The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01651

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Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
1
"Jewish Flor idian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 33 Number 39
Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960
Nine Sections Price 52.00
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_ I960 ... 9o^ JKasliona Edition ... 572/
Cordial New Year Greetings
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Jay, September 16, 1960
/ICIiKlllI CINISAL.
Central OOte. U, Ik. Ba**M ,1 1,^
-Jenisfi Fkrktion
Page 3-A
Our lUf, IMS/a/M/Keg
Data i Jly lit, iwg
J-n TnWroottaool, Im,,
11 Kat aet'i Straat,
,. ye* itv".r.
iiilwi
V* Mr kaavlaos* that 7 We taaa.trlal icthwI
It
[ !!
Sine* tala paalttao af yaara iHtnnui with tha bayaatt ariaalplaa
tppllad la (ill of th Armb cauntrlaa .hlch laad ta haaalac iruwtlai
,1th yen Uiroufhoat th* Arab countrlaa, and .llllag U fir. fan lb* aaaaaai
tanalcata yor UniaMt with laraal, a fanad li aaltabla ta at***
IraiM? baaing yaa V* aOaqaataiy aaaarstand IMh feat*.
Sa, w* beg t aafc j-aa, If ra ara willing t* aalataia yoar daallng*
1th tha astaaaira aarkata af tfca Arab iwlrlii, W faralaa aa ttk tba>
caaaarj ita aktok arara tka tarartaatlaa af yaar agrnaaa*. .,ak
laraal, aajy annareait by yaar gavnraaantaa aatbarttlaa aad caantaraiaaad!
any Arab rapraaaatatir* ataalaa la yaor cauatry vltkla a parlad
.a*** Calabar 31, 10.
If tka ftxad parlad alapaad attkaat raeairtag tha amid da
aa.ll ba ragratfallr akllgad ta baa traoaactioaa lth year a
vll) Uu if** Nwlrtik
Taara faithfally
saitaar Oanaral far tka liycatt af laraal
Dr. ibdal Karl a B-aV idt
lerican Jewish Congress has called on the State Department
[initiate discussions directly with the League of Arab States
led at halting the Arab boycott of U.S. firms dealing with
jel. AjCongress president Dr. Joachim Prinz sent Secretary
rter a phot03tcrtic copy of a letter from Arab League head-
ters in Damascus, oyria, threatening to blacklist an Amer-
company unless it ceased trading with Israel. The letter
ve) is the ffirst documentary evidence that a Central Office
| the Boycott of Israel has been established in the Secretariat
fcoeral of the League of Arab States.
.enrtedy Greets Jews of America
MISS MIKIAM SCHtlNBtKG
Hn. John F. Kennedy, candidate
TPresident of the Democratic
Bty, this week issued a Rosh
phona greeting to the Jewish
pmunity of America.
this eve of the Jewish New
' Sen. Kennedy said, "may
family and I join with you in
Hyer for a world blessed with I
^bce and for a mankind blessed
with understanding."
FUND RAISER
[With solid aockgrevnd in cam-
maign managamti* community or- ?
formation ant! public relations, ,
[available far pa'lien as director f
Mar worthy Jewish institution in-1'
I eluding Tempi* or Synagogue. Ex- ,
{tensive experience in supervising
I capital and operating fund drives r
I in fields af religion welfare, and .
| higher education. Matare, mar-
I ried, hard-working individual. Flo. {
i resident, bat will travel.
Write MR. A., Box 2973,
Miami 1, Fla.
Continued Son. Kennedy: "May
tha fears af yesterday ba turned
inta hopes for tomorrow, and
may our children grow strong
in a world of truth and dignity."
"May this new year turn the
hearts of man towards peace, and
bring an end to fear of war."
(For messages of greetings from
Vice President Nixon and other
state and national government
leaders, see page 8-A.)
B'nai B'rith Social Fete
A social gathering for members
of B'nai B'rith under the sponsor-
ship of Miami Beach Lodge, sched-
uled for the month of September,
has been cancelled as a result of
the High Holy Days and Hurricane
Donna. Herbert L. Heiken, presi-
dent, and Irving Schatzman, pro-
gram chairman, said the meeting
will be held instead on Oct. 19 at
the Ritz Plaza hotel.
TT Supervisor Off
On Scholarship
Miss Miriam Scheinberg, youth
i activities supervisor of the Miami
Beach YMHA Branch of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Community Cen-|
ter, has been granted a leave of
absence to receive her graduate:
training in social work during the
next two-year period.
Miss Scheinberg is well known I
in the community for her work
with teen-age activities and chil-,
dren's programs for the past five
years of her association with the
agency.
A combined national and local;
scholarship plan was granted Miss;
Scheinberg to enable her to attend
the New York School of Social Work i
of Columbia University.
The scholarship plan was made;
possible through the assistance of
the Council of Jewish Federation
and Welfare Funds, National Assoc.
of Jewish Center Workers, and the'
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center.
Upon completion of her graduate
I studies leading to a Master's de-!
: gree in social work in June, 1962,1
Miss Scheinberg will return to her I
position with the Center, which isj
a beneficiary agency of the United
{Fund and the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation.
New Law Aids
Vets' Widows
Some veterans' widows receiving
dependency and indemnity com-
pensation may be entitled to re-
ceive higher payments as the re-
sult of a recently enacted law, the
Veterans Administration said this
week.
The amount of dependency and
indemnity compensation is now
based in part on the rank of the
deceased veteran at the time of
his separation from service, C. W.
Boggs, officer in charge of the VA
office at 984 W. Flagler st, said
The new law, known as Public
Law 86-492, allows the widow to
receive payments based on a high-
er rank, provided the veteran sat-
isfactorily held the higher rank for
at least six months, and was hold-
ing it within 120 days of the date
of his death or separation from the
service.
The VA lacks the necessary in-
formation to identify these eligi-
ble widows. Widows whose hus-
band at one time held a rank high-
er than their rank at separation,
under the above conditions, should
contact the Miami VA office, Boggs
advised.
600 Families Affiliate
Beth Torah Congregation, which
opened its synagogue and school
last weekend, has enrolled close to
600 families as members of the
congregation. Membership is still
open, and some seats are still avail-
able for Yom Kippur services. An
additional 100 families are expect-
ed to affiliate with Beth Torah
Congregation before 1961.
I '......' "I-1 !"'"" "" '' : ":"H
PHOTO CREDITS
Frontispiece of The Jewish
Floridian New Year Edition
is courtesy of the Ameri-
can-Israel Paper Mills, Had
era. Israel, as are the illu
strations on Pages 1-C. 1-D,
IE, IF, and 1-G. Other
photos are courtesy of the
United Jewish Appaal and
-Israel Bond Organization, as I
well as of numerous national
and international philanth
ropic. religious and educa- I
tional institutions.
.0.1 ti... i .. ..ua
IstobmWed
1W
Hoese Owned
TERMITES?
ROACHES? ANTS?
Safe, Positive Control With Every
Other Week Service For The Home
TRULY NOLEN ~
"The Sign of Good Housekeeping"
COSTS LESS THAN
YOU THINK
CALLFR 7-1411 -
reefer Mlaiai's Laroese tJrtarssiearer
personalized service af the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money .. un 6-1233
24-hour service except rosh heshoao and yom kippm
Rabbi on Commission
By Spatial fiaaert
NEW YORK Rabbi Norman
Gerstenfeld, of Washington DC-
has been named official represen-
tative of the Synagogue Council of
America to the Religious Coopcra-
tive Council of the Civil War Cen-
tennial Commission, it was an-
nouncd this week by Rabbi Max
D. Davidson, of Perth Amboy, N.J.,
Council president. Rabbi Davidson
announced at the same time that
the Council has affiliated with the
Civil War Centennial Jewish His-
torical Commission which will
highlight the contributions of the
Jews to the Civil waf effort.
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
needs for its
THRIFT SHOP
All your furniture), clothing,
linens, dishes, drapes, etc.
All procaadt go lowardi support of
the Heme. You may contribute, take
a tax daduction or wa will pay cash
for same. Remember wa are HOT
a profit-making organization ... We
ara halping your community to kaap
it* dignity. By helping others you
ara halping yourialf! Manufacturer*
and jobbers romomborwo can use
all your sutcast* or misfit*.
Pease call us for early
pick-up.
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
THRIFT SHOT
5737 N.W. 27th Avenue
NE 3-2331
Closed Saturdays
CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE
_aL-
1
TODAY
VAN n CHAMI.ES
: EFL.K AUGHTOH
[)||i!)jji;fl!jiiiaiiiioiw
eusational 665i)ay pursuit
Kilur-ShipAtlaktis
If
rst
^auJoU* aaeeas/ u*t6eT A/lUifoi TOOAy
f^tdkusa: *i?u&mr *. ope***
fljWw
Throo of fngfoners farm.nl
TlWY-TIIQpalS-ALaSTAR SIM UH QRMICHAfL Qa^s<|lt
Best Wishes fer a Very
Happy, Healthy and
Prosperous New Year
This thing whi< h was once
the lovely Madeline rose from
the tomb with the terrible
madness of the L-Uherv"
LJGAR Al LA*-
> i j
NOW PLAYING
i.
IN DOWNIOW. .Ml K >IA. 1P.CM
Olympic* t Beach Gables
'71 I tiac.tll ST ON IINCOIN BOD Mu 7111 PONCl OC LION


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OFFICE and FLKRT 12: K Sixth Street
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LEO MDJDLIN .......-------------Exeeutxwe Editor
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wad. the Amajican BKtr
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BINDEL _____________
o mere lAingE to cente m the days ahW
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Conespotiaer-
Vounae 33 Number
Fririav Septemoe: 2
2 Turn; 5721

Survey
Weea: aner weecthroagnou: toe veer tne edits-
aaaa cr this oaae rettec: me eeanaine moocL
aes c: wariawie^ nanaaa Bad locc. rmr-T-
the ettec: tne lewis:, cammumrv On tne occc
-os:. hasnon. ~~. ena aafcajg :
:ajce nacxw~r- aiance at eame of tn^ mcnc
manner toe pas- twelve monrns mat ier. more
a momentnr-.- aeoressioi B*aa Bad Tram wnic;
noune m tne aavs c: tn^- Nev.
rear enaac

DiTlKMINATlOh HER: UK AMtOAL
rmg tne outcome Hee-rev 'leer 572- = rox.
c: acti-Semitr mnoeau nan;rrr.r wire toe Ccns
:r.c_s Ev? aaaerronor. o: tne Synnoooue of Coioane
-:nEr" tiooaed mroue.- tne tanuiv ot nanar
c: ~ aiver. sicmj to mrrre toe:; mar, :; *ver-
rrcio- warid iwisr. communirv It toe aeaearation.-
-;0*6- dot toe xair.: or Naxisa: is tar natr. nog- a
German-, tnev ais-o aamansaate- toot toe voutxi o-
irro-tone fTinocrat:: not?ans are aio miectE
noasuv joaouxr.
f" ^^ maianr c ta< :_;ar.t opnrenanaec
were (sen-oners mar.- o: wnarr. anas irair aohz
=itoes. moEt ot wnor. mdmatej: tne: tnev jaaitv
xnsvi- iittie aoou: Adoi
c- tne tat- c* tn- Jewi
tr.ev learned at scnoo.
Hine: Tnir-_ Rei^i
n. tneir nana
waa'
E THING! ID COMf
And. wnat toey iearnea c: scnoo. a faMBOa c:
leas: was precioui htUt Tnu^ emergi;: aet-
Ma.- occurrences ^-d the aecisio! ootr. nere anc
aoroad tor a reevaiuotion o: ou: teachinc vz-zznmm*
wttn rnect u Nazism anc the renewed cetermma
Man Dv itonr-. tne: toey tne sacred Six Miliio:. snal
nc: r>e toraottei-
But Nazi nhiinopn% Germar. styie we- no: tne
on- lane: niaauma tne American jewis: community
annng toe outaoinc Henrev.- Year A bflBH :;awr
variant m tne iuuii o: Georae iuncoir. Rocrwtl. ap-
fMB*d ox. the scene o: the nation capital to
naxanqne Wasninato:.. D.C. crowds or. tne MaL rrnp
to aavocaie tne wnoiesaie aaxsinc of U^ jewr\-.
Wnat anould nave round a unitec America;, je*
cornniunrr. touna c dmaed one instecc Tnere
tnone erno called Hocirweli c penn\ Hnia/r'
on- lmiNd he nhould oe ignored Tnexe were otoers
wao iiuaa a loud rninucr. cr\- to preven: ius noldtnc
raiiies m New \ aric City. and woo squeicaee nis a-
iKHmjum as tnmaiMK rumm
Amtricat: immm -mm* 4*,uied on the,
o: Ruccwel. tnev mmi aiatBei fa__i.. a
prouc tohowuic the -n-nmriin o wa-
tmec oue o: the MM .nd or taxaagJ
s.o: :ae year- the nwpfiL or Km, Pulekir^
Ettmnax. Ane: 1^ yean, oi *xiich tne ^uuanie: o: an milhnu Jmm ffi EuK-il^r
itol- Mae! by the eecunry nohce o- tsrae'
Lcnmon:. newer nv,U q^ c s
aemovin c sme anow^pTLW
justioe
Argentine anger where he was ktdaan-a
- pMd ana toroec a niptuie m asaJT
^oetweenthete^aateaM. Apprenensrw^
tnem of MraeU snemkr acaor.
wwi openly orieocolml Eicmnanaxt
AdaniaBJ irae. retueed and emsroer; Ticta
tohowmc as Seamry Vtumi V rote u. netW
iai* las junt Eirtrman owottB tna: u. israe -
mav very well 1 i r ni i an .mwilrmc nntar I
Hm orocemt ot le-ieachiiia the wadd anou fiaaa-
-xfc tc wnicr: ao manv eaocator: one
men: ieadezE m Aieenoa and Gennan-
tnemBeiwcE u the iwHTpiaiiiij Hebrew Year 572;,
mi *fWAKD of vmumm urn
Aiec aunnc 572C israel Pane Minmr ie>
Gurioi. came to the United Tit anil mi m New Y
wit: Wee- Germar ChaaaaUar Xanrac AaaoaK
spoxe onefjv witr. ^ 1 Thiiil...... ej the Wim
Houee and dined at the haaw of Vice PnOas
Nixox. What emeraec soon these oanwenanaaea
pemapK iees debuuiwe mar wca* ami
on: o: his iiheeqeeijt talks with Tibc
Premier "nimii. be Gauue h Pant
One thmn ib ''tin DacasBiOD thet
was of the ijumiui) teneaans m the Mo-
die Easi*eaene* braeght to tever ma
at tne cioee at the Tieiaiii Year eat h
Pmne Minster ItenL. Coula mew ixh
crrwf oeex. rruittu!" in the lace of Ko>
eer t ratrtmintiq vxaaataane c tr? Iirra:
NaaaaB Charter and ieliiii 11 mi av
nens witr lexuec tr toe Sue? Can
and Prexiaent Eaenhowe: 1 rv- unhee:
ec vow that th? cane. wrr__ r1-- cper. z
lsrasi: snronmc. no? werv
wari "" this wet: Now:
loined the othei il^i^*- zr. c masc tak
'Jailed NaOoos in New '
luce tnrothcBTv ne em welrcm^
liuaen*who pramr
*c Aaxb *tp"Mr I
Oh Tiff CtfJSTH?
1 SWB
--M falw i-waaaaa......\ |ei
d toal; tea tne roue we [
-xte^coaah> aaxe wmeb cs
'tii 1 nd natfcme! atieneo.. wi edbx-
d coiamns trarr. the oarre. c
*^w.-. Floridaan an bob ajaen
wnoteeate ttauughi.ii
Miami eaeid aaak- faoc
to fewixr .Tjiiniaiay
need* (To: acfaccy* lafja aee Sec. fi
ax I Greater Miami fewa: -eaerotict.
afto: 22 yea's u. exdescee as Dade )aw-
1 centra! tarasWatabxc one coeunanrty
otaan tv. ozgaabcabac.. >un.
mace vi

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reTxvrt *howmci an anno a ioc '*
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rriuntn- reodpaeaes& Foj hi b01
unchine et the H61 Coa**"*
em
Meaiie4iaa on the ooaVBtor. af **
"~ ^-r'.--. them*.!: caBaJ*"!
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b?r tv-rwe beer dotae or
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Special Rosh Hashona gift to school in Israel ... A Safer Torah.
jift from the Temple Youth Camp of the Bradford Hebrew Con-
egation, Bradford, Pa., to the Leo Baeck School in Haifa, is on
le way to Israel aboard the SS Zion of the Zim Lines to be used
the school's High Holiday observance. The Torah was
iced in the care of the ship's rabbi for the two-week voyage
Israel. Shown here in the Zion's synagogue on sailing day
re (left to right) Joseph Rubin, representing the Bradford He-
rew Congregation; Miss Louise Danny, the Temple Youth,
rho donated the gift; Erwin Frankel, member of the congre-
gation who will present the Torah to tne Leo Baeck School;
Rabbi Yaacov Levy, of the SS Zion; Rabbi Allen Levine, of the
rodford Hebrew Congregation; and Raboi Joseph Goldman,
assistant director of the National Federaticn of Temple Youth.
New Programs
m Southwest Y"
New programs are being institut-
ed along with the old as the South
^st YMHA, 7215 Coral Way, pre-
ss to begin its new program
ir oc Monday.
A full course of instruction in
udo beginning with the third
grade, for boys and girls, will com-
mence on Monday. The course will
Jso be held for junior and senior
kigh divisions, for boys and girls,
K evening a week, the date to be
Renounced in the near future.
In addition to activities for chil-
en, an adult sculpting class is be-
planned at the "Y." Classes will
held on Tuesday evening.
[The Southwest "Y," as a branch
the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, also sponsors a Sen-
|r Citizens Club. The club will
ive its first open house and birth-
party on Wednesday afternoon
Dm 2 to 4:30 p.m.
Miamian featured Speaker
Henry Gherman, of 1761 NW
10th ct., No. Miami, was honored
as featured speaker of the General
Agency School of the John Han-
cock Mutual Life Insurance Com-
pany in Boston last week. Associ-
ated with John Hancock since Nov.,
1968, Gherman is a member ef the
Hans O. Clawson General Agency
in Miami.
loly Days Will
le Observed
High Holiday services will be
Bonducted by Rabbi Joseph H. Mar-
holies at Mt. Sinai Hospital Friday,
|:30 p.m., acording to an announce-
ncnt by hospital executive direc-
or Samuel Gertner.
Patients who wish to attend and
Fare given permission by their phy-
jsirians, will he p^isted bv the
[nursing staff in the second floor
conference room. Nursing staff
| members will be in attendance dur-
ing services.
Services have been arranged by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the Rabbinical Assn. of Great-
er Miami, and the hospital.
Rabbi Margolies is hospital
chaplain.
10NG DISTANCE
Miami Awards
Major Winners
E. Albert Pallot, civic leader
and chairman of the City of Mi
ami beautification committee,
awarded prizes last week to 14 ma-
jor winners in the "Make Miami
Beautiful" contest.
Pallot singled out Helen Alpert
for a special plaque in honor of
her leadership as contest chairman.
Miss Alpert is vice chairman of
First Retirement Foundation.
The public dinner in the Biscayne
Terrace hotel was attended by Mi-
ami City Manager Melvin Reese,
Mayor Robert King High, City
Commissioners George DuBreuil
and Henry L. Balaban, and Metro
Commissioner Joseph Boyd.
Also present was a large group
from the Women's Division, Mi-
ami-Dade Chamber of Commerce.
MOVING
to all points in the country
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
ACE It.B. VAN
LI.XFS. INC.
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
For Information Call MR. ROSS
ME 5-444* MIAMI
tZSTL
J2*>t
;\3GUST BROS R>7
_
Club Formed at
Temple Zamora
Newly formed Young Married
Couples Club of Temple Zamora
met last week to plan future activ-
ities.
Elected officers of the club were
president. Dr. Edward Tescher;
vice president, Calvin Sokol; sec-
retary, Carol Lechowitz; treasurer,
Myron Abramowitz; historian,
Marion Silverman; program chair-
man, Joy Abramowitz; publicity
chairman, Yaffa Tescher.
The club will meet twice a month
for business and cultural functions,
and will have one social event each
month. A member-bring-a-member
party has been planned for Octo-
ber. .
The club will stress social, cul-
tural and community service activ-
ities.
RETIREMENT LIVING
In An Oceanfront Hotel
on MIAMI BEACH
$14A per month, per person
l/.U 4bl. tt., yorly hmth
INCIUD'N 3 Will BALANCED
MEALS OAILY 50 ef 130 R.em
Private Pool Ocean B-ach
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Phone JE 1-6691
W0FF0RD BEACH HOTEL
On the Ocean at 24th Street
MIAMI KACH
Israel Fails to Nip Ceylon 'Break'
has failed to persuade Ceylon to
change its decision to cancel the
accreditation of Ceylon's non-resi-
dent Minister in Israel and that
decision stands, it w a s reported
this week.
Mrs. Bandaranaike, Ceylon's Pre-
mier, said recently she planned to
reconsider the accreditation in an
effort to improve Ceylonese relat-
ions with the Arab states. Daniel
Levin, who is both Ambassador to
Japan and Minister to Ceylon for
Israel, flew from Tokyo to Colombo
for a meeting this week with Mrs.
Bandaranaike.
The Premier, while reiterating to
the Israeli envoy Ceylon's desire
for continued friendly relations
with Israel, declined to change
her position on the accreditation
decision. Consequently, when the
present Ceylonese envoy to Italy,
who has been accredited as Minos-
ter to Israel, returns to Ceylon,
the new Ceylonese envoy to Italy
will not be accredited to Israel.
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RESOURCES EXCEED 1SS MILLION DOLLARS




Friday. September 23. 1960
-Jmidhfhrkiian
Page 7-A
Meir Leads Israel Delegation at UN
Esther M. Tyson (left) registers Randy and Meryl Weiss at Tem-
ple Ner Tamid nursery school in a scene duplicated in the
synagcgues and temples throughout Greater Miami last week
a the youngsters' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Weiss, look on.
'Changing Values' to Spark Panel Talk
At Annual Board Meeting of BBYO
"Changing Values of Youth and,
Adults in Society" will be the theme
of a panel discussion at the annual
meeting of the board of directors
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion Sunday at the Dupont Plaza
hotel, it was announced by Mrs.
Alfred Reich, chairman of the
planning committee.
Installation of new board office-
ers by Judge Milton A. Friedman,
president elect of District S Grand
Lodge. B'nai B'rith. will take place
at the luncheon following the panel J
discussion.
Panelists for the occasion in-
clude Rabbi William Sajowitz,
director of the Southeastern
region of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, who will
evaluate the them* as it relates
to Jewish youth.
Mrs. Nathan Perlmutter, a for-
mer instructor in the sociology de-
partment of the University of Mi-
ami, will trace patterns of cultural
change which affect human behav-
ior and values.
Maxwell Fassler, acting execu-
tive director of Jewish Family and
children's Service, will review pat-1
terns of change in family life and
child development which relate to
the theme of the meeting.
A member of the professional
staff of the Dade County Metropol-
itan Juvenile and Domestic Rela-
tions court will also be present to
discuss the topic in relation to
youngsters who come into contact
with the courts.
The luncheon meeting will in-
clude a presentation to Jack Fink,
outgoing president of the BBYO
board.
Officers to be installed include
Eli Hurwiti, president; Mrs. Ed-
ward Sabra, vies president; Mrs.
Bar nice Bobkoff, secretary; and
Ainsley Ferdie, treasurer. Fink
will act as counsellor.
B'nai B'rith Women; Samuel Nie-
ber, president, Florida State Fed-
eration, B'nai B'rith Lodges; David
Sachs, chairman, Florida State
B'nai B'rith Youth Committee;
Mrs. Norman Reinhard, past BBYO
chairman. District 5, B'nai B'rith
Women; Mrs. Harvey Herman, Mrs.
Murray Lazarus, and Jerome
Greene, past president. Florida
State Federation B'nai B'rith
Lodges.
The Greater Miami BBYO serves
almost 1.000 Jewish teen-agers in
28 chapters in Dade county.
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Mrs. Golda Meir Israel's Foreign
Minister, led Israel's delegation to
the United Nations for the General
Assembly which opened this week.
It was the largest delegation Is-
rael has sent to the General As-
sembly. It included six members of
the Israel Parliament.
Israel was planning to reiterate
at the General Assembly its sug-
gestion that the first stage of
world disarmament should be im-
plemented in Israel and the neigh-
boring countries, under foolproof
control. The Israeli delegates were
scheduled to express this idea dur-
ing the general debate and in the
debate on disarmament.
Israel speakers will .also reit-
erate Israel's willingness to ne-
gotiate with the Arabs but, it
was believed unlikely that Israel
would renew its proposal to nego-
tiate on specific problems such
as the Arab refuge* ques-
tion, separately and before gen-
eral Israel-Arab peace talks. The
present Israel position was re-
ported to be that if the Arabs
f ready te sit down to a peace
parley, Israel is willing te ne-
gotiate all outstanding problems.
The Israeli delegation was also
planning a close watch on moves
which President Nasser of the
United Arab Republic will make
both at the United Nations and
outside of it during his first visit
to a Western country.
Israel will be especially inter-
ested in how Nasser will explain
away the revolt of his military units
against ther_United Nations com-
mand in the Congo, and his ignor-
ing the UN Security Council's de-
cision to keep the Suez Canal open
to all nations.
The opinion of political experts
in Jerusalem was that, if Nasser
gets away without any rebuke by
the United Nations for the revolt
which his units staged against the
UN command in the Congo, he may
be prompted to indulge in making
further moves against the United
Nations. Some of these moves may
even affect the UN forces in Gaza
and in Sinai.
The Jerusalem observers noted
that Nasser's Congo action was
an important lesson for Israel
in the Middle East: If Nasser can
flaunt the United Nations Com-
mand in the Congo, there is even
! less reason than ever to believe
j he would consider United Nations
| units along his borders as an
| obstacle against aggression to-
wards Israel, should political and
j military deterrents particular-
j ty Israel's own strength seem
te him unconvincing.
The Israeli delegation, in ad-
dition to Mrs. Meir, includes Arieh
Levavi, assistant director-general
of the Foreign Ministry; Simcha
Pratt, director of the Foreign Min-
istry's International Organization
Division; Shabtai Rosenne the For-1
eign Ministry's legal adviser; and
Ambassador Eliahu Sasson, envoy
to Italy.
The delegation also includes
Michael S. Comay, permanent rep-
resentative at the United Nations;
Ambassador Arieh Eshel, deputy
permanent representative; Bmya-
min Eliav, Minister Plenipotentiary
and Consul General in New York;
; Arieh Eilan and Miss Hava Hareli,
members of the permanent mission
to the UN, and Nathan Bar-Yaacov,
labor attache at the Washington
Embassy.
No restrictions on President Nas-
ser's movements in the United
States during his visit to the
United Nations have been formu-
lated, Secretary of State Herter
meanwhile declared at his press
I conference in Washington this
week. He said the question of in-
viting Nasser to Washington was
one for President Eisenhower te
decide. He added that so far no
formal invitation has been issued
by the White House.
Meanwhile, Henry Cabot Lodge,
former United States Ambassador
to the United Nations and now a
I Vice Presidential candidate, an-
nounced in Erie. Pa., that he
| thought it would be a good thing
for Nasser to tour the U.S. while
he is in this country.
Rabbi Lehrman on Television
"Still Small Voice," television
program sponsored weekly by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn.,
will feature Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
of Temple Emanu-El, on Sunday,
10 a.m., over WCKT ch. 7. Rabbi
Lehrman will discuss "Glory of
Yom Kippur."
Members of the BBYO executive
committee are Judge Friedman;
Mrs. Gerald Soltz, president, Dis-
trict 5 B'nai B'rith Women; Mrs.
Reich, vice president, District 5
North County V
In New Program
A new veigsjtter program has
been started te enable the expan-
sion of the Senior Citizens Division
of the North County YMHA Branch
of the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, 14036 NE 6th ave.
Mrs. Fred Browne, chairman of
the senior citizens committee, an-
nounced that increased activities
will now be offered to this rapidly
growing segment of the program
during the coming year. The pro-
gram, the first of its kind in this
branch, will select, train and super-
vise volunteers who will in turn
lead special afternoon activities at
the "Y."
People with stalls in arts and
crafts, dancing, choral work. Eng-
lish and public speaking, discussion
groups, photography, music appre-
ciation, and card-playing are wel-
Icome to participate in the pro-
gram.
tf'l60 P lofillatd Co.
Give me your tired, your poor...
Emma Lazarus was a well-brought-up,
sheltered young lady who had been educated
by private tutors.
Only the world of letters touched her.
While still a young woman she had estab-
lished herself as a poetess of great promise.
She moved in the society of intellectuals.
Ralph Waldo Emerson was a guide and
But the limited world of Emma Laearua
was to change abruptly one day in 1881. A
friend took her to visit Ward's Island in
New York Harbor where refugees from the
Polish and Russian pogroms, ragged, be-
wildered, and friendless, were landing.
From that day forward Emma Lazarus
mdifferent woman. She became a fighter
against discrimination and persecution.
Wherever there was an audience that would
listen to her or a paper that would publish
her, Emma Lazarus spoke out against the
heartless persecution of people everywhere.
It was on the occasion of a fund-raising
for a pedestal for the new Statue of Liberty
that she wrote the words that still ring out
as dearly today as a call from a shofar.
"Giw me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send thee*, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
i
First with the Finest Cigarette*
through Lorillerd roe seven


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Friday, September 23, 1960
*'Jewishfhridton
Page 9-A
'

Greater Miami's Jewish National Fund
By RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
President, JNF Council of Gr..tr Miami
AS 57#) (1959-1960) draws to a close, the Jewish
^ Natioral Fund Council of Greater Miami proud-
ly reports that the past year has been a banner year
due to its magnificent effort on behalf of Jewish
National Fund.
Because of the new partnership between the
Jewish National Fund and the Government of Is-
rael as ehtablished in the Land Authority Act, pass-
ed by Isiael's Knesset, by which Jewish National
Fund has been made the sole custodian of all land
reclamaticn and afforestation projects in Israel,
JNF now holds a more prominent position than
ever befoie in the future development of Israel,
and it calJs upon all its affiliated and devoted
friends tc rededicate themselves to the holy task
of "Kibush Ha Shmama" the Conquest of the
Desert.
The year 1959 1960 catapulted the Jewish Na-
tional Fund in Greater Miami to higher promi-
nence and accomplishment than in past years. Re-
sponsible lor these great strides are the dedicated
officers, executive board members, and the host of
tireless JNF workers who have made this possible.
The annual JNF banquet held on Nov. 19, 1959,
sparked the year's activities and was a tremendous
success, despite the deluge which flooded Greater
Miami that evening.
Of ever-increasing importance in the activities
of the JNF Council of Greater Miami are the tra-
ditional lag Days. The success of this project has
been due primarily to the outstanding organization-
al ability and devotion of Mrs. Jacob (Beulah) Da-
vis and her corps of untiring JNF devotees.
Awards fcr Tag Day effort and achievement were
presented at the annual JNF Special Award Night
in May to Mrs. Louis Marcus, Mrs. Wolfe Shklair
and Mrs. Davis, who was Tag Day chairman.
Youth and the JNF
Of special importance was the establishment
of the JNF Annual Youth Festival, sponsored by
Jewish National Fund in conjunction with the Bu-
reau of Jewish Education of Greater Miami, under
the direction of Louis Schwartzmann, Bureau di-
rector, and Zvi Berger, assistant director. This
yearly conclave of Jewish boys and girls in our
community, who gather under the banner of the
pioneering spirit which transformed the dream of
a State of Israel into a reality, will assure a better-
informed and educated Jewish generation, who will
be devoted to their heritage, their people and the
land of Israel. Outstanding event at the Youth Fest-
ival wa.v the presentation of the Degel Yerushala-
yim to those religious schools that had achieved
most for JNF during the JNF annual Tu B'Shevat
tree campaign. Students of Knesseth Israel Congre-
gation, Temple Emanu-EI and Beth David Congre-
gation were singled out for this honor. Awards were
also presented to the religious schools of Monticello
Park Congregation (now Beth Torah), Temple Ju-
dea, and Temple Zion.
A unique Jewish National Fund event sponsored
for the first time in our community was the inaug-
ural Foundation banquet for Jewish National Fund
on Apr. 21 in the Fontainebleau hotel. Dr. Irving
Lehrman, chairman of JNF Foundation in Greater
Miami, gave a glowing report of Foundation
achievements during the past year,
An Eternal Link
A most impressive and moving candle-lighting
ceremony, symbolizing the establishment of "The
Eternal Link'- with the holy soil of Israel, was perl
formed by Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz and Cantor
Edward Klein, of Temple Menorah, in which the
following honorecs whose generosity had establish-
ed such JNF Foundation projects during the pax
year, participated:
Ellie Berenson, Mr. and Mrs. Johan L. Ber-
man, Mrs. Sadie Bieler, Sol Bronstein, Mr. and
Mrs. Hyman Eisenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer
Greenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Max Hecht, Mrs. Rose
Hurevitz, Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Lefkoff, Kolman
Luria, Mrs. Leah Notkin, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Oritt, Mrs. Dora Rosenberg Cantor, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Schwartz, and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Strouch.
Because of their outstanding and generous
gift, Mr. and Mrs. Max Hecht had the privilege of
dedicating a 1.500-dunam Nachlah, a Living JNF
project, in Israel during their recent visit to the
young state.
Leaders of the Jewish National Fund in our
community are now busy formulating plans for
the forthcoming annual JNF banquet to be held
on Dec. 4 at the Fontainebleau hotel.
Planning for inaugural banquet of the Jew-
ish National Fund Foundation during the
outgoing Hebrew Year 5720. Left to right
are Rabbis Leon Kronish. Beth Sholom; Al-
fred Waxman, Temple Zion; and Mayer
Abramowitz, Temple Menorah. Not shown:
Dr. Irving Lehrman, of Temple Emanu-EI,
chairman of the JNF Foundation.
not. SOL UP1VM
Prof. Liptzin Will
Head AJC Body
By Special Report
NEW YORK Pror. Sol Liptzin,
of City College, has been appointed
chairman of the newly reestablish-
ed Commission on Jewish Affairs
of the American Jewish Congress,
it was announced here by Dr. Jo-
achim Prinz, president.
One of the country's reading Jew-
ish educators and authors, Dr. Lipt-
zin will formulate a series of Jew-
ish cultural and educational activi-
ties aimed at studying the chang-
ing developments in American Jew-
ish life and strengthening an under-
standing of and indentification with
Judaism and its values, according
to the announcement.
Dr. Liptzin has been a member
of the faculty at City College since
11923, and for 15 years served as
chairman of its Department of Ger-
1 man and Yiddish literature.
A former president of the Jew-
lish Book Council of America, he
serves as president of the Col-
lege Yiddish Assn.. and secretary
of the academic council of the Yid-
dish Scientific Institute.
CBeauyille
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Pc?e 10-A
Friday.
23. I960
I-
Gerstein Cited
For Big Role
In Anti-Smut
1* recognition of the efforts be-
made b> Siate Attorney Ri-h-
F. Gerstein in the eiiforcessent
of aw* dea.-Ag with the distribu-
f obscene literature, the North
e Optimut Club of Miami
Bt-'ch awarded Gerstein a testi-
monial plaque Monday at a dinner
the Bel Aire hotel.
Tie award was in line with the
0 must International anti smut
OB paign to combat juvenile de-
jenc>
Participaunc in the presentation
of he award were Manny Gold-
h. governor of Optimist Dis-
4 and Robert L Jackson, pres-
- of North Shore Optimist C.jb
of iiami Beach.
.ackson potee out that ob-
scane literature is a ftve-4*vndred
mubon doUr business in the
U'.tee States and that porno-
grtptwc material is betne unlaw-
ful > distracted to one out of
oery 35 chaldron.
1' accepting the plaque. Ger
stein emphasised that his office is
n* the cooperation of public
a other law enforcement agen-
CSf as well as distributors of mag-
az. *-s and periodicals, who are be-
-ncouraged to police then* own
tie. prior to legal action.
I endorsing the efforts of the
Attorneys office. Charles M
Gn-rnherg. Miami attorney, chair
of the Optimist anti-smut com-
mifee, urged that citizen- recog-
the need for adequate law en-
i -men! in this field
let's Be
Realistic___
Jeara't ne web time a* tee ***"
leae terwee cfceea). Me -...' a*
f he *eaa* m* the "tiprti' cae
Services Slated At Mt. Nebo
Special community memorial
services will be conducted by Rabbi
h-Ttng Lehrir.a.i. of Temple Emanu
O. at Mount Nebo Cemetery on
Sunday. Sept 25. at 11 a.m.
The service is in conjunction
with the annual tradition of visita-
tion by family and friends on the
Sunday between Rosh Hashona and
Yom Kippur
At 11:45 a.m.. Rabb: Lehrman is
scheduled to conduct services for
members of Temple Emanu-EI.
who will be making memorial
visits at the cemetery'.
Rabbi Moms Skop. spiritual lead-
er of Temple Judea. will conduct
similar service* for members and \
friends of his congregation at 3 30
p.m.
Moont Nebo Cemetery is at 5505
\W 3rd St.. Miami.
Tempi* ImUm Sisfrhd
Suterbod of Temple Judea will
hold its first meeting of the new
1960-61 season on Wednesday eve-
ning at the Temple. Cantor Her-
man Gottlieb will open the meeting
with a community sing. Mrs. Morris
A Skop. who recently returned
with Rabbi Skop from a trip abroad,
will talk on "A Tour of Europe
from a Woman's View."
Mrs. Jennie Grosannger second from left, philanthropist and
hotel owner, becomes the first national patroness of Phi Sigma
Sxpna. national college sorority, at a special installation cere-
mony held recently at the sorority's chapter house at the Uni-
versity of Maryland. Mrs. Grossmger is flanked by Mrs. Vic-
tor Honor left, national tribune, of Coral Gables. Mrs. Albert
Bioom. national president of Philadelphia, and Mrs. Joseph
Klein, member of the national expansion committee, of Coral
Gables 'righti. In presenting Mrs. Grossinger with a citation.
Mrs. Bloom announced that through the Phi Sigma Sigma
Scholarship Foundation, a scholarship will be presented in her
honor.
Emanu-EI Will
Honor Rose
Joseph M Rose, local community
leader and outgoing Miami Beach
chairman for the State of Israel
Bond drive, will be honored at a
dinner tribute by the congregation
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nt Temple Emanu El. of which be
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tee aMb| W. at Caaanalieh* I
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tt-i eef chefi araaan +m plaai*
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CMMfM Im hat leaf hem rfce
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wany **s*f sssMsffasf **r%
l- w, ki*>e aVieh*. aea)
r*- \i.< r cci SSSSSSSWa let yew, aVotlar
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Com cljly tmr leech mm* %mrt'*mm eie-
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li. Hi aee HarieVaai ahea. a Oaaief
etth>hhanat a*eed te aeea. Caaeiie
he' lea n lecatae eea Week Nerte ml
a* Greva Wayhawaa Thaatra.
t\S 1 uc 3'Mnr ft*
& tfC mm
C iNIONISI ^ cooai*.'. ^O* r i .
7t OUST BROS RVr
*V I a 1. A 1 V f '
IS f hr flf ST
i> a member.
The event k scheduled for Sun-
day evening. Oct. 9. in the Fon-
taine room of the Fontainebleau
hotel.
Harry Golden, famed editor
and I/Wisher ef the Carolina Is-
raelite and author of "Only in
America." "For 2c Plain," end
"Enjoy. En,oy. will be flwest
speaker.
The gentle North Carolina journ-
alist has been in the national spot-
light (or several years now as a
whimsical writer and speaker on
almost every subject known.
Rose is being honored for his out
standing service to the community,
the State of Israel Bonds. He has
been an ardent bond drive worker
and contributor, and served as
city-wide chairman in 1953 54.
He is honorary Irfe president
of Hie Temple Emanu-EI, which
was constructed during his pros-
idency in 1948-49. He is on the
board of trustees of Mt. Sinai
Hospital, and a member of the
hospital'* building committee.
Rose is also a trustee and mem-
ber of the board of governors of
the Greater Miami Jewon Federa-
tion He was the first co-chairman
of the Miami Beach division of the
THerttk Jacob Snlerhcod
Mrs. Josephine Hammel. presi-
dent of Temple Tifereth Jacob Sis-
terhood. aosxmacoa a regular
s>: monthly meeting of the Sisterhood
for next Wednesday evening at the
Temple. 861 Flamingo Way.
ROMWELL
ABE
GEFTETS
KM KSSHEI
HOTEL aaeoerrse
tjai
8 M8AIS INCL
PwOev
Pmt Pmrx.
Diiae Occ
S>oi Oca St*. Hienar
M oi '35 Rm* Euroa Plan
a Omar Rat** *..(
Otitn, Law*Sanr Oa'V
Sae k Sviear frm ot>
t*a Eiira CKeraa tar
Arx) AK Thfl r-
C i La* S w*'t
31- TV t *M4
Eaci eoam
Fro* S*lf-P*rk.ne
Ae-ofen no**!
Wn*r Maasr*
Mavia* Cam**
Enl*rt*ln NlaMly
*"^or Omar Ftaf.
a
iMitlraat at IM II.
Sir laatitmiaa lat.
M. SataS S Hal
a. nt.
Federation more than 20 years
ago.
Chairman for the dinner are
Charles Fruchtman aim Jack Po-
pick Judge Irving Cypen will serve
as toastmaster. An attendance of
600 is anticipated.
Hippr Mew Year to All Omr friends t Customers
HARFENIST RESTAURANT
STRICTLY -ffl MEAT MEALS
Will Be Served Reservations Taken Now
WE WILL BE OPEN FOR THE HOLIDAYS
13S1 Washington Are., Miami Beach JE 8 2058
,L, ^T-j. m^er 2 OPN EVERYDAY o /jw r '- '
170 N.B. 5^SI f ta.m 1*1*pm f fit FR 9-7996
VOLUNTEER
FOR A DEMOCRATIC VICTORY THE HELP
OF EVERY MAN AND WOMAN COUNTS!
Volunteers are needed to work in the office,- to aid
new registrants; to call on important citizens. The
Committee office is open daily from 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.;
1242 Coral Way at Five Points.
OFFER YOUR HELP PHONE FR 7-4011
KENNEDY
JOHNSON
Voter Registration Committee
REGISTER TODAY TO VOTE!
NOW!
M Pl. A*v.


Friday. September 23, 1960
+Jmlsti Fkridlari
Page 11-A
State Dep 't Eyes Ouster of Envoy
HowyiMonere at the Arcrwak hotel in Jamaica, W.I., (top to
bottean) are Mr. and Mrs. Allan Goldman, 1630 SW 13th ave
sVZL**1*- Edward I*vinson, 6930 Rue Versailles, and Mr'
**VPovki Rnb. 826 13th ave. They are seen on the
Btepsletrdmg to the diving board of the swimming pool at the
AxcrwtA. Mrs. Goldman is the fanner Frances Lazarus of Mi-
arm. Mrs. Rubin is the former Jndy Wagtnnn, of Miami'. Mrs
Levmson is the fanner Tobie Mills, of Miami Beach.
Memorial Due For Departed
"Honoring Our Beloved Depart-
ed" will be the theme of the an-
nual community memorial services
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Assn. at Mt. Si-
nai Memorial Park Cemetery and
the Jewish section of Woodlawn
Park Cemetery.
Services will be Sunday, Sept.
25. 11 a.m., at Woodlawn Park.
Services at Mt. Sinai are scheduled
the same day for 2 p.m.
Hyman P. Galbut, president of
the association, said that "the
services have been timed so that
they foil on the Sunday between
Rot* Hsshone and Ye*n Kippur.
Officiating will be Rabbis Tiber
Stern, Beth Jacob; Solomon Schiff,
Beth El; and David Lehrfield,
Ksessetfc Israel. Cantor William
Lipson, of Beth David, and Cantor
Maurice Mamches, Beth Jacob,
will chant the liturgy.
Chairs and tents will be set up
at both cemeteries, and prayer
books will be distributed. Mt. Si-
nai Cemetery is at 1125 NW 137th
st., Miami. Woodlawn is at 3260
SW 8th st., Miami.
WASHINGTON.,- (JTA) Jitate
Department sources said this week
that a formal request from a mem-
ber of Congress to Secretary of
State Herter to consider ousting
Ambassador Mostafa Kamel of the
United Arab Republic for injecting
an anti-Jewish issue and other in-
volvement in the United States
election campaign would be given
"appropriate .study and considera-
tion."
The Department has requested
the full text of the ambassador's
speech which was delivered at a!
convention of Arab students in this!
country. The demand to oust the'
Arab envoy came from Rep. Sey-1
mour Halpern New York Republi-
can. Citing the ambassador's at-
tack on The Jewish minority" and
the candidates, Rep. Halpern said:
"There has been enough difficulty
with native bigots injecting religi-:
ous issues into the current election
without the ambassador of the UAR
entering the fray."
Dr. Kamel, in hit address to
Arab students in this country at
their recent convention, said it
was their "duty to enter election
activity here to propagandize
against Israel and the American
Jewish community. Rep. Halpern
asked Wr. Herter H the ambas-
sador was to be permitted to
instruct Arab nationals in this
country on temporary student
visas to become "anti religious
agitater* as well as political cam-
paign workers in our internal
tec view.
Rep. Halpern also asked the Sec-
retary to investigate possible cases
of visa abuse by Arab students as
a result of the ambassador's politi-
cal inductions to them. Halpern
said the Arab ambassador "openly
defamed a section of the American
public, our citizens of Jewish faith"
as well as injecting himself directly
into domestic American political
affairs involving (he peertiea taken
on the Middle East issue by vari-
ous candidates. He termed the am-
bassador's activity "an apparent
breach of protocol."'
SEABOARD RAILROAD
is Pleased to Announce
Restoration of Normal
DOUBLE DAILY STREAMLINER
SERVICE TO AND FROM
NEW YORK
9 CONVENIENT DEPARTURES
* MORNING AND AFTERNOON
THE SILVER
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EASTERN STANDARD TIME
THE SILVER
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SILVER FLEET FEATURES:
Reclining Coach seats reserved in advance; private
room Pullmans,- attractive lounge accommodations
for all passengers; excellent dining car meals at rea-
sonable prices; "Hospitality Hour"; REGISTERED
NURSE, Passenger Service Agent.
Far further information on through or local service. Coach
and Pullman accommodations, pleat* phone FRanklin
1-6611 or call in person: 173 E. Flagler St., 2206 NW.
7th Ave, Miami; 1S53 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach;
1240 S.I. Eleventh Ave., Hialeah; West Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood. W. J. FICHT. G.P.A.
SEABOARD RAILROAD
THE ROUTE OF COURTEOUS SERVICE
Students Conduct
Holiday Services
Mare than 600 students, from tots
j to teens all participating in the
| High Holiday services at Beth
"Porah Congregation this week.
The Alef Congregation for boys
and gh-ls, from 5 to 8, under the
direction of Miss Sondra Levy and
Miss Elaine Edelm'an, begin their
worship at 10 a.m.
Student Congregation lead by
Abraham J. Gittclson, educational
director, is holding concurrent serv-
ices in the school's Youth Syna-
gogue. Teenagers are praying to-
gether in the former synagogue
building, directed by Hy Novinson.
Students themselves are serving
as cantors and rabbis, with officers
of the Student Congregation assum-
ing leadership roles.
Taxpayers Name
New Chairman
Jacob C. Lefkowitz has been
named chairman of the legislative
committee of the Miami Beach Tax-
payers' Assoc.
President Simon E. Rubin, in
making the announcement, said
that the longtime chairman of the
committee, Seymour B. Liebman,
had resigned to move to Mexico.
Members of the committee are
Jack A. Abbott, John B. Denvir, jr..
Dr. I. William Lippman, Mitchell
Litvia, Robert Peterson, Donald S.
Rose.
Marcus O. Sarokin, B. Bayard
Strell, George J. Talianoff, Henry
Waitzkin, Pawl C. Wimbish, and
Raphael K. Yuncs.
Miamian Gets Top Award
Murray A. Best, of Prudential
Insurance Company, was awarded
the coveted C.L.U. designation at
national conferment exercises of
American College of Life Under-
writers in Washington, D.C., last
week.
Left to right are Eugene Beck, Florence Diffendorfer and Wel-
ter Lebowitz as they display a Proclamation by Mayor D. Lee
Powell designating Sept. 12 to 17 as Registration Week :.n
Miami Beach. Registration books are available at Miami
Beach City Hall during this period. Alter Sept. 17, it w411 be
necessary to register in person at 116 W. FTogler St.. Miami.
.^


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But don't miss out do it now!


Page 12-A
Friday.
23. I960
k
Your CIA Leaders: 1960-61
MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY
SAMUEL FRIEDLAND. No. I in Scries.
Samuel N. Friedland. na
tiooally known businessman
and philanthropist, will this
year again assume the top
post of Pacesetter's commit
tee chairman of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
In more than a dozen cam-
paigns, he has functioned at
the head of CJA's Paceset-
ters Division as advisor and
planner, infusing community
businessmen with much of
his own spirit and drive.
In 1951 Friedland. who is
chairman of the board of
Food Fair, set a brilliant ex-
ample of leadership as gen-
eral chairman of the C'JA
campaign. Those who worked
at his side recall his sense of
organization and admired his
knack of getting his asociates
to expend a greater effort
than they ever believed they
could muster.
Friedland has often demon-
strated that his real interest
i> in people. For example, he
takes pride in a little-known
function of the Food Fair
Stores Foundation, which
grants scholarships to more
than 300 outstanding young
men and women at leading
American universities.
And, because of his deep
affection for Israel and its
courageous people, he h a s
SAMUU ftltDlAMD
... special leeeVrsfcip
participated widely in phil-
anthropic endeavors aimed at
helping the new nation gain
a measure of stability. In ad-
dition, b i s business invest-
ments in Israel have provid-
ed strength and substantial
dollars to the national eco-
nomy.
Building a big hotel or a
new string of supermarkets
is a complex enterprise,
Friedland admits. An even
more rewarding personal ex-
perience, he says, is an in-
dividual's concern for h 1 s
fetfcnVman, and giving and
working to alleviate human
need.
Each time he returns from
Israel, he is more enthusi-
astic about the morale and
spirit of the people, "but they
still need our help," be says.
Locally, Friendland is
chairman of trustees and a
former vice president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, and has served with
distinction on Federation's
executive committee and
with the board of governors.
He has been president for
ten years of Temple Emanu-
El. is a trustee and founder
of Mt. Sinai Hospital, a board
member of Jewish Home for
the Aged, former chairman
of the Community Chest drive
in Miami Beach, member of
the University of Miami Citi-
zen's Board, and chairman
board of governors of the
Bonds for Israel drive.
He is national vice chair-
man of the Jewish Theologi
cal Seminary, and has played
a major role in the national
United Jewish Appeal. Two
years ago. he received the
coveted Brotherhood Award
of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews for in-
terfaith leadership in bis
community.
The Pacesetter's chairman
begins a new year by giving
his special brand of leader-
ship to CJA, our most vital
philanthropic effort.
Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Brooks, of 19600 NE 19th ave.. No. Miami
Beach, and their grandson, Mark Knobel, enjoy a Labor Day
weekend at the Singapore motel.
JWV Urges Herter to Abandon Support
Of UAR for Seat on Security Council
Fear Rise of US. Religious Parties
i
By Special Report
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress warned this week
that injecting the religious issue
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
treetor Miami's laraest A OMett
Sepplier for Svaoffoeoet,
Heorew t Sunaoy Schools.
Wholesale A Retail
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PARK
The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
90 Minutat from tha Besch Via
Tfca New 36th St. Causeway
JE 1-5369
into the Presidential election cam-
paign might give rise to the de-
velopment of religious political
parties in the United States.
In a statement, the Jewish group
cautioned that "if a candidate is
opposed by some voters because of
his religion, it is inevitable that he
will be supported by others for the
same reason." Such a development,
the statement continued, might
lead to the birth of political par-
ties based on religion, "threaten-
ing the unity of the American peo-
ple and the very foundation of
American democracy."
The statement was adopted by
the American Jewish Congrats'
Governing Council, the newly-
formed policy making body of
the Congress. Nathan L. Edel-
stain, et Philadelphia, chairman
of the Council, presided, with
Pawl Annas, of Chicago, as co-
chairman. Nearly 100 leaders
f the organisation from various
sections of the country attended.
The policy declaration asserted
that "the American tradition, as
well as our common religious heri-
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tage, teaches us that a man shall
be held accountable for what he
does and says, not for what others
who may be members of the same
family, religion or church do or
say.
"The concept of 'guilt by associ-
ation' is anathema to freedom, the
policy declaration said. "Those
who judge a man by his race, by
his religion or by any other basis
than his own acts and his own
qualities subvert the basic demo-
cratic belief in the sanctity of the
individual."
Noting that a religious test for
public office "disregards the Con-
stitution and violates the spirit of
equality that animates our coun-
try's great experiment in demo-
cratic government," the American
Jewish Congress statement said:
"Disqualifying a candidate on the
ground of his religion constitutes
, a charge that he cannot be trusted
to honor his oath of office. We be-
ilieve that those who, knowingly or
not, make such a charge do a seri-
ous di.vservice to the integrity of
political campaigns and to the pre-
sumption of good faith on the part
of political candidates."
"But only these should serve as
the basis for judging a candidate
not his religious beliefs or disbe-
liefs, or his church affiliation or
non-affiliation. Anything less de-
means the democratic process and
debases the ideals of justice and
equality which are our common
religious tradition."
By Special Report
WASHINGTON I. L. Feuer, of
Youngstown, O. national com-
mander of the Jewish War Veter-
ans of the U.S.A., Wednesday call-
ed upon Secretary of State Herter
to instruct America's representa-
tive at the United Nations not to
support the United Arab Republic
for election to the United Nations
Security Council.
In a letter to Secretary of State
Herter, Commander Feuer pointed
out that the Jewish War Veterans
of the U.S.A. protested "with a
sense of approaching outrage re-
ported plans by the State Depart-
ment to suport the election of the
United Arab Republic for the Unit-
ed Nations Security Council."
"This dictatorship," ho seM
"which has Mooted Socofiry
Council and United Nations As-
sembly decisions, among them
its refusal to implement the in-
ternational character of the Sues
Canal, the refusal to negotiate a
peace with its neighbor, Israel,
and its constant effort to keep a
state of tension in the Middle
East, certainly represents enough
evidence that this nation does not
have the responsible attitude
that is required for the Security
Council."
Commander Feuer pointed out
that "the support of such a nation
for the post would be a violation
of American tradition and princi-
ple. It would seem that we have
inot profited from the lessons of
the reverses ocasioned by our sup-
port of other dictatorships in the
I past."
"President Nasser of the United
Arab Republic is trying to influ-
ence the entire Middle Bast with
anti American propaganda, while
soliciting favors and good will. It
is offensive to any sense of justice
to support such a man and such a
government for a seat in the Secur-
ity Council which is charged with
the maintenance of world peace,"
he said.
Hospital Elects
Executive VP
Milton D. I)r< yfns, of 3415 Sher-
idan are., has been elected execu-
tive vice president of National
Children's Cardac Hospital.
Dreyfus has been actively identi-
; tied with the institution almost
from its founding.
Named to the board of governors
ln IMS. he was elected first vice
president in 1849. For ten years, he
was chairman of the hospital's com-
, mittee on chapters, and helped m-
' Tease the auxiliary chapters.
He serves currently as head of
the public relations and executive
leering committees.
National Children's Cardiac Hos-
pital is planning to build a much
larger hospital lccility in the new
Metropoliten Medical Center adja-
cent to Jackson Memorial Hospital,
i rhe proposed structure will cost
W.500,000.
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Friday. September 23. 1960
+Jewish nerkUati
Page 13-A
Mrs. Kramarsky Heads Hadassah;
Convention Adopts $9,875,000 Budget
By Special R*jx>rt
Hadassah, the
NEW YORK
Women'* Zionist
America
tional president to head
than 318,000 members
its
in
more
1,320
Kramarsky told the convention:
"It is one of Hadassah's greatest
Oritanieatwm fc4ribatr*- tffarWr!'f#nhe world
has elected a new na- : ... ____
in terms of successive generations
of a timeless people. When so many
chapters and groups throughout the have so lew roots in the past, we
United States and Puerto Rico.
Elected to head the largest Zion-
ist organization in the world was
Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, of New
York City, a national vice presi-
dent of Hadassah for the last four
years and a member of Hadassah's
national board since 1944. Mrs.
Kramarsky has Jieid the national
find anchorage in the eternal truths
of our Jewish tradition. Although
we, too, discard the outmoded, and
look for today's paths to tomorrow's
goals, we find our purpose and our
sense of direction in the vision be-
queathed to us by the ancient
Prophets of Israel.
"We realize that the historic
vice presidency of Hadassah for wonder of the re-establishment of
Israel as a modern, democratic
state, generates new problems,
demanding new action on the part
of the Jewish people. We are a
Zionist organization whose labors
and thoughts have been, are and
will continue to be concentrated on
realizing the Zionist dream of Is-,
The election wound up the four-irael reborn, and of a regenerated,
day 48th national convention of unified Jewish people, with Israel
Hadassah at the Waldorf Astoria j as its cultural and spiritual center, i
hotel, attended by more than 2,500 To reinforce the whole Jewish peo-
six one-year terms since 1948.
Mrs. Kramarsky succeeds Dr.
Miriam K. Freund, also of New
York City, who has held the na-
tional presidency of Hadassah for
the last lour consecutive one-year
terms.
delegates and guests. The conven-
tion also adopted a budget of $9,-
875,000 for its 1960-61 programs in
Israel and the United States and
a series of resolutions on the
pie with a unifying sense of a com-
mon past and a common destiny
requires hard thinking and hard
work. Hadassah is no stranger to
either. And our rewards are far
suspension of nuclear tests, and beyond what is given to most peo-
American technical assistance. The' pie."
convention approved a statement | Born in Hamburg. Germany, Mrs.
defining the responsibilities of the Kramarsky left her native country
?L'on,St..mv5inen.t !" ine J'*?1 l after a bitter encounter with anti-
Semitism in 1923, and settled in
Holland. In 1939, just before the
Nazis invaded the Netherlands, she
and her family went to Canada
and two years later settled in the
United States. Mrs. Kramarsky be-
came active in Hadassah immedi-
ately upon her arrival in New York
and has held such major portfolios
as national chairman of Hadassah's
the establishment of the State ol
Israel.
Of the $9,875,000 budgeted for
Hadassah activities. $8,440,000 was
earmarked for Hadassah's opera-
tions in Israel. The quotas set for
Hadassah's projects in Israel were
$3,740,000 for the Hadassah Medi-
cal Organization; $2,300,000 for
Youth Aliyah, international agency
Seek Volunteers
For Beach UF
Claude Pepper, Miami Beach
Member Affair Scheduled
Paid-up membership affair will
be sponsored by the Miami Wom-
en's United of United Cerebral Pal-
chairman of the United Fund's sv on Nov. 3. Mrs. Bess Schoen-
1961 campaign, Wednesday issued!berg, membership chairman, said
a call for volunteers to aid in malt- the affair is scheduled for the Ter-
ing thisyeai^s,aruA^^drive4a.suc-lraC9 r<)om b the BiscaynufTerrace
cessful one. [hotel.
"Last year, 17,185 residents of
for the relief and rehabilitation of Youth Aliyah committee, chairman-
homeless Jewish children in Is-|of Hadassah's management com-
rael; $1,000,000 for continued con-
struction of the $25 million Hadas-
sah Hebrew University Medical
Center, now being completed at
Kiryat Hadassah (Hadassah Town),
on the western outskirts of Jeru-
salem, Israel; $700,000 for the
Jewish National Fund; and $600,000
for Hadassah's vocational educa-
tion program in Israel.
mittee. national treasurer of Ha-
dassah, and chairman of Hadas-
sah's Wills and Bequests commit-
tee.
Mrs. Kramarsky was a delegate
to several World Zionist Congres-
ses, including the 1951 and 1956
congresses held in Jerusalem, In
July 1957 and May, 1959, she
participated in the Israel meetings
In her acceptance aldress, Mrs. of the Zionist General Council.
YOUR FUTURE IS HIS BUSINESS!
MM. S/cCft'fD KKAMAMSKf
Slave Laborers
Should Register,
Committee Urges
By Special Report
NEW YORK Former Jewish
inmates of Nazi concentration
camps, who toiled as slave labor-
ers for private German firms, are
requested to register with the Com-
mittee of Former Jewish Slave
Laborers in Germany, which was
set up in cooperation with leading
national and world Jewish organi-
zations. The committee has its
principal office in New York.
The committee is seeking to gain
compensation from German firms
for the benefit of their surviving
Jewish slave laborers, along the
same lines as are provided by the
agreements reached with the I. G.
Farben and the Friedrich Krupp
companies.
It is in the claimants' own in-
terest, the committee empha-
sised, to give th* matter their
immediate attention, end to reg-
ister by Dec. 31, 1960. The com-
mittee makes no charge for its
services, nor does it act es a le-
gal representative of individual
claimants.
Communications should be ad-
dressed to the Compensation Treu
hand GmbH, Straufenstrasse 29a,
Frankfurt a-Main, Germany, and
should contain the following infor-
mation: Full name, address, datej
and place of birth, name of Ger-i
man firm, and the place and dates
where the slave labor was perform-;
ed. The Compensation Treuhand'
GmbH is a special trust set up to
administer the funds to be paid,
out under the I. G. Farben and the
Krupp agreements.
Former slave laborers at the
I. G. Farben and the Friedrich
Krupp companies, who have al-
ready registered with the Compen-
sation Treuhand, are requested not
to register again, as their claims,
are already on file. Slave laborers
at other companies, who were in
previous correspondence with the
Committee of Former Jewish Slave]
Laborers at its New York office,
need not register again at this
time.
Miami Beach received some form
of help or service from a United
Fund agency," Pepper pointed out.
That's approximately one out of
every three persons who received
a helping hand in time of need,"
the volunteer chairman said.
"United Funds' services are
many," he continuod. "TSere
rt 54 affiliated agencies offer-
ing over 400 health and welfare
services.
"Youth services, family and child
care, health services, and services
to the aged and handicapped en-
compass every misfortune or
health problem that might befall
an average person or family," Pep-
per said.
"In order to continue this fine
work and keep up with the rapid
growth of our area, we need the
help of all Miami Beach residents,"
Pepper said.
Oscar Leonard
Honored by 6B
Author and lecturer Oscar Leon-
ard, annual winter visitor of Mi-
ami Beach, was recently honored
by Cortlandt Lodge of B'nai B'rith
in Ossining, N.Y.
The event celebrated Leonard's
150th anniversary as a member of
B'nai B'rith. Leonard founded Cort-
landt Lodge 20 years ago.
He is author of "Americans
All," joined the staff of the St.
Louis Post Dispatch after his
graduation from Leclaire Col-
lege, and later did graduate work
in the School of Social Work at
Washington University.
For ten years, Leonard was di-
rector of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration in St. Louis and he has also
served as president of the Missouri
State Conference of Social Work.
Proceeds tor Dystrophy
at the Miami Spring Villas Play-
house on Saturday evening, Oct. 1.
Irving Levin, president of the
Muscular Dystrophy Society of j Proceeds will go to the Society to
South Florida, announced this week j augments needs of dystrophy pa-
that a dinner dance will be held tients.
LIGHTS ON! FRIDAYS
6 to 8 evening hours
FOR YOUR SPECIAL CONVENIENCE .
ALL BANKING SERVICES
DRIVE-IN WINDOWS FREE PARKING
MERCHANTS BANK OF MIAMI
950 RED ROAD (S.W. 57th Ave. near the Trail)
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
i
He solves TODAY'S anxieties by solving tomorrow's
problems today! What becomes of your family if you're
not there? Can you afford college for your son? Do you
d.-re look forward to retirement? Anxieties like these
can be solved today by Living Insurance. And the man
to help you is the Man from Equitable. He can bring
you a program well suited to your needs-a program to
relieve your anxieties. Today. For details call Tha
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.
SIDNEY S. KRAEMER
FR 1-5691
245 S.E. 1st Stret Hd-
Youth to Assist
At Services
For the first time in the his-
tory of Temple B'nai Sholom, jun-
ior congregation officers will take
part in High Holy Day services at
the Temple.
Post Bar Mitzvah students will
read the Haftorah, with younger
pupils reciting the Haftorah bless-
ings and leading the congregation
in responsive readings.
Taking part are Rodney M a x.
president of the Junior Congrega-
tion; Bruce Greenfield, chairman
of the board of trustees; Robert
Cowan, rabbi; Michael Horowitz,
vice president; Martin Kaplan, vice
president; Jay Kalinsky, treasurer;
Arlene Mornick, secretary; Ann
Porges, assistant rabbi; James
Lewis, cantor.
Jack Kinsell. Michael Kurtz.
Mark Miller, Jeffrey Yohay,
Sammy Zucker, directors; Marshall
Fitter, trustee; Alan Goldberg,
gabbai; Bradley Eagerman, Rich-
ard Wolf, and Robert Zitrin, sex-
tons.
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FR 1-1411


Pcge 14-A
+Jenisti fkrMtor
Friday. September 23. I960
Equal Rights Urged for Soviet Jewish Minority
TARIS (JTA) A solemn
appeal to Soviet authorities to re-
examine the situation of Soviet
Jews and to grant them equal rights
nh other minority groups in Rus-
sia was issued here by the one-day
conference on Soviet Jewry which
br light together world-famous in-
tellectuals from 14 countries. It
was convened by Dr. Nahum Gold-
ma nn. who delivered one of the
major addresses at the parley.
The resolution in which the ap-
peal was made reiterated the sor-
row expressed during the day by
the various speakers. The resolu-
tion asked the Soviet Government
to reestablish Jewish organizations,
and cultural and religious institu-
tions and to permit Soviet Jewry
to contact Jewish religious centers
in other countries and to develop
th:r own cultural life in Russia
Urged by humanitarian con-
siderations, we especially ask the
Soviet Union to permit Jews It*
irvg in the Soviet Union who have
beon separated from their fam-
ilies during the last war to re-
join them," the resolution em-'
pheciied. The resolutkn. which
was couched in moderate tones,
stressed that all appeals in it
were based strictly on humani-
tarian grounds without any polit-
ical implications.
Goldmann. who presented in
hi] j Mrs i a list of religioua and
national discriminations against
Jews in the Soviet Union, paid a
warm tribute to the Soviet Union
for its role in World War II and
for having outlawed anti-Semitism.
He said that, in spite of that ac-
tion, the Jewish community in Rus-
sia was being "collectively dis-
criminated against from both the
religious and national angle."
"A special policy different from
that applied to all other minorities,
is applied to Soviet Jews," Dr.
Goldmann said "This policy, if
not modified, can in the long run
bring about the forced disintegra-
tion of the community and even
its disappearance as such."
The Jewish leader cited at length'
official Soviet publications to dem-
onstrate that the Soviet Govern-
ment's attitude toward Soviet Jews
rat contrary to its own laws. He
contrasted the difficulties for So-
riet Jewry with the advantages
granted to Russia's other minority
groups In the rcligous sphere, he
compared the situation of the other
religious groups, all of which have
some form of organization and
which keep in touch with co-relig-
ifiroad with the Jewish
which v\as cut off
Us brethren abr-jad and de-
prive.! of all central organizations
within.
He also disclosed that the Jewish
Prayerbook published ic 1957
CHARLES S. LAVIN
ANNOUNCES NEW
ORGANIZATION PLANS
CHARLES S. LAVIN, wboce
ideas have been editorialized in
Reada's Digest, announces the
addition of the famous Palm
Beach Hotel at Palm Beach,
Florida. This is a truly luxurious
place for retirement; the average
rate being SS6.50 per month pet
person, double occupancy which
includes three meals a day.
Single rooms are also available.
Special dietary kitchen and. din-
Lawmen Hit
Hospitality
WASHINGTON (JTA) Two
Ne York Congressmen protested
against the extension of any United They have no possibility t
States Government hospitality to their creative sentiments as Jews.
aVJ e*4"s..- a ^r. #m e) Sa>- a a d j^ ^ ^* a? a ah a Tom #> *^ *M
no newspapers, no schools, no cen-
the only edition in 40 years con-
sisted of only 3.000 copies, "a ridic
ulou.slx small number {or a com-
munity of 2.500.000 which has been
deprived of prjyerbooks for so
many years." He reported that the
manufacture and import of all
Jewish htuai objects, such as
mezuzahs and phylacteries, was
forbidden in the Soviet Union.
In spit* of many available
manusriatts, ho said, no Yiddish
books whatever were printed in
the Soviet Union in 1958. In 1959,
re reported. Hire* Yiddish beets
were printed in editions of 3.000
each, the majority of which wore
exported. Only a few hundred
wore retained for sale in the
Soviet Union.
The Jewish leader declared that
the Biro Bidjan Yiddish newspaper
was not for sale in the Soviet Union
and that even the Warsaw Com-
munist paper, the Folkstimme, has
been banned.
Contrasting these conditions with
the more liberal attitude in other
Communist countries and even with
the attitude which prevailed in the i
Soviet Union in its early years
when Jews enjoyed equal rights
with other minorities." Dr. Gold-
mann said this was proof that
anti Jewish discrimination is not
an integral aspect of the Com-
munist regime."
Another equally tragic grievance,
i he stated, was the lack of coopera-
tion shown by Soviet authonties
in helping in the re-union of Jewish j
families to eliminate one of the
most horrible aftermaths of t h e
last w ar.
Summing up the situation. Dr.
Goldmann said: "This is indeed a
tragic picture. The Jews in Rus-
sia have neither the right nor the
possibility to lead a Jewish life.
Professor Martin Buber discussing
the concept of the immortality of
Judaism, expressed the hope that
the Soviet Jewry would receive
equal rights 'so a7**fb develop* its
"fundamental cultural attributes."
threatened with cultural dehydra-
tion." He urged the conference
participants to pass a resolution
| which would make the Soviet Union
aware of the fact that -'the eyes
of the world are on it in this is-
sue." He agreed that international
politics must be kept out of the
debate.
Wolf Mankiewicz, the young Brit-
ish Jewish writer, criticized the
Other speakers were Doan Soviet authorities and particularly
James Pike, of Son Francisco,
the Soviet press for "caiusnnies
and falsehoods" against the Jews
which he said were "reminiscent
of those of the early Nazi era."
Messages to the conference were
received from Mrs. Eleanor Roose-
Label A. Katz. president of the velt. United States Supreme Court
Bnai Brith, said that "if the 2.500.- Justice William O. Douglas and
,000 Soviet Jews are not faced with former French Premier Pierre
annihilation, they are certainly Mendes France.
and former French Minister Ed
ooerd Deprevx who discussed the
problem end- urged the Soviet
Union to give equal rights to
IWftOKE
\ w;:v \ :
\ information % #
\ and \ .
X Reaervation* \ ^
Private Pool
Beach and
Cabana Colony
HOTEL
At 24th ST., MIAMI BEACH
JE 1-0331
Air-Conditioned Rooma
Private Beach and Pool
Parking on Premiaee
Cocktail Louni
Dining Room
Entertainment
emii aaav
: $3
Daily
Par Pmr*.
Oble. Occ.^
I rated
coming
President Nasser, of the
Arab Republic, during his
visit.
Rep. Seymour Halpern. New
York Republican, said in a com-
munication to President Eisen-
tral organizations and no contacts
with Jews abroad. Russia's Jews
cannot even protest they can
only wait, pray and hope.

FLORIDA
CONGRESS
AIRPORT INN
He appealed to the delegates to
draw their own conclusions and ex-
hower that Nasser is "no more
iniT room avail a KU at tl fat me "l.serving of American respect and araw lneif own
Lav eX charge. hosp.tality than the other dictators P* *** hope that an enlight-
*.ay e*ira cnarge, who haye jnvited tnemse,ves here ened world opinion would make its
Reservations are now being ao- Khrushchev. Castro and Tito." wei8t felt to help alleviate the
cepted for our new Garden He said that any concession to pllghl of what was once the cul-
Wing. Rentals start at $86.50 pea **>. Prior to compliance with ,ura' a"d traditional source for
international law on the Suez w0Jld Jewr>
blockade issue, will only cause Daniel Mayer, chairman of the
greater intransigeance. He urged f*f"eJfor_theJ R}*hls of Man, who
in
month per person, which in-
eludes a lovely private room
with running water, and three*
veil-prepared meals a day. Also
these guests may enjoy the same
social activities as those in tha
main building
Regardless of your age, you can
now join The Charles S. Lavin
Retirement Organization, tha
dues being one dollar ($1.00)
per year. This entitles you to a
monthly bulletin and should a
member come to ona of oux
hotels as a permanent guest; ha
or she will receive a discount of liar of serving the Krem-
$100.00 the end of the first year. 1 s ends
that Nasser should be restricted in Preded "r*J*i the conference to
the same manner as "his admirer studv ,he Problem of Soviet Jewry
and friend. Castro." in a "cold and dispassionate spirit."
Rep. Leonard Farbstein, New
York Democratic member of the
House Foreign Affairs Committee.!
called on Secretary of State Her-:
*.er to oppose any con in of
inviting Nasser to Washington. He
said hospitaliry or concessions to
Nasser would be appeasement of1
an "aim American dictator" that
would "trouble : .ence of
millions of Americans" He ac
*
*
All BRAND NEW
AT ENTRANCE TO M'AMI INT'l. AIRPORT
AIR-CONDITIONEO AN3 HEATED
TV RADIOS, PHONES
BOATING AMD GOLF OPPOSITE
SWIM POOt CA9ANA5
COFFEE SHOP DINING ROOM.
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
CREDIT CARDS HONORED
N.W. 42nd
MIAMI

^time to head for the
MOUNTAINS
For specific information
regarding the numerous
Lavin Retirement Hotel*
throughout the country,
please write Charles S.
Lavin at noted below.
There is no obligation.
(peers/ Course Sponsored
Tlferetta l.-r., aood will
in dancing and
'h a professional
instructor for girls and boys -
at the sixth grade level and
through the teens. In charge of or-
/ation is Mrs. E. Rosenberg.
COMING TO NEW YORK?
I
Charles S. Lavin
j Lavin Palm Beach Hotel
235 Sunrise Avenue
J Palm Beach, Florida
| DEAR MR. LAVINs
I Enclosed Is my $1.00 membership
ifee. Please send membership eard j
and monthly bulletins.
!*-......................
lAddrset .....
a*
H3
Stay at thu medar*
95-itery held, large,
beautifully furnlih.d
reomi with kitchenette,
private bath, from
S7.00 doily, deoble
free) $10 75. Te
ream t.ilet fro*
$14 SO.
10WII WUUY S
WONTMir IATEI
HO (Mtc| Iw (M,
14 i
-I
Air condftiaMii
tvteviWwi avoifc
roadway at 7Sth St.. Now York
Oner WMa. Mena reeJer
. playground for rieaJth and fun
for the) whole family. No place ON
earth has moro to offer than Hot
Springi, and there's no finer place to
stay than The Arlington.
Swim in our beautiful, now twin-cef-
cade temperature-controlled pools
. golf on our two 18-hole Cham-
pionship courses enjoy gourmet
food dance and be entertained.
A( sports and recreations in Hot
Sp rings including eicellent fishing
nd Las Vegas Night Life.
Bathe away all your aches end paint,
due to tension and fatigue in tha
beneficial, radioactive waters of
world-famous Hot Springs ... relieve
rtfiritit, rheumatism, and high blood
pressure. Government regulated]
bathhouse right in hotel where you
can go in robe and slippers by spe-
cial elevator direct from the privacy
of your room.
IOW SUM*. I* ROOM SATIS .with half bath frees $4
per pe'sea.dewbla- wMk Iwia boat one private both
Irem per pertoa, dooble. No room charge far children under 14.
For rates and color brochurewrite R. E. McEachin. Gen. Mgiv
hot springs NATIONAL PARK


Friday, September 23, 1960
Jewlsti Ffrricfinn
Page 15-A
LSGAL NOTICE
NOT.CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to cnnum- In
tiuuii r the fictitious name of
.vAMI *ON MARKET ut 1466 N W
hlnA Street. Miami, Florida lni<-mlH
I,. register Bali) name with tin- Clerk
of the Circuit Courl of Dade County,
Isamdson s MARKCT, INC.
ih Fla. l'orp.>
Ol'SNIE KLEIN, Pres.
NELSON r HPIEUVOQEL.
Attorneys for Applicant
41*7 Lincoln Ki'uti
8/16-23-30, 10/7
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR DAOE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY,
No. CtC 6381
( ARMKN OLIVRRAH TEIJE1RO,
Plaintiff.
vs.
RENE TEUEIRO.
Defendant.
TO: RBNE TBIJE1RO
Vou are required to serve a copy of
your answer to the Bill of Complaint
for Divorce on the plaintiff's attorney,
nnd to file the original answer In the
of fee of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the 30th day of September
A.D. 1960; otherwlae, the Rill of Com-
plaint for Divorce, heretofore filed
herein, will be taken as confessed by
ynu.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this the
31st day of August lo
E. B. LEATHI.IiM AN
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: K. M. LTMAN,
l*puty Cierk
NBALJ. Dr.N.N
1111 Ainsley Bid*.
Miami. Florida
9/J-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name ot
WEKLBY*H BROAS'TED CHICKEN at
41<>l B. 4th Ave., Hiaieah Inland* to
register said name with the Clerk Of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Donna MARE, INC.
(a Fla. Corp i
KM BRBGKR
Attoi ney
4U0 Lincoln Rad
j___________________________9.16-2.1-30, 10/'.
NOTICE UNDER
FICT.TIOUS NAME LAW
N'.Th'E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the m,dersignei, desiring to
bu*:r r the fictitious name of
RUCTION CO .not
Inc.) at numherSOM S.W. 90th Court,
In the City of Miami. Ho! Ida intends
to register the said name with :l.<
k of the circuit Court of Dadi
County, Florida.
i, CAMNER
WEI'MAN A. WI.I'MAN, Esqs.
407 Bisoayne n.nldlng
Miauii, Florida
By: warren S Wepman
Attorney* for Applicant
9/9-16-21-3"
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY,
No. SOC 13
BARBARA T. GREENBERO,
Italntlff,
ronajJda. GRKBNBERG,
Defendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO RONALD A. GREEN BERG
North Wilson Avenue
Margate, New Jersey
You Ronald A. Greenberg are hereby
notified that a Bill of Complaint for
Divorce ban been filed against you,
and you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's At-
torney, STONE AND BITTEI., 305 In-
dustrial National Bank Building. Mi-
ami. Florida and file the original An-
swer or Pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or before
the 7th day of October, 1960. If
you fail to do so, Judgment by default
will be taken against you for the re-
lief demanded In the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE Jewish Ki,oiti:>iAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this 26th day of August, A.D.
1960.
Circuit Court, Dade County. Florida
E. B. LEATHIJtMAN, Clerk
(Seal) By: K. M. LTMAN,
Deputy Clerk
I STONE AND BITTEI.,
Of, Industrial National Bank Bldg.
,laml 32. Florida.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
________________9/2-9-16-23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT.
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. SOC 8147
SUPEMA 8. 8ABATHIE.
Plaintiff,
Luis Fernandez sabathie.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
You, LU18 FERNANDEZ HABA
"TIB, 841 Caldwell Avenue, Bronx.
jw York, are required to file your
nswer to the complaint for divorce
nth the Clerk of the above Court and
krva a copy thereof upon Gino P.
egrettl. Attorney, 910-911 Congress
ullding, Miami, Florida, on or before
i-tober 3, 1960, or else complaint will
taken as confessed. Dated this
.th day of August, 1960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
leal) By: K. M. I.YMAN,
iMputyewm ,.,..
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
SKALD JOSEPH LADERMAN, who
convicted In the Criminal Court of
?cord In and for Pade County. Flor-
t the June term thereof. A.D.,
6. of th* offense of Grand Larceny.
which a sentence of 18 month* im-
Wnment in th* State Penitentiary
DAVBHU
BY HENfiY tfONAID
"Why, our Rabbi hasn't 094yd a bit sine* we
taw Mm last Rosh Hcwhonahr
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
JN CHANCERY
No. SOC 8501-1
DOROTHY WHITEHEAD.
Plaintiff.
I -
DOCK WHITEHKAD,
I > fetidant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: DOCK WHITEHEAD
Navy Air Station
< 11} III o,
Brunswick. ',. orgia
-
Y>i: ARE HKUKIIY NOTIFIED thai
a Bill ..r Complaint for Divorce bai
been filed agalnai you and you are
hereby requir, d to serve a cop] of
your answer thereto on th,- plaintifri
ENGEL Ai l-i 11,1. Al K
Huite M-111 Blacayne Building, 19
Miami 82, Flor-
ida, and file the original answer in the
i >,. i", rv nl the i
on or before the 17th day of October,
1860, ol.. ... ;, 1 i I ': I ..liles -u
will he entered .igu DSt you.
I on the 13th d.'.v of BeUtenToei
1960.
E. Ii. LEATHERMAN. Clerk
of the Circuit Court
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING
Deputy Clerk
_________ ___- 9/16-23-^0. 10/7
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN ANO tOfl DADE COUNTY,
FLOR.DA. IN PROBATE
No. 80633-B
IN RE: Estate of
BELMA HODE8
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona-Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of SE1.MA HODE8 deceased late
of Dade County, Florida, to the Coun-
ty Judges oi Dade County, and file the
same in their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
within eight calendar months from the
date of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
BARNEY HODES
Executor
SIMON. HAYS A GRUNDWERQ
Attorneys
301 Ainsley Building
Miami 32. Florida
9/16-23-30. 10/7
S
the
imposed, will apply for cktnienc)
-j* State Hoard of Pardons, Tal'a-
eee. Florida, at its next regular
eting. through and by his under-
tned attorney of record.
(UNO IV NBC.RETTI
l/U-19-26. 9/2-8-M-2J-J0. 10/7-14
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 48T94-A
IN RE: Fststo o*
KURT BOTTNER a/k/a
Kl'RT BOETT.NEK
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any "claims and de-
mands which you may have aga'nst
the estate of KURT BOTTNER a/k/a
KURT BOETTNER deceased late of
Dade County, Florida, to the County
Judges of Dade County, and file th,
same in their office* In the County
Coorthouse In Dade County, Florida.
within eight calendar months from
the date of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
ALF*RBT> !>. BIELET
AS Admlniatrator
19 W Flagler M., Miami 32. Fla.
9/9-16-y-*"
NOTICE UNOeR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
INTERNATIONAL HEALTH AND
BEAUTY SHOW and NATIONAL
HEALTH AND BEAUTY SHOW at
605 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
JEROME J BERGER
KOVNBR & MANNHEIMER
Attorneys for Jerome J. Berger
9/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MAS TRADING CO. (Not Inc.) at
3440 N.W North River Drive. Miami.
Florida Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
SIDNEY PEPPER
(HIS PEPPER
MAX R. SILVER
Attorney for M 8 Tn4mCo.]|a_M
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersiL-n, d. desiring to enggg* In
business under the fictitious name of
ONE HOUR CI.KANERA.MA at 816
.".th Street, Miami I'.ea.h. Florida in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the circuit Court ol i ad
i 'ounty, l loi
C.B W'EIis. INC.
., Ho.-nla Corp.
WEJNKLE .\ KESRLER
4,1 toi n< si '. r
'' 7-14
LFOAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUOICAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No 80C 8755
FRED1 HE MEIER,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY K MBIBR,
i ft odaiit.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
Yon. .MARY K. MEIER,.......lent
at the following address: o Tern-1
hacker. Tarlei Trailer Courts, 3014
Bragg Boulevard, Fayettevlll*, North
Carolina, are- herehy required 10 serve
of v..... Answer to a Bill of
Complaint for Divorce on Plaintiffs
attorney. Charles I Rich. 2432 Holly-
wood Boulevard, Hollyw.....I. Florida. I
and file the original with the Clerk of
th* above Court on or before October
17, li>, or a default will be entered
against rou.
DATED at .Miami. Florida, this 12th
day of Kentemh-- '<'"
E R LEATHERMAN
ci.rk. Circuit > ot, .
(seal) By: WM. w sWOCKINO
Deputy Clark
_____________________9/16-23-30. 10/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIRCUIT IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. SOC BMW
ROBERT A. WALKER,
Plal-Mff,
vs.
BKATIlu E WALKER.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: BEATRICE WALKER
Cars of Cyrus Neville
ttJTI Herktmer street
Brooklyn. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT I Fl El- thai
., Bill of Complaint for Divorce Sat
been filed against you, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer to the It;il of Comp'alnt
upon plaintiffs attorneys. ENGEL &
POLLACK, M-111 Biscavpne Building.
Miami 32. Florida, and file the original
Answer in the Off Ire of the CleH-: of
the Circuit Court on or before the
lfrth day ol October, 1980; otberwlsx
the sllscatloni of said Bill of Com-
plaint win taken ag confessed
avaiiiH-
DATED rioi da, this 1st
. .
E. I I.EATHERM VN
i llrcull Court
I B) P COPELAND,
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
+Jei*isti fhridiair
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
iHai ill :i- i for messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Nl : IERBBY GIVEN thai
the undi to < neage i
me of
[AR I'M BRPRISB8 at Mel
N B. '. t, North Miami

tilt Court ot 1 <'
Count)
N4 iRMAN KPBCTUR
s. |* i iw ni r
BTOLAR& MUCHNICK
Attorneys for Applloant
KM 7!-: St M B.
9/2S-30. in 7-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT.
ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIBCUIT,
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
no. ioc sees
MARY BKINKER,
Plaintiff.
NORMAN BRINKER,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
You. Norman Brinker, address un-
known, are required to file your an-
swer to the complaint of divorce with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
and serve a copy thereof upon Her-
man Cohen. Esquire, 1305 Congress
Building, Miami, Florida, on or before
October 24, 190, or else complaint
will be taken as confessed.
Dated September 16, 1900.
E. B LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING
Deputy Clerk
9/23-S0. 10,7-14
\IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE,
NO. 50177-C
IN RB:
Estate of PETER PAUL 1HSA.
Deceased.
NOTICE------------------MPTION
OF DEATH
TO WHOM IT to^i CONCERN:
... iW -.,..! a.frlleU 1 Oiinl}
Judge in and for Dade County. Flor-
ida, did enter an Order of Presumption
of Death of 1'ETER PAUL IBs., on
August 30, I960 as provided for in
hacrion lit*.34 of the Statutes of the
State of Florida.
YOU ARE THEREFORE required.
or anyone In your behalf, to pod ice
within three months from the date of
first insertion of this publication, sat-
isfactory evidence of the continuance
in life of the said PETER PAUL. IRSA.
OTHERWISE th.- Court will proceed
with the administration of the Estate
of the said PETER PAUL IRSA
DATED this SOth day of August.
I NO.
/a/ OEOROE T. CLARK
County Judfce
.9/23-30. 10/7-14
NOTCE BY PUBLICATION
The public Is advised that as e*
8epteHb*r 14. I960. GEORGE AND
NATALIE N. COLEN have no inter-
est in and are no longer connected
with VOGUE Of' MIAMI, INC., a Flor-
ida C>ryio*t1*n. which Is located at
43 N.E. lad Avenue and 60 Northslde
1'iasa, N.W. 7th Street and 27th Ave-
nue.
El*W1N D. COtEN, Attorney
2310 Qa'iano Av*.. Coral Gables
9/1C-I3
NOT CE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIRCUIT IN
AMD FCR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
No. 60C 86C6
PHYLLIS Mi 'lj; w BAYIH,
.
.1 A NIKS M 6AYJH,
1 'i fendant.
SLIT FOR DIVORCE
TV ,: t \|i.--. .. < will. JR.
Washington, 11 C.
i it street, N.W.
YOU, JAMBS M SAYI1I, JR.. are
i hat ., Bill i I
plaint for Plvorce has been filed
against you. and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complaint on th,
Plaintiffs Attorney, MAX R SILVER,
Ef Florida, and file the original Awwn
or Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
10th day of October. 190. If you fail
to do so. Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief de-
manded 1n the Bill of Omplalnt.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 6th day of September.
A.D. 19(0.
E. B. LEATHERMAN.CIerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County. Florida
(seal) By: HELEN KEHSLER
Deputy Clerk
9/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HEV.KUY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage, in
business under the fictitious name ,.f
SOI'THERN "HILT KITCHENS at
M07 N.E. Miami Place intends to reg-
ister said name with the clerk of the
circuit Court of Dade Co*ntv, FlorWa.
B. I. G. CORPORATION
(a Ha. Corp.)
HARftlJi KTRI'MI'F
AttfWey for Asmiicuiit
IWW Bls.-ayne Bldg.
9/16-23-30. H 1
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engag, in
business under the fictitious nam, of
SEA s'AI.EH LTD. at 2143 N.IV. Rth
Avenue. Miami, Fla.. Intends to regis-
ter said name, with the Clerk of ;lie
|'li, in Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
UNITED PI'llVRTORR, INC.
(a Fla. Corp.)
9/16-23-3". I"'7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
IMCE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
nderakfsjad, delrin to enifax- In
ni i m :. i fidiii'.iis nami f
' at I. MIRRl >R a ill.ass ci ai M
!. st,.t, Miami Intends to
with the Ii r of
ourt ol l lade I "oi I .
Ida.
CHARLEH FRIBDM IN
I -'.viler
'
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD.CIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY
NO. (0 C S4SS J
DONALD FRANKLIN SCOTT.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EMMA JEAN RCtrTT.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: EMMA JEAN SCOTT
11 Wait h
hestei v, York
You EMMA JEAN SCOTT are here
by notified that a BID of Complaint
for Dvorce bas been filed agalnx* y u
Slid you are required -to serve
of your Answer or Pleading to the
Bill of Comp'alnt on the plaintiff'?
AUorney, RAYMAN a IUHKI. ><>:
Ainsley Building, Miami 32, Florida
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing In the offlre of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court on or before the 17th
day of October, 1960. if you fail t
do so, Judgment by default will be
tak< n against you for the relief de-
manded in the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four conseeotlve weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Mlsml
Florida, this 13th day of Septerrsber,
A.D. I960.
E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit cotn-t. Dade coghty, Florida
(seal) By: HELEN KERtiLER.
Deputy Clerk
RAYMAN & DUH1G
902 Ainsley Ytdg
Miami 32. FlaFR 9-^44
Attorneys for Plaintiff
9/16-23-30. 10/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
v ''<-K IB HEREBY tlTVBN
.ndersigncd, desiring to en?ag* in
. ...... Ihi iiir at
[HEM PREMIUM PAYMENT
x .: ::.) -list Street, M
nd to l, Sinter nid
with tin Clerk of the circuit
:. County, Florida.
MARCY SHE1.I-"
SALLY SHELDON
Sole ow ners,
M M:TIN VK1.LKN
At to: ney foi Applicants
Bl-cayne Building
9/16-23-JO. hO/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, IN CHANCERY
No. SC 8290
DONALDMLVTN DrjCHESNBAU,
Plaialtff.
ROBBRT-A J>A>JBlMT4?EeNBAU,
l '"T*n n t.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: HOBERTA jArTE DUCHKHNE^AU
Liberty Apartments
Box 72
Flskdale, Massachusetts
YOU. ARE RBHJI'IKKD to iv a
Copy of yoOr Answer to the Bill of
complaint for Divorce on Plaintiff's
Attorney, PAUL KWITNBY. 424 Un-
coln Road, Miami Beach. Florida, and
file rile original In the office of *.he
' *1< rk of th* Circuit Court, on or (to-
ok* S 'n default of TSSiich, a Decree Pro C*n-
fesso, may be entered against you.
DATED thbj 26th *iy of August,
1960. _
E. B. MCA THERM AN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade Countv, Florida
iseal) By: R H RICE. JR..
Deputy Clerk
9/2-9-16-2J
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
DADE COUNTY, FLA.
No. -60C 8631
THERESA F. REDNARICK
lil'AHRIERl.
Plaintiff.
vs.
JOSEPH F, CI'ARRIEKI.
I>efendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Yen, Joseph F. Guarrierl, 7346 Tor-
resdale Avenue, Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania, are required to file yeur an-
swer to the complaint for divorce with
the Clerk of the above Court and serve
a copy thereof upon Herman Cohen,
Attorney, 130& Congress Bldg., Miami,
Florida, bn or before October 10, i960,
or else suit will be taken as confessed.
T*rted September*, I960
E. B. LEATHERMAN
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal) By: WM W. STOCKING
Deputy Clerk
9/9-16-23-J0
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
CORPORATiON OUTWtTS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN al
FR .1--1605


tfr-g&^S
-xl-w ra ^tapi
FLACLXR FEDERAL SAVINGS


ULITE
AeWt
oman s
'World
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Schultz. formerly of
Rochester, N.Y., and now of 544 Michigan ave.,
Miami Beach, celebrated their 50th wedding anni-
versary on Sept. 18 ... A buffet dinner for 40
guests was tendered in their honor by the couple's
son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Schultz, of Hialeah ...
The affair was at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nate Becker, 5700
San Amaro, Coral Gables, the celebrants' nephew Rabbi Leo
HeitB, of Temple Tifereth Jacob officiated at the ceremony, with
Mr. and Mrs. Schultz renewing their marriage vows They have
four grandchildren.

