 0(Z|
American delegation to t- taXI
conference ti UNESCO in p^f
INSURANCE
Music and Arts
League Concert
Miami Beach Music and Arts
League will open its 196061 series
of music and arts events with a
concert in the Ocean Lounge of
the Roney Plaza hotel on Saturday.
Soprano Margaret Barnes will be
featured artist. Program will con-
sist of arias from Mozart's "Don
Giovanni" and "Marriage of Fig-
aro" as well as lighter selections
from Broadway musical comedy
stage. She will be acompanied at
the piano by Esther Barrett.
Miss Barnes, a former member
of the Opera Guild of Miami, ia a
member of the Light Opera Or-
ganization of Miami. She will be
remembered for her performance
in last season's Gilbert and Sulli-j
van productions with that group.

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Amitetdam Ay*.


iday, Otcober 21. 1960
+Jmlst>ncrl Page 3-A
'Bayville Survey' Makes New Series
^r* **'''*??';&!
M4NHEIM SHAHKO
The "Bayville Survey," a study
of attitudes held by Dade county
Jews toward their Jewi.shness, be-
gins in an exclusive series in this
week's issue o.The Jewish Elorid-
ian. (See Page 1A.)
"Bayville," a fictitious name for
Dade county, is the site of the sur-
vey launched here by the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee in June,
[ 1958. Results of the survey will
I be released nationally to become
I a part of the emerging socioligical
I picture of the American Jewish
I community.
Author of the four-part series
appearing in The Jewish Florid
ian it Manheim S. Shapiro, di-
rector of the Department of Jew-
ish Communal Affairs of the
American Jewish Committee.
iymphony Week Observed Here
A series of special events is
larkinp the eighth annual observ-
ance q Symphony Week from Oct.
It. to 24.
The week preceles the opening
kf the University of Miami's win-
ler concert season, with the first
Concert at Miami Beach Auditor-
urn Sunday evening, Oct. 23, and
Monday evening; Oct. 24, at Dade
founty Auditorium.
Fabien Sevitzky, the University
kf Miami's world-renowned conduc-
tor, will wield the baton at the
iine pairs of concerts, featuring
li-.tingui.shed guest artists.
The traditional observance op-
lened with a tea dance for sym-
phony subscribers and Symphony
Club members on Sunday in gar-
]16, from 5 to 7 p.m., in the gar-
Idens of the Roney Plaza hotel.
The J. Myer and G. David
Schine:, along with the Urtiver-
Isity of Miami and its Symphony
Club, were hosts to the affair.
Mrs. Marie Volpe, veteran man-
ager of the orchestra, was hon-
ored for her 34 years of service to
the University of Miami Symphony
Orchestra.
The Symphony Club's first musi-
cal preview of the season is
scheduled for Friday, 11 a.m.,
at the Miami Woman's Club. Dr.
Sevitzky will discuss the works to
be played at the first pair of con-
certs, and Edward Clarke will mod-
erate the one-hour program, follow-
ed by an informal buffet luncheon.
The week closes with the presen-
tation of the two concerts featur-
ing Eugene Istomin, pianist, as
guest artist.
Masquerade Ball Slated
Miami Beach Jaycee-ettes will
hold a masquerade ball at the Del-
monico hotel on Sunday evening,
Oct. 30. Sandy Garfinkel is chair-
man.
Function of this body is to as-
sist Jews in strengthening both
their identification with and un-
derstanding of their own JewisK-
ness; their relationship with
other Jews and Christians; their
farnTtUrify Wtfh the Jewish re-
ligious and cultural heritage;
and their participation in Jewish
community organizations and
activities.
Shapiro has also served as spe-
cial consultant to the State Depart-
ment on human rights program,
consultant to the American Coun-
cil for the Community. Conference]
on Community Mobilization, the
New York State Citizens Council,
and other such organizations.
A report to the Jewish commu-
nity on the "Bayville Survey" will
be given by Shapiro at a meeting
in the Dupont Plaza htiel on
Nov. 2.
Charles Finkelstein, chairman of
the survey committee, said Wed-j
nesday that thousands of man-
hours were devoted to the com-;
pletion of the study of Dade county
Jewry.
According to Col. Nathan B.
Rood, Greater Miami chapter
president, "the survey consisted
of face-to-face interviews with a
sample of 240 individuals select-
ed from among 17 congregations
and eight Jewish organizations,
with 65 interviewers and cap-
tains participating under the
chairmanship .of Mrs. Jean C.
Lehman, columnist for The Jew-
ish Floridian.
At the Nov. 2 meeting, Shapiro
will be interrogated by a panel
consisting of Arthur Rosichan, ex-
ecutive director of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation; Rabbi Jo-
seph R. Narot, of Temple Israel;
and Mrs. Jerome Hofmayer, of
the Jewish attitude survey com-
mittee.
In addition to Finkelstein, the
committee consisted- e< Mrjr-fceh-
man, chairman of interviewer
training and recruitment; Mrs.
j Leo Ackerman, chairman of the
I questionnaire committee: Herbert
11. Markow, chairman of the sam-
ple committee; and Mrs. Charles
I E. Leeds, Mrs. Jerome Hofmayer
' and Ralph Nurberg, co-chairmea
of the coding committee.
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Book Committee
Meets on Beach
Greater Miami Books Abroad j
Committee was to meet Thursday,
3:15 p.m., at the Miami Beach]
Chamber of Commerce, 1700 Wash-1
ington ave.
Speakers were to include Ben-
jamin R. Stickney, and Maurice
Lee, Washington, D.C., program
executives of the national body.
The organization is part of the
President's People-to-People cam-
paign for the establishment of cor-
dial ties with citizens of countries
behind the Iron Curtain.
Dr. H. Franklin Williams, vice
president of the University of Mi-
ami, is chairman of the local com-
mittee.
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.4


Fcge 4-A
-Jowls* fhrkfian
Friday, Otcober 21. iggg
1M., .- WBWBM I
Jewish Floridian
OFHCE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
MM 396
FEED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
ISRAEL BUREAU
202 Ben Yehuda Tel Aviv, Israel
HAT U. BINDER----------------------Correspondent
Published every Friday since \%H by The Jewish FlortdUn
t 120 N.E. Sixth Street. Miami 1. Florida. Entered at
second-class matter July 4, 130, at P'-st Office of Miami.
Florida, under Ili'XWof Mn-h J. U79. ,
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and
the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide N^wi
Service. Natfonal Editorial Assn.. American Assn. if
English-Jewish Newspapers, and ths Florida Press Assn.
The Jewish Floridian does mil guarantee the Kashrutn
of the merchndle idvrtlnet In !' rnlumn'
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year 5 00
RATES:
Three Year. S10.00
Volume 33 Number 43
Friday. Otcober 21. 1960
30 Tishri 5721
National Newspaper Week
This is National Newspaper Week. It is
weJ for Americans to set aside a week in which
to celebrate one of their most precious heritages
freedom of the press.
Our own time is filled with the incidence of
peoples falling behind the iron curtain of dicta-
torship. Cuba, some 90 miles off the shores of
Flcrida, is the latest example of a nation where
democracy has died.
We need not be reminded that it is always
the press which falls first victim to a dictator's
c bition.
A free press is the continuing guarantee of
an informed people. A free press is the watch-
dog of human liberty and an unwavering con-
tribution to the progress of a democratic society.
National Newspaper Week, observed Oct.
15 to 21, serves to remind us of these things.
Statistics as Mans Tools
This is the era of statistics. Experience
tecches that statistics are potent things. Their
most common incidence today is in the Presi-
dential polls. People have been conditioned to
went to know how others will vote, what theL'
feelings are on specific issues, how they budget
their earnings, what land of purchases they
make annually, and so on, endlessly.
A common complaint against statistics is
that they can be rigged to yield any set of pre-
determined results or that irresponsible
manipulators of statistics, relying on their
"drawing power," frequently employ them
without any scientific basis whatsoever in order
to predispose the public to certain products, to
o type of feeling for or against a popular ques-
tion, and even as in the case of bigots to mold
attitudes toward races and religions.
One of the oldest and most respected uses
of statistics is in the impartial sociological sur-
vey a long-term study to determine the atti-
tudes of a body of people in comprehensive and
depth fashion. Such a study begins this week
in The Jewish Floridian. (See Pages 1-A, 3-A.)
The "Bayville Survey" should prove of in-
terest to our readers for a number of reasons.
Perhaps the most important is that it concerns
the Greater Miami Jewish community local
Jewry's attitudes toward the question of "Jew
lfihness" in a wide variety Of issues. But if
should also prove significant because its re-
sults may very well add to an emerging por-
trait of American Jewry.
The "Bayville Survey" was launched here
in June. 1958 under the auspices of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee. The study is the result
of a statistical analysis ir. which statistics are
the tools of man's searching mind to help him
learn more about himself.
World Peace Organization
The fifteenth anniversary of the United Na-
tions finds the world divided, with strife in
Africa, more nations in A3ia falling into the
grip of the Soviet orbit, and our friendly neigh-
bor, Cuba, also joining the Khrushchev entour-
age.
At a ,im when nothing can seem more
bleak for the forces of human freedom every-
where, we are called upon to consider the
achievements of the world peace organization.
The emerging of the United Nations fifteen
years ago brought hope to a war-weary globe
Under its aegis, new republics have been born
and defended against the rapacious. Through
its many agencies, such as UNJCEF. UNESCO
and others, needy peoples have received tech-
IN HIS SPEECH BEFORE THE UN ASSEMBLY
nical and financial assistance, scientific and
cultural education.
The UN has been the arbiter of interna-
tional quarrels. It has brought a conclusion
to wars, prevented wars from breaking out,
sent armies to assure the cessation of conflicts.
Its achievements are many.
The table-pounding, shoe-waving, Nikita
Khrushchev is still fresh in our memories. But
such boorish international diplomacy is not the
fault of the United Nations. Indeed, the Soviet
dictator's astonishing behavior speaks more
eloquently for the significance of the UN as a
powerful world force for peace than is apparent
at first glance.
Above the rancor among some of its mem-
bers, beyond the din of the debates and quar-
rels which on occasion become threats of war,
there is the continuing recognition that so long
as men talk, they do not fight
On the occasion of the fifteenth anniversary
of the United Nations, this organization still re-
mains man's greatest hope for survival.
Selling the Record Straight
The charges and counter-charges swirling
about the Pinhas Lavon case in Israel make for
a completely disquieting situation.
The newspaper wordage emerging as "re-
ports" of the case produce a mile-high mound
of copy. But it all adds up to a terrifying vague-
ness that spells censorship.
The clearest example of this is the fact that
Israeli newspapers are appearing on the streets
these days with blank spaces in their columns
to indicate the heavy hand of government blue
pencil.
Until the whole story is told, it really seems
quite senseless for Israeli leaders to offer metic-
ulously ambiguous statements on the question.
So far, we can only be certain that the Lavon
case is developing into one of Israel's great-
est scandals to date. The personalities in-
volved. Sharett, Dayan, and others, are proof
of that *^
But if the government feels that blow-by-
blow reports are a danger to the nation's secur-
ity, then it ought to say so. The half-truth wire
service stories of the case merely reflect nega-
tively on a democratic nation and remind us
of the on-again, off-again position Israel adop-
ted in the Eichmann case.
during the week
... as i see it
_py 1E0 MINDLIN
JHEAMER.CAN Jewish Co*
gress has issued a PrT,
coverage summary in ,J ^
ami case challenging reiigC;
practices in the Dade cuuj
school system. The m*
study purports to give brnai
view of newspaper opinion wi,2
;^ihrLli,igalion *E
win irainiie before fiirln m_
don here Oct. 31. The'
stance of the survey attetrZ
"to disprove fears expressed by Leo Mindlin, executive editor of Th,
Jewish Floridian that the case 'may possibly do greater harm th-T
good to the human relations progress we have thus far made'
The Congress summary suggests that the local dailies "were emi
nently fair, and gave both sides of the picture." This is a weU-foundj!!.
assertion, which should hardly prove surprising. The Miami Herairt
and Miami News are positively oriented in the matter of civil lib-
ties. Their positions on minority rights, especially with respect tot
sensitive question of integration, are unequivocally clear. If they hav
spoken out against antiquated traditions of segregation, why should
these newspapers be anything less than "eminently fair" in their r
porting of the religion-in-the-schools case involving separation of churrn
and state?
The AJCongress survey is equally simple in its insistence on
50-50 incidence of letters to the editor "between those favoring and 0D.
posed to the plaintiffs" as an intelligent assessment of public opinion
The study bases its statistics on the July 20 and 21 issues of both
papers. But a more protracted analysis of letters to the Herald and
News, as well as to editors of other Florida publications, offers a pic-
ture entirely different from the even-tempered Greater Miami com"
munity the Congress study attempts to paint.
-;- {
THE INTIRPKCTATION OF IDIT0RIAI SUPPOKT
THE LETTERS QUESTION apart for the moment, what official pon.
* tions did the Herald and News in fact take? The Herald sat com-
fortably on the fence, safely waving the Stars and Stripes with these
words: ". that is where such controversies belong in our Republic -
in court." Did it call for clear support of separation of church and
state? The answer must depend upon one's interpretation of the
reference to "the right relation between religion and the public
schools," from which the morning daily boldly but ambiguously con-
cluded in its July 20 editorial on the subject: "Nothing hs closer to the
heart of the American people."
And what, precisely, is "the right relation"? One can merely de-
duce a feeling of sympathy the Herald called it "a healthy sigi" _
but the final word; apparently, must lie in the court. This is a cir-
cumlocution if ever there was one, and a far cry from the American
Jewish Congress intimation that the editorial comments on a,people
at peace in the due process of law.
No less must the AJCongress interpretation of the Miami News
editorial published July 20 be readjusted for a more accurate under-
standing of the true climate of opinion here. Quotes the Congress:
". the Miami News deplored the fact that 'parents, teachers, stu-
dents, public officials, lawyers and judges must, at this very moment
of our complex lives, devote time, money and effort to this debate'."
On its face, one would assume that the News was proffering its editorial
support even if of a lukewarm variety. But the Congress survey
fails to open its quote with the preceding sentence: ". it can not be
considered anything but tragic that confronted with a multitude of
urgent local, national and international problems we should now he
confronted with this issue too."
:- : .;.
THE HAIVCT OF THt SO SO VOW
|T WOULD HAVE been difficult for the News to place the religion-
in-the-schools case here into a more absurd, wasteful light or to
be more explicit in its criticism of the litigants. Nevertheless, this
carefully-excerpted editorial, and the Herald's ambiguously worded
one, are the AJCongress survey's major lines of argument to prove
local newspaper "fairness" if not downright support by implication.
Placed against a background of equivocation on the one hand,
and rejection on the other, the Congress study's virtual claim of 50-50
letters to the editor acquires new meaning sentiment in favor of
religious practices is actually conceded in both papers of July 20 and
21 by the narrow margins of 3-to-2 for the News and 6-to-5 for the
Herald. As an example, American Jewish Congress statistics fail to
indicate whether or not letters supporting the litigation included some
written by Jews and, if so, how many. It is clear that these would
have to be disqualified in any discussion of the public relations ram-
ifications of the case.
Nor, in this rather naive 50-50 study, is there proper account taken
of the vicious extent to which opponents of the litigation went in the
intensity of their expression a quantity that must be considered in
an intelligent assessment of their impact on the community if the
object is not to dupe us with "balanced" statistics that are actually oat
of joint. Can a letter written by a Jew, favorably disposed to the
litigation, really "cancer' the impact of a negative letter bordering'
on the anti-Semitic?
n But the sleight-of-hand does not end here. In its effort further
'to disprove fears expressed by Leo Mindlin," the survey quotes from
my Aug. 5 column, which considered the militance of the AJCcngress
suit "ill-advised and costly, when civil libertarians of a more restrained
nature judge that principles however dear to us can not, eves
short of self-defeat, be defended at all times and all places"
: : .-.
an tmm to Disentail w soviet
RAVING PROPERLY QUOTED me on this occasion, the CoagresJ
survey continues: "In another column he (Mindlin) wrote: 'Our own
emotions are mixed in this instance. While the principle involved i
a just one. we would feel better were the American Jewish Congress
action joined by the other Jewish defense agencies and Jewish com-
munity organs of civic expression'."
The clear intent of juxtaposing these excerpts is to suggest un-
certainty in my mind with respect to the propriety of the Congress-
American Civil Liberties Union suit. Nothing could characterize mT
position less accurately. I have time and again stated unequivocally
that I support the principle involved in the litigation. But in the name
ot conservation of minority group energy, I suggested that the s"
might have been filed in a more favorable climate. (See "During the
Week As I See It," July 29. Aug. 5, Aug. 12.)
These considerations apart, the second excerpt attributed to me
t>y the Congress survey is worse than a misquote: It was never, in
, i T !? me' but PPe" in an editorial in The Jewish Floridian
or July 22, which takes a less harsh view of the litigation than my own-
i hose who have read the editorials is The Jewish Floridian over the
years can point to more than one occasion when they have been
critical of a position expressed in this column.
unregarded, however, in all these self-deceiving considerations,
was the massive impact on the community of bold headlines thai
CenHnwed en Rage 12-A
ir


Friday. Otcobtr 21. I960
-Jelsi Page 5-A
College of Jewish Studies Offers Varied
Curriculum for Religious School Teachers
Running through final plans for the opening of Temple Men-
orah's new $300,000 Community Center at a dedication dinner
to be held at the Center on Nov. 6 are (left to right) Archie
Levine, dinner chairman; Maurice Revitz, president of Temple
Menorah; and Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. The dinner will start
at 6:30 p.m., after which there will be entertainment by
comedienne Patsy Abbott and dancing to the music of Arnie
Barnett and hi* orchestra.
Sharett, Dayan Now Figure
In Probe of Hot La von Case
Continued from Pag. 1-A
to appear on Thursday. Mr. Peres
was director-general of the De-
fense Ministry at the time of Mr.
Lavon's resignation.
La von, who is now Secretary
GeneraT of the Histadrut, again
took issue with Premier Ben-Gur-
ion for the latter'* statements dur-
ing the controversy. Mr. Lavon had
earlier denied assertions by the
Premier that the latter's appoint-
ment of the special investigating
committee had nothing to do with
Lavon's resignation in 1955. Mr.
Lavon asserted that the Premier
t-ither did not read his proposals
for defense reorganization, or did
not remember them, if he could
say that "they would result in split-
ting the defense network like Solel
Boneh was split." Mr. Lavon re-
iterated his position that he de-
manded full public clearance.
Agriculture Minister Mstht
Dayan, who was Chiof of Staff
*t the time Lavon resigned, said
that officers in tho Armed
Forces are subject to severe dis-
cipline. Ho declared that "any
commander in Israel's Army who
was aware of such acts (forgery
or manipulation of facts), and
did not immediately take all
Stops open to him tO investigate
I tho case and punish the goirry,
should bo considered en accom-
plice and the full fore* of the
law should be invoked against
him.
Dayan revealed that he had sub-
mitted his resignation to Lavon
five years ago, when be learned
that he did not enjoy the confi-
dence of the Defense Minister. He
said, however, that his resignation
was not accepted.
Public interest in the case reach-
ed peak intensity here, with grow-
ing support for Lavon, Within Ma-
pa i cjrcles, the veteran politicians
were reported lining up on the
side of Lavon, against Premier
Ben-Gurion and the "young gen-
eration."
Miamian Takes lead
Joseph Simons, Miami represen-
tative of Seaboard Life Insurance
Company of America, was leading
producer for that company during
the month of September with a
personal paid volume of $225,000.
Courses of study at the College
of Jewiah Studies of the Bureau of
Jewish Education for the year
1960 61 have just been released by
Meyer A. Baskin, president.
The College oi Jewish Studies
will meet this year in three loca-
tions, the Bureau Central Branch,
135 NW 3rd ave., Miami, Wednes-
days, 8 to 10 p.m.; Coral Gables
Branch at Temple Judea, 320 Pa-
lermo, for the first semester, and
at Temple Beth Am, 5950 No. Ken-
dall dr.. So. Miami, for the second'
semester, Wednesdays, 8 to 10
p.m.; and at the North County
Branch, Beth Torah Congregation,
1060 NE 164th St., North Miami
j Beach, on Thursdays, 8:15 to
10:15 p.m.
Registration at the Central and
Temple Judea Branches of tho
Bureau will bo hold on Wednes-
! day, Oct. 26. Registration at tho
< North County Branch will bo
( hold on Thursday, Oct. 27.
The Bureau Central Branch is
offering two-semester courses in
Post Biblical Jewish History,"
"Elemenlary Hebrew" and "Sur-
vey of the Bible." Instructors in
this course include Herbert Berg-
cr, assistant director of the Bu-
reau; Benjamin Udoff, education
director, Temple Judea; and Dr.
Heszl Klepfisz, noted scholar and
Hebraist.
The Bureau Central Branch will
also house the department for re-
cruiting and training of Hebrew
teachers. The Hebrew Teaching
Department will include two class-
es leading to preparation for a He-
brew teachers license through the
Bureau's Board of License. The in-
structors in this department in-
clude Dr. Joseph Zuckerbram and
Meyer Samberg, instructor at Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
The Central Branch will also
[ sponsor a winter seminar for pre-
school education and a Hebrew
language seminar and workshop,
beginning Nov. 7, under the direc-
Nab U.S. Nazis;
Picket Kennedy
Continued from Pago 1-A
religious bigotry yet to occur in
tho election campaign.
Typical of the provocative signs
of the picket line was a placard
stating: "FDR and JFK means
Jew deal." Police sought to avert
violence as the mounting crowd
protested against the signs.
Clark King, chief prosecutor for
the District of Columbia, said that
Rockwell and six of his men, ar-
rested by police as a result of the
demonstration, would be tried this
Thursday.
tion of Dr. Heszel Klepfisz and Dr.
Nathaniel Sorbff, Bureau consult-
ant.
Courses in teaching methods
in both Hebrew and Sunday
Schools will be offered on Friday
at the Bureau'* Central Branch
under tho instruction of Louie
Schwartimart, executive director
of the Bureau.
The Coral Gables Branch of the
college will offer two-term courses
in "Survey of the Bible" and "Re-
form Judaism." Instructors will
be Meyer Samberg Rabbi Morris
A. Skop, of Temple Judea, and
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard, of Tem-
ple Beth Am. The courses at the
Coral Gables Branch are offered
in collaboration with the South
Florida Council of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
North County Branch offers the
following two semester courses:
"Elementary Hebrew," "Methods
of Teaching in the Sunday School,"
"Prophets and Writings," and "Bib-
lical Jewish History." Faculty con-
sists of Meyer Samberg, Louis
Schwartzman, Rabbi Max Zuckcr,
of the Dade Heights Jewish Con-
gregation, Rabbi Bcnno Wallach.
of Temple Sinai of North Beach,
Rabbi Max Lipshitz, Beth Torah
Congregation, and Rabbi Samuel
Jaffee, Temple Beth El, Holly-
wood.
The College of Jewish Studies
has been organized with the pur-
pose of training religious school
teachers to serve the Jewish
schools of Greater Miami and Hol-
Juck D. Weiler has bwu
named chairman of the Board
of Overseers of the Albert Ein-
stein College of Medicine. tie
! succeeds former New York
j State Atty. Gen. Nathaniel L.
Goldstein, who has bee^i
named chairman emeriti ;.
A key leader in post-wzr
overseas aid activities of tla
American Jewish community,
Weiler is national chairmen
of the United Jewish Appeal
and, for nine years, served ci
chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal of Greater New
York. He is secretary-trec>-
urer of the State of Israel Bor. d
Organization.
lywood in the preschool, one-day-
a-week, and in the afternoon He-
brew departments. The collage
publishes detailed credit require-
ments for teachers license in these
three areas.
Beth David Men's Club
PRESENTS TIMELY ATTRACTION
TOWN HALL FORUM
REPUBLICANS vs. DEMOCRATS
PRESENTING
MAXWELL RABB
Newly appointed assistant to Leonard Hall, Campaign Chairman
of the Republican Parly
FOR THE REPUBLICANS
SEN. CLAUDE PEPPER
FOR THE DEMOCRATS
QUESTIONS FROM THE AUDIENCE WILL BE PERMITTED
The Beth David Men's Club takes this Opportunity to Invite to
this Outstanding and Timely Presentation the
Entire Greater Miami Community, at
BETH DAVID AUDITORIUM, 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, at 8 P.M.
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24-hour service except rosh hashono end yom kippur


Page 6-A
-Jmist, Ocrkfian
Friday, Otcober 21.
I960
U.S. Urged to Block Electioneering
Jim Carey, president of International Union of Electrical Work-
ers (left), and Arthur Spiegel, director of education, Florida ADL
Office, discuss Anti-Defamation League exhibit of human rela-
tions materials on exhibit during the IUE convention held at
the Carillon hotel last week.
Union Leaders
See ADL Exhibit
Over 1,000 trade union leaders
were exposed to the human rela
tions educational materials distri-
buted by the Ami Defamation Lea-
gue of B'nai B'rith during the In-
ternational Union of Electrical
Workers convention held last
itnnth. Paul Seiderman. chairman
of the Florida board of the ADL
announced Wednesay.
"An ADL exhibit at the conven
tion received much attention fror
the delegates representing hun
drcds of locals from 35 states, an-
this offered a unique opportunit<
for union leaders and organizers t<
be mailp familiar with the positive
human relations work of our agen
ty. Seiderman said.
Members of B'nai B'rith women's
chapters, throughout the week-low
convention, manned the exhibi;
and answered hundreds of inquir
ies directed to them about Jews
aBti-Semitism, race relations, and
education.
Volunteers included Mrs. Richari
Hecht, Mrs. Herbert Heiken, Mrs
Alfred Reich. Miss I.inda Brown
Mrs. George Shaw. Mrs. Dalton Is
lael, Mrs. Jack Lobell, Mrs. Louis
Sokol and Mrs. Al Goldberg, whq
spent time meeting with delegates
and consulting with them on po
tivc rage relations programs.
Arthur Spiegel, director of edu
cation of the Florida ADL office,
met with officers throughout the
convention and planned programs
and techniques for increased inter-
group understanding with the trade
union movement.
Young Judea Youth Group
More than 50 youngsters attend
cd the first meeting of the Young
Judea Youth Group held Monda>
evening at Beth Torah Congrega
lion. Leaders include Doris Horo-
witz and Sdndra Levy. The group.-
meet Monday evenings at 7:15
p.m.
Beach Realtors
Sleet Simon
George A. Simon bas been nam-
;d president of the Miami Beach
Board of Realtors. He succeeds
George Frix.
One of the most active members
f the organization, Simon has
served as a director of the Board
.'or three years. He is a former
chairman of its convention com-
mittee, and was among the leaders
n the development of plans for
he Florida Assn. of Realtors con-
vention which opens at the Dupont
Maza this week.
Simon it member of the state
association's board of governors,
and also servos as a member of
the public relations committee
on a national level. He has been
active in real estate circles since
194*.
Named first vice president of the
iremization was Edward J Char-
By Special Report
YOUNGSTSOWN, O. Nation-
al Commander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United States, I. L.
Feuer, has called on the State De-
partment to censure "the intru-
I sion of Arab governments into the
'American election campaign" and
I to oust offending Arab ambassa-
dors.
Feuer pointed out that Iraq, "an
Arab State heavily oriented to-
ward the Soviet orbit, has gone
| so far as to protest to our Depart-
ment of State against a speech by
a candidate for the presidency,
United States Sen. John F. Ken-
nedy, of Massachusetts, to an
American audience in an Ameri-
can city. New York.''
Iraq threatened the United States
with a deterioration of diplomatic
relations unless Sen. Kennedy was
silenced on the subject of Israel
, and Jew ish issue.
The national commander urged
the "immediate rejection" of a
diplomatic note handed to the
American Embassy in Baghdad
by the Iraqi Foreign Ministry.
Citing the State Department's
admission of "concern" as to a
speech delivered in Washington,
D. C, by UAR Ambassador Must-
afa Kamel at a recent convention
of Arab students, Commander Feu-
er said the Ambassador should be
declared persona non grata to end
his intervention in American do-
mestic politics.
Ambassador Kamel had told
Arab students assembled in Wash-
ington that it was their "duty" to
enter American election activity
despite the (act that they are cit-
izens of one of the Arab states, and
are guests of America on tempo'
Metro Names
Kahn to Board
Burton S. Kahn, civic and busi-
ness leader, has been appointed a
member of the Metropolitan Dade
County Zoning Appeals Board by
tthe Dade County Commission.
Kabn was named to succeed
Charles Crandon, who recently re-
signed from this post. Kahn's ap-
pointment is effective immediate-
ly, and he will serve until June
18. 1962.
A long-time resident of Miami
Beach, Kahn is president of Colon-
ial Pontiac, Inc., and formerly
served as president of the Greater
Miami Automobile Dealers Assn.
In addition to his activities in
the automotive field, Kahn has
been active in the real estate and
1 construction field in Dade and
rary student visas. He urged the
students to propagandize American
voters against political candidates,
including Sen. KelfflWy, who sup-
port the rights of the State of Is-
rael. Feuer said he also "impugn-
ed the loyalty of American citizens
of the Jewish faith."
Commander Feuer pointed out:
"We have enough trouble with na-
tive agitators injecting spurious re-
ligious issues into the current
campaign without permitting the
Arab Ambassador in Washington
to violate the rules of diplomatic
behavior by such shocking intru-
sion into purely domestic mat-
terss."
Mr. Fever said that any of the
estimated 4,000 Arab students
here who agitate against Amer-
ican political candidates on
religious basis should be de-
ported for "unseemly intrusion
into our internal affairs."
"There are already too many
bigots striving to divide Ameri-
cans without importing Arab hate
that all too often follows Commu-
nist lines," he said.
Feuer suggested an investiga-
tion by the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation and appropriate com-
mittee of the Congress.
He said that the Jewish War
Veterans, which was the first na-
tional organization decrying the in-
jection of religion in the present!
campaign, is dedicated to the prcs-1
ervation of American institutions. |
including free elections. Accord-
ing to Commander Feuer, ^
forms of diplomacy might'pen*
tne presence in m.s count of,'*
desirable diplomatic guesj. !, T
United Nations but v,'^!."?
ly do not have to allow such
sons to intrude into our elecZ,"
and set American against AmcrL
can because of religious dififr
ences. "'
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iFriday. Otcobar 21, 1960
*Jewish fhridian
Page 7-A
M .^a*****. \
|C' i r ^^fli
k r

Sen. John F. Kennedy and Simon J. Helman (right), president
off the Associated Jewish Philanthropies of Boston, examine
plans for recently-completed new gymnasium of Boston YMHA-
Hecht House in Dorchester, a memorial to the Senator's brother,
Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy. A grant from the Joseph P. Kennedy
Foundation enabled the AJP to finish the facility.
Mrs. Meir Impresses UN
As Arab Chiefs Hurl Insults
UNITED NATIONS-UTA) -The
>id of Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's
"oreign Minister, tor immediate
eace talks with the Arabs has pro-
]uced a profound impression on
friends, foes and ne't,rals alike at
pe United Nations. Mrs. Meir pro-
posed tmconditionil negotiations
yith Prime Minister David Ben-
Jurion and rulers of the Arab coun-
tries.
Many Wst Eu'o*>ean. Asian. La-
_ American, and African dele-
gates expressed open, though un
Ifficial approval of "Israel's forth
pghf stand." They were impressed
ly the 'without preconditions"
Jtand and by Mrs. Meir's plea for
Vat least a non-aggression pact."
Many delegates also endorsed Mrs.
^feir's plea for Middle East dis-
armament.
The Arab spokesman reacted
by being mere bitterly anti-Israel
than usual. Ahmed Shukairy, of
Saudi Arabia, exercising his right
of reply, accused Israel from the
Assembly podium of having com-
mitted "Nazi atrocities."
Michael S. Comay. Israel's perma-
Inent representative, told the As-
sembly immediately that Israel had
I no intention of replying to Shu-
Ikairy's speech, saying "the Assem-
Ibly has long been accustomed to
Ithe type of remarks made by the
ISaudi Arabian representative." He
Iadded: "We want only to register a
Isense of disgust at anyone here
[comparing any peoples with Nazis."
Mr. Comay was applauded loudly
after his brief intervention.
The Arab reaction came as soon
s Mrs. Meir concluded her address
before the plenary session of the
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Assembly. Since she had aimed
her peace challenge directly at Uni-
ted Arab Republic President Gamal
Abdel Nasser, the first open reply
was given the Assembly by Egypt's
permanent representative Omar
Loutfi.
Mrs. Meir's address, he said, had
been "designed to confuse public
opinion with insidious propagan-
da." Israel, he reiterated, has vio-
lated "hundreds" of UN resolutions
and has demonstrated "nothing but
aggressive and belligerent conduct
n th? Middle East."
Jordan's Foreign Minister, Musa
Naser. told correspondents there
was "nothing new" in Mrs. Meir's
peace proposal, saying her speech
was "full of distortions."
Oassim Hassan. Iraqi Ambas-
sador to Czechoslovakia, and a
member of his government's dele-
gation to thi year's Assembly,
took a leaf out of tt-e book of
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev by pounding his desk vio-
lently after Mrs. Meir's address
was concluded. On the other
hand, the applause for her speech
was loud and prolonged. She had
been greeted by applause when
she mounted the rostrum, and
she was interrupted by applause
a number of times.
Members of various delegations
sought out Israeli and other Jew-
ish correspondents to express ap-
proval of Mrs. Meir's peace offer.
"She really challenged Nasser this
time to make good on his own pro-
fessions of good faith," one promi-
nent Asian told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Another, a West Ewopean, said:
"Mrs. Meir's authorized offer of
peace talks without any precondi-
tions whatever, and immediately,
is about as reasonable a proposal
as I have heard here in a long
time. And I'm not the only one
who feels that way."
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Histadrut Plans
Annual Meeting
By Special Report
NEW YORK The 29th nation-
al convention of the Histadruth Iv-
rith of America will be held Nov.
2 to 6 at the Chelsea hotel, in At-
lantic City. N.J.
The sessions will be conducted
in both Hebrew and English.
Among participants will be Avra-
ham Harman, Ambassador from Is-
rael to the United States; Rabbi
Irving Miller, chairman of the
American Zionist Council; Max
Ki.ssler, newly-elected president
of the Zionist Organization of
America; and other leaders and
scholars. .._ ,^.
Danish Royalty Given AJC Citation
By Special Report
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Committed! this week pre-
sented a silver menorah to the
King and Queen of Denmark in
appreciation of Denmark's effec-
tive protection ot us Jewish pop-
ulation during World War II. Al-
most all of the 9,000 Jews in Den-
mark were saved from major gen-
ocide.
The presentation was made to
Paul B. Ryder, Consul General of
Denmark, who accepted the gift
in behalf of King Frederick IX
and Queen Ingrid, now visiting this
country.
Representing the committee
were Herbert B. Ehrmann, presi-
dent, Ralph Friedman, chairman
of AJC's Foreign Affairs Depart-
ment, and executive vice president
John Slawson. The ceremonies
took place at the offices of the
Danish Consulate General.
The menorah was engraved
with these words: "With ever-
lasting thanksgiving to the
Throne and People of Denmark
for saving with heroic determi-
nation the entire Jewish commu-
nity of their country."
On April 9. 1940, when Denmark
was occupied by Germany, there
were some 9,000 Jews in the coun-
try. Under the determined protec-
tion of King Christian X, brother
of the present monarch, the Jews
remained almost completely un-
disturbed for over three years.
Every Nazi attempt to "see the
Jewish problem solved" in Den-
mark was frustrated by unrelent- were smuggled across the straits
ing resistance. to neutral Sweden.
In Jan aa-r-eV 1942,-Jiie King
threatened to resign when the Ger-
mans tried to foist a harsh anti-
Jewish law on the Danish cabinet
and parliament. On his birthday,
Sept. 27. 1942. the King publicly
declared that should the Jews of
his country be compelled to wear
the yellow star of David badge,
he. the royal family, and the royal
household would immediately wear
ii all the time. The King also made
it a frequent habit to attend Jew-
ish religious services at the Cop-
enhagen Synagogue.
In Sept.. 1943. a personal ulti-
matum from Hitler to the Dam h
cabinet warned that either Den-
mark would "voluntarily" accept
the German "solution of the Jew-
ish problem" or else be subjected
to full and direct German rule. AH
members of the cabinet announced
that they would resign rather than
submit to compulsion. As a result,
the Germans were compelled to
initiate these measures themselves.
Wehrmacht detachments im-
mediately started to round up the
Jewish population in their
homes, for deportation. They
came too late. The Jews were
forewarned by the Danish auth-
orities and with the help of the
orgeniied Danish resistance
movement most of them were
able to disappear in safe hiding
places gearded by the under-
ground. At the King's behest, an
entire flotilla of Danish fishing
vessels was recruited, and with-
in a few days, thousands of Jews
. OnUya .lew* vpstela ufere cap-
tured or sunk by the German Navy,
and about 5,500 Jews were able
to reach Sweden where they given
asylum and help. Alter the war,
these Jews returned to Denmark.
Hundreds of other Danish Jews
who could not escape were protect-
ed and kept alive in hiding in Den-
mark by the Danish people Only
about 750 Jews, among them 450
inmates of a home for the aged,
were caught by the Germans and
even these, probably out of respect
for the mood of the Danes, were
sent to Theresienstadt, instead of
the extermination camps. Even in
Theresienstadt. they were fed and
supplied with medical and other
facilities from Denmark, and King
Christian himself intervened sev-
eral times in behalf of their safe-
ty and welfare. In April. 1944. un-
der Danish and Swedish pressure,
the Germans felt compelled to re-
lease these Jews and to send them
by bus to Sweden. While passing
through Copenhagen, they were
greeted by a huge popular dem-
onstration which the Nazis were
unable to prevent, and were over-
whelmed with gifts of food and
clothing.
All Jewish possessions were held
in safe trust by Danish friends and
neighbors, and businesses were
kept intact and voluntarily return-
ed after the war without loss or
difficulty. The Torah scrolls of
j Copenhagen temples were hidden
i in the local cathedral.

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Page 8-A
9-JmistncrHian
Friday, Otcober 21,

Golda Refutes Arab Charges at UN
Continued from Pg 1-A
did they have to say about this
racial doctrine at thai time""
In reply to Arab complaints that
Israi 1 had refused to obey United
Nation* resolutions, she comment-
ed: But what was the answer of
the Arab League to the United Na-
tions resolution of 1947? They not
oih rejected it. but they went to
war to defeat it." This historical
error"' of the Arab intervention in
Palestine, she pointed out. "left
behind it a bitter legacy, includ-
ing the creation of the Arab refu-
gee problem." The Arab States
themselves, she declared, quoting
Arab sources, were responsible for
!he flight of the Arab population.
To the accusations of "expan-
liv n Katz (right), principal of Miami Beach High School, was
guest speaker atv services of Temple Menorah last Friday.
Stcnding (center) is Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual leader
ci .he Temple, who looks on as Mark Granoff (standing left)
ODd Janice Revitz, students at Beach High, discuss the address,
ch accented youth.
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sionist aim*," Mr*. Meir replied
briafly, demolishing tha "fairy
tales about map* and textbooks."
"None of tha foreign diplomat*
in Israel, and tha thousand* of
foreign visitor* who com* to tha
Knesset, she said, "had evar
soon tha map of Israel'* expan-
sionist program which the Lob-
, anese dale gate said hung there,
for one simple reason it does
! not exist and never has existed."
Mrs. Meir disposed of charges
1 about the condition of Israel Arabs
by affirming that all Israeli Arabs
"enjoy the same political rights
[ as do the Israeli Jews." No Arab
i state, she said, "can point to the
achievement of a standard of liv-
ing for the masses of its population
that may be compared favorably
to the standard ot living of the Is-
raeli Arabs."
Mrs. Meir was most effective in
refuting Arab warnings against Is-
rael's alleged "colonialism." She
told the Assembly: "We are proud
of our relations with these new
states." The Arabs know their
charges are nonsense, she said,
and what is more important the
Africans themselves know it is non-
sense. The leaders of the African (
countries are not to be frightened
by meaningless slogans."
In the entire United Nations, the
Israeli Foreign Minister declared,
there was only one instance where|
member states declared openly j
that another member-state had no
right to exist and should be put I
out of existence. "This is the posi-|
tion loudly proclaimed by the Arab
States against Israel." she noted. |
"Is this in keeping with tha
Charter of the United Nations?" ,
she asked. "Is this in keeping I
with the obligation that each I
state takes upon itself when it
is received into membership of j
the United Nations? Can this or-
ganization overlook such a se-
rious repudiation of tha Charter?
My delegation sincerely believes
that the time is overdue for this
organization to remind the Arab
states of their basic obliga-
tions."
The Israeli Foreign Minister j
concluded her address with a fer-i
vent appeal for negotiations. "Let
us make peace," she said, "pledge.
ourselves to non-aggression and |
j have our borders internationally J
, guaranteed. We are prepared. Wei
| ask the Arab states to agree. When]
i they do, there will be a genuine j
I prospect of ending a conflict of I
which the world is weary, and of|
j opening up a new vista of progress
' for our troubled region."
Musa Nasir, Foreign Minister of
Jordan, again mounted the Assem-j
bly rostrum today "to correct some
of the misrepresentations" he at-
tributed to Mrs. Meir. Rejecting:
the offer of peace negotiations, he
reiterated all the old charges,
against Israel's "aggressions," and
added some fresh allegations about
Israel's purported "persecution''
of Arabs living in the Jewish State.
Fruchtman Will
Get Top Award
By Special Report
TOLEDO Charles Fruchttman,
of Toledo, O.. and Miami Beach,
who began his American careeer
with a strong back and a sledge
hammer, will receive one of the
highest awards American Jewry
can bestow at a special national
ceremonial dinner here on Nov. 1.
Fruchtman will be given the
Louis Marshall Award for 1961.
which goes to the citizen who is
outstanding in his civic contribu-
tions and who "follows in the hon-
ored tradition of lay leadership,
cherishing always the living force
of our great faith."
At the same ceremony at a din-
ner in Temple B'nai Israel here,
announcement will be made that
an associate professorship will be
formally established in perpetuity
in Fruchtman'* name at the Jew-
ish Theological Seminary of Amer-
ica.
Speaker will be Dr. Louis Fink-
elstein, chancellor of the Semi-
nary, and internationally known
scholar and religionist, who also
will present the award.
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Friday, Olcobor 21, 1960
+Jew 1st fkridfian
Page 9-A
RESULTS OF SURVEY IN SERIES
What Do Dade Jews
Think of lewishness'?
Ccriinoed from Page 1-A
munity, should be related to a
knowledge of the expressed views
and feelings of the Jews who live
here. This was the origin of the
"BayviJJe Survey." a code name
for the study of the attitudes of
Miami Jewry.
Piparing the Survey
With the assistance of social
scientists from the national staff
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee, a questionnaire was drawn
up incorporating subjects recom-
mended by local residents. The
questionnaire consisted of 63
questions, some of them with as
many as 15 parts. Each person
interviewed had the opportunity
to make choices among a mini-
mum of 573 possible responses,
giving iacts, opinions, feelings or
experiences.
Using methods currently em-
ployed by social scientists and
market researchers, a sample of
240 persons was selected for in-
terviews. Because of the high
rate of change among Miami resi-
dents, and the lack of any reliable
recordt, of the total Jewish pop-
ulation of Dadc county, the sam-
ple Wa.f selected from among af-
filiated Jews onlythat is, those
who are members either of con-
gregations or organizations. The
membership lists of 17 temples
and synagogues (Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reform) and eight
Jewish organizations were used
to select at random the names
ol the total number of respon-
dents.
These were from all parts of
Dade county and of every eco-
nomic itvti Eich category
branch cf Judaism and area of
residence Was selected in a
proport'cn of the sample equiva-
lent .'to the proportion of these
groups !n the total number of af-
filiated Jews in the county.
People were interviewed face-
to face by a team of 50 interview-
ers anc' 12 captains, selected from
among members of the American
Jewisb Committee and other Jew-
ish organizations. The interview-
ers were trained by a professional
survey director. The interview-
ing wat completed in the late
fall of JU58, and the tabulation of
the da'.a was completed in the
sumraei of 1960.
Viho Was Interviewed
A dc:cription of who was inter-
viewed and the demographic r>i-
tributet of these persons is a
necessfli> preliminary to report-
ing their attitudes and activities.
The 240 affiliated Jews who an
swered the questions were divided
almost < actly halt and half into
men at:.' women, deliberately so
chosen.
They range in age from their
20 i to over SO, but the largest
proportion of the sample (96%)
is between 30 and 79. The me-
dian age for the men in the group
it 47; hi the women 45. (There
are pixkably fewer young adults
in the sample because fewer of
these are affiliated in their own
right with synagogues and organ-
izations.)
This group has a much higher
level of formal education than the
general population. Over half the
men and over a third of the wom-
en have completed college. Four
out of five finished high school,
and only one out of 20 did not
complete grade school. Some 85Tc
of the respondents are currently
married and living with their
spouses. A total of 12% are wid-
owed (mostly women), and 37
are divorced or separated. Facts
show that 92*:; have childrenof
all ages.
Two out of three of these adults
were born in the United States,
but four out of five are the chil-
dren of two foreign-born parents.
Occupation ally, the largest
single group (35%) are house-
wives. Thereafter, the frequency
of occupational groups is: owners
of businesses (16%), retired (8%),
executives (5<<). service workers
(4%), clerical workers (3"'!), and
one factory worker.
Almost all (08%) say they re
gard the Miami area as their
permanent home. Nine out of ten
register to vote here. AH but
one out of ten have lived here at
least three years, and more than
half have lived here for ten years
or more.
The largest proportion (43%)
lived in the metropolitan area of
New York City before coming
here. There are 18% from the
Middle Atlantic States. 13% from
the North Central States (includ-
ing Illinois and Ohio), 10% from
the Southeast and 9% from New
England.
Almost nine out of ten say they
are members of a temple or syna-
gogue. (This proportion reflects
the fact that names were drawn
mostly from congregational mem-
bership lists.) Of these, 48% are
members of a Conservative con-
gregation. 28% of a Reform tem-
ple, and 14% of an Orthodox syna-
gogue. However, when they were
asked "Regardless of your actual
affiliation and membership, would
you describe yourself as an Orth-
odox, Conservative, or Reform
Jew, or as none of these?", about
a quarter of each group described
themselves as something other
than the branch of Judaism of the
congregation to which they be-
long.
Of the Orthodox-affiliated, most
of these said they considered
themselves Conservative. Of the
Conservative-affiliated, most of
these regarded themselves is Re
form, and of the Reform-affiliatetl
most declared they would consid-
er themselves Conservative. These
answers probably reflect the type
of Judaism practiced in their
childhood homes, the degree to
which they think they conform to
the requirements of their partic
ular branch of Judaism, and their
conception of the degree to which
they accept what they consider
"traditional."
NEXT WEEK: Jewish Reaction
to being Jewish.
Hospital Elects Judge Friedman
Judge Milton A. Friedman has
been elected to the board of gov-
ernors of National Children's Car-
diac Hospital according to an an-
nouncement by Richard I. Beren-
son president of the nation's only
completely free, non-sectarian hos-
pital devcted exclusively to the
diagnosis and treatment of rheu-
matic and congenital heart disease
in children.
Judge Friedman has been a di-
rector of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation for 21 years, and
currently' is president-elect of
District Group Lodge 5 B'nai
B'rith. .
In other action, the board of
governors of Children's Cardiac
Cardiac Hospital named Lee Rat
ner honorary chairman of the an-
nual Jubilee Ball to be held next
Jan. 28. Chairman of the fund-
raising dinner dance will be Judge
Harold B. Spact, of Miami Beach.
Berenson also announced a new
staff appointment with the naming
of Sidney M. Kain as director of
development for National Chil-
dren's Cardiac Hospital. Kain has
held various executive positions
with the American Heart Assn..
and will assist with the $2,500,000
building fund drive for the new
"Enchanted Forest" Children's
Cardiac Hospital to be erected in
the Metropolitan Medical Center.
"Israel's problems in education are being met
head-on," moderator Leo Mindlin tells the
South Florida chapter of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University. More than 150 per-
sons attended the meeting last week at
the Shelborne hotel to hear a panel consisting
of (left to right) Mrs. Edyth Geiger, Mel Hecht
and Mrs. Joseph Milton. Mrs. Geiger is execu-
tive secretary of the local chapter. Hecht was
a student at Hebrew University in Jerusalem
last year, and Mrs. Milton was a delegate to
the dedication of the Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical Center in August. Looking on
(extreme left) are Mrs. Oida Rubin, honorary
president, and Herbert Shapiro, president.
Mindlin is executive editor of The Jewish,
Floridian.
GOP Organ Picks
Leader as Advisor
Continued from Page 1-A
Mass.. Republican active in pro-
Arab causes; and George J. Sha-
gory, Boston, Mass.. businessman
and Arab-American leader.
Apart from this group, the Re
publicans designated another per-
sonality, a controversial figure, to
advise the Nixon-Lodge campaign.
He is George Mardikian, San Fran-
cisco restaurant operator, who re
cently invited President Nasser, of
the United Arab Republic, to San
Francisco. Nasser accepted but re-
turned to Cairo without touring the
West Coast.
The Republican National Com-
mittee said Nasser's would-be host
was "available to advise Republi
can candidates for office."
Raies appeared this summer et
both the Republican convention
in Chicago and the Democrat
convention in Los Angeles. A
personable and effective lobbyist.
Raies sought support of the Arab
position in the platform commit-
tee. The Republican plank emer-
ged weaker than it had been
formulated in 1956 on Israel.
After a study of the Democratic
and Republican platforms, the pro
Arab element decided to support
the Republicans. Raies was wel-
comed by the National Committee
in Washington and named a 'con-
tributing editor" of the "G.O.P.
Nationalities Reporter."
The Arab faction, at a meeting
here, greeted the Nixon announce-
ment that primary responsibility
on the Arab-Israel issue would be
assigned to Henry Cabot Lodge if
the Republicans win. The Arabs
commented with approval on
Lodge's support of Nasser in the
1956 Suez war.
The Arab committee announced
officially in a press release that it
would "actively promote the candi-
dacy of the G.O.P. standardbear-
ers The Arabs supported the Re-
publicans because "both the- cur-
rent and past foreign policy in the
Eisenhower-Nixon-Lodge program
have proved to be better than
that of the previous Democratic
Administrations."
A spokesman for the Democratic
National Committee said that no
similar Arab committee for Ken-
nedy had been established although
some Arabs, as individuals, mifcht
be backing Kennedy.
Monthly luncheon Held
Beth Emeth Sisterhood held its
monthly luncheon on Wednesday
at 12250 NW 2nd ave. Mrs. Wanda
Sigler gave a cosmetic demonstra-
tion. Chairman was Mrs. A. Ed-
ward Aberman. Committee consist-
ed of Mrs. M. Weiss, Mrs. L. Ros-
enthal, Mrs. J. Lampert and Mrs.
H. Klusky.
1
PARIS, I960:
LORD CALVERT AWARDED
LE GRAND PRIX AMERICAIN
Only a few rare products of excep-
tional quality receive this coveted
prize, presented by Le Comite du
Grand Prix. Lord Calvert was the
unanimous choice of this distin-
guished group of French connois-
seurs because it appeals to the
cultivated taste that knows no
national boundaries.
No wonder Lord Calvert
has been the
most prized whiskey
in Jewish homes
for so many years!
LORD
CALTOI
m
The
L'chayim
whiskey!
MEDALS U COMITE DU GRAND PRIX AMERICAIN. M PROOF, 3S% STRAIGHT WHISKIES YEARS OR MORE OLD, S5% GRAIN
SPIRITS. CALYUI OIJTlUtRS. COMPANY. INQ.. NEW YON* CITY


Poqe 10-A
+Jeisti fhrMian
Friday, Otcober 21. lggQ
Nixon Workers Cite Israeli Paper's Support
Taming over the gavel to he newly-elected president of the
Golden Age Friendship Club of the Miami YMHA is Firaim H.
Gale (right), executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish
Community Center. Hyman Kam will be serving his third term
o? president. Kam also serves as vice president of the Hebrew
Free Loan Assn.. is a member of the board of governors of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and is on the boards of the
Miami YMHA and the Greater Miami Jewish Community Cen-
ts r. He has recently been appointed chairman of the volunteer
v.sitors committee to hospitalized veterans of the Jewish Wel-
fcre Board.
B'nai BVith Sets Membership Push
Oct. 9 to Dec. 31 is marking the
official period of the 1960 B'nai
B'nth "Half Million" membership
campaign aimed at bringing the
to'al number of members in the
Jewish service organiiation to the
h; f-million mark.
Simulating its membership to!
"gel a member by December."
Brai B'rith is moving ahead
qr.&kly with extensive prepara-
tions for the new campaign.
tm part of the effort, the ten
local B'nai B'rith lodges, under
th< overall supervision of district
ii> nbership and activities direc-:
tor" Arnold D. Ellison, and withl
co-Ohatrman Irving Schatzman and
Btreard Newmark. have mapped
out an intensive drive in the Great-
er Miumi area, pledging 800 new
mi .-nbers by Dec. 31.
7 tiis would bring the local mem-
ber-hip count to 4.300 men. All
lodges have organized member-,
ship teams and will be approach-
in. their neighbors in a door-to-
diK r canvas for prespective mem-
bei j.
The Greater Miami campaign
will include with a mass initiation
in January. 1961. Assisting in the
drive are Dave Greenberg, West
Miami: Milton Kahn, Miami
Beach: Milton Hahn, Sholem; Lar-
ry Lipkin, North Shore; Leonard
Schwartz. North Dade; Bob Mar-
shall, Hialeah: Jerry Robinson.
Coral Gables; and Sy Bobbins. Gil
Balkin.
Member Show on Exhibit
Miami Beach Art Club recently
hung its second members show in
the main lobby of the DiLido ho-
tel. Exhibitions of the club run
continuously throughout the year,
and are changed every two months.
The current exhibit includes 24
works of art.
Continued from Page 1-A
lion of Vice President Richard
Nixon, was the subject of an edi-
torial in Yedioth Achronoth,~he
Aid Shunned
WASHINGTON (JTA- -
Vice President Richard M.
Nixon's press secretary, Her-
bert G. Klein, has repudiated
his statement urging Ameri-
can Jews to vote for Nixon
for the sake of Israel. The
repudiation was announced
in Los Angeles after the
Klein statement caused a
protest from three eminent
Jewish leaders Philip M.
Klutznick. Irving M. Engel,
and Rabbi Israel Goldstein.
Mr. Klein said: "The re-
lease referred to was issued
in Washington by an over-en-
thusiastic campaign worker,
without the knowledge of
either myself or the Vice
President." Mr. Klein stated
that Mr. Nixon "has consist
ently taken the position that
there is no such thing as bloc
voting in the United States.
In addition, he has instruct
ed his staff to avoid any ap-
peals which would be direct
ed toward a group with the
implication that it would
vote as a bloc."
According to Mr. Klein,
Mr. Nixon "does not sub-
scribe to the statement in
the editorial" of the Israeli
newspaper Yediot Ahonot
which was quoted by Klein
in his controversial state-
ment warning that a Kenne-
dy election victory might
cause the destruction of Is-
rael.
Aviv newspaper's editorial, accord-
ing to Klein, "pointed up the fact
that there were 2,000.000 Jewish
vul the United States-awl. that
for the sake of Israel, they should
be cast for Vice President Nixon."
The Klein statement concluded:
j "The paper did not call for govern-
mental endorsement of Nixon, but
called for the people of the country
to come forth as volunteers for the
cause of a Nixon-Lodge victory, by
! explaining that aid and comfort.
I via votes, to the Democratic Partv
could result in a policy of appease
ment and the destruction of Israel."
In their telegram to Nixon, the
three Jewish leaders stated:
"Your Press Secretary. Herbert
G. Klein, in a statement issued Oct.
, 10 from the Nixon-Lodge campaign
headquarters, made references to a
purported danger of the 'desiruc-
j tion of Israel" if Sen. Kennedy is
elected. Mr. Klein's press message
contained allegations that Israeli
elements were seeking a pro-Nixon
vote as a 'safeguard for Israel.'
"The rtlNH is an unfortunate
distortion of tho relationship of
American Jewry with Israel, and
disservice to Israel-American
relations. Americans of Jewish
faith vote their individual con-
eeMweviBHMnii
I
Annuml Installation Boll
Temple Ner Tamid Young
Adults will hold its annual instal-
lation ball on Sunday evening at
the Barcelona hotel.
oldest daily newspaper in Israel.
Tlte editorial went on to criticize
Sen. John Kennedy, as 'the incarna-
tion of American political infantil-
ism'."
The last paragraph of the Tel
iKAVtLMG! ^
\HnW IkAVll URVKI. Im
.> ',- m.i..... i m j'.o-*
""" HEALTH
...with EVERY LUXURY. Benefit from hS. hoelth-glving, rodtooerlve thermo"
waters of Hot Springi and relax in luxury of The Arlington.
Barf., awoy oil your aches ond pains due to tension and fatigue....relieve
arthritis, rheumatism, and high blood pressure. Superb bathhouse In the hotel.
Enjoy our ne- miracle, temperature-controlled, cascade twin swimming pools,
pot.o and sun decks.. .dance aftd be entertained. Golf on our two 18-hol.
Championship Courses. Finest food served anywhere is Ide pride, of the
Arlington. All sport, and recreations in Hot Springs nature's wonderland -
including huntirxj, fishing and La* Vegas night lif,.
HOT SPRINGS Am*
science. A political party, f,,
partisan advantage, should never
try to tell Americans of any faith
hew* elements in a foreign nation
allegedly want them to vote.
"When Mr. Klein cited an Israeli
tabloid as an authority on how
Americans of Jewish faith shou'd
vote, we feel he made a grave er-
ror that must immediately be re-
jpudiated. We do not wish to be
! iieve this press release reflects
! your own personal thinking. How-
ever, since Mr. Klein is your au-
thorized spokesman, we must as-
sume he was speaking with your
authority in this official release.
A clarification of your views on this
serious matter is urgently request-
ed."
NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS
Rabbi Abramowitz is Host
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz spiri-
tual leader of Temple Menorah
and president of tht Greater Mi-
| ami Rabbinical Assn.. will be host
I on "Still Small Voice," weekly tele>
i vision program sponsored by the
Rabbinical Assn., on Sunday. 10
a.m.. over WCKT ch. 7. Theme
of the program will be "Words of
Wisdom."
TBS*
)A(j$-6NI()HTS
NO TAX
round-trip tourist faro included
** uuest Afoo"/^
Visit glamorous, summer-cool Mexico via Quest
Airways famed for passenger-pampering
sarvica. But tha Guast flight is only half tha
fun for a complete itinerary of everything
this unbeatable tour has to offer contact
your travel agent or send tha coupon below
to us. In addition to Mexico City, you'll visit
Cuernavaca, Taxco and see so much more.
But don't miss out do it now!
1 PieasesendmefuHdetau.o17.DayM


Friday. Otcober 21, I960
'"MmUtirk rid/am
Pag* 11-A
W 5000 Jemfa To*
"WHO HAVE! AXJfcELAJDY CHOSEN
BURIAL ESTATBB
5505 NORTHWEST 3rd STREET MO 1-7693
Miami's oldest and finest exclusively Jewish Cemetery and Mausoleum 4V
I

Too many people intend to select a family burial site
"someday," but never get around to it until they are
faced with an emergency. This means making a hasty
decision under great emotional stress and hasty
decisions are seldom the best ones. That's why you'll be
so wise to join the thousands of other esteemed Jewish
families who have already made the decision that will
lighten the burden so much, when loved ones are left apq|.'
Their selection of Mount Nebo, Miami's oldest and finest
Jewish Cemetery, has been made after the same con-i
sidered investigation and thought that you would devotej
to selecting insurance or making a will.
Like them, you too will find so many reasons why
beautiful Mount Nebo can be your only choice.
.- -,
\i

Mount Nebo's Perpetual Care Fund
NOW EXCEEDS $150,000
Administered hy The Firsl Nalional Bank of Miami, which
acts as its trustee, this steadily .increasing fund is the
largest of its kind owned by any Jewish Cemetery in
Florida. Fvery cent is devoted to the upkeep and beau tin-
cation of Mount Nebo's grounds. To you this means
owning a burial estate in surroundings that will always
be maintained with parklike beauty'and perfection.
MOUNT NEBO IS SO CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
Whether you use your own car or depend on public
transportation. Mount Nebo is easily accessible.
MOUNT NEBO IS SO WELL-ESTABLISHED
Miami's oldest exclusively Jewish cemeaSi^Wias for years,
been a place of solace, inspiration" and hemiiv.
I
BURIAL ESTAJ|$ANNOT,vBE TAXED
are non-
WRITE FOR
DETAILS TODAY
I
MOUWT UH3BO CEMETB3RY
5505 N.W. 3rd Strsst, Miami, Florid*
Please send jne, without obligation, full information on
Family Burial Estates in Mount Nebo.


