The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01653

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
clewish Floridian
Combining THI JEWISH IHWTY and THE JHWSH WttKiY
folume 33 dumber 41
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 7, 1960
Two Sections Price 20*
\Reds Hold Out
{Evidence Vow
On Eichmann
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
hrew virtually a total blank in re-
sponse to requests to several
East European countries to sup-
l,i\ evidence on the activities in
hose countries of Adolf Eich-
nann. it was disclosed here.
More than two months ago Israel
appealed to all such countries hav-
any information whatever, on
he man who directed the exter-
jnation of European Jewry to
Provide help in the presentation of
bis trial. The only country to give
postive reply, it was reported.
Has Yugoslavia, which promised
help.
This negative attitude, it was no-
conflicted sharply with the
nany articles and statements in
the Soviet Bloc press, after the an-
nouncement last May 23 of Eich-'
riiann s seizure, welcoming the ar- j
rest and urging punishment.
Golda Challenges Nasser
To Peace Talk With Israel
UNITED NATIONS(JTA)President Nasser, of the United Arab|
-Republic, told the United Nations General Assembly here of his earnest
hope for world peace and was promptly challenged by Israel to back his
words with deeds by entering into immeflbte peace talks with Israel.
Nasser presented his views in his |.
first address to the General Assem- | *. interview for Radio:
bly. Israel's reply came from Mrs. |Rvadavia of Buenos Aires.
Golda Mcir, the Israel Foreign Min-
U.S. Cools to Supporting
UAR for Security Council
UNITED NATIONSAuthoritative sources hereas well as
I said the absence in Washington and in New York-expressed "absolute conviction" that
f East European cooperation i the United States has no intention of supporting President Nasser, of the
ould not delay the start of the United Arab Republic, in his bid for a seat on the United Nations Se
ichmann trial because sufficient curity Council.
vidence was available from other i A|, indJcations point to the fact
iimt. Israel, however, sought ,hat President Eisenhower, Vice
aterial from East Europe, a ma- President Nixon secretary of State
Mrs. Meir. asked for her reaction
to the Nasser speech, replied that
Nasser .spoke about some principles
"in which he says he believes and
which I and my country are ready
to accept." She enumerated the
principles as follows:
"1. The safeguarding of the
Charter of the United Nations.
2. A general declaration about
the peace In the world. 3. Hit
suggestion that the problems of
the world that may endanger the
peace of the world should be re-
solved by negotiation.
Hussein Raps
Egypt's Tactics
In Middle East
or theatre of Eichmann's exter-
Herter and Ambassador Henry Ca-
nination efforts, to obtain at the ^ ^ former ne,d of tne
-nal the fullest possible picture of
he holocaust suffered by Euro-
pan Jewry.
.. ,i i.
OIL WAS KING
The geopolitical scene in
the Middle East is changing.
| The emerging of new impor-
tant oil centers in Algeria
and Libya challenges the
longstanding Arab advantage
in this highly important pro-
duct. What about tomorrow's
changing scene? For a spe-
cial report, see Page 7-A.
American delegation to the United
Nations, are all opposed to assist-
ing Nasser to realize his ambition,
tt was emphasized.
The United States will support
the candidate of another member
of the Afro-Asian states for the
seat in the Security Council, these
sources said. They indicated that
Nasser's alignment with the hos-
tile attitude taken by Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita Khrushchev against
UN secretary General Dag Ham-
marskjold is regarded as a sure
deterrent to his ability to secure
American support.
(The United Arab Republic's dele-
gation at the United Nations issued
a statement denying a report that
Continued on Page 10-A
Bonn Applauds
Plan to Drop
Ex-Nazi's Case
UNITED NATIONS (JTAi
King Hussein of Jordan Monday*
delivered a series of sharp blasts
i at the United Arab Republic, ac-
cusing its President, Gamal Abdel
Nasser, of following the Commu-
nist line in the Middle East. The
Jordanian ruler also discussed the
| Palestinea refugee question, accus-
ing Israel of failure to carry out
j UN resolutions. But his main fire
: was directed against UAR Presi-
dent Nasser.
BONN (JTA) The decision of
the public prosecutor to drop pro-
"The Charter of the United Na-
tions, in its first Article, refers to
peace in the world, to the solution Obviously disregarding heavy*
of all problems by peaceful negoti- Arab pressures which, since his ar-
jaiion and not by any sort of boy- rival here Friday, attempted to
cott by one country against an- convince him that, in the interests
other. We say to Mr. Nasser: If of Arab "unity," he should with-
you desire peace in the world, there hold criticism of the United Arao
should also be a desire for peace Republic, King Hussein told the
in every part of the world. I General Assembly plenary session
"It is not a secret that our area |hat h,e tould ,' kP siIen'n the
| local quarrel between Nasser
SWMMl COURT IUSTKC HUBS QUIZ
B-G Orders Investigation
Of Aides in Lavon Case
prime mmisriK ornas exflanajion
PACE 3 A
JERUSALEM(JTA)The Prime : necessary a reexamination of the
Ministers office issued a commun-! reliability of the two officers. Thj?
"iue here which lifted somewhat committee's conclusion will be prc-
tl>e screen of secrecy over the re- sented to the Cabinet and the Jus
lamination of the 1955 security | tice Ministry will probably take
se in which Pinhas Lavon was'the necessary steps."
forced to resign as Minister of De-
I lense.
Mr. I.avon, who is now secretary
I general of the Histadrut, protested
*t the time that he was not respon-
se for the situation found by a
Jwo-man investigating committee
The nature of the findings has
never been disclosed.
The communique said that, by
order of Prime Minister David Ben-
Gunon as Minister of Defense, the
Chief of staff had appointed a three-1
"lan investigating committee "to
examine the conduct of a regular
rmy officer and a reserve olficer.
following a decision handed down
6> a civil court in connection with
* certain accused which makes
The communique indicated that
the new inquiry committee, which
is headed by Supreme Court Jus-
tice Haim Cohen, will not be con-
cerned with Mr. Lavon's role in
the IMS security situation. The
new investigation will look only
Into the question of whether two
officers who testified before the
1955 committee perjured them-
selves, as a recent civil trial
seemed to indicate. It was this
is one where there are difficulties,
because Mr. Nasser says that he and Jordan Twnatd*SPUV".^"!."
of the problems between Israel and has been our destruction." He said
Continued en Page 8 A Continued on Page t-A
ceedings against Dr. Oberlaender.! is in a state of belligerence against frs Pface in !he Middle East a"d
who was accused of participation j Israel. This is why we say to Mr. 'nrea ens world ** as a whole-
in a 1941 massacre of Polish Jews, I Nasser that he should sit down with ne ,rmea-
was welcomed this week by Felix us and start immediate negoti-j "From the very beginning." he
von Eckhardt, chief spokesman, at ions to arrive at peaceful solution \ stated, "the aim of our sister state
for the West German Government.
The decision of the public pro-
secutor followed an 11-month judi-
cial investigation which produced
"no evidence" that the former |
West German Minister for Refugee j
Affairs was involved in the atro-.
city in Lvov in German-occupied i
Poland. The charges, which ori-1
ginated from Communist sources,'
forced Dr. Oberlaender to resign
the Cabinet post last May.
Von Eckhardt said it was. nee- I
essary to make the result of the
investigation widely known be-
cause of the propaganda cam-
paign conducted against Dr.
Oberlaender in East Germany.
He added that there was no
question of Dr. Oberlaender
being readmitted to the West
German Cabinet.
Iraq Blasts Kennedy Talk;
Complains to State Dep't.
WASHINGTON(JTA> Iraq has handed a formal diplomatic note
to the Department of State, protesting a recent address by Sen. John F.
Kennedy, Massachusetts Democrat, before the Zionist Organization of
America. ?
The Iraqi Embassy made known
that it has protested to the Depart
ment here and that the Iraqi For-
eign Ministry handed a note to the
American Embassy in Baghdad.
According to an Iraqi news agency
The public prosecutor's office, I report, the protest was lodged be-
in justifying its refusal to issue an: cause the Kennedy speech "contain-
indictment, reported that the tcsti- ed blatant praise of world Zionism
mony of scores of witnesses and a and Jewry."
study of Nuremberg trial records.
did not produce any evidence that | The note said that "it is truly
Dr. Oberlaender had any part in painful that electioneering propa-
the pogrom or in causing any mem-! ganda should be exploited for the
bers of his battalion to take part j purpose of harming the Arabs
in the killings. j and their legal rights and for
supporting the usurping group
which continues committing
crimes against the rights of the
peaceful Palestinian Arabs a
group responsible for displacing
one million.Arab refugees."
The Iraqi Foreign Ministry note
stated that the Kennedy speech af-
fected American Arab relations
land that this stand was not in the
I interest of relations between Iraq
and the United States.
The Iraqi government asked the
Stale Department to intercede with
"American quarters concerned with
a view to clarifying the ill effects
caused by Kennedy's speech."
'Mistaken Bormann' Interests Bonn
BONN (JTA) The West I suspect proves to be Bormann. the
German Foreign Office disclosed (West German goverrment will im
t here it had instructed the West mediately ask for his extradition,
possibility of perjured testimony ; German Embassy in Buenos Aires |
to look into the report that a man (Alfred Vitolo. Argentina's Min
has been seized by Argentine po-; ister of the Interior, said in Buenos
lice on suspicion he may be Mar-1 Aires that .the arrested man, who
tin Bormann. Hitler's wartime dep-1 gave his name as Walter Flueger.
uty. It was understood that if the | entered Argentina illegally 11 years
which led to reopening of the
case.
have
Mr. Lavon's supporters
Continued on Page 7 A
ago. He was arrested in Zarate,
85 miles from Buenos Aires, by
Federal police last Saturday. So
far, police have not been able to
identity the suspect positively as
Bormann, who was officially de-
clared dead six years ago by Ber-
Continued on Page 5-A


Pcge 2-A
+Je*ist>ncrknan
Special Services Launch Sukkoth Here Thursday
Services Thursday and Friday this week launch the observance of
Sukkoth. or Fe*st_of the Tabernacles. The holiday celebrates the boun-
ties cf the harvest season, and is marked by the erection of temporary
booths at the home and synagogue, where fruits are eaten and enjoyed
by young ar.d old. Final days of the Sukkoth festival will be observed
at Shmini Atzereth with services next Thursday and Friday. Oct. 13
and 14.
Temple Menorah. 620 75th St.. iain
observes Sukkoth as services Thurs- m
day at 8:45 am., with Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz officiating. Friday
meming services are also at 8:45.
Irving, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Jacoby. will become Bar Mitzvah.
Cantor Edward Klein renders the
musical portions of the liturgy,
with Eli Samuels directing the
Temple choir. Saturday morning
services are at 8:45. Myles. son
of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hornreich.
CANDUUGHTMG TIAfi
16 Tlahri 5:47 pun.
10:45 a.m. The service will feature
a Sukkoth Harvest Festival, with
and Morton son of Mr and Mrs. chiWren v^gjng canned goods of-
Murray Ornste.n. will become Bar ^ ,0 ^ dl5tribut,d t0 n^y
S25: fVF'V.w '"' Thanksgiving. Lulav
"Weekly Portion of the Law. Md Esrog pagm g al(# Kiui.
At Temple Ner Tamid. 80th st. uled. Rabbi Leon Kronish will offi-
and Tatum Waterway. Rabbi Eu-
gene Labovitz will officiate Thurs-
day and Friday at 8:45 a.m. Sat-
ciate. with Cantor David Convisor
rendering the musical portions ef
the liturgy. Friday evening serv
urday morning services are at 8:45. ices are at 8:45 p.m. Sermon will ,
Cantor Samuel Gomberg renders be There are Still People Livir-
the musical portions of the liturgy, in Huts." Saturday morning serv-
Morris. son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon ices begin at 10:45 a.m. Michael
Shaftal. will become Bar Mitzvah. Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Kicdush will follow in the Temple Charles Katz. and Mark, son of Mr.
Sukkah. and Mrs. Irving Rabinowilz. will
De Bar Mitzvah.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard will of
Temple Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase
ave.. observes Sukkoth Thursday.
DAILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
KW JERSEY PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE
AUAJIY Mj BOSTON
PROVIDENCE aad .H ether saints Veahff Service
fin Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
655 Collins Ave., Miami Road. DM JE 8 8353
ficiate at service* marking Suk
ko h on Thursday. 10 a.m.. at Tem-
ple Beth Am of South Miami. 5950
No. Kendall dr. Cantor Charles
Kodner renders the musical por-
tions of the liturgy. Children will
bring fruits to the Sukkah and help
decorate it. Friday evening serv-
ices for families and their children
will open at 7:30 p.m. Sermon:
What s Our Sukkah For'" Chil-
dren's Choral Group will be fea-
tured under the direction of Mrs.
Doris Helson.
Sukkoth services are Thursday
and Friday at 8:30 a.m. in Miami
Hebrew Congregation. 1101 SW 12th
ave. Guest Rabbi Samuel M. Mach-
tei will officiate. Friday evening
services are at 6 p.m. Saturday
services will be at 9 a.m.
At Kneseth Israel Congregation,
1415 Euclid ave.. Rabbi David Lehr-
field and Cantor Abraham Seif will
officiate. Sukko'h services are
Thursday and Friday at 8:30 a.m.
Friday evening services are at 6
p.m. Sermons both days are sched-
uled as "Clouds of Glory" and "The
Willow Branch." Saturday morning
services are 8:30 a.m.
Beth David Congregation, 2625
SW 3rd ave.. will observe Sukkoth
Thursday and Friday at 9 a.m. Fri-
day evening services will be at 8:15
p.m. EJIen. daughter of Mr and
Mrs. Homer Rievman. will become
Bas Mitzvah. Saturday service!
are at 9 a.m. Myles. son of Mr
and Mrs. Harold Abbott, will be
come Bar Mitzvah.
At Beth Jacob Congregation, 311
Washington ave.. Sukkoth service?
are scheduled for Thursday anr
Friday at 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Tibor
Stern officiates, with Cantor Mau
rice Mamches rendering the musi
cal portions of the liturgy Sermon
the first day is "The Harvest ol
Nature is the Spring of Life." Ser
;mon the second day will be "In the
Shade of the Sukkah." Kiddush will
take place in the congregation Suk-
kah, with esrog and hilav provided.
Friday evening services are at
6 p.m. Saturday mornine services
-nil >rf t 8:30 am. Sermon is The
Man Koheleth."
Dr. Irving Lehrman will officiate
at services on Sukkoth at Temple
manw-CI, 1701 Washington ave.
on Thursday and Friday at 9 a.m.
Cantor Hirsh Adler renders the
musical portions of the liturgy.
Junior services are 10:30 am in
the Assembly Hall conducted by-
Rabbi Bernard Mussman. Saturday-
services will be at 9 a.m. Sermon
is based on the "Weekly Portion
of the Law." Adrienne. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Deblinger.
will be Bas JdittVah.
Temple Ttfereth Jacob, 951 Fla
mingo Way. will observe Sukkoth
Thursday at 9 a.m. Rabbi Leo
Heim will officiate and preach oa
"Special Guests Knocking at Our
Doors." Friday services are at 9
am. and 8:15 p.m.. when the ser
' mon will be "Clouds of Glory Shine
Through Our Sukkah." Cantor
Samuei Levine renders the musicnl
.portions of the liturgy. Saturday
services will be at 9 a.m. Sermon
is "The Components of a Good
Jew Junior services are Sunday
Friday, October 7, 1950
I at 10 a.m., followed b> a Sukkoti
I party.
At Beth El Congregation, 500 s*
; 17ih ave.. Sukkoth services will be
held Thursday at 8:30 am, j^
^iabbi Solomon Schiff tfticiatine
nSermcn is "The Significance of the
Foot Species." Friday services
; are also at 8:30 am., with the ier.
[ mon scheduled as "Gratification
for Our Blessings." Evening serv-
ices will be at 5:45 p.m. Saturday
services are at 8:30 a.m.
Hebrew Academy. Sit 6th st,
will mark the Sukkoth Nlidayij
', services Thursday at 8:30 im. 1
Rabbi Alexander Gross v,:.\ preach'
i on "SukkothJewish Thanksgiving
Festival." Friday services are also
at 8:30 a.m. Sermon is Rejoicing
j with the Almightv." Saturday
'services will be at 8:45 ajn.
Rabbi Isaac Ever will officiate
at services of Aaudoth lira*) h*.
Continued an age 13-A
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Friday, October 7. 1960
+Jewlsttk)rldian
Page 3 A
Gwion Explains Reasons for Inquiry
First Lady of the World, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, chats with
Joseph Rose during a Miami Beach visit in 1952 on behalf of
State of Israel Bonds, when Rose served as chairman of the
1952-53 campaign here.
Community to Honor Joe Rose Sunday
At Bond Function at Fontainebleau
Joseph Rose, Miami Beach ho-
tel owner and active community
worker, is also a proficient artist,
althought not many people know
about this area of accomplishment.
He paints primarily for pleas-
ure, but when pressed, Rose will
admit that he a "professional." He
has already sold one painting, for
an undisclosed sum, and contrib-
uted the money to the Sisterhood
of Temple'Emanu-El. He is a mem-
ber and former, president of the
congregation.
He exhibited artistic talent as
a small boy. Ret* say*, but nev-
er really began to pain* until
1951. "I just felt that wanted to
express something by painting,"
he says. "I really can't explain
why I should have begun at that
particular time."
Since then, he has painted quite
often, but purely for the enjoy-
ment of it, working primarily in
pastels a*4 eils.
Although his hobby may not be
well known, Rose's civic and phil-
anthropic work is widely recog-
nized.
The JaXpat of many honors is a
reception and dinner dance on
Sunday in the Fontaine room of the
r' pay tribute to Rose for his serv-
, ices to the community, the State
i of Israel, and the Israel Bond
drive. About 600 guests are ex-
pected.
The function, which begins at
6 pm. with a reception, has been
| planned by the Temple Emanu-El
I congregation. Rose is outgoing
i Miami Beach chairman for the
I Israel bond drive, and formerly j
[ served as city-wide chairman.
Featured speaker will be editor,'
publisher, and author Harry Gol-I
den, of the "Carolina Isralite."
In addition to his work with the
Israel Bond Federation, Rose is
also active with the Greater Miami |
Jewish Federation, which he serves ]
as trustee and member of the I
board of governors. |
He is honorary life president of:
Temple Emanu-El. which was con-
structed during his presidency in
1948-48. He is on the board of
trustees of Mt. Sinai Hospital andj
a member of the hospital's build-1
ing committee. Rose also works
on behalf of United Fund, and in
1959 served as a director.
He and Mrs. Rose make their
home at the Royal Palm hotel,
which they own. They are the
parents of two daughters, Mrs.
Harold Unger, of Miami Beach,
and Mrs. Benedict Silvermen, of
Coral Cables. Their son, Richard,
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prime
| Minister David Ben-Gurion issued
(.statement Monday night denying
that there was any connection be-
tween an inquiry he had ordered
into the integrity of two Army o!fi
cers and the resignation in 1955 of
Pinhas La von as Minister of De-
fense in the Cabinet of former Pre-
mier Moshe Sharett.
Supporters of Mr. Lavon, who is
now secretary general of the Hista-
drut, Israel's labor federation, had
claimed that the probe of the two
officers would "rehabilitate" the
former Defefnse Minister.
"As Defense Minister," Mr.
Ben-Gurion declared in the
lengthy statement on the investi-
gation, "I will not allow any of-
ficer to serve in the Army, whose
hands are not clean. But I will
also not allow an officer to be pil-
loried without proof and without
trial."
The Prime Minister revealed
that on the basis of material sub-
mitted to him by Mr. Lavon some
five months ago and "reports that
reached me during the trial of a
certain person in recent months,"
he considered it his duty to order
the setting up of an inquiry into
the integrity of two Army officers.
The press, however, confused
two issues, the Premier's state-
ment continued. One was "an un-
fortunate incident for which an in-
quiry committee was appointed by
former Premier Sharett at the end
Istebftsheal
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Marks Birthday
Sunshine chapter of B'nai tt'rith
Women will celebrate its second
birthday party Tuesday. 1 p.m.,
at the First Federal Savings and
Loan Assn., 900 NE 125th st.
Honored guests will be Mrs.
Gerald P. Soltz. president of Dis-
trict 5, B'nai B'rith Women; Mrs.
Alfred Reich first vice president;
and Mrs. Alvin Wank, president of
the BrowardDade Council.
Mrs. David Shapiro will intro-
duce Max Friedson, president of
the Political Information Council,
in a discussion of "Importance of
Voting."
of 1954 at the request of the then
Defense Minister Lavon. which did
not reach-any .conclusion.'.'. The sec-
ond issue, the statement asserted,
was Mr. Lavon's resignation in
February. 1955, which, according to
Mr. Sharett's statement to the
Knesset, was because Lavon "did
not find it possible to continue in
his post after his proposals for
changes in the structure of the de-
fense organization were not accept-
ed by the Government."
Declaring that he did not have
the least doubt that Mr. Sharett's
statement to the Knesset was truth-
ful, Mr. Ben-Gurion said in the
statement: "I had political differ-
ences with Sharett in the Govern-
ment, but I never had, and I do
not have today, the slightest doubt
as to his personal integrity and
honesty."
Denying any knowledge of the
changes proposed by Mr. Lavon.
the Premier said that neither be
fore he relinquished the po->t of
Defense Minister, which Mr. Lavon
assumed, nor after returning to it
in February 1955. "did I see any
need for changes in the defense
organization." The present inquiry
will not deal with Mr. Lavon's ac-
tivities as Minister but only with
the integrity of the two Army offfi-
cers, Mr. Ben-Gurion declared.
Monday, the Prime Minister
reported to the full cabinet mnd,
later, to a special meeting of
Parliament's Committee on Se-
curity and Foreign Affairs, about
the reasons why he has ordered*
a special committee, headed by
Supreme Court Justice Haim Co-
hen, to probe into the events pre-
ceding the sudden resignation of
Pinhas Lavon from the post of
Minister of Defense, in 1955.
Mr. Ben-Gurion promised the
Cabinet that he will bring before
it the results of the committee's
probe, and said he will order the
Minister of Justice to prosecute
anyone who might be deemed
guilty of perjury as a result of
1'affaire Lavon.
Mr. Lavon said that he would
not comment on the Premier's
statement on the investigation un-
til he addressed the Knesset For-
eign Affairs and Security Commit-
tee. He said he would supply the
Committee with additional docu-
ments relating to the "affair"
which led to his resignation as De-
fense Minister in 1955.
Israelis, meanwhile, are still in
a dilemma over what the whole
affair is about and hints in the pa-
pers only help to increase the ob-
scurity.
He had the town
light in hi big,
fettlst!
&%&
&***
So beautiful, (he *Jt stx yews Mi
cook! get *. man ex-
pects more than
ekJaal
last away
i murder!
sa. knew what
thayhaeteae
to her sonl
who lives with them, is an arch-
itect and graduate of Cornell
University.
The entire Rose family will be
present in full force Sunday even-;
ing when Joseph Rose will be in
the spotlight.
Chairman for the dinner are
Charles Fruchtman and Jack S.
Popick. Judge Irving Cypen will
serve as toastmaster, and Harry
Rodgers' Orchestra will provide
music for dinner and dancing.
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Page 4-A
Je*lstncricnar
Friday, October 7, lggj
i .i,,.,'!:! Jll.lllliiril.U.i
"Jewish Floridian
CFHCE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
...... MM 396 --
FRED K. SKOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
Published every Friday since 19*7 by TT-e Tewliih FlorMLn
at 120 N.E. Sixth Street. MLimi 1. FIoHla. P"}8JM
e<-nd-claaa matter July 4. 1930. at rVtti-* of Mural.
Florida, under the Acl of Mai oh 3. t.9.
The Jewlah Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity ana
ISRAEL BUREAU
202 Ben Yehuda Tel Aviv, Israel
RAY U. BINDER ......_................ Correspondent
The Jewish Floridian doex not guarantee the Knsnrutb
nt tb merohandl."-' n-lvertlse* In Iti* wl'imm.
SUBSCRIPTION
One Vetr 15.00
RATES:
Thre- Years JJ'0.00
Volume 33 Number 41
Friday. October 7, 1960
16 Tishri 5721
The Significance of Sukkolh
Sukkoth comes on the heels of Rosh Ha-
shona and Yom Kippur, and was launched with
opening prayers Wednesday evening.
On the occasion of this festival, the solemn-
ity of the Yomim Nora'imDays of Awegives
rise to the joyousness of fulfillment.
In Hebrew, Sukkoth means "tents" or "tab-
ernacles." The holiday is celebrated in tem-
porary booths built near the home and syna-
gogue to remind Jews of at least two significant
occurrences. One is historic. It commemorates
the manner in which the ancient Israelites lived
in the desert during their flight from Egypt in
bondage.
The second is symbolic. It gives thanks for
the bounty of nature. Sukkoth is thus a holiday
during which fruits particularly those found
in Israel are eaten.
In this way, Rosh Hashona and Yom Kip-
pur, the occasion when men search the inner
recesses of their souls and spiritually cleanse
themselves in preparation for the year ahead,
progress naturglly into Sukkoth the festival
during which they offer thanks for the physical
sustenance of the earth.
Until recent years, Sukkoth also evoked
Jewry's eternal longing for the return to Israel
much as it historically marked the ancient
Israelites' travels from Egypt. The eating of
Palestinian fruits in the Sukkah partly symbol-
ized this longing.
Israel observed its 12th anniversary of in-
dependence during the past Hebrew Year 5720,
For Jews today, the historic significance of Suk-
koth is in this regard perhaps greater than it
has been in the preceding two millenia of the
dispersion. The Return has been fulfilled.
Nasser Departs for Home
The Soviet Union's first attack against the
secretary general of the United Nations came
years ago when it charged Dag Hammar-
skjold's predecessor, Trygvie Lie, with partial-
ity. Lie. who was the first to hold the post,
resigned.
The Soviet Union is trying to do it again.
The post of secretary general has emerged from
the morass of the Security Council, frustrated in
iis affairs again and again by Communist ve-
toes, to bring back to the world peace organiza-
tion some of the effectiveness it was meant to
have. Hence Russia's most recent frontal at-
tack against Hammarskjold's handling of the
Congo.
It was a tribute to the sagacity of the emer-
ging African republics that they did not fall for
the Soviet line. Only the more traditional pup-
pets among the Red entourage did that.
And how did Gamal Abdel Nasser fare?
As "pious" as the company he keeps, the
UAR dictator had the effrontery to pose as
peacemaker between East and West. But his
stern warning that the Middle East cold war is
as hot as ever showed Nasser in his true light.
How that sat with the Eisenhower Admin-
istration is difficult to tell. No positive state-
ments have emerged either from the President
or his press secretary. Bui, by week's end, it
was interesting to note two developments:
U.S. determination to support the UAR
for a seat on the Security Council had sudden-
ly, and just as inexplicably, cooled down.
Gamal Abdel Nasser, his cheeks burn-
ing by the stinging remarks of King Hussein of
Jordan, cancelled his proposed tour of the
American mainland and departed for home.
Somehow, Nasser's piety sat uneasily on
his shoulders. Somehow, Nasser knew it.
Sukkoth Thanksgiving 1960
Jewish Floridian with a four-page advertise-
ment featuring an attack against local individ-
uals and the organization in which they hold
positions of leadership.
Despite the financial advantage which
would have accrued to this newspaper. The
Jewish Floridian rejected the ad.
As an organ of free expression, The Jewish
Floridian has always, and will continue, to as-
sess with all possible seriousness its role in the
responsible contribution to Jewish community
dignity and progress. But it was our opinion
that the proposed advertising semed divisive
and destructive, and that its main intent was to
continue the advertiser's campaigns designed
to engage in what we consider to be a "Chilul
Ha'Shem"behavior unbecoming a member of
the Jewish community.
A Miami Beach newspaper subsequently
saw fit to publish the ad. This publication, we
believe, accepted it without bothering to check
on the facts, and thus violated the spirit of co-
operation and harmony that should dominate
the Jewish communitya portion of which it
purports to serve.
In our opinion, The Jewish Floridian is not
the only publication here that should feel a
sense of responsibility toward the highest in-
terests of the Jewish community. Even within
the purview of free speech and a free press, we
believe that all other media have the same re-
sponsibilityand toward all segments of the
general community.
This must mean increasingly careful eval-
uation of the material they use, whether it be
of en editorial, straight news, or advertisina
nature. ^
Not a Singular Responsibility
A member of the local Jewish community
continues to find himself increasingly per-
sonnel non grata as a result of his mounting
criticism of Jewish organizations, their leader-
ship, and even their motivescriticism which
stems from his unprincipled behavior.
Several weeks ago, he approached The
Have You Paid Your Pledge?
Greater Miami's Combined Jewish Appeal
launched a special cash drive at the beginning
o September to clean up the remaininq unful-
filled pledges to the 1960 CJA campaign.
This is the beginning of October. Have you
heeded the call? Are you one of those re-
sponding to the cash drive?
We urge you to consider the many vital
activities which depend upon CJA cash.
Unfulfilled pledges can not be written off
as unfulfilled responsibility. These agencies
must have the ready means to continue their
programs. Unless pledges are paid reason-
ably early, the Combined Jewish Aopeal must
borrow funds to bridge the gap. This means
the negotiation of costly loans.
Won't you pay your pledge to CJA now?
during the week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
JHB GREATER Miami Mi*
isterial Assn. has viottH
its role as a non-profit, rel*
ious. tax-exempt organuiuT
The chirge is politicking .J
two counts, and the I(J
ation can hardly plead ignor-
ance in self-defense int0 ^
mail some two weeks ago vrent
a letter to all members Dated
Sept. 15, the letter announced
a meeting for last Monday
the Central Baptist Church. Featured was a panel of four speakers
including Dr. Henry Dahlberg, Dr. John Haldeman, Rev. Donald Mac^
kay president of the Ministerial Assn., and Donald Swanson, executive
director of the Council of Churches here
On the agenda, were these topics: ... the developments and sig-
nificance of the Bible-reading suit in our Civil Courts, and perhaps
other matters of local interest such as the School Board election ..,
The letter also suggested possible discussion of the national Presiden-
tial campaign.
It is not difficult to envision the substance of the talks Monday.
For with the letter was enclosed a pamphlet urging the election of
Arthur A. Atkinson to the Board of Public Instruction, District 2-i
Republican who opposes Jack D. Gordon, of Miami Beach This s>
culent piece of electioneering literature begins: "If you want to pre-
serve Bible-reading in the public schools, and the previous heritage
for which our forefathers fought ..." Then follows a fantastic list if
political charges, half-truths, and downright distortions reminiscent
of the McCarthy heyday.
-: -: -:
MASS APPEAL TO THf UNCULTNATtO
THE CHARGES ARE astonishing in themselves. But it is even more
staggering that the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn. should ha?e
been a party to passing them along. Having violated their tax-exempt
status in the first instance, members of the organization went two steps
further: (a) They sent the Sept. 15 letter and the Atkinson flyer in
envelopes deliberately bearing no return address, and incidentally
cancelling the stamps with the words, "non-profit organization," to
compound the felony: (b) they set their hand to the kind of disguise,
duplicity and bigotry that should hardly characterize a body of spirit-
ual leaders.
The Atkinson literature warns the ministers that "ultra liberal ele-
ments are out to seize control of the Dade County School Board." With-
out any reference whatever to the constitutional principles involved-
which universally fail to impress the zealous in this regardAtkinson
vows to preserve Bible-reading and to "combat all efforts to remove
the mention of God and the recognition of the importance of religious
faith from our schools." He doesn't say how.
Gordon is condemned because "... his brother and sister-in-law
are in the small group which has brought a law suit to remove from
the public schools Bible-reading and the use of the Lord's prayer..."
and because "they and two others are backed by the radical American
Jewish Congress ..."
There is little point in arguing Atkinson's hysterical assertion!
individually. Campaign literature is rarely designed to do more than
massage the Hottentot mind; while it rises a niche above the ordinary
level of electioneering drivel only if it manages to hide the candidate's
own incompetence. In this case, it has hardly even done that
But I think it sad that the Republican hopeful should be able with
impunity to hurl an irresponsible charge of radicalism against the
American Jewish Congress, one of whose founding fathers, Rabbi
Stephen Wise, would have made less than little boys of the member*
of the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn., each by one. in the matter of
being a spiritual leaderno less than a man.
:

SAVt IIS WITH NATE
A LSO SAD ABOUT the Atkinson flyer is the candidates puny effort
** to equate "both the Christian and Jewish faiths" in their desire
to see "Easter, Christmas, and Hanukah" observances retained in the
schools. This is achieved by a reference to presumably sympathetic
"noteworthy Jewish leaders." of whom only one is mentionedRabh:
Tibor Stern, of Beth Jacob Congregation. The pamphlet then proceeds
to quote from Rabbi Stern's letter to the Miami Beach Sun on Aug. 21.
which explained his position with respect to the religion -in -theschools
case due to resume here Oct. 31.
Fact is that Atkinson would be hard-pressed to add to this fictional.
self-serving list of "noteworthy Jewish leaders" who find the law sol.
in Rabbi Stern's words, "a gross violation" -r- wherever their feelmp
may lie in the matter of its propriety. Since it is safe to say that the
Beach rabbi speaks for himselfnot for the Jewish community-why
doesn't candidate Atkinson do the same?
In any case, the substance of such campaigning, with its loose
reference to agnostics, "powerful elements" intent on "separating our
children from God," and Communists, easily foretold the way of the
school board discussion at the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn. meet
ing Monday. Apart from the fact that the Atkinson pamphlet is
latiun of the fair campaign practices code adopted by both part*
which hardly seems to make the militant ministers the least bit anx
-what other question slipped by their consideration for lack of U*
and as a result of the heat emanating from the hands-down vocal sup-
port extended Atkinson, the "Christian candidate?"
The association is a representative body of Protestant spirits-
leaders. In their discussion of the national Presidential rI.clio,B
would not be too difficult to guage the extent of the anti-Catholic fears
they might express. But is not an across-the-board condemnation o.
a candidate on the basis of his Catholic faith precisely the ki
bigotry from which such condemnations profess to save us? Is
a supreme example of the very Papal power which it charges >
crush us in the event of a Kennedy victory?
: :
VIOLATION AS TM fUNDAMiNTAL C0NSMKATIOM
| SERIOUSLY DOUBT that such considerations ever entered the
minds-,1 not the hearts-of the members of the Greater MJ**
S%I?*' exPressed the fear that a Gordon victory would "M
tw ., n the sch001 oard-"them." of course, meaning Je;
H i^V^ enough rea>on fr hi" to support the Bepjibjg
fh1 ..f. cTakm ,0 ^s pulp.t, he preached a sermon to that effect
one bright Sunday morning
wilrtBaUro!,heS.e 0Pen manifestations of religious bigotry, no less than the
cons.iH,^ ,TS 8nd hal"ths of a school board candidate, do oj
easflv rtlf a "a/rant violation; indeed.-they are side issues almost too
fs that f. 6 d '" thC n"me of free =**<* ^ central que5tlonh he
mail, aSS0C'a ,0n sent Partlsan campaign literature through!P
reS SXLOl !JL t^ deliberate step, taken to evade
rei.. Jm vioiation-and the deliberate step* taken to
butt PrVe both Pfevious knowledge and intention
lal culf*'


Friday. October 7. 1960
+-Je*lstncrldliar
Pago 5-A
Buber Sees Growth of Liberalism
By Special Report
NEW YORK A noted Jewish
theologian has expressed the belief
that a liberal Jewish movement
will first begin to flourish in Israel
during the next generation.
This opinion was given by Prof.
Martin Buber in a recent interview
in his study in Israel. His views
were revealed in an exclusive arti-
cle, "A Conversation with Martin
Buber," by Rabbi Herbert Weiner,
Bonn Interest
Seen in Arrest
Continued from Pago 1-A
tin authorities.)
The effort by Argentine au-
thorities to determine whether
lie German arrested was Martin
Eormann brought a reminder
that the World Jewish Congress
t ported publicly in Buenos Aires
in 1945 that Bormann had come
to Argentina that year in one of
two German submarines. The
report was later confirmed by
Vladimir Dormosson, the then
French Ambassador to Buenos
Aires.
It was also disclosed that an Ital-
ian physician from Milan who lives
lure told Mark Turkow, represcn
I alive of the WJC, a few weeks ago
I hat after the war, he saw Bur-
in a nn in Buenos Aires and reported
it to the Italian Ambassador in
Buenos Aires at that time.
The WJC said that Bormann had
been seen in Santa Catalina, Brazil,
last February and in Paraguay in
July, traveling with Argentine doc-
uments. It was noted that the
seizure of the suspect was an indi-
cation that the Argentine) govern-
Hint was now seeking Nazi war
criminals who reportedly settled in
Argentina after the war, in con-
! rast to signs of reluctance to do so
previously,
(The Israel Foreign Ministry said
ii Jerusalem that Israel was ready
li provide all available material
on Bormann to whatever country
wculd try him, if the arrested sus
1 (ct is Bormann. There is no ma-
le rial on Bormann in government
archives; but there is in other col-
lations in Israel, including that ol
ti i Yad Vashem.)
Skit to be Featured
Miami chapter of the National
'ruldren's Cardiac Hospital will
hold its annual membership tea at
Mc Kin Cohen Hall. 4250 W. Flag-
It r st.. on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Mrs.
Jack Stone is chairman. Featured
will be a skit, "Banish the Ghosts."
LONG DISTANCE
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of the Temple' Israei of the
Oranges and Maplewood in South
Orange, N.J., in the Rosh Hashona
issue of "American Judaism," offi-
cial publication of fthe 1,000,000-
member Union of American He-
brew Congregations and Its affili-
ated bodies.
Asked about the religious in-
terests in modern day Israel, Dr.
Buber commented, "The whole
religious question here is terri-
bly difficult. There is no liberal
Jewish movement here only
some Jews who have liberal re-
ligious ideas. I em inclined to
think that something will happen
only after the next generation.
After we have overcome this
state of excessive politicization."
He continued. "We are too pol-
iticized here, externally and in-
ternally. Most of the youth apart
from the Orthodox are inter-
ested in politics; that means mili-
tary problems, or political prob-
lems, or the two of them."
"Another part of our youth.'
continued Prof. Buber, "is inter-
ested in just what you might call
career, personal career, without
any ideas at'^11. Just knowing
something because they must know
something in order to make a ca-
reer."
At present there are two liberal
Jewish congregations in the State
of Israel in Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv (with a group in Haifa) who
are members of the World Union
for Progressive Judaism, the in'er-
national branch of liberal Judaism
with headquarters in New York
City. The largest segment is the
UAHC with 1.000.000 members and
605 synagogues in the western
hemisphere.
Salute to Szold
Centennial birthday of Henri-
etta Szold, founder of Hadassah,
will be celebrated Monday evening
at Oceanfront Auditorium.
Mrs. Dorothy K. Fink will pre-
sent a biography of Miss Szold.
! Mrs. Sanford Jacobson wiii read
! excerpts from the world-famous
woman Zionist's letters.
Louis Schwartzman, executive
of the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion, will speak on Jewish Book
J Month.
Mrs. Samuel Z. Sakrais, of the
national board of Hadassah, will
be chairman of the evening.


Yes, now is the time to have your savings where It b
always worth 100 cents or the dollar. Open or odd to
your Dade Federal Insured savings account by the 10th
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Dode Federal makes no charge for transfer of fond*
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avings
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RESOURCES EXCEED 155 MILLION DOLLARS


Page 6-A
*JewistFkrfcNar
Friday. October 7. i960
Hussein Hits Nasser Hard;
Takes it Easy on
Two years of service as president of the board of directors of
the Greater Miami B'nai B'rith Youth Organization are recog-
nized by the presentation of a plague to lack Fink, (second
from left) by newly-elected president Eli Hurwitz (second from
right). Looking on is Judge Milton A. Friedman (left), president-
elect of District 5, Grand Lodge of B'nai B'rith, and Mrs. Alfred
Reich (right), president-elect of District 5 B'nai B'rith Women.
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization serves almost 1,000 Jewish high
school youth in Dade county.
Emanu-EI Names
New Cantor
Samuel Friedland, president of
Temple Emanu-EI announces the
appointment of Cantor Hirsh Ad-
ler to the congregation's staff. Can-
tor Adler's first official appear-
ance was at High Holy Day serv-
ices at the Miami Beach Auditor-
ium.
Cantor Adler was born in Je-
rusalem and is descended from a
long line of rabbis and cantors. At
an early age he was accepted as
a soloist with the Jerusalem Choir
conducted by Cantor Zalman Riv-
lin.
He received his musical educa-
tion at the Conservatory of Music
in Jerusalem, and is a graduate of
the Ycshiva Hebron. During the
War of Liberation in 1948. he serv-
ed as a member of Israels Armed
Forces.
Cantor Adler came to the United I
Slates at the end of 1955. when he!
assumed a position as cantor with
Congregation B'nai B'rith Jacob in
Savannah, Ga., where he served
until coming to Miami. He is mar-j
ried and the father of two sons. !
He succeeds Cantor Israel Reich,
CANTOR HIKSH ADLER
Continued from Page 1-A
the hostility of the UAR against
Jordan dates from the time, he,
Hussein, spoke out clearly against
Jordanian alignment with the Com-
munist bloc or Communist ideal-
' ogy.
Jordan, he said, has been sub-
jected by Hie UAR "to abuse,
pressures of many kinds, incite-
ments by radio and other means,
] and subversion." He cited the
: fact that Jordanian Prim* Min-
I ister Majali and 11 other persons
i wore kilted recently by a bomb
explosion, and tied up those as-
sassinations with UAR polices
directed against Jordan.

I Coming to the "Palestine Ques-
tion," King Hussein treated that
t supject with comparative mild-
' ness. The world," he said, "has
closed and continues to close its
jeyes to the tragedy of humanity in
the Middle East, the tragedy of the
| Arab refugees.
"Nothing has been done by the
Cniled Nations to bring pressure
upon Israel to live up to UN reso-
lutions. Israel must live up to these
resolutions. There can be no peace
in the Middle East without a just
solution of the refugee problem,"
King Hussein stated.
Nasser, who absented himself
from the Assembly during Hus-
sein's speech, was to leave New
York for Cairo Wednesday or
Thursday, according to Arab cir-
cles here. Thus, Nasser's projected
tour through the United States has
been called off.
In attacking Nassor at the UN
Assembly, King Hussein said
that tensions between Jordan
and the United Arab Republic
began several years ago when ho
had warned the people of Jor-
dan against "Communist pene-
tration" into the area. After
that warning, he declared, Jor-
dan found itself subjected to
"abuse, subversion and external
pressures." He could only inter-
pret these acts, he emphasized,
s UAR effort aimed at the
destruction of Jordan.
The UAR. he charged, is seeking
to dominate the Arab part of the
world and, if it succeeded, "eith-
er as a neutral or as an openly
avowed Communist ally." it would
destroy the basic aims of the
Arab people. "Better ways," he
told the Assembly, "must be found
to bring the combined weight of
public opinion quickly and effec-
tively to bear upon whatever na-
tion trans'- agreed upon in-
terrelationships." However, he
made it clear he is not requesting
immediate action from the United
Nations on the disagreement be-
tween Jordan and the UAR.
In regard to Israel, the Jordan-
ian king said that "the original
failure of the United Nations"
went back to the partition resolu-
tion of 1947 which, he claimed,
"left in its wake a sorrowfully un-
resolved situation." He insisted ji
was "morally wrong and political,
ly unjust in 1947 to partition p,i.
estine, and it is no less to today"
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"Habits to Forget" will be the
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before the Athletic Club on the
10th st. beach. The group meets
under the auspices of the Miami
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Jack Woody is superintendent. A
question and answer period follows
Dr Wolfson's talk.
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Friday. October 7, 1960
+Jet*isii fkrifi tr
Page 7-A
Mid- East Oil Losing Strategic Role
Left to right are Ronald Bergman and Philip Mirmelli. seventh
grade students, packing canned goods and other foods for
delivery to Tavernier.
Acad. Students Help Tavernier
Hebrew Academy students initi-
ate the Hebrew New Year 5721
with a collection of canned goods
and other foods for the children of
Tavernier in the Keys, which was
almost completely destroyed by
Hurricane Donna.
What have the Hebrew Academy-
students to do with Tavernier?
Joseph Acknr, chairman of
the Science Department, taught
for two years at tha Canal Shores
School in Tavernier. Aftar Hur-
ricane Donna took its tot I, Ack-
ner contacted Charles Albury,
principal of tha school, and ask-
ed if he couW ha of help. Albury
said tha city needed help badly.
Ackner than contacted Rabbi
Gross, principal of the Academy,
I to ask the students to start a
I drive.
The drive brought in more than
1.300 cans of food, and were dis-
tributed in Tavernier by Ackner
and two Academy students on
Wednesday morning, Erev Rosh
Hashona.
"This is a wonderful way to cele-
brate a holiday." Rabin Gross
said.
By Special Report
NEW YORK The emergence of
Algerian Sahara and Libya as ma-
jor new centers of oil production
and the growing world surplus of
oil "have considerably reduced the
I international political importance
j of Middle East oil and consequently
of the Middle East itself," declares
I Dr.. Benjamin Shwadren. noted au-
| thority on oil and on the Middle
East, in the current issue of "Mid-
jdle Eastern Affairs," monthly pub-
i lication of the Council for Middle
! Eastern Affairs '. ere.
Because of these significant
: changes, the full impact of which
I will be felt only in the next several
years, "the Arab Middle Eastern
' governments must make adiust-
1 ments, perhaps even radical adjust-
i ments. in their attitudes to and
relations with the Western world
The West would also have to draw
the resultant conclusions."
In a lucid and comprehensive
analysis of recant Middle East
oil development, tha author as-
serts that the actions of tha ma-
jor international oil companies
have already begun to reflect the
changed world market conditions.
All the companies resisted the
pressures for increased royalties
and the demand for integrated
companies.
In fact, early in 1959, they an-
nounced a cut in oil prices which,
according to Shwadran. resulted in
a revenue loss to the producing
countries in the amount of $135
million (another cut was announced
in August of this year). Aramco
clearly warned Saudi Arabia to ex-
pect "11 "dfopTn royaTtTSS asTresult
of the drop in price, in order to |
meet competition. The companies i
also showed no willingness to build I
a new pipeline from the Persian
Gulf to the Mediterranean and dis-
| played little interest in obtaining
new concessions.
The author shows that the Mid-
i die East oil companies, some of
; which also have concessions in
North Africa, may be torn between
conflicting factors: "on the one
hand, increasing North African pro-
duction to resist Middle East de-
mands and. on the other hand,
maintaining Middle East produc-
tion to protect their interests."
Shwadran sees as one possible
outcome a "drastic cut in world
prices of oil and oil products in or-
der to increase consumption and
thus strike a happy balance be-
tween Middle Eastern and North
African supplies." He suggests,
however, that the price of Middle
East oil will be affected not only
by increasing supplies from North
Africa, but also from the Soviet
Union, South America and Canada,
as well as by the development of
atomic energy.
The writer, who has authored
Several books on the Middle East
and has traveled in the area, re-
views the major oil developments
in the past years, notably the Arab
Petroleum Conferences of Cairo
and Jidda.
He notes that despite repeated
public declarations and implied
threats by some Arab spokesman
and the apprehensions of tha oil m .
companies prior7o"tre opening of
the Cairo conference in April,
1959, no basic changes in the re-
lations between the Arab govern-
ments and the concessionaire
companies, either in royalty ar-
rangements or in the besis of cal-
culation, have occurred.
The Arab governments emerged
from the conference as willing to
cooperate with the companies on
a much broader basis than was in-
dicated before.
And their two favorite projects,
the joint Arab pipeline and the
integrated company proposal, ap-
peared to them, under the circum-
stances, unrealizable. Shwadran
observes that even if the projects
were approved by all Arab League
' constituent bodies, it is important
' 10 differentiate between the non-
] binding recommendations of the
| League and the actions of the Arab
producing countries. Saudi Arabia
: and Iraq, as well as Kuwait, which
I is not a member of the League. He
adds that so far both Saudi Arabia
and Iraq have jealously kept tue
Arab League leader, Egypt, out of
l (he oil business.
Mew Group Organized
Unattached Club h now being
organized for men and women be-
tween the ages of 28 and 45. First
meeting will be Tuesday evening
at the home of Rabbi and Mrs.
Maurice Klein, 5939 SW 12th at,
Miami.
B-G Orders
New Lavon
Case Inquiry
Continued from Page 1-A
maintained since his resignation
i that he had been the victim of a
frame-up. and several newspapers
have hinted that personalities high
I er up than the two officers were in-
volved. Mr. Lavon was Defense
Minister while Mr. Ben-Gurion was
in self-imposed retirement at his
retreat at Sde Boker. After Mr.
Lavon resigned, Mr. Ben-Gurion
returned to the Cabinet as Defense
Minister, subsequently replacing
; Moshe Sharett as Prime Minister.
Mr. Lavon's associate continued
to insist that new evidence, partic-
ularly that from the recent civil
trial, was sufficient for full reha-
bilitation of Mr. Lavon, but the
Prime Minister decided he wanted
to have the findings of a new in-
vestigation before further action in
the case.
Mr. Lavon indicated that he had
no intention of appearing before
the committee named to reopen the
1955 cae in which he was forced to
resign as Minister of Defense. He
said that evidence already possess-
ed by Prime Minister Ben-Gurion.
who ordered the case reopened
when the evidence was uncovered,
was "amply sufficient" to give him
lull rehabilitation.
Israeli newspapers hinted here
that high ranking personalities
might be involved in the new devel-
opment. One newspaper, Maariv,
said editorially that the evidence
now held by the Prime Minister
was enough to justify full rehabil-
itation of Mr. Lavon and asked the
Prime Minister to make a public
statement to that effect even be-
fore the new committee finished its
Investigation.
Men's Club Annual Donee
Brotherhood of Temple Emanu-
El sponsored its annual Yom Kip-
Pur night dance Saturday at the
fchelborne hotel. The evening fea-
tured music, dancing, entertain-
ment by Harvey Bell and his son,
Jody.
His vision...A better world through electricity
To this great man the significance of his
work lay not in the huge, whirring dyna-
mos, but in tha homes of people. Through
his genius, in his lifetime, he saw elec-
tricity harnessed in dozens of ways to
make life easier and more convenient for
millions of people.
Charles Proteus Steinmetz was born in
Germany in 1866. He completed his scien-
tific studiea in Switzerland and came to
America in 1889. Certain scientific articles
of his had brought him world-wide atten-
tion and as a result, in 1893. when he was
only 28 years old, he was retained as chief
First wKh tha Finast Caratta through Lerillard research
consulting engineer by the General Elec-
tric Company. Here, for the next thirty-
one years, his experiments and ideas
helped to change the living habits of the
entire country!
The "con veniences" we take for granted
today were the "wonders" of but a gen-
eration ago ... home generators and freez-
ers, dishwashers and pumps, stoves and
refrigerators and even toasters there
is no electrically-driven appliance that
does not ^someplacebear the touch of
Charles Proteus Steinmetz, the little man
who saw a better world through electricity.