Mrs. Bess (Louis) Glasser in her new Paris feather hat rushing
to the airport from the champagne brunch at the Americana hotel
[ last week given by the Women's Division, State of Israel Bonds .
Due to arrive were her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Siegel, and
sister, Jean Arnold, just back from a trip to the Scandinavian
countries, with a whirlwind finish at the Carlsbad baths .
Sweet sixteen party will be given for Carole D. Lerner Satur-
day evening Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lerner, 17141 NE
5th ave., where the party will be held, Carole is a junior at Nor-
land High School The Lerners are active charter members of
I Young Israel of Greater Miami. .
Mrs. Jacob Entine, after spending the summer in Chicago and
[St. Louis, is off to Hot Springs for the holidays ...
It was an informal buffet Saturday night at the home of the
PDnvid Bergers The Roadracers Bowling League had their ban-
[quet, and gave out trophies Coming in first were Al and Bobby
lore and Dave and Gloria Berger ... No wonder they were
ich willing hosts.
*
The Orleans family, Harry, Virginia and Doris, just back from
[New York, where they visited relatives and "did" Broadway .
Another one off to school at Florida State Marianna, daugh-
ter of Alex and Reyna Youngerman, who was named for her great-
acdmother Meanwhile, Reyna is busy with an art exhibit at
Deauville hotel...
Keyboard Master Series of a prominent New York radio sta-
presents Lotte Landau, wife of Miami anesthesiologist Dr.
an Glover, of Miami, in a program Oct. 2 ... In honor of the
anniversary of her Gotham Town debut as a concert pianist,
!.will include in her program the suite, "At the Recital," written
rially for the debut occasion by her brother, Siegfried Landau
Incidentally, he's the prominent music director of the Brooklyn
|>hilbarmonia and Chattanooga Opera Assn.
MM MM
Beachites Earl Pertnoy and David Miller due back next week
[from a business and pleasure trip to New York and Baltimore .
Mrs. Bernard (Bunny) Israel, of 12200 Vista In., So. Miami,
(leaves for New York next month She'll have an exhibition of
[abstract paintings, drawings and water colors at the Barzansky
[Gallery on swank Madison ave. Oct. 17 ...
The eldest daughter of the Henry Romans, of Miami, Cacon,
on their trip to California and Grand Canyon, sketched scenes
the most exciting spots Caron is an art student at the Joe
Emily Lowe Gallery on the University of Miami campus .
Eer grandparents are the prominent Jerry Bakers, of Miami.
MM
Their 18th wedding anniversary was celebrated by Mr. and
rln. "Mickey" (Ruth) Segall on Sept. 16 "Mickey" is on the
governing board of Temple Tifereth Jacob, and Ruth's a member
! the education committee They live in Hialeah with their chil-
ren, Judith, Linda, and Robert ...
David Schwartz home from Chicago, where he went to visit his
rents, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Schwartz ..
Irving and Selma Marcus back from Hattiesburg, Miss., where
_Jiey visited their daughter's family, Shifley and Alvin Sackler .
IThen on to Chicago to visit newlyweds Arthur and Judy Marcus .
Eve Chanin has another grandson His name is Jack Drew
JBaumann, and he's the third son of Phyllis and Stan, Eve's daugh-
|ter and son-in-law.
M M MM
The Misses Esther and Lillian Goodman back from Gotham
[Town, where they have been vacationing ...
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Catsman returned home after several
[ months at Higgins Lake in Michigan ...
Mr and Mrs. William Friedman telling the newspapers and
milkman to resume deliveries at the Coral Gables home after spend-
I ing the summer at the South Seas hotel on Miami Beach .
Lovely New Year Greetings from Jennie and Harry Gordon,
signed "Jerusalem, 1900" ...
Mr and Mrs. Samuel Cutler, of Miami Beach and Atlantic City,
off to Israel aboard the SS Zion for the High Holy Days with.the
iUnerary also including London, Paris and Rome They ll be
returning home aboard the SS United States, with a golden wedding
anniversary planned for them later in the season by the. couple s six
children and 13 grandchildren-among them Mr. and Mrs. A. Buud
(Iris) Cutler and moppets Betsy Gail, 7. and Harold Jeffrey, 3.
>c M MM
Birthdaxe: Glenn Loren, born to Dr. and Mrs. Ernest (Diane)
Halpryn, of Sky Lake, on Aug. 29 at Mt. Sinai Hospital He join,
sister Allison. 2 Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs Samuelit.
enaon, of San Marco Island, and Mr. and Mrs. Julius Halpryn,
No. Miami Beach.
"dfewish Floriidian
Miami. Florida. Friday, September 23, 1960
Section B
Holding champagne glasses for a toast are
these lour officers of the Women's Division.
State of Israel Bonds, and their special guest,
}oan (Mrs. Michael) Camay (center). Mrs.
Comay. noted Israel journalist, spoke at the
Women's Division brunch and installation at
the Americana hotel last week. Left to right
are Mrs. Jacic S. fopicic, vice chairman; iirs.
Jack Katzman, general chairman; Mrs. Max
Weitz. honorary chairman and installing offi-
cer; and Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro, vice chairman.
Israel's Image Changes-Mrs. Comay;
Helped Now Becoming Mideast Helpers
Israel's image and role in the
world today is undergoing a change,
Joan (Mrs. Michael) Comay, noted
journalist, and wife of Israel's
permanent representative to t h e
United Nations, told an audience of
350 women attending the cham-
pagne brunch and installation of
the Women's Division, State of Is-
rael Bonds, at the Americana hotel
last Thursday.
Until this year, Mrs. Comay said,
Israel needed much help in its
struggle as a new democratic na-
tion. "Now, the State of Israel has
learned to live with its problems,
and has begun helping other new
nations."
Much of Israel's help has been
directed to the emerging African
nations. On a tour of Ghanna, Li-
beria, Nigeria and the Congo, Mrs.
Comay reports that she met Israeli
men and women helping and teach-
ing the people to construct a naval
school, airfield, lay water pipes,
build roads.
However, before Israel could be-
gin to help others, much had to
be done within the nation.
"We hear the words 'capital de-
velopment' quite often," Mrs. Co-
may said, "and it means simply
raising the standard of living. It
has risen for almost all the people,
but there are still areas where cap-
ital development has not kept pace
with immigration."
Nevertheless, progress has been
remarkable for the tiny Middle
East nation. "Twelve years ago we
fought for Israel and got it," Mrs.
Comay said, speaking with a
charmingly British accented voice.
"But then we found that we needed
all the things that are taken for
granted in the United Statesair-
ports, roads, electric power, water
pipelines."
Mrs. Comay and her family have
consistently played a leading role
in Israel's defense and develop-
ment. She and her husband came
to the country from South Africa
in 1947. Almost immediately in-
volved in Israel's fight for inde-
pendence. Mrs. Comay served as
a driver for the Haganah. She has
also been a liaison officer with the
British for the Jews in Palestine,
and assistant to a Hadassah team
of South African surgeons caring
for wounded soldiers and civilians
during the War of Liberation.
Her 20-year-old son, Yochana,
presently serves with the Israeli
Army in the Negev, and her daugh-
ter, Yael, has already completed
service in the Women's Army.
Mrs. Comay's speech climaxed a
full program which began with the
"Offering of the Sheaves" installa-
tion ceremony. Each woman car-
ried one sheaf of wheat which she
placed in a large bouquet of flow-
ers. At the conclusion, Mrs. Max
Weitz, outgoing general chairman
and installing officer, presented
Mrs. Jack Katzman, new general
chairman, with the bouquet of the
sheaves.
Representative leaders of six
organizations, all of whom have
recently returned from Israel,
Continued on Pag 4-B
f ASHIOM nous
Fashion notes at the cham-
pagne brunch of the Women's
Division, State of Israel
Bonds:
Mrs. Irving (Shirley) Mil-
ler la brown silk alpaca, with
a Mr. Arnold Original made
entirely of feathers .
Mrs. Sheldon (Evelyn) Kay
in cream-color, with a most
unusual hat of her own de-
sign and making .
Mrs. Samuel (Selma) Oritt
in a cherry red outfit featur-
ing a white braided beret...
Eve Burke (Mrs. Robert
Charles) in a black sheath,
the latest in high hat design
featuring a wide white band,
and large white pearls .
Anna Brenner Meyers
smart in light blue, accented
by dark blue ami red .
Mrs. Jack Katzman lovely
in a red suit .
Mrs. Louis (Bess) Glasser
in her new Paris feather hat.
Three newly-installed officers of the Women's Division, State
of Israel Bonds, look over programs f or their champagne
brunch and installation at the Americana hotel. Left to right
are Mrs. Milton Lubarr. chairman of communications; Mrs. Ber-
nard D. Kaplan, chairman of special events; and Mrs. lack
Rifkin. Chen chairman tor Miami Beach.


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Sv LEAH LSCHMHO
Well planni
fbr 'be fig}! Buima'
ae *>sr-entiiii is the ii-
naad nm lefkire agf par
centimes nr w-opie
"
iBtSer i* jllSPNiie
seetfiin.s doae tngetlie-.- thai
n.HliT:
|u.sf*ri ; -ned mil ree 'it
sesame I in fcal I HTMJBhlr
>*d '. aoei ir tanahed nm n i aril prha1
rounds of rye oread armintt. P!aee ..in ian
in
- ~ t-*-* ratrg serving when aiiirt aroumt
ten. Wine mnev wrtn iHffrrt apples __ *-s <*
_ ____._ __*__ ... .. "^ sized ^cooped our pineannie you.
ScatUmtm* Cnra.ouow ne*

Site fish. Thicken. :sm
Us and its varfations.
l.cfcarb i honey cake and-ir a Kugei | with sane
nqw mo : ad Bank
rings. miavinK seeds. Wun a seai-
Inpro ir fluted entter Tim or
<,r outer skin Turn eacn ring jj turn
and place -.ngs To our readers of this column
or many years, and *be Inmr
mnker^ whose kitchen eqiupmeni
includes a name Jwwieh L'ntaaM.
other ingredients.
and paste "lie -eripes in your
en scrapneak it's always honjrui
te Have around.
Wine
eggs. Hard->.'ooked. 1 laegn
onion diced and lightly hrowne-t :i
S tablespoons if a
schmaltz. Broil the liver am:
fte ?0i tt,rtDre cJ*Cn* Up and "umn* aJtanmuin bul-uned" coekae tbeet
y special rands to prepare 'S^jJlL^ chopp*r w,rtl 'h" a: will fit nm the meat pan at
refrigerator Allow -'nuugh 'if Bte
"lining" "a come
sides of tile pan so raey can be tided
Allow a iihi'ii a"ii 11aan cktekv To enver lie tilling nngs. *r* nil
tenu -tar tieir liil.ann g_!___/ wrt* W" *wei. t UgftHy wilfc cantalmipes. waller meann
w 4o .nclude rn ralln^na. rwtaeM "-^T"'1 ff,mr nr flfc !* TOlnn- 'O*** -^
and a few special aajesakau ^""bw. place sain-(e rfown on an
aam tlis pr^lwliitoiv -ram Can alumnwn linnd aftaBaw van and
P aanlBr broiler flame turned op
tn iiajitiy tawwnad Tarn sin-nrte op.
"brnan eaeh parce wttli dUutterf war
Rtiirn to brnder flame fbr SI
uuinbBs or oil ^laaed ana "*nrpt-
. _.___. __ _. Liwr P^neapaae aW- .
Fish Balls m aast of
ibeert Tomaroes on 'jnttice
Oen Brmlen Cbieneu ^iar*en
r f fi' -_______ Scrp* raw ""^ !engwe
*+g*C*m*m*9m*.*ai-^ aui aJ are scraped. Wth a ibarp knife
taMac vaganaffy ana bath thank
slices nut let stand ji cold water
paanat preparing iwaat petaaaes
wnicn snnald be pared and diced or
i cut into -v-tn*n r o a a. d s wink a
Sc3i aysaaty naday cnanmrnn^ar Van Bbbbbi and two at H' I
ctficers. lots. Erevan and Peter Ccrsten. conHaapiaa* tfatg
denqesocs asore as the Brifia* doa* in. en its in "Under 1*>
Tjzqs. .uiteiidy abowtog at the Ccrifc. ICcnu and Ifind!
Opft-Mrs. Names New CtMirmea
plums, ami "iierter-e^
eitlter 5e*li or well-drained canned
mad. Top with a spi-j{ of fresh
mini or mu* favorite fruit saakd
"ft n.iaing jtmt before servniij tune
Caoirven af me Tajrfk Skeee Harry
Ope- *r were appamted at tae er Matt, efiaaai an%
the year at haaae af Wrs La .
iiiam Carmei aal *,.
A. Wesoan. MK Clev
Leairl
Lew**
*nry
fiOlnar
Cnapj Banun
~ r.eappie Vur Drop*-
H eap dark or 'ignt se-nles*
raisin.s
fa cap 48table *bnr*ennii?
1 can sugar
2 eggs
t-i enpH *a reaapwnn
W atappnan baamg
I maepenn vanulu
I taaepaan grated' leman rau
3s-! cups dry eereai :-u-ulajes
pfererreit
1 eup cfiapped or UttkM -oeoa-
nut
Appointed were H-sdame^ Ranpk' amaaaWB and 9j CVmei
-j.l. vice ar-sidest. waj aad.en Scacal repreaeatacie: Ckiito
neans Hurra; Seanett. final r iia ,CrwemVrg. laatesaes Sctbui
an coordinator Samuel Hinca.. Snvermaw and ANtn Sarajf ^
Louis FQaer sperial prlbes *aKte SeTefce CTu* ArCbar La%>
Sankay Saaamar
af Lair.'wtta.
J*
5-w>cp. yeflwr segctaale nkf.
Jig. if desared
d wan
; ^uwu Plums Sic rwauu ay jiacing ai
... -. ,* h *" Cut*<1 eurter (-nbuie Oetb a coaaoncr oser baifing aur water
aS w-tn anZSS knifeman '^^ *" MOU,?l1 caU fcr a*T ftr wbfl. ms^rag
ewneers ^bwS a lilf gBr "" "It a taam and bnng the rest of tie aigreflients as be-
dside nm. Dice the pineapple* *"** *^" |*JJ ^J J-Jtrnfat rm.Ttfl
tST r!?"** T*tl,^raUa, fc C"fc T mo*mu beat for 3P combined i -ogetber tne try a-
Uons and use witu the Cantalonpe minutes, add peuncs tltat ftae aecir'.gieiUa Vkcn A arad-^ ui
Ceak aver low heat n a weU Wended. Duet rate phimpe*
flanr aal
leng watb Pkc
dry eereaa. adaaan
be cacaenut btu Last a uttle at a 'a tap
-me. Dvep fraau a
an (increased eoaaae
foii-uaed raakie skeet tf yeu pre-
fer Bane C *c 15 mantes at JT5
F or -.11 Lgfctrj
appraaaaadaely X
Hawk
aaVaaTl
oBakaV
kdfl
nan. if asec. aw |
I weilkaalin egg
-srap weU-drauied t a a a e d auaawea at 4BS F er oB apkl|
aato eaeb self of pin
mg I ip as aigh aa
niMlii at 4BS F er till apt*
fwrnPnen, Let anal before weaj
nfteg agaun {between kayers af akiianan w
raiiani Ynate Be
Bring the genius fA.
^cal Jewish cnokiiig to your table!
MANISCHEWITZ
Whitefish & Pike

H
ror FRE Rccfrx Boo., s*^ today to:
THE & -tAMSCHCWITZ CO.Bod M. rtpnark I. N J
UttiKllB'1-


Friday. September 23, 1960
Women's Division
Plans Tribute
To Mrs. Sapiro
Mrs. Samuel T. Sapiro, vice
chairman of the Women's Division,
State of Israel Bonds, will be hon-
ored at- a- SpwiMK- Iwicfeeoit nn
Wednesday noon, Oct. 12, in the
Eden Roc hotel.
A dedicated leader and worker
Ion behalf of Israel Bonds, as well
[as many other civic and philan-
thropic projects. Mrs. Sapiro will
doubly honored.
First, she will receive a "Worn-
In of Valor" pin signifying that she
las purchased and sold. $100,000
State of Israel Bonds.
Second, she will receive the "De-
de Award" plaque in recognition
her "long and devoted efforts
or Israel and Israel Bonds."
Presentation of the plaque will
made by Col. Dina Werth, chief
lining officer of "Chen," the
tomen's Army of Israel, who is
pming to Miami Beach specially
this function.
Sapiro has been devoting
time and efforts to bond, drives I
ice they began in Miami ten years'
. She was trustee chairman for
past two years, and took office
[vice chairman last week at the
en's Division installation
eh at the Americana,
ally interested m the develop-
and growth of Israel, airs.
and her husband have visit-
j the new democratic nation in
Middle East many times. She
ently returned from, her tenth
Hrs. Sapiro is also active in oth-
pivic and community work. She
red Hadassah for the past 25
* Jewish fhridiar
Page 3-B
Women's Division Names Mrs. Goodman
To Helm of Coming Year's CJA Campaign
I
axwell House
kr Year 'Round
he New Year, followed by a
nth of high holidays, is ap-
Baching, and it is important to
er in these holidays with festive
BM.lv
or many people, the most im-
tant item in a meal is the cup
Tcoffee that comes at its con-
lion. This means Maxwell
t, of course. Not that Maxwell
Coffee is more costly than
coffees. But Maxwell House
give you the best cup of cof-
in the world, so that even the
It critical of connoisseurs will
Jise your coffee-making talents
you serve him Maxwell
use.
fto wonder it has gained renown
I the coffee the! is good to the
Bt drop, with the flavor that is
B f this world.
no wonder more Maxwell
use is used in more Jewish
es than any other coffee. Max-
U House is also Kosher and pro-
Ked under strict Rabbinical sup
(ision.
Urt your New Year right with
[most delicious coffee, a cup of
toning hot Maxwell Rouse Cof-
1 with the flavor that is out of
world. Stock up on Maxwell
Coffeea. Get. Maxwell Keuse
,j in 1 and 2 lb. cans.
. sure to always neve Maxwell
Coffee on your holidays and
'round. S.T.
AIM. SAMUU SAPIRO
years, devoting much of her effort
to Youth Aliyah. She is now a mem-
ber of the national board of the
Youth Aliyah committee.
She holds a life membership in
the American Jewish Congress,
and was a founder of both the Jew-
ish Home for the Aged and the
Friends of the Hebrew University.
More than 500 guests are ex-
pected to attend the luncheon trib-
ute for Mrs. Sapiro.
Mrs. Morris Goodman has been
named chairman of the Combined
Jewish Appeal Women's Division
for the coming year.
Announcement of Mrs. Good-
man's appointment to the top post
was revealed this week by Joseph
M. Lipton. general campaign chair-
man of the 1961 Combined Jewish
Appeal.
For the first time in the history
of the Women's Division, the chair-
man was appointed a f u 11 three
months in advance of the usual
date.
The CJA women's campaign, with
a new look and fresh spirit, is start-
ing much earlier this year.
Going into immediate action,
Mrs. Goodman called a meeting of
the Campaign Cabinet, consisting
of former CJA chairmen and lead-
ership, for next Wednesday at the
Seville hotel to discuss the Wom-
en's Division schedule of events.
"These experienced and koow-
ledgable women will become our
1961 campaign advisory commit-
tee," Mrs. Goodman said.
Women each year make their
S GOODMAN
personal contributions to the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal, often called
"plus gifts," over and above the
pledges of their husbands.
Mrs. Goodman has been active in
the CJA Pacesetters committee
and has taken part in a number
of campaigns at the leadership
level. In- 1958; when her husband.
Dr. Morris Goodman, was CJA
campaign chairman, she accom-
panied him on his trip to Israel
with the United Jewish Appeal
Overseas Study Mission.
A former school teacher, the
campaign chairman has been in-
terested for some time in youth
and education. In Israel, she visited
school after school, discussing
teaching methods with officials,
watching classes in session,
"Mrs. Goodman is ideally suited
to direct this year's campaign,"
said Lipton, commenting upon her
appointment. "Her leadership is a
happy combination of campaign
skill and personal dedication."
The Women's Division campaign
can expect a fresh business-like ap-
proach with Mrs. Goodman at the
helm. She was president of the for-
mer Goodman's Lincoln Road oa
Miami Beach. Under her dynamic
direction, the store grew into a
thriving, successful business enter-
prise.
[year

fo be Shown
ireater Miami chapter of the
Itional Kidney Disease Founda-
will have a membership coffee
| Monday, 10:30 a.m.. at the home
Mrs. Irving Stemerman. 4420
inserrate st., Coral Gables. Dr.
rge Webster, of the Miami Med-
II Research Center will be spcak-
Film, "To Let a Boy Play
111,' will be shown.
9
MOKKOPUUM
refreshing, calorit-frM
Sug*r3
SWHTII THAN SaCA*
Til mo root VMM
fttt4t I
WAPPY NEW YEA*
pMC*, health, preoperity and good wiN re aM
RPIMG'S





Friday, September 23, 1960
+Jelstrk>rMI&r
UUHAT started out as a casual
hour of browsing at the Chel-
sea Pottery Centre in Nassau end-
ed with tea being served high on
a veranda almost in the branches
of a huge and beautiful silk cot-
ton tree, plus an interview with
an internationally-known artist.
While acting the part of tourist
guide for several of my Miami
friends, I became increasingly in-
terested in the Chelsea Pottery
Centre, and so decided to spend
a quiet hour just looking around.
I drove my car into the grounds,
where a conglomeration of men
molding pottery, half finished
sculpture, finished museum
pieces, and a donkey all blended
together in t h i a lovely garden
dominated by the cotton tree.
After depositing the nominal ad-
mittance fee, I walked into a
technique in the history of ceram-
ics. As Rawnsley explained, the
etching type of glazing process he
uses is one which he has de-
veloped. It is the finest in the
world, but much too expensive to
be comercially profitable. As a
result, the Pottery Centre will
soon be forced to change the pro-
cess, and the existing pieces will
become collectors items.
They are currently working on
a series of ten diaramas depicting
incidents in the history of the
Bahamas, beginning with the
landing of Columbus. These ce-
ramic murals will each be about
ten feet in length by about five
feet high, and will be exhibited
in the garden. The first is ex-
pected to be on display by the
end of this year.
*
Page 5-B
Left to right are Mrs. Herbert Kaplan, representing Hawaii;
Mrs. Helen Cardoza, France; and Mrs. Julian Siegel, Japan.
Mrs. A. L. Mechlowitz, looking on, is president of Sisterhood.
Renowned Nurse
Educator Will
Speak at Sinai
large, old house. Paintings, sculp-
ture, and pieces of pottery in THE most fascinating of all was
varying stages of completion tne texture paintings that
David Rawnsley has created. Not
since the Renaissance period in
Italy has anything of this magni-
tude been attempted in ceramics.
Working on a hard board base,
he begins by building up with
special plastic material, and then
combines ceramics sculpture and
painting into a most beautiful
work of art. He sculpts the ma-
terial as a diamond cutter facet-
ing it to catch the light from
obtuse angles, and when properly
lit, the finished work gives a
three-dimensional effect. Rawns-
ley calls it "virtually painting
with light." He completes them in
either water color or oils.
of
abounded. N a t i ve Bahamians,
trained in the pottery process and
busy working, indicated a stair-
way at the rear, where the com-
pleted pieces were exhibited.
Upstairs, a secretary was typ-
ing at a desk, and a tall slim
man stood casually dressed in
working clothes fairly well cover-
ed with white powder and dabs of
colored paint.

|_|E turned out to be David
Rawnsley, founder of the
world famous Chelsea Potteries
of London, Paris and South Af-
rica, and with another one due to
open in Italy shortly. He is now
training Bahamians in the arts
at the request of prominent mem-
bers of the community who fore-
saw the need for this type of
activity to stimulate cultural life
in the Bahamas. Rawnsley came
over from London a little over
two years ago and brought with
him a number of Chelsea guild-
standard trained artists from his
London studios.
Museums and collectors in var-
ious parts of the world have ex-
amples of the work of the Chelsea
artists and craftsmen, as their
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FT IAUDERDAIE
MISS HIIDA TOKHOP
These textured paintings, or
Bas Relief, when exhibited in
London and Paris, caused quite a
sensation. An exhibition is being
planned in New York for fall or
early spring.

ACCORDING to Rawnsley, ce-
** ramies is the only medium
that provides the artist with tex-
ture, form and color. The Bas Re-
lief paintings are the link be-
tween painting and sculpture, thus
giving the artist an opportunity to
express himself in the fullest sense
of the term, as he utilizes all three
of the visual elements.
These beautiful works of art
are not properly displayed by our
more modern standards, but as I
re-entered the tourist city of Nas-
sau. I was glad to have the
chance to have driven through
the gateway and into this almost
hidden world of art.
Home Auxiliary
To Open Season
Greater Miami Women's Auxili-
ary, Jewish Home for the Aged,
will hold its first get-together meet-
ing of the new fall season, on
Tuesday, now at the Algiers hotel.
Mrs. Benjamin Hammerman will
offer the opening prayer. Mrs. Sol
Silverman, president, will present
a message of greeting. A special
memorial tribute will be paid to
the auxiliary's treasurer, Mrs. Mor-
ris (Sadie) Kriegel.
Admission is by reservation only.
which may be made with Mrs. Man-f f.ved d,r? tof f the ?a"ard
uel Tanenbaum, Mrs. Benjamin Or- ?ch?0'f Practical Nursing in New
low, and Mrs. Samuel Baum. lYo/k T. a"d executive sec-
New residents and nonmembers ret"ry of,lh.t VV??mk, SJ'te CT"'
were this week invited to attend the m,,,ee f .l,he National Assn. for
Worldwide Music
Comedy Slated
By Sisterhood I
Costumes from all parts of tha
world, including Japan, Hawaii,
AJaaka. Prance-and -Italy, will *
represented in the program to bo
featured at the opening meeting of
the Temple Menorah Sisterhood.
The program, "Around the World
With Sisterhood," is a musical
comedy based on worldwide Sister-
hood activities, written and direct-
ed by Mrs. Robert Bloch.
Included in the cast are the Meg-
dames Alex Barad, Milton Breo-
man, Helen Gardoza, Rita Epstein,
Joseph Feldman. Ralph Hall, Nor-
man Harrow. William Horowitz,
Ann Hirshman, Herbert Kaplan,
Laura Lyons, A. L. Mechlowitz,
Ted Nelson, Jerry Rieger, Julian
Siegal, Albert Schwartz. Richard
Schwartz. Leo Sonnenblick, Mur-
ray Spiegal and Ada Wolf.
Mrs. Harry Glass will provide
the piano accompaniment. The
meeting will be held in the Casa-
nova room of the Deauville hotel
on Wednesday evening, and is open
Miss Hilda M Torrop. executive ,0 af' ";* nd prospective
director of the National Assn. for! members Mrs A- ^ Mechlowitz,
Practical Nurse Education and Prsident of the Sisterhood, will
Service, will be principal speaker conduct the affair .
at the 17th commencement exer- _^
cises of the Mt. Sinai Hospital YaCCier Da?ut.ch
School of Practical Nursing mil "MM"* ***"aWl
Wednesday. Sept. 28. in Wolfson CXChcinae VOWC
Auditorium. "* ~ -jw- ww
The class of 39 students also willL *r- "Bd "? J*wi. Chester,
be addressed by J. Gerald Lewis, 2^49 S_,12th st M,ami- announce
president of the hopital board of l,ne w"ing f ,heir "'ece. Miss
trustees; Mrs. Phillip Lefkowitz, Jean March Deutsch. to Jerry Yae-
chairman of the advisory commit- 8/r on Sunday, Sept. 18. in New
tee of the school; and Mrs. A. Her-1 YoJ"* u,y
bert Mathes. president of the Worn-' .|roolB1 '?/ e n of Mr. and
en's Auxiliary. Mrs- S^ue' Yaeger, Cedarhurst,
Highlighting the ceremonies will ^J?.8 I.sland: NY-
be presentation of cash prizes for The D"de'* aVaduate of Miami
outstanding student achievement in f?mo* High school and attended
various categories sponsored by the University of Miami. She m
auxiliary, faculty, administration. cu"ently associated with the Jew-
and, for the first time, by the med- h Community Center of Atlanta,
ical advisory board. I. The groom is a student at Georgia
Miss Torrop. active in nursing Instltute of Technology. He served
administration since the mid-thir-----------------------------------------.
ties, served as a consultant to the: ____i,, ,.----- .__-.
Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Prac-: PMdenf ofJhe National Aaan. for
tical Nursing during its formation L":^ EduCat,on **
in 1930. | :*rv'ce_______________________
She received her professional ed-
ucation at the Faulkner Hospital
School of Nursing in Boston, where'
she subsequently returned as prin-
cipal. She earned her BS degree at
Teachers College, Columbia Uni
versity.
During an outstanding adminis-
trative career, Miss Torrop has
opening meeting.
Barricini Candy
For High Holydays
NEW YORK A wide variety of
ingeniously packaged traditional
Kosher chocolates, candies, and
delicacies, especially prepared for
the Rosh Hashona holidays, are cur-
The silk cotton wood tree is'rently being displayed at all Bar
supposed to be the home of the
Chick Charnie, the Bahamian
equivalent of gremlins, lepre-
c h a u n s and snowtoads. As I
sipped tea with David Rawnsley,
and the branches extended into
the open veranda, I almost be-
lieved I could see those mischiev-
ous little characters playing in the
leaves.
SATISFACTION IS
GOOD BUSINESS!
m mats ... aa
Decorator Serv/ce
ricini Candy shops in Greater New
York, New Jersey, Philadelphia,
Washington, D.C., and Boston.
As Barricini's way of saying
"Happy New York," a new three-
year calendar will be offered free
with all holiday assortments, giving
the dates of all Jewish holidays
as well as candle lighting times for
Sabbath and holidays.
Joining the tempting array of
Rosh Hashona specialties for the
first time this year is the new and
original Holiday Octagon. The artis-
tic cover on this package is de-
signed to bring an exalted holiday
spirit and feeling of gladness.
? IT*-
MfM l*r Mtactla
mrdm Hi oinrm,
niHiUtn-t par
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NO OC4.MATION
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aaowAae
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Practical Nurse Education.
She was appointed to her present
position in 1947, having served
previously from 1941 to 1947 as
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR
Permanently Removed
Y ELECTROLYSIS
Short w Mrtlne'
SqJbia 171. JhombaAq
ILICTROLOGIST
Physicians' Reference*
108S DADE BLVD.
v Miami Beoch
By Appointment
TEL. JE 2-4306
or UN 6-9887

-




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for Miaous
Hobbf Meals
PLAKURS
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HI MKHTW it S
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
at 2
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MHB


iday, September 23, 1960
JenisttfhridSan
Page 7-B
Home for the Aged Women's Auxiliary
I HE SAME FROM ANY ANGLE
Quite a switch for me at the champagne brunch of the Women's
[Division, State of Israel Bonds, at the Americana hotel last Thursday.
Instead of sitting at the head table, I sat at the Press Table, giving
1 public credence to my new profession. Let me tell you that women
I look and act the same seen from any angle ...
Talked to guest speaker Joan (Mrs. Michael) Comay, noted Israeli
I journalist and wife of Israel's permanent representative to the United
Nations. She was most charming with her exquisite British accent and
I soft silvery hair that seemed to give authority to everything she said ...
Dresed in dapper black silk with long black gloves, I -asked her If it
I was all made in Israel. Mrs. Gomay replied that it wasof courseand
I that she felt as smartly-attired as any of her sex both here and in New
lYork .
And, judging by the impression she made, who would deny her?

The champagne brunch was Interesting and informative, except
[for some of the representatives who talked too long in telling of their
organization's work both in end for Israel. 1 feel that when you are sup-
sed to talk two minuter you do just thattalk two minutes, and not
la second over. All these speeches that are too long and make the pro-
gram run overtime can be avoided if every one would time her talks.
It is certainly easy enough to do. Use an egg-timer.
*
| FANTASTIC FLAIR FOR THE DRAMATIC
She admits it herself, Stella (Mrs. Harold) Turk, that she's naturally
llazy. But every morning she does her exercises. It's like swallowing a
[vitanim pilL peps you up for the whole day, she insists. However, all
these fancy exercises are easy for her to do, because up to a very short
(time ago, Stella took ballet lessons. She had taken them all her life, as
they are part of the training for the theater...
Stella didn't go on the stage, though; she got married instead. But
keeping with her flair for the dramatic, she puts on local interpreta-
tions of the newest Broadway shows. Stella does her own writing and
cutting in privacy, and when tbe-plsy is completely finished, she tries
{It out on her family. Her handling of "The King and I" is memorable ...
I had just come from New York, where I saw Gertrude Lawrence
in the tame role. It -wasn't until several days after seeing Stella'*
adaptation that I realized that Stella had talked all of her lines, not sung
hem. That's how good she is ...
At this point Stella, besides keeping copious files on everything she
sads, has decided to learn' bridge. Her enthusiasm no doubt makes
up for her lack of knowledge. "But Knowing Stella, this time "next year
?he will have annexed many master points in duplicate .Bridge Teuraa-
netrts and will have joined the ranks of the best bridge players extant.
I
Red letter day in the Duntov family. For the first time in a year
Imd a half, Joseph sat up for dinnerhe's been sick. Lili said it was
|uite a festive occasion and everything tasted extra special .
The Samuel Klings, trailer and all, finally reached their borne in
laltimore, missing Hurricane Donna. It must be very wearing to be
named to a man who knows all the answers and tells people what to
with their ailing marriages, but Sadie doesn't seem to mind; in fact
tie loves it. "Everything fell into place, and in some ways it seems
ttat we've never been gone," writes Sadie, "even to the stationery in
lie bottom desk drawer." The stationery is printed "Klingdom" .
Gerry Lou (Mrs. Benedict) Silverman is finishing something she
parted before she was marriedher education. During the summer,
lie took the two children, Jill and Johnny, to New York where she at-
Bnded Columbia University and received ber Master's in Speech and
tearing. Buster spent the summer commuting. As soon as Johnny
es to nursery school, Gerry Lou will have a year of supervised work
|ere and then start on a Doctorate.

This i some month of holidays for Chester and Sally Krone. Their
Anniversary is on Rosh Hashona. and then Chester's birthday is on Yom
Lippur. The Krone boys, excuse me, young men, will come home from
Jew York for the occasion. Chesterhe used to be called Little Chester
as not to mix him up with bis fatheris now associate editor of the
lagazine Publishing Company on Madison ave. ...
He already has had three short stories accepted. The first one
rill be in the December issue of "Stag." Everyone walking along the
lew Lincoln Road Mall with that magazine under arm, you will know
a friend of the Krones ...
Chester is working on a PhD degree at New York Universityfrom
fne extreme to another, since he got his Master's at Stanford out in Cal-
fornia Robert goes to the university too. He's a Phi Beta Kappa
Irom Wisconsin and is studying for a Master's there.
+ + +
THE CAR PLEASE, JEEVES .
When you have dinner at the home of Betty (Mrs. Leopold- Schwartz.
Be sure you push aside the parsley on the saver serving trays and look at
the engraving. Betty has been playing golf for the last seven years,
enjoying being in the open air, loving the competition, and delighting in
Seeing the different golf courses where she plays .
She accepts golf as a challenge, just as she has accepted her Na
ional Council of Jewish Women, Temple Israel Sisterhood, and National
ederation of Temple Sisterhood commitments. The silver pieces are
Ipart of the golf trophies she has won. Some are in the living room on
| fireside mantle, some in the china closet, and the rest are delegated
to the top shelf in the kitchen ...
Sometimes, Betty frightens herself, because she knows things that
Ihappen before they actually do. Friends insist that people as a whole
lore an open-book to Betty and that she is really psyr
"""By MRS.'SOL SILVERMAN
President, Jewish Home of Nw Aged Auxiliary
ftOUGLAS Gardens, our Jewish Home for the
Aged, now has a capacity of 104 elderly resi-
dents. With all the new facilities and the beautiful
new pavilions, life is really worth living at Douglas
Gardens.
The Auxiliary women, who contribute morally
and financially to the Home, are the "main pillars,"
so to speak. Everything and anything that will
bring comfort, joy, security and peace to the elder-
ly residents is the prime concern of these women.
Let us define each of our projects undertaken by
the Auxiliary Women.
Ou yearly gift of $12,000 to the Home helps
towards the maintenance of the Home. Next to
this, special medical care is our concern. As an
illustration, let us cite the case of Mrs. M., 83 years
of age. She has been a resident at Douglas Gardens
for less than six months. The change in Mrs. M.
during these six months has been tremendous.
Doctors and nurses have freed her from the
half-world of sedatives in caring for ber fractured
hip. Now freed from intense physical pain, she has
entered with renewed spirit into the rehabilitation
program mapped out for her. Drugs have reduced
her swollen legs to normal. She has learned to
walk. Faint movement is returning to her para-
lyzed hand. A woman of spirit and intelligence,
Mrs. M. is beginning to find that life does hold
more than pain and dejection. Soon, she will be
able to leave the Jack Ablin Memorial Wing, where
the sick and incapacitead reside, to enter the
Pavilion section, and become a part of the resi-
dents' community.
This story typifies our Home for the Aged, a
flexible Institution of dynamic care for the aged.
Although over 100 elderly people live at the Home,
they are not alike, nor are their living conditions
similar.
Labor of Love
The Auxiliary Women are proud to participate
in this labor of love, which is life-giving and life-
saving. Through our Sidney Appeal Medical Fund,
all necessary medication is provided. The Sol and
Mollie Silverman Physical Therapy Room, with a
trained physical therapist in attendance, will help

1

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MM. SOI SHVItMAM
Mrs. M to walk again and regain the use of her
onccparalyzed hand. This is what our Auxiliary
is working for to'give our residents the benefits
of all new special medical innovations.
In addition to the Senior Women's group, we
have two younger women's auxiliaries, which were
organized only, a'few years ago. The Junior Aux-
iliary, under the able leadership of Mrs. Lotus
Cole, is to be lauded for its outstanding contribu-
tions to the Home'and residents. In addition'to
contributing to monthly maintenance an capital
funds, it has recently undertaken a "Day Care Pro-
gram. It has remodeled and renovated the Day
Care Room and purchased a 32-passenger bus,
which handles the transportation for Day Care
folks, as well as take care of the transportation-of
our full-time residents.
The Hollywood Auxiliary in Hollywood. Fla.,
has a most dynamic president in Mrs. Stanley
Beckerman. The Geronotological Laboratory Mat
the Home will permit the University of Miami
medical -school to conduct all of its geriatric re-
search, and is the gift of the Hollywood women.
This fine group also contributes towards the cap-
ital funds of the Home.
children .are grown, she has more time to spend on herself, her reading
and creative writing...
Betty -insists -she will be remembered best-by her chlJoren-wiot as
a mother, but as a darri good chauffeur ...
* *
Nettie'Lefkowitz is bursting wittr'the news. Daughter LouiseMrs.
Gerald Smith just had the mast adorable black-haired baby, Debra
Joy. "Nettle is letting Grandpa Phil share in some of the glory, too .
* *
Trudy Hamerschlag went to Champaign, 111., to visit her son, who
is a .professor at the university there, while Helen Sparber stayed on
riir New York. Theyboth had .a very harrowing- experience. Coming
home from Europe on the SS Indepesdenee.-thsy were two days overdue
because of the hurricane. For five days, they wore life jackets ..
They're lucky to have come through aiive*wenty-five people on
their ship were hurt.
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
STEELMAN CATERERS
1009 S.W. 27th AVENUE
Phone HI 3-2826
Happy New Year to All Oui Friends and Patrons
COMMERCIAL FISHING SUPPLY CO.
54 SOVTHWEST SOTN STtEET
TELEPHONE PR 4*444
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
COHEN'S BAKERY
SS WuMHtN Avswm MIAMI BEACH
Ji 8-4142
-. T
ciiinais re *ii
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APPLIANCES
271* S.W. ttk STREET PNONE IN ft-ISM
SEASON'S GREETINGS .
PALMETTO HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPLY
7334 RED ROAD
MO 5-4231
SOUTH MIAMI
LAWRENCE DRUG
1*W CORAl WAT
Mr. and Mrs. Lorry ShnUn
Wish Their Many Friends
A Happy New Year
I Extend
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
and Best Wishes to All .
MMm PkillipH
New Year Greetings to All
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Chris' Beauty
Salon
BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLING
1672 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH
Phone IE 8-1912
Mi. and Mzs. Laurelli
A Happ\ And Prosperous New tfi
To AM Out Friends and Patrons
Fisher Jewelry
1433 S.W. 8th STRUT
MIAMI
Phone FR 4-2468
Milton Fisher


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^Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23,
1960
Section C
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Friday, September 23. 1960
*JewisliHerkUar)
Page 3-C
Candlestick! Were Pillars of Strength
By TRUDE DUB
T was Friday night, and I surveyed Ihe table lov-
ingly. The snow white cloth, the two crisp c.hal-
las nestling coyly under the hand-embroidered mat,
Ujc redjjyne^sparjflinii rit-hly through the cut glass
decanter, the lean, handsome shapes of silver cut-
lery Yes, it was perfect. The roses in the cen-
ter breathed a sweet air of contentment.
1 was going to light the candles, when my
daughter Frances exclaimed in the doorway:
Mother, can't you get yourself a decent pair of
candlesticks? These two wooden sticks are a pos-
itive disgrace!" Like all teen-agers, she recently
developed a highly critical altitude towards her
parents and her home.
"But why? What's disgraceful about them?"
I could see nothing wrong.
"The chromium is flaking off for one thing,"
Frances pointed with disgust to the round metal
base and top of the candle holder, "and they are
altogether too shabby for words."
I was hurt. "These candlesticks were the first
piece of our home in this country."
But how is a child to understand? A child that
thank God never knew homelessness or hun-
ger or fear, a child that was born in a free country
and is therefore taking everything for granted.
I blessed the caudles and Frances left the
room murmuring something about "people's tastes."
1 sat down to await the return of my husband
Izio and our youngest daughter Miriam from
school. My eyes fell again on the candlesticks. What
did she call them? Shabby? Old? Maybe they were
a bit worn Funny, how I never noticed it be-
fore. Come to think of it. Izio and I must have got
worn a bit since we bought these candlesticks. And
yet it seems only like yesterday .
Oh, we were making progress by then. Penni-
less refugees of a year ago, we were setting up a
home again. What did it matter that it consisted
of a small furnished room, dark and cheerless,
next door to the communal bathroom and lavatory
and two flights of stairs away from the kitchen? It
was so much better than the year of separation
when Izio lived in lodgings and I slept at the hos-
pital where I learned nursing. Now Izio had a job
and I could leave the hospital.
To* Much Water
True, working in a factory was not exactly con-
I genial for a doctor, but then we were young and
life was still before us. What kind of life? We didn't
have time to stop and think we wanted to eat.
Besides where would you stop, once you started
thinking and remembering? You might be tempted
to go right back to all the lost things which now
seemed like a part of somebody else's life. No, no,
that would never do.
We bought the candlesticks the day we moved
in and for the rest of the week lived on bread and
butter. We felt wildly extravagant and. wk I
lit my first Shabbos candles, my new candlesffks
witnessed tears of joy.
Izio and I did not stay long in this place. The
landlady thought we used too much hot water for
our laundry and baths and then all this cooking
... no, she would rather have a business couple
out all day, who would send their laundry out. Sad-
ly we packed the candlesticks and timidly installed
them in our second home, a very similar estab-
lishment to the first one. What could you expect
for the price we could pay?
This time, the landlady was a religious maniac
who preached to us, particularly at night, when
we sheltered together during air-raids. She said
the bombs falling all around us were meant for all
It will be a real Happy New Year for these
reunited people. Jewish migrants brought
to the U.S. through the assistance of United
Hias Service meet their relatives after a long
separation begun by Nazi atrocities and
World War II. ". life was still before us.
What kind of life? We didn't have time to
stop and think ..."
those unbelievers who did not want to accept her
Lord. It was hard to decide what was worse: the
bombs or this woman.
The German Luftwaffe was just then unleash-
ing all its fury and night after night we spent shel-
tering in the cellar. Our wishes became even more
humble: Just one night, dear God. let us sleep un-
disturbed in our beds. And every Shabbos over my
candlesticks I whispered thanks for another week
of life.
By now we were becoming experienced ex-
iles. Surprisingly, what a banquet could be con-
jured up from a few pennyworth of bones. Not only
did you have the soup, if the butcher was in a gen-
erous mood, he left enough meat on them to give
taste to noodles, rice or vegetables. We also dis-
covered a Jewish fish-shop, where refugees got dou-
ble portions for half the price. Of course, you
didn't have to be fussy. The place was not exactly
the Waldorf, in fact it was not like a restaurant of
any kind. But if you did not like the looks of the
dirty walls or the incredibly filthy overalls, on
which the proprietors continually wiped then-
greasy hands, you could always look into their kind,
goodnatured faces.
We were beginning to feel that the beastliness
of war was being at least partly balanced out by
human kindness and friendship when an unexpect-
ed blow struck us. Izio's firm had to close down, as
their supply of raw material ran out What next?
As a worker Izio was an unskilled man, as a doc-
tor he was not allowed to work and most occupa-
tions were barred to aliens anyway.
The Younfj Doctor
The Labor Exchange had only one post to of-
fer that of a hospital porter. Without telling me,
Izio decided to give it a try.
He did not disclose his qualifications when he
presented himself at the hospital and his first task
was to polish the floor with a heavy bumper. This
instrument Izio pushed clumsily backwards and for-
wards much to the amusement of the patients
but frequently drops of sweat would fall on the
Continued or. Pago 13-C
Beat WlahM Fot A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Gordon
and Family
5127 Ahon Rood
MIAMI BEACH
T. All ... A Mart ftaeay Tsar
van mautt am mci mm-
Rutki* Interior Decorators
surcovns Murauis
COtNKIS
onioisnuM amMStwM
41M N.W. 17* AVL CAUttS-iMI
TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
RED COACH GRILL
1455 Biscayne Blvd.
Phone FR 94008
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL (
WILSON BATTERIES. INC.
Featuring
SOUTHWAY BATTERIES
"MORE POWER TO YQU"
MARINE WESa AUTOMOTIVE
2940 N.W. 71tr S*Mf Phoiwi OX 1-4443
I jpsr
I .
Happy Holiday*
IE. SAMUEL
Inc.
DEX-O-TEX NEOPRENE |T
TERRAZZO FLOORING \\
1675 N.E. 49th Street
NE 4-6737
c':l
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS -
"RICHARD "DICK" BERENSOK
And Associate.
Miami Joi Alai Fronton
NE 3-3201
w
GREETINGS TO ALL *
U. S. PLASTERING COMPANY
Plastering Lathing Stucco To Please Yoa ?)
No Job Too Small or Too Big V\
1736 S.W. 6th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone FR 4-8115 i
TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS
SOB EL ft WEI N BERG
imiroii
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Baaeh Mien* JE
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS -
WERNER KAHN PHOTOGRAPHER
2511 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
JE M872
(iiiriMCf...
SETTLE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY, INC.
Mir WITH CONNMNC! -
2348 Nats B* Um IW.
IK COt AI CAKES SMCf 194*
Free BsHvery Ml 1-2407
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9800 N. Miami Aywu. Phone PL 8-8791. PL 8-8786
WALL-TEX SCRUBBABLK WALL CANVASWell-Tox i* honsstly scrub-
babl*. Smudgn, fingerprints, grass* spots wash off with soap and watsr.
WALL-TEX is wondsrful for steamy bathrooms. Psrfsct for kitchens, too,
anal far any ream In a home where there are aetlve youngsters.
"WALL-TEX Lasts for Years."
7* Ail Greetings ,
. BROOKS


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Friday. September 23. 1960

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Page 5-C
A New Foundation for the New Year
V>*'WW^>^a'*>**^^*^*A>tf^a^>*A>*^*^^s'WWAr**W^*^*^
By JUDAH J. SHAPIRO
U T*4* occiion of Bosh Hashona, 5721, is the first
Jewish New Year on which it is possible to
bring greetings from the National Foundation for
Jewish Culture to the Jewish community and to
the American public Arising out of a resolution
adopted by :he General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds in San
Francisco during November of last year, it was
in the period between the past Chanuka and Sha-
vuoth that the Foundation became a functioning
reality.
Jewish culture is an appropriate subject for
discussion during this season of our Holy Days, a
time of hope and stock-taking for the individual
and for the Jewish community. The presence of
the National Foundation for Jewish Culture sug-
gests that Jewish culture is now a working assign-
ment and not merely a talking matter. The Founda-
tion's mandate is not only to bring support to Jew-
ish cultural agencies but to strengthen the Jewish
communities themselves by restoring an awareness
of the historic and dynamic connection of the Jew-
ish heritage with the Jewish community's present
efforts, and to assure a Jewish future in America.
No emphasis, no comment even, is necessary on
the great, present-day involvement of American
Jews in Jewish life. It is obvious and apparent how
much activity and how many people are encom-
passed within the multiplicity of Jewish organiza-
tions, movements, services, and philanthropies. In
all these, there is only now beginning to be ex-
hibited an uneasiness about the future, about what
will happen in all these activities in that time to
come when its present leadership will have passed.
While it is an age-old tradition for an adult genera-
tion to doubt its inheritor's capacity to be similarly
adult, we see an increasing sUrkness to these
doubts and fears. And there may be good reason
for this.
During this- pest year, two personal experiences
pointed up the difference in the nature of the fears
of our fathers and of ourselves. In the first in-
stance, 1 was a participant in an imaginative series
of seminar sessions arranged for the Board mem-
bers of the several Federation-supported agencies
in a metropolitan area. The subjects under discus-
sion ranged over all the areas of service by this
community, and my own assignment was to dis-
Story from the Scroll of Esther lascmcucs
these youngsters who read from a Megillah
at the Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations. ". who might give a similarly
thrilling lecture on Jewish history for his son.
when this boy attained the father's present
age?"
JUDAH SHAMKO
... brightacts and warmth
cuss problems of Jewish culture in America. At
the conclusion of this part of the program, one
gentleman who occupied a leading directive post
rose to express his worries about the future and
explained that with all his activity and support
within the Jewish community, he could not see any
similar interest on the part of his twenty-year old
son. My comment was that though I did not know
him personally, I was prepared to make a guess
that when this gentleman was himself 20 years old,
his father very likely had given him up as a bad
bargain for Jewish life. "You know," he said,
you're absolutely right."
Continuing Tradition
On the second occasion, I was being driven
back to my hotel from a public meeting in one of
our larger communities by a man who was telling
me how much he personally enjoyed a Jewish cul-
tural experience. He told of a stimulating lecture
which had been delivered some two weeks earlier
at the Jewish- Community Center by one of Amer-
ica's outstanding Jewish historians.
He thrilled to the telling of that evening's ex-
perience. It was at this point that I asked whether
he had a son and if so of what age. He had a 20-
year-old boy. Then 1 asked him whether he had
sioDPed to consider who might give a similarly
thrilling lecture on Jewish history for his son, when
this boy attained the father's present age. He was
visibly shaken by the question, and with a sad
whimsicality said, "Thai's such an important
point."
What, then, is the difference in the two situa-
tions? Our fathers may have had concern aqd
doubts about the intensity of the commitments of
their sons to Jewish life, and surely about their
knowledgeability, but on the other hand, they knew
that within the Jewish community there were
teachers and scholars who would continue the Jew-
ish tradition of learning and leaching with more
or less, better or worse, students. Today, our neg-
lect in assuring ourselves of the Jewish learned
professions to write, to teach, to study and to in-
terpret, makes us realize that Jewish continuity is
based upon scholarship rather than on the number
of the members and the degree of activity in or-
ganized Jewish life.
Before, the concern was whether the children
would wish to learn; today, the question is: who
will teach them if they should wish to learn? This
Continuod on Pas* tO-C
re mi c*w rates
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821 NX. 79th St PL 4-5527
FREE ESTIMATES
GREETINGS
Morris BlakeMax Schoenfeld
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026 SO. MIAMI AVE.
MIAMI
GREETINGS
JOHN KORNHAUS
K. & K. GARAGE
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
Special Wheel Alignment I Balancing $7.95
375 East 32nd STREET TU 7-9898
KAPPY HOLIDAYS .
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Holiday
Greetings
from t he
LUBY CHEVROLET
ORGANIZATION
SAM LUBY, SR.
Chairman of ffce Bocrd

SAM LUBY, JR. 1UEY CHEVROLET Miami, Florida FRANK COLE l.UBY MOTORS Miami, Florida
CHESTER LUBY LUBY CHEVROLET New York, M.Y. JERRY KOEPPEL JURY CHEVROLET Baltimore. Md.
LEE SPENCE SPEMCE CHEVROLET Doytono Beach, Flo. EDWARD ASHERMAN LUBY CHEVROLET Boston, Moss.
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Best Wishes for a Happy Xew Hear
Eric F. Undqnist
STORE CTXriJItES
144S0 N.W. 26* Ammm Ope-locko, FUricta
Season's Greetings .
MARK'S

CLEANING
LAUNDRY
STORAGE
SAME DAY SERVICE NEVER AN EXTRA CHARGE }
1201 20th Street, M. B. Phone JE 8-6104
GREENLEAF & CROSBY
JEWELERS '
1000 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH ~~
THE OLDEST JEWELERS IN FLORIDA 1
Quality Diamonds Since 1868, Greenleaf & Crosby has
been famous for its outstanding collection of gem quality
diamonds in traditional and modern settings.
SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO THE ENTIRE JEWISH COMMUNITY
WALTER E. HEADLEY. JR.
CHIEF OF POLICE
MIAMI. FLORIDA
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
EASY LIVING FOAM PRODUCTS, INC.
PfOTtiMI IN Msi1#H IWM)
252 N.E. 73ro STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR .
SUNSHINE POOLS
2*21 S.W. II* AVENUE MIAMI Hmm Ml 242**

1


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Friday. September 23. 1960
*kwitfFkrHr-tr
Page 7-C
Seen from the Pisgah of Forty Years
By JACOB J. WEINSTEIN
T is the special genius of the Jewish New Year
that H induces even the average citizen to be-
come philosophical and introspective, not only
abouThii5?m nur-touurnTrcauses, Tito ISrTteTR
annivers>aiy of Hi3tadrut offers a very special in-
centive fcr both an inner and an outer look. Forty
is a favorite number in our tradition. Forty is the
number ol days and nights of the Flood; forty the
days oi Elijah in the desert before the inward
revelation of th "still, small voice;" and forty
were the years in which the mixed multitude that
came cut of Egypt were drained of (he hunger for
the fleshpots and made ready for the responsibili-
ties of fieidom anj sell-government.
So, too, have the four decades in which Hista-
drut ha; grown from a small band of visionaries
to the most effective instrument of social democ-
racy in the. Middle East been years of cleansing
and vitaJ growth. In these years the multi-faceted
Histadrut has sweated out of its pores unassimil-
able material, whether it be the incandescent phil-
osophical anarchism of an A. D. Gordon or the too
tightly structured equalitarianism of a Borochov.
It was the period in which the members of Hista-
drut learned that reality bends all ideology to its
necessities.
In the course of learning this sometimes bitter
truth, the pioneers gave up some of their inherited
attitudes toward bourgeois fetiches as administra-
tive order, planned production, individual incentive
and military defense. It was a period in which some
of the frozen gestures inherited from the "Kultur-
kampf" of the Pale of Settlement had to thaw out
and give way to a toleration for those who needed
the assurnnces of eternity to keep them loyal to the
cause of improving life on earth. And in the last
decade, ire men and women of Hisadrut have faced
a new challenge: the giddy provocation of a suc-
| cess ant the corruptive temptation of power.
Today's Miracle
Mose. found it necessary to let the generation
jborn in Tgyptian slavery die out before he could
create a nation of free men from its children. We
witness the miracle almost as incredible as that
of the splitting of the Red Sea of a people always
in the mrrginal position of an idealistic minority
[moving ir.fo the central position of power and yet
holding fsal to the core of Us idealism.
The concessions which Histadrut now makes
to private enterprise on the one hand and to the
more all-embracing collectivism on the other are
concessions made out of strength and certainty;
the strength and the certainty of a labor movement
which has assumed a task unprecedented for a
labor movement: the national rehabilitation of a
people and the revival of a long neglected land.
Nowhere in the tortured history of western
man's attempt to achieve a workable balance be-
tween the one and the many, freedom and order,
personal liberty and social security, have we seen
so many creative syntheses as are now in practical
effect in Israel. We had thought that all these so-
cial mutations had been played out oh the stage
of history, with the mir and the guild, the innumer-
able idealistic sodalities, the Christian Socialist
movement, the Scandinavian Cooperatives, the
j Rochdale system, and the various improvisations
of the Social Welfare State. But a study of Israeli
cooperatives, in the framework of a Social Demo-
cratic state and a labor movement that has pre-
[dominant political power and a sizeable economic
(investment in the basic industry of the land, re-
Iveals new, emergent, creative solutions to many
problems which have often been considered in-
Tribute to Jennie Grossinger. noted hotel-
woman, attended during outgoing Hebrew
Year 5720 by some 1,000 persons in New
York launched a drive to benefit the
new Kupat Holim medical center in
Tel Aviv. Left to right are Joey Adams,
president of the American Guild of Variety
Artists; Isaiah Avrech, representative of
Histadrut in America; and George Jesse 1,
toastmaster.
soluble. Students of collective bargaining have al-
ready noticed the constructive gains inherent in a
situation where the negotiators on both sides of the
table have had actual experience both in the field
of management and of labor, since it is quite com-
mon for a member of Histadrut to represent labor
at one time and then later be transferred to a man-
agerial position in one of the Histadrut enterprises.
Life Begins
Still, life only begins at forty. Histadrut faces its
fifth decade fully conscious that the military de-
fense of Israel is still a prior obligation and the ex-
pansion of its economy equally urgent. It is as
strongly committed as ever to make the Negev
blossom as a rose and to ring the. border areas with
strong fortresses of working settlements. While the
idealism of the early decades has taken on some of
the ineluctable sobriety of age, there still remain
great reservoirs of noble enthusiasm in the youth
of Histadrut. Where once they considered the mil-
itary hero as their paragon of virtue, they have
now transferred a large part of their adoration to
the soil chemist, the researcher in solar energy and
the desalination of water.
In a land where Moses was in full vigor at 120.
forty is the age of youth and the time when one
mitzvah compounds another. And so Histadrut has
recently assumed another heroic role. It may prove
to be the most seminal of all its roles. It has un-
dertaken to share its know-how with the young,
nascent nations of Asia and Africa. The success of
the Afro-Asian Seminar, under the brilliant direc-
tion of Reuven Barkatt, encouraged Histadrut to
suggest to the AFL-CIO a partnership in the spon-
Centinwed en Page I4-C
GREETINGS ...
{All Typo Cabinets 1 Fixtures
CHAS. F. BETTIS
Custom Made Furniture, Stere
Fixtuiet. Tables. Bart J.
Cocktail Lounge*
3819 N. Miami Avo.
PL 4-5106
A MOST HAPPY
NEW YEAR TO ALL
Le Bon Cleaners
& Laundry
Irving Kornicks
855 S.W. 8th STREET
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
MARY ENGELHARD ASSOCIATES
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER NOTARY PUBLIC
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Printing
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8080 N.E. Second Avenue Tel. Plaza 7 1685
Miami 38, Florida
To All... Season's Best Wishes
Tropical Paper & Wax Company
Was Paper, Preeser Paper. Delicatessen Faper, Tropical"
1111 East 24th Street Hialeeh, Florida
~
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Mindlin
and son Jeremy-
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
1310 no-nn nc:
To All .. Greetings
Russell House Movers, Inc.
HOUSE MOVING and RAISINS FlerieVs Most Reliable Heese Movers
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loth From* and Masonry Construction
7250 N.W. 1st Avenue, Miami 38, Florida
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TO ALL ... GREETINGS
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131 S.E. 1st STREET
MIAMI
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To All ... A Most Happy New Year
W. VALENTINE COMPANY
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Phone FR 3-4601
GreetfOfs To Our Mam/ Patrons aad friends
NOW IN OUR NEW HOME
Fruehauf Trailer Co.
17301 N.W. 2nd Averts*
Phone NA 1-3633 \
HOUDAt GKUJINGS .
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TO OUR MANY FRIENDS, A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Davis Boiler o% Iron Works, lao. i
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Ph. PR 440)0 mO-81 N. Miami Ave.
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A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR ^BJP;
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814 N.E. First Arenas
Phones: FR 9 3431 2
iinr i Nets
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TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
ACME FURNITURE MANUFACTURING CO. ",
CASE GOODS FURNITURE WOOD I
2750 N.W. 22nd Street Phono NE 4-3902



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auM J"


Friday. September 23, 1960
* Jew is* Fkriht,
fi-rence In April when he said he did not know what
the United States could do to induce Nasser to re-
spect Israel's shipping rights in the canal.
The fight against the Arab blockade, which ex-
tended to blackhsring of ships doing business with
Israel, sparked two developments which consti-
tuted setbacks far the Arab economic war.
Maritime B*ttl
One was the decision of the U.S. Navy, after
wide public outer,;, to cancel last February a
contract clause in its shipping contracts which was
in effect an assist to the Arab blockade. The clause
made it impossible for American shippers which
had done business with Israel to bid on the lucra-
tive Navy transport cargo contracts.
The other was a -decision of two powerful Amer-
ican maritime unions to hit back at the Arab block-
ade by a counter-blockade. This took the form of
picketing an Egyptian 3hip, tne Cleopatra, at a New
York berth for 22 diys while the State Department
threatened and fumed. The Seafarers International
Union finally pulled its pickets off the dock on a
promise by the State Department it would try to do
better in prevent.ng loss of jobs to American sea-
men and abuse of American seamen in Arab ports
because of the blockade. At year's end, the pledge
remained to be fulfilled and the maritime union
was on record wita a warning that would resume
picketing if there was no other course.
On the American scene, three notable events
were recorded. Perhaps the most important was
the reorganization of the Jewish Agency to assure
closer control of tbe expenditure of American Jew-
ish philanthropic funds in Israel. A Jewish Agency
for Israel, Inc., was created with headquarters in
New York, with a aew 21-man board which desig-
nated the noted economist. Dr. Isador Lubin, as
its consultant in Jerusalem.
One consequence of the reorganization was the
cancellation of annual grants of United Jewish Ap-
peal funds to sever-il Israeli parties for their social
welfare and educational programs. Some of the
affected parties announced plans to run their own
independent fund-raising campaigns in the United
States, if local Jewish federations declined to give
them allocations.
The second was the nearly yearlong observ-
ance by Canada's energetic community of 250,000
Jews of the 200th year of Jewish settlement in that
country.
Turning Point
The third was a series of sharp setbacks to
George Lincoln Rockwell's dream of becoming the
American Hitler. Rockwell and a handful of "storm
troopers" had been holding viciously anti-Semitic
rallies on the mall in Washington, D.C. District of
CNANCfUOt 4MHAIMI
...at rtMicmtitm
uktiicai samci
Neb** Bhi ffflis
IKEMSf* CONTtACTM
aii w*k tmmmtM
IwMMtWeseCteeiKW Wirtef
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Bias Thaw
Page 9 O
DAG HAMMAMSKKHD
... feifed lormulai
Columbia park police, under a curious directive,
had been protecting Rockwell's "free speech"
rights by arresting listeners who sought to protest
Fears began to grow among American Jews that
Rockwell would be permitted to grow in influence
and threat without hindrance.
The turning point was a visit to New York by
Rockwell in support of his bid for a permit to hold
a Nazi rally in New York City's famous Union
Square. Out of that visit at which Rockwell was
roughed up by enraged Jews and other anti-Nazis
came a rejection by Mayor Wagner of Rock-
well's request for a permit; a temporary injunction
against bis appearance in New York State; and
a warrant for his arrest whenever he appeared in
New York.
A chastened Rockwell returned to his base in
Arlington, Virginia and ran into new trobules. The
corporation counsel of the nation's capital dumped
the ruling that the targets of Rockwell's public
abuse could not reply. The net result was a fracas
at Rockwell's next public rally which ended in a
melee in which many of his "troopers" were badly
mauled and 11 of them arrested with Rockwell on
charges of disorderly conduct. A group of Anti-
Nazis also were arrested.
Clark King, the assistant corporation counsel,
rocked the would-be Hitler with a request that he
be given a sanity hearing. The Department of the
Interior ordered a ban on use of the Hall and the
Marine Corps, after several weeks of foot-dragging,
discharged a young Bronx marine who had joined
the Rockwell forces.
It was a good ending for the Jewish Year.
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
To All Our Tenants and Friends
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from **g
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Monday Eve. Till 1:00
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To All... A Most Nappy New Yaw
Jack L. Brasington C B. Brasington
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SWIMSUITS
I
TO All MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS
Paid U. Tevis
YOUR MAYOR Of SOUTH
SJ*. 57* Court

Greeting s To All
Quesenbeiry & Coffin ]
......1
735 N.W. 22nd A
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Friday. September 23. 1960
vJew/stincricUan
Page 11-C
Jewish brethren from Moslem lands, and build-
ling the State of Israel. All these efforts correctly
received the highest priority, while alongside these
Iprograms there were maintained and increased
I proud institutions of Jewish communal service and
[religious life in this country. As-- result*.there
have been two consequences. The first is that the
truly rcseponsible Jewish "g'vir" has not yet recog-
nized the need to return, at least in some measure,
I U, 1he support of the intellectual fabric of Jewish
life from his magnificent battles to rescue, re-
vive, and restore Jewish people.
Serving Cultural Needs
The second is that the organized forms of fund-
raising, national, international, and local have for
s< long held him in close rein because of the mag-
nitude of the welfare needs that they have not yet
rcahzed that their very causes stand in jeopardy
today. It is a sound principle to follow that where
there is commitment to Jewish culture, there is
necessarily commitment to Jewish philanthropies.
The reverse is patently untrue. For his own sake,
for the sake of Jewish continuity in America, and
for the sake of the continuing Jewish readiness to
respond to whatever Jewish philantropic need
may lie ahead, the Jewish patron, the Jewish phil-
anthropist, must be restored to the intellectual core
of Jewishness.
The National Foundation for Jewish Culture
throughout the coming year will exercise its com-
bined skills and representative leadership, both
lay and professional, to serve the Jewish cultural
agencies and the Jewish communities. It will really
be able to deal with the significant and the pro-
grammatic issues to the extent that individuals
will present themselves to support a student, a
scholar, a writer; to make possible an investiga-
tion of the treasures of the Jewish record in this
country presently scattered and requiring orderly
The Gifted
Continued from Pag* 6-C
son's warning that "somehow, it must be made
clear to the teachers that this program represents
no threat to them." The teachers, he adds, "would
need sympathetic handling, encouragement and in-
ducements to introduce" such programs.
Assurance of teacher support does not necessarily
mean that such programs can be started; there
may be powerful resistance from other sources,
such as the parents of the less gifted children. Dr.
Levinson cites the case of a large and progressive
day school where the teachers and principal agreed
to introduce a rapid advanced class to permit the
more gifted children to complete three years of
study in two. The plan was announced and de-
scribed at a Parent-Teachers meeting. How did the
parents react to this admirable advanced idea?
Some parents felt that some children, includ-
ing presumably their own, would be discriminated
against "because they were on either full or part-
time scholarships. Others thought that, since they
paid full tuition, their children were entitled to "all
benefits and skipping" that other children were.
Still others quoted chapter and verse on Mhe un-
reliability of tests and teachers' grades." Upshot:
The principal and the teachers beat a hasty retreat
and the plan was abandoned.
Acknowledge Ignorance
Another aspect of relations of teachers to gift-
ed children is that which sometimes develops from
the fact that "it is not unusual to find that some
teachers, as well as some parents, feel insecure
Mrs. Leopold Strauss, chairman of United
Order of True Sisters Cancer Service, pre-
sents SI.000 check to Milton Hans, of Israel
Supply Mission. New York City, renewing
grant to Government Hospital, Tel Hasho-
mer, for radio-isotope therapy. Looking on
is Mrs. Maurice Levien, national trustee.
". the Jewish philanthropist must be re-
stored to the intellectual core of Jewishness."
arrangement, while setting up a process of regu-
lar accumulation of such documents; to publish
a volume of scholarly worth without the need to be
governed by the present weakness of the market
for such material.
At the beginning of this New Year and of this
Academic Year, we, the fledglings .greet the ma-
ture Jewish community and its agencies, hoping to
benefit from their maturity and to enrich it.
ild is a Challenge
in dealing with the intellectually gifted child who
often knows more than they do."
Ideally, what should the teacher do in such cir-
cumstances? He should, says Dr. Levinson, "ac-
knowledge frankly his ignorance and call upon the
gifted child to supply the information." What does
he in fact actually do? If he feels his authority is
threatened, he "may turn against the child, chas-
tise him or even ridicule him in an attempt to turn
the whole class against him."
What problem does the gifted Jewish child face
in relation to his peers?
The case of Joshua, a third grader in a Jewish
day school, is instructive. Joshua, possessing an 1Q
of 185, was big for his age, well adjusted to his
classmates and a happy child. But he was bored
with his classwork and the principal decided to
skip him a grade.
The children in the third and fifth grades be-
came very antagonistic to Joshua because their
parents assured them that they were just as smart
as Joshua and that his extra promotion was not
due to his brilliance "but to the fact" that Joshua's
parents were mainstays of the Yeshiva and were
thus in a position to secure extra privileges for
Joshua. In vain did the principal protest that Josh-
ua was doing extremely well in the fifth grade.
"The children began to ostracize him. They
would not play with him or even talk to him. Josh-
ua was no longer the happy go lucky boy he used
to be. He was becoming bitter and morose, a child
with a chip on his shoulder. At this point, we rec-
Continuedd on Pege U-C
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Pcge 12C
Friday. September 23. 196oJ
rm umtir
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IHmH.,
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A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO CUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
HELEN A. QUICK
! PARRAKEET HOSPITAL
13910 N.W. 6th Court
MU 1-9713
TO ALL GREETINGS
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TO ALL GREETINGS
; Investors Insurance Agency, Inc.
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505 S.W. Ith STREET
it
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Rosh Hashona is the Power of Memory
from Poo* 2-C
Me tWTMr.~TW central theme of-New Year's
Day is the power of memory itself. Memory defies
oblivion, breaks the coils of the present, establish-
es the continuity of the generations, and rescue*
human life and effort from futility.
It affords the only true resurrection of the dead.
The act of remembering is thus in itself redemp-
tive. If, on the one hand, it involves a chastening
assessment, it involves, on the other, a comfort-
ing reassurance. New Year's Day is at once a day
Of judgment and a new beginning. If it looks back-
ward, it does so only on the way forward; and its
symbol is the trumpet of an eternal reveille."
But quite apart from the rabbinical sermons,
many quite eloquent, and from the scholarly an-
alyses, also persuasive, the individual Jew who
realizes the importance of the Days of Awe, does
so because this period affords him an opportunity
to worship on the highest possible level with his
fellow Jews. The blowing of the shofar, the cast-
ing away of sins, the remarkably beautiful pray-
ers and melodies, the hushed hall, the sobriety of
the occasion all combined make for a holiday
unequalled in the Jewish ritual. Thus, you scarcely
lind a Jew who is casual about the Days of Awe.
Into tho Synagogue
More than that, you discover that most Jews
do not feel adequate to discuss the depth of their
feelings. This goes for artists as well as "ordi-
nary" men and women. Novelists will discuss and
decribe the Passover Seder; few of them have
the temerity, or the knowledge, or the awareness,
to utilize the High Holy Days in their novels. And
the "three day-a-year" synagogue goer, finds him-
self impelled to attend services on these three days,
the two days of Rosh Hashona and the day of Yom
Kippur. Just as no one forces them to enter the
synagogue the rest of the year, no one drives them
there on the Days of Awe. But they find their way.
And so the "three-day-a-year' synagogue goer,
finds himseli impelled to attend services on these
ml
Soldier uses mine detectci to disclose
presence of metal beneath the floor of a
cave in Judean hill* during archaeolo-
gical study that uncovered Bar Kochba
letters. "Memory defies oblivion, breaks
the coils of the present, establishes the
continuity of the generations, and rescues
human life and effort torn futility."
days, the two days of Rosh Hashona and the day
of Yom Kippur. Just as no one forces them to enter
the synagogue the rest of the year, no one drives
them there on the Days of Awe. But they find t hen-
way. And so long as they do. Judaism will not be
weakened to any danger point.
The Gifted Jewish Child is a Challenge
Continued from Pago 11 C
ommended that he transferred to the fifth grade
of another Yeshiva. He adjusted beautifully there
and later won very high scholastic honors."
What problems does the gifted Jewish child
present to his parents?
Some of these are suggested in Dr. Levinson's
advice to such parents. They must, for example,
"consider the possibility that their child may not
be as advanced socially, physically or motorially as
he is intellectually." Such parents should also try
to be aware "of their own feelings of insecurity or
inadequacy. They must try to think through some
of their feelings and expectations of their children
as well as how they behave toward their children."
Not Enough Understanding
Sometimes the results are startling: "We find
that some parents, after such soul searching, dis-
cover that they do not like their gifted children.
Others will not admit that their children are gifted
in the mistaken belief that such admission will
make the child because of his exaggerated opin-
ion of himself unable to adjust socially to his
peers and develop friendships."
There are ether problems, including the parents
who are over-ambitious and forte their gifted chil-
dren to overwork; and those who. overprotecting
"their precious gift." tend to "'nlantiltfe" their
child by not allowing him to engage in activities
normal to children of his age.
And there are still otherx
Whether viewed from the traditional Jewish
standpoint of profound respect for great intellec-
tual endowment, or from the mere general view-
point that now. perhaps more than ever before, so-
ciety urgently needs such intellects, the Jewish
gifted child is indeed to be prized. But an attitude
of generalized respect for a high 1Q is virtually
useless as a guarantee if there is a guarantee
that such children will be prcv ded with a home,
play and school environment of maximum oppor-
tunity and encouragement to develop into well-
adjusted adults capable of using their superior in-
tellects in creative ways. The gifted Jewish child,
apparently no less than his nc Jewish contempor-
ary, must walk a rocky road of development, not
only intellectually but also socially and emotion-
ally largely because he is intellectually gifted.
It seems safe to conclude that such Jewish chil-
dren all too often are not getting from either their
parents or their teachers the understanding and
the guidance they so desperately seed.
NEW YEAR GREETINGS .
Les Rachline Julius Lidsky Sam Berdon
EMPIRE
ROOF TRUSS CORPORATION
MANUFACTURERS Of INTERIOR I EXTERIOR PARTITIONS
1255 Burlington Street Opa-locka
MU 5-1516
EXCHANGE
GREETINGS .
NICHOLS HOUSE OF UPHOLSTERY
MARINE UPHOLSTERING
AUTO CAR TOPS
I860-79th Street UN 5-7772
TREASURE ISLE, NORTH BAY VULAOf
mm* Bssw Office fan*"*
I74J H.W. 35* STtOT
A. F. 6IVEH
PUBLIC
ACCX5UNTANT
319 N. E 2nd Are.
Phone fit 34373
MIAMI, FLORIDA


111 '


September 23, 1960
fJmlstfhrldlar)
Page 13-C

Shofar Like Reb
Continued from Pag* 4-C
Prom his Pew ^e walked forward. He mount-
1, bim.ih.
\\ Meir puilaeVover his head the talith, hiding,
h-rribed, hiJPfc-4lenanc*. The sex ion handed
J his shofar. It was a plain, unadorned ram's
| bent as a symbol that the children of Israel
bend their hearts toward their Father in
[en. The mouthpiece was plain, undecorated,
mlal separates the mouthpiece from the mouth
he blower. And it is through the mouth that
blower's very soul enters that horn.
Approaching God Humbly
Pic sexton had prepared the shofar. The Shul-
.Arukh is clear on that point: "It is permitted
ixiur water or wine or vinegar into the ram's
c n the holiday in order to make a clear
I." At the behest of Reb Meir, the sexton
treated the horn with vinegar for Reb Meir
said: Is vinegar not, like the sweetest of wines,
:tl unto the taste of him who serves the Lord?
The congregation listened. It seemed to the lis-
rs that the opening.notes of the first Tekiah
very low. Wouid Reb Meir have enough breath
\m:\ to complete the act of faith?
I in' answer became apparent as the glissando
the first note swelled upward into the higher
i. Reb Meir had begun quietly not because
lock of wind but out of humility. I approach my
humbly, he seemed to say. But having opened
j dialogue with God, he rose higher. He had al-
lay reached the height of Sinai itself as he ap-
lached the Teruah. The series of staccato blasts
In the lower note was metamorphosed into the
(gcr high note. The note rose in majesty. "And
voice of the trumpet," as the Bible tells of the
jrrence on Sinai, ranfl "exceedingly loud." And,
I did the people before Sinai, the congregation
mbled.
Vnd then came the Tekiah Gedolab the great
tiah. In it was heard the pain and the joy, the
row and the happiness and the hope of this old
whose life had spanned two horrible wars, one
|tliem resulting in the extermination of six mil-
of his people as well as the founding of the
e of Israel as the long-hoped-for refuge for his
Me. Generations of Jews wept and prayed,
iced and rejoiced, suffered destruction and gave
inks for the ability to build and to create.
Until Judgment Day
All the ten reasons for the blowing of the sho-
. as expounded by Saadia Gaon, were sounded
lhat tekiah gedolah. Because Rosh Hashona,
ich ushers in the Days of Awe, marks the begin-
g of Creation. Because Rosh Hashona is the first
the ten Days of Repentance while the Neilah
rks the moment when the Books of Judgment
sealed. Because the shofar reminds us of the
our ancestors stood at the foot of Sinai, and
[ause the horn reminds us of the clear words of
Prophets.
The destruction of the Temple is re-created for
because in the shofar we hear the alarms of war.
d the binding of Isaac and the covenant entered
o between Israel's father Abraham and God,
^e are among the remembrances brought to us
the shtifar. The trembling before God is in the
nds of the horn, and the Great Day of Judgment,
ingathering of the dispersed of Israel, and the
urrection of the dead.
As if determine] to emphasize each of these
i reasons, Reb Meir's tekiah gedolah continued to
ierberate through the synagogue. There may
ve been few in that synagogue that late after-
#
Blown Again
Israel Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion
(center) meets with Dr. Joseph B. Solo
veitchik (left), renowned Talmudist, and
Dr. Samuel Belkin (right), president of
Yeshiva University, on occasion of Ben-
Gurion's visit to the United States during
outgoing Hebrew Year 5720. "In it was
heard the pain and the joy, the sorrow
and the happiness and the hope of this
old Jew whose life had spanned two
horrible wars, one of them resulting in
the extermination of six million of his
people..."
noon who could read all the intents and purposes
of the sounds of the ram's horn into the notes pro-
longed by Reb Meir. But some there were who
knew. And all, without knowing explicitly, felt the
meanings.
Reb Meir did permit the sexton to hold one of
his arms as he descended from the bimah. Then
his sons took over. Soon he was home, breaking
the fast.
Reb Meir never blew the shofar again. It was
not long after that Yom Kippur that he was gath-
ered unto his fathers.
It is probable that never before in all of the
history of Jewry did anyone hear the tekiah gedo-
lah sounded as it was that evening, after Neilah,
at the synagogue of the Congregation A g u d a t h
Achim Nusach Ari.
There are some in that congregation today, even
among the youngest, who believe that never again
until Judgment Day will such a tekiah gedo-
lah be heard again.
CRilTINGS
BELLE'S BEAUTY SALON
"too* Bait t BelleV
4087 t. Sth AVENUE
HIAUAM
OX 1-8746
Air Cendrtioned
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
TO ALL
MEL JACK HERMAN
and MORRIS
KALER PRODUCE
COMPANY
2121 N. W. 13th Avenue
Mmm F 4-4174
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
MAGIKIST RUG CLEANERS
'Serving the Greater Miami Area''
3601 N.W. 46th Street
DIAL NE 4-7541 or NE 4-8941
B
The Candlesticks
Continued from Page 3-C
polished surface and smudge the gloss so painfully
achieved. Unused to the heavy physical work, he
puffed and panted, when a nurse approached him
with an order, which at first he did not compre-
hend.
He heard the word "doctor," and in his con-
fusion thought the nurse was addressing him thus.
But. before he could collect himself, the nurse
seized him by the elbow and propelled him out of
the door broom and all. Then she held the same
door open for a young doctor to pass into the
ward. He was indeed very young, 24 if a day older,
and of course it never occurred to him to spare a
Continued on Paoe 14-C
TO All. .. GREETINGS
HERM GELLER CONSTRUCTION CO.
14075 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY
2225 N.L 123rd Street Phone PL 7-6652
NORTH MIAMI
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
AMERICAN EXTERMINATORS
MIAMI MIAMI BEACH
PHONE JE 8-6140
i,!
n
LANG ROOFING &
TILE CO., INC.
ROOF REPAIRING and SHEET METAL WORK
PL 8-1009 PL 1-2878 *
Established 1939 Ifl'J
430 N.W. 79th Street

To All Greetings
Tole Electric Company
Fixtures and Supplies
Retail and Wholesale
M
1041 N.W. 119th STREET
Phone MO 1-7421
To Ait Season99 Greetings ,
PELICAN HARBOR
MARINE and BOAT DOCKS .,
1301 79th Street Causeway tftj
MIAMI, FLORIDA

BEST WISHES FOR
THE NEW YEAR .
VIENNA SAUSAGE
MANUFACTURING CO.
Phone FR 1-6551
2181 N.W. 10th Avenue
To All A Most Happy New Year ____
BYRON HOLDREN & ASSOCIATES
United Benefit lite Insurance Mutual Benefit Health A Accident Ass*e
Phone FR 1-1533 Ainiley Building
TO ALL MAPFY NEW YEAR
JOHN H. BARCLAY
SIB CATAIONIA AVDMIE
Tax Consultant
HONE HI 3-4711
Accountant
rOAU...CRIiriN6S
Fred's Kiwi rival Motor Service
Sptcialhint tm Direct Carrent Atofars New ana* Benefit
1*44 N.W. 7th AVENUE *-1M
TO All CRCETIN6S .
WESTVIEW MARKET
"The Best the Market Affords at BeasenehJe Prices"
12*15 N.W. 17th AVENUE
MEW YIAlt CBEETINCS
SALES MOTOROLA SERVICE
EDDIE'S RADIO SERVICE
4604 N.W. 7th AVENUE Phone PI '0581
Service oe All Mates Aate end Meac Regies and Televisiae


+Jemi& Fk+kMbr
Friday. September 23, I960
TO ALL
HOLIDAY GREETINGS

Al
ESS: Alamo
FRIED CHICKEN
PI 7-4031
PI 14*35
Candlesticks Were Pillars of Strength ,
CATERERS
For "TWO or TOO Many"
Ym mm c*f far Cl.ki. Chart***. SckMlt WedeM** mm* lwdiiW Pmriitu
Tm Sandwiches $1.00 4m.. and Ce*d H*>r dOwtfti 15.00 hundred
Trvdy M. Sea ten Cheryl M SmNk Lee M. Seaten
To Alt Gf refines .
BENNETT ELECTRIC COMPANY
INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
METROPOLITAN LKJUBI FOR ALL AREAS
LICENSED INSURED
"free EitMMtos CktrUlbr Given"
13300 H.W. 17th Ctvrt MU 1-4453
Continued from Pane >*-C
glance for the porter at the door a children"*
intOillH "t some years standing.
\. I could not blame Ino for giving up that
job._fck wAs.wulm* to he a. portjr >r in. facunny-
thing. but not in a hospital
That week the candlestick* presided over a
troubled meal. But before the candles were lit
again, laio found another factory job through hi>
friend Joseph, a former rtech company director.
Only Joseph was not a company director now. Be-
ing a big. strong fellow, he put his muscle to good
use by carrying hea>> steel plates in a factory,
luo became a dr.Her and bis task was to drill boles
3T^
HOUOAN GMCfVKSS TO ajj.
FOOD TOWN
fwaorfy DUUMEYS
*- |mamOai I^m feamramrWat ONE |E 0OSS1 FREE DQJVEBY
in those steel plates that Joseph carried about He
worked seven days a week and got double pay for
Sundays.
We were able to get better accommodations
now so the candlesticks went again journeying
Our new landlady was a pretty woman of about
thirt> who waggled her hips as she walked. She
was followed at every step by a Pekinese who had
the same kind of walk. It was difficult to say who
imitated whom.
We did not take much notice when the first
man arrived and our landlady welcomed him ui
the housecoat with the long zipper. When the sec-
ond visitor came, we did not look closely and took
him for the same man. But as time went on. the
procession increased with an alarming variety.
However, this woman was the only kind landlady
we ever had.
Srtvet ien I
Dr
ASPHALT MATERIAL CO.
10M HW. 57* Anon MO 7 2551
awing If ft Pfonf Mi zoo* AsnfOofY
r s Omn IT W
P.O. tuTU
Harry Holler QsftJ. chart of the medical
of Government Hospital Tel
. Israel, arrived in New York re-
a waiting lecturer at Albert Ein-
at Medaane. Greeting him is
Dr. bring M. London, yrnmmrw of merlin w
and chairman of the department of medaane
at Einstein. "... it newer occurred to him
to spare a glance tor the porter at the door
a children's
standing.
As the war progressed, it was found that there
were not enough doctors in the country and oat
tag we were told that foreign doctors were allowed
to take up medical jobs. Our rejoicing knew no end.
That Friday we even asked the lady of the doubt-
ful virtue to partake in our traditional meal
A few weeks later, we gathered up our candle-
sticks and moved on this tune to another ton
and to a medical career.
And slowly our situation improved Step by
step we furnished a modest home of our own when
the candlesticks found a immanent place of honor.
AH kinds of events came and went but the candle-
sticks stood steadfastly in their place like two pa-
Lars of strength. I poured out over them my grief
over the loss of my family at Nan hands and I
w hispered to them my joy when our first child u-
hved and a few years later ear ireaed.
And se pirtare after picture rear up before;
me. each filled with the radiance that shone from
never pert with them .
My hesaaads key rattled m the dear and his
~Gead Snakees- I called to
omekly wiaang my eyes. -Goad
Seen from the Pisgah of Forty Years
tavOta Mannas
100 N. E. 1st Aw*.
ir*~loM.
s.w. tm Ai
HAPTr XRW YEAat TO ALL
JACK all
--; SUaVSKal 09*
"OaT 'Jwsaoe -.x Sc-.e'
UN 4*4411
TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mia. Seal Certificate & Staap Co,
ft* Cm*
ATUS SJJkTT METAL
93* S.W
W 00411
to Ml One T> eaon *sn~3r
A Happy Now Yoor to the
GxnrTujnity
r. H


fiiday, September 23. 1960
fJewist fkridiciin
Page ISC
United States Supreme Court Justice William
O. Douglas (seated right) and Gen. David
Sarnoff (center) were among luminaries who
joined in the double celebration marking the
30th anniversary oi Rabbi Israel Goldstein
(seated left) as president of the Jewish Con-
ciliation Board of America. Standing at the
occasion which also celebrated the 40th anni-
versary oi the Board during the outgoing He-
brew Year 5720 are Mrs. Ruth Richman,
executive secretary, and Judge Jacob Panken,
one of the Board's founders. "Wisdom .
often emerges horn the tongues of children
. light can also be shed ... by slips of the
tongue."
Reality of Rosh Kippur and Yom
By RABBI SAMUEL M. SILVER
QOMETIMES an error can illuminate a situation
more vividly than an accurate statement.
For example, think of the import of that fa-
mous typographical mistake by which the United
Nations was once rendered "Untied Nations." Peo-
ple who saw the misprint were prone to say, "Yes,
the nations are untied. When will they finally be
united?"
Sometimes the eloquent error is a stumble into
an idiom. For example, they tell the story of the
youngster whose mother pleaded with him to be-
fcave properly. "1*11 be good for a quarter," bar-
gained the boy, and according to this tale, the
mother replied, "Why don't you be like your father
and be good for nothing?"
In a sense, the High Holy Days urge us to be
"good for nothing." Other holidays are associated
with some event or some individual On Lincoln's
Birthday we feel the tug to be virtuous because
Lincoln was. On Purim and Chanuka we are in-
spired to be brave because of what Esther and
MatUthias did for us and our faith. On Sukkos,
Passover and Shavuos the majestic figure of the
Great Liberator appears, almost subliminally, ap-
pealing to be "good for Moses."
But on the High Holy Days we are importuned
to be "food for nothing." Be righteoea not as a re-
sult of the stimulation of some stirring episode or
personage, but for the sake of righteousness itself,
the satisfaction which comes from being properly
attuned to the divinity within us.
Like comment of the mother in the story who
asked the child to be "good for nothing," so an-
other lapse which once actually happened opens up
new insights with regard to the meaning of the
High Holy Days.
Beginning of Atonement
In a small town, a weekly newspaper told its
readers, as all newspapers do these days, about
the holy days. But when the article appeared,
there was a lamentable verbal mix-up, and the pa-
per announced that the ten days of penitence be-
gan with "Rosh Kippur" and ended with "Yom
Hashona."
After the first chuckle, one can examine this
mistake with a certain degree of spiritual profit,
and scrutiny will spur some interesting observa-
tions.
Rosh Kippur would be translated, "Beginning
of Atonement." And that might make a good name
tor the observance at that. Actually. Yom Kippur
for many people, is the only time for indulging in
remorse in depth. True, Yom Kippur is an import-
ant day, and it is commendable that it is observed
by the masses, who flock to their pews for prayer
and song. But we do not really carry out the man-
date of Judaism if we confine our admission of
fault and failing to that one day. It is too much to
load on one worship experience. The mistake, Rosh
Kippur, can remind us, therefore, that properly
Judaism pleads with us merely to make Yom Kip-
pur Rosh Kippur, the beginning of the process of
acknowledging our misdeeds; the commencement
of the chain reaction of reflection on our deficien-
cies, self-chastisement for our shortcomings, and
determination to elevate the level of our behavior.
And what thoughts are suggested by the typo-
graphical error (we almost wrote typographical
terror). Yom Hashona? In Hebrew that would mean
"The Day of the Year." Alas, it is all too true that
for multitudes the High Holy Day session is the
day for worship, frequently the only day. So Yom
Hashona has a sardonic note to ft. The mistake
seems to chide us, as though ft were asking.
Do you think you can cram into one period of
introspection the work needed for year-round mor-
al rehabilitation? Indeed, for many people Rosh
Hashona is virtually "Yom Hashona," the one oc-
casion during the entire year when they come to
grips with themselves, their progress in life, their
conscience, and-their Maker. For so many events
we prepare at great lengths.
Wisdom, they say. often emerges from the
tongues of children. Oddly enough, light can also
be shed occasionally by slips of the tongue. Per-
haps those we have examined will save us from
serious slips on the path of life.
CKtriNSI
FOREIGN FREIGHT A All FORWARDERS
RODVILL
FORWARDING CO.
& KREPS INTERNATIONAL
FJfLO. Na. 7M
13t N.i. 1st STREET, MIAMI
Phone FR 1-1250 P.O. Box 4047
NWerea Minn
GREETINGS TO All
RAY BOND
CUSTOM BOATS
"CUDA CRAFT"
18120 S. Dixie Highway
CE 5-6612
GREETINGS ...
RADER and ASSOCIATES
ENGINEERS I ARCHITECTS
100 Biscayrte Blvd., South, First National Bank Building
Phone FR 3-5482 Miami, Florida
TO ALL GREETINGS .
PARIS BUILDERS
GENERAL CONTRACTING
FREE ESTIMATES M0 6-0366
7401 S.W. 69th Court *" ^Wa
May your New Year be
filled with the better
things of life. m
MILLER, BACON, AVRUTIS & SIMONS
INCORPORATED
ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS

To All New Year Greetings
TUR ZEL ORIGINALS
Street, Afternoon and Evening Dresses
JE 4-2224 Miami Beach 1008 Lincoln Road
TO ALL GREETINGS .
TRAIL GARAGE INC.
Repairs Painting
1277 S.W. 8th Street
Phone FR 3-8861
^
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS -
KING FINISH PLASTER CO.
LIME COLORED PLASTER
Phone FR 3-2031
260 N.W. 27th Street Miami, FU.