Page 12-A
"Jmistncrkfton
' .'.." in........' ....... "" --'
ajkmm i
Your a A Leaders: 1960-61
MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY
SIDNEY ARONOVITZ and HYLAND RIFAS: No. 12 in a Series
Sidney Aronovitz and Hy
land Ritas, who were select
ed to head the Combined
Jewish Appeal Banks and
Finance Division in 1961,
have taken a keen interest
in Miami's welfare agencies
for many years.
Both hail from pioneer
families which have been
identified with a wide van
ety of Jewish social services
in the South Florida area.
Aronovitz is a member of
Federation's executive com-
mittee and board of gover-
nors. He worked in Federa-
tion's budget committee, and
has been active in more than
a dozen CJA campaigns in
the Attorney's Division. He
is president of Beth David
Congregation, a past presi-
dent of the Hillel Advisory
Council at the University of
Miami, and he was an or-
ganizer of the B'nai B'nth
Council of South Florida in
the 1940s.
Aronovittz is chairman of
the board of the Bank oi
bade County, and served as
chairman of the Dade County
Zoning Board of Adjust-
ments. He is also a director
cf Cedars of Lebanon Hos-
pital.
Rifas' record of commu-
nity leadership stems from
Ihe early '30's. when he
worked to build Miami's
oldest social service agen-
cy, the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau, now known as the Jew-
ish Family and Children's
Service. In the 1960 CJA
campaign, he was active in
the Finance Division. He is
president of the Miami Title
and Abstract Company.
He is a director of the Jew-
Friday, Olc<*m 21, i960
Tor oh luncheon Meef.ni
Beth David Sisterhood held
a Torah luncheon meeting Wedn.
day, 11:30 a.m. al Beth David A^
dttorium, 2625 SW 3rd ave Pro!'
ram was followed by cards and
Mah Jongg. Torah Fund c'.airrnan
is Mrs. John Stiunin 194R cu,
20th st. 5W
To Live in Hearts We Lorn*
Behind li 10 Lite Forever!
PALMER'S
MEMORIALS
"MimPt 0*1,
Jewish
Monument
MUm*
HYIAND MAS
ish Home for tiie Aged,
Greater Miami Jewish Com
munily Center, and the Bar-
on de Hirsch Loan Fund.
Aronovitz and Rifas will
now combine their personal
.
1
SIDHtT AKOHOVITZ
ingenuity and professional
skill to raise greater funds
for CJA.
They are most welcome
additions to the leadership
roster.
,.,. i.ii,i:::iii.MiaaapaMMi WMaH
Scheduled Un veilings
J
Accuracy of Newspaper Survey is Challenged
Continued from Pago 4-A
chronicled the day-by-day occur-
rences in the religion-in-the-schools
bearing and their destructive mean-
ing to Greater Miami Jewry. In
its propensity for seeing all things
in a one-to-one relationship, how
many letters, pro or con, would the
Congress survey need to "balance"
the effect of one of these heads?
>< >
ACCENT ON TNI ONIMPOtTANT
hJOR WAS there any significance
attached to these widely-pub-
licized events presumably "unre-
lated" to the newspaper climate of
MEN and WOMEN:
SUrl OWN PROFITABLE BUSINESS
wiling large lint, Fineil Quality Cos-
metic! and Household Needs. Foil
or Spare Time. Old Reliable Firm
with YEARS OF KNOW HOW.
EVERYBODY BUYS. Write
ASTORIA PRODUCTS CO.
Dcpt. K, Birmingham 1, Alabama.
opinion: the all-night prayer vigils
for success of the defense; expres-
sions of outrage by such groups as
the Dade County Federation of
Women's Clubs that the "word of
God in the schools" should be chal-
lenged; the Metropolitan Commis-
sion, which passed a resolution 7-
to-1 against the litigation; and a
petition issued by the Council of
Churches, with 30,472 signatures
representing some 180 churches
here (as of Aug. 16), frankly hoping
for failure of the suit.
Do these truly bear no relation
to the Jewish community's image
in the eyes of the general commun-
ity? Was a simple survey of edi-
torial opinion an accurate portrait
of the public relations climate in
south Florida?
And what of the expressions of
sympathy in behalf of the defense,
to which the American Jewish Con-
gress study made no allusion what-
ever, but which were elfectively
voiced by the Florida Education
I Assn., Miami Woman's Club, Uni-
ted Church Women, Florida Junior
Chamber of Commerce, Dade Son.
Cliff Herrell, Dade Rep. David
Eldridge. and Florida State Super-
intendent of Schools Thomas Bailey,
whose office received 170 letters
following his public remarks on
the case here all but one report-
ed as favorable to the defense?
One can go on and on, discussing
in detail all of these events, which
were reported under bold headlines
if with eminent fairness in the
local press. But it must only be-
come increasingly clear that the
AJCongress survey's 50-50 division
of community opinion over the re-
ligion-in-the-schools litigation here,
with its absurd emphasis on two
editorials and a handful of letters
to the editor, yields a spurious view
of the real situation.
Next week for more on this, and
school board race, as an example
of the tragic failure to conserve
its relation to the Dade county-
Jewish minority group energy.
SUNDAT, OCT 23, 1960
Mt. Note Cemetery
FANNIE KMfftU, 1 a.m.
Rabbi Munis Shop
IEBA Ktm,[R, 2 p.*.
Rabbi Morris Sfc,of>
Jewish Section of
Weedlenea Cemetery
AtlAHAM TUIETSKY, 2 B*.
Rabbi Leon Kroniih
"May Their Souls Repose
in Eternal Peace.'"
ARRANSIhUKTS IT
PALAKI'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
Israel Mourns Passing
Of Rabbi Toledano at 79
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Creator Miami's lergett 1 OUest
tfjaJUr for Siaageaan,
Hebrew A Sender, SckoeJt.
Wholesale A letofl
rSIAtU SMTS AM HOVaTKS
417 WasMstertoti Ave. K 1 Mil
Lakeside
MEMORIAL
PARK
The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minutes from the Beach Via
The New 36th St. Causeway
TU 5-1689
luncheon and Card Party
The home of Mrs. Richard Berg-
man, 51 No. Shore dr., will be the
site of a tuncneon and card party
on Thursday noon, Oct. 27. Pro-
ceeds are for the B'nai B'rith Wom-
en of America Children's Home
for Maladjusted Children in Israel
RABBI CANTOR
HEBREW TEACHER
Marriages performed. Bar Mttsvah
preparation a specialty. Success
guaranteed. UN 5-M06
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
1357 Washington Ave. JE 1-7722
ALL HEBREW SUPPLIES FOR
SYNAGOGUES at JEWI8H HOME!
We Carry Bar Mitivah Records
NZWMZN
FUNERAL HOME
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
MIAMI BEACH
JEfferson 1-7677
Ed word T. Newman
Funerol Director
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 1-3040
Hebrew Religious Supplies foe
Synagogues, Schools & Private Ute
ISRAELI 4 DOMESTIC OlFTt
Continued from Pag* 1 A
ed Minister for Religious Affairs!
in 1958, after the religious parties
had withdrawn from the coalition
Cabinet because of a disagreement
over the "Who's a Jew?" issue.
Born in Tiberias. Rabbi Toledano
studied at the yeshiva in that city.
During World War I, he was ex-
iled to Corsica, because of his
French citizenship. He was a
member of the chief rabbinate of
Tangier from 1926 to 1929, then
served as chief justice of the rab-
binical courts in Cairo and Alex-
andria until 1939. He was appoint-
ed chief rabbbi of Tel Aviv in
1942.
s
An authority on Maimonides,
the medieval Jewish physician
and religious philosopher, Rab-
bi Toledano served as chairman
of the supervisory commission
for the reconstruction of the
tomb of Maimonides in Tiberias.
He was a prolific writer and the
author of many scholary works.
Rabbi Toledano was the center
of public attention in Israel sev-
eral months ago, when he married
a 25-year-old divorcee, the daugh-
ter of an immigrant rabbi from
Morocco. He was again the center
of a political controversy last
month, when it was disclosed that
he had never relinquished his
French cili?tn.hip, even after as-;
suming his cabinet post.
Rabbi Toledano's death was be-
lieved likely here to create politi-i
i-.il activity in various quarters, in-
eluding the Chief Rabbinate, the
Cabinet, and among the religious1
parties.
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAl DlRf-CtOR
I Do women live longer than men?
LONG DISTANCE
MOVING
fo off points in the country
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
ai : ii.ii. v.\>
i\i> as. inc.
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
For Information Call MR. ROSS
Nf 3-6496
JVVV Jamboree Scheduled
Jewish War Veterans Post and
Auxiliary 223. West Miami, will
hold a jamboree on Saturday eve-
ning, Oct. 29, at the Miami Pio-
neers, 250 NW No. River dr. Mus-
ic will be by Herb Greenfield and
his orchestra. In charge of infor-
mation is Mrs. Rosalie Cox. Pro-
ceeds will be used for the pur-
chase of an Emerson respiration
assistor at the Veterans Adminis-
tration Hospital.
GENTLEMAN
Wishes to Share bis Private Kerne
with Another Gentlemen.
Large led ream. Kitchen Privileaes.
2940 SW 25th Ter. HI 6-6653
Yo. That's why they can now get special rates on Living
Insurance from Equitable. Coverage costs even less than
it would have a short time ago. Leu than a man'* pwV
ofering tame benefits! Provide* protection now-P'"8
guaranteed funds for emergencies, education, re
nut (Not applicable to policies below $10,000, ^^
of their administrative costs.) For details call: 1
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
LIFE UNDERWRITER .....
Phone FR 1-5691 Phono UN 6-1873
24S S.f. 1st Street Miami, Fla.
it.....


Friday, Otcober 21. I960
+Jewish rhrktian
Pag* 13-A
timnntimmnrtn.i i
GEMS OF WISDOM
The wrld exists only on account
of him who disregards his own I
existence. TALMUD. ?
On|y a life lived for others is l
life wor--.ii.hile. EINSTEIN.I
am 'i-#
My fathers blunted for me. and *
/ plant for my children.Talmud, i

Tire ii-cends and noes out; water
descends and is not lost.
M'SBLE SHUAL1M. [
Ambi:;on is bondage.
IBN GABRAEL I

Loofc {or ca^e and lose your'':
bread. proverb. -
*
Who doesn't jump too high,
doesn't fall too lou>. SYRKIN
'
Ambuion destroys its possessor i
TALMUD I
*>"' nwHwirm iiii iniHmmmmmaJI
Sn OlelQealm Of'Jfi
tami s
r^eliaioHS JL^ife
Nerve of Failure Needed
For Righteous Generation
By RABBI LEO HEIM
Tempi. Tifereth Jacob
tnlK iBorrivaa
con K1? Tsn-Tsra
nwn..rnro'-3 ,1"? BHln?
-183 B?fflfe"DI^B p^i
nays rD3f niao inx1? to
nn"W| ^ajwij a,i?lC! n'?3
is* ,-sai'n rnian ]a 3rpn
eaaftj n^yta n3 ,sn*o ran
-sn1? "t^as nan .Tins
.^xi^-s rrxrixpa mtf
-r.^3^'7 n3T ,njjn ra#D
-7.3"T? run1?: .narT^j d-is
n3Dp ns-is oynatf ,-!j3
,mTi3S7miia'?n-niSi3pr3
.nax'7 inix nyan nnx ^ds:
t:-: t:t "~ tv
rj^vP? nisi n-im jvts
i t-: t t: :
-zmn nnx ^xx ninn ?#
1? rn-ayn ^xi ,Ta nin
.nnay'p iT-jto
(n-nVi may nna rxsina)
TRANSLATION -
New Student Of Tha ORT School
The Town Clerk without hesita-
tion informed him that Nathania
would be happy to award a scholar-
ship in one of the institutions to a
member of one of the tribes. Some
months later the Municipality re-
ceived a letter from the Ghanaian
leader that the tribal council had
chosen his grandson as the candi-
date for vocational training in Is-
rael.
When the boy arrived he was ac-
corded an enthusiastic welcome,
so enthusiastic indeed, that a quar-
rel almost broke out among the
work and study groups, each of
which wanted him to join them
(for themselves).
The Nathania Municipality has
arranged for the boy to lodge with
~< lamily in the town and has even
provided him with a Hebrew
teacher.
(Published by Brit Ivrit Olamit)
Students' Bowling League
Rabbi Sheldon SteinmeU, spiri-
tual leader of Congregation Ye-
nn.ah Moshe, this week an-
nounced the formation of a bowl-
'"g league at the congregation.
Students of the Popiel religious
school from 8 to 14 years of age
are eligible for membership. The
league meets on Sunday noon at
the Cloverleaf Bowling Alley.
s
c r v i c e 3
J his LVeehend
UDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Iliac Ever.
Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Sermon: "The Evolution of Israel's
Nationhood."
ANSHE EME8. 2533 SW 1Mb ave.
Conservative. Maxwell Silberman,
pieeident.
RABBI UO HUM
... in nil genera? ioa
As time revolves in its inevitable
cycle, all of us in oar Houses of
Worship will read this Sabbath of
that cataclysmic event known as
the flood or "mabul." The story,
though centuries old, has penetra-
ted deeply into the heart and soul
of modern man. Somehow we can-
I not help but detect the implication
iof a tragedy plaguing the human
! animal man blessed by Provi-
dence to dwell in a glorious uni-
verse. Yet it is this very same crea-
ture who constantly aims for its
utter destruction in which he him-
self might perish.
Why was Noah saved? Our
Torah explains the reason: Noah
was a righteous man; he was the
perfect one in his generation.
The sociologist David Reisman,
in one of his masterpieces, deals
with the highest expression of in-
dividualism, the supreme quality
of which he calls "the nerve of
failure," the nerve to bear the possibility of being a failure in the eyes
of society, of family, of public opinion; the nerve to be yourself even
when that self is not approved of by society; the nerve to do something
which is good, though unpopular; the nerve to follow your convictions
although you run the risk of being ill thought of.
Noah, more than pious, more than ethical, was a genuine and
authentic individualist. Try to visualize yourselves in his situation
build an odd-shaped, funny-looking boathouse in your backyard, and then
lead a parade of animals through the streets of your neighborhood into
it. Imagine what your good and proper friends and neighbors would say
behind your back. It would seem that only a powerful individualist
could withstand the pressure of social excommunication and belittlement.
And later, when he was in the Ark, and the waters rocked his boat,
he was still afraid he would die, and he prayed frantically: "O, Lord,
help us, for we are not able to bear the evil that encompasses us."
In that incident, we detect the true essence of profound spiritual
individuality. The great individualist is not one who is always certain
of his feelings. It is one who runs the risk of being a failure if his ideals
and hopes are not realized, one who though he is not absolutely sure, still
maintains great faith. In Noah we find a trace of doubt yet he
preached, prepared, and built. He was, in fact, gambling with his exis-
tence. He was not completely certain that God would bring the flood or
that he would survive it.
We have come to the point in our communal lives when our entire
selves, our hearts and souls, are shaped by mass opinions an judgments.
Our ideas have to be acceptable, our personalities have' to be pleasing,
and we must never, never experience the torture of being unpopular.
The quality of Noah, the nerve of failure, will enable us to lift ourselves
from this "neurosis" of mass criticism.
These are the Noahs we must look for, and moreso even strive for,
today. Even though what we believe is unpopular, even though what we
propose is different and unusual, even though we run the risk of be-
coming social failures, unacceptable to the masses of man, we must un-
waveringly maintain our individualism, or else we become deluged by
the mediocrity and laxity of twentieth century morals. Then, and only
then, shall we, like Noah, be "righteous in our generations."
ETH DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con
aervative. Cantor William W. Lip-
son.
ETH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Solomcn ftohiff.
Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Kermon. "The Tides of Our Times."
ETH EMETH. 12350 NW 2nd ave.
Conservative. Rabbi David W. Her-
eon. Cantor Hyman Fein.
Friday |:H p.m. Rabbi Herson returns
to the. pulpit followlnx a lengthy Ill-
ness. Sermon: "When Destruction
Leads to Construction." Saturday 9
a.m. Kar Mitzvah: Barry, son of Mr.
and Mn. Burton Simon, who will be
bpata at the Friday evening One*
Shabbat in his honor.
------o------
BETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
----
ETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamches.
Friday 5:4.', p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Bar Mltivah: Freddie A., son or lira
Esther Hillman. Sermon: "The Ark
An Escape or a Shelter."

BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave.
Orthodox, juiius Sapero, president.
cAwow Uour Is there any statement in tho Tal-
mud that a child born on tha
Sabbath will 6a immune to
harm?
Yes. This was the opinion of
Rabbi Joshua Ben Levi (Babylon-
ian Talmud Shabbat 156 a.) The
Rabbi believed that the condition
of nature at the time of a child's
arrival played a part in his dest-
iny. Since God blessed and hal-
lowed the Sabbath, the author as-
sumed that the day's blessings will
affect advantageously the future
of the child.

Who was Lilith?
She is the cread figure in Jew-
ish folklore, as well as in the folk-
lore of other Eastern peoples.
In Jewish folklore, she is pre-
sented as the first wife of Adorn,
also created out of dust. Their un-
ion was terminated due to a spe-
cial sin on the part of Liuth. She
was then bent on destroying newly-
born infants, but promised that
she would never enter a house
where the names of angels were
written or repeated. (See "The
Holy and the Profane.")

What is a Chuppah? Is tha word
mentioned in tha Bible?
The Chuppah usually consists
of an awning of white silk or sat-
in, supported by four poles and
embroidered with Biblical mottoes.
The word is mentioned in the Book
of Psalms (19:5), where the ris-
ing sun is likened "to a bride-
groom that cometh from his Chup-
pah." In the absence of a Chappuh,
a tallis (prayer shawl) may be
spread over the bride and groom.
see
What is tha significance of tha
breaking of tha glass under tha
canopy by tha groom?
It symbolizes the destruction of
the Temple and serves as a re-
minder that the fate of Jerusalem
must be in our minds. The cus-
tom of breaking a wineglass has
recently been modified by the use
of "bulbs," which are more avail-
able and less extravagant.
e e e
What is tha Samichoh?
It is the "authority" given to a
rabbi to practice his calling, espe-
cially in the area of giving decis-
ions on Jewish law. The modern
word for it is "ordination." In the
past, candidates for ordination
could procure Semichoh even from
one rabbi. In modern days, they
are offered in terms of rabbinic
degrees by faculties of seminaries.
As a rule, however, the word
Semichoh is applied to Orthodox
ordained rabbis.
ETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbf Joseph E. Rackovsky.
BETH TORAH. 164th st. and NE 11th
ave. Conservativs. Rabbi Max Lip-
schitx. Cantor Ben-Zion Kirschen-
baum.
Friday 8il5 p.m. Season's late sen-ices
resume. Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar Mitz-
vah: Barry, son of Mrs. Kita Silver-
man.
CONGREGATION E~T2 CHAIM. 40S
16th et. Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim
Karlinsky.
CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER.
755 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi Sam-
uel April. Cantor Meyer Oisser.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Great De-
bates and the Great Tower of Babel."
Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mltavah: Harrln.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Adelman.
OAOE HEIGHTS CENTER. 1401 NW
183rd at. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Zucker Canter Emanuel Mandel.
r-LAGLER. GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
Si. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard
hoter. Canter Fred Bernstein.
Friday 5:30 p m. Katurday 8:30 a.m.
Mincha 5:30 p.m.
------a------
FT. LAUOERDALE EMANUEL 1601
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
Marius Ranson. Cantor Shsrwin
Levirte.
HEBREW ACADEMY. SIS 6th et- Or-
thodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross.
------m
HIALEAH REFORM JEWISH CON.
OREOATION. 1150 W. 68th st.. Hia-
Isah.
----
ISRAELITE CENTER. S175 SW 25th
ter. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louie Cohen.
Friday 5:45 and 8:15 p.m. This will be
the Inauguration of late Sabbath serv-
ices. Sermon: "Beginnlnx of Anuihoi
Cycle." Oneit Shabbat hosts: Mr. and
Mr*. Hoi KoeninRsherB. whose son.
Richard, will become Bar Mltivah
during Saturday services beginning; at
8:30 a.m.
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self.
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREOATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Traditional. Can-
tor Ben Grossberg.
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 64JS SW tth
at. Conservativs. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN. 2320
NE 171st st. Rabbi Jonah Caplan.
Fri.liiv 8 p.m. Senni.n: "Th- Two
t-'ldes of One Face." Ones; Shabbat
hoeta: Mr. and Mrs. M-ircv Ruben-
stein, in honor of the blrthda>.- of
th.lr three sons. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall
dr., S. Miami. Reform RaO0< Herbert
Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner.
Friday l:M p.m. Sisterhood sabbath
to be observod. Eferraqn: "The Role of
th>' Woman In Judaism Mrs. Joshua
Segal, president, to speak.
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1S45 Polk St.,
Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samus;
Jaffa.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly
wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
Schreiber.
Friday S p.m. Bas MiUvah: Wendy.
daughter or Mr. and Mrs. Harry Le-
vitt. Saturday 9 a.m.
---- ----
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chaat
ave. Liberal Rabbi Leon Kronish
Cantor Davis Convlser.
Friday S:lo p.m. Sermon: "We Don't
All Talk the Same Language." Sat-
urday 10:45 a.m. Bar Mltivah: Mich-
ael, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry A.
Lack: Ronald J-, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Koaenthal.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16500 NW
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi Shel-
don Edwards. Cantor Seymour
Hlnkee.
----
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Waehlng
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irvine
Lehrman. Cantor Hirsch Adler.
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 1S7 NE 1tth et
Reform. Rabbi Jossph R. Narot
Cantor Jacob Bornateln.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Morris W.
Graff U> officiate in the absence of Dr.
CANDUUGHTING TIMt
30 Tishri 5:33 pan.
*
Joseph Narot. Sermon: "Life's Second
i 'ii;uu-es."
TEMPLE JUDE... 320 Palermo ava.
Liberal. Rabbi Morrie Skop. Cantor
Herman Gottlieb
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "America'a
Search for a Righteous trailer." Sat-
urday 10:30 a.m. Bar Mitivah: Eric,
son of Dr. and Mrs. George Balaber,
who will be hosts at Klddubh of Sanc-
tificatlon following.
TEMPLE MENORAH. 820 75th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Maver Abram-
owitz. Cantor Edward Klein.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Rain-
bow of Peace." Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar
Mitzvah: Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Neabltt: Robert, son of Mr. and
lira. I.OUI* Reinstein. Sermon: "Week-
ly Portion."
TEMPLE NER TAMID. SOth at. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitx. Can-
tor Samuel Qombera.
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
M. Wallach.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. SS1
Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi
Lee Helm.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Ark
Remlnl-cent of a Threefold Kvent."
Consecration Sabbath. Newly-enrolled
students in the religious school to be
blessed. Onec Shabbat hosts: Mem-
bers of education committee. Satur-
day 9 a.m.
TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave.
Conservative. Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitx.
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-.
man. Canter Jacob Goldfarb.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Where Do
We Benin?"
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami
ave. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman. Can-
tor Albert Giants.
Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "New Con-
cepts of Righteousness." Saturday 9
a.m. Sermon: "Noah and Hia Gener-
ation."
YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie
hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon
Steinmetx. Cantor Morris Berger.
Friday 1:M p.m. Sermon: "We. tho
Parents." Oneg Shabbat hosts: Mem-
bers of Sisterhood. Saturday 9 a.m.

YOUNG ISRAEL. 6*0 NE 171st st. i
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber.
Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Threshold of Manhood." Bar '
Mltivah: Richard Me\ < r.
Tenth Century
Book in Israel
JERUSALEM A price-
less manuscript of the Keter Ha- j
torah of Aaron Ben Moses Bon
Asher, the oldest existing parch-
ment Bible in book form, as distinct,
from a scroll, has been brought to
Israel from Syria, it was disclosed
this week.
Tha Keter Hatorah, which dates
back to tha tanth century, was
used by Maimonidas and contem-
poraries as a basic source book.
Biblical scholars, Jewish and
Christian, recognize its import-
ance.
The Ben Asher Keter Hatorah;
has been in Aleppo in northern!
Syria for the past 500 years, and'
has been inaccessible to Jewish,
scholars since the establishment of
modern Israel. The story of how
it was transferred to Israel for de-
posit at the Hebrew University,
when it can be told, is expected to
be a true cloak-and-dagger adven-
ture, it was hinted.
This page is prepared in co-
: operation with the Spiritual Lead*-
I eri of the Greater Miami Rabbin-
1 ical Assn.
Rabbi David Herson
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Herson
Tales of Moral
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwita
Know Tour Heritage
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Gems of Wisdom


Pcge 14-A
+Jewlstnar*fk*r
Friday, Otcober 21,
1960
Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINPtIN
No Single Book Describes the Horror Completely
NIGHT. By Elie Wiesel. 116 pp. New York: Hill and
Wans, Inc., 104 Fifth av*. $3.00.
ELIE WIESEL'S "Night" is more than it would seem, at
first look, to be; it is stronger and more poignant than
any description would indicate. It is a narrative of Ausch-
will and Buchenwald. told by a 15 year-old Transylvanian
boy, a devout child already deeply engrossed in the Tal-
n.ud. a profound believer who studied all day and ran at
nigpt to the synagogue to weep over the destruction of the
Ttfnple. It is a story, then, of breavement and despair,
filled with scenes of horror and humiliation, and sometimes
ol love. Although we have read of it again and again, each
time is like a first time the same tears, the same old
fury, the same set bitterness. But I think we are beginning
to understand that there is not going to be one book to end
all books, to tell it completely and perfectly once and for
ever. Quite the contrary, each book which appears adds
a bit more to the picture.
"Night" adds in two areas. To begin with, it is the
story ol a child, a child who walked, saying the Kaddish
for himself, toward a pit of flames in which were burning
carload after carload of. babies: who saw anothei__duM
hanged: who tried desperately to keep his father alive and
shared instead the relentless days of his dying. Then, it is
the story of a religious child, a child who lived with God,
until God died in him.
Readers will undoubtedly be piqued by Francois
Mauriac's beautifully written foreword when he writes, "the
stumbling block to his faith was the cornerstone of mine,"
and "the conformity between the Cross and the suffering
of men was in my eyes the key to that impenetrable mys-
tery whereon the faith of his childhood had perished." Per-
haps it would be well to remember that the value of a
faith is not in the ease with which one can maintain it;
often, it is in the difficulty. For a Jew, life-centered rather
than death-centered, the demands his faith makes upon him
and what he asks of God in return are integral; God for
the Jew is not so much a way of endurance as a way of
moral progress.
There is no doubt in my mind that the first half of this
book is extraordinary. The blindness tof the Jews) in
Capitol Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Arabs Engage in Bold Electioneering in U.S.
Washington
lAfHILE JEWISH GROUPS were quie:-
* ly dignified during the visit ol Pres-
ident Nasser, of the United Arab Repub-
lic, the Arabs have boldly intruded into
the American election campaign.
Arab electioneering has come not
only trom American Arabs but from the
embassies of the (Jutted Arab Republic.
Iraq, aad Saudi Arabia. The State Department was forced
to remonstrate with the I'AK Ambassador. The Nasser
,..- i .'i;
UM Listening Post:
By SAUL CARSON
hu-> naiuiy
Soft Sell at the UN
United Nations
ISRAEL IS PLAYING a most un-
' usual role here, at this year's
General Assembly, At a session lit-
rally gleaming with a great num-
er of heads of state and govern-
.lent, foreign ministers and other
abinet members from count
he world over, the name of Israel
red here openly. Even mention of
the Middle East in general has been infrequent Yet
Israel is not only here. It is here in force and is as
active as it has ever been. Furthermore, its activ-
ity is fruitful.
During the first two weeks of this year's Assem-
bly, Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel- Foreign Minister, ac-
conpanicd in nearly every case by Israel's perma-
nent representative here. Michael S. Comay, met at
formal conferences with no less than two dozen
foreign policy chiefs. These meetings do not include
the diplomatic-social contacts with many of the
world's leaders at cocktail parties, receptions and
other events of that typo
At the formal conferences, whether with U.S.
Secretary of State Christian A. Herter, Britain s
Foreign Secretary, the Ear! of Home, or others, the
subjects ranged to what is called here a veritable
tourd'horizon. They were general in character. Is
reel had no specific requests to make, did not at-
tempt to tie the other parties down to any specific
commitments at this time. But throughout. Israel
found friendship and understanding. There is mu-
tual rapport among many of the world's governments
and Israel.
The "party circuit" had proven its own value.
For instance, when Israel was invited to the official
reception given by India's Prime Minister Jawahar-
lal Nehru, there was significance in the fact that
Nehru himself led a Yemenite prince to a table
where, he knew, Mrs. Meir was seated. He thus
manifested openly his desire to show that Israel and
a hostile Arab state hold equal status in his eyes.
When the table-pounding Nikita S. Khrushchev
held his official reception for heads of state and dele-
gation chairmen. Mrs. Meir was presented to him
formally by Russia's new permanent representative
here, V. A. Zorin. There was an exchange of pleas-
antries between Khrushchev and Mrs. Meir. The Is-
raeli Foreign Minister, speaking in Russian, told the
USSR chief that she had been Israel's Minister in
Moscow, back in 1948, and he assured her that Mos-
cow is a changed city now, "changed for the better."
"How does it happen that you speak Russian so
. well?" asked Khrushchev.
"Well, I was born in Kiev," answered Mrs. Meir,
9he added that she would like to see Kiev again.
"Please, please, you are welcome," Khrushchev
assured her.
Certainly that was not in'ended as a formal in-
vitation, and was not identified as such by the Is-
raelis. Bat it did mean that, when Khrushchev is
in a mood to turn on his charm, he can direct it to-
ward Israel as well as to others.
envoy had publicly denounced American Jewry and told
Arab students in the United States that it was their "duty"
to campaign against American candidates who support
Israel.
Iraq and Saudi Arabia protested Sen. John F. Ken-
nedy's pro-Israel speech before the Zionist Organization
of America. Iraq handed a formal diplomatic note to the
State Department, urging the silencing of Sen. Kennedy.
The Jewisn war veterans organization urged the State
Department to ensure "the interference by Arab govern-
ments in the American election campaign" and oust of-
fending Arab diplomats.
The Arabs mainly attacked Sen. Kennedy. But Vice
President Nixon also came under fire. So did Republicans
like Sen. Jacob K. Javits and Rep. Seymour Halpern. both
of New York.
The presence of Nasser in the United States during
the election activity caused embarrassment in official
Washington. There was consideration of inviting him to
the White House as a state guest. However, it was feared
such an invitation might be subjected to political attack.
A delicate problem emerged involving American sup-
port of the Nasser regime for a seat on the United Nations
Security Council. There was wide opposition because of
Nasser's continued defiance of UN resolutions on Suez
and other matters.
The restrained conduct of American Jewry during
Nasser's presence in New York was noted with approval
in official circles. Jewish groups meanwhile refrained
from the brazen electioneering tactics that typified the
American Arabs as well as Arab diplomats.
Suppose the Israeli Ambassador made an address in
Washington urging Israeli exchange students to campaign
against various American candidates. The Arabs would
instantly demand that he be declared persona non grata
and kicked out of America.
The Israeli Ambassador has remained quietly aloof
from the election furor. But the Arabs went so far as to
threaten the State Department that they would move even
closer to the Soviet orbit unless candidates were stopped
from voicing approval of "world Zionism and Jewry."
The Iraqis said in a note to the State Department that
Sen. Kennedy's "blatant praise" of the Jews was "truly
painful." Baghdad asked the American Embassy to ser\e
as "a medium" to apply pressure on the Kennedy cam-
paign headquarters
Foreign Arabs are continuing attacks on candidates
and appeals to "the anti-Jewish vote." Cairo Radio has
just termed Sen. Kennedy a "Zionist snake." The situa-
tion is reaching a point where American patience is under
trial. The sideshow might explode into a major national
issue before Nov. 8.
From Hollywood:
HERBERT G. LUFT
the face of a destiny from which they would still have h H
time to flee: the inconceivable passivity with which th
gave themselves up to it" has never been more movinsw
evoked, nor the heartbreaking sundering of a family nor
the unbelievable horror of a concentration camp, it jj thf
recorded outrage of the senses of civilization to which vH
respond best. Dignity is our best imitation of what we
imagine divinity to be; we are horrified by its loss
The latter half of the book is less distinctive and like
many others we have read. To oe quite cool about it (which
is not so easy to do), this seems to be the pattern in mo t
books like "Night." After a time, the sensitivities of the
sufferer become, perforce, blunted; he remembers his suf-
fering in more physical terms, and physical misery _
starvation and cold and pain is far more difficult to
convey. Thus one weeps for the loss of mother and is
desolated by the loss of God. because it is easy to imagine-
but it is hard to imagine cold when one is warm and nearly
impossible to conjure up starvation, when one has never
starved. Yet it is precisely what is so perfectly indicated
in the book, imbedded in its very structure this change
of emphasis which dramatises the ultimate degradation
the changing of a person close to God to one close to an
animal.
Elie Wiesel is a reporter at the United Nations for one
of Israel's largest newspapers, as well as a literary- critic
for the "Jewish Daily Forward." Hill and Wang Publish-
ers are planning to publish his first novel, "'L'Aube
(Dawn)," in the spring. "Night." which was a selection of
the Societe des Lecteurs in France last year, was also a
best seller in that country.

Panorama:
By DAYID SCHWARTZ
Fathers are Honored
AN ORGANIZATIONS the
** Founding Fathers of the Zion-
ist movement in America has been
ormed. called Brith Rishonim. in-
cluding among, its members Louis
.ipsky, Bernard G. Richards, Mor-
is Margulies and Dr. S. Bernstein.
The founding fathers usually
ire neglected by the generation
wmen succeeus it. Now and then a few are given
to see the rewards of their labors.
I'sn.ilU it is a difficult kind of story that the
past reveals. Bernard G. Richards has told me that
duiing the presidency of Richard Gottheil all of the
files of the Zionist organization were concentrated in
one dssk of his office. Gottheil was professor of
Semitics at Columbia, and if you wanted to talk to
him about his teaching, he would go to one desk and
if you wanted to talk to him about Zionism, he would
go to the other desk, where his Zionist papers were
filed away. It was good that he was systematic or
the cause of Zion might have gotten mixed up with
a conjugation and been lost.
Israel Goldberg, who was for many years asso-
ciated with the growing up days of Zionism, once
to'.d me of the time when the Zionists sent a delega-
tion headed by Jacob de Haas, to discuss the buying
of Palestine from the Young Turks. It was around
1904. when the Young Turks had deposed of the
Sultan. The Youug Turks did offer to sell but they
named a sum in the millions. De Haas picked up
and left realizing that the only way the American
Zionists could buy Palestine from them was on the
installment plan. $1.00 down and 50* a month, but
the Young Turks hadn't heard of installment buying.
The Zionists didn't have much money but the
New Maccabean, which Lipsky edited, was educa-
ting the new generation, planting the seed, which
was to flower many years after.
De Haas was a controversial figure but I recall
him with respect and affection.
Ina Balin Offers Her Views on the Minority
Hollywood to New York
"| AM VERY glad to be a Jew," Ina
' Balin told me during an interview in
Manhattan this week. "There is some-
thing inbred in us that urges us on to do
the unusual, evidently to prove ourselves
to the world around us."
The young actress, who only this
summer zoomed to stardom in the Twen-
tieth-Century-Fox movie. "From the Terrace,
proud of her age-old heritage, though she stresses that", in
strictly Orthodox terms, she would not be classified as
overly religious. But she believes in the equality of man
indeed is
Miss Balin loves people. "If only we could take our
fellow men as individuals," she reasons, "and not judge
everyone according to origin, nationality or religion, n'iter.
than by their merits and achievements, our world wouia
be a better place to live in." As a Jew, she doesn't want
to be better, but just to be like the rest of humanity. She
goes about her work with a relentless drive, determined to
show that she is an equal, though her grandparents were
immigrants from Eastern Europe who came to this coun-
try with nothing but a dream.
Ina Balin is the daughter of Betty Friedman and
Sam Rosenberg, whose families originated in Hungary
and Russia. She was born on Nov. 12, 1937, in Brooklyn;
-^^^J^r'at^ "b 'rrr1 When Uttle lnanwas b.^ 9 hTparenU were forced;
Lrlvrtce W" "'" l Mng t0 bo,h have since remarried and. until recently, she lived
minority race. ;.h m.. ., ___,. ,- ;_ Hills. N.i-
Ina Balin, our young philosopher, is a lithesome, deli-
cate lass of 23, with flawless snow-white skin, softly curl
ing shoulder-length dark hair, and extremely large sensi-
tive eyes. Though the actress wears no make-up and
dresses quite simply, she appeared to me like a princess
from an Oriental fable, when she walked into the Barbary
Room on Gotham's East 52nd st. for the prearranged
interview.
with her mother, Mrs. Harold Balin, in Forest Hills,
Ina attended the Montessori School in Bucks county, ana
the Buckingham High School in Pennsylvania, then movea
to Long Island, where she graduated from Forest nu
High at the ripe age of 15.
But she had started her theatrical career long before,
at the age of 8, playing leads in class plays. Later, sne
sang in the chorus and glee clubs, earning extra money
as a baby sitter in her final student years in New Yort.


Friday. Otcober 21, 1960
LEGAL NOTICE
+Jmiiii fk>rMian
Page IS A
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA :N AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. MARGARET HOKWTl/.,
Plaintiff,
VS.
HERBERT HORWITZ,
I>. fenrtant.
NOTICE TO DEFEND
TO: HERBERT HORWITZ
o Mrs. Bertha Hoi wlti
ION Btuyveaam Avenue
Irvlnglon. New .lormy
Tin- ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED thai
a Bill of Complaint f.,r Divorce has
been filed aualnst you, HERBERT
Hi'ltwiTZ, and you are hereby re-
quired to serve a copy of your anewi i
to the Bill of Complaint on plaintiffs
attorney, and file the original answer
In the office of the Clerk of the Clr-
ouit Court on or before November V.
I960, in default of which the P.lll of
Complaint will be taken ax confessed
by you.
Dated: October 7, 1960.
H. B, LEATHERMAN, Clerk
of Circuit Court,
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
HAROLD B. M'AKT
Attorney for Plaintiff
47 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
10/11-21-28. ll/<
rMVBHO
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 50846-C
In RK: Estate of
BERTHA B. LEVY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Againsl Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified aqd requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
Which you may have against the es-
tate of BERTHA B. LEVY, deceased
lgte of Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same In their offices in the
County Courthouse In Hade Cou.ily
Florida, within eight calendar months
from the date of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred
// MORGAN I LEVY
/a/ J. If. MORRIS
Executors
// J N. MORRIH
Attorney
S14 inti,ham Uldg.
Miami ".1, Florida
10/14-21-28. 11/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 8663
M A H CONSTRICTION CORP.
:< h orida corporation
JUOENE Cola (and.
Plaintiff,
LOl'lsK ,; BOBO, his wife,
Hefendanls.
___ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: EUGENE CoBO and
LOL'ls'E G HOBO, his wife
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a bill of complaint for foreclosure of
mortgage has been filed against you
and you are hereby required to serve
a copy of your answer to said com-
plaint on plaintiff's attorney and rile
the original answer in the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Coinu on or
before the 7t|i day of November. m;U;
otherwise the allegations of said oom-
nlalnt will be taken as confessed
against you. .
DATED: September 30, I960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk, Cnciui luuii
(seal) By: R. H. BICE, JR.,
Deputy Clerk
TAL1ANOFF & WALLER
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
Attorneys for Plaintiff.
10/7-14-2}-28
BY HENRY LEONARD
L6CAL NOTICE
"Look, Noah, you save 'om in your way and 111
save 'em in mine."
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 13 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engace In
business under the fictitious name of
UiRRAINE CLEANERS AND LAUN-
DRY at 861 Washington Avenue. Mi-
anil Reach, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
J< 'SEl'H PHILLIPS, Sole Owner
I.I I > >WITZ & BELLER
706 1st St., Miami Beach
Attorneys for Joseph Phillips.
Iit/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 9576
HATT1B MAE WILLIAMS
vs.
ALBERT WILLIAMS
TO ALBERT WILLIAMS, residence
unknown. You are or.it.ed t ( li.e your
answer to above styled bill for dlvorcc
with the Clerk of said Court and fur-
'' ah to Geo. W. Wood. Atty. for plain -
tilf on or before Nov. 7th, I960 or the
bill will be taxen as confessed.
l>ated Oct. 4, 1SI60.
B, B LEATHERMAN, Clerk
(seal) By: WM. \\ STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
10/7-14-21-2*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY civ i N that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SI I'KRIOR BOX .SALES al P.O. |:,,x
Miami 48. Florida Intends to
reglater said name with the Clerk of
tho Circuit Court of Dade County.
BENNER BOX. INC.
Sola Owner
MYERS. HEIMAN & KAPLAN
1160 S.W. 1st Sir.
\ tor A)plicant
10/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAM* LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OiVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
.SPENCER l^ANE at 3J1 N.E. 79th
St reef!, Miami Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SAMTTBL GOLDBERG
9/10, 10/7-14-11
LfGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names of
Mall Towers: Lincoln Mall Towers;
Lincoln Mall Hilldini; at 1441 Lincoln
Road, Miami Keach. Florida intends to
p said names with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Flori..
HONOR PROPERTIES, INC
*a Fla. corp.)
By Hannah Peilmutter, Sec.
Jl'l.irs.l.W PKRLMUTTER, Esq.
Attorney for Honor Properties, Inc.
407 Lincoln Road
10,14-21-28. 11/1
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT'
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 504*9 C
IN RK: Estate of
BARNET CH1RINSKY,
1 M c .
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All creditors and All Pi rsona Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Againsl Said
You are hereby notified nod required !
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of BARNET CHIRINKKY di
ad late ol Hade County, fc'lorioa, to I
the County Judges o' I >h.I, onntv
and 'ile th, same In th.ir offices in i
the County Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, within .-it tu calendar1
months from the date of the first pub-
lication hereof, or the same will be
barred.
BAM I SILVER,
..". K.''' WK'NKR. Co-Executors
I allot Bllvei Pa lot. St,., n & Mints
II i fngress Building
Miami 32. Florida
By: Edward A Stern. Attorn. .
I in. 10/7-'4-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY .GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
UERHAY at 390 N.E. 2nd Avenue.
Miami, Florida intends to register said
ram* with me Clerk of toe Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MURGER, INC.
By: Thomas J. Murray. President
Frank Gergen, Secretary-Treasurer
'*>H'MAN A GOLDSTEIN
:m West Flagler St.
Miami, Florida
Attorneys for Registrant
10/7-14-21-28
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
. Ne. M74M-0
IN RE: Estate of
MART WERNER
Dec eased
NOTICE TO CRED TORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
alma or Demands Against Said
^ o J'a re.-hereby notified and required
>" Present any claims and demands
iilrh you may have against the le of MARY WERNER deceased
' Dade County, Florida, to the
' "nty Judges of Dade County, and
same In their offices in the
,,!""''>' Courthouse in I'ad.- I
*>'ida. within eight calendar months
xri.m the date of the first publication
,*"' ame wl'l be barred.
OTIS KENNETH BERNARD. JR.
11 iiyvm -2!*<-'utor of Estate
lio; iN A BPRTEIN, Attorney
l0 Lincoln Road
|evaml Beach, Florida
10/1-14-21-28
IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 41708-B
RE: ESTATE OF
EVERETT R LEW ARK,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE Is hereby given that 1 have
filed my final report and petition for
Final IWscharye as Administrator nf
the estate of EVERETT R. LEW ARK,
deceased; and tihat on the ISth day
ot September, 1960. will apply to the
Honorable Frank B. Dowllng County
Judge of Dade County, Florida, for
approval of said final report and for
final discharge as Administrator ol
the Batata of everett r. lewark
deceased.
Huh day of September. 1960.
WILLIAM LASSIE ROSE
SIDNEY BFRON8" IN
Attorney for Administrator of the
Estate of Everett it. i.a
_______________ 9/30, 10/7-14-tl
NOTICE UNb-H
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
Executive Suites: Executive Office
Furniture Co.; Executive Offices;
Executive Desks; Executive Office
Equipment at 10J."> East 13th Street,
Hlaleah. F.orida intends to register
said names with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
EXECUTIVE SUITES, INC.
Ca Fla. corp)Sole Owner
HENRY A. KAMP
Attorney for Executive Suites, Inc.
1224 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach, Florida
9/30, 10/7-14-21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE C RC'JIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTV. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 9831
MARY RYMKR.s WALTERS,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LESTER A. WALTERS.
Defendant,
SUIT FOR O'VORCK
TO: LESTER A WALTERS
2605 Boxwood Road
Toledo IS, Ohio
You LESTER A. WALTERS are
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
plaint for Divorce has been fled
against you, and you are requir.-d <
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Comtdalnt on the
plaintiff's Attorney. THEODORE M.
TRUKHIN. 420 Lincoln Road. Miami
Beach, FIs., and file the original An-
swer or Pleading in the office of 'he
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before
the 14th day of November, 1MQ. If
you fail 10 do so, judgment by default
will be taken against you for tn- re-
lief demanded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published onc<
each week for four eonecotlve weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami
Florida, this 10th day of October, A.D
1960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade Conntv. Florida
(seal) Py: R. H. RICE. JR.
I>eputy Clerk
THFOnoRE M. TR1SIII.N
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach .'Is. Fla.
Attorney for Plaintiff
10/14-21-28. 11/4
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE C.RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 9076
CHARLOTTE DIET/,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD DIETZ,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: DONALD DIETZ,
:UI2 Burch Avenue
Cincinnati, Ohio
You DONALD DIETZ are hereby
notified that BUI of Complaint for Di-
vorce has been filed againsl you. and
you are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the Bill
of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attor-
ney. MYERS, HKIMAN a, KAPLAN,
Eleven Fifty Building, ll.'.O S.W 1st
str.it. M!aml. Florida, and file the
original Answer or Pleading In the
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the 31st day of October.
1960. if you fail to do so. judgment
by default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the Rili of
Complaint.
This notice shall be publish. I once
each wok for foui consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED al Miami,
Florida, this 20th day of Bepti
AD i
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
County, Floiida
Bj WM W ST< KING,
I >eputy clerk
MYERS HE1MAN ft KAPLAN
I ,B illdina
W. 1st Sir- .t
Miami S, K
mt iff
9 80, 10 7-1 l-J]
mmmmmmmm
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
fJmvisti ncrkUar)
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial in 3-mm
lor messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
'.he ,:r. desiring to vngage In
business under t^c fictitious names oi
REX AHTls'c SUPPLIES and REX
ART SUPPLIES >;.: Southwest
37th Avenue. Miami. Florida Intmda
to register said names with the CJj rk
f the Circuit I'ourt of Dade County.
Florida.
REX ART COMPANY,
a Florida Corp.. Sole Owner
by: A. Melvln Morris, President
AIN8LEE R. FERD1F
Attorney for Rex Art Company,
a Florida corporation
1782 West Flagler St.
Miami 35, Florida
9/30, 10/7-11-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDIC.AL CIRCUIT IN AN3
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY No. 60C 9C-45
KIRBY BUCHANAN,
Plalr'lff.
vs. |
DORIS P..TRICIA BUCHANAN,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUOLICAT.ON
TO: DORIK PATRICIA Bi'CHAMAN
is Hich Point Road
Greensboro, North Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a complaint for divorce ha-s been f.sd
against you and you are hereby :- -
quired to serve a copy of your .ins ,-r
to the complaint for divorce on piar--
tlffs attorney and file the orlai al
answer In the office of the clerk ofj>iB
Circuit Court on or bafore the 7ili
of November. I960; otherwise the si-
ns of said ciHoplaint f>.r divorce
will be taken as confessed apamst > u.
DATED this T,th day of Octohei ,0.
E. P LEATHKRMA.S
'". ik ..f Circuit Court
(seal) By: R. 11 RICE. JR.,
Deputy Ork
GEORGE J TALIANOPF
Attoi j lor Plaintiff
J: i Lin oin Road
Miami Beach. Florida
10/7-14-2: 2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SUNSET ACRES at 12023 8.W. 80th
Street. Miami. Fla.. Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
BON1TA ENTERPRISES, INC.
(a Fla. cprp.)
HAROLD STKl .\ni
Attorney for Applicant
909 Blscayne Bldg.
9/30, 10/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MAULE TREE BURGEONS a' 82*0
ti.Hr. 57th Court, Miami. Dade Coun-
ty, Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MARTHA C. MAOLE
GEORGE N. M.oDoNELL
Attorney for Petitioner
J04 Biscaync Bldg.
9/90, 10/7-14-21
NOTICE RY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTV. IN CHANCERY,
No. 0OC *15
JAMES D MacRAE, JR,
ill,
vs.
HAPR'FT n, MacRAE.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
.You are hereby notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce has been
filed aeslnst you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copv of vour Answei-
or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint
on the plaintiffs Attorney. RICH-
MOND A FARBER. One Lincoln Road
Building, Miami. Florid* and fl|p the
original Answer or Pleading :n th.
effioe of the Clerk of ttie Circuit Court
on or a*for* ihw 15t*i Auy of .Novem-
ber. I960. If jou tell to do so. Judg-
ment by default will be taken siralnet
you for the relief demanded in the
U4I1 ef OtrmeHamt.
This .SMStlee- she* hs unMl^sil once
each weii fer four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIUFAN
rX'OT AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, tlrls roth day of October. A.p.
1W0
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under ihe fictitious name of
J FURY'S 6 SERVICE STATION at
S95 S.W. 42nd Avenue. Miami. Florida
Int-nds to register said name with the
C'erk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
JERRY H LIPPSON
(sole proprietor)
MITCHELL HM.LER
Attorney for Applicant
046 Seybold Building
Miami, Floriaa
". 10/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. rN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
NO. 60C 9441
JUDITH ANN WILLIAMS,
'tiff.
vs.
STEVEN WILLIAMS, JR.,
nd nt.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR.,
Address I'nknown
Von STKVLN WILLIAMS. JR
notified that a Bill of C
plaint for Divorce has seal i d
you, and you an reouil
copy of your Answer or P!-
Ings to the Bill ot iiinipla'nt
Is Attorney. LEONARD II.
R1LIN, Metropolitan Bank Buildm.,-,
Miami 32. Florida, and file the original
or Pleadings in thg office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the Nth dsy of Novemhc:
If you fall to do so. Judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you t.
relief demanded In the L'iM of I
plaint.
DONE AND ORI1EREU at Mi ll,
Florida, this 2*th day of Septcm'!.
19K0.
E. B LEATHERMAN
Clerk of Circuit Court
Dade County Court House
Miami, Florida
(seal) By: M Deputy Clerk
10/7-14-21-J9
NOTICE UNDER
FICT TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTli'F s HEREBY OIVEN that
the underslg.-f d, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE VOYAGER at 1433 NF. Miami
Ilace. Miami. Kla intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
AL GOTTLIEB. INC
by: Al Gottlieb, Pres.
GEORGE J TALIANOFF
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. FloriCa
Attorney for Al Gottlieb. Inc.
9'30. 'O/7-14.21
E. B. LBiWHERMAN. CWrk.
Vaurt. Dade County, FV>r
R H. RICE. JR.
rlda
ijnceitCour.
(seal) 1:
IVputy Clerk
DONALD H. IRHBR
Attorney for Wainllff
10/14-21 -24), 11/4
NOTiCE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW'
NOTICE IX HEREBY GIVEN that
-raignsd. desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
WESLEY'S BROAKTED CHICKEN at
4P01 E. 4th Ave., Hjaleah intends to
redster saM name wMh the "Clerk of
icjlt Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DONNA MARE. INC.
- (a Fla. Corp.!
ELI BREGER
Attorney
420 Lincoln Road
/'lO-W-SO. 10/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE FRUIT BOWL at number 433
Lincoln Road in the City of Miami
Beach, Florida Intend to register the
said name with the CleTk of the Clr-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this
30th day of August, 1960.
SEYMOL'R WEISS
ELMA WEISS
TALIANOFF A WALLER
by: George .1. Tallanoff
Attorney for Applicant
9/SII. iO'T-14-21
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND rOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
Ns. tWto-C
IN RE: Estate of
VICTOR SWWSON
used.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and AB Person' Hiv-
ing claims or Dumands Agalnet bald
V' I are hereby notified and reqcii -
b i m.s. in mi) < I. ims and denial's
which you may have against th.-
tate of Viator E Swanson decea-cd
I >ade County. Florida, i
County Judges of Dade Count> I
file the same in their offices
County Courthouse in Hade Coun v,
. within t-i^lit calendar months
from the date ol ihe first pirhlical .u
hereof, or the same will be barred.
ARTHUR C. PERSON
WE1NKLK* RBRSLBfi
Attorneys
>bold Building
Miami. Florida
10/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
TiTlOUS NAIV
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTK'E 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the ondswahjned. desiring to enaraev In
business under the l1ctltu>u name of
royal Palm kft-tciencies &
AITS at 420-22 N.E. 7trd Street. M.-
and, Floriaa in tend to register said
name with the Clerk of Ore Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
FRANK B PIGNATORE. and
ROSE PIGNATORE. His Wife.
undivided t4 Interest
ANTHONY FLORENTINE
undivided % Interest
LEON KAPLAN
Attorney for Applicants
1139?*, 1st Street
Miami, florida
tO/7-W-21-25
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORVOHATtOS Ol TFMTS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FH .l-Hitr.