Page 8-A
*Jewlst Fkr/kfiyr
Friday, October 7, i%q
Nasser Challenged to Peace Talks
Temple Emanu-El, which held High Holy Day services for the
third consecutive year at Miami Beach Auditorium, also fea-
tured special Junior Congregation services for children from
nine to 12 years of age in the main Temple. A special service
for youngsters from five to eight years of age was held in the
Assembly Hall of the school building. Dr. Irving Lehrman,
spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, explains the blowing of
the Shofar before the open Ark. Left to right are Mrs. Naomi
Brandeis, nursery school supervisor; Benjy Novak, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ben Novak; and Kathryn and Suzanne, twin daugh-
ters of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown.
One-Man Show
A one-man "Exhibition of Gra-
ph i -' will open at the Miami Mu-
seum "f Modern Art on Sunday | had a one-man show of paintings
;i members' preview from 4 tc and sculpture at the Portland Art
. and will continue for a two-' Museum.
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week period while the Mexican Art
Exhibition is still on view. The
Graphics show is by Lee Kelly, of
Portland. Ore., where he has just
Continued from Pago 1-A
|the United Arab RepuWc. We are
ready also to sit down with any
other or with all of the leaders of
the Arab States to nesotiate the
peace immediately. This would be
! a concrete contribution to peace in
the world."
Asked whether there is ,i chance
that she would see Nasser while
1 she and the United Arab Republic
President .are here. Mrs. Men- re-
plied: "If Mr. Nasser is willing to
speak with us. it will be a pleasure
for us to speak with him about
peace. If he does not w.-.nt to se-
me becau>c he is president and I
am only a minister, ami lie wants
to sea the Prime Minister, our
Prime Minister has said repeatedly
in our Parliament and on many
other occasions that he is ready to
j see him at any time or in any place
or to see the leader of any other
; Arab slate to discuss peace. If Mr.
Nasser wants to see me. I am
! ready to sec him. at any moment."
Mrs. Meir said she did not
think that Nasser's presence
here would change the policies
of either the United States or the
United Nations. "Until Mr. Nas-
ser is ready to act according to
his declarations, he really can-
not have any influence whatso-
ever," the said.
Speaking in Arabic. Nasser told
the General Assembly that his gov-
eminent was "ready to accept the |
UN Charter and its principles, the
resolutions of the United Nations j
and its recommendations for a just j
settlement with the best of good-
will." He gave no indication as to
whether he would agree to carry
out the UN Security Council reso-
lution to keep the Suez Canal open
for the passage of ships of all na-
tions, including Israel.
Mr. Nasser called for "the re-
storation of the full rights of the
people of Palestine." Without men-
tioning Israel by name during his
entire speech, he said the Arabs
did not accept "the loss of Pales-
tine." The Palestine mandate of
the League of Nations which
pledged the establishment of a Jcw-
Ish National Home in Palestine
'was an "imperialist conspiracy."
he said.
"The Arab nation." he declared,
"does not accept the geocraphic
division imposed by imperialism"
on Palestine. The only solution of
the Palestine problem, he said, was
that the land "should return to the
condition prevailing before the er-
ror was committed."
Mrs. Meir later conferred with
Christian A. Herter, United States
Secretary of State. It was as-
sumed that the issues discussed
included American Israel rela-
tions, Arab-Israel questions, and
the anti-Israel aspects of Nasser's
speech. A similar conference
was held by Mrs. Meir with the
Earl of Home, Britain's new For-
eign Secretary.
Delegates of Western, Latin
American, Asian and African coun-
tries expressed the view informal-
ly that Nasser's speech and his
meetings with top world leaders in
New York had resulted in cement-
ing Israel's relations with the rest
and with leaders of the "neutralist
bloc." such as India and Ghana.
These statesmen were believed re
acting negatively lo Na -r1, p,,.
posal to lurn history bock to oefore
the Balfour Declaration, and mos,
ing toward the idea th;,; the Arab
states must be brouirh' m accent
Israel as a poHttcal reality ,'[
! must be persuader that the ii'meU
! near to convert the Arab-brad
i armistice pacts into pear* a-rea.
, ments.
An appeal for that objective wm
voiced by Uruguay's President-elect
Victor Haedo, in an address to tha
Assembly. He said that however
grave or complicated the circum-
Stances may be, "we cannot over-
look such significant developments
as the affirmations of heroism anl
the most happy possibilities for the
future of humanity as the creatioa
of the State of Israel."
Dr. Haedo said thai the events
| of the Afro-Asian World makes (or
new attention to "the problems that
still affect the presence here of the
representatives of Israel and of the
Arab nations. Therefore we must
formulate from this tribune a re-
iteration of our profound wish for
, peace between these two peoples.
That peace is demanded not only
j by the Near East region. It is the
universal task of peace which the
entire world demands."
i
EPH Committee
To Convene Here
World Committee on Employ-
ment of the Handicapped will hold
its fourth annual congress on Oct.
15 at the Miami Dade County
Chamber of Commerce, 345 NE
2nd ave.
Agenda will include election of
(itfliers, plans for the Jaycees In-
ternational. Chamber of Commerce
of the Americas, B'nai B'rith In-
ternational, and Goodwill Indust-
ries.
Sidney G. Kusworn, chairman
of the board of governors and na-
tional B'nai B'rith leader, will of-
ficiate.
Outgoing president is Leo Ax)-
rod. of Coral Gables.
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^
today. October 7. 1960
+JewlsHk>rklfor}
.


-
r
A
Looking over plans for Saturday night's program of the South
Florida chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
sity ere (left to right) Herbert S. Shapiro, president; Leo Robin-
son, treasurer; and Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro, board member and
panelist for the Shelbome hotel meeting.
Hebrew Univ.
Panel Saturday
A panel discussion on "Israel
and the Hebrew University5721'
will highlight the first fall merlin:
of the South Florida chapter of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University. The gathering is sehed
uled for 8 p.m. Saturday at the
Shelbome hotel.
Panelists will include Mel Hecht,
a student at the University of Mi-
ami, who last year attended He-
brew University in Jerusalem:
Mrs. Joseph Milton, of Coral
Gables, president of the Mcnorah
group of Hadassah. who attended
the dedication of the Hadassah-He-
brew University Medical Center in
Israel this summer; and Mrs. Sam-
uel T. Sapiro. member of the board
of the local Hebrew University
chapter.
Leo Mindlin, executive editor of
The Jewish Floridian and a He-
brew University board member,
will moderate. A question-and-an-
swer period will follow.
Balfouria Gilad, Israeli enter-
tainer who now lives in Miami
Beach, will present Yemenite and
other Israeli songs. Esther Bar-
rett will accompany her.
Herbert S. Shapiro, president,
Samuel T. Sapiro, board chairman,
and Mrs. Oida Rubin, honorary
president, will report on activities
of the American Friends during the
summer months.
Newspapers Drop Prejudicial Ads
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA) Daily newspapers in Minneapolis and
fet. Pail, after running'for several days a classified advertisement for
I; socii > -for the Preservation of the White Race." rejected additional
[advert.-ing from the group. The rejection by the St. Paul Dispatch
[and I' neer Press and by the Minneapolis Star and Tribune brought
pii'lctr g of the Minneapolis paper
Iby Pai: B. Hurley, a candidate for
ICongn -s u ho reportedly was asso-
[ciated i t h the Society for the
[Presenalion of the White Race.
The rejected advertisement read:
("Supporters needed. The National
Society for the Preservation of the
White Race." The insertion carried
a "blind" box number. Those re-
plying to the insertion received
literature on the organization's
goals and suggesting solicitation
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,of funds for further organzation
work might be needed.
John Moffett, advertising di I
, rector of the Star and Tribune,
said it was the policy of the news-
1 papers not to accept advertising
seeking contributions for other
i than recognized charities or be
| a party to such solicitations
through classified advertising.
Samuel L. Scheiner, executive',
director of the Minnesota Jewish
Community Relations Council, and '
Clifford E. Rocker executive sec-
retary of the Governor's Human,
Rights Commission met with news-'
paper officials to determine policy
on acceptance of such advertising.'
The North Minneapolis Post, a j
neighborhood newspaper, refused,
all advertising from the group on'
grounds the newspaper opposed
"the principles of the Ku Klux
Klan. The paper asserted editori-:
ally that the KKK had been char-i
acterized by "intense nativism,
anti-Catholicism and anti-Semit-
ism."
UF Forms
Speakers Bureau
More Greater Miami community
and civic leaders were named this
week to serve in key positions for
the 1961 campaign of the United
Fund of Dade County
Campaign general chairman Ar
thur Gucker named Donald Daves
to head the Speakers Bureau of the
United Fund for the coming cam-
paign.
Daves, a district manager for
the Southern Bell Telephone Com-
pany, said the Speakers Bureau is
comprised of leading business and
civic leaders who are equipped' to
provide clubs and organizations
with a stimulating and different
program.
1225 S. W. 8th Street
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ast Jsst ess bst MMskassMM si
Page 9-A
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Page 10-A
+Jen is* ttorktiati
Friday. October 7,
I960
Mindlin Photo Exhibit at Gallery
An exhibition of photographs by Leo Mindlin will open Thursday
evening. Oct. 13. at the Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery of the Univer-
sity of Miami.
The preview showing is for members only, and will be seen in con-
junction with the Gallery's exhibition of "Twenty American Painters."
Following the preview, both ex
hibits will be open to the public; tures he presented in a retrospec-
through Oct. 31. ||ive snow at tne Miami Beach Art
Mindlin, executive editor of The Center in August. 1958.
Floridian. is a nationally-,
The few "older" pictures, mede
sine* 1957, mr the last in an ear-
lier photographic pnose, and load
almost naturally in th now,
light-filled stylo Mindlin has sine*
developed. His most recent en-
deavors highlight the influence
of the spatial non-reference
characterizing the Japanese print.
Jewish Floridian. is a .
known amateur photographer. With
only two or three exceptions, the
exhibit, entitled "Photograpic
Statements in Non-Space." features
work he has completed since Feb-
ruary of this year, and marks a
distinct departure from the pic-
"China on Silver," by Leo Mindlin, is among the pictures
making up exhibition of "Photographic Statements in Non-
Space" by Mindlin previewing at the Joe and Emily Lowe Art
Gallery of the University of Miami on Oct. 13. The exhibit is
in conjunction with the Gallery's opening season show of
"Twenty American Painters."_________ ______________________
Israeli Scientist Dead
By Special Report
liEHOVOTH. Israel Prof. Ye-
tion at the Weizmann Institute of
Science, died here. He was taken
ill while at work in his laboratory.
and passed away a few hours later
huda llirshbcrg. head of the Pho- ] at the Kaplan Hospital in Reho-
tochemistry and Spectroscopy Sec-lvoth.
SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS
MANUFACTURERS OF RUBBER STAMPS
CORPORATION SEALS and SUPPUES
CHARLIE MERZ, Owner
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GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
WOODY'S TKXACO SHRYICE
lubrication Specialists Gat Oils Batteries Tire*
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To UAR Seat
Continued from Page 1-A
Nasser had decided to side with the
Western Powers against Khrush-
chev's request to replace Hammar-
skjold and to move the UN head-
quarters from the United States to:
another country.)
It was also indicated authorita-
tively here that no formal state-
ment on the attitude toward Nas-
ser's attempt to seek a seat for his
country in the UN Security Council
would be forthcoming while the
General Assembly is in session.
Meanwhile. Mrs. Golda Mejr, Is-
i rael's Foreign Minister, continued
series of private conversations
she had been holding all last week
with leaders of dele0ations and the;
heads of foreign affairs attending
the General Assembly. She confer-
red with Horacio Later, Brazil's
Minister for External Relations.
.Then she met with Italy's delega- j
1 lion chairman. Gaetano Martino.
As in her conferences with Uni-!
ted States Secretary of State Chris-
tian A. Herter and Britain's For-!
eign Secretary, the Earl of Home,
Mrs. Meir is understood to have
discussed general issues of interest
in the normal relations between Is-
rael and the respective govern-
ments. No concrete issues or mat-
ters of immediate interest were
said to have been discussed in any
of the conferences.
Nevertheless, observers here no
ted Israel's position, as a result of
the many contacts made by Mrs.
i Meir and by other leading mem-
bers of the Israeli delegation. i~
\ firmer now than it was prior to the
call by UAR President Gamal Ab-
idel Nasser earlier for the reversal
of history by eliminating the
"crime" of the establishment of
Jewish settlements in Palestine,
and later the State of Israel as a
I consequence of the Balfour Declar-
ation of 1917.
Forty-ight howrs after Nasser
had proposed the virtual elimin-
ation of Israel's existence, more
end more delegations here were
saying freely that Nasser had
overplayed his hand in regard to
Israel. Many Westerners, Latin
Americans and Afro-Asiane now
believe that Nasser's extreme
position regarding Israel hes
only defeated whatever purpose
he may have had in mind,
"Practical and realistic efforts"
by the United Nations to solve the
Arab-Israel dispute were called for
in the Assembly by B. P. Koirala,
Prime Minister of Nepal. He told
the United Nations that "with re-
gard to the Middle East situation
it is the view of my government
that we must recognize and accept
political realities in the Middle
East region."
Pakistan meanwhile disputed the
suggestion made here last week by-
Ghana for recognition of Israel's
existence as "political realism,"
and, instead, upheld the Arab thesis
that the only reality in the Arab
Israel dispute lies in the "return"
of the Arab refugees to Israel. This
attitude was announced in (he Gen-
eral Assembly by the chairman of
the Pakistanian delegation. Zulki
far Ah Bhutto.
Also included in the show, which
opens the season at the Joe and
Emily Lowe Art Gallery, are sev-
eral of Mindlin's newest efforts in
the area of "photo-impressionism,"
where masses and the patterns
they create take priority over the
distinct literalness that is the hall-
mark of the fine photographic lens
and the craftsman who uses it.
Mindlin. who is more prominent-
ly known for his columns on world
and local affairs, has exhibited at
the Carnegie Art Institute in Pftfr.
burgh, Brooklyn Museum. WillooA.
by's in New York, Laguna Bea'c',,
(Calif.) Salon, and the Miami Beach
Art Center.
He was the winner of a Nationol
Graflex Award for two photo-
graphs, which have since been
widely reproduced, and a Silver
Medallion Achievement Award
from the School of Modern Photon
raphy in New York, among other*
In addition, his photographs have
been published in authoritative
books on photographic technique
as well as on book jackets
RABBI CANTOR
HEtttEW TEACHER
Marriages performed. Bar Mn,t,
preparation a pecialty Success
guaranteed UN 5-8806
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Ljdoy. October 7. 1960
+Jeisth rkridiar
Page Jl-A
4/7 American Celebrates Sukkoth in Morocco
By ISRAELS. STERN
Hoshanna Rabba night as I saw
and experienced it in El Kara ah,
Morocco, began on a Wednesday
afternoon about 1:30. I was in
the Mellah, the poorest section of
the town. Rather, I was a lunch-
con guest in the Sukkah of one of
the poorest families I know and
frequently visit here in Casablan-
ca. You can really call them a
ment, there were also two very
thin tubes in the shape of long
candles. They were hollow, and
when filled with olive oil would
burn at least 36 hours.
Such candles are used there for
sacramental purposes. The peo-
ple were already on the begin-
ning of the second section of Deu-
teronomy. The "Haham" was
reading word by word with fanat-
ical adherence to punctuation and
r>- plain, typical Moroccan Jew- cantillation, with cverywrr listen-
ing or saying with him. He'd stop
often. And in the case of the
Sidra's containing numerous com-
mandments which apply in our
times, often, after every two or
three verses, he would pause and
make anywhere from a three
word remark to a five-to-six-min-
ute speech in Arabic, which most
of the time was not too difficult
for me to understand, at least in
content.
jth family, very ignorant in secu-
lar, as well as in Jewish learning.
I -..,! S. Stern is an American, who
I .i living in Casablanca. Moroc-
co, for the past year. He is the son
of Rabbi Dili id S. Stem, principal
of the noted Teihii'fl Torah Vodaath
in Brool(lvn, N-T. Mr. Slrrn i also
the nephew oj William G. Mechanic,
o/ Miami Beach, past president of
Btlh Jacob Congregation.
The husband and wife can neither
read nor write French, and speak
it with difficulty, so that were the
children not present, I would have
been the "Frenchman" of the
house.
Their native Arabic they can
read and write only in Hebrew
script, though the Hebrew langu-
age, itself, they know not at all.
The parents are also great "am
ho'ratzim," very ignorant, but at
the same time fanatically observ-
ant and particular of Jewish laws
and Sephardie customs. If a son
or daughter wants to introduce
an "innovation" in the house,
some Ashkenazic custom ritual
which they learned or picked up
in the Yeshiva, the parents would
say "Barakah" or, as we say,
"thank goodness"as if to say at
least we see they are teaching
them something and they are not
wasting their time there.
But if any f the "innovations"
touches or interferes with a Se-
phardie ritual, they will shout
"Kharah" "forbidden" and
give them a look as you would
expect a Jew to get who conducts
Ire Seder at the Satmarer Rabbi's
table and begins to eat Matzo
soaked in soup, somrhing anathe-
ma to Chassidic ritual. Their
Sukkah, too, was typical of them
very plain and simply-built, but
elaborated decorated on the in-
side.
While eating, we suddenly had
a guest. A woman, a second or
third cousin of our hostess, was
"rounding up talent" for the
"Kara" or reading to be held in
her house on Thursday night,
"Lail Hoshanna Rabba," the eve
ol Hoshanna Rabba, to make sure
she has more than an ample min-
yan or quorum. On seeing me,
she didn't let go, until I gave her
a definite promise that I, too.
will attend; and only then did she
bid us 'peace" and departed for
other "courts" to round up addi-
tional 'talent." On Hoshanna
Rabba night, around 8:30-8:40, I
returned there and found them
waiting for me as wc had agreed:
for by myself they feared I would
never find the house in that twist-
ed mass of alleys. My entreaties
that I had finished supper only
one and one-half hours before
were to no avail. I had to sit
down and eat with them all over
again.
It was 9:45, approximately,
when we arrived at the woman's
house and were ushered into the
Sukkah. The "we" consisted of
he husband, her 15-year-old and
18-year-old sons, a nephew, his
*'fe, a daughter not quite 14 and
myself. There were already pres-
on a rug around a big, extremely
low, circular table. The women
*ere similarly arranged in an ad-
joining room, separated from
our" room by a heavy curtain.
On our table besides Seferim, ash
lra>'s, plates and cups for refresh-
For though he was "speaking
Arabic,' in reality what he would
say was maybe 30 to 35 percent
Arabic, which was used as a link
or translation of a law, quotation
or a rabbinic dictum. At inter-
valswhich I found later always
to be the same, one to two hours
apartrefreshment was served.
They gave tea, coffee, nuts, dates,
cake, and pomegranates. Another
thing of interest which even yet
seems fantastic to me was every-
one's familiarity with the words
and cantillation.
A good bit of time was in fact
lost because of frequent, and oc-
casionally lengthy, interruptions
and disputes which ensued when
someone accused the "Haham''
with the charge that he read a
word with the wrong vowel points
MAoA Party Sunday
Sukkoth party sponsored by Con-
pgation Beth El Sisterhood will
r held in Dora August Memorial
F'l. 500 SW nth ave., on Sunday
wening at 8 p.m.
or used incorrect cantillation
and this in spite of the fact that
except for the reader there was
only one textbook of Deuteronomy
for the entire assembly. In short,
it was even more than a whole
night affair. For after the read-
ing of Deuteronomy, they said
special prayers, after which they
read the Book of Psalms in its
entirety, with everyone taking
turns being the reader.
The reading of the Psalms fal-
lowed the previous only with a
special traditional chant for "Til-
lim" and the discussions and ex-
planations. The challenges* oc-
curred much less frequently; how-
ever, one interruption occurred
which I must describe. It was al-
most 4 a.m., and because of the
late htur. the "Baal Karah," the
official reader, was reading at a
switt pace and everyone was fol-
lowingwith the cantillation chant
of course. Then, it was for the
first time my turn to be the read-
er. I told them I would be glad
to, but warned them, however,
that I would do so only in our Ash-
kenazic chant. I felt that if I
had to read, and with all eyes on
this strange "Yehud" American,
I would rather use my way and
make a good job of it than try to
imitate their Sephardie tune and
make a mess of it.
At any rate, it seems they were
satisfied, because, thereafter,
whenever my turn came, they did
not hesitate to let me read. At
one chapter, one of the assembled
halted the reader with a shout
claiming that he mispronounced
a word. However, the reader ar-
gued that he was right. From the
"Tillim," alone, it was not pos-
sible to judge, because the "neku-
dos," vowel points, were badly
printed. In short, they began to
hunt for a different copy of the
Psalms and found that the one
who challenged the reader was
correct.
All the assembled took it as if
it was the most natural thing, a
daily occurence, but to me it
seemed wonderful and fantastic
because the over 75-year-old old-
ster who caused the disturbance
had been for 55 years, or lortger,
totally blind, and one of the most
desperately poor beggars I have
yet seen in my life, even by
Moroccan standards, and one of
the greatest ignoramuses an
"am Ho'reti." I do not believe
he knows the rendering or trans-
lation of a single prayer or Psalm.
Yet he is reputed to know by
heart to perfection all the pray-
ers. Psalms, and the daily Sephar
die poetic prayers. To return to
our stay, the conclusion of the
Psalms was followed by more
prayers and "Piyutim u' Vakos-
hos." That was followed by a 28-
page selection of the Holy Zohar,
which was also read in rotation.
And I could not help but marvel
again and again at the smooth
flawless perfection of their read-
ing. (1 however did not make out
nearly as well with the "Zohar"
as I had with the Psalms.) The
system here used was that there
was no specified amount of read-
ing, and whoever took the book
went on until he felt tired and
could not continue, and nearly
all as their turn came did a con-
siderable amount of reading.
When my turn came, and es-
pecially as the "Haham" and sev-
eral others glanced at one an-
other in doubt, I felt a compulsion
lo show them that it is possible
for a person to be an Ashkenazi
and still know how to read even
Zohar. In short, I tried my best
to read the words, but I admit
that the pronounciation and es-
pecially the abbreviations were no
match for me. Yet I went on
"valiantly," and lasted over three
and a half pages when I gave up.
I admired very much their tact;
for while I was reading no one
interferred with me, and a strict
"hands off" policy was enforced.
However, after I finished and an-
other started reading, it just
never came my turn lo read
again which was most probably
by design, as several of the as-
sembled obviously were urgin;*
themselves to read much longer
portions than they would have
ordinarily, so that the Zohar read-
ing was finished just short of my
turn.
After a long "Yehi Hotiur"
prayer concluding the reading, the
"Haham" made a lovely individ-
ual "mi shabayraah" for each of
the assembled (including the
women) and a second on* for all
near and dear ones of whoever
requested it of him, as I and most
of the others did. The "Haham"
also complimented me that for
an Ashkenazi I did the Zohar
amazingly well.
Now they served some more
strong coffee and cake. It was
close to 7 a.m.. and all were about
to depart. Most of the partici-
pants went to Shul, well over a
minyan, to darven, some went
home to pick up Lulav. Esrog,
and Machzor. And a couple went
with the "Haham" to the mikva
to perform the ceremony of ablu-
tion before the Hoshanna Rabba
prayers.
TO
FOR YOU
CLIP AND FILL
OUT
Storting Saturday, October 7th, and continuing through October 12th, a Religious Servey wiH ho made of every
home in Southeast Florida, from Pompano Beach to Key West. PLEASE CLIP THE FOLLOWING SURVEY CARD, fill
in the blanks, and ploce on your front door, visible to survey teams. This information will be shared with all
denominations. Your help will be greatly appreciated.
RELIGIOUS SURVEY RECORD
Family Name -
Street Address
House Number
Telephone_____
Zone .
Pt At Of fire* 1 J.ltC ______Nationality __________

" Given Name Jt E u- T 1 m S Member of What Sunday School? . Member of What Church? Where? Are You Loot Chare* Preference Dat of Birth

Chris-tun Jewish None
Month D-r Year At*
i





t

1. For Absentee Members of Family:
a. In Armed Services: Name
Address----------------------------
6. Language spoken in.home (including sign language)
a. Father ________________ b. Mother .
c. Children _______________ d. Others--------------
If "D" answered by whom spoken
b. In School: Name
Address------------
Other: Name
Address -------
2. Extension Department Prospects
a. Shut-in: Name _-------------
b. Employed on Sunday: Name
3. Number Yeats Lived in:
a. Community .
4. Owner-----------------------------
5. Do You Haw Ii-**-*"*' -
b. This House .
Renter .
7. Kind of Bible used by family ,
8. Husband and Wife married by church or
Synagogue
9. How oftea does family attend church _____
10. Who provides family income __________
11. Kind ol employment ,
13. Affiliations
a. Secular organizations _____________
W ReU*__


Pog 13-A
+Jew Is* fhrXMan

miu>m\\mmummnwmnun
Your CJA Leaders: 1960-61
MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY
SIDNEY D. ANSIN: No. 10 in Series.
Twenty-two years ago, in
Athol, Mass., a spirited young
businessman accepted the
chairmanship of the city's
I'.I A campaign.
It marked the beginning of
a long and distinguished ca-
reer of public service for Sid-
ney D. Ansin. who was re-
cently appointed chairman of
the new gifts development
committee in the 1961 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal of
Greater Miami.
Needless to say, that Brat
campaign was most success-
ful. In fact, he was recalled
to head the drive again in the
following year.
A leader in the communal
life of Miami Beach since his
arrival in 1941, Ansin has
been consistently involved in
the religious and welfare
causes of this area. He was
a director of the Jewish
Home for the Aged and vice
president and chairman of
the board of Temple Ueid
Sholom.
He was chairman of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration budget committee,
served as a member of the
chaplains service committee,
and is now a member of the
executive committee.
Ansin is president of the
National Land and Mortgage
Corporation and the Anwclt
Corporation, among other
business interests.
Ansin's concern for the
total community has been
amply demonstrated in his
many affiliations with gen-
eral and non-sectarian agen-
cies. He is active in the Na-
tional Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, works in the
leadership ranks of the Uni-
ted Fund, and willingly lends
his energies and organiza-
Beth David Names Rabbi Shapiro;
New Spiritual Leader Here Dec. 1
SIDNEY ANSIN
. out fo succeed
tiona! skills to advancement
of worthwhile community cul-
tural and educational pro-
jects.
His new assignment is a
singular challengea chance
to uncover new sources of
support among his fellow-
Jews.
Despite the steady de-
mands upon his time, he con-
tinues to assume even great-
er responsibilities, each suc-
ceeding year, and to achieve
telling results.
A disciple of the old school
of action, Ansin's motto is
"l^t's forget the excuses and
get the job done."
The chairman of new gifts,
like the young UJA leader
back in 1938, is out to suc-
ceed, nothing else.
Sidney M. Aronovitz, president,
announced this week that Rabbi
Norman N. Shapiro has accepted
the pulpit Beth David congrega-
tion.
Rabbi Shapiro will be formally
welcomed at a reception tendered
I by the congregation Sunday eve-
Ining, Oct. 16. He will officially as-
sume his duties early in December.
Rabbi Shapiro is a native of
Minneapolis, Minn. Ho graduated
with honors from the University
of Minnesota col logo of educa-
tion. Ho is also a graduate of
Both Hamidrash, collage depart-
ment of the Minneapolis Talmud
Tor ah, one of the foremost Heb-
rew educational centers in the
United States.
His present pulpit is at Beth El
Congregation. Akron, O., where he
came in August of 1955. A gradu-
ate of the Jewish Theological Sem-
inary of America, where he also
received a Master's degree, Rabbi
Shapiro has held positions in Tulsa,
Okla., and Toronto, Canada. In
Toronto. Rabbi Shapiro was spiri-
tual leader of Beth Tzedec Con-
gregation, one of Canada's largest
and most influential synagogues.
-
. i
LV
^^LflHLV^S a*.*
!^n^mmy m?$
-
F
BH8~^*,*'?ll
RABBI NORMAN SHAPIRO
Rabbi Shapiro sponsored a five-
state educational conference in the
Southwest under the auspices of
the United Synagogue of America.
Friday, October 7, 19611
To Live in Heart. W, Last,
Behind I, to Live rorerrt
PALMER'S
MEMORIALS |
"Miemi't Only
Itmhk
Mentrntat
vilcleri"
Scheduled Unveilirgi
Mr. Sinai Memorial Ferk
Cemetery
SUNDAY, OCT. 9, I960
SARAH F1NKEL, 1 c if.
Ml. Nebe CemeKi,
FRIEDA AFFRON, 7 p.m.
Rubhi Morris A. S?f
LENA R0TTEN8ERG, 3 p.m.
"May Their Soulj RrpoM
in Eternal Peace''1
ARRANGEMENTS BT
PALMER'S MIAMI MONIWWCO.
He formerly was a member of ln addition, during the summer of
the editorial advisory board ofj,_._ .. .. ,
the American Jewish Times-Out- 1947' he enjyed ** d'-^'nction of
look of Greensboro, N.C., and is Dein8 ">* only delegate from the
still a frequent contributor of ar-1 Southwestern United States to the
tides and editorials to this pub- j first world conference on Jewis
lication, as well as to the Southern j education at Hebrew University in
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1S85 WASHINGTON AVE
Miami Beach JE 8 3840
Hebrew Religious Supplitt tor
Synagogues, Schools A. Private l is
ISRAELI DOMESTIC GIFTS
Israelite of Atlanta, Ga. While with
Congregation B'nai Emunah in
Tulsa, Rabbi Shapiro was associate
editor of the Tulsa Jewish Review.
During his stay in Oklahoma,
To Meet in Sukkah
ssaajssMM sasMtasHi
Judea PTATo Open Season
First Temple Judea PTA meet- will be held on Tuesday evening at
ing of the religious school year, the Temple, with Mrs. Al Berko-
witz, newly reelected president,
conducting the session.
Newest methods of present-day
study by carefully selected certi
fied teachers will be discussed.
Parents will be invited to visit
the classrooms, meet the teachers
personnally, and become acquaint-
ed with the curriculum.
Question and answer period or,
I the school will be held with Ben-
jamin Udoff, education director,
and Albert Jacobson, chairman of
the education committee of the
Temple.
Miami Beach chapter of Mizra-
chi Women will meet Oct. 11 in
the Sukkah at the home of Mrs.
Samuel M.
Prairie awe.
delicacies will be served.
Jerusalem.
For years. Rabbi Shapiro hat
boon very active in the Zionist
movement. While in Israel,, ho
volunteered for secret operations
in the Ncov and helped in the
establishment of a new colony
near Caia.
Rabbi Shapiro is also closely
identified with the programs of
,the National Conference of Chris-
Grundwerg 4561itians and Jews and is active in
holiday radio and television He is married
and has three children.
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Sreoter Miami's largest I Oldest
Supplier for Synagogues,
Hebrew A Sunday Schools.
Wholesale Retail
ISRAELI ClfTS AND NOVELTIES
417 Wash ington Ava. JE 1 -9017
Simchas Torah Evening
David Pinski School will hold a
Simchas Torah evening at the Se-
ville hotel on Friday evening, Oct.
14. The school is now open for the
season, with registration still con-
tinuing at 1534 Washington ave.
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
1357 Washington Ava. JE 1-7722
ALL HEBREW SUPPLIES FOR
ISYNAGOGUES 4 JEWISH HOMEf|
We Carry Bar Mitzvah Records
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
^
Lakeside
MEMORIAL
PARK
"The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minuiei from the Beach Via
The New 36th St. Causeway
PREII NEW EDITION
OF THE FAMOUS
24-YEAR HEBREW-
ENGLISH CALENDAR
Here it is! A new edition of a
very popular calendar.
Contents:
1 Every Hebrew date and
day of the week from
October 1940 to Septem-
ber 19C4
2 Every Jewish holiday to
1970
For a free copy, write to
H.J. HEINZ CO.
Dept. 12, Pittsburgh 30, Pa.
There is
in
*igHt way and a wrong way
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^joy, October 7, I960
-Jewlsti nor id ton
Page 13-A
[Special Services Launch Sukkoth
M I I M "ci i
Corri;nued froM P9 2-A officiate and preach on "Siren "th
serip-m is
The Message of
a.m. and 8:30
re at 9,
p.m., when the ser-
^'-ond'^atf ai IS! ***** "f^oth-Message *
LL._^ _i-----.._ Saturday morning services
are at 9 a.m.
with the rabbinic topic sche-l
' as -SukkothPeriod of Joy
Contemplation.' Friday eve-
Z cervices arc at 5:45 p.m. Sat-
jay morning services will be at
Ija.m Sermon is based on the
feekly Potion of the Law."
At Temple Jud, 320 Palermo
Coral Gables, Rabbi Morris
ifficiate Thursday morn-
j'lt 10:30 a.m., with Kiddush of
fcetification foUowing in the con-
tgaiion 5'ikkah. Friday evening
rvices are at 8:15 p.m. Sermon
Interpretation of the Harvest
yims and the Hallel Prayers."
Eurday morning services will be
110:30 a.m. Cantor Herman Oott-
> renders the musical portions
[the li'urey. Mark, son of Mr. and
PAwlore Lotterman, will be- ***!*
neBar Mitzvah.
ISukkoth will be observed Thurs-
9 a.m., at Tifrrh Israel
hti Rabbi Nathan Zwitman will
Spe<
tdSBI ItOH KRONISH
iRabbi Kronish Win
?ak at Local
.Histadrut Affair
Rabbi (..-on Kronish. spiritual
Ikader of 7 -mple Beth Sholom. will
Be giies: >f honor and speaker at
the annu ii conference of the Great-
ItrMiam. I-rael Histadrut Commit-
Ifce on S lay, Oct. 16, at the Se-
|tille hotel.
Abrahi!:i Fox, chairman of the
IJemmittee ;aid the 11 a.m. func-
Ition will c. the opening celebration
[ft Diudrjt's 40th anniversary.
Rabbi and Mrs. Kronish have
Ijist returned from a trip to Israel,
md were ;uesta of the Vaad Hapoel
lf Histadrut during a tour of the
yrganittti ms' institutions engaged
the anorption of new immi-
grants, medical and health welfare.
Vocational training, and upbuilding
new border settlements.
.Dr. So! Stein, national executive
frector of Histadrut, will join with
fbbi Kranish at the Oct. 16" event
ddres.-ir.g the gathering.
Membership Luncheon Meet j
[Breath of Life chapter of thej
f*!sh National Home for Asth-,
pt>c Children will hold a mem-|
phip li-heon meeting on Tues-
y morain at ihe Park Lane Ca-
pna o,! .ral Way. Mrs. Ber-
F Pul Mar. and Mrs. Ernest Neu-
heon chairman.
At Flagler-Granada Jewish Com-
munity Centar, 50 NW 51st pi.,
Rabbi Bernard Shoter will officiate
Thursday at 9 a.m. Topic of his
Sukkoth sermon is "The Basis for
True Happiness." Friday services
are at 9 a.m. Sermon will be "The
Weakness of the Heart." Evening
services are at 5:30 p.m. Saturday
services will be at 8:30 a.m. Can-
tor Fred Bernstein renders the
musical portions of the liturgy.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky will of-
ficiate at Sukkoth services Thurs- S
day, 8:30 a.m.. at the Israalita Can-
tar, 3175 SW 25th St. Sermon is j
"Feast of Booths." Cantor Loins j
Cohen renders the musical portions |
Friday services are I
at 8:30 a.m. Sermon will be "The
Symbols of Sukkoth." Evening
services are at 5:45 p.m. Saturday-
morning services are 8:30 a.m.
At Congregation Yebudah Moshe,
13630 W. Dixie hwy., services will
I be Thursday and Friday at 9 a.m.
land 7:30 p:m. Instead of religious
I school classes, children will be of-
fered a discussion of Sukkoth by
I Rabbi Sheldon Steinmetz in the
, congregation Sukkah. Friday eve-
Ining services are 8:15 p.m. Ser-
I mini will be "Judaism Its Mes-
; sage." Cantor Maurice Neu ren-
ders the musical portions of the
liturgy assisted by Terri Grossberg.
Saturday services will be at 9 a.m.
Sukkoth services are Thursday
and Friday, 9 a.m., at TompU
Adath Yashurvn, 2320 NE 171st St.
Rabbi Jonah Caplan will officiate.
Friday evening services are 8 p.m
Sermon will be "A Just Way of
Life." Saturday morning services
are 9 a.m.
At Temple Sinai of No. Miami,
12100 NE 15th ave., Rabbi Benno
Wallach will officiate Thursday at
10 a.m. Special concesration serv-
ice of children in the religious
school and daily kindergarten will I
take place Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat-
urday services are at 11 a.m.
Coral Way Jewish Centar, 8755
SW 16th St., will hold Sukkoth serv-
ices Thursday 9 a.m. Rabbi Sam
uel April will discuss "From the
Mitzvah of Yom Kippur to the Mitz-
vah of Sukkoth." Friday services
are at 9 a.m., with the sermon
scheduled as "The Time of Our
Rejoicing." Evening services will
be at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. Sermon
is "Wisdom of Koheleth Wisdom
of Life." Saturday services are at
9 am. Sermon will be "Ecclesias-
tes." Wayne, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Tractenberg, will become
Bar Mitzvah.
Rabbi Joseph Narot officiated at
As tha Esrog has tasta and
fragrance, tha palm taste but 1
no fragrance, the myrtle fra-
irance but no taste, so tha -
- Jaws have learning and good t.
laeds, tome learning but no
deec*t, some deeds but no -
learning, and some neither 5
'earning nor deeds. Said the f
a Holy One: "Let them all be
ied together, and they will
atone one for the other."
Lev. R. \

On the Feast of Booths, Is- I
; rael would offer severity bul- I
locks, corresponding to the ;
seventy nations of the world, ]
i and prayed that they might 5
live in tranquility.
Midrash Tehillim. ?
a
The booth is designed to
teach us not to put our trust
: in the size or strength or im- r:
- provements of a house, nor in
- rhe help of any man, even the I
i Lord of the land, but in the .
Creator, for He alone is =
mighty, Hit promises alone \
I are sure.
Aboab. I

A myrtle among reeds, is 1
I still a myrtle.
Sanhedrin. I
e
Lord, I thank Thee for the I
goodness of growth, I thank
Thee for. the slice of bread
; and the prayerful mood.
Ben Amittai.
COMING TO NEW YORK?
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Dally
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Dble. Occ.
a special children's service at Suk-
koth services in Temple Israel, 137
NE 19th st., Wednesday evening.
Sermon was "Bringing Without]
Stringing." Sukkoth observance, j
continues Thursday at 11 a.m. Can-,
tor Jacob Bornstein renders the
musical portions of the liturgy.
Services Friday evening will be at
8:15 p.m., with the sermon sched-
uled as "How Happy are We?"
Temple B'nai Sholom, 10800 NW
22nd ave., will observe Sukkoth
Thursday at 9:30 a.m. Rabbi Shel-
don Edwards will officiate and dis-
cuss "Judaism is Not Any One
Man." Kiddush follows in the Suk
kah. Friday services are at 9:30
a.m. Cantor Seymour Hinkes ren-
ders the musical portions of the
liturgy. Sermon will be "Your
Home is a Palace."
*Rabbi Max Lipschitz will officiate
at Sukkoth services Thursday and
Friday at Temple Beth Torah, 1009
NE 163rd St., at 8:45 a.m. Cantor
Ben Zion Kirschenbaum renders
the musical portions of the liturgy.
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mor
ris Segall, will become Bar Mitz-
vah during Friday morning serv-
ices. James, son of Mr. and Mrs.
en Lynn, and David, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Newmark. will be Bar
Mitzvah during Saturday services
at 9 a.m.
New Jewish Body
Elects Officers
By Special Report
NEW YORK Edwin Wolf II,
of Philadelphia, was chosen presi-
dent of the National Foundation
for Jewish Culture by the board of
directors in the first election of
permanent officers.
Wolf, a professional librarian
and historian, is president of the
Federation of Jewish Agencies of
Greater Philadelphia, and was for-
merly president of the Jewish Pub-
lication Society.
At the same time, Herbert H.
Lehman, former governor and sen-
ator of the State of New York, was
named honorary president.
Other officers eiec;ed were Sam-
uel Bronfman, of Montreal. Julian
Freeman, of Indianapolis, and
Judge Simon Sobeloff. of Balti-
more, vice presidents; Edwin Ros-
enberg, New York, treasurer; Wil-
liam Lee Frost, New York, assist-
ant treasurer; and Dr. Judah J.
Shapiro, New York, secretary.
The National Foundation for
Jewish Culture was created by the
Council of Jewish Federations and.
Welfare Funds at its General As-
sembly in 1959.
3
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Page 14-A
Jen is tncrXtian
Friday, October 7. l^n
from Hollywood:
HERBERT G. LUFT
Oriental Beauty Aliza Gur Star-Struck but Intelligent
Hollywood
* LIZA GUR, Miss Israel of 1960. was introduced
*^ lo me at a recent Labor Zionist affair in Los
Angeles where she praised another young Sabra,
actress Elana Eden, who was receiving an award
for her performance in "The Story of Ruth."
Aliza is an Oriental beauty whose face seems to
have a rare Biblical quality. When Otto Preminger
saw her during the production of "Exodus." he ex-
claimed that she represented to him the native-
born Israeli he had been thinking about all the
time. Actually. Miss Gur was set for a featured part
in the Leon Uris opus. However, when it turned
out that she had to leave for location on Cyprus,
she realized the assignment would conflict with an
Israeli movie in which she was playing the lead.
Since she decided to stay in her home country,
Preminger switched her to a smaller character part
in Acre prison. If you'll see "Exodus," you can
detect her on the screen as the courageous wife of a
Jewish freedom-fighter, bringing her imprisoned
husband a cake into which she stuck a smuggled
gun. While kissing him good-bye. she transmits rifle
bullets from her mouth onto his lips
We talked with the 19year-old Aliza at length
during a visit to the State of Israel Bonds office in
Los Angeles.
The young Sabra. who scored notably as a
finalist in the Miss Universe contest held in Miami,
told us that the foremost race for the Miss Uni-
verse crown took place this year in Florida, the
second one Miss World contest in London, and
only the third one in Long Beach. California.
The Israeli beauty queen was born in Ramat
Can. Her father. Yitzhak Gross, a life-long Zionist,
had come from Berlin long before Hitler rose to
power; her mother. Malka Netza. hails from an an-
cient Yemenite family. Aliza was raised and edu-
cated in Haifa, where she went to grammar and
high school, later studying costume designing. Her
proficiency earned her a scholarship in languages
and psychology at the Hebrew University. She still
plans to study for her doctorate degree in order to
translate some day English and German classics
into Hebrew.
While studying drama in Tel Aviv she met
Peter Fry. who had come to Israel seven years ago
Capitol Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Agitators on Loose
Washington
?HE NATIONAL ELECTION religious
cornroversy is being exploited by
such agitators as George Rockwell. Ger-
ald L. K. Smith, and Conde McGinley.
The intrusion of extremist elements |
came at a time when responsible Ameri-
cans af all faiths were rallying to com-
bat a grow ing Protestant Catholic rift.
The extremists turned their fire against Jews and Negroes
rathej than at the two major faiths.
Typical propaganda came from Rockwell's neo-Nazi
group. The Nazis opposed Sen. John F. Kennedy's elec-
tion on grounds that election of any "minority" member
might lead ultimately to "a Jew President."
But the Nazis also attacked Vice President Richard
M. Nixon. He was scored for "membership in the NAACP,"
employing a Jew, and using words like "brotherhood"
and "equality."
Gerald L. K. Smith impugned the sincerity of Sen
Kennedy's religious conviction rather than attacking
Catholicism. He sought to portray the Senator as a leftist
radical. Smith said "I can imagine nothing within the
range of possibility which could be worse for America
than for Kennedy, the nominee of the Democratic party,
to be elected as President of the United States."
Smith simultaneously denounced Mr. Nixon for "dis-
gusting expediencies" that have "nauseated the Smith
group.
Conde McGinley's hate sheet, "Common Sense," at-
tacked Sen. Kennedy because "Zionists back Kennedy."
The Senator was condemned for addressing Jewish groups
and supporting a liberal immigration policy.
A "White Citizens' Council" handout, attacked both
candidates. Nixon and Kennedy were termed "the twin
stooges of the Congolese and Jewish manipulators, as
indistinguishable as Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee." A
call was made for "a really white American President
who would combat Palestinian pressure and the Com-
munist goons of Leopoldville."
The religious issue generated by the election was
generally on a much higher level. Eminent Jewish leaders
joined leading Protestants and Catholics in efforts to
curtail bias aimed at the religion of one of the candidates.
Discussion of the Church-State issue, it seemed, descended
all too often to an emotional level.
Assailed by the bitterest manifestation of anti-Cath-
olicism since the 1928 Al Smith campaign. Catholics
sought Jewish advice on anti-defamation tactics. It was
a new experience for many Americans of the Catholic
faith to Hear loyalty challenged.
In the smouldering South, the Ku Klux Klan emerged
in new strength. From Virginia to Louisiana, fiery crosses
burned. But the Klan stood repudiated by the mass of
Southerners. Its status was insignificant compared to its
1928 peak;
to become a director at Habima. He inspired her in-
terest in the theater and the cinema. On the stage
of the Kameri theater, she later appeared in Hebrew
productions, as Ophelia in "Hamlet" and as Medea.
Aliza made many low-budget films for home-grown
audiences, such as "Lets take the Gun" at the
Herzlia studios.
Chosen Miss Israel in a contest sponsored both
by the magazine La1 Isha (for the Woman) and the
HP MHHRI MB 11
Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDUN
The'Dream World
Of Artist Marc Chagall
MY LIFE. By Mare Chagall.
Translated from the French by
Elisabeth Abbott. With twtnty
illustrations by th author. 174
pp. New York: The Orion Press,
30 Fifth ve. $6.00.
READING MARC CHAGALL'S brief autobiography
is like being whirled into one of his paintings and
wafted gently about the room of his life, bumping
softiy into his images. Chagall writes exactly as he
paints, in brilliant splashes of color, wjth something
of fantasy and something of supernaturalism. rooted
in a sad and* sentimental sort of remembered reality.
There is nothing of affection in his writing, for all its
strangeness. Rather, one becomes engrossed by the
deceptive simplicity with which Chagall portrays his
life.
lake a child. Chagall seems to inhabit an anthro-
pomorphic world, a haunted world, if you will, in
which The very road prays. The houses weep," and
"People I know well, settle down on roofs and rest
there." Like a child, whose knowledge of life and its
limitations is incomplete, Chagall too finds all things
simultaneously wondrous and possible, writing oi hi.-
feelings as he has painted them, floating off in the
air, peering down with great dark eyes, or sitting
around on rooftops.
The book is filled, also, with that same delightfu!
c'hagallian humor which lightens his painted world
and saves his surrealism from the edge of terror. --
Here the young Chagall writes of attending a wed
ding and hearing the badchan sing "Betrothed, be- i
trotheri. Think of what awaits you."at which words
"my head detaches itself gently from my body and
weeps somewhere near the kitchen where the fish
is being prepared."
The book begins with his birth ("I was born
dead") and ends in Moscow in 1922. as the 35-year
old Chagall was about to leave Russia for Paris, for
the last time. It evokes in vivid detail the shtetl life
in all its warmth, catching it through the eyes of a
precocious child. There is also a fascinating picture
, of the artist colony in Paris just before World War I
Apollinaire. Bakst and Nijinsky and the Diaghiloff
ballet, a glimpse of Degas and others. He speak-
bitterly of post- Revolution Russia anil the Commun-
i, complaining that they neither love nor under-
- and him
The twenty illustrations were designed express
ly or perhaps one should say expresrioniaticallj
for this autobiography, which Chagall wrote in Ru>
sian during his final stay in Moscow in 1921-22. The
pictures were published at that time, although the t
:ext did not appear until 1932, in a French tra-i
lion by his wife, Bella. .
This is the first American edition. Orion Press
has printed it beautifully, with a wide left-hand in-
i and handsome type The book is. in its ow.i v
a work of artlovely to read, lovely to own, and. bj
the way, lovely to give.
Overseas Newsletter: By ELIAHU SALPETER
government, she was brought to thjs country. On
a three-day stop-over in Paris, she met most of the
other European beauty queens.
After a number of screen and television ap-
pearances, among them one on the Ed Sullivan show
Aliza Gur is under the magic spell of the theater'
but too intelligent to be taken in by mere publicity
stories. She wants to become a good actress. At
Fox, she was asked to play an American Indian
in an Elvis Presley movie, a role she felt she had
to decline.
Jill St. John (the lovely Mrs. Lance Reventlow)
is another Jewish actress who is currently volun-
teering her efforts for Israel Bonds. Last weekend,
we attended a gala soiree at the swanky hill-top
home of the former Miss Oppenheim now daugh-
ter-in-law of the Woolworth heiress, one of the rich-
est women in the world. It was the first major event
of the Junior Auxiliary of the Women's Division in
Beverly Hills that carried the message of Israel
to the younger movie celebrities and socialites.
Though a mere $40,000 was sold in bonds at the
affair, it became an opening wedge for vital activi-
ties in behalf of Israel and world Jewry. Mrs. Mau-
rice J. Hyman was the chairman, with Mrs. Gene
Barry (the television star's wife) as co-chairman,
and Miss Gogi Grant, the singer and, in real Jife,
wife of attorney Bob Rifkind, acting not only in
an honorary capacity but also giving renditions in
English and Hebrew to the entertainment of the
100 couples, of which your JTA correspondent plus
wife were the only press representativves.
Off the Record
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
Year is a Long Time
A YEAR IS a long lapse of time, even
** when measured by the newest scien-
tific rods that make a mockery of time
and distance. Yet the cycle has moved
so rapidly that it challenges contain-
ment, recapture, evaluation.
In the pre space age days it was
possible to spot the highlights of a
passing year with comparative ease.
Time then rolled its pages slowly. Now the calendar is
always in turmoil, its pages falling era we can even gaze
at the script.
What has been the script of the year that is now at
its end? The answer will be given by the tomes of time.
If mercy is given priority over wrath and if the wise men
who guide our destiny are led by more meaningful pur-
pose the despair of our times will give way to faith, dej-
t ruction to rising edifices and fear to vision of new
horizons.
To contemplate any other course is simply unthink-
able. The human race is too young to die.
The early days of the year were promising Hands
were stretching across the seas in preparation for meet-
ing. Harsh exchanges gave way to soft dealings and the
spirit of Camp David was to be inscribed in summit
script in Paris. Sesame-like, the world was opening a new
leaf. The storm seemed subsided and there was a new
climate of hope in the lands.
Then thunder broke loose over the skies and people
everywhere ran for shelter from its wrath. The hands
that strove for warmth were now frozen in unmeeting,
and darkness descended upon human countenaces every-
where and fear of the imponderable. Men no longer were
masters of their own tools. Their destiny now was in the
hands of the few who held the secret, the key to life or
extinction.
As the year was approaching its end there were signs,
albeit feeble ones, that the clouds over the big-power-
lands were dissipating. However, offsetting this promise
was the unrest in the countries of our own hemisphere
and in the distant lands whose people were first savoring
the taste of freedom, of independence.
The Scale That Balanced Gurion's Visit to UN
Jerusalem
ISRAEL HAS SENT the largest delega-
tion yet to the United Nations Gen-
eral Assembly. The delegation is headed
by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mrs.
Golda Meir and consists of 24 members
including a number of top-ranking For-
eign Ministry officials, ambassadors and
several members of the Knesset who will
act as advisors.
There had been lively discussion, both in official
circles and in the press as to whether Mr. Ben-Gurion
should attend at least the opening of the General As-
sembly particularly since it was announced that Colonel
Nasser of Egypt will attend the Assembly.
There were several considerations in favor of Mr.
Ben-Gurion's participation in the Assembly. It was felt,
for example that since several African and Asian Premiers
who are not pro-Communist did follow Mr. Khrushchev's
suggestion to go to the Assembly, Israel should also
demonstrate an independent course of action by not to -
lowing blindly the Western attitude. More important, now-
ever, was the feeling that Mr. Ben-Gurion's Pr"encev*rt
needed to counter Col. Nasser's appearance in New o
and prevent this occasion from becoming an all-out Ara
propaganda campaign against Israel.
Among the arguments against Mr. Ben-Gurion's jour-
ney to New York was that Iarael should not assist
what appears to be a Soviet propaganda campaign spea-
headed by the participation of Soviet Bloc Prei"'efrsJr
the Assembly. Yet another consideration was that r.
Ben-Gurion waa juat recently in the United States, m
with American leaden and nothing new could <*****
from a "repeat performance" of hia visit. Some P'1U'
circles also felt that it would be "a waate" to send
Ben-Gurion to America now where his presence
be eclipsed by the presence of Mr. Khrushchev and otn
world leaders.