G r toriafs
ELLIOTT E. STALLINS
STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANY
tnrovgm service to roe we grow-
J7S5 S.W. 27* AVENUE FNONE M t-leS*
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
JAMES NELSON
17G N.W. 7SHi STREET, MIAMI, HOtlDA fUmt Ft 44442
SEFTK TANK CONTRACTOR
Tanks Ckeeei Droin Lines loiekl New lastalletwM
SEASONS GREETIKtGS .
ARCHITECTURAL GLASS PRODUCTS
INCORPORATED
552-556 N.W. FIFTH STREET
Phww FR 3-6213 C.bte A TO All CIEETIMCS .
Abbott Gardens Private Sehool
NURSERY THRU 8th GRADE
7705 ARBOTT AVE. PHONE UN 64811
GREETINGS
HOFFMAN OFFICE SUPPLY COMPANY, INC
frMki -Cefcmtn Cfcein-eK.
S3 WALEAH DRIVE HIALIAH, FUA. Fliem TU G-247*
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS -
FENIM0RE APARTMENT HOTEL
12M EUCUO AVENUE FNONE Jl 14*11


*-7 MC
5505 NORTHWEST 3rd STREET MO 1-7693
Miami s oldest and finest exclusively Jewish Cemetery ami Mausoleum
Too many people intend to select a family burial site
"someday," bat never fet around to it until they *r*
faced with an emergency. Tbie near** making a kasty
decision under great emotional strew and hasty
decisions are seldom the best ones. That'* why you'll be
so wise to join the thousands of other esteemed Jewish
families who have already made the decision that wfll
Momd Nebo** Perpetual Care Fund
NOW EXCEEDS S150.000
i*-. ru. F^; 'Mi
lighten the burden so much, when loved ones *n lei
Their selection of Mount Nebo. Miami's oldest and finest
Jewish Cemetery, has been made after the same con-j
sidered investigation and thought that you would devote
to selecting insurance or making a will.
Like them, you too will find so many reasons why
beautiful Mount Nebo can be your only choice.
IfctlV **iBm*4Mmm.i.i6rh
t* a* M frwut. tfex* miMj tmmmm% fwmi w the
Iitjbm M m kimi *mm4 fcv tm% W4 Owvn M
r~n*. txr% ml m *^oc*4 to iW npfciLp MUlemmtm-
tmmm m" Ummt .VW anwaS*. T. mm Am mtmm
fee in.nl Mk p-riU* Wm* mU frtUrrmm
MXVT >EB0 IS y> >\\ENIEVTLY LOCATED
WWikcr \ttm b*c MOOR NEBO IS SO WELL ESTjNJ*HED
*UeM scW^K fpsMb <*~4*5(C* for *
keaapWof
ML fcT\K^&NXO'T^BET\\ED
- tkr, he M fc, 4ri*""M are mm.
WtfTE r"0*
DFMI1S TOOAr
COUNT
5505 M.W.
Ml


Tradition of the People of the Book
"Jewish Flor idian
Miami. Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960
Section D
Extract from "Boo\ of E ai'tftou U'iiii'juc-a-rr't-rs'fwp-
1^y^wf-a* a'rowgwn w'rv -r-tf **y\
aa**p?ww^ ^S-o^rriwjiMwa^y-aj-' a?n VaVfWt nwy
awa-Saoa^jy Srwfeajwpttw *w"timr- varcx-H* no* anMntwft?
sr^tr,*nrw^r>-w*r^jraa^:^^ nr
i-rwnwavaa^a; .^.'f*rJWT^|3Kwnr iwa {w** ra'f**"*1' a' 9*8*
iwrotnon "*a "Wrfhw ***** vmrvfoh fife** wn njrwKrt: o:
<*yxip^9^'V-*wvorhi?an'im** i3rrvatw*T-*jra
acr pno xjtra tnn ygr kwwwh^ a-arym f^Trtyr^
Syra^c^VaVya i3Sor*,wnntwtMt3tyf^'3^'?y|'>a"*ym faan '3rt^
a^tranVaVrfiarran-vnicro rrwrwi^nr'J^Saa-'tvs'raJ'n
Tim J* WbA ^rtl>liir^^r*na,r3Wa^,n^f<^30li*ar^r
->* *** *-j ?mp "tfnaKxrttprwrro rBOi^w vtw*
r3CJS**ar'a*w.Mra^S'
I

^w-s
BOOKS ENABLE US TO MASTER THE COMPLEX ART OF LIVING
Libraries Indispensable to Civilization of Jews Everywhere
By MARVIN LOWENTHAL
lAfHENEVER a Jewish community opens for gen-
" eral use a roomful of pertinent books, it con-
stitutes the latest link in the long chain of Jewish
libraries, public and private, which stretches back
to a misty and dateless antiquity. No one any
longer knows the nature or the precise origin of the
first Jewish or, better said, Hebrew library. Ancient
Israel aroe in a highly civilized region; and
libraries are indispensable to civilization. Vast
collections of books, written to be sure on clay
rather than paper, have survived from the royal
libraries of Nineveh and Babylon collections
whose earliest material, whose first editions, date
from nearly five thousand years ago.
Of Israel itself, only hints are left us. There
was a city in the territory of Judah, originally a
Canaanite city, which Joshua calLs Kiriat-Sefer,
that is. Book-Towna name later changed to Debir.
itself perhaps related to the Hebrew term for
word." When the prophet Samuel wrote a book
on the character of the kingdom which the Israel-
ites insisted upon adopting, he "laid" the book "up
before the Lord"that is to say, he put it into the
safekeeping of a sacred, priestly library-possibly
at Shiloh. To put a book in a sacred shrine was a
way of preserving not only the document itself but
the integrity of its text. The Greeks often em-
ployed the same safeguards; it was the ancient
equivalent of taking out a copyright.
There must have been a library, a collection
of archives at least, in the celebrated First Temple
at Jerusalem. It was not any loo well run-or so
circumstantial evidence would imply. During the
18th year of his reign (621 B.C.E.) King Josiah or-
dered the Temple to undergo necessary' repairs.
While the repairs wore in progress, probably in the
slackroom. a book was discovered which had long
been lot to sight and mind. Tradition holds that
i; was the Book of the Law. or the Torah; modern
scholarship identifies it as the presumably newly-
writtcn Book of Deuteronomy.
The first individual Jew credited with the cre-
ation of a public library was Ncheiniah, one of the
happy few who led in the restoration of Jerusalem
after the return from the Babylonian captivity. The
Second Book of the Maccabees tells how Nehemiah.
lounding a library, gathered together the acts of
the kings and the prophets, and of David, and the
epistles of the kings concerning the holy gifts"
(2:13. Certainly the compilers of the two Books of
Chronicles, the last historical writings included in
the canonical Hebrew Scriptures, had at their dis-
posal a rather extensive librarypossibly the one
founded by Nehemiah. The contents included all
nl the books now contained in the Hebrew Bible,
except of course for such miscellaneous works as
were not yet written. It also included a goodly
number of books cited and sometimes tantalizingly
described in Kings and Chronicles, but which are
lost forever. 1 count 21 of these vanished treasures.
Talking <"*
No doubt somebody at some time or another
must have borrowed these fascinating books, and
as borrowers will, disappeared with them into ob-
livion. What says Ben Sirach? 'Many persons,
when a thing is lent them, reckon it to be something
they found."
Yet, despite the depredations of borrowers,
books multiplied and libraries grew. Koheleth has
an immortal word on this proliferation: "Of making
many books there is no end." Probably the speedi-
est and most copious output in the annals of the
ancient publication trade is recorded in the Second
Book of Esdras (14:44); in lorty days five men un-
der the dictation of Ezra wrote down 204 different
books composed on the spot. The last seventy of
them, incidentally, were placed under what librar-
ians today call restricted circulation: in this in-
stance they were issued only to such readers "as
be wise among the people." But the account smacks
more of Talmudic midrash than of fact.
When the Talmud was in the process of com-
positionduring the first two centuries before and
after the start of the Common Erathe rabbinical
schools had at their command, among more con-
ventional material, what might be termed a talking
book. For a long while the rabbis were loath to
commit to writing their prime source material, the
Mishnah or Oral I-aw, which was the basic subject
oi their studies, commentaries, opinions, and argu-
ments. Writing down the Oral Law, they felt,
might impair the authoritative quality which came
lrom its being par excellence the "unwritten" law.
They were also afraid that scribes, who could
not be checked up on the spot and at once, might
be led into making editorial changes or else what
we know today as typographical errors. So they
trained a band of young men, usually not bright
enough to think of anything divergent to learn the
Mishnah by heart; and when an assembly of schol-
ars wished to refer to this or that original Mishnah
text, about which there might be some dispute as
to how it ran, one of these young men would reel
Continued nl.o* 12 D


NEW YEAR GREETINGS
ARKIN CONSTRUCTION CO, MC.
1827 Pwrdr Awm Phone IE t-0C13
MIAMI BEACH. FLOHIDA
----- -
ZZ All HAPPY HOLIDAYS (ROW* I.AIMIKV A (IKWKKN -m mit set u$$- muni nas uaria 2C2S Hi I63rd St N. Miami Beech WI 7 1112 -------------- .. ,
BASOtri StOTUKS TO Mi
tKlf G. IIIKTMH
165* N.W. 19th Street
NE5-S912
Secsc- e Greetings 7 c ALL Cur Friends and Patrons
Paul's Carpet Co. Inc.
2412 If. Miami Amut 4797 S.W. 8th Street
FR 44435 Phone HI 44092
Bat a was the awtosuj of
that braaght to Soath Africa the Jew*
traveled Boat to its icanc dere)
Uc* Barney Barnato. Alfred Best. David Harm aad
Smmj Marks, who played signdicant rates in taw
carry awaiag days. Baraate was Rhodes' rrral
the treat bmeerky
sntil nxaSy they aatal*ara: came a director of Rhodes' D Been Diamond Com-
pany, the concern destined tc beence sot only the
b*sa* ffimmii minis* combine m the warld. bat
the reJers of the world's diamond mdnstry. la
mare recent yean this iwam named into the
hands of another Jew. the late Sir Ernest Oppin
lister, and in the present da; tc his son. Harry
Orpii'iiimi. Beit and Hams also amtiates
of Rhodes in the Rimherhj diamesd empire.
ftmms Marks came to Soutt Africa. Lke so
Discussing new Sheraton-Tel Arre hotel are
Prime Minister Darid Een-Gurion left) on
occanioo of his recent -risil to the United
Slates and Ernest Henderson president d
Sheraton chain, who chaired mrenth an-
nual dinner of Aiaarican-Jsrcen Charmer of
Commerce tost April in New Yoric City.
: AM 4
erw re
WEATHER-TIGHT COMPANY
PS
1112 WORTH LF JETJNI BOAD
WHITMORE
ELECTRIC
COMPANY.
A Happy :Cew Yecr to All
M O ONE Y
IRON WORKS
Shop
1299 N. W. 29th Street
Phone NE 54*72
PORTABLE EQ0IPMEKT
Acatfleae and Electric
OUP4T
TO Ml
Uncle Eric's Happy Town
ttffrmcs re m
mast
y
O'ANGOO PUSTBHNG CO.
454 H.W. 71st STRUT,
Pi i-*e4
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS
163rd ST. GARDEN & PfT SUPPLY
Fertilizers Lawn Mower Sharpening, Repairs
Sprinkler Systems Birds
1629 N.E. 163rd Street WI 5-3961
FREE DELIVERY
A HAPPT NEW TEAR TO AUj
OUR FRIENDS AHO rn1M|
Gables Stationers
OFFICE SUPPLIES
129 GIRALDA AVENUE
CORAL GABLES
Phone HI 4404.
Sol and TheJma Schreiber
___..
..

M---------------


\
Friday, September 23, 1960
+JewlsliFk>ridUan
Page 3-D
The Legal Aspects of the Eichmann Trial
By RICHARD COHEN
ISRAEL'S right to try Nazi mass murderer Adolf
Eichmann rests on firm legal as well as moral
gtpund*, according to a study made by the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress.
The analysis cites precedents in international
law ana in American jurisprudence supporting Is-
rael's claim to jurisdiction in the case. The study
points oul, for example, that international law has
no provifcions governing jurisdiction by individual
nations ir. criminal cases. In certain crimes, such
as piracy, all nations are considered to be equally
affronted and any state acquiring physical custody
of the accused may try him, it is noted.
"The genocidal acts of which Eichmann is
accused would seem to comprise no less universal
a crime under international law than piracy," the
report asserts.
The American Jewish Congress document cites
the unanimous adoption by the General Assembly
of the United Nations in 1946 of a resolution affirm-
ing the principles of international law as laid down
at the Nuremberg trialamong them, the outlaw-
ing of ma.-s murder. The study comments:
"If the Nuremberg principles have been incor-
porated into the common law of mankind, then any
nationincluding Israelthat succeeds in obtain-
ing custody of the person of Eichmann would have
the right to conduct his trial."
No Bar to Jurisdiction
The fact that Eichmann may have been forcibly
abducted Irom Argentina has no bearing either in
international law or in American legal practice on
Israel's jurisdiction in the case, the analysis finds.
According to the study, the basis in international
law for criminal jurisdiction varies widely from
nation to nation, but is never affected by the way
in which the prisoner may have been apprehended
and brought to trial. Similarly, it is noted, the
United States Supreme Court has consistently main-
tained that the manner in which physical custody
of a prisoner has been obtained in no way affects
his trial or impairs the competency of the trial
courteven in cases of prisoners brought forcibly
from abroad to U.S. courts.
The report cites numerous legal precedents to
this effect, going back to the 1886 case of Ker vs.
Illinois, in which the jurisdiction of an Illinois court
was challenged on the ground that the accused had
been seized in Peru in violation of the law, forcibly
brought against his will into the United States and
delivered to Illinois authorities. The U.S. Supreme
Court held that although this was an instance of
"kidnapping within the Dominion of Peru without
any pretense of authority," it in no way disabled
the criminal courts of the U.S. from proceeding
against the accused.
Territorial and Nationality Grounds
The rule of the Ker case reflects the attitude
not only of the U.S. Supreme Court but of the Exec-
utive branch as well, the AJCongress reports. The
study notes the rejection by the United States At-
torney-General in 1935 of a claim by the Mexican
embassy that one of its nationals had been abducted
from Mexico "in a manner which constitutes an in-
vasion of jurisdiction by American officials com-
mitted in Mexican territory." While recognizing
the irregular recovery of the Mexican national, the
Attorney-General insisted that the trial of the ac-
Traditional silver Torah Pointer being made
by an Israeli silversmith. Many of these
pointers will be presented to synagogues
throughout the United States this Rosh
Hashona in recognition of their Israel Bond
effort. "Nowhere in the world (than in
Israel) are there more witnesses who
can testify to Eichmann's activities."
cused and his subsequent imprisonment on a nar-
cotics charge were v alid and lawful.
The analysis discusses two customarily ack-
nowledged grounds for jurisdiction in criminal
casesone based on the territory in which the al-
leged acts were committed; the other determined
by the nationality of the persons affected by these
acts.
The rationale of the terrritorial basis for juris-
diction, according to the AJCongress document, is
the assumption that evidence, witnesses and other
elements necessary for a finding of fact in the case
are likely to be found most readily where the act
occurred. But it is precisely these considerations
that argue for Israeli jurisdiction in the Eichmann
case, the study declares, adding:
"Nowhere in the world are there more wit-
nesses who can testify to Eichmann's activities.
Nowhere in the world has there been as systematic
and careful an attempt to collect and retain infor-
mation relating to his operations. For reason of
trial convenience alone, therefore, Israel's claim
to jurisdiction is based on solid legal and practical
grounds."
The report observes that Israel came into be-
ing after the conclusion of World War II and there-
fore cannot conventionally qualify as the place of
nationality of Eichmann's victims. But the inten-
tion of this jurisdictional principle is "to allow that
community most directly injured and aggrieved to
participate in the determination of responsibility,"
the study asserts, adding:
"Adolf Eichmann's crimes were directed spe-
cifically against the Jewish people. As the inter-
nationally-recognized heir and representative of the
Jewish victims of Nazism, Israel is the logical and
legitimate instrument to try the man responsible
for decimating the Jewish community of Europe.
West Germany itself has recognized Israel's unique
sovereignty in agreeing to pay some $822,000,000
Continued on Ptgt 14-D
GREETINGS TO ALL
FRANK GARCIA
BEACH
TYPEWRITER
CO., INC.
. Erry*hin foe Your Office
Sales Service Rentals
Supplies
\ Wl-A ALTON ROAD
Phone IE 8-6272
MAM BEACH, FLORIDA
A NAPPY AND PftOSPffOVS HI W ft At
TO alt OOf WINDS AM PATRONS
MODERN AWNING SHUTTERS
8851 N.W. 37 th COURT
Phone OX 1-6851
to all ... Gutnmes
DIRJTS GOLD SEAL MEATS INC
5010 AT TOUR MVOftfTE STOW
1177 NJ. list Straot P1M5W
IT IS OUR PLEASURE TO EXTEND
GREETINGS FOR THE NEW YEAR .
CITY of
NORTH MIAMI
] ED. G. VISCHI
Mayor
E. MAY AVIL 1
City Clerk j
J. HOUSTON GRIBBLE
Tax Collector
WOODWARD M. HAMPTON
City Manager
9BE*
9P
Councilmen
THOMAS SASSO HARRY K. HURST
JOHN B. BOUDROT JAMES G. MILLER
naiQ nn-nn id:
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mindlin
-*!
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
SER0TA PLUMBING COMPANY
PUmaina t Hatting Contractors *ifol/afio*s IWittMMt laoaJrs
1728 Alton Rtaa Mmm JI 8-2S85
Miami Rtach JE 8^*54

Hancock Refrigeration Co., Inc.
"FRIGIDAIRE DEALER" Salts Strvict
1524 N.W. So* STREET PHONE NE 5-4521
USED DEPT. 2196 N.W. 7th AVENUE
GREETINGS ,
DIXIE FARMS PRODUCTS J
WHOLESALE MEATS and PROVISIONS
519 N.W. 23rd Street Phone FR 14494
IffTIN C S
M0NSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI, INC
WHOUSAU OCAIS mmd CANDIES
M 5.W. FIRST STREET PHONE Ft 4-515*
GREETINGS TO OUR MANY JEWISH FRIENDS |
EARL V. WILSON COMPANY fi
MERCHANDISE BROKERS
Miami
Jacksonville
Tampa
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS and PATRONS GREETINGS
CLARK & LEWIS CO.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
34N.E. llthStr^t Phon FR 3-310S
I
TO ALL GREETINGS .
THE MIAMI INSURANCE AGENCY. INC
GENERAL INSURANCE
H. JHL WOO DSMAIX. J JO,
#02 N.E. 114th St. North MUml Fhona t>L 44*15
TO ALL GREETINGS
llixie l.jut < rp>rsU!4R
MooJpMp
405 So. Dixio Hhjhwoy Cord Gojhoj


?r^.+!
Friday.
23 1880
0UD4f wtftTMCS TO Oft
PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK
Part-Time Chaplain for Welfare Board
Mi 94O0E5 =-.:
AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK
PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK
Dbrie
,;;-- <. =:
at H
NATIONAL
IANK OF COMMERCE. MIAMI

I
N.W. 79*
33rd Ai
greetings:
T. J. James Const. Company, Inc.
MU t-tttl
IOCS FILL SAJCD
"WE MOVE THE EABTH"
1730 H.W. 113th SL
The part
vanety to
tieaai and ether rimmnaeM activities Far the past
H years he hat ben part-txaae renal am at Part
Ga.. serving alone aad naaidrl sheet half
thereat < the time with a rrfnlarlr
taaawarx He's alas the Jewish
at Learn end VA law pal I Aagasta. Ga.
aad the Forest BiSs Aamex. which he has covered
for 11 aad six years, respectively. Far faar rears
he was also the part-txaae f*Trltin at the
p.ar- the Aab-Aircraft AruUery of the C
River Project. Aikea. SC. On the latter
traveled almost aa hoar each way
aa a weekly vast. Tm* A-A-A installation, he al-
ways said, rimndtJ him of a military nai|aii1
ia a small peat as Orefoa daring World War H
days "I didn't have a
they seed ase there
a
letters.
GHEZT^rGS
Lehnhard-Burgess Corporation
Imormace Adjusters
Ai. uses w rm comumms
1433 N W 30fh ST*tKT, Sv*. 211 Ph. HE 3-9541
I 'Juak he was exaggeratiag: he lakes to do
that. A: any rate. TH answer f x the fact that
he had few few men of the Jewish faith at the
AAA. see. He coatdet riidrt regular services.
Nevertheless, he had regular coafereaces with the
boys He made arrangements for Sabbath aad hob-
day aarucaaataaa ia Aikea aad in Angwsta. He
worked with the top brass oa the personal prob-
lem* which come to the fare ia any aa
rtary or VA assignment He enjoyed
ant contacts with the
From tune to time, at AA_A_. as at other av
stauaLon- he attended a Mass or Protestant serr-
** law Catholic chaplain gave him a beantifal
Una with English translation aad the Kabbi
like.; :o sit in a back row of the chapel translating
Baabca! passages from Lat-n to Hebrew. He al-
ways complained that the chaplain u, darewng"
too fast.
Jewish chnpsnin in Hawaii shows a
nan and bin family the h*>T which will
uahnr in tho new Jewish Year 5721. Tnroach
oat die year, in all pars of the world, lew-
ash Gls guarding America's freedom ob-
serve the holidays and 'ivnla of the Jew-
ish calendar, led by lewieh chaplains re-
cruited, entice end and eorvod by (he Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board.
Bighto' He wonld aad he did. fating ante the old
military roatine once again.
Sometiaees. he writes a letter te
enarters in New York, asking for a
lain to be assigned to Fort Gordon.
read case. I ought to know. I write the
"Came on. now, Aryan ; Rabat Aryeh Lev.
of JWB's Cirmirnia oa Jewish
can't handle this all by myself. Yea
a congregation of my own. Send as a
laiE
The part-time chaplains, like those en a fall-
time duty in all the branches of the Armed Forces,
are recrmted. endorsed aad served by JWB's Com-
mission on Jewish Chaplaincy, and together with
JWB's Armed Services Committees and USOJWB
workers cover more than COO mdatary installations
and hospitals in every earner of the rieatii
When Rabbi Lev answers aad avoids the S64
ouestasa by teshng the Rabbi ef the goad reports
they are getting from Fort Cords*, from the Post
chaplain and from the CO, he purrs lake a ma-
Ian, -Well- he says in that sanayiag uugrammati
cal way -They ain't a seadaag a chaplain to Gor-
don. I reckon HI have to fa right an ^lTf-i it
all by myself. Hona"
X, I
i rot
chap-
TO ALL GDI FRIENDS AND PATRONS
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
g
ALBERT HAVE?. JACOB L LEVLNE
AIIU \IK.O BROKERAGE CO.
Custom Hc-se Brokers and Forwarders
**&k Bwisdina PWoe FX 1-4S78
The close Meacialiun with the chaplains resett-
ed ia an ittmsnal assignment which the Rabbi said
look ban back to the days of his Army chaplain-
cy." The two resident chaplains were scheduled to
be away from the post for a period of two months.
CathoLc boys were directed to go to Aikea for re-
ligions services The Protestants had a service
scheduled every Suriay morning aa Post, under
the direction of a sergeant-assistant aiiiiiii The
JewLh boys, of course, had their weekly meetings
with the Rabbi
"Would the Rabbi come over on alternate Sen-
day mornings and preach at the Protestant serv-
ice*" Certainly, he would, and he did. Fine, but
would the Chapiam come over earlier on Wednes-
day* and giTe the -characterguidance" lectures?
Yes. it takes considerable tune but he's got
it down to the rrarntisli He preaches eat there
two Fricay evenings at 7 o'clock. That's aa hour
and fifteen mmates before bis awn senates ia
town. He goes oat during the week far hasn't il
calls and consahations. Tomilimu. an mangim j
calls him to the Fort for a wand time enrriag the
week. Sometimes, when he is m a harry, he asks
for aad gets a ''Military Pouce escort.-* Yoad think
the top brass was ridiag in from Washington when
this takes place. Oser'" It's the -fcpi~ en a fly-
ing visit, sandwiching in an extra hoar between
two non-military engagements His camiagatiaail
religious school is open to Army iirnanH and be
CawHnwed an Pane 10-O
! All. Greetifs
Tharpe's Iron Works
WROUGHT IRON RATINGS ORNAMENTAL DOORS. Dc
3155 N.W. Swwti River DrtVt
NE 54713
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON .
WILLIAM "BILL" WISNESKY
EXCAVATING CONTRACTORS
Barber-Green Dttchera Iwaaaaawaaal Septic Tanks
Dry Wells Barkhoo Excavanha
7140 S.W. 42hm Street
GSET NGS .
J. F. STEWAIT NIORTGAGE C0 IHC
MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTME3TT
Room 300
1st National Bank Buildin*
CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA
MO 6-2523
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO AU OUR FRIENDS
Adams Glass Service
1919 Purdy Acenue. Miami
lEMtSl
NEW YEAR GREETINGS .
JOHN B. ORR. INC
M HMM. rOVSTITf
Qmmrrtf K+n*t*nr
415 IV.W. .>flh Swi-eBOBt
TOAU...
A MOST
HAPPY NEW YEAR
MILTON
WHSS
1


Friday. September 23, 1960
+JmisMlt**matn
Page 5-D
r
80 Years of
Technical Assistance
By DR. WILLIAM HABER
MEXT month in London,-4alegAtec from Jewish
communities in 25 countries will assemble to
celebrate the 80th anniversary of ORT, Organiza-
tion for Rehabilitation through Training, one of
the oldest welfare agencies in Jewish life.
The year of ORT's founding in 1880 in Czarist
Russia seems located in the far distant past. But
it is not so much a matter of the length of the time
span that gives its remoteness, as of the fullness of
events which have effectively transformed the
world during these intervening decades.
Yet, eight decades ago, the antecedents of the
great majority of today's American Jews lived in
Eastern Europe. Nor was the size of this popula-
tion much less than that of the present American
community. But the conditions of life differed
drastically.
All but a few select categories of Jews were
restricted to the crowded towns and villages of the
Pale of Settlement. Nor were they free to live as
they chose within this vast ghetto. In a predomin-
antly agricultural society, they were barred from
land ownership. In what was still a handicraft
society, they were excluded from many trades.
The world celebrated by Sholom Aleichem and
I. L. Peretz was a place of destitution. Jewish eco-
nomic activity was burdened by legal oppression
and discrimination. Jews were forced into mar-
ginal occupations. A few were artisans. Most,
like Tuvye the Dairyman, were "luftmenschen,"
peddlers, innkeepers, petty tradesmen. Large num-
bers were paupers on the edge of chronic hunger.
But if the material side was bleak, the spiritual
existence of the "shtetl" was often vivid and cre-
ative. Toward the latter half of the century a fresh
spirit was abroad within the ghetto confines. The
movement known as the Haskala. or Enlighten-
ment, stirred a new ferment of intellectual excite-
ment, stimulating a desire to action for equal rights
and Jewish emancipation.
Modernization Proctst
At the same time, the traditional economy,
poor as it was, was being battered by powerful
forces of economic modernization, as the indus-
trial revolution spread eastward. The small-town
pattern of Jewish hfe was undergoing the disloca-
tion of change. The times called for new approaches
to the social problems of age.
Youngsters at ORT Vocational High School
in Nathanya, Israel. "ORT today is provid-
ing training to some 40,000 persons an-
nually in 19 countries."
John Daniel Aboagyeh, 17. of the Santi
Nyankumasi tribe oi Ghana, and grandson
of a tribal chisf related to Prime Minister
Kwame Nkrumah. is shown with fellow-
students at an ORT Vocational School in
Israel. The Council of Elders oi the tribe
selected John to go to Israel to study electro-
mechanics.
The idea of ameliorating the extremes of Jew-
ish poverty through rendering more people eco-
nomically productive had long been propagated by
a few leaders of the community. In 1880, a group
of Jewish industrialists and intellectuals of St.
Petersburg petitioned the Czar lor the privilege of
establishing a fund for the purpose of "developing
artisanal and agricultural occupations among the
mass of our co-religionists," which became known
as ORT.
Creation of a vocational training agency for
the Jewish people was part of the modernization
process of Eastern European Jewry. By under-
taking a task that is customarily the function of
governments, the community was expressing, in
this as in so many other welfare areas, the principle
of self-help'which has such profound and creative
roots in the Jewish past.
While that world of 80 years ago has vanished,
the need for vocational aid, for trade schools and
training in technical skills, has acquired heightened
relevance. Through two world wars and their after-
maths, such programs have proven to be powerful
aids for human reconstruction, for rekindling hope
and the ability to work, learn and be productive
once more.
But it is the continuing technological revolution
of our age that has given particular immediacy to
this program. In Israel vocational training has ob-
vious significance for the economic integration of
its newcomers, the majority of them from under-
developed societies. Equally, the formation of
skilled manpower to operate the emerging indus-
tries of Israel, calls for an expanding program of
trade and technical schools. And so, ORT has had
its most extensive development in Israel. Tech-
nical training centers are operated in 22 localities
throughout the land, with an annual enrollment of
almost 10,000.
In the Moslem lands of North Africa and Iran,
a half-million Jews live today under conditions that
are, if anything, even more wretched than pre-
vailed 80 years ago in Eastern Europe. These
areas are no longer outside the range of modern
influence and the trade schools have opened new
Continued on Pag* 15-D
To All .
Happy New Year
and Season's Greetings
Auerbach Paint Co.
1871 ALTON ROAD
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
Bonfire Restaurant
HICKORY ROASTED FOOD OVER OPEN BONFIRE
GREETINGS
AIRLINE BRAKE & WHEEL
ALIGNING CO.
Ovar 12 *'> Ixptritnct
MAKES M* FIONT ENDS
WfcMl AKflMMMt C*i iMCMfl
hiM eae Asia Sarviet
-K Tn Cm"t SNe-tW *"
3701 N.W. 36th Street
NE 4-3311
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR .
Hoover Awning & Mfg. Co.
6921 N.W. 7tfi Avenut
AwateflS SslsHeM
Bsech C
Pimm PI 4-2667
Impmttmt
Canvas trntf
Met Watwyrt
-Wt Aaytfctaf at C
rCotM xif
tjjf^st lAJishes fer
Uo
SEASON'S BEST
WISHES TO ALL
SWEET INSURANCE AGENCY
117 N.E. 1st AVENUE
"SWEET IS YOTO KEY TO SECURITY"
FR 4-2675


Shop Phone FR 3-4113
GULF ELECTRIC SERVICE
Contracting Repairing Appliances
John Sutherland
3529 N. E. 2nd Avenue
Miami Florida
i

i
W>'W\rf\^4^>A^>^^^^W^^\tf'W^A^W\>W'W'U
BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
KAMMER & WOOD
Electrical Contractors
i
I
297 N.W. 54th Street
Phone PL 1-3621
TO ALL
SEASON'S BEST WISHES
BOH X V. AULASOK
Pain Island of Miami

TW UNNMM FAMAT
1M NX St* STMfT
G*Ef T/NGS .
I IHNOX TIRE & SUPPLY CO.
THIS ri TUBfS IECAMMNC ACCESSOtMES ATTFIKS
III Of CONSNOMOCHfN TIMS
5590 N.W. 7th AVE. PI 1-9669 3300 S.W. tth ST.
llliriRIi
MmreeUu M'phl*tering Shop
H4kmm4 WH m WMftwt Owr MwHrM
S19S S.W. Ittfc STWIT NMM M S-7SM


^
Page 6-D
+Mis*rkridB&r
Friday. Sopminbor 23, i960
1
BEST WISHES
or a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
BEST WISHES
IJV TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
l^ff ON THIS HOLIDAY OCCASION
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
MacOONALD CLEANERS & LAUNDRY
DRAPES SPREADS RUGS PICKUP 6 DELIVERY SERVICE
Phone MO 1-5831
MIKE SALAMON. Manager
5650 S. DIXIE HWY. SOUTH MIAMI
NEW YEAR GREETINGS .
Lobnitz & McCormick Millwork
2789 COACOOCHEE AVENUE
and
3060 S.W. 37th COURT
MIAMI. FLORIDA
Phone HI 6-0607
r
"WHftf TO GfT IHtkV'
Hopkins Carter Hardware Co.
MAIN* SUffllfS rAmTS mm VAMMSMfS nSttMC TACUf
KAUTICAl CNAITS SHMUn ft mills lOTTtEB 6AS
fffff PARKING ami DELIVERY
139 S. Mhmi! Avmm fW Ft 1^654
Italian ami America* Dnhmts
COCETAJU ITALIAN SPECMLTKS Servioa tm rM
GIO* A VMS REST AC
MM N.W. Tvlfc SHUT
Feed Sim IMS
tuti
4-153*
PHOCTOH AND SON BODY WORKS
SEAT COVERS TAILOR MADE
Douglas Road
Florida
Peerless Manufacturing Co.
Corrugated Cartons and
MX 74th Street
Frail CaxfiM
PL 84353
British Organization Marks 200 Years
y EOWIN EYTAN
ONDON British Jewry this year celebrates
fc the 200th anniversary ofns Tepresentative or-
ganrrati the London Committee of Deputies
of British Jews, universally known as the Board
of Deputies.
The Committee was founded in 1700 when
seven -Gentlemen Elders of the Portuguese Jewish
Nation" called on the Lord Chamberlain and asked
htm to coweey to King George III. on his accession
to the throne, the homage and congratulations of
their
The Ashkenaum. grieved that they had not
been invited to join, appealed to the Sephardim for
joint action in the future and the two congregations
decided to act in unison, communicate with each
other and cooperate "in all matters touching their
political welfare." The Board of Deputies was
born.
At its first business meeting the Board's com-
mittee had to deal with a call for help from Ja-
maica's Jews. The Board intervened at once with
the governor of the island thus setting a precedent
for the great tradition which, in the words of Sir
Moses Montefiore, its president from 1835 to 1874,
hi to "intervene wherever and whenever possible
to alleviate the sufferings of Jewry."
It was Sir Moses Montefiore, whose services
to Jewish distress lasted until his death at the age
of 101. who gave the Board its modern form. It
was also during his tenure of office in 1837 that
the Board was given the honor of presenting its
homage to a new sovereign in person, and not
through a court official.
Barely three days after the Board's delegation
presented an illuminated address to Queen Victoria
on her enthronement, a major calamity befell world
Jewry the Jews of Damascus and Rhodes were
accused of killing Christians for the purpose of
using their blood for baking matzot. The Board at
onc% dispatched its president to the Near East
where he successfully met with the governor of
Alexandria and with court official* in Istanbul. The
deputies also subscribed a large amount for assist-
ance to the victims of the persecution.
Major Calamity
For the next half century the board was kept
busy with local matters, fighting for equal rights
for British Jews. This campaign was sucessfully
concluded in 1858 when Lionel de Rothschild took
the oath of office and his rightful seat in the House
of Common-, as the first Jew to sit in Britain's
Parliament Jews were also granted the right to
serve on equal terms with the rest of their country-
men in all sections of the nation's life, military
and naval as well M civil.
At the same time the Board continued its end-
less interventions on behalf of less fortunate Jews
in Ru>sia. Rumania. Morocco and Persia. It also
granted its whole-hearted assistance in assimilating
the thousands of homeless Jewish refugees escap-
ing Russian persecution the refugees' material
needs were being cared for by another well-es-
tablished body. -The Jewish Board of Guardians."
but the deputies dealt with their political and social
rights orphans and widows were protected; leg-
islation and factory regulations were translated
into Yiddish: interpreters were provided: and count-
less children were recuperated from the snatching
arms of various Christian missionaries. The Board
also organized English classes for the thousands
of foreign Jews who yearly flocked to Britain.
For years the Board had opposed Zionism and
yet when Lord Balfour in 1917 dispatched his his-
toric letter granting British support for the crea-
tion of a Jewish National Home in Palestine, it was
addressed to the Board** vice president. Lord
Rothschild.
Zionist Imawratisn
With the election of a distinguished mathe-
matician. Prof. Selig Brodetsky in 1840. the Board
gained not only its first president of Russian ori-
gin, hot also its official Zionist inspiration Through-
out the difficult last years of the British Mandate
the Board adopted a courageous attitude defending
the rights of the Yishuv sometimes in the face of
a misguided and hostile public opinion.
Today the Board with its 420 delegates repre-
senting 250 synagogues and 25 secular institutions
is a tumuluous but vigorous assembly. It is ever
ready to take action on all internal and external
issues dealing with the welfare of the Jewish peo-
ple. During the recent anti-Semitic outbreaks last
January, it cooperated with the Home Office and
the police, undertook research work aod vigor-
ously denounced the bestial happenings thus rally*
ing public opinion in the fight against the outrages.
Much of the prestige of the Board rests on the
fact that it is no self-appointed group but that each
member is democratically elected by his own con-
stituency." Nowhere else in the world, except in
Israel, is there an organization which can be said
to represent the Jews of its country so truly and
completely. Its honorary officers are also freely
elected, sometimes, during bitterly contested elec-
tions.
It is the representative character of the Board
that has led to its recognition in so many spheres
by the government of the day. Delegations are fre-
quently received by Ministers and the heads of gov-
ernment departments. The Board has received stat-
utory recognition, by mention in Act of Parliament
such as the Marriage Act and the Shops Act, as the
authoritative body empowered to act on behalf
of the Anglo-Jewish community:
Post War Problem*
At the first meeting of each new Board, mem-
bers are elected to the various committees for a
three-year period. The senior of these committees
U the "Law and Parliamentary" which was created
Continued on P* 1
TO ALL GREETINGS .
KIRT'S PIPE SHOP
"QUALITY SMOKERS REQUISITES"
TOBACCONIST PtPCMAKER
HUMIDOR FRESH CIGARS PIPE REPAIRS OUR SPECIALTY
Sooth of Miracle MO* (Opposite Coral Gables lank)
2413 Galiano Street HI 8-4916
LI, Terr.
8017 NX. 2nd Aon.
MIAMI
SEASON'S GREETINGS
T. V. SCOTT
LAND CLEARING COMPANY
BULLDOZING EXCAVATING
WRECKING CRANE SERVICE
7143 N. Miami Avo.
PL 44733
GREETINGS
G. m R. AUTO SERVICE
ROAD SBtVKE A TO WING
BODY and FENDER WORK
PAINTING
GAS-Oll-TIRES
3851 Bird Rood
HI 4-2421


I II
Friday. September 23. 1960
>len#$# fhridfor)
Page 7-D
Difference in the Youngsters of Israel
By ANITA ENGLE
T isn't hard to discover that most people who
write about SabrasIsraeli young^t&rshave a
strong partisan belief that they are different from
all other >oungs'er3. Not only just different, but
because tl their phenomenal national featsbetter
as well
As a matter of fact, Israeli youngsters are
different from young people everywhere else in
the world. Not because they're braver, more in-
dependent or more patriotic. It would be hard to
prove thai the young people of o^her countries
j would not behave as the Israeli youth have done,
[ under the .-ame circumstances.
Whal makes them unique, and rather special
products in today's world is due to one thing. That
is their study of the Bible. The Bible is taught in
every school in the country as a subject. Israeli
children begin their study officially from grade two,
and they continue until they leave high school. The
Bible is the book from which they learn the history
of their people and their land, and it is the book
from which they learn much of their literature.
Thus nothing foreign is imposed on them. It is
a living part of their language and their country.
My children were brought up in the lovely vil-
lage of Kiryat Amal in Lower Galilee. Ml. Carmel
stretched across the sky line, in full view, the high
point from which the Prophet Elijah called down
fire to confound the false prophets of Baal.
All around us were the remnants of the oak
forests ot Biblical times. This is a special oak.
called the Holy Oak, and it has varieties of en-
chanting acorns. [ kept looking in the Bible for
gome relerence to this oak. At last I was thrilled
to find that Absalom was killed when he took shel-
ter in an oak forest. If you remember, his long
bair got <; ight up in the branches. This was in the
mountains of Ephraim. The mountains of Ephraim
were not far from where we lived, and these special
oaks also grew there.
That was enough for me. I used to show all
Our visitors these fascinating acorns, and tell them
my wonderful discovery. One day my boys were
in the room when I was telling this story to a vis-
itor from abroad. David, my youngest, who was
eight years old then, suddenly piped up and said,
"Why that's not true, Mummy!"
We produced our English-Hebrew Bible, and
we found that we were both right. According to
the English version, the tree that Absalom got
caught in was oak. Oak in Hebrew is "alon." Ac
cording to the Hebrew text, which is, of course,
the original version, the tree was an "aylah."
"But what's an aylah?" I asked.
No Swrpriae
"I'll show you," said David, and off he ran to
the woods at the back of the house. He came run-
ning back with a spicy smelling branch of a tree
which I knew very well by sight, but had never
heard it called by name. We looked up its English
name in the dictionary. The tree that poor Absa-
lom got caught in was not the oak, btu the terebinth
tree. That is the same tree that Saul, the first
king of Israel, sat under when he held his court. And
here it was, growing in our back yard, just like
any ordinary tree!
it is not surprising to find youngsters in ele-
mentary schools in Israel who are more at home in
the Bible than many people who have sweated to
get university degrees in the subject in other coun-
Cheerful Miss is this resident at the Mir-
rachi Women's Children's Village and Farm
School at Raanana "studying at the font
of the world's ethics cannot help but leave
some impression ..."
tries. "Gingy." a 19-year-old private in the Engi-
neering Corps, is an example.
Gingy was one of the volunteers who took part
in the famous expedition to the Judean Desert when
Prof. Yadin found the Bar Kochba letters. This
stalky.'red-headed little chap showed such phenom-
enal strength in shifting boulders about in the cave,
they nicknamed him "the human bull-dozer." When
they found the first scrap of parchment scroll with
a few words written on it in ancient Hebrew. Prof.
Yadin hadn't time to whip out his concordance, to
check its source, when Gingy called out "Psalms."
another youth called out "Number 15," and both
of them recited the missing passages to the end.
I met Gingy at a reception given by the Pres-
ident and Mrs. Ben-Zvi in honor of the expedition.
He was about 5 feet 5 inches tall. His arms were
like the thighs of a steer. Although he had come
from North Africa as a child, with his flaming red
hair, broad, freckled face, and good natured smile,
he looked like an Irish navvy.
Does their study of the Bible make Israeli
children any more religious, or even better be-
haved? It's rather hard to say. But studying at
the fount of the world's ethics cannot help but leave
some impression, although* I must admit it was
more noticeable in my boys during their early
years at school.
On the last day of school before Yom Kippur.
my seven-year-old Jonathan came home and said to
me: "Our teacher told us that we must ask par-
don of everyone we hurt or caused trouble to in
this last year. We asked her pardon for being so
noisy. She asked our pardon for being cranky with
us, and the boy who threw me down last week and
cut my leg came up and asked me to pardon him."
Up till then, Jonathan hadn't been able to get
a sympathetic word out of the boy, even by dis-
playing an imposing Kupath Holim bandage.
Then Jonathan asked my pardon for various
misdemeanors. I asked his, we exchanged kisses,
there was a one-way transfer of chocolate, and
we both felt well on the way to a happy New Year.
Happy New Year to All
BEST WISHES
FOR
A
HAPPY
NEW YEAH
MR. and .MRS.
AKHY NlltKIV
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
GROO DISPLAYS, INC.
WINDOW & INTERIOR DISPLAYS
111 N.W. 22nd Avonuo
Miami 35, Florida
FR 1-3473
Greetings for a Most Happy
and Prosperous New Year
to Our Many Friends and
Acquaintances
NAT and BOB
BERNSTEIN
SEASON'S GREETINGS
PHIL CROTEAU
CUSTOM RUNT FURNITURE
and STORE FIXTURES
7000 Oral Way
Phone MO 1-4696
TO OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
AND THE ENTIRE
JEWISH COMMUNITY
VyVExTenc!-------"*
ALL GOOD WISHES FOR THE
NEW YEAR
VICTOR ft. CONN
ACME SUPPLY COMPANY
2670 N.W. 75th STREET Phone OX 1-1321
J

To All... Most Happy Holidays
Dr. Joe Hall
DADE COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
1410 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
lest Wishes for the Now Year ...
Tho Doorway to
Fashion at
Its Fintil
Imo-ThirlyTwo Miraclt Milt Coral Cables, Flo.
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS .
JACKSON ELECTRIC COMPANY
ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
AIR CONDITIONING WIRING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL
21330 S. Federal Hwy.
Perrtne
CE 5-2541
PERRINE. FLORIDA
lest Wishes for the Holiday Season .
i&i
GENERAL TIRE CO., INC.
4 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
MURPHY & JORDAN, INC. ^
Insurance Honaoers and Agents l4l*T]
"PR
IS
1
Affiliated with Murphy A Jordan, Inc.
with office* at 101 Park Avenue, Rutherfard, N.J.
179 Broadway. New York 7, N.Y.
1150 S.W. 1st Street
FR 7-2318
COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE
NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM
AVi:ilKTT\S TREK SERVICE
TREES TRIMMED. TOPPED, REMOVED
LICENSED and INSURED
7550 S.W. 30th Tarrac* Phone MO 74103
1
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
MACK CONSTRUCTION CO.
Uol S.W. lt STRUT POONI MO 1


Pc^e 8-D
23. 198Q
to Ali Omr J*>iri*h Wriemdm
ASSOCIATEP QMCm
1 Ollt SIGN OF QIALITY.
MKVKi; A.\D HONESTY
Ass^riated Grocery Stores ove embers srr.:
Local people Living here with you e
Fiends Representing orer 20% of Sou ia ;
pmBTJ business.
there's one cf as near you.
SHOP IN ONE TODAY ."
n
RABBI and MRS. S. M. M \< IITI I
MR. and MRS. MORTON STITSKY
STELLA REGINA. LEO JAY and JERRY HOWARD
Extend To All Jewry-
Best Wishes for
A HAPPY NEW YEAR

MR. and MRS. DONALD S. LAVIGNE
join with their children
MR. and MRS. MYRON COWEN
Sen. Gary John, and Daughters, Elizabeth & Melinda
and
MR. and MRS. WALTER A. LAVIGNE
Daughters Leslie. Morley and Shelly
and Son. Elliot Mayer
la expressing their best wishes to all their friends for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
T O A LL
HAPPY NEW YEAR
NASH MIAMI MOTORS, INC
545 N. E. 15th Street Miami. Florida
Phone FR 9-2828
BEST WISHES FROM ALL OF US
TO ALL OF YOU
RAY-MAR ELECTRIC CO.
3043 S.W. 31th COURT PHONE HI 64418
SEASWS MrffTMCS ..
ABBOTT BO.VN ETT M RMTI RK
2718 S.W. 28* Lens (S Dixie Hwy ft 27th Ave.) M 5-2433
MUMf MffTMSS TO AU .
.EAR PEST CONTROL
18870 Mi 8th AVENUE Phone PL 4-4883 or PL 82534
Former President Harry S. Truman (right) is ident; and Lawrence G. Laskey. executive
greeted by Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice pres- committee chairman. Principal speaker waj
ident of Israel Bond Organization, at opening Gen. Moshe Dayan. hero of the 1956 Sinai
of 1960 Israel Bond campaign in Greater Mi- campaign and currently Minister of Agricul-
ami during Hebrew Year 5720. Looking on hire for the State of IsraeL
are Abraham Feinberg (right), national pies
Israel Meets Challenge of Development
By DR. JOSEPH J. SCHWARTZ
Vice President State of Israel Bend Organization
IT an exactly ten years ago that the Government
of Israel first suggested the floating of an Is-
rael Bond issue in the United States. Those of us
who attended the meeting in Jerusalem in 1950
convened by Prime Minister Ben-Gurion were force-
fully made aware of Israel's acute economic posi-
tion at that time.
There was a general recognition that extraord-
inary measures were needed to help Israel meet
the staggering problem of absorbing immigrants,
who were pouring in at a rate of some 250.000 per
year. More than 100,600 of these immigrants were
living in tests at the time of the Jerusalem meet-
ing. It was a tune of severe austerity. Food was
in extremely short supply, and some foods were
completely unavailable. There was no money in
the Israel Treasury
The big question was: could Israel sustain her-
self economically' The War of Independence had
been fought courageously and successfully: the
Jews of the world had bees inspired by Israel's
heroism: a great moment in history had brought
joy and pnde to our people. Yet K was by no means
clear whether Israel could build a sound economy,
whether she could maintain herself at a level which
would make it possible to absorb hundreds of
thousands of newcomers.
Cap Reduced
It was in this bleak atmosphere that the Israel
Bond drive wa undertaken. Only by recalling these
circumstances can one arrive at an adequate ap-
preciation of the magnitude of Israel's economic
strides in the past nine years and the tremendous
role which the S440.0O0.000 derived from the sale
of Israel Bonds have played in bringing Israel
within easy reach of a visible economy.
In the period since September, 1950. Israel has
moved steadily upward on the barometer of eco-
nomic growth. The year 1969. for example, was
the best year in Israel's economic activity since
her establishment, and was the first time since
1951 that her balance of payments showed a de-
cided improvement.
Since Israel last observed Rosh Hasbona. tho
total gap in her trade balance the difference be-
tween the value of goods and services bought and
those sold by the country were reduced by about
10 percent, from $335 million per annum to $305
million. Israel's exports totaled $290 million in
1969. as compared with $235 million in the previous
year.
At the same time. Israel's exports have become
greatly diversified. Israel now exports commodi-
ties to some 90 countries throughout the world. She
sends diamonds and cement and raincoats to the
United States, textiles to the Scandinavian coun-
tries. Switzerland and England, automobiles and
trucks to Africa and Banna, and staple citrus prod-
ucts to almost all the European countries. New in-
dustrial crops such as peanuts, tobacco, cotton,
sisal and sugar beets are increasing from year to
year, with a large share earmarked for export.
In the past nine years. Israel Bond> have en-
abled Israel to construct more than 225.000 perm-
anent housing units for immigrants. Israel plans
to use additional Israel Bond allocations for the
erection of 160.000 permanent dwellings in the next
five years, at a cost of $3,000 apiece.
Israel, with a population of more than 2.000,-
000. now provides 70 percent of her food needs by
her own production. In 1951. with a population of
approximately 1.000.000. Israel produced little more
than 50 percent of the foodstuffs consumed in the
country. The total area under cultivation since that
time has increased from 412.000 acres to more
than 1.000.000 acres, while the irrigated area has
increased from 75.000 acres to 300.000 acres.
Since 1951, more than 700 new enterprises have
TO ALL GREETINGS .
HARRIS REFRIGERATION &
AIR CONDITIONING. INC
COMPLETE SYSTEMS FOB STORES. OFFICES.
UTLDDrGS. INDUSTRIES. HOMES
AID PROMPT SERVICE
*34 West rMsyief Street
Ht 94114
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR
FRIENDS AND PATRONS
J. A. Cantor Associates, he
145! N- BA
Pal
CUMATML COtPtXATrON
Kinai
4S45
1-4178
affraMS re au
I


Friday, September 23, 1960
been established to produce machinery and equip-
ment like lathes, drilling machines, welding equip-
ment, cranes, lifts, agricultural machinery and
tools. lr addition, over 100 new enterprises have
been set up to process various chemical deposits,
including potassium, chlorine, bromine, magnesium
and phosphates.
New Enterprises
Mineral development is going forward in all
sectors of the Megtv and in the central region of
the countiy. With the aid of Israel Bond resources,
the Dead Sea Potash Works will increase its annual
production of potash, bromine and other minerals
irom 13E.00O tons to 600,000 tons in Hi* next decade.
The phosphate nines at Oron in the Negev, un-
known beiore Israel was created, are now produc-
ing over 250,000 tons of plu^phates per year.
It is la Elath. perhaps, that Israel's history-mak-
ing progjam of development is most excitingly dra-
matized. This new port, Israel's gateway to Asia
and Airica, has become in its eleven years of ex-
istence a thriving town, with an oil pipeline which
runs to Beersheba and Haifa. It is being developed
as an industrial center, as well as a resort area.
Technical assistance for underdeveloped coun-
tries has become a major adjunct of increasing
trade with Asian and African countries. More and
more of these nations are coming to Israel for guid-
ance in agricultural development and industrial
"know how." Israel has sent technical experts,
plant managers and economists to many of these
nations, tc help develop their economies.
New Development Areas
Among the countries which have received eco-
nomic find technical assistance from Israel are
Burma, Ceylon. Ghana. Liberia, the Philippines,
Sierra I-cone, West Nigeria, and a number of oth-
ers. Israel has signed trade treaties with some of
these nations, and has entered into partnerships
with others in such diversified endeavors as ship-
ping linct, construction companies and industrial
plants.
This development represents an important as-
set for ^rael on the international scene. In a very
significant sense, it constitutes an answer to the
Arab effort to isolate Israel and to throttle her
economic advancement. At the same time it dem-
onstrates Israel's effectiveness as a "showcase"
for the hind of social and enonomic progress which
may be achieved under a democratic system.
Israel's growing influence confirms our hopes
from the very beginning that she might stand be-
fore the world as an exponent of the highest moral
principle;,. This has been shown in many ways.
Recently Israel revealed in a dramatic manner
that she has the capacity to serve as a guardian
Jen>isti Hcridliain
Page 9-D
Spraying grape vines at an Israeli settle-
ment. Israel Band funds have helped stim-
ulate this industry.
T^rsjsfs/HfSJBjmrsrsfELrEJSfsii
Young immigrant fits spokes into bicycle
wheels at a factory in Israel v/here, since
1951, the Israel Bond campaign has pro-
vided more than $440 million of investment
capital.
Member of Israeli Kibbutz Tsora works on
the construction of a new dwelling to help
Israel's growing population. Since inde-
pendence, Israel has built more than a quar-
ter of a million housinq units with the aid of
State of Israel Bond funds.
of Jewish rights and as the keeper of the conscience
of the world in its treatment of Jews. Israel will
not permit the world to forget the terrible crimes
of Hitlerism, and.she is determined to do every-
thing in her power to make certain that they will
never recur.
At the foundation of Israel's role in the sur-
vival and reconstruction of the Jewish people is
her need to attain complete economic stability dur-
ing the coming years. During this period, increased
economic opportunity, including full employment
and permanent dwellings for her newcomers, will
have to be created throughout the country. To
achieve these purposes in the shortest time possible,
Israel will rely heavily on Israel Bond funds.
Vital Facts
With the aid of Israel Bonds Israel expects to
fulfill major economic objectives in the coming
years, including the speedy industrialization of the
country to increase exports and narrow the gap in
the balance of payments. She plans to accelerate
the exploitation of her natural resources, including
Continued on Page 15-D
tinrmci
PETE'S LAWN MOWER
SERVICE
1391 .. 7** tram
Pkom OX 1-3842
hi*"
BEST WISHES FOR THE
HOLIDAY SEASON
LESTER
(.Kit FIN
"PUMP 4 WELL SERVICE"
3175 H.W. 87th Strost
Phone OX 1-1531
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
HARRIS UPHOLSTERING CO.
RE UPHOLSTERING and NEW
Hotel Cocktail Lounges. Bar*. Booths,
Also Breakfast Nooks
921 N. Miami Avanu. FR 1-5286
GREETINGS HAPPY NEW YEAR
NICK & ARTHUR'S
RESTAURANT and LOUNGE
Over 27 Years of Gourmet Dining
in Greater Miami
1601 79th STREET CAUSEWAY
H A Very tittppy New Year to Ati
M
1 Mr. and Mrs. Dan Weinstein
\
*(rtoi[Company
Manufacturers of vl-jf
Genuine Steel Die Engraved Stationery f?
Wedding Invitations Bar HHHzvah Invitations
Social Stationery
commercial hotel social
FRED K. SHOCHET SHIRLEY BARNES
BILL APTE
116 n.e. 6th street
Photit FR 3-4634
SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL
NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF
MIAMI, INC.
Wholesale Produce) Crate to Carload
1229 N.W. 21st Street Phono FR 3-8491
TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
MARVEL CLEANERS
SEtVKE 4 QUALITY CUANMC
Mrs. Lucllo P. Neher. Owaor
16 MIRACLE MILE
Phono HI 8-2554 '
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Tropicalites
# Designers Manufacturers
Cold Cathode Lighting
NEON SIGNS MAINTENANCE
120 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 9-57*1 '

A HAPPY NEW YCAR TO ALL
OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
Mr* ana Mrs. Back
oitho
apix cieaners i
Phono FR 4-2833
LAUNDRY
J


Pace
+JeistrkrHku-
Friday. September 23.
1960

THE OPERA GUILD
OF
GREATER MIAMI
wmw aii in am of.rho ***** Faith
A Vary Happy, Pro*provs and Haattfcy Nn Yaar
ARTUtO Dl FILIPPI
Artistic Director and Ganoral Maoayar
THE PERSONNEL OF
WEINKLES
Liquor Stores
WISHES EVERYONE
A Mont Happy Wmm Year
IMS
19 STORES SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA
Besr Wishes for the New Year Holidays
ASSOCIATED ARTISTS
Supplies for Artists, Engineers and Architects
1122 BISCAYNE BLVD.
Phones FR 3-3562 or FR 9 2336
TO ALL GREETINGS .
POWELL SEATING AND
SUPPLY COMPANY
Fofiorty C ft A Seles Sorvico
FOUJOJg OUItS sad rOUOW TAMB
AU TfffS Of SIATK4C FOO CLUBS. WHOM It ALLS, CM, ITC
A. 1. (Ml) f*w*ff
Tfco Seofiog Headquarters for the Soot a"
52 NX 51st Street F1wm It 1-1954
THE FARR FAMILY
f jr#e#Ws Now roar Grettimn H Hot ftiro Jewish Ciewrf)
TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
PARK MAIrlSOX STIRIO
PORTRAIT PHOTO GRAPH CIS
205-07 Lincoln lldcj. 350 Lincoln owl
Phonn J 1 5280 Miami Beach. Florida
OILS FRAMES MINIATURES
SEASON'S GREETINGS .
PARAMOUNT CLEANERS
spkiMizmc m rtuiotMC amo custom mam ciotwj
1753 COOAL WAY Phoo. HI e-0347
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON
FLFKMAV HI IIJIISKS
-fUlMAD OMIT HUAMS UTTtt KHU"
2139 N.W. 7th Street
A Happy -New Year to Our Customers and Friends
PEGGY'S BEAUTY SALON, IXC.
1*37 WASMINOTON AVL (at UaKeta Band) MIAMI Bf ACH Jf 1-1*45
**ti->fcji

Part-Time Chaplain for Welfare Board
from Pi
4-0
has recruited tome fine Sunday School teachers
from Fort Gordon. He tells his congregation: "We
fet some fine 'dividends from the Fort."
They no longer have the Di>ciplinary Bar-
racks" at Fort Gordon, but when they had. then
he as in his element. 'An old prison chaplain."
he describes himself, having served tn that capacity
at Feisom Prison near Sacramento. Calif., in his
early days in the rabbinate He liked to work with
the prisoners and I do believe that he was sorry
to *ee hi> favorites released
What do you do with a guy like the Chaplain?
He ...oes get involved emotionally with the soldiers,
the prisoners and the patienrs at the V'A. Nothing
is routine as far as he is concerned.
He likes the freedom he now enjoys in taking
military problems right to the top. "Remember
the Army days. Patrick." he reminds me. "when
we used to go through channels*" I remembered
them. He found out. the hard way. that you don't
just walk in to see the Colonel or the General.
Ah. but he does walk in. today He does phone
directly to the CO or to the Chief of Staff, and
how he enjoys the new freedom He sits in the
Post Chaplains office discussing a particular prob-
lem. It is involved: it is difficult: it is likely to be
fouled up somewhere along the line. Ultimately,
of course, it must be brought to the attention of the
front office."
I think the VA is his most very special inter-
est. At Lenwood VA Hospital we have a number
of Jewish patients, somewhere between 20 and 30.
at all times. These men are veterans of World
War II. mainly, plus a few World War I OMOOaVoi
and several Korean conflict men.
Here. too. it is difficult to hold regular services
for all the men. The Chaplain finds it practicable
to schedule group meetings and services in the
various scattered wards. Of course, there are men
at VA who are not in condition to participate in
services.
Occasionally, they fool you. For example, at
a holiday service when the Rabbi was accompanied
by a little lady of the Sisterhood, this is what hap-
pened The Sisterhood gal questioned a patient,
asking him. pointedly. "What did the Rabbi say?"
He looked her in the eye and asked this question.
"You were there weren't you?" She admitted,
somewhat disconcerted, that she was. "Well." said
the patient, "he said the same thing to me that
he said to you."
o*yooo Cooo/fagattofv
A death among the old timers who have been
at Lenwood for many years is like a death in the
congregation. As the chaplain says. "You get to
know these guys. Sometimes you meet members
of the family (all too infrequently, alas). The men
confide in you. You visit them quite often. Indeed,
you see them more often than you see some mem-
bers of your own congregation.
"Bonds of friendship are strengthened through
the years. You go with a man to staff meetings.
You have consultations with his doctors. You dis-
cuss the matter of transfer, of trial visits at home,
of discharge from the hospital.
"Sometimes you accompany a patient you have
known so pleasantly in life, to his last resting
place and read the funeral service.
"Oh. yes, your rabbinical duties are extended
far beyond the confines of the congregation and
the general community when you do chaplaincy
work. You have a commitment that's the right
word when you undertake to minister to patients
at a VA installation."
Welcoming the New Year, the congregation
of GIs and their dependents in Korea take
Kart in the traditional observance of Rosh
ashona. For Jewish men and women with
the U.S. Armed Services in every corner of
the world, the Jewish chaplain recruited,
endorsed and served by the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board provides religious activ-
ities throughout the year.
"And don't think." the Rabbi reminds me. "that
you are ministering only to Jewish personnel." He
is available for the Sunday preaching schedule
when one of the regular chaplains is ill. indisposed
or out of the city. He preaches, from time to time,
and the service he conducts is reminiscent of the
"general" service and sermon that has an appeal
to all men of all faiths. Also, every Tuesday
morning he conducts a devotional service on the
hospital radio hook-up.
He relishes an invitation to preach to VA pa-
tient.,. They are. he claims, most discriminating.
He is so keen about his work in Augusta be-
cause it is. as he says, "a wonderful congregation
plus The people in the congregation understand
the great need which exists in local military and
VA installations. Many of them, men and women,
serve as volunteer workers in all of the local mili-
tary and VA facilities.
And because the members of the Rabbi's civi-
l;an congregationthe Walton Way Temple in Au-
gustahave this warm interest and understanding,
they are never critical about the hours their Rabbi
spends with soldiers and patients.
The congregation invites the participation of
the military at rehgiem and social functions Often,
patients from the VA and workers and officials
come to the services. Psychiatrists and other staff
members belong to the Rabbi's congregation Holi-
day services and Passover seders are crowded with
visitors from military and VA installations.
It is this fine cooperative aptrit which makes
it passible for the boss to work a few hours each
week at the various installations in and near Au-
gusta. "Variety is the space of life." he likes t
say and. when he says it. I knew exactly what he is
driving at. He is saying "Life is interesting down
here ful communityand there's an opportunity to re-
live the pleasant military experiences of the war
days by continuing to serve the ban as ther part-
time chaplain."
I guess he has been on the JWB Chaplaincy
rolls for more than 25 years. Shea Schwartz in-
troduced him to the Array Chaplaincy in 1034 in
GREETINGS .
tar Jeerts Set
Stool Erected
Clam and Drag
N. POPENHAGER
-CRANES-
Phone HI 3-J05J 2534 ufKO|n Avenue
COCONUT GROVE, FLORIDA
TO ALL OUR FRIEND6.
RELATIVES AND
ACQUAINTANCES
A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. A Mi
Harry W. Field*
1434 COUNtS AVI.
BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAYS .
ATLAS SCREW & SPECIALTY
COMPANY, INC.
Bolts Nuts Screws Washers Expansion Bolts
Steel Brass Stainless Aluminum
IRVING M. STERN
3675 N.W. 67th St. Miami
OX 1-4351
New Year
Greetings to All .
MRS.
V. C. PLUMMER


Friday. September 23, 1860
+Je*is*fk>rldUar)
Page 11-D
San Faanciso. The Rabb- has always been senti-
mental about Shea who guided the destiny of Jew-
ish chaplains. Armed Services and civilian volun-
teers during the early days of World War II in Cali-
fornia and the Northwest. Working with JWB per-
nel has always been a source of pleasure and
satisfaction to him. ilc numbers many of the JWB
'workers," as he calls them, among h's intimate
friends. He haunts JWB's national office in New
York on his rare trips to the big city. He main-
tains close telephone contact with the regional
Armed Services office in Atlanta, presided over by
his "cousin, Leon Goldberg," and he goes toAtlanta
whenever he can f'nd the slightest excuse.
A favorite "gripe" of his has to do with the
JWB. "It doesn't receive the support it deserves
from the American Jewish community," he main-
tains. "There is no more important organization.
No Jewish institution has served American Jewry
with greater dedication." Now, he begins to warm
up to the theme"How come we raise millions for
charity and millions for defense agenciesand can-
not make adequate provision lor the one American
Jewish organization which cuts across religious
l'nes, across all partisan lines, which serves prac-
tically every Jewish family in the United States?"
"Patrick," he pounds the table to get my at-
tention"Isn't JWB a perfect combination of true
philanthropic and socalled defense work? Isn't
it the greatest?" Well, I'm not going to report the
speech in detail. This gives you a little idea of his
attitude toward the organization to which he has
a singular attachmentTake it from me. Don't
get the guy started on JWB and the part-time chap-
lains.
S. Africa Jews in Commerce and Industry
Continued from Pago 2-D
vool farming, ostrich farming, citrus growing and
|the wine industry.
Garmont Industry
The clothing industry in South Africa was es-
sentially pioneered by Jews. As far back as 1913,
ilomon Wunsch had started to manufacture trous-
krs locally, while about 1917 Morris Kalmek start-
Id the first factory for men's suits on the Wit-
yatersrand.
Other Jews followed in developing the industry
the Kramers and Rosens in the Transvaal, Ber-
ish, Roy, Back and Shub in the Cape. The industry
tiey started has today grown to massive propor-
tions, and supplies most of South Africa's men's
vear. German Jewish immigrants who came to
outh Africa in the early Hitler years developed
\he ladies' wear manufacturing industry to similar
proportions Weil and Ascheim, the Spiegels and
Duth African-born Jews like the Nathans and
faffs.
The late I. W. Schlcsinger, who came to South
Africa from the United States in the early years
of this century as an insurance salesman, and pres-
ently started his own insurance company here, the
Africa Life Assurance, played a pivotal role in de-
veloping the entertainment industry, which in those
years was still comparatively primitive.
Schlesinger built up a nationwide chain of cin-
emas, bought most of the existing theaters, im-
ported actors from abroad to tour his theaters with
London and Broadway successes. He also started
the local film production industry and in the 1920s
brought radio to South Africa. His African Broad-
casting Company for many years ran South Af-
rica's radio network, until it was taken over by the
state and became the South African Broadcasting
Corporation. His widely ramified companies have
been carried on, since his death, by .his son, John
Schlesinger, who inherited his father's talent for
big business.
Jews in Foro
In retail commerce. Jews have played a role
out of all proportion to their numbers. They were
pioneers in the department store field, the first
chain of department stores being established in the
1920s by the late Henry Herber. Following his en-
terprise came the chains of department stores
which in South Africa are called "bazaars" the
O.K. Bazaars, C.T.C. Bazaars, and Woolworth's
(no relation to the American firm). These firms
played a vital role in cutting prices in the cheaper
retail field, and thus materially helped low-salaried
workers. The O.K. Bazaars (which today incorp-
orates the C.T.C. Bazaars) currently has sixty
branches all over the Union and Rhodesia, and em-
ploys a staff of ten thousand people.
Contrary to popular legend, Jews have not
played a major part in the control of the gold in-
dustry, which is still largely vested in British
hands. In the 1930s, however, two Jews, A. S. Her-
sov and S. G. Menel, formed an investment com-
pany which began playing an important part
in mining developments further afield than the
Central Rand gold mines. In the development of
Continued on Pago 15 D
Latest in swim-wear from Israel sailed into
New York during outgoing Hebrew Year
5720 aboard the SS Jerusalem of Zim Lines.
Israeli model Tamar Benamy (left) shows a
bikini creation called "Gigi." Dorothy
Doliver displays the "Canasta" model.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
MY FRIENDS '
ANTONIA
MERRITT
GREETINGS
B. W. THACKER
AGENCY
TYPEWRITERS
Adding Machines
Check Writers
BOLD RENTED
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To AIM a Most Happy New Year
*
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Ph. PI 88555
Best Wishes tor the
New Year Holidays
UNGSTON and CO. Inc.
INSURANCE
351 S.E. 2ml Street Miami
Phone Ft 3-7411
Holiday Greetings To Our Many Friend's
Construction Products Corp.
BUILDING MATERIALS
6865 N.W. 36th Avenue Phone OX 1-9180
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO AIL .
Nu-Art SIGNS
of quality
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Phone JE 4-4382
***^^-v*
Season's Greetings to All from
The Blackstone & The Royal Blackstone
HOTELS
Residential Halls for Senior Citizens in Their Golden Years
MODERATE RATES YEAR ROUND
800 Washington Avenue Miami Beach
MICHAEL SOSSIN. LJLD.. President
C. R. MEYERS. Asst. Director
SEASON'S GREETINGS .
THE BARE FOOT MAILMAN ______
GIFTS CHANUKA CARDS GOURMET
We Pock Wrmp Mail or Ship Anything to Anywhere
234 VALENCIA "At the Post Of tie*" Phone HI 4-1773
rurnrt s
Hastings Trim Shop
Nmiturt Upholstering Track Seat Covers and Tops
1250 M.W. 7th AVINUf PHOMI FR 44107
HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM
"STEWARTS TOYIAN9"
1AS4 MERIDIAN AVINOf MIAMI BEACH Jf 1-1201
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
HI SV KKK EXTERMINATORS
13224 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY PL 8-8953. PL 7-8503
NORTH MIAMI
TO ALL GREETINGS -
Coral Gift Shop
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT JAMES W. THOMAS
2231 S.W. 67th AVENUE PHONE MO 1
NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO All .
WKSTBROOK MOTORS
WRECKER SERVICE EXPERT ROOT AND FENDER REPAIRING
PAINTtWG AND GIASS WOM MECHANICAL WORK
1751 PAIM AVENUE, HI Alt AH, FIA. Phone TV S-14U
TO ALL GREETINGS "Sine*. 1922"
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GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING
"OUR WORK IS AS GOOD AS THE BEST"
9t2t M. W. Second Atsdus Mud, PWflde
Phone PI 7 1155


^
Pag* 12-D

THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
+Je*ist>fkr**an
Friday. September
23,
extends its best wishes for a peaceful and joyous
NEW YEAR to its many potions and friends who
have helped make this season a success.
CUB BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY AND MEANINGFUL NEW YEAR .
ALNEY LETTER &
PRINTING SERVICE
116 N.E. 1st STREET
MARSHA MILTON
NINA & ALAN
BALSAM
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR. .
from MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR DEGUTZ
ARDMORE STUDIOS
738 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach
Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR APPLE
and Sons LARRY and JEFFREY
ASSOCIATED PHOTOGRAPHERS
EXTEND GREETINGS FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR


SAM TRAURIG and WALTER TRAURIG
Extend Best Wishes to all their friends
for a Happy New Year
ALL FOB*** OF
IC
3031 COtAl WAT
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Mm HI 11771
HOLIDAY GREETINGS .
THE BILLY BELLACK
|> ORCHESTRA
Specializing in
WEDDINGS and BAR MITZVAHS
Phone Wl 7-8124
1055 N.E. 171st Terrace No. Miami Beach
Van's Equipment & Rentals
F* | Distributor! far
l5**^' COOPER CUPPER POWER MOWERS
FF Safes Rentals leeeirs
| TOOLS & MACHINERY RENTED
i MM M.W. 20th Street Phone Nfwtea 5-1712
Wish You All a Very Happy New Year
HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
C. DANA WOODMAN
REALTOR
88 Merrick Way Phone HI 3-2534
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR .
ACE I \WV>IOY% I It SHOP
3292 S.W. ISse AVENUE
LAWN MOWteS, ETC.
ai e-uie
World Jewish Congress in New York has
been instrumental in aiding Dominican Jewry
find a teacher for its Hebrew classes in Sosua
and Ciudad Trujillo. Above is the recently-
established Jewish Community Center in the
Dominican capital. "One hundred and thirty
libraries sponsored by Jewish Commun.,
Centers, synagogues. Jewish school* and
other community agencies hove received
citations of merit from the Jewish Book Coun
cil of America."
Long Chain of Books in Jewish History
Continued frm Pag ID
it off verbatim. These human parrots had power-
ful, will developed memories and not too much
intelligence. Curiously enough, our ultra-modern
libraries are resorting to this old Talmudic method,
though for a different purpose: we have transform-
ed the young men into robots known as tape record-
ings.
Independent of the scholarly or literary merit
of their contents, the Dead Sea Scrolls, dating from
just before the dawn of the Common Era, have a
dramatic interest which has captured our imagin-
ations. The drama is multiple. The discovery and
subsequent adventures of the scrolls is exciting
enough, but it is more than matched by what must
have been the dramatic scene and circumstance
of their original entombment in the remote eaves
above the Wadi Qumran. Facing dire peril and
perhaps extermination, the devout "yahad," or
brotherhood, being a Jewish community, wrapped,
double wrapped, sealed in jars, and bid away their
most precious possessiontheir library. They show-
ed in this a true and enviable sense of community
values.
By its very nature, traditional Judaism is a
religion, a view of life and a way of life, inextric-
ably dependent upon books; and with the passage
of time and with the many varied and changing
worlds to which the Jews found they had to adapt
themselves, the necessary- books grew more numer-
ous and the dependence upon them more impera-
tive. Mohammed called the Jews "the people of
the book," meaning of course the Hebrew Bible,
but 'the people of books" would be more accurate.
Besides the Bible, an adequate Jewish library had
to possess the many-volumed Talmud, a whole ar-
senal of later digests, commentaries and case-
books, an array of prayer-books and other devo-
tional literature, and, by the early Middle Ages,
shelves of philosophic speculations, mystical and
cabbalistic works, anthologies of fables, parable,
and anecdotes (the Midrashim), moral disquisitions,
as well as grammars, dictionaries, geographies, as-
tronomies, travel accounts, and medical treatises
Daily Practice
Every Jewish community in the Middle Ages
which for most Jews lasted well into the 18th
centurypossessed a library, large or small, of
this nature. It was usually housed in the syna-
gogue, which was literally the community center,
or else in the Bet Ha-midrash or House of Study.
The community was dependent upon this library
not only for recreation and for a fruitful way of
investing one"s time, but for the proper exercise
of Judaism itself, for the maintenance of economic
and social justice within the community's gates fo
the adjustment of a thousand private, conflje'tir
interests, and for the true worship of God.
Study for the Jew is also prayer. Hillel-ii
words that you will find in your Sabbath prayd
booksaid: "Do not say, when 1 have leisure 1 will
study; perhaps you will have no leisure. Yet aj
empty-headed man cannot be a sin-fearing man. nc
can an ignorant person be pious. DOT can a shame
faced man learn, nor a passionate man teach, nc
anyone who is overmuch engaged in business gro
wise." For centuries the Jews transformed
words from prayer book precepts into daily p
tice in the synagogue library or at borne by a book
laden, candle-lit table.
Besides the community lioraries there werj
naturally certain fortunate individuals possesse
of well-stocked book shelves. Lists and catalogue
have survived of private medieval coilectit..
Judah ben Saul Ibn Tibbon, a famous 12th centur
scholar and translator, has left us the injunction^
he laid upon his son for the care of his librar
keep the books, he enjoins, well-covered again
dust and damp, and protected from mice; write
list of the books pieced on each shelf, affix the li]
to the shelf, and arrange the books in the ...
order as on the list; cheek over the Hebrew bookil
once every month, the Arabic books every months, and the cases of unbound works ever
three months: restore and have restored all loane
books on Passover and >n Succot. It was Ibn Tit
bon who wrote some of the most gracious and
viting words ever applied to a library: "Let youl
cases and shelves be your pleasure-grounds am
orchards." 1 would like to see this motto inscribe;
in every Jewish community library-, which like al
libraries should be enjoyed for both its delight!
and its fruits.
One of the great private COOtttOn was the Hit
century court-Jew of Vienna, Samuel Oppenheimer.j
Eventually his 7.000 printed volumes and l.OOfli
manucripts became the basis of the Bodleian}
Library's magnificent collection of Judaica (at Ox-
ford). The earliest modern communal collection!
of which the precise origin can be dated was that
of Mantua in Italy; it was founded ir. 1767 upon the,
acquisition of 4.500 volumes from the private j
library of Raphael Emanuel Mendola.
In the communal libraries, the study halls ofl
old Jewish centers, whether in North Africa or itu
Europe, the very appearance of the books piled onl
the shelves or scattered on the tables told a story.]
For the most part they looked woebegone, drag-J
gled, and worm-eatennot, however, because they]
were neglected but because they were used until
r f i11...
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330 M.W. 71st Street Phone PI 4-f 514
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WHOLESALE
3110 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Phone FR 1-8625
GREETINGS TO ALL .
w*m r rwa* ,t
BOTTLES
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itSO N.W. 35th AVENUE
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BEER WINE
"Beat Hamburgers in Town"
Jimmie & Nat
3S9 S.W. 8th STREET
FR4-tt30
"T


jay. September 23, 1960
'Jewlstincr/dttan
were virtually used up. The best books are
worst preserved, because they are the best
Lsrdfor what better treatment of a book can
tv be than to read it so often that its pages fall
PurpM of Library
The National Jewish Welfare Board's Jewish
I'k tCouyi}U>i America has seLJoj^h y"ht|-njn
\im requirements which must be met by any
imunal library if it wishes to be accorded a
tatioa of Merit" from the Council. I would urge
underline a ninth requirement: that a fair
[portion of its books be read to shreds.
(One hundred and thirty libraries sponsored
by Jewish Community Centers, synagogues,
Jewish schools and other community agencies
have received citations of merit from the Jew-
ish Book Council of America.
To win this citation a library must be at
least a year old: have one room set aside for
its exclusive use; be staffed by a full or part-
time librarian: have a fixed annual budget;
contain a minimum of 1,000 Jewish books in
any language; acquire a minimum of 100 new
Jewish books during the previous year; have
a catalogue accessible to all readers; be open
at least 10 hoars a week; and participate
actively in Jewish Book Month activities and
other projects that enrich Jewish culture.)
The purpose of a library is to be used; a library
fiout readers, especially zealous readers, is just
Lit above a library that doesn't exist. There is
public prestige or morale-boosting to be gained
the mere presence of a collection of books. A
fish community library has a unique function
Is own in relation to the community it serves,
linings stand today, every Jewish community
It look upon itself as a reservoir of forces de-
fcd to the cultivation, enrichment, and survival
Jewish life. Conceivably it may not be a large
Irvoir, but it will be deep, and it will be fed by
filing springs. These springs well up from with-
tie books which contain the ever-living waters,
"mayim hayim." of the Jewish tradition. Only
he degree that these waters are regularly im-
by the individual members of our local corn-
lilies will Jewish life thrive in America.
Life in any Diaspora land sets up powerful cur-
Its and counter-attractions against the mainten-
of an informed, vigorous Jewish culture. The
Page 13-D
Continuing cooperation of scholar and wri-
ter is indicated as (left to right) Milton Krents,
of "Eternal Light" of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, James Yaffee, pro-
gram script-writer, and Dr. Bernard Mandel-
baum, of the Seminary, discuss a recent
television series. "Life in any Diaspora land
sets up powerful currents and counter-attrac-
tions against the maintenance of an in-
formed, vigorous Jewish culture."
Jewish library, the Jewish school, and the Jewish
home, even when working together, will have a
hard enough struggle to prevent the gradually com-
plete evaporation of Jewish knowledge and values.
Neither library, school, nor home can afford to
go it alone, and Victory can be had only at the price
of constant cooperation and effort. We can hope
that someday this victory will be seen in the
shabby, dog-eared, dilapidated condition of the
books stacked in every communal library; these
veterans will bear, like trophies, the scars of a
triumphant campaign.
A book, after all, is chiefly an instrument for
enabling us to master the art of living. David Ben-
Gurion, the valiant Prime Minister of Israel, sum-
med up three thousand years of history when he
said, "We have preserved the Book and the Book
has preserved us."
tritish Organization Marks 200 Years
Continued from Pag* 6 D
[1854 and which concerns itself with safeguard-
the citizen rights of the Jew in every walk of
. There have been, even recently, instances
en, in one way or another, without the vigilance
Ihis committee, some clause or regulation might
?*e been introduced in Parliament, or in Munici-
Councils, which would have adversely affected
community.
The Foreign Affairs Committee, which was es-
blished in its present form only during the Sec-
World War, has often alone, or in conjunction
1 other organizations, mainly American, dealt
Ith the problems of post-war Jewry. The Board
fs represented at the first meeting of the United
ations in San Francisco and is a member of the
boordinatinR Board of Jewish Organizations, a
pdy with consultative status at the Economic and
: ial Council.
Other committees deal with aliens, education,
^chita, finance and defense. The defense com-
mittee combats anti-Semitism in every respect and
has been largely successful in creating the favor-
able climate for the Jewish community which now
prevails in this country.
The Board has counted many impressive or
colorful figures among its presidents. One who
guided the fortunes of the deputies for nearly 40
years towers over all the others Sir Moses Mont-
efiore. An ultra-Orthodox Jew, countless were the
mercy missions he undertookfrom Alexandria to
Istanbul, from Palestine to Italy. At the Vatican he
called to have restored a Jewish child which had
been secretly baptized and stolen from its mother,
who died of grief; to Constantinople he traveled
to obtain from the Sultan, Abdul Azziz, confirma-
tion of his predecessor's degrees in favor of the
Jews; he made the long and difficult land journey
to Bucharest to plead with the ruler, Prince
Charles, the cause of the oppressed Jewish commu-
nity, and met the Russian Czar, Alexander II, to
Continued on Pago 15 D
SEASON'S GRttTINGS
Christine
Corrigan
SEASON'S GREETINGS .
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A HAPPY NEW YEAR
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p
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    Community
    for
    A HAPPY
    NEW YEAR
    m MUM: SMIL 129* ST.
    \
    V
    mm tun. ius urn mm
    uyvm: im ma shift
    n.UMEMU: III LIMA*!
    Mr. Pumpernik sez:
    A Very Happy New Year To All
    wmm\k'$
    1 I RESTAURANT
    67th ft Collins
    Best Wishes for a Happy New Year .
    CORAL GABLES GARAGE !
    i
    Specializing in Cadillac Service
    Free Pick-Up and Delivery Service (AAA) Expert Motor
    Tune-Up and Automatic Transmission Work.
    PAINT and BODY WORK !
    4200 Laguna (East off Coral Gables High) HI 8-2691
    NIGHTS and HOLIDAYS CA 1-4422
    Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
    MIAMI FISH & LOBSTER CO.
    5711 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami
    Phone PL 4-3667
    Hotels, Restaurants and Institutions Supplied
    NEW YEAR GREFTINGS TO ALL .
    CLUB, RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES & BARTENDERS
    UNION LOCAL 133, AFL-CI0 1
    AL GONZALEZ. Jr., President
    MORRIS G. DRAPKIN. Secretary-Treasurer
    21 NX 2nd AvtMt, Miami Ph.nt FR 3-7403
    SEASON'S GKEETINGS TO AU
    BAUKPS BAKERY
    Ask for "BAMN'S HOMEMADE DAINTIES" in tvery start
    Abe Fancy C.okiet Call And W. Will Deliver
    Baros Family
    and Miami Rug Co.