Page 16-A
*Jmlst>ncrdFk>f7
Friday, Oteober 21, ljfl*

The Red
Mattress
By MAX IERNER
Question Raised on Eichmann Fee
Pittsburgh
When Ted Cott asked mc to join the press panel which would dissect
?be David Susskind TV interview .with Premier Khrushchev on the "Open
End" show 1 figured it would be fun as well as duty; and said yes. For
a while the security angle posed a problem, but it was solved when a
monstrous photo, making me look like one of Lombroso's congenial
criminals, was attached to an accreditation card.
I don't blame the security guards, when 1 presented (he card at the
DN, for searching my portable typewriter case for a concealed bomb.
But I came to appraise Caesar, not to bury him.
MC ARRIVED A QUARTER-HOUR BEFORE the 9 p.m. opening
time for the show, with his translator and an entourage. I have been
bopping around the continent while the UN has been in session so this
was my first direct sight of him since that fateful press conference at
the Paris summit-that-failed.
At first sight he always strikes you as simply a roly-poly politician
with a shrewd peasant face. Then you look again, and the roly-poly
peasant sopors the sense of authority which comes from the power of a
great imperial mass.
The panel gathered in the room next to the one in which Susskind
was getting ready for the thankless grappling with a slipper)' Russian
bear. Our earphones gave us the preliminary chitchat before the show
went on and during the stationbreaks. At one point, when Susskind was
in despair at the length of Khrushchev's answers, he suggested that they
both "practice brevity" and asked whether the Russian Premier had
brought a couple of mattresses. "If you provide the mattresses," Khru-
shchev answered. "I am ready to be here all night."
A little after 10 a signal reached our panel to get ready for our turn.
Al 10:30 the good-byes were being said on both sides, and Khrushchev
was giving Susskind the bear's hug he reserves for those whom he wants
to crush and bury. They looked as if they would say goodbye until
tomorrow.
Finally at eleven the emperor of the Communist world domain took
his leave. Under the guidance of Dean Edward Barrett our group ol
working newspapermen took over.
- *
I TIP MY HAT TO SUSSKIND and WNTA for going through with
the Khrushchev show despite earlier State Department hints about re-
fusing him any propaganda chance and despite the sponsors' panicky
threat to pull out. In an open soceity even America's enemies must be
given a hearing, not because of any softness toward them but because a
democracy depends upon the competition of ideas.
The problem was not whether to give Khrushchev a hearing but
how to set his arguments, evasions, and distortions within a frame where
they would be recognized for what they were. The idea of a panel strikes
me as a good one. Khrushchev had a two-hour span when he rolled out
a red mattress for himself and stretched out on it with all his customary
theatrical resources. I don't know how much of an audience remained
after he rolled up his mattress and left, but we did our best to appraise
what was plain sawdust in the figure he presented, what was important,
and what it meant.
It wouldn't be a bad idea to do the same with other foreign states-
men. It might even help to follow the two remaining Kennedy-Nixon
debates with a panel dissection of their arguments.
THERE REMAINS THE QUESTION of what Khrushchev was up to.
There was some news value in his charge that the Americans had plan-
ned to send another U-2 over Russia but were frightened offa self
serving charge that strikes me as unimportant. There was also news in
his willingness to accept a ban on all military aid, although clearly he
would argue that it would involve America's giving up NATO and the
military bases around the world.
My own feeling was that Khrushchev acted like a man who was
caught between the fear of nuclear war and the temptation to expand
world Communist power as far and fast as possible without taking too
dangerous risks with war. Unfortunately the American bungling of the
U-2 overflight, now re-enforced by Vice President Nixon's assertion
. that it was America's moral "right'' to make the flights, gives Khrush
chev a stick with which to beat the West. He was shrewd enouph to
belabor it, while evading the plain fact that Communism is constantly
expanding its power and seeking to bring new areas under its domination.
The world's danger comes from the fact that world Communism-
including the Russian as well as the Chineseis unwilling to give up its
drive for world power, even while the Russians tnot the Chinese) are
fearful of the risks of nuclear war that are invovled. If you watched
and listened to Khrushchev with that in mind, much of what he said fell
into place, including his effort to destroy Hammarskjold because a
strong UN executive under his direction necessarily stands in the way of
the drive to world power by either bloc.
Copyright 1960
ed this week in Paris.
One of the documents revealed
that an SS officer named Guent-
ner, one ef Eichmann's personal
assistants, ordered the start ef
experiment* in June, 1942. with
pruttic acid, te "liquidate" Jews.
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-Several developments raised the quest on thts
week as to who was paying the fee which Dr. Robert Serv-t us of
Cologne, will receive for his services as defense attorney m the trial of
Nazi master killer Adolf Eichmann._________________________________
i ft was noted, at the attorney de-1
cided to cut short his current stay j acCording to two documents pre-
in Israel, that he has been consis-, ed (be Cen)cr f Contempor-
tently vague in response to queries Documentation publish-
about his fee, saying only that ^Ek ta Pari,.
"family and friends were pacing
the costs.
It was reported, however, that
the Eichmann tamily had to ob-
tain a loan to buy airline tickets
to meet Dr. Servatiu* in West
Germany before He left for Is-
rael. It has been reported that
Hie attorney expects to receive
a fee of 100,000 German marks
($24,000) if the trial lasts no long-
er than three months.
The attorney, who came here laat
week to start preliminary work on
his defense plan for the trial next
spring, had originally intended to
remain in Israel two weeks.
He was expected to meet with
Eichmann a second time before
leaving. The two men conferred
for two hours in the special, trans-
parent, sound-proof booth built lor
that purpose in the prison where
Eichmann is being held.
Adolf Eichmann was personally
responsible for installation of the
gas chambers in which millions of
European Jews were slaughtered.
Eichmann personally propose*
this system to his superiors. atf
designated camps in the Rig,
Minsk areas for the Initial exwri-
ments. The first one was perform.
ed in Chelmo. where ten gas cham
bers were set up in 1941. uccordinj
to the documents.
The French newspaper. Fig,
began publication of a series nf
articles on the background of the
forthcoming trial of Eichmann i0
Israel, including the new oW
ments. L'Aurore, a mass circub.
tion newspaper, also be^o, a sim-
ilar series.
1
Plans Advance
For Dinner Fete
To Rabbi Kronish
Rabbi Leon Kronish, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Sholom, will
be honored by his congregation at
the Temple's annual dinner in be-
half of State of Israel Bonds on
Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Americana
hotel.
Gen. Meir Amit. distinguished
war strategist of the Israel Armed
Forces and leader of the famed
Sinai campaign, will be guest
speaker. The 38-year-old officer
and native Israeli began his mili-
tary career as the age of 15 when
he joined the Haganah.
Rabbi Kronish has served
Temple Beth Sholom since 1944,
when the congregation number-
ed only a handful of families who
met in a rented store. Over the
years, he has guided the growth
of the Temple's membership
and facilities. Today, Beth Sho-
lom numbers more than 700 fam-
ilies.
The religious school program
which Rabbi Krnoish helped de-
velop is considered a model for
Liberal congregations He was in-
vited to serve on the National Com-
mission on Jewish Education, an
organization which guides the /d-
| ucational policies and textbook
publications of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations.
Rabbi Kronish was part of a
. three-man delegation from Greater
Miami to visit Israel in 1954. He
recently returned from another
visit.
About 500 persons are expected
to attend the dinner of tribute to
Rabbi Kronish. Isadore Hecht and i
Harold Zinn are co-chairmen of the'
j dinner. Zinn will serve as toast-
i master.
FREE
A stimulating guide
tor youngsters and
adults on the customs,
traditions and observ-
aaces of Judaism.
^tai
JewisK
Jerita
"YOUR JEWISH
HERITAGE"
b printed in English-an
inspiring booklet for
every home and every-
one in it.
KM KM COPY, send re-
quest to: Ray Keator.
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BIL.S
j
Me
l(/<
omaw s
'MU/
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dernis and son, Martin,
back from Toronto, where they visited their
daughter, Elaine, and son-in-law. Morton Laufer
. The couple were married in February, and
this was the tamily's first sight of one another
since the wedding While in Toronto, they were
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Laufer, in-laws of
Elaine ...
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zukernick, 3134 Sheridan ave., have re-
turned from a two-month trip to Europe, where they spent three
weeks in Holland while Harry attended the Hague Academy of In-
ternational Law Incidentally, Harry has been appointed to the
hoard of trustees of the International Lawyers Assn. ... In Holland,
they also visited Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Haarlem and Delft .
j:e and Sue spent lour weeks in London, and friends are impressed
with their record of twelve trips to the theater there, among them,
an outstanding performance by Alec Guinness in "Ross" And,
during their five days in Dublin, the Zukernicks attended the Dublin
International Theatre Festival...
Mrs. Maxwell Hyman off for a visit to son, Tom, in Washington,
and then to New York to visit her three brothers and to stay with
her life-long friend. Pearl Bernstein.
> >
Birthdaze: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lchrman are grandparents for
I he first time Born on Oct. 18, a son, Michael Bruce, to Mr.
iind Mrs. David (Sandra) Lehrman Arrival was at Mt. Sinai
Hospital David is a student at the University of Miami medical
school .
Also: A boy, Andrew Scot, born Oct. 9, to Mr. and Mrs. Stuart
(Diane) Wasserstrom, of Columbus, O. Maternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. David Rabinowitz the Miami Diamond Center
. Paternal grandparents are the Julius Wasserstroms, of Colum-
bus Maternal great-grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Gertzen-
berg and Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz, all of Miami, joined the
David Rabinowitzes on a trip to Cleveland to attend the bris.
K
Impressive letters being received here from E. Albert Pallot,
Riving pen-pictures of his round-the-world travels He's partic-
ularly interested in world-famed gardens, and is recording them in
a series of photographs for official use by the City of Miami bcau-
tification committee, of which he is chairman Pallol's trip is
taking him from arrival in Vienna to Athens, Istanbul, Teheran,
Karachi, Bombay, Delhi, Jaipur, Calcutta, Bangkok, Hong Kong,
and Japan ... He returns home late this month ...
Gertrude (Mrs. Kenneth) Oka has turned tables on her council-
| man husband ... It was she who recently made a speech of greet-
| ing before more than 1,500 people in Japan ...
Inez Krensky back home after eight weeks abroad And
back, she is, too, in the swing of things with the Mt. Sinai Hospital
Women's Auxiliary Also chairing and co-chairing several im-
portant projects for Temple Beth Sholom.

Dr. and Mrs. Lester (Sara) Stepner being posted with news of
Syracuse University Daughter Barbara is attending her fresh-
|man year there .
Edgar Greenberg back from New York in time to attend the
[Men's and Boys' Apparel Club convention with wife Rose at the
I Eden Roc hotel...
Ruth (Mrs. Cy) Bernard making final arrangements to board
| the plane that will take her to Mexico for another vacation .
After a summer of continued advanced study under the guid-
ance of her former piano teacher. Rose M. Robin, Carole Goldstein,
talented daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam (Frances) Goldstein, has
resumed her college career at Stetson majoring of course, in
piano .
Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Coller were recent hosts to Marvin
Kratter. finance whiz of Gotham Town, at the Gale hotel Marv
Hew here at the invitation of the Miami Beach Bar for an address
to its membership.
>
Bernie (Mrs. Joe) Weiner can be seen in her Mt. Sinai Hospital
Pink Lady uniform again She's been away since June, visiting
with friends and family in Chicago ...
Speaking of Mt. Sinai, the Garden Club there held its first
meeting of the season at the lovely home of Alice (Mrs. Seymour)
Rubin Guest speaker was Mrs. M. S. Farrar, noted flower show
judge and teacher .
Mr. and Mrs. Milton (Lane) Coleman practice what they preach
at International Tours The couple recently returned from a
three-month trip through Greece, Turkey, Israel, Aegean Sea sites,
France, England, Italy and the Isle of Elba, where Napoleon I was
exiled .
Mrs. Jack Chanin moving into the Barclay Plaza until the Mor-
ton Towers is ready for occupancy.
More on Birth Front: Daughter. Lori, born Sept. 19 to Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Golin, 9285 Martinique dr. Lori joins brother Gary,
age 20 months Stan's entertainment chairman of the Caribbean
Jewish Congregation Mrs. G.'s recording and corresponding
secretary of the Temple, as well as Gift Shop chairman of Sister-
hood She's also a membership vice president of Shalom chapter
of B'nai B'rith Women.
*
Lou and Marcella Heiman reporting to friends on their trip to
Hot Springs, Ark. While there, the Heimans saw Mrs. Ethel
Shochet and Mrs. Sally Gardner ..
The Harold Thurmans off for Syracuse to greet the new ar-
rival in their daughter's family, young John Samuel Sharon .
Creat-grandparents are Rabbi and Mrs. Samuel Thurman, of St.
Louis .
Ten new drip technique paintings on display at Hi-Fi Associates
on Coral Way ... Artist is Charles It. Jacobson .. .
In honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Spitalny, 580 NE 175th St., No. Miami Beach, friends have
''onated 50 croton plants to beautify the new approach of Temple
Sinai .
Mr. and Mrs. Max S. Rosenzweig, of Keystone Island, receiving
condolences on the sudden passing of his mother.
"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 21, 1960
Section B
*
Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro displays the Exodus
Award plaque, one of two she received last
week at a luncheon tribute at the Eden Roc
hotel planned in her honor by the Women's
Division. State of Israel Bonds. With Mrs.
Sapiro is Col. Dina Werth. commanding officer
of "Chen," the Israeli Women's Army, who pre-
sented the plaque "in appreciation of her un-
selfish and dedicated service in helping to
spur Israel's economic development through
her leadership and efforts on behalf of State
Original Fashions
To Mark Show
Original fashions by leading
American designers and Israel's
most talented couturiers, all of
fabrics designed and processed in
Israel, will give dramatic testi-
mony to that nation's progress in
the fashion and textile fields.
The results of their combined'
creative efforts will be on exhibit
Nov. 9 in the Grand Ballroom of
the Americana hotel when "Israel
Fashions, U.S.A." is presented by
the Women's Division, State of Is-
rael Bonds.
The collection contains 42 de-
signs, 10 by Americans and the
balance by Israelis, using cottons,
silks, woolens, lames, embroider-
ies, tweeds, and jersey, all loomed
in Israel.
Representative is the theater or
cocktail dress pictured here, a de-
sign of Lily Schleifer, Hungarian-
born Israel designer who studied
psychiatry in preparation for her
career as a couturier.
This outfit is called "Habima,"
after the name of Israel's nation-
al theater. The ensemble consists
of a shirt waist print of turquoise,
white and grey, with a turquoise
cummerbund, over a bouffant pet-
ticoat, topped with a turquoise sat-
in coat lined to match the dress.
Commentating the show will be
Maggi McNellis, famed New York
radio, television and fashion ex-
pert, who has herself been named
many times to the "best dressed
women" lists.
"Habima." by Lilly Schleifer.
is among Israeli designs to
be presented during "Israel
Fashions, U.S.A.," due here
Nov. 9.
Coordination and accessories lor
the show will be handled by Saks
Fifth Avenue, Miami Beach, un-
der the supervision of Mrs. Irene
Gracia.
Admission to the fashion lunch-
eon is either by the purchase of
one $100 Israel Bond, or the sale
of three. About 1,000 guests are
expected.
of Israel Bonds." Mrs. Sapiro also received
he Woman of Valor pin, presented to her by
Mrs. Jack Katzman (left), general chairman
of the Women's Division. The pin signifies that
she was responsible for the sale of $100,000 in
bonds. Chairman of the luncheon was Mra.
Joseph Shapiro (right), who led a bond appeal
which resulted in more than $100,000 in pledges.
Israeli actor-pantomimist Shai K. Ophir enter-
tained.
Beach Council
Party on Monday
Miami Beach Council of B'nai
B'rith Women. District 5, will hold
its second annual paid-up member-
ship party on Monday evening at
the Deauville hotel. Participating
will be the five chapters making
up the Council Chai, Harmony,
Menorah, Miami Beach, and North
Shore.
Bach chapter will entertain with
a skit or musical show. President
Mrs. Sam Belsky has donated a
trophy to go to the chapter an-
nouncing the most new members.
Winner last year was Menorah
chapter.
Membership chairman is Mrs.
Irving Laibson. Mrs. Joseph Feld-
man is program chairman.
Mrs. Gerald Soltz. District 5
president, will be suest f honor.
Also present will be Mrs. Bernard
Supworth. third vice president;
Mrs. Alfred Reich, first vice pres-
ident: and Judge Milton Friedman,
president elect of District 5, B'nai
B'rith.
Some 700 women are expected to
attend the event.
Sisterhood Will Mark Anniversary
Temple Zioa Sisterhood will cele-
brate its 10th anniversary at a
function Saturday evening at the
Temple, 5720 SW 17th St.
Program will feature an "era of
dancing" from minuet to cha cha
cha. Mrs. Sam Gordon is chair-
man. Irs Abe Isgar is publicity
chairman.
Membership coffee will be held
Wednesday evening at the home
of Mrs Seymour Samules, 1800
SW 85th ave. Chairman is Mrs.
Leonard Harris.
Sisterhood met last Wednesday
evening at the Temple, and heard
Mrs. Ann Goldberg, of the League
of Women Voters. Mrs. Lawrence
Wulkan was chairman.
Hope School
Chapter Luncheon
Prospective members of Angel
chapter for Hope School were feted
at a Luau luncheon on Wednesday
at the Seville hotel.
Mrs. Gerald Linderbaum, vice
president in charge of membership
was chairman of the event which
featured an Hawaiian luncheon
menu.
Angel chapter, chartered two
years ago, has grown from a nu-
cleus of 12 Miami Beach women
who started the organization, to
a current membership of 250. The
chapter is devoted to service and
fund-raising for the Hope School
for Mentally Retarded Children,
666 SW 4th st., Miami.


Page 2-B
-Jenist- fkrkHan
Friday, Otccbei
J*0
October Days Mean Colorful Meals
By LEAH LEONARD
October days are colorful a*1
nappy ri*f- _f\en ,jp "" k"rtlfjr i
If you are among the fortunate
ones, with a little kitchen garden,
you will gather in the remaining
PW tomatoes and use them in
th following manner for winter
ute. Nothing like home-made pick-
les U j-cr.e with poultry and meat
dishes The young people especial-
ly will relish it.

SwU Crwn Tomato* Pieklo
'A peck green tomatoes
2 stalks celery
10 or 12 green peppers
20 large white onions
2 large heads of cabbage
1 cup salt
3'A quarts white vinegar
8 pounds brown sugar (light or
dark) |
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
V4 teaspoon ground red pepper
0 tablespoons ground ginger
Wash and drain the tomatoes
before cutting into pieces and re-
moving the stem ends. Chop as
fine as possible in a wooden bowl.'
Cut green peppers into halves, re-
moving seeds and stems and put
tin; togetaer with the stalks of.
celery, peeled onions and cut cab-
bage through the medium blade of
your food chopper. Combine both
mixures, sprinkle with salt and
let stand overnight. Drain well.
Combine the vinegar, sugar and
spices in a large enough pot and
bring to a boil quickly Add the
vegetable and spice- mixture and
Uimmw Simmer about 30 mmu'.es. Turn
.n"o pi.it jars and seal while hot.
Yields about 8 pints.
a
Sliced Green Tomato Pickle
(Larger Quantity)
1 peck green tomatoes
2 quarts onions
8 cups pickling vinegar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon tumeric
2 pounds dark brown sugar
1 cup mustard seeds (white va-
riety )
1 tablespoon celery seeds
Vx cup olive oil
Wash and slice tomatoes very
thin. Peel and slice onions as thin
as possible. Place the sliced vege-
tables on large platters and sprin
kle with salt. Let stand overnight.
covered with wax paper or alum-,
nujr. foil. In the morning, drain off
the liquid which has formed, using
a colander for this. Turn this into I
a large enough cooking pot to pre
vent boiling over. Add half the
above amount of vinegar and bring
to a boil then turn down heat to
let the mixture simmer until tender
and transparent. Drain off liquid.
Combine the mustard, tumeric.
sugar and seeds and add lo the
remaining vinegar that has not
I* ( n cooked in another pot. Bring
Ihis to a boil and turn into the
Pythian Sisters Official Visits
l 'net deputy grand chief Temple 37. Lions Hall, 7310 SW
Shirk;. Bath m. e her official S7th pi. Most exellent chief. Mrs.
:o tthe following temples last Virgil Bryant.
v"k: Wednesday. 8 p.m.. Roosevelt
1 u -day. 8 p.m.. South Miami Temple 33. Roosevelt Hall. 4601
------------------------------------W. Flagler st.. Mrs. Martha Krantz.
drained prepared first combination.
Stir well, and the olive oil, mix
again and turn into sterilized jars.
'^fti.Y i e I7js Approximately 8
We prefer to turn ours
into pint jars.)

Here is a happy coincidence. A
friend in Miami Beach brought me
the following recipe for a delicious
Carrot Mol_. It came to her via a
fr:end who lives in Detroit. The
recipe is credited to our good
friend. Anna Slomovitz! You'll be
as grateful to everyone concerned
as I was.

Carre* Mold
1 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup brown sugar, tightly pack-
ed for measuring
2 eggs, separated
' i teaspoon salt
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
V4 teaspoon baking soda
I'm cups grated raw carrot
1 tablespoon lemon juice
' teaspoons grated lemon rind
Combine all ingredients in mix-
ing bowl, adding stiffly beaten egg
whites last. Grease well the inside
of a pudding mold or other baking
pan and sprinkle generously with
fine dry bread or cracker crumbs.
Turn in the batter and bake 15
minutes at 350 F. then increase
heat to 375 F. and continue bak-
ing 40 to 45 minutes or till nicely
browned on top. Turn out while
warm on a serving plate and dust
lightly with f:ne ground nuts or
confectioners' sugar just before
serving time.
Left to right are Mrs. Roland Oppenheimer, Indian brave; Mrs.
Michael Mersel. Big Chief (president); and Mrs. Jor.cs Erot-.an,
Indian runner, in "Indi-Antics," presented by the Indian Creek
Division, National Council of Jewish Women, at c mebership
party.
You're Rich
When You're Healthy!
i most exellent chief.
Friday. 8 p.m.. Arch Creek
i Temple 16. Booster Lodge Hall,
I 1311 NE 125th St., No. Miami.
Mrs. Robert Mellin, most excellent
chief.
Tuesday, Oct. 25, Flagler Tem-
ple 54, Carpenter Hall, 151 NW
37th ave. Mrs. Kin Lubin, most
exellent chief.
TASTE
COUNTSJOO!
Uniquely delicious,
custard-smooth
PRUNE WHIP
YOGURT
fa the taste treat supreme! The
perfect food ... so good and
nutritious! A perfect between-
meal enack. So easy to digestl
Breakstone's traditional quality.
AIho enjoy Breakstone's other de-
lightful flavors Strawberry,
1'ineapple, Vanilla or tangy Plain.
Thursday, Oct 27, 8 p.m.,
Beach Temple 43, American Leg
ion Hell, 1828 Alton rd. Mrs. Ben
Haeeafeld, most exellent chief.
Board Members
Are to Serve
At a recent meeting of the Wom-
en's Auxiliary, Ml. Sinai Hospital.
j ihree board members were elected
! to serve on the executive board of
i the Auxiliary for the year.
They are Mrs. S. H. Bruce Le-
! vine, chairman of Snack Bar; Mrs.
: Ben Schanfald, chairman cf Gift
Shop: and Mrs. Saiiiord Roihman.
r.ur'ing clerk and servette coor-
i unator.
The meeting was conducted by
.Mrs. Murray A. Shaw, vice presi-
dent of the Auxiliary, in the ab-
sence of the president, Mrs. A.
! Herbert Mathes.
10:00 P.M.
TONIGHT

Anottw Fin*
Product
A"
Tonight as you watch TV enjoy the
distinctive nutty flavor of Swiss Knight
cheese. Great for seacks with crackers
and fruit. 6 handy "zip open" wedges.
TH 0RIGINA1
Swiss
Knight
psociss caurtRf cmux
This Heinz symbol of quality and
thiS *Seal Of kashmth appear on the tastiest
of all vegetarian beans... on seven savory soups... on the world's
best liked Ketchupand on a great variety of pure and nourishing
strained and junior foods for babies.



the Q) is the see/ of The Union Of Orthodox Jewish Congregations Of Am**ic-
tour guarantee that these Heinx Varieties ere ttrictlg kosher.
_L-


Friday, Otcobr 21. 1960
+Jmisti ttorktlair
Page 3-B
S'nai B'rith Women Will Dedicate
|l,000 Members in Honor of Mrs. Soltz
t The more than 3.500 B'nai B'rith
[women in South Florida are firm-
|ly convinced that membership is
I the "life" of thejr.organization. All
[duTBTg the spring, summer and fait
I months, each of the 19 chapters,
I from Shalom in South Dade to
I Ft. Lauderdale in the north, have
[been displaying beautiful "trees of
I life" at all chapter functions, upon
I which all new members have pin-
[ned their membership "leaves."
The chapters combined aim is
1.000 new members who will be
J appropriately grouped together as
(the "Roslya Soltz Class" in honor
1 of district president, Mrs. Gerald
|p. Soltz. of Miami.
For the first time in the history
of B'nai B'rith in this area, all
three Councils will have coordi-
nated paid-up membership parties
I for their constituent chapters.
On Monday. 8 p.m., at the Deau-
[ ville hotel, the Miami Beach Coun-
cil, composed of the Harmony,
Chai, North Shore, Miami Beach
and Menorah chapters, will hold
its paid-up membership party
which last year attracted over 700
women. Mrs. Sam Belsky is Coun-
cil president, and Mrs. Irving
Laibson is chairman of the event.
A motorcade starting at 2 p.m.
through Miami Beach will precede
the function. Each chapter will
present a skit, and the Mrs. Sam
Belsky Membership Award will be
presented to the chapter acquiring
the greatest number of new mem-
bers.
Mrs. Joseph Fekiman is in
charge of the program for the eve-
ning. Serving on the committee are
Mrs. Jack Dernis, Miss Helen Sil-
yerstein. Mj-s.jjj. August, Mrs. Mor-
ris Praissman and Mrs. Richard
Bergman.
On Thursday. Oct. 27, at 8 p.m.,
the Miami Council will sponsor
its paid-up membership party at
the Disabled American Veterans
Hall in Hialeah for its nine mem-
ber chapters. Anne FFrank, Coral
Gables, Eleanor Roosevelt. Emma
[ Lazarus, Flamingo, Gilbert J. Bal-
i kin, Miami, Shalom and West Mi-
Mizrachi Cites
Justice Douglas
By Special Report
WASHINGTON William O.
Douglas, Associate Justice of the
iU. S. Supreme Court, received the
1960 America Israel Friendship
Award of the Mizrachi Women's
Organization of America here this
week.
In a brief eeremony in his ju-
dicial chambers, Justice Douglas
was cited for the "distinguished
I contribution he had rendered to-
j ward fostering understanding be-
tween the peoples of the United
States and Israel and toward the
promotion of the biblical ideals of
peace and social justice among na-
tions and peoples throughout the
world."
Mrs. Moses Dyckman, of New
York City, national president of
Mizrachi Women, presented the ci-
tation in the presence of Mrs. Eli
Resnikoff, of Brooklyn, N.Y., chair-
man of the national board of the
woman's religious Zionist organi-
zation, and leaders of District of
Columbia chapters of Mizrachi
Women.
The America Israel Friendship
Award, established immediately
after the rebirth of Israel, has been
conferred at annual national con-
ventions of the Mizrachi Women's
Organization of America since
1948.
The award ceremony this year
was held here because pressures
of the court term, which recently
convened, prevent Justice Douglas
from attending the 35th national
convention of Mizrachi Women in
Atlantic City beginning Oct. 30.
Films of this week's presentation
will be seen by more than a thou-
sand delegates from 37 states at
the keynote session of the national
meeting.
Local Unit Will
Be at Area Meet
"The Decade Ahead Agenda
for Southern Jewry" is the theme
of the Southeast-Southwest confer-
ence sponsored by the American
Jewish Committee to be held in
Dallas, Tex., beginning Oct. 27.
Attending the four-day confer-
enee from Miami will be James K
Katzman, Mr. and Mrs. David Flee-
man, Mrs. Charles E. Leeds, Mrs.
Milton Margulis, Mrs. Per its
Sckeinherg, and Seymour Samet.
MM!. 6MALD SOLTZ
ami. Mrs. Irving Riemer is chair-
man of the evening, and Mrs. Her-
bert Heiken in charge of the pro-
gram. Mrs. David Sherper is Coun-
cil president. Each chapter will
participate in a' "Family Album"
presentation, and new members
will be initiated in a candlelight
ceremony.
Committee members are Mes-
dames Simon Sanders, Arthur Resi-
nek, Hewitt Weiss, Adele Baum.
Robert Lourie, Ira Segal, Louis
Cohen, Irving Kaye and Jack Was-
serman.
The Broward-North Dade Coun-
cil, composed of the North Dade,
Sunshine, Shoshana. Hollywood and
Ft. Lauderdale chapters, has tak-
en as its theme "Friendship Around
the World." They are extending
the hand of friendship to an honor-
ed guest from Holland, Israel, Ja-
pan and Tahiti. Ihe function .will
take place at the Americana hotel
at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 15.
Mrs. Stanley Goldberg is chairman
of the evening, and Mrs. "Alvin
Wank is Council president. Mem-
bers of the committee are Mes-
dames Harry Friedman, Irving
Finn, Hyman Mars and Nathan Mil-
ler.
Mrs. Soltz will be guest speaker
and initiate new members at each
of the three functions. The class
of 1,000 new members will then
be presented by Mrs. Soltz to the
national president, Mrs. Charles
Solovich, of Detroit, at the bien-
nial convention of B'nai B'rith
Women in April in Miami Beach,
marking the first time the nation-
al organization has ever convened
in this community.
'Jade' Luncheon
Slated Here
Newly-formed Women's Division
of the Miami Beach YMHA will
hold a "Jade" luncheon and fash-
ion show by Paul Freed at the
House of Hoo restaurant, 79th st.,
causeway, on Tuesday noon, Nov.
1. Surprise gift in jade will be giv-
en as a prize.
In charge of reservations are
Mrs. Solomon Kann, president, and
Mrs. Norman Giller, chairman of
the day.
The organization is planning a
New Year's eve function at the
Coconut Grove Playhouse, includ-
ing a Broadway musical shew and
midnight champagne supper party.
The Women's Division meets on
the third Wednesday of each month
at the "Y," 1536 Bay rd. Mrs. Sid
Lang is in charge of publicity.
Purpose of the organization is
to improve the facilities at the
*t* branch of the Greater Miami
Jewish Community Center. First
project was the purchase of a bus
for transportation of children.
BTJRIDIlSFErS
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-.


Poge 4-B
*Jen 1stFtcrktetr
Friday. Otcober 21, i960
I
Mizrachi Women in U.S. and Israel
By MRS EMANUEL KARGER
National Representative
From small beginnings in 1925,
1he Mizrachi Women's Organiza-
I on has grQwn until some 50,000
v. omen, organized" into some 250
i cal chapters, councils and re-
gions throughout the United
In tha aftarmath of spirit of
tha Holy Day season, Mr*. E man-
ia! Karger, national raprosanta-
liva of tha> Mizrachi Women's Or-
ganization of Amarica, presents
tome pertinent insights into the
programs of the organization.
States, carry forward the organi-
. .tion's extensive programs in Is-
lael.
The Mizrachi Women's Organi-
lion was founded in faith
?nd its manifold activities
wtroughout three and a half dec-
|M have reflected the devotion
ti religious-Zionist women to the
leal of the "land of Israel, for
the people of Israel, in the spirit
I Israel's Torah."
The history of the organization
il more than a record of achieve-
ment in the fields of religious,
. .ademic and agricultural educa-
on; child restoration and Youth
.Aliyah work, social service and
social welfare activities. It is, as
..ell, the history of aid to the
spiritual reconstruction of the
Jewish State.
Mizrachi Women have partici-
.ited in the historic task of bring-
ing into existence the State of
i-rael; they have shared in ev-
on; they have participated in ev-
, ry important effort of the Jew-
-h community.
But to all this, they have add-
ed the great "plus" of the Miz-
,.ichi movement the belief that
the principles and practices of
.KS. tMANUU KAKGfK
traditional Judaism will enrich
the lives and future of Jews trom
all lands who have recreated
Zion.
The functional program of Miz-
rachi Women is three-fold. It cov-
ers the field of education and vo-
cational training, child restora-
tion and Youth Aliyah work, and
social service and social welfare
activities.
The preparation of adolescent
girls for their role as citizens of
Israel and as Jewish mothers
was the first work undertaken by
the Mizrachi Women's Organiza-
tion. Following a survey by Mrs.
Bessie Gotsfeld. the first project
of religious Zionist women was
established in Palestine. It was
the Beth Zeiroth Mizrachi in Je-
rusalem, where vocational train-
ing and academic study were co-
ordinated in a traditional relig-
ious atmosphere.
From this beginning, Mizrachi
Women hwr developed a faMUmg
system of vocational, academic,
religious and agricultural train-
ing which today is preparing Is-
rael's youth for integration into
the future economy of the land.
Educational efforts are carried
forward not only for youth, but
for children and adults as well.
The Beth Zeiroth Mizrachi in Tel
Aviv is generally considered one
of the finest schools in all Israel,
providing among other courses,
full training for kindergarten,
handicraft and home making
teachers.
Most recent addition to the ed-
ucational system are: the Esther
and David Shapiro School in Je-
rusalem; the Wurzweiler School
in Petach Tikvah, and the Bar-
Ilan Memorial School in Raan-
ana. All are integral parts of Miz-
rachi Women's projects in the lo-
calities named.
Witth the rise of Hitlerism, Miz-
rachi Women entered a great new
phase of activity. They readily
joined in the gigantic task of car-
ing for refugee children from Eu-
rope, establishing through the
the years a vast network of chil-
dren's homes and villages
throughout Israel. According to!
official statements of Youth Ali-j
yah, a majoritty of all children
now placed in orthodox children's
homes in Israel are in projects
sponsored by Mizrachi Women.
Best-known of Mizrachi Wom-
en's child restoration projects is
the Bessie Gotsfeld Children's Vil-
lage and Farm School at Raart-
ana (Kraf Batya), where Jewish
children from twenty-four lands
have been restored to spiritual,
as well as physical, well-being.
Recently the first Falasha chil-
dren to return to Israel in 2.000
years arrived for a period of
training at Kfar Batya. These
members of the "Lost Tribe" are
Jewish youngsters from Ethiopia.
Other major Youth Aliyah
projects ot Mizrachi Women, an
authorized agency of Youth Ali-
vah, include _tlT f lilllffifl'* ^""
nex of the Beth Zeiroth Mizrachi.
Jerusalem; the Mosal Aliyah
Children's Village at Petach Ti-
kvah, and the Talbiah Children's
Home in Jerusalem.
Having met the influx of ref-
ugee children first from Europe,
then from Cyprus, Mizrachi Wom-
en then faced the challenge of
absorbing thousands of Yemenite
and North African children, nine
out of ten of whom came from
orthodox Jewish backgrounds.
Social welfare activities had
been conducted for many years
by Mizrachi Women, but the es-
tablishment of the Jewish State
brought the organization to a new
phase of intensive activity in this
field. In addition to direct Pur,
im and Passover relief to adult
refugees, provision of living quar.
ters for working girJs in. Tel Aviv
and Jerusalem, nursery schools
and kindergartens for children
of working mothers, clothing dig.
tributions, afternoon clubs for
children and summer camps for
the,. underprivileged Jjg i z r a c h i
Women have pioneered in settle-
ment house work.
The first settlement houses in
Jerusalem the Bakka Settle-
ment Houses were" established
by the Mizrachi Women's Organ-
ization in 1950 to aid the new
olim" in integrating into the life
of Israel.
Local units of Mizrachi include
Miami Beach chapter, Mrs. Paul-
ine Grundwerg, president; Dov
chapter, Mrs. Louis Tokayer,
president; Tamara chapter, Mrs.
Jack Greenhouse and Mrs. Louis
Pinchot; Orah chapter. Miss Es-
telle Coletz; and Tziona chapter,
Mrs. Eugene Labovitz, presi-
dent.
Beachite Wins Legal Award
Betti Shari Baron, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Baron, 2191
No. Bay rd.. Miami Beach, is this
year's receipient of the Kappa
Beta Pi Book Scholarship.
The award is presented each year
by the legal sorority to the wom-
an law student with the highest
scholastic average.
A senior at the University of
Miami School of Law, Miss Baron
was honored on Sunday at a Beta
Sigma Pi tea at the home of Mrs.
Joe Dolin, 4548 SW 70th ave.
Miss Baron is now serving as
vice president of Bar and Gavel
legal fraternity. She is also secre-
tary of the University of Miami
Student Bar Assn., chairman of
the Senior Bar Review, a member
of the Dean's Committee, and has
been on the Dean's List.
New and delicious!
L
WHHO
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WILN0 Kosher PRODUCTS
Corned Beef, Pastrami,
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Krispit Frankfurters
Metropolitan Bank
Tells Club Plan
Metropolitan Bank of Miami this
: week became the first bank in
South Florida to institute a new
' Silver Savings Club" which has
been used successfully by banks in
New York, California, Georgia.
Connecticut, Wisconsin, and in
north Florida.
Metropolitan, which has the ex-
i elusive rights to the program in I
Dade county, will give a free five-1
I piece setting of Wm. A. Rogers i
I Silverplate, unconditionally guaran-
teed by Oneida Ltd., Silversmiths,
to every person who opens a new
! savings account with $25 or more |
or adds to an existing account in
ithe amount of $25 or more.
Metropolitan president, G. James
Hughes, said that for every addi-
tional $10 in deposits above the
first S25. Metropolitan savings de-
positors will be given a Silver Sav-
ings Club Certificate, which entitles
them to purchase an additional
five-piece place setting retailing
for more than $5. for only $2.25.
Hughes said that to his knowl-
edge this is the first time that a
commercial bank in Dade county
has gone into such a program. He i
added that the plan has been most
successful in other cities where it j
has been instituted, and in some ,
CAM! baa added more than a mil-
lion dollars in deposits to the spon- i
soring bank in just a few months.
Cord Porfy Tuesday
Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will
sponsor a luncheon and card party
on Tuesday, 11:30 a.m., at the
Center. 6500 N. Miami ave. Hos-
tesses are Mrs. Ann Harris, Mrs.
Edythe Rosenberg, Mrs. Sadie
Kushner, and Mrs. Claire Tonik.

ft ':
8 v
S S
WfrKhSHk
of course!
If you
like
CHEESE
Ikreplach
:; x
A traditional standby...
for old-timey good Kasha
Vameshkes Kasha
Knishes, and otht* treats.
Lass than V a serving I
Abe ** Woir. Cnom, Kara* (arib) ...
WoMTj Koata 'N' Oovy.. WalTe KaaSo Soup.
Sand for MB KASHA COOK BOOK.
PHYLLIS WOLFf, fm Vaa,
KASHA MEANS
:j::S;i:i;j;i;i;i;i;i;i|i;i:o 'jlji'lolil^
!**1
.Cheese.
Ravioli
IN SAUCC
WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicago)
MIAMI BtANCH
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Phono FR 1-6551
Flowers Spark Theme
"Say it With Flowers" was to
be the theme of a meeting of Sis-
terhood of Flagler-Granada Jew-
ish Community Center on Thurs-
day evening at the Center. 50 NW
51st pi. Elton L. Adelman, Miami
florist, was to make the presenta-
tion. Mrs. Leo Drutz is in charge
of refreshments. Mrs. Abe Saluk,
501 SW 65th ave., is program
chairman.
'Beatnik Bop' Dance Here
Senior Hi Clubs sponsor a "Beat-
nik Bop" dance on Saturday night
at the Southwest YMHA. 7212 Cor-
al Way. The Miami Continentals
v, ill furnish the music for dancing.
I You'll love
MEATLESS]
1 CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
I CHEESE
| RAVIOLI
Just heat'n'eat!
Hear family, guests, cheer for
that real Italian flavor created
by famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Ten-
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with tangy Italian Cheese...
simmered with savory tomato
sauce and cheese... seasoned
the real Italian way. Thrifty, too.
About 15* a serving. Each can
serves two. Buy several cans
today.
1050
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Friday. Otcober 21. 1960
+Je*lsiifk>rkHain
Pag 5-B
i r

Beach Hadassah Plans Capsule Confab;
To Feature Workshop Sessions Here
Miami Beach chapter of Hadas-
sah will hold its 1961 Capsule Con-
ference at the Algiers hotel on Mon-
day from 9:45 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Theme of the conference will be
Henrietta Szold's words, "Make
my Eyes Look to the Future."
Mrs. Fred Jonas is president of
the chapter. Miss Lillian Good-
man, chairman of the conference,
said Wednesday that "Hadassah
must meet its many challenges this
year Decause this is the historic
year of the dedication of the Med-
ical Center in Jerusalem, the 100th
anniversary year of the birth of
Henrietta Szold, its founder, and
the 100th anniversary of the birth
of Theodore Herzl, founder of po-
litical Zionism.
"Hadassah women have recog-
nized the significance of import-
ant days in Hadassah's life and
many of them have, and are daily,
translating their emotion into
permanent affiliation through life
membership."
In addition to its basic task of
providing motivation, direction,
content and guidance in the field
of Jewish education, Hadassah will
locus its attention on two pioneer-
ing endeavors. One of these, a new
and unique approach to Bible
.study, will be presented as a vital
part of the organization's program
in the coming year. The other is
to further Jewish education for
youth through a serious explora-
tion of an "action program" which
has brought Hadassah into consul-
tation with many leading educa-
tors.
"In our American Affairs De-
partment we are concerned with
the development of an informed
responsible core of good citizens,
and to that end have brought and
will continue to bring information
on disarmament, education prob-
lems, housing, and international
meetings," Mrs. Goodman explain-
ed.
"In this election year, every ef-
fort is being made to bring a con-
tinued flow of information on the
issues that will confront the elec-
torate. Hadassah will not endorse
any candidate but will continue its
policy of support of issues not per-
sons," according to Mrs. Jonas.
The morning of the Capsule Con-
with a Flair..,
THB
(Emville
Complete Catering Facilities
for that Special Party
served in an elegant fashion
williin a luxurious
setting that will
reflect your good l.i-te.
CONFIRMATIONS
RECEPTIONS
WEDDINGS
BANQUETS
MEETINGS
PARTIES
Tetea telf
or a gala
celebration
with 3.500J
Ruels.
iQL
BILL
^GOLDRING"1
CATtRINO \S^
MKIOi
Supervised
Koilur Catering
Available
6 UN 5-8511X
0NTH(0CIAN 6?th TO 69th STS:
MIAMI BEACH
MISS LILLIAN GOODMAN
ference will be devoted to special
"Know How" clinic workshops
where prescriptions will be given
for remedies and guaranteed cures
for Hadassah groups to gain good
health and organizational strength.
On "Membership," Mrs. Nathan
Barth will preside as coordinator.
Participants are Mrs. Arthur Ap-
plebaum, "Operation Shoe-leather*.
Mrs. Ellis Amdur, "W e 1 c o m e
Stranger;" and Mrs. Oscar Sindell,
"The Nest Egg."
On "Fund-Raising Clinic," Mrs.
Lillian Perlman will preside as
moderator. Featured are Mrs. Dor-
othy K. Fink, Mrs. Inez Krensky,
Mrs. Philip Thau, Mrs. Bernard
Berkley, Mrs. Nat Barth.
"Brainstorming Techniques" in-
cludes as participants Mrs. Joseph
Maze. Mrs. Jack Davis, Mrs. Mor-
ris Kogan.
"Donor Reward" discussion will
be by Mrs. Joseph Shapiro.
Presiding for the "Education Ses-
sion" is Mrs. Sanford Jacobson,
and for "Programming Clinic,"
Mrs. Jack Falk.
During the program of the after-
noon, the audience will be greet-
ed by Miss Gooaman followed by
summations of morning delibera-
tions by Mrs. Jones.
Highlight of the afternoon ses-
sion will be "The Great Debate."
Moderator will be Mrs. Dorothy
K. Fink, chapter's American Af-
fair chairman, who will present
lames Guilmartin, Republican,
:"ormer U.S. Attorney for South
Florida; and Earl Faircloth, can- Cfc0J||| WeiimOim Group
didate for State Senator and lead-
ing Democrat.
Mrs. Joseph Sugerman, treasur-
Chaim Weizmann group of Ha-
dassah will hold its annual m u-
er, Mrs. Harry Platoff, auditor, I bership ana re-enroilment party
and Mrs. Ira Krivizin, financial sec-1 Monday evening at the Miami Pio-
retaryTare-lh charge of tickets, fi- neer's Club, 250 NW No. River dr.
nances and reservations.
Mrs. Anne Melnick is arrange-
ment chairman. An estimated
audience of 500 women is expect-
ed.
Guest speaker will be Mrs. Morns
Lauretz, chapter membership
chairman. Refreshments will be
served by the group's member I up
chairman, Mrs. Rae Winkler.
Have that
Business Meeting,
nquet, or
Special Occasion
'Exodus1 Ball Shapes Up Here
#
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
It thi
For the third consecutive year,
the Israel Bond campaign will
close with a gala ball. This year's
function, the "Exodus" Diplomatic
Ball, is scheduled for Dec. 3 in
the grand ballroom of the Fontaine-
bleau hotel.
"Those who remember the suc-
cess and glamor of the previous
affairs can look forward to an even
more outstanding ball this year,
promise Samuel Oritt and J. A.
Cantor, general chairmen of the
bond drive. "We'll have a number
of special guests, including Holly-
wood stars and prominent figures
from around the nation and from
Israel."
Included on the list thus far are
Avraham Harmon, Israel Ambas-
sador to the United States; Shimon
Peres, Israel's Minister of Defense;
Aliza Gur, Miss Israel, who repre-
sented the nation in the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant recently.
Hon. James G. McDonald, first
United States Ambassador to Israel,
and now chairman of the Advisory
Council of the State of Israel Bond
drive, is serving as honorary chair-
man. The distinguished statesman
is a familiar figure to Greater Mi-
amians, who have welcomed him
to the city many times on behalf
of Israel Bonds.
The plush formal ball is expected
to attract a capacity guest list of
2.200. Attendance is limited to pur-
chasers of $1,000 bonds.
Reservations are $25 per couple,
and this sum includes two free
tickets to the pre-premiere of "Ex-
odus" on Dec. 20 at the Sheridan
Theater.
Taken from the novel by the
Ike Aronovitz, captain of the same name, "Exodus" is the film
c/k
crs

tor Inform all on i
HAZEL ALLISON
Catering Director.
JE 1-6061
th St. a Colllna Av*>.
famed ship "Exodus;" and lovely
CP Unit Will
Show Fashions
Miami Beach Women's Unit of
United Cerebral Palsy will hold its
annual membership lunch at the
Seville hotel on Tuesday noon.
Entertainment will include a
fur fashion show, for which a
quarter of a million dollars in
furs has been brought from New
York. Models will also show im-
ported Parisian halts by Lilly
Street.
Chairman for the afternoon is
Mrs. Albert Budlow. Co-chairman
is Mrs. William Levin.
Southgate Oneg Shabbat
Southgate group of Hadassah
will hold its first Oneg Shabbat on
Saturday, 2 p.m.. in the Recreation
Center of Southgate Towers, 910
West ave. Rabbi Henry Wernick
will review "G rest Ages and
Ideas of the Jewish People." Mrs.
Henry Schwartz, vice president in
charge of education, has prepared
the program.
CATERING
to banquets, parties, wed-
dings any social function
with superb cuisine, and serv-
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MAY WE MAN YOUR OCCASION?
Call: UN 6-8031
ARTHUR tE.'CHNER.
Executive Food Director
rfw Martinique-
Delmonlco HotW
Ob IIii Ocean at 64th St. Miami leach
version of Leon Uris' inspiring ac-
count of the birth of the State;
of Israel. It was filmed in color
entirely on location in Israel and
Cyprus.
The top cast includes such stars
as Paul Newman, Eva Marie
Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Peter Lawford,
Sal Mineo, and John Derek. Aliza
Gur is also in the film.
.
i
THE DIPLOMAT
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NellywMrf-by-ilw-Sva. flerUe
Information: Domenic


Pag* 6-B
*Jm is/> fhrkfktr
Friday. Otcober 21
I960
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra's Israeli' Music
By HARVEY W. LAURENCE
Whatia_ Israeli music? Is it
merely music written in Israel by
native Israeli composers or is
there something musically new
being born in Israel, a fusion of
the traditions of the East and
West?
It isn't likely that there'll he an
answer to this question fur some
years now, if ever. But at tout
American critics will have the op-
portunity of evaluating new evi-
dence on the subject when the Is-
rael Philharrr.or.ic Orchestra ar-
rive! in the United States for its
second American tour this fall.
For among the numbers to be
played on the American four by
conductors Carlo Maria Giulini
and Josef Krips will be two new
Israeli pieces: "Psalm," two sym-
phonic movements, by the youth-
ful Noam Sheriff, and "Capriccis"
for piano and orchestra, by the
rlc-an of Israel's composers, Paul
Ber-Haim.
The American tour of the Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra was
opened in New York City at the
Metropolitan Opera House on
Sunday evening. Oct. 16. Follow-
ing two other performances at
Carnegie Hall on Monday and
Tuesday. Oct. 17 and 18. the orch-
estra will visit 25 other American
communities playing over 30 con-
certs during the seven-week per-
iod.
The tour will take the orches-
tra to Canada for two perform-
ances in Toronto and Montreal,
and to Mexico City for three per-
formances. The tour of the Uni-
ted States and Canada will be
Jointly sponsored by the America-
Israel Cultural Foundation and
the J. M. Kaplan Fund. Inc.. with
S. Hurok as manager. The Mex-
ican appearance will be sponMjr-
ed by the Israel Foreign Office.
Mr. Sheriff, a sabra who was
bem in Tel Aviv in 1935, first
came to attention as a composer
mosphere of its own that may
well be called Israeli in spj/^."
Mr. Ben-Haim. better known in
the United Stales, was in this
country last year when Leonard
Bernstein and the New York Phil-
harmonic Orchestra gave the
American premiere oi his "Sweet
Psalmist cf Israel." This three-
movement symphonic work, with
harp and harpsichord solos, re-
ceived critical acclaim from
America's major critics.
Inspired by the story of King
David, Harold C. Schoenbere, the
New YoHc Times critic, said of
Mr. Ben-Haim that his "workman-
ship is secure, and he has a thor-
ough knowledge of the orchestra."
Other New York critics employed
such phrases as "generously mel-
odic," "plaintive melody," "ex-
otic vignettes of the Biblical Da-
vid," "imaginative and stimula-
ting," and "iridescent fantasy."
cago Symphony Orchestra r "
lini first conducted tht I'raelPhT
harmonic Orchestra in l96 '*
has made many appearance, j.
Israel since then, tht mo,t
cent being to oper
season this September.
IMOHii
The asseciat* conductor will k
Dr. Josef Krips, noted Vi.n.,!!
for rebuilding the musical 3|0ri
of the Vienna Staatiepgr,
Vienna Philharmonic, and tu
Hofmusikkappelle after th *.
vastation caused by World War l|
Gary Bertini, young Urseli con!
ductor, also will accompany th,
orchestra for the American tour.
Prior to coming to the United
States, the Israel P) harmonic
Orchestra will give two concefii
in Paris at the Palais de (.
on Oct. 10 and 11. Following the
American tour, the i rchestra will
return to Israel after spending
two weeks in Japan. India, and
other countries of the Far East.
The American tour will cele-
brate the beginning ol -.he 25th
anniversary year of the orchestra,
founded in 1936 by Broniilat
Huberman.
Paul Ben-Haim. Israeli composer on occasion of his visit to the
United States last year as part of cultural exchange program
of the America Israel Cultural Foundation, hears his "The
Sweet Psalmist of Israel" as played at its United States pre-
miere by Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic
Orchestra. Inspired by the King David story, the three-move-
ment symphony features harpischord and harp solos. Left to
right aie Samuel Rubin, president of the America Israel Cul-
tural Foundation; Sylvia Marlowe, who played the harpis-
chord solo; and Mr. Ben-Haim.
Mr. Ben-Haim. who was born in
Munich in 1897 as Paul Franken- ____________
burger, migrated to Israel in 1933.!
A graduate of the Munich Acad- IIP Wflmpn
emy of Music, he was celebrated ftWIiiwn
as both conductor and composer | Dlf>M rftlArtrnlina
before he fled Nazism. Ben-Haim's I
first large scale work was written
under the impact of his experi-
ence in Israel, after he came un-
der the influence of Oriental folk
songs.
B'nai B'rith Women cf Coral Gt
bles will hold' a candlelightmj
ceremony conducted by Dr Don-
ald Michelson, director of HilW
Foundation at the University of
Miami.
The ceremony will be part or i
"celebration brunch" Tuesday,
when his "Festival Prelude" was
chosen in 1957 as the only Israeli
number to be performed at the
opening concert in the Frederic
R. .Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv.
A child prodigy, Sheriff conduc-
ted the Israel radio orchestra
when he was eighteen. From
1953 to 1955. he was Deputy Con-
ductor of the Israel Army Orch-
estra, lie has since studied philos-
ophy at the Hebrew University.
The new Sheriff number has
been described by the Israel mu-
sic critic, Peter Gradenwitz, as
"brilliantly scored for orchestra,
and though never leaning on tra-
ditional material, breathes an at-
During his recent visit to the
United Slates. Mr. Ben-Haim was
a guest lecturer at the Institute of
Contemporary Arts in Washing-: 11:3n "> at the Algiers hotel,
ton, D.C.. a meeting of world lead-
ers in the field of cultural ex-
change.
Principal conductor and music
director for the American tour
will be Carlo Maria Giulini, world-
famous as the leader of the La
Scala Orchestra. Giulini's only
previous American appearances
were in 1956 and 1958 as guest
conductor for Fritz Reiner's Chi-
Chairman of the event is Mrs.
Sidney Falk, 5159 SW 5th ter. Ma
Barney Landers, 940 Sylvanu
blvd., is president.
Israel's Ambassador to Mexico holds a reception honoring
sociologists attending the 19th International Congress of Soci-
ology. Shown with Ambassador Mordechai Schneerson (left)
are Mrs. Mori Fremon, of Miami, her daughter, Morila Andrea,
attending the University of Mexico, Hector Solis Quiroga, sec-
retary general of the Congress, and Sra. de Quiroga.
Coral Way Sisterhood
Regular meeting of Sisterhood of
Coral Way Jewish Center was to
be held Thursday evening at the
Center. Featured was to be a skit,
"Dearie Do You Remember
Training Institute
Held Here
Douglas Gardens. Jewish Home
for the Aged of Greater Miami,
held its annual Orientation and
Training Institute for new Nation-
al Council of Jewish Women vol-
unteers in the Home's Junior Aux-
iliary Day Care Room on Monday,
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Maurice Pearlstein. executive di-ienson.
rector, welcomed prospective vol-'
unteers. A model for other volun-
teer training programs for service
in a Home for the Aged, Miami's
cooperative program with National
Council of Jewish Women is now |
in its sixth year.
Council members completing the
! Training Institute will be inter- I
; viewed personally by the Home's I
professional staff to determine how.]
'and where they can best serve the]
j residents. Upon assignment, they
J will join more than 40 Council col-1
unteers now on the job at the Home |
as group activity leaders, friendly i
visitors, and letter writers.
Mrs. Jean Rhyon, chairman of|i
Class Slated in Chain
De-
Miami Beach Recreation
partment announces a new course
starting Thursday, Oct. 27, at 3
p.m. Course will teach the playing;
of the Chalil, Israeli instrument
which is somewhat like the Record-!
er. or vertical flute, of the Great
Baroque period of Handel and
Bach. Instructor is Mrs. Eva Lev-
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Competitive b;dd!ng b-ngs tcp value.
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'' y0 W,TH
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When Sisterhood Was Young?" Co-1 Council's senior citiiens program,
ordinators are Mrs. Leo Weinstein. was chairman of the Institute,
program chairman, and Mrs. Jack Tribute was paid to retiring chair-
Raymond,
ident.
membership vice pres-
We are pleased to announce that
Raymond F. Barren
has been appointed regional manager
of our Miami Beach,
Coral Gables and Ft. Lauderdale Offices
HAYDEN, STONE & CO.
E.t.blith.d ia*2
MEMBERS NY. STOCK EXCHAMGE AND OTHER
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J17 7t.t Suet, MS *.. CireW, 104* fey**. Drive,
Miami Beach Co-.l Cablet Ft. Lauderdale
men Mrs. Mildred Spirer and Mrs.
Grace Tater, "for their distinguish-
ed service to the program."
Arthur Kalish, assistant director
of the Home, and Marvin Schrei-
ber, group work supervisor, con-
ducted Monday's Training Institute.
Members of the residents tour
committee, averaging 82 years in
age, guided prospective volun-
teers on a tour of the Home.
Interest and
Return of
Your Capital
Paid Monthly
YOUR MONEY IS SECURED
by 1st and 2nd Mortgages on Owner Occupied Homes
Do Business with One of the Oldest
and Largest Mortgage Companies
Licensed and Bonded
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ZL FR 9-2676
pleas* visit
our offices
phone
To Attend Board Meeting
Mrs. Carl Ettinger, 7125 Rue
Granville, Miami Beach, a member
of the board of directors of the
National Federation of Temple Sis
terhoods, will participate in the
annual meeting of the board in
New York City on Oct. 26 and 27.
Mrs Ettinger is chairman of the
committee on Jewish ceremonials
and arts in the department on re-
ligion and education at the Fed-
eration.
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Friday, Ctcober 21. I960
-Jewlsti rhriii tr
Page 7-B
MRS. lOStPH KRANTZ
ioneer Women's
Vograms Slated
Mrs. Ruth UI i dent of Pioneer Women's Tikvah
blub, announces a luncheon on
H'ednenlay noon, Oct. 25.
The affair is being hosted by
Ir. and Mr*. M. Seeman at their
kome, 1484 5W 17th ave., in hon
kr of the Bar Mitzvah of their
rnni(i-".:i. David Seeman, on Dec.
|4 in Washington, D.C.
Mrs. Milton Green, Council pres-
jent, v. ill be guest speaker. Pro-
eeds ere for the Child Rescue
fund. Entertainment and prizes
Ire pan of the afternoon's pro-
Iram.
| Golda Meir Club is holding its
ext regular meeting on Tuesday,
J3(i p.m., att Beth El Congrega-
[>n. Mrs, William Beckwith. pres-
ent, is in charge of the afternoon,
frich will be devoted to outlining
vines and programs for the
B>i)n. The social hour will he
feted by Mrs. Jack Caichom,
^spitality chairman.