1
Friday, October 7, 1960
+Jewlsti fhrkttan
Page 15-A
Religion 'Census1
To be Launched
Southern Baptist churches un-
der the direction off the Home
Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga.,
launches a house-to-house religious
survey in South Florida this week-
end.
Most Protestant denominations
will be cooperating in the religious
survey by providing volunteer
workers. Joining in the "census"
effort will be synagogues and mem-
bers of the Jewish community.
Some 20,000 survey workers will
participate through Oct. 14 in a
drive to determine the religious
makeup of South Florida from
Pompano Beach to Key West.
A unique family card, repro-
duced in newspapers throughout
the area, will assist in securing
what survey leaders hope is as
high as 95 percent coverage.
Families r being asked to clip
me newspaper reproduction of
the card, fill in the information,
and place it on their doer if they
expect to be out when canvassers
come by.
Instruction clinics for workers
will be held in local Baptist church-
es on Friday, 7:30 p.m., and Sun-
day afternoon, 2 p.m.
A list of prospects will be pre-
pared in book form and given to
each participating church and syn-
agogue in the survey. The list re-
quests information on the individ-
ual's name, address, religious af-
filiation, frequency of church-syna-
gogue attendance, language spok-
en in the home, and number of
years the family has lived here.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
no. sec t7
CHARLOTTE IUKTZ,
Plaintiff,
\ v.
DON AI H DIETS,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: DONALD DIETZ,
.....eh Avenue
< 'im Iniuitl, Ohio
Tou DoNALD DIETZ are hereby
notified that Bill of Complaint for Di-
vorce has been tiled against yon, ana
>ou a.-e required to nerve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to ths BUI
of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attor-
ney, MYERS, HK1.MAN A KAPLAN,
Kleven Fifty Building;. 1150 s.w. lit
Street. Miami, Florida, and tile the
original Answer or Pleading In tha
office of the Clerk of tha Circuit Court
on or before the SIM day of October,
I960. If you fall to do so, Judgment
by default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded In the Bill of
Complaint.
Thin notice (hall be aubllshed once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 20th day of September.
A 11 1960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
(i-eal) By: WM W. STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
MYERS. HE1MA.N & KAPLAN
Eleven Fifty Building
1150 S.W. 1st Street
tauum ..>, r toriua
Attorneys for Plaintiff
9/30, 10/7-14-21
IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 4170S-B
Rr. ESTATE OF
EVERETT R. I.EWARK,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that 1 have
"Jen m) tlnal report and petition for
Final Discharge as Administrator of
the estate of EVERETT R. LBWARK,
'. ana that on the 19th day
"j September. | mo, will apply to the
Honorable Frank B. Dowllng County
Judse of Hade County. Florida, for
Ppro\al of said final report and for
"na discharge as Administrator of
the Estate of EVERETT R. LEWARK.
deceased.
This 19th day of September, 1960.
., WII-1-1AM LASSIE ROSE
KIDNEY EFRONSON
Attorney for Administrator of the
"Ute of Everett R. Lewark
_____ 9/30, 10/7-14-21
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
n RE: Estate of
I1AR.NET CH1R1.NSKY.
Deceased.
- .NOTICE TO CREDITORS
7 A! Creditors and All Persona Hav-
Stat or Demands Against Said
V ,,i i,r,. h6reby nol|fled ,nd required
wki w '" un> claims and demands
wriich you may have against the es-
ed,u GARNET illlKiNSKY deceas-
1 of Hade County, Florida, to
,2 ',,',""''>' J th,. lhr same In their offices In
;lioi.s in Dade Coun-
i;,.V.1"L"f'lu' vDhin eight calendar
,..">* from the date of the first pub-
or the sain* will be
_, Ram i silver.
Pall., J''.1 "rJl.NER, ( o-Eaecutori
S-lver, Paliot. SVn A Mints
gi*m' S. Florida
" Edward A. Bt.rn. Attorney
9/S'J, 10/7-14-21
DAyem
"That'* Manny's new ali-weottMr Sddcah. With
that wothr eys, the umbrella opens automat-
ically at the first raindrop.'*
LICAL notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW _
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring t eng*g
bualnasa under the fictitious names of
REX ARTIST SII'I'I.IKS and REX
ART SUPPLIES .it 22*3 Southwest
17th Avenue, .Miami. Florida ini.nds
to register said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
REX ART COMPANY.
a Florida corp.. Sole Owner
by: A. Melvin Morris, President
AINSI.KK H l-Klil HE
Attorney for it Art Company,
.i Mo, (,1a corporation
I 7v.' West Flagler St.
Miami 16, Florida
9/30. 11/7-il-zl
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
by virtue of Chapter 678 of Florida
Statutes Annotated (194,1). Ware-
housemen and Warehouse RacalptS
wherein ACE-R.B. VAN LINKS. INC.,
a Florida corporation, by vlrture of Its
warerouse Han. has In its possession
the following described property:
Household Goods A the prop-
erty of Miss Kay McCord, and that
on the 2Sth day of (id,,her, I960, dur-
ing the legal hours of sale, mainly be-
tween 11:00 forenoon and 2:00 In the
afternoon, at 213t N.W. 24th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, the undersigned shall
offer for sale to the highest bidder for
ash in hand the above described prop-
erty, as the property of Miss Kay
Mi Cord.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 28th
of September, 1910.
ACE-R.B VAN LINES, IN''
9/30. 10/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
biisiness under the fictitious name of
ROYAL PALM EFFICIENCIES &
AITS, at 420-22 N.E. 73rd Street. Mi-
ami, Florida In tend to register said
name, with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
FRANK ST. PIGNATORE. and
ROSE PIGNATORE, His Wife
- usxiivtii. il 'v Interest
ANTHONY FLORENTINE
undivided Vi interest
LEON KAPLAN
Attorney for Applicants
1150 S.W. 1st Street
Miami. Florida
9/30,10/7-14-21
10/7-14-L'l-S*
NOTICE UNi-i-R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
tha undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
Executive Suites; Executive Office
Furniture Co.; Executive Offices;
Executive Desks; Executive Office
Equipment at 1055 East 13th Street,
Hlaleah, Florida Intends to register
said names with, the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
EXECUTIVE SUITES, INC.
(a Fla. corp.)Sole Owner
HENRY A. KAMP
Attorney for Exacutlve Suites, Inc.
1221 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Florida
9/S0. 10/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TI49US NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SUNSET ACRES' at 12025 S.W. 80th
Street, Miami. ,Fla., Intends to rag-
is-er 'aid name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
BONITA ENTERPRISES. INC.
(a Fla. corp.)
HAHOLD STRUMPF
Attorney for Applicant
909 Biscayne Bid.. ]W, ,.,,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
th undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
MAOLB TREE SURGEONS at 2230
S.W. 57th Court. Miami, Dade Coun-
ty Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dada County. Florida.
MARTHA C. MAOLB
GEORGE N. MacDONELL
Attorney for Petitioner
504 Biscayne Bid,. ,,,,..,,
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FI.OFI.OA. IN PROBATE
No. 50633-B
IN RE: Estate of
8ELMA HOPES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Parsons Hay
ing Claims or Demands Against said
Estate: ...
Y, j are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demand*
which you may have against the es-
tate of SELMA HODES d.
of Dade "County. Florida, to the Coun-
c. of Dade County, and file the
same in their offices in the ]
Courthouse In Dade County. Florida,
within eight calendar months from the
date of the first publication l.creof.
or the same will be harr-d
BARNEY HODES
itor
SIMON, HAYS A GRUNDWERG
Attorneys
301 Alnsley Building
Miami 32. Florida ,/w.a.l0> 10/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTI"'F: IS HFrHF:BY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
ONE HOUR CLF:ANERAMA at 91K
:,th Street. Miami Beach. Florida in-
tends to rccister said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
C.B.G. CLEANERS, INC.
a Florida Corp.
WEINKI.E .v KKSSI.Ell
Attornev s for i hs nar
814 Beybold lildg.
.Miami It, Florida
.-30. 10/7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREHY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
busisjt ss under the fictitious name of
JERRY'S 66 SF7RVICE STATION at
S9 S.W. 42nd Avenue. Miami. Florida
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
JERRY H. LIPPHON
(sole proprietor)
MITCHELL ItAUJER
Attorney for Applicant
"16 s. > hold Building
-Miami, Florida
9/30, 10/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious namo of
THB VOYAGER at 1433 NE -Miami
Place, Miami, Fla.. intenos to re^i.-t, .
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
AL GOTTLIF.I1, i.x'.
by: A! Gottlieb. Pres.
GEORGE J. TALIANOFE
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
Attorney for Al Gottlieb. Inc.
9/30. '.V7-I4-21
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
vJewisii fkriafiatn
solicits your legal notices
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at UgeJ
rates .
MPiml Fit 3-44*5
for messenger service
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
liusiness under the fictitious name of
SOUTHERN ?IILT KITCHENS at
MM N.E. Miami Place Intend* to reg-
ister said name with the clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
B. I. O. CORPORATION
HAROLD STHI'MIl'
Attorney for A ppllcant
SOS Bis, syne rlMg.
9/16-2.1 -30, 10'7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVKN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
busin.se under the fictitious name of
SEA SALES LTD. at 2143 N.W. nth
Avenue, Miami, Fla.. Intends to regis-
ter sold mime with the Cleric of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
UNITED PI-RVKYRS. INC.

9/16-23-30. 10'7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKHEBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desliing to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
NOHMAR ENTEI'.l'KISES at 111'.
N.E. 129th Btreat, North Miami, Flor-
Ida intends to register said name with
Hi. clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
NORM AN KPECTOR
Sole Owner
STOLAR A MUCHNICK
Attorne>s for Applicant
220 71st 81-.. M.B.
9/23-30. 10/7-14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. toe sew
MARY BRINKElt,
Plaintiff,
Vs. -
NORMAN BRINKER,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
You. Norman Rrinkcr, address un-
known,1 are required, to file your an-
swer to. the complaint of divorce with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
and serve a, copy thereof upon Her-
man Cohen. Esquire, 1305 Congress
Building, Miami. Florida, on or before
October 24. 190, or else complaint
will be taken as confessed-
Dated September 16, I960.
f;. b. leatherman
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING
Deputy Clerk
9/2S-SO. 10/7-14
\IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
NO. 60177-C
IN RE:
Estate of I'ETER PAUL 1RSA,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF PRESUMPTION
OF DEATH
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
WHEREAh, the undersigned Count)
Judge In and for Dade County, Flor-
ida, did enter an Older of Presumption
of Death of PETER PAUL 1RSA on
August 30, 1960 as provided for in
Section 734.34 of the Statutes of the
State of Florida,
YOU ARE THEREFORE WHjulrcd
or anyone In your behalf, to produce
within thr.e months from the date of
first insertion of this publication, sat-
isfactory evidence of tha coatlmiance
In life of the said I'ETER PAUL 1RSA.
UTHERWISF: the Court will proceed
with I he administration of the Estate
of the said PETER PAUL 1RSA
DATED this 30th day of August,
1960.
/s/ OBOaKia T. CLARK
County Judge
9/S3-30, 10 7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVKN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
WEetJtVS BHOASTED CHICKEN at
ijai E. 4th Ave., Hlaleah Intends to
rapistar saM same with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dada County.
Florida.
DONNA MARE, INC.
(a Fla. Corp)
ELI BREGER
Attorney
120 Lincoln Road
______ 9/16-23-30, lO/'i
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
GERALD JOSEPH LADBRMAN, who
was convicted in the Criminal Court ol
in and for Dade County, Flor-
ida, at the June temi thereof, AD..
I960, of the offense of Grand 1..
for which a sentence of 18 months Im-
in the State Penitentiary
was Imposed, will apply for clemency
to the Slate Board of Pardons, Tal'a-
hassee, Florida, at its next regular
meeting, through and by his under-
signed attorney of record.
HO P. NEGRETTI
8/12-19-26, 9/2-9-16-2S-30,10/7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the understated, desiring to engage In
business under th. .me o
THE FRUIT Howl at number 48;:
Lincoln Road in the City of .Miami
Beach, Florida intend to register th.
said name with the Clerk of the <"ir-
cuit Court of Dads Countv, F
Dated ,.t Miami Beach, Florida, thi>
80th day or Aiimist. Id60.
gpVMi "H WEI88
SKI,MA WEISS
TALIANOFT .V WALLER
b) leorga .1. TaPaniff
Attornev for Applicant
9/30. 7-14-2!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC AL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 60C 8755
FREDDIE MEIER,
Plain tUf,
MARY K MEIER.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
Tou, MART K. .MEIER, a resident
at the following address: c/o Tern-
hacker, Taries Trailer Courts. 3014
Hiagtr Boulevard, F'ayetteville, North
Carolina, are hereby required to serve
a copy of your Answer to a Bill o?
Complaint for Divorce on Plaintiff's
attorney. Charles J. Rich, 2432 Holly-
wood Boulevardi Hollywood, Florida,
and file the original with the Clerk of
the above Court on or before October
17. I960, or a default will be entered
against you.
IMTED at Miami, Florida, this 12th
day of September, 1960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk. Circuit Court
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING
Deputy Clerk
9/16-23-3S, 10/7
NOTICE BY PUBL.CATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
NO. SO C 48S J
DONALD FRANKLIN SCOTT,
Plaintiff.
vs.
EMMA JEAN SCOTT,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: EMMA JEAN SVOTT
11 Wait street
Rochester ". New York
You EMMA JEAN SCOTT are here
by notified that a Bin of Complaint
for Divorce has been filed against you.
and you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Comp'alnt on the plaintlff'f
Attorney. RAYMAN A DI711143. 90S
Alnsley Building, Miami 32, Florida
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing In the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before ttie 17th
day of October, I960. If yau fail to
do so, Judgment by default wltl be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
saoh week for four consecutive weeks
in -THE JEWISH F1>>R1DIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Mli'mi.
Florida, this 12th day of September,
A.D. 1960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court. l>arle County, Florida
(seal) By: HELEN KE8SLBR,
Deputy Clerk
RAYMAN A DUHTG
nsley Uldg.
Miami 32. Fla.FR 9-2644
Attorneys for Halntlff
9/16-23-30, 10/7
NOTICB UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
F' & R MIRROR & GUAM CO. at lt>2
N.E. tftth Street, Miami Intends to
said name with the* Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Iade County.
Florida
CHAKI.ES FRIEDMAN
Sole Owner
9/16-23-30, Hi'7
NOTICB UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREltY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
I.u- loss under the- flctitiotia name of
THE DIEM PREMIUM PAYMENT
PLAN at r>4 41st Street. Miami
Beach. Florida mien.I to rfglitter said
name with th* Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
marcy sheldon
Sally shei.don
Sole Owners
MARTIN YEI.1.1 N
Attorney (or Applicants
Biscayne Building
SVltV 28-30. 10/7
NQTICE UNDER
FiCTITteuS NAME LAW
NOfftCB IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dualling to eogatse In
business under the fictitious name of
SAMPSON"S MARKET at 14K6 N.W.
62nd Street, Miami. Florida Ulgwda
to register said name with the Clerk
of Mta- Clroult Ourt ef Dade Catmty,
Floruit*. ,
SAMPSON'S M>ARKET. INC.
(a m. Carp. >
H. .W4lBi KHUN. Pees.
NELSUN & SPIEL.VOGF;L
Attorneys fer Applicant
407 Lincohi Read i
9/16-2J-S0. 10/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 4>a THE
lit* JUO.CIAL CIRCUIT IN AMD
FOR DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCBRY
Nn. tac S601-I
DOROTHY WH1TEHJSAD.
Plaintiff.
IKH'K W'HITEHEAD.
Defendant
NATFCE BY RUBjLICATION
TO: DOCK WHJTEHEAD
Navy Air Station
Glyaco.
I'.runawick. Georgia
Serial No. HM94W7
Y< >L' AW HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has
been filed against you and you are
hereby rsnurred to serve a com of
your answer Usareta on the plaintiff's
attorneys. ENGEL A POLIICK.
Suite M-lll Biscayne Building, 19
West Flagler Street, Miami Jt. Flor-
ida, and file the original answer In the
Office of the C'erk of the Circuit Court
on or before tha lTth day of October.
1960. oaher.-De a Decree Pro Conleeso
will he entered .igamst you.
Dated on the 13th day o.' Scpte.nber,
1160.
E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk
of the Circuit Caurt
(seal) By: WM. W stocking-
Deputy Clerk
a/16-M-30.10/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOT1CFJ tie HEREBY GIVEN that
tha undersigned, daalrlng to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SPENCER LANE at 321 N.E. 79th
Street. Miami intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Flirtaa.
SAMUEL CKMJM3KRG
9/30. 10/7-14-21
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATION OUTFITS
Lowest Prices QuickMt Delivery
In South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
IK 3-1KI5


Page 16-A
9-JmistncrkMafi
Friday, Ocioter 7,
The Great
TV Debate
By MAX IERNER
State Dep't. Slaps at UAR Envoy
WASHINGTON- (JTA) The de
partment of State made known
here that it has called Ambas-
sador Mustafa Kamel of the United
Arab Republic to account for por-
tions of an anti-Jewish address de-
livered m Washington by the Am-
bassador on August 29.
William B. Macomber. jr.. As-
sistant Secretary of State, revealed
Zionist Council
Plans Convention
By Special Report
NEW YORK The American
Zionist Council this week called
for the convening of a national
assembly of American Zionists on
Nov. 13 to 15 at the Sutler-Hilton
hotel here.
The assembly will open on Sun-
History has often turned on the hinge of a single event, and the
current, fateful Presidential campaign may in the end prove to have
turned on the first Nixon-Kennedy debate and its successors.
l"p to then the campaign had gone sluggish. Each of the candidates
was running, as the phrase has it. like a dry creek. Each was working
way at his campaign in a kind of isolation, local segment by local
segment. The prevailing mood was of apathy, doubt, indifference. lack
of commitment.
What was needed to make the campaign come alive was a direct
confrontation of the candidates This the first debate provided. It was
no Lincoln-Douglas affair, but it had drama, dignity and tension. The
*JN debates helped, since the audience which had*watched them must
have wondered why the living drama of the world crisis could not
rub off on the contest which was to decide who would lead America in
that crisis. For the first time also, an audience of the leaders of the
world's nations was able, like the American audience, to size up the day, Nov. 13. with a welcoming ad-
two candidates as they confronted each other and the world, faced the dress from New York's Mayor Rob-
same problems, answered the same questions. ert F. Wagner. Scheduled to speak j
--- before the delegates during the
I SHOULD GUESS that this debate furnished Kennedy with his three days is a list of nationally
first real breakthrough. The vast audience had a chance to compare and internationally prominent Jew '
two programs for the nation, two visions of its future, two men as per- ish figures, including former Israel
tonalities. It was an exacting thing to watch, demanding much of the Prime Minister Moshe Sharett; Na-!
viewer-listener, since he had constantly not only to absorb what he saw hum Goldmann. president of the >
and heard but make reassessments of both men at each point. An hour World Zionist Federation; Dr. Ab-
is not a long stretch for this purpose but it is long enough for a judg-
ment to emerge. On all three scores program, vision, man the
judgment seemed to me strongly to favor Kennedy, at Nixon's expense.
Curiously the whole debate turned on the nature of the welfare
state which has come to stay in America. If the debate had been be-
tween Kennedy and Barry Goldwater the issue would have been sharp.
Between Kennedy and Nixon it was blurred by Nixon's I-agree-with-
the development ia letter to Rep. to the Ambassador attenti-.
Seymour Halpern, New York Re- "- "-< *
publican Rep. Halpern had
lodged a formal protest with the
Department against the speech in(
which Ambassador Kamel ques-
tioned the loyalty of American
Jewry nd urged Arab students in
America to inject anti-Jewish and
anti-Israel propaganda into current
election activity
Mr. Macombcr said that "certain
aspects of the text to which you
have referred gave the Depart
ment concern, and were brought
He added that with rNp(
possible improper aciivitiei^
students." the appropriate '
cies of the Justice Depart
were following the -iluationtk.
I* He said any abuse, ttogjJj
dealt with promptly."
Rep. Halpern had a-ked ih. iwl
partment to consider
the Ambassador persona
because of his attack on a se
of the American public and13
ference in the internal
scene.
ba Hillel Silver, of Cleveland; Av
raham Harman. Israel's Ambassa
dor to the United States; and Rabbi
Irving Miller, chairman of the
American Zionist Council.
In a letter addressed to Ameri
can Zionists. Rabbi Irving Miller
your-ends but not means attitude But Kennedy had the advantage be- ^ated that the purpose of the as
cause on every phase of the welfare state they discussed minimui
wage, health insurance, farm aid. federal aid to education Kennedy
was affirming while Nixon was qualifying. Kennedy was on the offensive
while Nixon was on the defensive.
If anyone doubted Kennedy's liberal position before, there is no
longer any basis for doubt. But along with the program itself, what
counted was the passion behind it. Here is a man who in a brief spell
of time, under the stress of events, has found maturity because he has
found conviction. His answers were not learned by rote, to be repeated
parrotlike, thev came readily and swiftly because they were part of
what he felt.
* *
BUT THE SHARPEST difference lay in the two men themselves.
Both were being sedulously careful, of course, to present themselves
at their best. Kennedy tried not to look boyish. Nixon tried to dispel the
old picture of the hatchet-man and to present an unfailing sweet reason-
ableness But there are limits to what you can do in doctoring your
image. The truth manages to come through.
Nixon emerged as an anxious man. overeager. overexplaining. re-
peating himself, assuring everyone of his opponent's sincerity and his
At one point his tension was so great that he offered by mad-
sembly will be to place before the
American Jewish community a pro-
gram of "positive action aimed at
providing a fresh interpretation of
the ideals of Zionism in light of to-
day's needs." He expressed the
hope that the assembly would "re
activate the enthusiasm that ren
dered possible the achievement of
Zionism's first, but by no means
final, goal the restoration of the
State of Israel."
the Legion's
tion.
convention
Polar'n to he See*
The Navy's Polaris missile, re-
cently successfully launched from
a submerged submarine at Cape
Canaveral, will be on display in
front of the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Hall during the American Le
vertence to "get nd of the farmers before he stumbled into the clear ion natk)na| Convcntlon ,his
to get nd only of their farm surpluses If a team off psychologists were mon|k wa? annouDced htn b%
watching, and comparing notes, their reports on Nixon as a Personality Uwrence E Hoffn,an tltMm ,
would be worth reading. The product of an age of anxiety, be showed
the characteristic marks of his era.
Kennedy, by contrast, was alert, crisp, quietly confident. Hi*
economy speech revealed a spare and muscular mind An intellectual.
he sought neither to hide nor parade that quality He spoke and thought
swiftly, and his words while rarely memorable were the right
words in the right place. He could demolish an argument in two
rewtences. He knew his stuff, as Nixon did too. but he marshalled it
nore effectively.
Curiously the whole issue of "experience" had the sawdust stuffing
Knocked out of it Kennedy has had the same length of national ex-
perience as Nixon, who sounded boyish in his effort to puff up the
consequences of his trips abroad. As for the vaunted ability to stand
tip to Khrushchev. Nixon was so busy being sweetly reasonable that
the image of the tough talker grew tarnished. If anyone emerged as
Strong enough to express America in the world crisis, it was the Mas
sachusetts Senator who cares so deeply that he is angry at what the
amateurs have done.
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sy .SDCIAL1TE
Due to the Sukkoth holiday and an ad-
vanced deadline, ". by Socialite" does not
appear this week.
The School That
Lived in Boxes ,
By IRENE MYERSON
THIS is a story of a Jewish day school which be-
gan life living out of a collection of boxes and
which graduated eight years later into a hand-
some fully-equipped building near Asbury Park,
New Jersey.
The beginning was a meeting in Deal, N.J., in
Apr., 1951 of a small group of individuals, rabbis
and community leaders of the area organized by
Rabbi Morris Schmidman, of Congregation Sons of
Israel, of Asbury Park. Attending were representa-
tives of Torah Umesorah, the national society for
Jewish day schools. The participants organized the
Hillel Academy of the Shore area. One month later,
seven children were prepared for the first grade
for the coming September. All that was lacking
were classrooms, facilities and money.
The first home of the Orthodox school was the
Jewish Community Center, a former hospital. As
the story was told by Principal Jacob Mermelstein
in "The Jewish Parent," everybody joined in con-
verting closets into offices, a coal shed into a library
and in providing exits and partitions.
This was an annual job because each year
meant another grade requiring at least another
room. The dark and rundown building was trans-
formed by loving labor. Women who had their
cleaning done at home by maids helped to scrub
floors and wash windows. Furniture was provided
on a similarly informal basis. As Rabbi Mermel-
stein put it, "no child could mistake another's
desk for his own; there were hardly two alike.'*-
Educational services were donated, cajoled, so-
licited. These included the services of pediatricians,
dentists, optometrists, psychologists and much
more "all were given freely for our children."
Then came the first blow: the local housing
authority needed the land and the building was
sold in 1957. Two weeks before school opening the
school, despite frantic searching, was still with-
out a home. The haphazard collection of furniture
was still stored in the corrugated cardboard boxes
which had previously served as furniture and stor-
age containers in the classrooms.
Congregation Sons of Israel in Asbury Park of-
fered their community house. Into its six tiny
rooms would have to go eight grades and 100 chil-
dren. There was no alternative, so the school mov-
ed into the community house, formerly a private
home. Halls and pantries were converted into of-
fices, kitchens into storerooms, the second sanctu-
ary became a kindergarten, the vestry became a
lunchroom and the sunporch a classroom.
Volunteer labor was again the mainstay of the
hasty conversion. Yet despite the difficulties and
the inadequate facilities, "we did not lose a single
child," says Rabbi Mermelstein. "Even those who
were ideologically opposed to the day school
they came, they saw, they helped ."
"And always the boxes. The rooms could hard-
ly hold the children." But the boxes were furniture
as well as storage facilities. Life at the Hillel School
settled down to its own weird kind of normalcy.
Then came the new blow. In the nation-wide furore
which followed the disastrous Chicago school fire,
inspection of schools was ordered everywhere. In
Asbury Park, the Community House was condemn-
ed and barred for school use.
Another urgent hunt followed and considera-
tion turned to an offer by the city of its solarium
buildings on the boardwalk, next to the ocean.
Built on a terrace, the two buildings consisted of
a roof and four walls of glass each. There was no
water, no toilet facilities and a separation of 100
yards between the two structures.
. So they moved in with the boxes. Partitions
were hastily erected to provide classroom space.
Passers-by stared in amazement at the school ac-
tivities in the glass houses. In the winter, howling
winds buffeted pupils and teachers as they went
to the North Solarium for lunch and back to the
South Solarium for classes.
Eventually there developed a firm determina-
tion to provide a permanent home for the school.
Congregation Sons of Israel promised $35,000 if
supporters and officials of the school, led by Pres-
ident Zimel Resnick and Treasurer Jacob Kasliner,
*w<
ovnctn s
"World
* tJfewislhi Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, October 7, 1960
Section B
At last week's installation luncheon of the
Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations
are front row (left to right) Mrs. Oscar Zelteer.
corresponding secretary; Mr. Irving Lehrman,
installing officer; Mrs. Bernard Stevens, mem-
ber of the advisory council and chairman of
the day; Mrs. Meyer Eggnatr. parliamentarian.
and Mrs. Milton Sirkin, president. Rear (left
to right) are Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg, program
vice chairman; Mrs. Oscar Sindell, recording
secretary; and Mrs. Jean C. Lehman, honorary
president. Not shown are Mrs. Inez Krensky.
vice president of community volunteer serv-
ices; Mrs. Dorothy Krieger Fink, vice president
of public affairs; and Mrs. George Simon, vice
president of education and leadership. Mrs.
John Hopp, vice chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal Women's Division, was the speaker.
(See, "Charmingly Yours" Page 7-B.)
"They Said if Couldn't be Done" is title of a skit was acclaimed by national Hadassah at
skit to be presented Monday at a meeting of a recent conference in Orlando. Standing (left
the Herel group of Hadassah in the Eden Roc to right are Mrs. Jacob D. Davis and Mrs Dolly
hotel, according to Mrs. Rose Ziegmund, pres- Hirsch. Seated (left to right) are Mr. Al Hauer
ident. Written by Mrs. Henry Wernick. the and Mrs. Stella Cohen.
Fashion Show Promises Glitter For Style-Minded
The season's highlight in func- the best of Israeli and American
tions sponsored by the Women's sk>" nd imagination.
Division, State of Israel Bonds, will Israeli fabrics are the focal point
be the "Israel Fashion, USA." ,he collection, and demonstrate
show and luncheon on Nov. in the V* rapid development of the na-
Americana hotel. t,on s *>u ,____ rw.- ,.a Ten deigns in the collection are
Women of Greater Miami who re- ^ worfc AmericaBg_Cei, Cha
member the breathtaking Israel. Frechtel, Vera Mai-
and French designs featured at the we ^ Parni p^,^,
^.Tih^JTilrf iSi kZ Copeland, Maurice Rentner Adele
pointed this year, Mrs. Jack Katz- cin __' .. ^_.
?., genera, chairman, promised. J^naS. *""* *"""
The new collection features 42 Their creations, in silks, wools,
creations in a symphony of color, tweeds and cottons, are primarily
fabric and design, incorporating suits, coats, ensembles, sheaths and
colorful printed evening styles.
The Israeli offerings are of a
"variety sportswear, rainwear,
daytime outfits, lush evening cre-
ations, coats and suits, many ac-
cented with fur.
The fashion show will be coor-
dinated by Mrs. Irene Gracia, of
Saks Fifth Avenue, which is also
accessorizing the show and furnish-
ing several models.
An attendance in excess of 1,000
is anticipated. Admission is either
by the purchase of a $100 Israel
Bond, or the sale of three bonds.


Page 2-B
*Uisf fhrkMar
Friday. October 7,
I960
1 tablespoon grated orange
rind
the sauce. Serve hot with mashed
potatoes, boiled rice or spaghetti.
Serves 10 or more. tablespoon wine or fruit
Variation: If using grapevine e
leav,-. be ', Hv
1 cup cherry, red xi pberrv
itrawberry pre-tue
'2 cup fine crumb-
= 2 cup finely chopped nuts any kind
Divide chilled pastry into
leaves Wash first :n cold water
then drain and cover with boilina
water. Cover and let stand till
wilted. Drain and use like the cab-
bage lea\e> in above recipe. If
leaves are -mall, place 2 together
for sizeable rolls. Cook then bake par.^ r0u out one rn mto
as above. a >heet a pos< |,r,,l
For this holiday it has been cus- enough to fit into a 7 .xii-mc,)
toir.ary to serve the following pas- baking pan. lighUy dusted vA
trv: "or. bringing up pastry along ql
. .. four sides about It-inch Sprm
Fluden. B*k Recipe {lilmg Xo 1. RoU out ?ec0[)d ^
Crwst- pastry Jn the sam uay m]
At a recent charter-signing ceremony of the Is- Florence Kupperman was chairmen of ie^-
Vender' chapter of Woman's American ORT. Seated (left to right) are Mesdcmes Josephber-
members pledged their support to Mrs. Philip ger. Margaret Newman Steam. ^P *"*
Stark, president, to enable the chapter to meet Florence Kupperman Joseph hantor. Georg,
its aoaTof participation in the program of ORT. Whitney. Standing (left to right} are Mes-
which is to -help people help themselves." dames Sam Garfunkel. Sidney Finger. Aaron
The program teaches them skills and trades. Green. Terry Sponder. David Nabot. Marim
thereby making them self-supporting. Mrs. Lodge. Joseph Lipsky. Harold Cruder.___________
Sukkoth Features Special Dishes
of pastry in the sarrt
pierce with a fork. Arrange over]
2'4 cups sifted all-purpose flour filling, bringing up sides a lituj
4 teaspoon salt. Spread filling No. 2.
* cup softened vegetable short-
By LEAH LEONARD
Cover with the 3rd rolled out
pastry dough, treated like the 2nd
pastry', then spread the 3rd filling!
evenly over top. sprinkling muel I
crumbs and chopped nuts over all
in swirls or evenly. Bake in a pre.
heated oven 25 to 30 minutes at I
Sift together flour and salt into 425 F. or till crust edges are light,
a mixing bowl then cut in the ly browned. Cut into squares or
softened shortening till the mix- oblong sections when cold right
ture forms little peas. (Use two the pan. and lift out aeh section
knives or a pastry blender) Add carefully with a spatula or broad]
the ice water, a little at a time, k
emng
5 to 6 tablespoons ice cold
water
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon grated lemon or
orange rind (optional)
plants: red and green peppers; cabbage leaf in turn; starting from .
Sums. pers. oranges, kumquats. the thick portion of the leaf, roll while rn.xing t,,11 it^bep* to form
The'fall ar.d winter season brings ^^ ^ ,ernons a add color tucking in the two ends secure- ball ofdoug h then add thesugax
us a colorful week of holiday. Suk accents t0 lny deSJgn of deCora- "p' "*\ f roUs p,ace and graed fruit rnd *nd ron'irnie
koth. which features special on Enlist the children in this l>' whU ionuB* mto rolls. Place t0 pat together. Chill m refrigera-
dishes plan while vou tell the story of each roll in a 2- or 2W-inch deep %nr wh>le preparing the fillings as
Wketkek vcu eat your meals in lh, Sukko'h' or better still, have heavy frying pan. close to getner. beknr:
4 of Willows appro- xhem teU lt t0 vcu and add the following mixture to pg^. lst f;]ling m4y ^ *Ith-
festooned Rnt ,#l!a eet dow to recipes ccver; grated raw apple mixture or
TV SPECIAL
9:30-11:00 PM
But lefa get d. -. to recipes
w tt Ml vegetables, or youl] want t0 thls Hoh.
-. e a corner of your dining- y.'eek
r ior decorating, one main c>h '*
r.e at least
orct .:! be H also called
Praakt me. and Galuptze by
1
go rack to Rurr.ania. >ou will use
( instead
bsge I r.d prepare Sarmah
ie tee \'-:zi Recipe below.
We !;ke to make festoons of
NsMtel
2 pounds of chopped beef
-2 cup long-grain nee
2 eggs
1 large onion, grated
1 large carrot, grated
1 leaspoo r :o taste)
Combine thoroughly and
let
juice or vinegar chopped dried fruits proportions
't-a spoon citric acid as follows:
* cup "dark brown sugar (or to Crmbine:
H4 to 2 eupa tomato sauce
(homemade or canned)
Water added till sufficient to
cove- -^ par
Cover and bring to a boil. Re-
of Co k Trouftiyr JT duce heat to a steady dimmer and
cranberries, using an, rse stand ".** T*!l\?T*?**M*. P/-t let cook 30 minutes. Lift out each
cranberries, using any course ^^Skiva"as tot cook M rc:DU,eS ^ Ml each
thread to string cranberries for f** ** cabba8 lwes *s fo1 f.hed roll into a suitable baking
"5 to 24 leaves of cabbage (cut jjj.J[-* -"gg
from medium or large cab- .
bage)
Boiling water to ccver
Cover and let stand till leaves
decorations. Once when cranber
lies were not available we made
strings of both the green and the
large, round dark grapes, and add-
ed clusters of grapes of both va-
rieties to bowls of apples placed
about the diningroom. are wilted and soft enough to ban- ing water may be added if neces-
Coruakeares. with some ears of die. Drain and let stand in a eoJ-jsary. shaking the pan to distribute
corn with the husks pulled partly ander over boiling water, if de- ________ _
away: small |ipsinr and all va- sired for easier handling and fill
rieties of squaskes: cucumbers ing Place a ball of the meat mix-
and green tomatoes: purple eg- ture m the center of each drained
2 cups grated raw apple, tight-
acked
4 tablcpoors sugar
teaspoon cinnamon (or more
to suit taste)
A dash cf nutmeg
3 tablespoons fine cracker or
dry cake crumbs
(If using dried fruits like
prunes, pears, apricots, put
these through a food chopper
for best results) ,
or triple rows. Be sure the sauce
comes to the top. Bake at 375 F ^n4 filling:
for 30 minutes, turning carefully
to brown each side lightly. Boil- 1 cup chopped seeded rasas
H cup chopped nuts tany kind)
'1 cup fine crumbs
Tcrght as yoo watch TV enjc> the
distinctive nutty flaw* ol SissJ(nigtit
cheese. Great far snacks a 3i crackers
and fruit 6 handy "iip ccer." wedges.
THE OftlGINAl
^ Swiss
Knight
:ssc*L"rtatCxusi
m% P9iif
WHICH KEF
UIBSMBME
nuuMnHrrats
CMasECF
PASTMMI
BOLSGM
a:
ITLUMM KUUTESSOS. SSKMOITTS t KJTUtAjrrj
KOSHER ZI0N
SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
ISt Sswtk Water Market, CfckaflO t, llliaeit
Bring the genius of
real Jewish cooking to your table!
MANISCHEWITZ
Whitefish & Pike
<&e<38u*e
Gefilte Fish
COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. IMC.
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PHONES: JE 1*232. JE S4231
HERMAN PEARL PAT OEARR
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RYE BREAD PUMPERNICKEL
CHALAH ROUS BAGELS
division of NEW YORK BAKERIES, INC.
*JE 1-7117
outter or .WJffli-lS
For FREE Recipe Book, send today to:
THE B. MANISCHEWITZ CO.. Box 88. Newark 1. N. J.
MANISCHEWITZ


Friday* October 7. 1960
Pag* 3-B
35 Years of Pioneer Women's Work
By MRS. MILTON GREEN
President, Greater Miami Council
Pioneer Woman
As the Jewish world prepares
to celebrate Sukfcoth, we of Pio-
neer Women will celebrate a
double "simcha"the birth of our
organization 35 years ago.
In 1925, a woman in New York
received a letter from her friend,
Rahel Yanait Ben-Zvi, asking for
a loan of $500 with which to build
a well. The letter was read by
seven women, six of whom did not
know the writer, but something in
its undertones so impressed these
American women, that they re-
solved to implement and
Mrs. Green is president of the
Greater Miami Council of Pioneer
Women. During this holiddv season,
she offers then views on the programs
and significance of Pioneer Women
in the United States and Israel.
Irengthcn the hands of those who
were laboring Under the severest
hardships to make Palestine a
homeland for the Jewish people.
This handful of women organ-
ized into Pioneer Women to re-
spond to the appeal for help. Lit-
tle did they realize that in 35
years Pioneer Women would be
an international organization a
firm chain binding together the
Jewish women of the world, with
links in Canada, Mexico, South
America, Europe and Israel.
' Pioneer Women stands as the
vital, constructive, Women's La-
bor Zionist Organization. It ia
unique in that it is the only wom-
en's organization anywhere in the
world directly connected with a
sister organization in Israel, the
Moetzet Hapoalotor {he Work-
ing Women's Councilfor which
it is the main source of support.
With the Moetzet Hapoalot in Is-
rael and the Pioneer Women in
America, we have a remarkable
partnership of women. Each
shares the same deep belief in so-
cial and economic equality and
social justice.
It is a partnership of women
who believe that support and help
for Israel is not philanthropy, not
charity, not a question of address
unknownbut that support for Is-
rael is a constructive investment
in a new way of life, a life of
MRS. MIITOS GREEN
vigor, of beauty, of purpose, and
a blueprint for democracy in the
Middle East. This partnership is
strengthened by the constant ex-
change of leaders, visits of one
to the other, a personal, intimate
relationship that does hot exist in
any other organization.
From 500 to 315,000these fig-
ures indicate the growth of the
Moetzet Hapoalot, since it was or-
ganized 35 years ago. It is to-
day the largest women's organ-
ization in Israel.
During the past 35 years, with
the help of Pioneer Women, the
Moetzet Hapoalot has established
training farms, vocational schools,
convalescent care homes for
women and children, and a vast
vast network of children's homes,
kindergartens, and nurseries.
These are not institutions, but
homes where loving care of thous-
ands of children has made them
strong, both in body and spirit,
and has given them a new lease
on life.
The greatest acknowledgement
of the vital role played by our sis-
ters in Israel lies not only in their
heroic fight for freedom, but in
their importance to Israel's, fu-
ture. This is underscored by the
fact that eight women of the Moet-
zet Hapoalot occupy seats in the
II
m$.K ASH A
of course! *
1
A traditional standby...
for old-timey good Kasha
Varneshkes Kasha
Knithts, and other treats.
Lost than 2< a serving!
Abe w Woir. Oeoey Kerneli far*)...
WeJT. Koiha 'N' Cnny .. WoJTi KoeSe Soup.
| Send for tt KASHA COOK BOOK:
;;: PHYUIS WOlfF, Ponn Y-a,. New Ye*
!
y.
iii 5
KASHA MEANS
iffij'j^
Distributed By
LEVINSONS FOOD SPECIALTIES
1050 Cost 17* Street Hioleek, florido Pheee T 71571

In Miami it's
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
for Home Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
The greet nemo In deiry products
FRANK J. HOLT, Menager -
Knesset. Israel's Foreign Minis-
ter, and the only woman cabinet
member, is Mrs. Gold*. Meir, who
, .at one time was national execiu
tive secretary of Pioneer Women.
In addition to supplying the
necessary funds for the Working
Women's Council in Israel, Pio
neer Women supports other ma-
jor national funds for Israel. It
is one of the participating organ-
izations in the Youth Aliyah co-
ordinating committee, and raises
its funds for this agency through
its Child Rescue Fund.
Pioneer Women, throughout the
country, has participated actively
in the campaigns of the United
Jewish Appeal, Federation, Hist a-
drut and the Jewish National
Fund, and has been outstanding |
in its sale of Israel Bonds.
At a recent Presidents confer-
ence in New York, Pioneer Worn- j
en launched its 35th year by an-,
nouncing that an Eleanor Roose-
velt Lecture Hall would be es-
tablished in the Graduate Library
School Building of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. The j
Hall will accommodate several
hundred students, and will be
built at a cost of $35,000. The
Graduto Library School Building
is an overall project of Pioneer i
Women for the coming year.
On the local scene, Pioneer
Women fulfills its obligation to!
the Moetzet Hapoalot by raising
a substantial quota through;
functions sponsored by the eight
chapters and the coordinating
Council. The 850 members are
not only active participants in all
Jewish community projects, but
support many social service pro-
jects of the .general community.
Last year, the Greater Miami
Council of Pioneer Women was
the recipient of a gold certificate
for its outstanding work on behalf
of the United Fund. This year,
Miami Pioneer Women sponsored
a party for and made spiritual
adoption of the children of the
National Cardiac Hospital. And
as recent as Hurricane Donna,
disaster victims were aided with
clothing from the Pioneer Worn
en's Thrift Shop.
On this, the 351h year of Pio-
neer Women, we celebrate not
only an achievement, but a pros-
pect of fulfilling our ideals in the
future.
Marriage Laws
Brochure Listed
By Special Report
NEW YORKA 78-page brochure
clarifying the traditional laws of i
Jewish family purity is once again!
available free-of-charge from Agu-,
dath Israel of America, it was an-
nounced by Rabbi Moshe Sherer.
executive vice president of the or-
ganization.
"Jewish Family Life," published
by the Spero Foundation, is now in
its seventh edition, and Agudath
Israel has in recent years distrib-
uted over 10,000 copies as a public
service.
Written in English by Rabbi Sid-
ney B. Hoenig, the brochure ex-
plains the background and details
of traditional Jewish marriage
laws and Mikva (ritualarium) ob
i servance.
Free copies are available with
10c to cover postage from Relig-
ious Observance Division. Agudath
Israel of America, 5 Beekman St.,
New York 38. .
Exports Talk to Women '
Dr. Stephen C. Wright, child psy-
chiatrist, and A. J. Montanari.
head of the Montanari Clinical
School, spoke at the North Shore
lOpti-Mrs. membership tea at the
| home off Mrs. Louis Pilzer, 7815
|Noremac ave.'. this week. The
speakers discussed emotionally
disturbed children.
Mi
always look (or the
EARLY SANTAS
GO INTO* ACTION
toyland
OPENS TODAY
Make way for the young fry Toyland opens
today! The most tremendous, the most exciting
collection of toys ever unloaded from Santa's copi-
ous bag. Have the pick of this enormous assort-
ment now And you don't have to "take them
with you" now use our convenient layaway
plan* and we'll hold them for you until Dec. 15th!
Toyland, fourth floor across-the-bridge miami.
Also available at all other Burdine's stores
*10% down will hold your purchases 'til December
15th. Minimum deposit 1.00.
Ruthie Walker Doll by Horsman, head tilts and
turns, all vinyl. 26" tall, can wear any size 1 dress
9.98
Football Outfit, plastic helmet, long sleeve jersey
shirt, shoulder pad, heavy pants. S-M-L .... 9.98
Automatic Sice* Ball Game, circular target with 9
balls. Balls release automatically for replay. For
ages 6 to adult \_____.....__ 4.54
Colonial Mansion Doll House, a miniature home in
every way including furniture. For ages 3-12.
4.98
Pin Ball Gam* for ages"6 to adult. Score registers
automatically. Battery operated 9.98
Chatty Kathy, really talks! Answers questions, says
whole sentences by pulling cord. 20" tall. Usually
18.00
shirt, shoulder pad, heavy pants. S-M-L
12.88
9.98
SHOP TONIGHT Til 9 P. M.


Page 4-B
+Jm&>ncrkttan
Friday, October 7, leen
Left to right are Mrs. Sidney Lewis, president.
Greater Miami Section, National Council Jew-
ish Women; Mrs. William I. Brenner, Section
vice president of membership; Mrs. Phyllis
Garber, secretary; and Miss Minnie Feinberg,
executive secretary, workina on membership
plans in one of the rooms of the new suite of
offices Council now occupies.
Council Has New Quarters; Drive in Process
This summer, the Greater Miami
Section. National Council of Jew-
ish Women, moved to spacious new
quarters at 1317 Biscayne blvd.
Air-conditioning and a perma-
nent board room which holds 100
will be a spur to vigorous, stimula-
ting meetings, and exiensive work-
rooms for mimeographing and
mailing will help Council volunteers
with the volume of paper work
which increases with the growth ol
Council's membership, according to
Mrs Sidney Lewis, president.
The building is centrally located
and easily accessible to both Miami
and Miami Beach. "Each division
will hold one board meeting each
year at the Council office, giving to
the neighborhood groups a focal
point which will contribute to a
feeling of the oneness of the eight
divisions combined as the Greater '
Miami Section."' Mrs. Lewis said. !
The new quarters are in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation j
bldg.

On Oct. 5. all divisions held
their membership parties. Attract
ed by Council's extensive and many-1
facted program of education, social:
action and service to the commun |
ity, over 550 more women joined
Council's 2.000 members here. With
the membership slogan, "each one
reach one in '61." Miami Section
is well on its way to winning the
Record Nursing Class Graduates
Personal .satisfaction as the key
to success in nursing careers wn
emphasized by Hilda M. Torrop.
extiuiive director of the National
I for Practical Nurse Educa
tion and Ser\ice. in her graduation
address to the Mt. Sinai Hospita.
Srbool of Practical Nursing on
Sept. 28.
Speaking in Wolfson Auditorium
to the largegst graduating cla>~ in
the school's 10-year history. Miss.
Torrop called upon the 39 candi
i to develop their faculties of
Illness, imagination and court-
esy io meet the increased burdens
of nurses today
"A nurse's greatest privilege
and responsibility is that people
MOKE PEOPLE USE
refreshing, calorie-tree
/
a sr^
SWflTft THAN SU6AI
TIT MO WOO VAlUt
Rtcommtndcd b, doctors lor
3.ibetx* Orttwt-cMs *nd Io cjl-
c r dttts. Ust lor tf*rri|fi
totem. cookM|. Pure Com
pWW, Mmtm 4 m. Ik
CUMtlNTEIO NOrmrnNINC
AT rOOO STORES EVCMVWHCMf
need and believe in her.'" Miss Tor
rop said.
"Everything is worthwhile when
somebody turns to you as the most
important person in the world."
she added.
Mis- Torrop. active in nursing
administration since the rr,:d-30's.
pointed to the growing adapt.hility
of practical nurses in a time of
critical nursing need.
"Only five years ago." she said,
"the practical nurse was OiJy a
staff nurse. Today she serves in
the operating room, as assistant to
supervisory personnel, and in
I teaching posts."
The graduating class also was
addressed by Samuel Levenson.
member of the board of trustees
Samuel Gertner. executive direc
tor of the hospital: and Mrs. Phil-
ip Lefkowitz. former president of
; the women's auxiliary.
The 39 graduates brought to 200
the number-of practical nurses
trained at the school, which offers
the only course in Florida accred-
ited by the National Assn. for Prac-
tical Nurse Education and Service.
; as well as the State Board of Nurs-
ling and the Veterans' Admini>tra
tion.
It is expected that more than 20
of the graduating nurses will re-
! main at Mt. Sinai and other hospi-
tals in^the Greater Miami area.
national prize given at the biennial
convention for the Section attract-
ing the most new members, ac
cording to local Section officers.
To establish warmth and friendli
MM, as well as to help the new
member place herself in the Coun
cil program, all divisions hav
made plans for the first of rnan>
new members teas early in Octo
ber.
Small groups of new members
will meet officers and chairmen ir
specialized fields of Council's activ
ities who will explain Council';
structure, philosophy and servio
program.
Mrs. William I. Brenner. Sectior
vice president of membership, feel;
this mutual exchange of informs
ion "will bring fresh ideas, enthu
siasm and strength to Council, en
suring a continuation of its work
toward the preservation of lree
dom. the exercise of compassior.
and the will to be of ever greatei
service to our fellow man."
NOW!
Launch Flower Lecture Series
Cedars of Lebanon Women s
Auxiliary launches a special talent
project Friday, 10 a.m.. at the
Coral Gables Masonic. Lodge. 41
Valencia ave.
Featured will be Mrs. Charles
McWethy. of Coral Gables, in the
first of four lecture demonstrations
on "How to Arrange Flowers."
The entire course will include
Japanese concepts of design; use
of material from one's own gar-
den; uses of various types of con-
Uainers. including unusual vases or
! urns; arrangements suitable for
end tables, coffee tables, dininp
(tables and mantlepieces; and prep-
aration of dry material for use with
| fresh material.
Other lectures are scheduled Oct.
21 and 28 and No*. 4. Mrs. Mc-
Wethy is a past chairman of Gar-
den Centers of the Florida State
Garden Club Assn.. president of the
West End Garden Club, and a mem
ber of the Ikebana International
Society.
She is also past president of tn.
.Miami Floralia Arrangers club as
I well as of the Florida Federatioa
of Judges and the Metropolitan m;. >
ami Flower Show Board.
In charge of registration for tbe
course- is Mrs. Hyman Kaplan m
N. Prospect dr.. Coral Gables
Others on the committee are Mrs
Emil Gould, Mrs. B. F. Breslauer'
and Mrs. Milton Margulis. '
Birthday Supper fieff
Thrid anniversary of the South
Miami chapter of Women's Ameri.
can ORT will be held Saturday at
Suniland Hall, 11525 Se. Diit
hwy.. in the form of a birthday
supper ball. In charge of reser-
vations are Mrs. Leo Kopolow and
Mrs. Selvin Fox. Mrs. Allen Tail.
nen is chairman of the affair.
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[Friday, October 7, 1960
-Jewisti fhrld/ar
Page 5-B
Women
In Social Affairs
Beach Afternoon Chapter
Kadimah's kosher smorgasbord
will be held Saturday. 7 p.m., at
the William Chasen home, 3061 SW
11th st. Mrs. Lillian Cohen is chair-
man. Servin? on the committee
are the Mesdames Albert Berson.
William Chase, Jack Bott, Kalman
Kalman, Milton Kessler, Hyman
; Seltzer, Cele Segal, David Meltzer
and Teeny Deutsch.
.
On Sunday noon. Pioneer Worn
I en's Club 2 will hold its annual in-
! stallation in the form of a luncheon
at the Harfenist Restaurant. 1381
October luncheon meeting of the
. Miami Beach Afternoon chapter of
w A* d y U \ na,,onal Presi- Women's American ORT will be
' ,P'oneer Women has an-:heid Wednesday noon .' the Bel
wZpS. ,hn f f P,oneer A.re hotel. Featured will be a
*71sm^th a"mve0rE,ary' any demonstration by the Women's Ex-
new member m the 35-year age ; change Hobby Shop.
,'roup will receive this year's mem-1
bership free. .. ~l _
Boodms to Mark
50th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Max Boodin, of 735
Michigan ave.. will celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary on Oct.
10.
The couple were married in Rus-
sia, and left for the United States
almost immediately thereafter.
Mr. and Mrs. Boodin have lived
in Miami since 1945, coming here
fromDetroit, Mich.
The couple have one son. three-
EJaS "ft ^ghte^nd-IIZ\^Z7.
President. Mrs. Irving Liftman;
vice presidents. Mesdames Abra-
Mrs. Boodin is a member of the
[Rehearsing for the musical installation of Sis-
terhood and PTA of Temple Beth Sholom are
Cantor David Conviser at me piano, and Mrs.
iDavid Drucker, chairman, Mrs. Wolfie Cohen,
land Mrs. Norman Arkin." Participants not
shown are Mrs. Tom Gerard, Mrs. Harry Smith,
Mrs. Stanley Arkin and Mrs. Leo Levin. The
funclion will take place at the Everglades hotel
on Oct. 19.
lusical Program Will Set Stage For Installation
For the first time in its 18-year
Istory. the Sisterhood and PTA of
emple Beth Sholom will hold a
puble installation, and for the first
ne it will be held in the fail in
lead of the spring.
iThe installation luncheon will
itake place Wednesday noon. Oct.
[19, at the Everglades hotel.
Preceding the installation. Mrs.
Burton Haft will offer a program
I of musical selections.
Installation will take the form of
i a poetic script with music, written
fomen Planning
[or Tag Day
IWomen's chapters of Miami's
ational Children's Cardiac Hos
Ital are busy on the telephone this
pek. calling for 8,000 volunteers
will join them on next Janu-
|> > Tag Day fund-raising drive to
|ise $75,000 for the new "Enchan-
Forest" building program of
local 100 percent charity in
Itution.
five area groups of dedicated,
Buateer workers are combining
pir efforts in the Tag Day pro-
am. with Bob Rubinstein, assis-
M secretary of Children's Car-
lo Ho.-pital, directing and coor-
Hting the drive. National Chll-
pn's Cardiac Hospital, like other
spitals. is not included in the
|ited Fund, but operates solely on
juatary public contributions.
with Tag Day scheduled for Jan.
[members of the various chapters
Criminologist to be Speaker
Jacques L. Bril will discuss "Sci-
entific Detection of Deception" at
a meeting of the Greater Miami
chapter of ORT on Monday evening
at the Deauville hotel. Bril is the
inventor of the lie-detector and a
noted criminologist.
Rebekah Lodge Mooting
Sunshine Rebekah Lodge 9 will
meet Tuesday evening at Work-
men's Circle, 2565 Washington ave.
heading up the project include Mes-
dames Henry Jacobson. Martin
Rubinstein, Rae Rosenthal and
Hilda Bendell, of Miami chapter:
Clementine Kemp, Ethel Silver
stein, and Gert Lachs. Miami
Beach; Ruth Katzif and Faye Em-
mer, Flamingo; Aline A m a r a.
North Dade; and Sandy Salzman
and Shirley Seltzer, South Dade.
by Mrs. Seymour Baron and en-
titled "Two for the Temple." Mrs.
Charles P. Feinberg will do the
narration. Songs, under the direc-
tion of Cantor David Convisor, will
be rendered by Mesdames Tom
Gerard, Harry B. Smith. Jules Ar-
kin, Norman Arkin, Leo Levin. Da-
vid Drucker and Wolfie Cohen.
Mrs. Drucker, who will be in-
stalled as a Sisterhood vice pres-
ident, is chairman of the musical
program. Rabbi Leon Kronish,
spiritual leader of the congrega-
tion, will be installing officer. Mrs.
Howard Miller and Mrs. Samuel
Hirsch. outgoing presidents of Sis-
terhood and PTA respectively, will
be co-chairmen of the luncheon.
Mrs. Murray Gilden is in charge
of special arrangements, and Mrs.
Tom C. Kravitz is ticket chairman.
To be installed as the new pres-
idents are Mrs. Harvey E. Kramer
for Sisterhood, and Mrs. Joseph
Pardo for PTA.
ham Shedroff and Miriam Wolf- Golda Meir Club. Pioneer Women,
man; financial secretary. Mrs. Na-1 Her husband belongs to Ben-Gurion
than Ostrof; treasurer, Mrs. Wil-1 Branch of Farband.
liam Malmuth: recording secretary,
Mrs. Aaron Libman; and corres-
ponding secretary, Mrs. Sadie Ros-
enberg.
Retiree Group
Adds to Facilities
First Retirement Foundation this
Mrs. Isaac Offenhenden, presi-
dent of Bebe Idelson Club, announ- week added two more services for
ces a luncheon to be sponsored by the elderly, reported vice president
her group on Monday noon at the "
home of Mrs. Mendel Chomitz, 4458
Menorah Chapter Women
Menorah chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will hold a board meeting
Tuesday. 10 a.m., at the Peter Mil-
ler hotel. Mrs. Mildred R. Free-
man, president, will conduct the
meeting.
Sheridan ave. Proceeds are ear-
marked for Moetzet Hapoalot.