    Page 14-D
    +Jewish Hcrkttan
    Friday, September 23. iggg
    THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE
    AlCil ST FAMILY and
    AtTOI ST BROS. BAKERY
    3S1 S.W. Eighth Street Phone FR 4-2792
    SOUTH HllWrs 3MOST
    BEAMTill 'X CEMETERY
    FOB THOSE Of THE JEWISH FAITH
    STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL PARK
    5900 S.W. 77th AVENUE
    MO 7-3669
    3"M .-V.r-3
    r-K......- -y
    C*roti n_.N.
    FIANKFUtTEtS SAIAMI SOlOGNA
    PASTRAMI CQINED Ittt TONGUES
    AMERICAN KOSHER PROVISIONS !>C
    wfw roiK n^wr notiOA fiANr
    W No>cr mi 1075 N.W. 21t Terrace
    Miami, Florida
    FR 9-0933 FR 14511
    l-ootiv" 77. N T
    CV J50 (V 9 1117
    To All Our Friends, Patrons and
    Acquaintances New Year Holiday Greetings
    Ted's Broadway Battery & Ignition
    ATTiRICS GENERATORS STARTERS
    2731 N.W. 36th Street Miami Phone NE 4-1331
    GREETINGS...
    KREMSER RADIATOR COMPANY
    1237 NE .lit AVENUE rheee FR 3-7493
    Serviced lepeired fle1 Iu-t*t4
    BETTER TO SERVE YOU -
    MIAMI JACK SERVICE
    Greenlee Equipment Part Cable Cutter Hydraulic Jacks,
    Steam Jennys Pick Up and Delivery
    All Work Guaranteed Factory Specifications
    3077 N.W. 54rh Street Phone NE 4-2226
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    BANCROFT HOTEL AND MOTEL APTS.
    1501 Collins Avenue Miami Beach
    TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    COMMUNITY BARBER SHOP
    1688 ALTON ROAD Air Conditioned Phone IE 1-9402 No Waiting


    JfOURAT CRHTINCS frees
    JAR. CARllON-J. C<
    eft**
    CABLTON VAULTS MNC.
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL .
    SARBEY ELECTRONICS
    2s7S5 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 4-3341
    The Legal Aspects of the Eichmann Trial
    Continued from Peso 3-D
    to Israel as restitution for Nazism's crimes against
    the Jews. No other state more genuinely repre-
    sents the interest ot those millions put to death by
    Eichmann. for Israel is the successor in interest to
    Eichmann's victims not only for pecuniary' pur-
    ples but as principal custodian of their memory
    and to insure retributive justice in their name.''
    The argument that Eichmann's trial under a
    1950 Israeli law would be ex post facto that is,
    under a law passed after an act has been commit-
    ted has no validity, the report asserts. Noting
    that there is no prohibition in international law
    against ex post facto, the study points out that the
    law of nations is not based on any particular laws
    or statutes but takes cognizance only of crimes
    against humanity, "acts presumed to have been
    perennially criminal."
    The American Jewish Congress document adds:
    "To argue that the Israeli law of 1950 is ex
    post facto as applied to Eichmann is to say in ef-
    fect that Eichmann had no reason to suspect the
    criminal implication of his acts at the time he per-
    formed them, and that he could genuinely have be-
    lieved his conduct in planning and programming the
    mass extermination ot Europe's Jews to have been
    lawful.
    "The fact is. however, that indiscriminate mur-
    der is not the kind of act whose moral quality vanes
    from administration to administration. It remains
    a constant of evil, forever abhorrent to society. No
    country could ever make it legal. All claims of
    ex post facto culpability in Eichmann's case must
    therefore be rejected as groundless both in inter
    national law and in the conscience of civilization."
    On the possibility of an international tribunal
    to arraign Eichmann. the report notes that the prin-
    cipal nations that would be expected to make up
    such a body have indicated "not the slightest will-
    ingness" to participate. Moreover, the report says.
    even if it were possible to create such a tribunal,
    the danger that Soviet Russia would subvert it into
    an anti-Western propaganda vehicle makes such an
    international court both practically and politically
    unfeasible. To hold an international trial without
    Soviet Russia and the Eastern European Soviet
    bloc raises additional procedural and administra-
    tive difficulties that would render such a trial, and
    its eventual judgment, meaningless, it is stated.
    Discussing various proposals that West Ger-
    many try Eichmann. the report points out that West
    R. J0ACMIM MtMZ
    . "eeprepriete eed fiftiee"
    Seafaring sabra Capt. Sholem Dulitzky Mas-
    ter of the Ghanaian frieighter, Tano River
    converses with H. E. William Q. M. Halm!
    Ghana's Ambassador to the United States!
    at a reception aboard the vessel in New
    York when she inaugurated a new carqo
    service between West Africa and the U.S.A.
    during outgoing Hebrew Year 5720. Ghana's
    Black Star Line, owners of the vessel, is
    managed by the Zim Israel Navigation Co.
    of Haifa. "... a country that rose on the
    ashes of millions of innocent men and wom-
    en and children..."
    Germany has not asked that Eichmann be transfer-
    red to its custody and that the Federal Republic
    "has given indications that it does not want to as-
    sume responsibility for his trial."
    Appropriate and Fitting
    The study also notes that the behavior of Ger
    man courts "has operated to promote sympathy for
    those accused of war crimes as often as it has to
    inspire a profound and sober reflection upon na-
    tional guilt."
    Discussing the ultimate purposes of the Eich-
    man trial, the American Jewish Congress study
    asserts:
    "The recitation of his monstrous crimes
    against European Jewry must be allowed to remind
    mankind of the bestiality to which not only one
    man but an entire nation once sank. It is not un-
    likely that a German court would tend to separate
    the defendant Eichmann from the broad masses of
    the German people under Hitler. There is no moral
    or practical consideration supporting Eichmann's
    trial in Germany which could not be invoked with
    equal force to support bis trial in Israel."
    The American Jewish Congress report con-
    cludes with a statement by Dr. Joachim Prinz, the
    national president of the American Jewish Con-
    gress:
    "It is appropriate and fitting that Eichmann
    be brought to trial in Israela sovereign nation
    created by the Jewish people whom Eichmann
    sought to destroy; a country that rose on the ashes
    of millions of innocent men and women and chil-
    dren whom Eichmann put to death: a land recog-
    nized by the United Nations as the haven and
    refuge for hundreds of thousands of survivors of
    Eichmann's concentration camps."
    The American Jewish Congress document was
    prepared by the agency's Commission on Interna-
    tional Affairs, directed by Phil Baum. Will Maslow
    is acting executive director of the American Jewish
    Congress.
    GREETINGS
    FROM
    J. R. SPRADLEY & CO.
    FOOD BROIERS
    7240 N.W. 30th COURT
    OX 1-5300
    Best Wishes far fae MaMay S^mMa ...
    1
    BEUTEL'S SOLAR-HEATER CO.
    TANKS BOOSTERS COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS
    1527 N. Mkoni Avenue Phone Fl 1-1
    MIITIIII
    Sel Keeke, Free.
    SUNOCO STATION
    ROYAL PALM SRVKE
    fV#arVCtfl f JC^#rf art^aWMMj
    7*03 M.I. M t
    Fl 8-91II
    to ml muimi
    L D.KHFK
    888 UNC0U4 8888
    Jf 4-1*1*


    1
    Friday. September 23. 1960
    +Je*yidh tkridnan
    Page 15-D
    S. Africa Jews in Commerce and Industry
    Continued from Page 11-0
    the Free State goldfields, the Oppcnheimers have
    i ti a key role. When Sir Ernest Oppenheimor
    (fVS"in 1957. the late JohairnTs" Sffijdom, then
    Prime Minister, said of him: "He undoubtedly did
    more than any other individual to develop
    our mining and industries. I know of no one in
    South Africa who achieved more in this respect than
    Sir Ernest. The results of his work will continue
    fcr generations."
    Tlaying a big part in the South African economy
    today is Wolf Heller and his group of companies,
    which extends to many diversified interests, in-
    cluding farming and canning. The late Woolf Har-
    ris pioneered South Africa's textile manufacturing
    industry, and Jews were in the fore in the develop-
    men of the furniture manufacturing industry. Al-
    though, for the most part, Jews came late to farm-
    ing in South Africa, some Jews have played an
    outstanding part in agriculture. For years South
    Africa's corn "king" was the late Esrael Lazarus,
    its potato "king" the late J. B. Lurie; while the
    late I. W. Schlesinger played a big part in citrus
    farming.
    Little Anti-Semitism
    Jews are among the leaders of the organized
    bodies representing industry and commerce. The
    Chamber of Industries and the Chamber of Com-
    merce have both bad Jewish presidents, and sev-
    eral Jews serve on their governing councils today.
    These bodies are playing an important part in put-
    ting forward proposals for the solution of South
    Africa's current political problems, and in intro-
    ducing higher wage scales for Native (Negro)
    workers. Where else in the capitalist world do
    representative employer organizations try to in-
    crease rather than peg the wages of low-paid
    workers?
    Britain Celebrates
    Continued from Page 13-D
    ask for a more lenient treatment for the long-suf-
    fering Russian Jews.
    Looking Backward
    But above all Sir Moses' heart was in Pales-
    tine where he made seven pilgrimages and from
    which he brought back a book, "Narrative of Forty-
    Day Sojourn in the Holy Land" which even today
    makes fascinating reading.
    Today's president illustrates the great changes
    which have taken place during the last half cen-
    tury. Barnett Janner is not only a Labor member
    of Parliament but also serves as president of the
    British Zionist Federation. Born in Cardiff, he was
    regarded in his early days as the community's en-
    fant terrible. Elected at an early age to public of-
    fice he guides the Board with an experienced and
    firm hand. He takes the many Jewish problems with
    him to Parliament and both from the floor and in
    the lobbies he does not mince his words when deal-
    ing with any menace to equal right for Jews.
    Looking back at its rich past critics of the
    Board claim that its days are over the Board
    has become a war machine with no more battles
    to fight. Local problems are solved, the existence
    of a strong Jewish State and active international
    Jewish organizations answer the needs of world
    Jewry, and the Board, they feel, is becoming slow-
    ly, but irrevocably, a petrified statue to its former
    glory.
    Taken all in all. the role which Jews have
    played, and continue to play, in the South African
    (( or.omy is a remarkable
    Today, anti-Semitism has largely disappeared.
    There are still, here and there, a few crackpots
    who make it their business to issue anti-Jewish
    pamphlets: one at least is known to have connec-
    t.ons with the Swedish anti-Semite, Einar Aberg,
    and to reproduce some of his hate-sheets. And
    when, this year, a rash of >\va-.tikas appeared
    throughout the world, some swastikas but fewer
    than many folk here expected were daubed on
    the walls of some Jewish buildings in South Africa.
    Taken as a whole, however, anti-Jewish feeling
    has abated. There is no George Rockwell in South
    Africa, with Nazi-type "storm troopers."
    There is not, in South Africa today, the equiv-
    alent of a "British National Party" which holds
    meetings on public squares and urges the country
    to "get rid of its Jews." Relations between the Gov-
    ernment and the Jewish community are good, as
    are relations between Jews and their Gentile fel-
    low-citizens generally, both English and Afrikaans.
    Jewish communal policy is directed towards main-
    taining that healthy position. When Jews in other
    lands are tempted to climb on the band-wagon of
    anti-South African boycotts, they should bear these
    facts in mind.
    Meeting Challenge
    Continued from Page 9-D
    phosphates, oil, copper, iron ore and the minerals
    of the Dead Sea. Israel Bond dollars will enable
    Israel to expand agriculture and housing and the
    development of new industrial centers in the Negev.
    Now that the Israel Bond drive has entered its
    tenth year, certain vital facts have been establish-
    ed. First, Israel has shown that she is well on the
    way toward achieving economic independence.
    Second, Israel can absorb many additional hundreds
    of thousands of Jews. It is now practical to speak
    of a population of 3,000,000 by 1970. Third, Israel
    Bonds have created the foundations for a long-range
    relationship on a businesslike basis between the
    Jews of America and Israel.
    This Rosh Hashona, as Israel looks ahead to
    the tasks and opportunities of the next decade, she
    finds herself facing the great challenge of con-
    tinued development. Israel Bonds will play a de-
    cisive role in helping her meet that challenge.
    Technical Assistance
    Continued from Page 5-D
    horizons for large numbers of the youth of these
    ancient ghettos.
    ORT today is providing training to some 40.000
    persons, annually, in 19 countries. It maintains
    650 training units and teaches over 70 different
    trades. In doing so it has helped to alter the oc-
    cupational pattern of large numbers, opening many
    new areas of job and work opportunity to Jews.
    Thus, an idea born in the ferment of Eastern
    European Jewry, in an age gone by, remains vital
    and valid for the world of today. In our current
    idiom, the work of ORT has been characterized as
    "technical assistance." And it is, indeed, the
    technical assistance program of the Jewish people
    throughout the world.
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. L. Sheade
    Sheade Bedding
    and Mattress Co.
    123 N.W. 23rd STREET
    Ph.*. m t-3148
    ,^v\^W.'W'\~-'W'W^W'^'WA^A_^\_^W-'W'W'W'W^_
    GREETINGS
    Hollopeter
    A Post, Inc.
    REAL ESTATE
    SALES & RENTALS
    840 SX MIAMI AVENUE RD.
    rfceie re 3 737*
    ASPHALT DRIVEWAYS, SEAL-COATING
    GEORGE OBENOUR, JR. & SONS. Inc.
    BONDED ROOFING & SHEET METAL
    ROOF CLEANING ft COATING
    Established 1926
    7352 N. MIAMI AVENUE Phone PL 7-2612
    TO ALL GREETINGS .
    BURNS and JAEGER, Inc.
    f iecfricaf Contractors
    Wm. I. Jutftr Hmrry Bmrmt
    3251 N.W. 7th Street Phone NE 4-3363
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Eli Witt Cigar and Tobacco Company
    WHOLESALERS CANDY CIGARETTES PAPER
    WONT YOU
    Hav-a-Tampa Cigar?
    "THEY'RE BETTER"
    73 N.W. EIGHTH STREET PHONE FR 4-8185

    GREETINGS...
    C. E. MORGAN
    "ft Is Our Pleasure to Jerre You"
    SALES and INSTALLATIONS
    ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS
    2034 N.W. 24th Avenue Hi 5 7201

    YOUR TRANSFER PROBLEMS
    BRIDGES TRANSEER CO.
    1147 N.W. 22nd Street Phone FR 4-4788
    GREETINGS ...
    NURSERY and SPRAY SERVICE
    IAWH SnAYIMG TKtt MAYING Ne Cfeeree fer tttim.tt, er Am+th
    CHARLES P. JOHNSON
    44S5 N.W. 36th Avenue MIAMI, FLA. NE 4-771S
    to III... ummts
    Charles Stuart Motor Co.
    FINE NEW and USED CARS
    1757 N.W. 36th STIEET FHONE NE 5-407
    Stuart Steingold Charles Steingold
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    T. R. KUZNIK
    Wefts Wafer Pumps
    Free Estimates Licensed
    Insured Sprinkling
    Systems Pump Repairs
    No Down Payment
    36 Months to Pay
    FHA Financing
    Phone NA 10731
    19825 N.W. 2nd Ave.
    SEASON'S GREETINGS .
    PIZZA
    PATIO
    PIZZA
    BARBECUE
    FRIED CHICKEN
    9495 Bird Rood
    South Miami
    CA 1-0741
    r
    SEASONS GREETINGS
    THERMO
    AIR SERVICE
    AUTHORIZED *9
    Carrie
    PLANNED SERVICE
    FACTORY TRAINED MEN
    COMMERCIAL
    RESIDENTIAL
    24-HOUR SERVICE
    MU 5-3631
    C. A. WIEDERHOLD, President
    4555 E. 10th Court
    Hialeah
    To All .
    A Most Happy
    New Year
    MOORE'S
    FURNITURE
    THE BEST THROUGH
    THE AGES
    191 N 40th STREET


    Page 16-D
    -Jmidh ftcrktiairi
    Friday. September 23,
    I960

    Yom Kippur Voices Sublime Religious Truth
    a common act of faith with the vast majority Je,
    every ?W nd in every part of the globe. *s "
    |N the Talmud. Yom Kippur is simply called "Yom," the
    most sacred of holy days, that voices the sublimes!
    truths of religion. No other nation, ancient or modern, has
    of the merciful God who holds penitence as hixh in esteem
    as guiltlessness.
    The great solemnity of Yom Kippur. which ha- been
    an .nst.tut.on approach.ng the Day of Atonement in relig- of vita, slgnifjoano(. in every ,ge, has set r>ay of At0Be.
    ieus depth and feelinga day of purification and of turning ment aside as a special day in our crowded lives. It not
    from sin. for which forgiveness is granted through the grace only induces self-discipline but binds all Jews to2ether in
    Yom Kippur. the most solemn day in the ufe
    Jew. brings its reminder of the long history of h
    ing. of unspeakable tortures of the spirit and th
    the struggle to find God Almighty.
    It is a unique day of mourning, of self-lacy -
    remembering a martyred past, of beggiag the A
    forgiveness for individual and common sins, i ,
    day of fasting, of conlcssion. of contrition, of red
    if evi
    M
    tion, t||
    nighty-,
    loojl
    trrPtion.[
    TO
    THE
    LOVELY
    BRIDES-
    -TO-
    BE
    a hurri new nam to au out
    ftlENOS AMD fATKOMS
    Atlantic
    LquipiiM'iit Co.
    1220 N. Miami Avenue
    f Phone FR 3-0316
    A flop* K rf i# Mr
    Frits** oad Pfrs*s
    MAURICE CUSTOM
    TAILORING
    1470 AITON I0AD
    MtAMt KACH
    . V PImm Jf I 33*3
    M. i. Weiss
    REDDY
    KILOWATT
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    Wishing You Good Luck, Good
    Times and Much Happiness
    At This Holiday Season
    Hade Linen 3c
    Fnrniture to.
    536 Collins Are.. Miami Beach
    Phone IE 8 7654
    Complete Wholesale
    Furnishers lor Hotels and
    Apartment Houses
    AND THE ENTIRE SUNSHINE SERVICE TEAM
    EXTEND TO YOU AND YOURS BEST WISHES
    FOR A
    HAPPY and PROSPEROUS
    NEW YEAR
    FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
    Helping Build Florida
    THE VERY BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO AU .
    Miami Transit Co.
    The Miami Beach Railway Co.
    ...


    Hassidism and the Yearning for Zion
    ' (Jewish FlondliUwi
    Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960
    Section E
    : HMnmnmriirMii
    *
    **r -jmarm fryomyo -#t^ii wvi>w^H>rtnnvro awtowmi
    ^., ....... ._,_.. ; ___* Tfifnyan {W mrwj
    Tnn&n ?f*^y *w wp*VqraS*ew T&sfn ;w^rt'
    ;'T|ph^ r-pa8fm# t JMt 'wtotim rffttrgs VS^H
    i _Ta"\ "prt "ft viS^Tjsjn ^s* -trapes* ;*& wn
    .. t
    * ** flttP TJUSIW TO *pTJ
    { 1' T'TTTF
    WVlJJJ >wn*iiVflW9 *Kl)
    ' 'Wwn*yiv99ii i *'>"


    SWW tt"!S WttW* "acwt*
    wsi 5SSP P*
    -- ;
    r?5 a t^.u ^T^ggWwy *^w#^mtt>w n>
    "Circumcwion," Rothschild MS24, 1475. BezuieJ Muwum, /eruialem.

    'W
    4^i
    N
    N^
    *
    THE HOLY LAND AS THE OBJECT OF DEEPEST SPIRITUAL LONGING.
    Israel Molds the Nature of the Followers of Sacred Writings
    By RABBI JACOB SHACHTER
    THE 7th of Sivan 5720 marked the 200th anniver-
    ' sary of the death of Rabbi Israel Baal Sbem
    Tov, generally known as the Besht, founder of the
    Hasaidic Movement. This landmark has evoked a
    renewed and intensified Interest in the various
    aspects of this extraordinarily romantic-religious
    movement that has left so deep an imprint on the
    acnala of our history. Little, if anything, has ao
    far been written of the deep yearning of the Has-
    idism for Zion.
    Yet Eretz Yisrael has been the center of Has-
    sidic thought not only because it is the site of the
    early glories of our people but because it is the
    land destined by its unique qualities and virtues
    to mould the character of those chosen people on
    the lines of our sacred teachings. It is this idea
    that the Hassidim imbibed from the Kabbalistic
    school of Rabbi Isaac Luria and Rabbi Haim Vital
    which flourished in Safed two centuries before the
    rise of the Movement.
    Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov and his disciples
    who were inspired by Kabbalistic teachings were
    stimulated to undertake pilgrimages to the Holy
    Land which began sporadically in the early begin-
    nings of the 18th century. The Besht as a follower
    of the Lurian mystical philosophy maintained that
    the redemption of the Shechina from exile is a pre-
    Continued en Page 12-E


    Page 2-E
    vJewlst fhrktSam
    Friday, September 23. 10J
    \ '

    jm extends
    sincere wishes for a
    HAPPY
    NEW YEAR
    WaitlKfixJv
    MIAMI
    Bill WRIGLEY
    AND THE

    WRIGLEY ENGRAVING CO.
    EXTEND HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
    122 N.I. 6th St. Miami Dial FR 4-7330
    MHIbM CMCTINCS 10 Ml
    I %\l FRANK D. DILLARD ana* FAMILY

    StASON'S GKfirmCS TO AU OUt FffffNM
    BISCAYNK KLKCTRIC CO.
    ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
    60* N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami Phm PR 4-2)51
    wit wums rot a rappi onr rum
    Cusf ombilt Furniture Mfg. Co.
    Showrooms and Factory! 100 N.E. 40th POOR I
    Phone PL 8-0171
    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    I ALLIED LAWN SPRINKLER SYSTIMS
    Phono JE 8-7071
    DM N.W. HSlh Street
    MU 84681
    A Happy Now Year to All Our Friends ...
    MIAMI COLONIAL HOTEL
    146 BISCAYNE BLVD.
    I

    Test pilot of the Fouga Magister, Hugo Menor,
    chanic before flight.
    checks controls of the jet trainer with a me-
    Israel's Fledgling Jet Assembly Industry
    By PHILIP GILLON
    THE delivery to the Israel Air Force of the first
    Fouga jet assembled in Israel marks a great
    stride forward by the Israel Aircraft Industries
    (formerly called Bedek), one of the country's most
    bizarre but most successful enterprises. In six
    years Bedek has become one of the largest employ-
    ers of labor in the country; in 1954 the firm open-
    ed with 70 employees, two years ago there were
    1,074, today there are 2.139. and the expansion is
    proceeding at a formidable tempo.
    On superficial consideration the repair, sale,
    assembly, manufacture and design of aircraft
    hardly seems to be a suitable venture for a small
    country with limited raw materials or industrial
    experience. On further analysis, however, it emerg-
    es that such an enterprise is ideal for Israel.
    The main item that Israel Aircraft Industries
    is selling is labor. The company's own allocation
    is that 75 per cent of its output is work and only
    25 per cent material; of this latter amount, 10 per
    cent is provided by local suppliers and the propor-
    tion is expected to increase as aluminum sheets
    are turned out in the near future by Israel's own
    rolling mills. If the country's labor cost can be
    kept lower than those of competing firms in Europe
    and America after allowing for the cost of trans-
    port to Israel, Israel is in a position to develop a
    great industry based on technical skills.
    Only Pirm
    The firm is the only one of its kind between
    Europe and Japan; Israel's strategic position en-
    ables IAI to service planes from all parts of Eur-
    ope, Africa and Asia. Apart from its staple cus-
    tomers the Air Force, El Al, Arkia the firm
    services all foreign airlines touching at Lydda and
    has customers even in highly developed European
    countries. It has just delivered a second Dakota,
    completely overhauled, to Cambodia. In the last
    three years IAI earned $1.5 million from repairs
    and overhauls for foreign firms alone; it hopes to
    increase the figure this year. The company copes
    with 14 different types of piston planes and 12 types|
    of jet, a staggering technical achievement.
    At present the prices charged to customers!
    are somewhat lower than in Europe and very much]
    lower than America. Al Schwimmer, thel
    managing director, points out that this has beenl
    managed without subsidies, overt or covert. Thai
    wage scales are determined by the Government!
    and the Histadrut.
    Bedek began wun some do toreign experts. Thel
    firm has capitalized on another of Israel's most ira-1
    port ant invisible assets, the presence here of nura-l
    bers of trained energetic and dedicated persons I
    from many lands. Immigration, often considered!
    a strain, is of course in reality a major source of I
    strength. The engineers and others who launched!
    the firm towards its present soaring success camel
    from the air forces and aircraft industries of the
    U.S., South Africa, England, India, Czechoslovakia
    and other Central and Eastern European coun-
    tries. This group came to Bedek via the Hagam
    and the Israel Air Force; they still form the hard|
    core of management.
    H19h Quality
    Today there are no "foreign experts" on the
    payrolls and streams of able, intelligent and train-
    ed personnel are flowing from the Technion, the
    vocational schools, Ministry of Labor courses, the
    Air Forte and the firm's training courses.
    The ultimate test of whether such a firm will
    keep its customers is not price but quality. The
    standard attained has been very high and well up
    to international level; had this not been the case,
    of course, Bedek would not have been licensed by
    the American Government and other bodies with
    equally rigid demands. To comply with American
    regulations for manufacturers of planes, the for-
    mer inspection department has just been converted
    into a quality control division. The most modera
    equipment has been obtained and the system of
    checking is as near to being foolproof as possible.
    The new division for assembling Fouga jet
    CenHnued en Page 14-1
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    PMI
    Friday, September 23, 1960
    fJewist ftcridian
    Page 3-E

    Role of the Chazzan in Jewish Tradition
    By RUTH MORRIS
    gVERY people fashions its songs to suit its spirit
    and to reflect in its chant its inner'moods and
    characteristics. The vast realm of tune and melo-
    dy shows best the achievements and the traits of
    a people.
    The Talmud orders that the Bible should be
    read in public and made understood to the listen-
    ers in a musical, sweet voice. But a deep under-
    standing can be achieved only by singing the Torah.
    Hazanuth, a term derived from Hazzan (cantor)
    was the name given to synagogue as a whole. La-
    ter, the term was transferred to designate the of-
    fice and the profession of precentor.
    In ancient times, the office of Chazzan was dif-
    ferent from what it is now. The word, derived
    from the Assyrian language meaning "overseer",
    is used in the Talmud in this meaning. At that
    time, the Chazzan was in charge of many com-
    munal affairs and his place was on the "Bimah."
    He took care of the sacred vessels in the syna-
    gogue, took out the holy scrolls of the Torah from
    the Ark and returned them afterwards. He often
    served as reader of the weekly portions in the
    Torah. It was he who made all public announce-
    ments and sometimes assisted the schoolmaster
    in teaching the children. The Talmud also men-
    tions that the Chazzan used to accompany the pil-
    grims to Jerusalem to offer "Bikkurim"' (the first
    fruits) in the Beth Hamikdosh.
    During Middl* Ages
    Centuries later, during the peroid of the Gas-
    nim, the Chazzan was increasingly relied upon to
    act as "Baal Korch" (Reader of the Torah) and
    "Sheliach Tzibbur'' (Deputy of the Congregation)
    and these functions became an essential part of
    his office since the knowledge of Hebrew and the
    ability to read in the Torah were not as wide-
    spread as before. The Chazzan was also a "Baal
    Tefilah" (Leader in Prayer) and as a represent-
    ative of the congregation, had to be unanimously
    elected and acceptable to all.
    During the Middle Ages, the office of the Chaz-
    zan was held in especially high esteem. There
    were many learned men and sages among the sing-
    ers. They were renowned for their piety and ex-
    cellence of character. Most of the Piyutim were
    composed by them. The greatest of all Paytanim,
    authors of Piyutim, Rabbi Elazar Hakalir, was a
    was a Chazzan.
    The great achievements of synagogal music
    of the past century are rooted in the relentless ef-
    forts of the synagogue singers of the preceding
    century.
    As all other spiritual values, the synagogue
    song is a tonal expression of the long history and
    martyrdom of Israel during the Dark Ages. It is
    an exalted expression of its high and eternal ideals,
    and when properly rendered by the traditional in-
    terpreter, the Chazzan, it has always left and does
    so still, a deep impression upon the worshipper,
    especially when the singer has the devotion and
    understanding, a good voice and the power of pres-
    entation.
    One of the outstanding synagogue singers to-
    wards the end of the eighteenth century was Israel
    Levy. Equipped with an unusual voice and musical
    talc as well as intelligence, he made a deep im-
    pre'on upon his listeners and was elected Chaz-
    zan of Fuerth. where he remained for many years.
    On n 'our. he came to Paris and was immediately
    engaged as cantor. He composed many tunes some
    of which have been preserved. His voice was a
    barifif-bass from lower F, while in the high
    Advisory body of Synagogue Council of
    America has included these noted Jewish
    leaders (left to right): Rabbi Max Davidson,
    president of Synagogue Council; Sen. Her-
    bert H. Lehman; and Benjamin Lazarus, ad-
    visory chairman. "As all the other spiritual
    values, the synagogue song is a tonal ex-
    pression of the long history and martyrdom
    of Israel..."
    range it had ter.or timbre and effortessly, reach-
    ed the highest notes. He died in 1932.
    Another prominent Chazzan was Sholem Friede
    of Amsterdam. Due to his great love for Polish-
    Jewish songs, he left a great, invaluable collection
    of the early Polish chazzanuth and of tunes in
    Chassidic style. He died in 1954.
    Another Chazzan of great popularity in Munich,
    was Loew Saenger (1781-1843). These names have
    been chosen at random out of hundreds of singers
    of the synagogue since space does not permit to
    name them all.
    The American Chazzan
    The first Jewish settlers who came here more
    than three hundred years ago soon realized that
    America was the land of longed-for freedom, that
    the endless, dark period of bitter oppression and
    seclusion in Europe's walled ghettos was over
    and thus an important spiritual change grew and
    developed gradually. Part of the Jewish song in-
    heritance lost its significance. No more was Israel
    in exile, no more was its dwelling place only of
    a temporary nature. More than in any other cul-
    tural sphere, this psychological change manifested
    itself in the synagogue song has always been a gen-
    uine expression of emotion and sentiments. At this
    time, the rabbi again became the central figure in
    the synagogue being both preacher and precentor.
    Many famous Chazzanim came from Europe,
    such as Samuel Welsh who was born in Prague in
    1835 and became cantor of Ahavad Chesed, New
    York, in 1865; but homesick, he returned to Prague
    in 1880 where he died in 1901.
    Then there was Morris Goldstein, born in Hun-
    gary in 1840. His father was the well-known Chaz-
    zan Shmelke, a singer who died young in 1849
    leaving ten small children. The oldest boy, Joseph,
    who was at the tender age of eleven at his father's
    death, succeeded his father. Later he gained fame
    as Chazzan in Vienna where he worked from 1858
    to 1899. He studied music in Vienna, was called
    to New York to accept the position as cantor in
    the Norko Synagogue. Later he went to Cincinnati
    and sang there in B'nai Israel Temple. He held
    this postion until he died in 1906.
    These three chazzanim, realizing the need of
    Continued on Pag* 11-E
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    Page 4-E
    +Jtwlsli Fkrkfiaw
    Friday. September 23, I960

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    Holy Day Question: Can Man Improve?
    By RABBI SAMUEL UMEN
    INURING the Holy Days season, the thoughts of
    * a Jew center on his way of life. For, in these
    days he is -urged-^avcarefully eaamaoo his ways
    and exhorted to mend and correct whatever in bis
    behavior needs to be improved.
    In this connection it is often asked whether
    man's nature is such that it can be improved. There
    are individuals who contend that man is utterly
    hopeless. He is born imperfect, lives and dies in
    the same state. With the whole world unto them-
    selves, brothers Cain and Abel could not get along
    together and committed murder. The example of
    these two has repeated itself throughout history
    and is not much different in our own day. The
    strong take advantage of the weak, power and
    might are enthroned. Thus it has been, some ar-
    gue, and so it will continue to be.
    However, an examination of human history
    from primitive times to the present will reveal that
    in every phase of life progress is recorded. The
    desire to improve, the capacity to reason, enabled
    man to conceive a higher God concept: to gain a
    deeper understanding of his environment; to estab-
    lish better forms of government; to create im-
    proved labor conditions; and to acquire a more
    profound evaluation of human dignity and human
    rights.
    If history records man's inhumanity to man, it
    also records many instances of heroism, martyr-
    dom, saintliness, sympathy, charity, love, and un-
    derstanding.
    If man is possessed with qualities of the beast,
    he is also fashioned a little lower than the angels.
    "Individuals," says Rabbi Abraham Kook in his
    religious philosophy, "and even groups may stray
    from the right path but the human path is constant-
    ly rising and approaching the good which is ele-
    mental in the universe ... In every generation
    there are always a number of men who strive whole-
    heartedly toward the divine good in the world and
    they indirectly raise even the weaker members of
    the race to a higher level Moreover, there it
    still another factor which contributes to human
    Israel Ambassador Avraham Harman (cen-
    ter) was honored at the annual convention
    ol the National Committee for Labor Israel
    in New York during outgoing Hebrew Year.
    Right is Joseph Schlossberg, president. Look-
    ing on is Rabbi Jacob J. Weinstein, chairman
    of Histadrut campaign for past 25 years.
    "Not only is man able to improve and re-
    new himself but in this enterprise toward
    newness and regeneration lies the very
    meaning of his life."
    B'nai B'rith president Label A. Kalz (center)
    shows Mrs. Maurice B. Leschen a plaque
    announcing the establishment of the Maurice
    B. Leschen Youth Fellowship in memory of
    her late husband, noted leader in civic af-
    fairs. Murray Goldwasser (left), chairman
    of the committee, looks on. "If history re-
    cords man's inhumanity to man, it also
    records many instances of heroism, martyr-
    dom, saintliness, sympathy, charity, love
    and understanding.'
    progress, namely, the deeds and thoughts of the
    great men of the past. The good which these men
    of the past acquired during their lives does not dis-
    appear even after their death. Indirectly and by
    devious ways the good of the men of the past in-
    fluences the lives of later generations and conduces
    to their elevation.''
    Yes, man can improve. He has the capacity to
    overcome his savage characteristics. To civilized
    people today, eating human flesh is an entirely un-
    natural thing. Yet, there have been peoples to whom
    it seemed natural because it was socially author-
    ized and even highly esteemed.
    Becoming a Mew Man
    Aristotle spoke for an entire social order as
    well as for himself when he said that slavery ex-
    isted by nature. He would have regarded efforts to
    abolish slavery from society as an idle Utopian ef-
    fort.
    There have been times and places in which
    land was held in common and in which private
    ownership of land would have been regarded as
    the most monstrous of unnatural things. There
    have been other times and places when and where
    all wealth was possessed by an overlcrd and his
    subjects held wealth, if any, subject to his pleasure.
    "The belief that human nature is beyond im-
    provement," says John Dewey, "is the most de-
    pressing and pessimistic of all possible doctrines.
    For according to it, persons are what they are at
    birth and nothing can be done about it. Tf human
    nature is unchangeable, then all our aims and ef-
    forts to educate are doomed to failure. For the
    very meaning of education is modification of nature
    in formation of those ways of thinking and believ-
    ing that are foreign to primitaive man."
    Not only is man able to improve and renew
    himself but in this enterprise toward newness and
    Continued on Pago 13-E
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    Friday, September 23, 1960
    *Jewlsti ftcridliar
    1
    Page 5-E
    Best Books Since Last Rosli Hashona
    By HAROLD U. RIBALOW
    THIS has been a good year in Jewish books. As
    usual, it is impossible to Ust them all, or to
    call attention to books which are of peripheral Jew-
    ish Interest. And many of the useful Jewish vol-
    umes are for specialists only, or will be remem-
    bered for a brief period. Nonetheless, any year is
    a good one which has produced as many worthy
    books as this one has.
    Let us, then, take them by category and see what
    bas been published.
    The year in fiction has been rather mediocre,
    the weakest list of a few seasons, although even
    here some titles stand out. I shall pass over the
    transient volumes and pay some attention only to
    those worth our time and effort. Meyer Levin's
    "Eva" (Simon and Schuster) is a fine evocation of
    the Hitler years and how a .young Jewess not only
    survives but manages, throughout, to retain her
    sense of identification with her people. Based on
    an actual case, "Eva" made the best-seller lists
    and further enhanced Mr. Levin's reputation as one
    of the best living American novelists, and one who
    always keeps closely in mind his own Jewish her-
    itage.
    "Shalom" by Dean Brelis, published by Little,
    Brown, is a novel about Israel which did not come
    off as well as Leon Uris' "Exodus" of an earlier
    season, bat it nevertheless contained some moving
    passages and Mr. Brelis' heart is on the right side.
    His narrative served to remind readers once more
    of the miracle of Israel and the difficulties under
    which the Jew labored in order to come to Israel
    to help build a new State.
    Other Jewish novels had less impact, but have
    enriched American Jewish fiction. Arthur Granit's
    "The Time of the Peaches" (Abelhard-Schuman)
    was a curiously-neglected novel, not reviewed wide-
    ' ly and. apparently, not bought by many readers,
    either. But it is a vivid re-creation of Jewish life
    in Brooklyn 30 years ago. Written in poetic prose,
    full of sharp insights, and with shrewd comments
    about the Jewish sense of security in a ghetto at-
    mosphere, "The Time of the Peaches" heralds the
    debut of an important Jewish writer.
    Yaal Dayan'a First
    More will be heard from If r. Granit, but do go
    out of your way to read his first novel, which is in
    many respects more than promising. On the other
    hand, Peter Martin's second novel, "The Building,"
    (Little. Brown) is less impressive than his first
    book, "The Landsmen." The later book follows the
    lives of members of a family first introduced in
    "The Landsmen." But it is less successful, even
    if it deals with a more contemporary era. Still, Mr.
    Martin is engaged in an ambitious series of novels
    and he is worth following both for his scope and
    his ability, in patches, to suggest problems in Jew-
    ish life untouched upon by others.
    Much already has been written about Yael Da-
    yan's "New Face in the Mirror" (World), a slight
    novel about an Israel girl and her experiences in
    her country's army. At the outset, there were wails
    of discontent because Miss Dayan, the daughter of
    a noted Israeli general, found that her fellow Is-
    raelis are not entirely idealistic. But the perspec-
    tive of time has, I am sure, led us to see that hers
    was a minor but sensitive portrayal of one girl's
    development and maturity.
    It is a rather impressive little novel. Marjorie
    Fischer won a Lippincott Award for her novel
    "Mrs. Sherman's Summer," a carefully-written nov-
    el about a Jewish matriarch in Long Island some
    80 years ago. The lives of the members of a well-
    to-do Jewish clan are lovingly traced and the novel
    . A r *
    f.
    MOUOti.AI KAflA/4
    ... religious analysis
    HERMAN WOW
    ... itery In itself
    makes for pleasant reading. Not too well received
    by the critics, it remains a good book, one worth
    dipping into, if only because it is concerned with a
    level of Jewish life not frequently treated, and
    written by a skillful novelist.
    There remain two more good novels, both trans-
    lated from the Yiddish, one an old classic, the oth-
    er bound to be a new one. Mendele Mocher Sefor-
    im's "Fishke the Lame" (Yoseloff) has been made
    available in a smooth translation by Gerald Still-
    man and continues to impress us as a humorous
    and sad picture of the poverty-stricken Jews of a
    European of long ago.
    Isaac Bashevis Singer's "The Magician of Lub-
    lin" (Noonday Press) is a novel by the contempor-
    ary Yiddish novelist who is perhaps the finest Jew-
    ish writer in the world, regardless of the language
    in which he writes. This is a novel about a magician
    who is lusty, something of a fraud and a man who
    believes in practically nothing. How he finds pur-
    pose in life, after helping to destroy the lives of
    many of the people he knows, is the crux of Mr.
    Singer's tale. It is a remarkable story, told by a
    masterful yarn-spinner. It is a book that will live.
    Roth Book Aa in
    Another novel which will live is one that is now
    in its second incarnation. It is titled "Call it Sleep"
    (Pageant Book Co.) and was written in 1934 by
    Henry Roth. Long out of print, it has been reissued
    with critical introductions by Maxwell Geismar,
    Meyer Levin and this writer. "Call it Sleep" is
    about a little Jewish boy in the jungles of a Brook-
    lyn ghetto and his relationships with his mother,
    Continued from Page 10-E
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    "THE BEST BAffBEQUE SAUCE IN TOWN"
    HARRIS FOOD PRODUCTS U
    Manufacturers and Distributor* ";
    Mayonnaise) Pickles Condiments Spices
    7340 N.W. 35th Ave. Miami, He. Phone OX 1-4250


    Page 6-E
    +Je*isttUridliar,
    Friday, September 23. I860
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    HOLIDAY CitfJINCS TO All
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    * Season's Greetings To AH
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    TO ALL GREETINGS
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    Good Plumbing
    33 N.W. lift* Street Mi. PR 4-3082
    Miami, Florid*
    > FRIENDSHIP HOUSE, INC.
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    747 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 1-3*26
    Events in Israel Since Last Rosh Hashona
    By ELIAHU SALPETER
    JERUSALEM -^"wTnle the outgoing year was neb?""
    in events and excitement in Israel, by and large
    it was essentially another year of relative tranquil-
    ity during which the nation's economy made im-
    portant steps toward stabilization and independ-
    ence, the Israel Army has been strengthened and
    the cultural and scientific life of the country has
    been enriched.
    Shortly after last Rosh Hashona close to one
    million Israelis went to the polls 81.6 percent
    of the electorate to choose the 120 members to
    represent them in the Fourth Knesset. While Herut
    made an all-out drive to present itself as the "al-
    ternative party*' to Mapai which has been in power
    since the establishment of the State, it actually
    overdid its propaganda and many Israelis became
    seriously alarmed at the possibility that the ultra-
    nationalist Herut may really emerge as the second
    strongest political force in the country- This be-
    sides the fact that Israelis were better off than
    ever in the past seemed to be the main reason
    for the surprising Mapai victory in the elections.
    Mapai gained 47 out of the 120 Knesset seats,
    as compared to only 40 in the previous elections,
    and what with the five Arab Knesset members as-
    sociated with Mapai, it came within sight of ob-
    taining a majority in the Knesset. Herut. despite
    its all-out campaign suceeded in electing 17 mem-
    bers, only two more than in the previous elections.
    Altogether 12 partiese managed to get represent-
    atives elected to the Knesset. Their relative
    strength remained more or less as in the previous
    elections with the exception of the General Zion-
    ists who dropped from 13 to eight members and the
    Communists who dropped from six to three mem-
    bers.
    After tiie elections Mr. Ben-Gurion again form-
    ed a Mapai-led coalition in which Mapam and Ach-
    dut Aavoda. the National Religious Party and the
    Progressive Party joined receiving a vote of con-
    fidence of 78 to 33 in the Knesset. This summer
    the Poalei Agudat Israel also reached an agreement
    on joining the coalition. (
    Only Trouble Spot
    The center of attention between Israel and her
    hostile Arab neighbors was the Israel-Syrian bor-
    der, Southeast of the Sea of Galilee. There, in a
    demilitarized zone inside Israel territory is the Kib-
    butz Beit-Katzir. Not far from it, on a hill sloping
    to the east is the abandoned Arab village of Tawa-
    fik half of which is in the Israeli part of the de-
    militarized zone. However the Syrians actually oc-
    cupied the abandoned village making it into a fort-
    ified position serving as a base for attack on Is-
    rael territory where they disputed Beit Katzir's
    right to work certain lands.
    The major outburst took place in December
    1959 when an Israel policeman was killed by Syr-
    ian fire. In the following weeks there were further
    attacks and incursions which came to a head at
    the end of January when the Syrians opened up
    mortar and artillery fire from positions in the
    "abandoned" village. Israel finally retaliated: in
    a brief fight occupied the village and blew up all
    the Syrian positions.
    With periods of relative calm the Syrian-Israel
    border was often the scene of tensions even after
    the Tawafik incidents. However, there was no major
    trouble on Israel borders with Lebanon, Jordan
    and Egypt. Cairo continued its political and eco-
    nomic warfare against Israel, maintaining the il-
    legal Suez blockade and trying to tighten the eco-
    nomic boycott. Israelis were greatly heartened
    when the New York seamen, whose patience had
    Joan Crawford honored by the United Jew-
    ish Appeal during outgoing Hebrew Year
    5720. Left ia Rabbi Herbert Friedman, ex-
    ecutive vice chairman, at a ceremony in
    Miss Crawford's home. Right is Capt. Josh-
    ua Goldberg, U.S. Naval District Chaplain,
    3rd Naval District, since retired. ". the
    cultural and scientific life of the country
    has been enriched."
    been worn thin by the Egyptian discrimination
    against American ships trading with Israel, re-
    acted by picketing the Egyptian vessel Cleopatra.
    In Israel's efforts to strengthen her ties with
    other nations, important progress was made by
    Prime Minister Ben-Gurion's visits to (he United
    States, Britain, Prance, Belgium and Holland. The
    close relations with Burma were highlighted last
    October by the extremely warm reception given
    there to President Ben-Zvi during his ten-day State
    visit. Israel followed with close interest the rapid
    emergence of new independent states in Africa. In
    many cases Israel established ties of cooperation
    with the new nations even before they achieved
    formal independence and was usually among the
    first to accord recognition and send diplomats to
    the new States.
    i
    Swrg* Forward
    The three things which make newly indepen-
    dent African states interested in technical coop-
    eration with Israel are usually described by the
    African leaders as follows: first, they are all in a
    rush and feel that Israel also is developing her eco-
    nomy in a hurry which could not be learned from
    older well established European nations; second,
    the African leaders are aware that Israel herself
    is struggling with lack of capital for investments
    and that attracting capital from abroad is com-
    bined with government planning of development
    projects but at the same time maintaining a free
    economy: third, the newly independent African
    nations are attracted by the social welfare aspects
    of Israel, its cooperative enterprises and its many
    sided trade-union organization, the Histadrut.
    The nation's economy showed another surge
    forward. There was abundance in all shops, unem-
    ployment was almost non-existent (though quite
    a number of unskilled laborers among the new im-
    migrants did not work a full six-day week in some
    offseason manths), the construction boom contin-
    ued and the price levels remained relatively stable
    despite considerable increases in various excise
    taxes levied to finance growing public expenditure.
    BEST WISHES
    TO OUR
    JEWISH FRIENDS
    MR. ami MRS.
    M. N. LIPP
    TO ALL GREETING*
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    JEWELER
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    3304 Penes de Leon tlvd.
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    TO ALL AAY FRIENDS '
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    Miami Beach
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    y
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    HAPPY HOLIDAY
    John Sh
    AND
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    In The Heart of Miami
    312 N. E. First
    room ra 1-2*71


    Friday, September 23. 1960
    *Jm-isti rhridttaun
    There was a most welcome increase in foreign in-
    vestment according to official figures foreign
    investments in the first half of I960 were almost
    three times as high as in the same period a year
    before.
    Eichmann Capture
    The most dramatic event of the year occurred*
    in May when Trime Minister Ben-Gurion told a
    surprised Knesset that Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi
    responsible for the "final solution" of the Jewish
    question and quoted as "taking credit" for the
    murder of at least five million European Jews had
    been arrested, brought to Israel and would be put
    on trial here.
    Israel officials made no secret of the fact that
    Eichmann was discovered and arrested by agents
    of Israels- Secret Police but they naively hoped
    I hat the place of his arrest could be kept secret.
    However, when it became widely publicized that
    Eichmann was captured in Argentina, the Argen-
    tine Government protested and demanded Eich-
    rnann's return. When Israel declined the Argentine
    asked for a Security Council meeting. At the meet-
    ing general understanding was shown for Israel's
    special postion and efforts to bring the Nazi crim-
    inal to trial. However there was no getting around
    the fact that violation of Argentine sovereignty
    took place and the Council advised Israel to make
    "adequate reparation." Council members made ft.
    clear that they considered Israels repeated apolo-
    gies to Argentine as such "adequate reparation."
    However, the Argentine Government, possibly un-
    der pressure from ultra-nationalist elements which
    were not unfriendly to the Nazis during the war,
    continued to insist on Eichmann's return. Argen-
    tina recalled her ambassador from Israel as a sign
    of protest.
    A special bureau to the Israel Police was put
    in charge of investigating Eichmann and collect-
    ing evidence in preparation for the trial. Israel felt
    that the trial should transcend mere criminal pro-
    ceedings and should instead provide an historic con-
    frontation with the events of the holocaust. It was
    estimated that it may take until late Autumn or
    probably even until early next year to prepare
    such a broad trial and the court sessions may last
    another four to six months next year.
    Page 7-E
    Official scroll proclaiming Abba Eban's
    election to the presidency of the Weizmann
    Institute of Science is given to Eban at a
    Erivate ceremony in Rehovot. Left is Dewey
    . Stone, chairman, board of governors.
    Right is Meyer W. Weisgal, chairman, exec-
    utive council. Twenty-fifth anniversary of
    the Institute was marked last Dec. 8 in New
    York City. "In Israel's efforts to strengthen
    her ties with other nations, important pro-
    gress was. BMOdS "
    Israel's exports skyrocket with the assistance
    of Israel Bond funds. "The nation's economy
    shows another surge forward. There was
    abundance in all shops, unemployment was
    almost non-existent the boom contin-
    ued ..."
    While Eichmann's capture and the prepartions
    for his trial revived the memory of the not-too-dis-
    tant tragic past of the Jewish people in Europe,
    another even evoked the dramatic but glorious
    phase of Jewish history 2,000 years ago. An ar-
    chaeological expedition organized by the Hebrew
    University the largest ever assembled in Israel
    spent two weeks in wilderness of the Judean
    Desert west and southwest of the Dead Sea to
    search for relics of the Bar-Kochba revolt against
    the Romans. Of the four groups into which the ex-
    pedition was divided, particular success beckoned
    to the one headed by Israel's former Chief of Staff
    and presently professor of archaeology, Dr. Yigael
    Yadin. The expedition being assisted by the Is-
    rael Army, Yadin's group employed mine detectors
    in searching through the caves which served as
    hiding places for the Jewish freedom fighters who
    made their last ditch stand against the Romans.
    Bar Kochb* Relics Found
    The mine detector discovered a bag containing
    Roman sacrificial vessels, evidently captured by
    Bar-Kochba from the Romans. The archaeologists
    also found a large number of skeletons of men,
    women and children, utensils, spears, swords and
    other weapons as well as various leather and tex-
    tile artifacts, all excellently preserved by the com-
    pletely dry climate of the region. However, the
    most dramatic discovery was made at the Univer-
    sity laboratories a few weeks later.
    Among the articles found in one of the caves
    was a leather bag, which obviously belonged to a
    woman: there was in it a mirror, various colored
    threads and numerous beads and other jewelry.
    Among all this there was a bunch of closely folded
    parchment letters. First it was believed that these
    might be some private letters sent to the lady who
    owned the bag by some departed husband or lover.
    To the joyful surprise of the scientists, however,
    when the letters were carefully opened it was dis-
    covered that they are from the commander of the
    revolt, Bar-Kochba himself, mostly to one of his
    sub-commanders. The letters apparently were writ-
    ten before the fighters retreated to the caves and
    contained various requisition orders and other
    commands by Bar Kochba. The recipient of the
    letters, when retreating or fleeing before the Ro-
    mans, presumably gave the documents for safe-
    keeping to the lady with the bag. The documents
    provide most important material on the entire Bar-
    Kochba period.
    L GREETINGS FOR NW YEAR
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    Extends New Year Greetings
    to All His Friends and Patrons
    394 E. 10th Court
    Phone TU 5-1454
    Mr. and Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer
    - -EXTEND TO THEIR MANY r.
    FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES
    BEST WISHES FOR THE
    NE W YE A R
    4JI
    WE EXTEND SINCERE GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES
    FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR jfl
    THE
    DANIA JAI ALAI PALACE 1
    -
    Opening December 12th M

    HAPPY
    NEW YEAR
    We would like fo fake
    this time fo
    thank our many Friends
    for their kind patronage
    and wish one and all
    Good Fortune during
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    STEVUiS MARKETS
    We Extend Sincere Best Wishes to All Oar
    Relatives and Friends
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    and Daaghter Ava Lee
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    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL |
    MR. and MRS. PHILIP R0MER ^
    and Family ^
    SEASONS GREETINGS
    MIAMI BEACH TRANSFER & STORAGE CO.
    .
    J. F. DavMi.il, Oww
    142s ALTON ROAD, MIAMI REACH
    PHONE M44M1


    Page 8-E
    +Jewist nork&Mn
    Friday, September 23, I960

    r
    70 ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
    WE WISH A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    "Art" "Murray" "Nat"
    COULTON BROTHERS
    1 SERVICE STATION & GARAGE
    Coral Way & S.W. 27th Ave. 840 S.W. 8th St.

    5721 X^K 1960
    Happy New Year
    As you face the new year with" vis-
    ion and courage, please accept the
    sincere wishes of your many good
    friends here who stand
    ready .'always .. : to
    help you to make you?
    future brighter and
    happier.
    Savings a.rxd I-.oa.ri A.ssooia.tir
    tISCAYNC iOUlIVA0 AT It* STMIT MIAMI HOIIM
    t. ALBEIT PA HOT, Fr*4~*
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    U.S. ROYAL TIRES
    AMALIE (Pennsylvania) MOTOR OH.
    DADE TIRE CO., Inc.
    1501 N. MIAMI AVENUE MIAML FLORIDA
    Phone FR 3-8445
    ,_ GREETINGS
    I f HOLLEMANS RESTAURANT
    | & N.W. 781 h Street at 7th Avenue
    |j The Best of Foods With Friendly Service
    f Air Conditioned Popular Prices Ample Parking
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    Kmm Ml 3-7179
    *Mcni
    BEAUTY SALON
    Air-Condrtioned
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    CORAL GABLES
    | TO ALL GREETINGS .
    f% FIVE POINT PAINT & HARDWARE STORE
    |Mr QUALITY PAINTS BRUSHES
    MM* COME IN BROWSE AROUND
    W 15,000 ITEMS OF HARDWARE
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    BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
    w CHARLES HOTEL
    CCtim AVfNtfT etlS* STtfIT
    MAIM BfACH
    5721 A Year of U.S. Jewish Maturity
    By RABBI HERBERT A. FRIEDMAN
    Executive Vice Chairman UJA
    AS the year 5721 begins for the Jews of the world,
    ^* I find retained in my mind and in my heart
    the warm and vivid impressions I received this
    summer in one of the most exciting countries in
    the world, the State of Israel Although I have
    been to Israel a number of times, I found the spec-
    tacle of the steady, sturdy growth of the Jewish
    homeland more impressive than on any previous
    trip.
    Israel's cities are growing, and Israel's fields
    and factories are becoming increasingly product-
    ive. Israel's scientists and engineers are success-
    fully probing the chemical richness of her earth,
    and arc coming close to their aim of making salt
    water potable and making the use of atomic ener-
    gy practical. Israel's universities and democratic
    institutions are training the nation's youth ;in:i at-
    tracting the progressive new generation of Afri-
    cans and Asians. Finally, Israel's ports and landing
    strps remain steadfastly open to thousands of new
    immigrants in search of full lives in freedom.
    In these and many other ways, the Israel I saw
    this summer has come of age. Problems remain,
    deficiencies exist and some are serious but
    there is more reason than ever to believe that this
    increasingly mature and confident nation will be
    able to meet them in the years to come. Feeling
    this, seeing this, knowing this, I was doubly proud.
    "Doubly," I say, for I came to Israel this sum-
    mer with the knowledge that the American Jew-
    ish community as reflected in the United Jew-
    ish Appeal has also come of age. For the Jews
    of America are responding as magnificiently to
    this year's UJA campaign which was without
    Harvesting for the New Year Farmers on
    an immigrant settlement in Israel gather a
    bountiful crop with the aid of modern
    machinery. This settlement is one of over
    400 established with the aid of programs
    made possible by American Jews through
    the United Jewish Appeal. More than 130,-
    000 immigrants are settled on these farms.
    More than 160,000 other newcomers to Is-
    rael depend upon UJA for housing, medical
    care, social services, education and voca-
    tional training.
    Happily making toys for nearby orphanage
    is one of Israel's senior immigrants in a
    home operated by Malben, made possible
    by American Jews through the United Jew-
    ish Appeal. Malben, which cares lor aged,
    handicapped and chronically ill newcomers
    in Israel, is an arm of the Joint Distribution
    Committee, a UJA constituent agency.
    "benefit" of headline-making emergency as they
    had in previous drives sparked by crises.
    Life or Death
    I cannot stress too strongly the significance
    of this development. Consider the nature of UJA
    campaigning since the organization's inception in
    1939. Throughout the years of the Hitler terror,
    of World War II, of post-war chaos, throughout the
    critical early years of Israel's existence, the years
    of mass expulsion, and flight of large Jewish pop-
    .f. u hit ions, particularly from Arab lands, of torrent-
    ial immigration, of borders crossed in outbreak
    and skTmish the UJA was by force of historic
    circumstance an emergency operation. Re>cue was
    the key word. Life or death was often the issue.
    American Jewry rose splendidly to the wave
    after wave of crisis. Rescue was accomplished.
    Lives were saved.
    Then suddenly, this past year, there was no
    emergency comparable with those of the" past. Op-
    pression continued in many parts of the earth, pri-
    vation continued, imnvgration into Israel went on
    at a steady if not spectacular pace, day-by-riay need
    persisted in Israel and the other 25 countries serv-
    iced by JDC and other UJA agencies. Sjx hundred
    thousand people still required help from the Unit-
    ed Jewish Appeal.
    But there was no great upheaval, no outsize
    violence and no urgent streaming headline^ to back
    up our appeal. The UJA was in for trouble, we
    were told. Amercan Jews had too long equated
    contribution with crisis. Collections would tail off.
    It was inevitable. It had to happen. Se ran the ar-
    guments. ,
    It did not happen.
    Why? Because the Jews of America did not
    . let down. They had thought deeply about the un-
    derlying reasons for their act of giving aid and
    comfort to world Jewry through the UJA. And
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    Friday. September 23. I960
    -JewlstFlcrMiann
    Page *-E
    tt
    ii
    they had come to understand some very basic
    things:
    They began to recognize their enduring re-
    sponsibility, on a global basis, to their fellow Jews:
    not to permit a single day's unnecessary suffering
    and privation, even at a time when that suffering
    w#s not translated into bold, blazing headlines.
    They tJegm to face their eternal obligation to
    contribute to and preserve the vision of an ageless
    and creative people, devoted to the highest con-
    cepts of moral responsibility.
    Integration Necessary
    They began to see themselves not as dispensers
    of year-to-year charity, but as members of a world
    fdlow&hip actively willing to help their needful
    brethren attain the living dignity and security they
    must have to make their own contribution to this
    historic continuity of the Jewish people.
    And, perhaps most importantly, they began to
    understand the contrality of the State of Israel in
    world Jewish life.
    They had come to realize it was not enough
    to have rescued and transported a million people
    to Israel in the last twelve years and to have help-
    ed to absorb two-thirds of them productively into
    the young republic's life and economy. They knew
    that they must help complete the process of inte-
    gration for all immigrants they have helped re-
    settle in Israel and that they must be prepared
    for many years to come to help the thousands of
    other immigrants who will follow.
    In other words, the Jews of America have come
    to understand and have embraced the long-
    range nature of the global work of the United Jew-
    ish Appeal. This represents a great turning point
    in UJA history.
    What is perhaps most gratifying about this
    development is the active participation in this piv-
    otal campaign of so many of the younger Jewish
    leaders throughout the country. This newer gen-
    eration, which did not take part in the tragic events
    of two decades ago that gave the UJA its initial
    momentum, shows every sign of being a driving
    force behind future campaigns. The potential for
    growth is high and great.
    It was that image of American Jewish maturity
    Beginning the New Year 5721 with hope,
    these ma'abarot dwellers in Israel will soon
    leave their squalid shanties for new apart-
    ments, seen nearing completion in the back-
    ground. Last Rosh Hashona. some 60,000
    were living in the ma'abarot. With the help
    of United Jewish Appeal funds, these num-
    bers have been reduced by some 20,000
    during the last 12-month period.
    r*"*
    The New Year 5721 starts off right for these
    recently-arrived immigrant youngsters in Is-
    rael, who are learning a useful trade in a
    school established by American Jews
    through the United Jewish Appeal. During
    5720, some 38,000 young people in Israel
    learned trades, acquired secondary and
    higher education, and received vocational
    guidance. They are among 185,000 young
    in 25 other countries who depend upon UJA
    assistance.
    and its great future potential that I brought with
    me to Israel this summer and found that the
    image of the State of Israel more than matched it.
    This double image was an exhilarating fact of Jew-
    ish life in the last months of the Hebrew year 5720.
    Now, as the New Year 5721 begins and thoughts
    turn to the next year's campaigning, I know there
    are some who may be uneasy. Their caution tells
    them that one challenge squarely and maturely
    met does not necessarily prove continuing maturity.
    It tells them that one successful campaign may
    not guarantee another, that the image may prove
    illusory and that the follow-up year to come
    will tell the story.
    Ongoing Needs
    I agree. The coming campaign, which will oc-
    cupy most of the year 5721, will indeed be the test
    of the new maturity I have sensed among the Jews
    of this country. It will establish it either as a one-
    year phenomenon or as an enduring part of Amer-
    ican Jewish life.
    The needs to be met by the next UJA cam-
    paign will once again be the onging daily needs
    of more than half a million Jewish men, women
    and children. In Israel, they will be struggling to
    rise to a level of living on which they can meet
    the great future on equal terms with their fellow
    Israelis. In the other countries in which the pro-
    gram of the UJA's agencies operate through the
    JDC, they will still be struggl'ng against age-old
    conditions of poverty, disease and backwardness
    so that they may begin to participate with dignity
    in the Jewish future.
    Meeting these ongoing daily needs is impera-
    tive, to clear the way for greater tasks in the
    future. For the time will come, as it must, when
    thousands of Jews will be able to leave lands from
    which they cannot now emigrate and go to Israel.
    And the time is almost at hand for the people of
    Israel to penetrate the Negev desert in depth and
    finish the job of making that whole vast barren
    area fruitful. The Jews of America must be pre-
    pared to help make these future breakthroughs
    smooth and successful.
    The men and women who will work in the cam-
    Contiuned on Page 13-E
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    Page 10-E
    +Jmistt Her id fan
    Friday. September 23, I960
    uifc
    happy new year
    the cobbs
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    CORRE CLEANERS & LAUNDRY INC.
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    TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES .
    MR. and MRS. ALBERT GOODSTEIN
    and FAMILY
    r
    Best Books Since Last Rosh Hashona
    Continued from Pag* 5-E
    father and the wild children in his neighborhood.
    The prose is magnificent and the imagination of,
    the novelist wild and tempestuous. "Call it Sleep"
    has been ranked as one of the finest novels ever
    writen by an American Jew about Jews in Amer-
    ica, by such diverse critics as Marie Syrkin, Leslie
    Fiedler. Alfred Kazin and a host of others. Any
    year which sees its reappearance is a fine year.
    In the field of non-fiction, there also have seen
    some impressive titles. Herman Wouk once again
    has made the bestseller lists with a rather un-
    likely candidate. He produced a popularly-written
    account (from the Orthodox point of view) of Ju-
    daism as it is and perhaps should be practiced
    in the United States, with descriptions of the holi-
    days, traditions and religious ideas. The title is
    This Is My God" (Doubleday) and it caught on for
    a simple reason: it filled a need and was persuasive-
    ly written. It also sold more than 100,000 copies,
    which is a story in itself.
    Another bestseller was produced by Harry Gold-
    en, who has got into the habit. This one was, of
    course, "For 2c Plain" (World) and is very much
    like "Only in America," which means it is a com-
    pilation of Mr. Golden's essays in his paper, "The
    Carolina Israelite," and contains pleasant and
    shrewd little stories about America and Jewish life
    in this country, past and present.
    There also have been a number of books deal-
    ing with the Nazi period of destruction of the Jews.
    "The Works of Anne Frank," selected and edited
    by Anne Birstein and Alfred Kazin and published
    by Doubleday, includes not only the classic Diary
    but also all the earlier writings of the gifted girl
    whose work has inspired the world. The collection
    proves that Anne Frank had a true gift and that
    the Diary was no accident. "A Cat in the Ghetto"
    by Rachmil Bryks (distributed by Bloch) includes
    a novella and a handful of tales which are hair-
    raising and unforgettable.
    Edna Ferber Adds
    Mr. Bryks has taken the most tragic of materials
    and woven them into remarkable stories, mostly
    factual but containing the flashes of imagination
    which are the true artist's. It is a harrowing book,
    yet when finished, it somehow elevates man. The
    same holds true for "Night of the Mist" by Eugene
    Heimler and published in this country by the Van-
    guard Press. Mr. Heimler survived Auschwitz and
    Buchenwald. He informs us what happened to him
    and others, but, at the same time, he reveals a tol-
    erance of man that is most unusual. These three
    books have an overwhelming sensitivity and serve
    to remind us that in the very depths, man retains
    his humanity.
    We have had, this past season, a few good bio-
    graphies and autobiographies. They are worth men-
    tioning. Edna Ferber has added a little to her auto-
    biography "A Peculiar Treasure" (Doubleday) and
    read today, twenty-five years after the first issu-
    ance of this book, it holds up extremely well. It is
    the story of a small-town Jewish girl who became
    a famous writer.
    What stands out, however, is her account of
    small-town life as seen by a young Jewess. It is
    authentic Americana and is, simultaneously, a
    strongly and impressively Jewish book. Morris Ros-
    enfeld's life is told by Leon Goldenthal in 'Toil
    and Triumph" (Pageant). Here, we learn of the
    impact by the famous Yiddish poet who worked in
    a sweatshop and managed to capture, in simple
    and affecting lines, the agony of the poverty-strick-
    en Jews who struggled to eke out a living in New
    York at the turn of the century. It combined fact
    Recently elected Fellows of Brandeis Uni-
    versity, Waltham, Mass., these ladies are
    members of the National Women's Com-
    mittee, numbering more than 70,000, which
    supports the Brandeis library. It is the
    largest "friends of a library" movement in
    the world.
    with imagination and does come off For that
    matter, so does Samuel Shihor's sad account of the
    last years of the life of Dr. Chaim Weizmann. the
    tirst president of the State of Israel. Called "Hol-
    low Glory" (Yoscloff), this book permits us to see
    how Dr. Weizmann was thrust aside soon after Is-
    rael was established. What is most uniortunate is
    that Dr. Weizmann was cognizant of his helpless-
    ness and told his friends and confidants that his
    prestige was being used, but that he himselt was
    not. It is an unhappy account but important t > the
    history of Israel and Dr. Weizmann.
    Christopher Sykcs. in "Orde Wingate" (World)
    has written an authoritative, compnhn-:ve bio-
    graphy of the eccentric English military officer
    who took the cause of Zionism seriously to his
    heart and helped create the Haganah and taught
    the Jewish settlers of Palestine how to figh: off
    the Arabs who constantly attacked them and tried
    to drive them off the land. Wingate was a fascinat-
    ing character, one of a handful of Englishmen who
    sacrificed much to give support and practical aid
    to the men and women building a new homeland
    in Palestine. Mr. Sykes has captured the man on
    paper and has given us an unusual glimpse into a
    most remarkable leader of men.
    Passages on Jaws
    In "Thomas Wolfe" (Doubleday), Elizabeth Now-
    ell, who had been Wolfe's agent, traces the career
    of the great American writer who had a love af-
    fair with a Jewish stage designer named Aline
    Bernstein and who, before he died at 38, ranked
    as a major American novelist. In Wolfe's works
    there are many characters and passages relating
    to Jews. There are some who call him an anti-
    Semite and a lover of Hitler's Germany. Miss Now-
    ell, who died before her biography was published,
    points out why Wolfe was anti-Jewish as a young
    man and how he changed, but he finally saw the
    poison in Hitlerism and how, before be died, he
    gained tolerance and understanding. This is an
    important book about a significant writer and also
    clarifies many matters of interest to Jewish read-
    ers.
    There is another American writer, Norman Matt*
    Uwr t^incere LVis lies Jc
    or a
    ear
    y*
    IVeAH-eatjteA. at 3j-tk'QueHU&


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    +Je*lstncrkttan
    er, who has had a controversial and hectic career.
    His "The Naked and the Dead" made him his rep-
    utation and his later books did nothing to enhance
    that reputation. Yet his very latest, "Advertise-
    ments for Hweji." .tP.utnamJ doea-jnuch -to.illwui.
    nate him for us. Here, Mailer reproduces segments
    of his earlier books and sections of a work in prog-
    ress. Throughout, he prefaces his selections with
    observations on his work and himself. In all, the
    book Is a candid exposure of a writer's mind at
    work.
    "Act One" (Simon and Schuster) by Moss Hart
    is an autobiography of sorts by a popular Ameri-
    can playwright, with many details about his Jew-
    ism background. It has been a national best-seller
    because of its candor, humor and name-dropping
    and, I suppose, because the American people are
    fascinated by success stories revolving around the-
    ater personalities ... Yet Karl Shapiro's "In De-
    fense of Ignorance" (Random House) is a series
    of essays which, in a sense, is also autobiographi-
    cal, but because it deals with writers, writing and
    poetry, has not made, and won't ever make, the
    best-seller lists. Nonetheless, it is superior writing
    and criticism and the chapter by Shapiro on Jewish
    writing, while controversial, is thoughtful and
    worth arguing.
    Page Il-E
    Three more books deserve comment here, even
    though they will not attract large reading audi-
    ences, for each book requires the reader to work
    hard, an act not popular nowadays. One is Cecil
    Roth's "The Jews in the Renaissance" (Jewish Pub-
    ""Tication Society) which is scholarly, documented
    and chock full of valuable information. A second
    is "The Israeli Worker" (Herzl Press and Sharon
    Books) by Dr. Ferdynand Zweig, a study of the
    working man in Israel's ever-changing society.
    The third is Dr. Mordecai Kaplan's "The Great-
    er Judaism in the Making" (Reconstructlonist
    Press), with the subtitle of "A Story of the Mod-
    ern Evolution of Judaism," in which Dr. Kaplan,
    the founder of Reconstructionism, analyzes all
    wings and trends in Judaism, Orthodox, Reform
    and Conservative, and offers his own interpretation
    of what is best for the Jew in our own time. While
    all three titles are scholarly, they are on widely
    disparate themes, and yet deserve the close atten-
    tion of the serious-minded Jew.
    There are, of course, other fine books, like "The
    Midstream Reader" (Yoseloff) edited by Shlomo
    Katz and Max Lerner's "The Unfinished Country"
    (Simon and Schuster), but if the reader catches up
    with the books already listed, he will have done
    well and will, I believe, agree with me that this
    has been, on balance, a good year for Jewish books.
    Rob of the Chazzan in Jewish Tradition
    Continued from Pag* 3-E
    new music for the American synagogue, complied
    a collection of songs in Hebrew, English aad Ger-
    man. These songs, published in New York from
    1871 to 1836 in four volumes, were for the Sab-
    bath, the festivals and other occasions. Many more
    books of music followed.
    There is a rich literature devoted to the inter-
    est of the Chazzan and one not less abundant per-
    taining to their biographies and evaluation. The
    most famous Is by the German Aron Friedman.
    'LebeasbiMer der beruehmten Cantoren," (Ber-
    lin 1918 to 1927).
    An Evaluation
    The Jewish Ministers Cantors Assn. of Amer-
    ica in New York has published a history of the
    Chazzanuth in Yiddish (1924).
    We can give no more than passing attention to
    the legion of famous singers of Israel. Let us only
    mention Josef (Yossele) Rosenblatt, whose bio-
    graphy has recently been published by his son,
    Rabbi Dr. Samuel Rosenblatt. Nor must the great
    Koussevitzky remain unmentioned. Countless can-
    torial records have been made of the songs by
    great Chazzanim.
    The Chazzanim keep alive the great, millenia
    old sacred tradition of our people. It is well that
    all those stirring old songs be kept alive. For they
    have helped to keep our people alive.
    The words are from the Bible and Prayer
    Book. Some songs were sung on the way to the gas
    chambers by those who proclaimed at the very
    Continued on Pago 13-E I
    Key symbolizing the dedication of the Leah
    and Joseph Rubin Residence Hall at Yeshiva
    University in New York is presented to 93-
    year-old philanthropist, Joseph Rubin, by
    his great-grandson. Leigh Rubin Weiner.
    The building was made possible by a $500,-
    000 gift from the Rubin Foundation. "The
    dignity of Jewish life cannot be realized
    without a deeper understanding of the sub-
    stance of Jewish values ..."
    IN wishing you a happy
    New Year, The Herald
    hopes for you every
    possible blessing that
    the New Year can bring
    Stye ^rami Jleralb
    FLORIDA'S MOST COMPLETE NIWSPAPiR
    J
    ROSH HASHANAH
    TIME TO REMEMBER THE TWIN -JUBILEES AND
    'Whosoever Honors the Torah Shall Himself Bo Honored'
    IMS KtfK
    1.-.v.\t; ti-.-.r-
    l sjjm L-;~3
    1 ?:i:ia U-:i'..'.--
    SALUTE AND MAZEL TOV TO ISRAEL!
    The year 5721 marks the Bar AAitzvah anniversary of
    Israel's Independence. It is an important milestone in
    Jewish history.
    68th JUBILEE OF THE
    W1LNO
    KOSHER
    SAUSAGE CO.
    k another important milestone to the Kashrurh
    observant Jews from coast to coast.
    At the dawn of this New Year, the leaders in the manu-
    facture of fine Kosher delicatessen products for close to
    70 years, reaffirm the principles that have made the
    Wilno Kosher products a favorite to Jewish families.
    Two prominent Orthodox Rabbit, Rabbi Boruch Rabinowitz and Rabbi
    Ben Zion Rosenthal. and two steady Mahgichim are in charge of tte
    Kaahruth Department.
    MAY THE TWIN JUBILEES USHER IN
    A HAPPY, HEALTHFUL, PROSPEROUS AND PEACEFUL
    NEW YEAR!
    WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO.
    Of CHICAGO
    LOCAL PLANT:
    2181 NORTHWEST 10th AVE., MIAMI, FLORIDA
    Telephone: FRanklin 1-6551
    BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO OUR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS
    Mr. and Mrs. A. Finley Binder
    and Children ]
    J. I.ouis. Manriee leffry. 1
    Jonathan Mark and Ethel Mary
    New Year Greetings to All ^
    Contour Chair Shop
    40 Miracle Mile Coral Gables ^
    HI 4-4760
    ?^^^W^WAM^W^^W^J^n^^^r^Aa/^W^.
    rWWWWW
    To All New Year Greetings .
    JUDGE FRANCIS J. CHRISTIE
    JUDGE-ELECT OF CIRCUIT COURT,
    GROUP NO. 1
    46 N.W. 1st STREET
    15
    ~1
    -<*W*W'WW*W'W


    Frid
    Page 12-E
    ?Jenist ncrkHan
    Friday. September 23. I960
    I
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    FOR REST AND RELAXATION
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    L B. MALONE MATTRESS CO.
    I
    GREETINGS ... "f
    I ENDURANCE FLOOR CO., INC.
    "FLOOR COVERING CONTRACTORS'
    Residential & Commercial
    13900 N.W. 7th Avenue
    Phone MU 1-4923
    TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION CO.
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    PHONE NE 4-9761
    S?
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    TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
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    H Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gottesman

    TO ALL GREETINGS .
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    p" p Insurance
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    [ GOVERNOR CAFETERIA
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    R
    Hassidism and the Yearning for Zion
    Continued from Pago 1-E
    requisite for the redemption of the people of Is-
    rael. The Holy Land was, therefore the object of
    deepest longing for him and Hassidic lore is re-
    plete with legends about his attempts to undertake
    the hazardous voyage to Eretz Yisrael. In fact, he
    is said to have reached as far as Constantinople,
    and to have been forced by various circumstances
    to return.
    Similar attempts were made by the Besht's
    disciples, notably Rabbi Pinchas, of Koretz, and
    Rabbi Zalman. of Ladi, founder of the Habbad
    wing in Hassidism, with a view to propagating
    Hassidic ideology in Eretz Yisrael. They, too, were
    prevented from reaching their goal. Other cele-
    brated early Hassidic leaders however, succeeded
    in gratifying their longing. The first among them
    was Rabbi Gershon Kitover. the Bcshfs brother-in-
    l.iu. who settled in Hebron in 1747 and who, in
    view of his fame as a Talmudic and Kabbalistic
    scholar, was received with enthusiasm and given
    the appointment as head of the community. After
    .staying in that office for six years, he settled in
    Jerusalem where he died in the year 1762.
    Braved Hazards
    Rabbi Gershon's fruitful activities in dissem-
    inating Hassidic philosophy in Eretz Yisrael stimu-
    lated many of the Hassidic leaders in the Dia-
    spora to undertake a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.
    In the year 1764. four years after the Besht's death,
    a group of 30 men and women, led by the Besht's
    senior disciples. Rabbi Nachman of Horodenko
    and Rabbi Mendel of Premyslan, succeeded in
    reaching the shores of Jaffa on the eve of Rosh
    Hoshana. They were forbidden to land, however,
    by the Arabs, and remained on board ship until the
    Fast of Gedalyah. when they decided to continue
    the journey to the port' of Acre.
    This voyage, even in those days, should have
    taken no longer than six hours, but a storm at sea
    tossed their vessel about for eight days, and it was
    on the point of breaking up in the raging sea. Rabbi
    Nachman, we are told, then assembled a minyan
    of his followers and with a Scroll of the Law in
    his arms, pronounced the following statement:
    "Lord of the Universe, if it was decreed by Thy
    Heavenly Court that we should perish, this holy
    Joseph Meyerhoff receives PEC "Man of the
    Year" Award at annual dinner of the Pal-
    estine Economic Corporation. "They hoped
    that by renewing the bonds with the soU of
    their ancestral homeland and by devotinq
    their days to the study of the Torah they
    would be able to delve deeper into the se-
    crets of their faith ..."
    congregation jointly with the Shechinah declare
    that we decline to accept the decree. We demand
    that it be promptly annulled." The story continues
    that in consequence of this pronouncement th<*
    storm subsided and they landed at Acre on the 12th
    of Tishrei, whence they proceeded to Safed and
    Tiberias.
    Some two decades later Hassidim began arriv-
    Conrinued on Pago 15 E
    glil
    in
    Thi
    anc
    art
    cai
    shi
    set
    hin
    hir
    wo
    hir
    his
    th
    fel
    dei
    pei
    fear
    <2M ^/vtost to the Jewish C__rontm unify front the
    Jjoard of JiJirectors, \^)fficers and ^>taff of
    * ?
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    CMrmmti of the BMrl
    INDUSTRIAL
    NATIONAL BANK
    25 VEST FLAGLER STREET
    Aiemoer: Federal Reserve System Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


    - ^
    Friday, September 23. 1960
    vJewist flcricUairi
    Page 13-E
    Role of the Chazzan in Jewish Tradition
    Continued from Pag* he
    door of death their undying faith in the Messiah
    and the life thereafter.
    Tiiese tfie Ch*an prMrved as wU-*
    songs that are sung with'children at Jewish tables,
    those tables which are the high altars of the Dia-
    spora. "An altar will I build out of the broken
    pieces of my heart." These age-old words are re-
    plete with untranslatable alliterations. Their deep-
    er meaning intoxicates the mind and the beauti-
    ful melodies, gladden the heart. Thus heart and

    Can Man Improve?
    Continued from Pago 4-E
    regeneration lies the very meaning of his life. Con-
    cerning all things which God created, the Bible
    slates, "And God said that it was good." But of the
    i n.it ion of man, it is not said it was good. Because,
    say the rabbis, man was not created perfect, but
    perfectible. His destiny is to perfect himself and
    his world.
    A person who is intent on self-improvement
    will discover that he has within him the potentiali-
    ties of becoming "a little lower than the angels."
    Experience and observation reveal daily
    glimpses of possibility and resource stored away
    in the depths of consciousness of average men.
    They can be stirred to feats of physical strength
    and endurance: they have in them capacities for
    art, skill, poetry, idealism, devotion. You never
    can tell when these gleams of a higher life may
    shine out. These gleams and sparks are to be
    seen in the humblest places. Wake a man up, give
    him a hope, set a great purpose before him, let
    him feel the thrill of the heart beats of his fellow
    working, fighting, struggling, cooperating with
    him, and he becomes a new man.
    The Holy Days call the Jew to take stock of
    his gifts, to improve them, to use them and use
    them wisely for his own benefits and that of his
    fellow man.
    May we, through self improvement and worthy
    deeds, help make the New Year one of peace, pros-
    perity and good will for all mankind.
    mind are entwined in symphonic harmony.
    The Jewish people has created a .special type
    of music which represents the true interpretation
    and expression of the rich spiritual life, its mil-
    lenia-old precious heritage, but also of its ideas
    and emotions.
    The Chazzan, as the chosen interperter of Jew-
    ish song, thus voices the spirit and history of a
    people who, for thousands of years have been fight-
    ing relentlessly for its existence, scattered in thou-
    sands of small groups among the millions of di-
    verse tongues, cultures and creeds. Jewish song
    has always been a genuine echo of Jewish relig-
    ion, ethics, history of the inner life of the Jews
    and their external vicissitudes.
    The cantor when singing for the children of
    Israel will utter a devout silent prayer that har-
    mony shall always reign and that the Messiah may
    come soon of whom the prophet says "and he will
    turn the hearts of the parents towards the chil-
    dren and the hearts of the children towards their
    parents." Thus the cantor, chosen interpreter of
    the great songs born of Jews, helps to keep them
    alive. And they are well worth to be kept alive: for
    deeply are they steeped in Jewish folklore and
    folksong, vibrant with Jewish emotion, sensitive
    to Jewish sorrows, joys, hopes and unshakable
    convictions.
    w
    Year of Maturity
    Continued from Pog* t-E
    paign next year to meet these needs vigorously
    and successfully must be capable of both compas-
    sion for this daily personal struggle of their anon-
    ymous brothers and of seeing that struggle as
    part of a great march forward by a whole people.
    They must be able to sorrow at the suffering that
    goes on and to exult in the joyous fulfillment that
    will come. They must, with one hand, take the
    hand of their weakened brother, and with the other,
    point out to him the strength of his future.
    Will the Jews of America, for the second
    straight year, demonstrate this kind of far-seeing
    maturity? I for one have no doubt of it.
    BEST WISHES
    for a
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    to our many
    Friends and Customers
    Happy New Year to All .
    E. B. LEATHERMAN
    DADE COUNTY
    COURTHOUSE
    ^1
    Best Wishes and Greetings
    on the New Year .
    BANK of MIAMI BEACH
    9j7 Washington Avenue
    Mrmbtr Ftdtrci Dieoilt /orfti.C Corp.
    MARTIN D. von ZAMFT D LEE POWELL
    Chairman and President Vice-Chairman
    INTERCONTINENT TRAVEL SERVICE, INC. 4
    Columbus Hotel J
    MR. LOUIS MARTIN W)
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    Diplomat Hotel Hollywood, Fla.
    GEORGE BERGER
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    HOLIDAY GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES
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    Season's Best Wishes ... ^
    GONDAS CORPORATION
    MACHINERY <|f
    151 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 7-5531
    To All A Most Happy New Year .
    Stembler Adorns Frazier
    Insurance Agency, Inc.
    EASY OFF-STREET PARKING
    2600 W. Flagler Street Phone HI 4-6575
    "SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA OVER 40 YEARS"

    I
    1


    SULLIVAN COUNTY
    SUPERMARKET
    634 Collins Avenue
    MIAMI BEACH PHONE JE 1-6145
    FREE DELIVERY
    HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    TO ALL NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS
    HOSPITAL APOTHECAPY
    SERVING OUR NEW SOUTH MIAMI HOSPITAL
    AND THE SOUTH MIAMI AREA
    WALLY RINZ Pharmacist
    24-HOUR EMERGENCY CALL
    MO 1-8581
    7400 S.W. 62nd Ave.