Pioneer Women's Club One will
Id its annual installation on
urs:ay evening, Oct. 27 in the
yal Hungarian restaurant. Mrs.
ilton Green will install incoming
ficers and board of directors.
Mrs. Joseph Krantz has been un-
imou-Iy reelected for a third
rni of office as president.
Serving with Mrs. Krantz will
Mrs. Simon Wilensky and Mrs.
feck Javitz. vice presidents; Mrs.
Dukler, recording secretary;
rs. Rcse Lifshitz, corresponding
cretary; Mrs. Leah Notkin, finan-
al secretary; Mrs. Minnie Baw-
, treasurer.
Members of the board are Mrs.
enry S e i 11 i n and Mrs. Betty
hechter. Moetzet Hapaolot; Mrs.
ose Garber and Mrs. E. Yaffe,
ild rescue; Mrs. David Freed-
an, cultural; Mrs. Pearl Rosen-
han, sunshine; Mrs. L. Yelson and
Irs. Masha Goldfarb, publicity.
Bebe Idelson Club installation
Rill take place on Thursday, Nov.
J. in the Washington Federal Sav-
ngs and Loan Assn. on Normandy
sle. Incoming officers are presi-
lent, "rs Isaac Offenhenden;
nee president, Mrs. Charles Lang;
reasurer. Mrs. Sarah Babries; fi-
ancial and recording secretary,
Mrs. Fannie Levinee; correspond-
ing secretary, Mrj. Meyer Siegel.
Annual Halloween Dance
Annual Halloween dance of the
Temple Beth Am Sisterhood will
have music and entertainment by I
Johnny Masters and his orchestra,!
when it takes place Oct. 29. Har-i
riet Segal, dance committee chair-!
man, said the affair will include
a costume parade.
Belie Earth to Sing
Regular monthly meeting of the
Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid,
will be held on Wednesday eve-
ning, Oct. 26, in Sklar Auditorium.
Belle Barth, renowned entertainer,
will present a program of "Songs
our Mothers Taught Us." Mrs.
Louis Cohen is president.
A KAY-MOSS
^tas\cWs\w "Vtome
is the kind of a home
in the kind of a
neighborhood that
a mother would want.. *
for her son!
"1

^"H
OAK PARQUET FLOORS
CENTRAL HEATING
CENTRAL AIR-CONDITIONING
OVERSIZED GARAGES
3 & 4 BEDROOM HOMES
21,49522,995
INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE
NOW ON I
SAVE M.OOO.
FIRST p*r*on who pUcet a deposit aaah day *a bow
Wetlhw Home Will fed Hjm Mw-lW froot lb.
KHJll COM of U>* bWM.
NO DOWN PAYMENT... IF YOU WISH.
another KAY and MOSS presentation at
CORAL WAY AND SOUTHWEST 84th AVE.
Cioo by Coral Way Jowlah Ctnltr, Wotch*t*r Shopping Plaxa, Pood Pair Koeher Moat Market.
LISTEN TO THIS:
Colonials, Moderns, Cape Coda, 8 ww "* just one, and range Extra large garages a "htrtA drive-
and English Country-side exterior a Step-ap bedroom wings .Decorator-, ways* Individually styled lamp post*.
elevations, all on lushly landscaped designed kitchen cabinets # Schools 'surround' WeMcnestcr
olid sodded lots with a concre Acoustical tile in all Florida p.,mello e^^*- 2 minutc. ,wav.
louvered fence at the rear of eveiy *'1 hardware
back yard. Awning windows Garbage disposals* Bedrooms with
Flower boxes Lanai's Loggia's ^ vawhs Kitchens with pantries
*


Page 8-B
+Jewish fleridfon
Friday, Otcober 21, iggj
Mrs. Grossman
Elected President
South Florida Assn. on Childrer
Under Six has elected Mrs. Ethel
Grossman, president, to head itf
membership, which consists o!
teachers and other professional per
sonnel handling programs for chil
'dren under public school age in
South Florida.
Mrs. Grossman is supervisor of
I the early childhood development
program, which serves some 200
children in the four Branches of the
Greater Miami Jewish Commun
A TRIBUTE TO MY MOTHER ity Center.
On Saturday, my mother. Jeanne Rothschild, will be eighty years Dr. Laura Cushman & CM*
old or shall I say "young. Of those eighty years, she has lived 31 of J" P"vte School.of M. ha*
them With my husband and me. As a mother, she has been wonderful, been electedI to serve ujtaJW*
instilling in my brother, Bill, and me the lunda- 'dent; Mr.. Robert E Sisak. senior
mentals for living a good life. As a person, she is teacher, M.m. Spring, Bapt.s,
delightful, fun to be with, kind, sympath-c. under- School. ,cor,"^d^g he^rfe^n;
standing and unselfish. Saturday from 3 tc,6 p.rrjj J^ ^ sTot Community
we are having open house at our home, 51 N. Shore V" ,. center 2 record
dr. We win be happy to greet all of our friends on ^J^^X^vL
Gates. Florida District Welfare
Board 9. treasurer.
MKS. ROTHSCHILD
this very, very joyous day.
* *
PARTIES, PARTIES, PARTIES .
Three hostesses. Mrs. Dan Wax. Mrs. Marshal
Breakstone and Mrs. Bernard Harris, entertained at
Mrs. Harris' Sunset Island home in honor of Mrs.
Stanley Kahan. who is moving to New York. Twenty-
five- of the guest of honor's closest irtends were invited for brunch. They
gave her a lovely charm, a gold heart with her initials on the front, and
all ,f their names on the back. I would like to see it; I can't figure out
how room was tound for all the names. Afterwards they all sat around
nd talked and talked .
Another brunch, in fact two of them, were given by Mrs. Seymour
Somentein and Mrs. Sandford Kramer at Mrs. Somerstein's Bay Heights
home. The guests all came in casual clothes shorts to you so that
th. j would be comfortable for a long canasta session after the last
lllinti had been eaten.
* *
WOMAN OF THE WEEK
Wedgewood china isn't always blue. When Gladys (Mrs. Sol) Cohen
first married and shopping lor a new home, she found a piece of
green wedgewood. Since neither she nor Sol had even seen anything
like it betore. they both became enthusiastic, and
started to search for odd colored pieces made before
the 20th century.
Now they have quite a collection. They have
built a special wall in their house to show off their
collection to the best advantage. Several museum
ptecei are included, among which are two of agate
wan' made in 1830 by the first Wedgewood Company.
Not many people know about Gladys' hobby.
They only think of her as being intensely interested
and vitally instrumental in the Braille program of
National Council of Jewish Women and Temple Israel
Sisterhood. Presently, she is on the board of the
r-. Mttl Braille Club, and has organized the Florida Braille Committee.
Mo matter how I kept asking her questions about the Wedgewood of
v. i li I frankly know nothing Gladys would bring the subject back
to Braille
During the time Sol was in the service. Gladys worked with the
ReU Cross in a coal mining town.
One gloomy day. she went to a dingy home where a beautiful blonde
youngster was sitting on the steps. The father kicked the boy out of
the way. saying. "He's no good; he's blind."
And thai started Gladys on her way a little blind youngster treat-
ed : shameiuly by his own father.
* *
OVER THE BOUNDING MAIN
All quiet on the Dr. David Brezin home front on San Marino dr.
'1 ve had a very quiet summer because of David's twisted knee.
1 ever, they have done a lot of sailing, with the doctor in charge ol
leering and Marcia and the boys. Alan Mark and Ben. doing all of
the running around .
When Robert Rubin went to Harvard. I wrote a very nice story
: how his folks. Alex and Sylvia, were going to watch the mailman
for letters. Well, he went to Harvard all right, but he was only there
days didn't even get his trunk out of the railroad station. He
( home for a family farewell dinner and Hew off to London to go
: University of London School of Ecnomics, International Studies.
But his family will still watch for the mail ..
From up Boston way. Mickey (Mrs. Benjamin B.) Rosenberg writes,
"Ben is back in the office again after a rough seige. Fall, with all its
GLADYS
Shoshana Women
To See Film
On Tuesday evening. Shoshana
chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will
hold its monthly meeting at Dade
Heights Jewish Community Center.
Featured will be a film sponsored
by the South Florida State Hospital
committee of the chapter. The film,
entitled "Who's Right?", concerns
a family's marital adjustments.
The meeting is open to the pub
lie. Mrs. Irving Finn is program
vice president.
First Meeting of Year
Sisterhood of Agudath Israel He-
brew Institute held its first meet-
Pleased at the response to the dinner which will dedicate the
new 5300,000 Community Center just completed by Temple
Menorah are (left to right) Mrs. Sam Belslcy, chairman ol the
Women's executive committee; Mrs. Al Mechlowitz, president
of Temple Menorah Sisterhood; and Mrs. Fannie Bridge, co-
chairman for. the dedication dinner. Plans for the Nov. 6 func-
tion include dining, dancing to the music of Arnie Barnett and
his orchestra, and entertainment by Patsy Abbott, comedienne.
Beach 'Y' Lists Special Program
Miami Beach YMHA, a branch
of the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, has a special five-
day a week program for boys and
girls in the first and second grades
only. The special after-school pro-
gram has been designed primarily | d~y a special Oneg Shabbat pro-
for working mothers who need gram js planned, and all Jewish
supervised activities for their chil -und national holidays are also
are no playmates in their neigh
oorhood.
Children are picked up at their
schools at 2 p.m., and brought to
the "Y," where they engage in
crafts, dramatics, athletics, danc-
ing, singing and games. Each Fri-
ng of the new year on Tuesday j dren from 2 to 4 p.m. The program celebrated. At the end of the day,
evening.
also services children where there
children are transported to their
homes.
As a special feature on public
school holidays, the children
spend a full day at the "Y," wheie
trips are arranged.
Leaders of the community who are working to help expand
local activities of youth services of B'nai B'rith Foundation of
the U.S. are (left to right) Mr. and Mrs. Burnett Roth and Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Revitz. At a reception in the Star Island
home of the Roths, they are shown discussing the possibilities
of raising additional funds for local and national Hillel Founda-
tions and BBYO activities. Roth is a trustee of the Foundation
and Revitz is president of the B'nai B'rith Foundation of the
U.S. for Florida.
beauty of color has crept up on us. I can't help but: welkstocked with chemicalSi since Florence makes most o{ ner ow
shiver at the thought that winter is just around the _. .. ,.,. "w"
glazes. She finds it diffifcult to part with her own work, and keeps the
pieces she likes best for herself. For the second year, she has been
elected president of the Ceramic League of Miami. This vocation is
quite a switch for a person who was an excellent athlete in college, an
inter-collegiate swimmer and diver, and who also holds a Master's de-
gree in social welfare.
MICKEY
corner. A combination of Miami and Boston would
be wonderful" .

CHOP CHOP
Had the most fun last week. Saved Five dollars
worth of dimes and went to a kosher Chinese lunch-
eon. It was at Temple Ner Tamid. The president
of Sisterhood, Goldie (Mrs. Louis) Cohen, is our land-
lord. Mrs. Eugene Schwartz, in black and red pa-
jamas, and Mis. Henrietta Fine in a kimona and fan.
were at the door. The Chinese food was really good.
Th. v gave cute little animal favors. For some reason, mine was a
and white skunk.
The Honorable Sisters, done up in what looked like black mops for
hair, decided that in order to make money for their Temple they would
have a Maj Jongg party and Jewish luncheon.
Ming Toy Moskowitz assured her Honorable Sisters that they
wouldn't be hungry in two hours after that kind of a luncheon. Mrs.
Jom ph Feldman, who wrote and directed the skit, "A Sisterhood Meet
in- in China," was quite original, but I have a feeling that spies were
thire and that many other organization meetings in China are now
in the offing.
* *
A CRAZE FOR GLAZE
Women talk about their electric kitchens and not very enthusi-
astically during hurricane weather. But Florence Comanor talks about
her electric workshop. She has fixed up her garage as a ceramic
w< kshop. and spends all of her free time there. She has an electric
kiln and an electric wheel, where she "throws a pot." The studio is
Birthday Parties
Slated Sunday
The monthly birthday parties
program sponsored by the Great
er Miami Women's Auxiliary, Jew-
ish Home for the Aged, will hold
its first party of the new year Sun-
day, 2 p.m.. at Douglas Gar-ens
Mrs. Sol Silverman. auxiliary
president, will welcome guests,
and all honorees whose birthdays
occurred during the months of
September and October, auxiliary
member! and Home residents
alike will be feted.
Mrs. Louis ktakovsky is program
chairman. James W. Rowe, basa
baritone, will perform. Mrs. L*
lian Nelson will present a program
of folk songs and accompany her-
self at the piano.
.Monthly parties are made possi-
ble by the contributions of Auxili-
ary members to the Sadie Knegel
Birthday Club.
BAR MITZVAH
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'a


Friday. Otcober 21, I960
*Jewls> Her Miar
Page 9-B
tUITH the new fall collections
" beginning to arrive in many
of our shops, we thought it would
be interesting to note what New
York fashion authorities have to
say about some of the well known
designers.
The pretty American, and the
places she travels to, have chart-
ed the course for Luis Esteves in
his fall and holiday 1960 collec-
tion. He calls his "Europa," and
names each costume .for a land-
mark of history or a goal of the
de luxe travelling across the con-
tinent of Europe from London to
Athens.
"If I had to pick one word that
would best describe this collec-
tion, it would be 'side-cut,' says
Luis Esteves. "Most of the dress-
es are side-draped, side-slashed,
slanted or side tucked.
'It is a stark, uncluttered, so-
phisticated collection, in many in-
stances almost severe. The rule
is slimness, and a cut that skims
over the body in an unbroken line.
There is also the opposite type,
which I call the Space Silhouette,
cut on the round, a new kind of
subtlety which is sexy but not
slinky and as stark as the geo-
detic dome in architecture."
The universal rage for provo-
cative, picturesque necklines is
so linked with Estevcz's name
I hat it is only normal for fall,
1960 to report them as a ma-
jor fashion trend.

THE quiet elegante, with the
' ta>te and discrimination to
look different without looking
bizarre or froufrou, is what Paul-
ine Trigere admittedly kept in
mind in designing her fall, 1960
collection. Termed by numerous
fashion reporters the best in her
career, it sidesteps revolutionary
Klittrr in favor of pure Trigere
line, the sure, low-keyed color
sense for which she is noted, and
a free, dramatic movement
Irom the toss of a long scarf col-
lar, (he ripple of her new Tre-
mole hemline and the sweep of
her full, full coats.
Free movement is certainly the
keynote of the collection. Every
costume has fullness somewhere:
sometimes merely the soft ex-
pansion of a sleeve or the un-
ob8truaiva widening of a slim
skirt into a godeted flare. But it
is apt to be a swirl of beautiful
fabric in a low-placed skirt, or
Pauline's re-definition of the Bal-
macaan as a capelet flowing into
the deeply rounded armhole of
a coat or jacket. The fluid slim
dresses derive their shape from
From the Mam'selle "La Vie
Parisienne" collection for fall
of 1960, designed by Betty
Carol, a costume in cognac,
black and white plaid. The
jacket shapes up into the tall,
rounded "kiosk" silhouette,
covering a one-piece dress
whose slim plaid skirt con-
trasts brightly with its sweater-
shaped, black worsted wool
top.
a new Flick Tuck which is set at,
strategic spots where a touch of
fullness is needed.
The essence of fashion excite-
ment is what Larry Aldrich calls1
the desire to acquire. Without1
this essential ingredient, ideas
and excitement are doomed to
-misfire like damp rockets.
Known for his firm encourage-
ment of the new and different sil-
houettes as opposed to the static
and "safe." Larry AMrich, and
his designer. Marie McCarthy,
make sure that each Aldrich col-
lection is a mutation between a
fresh viewpoint and the feminine
appeal which prompt an irresis-
tible desire to acquire.

ISN'T it romantic?" is an apt de-
scription of almost everyone
of the soft, high, subtly colored
and unfailingly beautifying hats
in Lilly Dache's collection for
fall. I960
There is not a hard, difficult,
or ruthlessly chic chapeau to be
seen. Even the deepest hats are
cut back off the forehead to let
some of the hair show, and most
are high enough at the sides to
let a curve of hair extend onto
the cheek.
Even suit hats are made in
gleaming satin, feathers, or me-
lusine (downy felt). There are
many fur hats, of mink, Alaska
seal, and beaver.
For evening, high puffy tur-
bans and net glinting with tiny
jewels, the swirls of glycerined
feathers, or giant maline flow-
ers make it obvious that the eve-
ning costume, already certain as
a major trend, will unfailingly
include its evening hat or head-
dress.
As Lilly Dache says, "It is go-
ing to be a great hat year."
All the new Dache coiffures
leave the back of the neck bare,
with an upswept effect which
adds to the swan-necked appear-
ance so fundamental to the new
fashion picture.
The key word in hair fashion is
"uncurled." The hair must lie in
shining waves without a hint of;
a set, ringlets, or teasing.
All in all, it promises to be a
most interesting fashion wise
season, with each designer af-
firming his own personal feel-
ings, not copying a fashion trend.
Since our New York sisters are
already buying their fall clothes,1
it will be interesting to note which |
of the lines follow the same line
of popularity here in Miami.

John Kerr and Anne Francis in "Girl of the Night," from the best-
seller. "Call Girl," now at the Carib, Miami, Miracle and 163rd
Street Theatres.
Beach PTA's Slate Workshop
The Parent Teachers Assn. in |
the Miami Beach area will hold
a four-hour "Legislation Work-:
shop" on Friday, Oct. 28. at the
Venetian Isle motel, from 10 a.m.:
until 2 p.m.
Mrs. Maurice Serotta, past pres!
ident of the North Beach Elemen-1
tary School and past president or
the Miami Beach League of Wom-j
B Voters, is coordinating the pro-!
gram for this workshop.
Since there are government is-'
sues on every level in connection
with the current elections, five ele-
ments are proposed for the work-
shop.
Also to be discussed will be the
proposed action platform of the
Florida Congress of Parents and
Teachers to be presented at the
state PTA. convention in Tampa
m Nov. 15 to 17.
There will be a panel discussing
the national party platform issue
nertaining to education. The four
panel members will be Miss Mir-
iam Rogers, representing the Dem-
ocratic Party; Mr. Leland Hyzer,
the Republican Party; and Mrs.
Morris Burk and Mrs. Milton Fel-
ler, two members of the PTA.
Other issues to be discussed will
be the ballot, the Miami Beach
city charter, and the State Consti-
tutional amendments.
Candidates for the school board,
as well as county commission post
from the City of Miami Beach, will
be guest speakers.
Summary of current events in
the United Nations will be discuss-
ed by Mrs. Harold Rand, legisla-
tion chairman of the Ida M. Fish-
er Junior High School.
ENLARGEMENT OF YOUR
FAVORITE NEGATIVE only $1
(B & W) to 8x10 Mounted.
PROFESSIONALLY FINISHED.
Mail or Bring to
LIPSON LAB., 163 Aragon Ave.
Coral Gables, H.I 5-3434
ATTENTION MOTHERS!
WEEK-END ACTIVITIES
for your Sons Ages 7 to 13
BILL POLLACK
or THE
WASHINGTON SENATORS
Hat openings for hit
MIAWI SENATORS YOUTH GROUP
For Furthor Information
Call FR 4-3790 or UN 5-8921
Free-Trial Day Upon
D'esentafion of this Ad.
North Dade Women
North Dade chapter of B"nai
B'rith Women will hold its next
inciting at Congregation Yehu..ah
Moshe on Tuesday evening. Guest
will be Charlotte Leibel, handwrit-
ing analyst. Mrs. Ralph Abram-
son is program chairman. The
chapter will hold a card and Man
Jongg party at Arthur Maisel's,
183rd st. and Collins ave., on
Wednesday evening. Nov. 2. In
charge of reservations are Mrs.
Stanley Gunsher and Mrs. Bert
Simon.
Oneg Shabbat Scheduled
Oneg Shabbat will be held Sat-
urday. Oct. 29, 1 p.m., at the home
of Mrs. Ben Zeigmund. 4320 Jef-
ferson ave. Honored will be life
members of the Herzl group of
Hadassah. Mrs. Jack Davis will
be guest speaker. Mrs. Kenneth
Sokolsky is life membership chair-
man.
CORAL GABLES
CONVALESCENT HOME
DAY CARE AVAILABLE
"A Friendly and Gentle Atmosphere
For Thox Tou Loir"
24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING SERVICE
SRfciAi diets Observed
AU ROOMS ON OROUND FLOOR
PRIVATE RATHROOMS
AIR CONDITIONED SWIMMING POOL
SPACIOUS OROUNDS SCREENED PATIO
Ferdinand H. Rosenthal, Director-Owner
r Aeat. plr. Ml Sinai Ho.sp., Cleveland A
FewtM Hlme for Aged. Plttaliurch
7060 S.W. 8rh ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA
CA 6-1363
Mrs. Gladwin
On Committee
At the annual meeting of the;
Southeastern regional conference
of Women in Chambers of Com-
merce, Mrs. Rhea Cashman Glad-
win, delegate representing the
Women's Division of the Chamber
of Commerce of Surfside. Bal Har-
bour and Bay Harbor Islands, was
elected to the executive committee
of the board representing the State
of Florida.
The conference was held at the
Diplomat hotel over the weekend,
and was attended by 100 members
representing Alabama, Arkansas,
Georgia, Louisiana, North Caro-
lina. South Carolina, Ohio and Vir-
ginia.
Also in attendance from Surf-
side, Bay Harbor and Bal Harbor
as delegates were president Beu-
lah Butler, executive vice presi-
dent Lucy Altman, vice president
Gladys Israel, and Freda Levice
and Mavis Harris.
Mrs. Gladwin was founder of;
the division, the first president.
and now is president of the Surf-
Bal-Bay Library Assn.
PARIS CONSERVATORY
METHOD
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with PIERRE MANDE
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Attendance accepted by Dade" County
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Near Biscayne Blvd.
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Women Take
Picture Trip1
A United Nations Month meet-
ing of Temple Menorah Sisterhood
featured a "trip" through Israel
on Wednesday.
The "trip" was in the form of
pictures taken by Rabbi and Mrs.
Mayer Abramowitz on their recent
trip to Israel.
Mrs. Elayne Kaplan was pro-
gram chairman. Sisterhood presi-
dent is Mrs. Al Mechlowitz.
MR. KENNEY'S
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Miami Beach


*Jewlsti fk>ridN&n
Friday. Otcober 21. ig6Q
Ladies of Temple Beth Sholom gather for a
planning session of the congregation's annual
Israel Bond dinner Oct. 30 at the Americana
hotel, which this year will honor their spiritual
leader, Rabbi Leon Kronish. Seated (left to
right) are Mesdames Tessie Litt, Ralph Spero,
Inez Krensky, dinner chairman, Max Weitz,

Sam Schwartz, chairman of the Ben Cohen testimonial dinner
scheduled for Sunday evening crt the Eden Roc hotel, checks
reservations with Murray Goodman and Sue Berkowitz, mem-
bers of the honorary committee. According to Schwartz, more
than 300 reservations have b%an received by the committee.
Louis Shapiro, Florence Nadler, co-chairman,
and Harvey Kramer, president of the Temple
Beth Sholom Sisterhood. Standing (left to right)
are Mesdames Samuel Hirsch, Louis Snetman.
Samuel Meiselman, Harold Granoff, Irving
Westin, Harry Wolk, Julius Shapiro, Lillian
Edell, Joseph Shawmut and Ben Sabin.
Cohen Testimonial
Anticipates 400
More than 400 persons are ex-
pected to attend the Ben Cohen
testimonial dinner at the Eden Roc
hotel on Sunday evening. Sam
Swartz, chairman and Charles
Fruchtman, co chairman, jointly
announced this week.
The dinner is being tendered by
the officers and directors of the
Hebrew Academy in tribute to the
legal services Cohen rendered
gratuitously to obtain a site to
build a new school.
The site it at 24th ft. and Pin*
Tree dr., north of the Fire Sta-
tion. B. I. Binder, president, will
announce the date of ground-
breaking ceremonies, which will
officially launch the Academy's
building campaign. The project-
ed building program calls for
the construction of a full ele-
mentary and junior high depart-
20th Season
For Opera Guild
The 20th anniversary seasdlf of
the Opera Guild of Miami is on
its way. The parties are beginning,
* ind wiU^eceelerate in frequency as
the two exciting operas near their
j npening nights.
The two operas this year are
"Andrea Chenier." starring Renata
Tebaldi in her first Miami appear-
ance in January, nnd 'Martha,'"
in English, starring Roberta Peters,
slated for February.
Dr. and Mrs. Arturo di Filippi
are sparking the 20th anniversary
season by having cocktails and a
buffet in their home on Saturday.
Oct. 29. at 7 p.m.
Some 60 people have been in-
vited to the di Filippi home at 625
SW 2th rd. Among them are Mr.
and Mrs. R. C. Fullerton, Mr. and
Mrs. Willam H. Carmichael. Mr.
and Mrs. Henry D. Green. Mr. and
Mrs. Leland Hyzer, Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Landfield, Mr. and Mrs.
Nat Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Mil-
ler, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Neale.
Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Pelton. and
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Weintraub.
Also Dr. and Mrs. Leonard H.
Jacobson, Mr. and Mrs. George
Brumlik. Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M.
Greene, Mr. and Mrs. David Hoch-
berg. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lapidus.
Mr. and Mrs. Ritter Levinson, and
Mr. and Mrs. Hank Meyer.
UN Anniversary CoJtbrofeti
Fifteenth anniversary of tnp
United Nations was to be celebrat
ed at Ada Merritt Junior Hith
School on Thursday evening r
ben Blumstein. sponsor of SUiient
Council, has organized and pro-
duced the affair. Cuncert was to
inrtflcre slTftgs by MnrHRose Rosgr.
mond.
Demonstration Scheduled
Greater Miami chapter of the
National Kidney Disease Founda-
tion will hold a general meeting
at the home of Mrs. Sam Seitlin
1819 SW 23rd st.. on Monday at
11 a.m. Eugene Rawls will glve
a demonstration and lecture on
Yogi.
BUY LIVE POULTRY
KOSHER KILLtO
mm (stcwws) 25 ib.
ROASTERS-Broilers 33Mb.
PUUITS.....4* lb.
CAPONS-TURKEYS Srib.
BttMAH crates the 0NIT UVt
POULTRY MARKET en the Beach.
C MMUO.
&
Uk\
WORE PEOPLE UftC
refreshing, calone-tree
Suoarirw
Li. t*
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SWmtH THAN SUGAR
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Itcommtndvd by ooctWs lor
I tllllll. WMjfm Mkal
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tnmxt. <*Mmt furs eefli
pt*Wy hmlMi U. -tfc
AT POOD STORM IVCftTWMMC

Beth Torah Now
In New Quarters
Beth Torah Congregation is now
occupying its new synagogue and
school at 1051 No. Miami Beach
bkd. A total of 630 member fam-
ilies are affiliated with the congre-
gation.
Included in its programs are a
nursery, Hebrew, and Sunday
school, with a registration of over
700 pupils.
Abraham J. Gittelson is now in
his third year as education direc-
tor at Beth Torah. Mrs. Rebecca
Kay heads the nursery school and
kindergarten.
Hurricane Victims Benefit
A one act opera, "Gallantry." by
Douglas Moore, will be presented
by the University of Miami Opera
Workshop in cooperation with the
Opera Guild of Miami on Saturday
evening at Bowman Hall on the
U of M campus. Proceeds are lor
the benefit of the victims of Hur-
ricane Donna.
SWochet en premises 'oily, sloeghter-
ti under strict ratMnkal saaervisien.
MR MAC* DtUVUr
320 Collins Ave. JE 8-1139
fEivro
IN A OUSS
Ot A CU
Melvin Safra. a sixth grade stu-
dent, will speak on "What the
Academy Means to Me." Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, principal, will
introduce the guest of honor.
Greetings on behalf of the City of
Miami Beach will be presented by
Mayor D. Lee Powell.
Entertainment and music will
be provided by Mai Malkin and his
orchestra.
Unmatched
For Delicious Flavor!
Floral Fashion Show
Miami chapter of the American
Jewish Congress will have a floral
fashion show and card party on
Tuesday noon at the Shore Club
hotel. Featured will be Elton L.
Edelman, of the Floral Shop of
Miami.
STEVENS
MARKETS
TETLEY TEA
A TRADITION
IN JEWISH
HOMES
SINCE 1837
Yes. there i Yom Tot spirit in
rhu fine tea...'flavor crushed"
for fullest strength tod stimu.
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refreshment...
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under ttrict Rabbinical Supervision
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roofGlte


Friday. Otcober 21. 1960
+JtniUrksKUu7
Page 11-B
Priceless Bar Kochba Relic
Uncovered by Yadin Group
Newly-installed officers of the Golden Age
Friendship Club of Miami YMHA are (left
to right) Mrs. Lester Crozier, corresponding sec-
retary; Mrs. Herman Fisher, financial secretary;
Lester Crozier, treasurer; Mrs. Eva Brown, first
vice president; Hyman Kam, president; Jack
Raichick, second vice president; Mrs. Bessie
Yonkelowitz, recording secretary; Mrs. Frieda
Grecke, social secretary. These officers were
recently installed by Efriam H. Gale, executive
director of the Greater Miami Jewish Commun-
ity Center.
NCCJ Issues Statement of Principle"
For Religious Issue in Current Campaign
JERUSALEM pression depicting a man fighting
a lion, which may have been the
seal of Bar Kochba. was found by
the archaeological expedition which
last winter discovered in a Dead
Sea cave the archives of the Jewish
freedom fighter, who led the rebel-
lion against the Romans in the
second century C.E., it was re-
ported here this week by Prof, j
Yigael Yadin, who was in charge
of the expedition.
Prof, Yadin made the disclosure j
in an address at th" closing session
of the annual conference of the j
Israel Exploration Society.
Prof. Yadin, who was formerly i
Chief of Staff of the Israel Arm- j
ed Forces, told the conference
that the impression was found
on a clay fragment which be-
came detached from a bundle of
letters sent by Bar Kochba. An
enlarged photograph of the frag-
ment disclosed the seal.
stand against the Romans. Prof.
Yadin indicated that he would par-
ticipate in the new expedition.
It was also announced at the
conference that Dr. Avraham
Biran, former Israel Consul Gen-
eral in Los Angeles and now head
of the Foreign Ministry's Armis-
tice Affairs Division, would be
appointed as the new director of
the Government Department of
Antiquities.
Prof. H. Susuki. of Tokyo Uni-
versity, who participated in the
conference, indicated that his uni-
versity would seek to take part in
forthcoming explorations in the Ju-
dean desert.
Board of governors or the Flor
ida region, National Conference of
Christians and Jews, has issued a
"Statement of Principle" with ref-
erence to the religious issues in
current political campaigns.
Composed of Protestants, Cath-
olics and Jews, the organization
has listed "those principles which
should govern our conduct as
Americans who intend to be faith-
ful to their religious convictions
and to their sacred heritage as
members of a free society."
The statement is similar to
one issued nationally by a com-
mittee of 100 religious leaders,
including ranking members of
the various faiths. Among them
are 51 Protestant*, 29 Roman
Catholics, one Greek Orthodox
archbishop, and 15 Jews.
The Florida action also follows
upon statements made by the Rev.
Dr. Edwin T. Dahlberg, president
Winner of the Dade Civic
Eallet Scholarship in the ad-
vanced second grade division
is Heather Sokuvitz. She is
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
David Sokuvitz, 1131 NE 153rd
ter.. No. Miami Beach. Heather
competed with other Dade
county ballet students in an
open audition for one of three
scholarships awarded annual-
ly by the Dade Civic Eallet
Auxiliary, a non-profit organ-
ization for the promotion of
classic ballet. Frieda J. Ras-
Eel is artistic director.
Women Schedule
Coffee Confabs
Early childhood development
program of the North County
YMHA Branch has scheduled six
toffee conferences for the month
of October, at which mothers and
teachers discuss their children's
programs and progress.
On Oct. 11, the mothers of Mrs.
Francis Heilig's group met at the
home of room mother Mrs. Val
Bloch.
On Oct. 12, Mrs. Aaron Gold,
room mother, entertained mothers
of Mrs. Eugene Marshall's group.
Last Monday, Mrs. Philip Kram-
er met with the mothers of her
mother Mrs. Stanley L. Cohen.
Mrs. Seth Levene was to meet
with her mothers on Thursday
morning at the home of Mrs. Ed-
mund Cava.
Mrs. Sol Wax, room mother of
Mrs. Bernard Baron's group, will
entertain her group of mothers on
Oct. 28.
Mrs. Charles Cole will meet with
mothers on Oct. 27 at the home
of Mrs. Frank Hackmyer.
Seminary Opens
Beach Office
Dr. Louis Finkelstein, chancellor
of the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America, this week an-
nounce:! that Greater Miami of-
Bees lit the Seminary will be open-|
ed on Nov. 1 at 1073 95th St.. Bay j
Harbor Island, "to give greater
spiritual and cultural service to
that area's ever-expanding and
deserving community of Conserva-
tive Jews."
Dr. Finkelstein pointed out that
interest in the multi-faceted pro-
gram of the Seminary- has deepen-
ed among members of Greater Mi-
ami's growing Conservative con-
gregations. "Increasing requests
for one kind of service or another
make it clear to Seminary admin-
istrators that on-the-spot repre-
sentation has become necessary on
a year-round basis," Dr. Finkel-
stein explained.
Samuel Friedland, national vice
chairman of the Seminary, and
sponsor of the Samuel Friedland
Lecture Series of that institution,
has long been closely associated
with its work. The lecture series
was inaugurated in Miami Beach
last February, when the Seminary
conferred an honorary degree on
former President Harry S. Tru-
man. The second in the series will
be delivered in Miami Beach at
a convocation planned for next
February.
Among the many Bay Harbor Is-
land residents who have given
service and support to the Semi-
nary are Louis Berry. Irwin Cohn,
Ben J. Massell and Samuel J. Gold-
farb, who earlier this year was
presented the Seminary's coveted
Eternal Light Award.
Open House Party
Open house party was to be held
for boys and girls at the North
County" YMHA, 14036 NE 6th ave.,
on Thursday at 7 p.m.
of the National Council of Churches
of Christ in the U.S.A.; Richard
Cushing, Archbishop of Boston;
and Rabbi Max D. Davidson, pres-
ident of the Synagogue Council of
America.
At the same time, the co-chair-
men announced that a public meet-
ing, sponsored by the National
Conference of Christians and Jews,
will be held on Friday noon.
The panel will discuss tne topic:
"Religious Freedom in Politics
for a Fair Campaign."
The principles, live in number,
include the following:
1. The Federal Constitution
lays upon all of us the respon-
sibility to insure that "no re-
ligious test shall ever be requir-
ed as a qualification to any of-
fice or public trust under the
United States." No candidate for
office should be opposed or sup-
ported only because of his par-
ticular religious affiliation.
2. Religious liberty is basic to all
our liberties so that religious and
civil liberties are interdependent
and indivisible. Religious bgiotry
is also indivisible. Like the plague,
it can spread from group to group.
3. The exclusion of members of
any family of faith from public of-
fice on the basis of religious uflil
iation violates the fundamental
conditions of a free people.
4. The religious iauh of a public-
oil icer is relevant to the conduct
of his office as part of the totality
of his outlook. The bearing of the
religious views of any candidate
of any party upon his decisions in
public office is a public matter. In-
quiry regarding this relevancy is
an exercise of responsible citizen-
ship, if conducted in such a way
as not to violate the constitutional
prohibition against any religious
test for public office.
5. A candidate's faith and Ms
affirmations of it, as they bear
upon his conduct in public office,
should be viewed in their best
light, rather than their worst. We
must all strive to encourage every
official to attain the highest spiri-
tual and moral realization to which
his own faith can inspire.
Women's Chapter Meets
Broward-North Dade chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women was to meet
Thursday evening at Temple Beth
Sholom. 1725 Monroe st., Holly-
wood. Mrs. Alvin Wank is in charge
of information.
A second large-scale archaeologi-
cal expedition to the Judean desert,
where earlier this year the Bar |
Kochba letters were found, is being : Zukewkk to be Speaker
planned for this winter, it was an-
j nounced at the conference. The i
new expedition will cover a wide
area east of the Dead Sea from Ein i
Gedi to Massada, where Jewish
freedom fighters made their last
Harry Zukernick, past president
of Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith, will be speaker at a lodge
luncheon meeting Tuesday noon
at the DiLido hotel.
Vice President Richard Nixon turns first spadeful of earth at
exercises marking start of construction for outdoor facilities
of the St. Louis Jewish Community Centers Assn. Looking on
(left) is Mrs. Nixon.
USY Group
At Beth Torah
First meeting of the United Syn-
agogue Youth Group at Beth Tor-
ah Congregation was held Tuesday
evening.
Directing the group, which is na-
tionally affiliated with the United
Synagogue of America, will be
Miriam Gardner, an instructor in
the congregation's religious school.
Eighth and ninth graders of the
North Miami Beach area are invit-
ed to join the group, whose pro-
gram will include educational, so-
cial, recreational and cultural ac-
tivities.
The group meets on Tuesday
evenings at 7:30 p.m.

C=3^.
" COST
HOME LOANS
To Buy, Build or Refinance
Inquiries Invited No Obligation
(jJQesI ri"fl t.nrae<'
Dade Federal
y A JNGS and Lc~i* AVOCATION of MiAMi

5 Convenient Offices Serve Dade County
RESOURCES EXCEED 155 MILLION DOLLARS


Page 12-B
+Je*lsti fkr/cftlfl

Pearly Gait
by HalP'earl
NAMES THAT MAKE NEWS: Jewish Agency Professionals is the
name of the recently-organized group. Some of the members aren't too
favorable in regard to shortening the name (JAP), and hope they'll be
recognized by the full lettering of the organization.
Haskell Lazare, director of the American Jewish Congress, which
does not see eye-to-eye with the ADL and American Jewish Committee
on the controversial school Bible-reading issue, addesscd the newly- j
formed Jewish Agency Professionals anent that topic.
Mrs. Paul Pollak, founder president of the PROPS, was recently
reflected head of the active group. Newly-elected officers include
Patsy Abbott, first vice president; attorney Shirley Woolf, executive
vice president; Barbara Flimm, recording secretary; Mrs. Leon
Fields, corresponding secretary; and Mrs. Harold Krongold, treasurer, j
The installation luncheon will be staged at the Fontainebleau on
Nov. II, Highlight will be an original revue, "Life is a Contest."
Congratulations to Bette Shari Baron, of Miami Beach, who was
awarded this year's Kappa Beta Pi Book Scholarship at University of
Miami. It's presented yearly to the woman law student with the highest
scholastic average.
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Harris, of Miami Beach, are off on a 36-day
ocean cruise, taking in Europe and Israel.
Friends still talking aboul the smart reception following the Bar
Mitzvah of Howard Alan Feller, son of Judge and Mrs. Milton Feller. It
was held at the Fontainebleau. and guests came from such distant cities
at Phoenix, Ariz., South Orange, N.J., and Decalur and Galesburg, 111.,
not forgetting the New York area.
-tr it -&
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Martin Sachs following in his father's
and mother's footsteps in B'nai B'rith activities, was elected president
of the Youth Council. His father. David Sachs, is past president of
Flamingo Lodge, and his mother is past president of Flamingo Women's
chapter.
The early ayem "breakfast round table" at Wolfie's Lincoln rd. in-
cludes attorney Ben Cohen, motelman Dave Glass, businessman George
Kramer, and restaurateur Sam Schwartz among its "charter members."
Lebowitz Vows Metro Cooper
Friday, Qtcobgr 21, iggn
W ALU UBOWITZ
Mr*. Morton Perry, assistant director of American Jewish Com-
mittee, looking over latest infant wear, in anticipation of a second
addition to the family in the spring.
Label Katz, international president of B'nai B'rith, expected in
town in January- for installation of local officers. The national conven-
tion of B'nai B'rith Women will be held in Miami Beach in April, and
the annual convention of Fifth District B'nai B'rith is set for June at
the Americana.
The musical Dan Lapins will soon be humming and playing "The
Wedding March" for daughter Diane, who's engaged to Mike Walberg, j
of Columbia, S.C.
Jerry Carver hearing such glowing reports of Israel from members |
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Council, including Ginger Rood and Debbie !
Suiter, who visited there recently, he's making plans for a 1961 summer'
trip right now.
-6- -it- it-
WHAT'S NEW: "Song without End," the movie based on the life and
loves of Franz Liszt, bows into the Carib, Miami and Miracle on Thurs-
day, Oct. 27. It stars handsome Dick Bogarde as the romantic composer,!
and introduces the French beauty. Capucine. Advance reports have
boasted the film as one of the year's best.
Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier are the leads in "All the Young Men,"
a tense drama of racial conflict, holding forth this week at the Flamingo.
Mort Sahl, the controversial comic, has a featured role along with the
rapidly rising star, James Darren. Background of the film is the Korean
War.
Ever check the double features at the" Cameo and Cinema on the
Beach? Good opportunity to see some of the "big" movies you may
have missed at the first and second run houses, and the price is right.
In fact. 1 would say they're the biggest box office bargains in town.
Bobby Darrin, who opens at the DeauviUe Casanova room, Dec. 23,
has a "guest star" role in "Pepe," the CinemaScope Technicolor holidav
package from Columbia, starring Cantinflas. No doubt, the hot-as-a
pistol singer will make a personal appearance at the world premiere of
the film at the Lincoln on Dec. 23.
-it -it -ir-
THE AFTER DARK SCENE: King-size cocktails and the finest,
liquors are on hand at the cozy cocktail lounge of the Candlelight Inn in
Coconut Grove, l,eitson's popular dining rendezvous boast's ideal ban
quet facilities.
If you are among the local folk who haven't ventured out to King
Arthur's Court in Miami Springs Villas as yet, you've got something to
look forward to. It's an ideal spot for family dining, and its colorful
atmosphere is truly intriguing, not forgetting the always excellent cui-
cine at hand.
Al Goldman, although quite busy with his two Fu Manchu's, in
Miami Beach and Hollywood, still finds time for a night of dining occa
tionally at Nick and Arthur's on the 78th st. causeway.
Caterers Gordon and Pont did themselves proud at the "dual
party" at Julius Spector's home. It was his 75th birthday, and the
25th wedding anniversary of son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Specter. The caterers also handled the two cocktail parties
this week for "Daisy Originals" new building.
The Riviera in Coral Gables is one of the area's newest an<' Snest
Kosher restaurants. All your favorite likc-mothcr-used-to-make dishes
a/e always on hand. And wait till you see the kosher "smorgasbord'
table there.
It's just a matter of minutes to get to the South Pacific on U.S. 1,
just below Hollywood. It's oriental dishes are as exotic as the appear-
ance of the colorful restaurant. It's a treat for the family an)
of the week.
Norton Tire Co.
Marks 36th Year
Of Operation
Norton Tire Company, a pioneer
\ South Florida firm, this week cele-
; brates its 36th anniversary.
Begun in a small Dania service
station in 1924, the company now
maintains 13 retail outlets and
serves some 75 associate dealers
from Key West to Hollywood.
Louis E. Pallot, founder and cur-
rently chairman of the board of
Norton Tire Co., remembers the
pessimism that greeted announce-
ment of his venture 36 years ago.
"Despite criticism thet there
wasn't enought automobiles to
sustain the infant tire company,
and that our out-of-the-way loca-
tion was another handicap, we
opened for business," Pallot
reminised.
After handling high-profit, low-
value off-brands, Pallot determ-
ined that success lay in repeat
business, achieved only through
the sale and specialization of a
quality major-brand tire. Today his
company is one of the largest dis-
tributors of B. F. Goodrich tire
products in the world, with an an-
nual sales volume in excess of
S2.5O0.000.
Norton Pallot, who was born the
year the company was organized,
and for whom the firm is named,
is now president. Howard Katzen,
a son-in-law, is vice president, and
son Ronald Pallot is secretary
treasurer.
"A leader representing Miami
Beach in a spirit of cooperation in-
stead of antagonism could bring
worthwhile results from Metro Gov-
ernment," said Walter Lebowitz
this week, candidate for Metro
Commission for Miami Beach.
Lebowitz asserted at a kick-off j
meeting that he would be "the first
one to champion the cause of a
separate county for Miami Beach,
thereby eivinc the Beach its own
county Commission and represen-
tatives in the State Legislature."
However, he continued, "since'
such a possibility is very rpm*-
at the time, we must stop fighting
our county government ana star,
cooperating with it in order to re-
ceive the maximum benefits Metro {
has to offer."
A local resident for 27 years, i
Lebowitz has been *n active civic
worker and Democratic leader
since attending the University of
Miami, where he served as sen-
ator and clerks' representative in
the Student Body Government
and Law School Congress.
Lebowitz is presently the attor-
ney for the Democratic Party, at-
torney for the Miami Beach Bar
Assn. legal aid committee, an ofli
Ctr in the Knights of Pythias and
Histadrut. and has served as vice
president of the South Sho-e rm
provement Assn. and Yiw. r,*
cratic Club.
KING
ARTHUR'S
COURT
SINGING STRINGS
DINNER SUFFER
MIAMI
SPRINGS
VILLAS
500 Deer Run TU 8-4521
ART SHUNS, Co-Owner
RIVIERA m RESTAURANT
DELICATESSEN and CATERERS
SMORGASBORD $1.89 Jit Kf.
MONDAY thru THURSDAY, 5 P.M. lo 830 f M
SERVING DINNERS FRIDAY NIGHTS & SUNDAYS
THE ULTIMATE IN KOSHER CATERING
Consult Ut for Your Catering Needs, Bar Mitzvahi. tic.
1830 Ponce de Leon, Comer Majorca, Coral Gables
For Reservations call HI 8-5441 Closed Saturdays
ROYAL HUNGARIAN ^3 CATERERS
731 WASHINGTON AVE MIAMI BEACH JE 8 5401
FOR SUPERB CATER1X1;
WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS BANQUETS
OUR MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST REFERENCE
Lectures Slated
In Yiddish
A winter series of lectures in
Yiddish will be launched Saturday
at Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute.
The scries will be heard week-
ly from 4.30 to 5:30 p.m. Lecturer
will be Rabbi Isaac Ever.
The talks will be based on the
"Weekly Portion" in conjunction
with contemporary Jewish and
world problems.
Boneless
Lunvh and Dinner Servrd Poi/i
CANDLELIGHT INN
In Tit* Maori Coconut Gro*t
Banquet Facilititt Cocktail loungt
Henry Lett ion, Myr.
Women Hear Hair Designer
Sisterhood of Temple Judea was
to hold its first luncheon of the
season on Thursday noon at the
Temple. J. Baldi, Miami and Coral
Gables coiffure designer, was to
speak on hair care.
ABE
GEFTCR'S
NEW KOSHER
Mcnorah Chapter Card Party Slated
I members to join the chapter "so
Mcnorah chapter may retain the
trophy it won last year at the
paid-up membership party."
Mrs. Mildred R. Freeman pres-
ident said that the contest ends on I
Monday at the DeauviUe hotel. j
ROMWELL hotel
Oceanironi at 20lh SI MIAMI BEACH
Pm Day, rer
Fffi.. DM. IM.
25 el 103 Sat
Te Dm. "
SINGLE OCCUPANCY 50% HIGHER
EUROPEAN PLAN It OTHER RATES
0'i!".lL"\* F Chili. Ltuntei ir.4
S.'li, in, in. *rtl"S "l"" "f'
KOSHER MEALS $fi58
INCLUDED w
JE 4-2141
ATTENTION STEAK LOVERS!
"RONNIE"
Your favorite chef for so many years in Miami
it now serving at a new location.
----- CHARCOAL BROILED-----
Prime Sirloin Filet Mignon
Prime Rib of Beef
BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCHES from 85*
809 STEAK HOUSE
and COCKTAIL LOUNGE
809 S.W. 8th ST. (On the Trail)
Completely Air Conditioned Ample Free Porkirg
PHONE FR 4-18B5
M< non.h chapter, B'nai B'litth
Women, will hold a car.i party cm
Tuesday, 1 p.m.. at the Miami
Beach Bui tb, 201 20th st.
Program chairman Mrs. Faurice
Fink and membership chairman
Mrs Solomon Moses are in charge.
. Airs. Moses urged prospective
LUNCH DINMCR
SUPPER
&*&*
l;l 'lu Mum
CANTONtSI ,
COOKING
tJiM.Sg f Z&WSSS. T M FR 9-7996


Friday. Otcober 21. 1960
+ lewis* ncridfknn
Page 13-B
J^jctr As a gift to subscribers, The Jewish Floridian will present free
for ine asking a corsage to each mothsr of a Bar or Bas Mitzvah.
Requests should be addressed to "Corsage for You," P.O. Box
2973, Miami 1, Fla., one month in-advance. Include the name.i
of the Bar or Bas Mitzvah, date and place of the ceremony,
ho.re address and telephone number. The corsage will be
forwarded to you courtesy of Blackstone Flower Shops in time
for the occasion.
UK
BARRf
JtROMl
ROBERT
JEFFREY
FREDDIE
Barry Simon
Bar Mitzvah of Barry Simon will
take piace Saturday morning, Oct.
22. at Beth Emeth Congregation,
with Rabbi David Herson offici-
ating.
Barry is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Burton Simon. He is a student at
North Miami Junior High, and at-
tend? Beth Emeth religious school.
Kiddush in his honor will follow
the Bar Mitzvah ceremony.

Richard Koonigsberg
Israelite Center will be the site
of the Bar Mitzvah of Richard
Terry Koenigsberg on Saturday
morning, Oct. 22, with Rabbi Mor
ton Malavsky and Cantor Louis
Cohen officiating.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Koenigs-
berg, 3191 SW 27th st., Richard at-
tends eighth grade at Shenandoah
Junior High, and he is active in
the youth group of Israelite Center.
mony will include his paternal
grandmother, Mrs. Frieda Koenigs-
berg. of New York. Reception in
his honor will be held Saturday
evening at the Riviera Caterers in
Coral Gables.
*
Jerome Kauffman
Saturday morning services, Oct.
22, at Temple Zion will include the
Bar Mitzvah of Jerome Kauffman.
Jerome is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Kauffman. Mrs. Ce-
lia Nitzky, Mrs. Ruth Rinis and
Mrs. Elsie Kauffman have arrived
from Philadelphia to attend the
ceremony.
Kiddush in Jerome's honor will
follow. Rabbi Alfred Waxman will
officiate.
ber on Saturday morning, Oct. 22, will take place Saturday morning, Freddie attends eighth grade at
at Temple Judea. Oct. 22, at Temple Menorah, with Ida M. Fisher Junior High, where
Eric, son of Dr. and Mrs. George Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz offici- he is a member of the school orch-
Balber! is an eigh'h grade honor atin- estra-
student at Ponce de Leon Junior Jefirey is the son of Mr. and Out-of-town guests at the Bar
High, where he plays clarinet in Mrs. Alfred Nesbitt, 900 So. Shore Mitzvah will be Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
the band. He has been a student dr. He attends the religious school ert Trude, of Alexandria. Va.
in the Temple religious school for of the Temple and Nautilus Junior
the past four years, and the Sunday High. Robert Reinstein
school since 1951. including nurs- Reception in his honor will be Temple Menorah will be the site
ery and kindergarten. He will en- held Saturday evening at the Fon- of the Bar Mitzvah of Robert Rein-
ter the confirmation class of 1963 tainebleau hotel. stein on Saturday morning, Oct. 22,
after his Bar Mitzvah. with Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz of-
Out-of-town guests at the cere- Freddie Hillman ficiating.
mony Saturday will include his ma- Rabbi Tibor Stern will officiate Robert is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
ternal grandparents, Mr. and Mr*, at the Bar Mitzvah of Freddie A. Louis Reinstein, 795 No. Shore dr.
Samuel F. Graff; aunt. Mrs. Evelyn Hillman on Saturday morning, Oct. He is a student at the religious
Rubin; and cousins, Dora, Janet 22, with Cantor Maurice Mamches school of the Temple, and attends
and Douglas Rubin. rendering the musical portions of Nautilus Junior High.
the Uturgy in Beth Jacob Congrega- Reception in his honor will be
Jeffrey Nesbitt tion. held Saturday evening at the Fon-
Bar Mitzvah of Jeffrey Nesbitt Son of Mrs. Esther Hillman, tainebleau.
Eric Balber
Rabbi Morris Skop and Cantor
Herman Gottlieb will officiate at
Out-of-town guests at the cere- the Bar Mitzvah of Eric David Bal-
PTA to Focus
On the Family
Coninuing in line with the theme
for the year of the Dade County
Council of Parent-Teacher Assns.,
"The PTA Looking Glass," the pro-
gram of the regular county-wide
meeting for PTA members on Oct
26 will focus attention on the fam-
ily, believing that "Our Children
are Our Images."
The meeting will begin at 10 a.m.
and run until 12 noon, and will be I C4aj#|lf LflUlir h Ad
held at North Miami Beach Junior *"** J WMntncg
High School.
JAts. Milton Weiss, president, will
conduct the business portion of the
meeting. Principals and PTA pres-
idents from areas one, two, and \
Tea for Two
"Tea for Two," your new mem-
ber and you, will be served by
Temple Menorah Sisterhood in its
new social hall on Wednesday eve-
ning. Mrs. Hyman Bergad, mem-
bership chairman, is in charge of
the "member bring a member"
party. Mrs. Elaine Kaplan it pro-
gram chairman.
Rheumatic Fever
rheumatic fever will be made here
in Miami at National Children's
Cardiac Hospital for the United
hree will be honored. They will j States Public Health Service ac
be introduced by their respective>.d.ng to an announcement by
area coordinators, Mrs. E. M. Wil- Dave Emmer. chatrman of the lay
lard. Mrs. A. J. Brown, and Mrs. j ^'ca' _^mmittee of the local
William R. Brown.
One of the first major research Mrs. Julius Fligelman (left), vice president, and Mrs. Louis S.
studies in the actual prevention of Gimbel, jr. (right), president, tell Mr. and Mrs. Philip M Klutz-
nick (center) of plans for the one million dollar drive which
national Women's Division, American Friends of Hebrew Uni-
versity, has launched. Funds raised by the women's group
will aid in the construction of a new library at the Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem.
To produce a cause-and-effect
Women Launch Library Project
By Special Report
NEW YORKA United Nations
Documents Reading Room will be
charity institution.
Over 1,000 Dade county families
situation, four common family atti- and the Dade county school system
tudes will be briefly depicted, with! will be cooperating on the proj-
a guidance counselor interpreting ect, when 90 children from each
their effect on the child. Board| of 12 schools will participate.
members and young people will Monthly throat culture and quar- one o'f'the'features'of the new cen
enact the part of the parents and, terly blood samples from the chil-|tral ijbrary being constructed on
children. 'dren involved will be a key phase/ the new campus 0f the Hebrew
Martin Rubinstein, assistant prin- of the research. Parent approval I university of Jerusalem, it was dis-
cipal of the North Miami Beach slips are already being issued tojclosed here
Junior High School, and Council's | the students selected, and families
juvenile protection chairman, will are urged to sign and return them
coordinate the program and act as immediately to faciltate this vital
counselor in the role of the over- research into the possible causes
indulgent, overambitious, disinter- and prevention of rheumatic fever.
ested, and arguing and disagreeing I "We at the Children's Cardiac
parents. Hospital and everyone in the Mi-
Music adapted to the program j a[m area can De proud of this as-
will be under the direction of Mrs.sjgnrnent," says Emmer, who has
Teachers Group
Elects Officers
David Freedman, faculty mem-
ber of the Hebrew High School,
was elected honorary president at
a meeting of the Hebrew Educa-
tors Alliance of Greater Miami
last week.
Others elected were Rabbi Shi-
mon Azulary, Hebrew Academy,
president; Nettie Goldstein, Tem-
ple Beth Sholom vice president;
Rabbi Morris Horovitz, Hebrew
Academy, vice president; Rabbi
Menachem Gottesman, Hebrew
Academy, secretary; and Saul
Porush, Hebrew Academy, treas-
urer.
Elected to the board were Meyer
Samberg, Temple Emanu-El; Na-
than Sern, Beth David; Avi Kaye,
Flagler Granada Jewish Commu-
nity Center; Isadore Dickman,
Beth El Congregation; and Ze-
hava Sukenick, Hebrew Academy.
The organization has been in ex-
istence locally for three years, and
includes educators on the staffs
of Greater Miami's religious
schools.
Mary L. Boyd. Mrs. Charles Finkle-
stcin is program chairman.
Million Dollar
Stamp Exhibit Due
Stamps valued by philatelists at
one million dollars will arrive
aboard the famed Postal Calva"-
de' -aJraveJ'" dis.P-lay.fu;??lS;tA1! Milton's. Sulwr, Sreetor oTnie*
ical research and executive direc-
been a member of the NCCH board
of governors since the founding
of the hospital 24 years ago. "It is
a $14,835 contract under the Heart
Disease Control Program of the
Public Health Service, and is the
result of highly advanced, prelimi-
nary research developed here."
The specialized resea/ch work
will be under the direction of Dr.
lore and exhibits, for exhibition
Oct. 23.
The Postal Calvacade, housed in
two highway post office vehicles,
will go on exhibition at the Caril-
lon hotel through Oct. 27 in con-
junction with the convention of the
National Assn. of Postmasters of
the United States.
The exhibit will be open to the
public from 2 to 10 p.m. daily.
The valuable stamps are dis-
played in exhibit form from the
Post Office Department's Philatelic
Exhibition Room in Washington.
Also included in the display is a
die-proof of the famed inverted 24-
cent air mail stamp of 1918. This
die-stamp is valued by collectors
in excess of $100,000.
One of the traveling post of-
fices, Miami Postmaster Eugene
r>unlap said, is devoted entirely to
the Pony Express era
tor of the hospital.
Named Media Director
Mrs. Beverly M. Kirven, former-
ly of Atlanta, Go., has been ap-
pointed to the post of media direc-
tor for E. J. Scheaffer and Asso-
ciates Advertising Agency. Mrs.
Kirven was formerly a partner in
the advertising agency of Harris
and Weinstein Associates, Atlanta.
Cotillion at Temple Judea
Sisterhood of Temple Judea of-
fers a cotillion for seventh and
Mrs. Louis S. Gimbel, jr., nation-
al president of the Women's Divis-
ion, American Friends of the He-
brew University, said that her
group was launching a million dol-
lar fund-raising campaign to help
build the new library of the Jeru-
salem university.
The library will supplement and
replace library facilities on Mt.
Scopus, Jerusalem, original cam-
pus of the university, where its
library and other buildings were
cut off from the use of students and
faculty during the Israel War of
Independence in 1948.
Mrs. Gimbel said that segments
of the quota had been pledged by
regional units of the Women's Di-
vision throughout the country.
The women's group campaign was
hailed by Michael Comay, Israel's
permanent representative to the
United Nations, who declared that
he "was especially happy to learn
that an imposing hall in the library
will be set aside as a United Na-
tions Reading Room." This, the Is-
raeli diplomat asserted, "will pro-
mote understanding of the vast
range of organized international
activities, extending in our time
into every field of endeavor."
Mrs. Gimbel disclosed that the
Women's Division will allocate a
eighth grade boys and girls to be special Library Endowment Fund
held in the Temple every Thurs- of $100,000 to provide the Hebrew
day evening. A leading dance in- j University with urgently needed
structor will teach modern danc- books and the personnel to service
ing and social graces. j them.
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OPENING CONCERTS
SUNDAY, OCT. 23, MIAMI BEACH AUDITORIUM. 8 30 P M.
MONDAY, OCT. 24, DADE COUNTY AUDITORIUM, S 30 t M.
FABIEN SEVITSKY
GARY GRAFFMAN. KM
PROGRAM
Preluda to Die Maistersinger Wagner
Symphony No. 1 Sibelius
Piano Concerto No. 2 Rachmaninoff
Tick** $1.50 to (3.50. UM Symphony Off ic*. MO 1-4960; _^___
Miami Boach Auditorium. JE 1-0477; Dado County Audtorium. HI 6-9230;
Cordolia't, FR 3-5123; Amidon't, HI 6-2070.
116 N E 6* Street Miami. Florida
ft!
r