Mrs. Moses Meyer, vice president
of Council, has called a committee
meeting for all members of the
donor ad journal at the home of
Mrs. Jacob Krantz, 811 Euclid ave.,
on Tuesday evening.

Mrs. William Beckwith, president
of Golda Meir Club, will conduct
first meeting of the season Toes-
day, 8 p.m.. in Beth El Auditorium,
500 SW 17th ave The holiday of
Sukkoth will be celebrated with an
appropriate program. Social hour
is being hosted by the Mesdames
Isaac Pushkin, Rebecca Ishlon.
Eva Kahn and Anna Soren Bild.
Named Coordinator
Walter Lebowitz. president of the
Miami Beach Senior Citizens Assn.,
and general counsel for the Amer-
ican Federation of Senior Citizens.
has been named Democratic co
ordinator for senior citizens activ-
ities in the Miami Beach aroa by
Joe Weil, state coordinator, i^ebo
witz recently aduressetr a large
gathering of senior citizens at the
Blackstone hotel along with Sen.
Claude Pepper.
Helen Alpert.
One is a new oceanfront retire-
ment hotel, the other a nursing and
convalescent home. Both are in
Greater Miami.
This completes the Foundation's
nationwide program of services to
meet basic needs. Now included
are discount drugs, health insur-
ance, friendship travel tours, cost-
scaled Florida retirement living,
and the association's national news
publication.
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Page 6-B
Jenisti Hcrldlar
Friday, October 7, i960
For Her 'Doing' and 'Giving Women's
Leader to Receive Double Tribute
Mrs. Samuel T. S.p.ro is a pe-.with Hadassah for years desot
tite woman of boundless energy ing much of her effort to the Youth
and enthusiasm, channeled effec-1 Aliyah program. She '"*
lively and productively toward member oi.the national boar
helping to make the world "a bet-
ter place in -which to live."
the Youth AJiyah committee.
Mrs. Sapiro was the first Dia-
On Wednesday, she is;ZVZ%T^lVo^T^l
known to her associates, will stop ^utJa^MJJSribStes8 generously
'"doing" and "giving" long enough .South ^^ Medica*, Ceter.,
to accept a double tribute at an ^ne Ha^,a wvidcd the 12th
:E r^Ver^L^l^ne/glas/fo^the Center's chap-
THE LEAD OFF State of Israel Bonds. |eI-
Officially, the women's club year opened as of last Thursday with For Mrs Sapiro's work on be-! She is a life meJ" J
the installation luncheon of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organ- na of Israel Bonds she wdl re-, ^TchMrel' Cardiac Hospital,
iiations. Belle (Mrs. Irving) Lehrman installed Miriam (Mrs. Milton) ceive thUomanof Valor pin and ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ of
the
Na-
Sirkin her officers, chairman, directors and organ
the
MltlAM
BfUE
Exodus" Award. The Woman -
f Valor oin is the highest award the Jewish Home for the Aged and
ization presidents in a most moving manner. !whicn the State of Israel can pre- American Friends of the Hebrew
Every one-was glad of the opportunity to meet sent to a woman, and it signifies University,
the new executive director of the Greater Miami that Mrs. apiro has been directly, Miami residents since 1935, Mrs
Jewish Federation. Arthur S. Rosichan. and to hear responsible for the sale of $100,-j Sapiro and her husband make their
him speak. I was especially glad, since he said such OOO in Israel Bonds. I home
nice things about me and presented me with a Equally significant is the presen-
lovely charm from FJWO as outgoing president. ,a,ion o{ tne -Exodus" plaque for
'"extraordinary service to Israel's
A warm and friendly feeling was apparent, growth and security," because
throughout the luncheon, as women sat in groups of j,\TS Sapiro will be the first to re-
eight, and told each other how busy they were. A cejve this singular honor. The pres-
deep feeling of concern for community need, was entation will be made by Col. Dina
uppermost in their minds. Looks as if the com- Werth. commanding officer of
munity and you are going to have a banner year, -chen," the Israeli Woman's
Miriam. !Army.
Eighteen months of planning before thef first Ml special t^Wg
SS SL^UT&tPJSl ? SS will entertain at the lunch-
Heights is absolutely the last word in comfortable eon.
living. There is plenty of closet and storage room. is particularly fittir thai
which is
COt. DINA WERTH
Gables. They have three sons, all
of whom are married.
Chairman of the luncheon is Mrs.
Joseph Shapiro.
i .,-> to operate that even Marty can do it. says Pat.
the first prerequisite in every woman's Mrs. Sapiro should be honored for
dream house. They have a gas-f.red barbecue grill her effort, in selling bonds._Dur-
ing World War II, she was aecor-
ated and given the rank of a four-
star general by Mrs. Omar Brad-
ley for her work in the sale of
United States War Bonds.
Mrs. Sapiro has been working
with the Israel Bond drive
family reunion in Chicago,
they all stayed with Pat's
have two little boys. Need
They have just returned from Pat's
Ricky and Randy went with them, and
("imps. Jim and Helen Lewis, who also
mi re i>c said?
-* *
IN THE PUBLIC EYE
W.nen Sally (Mr*. Harold) Spaet got a hurry-up call to go on a
tr:p with her husband to Panama City and Bogota, Columbia, she
atarted packing like mad. Harold came home and saw the frantic
p. eking that was going on laughed and said. "Don't bother. We're not
Vitally interested in the growth
going to take any luggage wont be there long enough. AH that the deve,opment of Israel, both she
did was to fly down for the opening of an airport and shake hands all husband have visited the
around. It was 14*. hours flying time, but all Sally go to see were* %r^^K nalion in the Mid-
the mountains from the airport and to buy a chocolate bar and a Mrs ^ iro
pound Of coffee. Flying fascinates Sally and if she ever gets up ^ ^ ^ ^^
oourage she woulB like to take lessons. Then Harold would have to loyUrael where she saw first-
get up courage and fly with her. |h>nd |he resui,s 0f the funds she
In college, she majored in journalism and creative writing. She'helped to raise through the sale of
always intended to go back for a Master's degree. Every year it was [srae| Bonds.
pu-hed on to the next year, and now it's going to.wait until the children Qiher areas o{ civic and philan-
are through school. Methinks Sally is a frustrated writer for sure. thropic work are also of interest
But she's not frustrated as far as her hobbies are concerned. Sally no Mrs. Sapiro. She has been active
always wanted to be a good housewife. Following the old adage that
the way to a man's heart is through his stomach, she has the largest
and best collection of cook books in Miami. Although
active in many community affairs like Mt. Sinai
Women's Auxiliary, of which she was president.
Temple Israel Sisterhood, and the tfnited Fund.
Sally leans heavily towards her hobby flower
arrangements and the Garden- Club of Mt. Sinai
Women's Auxiliary. She loves to make the flower or:
fruit arrangements for her own dinner parties, as,
well as for her friends, and of course the center.
piece carries out a definite theme.
ever
since it began in Greater Miami ^ ^ g^^ T ^ ^ recent Israel Bond ^^
,,.on?X tne Womer^Dwls5 'here welcoming then new Israel Ambassador A^aham Har-
ton and presently serves as vice man (center) on his first visit to Greater Miami. For her con
chairman tinning effort in behalf of the State of Israel Bond campaign,
Mrs. Sapiro will be honored with a special award Wednesday.
Beach Committee
Meeting Here
Miami Beach Committee for the
Advancement of Grand Opera was
to have its first luncheon meeting
of the 1960-61 season this Thursday
at Junior's restaurant at 12: IS p.m.
The committee, consisting of
Being married to a civic leader is lots of fun prominent businessmen in the area.
SAUT according to Sally. You never know what is going is working with the Opera Guild of
to pop up next. How else could you get to meet so many fascinating, Miami to help celebrate the Guild's
and unusual people like the Flying Farmers for instance? The friend- 20th anniversary'. New chairman
aUpa she has made and the fact that she and Harold can do so many of the committee is Dr. Leonard H.
thiagi together make up for the trivial inconviences that go to make j Jacobson. of 6410 N. Bay rd.
up a life that is so much in the public eye. Dr. Jacobson was to address the
Onlv one thing bothers me. Sally What kind of a centerpe.ee *M.W^rit^f*"*^*
rm use for mao ball soup Barbecued nbs and hot apple P.e* fftt, ^yeTJSZ-
* dan Davidson, George Brumlik, T.
moo moo H. Greenfield. Charles Friedlander.
David Hochberg. Samuel Knowles.
Because of Hurricane Donna. Leon and Dorothy Kaplan couldn't Morns Lapidus. David Levinson.
drive their daughter. Rita, to Gainesville for her first year in college, j Hitter Levinson. Arnold Levy. Sam-
She finaUy got a ride, but in order to get her luggage to school, it had ^ L Seller, Meyer B. Marks. Dr.
to be divided and sent with three other people. My. my. they must, Arthur M. Green, and Hank Meyer,
have had a good time shopping. ________________________________
Richard and Linda Brickman. the Kaplans' elder daughter, brought___________________________
the baby over to stay out the hurricane. The weather stripping made,
a most peculiar noise, like a herd of cattle, and that intrigued the,
baby. When asked about the weather. Karen said. "Poppy had a hur-,
mane with a moo cow and lots of big trees fall down." Absolutely no
one could give a better description of a hurricane, says Leon. He's an
attorney and he should know.
* *
Israelite Center Jewish Playhouse
3198 S.W. 24th Terrace, Miami
Prawdfy frastats with IHGUSH TITUS the f.Jlowine
OUTSTANDING JEWISH FILMS
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16th
"THE SINGING BLACKSMITH"
Sfarrinf ANNUM OrSHf*
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18th
"MONTICELLO HERE WE COME"
with MtNASHA SKULHIK and MICHll ROSENBftG
AOOEO ATTRACTION: "THE SINGERS OF ISRAEL"
CANTOR MALAVSKY 4. FAMILY CHOIR
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26th
"GOD, MAN AND DEVIL"
MfCMU MKHtUSKO I LUCY GEtMAN
SUNDAY, APRIL 16th
"MAZEL-TOV YIDDEN"
with L10 fUCHS, CNAIM TAUBtK
----- ALL SHOWINGS at 8:00 P.M. -----
Pfcaadi h Isrmtlitt Crater St\i%iwl UkI
Season Ticket: Donation $5.00 Individual Show: Donation St 50
FOR RESERVATIONS Call HI 5 1S29 Evenings HI 3S4+4
THE ISRAELITE CENTER JEWISH PLAYHOUSE
ATTN: R. GILBERT. P.O. Box 413. Miami 45. Fla.
Enclosed find check in amount of %__________to cover Seatoa
Tickets at S3 each, or to cover...... Ticket* at '"
each for performance on __ ....... (fill in <>>
N'anin ._________
Add re**
SOMETHING NEW
How would you like to go to a play and not know how long you
were going to be there? That's what happened to Harold and Stella
Turk when they were in Los Angeles. They went to see "The Connec-
tion." a curious experimental play in which the actors imorovise their!
lines. It's supposed to be the newest in Theater (with a capital T). They |
aba saw the Royal Danish Ballet, which is supposed to be the finest
in the world and that is not experimental.
Saw "Vintage Sixty." which had its tryout in Los Angeles and then
opened in New York. If it closes there, at least the Turks got to see
it first.
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m out if Aoniou of
rims? wotumAMsmr
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Friday. October 7, 1960
* Jew I si) fhrktlati
Page 7-B
was the choice of Mrs. Stephen
Carner. Her dress featured a
deep collar cut low to give the
impression of a cape. Her hat
was of the large, white, soft va-
riety.
Mrs. Sidney Lewis was in moss
green, with a high rounded neck-
line and short sleeves. She wore
white rope beads, draped around
her neck, and a white modified
"beanie" hat with a long white
tassel down the back.

P ASH ION shows are returning
to our social scene. Last Fri-
day, your columnist produced a
show at the King's Bay Yacht
and Country Club for one of the
local chapters of the Cancer
Assn. Clothes were from the
Princely Shops, with emphasis on
deep, muted shades of green.
Next week, we are coordinat-
ing a fashion show for the Wom-
en's Panhellenic Assn. of Miami
at the LaGorce Country Club.
Strictly-lown_ clothes -.muLL, ttt
shown from the Don Mullen col-
lection Club members are mod-
eling the clothes, and the collec-
tion will feature, in addition to
dresses and gowns, -the sports-
wear groups that are in demand
for the gold course, as well as for
many of our more casual hours.
FEDERATION of Jewish Wom-
en's Organizations held its in-
stallation luncheon last Wednes-
day at the Seville hotel. This
group is comprised of 120 affili-
ated organizations, and Mrs. Mil-
ton Sirkin was installed as pres-
ident. For the occasion, she wore
a beige dress, and her hat was
in tones and shades of brown.
Chairman of the day was Mrs.
Rernard Stevens, and her silk
shirtwaist was of blue and pur-
ple stripes. She also wofe a small
dark blue feathered hat.
The coat style dress was worn
by Mrs. Buddy Weissel, featur-
ing eggshell white with huge jet
black buttons. Large patch poc-
kets were placed low near the
hemline. Her black straw hat
.showed a face framing deep
brim.
Mrs. Daniel Heller chose a
green ensemble with green hat.
An aqua print was the selection
ot Mrs. William Bernstein for the
occasion. At the microphone was
Mrs. Irving Lehrman in a black
print with a bateau neckline,
and a small muted white fur hat.
Mrs. Arnold Strauss chose a
.silk print in transitional tones of
yellow and greens on a white
background. Her iridescent green
toque hat had a touch of veiling.
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers looked chic
in a black imported cotton suit
and a large black velvet hat.
Mrs. Richard Friedman also se-
lected black in a silk tunic, while
Mrs. Oscar Sindell chose light
blue with a small royal blue hat.
THE new taupe color was se
* lected by Mrs. Raymond R.
Rubin, which was featured in her'
silk print shirtwaist dress, and [
also her stitched velvet hat. Brim
of the hat was contuored and
scalloped.
Mrs. Michael Tobin wore a two-
piece damask ensemble with the
short jacket. Her hat was of black
silk organza draped over the
pancake-shaped frame. A touch
of color was added with a large j
red rose. The same shape hat was j
also chosen by Mrs. Melvin
Frumkes, except for the fringed
feathers, which looked like a lux-
urious powder puff. Her dress
had a sheath skirt of white silk
with the bodice of gold and white I
stripes. The collar was cut low
with a modified shawl effect.
The costume suit in a two-piece
blue-on-greeh print was worn by
Mrs. Jay Siegel. Powder and
royal blue were the colors, and
the royal was repeated in the
small pill-box hat, as well as in
the rest of her accessories. Black
silk linen with a touch of white
"Y" Branch Names
New Supervisor
Mrs. Sylvia Ruskin has been ap-
pointed youth activities supervisor
at the Miami YMHA Branch of the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center. She replaces Judith Gold-
stein, who is now a graduate assist-
ant at the University of Miami, pre-
paring for completion of work to-
ward a PhD degree in pyschology.
Last year, Mrs. Ruskin was sup-
ervisor of the Junior High Depart-
ment at the Miami Branch, and
also worked in the senior citizens
prpgram. She has also been arts
and crafts counselor in the day
camp program for the last two
years. During the coming year,
she will be responsible for the sup-
ervision of the Senior High Divi
sion, which presently includes 12
clubs, with a total membership of
over 300 young people.
She will also be assuming the re-
sponsibility of editor of the GMJCC
Bulletin.
Mrs. Ruskin holds a Bachelor's
degree from New York University,
where she specialized in occupa-
tional therapy. Prior to coming to
the agency, she had many years
of camp counseling experience. She
resides with her husband. Stephen,
who is an attorney, and their chil-
dren, Michael. 9, and Jimmy, 5.
Theater Group i
Goes on Stage
"The Night of January 16," by
Ayn Rand, will be presented at
Temple Ner Tamid on Oct. 22 and
23.
The "First Niters" will stage
the production under the direction
of Mrs. Harry (Lillian) Burak, her-
self the author of many plays pre-
sented in the Greater Miami area
during the past few seasons.
The "First Niters" is a dramatic
group of semi -.professional and
professional actors, who offer a
repertoire of comedy, drama and
mystery. President is Gertrude
Marx, who has appeared* at the Co-
conut Grove Playhouse and Stu-
dio M with such stars as Ed Beg-
ley, and may be seen in the cur-
rent film, "The Bell Boy," featur-
ing Jerry Lewis.
The organization is open for
booking throughout the Greater
Miami area.
"The Night of January 16" fea-
tures a murder trial. Unique part
of the production is that six mem-
bers of the audience will serve aa
jurors and give their verdict after
the final curtain._________________
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tion of the Orthodox Union's Kosher
Products Directory, listing a record
total of more than 1.500 kosher
foods and related products, has
been published. Free copies are
available on request from the
Orthodox Union, 84 Fifth ave., New
York 11.
The new 26-page directory has a
new cover and a redesigned copy
format for easier readability. Many
products are listed which are avail-
able for the first time .under the
rabbinical supervision of the Ortho-
dox Union.
Rabbinic phases of the Orthodox
Union's kosher certification pro-
gram, now in its 35th year of co-
operation with the American food
industry, are handled through the
Rabbinical Council of America, the
largest association of Orthodox
rabbis in the world, which serves
as the rabbinic arm of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America.
Yom Kippvr Cantata
Temple Emanu-El junior congre-
gation Yom Kippur services Satur-
day featured a cantata, "That Thy
Days May be Long Upon the Land."
The cantata was arranged by
Trixie Levin and Rabbi Bernard
Mussman, director of education at
the Temple, assisted by Cantor
rjirsh Adler and Joseph Schreib-
man. music director.
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for the past 16 years.
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Page 8-B
+Jeis*rk>rkfc*ri
Friday. October 7, i960
Beth Israel
Marks Sukkoth
At Film festival'
Sisterhood of Beth Israel Congre-
gation will celebrate the Sukkoth
holiday with. *.. movie concert of.
lA'onard Bernstein and the New
York Philharmonic Orchestra on
film direct from Moscow and Ven-
ice. The showing is Tuesday av
ning at the Social Hall. 711 W. 40th
m Mi:imi Beach.
The Moscow concert was filmed
at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory,
and features Dimitri Shostakovich's
Leningrad Sviftphony and Aaron
Copland's "Billy the Kid" Ballet
suite, with appearances hy Boris
Pasternak ;ind Shostakovich.
The Venice concert was (timed
at the Venice International Music
Festival, where Bernstein played
anil conducted Mozart's Piano (on
ccito in noted U.S. attorney, comments on
the importance of education in a
free land.
Seasonal refreshments will be
erved in the specially decorated
Sukk.h. with a social hour follow-
ing. Mrs. George Hechter is pres-
ident Mrs. Charles Inslat is chair-
man.
From Shochet to Hockettor How
A Telegram Pilloried a Publisher
Jewish Floridian publisher Fred. of the extremist Florida States
K. Shochet was congratulated Mon Rights Party, which he organized,
... -
Due to this week's advanced deadline Hal Pearl does not ap-
pear. His column resumes next week. _____ ________________
Expert Feels Religion
Won't Hurt Kennedy
By Special Report
day "for putting our fine Cover
nor on vour ballot."
The congratulations came in the
form of a telegram to "Hon. Fred
K. Shochet. chairman of the States
Rights Party, which read: "Ac-
cept our thanks for putting our fine
Governor on your ballot."
Senders were Dewey Earle
and R. C. Coulter, of the party's
organization in Little Rock. Ark
The candidate of "Shochet's bal-
lot" was Gov. Orville Faubus.
The Jewish Floridian publish-
er gently but firmly rejected the
mistaken plaudits. The recipient
should have been Fred Hockett,
of Miami.
He zoomed to prominence here sev-
eral years ago when John Kasper
visited Miami following the race
riots he helped form in Clinton,
Tenn., and prior to his serving a
term in Federal prison.
The National States Rights Par-
ty is, itself, arch segregationist and
anti-Semitic.
Opti-Mrs. Hears
Nurse Talk
Hockett is locally identified with
; iation. His view was that among
the 43 percent who are committed
NEW YORK-A leading Amer Democrats, a large segment will be
ican sociologist and political ana ,notivated in their choices by eco ;
lyst at Yale University has predic nomic. socja| and other considera- numerous white supremacy and
ted that Sen. John Kennedy "will' tjons which can outweigh the relig-; anti-Semitic organizations. Among
not lose the election because he is jous jssue. others, he is executive secretary
a Catholic." He stressed that if j .. ------------------------------------------------
the religious Issue has anv effect "Since a mans ethnic origin is ,
at all it will be to add to his only one of the many factors which Women S Auxiliary to Meet
chances of winning an electoral col- dettrmtonjioy ftfJJ^J^J"^ !
left majority."
Sevmour Martin Lipset. current-
to him." Prof. Lipset said "in the : Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai
case of the poor Protestants, a; Hospital will meet Tuesday. 10:30
eoodlv number are likely to find | a.m.. in the Louis E. Wolfson Au-
PTA Presidents
Asked to Meeting
Dade County Council of Parent
Teacher Assns. will hold its first
board of managers meeting for
Dade PTA presidents Wednesday
at the Miami Woman's Club. 1737
N. Bayshorc dr. Coffee and orange
juice, will be served at 9:30 a.m.
before the meeting begins at 10.
Mrs Milton Weiss. Council pres
ident. will conduct the meeting. Ad
ditionaJ plans of work will be given
by Council chairmen.
A report on what is being done in
an education in the schools of Dade
county will be given hv Al Hur-
wit/, art director of the Board of
Public Instruction.
Mrs. Harry Bethea. first vice
pilllUI of Council and transpor
lalion chairman, will give dHoiis
on transportation plans to Tampa
next month, where the Parent-
Teacher state convention is sched
Head.
Besides the local unit presidents,
the board of managers is OoMpTised
of area coordinators. County Coun
Cil chairmen, and the executive
board. Presidents may invite their
Brtt fiH presidents to attend as
their guests.
Herbert Mathes. president,
conduct the session.
will
ly visiting Ford Research professor the idea of voting for a Republican ;ditorium of the hospital. Mrs. A.
I of political science at Yale, said i more repugnant than voting for a
that "there is surprisingly little ac j Catholic."
tual evidence that the religious is- ,n general, Prof. Lipset pointed
sue will be decisive for the voters | out "Americans have repeatedly
themselves." Dr. Lipset. whose eiectea Catholics and Jews to high
permanent position is professor of (0ffiot-. Thus. Catholics have held
sociology at the University of Cal- senatorships or governorships in
ifornia at Berkeley, presented his 110 give a partiai listingAlaska.
views on the religious issue and California. Ohio. New York. Penn-
the election campaign in an article SVlvania. Minnesota. Montana. Wis-
in the October issue of "Commen- consm. Maine. Washington, and
tary" magazine, a monthly publics Rnoc]e island. And since the tQ3(Vs.
Luncheon meeting of Opti Mcs.
of Miami Beach was held at the
Seville hotel on Tuesday.
Guest speaker was Miss Patricia
Summer, scholarship nurse of Opti-
I Mrs., Fourth District.
Beach Opti-Mrs. interest in the
nursing profession has received
strong support of the congregation
since its reactivation in 1955 So
far. five nursing scholarships have
been awarded to Miami Beach
High School graduates.
Two other guests at the meet-
ing were members of the Opti-
Miss Service Club of Miami Beach
High School, which Opti Mrs.
sponsors. Mrs. Melvin Richard
presided.
kdvertl* m,-lil
There's No
Such Thing....
A. -P aaSaj M .-v.j cheap
No AiatwKl of fArnishiOf, flooring and
tenoWittaf < mpptti by mm of the
' oxprtts <*n Mtobe Aft inferior prodwet
MM fin) 'op ,*"> W *
C.no'WUjM loo tint p.ion Mm West
soots procwToMo moo Mr chefs prepeee
rkeas to ploooe bo teote .1 too mmt
.octine >yioi
Spectol eiesvot iteoos or. cot *oo" ie.4-
CodU>beM loo om leoe, km mo
e*tneroa poor, fee ie..'liooioi. orfistt.
p, of ivoool lllpo >od ikiilrinl
'wpt *>* CMfVy VIKV fpoKooilTfW
A9od StMil ** n
tony other ctolojbrfwl .
Ovr coHWot oWKO, ktee dnoot
Mel oroiot nseost pooooro tor yoo
doll,, I., delUr. rho e*t Mn v.W.
m ttW SooMi o
OPtN DAIIY FO IUNCH and torvooa
oSonort frees 5 p ns to nsodnsont yoo
IM CoootMbfht loo Has*** IM|
WM of Hoofy loitsoo tonsbmos mfe-
mokty on** itUuliw lo tko ysM !
tevristt oool FtorsoSont *Noo.
ottooli'iomoot ec.net to ....
ho>t loo n Wcoteel m Mm keert of
Cocovt Orovo
rW*Se*
caiiomu
tion on Jewish affairs and contem-
porary issues.
He based his analysis on the
combined impact of Catholic and
Jewish voters who together make
up 30 percent of the American
electorate26 percent Catholics
and 4 percent Jews. On the
strength of recent surveys and
party registrations he estimated
that 75 to SO percent of this sig-
nificant section of the American
electorate would give its vote to
Sen. Kennedy.
This non-Protestant irou p."
Prof I.ioset said, "is even more
important than the percentages in-
dicate, fer it is concentrated in
densely populated states which by
themselves constitute close to a,
majority of the electoral votes."
Prof. Lipst. who wrote "Political
Man." an analysis of voting be-
havior, saw the population distribu-
tion in the "politically potent
states" as a significant factor in
favor of Kennedy He stated: "Con-
siderably more than 30 percent of
the population of eight politically
potent statesNew York. New Jer-
Kjr, California. Illinois. Massachu-
setts. Michigan. Pennsylvania, and
Connecticutis made up of Catho-
lics and Jews. Furthermore, the
Northern Negroes who gave the
Democratic ticket a large majority
(about 80 percent)even against
Eisenhowerare also concentrated
ia most of the same states He
cited surveys to indicate that the
Negro population in these states
as sure to remain a bulwark of
the Democratic vote in the North "
Thus. Prof Lipset pointed out
that with Kennedy receiving ma-
jorities "of from 75 to 80 percent
among the Catholics, Jews ard Ne
groes. he could win the election
with as little as 35 to 40 percent of
the white Protestant vote This
would allow for the defection, mam
ly in the South, of about 3 to 8 per-
cent of the 43 percent of the white
Protestants who call themselves
Democrats.' Prof Lipset stated.
With the majority of the votes
Of these minorities. Sen. Kennedy
could win the election "even in
the impossible event that he dad
net receive a single vote from
the 21 percent who call them-
selves independent, or the 3d per
cent who identify with the Re-
publicans. "
\- for the Protestant voters.
Prof. Lipset cited studies which
showed that their ballots do not
express unswerving religious jffi!
Jews have been elected to the of-
I fice of governor and senator in
Oregon. New York. Alaska. Con-
necticut, and Illinois."
He said that although these of-
fices were not as important as the
presidency, "one still would expect
that people who feel strongly
enough to vote against a presiden-
tial candidate simply because of
his religion, would not knowingly
vote for a Catholic or Jew running
for any major state office.'
In another article in the October
issue of "Commentary." Rabbi Ar-
thur liertzberg. chairman of the
International Affairs Commission
of the Synagogue Council of Amer-
ica, asserted that the separation of
church and state was not a real
issue in the current campaign for
ranking Protestant spokesmen.
Rabbi Hertzberg. of Temple
Emanu-El here, stated in his arti-
cle: "One might suppose from the
arguments of the Protestant spokes-
men that Protestant devotion to
the principles embodied in the
First Amendment was absolute and
unswerving. However, there is
ample evidenceboth in the his-
tory of Protestantism and in the
current state of the American Pro-
testant community to indicate
that the Protestants' commitment
to the amendment is itself ambigu-
ous."
. He gave as a major example of
Protestant ambivalence, the issue
of the public schools. "Opposing
Catholics on state aid to parochial
schools. Protestants still share the
almost unitary view of the Cath-
olics that the public schools need
greater religious influences." He
pointed out that most of the relig-
ious aspects of public school educa-
tion, such as released and dismis
sed time, and prayers in home
rooms, "have all been fought for
not only by Catholics, but also by
the majont> of Protestants."
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Social Singles
B'nai B'rith Social Singles will
hold a dance Saturday evening in
the Imperial room of the Roney
Plan. Unattached men and women
35 and over are invited to attend.
The club is currently holding a
membership drive. Faye Socn is.
chairman.
170m5-sii?ivi%?i? 9kwww.
Extcvfhre Meord in Talk
Robert W. Cress, executive of
Outdoor Advertising Incorporated,
addressed a meeting of the Adver-
tising Club of Greater Miami at the
Biscayne Terrace hotel Wednesday
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Friday, October 7. 1960
rfKJQ S-D
Jjar A corsage is yours free for the asking, and will be presented
by The Jewish Flondian to each mother of a Bar or Bas AAitzvah
if the request is addressed to "Corsage for You," P.O. Box 2973,
Miami 1, Fla., one month in advance. Requests may be made on
a postcard, and should include the name of the Bar AAitzvah and
date and place of the ceremony. The corsage will be forwarded
to you courtesy of Blackstone Flower Shops in .time for the Bar
AAitzvah occasion.
Michael Small (Academy, and attends Sunday
Bar Mitzvah of Michael Segall school classes at Temple Emanu-El
will take place Saturday morning. | religious school.
Oct. 8. at Beth Torah Congrega-; Reception in her honor will fol
tion. with Rabi Max Lipschitz offi- low in Sirkin Hall.
anting.
. miCHAU
MY US
ADRItNNi
MORTON
IRVING
Michael is the son of Mr. and
Mr- Morris Segall, 645 NE 175th
st., No. Miami Beach.'
He is a student at North Miami
B<;.ch Junior High, and will be
JAMES
MY US
honored at a party Saturday
ning in the Deauville hotel.
eve-
Adrisnn* Deblinger
Rabbi Irving Lehrman will offici-
ate at the Bas Mitzvah of Adrienne
Rcnee Deblinger on Saturday morn-
ing, Oct. 8, at Temple Emanu-El.
Adrienne is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Murray Deblinger and
granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Fields.
She is a student at the Hebrew
My les Abbott
Beth David Congregation will b*
the site of the Bar Mitzvah ol
Myles Bruce Abbott on Saturday
morning, Oct. 8.
Myles is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Harold Abbott, 511 Almeria ave..
Coral Gables.
He is a student at Ponce de Leon
Junior High, and attends Beth Da
vid religious school.
Reception in Myles' honor will be
held Sunday at the Seville hotel.

George Rosner
George Rosner will become Bar
Mitzvah at Agudath Israel Hebrew
Institute on Saturday morning, Oct.
8. Rabbi Isaac Ever will officiate,
George is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Rosner, of 1145 Bay dr.
Kiddush will follow the Bar Mitz
vah service.

Morris Shaftal
Morris Shaftal will become Bar
Mitzvah during Saturday morning
services, Oct. 8, of Temple Ner
Tamid, with Rabbi Eugene L.abo-
vitz and Cantor Samuel Gomberg
officiating.
Morris is the son of Mr. ai.d Mrs.
Simon Shaftal. He is a student in
the religious school of Ncr Tamid, Philip Jacoby, 7815 Crespi blvd. In Berk, and cousins, Gerald and Her-
and attends Nautilus Junior High.
Reception will follow the Bar
Mitzvah service.

James Lynn
Beth Torah Congregation will be
the site of the Bar Mitzvah ol
James I. Lynn on Saturday morn
ing. Oct. 8. Rabbi Max Lipschitz
will officiate.
James is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ben H. Lynn, 18015 NE 9th pi. He
is a student at North Miami Beach
Junior High School.
Reception will be held in his
honor at the Carillon hotel.

Irving Jacoby
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will of-
ficiate at the Bar Mitzvah cere-
mony of Irving Jacoby on Friday
morning. Oct. 7, the second day of
Sukkoth, in Temple Menorah.
Irving is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
addition to the Haftorah. he will
chant the portion of the Torah read
on Sukkoth.
Irving is an outstanding eighth
grade student at the Hebrew Acad-
emy. He is on the Honor Roll in
both the English and Hebrew de-
partments.
Kiddush will follow the cere-
mony.
.
Mark Lotterman
Bar Mitzvah of Marie Lotterman
will lake place Saturday morning.
Oct. 8,at Temple Judea.
Mark is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Lotterman. He attends
eighth grade at Ponce de Leon Jun-
ior High, and has been a student
at Temple Judea religious school
for the past three years, and the
Sunday school for the past eight
years.
Out-of-town guests at the Bar
Mitzvah will be his aunt, Mrs. E.
Bonds Reports Tremendously Successful
$262,000 High Holy Day Pulpit Appeal
Students Will
Be Consecrated
Annual Simchas Torah Hakofos
Pageant will take place at Temple
Bch Sholom on Wednesday eve-
ning. Oct. 12.
On Thursday morning, Oct. 13,
48 ><>ung children will be conse-
crated at a special service.
Kindergarten through the sec-
ond crade pupils to be consecrated
by Rabbi Leon Kronish are Michael
Arkin. Matty Bloom, Melanie Co
ben. Barry Cooper, Cathy Erlang-
cr, David .Gaynor, Judy Gilden,|
Family Barbecue Supper
Sisterhood of Coral Way Jewish
Center will hold a family barbeque
supper at the Center on Sunday
from 5 to 7 p.m. Program will in-
clude favors for young children and
dance music lor teenagers.
Offices are Moved
Lakeside Memorial Park, has
moved its offices from Miami
Beach to new,
quarters at the park. Mrs. Samuel
Oritt, vice president of Lakeside,
a non-profit organization, announc-
ing
A "tremendously successful'
High Holiday campaign on behalf
of State of Israel Bonds came to a
close Saturday evening at the con-
clusion of the observance of Yom
Kippur.
Samuel Oritt and J. A. Cantor,
general chairmen of the bond drive,
report that $262,000 in bonds was
raised during the appeal period.
"This figure," they said, "rep-
resent! *n eight-percent increase
over last year's acheivement, and
the figures are still incomplete.
We can not adequately express
our pleasure and appreciation for
the tremendously successful cam-
paign, and the continuing and
devoted effort by so many people
to make it so."
Miami especially for the High Holi
day appeals.
Local Greater Miami and Holly
wood leaders who spoke for the
bond drive included Oritt. Manuc
Burstein, Clifford Straus, Rabb
Murray Alstet, Ben Essen. Haroh
Turk. Maurice Klein, Sheldon Ed
wards, Mel Hecht, Ralph Levy
Joseph Rappaport. Dr. Milton Lu
barr. Rabbi Tibor Stern, Hy Gal
but, Rabbi Joseph E. Rackov.sky
Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky, Paul Kwit
ney, Rabbi David Lehrfield. Rabb
Labovitz, Rabbi David Shapiro ane
Rabbi Samuel S. Lerer.
bert Berk, of Philadelphia.
Kiddush of Sanctification will fol-
low. Rabbi Morris Skop and Can-
tor Herman Gottlieb will officiate.
* V
Myles Hornreich
Salurday morning services, Oct.
8. at Temple Menorah will include
the Bar Mitzvah of Myles Horn-
reich. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
officiates.
Myles is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Hornreich, 7508 Jewel ave.
He is a student in the religious
school of the Temple, and attends
Nautilus Junior High.

Morton Ornstein
Bar Mitzvah of Morton Ornstein
wiil take place Saturday morning,
Oct. 8, at Temple Menorah. Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz will officiate.
Morton is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Murray Ornstein, 825 85th st. He
is a student in the religious school
of the Temple, and attends Nauti-
lus Junior High.
Out-of-town guests will include
Mrs. Rebecca Ornstein, paternal
grandmother, Long Island, N.Y.;
Mrs. Sylvia List, aunt, Brooklyn,
N.Y.; Mrs. Faye Saltz, aunt, I-ong
Island; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dia-
mond, uncle and aunt, Fairlawn,
N.J.; and the Bar Mitzvah's bro-
ther, Howard, of California.
Reception in his honor will be
held Saturday evening at the Bar-
celona hotel.
Dividend Announced
Frederick J. Teschke, president
of the Bank of Dade County, an-
nounced that a quarterly dividend
of 15 cents per share has been de-
clared by the board of directors of
the bank, to all stockholders as of
record Sept. 30, to be paid Oct. 14.
Still to be counted before any
ir conditioned f,nal f,f s "n ,be r?ath^ arc '",?
sums of bonds already sold or still
to be sold through eight congrega-
tional and area dinners.
Thirty three congregations in
1 st. Former location was 4007 Chase
ave.
berg. Wendy Haft, Danny Jonas,
Susan Lee, Pamela Leslie, Albert
levin. Donna Sue Lundy, Steven
Maislin, Jennifer Neber, Jeffrey
Pardo. Jo-Ann Rackeafr.
Thomas Tobirr, Karen linger,
Richard Wieder, David A 1 p e r t,
James Baker, Jane Benson, Steven
Chu>mir, Alan Harvey, Jamie Jack
er, Beth Kringman. Michael Le-
vine. Irene Randall, Steven Ran
man. Jeffrey Gaynor. Etan Gruen-
*al Krams, llene Weinman, Nancy Ba-
r. Bari Lynn Berkman, Patty
Brk. Nancy Jane Fisher, Lisa
Ann Had, I,eighton Hamar, Bar-
bara Locke and Richard Rickles.
Vajda Opens
Voice Studio
Ladisl
Lll
ao Vaida announces the
opening of his Voice Studio in
Preparation of students for opera,
musical comedy and popular sing-
|'"K- The studio is at 1640 S. Bay-
Ithore dr., Miami.
, ,no,<,d European ope-a singer !
nr. head of ,he vocal de- i
Parirnen, of St. Louis Institute of I
let ik. da ls currently director1
L mvers'ty of Miami musical
tomedy class.
Sludenis larn their tuition while
wticipaiing in public perform-
Imm Tn Aim a tk.--------
in
They
ICteuV-,.t!reo..wpek engagement
in-the-Clouds, noted Tennes-
^ resort hotel.
I^'rlri'w tame to ,he U-S- af,er
Ueiuhil i l1, and was granted cit-
pHup by a special act of Con-
part
Spearheading the appeals were
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual lead
|er of Temple Emanu-El and chair-
mon of the Israel Bonds Rabbinical
.Council; Rabbi Eugene Labovit/.
| spiritual leader of Temple Ner
,Tamid: and Samuel Reinhard. The
' latter two served as co-chairmen ot
the High Holidays committee.
Prominent national and local
figures, including many rabbis,
took part in making the appeals
from the pulpits. The Hon. James
G. McDonald, former first United
States Ambassador to Israel and
1 now chairman of the Advisory
; Council of the State of Israel Bond
'drive, Julius Schalz, director of
the Community Service Bureau ol
the American Jewish Congress, and
Yehoshua Trigor, vice consul of Is-
j rael for the Southeast United States,
Iwith offices in Atlanta, all came to
Party Platforms Their Topic
B'nai B'rith Lodge of Miami
Beach will hold a luncheon meet-
ing at the DiLido hotel on Tues-
day, noon. Gershon S. Miller is
chairman. Guest speakers will be
Leon J. Ell. in a talk on the Re
publican platform, and Arthur
Rolh, who will discuss the Demo-
cratic platform.
Pianist Jan August and his
trio are now appearing in the
Carriage Club at the Miami
Springs Villas. _
gress because of the aid he gave
the Allies in the struggle against
the Nazis.
New Firm Announced
. George J. Bertman and J. B.
(Jerrj i -Mills announce the forma-
tion of a new firm specializing as
Investment consultants and real
estate brokers. The firm, to be j
known as Bertman and Mills, is
at 940 Lincoln rd.
T dfewishi Floridian
DATELINE
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Toronto
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The dateline may be Tel Aviv Jerusalem or Washington
But to Miamians it is a link between themselves and World
JewryKeep yourself, your relatives and friends in the know
about happenings all over the World Don't delay, send your
gift subscription TODAY Either fill" in the attached coupon
or call FR 3-4605 NOW!
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-r


Page 10-B
+Jenistifk>rAfiaf7
Friday, October 7.
Dr. Irving Lehrman conducts Yom Kippur services for Temple
Emanu-El at Miami Beach Auditorium. At right is congregation
president Samuel Friedland. At left is Joseph Rose, to be hon-
ored by Temple Emanu-El at a dinner in the Fontainebleau
hotel Sunday night. ,
e^ ..... i i
Lyndon Johnson
Due Wednesday
Sen. Lyndon* B. Johson. Demo-
cratic vice presidential nominee.
will arrive in Miami on Wednesday
lor a series of appearances and
meetings with local Democratic
leaders, it was announced by Con-
gressman Dante Fascell. campaign
manager for Dade and Monroe
counties.
Johnson's schedule has not been
confirmed at this date, but he will
make as many stops as possible, as
well as holding one major rally.
The Texas Senator will be pre-
ceded here by the arrival of the
Texas Belles, five prominent Demo-
cratic women who will meet with
local women's organizations in
Dade county.
Johnson's visit here comes only
a week before the arrival of pres-
idential nominee Sen. John F. Ken-
nedy who will arrive on Oct. 18 lo
address the American Legion con-
vention.
Tropical Chapter
Luncheon Friday
Tropical chapter, American Med-
ical Center at Denver, will hold its
annual memebership luncheon
Friday noon aMhe Seville hotel.
Mrs. Hazel Jackson Tooker, for-
mer patient from the Miami area
at the Denver hospital, will be
guest speaker. She will discuss
the hospital and its programs in
the rehabilitation, cure and treat-
ment of cancer.
Members of tropical chapter last
year contributed over $6,000 for
patient care at the free, national
and non-sectarian medical insti-
tution.
Chairman of the day will be Mrs.
Nat Klein. 1100 Venetian Way.
Mrs. Bertram Thorpe is president
of the organization, which will also
feature a fur show, courtesy of
Frederich's Furs of Surfside, at
the Friday function.
Dtt. JUDAH STAMFFM
B'nai B'rith Plans Judaism Institute
Featuring Famous Faculty at Juno Beach
, TO ALL GREETINGS ...
^ VAL'S
MARKET
Everything in the Food Line
The Best Grade of
MEATS & GROCERIES
We Appreciate Your Patronage
605-07 N.E. 1st AVE.
Phone FR 4-9957
WINDY UNQIW
Granddaughter
Scheduled in Skit
A highlight of Temple Emanu-El
Israel Bonds congregational dinner
slated Sunday. 6 p.m., at the Fon-
tainebleau hotel, will be a skit and
speech by Wendy tJnger, 12-year-
old granddaughter of Joseph Rose.
Rose himself will be honored at
the affair for his service to the
community, the State of Israel and
the Israel Bond campaign.
Wendy, a seventh grader at Nau-
tilus Junior High on Miami Beach,
will read the Israel Declaration of
Independence, and will also do a
skit comparing her 12 years of age
with the first 12 years of the State
of Israel and Rose's own contribu-
tions during that period.
Wendy is the daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Harold Unger, 510 S.
Shore dr., Miami Beach.
Torah Hadassah Meeting
Torah group of Hadassah will
hold a regular meeting and a free
dessert luncheon on Monday noon
at the Coral Gables Woman's Club,
1001 E. Ponce de Leon blvd. A
musical skit is planned.
TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES
I
fc KENS WHOLESALE LIGHTING
RETAIL TRADE INVITED TO VISIT OUR SHOWROOM
L'JBK,
<3VL
DISCOUNTS TO PROPERTY OWNERS
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
"OVER 900 FIXTURES ON DISPLAY"
1155 S.W. 2nd STREET
Phone FR 4-8123
A pioneer Florida Institute of
Judaism will be held at Maddens
Ocean Lodge in Juno Beach from
Oct. 20 to 23.
The Institute of Judaism is spon-
sored by the Florida Federation of
B'nai B'rith as part of a national
program of adult Jewish educa-
tion, and is open to all interested
persons.
Theme of the weekend insti-
tute will be "The Imeee of the
Jew in Modern American Litera-
ture." Faculty will include Dr.
David Bereff and Dr. Judah
Stampfer.
Dr. Boroff is professor of Eng-
lish literature at New York Uni-
verslty. A noted lecturer, author
and poet, he will discuss "Prob-
lems of Jewish Adjustment,"
"Anti-Semitism and Jewish Self-
Hatred," and "Impact of Jewish
Culture on the American Scene."
Dr. Stampfer, professor of Eng-
lish literature at the State Uni-
versity College of Long Island in
New York, is also a distinguished
lecturer, rabbinical scholar and
poet. He will present a discussion
of basic issues in American Jew-
ish living with respect to the his-
torical background, contemporary
scene, and "Golden Era" of Jew-
ish culture.
Dr. Stampfer is the recipient of
the Sachar Prize for poetry, which
he received for his "Jerusalem
Many Faces."
Chairman of the weekend insti-
tute is Rabbi Samuel Jaffe, spir-
Safran Assumes
Official Duties
Temple Sinai's new education di-
rector, Herbert Safran, recently as-
sumed his official duties at the No.
Miami synagogue.
Educated at New York State Col-
lege for Teachers at Albany, he
holds an AB and MA degree.
Safran has taught both adults
and children, and was in charge of
a Reform religious school in Al-
bany.
Spiritual leader of Temple Sinai
is Rabbi Benno Wallach.
itual leader of Temple Beth El,
Hollywood. Co chairmen are
Mrs. Richard Hecht and Mrs.
Sidney Palmer. Rabbi B. Leon
Hurwiti, of Temple Zemora, Cor-
al Gables, is religious chairman.
Samuel Schutzer, Mrs. Shepard
Lewis and Mrs. Harry Orenstein
are in charge of arrangements.
Mrs. Herbert Heiken is library
chairman, and Mrs. Alfred Reich
is secretary.
M. DAVID BOKOff
Advisory committee includes
Mrs. Samuel Belsky, Mrs. Sey
mour Cole, Norman Freedman.
David Gorman, Mrs. Elliot Hering
Milton Levinson, Louis Ossinsky
Jr., Mrs. Jerome Robinson, Mrs
I Theodore Robinson, Charles Saie
Ivitch, Irving Schatzman, Mrs. Dav
'id Sherper, Mrs. Bernard Sup-
worth, Mrs. Alvin Wank, Jack Wil-
son, and Ansel Wittenstein.
Institute coordinator is Arthur
Spiegel, assistant director of the
Florida office, Anti Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. In charge
of publicity are Spiegel. Eli Hur-
witz, and Sam Nieberg. president
of the Florida State Federation
of B'nai B'rith.
TO ALL GREETINGS
Downtown Desoto & Plymouth Service
DEPENDABLE GARAGE SERVICE
APPROVED SERVICES
CHRYSLER DODGE DESOTO PLYMOUTH
27 Years Experience Is Our Guarantee
EARLY AND LATE SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES
1200 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
Phone FR 3-2889
A. B. "RED" WOMACK
TO ALL GREETINGS -
% COLONIAL TELEVISION SERVICE
NEW AND USED T.V. AND RADIOS
GUARANTEED REPAIR SERVICE
3414 N.W. 7th AVENUE
Phone NE 5-0582
PETER R. PETRAS, Owner
TO ALL GREETINGS
"OUR SPECIALTY" AUTO PAINTING
Village Custom Body & Paint Garage
CORVETTE REPAIRS AMERICAN
CUSTOM RESTYLING SPORT CARS
766 E.V10th Street, Hialeah
Phone TU 7-2933
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
SISK MACHINE SHOP
ALL KINDS OF
MACHINE WORK AND WELDING
REASONABLE PRICES
WORK GUARANTEED
4154 S.W. 70th COURT
Phone MO 7-5342
TO ALL GREETINGS .
MARTIN'S CHINCH
BUG CONTROL
Yearly Service or Monthly
$15 AND UP
Depending on Size of Lawn
HIGH PRESSURE SPRAYING
7 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Certified State Board of Health
CHINCH BUG CONTROL
HI 3-7691
FREE FERTILIZER
100 S.W. 51st Court
TO ALL GREETINGS
BEE T.V.
CUSTOM AND COMMERCIAL INSTALLATIONS OF
STEREO HI Fl P. A. INTERCOMS
853 N.E. 79th STREET
Phone PL 4-8407
(Call Us and We Will BEE at Your Service)
R. J. WAINWRIGHT & SONS
Established 1*37 Manatoctertr* Representative Poesr Prte*
SWING ftOKIDA JOBHKS OVtK EWMTKN riMS
MS4 OAK AVI., Coconut Grove P.O. Box 101 ?* Hl *"