    I"
    Page 14-E
    vJenisti fhrkKpun
    Friday. September 23. 1960
    Season's Greetings .
    WOMETCO Enterprises, Inc.
    MITCHELL WOLFSON, President
    WTVJ Channel 4
    MIAMI SEAQUARIUM
    WOMETCO THEATRES
    WOMETCO VENDING

    THE OFFICERS,
    DIRECTORS AND STAFF OF
    FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
    extend our
    best wishes
    for a

    Happy, Healthy and
    Prosperous New Year
    Downtown:
    100 N.E. 2nd Avenue
    Branch:
    Biscayne Shopping Plaza
    OZ2D *i53b(*
    FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
    AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI
    Assembly plant of Israel Aircraft Industries
    (Bedek) at Lod, shewing the Fougc Magister,
    the first jet to be assembled in Israel, standard
    jet training craft of the Israel Air Force. The
    engine is bought in France, and the bedy has
    been adjusted by Israel designers. Export
    price, $165,000.
    Israel's Fledgling Jet Assembly Industry


    Happy New Year to All
    9ncomporob!c
    French Cuisine*
    9S16 HARDING AVE.
    MIAMI BEACH UN 61654-
    DAVID LER0UX
    FOR DINNER AT THE STEINWAY
    LATER, IN THE PIANO BAR .
    Continued from Page 2-E
    trainers was started two years ago when a license
    was obtained from Europe to sell the plane any-
    where outside Europe and the French territories.
    This is, of course, the first plane to come off an
    Israel production line: except for the engines and
    instruments, all parts are of local manufacture.
    The plane will sell at approximately $130,000 and
    is described by the local test pilot as "very good,
    an excellent plane. In view of the high repute of
    the French aircraft industry, it should be compara-
    tively easy to find purchasers.
    Ambitious Plans
    Even more ambitious is the plan to sell a lo-
    cally designed twin-jet passenger plane for civilian
    use. Known as an "executive plane," the B101, as
    it is called, has a range of 1,400 miles and is pri-
    marily planned for the American market. Large
    manufacturers of planes in the United States have
    not bothered to build small jets of this type. IAI
    has been working at it for a year and has just com-
    pleted a full scale "mock-up." If everything goes
    according to plan, the Lydda plant should be turn-
    ing out 60 planes a year after 1962. The estimated
    cost will be in the neighborhood of $250,000.
    The present capital investment is 1 1.7 mil-
    lion, all provided by the Government. While no prof-
    it figures are published, Schwimmer points out that
    the firm is in the black and intends to make prof-
    its. Future plans envisage an expansion ol the labor
    force to 4,0005,000 within a few years. This is
    'an impressive p!ant by any standard, a gigantic
    one for a small country handicapped as Israel was.
    JACQUES DONNET and ORCHESTRA
    Wish All Their Friends
    A Very Happy New Year
    UN 5-7561 Eve. Wl 7-7836


    MRS. HORLAMUS' BREAD
    Hand Kneaded
    DARK HIGH PROTEIN
    NO Sugar, Salt or Fat Added
    - PUMPERNICKEL -
    Old World Recipe Using Stone-Ground RyeDelicious.
    HORLAMUS FOOD PRODUCTS
    4210V2 LAGUNA ST. CORAL CARIES
    IN MEMORY OF OUR BELOVED
    HUSBAND, FATHER and GRANDFATHER
    Or. MRS. I. L MINTZER
    JACK and JACKIE
    and the Children, Michael, Bruce and Wayne
    MR. and MRS. RAYMOND M. CHISUNG
    end Jody, Gary and Jill


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    *Jeni$ti noridfiftry
    Page 15-E
    Hassidism and the Yearning for
    Continued from Page 12 E
    ing froai.Ruaila and Ejistejo Europe in larger num-
    ber;. Among them Rabbi Mendel of Vitebsk, lead-
    ing disciple of Rabbi Ber of Meseritz, the Baal
    Shem's successor, occupies a unique place. Joint-
    ly with Abraham Kalisker and Rabbi Israel Polotz-
    ker he transplanted the Movement to Eretz Yis-
    raei. coming in 1777 at the head of a contingent of
    300 Hassidim who settled in Safed and Tiberias to
    be followed by many others from Eastern Europe.
    Sought Spiritual Wealth
    At that time immigration on such a scale was
    a fantastic venture, but equipped with unbounded
    faith and love they saw no obstacles in their way.
    It would be incorrect to assume that they came to
    , settle for the purpose of leading a productive eco-
    nomic life or of founding agricultural settlements.
    It was the spiritual wealth which the Holy Land
    alcr.e could afford that prompted them to come.
    They hoped that by renewing the bonds with the
    soJ] of their ancestral homeland and by devoting
    thtir days to the study of the Torah and to.Divine
    worship they would be able to delve deeper into
    the secrets of their faith, and by living a pious life
    they would achieve eternal bliss and promote the
    &:': me of salvation and redemption, speeding up
    the return of their people to the Holy Land in ful-
    fillment of Biblical prophecy. Their journey which
    took several months was full of danger and hard-
    ships. Travelling by sailing boat they depended en-
    tirely on favorable winds which exposed them
    to terrible sickness. In those days sea-faring was
    the calling either of desperadoes or of criminals.
    The route via Constantinople was infested by pi-
    rate?. They had to wait for several months before
    a protected vessel sailed from Constantinople to
    Jaffa or Acre, and once they arrived there they had
    to wait for safe conduct to Safed or Tiberias. A
    livelihood for their families was to them a matter
    of minor consideration. They subsisted largely on
    the distribution of "Halukkah," charitable dona-
    tion; collected on their behalf in the various com-
    munities of the Diaspora. The administration of
    thet-e funds often led to serious friction among the
    adherents of the various Hassidic groups. Finally
    reconciliation was brought about by Rabbi Nach-
    man of Braczlav, grandson of the Besht, who went
    to Eretz Yisrael in 1798, where he was received
    with great honor and brought many under the spell
    of his unique personality.
    While in the 19th century Hassidim from East-
    ern Europe came to Eretz Yisrael not in groups,
    the arrival of many individual settlers succeeded
    in strengthening the Hassidic nests and in estab-
    lishing well organized communities which, in their
    turn, provided the background for agricultural set-
    tlement. A careful study of Jewish settlement prior
    to Second Aliyah would reveal the great role played
    by the Hassidim, as well as by the disciples of the
    Gaon of Vilna, known as "Perushim."
    While the development of political Zionism at
    the end of the century was either severely opposed
    by the leaders of Hassidism or watched passively,
    it was only in the '20s of the present century, when
    Palestine became a territory administered under
    Britist mandate, that a widespread movement
    arose among Hassidim in Galicia and Poland to
    settle as farmers on the land. This was due not
    only to the economic factor at work in Poland;
    there was some ideological transformation among
    those Hassidim who came to participate in the work
    of restoration of the Jewish people in their home-
    land.
    Ideological Transformation
    In 1925 over 100 Hassidic families settled on
    a stretch of land on the banks of the Kishon River
    and began preparing the soil for cultivation. Their
    amazing devotion to the task aroused general ad-
    miration, and it was only by dint of their perse-
    verance that Kfar Hassidim weathered the storms
    and emerged with some considerable success. An-
    other venturesome initiative took shape at about
    the same time when a group of energetic and de-
    termined Hassidim from Poland acquired a stretch
    of sand dunes near Tel Aviv, on which the present
    flourishing Bnei Brak stands.
    During the 12 years of Israel's independence
    Hassidim may be credited with singular achieve-
    ments, both in the field of agriculture and in the
    restoration of the wastes. Mention might be made
    of two Hassidic ventures, namely Kfar Habbad at
    Shafrir and Kiryat Zanz near Natanya.
    With its outstanding characteristic of optimism,
    enthusiasm, fervency, and love of Israel, Hassid-
    ism is destined to be a great contributory factor
    in the upbuilding of the Jewish homeland which
    plays a central role in Hassidic philosophy.
    OeasoM s {-jreetinejs .
    M. B. CONSTRUCTION
    COMPANY
    Specialist in New Construction
    "It Is Our Pleasure to Give You Free Estimates"
    Quality Materials and Workmanship
    1241 N.E. 210th Terrace
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    ^Tjest (Jjisties S^ytir jf-rienas
    THE FOGGS
    LAND-O-SUN DAIRIES
    FARM STORES, Inc.
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    GREETINGS
    CITIZENS ffi
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    ANO LOAN ASSOCIATION OF HIALEAH
    DAVID STUZIN, Pretident

    Io I meyer, architect
    and
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    WISH TO EXTEND GREETINGS TO ALL
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    phone PL 4-0811
    TOUPEES WIOS M
    GLAMOROUS INDIVIDUALLY STYLED HAIR PIECES
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    Made and Shown in My StudioExpert Cleaning & Dressing
    LeLian KRUMM
    215 Seybold Bldg. FR 3-4141
    *-
    GREETINGS .
    RICHARD H. SHADDICK, Realtor
    "S.W. BARGAIN, IN REAL ESTATT*
    9t GMAIDA AVi: Shaddick Building Hi t-1591
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    A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    EASY LIVING FOAM PRODUCTS, INC
    320 N.E. 75tft Straat

    Miami, PtorMa


    Page 18-E
    *Jewist> nerHbtf
    Friday. September 23, 1960

    LOUIS
    P ALLOT
    NORTON
    nd
    NORTON
    PALLOT
    Smfleage/
    f

    or a
    l tapp v/
    NEW YEAR
    NORTON TIRE CO.. INC.
    N.W. 27th AVENUE MIAMI


    DONALD
    PALLOT
    ruiu- st.
    133*0 N.W.
    7tk Ae.
    4*00 H.W.
    2*4 A. t.
    HOWARD
    KATZEN
    Wirt Kw
    SteO S.W. M St.
    S*wth M.aa.
    5 WO
    S. UW
    WORLD'S
    102 S. Ktmm An.
    SERVING MIAMI SINCE 1924
    largest B. F. Goodrich
    DISTRIBUTOR


    Stirring Message of Rosh Hashona
    1
    ' tfliewislh Floridian
    Miami. Florida. Friday, September 23, 1960
    *W PWaw> 'WHWW fV
    til


    Th< Scholar." Rothjch.W MS 24, 1475. Bwalel Mustum, Jerusalem.
    Section F
    m

    WTO ."'/' ~t TUfBUPW^v *** *"
    **


    . *

    78
    I


    WHEN MEN FIND PATH TO GOD THEY WILL DISCOVER PATH TO ONE ANOTHER, ]
    Soulful Prayers Strike Deepest Chords of Human Emotion
    By DR. HELEN HIRSCH
    pOSH Hashona, like a mighty, rock-hewn light-
    house on eternity's far away shores, has flash-
    ed Its holy, awe-inspiring .message through the
    miiinni thus relentlessly preparing potent agen-
    cies for spiritual renewal to hundreds of genera-
    tions of Jews. Striking the deepest chords of human
    feelings and voicing religion's sublimest truth, the
    fbul-etlrring prayers recited, during the "Days of
    Awe" (Yomom Noraiin) enshrine whatever Judaism
    has to say on God, man and his manifold respon-
    sibilities. "Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel!" is
    the stern bidding of the Prophet Amos (4:12).
    In Leviticus 23:24, it Is written: "All year
    round, the people are busy at their tasks; but on
    Rosh Hashona, they take their shofars and blow
    them before God; and God Almighty goes from
    the throne of judgment to the throne of mercy
    and is filled with compassion for them."'
    Once again, the soul-stirring blasts of the stao-
    far bid us take of our daily routine and set us to
    dwell upon our achievements and failures of the
    year gone by to see for ourselves whether we have
    succeeded or not in living up to our manifold re-
    sponsibilities. This is the time to relentlessly pry
    into our minds and souls and to attempt to model
    our lives to the holy Torah, our eternal code of
    Continued on Pag* 10-F
    I


    "
    Page 2-F
    vJmlsti fkridiar
    Friday. September 23. I960

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    SEARS
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    GREETINGS .
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    American students left during outgoing Year
    5720 to pursue a special one-year study pro-
    gram at the Hebrew University under the aus-
    pices of the American Friends of the Hebrew
    University. The group represented 23 col-
    leges and universities throughout the U.S.
    ". where Jewish education is neglected,
    the entire content of Judaism is reduced to
    merely an awareness of anti-Semitism .
    It becomes a psychological complex."
    Status of Jewish Education in America
    By MILTON FRIEDMAN
    IS Jewish education in America a mile wide but
    only an inch deep?
    Jews are well informed on current events:
    anti-Semitism and Israeli problems. But what is the
    status of Judaism as a living faith? How much do
    American Jews know about their religion, culture,
    and history?
    As a nation, America is alarmed by reports
    that the Russians are building more and better roc-
    kets than Americans can produce. The Russians
    are graduating more engineers and scientists. Tech-
    nical education in the Soviet Union has emerged
    as superior in many aspects. Consequently. Amer-
    ica embarked on a program to modernize our whole
    system of general education.
    Our highly-vaunted technology has been chal-
    lenged. Americans are groping for a new defini-
    tion of the American image in the confusion of rap-
    idly changing times. There is talk of implementing
    the ideals of the Judeo Christian heritage as a bul-
    wark against materialism and Communism. This
    has raised a queston of whether Jews in Uus coun-
    try really know their own heritage.
    Objective criteria to measure Jewish education
    in America are lacking In general education,
    shortcomings were seen when the Russians showed
    they could hit the moon. But in Jewish education,
    it is not a question of hitting the angels in the
    heavens above. So Jewish education, with present-
    ly ill-defined objective goals has not yet fully re-
    alized how far it is from its potential
    One eminent educator said that "Jewish edu-
    cation in America is far from the Space Age .
    it has not even caught up with the Horse Age."
    Another thinker. National President Label Kaffc.
    of B'nai B'rith. held that "where Jewish education
    is neglected, the entire content of Judaism is re-
    duced to merely an awareness of anti-Semitism Ju-
    daism ceases to be a civilization. It becomes a psy-
    chological complex."
    Unteweht Children
    Other leaders, too, are concerned about the
    basic content of Judaism in America. They see ed-
    ucation as the major function of the synagogue
    an indispensable thread that ensures Jewish con-
    tinuity and a meaningful Judaism.
    The sages of Israel, in ancient days, asked why
    Jerusalem was destroyed. Replying to this rhetori-
    cal question, they concluded that "Jerusalem was
    destroyed only because the children remained un-
    taught Jerusalem was destroyed only because
    men of scholarship and learning were despised...
    Jerusalem was destroyed only because there were
    no longer men of faith and hope in her midst
    Jewish teen-agers are caught in the spint of
    the Space Age. They have noticed the huge num-
    ber of great scientists of Jewish origin. Is this
    capacity for learning due to centuries of Talmudic
    study, to Jewish tradition? Then, what is the Tal-
    mud? What is Jewish tradition? Such questions
    have emerged from Jewish youth.
    What do Jews believe? Are we a Chosen Peo-
    ple? How and why are Jews different?
    Are Jewish parents equipped to answer these
    questions? Is organized Jewish education meeting
    the challenge?
    Recently. 11.000 Jewish boys and girls were
    questioned about their attitudes on Jewish educa-
    tion. The great majority, more than nine out of 10,
    acepted such education as desirable and natural
    in the American environment. They thought all
    children should receive some form of religious ed-
    ucation.
    An Awakening
    But the children said they liked their public
    school teachers better than Jewish teachers. They
    preferred public school to Jewish schooling. Stu-
    dents of hi teaching in Jewish classes and boring presentation
    of content. They wanted to learn about Judaism
    and were ready for an interesting presentation. But
    their teachers were too poorly equipped to meet
    the challenge.
    Directors of B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations at
    various universities report they no longer have to
    struggle to elicit interest. Today's student is rebell-
    ing against his parents' indifference.
    A major weakness is found in the Jewish teach-
    er. It has been reliably estimated that 58 per cent
    of Jewish Sunday School teachers had "only ele-
    mentary Jewish schooling of some sort." Nine per
    cent had no Jewish schooling whatever.
    Most 13-year-olds, after Bar Mitzvah or Bas
    Mitzvah, graduate from Judaism rather than into
    ft Age 13. instead of being a starting point for sec-
    ondary Jewish education, is too often a lifetime
    terminal point.
    Rabbis are agreed that the Bar Mitzvah should
    Continued an Page 11 F
    A Happy blew Year to All
    Our Friends and Patrons
    Jim Wood
    Land Clearing
    3005 N.W. 54th STREET
    Ph. NE 5-4102
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL
    ELECTRONIC
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    COMPANY
    2701 N.W. 42nd Avenue
    Phone NE 54421
    Miami. Flo.
    RICITEI'S
    JEWELSY CO.. Inc.
    130 E. Floater Street
    PRO* n 3-1137
    A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY
    TOHNNTE & MACK
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    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
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    324 N.R. 13th STREET
    MANUFACTURERS
    WHOLESALE RETAIL
    Fishing Tackle Repairing
    Underwater Equipment


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    +Jenist> ncridfor
    Page 3-F
    Our New Bezalels in the Year of 1960
    By ALFRED WERNER
    LUHEN the shooting war ended, in the fall of 1945,
    " many a young American of Jewish descent
    felt that the time had arrived to turn a personal
    dream into reaJMy and followed in the footsteps
    of the wise and skillful man who built the Taber-
    nacle in the wilderness. In other words, there was
    a rush to places like the Art Students League, the
    National Academy's School of Fine Arts, the Coop-
    er Union Art School and other institutions where
    painting and sculpture were taught. Some of these
    American boys and girls were just finishing high
    school, while others were returning from what had
    been the battle fields of Europe and Asia. They
    were young and full of that mad idealism required
    of any one embarking upon the hazards of a ca-
    reer in any of the visual arts.
    Now, a decade and a half later, let us look at
    Ihem again. Have they remained true to their high
    ideals? Were they able to express in whatever
    medium they chose their individuality in such
    a way as to communicate through their work their
    subtle feeling about themselves, the world around
    Ihem, their fellow-men? Being Jews, have they
    been influenced by some of the major events of
    our era (ranging from the annihilation of six mil-
    lion Jews to the creation of a Jewish state) suf-
    ficiently to transmute Jewish sentiments into tang-
    ible creations?
    A full report on the accomplishments of living
    American Jewish artists between thirty and forty
    is not possible within a short article, so I have se-
    lected fifteen painters and graphic artists. These
    have achieved some prominence, due to their un-
    usual talents, and to publicity given them by the
    Museum of Modern Art. the Whitney Museum of
    American Art, the Jewish Museum and other in-
    stitutions of national influence. These fifteen have
    a few things in common. All but three are Ameri-
    can-born, and even these three were children when
    they were brought to this country. They all come
    from Jewish homes, yet none of them had to ex-
    perience the harassment of earlier Jewish artists
    who were forced to wage a two-front battle; against
    Gentiles, who looked askance at the infiltration of
    Jews into the art world, and against their own
    tradition-bound families who maintained that the
    pursuit of art was in violation of the Second Com-
    mandment. Because I have conviction that figura-
    tive art can be as valuable and as modern in spirit
    as abstract art, and believe that non-abstract art
    deserves as much attention as the currently more
    fashionable non-objective trends, I have deliberate-
    ly selected artists whose activity is largely con-
    cerned with recording their sentiments and ideas
    about the visible world.
    New Directions
    Herbert Katzman, the Chicagoan who spent the
    war years in naval service and studied in Europe
    after war, seems to speak for all of them: "I paint
    things around me that I like and if at times the
    paintings move it's because I am moved by the
    world around me ... I do not paint abstractly be-
    cause if I give up the appearance of the world I
    am unable te become involved in it." Therefore, he
    uses color energetically and rhythmically to re-
    cord "the way the yellow-black sky looks over the
    Brooklyn Bridge, the way a sun hits a building, or
    the way my wife looks in an ochre-green dress."
    Hit work might be called Expressionist, like
    that of Gandy Brodie, in whose portraits, land-
    soapes end still life with scattered fruit there is
    always an ardent desire to penetrate the veils of
    reality, te fix upon the canvas the metaphysics of
    bodies. No less a "chromaticist" is Jonah Kinig-
    Mosaic by Joseph Young in Temple Eman-
    uel, Beverly Hills, Calif., depicting study,
    assembly and prayer in the contemporary
    synagogue, one of the illustrations in the
    Art Calendar for 5721 issued by the Na-
    tional Federation of Temple Sisterhoods.
    "Being Jews, have they been influenced by
    some of the major events of our era suffi-
    ciently to transmute Jewish sentiments into
    tangible creations?"
    stein whose large canvases are baroque in the
    treatment of subject and in the use of the medium:
    flickering, swirling impasto transports the viewer
    to the altars set up by the Counter-Reformation,
    and the dolorous figures are reminiscent of Saints
    found in primitive country churches of the early
    17th century.
    Veering in the direction of Abstractionism,
    thouph still within the realm of representation, are
    Philip Pearlstein and German-born Wolf Kahn.
    Pearlsteins early work renderings of strange
    rock formations, torrential rivers and wild seas
    recalls the feverish eye and the electrically charg-
    ed brush of a Soutine. The later work is more sol-
    idly constructed as though the artist had paid
    more attention to the teachings of Cezanne, or,
    quite simply, as if he had matured rather quickly.
    With a palette confined mainly to browns and greys
    and blues, he creates an identification with the
    stones and trees washed uprooted by the surging
    elements.
    Vehemence, though controlled, is, nevertheles-
    clearly felt. Wolf Kahn is more lyrical, more
    gentle. He has learned from Monet (paintings of
    the facade of Rouen Cathedral, where substance
    is dissolved into atmospheric vibrances) and from
    Whistler's almost abstract "Nocturnes." But he is
    not hampered, as the Impressionists were, by
    would-be-scientific considerations. In pale, soft col-
    or he establishes the essence of Venetia vistas, re-
    ferring faintly to the contours of celebrated build-
    ings, yet letting the wide expanses of ocean and
    sky do all the mysterious whispering.
    Jan Muller was German-born like Kahn. When
    the Naiis came to power, the Mullers fled to Swit-
    zerland, Holland and Prance until they safely ar-
    rived in the U.S.A. Jan studied under the dean of
    abstract art, Hans Hofman. Gradually freeing him-
    self from Hofman's overpowering influence, he in-
    troduced figures into his romantically expression-
    ist canvases that were often inspired by the -Bible
    or by literary subjects (for instance, Goethe's
    Continued n Paae 12-F
    HOLIDAY
    SPORTSWEAR
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    U HOLIDAY
    | TO ALL
    ! OUR FRIENDS
    375 N.W. 23rd Street
    MINNA LEE
    IMPORTERS
    Diif fee*f Apaaraf latarf FasMaaa
    cVatsat Pwmal Attirt Saatawtar
    MiHImtry CmO fwlry Maartaf
    Scarfs laa$ Umt$t
    CORAl CAiUS
    152 MNMCU MtlE Pfc. Ill 3-4244
    1025 Kane Cancawrse, Bay Harbor
    lafa
    151$ laf Ota* ih-a.
    Maaa JAcfcsaa 2-5211
    raVf Laaeardala, fterMa
    BEST WISHES AND A
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO EVERYONE
    Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kaye
    and Son
    725 51st STREET
    NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
    DRAKE
    PROPERTIES,
    INC.
    Harold Sehres Louis Alweis
    1451 E. 10th Ave.
    Hialeah
    TU 5-3831
    ABBOTT ELECTRIC. INC
    RESIDENTIAL
    INDUSTRIAL
    COMMERCIAL
    Wiring Repairs
    Alterations of All Kinds
    MOO Worth Miami Aveante
    PHONE FR 3-42M
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    J. DOSHAY
    and Family
    NOVELTY STITCHING
    HEMSTITCHING
    Pleating, Tucking, Shirring,
    Applique, Rhinestones
    261 N.W. 23rd Street
    FR 1-7133
    Mr. and Mrs.
    Jacob M. Arvey
    my
    MR. AND MRS. GEORGE KRONENGOLD
    1
    WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    George Kronengold Travel Service Miami Beach
    540 Arthur Godfrey Road
    SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Royal Beauty Supply Co., Inc.
    ALBERT J. HIRSCH. President
    119 NT. 6th Street
    Phones FR 3-0851, FR 3-0852 or FR 9-0901
    Diitrikutars at
    MAX FACTOR, HELENE CURTIS, ELLEN KAYE,
    RESTOR-A-WAVE New and Used Furniture & Dryers
    ALL NATIONALLY ADVERTISED SUNDRIES
    ammnA t ot holiday ems tm display hov. i
    1
    i
    'I
    BEST WISHES FOR A HEALTHY, HAPPY
    AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
    PRINCELY SHOP
    HELEN BROOKS
    KIDDIE BROOKS
    MIAMI SURFSIDE MIAMI BEACH
    CORAL GABLES SOUTH MIAMI
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR
    FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    KEYSTONE TOURIST COURT
    S307 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
    MIAMI
    Phone PL 4-C295
    George W. Lasche
    To All Happy Holidays
    A. S. JONSON LABS.. INC.
    PLASTIC EYES, PLASTIC EARMOLDS, SMALL PLASTIC
    OBJECTS COSMETIC DENTISTRY (Plastic. Gold. Steel)
    Pacific Building
    Phone FI 4-4446


    w
    Page 4-F
    vJewist, ncr/kfton
    Friday, September 23. 1960
    Season's Greetings
    Truly Nolen Exterminators
    n.~~ REGULAR EXTERMINATING SERVICE
    fj^B FOR'ITC'HOME' "
    r
    r* JE 1-3444
    FR 7-1411
    Our Pleasure Is Serving Yon
    with (Quality Workmanship
    and Materials
    Greetings.,.
    JAMES L. WALL
    WALL PLASTERING CO.
    PLASTERING CONTRACTORS
    PLAIN & ORNAMENTAL WORK
    LICENSED & INSURED
    PLASTERING LATHING STUCCO
    Office Hours Mon.-Fri. 8 to 5
    355 West 29th Street
    Phone MU 1-6171
    Hioleah, Florida
    HAPPY MtW
    tram
    YEAR

    MIAMI COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
    :it I N.W. 29th Street
    BEST WISHES
    FOR THE
    NEW YEAR
    a.music
    \ h
    TO THE
    ENTIRE JEWISH
    COMMUNITY
    MIAMI FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS
    LOCAL 655. A. F. of M.
    President Frank J. Ccsciola

    TO ALL GREETINGS
    "Flie Best tor Less*9
    Murguia Bakery
    CUBAN & ITALIAN BREAD
    Delivery to Store* and Restaurants
    2125 N.W. 8th AVENUE MIAMI. FLORIDA
    Phone FR 3-3894
    SEASON'S GREETINGS from TOM OREEIEY (Formerly U.S. Moot Inspector)
    NOW THE OWNER OF
    U-PAINT.IT FURNITURE CO.
    COMPLETE UNE IN STOCK, ALSO CUSTOM MADE DEPT.
    5519 N.W. 7th Avenue PL 1-2325
    HOLIDAY Clfff.KCJ TO 411
    HOUSE OF PICTURES
    The VmsmZ is Oils, Rtarorfoctioat, EafreviafS, W fr.mim.
    M7 HSCATNE ILV. TO. PI 4%sU
    First meeting of the religious advisory coun-
    cil to President Eisenhower's committee on
    government contracts met during outgoing
    Hebrew Year 5721. Seated center is Vice
    President Nixon, chairman oi the President's
    committee, which monitors hiring practices of
    companies seeking to do business with the
    U.S. government. Such companies must
    prove that they employ personnel without re-
    gard to race, religion or creed.
    I ;
    The Miracle of a Synagogue in Manila
    By GEORGE PERR>
    AS worshippers enter Temple Emil, on Taft ave.
    ** in Manila, for Rosh Hashona service, they will
    also be observing the Bar Mitzvah of the "miracle
    of Manila." This is how the Jews of the Republic
    of the Philippines regard the restoration of the
    only synagogue destroyed in battle on American
    territory during World War II. For Temple Emil
    the only synagogue in the Philippines as well as
    in the whole of the Western Pacific was rebuilt
    through the efforts of thousands of Jewish GIs who
    had helped liberate the Philippines from the Jap-
    anese.
    In the lobby of this synagogue is a modest
    plaque dedicated "to all men and women of the Jew-
    ish faith of the Armed Forces of the United States
    and Allied Nations who laid down their lives in the
    defense and liberation of the Philippines 1941-
    1945 and in tribute to the American Jewish serv-
    ice personnel stationed in the Philippines who ini-
    tiated the drive to assist the local community in the
    expenses of reconstruction."
    These simple words are the final chapter of a
    story that began in 1942 when the Japanese drove
    the last American forces out of the Philippines.
    There were then about 1.800 Jews in the Philip-
    pines. More than 1,300 were refugees from Ger-
    many. The others were American, British, French
    and some from Syria, Turkey and China. The lead-
    ers of the Jewish community were Rabbi Joseph
    Schwartz, a refugee who had been a chaplain in
    the Austrian Army in World War I. and Morton Net-
    zorg, director of the National Jewish Welfare
    Board's Army and Navy Department for the Phil-
    ippines.
    The Japanese conquerers immediately intern-
    ed all Jews who were nationals of countries at war
    with Japan. The German-Jewish refugees, who had
    arrived in the mid 1930s, had German passports
    stamped "Jude" in red ink. At first the Japanese
    regarded them as Germans and treated them as
    semi-allies. Thus the refugees who had earlier been
    welcomed by the other Jews were able to aid their
    co-religionists with food and medicine. Gradually,
    the Japanese changed their attitude and treated all
    Jews as enemies.
    U.S. Troop. Land
    Rabbi Schwartz was one of the few who es-
    caped internment. All during the Japanese occupa-
    tion he continued to hold services in an abandoned
    building under the watchful eyes of Japanese offi-
    cers. But Netxorg and his wife, who had come to
    Manila in 1915 from Detroit as honeymooners, were
    put in the dreaded Santo Toraas Camp. Their sen,
    David, who had been teaching at the University
    of Nebraska, was visiting them when the war
    broke out and he joined the U.S. Army Engineers.
    He was assigned to Bataan where he was captured
    and later died in the Capas Prison, a victim of the
    infamous "death march."
    When American troops landed on Leyte in Oc-
    tober, 1944, the Japanese ordered all Jews not in-
    terned to leave Manila. Temple Emil's community
    hall was converted into an ammunition dump. As
    the U.S. Eleventh Airborne Division neared Manila
    in February, 1945. the Japanese sacked and burn-
    ed the city, and killed hundreds of civilians, among
    them at least 80 Jews. The Japanese touched off
    the stores of explosives in Temple Emil's commu-
    nity hall and blew the synagogue and community
    house to rubble. Only the walls of the synagogue
    were standing when American and Filipino forces
    re-occupied the city.
    Immediately after his release from Santo To-
    mas Prison, Netzorg became the head of the Jew-
    ish community. His first task was to provide shel-
    Continued on Page 10 F
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    Buy a Remote Control TV SH
    Stern Electrical
    Engineering
    factor? Distributor
    RCA Radios Television
    Sales and Service
    DUMONT
    5138 S.W. 8th STREET
    Phone HI 64540
    The Btst tor last"
    With Best Wishes For A
    Happy Holiday
    Season
    Collins Glass and
    Mirror Co.
    lOOt 5th STREET
    MIAMI BEACH
    Phone IE 1-7697
    New Year Greetings to All
    KELLY'S
    >i rsi:ry
    FRUIT TREES, SHADE TRIES,
    PALMS SHRUBS
    2950 N.W. 132nd Terrace
    Micuni
    Phone MU 8-6461
    GREETINGS
    Herbert Diamond
    ft Co.
    1340 N.W. 27th Ave.
    Miami 35. Florida
    Telephone NE 4-6031
    SEA SHELLS &
    FLOWER SUPPLIES
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    THE
    C. R. KISTLER
    COMPANY
    duPONT BUILDING
    MIAMI. FLORIDA
    Phone HI 4-5154
    Lowest Monthly Payment in
    This Area on Home Loans
    LOWEST RATES
    No Mortgage Insuri
    MIAMI BEACH
    ABSTRACT &
    "TITLE COMPANY. Inc.
    Complete Abcrract sad
    TUU Uauranc* Service
    THE ONLY ABSTRACT
    PLANT Df
    MIAMI BEACH
    1630 Lenox Atmim)
    MIAMI BEACH
    .


    n
    Friday, September 23, 1960
    *k1st Durktlan
    Page 5-F
    The Story Behind Kosher Food Production
    By ROBERT APPEL
    TH American Jewish community can contribute
    one. specialist whose line is virtually guaran-
    teed to stump the quick-witted panelists of a pop-
    ular television program dedicated to ferreting out
    unusual occupations.
    He is the twentieth century rabbinical author-
    ity on kosher foods and related products, who must
    know not only the Jewish Dietary Laws but also
    chemistry and food technology. The laws of Kash-
    ruth are unvarying but the conditions under which
    foods are produced in the United States have un-
    dergone extraordinary changes in the past half-
    century. The rabbinical authority on kashruth needs
    this unique blend of secular and religious know-
    ledge for these new conditions.
    Who does not remember the mother and the
    grandmother who spent endless hours of kitchen
    toil in preparing almost everything her family
    ate? She paid a heavy price in long hours in her
    kitchen but she was sure everything was kosher.
    But if her prototype on the American scene to-
    day enjoys a blessed freedom from such a burden,
    she also if she maintains a kosher home faces
    problems which her grandmother could not have
    imagined. And because she does, the twentieth cen-
    tury rabbinical authority on kashruth has come
    into being to serve as an effective guardian of the
    kashruth of her home.
    The advances in food technology in the United
    States, particularly in the past two decades, have
    greatly widened the range of foods available to
    the American meal planner. For the substantial
    number of observant Jewish homemakers, however,
    this bounty represented an overriding problem. How
    could this homemaker be sure that the ingredients,
    the equipment and the containers of modern pro-
    cessed foods were kosher? A modern food plant
    is like en auto factory; ingredients from dozens of
    suppliers are processed into the final product. Who
    would assure this homemaker that kosher condi-
    tions were maintained in all supplier plants?
    In response to this problem, scientific kosher
    certification and supervision in the plant has de-
    veloped at almost every level, from the corner
    walk-in bakery to the nationwide food manufactur-
    ing giant with plants in scores of cities.
    But why does the modern rabbinical expert
    have to know something about chemistry and food
    technology to discharge his religious duties effect-
    ively? And, to raise another current question, why
    cannot the religiously-conscientious Jewish house-
    wife depend in most cases, on the label of foods
    she buy in the local supermarket as a guide to the
    kashruth of those products?
    Growing Demand
    One of the best sources for replies to such
    questions is a tall mild-mannered rabbi, Alexander
    S. Rosenberg, who is the rabbinic administrator of
    the kashruth certification program of the Union
    of Orthodox Jewish Congregations, more familiarly
    known e% the Orthodox Union. This nationwide pub-
    lic service program, now in its 35th year, has es-
    tablished a unique relationship with the American
    food industry which provides a constantly growing
    variety each year of dependably kosher foods and
    related products designated by the familiar (U)
    on the Jedc! for the Jewish homemaker.
    From long experience. Rabbi Rosenberg be-
    lieves that observant Jewish housewives depend
    far too much and too often on label reading. This
    shopperoccasionally-turned-mashgiach rarely has
    any idea of thp complexity of modern food tecV
    nology and is frequently led astray by being her
    Specially-equipped bloodmobiles shipped to
    Israel by American Red Mogen Dovid are
    put into service as crowd in Haifa shopping
    center lines up to donate blood. From Haifa,
    the blood is rushed to special storage banks
    in the Marcus Memorial Fractionation Cen-
    ter, which has been equipped by American
    Red Mogen Dovid, Israel's counterpart of
    the Red Cross.
    own self-appointed expert on kashruth via label
    reading.
    Tha growing demand for kosher foods has
    brought about a smattering of knowledge among
    some food manufacturers which is displayed on
    some labels in a boldly-lettered phrase: "pure veg-
    etable shortening." Assuming none of the ingredi-
    ents listed on the label are inherently non-kosher,
    isn't that good enough?
    The bulky files of the Orthodox Union's kash-
    ruth certification service provide some revealing
    answers about both that question and the need for
    the special qualifications for modern rabbinical
    supervision.
    Emulsifiers, to cite one example, are more and
    more used in the manufacture of processed foods.
    They perform an essential blending function. They
    may be derived from animal sources which makes
    them an the food in which they are used non-
    kosher, or from vegetable sources, which may or
    may not be kosher. Emulsifiers need not, by law,
    be listed on the label. Even if there was such a
    requirement the listing would not indicate the ori-
    gin of the emulsifier.
    Glycerine is widely used In preparation of
    foods. Its presence also need not be listed on the
    label. Most glycerines are of animal origin and
    may be considered non-kosher. How could the label
    reader know? Another technological development
    concerns the use of lard. Survey after survey has
    Continued on Page 16-F
    NORTHWEST
    \\ TO SUPPLY
    9832 N.W. 7th Avenue
    Phone PL 4-0603
    We Deliver Shurhit Ignition
    Delco Batteries Ramco Rings
    Weatherhead
    "Quertly Brandi Northweet Auto
    Supply Give You Bettor Service"
    BLU GREEN
    PLAWT FOOD
    On Your Lawnf
    Startling results can be ob-
    tained from thia rich plant too which contains mineral* that
    Will help keep chinch bugs out
    of voux lawn. Sold exclusively
    "hughes
    SEED STORE
    114 S. Mean Aee. Hu PI M771
    LOTSPEU II
    FLOORING
    CO.
    KTA& WWUSTWAL
    Aataeriiad CMfreafars
    TileTt* Atfhmlt Tih
    3665 N.W. 74th Street
    OX 1-0881
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    Tropical
    Paper Box Co.
    Manufacturers of
    AUTISTIC PAPER BOXES
    Miami International Air Depot
    Bldg. 144 Phone TU 84459
    MIAMI
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND
    ACQUAINTANCES
    Mr. and Mrs. Soul Greiii
    and Family
    7400 S.W. 68th Street
    (iffriNts
    County Bottled
    Gas Co.. Inc.
    J*rice Economy
    eeeeeeeMNty
    ftwk'm Katie Al First Fl.r4 treat
    1234 N.W. 7tk Street
    Maae PI I 5544
    EXCLUSIVE VALETONE SERVICE"
    ETwc Wishes you
    A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR!
    FAST DRY-CUANING & LAUNDRY SERVICE
    500 N.E. 2nd AVENUE Drive-In Service
    115 N.E. 2nd AVENUE Congress Bldg.
    178 W. FLAGLER STREET Corner S.W. 2nd Ave.
    Exclusive VALETONE Process
    80 Stores in 50 Cities in 15 States
    Member DINERS' CLUB

    TO ALL GREETINGS

    STOLPMANN PLUMBING CO.
    1853 West ATenue
    Miami Beach. Flo.
    PHONE IE 1-0481

    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL *#.)
    A. ARTHUR PEELNEH ^?|
    INTERCOaSTAL BOAT YARD INC i
    "Miami's /Most Complef e Narm Serf ice" < 609 N.W. So. Rirer Dr. FR 1-2629 Miami. Florida [
    TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    MILTON E. THOMPSON & SON
    ROOFING
    fREE CSTIHATtS TU 8-1549
    ,*ii
    347 East 4th St.
    Hraleak
    DANNY'S AUTO SERVICE ><
    sir
    Automatic Transmissions Our Specialty ..mc
    OVERHAUL PARTS AND LABOR
    BODY WORK AND EXPERT PAINTING
    SE HABLA ESPANOL '*Q\
    3765 N.W. 79th Street OX 1-8632 I
    SEASON'S GREETINGS .
    WELL-BILT PRODUCTS, Inc.
    "The Home of Beautihl Kitchens"
    FORMICA TOPS
    Phone: NEwton 5-5276 5561 N.W. 36t.
    Miami, Florida
    *M
    m
    '

    '
    BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR TO ALL .
    ROBERT RICHTER HOTEL.
    ESS
    me"


    Page 6-F
    +Jmlst> fkrkUam
    Friday. September 23, 1960
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO ALL
    MR. and MRS. BERT SHER
    KENNY and ARTHUR
    76 SHORE DRIVE WEST, MIAMI
    Nappy New Year Greetings to All .
    LARRY PASKOW'S
    HARBOR ISLAND SPA
    Harbor Island, on the 79th St. Causeway, Miami Beach
    PERSONALIZED DIET
    EXClUSfVE .'N FLORIDA IMPORTED
    FAMOUS CARLSBAD MINiRAL BATHS
    For Reservations Phone PLaza 1-7561
    t write tor rates and color brochure
    100% AIR CONDITIONED AND HEATED
    MtMBW OF DINERS' CLUB
    TO ALL
    A MOST HAPPY
    HOLIDAY
    ZARET BUILDING CORP.
    924 Lincoln Road
    Miami Beach
    Best Wishes for the Holiday Season
    FIRESTONE STORES
    1569 ALTON ROAD
    Miami Beach 39. Florida Phone IE '8-2747
    TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS
    I
    Seymour and Dorothy Schaefer
    Dorothy Schaefer
    i EXCLUSIVE CASUAL WEAR
    369 Miracle Mile
    Coral Gables, Fla.
    SMALL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL
    Eden Roc Hotel 4525 Collins Ave.
    EXTENDS TO ALL ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    II %\M>\ PLUMBING CO.
    729 S. W. 12th Avenue
    NONES Ft 3-1611 and FR 1-5312
    MAM> 1 HtW YtAK TO All .
    THE WAX Ml M I >l
    Opoa Daily 9:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M.
    Historical kihi with Lift SIZt Wax fiaorts in frrmendoos iiormmmt.
    ifcayne Baalevord at 139th Street Pbont Wl 5 3641
    JONES MIAMI BEACH MOVING I STORAGE
    IT PIONEER MOVERS OF MIAMI BEACH
    1826 West Ave. Est. 1919 JE 1-3707
    Top left, Morocco religious school in Casa-
    blanca ghetto, once dingy, medieval, dis-
    ease-breeding, is being replaced with JDC
    help. Top right, oasis in this ghetto. On a
    street recently cleaned up and beautified, a
    JDC-eupported kindergarten offers a new life
    to Jewish children. Bottom left, at a IDC-aided
    day nursery in Rome, Italy, babies get loving
    care while their mothers work to supplement
    marginal family income. Bottom right, Rus-
    sian youngster newly-repatriated in Poland*
    gets hot lunch, medical care, constructive-
    loans, and vocational training, in addition to-
    book-learning at the Jewish school in- Wro-
    claw.
    May Their New Future Come Tomorrow
    By MOSES A. LEAVITT
    Executive Vice Chairman,
    Joint Distribution Committoa
    XO you remember David, of Agadir? Perhaps you
    *^ remember reading about him. David was one
    of the survivors of the earthquake, he and two of
    his children. Both among those who did not sur-
    vive were David's wife and their seven other chil-
    dren.
    After the disaster, David and his children were
    evacuated to Casablanca with the rest of Agadir's
    Jewish survivors. Food, shelter, clothing, medi-
    cines in those first days David was still too
    shocked by his tragedy to ask for the things he
    needed, but they were given him.
    The shock is finally beginning to wear off now.
    David, who was once a man of substance, is still
    in Casablanca, beginning to think of beginning
    again, and of the future.
    But how do you begin again? And if you
    are David where do you find your future?
    Perhaps you will remember the young Jew of
    Gabes, in Tunisia. He died saving the lives of four
    Moslem children in the flash flood which devastat-
    ed that desert town a few months ago. The young
    man died a hero but he left behind him a preg-
    nant wife, two children and a sick and aged father.
    For them too in their hour of agony there
    was help. And help until what?
    What of their future?
    There are other names that may have remain-
    ed in your memory. Names like Aliza, who was
    born in Poland and is now in a hospital in Israel.
    Names like Alex, who was once a successful busi-
    nessman in Egypt, and is now a "refugee" in
    France. Names like Pierre, who is now almost IS,
    and who has lived in a children's home in France
    for 12 of those 16 years.
    David and the family in Gabes and Aliza and
    Alex and Pierre have never even heard of each
    other. But they have much in common.
    Agony, for one thing, and the days of unbear-
    able suffering which came to each.
    The Years Ahead
    And in that moment of agony there was
    the help which came like a miracle from the great
    Jewish community of the United States. Help which
    had a name Joint Distribution Committee. Life-
    giving help which American Jews provided through
    the United Jewish Appeal.
    But today there is one thing more which they
    have in common. For today as the New Year be-
    gins there is in the minds of each of them a great
    question: What of the future?
    There was a time when Aliza didn't even dream
    of a future. She was 17 when the Nazis invaded
    Poland. Separated from her family, she fled to-
    ward Siberia. But though she was on the road two
    years, she never reached Siberia. Somewhere in
    Continued on Page 14 F
    A Happy New Year to All
    Our Many Friends and Patrons
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    Sincere Good Wishes for
    The Holiday
    DADE UNDERWRITERS
    INSURANCE AGENCY
    RALPH D. HOLLANDER


    Friday, September 23, 1960
    ^Jetvisti Fkrkffori
    Page 7-F
    Plant a Tree With Your Own Hands
    By E. SHEDLETZKY
    JERUSALEM Seme years ago, when the first
    trees in the Martyrs' Forest in the Judean Hills
    were planted bfc^jft *U*j*fc National FundU per-
    petuate the memory of those who i in the Nazi
    holocaust, representatives of nearly all the de-
    stroyed communities of Europe assembled, includ-
    ing many from abroad who came either with the
    express purpose of participating in the ceremony
    or were visiting the country at trie time. After the
    traditional prayers had been recited and after ad-
    dresses had been delivered by leading Israel per-
    sonalities and by former partisans and ghetto
    fighters, the first trees were planted in rows by
    representatives of the survivors of the holocaust,
    each from one of the European countries which
    bad come under the Nazi yoke.
    The guests made their way in couples to the
    row where they were to plant, and received a sap-
    ling from Yemenite laborers; each couple then
    placed it into the hole prepared for it and the other
    scraped loose soil around its roots and watered it.
    I was given the opportunity of planting in the
    row commemorating the Polish martyrs, and my
    partner was a friend from America. For him this
    was a very moving experience. He left Poland two
    weeks before the outbreak of World War II; all his
    relatives and friends were destroyed and now he
    was planting a tree in their memory. "1 should like
    to return here in a few years' time to see the small
    tree we have planted," he said and recorded in his
    notebook: "the.second tree in the second row on
    the right."
    My friend k'-pt his promise. This year Pesach
    he returned to Israel, this time with his family, for
    a visit extending over Independence. Day. Like
    most tourists, my friend enjoys comparing what he
    now saw in Israel with what he remembers from
    his lirst visit On the "Day of the Holocaust," the
    27th of the month of Nissan, I accompanied him to
    the annual memorial ceremony in the Martyrs'
    Forest. On the way out from Jerusalem my friend
    kept marvelling at the changes which he noted in
    the landscape. "So much greenery, so many trees!"
    First Plantings
    And then he recalled: "Do you remember how
    we planted a tree at the ceremony?" "Certainly,"
    I answered and promised that the first thing I
    would do when we arrived there would be to try
    Sister Georgina, enrollee at the Institute of
    Jewish Studies oi the Hebrew University at
    Jerusalem, brushes up on her Hebrew in the
    company.of two of her fellow-students by
    reading "Haaretz," prominent daily Israeli
    newspaper. "Every Jew feels his strong ties
    with this ancient country now renewing its
    youth ... to see both the antiquities which
    an being ecavated to an ever growing de-
    gree as well as the new towns and villages."
    "Tree planting in Israel is creative work: it
    was the very first thing the pioneers did
    when they returned to the country's wastes.
    Also both Biblical and Jewish tradition
    cherish the planting of trees: 'When you
    come to the land you shall plant' ."
    atid find the exact spot, and we would see what be-
    of the tree in whose planting we had shared.
    As we arrived quite early for the ceremony,
    we had time to look around and found a grove of
    slender cypresses, all the same height. "These are
    the first plantings. 1 said, and was surprised by
    the way he remembered: "The second tree in the
    second row on the right side!"
    Now that we have located the tree, which was
    in no way different from all the others in the grove,
    my friend ran towards it as towards a well-beloved
    relative Then only did 1 understand the im-
    portance of the new Jewish National Fund under-
    taking which gives tourists from abroad the oppor-
    tunity of planting trees in Israel with their own
    hands. Tourism to Israel is on the increase every
    year. This year a new record is inticipated with the
    number of tourists to exceed one hundred thousand.
    New hotels are being built in all parts of the coun-
    try and experts predict a further growth of tour-
    ism in the coming years. This country has many
    attractions for tourists after all Israel is the
    Land of the Bible.
    Every Jew feels his strong ties with this an-
    cient country now renewing its youth; every Jew
    wants to see both the antiquities that are being exca-
    vated to an ever growing degree as well as the
    new towns and villages. But this is not the coun-
    try's only attraction. The colorful landscapes and
    climate greatly attract people seeking pleasant sur-
    roundings in which to spend their holiday. In Is-
    rael they can enjoy the beauty of its Mediterranean
    and Red Sea beaches in summer and winter alike.
    In the course of one day one can breathe the
    healthful mountain air of Jerusalem and bathe in
    the waters of the Dead Sea, the lowest spot in the
    world.
    However, the Jew visiting Israel desires
    above all to give expression to his feelings for the
    old-new Homeland, and to do so in a practical man-
    ner which will ever keep alive the memory of his
    visit. For the best way of doing this is by planting
    Continued on Pago 12-F
    A Happy New Year to All
    OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
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    eaaaj


    Page 8-F
    +Jewish FlcrkJtan
    Friday. September 23. 1960
    Fear Dominates Jewish Life in Soviet
    By MICHAEL SHASHAR
    AuSSIA is a vast and bewildering country. Dur-
    in* the three jifteks that my two colleagues
    iinc 1 spent in the USSR, ire saw many-eontrasting
    and otten contradictory things which made it im-
    pc-.hle to draw final conclusive judgments. How-
    ever, certain aspects of life, especially Jewish life,
    seemed to stand out in such stark relief, that it was
    impossible to dismii-s them as mere accidents.
    It was impossible, for instance, to ignore the
    open and genuine fear displayed by the va.-t ma-
    jority of Jews with whom we attempted to make
    contact. Only a very few allowed themselves to
    become involved in discussions, and even then, one
    could not help perceiving the whispered tone of
    voice and the stolen glance over the shoulder. We
    were left with the impression that no one felt se-
    cure in our presence, not even with those who con-
    gregate in the synagogues. The informer was ev-
    erywhere and was every man, including the one
    who swayed to and fro in fervent prayer, with his
    Michael Shashar is a student of the Hebrew
    University in Jerusalem, who visited Soviet
    Russia with two other Israeli students. They
    wore white-blue skull caps during their trip,
    attracting attention of many Jews in various
    Soviet cities.
    prayer shawl over his head and his phylacteries
    bound round his arm.
    This was probably our most profound shock:
    the realization that Jew informed upon JeW. Many
    people refrained from reciting the prayer "Next
    year in Jerusalem" for fear of being accused of
    treason. We spoke to men who had spent ten and
    fifteen years in Sibera in payment for the crime
    oi possessing a Hebrew newspaper.
    Significant Incident
    This is why Russian Jews prefer to keep silent
    when confronted with strangers, especially if they
    happen to come from Israel. But they stare, oh how
    they stare, in a manner which leaves nothing un-
    said. On countless occasions, strangers brushed
    past us in the street, in the hotel lobby or theatre
    foyer with a whispered "Shalom," or "God bless
    you," or "Don't forget us," or a snatched verse
    from the Bible.
    On one occasion in Kiev, we managed to ob-
    tain an invitation to the home of a Jewish profes-
    sional man. We sat down to tea and were joined
    by two other local residents, also Jews. The in-
    cident that followed would have seemed, in any
    other setting, as amusing as a music hall act Un-
    der the circumstances we were appalled.
    After having had our tea, two of the men asked
    Henry Morgenthau. jr.. former U.S. Secre-
    tary oi the Treasury, purchases Debenture
    oi Israel Tourist Development Corp. from
    Theodore Kollek (right), director general of
    the Prime Minister's office in Israel, as Law-
    rence Laskey, American chairman, looks
    on. "Many Russian Jews have relatives in
    Israel though but few correspond with them
    for fear of the consequences."
    r
    BEST WISHES TO
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    EDWIN T.
    REEDER
    1114 DUPONT PLAZA CENTER
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    MIAMI, rtOtRM


    ^
    Friday. September 23. 1960
    +Jtwisti fhrkilan
    Pag J*t
    ll
    to be excused, one to make a phone call, the other
    to post a letter. The moment they were gone the
    third, our host, whispered, "Be careful of those
    other two. Have you got a prayer book to give me?
    The others soon returned and a general conversa-
    tion ensued during the course of which I was drawn
    to the window by the man who had made the phone
    call. "Lt me show you some local landmarks," he
    began. "You see that church spire," and in a hush-
    ed voice, "don't say too much in front of them...
    It was built by the Czar Nicholas.
    It was only a matter of time before the third
    visitor found his opportunity to warn us of the un-
    reliability of his colleagues asking at the same
    time if we could spare a Jewish calendar. His only
    proviso was that the others should not know. This
    is how we spent afternoon tea at a Jewish home
    in Kiev.
    Similarly, one could laugh or cry, depending
    on one's outlook, at the scenes we witnessed in an-
    other Jewish home in Moscow. Our host was a
    widower, a man in his forties, who caught us in
    Red Square and pushed a note into my hand.
    "Please come and visit me at the above address.
    I have nothing left to lose," the note said.
    We accepted the invitation and the man's joy
    on our arrival was overwhelming. We were em-
    braced, made to sit down, and were then enjoined
    to tell him of our lives back home. Simple things
    like buying a newspaper in Jerusalem became
    transformed in his eyes into an act of great con-
    sequence. He stared hard at the Israeli cigarette
    Left to right are Julian B. Venezky, Samuel
    Rothberg and Israel Foreign Minister Golda
    Meir in tete-a-tete during Mrs. Meir's recent
    visit to the American Jewish community.
    "Thus, there are people who refrain from
    chanting in the synagogues 'Next year in
    Jerusalem'..."
    I gave him but refused to smoke it. Eventually he
    opened a drawer and extracted a bottle hidden be-
    neath towels and sheets.
    It had a familiar label, "Carmel Wine from
    Rishon le Zion, Israel. "This," he proudly explain-
    ed, "has been in my possession for five years. Now
    for the first time I have found a fitting occasion
    to open it." In spite of our protests, he pulled the
    cork and carefully, very carefully poured the drink.
    Some drops fell on the saucer. "Nothing must be
    wasted," he said, and repourcd them into the bot-
    tle. We drank "le Hayim," and the tears he had
    tried so hard to subdue finally broke forth.
    Many Russian Jews have relatives in Israel
    though but few correspond with them for fear of
    the consequences. We returned to Israel with many
    a scribbled note, some in Russsian, some in Yid*
    dish and others in Hebrew, giving names and ad-
    dresses of parents, brothers, sisters and children
    residing in Israel. These notes were never written
    publicly; they were placed into our hands or poc-
    kets. One such note which I have now before me
    reads, "To my dear sister Miriam. I am well. Your
    brother Raphael. Is our father still alive?"
    Some people did not even dare to take the
    chance of scribbling a note. There was the case of
    the man who fell in step with me on the Odessa
    street having obviously recognized my country of
    origin by the white Jerusalem skull cap on my
    head, and the Hebrew newspaper protruding from
    my pocket. "I have a brother there," he whispered.
    "What's his name?" I asked. "Moshe what?" I
    asked again. "Never mind," was his only answer
    and with that he turned and crossed the street.
    Presumably it was wiser that I should not know
    his surname just in case we had been seen.
    To the Western mind, such behavior might
    seem incomprehensible. To the Jew in Russia to-
    day, it is the norm. The Soviet regime has made
    it that way. It is the result of the "Doctor's Plot,"
    Contiucd en Page 13-F
    M !
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    AUTO AIR-CONDITIONING
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    NEW YEAR GREETINGS
    FRANK and MACK'S
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    Specializing in Auto
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    M W / May the new year
    f / be bountiful
    f / end may you enjoy
    goodly measure of happiness.
    W f peace and prosperity
    {
    ? CHASE
    -
    Is E
    R /K L-
    __


    Page 10-F
    +Jeisti tier Mian
    Friday, September 23. 1980
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    "Messianic Vision," by Gustave Dore, from
    "Illustrations to the Old Testament," 1860.
    "And they shaJl beat th=:r swords into plow-
    shares/ And their spears into pruning hooks/
    Nation shall not lift up swo:d again nation/
    Neither shall they learn war anymore." (Isa.
    2:4). "A harmonious blending ol man's moral
    obligations to humanity and his divine at-
    tachment to God this is the high tet gcal
    man must try to achieve."
    Prayers Strike Deepest Chords of Emotion
    Continued from Page 1-F
    law dcaliny vuth the dttOct man has towards his
    fellowmcn as well as towards his Creator. A har-
    monious blending of man's moral obligations to
    humanity and hi* divine attachment to God, a syn-
    I In sis between his contemporary environment and
    his inner spiritual life this is the high set goal
    man must try to achieve.
    Fearful Day* of Awe
    What makes the "Days of Awe" so fearful, so
    awe-inspiring, is the fateful uncertainty of the hu-
    man lot to foresee the future. From hoary antiquity
    on, there has been no change in this aspect of
    man's precarious existence. The perturbing ele-
    ment of chance has remained. And so. at the be-
    ginning of each New Year, we ask ourselves, full
    of anxiety: "Who shall live and who shall die?"
    Only God Almighty knows the answer and in our
    soul-stirring prayers we turn to Him earnestly im-
    ploring His great mercy and compassion. This is
    the time of the year when God's presence is most
    manifest in our lives; when He is most nigh, the
    holy time of which the psalmist sings: "Seek ye
    the Lord when He can be found." Rabbi Leo Baeck
    said: "When men find the path to God, they will
    discover the path to one another." The recogni-
    tion of the Divine Sovereignly is the condition of
    the fulfillment of the Messianic vision of all man-
    kind forming one human brotherhood.
    In our own dark, danger-fraught days, wben
    all we treasure, when all the cherished values we
    live by are threatened every moment to obliter-
    ation, when all day long we witness a destructive
    race between robot machines and strong and yet
    so weak men, when there are so many crushing
    forces that seem to grind thinking men into empti-
    ness, when mighty powers are unleashed that with-
    in a few short minutes can wipe out cultural and
    artistic life of man which it took millernia to cre-
    ate, when each personal life is fraug't with un-
    bearable tensions and disturbing, oppressive ever-
    increasing anxieties then we hopefully turn to
    the psalmist's promise: "The Lord is my light and
    my salvation whom shall I fear?"
    The Biblical name of Rosh Hashona "Yom
    Teruah" "the day of the sounding of the ram's
    horn-' comforts a trembling mankind and an-
    nounces the sure advent of the Messianic Redemp-
    tion when humanity will be one, even as the God
    of Righteousness is One; when the Prophet-, the
    shofar of the Messiah shall inaugurate th; time
    when all ti^'er passions in the human brea-l shall
    have been tamed, and peace reign on earth: when
    "the knowledge of God shall fill the earth, as the
    waters cover the bed of the ocean." (Isa. 11, ft).
    Manila Miracle
    Continued from Page 4-F
    ter, food, clothing and other necessities for the des-
    titute Jewish residents. With the aid of an emer-
    gency grant of $10,000 from the Joint Distribution
    Committee, Netzorg began the task of reorganiza-
    tion. Supplies flown in by the National Jewish Wel-
    fare Board and brought in by the Jewish chaplains
    who accompanied t h e American forces enabled
    Netzorg to organize a huge Seder for civilians and
    military personnel. Jewish servicemen cooperated
    magnificently in aiding the civilian Jews. They or-
    ganized classes, clubs, lectures in the USO-JWB
    Continued on Page 15 F
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    Wish for All Their Patrons and
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    NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
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    Service
    COMPtfTf AUTO tfPAM SftVKf
    "Hyirt mat it" Irmmtmtinmn
    feeeired
    417 s.w. in, srtin
    rheee HI 4 3**0
    Over 23 Years Same Location
    TO All StHTMCS
    Kern Awning
    Company
    Meeefecterers el TeraeeNM
    eed Trailer Awaieei
    Wholesale Retail
    3520 N.W. 50th Street
    Phone NE 5-2065
    1
    Mr. and Mrs.
    Harry Naffer
    and Family
    Extend Their Beat Wiahae
    TO ALL FOR A
    HAPPY NEW YEAH
    h%r. and Mrs.
    CLAUDE
    RENSHAW
    wish their ateey frieads
    A Vr Mate) Mew few


    Friday, September 23, 1960
    +Je*tat>lk**Kam
    n-r
    Status of Jewish Education in America

    Continued from Page 2F
    represent an awakening and not a finish. It is only
    after Bar Mitzvah, during adolescence, that Jew-
    ish culture and religion can begin to have real
    meaning and influence. Skillful educators could
    transform the powerful mystique of Bar Matzvah
    into a personal Jewish awakening.
    As everywhere, there is the problem of en-
    trenched interests holding back progress. Philoso-
    phies and Jewish education are vague and conflict-
    ing. Many texts are mediocre and uninspiring.
    Consider the teachers' side of the story. The
    teacher complains about low salaries; lack of in-
    terest and cooperation on the part of parents; lack
    of community respect; unclear goals, insufficient
    time; lack of good texts and aids, and lack of dis-
    cipline among the children.
    Of the 3,300 Jewish schools in America, only
    slightly more than 1,000 receive central supervis-
    ion. Jewish teaching is a part-time occupation. This
    is true not only in one-day schools but also to a
    considerable extent in weekday schools.
    The general incompetence of Sunday School
    teachers is confirmed statistically. A recent study
    revealed that only 40 per cent received pedagogic
    training. Turnover of teachers is constant and:
    rapid. Twenty per cent of teachers stay less than
    one year, the majority less than three years.
    lneas are being discussed about consolidation
    and improvement* of small, inadequate congrega-
    tional weekday schools. National programs have
    been advocated to develop standards, curricular
    mater als, school forms and tests .
    Jev, ;sh day schools have increased dramatically
    in the last three decades. There is sufficient inter-
    est tc warrant co/nmunity support of these sschools
    for H.jse who want them.
    There is a striking similarity in the fundament-
    al principles of the educational objectives of the
    three groups. Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform
    al.hough they are implemented differently.
    Moving from Periphery
    The three groups agree that in Jewish educa-
    tion the aim is to foster a sense of belonging and
    identification; impart knowledge; engender beliefs
    and values, attitudes, appreciations, and inculate
    participation, ritual and communal. There is agree-
    Key to Leah and Joseph Rubin Residence
    Hall at Yeshiva University in New York is
    presented to 93-year-old philanthropist, Jos-
    eph Rubin, by his great-grandson, Leiqh
    Rubin Weiner. "The dignity of Jewish life .
    cannot be realized without a deeper under-
    standing of the substance of Jewish
    values ..."
    Discussing future of Brandeis University's
    new Florence Heller Graduate School for
    Advanced Studies in Social Welfare are
    Dean Charles I. Schottland (left), Mrs. Flor-
    ence G. Heller. Chicago, whose endowment
    created the school, and Dr. Abram L. Sachar,
    president oi Brandeis. "Slowly, Jewish edu-
    cation is moving from the periphery to the
    center of communal responsibility and in-
    terest"
    ment that teaching must be skillfully linked, in
    pursuit of Jewish knowledge.
    Over $60,000,000 is spent annually in the Unit-
    ed States for Jewish education. This is about $110
    per pupil per year or about $11.40 for every Jewish
    person in America, exclusive of capital outlay for
    schools. About half of the total budget is paid by
    parents. About 7 or 8 per cent comes from the or-
    ganized Jewish community. The remainder is sup-
    plied by donors who feel there can be no Jews
    without Judaism.
    Slowly, Jewish education is moving from the
    periphery to the center of communal responsibil-
    ity and interest. Some cities are far ahead of others.
    There is a constant, general trend toward more in-
    tensive Jewish education for increased numbers
    of children.
    In a previous generation, Jewish children and
    parents lived in America but in different worlds.
    The home atmosphere was then more "Jewish."
    But lines of communication within the family were
    obstructed.
    Today, communication lines are open. Parents
    and children dwell in the same American atmos-
    phere. Guidance is more likely to be accepted.
    The first requirement of education is education
    to the need for education. The children are willing
    to learn. But parental ignorance and indifference
    are widespread. Underscored is the great task of
    adult Jewish education.
    Moses commanded, the children of Israel to
    take pure olive oil and make a light that would
    shine continuously. This is the traditional ideal of
    the Jewish parent and teacher: to light up the
    heart and mind of the child in such a way that the
    flame will burn by itself, out of its own substance.
    The task of Jewish education is to stimulate indi-
    vidual development through a chain reaction of
    expanding growth involving self-discovery as a Jew.
    The dignity of Jewish life, Jewish contributions
    to civilization, the fullest expression of Jewish
    ideals cannot be realized without a deeper under-
    standing of the substance of Jewish values and
    ethics. This is the view of American Jewish lead-
    ership. But the problem of implementation remains
    as Jewry enters a new year.
    DAVID ROSNER & FAMILY
    of the
    Stirling
    Hotel Pool Cabana*
    Wish for all Jewry
    L'SHONA TOVA TIKESEVU
    znzn naio r\iv?
    TO *U .
    BAPPY W f**
    FANNETHARMS
    APARTMENTS
    7SH Abbott Ave. Uimmi Bosch
    Mr. and Mrs.
    David Brown
    and Family
    WISH ALL THEIR
    RELATIVES AND
    FRIENDS
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Dr. and Mrs.
    A. 1- Roeenthal
    and Family
    Extend to All Their Relatives
    and Friends
    Sincere Wishes For A
    VERY HAPPY NEW YEAB
    GREETINGS
    TOM Of REE
    and SONS. INC.
    REAL ESTATE
    1800 Bay Road
    PfcwM Jl 5224
    MIAMI BEACF
    Auto Seat Covers
    Custom Convertible Tops
    2160 N.W. 27th At..
    NE 4-1432

    CITY ICE
    - 101 I-V4RY COOLING MEED
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    PORTABLE BEVERAGE COOLERS ICE REFRIGERATORS
    PRODUCE DISPLAY CASES WATER COOLERS
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    BLOCKS CUBES
    FISH & POULTRY DISPLAY CASES
    Also Hollywood and Ft. Lauderdale
    CITY PRODUCTS CORPORATION
    FLORIDA DIVISION
    931 S.W. 1st Street, Miami Phone FR 3-2191
    M(fTIN5 TO All
    CVS AUTO
    TRIM
    SCHWEBKE & ASSOCIATES, INC.
    LAND PLANNERS iNGINtm LAND SURVEYORS ^
    'We Cover Greater Miami"
    REASONABLE RATES PROMPT SERVICE
    4841 N.W. 2nd AVttlUI MIAMI
    PL 1-2592
    3521 W. Brow a id Blvd.
    LUdlow 1-4600
    Ft. Lauderdale
    GREETINGS TO ALL
    Alexander Orr & Associates. Inc.
    PLUMBING HEATING
    Residential Commercial Industrial
    StrWsf foe Crfr Mimml Area Slmt* 115
    70 N.E. 39th Street Phone PI 4-6671
    To All Greetings .
    CAPT. S. HAMWAY
    BOAT POPEYE TOO
    Haulover Beach Dock Phone Wl 7-3525
    ENJOY A DAY FISHING Pier 2 lOsOO COLLINS AVE.
    Licensed Bid & Completion Bonds Insured
    * DAAC ROOF REPA,RS
    ROOFING IWUr METAL WORK
    __4 i4 y W HERE
    APPLICATORS OF BONDED COVERINGS
    RESIDENTIAL COMWERC'AL
    ASPHALT e ASBESTOS CEMENT SHINGLES
    GRAVEL TILE-9LATB ROLL ROOFING, ETC.
    NYSTRAND LLOYD CORP.
    230 S.W. 17th Avenue
    FR 4-4128
    Roofs Applied in Any City of S.E. Florida
    MEMBER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
    Best Wishes for the Holiday Season
    RUDY'S PAINT & BODY SHOP
    SEAT COVERS and SPORT TOPS
    3665 N.W. 48th Street
    Phone NE 4-7771
    MIAMI

    BEST WISHES FOR- THE NEW YEAR .
    KEYSTONE POINT MEDICAL PHARMACY
    12400 BBCAYNE BLVD. PL t-glSQ


    Page 12-F
    +Jewist)thrldk>n
    Friday, September 23. I960
    i To Our Many Friends and Acquaintances .
    Best Wishes for the New Year Holidays
    Compfefe Marine tlettrkat Service
    Marine
    Electrical Service, Inc.
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    1480 N.W. 22nd COURT
    PHONE NE 5-6531
    Commissioner Charles "Chuck" Hall
    f^U REAL ESTATE
    TW\W txfends Best Wishes for The Holidays
    1 To All His friends
    U BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    ADRIAN THAL
    m
    fURRIERS
    716 LINCOLN ROAD
    J. lli
    n
    420 Lincoln Road
    Wish All Their Many Friends
    A Happy Holiday
    GREETINGS
    Mmmu focr*rfi
    Bfctriooters
    Arcff#cti*r#i
    WmammI
    ^ 535 N.W. 11th STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA
    r^" As Near as the Telephone: FR 4-3186
    Dad* County Resident Sine* 1906
    A. M. TRANSFER & CRANE SERVICE
    Boats, Machinery, Office, Safes, Household, Concrete Pouring Move
    Anything34 Years of Experience in the Greater Miami Area
    239 N.W. 26th STREET Phono FR 9-8959
    ?
    cinriNf i...
    HOWARD BACKUS
    TOWING UGHTIKING CltANl KtMTAL
    !' 1M1 N.W. Seat* fiver Or. P.O. lei Ml Miami 4, FUtiao
    Yard Pbaae Fl 3-5019 Miami 4, Florid* let. Ph. PL 7-1043
    Our New Bezalels in the Year of 1960
    Contifwed From Pag* 3-F
    "Faust"). "I hold that the drive to art should re-
    sult from the conscious desire to express feeling,"
    he once wrote, adding: "It may be that through
    abstraction such expression is most readily real-
    ized, but it is through other, more traditional chan-
    nels that I gain my satisfaction." In 1997, his work
    was exhibited at both the Whitney Museum and
    the Jewish Museum, but a year later he was dead
    at the age of thirty-five.
    Satire, especially about the neurotic restless-
    ness of modern man, can be felt in the large can-
    vases of Sarai Sherman (the only woman in our
    group, although American women have played a
    most active part in the visual arts during the last
    fifteen years). Her figures, slightly distorted for
    emphasis, are taken from real life and rendered
    in subtle color with uncanny mystery. Satire
    mild and unobstrusive is also the forte of Meyer
    F. Lieberman (who makes a living as a commer-
    cial lithographer). In his emotion-fraught work Jew-
    ish ghetto types are recaptured with extreme care
    and attention to minute detail, though discarding
    academic routine, he puts huge heads on tiny bod-
    ies.
    Sheer Technical Skill
    Like Lieberman. Elias Friedensohn makes use
    of the figure to communicate his interest in Bibli-
    cal lore and in the human condition in general. Far
    from conjuring up the "beautiful" images of the
    Graeco-Roman tradition, he sees man "ugly," pit-
    iable, and full of that mystery that came with the
    Judaeo-Christian stress on inwardness. His hyp-
    notic canvases are peopled by strange creatures
    with bloated bodies and large expressive heads.
    David Aronson, too, is preoccupied with human
    qualities. He came to Boston from Lithuania, en-
    dowed with a solid Hebrew education. His is "Jew-
    ish Art" in a now view. Distorted to the point of
    grotesqueaess, hio- weird figure* look *b u- with
    large sad eyes full of Judenschmerz, with an un-
    forgettable intensity of expression.
    Jules Kirschenbaum. the youngest in the group
    (he is barely thirty) stands entirely by himself.
    This Surrealist tops them all in his sheer technical
    skill, which is matched by an unerring sense for
    composition. In his works, full of self-torturing cru-
    elty, one feels the terror of a young soul that, in
    a round-about way, tries to come to grips with the
    metaphysics of today. His stupendous technique is
    reminiscent of that of such old masters as Duere-r
    or Bosch.
    Carl Zigrosser of Philadelphia's Museum of
    Art is very hopeful concerning Aubrey Schwartz
    who once studied with Ben Shahn. Schwartz, he
    notes, is "one of America's Angry Young Men
    yet, he can be ever so tender when drawing a baby.
    He is angry with people who are cruel, cunning,
    ruthless, predatory, and he exposes them in the
    guise of birds or beasts. His lithographs and etch-
    ings, with their mordant line, truly have a fear-
    some beauty." Equally gifted is Misch Kohn. Lions,
    tigers, bulls stare at us from his wood engravings.
    Drama is produced through the opposition between
    glaring whites and pitch-like blacks, while kaleido-
    scopic whirling lines are worked into the clearly
    recognizable figures.
    I wish to close with a reference to Harvey Din-
    nerstein and Burt Silverman who journeyed to a
    center of racial tension in the South in order to
    "recapture and revive that tradition which saw the
    artist as reporter and commentator, the tradition
    of Goya. Daumier and Kollwitz." Again and again
    their swift pencils succeed in. crystallizing the
    fear, bitterness and courage of the simple people
    who, by means of boycotts and strikes, are fighting
    for elementary rights that have been denied to
    them.
    Plant a Tree With Your Own Hands .
    Continued from Pag* 7-F
    a tree. Tree planting in Israel is creative work:
    it was the very first thing the pioneers did when
    they returned to the country's wastes. Also both
    Biblical and Jewish tradition cherish the planting
    of trees: "When you come to the land you shall
    plant," and the Talmud adds: "At the beginning
    of Creation the Lord has done one thing plant-
    ing; and therefore you, too, when you come to
    Eretz Israel, shall occupy yourself with planting
    as the first thing," and. elsewhere: "Just as others
    have planted for you, so you shall plant for your
    children."
    Loving the Soil
    Among the things in Israel which afford most
    delight to visitors are the young forests covering
    the formerly naked and desolate hillsides. The
    Jewish National Fund, which has up-to-date plant-
    ed over 46 million trees in all parts of Israel, finds
    faithful partners for this grand undertaking in the
    Jews from the world over whose contributions have
    made this work possible.
    The novel project of the JNF. "Plant a Tree
    with Your Own Hands." is a further step towards
    strengthening the partnership between the Jewish
    National Fund and world Jewry, and creates a
    PfceM Fl 9-4944
    Peter Kent, Inc.
    'Anything That's Good Enough to
    Sell Is Good Enough to
    Take Back"
    170-176 W. Flagler SL
    I
    Mrs. Sally Gardner
    1560 MERIDIAN AVENUE
    MIAMI BEACH
    EXTENDS BEST WISHtS fO A
    NAPPf NEW YIAM
    Te All Ner Friers
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    0
    ^IfcrWIIbt
    IUrU.ln.hr hm
    Henry E. Mangels Company
    3550 N.W. 58th St. Ph. Nl 5-1391
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
    OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Service
    Plumbing Co. Ine.
    760 COLLINS AVENUE
    MIAMI BEACH
    Phono IE 8-6379
    Dr. and Mrs.
    MAX PEPPER
    AND FAMILY
    EXTEND BEST WISHES
    tor a
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    To All Their Friends
    and Relatives
    TO ALL GREETINGS
    nu'UTEirs
    "25 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
    Custom Upholstering
    Furniture Repairing
    RefinUhing Pointing
    Antiques a Specialty
    1349 S.W. 8th STREET
    Phoa* FR 4-7804
    practical as well as a sentimental link between
    them.
    The man who plants a tree will become the
    tree's' friend and will love the soil in which it has
    been planted. As the years pass the tourist will
    want to see how the tree has grown, and the deeper
    the tree strikes its roots and the broader the shad-
    ow of its crown spreads, the closer will become the
    bonds between it and the one who planted it.
    Even during the present tourist season the new
    project has found a ready response. Two months
    after the project was announced under the joint
    auspices of the Jewish National Fund and the Gov
    ernment Tourist Office, groups of tourists can be
    seen daily arriving at the sites designated for the
    purpose where they spend a few enjoyable hours
    in the midst of the JNF Forests, plant their trees
    and afterwards proudly wear the medal which is
    presented to every planter, taking with them the
    receipt which carries the tree's number.
    Four sites have been chosen for the project:
    The forest in the Negev, commemorating the Sinai
    Campaign hero. Commander Assaf Simhoni; the
    Martyrs' Forest in the Jerusalem Corridor, com-
    memorating the victims of the Nazi terror; the
    Biriya Forest in Galilee; and the Jerusalem Forest
    near the Sanhedrin Tombs, symbolizing the eternal
    bond with the Holy City.


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    vJewisli flcrkfiar
    Page 13-F
    Fear Dominates Jewish Life in Soviet
    Continued from Pag* 9-F
    of the "Zionist reactionaries," and all the other
    grotesque manifestations of a seditious propaganda
    machine intent on obliterating, not the J*w as a
    person/ bat Jwlaisfn-as4 a- religion;' a culture and a
    rational heritage. Thus there are people who re-
    frain from chanting in the synagogues "Next year
    in Jerusalem." for fear of the man in the next
    seat who might have a son in Siberia and whom
    the authorities might release in payment for a pat-
    riotic act. The tragedy is rfiat the man in the next
    seat has the same sense of fear and so it goes
    on.
    After three weeks in Soviet Russia. I found my-
    self asking much the same question which Boris
    Pasternak asked in his "Dr. Zhivago." What makes
    the Russian Jews so stubborn? Why don't they suc-
    cumb to their fate, de-Judaize themselves and
    merge into the landscape? For more than 40 years
    they have, to a greater or lesser degree, been sub-
    jected to threats, discrimination, force anything
    that would lead to the cultural suicide of the three
    million Jews of Soviet Russia.
    The authorities can at least point to a partial
    success in their campaign. For one thing there is
    widespread intermarriage. One bearded man in his
    sixties swore to me that his daughter would not
    marry a Jew. "What for," he exclaimed, "so that
    my grandchildren will curse the day they were
    born?" Then again, circumcision has become the
    exception rather than the rule because of the stig-
    ma attached to it, one that can never be eradi-
    cated.
    Dowt Know How
    Few of the youth know how to read from a
    Hebrew prayer book and, as one man, a devoutly
    Orthodox person, explained to me: "If I teach mjr
    son "The Shema' I can be arrested for having in-
    doctrinated him." Religious education is illegal
    in Russia until a person has reached his eighteenth
    year.
    I never really found an answer to this most
    perplexing of questions at least not a logical one.
    Because the fact remains that while assimilatory
    inroads have been made, they only touch the peri-
    phery. The central core, call it the inner Jewish
    consciousness, is proving to be indestructible.
    How otherwise can one explain the scenes I
    witnessed at the Yiddish concert in Moscow? The
    hall was packed to the last seat. Young and old
    had turned out to hear Nehama Lipshitz sing the
    old favorites. It was an exceptional cultural event,
    permitted by the authorities in commemoration of
    the Shalom Aleichem centenary celebrations.
    The young people did not understand a word
    of the Yiddish lyrics. Throughout the singing one
    could hear a hushed undertone of voices; the par-
    ents were explaining the words to their children.
    1 could understand why the older people were
    moved when "Der Shabbos Licht" was sung by the
    great singer. But why the sons and daughters? Why
    was it that so many of them were literally reduced
    to tears because of a song they did not know about
    a world gone by they had never seen? Miss Lipshitz
    sang "Mein Shtetele Belz" with great restraint and
    beauty to an accompaniment of sobs, which rose
    from the stalls to the gallery.
    Then there was the incident in Kharkow, a dif-
    ferent story with the same moral. We entered a
    large music shop in the center of the town in search
    of popular Ruhsian records. We stood by the count-
    er listening to the Moscow Choir when a man came
    up from behind and whispered, "Buy Yiddish rec-
    ords; they're no good but buy them." We turned
    around and saw a nondescript looking man in his
    Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (Tex.-D.), majority
    leader of the U.S. Senate and Democratic
    Party nominee for Vice President (right),
    stresses importance of investment in Israel
    through Israel Bond purchases at a dinner
    in his honor in Houston. Tex., during out-
    going Hebrew year. Left is Joe Weingar-
    len, veteran communal leader of Houston.
    Philip M. Klutznick. president of the B'nai
    B'rith International Council and American
    Friends of the Hebrew University, looks on
    (center). "These two experiences (were)
    . vivid illustrations of the impossible task
    the Russian authorities have set themselves
    in their quest to bring about a cultural
    paralysis within the body of Russian Jewry."
    forties who answered our smile with a blank stare.
    We asked the salesgirl to show us a selection of
    Yiddish records and it was obvious from her rather
    startled look that no one had made such a request
    for a long time.
    We played some of them over. As the turn-
    table began to revolve, the tiny echoes of "Shlof
    Mein Kind Shlof resounded throughout the shop
    and were relayed through the loudspeaker to the
    passers-by outside. One by one people came up to
    the counter, their eyes glued to the revolving disk.
    I glanced through the window and saw a small
    crowd gathered on the pavement around the loud-
    speaker. The words of the old Yiddish song seem-
    ed to have struck a familiar chord within the heart
    of every Jew in the vicinity of the Kharkow record
    shop. The stranger who had urged us to buy Yid-
    dish records was correct. They were not very good
    but they had a quality which was not to be meas-
    ured by the usual criteria.
    If there was need for further confirmation of
    this irrepressible truth I found it in a school play-
    ground one lunch hour. 1 had been shown around
    the school by the headmaster, a capable and well
    read man who was obviously proud of his large in-
    stitution attended by over a thousand teen-age pu-
    pils.
    I watched these boys and girls, the future cit-
    izens of this great country and they looked to me
    no different from youngsters of a similar age in
    any other European state. The headmaster called
    a few of them over and introduced me. We carried
    on a very general conversation until one 15-year-old
    blue-eyed-blond girl asked, "Why is your skull cap
    white? My grandfather always wore a black one."
    I had not guessed that there was a Jewess in the
    group. After explaining that many people in Israel
    wore white ones, she remarked, "Jerusalem must
    look very lovely with all those white skull caps."
    I smiled and to my surprise so did the headmaster.
    We bade each other good-bye and the headmas-
    ter took my hand with the words: "Who knows, I
    might be there one day."
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    BAKER'S
    MIAMI CARPET CLEANING CO.
    , 120 N.W. 25th St.
    4 Phone FR 4-2921
    JOHN A. BAKU, Owner
    CREATE! MIAMI'S OLDtST mmi IARCEJT
    SINCERE WISHES
    TO
    ALL MY
    JEWISH FRIENDS
    i
    J. FRANK McCRACKEN
    Clerk of Criminal
    Court
    SEASON'S. GREETINGS
    TO AIL
    SELMA
    M.
    THOMPSON
    SEASON'S BEST WISHES
    TO ALL
    TEFrTS GOWNS
    BRIDAL &
    EVENING WEAR
    3546 Coral Way HI 3-6112
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    II & II
    Glass Company
    AUTO MASS PICTURE FRAMES
    WINDOW GLASS MIRROR!
    Strrict Installation
    AUTO AIR CONDITIONING
    All Makes New t Used
    12912 N.W. 7th AVENUE
    MU 1-4733
    TO ALL .. GREETINGS
    1
    L. D. Lockwood
    Company
    AVIATION PARTS
    234 E. 18th Street Hialeah
    Phone TU 8-2155
    hVShona Tora 4 haq Samayaeh j j
    MODERN WOOD INDUSTRIES, }|
    INC.
    ELI HORA FRED SCHRAGER
    . f OR MICA KITCHEN CAUNTS
    DESKS AND BAR TOPS
    MEDICINE CABINETS
    I 1029 E. 28th Street
    OX 64)771
    BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
    GOODY SHOES
    THE LARGEST FAMILY SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORES
    IN THE SOUTH
    SHOP THE STORE NEAREST YOU P
    Season's Greetings
    from the Salons of
    Lillie Rubin
    and
    Miss Georgette
    =
    GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES
    FOR THE NEW YEAR
    J
    I
    ARISTOCRA
    Luxury Motel
    OVER A FULL BLOCK ON THE OCEAN
    HOLLYWOOD BEACH. FLA.
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    mi
    BEST WISHES FOR
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    SERBIN OF FLORIDA
    i
    )
    iri
    1280 S.W. 1st STREET
    FR 9-2838

    COHEN AND POSTOL INC.
    Insurance
    752 ABTHUR GODFREY ROAD
    EXTENDS
    NEW YEARS GREETINGS
    TO
    ALL THEIR PATRONS AND FRIENDS
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL .
    PROMENADE HOTEL
    OCEAN FRONT at 25th STREET MIAMI BEACH


    Page 14-F
    +Jewlst> ncrktian
    Friday. September 23, 1960
    SINCME GOOD WISHtS
    FOR A NAPPr NEW YEAR
    F*0M DIRECTORS, OFFICERS
    AN0 STAFF Of
    J^ERCANTILE
    H >^ft* BANK
    Y OF MIAMI BEACH
    420 Lincoln Road
    PHONE JEfferson 8-7831
    MEMBER: FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM.
    FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP.
    FREE PARKING IN OUR 10T
    EOSH HASHONA GREETINGS TO
    ALL OUfl FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS

    MR. and MRS. HYMAN ZAIDMAN
    DADE KOSHER MARKET
    If tFI'I
    FROM
    THE SEYBOLD BUILDING
    I E I R
    36 N.-f. 1st Street Miami, Florida
    Air-Conditioned Beefed
    OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE BEST CENTRAL LOCATION
    ^
    CALL
    People of Malben, Joint Distribution Com-
    mittee's weilare program for aqed, ill and
    handicapped newcomers in Israel, are among
    the 250,000 Jews throughout the world who
    received IDC aid during the outgoing Hebrew
    Year. Top left, a paralyzed youncj man from
    Tripoli operates a newsstand which a Malben
    loan helped him establish. Top right, loving
    care assists this faur-year-old in a Mclben
    tuberculosis hospital. Bottom left, after years
    of persecution, an immicrant couple er.joy
    their twilight years in a Malben heme. Bot-
    tom right, teen-ager in a home for mentally-
    retarded leams to become productive and
    self-suppciting.
    May Their New Future Come Tomorrow
    f&0 Management Componv
    REALTORS
    FR 1-3592 234~Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Fla.
    TO SERVE OUR JEWISH CUSTOMERS
    McArthur Jersey Farm Dairy
    Will Provide KOSHER Products
    MILK CREAM SOUR CREAM COTTAGE CHEESE
    PLACE TOUR ORDERS WITH TOOR DRFVER OR CALL PL 4-452 J
    6151 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
    TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR .
    CHARLES H. IENNEY
    "KENNEY" STUDIO
    DRAPERIES BEDSPREADS
    1215 71st STREET
    MIAMI BEACH
    UN 6-5583
    Mrs. Sadie Fagan
    Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hershbein
    and Children, Edyse, Martin and Andrea
    EXTEND NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL
    Continued from Peje 6-F
    the Urals, fever and paralysis struck her body.
    She did not die instead she lay helpless on
    a hospital bed for 14 long years until the day
    9he was repatriated to Poland along with other
    Polish refugees.
    But that was not the end. Her determination
    achieved another miracle emigration to Israel.
    But she came on a stretcher. In the JDC-Mal-
    ben hospital, which became her home in Israel,
    the orthopedic surgeon told her it would take a
    miracle for her to walk but he didn't know Aliza.
    Today, after three years, Aliza is walking on
    crutches, slowly, polnfully, but walking.
    And beginning to think of a future. With more
    treatments, with JDC Malben vocational training,
    with a constructive loan one day Aliza will live
    again. Really live.
    Pierre will too. Twelve years ago his father
    died because of the concentration camp If not
    in it Pierre's mother couldn't bear not to aee her
    son, but on her pitiful wages as a seamstress she
    couldn't provide him with a home.
    So Pierre went into a children's home one
    of the 15 JDC-supported homes for children and
    young people in France. He has been there since,
    and his mother visits him as often as she can find
    the train fare.
    But soon Pierre and his mother will be togeth-
    er. He has been studying radio and television re-
    pair, and soon he will be a wage earner. Pierre's
    mother could not make a home for him perhaps
    he can make a home for her.
    For Alex, the future is not so bright, so near.
    When he was expelled from Egypt wllh his wife
    and aged mother, he could bring nothir.g with him.
    And one does not start life again so easily at 58
    in a Grange land, with a strange language, and
    without a trade or a profession.
    So dc the thoughts of those the agel the
    ill and tie handicapped now being cared for in
    Israel by JDC-Malben. For them for some 230,-
    000 Jews in 25 countries the future doesn't ex-
    ist except as a great question mark.
    For them, the prayers at Rosh Hnshona 5721
    will have a deeper meaning, a special urgency.
    And there will perhaps be even an added prayer
    "May the future begin tomorrow."
    But it will take longer than tomorrow per-
    haps months, perhaps years. And when it comes
    if it comes it will only be because in the days
    of agony, in the long years of suffering, they have
    had the help of the JDC and of the American
    Jewish community. For it is through JDC that the
    Jews of America have expressed their wili and
    their determination that those who ought other-
    wise have died shall live again.
    VOGUE
    Laundry and Cleaners
    PHONE IE 14731
    The Best For Less
    Office and Plant
    1425 20th Street
    MIAMI BEACH
    BEST WISHES TO ALL
    GEORGE'S CARPET SHOP
    927 N. W. 7th Avenue
    TO All Mil FIIENSS AND ACQUAINTANCES MOST NAPPY NOUDATS
    MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SHAFKIN
    1903 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
    GREETINGS .
    BILL TINDER
    $0U> PtOPESSIONAl
    BnriM+rff vvvrti
    Iciimi by App+intmiui
    Complete lim af esfflaf Eavfsmeat
    PkMt liHawra M 6444S
    T310 ANASTASIA AVL
    *-
    IffTINCS
    INFIELD'S CAMERA SHOP
    503 LINCOLN ROAD
    Phone JE 1-3451
    133* IISCAYNE BOULEVARD
    Ptwne FR 3-7*76
    It Is Our Pleasure
    Serving You .
    AWED PARCEL SERVICE
    5702 N.W. 2nd AVENUE
    Phone PL 1-7S22
    Holiday
    Greetings
    to our
    Patrons and
    Friends
    22nd OH Collins. Miami Beach
    Phone IE 8-4345

    =


    f
    Friday. September 23. 1960
    *Jmistincr/kUatr>
    Page 15-F
    The Miracle of a Synagogue in
    Continued from Page 10-F
    club opened under Netzorg's direction. The Jewish
    cTUrJfirMsTsfffrife a ""tower "of strength to the re-
    viving Jewish community.
    The Temple Rebuilt
    Inspired by the leadership of Netzorg and the
    Jewish chaplains, the Jewish GIs assembled for
    an op Temple Erv.it and pledged themselves to rebuild
    the synagogue as a memorial to their comrades
    who <":icd in the Pacific. With the enthusiastic back-
    ing of Chaplains Dudley Weinberg, Colman Zwit-
    man, Samuel Silver, Albert Gordon, Perry Nuss-
    baum, A. Herbert Fedder, Robert I. Kahn, David
    Meltzer, Jack Levy, Jacob Halevy, Joseph Weiss,
    Jesse Finkie and Moshe Gold, a huge campaign
    was organized throughout the Pacific.
    GIs emptied their pockets, contributed in mem-
    ory of a father or a mother or the safe return of a
    brother from the war. Relatives at home sent in
    donations in a steady stream. Non-Jewish service-
    men and officers rallied to the drive. In less than
    a month more than $20,000 was raised by the com-
    mittee headed by Chaplain Zwitman. The money
    was turned over to Netzorg as president of the Jew-
    ish community and placed in trust with the JDC.
    The Chilian Jewish community raised a matching
    sum. (Chaplain Zwitman later became spiritual
    leader c-f Temple Israel of Greater Miami.succumb-
    ing finally to an illness contacted in the Pacific.)
    When the rebuilt Temple Emil was dedicated
    in 1947, Netzorg was not among the congregation.
    He had died in October, 1946, in Walter Reed Hos-
    pital, Washington, D.C., probably from the after-
    effects of his imprisonment in Manila and his re-
    fusal to give up his work with the Jewish commu-
    nity and GIs after his release.
    The dedication of the rebuilt Temple Emil
    came one year after the Republic of Philippines
    became independent. But Jewish history in the
    Philippines goes back to the 16th century. An In-
    quisition tribunal functioned there in 1590 and*
    there are eight known cases of Marranos who were
    deported to Mexico for punishment. There are still
    some Filipino families who trace their ancestry
    back to these Marranos.
    A later settlement was made in the 1840s by
    Jews from Alsace-Lorraine. After the United States
    acquired the Philippines as a result of the Spanish-
    American War in 1898, a number of Jews who had
    served with the American Army stayed on and were
    joined by co-religionists from the States and from
    Russia, by Sephardim from the Middle East and
    the Balkans, and Jews of British, French and Po-
    lish origin. Most of these were in business, some
    managing substantial enterprises. There were also
    some American Jews who served in governmental
    posts.
    Beginning of Community
    Organized Jewish life however was virtually
    non-exifctent. There were services for the High
    Holy Days on several occasions. A cantor was
    brought across the Pacific from Shanghai one year
    to officiate on Yom Kippur. Jews who wanted their
    new-born sons circumcised had to take them to
    Hong Kong.
    A certain Mr. Sinsberg of Singapore who did
    business in the Philippines donated two T o r a h
    Scrolls to the Jews in Manila in 1908 on condition
    that services be held at least on Rosh Hashona,
    Yom Kippur and major festivals. When no such
    services were held in 1909 and 1910, Mr. Sinsberg
    demanded the return of his Torah Scrolls. He got
    them beck.
    The beginning of a permanent Jewish commu-
    nity dates from 1917 when Mottel Goldstein,-a well-
    to-do hiisincssmjr.n, rented a hall aod -organized ,
    a permanent congregation. At the end of a year
    the congregation numbered 150. In 1919 Goldstein
    was in the United States on business and he called
    on the National Jewish Welfare Board. He came
    back to M a n il 8 as the representative of JWB,
    charged with organizing religious services for Jew-
    ish GIs during the High Holy Days and Passover
    and providing them with kosher meals. Thereafter,
    JWB regularly sent supplies to the Philippines and
    the welfare and religious program for Jewish serv-
    ice personnel became permanently established.
    In 1922, JWB named Morton Netzorg as its
    official representative in Manila. He had been a
    teacher- in the Philippine public schools and an ex-
    ecutive of an insurance company. Under Netzorg's
    leadership, the Jewish community gained stability
    and by 1924 it organized Temple Emil and built
    a synagogue. The synagogue was named for Emil
    Bachrach, the first American Jew to settle perm-
    anently in the Philippines. He had come there in
    the 1890's. When he died Mrs. Bachrach gave the
    community an additional building, Bachrach Hall,
    which became the center for all cultural, social,
    recreational and educational activities.
    In the 1930s the community was so well-estab-
    lished and secure that it was able to absorb nearly
    1,300 German-Jewish refugees. The newcomers
    were warmly received and became an important
    part of the growing Jewish community. In 1932
    Temple Emil had to build an addition to accommo-
    date the growing community.
    Strong Pacific Outpost
    Then came the war and the miracle of Manila.
    After the war abbout a third of the Jewish popula-
    tion emigrated. The more than 500 who remained
    opened a Hebrew school, established a Zionist club,
    founded an old folks home and acquired a ceme-
    tery.
    The last Jewish chaplain was Herbert Berger,
    recently transferred by the Air Force from Clark
    Air Force Base to Westover Field, Mass. Five
    years ago the authorities at Clark Air Force Base
    paid the Jewish community and the Jewish chap-
    lains and servicement a unique tribute when they
    named the rebuilt gymnasium at the base in honor
    of Lt. Meyer Levin of Brooklyn, one of the first Jew
    ish heroes of World War II. Leaders of-the Jewish
    community today cooperate closely with USO Club
    in Manila and provide hospitality for Jewish GIs.
    The community is headed by Jack Harberer. E. E.
    Simke serves as Israeli consul-general. Ezra Toeg
    is the community shpehet.
    Periodically, JWB's Commission on Jewish
    Chaplaincy arranges with the military for Torah
    Convocations in the Pacific and the leaders of these
    missions provide the Manila Jewish community
    with a major tie to the mainstream of Jewish life.
    Such missions were led by Rabbi Robert .Gordis,
    the late Rabbi Leon Lang, Rabbi Julius Hark, Rab-
    bi Max Eichhorn, director of field operations of
    the JWB's Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, and
    Rabbi Aryeh Lev, -the Commission's director. In
    1955, S. D. Gershovitz, JWB executive yicepresi-
    dent, visited the Philippines and conferred with
    Jewish leaders, military officials, chaplains and
    USO personnel on GI morale needs.
    On this Bar Mitzvah year of the miracle of
    Manila and the 14th anniversary of Philippine in-
    dependence, the Jewish community in the Philip-
    pines is a strong Pacific outpost of Jewish life be-
    cause of its own will to survive and because Jew-
    ish servicement, Jewish chaplains and JWB pro-
    vide an unbreakable link with Jewry everywhere.
    1 GREETINGS
    Ca. f. CeJeaae
    Coleman
    Solar
    Service
    TANKS
    e BOOSTERS
    NEW STSTIMS
    REPAIRS
    (Member Chamber of Commerce)
    1007 S.W. 27th AVENUE
    6251 N.W. 2nd STREET
    Pbeet HI ft 7154
    Nights Sundays Holidays
    Phee* MO 1434*
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR
    FRIENDS AND PATRONS
    Berson Co.
    Wholesale Distributors
    Ladies' and Children's Wear
    212 N.W. 1st COURT
    Phone FR 9-5912
    Te 0r MSar f tleads ead .trees. .
    A MOST KArfT NEW TIM
    GREETING CARDS &
    OFFICE SUPPLIES
    CORDELMA'S
    CARD SHOP
    1$ W. FLAGLER ST.
    DAN CHAPPELL
    *
    402-03 Industrial National
    rVlr Building
    GREETINGS
    Nnm Fl *42H
    A & A SIGN CO.
    SIGNS
    . Show Cards ...
    WINDOW LETTERING
    OUR SPECIALTY
    Metal. Geld Leaf,
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    LEON BERNARD
    1743 S. W. 8th Street
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    Serving Northern
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    A HEALTHY AND PROSPEROUS
    NEW YEAR TO ALL
    GARB-BIN
    7488 NIL 2nd AVENUE
    Phone PL 9-8521
    UASON'S 6tEET/$
    MM IN AN 010 WORID ATMOSPHERE et the
    PINE TREE INN
    GERMAN AMERICAN CUISINE
    IHs Cater w Parties UMssrets Prices)
    241 S.W. 37m A*e.-4 Mocks Seem of MW-erle Mile
    Air CesriMoaed
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    from
    Lou Goodman Sol Wexler
    ATLAS
    T.V. CENTER
    736 71st STREET
    UN 6-5868
    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    FRUIT FAIR
    1645 COLLINS AVE.
    Fred Aaronson Eli Quoin
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    CUAIANTEE*
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    ir POWER SPRAYING
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    ROOFS CLEANED and COATED
    1701 N.W. 83rd Terrace
    Phone PL 9-5347
    BEST WISHES FOR
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    BROADRIPPLE HOTEL
    Ken Rubinstein Mgr.
    4370 COLLINS AVE.
    Miami Beach
    GREETINGS .
    A. J. WALLACE
    FURNITURE STORE
    REPAIRING REFINISHING
    SPECIALIZING
    In Antiques. Piano, furniture
    and Office Equipment
    7622 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
    PI 8-7824
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    H. W. LAY
    and CO-, 1 n<*.
    4101 N.W- 37th Ai
    Phone NE 3-2543
    Miami. Florida


    Page 16-F
    #Je1st>fhrkM&n
    Friday. September 23. 19G0
    Production
    Continued from Pfe 5-F
    tfcown that almost no Jewish housewife
    those who do not keep kosher will use lard.
    Nevertheless, if she buys a food product on the lab-
    el of which is listed the ingredient "shortening"
    or "blended shortening." she is almost certainly
    serving lard to her family.
    This is what has happened: Refinement of this
    animal fat has reached a point where it is no long-
    er objectionable to the general consumer because
    of taste or odor; or to the manufacturer because
    of lard's shorter shelf-life, the length of time a
    product will remain fresh on the grocery shelf.
    Extensive TraJnin*
    Even after such refinement, the price differ-
    ence between lard and vegetable shortening is so
    great that cost-conscious manufacturers will choose
    lard, or add lard to vegetable shortening. Depend-
    able rabbinical certification and supervision is the
    only guarantee that a product does not have this
    non-kosher fat.
    Without such certification and supervision, a
    consumer cannot be certain that a product listing
    only vegetable shortenings may not contain lard.
    This could happen in spite of a government regu-
    lation which forbids such a substitution. There are
    circumstances when the government agency will
    permit this to happen. In the experience of the
    Orthodox Union, it has happened more than once
    that the company was permitted to continue with a
    listing of vegetable shortening on its label, despite
    inclusion of lard, on the plea that the company
    would suffer a substantial loss if it was forced to
    i- i
    Best Wi*hem
    for the
    Holidays
    WEBB
    REALTY
    CORP.
    639 N.W. .Mod Street
    We Specialize n
    Bargain Acreage and
    Business Properties
    i# riioNi
    PL l-SKSti
    To AM .
    New Year
    Greetings
    i J^icrrc
    CUSTOM TAILORING
    ll 04 LINCOLN ROAD
    Miami Beach
    9473 HARDING AVENUE j
    Surfside
    HABERDASHERY
    34rh Year on Miami Beach
    SEASON'S GREETINGS
    LOUIS...
    Your Hairdr
    WHERE
    INDIVIDUAL
    SERVICE
    IB GIVEN
    Beauty
    SALON
    1735 CORAL WAT
    SPECIALIZING IN ALL
    BRANCHES OF BEAUTY
    CULTURE
    Phone HI 8-4323
    Happy voyagers and bound for Israel dur-
    ing outgoing Hebrew Year 5720 are Judge
    John Voelker. author of the best-selling novel
    "Anatomy of Murder." and Mrs. Voelker
    aboard the SS Jerusalem. The Michigan
    Supreme Court Justice and his- wife were
    guests of producer Otto Preminger in Israel
    during the filming of "Exodus."
    destroy the label or the containers listing vege-
    table shortening.
    In the Orthodox Union's program of such cer-
    tification and supervision, nothing is left to chance.
    The statement of an applicant company about the
    sources and kashmth of its raw materials is not
    accepted at face value, not because managements
    are considered suspect but because they are not
    experts on the Jewish Dietary Laws. The Orthodox
    Union's rabbinical authorities are experts on mod-
    ern food technology because thousands of hours of
    plant research have gone into the program. Rabbi
    Rosenberg hiauelf has had extensive training in
    chemistry and the Kashruth Division has chemists
    and laboratories on call to check questionable in-
    gredients.
    Not all ingredients necessarily present pro-
    blems of kashurth but there are usually questions
    of equipment and processing which may require
    on-the-spot investigation. The principle is that the
    rabbinical authorities of the Orthodox Union and
    of the Rabbinical Council of America, the rabbinic
    41-m of the Orthodox Union, must be satisfied that
    ingredients, equipment, cleaning agents, proces-
    sing and storing are kosher, not only in the final
    manufacture but in all supplier plants as well.
    And what premium does the kosher shopper
    pay for this intensive careful checking by the rabbi
    who is also food technologist and chemist? None
    at all. The rabbinical supervision of the Orthodox
    Union is based on fees established at a level to as-
    sure that the service is self-sustaining. Spread over
    the total volume of production in a modern food
    plant, the cost of the fee per unit of production is
    o small that the manufacturer need not raise the
    price of his product when such rabbinical super-
    vision is instituted in his plants.
    This is only half of the equation, of course. If
    kosher certification did not increase sales, the fee
    would be an economically unjustifiable increase in
    the companys cost of production. Because Ameri-
    can Jews do seek out and buy such kosher pro-
    ducts, they give the manufacturer solid business
    reasons for engaging a service which is available
    on a basis that does not require the Jewish con-
    sumer to pay a premium for these products.