Page 14-B
+Jenisti ncrkHan
Friday, Qtcober 21. i360

Jewish Teen-Agers
Have Harder Time,
Expert Declares
By Special Report
WASHINGTON Adolescence
is more difficult for the Jewish
teen-ager than his Christian con-
temporary, says a veteran Jewish j
youth worker.
Complicating the adjustment tor
the Jewish youngsters are "his
status as a member of a minority
group and the ambivalences cre-
ated by Judaism's lack of dogma."
writes Dr. Daniel Raylesberg. of
New York, in a pamphlet. "The
Jewish Adolescent." published this
week by the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization. Dr. Raylesberg is
the youth group's regional director
lor the northeast United States and
eastern Canada.
Christian and Jewish youth
both go through a period of
questioning many aspects of life
around them. But the Jewish
youngsters. Dr. Raylesberg em-
phesiies, must find answers to
questions which never occur to
Christian teen-agers. Such as -
"What is a Jew? How does
one express himself as a Jew?"
e "What causes anti-Semitism0"
"What shall I be?Orthodox.
Conservative, Reform. Reconstruc-
ttionist. or secular?"
"Can and should Jews assim-
ilate?"
Youth organizations which
have as their basic objectives
the development of a positive ,
philosophy about Jewish life go
a long way toward making the |
adjustment easier, the author de-
Lipton Pledges
Miami Support
By Special Report
ROME
program
1961
Joint
"One need not have all the an-
swers to be of service to Jewish
adolescents who are seeking an-
swers." Dr. Raylesberg writes.
"In'group work we help people by
enabling them to become more
aware of the questions they wish
to ask and to find the answers for
themselves, rather than providing
answers for them."
Tom by Dr. Wolhon
"Our Best Years" was to be the
topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham
Wolf son. director of the Spinoza
Outdoor Forum for Adult Educa-
tion, before the Athletie Club on
Thursday. 8:30 am at the 10th st.
beach.
MISS CHULOTTt fltltD
Miss Fried
Named to Staff
Appointment of Barry Eisen-
berg with Maidenform Inc.
was announced this week in
New York. Eisenberg will be
in charge of marketing and
Bales of the company's line
of swimsuits in the Southeast-
ern United States, with offices
and showroom at the Miami
Beach Federal bldg., 407 Lin-
coln id. He recently was the
Southeastern regional sales
manager for Flexees Inc..
manufacturer of swimsuits
and "foundation garments.
Eisenberg lives at 4421 Sheri-
dan ave.
Mrs. Nathan D. Perlman (center), national chairman of the
Hadassah Medical Organization committee in the United
States, is shown presenting Dr. Kalman I. Mann (left), director-
general of the Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel, with
a "surgical stapler" developed in the Soviet Union. Looking
on is Prof. Bernhard Zondek. head of Hadassah's Department
of Obstetrics and Gynecology and professor of obstetrics and
gynecology at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical
School in Jerusalem. The mechanical instrument, designed
for joining the ends of blood vessels and nerves, last week was
taken to Israel by Dr. Mann for use by surg3ons of the Hadas-
sah Medical Organization.
Beach Drives
To Air Condition
New High School
The raising of funds for the air-
conditioning of the Miami Beach
Senior High School is in high gear.
Approximately 50 workers, many
of them leading businessmen and
heads of organizations affiliated
with the Presidents' Council, have
begun*' a massive distribution of
tickets and literature to the Base-
ball Game and Field Day sponsor-
ed by the Presidents' Council of
Miami Beach last Sunday afternoon
at Flamingo Park.
According to Allen Goldberg,
president, every' business organiza-
tion, including tl^e Lincoln Progress
Assn.. Washington Avenue Mer-
chants Assn.. Arthur Godfrey Road
Assn., and the Alton Road Assn.
contacted their members and ex-
hibited posters advertising the
event.
Ted Cohen is general chairman
of the fund-raising drive. Dr. J. A.
Greenhouse is treasurer. Recep-
tion committee consisted of Joe
Cohen, Charles Hall, Melvin Rich-
ard. Wolfie Cohen. Leonard Cole-
man, Harold B. Spaet. Jack Gor-
don and Ritter Levinson.
Head of the Lawyers Division
was Judge Milton Feller, assisted
by Harold Rosen, Frank Conn. Irv-
ing Firtel, James Ruby and Julius
J. Perlmutter.
Restaurant Division consisted of
Edward Lassman. Sam Schwartz,
and Irving Kaplan.
David Klinger headed the distri
but ion of tickets among the Gaso-
line Dealers Assn. of Miami Beach.
Ticket committee consisted of
Harry Erlanger. chairman and
Leonard Glasser, Dr. Stanley Col-
tune. Dr. I. W. Lippman. Ed Man-
del, Norman K Schwartz, and Bar-
bara Kleinman.
Publicity committee included
Parks Rusk. James Wendler, Paul
Bruun. Hank Meyer. Ray Redman
and Pete Heller.
Real Estate Division consisted of
George Whitney, David Emmer.
Ray Sterling, Harold Segal, and
Ben Zion Ginsburg.
Laundry and Dry Cleaners Divis-
ion was headed by Henry Cove. Re-
tail Merchants Division consisted
of Adrian Thai. Alfred Mart, Austin
Burk, Al Zable and Fred Grimmig.
Edward J. Melniker headed the
bank committee. Milton Sirktn, B.
Bayard Strell. Simon Rubin and
George Zoller were in charge of
special events. Insurance com-
mittee consisied of Carl Gardner
and George Levenson. Nat Potam-
kin headed the Car Dealers Assn.
Mrs. Perfes Appointed
Mrs. Rose Pertes received a new
was
honor this week when she
named Florida State organizer f
the Navy Mothers Club Mrs P?
:es s presently a commander in
the group. In addition to her minv
other activities, Mrs. perte3
membership chairman of the Gt
of Miami bPautlfication-conimlttee
Western Cookout Saturday
Support of the
of the American
Distribution Committee on behalf
of more than 200,000 Jews in 25
countries, was pledged here Tues-
day by Joseph M. Lipton on behalf
of the Combined Jewish Appeal of
Greater Miami, following a series
of meetings arranged over the. Western cookout will be held by
weekend for the 1960 United Jew- the South Dade chapter of the Na
ish Appeal Study Mission. tional Children's Cardiac Hospital
Lipton is generat chairman of f"/3'"^.^eni"8. 6.30 p.m, at
the 1961 campaign of the Com-' "* Pl* 8e Ranch. 9940 SW
bined Jewish Appeal, of which the ,/'. c,-!!":._1 iniorma-
I'nited Jewish Appeal is a major
beneficiary.
Host of the Study Mission in
Rome was the Joint Distribution
Committee, major agency for
serving needy Jews overseas and
constituent member, together
tion is Mrs. Sandy Salzman,
with the Jewish Agency for
rael, of the UJA.
Is
Miami Chapter
Will Hear
Antique Expert
Display of rare and unusual an-
tiques and a discussion of their
history will be presented by R*.
In addition to the series of brief- ki, of Rikkj.s studl0 t0 m/mbe
ing sessions, the members of the of tne Miami chapter of Hadas mission were guests on Saturday attending the third annual life
Dight at a dinner in their honor membership coffee at the home of
at the 17th century Palazzo Bar- Mrs Jerome H Wemkle 55 p
berini. where they were greeted I rd Bay Heights, on Monday at
by U.S. Ambassador John David; \q am
Zellerbach. Charles H. Jordan, di-'
rector general of JDC, presided at! According to Mrs. George Simon,
the dinner and at all the briefing Hue membership chairman, "be-
sessions. I "use Hadassah has become a life-
. ,. time job for thousands of its mem-
The mtssion left here Tuesday, ber>f increasing numbers are tak-
; for a study of welfare needs in Is
rael.
Attorney Speaks
To Police Here
As part of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith educational
program in human relations, Mor-
Iton Lee Perry, Miami attorney,
I presented a "Rumor Clinic" pro-
Igram before police officers at the
j Miami Police Academy.
Perry spoke to the group on
Charlotte Fried, registered den-;"With Justice for Ail," a booklet
tal hygienist. has been appointed on police techniques in furthering
by the executive board to serve as law and order for all groups regard-
a staff member for the National less of race, color or creed.
Children's Cardiac Home. "Witn justic for Ml ig aUo
Miss Fried, recently elected to I being used as a text by law en-
membership in Phi Sigma Alpha,iforcemeat authorities in Holly-
national dental hygienists' honor- i wood, Daytona Beach, Ft. Lauder-
ary society, is associated with Dr. j dale- West Palm Beach, Daytona
ing out life membership in Hadas-
sah as an act of dedication to its
work and faith in the future.
"The tile membership plan not
only guarantees continuity of mem-
bership, but helps long-range plan-
ning on the local and national
scene." At the present time, there
are 135 life members in the Mi-
| ami chapter of Hadassah. Mrs. Ir-
ving Denmark is life membership
co-chairman. Mrs. Louis Goldman
is chapter president.
Doran D. Zinner in the Huntington
bldg.
Beach, Jacksonville, Sarasota, Or
lando, Deerfield Beach and Metro
Dade county.
The pamphlet, prepared jointly
by the ADL and the International
Assoc. of Chiefs of Police, is en-
dorsed by the Southern Police In-
Arthur Spiegel, education
Women's Member Coffee
Sisterhood of Temple Adath Ye-
shurun will hold a membership
coffee and fashion show on Wed-
nesday evening at the Diplomat
hotel.
Medical Fund
Party Tuesday
Greater Miami Women's Auxili-1 stitute
ary, Jewish Home for the Aged, director of the Florida ADL office,
will hold its annual Sidney Appeli
Medical Fund gift party at a
monthly meeting on Tuesday noon
at the Algiers hotel.
Mrs. Sol Silverman. Auxiliary
president, will give the address of
welcome. Mrs. Nat E. Katz, chair- '
man of the Sidney Appel Medical
Fund, will give the invocation.
Judge Harold B. Spaet, honorary
president of the Home will bring
a message from Douglas Gardens.!
Proceeds of the Sidney Appel1
Medical Fund help pay for special! *0
medical needs of residents.
Mrs. Ben Orlow, membership,
chairman, will discuss the mem- BARTOK
bership coffee planned for Dec.
22 at the Fontainebleau hotel for
new members and their sponsors.
Rummage Safe Monday
Tifereth Israel Sisterhood wttl
hold a rummage sale at Stevens
Market. 6209 NW 27th ave., on
Monday.
presented a similar program be-
fore law enforcement authorities in
training at Miami Beach.
Gvesf Speaker Heard
Chai chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women met Tuesday at the Del-
monico hotel. Guest speaker was
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitz, spiritual
leader of Temple Zamora.
ftMMMfe Sale Scheduled
Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood of
Beth Torah Congregation is spon-
soring a rummage sale at Stevens
Market, 551 NE 167th st., No. Mi-
ami Beach, on Oct. 26.
Miami Attorney
Will be Speaker
Ben-Zvi Branch of the Labor
Zionists will meet at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Grunhut,
961 SW 58th ave.. on Tuesday eve
ning.
Miami attorney Oscar Rappaport
is scheduled to address the group
on "Legal Aspects of the Eichmann
Case," it was announced by Andre
Bialolenki, president.
Dr. Sylvan Schotz, program chair-
man, has arranged for Miss Yaffe
Rosenthal, Hebrew teacher, to pre-
sent a demonstration of Israeli
dances. Also included in the pro-
gram will be songs by Cantor Abra-
ham Self and Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Yomen.
The next regular meeting of Ben-
Zvi is scheduled for Nov. 30, at
Washington Federal, 1244 Washing-
ton ave.
<#&&
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Friday. Oteober 21. 1960
"Jewtsii Meridian
Page 15-B
Oti
ituctries
SAMUEL H. BARNETT
41. of I?Sf Cleveland nl died Oct. IS.
--mix ago from Philadelphia, Bur-
MsUfN SlVlTZKf
UM Symphony
To Open Season
University of Miami Symphony
Orchestra will open its 34th year
Sunday evening at Miami Beach
Auditorium with Fabien SevitzVy
conducting.
The opening concert will be re-
peated Monday evening at Dade
County Auditorium.
Both concerts will be without
the benefit of the ori*>nally-an-
r.conced soloist, pianist Eugene
Istorrm, who took ill early this
week and will not be able to at-
tend. Pinch-hitting i* the world-
renowned pianist, Gary Graff-
man, who will perform the Con-
certo No. 2 in C minor by Rach-
maninoff as programmed.
Sevitzky has planned the season's
nine pair of programs for the pleas-
ure and satisfaction of every group
ol listeners as the opener indi-
cates.
in addition to the Rachmaninoff,
there will be performances of Sym-
phony No. 1 in E minor by Sibelius
and the Prelude to "Die Meiser
singer," by Wagner.
Greenberger
Named to Staff
Robert B. Greenberger, a veter-
an of 25 years*
in the cemetery I
business, has
been added to
the staff of Lake
side Memorial*
Park, 10300 NWs
25th St., Miami.
Announcement
of Greenberger's
appointment was
made by Mrs.
Samuel Oritt, OKHfiWCM
vice president of Lakeside, a non-
profit organization.
Greenberger was formely direc-
tor of sales for Montefiore Ceme-
tery Corporation, Long Island,
NY.
He now resides on Miami Beach
at 8620 Byron ave.
vivhiK are his wifi
and .lody; ni.-
daughters, Dumia i
fin*, Mr and Mr*. Abraham B
:i brother, Byron: and two slsterf
Mrs. France* Nathan and Mrs. Ruth
Lazar. Iiurial won in \lt Nebo Ceme-
tery, with ordon Funeral Home in
charge of arrangi -
MRS. DORIS CANTER
'-'. "f low Lenox av< died Oct. I
ago from N.w
York City. survivors include her hue-
band, Ifinaiid, a I ruth.r and
services and burial were in New York,
jrtth local arransementa i>y Riverside
Memorial Chapel.
ABRAHAM GOLDMAN
71, of 626 Ocean dr., died Oat 9. He
l'm' here six years ago from New
York, ami was a retired furrier, sjr-
vlvora Include his wife, Molly; three
laughters. Mra, Rose Kedderman. Mrs
Adeie Cohen, and Mrs. Yetta Katz;
four grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren. Services were Oct. 9
at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton
id.
CHARLES KATZ
74, retired hardware merchant, died
Oct. t. He came to Miami seven year*
ago. and lived at 1056 Jefferson i.ve.
Surviving locally la his wife. Katie.
Services and burial were In New York.
with local arrangements by Riverside
Memorial Chapel.
HERMAN PAUL LISS
47. retired meat dealer of 170 NE 171st
ter., died Oct. 8. He came here six
years ago from Brooklyn. Survivors
include his wife. Honnie; daughter.
Roberta: and three brothers. Including
Irving and Avid, of No. Miami Reach:
two sisters, Mrs. Helen Kaplan and
Mra, Rose Pain. Bervtaaa wen- Oct.
10 at Riverside Memorial Chapel. .Nor-
mandy Isle.
MATTHEW B. GOLDBERG
7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay 1. Hold-
Rabbi Narof Will
Preach in N.Y.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, spiritual
leader of Temple Israel of Great-
er Miami, has been invited to de-
liver the dedicatory sermon in
Temple Rodeph Sholom, New York
City, on Saturday morning in be-
half of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, parent body
of Reform Judaism in America.
Dr. Narot's sermon will be part
df a several-days conference of the
larger Reform congregations in the
United States.
The occasion will mark the
deification of the new building
program in Mow York City for
the House of Living Judaism,
headquarters for the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
Dr. Narot's sermon will present
the theme that the American Jew
is best able to find his integrity
'through the synagogue and its
three-fold function of study, prayer
and the building of good human
relationships.
Accompanying Rabbi Narot to
New York to attend the conference
will be Mr. and Mrs. Max Gold-
stein, Mr. and Mrs. Sam A. Gold-
stein, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Harris,
and Mr and Mrs. Henry E. Wolff.
Sgfl N\V ITSUl -l died Oct. r
H* was a Miami In addl
ui i r. ed b:
i brother, Gary maternal grand
,Um*- aMaWeVhia Qaiuherg: juj.
I arani ut ts. Mr. an
May Qotdb
t Rlv< Doug
laa id.
OSCAR GREEN
70, of flats' !-"! mi. ave., Burfslde, dle<
I U -a me tit < 1 11 V |
from New York. Bur Ivlna are hi
wife, N r> three sistei an.
a grandchild. Services were Oct. 9 a'
ial chapel, Nm niand\
Is!.-.
MRSIBETT.E J.MARTIN
74. of 12S5 Campo Sana, Coral Cables,
died Oct. 7. Hha name her* II yean
ago from Hazellon. Pa. Slie was
member of lladassah, Jewish Horn,
for the Aged, National Children's Car-
ilia. Hospital, and National Council ,,i"
Jewish Women. KemMces were Oct. ]
at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Doufflai
rd., wilh burial in Mt. Nebo Cem. teiy.
Surviving are a daughter. Mrs. Reva
Wexler, a brother, and three grand-
children.
MR*. ALICE NEWMARK
44. of 12300 SW Mst at., died Oct. 5.
She tame here eight years ago irom
Bank Lists
2 Appointments
Jack Carner, chairman of the
board of the Miami National Bank,
announces the appointment of Al-
bert E. Berkeley and Sidney M.
Kain to two key positions covering
the newly created Mortgage and
Public Relations Departments.
At a recent meeting of the board
'of directors, Berkeley was appoint-
ed vice president and Mortgage of-
' ficer of the bank. He is a past pres-
ident of the Mortgage Bankers
j Assn. of New York, former mem-
bet- of the mortgage committee of
the Real Estate Board of New
York, and a former member of the
[ mortgage and financial committee
of the National Assn. of Home
Builders.
Kain will head up the banks' Pub-
lic Relations Department and act
as liaison for Lou Poller, director
: and chairman of the executive
Committee, in planning and plac-
ing before the public and its de-
positors new inovations and serv-
ices such as the recent presenta-
tion of Miami National Bank "Cer-
ti-Check."
Kain has been a resident of Mi-
ami Beach for the past ten years,
and prior to his residence here
was director of special promotions
for the American Heart Assn. For
25 years, he was in the public re-
lations, publicity and advertising
departments of Loew's Theaters
and Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures,
with offices in New York.
'-a,,, i. ami was a member of Tempi*
'Ion. Surviving are her hush-ind
lonis; tine, daughtera, Celhv Kaj
.il and Marcla; and three son*, SSal
ian. Kphric and Zava sir- $ -,, I, aw
wo ii othei and i n*o si ters
'are Oct 7 at Oordon funeral Home
LEGAL NOTICE
MDTir.F 1'Mr.fp
fictitiou"name law
Ml ITICE IS IIKHKHV (irVFX Hi
he undersigned, desiring to encase In
tualni w under the fid I ime
.l:d >R1 ALE LODOE IfOTBL al
9800 B -. -i' ne I louli vai ntnd i-
i said name with th.- Clerk o'
the I 'ii- iii Court <-f I di C iuntj
Florida.
COLEMAN INSTITUTE, INC.
. Il. Corp.
MARX FABBR
I --':. ai.i
'612 Congress Bldg.
Rabb Named to Campaign
By Special Report
WASHINGTON Maxwell M.
Rabb, New York attorney and for-
mer secretary to the cabinet of
President Eisenhower, was named
this week as assistant to Leonard
Hall, campaign chairman for the
Nixon-Lodge ticket. The announce-
ment was made by Hall at Nixon-
Lodge Headquarters here.
firm Adds Associate
John B. Orr, jr., and Lawrence
L Lazar announce that Millicent
Brass has become associated with
the firm of Orr and Lazar at 407
Lincoln rd. She formerly practic
ed under the name of Millicent
Brass Pelle. Richard Yale Feder
and A. Norman Drucker continue
as associates of Orr and Lazar.
Baron Edmond de Rothschild (left), chairman for Europe of the
Israel Bond campaign, who recently visited Israel, is shown
with Finance Minister Levi Eshkol studying plans for a new
housing development at Caesarea. In addition to surveying
the economic progress made possible with the aid of Israel
Bonds, the French Jewish leader undertook various economic
projects, including the expansion of his development program
for Caesarea. where a golf course has already been built and
where other facilities are to be set up to convert the area into
a major tourist attraction.
luncheon Features Skit
The Women's Division of the
Chamber of Commerce of Surfside,
Bal Harbour and Bay Harbor Is
lands will hold its first social of
the 1960-61 season on Wednesday
noon st the Singapore hotel. Lunch-
will be followed by a musical skit
written and directed by Trixie
Levin.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTIT.OUS NAME LAW
Notice is HEREBY OrVEM that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
i under ttie fictitious name of
HALE WASSON UECl.HI> Ml.
13020 N W. 7th Avenue, North I
Ploi Ida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JOSEPH UNO
I 1-21-28, 11/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OP/EM thai
ihe undersigned, aeolrlna to fnaasf in
business under the fictitious name oi
P. F. PROVISIONS at l"'... N v.
Hi.. Miami intends lo register said
name with the Clerk of t*ie Ciseuil
Court oi'Made County. Florida
PAIL FARRERMAN
PROVISIONS, INC.
s "In. corp.
NORMAN KOl'T
An., n.-> for Applicant
120 Lincoln Roud
10/21-2S. 11/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OS THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. escioisi
RAM'II TKXCEIX. Plaintiff.
vs.
ALICE CAMILI.E TEXCBLL,
I > lendant
YOU. ALICE CAMILI.E TKXCEI.L.
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to fi!c youi
. i>le;idln--s to this suit with this
conn's Clerk and aerve <^ cony on
Plalntlffa attorney, RICHARD alt-
SHl I.Kit. yb Id Bulldinu, Ml-
aml, Florida, on or before N<
2.1, IS0; else the Complaint will he
i.ik. n as confi n> d t.\ you.
DATED: i
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade C nty, 1
(seal) By k M i vma.n.
.'... Clelk
];:-:*. il '-li
NOTICE BY PCBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC AL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 6OC10173
HART v. ERBEROER WAIN,
I'la in: iff.
JACK W WAIN,
Mefendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO! TACK W WAIN
i:. ni ral I \l\ i y
Melbourne, i- .urida
Von JACK W WAIN are
I that a Bill ',.-.., :.
Divorce hia beeb filed asalnst you,
and you are required to m
of your Answei or Pleading lo the I ii!
of Complalnl on the pi.iintifrs Atmr-
aay, ARN( !.' n POl LOCK ot WTE1 -
I.ISCH. C(il CIIKKTY AND ZAIAC,
HI 4-19 Congress Building. Miaaui.
Florida, and file the original Answei
ur Pleading In the office of tin
of the Circuit Court on or before th.
21st day of November. ]9oU. If yov
fall to do so. Judgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief de-
manded in the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published i ni
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORlIHAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this lth day of October, A.D.
1S0.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LI.MA.N.
Deputy Clerk
ARNOLD H. POLLOCK
.Attorney of Counsel
Welllsch. Dougherty and Zaiac
1414-19 Congress Building
Miami. Florida
Atto-ney for Plaintiff
10/21-28. 11M-11
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 50S77
IN RE i
CARL QRASER
ased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All and A'l Persona Hav-
alma or Memani.s Agau.al fcaid
. :nands
which you th* ea-
CARL URASI 'I li-
: j. Plot da to ti
. 'ai'.e Conn
same In I!.. Ir offloea ir
Courthouse In i-ade
ndar montha from the
date of the n hereof, or
ame will l PAUL KW1TN "V
r of the i
.
PAUL KWITN
-ney
Miami Beach. Florida
' 28, 11/J-lJ
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS il' I1VEN "..
the undersigned, deslrinr I
s3 under the fictitious name of
BAR .: -"1)0 Palm Avenue
eah, Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court ol
I>ade County Fl. i
M< 18 A M I 'i >RP.
IOC-". B. 9th St.. Hialeah
INICK
Attorney f.-r Purchaaer
itoad
.Miami Beach. Ha.
10/21-28. 11/4-11
LEGAL NOTICI
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 50777 C
IN RE: Batate of
ALEX en. limes known urn
.M.I'V iNDER) POLLACK
I eased.
,..... J40TiCEjrO CREDITORS
Ml Cr> dltoi .ni.l All Pe-i soni H
I Claim* or Demand! Aaraln I
:-iic.
f I al> \ Iir.t if leil u ||d I <|H I
d to preaenl an> eaalma anel ilenuuid*
vlii-.'h you may
'at* of AI.ICX is'.meiiini's known a*
M.i:\ iNDER) POLLACK, i- I
i A I IE Count I- loi Ida. to
'ounty Judges ol Dade Potinty, and
':!. ihe si me ii their offices In ihe
'ounty Courthouse In Dadta C.....
ii thin hrkl calMKli.......ii
'rom Ihe date of the first r>ublic*tl u
hereof, ir I' DAVID D POLLACK,
utor
BDWARI II LEVIN,
Lttorni utor
tnj Conarea* Building
Miami ::2. Fla.
10/21-28.11/4-11
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DAD*
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C10O35
Mi 'KRIS FELTENHTEIN,
Plaintiff,
NKLLIF. FRLTMNSrTElN,
I lelendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
To NELLIE FELTKNSTEIN
1 111 Monigomery Street
New Brunawlck. New Jer**y
YOl" ARE HEREBY NOTI KIED-tfuit
a Coniiilalnt f*.r Divorce has li.-.-n filed
against you and you are r.-.j.liroal to
m i-oiij of y/>ur Answer or o*to r
pleadings on Plaintiff* attorn.>.
OBOKOE N Miul'ONKI.I,. :.l)4 9'"-
-ayne Building, Miami, Mor-fda, ami
file the original in Ihe o(fii-e of the
k of the circuit Court of Diide
County. Fli.rida on or hefort? the fist
day of November, r.'6i. in dcfsult of
which the Complaint will lie taken
ii unfi ued against you
DATED, .it Miami. I>de> Potattv,
this nth day of October, ah.
I960.
E i: LEATHERMAM.
('!. rk ..I ihe Circuit Court
in and for Dade Count y
1 I.WttW.
I ,iiy 'leik
II '4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAXW
NOTICE IS' HEREBY UIV EN tlial
the underalgned. desiring to .-rurage hi
, under D fictitious na
,:..-,. BTYLEi vis'ntiiir-i-iii'.s .,\
j i Keyaton* Blvd.. Norte Miami In-
tend to register said naau iih 111-
Circuit COOrl County, Florida. ____ ___
ALBERT tJABOL. :.%
SAI l. ..<1 "'I.
1" !l-2. il 4- U
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice .BY. 01VSX thai
the undersl- -ace i.n
bualnea the fictitious narre of
BtsOTS A SADDLE BAR at 24c
Avenue, Hialeah Intends to
raid name with the Clerk of c
cult Court of Dade County. Pier Ida.
M< 'S.\v CORP
1005 E. 49th St., Hialeah
HARRY Zl'KERNICK
e-y for Purchaser
Miami Reach,.Fla.
10/21-88.11/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE lh HEREBY GIVEN tti.it
the undersigned, desiring lo engage in
l.ui.lness under the fictitious name of
HERSHEY WINDOW SKRVH'B at
1855 Bay Road, Miami Beach. Florida
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dele
County, Florida.
MICHAEL COTTONE
LEONARD KALISH
Attorney for Applicant
1629 duPont Bldg.
10/14-U -28, U -4
NOTICE UNOB
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.it
ihe undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the flctltloui name of
FIFTH AVENUE ORIGIN A 1.8 at
number 2640 NW 5th Avenue in the
City of Miami, Florida Intends; to Bo-
lster the said name with the Olerfc of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
CINDY L.U OF MIAMI
By: Jaok Weinntein, President
TAUAMOW* WALlJCRAttyn.
42U Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach
10/14-11 28,11 4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF- THC
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF
FLORIDA ,N AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERV.
No. 60C 97941
I H MMPBON,
tiff,
vs.
tOARBT SI MI 'SON.
ndant
ORDER TO APPEAR
YOB M.ARfSARBT SIMI'Sl >N. B8
Franklin St. North C&roHna,
ai<. hereby required t< serve a
your answer to a complaint for dlvercw
tlntlffa attorney Haude M.
Miami, Mm-.
on ur befori the 15th day ol Nmini-
l0, and file the original In the
uf th Clerk of Ihe i
utherwiae a default will lie Ihi-
: auainet you.
!>- 10, 19P0.
B i:. LEATHERMAN, Clerk
i.f i nrt.
(seal) B) K M l.Y.MAN,
''
1* U-ll-M,|l 4
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S CO UHT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 504J66-C
:n RE: Estate of
QOLDA BAKER
ised.
NOT CE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All Persona K*v-
Ina Claims ,r !>eniand8 Analnpt laid
You ar^ hereby notified and r-eonir-
d to present arty claims and demands
whleh you may have against t
tate of QOLDA BAKER deceas.
off MADE County, Florida, t eenty Judge* of Dade Cottnt^-. and
file the same in their offlcs in the
county Courthouse in Dade Couetv,
. within eight calendar mcUfchs
from the dsite of the first publUadim
hereof, or the same will he liar-res.
Ml'EL C BAKER
Administrator
MARK SILVERSTE1N
Attorney
-i-oln Road
10/14-iI-
, /


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Page 14-B +Jenisti ncrkHan Friday, Qtcober 21. i 360 Jewish Teen-Agers Have Harder Time, Expert Declares By Special Report WASHINGTON — Adolescence is more difficult for the Jewish teen-ager than his Christian contemporary, says a veteran Jewish j youth worker. Complicating the adjustment tor the Jewish youngsters are "his status as a member of a minority group and the ambivalences created by Judaism's lack of dogma." writes Dr. Daniel Raylesberg. of New York, in a pamphlet. "The Jewish Adolescent." published this week by the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization. Dr. Raylesberg is the youth group's regional director lor the northeast United States and eastern Canada. Christian and Jewish youth both go through a period of questioning many aspects of life around them. But the Jewish youngsters. Dr. Raylesberg emphesiies, must find answers to questions which never occur to Christian te en-agers. Such as • "What is a Jew? How does one express himself as a Jew?" e "What causes anti-Semitism 0 • "What shall I be?—Orthodox. Conservative, Reform. Reconstructtionist. or secular?" • "Can and should Jews assimilate?" Youth organizations which have as their basic objectives the development of a positive philosophy about Jewish life go a long way toward making the | adjustment easier, the author deLipton Pledges Miami Support By Special Report ROME program 1961 Joint "One need not have all the answers to be of service to Jewish adolescents who are seeking answers." Dr. Raylesberg writes. "In'group work we help people by enabling them to become more aware of the questions they wish to ask and to find the answers for themselves, rather than providing answers for them." Tom by Dr. Wolhon "Our Best Years" was to be the topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham Wolf son. director of the Spinoza Outdoor Forum for Adult Education, before the Athletie Club on Thursday. 8:30 am at the 10th st. beach. MISS CHULOTTt fltltD Miss Fried Named to Staff Appointment of Barry Eisenberg with Maidenform Inc. was announced this week in New York. Eisenberg will be in charge of marketing and Bales of the company's line of swimsuits in the Southeastern United States, with offices and showroom at the Miami Beach Federal bldg., 407 Lincoln id. He recently was the Southeastern regional sales manager for Flexees Inc.. manufacturer of swimsuits and "foundation garments. Eisenberg lives at 4421 Sheridan ave. Mrs. Nathan D. Perlman (center), national chairman of the Hadassah Medical Organization committee in the United States, is shown presenting Dr. Kalman I. Mann (left), directorgeneral of the Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel, with a "surgical stapler" developed in the Soviet Union. Looking on is Prof. Bernhard Zondek. head of Hadassah's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem. The mechanical instrument, designed for joining the ends of blood vessels and nerves, last week was taken to Israel by Dr. Mann for use by surg3ons of the Hadassah Medical Organization. Beach Drives To Air Condition New High School The raising of funds for the airconditioning of the Miami Beach Senior High School is in high gear. Approximately 50 workers, many of them leading businessmen and heads of organizations affiliated with the Presidents' Council, have begun*' a massive distribution of tickets and literature to the Baseball Game and Field Day sponsored by the Presidents' Council of Miami Beach last Sunday afternoon at Flamingo Park. According to Allen Goldberg, president, every' business organization, including tl^e Lincoln Progress Assn.. Washington Avenue Merchants Assn.. Arthur Godfrey Road Assn., and the Alton Road Assn. contacted their members and exhibited posters advertising the event. Ted Cohen is general chairman of the fund-raising drive. Dr. J. A. Greenhouse is treasurer. Reception committee consisted of Joe Cohen, Charles Hall, Melvin Richard. Wolfie Cohen. Leonard Coleman, Harold B. Spaet. Jack Gordon and Ritter Levinson. Head of the Lawyers Division was Judge Milton Feller, assisted by Harold Rosen, Frank Conn. Irving Firtel, James Ruby and Julius J. Perlmutter. Restaurant Division consisted of Edward Lassman. Sam Schwartz, and Irving Kaplan. David Klinger headed the distri but ion of tickets among the Gasoline Dealers Assn. of Miami Beach. Ticket committee consisted of Harry Erlanger. chairman and Leonard Glasser, Dr. Stanley Coltune. Dr. I. W. Lippman. Ed Mandel, Norman K Schwartz, and Barbara Kleinman. Publicity committee included Parks Rusk. James Wendler, Paul Bruun. Hank Meyer. Ray Redman and Pete Heller. Real Estate Division consisted of George Whitney, David Emmer. Ray Sterling, Harold Segal, and Ben Zion Ginsburg. Laundry and Dry Cleaners Division was headed by Henry Cove. Retail Merchants Division consisted of Adrian Thai. Alfred Mart, Austin Burk, Al Zable and Fred Grimmig. Edward J. Melniker headed the bank committee. Milton Sirktn, B. Bayard Strell. Simon Rubin and George Zoller were in charge of special events. Insurance committee consisied of Carl Gardner and George Levenson. Nat Potamkin headed the Car Dealers Assn. Mrs. Perfes Appointed Mrs. Rose Pertes received a new was honor this week when she named Florida State organizer f the Navy Mothers Club Mrs P? :es s presently a commander in the group. In addition to her minv other activities, Mrs. p e rt e3 %  membership chairman of the Gt of Miami bPautlfication-conimlttee Western Cookout Saturday — Support of the of the American Distribution Committee on behalf of more than 200,000 Jews in 25 countries, was pledged here Tuesday by Joseph M. Lipton on behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal of Greater Miami, following a series of meetings arranged over the. Western cookout will be held by weekend for the 1960 United Jewthe South Dade chapter of the Na ish Appeal Study Mission. tional Children's Cardiac Hospital Lipton is generat chairman of f"/ 3 '"^.^ eni "8. 6.30 p. m at the 1961 campaign of the Com-' "* Pl 8e Ranch. 9940 SW bined Jewish Appeal, of which the "„ ,/£'. C, -!!"£:._1 iniorma I'nited Jewish Appeal is a major beneficiary. Host of the Study Mission in Rome was the Joint Distribution Committee, major agency for serving needy Jews overseas and constituent member, together tion is Mrs. Sandy Salzman, with the Jewish Agency for rael, of the UJA. Is Miami Chapter Will Hear Antique Expert Display of rare and unusual antiques and a discussion of their history will be presented by R*. In addition to the series of briefki of Rikkj s studl0 t0 m / mbe ing sessions, the members of the of tne Miami chapter of H adasf increasing numbers are tak; for a study of welfare needs in Is rael. Attorney Speaks To Police Here As part of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith educational program in human relations, MorIton Lee Perry, Miami attorney, I presented a "Rumor Clinic" proIgram before police officers at the j Miami Police Academy. Perry spoke to the group on Charlotte Fried, registered den-;"With Justice for Ail," a booklet tal hygienist. has been appointed on police techniques in furthering by the executive board to serve as law and order for all groups regarda staff member for the National less of race, color or creed. Children's Cardiac Home. Witn j ustic f or Ml ig aUo Miss Fried, recently elected to I being used as a text by law enmembership in Phi Sigma Alpha,iforcemeat authorities in Hollynational dental hygienists' honori wood, Daytona Beach, Ft. Lauderary society, is associated with Dr. j da l e West Pa l m Beach, Daytona ing out life membership in Hadassah as an act of dedication to its work and faith in the future. "The tile membership plan not only guarantees continuity of membership, but helps long-range planning on the local and national scene." At the present time, there are 135 life members in the Mi| ami chapter of Hadassah. Mrs. Irving Denmark is life membership co-chairman. Mrs. Louis Goldman is chapter president. Doran D. Zinner in the Huntington bldg. Beach, Jacksonville, Sarasota, Or lando, Deerfield Beach and Metro Dade county. The pamphlet, prepared jointly by the ADL and the International Assoc. of Chiefs of Police, is endorsed by the Southern Police InArthur Spiegel, education Women's Member Coffee Sisterhood of Temple Adath Yeshurun will hold a membership coffee and fashion show on Wednesday evening at the Diplomat hotel. Medical Fund Party Tuesday Greater Miami Women's Auxili-1 stitute ary, Jewish Home for the Aged, director of the Florida ADL office, will hold its annual Sidney Appeli — Medical Fund gift party at a monthly meeting on Tuesday noon at the Algiers hotel. Mrs. Sol Silverman. Auxiliary president, will give the address of welcome. Mrs. Nat E. Katz, chair' man of the Sidney Appel Medical Fund, will give the invocation. Judge Harold B. Spaet, honorary president of the Home will bring a message from Douglas Gardens.! Proceeds of the Sidney Appel 1 Medical Fund help pay for special! *0 medical needs of residents. Mrs. Ben Orlow, membership, chairman, will discuss the memBARTOK bership coffee planned for Dec. 22 at the Fontainebleau hotel for new members and their sponsors. Rummage Safe Monday Tifereth Israel Sisterhood wttl hold a rummage sale at Stevens Market. 6209 NW 27th ave., on Monday. presented a similar program before law enforcement authorities in training at Miami Beach. Gvesf Speaker Heard Chai chapter of B'nai B'rith Women met Tuesday at the Delmonico hotel. Guest speaker was Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitz, spiritual leader of Temple Zamora. ftMMMfe Sale Scheduled Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood of Beth Torah Congregation is sponsoring a rummage sale at Stevens Market, 551 NE 167th st., No. Miami Beach, on Oct. 26. Miami Attorney Will be Speaker Ben-Zvi Branch of the Labor Zionists will meet at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Grunhut, 961 SW 58th ave.. on Tuesday eve ning. Miami attorney Oscar Rappaport is scheduled to address the group on "Legal Aspects of the Eichmann Case," it was announced by Andre Bialolenki, president. Dr. Sylvan Schotz, program chairman, has arranged for Miss Yaffe Rosenthal, Hebrew teacher, to present a demonstration of Israeli dances. Also included in the program will be songs by Cantor Abraham Self and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Yomen. The next regular meeting of BenZvi is scheduled for Nov. 30, at Washington Federal, 1244 Washington ave. <#&& From BRAHMS You'll Hear the World's Finest Music 16 Hours a Day on FM aa 93 1 100 KM 108 HC WAF Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers From Soft Drinks to Savings Institutions DADE FEDERAL SAYINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION



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Page 6-A -Jmist, Ocrkfian Friday, Otcober 21. I960 U.S. Urged to Block Electioneering Jim Carey, president of International Union of Electrical Workers (left), and Arthur Spiegel, director of education, Florida ADL Office, discuss Anti-Defamation League exhibit of human relations materials on exhibit during the IUE convention held at the Carillon hotel last week. Union Leaders See ADL Exhibit Over 1,000 trade union leaders were exposed to the human rela tions educational materials distributed by the Ami Defamation League of B'nai B'rith during the International Union of Electrical Workers convention held last IT nnth. Paul Seiderman. chairman of the Florida board of the ADL announced Wednesay. "An ADL exhibit at the conven tion received much attention fror the delegates representing hun drcds of locals from 35 states, anthis offered a unique opportunit< for union leaders and organizers t< be mailp familiar with the positive human relations work of our agen ty. Seiderman said. Members of B'nai B'rith women's chapters, throughout the week-low convention, manned the exhibi; and answered hundreds of inquir ies directed to them about Jews aBti-Semitism, race relations, and education. Volunteers included Mrs. Richari Hecht, Mrs. Herbert Heiken, Mrs Alfred Reich. Miss I.inda Brown Mrs. George Shaw. Mrs. Dalton Is lael, Mrs. Jack Lobell, Mrs. Louis Sokol and Mrs. Al Goldberg, whq spent time meeting with delegates and consulting with them on po tivc rage relations programs. Arthur Spiegel, director of edu cation of the Florida ADL office, met with officers throughout the convention and planned programs and techniques for increased intergroup understanding with the trade union movement. Young Judea Youth Group More than 50 youngsters attend cd the first meeting of the Young Judea Youth Group held Monda> evening at Beth Torah Congrega lion. Leaders include Doris Horowitz and Sdndra Levy. The group.meet Monday evenings at 7:15 p.m. Beach Realtors Sleet Simon George A. Simon bas been nam;d president of the Miami Beach Board of Realtors. He succeeds George Frix. One of the most active members f the organization, Simon has served as a director of the Board .'or three years. He is a former chairman of its convention committee, and was among the leaders n the development of plans for he Florida Assn. of Realtors convention which opens at the Dupont Maza this week. Simon it • member of the state association's board of governors, and also servos as a member of the public relations committee on a national level. He has been active in real estate circles since 194*. Named first vice president of the •iremization was Edward J CharBy Special Report YOUNGSTSOWN, O. — National Commander of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States, I. L. Feuer, has called on the State Department to censure "the intruI sion of Arab governments into the 'American election campaign" and I to oust offending Arab ambassa%  dors. Feuer pointed out that Iraq, "an Arab State heavily oriented toward the Soviet orbit, has gone | so far as to protest to our Department of State against a speech by a candidate for the presidency, United States Sen. John F. Kennedy, of Massachusetts, to an American audience in an American city. New York.'' Iraq threatened the United States with a deterioration of diplomatic relations unless Sen. Kennedy was silenced on the subject of Israel and Jew ish issue. The national commander urged the "immediate rejection" of a diplomatic note handed to the American Embassy in Baghdad by the Iraqi Foreign Ministry. Citing the State Department's admission of "concern" as to a speech delivered in Washington, D. C, by UAR Ambassador Mustafa Kamel at a recent convention of Arab students, Commander Feuer said the Ambassador should be declared persona non grata to end his intervention in American domestic politics. Ambassador Kamel had told Arab students assembled in Washington that it was their "duty" to enter American election activity despite the (act that they are citizens of one of the Arab states, and are guests of America on tempo' Metro Names Kahn to Board Burton S. Kahn, civic and business leader, has been appointed a member of the Metropolitan Dade County Zoning Appeals Board by tthe Dade County Commission. Kabn was named to succeed Charles Crandon, who recently resigned from this post. Kahn's appointment is effective immediately, and he will serve until June 18. 1962. A long-time resident of Miami Beach, Kahn is president of Colonial Pontiac, Inc., and formerly served as president of the Greater Miami Automobile Dealers Assn. In addition to his activities in the automotive field, Kahn has been active in the real estate and 1 construction field in Dade and rary student visas. He urged the students to propagandize American voters against political candidates, including Sen. KelfflWy, who support the rights of the State of Israel. Feuer said he also "impugned the loyalty of American citizens of the Jewish faith." Commander Feuer pointed out: "We have enough trouble with native agitators injecting spurious religious issues into the current campaign without permitting the Arab Ambassador in Washington to violate the rules of diplomatic behavior by such shocking intrusion into purely domestic matterss." Mr. Fever said that any of the estimated 4,000 Arab students here who agitate against American political candidates on • religious basis should be deported for "unseemly intrusion into our internal affairs." "There are already too many bigots striving to divide Americans without importing Arab hate that all too often follows Communist lines," he said. Feuer suggested an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and appropriate committee of the Congress. He said that the Jewish War Veterans, which was the first national organization decrying the injection of religion in the present! campaign, is dedicated to the prcs-1 ervation of American institutions. | including free elections. According to Commander Feuer, ^ forms of diplomacy might'pen* tne presence in m.s count !" of,'* desirable diplomatic guesj. !, T United Nations but v,'^!."? ly do not have to allow such „ sons to intrude into our elecZ," and set American against AmcrL can because of religious dififr ences. "' HOW ABOUT YOUR YAURZEIT DATES? New edition of 24-Year Hebrew-English Calendar civet Yahrzeit dates at a glance. In fact, all Hebrew dates and day? of the week from October }'J40 to September 1964. All Jewish holidays to 1&70! For free eopu, write H.J.HEINtTcp. Dept J2, Wttaburgh 30, Pa. Announce Hi/by To Help Drain JM8 Sinus Cavities X Without Discomfort ., New itCMfistttt taktot ftr sHws CMf istior. sufferers r acts bttk ts arai-. ctogfw] sfem cavities and relieve distressful head ISM Broward counties during the past 22 years. boneau. Herbert Lee Simon was elected second vice president. Mildred Callahan is new secretarytreasurer. Directors for three-year terms are Pauline Eden. Ernest A. Jones, Joseph Kolisch, J. A. Stone, and Harry S. Swan. New York, N. Y. (Special) Announcement has been made of a new tablet development which baa the remarkable ability to help drain clogged sinus cavities and thus relieve congestion and pressure. The headaches, pressure pains, stnffed-up head, nasal drip, clogged breathing—aR the unrelenting symptoms the ainus sufferer knows so well —are attacked directly by improving drainage of the ainus areas. Most remarkable of all is the fact that this is accomplished with extraordinary speed and without discomfort of any kind. This new tablet does its remarkable work internally, through the blood stream. It deposits into every drop of blood plasma a new medication which is carried to the sinus area, where it shrinks the swollen doors to tat sinus cavities and help? drain away the pain-causing pressum and congestion. The shrinking substance in this new tablet has been so successful topically in promoting drainage of the sinus cavities that it is now prescribed ruora widely by doctors than any material for this purpose. This new medication is now available tt drug counters without the need for a prescription under the name, Dristan* Decongestant Tablets. Dristan Tablets cost only 98* for a bottle of 24 tablets. Buy and use Dristan Tablets with the absolute guarantee that they will drain away paincausing pressure and congestion of the sinus cavities, relieve the pain and distress, or purchase price will be refunded. 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Page 8-A 9-JmistncrHian Friday, Otcober 21, Golda Refutes Arab Charges at UN Continued from Pg 1-A did they have to say about this racial doctrine at thai time"" In reply to Arab complaints that Israi 1 had refused to obey United Nation* resolutions, she commented: But what was the answer of the Arab League to the United Nations resolution of 1947? They not oih rejected it. but they went to war to defeat it." This •historical error"' of the Arab intervention in Palestine, she pointed out. "left behind it a bitter legacy, including the creation of the Arab refugee problem." The Arab States themselves, she declared, quoting Arab sources, were responsible for he flight of the Arab population. To the accusations of "expanliv n Katz (right), principal of Miami Beach High School, was guest speaker at v services of Temple Menorah last Friday. Stcnding (center) is Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual leader ci .he Temple, who looks on as Mark Granoff (standing left) ODd Janice Revitz, students at Beach High, discuss the address, ch accented youth. NOW!' V A Small Air Conditioner ^with 30% More Moisture 4 Removal... Longer Life YORK POWERFUL-QUIET ROOM AIR CONDITIONER MAKE US PROVE IT See On-The-Spot Presentation That Eraser All Doubts' See how York's exclusive Cooling Maze coils remove 80% more humidity from the air. Find out how York delivers extra cooling BTU's per kilowatt to give you the greatest total comfort at lowest operating cost. See how York's DualThrust Compressor cut* operating sounds to a whisper. Come to eye-opening YORK DEMONSTRATION CENTER! All YORK UNITS ARE SACKED IV WRITTEN PCRFORMANCE GUARANTEE HILL-YORK CORPORATION I 1225 S. W. 8th Street FR 1-1411 sionist aim*," Mr*. Meir replied briafly, demolishing tha "fairy tales about map* and textbooks." "None of tha foreign diplomat* in Israel, and tha thousand* of foreign visitor* who com* to tha Knesset, she said, "had evar soon tha map of Israel'* expansionist program which the Lob, anese dale gate said hung there, for one simple reason — it does not exist and never has existed." Mrs. Meir disposed of charges 1 about the condition of Israel Arabs by affirming that all Israeli Arabs "enjoy the same political rights [ as do the Israeli Jews." No Arab i state, she said, "can point to the achievement of a standard of living for the masses of its population that may be compared favorably to the standard ot living of the Israeli Arabs." Mrs. Meir was most effective in refuting Arab warnings against Israel's alleged "colonialism." She told the Assembly: "We are proud of our relations with these new states." The Arabs know their charges are nonsense, she said, •and what is more important — the Africans themselves know it is nonsense. The leaders of the African ( countries are not to be frightened by meaningless slogans." In the entire United Nations, the Israeli Foreign Minister declared, there was only one instance where| member states declared openly j that another member-state had no right to exist and should be put I out of existence. "This is the posi-| tion loudly proclaimed by the Arab States against Israel." she noted. | "Is this in keeping with tha Charter of the United Nations?" she asked. "Is this in keeping I with the obligation that each I state takes upon itself when it is received into membership of j the United Nations? Can this organization overlook such a serious repudiation of tha Charter? My delegation sincerely believes that the time is overdue for this organization to remind the Arab states of their basic obligations." The Israeli Foreign Minister j concluded her address with a fer-i vent appeal for negotiations. "Let us make peace," she said, "pledge. ourselves to non-aggression and | j have our borders internationally J guaranteed. We are prepared. Wei | ask the Arab states to agree. When] i they do, there will be a genuine j I prospect of ending a conflict of I which the world is weary, and of| j opening up a new vista of progress for our troubled region." Musa Nasir, Foreign Minister of Jordan, again mounted the Assem-j bly rostrum today "to correct some of the misrepresentations" he attributed to Mrs. Meir. Rejecting: the offer of peace negotiations, he reiterated all the old charges, against Israel's "aggressions," and added some fresh allegations about Israel's purported "persecution'' of Arabs living in the Jewish State. Fruchtman Will Get Top Award By Special Report TOLEDO — Charles Fruchttman, of Toledo, O.. and Miami Beach, who began his American careeer with a strong back and a sledge hammer, will receive one of the highest awards American Jewry can bestow at a special national ceremonial dinner here on Nov. 1. Fruchtman will be given the Louis Marshall Award for 1961. which goes to the citizen who is outstanding in his civic contributions and who "follows in the honored tradition of lay leadership, cherishing always the living force of our great faith." At the same ceremony at a dinner in Temple B'nai Israel here, announcement will be made that an associate professorship will be formally established in perpetuity in Fruchtman'* name at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Speaker will be Dr. Louis Finkelstein, chancellor of the Seminary, and internationally known scholar and religionist, who also will present the award. SINCI 192* P.W DAI tsjND** NO DOWN PAYMENT! 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Friday. Otcober 21. 1960 +Je*lsiifk>rkHain Pag 5-B i r Beach Hadassah Plans Capsule Confab; To Feature Workshop Sessions Here Miami Beach chapter of Hadassah will hold its 1961 Capsule Conference at the Algiers hotel on Monday from 9:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Theme of the conference will be Henrietta Szold's words, "Make my Eyes Look to the Future." Mrs. Fred Jonas is president of the chapter. Miss Lillian Goodman, chairman of the conference, said Wednesday that "Hadassah must meet its many challenges this year Decause this is the historic year of the dedication of the Medical Center in Jerusalem, the 100th anniversary year of the birth of Henrietta Szold, its founder, and the 100th anniversary of the birth of Theodore Herzl, founder of political Zionism. "Hadassah women have recognized the significance of important days in Hadassah's life and many of them have, and are daily, translating their emotion into permanent affiliation through life membership." In addition to its basic task of providing motivation, direction, content and guidance in the field of Jewish education, Hadassah will locus its attention on two pioneering endeavors. One of these, a new and unique approach to Bible .study, will be presented as a vital part of the organization's program in the coming year. The other is to further Jewish education for youth through a serious exploration of an "action program" which has brought Hadassah into consultation with many leading educators. "In our American Affairs Department we are concerned with the development of an informed responsible core of good citizens, and to that end have brought and will continue to bring information on disarmament, education problems, housing, and international meetings," Mrs. Goodman explained. "In this election year, every effort is being made to bring a continued flow of information on the issues that will confront the electorate. Hadassah will not endorse any candidate but will continue its policy of support of issues not persons," according to Mrs. Jonas. The morning of the Capsule Conwith a Flair.., THB (EMVILLE Complete Catering Facilities for that Special Party served in an elegant fashion williin a luxurious setting that will reflect your good l.i-te. CONFIRMATIONS RECEPTIONS WEDDINGS BANQUETS MEETINGS PARTIES Tetea telf or a gala celebration with 3.500J Ruels. iQL BILL ^GOLDRING" 1 CATtRINO \S^ MKIOi Supervised Koilur Catering Available 6 UN 5-8511 X 0NTH(0CIAN 6?th TO 69th STS: MIAMI BEACH MISS LILLIAN GOODMAN ference will be devoted to special "Know How" clinic workshops where prescriptions will be given for remedies and guaranteed cures for Hadassah groups to gain good health and organizational strength. On "Membership," Mrs. Nathan Barth will preside as coordinator. Participants are Mrs. Arthur Applebaum, "Operation Shoe-leather*. Mrs. Ellis Amdur, "W e 1 c o m e Stranger;" and Mrs. Oscar Sindell, "The Nest Egg." On "Fund-Raising Clinic," Mrs. Lillian Perlman will preside as moderator. Featured are Mrs. Dorothy K. Fink, Mrs. Inez Krensky, Mrs. Philip Thau, Mrs. Bernard Berkley, Mrs. Nat Barth. "Brainstorming Techniques" includes as participants Mrs. Joseph Maze. Mrs. Jack Davis, Mrs. Morris Kogan. "Donor Reward" discussion will be by Mrs. Joseph Shapiro. Presiding for the "Education Session" is Mrs. Sanford Jacobson, and for "Programming Clinic," Mrs. Jack Falk. During the program of the afternoon, the audience will be greeted by Miss Gooaman followed by summations of morning deliberations by Mrs. Jones. Highlight of the afternoon session will be "The Great Debate." Moderator will be Mrs. Dorothy K. Fink, chapter's American Affair chairman, who will present lames Guilmartin, Republican, :"ormer U.S. Attorney for South Florida; and Earl Faircloth, canCfc0J||| WeiimOim Group didate for State Senator and leading Democrat. Mrs. Joseph Sugerman, treasurChaim Weizmann group of Hadassah will hold its annual m uer, Mrs. Harry Platoff, auditor, I bership ana re-enroilment party and Mrs. Ira Krivizin, financial sec-1 Monday evening at the Miami PioretaryTare-lh charge of tickets, fineer's Club, 250 NW No. River dr. nances and reservations. Mrs. Anne Melnick is arrangement chairman. An estimated audience of 500 women is expected. Guest speaker will be Mrs. Morns Lauretz, chapter membership chairman. Refreshments will be served by the group's member I up chairman, Mrs. Rae Winkler. Have that Business Meeting, nquet, or Special Occasion 'Exodus 1 Ball Shapes Up Here # You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a wedding or a private party I It thi For the third consecutive year, the Israel Bond campaign will close with a gala ball. This year's function, the "Exodus" Diplomatic Ball, is scheduled for Dec. 3 in the grand ballroom of the Fontainebleau hotel. "Those who remember the success and glamor of the previous affairs can look forward to an even more outstanding ball this year, promise Samuel Oritt and J. A. Cantor, general chairmen of the bond drive. "We'll have a number of special guests, including Hollywood stars and prominent figures from around the nation and from Israel." Included on the list thus far are Avraham Harmon, Israel Ambassador to the United States; Shimon Peres, Israel's Minister of Defense; Aliza Gur, Miss Israel, who represented the nation in the Miss Universe Pageant recently. Hon. James G. McDonald, first United States Ambassador to Israel, and now chairman of the Advisory Council of the State of Israel Bond drive, is serving as honorary chairman. The distinguished statesman is a familiar figure to Greater Miamians, who have welcomed him to the city many times on behalf of Israel Bonds. The plush formal ball is expected to attract a capacity guest list of 2.200. Attendance is limited to purchasers of $1,000 bonds. Reservations are $25 per couple, and this sum includes two free tickets to the pre-premiere of "Exodus" on Dec. 20 at the Sheridan Theater. Taken from the novel by the Ike Aronovitz, captain of the same na me, "Exodus" is the film c/k crs tor Inform all on i HAZEL ALLISON Catering Director. JE 1-6061 %  th St. a Colllna Av*>. famed ship "Exodus;" and lovely CP Unit Will Show Fashions Miami Beach Women's Unit of United Cerebral Palsy will hold its annual membership lunch at the Seville hotel on Tuesday noon. Entertainment will include a fur fashion show, for which a quarter of a million dollars in furs has been brought from New York. Models will also show imported Parisian halts by Lilly Street. Chairman for the afternoon is Mrs. Albert Budlow. Co-chairman is Mrs. William Levin. Southgate Oneg Shabbat Southgate group of Hadassah will hold its first Oneg Shabbat on Saturday, 2 p.m.. in the Recreation Center of Southgate Towers, 910 West ave. Rabbi Henry Wernick will review "G rest Ages and Ideas of the Jewish People." Mrs. Henry Schwartz, vice president in charge of education, has prepared the program. CATERING to banquets, parties, weddings — any social function with superb cuisine, and service. Plus the talents of an imaginative staff and luxurious surroundings. MAY WE MAN YOUR OCCASION? Call: UN 6-8031 ARTHUR tE.'CHNER. Executive Food Director rfw MartiniqueDelmonlco HotW OB IIII Ocean at 64th St. • Miami leach version of Leon Uris' inspiring account of the birth of the State; of Israel. It was filmed in color entirely on location in Israel and Cyprus. The top cast includes such stars as Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Peter Lawford, Sal Mineo, and John Derek. Aliza Gur is also in the film. i THE DIPLOMAT NOTII AND COONT1Y ClUS 1200 '••! •( 0 MM NellywMrf-by-ilw-Sva. flerUe Information: Domenic



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Friday, Ctcober 21. I960 -Jewlsti rhriii tr Page 7-B MRS. lOStPH KRANTZ •ioneer Women's Vograms Slated Mrs. Ruth UI in. Mrs, William Beckwith. present, is in charge of the afternoon, frich will be devoted to outlining %  vines and programs for the B>i)n. The social hour will he feted by Mrs. Jack Caichom, ^spitality chairman. • • • Pioneer Women's Club One will Id its annual installation on urs:ay evening, Oct. 27 in the yal Hungarian restaurant. Mrs. ilton Green will install incoming ficers and board of directors. Mrs. Joseph Krantz has been unimou-Iy reelected for a third rni of office as president. Serving with Mrs. Krantz will Mrs. Simon Wilensky and Mrs. feck Javitz. vice presidents; Mrs. Dukler, recording secretary; rs. Rcse Lifshitz, corresponding cretary; Mrs. Leah Notkin, finanal secretary; Mrs. Minnie Baw, treasurer. Members of the board are Mrs. enry S e i 11 i n and Mrs. Betty hechter. Moetzet Hapaolot; Mrs. ose Garber and Mrs. E. Yaffe, ild rescue; Mrs. David Freedan, cultural; Mrs. Pearl Rosenhan, sunshine; Mrs. L. Yelson and Irs. Masha Goldfarb, publicity. Bebe Idelson Club installation Rill take place on Thursday, Nov. J. in the Washington Federal Savngs and Loan Assn. on Normandy sle. Incoming officers are presilent, "rs Isaac Offenhenden; nee president, Mrs. Charles Lang; reasurer. Mrs. Sarah Babries; fiancial and recording secretary, Mrs. Fannie Levinee; corresponding secretary, Mrj. Meyer Siegel. Annual Halloween Dance Annual Halloween dance of the Temple Beth Am Sisterhood will have music and entertainment by I Johnny Masters and his orchestra,! when it takes place Oct. 29. Har-i riet Segal, dance committee chair-! man, said the affair will include a costume parade. Belie Earth to Sing Regular monthly meeting of the Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid, will be held on Wednesday evening, Oct. 26, in Sklar Auditorium. Belle Barth, renowned entertainer, will present a program of "Songs our Mothers Taught Us." Mrs. Louis Cohen is president. A KAY-MOSS ^tas\cWs\w "Vtome is the kind of a home in the kind of a neighborhood that a mother would want.. for her son! "1 ^ %  % % %  H OAK PARQUET FLOORS CENTRAL HEATING CENTRAL AIR-CONDITIONING OVERSIZED GARAGES 3 & 4 BEDROOM HOMES 21,49522,995 INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE NOW ON I SAVE M.OOO. FIRST p*r*on who pUcet a deposit aaah day *a • BOW Wetlh —w Home Will fed Hjm Mw-lW froot lb. KHJll COM of U>* bWM. NO DOWN PAYMENT. IF YOU WISH. another KAY and MOSS presentation at CORAL WAY AND SOUTHWEST 84th AVE. Cioo by Coral Way Jowlah Ctnltr, Wotch*t*r Shopping Plaxa, Pood Pair Koeher Moat Market. LISTEN TO THIS: • Colonials, Moderns, Cape Coda, • 8 •ww — "•* just one, and range • Extra large garages a "htrtA driveand English Country-side exterior a Step-ap bedroom wings .Decorator-, ways* Individually styled lamp post*. elevations, all on lushly landscaped designed kitchen cabinets # Schools 'surround' WeMcnestcr •olid sodded lots with a concre • Acoustical tile in all Florida „ p., mello E^^*2 minutc wav louvered fence at the rear of eveiy ••* • *'1 hardware back yard. • Awning windows • • Garbage disposals* Bedrooms with Flower boxes • Lanai's • Loggia's ^ va w h s— • Kitchens with pantries