Friday. October 7. 19$0
+J&vistifk>ridKbr>
Page 11-B
Dade Women to
Attend Meeting
A two-day conference of the C
fffiufng Eaucalional Council
Florida will be held in Tampa on
Oct. 11 and 12th. Invited to attend
the conference are representatives
of Florida's junior and senior high
schools.
In Dade- county. Mrs. William
Edwards, high school service chair
man, will represent the Dade coun-
ty Council of Parent Teacher
Assns. Mrs. Alfred D. Barbieri will
represent the Hialeah High School
PTA. From the Miami Beach Sen
ior High School PTA, Mrs. Leon
(ireen, president, and Mrs. Ben
Samuels, president-elect, will at-
tend.
Purpose of the conference is to
determine what the high schools
should do for a community and
.state.
Wertheimer, 76
Passes Away
Adolph Wertheimer, of 50 SW
18th ter., died early Wednesday
irornine following surgery. Mr.
Wertheimer was 76.
Owner of Fashion Millinerv Com-
pany, he came here in 1926 from
New York.
Mr. Wertheimer was assistant di-
rector of the directors staff of Cor-
iidl Mahi Shrine, a member of the
Masons, and for 30 years on the
board of Templelsrael.
He was house chairman of Tem-
ple Israel at the time of his death.
Fi r years, he blew shofar at the
Temple during the High Holy Days.
He suddenly took ill on Saturday
during Yom Kippur services after
blowing the shofar three times.
He is survived by his wife. Rose.
Services will be Friday, 11 a.m.. at
Temple Israel, with Gordon Funeral
Home in charge, of arrangements.
LEGAL'NOTiCB
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN Uiat
BEXNER ri -X. INC.
8o ner
CBNVFTH MTERS
.Mi S.W, l.-i Si11
kttoriH v foi Applicant
10/7-1 l-:'l -it
Plans for Hebrew University draw attention of
(left to right) Mesdames Jack Landsberg. Leo
Robinson, Herbert S. Shapiro, and Oida C.
Rubin. The women met at the Shapiro home
to map out an Oct. 8 general membership
meeting of the South Florida chapter of the
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No. 80810-C
IN RE: Estate of
VICTOR E. gWANSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing i Malms or Demands Against Said
Kstate:
You are hereby notified and requlr
eii to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of Victor E. Swanson deceased
late of Pade County. Florida, to th
County Judges of Dade County, and
file the same In their offices in the
County Courthouse in Dade County.
K.orlda, within eight calendar months
from the date of the first publication
heret f. or the same will be barred.
ARTHUR C PERSON
V. INKLE KBBSIsER
Attorneys
v Seybold Building
1, Klorlda
10/7-14-21 -IV
in the circuit court of the
iith juoic al Circuit in and
'for dade county, florida
IN CHANCERY No. 60C 9645
K V I.C'-HANAN.

v.
I PATRICIA BUCHANAN,
"' ndant,
NOTICE OF PUCLICAT ON
Ti ri PATR1CIAI I ''HAN X.-."
High Point Road
V"C ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED thai
1 : lain! foi divorce has beam I
' -t you and you are herd y I-
i i......;>> << your
omplatal for divorce on
1 attorney and fl' "" r; '
in the office of the Clerk of the
1 lit Court on or before tne-i'ih oaj
of .November, I960; otherwise I
leratfnns of sa'rt c .mnlalnt for dlvi 'Ce
win be taken as confessed against you'.
DATED tms 5th day of October, I960.
B. 1( I.KATHF.I1MAN
Clerk <.f Clrrt'lt Co"rt
(seal) By: R H RICE, JR.,
I teptity Ork
OEORQEJ. TAL1ANOFF
Attorney for Plaintiff
' I- ncoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
10/T-14-S1-8
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 50766-B
IN RE Estate of
MARY WERNER
1 'ecuased.
,, NOTICE TO CRED TORS
and All Persons Hav-
nu .., demands Asaim
hereby rotlfled and requlrec1
'amiM and d<
"nlch you mav have against the es
""' of MART WERNER deceased
t of IVade Countv. Florida, to th.
Igea .,t Dade County. an.i
- In the
igbt calen ;
' publication
ar| I I
: NNBTH BERNARD, JR
11.-, .,. i-*1"1'
ney
Road
h, Florida
10/7-ll--'l-S*
American Friends of the Hebrew University.
The gathering of the group's board of direc-
tors voted to support a nationwide, $22,000,000
development fund program for the university
in Jerusalem.
IN THE CiRCUlT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
NO. 60C 9441
JUDITH ANN WILLIAMS.
Plaintiff,
v.-
STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR.,
i fend 'in
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: STEVKN WILLIAMS. .IK..
Address I'nknown
You. STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR.. are
hereby notified thai Bill of Cem-
lalnt for Divorce has been filed
BjjaJitHl you, and you are required to
MTVt -' copy of your Answer or I*lett btgl to the I'.ill of Complaint on the/
olalntlffs Attorney. LEONARD II.
RUBIN, Metropolitan Rank Ituildlrm,
Miami 12, Florida, and Hie the original
Answer '>r Pleadings, in the office of
the Clerk of the circuit Court on or
before the Mh day of November, lli
If you fail to do so, Judgment b) fault will he taken against you for the
relief demanded In the Bin of, Ce>m-
t>la!nt.
IKIXK AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this ;ih day of September.
i <;
B. B. I.EATHER.MAN
i ']< rk of Circuit Court
I>ade Count\ I'mirt House
Miami, i- lorldg
(seal) Bj M AVA1.ARIS.
Deputy Clerk
10 7-14-D-2I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN Ikat
I the undersigned, dealting to engage In
ndi the fictitious name ..r
IF.RRA v al IS 19 N B. tnd Avasjue,
Miami, Florida int. nils to register S*ld
name with the Clerk 'if the Circuit
Court '! Dadi County, Florida..
MURGER, INC.
By: Thomas .1. Mm ray. President
i- ran t : rgi n, >' retary. -Treaewrer
i ; ii.DM an a- <; l.l 18TEIN
. W< st f lagfc r St.
Mian I, Florida
Attorneys for Registrant
| I" 7 14-21-I'H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
tlie iintWrstsii.il, dealrtaaj tn engage in
I business under the fictltlnns name of
|i !'. 11 \ INK CLEANERS AND LAIN
DRY at v"l Washington Avenue. Mi-
ami Beach, Florida Intends to register
salil name with the clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court iJ I>ade County, Klorlda.
|i .SEI'H PHILLIPS. Sole < Iw ner
i.i in iwitz a heller
706 1st St., Miami Beach
Mtornejs for.loseph Phillips.
|A/;-l-|krM
Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid is sponsoring
a kosher Chinese luncheon, catered by Mrs.
Charles Rabb, at Sklar Auditorium on Monday
noon. Mrs. Joseph Feldman will present a skit.
Members of the cast are Geft to right) Mes-
dames Yvette Silberger. Ben Falk, Robert Sil-
vers, Jack Klinger, Max Sirotta, Harry Kaplan,
and Seymour Horwitz. Proceeds are for the
religious school of the Temple.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KpTieE IS HJvREBT Q1VEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name o:
ROYAL PALM EKKICIENCII S I
AITS at <-:<- L'U N BX 7:.rci Street Mi
ami; Elorliia in tend to reflate! eatd
name with the Clerk of the" Circuit
Court of Dade County, Fit
. NK K. PIONATORB, and
His Wife
unilivided tfc in! rest
ANTHi >NY FIA 'RBNT1NB
' crest
I.1C -N K A1-:.AN
a tti r illcanti
I ISO s '.
Raymond Burr and Martha Hyer in an intense scene from "De-
sire in the Dust," new Twentieth Century-Fox CinemaScope
Sreduction. Co-starred are Joan Bennett, Ken Scott and Brett
aleey. "Desire" is currently showing at the Carib, Miami,
Miracle and Wometco's new 163rd Street Theatres._________
New Division Announced
Singers Workshop, a division of
the Miami Conservatory has added ers Workshop,
another subject to its curriculum, classes
Fundamentals and Techniques of
Choral Directing." Roy Oliver,
founder and director of the Sing-
w i 11 conduct the
THE McCUNE COMPANY
APPRAISERS COUNSUORS
ADRIAN McCUNE, MAI.
MARION C McCUNE. M.A.i
151 N.E. THIRD STREET
MIAMI
b M3'
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It Is Our Pleasure to do
Business with You '
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
No. eOC 8663
M & H O INSTRUCTION CORP.
a Forlda corporation
KUOENK BOBO and
Plaintiff.
IXH'ISEG. BOBO. his wife.
Defendants.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: EUGENE HOBO and
LOUISE G. BOBO. hr wife
R*ld*-ni-e unknown
v< I ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED/tat
a bill of complaint for foreclosure of
mortgage has b. en filed against you
and you are hereby required to serve
,i copy nf xotnr answer to said com-
plaint on plaintiffs attorney and file
the original anawer in the Office of
. ik of the Circuit Court on or
in. 7ih day of November, 19*0:
otherwise the allejrattona "f ~1,i'1 ,'"1-
v* ill tie taken as confessed
: v,.u.
UATED
E. B. l.F.ATHKK.M AN
"l.-rk. Crrcull Court
B) R II KI.'K. JR,
Ity Cl. rk
WAl.l.KR
Road
h. Florida
Attorneys for Plaintiff.
if. 7-r-n-n
IN THE C RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COONTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 9576
1IATT1E MAB WILLIAMS
vs,
ALBERT WILLIAMS
ALBERT WILLIAMS, lesidence
unknown. You ar. to file your
to abovi styled hill for divorce
with the Cl, rk of said Court and fur-
nish to Geo. W. Wood, Atty. for plain-
tiff ..ii or before Nov. 7th. i960 or tin.
bill will be taken as confeeesd.
Dated Oct. 4. l^M.
E. B IJ4ATHERMAN. Clerk
(seal) By: WM. W BTOCKINO,
Deputy Clerk
10/7-14-S1-2X
AUGUST BROS Rw
** /i t.- /u sr'
l.y the Act of
August ,4, 1912, as Amended by the
i h -i. nr.i. and July 2. |IK<
K, United States code, Seofion
showing the ownerahip, inanjke-
ment and otrcalatlon of THE JEWJS1I
>R1DIAJ>7, published wc.kly at 1*1-
aral, Floriila. for Octi
- and addr. he |nib-
llsher at art: Editor ruhlUpi.i
x MH, >ili-
Pla.
The owner Is The Jewish Floridlan;
F-Ved.K
Shochet 71, Miami 1 fla.
The aver: er of copli
* publlral
nlher-
,. ;-e. iliers during the 13
efl'ng the date show n
i t.. and subsi re me
this Srd day 1M.
\.
lM) *. J96Z.)


J/crcre 12--B
+Je*lsti nrrkUan
Friday, October 7,
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR
, J hanks Jo our many j-riends and Kcustomers
for their patronage. contentment, good health, and the fulfillment of y
deepest wish in life*
our
-**>
In Honor of Succoth
All Food Fair Kosher Markets are Closed
Thursday and Friday, October 6th and 7th
WE URGE YOU TO DO YOUR SHOPPING EARLY
SO THAT WE MAY SERVE YOU BETTER
Store Hours for This Coming Week Only.
MONDAY......8:30 A.M. TILL 9 P.M.
TUESDAY ...... 8:30 A.M. TILL 9 P.M.
WEDNESDAY.....8:30 AM. TILL 3 PM.
CLOSED THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
19th ST. at ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH < 163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER, NORTH MIAMI BEACH
2091 CORAL WAY in MIAMI CORAL WAY at S.W. 87th AVE.f WESTCHESTER SHOPPING PLAZA
2662 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLYWOOD
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR


Full Text

PAGE 1

SY .SDCIAL1TE Due to the Sukkoth holiday and an advanced deadline, ". by Socialite" does not appear this week. The School That Lived in Boxes By IRENE MYERSON THIS is a story of a Jewish day school which began life living out of a collection of boxes and which graduated eight years later into a handsome fully-equipped building near Asbury Park, New Jersey. The beginning was a meeting in Deal, N.J., in Apr., 1951 of a small group of individuals, rabbis and community leaders of the area organized by Rabbi Morris Schmidman, of Congregation Sons of Israel, of Asbury Park. Attending were representatives of Torah Umesorah, the national society for Jewish day schools. The participants organized the Hillel Academy of the Shore area. One month later, seven children were prepared for the first grade for the coming September. All that was lacking were classrooms, facilities and money. The first home of the Orthodox school was the Jewish Community Center, a former hospital. As the story was told by Principal Jacob Mermelstein in "The Jewish Parent," everybody joined in converting closets into offices, a coal shed into a library and in providing exits and partitions. This was an annual job because each year meant another grade requiring at least another room. The dark and rundown building was transformed by loving labor. Women who had their cleaning done at home by maids helped to scrub floors and wash windows. Furniture was provided on a similarly informal basis. As Rabbi Mermelstein put it, "no child could mistake another's desk for his own; there were hardly two alike.'*Educational services were donated, cajoled, solicited. These included the services of pediatricians, dentists, optometrists, psychologists and much more — "all were given freely for our children." Then came the first blow: the local housing authority needed the land and the building was sold in 1957. Two weeks before school opening the school, despite frantic searching, was still without a home. The haphazard collection of furniture was still stored in the corrugated cardboard boxes which had previously served as furniture and storage containers in the classrooms. Congregation Sons of Israel in Asbury Park offered their community house. Into its six tiny rooms would have to go eight grades and 100 children. There was no alternative, so the school moved into the community house, formerly a private home. Halls and pantries were converted into offices, kitchens into storerooms, the second sanctuary became a kindergarten, the vestry became a lunchroom and the sunporch a classroom. Volunteer labor was again the mainstay of the hasty conversion. Yet despite the difficulties and the inadequate facilities, "we did not lose a single child," says Rabbi Mermelstein. "Even those who were ideologically opposed to the day school — they came, they saw, they helped ." "And always the boxes. The rooms could hardly hold the children." But the boxes were furniture as well as storage facilities. Life at the Hillel School settled down to its own weird kind of normalcy. Then came the new blow. In the nation-wide furore which followed the disastrous Chicago school fire, inspection of schools was ordered everywhere. In Asbury Park, the Community House was condemned and barred for school use. Another urgent hunt followed and consideration turned to an offer by the city of its solarium buildings on the boardwalk, next to the ocean. Built on a terrace, the two buildings consisted of a roof and four walls of glass each. There was no water, no toilet facilities and a separation of 100 yards between the two structures. So they moved in with the boxes. Partitions were hastily erected to provide classroom space. Passers-by stared in amazement at the school activities in the glass houses. In the winter, howling winds buffeted pupils and teachers as they went to the North Solarium for lunch and back to the South Solarium for classes. Eventually there developed a firm determination to provide a permanent home for the school. Congregation Sons of Israel promised $35,000 if supporters and officials of the school, led by President Zimel Resnick and Treasurer Jacob Kasliner, " nd imagination. Division, State of Israel Bonds, will Israeli fabrics are the focal point be the "Israel Fashion, USA." ,he collection, and demonstrate show and luncheon on Nov. in the V* rapid development of the naAmericana hotel. t,on s *> u


PAGE 1

Page 10-A +Jen is* ttorktiati Friday. October 7, I960 Mindlin Photo Exhibit at Gallery An exhibition of photographs by Leo Mindlin will open Thursday evening. Oct. 13. at the Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery of the University of Miami. The preview showing is for members only, and will be seen in conjunction with the Gallery's exhibition of "Twenty America n Painters." Following the preview, both ex hibits will be open to the public; tures he presented in a retrospecthrough Oct. 31. | | ive snow at tne Miami Beach Art Mindlin, executive editor of The Center in August. 1958. Floridian. is a nationally-, The few "older" pictures, mede sine* 1957, mr the last in an earlier photographic pnose, and load almost naturally in th now, light-filled stylo Mindlin has sine* developed. His most recent endeavors highlight the influence of the spatial non-reference characterizing the Japanese print. Jewish Floridian. is a known amateur photographer. With only two or three exceptions, the exhibit, entitled "Photograpic Statements in Non-Space." features work he has completed since February of this year, and marks a distinct departure from the pic"China on Silver," by Leo Mindlin, is among the pictures making up exhibition of "Photographic Statements in NonSpace" by Mindlin previewing at the Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery of the University of Miami on Oct. 13. The exhibit is in conjunction with the Gallery's opening season show of "Twenty American Painters." Israeli Scientist Dead By Special Report liEHOVOTH. Israel — Prof. Yetion at the Weizmann Institute of Science, died here. He was taken ill while at work in his laboratory. and passed away a few hours later huda llirshbcrg. head of the Pho] at the Kaplan Hospital in Rehotochemistry and Spectroscopy Sec-lvoth. SUPERIOR STAMP & SEAL WORKS MANUFACTURERS OF RUBBER STAMPS CORPORATION SEALS and SUPPUES CHARLIE MERZ, Owner NOW LOCATED AT 613 N.E. 1st Ave. FR 4-1034 ^W-A*r-'WA^d\^^*e% l *dVrf"e#\* rf \ / rf } i *W*' W. E. FOSSETT, Founder CARPET LAYING and REPAIRING RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED 26 S.W. South River Drive Phones FR 9-1155 & FR 1-2007 ACE RI7G (IIVMKs FURNITURE CLEANING Baby Die-Dee Diaper Service "Iflirif MIAMI'S MIST An Exclusive laundry lor Diapers and Baby Clothes 2111 N.W. 10th AVFNUE PHONE Fl 9 5593 GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS WOODY'S TKXACO SHRYICE lubrication Specialists Gat Oils Batteries Tire* "Service with a Smilt" 470 M.W. 5th STRUT PHONE FR 3 M33 Furnishers .nstllers Inlaid Linoleum — Asphalt Tlk Rubber Tile "EVERY IK8TALLATION GUARANTEED" Phone for Free Eotimttet 4256 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone PL 9-22M US. Cooling To UAR Seat Continued from Page 1-A Nasser had decided to side with the Western Powers against Khrushchev's request to replace Hammarskjold and to move the UN headquarters from the United States to: another country.) It was also indicated authoritatively here that no formal statement on the attitude toward Nasser's attempt to seek a seat for his country in the UN Security Council would be forthcoming while the General Assembly is in session. Meanwhile. Mrs. Golda Mejr, Isi rael's Foreign Minister, continued %  series of private conversations she had been holding all last week with leaders of dele0ations and the; heads of foreign affairs attending the General Assembly. She conferred with Horacio Later, Brazil's Minister for External Relations. .Then she met with Italy's delegaj 1 lion chairman. Gaetano Martino. As in her conferences with Uni-! ted States Secretary of State Christian A. Herter and Britain's For-! eign Secretary, the Earl of Home, Mrs. Meir is understood to have discussed general issues of interest in the normal relations between Israel and the respective governments. No concrete issues or matters of immediate interest were said to have been discussed in any of the conferences. Nevertheless, observers here no ted Israel's position, as a result of the many contacts made by Mrs. i Meir and by other leading members of the Israeli delegation. i~ \ firmer now than it was prior to the call by UAR President Gamal Abidel Nasser earlier for the reversal of history by eliminating the "crime" of the establishment of Jewish settlements in Palestine, and later the State of Israel as a I consequence of the Balfour Declaration of 1917. Forty-ight howrs after Nasser had proposed the virtual elimination of Israel's existence, more end more delegations here were saying freely that Nasser had overplayed his hand in regard to Israel. Many Westerners, Latin Americans and Afro-Asiane now believe that Nasser's extreme position regarding Israel hes only defeated whatever purpose he may have had in mind, "Practical and realistic efforts" by the United Nations to solve the Arab-Israel dispute were called for in the Assembly by B. P. Koirala, Prime Minister of Nepal. He told the United Nations that "with regard to the Middle East situation it is the view of my government that we must recognize and accept political realities in the Middle East region." Pakistan meanwhile disputed the suggestion made here last week byGhana for recognition of Israel's existence as "political realism," and, instead, upheld the Arab thesis that the only reality in the Arab Israel dispute lies in the "return" of the Arab refugees to Israel. This attitude was announced in (he General Assembly by the chairman of the Pakistanian delegation. Zulki far Ah Bhutto. Also included in the show, which opens the season at the Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery, are several of Mindlin's newest efforts in the area of "photo-impressionism," where masses and the patterns they create take priority over the distinct literalness that is the hallmark of the fine photographic lens and the craftsman who uses it. Mindlin. who is more prominently known for his columns on world and local affairs, has exhibited at the Carnegie Art Institute in Pftfr. burgh, Brooklyn Museum. WillooA. by's in New York, Laguna Bea'c',, (Calif.) Salon, and the Miami Beach Art Center. He was the winner of a Nationol Graflex Award for two photographs, which have since been widely reproduced, and a Silver Medallion Achievement Award from the School of Modern Photon raphy in New York, among other* In addition, his photographs have been published in authoritative books on photographic technique as well as on book jackets RABBI • CANTOR HEtttEW TEACHER Marriages performed. Bar Mn„,t, preparation a •pecialty Success guaranteed UN 5-8806 I y**-**-* 1 *^***^*^****^**** LOT IN HAIFA, ISRAEL On Carmed. Ocean View, lop location, next Megido Hotel 2 Dunami Zoned 24 A**!., $7,SM, .ntormat.en HI 3-0942 W^>^rV'WW^r>^*^ Unit of happiness costs less! ... tt' tm! Peace of mind eosts even lest Hum it uml to! Equitable'a brand new rate structure now gives you solid saving's on Living Insurance policies of $5,000 and up. Costs leu to protect children... provide for education... emergencies... retirement. For details call The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. SIDNEY S. KRAEMER LIFE UNDERWRITER Phone FR 1-5691 Phone UN 6-1875 245 S.E. 1st Street — Miami, Fla. From BRAHMS to BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music 16 Hours a Day on FM &S 93.1 100 KM 108 MC /£*, .... W A F Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers From Soft Drinks to Savings Institutions DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION



PAGE 1

1 Friday, October 7, 1960 +Jewlsti fhrkttan Page 15-A Religion 'Census 1 To be Launched Southern Baptist churches under the direction off the Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga., launches a house-to-house religious survey in South Florida this weekend. Most Protestant denominations will be cooperating in the religious survey by providing volunteer workers. Joining in the "census" effort will be synagogues and members of the Jewish community. Some 20,000 survey workers will participate through Oct. 14 in a drive to determine the religious makeup of South Florida from Pompano Beach to Key West. A unique family card, reproduced in newspapers throughout the area, will assist in securing what survey leaders hope is as high as 95 percent coverage. Families r being asked to clip me newspaper reproduction of the card, fill in the information, and place it on their doer if they expect to be out when canvassers come by. Instruction clinics for workers will be held in local Baptist churches on Friday, 7:30 p.m., and Sunday afternoon, 2 p.m. A list of prospects will be prepared in book form and given to each participating church and synagogue in the survey. The list requests information on the individual's name, address, religious affiliation, frequency of church-synagogue attendance, language spoken in the home, and number of years the family has lived here. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, NO. sec t7 CHARLOTTE IUKTZ, Plaintiff, \ v. DON AI H DIETS, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: DONALD DIETZ, eh Avenue < 'im Iniuitl, Ohio Tou DoNALD DIETZ are hereby notified that Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been tiled against yon, ana >ou a.-e required to nerve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to ths BUI of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorney, MYERS, HK1.MAN A KAPLAN, Kleven Fifty Building;. 1150 s.w. lit Street. Miami, Florida, and tile the original Answer or Pleading In tha office of the Clerk of tha Circuit Court on or before the SIM day of October, I960. If you fall to do so, Judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bill of Complaint. Thin notice (hall be aubllshed once each week for four consecutive weeks in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 20th day of September. A 11 1960. E. B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida (i-eal) By: WM W. STOCKING, Deputy Clerk MYERS. HE1MA.N & KAPLAN Eleven Fifty Building 1150 S.W. 1st Street tauum ..>, r toriua Attorneys for Plaintiff 9/30, 10/7-14-21 IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA No. 4170S-B Rr. ESTATE OF EVERETT R. I.EWARK, Deceased. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR FINAL DISCHARGE NOTICE is hereby given that 1 have "Jen m) tlnal report and petition for Final Discharge as Administrator of the estate of EVERETT R. LBWARK, '. ana that on the 19th day "j September. | MO, will apply to the Honorable Frank B. Dowllng County Judse of Hade County. Florida, for Ppro\al of said final report and for "na discharge as Administrator of the Estate of EVERETT R. LEWARK. deceased. This 19th day of September, 1960. „., WII-1-1AM LASSIE ROSE KIDNEY EFRONSON Attorney for Administrator of the "Ute of Everett R. Lewark __ 9/30, 10/7-14-21 IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE %  n RE: Estate of I1AR.NET CH1R1.NSKY. Deceased. .NOTICE TO CREDITORS 7 A Creditors and All Persona HavStat or Demands Against Said V ,,i i, r ,. h 6reby nol |f led nd required WKI w '" un > claims and demands wriich you may have against the esed u GARNET illlKiNSKY deceas1 of Hade County, Florida, to ,2 ',,',""''>' J* from the date of the first pubor the sain* will be _, RAM I SILVER. Pall., J''. 1 "rJl.NER, ( o-Eaecutori S-lver, Paliot. SVn A Mints gi* m S. Florida %  Edward A. Bt.rn. Attorney 9/S'J, 10/7-14-21 DAyem "That'* Manny's new ali-weottMr Sddcah. With that w o t hr ey s the umbrella opens automatically at the first raindrop.'* LICAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring t eng*g bualnasa under the fictitious names of REX ARTIST SII'I'I.IKS and REX ART SUPPLIES .it 22*3 Southwest 17th Avenue, .Miami. Florida ini.nds to register said names with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. REX ART COMPANY. a Florida corp.. Sole Owner by: A. Melvin Morris, President AINSI.KK H l-Klil HE Attorney for it Art Company, .i Mo, (,1a corporation I 7v.' West Flagler St. Miami 16, Florida 9/30. 11/7-il-zl LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that by virtue of Chapter 678 of Florida Statutes Annotated (194,1). Warehousemen and Warehouse RacalptS wherein ACE-R.B. VAN LINKS. INC., a Florida corporation, by vlrture of Its warerouse Han. has In its possession the following described property: Household Goods — A the property of Miss Kay McCord, and that on the 2Sth day of (id,,her, I960, during the legal hours of sale, mainly between 11:00 forenoon and 2:00 In the afternoon, at 213t N.W. 24th Avenue, Miami. Florida, the undersigned shall offer for sale to the highest bidder for ••ash in hand the above described property, as the property of Miss Kay Mi Cord. Dated at Miami, Florida, this 28th of September, 1910. ACE-R.B VAN LINES, IN'' 9/30. 10/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In biisiness under the fictitious name of ROYAL PALM EFFICIENCIES & AITS, at 420-22 N.E. 73rd Street. Miami, Florida In tend to register said name, with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. FRANK ST. PIGNATORE. and ROSE PIGNATORE, His Wife usxiivtii. il 'v Interest ANTHONY FLORENTINE undivided Vi interest LEON KAPLAN Attorney for Applicants 1150 S.W. 1st Street Miami. Florida 9/30,10/7-14-21 10/7-14-L'l-S* NOTICE UNi-i-R FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that tha undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious names of Executive Suites; Executive Office Furniture Co.; Executive Offices; Executive Desks; Executive Office Equipment at 1055 East 13th Street, Hlaleah, Florida Intends to register said names with, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. EXECUTIVE SUITES, INC. (a Fla. corp.)—Sole Owner HENRY A. KAMP Attorney for Exacutlve Suites, Inc. 1221 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, Florida 9/S0. 10/7-14-21 NOTICE UNDER FICT.TI49US NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of SUNSET ACRES' at 12025 S.W. 80th Street, Miami. ,Fla., Intends to ragis-er 'aid name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. BONITA ENTERPRISES. INC. (a Fla. corp.) HAHOLD STRUMPF Attorney for Applicant 909 Biscayne Bid.. ]W ,.,, NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that th undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of MAOLB TREE SURGEONS at 2230 S.W. 57th Court. Miami, Dade County Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dada County. Florida. MARTHA C. MAOLB GEORGE N. MacDONELL Attorney for Petitioner 504 Biscayne Bid,. ,,„,,„„.„.,, IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FI.OFI.OA. IN PROBATE No. 50633-B IN RE: Estate of 8ELMA HOPES Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Parsons Hay ing Claims or Demands Against said Estate: ... Y, j are hereby notified and required to present any claims and demand* which you may have against the estate of SELMA HODES d. of Dade "County. Florida, to the Counc. of Dade County, and file the same in their offices in the ] Courthouse In Dade County. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication l.creof. or the same will be harr-d BARNEY HODES itor SIMON, HAYS A GRUNDWERG Attorneys 301 Alnsley Building Miami 32. Florida /w a l0> 10/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTI"'F: IS HFrHF:BY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of ONE HOUR CLF:ANERAMA at 91K :,th Street. Miami Beach. Florida intends to rccister said name with the Clark of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. C.B.G. CLEANERS, INC. a Florida Corp. WEINKI.E .v KKSSI.Ell Attornev s for i hs nar 814 Beybold lildg. .Miami It, Florida .-30. 10/7-14 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREHY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In busisjt ss under the fictitious name of JERRY'S 66 SF7RVICE STATION at S9 S.W. 42nd Avenue. Miami. Florida Intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. JERRY H. LIPPHON (sole proprietor) MITCHELL ItAUJER Attorney for Applicant "•16 s. > hold Building -Miami, Florida 9/30, 10/7-14-21 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious namo of THB VOYAGER at 1433 NE -Miami Place, Miami, Fla.. intenos to re^i.-t, said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. AL GOTTLIF.I1, i.x'. by: A! Gottlieb. Pres. GEORGE J. TALIANOFE 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach, Florida Attorney for Al Gottlieb. Inc. 9/30. '.V7-I4-21 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! vJewisii fkriafiatn solicits your legal notices We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at UgeJ rates MPiml Fit 3-44*5 for messenger service NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In liusiness under the fictitious name of SOUTHERN ?IILT KITCHENS at MM N.E. Miami Place Intend* to register said name with the clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. B. I. O. CORPORATION 9/16-23-30. 10'7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HKHEBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desliing to engage in business under the fictitious name of NOHMAR ENTEI'.l'KISES at 111'. N.E. 129th Btreat, North Miami, FlorIda intends to register said name with Hi. clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. NORM AN KPECTOR Sole Owner STOLAR A MUCHNICK Attorne>s for Applicant 220 71st 81-.. M.B. 9/23-30. 10/7-14 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA NO. toe sew MARY BRINKElt, Plaintiff, Vs. NORMAN BRINKER, Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION You. Norman Rrinkcr, address unknown, 1 are required, to file your answer to. the complaint of divorce with the Clerk of the above styled Court and serve a, copy thereof upon Herman Cohen. Esquire, 1305 Congress Building, Miami. Florida, on or before October 24. 190, or else complaint will be taken as confess e dDated September 16, I960. F;. B. LEATHERMAN Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING Deputy Clerk 9/2S-SO. 10/7-14 \IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE, NO. 60177-C IN RE: Estate of I'ETER PAUL 1RSA, Deceased. NOTICE OF PRESUMPTION OF DEATH TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: WHEREAh, the undersigned Count) Judge In and for Dade County, Florida, did enter an Older of Presumption of Death of PETER PAUL 1RSA on August 30, 1960 as provided for in Section 734.34 of the Statutes of the State of Florida, YOU ARE THEREFORE WHjulrcd or anyone In your behalf, to produce within thr.e months from the date of first insertion of this publication, satisfactory evidence of tha coatlmiance In life of the said I'ETER PAUL 1RSA. UTHERWISF: the Court will proceed with I he administration of the Estate of the said PETER PAUL 1RSA DATED this 30th day of August, 1960. /s/ OBOaKia T. CLARK County Judge 9/S3-30, 10 7-14 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVKN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WEetJtVS BHOASTED CHICKEN at ijai E. 4th Ave., Hlaleah Intends to rapistar saM same with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dada County. Florida. DONNA MARE, INC. (a Fla. Corp) ELI BREGER Attorney 120 Lincoln Road 9/16-23-30, lO/'i NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GERALD JOSEPH LADBRMAN, who was convicted in the Criminal Court ol • in and for Dade County, Florida, at the June temi thereof, AD.. I960, of the offense of Grand 1.. for which a sentence of 18 months Imin the State Penitentiary was Imposed, will apply for clemency to the Slate Board of Pardons, Tal'ahassee, Florida, at its next regular meeting, through and by his undersigned attorney of record. HO P. NEGRETTI 8/12-19-26, 9/2-9-16-2S-30,10/7-14 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the understated, desiring to engage In business under th. .me o THE FRUIT HOWL at number 48;: Lincoln Road in the City of .Miami Beach, Florida intend to register th. said name with the Clerk of the <"ircuit Court of Dads Countv, F Dated ,.t Miami Beach, Florida, thi> 80th day or Aiimist. Id60. gpVMi "H WEI88 SKI,MA WEISS TALIANOFT .V WALLER b) • leorga .1. TaPaniff Attornev for Applicant 9/30. 7-14-2! IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDIC AL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 60C 8755 FREDDIE MEIER, Plain tUf, MARY K MEIER. Defendant. NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Tou, MART K. .MEIER, a resident at the following address: c/o Ternhacker, Taries Trailer Courts. 3014 Hiagtr Boulevard, F'ayetteville, North Carolina, are hereby required to serve a copy of your Answer to a Bill o? Complaint for Divorce on Plaintiff's attorney. Charles J. Rich, 2432 Hollywood Boulevardi Hollywood, Florida, and file the original with the Clerk of the above Court on or before October 17. I960, or a default will be entered against you. IMTED at Miami, Florida, this 12th day of September, 1960. E. B. LEATHERMAN Clerk. Circuit Court (seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING Deputy Clerk 9/16-23-3S, 10/7 NOTICE BY PUBL.CATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY NO. SO C 48S J DONALD FRANKLIN SCOTT, Plaintiff. vs. EMMA JEAN SCOTT, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: EMMA JEAN SVOTT 11 Wait street Rochester "•. New York You EMMA JEAN SCOTT are here by notified that a Bin of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Comp'alnt on the plaintlff'f Attorney. RAYMAN A DI711143. 90S Alnsley Building, Miami 32, Florida and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before ttie 17th day of October, I960. If yau fail to do so, Judgment by default wltl be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bill of Complaint. This notice shall be published once saoh week for four consecutive weeks in -THE JEWISH F1>>R1DIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Mli'mi. Florida, this 12th day of September, A.D. 1960. E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk, Circuit Court. l>arle County, Florida (seal) By: HELEN KE8SLBR, Deputy Clerk RAYMAN A DUHTG nsley Uldg. Miami 32. Fla.—FR 9-2644 Attorneys for Halntlff 9/16-23-30, 10/7 NOTICB UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of F' & R MIRROR & GUAM CO. at lt>2 N.E. tftth Street, Miami Intends to said name with the* Clerk of the Circuit Court of Iade County. Florida CHAKI.ES FRIEDMAN Sole Owner 9/16-23-30, Hi'7 NOTICB UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREltY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In I.uloss under theflctitiotia name of THE DIEM PREMIUM PAYMENT PLAN at r>4 41st Street. Miami Beach. Florida mien.I to rfglitter said name with th* Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. MARCY SHELDON SALLY SHEI.DON Sole Owners MARTIN YEI.1.1 N Attorney (or Applicants Biscayne Building SVltV 28-30. 10/7 NQTICE UNDER FiCTITteuS NAME LAW NOfftCB IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, dualling to eogatse In business under the fictitious name of SAMPSON"S MARKET at 14K6 N.W. 62nd Street, Miami. Florida Ulgwda to register said name with the Clerk of MtaClroult Ourt ef Dade Catmty, Floruit*. SAMPSON'S M>ARKET. INC. (a m. Carp. > %  H. .W4lBi KHUN. Pees. NELSUN & SPIEL.VOGF;L Attorneys fer Applicant 407 Lincohi Read i 9/16-2J-S0. 10/7 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 4>a THE lit* JUO.CIAL CIRCUIT IN AMD FOR DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN CHANCBRY Nn. tac S601-I DOROTHY WH1TEHJSAD. Plaintiff. IKH'K W'HITEHEAD. Defendant NATFCE BY RUBjLICATION TO: DOCK WHJTEHEAD Navy Air Station Glyaco. I'.runawick. Georgia Serial No. HM94W7 Y< >L' AW HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Bill of Complaint for Divorce has been filed against you and you are hereby rsnurred to serve a com of your answer Usareta on the plaintiff's attorneys. ENGEL A POLIICK. Suite M-lll Biscayne Building, 19 West Flagler Street, Miami Jt. Florida, and file the original answer In the Office of the C'erk of the Circuit Court on or before tha lTth day of October. 1960. oaher.-De a Decree Pro Conleeso will he entered .igamst you. Dated on the 13th day o.' Scpte.nber, 1160. E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk of the Circuit Caurt (seal) By: WM. W STOCKINGDeputy Clerk a/16-M-30.10/7 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOT1CFJ tie HEREBY GIVEN that tha undersigned, daalrlng to engage In business under the fictitious name of SPENCER LANE at 321 N.E. 79th Street. Miami intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, F lir t aa. SAMUEL CKMJM3KRG • 9/30. 10/7-14-21 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! CORPORATION OUTFITS Lowest Prices — QuickMt Delivery In South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at IK 3-1KI5



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Pcge 2-A +Je*ist>ncrknan Special Services Launch Sukkoth Here Thursday Services Thursday and Friday this week launch the observance of Sukkoth. or Fe*st_of the Tabernacles. The holiday celebrates the bounties cf the harvest season, and is marked by the erection of temporary booths at the home and synagogue, where fruits are eaten and enjoyed by young ar.d old. Final days of the Sukkoth festival will be observed at Shmini Atzereth with services next Thursday and Friday. Oct. 13 and 14. Temple Menorah. 620 75th St.. %  i a i n observes Sukkoth as services Thursm day at 8:45 am., with Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz officiating. Friday meming services are also at 8:45. Irving, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jacoby. will become Bar •Mitzvah. Cantor Edward Klein renders the musical portions of the liturgy, with Eli Samuels directing the Temple choir. Saturday morning services are at 8:45. Myles. son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hornreich. CANDUUGHTMG TIAfi 16 Tlahri — 5:47 pun. 10:45 a.m. The service will feature a Sukkoth Harvest Festival, with and Morton son of Mr and Mrs. chiWren v^gjng canne d goods ofMurray Ornste.n. will become Bar • ^ 0 ^ dl5tribut d t0 n ^ y S£25: fVF'V.w '"' Thanksgiving. Lulav "Weekly Portion of the Law. Md Esrog pag „ m g al(# Kiui At Temple Ner Tamid. 80th st. uled. Rabbi Leon Kronish will offiand Tatum Waterway. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will officiate Thursday and Friday at 8:45 a.m. Satciate. with Cantor David Convisor rendering the musical portions ef the liturgy. Friday evening serv urday morning services are at 8:45. ices are at 8:45 p.m. Sermon will Cantor Samuel Gomberg renders be There are Still People Livirthe musical portions of the liturgy, in Huts." Saturday morning servMorris. son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon ices begin at 10:45 a.m. Michael Shaftal. will become Bar Mitzvah. Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kicdush will follow in the Temple Charles Katz. and Mark, son of Mr. Sukkah. and Mrs. Irving Rabinowilz. will De Bar Mitzvah. Rabbi Herbert Baumgard will of Temple Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase ave.. observes Sukkoth Thursday. DAILY PICK-UPS TO NEW YORK M. LIEBERMAN & SONS LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM KW JERSEY • PHILADELPHIA • BALTIMORE AUAJIY • Mj— • BOSTON PROVIDENCE aad .H ether saints Veahff Service fin Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse 655 Collins Ave., Miami Road. DM JE 8 8353 ficiate at service* marking Suk ko h on Thursday. 10 a.m.. at Temple Beth Am of South Miami. 5950 No. Kendall dr. Cantor Charles Kodner renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Children will bring fruits to the Sukkah and help decorate it. Friday evening services for families and their children will open at 7:30 p.m. Sermon: What s Our Sukkah For'" Children's Choral Group will be featured under the direction of Mrs. Doris Helson. Sukkoth services are Thursday and Friday at 8:30 a.m. in Miami Hebrew Congregation. 1101 SW 12th ave. Guest Rabbi Samuel M. Machtei will officiate. Friday evening services are at 6 p.m. Saturday services will be at 9 a.m. At Kneseth Israel Congregation, 1415 Euclid ave.. Rabbi David Lehrfield and Cantor Abraham Seif will officiate. Sukko'h services are Thursday and Friday at 8:30 a.m. Friday evening services are at 6 p.m. Sermons both days are scheduled as "Clouds of Glory" and "The Willow Branch." Saturday morning services are 8:30 a.m. Beth David Congregation, 2625 SW 3rd ave.. will observe Sukkoth Thursday and Friday at 9 a.m. Friday evening services will be at 8:15 p.m. EJIen. daughter of Mr and Mrs. Homer Rievman. will become Bas Mitzvah. Saturday service! are at 9 a.m. Myles. son of Mr and Mrs. Harold Abbott, will be come Bar Mitzvah. At Beth Jacob Congregation, 311 Washington ave.. Sukkoth service? are scheduled for Thursday anr Friday at 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Tibor Stern officiates, with Cantor Mau rice Mamches rendering the musi cal portions of the liturgy Sermon the first day is "The Harvest ol Nature is the Spring of Life." Ser ;mon the second day will be "In the Shade of the Sukkah." Kiddush will take place in the congregation Sukkah, with esrog and hilav provided. Friday evening services are at 6 p.m. Saturday mornine services -nil >r f t 8:30 am. Sermon is The Man Koheleth." Dr. Irving Lehrman will officiate at services on Sukkoth at Temple %  manw-CI, 1701 Washington ave. on Thursday and Friday at 9 a.m. Cantor Hirsh Adler renders the musical portions of the liturgy. Junior services are 10:30 am in the Assembly Hall conducted byRabbi Bernard Mussman. Saturdayservices will be at 9 a.m. Sermon is based on the "Weekly Portion of the Law." Adrienne. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Deblinger. will be Bas JdittVah. Temple Ttfereth Jacob, 951 Fla mingo Way. will observe Sukkoth Thursday at 9 a.m. Rabbi Leo Heim will officiate and preach oa "Special Guests Knocking at Our Doors." Friday services are at 9 am. and 8:15 p.m.. when the ser mon will be "Clouds of Glory Shine Through Our Sukkah." Cantor Samuei Levine renders the musicnl .portions of the liturgy. Saturday services will be at 9 a.m. Sermon is "The Components of a Good Jew Junior services are Sunday Friday, October 7, 1950 I at 10 a.m., followed b> a Sukkoti I party. At Beth El Congregation, 500 s* ; 17ih ave.. Sukkoth services will be held Thursday at 8:30 am, j^ ^•iabbi Solomon Schiff tfticiatine nSermcn is "The Significance of the FOOT Species." Friday services ; are also at 8:30 am., with the ier. [ mon scheduled as "Gratification for Our Blessings." Evening services will be at 5:45 p.m. Saturday services are at 8:30 a.m. Hebrew A c ademy. Sit 6th st, will mark the Sukkoth Nlidayij ', services Thursday at 8:30 im. 1 Rabbi Alexander Gross v,:.\ preach' i on "Sukkoth—Jewish Thanksgiving Festival." Friday services are also at 8:30 a.m. Sermon is Rejoicing j with the Almightv." Saturday 'services will be at 8:45 ajn. Rabbi Isaac Ever will officiate at services of Aaudoth lira*) H*. Continued an •age 13-A -INSURANCE CD stf&pt**e etwee Prescription Specialists NOW IN TWO MODERN AlR-C0ND,7f0NrD, ENLARGED BUCK LOCATIONS mon PARKING Sf*rr CONVfNrtNT TO BVSfS 350 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 8-7475 iatr. Wesfahtftea Ave. Mexxeaiae 728 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 8-0749 OCUUSTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FILLER CONTACT LENSES SCIINTIFtC ^ PEST CONTROL HOMES STOIES INDUSTRY FREE INSPECTION CONSULT THI TUSFHOM DiaiCToev roe IHI OCCIN ICS NiaetsT YOU $500,000 Privoto Mono* CHAS. HIME •f CMSTTWCtMa en 1st or lad Ofeaad Fees or Leases ONE STOP AGENCY JfWIUtT-SUBS— MISCELLANEOUS FLO ATMS AWTOMOMU LIABILITY • PHYSICAL DAMAfrB The Ageacf that CAN ur, YES! Beat let fear eaeat say "It Coat Be UXERMAh 1 INSURANCE AGENCY, WC. „ IMf %  M Roe,. Unktr m*t. FH 1-3444 MS CALUMET BUM. A Happy New Year THE IPST WAY TO ENSURE A IOOD YEAR FOR ISRAEL IS TO BUY A BOND! Mayshie Friedberg JE 8-4969 ROJUN Josoph L RocksYsky •45 MICHIGAN AVE. MIAMI BUCK JE 14595 -.A **••* I WE INSTALL GLASS FOR EVERY PURPOSE STORE FRONT PUT! AND WINDOW SUSS *—%  : %  — %  %  Baal %  %  —it aW rvYBiiHt otjpBja •FvrvBfjrBjr m&wrwrt BPBBW LAC. 0USS AND MIRROR WOWS 134 S.W. Irk ST. Morris Orlsi Phea* F8 1-1341 Trog i— ROJJ with Our Mctavy ScroaBed C0ULT0N BROS -ART" %  •JABOT" • -BJAFCorol Way A S.W. 27th Avo. DOTS MttW.MSl PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Loading Memorial Dealers" SarvJsM the Jewish CeassMaJt* Slace 1924 BUAAVS ONE AMD ONir JEWISH MONUMENT BUHDERS CAJtUHC fXCLI/HVHf TO THE JFWISBI CfMNTElf 6UABANTEED FINEST QUALM T MONUMENTS AT LOWEST PIKES ORAVf MAMERS HEADSTONES FOOTSTONES Only $35.00 Why Pay More? Boy for less at Palmer's and Save! AM Meaamcaf I Carteai Made ia Oar Own Sheas wit hia 3 Days I 3277 79-11 SOUTHWEST 8th STREET Meat re Ceraer af 33rd Areaae PHONES 'I Nl 44)921 HI 4-09M RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS Phone JE Ml51 MIAMI BEACH 1250. NORMANDY DRIVE 1236 WASHINGTON AVENUE 1850 ALTON ROAD MIAMI 1717 SW. 37* AVENUE HI 3-2221 24-Hr. Ambulance Service Abe EiMAbe'9 l" S. Blatbwe, F.D N* York: 76-h St A Amirdm Ave.