    Young Israel Enters the Atomic Age
    -*,
    " Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960
    Section G

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    "Woman o/ Valor," Rothschild MS. 24, 1475. Bts-tdel Museum. Jerusalem.
    A FORMIDABLE TEMPLE OF SCIENTIFIC WORSHIP DOTS AN ANCIENT DESERT.
    Vn All Sides Stretch the Lonely and Desolate Dunes.. /
    By PHILIP OILLON
    ISRAEL'S nuclear reactor was activated ("became
    critical") towards the end of June, 1980. The
    activation wag achieved without any untoward in-
    cident and the reactor is expected to reach an out-
    put of 1,000 kilowatts by the end of this year.
    The reactor is designed for experiments involv-
    ing radio-activity and will be used by the scientists
    of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Weixmann
    Institute, the Hebrew University and the Haifa
    A fw weeks a*o, Israel's nuclear reactor
    began functioning under the direction of Dr*.
    Israel Doslrovsky and Israel Peiak, Weizmarm
    Institute scientists. The reactor Is situated* in
    the vicinity of the Weixmann Institute and is
    expected greatly to facilitate the work of Weix
    mann physicists. The reactor was made possi-
    ble by tho cooperation of the Unites) Stales
    Government. It is the only reactor of Its kind
    In the Middle East.
    Technion. It will be used for research only and not
    for the supply of power. The fuel elements, con-
    sisting of "enriched Uranium" or Uranium 235,
    were suplied by the United States as part of Pres-
    ident Eisenhower's program to acquaint newly lib-
    crated lands with the principles of nuclear energy.
    The break-up of the fuel elements through fis-
    sion reaction produces both heat and radiation: a
    power station powered by atomic energy uses the
    Continue*! on Page 13-

    T


    Page 2-G
    +Anist- FhrkJian
    Friday. September 23,
    As the Jewish New Year 5721 unfolds.
    Lakeside Memorial Park
    extends its wishes for a Shonah Tovah,
    a year of peace, happiness and well-being.

    LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK
    AND GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
    N.W. 29* Sheet at 103rd Ave
    MIAMI ISACH OFFICE 4007 Cliaee A
    SEASON'S GftSTINGS .
    REED CONSTRUCTION CORP.
    1345 20th Street
    R*.
    FOUNDATIONS DOCKS GUMTING
    BASCULE AND FIXED BRTDGES CONCRETE STEEL
    GREETINGS...
    PATIO-RAMA
    PATIO MAGiC
    SHOWERAMA
    SHOWEfi MAGIC
    7140 Nl Mk
    MIAMI M ROKttA
    n a
    O. M. PUSHKIN
    YOUR MIAMI BEACH CHIEF BUILDING INSPECTOR
    Extends Greetings to All
    BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    DIXIE BROOM & MOP CO.
    4700 N.W. 36th Arenue
    lilt
    IT IS A PLEASURE TO EXTEND A HOLIDAY GREETING
    TO JEWRY EVERYWHERE
    HERBERT A. FRINK
    MIAMI BEACH
    Three great world figures in Zionism photo-
    graphed as they conferred some 35 years ago
    in London, England. Lett to right axe Dr.
    Chcim Weizmann. then president oJ the World
    ZwmiitI Organization, who later became first
    President of the State of Israel; Sir Arthur
    Balfour (later Lard Balfour). author of the Bal-
    iour Declaration; and Dr. Nahum Sokolow,
    who also served as president of the World
    Zionist Orgai
    Herzl, Sokolow and the 'Altneuland'
    By JOSEPH WBNKEItT
    THE YEAR 1M0, which mask* the 160th anm
    versary of the birth of Theortor Hrzl. first
    President of the Werld Zionist Organization, is also
    the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nahum Soko-
    low. pioneer of the Hebrew press and fifth Psnii-
    dent of the World Zionist Organisation.
    When Herzl first appeared on the Jewish pub-
    lic scene in 1896. after the publication of his "The
    Jewish State." Sokolow was already a well-known
    figure in Hovevei Zion and Jewish intellectual cir-
    cles. The "Haiefirah"' of Warsaw, which to all in-
    tents and purposes he edited since the middle of
    the 1880- served as an organ for his ideas in all
    spheres of Jewish life, literature, relations towards
    official authorities, or the National Revival Move
    merit which sprang up at the time. It should be
    remembered that more often than not Sokolow him-
    self wrote almost all the columns in his newspaper.
    Sokolow was not among Herri's supporters from
    the very beginning; on the contrary, he was among
    his sharp antagonists. This rosy be gathered from
    his sarcastic articles in "Hazefirah" until after the
    First Zionist Congress. Sokolow who bad sharp*?
    criticised Pinsker's "Auto-Emancipation" did not
    believe in the "wonderful rumors about the estab-
    lishment of a Jewish state which originated from
    the mind of Dr. Herzl." When Herzl began actual
    work in the matter. Sokolow suggested that he
    "keep his prophecy within bounds, or 'fiasefirah'
    would be obliged to announce Uat what this hon-
    orable dreamer proclaimed was the vision of his
    own heart and not that of the people." Sokolow's
    attendance of the First Zionist Congress proved to
    be a decisive departure in his life Herzl bad in-
    vited Sokolow at the suggestion of Dr. David Farb-
    stein. one of Hani's principal assistants in organ-
    izing the First Zionist Congress.
    Bringing Him Around
    In a letter to Herzl. dated July 2. 1897. about
    two months before the opening cf the Congress.
    Farbstein wrote: "It were well if you invited Soko-
    low in order to cool him down a little. He can do
    a lot of harm, because be has the monopoly of the
    Hebrew press in Russian Poland." Herzl did not
    have to over-exert himself in order to bring Soko-
    low round. Herri's personality and the atmosphere
    at the Congress neeaaa sufficient to change Soko-
    low's attitude. And so a relationship of mutual re-
    spect and admiration developed between Sokolow
    and Herd from that slay on until the latter's death.
    between these two per-
    Sokolow undertook to
    translate Herat's novel, "Altneuland," into Hebrew.
    This and the question of circulating the novel
    among the Jews leasia held a central place in
    their correspondence during the years 1902 1903.
    (This exchange of letters is preserved in the Zion-
    ist Central Archives in Jerusalem.)
    Herzl regarded his novel "Altneuland" as em-
    bodying his Zionist pisn, and wanted the publica-
    tion of the bosk to he an outstanding event in the
    Zionist Movement as a whole. He wanted the con-
    tents of the novel to become an integral part of
    the knowledge ef every Zionist. Even before he
    finished it Ms writing continued for three years
    through erffrmhios ever the collecting of docu-
    mentary material en which to base his descriptions
    en Ps* 12-G
    Building in which the FL-fI World Zionist
    Congress met at Basle. Switzerland in 1897.
    Life Expectancy
    How many years of useful service you get from your car
    depends on the CARE you take of it. Your Standard Oil
    dealer's KYSOJubrkation at regular intervals will keep your
    car running better longer, and assure you extra years of
    service.
    ST AMI AMI OIL COMPACT
    (KENTUCKY)
    "}


    Friday. September 23, 1960
    -Jenisfifkr/dTfar
    Page 3-G
    Jane Addams and Millionaire Rosenwald
    By BERNARD POSTAL
    "Q.ME feels that it is a benediction to have her
    ^^ in the home."
    The speaker was Jufths R5se'nwaT6':-mr great
    Chicago philanthropist whose vast benefactions re-
    sulted in major social changes. He was referring
    to Jane Addams, famed social reformer, and one
    of the great women of this century, whose ceArfen-
    nial year is being celebrated throughout the world.
    The unique relationship between the self-made
    millionaire who was the son of a German-Jewish
    immigrant and the banker's daughter who devoted
    her life to fighting for social justice and world
    peace was a decisive factor in ridding Chicago of
    many of its wor*t social evils.
    Jane Addams fought an historic and often he-
    roic struggle against sub-standard health and san-
    itation conditions, the shame of child labor, sweat
    shops and vice-breeding slums, and sordid munici-
    pal corruption. She battled for higher standards of
    education, community recreation, social services,
    woman suffrage and world peace. In all of these
    efforts she had the unswerving support of Rosen-
    wald, as well as of a number of other prominent
    Jews.
    Rosenwald differed from many of his business
    contemporaries who sneered at Miss Addams as
    a radical. But he accepted her as an honest reform-
    er whose ideas he respected and generally adopted
    and supported. He and Mrs. Rosenwald seldom
    missed the dinners Miss Addams gave for guests
    who were important in the field of social work.
    When an American Legion official assailed her as
    subversive, Rosenwald not only defended her pub-
    licly but demanded an apology from her detractor.
    One bitter cold night in 1910, when Miss Ad-
    dams and Rosenwald were attending a meeting of
    the Immigrant Protective League an organiza-
    tion that protected immigrants from unscrupulous
    exploiters she had to hurry away to speak at a
    meeting cf a committee raising relief funds for the
    striking clothing workers. Rosenwald stopped her
    and said: "You're going to that strike meeting,
    aren't you?" She said she was and Rosenwald smil-
    ingly remarked that he probably wouldn't agree
    with a word she'd say, but he was going to see to
    it that she didn't catch cold on the way. He then
    took her down to the street and put her in his
    automobile and sent her to the strike meeting.
    Rosenwald was just getting started as a Chi-
    cago clothing merchant in 1884 when Miss Addams
    opened Hull House to serve the newly-arrived im-
    migrants of all racial and religious backgrounds.
    Located in the heart of Chicago's West Side ghetto,
    Hull House had a tremendous impact on the Jewish
    newcomers. Thirsting for knowledge, they crowded
    its lecture halls, library, art galleries and classes.
    In the spring of 1892 the leaders of the German
    Jewish community in Chicago called a conference
    at Hull House to establish "a social settlement in
    the West Side ghetto" to serve as a center for the
    "enlightenment" of needy and newly-arrived Jew-
    ish immigrants. Among the participants were Jul-
    ian W. Mack and Lessing Rosen thai.
    Together with Miss Addams they were among
    the most powerful and liberalizing influences on
    Rosenwald. To Miss Addams, Rosenwald looked for
    inspiration and leadership. To Judge Mack and
    Lessing Rosenthal the eminent philanthropist turn-
    ed for guidance in selecting causes, institutions and
    movements to which he gave his name and his
    support
    Miss Addams, too, was present, primarily as
    an observer. She was heartsick as she saw how
    the wealthier German Jews patronized their less
    fortunate Russian Jewish co-religionists. She was
    Older adults enjoy a meeting at the Jewish
    Community Center. Whether it's having
    fun or working on a community project older
    folks like the feeling of being needed and
    appreciated, which comes from taking part
    in activities at Jewish Community Centers
    affiliated with and served by the National
    Jewish Welfare Board (JWB).
    equally shocked by the bitterness between the two
    groups of Jews and at a loss to understand the feel-
    ing of some of the Russian Jews that the proposed
    settlement was nothing but a scheme to introduce
    Reform Judaism in their midst. Before the meeting
    was over she had to serve as arbitrator but had
    the satisfaction of seeing agreement on a plan to
    open what became known as the Maxwell Street
    Settlement.
    In this earliest Jewish Community Center in
    Chicago the immigrants found classes in foreign
    languages and English, bookkeeping, arithmetic,
    American history, commercial practices, debating,
    physical culture, art, and nature study. Similar
    settlements had been established in New York, Bos-
    ton, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Cleveland and other
    cities to help Americanize the immigrants and to
    ease their adjustment to American life.
    The Maxwell Street Settlement was short-lived
    but it had started something important which was
    revived in 1903 with the creation of the Chicago
    Hebrew Institute. By that time Rosenwald had be-
    come an active supporter of Hull House and was
    serving on its board. Jane Addams encouraged the
    founders of the Hebrew Institute and undoubtedly
    influenced Rosenwald to give it his support. Its
    first building was acquired with the aid of a sub-
    stantial loan from Rosenwald. On the site of this
    structure now stands the Jane Addams Houses. In
    1910 and 1911 Rosenwald served as president of
    the Jewish People's Institute, as the agency came
    to be known.
    Prodocouor of JWB
    A year later Rosenwald and Mack went to New
    York to help organize the first permanent national
    association of YMHAs the National Council' of
    Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Assns. Thh was
    the predecessor of the National Jewish Welfare
    Board which merged with the Council in 1921. The
    Council's first executive director, Samuel A. Gold-
    smith, later went to Chicago where since 1930 he
    has been executive vice president of the Jewish
    Federation of Metropolitan Chicago. In the last
    five years of Miss Addams' life, Goldsmith was ac-
    Corrfinued on Page 10-G
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    Pag* 4 Friday. September 23.
    1960
    iv
    A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    TO- *
    OUR MANY CLIENTS
    AND FRIENDS
    MERICAN SAVINGS
    AN* LOAN ASSOCIATION Of MAW OCA CM
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    Oy 6IL0ERTE ALT0AUE0
    r;E members of tbe orchestra stood up applaud-
    ing. The striae players, striking music stands
    wfth than- bou- *n tauson. imM the French con-
    ductor. Faul Paray. "JO connais vos quah'.es ... I
    can ask you things impossible to obtain ... the
    discipline of execution with you it is possi-
    ble .. ." And so speaking alternately in French and
    raiBifc bringing his baton up and down to start
    and stop the orchestra. Paray. full steam ahead.
    was rehearsing the orchestra for that evening's
    concert which featured another mus.eal celebrity
    and gues: from abroad, violinist Nathan ltilstein.
    Tbe constellation of foreign artists has illum-
    ined the history of the orchestra ever since 1038.
    when Toscamni a< invited to conduct the opening
    concert From the members of the orchestra to the
    long list of guest and artists, no orchestra is per-
    haps so multi-national and multi-lingual in char-
    acter. At the same time the Israel Philharmonic
    is a most indigenous creation brought about in large
    part by a most politically-conscious musician. Broa-
    islaw Hubencan. who viewed Hitlensm with alarm.
    but not with a defeated spirit
    Having pel funned in Palestine in the 1930s
    and aware of his listeners' passion for music, cog-
    txanrt of the situation of Jewish musicians being
    dismissed from their orchestral positions in Ear-
    ope ITiiIii i lain was bound to envisage the prac-
    tical and ideological benefits to result from the
    founding of a Jewish orchestra on Palestinian sou.
    A man like Huberman mounting the podium was
    like Herri mounting a political platform.
    Throughout its history, the orchestra has re-
    flected tbe tensions and political crises sweeping
    over tbe globe. First, the period of the Arab not*
    in the 1930s when it was founded, irrnni World
    War II and third, the period preceding and follow-
    ing Israel's War of Independence
    War Work
    No sooner had the orchestra struck the last
    chords of tbe National Anthem at tbe Declaration
    of Independence ceremony in Tel Aviv in 1948 than
    the war cacophony blared forth Shooting came
    from Arab-held Jaffa near Tel Aviv accompanied
    with air raids, black-outs, communications were
    disrupted and Jerusalem, the capital, came under
    siege. All this did not daunt the orchestra's will
    and ability to perform and apparently tbe Govern-
    ment realized tbe importance of music in sustain-
    ing national morale since it waived drafting the
    musicians into tbe fighting ranks.
    The Special Forces concerts performed at army
    encampments and military hospitals with a "be-
    yond-the-call-of-duty" spirit animating them were
    numerous. As soon as the "Burma Road" linked
    besieged Jerusalem to Tel Aviv, the musicians
    boarded the armored trucks for the eight-hour tnp
    over tbe rough and improvised road, instruments
    shielded in specially-built wooden cases. Travel-
    ling back once from Haifa to Tel Aviv, it began to
    rain bullets so that the musicians had to flee their
    buses and lie down in a ditch waiting for the firing
    to cease.
    The concert-going audience kept up its stream
    of attendance and the concerts are remembered
    for the concluding thunderous ovations and the
    overwhelming enthusiasm that swept over orche-
    stra and audience alike.
    It is no exaggeration to say that the seasonal
    IPO concerts from October through July consti-
    tute the highest cultural and social event in the
    land. Its 22.000 subscribers attest to that Concert
    are precious heniooams. passed on
    generation to the next, aad it is in part
    thanks to the Mann Auditorium, opened in Octo-
    ber. 1957. and accommodating 3.000. ghat fewer
    and fewer people need be turned away. The crowds
    at the box office still sizable however, a popular
    subscription series was instituted to supplement
    tbe regular subscription series.
    For the orchestra which performs m Jerusa-
    lem and Haifa as well it means about nine coa-
    Conrinued on Papa 1I-G
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    KJLCmSM Pk.PLM7lS HAPPY NEW YEAH HARPY NEW YEAR
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    Wdojv September 33^1960
    +Jmi*Mk*r*l*n
    Poge5-G
    American
    y OOHOTHY MH.LSTONE
    MfMO ia a Jew? This question, seemingly so sim-
    mw pie, recently agitated Israel and had repercus-
    sions internationally. The issue arose when a set of
    instructions drafted by the Israeli Government for
    a population census appeared to he at variance with
    traditional Jewish teaching. The official rabbinate
    in the State of Israel protested vehemently, and
    Prime Minister Ben-Gurion proposed at length to
    solicit opinions from noted Jewish scholars through-
    out the world. The controversy was settled for-
    mally, at least when the Israeli Ministry of the
    Interior issued revised instructions, according to
    which a person was to be regarded as Jewish if
    his or her mother was Jewish or if he or she had
    been converted to the Jewish religion by procedures
    conforming to Jewish tradition.
    Interestingly enough, as indicated in the files
    of the American Jewish Archives, the historical re-
    search center at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
    Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, this question was
    anticipated nearly 70 years ago by a distinguished
    American Reform rabbi.
    German-born Bernhard Felsenthal (1822-1908)
    emigrated to American in 1854. Four years later,
    he became the guiding spirit of Chicago's Judische
    Reformerein, a Reform society which subsequently
    developed into the Sinai Congregation with Felsen-
    thal as its first rabbi. In 1864, Felsenthal became
    rabbi of the Reform-minded Zion Congregation in
    West Chicago and served that pulpit until his re-
    tirement 23 years later. A scholarly and eloquent
    writer. Dr. Felsenthal was something of a maver-
    ick in the American Reform rabbinate of his day
    due to his outspoken advocacy of Zionism.
    Early Question
    In June, 1800, Dr. Felsenthal in "The Menorah,"
    wrote an article entitled "Who is a Jew." Was
    the term "Jew," he asked, "the designation for a
    member of a religious community" and as such
    "to be classified with the parallel words Christian,
    Mohammedan, Buddist, etc?" Or Was it to be used
    for "people who belong to a certain racial commu-
    nity vir, to the Jewish race," in which case it
    would have "to be classed with such words as
    'German,' 'Italian,' 'Englishman,' 'Scandinavian,'
    etc.?" It was in this latter "racial" sense, he
    wrote, that "the word 'Jew* is mostly understood
    in the present time, and in such a sense it was un-
    derstood in past times."
    Dr. Felsenthal illustrated his contention by
    alluding to "the disgraceful anti-Semitic agitation
    in some European countries and of kindred tend-
    encies (as, for instance, excluding Jews as such
    from certain hotels, from certain clubs and so-
    cieties, and so forth) even in the otherwise so lib-
    eral and so tolerant America." Whether Jews were
    viewed favorably or unfavorably by individuals and
    governments, he felt, "it will be admitted that
    among all these people the Jew is not thought of
    as a member of a religious community, but as a
    member of a particular race."
    Jews themselves, Dr. Felsenthal argued,
    thought of themselves as "brethren-in-race." Amer-
    ican Jewish periodicals in particular, he wrote,
    were guilty of a "chauvinistic spirit." ". because
    they are so race-proud, and push the Jewish
    religion so much into the background, tbey speak
    with such a great gusto of every "Jew' who, in any
    sphere whatever, rises more or less on the surface
    or over the surface ... If Mr. Tulpehfield, the
    champion among the billiardists, has arrived in
    town, the Jewish papers will not fail to announce
    that the famous Jewish billiard-player, the greatest
    among the great, is among us, and we all feel
    In this seven-story structure are housed the
    complete research facilities for medical and
    biological sciences at the National Jewish
    Hospital in Denver. This $1,250,000 Neu-
    stadt Research Lab was dedicated at the
    hospital during the outgoing Hebrew Year.
    ". the Jewish community should be a
    community of the most noble ones, of the
    most moral ones, of the most sincere ones in
    the human family united by ... the
    firm striving after hallowing and elevating
    the lives of individuals and the life of so-
    ciety ..."
    proud of him for he is our brother and sheds so
    much trlory upon Judaism." Jewish clubs and
    societies were, in the writer's view, no less at fault:
    "in their eyes a Jew by birth, a racial Jew, is a
    Jew; if they consider the applicant otherwise
    worthy of admission they admit him; if not, not."
    Mora a Raca
    Dr. Felsenthal went on lo say that "the Jewish
    community should be a community of the most
    noble ones, of the most mortal ones, of the most
    sincere ones in the human family ... an invisible
    Church of the truly chosen people united by
    the spirit of true religion, and by the firm striving
    after hallowing and elevating the lives of individu-
    als and the life of society ... It should be so, but
    is it so?" He felt it necessary to admit that "actu-
    ally we are more of a race than an idealistic re-
    ligious community."
    Turning his attention then to the views of tra-
    ditional Jewish religious authorities, Dr. Felsen-
    thal concluded that "the Jews themselves had had
    since two thousand years and more one and the
    Continued en Pass 11-0
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    lirternthrps at fee It
    Mm
    Gulf Stream Quick Frozen Foods, be
    first Jewish ratal trad medical
    is a ikfii mcfec.al complex geared to
    fee latest advances ia medical research, aad
    Uctlittes Jar training scientists aad
    Wife a -uperb facwlty. magasfieod research
    and training facilities, fee college has aon wkW
    acclaim in a remarkably short spam of Bane,
    Aa Act off
    is that
    t was es>
    at ?re>id*nt
    aad a small
    feu
    me of the worm *
    a completely mstrameated elec-
    These iu*mg r If Hi nan and atomic
    of fire years ago are he-
    rn fee sohatmaaf
    fee hey to laager aad healthier bvmg
    The man of haw tTawtem College was traas-
    What is so
    it was sparked by aa
    seaually aa act of courage aa the
    Samuel Btlkm. of Yeshsva I
    band of far-sighted pioneers.
    As Dr Bemia pat a. ~Oar
    a college of mefecme that waaU
    best. U was to he a
    1 seek to serve
    of sceatafic
    Vader fee dwwetma d Dr


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    *jBwi9t>Fk>rHfan
    Pag 7-G

    City, the College has sought to carry on in Uie
    spirit of warm humanity and scientific integrity
    exemplified by Alhert Einstein. It was the express-
    ed hope of Albert Einstein that the college would
    "help makej posiwle. many additional opportuni-
    ties fdr mg people to develop their inborn
    talents'in behalf of all people."
    Today, the college wnTchTears "thTgreat hu-
    manitarian-scientist's name, serves as a symbol of
    democratic education and equal opportunity. Here,
    scholarship is the sole criterion for student and
    faculty alike, not race, creed, religion, or color.
    Already, as was recently pointed out in the
    press, the existence of the college has helped break
    the barriers of the quota system. This has led* to
    greater opportunities for young men and women
    of the Jewish faith as well as other minorities in
    medical schools throughout the nation.
    National in Scope
    The college is national in scope world-wide
    in influerre. Students and faculty are recruited
    from all parts of the United States and abroad.
    The present enrollment includes medical students
    from as cistant as Liberia and Israel and from
    many states in the United States, including Florida
    and other southern states. Faculty members come
    from Canada, Latin America, South Africa, New
    Zealand, Turkey, France, Germany, Switzerland,
    Austria and Japan.
    In this connection, an interesting development
    is the expanding Exchange Program now in opera-
    tion between Einstein College and Israel. The pro-
    gram involves members of the faculty at Einstein
    Medical School and staff members of the Israeli
    Government Hospital Tel-Hashomer. In addition,
    students of the medical school may arrange to
    spend their elective period in the Tel Aviv Hos-
    pital. At present, three Israeli students are study-
    ing at Einstein College.
    As the heart of a vast $150,000,000 "Medical
    City," tb* strikingly contemporary college of med-
    icine has unusually comprehensive facilities avail-
    able for medical teaching, care and research. The
    college eneomeosaes a 10-story Science Building,
    a 200,000 volume Library Building, an auditorium
    seating 800. Living and recreational facilities in-
    clude a seven-story Residence Hall, a Student Ac-
    tivities Center, and a Faculty-Student Lounge.
    Adjoining the college is a 1,400-bed Muncipal
    Hospital Center which serves as the clinical teach-
    ing center for the college. The faculty is staffed
    by Einstein College physicians and specialists in
    all fields of medicine. The hospital is thus able to
    provide the finest medteal care for patients and to
    pioneer ir maey unique developments in therapy,
    research, and rehabilitation.
    A new Psjrehiatrie Hospital Center, now under
    construetion IP/ the State of New York at a cost
    of $70,000,000, is gradually taking shape on the
    grounds' rear the college. When completed, the
    1,500-eed hospital will provide the' most advanced
    facilities for treating mental illness America's
    No. 1 hearrh problem. The State Hospital will work
    in close cooperation with the College of Medicine
    in its program of research, training and care.
    Today, medical science is moving at an ex-
    plosive pace. Everywhere there are far-reaching
    advances, which will ultimately lead to the con-
    quest of disease and premature death. Research
    is therefore the principal means by which a med-
    ical school fulfills its obligations to the advance-
    ment of seience. At the College of Medicine, scien-
    tists are engaged in a far-ranging program of re-
    oearch. Significant advances here in many prom-
    ising new areas have already been reported wide-
    ly in the pre**.
    Gifted researchers are testieg new drugs for
    cancer, high blood pressure, heart disease and men-
    tal illness. Two scientists have made important
    Strides toward -the-development of an early test for
    Dr. Samuel Belkin (second from left), pres-
    ident of Yeshiva University, presents diplo-
    mas while dean Marcus D. Koael (left) looks
    on. First medical class of Einstein College
    accepted Declaration of Geneva, in which
    genocide is foresworn, instead of traditional
    Hippocratic Oath.
    cancer and an eventual anti-cancer vaccine. A
    team of research surgeons has found a way to by-
    pass clogged arteries and increase blood supplies
    to the heart in coronary attacks. Another research-
    er has devised techniques for averting the grave
    effects of a stroke by removing a clot.
    The scope of these research efforts can be
    measured by the fact that 60 percent of the col-
    lege's facilities are utilized for investigations into
    new and exciting worlds in genetics, microbial
    chemistry, organ replacement, biophysics and
    mathematical biology.
    At a time when the nation faces a critical
    shortage of medical personnel, the college in its
    short history has already trained well over a thou-
    sand scientists, specialists,- physicians and tech-
    nkians for every area of medicine. Internists, ped-
    iatricians, radiologists, surgeons, psychiatrists, re-
    habilitation specialists given top-flight training
    at the collegeare now serving communities across
    the land and abroad. Many of them have taken im-
    portant posts at leading hospitals, clinics and med-
    ical schools.
    The college has also undertaken a graduate
    program of training investigators in the biological
    and behavioral sciences. Altogether, this vast pro-
    gram is aimed at bringing the fruits of medical
    research to the world over, even as it adds to the
    pool of scientific manpower to communities across
    the land.
    Last year the college was sixth among all of
    the nation's medical schools in grants received for
    research from government and health agencies.
    This is considered a major yardstick in judging the
    caliber of the faculty and scientists and the excel-
    lence of the research facilities.
    Nationwide Support
    While support for the college has- come from
    men and women of all faiths, the major respon-
    sibility for its development has been- undertaken
    by the American Jewish community. A unique
    Founders Society, consisting of business, communal
    and civic leaders has played a vital role in the crea-
    tion and growth of the college.
    Now numbering close to 480, these dedicated
    men and women have taken on the cause of the
    college as a personal crusade, contributing Urae,
    energy and many mifhons of dollars toward Its de-
    velopment Included In this honorary alumni ol
    Continued en ># 14-G
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    Tax Assessor



    Puge 8-G
    +Jeist FkrkUtr
    Friday. September 23, i960
    Brandeis University Enters its 13th Year
    By BERYL REUBENS
    BRANDEIS University enters its thirteenth year
    this month applying the finishing touches to
    tN initial development of its attractive campus,
    t looming the most capable freshman class in its
    h -lory, and introducing several unique new pro
    grams in its educational offerings.
    The university's 1.500 graduate and undergrad-
    u.-e students will have six new buildings at their
    d pesaj thi> (all These new facilities will provide
    space for new and continuing research projects.
    ad will transform the university's classroom areas
    iro the most nuxiern and imaginative in the natur..
    The new Academic Quadrangle, for example.
    i HI inspiring classroom architecture designed to
    km students and faculty al.ke with an intima'.e
    fetUsMj for the subject matter under disci.
    A'ractive. functional, and thematic designs tuve
    dc UMM classrooms more than passive tools of
    communications proce>~
    In the American Civilization Center, made pos-
    - ,< by a gift from the Olin-Sang Foundation af
    Chicago, students will study the American Pres-
    :i-ncy in a classroom dedicated to the nations
    cVef executives, learn of the struggle for c;\.l
    r _ht> in an appropriately designed Four Free-
    c m> Hall: explore the workings of legislative gov-
    ernment in the Congressional Hall, and recapture
    tre .-.pint of the Civil War among the Lincoln Mem
    onHh in Lincoln Hall. Washington Hall will re-
    i.-.l the era of the nations first president, and the
    saga of the American Supreme Court as an instru-
    ment of democratic government will come alive in
    the Judicial Room.
    The new Humanities Center, a gilt of Abraham
    Shiftman through the Shiftman Foundation of De-
    troit, has seminars designed and furnished to en-
    gender work in English and American literature,
    renaissance studies, the classics, philosophy, ro-
    mance studies, and modern languages. This build-
    ing will extend its architectual influence into the
    academic quadrangle through its adjacent renais-
    sance, classical. English, and French gardens, all
    horticultural expressions of the classroom themes.
    Gardens outside the American Civilization Center
    will follow an early American motif. A Biblical
    garden, including those plants mentioned in the
    Bible which would flourish in the New England
    cttautt, will be planted adjacent to the Judaic Cen-
    ter
    Architactval Hybrid
    The family of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Goldmg, of
    New York City, provided funds for the Judaic Cen-
    ter, to house Brandeis' expanding programs in Ju-
    daic studies. In addition to its faculty offices and
    seminars, the Golding Center will also have its
    own lecture auditorium.
    A larger auditorium, to serve the entice Aca-
    demic Quadrangle, will be located in the Ameri-
    can Civilization Center. Appropriate to its New
    England location, and in keeping with the study of
    American civilization, the auditorium will be an
    architectural hybrid of influences from the colonial
    town hall and the modern style of the UN General
    Assembly.
    In opening this quadrangle, combining the as-
    pects mentioned above, Brandeis University has
    added to its modern. 50 building campus the tin
    lsTIingTo1Scnes"ot"its basi? priyslcal plant planned
    over the first dozen years of its existence. Students
    will this year, for the first time, be able to live,
    study, eat. and relax in facilities designed as the
    campus of tomorrow.
    Three other units opened this New Year include
    the Morris Brown Social Science Center, Samuel
    and Lucille Lemberg Hall, and David and Irene
    Schwartz Hall. This Social Science Center will
    house graduate and undergraduate programs in
    psychology, economics, sociology, and anthropo!
    ogy. Lemberg Hail will include an experimental
    nursery for work with children to learn more about
    the mysteries of character and personality forma-
    tion. The Brown Center provides special adapu
    tions for space flight research, an anthropology
    museum, and animal laboratories. In Schwartz
    Hall, a large auditorium will serve the entire quad
    rangle. Adjacent to the auditorium is a spacious
    and comfortable faculty lounge.
    The construction of these new quadrangles also
    makes it possible for the University to house all
    of its academic departments in facilities designed
    for the particular needs of the studies involved.
    The incoming Class of 1984 includes 345 stu-
    dents from thirty-five states and several foreign
    nations. Two hundred and fifty public, private, and
    parochial schools are represented by the freshmen.
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    I. C Wyckoft


    Friday, September 23. 1960
    -JewUMcrldUan
    i \
    Page 9-G
    American Cancer Society and National
    Science Foundation sponsor research pro-
    grams for high school students and outstand-
    ing Erandeis University undergraduates to
    give these talented young people additional
    science training during summer months. Men.
    and women in this program are paid for their
    work as laboratory assistants while gaining
    valuable experience on the job.
    Forty-five of these students were valedictorians
    or salutatorians of their graduating classes. Nearly
    all held positions of leadership in sports and other
    extracurricular activities in high school.
    Scholarships have already been awarded to
    29 percent of these 158 men and 187 women. Their
    academic excellence is further demonstrated by
    their performance in the keen competition of the
    nationwide scholarship programs from which have
    come four National Merit Scholarship winners, one
    General Motors scholarship winner, and a Westing-
    house Science Talent Search winner. In four years,
    it is expected that well over half of this class will
    be accepted by the nation's best professional and
    graduate schools and be eligible for international
    study programs.
    One of the specialized new educational ventures
    by the University opens in the New Year for the
    first students and faculty of the Philip W. Lown
    Institute of Advanced Jewish Studies. This pro-
    gram, underwritten by a prominent New England
    manufacturer, is designed to serve as a Center of
    Jewish Studies dedicated to pure research, inde-
    pendent of denominational trends.
    A broader appeal is seen in the new adult ed-
    ucation classes to be offered as courses both days
    and evenings this fall The morning courses, meet-
    ing once a week, are intended to give women an
    opportunity to return to the classroom for non-
    credit work in history and literature Evenings,
    members of the faculty will teach courses for men
    and women interested in both literature and inter-
    national relations Subject matter varies from
    "Great Irish Writers" to "Biblical Literature" and
    Continued on Pag 14 G
    'Soy if with Musk"
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    Page 10-G
    +Jeisti ncridfor
    Friday, September 23. I960
    Uhe \ifstands, JS)a' <-S~l"rbor Uillagu
    and *S5ttrfsitlc
    Greet the New Year
    $
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    For Appointment Phone UW 6-1151
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    DELMAN SHOE SALONS
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    Best Wishes for a Healthy, Happy
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    BLUE MARU.\ FISHERIES
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    NORTH MIAMI BEACH
    Jane Addams Centennial recalls ties to Jew- er of Chicago s Hull House. Taken at a din-
    ish Community Center This long-forgot- ner in 1933 honoring Jacob M. Loeb (third
    ten photograph epitomass the famed cham- from right), the dinner featured Miss Addams
    pion of the poor and friendless and the found- (fourth from left) as principal speaker.
    Jane Addams and Millionaire Rosenwald
    Continued from Pegs 3 G
    lively associated with her in many civic, education-
    al and recreational reforms.
    Rosenwald's successor as president of the Jew-
    ish People's Institute. Jacob M. Loeb, headed the
    agency for 22 years. When he retired in 1933 as
    president and also as a vice president of the Na-
    tional Jewish Welfare Board, he was given a din-
    ner at which Miss Addams was the principal speak-
    er. Loeb's grandson, Hamilton Loeb, jr., is now
    president of the Jewish Community Centers of Chi-
    cago, which grew out of the Jewish People's in-
    stitute.
    Other contemporary leaders of the Jewish com-
    munity of Chicago and of the Center movement
    also earned their social service spurs under Miss
    Addams' inspiring tutelage. Charles Aaron, a for-
    mer president of JWB and of the Jewish People's
    Institute, and now president of the Jewish Federa-
    tion of Metropolitan Chicago, was a volunteer club
    worker at Hull House in his early twenties and
    knew Miss Addams quite well. For several yesrs
    he directed a surrent events class at Hull House.
    Mrs. Florence G. Heller, a niece of Julias Ros-
    enwald, and for many years a vice president of the
    Jewish People's Institute, alse served a youthful
    apprenticeship at Hull House before she became
    a leader of the Jewish People's Institute and later
    a vice president and chairman of the Jewish Com-
    munity Center Division el the National Jewish Wel-
    fare Board. Jane Addams would have bees pleased
    to learn that Mrs. Heller has made possible the
    Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced
    Studies in Social Welfare at Brandeis University.
    Fruitful Yeere-
    Jane Addams' ties with Jewish settlement
    houses and the early YMHAs were not confined to
    Chicago. Whenever she came to New York she al-
    ways visited the Educational Alliance which had
    been founded in 1883 as a lower East Side branch
    sf New York's YMHA. now the famed 92nd st.
    YM-YWHA. She was a great admirer of Dr. David
    Blaustein. the Educational Alliance's executive di-
    rector, and she probably had something to do with
    the fact that he was called to Chicago in. 1908 to
    head the Jewish People's Institute. Bernard Horo-
    wich, a founder of the Jewish People's Institute.
    frequently met with Miss Addams to get her help
    in developing the early JPI program. Today, the
    Jewish Community Centers of Chicago is erecting
    $1000.000 North Westside JCC named for Him.
    Symbolizing the blessings of health and
    happiness for the New Year are the 150
    children at the free, non-sectarian Jewish
    National Home for Asthmatic Children at
    Denver. Formerly adjudged medically
    "hopeless" from intractable asthma in their
    own home communities, these youngsters
    are being restored to health at the Home.
    When JPI opened its magnificent new building
    in the Lawndate section of Chicago in 1927 no two
    guests were prouder than Jane Addams and Julius
    Rosenwald. One of the speakers at the dedication
    exercises was the late Dr. Philip L. Seman. who
    was general director of JPI for more than 30 years.
    During this period he worked closely with Miss
    Addams on many community projects. His tribute
    to Miss Addams in the JPI Observer when she died
    in 1935 epitomized the close ties that existed lor
    more than a generation between one of the greatest
    Centinwed en Pose 14-C
    BEST WISHES
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    UN 64343


    Friday. September 23. 1960
    +Je*isti FkridHcW
    Page IW
    Israel's Excellent Philharmonic Orchestra
    m. Continued from PB 4.Q
    certs within a fortnight. Opera with all of its in-
    herent splendor and aura drew very large crowds
    during this season's performances of "Falstafi"
    and the "Marriage of Figaro" under the baton of
    Carlo Maria Giulini; a concert version of "La For-
    za del Destino" will be the third treasured opera
    performance of this season with a New York Met-
    ropolitan cast headed by conductor Erich Leins-
    dorf and tenor Richard Tucker.
    Since the operas are staged so far only at the
    Mann Auditorium, special buses convey opera lov-
    ers from remote Carmel and Jerusalem to Tel
    Aviv. Afternoon Youth Concerts with special em-
    phasis on Israeli composers, the once-a-month Is-
    rael Forces concert and the open-air concerts held
    at various agricultural settlements during the sum-
    mer season are the other activities of the Philhar-
    monic.
    List of Talent
    Another unusual "extra" concert held on May
    25 of this year at Isaac Stern's suggestion was an
    optn-air concert attended by 2,000 people in Elath.
    The bringing of music to this culturally starved
    southern point was suported by the Defense Min-
    istry and the Elath Municipality which bore the
    cost of flying the musicians down. A similar un-
    orthodox .venture was the concert conducted by
    Leonard Bernstein at Beersheba for the armed
    forces.
    The IPO was never a humble undertaking.
    From the outset the ensemble numbered 72 mem-
    bers recruited from 14 different countries. At pres-
    ent there are 102 instrumentalists, many of them
    Israeli born and graduates of Israel musical acad-
    emies. Likewise, pianists, conductors and compos-
    ers of domestic vintage such as Pnina Salzman,
    Eajiid Jferenboim^Jlontt Aajuv Sigj^Weissenberg,
    George Singer, Michael Taube, Yahli Wagman, Jo-
    seph Kaminski, Oedeon Partos, Menahem Avidom,
    Paul Ben-Haim and Marc Lavry are featured on
    billboards and concert programs freely intermixed
    with the big names from abroad.
    American and Asian Tour
    Today the orchestra's fame rings out on all
    continents, for when it is not touring and being
    heard in live performances, it can be heard on
    "Columbia-H.M.V." recordings and on Decca re-
    cordings under conductors Paul Kletzki, Joseph
    Krips. Rafael, Kubclik. and George Solti. In 1951
    the orchestra made a coast-to-coast tour of the
    United States, followed four years later by a
    European tour that took in 40 different cities.
    Now, once more, the orchestra will take off in
    October on a coast-to-coast tour of the United States.
    Under the auspices of tne America-Israel Cultural
    Foundation and the management of Sol Hurok, the
    orchestra will play in Washington, Hartford. Bos-
    ton. Rochester, Detroit. Kansas City, Houston, and
    Minneapolis under conductors Krips and Ormandy,
    and will close its tour with a benefit performance
    at Madison Square Garden in New York on No-
    vember 29. On its return home journey, the or-
    chestra will perform in India, Manila and Japan
    through the sponsorship of the home Foreign Of-
    fice.
    As an instrument of good will, as a favored
    cultural export item and one is reminded of
    Russia's Bolshoi, France's Comedie Francaise,
    America's Porgy and Bess troupe we have the
    words of a former American diplomat to the effect
    that the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra is a more
    persuasive instrument than any government repre-
    sentatives may be in gaining prestige for itself
    and the country it represents.
    An American View of 'Who is a Jew?'
    Continued from Pace 5 G
    same answer to the question. Who is a Jew? A Jew
    is a Jew by birth ... a Jew is he who is 'of the
    seed of our patriarch Abraham.' According to
    Jewish tradition, wrote Felsenthal, a Jew was
    the offspring of Jewish parents, while "the off-
    spring of a Jewess were under all circumstances
    considered as Jews."
    In the eyes of the synagogue, the rule was,
    "Once a Jew, always a Jew," even in cases of
    apostasy; "marriages between a male Israelite and
    an apostate Jewess, or between an apostate Jew
    and a perfect Jewess, were considered to be valid
    and legally admissible and the offspring of such
    .marriages had the status of Jews." In addition,
    finally, to Jews "born as such," those "who were
    accepted into the fold of Judaism as proselytes"
    were recognised as Jews.
    Having outlined the traditional view. Dr. Fel-
    senthal asked: "Can all these ancient ecclesiasti-
    cal laws, all these old rules and regulations, which
    originated in times long gone by, still be main-
    tained? Ought all of them to be maintained?" For
    the Israeli rabbinate, as recent events showed, the
    answer was emphatically affirmative, but for the
    American Reformer, many of "these ancient ec-
    clesiastical laws" were "to a large extent non-
    sense."
    What was not nonsense, wrote Felsenthal, was
    the 'tperfect doctrinal freedom granted in an-
    cient Judaism, and the new Judaism should cer-
    tainly not give up that bright jewel in the crown
    of old Judaism, and should not create a mental
    thraldom for those who adhere to it, or desire to
    adhere to H."
    Dr. Fclsenthal's answer to the question was
    direct and explicit: "We-need-but-state that a Jew
    is a Jew in consequence of his birth, or in conse-
    quence of his formal application and adoption, and
    that heaemains a Jew as long as he does not open-
    ly and unmistakably separate himself from-the Jew-
    ish community. To no one should be denied the
    name of 'Jew' who honestly maintains and believes
    that he stands upon Jewish grounds, and that his
    whole religious life and that all bis religious views
    are rooted in Jewish grounds and have grown up
    from Jewish germs."
    It is precisely here, of course, that Dr. Felsen-
    thal and the Israeli tradilionists of today would be
    in sharpest disagreement. For the Chicago rabbi,
    anyone who identified himself as a Jew regard-
    less of his antecedents was to he accepted as a
    Jew. For the Israeli rabbinate and, as a result
    of its influence, for the Israeli Government one
    must have had a Jewish mother or have been con-
    verted to Judaism in due conformity to traditional
    rabbinic regulations in order to qualify as a Jew.
    The American Jewish Archives on the Cincin-
    nati campus of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
    Institute of Religion has in its files many other
    items relating to American Jewish life and thought
    at the turn of the century. Dr. Jacob R. Marcus is
    the Director of the Archives.
    HOLIDAY GREETINGS THE
    AND BEST WISHES PARTY LINE
    EMIUC'S BEAUTY SAMA0N 1029 KANE CONCOURSE Msrfecfhre Accessories for Every Party GREETING CAMS 0 STATIONERY 9464 HARDING AVE.
    UN 5-7434 UN 4-1714 UNion 9-7519
    Beat Wishes to All Our GREETINGS TO ALL
    Patrons and Frisnds BAY HARBOR
    M0AD CAUSEWAY -CITIES SERVICE JWRSERY SCHOOL
    BAY HARBOR ISLAND 9500 Bay Harbor Terrace
    UN 6-9472 UN6-99S7
    SINCERE mints
    10 AU JEWtr
    for a
    Am mw via*
    ndSo*
    mutr
    MRS. JACK HIRSCH
    greetings ro AU
    SAM SPUN
    AMBER FUEL Oft
    G4M/ on
    MIAMI It ACM
    mONf JE t-0735
    J~lc*rbor
    1 if *^n rjs iac
    am
    Greet the New Year
    Best Wishes for a Happy and
    Prosperous New Year
    Broad Causeway
    mi
    Town of Bay Harbor Islands
    Mayer Shepard Bread Councilman J. M. Lelchufc
    Councilman David M. Abel Councilman George M. $099
    Councilman Eugene S. Cooper Councilman Stanley Tale
    Councilman Joseph J. Gardner Edward H. Preble, Town Manager
    TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Young t^opnisticcttes
    9526 HARDING AVf. r' 1
    Pre-Teen. Junior and Junior Miss Fashions WT\\
    UN 5-7351
    Greetings to AU .
    *lizat>etlt tzftra*

    en
    ions
    JE 2-2383
    667 LINCOLN RD.
    UN 5-3586
    9592 HARDING AVE.
    MORNING STAR
    EVENING STAR
    Holiday Greeting*
    from
    AL GRANOFF LOU ROSENBERG
    of the
    STAR APARTMENTS
    Boy HQrDor Islonds
    Luxurious Furnished or Unfurnished
    2 & 3 Bedrooms, 2 BathsCentral Air-Conditioning & Heat
    MODEL AFT.
    1150-103rd STREET UN 54432
    NORTHERN STAR SOUTHERN STAR

    Greeting* to AU
    BAY HARBOR FINE FOOD MARKET
    FANCY GROCERIES PRIME MEATS
    1077 95th STREET Free Delivery
    UN 5-0331 UN 54332
    HAPPY NEW YEAR .
    tlAHMMW
    1009 KANE CONCOURSE
    UN 6-9237
    maBoaaSSBSBBJ


  • Full Text

    PAGE 1

    Stirring Message of Rosh Hashona 1 tfliewislh Floridian Miami. Florida. Friday, September 23, 1960 *W PW %  aw> 'WHWW fV til •Th< Scholar." Rothjch.W MS 24, 1475. Bwalel Mustum, Jerusalem. Section F %  m WTO ."'/' %  ~T TUfBUPW^v *** *" ** •78 I WHEN MEN FIND PATH TO GOD THEY WILL DISCOVER PATH TO ONE ANOTHER, ] Soulful Prayers Strike Deepest Chords of Human Emotion By DR. HELEN HIRSCH pOSH Hashona, like a mighty, rock-hewn lighthouse on eternity's far away shores, has flashed Its holy, awe-inspiring .message through the miiinni thus relentlessly preparing potent agencies for spiritual renewal to hundreds of generations of Jews. Striking the deepest chords of human feelings and voicing religion's sublimest truth, the fbul-etlrring prayers recited, during the "Days of Awe" (Yomom Noraiin) enshrine whatever Judaism has to say on God, man and his manifold responsibilities. "Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel!" is the stern bidding of the Prophet Amos (4:12). In Leviticus 23:24, it Is written: "All year round, the people are busy at their tasks; but on Rosh Hashona, they take their shofars and blow them before God; and God Almighty goes from the throne of judgment to the throne of mercy and is filled with compassion for them."' Once again, the soul-stirring blasts of the staofar bid us take of our daily routine and set us to dwell upon our achievements and failures of the year gone by to see for ourselves whether we have succeeded or not in living up to our manifold responsibilities. This is the time to relentlessly pry into our minds and souls and to attempt to model our lives to the holy Torah, our eternal code of Continued on Pag* 10-F I



    PAGE 1

    Fildcry, September 23, I960 +Jmlsl> ftcridfia/n Pegs 7-H B'nai B'rith's Vital Role in South Florida By SAM NIEBERG Preiidant, Florida States Federation B'nai B'rifh Lodges ^ %  O write about B'nai B'rith in South Florida is %  a challenging task. BY.ai B'rith encompasses vast areas of service and is dedicated to a rich pattern of activities. The significance and value of an organization is determined by the causes which it serves, and the goals which it hopes to attain. On the basis of these criteria, B'nai B'rith is potentially and actually one of the most constructive forces in American Judaism, and has been especially effective in the Greater Miami area. The Florida State Federation is the largest in District Grand Lodge 5, which comprises the District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. President Samuel Nieberg, of Miami, is the administrative head of the 24 Florida lodpes, stretching from Pcnsacola across to Jacksonville, and down to Homestead. In the Greater Miami area alone, there are 12 lodges operating under the aegis of Jack Fink, president of the South Florida Council of B'nai B'rflh. There are currently at least two new lodges in process of being created. The total state membership is up to its highest peak of 3.931, of whom 2,469 are members in and around South Florida. Many prominent Miamians hold positions of national and district importance. District past president E. Albert Pallot continues to serve as the National Commissioner for the Armed Forces and Veterans program of B'nai B'rith. Burnett Roth, of Miami Beach, is a member of the executive committee of the National Anti-Defamation League Commission. Judge Milton A. Friedman, of Miami, is currently president-elect of District No. 5, and will assume the presidency at the 1961 annual convention to be held here at Miami Beach next June. Past state presidents Jerome Greene, of Miami, and Jay Markowitr, of Tampa, both represent the State of Florida on the district board of governors, as does president Nieberg. Local Programs Illustrative of the importance which the Greater Miami area assumes in the organizational structure of B'nai B'rith, there are six members of the B'nai B'rith professional staff operating in our community. Nathan Perimutter is the regional director of the ADL, wortting with his assistant, Arthur Speigel. Supervising a vast youth program is Jerry Carver and his assistant, Mrs. Jane Robinson. Dr. Donald Michetson directs the HiTlel Foundation on the University of Miami campus, supervising the religious, cultural, and social needs of some 3,900 Jewish students there. Two years ago, the district membership and activities director, Arnold D. Ellison, was transferred to Miami, and now maintains an Office in the HHlel Foundation, where he supervises all aspects of membership acansition and retention, lodge programs and projects, and fiscal management for all 108 lodges in the district. Because we recognize no limits to the areas where we can be of service to others, the projects sponsored by the Miami lodges are too numerous to list in detail. To mention only some 6t them, members Of B'nai B'rith can find themselves donating prayer books and yarmulkes to Jewish airmen stationed at Homestead AFB; others collect clothing and food for needy migrant workers, as well as victims of the recent earthquakes in Chile; and yet others are proud of the tears they shed in private as they see crippled children respond to their j okes, gifts, and goodies at parti es h eld in tffe^v^nety-HospTral for CftTldren. Deeply-rooted in the true spirit of Americanism, some lodges sponsor essays in local high schools, awarding prizes for the best exemplification of democratic principles. Others single out an outstanding local policeman or fireman for public recognition, still others sponsor Man or Citizen of the Year awards, and the July 4 celebration sponsored by B'nai B'rith on Miami Beach has become a local institution. Ever mindful of the sacrifices made by those in Ihe Armed Forces, the program for service to hospitalized veterans, as well as to Jewish service personnel, is administered by Charles Seiavitch, district co-chairman of SCAFV. Parties, picnics, gifts, both at Chanuka and Christmas to both Christian and Jew, all are the results of the joint efforts of many members of B'nai B'rith lodges. Bowling leagues, blood banks, social singles clubs, employment of physically handicapped, sponsorship of Boy Scout Troops, softball teams, sale of Bonds for Israel, trees for the Martyrs Forest in Israel, participation in local Federation drives, admission to the internationally-renowned hospitals sponsored by B'nai B'rith — all form an abundant scope of services for those less fortunate and the needy. The B'nai B'rith Youth Organization (BBYO) sponsors a total of 26 AZA and BBG chapters ia Greater Miami. While not a synagogue affiliate, this largest Jewish youth organization in the world stimulates religious loyalty as an essential part of SAMUU NIEBf 16 its program. In addition, BBYO builds informed and understanding American citizens and transmutes into practice the principles of brotherhood. B'nai B'rith knows that our leaders of tomorow come from the youth of today, and thus the BBYO program is one of the most concentrated and active in the entire B'nai B'rith arena. %  Education for Adult. The ADL is the arm of B'nai B'rith dedicated to the defense of the Jewish name against earleatare and calamity. And of particular note is the fact that all B'nai B'rith lodges and chapters locally ate at the present time involved in completing the first total face-lifting that the Miami Hillel Foundation has received since It was built over seven years ago. It has been repaired, repainted, Continuod on Pago 11 H TH CONSUL OF ISRAEL IN ATLANTA AND MRS. MOSHE LESHEM extend to all their friends the best wishes FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR ROSH HASHONA 5721 L'Shona Tova Tikesevu from the GOLDEN AGE FRIENDSHIP CLUB Miami YMHA Branch Greater Miami Jewish Community Center 450 S.W. leth Avenue n 1-t/i* %  oron raw n:v> New Year Greetings fro* M — t ar of HADING CANTORS MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH HYMAN To Thoir family. Friends, Cantors, • %  bail and Shu/ Presidents 7525 SOUTH COLES Chicago 49. Illinois Phono RE 44748 %  ^ %  f%e—Ao;ia J ova Utit BETH T0RAH CONGREGATION (Formerly Monricelfo Perk Congregation) *JL^ t^fiona Uova J IK esevu THE BLASBERG FAMILY



    PAGE 1

    jay. September 23, 1960 'Jewlstincr/dttan were virtually used up. The best books are worst preserved, because they are the best Lsrd—for what better treatment of a book can tv be than to read it so often that its pages fall PurpM of Library The National Jewish Welfare Board's Jewish I'k t Co uyi}U>i America has seLJoj^h y"ht|-njn \im requirements which must be met by any imunal library if it wishes to be accorded a tatioa of Merit" from the Council. I would urge underline a ninth requirement: that a fair [portion of its books be read to shreds. (One hundred and thirty libraries sponsored by Jewish Community Centers, synagogues, Jewish schools and other community agencies have received citations of merit from the Jewish Book Council of America. To win this citation a library must be at least a year old: have one room set aside for its exclusive use; be staffed by a full or parttime librarian: have a fixed annual budget; contain a minimum of 1,000 Jewish books in any language; acquire a minimum of 100 new Jewish books during the previous year; have a catalogue accessible to all readers; be open at least 10 hoars a week; and participate actively in Jewish Book Month activities and other projects that enrich Jewish culture.) The purpose of a library is to be used; a library fiout readers, especially zealous readers, is just Lit above a library that doesn't exist. There is public prestige or morale-boosting to be gained the mere presence of a collection of books. A fish community library has a unique function Is own in relation to the community it serves, linings stand today, every Jewish community It look upon itself as a reservoir of forces defcd to the cultivation, enrichment, and survival Jewish life. Conceivably it may not be a large Irvoir, but it will be deep, and it will be fed by filing springs. These springs well up from withtie books which contain the ever-living waters, "mayim hayim." of the Jewish tradition. Only he degree that these waters are regularly imby the individual members of our local cornlilies will Jewish life thrive in America. Life in any Diaspora land sets up powerful curIts and counter-attractions against the maintenof an informed, vigorous Jewish culture. The Page 13-D Continuing cooperation of scholar and writer is indicated as (left to right) Milton Krents, of "Eternal Light" of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, James Yaffee, program script-writer, and Dr. Bernard Mandelbaum, of the Seminary, discuss a recent television series. "Life in any Diaspora land sets up powerful currents and counter-attractions against the maintenance of an informed, vigorous Jewish culture." Jewish library, the Jewish school, and the Jewish home, even when working together, will have a hard enough struggle to prevent the gradually complete evaporation of Jewish knowledge and values. Neither library, school, nor home can afford to go it alone, and Victory can be had only at the price of constant cooperation and effort. We can hope that someday this victory will be seen in the shabby, dog-eared, dilapidated condition of the books stacked in every communal library; these veterans will bear, like trophies, the scars of a triumphant campaign. A book, after all, is chiefly an instrument for enabling us to master the art of living. David BenGurion, the valiant Prime Minister of Israel, summed up three thousand years of history when he said, "We have preserved the Book and the Book has preserved us." tritish Organization Marks 200 Years Continued from Pag* 6 D [1854 and which concerns itself with safeguardthe citizen rights of the Jew in every walk of There have been, even recently, instances en, in one way or another, without the vigilance Ihis committee, some clause or regulation might % *e been introduced in Parliament, or in MuniciCouncils, which would have adversely affected community. The Foreign Affairs Committee, which was esblished in its present form only during the SecWorld War, has often alone, or in conjunction 1 other organizations, mainly American, dealt Ith the problems of post-war Jewry. The Board fs represented at the first meeting of the United ations in San Francisco and is a member of the boordinatinR Board of Jewish Organizations, a pdy with consultative status at the Economic and : ial Council. Other committees deal with aliens, education, ^chita, finance and defense. The defense committee combats anti-Semitism in every respect and has been largely successful in creating the favorable climate for the Jewish community which now prevails in this country. The Board has counted many impressive or colorful figures among its presidents. One who guided the fortunes of the deputies for nearly 40 years towers over all the others — Sir Moses Montefiore. An ultra-Orthodox Jew, countless were the mercy missions he undertook—from Alexandria to Istanbul, from Palestine to Italy. At the Vatican he called to have restored a Jewish child which had been secretly baptized and stolen from its mother, who died of grief; to Constantinople he traveled to obtain from the Sultan, Abdul Azziz, confirmation of his predecessor's degrees in favor of the Jews; he made the long and difficult land journey to Bucharest to plead with the ruler, Prince Charles, the cause of the oppressed Jewish community, and met the Russian Czar, Alexander II, to Continued on Pago 15 D SEASON'S GRttTINGS Christine Corrigan SEASON'S GREETINGS PUBLIC TRANSMISSION SERVICE Automatic Transmission — Power Steering SERVICE & REPAIRS 1340 N.W. 54th Street PL 1-6491 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL p
  • r Service of Miami St International Airport Greeting** to All • • ALBERT PICK HOTELLA You Will Enjoy Your Stay Here BAY HARBOR ISLAND 9601 E. Bay Harbor Drive UN 6-7328 PEOPLES GAS SYSTEM •• Extend Best Wishes to the Jewish Community for A HAPPY NEW YEAR m MUM: SMIL 129* ST. \ V mm tun. IUS urn MM %  UYVM: im ma SHIFT n.UMEMU: III LIMA*! Mr. Pumpernik sez: A Very Happy New Year To All wmm\k'$ 1 I RESTAURANT 67th ft Collins Best Wishes for a Happy New Year CORAL GABLES GARAGE i Specializing in Cadillac Service Free Pick-Up and Delivery Service (AAA) — Expert Motor Tune-Up and Automatic Transmission Work. PAINT and BODY WORK 4200 Laguna (East off Coral Gables High) HI 8-2691 NIGHTS and HOLIDAYS CA 1-4422 Best Wishes for a Happy New Year MIAMI FISH & LOBSTER CO. 5711 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami Phone PL 4-3667 Hotels, Restaurants and Institutions Supplied NEW YEAR GREFTINGS TO ALL CLUB, RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES & BARTENDERS UNION LOCAL 133, AFL-CI0 1 AL GONZALEZ. Jr., President MORRIS G. DRAPKIN. Secretary-Treasurer •21 NX 2nd AvtMt, Miami Ph.nt FR 3-7403 SEASON'S GKEETINGS TO AU BAUKPS BAKERY Ask for "BAMN'S HOMEMADE DAINTIES" in tvery start Abe Fancy C.okiet Call And W. Will Deliver


    PAGE 1

    Pace +JeistrkrHkuFriday. September 23. 1960 THE OPERA GUILD OF GREATER MIAMI WMW aii in %  — am of.rho ***** Faith A Vary Happy, Pro*provs and Haattfcy Nn Yaar ARTUtO Dl FILIPPI Artistic Director and Ganoral Maoayar THE PERSONNEL OF WEINKLES Liquor Stores WISHES EVERYONE A Mont Happy Wmm Year IMS 19 STORES SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA Besr Wishes for the New Year Holidays ASSOCIATED ARTISTS Supplies for Artists, Engineers and Architects 1122 BISCAYNE BLVD. Phones FR 3-3562 or FR 9 2336 TO ALL GREETINGS POWELL SEATING AND SUPPLY COMPANY F ofiorty C ft A Seles Sorvico FOUJOJg OUItS sad rOUO W TAMB AU TfffS Of SIATK4C FOO CLUBS. WHOM It ALLS, CM— %  ITC A. 1. (Ml) f*w*ff Tfco Seofiog Headquarters for the Soot a" 52 NX 51st Street F1WM It 1-1954 THE FARR FAMILY f jr#e#Ws Now roar Grettimn H Hot f %  tiro Jewish Ciewrf) TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS PARK MAIrlSOX STIRIO PORTRAIT PHOTO GRAPH CIS 205-07 Lincoln lldcj. 350 Lincoln %  owl Phonn J£ 1 5280 M iami B each. Florida OILS — FRAMES — MINIATURES SEASON'S GREETINGS PARAMOUNT CLEANERS SPKI Mizmc m rtuiotMC AMO CUSTOM MAM CIOTWJ 1753 COOAL WAY Phoo. HI e-0347 BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON FLFKMAV HI IIJIISKS -fUlMAD OMIT HUAMS UTTtt KHU" 2139 N.W. 7th Street A Happy -New Year to Our Customers and Friends PEGGY'S BEAUTY SALON, IXC. 1*37 WASMINOTON AVL (at UaKeta Band) MIAMI Bf ACH Jf 1-1*45 %  **ti->fcji Part-Time Chaplain for Welfare Board from Pi 4-0 has recruited tome fine Sunday School teachers from Fort Gordon. He tells his congregation: "We fet some fine 'dividends from the Fort." They no longer have the Di>ciplinary Barracks" at Fort Gordon, but when they had. then he as in his element. 'An old prison chaplain." he describes himself, having served tn that capacity at Feisom Prison near Sacramento. Calif., in his early days in the rabbinate He liked to work with the prisoners and I do believe that he was sorry to *ee hi> favorites released What do you do with a guy like the Chaplain? He ...oes get involved emotionally with the soldiers, the prisoners and the patienrs at the V'A. Nothing is routine as far as he is concerned. He likes the freedom he now enjoys in taking military problems right to the top. "Remember the Army days. Patrick." he reminds me. "when we used to go through channels*" I remembered them. He found out. the hard way. that you don't just walk in to see the Colonel or the General. Ah. but he does walk in. today He does phone directly to the CO or to the Chief of Staff, and how he enjoys the new freedom He sits in the Post Chaplains office discussing a particular problem. It is involved: it is difficult: it is likely to be fouled up somewhere along the line. Ultimately, of course, it must be brought to the attention of the •front office." I think the VA is his most very special interest. At Lenwood VA Hospital we have a number of Jewish patients, somewhere between 20 and 30. at all times. These men are veterans of World War II. mainly, plus a few World War I OMOOaVoi and several Korean conflict men. Here. too. it is difficult to hold regular services for all the men. The Chaplain finds it practicable to schedule group meetings and services in the various scattered wards. Of course, there are men at VA who are not in condition to participate in services. Occasionally, they fool you. For example, at a holiday service when the Rabbi was accompanied by a little lady of the Sisterhood, this is what happened The Sisterhood gal questioned a patient, asking him. pointedly. "What did the Rabbi say?" He looked her in the eye and asked this question. "You were there weren't you?" She admitted, somewhat disconcerted, that she was. "Well." said the patient, "he said the same thing to me that he said to you." o*yooo Cooo/fagattofv A death among the old timers who have been at Lenwood for many years is like a death in the congregation. As the chaplain says. "You get to know these guys. Sometimes you meet members of the family (all too infrequently, alas). The men confide in you. You visit them quite often. Indeed, you see them more often than you see some members of your own congregation. "Bonds of friendship are strengthened through the years. You go with a man to staff meetings. You have consultations with his doctors. You discuss the matter of transfer, of trial visits at home, of discharge from the hospital. "Sometimes you accompany a patient you have known so pleasantly in life, to his last resting place — and read the funeral service. "Oh. yes, your rabbinical duties are extended far beyond the confines of the congregation and the general community when you do chaplaincy work. You have a commitment — that's the right word — when you undertake to minister to patients at a VA installation." Welcoming the New Year, the congregation of GIs and their dependents in Korea take K art in the traditional observance of Rosh ashona. For Jewish men and women with the U.S. Armed Services in every corner of the world, the Jewish chaplain recruited, endorsed and served by the National Jewish Welfare Board provides religious activities throughout the year. "And don't think." the Rabbi reminds me. "that you are ministering only to Jewish personnel." He is available for the Sunday preaching schedule when one of the regular chaplains is ill. indisposed or out of the city. He preaches, from time to time, and the service he conducts is reminiscent of the "general" service and sermon that has an appeal to all men of all faiths. Also, every Tuesday morning he conducts a devotional service on the hospital radio hook-up. He relishes an invitation to preach to VA patient.,. They are. he claims, most discriminating. He is so keen about his work in Augusta because it is. as he says, "a wonderful congregation plus The people in the congregation understand the great need which exists in local military and VA installations. Many of them, men and women, serve as volunteer workers in all of the local military and VA facilities. And because the members of the Rabbi's civil ; an congregation—the Walton Way Temple in Augusta—have this warm interest and understanding, they are never critical about the hours their Rabbi spends with soldiers and patients. The congregation invites the participation of the military at rehgiem and social functions Often, patients from the VA and workers and officials come to the services. Psychiatrists and other staff members belong to the Rabbi's congregation Holiday services and Passover seders are crowded with visitors from military and VA installations. It is this fine cooperative aptrit which makes it passible for the boss to work a few hours each week at the various installations in and near Augusta. "Variety is the space of life." he likes t say and. when he says it. I knew exactly what he is driving at. He is saying "Life is interesting down here


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    Jay, September 16, 1960 /ICIiKlllI CINISAL. Central OOte. U, Ik. Ba**M ,1 1,^ -Jenisfi Fkrktion Page 3-A Our lUf, IMS/a/M/Keg Data i Jly lit, iwg J-n TnWroottaool, IM,, 11 Kat aet'i Straat, ,. ye* itv".r. %  i iilw i V* Mr kaavlaos* that 7 We • %  taaa.trlal ICTHWI It • [ !•!••• Sine* tala paalttao af yaara iHtnnui with tha bayaatt ariaalplaa tppllad la (ill of th Armb cauntrlaa .hlch laad ta haaalac iruwtlai ,1th yen Uiroufhoat th* Arab countrlaa, and .llllag U fir. fan lb* aaaaaai tanalcata yor UniaMt with laraal, a fanad li aaltabla ta ••at*** •IraiM? baaing yaa V* aOaqaataiy aaaarstand IMH feat*. Sa, w* beg t aafc j-aa, If ra ara willing t* aalataia yoar daallng* 1th tha astaaaira aarkata af tfca Arab iwlrlii, W faralaa aa ttk tba> caaaarj % %  — %  i ta aktok arara tka tarartaatlaa af yaar agr n aaa*. .,ak laraal, aajy annareait by yaar gavnraaantaa aatbarttlaa aad caantaraiaaad! any Arab rapraaaatatir* ataalaa la yaor cauatry vltkla a parlad %  • .a*** Calabar 31, 10. If tka ftxad parlad alapaad attkaat raeairtag tha amid da aa.ll ba ragratfallr akllgad ta baa traoaactioaa lth year a vll) Uu if** Nwlrtik Taara faithfally saitaar Oanaral far tka liycatt af laraal Dr. ibdal Karl a B-aV idt lerican Jewish Congress has called on the State Department [initiate discussions directly with the League of Arab States led at halting the Arab boycott of U.S. firms dealing with jel. AjCongress president Dr. Joachim Prinz sent Secretary rter a phot03tcrtic copy of a letter from Arab League head•ters in Damascus, oyria, threatening to blacklist an Amercompany unless it ceased trading with Israel. The letter ve) is the ffirst documentary evidence that a Central Office | the Boycott of Israel has been established in the Secretariat fcoeral of the League of Arab States. .enrtedy Greets Jews of America MISS MIKIAM SCHtlNBtKG Hn. John F. Kennedy, candidate TPresident of the Democratic Bty, this week issued a Rosh phona greeting to the Jewish pmunity of America. this eve of the Jewish New Sen. Kennedy said, "may family and I join with you in Hyer for a world blessed with I ^bce and for a mankind blessed with understanding." FUND RAISER [With solid aockgrevnd in cammaign managamti* community or? formation ant! public relations, [available far pa'lien as director f Mar worthy Jewish institution in-1' I eluding Tempi* or Synagogue. Ex, {tensive experience in supervising I capital and operating fund drives r I in fields af religion welfare, and | higher education. Matare, marI ried, hard-working individual. Flo. { i resident, bat will travel. Write MR. A., Box 2973, Miami 1, Fla. Continued Son. Kennedy: "May tha fears af yesterday ba turned inta hopes for tomorrow, and may our children grow strong in a world of truth and dignity." "May this new year turn the hearts of man towards peace, and bring an end to fear of war." (For messages of greetings from Vice President Nixon and other state and national government leaders, see page 8-A.) B'nai B'rith Social Fete A social gathering for members of B'nai B'rith under the sponsorship of Miami Beach Lodge, scheduled for the month of September, has been cancelled as a result of the High Holy Days and Hurricane Donna. Herbert L. Heiken, president, and Irving Schatzman, program chairman, said the meeting will be held instead on Oct. 19 at the Ritz Plaza hotel. TT Supervisor Off On Scholarship Miss Miriam Scheinberg, youth i activities supervisor of the Miami Beach YMHA Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Cen-| ter, has been granted a leave of absence to receive her graduate: training in social work during the next two-year period. Miss Scheinberg is well known I in the community for her work with teen-age activities and chil-, dren's programs for the past five years of her association with the agency. A combined national and local; scholarship plan was granted Miss; Scheinberg to enable her to attend the New York School of Social Work i of Columbia University. The scholarship plan was made; possible through the assistance of the Council of Jewish Federation and Welfare Funds, National Assoc. of Jewish Center Workers, and the' Greater Miami Jewish Community Center. Upon completion of her graduate I studies leading to a Master's de-! : gree in social work in June, 1962,1 Miss Scheinberg will return to her I position with the Center, which isj a beneficiary agency of the United {Fund and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. New Law Aids Vets' Widows Some veterans' widows receiving dependency and indemnity compensation may be entitled to receive higher payments as the result of a recently enacted law, the Veterans Administration said this week. The amount of dependency and indemnity compensation is now based in part on the rank of the deceased veteran at the time of his separation from service, C. W. Boggs, officer in charge of the VA office at 984 W. Flagler st, said The new law, known as Public Law 86-492, allows the widow to receive payments based on a higher rank, provided the veteran satisfactorily held the higher rank for at least six months, and was holding it within 120 days of the date of his death or separation from the service. The VA lacks the necessary information to identify these eligible widows. Widows whose husband at one time held a rank higher than their rank at separation, under the above conditions, should contact the Miami VA office, Boggs advised. 600 Families Affiliate Beth Torah Congregation, which opened its synagogue and school last weekend, has enrolled close to 600 families as members of the congregation. Membership is still open, and some seats are still available for Yom Kippur services. An additional 100 families are expected to affiliate with Beth Torah Congregation before 1961. I %  "I1 !"'"" "" '' : ":"H PHOTO CREDITS Frontispiece of The Jewish Floridian New Year Edition is courtesy of the American-Israel Paper Mills, Had era. Israel, as are the illu strations on Pages 1-C. 1-D, IE, IF, and 1-G. Other photos are courtesy of the United Jewish Appaal and -Israel Bond Organization, as I well as of numerous national and international philanth ropic. religious and educaI tional institutions. .0.1 ti... %  %  i .. %  ..ua IstobmWed 1W Hoese Owned TERMITES? ROACHES? ANTS? Safe, Positive Control With Every Other Week Service For The Home TRULY NOLEN ~ "The Sign of Good Housekeeping" COSTS LESS THAN YOU THINK CALL F R 7-1411 •reefer Mlaiai's Laroese tJrtarssiearer personalized service af the blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money •.. un 6-1233 24-hour service except rosh heshoao and yom kippm Rabbi on Commission By Spatial f iaaert NEW YORK — Rabbi Norman Gerstenfeld, of Washington DChas been named official representative of the Synagogue Council of America to the Religious Coopcrative Council of the Civil War Centennial Commission, it was announcd this week by Rabbi Max D. Davidson, of Perth Amboy, N.J., Council president. Rabbi Davidson announced at the same time that the Council has affiliated with the Civil War Centennial Jewish Historical Commission which will highlight the contributions of the Jews to the Civil waf effort. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs for its THRIFT SHOP All your furniture), clothing, linens, dishes, drapes, etc. All procaadt go lowardi support of the Heme. You may contribute, take a tax daduction or wa will pay cash for same. Remember wa are HOT a profit-making organization ... We ara halping your community to kaap it* dignity. By helping others you ara halping yourialf! Manufacturer* and jobbers— romombor—wo can use all your sutcast* or misfit*. Pease call us for early pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOT 5737 N.W. 27th Avenue NE 3-2331 Closed Saturdays CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE _aL1 TODAY VAN n CHAMI.ES : EFL.K AUGHTOH [)||i!)jji;fl!jiiiaiiiioiw EUSATIONAL 665I)AY PURSUIT KILUR-SHIPATLAKTIS If rst ^auJoU* aaeeas/ £u*t6eT A/lUifoi TOOAy f^tdkusa: *i?u&mr *. ope*** fljWw Throo of fngfoners f ar m .nl TlWY-TIIQpalS-ALaSTAR SIM • UH QRMICHAfL Qa^s<|lt Best Wishes fer a Very Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year This thing whi< h was once the lovely Madeline rose from the tomb with the terrible madness of the L-Uherv" LJGAR Al LA*> i j NOW PLAYING i. IN DOWNIOW. .Ml K >IA. 1P.CM Olympic* t Beach • Gables '71 I tiac.tll ST ON IINCOIN BOD Mu 7111 PONCl OC LION



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    ^ Friday, September 23. 1960 vJewist flcricUairi Page 13-E Role of the Chazzan in Jewish Tradition Continued from Pag* HE door of death their undying faith in the Messiah and the life thereafter. Tiiese tfie Ch*an prMrved as wU-* songs that are sung with'children at Jewish tables, those tables which are the high altars of the Diaspora. "An altar will I build out of the broken pieces of my heart." These age-old words are replete with untranslatable alliterations. Their deeper meaning intoxicates the mind and the beautiful melodies, gladden the heart. Thus heart and Can Man Improve? Continued from Pago 4-E regeneration lies the very meaning of his life. Concerning all things which God created, the Bible slates, "And God said that it was good." But of the i n.it ion of man, it is not said it was good. Because, say the rabbis, man was not created perfect, but perfectible. His destiny is to perfect himself and his world. A person who is intent on self-improvement will discover that he has within him the potentialities of becoming "a little lower than the angels." Experience and observation reveal daily glimpses of possibility and resource stored away in the depths of consciousness of average men. They can be stirred to feats of physical strength and endurance: they have in them capacities for art, skill, poetry, idealism, devotion. You never can tell when these gleams of a higher life may shine out. These gleams and sparks are to be seen in the humblest places. Wake a man up, give him a hope, set a great purpose before him, let him feel the thrill of the heart beats of his fellow working, fighting, struggling, cooperating with him, and he becomes a new man. The Holy Days call the Jew to take stock of his gifts, to improve them, to use them and use them wisely for his own benefits and that of his fellow man. May we, through self improvement and worthy deeds, help make the New Year one of peace, prosperity and good will for all mankind. mind are entwined in symphonic harmony. The Jewish people has created a .special type of music which represents the true interpretation and expression of the rich spiritual life, its millenia-old precious heritage, but also of its ideas and emotions. The Chazzan, as the chosen interperter of Jewish song, thus voices the spirit and history of a people who, for thousands of years have been fighting relentlessly for its existence, scattered in thousands of small groups among the millions of diverse tongues, cultures and creeds. Jewish song has always been a genuine echo of Jewish religion, ethics, history of the inner life of the Jews and their external vicissitudes. The cantor when singing for the children of Israel will utter a devout silent prayer that harmony shall always reign and that the Messiah may come soon of whom the prophet says "and he will turn the hearts of the parents towards the children and the hearts of the children towards their parents." Thus the cantor, chosen interpreter of the great songs born of Jews, helps to keep them alive. And they are well worth to be kept alive: for deeply are they steeped in Jewish folklore and folksong, vibrant with Jewish emotion, sensitive to Jewish sorrows, joys, hopes and unshakable convictions. w Year of Maturity Continued from Pog* t-E paign next year to meet these needs vigorously and successfully must be capable of both compassion for this daily personal struggle of their anonymous brothers and of seeing that struggle as part of a great march forward by a whole people. They must be able to sorrow at the suffering that goes on and to exult in the joyous fulfillment that will come. They must, with one hand, take the hand of their weakened brother, and with the other, point out to him the strength of his future. Will the Jews of America, for the second straight year, demonstrate this kind of far-seeing maturity? I for one have no doubt of it. BEST WISHES for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to our many Friends and Customers Happy New Year to All E. B. LEATHERMAN DADE COUNTY COURTHOUSE ^1 Best Wishes and Greetings on the New Year BANK of MIAMI BEACH 9j7 Washington Avenue Mrmbtr Ftdtrci Dieoilt /orfti.C Corp. MARTIN D. von ZAMFT D LEE POWELL Chairman and President Vice-Chairman INTERCONTINENT TRAVEL SERVICE, INC. 4 Columbus Hotel J MR. LOUIS MARTIN W) GEORGE BERGER TRAVEL SERVICE, INC. Diplomat Hotel — Hollywood, Fla. GEORGE BERGER • PALM BEACH TRAVEL SERVICE, INC. 116 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, Fla. GEORGE PIHL • HOLIDAY GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM ALL OF US 1 1 Season's Best Wishes ... ^ GONDAS CORPORATION MACHINERY <|f 151 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 7-5531 To All A Most Happy New Year Stembler Adorns Frazier Insurance Agency, Inc. EASY OFF-STREET PARKING 2600 W. Flagler Street Phone HI 4-6575 "SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA OVER 40 YEARS" I 1 SULLIVAN COUNTY SUPERMARKET 634 Collins Avenue MIAMI BEACH PHONE JE 1-6145 FREE DELIVERY HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL TO ALL NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS HOSPITAL APOTHECAPY SERVING OUR NEW SOUTH MIAMI HOSPITAL AND THE SOUTH MIAMI AREA WALLY RINZ Pharmacist 24-HOUR EMERGENCY CALL MO 1-8581 7400 S.W. 62nd Ave.



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    ^Jewish Floridian Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960 Section C .mmr.mmmmmmmmmmmmm %  I t -f I HMBM MMM MM /vos/i / j^rofound judgment and a <^/\ew < [jcai tnmn 9 "jab" from Aothtchild Manuscript. 1475. BeiaieX Miutum, Jerusalem.