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Friday. Oteober 21. 1960 "Jewtsii Meridian Page 15-B Oti ituctries SAMUEL H. BARNETT 41. of I?Sf Cleveland nl died Oct. IS. %  --MIX ago from Philadelphia, BurMsUfN SlVlTZKf UM Symphony To Open Season University of Miami Symphony Orchestra will open its 34th year Sunday evening at Miami Beach Auditorium with Fabien SevitzVy conducting. The opening concert will be repeated Monday evening at Dade County Auditorium. Both concerts will be without the benefit of the ori*>nally-anr.conced soloist, pianist Eugene Istorrm, who took ill early this week and will not be able to attend. Pinch-hitting i* the worldrenowned pianist, Gary Graffman, who will perform the Concerto No. 2 in C minor by Rachmaninoff as programmed. Sevitzky has planned the season's nine pair of programs for the pleasure and satisfaction of every group ol listeners — as the opener indicates. in addition to the Rachmaninoff, there will be performances of Symphony No. 1 in E minor by Sibelius and the Prelude to "Die Meiser singer," by Wagner. Greenberger Named to Staff Robert B. Greenberger, a veteran of 25 years* in the cemetery I business, has been added to the staff of Lake side Memorial* Park, 10300 NWs 25th St., Miami. Announcement of Greenberger's appointment was made by Mrs. Samuel Oritt, OKHfiWCM vice president of Lakeside, a nonprofit organization. Greenberger was formely director of sales for Montefiore Cemetery Corporation, Long Island, NY. He now resides on Miami Beach at 8620 Byron ave. vivhiK are his wifi and .lody; ni.daughters, Dumia i fin*, Mr and Mr*. Abraham B :i brother, Byron: and two slsterf Mrs. France* Nathan and Mrs. Ruth Lazar. Iiurial won in \lt Nebo Cemetery, with ordon Funeral Home in charge of arrangi MRS. DORIS CANTER '-'. "f low Lenox av< died Oct. I %  ago from N.w York City. survivors include her hueband, Ifinaiid, a I ruth.r and services and burial were in New York, jrtth local arransementa i>y Riverside Memorial Chapel. ABRAHAM GOLDMAN 71, of 626 Ocean dr., died Oat 9. He l m here six years ago from New York, ami was a retired furrier, sjrvlvora Include his wife, Molly; three %  laughters. Mra, Rose Kedderman. Mrs Adeie Cohen, and Mrs. Yetta Katz; four grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Services were Oct. 9 at Riverside Memorial Chapel. Alton id. CHARLES KATZ 74, retired hardware merchant, died Oct. t. He came to Miami seven year* ago. and lived at 1056 Jefferson i.ve. Surviving locally la his wife. Katie. Services and burial were In New York. with local arrangements by Riverside Memorial Chapel. HERMAN PAUL LISS 47. retired meat dealer of 170 NE 171st ter., died Oct. 8. He came here six years ago from Brooklyn. Survivors include his wife. Honnie; daughter. Roberta: and three brothers. Including Irving and Avid, of No. Miami Reach: two sisters, Mrs. Helen Kaplan and Mra, Rose Pain. Bervtaaa wenOct. 10 at Riverside Memorial Chapel. .Normandy Isle. MATTHEW B. GOLDBERG 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay 1. HoldRabbi Narof Will Preach in N.Y. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot, spiritual leader of Temple Israel of Greater Miami, has been invited to deliver the dedicatory sermon in Temple Rodeph Sholom, New York City, on Saturday morning in behalf of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, parent body of Reform Judaism in America. Dr. Narot's sermon will be part df a several-days conference of the larger Reform congregations in the United States. The occasion will mark the deification of the new building program in Mow York City for the House of Living Judaism, headquarters for the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Dr. Narot's sermon will present the theme that the American Jew is best able to find his integrity 'through the synagogue and its three-fold function of study, prayer and the building of good human relationships. Accompanying Rabbi Narot to New York to attend the conference will be Mr. and Mrs. Max Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sam A. Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Harris, and Mr and Mrs. Henry E. Wolff. • Sgfl N\V ITSUl -l died Oct. r H* was a Miami In addl %  ui i r. ed b: i brother, Gary maternal grand „,UM*aMaWeVhia %  Q aiuherg: JUJ. %  I arani UT ts. Mr. an May Qotdb t Rlv< Doug laa id. OSCAR GREEN 70, of flats' !-"!•• MI. ave., Burfslde, dle< I U -a me tit < 1 11 V | from New York. Bur Ivlna are hi wife, N r> three sistei an. a grandchild. Services were Oct. 9 a' ial chapel, Nm niand\ Is!.-. MRSIBETT.E J.MARTIN 74. of 12S5 Campo Sana, Coral Cables, died Oct. 7. Hha name her* II yean ago from Hazellon. Pa. Slie was member of lladassah, Jewish Horn, for the Aged, National Children's Carilia. Hospital, and National Council ,,i" Jewish Women. KemMces were Oct. ] at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Doufflai rd., wilh burial in Mt. Nebo Cem. teiy. Surviving are a daughter. Mrs. Reva Wexler, a brother, and three grandchildren. MR*. ALICE NEWMARK 44. of 12300 SW Mst at., died Oct. 5. She tame here eight years ago irom Bank Lists 2 Appointments Jack Carner, chairman of the board of the Miami National Bank, announces the appointment of Albert E. Berkeley and Sidney M. Kain to two key positions covering the newly created Mortgage and Public Relations Departments. At a recent meeting of the board 'of directors, Berkeley was appointed vice president and Mortgage of' %  ficer of the bank. He is a past president of the Mortgage Bankers j Assn. of New York, former membet of the mortgage committee of the Real Estate Board of New York, and a former member of the [ mortgage and financial committee of the National Assn. of Home Builders. Kain will head up the banks' Public Relations Department and act as liaison for Lou Poller, director : and chairman of the executive Committee, in planning and placing before the public and its depositors new inovations and services such as the recent presentation of Miami National Bank "Certi-Check." Kain has been a resident of Miami Beach for the past ten years, and prior to his residence here was director of special promotions for the American Heart Assn. For 25 years, he was in the public relations, publicity and advertising departments of Loew's Theaters and Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures, with offices in New York. '-a,,, i. ami was a member of Tempi* 'Ion. Surviving are her hush-ind lonis; tine, daughtera, Celhv Kaj .il and Marcla; and three son*, SSal ian. Kphric and Zava SIR$ -,, I, aw wo ii othei %  and i n*o si ters 'are Oct 7 at Oordon funeral Home LEGAL NOTICE MDTir.F 1'Mr.fp FICTITIOU"NAME LAW Ml ITICE IS IIKHKHV (irVFX Hi • he undersigned, desiring to encase In tualni w under the fid I ime %  .l:d >R1 ALE LODOE IfOTBL al 9800 B -. -i' ne I louli vai ntnd ii said name with th.Clerk o' the I 'iiiii Court <-f I di C iuntj Florida. COLEMAN INSTITUTE, INC. Il. Corp. MARX FABBR I --' : ai. i '612 Congress Bldg. Rabb Named to Campaign By Special Report WASHINGTON — Maxwell M. Rabb, New York attorney and former secretary to the cabinet of President Eisenhower, was named this week as assistant to Leonard Hall, campaign chairman for the Nixon-Lodge ticket. The announcement was made by Hall at NixonLodge Headquarters here. firm Adds Associate John B. Orr, jr., and Lawrence L Lazar announce that Millicent Brass has become associated with the firm of Orr and Lazar at 407 Lincoln rd. She formerly practic ed under the name of Millicent Brass Pelle. Richard Yale Feder and A. Norman Drucker continue as associates of Orr and Lazar. Baron Edmond de Rothschild (left), chairman for Europe of the Israel Bond campaign, who recently visited Israel, is shown with Finance Minister Levi Eshkol studying plans for a new housing development at Caesarea. In addition to surveying the economic progress made possible with the aid of Israel Bonds, the French Jewish leader undertook various economic projects, including the expansion of his development program for Caesarea. where a golf course has already been built and where other facilities are to be set up to convert the area into a major tourist attraction. luncheon Features Skit The Women's Division of the Chamber of Commerce of Surfside, Bal Harbour and Bay Harbor Is lands will hold its first social of the 1960-61 season on Wednesday noon st the Singapore hotel. Lunchwill be followed by a musical skit written and directed by Trixie Levin. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTIT.OUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY OrVEM that the undersigned, desiring to engage in i %  under ttie fictitious name of HALE WASSON UECl.HI> Ml. 13020 N W. 7th Avenue, North I Ploi Ida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. JOSEPH UNO I 1-21-28, 11/4 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OP/EM thai ihe undersigned, aeolrlna to fnaasf in business under the fictitious name oi P. F. PROVISIONS at l"'... N v. Hi.. Miami intends lo register said name with the Clerk of t*ie Ciseuil Court oi'Made County. Florida PAIL FARRERMAN PROVISIONS, INC. s "In. corp. NORMAN KOl'T An., n.-> for Applicant 120 Lincoln Roud 10/21-2S. 11/4-11 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OS THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. escioisi RAM'II TKXCEIX. Plaintiff. vs. ALICE CAMILI.E TEXCBLL, I > %  lendant YOU. ALICE CAMILI.E TKXCEI.L. ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to fi!c youi i>le;idln--s to this suit with this conn's Clerk and aerve <^ cony on Plalntlffa attorney, RICHARD ALTSHl I.Kit. yb Id Bulldinu, Mlaml, Florida, on or before N< 2.1, IS0; else the Complaint will he i.ik. n as confi n> d t.\ you. DATED: i E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court. Dade C nty, 1 (seal) By K M i VMA.N. .'... Clelk ] %  ;•:-:*. il '-li NOTICE BY PCBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDIC AL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 6OC10173 HART v. ERBEROER WAIN, I'la in: iff. JACK W WAIN, Mefendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO! TACK W WAIN i:. ni ral I % %  \l\ i y Melbourne, i.urida Von JACK W WAIN are %  I that a Bill • •',.-.., :. Divorce hia beeb filed asalnst you and you are required to M of your Answei or Pleading lo the I ii! of Complalnl on the pi.iintifrs Atmraay, ARN( %  !.' %  n POl LOCK ot WTE1 I.ISCH. C(il CIIKKTY AND ZAIAC, HI 4-19 Congress Building. Miaaui. Florida, and file the original Answei ur Pleading In the office of tin of the Circuit Court on or before th. 21st day of November. ]9oU. If yov fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint. This notice shall be published i ni %  each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORlIHAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this lth day of October, A.D. 1S0. E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida (seal) By: K. M. LI.MA.N. Deputy Clerk ARNOLD H. POLLOCK .Attorney of Counsel Welllsch. Dougherty and Zaiac 1414-19 Congress Building Miami. Florida Atto-ney for Plaintiff 10/21-28. 11M-11 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 50S77 IN RE i CARL QRASER %  ased NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All and A'l Persona Havalma or Memani.s Agau.al fcaid :nands which you th* ea• CARL URASI • 'I li: j. Plot da to ti 'ai'.e Conn same In I!.. Ir offloea ir Courthouse In i-ade %  ndar montha from the date of the n hereof, or ame will lade County Fl. i M< 18 A M I 'i >RP. IOC-". B. 9th St.. Hialeah INICK Attorney f.-r Purchaaer itoad .Miami Beach. Ha. 10/21-28. 11/4-11 LEGAL NOTICI IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 50777 C IN RE: Batate of ALEX en. limes known urn .M.I'V iNDER) POLLACK I %  eased. J40TiCEjrO CREDITORS %  Ml Cr> dltoi .ni.l All Pe-i soni H I Claim* or Demand! Aaraln I :-iic. f I al> \ Iir.t if leil u ||d I <|H I %  d to preaenl an> eaalma anel ilenuuid* vlii-.'h you may 'at* of AI.ICX is'.meiiini's known a* M.i:\ iNDER) POLLACK, i. I i A I IE Count •. Iloi Ida. to 'ounty Judges ol Dade Potinty, and ':!. %  ihe si me ii their offices In ihe 'ounty Courthouse In Dadta C ii thin •hrkl calMKli ii 'rom Ihe date of the first r>ublic*tl u hereof, ir I'ur Answer or o*to r pleadings on Plaintiff* attorn.•>. OBOKOE N Miul'ONKI.I,. :.l)4 9'"-ayne Building, Miami, Mor-fda, ami file the original in Ihe o(fii-e of the k of the circuit Court of Diide County. Fli.rida on or hefort? the fist day of November, r.'6i. in dcfsult of which the Complaint will lie taken ii unfi ued against you DATED, .it Miami. I>de> Potattv, this nth day of October, AH. I960. E i: LEATHERMAM. ('!. rk ..I ihe Circuit Court in and for Dade Count y 1 I.WttW. I •• ,iiy %  'leik II '4-11 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAXW NOTICE IS' HEREBY UIV EN tlial the underalgned. desiring to .-rurage hi under D •fictitious na ,•:..-,. BTYLEi vis'ntiiir-i-iii'.s .,\ j i Keyaton* Blvd.. Norte Miami Intend to register said naau iih 111•Circuit COOrl N. B8 Franklin St. North C&roHna, ai<. hereby required t< serve a your answer to a complaint for dlvercw tlntlffa attorney Haude M. Miami, Mm-. on ur befori the 15th day ol Nminil0, and file the original In the uf th Clerk of Ihe i utherwiae a default will lie IHI: auainet you. !>-• %  • 10, 19P0. B i:. LEATHERMAN, Clerk i.f i nrt. (seal) B) K M l.Y.MAN, '' 1* U-ll-M,|l 4 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S CO UHT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 504J66-C :n RE: Estate of QOLDA BAKER ised. NOT CE TO CREDITORS To All Creditor* and All Persona K*vIna Claims ,r !>eniand 8 Analnpt laid You ar^ hereby notified and r-eonird to present arty claims and demands whleh you may have against t %  tate of QOLDA BAKER deceas. off MADE County, Florida, t


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Page 16-A *Jmlst>ncr£dFk>f7 Friday, Oteober 21, ljfl* The Red Mattress By MAX IERNER Question Raised on Eichmann Fee Pittsburgh When Ted Cott asked mc to join the press panel which would dissect &f be David Susskind TV interview .with Premier Khrushchev on the "Open End" show 1 figured it would be fun as well as duty; and said yes. For a while the security angle posed a problem, but it was solved when a monstrous photo, making me look like one of Lombroso's congenial criminals, was attached to an accreditation card. I don't blame the security guards, when 1 presented (he card at the DN, for searching my portable typewriter case for a concealed bomb. But I came to appraise Caesar, not to bury him. MC ARRIVED A QUARTER-HOUR BEFORE the 9 p.m. opening time for the show, with his translator and an entourage. I have been bopping around the continent while the UN has been in session so this was my first direct sight of him since that fateful press conference at the Paris summit-that-failed. At first sight he always strikes you as simply a roly-poly politician with a shrewd peasant face. Then you look again, and the roly-poly peasant sopors the sense of authority which comes from the power of a great imperial mass. The panel gathered in the room next to the one in which Susskind was getting ready for the thankless grappling with a slipper)' Russian bear. Our earphones gave us the preliminary chitchat before the show went on and during the stationbreaks. At one point, when Susskind was in despair at the length of Khrushchev's answers, he suggested that they both "practice brevity" and asked whether the Russian Premier had brought a couple of mattresses. "If you provide the mattresses," Khrushchev answered. "I am ready to be here all night." A little after 10 a signal reached our panel to get ready for our turn. Al 10:30 the good-byes were being said on both sides, and Khrushchev was giving Susskind the bear's hug he reserves for those whom he wants to crush and bury. They looked as if they would say goodbye until tomorrow. Finally at eleven the emperor of the Communist world domain took his leave. Under the guidance of Dean Edward Barrett our group ol working newspapermen took over. • *• I TIP MY HAT TO SUSSKIND and WNTA for going through with the Khrushchev show despite earlier State Department hints about refusing him any propaganda chance and despite the sponsors' panicky threat to pull out. In an open soceity even America's enemies must be given a hearing, not because of any softness toward them but because a democracy depends upon the competition of ideas. The problem was not whether to give Khrushchev a hearing but how to set his arguments, evasions, and distortions within a frame where they would be recognized for what they were. The idea of a panel strikes me as a good one. Khrushchev had a two-hour span when he rolled out a red mattress for himself and stretched out on it with all his customary theatrical resources. I don't know how much of an audience remained after he rolled up his mattress and left, but we did our best to appraise what was plain sawdust in the figure he presented, what was important, and what it meant. It wouldn't be a bad idea to do the same with other foreign statesmen. It might even help to follow the two remaining Kennedy-Nixon debates with a panel dissection of their arguments. THERE REMAINS THE QUESTION of what Khrushchev was up to. There was some news value in his charge that the Americans had planned to send another U-2 over Russia but were frightened off—a self serving charge that strikes me as unimportant. There was also news in his willingness to accept a ban on all military aid, although clearly he would argue that it would involve America's giving up NATO and the military bases around the world. My own feeling was that Khrushchev acted like a man who was caught between the fear of nuclear war and the temptation to expand world Communist power as far and fast as possible without taking too dangerous risks with war. Unfortunately the American bungling of the U-2 overflight, now re-enforced by Vice President Nixon's assertion that it was America's moral "right'' to make the flights, gives Khrush chev a stick with which to beat the West. He was shrewd enouph to belabor it, while evading the plain fact that Communism is constantly expanding its power and seeking to bring new areas under its domination. The world's danger comes from the fact that world Communismincluding the Russian as well as the Chinese—is unwilling to give up its drive for world power, even while the Russians tnot the Chinese) are fearful of the risks of nuclear war that are invovled. If you watched and listened to Khrushchev with that in mind, much of what he said fell into place, including his effort to destroy Hammarskjold because a strong UN executive under his direction necessarily stands in the way of the drive to world power by either bloc. Copyright 1960 ed this week in Paris. One of the documents revealed that an SS officer named Guentner, one ef Eichmann's personal assistants, ordered the start ef experiment* in June, 1942. with pruttic acid, te "liquidate" Jews. JERUSALEM-(JTA)-Several developments raised the quest on thts week as to who was paying the fee which Dr. Robert Serv-t us of Cologne, will receive for his services as defense attorney m the trial of Nazi master killer Adolf Eichmann. i ft was noted, at the attorney de-1 cided to cut short his current stay j acC ording to two documents prein Israel, that he has been consis-, ed (be Cen)cr „f Contemportently vague in response to queries Documentation publishabout his fee, saying only that ^£ !" Ek ta Pari ,. "family and friends were pacing the costs. It was reported, however, that the Eichmann tamily had to obtain a loan to buy airline tickets to meet Dr. Servatiu* in West Germany before He left for Israel. It has been reported that Hie attorney expects to receive a fee of 100,000 German marks ($24,000) if the trial lasts no longer than three months. The attorney, who came here laat week to start preliminary work on his defense plan for the trial next spring, had originally intended to remain in Israel two weeks. He was expected to meet with Eichmann a second time before leaving. The two men conferred for two hours in the special, transparent, sound-proof booth built lor that purpose in the prison where Eichmann is being held. Adolf Eichmann was personally responsible for installation of the gas chambers in which millions of European Jews were slaughtered. Eichmann personally propose* this system to his superiors. a tf designated camps in the Rig, „ Minsk areas for the Initial exwriments. The first one was perform. ed in Chelmo. where ten gas cham bers were set up in 1941. uccordinj to the documents. The French newspaper. Fig, !" began publication of a series nf articles on the background of the forthcoming trial of Eichmann i 0 Israel, including the new oW ments. L'Aurore, a mass circub. tion newspaper, also be^o, a similar series. 1 Plans Advance For Dinner Fete To Rabbi Kronish Rabbi Leon Kronish, spiritual leader of Temple Beth Sholom, will be honored by his congregation at the Temple's annual dinner in behalf of State of Israel Bonds on Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Americana hotel. Gen. Meir Amit. distinguished war strategist of the Israel Armed Forces and leader of the famed Sinai campaign, will be guest speaker. The 38-year-old officer and native Israeli began his military career as the age of 15 when he joined the Haganah. Rabbi Kronish has served Temple Beth Sholom since 1944, when the congregation numbered only a handful of families who met in a rented store. Over the years, he has guided the growth of the Temple's membership and facilities. Today, Beth Sholom numbers more than 700 families. The religious school program which Rabbi Krnoish helped develop is considered a model for Liberal congregations He was invited to serve on the National Commission on Jewish Education, an organization which guides the /d| ucational policies and textbook publications of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. Rabbi Kronish was part of a three-man delegation from Greater Miami to visit Israel in 1954. He recently returned from another visit. About 500 persons are expected to attend the dinner of tribute to Rabbi Kronish. Isadore Hecht and i • Harold Zinn are co-chairmen of the' j dinner. Zinn will serve as toasti master. 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"(Jewish Floridian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WWO.1 Volume) 33 — Number 43 Miami, Florida, Friday, October 21, 1960 Two Sections — Pi ice 20* 'BAYVILLE SURVEY' BEGINS IN THIS WEEK'S ISSUE What Does Dade Jewry Believe? By MANHEIM S. SHAPIRO How do the adult Jews who are titled residents of Dade county eel about Judaism, about their vn Jewishness, about the world ground them? How do they retard their neighbors, both Jewish fml non-Jewish? What are their tstimates and experience of antiimitism, here and elsewhere? How do they think Jews should act, publicly and privately? What is their opinion about certain public issues like religious practices in the public schools and desegregation? What is their feeling about Israel and about Jewish and non-sectarian charities? These were some of the questions in the minds of the leaders of the Miami chapter of the Amer_. .-... id n % •• : I 'I -ill The Jcuish Flondion begins tins week the first m an rxclu.su'* series on a study of the attitudes of the Jews oj Dade county toward a wide variety oj religious and social issues. Statistical data based on the findings of tlie "Bay ville Survey" — BayviUc being a fictitious name for Dade county inquiring into the beliefs end activities of affiliated Jews in the Greater Miami area. Author of the series is Manheim Shapiro, national director of the Jewish Communal Affairs Department of the American few ih Committee. (See Page J-A.) ican Jewish Committee when they decided in June, 1958, to conduct a survey of the attitudes, opinion.and activity of Dade county Jew ry. The American Jewish Com mittec has been interested in obtaining such information about the views of American Jews because it serves as a basis for judging how the future of the American Jew is likely to evolve, and as an index to one aspect of the relations between Jews and non-Jews. The national organization of the GOP Organ Picks Top Arab Leader To Advise Ticket By MILTON FRIEDMAN WASHINGTON—— United Arab Republic President Gamal Abdel Nasser told his legislature in Cairo that he had told President Eisenhower, while visiting the American leader in New York recently, that Israel "would always remain a barrier" between the UAR and the U.S.A., according to press dispatches received here this week. The Cairo reports said that Nasser also reported he had complained to Mr. Eisenhower about Western shipments of arms to Israel, insisting that there "are no defensive weapons." The Egyptian dictator presumably told Mr. Eisenhower that his government was not prepared to "compromise" its position vis avis Israel.



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Friday. Otcober 21. 1960 +JtniUrksKUu7 Page 11-B Priceless Bar Kochba Relic Uncovered by Yadin Group Newly-installed officers of the Golden Age Friendship Club of Miami YMHA are (left to right) Mrs. Lester Crozier, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Herman Fisher, financial secretary; Lester Crozier, treasurer; Mrs. Eva Brown, first vice president; Hyman Kam, president; Jack Raichick, second vice president; Mrs. Bessie Yonkelowitz, recording secretary; Mrs. Frieda Grecke, social secretary. These officers were recently installed by Efriam H. Gale, executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. NCCJ Issues Statement of Principle" For Religious Issue in Current Campaign JERUSALEM—


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Friday, Otcobr 21. 1960 +Jmisti ttorktlair Page 3-B S'nai B'rith Women Will Dedicate |l,000 Members in Honor of Mrs. Soltz t The more than 3.500 B'nai B'rith [women in South Florida are firm|ly convinced that membership is I the "life" of thejr.organization. All [duTBTg the spring, summer and fait I months, each of the 19 chapters, I from Shalom in South Dade to I Ft. Lauderdale in the north, have [been displaying beautiful "trees of I life" at all chapter functions, upon I which all new members have pin[ned their membership "leaves." The chapters combined aim is 1.000 new members who will be J appropriately grouped together as (the "Roslya Soltz Class" in honor 1 of district president, Mrs. Gerald |p. Soltz. of Miami. For the first time in the history of B'nai B'rith in this area, all three Councils will have coordinated paid-up membership parties I for their constituent chapters. On Monday. 8 p.m., at the Deau[ ville hotel, the Miami Beach Council, composed of the Harmony, Chai, North Shore, Miami Beach and Menorah chapters, will hold its paid-up membership party which last year attracted over 700 women. Mrs. Sam Belsky is Council president, and Mrs. Irving Laibson is chairman of the event. A motorcade starting at 2 p.m. through Miami Beach will precede the function. Each chapter will present a skit, and the Mrs. Sam Belsky Membership Award will be presented to the chapter acquiring the greatest number of new members. Mrs. Joseph Fekiman is in charge of the program for the evening. Serving on the committee are Mrs. Jack Dernis, Miss Helen Silyerstein. Mj-s.jjj. August, Mrs. Morris Praissman and Mrs. Richard Bergman. On Thursday. Oct. 27, at 8 p.m., the Miami Council will sponsor its paid-up membership party at the Disabled American Veterans Hall in Hialeah for its nine member chapters. Anne FFrank, Coral Gables, Eleanor Roosevelt. Emma [ Lazarus, Flamingo, Gilbert J. Bali kin, Miami, Shalom and West MiMizrachi Cites Justice Douglas By Special Report WASHINGTON — William O. Douglas, Associate Justice of the iU. S. Supreme Court, received the 1960 America Israel Friendship Award of the Mizrachi Women's Organization of America here this week. In a brief eeremony in his judicial chambers, Justice Douglas was cited for the "distinguished I contribution he had rendered toj ward fostering understanding between the peoples of the United States and Israel and toward the promotion of the biblical ideals of peace and social justice among nations and peoples throughout the world." Mrs. Moses Dyckman, of New York City, national president of Mizrachi Women, presented the citation in the presence of Mrs. Eli Resnikoff, of Brooklyn, N.Y., chairman of the national board of the woman's religious Zionist organization, and leaders of District of Columbia chapters of Mizrachi Women. The America Israel Friendship Award, established immediately after the rebirth of Israel, has been conferred at annual national conventions of the Mizrachi Women's Organization of America since 1948. The award ceremony this year was held here because pressures of the court term, which recently convened, prevent Justice Douglas from attending the 35th national convention of Mizrachi Women in Atlantic City beginning Oct. 30. Films of this week's presentation will be seen by more than a thousand delegates from 37 states at the keynote session of the national meeting. Local Unit Will Be at Area Meet "The Decade Ahead — Agenda for Southern Jewry" is the theme of the Southeast-Southwest conference sponsored by the American Jewish Committee to be held in Dallas, Tex., beginning Oct. 27. Attending the four-day conferenee from Miami will be James K Katzman, Mr. and Mrs. David Fleeman, Mrs. Charles E. Leeds, Mrs. Milton Margulis, Mrs. Per its Sckeinherg, and Seymour Samet. MM!. 6MALD SOLTZ ami. Mrs. Irving Riemer is chairman of the evening, and Mrs. Herbert Heiken in charge of the program. Mrs. David Sherper is Council president. Each chapter will participate in a' "Family Album" presentation, and new members will be initiated in a candlelight ceremony. Committee members are Mesdames Simon Sanders, Arthur Resinek, Hewitt Weiss, Adele Baum. Robert Lourie, Ira Segal, Louis Cohen, Irving Kaye and Jack Wasserman. The Broward-North Dade Council, composed of the North Dade, Sunshine, Shoshana. Hollywood and Ft. Lauderdale chapters, has taken as its theme "Friendship Around the World." They are extending the hand of friendship to an honored guest from Holland, Israel, Japan and Tahiti. Ihe function .will take place at the Americana hotel at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 15. Mrs. Stanley Goldberg is chairman of the evening, and Mrs. "Alvin Wank is Council president. Members of the committee are Mesdames Harry Friedman, Irving Finn, Hyman Mars and Nathan Miller. Mrs. Soltz will be guest speaker and initiate new members at each of the three functions. The class of 1,000 new members will then be presented by Mrs. Soltz to the national president, Mrs. Charles Solovich, of Detroit, at the biennial convention of B'nai B'rith Women in April in Miami Beach, marking the first time the national organization has ever convened in this community. 'Jade' Luncheon Slated Here Newly-formed Women's Division of the Miami Beach YMHA will hold a "Jade" luncheon and fashion show by Paul Freed at the House of Hoo restaurant, 79th st., causeway, on Tuesday noon, Nov. 1. Surprise gift in jade will be given as a prize. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Solomon Kann, president, and Mrs. Norman Giller, chairman of the day. The organization is planning a New Year's eve function at the Coconut Grove Playhouse, including a Broadway musical shew and midnight champagne supper party. The Women's Division meets on the third Wednesday of each month at the "Y," 1536 Bay rd. Mrs. Sid Lang is in charge of publicity. Purpose of the organization is to improve the facilities at the *t* branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. First project was the purchase of a bus for transportation of children. BTJRIDIlSFErS 62xia. j?LIsnsriTZE]R,SJ5.I^r the greatest sale on earth now full swing great savings In every department on every floor shop and save now for yonrsclf, your family, yonr home and for ihe festive gift season ah e ad shop by phone from 8:30 a.m. call our telephone ordering service Ft 3-11 IT USE YOUR CONVENIENT BURDINE'S CHARGE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SPECIAL SAVINGS DURING THIS SAW! -.



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iday, Otcober 21. 1960 +Jmlst>ncrlutcasts or misfits. Pease call us for early pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.W. 27th Avenue NE 3-2338 Closed Saturdays PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK! Invest In Ufe Insurance now and your money works for a brighter future. Write or phone today. NAT GANS 3200 S.W. 3rd Aveaee. *HI Wionei Ft 3-4616 or HI 6-HI1 MjGL'ST BROS Rw. |j (hi OMI' .4



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Friday, Otcober 21. I960 +Jewish rhrktian Pag* 13-A timnntimmnrtn.i i GEMS OF WISDOM The wrld exists only on account of him who disregards his own I existence. —TALMUD. ? On|y a life lived for others is l life wor--.ii.hile. EINSTEIN.I am • %  %  ••'•• 'i-# My fathers blunted for me. and / plant for my children.— TALMUD, i • • Tire ii-cends and noes out; water descends and is not lost. —M'SBLE SHUAL1M. [ Ambi:;on is bondage. —IBN GABRAEL I • • Loofc {or ca^e and lose your'': bread. — PROVERB. • • Who doesn't jump too high, doesn't fall too lou>. —SYRKIN '• • • Ambuion destroys its possessor i TALMUD I *•>" %  nwHwirm IIII iniHmmmmmaJI .of th.lr three sons. Saturday 9 a.m. TEMPLE BETH AM. 5950 N. Kendall dr., S. Miami. Reform RaO0< Herbert Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodner. Friday l:M p.m. Sisterhood sabbath to be observod. Eferraqn: "The Role of th>' Woman In Judaism Mrs. Joshua Segal, president, to speak. TEMPLE BETH EL. 1S45 Polk St., Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samus; Jaffa. TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest Schreiber. Friday S p.m. Bas MiUvah: Wendy. daughter or Mr. and Mrs. Harry Levitt. Saturday 9 a.m. • TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chaat ave. Liberal Rabbi Leon Kronish Cantor Davis Convlser. Friday S:lo p.m. Sermon: "We Don't All Talk the Same Language." Saturday 10:45 a.m. Bar Mltivah: Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Lack: Ronald J-, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Koaenthal. TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16500 NW 22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon Edwards. Cantor Seymour Hlnkee. •— TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Waehlng ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irvine Lehrman. Cantor Hirsch Adler. TEMPLE ISRAEL. 1S7 NE 1tth et Reform. Rabbi Jossph R. Narot Cantor Jacob Bornateln. Friday 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Morris W. Graff U> officiate in the absence of Dr. CANDUUGHTING TIMt 30 Tishri — 5:33 pan. Joseph Narot. Sermon: "Life's Second i 'ii;uu-es." TEMPLE JUDE... 320 Palermo ava. Liberal. Rabbi Morrie Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "America'a Search for a Righteous trailer." Saturday 10:30 a.m. Bar Mitivah: Eric, son of Dr. and Mrs. George Balaber, who will be hosts at Klddubh of Sanctificatlon following. TEMPLE MENORAH. 820 75th st. Conservative. Rabbi Maver Abramowitz. Cantor Edward Klein. Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Rainbow of Peace." Saturday 8:45 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Neabltt: Robert, son of Mr. and lira. I.OUI* Reinstein. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." TEMPLE NER TAMID. SOth at. and Tatum Waterway. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitx. Cantor Samuel Qombera. TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno M. Wallach. TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. SS1 Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Lee Helm. Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Ark— Remlnl-cent of a Threefold Kvent." Consecration Sabbath. Newly-enrolled students in the religious school to be blessed. Onec Shabbat hosts: Members of education committee. Saturday 9 a.m. TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora ave. Conservative. Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitx. TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th st. Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-. man. Canter Jacob Goldfarb. Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "Where Do • We Benin?" TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6500 N. Miami ave. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman. Cantor Albert Giants. Friday 8:30 p.m. Sermon: "New Concepts of Righteousness." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Noah and Hia Generation." YEHUDAH MOSHE. 13630 W. Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon Steinmetx. Cantor Morris Berger. Friday 1:M p.m. Sermon: "We. tho Parents." Oneg Shabbat hosts: Members of Sisterhood. Saturday 9 a.m. — •— YOUNG ISRAEL. 6*0 NE 171st st. i Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber. Friday 5:30 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Threshold of Manhood." Bar Mltivah: Richard Me\ < r. Tenth Century Book in Israel JERUSALEM —— A priceless manuscript of the Keter Haj torah of Aaron Ben Moses Bon Asher, the oldest existing parchment Bible in book form, as distinct, from a scroll, has been brought to Israel from Syria, it was disclosed this week. Tha Keter Hatorah, which dates back to tha tanth century, was used by Maimonidas and contemporaries as a basic source book. Biblical scholars, Jewish and Christian, recognize its importance. The Ben Asher Keter Hatorah; has been in Aleppo in northern! Syria for the past 500 years, and' has been inaccessible to Jewish, scholars since the establishment of modern Israel. The story of how it was transferred to Israel for deposit at the Hebrew University, when it can be told, is expected to be a true cloak-and-dagger adventure, it was hinted. This page is prepared in co: operation with the Spiritual Lead*I eri of the Greater Miami Rabbin1 ical Assn. Rabbi David Herson Coordinator CONTRIBUTORS Rabbi David Herson Tales of Moral Rabbi B. Leon Hurwita Know Tour Heritage Rabbi Solomon Schiff Gems of Wisdom



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Page 2-A Panel to Eye Political Arena Rabbi Arthur Gilbert, of New York City, director of the national department of interreiigious co operation of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith will be one of three religious leaders who will appear in a discussion of religious liberty in politics on Friday in Miami. The Florida region of the National Conference of Christians and Jews is sponsoring the luncheon program, which will be held at the Ocean Ranch hotel. 200 SE 12th st. The meeting is open to ail interested persons. Appearing with Rabbi Gilbert will be Hi* Rev. CUud D. Met aoa. New York, farmer executive director of the department of religioot liberty of the National Council of Churches in the U.S.A., and William Clancy, Washington, D.C., editor of "World View." Moderator of the panel will be Dr. Cordon W. Lovejoy, associate director of the Southeast Division of the NCCJ. The group is appearing in Miami as part of the National Conference nation-wide program in behalf of **A Fair Campaign," which seeks to reduce the expressions of re-Jewlsti ncrkllan Friday, Otcober 21, Demos, GOP to Air Campaign Issues RABBI ARTHUR 6/lBf RT ligious prejudice for or against candidates for public office. "We believe this discussion has particular importance for citizens of Dade county." said Max Karl, regional NCCJ director. "In our midst, we are seeing a flagrant resort to the tactics of religious bigots in an effort to influence voters in their choice of a school board member. Our trio of Protestant, Catholic and Jewish leaders can render a great service by helping people to sort out real issues from the false and misleading appeals to religious prejudice." DAILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK M. LIEBERMAN & SONS LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM HiW JEASET e PHILADELPHIA e lALTIMOftf ALBANY o WASHINGTON • IOSTON t 1 MOVHMNCE and ell ether Batata WeeeJv Service fke Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse 6SS Collins Ave., Miami Beach Dial JE 8 8353 1 < < 4 I < 4 4 4 < 4 4 < 4 4 < < 4 I 4 I I 4 4 4 | 4 A trio of speakers will constitute J a panel discussion of the Presi'• dential election campaign and its implications to the nation at a Town Hall Foronr on TuwSUay eve ning at Beth David Congregation. Sponsoring the discussion i> the I Beth David Men's Club. Representing the Democratic Brcmdeis Students On Dean's List Brandeis University students from South Florida were named !to the First and Second Dean's List for outstanding scholarship during the 1959-60 academic year. On the First Dean's List is Harvey Glasser, 1960 graduate, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Glasser, 6741 SW 69th ter. Charles S. Kamen. who graduates in 1961, was named to the Second Dean's List. He is the son ol Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kamen. of 2166 SW 21st St.. Miami. Miami Beach students named to the Second Dean's List were the following: Anne M. Fishbein, 1961 graduate, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Fishbein. 2535 Pine Tree dr. Ruth Katz. 1962 graduate, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 1 Katz, 793 West ave. Jerome Hantman. 1963 graduate, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hantmen, 945 Bay dr. Party point of view will be for, mer United States Senator from Florida Claude Popper. Maxwell Rebb is flying here from Washington to present tha Republican Party posi t iew. Dean James A. Burns, of the. University of Miami school of I law. will "be moderator. A question and answer period follows. Sen. Pepper served Florida in the U.S. Senate from 1936 to 1951. During his tenure in office, he maintained close relations with ihen President Roosevelt, whose New Deal policies he staunchly supported, frequently pressing them on other legislators from the South. Currently a lawyer with practices in Miami Beach. Coral Gables, and Tallahassee, Sen. Pepper holds honorary degrees from McMaster University. University of Torento, Rollins College, and University of Alabama. Rabb it feraaee Secretary of President Eisenhower's Cabinet. Early this week, ho was named assistant to Leonard Hall, manager of the Republics PtoW ] nation campaign for Vie* pi? cnt Nixon am) Ambnu, w i ry Cabot Lodge. He was an admjnistraU ant to Sen. Henry Cabot al sr., from 1937 to 1943. as !£& ;o Sen. Sinclair Weeks. He JU as a lieutenant in the AtanujuS phibious Command of Uie j2i during World War II. I In 1958, President zum j appointed Rabb as chairman 0 (Z| American delegation to t- taXI conference ti UNESCO in p^f INSURANCE Music and Arts League Concert Miami Beach Music and Arts League will open its 196061 series of music and arts events with a concert in the Ocean Lounge of the Roney Plaza hotel on Saturday. Soprano Margaret Barnes will be featured artist. Program will consist of arias from Mozart's "Don Giovanni" and "Marriage of Figaro" as well as lighter selections from Broadway musical comedy stage. She will be acompanied at the piano by Esther Barrett. Miss Barnes, a former member of the Opera Guild of Miami, ia a member of the Light Opera Organization of Miami. She will be remembered for her performance in last season's Gilbert and Sulli-j van productions with that group. ONE STOP AGENCY JEWELRY—FURS— MISCELLANEOUS FLOATERS AUTOMOBILE LIAIILITY a PHYSICAL DAMAM Limits to asset your eeeai The Ageacy tbot CAN soy TESI Doa't let year egeet soy "N Coat Be Dooe" ACOMAN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 17 IX IH AVI. n i-:tn o ri nw A Happy New Year THE BI-ST WAY TO ENSURE A eOOD YEAR FOR ISRAEL IS TO BUY A BOND! Mayshie Friedberg JE 8-4969 PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" SerWef tbe Jewish Cimmmnitj Since 126 MIAMI'S ONI AM 6Nir JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS CArntNc ncmuvur re nif itwisn UUMtUt GUARANTEE! 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Rockovsky MS MICHIGAN AW., MIAMI IfACI Pbent JE 1-3MS WE INSTALL GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE STORE FRONT PLATE AMI WINDOW GLASS Fereitere Teas, O ae a loa 1 Min en aae eeaWvariafl Oar Specialty LAO, GLASS AND MIRROR WORKS 134 SW. I* ST. Morris Or lie Pbeoo FR t-W I with Our Many Sattafieci Customers" ANOTNER LOCATION FOB TOW CONVENIENCE C0ULT0N BROS. TEXACO BOTI 840 S.W. Hi Si -AOT. "MAOtr*. -HATCoral Way I S.W. 27th Ave. RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS Phone JE 1-1151 MIAMI BRACK 1250 NORMANDY ORtVE 1236 WASHINGTON AVENUE ItSO ALTON ROAD MIAMI 1717 S.W. 37rh AVENUE HI 3-2231 24-Hr. Ambulance Service Abe Eiienbetg U'ne S. Bluberg. F.C New York: 7fclS St. A Amitetdam Ay*.



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iFriday. Otcobar 21, 1960 Jewish fhridian Page 7-A •M .^a*****. \ |C' i • r ^^fli k r Sen. John F. Kennedy and Simon J. Helman (right), president off the Associated Jewish Philanthropies of Boston, examine plans for recently-completed new gymnasium of Boston YMHAHecht House in Dorchester, a memorial to the Senator's brother, Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy. A grant from the Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation enabled the AJP to finish the facility. Mrs. Meir Impresses UN As Arab Chiefs Hurl Insults UNITED NATIONS-UTA) -The >id of Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's •"oreign Minister, tor immediate eace talks with the Arabs has pro]uced a profound impression on friends, foes and ne't ,r als alike at pe United Nations. Mrs. Meir proposed tmconditionil negotiations yith Prime Minister David BenJurion and rulers of the Arab countries. Many Wst Eu'o*>ean. Asian. La_ American, and African delegates expressed open, though un Ifficial approval of "Israel's forth pghf stand." They were impressed ly the 'without preconditions" Jtand and by Mrs. Meir's plea for Vat least a non-aggression pact." Many delegates also endorsed Mrs. ^feir's plea for Middle East disarmament. The Arab spokesman reacted by being mere bitterly anti-Israel than usual. Ahmed Shukairy, of Saudi Arabia, exercising his right of reply, accused Israel from the Assembly podium of having committed "Nazi atrocities." Michael S. Comay. Israel's permaInent representative, told the Assembly immediately that Israel had I no intention of replying to ShuIkairy's speech, saying "the AssemIbly has long been accustomed to Ithe type of remarks made by the ISaudi Arabian representative." He Iadded: "We want only to register a Isense of disgust at anyone here [comparing any peoples with Nazis." Mr. Comay was applauded loudly after his brief intervention. The Arab reaction came as soon •s Mrs. Meir concluded her address before the plenary session of the FREBOMLAND U. S. A. Invites YOU to NEW YORK Lr-**$,550 FAMUY HAN { 2 dutf to roam Children undar 14 Free per day 400 COMFORTABLE NEW ROOMS with BATH, RADIO, TELEVISION AIR-CONDITIONED NEW YORK'S BEST LOCATION WOODSTOCK HOTEL 127 West 43rd St. FKW YORK CITY Wrfle A. Fernanda!, Can. Mfr. For Imitiediste Confirmation of Your Reservations, ENJOY FREEDOMLANO'S FUN WITH WOODSTOCK'S WARMTH Assembly. Since she had aimed her peace challenge directly at United Arab Republic President Gamal Abdel Nasser, the first open reply was given the Assembly by Egypt's permanent representative Omar Loutfi. Mrs. Meir's address, he said, had been "designed to confuse public opinion with insidious propaganda." Israel, he reiterated, has violated "hundreds" of UN resolutions and has demonstrated "nothing but aggressive and belligerent conduct n th? Middle East." Jordan's Foreign Minister, Musa Naser. told correspondents there was "nothing new" in Mrs. Meir's peace proposal, saying her speech was "full of distortions." Oassim Hassan. Iraqi Ambassador to Czechoslovakia, and a member of his government's delegation to thi year's Assembly, took a leaf out of tt-e book of Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev by pounding his desk violently after Mrs. Meir's address was concluded. On the other hand, the applause for her speech was loud and prolonged. She had been greeted by applause when she mounted the rostrum, and she was interrupted by applause a number of times. Members of various delegations sought out Israeli and other Jewish correspondents to express approval of Mrs. Meir's peace offer. "She really challenged Nasser this time to make good on his own professions of good faith," one prominent Asian told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Another, a West Ewopean, said: "Mrs. Meir's authorized offer of peace talks without any preconditions whatever, and immediately, is about as reasonable a proposal as I have heard here in a long time. And I'm not the only one who feels that way." GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC J14 M.W. 10th Me. Ft J-71S0 Have veawsroof repaired now: you new roof later. r aotory Work by Experienced Men" Have varaf noi w"i %  %  ; "Satiafar Histadrut Plans Annual Meeting By Special Report NEW YORK — The 29th national convention of the Histadruth Ivrith of America will be held Nov. 2 to 6 at the Chelsea hotel, in Atlantic City. N.J. The sessions will be conducted in both Hebrew and English. Among participants will be Avraham Harman, Ambassador from Israel to the United States; Rabbi Irving Miller, chairman of the American Zionist Council; Max Ki.ssler, newly-elected president of the Zionist Organization of America; and other leaders and scholars. .._ ,^. Danish Royalty Given AJC Citation By Special Report NEW YORK — The American Jewish Committed! this week presented a silver menorah to the King and Queen of Denmark in appreciation of Denmark's effective protection ot us Jewish population during World War II. Almost all of the 9,000 Jews in Denmark were saved from major genocide. The presentation was made to Paul B. Ryder, Consul General of Denmark, who accepted the gift in behalf of King Frederick IX and Queen Ingrid, now visiting this country. Representing the committee were Herbert B. Ehrmann, president, Ralph Friedman, chairman of AJC's Foreign Affairs Department, and executive vice president John Slawson. The ceremonies took place at the offices of the Danish Consulate General. The menorah was engraved with these words: "With everlasting thanksgiving to the Throne and People of Denmark for saving with heroic determination the entire Jewish community of their country." On April 9. 1940, when Denmark was occupied by Germany, there were some 9,000 Jews in the country. Under the determined protection of King Christian X, brother of the present monarch, the Jews remained almost completely undisturbed for over three years. Every Nazi attempt to "see the Jewish problem solved" in Denmark was frustrated by unrelentwere smuggled across the straits ing resistance. to neutral Sweden. In Jan aa-r-eV 1942,-Jiie „ King threatened to resign when the Germans tried to foist a harsh antiJewish law on the Danish cabinet and parliament. On his birthday, Sept. 27. 1942. the King publicly declared that should the Jews of his country be compelled to wear the yellow star of David badge, he. the royal family, and the royal household would immediately wear ii all the time. The King also made it a frequent habit to attend Jewish religious services at the Copenhagen Synagogue. In Sept.. 1943. a personal ultimatum from Hitler to the Dam h cabinet warned that either Denmark would "voluntarily" accept the German "solution of the Jewish problem" or else be subjected to full and direct German rule. AH members of the cabinet announced that they would resign rather than submit to compulsion. As a result, the Germans were compelled to initiate these measures themselves. Wehrmacht detachments immediately started to round up the Jewish population in their homes, for deportation. They came too late. The Jews were forewarned by the Danish authorities and with the help of the orgeniied Danish resistance movement most of them were able to disappear in safe hiding places gearded by the underground. At the King's b e h est, an entire flotilla of Danish fishing vessels was recruited, and within a few days, thousands of Jews OnUy—a %  lew* vpstela ufere captured or sunk by the German Navy, and about 5,500 Jews were able to reach Sweden where they given asylum and help. Alter the war, these Jews returned to Denmark. Hundreds of other Danish Jews who could not escape were protected and kept alive in hiding in Denmark by the Danish people Only about 750 Jews, among them 450 inmates of a home for the aged, were caught by the Germans and even these, probably out of respect for the mood of the Danes, were sent to Theresienstadt, instead of the extermination camps. Even in Theresienstadt. they were fed and supplied with medical and other facilities from Denmark, and King Christian himself intervened several times in behalf of their safety and welfare. In April. 1944. under Danish and Swedish pressure, the Germans felt compelled to release these Jews and to send them by bus to Sweden. While passing through Copenhagen, they were greeted by a huge popular demonstration which the Nazis were unable to prevent, and were overwhelmed with gifts of food and clothing. All Jewish possessions were held in safe trust by Danish friends and neighbors, and businesses were kept intact and voluntarily returned after the war without loss or difficulty. The Torah scrolls of j Copenhagen temples were hidden i in the local cathedral. More people buy and enjoy the> %  HI peri or quality of Seagram's V O. ttaaa any other imported whieky. SEAGRAM'S IMPORTED Known by the company it keeps CANADIAN WHISKY • A BLEND OF RARE SELECTED WHISKIES • THIS WHISKY IS SIX YEARS OLD-86.6 PROOF



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*Jewlsti fk>ridN&n Friday. Otcober 21. ig 6 Q Ladies of Temple Beth Sholom gather for a planning session of the congregation's annual Israel Bond dinner Oct. 30 at the Americana hotel, which this year will honor their spiritual leader, Rabbi Leon Kronish. Seated (left to right) are Mesdames Tessie Litt, Ralph Spero, Inez Krensky, dinner chairman, Max Weitz, Sam Schwartz, chairman of the Ben Cohen testimonial dinner scheduled for Sunday evening crt the Eden Roc hotel, checks reservations with Murray Goodman and Sue Berkowitz, members of the honorary committee. According to Schwartz, more than 300 reservations have b%an received by the committee. Louis Shapiro, Florence Nadler, co-chairman, and Harvey Kramer, president of the Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood. Standing (left to right) are Mesdames Samuel Hirsch, Louis Snetman. Samuel Meiselman, Harold Granoff, Irving Westin, Harry Wolk, Julius Shapiro, Lillian Edell, Joseph Shawmut and Ben Sabin. Cohen Testimonial Anticipates 400 More than 400 persons are expected to attend the Ben Cohen testimonial dinner at the Eden Roc hotel on Sunday evening. Sam Swartz, chairman and Charles Fruchtman, co chairman, jointly announced this week. The dinner is being tendered by the officers and directors of the Hebrew Academy in tribute to the legal services Cohen rendered gratuitously to obtain a site to build a new school. The site it at 24th ft. and Pin* Tree dr., north of the Fire Station. B. I. Binder, president, will announce the date of groundbreaking ceremonies, which will officially launch the Academy's building campaign. The projected building program calls for the construction of a full elementary and junior high depart20th Season For Opera Guild The 20th anniversary seasdlf of the Opera Guild of Miami is on its way. The parties are beginning, ind wiU^eceelerate in frequency as the two exciting operas near their j npening nights. The two operas this year are "Andrea Chenier." starring Renata Tebaldi in her first Miami appearance in January, nnd 'Martha,'" in English, starring Roberta Peters, slated for February. Dr. and Mrs. Arturo di Filippi are sparking the 20th anniversary season by having cocktails and a buffet in their home on Saturday. Oct. 29. at 7 p.m. Some 60 people have been invited to the di Filippi home at 625 SW 2th rd. Among them are Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Fullerton, Mr. and Mrs. Willam H. Carmichael. Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. Green. Mr. and Mrs. Leland Hyzer, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Landfield, Mr. and Mrs. Nat Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Neale. Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Pelton. and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Weintraub. Also Dr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Jacobson, Mr. and Mrs. George Brumlik. Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Greene, Mr. and Mrs. David Hochberg. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lapidus. Mr. and Mrs. Ritter Levinson, and Mr. and Mrs. Hank Meyer. UN Anniversary CoJtbrofeti %  Fifteenth anniversary of t np United Nations was to be celebrat ed at Ada Merritt Junior Hith School on Thursday evening R„ ben Blumstein. sponsor of SUiient Council, has organized and produced the affair. Cuncert was to inrtflcre slTftgs by MnrHRose Rosgr. mond. Demonstration Scheduled Greater Miami chapter of the National Kidney Disease Foundation will hold a general meeting at the home of Mrs. Sam Seitlin 1819 SW 23rd st.. on Monday at 11 a.m. Eugene Rawls will glve a demonstration and lecture on Yogi. BUY LIVE POULTRY KOSHER KILLtO mm (STCWWS) 25 ib. ROASTERS-Broilers 33Mb. PUUITS 4 lb. CAPONS-TURKEYS Srib. BttMAH ••crates the 0NIT UVt POULTRY MARKET en the Beach. C MMUO. & Uk\ WORE PEOPLE UftC refreshing, calone-tree Suoarirw Li. t* fcWf>cte< i SWmt H THAN SUGAR TIT HO rooo mot Itcommtndvd by ooctWs lor I tllll ll WM—jf m Mkal *tls. Uit l twnain tnmxt. <*Mmt furs eefli pt*Wy hmlMi U. -tfc AT POOD STORM IVCftTWMMC Beth Torah Now In New Quarters Beth Torah Congregation is now occupying its new synagogue and school at 1051 No. Miami Beach bkd. A total of 630 member families are affiliated with the congregation. Included in its programs are a nursery, Hebrew, and Sunday school, with a registration of over 700 pupils. Abraham J. Gittelson is now in his third year as education director at Beth Torah. Mrs. Rebecca Kay heads the nursery school and kindergarten. Hurricane Victims Benefit A one act opera, "Gallantry." by Douglas Moore, will be presented by the University of Miami Opera Workshop in cooperation with the Opera Guild of Miami on Saturday evening at Bowman Hall on the U of M campus. Proceeds are lor the benefit of the victims of Hurricane Donna. SWochet en premises •'oily, sloeghterti under strict ratMnkal saaervisien. MR MAC* DtUVUr 320 Collins Ave. JE 8-1139 fEivro IN A OUSS Ot A CU Melvin Safra. a sixth grade student, will speak on "What the Academy Means to Me." Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principal, will introduce the guest of honor. Greetings on behalf of the City of Miami Beach will be presented by Mayor D. Lee Powell. Entertainment and music will be provided by Mai Malkin and his orchestra. Unmatched For Delicious Flavor! Floral Fashion Show Miami chapter of the American Jewish Congress will have a floral fashion show and card party on Tuesday noon at the Shore Club hotel. Featured will be Elton L. Edelman, of the Floral Shop of Miami. STEVENS MARKETS TETLEY TEA A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES SINCE 1837 Yes. there i Yom Tot spirit in rhu fine tea... 'flavor crushed" for fullest s tr eng th tod stimu. Ution ... richer taste ind pleasure with your fleirhigs ind nilchifs and betweri meal refreshment... Certified Kosher under ttrict Rabbinical Supervision & i **• %  • m 0 Sugar flO Spices ItOSti r iti.xi.a*! 'iijoYH*Ti*L u>GcL"urU/ tufa,' W\A^^VW^%^ > % < ^. i i < m % iy, % %  %  -w-ww-v HO FAT! Holland Honey Cakes MO SAL are made w,tnout these ingredients, IM\ ClirADI yet are De,icious Tas, Y' and Good m) JllUAK! for Everyone! ASK FOR THEM IN TOUR FOOD STORE OR HEALTH FOOD SHOP. Mmae by HOLLAND HONEY CAKE CO., Holland, Michigan U 1. # 7 r-V—V~V^-X^~\^~! r^^^-^r^^r^-^^~^^-v-~^^-^^~\^~v--l CHICKEN OF THE SEA HOT POTATO SALAD Make hot potato salad (you needn't wait for the potatoes to cool). Add a Family Sire can of Chicken of the Sea brand tuna. Heat through in the oven for a hot potato salad that's some thing! Serve with a green vegetable. FUSE: "Craatb* Cookery," 20 Tuna Tip*