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Pog 13-A +Jew Is* fhrXMan miu>m\\mmummnwmnun Your CJA Leaders: 1960-61 MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY SIDNEY D. ANSIN: No. 10 in • Series. Twenty-two years ago, in Athol, Mass., a spirited young businessman accepted the chairmanship of the city's I'.I A campaign. It marked the beginning of a long and distinguished career of public service for Sidney D. Ansin. who was recently appointed chairman of the new gifts development committee in the 1961 Combined Jewish Appeal of Greater Miami. Needless to say, that Brat campaign was most successful. In fact, he was recalled to head the drive again in the following year. A leader in the communal life of Miami Beach since his arrival in 1941, Ansin has been consistently involved in the religious and welfare causes of this area. He was a director of the Jewish Home for the Aged and vice president and chairman of the board of Temple Ueid Sholom. He was chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation budget committee, served as a member of the chaplains service committee, and is now a member of the executive committee. Ansin is president of the National Land and Mortgage Corporation and the Anwclt Corporation, among other business interests. Ansin's concern for the total community has been amply demonstrated in his many affiliations with general and non-sectarian agencies. He is active in the National Conference of Christians and Jews, works in the leadership ranks of the United Fund, and willingly lends his energies and organizaBeth David Names Rabbi Shapiro; New Spiritual Leader Here Dec. 1 SIDNEY ANSIN out fo succeed tiona! skills to advancement of worthwhile community cultural and educational projects. His new assignment is a singular challenge—a chance to uncover new sources of support among his fellowJews. Despite the steady demands upon his time, he continues to assume even greater responsibilities, each succeeding year, and to achieve telling results. A disciple of the old school of action, Ansin's motto is "l^t's forget the excuses and get the job done." • The chairman of new gifts, like the young UJA leader back in 1938, is out to succeed, nothing else. Sidney M. Aronovitz, president, announced this week that Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro has accepted the pulpit Beth David congregation. Rabbi Shapiro will be formally welcomed at a reception tendered I by the congregation Sunday eveIning, Oct. 16. He will officially assume his duties early in December. Rabbi Shapiro is a native of Minneapolis, Minn. Ho graduated with honors from the University of Minnesota col logo of education. Ho is also a graduate of Both Hamidrash, collage department of the Minneapolis Talmud Tor ah, one of the foremost Hebrew educational centers in the United States. His present pulpit is at Beth El Congregation. Akron, O., where he came in August of 1955. A graduate of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where he also received a Master's degree, Rabbi Shapiro has held positions in Tulsa, Okla., and Toronto, Canada. In Toronto. Rabbi Shapiro was spiritual leader of Beth Tzedec Congregation, one of Canada's largest and most influential synagogues. i LV •^^LflHLV^S a*. !^n^ mm y m?$ F BH8~^* *'?ll RABBI NORMAN SHAPIRO Rabbi Shapiro sponsored a fivestate educational conference in the Southwest under the auspices of the United Synagogue of America. Friday, October 7, 19611 To Live in Heart. W, Last, Behind I, to Live rorerrt PALMER'S MEMORIALS | "Miemi't Only Itmhk Mentrntat %  vilcleri" Scheduled Unveilirgi Mr. Sinai Memorial Ferk Cemetery SUNDAY, OCT. 9, I960 SARAH F1NKEL, 1 c IF. Ml. Nebe CemeKi, FRIEDA AFFRON, 7 p.m. Rubhi Morris A. S?„f LENA R0TTEN8ERG, 3 p.m. "May Their Soulj RrpoM in Eternal Peace'' 1 ARRANGEMENTS BT PALMER'S MIAMI MONIWWCO. He formerly was a member of ln addition, during the summer of the editorial advisory board ofj,_._ .. .. the American Jewish Times-Out1947 he enj y ed ** d'-^'nction of look of Greensboro, N.C., and is Dein 8 ">* only delegate from the still a frequent contributor of ar-1 Southwestern United States to the tides and editorials to this pubj first world conference on Jewis lication, as well as to the Southern j education at Hebrew University in Miami Hebrew Book Store 1S85 WASHINGTON AVE Miami Beach JE 8 3840 Hebrew Religious Supplitt tor Synagogues, Schools A. Private l is ISRAELI DOMESTIC GIFTS Israelite of Atlanta, Ga. While with Congregation B'nai Emunah in Tulsa, Rabbi Shapiro was associate editor of the Tulsa Jewish Review. During his stay in Oklahoma, To Meet in Sukkah ssaajssMM sasMtasHi Judea PTATo Open Season First Temple Judea PTA meetwill be held on Tuesday evening at ing of the religious school year, the Temple, with Mrs. Al Berkowitz, newly reelected president, conducting the session. Newest methods of present-day study by carefully selected certi fied teachers will be discussed. Parents will be invited to visit the classrooms, meet the teachers personnally, and become acquainted with the curriculum. Question and answer period or, I the school will be held with Benjamin Udoff, education director, and Albert Jacobson, chairman of the education committee of the Temple. Miami Beach chapter of Mizrachi Women will meet Oct. 11 in the Sukkah at the home of Mrs. Samuel M. Prairie awe. delicacies will be served. Jerusalem. For years. Rabbi Shapiro hat boon very active in the Zionist movement. While in Israel,, ho volunteered for secret operations in the Ncov and helped in the establishment of a new colony near Caia. Rabbi Shapiro is also closely identified with the programs of ,the National Conference of ChrisGrundwerg 4561i tians and Jews and is active in holiday radio and television He is married and has three children. REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Sreoter Miami's largest I Oldest Supplier for Synagogues, Hebrew A Sunday Schools. Wholesale Retail ISRAELI ClfTS AND NOVELTIES 417 Wash ington Ava. JE 1 -9017 Simchas Torah Evening David Pinski School will hold a Simchas Torah evening at the Seville hotel on Friday evening, Oct. 14. The school is now open for the season, with registration still continuing at 1534 Washington ave. ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE 1357 Washington Ava. JE 1-7722 ALL HEBREW SUPPLIES FOR ISYNAGOGUES 4 JEWISH HOMEf| We Carry Bar Mitzvah Records GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FRanklin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Avenue Miami, Fla. HARRY GORDON PRESIDENT IKE GORDON FUNERAL DIRECTOR ^ LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK "The South's most beautiful Jewish cemetery" 30 Minuiei from the Beach Via The New 36th St. Causeway PREII NEW EDITION OF THE FAMOUS 24-YEAR HEBREWENGLISH CALENDAR Here it is! A new edition of a very popular calendar. Contents: 1 — Every Hebrew date and day of the week from October 1940 to September 19C4 2 — Every Jewish holiday to 1970 For a free copy, write to H.J. HEINZ CO. Dept. 12, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. There is in *igHt way and a wrong way Certainly you would not wail for an emergency to force you into taking out life insurance this is something you consider ralmly, ami decide on after thorough investigation. Doesn't selection of.your family Memorial Plot merit the same judicious concern? Of course..That's why you'll want to find out about Miami's finest and oldest Jewish cemetery today. Mount Nd Perpetual Care Fund (largest of any local Jewish cemetery), already exceeds $100,0(X). Serenity and loveliness is its keynote ... a place of comfort and inspiration for you ... a lender memorial of love Cor those departed. Dct.nl, trill be gladly given, in your home or by mail. ajjoCfgj^Bfaaarfajp^Oftj MJGUST BROS Ry:7 i-. th. at si I r MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL Mount Na'^o Cemetery. SJ05 N.W. 3,d St., Miami, Flo. Please tend me, without M.gat„ m lull ,„/„„„„. lion on family Burial Estates m Mount S.-bo. Name Address Ci, y Zone....State ... i EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETi SBOS Northwest 3rd StreetPbene MOhawk 1-74M



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Page 14-A Jen is tncrXtian Friday, October 7. l^n from Hollywood: HERBERT G. LUFT Oriental Beauty Aliza Gur Star-Struck but Intelligent Hollywood LIZA GUR, Miss Israel of 1960. was introduced *^ lo me at a recent Labor Zionist affair in Los Angeles where she praised another young Sabra, actress Elana Eden, who was receiving an award for her performance in "The Story of Ruth." Aliza is an Oriental beauty whose face seems to have a rare Biblical quality. When Otto Preminger saw her during the production of "Exodus." he exclaimed that she represented to him the nativeborn Israeli he had been thinking about all the time. Actually. Miss Gur was set for a featured part in the Leon Uris opus. However, when it turned out that she had to leave for location on Cyprus, she realized the assignment would conflict with an Israeli movie in which she was playing the lead. Since she decided to stay in her home country, Preminger switched her to a smaller character part in Acre prison. If you'll see "Exodus," you can detect her on the screen as the courageous wife of a Jewish freedom-fighter, bringing her imprisoned husband a cake into which she stuck a smuggled gun. While kissing him good-bye. she transmits rifle bullets from her mouth onto his lips We talked with the 19year-old Aliza at length during a visit to the State of Israel Bonds office in Los Angeles. The young Sabra. who scored notably as a finalist in the Miss Universe contest held in Miami, told us that the foremost race for the Miss Universe crown took place this year in Florida, the second one — Miss World contest — in London, and only the third one in Long Beach. California. The Israeli beauty queen was born in Ramat Can. Her father. Yitzhak Gross, a life-long Zionist, had come from Berlin long before Hitler rose to power; her mother. Malka Netza. hails from an ancient Yemenite family. Aliza was raised and educated in Haifa, where she went to grammar and high school, later studying costume designing. Her proficiency earned her a scholarship in languages and psychology at the Hebrew University. She still plans to study for her doctorate degree in order to translate some day English and German classics into Hebrew. While studying drama in Tel Aviv she met Peter Fry. who had come to Israel seven years ago Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN Agitators on Loose Washington % HE NATIONAL ELECTION religious %  cornroversy is being exploited by such agitators as George Rockwell. Gerald L. K. Smith, and Conde McGinley. The intrusion of extremist elements | came at a time when responsible Americans af all faiths were rallying to combat a grow ing Protestant • Catholic rift. The extremists turned their fire against Jews and Negroes rathej than at the two major faiths. Typical propaganda came from Rockwell's neo-Nazi group. The Nazis opposed Sen. John F. Kennedy's election on grounds that election of any "minority" member might lead ultimately to "a Jew President." But the Nazis also attacked Vice President Richard M. Nixon. He was scored for "membership in the NAACP," employing a Jew, and using words like "brotherhood" and "equality." Gerald L. K. Smith impugned the sincerity of Sen Kennedy's religious conviction rather than attacking Catholicism. He sought to portray the Senator as a leftist radical. Smith said "I can imagine nothing within the range of possibility which could be worse for America than for Kennedy, the nominee of the Democratic party, to be elected as President of the United States." Smith simultaneously denounced Mr. Nixon for "disgusting expediencies" that have "nauseated the Smith group. Conde McGinley's hate sheet, "Common Sense," attacked Sen. Kennedy because "Zionists back Kennedy." The Senator was condemned for addressing Jewish groups and supporting a liberal immigration policy. A "White Citizens' Council" handout, attacked both candidates. Nixon and Kennedy were termed "the twin stooges of the Congolese and Jewish manipulators, as indistinguishable as Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee." A call was made for "a really white American President who would combat Palestinian pressure and the Communist goons of Leopoldville." The religious issue generated by the election was generally on a much higher level. Eminent Jewish leaders joined leading Protestants and Catholics in efforts to curtail bias aimed at the religion of one of the candidates. Discussion of the Church-State issue, it seemed, descended all too often to an emotional level. Assailed by the bitterest manifestation of anti-Catholicism since the 1928 Al Smith campaign. Catholics sought Jewish advice on anti-defamation tactics. It was a new experience for many Americans of the Catholic faith to Hear loyalty challenged. In the smouldering South, the Ku Klux Klan emerged in new strength. From Virginia to Louisiana, fiery crosses burned. But the Klan stood repudiated by the mass of Southerners. Its status was insignificant compared to its 1928 peak; to become a director at Habima. He inspired her interest in the theater and the cinema. On the stage of the Kameri theater, she later appeared in Hebrew productions, as Ophelia in "Hamlet" and as Medea. Aliza made many low-budget films for home-grown audiences, such as "Lets take the Gun" at the Herzlia studios. Chosen Miss Israel in a contest sponsored both by the magazine La 1 Isha (for the Woman) and the HP MHHRI MB 11 %  Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDUN The'Dream World Of Artist Marc Chagall MY LIFE. By Mare Chagall. Translated from the French by Elisabeth Abbott. With twtnty illustrations by th author. 174 pp. New York: The Orion Press, 30 Fifth ve. $6.00. R EADING MARC CHAGALL'S brief autobiography is like being whirled into one of his paintings and wafted gently about the room of his life, bumping softiy into his images. Chagall writes exactly as he paints, in brilliant splashes of color, wjth something of fantasy and something of supernaturalism. rooted in a sad and* sentimental sort of remembered reality. There is nothing of affection in his writing, for all its strangeness. Rather, one becomes engrossed by the deceptive simplicity with which Chagall portrays his life. lake a child. Chagall seems to inhabit an anthropomorphic world, a haunted world, if you will, in which The very road prays. The houses weep," and "People I know well, settle down on roofs and rest there." Like a child, whose knowledge of life and its limitations is incomplete, Chagall too finds all things simultaneously wondrous and possible, writing oi hi.feelings as he has painted them, floating off in the air, peering down with great dark eyes, or sitting around on rooftops. The book is filled, also, with that same delightfu! c'hagallian humor which lightens his painted world and saves his surrealism from the edge of terror. -Here the young Chagall writes of attending a wed ding and hearing the badchan sing "Betrothed, bei trotheri. Think of what awaits you."—at which words "my head detaches itself gently from my body and weeps somewhere near the kitchen where the fish is being prepared." The book begins with his birth ("I was born dead") and ends in Moscow in 1922. as the 35-year old Chagall was about to leave Russia for Paris, for the last time. It evokes in vivid detail the shtetl life in all its warmth, catching it through the eyes of a precocious child. There is also a fascinating picture of the artist colony in Paris just before World War I —Apollinaire. Bakst and Nijinsky and the Diaghiloff ballet, a glimpse of Degas and others. He speakbitterly of postRevolution Russia anil the Communi, complaining that they neither love nor underand him The twenty illustrations were designed express ly —or perhaps one should say expresrioniaticallj for this autobiography, which Chagall wrote in Ru> sian during his final stay in Moscow in 1921-22. The pictures were published at that time, although the t :ext did not appear until 1932, in a French tra-i lion by his wife, Bella. This is the first American edition. Orion Press %  has printed it beautifully, with a wide left-hand in%  i and handsome type The book is. in its ow.i v a work of art—lovely to read, lovely to own, and. bj %  the way, lovely to give. Overseas Newsletter: By ELIAHU SALPETER government, she was brought to thjs country. On a three-day stop-over in Paris, she met most of the other European beauty queens. After a number of screen and television appearances, among them one on the Ed Sullivan show Aliza Gur is under the magic spell of the theater' but too intelligent to be taken in by mere publicity stories. She wants to become a good actress. At Fox, she was asked to play an American Indian in an Elvis Presley movie, a role she felt she had to decline. Jill St. John (the lovely Mrs. Lance Reventlow) is another Jewish actress who is currently volunteering her efforts for Israel Bonds. Last weekend, we attended a gala soiree at the swanky hill-top home of the former Miss Oppenheim — now daughter-in-law of the Woolworth heiress, one of the richest women in the world. It was the first major event of the Junior Auxiliary of the Women's Division in Beverly Hills that carried the message of Israel to the younger movie celebrities and socialites. Though a mere $40,000 was sold in bonds at the affair, it became an opening wedge for vital activities in behalf of Israel and world Jewry. Mrs. Maurice J. Hyman was the chairman, with Mrs. Gene Barry (the television star's wife) as co-chairman, and Miss Gogi Grant, the singer and, in real Jife, wife of attorney Bob Rifkind, acting not only in an honorary capacity but also giving renditions in English and Hebrew to the entertainment of the 100 couples, of which your JTA correspondent plus wife were the only press representativves. Off the Record By NATHAN ZIPRIN Year is a Long Time A YEAR IS a long lapse of time, even ** when measured by the newest scientific rods that make a mockery of time and distance. Yet the cycle has moved so rapidly that it challenges containment, recapture, evaluation. In the pre space age days it was possible to spot the highlights of a passing year with comparative ease. Time then rolled its pages slowly. Now the calendar is always in turmoil, its pages falling era we can even gaze at the script. What has been the script of the year that is now at its end? The answer will be given by the tomes of time. If mercy is given priority over wrath and if the wise men who guide our destiny are led by more meaningful purpose the despair of our times will give way to faith, dejt ruction to rising edifices and fear to vision of new horizons. To contemplate any other course is simply unthinkable. The human race is too young to die. The early days of the year were promising Hands were stretching across the seas in preparation for meeting. Harsh exchanges gave way to soft dealings and the spirit of Camp David was to be inscribed in summit script in Paris. Sesame-like, the world was opening a new leaf. The storm seemed subsided and there was a new climate of hope in the lands. Then thunder broke loose over the skies and people everywhere ran for shelter from its wrath. The hands that strove for warmth were now frozen in unmeeting, and darkness descended upon human countenaces everywhere and fear of the imponderable. Men no longer were masters of their own tools. Their destiny now was in the hands of the few who held the secret, the key to life or extinction. As the year was approaching its end there were signs, albeit feeble ones, that the clouds over the big-powerlands were dissipating. However, offsetting this promise was the unrest in the countries of our own hemisphere and in the distant lands whose people were first savoring the taste of freedom, of independence. The Scale That Balanced Gurion's Visit to UN Jerusalem ISRAEL HAS SENT the largest delega%  tion yet to the United Nations General Assembly. The delegation is headed by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mrs. Golda Meir and consists of 24 members including a number of top-ranking Foreign Ministry officials, ambassadors and several members of the Knesset who will act as advisors. There had been lively discussion, both in official circles and in the press as to whether Mr. Ben-Gurion should attend at least the opening of the General Assembly particularly since it was announced that Colonel Nasser of Egypt will attend the Assembly. There were several considerations in favor of Mr. Ben-Gurion's participation in the Assembly. It was felt, for example that since several African and Asian Premiers who are not pro-Communist did follow Mr. Khrushchev's suggestion to go to the Assembly, Israel should also demonstrate an independent course of action by not to lowing blindly the Western attitude. More important, nowever, was the feeling that Mr. Ben-Gurion's P r ence v *rt needed to counter Col. Nasser's appearance in New o and prevent this occasion from becoming an all-out Ara propaganda campaign against Israel. Among the arguments against Mr. Ben-Gurion's journey to New York was that Iarael should not assist what appears to be a Soviet propaganda campaign speaheaded by the participation of Soviet Bloc Prei "' e f rs Jr the Assembly. Yet another consideration was that r. Ben-Gurion waa juat recently in the United States, m with American leaden and nothing new could <***** from a "repeat performance" of hia visit. Some P' 1U circles also felt that it would be "a waate" to send %  Ben-Gurion to America now where his presence be eclipsed by the presence of Mr. Khrushchev and otn world leaders.



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Ljdoy. October 7. 1960 +Jeisth rkridiar Page Jl-A 4/7 American Celebrates Sukkoth in Morocco By ISRAELS. STERN Hoshanna Rabba night as I saw and experienced it in El Kara ah, Morocco, began on a Wednesday afternoon about 1:30. I was in the Mellah, the poorest section of the town. Rather, I was a lunchcon guest in the Sukkah of one of the poorest families I know and frequently visit here in Casablanca. You can really call them a ment, there were also two very thin tubes in the shape of long candles. They were hollow, and when filled with olive oil would burn at least 36 hours. • Such candles are used there for sacramental purposes. The people were already on the beginning of the second section of Deuteronomy. The "Haham" was reading word by word with fanatical adherence to punctuation and %  r>plain, typical Moroccan Jewcantillation, with cverywrr listening or saying with him. He'd stop often. And in the case of the Sidra's containing numerous commandments which apply in our times, often, after every two or three verses, he would pause and make anywhere from a three word remark to a five-to-six-minute speech in Arabic, which most of the time was not too difficult for me to understand, at least in content. j t h family, very ignorant in secular, as well as in Jewish learning. I -..,! S. Stern is an American, who I .i living in Casablanca. Morocco, for the past year. He is the son of Rabbi Dili id S. Stem, principal of the noted Teihii'fl Torah Vodaath in Brool(lvn, N-T. Mr. Slrrn i also the nephew oj William G. Mechanic, o/ Miami Beach, past president of Btlh Jacob Congregation. The husband and wife can neither read nor write French, and speak it with difficulty, so that were the children not present, I would have been the "Frenchman" of the house. Their native Arabic they can read and write only in Hebrew script, though the Hebrew language, itself, they know not at all. The parents are also great "am ho'ratzim," very ignorant, but at the same time fanatically observant and particular of Jewish laws and Sephardie customs. If a son or daughter wants to introduce an "innovation" in the house, some Ashkenazic custom ritual which they learned or picked up in the Yeshiva, the parents would say "Barakah" or, as we say, "thank goodness"—as if to say at least we see they are teaching them something and they are not wasting their time there. But if any f the "innovations" touches or interferes with a Sephardie ritual, they will shout "Kharah" — "forbidden" — and give them a look as you would expect a Jew to get who conducts Ire Seder at the Satmarer Rabbi's table and begins to eat Matzo soaked in soup, somrhing anathema to Chassidic ritual. Their Sukkah, too, was typical of them —very plain and simply-built, but elaborated decorated on the inside. While eating, we suddenly had a guest. A woman, a second or third cousin of our hostess, was "rounding up talent" for the "Kara" or reading to be held in her house on Thursday night, "Lail Hoshanna Rabba," the eve ol Hoshanna Rabba, to make sure she has more than an ample minyan or quorum. On seeing me, she didn't let go, until I gave her a definite promise that I, too. will attend; and only then did she bid us 'peace" and departed for other "courts" to round up additional 'talent." On Hoshanna Rabba night, around 8:30-8:40, I returned there and found them waiting for me as wc had agreed: for by myself they feared I would never find the house in that twisted mass of alleys. My entreaties that I had finished supper only one and one-half hours before were to no avail. I had to sit down and eat with them all over again. It was 9:45, approximately, when we arrived at the woman's house and were ushered into the Sukkah. The "we" consisted of •he husband, her 15-year-old and 18-year-old sons, a nephew, his *' f e, a daughter not quite 14 and myself. There were already pres's, plates and cups for refreshFor though he was "speaking Arabic,' in reality what he would say was maybe 30 to 35 percent Arabic, which was used as a link or translation of a law, quotation or a rabbinic dictum. At intervals—which I found later always to be the same, one to two hours apart—refreshment was served. They gave tea, coffee, nuts, dates, cake, and pomegranates. Another thing of interest which even yet seems fantastic to me was everyone's familiarity with the words and cantillation. A good bit of time was in fact lost because of frequent, and occasionally lengthy, interruptions and disputes which ensued when someone accused the "Haham'' with the charge that he read a word with the wrong vowel points MAoA Party Sunday Sukkoth party sponsored by Conpgation Beth El Sisterhood will r held in Dora August Memorial F'l. 500 SW nth ave., on Sunday wening at 8 p.m. or used incorrect cantillation — and this in spite of the fact that except for the reader there was only one textbook of Deuteronomy for the entire assembly. In short, it was even more than a whole night affair. For after the reading of Deuteronomy, they said special prayers, after which they read the Book of Psalms in its entirety, with everyone taking turns being the reader. The reading of the Psalms fallowed the previous only with a special traditional chant for "Tillim" and the discussions and explanations. The challenges* occurred much less frequently; however, one interruption occurred which I must describe. It was almost 4 a.m., and because of the late htur. the "Baal Karah," the official reader, was reading at a switt pace and everyone was following—with the cantillation chant of course. Then, it was for the first time my turn to be the reader. I told them I would be glad to, but warned them, however, that I would do so only in our Ashkenazic chant. I felt that if I had to read, and with all eyes on this strange "Yehud" American, I would rather use my way and make a good job of it than try to imitate their Sephardie tune and make a mess of it. At any rate, it seems they were satisfied, because, thereafter, whenever my turn came, they did not hesitate to let me read. At one chapter, one of the assembled halted the reader with a shout claiming that he mispronounced a word. However, the reader argued that he was right. From the "Tillim," alone, it was not possible to judge, because the "nekudos," vowel points, were badly printed. In short, they began to hunt for a different copy of the Psalms and found that the one who challenged the reader was correct. All the assembled took it as if it was the most natural thing, a daily occurence, but to me it seemed wonderful and fantastic because the over 75-year-old oldster who caused the disturbance had been for 55 years, or lortger, totally blind, and one of the most desperately poor beggars I have yet seen in my life, even by Moroccan standards, and one of the greatest ignoramuses — an "am Ho'reti." I do not believe he knows the rendering or translation of a single prayer or Psalm. Yet he is reputed to know by heart to perfection all the prayers. Psalms, and the daily Sephar die poetic prayers. To return to our stay, the conclusion of the Psalms was followed by more prayers and "Piyutim u' Vakoshos." That was followed by a 28page selection of the Holy Zohar, which was also read in rotation. And I could not help but marvel again and again at the smooth flawless perfection of their reading. (1 however did not make out nearly as well with the "Zohar" as I had with the Psalms.) The system here used was that there was no specified amount of reading, and whoever took the book went on until he felt tired and could not continue, and nearly all as their turn came did a considerable amount of reading. When my turn came, and especially as the "Haham" and several others glanced at one another in doubt, I felt a compulsion lo show them that it is possible for a person to be an Ashkenazi and still know how to read even Zohar. In short, I tried my best to read the words, but I admit that the pronounciation and especially the abbreviations were no match for me. Yet I went on "valiantly," and lasted over three and a half pages when I gave up. I admired very much their tact; for while I was reading no one interferred with me, and a strict "hands off" policy was enforced. However, after I finished and another started reading, it just never came my turn lo read again — which was most probably by design, as several of the assembled obviously were urgin;* themselves to read much longer portions than they would have ordinarily, so that the Zohar reading was finished just short of my turn. After a long "Yehi Hotiur" prayer concluding the reading, the "Haham" made a lovely individual "mi shabayraah" for each of the assembled (including the women) and a second on* for all near and dear ones of whoever requested it of him, as I and most of the others did. The "Haham" also complimented me — that for an Ashkenazi I did the Zohar amazingly well. Now they served some more strong coffee and cake. It was close to 7 a.m.. and all were about to depart. Most of the participants went to Shul, well over a minyan, to darven, some went home to pick up Lulav. Esrog, and Machzor. And a couple went with the "Haham" to the mikva to perform the ceremony of ablution before the Hoshanna Rabba prayers. TO FOR YOU CLIP AND FILL OUT Storting Saturday, October 7th, and continuing through October 12th, a Religious Servey wiH ho made of every home in Southeast Florida, from Pompano Beach to Key West. PLEASE CLIP THE FOLLOWING SURVEY CARD, fill in the blanks, and ploce on your front door, visible to survey teams. This information will be shared with all denominations. Your help will be greatly appreciated. RELIGIOUS SURVEY RECORD Family Name Street Address House Number Telephone Zone Pt At Of fire* 1 J.ltC Nationality __________ %  % %  Given Name Jt %  E %  uT 1 m S Member of What Sunday School? Member of What Church? Where? Are You Loot Chare* Preference Dat of Birth Christun Jewish None Month D-r Year At* i ——— t — 1. For Absentee Members of Family: a. In Armed Services: Name — Address 6. Language spoken in.home (including sign language) a. Father ________________ b. Mother c. Children _______________ d. Others If "D" answered by whom spoken b. In School: Name Address Other: Name Address 2. Extension Department Prospects a. Shut-in: Name — b. Employed on Sunday: Name 3. Number Yeats Lived in: a. Community 4. Owner — 5. Do You Haw Ii-**-*"*' b. This House Renter 7. Kind of Bible used by family 8. Husband and Wife married by church or Synagogue %  9. How oftea does family attend church _____ 10. Who provides family income __________ 11. Kind ol employment 13. Affiliations a. Secular organizations _____________ W ReU*__



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Friday, October 7. 1960 rfKJQ S-D Jjar <>ung children will be consecrated at a special service. Kindergarten through the second crade pupils to be consecrated by Rabbi Leon Kronish are Michael Arkin. Matty Bloom, Melanie Co ben. Barry Cooper, Cathy Erlangcr, David .Gaynor, Judy Gilden,| Family Barbecue Supper Sisterhood of Coral Way Jewish Center will hold a family barbeque supper at the Center on Sunday from 5 to 7 p.m. Program will include favors for young children and dance music lor teenagers. Offices are Moved Lakeside Memorial Park, has moved its offices from Miami Beach to new, quarters at the park. Mrs. Samuel Oritt, vice president of Lakeside, a non-profit organization, announcing A "tremendously successful' High Holiday campaign on behalf of State of Israel Bonds came to a close Saturday evening at the conclusion of the observance of Yom Kippur. Samuel Oritt and J. A. Cantor, general chairmen of the bond drive, report that $262,000 in bonds was raised during the appeal period. "This figure," they said, "represent! *n eight-percent increase over last year's acheivement, and the figures are still incomplete. We can not adequately express our pleasure and appreciation for the tremendously successful campaign, and the continuing and devoted effort by so many people to make it so." Miami especially for the High Holi day appeals. Local Greater Miami and Holly wood leaders who spoke for the bond drive included Oritt. Manuc Burstein, Clifford Straus, Rabb Murray Alstet, Ben Essen. Haroh Turk. Maurice Klein, Sheldon Ed wards, Mel Hecht, Ralph Levy Joseph Rappaport. Dr. Milton Lu barr. Rabbi Tibor Stern, Hy Gal but, Rabbi Joseph E. Rackov.sky Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky, Paul Kwit ney, Rabbi David Lehrfield. Rabb Labovitz, Rabbi David Shapiro ane Rabbi Samuel S. Lerer. bert Berk, of Philadelphia. Kiddush of Sanctification will follow. Rabbi Morris Skop and Cantor Herman Gottlieb will officiate. V Myles Hornreich Salurday morning services, Oct. 8. at Temple Menorah will include the Bar Mitzvah of Myles Hornreich. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz officiates. Myles is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hornreich, 7508 Jewel ave. He is a student in the religious school of the Temple, and attends Nautilus Junior High. • • • Morton Ornstein Bar Mitzvah of Morton Ornstein wiil take place Saturday morning, Oct. 8, at Temple Menorah. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will officiate. Morton is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Ornstein, 825 85th st. He is a student in the religious school of the Temple, and attends Nautilus Junior High. Out-of-town guests will include Mrs. Rebecca Ornstein, paternal grandmother, Long Island, N.Y.; Mrs. Sylvia List, aunt, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Mrs. Faye Saltz, aunt, I-ong Island; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Diamond, uncle and aunt, Fairlawn, N.J.; and the Bar Mitzvah's brother, Howard, of California. Reception in his honor will be held Saturday evening at the Barcelona hotel. Dividend Announced Frederick J. Teschke, president of the Bank of Dade County, announced that a quarterly dividend of 15 cents per share has been declared by the board of directors of the bank, to all stockholders as of record Sept. 30, to be paid Oct. 14. Still to be counted before any ir conditioned f,nal f, f £ s n be r ? ath ^ arc '",? sums of bonds already sold or still to be sold through eight congregational and area dinners. Thirty three congregations in 1 st. Former location was 4007 Chase ave. berg. Wendy Haft, Danny Jonas, Susan Lee, Pamela Leslie, Albert levin. Donna Sue Lundy, Steven Maislin, Jennifer Neber, Jeffrey Pardo. Jo-Ann Rackeafr. Thomas Tobirr, Karen linger, Richard Wieder, David A 1 p e r t, James Baker, Jane Benson, Steven Chu>mir, Alan Harvey, Jamie Jack er, Beth Kringman. Michael Levine. Irene Randall, Steven Ran


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Page 6-B •Jenisti Hcrldlar Friday, October 7, i960 For Her 'Doing' and 'Giving Women's Leader to Receive Double Tribute Mrs. Samuel T. S.p.ro is a pe-.with Hadassah for years desot tite woman of boundless energy ing much of her effort to the Youth and enthusiasm, channeled effec-1 Aliyah program. She %  %  lively and productively toward member oi.the national boar helping to make the world "a better place in -which to live." the Youth AJiyah committee. Mrs. Sapiro was the first DiaOn Wednesday, she is; ZVZ%T^lVo^T^l %  known to her associates, will stop ^ ut J a ^ M JJSri b S tes 8 generously '"doing" and "giving" long enough .South ^^ Medica *, Ce „t e r., to accept a double tribute at an ^ ne Ha ^, a wvidcd the 12th :E£ r^Ver^L^l^ne/glas/fo^the Center's chapTHE LEAD OFF State of Israel Bonds. | eI Officially, the women's club year opened as of last Thursday with For Mrs Sapiro's work on be-! She is a life me !" J" J the installation luncheon of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organna „ of Israel Bonds she wdl re-, ^TchMrel' Cardiac Hospital, iiations. Belle (Mrs. Irving) Lehrman installed Miriam (Mrs. Milton) ceive %  thUomanof Valor pin and ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ of the NaSirkin her officers, chairman, directors and organ the MltlAM BfUE •Exodus" Award. The Woman f Valor oin is the highest award the Jewish Home for the Aged and ization presidents in a most moving manner. whicn the State of Israel can preAmerican Friends of the Hebrew Every one-was glad of the opportunity to meet se nt to a woman, and it signifies University, the new executive director of the Greater Miami that Mrs. £apiro has been directly, Miami residents since 1935, Mrs Jewish Federation. Arthur S. Rosichan. and to hear responsible for the sale of $100,-j Sapiro and her husband make their him speak. I was especially glad, since he said such OOO in Israel Bonds. I home nice things about me and presented me with a Equally significant is the presenlovely charm from FJWO as outgoing president. a ion o{ tne -Exodus" plaque for • • '"extraordinary service to Israel's A warm and friendly feeling was apparent, growth and security," because throughout the luncheon, as women sat in groups of j,\ TS Sapiro will be the first to reeight, and told each other how busy they were. A ce j ve this singular honor. The presdeep feeling of concern for community need, was en tation will be made by Col. Dina uppermost in their minds. Looks as if the comWerth. commanding officer of munity and you are going to have a banner year, -chen," the Israeli Woman's Miriam. !Army. Eighteen months of planning before the f first £ Ml special t !" ^Wg SS SL^UT&tPJSl ? £ SS£ will entertain at the lunchHeights is absolutely the last word in comfortable eon. living. There is plenty of closet and storage room. is particularly fittir thai which is COt. DINA WERTH Gables. They have three sons, all of whom are married. Chairman of the luncheon is Mrs. Joseph Shapiro. i .,-> to operate that even Marty can do it. says Pat. the first prerequisite in every woman's Mrs. Sapiro should be honored for dream house. They have a gas-f.red barbecue grill her effort, in selling bonds._During World War II, she was aecorated and given the rank of a fourstar general by Mrs. Omar Bradley for her work in the sale of United States War Bonds. Mrs. Sapiro has been working with the Israel Bond drive family reunion in Chicago, they all stayed with Pat's have two little boys. Need They have just returned from Pat's Ricky and Randy went with them, and ("•IMPS. Jim and Helen Lewis, who also mi re i>c said? -* IN THE PUBLIC EYE W.nen Sally (Mr*. Harold) Spaet got a hurry-up call to go on a tr:p with her husband to Panama City and Bogota, Columbia, she atarted packing like mad. Harold came home and saw the frantic p. eking that was going on laughed and said. "Don't bother. We're not Vitally interested in the growth going to take any luggage wont be there long enough. AH that the deve opment of Israel, both she did was to fly down for the opening of an airport and shake hands all husband have visited the around. It was 14*. hours flying time, but all Sally go to see were !" % r „^^ K nalion in the Midthe mountains from the airport and to buy a chocolate bar and a Mrs ^ iro pound Of coffee. Flying fascinates Sally and if she ever gets up ^ ^ ^ ^^ oourage she woulB like to take lessons. Then Harold would have to lo y Urael where she saw firstget up courage and fly with her. | h>nd |he resu i, s 0 f t h e funds she In college, she majored in journalism and creative writing. She'helped to raise through the sale of always intended to go back for a Master's degree. Every year it was [ srae | Bonds. pu-hed on to the next year, and now it's going to.wait until the children Qiher areas o{ civic and philanare through school. Methinks Sally is a frustrated writer for sure. thropic work are also of interest But she's not frustrated as far as her hobbies are concerned. Sally no Mrs. Sapiro. She has been active always wanted to be a good housewife. Following the old adage that the way to a man's heart is through his stomach, she has the largest and best collection of cook books in Miami. Although active in many community affairs like Mt. Sinai Women's Auxiliary, of which she was president. Temple Israel Sisterhood, and the tfnited Fund. Sally leans heavily towards her hobby — flower arrangements and the GardenClub of Mt. Sinai Women's Auxiliary. She loves to make the flower or : fruit arrangements for her own dinner parties, as, well as for her friends, and of course the center. piece carries out a definite theme. ever since it began in Greater Miami ^ ^ g^^ T ^ ^ recent Israel Bond ^^ !" ,,.on?X tne Womer^Dwls 5 'here welcoming then new Israel Ambassador A^aham Harton and presently serves as vice man (center) on his first visit to Greater Miami. For her con chairman tinning effort in behalf of the State of Israel Bond campaign, Mrs. Sapiro will be honored with a special award Wednesday. Beach Committee Meeting Here Miami Beach Committee for the Advancement of Grand Opera was to have its first luncheon meeting of the 1960-61 season this Thursday at Junior's restaurant at 12: IS p.m. The committee, consisting of Being married to a civic leader is lots of fun prominent businessmen in the area. SAUT according to Sally. You never know what is going is working with the Opera Guild of to pop up next. How else could you get to meet so many fascinating, Miami to help celebrate the Guild's and unusual people like the Flying Farmers for instance? The friend20th anniversary'. New chairman aUpa she has made and the fact that she and Harold can do so many of the committee is Dr. Leonard H. thiagi together make up for the trivial inconviences that go to make j Jacobson. of 6410 N. Bay rd. up a life that is so much in the public eye. Dr. Jacobson was to address the Onlv one thing bothers me. Sally What kind of a centerpe.ee *M.W^rit^f* !" "*^ !" rm use for mao ball soup Barbecued nbs and hot apple P .e* ff tt !" ££, ^yeTJSZ* dan Davidson, George Brumlik, T. MOO MOO H. Greenfield. Charles Friedlander. David Hochberg. Samuel Knowles. Because of Hurricane Donna. Leon and Dorothy Kaplan couldn't Morns Lapidus. David Levinson. drive their daughter. Rita, to Gainesville for her first year in college, j Hitter Levinson. Arnold Levy. SamShe finaUy got a ride, but in order to get her luggage to school, it had ^ L Seller, Meyer B. Marks. Dr. to be divided and sent with three other people. My. my. they must, Arthur M. Green, and Hank Meyer, have had a good time shopping. Richard and Linda Brickman. the Kaplans' elder daughter, brought the baby over to stay out the hurricane. The weather stripping made, a most peculiar noise, like a herd of cattle, and that intrigued the, baby. When asked about the weather. Karen said. "Poppy had a hur-, mane with a moo cow and lots of big trees fall down." Absolutely no one could give a better description of a hurricane, says Leon. He's an attorney and he should know. Israelite Center Jewish Playhouse 3198 S.W. 24th Terrace, Miami Prawdfy frastats with IHGUSH TITUS the f.Jlowine OUTSTANDING JEWISH FILMS • SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16th • "THE SINGING BLACKSMITH" Sfarrinf ANNUM OrSHf* • SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18th • "MONTICELLO HERE WE COME" with MtNASHA SKULHIK and MICHll ROSENBftG AOOEO ATTRACTION: "THE SINGERS OF ISRAEL" CANTOR MALAVSKY 4. FAMILY CHOIR • SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26th • "GOD, MAN AND DEVIL" MfCMU MKHtUSKO I LUCY GEtMAN • SUNDAY, APRIL 16th • "MAZEL-TOV YIDDEN" with L10 fUCHS, CNAIM TAUBtK ALL SHOWINGS at 8:00 P.M. Pf caa di h Isrmtlitt Crater St\i% iwl Uk—I Season Ticket: Donation $5.00 — Individual Show: Donation St 50 FOR RESERVATIONS Call HI 5 1S29 — Evenings HI 3S4+4 THE ISRAELITE CENTER JEWISH PLAYHOUSE ATTN: R. GILBERT. P.O. Box 413. Miami 45. Fla. Enclosed find check in amount of % t o cover Seatoa Tickets at S3 each, or to cover Ticket* at %  each for performance on __ (fill in <>••> N'anin Add re** SOMETHING NEW How would you like to go to a play and not know how long you were going to be there? That's what happened to Harold and Stella Turk when they were in Los Angeles. They went to see "The Connection." a curious experimental play in which the actors imorovise their! lines. It's supposed to be the newest in Theater (with a capital T). They | aba saw the Royal Danish Ballet, which is supposed to be the finest in the world — and that is not experimental. Saw "Vintage Sixty." which had its tryout in Los Angeles and then opened in New York. If it closes there, at least the Turks got to see it first. FUR RE-STYLING m out if Aoniou of rims? wotumAMsmr .VE CAN CGNVEBT v. '%  '. SMART rt3W From $39 FLORIDA FURS & CLINIC 2296 Coral Way HI 4-0544 MIAMI 1117 Las Olas Blvd. JA 4-7697 IT lA'JDEROAlE HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OLYMPIC HEALTH STUDIO AIR CONDITIONED COMPLETELY EQUIPPED FOB •OOY SWHDING IEDUCINO PHYSICAL CONDITIONING WEIGHT GAINING CORRECTVE EXERCISES NO ONE CAN AFFORD TO IGNORE THE HEALTH — REASONABLE RATES a LADIES -BE FIRM COME TO LADIES ONLY MORNING CLASSES $35 YEAR TUESDAY THURSDAY SATURDAY MORNINGS *M -11*0 A* CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ACROSS FROM CORAL GABLES HIGH SCHOOL 4027 LB Jeune Rd. Phon HI 8-9561



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Friday. October 7, 1960 *• Jew I si) fhrktlati Page 7-B was the choice of Mrs. Stephen Carner. Her dress featured a deep collar cut low to give the impression of a cape. Her hat was of the large, white, soft variety. Mrs. Sidney Lewis was in moss green, with a high rounded neckline and short sleeves. She wore white rope beads, draped around her neck, and a white modified "beanie" hat with a long white tassel down the back. • • • P ASH ION shows are returning %  to our social scene. Last Friday, your columnist produced a show at the King's Bay Yacht and Country Club for one of the local chapters of the Cancer Assn. Clothes were from the Princely Shops, with emphasis on deep, muted shades of green. Next week, we are coordinating a fashion show for the Women's Panhellenic Assn. of Miami at the LaGorce Country Club. Strictly-lown_ clothes -.MULL, ttt shown from the Don Mullen collection Club members are modeling the clothes, and the collection will feature, in addition to dresses and gowns, -the sportswear groups that are in demand for the gold course, as well as for many of our more casual hours. FEDERATION of Jewish Wom%  en's Organizations held its installation luncheon last Wednesday at the Seville hotel. This group is comprised of 120 affiliated organizations, and Mrs. Milton Sirkin was installed as president. For the occasion, she wore a beige dress, and her hat was in tones and shades of brown. Chairman of the day was Mrs. Rernard Stevens, and her silk shirtwaist was of blue and purple stripes. She also wofe a small dark blue feathered hat. The coat style dress was worn by Mrs. Buddy Weissel, featuring eggshell white with huge jet black buttons. Large patch pockets were placed low near the hemline. Her black straw hat .showed a face framing deep brim. Mrs. Daniel Heller chose a green ensemble with green hat. An aqua print was the selection ot Mrs. William Bernstein for the occasion. At the microphone was Mrs. Irving Lehrman in a black print with a bateau neckline, and a small muted white fur hat. Mrs. Arnold Strauss chose a .silk print in transitional tones of yellow and greens on a white background. Her iridescent green toque hat had a touch of veiling. Mrs. Stanley C. Myers looked chic in a black imported cotton suit and a large black velvet hat. Mrs. Richard Friedman also selected black in a silk tunic, while Mrs. Oscar Sindell chose light blue with a small royal blue hat. THE new taupe color was se lected by Mrs. Raymond R. Rubin, which was featured in her' silk print shirtwaist dress, and [ also her stitched velvet hat. Brim of the hat was contuored and scalloped. Mrs. Michael Tobin wore a twopiece damask ensemble with the short jacket. Her hat was of black silk organza draped over the pancake-shaped frame. A touch of color was added with a large j red rose. The same shape hat was j also chosen by Mrs. Melvin Frumkes, except for the fringed feathers, which looked like a luxurious powder puff. Her dress had a sheath skirt of white silk with the bodice of gold and white I stripes. The collar was cut low with a modified shawl effect. The costume suit in a two-piece blue-on-greeh print was worn by Mrs. Jay Siegel. Powder and royal blue were the colors, and the royal was repeated in the small pill-box hat, as well as in the rest of her accessories. Black silk linen with a touch of white "Y" Branch Names New Supervisor Mrs. Sylvia Ruskin has been appointed youth activities supervisor at the Miami YMHA Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. She replaces Judith Goldstein, who is now a graduate assistant at the University of Miami, preparing for completion of work toward a PhD degree in pyschology. Last year, Mrs. Ruskin was supervisor of the Junior High Department at the Miami Branch, and also worked in the senior citizens prpgram. She has also been arts and crafts counselor in the day camp program for the last two years. During the coming year, she will be responsible for the supervision of the Senior High Divi sion, which presently includes 12 clubs, with a total membership of over 300 young people. She will also be assuming the responsibility of editor of the GMJCC Bulletin. Mrs. Ruskin holds a Bachelor's degree from New York University, where she specialized in occupational therapy. Prior to coming to the agency, she had many years of camp counseling experience. She resides with her husband. Stephen, who is an attorney, and their children, Michael. 9, and Jimmy, 5. Theater Group i Goes on Stage "The Night of January 16," by Ayn Rand, will be presented at Temple Ner Tamid on Oct. 22 and 23. The "First Niters" will stage the production under the direction of Mrs. Harry (Lillian) Burak, herself the author of many plays presented in the Greater Miami area during the past few seasons. The "First Niters" is a dramatic group of semi -.professional and professional actors, who offer a repertoire of comedy, drama and mystery. President is Gertrude Marx, who has appeared* at the Coconut Grove Playhouse and Studio M with such stars as Ed Begley, and may be seen in the current film, "The Bell Boy," featuring Jerry Lewis. The organization is open for booking throughout the Greater Miami area. "The Night of January 16" features a murder trial. Unique part of the production is that six members of the audience will serve aa jurors and give their verdict after the final curtain. PARIS CONSERVATORY METHOD VIOLIN PIANO SOLFEGGIO EAR TRAINING-SIGHT READING with PIERRE MANDE HI 3-0942 There Is A Definite Difference In Dry Cleaning!! We are big enough to give you the right price — and small enough to -give your every garment personal and careful attention. ONE HOI II DRY CLEANING NO EXTRA CHARGE FRIEDMAN'S PREMIUM (1 HOUR) DRY CLEANERS 2922 Coral Way 1718 79th St. Causeway Next to Bonfire's COIN LAUNDRY ON PREMISES — BIG 12-LB. WASH "FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST" Miracle Massage Salon • "STREAMLINE YOUR FIGURE" SPECIALIZING IN BODY MASSAGING NOW OPEN Monday through Friday 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. Saturday, Sunday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. 2373 CORAL WAY HI 4-1186 "Tew SefisfecfloM Oer Fleesere" Pldk-UP AND DELIVERY ZANDER'S LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 3466 N. Miami Avenue Phono FR 1-1343 BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT — NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vd Hkhruth of Florida Rabbi Or. Isaac H. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSING — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS __ aoottw nutmuNT a, HWHWHWCS MMPROOF UIUMHO jlO Collins Avt. Ph. JE 23571 Miami Moch | Kosher Products Directory Listed By Special Report NEW YORK-The new fall edition of the Orthodox Union's Kosher Products Directory, listing a record total of more than 1.500 kosher foods and related products, has been published. Free copies are available on request from the Orthodox Union, 84 Fifth ave., New York 11. The new 26-page directory has a new cover and a redesigned copy format for easier readability. Many products are listed which are available for the first time .under the rabbinical supervision of the Orthodox Union. Rabbinic phases of the Orthodox Union's kosher certification program, now in its 35th year of cooperation with the American food industry, are handled through the Rabbinical Council of America, the largest association of Orthodox rabbis in the world, which serves as the rabbinic arm of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Yom Kippvr Cantata Temple Emanu-El junior congregation Yom Kippur services Saturday featured a cantata, "That Thy Days May be Long Upon the Land." The cantata was arranged by Trixie Levin and Rabbi Bernard Mussman, director of education at the Temple, assisted by Cantor rjirsh Adler and Joseph Schreibman. music director. ABC SHORIHAND, GREGG PITMAN Comptomelry, PBX. IBM, NCR, etc. For other courses please consult YELLOW PAGE 654, PHONE BOOK A Is C 1 Dili ""S'NESS AND A u c L r n I TUTORING SCHOOL Attendance accepted by Dade County Board of Public Instruct.on. 500-526 N.E. 79th Street Near Biscayne Blvd. PL 7-7623 MU 1-3568 A-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HKP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 9-8401 Physician Appointed Dr. Stanley J. Coltune, Lt. Cmdr., United States Public Health Service, Reserve, has just been appointed an aviation medical examiner for the administrator of the Federal Aviation Agency. The agency has replaced the C.A.A., and regulates all flight personnel. Dr. Coltune has been a practicing physician in the City of Miami Beach for the past 16 years. GREETINGS "It is our pleasure to do business with you." MAX T.V. Repairs to All Electronic Entertainment Equipment REASONABLE PRICES GUARANTEED WORK Phone FR 3-3847 CORAL GABLES COHVALESCEHT HOME DAY CARE AVAILABLE "A Friendly and Gentle Almoiphere For Those You Lore" • 24 HOUR REOISTERCD NURSING SERVICE • SPECIAL DIETS OBSERVED • All ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR • PRIVATE BATHROOMS ,• AIR CONDITIONED • SWIMMING POOL • SPACIOUS GROUNDS 1 SCREENED PATIO Ferdinand H. Rosenthal, Director-Owner Former AMI. I >ir Mt. Slnal Hosp., Cleveland & Dir. J.\M.II II,, me fur Aged. Pittsburgh 7060 S.W. 8th ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA CA 6-1361 NEED ROOFING? Specializing in Re-Roofing BENTONE ROOFING COMPANY "YOU'VE TRIED THE REST, NOW TRY THE BEST" "MNNY CUREUA" 4045 S.W. 113th Court Phono CA 1-6134



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Friday. October 7, 1960 +Jet*isii fkrifi tr Page 7-A MidEast Oil Losing Strategic Role Left to right are Ronald Bergman and Philip Mirmelli. seventh grade students, packing canned goods and other foods for delivery to Tavernier. Acad. Students Help Tavernier Hebrew Academy students initiate the Hebrew New Year 5721 with a collection of canned goods and other foods for the children of Tavernier in the Keys, which was almost completely destroyed by Hurricane Donna. What have the Hebrew Academystudents to do with Tavernier? Joseph Acknr, chairman of the Science Department, taught for two years at tha Canal Shores School in Tavernier. Aftar Hurricane Donna took its tot I, Ackner contacted Charles Albury, principal of tha school, and asked if he couW ha of help. Albury said tha city needed help badly. Ackner than contacted Rabbi Gross, principal of the Academy, I to ask the students to start a I drive. The drive brought in more than 1.300 cans of food, and were distributed in Tavernier by Ackner and two Academy students on Wednesday morning, Erev Rosh Hashona. "This is a wonderful way to celebrate a holiday." Rabin Gross said. By Special Report NEW YORK — The emergence of Algerian Sahara and Libya as major new centers of oil production and the growing world surplus of oil "have considerably reduced the I international political importance j of Middle East oil and consequently of the Middle East itself," declares %  I Dr.. Benjamin Shwadren. noted au| thority on oil and on the Middle East, in the current issue of "Midjdle Eastern Affairs," monthly pubi lication of the Council for Middle Eastern Affairs '. ere. Because of these significant : changes, the full impact of which I will be felt only in the next several years, "the Arab Middle Eastern governments must make adiust1 ments, perhaps even radical adjusti ments. in their attitudes to and relations with the Western world The West would also have to draw the resultant conclusions." In a lucid and comprehensive analysis of recant Middle East oil development, tha author asserts that the actions of tha major international oil companies have already begun to reflect the changed world market conditions. All the companies resisted the pressures for increased royalties and the demand for integrated companies. In fact, early in 1959, they announced a cut in oil prices which, according to Shwadran. resulted in a revenue loss to the producing countries in the amount of $135 million (another cut was announced in August of this year). Aramco clearl y w arned Saudi Arabia to expect "11 "dfopTn royaTtTSS asTresult of the drop in price, in order to | meet competition. The companies i also showed no willingness to build I a new pipeline from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean and dis| played little interest in obtaining new concessions. The author shows that the Midi die East oil companies, some of ; which also have concessions in North Africa, may be torn between conflicting factors: "on the one hand, increasing North African production to resist Middle East demands and. on the other hand, maintaining Middle East production to protect their interests." Shwadran sees as one possible outcome a "drastic cut in world prices of oil and oil products in order to increase consumption and thus strike a happy balance between Middle Eastern and North African supplies." He suggests, however, that the price of Middle East oil will be affected not only by increasing supplies from North Africa, but also from the Soviet Union, South America and Canada, as well as by the development of atomic energy. The writer, who has authored Several books on the Middle East and has traveled in the area, reviews the major oil developments in the past years, notably the Arab Petroleum Conferences of Cairo and Jidda. He notes that despite repeated public declarations and implied threats by some Arab spokesman and the apprehensions of tha oil m companies prior7o"tre opening of the Cairo conference in April, 1959, no basic changes in the relations between the Arab governments and the concessionaire companies, either in royalty arrangements or in the besis of calculation, have occurred. The Arab governments emerged from the conference as willing to cooperate with the companies on a much broader basis than was indicated before. And their two favorite projects, the joint Arab pipeline and the integrated company proposal, appeared to them, under the circumstances, unrealizable. Shwadran observes that even if the projects were approved by all Arab League constituent bodies, it is important 10 differentiate between the non] binding recommendations of the | League and the actions of the Arab producing countries. Saudi Arabia : and Iraq, as well as Kuwait, which I is not a member of the League. He adds that so far both Saudi Arabia and Iraq have jealously kept tue Arab League leader, Egypt, out of l (he oil business. Mew Group Organized Unattached Club h now being organized for men and women between the ages of 28 and 45. First meeting will be Tuesday evening at the home of Rabbi and Mrs. Maurice Klein, 5939 SW 12th at, Miami. B-G Orders New Lavon Case Inquiry Continued from Page 1-A maintained since his resignation i that he had been the victim of a frame-up. and several newspapers have hinted that personalities high I er up than the two officers were involved. Mr. Lavon was Defense Minister while Mr. Ben-Gurion was in self-imposed retirement at his retreat at Sde Boker. After Mr. Lavon resigned, Mr. Ben-Gurion returned to the Cabinet as Defense Minister, subsequently replacing ; Moshe Sharett as Prime Minister. Mr. Lavon's associate continued to insist that new evidence, particularly that from the recent civil trial, was sufficient for full rehabilitation of Mr. Lavon, but the Prime Minister decided he wanted to have the findings of a new investigation before further action in the case. Mr. Lavon indicated that he had no intention of appearing before the committee named to reopen the 1955 cae in which he was forced to resign as Minister of Defense. He said that evidence already possessed by Prime Minister Ben-Gurion. who ordered the case reopened when the evidence was uncovered, was "amply sufficient" to give him lull rehabilitation. Israeli newspapers hinted here that high ranking personalities might be involved in the new development. One newspaper, Maariv, said editorially that the evidence now held by the Prime Minister was enough to justify full rehabilitation of Mr. Lavon and asked the Prime Minister to make a public statement to that effect even before the new committee finished its Investigation. Men's Club Annual Donee Brotherhood of Temple EmanuEl sponsored its annual Yom KipPur night dance Saturday at the fchelborne hotel. The evening featured music, dancing, entertainment by Harvey Bell and his son, Jody. His vision...A better world through electricity To this great man the significance of his work lay not in the huge, whirring dynamos, but in tha homes of people. Through his genius, in his lifetime, he saw electricity harnessed in dozens of ways to make life easier and more convenient for millions of people. Charles Proteus Steinmetz was born in Germany in 1866. He completed his scientific studiea in Switzerland and came to America in 1889. Certain scientific articles of his had brought him world-wide attention and as a result, in 1893. when he was only 28 years old, he was retained as chief First wKh tha Finast Caratta through Lerillard research consulting engineer by the General Electric Company. Here, for the next thirtyone years, his experiments and ideas helped to change the living habits of the entire country! The "con veniences" we take for granted today were the "wonders" of but a generation ago ... home generators and freezers, dishwashers and pumps, stoves and refrigerators and even toasters there is no electrically-driven appliance that does not ^someplace—bear the touch of Charles Proteus Steinmetz, the little man who saw a better world through electricity.