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    ??C8 BBC < 5ES7 A/ISB6 TC ML QH aWENCS WATSONS .iWMWIICZi SPKTORai SONS LunixACriMS 575 UK 22nd A. R M2ftS : : TOUt FtlELT IWIK CHEI STORES F • • ITtlES ij jfcus 21 Isiuaii *ecc3ers on 2 7*: i of the Jeenah learned pr> :r.cnce 3 ? ji ni i a the laxtsd 3kaa durng SaaaieBMi aakn us remise thct jew-ja juicainq i i un i i Ycr 57*3. Praajrani nmrrttnnrty i> cased apoa schoiaaahnp rch-r Tf;il %  pirriiiimri raaCSeZS C BUCV *MT r— I "h(3n 3d fh* lumCff It rfae OmOBl O&d TSe •rtiM IIIIIIU ^ii tii,—. Tadcv oar oaajiect ta isejaaeaf activity m A New F for die New Year *: :u *AN V TUSTCMESS *NC =*!ENCS VICST -At*^ -CUCA'I CM* fell i 14* • | kai iiir reeDon !*eri .mnceaole that m the field at taeaa. aaanr Baoeaat Jewna jcnatanenn n \ncnu radar dasre ear aa> fog rlames. set *rntre ire M icaat e uib c rt eita tae paWaaW I v ranos raaaed into flaaae. ft teat aacaaat 'urai aaaaeaa> j u a wj more eawly dat faaaaaL oaaaattaaa af oar a* a* tt Jevaaa eai t a re JI **aer?ex That 1a at aav. wanuut dat naeat *ae 4u*y READY POTATOES B01 X.W Bra ATORJE A 'iaoc** %  ***< 'ear *o A,l AL KtOHOWTTZ MOOBtN PRECAST1NG COMPANY 2159 W. 3rv w *U1 be at dat rature ay aay af w ia i i *i : aa aavaaaaK %  nij eill ae maintainrn : auaaaa M dat ruture anv %  < dat caaaaa; caroani flaaat af .fciwaiB culture iwras low m tae Jewua -muaaoity a daraaes* aaataaa e aattaaaai at a or haver leveL 3fJ% MaVaaW OH *C**3*J08n£ INSLRANCE ae iewtak araaiars. av aau> yet cuiupetant at 1 -n -imiru %  aMnred s numty if dat aiau aai eaaiit? vaaaa> ud ikrt. ae af rtow x ha aat yet aeim •*hJe -o auaat aaMoaat dat raai ifj aaaaaat I yean tatriaewn aaaaaaat saaaaai at 4 awtianre at Jadaut aBaaas at a *ty -a a aow TS aaam a> tae "g tr. are>iea irtmn Ji^tjat af aat real cata af %  gataai aat Xa eSart af iBHiaaaama af tea Jems, aat at tae -Mrvtven af TC ALL MOST SAP?T JUO SEW YIAfl TO ALL SEASOWS OTEETWGS M01 W-aT >4ir* ID ALL TEAS TO ALL HAPPY A avr NEW rcr icau MEHI BOTTLING CO P*L PvrOYTTT I MTU Pw in



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    Friday. September 23. 1960 *Jeni$ti noridfiftry Page 15-E Hassidism and the Yearning for Continued from Page 12 E ing froai.Ruaila and Ejistejo Europe in larger number;. Among them Rabbi Mendel of Vitebsk, leading disciple of Rabbi Ber of Meseritz, the Baal Shem's successor, occupies a unique place. Jointly with Abraham Kalisker and Rabbi Israel Polotzker he transplanted the Movement to Eretz Yisraei. coming in 1777 at the head of a contingent of 300 Hassidim who settled in Safed and Tiberias to be followed by many others from Eastern Europe. Sought Spiritual Wealth At that time immigration on such a scale was a fantastic venture, but equipped with unbounded faith and love they saw no obstacles in their way. It would be incorrect to assume that they came to settle for the purpose of leading a productive economic life or of founding agricultural settlements. It was the spiritual wealth which the Holy Land alcr.e could afford that prompted them to come. They hoped that by renewing the bonds with the soJ] of their ancestral homeland and by devoting thtir days to the study of the Torah and to.Divine worship they would be able to delve deeper into the secrets of their faith, and by living a pious life they would achieve eternal bliss and promote the & %  :': me of salvation and redemption, speeding up the return of their people to the Holy Land in fulfillment of Biblical prophecy. Their journey which took several months was full of danger and hardships. Travelling by sailing boat they depended entirely on favorable winds which exposed them to terrible sickness. In those days sea-faring was the calling either of desperadoes or of criminals. The route via Constantinople was infested by pirate?. They had to wait for several months before a protected vessel sailed from Constantinople to Jaffa or Acre, and once they arrived there they had to wait for safe conduct to Safed or Tiberias. A livelihood for their families was to them a matter of minor consideration. They subsisted largely on the distribution of "Halukkah," charitable donation; collected on their behalf in the various communities of the Diaspora. The administration of thet-e funds often led to serious friction among the adherents of the various Hassidic groups. Finally reconciliation was brought about by Rabbi Nachman of Braczlav, grandson of the Besht, who went to Eretz Yisrael in 1798, where he was received with great honor and brought many under the spell of his unique personality. While in the 19th century Hassidim from Eastern Europe came to Eretz Yisrael not in groups, the arrival of many individual settlers succeeded in strengthening the Hassidic nests and in establishing well organized communities which, in their turn, provided the background for agricultural settlement. A careful study of Jewish settlement prior to Second Aliyah would reveal the great role played by the Hassidim, as well as by the disciples of the Gaon of Vilna, known as "Perushim." While the development of political Zionism at the end of the century was either severely opposed by the leaders of Hassidism or watched passively, it was only in the '20s of the present century, when Palestine became a territory administered under Britist mandate, that a widespread movement arose among Hassidim in Galicia and Poland to settle as farmers on the land. This was due not only to the economic factor at work in Poland; there was some ideological transformation among those Hassidim who came to participate in the work of restoration of the Jewish people in their homeland. Ideological Transformation In 1925 over 100 Hassidic families settled on a stretch of land on the banks of the Kishon River and began preparing the soil for cultivation. Their amazing devotion to the task aroused general admiration, and it was only by dint of their perseverance that Kfar Hassidim weathered the storms and emerged with some considerable success. Another venturesome initiative took shape at about the same time when a group of energetic and determined Hassidim from Poland acquired a stretch of sand dunes near Tel Aviv, on which the present flourishing Bnei Brak stands. During the 12 years of Israel's independence Hassidim may be credited with singular achievements, both in the field of agriculture and in the restoration of the wastes. Mention might be made of two Hassidic ventures, namely Kfar Habbad at Shafrir and Kiryat Zanz near Natanya. With its outstanding characteristic of optimism, enthusiasm, fervency, and love of Israel, Hassidism is destined to be a great contributory factor in the upbuilding of the Jewish homeland which plays a central role in Hassidic philosophy. OeasoM s {-jreetinejs • M. B. CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Specialist in New Construction "It Is Our Pleasure to Give You Free Estimates" Quality Materials and Workmanship 1241 N.E. 210th Terrace Wl 54861 ^Tjest (Jjisties < j o r


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    South mki 'JV'Sw rfirhll I J< v*. warn i ixi^i :HJE MllETT I t -am 11 x -?5B ^•TOBfc S2 M1IL SCMIFF auM J"



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    Page 2-E vJewlst fhrktSam Friday, September 23. 10J \ jm extends sincere wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR WaitlKfixJv MIAMI Bill WRIGLEY AND THE WRIGLEY ENGRAVING CO. EXTEND HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY 122 N.I. 6th St. Miami Dial FR 4-7330 MHIbM CMCTINCS 10 Ml I %\l FRANK D. DILLARD ana* FAMILY StASON'S GKfirmCS TO AU OUt FffffNM BISCAYNK KLKCTRIC CO. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 60* N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami Phm PR 4-2)51 WIT WUMS rot A RAPP i onr rum Cusf ombilt Furniture Mfg. Co. Showrooms and Factory! 100 N.E. 40th PO O R I Phone PL 8-0171 A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL I ALLIED LAWN SPRINKLER SYSTIMS Phono JE 8-7071 DM N.W. HSlh Street MU 84681 A Happy Now Year to All Our Friends ... MIAMI COLONIAL HOTEL 146 BISCAYNE BLVD. I Test pilot of the Fouga Magister, Hugo Menor, chanic before flight. checks controls of the jet trainer with a meIsrael's Fledgling Jet Assembly Industry By PHILIP GILLON THE delivery to the Israel Air Force of the first Fouga jet assembled in Israel marks a great stride forward by the Israel Aircraft Industries (formerly called Bedek), one of the country's most bizarre but most successful enterprises. In six years Bedek has become one of the largest employers of labor in the country; in 1954 the firm opened with 70 employees, two years ago there were 1,074, today there are 2.139. and the expansion is proceeding at a formidable tempo. On superficial consideration the repair, sale, assembly, manufacture and design of aircraft hardly seems to be a suitable venture for a small country with limited raw materials or industrial experience. On further analysis, however, it emerges that such an enterprise is ideal for Israel. The main item that Israel Aircraft Industries is selling is labor. The company's own allocation is that 75 per cent of its output is work and only 25 per cent material; of this latter amount, 10 per cent is provided by local suppliers and the proportion is expected to increase as aluminum sheets are turned out in the near future by Israel's own rolling mills. If the country's labor cost can be kept lower than those of competing firms in Europe and America after allowing for the cost of transport to Israel, Israel is in a position to develop a great industry based on technical skills. Only Pirm The firm is the only one of its kind between Europe and Japan; Israel's strategic position enables IAI to service planes from all parts of Europe, Africa and Asia. Apart from its staple customers — the Air Force, El Al, Arkia — the firm services all foreign airlines touching at Lydda and has customers even in highly developed European countries. It has just delivered a second Dakota, completely overhauled, to Cambodia. In the last three years IAI earned $1.5 million from repairs and overhauls for foreign firms alone; it hopes to increase the figure this year. The company copes with 14 different types of piston planes and 12 types| of jet, a staggering technical achievement. At present the prices charged to customers! are somewhat lower than in Europe and very much] lower than America. Al Schwimmer, thel managing director, points out that this has beenl managed without subsidies, overt or covert. Thai wage scales are determined by the Government! and the Histadrut. Bedek began wun some DO toreign experts. Thel firm has capitalized on another of Israel's most ira-1 port ant invisible assets, the presence here of nura-l bers of trained energetic and dedicated persons I from many lands. Immigration, often considered! a strain, is of course in reality a major source of I strength. The engineers and others who launched! the firm towards its present soaring success camel from the air forces and aircraft industries of the U.S., South Africa, England, India, Czechoslovakia and other Central and Eastern European countries. This group came to Bedek via the Hagam and the Israel Air Force; they still form the hard| core of management. H1 9 h Quality Today there are no "foreign experts" on the payrolls and streams of able, intelligent and trained personnel are flowing from the Technion, the vocational schools, Ministry of Labor courses, the Air Forte and the firm's training courses. The ultimate test of whether such a firm will keep its customers is not price but quality. The standard attained has been very high and well up to international level; had this not been the case, of course, Bedek would not have been licensed by the American Government and other bodies with equally rigid demands. To comply with American regulations for manufacturers of planes, the former inspection department has just been converted into a quality control division. The most modera equipment has been obtained and the system of checking is as near to being foolproof as possible. The new division for assembling Fouga jet CenHnued en Page 14-1 I it hit, n Stmdiom Distinguished Private School D ancin g — Drama Radio — Speech 823 W. 47th STREET MIAMI BEACH A Happy New Year to All M. Glenn Tuttle e %  OSOMSS mSWANCI SPECIALIST 814 Alnsley Bldg JOHN STRATMAN Prime Meat* 878 NX 125th Street PLosa 44472 HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL GREETINGS N.A.C. -HanufjM'turing WOOD CUSTOM PURNmjRE CORNER CABINETS — DESKS MADE TO ORDER 842 N.W. 7th STREET FR 1-3924 Season's Greetings to Our Many Friends and Patrons BALDWIN Mortgage Co. BALDWIN Inaurcmca Agency. Inc. 840 Biscayne Blvd~ Miami A Happy New Yew to All S. Z. BINNITT, MJU. 307 Alnsley Blda. Phone FR 1-1888



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    Page 12-G +Jeis*ncrk*an Friday. September 23. 1960 COAST TO COAST ANTHONY'S BARBER SHOP I MM COUMS AVISWf MMM (remedy SPORTSMAN) TONY SASSO and FAMILY [ Whh AlHheir Jewish Fritn4s A Very Happy Ntw Year God Bless You AH TO ALL GREETINGS RICHARD DECORATORS YW9 I* UPHOLSTERING P*"" DRAPERIES CARPETING I 5865 N.E. 2nd Avenue Phone PL 7-6631 TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES ROBERT GR0SSBER6ER Hf UNIVERSITY HOME CONSTRUCTION COMPANY si 5025 S.W. 92nd Avenue Phono MO 5-1663 ^ GREETINGS... LA NUIS CUHICAL IAIORATORIES •at %  Mam VMm nwmnoTON j To-All--.-. Season's Best Wishes w Morehouse Supply Company •— PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES 1480 N.W. 20th St., Miami 42, Ha, Phone NE 4-3517 GREETINGS... MADER & COMPANY P. & O. DOCKS MIAMI GREETINGS |9 PQHL HERNDON MARINE ENGINES, INC. Interceptor Motors — Gasoline — Sales A Service 320 S.W. 3rd Street TV .W. SOUTH RIVtt DRIVE Phone FR 4-1577 PNONi HI 4-1577 GREETINGS THE LEVIN FAMILY Hit-hie Plumbing Supply, Ine. NEW AND USED PLUMBING SUPPLIES Silt N.W. 27th AT.. Telephone NE 4-4537 Miami. Fkx. Df A HURRY CALL KIMBALL MURRAY THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS [ 5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue Phone PL 8-5521 | 6220 N.W. 2nd Avenue L TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR I OM.IH CLINIC PHARMACY 1633 N.W. 35th Street Conger Building %  K PNONC NE 5-6723 VAL DAYTON. Owner Herzl, Sokolow and the Ahneuland' Continued from Paa of "The New Society" — he planned for its pubtication in several other languages so that the book should reach readers in various countries at one and the same time. Here! began writing the novel on the 8th of October. 1899. and finished it on the 30th of April, 1902. During one of the Congresses, apparently the one in 1901. Herzl talked to Sokolow about the book and Sokolow liked the idea of translating it into Hebrew. In a letter to Sokolow, dated January 22. 1902. Herzl wrote in reply to a question by thelatter, that he would return to the question of the translation as soon as the time was ripe. Indeed, on Apr. 29. a week before Herzl finished his novel, we find him writing to Sokolow: "If my memory does not mislead me. you received instructions in Basle to take charge of the matter, (the agreement between Herzl and the Executive Committee ol Russian Zionists regarding the circulation of the novel in Russia through their good offices) and it is by all means in accordance with my artistic interest that the translation into Hebrew be entrusted to the care of a master such as you are said to be. My ignorance of the language prevents me from saying so on my own judgment." In the same letter he writes: "I hope that this publication of mine through the discussion to which it may give rise, will prove to be a significant piece of promotion for our cause." In another letter Herzl once again expressed his belief in Sokolow as a distinguished Hebrew writer. And here, in a surprising way, Herzl stated his view about the future of the Hebrew language: "I do appreciate deeply the honor you pay me by doing the Hebrew translation, and I hope you also understand that it is precisely the Hebrew translation, which should, indeed, have some meaning for the future, that I am so happy to see in your hands, and in your hands only." Underteek PobMcetien of Work Apart from the translation. Sokolow was also charged with the publication of the book in Russia in Yiddish and Russian. Herzl intended to place ziomsTn-cowons VwHaRae Aseeioe. Provisioned communication issued by Dr. Theodor Herzl regarding the convening of the First World Zionist Congress. MT. TNFOMMt HEtZl %  • • far n% ewa sake part of the proceeds of its sale there at the disposal of the Zionist Organizalicn in Russia. He gave Sokolow detailed instructions in regard to the publication and appeared to be greatly upset when things went otherwise as he .had anticipated them: "I am sure you will appreciate my deep concern about the book into which 1 put so much of my life's work." Indeed, in Sokolow's letters to Herzl, one is able to read of the devotion with which he applied himself to the work. Sokolow writes inter alia that he had undertaken the translation "only because it is your work, because it can be of use to Zionism, and because it will give the cause a certain eclat." In bis article on Herzl, reproduced in his book "Personalities," Sokolow writes: "My attitude to Herzl was not that of a writer or a relationship between a writer and a publisher or a translator and an author. Not one word passed between us regarding translation fees or publisher's profits The work was done for its own sake, with not a shadow of monetary considerations intervening." The Hebrew Trhe The novel began appearing in serial form in Sept. 1902 in Hebrew and Yiddish, even before the publication of the original German edition (Oct. 1902). The Hebrew title givea by Sokolow to "Altneuland" is of interest. He found it difficult to translate the long name, and finally saw the solution in "Tel Aviv." a name of historical and symbolic meaning. "Tel" signifies a ruin, and "Aviv." spring, that is a ruin living to see another spring. "You will perhaps be interested to know that your title presented the greatest difficulties. "A tripartite construction, such as is so easily arrived at in German, is not possible in Hebrew, and three long words would be awkward and displeasing, all the more so, because the Hebrew language is more concise and profound than the German in other respects. But I was able to find a title which quite delights me since it is just as short (three syllables) as the German aod has more meaning, at least more historic-symbolic meaning. The Hebrew title reads "Tel Aviv." This is a Biblical Palestinian place name and is, therefore, more classic than a newly formed word, and yet expresses the same connection between the new and the old." BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON JACK'S 54th ST. GRILL -MILE LONG HOT DOGS— N.W. 54th Si & 13th Ave. Miami. Fla. HAPPY NEW YEAR TONY'S FACTORY RKFIMSIIIM. Furniture R •finishing Kitchen Cabinets Refinished C A R P E 1 MAR1 "Your Satisfaction A Happy New Year to All Our Friends and Patrons KATZ'S KOSHER MEAT I POULTRY MARKET Tintsi QmrnlHy — Free Oafhrary lite S.W. Its STREET PkM F8 1-tts* Our Pleasure" 634 S.W. 22nd Avenue HI 4-4553 h_ s. — NAPPr M0URAT km STIVIA ami HUB HABlt sf MIRACLE CHILDREN'S CENTRE In 0m New Location 212 Miracle Mile %  ays' ead Skis' Teas Tmr~mk She 14970 S.W. tth Sweet Phone FR 3-0574 BAKER PHARMACY PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS TV S-VH3 40 PAIN AVIWC MAUAM, FUMUM



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    Friday. September 23. 1960 *kwitfFkrHr-tr Page 7-C Seen from the Pisgah of Forty Years By JACOB J. WEINSTEIN %  T is the special genius of the Jewish New Year that H induces even the average citizen to become philosophical and intro spective, not only abouThii5?m nur-touurnTrcauses, Tito ISrTteTR annivers>aiy of Hi3tadrut offers a very special incentive fcr both an inner and an outer look. Forty is a favorite number in our tradition. Forty is the number ol days and nights of the Flood; forty the days oi Elijah in the desert before the inward revelation of th "still, small voice;" and forty were the years in which the mixed multitude that came cut of Egypt were drained of (he hunger for the fleshpots and made ready for the responsibilities of fieidom anj sell-government. So, too, have the four decades in which Histadrut ha; grown from a small band of visionaries to the most effective instrument of social democracy in the. Middle East been years of cleansing and vitaJ growth. In these years the multi-faceted Histadrut has sweated out of its pores unassimilable material, whether it be the incandescent philosophical anarchism of an A. D. Gordon or the too tightly structured equalitarianism of a Borochov. It was the period in which the members of Histadrut learned that reality bends all ideology to its necessities. In the course of learning this sometimes bitter truth, the pioneers gave up some of their inherited attitudes toward bourgeois fetiches as administrative order, planned production, individual incentive and military defense. It was a period in which some of the frozen gestures inherited from the "Kulturkampf" of the Pale of Settlement had to thaw out and give way to a toleration for those who needed the assurnnces of eternity to keep them loyal to the cause of improving life on earth. And in the last decade, ire men and women of Hisadrut have faced a new challenge: the giddy provocation of a suc| cess ant the corruptive temptation of power. Today's Miracle Mose. found it necessary to let the generation jborn in Tgyptian slavery die out before he could create a nation of free men from its children. We witness the miracle — almost as incredible as that of the splitting of the Red Sea — of a people always in the mrrginal position of an idealistic minority [moving ir.fo the central position of power and yet holding fsal to the core of Us idealism. The concessions which Histadrut now makes to private enterprise on the one hand and to the more all-embracing collectivism on the other are concessions made out of strength and certainty; the strength and the certainty of a labor movement which has assumed a task unprecedented for a labor movement: the national rehabilitation of a people and the revival of a long neglected land. Nowhere in the tortured history of western man's attempt to achieve a workable balance between the one and the many, freedom and order, personal liberty and social security, have we seen so many creative syntheses as are now in practical effect in Israel. We had thought that all these social mutations had been played out oh the stage of history, with the mir and the guild, the innumerable idealistic sodalities, the Christian Socialist movement, the Scandinavian Cooperatives, the j Rochdale system, and the various improvisations of the Social Welfare State. But a study of Israeli cooperatives, in the framework of a Social Democratic state and a labor movement that has pre[dominant political power and a sizeable economic (investment in the basic industry of the land, reIveals new, emergent, creative solutions to many problems which have often been considered inTribute to Jennie Grossinger. noted hotelwoman, attended during outgoing Hebrew Year 5720 by some 1,000 persons in New York launched a drive to benefit the new Kupat Holim medical center in Tel Aviv. Left to right are Joey Adams, president of the American Guild of Variety Artists; Isaiah Avrech, representative of Histadrut in America; and George Jesse 1, toastmaster. soluble. Students of collective bargaining have already noticed the constructive gains inherent in a situation where the negotiators on both sides of the table have had actual experience both in the field of management and of labor, since it is quite common for a member of Histadrut to represent labor at one time and then later be transferred to a managerial position in one of the Histadrut enterprises. Life Begins Still, life only begins at forty. Histadrut faces its fifth decade fully conscious that the military defense of Israel is still a prior obligation and the expansion of its economy equally urgent. It is as strongly committed as ever to make the Negev blossom as a rose and to ring the. border areas with strong fortresses of working settlements. While the idealism of the early decades has taken on some of the ineluctable sobriety of age, there still remain great reservoirs of noble enthusiasm in the youth of Histadrut. Where once they considered the military hero as their paragon of virtue, they have now transferred a large part of their adoration to the soil chemist, the researcher in solar energy and the desalination of water. In a land where Moses was in full vigor at 120. forty is the age of youth and the time when one mitzvah compounds another. And so Histadrut has recently assumed another heroic role. It may prove to be the most seminal of all its roles. It has undertaken to share its know-how with the young, nascent nations of Asia and Africa. The success of the Afro-Asian Seminar, under the brilliant direction of Reuven Barkatt, encouraged Histadrut to suggest to the AFL-CIO a partnership in the sponCentinwed en Page I4-C GREETINGS ... {All Typo Cabinets 1 Fixtures CHAS. F. BETTIS Custom Made Furniture, Stere Fixtuiet. Tables. Bart J. Cocktail Lounge* 3819 N. Miami Avo. PL 4-5106 A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL Le Bon Cleaners & Laundry Irving Kornicks 855 S.W. 8th STREET HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL MARY ENGELHARD ASSOCIATES PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER — NOTARY PUBLIC Secretarial Muneoarcrphinq] Bookkeeping Mail Printing Desk Space Phone Answering All Work Confidential 8080 N.E. Second Avenue Tel. Plaza 7 1685 Miami 38, Florida To All... Season's Best Wishes Tropical Paper & Wax Company Was Paper, Preeser Paper. Delicatessen Faper, Tropical" 1111 East 24th Street Hialeeh, Florida ~ Mr. and Mrs. Leo Mindlin and son JeremyWish Their Relatives and Friends •1310 no-nn nc: To All .. Greetings Russell House Movers, Inc. HOUSE MOVING and RAISINS FlerieVs Most Reliable Heese Movers fsfablisfced 1918 loth From* and Masonry Construction 7250 N.W. 1st Avenue, Miami 38, Florida 24 Emerson Street, St. Petersburg, Florida TO ALL ... GREETINGS ROY ALTON HOTEL 1 131 S.E. 1st STREET MIAMI "OPf* THt TEAR AIOUMD" To All ... A Most Happy New Year W. VALENTINE COMPANY WHOLESALE ONLY Phone FR 3-4601 GreetfOfs To Our Mam/ Patrons aad friends NOW IN OUR NEW HOME Fruehauf Trailer Co. 17301 N.W. 2nd Averts* Phone NA 1-3633 \ HOUDAt GKUJINGS Mil AMMIIt \l I.SKItV We Grow Our Own PLANTS—TREES—SHRUBS New York City — Westchester — New Jersey Washington. DC. — York. Pa. Lake Success, Long Island, N.Y. rm TO OUR MANY FRIENDS, A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Davis Boiler o% Iron Works, lao. i BOILERMAKERS AND CERTIFIED WELDERS Ph. PR 440)0 mO-81 N. Miami Ave. Ro c e d a noad Boi l o n for Solo aad Rtpairi Day or Right Anywhere. Smokestacks and Tanks. BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR > A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR ^BJP ; Florida IJpliolstery Supply Co. *! 814 N.E. First Arenas Phones: FR 9 3431 2 iinr i Nets HAVEN MANOR SANITARIUM ledewed oml focerpsra*erf tesMeafiof and Transient leeseneefe tsfet 24-Meor neniof Care for CeevelttceaH Invalid* Aged Registered Norses 0. I. TMRP, Sleetter IRIS W. 6RIZZAR0, sweeter 2*29 N.W. 17th AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR ACME FURNITURE MANUFACTURING CO. %  CASE GOODS — FURNITURE — WOOD I 2750 N.W. 22nd Street Phono NE 4-3902



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    Friday. September 23, 1860 +Je*is*fk>rldUar) Page 11-D San Faanciso. The Rabbhas always been sentimental about Shea who guided the destiny of Jewish chaplains. Armed Services and civilian volunteers during the early days of World War II in California and the Northwest. Working with JWB pernel has always been a source of pleasure and satisfaction to him. ilc numbers many of the JWB 'workers," as he calls them, among h's intimate friends. He haunts JWB's national office in New York on his rare trips to the big city. He maintains close telephone contact with the regional Armed Services office in Atlanta, presided over by his "cousin, Leon Goldberg," and he goes toAtlanta whenever he can f'nd the slightest excuse. A favorite "gripe" of his has to do with the JWB. "It doesn't receive the support it deserves from the American Jewish community," he maintains. "There is no more important organization. No Jewish institution has served American Jewry with greater dedication." Now, he begins to warm up to the theme—"How come we raise millions for charity and millions for defense agencies—and cannot make adequate provision lor the one American Jewish organization which cuts across religious l'nes, across all partisan lines, which serves practically every Jewish family in the United States?" "Patrick," he pounds the table to get my attention—"Isn't JWB a perfect combination of true philanthropic and socalled defense work? Isn't it the greatest?" Well, I'm not going to report the speech in detail. This gives you a little idea of his attitude toward the organization to which he has a singular attachment—Take it from me. Don't get the guy started on JWB and the part-time chaplains. S. Africa Jews in Commerce and Industry Continued from Pago 2-D vool farming, ostrich farming, citrus growing and |the wine industry. Garmont Industry The clothing industry in South Africa was essentially pioneered by Jews. As far back as 1913, ilomon Wunsch had started to manufacture trouskrs locally, while about 1917 Morris Kalmek startId the first factory for men's suits on the Wityatersrand. Other Jews followed in developing the industry the Kramers and Rosens in the Transvaal, Berish, Roy, Back and Shub in the Cape. The industry tiey started has today grown to massive proportions, and supplies most of South Africa's men's vear. German Jewish immigrants who came to outh Africa in the early Hitler years developed \he ladies' wear manufacturing industry to similar proportions — Weil and Ascheim, the Spiegels and Duth African-born Jews like the Nathans and faffs. The late I. W. Schlcsinger, who came to South Africa from the United States in the early years of this century as an insurance salesman, and presently started his own insurance company here, the Africa Life Assurance, played a pivotal role in developing the entertainment industry, which in those years was still comparatively primitive. Schlesinger built up a nationwide chain of cinemas, bought most of the existing theaters, imported actors from abroad to tour his theaters with London and Broadway successes. He also started the local film production industry and in the 1920s brought radio to South Africa. His African Broadcasting Company for many years ran South Africa's radio network, until it was taken over by the state and became the South African Broadcasting Corporation. His widely ramified companies have been carried on, since his death, by .his son, John Schlesinger, who inherited his father's talent for big business. Jews in Foro In retail commerce. Jews have played a role out of all proportion to their numbers. They were pioneers in the department store field, the first chain of department stores being established in the 1920s by the late Henry Herber. Following his enterprise came the chains of department stores which in South Africa are called "bazaars" — the O.K. Bazaars, C.T.C. Bazaars, and Woolworth's (no relation to the American firm). These firms played a vital role in cutting prices in the cheaper retail field, and thus materially helped low-salaried workers. The O.K. Bazaars (which today incorporates the C.T.C. Bazaars) currently has sixty branches all over the Union and Rhodesia, and employs a staff of ten thousand people. Contrary to popular legend, Jews have not played a major part in the control of the gold industry, which is still largely vested in British hands. In the 1930s, however, two Jews, A. S. Hersov and S. G. Menel, formed an investment company which began playing an important part in mining developments further afield than the Central Rand gold mines. In the development of Continued on Pago 15 D Latest in swim-wear from Israel sailed into New York during outgoing Hebrew Year 5720 aboard the SS Jerusalem of Zim Lines. Israeli model Tamar Benamy (left) shows a bikini creation called "Gigi." Dorothy Doliver displays the "Canasta" model. A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL MY FRIENDS ANTONIA MERRITT GREETINGS B. W. THACKER AGENCY TYPEWRITERS Adding Machines Check Writers BOLD — RENTED REPAIRED 339 U.S. 2ml AVENUE To AIM a Most Happy New Year STANLEY DRUGS 8690 N.W. 22nd Avt. Miami Ph. PI 88555 Best Wishes tor the New Year Holidays UNGSTON and CO. Inc. INSURANCE 351 S.E. 2ml Street Miami Phone Ft 3-7411 Holiday Greetings To Our Many Friend's Construction Products Corp. BUILDING MATERIALS 6865 N.W. 36th Avenue Phone OX 1-9180 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO AIL Nu-Art SIGNS of quality 1690 ALTON ROAD Near Lincoln Road Phone JE 4-4382 ***^^-v* Season's Greetings to All from The Blackstone & The Royal Blackstone HOTELS Residential Halls for Senior Citizens in Their Golden Years MODERATE RATES • YEAR ROUND 800 Washington Avenue Miami Beach MICHAEL SOSSIN. LJLD.. President C. R. MEYERS. Asst. Director SEASON'S GREETINGS THE BARE FOOT MAILMAN ___ GIFTS • CHANUKA CARDS • GOURMET We Pock • Wrmp • Mail or Ship Anything to Anywhere 234 VALENCIA "At the Post Of tie*" Phone HI 4-1773 • rurnrt s Hastings Trim Shop Nmiturt Upholstering Track Seat Covers and Tops 1250 M.W. 7th AVINUf PHOMI FR 44107 HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM "STEWARTS TOYIAN9" 1AS4 MERIDIAN AVINOf MIAMI BEACH Jf 1-1201 HOLIDAY GREETINGS HI SV KKK EXTERMINATORS 13224 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY PL 8-8953. PL 7-8503 NORTH MIAMI TO ALL GREETINGS Coral Gift Shop UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT JAMES W. THOMAS 2231 S.W. 67th AVENUE PHONE MO 1 NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO All WKSTBROOK MOTORS WRECKER SERVICE EXPERT ROOT AND FENDER REPAIRING PAINTtWG AND GIASS WOM MECHANICAL WORK 1751 PAIM AVENUE, HI Alt AH, FIA. Phone TV S-14U TO ALL GREETINGS "Sine*. 1922" JO I 4,1 mm IS REPAIR SHOP GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING "OUR WORK IS AS GOOD AS THE BEST" 9t2t M. W. Second ATSDUS Mud, PWflde Phone PI 7 1155



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    Page 12-H +Jew is IfhcriJktn Friday. September 23. i960 i RABBI and MRS. SOLOMON SCHIFF i AND FAMILY Extend Best Wishes to the Officers and Members of Congregation Beth El and to the entire Jewish Community for a Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. NATHAN H. ZWITMAN and Family Extend Best Wishes to the Officers and Members of Tifereth Israel Congregation For A Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. LEON KRON1SH and Family Wish for the Members and Officers of Temple Beth Sholom. Jewry at large, and all humanity a year of fulfillment and peace. RABBI and MRS. SAMUEL S. LERER Wish for all Jewry and particularly the members and officers of Temple Beth Sholem, Hollywood. RABBI and MRS. SHELDON EDWARDS Extend Best Wishes to the Members and Officers of TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM Its Sisterhood, Men's Club and the Greater Miami Jewish Community for a Happy New Year Converting Energy into Motive Power RABBI and MRS. MORTON MALAVSKY Extend to all Jewry and particularly the members of the Israelite Center and its affiliated organizations — A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR NEW YEAR RABBI and MRS. | MAURICE KLEIN I and Family I With for the Members of the SOUTHWtST 11WISH CfNTM |* tmi far All Jewry A Yt At Of MAC* AND JOY RABBI and MRS. BERNARD P. SHOTER greet the members or FIAGIER GRANADA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER %  •* if* affiliate organizations on Ik* occasion of the New Year RABBI and MRS. CHAIM KARUNSKY Extend to the Officers and Members of Congregation Etz Chaim Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR RABBI and MRS. JONAH CAPLAN and Family ixtemd heartfelt MEW YEAR GREETINGS to Temple Adath Yeshurun and the entire community RABBI and MRS. MAX ZUCKER Extend heartfelt wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to the officers of Dade Heights Jewish Community Center its members, and affiliate organizations RABBI and MRS. SAMUEL JAFFE AND FAMILY Extend Greetings to Members and Friends of TEMPLE BETH EL Hollywood, Fla.. And to All Jewry for A Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. SHERWIN STAUBER Extends Best Wishes to Officers and Members of YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI And to All Jewry for A Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. HERBERT BAUMGARD txteni Heartfelt NEW riAt ctcrriNcs fo tho Members of Temple Beth Am SOUTH MIAMI to the Crtutor MUwml Jewish Comm.mty By RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ President, Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn. THE Hight Hoy Day period is a time for self-analysis. Traditionally it is a time when each Jew takes a "Heshbon Hanefesh" — a self evaluation to determine whether his life is proceeding upon the proper path intended by his Creator. The profoundly inspiring prayers of these Holy Days are liturgical classics which bestir our thoughts — "What are we? What is our life? What is our salvation?" As we take spiritual stock of our own individual life we must also evaluate our own community. The efficacy of prayer and the very meaning of the High Holy Days largly depends upon our ability to find correct answers to these questions. A similar questiton, "What is a Jew?" which was recently asked in Israel, had thrust the new state into confusion and contributed to the fall of a government. The question has not yet been resolved. Whenever it is raised, it is still certain to bring about a violent reaction from various segments of the population in Israel. Raising the question "What is the Jewish community?" will probably bring on equally violent reaction on the part of those segments of Jews which make up a Jewish community. However, by searching a solution to the question, we may better understand our particular role vis-a-vis the community in which we live. Parts of • Community Simply stated, we might say that the Jews and their institutions make up the Jewish community. Thus, the hospitals, the charitable organizations, the educational and fraternal institutions, the synagogues, as well as the Jews who maintain and belong to them make up the Jewish community. Obviously, this definition falls short of being complete and true. We might as well define an automobile merely by listing its component parts. What is missing is the dynamic mechanism which converts energy into motive power. Similarly, in limiting our definition of the Jewish community merely to the numbers of Jews and to the organizational statistics of institutions, we fail to account for the "energy" or the Jewish spirit which is certainly a dynamic factor in the make up of the Jewish community. It is the tremendous force of spiritual strength that characterized the Jewish community of the past. The Talmudic dictum which proclaimed. "Do not separate thyself from the community." became a first principle of Jewish communal living. Isolationism by an individual or by a group from the Kehillah was unthinkable. A spiritual kinship with the community gave the individual Jew his strength. and conversely, it is this spiritual kinship that gave the Jewish community its strength. We now return to the question with which we began. "What is a Jewish community in our own city?" Our question does not relate to the efficiency rating of the institutions or to the size of its membership lists. Is there a spiritual kinship that we feel with the Jewish hospital, with our synagogue, with our Jewish Center, with our charitable institutions? Is there a sufficient emphasis on Jewish values, be they cultural, religious or educational, in these institutions which can bring about a true spiritual link? Character of Sacredness As we grapple with these problems and attempt to find solutions to them, we will discover that our own ties to the Jewish community will be strengthened. For we recognize that many things make up %  ABM MAYU AMAMOWfTZ the Jewish community. It is the sum total of Jews living in a prescribed area; it is the institutions and organizations maintained and financed by Jews of that area; it is the meetings, the rallies, the projects, the activities keeping the Jews together in the area. It is all these and more. The Jewish community is the corporate soul, as it were, maintaining the sacred bond between the Jew and his heritage. The Jewish communities of old were designated by the unique description,' "Kehilla Kaddisha," a sacred community. The Jewish community of today must likewise retain the character of sacredness. The more sacredness we discern in our community, the greater will be its rold upon us. The more spirituality we find in our institutions, the greater will be their strength. ML Sinai Hospital Continued from Page 3-H gram of informing the public, not only the public as it becomes a patient, but the public as it remains well within the concomitant tendency to forget what the hospital is. Its success, shown increasingly but never to be taken for granted, will continue to be measured by public service and public response. Forward Looking Program For the community, most often the hospital is an extension of the doctor's office and the patient's home. We have sought to provide at Mt. Sinai Hospital the most advanced equipment for diagnosis and treatment so that our medical staff. We have sought, as a responsibility to the public, to encourage the use of these facilities by the medical profession to the end that the Greater Miami community will become familiar with the disposition of its generous contributions. We have encouraged greater use of hospital facilities also so that this generosity need not be over-taxed, that, as needed, this ultra-modern structure will be sustained as far as possible by those who receive its benefits directly. Through wise allocation of funds, hospital equipContinued on Page 14-M RABBI and MRS. EUGENE LABOVITZ and Shiri Alyssa Extend Best Wishes to the Officers and Members of TEMPLE NER TAMJD and to the Jewish Community for a Happy and Prosperous New Year RABBI and MRS. H. LOUIS ROTTMAN EXTEND HEARTFELT NEW YEAR GREETINGS to the BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE and Greater Miami RABBI and MRS. LEO HEIM and Children txteni test Wiihe I tt, TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB ••" to the Jowith Community far A BAPPT MIW YIAK RABBI and MRS. SAMUEL APRIL and Family Extend Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to Members and Friends of the CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER and to All Jewry RABBI and MRS. B. LEON HURWITZ and Daughter Extend Best Wishes for a Happy New Year to the Members and Officers of Temple Zamora and its affiliated organizations and the Greater Miami Jewish Community RABBI and MRS. TIBOR H. STERN AND FAMILY wish Beth Jacob Congregation and its affiliate groups A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR



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    Friday, September 23, 1960 been established to produce machinery and equipment like lathes, drilling machines, welding equipment, cranes, lifts, agricultural machinery and tools. lr addition, over 100 new enterprises have been set up to process various chemical deposits, including potassium, chlorine, bromine, magnesium and phosphates. %  New Enterprises Mineral development is going forward in all sectors of the Megtv and in the central region of the countiy. With the aid of Israel Bond resources, the Dead Sea Potash Works will increase its annual production of potash, bromine and other minerals irom 13E.00O tons to 600,000 tons in Hi* next decade. The phosphate nines at Oron in the Negev, unknown beiore Israel was created, are now producing over 250,000 tons of plu^phates per year. It is la Elath. perhaps, that Israel's history-making progjam of development is most excitingly dramatized. This new port, Israel's gateway to Asia and Airica, has become in its eleven years of existence a thriving town, with an oil pipeline which runs to Beersheba and Haifa. It is being developed as an industrial center, as well as a resort area. Technical assistance for underdeveloped countries has become a major adjunct of increasing trade with Asian and African countries. More and more of these nations are coming to Israel for guidance in agricultural development and industrial "know how." Israel has sent technical experts, plant managers and economists to many of these nations, tc help develop their economies. New Development Areas Among the countries which have received economic find technical assistance from Israel are Burma, Ceylon. Ghana. Liberia, the Philippines, Sierra I-cone, West Nigeria, and a number of others. Israel has signed trade treaties with some of these nations, and has entered into partnerships with others in such diversified endeavors as shipping linct, construction companies and industrial plants. This development represents an important asset for ^rael on the international scene. In a very significant sense, it constitutes an answer to the Arab effort to isolate Israel and to throttle her economic advancement. At the same time it demonstrates Israel's effectiveness as a "showcase" for the hind of social and enonomic progress which may be achieved under a democratic system. Israel's growing influence confirms our hopes from the very beginning that she might stand before the world as an exponent of the highest moral principle;,. This has been shown in many ways. Recently Israel revealed in a dramatic manner that she has the capacity to serve as a guardian Jen>isti Hcridliain Page 9-D Spraying grape vines at an Israeli settlement. Israel Band funds have helped stimulate this industry. T ^rsjsfs/HfSJBjmrsrsfELrEJSfsii Young immigrant fits spokes into bicycle wheels at a factory in Israel v/here, since 1951, the Israel Bond campaign has provided more than $440 million of investment capital. Member of Israeli Kibbutz Tsora works on the construction of a new dwelling to help Israel's growing population. Since independence, Israel has built more than a quarter of a million housinq units with the aid of State of Israel Bond funds. of Jewish rights and as the keeper of the conscience of the world in its treatment of Jews. Israel will not permit the world to forget the terrible crimes of Hitlerism, and.she is determined to do everything in her power to make certain that they will never recur. At the foundation of Israel's role in the survival and reconstruction of the Jewish people is her need to attain complete economic stability during the coming years. During this period, increased economic opportunity, including full employment and permanent dwellings for her newcomers, will have to be created throughout the country. To achieve these purposes in the shortest time possible, Israel will rely heavily on Israel Bond funds. Vital Facts With the aid of Israel Bonds Israel expects to fulfill major economic objectives in the coming years, including the speedy industrialization of the country to increase exports and narrow the gap in the balance of payments. She plans to accelerate the exploitation of her natural resources, including Continued on Page 15-D tinrmci PETE'S LAWN MOWER SERVICE 1391 .. 7** tram Pkom OX 1-3842 hi*" BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON LESTER (.Kit FIN "PUMP 4 WELL SERVICE" 3175 H.W. 87th Strost Phone OX 1-1531 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL HARRIS UPHOLSTERING CO. RE UPHOLSTERING and NEW Hotel Cocktail Lounges. Bar*. Booths, Also Breakfast Nooks 921 N. Miami Avanu. FR 1-5286 GREETINGS HAPPY NEW YEAR NICK & ARTHUR'S RESTAURANT and LOUNGE Over 27 Years of Gourmet Dining in Greater Miami 1601 79th STREET CAUSEWAY H A Very tittppy New Year to Ati M 1 Mr. and Mrs. Dan Weinstein \ €*(rtoi [ C o m p a n y Manufacturers of vl-jf Genuine Steel Die Engraved Stationery f? Wedding Invitations — Bar HHHzvah Invitations Social Stationery commercial — hotel — social FRED K. SHOCHET SHIRLEY BARNES BILL APTE 116 n.e. 6th street Photit FR 3-4634 SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL NATIONAL PRODUCE CO. OF MIAMI, INC. Wholesale Produce) — Crate to Carload 1229 N.W. 21st Street Phono FR 3-8491 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY MARVEL CLEANERS SEtVKE —4 QUALITY CUANMC Mrs. Lucllo P. Neher. Owaor 16 MIRACLE MILE Phono HI 8-2554 TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS Tropicalites # Designers • Manufacturers Cold Cathode Lighting NEON SIGNS • MAINTENANCE 120 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 9-57*1 A HAPPY NEW YCAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS Mr* ana Mrs. Back oitho APIX CIEANERS I Phono FR 4-2833 LAUNDRY J



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    Poa/e 144 Pridey, September 23. !96Q NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO All... / GuiFSTREAM HAUANOAU, FLORIDA HOME Of THE FLORIDA DOIT HAPPY NEW YEAR BARRICINI Ftmtm 0* WmU Over tm Wim Kmker Ca*diee TO ALL GREETINGS CRABTREE INSULATION COMPANY • • FREEZERS • COOLERS ENGINEERED INSTALLATIONS • FOAMGLASS • FIBERGLASS • CORK • JAMISON DOORS 300 N.E. 75fh STREET PL 4-6617 MOUOAV 0€fW08 HAROLD J. SEGAL, REALTOR and associates Jewel* Road Miami Beach.fia. 360 72nd Srraat EW*rr I ll — I Hr*l<3 Ovcrtf *id Eet,-i Prtj TJIW Brown Dvd Me,mrGodfrey PrN Je*" Cov Hrvy Norrw^n a*n, fegon* Aw 3-lbwt BM Lakm Irmr] Satan STK^I Gombcrg Mornt te—•> M/'i, SKMV EH>*I Oxdn rtorlan Prrt.,* Frh S.IH IT IS WITH PLEASURE I EXTEND SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL RALPH B. FERGUSON, JR. JUSTICE OF PEACE-ELECT, District No. 2 Olympia Bldg. Miami, Fla. TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR ALAN KAPLAN DAM MEAT PACKING CORPORATION MEAT PROCESSING 11865 S.W. 80th Street MO 7-3306 Federation as Heart of the Cofmnimty c*ta id In ty af Dad* ciaalj to i JrnWi •fee* teak tea years f played a mayar rott From Ike very Federation has coatnbettd at vary aabntaatnl mtmmn la the hospital yearly asceme m order to rover Ike epetattaaal aeftrt reeaftang from the care ef tae medically ladngcat As aae af tae aiajar lecaJ itfihalai of Federataaa. Ml. Saaat aVaspital anw staad> as a beacon af cemmittcc eoasi atanj af saaae 90 men aad women, tavCaTYV) PBanWCaM f *he fraap ta a %  aihahU body which could aa %  etfhrtaatly aad apeedUj a>al .Tj commaaal proM cms. a The Fed* tralasa af Jewish Women's Organ. izattaas. ia tae saaaad year af its existence pro. vided %  aaarfii af i ahaaturi la the Women'* Divisiee af the C aabtaad Jewish Appeal, headed by Mrs. Aaaa Bm aaer Mayers B readnctod leadership training e lasses aad adaraHaaal programs. The FJWO TraeeUac Traeau. a musical presentattoo which expl lamed the aanncas af FadaraUon aad CJA. was seen by thoasaads af member; of local women's m rgaanaaejaas. Mrs. Ml ken Srkh was recently tlcctei araasdaat af FJWO, succeeding tu seaae af of Jewish life way C means, first. Mrs Myers. Mrs. Myers' ihnmag rsiisttii has aaar eif established a i ah p ee p which will uadertak study to determine the character of Miami's it ish coainiMrnty Eventually, at hopes to be able to gather rateable data m this popniatiea study telLs^ as who we are. how we are. where we bee. aad where we are going. Dr. George Graham is temporary chairman at this study unit. • A second committee headed by Dr Morns Goodman is already in the midst of a study at chronic illness and 'he aging in our area, a highly significant project Meeting with agencies for the first time, to get a complete picture of what each agency is doing. Dr. Goodman's group wiQ endeavor to determine whether they are performing an adequate job. and where the gaps in service occur. The committee has been impressed with some of the available programs, but early reactions point up the fact that many of these programs do not meet the full needs of our Jewish aged and chronically UL Future recommendations for the care of this segment of our population will depend greatly upon the findings of the study committee. • A giant stride in modernizing Federation's internal structure occurred in I960, when the board of governors elected a streamlined executive Mrs. Jeaa C Lehman • Finally the execuaere committee of Federation has awthonaed a committee to explore the possibilities of devetoptag Federation j endowment and bequest program With the implementation of such a program. Federation will be better prepared to cope with unforeseen financial emergencies, will be able to help its ageacies m new demonstration programs, and provide them with Bead e d fuads which are aot available in toe annual Combined Jewish Appeal %  p* i fr Era af Sputnik The decade of the 1990*s. when its history is written, will be known. I believe, as the period of Miami's Jewish "population explosion" and dynamic growth, wbea our basic communal agencies developed new programs, services and facilities required to weld countless thousands of new residents together into a proud community. The era of the Sputnik has come, aad "reaching for the moon" now becomes a realistic possibility for early achievement. In oar Combined Jewish Appeal. Miami Jewry also can set its sights on a S3.000.000 campaign which can be achieved and even surpassed: we are confident that agency programs will then truly meet demands made upon them, and that Miami will rightly occupy a position of prominence in the company of other major American Jewish communities. With the constant expansion of Dade county, we can expect a number of new and iiinx problems to accompany this growth. Federatiaa wi> be asked to provide guidance, direction and welfare help in newer areas. As the central welfare planning body. Federation most stand ready to serve on all fronts, to strengthen the spiritual, educational, and cultural fabric of the Jewish community The High Holy Days are the fitting times for renewed personal dedication to these tasks. Exercise of Principle Over Relations Cenrinoed from Papa S-l four chapters in Miami, aad a fifth one in process of organization in Hollywood. One couples' chapter in Miami is soon to be joined by another of a similar type on the Beach. The Dade Men's chapter, headed by Louis Hoberman. of Surtside. has announced plans to become a Beach luncheon forum-at which Congress speakers will p r ese nt the programs aad projects -of the movement. Congress function* through its Commissions in bringing its program to the community. The Commission on Law and Social Action is chaired by Bernard S. Mandler. who is currently also serving as chief counsel in the Resnick case. The Commission on Community Interrelations is chaired by Mrs. Milton Zoloth Chairman of the Commission en International Affairs and the Commission on Jewish Living have not yet been annouced for 1960•1. Regional director is Haskell Lazere. Through the "Congress Bi-Weekly." through "Judaism" and through its programs of socal action, the Congress seeks not only to inform its membership and the Jewish community of day-today problems, but to stimulate every American Jew lo become an effective and responsible participant in the straggle to achieve the fulfillment of democracy. O'NEAL %  LOCK & SEPTIC TANK CO. KPTK TaNKS CUAHf* aad IfPAUUB mSTAUATtOHS ran msPKnotrs UPAI TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR I $-*• If27 1368 N.W. 29th Street Phone NE 5-6431 FRUIT JUKE CO., INC. FRESH FRUTT JUICE SALADS BUY MORE "RUSSELL'S' 2154 N.W. 10th Avenue FR 4-1573 TO ALL GREETINGS COMPANY MES-671S ISM M.W. tf* srtarr TO ALL GREETINGS BARBER'S CUSTOM CABINET SHOP 'BANK AND STOftf FlXTURK" ALL WORK DONE BY EXPERTS RtASON ABLE RATf S 377 N. Royal Poinciana Blvd. Ph. TU 7-70W MIAMI SPRINGS



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    Page 10-H +.kmisHlcridiain Friday. September 23, 1988 It is oui privilege to express Our appreciation to our many Friends for their kind consideration During the past year. We Express Genuine Greetings and Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR Carpenters 1 District Council 2955 NW 17th Avenue Miami 42, Florida Telephone NE 5-5207 ROBERT N. ROSS H. L MORRIS ARTHUR E. STEWART Robert N. Ferguson Lyman WJiama Harold E. Lewi. Agents %  YTT^^T^I^IT nappy new MIAMI KACH SOUTH SHORE MOTEl ASSN PtOfHTY OWNERS AND t*8m WVWtew ftNANCIAl INSTITUTIONS WASHINGTON AVENUI ASSOCIATION MERCHANTS DIVISION WASHINGTON AVENUE SOUTH SHORE ASSOCIATION. N Maicus O. Sarokin Ray Rtdman Preldent Executive Direcfot 1370 WasHtnttow Avenue, Miami Ranch, fHocHte twift^pon MR. AND MRS. SOL GOLDMAN 2444 FIAMINCO PIACI MIAMI IEACM *jtfeW tkmr test Wishes It a Nappy. *•"? cmd Praiaaraai Near Tsar A classroom in action under the supervision oi the Bureau. At the Core of Educational Achievement Continued from Pae 5-H Burcan concentrates the burden of its functions around The recruitment, placement, training, and licensing of '.he Jewish teacher. The Bureau strives to give the Jewish teacher status aM security through the implementation of comrrnmfty codes of practice for all Jewish teachers, and a projected program of retirement and insurance for licensed Hebrew teachers. The Bureau trains teachers (o meet code qualifications through its college of Jewish Studies, through its regular classroom supervision, and through its professional seminars and workshops. The Bureau publishes educational bulletins for teachers for all Jewish festivals and for exposition of the most constructive approaches to classroom method and procedures, making available its central library of over 7,000 volumes. Teacher problems are tackled by various lay and professional committees of the B ar ton : the Bureau's Board of License, headed by Sol Goldman, with local licenses recognized by The Watt seal Board of Licenses of Ike American Assn. far Jewish Education; the Bureau's Board of Review, ehatred by Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers: the Bureau's Central Placement Committee, chaired by Ehtel Lcsowoder, with teacher representation; The Teach er Welfare Committee, headed by Leo Rebuts**; professional consultation by The Bureau's oneeutive director. Loots Schwarttman, Herbert Berger, assistant director, and Dr. Nathaniel SorefT, supervisor. EsvcaHen Directors ana Principals TO improve community educational standards, the Bureau works intimately, en a day-byday basis, with educational directors and principals of all Jewish schools. The Bureau initiated the formation of a professional principals' association, the Jewish Educators Council, which meets bimonthly with Bureau professionals to stimulate experimentation within the schools. Aatn, the Bureau brings together the directors of all Jewish schools bi-monthly to discuss problems faring all schools. to publish the annnal school calendar, to evaluate new texts, to plan new cnrricular aprpoaches, to plan inter-school activities. Through the promotion of a central Jewish library, the Bureau makes available to the community a cultural resource of the highest quality, over 7,000 volumes of Judaica in Hebrew, Yiddish and English, with Mrs. Anna Sintow serving as librarian. Mrs. Joseph Duntov is chairman of the Bureau's Library Committee, which directs library policy. National Jewish Book Month is sponsored by the Bureau for the entire cofiTmunrty through public exhibits in the public libraries, through book review service to all Jewish organizations, through public book rallies, and the use of radio, press and television. Seymour B. Licbman served as the 195960 chairman of the Bureau's Adult Education Committee, which sponsored Jewish Book Month. This committee also directed the Bureau's television program over Station WTHS, cb. 2, in the leaching of Hebrew to the entire community. The two television programs, "Living Hebrew* and "Begin Hebrew,'' were heard each week during the school year. Again, as in 1958-1959, Mrs. Miriam Anisfeld and Mrs. Pay Feinstein ware the Kit vision teachers whose efforts received wide acclaim. The Bureau has called for a communRy cooperation with the Rabbinical Asen., the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and focal and national educational agencies to stop the mushrooming of small, inadequate schools and to make a definite stand for inter-congregational mergers in viable geographic areas. Hence, the Bureau has attempted to act as a catalytic agent to improve the standards of Jewish education in the community, through teachers, through educational direc t ors, through schools, and through the general community. Tins it consonant with Bureau policy initially expressed in Its Charter of 1941: ". to do and perform aU acts and things necessary or proper for the advancement of Jewish education in Greater Miami ... for children, youth and aduttt ." aVMf W I Nrtf f#f MM RNW 7 ##f S. S. <,OI MEN Krai Estate Room 603 Biacayno BMpJ. Phone FR 1-8537 TO ALL — GREETINGS BACH*: A CO. 9578 HARDING AVE. EDWIN S. CROOKS Mgr. SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY. PEACKFTJL NEW YEAR Dick Alton's Deauville Servico Station 6341 Collins Avenue Phce UN 6-9.54 M SINCMIt ... RtfVI MOTR CAtf ... "PORTII tf • WITH POWff 24-Hour Reliable Road Service TO ALL OUR FRIENDS A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR PRINCE ARTHUR KING ARTHUR EMBASSY HOMES 2055 Riverland R*J., R. Uodswderle FR 7-3394



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    Page 6-H +JtwHt'fk>rk**n Friday, September, ft J96o JieUDATH ISRAEL HEBREW INSTITUTE 7*01 CAUTU AVEMVt MIAMI RfACB Orari r2*e r:r7 Wa fcarawits txltni •vr bsf WI'JJKI f Mrr k*'ed fanmitr mm4 Strife*/ I OBSW IAHI PR. ISAAC NIRSH EVER l HIS FAM&T Otrteari, Birrcfars, Members. Sisferbe Oraanjiefiaa, Mea's Ciafc •J well • fo all ear weli-nrisfcerj in Grtvttr Kimmri %  AT Tiff NfW Tf At UIMC rilC tf AUZATION Of ALL OUt ROPES, coMftrrc uotMnioM re out MOPIE sw %  SOil/TrO* TO AFFUCTID NUMAMTr a HERMAN WEINTHAU3. Presideat MRS. ESTHER LERMAN. Presideat SISTERHOOD OF AGUDATH ISRAEL THE PRESIDENT OFFICERS ami DIRECTORS Re SHOLEM LODGE B'NAI IRITH Extend to Their Members ... Families and Jewry Everywhere Best Wishes for a Most Happy. Healthy and Prosperous New Year! EDWARD S. KLEIN President ELI HURWITZ Preskient-tlect SOUTH FLORIDA COUNCIL OF THE JEWISH NATIONAL HOME FOR ASTHMATIC CHILDREN AT DENVER Extend? Wishes for a Happy. Healthy and Prosperous New Year to All GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER NORTH DADE CHAPTER LORBER CHAPTER PESHKIN CHAPTER BREATH Of LIFE CHAPTER MIAMI BEACH CHAPTER SOUTH BROWARD CHAPTER RAY OF HOPE CHAPTER GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE CHAPTER TEMPLE JUDEA OF CORAL GABLES "Where You Are A Stranger But Once" § 320 Palermo Avenue near Miracle Mile *?*" May Our Religious New Year 5721 MV be filled with blessings of health and service. P^"~ RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP Cantor Herman K. Gottlieb %  enjamin IMoff, Educational Director TiloVn Corenblwm, Pros. ... WE OF TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM EXTEND TO OUR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR RABBI SHELDON EDWARDS Cantor Seymour Hlnkes The President, the Officers and the Directors —>*4 At the home oi Mrs. Max Weitz. preparations were made during the outgoing Hebrew Year for the Women's Division, State of Israel Bonds, fashion show. Standing (left to right) are Mesdarr.es Samuel T. Sapiro. Milton Lubarr, Bernard D. Kaplan, David Ponre, and Sam F. Danels. Seated are Mesdames Jack Katrman, Jack S. Popiclc, Max Weits. and Irving Miller. The Intensive Campaign of Israel Bonds By J..A, CANTOR and SAMUEL OR ITT General Chairmen SAMUEL FRIIDLAND Chairman, Board at aovarners Cmhr Miami Israel Bond Committee *_Wfi, the general chairmen, in looking back upon ** the pest year, are very proud. We are proud of our people, proed of our city, and bursting with pride over Miami's record-shattering Israel Bond efforts. 1999 was the year of the launching of the most intensive effort for the sale of Israel Bonds in our history, supported by an army of enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers, representing nearly every organization, business, professional and geographic area In the community. We went on to establish a new goal for the rest of the United States to follow when we assumed the responsibility for leadership of the Israel Bond campaign for the community of Greater Miami. We call 1999 our "Golds" year for many ressons — principally because it was Golds Heir who opened our most successful and exciting campaign year by her appearance at the inaurural conference. Our committee, after hearing the inspiring and Informative talk made by Mrs. Meir, planned a program geared to the possibility of increasing the number of bond purchasers, as wen as increasing our general sales. We are pleased to report to trie community at large that, during the year of 1999. this was accomplished only because of toe tremendous ertorl made by our rabbis and presidents, by individual congregational dinners, sad through pulpit appeals during the High Holidays Bffort The challenge of Israel's present need for housing was made by Greater Miami Jewry in an unprecedented effort to provide Israel Bond funds for 400 Israel housing units. We are proud to state, here and how, that our synagogues helped us to go Continued on Pees 1541 JACK A. CANTOR SAMUU FRKMAND SAMUH ocirr To Ait Jewry We Extend Kent Wisme* /r the Nettf Year MIAMIGABLES ZIONIST DISTRICT L'Shona Tova Tikesevu GERALD and FELICE P. SCHWARTZ REGIONAL DIRECTOR, HEBREW UNIVERSITY New Year Greetings from AMERICAN FRIENDS OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY dedicated to the growth and development of Israel's renowned institution of higher learning and research, the training ground of Israel's future leaders and world center of Jewish culture. Miami Beach Office: 940 Lmcela Read A Most Happy New Year to the Entire Jewish Communrry TIFERETH ISRAEL NORTHSIDE CENTER ItlOOni SCHLISSEL, Pr e s ident ..... ....



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    — Friday. September 23. 1960 +Jeist Fk>rHi*r Vaqe 7-1 The Programs of Hadassah in Miami By MRS. FRED JONAS Pr*id*rt, Miami Beach Chapter of Hadassah By MRS. LEONARD WOLPE Publicity ChairWatl, Miami Chapter'**"* • e^lNCE its founding in 1012. Hadassah. the Won<^ en's Zionist Organization of America, has chalked up a record that few — if any — organizations can equal. To begin with, and most impressive, is the phenomenal growth of Hadassah frem 12 original members to the current total of 316.000 in This ar.icle on Had*s*ah was to be written by Mrs. Fred Jonas, president of tlie Miami Brazil chapter of Hadassah. and Mrs. Louis Goldman, president of the I Miami chapter. On her way to thr ^dedication of tlie \new $25 i.-.illton Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical (Center at Kiryat Hjiiassah outside of Jerusalem. Israel. I early in August. Mrs. Goldman became ill. and was [forced to return to the United States from Rome. Here. [Mrs. Leonard Wolpe. publicity chairman of tlie Miami I chapter, substitutes. 11.320 chapters and groups throughout the United I States ami Puerto Rico. But more important than [mere numbers are the Hadassah accomplishments [of the members themselves. For this is the force [that attracts American Jewish womanhood to HaIdassah. Through its work in the three decades prior Israel's reemergence as a State, Hadassah in Effect laid the foundation for the country's public health service, modern hospital system, network of nother and child clinkrs, medical and nursing education, and clinical and scientific research. This fas a vital factor providing strength to the people f Israel as they struggled for freedom and indeendence against innumerable odds. And in America. Hadassah, through its education programs, has been a dynamic influence in Stimulating creative and intelligent Jewish living ind an understanding of the Jewish cultural henage. It has done its full share in efforts to preserve democracy and bolster the United Nations, knd it has fostered and conducted Jewish youth Activities and interpreted the meaning of Israel to lie American community. In Israel today, Hadassan supports seven hositals — five in Jerusalem, one in Safed and one Beersheba — totaling more than 750 beds. There iadassah treats thousands of patients annually and rges ahead toward new horizons of health. Health re is being provided for the total region of Jesalera and the Jerusalem Corridor with its 200.popuk'tjen since — in addition to hospital serv — Hadassah has both urban and rural cornunityhealth canters catering to the daily medial needs of the pregnant mother, the school child, he family uatt and the community. Health Standards Improve On Ai'g. 3, hundreds of Hadassah members Dined with-thousands of Israelis and the 254 physicians, M* nurses and 1,38* other staff members of lie HadassaJfeHebxew University Medical Center dedicate the 125 million building in which will consolidated all of Hadassah's health and medical training facilities, including the Medical School f the Hebrew University and Hadassah, at Kiryat Iadassah, five miles west of Jerusalem. When the Hadassah doctors and nurses first [came to Palestine, they found malena, typhus, iniienaa, cholera, dysentery, trachoma and the dread Black Death itself. They opened scores of MRS. LOWS 60UMMN hospitals, clinics, and mother and child welfare stations. By the time the State of Israel was born in 1948. the infant death rate which bad been 140 per 1,000 in 1MB was down to a western-world normal ot 2ft. Trachoma among schoolchildren was down from 34 percent to 4 percent, ringworm from 4 percent to 1 percent. In 1939, Hadassah moved to a new medical center on Mount Scopus. There, for a time, Arab royalty from Jordan, Iraq and Saudi Arabia got modern medical treatmeat unavailable in their homelands. But 1948-49. war left Moevtt Scopus a no man's land, and the medical center sits empty. The new hospital at Bin Karim is needed to replace it. To save the nurses steps, the main patient building is semi circular. Two of its nine floors are underground, in case Bin Karim. too, becomes a battleground. The women of Hadassah have by now raised a total of almost $200 million, two-thirds of which has gone for medical services. Isr a el has 4,700 physicians, the world's highest doctor-patient ratio, and a fine medical school for training new ones. In addition to its vast medical and health operations in Israel. Hadassah has been playing a vital role in Youth Aliyah work since this internaCenHmjed an Pane 12-1 TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES MILLS -BURNETT MFG. 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Phone M 4-9457 HAPPY NEW YEAft TO AIL COLISEUM LANES UNIVERSITY BOWL { 1500 Onealaa, Roast SuaoarDriveat U.S. 1 %  CORAL GABLES SOUTH MIAMI Happy Neav Year Holiday Good Wishes te All PHIL SCHILLER, Realtor | 2007 N.E. 143rd STRUT Wl 5 5494 %  "•oi In Mi a) mi B#a>cn, rtofioft TO ALL HAPPY HOLIDAYS MR. and MBS. ALEXANDER S. GORDON and FAMILY GREETINGS ... %  J. T. STEWART MORTGAGE. CO., INC. i MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTMENT "1 Room 3001st National Bank Bld 9 ., Coral Gable*. Re. SEASON'S GREETINGS j MIAMI REAL ESTATE AGENCY 1 1034 DuPeot Building Phene FR 4-4033



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    %  Frid Page 12-E &f Jenist ncrkHan Friday. September 23. I960 I TO ALL GREETINGS THE TOWN RESTAURANT 153 NX. 1st Street BREAKFAST LUNCHEON DINNER Music Air Conditioned 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Closed Sunday Phone FR 4-4733 FOR REST AND RELAXATION AT YOUR FAVORITE FURNITURE STORE L B. MALONE MATTRESS CO. I GREETINGS ... "f I ENDURANCE FLOOR CO., INC. "FLOOR COVERING CONTRACTORS' Residential & Commercial 13900 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone MU 1-4923 TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION CO. GENERAL CONTRACTORS 2675 Northwest Lejeune Road Miami PHONE NE 4-9761 S? SILICA LAWN DRESSING • This is net an ordinary sand drassing. It it scientifically processed for a perfect lawn. • Guaranteed to be weed, root and lump free. • Silica retains moisture. .2* I {Ml • Silica levels and firms lawns Phone FR 7-3S84 FLORIDA SILICA SAND CO. 2675 N.W. 131 st Street DANIA — Phone WA 2-2385 Inc. l&Al I 4 IJI3 TO OUR MANY FRIENDS OUR SINCERE WISHES 1 for a HAPPY NEW YEAR H Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gottesman TO ALL GREETINGS FIB!* A. L. McMULLEN p" p Insurance | WE NOW HAVE THE NEW NO ACCIDENT SAVINGS PLAN \ SAFE DRIVERS AWARD 30, DISCOUNT I FR 4-1702 245 Security Trust Bldg. A Happy New Year to All Our Friends and Patrons [ GOVERNOR CAFETERIA AND ENTIRE MANAGEMENT R Hassidism and the Yearning for Zion Continued from Pago 1-E requisite for the redemption of the people of Israel. The Holy Land was, therefore the object of deepest longing for him and Hassidic lore is replete with legends about his attempts to undertake the hazardous voyage to Eretz Yisrael. In fact, he is said to have reached as far as Constantinople, and to have been forced by various circumstances to return. Similar attempts were made by the Besht's disciples, notably Rabbi Pinchas, of Koretz, and Rabbi Zalman. of Ladi, founder of the Habbad wing in Hassidism, with a view to propagating Hassidic ideology in Eretz Yisrael. They, too, were prevented from reaching their goal. Other celebrated early Hassidic leaders however, succeeded in gratifying their longing. The first among them was Rabbi Gershon Kitover. the Bcshfs brother-inl.iu. who settled in Hebron in 1747 and who, in view of his fame as a Talmudic and Kabbalistic scholar, was received with enthusiasm and given the appointment as head of the community. After .staying in that office for six years, he settled in Jerusalem where he died in the year 1762. Braved Hazards Rabbi Gershon's fruitful activities in disseminating Hassidic philosophy in Eretz Yisrael stimulated many of the Hassidic leaders in the Diaspora to undertake a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In the year 1764. four years after the Besht's death, a group of 30 men and women, led by the Besht's senior disciples. Rabbi Nachman of Horodenko and Rabbi Mendel of Premyslan, succeeded in reaching the shores of Jaffa on the eve of Rosh Hoshana. They were forbidden to land, however, by the Arabs, and remained on board ship until the Fast of Gedalyah. when they decided to continue the journey to the port' of Acre. This voyage, even in those days, should have taken no longer than six hours, but a storm at sea tossed their vessel about for eight days, and it was on the point of breaking up in the raging sea. Rabbi Nachman, we are told, then assembled a minyan of his followers and with a Scroll of the Law in his arms, pronounced the following statement: "Lord of the Universe, if it was decreed by Thy Heavenly Court that we should perish, this holy Joseph Meyerhoff receives PEC "Man of the Year" Award at annual dinner of the Palestine Economic Corporation. "They hoped that by renewing the bonds with the soU of their ancestral homeland and by devotinq their days to the study of the Torah they would be able to delve deeper into the secrets of their faith ..." congregation jointly with the Shechinah declare that we decline to accept the decree. We demand that it be promptly annulled." The story continues that in consequence of this pronouncement th<* storm subsided and they landed at Acre on the 12th of Tishrei, whence they proceeded to Safed and Tiberias. Some two decades later Hassidim began arrivConrinued on Pago 15 E glil in Thi anc art cai shi set hin hir wo hir his th fel dei pei fear <2M ^/vtost taff of &f Current AaaeW DivUead WASHINi FEDERAL SAVIN^SMND IOAN'ASSOCIATION MIAMI BEACH 1701 MERIDIAN AVENUE 1244 WASHINGTON AVENUE • 1133 NORMANDY DRIVE WASHINGTON AVENOI at 12* STRUT PNONt Jf I 27 JACK D. GORDON PresMenf ARTHUR N. C0URSH0N CMrmmti of the BMrl INDUSTRIAL NATIONAL BANK 25 VEST FLAGLER STREET Aiemoer: Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation



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    ttJ 23. m • I JWV V*itTiIB arafk etf flhr 1 UC ttr of tkr BKS Far Hut CB*r a n it. be aflajj am c r? ir e have an tar vaa ruue % %  an MV hfis ae* af t*e Se*r VSUAi. AC SMUTS TO VDUt S*UE "" ART MART or jLi2 Sfw n %  -_ PALHBTS MIAMI MOWMRT CO. lift l I5TITI iowt (Mr Ther Many friends • iVsnes icr -sappy New Yar tuian rroa roof? : ESSEHT1AL TO A BUDGET THAT WORKS FLORIDA NATIONAL Bank at Coral Gables L "asnayu ts iu'gwwi I g'enio* a Hat Tim* and TWOS* sacree TTIW ip** Nl • i ec oaaaJ %  fee M ITS trus: ho wttr t ~iAL>~DV*^ li PALMBTS MUM MOMMNT CO. HI 44921 A M \^+m*>~f*~^^~l-**>. ,\~*^~,*K ^ *.' ~ ^ >m ^ -0*^** ^. ^ .< Sr. < ^ *-* %  —>^-"W^ ^^# iA ar c / ^t* JppillCff ^/e C*v4 crueMC. ^ %  T 1 SEITLIUMMPiU ^*v • S.W. 1st Street MUM. FLOtlDA %^K I V*K^>^^'^*



    PAGE 1

    ZrZ =: m i xjgstart**rB*nm 5-21 I >4V f I, /960 f*rtLir S YOL EXTEA SONUS AT FOC? C A | R


    Pag 2-H
    +Jewlsti FhrkU&r
    Friday, September 23. I960 ==
    GREETINGS:
    May v/e take this opportunity of extending Very Best'
    Wishes for the New Year to each and every one of you!
    On behalf of the Israel Bond Committee of Greater
    Miami, we want to express our gratitude for the support
    given in this area to the State of Israel Bond Program during
    the past year.
    The New Year. 5721 offers Miami's Jewry an appro-
    priate opportunity to rededicate itself towards the historic
    task of helping to make Israel's second decade one of
    unparallea progress and development, through the pur-
    chase of Israel Bonds.
    May Good Health and Prosperity be your reward in
    the New Year.
    JACK A. CANTOR SAMUEL ORITT
    Genera] Chairmen
    SAMUEL FRIEDLANO, Chairman Board of Governors
    GREATER MIAMI COMMITTEE
    STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
    The Southwest Jewish Center
    AND ITS SISTERHOOD
    6438 S.W. 8th STREET
    Extend to the Entire Jewish Community
    Best Wishes for a Very Happy Mew Year
    Wishing a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year to the
    Officers and Members of our Lodge and their families;
    and to our Brethren who will join our Lodge
    to help us carry out the good work of B'nai B'rith .
    HERBERT L. HEIKEN. Preslent
    IRVING SCHATZMAN. Past President President-Elect
    MIAMI BEACH LODGE OF B'NAI B'RITH
    BSkur Cholem Kosher Convalescent
    Home of Greater Miami
    310 COLLINS AVENUE
    0
    MRS. EDWARD ELKIN. President, and OFFICERS
    Extend Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year
    to All Their Members and Friends
    THE SPINOZA OUTDOOR FORUM
    124 lit* STMfT, MIAMI tCACH
    ML ABRAHAM W01FS0N, Chsirew
    fassess ft* All
    A M A P P T N I W T I A I
    HIGH HOLIDAY GREETINGS
    ** Wish** for a Healthy, Joyful and Religious New Ycer
    BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
    H. Lewis Rottman, Rabbi
    N. LOWS I0TTMAN, ta*< ALEXANDER C. MOKOVITZ, PretieW
    TNI OFFICERS Mid DIRECTORS !
    The Sisterhood
    t
    Congregation Beth Tfilah
    EXTEND TO ITS FRIENDS AND THEIR FAMILIES
    BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Mrs. Rachel Katz, President
    Programs of Jewish Vocational Service
    By LLOYD L. RUSKIN
    Presided, Jewish Vocational Service
    AS the New Year 5721 approaches, the Jewish
    ** Vocational Service prepares to celebrate its
    second anniversary. Just a little less than two
    ycar> aso. this agency became a full-fledged mem-
    ber of the family of organizations under the spon-
    sorship and auspices of the Greater Miami Jewish
    Federation. In the life of a community, two years
    are but a brief moment. Nevertheless, JVS has been
    making its presence known in a variety of i
    not only with regard to the Jewish segment of our
    population, but to the community as a whole.
    During the past year, it was estimated that
    better "than 1,020 people were served by JVS. Of
    this number, more than 530 men and women sought
    help with job placement and vocational adjustment
    problems. Not all of these were seeking jobs, but
    105 job placements were effected by JVS. Over 40
    youngsters of high school and college age received
    guidance and counseling services through the func-
    tioning of our career counseling program. A> an
    aid in this latter program, approximately 190 dif-
    ferent tests were administered as part of our psy-
    chological testing program.
    Through our facilities for group guidance, over
    360 youngsters of high school and college age and
    their parents were served. The Jewish Vocational
    Service Workshop employed 84 handicapped and
    elderly clients who earned $23.516 37 while work-
    ing 29.254 man hours. The amount of money re-
    ceived from the completion of contract work in
    the JVS workshop totaled $23,898.18, which means
    that for the first time in the history of this pro-
    gram more money has been received as income
    from contracts than was paid out in wages to cli-
    ents employed at the workshop.
    Aims of the Agency
    Since the Jewish Vocational Service is still a
    comparatively new agency a word about its serv-
    ices appears to be in order. The agency was or-
    ganized to help people solve problems arising in
    the area of their vocational adjustment. As an agen-
    cy created by the Jewish community, it is partic-
    ularly concerned with such problems as they arise
    Employee at Jewish Vocational Service
    Workshop drills holes in a starfish later to
    be made into a shell novelty.
    LLoro mukjn
    in the Jewish population. The intent of the over-
    all program is to provide services which make
    available professional skills of the highest order
    controlled by professional ethics.
    As a testimony to the efficiency and proficiency
    of the professional staff of JVS. the agency has
    been certified and approved by the two major ac-
    crediting agencies in the field of vocational serv-
    ices the American Board on Professional Stand-
    ard.- in Vocational Counseling, and the American
    Board of Psychological Services. Approval by these
    boards is based upon a continuing evaluation of toe
    JVS program, and since such approval is not auto-
    matic, the agency must maintain the highest of
    standards to receive continuing approval.
    JVS makes its unique contribution to the com-
    munity through emphasis on individualization in
    practice, the nature of the service being based upon
    meeting the needs of each individual served. At
    the present time, the major emphasis of the agen-
    cy is focused on job placement and sheltered work-
    shop services. Csreer counseling and group guid-
    ance, both vitally needed by the youth of the Mi-
    ami community, are also offered, but in lesser de-
    gree, than job placement and sheltered workshop
    services because of a lack of staff.
    JVS recognizes the fact that the agency must
    keep abreast of new developments in the area of
    vocational adjustment. Because of this, staff and
    board have become active in local and national
    organizations and committees. The staff holds mem-
    bership in such organizations as the National Con-
    ference of Jewish Communal Workers, American
    Psychological Assn., the American Personel and
    Guidance Assn., the National Vocational Guidance
    Assn.. the National Rehabilitation Assn., and ine
    Florida Assn. of Sheltered Workshops and Home-
    bound Programs. In addition to membership in the
    Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the agency,
    whose parent was Jewish Family and Children's
    Service, as such is an accredited member of the
    associations above plus the Jewish Occupational
    Council, and the Welfare Planning Council of Dade
    County. Our workshop director is the treasurer of
    the Florida Assn. of Sheltered Workshops and
    Homebound Programs. Our executive director and
    the president both sit on the board of directors of
    the Jewish Occupational Council. The executive di-
    rector is chairman of the committee on retarded
    CorrtinuedonP.gellH
    We Wish All Our
    Relatives and Friends
    A Happy and Healthy
    New Year
    MILTON and MIRIAM,
    WCK, RUTH and JOSH
    SIICK1V
    Holiday Greetings to All
    B'NAI B'RITH
    AZA
    MIAMI 322
    TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
    The liberal Cm,raffsties > th. leech"
    Affiliated with the liaise el Aeaerkea Hebrew CeenregstUei
    CHASE AVENUE at 41st STREET MIAMI BEACH
    Wf PtAT THAT OfcW NEW NOW Of PfACf Will MAl
    a Nrw f ta of pud rot mmjumv
    MR. and MRS. MEYER A. BASKIN
    EXTEND THER BEST WISHES FOR A
    HAPPY, HEALTHFUL AMD CONSTRUCTIVE NEW YEAR
    To Vie Officers. Directors and Staff of the
    BUREAU OF JEWISH EDUCATION and fht
    GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION;
    To the Rabbis and Jewish Teachers and to the many Meads
    of Jewish Education throughout Greater Miami
    "an



    PAGE 1

    iday, September 23, 1960 —JenisttfhridSan Page 7-B Home for the Aged Women's Auxiliary I HE SAME FROM ANY ANGLE Quite a switch for me at the champagne brunch of the Women's [Division, State of Israel Bonds, at the Americana hotel last Thursday. %  Instead of sitting at the head table, I sat at the Press Table, giving 1 public credence to my new profession. Let me tell you that women I look and act the same seen from any angle ... Talked to guest speaker Joan (Mrs. Michael) Comay, noted Israeli I journalist and wife of Israel's permanent representative to the United Nations. She was most charming with her exquisite British accent and I soft silvery hair that seemed to give authority to everything she said ... Dresed in dapper black silk with long black gloves, I -asked her If it I was all made in Israel. Mrs. Gomay replied that it was—of course—and I that she felt as smartly-attired as any of her sex both here and in New lYork And, judging by the impression she made, who would deny her? • • • The champagne brunch was Interesting and informative, except [for some of the representatives who talked too long in telling of their organization's work both in end for Israel. 1 feel that when you are supsed to talk two minuter you do just that—talk two minutes, and not la second over. All these speeches that are too long and make the program run overtime can be avoided if every one would time her talks. It is certainly easy enough to do. Use an egg-timer. • | FANTASTIC FLAIR FOR THE DRAMATIC She admits it herself, Stella (Mrs. Harold) Turk, that she's naturally llazy. But every morning she does her exercises. It's like swallowing a [vitanim pilL peps you up for the whole day, she insists. However, all these fancy exercises are easy for her to do, because up to a very short (time ago, Stella took ballet lessons. She had taken them all her life, as they are part of the training for the theater... Stella didn't go on the stage, though; she got married instead. But keeping with her flair for the dramatic, she puts on local interpretations of the newest Broadway shows. Stella does her own writing and cutting in privacy, and when tbe-plsy is completely finished, she tries {It out on her family. Her handling of "The King and I" is memorable ... I had just come from New York, where I saw Gertrude Lawrence in the tame role. It -wasn't until several days after seeing Stella'* adaptation that I realized that Stella had talked all of her lines, not sung hem. That's how good she is ... At this point Stella, besides keeping copious files on everything she sads, has decided to learn' bridge. Her enthusiasm no doubt makes up for her lack of knowledge. "But Knowing Stella, this time "next year % he will have annexed many master points in duplicate .Bridge Teuraanetrts and will have joined the ranks of the best bridge players extant. • • • I Red letter day in the Duntov family. For the first time in a year Imd a half, Joseph sat up for dinner—he's been sick. Lili said it was |uite a festive occasion and everything tasted extra special The Samuel Klings, trailer and all, finally reached their borne in laltimore, missing Hurricane Donna. It must be very wearing to be named to a man who knows all the answers and tells people what to with their ailing marriages, but Sadie doesn't seem to mind; in fact tie loves it. "Everything fell into place, and in some ways it seems ttat we've never been gone," writes Sadie, "even to the stationery in lie bottom desk drawer." The stationery is printed "Klingdom" Gerry Lou (Mrs. Benedict) Silverman is finishing something she parted before she was married—her education. During the summer, lie took the two children, Jill and Johnny, to New York where she atBnded Columbia University and received ber Master's in Speech and tearing. Buster spent the summer commuting. As soon as Johnny es to nursery school, Gerry Lou will have a year of supervised work |ere and then start on a Doctorate. • • • This i some month of holidays for Chester and Sally Krone. Their Anniversary is on Rosh Hashona. and then Chester's birthday is on Yom Lippur. The Krone boys, excuse me, young men, will come home from Jew York for the occasion. Chester—he used to be called Little Chester as not to mix him up with bis father—is now associate editor of the lagazine Publishing Company on Madison ave. ... He already has had three short stories accepted. The first one rill be in the December issue of "Stag." Everyone walking along the lew Lincoln Road Mall with that magazine under arm, you will know a friend of the Krones ... Chester is working on a PhD degree at New York University—from fne extreme to another, since he got his Master's at Stanford out in Calfornia Robert goes to the university too. He's a Phi Beta Kappa Irom Wisconsin and is studying for a Master's there. + + + THE CAR PLEASE, JEEVES When you have dinner at the home of Betty (Mrs. LeopoldSchwartz. Be sure you push aside the parsley on the saver serving trays and look at the engraving. Betty has been playing golf for the last seven years, enjoying being in the open air, loving the competition, and delighting in Seeing the different golf courses where she plays She accepts golf as a challenge, just as she has accepted her Na ional Council of Jewish Women, Temple Israel Sisterhood, and National •ederation of Temple Sisterhood commitments. The silver pieces are Ipart of the golf trophies she has won. Some are in the living room on | fireside mantle, some in the china closet, and the rest are delegated to the top shelf in the kitchen ... Sometimes, Betty frightens herself, because she knows things that Ihappen before they actually do. Friends insist that people as a whole lore an open-book to Betty and that she is really psyr """By MRS.'SOL SILVERMAN President, Jewish Home of Nw Aged Auxiliary ftOUGLAS Gardens, our Jewish Home for the Aged, now has a capacity of 104 elderly residents. With all the new facilities and the beautiful new pavilions, life is really worth living at Douglas Gardens. The Auxiliary women, who contribute morally and financially to the Home, are the "main pillars," so to speak. Everything and anything that will bring comfort, joy, security and peace to the elderly residents is the prime concern of these women. Let us define each of our projects undertaken by the Auxiliary Women. Ou yearly gift of $12,000 to the Home helps towards the maintenance of the Home. Next to this, special medical care is our concern. As an illustration, let us cite the case of Mrs. M., 83 years of age. She has been a resident at Douglas Gardens for less than six months. The change in Mrs. M. during these six months has been tremendous. Doctors and nurses have f r ee d her from the half-world of sedatives in caring for ber fractured hip. Now freed from intense physical pain, she has entered with renewed spirit into the rehabilitation program mapped out for her. Drugs have reduced her swollen legs to normal. She has learned to walk. Faint movement is returning to her paralyzed hand. A woman of spirit and intelligence, Mrs. M. is beginning to find that life does hold more than pain and dejection. Soon, she will be able to leave the Jack Ablin Memorial Wing, where the sick and incapacitead reside, to enter the Pavilion section, and become a part of the residents' community. This story typifies our Home for the Aged, a flexible Institution of dynamic care for the aged. Although over 100 elderly people live at the Home, they are not alike, nor are their living conditions similar. Labor of Love The Auxiliary Women are proud to participate in this labor of love, which is life-giving and lifesaving. Through our Sidney Appeal Medical Fund, all necessary medication is provided. The Sol and Mollie Silverman Physical Therapy Room, with a trained physical therapist in attendance, will help 1 JM % %  *" '*f• %  <•--* %  1 H %  % %  fl H %  MM. SOI SHVItMAM Mrs. M to walk again and regain the use of her onccparalyzed hand. This is what our Auxiliary is working for — to'give our residents the benefits of all new special medical innovations. In addition to the Senior Women's group, we have two younger women's auxiliaries, which were organized only, a'few years ago. The Junior Auxiliary, under the able leadership of Mrs. Lotus Cole, is to be lauded for its outstanding contributions to the Home'and residents. In addition'to contributing to monthly maintenance an capital funds, it has recently undertaken a "Day Care Program. It has remodeled and renovated the Day Care Room and purchased a 32-passenger bus, which handles the transportation for Day Care folks, as well as take care of the transportation-of our full-time residents. The Hollywood Auxiliary in Hollywood. Fla., has a most dynamic president in Mrs. Stanley Beckerman. The Geronotological Laboratory Mat the Home will permit the University of Miami medical -school to conduct all of its geriatric research, and is the gift of the Hollywood women. This fine group also contributes towards the capital funds of the Home. children .are grown, she has more time to spend on herself, her reading and creative writing... Betty -insists -she will be remembered best-by her chlJoren-wiot as a mother, but as a darri good chauffeur ... • Nettie'Lefkowitz is bursting wittr'the news. Daughter Louise—Mrs. Gerald Smith — just had the mast adorable black-haired baby, Debra Joy. "Nettle is letting Grandpa Phil share in some of the glory, too Trudy Hamerschlag went to Champaign, 111., to visit her son, who is a .professor at the university there, while Helen Sparber stayed on riir New York. Theyboth had .a very harrowingexperience. Coming home from Europe on the SS Indepesdenee.-thsy were two days overdue because of the hurricane. For five days, they wore life jackets .. They're lucky to have come through aiive—*wenty-five people on their ship were hurt. HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL STEELMAN CATERERS 1009 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 3-2826 Happy New Year to All Oui Friends and Patrons COMMERCIAL FISHING SUPPLY CO. 54 SOVTHWEST SOTN STtEET TELEPHONE PR 4*444 BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR COHEN'S BAKERY •SS WuMHtN AVSWM MIAMI BEACH Ji 8-4142 %  T ciiinais re *ii DAVID'S FURNITURE CO. INC APPLIANCES 271* S.W. ttk STREET PNONE IN ft-ISM SEASON'S GREETINGS PALMETTO HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPLY 7334 RED ROAD MO 5-4231 SOUTH MIAMI LAWRENCE DRUG 1*W CORAl WAT Mr. and Mrs. Lorry SHNUN Wish Their Many Friends A Happy New Year I Extend HOLIDAY GREETINGS and Best Wishes to All MMm PkillipH New Year Greetings to All OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Chris' Beauty Salon BEAUTIFUL HAIR STYLING 1672 ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH Phone IE 8-1912 Mi. and Mzs. Laurelli A Happ\ And Prosperous New tfi To AM OUT Friends and Patrons Fisher Jewelry 1433 S.W. 8th STRUT MIAMI Phone FR 4-2468 Milton Fisher



    PAGE 1

    ridoy, September 23, I960 *• Jen I si) Fhrkfiatv Page 3-1 IFCS Works Toward Human Betterment By HAROLD TA.NNEN [resident, Jewish Family and Children's Service L T the annual meeting of Jewish Family and Children's Service this past June, there was shown slide series titled "People With Problems." As lie pictures moved in succession across the screen, were told of family conflicts, the troubled child, !< %  little girl who had to be placed in a fester oarding home, the family where the mother had go to the hospital, the loneliness and fear of \v unwed mother, and the many cases that beset jr older neighbors. We gave thought to the thousnd variations of trouble that beset mankind, that |ague our neghbors, that burden us. It is because there are people with problems tat there is Jewish Family and Children's Servle, for JFCS is one of the answers that humankind as created to meet its troubles. We have such bor words to describe the profound quality of this jbor, this institution, this cooperative effort of psponse to need. "People With Problems" reminded us that it is bt our character to sit idly by when people need kip. We have developed ways of helping, services hil techniques that offer hope and healing. Let le emphasize, though, that it is the attentive con|rn to human social problems in whatever ways ey shape themselves which is the primary la ract eristic. Jewish Family and Children's Service is a r n-profit corporation, incorporated under the laws the State of Florida. Like all such social agents, the charter and by-laws of the organization ve placed the responsibility for general manageent in a board of directors. The expectation of founders of a voluntary social work organizais that the original constructive purposes for kich the organization was created will be conlued so long as these purposes continue to be lid ones. The people who succeed each other the rotating board of directors are those people jour community whose interest an commitment [such that they wish to continue to advance this ticular good cause. The modern social work janization has established a description of what fuld be the qualifications of those who take on important social responsibility of board memship. Commitment to Purpose I In addition to the quality of interest which I re described, and the agreement to carry out duties of attendance and of responsible repretation, the board member also must grow from nth to month and year to year in an underlying of people, of services to people and of the agency works. A board member, in brief, elected from the community as a representative ^he character, quality and morality of the comlity. The board members as a group reflect imitment to a purpose, but they also reveal level of conrmunity compassion. Having in imon their -stewardship in behalf of people with Iblems, they need also to be different from th other, representing different experiences and Ch one independently able to make a unique itributionc This group of people, this board of directors, ermines the general character and direction of agency and sets its policies. The high quality [ service that has characterized the JFCS board been noted'fay many observers. The agency achieves its purpose of helping augh the employment of a staff of professional D Mr. and Mrs. Jack Diamond and family wish their relatives and friends Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear | Mr.and Mrs. Jack Diamond sons, Barry and Bill, of NE 164th St., No. Miami Beach wish their relatives and friends Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Ar. H. M. Drewich end family Ir. and Mrs. Bon Drewich and children Mr. and Mrs. Nat Weiss and children I Mr. and Mrs. Pete Sil v.rmin and children wish their relatives and friends l Happy and Protperom New Tear [Mr. and Mrs. JosaohDoiHWv wish their relatives and friends Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear E Mr. and Mrs. Ill Einbinder and da u ghters wish their relative* and friends Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear HAKOID T4BNEN social case workers guided by a code of professional ethics, committed to dedicated, unselfish service, with skilled, professional training and experience. This community can be proud of the kind of service given by the JFCS staff. For those who may not yet have learned of this, the professional social caseworker not only must have a Bachelor's degree but have attended the full-time, two-year graduate program at an accredited school of social work. Central to their capacity to help people is an unswerving respect for each person as a unique individual having the right to discover and to work toward the fulfillment of his or her own creative aspirations. In helping people with problems, the social caseworker, together with his client, gains insight into individual perplexities and behavior while facing to the character of the social reality in which the client's life is led. Aiding, supporting, adding additional dimensions to these efforts is the work of many more people. There is the clerical staff, standing by and facilitating the professional and management activities. Working together with the professional staff are other professionals — a dental panel, a group of pediatricians, doctors, several lawyers who volunteered to help in particular situations. Participating directly with the staff is our consulting psychiatrist, Dr. Walter White, Jr., and our staff psychologist. Dr. Murray Heiken. In concentric circles, moving out from this central core of primary activities, are associations with other organizations, groups that give direct aid to this program, that cooperate with it, or whom we help in specific ways. They provide the means by which we help in communal planning. The Welfare Planning Council is an example. They are the national organizations in which we hold membership and which establish the standards which guide our practice, such as the Family Service Assn. of America, or the Child Welfare League of America. They are the sister agencies in other cities who need to confer with some family in our behalf or whom we help in like manner. Practical Reality One of the purposes in our work is constructive cooperation, involving, increasing numbers of people in understanding each other and in' giving their energies toward a better and healthier society. Continued on Page 12-1 E Mr. and Mrs. Abe Eisenberg wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew "fear F Mr. and Mrs. Loon Bll and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Mr. Harry Bison wishes his relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Ben Essen and son, Richard wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear F Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Balk end fondly wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tatw Mr. end Mrs. Maxwell PeseJor wish their relatives and friends A Hippy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Feinber* Bill, Dan, Susan and Debbie wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Max P. Fold and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mrs. Herbert Feldan Mr. and Mrs. Albert Feldan and son. Pawl Evan, and Mr. and Mrs. David E. Goodman u'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Mr. —4 Mrs. Joseph FeMbeim with their relenVe* and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Fine and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Fink end daughter. Carle Jane wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year y&iyjj row rrrvb F Naomi and Dick Fink unsh their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Isadora Fischer and family, of 512 75th St., Miami Beech U'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Max Fishman and family u>ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fliegler end family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Forer and children, Henry, Minna Lea, Joseph and Debbie Wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Alvin S. Forrest end children, Linda Gaye, Howard and Roberta Helena wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year G Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goldman and daughters wish their relative* and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Fox and family wish their relatives and friendi A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Frank daughter, Charlotte wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Dorothy and Herb Freedman of 12900 Ixora Circle, Keystone Point wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Charles Freefield and daughter, Sandra, of 1911 Coral Gate Drive ut'sh their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Fried itra CfHWr#fe> Scott, Mark and Diane wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Dr. and Mrs. Nathan Friedman and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mrs. Sernvel A. Frommer wishes her relatives A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Fvrman and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fwternlck wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year GMK and Mrs. Edward Gale wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Year Mr. and Mrs. Efrelnf Gale and cbHdren, Diane and Michael wish thetr relam-es and friends A Happy and Prosperous H**> Tear Mr. and-Mrs. Morris GetHeman and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Ben Giller and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Ben ZJoa Ginsburg and Edwin wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. end Mrs. William Givner and family unsh their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Al Glaseor and sons, Harvey and Bruce wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg with their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Murray Goldberg •nd children, Alan end CynHSIa wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Sam H. Goldman and family U'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Goldstrich and family wish their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Sol and Joeie •ektstrom wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Lillian and Esther Goodman uish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mrs. Emanuei Gordon and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon ant son, Jimmie U'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mrs. Mermen weroon wishes her relatives A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Ike and Florence Cordon u-ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gordon sn'sh their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Gottlieb wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Dr. and Mrs. George A. Graham and sons, Michael, Leo and Jon unsh their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Dr. and Mrs. Henry Green and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. end Mrs. Jack I. Green and children, Linda and Bobby U'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Greenbaum Alan and Geri, of 412 SW 22nd Rd. wish their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Rev. and Mrs. Ben Grossborg and daughters. Rite, Mferi, Judy and Soiy A Happy ond Prosperou* New Tear wish their relatives andfriends Mrs. Pauline S. Grundwerg Moses J„ Saul, Sandra and grandson, Steven wish their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prospetou* New Tear Dr. and Mrs. Bernard K. Guerin end family wish their relatroes ant friends A Happy and Prosperou* New Tear H Mr. and Mrs. Saul Habee and son, Julian U'ish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperou* New Tear Dr. and Mrs, Daniel Hagen and family wish their relatives ond friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hamersmith and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosper** New Tear Mr. and Ben Hausmen and daughter, Peppi wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosper*! New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Isadora Hecht ond children, Isabella, David and Barbara wish their reUbvoeand friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. end Mrs. Samuel I. Herschfeid wish their relatives and friend* A Nappy and Pros p erou* New'Tear Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hoffman and family with their reUnvo* end friend* A Happy and Prosperous Hew Year



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    Friday, September 23. 1960 *Jm-isti rhridttaun There was a most welcome increase in foreign investment — according to official figures foreign investments in the first half of I960 were almost three times as high as in the same period a year before. Eichmann Capture The most dramatic event of the year occurred* in May when Trime Minister Ben-Gurion told a surprised Knesset that Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi responsible for the "final solution" of the Jewish question and quoted as "taking credit" for the murder of at least five million European Jews had been arrested, brought to Israel and would be put on trial here. Israel officials made no secret of the fact that Eichmann was discovered and arrested by agents of IsraelsSecret Police but they naively hoped I hat the place of his arrest could be kept secret. However, when it became widely publicized that Eichmann was captured in Argentina, the Argentine Government protested and demanded Eichrnann's return. When Israel declined the Argentine asked for a Security Council meeting. At the meeting general understanding was shown for Israel's special postion and efforts to bring the Nazi criminal to trial. However there was no getting around the fact that violation of Argentine sovereignty took place and the Council advised Israel to make "adequate reparation." Council members made ft. clear that they considered Israels repeated apologies to Argentine as such "adequate reparation." However, the Argentine Government, possibly under pressure from ultra-nationalist elements which were not unfriendly to the Nazis during the war, continued to insist on Eichmann's return. Argentina recalled her ambassador from Israel as a sign of protest. A special bureau to the Israel Police was put in charge of investigating Eichmann and collecting evidence in preparation for the trial. Israel felt that the trial should transcend mere criminal proceedings and should instead provide an historic confrontation with the events of the holocaust. It was estimated that it may take until late Autumn or probably even until early next year to prepare such a broad trial and the court sessions may last another four to six months next year. Page 7-E Official scroll proclaiming Abba Eban's election to the presidency of the Weizmann Institute of Science is given to Eban at a E rivate ceremony in Rehovot. Left is Dewey Stone, chairman, board of governors. Right is Meyer W. Weisgal, chairman, executive council. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Institute was marked last Dec. 8 in New York City. "In Israel's efforts to strengthen her ties with other nations, important progress was. BMOdS • • •" Israel's exports skyrocket with the assistance of Israel Bond funds. "The nation's economy shows another surge forward. There was abundance in all shops, unemployment was almost non-existent the boom continued ..." While Eichmann's capture and the prepartions for his trial revived the memory of the not-too-distant tragic past of the Jewish people in Europe, another even evoked the dramatic but glorious phase of Jewish history 2,000 years ago. An archaeological expedition organized by the Hebrew University — the largest ever assembled in Israel — spent two weeks in wilderness of the Judean Desert west and southwest of the Dead Sea to search for relics of the Bar-Kochba revolt against the Romans. Of the four groups into which the expedition was divided, particular success beckoned to the one headed by Israel's former Chief of Staff and presently professor of archaeology, Dr. Yigael Yadin. The expedition being assisted by the Israel Army, Yadin's group employed mine detectors in searching through the caves which served as hiding places for the Jewish freedom fighters who made their last ditch stand against the Romans. Bar Kochb* Relics Found The mine detector discovered a bag containing Roman sacrificial vessels, evidently captured by Bar-Kochba from the Romans. The archaeologists also found a large number of skeletons of men, women and children, utensils, spears, swords and other weapons as well as various leather and textile artifacts, all excellently preserved by the completely dry climate of the region. However, the most dramatic discovery was made at the University laboratories a few weeks later. Among the articles found in one of the caves was a leather bag, which obviously belonged to a woman: there was in it a mirror, various colored threads and numerous beads and other jewelry. Among all this there was a bunch of closely folded parchment letters. First it was believed that these might be some private letters sent to the lady who owned the bag by some departed husband or lover. To the joyful surprise of the scientists, however, when the letters were carefully opened it was discovered that they are from the commander of the revolt, Bar-Kochba himself, mostly to one of his sub-commanders. The letters apparently were written before the fighters retreated to the caves and contained various requisition orders and other commands by Bar Kochba. The recipient of the letters, when retreating or fleeing before the Romans, presumably gave the documents for safekeeping to the lady with the bag. The documents provide most important material on the entire BarKochba period. L GREETINGS FOR N£W YEAR r SesMMlC. lehY r I Miami Track Sales r* r 7100 M.W. 7* AVINUR MIAMI, FLONMA CfEETINCS k i DEMPSEY'S RADIO & TELEVISION SALES AND SERVICE j All Work Guaranteed "FAST SERVICE" 704 NX 7T* St. n. Ft 14S5* MM BEST WISHES FOt A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR SHAW BROS OIL CO. Exclusive Distributors of Pure Oil Company Products in SouthEastern Florida tr OUR SPECIALTY it CONDOLENCE BASKETS mSHLY PACKED % %  DELIVERED WITHIN THC NOW FRUIT CIRCUS 1698 S.W. Flagler Ter. • PHONE • £ PR 3-9275-PR 1-2511 -£r MR. LEO CIMENT •f ffc. DIXIE PICTURE FRAME CO. Extends New Year Greetings to All His Friends and Patrons 394 E. 10th Court Phone TU 5-1454 Mr. and Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer -EXTEND TO THEIR MANY r. FRIENDS AND ACQUAINTANCES BEST WISHES FOR THE • NE W YE A R 4JI WE EXTEND SINCERE GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR jfl THE DANIA JAI ALAI PALACE 1 Opening December 12th M HAPPY NEW YEAR We would like fo fake this time fo thank our many Friends for their kind patronage and wish one and all Good Fortune during the coming New Year. STEVUiS MARKETS We Extend Sincere Best Wishes to All Oar Relatives and Friends Dr. and Mrs. AK in F. Gar* and Daaghter Ava Lee etEfrmes ... AIM 'O NOTIONS & TRIM COMPANY ^^u*. • --*MAW ^ A 5 TU R ***.... vaakjHtM **•• •••* iMRrlinMl, Verrtty sfta raaric Starts — WftOlESALE M NX 17* STREET f* 4^, 51 A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL | MR. and MRS. PHILIP R0MER ^ and Family ^ SEASONS GREETINGS MIAMI BEACH TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. • J. F. DavMi.il, Oww 142s ALTON ROAD, MIAMI REACH PHONE M44M1



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    Friday. September 23, 1960 +Jmlsti Fkridlari Page 11-A State Dep 't Eyes Ouster of Envoy Howyi Monere at the Arcrwak hotel in Jamaica, W.I., (top to bottean) are Mr. and Mrs. Allan Goldman, 1630 SW 13th ave sVZL** 1 *Edward I*vinson, 6930 Rue Versailles, and Mr' **VP ovki Rnb. 826 13th ave. They are seen on the Btepsletrdmg to the diving board of the swimming pool at the AxcrwtA. Mrs. Goldman is the fanner Frances Lazarus of Miarm. Mrs. Rubin is the former Jndy Wagtnnn, of Miami'. Mrs Levmson is the fanner Tobie Mi lls, of Miami Beach. Memorial Due For Departed "Honoring Our Beloved Departed" will be the theme of the annual community memorial services sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery Assn. at Mt. Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery and the Jewish section of Woodlawn Park Cemetery. Services will be Sunday, Sept. 25. 11 a.m., at Woodlawn Park. Services at Mt. Sinai are scheduled the same day for 2 p.m. Hyman P. Galbut, president of the association, said that "the services have been timed so that they foil on the Sunday between Rot* Hsshone and Ye*n Kippur. Officiating will be Rabbis Tiber Stern, Beth Jacob; Solomon Schiff, Beth El; and David Lehrfield, Ksessetfc Israel. Cantor William Lipson, of Beth David, and Cantor Maurice Mamches, Beth Jacob, will chant the liturgy. Chairs and tents will be set up at both cemeteries, and prayer books will be distributed. Mt. Sinai Cemetery is at 1125 NW 137th st., Miami. Woodlawn is at 3260 SW 8th st., Miami. WASHINGTON.,(JTA) — Jitate Department sources said this week that a formal request from a member of Congress to Secretary of State Herter to consider ousting Ambassador Mostafa Kamel of the United Arab Republic for injecting an anti-Jewish issue and other involvement in the United States election campaign would be given "appropriate .study and consideration." The Department has requested the full text of the ambassador's speech which was delivered at a! convention of Arab students in this! country. The demand to oust the' Arab envoy came from Rep. Sey1 mour Halpern New York Republican. Citing the ambassador's attack on The Jewish minority" and the candidates, Rep. Halpern said: "There has been enough difficulty with native bigots injecting religi: ous issues into the current election without the ambassador of the UAR entering the fray." Dr. Kamel, in hit address to Arab students in this country at their recent convention, said it was their "duty to enter election activity here to propagandize against Israel and the American Jewish community. Rep. Halpern asked Wr. Herter H the ambassador was to be permitted to instruct Arab nationals in this country on temporary student visas to become "anti religious agitater* as well as political campaign workers in our internal •tec view. Rep. Halpern also asked the Secretary to investigate possible cases of visa abuse by Arab students as a result of the ambassador's political inductions to them. Halpern said the Arab ambassador "openly defamed a section of the American public, our citizens of Jewish faith" as well as injecting himself directly into domestic American political affairs involving (he peertiea taken on the Middle East issue by various candidates. He termed the ambassador's activity "an apparent breach of protocol."' SEABOARD RAILROAD is Pleased to Announce Restoration of Normal DOUBLE DAILY STREAMLINER SERVICE TO AND FROM NEW YORK 9 CONVENIENT DEPARTURES MORNING AND AFTERNOON THE SILVER METEOR LV. MIAMI 9:00 A.M. EASTERN STANDARD TIME THE SILVER STAR LV. MIAMI 1:40 P.M. SILVER FLEET FEATURES: Reclining Coach seats reserved in advance; private room Pullmans,attractive lounge accommodations for all passengers; excellent dining car meals at reasonable prices; "Hospitality Hour"; REGISTERED NURSE, Passenger Service Agent. Far further information on through or local service. Coach and Pullman accommodations, pleat* phone FRanklin 1-6611 or call in person: 173 E. Flagler St., 2206 NW. 7th Ave, Miami; 1S53 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach; 1240 S.I. Eleventh Ave., Hialeah; West Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. W. J. FICHT. G.P.A. SEABOARD RAILROAD THE ROUTE OF COURTEOUS SERVICE Students Conduct Holiday Services Mare than 600 students, from tots j to teens all participating in the | High Holiday services at Beth "Porah Congregation this week. The Alef Congregation for boys and gh-ls, from 5 to 8, under the direction of Miss Sondra Levy and Miss Elaine Edelm'an, begin their worship at 10 a.m. Student Congregation lead by Abraham J. Gittclson, educational director, is holding concurrent services in the school's Youth Synagogue. Teenagers are praying together in the former synagogue building, directed by Hy Novinson. Students themselves are serving as cantors and rabbis, with officers of the Student Congregation assuming leadership roles. Taxpayers Name New Chairman Jacob C. Lefkowitz has been named chairman of the legislative committee of the Miami Beach Taxpayers' Assoc. President Simon E. Rubin, in making the announcement, said that the longtime chairman of the committee, Seymour B. Liebman, had resigned to move to Mexico. Members of the committee are Jack A. Abbott, John B. Denvir, jr.. Dr. I. William Lippman, Mitchell Litvia, Robert Peterson, Donald S. Rose. Marcus O. Sarokin, B. Bayard Strell, George J. Talianoff, Henry Waitzkin, Pawl C. Wimbish, and Raphael K. Yuncs. Miamian Gets Top Award Murray A. Best, of Prudential Insurance Company, was awarded the coveted C.L.U. designation at national conferment exercises of American College of Life Underwriters in Washington, D.C., last week. Left to right are Eugene Beck, Florence Diffendorfer and Welter Lebowitz as they display a Proclamation by Mayor D. Lee Powell designating Sept. 12 to 17 as Registration Week : .n Miami Beach. Registration books are available at Miami Beach City Hall during this period. Alter Sept. 17, it w411 be necess a ry to re gister in person at 116 W. FTogler St.. Miami. .^ 7Qj>Ay$-6NigrlTS MIAMI % %  NO TAX round-trip tourist fare included &> u uest'rffa**^ VTsft glamorous, summer-cool Mexico via Guest Airways — famed for passenger-pampering service. But the tiuest flight is erdy half the fun — for a complete itinerary of everything this unbeatable tour has to offer contact your travel agent or send the coupon below to us. In axWrtton to Mexico City, you'll visit Cuernsvaca, Taxco and see so much more. But don't miss out — do it now!