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Pag* 6-B Jm is/> fhrkfktr Friday. Otcober 21 I960 Israel Philharmonic Orchestra's Israeli' Music By HARVEY W. LAURENCE Whatia_ Israeli music? Is it merely music written in Israel by native Israeli composers or is there something musically new being born in Israel, a fusion of the traditions of the East and West? It isn't likely that there'll he an answer to this question fur some years now, if ever. But at tout American critics will have the opportunity of evaluating new evidence on the subject when the Israel Philharrr.or.ic Orchestra arrive! in the United States for its second American tour this fall. For among the numbers to be played on the American four by conductors Carlo Maria Giulini and Josef Krips will be two new Israeli pieces: "Psalm," two symphonic movements, by the youthful Noam Sheriff, and "Capriccis" for piano and orchestra, by the rlc-an of Israel's composers, Paul Ber-Haim. The American tour of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra was opened in New York City at the Metropolitan Opera House on Sunday evening. Oct. 16. Following two other performances at Carnegie Hall on Monday and Tuesday. Oct. 17 and 18. the orchestra will visit 25 other American communities playing over 30 concerts during the seven-week period. The tour will take the orchestra to Canada for two performances in Toronto and Montreal, and to Mexico City for three performances. The tour of the United States and Canada will be Jointly sponsored by the AmericaIsrael Cultural Foundation and the J. M. Kaplan Fund. Inc.. with S. Hurok as manager. The Mexican appearance will be sponMjred by the Israel Foreign Office. Mr. Sheriff, a sabra who was bem in Tel Aviv in 1935, first came to attention as a composer mosphere of its own that may well be called Israeli in spj/^." Mr. Ben-Haim. better known in the United Stales, was in this country last year when Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra gave the American premiere oi his "Sweet Psalmist cf Israel." This threemovement symphonic work, with harp and harpsichord solos, received critical acclaim from America's major critics. Inspired by the story of King David, Harold C. Schoenbere, the New YoHc Times critic, said of Mr. Ben-Haim that his "workmanship is secure, and he has a thorough knowledge of the orchestra." Other New York critics employed such phrases as "generously melodic," "plaintive melody," "exotic vignettes of the Biblical David," "imaginative and stimulating," and "iridescent fantasy." cago Symphony Orchestra r lini first conducted tht I'raelPhT harmonic Orchestra in l 9£6 '* has made many appearance, j. Israel since then, tht mo ,t !" cent being to oper season this September. IMOHii The asseciat* conductor will k Dr. Josef Krips, noted Vi.n.,!! for rebuilding the musical 3| 0ri „ of the Vienna Staatiepgr, £ Vienna Philharmonic, and tu Hofmusikkappelle after th *. vastation caused by World War l| Gary Bertini, young Urseli con! ductor, also will accompany th, orchestra for the American tour. Prior to coming to the United States, the Israel P) harmonic Orchestra will give two concefii in Paris at the Palais de ( % %  on Oct. 10 and 11. Following the American tour, the i rchestra will return to Israel after spending two weeks in Japan. India, and other countries of the Far East. The American tour will celebrate the beginning ol -.he 25th anniversary year of the orchestra, founded in 1936 by Broniilat Huberman. Paul Ben-Haim. Israeli composer on occasion of his visit to the United States last year as part of cultural exchange program of the America Israel Cultural Foundation, hears his "The Sweet Psalmist of Israel" as played at its United States premiere by Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Inspired by the King David story, the three-movement symphony features harpischord and harp solos. Left to right aie Samuel Rubin, president of the America Israel Cultural Foundation; Sylvia Marlowe, who played the harpischord solo; and Mr. Ben-Haim. Mr. Ben-Haim. who was born in Munich in 1897 as Paul Frankenburger, migrated to Israel in 1933.! A graduate of the Munich AcadIIP Wflmpn emy of Music, he was celebrated % %  ftWIiiwn as both conductor and composer | Dlf>M rftlArtrnlina before he fled Nazism. Ben-Haim's I %  first large scale work was written under the impact of his experience in Israel, after he came under the influence of Oriental folk songs. B'nai B'rith Women cf Coral Gt bles will hold' a candlelightmj ceremony conducted by Dr Donald Michelson, director of HilW Foundation at the University of Miami. The ceremony will be part or i "celebration brunch" Tuesday, when his "Festival Prelude" was chosen in 1957 as the only Israeli number to be performed at the opening concert in the Frederic R. .Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv. A child prodigy, Sheriff conducted the Israel radio orchestra when he was eighteen. From 1953 to 1955. he was Deputy Conductor of the Israel Army Orchestra, lie has since studied philosophy at the Hebrew University. The new Sheriff number has been described by the Israel music critic, Peter Gradenwitz, as "brilliantly scored for orchestra, and though never leaning on traditional material, breathes an atDuring his recent visit to the United Slates. Mr. Ben-Haim was a guest lecturer at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in Washing-: 11:3n •">• at the Algiers hotel, ton, D.C.. a meeting of world leaders in the field of cultural exchange. Principal conductor and music director for the American tour will be Carlo Maria Giulini, worldfamous as the leader of the La Scala Orchestra. Giulini's only previous American appearances were in 1956 and 1958 as guest conductor for Fritz Reiner's ChiChairman of the event is Mrs. Sidney Falk, 5159 SW 5th ter. Ma Barney Landers, 940 Sylvanu blvd., is president. Israel's Ambassador to Mexico holds a reception honoring sociologists attending the 19th International Congress of Sociology. Shown with Ambassador Mordechai Schneerson (left) are Mrs. Mori Fremon, of Miami, her daughter, Morila Andrea, attending the University of Mexico, Hector Solis Quiroga, secretary general of the Congress, and Sra. de Quiroga. Coral Way Sisterhood Regular meeting of Sisterhood of Coral Way Jewish Center was to be held Thursday evening at the Center. Featured was to be a skit, "Dearie — Do You Remember Training Institute Held Here Douglas Gardens. Jewish Home for the Aged of Greater Miami, held its annual Orientation and Training Institute for new National Council of Jewish Women volunteers in the Home's Junior Auxiliary Day Care Room on Monday, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Maurice Pearlstein. executive di-ienson. rector, welcomed prospective vol-' unteers. A model for other volunteer training programs for service in a Home for the Aged, Miami's cooperative program with National Council of Jewish Women is now | in its sixth year. Council members completing the Training Institute will be interI ; viewed personally by the Home's I professional staff to determine how.] 'and where they can best serve the] j residents. Upon assignment, they J will join more than 40 Council col-1 unteers now on the job at the Home | as group activity leaders, friendly i visitors, and letter writers. Mrs. Jean Rhyon, chairman of|i Class Slated in Chain DeMiami Beach Recreation partment announces a new course starting Thursday, Oct. 27, at 3 p.m. Course will teach the playing; of the Chalil, Israeli instrument which is somewhat like the Record-! er. or vertical flute, of the Great Baroque period of Handel and Bach. Instructor is Mrs. Eva LevAUCTION MEANS ACTION! Phone FR 4-4151 We want Real Estate *o lei Pjblic Auction. We pay all advert'* ng costi. Competitive b;dd!ng b-ngs tcp value. Miami Real Estate Exchange Inc. 405 Dade Commonwealth Bldg. ROOM & BOARD for Refined Lady or Gentleman ii beautiful, centrally located, Beach home. JE 2-4236 I0W! YOU CAN EARN '' y 0 W,TH 1 SAFETY When Sisterhood Was Young?" Co-1 Council's senior citiiens program, ordinators are Mrs. Leo Weinstein. was chairman of the Institute, program chairman, and Mrs. Jack Tribute was paid to retiring chairRaymond, ident. membership vice presWe are pleased to announce that Raymond F. Barren has been appointed regional manager of our Miami Beach, Coral Gables and Ft. Lauderdale Offices HAYDEN, STONE & CO. E.t.blith.d ia*2 MEMBERS NY. STOCK EXCHAMGE AND OTHER PRINCIPAL STOCK AND COMMODITY EXCHANGES J17 7t.t Suet, MS *.. CireW, 104* fey**. Drive, Miami Beach Co-.l Cablet Ft. Lauderdale men Mrs. Mildred Spirer and Mrs. Grace Tater, "for their distinguished service to the program." Arthur Kalish, assistant director of the Home, and Marvin Schreiber, group work supervisor, conducted Monday's Training Institute. Members of the residents tour committee, averaging 82 years in age, guided prospective volunteers on a tour of the Home. Interest and Return of Your Capital Paid Monthly YOUR MONEY IS SECURED by 1st and 2nd Mortgages on Owner Occupied Homes Do Business with One of the Oldest and Largest Mortgage Companies Licensed and Bonded by State of Florida ZL FR 9-2676 pleas* visit our offices phone To Attend Board Meeting Mrs. Carl Ettinger, 7125 Rue Granville, Miami Beach, a member of the board of directors of the National Federation of Temple Sis terhoods, will participate in the annual meeting of the board in New York City on Oct. 26 and 27. Mrs Ettinger is chairman of the committee on Jewish ceremonials and arts in the department on religion and education at the Federation. UNITED MORTGAGE CO. 17th Floor Congress Building Miami, Fla. for Florida Residents Only WINDOW SPECIALISTS "SERVICE WE'RE PROUD OFI" Maintenance Inc. REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE OF ALL TYPES WINDOWS AND JALOUSIES Complete Stock of Replacement Parti 3427 N. Miami Ave. Miami 37, Fla. FRanklin 3-5491



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BIL.S J Me l(/< omaw s 'MU/ Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dernis and son, Martin, back from Toronto, where they visited their daughter, Elaine, and son-in-law. Morton Laufer The couple were married in February, and this was the tamily's first sight of one another since the wedding While in Toronto, they were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Laufer, in-laws of Elaine ... Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zukernick, 3134 Sheridan ave., have returned from a two-month trip to Europe, where they spent three weeks in Holland while Harry attended the Hague Academy of International Law Incidentally, Harry has been appointed to the hoard of trustees of the International Lawyers Assn. ... In Holland, they also visited Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Haarlem and Delft j:e and Sue spent lour weeks in London, and friends are impressed with their record of twelve trips to the theater there, among them, an outstanding performance by Alec Guinness in "Ross" And, during their five days in Dublin, the Zukernicks attended the Dublin International Theatre Festival... Mrs. Maxwell Hyman off for a visit to son, Tom, in Washington, and then to New York to visit her three brothers and to stay with her life-long friend. Pearl Bernstein. > > Birthdaze: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lchrman are grandparents for I he first time Born on Oct. 18, a son, Michael Bruce, to Mr. iind Mrs. David (Sandra) Lehrman Arrival was at Mt. Sinai Hospital David is a student at the University of Miami medical school Also: A boy, Andrew Scot, born Oct. 9, to Mr. and Mrs. Stuart (Diane) Wasserstrom, of Columbus, O. Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Rabinowitz — the Miami Diamond Center Paternal grandparents are the Julius Wasserstroms, of Columbus Maternal great-grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Gertzenberg and Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz, all of Miami, joined the David Rabinowitzes on a trip to Cleveland to attend the bris. K Impressive letters being received here from E. Albert Pallot, Riving pen-pictures of his round-the-world travels He's particularly interested in world-famed gardens, and is recording them in a series of photographs for official use by the City of Miami bcautification committee, of which he is chairman Pallol's trip is taking him from arrival in Vienna to Athens, Istanbul, Teheran, Karachi, Bombay, Delhi, Jaipur, Calcutta, Bangkok, Hong Kong, and Japan ... He returns home late this month ... Gertrude (Mrs. Kenneth) Oka has turned tables on her council| man husband ... It was she who recently made a speech of greet| ing before more than 1,500 people in Japan ... Inez Krensky back home after eight weeks abroad And back, she is, too, in the swing of things with the Mt. Sinai Hospital Women's Auxiliary Also chairing and co-chairing several important projects for Temple Beth Sholom. %  Dr. and Mrs. Lester (Sara) Stepner being posted with news of •Syracuse University Daughter Barbara is attending her fresh|man year there Edgar Greenberg back from New York in time to attend the [Men's and Boys' Apparel Club convention with wife Rose at the I Eden Roc hotel... Ruth (Mrs. Cy) Bernard making final arrangements to board | the plane that will take her to Mexico for another vacation After a summer of continued advanced study under the guidance of her former piano teacher. Rose M. Robin, Carole Goldstein, talented daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam (Frances) Goldstein, has resumed her college career at Stetson majoring — of course, in piano Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Coller were recent hosts to Marvin Kratter. finance whiz of Gotham Town, at the Gale hotel Marv Hew here at the invitation of the Miami Beach Bar for an address to its membership. > Bernie (Mrs. Joe) Weiner can be seen in her Mt. Sinai Hospital Pink Lady uniform again She's been away since June, visiting with friends and family in Chicago ... Speaking of Mt. Sinai, the Garden Club there held its first meeting of the season at the lovely home of Alice (Mrs. Seymour) Rubin Guest speaker was Mrs. M. S. Farrar, noted flower show judge and teacher Mr. and Mrs. Milton (Lane) Coleman practice what they preach at International Tours The couple recently returned from a three-month trip through Greece, Turkey, Israel, Aegean Sea sites, France, England, Italy and the Isle of Elba, where Napoleon I was exiled Mrs. Jack Chanin moving into the Barclay Plaza until the Morton Towers is ready for occupancy. More on Birth Front: Daughter. Lori, born Sept. 19 to Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Golin, 9285 Martinique dr. Lori joins brother Gary, age 20 months Stan's entertainment chairman of the Caribbean Jewish Congregation Mrs. G.'s recording and corresponding •secretary of the Temple, as well as Gift Shop chairman of Sisterhood She's also a membership vice president of Shalom chapter of B'nai B'rith Women. Lou and Marcella Heiman reporting to friends on their trip to Hot Springs, Ark. While there, the Heimans saw Mrs. Ethel Shochet and Mrs. Sally Gardner .. The Harold Thurmans off for Syracuse to greet the new arrival in their daughter's family, young John Samuel Sharon Creat-grandparents are Rabbi and Mrs. Samuel Thurman, of St. Louis Ten new drip technique paintings on display at Hi-Fi Associates on Coral Way ... Artist is Charles It. Jacobson .. In honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Spitalny, 580 NE 175th St., No. Miami Beach, friends have ''onated 50 croton plants to beautify the new approach of Temple %  Sinai Mr. and Mrs. Max S. Rosenzweig, of Keystone Island, receiving condolences on the sudden passing of his mother. "Jewish Floridian Miami, Florida, Friday, October 21, 1960 Section B Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro displays the Exodus Award plaque, one of two she received last week at a luncheon tribute at the Eden Roc hotel planned in her honor by the Women's Division. State of Israel Bonds. With Mrs. Sapiro is Col. Dina Werth. commanding officer of "Chen," the Israeli Women's Army, who presented the plaque "in appreciation of her unselfish and dedicated service in helping to spur Israel's economic development through her leadership and efforts on behalf of State Original Fashions To Mark Show Original fashions by leading American designers and Israel's most talented couturiers, all of fabrics designed and processed in Israel, will give dramatic testimony to that nation's progress in the fashion and textile fields. The results of their combined' creative efforts will be on exhibit Nov. 9 in the Grand Ballroom of the Americana hotel when "Israel Fashions, U.S.A." is presented by the Women's Division, State of Israel Bonds. The collection contains 42 designs, 10 by Americans and the balance by Israelis, using cottons, silks, woolens, lames, embroideries, tweeds, and jersey, all loomed in Israel. Representative is the theater or cocktail dress pictured here, a design of Lily Schleifer, Hungarianborn Israel designer who studied psychiatry in preparation for her career as a couturier. This outfit is called "Habima," after the name of Israel's national theater. The ensemble consists of a shirt waist print of turquoise, white and grey, with a turquoise cummerbund, over a bouffant petticoat, topped with a turquoise satin coat lined to match the dress. Commentating the show will be Maggi McNellis, famed New York radio, television and fashion expert, who has herself been named many times to the "best dressed women" lists. "Habima." by Lilly Schleifer. is among Israeli designs to be presented during "Israel Fashions, U.S.A.," due here Nov. 9. Coordination and accessories lor the show will be handled by Saks Fifth Avenue, Miami Beach, under the supervision of Mrs. Irene Gracia. Admission to the fashion luncheon is either by the purchase of one $100 Israel Bond, or the sale of three. About 1,000 guests are expected. of Israel Bonds." Mrs. Sapiro also received • he Woman of Valor pin, presented to her by Mrs. Jack Katzman (left), general chairman of the Women's Division. The pin signifies that she was responsible for the sale of $100,000 in bonds. Chairman of the luncheon was Mra. Joseph Shapiro (right), who led a bond appeal which resulted in more than $100,000 in pledges. Israeli actor-pantomimist Shai K. Ophir entertained. Beach Council Party on Monday Miami Beach Council of B'nai B'rith Women. District 5, will hold its second annual paid-up membership party on Monday evening at the Deauville hotel. Participating will be the five chapters making up the Council — Chai, Harmony, Menorah, Miami Beach, and North Shore. Bach chapter will entertain with a skit or musical show. President Mrs. Sam Belsky has donated a trophy to go to the chapter announcing the most new members. Winner last year was Menorah chapter. Membership chairman is Mrs. Irving Laibson. Mrs. Joseph Feldman is program chairman. Mrs. Gerald Soltz. District 5 president, will be suest „f honor. Also present will be Mrs. Bernard Supworth. third vice president; Mrs. Alfred Reich, first vice president: and Judge Milton Friedman, president elect of District 5, B'nai B'rith. Some 700 women are expected to attend the event. Sisterhood Will Mark Anniversary Temple Zioa Sisterhood will celebrate its 10th anniversary at a function Saturday evening at the Temple, 5720 SW 17th St. Program will feature an "era of dancing" from minuet to cha cha cha. Mrs. Sam Gordon is chairman. Irs Abe Isgar is publicity chairman. Membership coffee will be held Wednesday evening at the home of Mrs Seymour Samules, 1800 SW 85th ave. Chairman is Mrs. Leonard Harris. Sisterhood met last Wednesday evening at the Temple, and heard Mrs. Ann Goldberg, of the League of Women Voters. Mrs. Lawrence Wulkan was chairman. Hope School Chapter Luncheon Prospective members of Angel chapter for Hope School were feted at a Luau luncheon on Wednesday at the Seville hotel. Mrs. Gerald Linderbaum, vice president in charge of membership was chairman of the event which featured an Hawaiian luncheon menu. Angel chapter, chartered two years ago, has grown from a nucleus of 12 Miami Beach women who started the organization, to a current membership of 250. The chapter is devoted to service and fund-raising for the Hope School for Mentally Retarded Children, 666 SW 4th st., Miami.



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Poge 4-B Jen 1stFtcrktetr Friday. Otcober 21, i960 I Mizrachi Women in U.S. and Israel By MRS EMANUEL KARGER National Representative From small beginnings in 1925, 1he Mizrachi Women's OrganizaI on has grQwn until some 50,000 v. omen, organized" into some 250 i cal chapters, councils and regions throughout the United In tha aftarmath of spirit of tha Holy Day season, Mr*. E mania! Karger, national raprosantaliva of tha> Mizrachi Women's Organization of Amarica, presents tome pertinent insights into the programs of the organization. States, carry forward the organi. .tion's extensive programs in Islael. The Mizrachi Women's Organi• lion was founded in faith — ?nd its manifold activities wtroughout three and a half dec|M have reflected the devotion ti religious-Zionist women to the leal of the "land of Israel, for the people of Israel, in the spirit • I Israel's Torah." The history of the organization il more than a record of achievement in the fields of religious, .ademic and agricultural educa%  on; child restoration and Youth .Aliyah work, social service and social welfare activities. It is, as ..ell, the history of aid to the spiritual reconstruction of the Jewish State. Mizrachi Women have partici.ited in the historic task of bringing into existence the State of i-rael; they have shared in ev

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Fcge 4-A -Jowls* fhrkfian Friday, Otcober 21. iggg 1M ., %  ., WBWBM % % % %  I Jewish Floridian OFHCE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 FEED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Aviv, Israel HAT U. BINDER C orrespondent Published every Friday since \%H by The Jewish FlortdUn %  t 120 N.E. Sixth Street. Miami 1. Florida. Entered at second-class matter July 4, 130, at P'-st Office of Miami. Florida, under Ili'XWof Mn-h J. U79. The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide N^wi Service. Natfonal Editorial Assn.. American Assn. if English-Jewish Newspapers, and ths Florida Press Assn. The Jewish Floridian does mil guarantee the Kashrutn of the merchndle idvrtlnet In !' %  rnlumn' SUBSCRIPTION One Year 5 00 RATES: Three Year. S10.00 Volume 33 Number 43 Friday. Otcober 21. 1960 30 Tishri 5721 National Newspaper Week This is National Newspaper Week. It is weJ for Americans to set aside a week in which to celebrate one of their most precious heritages — freedom of the press. Our own time is filled with the incidence of peoples falling behind the iron curtain of dictatorship. Cuba, some 90 miles off the shores of Flcrida, is the latest example of a nation where democracy has died. We need not be reminded that it is always the press which falls first victim to a dictator's c— bition. A free press is the continuing guarantee of an informed people. A free press is the watchdog of human liberty and an unwavering contribution to the progress of a democratic society. National Newspaper Week, observed Oct. 15 to 21, serves to remind us of these things. Statistics as Mans Tools This is the era of statistics. Experience tecches that statistics are potent things. Their most common incidence today is in the Presidential polls. People have been conditioned to went to know how others will vote, what theL' feelings are on specific issues, how they budget their earnings, what land of purchases they make annually, and so on, endlessly. A common complaint against statistics is that they can be rigged to yield any set of predetermined results — or that irresponsible manipulators of statistics, relying on their "drawing power," frequently employ them without any scientific basis whatsoever in order to predispose the public to certain products, to o type of feeling for or against a popular question, and even as in the case of bigots to mold attitudes toward races and religions. One of the oldest and most respected uses of statistics is in the impartial sociological survey — a long-term study to determine the attitudes of a body of people in comprehensive and depth fashion. Such a study begins this week in The Jewish Floridian. (See Pages 1-A, 3-A.) The "Bayville Survey" should prove of interest to our readers for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important is that it concerns the Greater Miami Jewish community — local Jewry's attitudes toward the question of "Jew lfihness" in a wide variety Of issues. But if should also prove significant because its results may very well add to an emerging portrait of American Jewry. The "Bayville Survey" was launched here in June. 1958 under the auspices of the American Jewish Committee. The study is the result of a statistical analysis ir. which statistics are the tools of man's searching mind to help him learn more about himself. World Peace Organization The fifteenth anniversary of the United Nations finds the world divided, with strife in Africa, more nations in A3ia falling into the grip of the Soviet orbit, and our friendly neighbor, Cuba, also joining the Khrushchev entourage. At a ,im when nothing can seem more bleak for the forces of human freedom everywhere, we are called upon to consider the achievements of the world peace organization. The emerging of the United Nations fifteen years ago brought hope to a war-weary globe Under its aegis, new republics have been born —and defended against the rapacious. Through its many agencies, such as UNJCEF. UNESCO and others, needy peoples have received techIN HIS SPEECH BEFORE THE UN ASSEMBLY nical and financial assistance, scientific and cultural education. The UN has been the arbiter of international quarrels. It has brought a conclusion to wars, prevented wars from breaking out, sent armies to assure the cessation of conflicts. Its achievements are many. The table-pounding, shoe-waving, Nikita Khrushchev is still fresh in our memories. But such boorish international diplomacy is not the fault of the United Nations. Indeed, the Soviet dictator's astonishing behavior speaks more eloquently for the significance of the UN as a powerful world force for peace than is apparent at first glance. Above the rancor among some of its members, beyond the din of the debates and quarrels which on occasion become threats of war, there is the continuing recognition that so long as men talk, they do not fight On the occasion of the fifteenth anniversary of the United Nations, this organization still remains man's greatest hope for survival. Selling the Record Straight The charges and counter-charges swirling about the Pinhas Lavon case in Israel make for a completely disquieting situation. The newspaper wordage emerging as "reports" of the case produce a mile-high mound of copy. But it all adds up to a terrifying vagueness that spells censorship. The clearest example of this is the fact that Israeli newspapers are appearing on the streets these days with blank spaces in their columns to indicate the heavy hand of government blue pencil. Until the whole story is told, it really seems quite senseless for Israeli leaders to offer meticulously ambiguous statements on the question. So far, we can only be certain that the Lavon case is developing into one of Israel's greatest scandals to date. The personalities involved. Sharett, Dayan, and others, are proof of that *^ But if the government feels that blow-byblow reports are a danger to the nation's security, then it ought to say so. The half-truth wire service stories of the case merely reflect negatively on a democratic nation and remind us of the on-again, off-again position Israel adopted in the Eichmann case. during the week ... as i see it _py 1E0 MIND LIN JHEAMER.CAN Jewish Co* gress has issued a Pr T, coverage summary in ,J ^ ami case challenging reiigC; practices in the Dade cuuj school system. The m £* study purports to give „ b r na i view of newspaper opinion wi,2 ;^i h rL li,igalion *E win irainiie before fiirln m_ don here Oct. 31. The' stance of the survey attetrZ "to disprove fears expressed by Leo Mindlin, executive editor of Th, Jewish Floridian that the case 'may possibly do greater harm th-T good to the human relations progress we have thus far made' •• The Congress summary suggests that the local dailies "were emi nently fair, and gave both sides of the picture." This i s a weU-foundj!!. assertion, which should hardly prove surprising. The Miami Herairt and Miami News are positively oriented in the matter of civil libties. Their positions on minority rights, especially with respect tot sensitive question of integration, are unequivocally clear. If they hav spoken out against antiquated traditions of segregation, why should these newspapers be anything less than "eminently fair" in their r porting of the religion-in-the-schools case involving separation of churrn and state? The AJCongress survey is equally simple in its insistence on 50-50 incidence of letters to the editor "between those favoring and 0D posed to the plaintiffs" as an intelligent assessment of public opinion The study bases its statistics on the July 20 and 21 issues of both papers. But a more protracted analysis of letters to the Herald and News, as well as to editors of other Florida publications, offers a picture entirely different from the even-tempered Greater Miami com" munity the Congress study attempts to paint. -;•{• ••• THE INTIRPKCTATION OF IDIT0RIAI SUPPOKT THE LETTERS QUESTION apart for the moment, what official pon. tions did the Herald and News in fact take? The Herald sat comfortably on the fence, safely waving the Stars and Stripes with these words: ". that is where such controversies belong in our Republic in court." Did it call for clear support of separation of church and state? The answer must depend upon one's interpretation of the reference to "the right relation between religion and the public schools," from which the morning daily boldly but ambiguously concluded in its July 20 editorial on the subject: "Nothing hs closer to the heart of the American people." And what, precisely, is "the right relation"? One can merely deduce a feeling of sympathy — the Herald called it "a healthy sigi" but the final word; apparently, must lie in the court. This is a circumlocution if ever there was one, and a far cry from the American Jewish Congress intimation that the editorial comments on a,people at peace in the due process of law. No less must the AJCongress interpretation of the Miami News editorial published July 20 be readjusted for a more accurate understanding of the true climate of opinion here. Quotes the Congress: ". the Miami News deplored the fact that 'parents, teachers, students, public officials, lawyers and judges must, at this very moment of our complex lives, devote time, money and effort to this debate'." On its face, one would assume that the News was proffering its editorial support — even if of a lukewarm variety. But the Congress survey fails to open its quote with the preceding sentence: ". it can not be considered anything but tragic that confronted with a multitude of urgent local, national and international problems we should now he confronted with this issue too." •:•:• .;. THE HAIVC T£ OF THt SO SO VOW |T WOULD HAVE been difficult for the News to place the religionin-the-schools case here into a more absurd, wasteful light — or to be more explicit in its criticism of the litigants. Nevertheless, this carefully-excerpted editorial, and the Herald's ambiguously worded one, are the AJCongress survey's major lines of argument to prove local newspaper "fairness" if not downright support by implication. Placed against a background of equivocation on the one hand, and rejection on the other, the Congress study's virtual claim of 50-50 letters to the editor acquires new meaning — sentiment in favor of religious practices is actually conceded in both papers of July 20 and 21 by the narrow margins of 3-to-2 for the News and 6-to-5 for the Herald. As an example, American Jewish Congress statistics fail to indicate whether or not letters supporting the litigation included some written by Jews and, if so, how many. It is clear that these would have to be disqualified in any discussion of the public relations ramifications of the case. Nor, in this rather naive 50-50 study, is there proper account taken of the vicious extent to which opponents of the litigation went in the intensity of their expression — a quantity that must be considered in an intelligent assessment of their impact on the community if the object is not to dupe us with "balanced" statistics that are actually oat of joint. Can a letter written by a Jew, favorably disposed to the litigation, really "cancer' the impact of a negative letter bordering' on the anti-Semitic? n But the sleight-of-hand does not end here. In its effort further 'to disprove fears expressed by Leo Mindlin," the survey quotes from my Aug. 5 column, which considered the militance of the AJCcngress suit "ill-advised and costly, when civil libertarians of a more restrained nature judge that principles — however dear to us — can not, eves short of self-defeat, be defended at all times and all places" •:• •:• .-. AN tmm TO Disentail w soviet RAVING PROPERLY QUOTED me on this occasion, the CoagresJ survey continues: "In another column he (Mindlin) wrote: 'Our own emotions are mixed in this instance. While the principle involved i a just one. we would feel better were the American Jewish Congress action joined by the other Jewish defense agencies and Jewish community organs of civic expression'." The clear intent of juxtaposing these excerpts is to suggest uncertainty in my mind with respect to the propriety of the CongressAmerican Civil Liberties Union suit. Nothing could characterize mT position less accurately. I have time and again stated unequivocally that I support the principle involved in the litigation. But in the name ot conservation of minority group energy, I suggested that the s" might have been filed in a more favorable climate. (See "During the Week As I See It," July 29. Aug. 5, Aug. 12.) These considerations apart, the second excerpt attributed to me t>y the Congress survey is worse than a misquote: It was never, in „, i T£ !? me but PPe" in an editorial in The Jewish Floridian or July 22, which takes a less harsh view of the litigation than my owni hose who have read the editorials is The Jewish Floridian over the years can point to more than one occasion when they have been critical of a position expressed in this column. unregarded, however, in all these self-deceiving considerations, was the massive impact on the community of bold headlines thai CenHnwed en Rage 12-A ir



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Pcge 14-A +Jewlstnar*fk*r Friday, Otcober 21, 1960 Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINPtIN No Single Book Describes the Horror Completely NIGHT. By Elie Wiesel. 116 pp. New York: Hill and Wans, Inc., 104 Fifth av*. $3.00. ELIE WIESEL'S "Night" is more than it would seem, at • first look, to be; it is stronger and more poignant than any description would indicate. It is a narrative of Auschwill and Buchenwald. told by a 15 year-old Transylvanian boy, a devout child already deeply engrossed in the Taln.ud. a profound believer who studied all day and ran at nigpt to the synagogue to weep over the destruction of the Ttfnple. It is a story, then, of breavement and despair, filled with scenes of horror and humiliation, and sometimes ol love. Although we have read of it again and again, each time is like a first time — the same tears, the same old fury, the same set bitterness. But I think we are beginning to understand that there is not going to be one book to end all books, to tell it completely and perfectly once and for ever. Quite the contrary, each book which appears adds a bit more to the picture. "Night" adds in two areas. To begin with, it is the story ol a child, a child who walked, saying the Kaddish for himself, toward a pit of flames in which were burning carload after carload of. babies: who saw anothei__duM hanged: who tried desperately to keep his father alive and shared instead the relentless days of his dying. Then, it is the story of a religious child, a child who lived with God, until God died in him. Readers will undoubtedly be piqued by Francois Mauriac's beautifully written foreword when he writes, "the stumbling block to his faith was the cornerstone of mine," and "the conformity between the Cross and the suffering of men was in my eyes the key to that impenetrable mystery whereon the faith of his childhood had perished." Perhaps it would be well to remember that the value of a faith is not in the ease with which one can maintain it; often, it is in the difficulty. For a Jew, life-centered rather than death-centered, the demands his faith makes upon him and what he asks of God in return are integral; God for the Jew is not so much a way of endurance as a way of moral progress. There is no doubt in my mind that the first half of this book is extraordinary. The blindness tof the Jews) in Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN Arabs Engage in Bold Electioneering in U.S. Washington lAfHILE JEWISH GROUPS were quie:%  ly dignified during the visit ol President Nasser, of the United Arab Republic, the Arabs have boldly intruded into the American election campaign. Arab electioneering has come not only t rom American Arabs but from the embassies of the (Jutted Arab Republic. Iraq, aad Saudi Arabia. The State Department was forced to remonstrate with the I'AK Ambassador. The Nasser ,..i .'i; UM Listening Post: By SAUL CARSON hu-> naiuiy Soft Sell at the UN United Nations ISRAEL IS PLAYING a most un' usual role here, at this year's General Assembly, At a session lit•rally gleaming with a great numer of heads of state and govern.lent, foreign ministers and other abinet members from count he world over, the name of Israel red here openly. Even mention of the Middle East in general has been infrequent Yet Israel is not only here. It is here in force and is as active as it has ever been. Furthermore, its activity is fruitful. During the first two weeks of this year's Assembly, Mrs. Golda Meir, IsraelForeign Minister, acconpanicd in nearly every case by Israel's permanent representative here. Michael S. Comay, met at formal conferences with no less than two dozen foreign policy chiefs. These meetings do not include the diplomatic-social contacts with many of the world's leaders at cocktail parties, receptions and other events of that typo At the formal conferences, whether with U.S. Secretary of State Christian A. Herter, Britain s Foreign Secretary, the Ear! of Home, or others, the subjects ranged to what is called here a veritable tourd'horizon. They were general in character. Is reel had no specific requests to make, did not attempt to tie the other parties down to any specific commitments at this time. But throughout. Israel found friendship and understanding. There is mutual rapport among many of the world's governments and Israel. The "party circuit" had proven its own value. For instance, when Israel was invited to the official reception given by India's Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, there was significance in the fact that Nehru himself led a Yemenite prince to a table where, he knew, Mrs. Meir was seated. He thus manifested openly his desire to show that Israel and a hostile Arab state hold equal status in his eyes. When the table-pounding Nikita S. Khrushchev held his official reception for heads of state and delegation chairmen. Mrs. Meir was presented to him formally by Russia's new permanent representative here, V. A. Zorin. There was an exchange of pleasantries between Khrushchev and Mrs. Meir. The Israeli Foreign Minister, speaking in Russian, told the USSR chief that she had been Israel's Minister in Moscow, back in 1948, and he assured her that Moscow is a changed city now, "changed for the better." "How does it happen that you speak Russian so well?" asked Khrushchev. "Well, I was born in Kiev," answered Mrs. Meir, 9he added that she would like to see Kiev again. "Please, please, you are welcome," Khrushchev assured her. Certainly that was not in'ended as a formal invitation, and was not identified as such by the Israelis. Bat it did mean that, when Khrushchev is in a mood to turn on his charm, he can direct it toward Israel as well as to others. envoy had publicly denounced American Jewry and told Arab students in the United States that it was their "duty" to campaign against American candidates who support Israel. • Iraq and Saudi Arabia protested Sen. John F. Kennedy's pro-Israel speech before the Zionist Organization of America. Iraq handed a formal diplomatic note to the State Department, urging the silencing of Sen. Kennedy. The Jewisn war veterans organization urged the State Department to ensure "the interference by Arab governments in the American election campaign" and oust offending Arab diplomats. The Arabs mainly attacked Sen. Kennedy. But Vice President Nixon also came under fire. So did Republicans like Sen. Jacob K. Javits and Rep. Seymour Halpern. both of New York. The presence of Nasser in the United States during the election activity caused embarrassment in official Washington. There was consideration of inviting him to the White House as a state guest. However, it was feared such an invitation might be subjected to political attack. A delicate problem emerged involving American support of the Nasser regime for a seat on the United Nations Security Council. There was wide opposition because of Nasser's continued defiance of UN resolutions on Suez and other matters. The restrained conduct of American Jewry during Nasser's presence in New York was noted with approval in official circles. Jewish groups meanwhile refrained from the brazen electioneering tactics that typified the American Arabs as well as Arab diplomats. Suppose the Israeli Ambassador made an address in Washington urging Israeli exchange students to campaign against various American candidates. The Arabs would instantly demand that he be declared persona non grata and kicked out of America. The Israeli Ambassador has remained quietly aloof from the election furor. But the Arabs went so far as to threaten the State Department that they would move even closer to the Soviet orbit unless candidates were stopped from voicing approval of "world Zionism and Jewry." The Iraqis said in a note to the State Department that Sen. Kennedy's "blatant praise" of the Jews was "truly painful." Baghdad asked the American Embassy to ser\e as "a medium" to apply pressure on the Kennedy campaign headquarters Foreign Arabs are continuing attacks on candidates and appeals to "the anti-Jewish vote." Cairo Radio has just termed Sen. Kennedy a "Zionist snake." The situation is reaching a point where American patience is under trial. The sideshow might explode into a major national issue before Nov. 8. From Hollywood: HERBERT G. LUFT the face of a destiny from which they would still have h H time to flee: the inconceivable passivity with which th gave themselves up to it" has never been more movinsw evoked, nor the heartbreaking sundering of a family nor the unbelievable horror of a concentration camp, it jj t hf recorded outrage of the senses of civilization to which vH respond best. Dignity is our best imitation of what we imagine divinity to be; we are horrified by its loss The latter half of the book is less distinctive and like many others we have read. To oe quite cool about it (which is not so easy to do), this seems to be the pattern in mo t books like "Night." After a time, the sensitivities of the sufferer become, perforce, blunted; he remembers his suffering in more physical terms, and physical misery starvation and cold and pain — is far more difficult to convey. Thus one weeps for the loss of mother and is desolated by the loss of God. because it is easy to imaginebut it is hard to imagine cold when one is warm and nearly impossible to conjure up starvation, when one has never starved. Yet it is precisely what is so perfectly indicated in the book, imbedded in its very structure — this change of emphasis — which dramatises the ultimate degradation the changing of a person close to God to one close to an animal. Elie Wiesel is a reporter at the United Nations for one of Israel's largest newspapers, as well as a literarycritic for the "Jewish Daily Forward." Hill and Wang Publishers are planning to publish his first novel, "'L'Aube (Dawn)," in the spring. "Night." which was a selection of the Societe des Lecteurs in France last year, was also a best seller in that country. Panorama: By DAYID SCHWARTZ Fathers are Honored AN ORGANIZATIONS the ** Founding Fathers of the Zionist movement in America has been ormed. called Brith Rishonim. including among, its members Louis .ipsky, Bernard G. Richards, Moris Margulies and Dr. S. Bernstein. The founding fathers usually ire neglected by the generation wmen succeeus it. Now and then a few are given to see the rewards of their labors. I'sn.ilU it is a difficult kind of story that the past reveals. Bernard G. Richards has told me that duiing the presidency of Richard Gottheil all of the files of the Zionist organization were concentrated in one dssk of his office. Gottheil was professor of Semitics at Columbia, and if you wanted to talk to him about his teaching, he would go to one desk and if you wanted to talk to him about Zionism, he would go to the other desk, where his Zionist papers were filed away. It was good that he was systematic or the cause of Zion might have gotten mixed up with a conjugation and been lost. Israel Goldberg, who was for many years associated with the growing up days of Zionism, once to'.d me of the time when the Zionists sent a delegation headed by Jacob de Haas, to discuss the buying of Palestine from the Young Turks. It was around 1904. when the Young Turks had deposed of the Sultan. The Youug Turks did offer to sell but they named a sum in the millions. De Haas picked up and left realizing that the only way the American Zionists could buy Palestine from them was on the installment plan. $1.00 down and 50* a month, but the Young Turks hadn't heard of installment buying. The Zionists didn't have much money but the New Maccabean, which Lipsky edited, was educating the new generation, planting the seed, which was to flower many years after. De Haas was a controversial figure but I recall him with respect and affection. Ina Balin Offers Her Views on the Minority Hollywood to New York "| AM VERY glad to be a Jew," Ina Balin told me during an interview in Manhattan this week. "There is something inbred in us that urges us on to do the unusual, evidently to prove ourselves to the world around us." The young actress, who only this summer zoomed to stardom in the Twentieth-Century-Fox movie. "From the Terrace, proud of her age-old heritage, though she stresses that", in strictly Orthodox terms, she would not be classified as overly religious. But she believes in the equality of man indeed is Miss Balin loves people. "If only we could take our fellow men as individuals," she reasons, "and not judge everyone according to origin, nationality or religion, n iter than by their merits and achievements, our world wouia be a better place to live in." As a Jew, she doesn't want to be better, but just to be like the rest of humanity. She goes about her work with a relentless drive, determined to show that she is an equal, though her grandparents were immigrants from Eastern Europe who came to this country with nothing but a dream. Ina Balin is the daughter of Betty Friedman and Sam Rosenberg, whose families originated in Hungary and Russia. She was born on Nov. 12, 1937, in Brooklyn; -^^^J^r'at^ b 'rrr !" 1 When Uttle lna n was b.^ 9 hTparenU were forced; Lrlvrtce W "'" l M ng t0 bo,h have since remarried and. until recently, she lived %  minority race. ; h m „.. .,„ „ ,. ,;_ •„„. Hills. N.iIna Balin, our young philosopher, is a lithesome, delicate lass of 23, with flawless snow-white skin, softly curl ing shoulder-length dark hair, and extremely large sensitive eyes. Though the actress wears no make-up and dresses quite simply, she appeared to me like a princess from an Oriental fable, when she walked into the Barbary Room on Gotham's East 52nd st. for the prearranged interview. with her mother, Mrs. Harold Balin, in Forest Hills, Ina attended the Montessori School in Bucks county, ana the Buckingham High School in Pennsylvania, then movea to Long Island, where she graduated from Forest nu High at the ripe age of 15. But she had started her theatrical career long before, at the age of 8, playing leads in class plays. Later, sne sang in the chorus and glee clubs, earning extra money as a baby sitter in her final student years in New Yort.



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Poqe 10-A +Jeisti fhrMian Friday, Otcober 21. lggQ Nixon Workers Cite Israeli Paper's Support Taming over the gavel to he newly-elected president of the Golden Age Friendship Club of the Miami YMHA is Firaim H. Gale (right), executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. Hyman Kam will be serving his third term o? president. Kam also serves as vice president of the Hebrew Free Loan Assn.. is a member of the board of governors of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and is on the boards of the Miami YMHA and the Greater Miami Jewish Community Cents r. He has recently been appointed chairman of the volunteer v.sitors committee to hospitalized veterans of the Jewish Welfcre Board. B'nai BVith Sets Membership Push Oct. 9 to Dec. 31 is marking the official period of the 1960 B'nai B'nth "Half Million" membership campaign aimed at bringing the to'al number of members in the Jewish service organiiation to the h; f-million mark. Simulating its membership to! "gel a member by December." Brai B'rith is moving ahead qr.&kly with extensive preparations for the new campaign. tm part of the effort, the ten local B'nai B'rith lodges, under th< overall supervision of district ii> nbership and activities direc: tor" Arnold D. Ellison, and withl co-Ohatrman Irving Schatzman and Btreard Newmark. have mapped out an intensive drive in the Greater Miumi area, pledging 800 new mi .-nbers by Dec. 31. 7 tiis would bring the local member-hip count to 4.300 men. All lodges have organized member-, ship teams and will be approachin. their neighbors in a door-todiK r canvas for prespective membei J. The Greater Miami campaign will include with a mass initiation in January. 1961. Assisting in the drive are Dave Greenberg, West Miami: Milton Kahn, Miami Beach: Milton Hahn, Sholem; Larry Lipkin, North Shore; Leonard Schwartz. North Dade; Bob Marshall, Hialeah: Jerry Robinson. Coral Gables; and Sy Bobbins. Gil Balkin. Member Show on Exhibit Miami Beach Art Club recently hung its second members show in the main lobby of the DiLido hotel. Exhibitions of the club run continuously throughout the year, and are changed every two months. The current exhibit includes 24 works of art. Continued from Page 1-A lion of Vice President Richard Nixon, was the subject of an editorial in Yedioth Achronoth,~he Aid Shunned WASHINGTON — (JTAVice President Richard M. Nixon's press secretary, Herbert G. Klein, has repudiated his statement urging American Jews to vote for Nixon for the sake of Israel. The repudiation was announced in Los Angeles after the Klein statement caused a protest from three eminent Jewish leaders — Philip M. Klutznick. Irving M. Engel, and Rabbi Israel Goldstein. Mr. Klein said: "The release referred to was issued in Washington by an over-enthusiastic campaign worker, without the knowledge of either myself or the Vice President." Mr. Klein stated that Mr. Nixon "has consist ently taken the position that there is no such thing as bloc voting in the United States. In addition, he has instruct ed his staff to avoid any appeals which would be direct ed toward a group with the implication that it would vote as a bloc." According to Mr. Klein, Mr. Nixon "does not subscribe to the statement in the editorial" of the Israeli newspaper Yediot Ahonot which was quoted by Klein in his controversial statement warning that a Kennedy election victory might cause the destruction of Israel. Aviv newspaper's editorial, according to Klein, "pointed up the fact that there were 2,000.000 Jewish vul the United States-awl. that for the sake of Israel, they should be cast for Vice President Nixon." The Klein statement concluded: j "The paper did not call for governmental endorsement of Nixon, but called for the people of the country to come forth as volunteers for the cause of a Nixon-Lodge victory, by explaining that aid and comfort. I via votes, to the Democratic Partv could result in a policy of appease ment and the destruction of Israel." In their telegram to Nixon, the three Jewish leaders stated: "Your Press Secretary. Herbert G. Klein, in a statement issued Oct. 10 from the Nixon-Lodge campaign headquarters, made references to a purported danger of the 'desirucj tion of Israel" if Sen. Kennedy is elected. Mr. Klein's press message contained allegations that Israeli elements were seeking a pro-Nixon vote as a 'safeguard for Israel.' "The rtlNH is an unfortunate distortion of tho relationship of American Jewry with Israel, and • disservice to Israel-American relations. Americans of Jewish faith vote their individual coneeMweviBHMnii %  I Annuml Installation Boll Temple Ner Tamid Young Adults will hold its annual installation ball on Sunday evening at the Barcelona hotel. oldest daily newspaper in Israel. Tlte editorial went on to criticize Sen. John Kennedy, as 'the incarnation of American political infantilism'." The last paragraph of the Tel iKAVtLMG! ^ \HnW IkAVll URVKI. Im .> ',M.I..... i • m j'.o-* """ HEALTH ...with EVERY LUXURY. Benefit from hS. hoelth-glving, rodtooerlve thermo" waters of Hot Springi and relax in luxury of The Arlington. Barf., awoy oil your aches ond pains due to tension and fatigue....relieve arthritis, rheumatism, and high blood pressure. Superb bathhouse In the hotel. Enjoy our nemiracle, temperature-controlled, cascade twin swimming pools, pot.o and sun decks.. .dance aftd be entertained. Golf on our two 18-hol. Championship Courses. Finest food served anywhere is Ide pride, of the Arlington. All sport, and recreations in Hot Springs nature's wonderland including huntirxj, fishing and La* Vegas night lif,. HOT SPRINGS Am* science. A political party, f,, partisan advantage, should never try to tell Americans of any faith hew* elements in a foreign nation allegedly want them to vote. "When Mr. Klein cited an Israeli tabloid as an authority on how Americans of Jewish faith shou'd vote, we feel he made a grave error that must immediately be rejpudiated. We do not wish to be iieve this press release reflects your own personal thinking. However, since Mr. Klein is your authorized spokesman, we must assume he was speaking with your authority in this official release. A clarification of your views on this serious matter is urgently requested." NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS Rabbi Abramowitz is Host Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz spiritual leader of Temple Menorah and president of tht Greater Mi| ami Rabbinical Assn.. will be host I on "Still Small Voice," weekly tele> i vision program sponsored by the Rabbinical Assn., on Sunday. 10 • a.m.. over WCKT ch. 7. Theme of the program will be "Words of Wisdom." TBS* )A(j$-6NI()HTS NO TAX round-trip tourist faro included *£* uuest Afoo"/^ Visit glamorous, summer-cool Mexico via Quest Airways — famed for passenger-pampering sarvica. But tha Guast flight is only half tha fun — for a complete itinerary of everything this unbeatable tour has to offer contact your travel agent or send tha coupon below to us. In addition to Mexico City, you'll visit Cuernavaca, Taxco and see so much more. But don't miss out — do it now! 1 PieasesendmefuHdetau.o17.DayM



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Page 12-A "Jmistncrkfton %  '• • %  • %  • %  !• %  % %  %  ." in... % %  • %  "•" %  %  ajkmm %  % %  i Your a A Leaders: 1960-61 MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY SIDNEY ARONOVITZ and HYLAND RIFAS: No. 12 in a Series Sidney Aronovitz and Hy land Ritas, who were select ed to head the Combined Jewish Appeal Banks and Finance Division in 1961, have taken a keen interest in Miami's welfare agencies for many years. Both hail from pioneer families which have been identified with a wide van ety of Jewish social services in the South Florida area. Aronovitz is a member of Federation's executive committee and board of governors. He worked in Federation's budget committee, and has been active in more than a dozen CJA campaigns in the Attorney's Division. He is president of Beth David Congregation, a past president of the Hillel Advisory Council at the University of Miami, and he was an organizer of the B'nai B'nth Council of South Florida in the 1940s. Aronovittz is chairman of the board of the Bank oi bade County, and served as chairman of the Dade County Zoning Board of Adjustments. He is also a director cf Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. Rifas' record of community leadership stems from Ihe early '30's. when he worked to build Miami's oldest social service agency, the Jewish Welfare Bureau, now known as the Jewish Family and Children's Service. In the 1960 CJA campaign, he was active in the Finance Division. He is president of the Miami Title and Abstract Company. He is a director of the JewFriday, Olc<*m 21, i960 Tor oh luncheon Meef.ni Beth David Sisterhood held a Torah luncheon meeting Wedn. day, 11:30 a.m. al Beth David A ^ dttorium, 2625 SW 3rd ave Pro!' ram was followed by cards and Mah Jongg. Torah Fund c'.airrnan is Mrs. John Stiunin 194R cu, 20th st. 5W To Live in Hearts We Lorn* Behind li 10 Lite Forever! PALMER'S MEMORIALS "MimPt 0*1, Jewish Monument MUm* HYIAND MAS ish Home for tiie Aged, Greater Miami Jewish Com munily Center, and the Baron de Hirsch Loan Fund. Aronovitz and Rifas will now combine their personal 1 SIDHtT AKOHOVITZ ingenuity and professional skill to raise greater funds for CJA. They are most welcome additions to the leadership roster. ,.,. i.ii,i:::iii.MiaaapaMMi WMaH Scheduled Un veilings J Accuracy of Newspaper Survey is Challenged Continued from Pago 4-A chronicled the day-by-day occurrences in the religion-in-the-schools bearing and their destructive meaning to Greater Miami Jewry. In its propensity for seeing all things in a one-to-one relationship, how many letters, pro or con, would the Congress survey need to "balance" the effect of one of these heads? >< > ACCENT ON TNI ONIMPOtTANT %  hJOR WAS there any significance !" attached to these widely-publicized events presumably "unrelated" to the newspaper climate of MEN and WOMEN: SUrl OWN PROFITABLE BUSINESS wiling large lint, Fineil Quality Cosmetic! and Household Needs. Foil or Spare Time. Old Reliable Firm with YEARS OF KNOW HOW. EVERYBODY BUYS. Write ASTORIA PRODUCTS CO. Dcpt. K, Birmingham 1, Alabama. opinion: the all-night prayer vigils for success of the defense; expressions of outrage by such groups as the Dade County Federation of Women's Clubs that the "word of God in the schools" should be challenged; the Metropolitan Commission, which passed a resolution 7to-1 against the litigation; and a petition issued by the Council of Churches, with 30,472 signatures representing some 180 churches here (as of Aug. 16), frankly hoping for failure of the suit. Do these truly bear no relation to the Jewish community's image in the eyes of the general community? Was a simple survey of editorial opinion an accurate portrait of the public relations climate in south Florida? And what of the expressions of sympathy in behalf of the defense, to which the American Jewish Congress study made no allusion whatever, but which were elfectively voiced by the Florida Education I Assn., Miami Woman's Club, United Church Women, Florida Junior Chamber of Commerce, Dade Son. Cliff Herrell, Dade Rep. David Eldridge. and Florida State Superintendent of Schools Thomas Bailey, whose office received 170 letters following his public remarks on the case here — all but one reported as favorable to the defense? One can go on and on, discussing in detail all of these events, which were reported under bold headlines — if with eminent fairness — in the local press. But it must only become increasingly clear that the AJCongress survey's 50-50 division of community opinion over the religion-in-the-schools litigation here, with its absurd emphasis on two editorials and a handful of letters to the editor, yields a spurious view of the real situation. Next week for more on this, and school board race, as an example of the tragic failure to conserve its relation to the Dade countyJewish minority group energy. SUNDAT, OCT 23, 1960 Mt. Note Cemetery FANNIE KMfftU, 1 a.m. Rabbi Munis Shop IEBA £. Ktm,[R, 2 p.*. Rabbi Morris Sfc,of> Jewish Section of Weedlenea Cemetery AtlAHAM TUIETSKY, 2 B*. Rabbi Leon Kroniih "May Their Souls Repose in Eternal Peace.'" ARRANSIhUKTS IT PALAKI'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. Israel Mourns Passing Of Rabbi Toledano at 79 REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Creator Miami's lergett 1 OUest t fja JUr for Siaageaa n Hebrew A Sender, SckoeJt. Wholesale A letofl rSIAtU SMTS AM HOVaTKS 417 WasMstertoti Ave. K 1 Mil LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK The South's most beautiful Jewish cemetery" 30 Minutes from the Beach Via The New 36th St. Causeway TU 5-1689 luncheon and Card Party The home of Mrs. Richard Bergman, 51 No. Shore dr., will be the site of a tuncneon and card party on Thursday noon, Oct. 27. Proceeds are for the B'nai B'rith Women of America Children's Home for Maladjusted Children in Israel RABBI • CANTOR HEBREW TEACHER Marriages performed. Bar Mttsvah preparation a specialty. Success guaranteed. UN 5-M06 ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE 1357 Washington Ave. JE 1-7722 ALL HEBREW SUPPLIES FOR SYNAGOGUES at JEWI8H HOME! We Carry Bar Mitivah Records NZWMZN FUNERAL HOME 1333 DADE BOULEVARD MIAMI BEACH JEfferson 1-7677 Ed word T. Newman Funerol Director Miami Hebrew Book Store 1585 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach — JE 1-3040 Hebrew Religious Supplies foe Synagogues, Schools & Private Ute ISRAELI 4 DOMESTIC OlFTt Continued from Pag* 1 A ed Minister for Religious Affairs! in 1958, after the religious parties had withdrawn from the coalition Cabinet because of a disagreement over the "Who's a Jew?" issue. Born in Tiberias. Rabbi Toledano studied at the yeshiva in that city. During World War I, he was exiled to Corsica, because of his French citizenship. He was a member of the chief rabbinate of Tangier from 1926 to 1929, then served as chief justice of the rabbinical courts in Cairo and Alexandria until 1939. He was appointed chief rabbbi of Tel Aviv in 1942. s An authority on Maimonides, the medieval Jewish physician and religious philosopher, Rabbi Toledano served as chairman of the supervisory commission for the reconstruction of the tomb of Maimonides in Tiberias. He was a prolific writer and the author of many scholary works. Rabbi Toledano was the center of public attention in Israel several months ago, when he married a 25-year-old divorcee, the daughter of an immigrant rabbi from Morocco. He was again the center of a political controversy last month, when it was disclosed that he had never relinquished his French cili?tn.hip, even after as-; suming his cabinet post. Rabbi Toledano's death was believed likely here to create politi-i i-.il activity in various quarters, ineluding the Chief Rabbinate, the Cabinet, and among the religious 1 parties. GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FRanklin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Avenue Miami, Fla. HARRY GORDON •• PRESIDENT IKE GORDON FUNERAl DlRf-CtOR I Do women live longer than men? LONG DISTANCE MOVING fo off points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE AI %  •:• II.II. v.\> I\I> as. INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue For Information Call MR. ROSS Nf 3-6496 JVVV Jamboree Scheduled Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary 223. West Miami, will hold a jamboree on Saturday evening, Oct. 29, at the Miami Pioneers, 250 NW No. River dr. Music will be by Herb Greenfield and his orchestra. In charge of information is Mrs. Rosalie Cox. Proceeds will be used for the purchase of an Emerson respiration assistor at the Veterans Administration Hospital. GENTLEMAN Wishes to Share bis Private Kerne with Another Gentlemen. Large led ream. Kitchen Privileaes. 2940 SW 25th Ter. HI 6-6653 Yo. That's why they can now get special rates on Living Insurance from Equitable. Coverage costs even less than it would have a short time ago. Leu than a man'* pwV ofering tame benefits! Provide* protection now-P'" 8 guaranteed funds for emergencies, education, re nut (Not applicable to policies below $10,000, ^^ of their administrative costs.) For details call: 1 Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. SIDNEY S. KRAEMER LIFE UNDERWRITER ..... Phone FR 1-5691 Phono UN 6-1873 24S S.f. 1st Street — Miami, Fla. i t % 



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Friday. Otcobtr 21. I960 -Jelsiurer of the State of Israel Bor. d Organization. lywood in the preschool, one-daya-week, and in the afternoon Hebrew departments. The collage publishes detailed credit requirements for teachers license in these three areas. Beth David Men's Club PRESENTS TIMELY ATTRACTION TOWN HALL FORUM REPUBLICANS vs. DEMOCRATS PRESENTING MAXWELL RABB Newly appointed assistant to Leonard Hall, Campaign Chairman of the Republican Parly FOR THE REPUBLICANS SEN. CLAUDE PEPPER FOR THE DEMOCRATS QUESTIONS FROM THE AUDIENCE WILL BE PERMITTED The Beth David Men's Club takes this Opportunity to Invite to this Outstanding and Timely Presentation the Entire Greater Miami Community, at BETH DAVID AUDITORIUM, 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, at 8 P.M. INSURED SAVINGS A EARN % PERANNUM (CURRENT RATH PlogLr at First N "One of the Nation's Oldest and Largest pade Federal t/AV/NGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MlAMI J0S1PH M UPTON President 6 Convenient Office* Serve Dude County J RESOURCES EXCEED 155 MILLION DOLLARS Complete and Dependable Title Service M IAMI TITLE & Qktvact Co. 34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE Title Insurance P.licies •! Kansas City Title Insurance C. Capital, Surplus A Reserves txctti $5,000,000 124 SECURITY TRUST BUILDING ana 1S4 N.E. FIRST STREET TELEPHONE FRanklin 3-4432 personalized service of fhe blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money ... un 6-1233 24-hour service except rosh hashono end yom kippur