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Friday. October 7. 1960 +-Je*lstncrldliar Pago 5-A Buber Sees Growth of Liberalism By Special Report NEW YORK — A noted Jewish theologian has expressed the belief that a liberal Jewish movement will first begin to flourish in Israel during the next generation. This opinion was given by Prof. Martin Buber in a recent interview in his study in Israel. His views were revealed in an exclusive article, "A Conversation with Martin Buber," by Rabbi Herbert Weiner, Bonn Interest Seen in Arrest Continued from Pago 1-A tin authorities.) The effort by Argentine authorities to determine whether lie German arrested was Martin Eormann brought a reminder that the World Jewish Congress t ported publicly in Buenos Aires in 1945 that Bormann had come to Argentina that year in one of two German submarines. The report was later confirmed by Vladimir Dormosson, the then French Ambassador to Buenos Aires. It was also disclosed that an Italian physician from Milan who lives lure told Mark Turkow, represcn I alive of the WJC, a few weeks ago I hat after the war, he saw Burin a nn in Buenos Aires and reported it to the Italian Ambassador in Buenos Aires at that time. The WJC said that Bormann had been seen in Santa Catalina, Brazil, last February and in Paraguay in July, traveling with Argentine documents. It was noted that the seizure of the suspect was an indication that the Argentine) governHint was now seeking Nazi war criminals who reportedly settled in Argentina after the war, in con! rast to signs of reluctance to do so previously, (The Israel Foreign Ministry said ii Jerusalem that Israel was ready li provide all available material on Bormann to whatever country wculd try him, if the arrested sus 1 (ct is Bormann. There is no male rial on Bormann in government archives; but there is in other collations in Israel, including that ol ti i Yad Vashem.) Skit to be Featured Miami chapter of the National '•ruldren's Cardiac Hospital will hold its annual membership tea at Mc Kin Cohen Hall. 4250 W. FlagIt r st.. on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Mrs. Jack Stone is chairman. Featured will be a skit, "Banish the Ghosts." LONG DISTANCE MOVING fo all points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE LINES, INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue For Information Call MR. ROSS NE 5-6496 MIAMI Miller Electric Co. of Miami, Inc. MAUTt CONTMCTINs i SERVICE 3905 N.W. 37th Ct. Ph. NE 3-26S6 of the Temple' Israei of the Oranges and Maplewood in South Orange, N.J., in the Rosh Hashona issue of "American Judaism," official publication of fthe 1,000,000member Union of American Hebrew Congregations and Its affiliated bodies. Asked about the religious interests in modern day Israel, Dr. Buber commented, "The whole religious question here is terribly difficult. There is no liberal Jewish movement here — only some Jews who have liberal religious ideas. I em inclined to think that something will happen only after the next generation. After we have overcome this state of excessive politicization." He continued. "We are too politicized here, externally and internally. Most of the youth — apart from the Orthodox — are interested in politics; that means military problems, or political problems, or the two of them." "Another part of our youth.' continued Prof. Buber, "is interested in just what you might call career, personal career, without any ideas at'^11. Just knowing something because they must know something in order to make a career." At present there are two liberal Jewish congregations in the State of Israel in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv (with a group in Haifa) who are members of the World Union for Progressive Judaism, the in'ernational branch of liberal Judaism with headquarters in New York City. The largest segment is the UAHC with 1.000.000 members and 605 synagogues in the western hemisphere. Salute to Szold Centennial birthday of Henrietta Szold, founder of Hadassah, will be celebrated Monday evening at Oceanfront Auditorium. Mrs. Dorothy K. Fink will p r esent a biography of Miss Szold. Mrs. Sanford Jacobson wiii read excerpts from the world-famous woman Zionist's letters. Louis Schwartzman, executive of the Bureau of Jewish Education, will speak on Jewish Book J Month. Mrs. Samuel Z. Sakrais, of the national board of Hadassah, will be chairman of the evening. Yes, now is the time to have your savings where It b always worth 100 cents OR the dollar. Open or odd to your Dade Federal Insured savings account by the 10th of October and earn dividends from the 1st. Dode Federal makes no charge for transfer of fond* from any point in the U.S.A. Just bring us your passbook. Well do the rest. avings "One of the Nation's Oldest and Largest £)ade Federal i/AVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MlAMI SAVINGS ACCOUNTS in DADE FEDERAL are INSURED to $10,000. by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, an agency of the Federal Government, and EARN dividends twice a year for you at the current rate of .... JOSEPH M. LIPTON, I' %  SOWMTOWft PARK SHOI Whan transacting busineis at Dade Federal's Main Office, "Flagler at First," you may park at any downtown parking lot that is a member of the Park and Shop Plan, and Dade Federal will validate your ticket for I free hour of parking. Mam Office flatter at first OUR 5 CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU Maaattah Branch Herts MUM Branch TaMum Branch Ease* Ceater Branch 1400 N.W. 36th St. 12370 N.W. 7th Are. 1901 S.W. Its St. S00 N.W. 7th Are. RESOURCES EXCEED 155 MILLION DOLLARS



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Friday, October 7. 1960 +Jewlsttk)rldian Page 3 A Gwion Explains Reasons for Inquiry First Lady of the World, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, chats with Joseph Rose during a Miami Beach visit in 1952 on behalf of State of Israel Bonds, when Rose served as chairman of the 1952-53 campaign here. Community to Honor Joe Rose Sunday At Bond Function at Fontainebleau Joseph Rose, Miami Beach hotel owner and active community worker, is also a proficient artist, althought not many people know about this area of accomplishment. He paints primarily for pleasure, but when pressed, Rose will admit that he a "professional." He has already sold one painting, for an undisclosed sum, and contributed the money to the Sisterhood of Temple'Emanu-El. He is a member and former, president of the congregation. He exhibited artistic talent as a small boy. Ret* say*, but never really began to pain* until 1951. "I just felt that wanted to express something by painting," he says. "I really can't explain why I should have begun at that particular time." Since then, he has painted quite often, but purely for the enjoyment of it, working primarily in pastels a*4 eils. Although his hobby may not be well known, Rose's civic and philanthropic work is widely recognized. The JaXpat of many honors is a reception and dinner dance on Sunday in the Fontaine room of the r't of Defense Minister, which Mr. Lavon assumed, nor after returning to it in February 1955. "did I see any need for changes in the defense organization." The present inquiry will not deal with Mr. Lavon's activities as Minister but only with the integrity of the two Army offficers, Mr. Ben-Gurion declared. Monday, the Prime Minister reported to the full cabinet mnd, later, to a special meeting of Parliament's Committee on Security and Foreign Affairs, about the reasons why he has ordered* a special committee, headed by Supreme Court Justice Haim Cohen, to probe into the events preceding the sudden resignation of Pinhas Lavon from the post of Minister of Defense, in 1955. Mr. Ben-Gurion promised the Cabinet that he will bring before it the results of the committee's probe, and said he will order the Minister of Justice to prosecute anyone who might be deemed guilty of perjury as a result of 1'affaire Lavon. Mr. Lavon said that he would not comment on the Premier's statement on the investigation until he addressed the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Security Committee. He said he would supply the Committee with additional documents relating to the "affair" which led to his resignation as Defense Minister in 1955. Israelis, meanwhile, are still in a dilemma over what the whole affair is about and hints in the papers only help to increase the obscurity. He had the town light in hi big, fettlst! &%&£ &***• So beautiful, (he *Jt stx yews Mi cook! get "• •*. • man expects more than ekJaal last away i murder! sa. knew what thayhaeteae to her sonl who lives with them, is an architect and graduate of Cornell University. The entire Rose family will be present in full force Sunday even-; ing when Joseph Rose will be in the spotlight. Chairman for the dinner are Charles Fruchtman and Jack S. Popick. Judge Irving Cypen will serve as toastmaster, and Harry Rodgers' Orchestra will provide music for dinner and dancing. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs for its THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, linens, dishes, drapes, etc. All proceed! go towards support of the Home. You may contribute, take a tax deduction or we will pay cask for same. Remember ... we are NOT a profit-making organization ... We are helping your community to keep ill dignity. By helping others you are helping yourself! Manufacturers and jobbers—remember— we can use all your wtcastt or misfits. Pease call us for early pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.W. 27th Avenue Nl 3-2338 Closed Saturday* TODAY Open 9:43 %  TOY-THOMAS•aljIiTaK SM-UN CARMKNAa Q^UgMfi aw %  # -*IIMI\ aw -eaaafa*w r "" %  a raw*. fapiewatw^eajS? 13*L~ Complete and Dependable Title Service IAMI TITLE & Qkttact Co, 34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE TO WOMEN WHO WORK Will your preaent Income continue all your life? Ask about the Metropolitan's Income Plaji—and make your future aafe. NAT GANS 33M S.W. M *rawsa, Miatal PfceeM Ft 34*1* ar HI 4-tM1 Title Insurance Policies ef Kansas City Title lasarance Ce. Capital, Sera/at t lasarvas fxeeed $5joe,eoe 124 SECURITY TUIST BUILDING aad 13* NX FUST smrr TELEPHONE Ftoaklm 3-4432 TWIN CITY VI,ASS CO. ftUAIANTIED MNHMMtS STOW FMNTS FUtNITUsU TOPS ANTIQUE MIRRORS I RE SIlVEtNtC A4TO 6US5 MfSTAUf D WftaU ft* WAIT 1224 %  let. Street, MJ. Claaad l a ta rae u /. TaL Jt 44141 •*"V : 'VV"V'W*V"WV W***^* I V*^*^#* W'''V ^* V"V*V*'* <



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Page 4-B +Jm&>ncrkttan Friday, October 7, leen Left to right are Mrs. Sidney Lewis, president. Greater Miami Section, National Council Jewish Women; Mrs. William I. Brenner, Section vice president of membership; Mrs. Phyllis Garber, secretary; and Miss Minnie Feinberg, executive secretary, workina on membership plans in one of the rooms of the new suite of offices Council now occupies. Council Has New Quarters; Drive in Process This summer, the Greater Miami Section. National Council of Jewish Women, moved to spacious new quarters at 1317 Biscayne blvd. Air-conditioning and a permanent board room which holds 100 will be a spur to vigorous, stimulating meetings, and exiensive workrooms for mimeographing and mailing will help Council volunteers with the volume of paper work which increases with the growth ol Council's membership, according to Mrs Sidney Lewis, president. The building is centrally located and easily accessible to both Miami and Miami Beach. "Each division will hold one board meeting each year at the Council office, giving to the neighborhood groups a focal point which will contribute to a feeling of the oneness of the eight divisions combined as the Greater Miami Section."' Mrs. Lewis said. The new quarters are in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation j bldg. • • • On Oct. 5. all divisions held their membership parties. Attract ed by Council's extensive and many-1 facted program of education, social: action and service to the commun | ity, over 550 more women joined Council's 2.000 members here. With the membership slogan, "each one reach one in '61." Miami Section is well on its way to winning the Record Nursing Class Graduates Personal .satisfaction as the key to success in nursing careers wn emphasized by Hilda M. Torrop. extiuiive director of the National I for Practical Nurse Educa tion and Ser\ice. in her graduation address to the Mt. Sinai Hospita. Srbool of Practical Nursing on Sept. 28. Speaking in Wolfson Auditorium to the largegst graduating cla>~ in the school's 10-year history. Miss. Torrop called upon the 39 candi i to develop their faculties of Illness, imagination and courtesy io meet the increased burdens of nurses today "A nurse's greatest privilege and responsibility is that people MOKE PEOPLE USE refreshing, calorie-tree / a sr^ SWflTft THAN SU6AI TIT MO WOO VAlUt Rtcommtndcd b, doctors lor 3.ibetx* Orttwt-cMs *nd Io cjlc r dttts. Ust lor tf*rri|fi totem. cookM|. Pure Com pW W, M mt m 4 M. — Ik CUMtlNTEIO NOrmrnNINC AT rOOO STORES EVCMVWHCMf need and believe in her.'" Miss Tor rop said. "Everything is worthwhile when somebody turns to you as the most important person in the world." she added. MisTorrop. active in nursing administration since the rr,:d-30's. pointed to the growing adapt. hility of practical nurses in a time of critical nursing need. "Only five years ago." she said, "the practical nurse was OiJy a staff nurse. Today she serves in the operating room, as assistant to supervisory personnel, and in I teaching posts." The graduating class also was addressed by Samuel Levenson. member of the board of trustees Samuel Gertner. executive direc %  tor of the hospital: and Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. former president of ; the women's auxiliary. The 39 graduates brought to 200 the number o f practical nurses trained at the school, which offers the only course in Florida accredited by the National Assn. for Practical Nurse Education and Service. ; as well as the State Board of Nursling and the Veterans' Admini>tra tion. It is expected that more than 20 of the graduating nurses will re! main at Mt. Sinai and other hospitals in^the Greater Miami area. national prize given at the biennial convention for the Section attracting the most new members, ac cording to local Section officers. To establish warmth and friendli MM, as well as to help the new member place herself in the Coun cil program, all divisions hav made plans for the first of rnan> new members teas early in Octo ber. Small groups of new members will meet officers and chairmen ir specialized fields of Council's activ ities who will explain Council'; structure, philosophy and servio program. Mrs. William I. Brenner. Sectior vice president of membership, feel; this mutual exchange of informs ion "will bring fresh ideas, enthu siasm and strength to Council, en suring a continuation of its work toward the preservation of lree dom. the exercise of compassior. and the will to be of ever greatei service to our fellow man." NOW! Launch Flower Lecture Series Cedars of Lebanon Women s Auxiliary launches a special talent project Friday, 10 a.m.. at the Coral Gables Masonic. Lodge. 41 Valencia ave. Featured will be Mrs. Charles McWethy. of Coral Gables, in the first of four lecture demonstrations on "How to Arrange Flowers." The entire course will include Japanese concepts of design; use of material from one's own garden; uses of various types of conUainers. including unusual vases or urns; arrangements suitable for end tables, coffee tables, dininp (tables and mantlepieces; and preparation of dry material for use with | fresh material. Other lectures are scheduled Oct. 21 and 28 and No*. 4. Mrs. McWethy is a past chairman of Garden Centers of the Florida State Garden Club Assn.. president of the West End Garden Club, and a mem ber of the Ikebana International Society. She is also past president of t n .Miami Floralia Arrangers club as I well as of the Florida Federatioa of Judges and the Metropolitan M ; •> ami Flower Show Board. In charge of registration for tb e courseis Mrs. Hyman Kaplan m N. Prospect dr.. Coral Gables Others on the committee are Mrs Emil Gould, Mrs. B. F. Breslauer' and Mrs. Milton Margulis. Birthday Supper fieff Thrid anniversary of the South Miami chapter of Women's Ameri. can ORT will be held Saturday at Suniland Hall, 11525 Se. Dii t hwy.. in the form of a birthday supper ball. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Leo Kopolow and Mrs. Selvin Fox. Mrs. Allen Tail. nen is chairman of the affair. Unmatched For Deliciou s Fla vor! SLICED CORNED BEEF for delicious magic-easy meals} Ask for All WILN0 Kosher PRODUCTS Corned Beef, Pastrami, Salami, Bologna, Krispit Frankfurters NO Salt NO Sugar NO Spices NO Shortening 1 %  -dm/yn(C&IL utCtL "rfj, "Gufc/ WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO. (of Chicago) MIAMI BRANCH 2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phone FR 1-6551 TRADITIONALLY RIGHT WHEN FAMILY AND FRIENDS GET TOGETHER Whether the occasion is an elegant party or a casual meal, people always feel at home when Vita Herring is served. It's your link with the old-world Jewish tradition of hospitality. So always keep a supply of Vita Herring in your refrigerator, ready to serve from the handy glass jar. Win??-HERRING hMA Kswer TO LOW CALORIE MEALS Solve that weighty problem .. serve plenty of nutritious, flavorful August Bros. Sread • • •"•"• from select spring wheat Hour .. • contains no shortening • PUMIK~aUl • BOHEMIAN IH • BAGELS • VIENNA e |G€ TNW • FIENCH MUD EGG ROLLS HARD I0U5



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^joy, October 7, I960 -Jewlsti nor id ton Page 13-A [Special Services Launch Sukkoth M I I M "ci i Corr i;nued froM P9 2-A officiate and preach on "Siren "th serip-m is The Message of a.m. and 8:30 re at 9, p.m., when the ser^'-ond'^atf ai IS! ***** "f^oth-Message LL ._^ _i .._ Saturday morning services are at 9 a.m. with the rabbinic topic sche-l as -Sukkoth—Period of Joy Contemplation.' Friday eveZ cervices arc at 5:45 p.m. Satjay morning services will be at Ija.m Sermon is based on the feekly Potion of the Law." At Temple Jud, 320 Palermo Coral Gables, Rabbi Morris ifficiate Thursday mornj'lt 10:30 a.m., with Kiddush of fcetification foUowing in the contgaiion 5'ikkah. Friday evening rvices are at 8:15 p.m. Sermon ••Interpretation of the Harvest %  yims and the Hallel Prayers." Eurday morning services will be 110:30 a.m. Cantor Herman Oott%  > renders the musical portions [the li'urey. Mark, son of Mr. and PAwlore Lotterman, will be**•* %  %  neBar Mitzvah. ISukkoth will be observed Thurs9 a.m., at Tifrrh Israel htif honor and speaker at %  the annu ii conference of the GreatItrMiam. I-rael Histadrut CommitIfce on S lay, Oct. 16, at the Se|tille hotel. Abrahi!:i Fox, chairman of the IJemmittee ;aid the 11 a.m. funcItion will c. • the opening celebration [ft Diudrjt's 40th anniversary. Rabbi and Mrs. Kronish have Ijist returned from a trip to Israel, md were ;uesta of the Vaad Hapoel lf Histadrut during a tour of the yrganittti ms' institutions engaged the anorption of new immigrants, medical and health welfare. Vocational training, and upbuilding new border settlements. .Dr. So! Stein, national executive frector of Histadrut, will join with fbbi Kranish at the Oct. 16" event •ddres.-ir.g the gathering. Membership Luncheon Meet j [Breath of Life chapter of thej f*! sh National Home for Asth-, pt>c Children will hold a mem-| phip li-heon meeting on Tuesy morain at i he Park Lane Capna o,! .„ral Way. Mrs. BerF


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Page 16-A 9-JmistncrkMafi Friday, Ocioter 7, The Great TV Debate By MAX IERNER State Dep't. Slaps at UAR Envoy WASHINGTON(JTA) —The de partment of State made known here that it has called Ambassador Mustafa Kamel of the United Arab Republic to account for portions of an anti-Jewish address delivered m Washington by the Ambassador on August 29. William B. Macomber. jr.. Assistant Secretary of State, revealed Zionist Council Plans Convention By Special Report NEW YORK — The American Zionist Council this week called for the convening of a national assembly of American Zionists on Nov. 13 to 15 at the Sutler-Hilton hotel here. The assembly will open on SunHistory has often turned on the hinge of a single event, and the current, fateful Presidential campaign may in the end prove to have turned on the first Nixon-Kennedy debate and its successors. l"p to then the campaign had gone sluggish. Each of the candidates was running, as the phrase has it. like a dry creek. Each was working •way at his campaign in a kind of isolation, local segment by local segment. The prevailing mood was of apathy, doubt, indifference. lack of commitment. What was needed to make the campaign come alive was a direct confrontation of the candidates This the first debate provided. It was no Lincoln-Douglas affair, but it had drama, dignity and tension. The *JN debates helped, since the audience which had*watched them must have wondered why the living drama of the world crisis could not rub off on the contest which was to decide who would lead America in that crisis. For the first time also, an audience of the leaders of the world's nations was able, like the American audience, to size up the day, Nov. 13. with a welcoming adtwo candidates as they confronted each other and the world, faced the dress from New York's Mayor Robsame problems, answered the same questions. ert F. Wagner. Scheduled to speak j --- before the delegates during the I SHOULD GUESS that this debate furnished Kennedy with his three days is a list of nationally first real breakthrough. The vast audience had a chance to compare and internationally prominent Jew %  two programs for the nation, two visions of its future, two men as perish figures, including former Israel tonalities. It was an exacting thing to watch, demanding much of the Prime Minister Moshe Sharett; Na-! viewer-listener, since he had constantly not only to absorb what he saw hum Goldmann. president of the > and heard but make reassessments of both men at each point. An hour World Zionist Federation; Dr. Abis not a long stretch for this purpose but it is long enough for a judgment to emerge. On all three scores — program, vision, man — the judgment seemed to me strongly to favor Kennedy, at Nixon's expense. Curiously the whole debate turned on the nature of the welfare state which has come to stay in America. If the debate had been between Kennedy and Barry Goldwater the issue would have been sharp. Between Kennedy and Nixon it was blurred by Nixon's I-agree-withthe development ia letter to Rep. to the Ambassador attenti-. Seymour Halpern, New York Re""-<• ••*• publican Rep. Halpern had lodged a formal protest with the Department against the speech in ( which Ambassador Kamel questioned the loyalty of American Jewry nd urged Arab students in America to inject anti-Jewish and anti-Israel propaganda into current election activity Mr. Macombcr said that "certain aspects of the text to which you have referred gave the Depart ment concern, and were brought He added that with r Np( possible improper aciivitiei^ students." the appropriate cies of the Justice Depart were following the -iluationtk. I* He said any abuse, ttog jJj dealt with promptly." Rep. Halpern had a-ked ih. iwl partment to consider the Ambassador persona because of his attack on a se of the American public and13 ference in the internal scene. ba Hillel Silver, of Cleveland; Av raham Harman. Israel's Ambassa dor to the United States; and Rabbi Irving Miller, chairman of the American Zionist Council. In a letter addressed to Ameri can Zionists. Rabbi Irving Miller your-ends but not means attitude But Kennedy had the advantage be^ated that the purpose of the as cause on every phase of the welfare state they discussed — minimui wage, health insurance, farm aid. federal aid to education — Kennedy was affirming while Nixon was qualifying. Kennedy was on the offensive while Nixon was on the defensive. If anyone doubted Kennedy's liberal position before, there is no longer any basis for doubt. But along with the program itself, what counted was the passion behind it. Here is a man who in a brief spell of time, under the stress of events, has found maturity because he has found conviction. His answers were not learned by rote, to be repeated parrotlike, thev came readily and swiftly because they were part of what he felt. BUT THE SHARPEST difference lay in the two men themselves. Both were being sedulously careful, of course, to present themselves at their best. Kennedy tried not to look boyish. Nixon tried to dispel the old picture of the hatchet-man and to present an unfailing sweet reasonableness But there are limits to what you can do in doctoring your image. The truth manages to come through. Nixon emerged as an anxious man. overeager. overexplaining. repeating himself, assuring everyone of his opponent's sincerity and his At one point his tension was so great that he offered by madsembly will be to place before the American Jewish community a program of "positive action aimed at providing a fresh interpretation of the ideals of Zionism in light of today's needs." He expressed the hope that the assembly would "re activate the enthusiasm that ren dered possible the achievement of Zionism's first, but by no means final, goal — the restoration of the State of Israel." the Legion's tion. convention Polar'n to he See* The Navy's Polaris missile, recently successfully launched from a submerged submarine at Cape Canaveral, will be on display in front of the Miami Beach Convention Hall during the American Le vertence to "get nd of the farmers before he stumbled into the clear ion natk)na| Convcntlon ,„„ his to get nd only of their farm surpluses If a team off psychologists were mon|k „ wa? annouDced htn b% watching, and comparing notes, their reports on Nixon as a Personality Uwrence E Hoffn an tltMm would be worth reading. The product of an age of anxiety, be showed the characteristic marks of his era. Kennedy, by contrast, was alert, crisp, quietly confident. Hi* economy speech revealed a spare and muscular mind An intellectual. he sought neither to hide nor parade that quality He spoke and thought swiftly, and his words — while rarely memorable — were the right words in the right place. He could demolish an argument in two rewtences. He knew his stuff, as Nixon did too. but he marshalled it nore effectively. Curiously the whole issue of "experience" had the sawdust stuffing Knocked out of it Kennedy has had the same length of national experience as Nixon, who sounded boyish in his effort to puff up the consequences of his trips abroad. As for the vaunted ability to stand tip to Khrushchev. Nixon was so busy being sweetly reasonable that the image of the tough talker grew tarnished. If anyone emerged as Strong enough to express America in the world crisis, it was the Mas sachusetts Senator who cares so deeply that he is angry at what the amateurs have done. FOR RfTTEl MfAlTI VISIT Tftf MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE Physical Thcraav lady C—iHnii mi III, Cabinet* aad Munii Mara Sank Therwaf 7235 Biscoyrte Blvd. PI 7-7*34 FREE A stimulating guide for >ouag>iers aad adulisoathecusKMaa, trad it ions and observi of J nd 11II. "YOUI JEWISH h printed ia inspiring booklet for every home aad everyqactl to: Ray Kealar. Kraft Foods Ccvaptay. V* Part Aaaac, New York U.N.Y. BATTERIES for ALL AMERICAN and FOREIGN CARS Experts on Starter and Gana raler Rapairs BATTERIES GENERATORS — STARTERS lll-YOIT BATTERY DfC. SALES A SERVICE at Ham* wOaHw Read IBS* M.W. 7th Aver** ER T-1451 BMS S. Diaie Ita jNwav MO 1-SJS7 fiolnwiA ROOFING CO. Baraoftaa ft Rapalr* AR Tvpe laeti — Slaca 1VM ASK FOR FREE ESTIMATES OH ROOFING PIMM F* 3-4244 M OHM 14 K-BOiKTT PLUMBING CONTRACTORS FOR SALES. SCRVICt OB KfPARtS MORE PI 7-0444 •443 PARaTWAY BRTVf HAM SNORES. 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J/crcre 12--B +Je*lsti nrrkUan Friday, October 7, UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR J hanks Jo our many j-riends and K—customers for their patronage. In Honor of Succoth All Food Fair Kosher Markets are Closed Thursday and Friday, October 6th and 7th WE URGE YOU TO DO YOUR SHOPPING EARLY SO THAT WE MAY SERVE YOU BETTER Store Hours for This Coming Week Only. MONDAY 8 :30 A.M. TILL 9 P.M. TUESDAY ...... 8:30 A.M. TILL 9 P.M. WEDNESDAY 8 :30 AM. TILL 3 PM. CLOSED THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 19th ST. at ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH < • 163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER, NORTH MIAMI BEACH 2091 CORAL WAY in MIAMI • CORAL WAY at S.W. 87th AVE. f WESTCHESTER SHOPPING PLAZA • 2662 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLYWOOD MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR



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Page 10-B +Jenistifk>rAfiaf7 Friday, October 7. Dr. Irving Lehrman conducts Yom Kippur services for Temple Emanu-El at Miami Beach Auditorium. At right is congregation president Samuel Friedland. At left is Joseph Rose, to be honored by Temple Emanu-El at a dinner in the Fontainebleau hotel Sunday night. e^— ..... i %  %  i %  — Lyndon Johnson Due Wednesday Sen. Lyndon* B. Johson. Democratic vice presidential nominee. will arrive in Miami on Wednesday lor a series of appearances and meetings with local Democratic leaders, it was announced by Congressman Dante Fascell. campaign manager for Dade and Monroe counties. Johnson's schedule has not been confirmed at this date, but he will make as many stops as possible, as well as holding one major rally. The Texas Senator will be preceded here by the arrival of the Texas Belles, five prominent Democratic women who will meet with local women's organizations in Dade county. Johnson's visit here comes only a week before the arrival of presidential nominee Sen. John F. Kennedy who will arrive on Oct. 18 lo address the American Legion convention. Tropical Chapter Luncheon Friday Tropical chapter, American Medical Center at Denver, will hold its annual memebership luncheon Friday noon aMhe Seville hotel. Mrs. Hazel Jackson Tooker, former patient from the Miami area at the Denver hospital, will be guest speaker. She will discuss the hospital and its programs in the rehabilitation, cure and treatment of cancer. Members of tropical chapter last year contributed over $6,000 for patient care at the free, national and non-sectarian medical institution. Chairman of the day will be Mrs. Nat Klein. 1100 Venetian Way. Mrs. Bertram Thorpe is president of the organization, which will also feature a fur show, courtesy of Frederich's Furs of Surfside, at the Friday function. Dtt. JUDAH STAMFFM B'nai B'rith Plans Judaism Institute Featuring Famous Faculty at Juno Beach TO ALL GREETINGS ... ^ VAL'S MARKET Everything in the Food Line The Best Grade of MEATS & GROCERIES We Appreciate Your Patronage 605-07 N.E. 1st AVE. Phone FR 4-9957 WINDY UNQIW Granddaughter Scheduled in Skit A highlight of Temple Emanu-El Israel Bonds congregational dinner slated Sunday. 6 p.m., at the Fontainebleau hotel, will be a skit and speech by Wendy tJnger, 12-yearold granddaughter of Joseph Rose. Rose himself will be honored at the affair for his service to the community, the State of Israel and the Israel Bond campaign. Wendy, a seventh grader at Nautilus Junior High on Miami Beach, will read the Israel Declaration of Independence, and will also do a skit comparing her 12 years of age with the first 12 years of the State of Israel and Rose's own contributions during that period. Wendy is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Unger, 510 S. Shore dr., Miami Beach. Torah Hadassah Meeting Torah group of Hadassah will hold a regular meeting and a free dessert luncheon on Monday noon at the Coral Gables Woman's Club, 1001 E. Ponce de Leon blvd. A musical skit is planned. TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES I fc KENS WHOLESALE LIGHTING RETAIL TRADE INVITED TO VISIT OUR SHOWROOM L'JBK, <3VL DISCOUNTS TO PROPERTY OWNERS BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS "OVER 900 FIXTURES ON DISPLAY" 1155 S.W. 2nd STREET Phone FR 4-8123 A pioneer Florida Institute of Judaism will be held at Maddens Ocean Lodge in Juno Beach from Oct. 20 to 23. The Institute of Judaism is sponsored by the Florida Federation of B'nai B'rith as part of a national program of adult Jewish education, and is open to all interested persons. Theme of the weekend institute will be "The Imeee of the Jew in Modern American Literature." Faculty will include Dr. David Bereff and Dr. Judah Stampfer. Dr. Boroff is professor of English literature at New York Universlty. A noted lecturer, author and poet, he will discuss "Problems of Jewish Adjustment," "Anti-Semitism and Jewish SelfHatred," and "Impact of Jewish Culture on the American Scene." Dr. Stampfer, professor of English literature at the State University College of Long Island in New York, is also a distinguished lecturer, rabbinical scholar and poet. He will present a discussion of basic issues in American Jewish living with respect to the historical background, contemporary scene, and "Golden Era" of Jewish culture. Dr. Stampfer is the recipient of the Sachar Prize for poetry, which he received for his "Jerusalem — Many Faces." Chairman of the weekend institute is Rabbi Samuel Jaffe, spirSafran Assumes Official Duties Temple Sinai's new education director, Herbert Safran, recently assumed his official duties at the No. Miami synagogue. Educated at New York State College for Teachers at Albany, he holds an AB and MA degree. Safran has taught both adults and children, and was in charge of a Reform religious school in Albany. Spiritual leader of Temple Sinai is Rabbi Benno Wallach. itual leader of Temple Beth El, Hollywood. Co chairmen are Mrs. Richard Hecht and Mrs. Sidney Palmer. Rabbi B. Leon Hurwiti, of Temple Zemora, Coral Gables, is religious chairman. Samuel Schutzer, Mrs. Shepard Lewis and Mrs. Harry Orenstein are in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Herbert Heiken is library chairman, and Mrs. Alfred Reich is secretary. M. DAVID BOKOff Advisory committee includes Mrs. Samuel Belsky, Mrs. Sey mour Cole, Norman Freedman. David Gorman, Mrs. Elliot Hering Milton Levinson, Louis Ossinsky Jr., Mrs. Jerome Robinson, Mrs I Theodore Robinson, Charles Saie Ivitch, Irving Schatzman, Mrs. Dav 'id Sherper, Mrs. Bernard Supworth, Mrs. Alvin Wank, Jack Wilson, and Ansel Wittenstein. Institute coordinator is Arthur Spiegel, assistant director of the Florida office, Anti Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. 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Page 8-A Jewlst Fkr/kfiyr Friday, October 7, I%Q Nasser Challenged to Peace Talks Temple Emanu-El, which held High Holy Day services for the third consecutive year at Miami Beach Auditorium, also featured special Junior Congregation services for children from nine to 12 years of age in the main Temple. A special service for youngsters from five to eight years of age was held in the Assembly Hall of the school building. Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, explains the blowing of the Shofar before the open Ark. Left to right are Mrs. Naomi Brandeis, nursery school supervisor; Benjy Novak, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Novak; and Kathryn and Suzanne, twin daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown. One-Man Show A one-man "Exhibition of Graph i -' will open at the Miami Museum "f Modern Art on Sunday | had a one-man show of paintings ;i members' preview from 4 tc and sculpture at the Portland Art and will continue for a two-' Museum. QUIET AUTOMATIC GUN-TYPL" FLOOR FURNACE For low-cost, Big-Comfort HEATING • 82,000 BTU pressure-type oil burner • Minneapolis Honeywell Safety Controls • Completely Automatic with Underwriters Approved electric ignition • Barns low-cost Number 2 fuel oil • Free Estimates—FHA financing SIEGEL OIL CO. Distributors of Sinclair Products Since 1934 7400 N.W. 30th Ave., Miami, Fla. Call OX 1-4411 whatever your heating problem SURE Make every payday your Savings Dayl To SAVt Successfully, SAVE Regularly) 3% Interest Paid HI**** -... BANKS ... •omMtoa' t. Mtattt: fttinl 0*Hl Hwaci Ctiaatila BANK OF DADE COUNTY week period while the Mexican Art Exhibition is still on view. The Graphics show is by Lee Kelly, of Portland. Ore., where he has just Continued from Pago 1-A %  |the United Arab RepuWc. We are %  ready also to sit down with any other or with all of the leaders of the Arab States to nesotiate the peace immediately. This would be a concrete contribution to peace in the world." Asked whether there is ,i chance that she would see Nasser while 1 she and the United Arab Republic President .are here. Mrs. Menreplied: "If Mr. Nasser is willing to speak with us. it will be a pleasure for us to speak with him about peace. If he does not w.-.nt to seme becau>c he is president and I am only a minister, ami lie wants to sea the Prime Minister, our Prime Minister has said repeatedly in our Parliament and on many other occasions that he is ready to j see him at any time or in any place —or to see the leader of any other ; Arab slate to discuss peace. If Mr. Nasser wants to see me. I am ready to sec him. at any moment." Mrs. Meir said she did not think that Nasser's presence here would change the policies of either the United States or the United Nations. "Until Mr. Nasser is ready to act according to his declarations, he really cannot have any influence whatsoever," the said. Speaking in Arabic. Nasser told the General Assembly that his goveminent was "ready to accept the | UN Charter and its principles, the resolutions of the United Nations j and its recommendations for a just j settlement with the best of goodwill." He gave no indication as to whether he would agree to carry out the UN Security Council resolution to keep the Suez Canal open for the passage of ships of all nations, including Israel. Mr. Nasser called for "the restoration of the full rights of the people of Palestine." Without mentioning Israel by name during his entire speech, he said the Arabs did not accept "the loss of Palestine." The Palestine mandate of the League of Nations — which pledged the establishment of a JcwIsh National Home in Palestine — 'was an "imperialist conspiracy." he said. "The Arab nation." he declared, "does not accept the geocraphic division imposed by imperialism" on Palestine. The only solution of the Palestine problem, he said, was that the land "should return to the condition prevailing before the error was committed." Mrs. Meir later conferred with Christian A. Herter, United States Secretary of State. It was assumed that the issues discussed included American Israel relations, Arab-Israel questions, and the anti-Israel aspects of Nasser's speech. A similar conference was held by Mrs. Meir with the Earl of Home, Britain's new Foreign Secretary. Delegates of Western, Latin American, Asian and African countries expressed the view informally that Nasser's speech and his meetings with top world leaders in New York had resulted in cementing Israel's relations with the rest and with leaders of the "neutralist bloc." such as India and Ghana. These statesmen were believed re acting negatively lo N a -r 1 p,,. posal to lurn history bock to oefore the Balfour Declaration, and mos, ing toward the idea th;,; the Arab states must be brouirh' m accent Israel as a poHttcal reality ,'£[ must be persuader that the ii'meU near to convert the Arab-brad i armistice pacts into pear* a-rea. ments. An appeal for that objective WM voiced by Uruguay's President-elect Victor Haedo, in an address to tha Assembly. He said that however grave or complicated the circumStances may be, "we cannot overlook such significant developments as the affirmations of heroism anl the most happy possibilities for the future of humanity as the creatioa of the State of Israel." Dr. Haedo said thai the events | of the Afro-Asian World makes (or new attention to "the problems that still affect the presence here of the representatives of Israel and of the Arab nations. Therefore we must formulate from this tribune a reiteration of our profound wish for peace between these two peoples. That peace is demanded not only j by the Near East region. It is the universal task of peace which the • entire world demands." i EPH Committee To Convene Here World Committee on Employment of the Handicapped will hold its fourth annual congress on Oct. 15 at the Miami Dade County Chamber of Commerce, 345 NE 2nd ave. Agenda will include election of (it fliers, plans for the Jaycees International. Chamber of Commerce of the Americas, B'nai B'rith International, and Goodwill Industries. Sidney G. Kusworn, chairman of the board of governors and national B'nai B'rith leader, will officiate. Outgoing president is Leo Ax)rod. of Coral Gables. TRAVELING! Q Ca |j \ GUS *M SHAW SHAW IKAVIPTIRVIU IK To Serve You is Ow Pleasure Ed. J. 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clewish Floridian Combining THI JEWISH IHWTY and THE JHWSH WttKiY folume 33 — dumber 41 Miami, Florida, Friday, October 7, 1960 Two Sections — Price 20* \Reds Hold Out {Evidence Vow On Eichmann JERUSALEM — (JTA) — Israel hrew virtually a total blank in response to requests to several East European countries to supl,i\ evidence on the activities in hose countries of Adolf Eichnann. it was disclosed here. More than two months ago Israel appealed to all such countries havany information whatever, on he man who directed the exterjnation of European Jewry to Provide help in the presentation of bis trial. The only country to give postive reply, it was reported. Has Yugoslavia, which promised help. This negative attitude, it was noconflicted sharply with the nany articles and statements in the Soviet Bloc press, after the announcement last May 23 of Eich-' riiann s seizure, welcoming the arj rest and urging punishment. Golda Challenges Nasser To Peace Talk With Israel UNITED NATIONS—(JTA)—President Nasser, of the United Arab| -Republic, told the United Nations General Assembly here of his earnest hope for world peace and was promptly challenged by Israel to back his words with deeds by entering into immeflbte peace talks with Israel. Nasser presented his views in his |. first address to the General Assem| *. • •" interview for Radio: bly. Israel's reply came from Mrs. |Rvadavia of Buenos Aires. Golda Mcir, the Israel Foreign MinU.S. Cools to Supporting UAR for Security Council UNITED NATIONS——Authoritative sources here—as well as I said the absence in Washington and in New York-expressed "absolute conviction" that f East European cooperation i the United States has no intention of supporting President Nasser, of the ould not delay the start of the United Arab Republic, in his bid for a seat on the United Nations Se ichmann trial because sufficient curity Council. — vidence was available from other i A| indJcations point to the fact iimt. Israel, however, sought hat President Eisenhower, Vice aterial from East Europe, a maPresident Nixon secretary of State Mrs. Meir. asked for her reaction to the Nasser speech, replied that Nasser .spoke about some principles "in which he says he believes and which I and my country are ready to accept." She enumerated the principles as follows: "1. The safeguarding of the Charter of the United Nations. 2. A general declaration about the peace In the world. 3. Hit suggestion that the problems of the world that may endanger the peace of the world should be resolved by negotiation. Hussein Raps Egypt's Tactics In Middle East or theatre of Eichmann's exterHerter and Ambassador Henry Canination efforts, to obtain at the ^ ^ former ne d of tne -nal the fullest possible picture of he holocaust suffered by Europan Jewry. .. ,i %  i. OIL WAS KING The geopolitical scene in the Middle East is changing. | The emerging of new important oil centers in Algeria and Libya challenges the longstanding Arab advantage in this highly important product. What about tomorrow's changing scene? For a special report, see Page 7-A. American delegation to the United Nations, are all opposed to assisting Nasser to realize his ambition, tt was emphasized. The United States will support the candidate of another member of the Afro-Asian states for the seat in the Security Council, these sources said. They indicated that Nasser's alignment with the hostile attitude taken by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev against UN secretary General Dag Hammarskjold is regarded as a sure deterrent to his ability to secure American support. (The United Arab Republic's delegation at the United Nations issued a statement denying a report that Continued on Page 10-A Bonn Applauds Plan to Drop Ex-Nazi's Case UNITED NATIONS (JTAi — King Hussein of Jordan Monday* delivered a series of sharp blasts i at the United Arab Republic, accusing its President, Gamal Abdel Nasser, of following the Communist line in the Middle East. The Jordanian ruler also discussed the | Palestinea refugee question, accusing Israel of failure to carry out j UN resolutions. But his main fire : was directed against UAR President Nasser. BONN —(JTA) —The decision of the public prosecutor to drop pro"The Charter of the United Nations, in its first Article, refers to peace in the world, to the solution Obviously disregarding heavy* of all problems by peaceful negotiArab pressures which, since his arjaiion and not by any sort of boyrival here Friday, attempted to cott by one country against anconvince him that, in the interests other. We say to Mr. Nasser: If of Arab "unity," he should withyou desire peace in the world, there hold criticism of the United Arao should also be a desire for peace Republic, King Hussein told the in every part of the world. I General Assembly plenary session "It is not a secret that our area | hat h e tould !" ,' k P siIen n the | local quarrel between Nasser SWMMl COURT IUSTKC HUBS QUIZ B-G Orders Investigation Of Aides in Lavon Case PRIME mmisriK ornas EXFLANAJION PACE 3 A JERUSALEM—(JTA)—The Prime : necessary a reexamination of the Ministers office issued a commun-! reliability of the two officers. Thj? "iue here which lifted somewhat committee's conclusion will be prctl>e screen of secrecy over the resented to the Cabinet and the Jus lamination of the 1955 security | tice Ministry will probably take se in which Pinhas Lavon was'the necessary steps." forced to resign as Minister of DeI lense. Mr. I.avon, who is now secretary I general of the Histadrut, protested *t the time that he was not response for the situation found by a Jwo-man investigating committee The nature of the findings has never been disclosed. The communique said that, by order of Prime Minister David BenGunon as Minister of Defense, the Chief of staff had appointed a three-1 "lan investigating committee "to examine the conduct of a regular rmy officer and a reserve olficer. following a decision handed down 6 > a civil court in connection with %  certain accused which makes The communique indicated that the new inquiry committee, which is headed by Supreme Court Justice Haim Cohen, will not be concerned with Mr. Lavon's role in the IMS security situation. The new investigation will look only Into the question of whether two officers who testified before the 1955 committee perjured themselves, as a recent civil trial seemed to indicate. It was this is one where there are difficulties, %  because Mr. Nasser says that he and Jordan T w nat „ d S P U V".^"!." of the problems between Israel and has been our destruction." He said Continued en Page 8 A Continued on Page t-A ceedings against Dr. Oberlaender.! is in a state of belligerence against f rs Pf ace in he Middle East a d who was accused of participation j Israel. This is why we say to Mr. nrea ens world ** as a whole in a 1941 massacre of Polish Jews, I Nasser that he should sit down with ne ,rmea was welcomed this week by Felix us and start immediate negoti-j "From the very beginning." he von Eckhardt, chief spokesman, at ions to arrive at peaceful solution \ stated, "the aim of our sister state for the West German Government. The decision of the public prosecutor followed an 11-month judicial investigation which produced "no evidence" that the former | West German Minister for Refugee j Affairs was involved in the atro-. city in Lvov in German-occupied i Poland. The charges, which ori-1 ginated from Communist sources,' forced Dr. Oberlaender to resign the Cabinet post last May. Von Eckhardt said it was. neeI essary to make the result of the investigation widely known because of the propaganda campaign conducted against Dr. Oberlaender in East Germany. He added that there was no question of Dr. Oberlaender being readmitted to the West German Cabinet. Iraq Blasts Kennedy Talk; Complains to State Dep't. WASHINGTON—(JTA>— Iraq has handed a formal diplomatic note to the Department of State, protesting a recent address by Sen. John F. Kennedy, Massachusetts Democrat, before the Zionist Organization of America. &f The Iraqi Embassy made known that it has protested to the Depart ment here and that the Iraqi Foreign Ministry handed a note to the American Embassy in Baghdad. According to an Iraqi news agency The public prosecutor's office, I report, the protest was lodged bein justifying its refusal to issue an : cause the Kennedy speech "containindictment, reported that the tcstie d blatant praise of world Zionism mony of scores of witnesses and a and Jewry." study of Nuremberg trial records. did not produce any evidence that | The note said that "it is truly Dr. Oberlaender had any part in painful that electioneering propathe pogrom or in causing any mem-! ganda should be exploited for the bers of his battalion to take part j purpose of harming the Arabs in the killings. j and their legal rights and for supporting the usurping group which continues committing crimes against the rights of the peaceful Palestinian Arabs — a group responsible for displacing one million.Arab refugees." The Iraqi Foreign Ministry note stated that the Kennedy speech affected American Arab relations land that this stand was not in the I interest of relations between Iraq and the United States. The Iraqi government asked the Stale Department to intercede with "American quarters concerned with a view to clarifying the ill effects caused by Kennedy's speech." 'Mistaken Bormann' Interests Bonn BONN — (JTA) — The West I suspect proves to be Bormann. the German Foreign Office disclosed ( W est German goverrment will im t here it had instructed the West mediately ask for his extradition, possibility of perjured testimony ; German Embassy in Buenos Aires | to look into the report that a man (Alfred Vitolo. Argentina's Min has been seized by Argentine po-; ister of the Interior, said in Buenos lice on suspicion he may be Mar-1 Aires that .the arrested man, who tin Bormann. Hitler's wartime dep-1 gave his name as Walter Flueger. uty. It was understood that if the | entered Argentina illegally 11 years which led to reopening of the case. have Mr. Lavon's supporters Continued on Page 7 A ago. He was arrested in Zarate, 85 miles from Buenos Aires, by Federal police last Saturday. So far, police have not been able to identity the suspect positively as Bormann, who was officially declared dead six years ago by BerContinued on Page 5-A



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^ today. October 7. 1960 +JewlsHk>rklfor} r A Looking over plans for Saturday night's program of the South Florida chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew University ere (left to right) Herbert S. Shapiro, president; Leo Robinson, treasurer; and Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro, board member and panelist for the Shelbome hotel meeting. Hebrew Univ. Panel Saturday A panel discussion on "Israel and the Hebrew University—5721' will highlight the first fall merlin: of the South Florida chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew University. The gathering i s sehed uled for 8 p.m. Saturday at the Shelbome hotel. Panelists will include Mel Hecht, a student at the University of Miami, who last year attended Hebrew University in Jerusalem: Mrs. Joseph Milton, of Coral Gables, president of the Mcnorah group of Hadassah. who attended the dedication of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Israel this summer; and Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro. member of the board of the local Hebrew University chapter. Leo Mindlin, executive editor of The Jewish Floridian and a Hebrew University board member, will moderate. A question-and-answer period will follow. Balfouria Gilad, Israeli entertainer who now lives in Miami Beach, will present Yemenite and other Israeli songs. Esther Barrett will accompany her. Herbert S. Shapiro, president, Samuel T. Sapiro, board chairman, and Mrs. Oida Rubin, honorary president, will report on activities of the American Friends during the summer months. Newspapers Drop Prejudicial Ads MINNEAPOLIS — (JTA) — Daily newspapers in Minneapolis and fet. Pail, after running'for several days a classified advertisement for I; socii > -for the Preservation of the White Race." rejected additional [advert.-ing from the group. The rejection by the St. Paul Dispatch [and I' neer Press and by the Minneapolis Star and Tribune brought %  pii'lctr g of the Minneapolis paper Iby Pai: B. Hurley, a candidate for ICongn -s u ho reportedly was asso[ciated i t h the Society for the [Presenalion of the White Race. The rejected advertisement read: ("Supporters needed. The National Society for the Preservation of the White Race." The insertion carried a "blind" box number. Those replying to the insertion received literature on the organization's goals and suggesting solicitation NOW!** V i A Small Air Conditioner %  i w ith 30% More Moisture ,• Removal... LongerLife YORK. POWERFUL-QUIET ROOM AIR CONDITIONER MAKE US PROVE IT See On-The-Spo' Presentation Thai Erases All Doubts! See how York's exclusive Cooling Maze coils remove 30% more humidity from the air. Find out how York deliver* extra cooling BTU's per kilowatt to give you the greatest total comfort at lowest operating cost. See how York's DualThrust Compressor cuts operating sounds to a whisper. Come to eye-opening YORK DEMONSTRATION CENTER1 AIL YORK UNITS ARE RACKED RY WRITTEN PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE HILL-YORK CORPORATION ,of funds for further organzation work might be needed. John Moffett, advertising di I rector of the Star and Tribune, said it was the policy of the news1 papers not to accept advertising seeking contributions for other i than recognized charities or be | a party to such solicitations through classified advertising. Samuel L. Scheiner, executive', director of the Minnesota Jewish Community Relations Council, and Clifford E. Rocker executive secretary of the Governor's Human, Rights Commission met with news-' paper officials to determine policy on acceptance of such advertising.' The North Minneapolis Post, a j neighborhood newspaper, refused, all advertising from the group on' grounds the newspaper opposed "the principles of the Ku Klux Klan. The paper asserted editori-: ally that the KKK had been char-i acterized by "intense nativism, anti-Catholicism and anti-Semitism." UF Forms Speakers Bureau More Greater Miami community and civic leaders were named this week to serve in key positions for the 1961 campaign of the United Fund of Dade County Campaign general chairman Ar thur Gucker named Donald Daves to head the Speakers Bureau of the United Fund for the coming campaign. Daves, a district manager for the Southern Bell Telephone Company, said the Speakers Bureau is comprised of leading business and civic leaders who are equipped' to provide clubs and organizations with a stimulating and different program. 1225 S. W. 8th Street FR 1-1411 tINSE NERVOUS HEADACHES call for STRONGER Yet SATO ANACIH Won't Uswet Tke Stomach AaiB* set esly !*•• rtWJ GterreUsf *re P* • ^ Vet Is sis* •>/•*west speet tk* •tesisefc sad baa a* bad effect*. Yea MeT Assets la like a doctor', pr*serlstte*. 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Page 4-A Je*lstncricnar Friday, October 7, lggj %  „i .i,,.,'!:! Jll.lllliiril.U.i "Jewish Floridian CFHCE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 • -• • •• FRED K. SKOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor Published every Friday since 19*7 by TT-e Tewliih FlorMLn at 120 N.E. Sixth Street. MLimi 1. FIoHla. P"} 8 !" JM %  e<-nd-claaa matter July 4. 1930. at rVtti-* of Mural. Florida, under the Acl of Mai oh 3. t.9. The Jewlah Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity ana ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Aviv, Israel RAY U. BINDER — Correspondent The Jewish Floridian doex not guarantee the Knsnrutb nt tb merohandl."-' n-lv ertlse* In Iti* wl'imm. SUBSCRIPTION One Vetr 15.00 RATES: ThreYears JJ'0.00 Volume 33 Number 41 Friday. October 7, 1960 16 Tishri 5721 The Significance of Sukkolh Sukkoth comes on the heels of Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur, and was launched with opening prayers Wednesday evening. On the occasion of this festival, the solemnity of the Yomim Nora'im—Days of Awe—gives rise to the joyousness of fulfillment. In Hebrew, Sukkoth means "tents" or "tabernacles." The holiday is celebrated in temporary booths built near the home and synagogue to remind Jews of at least two significant occurrences. One is historic. It commemorates the manner in which the ancient Israelites lived in the desert during their flight from Egypt in bondage. The second is symbolic. It gives thanks for the bounty of nature. Sukkoth is thus a holiday during which fruits — particularly those found in Israel — are eaten. In this way, Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur, the occasion when men search the inner recesses of their souls and spiritually cleanse themselves in preparation for the year ahead, progress naturglly into Sukkoth — the festival during which they offer thanks for the physical sustenance of the earth. Until recent years, Sukkoth also evoked Jewry's eternal longing for the return to Israel —much as it historically marked the ancient Israelites' travels from Egypt. The eating of Palestinian fruits in the Sukkah partly symbolized this longing. Israel observed its 12th anniversary of independence during the past Hebrew Year 5720, For Jews today, the historic significance of Sukkoth is in this regard perhaps greater than it has been in the preceding two millenia of the dispersion. The Return has been fulfilled. Nasser Departs for Home The Soviet Union's first attack against the secretary general of the United Nations came years ago when it charged Dag Hammarskjold's predecessor, Trygvie Lie, with partiality. Lie. who was the first to hold the post, resigned. The Soviet Union is trying to do it again. The post of secretary general has emerged from the morass of the Security Council, frustrated in iis affairs again and again by Communist vetoes, to bring back to the world peace organization some of the effectiveness it was meant to have. Hence Russia's most recent frontal attack against Hammarskjold's handling of the Congo. It was a tribute to the sagacity of the emerging African republics that they did not fall for the Soviet line. Only the more traditional puppets among the Red entourage did that. And how did Gamal Abdel Nasser fare? As "pious" as the company he keeps, the UAR dictator had the effrontery to pose as peacemaker between East and West. But his stern warning that the Middle East cold war is as hot as ever showed Nasser in his true light. How that sat with the Eisenhower Administration is difficult to tell. No positive statements have emerged either from the President or his press secretary. Bui, by week's end, it was interesting to note two developments: • U.S. determination to support the UAR for a seat on the Security Council had suddenly, and just as inexplicably, cooled down. • Gamal Abdel Nasser, his cheeks burning by the stinging remarks of King Hussein of Jordan, cancelled his proposed tour of the American mainland and departed for home. Somehow, Nasser's piety sat uneasily on his shoulders. Somehow, Nasser knew it. Sukkoth Thanksgiving 1960 Jewish Floridian with a four-page advertisement featuring an attack against local individuals and the organization in which they hold positions of leadership. Despite the financial advantage which would have accrued to this newspaper. The Jewish Floridian rejected the ad. As an organ of free expression, The Jewish Floridian has always, and will continue, to assess with all possible seriousness its role in the responsible contribution to Jewish community dignity and progress. But it was our opinion that the proposed advertising semed divisive and destructive, and that its main intent was to continue the advertiser's campaigns designed to engage in what we consider to be a "Chilul Ha'Shem"—behavior unbecoming a member of the Jewish community. A Miami Beach newspaper subsequently saw fit to publish the ad. This publication, we believe, accepted it without bothering to check on the facts, and thus violated the spirit of cooperation and harmony that should dominate the Jewish community—a portion of which it purports to serve. In our opinion, The Jewish Floridian is not the only publication here that should feel a sense of responsibility toward the highest interests of the Jewish community. Even within the purview of free speech and a free press, we believe that all other media have the same responsibility—and toward all segments of the general community. This must mean increasingly careful evaluation of the material they use, whether it be of en editorial, straight news, or advertisina nature. ^ Not a Singular Responsibility A member of the local Jewish community continues to find himself increasingly personnel non grata as a result of his mounting criticism of Jewish organizations, their leadership, and even their motives—criticism which stems from his unprincipled behavior. Several weeks ago, he approached The Have You Paid Your Pledge? Greater Miami's Combined Jewish Appeal launched a special cash drive at the beginning o September to clean up the remaininq unfulfilled pledges to the 1960 CJA campaign. This is the beginning of October. Have you heeded the call? Are you one of those responding to the cash drive? We urge you to consider the many vital activities which depend upon CJA cash. Unfulfilled pledges can not be written off as unfulfilled responsibility. These agencies must have the ready means to continue their programs. Unless pledges are paid reasonably early, the Combined Jewish Aopeal must borrow funds to bridge the gap. This means the negotiation of costly loans. Won't you pay your pledge to CJA now? during the week ... as i see it by LEO MINDLIN JHB GREATER Miami Mi* %  isterial Assn. has viottH its role as a non-profit, rel* ious. tax-exempt organuiuT The chirge is politicking .J two counts, and th e „ I( J ation can hardly plead ignorance in self-defense i n t 0 ^ mail some two weeks ago vr ent a letter to all members Dated Sept. 15, the letter announced a meeting for last Monday the Central Baptist Church. Featured was a panel of four speakers including Dr. Henry Dahlberg, Dr. John Haldeman, Rev. Donald Mac^ kay president of the Ministerial Assn., and Donald Swanson, executive director of the Council of Churches here On the agenda, were these topics: ... the developments and significance of the Bible-reading suit in our Civil Courts, and perhaps other matters of local interest such as the School Board election .., The letter also suggested possible discussion of the national Presidential campaign. It is not difficult to envision the substance of the talks Monday. For with the letter was enclosed a pamphlet urging the election of Arthur A. Atkinson to the Board of Public Instruction, District 2-i Republican who opposes Jack D. Gordon, of Miami Beach This s£> culent piece of electioneering literature begins: "If you want to preserve Bible-reading in the public schools, and the previous heritage for which our forefathers fought ..." Then follows a fantastic list if political charges, half-truths, and downright distortions reminiscent of the McCarthy heyday. -:• -:• -:• MASS APPEAL TO THf UNCULTNATtO T HE CHARGES ARE astonishing in themselves. But it is even more staggering that the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn. should ha?e been a party to passing them along. Having violated their tax-exempt status in the first instance, members of the organization went two steps further: (a) They sent the Sept. 15 letter and the Atkinson flyer in envelopes deliberately bearing no return address, and incidentally cancelling the stamps with the words, "non-profit organization," to compound the felony: (b) they set their hand to the kind of disguise, duplicity and bigotry that should hardly characterize a body of spiritual leaders. The Atkinson literature warns the ministers that "ultra liberal elements are out to seize control of the Dade County School Board." Without any reference whatever to the constitutional principles involvedwhich universally fail to impress the zealous in this regard—Atkinson vows to preserve Bible-reading and to "combat all efforts to remove the mention of God and the recognition of the importance of religious faith from our schools." He doesn't say how. Gordon is condemned because "... his brother and sister-in-law are in the small group which has brought a law suit to remove from the public schools Bible-reading and the use of the Lord's prayer..." and because "they and two others are backed by the radical American Jewish Congress ..." There is little point in arguing Atkinson's hysterical assertion! individually. Campaign literature is rarely designed to do more than massage the Hottentot mind; while it rises a niche above the ordinary level of electioneering drivel only if it manages to hide the candidate's own incompetence. In this case, it has hardly even done that But I think it sad that the Republican hopeful should be able with impunity to hurl an irresponsible charge of radicalism against the American Jewish Congress, one of whose founding fathers, Rabbi Stephen Wise, would have made less than little boys of the member* of the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn., each by one. in the matter of being a spiritual leader—no less than a man. %  :• •• SAVt IIS WITH NATE A LSO SAD ABOUT the Atkinson flyer is the candidates puny effort ** to equate "both the Christian and Jewish faiths" in their desire to see "Easter, Christmas, and Hanukah" observances retained in the schools. This is achieved by a reference to presumably sympathetic "noteworthy Jewish leaders." of whom only one is mentioned—Rabh: Tibor Stern, of Beth Jacob Congregation. The pamphlet then proceeds to quote from Rabbi Stern's letter to the Miami Beach Sun on Aug. 21. which explained his position with respect to the religion -in -theschools case due to resume here Oct. 31. Fact is that Atkinson would be hard-pressed to add to this fictional. self-serving list of "noteworthy Jewish leaders" who find the law sol. in Rabbi Stern's words, "a gross violation" -rwherever their feelmp may lie in the matter of its propriety. Since it is safe to say that the Beach rabbi speaks for himself—not for the Jewish community-why doesn't candidate Atkinson do the same? In any case, the substance of such campaigning, with its loose reference to agnostics, "powerful elements" intent on "separating our children from God," and Communists, easily foretold the way of the school board discussion at the Greater Miami Ministerial Assn. meet ing Monday. Apart from the fact that the Atkinson pamphlet is latiun of the fair campaign practices code adopted by both part* which hardly seems to make the militant ministers the least bit anx -what other question slipped by their consideration for lack of U* and as a result of the heat emanating from the hands-down vocal support extended Atkinson, the "Christian candidate?" The association is a representative body of Protestant spiritsleaders. In their discussion of the national Presidential rI.clio,B would not be too difficult to guage the extent of the anti-Catholic fears they might express. But is not an across-the-board condemnation o. a candidate on the basis of his Catholic faith precisely the ki bigotry from which such condemnations profess to save us? Is • a supreme example of the very Papal power which it charges •> crush us in the event of a Kennedy victory? •:• •:• ••• VIOLATION AS TM fUNDAMiNTAL C0NSMKATIOM | SERIOUSLY DOUBT that such considerations ever entered the minds-,1 not the hearts-of the members of the Greater MJ** on f r hi" to support the Bepjibjg !" fh1 ..f. c Takm ,0 ^s pulp.t, he preached a sermon to that effect one bright Sunday morning wilrt B a U ro!, heS e 0Pen manif estations of religious bigotry, no less than the cons.iH,^ ,T S 8nd hal !" ths of a school board candidate, do oj easflv rtlf a a / rant violation; indeed.-they are side issues almost too fs that f. 6 d '" thC n me of free =**<*• ^ central que5tl o n h he mail, !" aSS0C a ,0n sent P artlsan campaign literature through!P reS !" SXLOl !JL %  —* t^ deliberate step, taken to evade rei.. !" JM vioiation-and the deliberate step* taken to butt !" Pr Ve both P feviou s knowledge and intention lal culf*'