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Friday. Otcober 21. 1960 + lewis* ncridfknn Page 13-B J^jctr .d.ng to an announcement by area coordinators, Mrs. E. M. WilDave Emmer. chatrman of the lay lard. Mrs. A. J. Brown, and Mrs. j ^'ca' _^mmittee of the local William R. Brown. One of the first major research Mrs. Julius Fligelman (left), vice president, and Mrs. Louis S. studies in the actual prevention of Gimbel, jr. (right), president, tell Mr. and Mrs. Philip M Klutznick (center) of plans for the one million dollar drive which national Women's Division, American Friends of Hebrew University, has launched. Funds raised by the women's group will aid in the construction of a new library at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. To produce a cause-and-effect Women Launch Library Project By Special Report NEW YORK—A United Nations Documents Reading Room will be charity institution. Over 1,000 Dade county families situation, four common family attiand the Dade county school system tudes will be briefly depicted, with! will be cooperating on the proja guidance counselor interpreting %  ect, when 90 children from each their effect on the child. Board| of 12 schools will participate. members and young people will Monthly throat culture and quarone o'f'the'features'of the new cen enact the part of the parents and, terly blood samples from the chil|tral ijb rary being constructed on children. 'dren involved will be a key phase/ the new campus 0 f the Hebrew Martin Rubinstein, assistant prinof the research. Parent approval I university of Jerusalem, it was discipal of the North Miami Beach slips are already being issued toj closed here Junior High School, and Council's | the students selected, and families juvenile protection chairman, will are urged to sign and return them coordinate the program and act as immediately to faciltate this vital counselor in the role of the overresearch into the possible causes indulgent, overambitious, disinterand prevention of rheumatic fever. ested, and arguing and disagreeing I "We at the Children's Cardiac parents. Hospital and everyone in the MiMusic adapted to the program j a[m area can De proud of this aswill be under the direction of Mrs. s jg nrne nt," says Emmer, who has Teachers Group Elects Officers David Freedman, faculty member of the Hebrew High School, was elected honorary president at a meeting of the Hebrew Educators Alliance of Greater Miami last week. Others elected were Rabbi Shimon Azulary, Hebrew Academy, president; Nettie Goldstein, Temple Beth Sholom vice president; Rabbi Morris Horovitz, Hebrew Academy, vice president; Rabbi Menachem Gottesman, Hebrew Academy, secretary; and Saul Porush, Hebrew Academy, treasurer. Elected to the board were Meyer Samberg, Temple Emanu-El; Nathan Sern, Beth David; Avi Kaye, Flagler Granada Jewish Community Center; Isadore Dickman, Beth El Congregation; and Zehava Sukenick, Hebrew Academy. The organization has been in existence locally for three years, and includes educators on the staffs of Greater Miami's religious schools. Mary L. Boyd. Mrs. Charles Finklestcin is program chairman. Million Dollar Stamp Exhibit Due Stamps valued by philatelists at one million dollars will arrive aboard the famed Postal Calva"!" de a J rave J'"£ dis P lay f u;?? l S ; t A 1 Milton's. Sulwr, Sreetor oTnie* ical research and executive direcbeen a member of the NCCH board of governors since the founding of the hospital 24 years ago. "It is a $14,835 contract under the Heart Disease Control Program of the Public Health Service, and is the result of highly advanced, preliminary research developed here." The specialized resea/ch work will be under the direction of Dr. lore and exhibits, for exhibition Oct. 23. The Postal Calvacade, housed in two highway post office vehicles, will go on exhibition at the Carillon hotel through Oct. 27 in conjunction with the convention of the National Assn. of Postmasters of the United States. The exhibit will be open to the public from 2 to 10 p.m. daily. The valuable stamps are displayed in exhibit form from the Post Office Department's Philatelic Exhibition Room in Washington. Also included in the display is a die-proof of the famed inverted 24cent air mail stamp of 1918. This die-stamp is valued by collectors in excess of $100,000. One of the traveling post offices, Miami Postmaster Eugene r>unlap said, is devoted entirely to the Pony Express era tor of the hospital. Named Media Director Mrs. Beverly M. Kirven, formerly of Atlanta, Go., has been appointed to the post of media director for E. J. Scheaffer and Associates Advertising Agency. Mrs. Kirven was formerly a partner in the advertising agency of Harris and Weinstein Associates, Atlanta. Cotillion at Temple Judea Sisterhood of Temple Judea offers a cotillion for seventh and Mrs. Louis S. Gimbel, jr., national president of the Women's Division, American Friends of the Hebrew University, said that her group was launching a million dollar fund-raising campaign to help build the new library of the Jerusalem university. The library will supplement and replace library facilities on Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem, original campus of the university, where its library and other buildings were cut off from the use of students and faculty during the Israel War of Independence in 1948. Mrs. Gimbel said that segments of the quota had been pledged by regional units of the Women's Division throughout the country. The women's group campaign was hailed by Michael Comay, Israel's permanent representative to the United Nations, who declared that he "was especially happy to learn that an imposing hall in the library will be set aside as a United Nations Reading Room." This, the Israeli diplomat asserted, "will promote understanding of the vast range of organized international activities, extending in our time into every field of endeavor." Mrs. Gimbel disclosed that the Women's Division will allocate a eighth grade boys and girls to be special Library Endowment Fund held in the Temple every Thursof $100,000 to provide the Hebrew day evening. A leading dance inj University with urgently needed structor will teach modern dancbooks and the personnel to service ing and social graces. j them. UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OPENING CONCERTS SUNDAY, OCT. 23, MIAMI BEACH AUDITORIUM. 8 30 P M. MONDAY, OCT. 24, DADE COUNTY AUDITORIUM, S 30 t M. FABIEN SEVITSKY GARY GRAFFMAN. KM PROGRAM Preluda to Die Maistersinger Wagner Symphony No. 1 Sibelius Piano Concerto No. 2 Rachmaninoff Tick** $1.50 to (3.50. UM Symphony Off ic*. MO 1-4960; _^___ Miami Boach Auditorium. JE 1-0477; Dado County Audtorium. HI 6-9230; Cordolia't, FR 3-5123; Amidon't, HI 6-2070. 116 N E 6* Street Miami. Florida ft! r



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Friday. Otcober 21, I960 *Jewls§> Her Miar Page 9-B tUITH the new fall collections beginning to arrive in many of our shops, we thought it would be interesting to note what New York fashion authorities have to say about some of the well known designers. The pretty American, and the places she travels to, have charted the course for Luis Esteves in his fall and holiday 1960 collection. He calls his "Europa," and names each costume .for a landmark of history or a goal of the de luxe travelling across the continent of Europe from London to Athens. "If I had to pick one word that would best describe this collection, it would be 'side-cut,' says Luis Esteves. "Most of the dresses are side-draped, side-slashed, slanted or side tucked. '•It is a stark, uncluttered, sophisticated collection, in many instances almost severe. The rule is slimness, and a cut that skims over the body in an unbroken line. There is also the opposite type, which I call the Space Silhouette, cut on the round, a new kind of subtlety which is sexy but not slinky and as stark as the geodetic dome in architecture." The universal rage for provocative, picturesque necklines is so linked with Estevcz's name I hat it is only normal for fall, 1960 to report them as a major fashion trend. • • THE quiet elegante, with the ta>te and discrimination to look different without looking bizarre or froufrou, is what Pauline Trigere admittedly kept in mind in designing her fall, 1960 collection. Termed by numerous fashion reporters the best in her career, it sidesteps revolutionary Klittrr in favor of pure Trigere line, the sure, low-keyed color sense for which she is noted, and a free, dramatic movement — Irom the toss of a long scarf collar, (he ripple of her new Tremole hemline and the sweep of her full, full coats. Free movement is certainly the keynote of the collection. Every costume has fullness somewhere: sometimes merely the soft expansion of a sleeve or the unob8truaiva widening of a slim skirt into a godeted flare. But it is apt to be a swirl of beautiful fabric in a low-placed skirt, or Pauline's re-definition of the Balmacaan as a capelet flowing into the deeply rounded armhole of a coat or jacket. The fluid slim dresses derive their shape from From the Mam'selle "La Vie Parisienne" collection for fall of 1960, designed by Betty Carol, a costume in cognac, black and white plaid. The jacket shapes up into the tall, rounded "kiosk" silhouette, covering a one-piece dress whose slim plaid skirt contrasts brightly with its sweatershaped, black worsted wool top. a new Flick Tuck which is set at, strategic spots where a touch of fullness is needed. The essence of fashion excitement is what Larry Aldrich calls 1 the desire to acquire. Without 1 this essential ingredient, ideas and excitement are doomed to -misfire like damp rockets. Known for his firm encouragement of the new and different silhouettes as opposed to the static and "safe." Larry AMrich, and his designer. Marie McCarthy, make sure that each Aldrich collection is a mutation between a fresh viewpoint and the feminine appeal which prompt an irresistible desire to acquire. • ISN'T it romantic?" is an apt description of almost everyone of the soft, high, subtly colored and unfailingly beautifying hats in Lilly Dache's collection for fall. I960 There is not a hard, difficult, or ruthlessly chic chapeau to be seen. Even the deepest hats are cut back off the forehead to let some of the hair show, and most are high enough at the sides to let a curve of hair extend onto the cheek. Even suit hats are made in gleaming satin, feathers, or melusine (downy felt). There are many fur hats, of mink, Alaska seal, and beaver. For evening, high puffy turbans and net glinting with tiny jewels, the swirls of glycerined feathers, or giant maline flowers make it obvious that the evening costume, already certain as a major trend, will unfailingly include its evening hat or headdress. As Lilly Dache says, "It is going to be a great hat year." All the new Dache coiffures leave the back of the neck bare, with an upswept effect which adds to the swan-necked appearance so fundamental to the new fashion picture. The key word in hair fashion is "uncurled." The hair must lie in shining waves without a hint of; a set, ringlets, or teasing. All in all, it promises to be a most interesting fashion wise season, with each designer affirming his own personal feelings, not copying a fashion trend. Since our New York sisters are already buying their fall clothes, 1 it will be interesting to note which | of the lines follow the same line of popularity here in Miami. %  John Kerr and Anne Francis in "Girl of the Night," from the bestseller. "Call Girl," now at the Carib, Miami, Miracle and 163rd Street Theatres. Beach PTA's Slate Workshop The Parent Teachers Assn. in | the Miami Beach area will hold a four-hour "Legislation Work-: shop" on Friday, Oct. 28. at the Venetian Isle motel, from 10 a.m.: until 2 p.m. Mrs. Maurice Serotta, past pres! ident of the North Beach Elemen-1 tary School and past president or the Miami Beach League of Wom-j B Voters, is coordinating the pro-! gram for this workshop. Since there are government is-' sues on every level in connection with the current elections, five elements are proposed for the workshop. Also to be discussed will be the proposed action platform of the Florida Congress of Parents and Teachers to be presented at the state PTA. convention in Tampa m Nov. 15 to 17. There will be a panel discussing the national party platform issue nertaining to education. The four panel members will be Miss Miriam Rogers, representing the Democratic Party; Mr. Leland Hyzer, the Republican Party; and Mrs. Morris Burk and Mrs. Milton Feller, two members of the PTA. Other issues to be discussed will be the ballot, the Miami Beach city charter, and the State Constitutional amendments. Candidates for the school board, as well as county commission post from the City of Miami Beach, will be guest speakers. Summary of current events in the United Nations will be discussed by Mrs. Harold Rand, legislation chairman of the Ida M. Fisher Junior High School. ENLARGEMENT OF YOUR FAVORITE NEGATIVE only $1 (B & W) to 8x10 Mounted. PROFESSIONALLY FINISHED. Mail or Bring to LIPSON LAB., 163 Aragon Ave. Coral Gables, H.I 5-3434 ATTENTION MOTHERS! WEEK-END ACTIVITIES for your Sons — Ages 7 to 13 BILL POLLACK or THE WASHINGTON SENATORS Hat openings for hit MIAWI SENATORS YOUTH GROUP For Furthor Information Call FR 4-3790 or UN 5-8921 Free-Trial Day Upon D 'esentafion of this Ad. North Dade Women North Dade chapter of B"nai B'rith Women will hold its next inciting at Congregation Yehu..ah Moshe on Tuesday evening. Guest will be Charlotte Leibel, handwriting analyst. Mrs. Ralph Abramson is program chairman. The chapter will hold a card and Man Jongg party at Arthur Maisel's, 183rd st. and Collins ave., on Wednesday evening. Nov. 2. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Stanley Gunsher and Mrs. Bert Simon. Oneg Shabbat Scheduled Oneg Shabbat will be held Saturday. Oct. 29, 1 p.m., at the home of Mrs. Ben Zeigmund. 4320 Jefferson ave. Honored will be life members of the Herzl group of Hadassah. Mrs. Jack Davis will be guest speaker. Mrs. Kenneth Sokolsky is life membership chairman. CORAL GABLES CONVALESCENT HOME DAY CARE AVAILABLE "A Friendly and Gentle Atmosphere For Thox Tou Loir" • 24 HOUR REGISTERED NURSING SERVICE • SRfciAi DIETS OBSERVED • AU ROOMS ON OROUND FLOOR • PRIVATE RATHROOMS • AIR CONDITIONED • SWIMMING POOL • SPACIOUS OROUNDS SCREENED PATIO Ferdinand H. Rosenthal, Director-Owner r Aeat. plr. Ml Sinai Ho.sp., Cleveland A FewtM HL me for Aged. Plttaliurch 7060 S.W. 8rh ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA CA 6-1363 Mrs. Gladwin On Committee At the annual meeting of the; Southeastern regional conference of Women in Chambers of Commerce, Mrs. Rhea Cashman Glad• win, delegate representing the Women's Division of the Chamber of Commerce of Surfside. Bal Harbour and Bay Harbor Islands, was elected to the executive committee of the board representing the State of Florida. The conference was held at the Diplomat hotel over the weekend, and was attended by 100 members representing Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina. South Carolina, Ohio and Virginia. Also in attendance from Surfside, Bay Harbor and Bal Harbor as delegates were president Beulah Butler, executive vice president Lucy Altman, vice president Gladys Israel, and Freda Levice and Mavis Harris. Mrs. Gladwin was founder of; the division, the first president. and now is president of the SurfBal-Bay Library Assn. PARIS CONSERVATORY METHOD VIOLIN PIANO SOLFEGGIO EAR TRAINING SIGHT READING with PIERRE MANDE HI 3-0942 ABC SHURlHANO, GREGG, PHMAN Comptometry, PBX, IBM. NCR, etc. For ether courses please consult YELLOW PAGE 654, PHONE BOOK A n C I D II I BUSINE ANO A V t L r n I TUTORING SCHOOL Attendance accepted by Dade" County Board of Public Instruction. 500-526 N.E. 79th Street Near Biscayne Blvd. PL 7-7623 MU 1-3568 WHY LEAVE YOUR HOME? Select Draperies In Comfort Mat yea teal Is H rust fn year loaa en lot" ss isi eats it's liaises*, tea't UU say caaacet %  a will eretiee la year ism faerie selectief far eesteai axe* eiaatfits, liies n ils, sheeetrtrs, re-aaeeltterifl Shop At Home Frtt Estimates • Nt OhliiatiM Phone OX 6-0301 BROWARD COUNTY M DISCOUNT A-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 94401 FUR RE STYLING IN OUR TKAOniOH Of FINEST WORKMANSHIP WE CAN CONVERT YOUR OUTMODED FURS TO THE SMART FASHIONS OF TOMORROW From $39 FLORIDA FURS & CLINIC 2296 Coral Way HI 4-0544 MIAMI 11I7LMOIM Blvd. JA 4-7697 FT LAUDEROALE Women Take Picture Trip 1 A United Nations Month meeting of Temple Menorah Sisterhood featured a "trip" through Israel on Wednesday. The "trip" was in the form of pictures taken by Rabbi and Mrs. Mayer Abramowitz on their recent trip to Israel. Mrs. Elayne Kaplan was program chairman. Sisterhood president is Mrs. Al Mechlowitz. MR. KENNEY'S BEAUTY SALON DISTINCTIVE HAIR STYLING BUDGET PRICES UN 6-9217 I 193 71t STREET, NORMANDY ISLE BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT — NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth of Florida Rabbi Or. laaac H. Ever. Director 24-HOUR NURSING — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS MOKKN EQUIPMENT ft FURNISHINGS FIREPROOF UIHJUM9 310 Collins Avt. Ph. JE 2 3571 Miami Beach



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Page 8-B +Jewish fleridfon Friday, Otcober 21, iggj Mrs. Grossman Elected President South Florida Assn. on Childrer Under Six has elected Mrs. Ethel Grossman, president, to head itf membership, which consists o! teachers and other professional per sonnel handling programs for chil 'dren under public school age in South Florida. Mrs. Grossman is supervisor of I the early childhood development program, which serves some 200 children in the four Branches of the Greater Miami Jewish Commun A TRIBUTE TO MY MOTHER ity Center. On Saturday, my mother. Jeanne Rothschild, will be eighty years Dr. Laura Cushman &• CM* old or shall I say "young. Of those eighty years, she has lived 31 of J !" P"vte School.of M !" ha* them With my husband and me. A s a mother, she has been wonderful, been electedI to serve ujtaJW* instilling in my brother, Bill, and me the lunda'dent; Mr.. Robert E Sisak. senior mentals for living a good life. As a person, she is teacher, M.m. Spring, Bapt.s, delightful, fun to be with, kind, sympath-c. underSchool. cor, "^ d ^ g he ^ r f e ^ n ; standing and unselfish. Saturday from 3 tc,6 p.rrjj J^ ^ sTot Community we are having open house at our home, 51 N. Shore V" „ ,. center 2 record dr. We win be happy to greet all of our friends on ^J^£^£X^v££L Gates. Florida District Welfare Board 9. treasurer. MKS. ROTHSCHILD this very, very joyous day. PARTIES, PARTIES, PARTIES Three hostesses. Mrs. Dan Wax. Mrs. Marshal Breakstone and Mrs. Bernard Harris, entertained at Mrs. Harris' Sunset Island home in honor of Mrs. Stanley Kahan. who is moving to New York. Twentyfiveof the guest of honor's closest irtends were invited for brunch. They gave her a lovely charm, a gold heart with her initials on the front, and all ,f their names on the back. I would like to see it; I can't figure out how room was tound for all the names. Afterwards they all sat around — nd talked — and talked Another brunch, in fact two of them, were given by Mrs. Seymour Somentein and Mrs. Sandford Kramer at Mrs. Somerstein's Bay Heights home. The guests all came in casual clothes — shorts to you — so that th. j would be comfortable for a long canasta session after the last lllinti had been eaten. WOMAN OF THE WEEK Wedgewood china isn't always blue. When Gladys (Mrs. Sol) Cohen • first married and shopping lor a new home, she found a piece of green wedgewood. Since neither she nor Sol had even seen anything like it betore. they both became enthusiastic, and started to search for odd colored pieces made before the 20th century. Now they have quite a collection. They have built a special wall in their house to show off their collection to the best advantage. Several museum ptecei are included, among which are two of agate wan' made in 1830 by the first Wedgewood Company. Not many people know about Gladys' hobby. They only think of her as being intensely interested and vitally instrumental in the Braille program of National Council of Jewish Women and Temple Israel Sisterhood. Presently, she is on the board of the r-. Mttl Braille Club, and has organized the Florida Braille Committee. Mo matter how I kept asking her questions about the Wedgewood — of v. i li I frankly know nothing — Gladys would bring the subject back to Braille During the time Sol was in the service. Gladys worked with the ReU Cross in a coal mining town. One gloomy day. she went to a dingy home where a beautiful blonde youngster was sitting on the steps. The father kicked the boy out of the way. saying. "He's no good; he's blind." And thai started Gladys on her way — a little blind youngster treated : shameiuly by his own father. OVER THE BOUNDING MAIN All quiet on the Dr. David Brezin home front on San Marino dr. '1 %  ve had a very quiet summer because of David's twisted knee. 1 ever, they have done a lot of sailing, with the doctor in charge ol leering and Marcia and the boys. Alan Mark and Ben. doing all of the running around When Robert Rubin went to Harvard. I wrote a very nice story : how his folks. Alex and Sylvia, were going to watch the mailman for letters. Well, he went to Harvard all right, but he was only there days — didn't even get his trunk out of the railroad station. He ( home for a family farewell dinner and Hew off to London to go : % %  University of London School of Ecnomics, International Studies. But his family will still watch for the mail .. From up Boston way. Mickey (Mrs. Benjamin B.) Rosenberg writes, "Ben is back in the office again after a rough seige. Fall, with all its GLADYS Shoshana Women To See Film On Tuesday evening. Shoshana chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will hold its monthly meeting at Dade Heights Jewish Community Center. Featured will be a film sponsored by the South Florida State Hospital committee of the chapter. The film, entitled "Who's Right?", concerns a family's marital adjustments. The meeting is open to the pub lie. Mrs. Irving Finn is program vice president. First Meeting of Year Sisterhood of Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute held its first meetPleased at the response to the dinner which will dedicate the new 5300,000 Community Center just completed by Temple Menorah are (left to right) Mrs. Sam Belslcy, chairman ol the Women's executive committee; Mrs. Al Mechlowitz, president of Temple Menorah Sisterhood; and Mrs. Fannie Bridge, cochairman for. the dedication dinner. Plans for the Nov. 6 function include dining, dancing to the music of Arnie Barnett and his orchestra, and entertainment by Patsy Abbott, comedienne. Beach 'Y' Lists Special Program Miami Beach YMHA, a branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, has a special fiveday a week program for boys and girls in the first and second grades only. The special after-school program has been designed primarily | d ~ y a special Oneg Shabbat profor working mothers who need gram j s planned, and all Jewish supervised activities for their chil u nd national holidays are also are no playmates in their neigh oorhood. Children are picked up at their schools at 2 p.m., and brought to the "Y," where they engage in crafts, dramatics, athletics, dancing, singing and games. Each Fring of the new year on Tuesday j dren from 2 to 4 p.m. The program celebrated. At the end of the day, evening. also services children where there children are transported to their homes. As a special feature on public school holidays, the children spend a full day at the "Y," wheie trips are arranged. Leaders of the community who are working to help expand local activities of youth services of B'nai B'rith Foundation of the U.S. are (left to right) Mr. and Mrs. Burnett Roth and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Revitz. At a reception in the Star Island home of the Roths, they are shown discussing the possibilities of raising additional funds for local and national Hillel Foundations and BBYO activities. Roth is a trustee of the Foundation and Revitz is president of the B'nai B'rith Foundation of the U.S. for Florida. beauty of color has crept up on us. I can't help but : welkstocked with chemicalSi since Florence makes most o{ ner ow „ shiver at the thought that winter is just around the _. .. ,.,.„ w glazes. She finds it diffifcult to part with her own work, and keeps the pieces she likes best for herself. For the second year, she has been elected president of the Ceramic League of Miami. This vocation is quite a switch for a person who was an excellent athlete in college, an inter-collegiate swimmer and diver, and who also holds a Master's degree in social welfare. MICKEY corner. A combination of Miami and Boston would be wonderful" • • • CHOP CHOP Had the most fun last week. Saved Five dollars worth of dimes and went to a kosher Chinese luncheon. It was at Temple Ner Tamid. The president of Sisterhood, Goldie (Mrs. Louis) Cohen, is our landlord. Mrs. Eugene Schwartz, in black and red pajamas, and Mis. Henrietta Fine in a kimona and fan. were at the door. The Chinese food was really good. Th. v gave cute little animal favors. For some reason, mine was a and white skunk. The Honorable Sisters, done up in what looked like black mops for hair, decided that in order to make money for their Temple they would have a Maj Jongg party and Jewish luncheon. Ming Toy Moskowitz assured her Honorable Sisters that they wouldn't be hungry in two hours after that kind of a luncheon. Mrs. JOM ph Feldman, who wrote and directed the skit, "A Sisterhood Meet inin China," was quite original, but I have a feeling that spies were thire — and that many other organization meetings in China are now in the offing. A CRAZE FOR GLAZE Women talk about their electric kitchens — and not very enthusiastically during hurricane weather. But Florence Comanor talks about her electric workshop. She has fixed up her garage as a ceramic w< kshop. and spends all of her free time there. She has an electric kiln and an electric wheel, where she "throws a pot." The studio is Birthday Parties Slated Sunday The monthly birthday parties program sponsored by the Great er Miami Women's Auxiliary, Jewish Home for the Aged, will hold its first party of the new year Sunday, 2 p.m.. at Douglas Gar-ens Mrs. Sol Silverman. auxiliary president, will welcome guests, and all honorees whose birthdays occurred during the months of September and October, auxiliary member! and Home residents alike will be feted. Mrs. Louis ktakovsky is program chairman. James W. Rowe, basa baritone, will perform. Mrs. L* lian Nelson will present a program of folk songs and accompany herself at the piano. .Monthly parties are made possible by the contributions of Auxiliary members to the Sadie Knegel Birthday Club. BAR MITZVAH Preparation ft Hebrew InstructiM given privately by retired Mat Satisfaction gnaranttti. HI 8-3664 CUSTOM MADE TO ORDER • DRAPES • SLIP COVERS • BEDSPREADS • GUARANTEED QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE NO OBLIGATION HOME ESTIMATE TU 8-0265 VMTDNIGHT • mm ro SUIT YOU EDWARD'S INTERIOR ASSOCIATES 1821 East 4th Avenue Hialeah, Flo. '£a



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Page 2-B -JenistfkrkHan Friday, Otccbei J*0 October Days Mean Colorful Meals By LEAH LEONARD October days are colorful a*1 nappy ri *f_f\ en ,jp "" k rtl fjr i If you are among the fortunate ones, with a little kitchen garden, you will gather in the remaining PW tomatoes and use them in th following manner for winter ute. Nothing like home-made pickles U j-cr.e with poultry and meat dishes The young people especially will relish it. • • • SwU Crwn Tomato* Pieklo 'A peck green tomatoes 2 stalks celery 10 or 12 green peppers 20 large white onions 2 large heads of cabbage 1 cup salt 3'A quarts white vinegar 8 pounds brown sugar (light or dark) | 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon V4 teaspoon ground red pepper 0 tablespoons ground ginger Wash and drain the tomatoes before cutting into pieces and removing the stem ends. Chop as fine as possible in a wooden bowl.' Cut green peppers into halves, removing seeds and stems and put tin; togetaer with the stalks of. celery, peeled onions and cut cabbage through the medium blade of your food chopper. Combine both mixures, sprinkle with salt and let stand overnight. Drain well. Combine the vinegar, sugar and spices in a large enough pot and bring to a boil quickly Add the vegetable and spicemixture and Uim m w


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Friday, Olcobor 21, 1960 +Jew 1st fkridfian Page 9-A RESULTS OF SURVEY IN SERIES What Do Dade Jews Think of lewishness'? Ccriinoed from Page 1-A munity, should be related to a knowledge of the expressed views and feelings of the Jews who live here. This was the origin of the "BayviJJe Survey." a code name for the study of the attitudes of Miami Jewry. Piparing the Survey With the assistance of social scientists from the national staff of the American Jewish Committee, a questionnaire was drawn up incorporating subjects recommended by local residents. The questionnaire consisted of 63 questions, some of them with as many as 15 parts. Each person interviewed had the opportunity to make choices among a minimum of 573 possible responses, giving iacts, opinions, feelings or experiences. Using methods currently employed by social scientists and market researchers, a sample of 240 persons was selected for interviews. Because of the high rate of change among Miami residents, and the lack of any reliable recordt, of the total Jewish population of Dadc county, the sample Wa.f selected from among affiliated Jews only—that is, those who are members either of congregations or organizations. The membership lists of 17 temples and synagogues (Orthodox, Conservative and Reform) and eight Jewish organizations were used to select at random the names ol the total number of respondents. These were from all parts of Dade county and of every economic itvti Eich category — branch cf Judaism and area of residence — Was selected in a proport'cn of the sample equivalent .'to the proportion of these groups n the total number of affiliated Jews in the county. People were interviewed faceto face by a team of 50 interviewers anc' 12 captains, selected from among members of the American Jewisb Committee and other Jewish organizations. The interviewers were trained by a professional survey director. The interviewing wat completed in the late fall of JU58, and the tabulation of the da'.a was completed in the sumraei of 1960. Viho Was Interviewed A dc:cription of who was interviewed and the demographic r>itributet of these persons is a necessfli> preliminary to reporting their attitudes and activities. The 240 affiliated Jews who an swered the questions were divided almost < actly halt and half into men at:.' women, deliberately so chosen. They range in age from their 20 i to over SO, but the largest proportion of the sample (96%) is between 30 and 79. The median age for the men in the group it 47; HI the women 45. (There are pixkably fewer young adults in the sample because fewer of these are affiliated in their own right with synagogues and organizations.) This group has a much higher level of formal education than the general population. Over half the men and over a third of the women have completed college. Four out of five finished high school, and only one out of 20 did not complete grade school. Some 85Tc of the respondents are currently married and living with their spouses. A total of 12% are widowed (mostly women), and 37 are divorced or separated. Facts show that 92*:; have children—of all ages. Two out of three of these adults were born in the United States, but four out of five are the children of two foreign-born parents. Occupation ally, the largest single group (35%) are housewives. Thereafter, the frequency of occupational groups is: owners of businesses (16%), retired (8%), executives (5<<). service workers (4%), clerical workers (3"'!), and one factory worker. Almost all (08%) say they re gard the Miami area as their permanent home. Nine out of ten register to vote here. AH but one out of ten have lived here at least three years, and more than half have lived here for ten years or more. The largest proportion (43%) lived in the metropolitan area of New York City before coming here. There are 18% from the Middle Atlantic States. 13% from the North Central States (including Illinois and Ohio), 10% from the Southeast and 9% from New England. Almost nine out of ten say they are members of a temple or synagogue. (This proportion reflects the fact that names were drawn mostly from congregational membership lists.) Of these, 48% are members of a Conservative congregation. 28% of a Reform temple, and 14% of an Orthodox synagogue. However, when they were asked "Regardless of your actual affiliation and membership, would you describe yourself as an Orthodox, Conservative, or Reform Jew, or as none of these?", about a quarter of each group described themselves as something other than the branch of Judaism of the congregation to which they belong. Of the Orthodox-affiliated, most of these said they considered themselves Conservative. Of the Conservative-affiliated, most of these regarded themselves is Re form, and of the Reform-affiliatetl most declared they would consider themselves Conservative. These answers probably reflect the type of Judaism practiced in their childhood homes, the degree to which they think they conform to the requirements of their partic ular branch of Judaism, and their conception of the degree to which they accept what they consider "traditional." NEXT WEEK: Jewish Reaction to being Jewish. Hospital Elects Judge Friedman Judge Milton A. Friedman has been elected to the board of governors of National Children's Cardiac Hospital according to an announcement by Richard I. Berenson president of the nation's only completely free, non-sectarian hospital devcted exclusively to the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic and congenital heart disease in children. Judge Friedman has been a director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation for 21 years, and currently' is president-elect of District Group Lodge 5 B'nai B'rith. In other action, the board of governors of Children's Cardiac Cardiac Hospital named Lee Rat ner honorary chairman of the annual Jubilee Ball to be held next Jan. 28. Chairman of the fundraising dinner dance will be Judge Harold B. Spact, of Miami Beach. Berenson also announced a new staff appointment with the naming of Sidney M. Kain as director of development for National Children's Cardiac Hospital. Kain has held various executive positions with the American Heart Assn.. and will assist with the $2,500,000 building fund drive for the new "Enchanted Forest" Children's Cardiac Hospital to be erected in the Metropolitan Medical Center. "Israel's problems in education are being met head-on," moderator Leo Mindlin tells the South Florida chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew University. More than 150 persons attended the meeting last week at the Shelborne hotel to hear a panel consisting of (left to right) Mrs. Edyth Geiger, Mel Hecht and Mrs. Joseph Milton. Mrs. Geiger is executive secretary of the local chapter. Hecht was a student at Hebrew University in Jerusalem last year, and Mrs. Milton was a delegate to the dedication of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in August. Looking on (extreme left) are Mrs. Oida Rubin, honorary president, and Herbert Shapiro, president. Mindlin is executive editor of The Jewish, Floridian. GOP Organ Picks Leader as Advisor Continued from Page 1-A Mass.. Republican active in proArab causes; and George J. Shagory, Boston, Mass.. businessman and Arab-American leader. Apart from this group, the Re publicans designated another personality, a controversial figure, to advise the Nixon-Lodge campaign. He is George Mardikian, San Francisco restaurant operator, who re cently invited President Nasser, of the United Arab Republic, to San Francisco. Nasser accepted but returned to Cairo without touring the West Coast. The Republican National Committee said Nasser's would-be host was "available to advise Republi can candidates for office." Raies appeared this summer et both the Republican convention in Chicago and the Democrat convention in Los Angeles. A personable and effective lobbyist. Raies sought support of the Arab position in the platform committee. The Republican plank emerged weaker than it had been formulated in 1956 on Israel. After a study of the Democratic and Republican platforms, the pro Arab element decided to support the Republicans. Raies was welcomed by the National Committee in Washington and named a 'contributing editor" of the "G.O.P. Nationalities Reporter." The Arab faction, at a meeting here, greeted the Nixon announcement that primary responsibility on the Arab-Israel issue would be assigned to Henry Cabot Lodge if the Republicans win. The Arabs commented with approval on Lodge's support of Nasser in the 1956 Suez war. The Arab committee announced officially in a press release that it would "actively promote the candidacy of the G.O.P. standardbearers The Arabs supported the Republicans because "both thecurrent and past foreign policy in the Eisenhower-Nixon-Lodge program have proved to be better than that of the previous Democratic Administrations." A spokesman for the Democratic National Committee said that no similar Arab committee for Kennedy had been established although some Arabs, as individuals, mifcht be backing Kennedy. Monthly luncheon Held Beth Emeth Sisterhood held its monthly luncheon on Wednesday at 12250 NW 2nd ave. Mrs. Wanda Sigler gave a cosmetic demonstration. Chairman was Mrs. A. Edward Aberman. Committee consisted of Mrs. M. Weiss, Mrs. L. Rosenthal, Mrs. J. Lampert and Mrs. H. Klusky. 1 PARIS, I960: LORD CALVERT AWARDED LE GRAND PRIX AMERICAIN Only a few rare products of exceptional quality receive this coveted prize, presented by Le Comite du Grand Prix. Lord Calvert was the unanimous choice of this distinguished group of French connoisseurs because it appeals to the cultivated taste that knows no national boundaries. No wonder Lord Calvert has been the most prized whiskey in Jewish homes for so many years! LORD CALTOI m The L'chayim whiskey! MEDALS U COMITE DU GRAND PRIX AMERICAIN. M PROOF, 3S% STRAIGHT WHISKIES • YEARS OR MORE OLD, S5% GRAIN SPIRITS. CALYUI OIJTlUtRS. COMPANY. INQ.. NEW YON* CITY



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Friday. Otcober 21, 1960 LEGAL NOTICE +Jm iii i fk>r Mian Page IS A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA :N AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. . fenrtant. NOTICE TO DEFEND TO: HERBERT HORWITZ o Mrs. Bertha Hoi wlti ION Btuyveaam Avenue Irvlnglon. New .lormy TinARK HEREBY NOTIFIED thai a Bill of Complaint f.,r Divorce has been filed aualnst you, HERBERT Hi'ltwiTZ, and you are hereby required to serve a copy of your anewi i to the Bill of Complaint on plaintiffs attorney, and file the original answer In the office of the Clerk of the Clrouit Court on or before November V. I960, in default of which the P.lll of Complaint will be taken ax confessed by you. Dated: October 7, 1960. H. B, LEATHERMAN, Clerk of Circuit Court, (seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING, Deputy Clerk HAROLD B. M'AKT Attorney for Plaintiff 47 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Florida 10/11-21-28. ll/< rMVBHO IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 50846-C In RK: Estate of BERTHA B. LEVY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Againsl Said Estate: You are hereby notified aqd required to present any claims and demands Which you may have against the estate of BERTHA B. LEVY, deceased lgte of Dade County, Florida, to the County Judges of Dade County, and file the same In their offices in the County Courthouse In Hade Cou.ily Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be barred // MORGAN I LEVY /a/ J. If. MORRIS Executors // J N. MORRIH Attorney S14 inti,ham Uldg. Miami ".1, Florida 10/14-21-28. 11/4 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 8663 M A H CONSTRICTION CORP. :< h orida corporation %  JUOENE Cola (and. Plaintiff, LOl'lsK ,; BOBO, his wife, Hefendanls. ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO: EUGENE CoBO and LOL'ls'E G HOBO, his wife Residence unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a bill of complaint for foreclosure of mortgage has been filed against you and you are hereby required to serve a copy of your answer to said complaint on plaintiff's attorney and rile the original answer in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Coinu on or before the 7t|i day of November. m;U; otherwise the allegations of said oomnlalnt will be taken as confessed against you. DATED: September 30, I960. E. B. LEATHERMAN Clerk, Cnciui LUUII (seal) By: R. H. BICE, JR., Deputy Clerk TAL1ANOFF & WALLER 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Florida Attorneys for Plaintiff. 10/7-14-2}-28 BY HENRY LEONARD L6CAL NOTICE "Look, Noah, you save 'om in your way and 111 save 'em in mine." LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 13 HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engace In business under the fictitious name of UiRRAINE CLEANERS AND LAUNDRY at 861 Washington Avenue. Mianil Reach, Florida intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. J< 'SEl'H PHILLIPS, Sole Owner I.I I %  > >WITZ & BELLER 706 1st St., Miami Beach Attorneys for Joseph Phillips. Iit/7-14-21-28 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 9576 HATT1B MAE WILLIAMS vs. ALBERT WILLIAMS TO ALBERT WILLIAMS, residence unknown. You are or.it.ed t ( li.e your answer to above styled bill for dlvorcc with the Clerk of said Court and fur'' ah to Geo. W. Wood. Atty. for plain tilf on or before Nov. 7th, I960 or the bill will be taxen as confessed. l>ated Oct. 4, 1SI60. B, B LEATHERMAN, Clerk (seal) By: WM. \\ STOCKING, Deputy Clerk 10/7-14-21-2* NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY civ i N that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of SI I'KRIOR BOX .SALES al P.O. |:,,x Miami 48. Florida Intends to reglater said name with the Clerk of tho Circuit Court of Dade County. BENNER BOX. INC. Sola Owner MYERS. HEIMAN & KAPLAN 1160 S.W. 1st Sir. • \ tor A)plicant 10/7-14-21-28 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAM* LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OiVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of .SPENCER l^ANE at 3J1 N.E. 79th St reef!, Miami Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. SAMTTBL GOLDBERG 9/10, 10/7-14-11 LfGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious names of Mall Towers: Lincoln Mall Towers; Lincoln Mall Hilldini; at 1441 Lincoln Road, Miami Keach. Florida intends to p said names with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Flori.. HONOR PROPERTIES, INC *a Fla. corp.) By Hannah Peilmutter, Sec. Jl'l.irs.l.W PKRLMUTTER, Esq. Attorney for Honor Properties, Inc. 407 Lincoln Road 10,14-21-28. 11/1 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT' IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE No. 504*9 C IN RK: Estate of BARNET CH1RINSKY, 1 M c NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All creditors and All Pi rsona Having Claims or Demands Againsl Said You are hereby notified nod required to present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of BARNET CHIRINKKY di ad late ol Hade County, fc'lorioa, to I the County Judges o' I >H.I, %  onntv and 'ile th, same In th.ir offices in i the County Courthouse In Dade County. Florida, within .-it tu calendar 1 months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be barred. BAM I SILVER, ..". K .''' WK 'NKR. Co-Executors I allot Bllvei Pa lot. St,., n & Mints %  •II i fngress Building Miami 32. Florida By: Edward A Stern. Attorn. I in. 10/7-'4-21 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY .GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of UERHAY at 390 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami, Florida intends to register said ram* with me Clerk of toe Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. MURGER, INC. By: Thomas J. Murray. President Frank Gergen, Secretary-Treasurer '*>H'MAN A GOLDSTEIN :m West Flagler St. Miami, Florida Attorneys for Registrant 10/7-14-21-28 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PROBATE „. Ne. M74M-0 IN RE: Estate of MART WERNER Dec eased „ NOTICE TO CRED TORS To All Creditors and All Persons Havalma or Demands Against Said ^ o J'a re.-hereby notified and required >" Present any claims and demands •iilrh you may have against the ' Courthouse in I'ad.I *>'ida. within eight calendar months xri.m the date of the first publication ,*"' %  ame wl'l be barred. OTIS KENNETH BERNARD. JR. 11 IIYVM -2!* < -' utor of Estate lio; i N A %  BPRTEIN, Attorney l0 Lincoln Road |evaml Beach, Florida 10/1-14-21-28 IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA No. 41708-B RE: ESTATE OF EVERETT R LEW ARK, Deceased. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE Is hereby given that 1 have filed my final report and petition for Final IWscharye as Administrator nf the estate of EVERETT R. LEW ARK, deceased; and tihat on the ISth day ot September, 1960. will apply to the Honorable Frank B. Dowllng County Judge of Dade County, Florida, for approval of said final report and for final discharge as Administrator ol the Batata of EVERETT R. LEWARK deceased. Huh day of September. 1960. WILLIAM LASSIE ROSE SIDNEY BFRON8" IN Attorney for Administrator of the Estate of Everett it. i.a 9/30, 10/7-14-tl NOTICE UNb-H FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious names of Executive Suites: Executive Office Furniture Co.; Executive Offices; Executive Desks; Executive Office Equipment at 10J."> East 13th Street, Hlaleah. F.orida intends to register said names with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. EXECUTIVE SUITES, INC. Ca Fla. corp)—Sole Owner HENRY A. KAMP Attorney for Executive Suites, Inc. 1224 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, Florida 9/30, 10/7-14-21 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE C RC'JIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTV. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 9831 MARY RYMKR.s WALTERS, Plaintiff, vs. LESTER A. WALTERS. Defendant, SUIT FOR O'VORCK TO: LESTER A WALTERS 2605 Boxwood Road Toledo IS, Ohio You LESTER A. WALTERS are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been fled against you, and you are requir.-d <• serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Comtdalnt on the plaintiff's Attorney. THEODORE M. TRUKHIN. 420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, FIs., and file the original Answer or Pleading in the office of 'he Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 14th day of November, 1MQ. If you fail 10 do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for tnrelief demanded In the Bill of Complaint. This notice shall be published onc< each week for four eonecotlve weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN DONE AND ORDERED at Miami Florida, this 10th day of October, A.D 1960. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade Conntv. Florida (seal) Py: R. H. RICE. JR. I>eputy Clerk THFOnoRE M. TR1SIII.N 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach .'Is. Fla. Attorney for Plaintiff 10/14-21-28. 11/4 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE C.RCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 9076 CHARLOTTE DIET/, Plaintiff, vs. DONALD DIETZ, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: DONALD DIETZ, :UI2 Burch Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio You DONALD DIETZ are hereby notified that BUI of Complaint for Divorce has been filed againsl you. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney. MYERS, HKIMAN A, KAPLAN, Eleven Fifty Building, ll.'.O S.W 1st str.it. M!aml. Florida, and file the original Answer or Pleading In the of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the 31st day of October. 1960. if you fail to do so. judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Rili of Complaint. This notice shall be publish.• I once each wok for foui consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED al Miami, Florida, this 20th day of Bepti AD i E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, County, Floiida %  • Bj WM W ST< KING, I >eputy clerk MYERS HE1MAN ft KAPLAN I ,B illdina W. 1st Sir.t Miami S, K • mt iff 9 80, 10 7-1 l-J] mmmmmmmm ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! fJmvisti ncrkUar) solicits your legal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates Dial in 3mm lor messenger service LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that '.he ,:r. d es i ring to vngage In business under t^c fictitious names oi REX AHTls'c SUPPLIES and REX ART SUPPLIES • >;.: Southwest 37th Avenue. Miami. Florida Intmda to register said names with the CJj rk f the Circuit I'ourt of Dade County. Florida. REX ART COMPANY, a Florida Corp.. Sole Owner by: A. Melvln Morris, President AIN8LEE R. FERD1F Attorney for Rex Art Company, a Florida corporation 1782 West Flagler St. Miami 35, Florida 9/30, 10/7-11-21 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 11TH JUDIC.AL CIRCUIT IN AN3 %  FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 60C 9C-45 KIRBY BUCHANAN, Plalr'lff. vs. | DORIS P..TRICIA BUCHANAN, Defendant. NOTICE OF PUOLICAT.ON TO: DORIK PATRICIA Bi'CHAMAN is Hich Point Road Greensboro, North Carolina YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a complaint for divorce ha-s been f.sd against you and you are hereby :•quired to serve a copy of your .ins ,-r to the complaint for divorce on piar-tlffs attorney and file the orlai al answer In the office of the clerk ofj>i B Circuit Court on or bafore the 7ili of November. I960; otherwise the sins of said ciHoplaint f>.r divorce will be taken as confessed apamst > u. DATED this T,th day of Octohei ,0. E. P LEATHKRMA.S '". ik ..f Circuit Court (seal) By: R. 11 RICE. JR., Deputy Ork GEORGE J TALIANOPF Attoi • j lor Plaintiff J : i Lin oin Road Miami Beach. Florida 10/7-14-2: 2 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of SUNSET ACRES at 12023 8.W. 80th Street. Miami. Fla.. Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. BON1TA ENTERPRISES, INC. (a Fla. cprp.) HAROLD STKl .\ni Attorney for Applicant 909 Blscayne Bldg. 9/30, 10/7-14-21 NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of MAULE TREE BURGEONS a' 82*0 ti.Hr. 57th Court, Miami. Dade County, Florida intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. MARTHA C. MAOLE GEORGE N. M.oDoNELL Attorney for Petitioner J04 Biscaync Bldg. 9/90, 10/7-14-21 NOTICE RY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTV. IN CHANCERY, No. 0OC *15 JAMES D MacRAE, JR, •ill, vs. HAPR'FT n, MacRAE. Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE .You are hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed aeslnst you, and you are required to serve a copv of vour Answeior Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney. RICHMOND A FARBER. One Lincoln Road Building, Miami. Florid* and fl|p the original Answer or Pleading :n th. effioe of the Clerk of ttie Circuit Court on or a*for* ihw 15t*i Auy of .November. I960. If jou tell to do so. Judgment by default will be taken siralnet you for the relief demanded in the U4I1 ef •OtrmeHamt. This .SMStleeshe* hs unMl^sil once each weii fer four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIUFAN rX'OT AND ORDERED at Miami, Florida, tlrls roth day of October. A.p. 1W0 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under ihe fictitious name of J FURY'S 6 SERVICE STATION at S95 S.W. 42nd Avenue. Miami. Florida Int-nds to register said name with the C'erk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. JERRY H LIPPSON (sole proprietor) MITCHELL HM.LER Attorney for Applicant 046 Seybold Building Miami, Floriaa ". 10/7-14-21 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. rN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. NO. 60C 9441 JUDITH ANN WILLIAMS, %  tiff. vs. STEVEN WILLIAMS, JR., %  • nd nt. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR., Address I'nknown Von STKVLN WILLIAMS. JR notified that a Bill of C plaint for Divorce has seal i d you, and you an reouil copy of your Answer or P!Ings to the Bill ot iiinipla'nt Is Attorney. LEONARD II. R1LIN, Metropolitan Bank Buildm.,-, Miami 32. Florida, and file the original or Pleadings in thg office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before the Nth dsy of Novemhc: If you fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against you t. relief demanded In the L'iM of I plaint. DONE AND ORI1EREU at Mi ll, Florida, this 2*th day of Septcm' %  !. 19K0. E. B LEATHERMAN Clerk of Circuit Court Dade County Court House Miami, Florida (seal) By: M r R H. RICE. JR. rlda ijnceitCour. (seal) 1: IVputy Clerk DONALD H. IRHBR Attorney for Wainllff 10/14-21 -24), 11/4 NOTiCE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW' NOTICE IX HEREBY GIVEN that -raignsd. desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of WESLEY'S BROAKTED CHICKEN at 4P01 E. 4th Ave., Hjaleah intends to redster saM name wMh the "Clerk of icjlt Court of Dade County, Florida. DONNA MARE. INC. (a Fla. Corp.! ELI BREGER Attorney 420 Lincoln Road •/'lO-W-SO. 10/7 NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of THE FRUIT BOWL at number 433 Lincoln Road in the City of Miami Beach, Florida Intend to register the said name with the CleTk of the Clrcuit Court of Dade County. Florida Dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this 30th day of August, 1960. SEYMOL'R WEISS ELMA WEISS TALIANOFF A WALLER by: George .1. Tallanoff Attorney for Applicant 9/SII. iO'T-14-21 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND rOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA, IN PROBATE Ns. tWto-C IN RE: Estate of VICTOR %  SWWSON used. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and AB Person' Hiving claims or Dumands Agalnet bald V' I are hereby notified and reqcii • %  b i M.S. in mi) < I. ims and denial's which you may have against th.tate of Viator E Swanson decea-cd I >ade County. Florida, i County Judges of Dade Count> I file the same in their offices County Courthouse in Hade Coun v, within t-i^lit calendar months from the date ol ihe first pirhlical .u hereof, or the same will be barred. ARTHUR C. PERSON WE1NKLK* RBRSLBfi Attorneys >bold Building Miami. Florida 10/7-14-21-28 NOTICE UNDER TiTlOUS NAIV FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTK'E 18 HEREBY GIVEN that the on d swa hjn ed. desiring to enaraev In business under the l1ctltu>u name of ROYAL PALM KFT-TCIENCIES & AITS at 420-22 N.E. 7trd Street. M.and, Floriaa in tend to register said name with the Clerk of Ore Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. FRANK B PIGNATORE. and ROSE PIGNATORE. His Wife. undivided t4 Interest ANTHONY FLORENTINE undivided % Interest LEON KAPLAN Attorney for Applicants 1139?*, 1st Street Miami, florida tO/7-W-21-25 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORVOHATtOS Ol TFMTS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at FH .l-Hitr.



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Page 12-B +Je*lsti fkr/cftlfl Pearly Gait by HalP'earl NAMES THAT MAKE NEWS: Jewish Agency Professionals is the name of the recently-organized group. Some of the members aren't too favorable in regard to shortening the name (JAP), and hope they'll be recognized by the full lettering of the organization. Haskell Lazare, director of the American Jewish Congress, which does not see eye-to-eye with the ADL and American Jewish Committee on the controversial school Bible-reading issue, addesscd the newlyj formed Jewish Agency Professionals anent that topic. Mrs. Paul Pollak, founder president of the PROPS, was recently reflected head of the active group. Newly-elected officers include Patsy Abbott, first vice president; attorney Shirley Woolf, executive vice president; Barbara Flimm, recording secretary; Mrs. Leon Fields, corresponding secretary; and Mrs. Harold Krongold, treasurer, j The installation luncheon will be staged at the Fontainebleau on Nov. II, Highlight will be an original revue, "Life is a Contest." Congratulations to Bette Shari Baron, of Miami Beach, who was awarded this year's Kappa Beta Pi Book Scholarship at University of Miami. It's presented yearly to the woman law student with the highest scholastic average. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Harris, of Miami Beach, are off on a 36-day ocean cruise, taking in Europe and Israel. Friends still talking aboul the smart reception following the Bar Mitzvah of Howard Alan Feller, son of Judge and Mrs. Milton Feller. It was held at the Fontainebleau. and guests came from such distant cities at Phoenix, Ariz., South Orange, N.J., and Decalur and Galesburg, 111., not forgetting the New York area. -tr— — it — %  & — BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Martin Sachs following in his father's and mother's footsteps in B'nai B'rith activities, was elected president of the Youth Council. His father. David Sachs, is past president of Flamingo Lodge, and his mother is past president of Flamingo Women's chapter. The early ayem "breakfast round table" at Wolfie's Lincoln rd. includes attorney Ben Cohen, motelman Dave Glass, businessman George Kramer, and restaurateur Sam Schwartz among its "charter members." Lebowitz Vows Metro Cooper Friday, Qtcobgr 21, iggn W ALU UBOWITZ Mr*. Morton Perry, assistant director of American Jewish Committee, looking over latest infant wear, in anticipation of a second addition to the family in the spring. Label Katz, international president of B'nai B'rith, expected in town in January for installation of local officers. The national convention of B'nai B'rith Women will be held in Miami Beach in April, and the annual convention of Fifth District B'nai B'rith is set for June at the Americana. The musical Dan Lapins will soon be humming and playing "The Wedding March" for daughter Diane, who's engaged to Mike Walberg, j of Columbia, S.C. Jerry Carver hearing such glowing reports of Israel from members | of the B'nai B'rith Youth Council, including Ginger Rood and Debbie Suiter, who visited there recently, he's making plans for a 1961 summer' trip right now. -6-it— itWHAT'S NEW: "Song without End," the movie based on the life and loves of Franz Liszt, bows into the Carib, Miami and Miracle on Thursday, Oct. 27. It stars handsome Dick Bogarde as the romantic composer,! and introduces the French beauty. Capucine. Advance reports have boasted the film as one of the year's best. Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier are the leads in "All the Young Men," a tense drama of racial conflict, holding forth this week at the Flamingo. Mort Sahl, the controversial comic, has a featured role along with the rapidly rising star, James Darren. Background of the film is the Korean War. Ever check the double features at the" Cameo and Cinema on the Beach? Good opportunity to see some of the "big" movies you may have missed at the first and second run houses, and the price is right. In fact. 1 would say they're the biggest box office bargains in town. Bobby Darrin, who opens at the DeauviUe Casanova room, Dec. 23, has a "guest star" role in "Pepe," the CinemaScope Technicolor holidav package from Columbia, starring Cantinflas. No doubt, the hot-as-a pistol singer will make a personal appearance at the world premiere of the film at the Lincoln on Dec. 23. -it — -it— -irTHE AFTER DARK SCENE: King-size cocktails and the finest, liquors are on hand at the cozy cocktail lounge of the Candlelight Inn in Coconut Grove, l,eitson's popular dining rendezvous boast's ideal ban quet facilities. If you are among the local folk who haven't ventured out to King Arthur's Court in Miami Springs Villas as yet, you've got something to look forward to. It's an ideal spot for family dining, and its colorful atmosphere is truly intriguing, not forgetting the always excellent cuicine at hand. Al Goldman, although quite busy with his two Fu Manchu's, in Miami Beach and Hollywood, still finds time for a night of dining occa tionally at Nick and Arthur's on the 78th st. causeway. Caterers Gordon and Pont did themselves proud at the "dual party" at Julius Spector's home. It was his 75th birthday, and the 25th wedding anniversary of son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Specter. The caterers also handled the two cocktail parties this week for "Daisy Originals" new building. The Riviera in Coral Gables is one of the area's newest an<' Snest Kosher restaurants. All your favorite likc-mothcr-used-to-make dishes a/e always on hand. And wait till you see the kosher "smorgasbord' table there. It's just a matter of minutes to get to the South Pacific on U.S. 1, just below Hollywood. It's oriental dishes are as exotic as the appearance of the colorful restaurant. It's a treat for the family an) of the week. Norton Tire Co. Marks 36th Year Of Operation Norton Tire Company, a pioneer \ South Florida firm, this week cele; brates its 36th anniversary. Begun in a small Dania service station in 1924, the company now maintains 13 retail outlets and serves some 75 associate dealers from Key West to Hollywood. Louis E. Pallot, founder and currently chairman of the board of Norton Tire Co., remembers the pessimism that greeted announcement of his venture 36 years ago. "Despite criticism thet there wasn't enought automobiles to sustain the infant tire company, and that our out-of-the-way location was another handicap, we opened for business," Pallot reminised. After handling high-profit, lowvalue off-brands, Pallot determined that success lay in repeat business, achieved only through the sale and specialization of a quality major-brand tire. Today his company is one of the largest distributors of B. F. Goodrich tire products in the world, with an annual sales volume in excess of S2.5O0.000. Norton Pallot, who was born the year the company was organized, and for whom the firm is named, is now president. Howard Katzen, a son-in-law, is vice president, and son Ronald Pallot is secretary treasurer. "A leader representing Miami Beach in a spirit of cooperation instead of antagonism could bring worthwhile results from Metro Government," said Walter Lebowitz this week, candidate for Metro Commission for Miami Beach. Lebowitz asserted at a kick-off j meeting that he would be "the first one to champion the cause of a separate county for Miami Beach, thereby eivinc the Beach its own county Commission and representatives in the State Legislature." However, he continued, "since such a possibility is very rp m *at the time, we must stop fighting our county government ana star, cooperating with it in order to receive the maximum benefits Metro { has to offer." A local resident for 27 years, i Lebowitz has been *n active civic worker and Democratic leader since attending the University of Miami, where he served as senator and clerks' representative in the Student Body Government and Law School Congress. Lebowitz is presently the attorney for the Democratic Party, attorney for the Miami Beach Bar Assn. legal aid committee, an ofli Ctr in the Knights of Pythias and Histadrut. and has served as vice president of the South Shoe r m provement Assn. and Yiw. r,* cratic Club. KING ARTHUR'S COURT SINGING STRINGS DINNER SUFFER MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS 500 Deer Run • TU 8-4521 ART SHUNS, Co-Owner RIVIERA m RESTAURANT DELICATESSEN and CATERERS SMORGASBORD $1.89 Jit Kf. MONDAY thru THURSDAY, 5 P.M. lo 830 f M SERVING DINNERS FRIDAY NIGHTS & SUNDAYS THE ULTIMATE IN KOSHER CATERING Consult Ut for Your Catering Needs, Bar Mitzvahi. tic. 1830 Ponce de Leon, Comer Majorca, Coral Gables For Reservations call HI 8-5441 Closed Saturdays ROYAL HUNGARIAN ^ 3 CATERERS 731 WASHINGTON AVE„ MIAMI BEACH JE 8 5401 FOR SUPERB CATER1X1; WEDDINGS • BAR MITZVAHS • BANQUETS OUR MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST REFERENCE Lectures Slated In Yiddish A winter series of lectures in Yiddish will be launched Saturday at Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute. The scries will be heard weekly from 4.30 to 5:30 p.m. Lecturer will be Rabbi Isaac Ever. The talks will be based on the "Weekly Portion" in conjunction with contemporary Jewish and world problems. Boneless Lunvh and Dinner Servrd Poi/i CANDLELIGHT INN In Tit* Maori Coconut Gro*t Banquet Facilititt — Cocktail loungt Henry Lett ion, Myr. Women Hear Hair Designer Sisterhood of Temple Judea was to hold its first luncheon of the season on Thursday noon at the Temple. J. Baldi, Miami and Coral Gables coiffure designer, was to speak on hair care. ABE GEFTCR'S NEW KOSHER Mcnorah Chapter Card Party Slated I members to join the chapter "so Mcnorah chapter may retain the trophy it won last year at the paid-up membership party." Mrs. Mildred R. Freeman president said that the contest ends on I Monday at the DeauviUe hotel. j ROMWELL HOTEL Oceanironi at 20lh SI • MIAMI BEACH PM Day, rer Fffi.. DM. IM. 25 el 103 Sat Te DM. SINGLE OCCUPANCY 50% HIGHER EUROPEAN PLAN It OTHER RATES 0 'i!".l L "\* F • Chili. Ltuntei ir.4 S.'li, in, in. rtl "S "l"" "f' KOSHER MEALS $fi58 INCLUDED w JE 4-2141 ATTENTION STEAK LOVERS! "RONNIE" Your favorite chef for so many years in Miami it now serving at a new location. CHARCOAL BROILED Prime Sirloin — Filet Mignon Prime Rib of Beef BUSINESS MEN'S LUNCHES from 85* 809 STEAK HOUSE and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 809 S.W. 8th ST. (On the Trail) Completely Air Conditioned Ample Free Porkirg PHONE FR 4-18B5 M< non.h chapter, B'nai B'litth Women, will hold a car.i party cm Tuesday, 1 p.m.. at the Miami Beach Bui tb, 201 20th st. Program chairman Mrs. Faurice Fink and membership chairman Mrs Solomon Moses are in charge. Airs. Moses urged prospective LUNCH DINMCR SUPPER &*&* l;l 'lu MUM CANTONtSI COOKING tJiM.Sg f Z&WSSS. T M FR 9-7996