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Page 6-A *JewistFkrfcNar Friday. October 7. i960 Hussein Hits Nasser Hard; Takes it Easy on Two years of service as president of the board of directors of the Greater Miami B'nai B'rith Youth Organization are recognized by the presentation of a plague to lack Fink, (second from left) by newly-elected president Eli Hurwitz (second from right). Looking on is Judge Milton A. Friedman (left), presidentelect of District 5, Grand Lodge of B'nai B'rith, and Mrs. Alfred Reich (right), president-elect of District 5 B'nai B'rith Women. B'nai B'rith Youth Organization serves almost 1,000 Jewish high school youth in Dade county. Emanu-EI Names New Cantor Samuel Friedland, president of Temple Emanu-EI announces the appointment of Cantor Hirsh Adler to the congregation's staff. Cantor Adler's first official appearance was at High Holy Day services at the Miami Beach Auditorium. Cantor Adler was born in Jerusalem and is descended from a long line of rabbis and cantors. At an early age he was accepted as a soloist with the Jerusalem Choir conducted by Cantor Zalman Rivlin. He received his musical education at the Conservatory of Music in Jerusalem, and is a graduate of the Ycshiva Hebron. During the War of Liberation in 1948. he served as a member of Israels Armed Forces. Cantor Adler came to the United I Slates at the end of 1955. when he! assumed a position as cantor with Congregation B'nai B'rith Jacob in Savannah, Ga., where he served until coming to Miami. He is mar-j ried and the father of two sons. He succeeds Cantor Israel Reich, CANTOR HIKSH ADLER Continued from Page 1-A the hostility of the UAR against Jordan dates from the time, he, Hussein, spoke out clearly against Jordanian alignment with the Communist bloc or Communist ideal' ogy. • Jordan, he said, has been subjected by Hie UAR "to abuse, pressures of many kinds, incitements by radio and other means, ] and subversion." He cited the : fact that Jordanian Prim* MinI ister Majali and 11 other persons i wore kilted recently by a bomb explosion, and tied up those assassinations with UAR polices directed against Jordan. • I Coming to the "Palestine Question," King Hussein treated that t supject with comparative mild' ness. The world," he said, "has closed and continues to close its jeyes to the tragedy of humanity in the Middle East, the tragedy of the | Arab refugees. "Nothing has been done by the Cniled Nations to bring pressure upon Israel to live up to UN resolutions. Israel must live up to these resolutions. There can be no peace in the Middle East without a just solution of the refugee problem," King Hussein stated. Nasser, who absented himself from the Assembly during Hussein's speech, was to leave New York for Cairo Wednesday or Thursday, according to Arab circles here. Thus, Nasser's projected tour through the United States has been called off. In attacking Nassor at the UN Assembly, King Hussein said that tensions between Jordan and the United Arab Republic began several years ago when ho had warned the people of Jordan against "Communist penetration" into the area. After that warning, he declared, Jordan found itself subjected to "abuse, subversion and external pressures." He could only interpret these acts, he emphasized, •s UAR effort aimed at the destruction of Jordan. The UAR. he charged, is seeking to dominate the Arab part of the world and, if it succeeded, "either as a neutral or as an openly avowed Communist ally." it would destroy the basic aims of the Arab people. "Better ways," he told the Assembly, "must be found to bring the combined weight of public opinion quickly and effectively to bear upon whatever nation trans'agreed upon interrelationships." However, he made it clear he is not requesting immediate action from the United Nations on the disagreement between Jordan and the UAR. In regard to Israel, the Jordanian king said that "the original failure of the United Nations" went back to the partition resolution of 1947 which, he claimed, "left in its wake a sorrowfully unresolved situation." He insisted ji was "morally wrong and political, ly unjust in 1947 to partition p,i. estine, and it is no less to today" CATERING to banquets, parties, weddings — any social function with superb cuisine and service. Plus the talents of an imaginative staff and luxurious surroundings. MAY Wl PtAN YOUH OCCASION? Call: UN 6-8031 ARTHUR TEICHNER, Executive Food Director — O. lb. OUM at *4* St • MIAMI HACM THB (EEMIUI Complete Cater inp Facilities for that Special Party nerved in an elegant fa-iiion within a luxurious setting that will reflect your good taste, CONFIRMATIONS RECEPTIONS WEDDINGS BANQUETS MEETINGS PARTIES Tete-a-tet* or a gala celebration ill. 3,500, guests AJ BM.L roOLMING^ pattCTOi PHONE: UN 5-8511 ON THf. OttAN 6/th 10 6tti STS. MIAMI BEACH Or. kVo/fson to Speak "Habits to Forget" will be the topic of a lecture by Dr. Abraham Wolfson Friday morning, 5:3G a.m. before the Athletic Club on the 10th st. beach. The group meets under the auspices of the Miami Beach Recreation Department. Jack Woody is superintendent. A question and answer period follows Dr Wolfson's talk. •••> ^ fa*jneheone, Taae. Reception*, Banquets, Partlae, Olnnore ... from 90 to 2000 catered In the) manner of the Diplomat... an unhurt-toe), •vor-attontlva. aoft-ODoken aarvlca that make* •M evont of yeur occaalon. THB DIPLOMAT MOTf I ANO COUNT*? CUM IJOO fi •/ Oce fri—cr •Mlroaa* er-ihe-SM. erle Infer matron: Have that %  uslnas a Meeting, Banquet, or Spoclal Occasion # You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade ond Rubaiyot Rooms, be >• *r wedding or o private party I at the &th lor informartie*" HAZBL AtLISOM Cartarlna %  §*•>•••'• JI 1-4M1 It*. St. a Co**** ••*



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Friday. October 7. 19$0 +J&vistifk>ridKbr> Page 11-B Dade Women to Attend Meeting A two-day conference of the C fffiufng Eaucalional Council !" Florida will be held in Tampa on Oct. 11 and 12th. Invited to attend the conference are representatives of Florida's junior and senior high schools. In Dadecounty. Mrs. William Edwards, high school service chair man, will represent the Dade county Council of Parent • Teacher Assns. Mrs. Alfred D. Barbieri will represent the Hialeah High School PTA. From the Miami Beach Sen ior High School PTA, Mrs. Leon (ireen, president, and Mrs. Ben Samuels, president-elect, will attend. Purpose of the conference is to determine what the high schools should do for a community and .state. Wertheimer, 76 Passes Away Adolph Wertheimer, of 50 SW 18th ter., died early Wednesday irornine following surgery. Mr. Wertheimer was 76. Owner of Fashion Millinerv Company, he came here in 1926 from New York. Mr. Wertheimer was assistant director of the directors staff of Coriidl Mahi Shrine, a member of the Masons, and for 30 years on the board of Templelsrael. He was house chairman of Temple Israel at the time of his death. Fi r years, he blew shofar at the Temple during the High Holy Days. He suddenly took ill on Saturday during Yom Kippur services after blowing the shofar three times. He is survived by his wife. Rose. Services will be Friday, 11 a.m.. at Temple Israel, with Gordon Funeral Home in charge, of arrangements. LEGAL'NOTiCB LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN Uiat BEXNER ri -X. INC. 8o • '• ner CBNVFTH MTERS .Mi S.W, l.-i Si11 kttoriH v foi Applicant 10/7-1 l-:'l -it Plans for Hebrew University draw attention of (left to right) Mesdames Jack Landsberg. Leo Robinson, Herbert S. Shapiro, and Oida C. Rubin. The women met at the Shapiro home to map out an Oct. 8 general membership meeting of the South Florida chapter of the IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PROBATE No. 80810-C IN RE: Estate of VICTOR E. gWANSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having i Malms or Demands Against Said Kstate: You are hereby notified and requlr eii to present any claims and demands which you may have against the estate of Victor E. Swanson deceased late of Pade County. Florida, to th County Judges of Dade County, and file the same In their offices in the County Courthouse in Dade County. K.orlda, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication heret f. or the same will be barred. ARTHUR C PERSON V. INKLE KBBSIsER Attorneys v %  Seybold Building 1, Klorlda 10/7-14-21 -IV IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE IITH JUOIC AL CIRCUIT IN AND 'FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. 60C 9645 K V I.C'-HANAN. %  v. I PATRICIA BUCHANAN, %  "' ndant, NOTICE OF PUCLICAT ON Ti RI PATR1CIAI I ''HAN X.-." • High Point Road > < %  < your %  omplatal for divorce on 1 attorney and fl' "" r ; %  in the office of the Clerk of the 1 lit Court on or before tne-i'ih oaj of .November, I960; otherwise I leratfnns of sa'rt c .mnlalnt for dlvi 'Ce win be taken as confessed against you'. DATED tms 5th day of October, I960. B. 1( I.KATHF.I1MAN Clerk <.f Clrrt'lt Co"rt (seal) By: R H RICE, JR., I teptity Ork OEORQEJ. TAL1ANOFF Attorney for Plaintiff • Incoln Road Miami Beach, Florida 10/T-14-S1-8 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 50766-B IN RE Estate of MARY WERNER 1 'ecuased. ,, NOTICE TO CRED TORS and All Persons Havnu .., demands Asaim hereby rotlfled and requlrec 1 •'amiM and d< "nlch you mav have against the es ""' of MART WERNER deceased t of IVade Countv. Florida, to th. Igea .,t Dade County. an.i In the igbt calen ; publication •• • ar| I I : NNBTH BERNARD, JR 11.-, %  ,. i-* 1 1 ney Road h, Florida 10/7-ll--'l-S* American Friends of the Hebrew University. The gathering of the group's board of directors voted to support a nationwide, $22,000,000 development fund program for the university in Jerusalem. IN THE CiRCUlT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. NO. 60C 9441 JUDITH ANN WILLIAMS. Plaintiff, v.STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR., i fend 'in NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: STEVKN WILLIAMS. .IK.. Address I'nknown You. STEVEN WILLIAMS. JR.. are hereby notified thai %  Bill of Cem%  %  lalnt for Divorce has been filed BjjaJitHl you, and you are required to MTVt -' copy of your Answer or I*lettr Pleadings, in the office of the Clerk of the circuit Court on or before the Mh day of November, lli If you fail to do so, Judgment b) mt>la!nt. IKIXK AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this ;ih day of September. i %  •<; %  • B. B. I.EATHER.MAN i ']< rk of Circuit Court I>ade Count\ I'mirt House Miami, ilorldg (seal) Bj M AVA1.ARIS. Deputy Clerk 10 7-14-D-2I NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN Ikat I the undersigned, dealting to engage In ndi the fictitious name ..r IF.RRA v al IS 19 N B. tnd Avasjue, Miami, Florida int. nils to register S*ld name with the Clerk 'if the Circuit Court %  '! Dadi County, Florida.. MURGER, INC. By: Thomas .1. Mm ray. President iran t :• rgi n, >' % %  retary. -Treaewrer i ; %  ii.DM AN A<; %  l.l 18TEIN W< st f lagfc r St. Mian I, Florida Attorneys for Registrant | I" 7 14-21I'H NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai tlie iintWrstsii.il, dealrtaaj tn engage in I business under the fictltlnns name of |i !'. 11 \ INK CLEANERS AND LAIN DRY at v "l Washington Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida Intends to register salil name with the clerk of the Circuit Court iJ I>ade County, Klorlda. |i .SEI'H PHILLIPS. Sole < Iw ner I.I in IWITZ A HELLER 706 1st St., Miami Beach Mtornejs for.loseph Phillips. |A/;-l-|krM Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid is sponsoring a kosher Chinese luncheon, catered by Mrs. Charles Rabb, at Sklar Auditorium on Monday noon. Mrs. Joseph Feldman will present a skit. Members of the cast are Geft to right) Mesdames Yvette Silberger. Ben Falk, Robert Silvers, Jack Klinger, Max Sirotta, Harry Kaplan, and Seymour Horwitz. Proceeds are for the religious school of the Temple. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW KpTieE IS HJvREBT Q1VEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name o: ROYAL PALM EKKICIENCII S I AITS at <-:<•L'U N BX 7:.rci Street Mi ami; Elorliia in tend to reflate! eatd name with the Clerk of the" Circuit Court of Dade County, Fit NK K. PIONATORB, and His Wife unilivided tfc in! rest ANTHi >NY FIA 'RBNT1NB crest I.1C -N K A1-:.AN A tti r illcanti I ISO s '. Raymond Burr and Martha Hyer in an intense scene from "Desire in the Dust," new Twentieth Century-Fox CinemaScope Sreduction. Co-starred are Joan Bennett, Ken Scott and Brett aleey. "Desire" is currently showing at the Carib, Miami, Miracle and Wometco's new 163rd Street Theatres. New Division Announced Singers Workshop, a division of the Miami Conservatory has added ers Workshop, another subject to its curriculum, classes •Fundamentals and Techniques of Choral Directing." Roy Oliver, founder and director of the Singw i 11 conduct the THE McCUNE COMPANY APPRAISERS • COUNSUORS ADRIAN McCUNE, MAI. MARION C McCUNE. M.A.i 151 N.E. THIRD STREET MIAMI b M3' GREETINGS It Is Our Pleasure to do Business with You GREATER ARTS CUSTOM BODY SHOP CUSTOM BODY SCULPTURE • Paint Body Scalloping Striping .... Louvers • i Newest Creations in Body Customizing Created by Greater Arts e 700 S.W. 57th AVE. Phone MO 1-7242 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. No. eOC 8663 M & H O INSTRUCTION CORP. a Forlda corporation KUOENK BOBO and Plaintiff. IXH'ISEG. BOBO. his wife. Defendants. ORDER OF PUBLICATION TO: EUGENE HOBO and LOUISE G. BOBO. hr wife R*ld*-ni-e unknown v< I ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED/tat a bill of complaint for foreclosure of mortgage has b. en filed against you and you are hereby required to serve ,i copy nf xotnr answer to said complaint on plaintiffs attorney and file the original anawer in the Office of ik of the Circuit Court on or in. 7ih day of November, 19*0: otherwise the allejrattona f ~ 1,i 1 '" 1 v* ill tie taken as confessed : v,.u. UATED E. B. l.F.ATHKK.M AN • "l.-rk. Crrcull Court B) R II KI.'K. JR, Ity Cl. rk WAl.l.KR Road h. Florida Attorneys for Plaintiff. if. 7-r-n-n IN THE C RCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE COONTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 9576 1IATT1E MAB WILLIAMS vs, ALBERT WILLIAMS ALBERT WILLIAMS, lesidence unknown. You ar. to file your to abovi styled hill for divorce with the Cl, rk of said Court and furnish to Geo. W. Wood, Atty. for plaintiff ..ii or before Nov. 7th. i960 or tin. bill will be taken as confeeesd. Dated Oct. 4. l^M. E. B IJ4ATHERMAN. Clerk (seal) By: WM. W BTOCKINO, • Deputy Clerk 10/7-14-S1-2X AUGUST BROS Rw ** %  /i t .-• /u sr' l.y the Act of August ,4, 1912, as Amended by the i h -i. nr.i. and July 2. |IK< K, United States code, Seofion showing the owne rahip inanjke•ment and otrcalatlon of THE JEWJS1I >R1DIAJ>7, published wc.kly at 1*1aral, Floriila. for Octi and addr. he |nibllsher at art: Editor ruhlUpi.i x MH, >iliPla. The owner Is The Jewish Floridlan; F-Ved.K Shochet 71, Miami 1 fla. The aver: er of copli publlral nlher,. ;-e. %  iliers during the 13 • efl'ng the date show n i t.. and subsi re me this Srd day 1M. \. lM) *. J96Z.)


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Page 8-B +Jeis*rk>rkfc*ri Friday. October 7, i960 Beth Israel Marks Sukkoth At Film festival' Sisterhood of Beth Israel Congregation will celebrate the Sukkoth holiday with. *.. movie concert of. lA'onard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra on film direct from Moscow and Venice. The showing is Tuesday av ning at the Social Hall. 711 W. 40th M Mi:imi Beach. The Moscow concert was filmed at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory, and features Dimitri Shostakovich's Leningrad Sviftphony and Aaron Copland's "Billy the Kid" Ballet suite, with appearances hy Boris Pasternak ;ind Shostakovich. The Venice concert was (timed at the Venice International Music Festival, where Bernstein played anil conducted Mozart's Piano (on ccito in W C.no'WUjM loo tint p. i o n MM West %  soots procwToMo moo Mr chefs prepeee rkeas to ploooe bo teote .1 too mm t %  octine §>y ioi S pectol eiesvot iteoos or. cot *oo" ie.4CodU>beM loo OM leoe, km mo e*tneroa poor, fee ie..'liooioi. orfistt. p, of • ivoool l l l p o >od ikiilrinl • '•wpt *>*•• CMfVy VIKV •fpoKooilTfW •• A 9 od StMil ** %  • n %  tony other ctolojbrfwl Ovr • %  coHWot oW K O, ktee ••. dnoot •Mel oroiot nseost pooooro tor yoo doll,, I., delUr. rho e*t MN V.W. M ttW SooMi o OPtN DAIIY FO IUNCH and torvooa oSonort frees 5 p ns to nsodnsont yoo • %  IM CoootMbfht loo Has*** I M | %  WM of Hoofy loitsoo tonsb m os mfemokty on** itUuliw lo tko ysM •! tevristt oool FtorsoSont *Noo. ottooli' i om o ot •ec.net to ... %  ho>t loo n Wcoteel M MM keert of Cocovt Orovo rW*Se* caiiomu tion on Jewish affairs and contemporary issues. He based his analysis on the combined impact of Catholic and Jewish voters who together make up 30 percent of the American electorate—26 percent Catholics and 4 percent Jews. On the strength of recent surveys and party registrations he estimated that 75 to SO percent of this significant section of the American electorate would give its vote to Sen. Kennedy. This non-Protestant irou p." Prof I.ioset said, "is even more important than the percentages indicate, fer it is concentrated in densely populated states which by themselves constitute close to a, majority of the electoral votes." Prof. Lipst. who wrote "Political Man." an analysis of voting behavior, saw the population distribution in the "politically potent states" as a significant factor in favor of Kennedy He stated: "Considerably more than 30 percent of the population of eight politically potent states—New York. New JerKjr, California. Illinois. Massachusetts. Michigan. Pennsylvania, and Connecticut—is made up of Catholics and Jews. Furthermore, the Northern Negroes who gave the Democratic ticket a large majority (about 80 percent)—even against Eisenhower—are also concentrated ia most of the same states He cited surveys to indicate that the Negro population in these states as sure to remain a bulwark of the Democratic vote in the North Thus. Prof Lipset pointed out that with Kennedy receiving majorities "of from 75 to 80 percent among the Catholics, Jews ard Ne groes. he could win the election with as little as 35 to 40 percent of the white Protestant vote This would allow for the defection, mam ly in the South, of about 3 to 8 percent of the 43 percent of the white Protestants who call themselves Democrats.' Prof Lipset stated. With the majority of the votes Of these minorities. Sen. Kennedy could win the election "even in the impossible event that he dad net receive a single vote from the 21 percent who call themselves independent, or the 3d per cent who identify with the Republicans. \for the Protestant voters. Prof. Lipset cited studies which showed that their ballots do not express unswerving religious jffi! Jews have been elected to the ofI fice of governor and senator in Oregon. New York. Alaska. Connecticut, and Illinois." He said that although these offices were not as important as the presidency, "one still would expect that people who feel strongly enough to vote against a presidential candidate simply because of his religion, would not knowingly vote for a Catholic or Jew running for any major state office.' In another article in the October issue of "Commentary." Rabbi Arthur liertzberg. chairman of the International Affairs Commission of the Synagogue Council of America, asserted that the separation of church and state was not a real issue in the current campaign for ranking Protestant spokesmen. Rabbi Hertzberg. of Temple Emanu-El here, stated in his article: "One might suppose from the arguments of the Protestant spokesmen that Protestant devotion to the principles embodied in the First Amendment was absolute and unswerving. However, there is ample evidence—both in the history of Protestantism and in the current state of the American Protestant community — to indicate that the Protestants' commitment to the amendment is itself ambiguous." He gave as a major example of Protestant ambivalence, the issue of the public schools. "Opposing Catholics on state aid to parochial schools. Protestants still share the almost unitary view of the Catholics that the public schools need greater religious influences." He pointed out that most of the religious aspects of public school education, such as released and dismis sed time, and prayers in home rooms, "have all been fought for not only by Catholics, but also by the majont> of Protestants." ROMWELL ABE GErTER'S NEW KI-SHCR HOTEL AB*prtt KOSHER MEALS MCI. KM ** Pw £50 DevOwOcc. SinoJe OCT. % Mlhr JS of m Rms. Euro*. PUfl a Other R in E*ch Room • Free Self-P*rkmg Admin, HOT • Wiener RMSU • Movies • Censes • Entertain. NJfhtly • Mam oiner Feet. Inl-il II. .Moil...!! SoiMfceai st itta'si: rer m. %  ., ft*. RIVIERA 103 RESTAURANT DCUCATtSSIN KM CATERERS srttliL WAHUMMit Open for Succos — Dinner Served 5 to 8:30 VISIT otw TAe-oJT of r COMPLETE L INE OF HOME -MADE SPECIALTIES I I 1 11 %  T = THE ULTIMATE IN KOSHER CATERING Consult Us tor Your Catonng Needs. Bar Mitrvaho. itc. 1S30 Pence de Leon, Corner Majorca, Coral Gables For Reservations call HI 8-5441 Closed Saturdays ROYAL HUNGARIAN nu>3 CATERERS 731 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH JE 8-5401 FOR SI PERB CATERING WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS • BANQUETS OUt ASANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST REfERENCE Social Singles B'nai B'rith Social Singles will hold a dance Saturday evening in the Imperial room of the Roney Plan. Unattached men and women 35 and over are invited to attend. The club is currently holding a membership drive. Faye Socn is. chairman. 170 m 5 -si i ? ivi%?i ? 9k w w w. Extcvfhre Meord in Talk Robert W. Cress, executive of Outdoor Advertising Incorporated, addressed a meeting of the Advertising Club of Greater Miami at the Biscayne Terrace hotel Wednesday >-r-"w"wn_-V^W-n^ "WE CATER TO PARTIES" Phone HI 3-4505 AffW JOeWtWO MSUMAHT t COCKTAIL LOUNGi 3059 S.Wf. tth STREET (on the Trail) Miami. Florida •teensa Ceisiae t Hum Air CeeeMtreeeJ 1M See*** Cea-Krf 'Plenty of Perking Room" •yev'v'V'V^ • •V^^^'^'-V^v ~V^e^>e'^e^V^o M w ^^-V^e'



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Page 2-B *Uisf fhrkMar Friday. October 7, I960 1 tablespoon grated orange rind the sauce. Serve hot with mashed potatoes, boiled rice or spaghetti. Serves 10 or more. tablespoon wine or fruit Variation: If using grapevine ££ e leav,-. be ', Hv 1 cup cherry, red xi pberrv • %  itrawberry pre-tue % %  2 cup fine crumb= 2 cup finely chopped nuts
in above recipe. If leaves are -mall, place 2 together for sizeable rolls. Cook then bake par .^ R 0 U out one r£n mto as above. a >heet a pos< |, r ,,l For this holiday it has been cusenough to fit into a 7 .xii-mc,) toir.ary to serve the following pasbaking pan. lighUy dusted vA trv: "or. bringing up pastry along ql .. four sides about It-inch Sprm Fluden. B*K Recipe {lilmg Xo 1. RoU out ?ec0[)d ^ Crwstpastry Jn the sam uay m] At a recent charter-signing ceremony of the IsFlorence Kupperman was chairmen of ie^Vender' chapter of Woman's American ORT. Seated (left to right) are Mesdcmes Josephbermembers pledged their support to Mrs. Philip ger. Margaret Newman Steam. ^P *"*• Stark, president, to enable the chapter to meet Florence Kupperman Joseph hantor. Georg, its aoaTof participation in the program of ORT. Whitney. Standing (left to right} are Meswhich is to -help people help themselves." dames Sam Garfunkel. Sidney Finger. Aaron The program teaches them skills and trades. Green. Terry Sponder. David Nabot. Marim thereby making them self-suppor ting. Mrs. Lodge. Joseph Lipsk y. Harold Cruder. Sukkoth Features Special Dishes of pastry in the sarrt pierce with a fork. Arrange over] 2'4 cups sifted all-purpose flour filling, bringing up sides a lituj 4 teaspoon salt. Spread filling No. 2. cup softened vegetable shortBy LEAH LEONARD Cover with the 3rd rolled out pastry dough, treated like the 2nd pastry', then spread the 3rd filling! evenly over top. sprinkling muel I crumbs and chopped nuts over all in swirls or evenly. Bake in a pre. heated oven 25 to 30 minutes at I Sift together flour and salt into 425 F. or till crust edges are light, a mixing bowl then cut in the ly browned. Cut into squares or softened shortening till the mixoblong sections when cold right ture forms little peas. (Use two the pan. and lift out aeh section knives or a pastry blender) Add carefully with a spatula or broad] the ice water, a little at a time, k emng 5 to 6 tablespoons ice cold water 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon grated lemon or orange rind (optional) plants: red and green peppers; cabbage leaf in turn; starting from Sums. pers. oranges, kumquats. the thick portion of the leaf, roll while rn.xing t,,11 it^bep* to form The'fall ar.d winter season brings ^^ ^ ernons a „ add color tucking in the two ends secure ball ofdoug h then add thesugax us a colorful week of holiday. Suk accents t0 lny deSJgn of deC ora" p "*\ f roUs p ace and graed fruit rnd nd ron'irnie koth. which features special £ on Enlist the children in this l >' whU ionuB mto rolls. Place t0 pat together. Chill m refrigeradishes plan while vou tell the story of each roll in a 2or 2W-inch deep %nr wh >le preparing the fillings as Wketkek vcu eat your meals in lh€ Sukko'h' or better still, have heavy frying pan. close to getner. beknr: •4 of Willows approxhem teU lt t0 vcu and add the following mixture to pg^. lst f;]ling m4y ^ It hfestooned Rnt #l!a eet dow „ to recipes ccver; gra ted raw apple mixture or TV SPECIAL 9:30-11:00 PM But lefa get d. -. to recipes w tt Ml • vegetables, or youl] want t0 £ thls Hoh -. e a corner of your dining. y.'eek r —. ior decorating, one main c>h '* %  r.e at least orct %  .:! be H also called Praakt me. and Galuptze by 1 go rack to Rurr.ania. >ou will use ( instead %  bsge I r.d prepare Sarmah ie tee \'-:zi Recipe below. We !;ke to make festoons of NsMtel 2 pounds of chopped beef -2 cup long-grain nee 2 eggs 1 large onion, grated 1 large carrot, grated 1 leaspoo r :o taste) Combine thoroughly and let juice or vinegar chopped dried fruits — proportions 't-a spoon citric acid as follows: cup "dark brown sugar (or to Crmbine: H4 to 2 eupa tomato sauce (homemade or canned) Water added till sufficient to cove-^ par Cover and bring to a boil. Reof Co K T rou f t iy r JT duce heat to a steady dimmer and cranberries, using an, rse stand ".** T *!l\? T *?** M *. P /-t let cook 30 minutes. Lift out each cranberries, using any course ^^Skiva "as tot cook M rc:DU,eS ^ Ml each thread to string cranberries for f* !" ** cabba 8 lwes s fo1 f.hed roll into a suitable baking "5 to 24 leaves of cabbage (cut jjj.J[£ £* -"gg from medium or large cab. bage) Boiling water to ccver Cover and let stand till leaves decorations. Once when cranber lies were not available we made strings of both the green and the large, round dark grapes, and added clusters of grapes of both varieties to bowls of apples placed about the diningroom. are wilted and soft enough to baning water may be added if necesCoruakeares. with some ears of die. Drain and let stand in a eoJ-j sary. shaking the pan to distribute corn with the husks pulled partly ander over boiling water, if de_ away: small |i—psinr and all vasired for easier handling and fill rieties of squaskes: cucumbers ing Place a ball of the meat mixand green tomatoes: purple egture m the center of each drained 2 cups grated raw apple, tightacked 4 tablcpoors sugar teaspoon cinnamon (or more to suit taste) A dash cf nutmeg 3 tablespoons fine cracker or dry cake crumbs (If using dried fruits like prunes, pears, apricots, put these through a food chopper for best results) or triple rows. Be sure the sauce comes to the top. Bake at 375 F ^n4 filling: for 30 minutes, turning carefully to brown each side lightly. Boil1 cup chopped seeded rasas H cup chopped nuts tany kind) '1 cup fine crumbs Tcrght as yoo watch TV enjc> the distinctive nutty flaw* ol SissJ(nigtit cheese. Great far snacks A 3I crackers and fruit 6 handy "iip ccer." wedges. THE OftlGINAl ^ Swiss KNIGHT :ssc*L"rtatCxusi m% P9i£i£€f • WHICH KEF • UIBSMBME • nuuMnHrrats • CMasECF • PASTMMI • BOLSGM a: ITLUMM KUUTESSOS. SSKMOITTS t KJTUtAjrrj KOSHER ZI0N SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO ISt Sswtk Water Market, CfckaflO t, llliaeit Bring the genius of real Jewish cooking to your table! MANISCHEWITZ Whitefish & Pike <&e<38u*e Gefilte Fish COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. IMC. SS5 BISCAVNE STREET. W AMI BEACH PHONES: JE 1*232. JE S4231 HERMAN PEARL PAT OEARR I ASK FOR nrafum BAKERY PRODUCTS AT YOUR FAVORITE FOOD MARKET RYE BREAD PUMPERNICKEL CHALAH ROUS BAGELS division of NEW YORK BAKERIES, INC. *JE 1-7117 outter or .WJffli-lS For FREE Recipe Book, send today to: THE B. MANISCHEWITZ CO.. Box 88. Newark 1. N. J. MANISCHEWITZ



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Friday* October 7. 1960 Pag* 3-B 35 Years of Pioneer Women's Work By MRS. MILTON GREEN President, Greater Miami Council Pioneer Woman As the Jewish world prepares to celebrate Sukfcoth, we of Pioneer Women will celebrate a double "simcha"—the birth of our organization 35 years ago. In 1925, a woman in New York received a letter from her friend, Rahel Yanait Ben-Zvi, asking for a loan of $500 with which to build a well. The letter was read by seven women, six of whom did not know the writer, but something in its undertones so impressed these American women, that they resolved to implement and Mrs. Green is president of the Greater Miami Council of Pioneer Women. During this holiddv season, she offers then views on the programs and significance of Pioneer Women in the United States and Israel. • %  Irengthcn the hands of those who were laboring Under the severest hardships to make Palestine a homeland for the Jewish people. This handful of women organized into Pioneer Women to respond to the appeal for help. Little did they realize that in 35 years Pioneer Women would be an international organization — a firm chain binding together the Jewish women of the world, with links in Canada, Mexico, South America, Europe and Israel. Pioneer Women stands as the vital, constructive, Women's Labor Zionist Organization. It ia unique in that it is the only women's organization anywhere in the world directly connected with a sister organization in Israel, the Moetzet Hapoalot—or {he Working Women's Council—for which it is the main source of support. With the Moetzet Hapoalot in Israel and the Pioneer Women in America, we have a remarkable partnership of women. Each shares the same deep belief in social and economic equality and social justice. It is a partnership of women who believe that support and help for Israel is not philanthropy, not charity, not a question of address unknown—but that support for Israel is a constructive investment in a new way of life, a life of MRS. MIITOS GREEN vigor, of beauty, of purpose, and a blueprint for democracy in the Middle East. This partnership is strengthened by the constant exchange of leaders, visits of one to the other, a personal, intimate relationship that does hot exist in any other organization. From 500 to 315,000—these figures indicate the growth of the Moetzet Hapoalot, since it was organized 35 years ago. It is today the largest women's organization in Israel. During the past 35 years, with the help of Pioneer Women, the Moetzet Hapoalot has established training farms, vocational schools, convalescent care homes for women and children, and a vast vast network of children's homes, kindergartens, and nurseries. These are not institutions, but homes where loving care of thousands of children has made them strong, both in body and spirit, and has given them a new lease on life. The greatest acknowledgement of the vital role played by our sisters in Israel lies not only in their heroic fight for freedom, but in their importance to Israel's, future. This is underscored by the fact that eight women of the Moetzet Hapoalot occupy seats in the II m$.K ASH A of course! 1 A traditional standby... for old-timey good Kasha Varneshkes Kasha Knithts, and other treats. Lost than 2< a serving! Abe w Woir. Oeoey Kerneli far*)... WeJT. Koiha 'N' Cnny .. WoJTi KoeSe Soup. | Send for tt KASHA COOK BOOK: ;;: PHYUIS WOlfF, Ponn Y-a,. New Ye* y. iii 5 KASHA MEANS i ffi j 'j^ Distributed By LEVINSONS FOOD SPECIALTIES 1050 Cost 17* Street Hioleek, florido Pheee T 71571 In Miami it's FLORIDA-FOREMOST DAIRIES for Home Delivery Phone FR 4-2621 The greet nemo In deiry products FRANK J. HOLT, Menager Knesset. Israel's Foreign Minister, and the only woman cabinet member, is Mrs. Gold*. Meir, who .at one time was national execiu tive secretary of Pioneer Women. In addition to supplying the necessary funds for the Working Women's Council in Israel, Pio neer Women supports other major national funds for Israel. It is one of the participating organizations in the Youth Aliyah coordinating committee, and raises its funds for this agency through its Child Rescue Fund. Pioneer Women, throughout the country, has participated actively in the campaigns of the United Jewish Appeal, Federation, Hist adrut and the Jewish National Fund, and has been outstanding | in its sale of Israel Bonds. At a recent Presidents conference in New York, Pioneer Wornj en launched its 35th year by an-, nouncing that an Eleanor Roosevelt Lecture Hall would be established in the Graduate Library School Building of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The j Hall will accommodate several hundred students, and will be %  built at a cost of $35,000. The Graduto Library School Building is an overall project of Pioneer i Women for the coming year. On the local scene, Pioneer Women fulfills its obligation to! the Moetzet Hapoalot by raising a substantial quota through; functions sponsored by the eight chapters and the coordinating Council. The 850 members are not only active participants in all Jewish community projects, but support many social service projects of the .general community. Last year, the Greater Miami Council of Pioneer Women was the recipient of a gold certificate for its outstanding work on behalf of the United Fund. This year, Miami Pioneer Women sponsored a party for and made spiritual adoption of the children of the National Cardiac Hospital. And as recent as Hurricane Donna, disaster victims were aided with clothing from the Pioneer Worn en's Thrift Shop. On this, the 351h year of Pioneer Women, we celebrate not only an achievement, but a prospect of fulfilling our ideals in the future. Marriage Laws Brochure Listed By Special Report NEW YORK—A 78-page brochure clarifying the traditional laws of i Jewish family purity is once again! available free-of-charge from Agu-, dath Israel of America, it was announced by Rabbi Moshe Sherer. executive vice president of the organization. "Jewish Family Life," published by the Spero Foundation, is now in its seventh edition, and Agudath Israel has in recent years distributed over 10,000 copies as a public service. Written in English by Rabbi Sidney B. Hoenig, the brochure explains the background and details of traditional Jewish marriage laws and Mikva (ritualarium) ob i servance. Free copies are available with 10c to cover postage from Religious Observance Division. Agudath Israel of America, 5 Beekman St., New York 38. Exports Talk to Women Dr. Stephen C. Wright, child psychiatrist, and A. J. Montanari. head of the Montanari Clinical School, spoke at the North Shore lOpti-Mrs. membership tea at the | home off Mrs. Louis Pilzer, 7815 |Noremac ave.'. this week. The speakers discussed emotionally disturbed children. Mi alwa ys look (or the EARLY SANTAS GO INTO* ACTION TOYLAND OPENS TODAY Make way for the young fry Toyland opens today! The most tremendous, the most exciting collection of toys ever unloaded from Santa's copious bag. Have the pick of this enormous assortment now And you don't have to "take them with you" now use our convenient layaway plan* and we'll hold them for you until Dec. 15th! Toyland, fourth floor across-the-bridge miami. Also available at all other Burdine's stores *10% down will hold your purchases 'til December 15th. Minimum deposit 1.00. Ruthie Walker Doll by Horsman, head tilts and turns, all vinyl. 26" tall, can wear any size 1 dress 9.98 Football Outfit, plastic helmet, long sleeve jersey shirt, shoulder pad, heavy pants. S-M-L .... 9.98 Automatic Sice* Ball Game, circular target with 9 balls. Balls release automatically for replay. For ages 6 to adult \ __ 4.54 Colonial Mansion Doll House, a miniature home in every way including furniture. For ages 3-12. 4.98 Pin Ball Gam* for ages"6 to adult. Score registers automatically. Battery operated 9.98 Chatty Kathy, really talks! Answers questions, says whole sentences by pulling cord. 20" tall. Usually 18.00 shirt, shoulder pad, heavy pants. S-M-L 12.88 9.98 SHOP TONIGHT Til 9 P. M.



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[Friday, October 7, 1960 %  -Jewisti fhrld/ar Page 5-B Women In Social Affairs Beach Afternoon Chapter Kadimah's kosher smorgasbord will be held Saturday. 7 p.m., at the William Chasen home, 3061 SW 11th st. Mrs. Lillian Cohen is chairman. Servin? on the committee %  are the Mesdames Albert Berson. William Chase, Jack Bott, Kalman Kalman, Milton Kessler, Hyman ; Seltzer, Cele Segal, David Meltzer and Teeny Deutsch. • • On Sunday noon. Pioneer Worn I en's Club 2 will hold its annual in! stallation in the form of a luncheon at the Harfenist Restaurant. 1381 October luncheon meeting of the Miami Beach Afternoon chapter of w A* D y U !" \ na,,onal P resi Women's American ORT will be P oneer Women has an-: he i d Wednesday noon .' the Bel WZPS. ,h n f f P,oneer A.re hotel. Featured will be a *71 s m ^ th a mve 0 r E ,ary any demonstration by the Women's Exnew member m the 35-year age ; change Hobby Shop. ,'roup will receive this year's mem-1 bership free. „ .. ~l — Boodms to Mark 50th Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Max Boodin, of 735 Michigan ave.. will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Oct. 10. The couple were married in Russia, and left for the United States almost immediately thereafter. Mr. and Mrs. Boodin have lived in Miami since 1945, coming here fromDetroit, Mich. The couple have one son. threeEJaS "£ft ^ghte^ndIIZ\^Z7. President. Mrs. Irving Liftman; vice presidents. Mesdames AbraMrs. Boodin is a member of the [Rehearsing for the musical installation of Sisterhood and PTA of Temple Beth Sholom are %  Cantor David Conviser at me piano, and Mrs. iDavid Drucker, chairman, Mrs. Wolfie Cohen, land Mrs. Norman Arkin." Participants not shown are Mrs. Tom Gerard, Mrs. Harry Smith, Mrs. Stanley Arkin and Mrs. Leo Levin. The funclion will take place at the Everglades hotel on Oct. 19. lusical Program Will Set Stage For Installation For the first time in its 18-year Istory. the Sisterhood and PTA of emple Beth Sholom will hold a puble installation, and for the first ne it will be held in the fail in lead of the spring. iThe installation luncheon will itake place Wednesday noon. Oct. [19, at the Everglades hotel. Preceding the installation. Mrs. Burton Haft will offer a program I of musical selections. Installation will take the form of i a poetic script with music, written fomen Planning [or Tag Day IWomen's chapters of Miami's ational Children's Cardiac Hos Ital are busy on the telephone this pek. calling for 8,000 volunteers will join them on next Janu|> > Tag Day fund-raising drive to |ise $75,000 for the new "EnchanForest" building program of local 100 percent charity in Itution. five area groups of dedicated, Buateer workers are combining pir efforts in the Tag Day proam. with Bob Rubinstein, assisM secretary of Children's Carlo Ho.-pital, directing and coorHting the drive. National Chllpn's Cardiac Hospital, like other spitals. is not included in the |ited Fund, but operates solely on juatary public contributions. with Tag Day scheduled for Jan. [members of the various chapters Criminologist to be Speaker Jacques L. Bril will discuss "Scientific Detection of Deception" at a meeting of the Greater Miami chapter of ORT on Monday evening at the Deauville hotel. Bril is the inventor of the lie-detector and a noted criminologist. Rebekah Lodge Mooting Sunshine Rebekah Lodge 9 will meet Tuesday evening at Workmen's Circle, 2565 Washington ave. heading up the project include Mesdames Henry Jacobson. Martin Rubinstein, Rae Rosenthal and Hilda Bendell, of Miami chapter: Clementine Kemp, Ethel Silver stein, and Gert Lachs. Miami Beach; Ruth Katzif and Faye Emmer, Flamingo; Aline A m a r a. North Dade; and Sandy Salzman and Shirley Seltzer, South Dade. by Mrs. Seymour Baron and entitled "Two for the Temple." Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg will do the narration. Songs, under the direction of Cantor David Convisor, will be rendered by Mesdames Tom Gerard, Harry B. Smith. Jules Arkin, Norman Arkin, Leo Levin. David Drucker and Wolfie Cohen. Mrs. Drucker, who will be installed as a Sisterhood vice president, is chairman of the musical program. Rabbi Leon Kronish, spiritual leader of the congregation, will be installing officer. Mrs. Howard Miller and Mrs. Samuel Hirsch. outgoing presidents of Sisterhood and PTA respectively, will be co-chairmen of the luncheon. Mrs. Murray Gilden is in charge of special arrangements, and Mrs. Tom C. Kravitz is ticket chairman. To be installed as the new presidents are Mrs. Harvey E. Kramer for Sisterhood, and Mrs. Joseph Pardo for PTA. ham Shedroff and Miriam WolfGolda Meir Club. Pioneer Women, man; financial secretary. Mrs. Na-1 Her husband belongs to Ben-Gurion than Ostrof; treasurer, Mrs. Wil-1 Branch of Farband. liam Malmuth: recording secretary, Mrs. Aaron Libman; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. Sadie Rosenberg. Retiree Group Adds to Facilities First Retirement Foundation this Mrs. Isaac Offenhenden, president of Bebe Idelson Club, announweek added two more services for ces a luncheon to be sponsored by the elderly, reported vice president her group on Monday noon at the home of Mrs. Mendel Chomitz, 4458 Menorah Chapter Women Menorah chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will hold a board meeting Tuesday. 10 a.m., at the Peter Miller hotel. Mrs. Mildred R. Freeman, president, will conduct the meeting. Sheridan ave. Proceeds are earmarked for Moetzet Hapoalot. • • • Mrs. Moses Meyer, vice president of Council, has called a committee meeting for all members of the donor ad journal at the home of Mrs. Jacob Krantz, 811 Euclid ave., on Tuesday evening. • • • Mrs. William Beckwith, president of Golda Meir Club, will conduct first meeting of the season Toesday, 8 p.m.. in Beth El Auditorium, 500 SW 17th ave The holiday of Sukkoth will be celebrated with an appropriate program. Social hour is being hosted by the Mesdames Isaac Pushkin, Rebecca Ishlon. Eva Kahn and Anna Soren Bild. Named Coordinator Walter Lebowitz. president of the Miami Beach Senior Citizens Assn., and general counsel for the American Federation of Senior Citizens. has been named Democratic co ordinator for senior citizens activities in the Miami Beach aroa by Joe Weil, state coordinator, i^ebo witz recently aduressetr a large gathering of senior citizens at the Blackstone hotel along with Sen. Claude Pepper. Helen Alpert. One is a new oceanfront retirement hotel, the other a nursing and convalescent home. Both are in Greater Miami. This completes the Foundation's nationwide program of services to meet basic needs. Now included are discount drugs, health insurance, friendship travel tours, costscaled Florida retirement living, and the association's national news publication. TRANSLATIONS and PRIVATE TUTORING in %  union, Engthh, German, Nckraw am* YiMi*. FOP Information Call PL 7-4M2, 8 to' 10 P.M. ROOM & BOARD for MM4 U>V or OMHII— hi •Mwtifal, CMtroUy located. Bench Home. JE 2-4236 WILL BOARD 9 Oft 10 TEAR OLD GIRL a companion for my daughter. Fin* home. S36 a wee*. Call Mr*. Altman at FR 1-2421 or NE 5-9033 K t '' "I can always depend upon my monthly check from FFC • ... and where else could I get so much for my money I" Yes, where else but FFC could you receive 19% annual return on your ALL FFC MMTCAMS money paid In regular monthly checks? The answer h stonfe Mil PIC ARE FUST IMMMO mortgage investment plan was conceived, you couldn't... unless yon went MM of the fortunate few with tremendous sums to invest. But now, • RMtAl TITM INSURANCE thanks to KM FFC you (on invest os little as $1,000 — or more — ond IN YOUR NAME enjoy the some high rote of return as the very wealthy investors. Your investment is protected ond secured by a first mortgage and tMe msur* FFC TAKES FUll RESPOMSIRIIITY once as wed. Through offices in Florida's principal cities, FK dots FOR COLLECTION AND SERVICING business with many outstanding builders ond brokers. OF THESE FIRST MORTGAGE FAYMENTS AT NO COST 10 FRANKLIN ,Nym I City Phono I Approximate investment contemplated