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    Friday. September 23. 1960 +Je*isti FkridHcW Page IW Israel's Excellent Philharmonic Orchestra m Continued from P B 4.Q certs within a fortnight. Opera with all of its inherent splendor and aura drew very large crowds during this season's performances of "Falstafi" and the "Marriage of Figaro" under the baton of Carlo Maria Giulini; a concert version of "La Forza del Destino" will be the third treasured opera performance of this season with a New York Metropolitan cast headed by conductor Erich Leinsdorf and tenor Richard Tucker. Since the operas are staged so far only at the Mann Auditorium, special buses convey opera lovers from remote Carmel and Jerusalem to Tel Aviv. Afternoon Youth Concerts with special emphasis on Israeli composers, the once-a-month Israel Forces concert and the open-air concerts held at various agricultural settlements during the summer season are the other activities of the Philharmonic. List of Talent Another unusual "extra" concert held on May 25 of this year at Isaac Stern's suggestion was an optn-air concert attended by 2,000 people in Elath. The bringing of music to this culturally starved southern point was suported by the Defense Ministry and the Elath Municipality which bore the cost of flying the musicians down. A similar unorthodox .venture was the concert conducted by Leonard Bernstein at Beersheba for the armed forces. The IPO was never a humble undertaking. From the outset the ensemble numbered 72 members recruited from 14 different countries. At present there are 102 instrumentalists, many of them Israeli born and graduates of Israel musical academies. Likewise, pianists, conductors and composers of domestic vintage such as Pnina Salzman, Eajiid Jferenboim^Jlontt Aajuv Sigj^Weissenberg, George Singer, Michael Taube, Yahli Wagman, Joseph Kaminski, Oedeon Partos, Menahem Avidom, Paul Ben-Haim and Marc Lavry are featured on billboards and concert programs freely intermixed with the big names from abroad. American and Asian Tour Today the orchestra's fame rings out on all continents, for when it is not touring and being heard in live performances, it can be heard on "Columbia-H.M.V." recordings and on Decca recordings under conductors Paul Kletzki, Joseph Krips. Rafael, Kubclik. and George Solti. In 1951 the orchestra made a coast-to-coast tour of the United States, followed four years later by a European tour that took in 40 different cities. Now, once more, the orchestra will take off in October on a coast-to-coast tour of the United States. Under the auspices of tne America-Israel Cultural Foundation and the management of Sol Hurok, the orchestra will play in Washington, Hartford. Boston. Rochester, Detroit. Kansas City, Houston, and Minneapolis under conductors Krips and Ormandy, and will close its tour with a benefit performance at Madison Square Garden in New York on November 29. On its return home journey, the orchestra will perform in India, Manila and Japan through the sponsorship of the home Foreign Office. As an instrument of good will, as a favored cultural export item — and one is reminded of Russia's Bolshoi, France's Comedie Francaise, America's Porgy and Bess troupe — we have the words of a former American diplomat to the effect that the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra is a more persuasive instrument than any government representatives may be in gaining prestige for itself and the country it represents. An American View of 'Who is a Jew?' Continued from Pace 5 G same answer to the question. Who is a Jew? A Jew is a Jew by birth ... a Jew is he who is 'of the seed of our patriarch Abraham.' According to Jewish tradition, wrote Felsenthal, a Jew was the offspring of Jewish parents, while "the offspring of a Jewess were under all circumstances considered as Jews." In the eyes of the synagogue, the rule was, "Once a Jew, always a Jew," even in cases of apostasy; "marriages between a male Israelite and an apostate Jewess, or between an apostate Jew and a perfect Jewess, were considered to be valid and legally admissible and the offspring of such .marriages had the status of Jews." In addition, finally, to Jews "born as such," those "who were accepted into the fold of Judaism as proselytes" were recognised as Jews. Having outlined the traditional view. Dr. Felsenthal asked: "Can all these ancient ecclesiastical laws, all these old rules and regulations, which originated in times long gone by, still be maintained? Ought all of them to be maintained?" For the Israeli rabbinate, as recent events showed, the answer was emphatically affirmative, but for the American Reformer, many of "these ancient ecclesiastical laws" were "to a large extent nonsense." What was not nonsense, wrote Felsenthal, was the 'tperfect doctrinal freedom granted in ancient Judaism, and the new Judaism should certainly not give up that bright jewel in the crown of old Judaism, and should not create a mental thraldom for those who adhere to it, or desire to adhere to H." Dr. Fclsenthal's answer to the question was direct and explicit: "We-need-but-state that a Jew is a Jew in consequence of his birth, or in consequence of his formal application and adoption, and that heaemains a Jew as long as he does not openly and unmistakably separate himself from-the Jewish community. To no one should be denied the name of 'Jew' who honestly maintains and believes that he stands upon Jewish grounds, and that his whole religious life and that all bis religious views are rooted in Jewish grounds and have grown up from Jewish germs." It is precisely here, of course, that Dr. Felsenthal and the Israeli tradilionists of today would be in sharpest disagreement. For the Chicago rabbi, anyone who identified himself as a Jew — regardless of his antecedents — was to he accepted as a Jew. For the Israeli rabbinate — and, as a result of its influence, for the Israeli Government — one must have had a Jewish mother or have been converted to Judaism in due conformity to traditional rabbinic regulations in order to qualify as a Jew. The American Jewish Archives on the Cincinnati campus of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion has in its files many other items relating to American Jewish life and thought at the turn of the century. Dr. Jacob R. Marcus is the Director of the Archives. HOLIDAY GREETINGS THE AND BEST WISHES PARTY LINE EMIUC'S BEAUTY SAMA0N 1029 KANE CONCOURSE Msrfecfhre Accessories for Every Party • GREETING CAMS 0 STATIONERY 9464 HARDING AVE. UN 5-7434 UN 4-1714 UNion 9-7519 Beat Wishes to All Our GREETINGS TO ALL Patrons and Frisnds BAY HARBOR M0AD CAUSEWAY CITIES SERVICE JWRSERY SCHOOL BAY HARBOR ISLAND 9500 Bay Harbor Terrace UN 6-9472 % % % %  UN6-99S7 SINCERE mints 10 AU JEWtr for a %  Am MW VIA* •ndSo* mutr MRS. JACK HIRSCH GREETINGS ro AU SAM SPUN AMBER FUEL Oft G4M/ on MIAMI It ACM mONf JE t-0735 J~lc*rbor 1 if *^n rjs iac am Greet the New Year Best Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year Broad Causeway mi Town of Bay Harbor Islands Mayer Shepard Bread Councilman J. M. Lelchufc Councilman David M. Abel Councilman George M. $099 Councilman Eugene S. Cooper Councilman Stanley Tale Councilman Joseph J. Gardner Edward H. Preble, Town Manager TO ALL A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR Young t^opnisticcttes 9526 HARDING AVf. r 1 Pre-Teen. Junior and Junior Miss Fashions WT\\ UN 5-7351 Greetings to AU • £*lizat>etlt tzftra* en ions JE 2-2383 667 LINCOLN RD. UN 5-3586 9592 HARDING AVE. MORNING STAR EVENING STAR Holiday Greeting* • • • from AL GRANOFF — LOU ROSENBERG of the STAR APARTMENTS Boy HQrDor Islonds Luxurious Furnished or Unfurnished 2 & 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths—Central Air-Conditioning & Heat MODEL AFT. 1150-103rd STREET UN 54432 NORTHERN STAR SOUTHERN STAR Greeting* to AU • • • BAY HARBOR FINE FOOD MARKET FANCY GROCERIES • PRIME MEATS 1077 • 95th STREET Free Delivery UN 5-0331 UN 54332 HAPPY NEW YEAR tlAHMMW 1009 KANE CONCOURSE UN 6-9237 maBoaaSSBSBBJ



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    Ptaa> 4-/ lafchataj "OewisH Fiaridian '•* OFFICE and FLKRT — 12: K£ Sixth Street Teienfiane FR 3-4SQ5 QfTTTr -eicatice.; MTI-TTPTWX 396 FEED i:. %  KXSTT E ditor and Public LEO MDJDLIN E xeeutxwe Editor Puttiahed tr> IT ion* Mm-' ItS" l> Tb* lU %  %  oo n %  *.•' T-.rrf'^P*'ara>eaK v. •* warn "> Bu epewCr 9 RocfaNl "IMC. 1-r %  •rvic %  an w fcaven Art* Faaiu'c f.awafia^ barton*' Mai) to Ike eaten: ^, oiucuhe to apeoa ^2 JJtUe beiwee:. toe j 9 man— ri wifa Rockwer and luff wao rapaaiitj to ^ %  aid m -n\mM iW 10 *=tr tmj.i-v-. -Jtwiin Nv-a>t>aU>-• %  wad. the Amajican BKtr %  OS 0 aevoia COUaatS< RtataaaaWd uwT. St. EttBabetr~ toe/ui rue oomnuunenat the govenaa meota; minima Hm. FTaa "* ba pa*** i.mmuUCM. tor LB* y c. ISRAEL BUREAU Ben Yettua.. — fieJ Ar.v. BINDEL o mere lAingE to cente m the days ahW Isree. ConespotiaerVounae 33 Number Fririav Septemoe: 2 2 Turn; 5721 Survey Weea: aner weecthroagnou: toe veer tne editsaaaa cr this oaae rettec: me eeanaine moocL aes c: wariawie^ nanaaa Bad locc. rmrT the ettec: tne lewis:, cammumrv On tne occc -os:. hasnon. ~~. ena %  aafcajg : :ajce „ nacxw~raiance at eame of tn^ mcnc manner toe pastwelve monrns mat ier. more a m oment nr-.aeoressioi B*aa Bad Tram wnic; noune m tne aavs c: tn^Nev. rear enaac %  DiTlKMINATlOh HER: UK AMtOAL rmg tne outcome Hee-rev 'leer 572= rox. c: acti-Semitr mnoea u nan;rr—r.r wire toe Ccns :r.c_s Ev? aaaerronor. o: tne Synnoooue of Coioane :nEr tiooaed mroue.tne tanuiv ot nanar c: ~ aiver. sicmj to mrrre toe:; mar, :; *verrrciowarid iwisr. communirv It toe aeaearation.-; 0 6 dot toe xair.: or Naxisa: is tar natr. noga German-, tnev ais-o aamansaatetoot toe voutxi oirro-tone f Tin oc r at:: not?ans are aio miectE noasuv joaouxr. f" ^^ maianr c ta< :_;ar.t opnrenanaec were (sen-oners mar.o: wnarr. anas irair aohz =itoes. moEt ot wnor. mdmatej: tne: tnev jaaitv xnsviiittie aoou: Adoi ctne tatc* tnJewi tr.ev learned at scnoo. Hine: Tnir-_ Rei^i n. tneir nana waa' E THING! ID COMf And. wnat toey iearnea c: scnoo. a faMBOa c: leas: was precioui htUt Tnu^ emergi;: aetMa.occurrences ^-D the aecisio! ootr. nere anc aoroad tor a reevaiuotion o: ou: teachinc vz-zznmm* wttn r— n e ct u Nazism anc the renewed cetermma Man Dv itonr-. tne: toey tne sacred Six Miliio:. snal nc: r>e toraotteiBut Nazi nhiinopn% Germar. styie weno: tne onlane: niaauma tne American jewis: community a nnng toe outaoinc Henrev.Year A bflBH :;awr variant m tne IUUII o: Georae iuncoir. Rocrwtl. apfMB*d ox. the scene o: the nation %  capital to naxanqne Wasninato:.. D.C. crowds or. tne MaL rrnp to aavocaie tne wnoiesaie aaxsinc of U^ jewr\-. Wnat a no uld nave round a unitec America;, je* cornniunrr. touna c dmaed one instecc Tnere tnone erno called Hocirweli c penn\ Hnia/r onlmiNd he nhou ld oe ignored Tnexe were otoers wao i iua —a a loud rn in uc r. cr\to preven: ius noldtnc r a i iie s m New \ aric City. and woo squeicaee nis aiKHmjum AS tnmaiMK rumm Amtricat: immm -mm* 4*,uied on the, o: Ruccwel. tnev mmi aiatBei fa i.. a prouc tohowuic the -n-nmrii—n o w a tmec oue o: the MM .nd or taxaagJ s.o: :ae yearthe nw p fiL or Km, Pulekir ^ Ettmnax. Ane: 1^ yean, oi *xiich tne Gurioi. came to the United Tit anil mi m New Y wit: WeeGermar ChaaaaUar Xanrac AaaoaK spoxe onefjv witr. ^ 1 Thiiil ej the Wim Houee and dined at the haaw of Vice PnOas Nixox. What emeraec soon these oanwenanaaea pemapK iees d e buui w e mar wca* ami on: o: his %  iiheeqeeijt talks with TIBC Premier "nimii. be Gauue h Pant One thmn IB ''—tin DacasBiOD thet was of the ijumiui) teneaans m the Modie Easi—*eaene* braeght to tever ma at tne cioee at the Tieiaiii Year eat h Pmne Minster ItenL. Coula mew ixh crrwf oeex. rruittu!" in the lace of Ko> eer t ratrtmintiq vxaaataane c tr? Iirra: NaaaaB Charter and ieliiii 11 mi av nens witr l e xu e c tr toe Sue? Can and Prexiaent Eaenhowe: 1 rvunhee: ec vow that th? cane. wrr__ r 1 -cper. z lsrasi: snronmc. no? werv war i %  "" this wet: Now: loined the othei il^i—^*zr. c masc tak 'Jailed NaOoos in New luce tnrothcB Tv ne em welrcm^ liuaen*—who pramr %  *c Aaxb tp" M r I Oh Tiff CtfJSTH? 1 SWB --M fa—lw i-waaaaa \ |ei •d toal; tea tne roue we [ -xte^coaah> aaxe wmeb cs 'tii 1 nd natfcme! atieneo.. wi edbxd coiamns trarr. the oarre. c *^w.-. Floridaan an BOB ajaen wnoteeate ttauu g h i i i Miami eaeid aaakfaoc to fewixr •.Tjiini a —iay need* (To: acfaccy* lafja aee Sec. fi ax I Greater Miami fewa: -eaerotict. afto: 22 yea's u. exdescee as Dade )aw1 centra! tarasWatabxc one coeunanrty otaan TV. ozgaabcabac.. >un. mace vi Ma* i fcecrra from than nww." • % %  %  Ibecto: Arrbt. Roeiche: ho reTxvrt *howmci an anno a IOC '* %  c "Trr.Tvi.o. fwoi? e-i oai %  --'"rriuntnreodpaeaes& FOJ hi B 01 unchine et the H61 Coa**"* em Me ai ie4iaa on the ooaVBtor. af ** "~ ^-r'. -. them*.!: caBaJ*"! 'THIOiMM ~*wer the call trf •b?r tv-rwe beer dotae or *<^and ir. th* -•uriac the breeohtflBb 'or fee Slowof iaajel frr o-h i^ a i i w jnu" tc behalf of th load — ta ctio Towa=



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    Friday, September 23, 1960 • Jenistncrkfian Page 13-G Weizmann Institute's New Atomic Reactor Continued from Page l-O .-.."> OB" v heat generated just as a normal power station uses the heat pi educed tuL*faurning co.l^oc petroleum. A reseai rt iawl lj e alT U| i H P* iiitswunl) the radiation. Nevertheless gigantic shields are essential to prevent the slightest danger of radio-active leakage. The site of the reactor was chosen so that there could be no possible danger to man, water or cultivated soil. It stands close to the sea, on a lonely stretch of dunes West of the village of Yavneh. where Joachanun ben Zafaai founded his famous Academy of Learning nearly two thousand years ago. It is perhaps fitting that this mighty tool of science should be at the same site. Temple of Science From the point of view of isolation the setting is certainly ideal; Robinson Crusoe himself did not enjoy such solitude. On all sides stretch the lonely and desolate dunes. The reactor was placed near the sea because the flow of underground water in Israel for a distance of five kilometers from the shore is towards the sea, while further East it flows inland: if the underground water should become radio-active the infected water will flow harmlessly into the ocean. A gaunt grey, concrete structure dominates one of the dunes, its sides a series of fluted panels and its crown a great dome. The entrance of this formidable temple of scientific worship is through two great doors in the concrete wall that remind one somehow of the entry into a prison. But once inside the building, one finds, somewhat surprisingly, light and charm in the laboratories that lie between the entrance and the reactor itself. There is a wall of glass and a gracious courtyard, with aesthetically shaped columns rising from narrow bases. In the floor of each laboratory are several sealed vent-holes to a tunnel which runs underneath them; through these holes the laboratories will receive electricity, gas and what ever utilities they may require. A door from the laboratories area leads to a vast room housing the "swimming pool" containing the reactor. 21 meters above is the ceiling of the dome: high up near the top is a great beam designed to support a 12-ton crane. The "swimming pool" is a concrete tube which contains a column of water seven meters in height. The reactor itself, the holy of holies, is only sixty cms. high and is at the bottom of the pool. Radioactivity is gradually absorbed as it passes upward through the water: at <\e top of the column there is no radiation at all and men can work there in safety. The concrete walls are 1.80 meters thick and are made of a special heavy concrete containing barium sulphate stone imported from Italy: the resulting mixture is one and one half times as heavy as ordinary concrete and has never before been used in Israel. The giant slab of cement was cast non-stop for 103 hours under vibration. Round-the-Clock Inside the concrete wall, near the base, are two eight inch holes arcl four six inch holes through which the scientists can draw off supplies of radioactivity for their experiments. The fuel itself weighs only about two kilograms but a time comes when it has to be renewed: it remains radio-active for six months after burr.-un. To remove those two kilograms from the pool Che crane lowers an eightton shield of lead through the water and the fuel Is extracted under this guard to be sent to the I'nitedStates for renewal. Prof. Israel Dostrovsky, head of the Weizmann Israel's Nuqlear Reactor, situated west of the village of Yavneh, in the vicinity of the Weizmann Institute. Institute's Department of Isotope Research, on loan to the Israel Government, was recently appointed director of the Scientific Development Projects Division of Israel's Ministry of Defense. He is also director of Research of Israel's Atomic Energy Commission. Dr. Dostrovsky will determine the work to be done at the reactor. Another Weizmann Institute scientist. Dr. Israel Pelah, will serve as the scientific director of the reactor. According to Dr. Pelah, the reactor will work 24 hours a day and will be "cleaned" every 10 days. Israel will use the reactor in several ways. One of the primary purposes is to train a generation of scientists completely familiar with reactors. Research will be both pure and applied. Among applied research projects that will facilitated are tests of materials, welds and castings. Israel is also interested in the production of isotopes for medical purposes. Every isotope has a certain life expectation; its "half-life" is the point at which half its radio-activity disappears. The isotope of cobalt used in the treatment of cancer, has a "half-life" of 5 years and obviously Israel cannot produce cobalt in competition with America. But there are other isotopes which have a "half-life" of a few days which can be advantageously produced in this small country: some of these are of considerable medical importance as they can be left in the body. Among pure research projects will be the investigation of the structure of the atom and of crystals and the location of single atoms and molecules. Another major investigation will be into the effects of radiation on plastics and the production of new plastics. Radiation changes the gene structure and new desirable qualities can be introduced into plants. The Americans, for instance, have produced corn containing sugar instead of starch. Plants can be made disease-resistant and sprouting of potatoes or decomposition of meat delayed. Pests may be eradicated. In Central America a certain insect was wiped out by radiation because the females mated only once and the males (the weaker sex) became sterile after being subjected to a small amount of radiation. Foodstuffs can be preserved. "Science is largely playing around," says Dr. Bergman, chief of the Atomic Energy Commission of Israel. "And Israel's scientists are thrilled to have a chance to play." The reactor was designed by American architect Philip Johnson. A young Israeli. Gideon 7..\\ was sent to work with him. The reactor parts were supplied by the American Machinery and Foundry which has built several research reactors in various parts of the world. Part of the electronics equipment was made in Israel. The total cost, including the road and other development, is just over $3,Continued on Page 15 G BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR OPALOCKA LUMBER CO. 2455 AU BAB A AVENUE Phone MU 1-2313 Rest Wishes tor a Happy New Year HERTZ CORP. MIAMI.... MIAMI BEACH eJE 4-4661 A. C. ALLYN & CO. MEMBERS OF NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE (ASSOCIATE) MIDWEST STOCK EXCHANGE INVESTMENT SECURITIES Chicago New York Boston Miami Beach Federal Bldg. LINCOLN RD. AT WASHINGTON AVI. Miami Beach 39, Ha. JEfferson 8-4731 TO ALL ... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR JOSEPH H. MURPHY YOUR CORAL GABLES CITY COMMISSIONER 1C SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR .* JM 1 MR. and MRS. DONALD BERKOWITZ and FAMILY PHILIP BERKOWITZ MR. and MRS. AL BERKOWITZ and FAMILY MR. and Mrs. ABE BERKOWITZ and FAMILY MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ and FAMILY MR. and MRS. LEO BRA VERM AN and FAMILY MR. and MRS. WALTER MACKAUF and FAMILY BEST WISHES TO ALL OUR FRIENDS FOR g\ A HAPPY NEW YEAR Miami Title and Abstract Company. Hyland Rifas David R. Rifas 25 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY TW| 124 SECURITY TRUST BLDG. end 136 N.E. FIRST STREET Phone FR 3-8432 HOLIDAY GREETINGS ... __ ^ TRAIL AUTO REFINISHING j£ BODY ft FENDER REPAIRS j£j Workmanship and Material Fully Guaranteed WHERE THE PROMISE IS PERFORMED ARNOLD M ULRICH. Prop. 3215 S.W. 8th STREET Phone HI 3-3177 NAPPY NEW YEAR TOWER TACKLE CO. Known from Ceest-fo-Coesf for Tap Qualify Merchandise ef Florida's lowest Prices In MIAMI 2197 N.W. 7th AVENUE Phone FR 9-2201 In FT. LAUDERDALE 1008 NE. 10th AVENUE Phono JA 4-2778 NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM YVETTE BAXTER OF ROt'i.EVARD FLORMST CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS F10WERS 8Y WIRE FREE DELIVERY 3031 Biscay ne B lvd. Phone FR 4-5017, R 9-4801 Mr. and Mrs. Saul Kenholz one FAMILY Eifead Best Wishes To The tmt'm Jewish CommunEify for A Very Hoy New Year THE BERMAN AND LEVITT FAMILIES OF d HI-GRADE FOOD CO. 7200 N.W. 29th Ave. MAM Phone OX 1-09*1 t fend lest Wishes to AN their Friends and Patrons far e Heeey New Year NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL BAMMGARDNER AUTO TAG AGENCY, INC 1375 N.W. 36th Street Miami 42. Florida NE 5-1082 — Phones — NE 5-2623 NOlfBAY CRKTINCS ... RADIANT HEALTH FOODS, IXC. vnAJAiNS "MJeesPs Peeeler Neelfh Stares" Salt-free AMU H. REISER 125 SeyfceM Arteee Mieoai 32, Fie. Sofer-Froe Feeds rkeete PR J-32JJ



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    ^ Friday. September 23. 1960 +Jtwisti fhrkilan Pag J*T ll to be excused, one to make a phone call, the other to post a letter. The moment they were gone the third, our host, whispered, "Be careful of those other two. Have you got a prayer book to give me? The others soon returned and a general conversation ensued during the course of which I was drawn to the window by the man who had made the phone call. "Lt me show you some local landmarks," he began. "You see that church spire," and in a hushed voice, "don't say too much in front of them... It was built by the Czar Nicholas. It was only a matter of time before the third visitor found his opportunity to warn us of the unreliability of his colleagues asking at the same time if we could spare a Jewish calendar. His only proviso was that the others should not know. This is how we spent afternoon tea at a Jewish home in Kiev. Similarly, one could laugh or cry, depending on one's outlook, at the scenes we witnessed in another Jewish home in Moscow. Our host was a widower, a man in his forties, who caught us in Red Square and pushed a note into my hand. "Please come and visit me at the above address. I have nothing left to lose," the note said. We accepted the invitation and the man's joy on our arrival was overwhelming. We were embraced, made to sit down, and were then enjoined to tell him of our lives back home. Simple things like buying a newspaper in Jerusalem became transformed in his eyes into an act of great consequence. He stared hard at the Israeli cigarette Left to right are Julian B. Venezky, Samuel Rothberg and Israel Foreign Minister Golda Meir in tete-a-tete during Mrs. Meir's recent visit to the American Jewish community. "Thus, there are people who refrain from chanting in the synagogues 'Next year in Jerusalem'..." I gave him but refused to smoke it. Eventually he opened a drawer and extracted a bottle hidden beneath towels and sheets. It had a familiar label, "Carmel Wine from Rishon le Zion, Israel. "This," he proudly explained, "has been in my possession for five years. Now for the first time I have found a fitting occasion to open it." In spite of our protests, he pulled the cork and carefully, very carefully poured the drink. Some drops fell on the saucer. "Nothing must be wasted," he said, and repourcd them into the bottle. We drank "le Hayim," and the tears he had tried so hard to subdue finally broke forth. Many Russian Jews have relatives in Israel though but few correspond with them for fear of the consequences. We returned to Israel with many a scribbled note, some in Russsian, some in Yid* dish and others in Hebrew, giving names and addresses of parents, brothers, sisters and children residing in Israel. These notes were never written publicly; they were placed into our hands or pockets. One such note which I have now before me reads, "To my dear sister Miriam. I am well. Your brother Raphael. Is our father still alive?" Some people did not even dare to take the chance of scribbling a note. There was the case of the man who fell in step with me on the Odessa street having obviously recognized my country of origin by the white Jerusalem skull cap on my head, and the Hebrew newspaper protruding from my pocket. "I have a brother there," he whispered. "What's his name?" I asked. "Moshe what?" I asked again. "Never mind," was his only answer and with that he turned and crossed the street. Presumably it was wiser that I should not know his surname just in case we had been seen. To the Western mind, such behavior might seem incomprehensible. To the Jew in Russia today, it is the norm. The Soviet regime has made • it that way. It is the result of the "Doctor's Plot," Contiucd en Page 13-F M GREETINGS ABUC 2808 Ponce de Leon Blvd. A. H. SOROKA DOROTHY SOROKA "CHARM For Your WINDOWS' ALL TYPES OF CORNICES COVERED OR PAINTED $lt COVItS nd IEUPHOLSTUY King Company "On the Trail" 3473 S. W. 8th STREET Phone HI 6-6872 TOPS IN CORNICES CUSTOM MAOf WMPfS NEW YEAR GREETINGS PRINTING ARTS 1300 N.W. 29lh Street ;k, Jew., mmm, M t W* • %  *" TO ALL — GREETINGS AUTO AIR-CONDITIONING CO. 3551 N.W. 14th AVENUE NE 44069 NEW YEAR GREETINGS FRANK and MACK'S GARAGE GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS Specializing in Auto AirConditioning 108 S.W. lit COURT FR 9-9810 R^R^R^RM %  R^RT 18 IBS3 ^^k M W / May the new year f / be bountiful f / end may you enjoy -• goodly measure of happiness. W f peace and prosperity { % CHASE -• I s E R /K L__



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    Friday. September 23. 1960 +Jmlst> ihrkUan Page 13-1 Excitement ruas high at the weekly basketprogram of the branches of the Greater Miball league games conducted for the girls' ami Jewish Community Center, clubs, as well as boys' clubs, in the teen-age Serving the Community on All Age Levels Continued from Pag 6 1 organized two thriving new groups in the suburbs, launched a new volunteer leadership corps, took a leading role in the U. S. Senate hearings on the aged, wound up the year with a first-time convention of Golden Agers from all branches. • This was a truly different year for the Early Childhood Development Program, where a psyIchiatric consultant was added to help guide the [teaching staff in the handling of special problems, [where a new scholarship program began to serve |the children of needy families, where a beginning jwus made in planning services to the handicapped. • This was the year when everyone in the >nter started talking about the need for larger, lodern, and attractive facilities, about obtaining land on which to build these facilities, about a [campaign that would someday soon begin. • This was the year when our teen-agers overwhelmed us (and the National Jewish Welfare [Board) by their mature handling of discussions on 'Values of Today's Youth" at their sixth annual Iconclave. • This was th? year that our research project .on "attitudes and interests of youth" was selected [for presentation at the National Conference of %  Jewish Communal Service, receiving widespread lattention. • This was the year when the first Women's (Division (at the &£:ami Beach Branch) got off to a flying .start a.> a new kind of association to help I further the cause af the Center in the community. • This was the year when the Center teamed [up with the University of Miami School of Radio. [Film and TV and the School of Medicine to produce an experimental film on group work with the aged. • This was the year for so many special things — only a continuous tape recorder at all places at all times could actually tell the story. Finally, it was also the year when the Center, banding together with other responsible agencies, recognized its obligation to help cope with serious community financial problems, by streamlining its fiscal operations, increasing its internal revenue, going all-out to assist both campaigns which give the Center its main support — the United Fund and the Combined Jewish Appeal — but, despite all this, permitting no letdown in the alert for the next step up to higher standards, better service, and fulled coverage to meet communal needs. And so, you continue to strive for self-improvement in the work of your agency, in your efforts to communicate its meaning to the public — and you hope that somehow, by this striving, you will make progress on your own front for a happier and healthier New Year ahead for all. AJCommittee Scene Continued from Pag* 9-1 ter, several service committees have functioned continuously. Of particular interest and importance has been the Fact-Finding Committee which, under the guidance of Herbert L. Markow, has kept constant track of the activities of the major hate-mongers in this area. In all this activity, the chapter has leaned heavily on its program committee. Here, through the skilled leadership of Mrs. David P. Catsman and Mrs. James R. Katzman, plans have been made for bringing about maximum learning opportunities for all AJC members and their friends. GREETINGS PRECISION OPTICAL REPAIR CO. Binocular-Micro*cope-Tele*cope REPAIR SPECIALISTS HERBERT BOEHAAKE, Manager 2221 Coral Way HI 5-1661 TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS WINSTON W. WYNNE TO ALL GREETINGS FLORIDA NUT COMPANY "Roasted Nuts" 1238 N.E. 2nd AVENUT FR 1-4252 Greetings to All for a HAPPY NEW YEAR H. P. RICH NE 4-2905 2024 N.W. 32nd STREET Miami, Fla. { MAYO am! SttYEY • YOUR LOCAL C— ^crailiac <^alesrnen &xtenJ J^est tl'/*/ie to their many fritnAa for a veru V^^<^^V< V'^* *^'>* rf *W^^' ^'"V^^^'^' ^' V >^* V GREETINGS LANE BRYANT I WOMEN'S APPAREL MIAMI-320 East Flagler, Ph. FR 3-8442 MIAMI BEACH -1001 Lincoln Rd., Ph. JE 8-8411 | FT. LAUDERDALE -2533 E. Sunrise Blvd., Ph. LO 6-7671 | "Visit Our Fur Department and Compare" J§ Member Downtown Park Shop j§| Customer Parking in Rear TO ALL MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS DR. BEN J. SHEPPARD "YOUR JUVENILE JUDGE-ELECT" 3009 Salzedo Street Coral Gables TO ALL GREETINGS RICE'S HONEY HOUSE ;i BOTTLED HONEY | R. R. RICE'S SELECTED FLORIDA HONEY | "HUMPTY DUMPTY PRODUCTS" 5880 N.W. 22nd Avenue NE 5-8022 TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS j NORMAN'S RESTAURANT ] Box Lunches 2711 N.E. 2nd Avenue FR 3-9315 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL CARWOOD KENNELS ARTHUR WOODS 9385 S.W. 79th AVENUE DICK MCCARTHY Phene MO 7-4987



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    PMI Friday, September 23, 1960 fJewist ftcridian Page 3-E Role of the Chazzan in Jewish Tradition By RUTH MORRIS gVERY people fashions its songs to suit its spirit !" and to reflect in its chant its inner'moods and characteristics. The vast realm of tune and melody shows best the achievements and the traits of a people. The Talmud orders that the Bible should be read in public and made understood to the listeners in a musical, sweet voice. But a deep understanding can be achieved only by singing the Torah. Hazanuth, a term derived from Hazzan (cantor) was the name given to synagogue as a whole. Later, the term was transferred to designate the office and the profession of precentor. In ancient times, the office of Chazzan was different from what it is now. The word, derived from the Assyrian language meaning "overseer", is used in the Talmud in this meaning. At that time, the Chazzan was in charge of many communal affairs and his place was on the "Bimah." He took care of the sacred vessels in the synagogue, took out the holy scrolls of the Torah from the Ark and returned them afterwards. He often served as reader of the weekly portions in the Torah. It was he who made all public announcements and sometimes assisted the schoolmaster in teaching the children. The Talmud also mentions that the Chazzan used to accompany the pilgrims to Jerusalem to offer "Bikkurim"' (the first fruits) in the Beth Hamikdosh. During Middl* Ages Centuries later, during the peroid of the Gasnim, the Chazzan was increasingly relied upon to act as "Baal Korch" (Reader of the Torah) and "Sheliach Tzibbur'' (Deputy of the Congregation) and these functions became an essential part of his office since the knowledge of Hebrew and the ability to read in the Torah were not as widespread as before. The Chazzan was also a "Baal Tefilah" (Leader in Prayer) and as a representative of the congregation, had to be unanimously elected and acceptable to all. During the Middle Ages, the office of the Chazzan was held in especially high esteem. There were many learned men and sages among the singers. They were renowned for their piety and excellence of character. Most of the Piyutim were composed by them. The greatest of all Paytanim, authors of Piyutim, Rabbi Elazar Hakalir, was a was a Chazzan. The great achievements of synagogal music of the past century are rooted in the relentless efforts of the synagogue singers of the preceding century. • As all other spiritual values, the synagogue song is a tonal expression of the long history and martyrdom of Israel during the Dark Ages. It is an exalted expression of its high and eternal ideals, and when properly rendered by the traditional interpreter, the Chazzan, it has always left and does so still, a deep impression upon the worshipper, especially when the singer has the devotion and understanding, a good voice and the power of presentation. One of the outstanding synagogue singers towards the end of the eighteenth century was Israel Levy. Equipped with an unusual voice and musical talc as well as intelligence, he made a deep impre'on upon his listeners and was elected Chazzan of Fuerth. where he remained for many years. On n 'our. he came to Paris and was immediately engaged as cantor. He composed many tunes some of which have been preserved. His voice was a barifif-bass from lower F, while in the high Advisory body of Synagogue Council of America has included these noted Jewish leaders (left to right): Rabbi Max Davidson, president of Synagogue Council; Sen. Herbert H. Lehman; and Benjamin Lazarus, advisory chairman. "As all the other spiritual values, the synagogue song is a tonal expression of the long history and martyrdom of Israel..." range it had ter.or timbre and effortessly, reached the highest notes. He died in 1932. Another prominent Chazzan was Sholem Friede of Amsterdam. Due to his great love for PolishJewish songs, he left a great, invaluable collection of the early Polish chazzanuth and of tunes in Chassidic style. He died in 1954. Another Chazzan of great popularity in Munich, was Loew Saenger (1781-1843). These names have been chosen at random out of hundreds of singers of the synagogue since space does not permit to name them all. The American Chazzan The first Jewish settlers who came here more than three hundred years ago soon realized that America was the land of longed-for freedom, that the endless, dark period of bitter oppression and seclusion in Europe's walled ghettos was over — and thus an important spiritual change grew and developed gradually. Part of the Jewish song inheritance lost its significance. No more was Israel in exile, no more was its dwelling place only of a temporary nature. More than in any other cultural sphere, this psychological change manifested itself in the synagogue song has always been a genuine expression of emotion and sentiments. At this time, the rabbi again became the central figure in the synagogue being both preacher and precentor. Many famous Chazzanim came from Europe, such as Samuel Welsh who was born in Prague in 1835 and became cantor of Ahavad Chesed, New York, in 1865; but homesick, he returned to Prague in 1880 where he died in 1901. Then there was Morris Goldstein, born in Hungary in 1840. His father was the well-known Chazzan Shmelke, a singer who died young in 1849 leaving ten small children. The oldest boy, Joseph, who was at the tender age of eleven at his father's death, succeeded his father. Later he gained fame as Chazzan in Vienna where he worked from 1858 to 1899. He studied music in Vienna, was called to New York to accept the position as cantor in the Norko Synagogue. Later he went to Cincinnati and sang there in B'nai Israel Temple. He held this postion until he died in 1906. These three chazzanim, realizing the need of Continued on Pag* 11-E NEW YEAR GREETINGS Phone PL 1-2924 Prescription Specialists CENTER PHARMACY 9723 N.E. 2nd Avenue (Dir. Opposite Shores Theater) A Happy New Year to All Cjr Friends and Patrons SHERRY'S FOR BEAUTIFUL SHOES 256 MIRACLE MILE CORAL GABLES Phone U 8-8947 The Winokurs A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Sonz and Lori Marsha I I A L ISTATI Investments and Gtneral Insurance 1543 Washington Avenue MIAMI IEACH TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS GREETINGS PARK'S MEN'S SHOP 221 E. Flaglec Street MMM ra 9-mi CONGER LIFE INSURANCE CO., Inc. ALL FORMS LEGAL RESERVE INSURANCE Including Hospitalization Health — Accident 16W N.W. 35th St, Ph. NE 34278 New Year's Greetings GEORGE G. WHITNEY JV. ew car Du brow'sLincoln Cafeterias 330 LINCOLN ROAD Miami Beach Brooklyn, N. Y. TO ALL GREETINGS ... j BOB PULLIAM CUFF ROOT £,.J*!||§ m i \9f CONCRETE FORMS B0BF0RM CORPORATION ADJUSTABLE METAL FORMS ., .: '-* %  SLAB ON JOIST AND FLAT SLAB FORMING 1260 N.W. 57th Ave. MO 1-0462 Holiday Greetings to All STANDARD WELDING SUPPLY CO. N C G Authorized Dealer WALTER MAHANY, Prop. 4382 N.W. 32nd Avenue Phone NE 5-0803 '* I Season's Best Wishes to All LEO & DAN COWAN T0 ALL MtW YEAM CtffTIMI Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rafkind and Family; Ml COtALMBUS, DR. and MRS. MILTON SANES GOLDMAN and daughters Rose Hannah and Lynn Esta 2335 Meridian Avenue, Miami Beach Extent Best Wishes for the New Y to their Friends and Relatives



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    Friday. September 23, 1960 Pag* 51 Exercise of Principle Over Public Relations By RABBI LEON KRONtSH Vie* Praeldent, South Florida Chapter American Jewish Congrats D R. Stephen S. Wise, one of the prime founders of the American Jewish Congress, said in 1916 that what the Jews in America needed was an organization with a program to provide "not relief but redress, not palliation but prevention, not charity but justice ." These same words could well apply today in describing the objectives and program of the American Jewish Congress. Implicit in them is one word which is the key to the preservation of the rights and human dignity of all people — not just Jews — "equality." Full equality is what the Congress seeks, not tolerance or tolt ration. It is this concept which perhaps more than any other has guided the program of the American Jewish Congress and in the process has caused it to be labeled a "militant" agency. But if such a label means a constant campaign to maintain equal justice and equal rights for all, the Congress merits the appellation, for it has pioneered in the field of human rights and has blazed a trail for others to follow. Prof. Robert Maclver, in his major study of the national Jewish organizations in the field of community relations wrote, in 1951: "The American Jewish Congress is more outspoken ideologically than the other agencies and represents a point of view that on the whole demarcates it from all the rest." What is the ideology and what are the points of view which distinguish the Congress? The preamble to the Congress constitution sets lorth its fundamental purposes: 1) the creative survival of the Jewish people; 2) the democratic organization of the Jewish community; 3) the weliare of Israel; 4) the unity of the Jewish people; 5) the struggle against racism; 6) the safeguarding of our fundamental freedoms. Integrated Cone apt This philosophy inspires and pervades the program of the Congress, and means that a member shares a certain concept of Jewish life in which he finds his relationship to American society, to his fellow Jews in America and throughout the world, and to his fellow Jews in Israel. It is an integrated concept of the Jew and the Jewish community which is unique on the American scene. The Congress is Zionist-oriented and believes that a Jewish state in Israel is essential as a source for the revival, preservation and extension of Jewish culture and Jewish life. The Congress believes in the unity of the Jewish people, and this commitment-is reflected in its creation of and participation in the World Jewish Congress, which is the forum for discussion of the common problems and needs of Jews all over the world. The WJC is the organizational embodiment of the idea of "a Jewish people." The AJCongress believes in the democratic principle that the Jewish community itself through its own organization should determine what is good for its own welfare. It rejects the notion that a few men of influence alone should determine what is good for the Jewish community. Congress advocates the formation of a Jewish Community Relations Council in Miami, and has advocated it lor the past several years. Wherever such CRC's exist. Congress is a member organization and abides in its local programming by the decisions of the CRC. Becau.ce the Congress is profoundly influenced by its ideology it gives precedence to principle over KAmal UOM KMNISH considerations of "public relations." This does not mean that "public relations" are not taken into consideration to determine tactics and strategy, but it does mean that it is not the decisive factor in reaching a decision. This criterion will account for the fact that the Congress has usually been the first and, in some cases the sole Jewish agency in taking positions that initially were not popular, such as the McCollum relcased-time case, the Gideon Bible case, opposition to McCarthyism, and, in Miami, suDporting the litigation challenging the constitutionality of sectarian religious practices in ihe baoe county public schools. It should be noted simililarly that while all agencies in the community relations field are critical of the Arab boycott against American Jews, it was only the American Jewish Congress which went to court to challenge the Arabian American Oil Company (ARAMCO) for its violation of the New York Slate Fair Employment Practices Law. In virtually every instance where the Congress has "gone it alone," as the only Jewish agency involved in a "controversial" issue-, -public relations" has been advanced for the inaction of other Jewish agencies. It should be roted here. also, that where Congress has braved the storm of "bad public relations," the principles involved and expounded have at a later time had ifle full support of all or nearly all other Jewish agencies. Congress feels that as a responsible agency it has the obligation to transfer policy statements into action programs designed to achieve the fulfillment of those pr'nciples upon which the statements are based. Dr. Israel Goldstein described the Congress as "standing up for what it stands for." On the Miami Scon* The American Jewish Congress is governed nationally by its officers and a Governing Council which are elected at the national biennial conventions. Dr. Joachim Prinz is currently the national president. Locally, the policy of the Congress is administered by a Council composed of elected representatives from the chapters. The South Florida Council, now consisting of some 20 members, is currently being enlarged to create an even more representative body of the membership in the area. In the past year, the Congress has added three new chapters in the Miami area. The Florida Women's Division, headed by Mrs. Leo Steinberg, baa Continued an Page 14-1 M N Mr. and Mrs. Phlnp MM* Dorothy and Edward Irish their reknvc* and fnendt A Happy and Protperotu Hew Tear Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myer* and family wtsh iheii relatives and frauds A Happy and Prosperont New Tear Mr. and Mrs. U4p A. Mtfi*m Midi ifcei' relative" and friends A H*r py and Prosperous New Tear P Mr. and Mrs. Earl Pertnoy Lois, Sidney, Ronnie and Sandi wish their relative* and fnrn.li A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. David Phillips wish ihnr relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Harold Pont and children, Edwin Stephen and Judy Lyn wish their relatives anil friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Mllforr 1 S. Purcell and family wish their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous New Tear R Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rabin and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Barney Raftenberg and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Lee Rarrver and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ravlti children and grandchildren wish their relatives and friends A Happy und Prosperous New tear Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Reinhard and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Irving Schetzmen wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. Irving Schenker and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mrs. Herbert E. Scher and family wish iheir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Schernwiand family wish their relatival and fnrnds A Happy and Prosperous New 1 Mr. and Mr*. Sol ScMmmel wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New 1 Mr. and Mrs. Alex Schneidma i wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Abe Schools W Nancy, Donna and Wayne wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New tear Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwartsmen and children, Susan, Linda and Barnett David wish iheir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Seeder wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Reisman and family, of 2251 SW 7th Street, Miami wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Pruiperous New Tear Mr*. Fannie Ritas and daughter, Evelyn wish iheir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mr*. Samuel Robbins wish iheir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mrs. Jacques Roher and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Mew tear Mr. and Mrs. Leslie C. Rome and children, Stuart, Melanie and Wendy wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mr*. David Reeenthei of 912 NW SOth Street wish their retain es and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr*. Simon Seiden children and grandchildren wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Pri,\prious New Tear Dr. and Mr*. Jack Seitlin and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New 1 Mr. and Mr*. Michael Sell.tr With then relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. and Mrs. Hat Roth and family wish (heir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New Tear Mr. I Mrs. *99W9 QHiVrVftf aamwt*"m>e !" n § •^ %  %  •••^ Mr*. Freda Edward T. Moor m en ins* their reUmes and friends A Happy and Prosperous Near Tear •mn tfieir relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tea* Mrs. Edith L. Heuriseei J-.dMii. "—'%  —' Mr*. Esre •*€• srah tfeer ressuwe* asid f Trend* A Happy esUrVospeTosu Neat Tr Pr. —d Mrs. Merry M aadilm an and children. FeBeia and Bkheed $' >a *'ens* there reienres and f*d ArsarwaWrVosprreni NrarTear Orlm with their relatives and friend* A Happy aad Proaperaau Near Tear Mr. and Mrs. Albert E.Ouep rs. Geyle Este Mr. twut Mr*. Max A. Porno** and daughter. Sheila Rae k-idi their relatives and friends A H*ppy and Prosperous Hew Tear Mr. and Mr*. Milton Retl and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mr*. Herbert A. Rethetein and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mr*. Donald F. Rub-. Mr. and Mr*. Lewi* I. Serbin and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mr*. N. John Serbin and family wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tl*M Or. and Mr*. C. Leon Shallewe, and children, David Irwsn, Lester Frederick, Mark Alan, and Mr. and Mr*. Harry Sir wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous New tr'.r Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shapiro of 1015 St III water Drive unth iheir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear Mr. and Mr*. Loan Shift and daughter., Riv. and Mi** I wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew teat wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Protperous Hew tear $ Mr. Irving Seal withes his relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear wish then relatsvcs and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hew Tear arts* these sesames and ', trends A Happy and Prosperous Near Tear Mr. and Mr*. Mai Peer! end children. Penny end Tony ends (brtr release* ami friend* A Happy and Pr*r*per*ms Near Tear and sens. Denial| %  Jkiiei.ieiame.wifnea* A Happy and rVeeprree* Near Tear Fa .^Aribmrelamtsa-dfriemds urn AHw eWrmtem.NnrTa> I AMw^r^-^a and f entity anafc then reiames and friend* A Happy and P r atp tr am* Near Tear Mr. end Mrs. Jack Saifman and family wish their relative* and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Hew tear Mr. and Mr*. Herbert Sander* Lynn end Steve Wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Near Tear Mrs. Margaret Shapiro and family wish their relatives and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Net* TnW Mr. end Mr*. Max R. Silver sen*. David end Ire, and doughter, Gail svssJi shrir relatives and friends A Happy and Prosperous Hrw tear Sherf am wish their relatives and friends A Happy and Protperou* Hew Tr Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Sitverm s end family trull their relatives and friendi A Happy and Prosptrou* New Tear Mr. and Mr*. I rider a B. Simfcew re and children, Elisabeth. Mechee'., Sara and Philip wssh then relative* and friend* A Happy and Prosper**** New 1 ear I Mr*. and* sbesr mleaieif ml /raced* A Happy and Prtnpersms Near Taw Mr.andMr*. and tana, Jer— and David w**h tfcetr relatives and friends A Happy and fVeaprrana Hew tear wtsh then ttXatmet and friend* A Happy and Prosperous Near Tear Mr, J. D, withe* her teXauvs A Happy and PrtHperou* Hew Tear Mr *md Mr*. Harry I wish their reiauves and friend* A Happy and frasperats* He w Tear Mr end Mr*. Oscar S. ana* liteir relative* and friends A lispp, and Pro*perom Haw tear



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    ^ !" Page 6-D +Mis*rkridB&r Friday. Sopminbor 23, i960 1 BEST WISHES or a HAPPY NEW YEAR BEST WISHES IJV TO ALL OUR FRIENDS l^ff ON THIS HOLIDAY OCCASION Mr. and Mrs. Allen Goldberg Best Wishes for a Happy New Year MacOONALD CLEANERS & LAUNDRY DRAPES SPREADS RUGS PICKUP 6 DELIVERY SERVICE Phone MO 1-5831 MIKE SALAMON. Manager 5650 S. DIXIE HWY. SOUTH MIAMI NEW YEAR GREETINGS Lobnitz & McCormick Millwork 2789 COACOOCHEE AVENUE and 3060 S.W. 37th COURT MIAMI. FLORIDA Phone HI 6-0607 r "WHftf TO GfT IHtkV' Hopkins Carter Hardware Co. • MAIN* SUffllfS • rAmTS mm VAMMSMfS • nSttMC TACUf • KAUTICAl CNAITS • SHMUn ft mills lOTTtEB 6AS fffff PARKING ami DELIVERY 139 S. MHMI! AVMM fW Ft 1^654 Italian ami America* DNHMTS COCETAJU ITALIAN SPECMLTKS Servioa tm r M GIO* A VMS REST AC MM N.W. Tvlfc SHUT Feed Sim IMS tuti %  4-153* PHOCTOH AND SON BODY WORKS SEAT COVERS TAILOR MADE Douglas Road Florida Peerless Manufacturing Co. Corrugated Cartons and MX 74th Street Frail CaxfiM PL 84353 British Organization Marks 200 Years •y EOWIN EYTAN %  ONDON — British Jewry this year celebrates fc the 200th anniversary ofns Tepresentative orga nrr ati— — the London Committee of Deputies of British Jews, universally known as the Board of Deputies. The Committee was founded in 1700 when seven -Gentlemen Elders of the Portuguese Jewish Nation" called on the Lord Chamberlain and asked htm to coweey to King George III. on his accession to the throne, the homage and congratulations of their The Ashkenaum. grieved that they had not been invited to join, appealed to the Sephardim for joint action in the future and the two congregations decided to act in unison, communicate with each other and cooper a te "in all matters touching their political welfare." The Board of Deputies was born. At its first business meeting the Board's committee had to deal with a call for help from Jamaica's Jews. The Board intervened at once with the governor of the island thus setting a precedent for the great tradition which, in the words of Sir Moses Montefiore, its president from 1835 to 1874, hi to "intervene wherever and whenever possible to alleviate the sufferings of Jewry." It was Sir Moses Montefiore, whose services to Jewish distress lasted until his death at the age of 101. who gave the Board its modern form. It was also during his tenure of office in 1837 that the Board was given the honor of presenting its homage to a new sovereign in person, and not through a court official. Barely three days after the Board's delegation presented an illuminated address to Queen Victoria on her enthronement, a major calamity befell world Jewry — the Jews of Damascus and Rhodes were accused of killing Christians for the purpose of using their blood for baking matzot. The Board at onc% dispatched its president to the Near East where he successfully met with the governor of Alexandria and with court official* in Istanbul. The deputies also subscribed a large amount for assistance to the victims of the persecution. Major Calamity For the next half century the board was kept busy with local matters, fighting for equal rights for British Jews. This campaign was sucessfully concluded in 1858 when Lionel de Rothschild took the oath of office and his rightful seat in the House of Common-, as the first Jew to sit in Britain's Parliament Jews were also granted the right to serve on equal terms with the rest of their countrymen in all sections of the nation's life, military and naval as well M civil. At the same time the Board continued its endless interventions on behalf of less fortunate Jews in Ru>sia. Rumania. Morocco and Persia. It also granted its whole-hearted assistance in assimilating the thousands of homeless Jewish refugees escaping Russian persecution — the refugees' material needs were being cared for by another well-established body. -The Jewish Board of Guardians." but the deputies dealt with their political and social rights — orphans and widows were protected; legislation and factory regulations were translated into Yiddish: interpreters were provided: and countless children were recuperated from the snatching arms of various Christian missionaries. The Board also organized English classes for the thousands of foreign Jews who yearly flocked to Britain. For years the Board had opposed Zionism and yet when Lord Balfour in 1917 dispatched his historic letter granting British support for the creation of a Jewish National Home in Palestine, it was addressed to the Board** vice president. Lord Rothschild. Zionist Imawratisn With the election of a distinguished mathematician. Prof. Selig Brodetsky in 1840. the Board gained not only its first president of Russian origin, hot also its official Zionist inspiration Throughout the difficult last years of the British Mandate the Board adopted a courageous attitude defending the rights of the Yishuv sometimes in the face of a misguided and hostile public opinion. Today the Board with its 420 delegates representing 250 synagogues and 25 secular institutions is a tumuluous but vigorous assembly. It is ever ready to take action on all internal and external issues dealing with the welfare of the Jewish people. During the recent anti-Semitic outbreaks last January, it cooperated with the Home Office and the police, undertook research work aod vigorously denounced the bestial happenings thus rally* ing public opinion in the fight against the outrages. Much of the prestige of the Board rests on the fact that it is no self-appointed group but that each member is democratically elected by his own ••constituency." Nowhere else in the world, except in Israel, is there an organization which can be said to represent the Jews of its country so truly and completely. Its honorary officers are also freely elected, sometimes, during bitterly contested elections. It is the representative character of the Board that has led to its recognition in so many spheres by the government of the day. Delegations are frequently received by Ministers and the heads of government departments. The Board has received statutory recognition, by mention in Act of Parliament such as the Marriage Act and the Shops Act, as the authoritative body empowered to act on behalf of the Anglo-Jewish community: Post War Problem* At the first meeting of each new Board, members are elected to the various committees for a three-year period. The senior of these committees U the "Law and Parliamentary" which was created Continued on P*„ 1 TO ALL GREETINGS KIRT'S PIPE SHOP "QUALITY SMOKERS REQUISITES" TOBACCONIST PtPCMAKER HUMIDOR FRESH CIGARS PIPE REPAIRS OUR SPECIALTY Sooth of Miracle MO* (Opposite Coral Gables lank) 2413 Galiano Street HI 8-4916 LI, Terr. 8017 NX. 2nd Aon. MIAMI SEASON'S GREETINGS T. V. SCOTT LAND CLEARING COMPANY BULLDOZING — EXCAVATING WRECKING — CRANE SERVICE 7143 N. Miami Avo. PL 44733 GREETINGS G. m R. AUTO SERVICE ROAD SBtVKE A TO WING BODY and FENDER WORK PAINTING GAS-Oll-TIRES 3851 Bird Rood HI 4-2421



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    * "dewish FkHridiajti Miami, Florida, fridgy, September 23. 1980 Section H Community Organizations Greet You i CITY OF MIAMI OFFICE OF THE MAYOR On this, the occasion of the 5721st observance of the Jewish New Year, it is my pleasure to extend to all of our citizens of the Jewish faith the greetings of all the residents of Miami, my fellow members of the City Commission and myself. Our Jewish citizens, in past years, have contributed immeasurably to the welfare, growth and advancement of our city. For this we extend our sincere thanks. Rosh Hashona. usnermg m the Hign Holy Days, brings to many of our citizens the hope of continued progress and happiness for all. Your prayers for world peace and understanding during this time are ones that the entire community shares with you. It is my sincere wish, along with all other citizens of Miami, that the coming New Year may be the happiest and most prosperous of all. ROBERT KING HIGH CITY Of MIAMI BEACH OFFICE OF THE MAYOR It is a warm pleasure once again to extend New Year greetings to the Greater Miami community from the official family of the City of Miami Beach. We can look back upon another year of accomplishment, in which we experienced sound growth and prosperity nurtured by the blessings of peace. Now, as we enter a New Year, it is with the hope that our well-being will become more encompassing, not only to be shared with others, but also to inspire the moral fundamentals of our individual undertakings. All that we aspire to do requires only the good will of men. Granted the peace for which we pray, we look forward to a year 5721 filled with greater spiritual and material achievements. O. LEE POWELL MAYOK 0. Ill POWfU THE CITY Of MIAMI ... expresses the sentiments of men of all beliefs in extending Rosh Hashona greetings to the Jewish residents of the community THE CITY of MIAMI BEACH wishes to extend May yom b inscribed for/nace and good lift to the Jewish citizenry of this area best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year _^i



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    f-aoe K?. Ttidaj. September 23. iggQ Ot&xn. toe Bcazd ot 1km Stadeah cad ASOxms Groups c: rTHE HEBREW ACADEMY Extend a Happy Hew Year Greater Miami Jewish CoaiarjiJty 7 tAJff ss BO AMD Of MtKTOtS of TEMPLE ZION fa**** ferf tf fsie* fsf • ft Tbamr Mt mktrt ami ft* fwr| sepey Hew few 5721 THE CANTORS' ASSOCIATION OF GREATER MIAMI £xfe*W Tfceir NHI TOVA fe TW Mi JEWISH COMMUNITY The Pxbbi. Camor. Officers. Board of Directors and the Entire Staff of THE BETH DAVID CONGREGATION Extend B*1 Wish*, for a HAPPY. HEALTHY AND PEACEFUL NEW YEAR to its MTibi and to the entire Jtwua Community le She Officers, Bears' ef OwtWn, a** 1 alt %  %  %  furt ef Misrscsi WMM: Wt *>M t ran a* hot witeas tor • COOD ffAt M 572) taewefasbareeaetaautfte Jewish aaaate every wher t NM MfU. MM. LOVtS TOKAYEf. fres. IACHEI SAKOWITZ, NM. Part Pre*. "DO*/" Cfcaettr Karachi Weesea THE JEWISH NATIONAL WORKERS' ALLIANCE BEN GURION BRANCH NO. 304 Wishes tht Jtmt ami Chavtrim All Orar Mto MTarM A Happy N* rear L H SACHS. President A. FRAIDLIN, Secretary SAMUEL KOPKIND. Vic* President A Happy and Prosperous Mew Yaw to All TEMPLE MENORAH SISTERHOOD L'Shona Tova Tikesevu CONGREGATION ANSHE EMES for Democracy" to of afl the bcacrment of of theADL children aboat the and religions toLeft to right are Abraham Ijnrorn. St. Francis of Assisi. Chaim Weizmann. and G eoig e Washington Carrer. Significant Year for Anti-Defamation League fry PAUL SCIOCSMAN VMS annual Bosh Hashona Edition of The Jewish Floridian is which costsrsntty agencies are invited to discuss their activities of the previous year and to crystal ball the forthcoming year's problems, is more than a communal public service. I suspect that it has. as wefl. as ancillary value — that of providing the agencies with an opportunity mome n tarily to pause from their preoccupations, think about themselves and their doing*, and to take stock of their operations. This is good for us in our personal lives; it is good for us in our organizational bves. For the Florida Anti-Defamation League of hr.n B'rith. this year of 5721 is a particularly significant one For it was just 20 years ago. almost to the month, that in response to community urging*, the Anti-Dei amation League of B'nai B nth established as office in Miami. In 5701. or 1940. as e recall the year, the long, dark shadow of Nazi Germany reached ominously across the waters. Here, in Miami, merchants were being harassed by '.-nail stickers on their pUteglass windows with inscriptions entitled, "To buy from Jews is helping Communism." The stickers, from Nazi Germany, appeared periodically following the docking of German ships in Miami harbors. Common too were hate publications, edited from material sent oat of Erlurt, Germany, violently anti-Semitic in content, and widely circulated in Dade county. These common but perturbing problems seem distant today, in both time and implication. The gulf between Miami. Fla. (5721; and Miami. Fla. • 5701) indeed, is deeper and wider than first impressions might suggest. The hate papers of 20 years ago caused, properly esosgh. considerable sneamess is s worried Jewish community. The implications of hate propaganda required patient, informed, explaining to editors, b usines s leaders, poli t i cal figures, who oftentimes failed to snderstaad Jewish sensitivity to home grows Nazism. With the budding Florida ADL, meeting upon meeting was called to devise ways and means of alerting ecmmunal le a der s to the unAmeriean and alarming import of h a t e propaganda. Such i i as Harry D J. Ante. Ellory •nPa*e9H fAW. SflOUMAN CONGREGATION YEHUDAH MOSHE & AUXILIARIES tmna *n NEW vt A* aaurmat re ALL ruin mines AN* %  ICNIOIS IssJr frnmUhi mmi ma satire Jtwith CmmmmmHy 13AM WEST 01X11 HIGHWAY ^L?JI>{|0iia folia Cikesrtnt BETH a CONGREGATION 500 S.W. 17th Avenue SOLOMON SCHIFF. Rabbi PHILLIP BERXOWTTZ. President TEMPLE BETH AM Prays that all who wander today may fand a home in the year to come. It extends wishes for a meaningful and fruitful New Year to all of its friends. Herbert M. Batrmgard, Rabbi Robert H. Newman, Pros. THE SOUTH FLORIDA COUNCIL OF MEN'S B'NAI B'RITH LODGES JACK M. FINK, President Extend HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL



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    Pc^e 8-D 23. 198Q to Ali Omr J*>iri*h Wriemdm ASSOCIATEP QMCm 1 Ollt SIGN OF QIALITY. MKVKi; A.\D HONESTY Ass^riated Grocery Stores ove embers srr.: Local people Living here with you e Fiends Re p re s e n ting orer 20% of Sou ia ; pmBTJ business. THERE'S ONE CF as NEAR YOU. — SHOP IN ONE TODAY ." n RABBI and MRS. S. M. M \< IITI I MR. and MRS. MORTON STITSKY STELLA REGINA. LEO JAY and JERRY HOWARD Extend To All JewryBest Wishes for A HAPPY NEW YEAR MR. and MRS. DONALD S. LAVIGNE join with their children MR. and MRS. MYRON COWEN Sen. Gary John, and Daughters, Elizabeth & Melinda and MR. and MRS. WALTER A. LAVIGNE Daughters Leslie. Morley and Shelly and Son. Elliot Mayer la expressing their best wishes to all their friends for a HAPPY NEW YEAR T O A LL HAPPY NEW YEAR NASH MIAMI MOTORS, INC 545 N. E. 15th Street Miami. Florida Phone FR 9-2828 BEST WISHES FROM ALL OF US TO ALL OF YOU RAY-MAR ELECTRIC CO. 3043 S.W. 31th COURT PHONE HI 64418 SEASWS MrffTMCS .. ABBOTT BO.VN ETT M RMTI RK 2718 S.W. 28* Lens (S Dixie Hwy ft 27th Ave.) M 5-2433 MUMf MffTMSS TO AU %  .EAR PEST CONTROL 18870 Mi 8th AVENUE Phone PL 4-4883 or PL 82534 Former President Harry S. Truman (right) is ident; and Lawrence G. Laskey. executive greeted by Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice prescommittee chairman. Principal speaker waj ident of Israel Bond Organization, at opening Gen. Moshe Dayan. hero of the 1956 Sinai of 1960 Israel Bond campaign in Greater Micampaign and currently Minister of Agriculami during Hebrew Year 5720. Looking on hire for the State of IsraeL are Abraham Feinberg (right), national pies Israel Meets Challenge of Development By DR. JOSEPH J. SCHWARTZ Vice President State of Israel Bend Organization IT an exactly ten years ago that the Government of Israel first suggested the floating of an Israel Bond issue in the United States. Those of us who attended the meeting in Jerusalem in 1950 convened by Prime Minister Ben-Gurion were forcefully made aware of Israel's acute economic position at that time. There was a general recognition that extraordinary measures were needed to help Israel meet the staggering problem of absorbing immigrants, who were pouring in at a rate of some 250.000 per year. More than 100,600 of these immigrants were living in tests at the time of the Jerusalem meeting. It was a tune of severe austerity. Food was in extremely short supply, and some foods were completely unavailable. There was no money in the Israel Treasury The big question was: could Israel sustain herself economically' The War of Independence had been fought courageously and successfully: the Jews of the world had bees inspired by Israel's heroism: a great moment in history had brought joy and pnde to our people. Yet K was by no means clear whether Israel could build a sound economy, whether she could maintain herself at a level which would make it possible to absorb hundreds of thousands of newcomers. Cap Reduced It was in this bleak atmosphere that the Israel Bond drive wa undertaken. Only by recalling these circumstances can one arrive at an adequate appreciation of the magnitude of Israel's economic strides in the past nine years and the tremendous role which the S440.0O0.000 derived from the sale of Israel Bonds have played in bringing Israel within easy reach of a visible economy. In the period since September, 1950. Israel has moved steadily upward on the barometer of economic growth. The year 1969. for example, was the best year in Israel's economic activity since her establishment, and was the first time since 1951 that her balance of payments showed a decided improvement. Since Israel last observed Rosh Hasbona. tho total gap in her trade balance — the difference between the value of goods and services bought and those sold by the country — were reduced by about 10 percent, from $335 million per annum to $305 million. Israel's exports totaled $290 million in 1969. as compared with $235 million in the previous year. At the same time. Israel's exports have become greatly diversified. Israel now exports commodities to some 90 countries throughout the world. She sends diamonds and cement and raincoats to the United States, textiles to the Scandinavian countries. Switzerland and England, automobiles and trucks to Africa and Banna, and staple citrus products to almost all the European countries. New industrial crops such as peanuts, t o ba c c o, cotton, sisal and sugar beets are increasing from year to year, with a large share earmarked for export. In the past nine years. Israel Bond> have enabled Israel to construct more than 225.000 permanent housing units for immigrants. Israel plans to use additional Israel Bond allocations for the erection of 160.000 permanent dwellings in the next five years, at a cost of $3,000 apiece. Israel, with a population of more than 2.000,000. now provides 70 percent of her food needs by her own production. In 1951. with a population of approximately 1.000.000. Israel produced little more than 50 percent of the foodstuffs consumed in the country. The total area under cultivation since that time has increased from 412.000 acres to more than 1.000.000 acres, while the irrigated area has increased from 75.000 acres to 300.000 acres. Since 1951, more than 700 new enterprises have TO ALL GREETINGS HARRIS REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING. INC COMPLETE SYSTEMS FOB STORES. OFFICES. •UTLDDrGS. INDUSTRIES. HOMES — %  — AID • PROMPT SERVICE *34 West rMsyief Street Ht 94114 SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS J. A. Cantor Associates, he 145! NBA Pal CUMATML COtPtXATrON Kinai 4S45 1-4178 •affraMS re AU I



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    Wdojv September 33^1960 +Jmi*Mk*r*l*n Poge5-G American %  y OOHOTHY MH.LSTONE MfMO ia a Jew? This question, seemingly so simmw pie, recently agitated Israel and had repercussions internationally. The issue arose when a set of instructions drafted by the Israeli Government for a population census appeared to he at variance with traditional Jewish teaching. The official rabbinate in the State of Israel protested vehemently, and Prime Minister Ben-Gurion proposed at length to solicit opinions from noted Jewish scholars throughout the world. The controversy was settled — formally, at least — when the Israeli Ministry of the Interior issued revised instructions, according to which a person was to be regarded as Jewish if his or her mother was Jewish or if he or she had been converted to the Jewish religion by procedures conforming to Jewish tradition. Interestingly enough, as indicated in the files of the American Jewish Archives, the historical research center at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, this question was anticipated nearly 70 years ago by a distinguished American Reform rabbi. German-born Bernhard Felsenthal (1822-1908) emigrated to American in 1854. Four years later, he became the guiding spirit of Chicago's Judische Reformerein, a Reform society which subsequently developed into the Sinai Congregation with Felsenthal as its first rabbi. In 1864, Felsenthal became rabbi of the Reform-minded Zion Congregation in West Chicago and served that pulpit until his retirement 23 years later. A scholarly and eloquent writer. Dr. Felsenthal was something of a maverick in the American Reform rabbinate of his day due to his outspoken advocacy of Zionism. Early Question In June, 1800, Dr. Felsenthal in "The Menorah," wrote an article entitled "Who is a Jew." Was the term "Jew," he asked, "the designation for a member of a religious community" and as such "to be classified with the parallel words Christian, Mohammedan, Buddist, etc?" Or Was it to be used for "people who belong to a certain racial community — vir, to the Jewish race," in which case it would have "to be classed with such words as 'German,' 'Italian,' 'Englishman,' 'Scandinavian,' etc.?" It was in this latter — "racial" — sense, he wrote, that "the word 'Jew* is mostly understood in the present time, and in such a sense it was understood in past times." Dr. Felsenthal illustrated his contention by alluding to "the disgraceful anti-Semitic agitation in some European countries and of kindred tendencies (as, for instance, excluding Jews as such from certain hotels, from certain clubs and societies, and so forth) even in the otherwise so liberal and so tolerant America." Whether Jews were viewed favorably or unfavorably by individuals and governments, he felt, "it will be admitted that among all these people the Jew is not thought of as a member of a religious community, but as a member of a particular race." Jews themselves, Dr. Felsenthal argued, thought of themselves as "brethren-in-race." American Jewish periodicals in particular, he wrote, were guilty of a "chauvinistic spirit." ". because they are so race-proud, and push the Jewish religion so much into the background, tbey speak with such a great gusto of every "Jew' who, in any sphere whatever, rises more or less on the surface or over the surface ... If Mr. Tulpehfield, the champion among the billiardists, has arrived in town, the Jewish papers will not fail to announce that the famous Jewish billiard-player, the greatest among the great, is among us, and we all feel In this seven-story structure are housed the complete research facilities for medical and biological sciences at the National Jewish Hospital in Denver. This $1,250,000 Neustadt Research Lab was dedicated at the hospital during the outgoing Hebrew Year. ". the Jewish community should be a community of the most noble ones, of the most moral ones, of the most sincere ones in the human family united by ... the firm striving after hallowing and elevating the lives of individuals and the life of society ..." proud of him for he is our brother and sheds so much trlory upon — Judaism." Jewish clubs and societies were, in the writer's view, no less at fault: "in their eyes a Jew by birth, a racial Jew, is a Jew; if they consider the applicant otherwise worthy of admission they admit him; if not, not." Mora a Raca Dr. Felsenthal went on lo say that "the Jewish community should be a community of the most noble ones, of the most mortal ones, of the most sincere ones in the human family ... an invisible Church of the truly chosen people united by the spirit of true religion, and by the firm striving after hallowing and elevating the lives of individuals and the life of society ... It should be so, but is it so?" He felt it necessary to admit that "actually we are more of a race than an idealistic religious community." Turning his attention then to the views of traditional Jewish religious authorities, Dr. Felsenthal concluded that "the Jews themselves had had since two thousand years and more one and the Continued en Pass 11-0 GREETINGS Weaver RexaU Drug Stores 744 N.E. lmi Ae. %% N. W. 62IMI St. 1701 Corol Way 5*01 NX 2a* *•. 572S tkd Road Ph. Ft •Mil Ph. PI S-t*M Ph. Nl 4-7421 Ph. PI 44414 Ph. MO l-6ol GREETINGS MARTHA'S FLOWER SHOP Our Wedding Work Is Superb Flowers for All Occasions "A Complete Floral Service" Art with Flowers 801 Arthur Godfrey Rot"* IE 8-5523 -TIDES HOTK THf OMNPROW? tarsctAPtR rrcrcrfiM nw ^nn To all aar Friei.es wa express otr fondest •esire that the Now Tear ho filled with "Brochot" at Ptoeo, Health, Hoppinett aad Prosperity for all Israel. M. NEWMARK KESSilMAN ON THE OCEAN '-^J^ AT 12th ST MIAMI BEACH PREI BKORATrNC SERVKI iiifTimf DIXIE FAMUCS 4 UPHOLSTERY, UK. SUP CO VMS REDSPRE AM Seta N E. 2nd A VE (Rear) PI 1-2121 DRAPES and CORNICES RUDE TO ORDER NEW Yl R GREETINGS lO ALL VER0 BEACH ASSOCIATE, INC If A 1 IW4TI Phooo PR 7-1479 424 SETROU) MM. GREETiXGS When In Search For Definitely Better Furniture and Home Furnishings At Reasonable Prices Remember The Name WOODRUM'S ONE OF FLORIDA'S LARGEST AND FINEST HOME FURNISHERS AIR CONDITIONED NORTHEAST SECOND AVE. AT SEVENTY-THIRD STREET MIAMI Phono PL 4-1625 HAPPY NEW YEAR PROM THE HUNTINGT0N BUILDING 164 SX 1st Street • Miami, Florida CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN OFFICES far PROFESSIONAL od RUSWESS RUN Arfjeiaiaa ParRJa* Corooe • feor roonW Waafear CoaifiaiMf \\fi£i&S Management Cofnpcnv / RCALTORS FR 1-3592 — 234 Btscavne Blvd. — Miami. Flo. Best Wishes for a Happy Holiday K IS LOS ANGELES I T'S MOTE LYMAN'S IN CHICAGO IT'S HENRICI'S IN NEW YORK I T'S LINDY'S IN MIAMI BEACH ITS WOLFI1TS RESTAURANTS 195 Lincoln Rood 2038 Collins JWenue ALUMINUM — WROUGHT IRON MADE AND INSTALLED BY a CARUSO IRON WORKS Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Work Rear of Aviation Building 2732 N.W. 34th St Phone NE 4-6362 BRITTON'S BODY SHOP METAL WORK AND PANITING *'! ii "WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS" JACK BrUTTON l* lJfJ f | ^ 2256 S. W. 32nd AVENUE Phone HI 65924 StASOttS 6HCITIH6S TO AIL SER1GRAPH CORPORATION DECALS. POSTERS. BUMPER STRIPS. WINDOW DISPLAYS 2141 N. MIAMI AVENUE Phons FR 1-3368 TO All A MOST NAPPY NEW TEA* MR. and MRS. LOUIS ELLIOTT KATZ and FAMILY EUZARETH ANN! ma MANY TERESSA 1140 S.W. 21st STRHT



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    Friday, September 23. 1960 *JewisliHerkUar) Page 3-C Candlestick! Were Pillars of Strength By TRUDE DUB %  T was Friday night, and I surveyed Ihe table lov%  ingly. The snow white cloth, the two crisp c.hallas nestling coyly under the hand-embroidered mat, Ujc redjjyne^sparjflinii rit-hly through the cut glass decanter, the lean, handsome shapes of silver cutlery Yes, it was perfect. The roses in the center breathed a sweet air of contentment. 1 was going to light the candles, when my daughter Frances exclaimed in the doorway: •Mother, can't you get yourself a decent pair of candlesticks? These two wooden sticks are a positive disgrace!" Like all teen-agers, she recently developed a highly critical altitude towards her parents and her home. "But why? What's disgraceful about them?" I could see nothing wrong. "The chromium is flaking off for one thing," Frances pointed with disgust to the round metal base and top of the candle holder, "and they are altogether too shabby for words." I was hurt. "These candlesticks were the first piece of our home in this country." But how is a child to understand? A child that — thank God — never knew homelessness or hunger or fear, a child that was born in a free country and is therefore taking everything for granted. I blessed the caudles and Frances left the room murmuring something about "people's tastes." 1 sat down to await the return of my husband Izio and our youngest daughter Miriam from school. My eyes fell again on the candlesticks. What did she call them? Shabby? Old? Maybe they were a bit worn Funny, how I never noticed it before. Come to think of it. Izio and I must have got worn a bit since we bought these candlesticks. And yet it seems only like yesterday Oh, we were making progress by then. Penniless refugees of a year ago, we were setting up a home again. What did it matter that it consisted of a small furnished room, dark and cheerless, next door to the communal bathroom and lavatory and two flights of stairs away from the kitchen? It was so much better than the year of separation when Izio lived in lodgings and I slept at the hospital where I learned nursing. Now Izio had a job and I could leave the hospital. To* Much Water True, working in a factory was not exactly conI genial for a doctor, but then we were young and life was still before us. What kind of life? We didn't have time to stop and think — we wanted to eat. Besides where would you stop, once you started thinking and remembering? You might be tempted to go right back to all the lost things which now seemed like a part of somebody else's life. No, no, that would never do. We bought the candlesticks the day we moved in and for the rest of the week lived on bread and butter. We felt wildly extravagant and. wk£ I lit my first Shabbos candles, my new candlesffks witnessed tears of joy. Izio and I did not stay long in this place. The landlady thought we used too much hot water for our laundry and baths and then all this cooking ... no, she would rather have a business couple — out all day, who would send their laundry out. Sadly we packed the candlesticks and timidly installed them in our second home, a very similar establishment to the first one. What could you expect for the price we could pay? This time, the landlady was a religious maniac who preached to us, particularly at night, when we sheltered together during air-raids. She said the bombs falling all around us were meant for all It will be a real Happy New Year for these reunited people. Jewish migrants brought to the U.S. through the assistance of United Hias Service meet their relatives after a long separation begun by Nazi atrocities and World War II. ". life was still before us. What kind of life? We didn't have time to stop and think ..." those unbelievers who did not want to accept her Lord. It was hard to decide what was worse: the bombs or this woman. The German Luftwaffe was just then unleashing all its fury and night after night we spent sheltering in the cellar. Our wishes became even more humble: Just one night, dear God. let us sleep undisturbed in our beds. And every Shabbos over my candlesticks I whispered thanks for another week of life. By now we were becoming experienced exiles. Surprisingly, what a banquet could be conjured up from a few pennyworth of bones. Not only did you have the soup, if the butcher was in a generous mood, he left enough meat on them to give taste to noodles, rice or vegetables. We also discovered a Jewish fish-shop, where refugees got double portions for half the price. Of course, you didn't have to be fussy. The place was not exactly the Waldorf, in fact it was not like a restaurant of any kind. But if you did not like the looks of the dirty walls or the incredibly filthy overalls, on which the proprietors continually wiped thengreasy hands, you could always look into their kind, goodnatured faces. We were beginning to feel that the beastliness of war was being at least partly balanced out by human kindness and friendship when an unexpected blow struck us. Izio's firm had to close down, as their supply of raw material ran out What next? As a worker Izio was an unskilled man, as a doctor he was not allowed to work and most occupations were barred to aliens anyway. The Younfj Doctor The Labor Exchange had only one post to offer — that of a hospital porter. Without telling me, Izio decided to give it a try. He did not disclose his qualifications when he presented himself at the hospital and his first task was to polish the floor with a heavy bumper. This instrument Izio pushed clumsily backwards and forwards — much to the amusement of the patients — but frequently drops of sweat would fall on the Continued or. Pago 13-C Beat WlahM Fot A HAPPY NEW YEAR Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon and Family 5127 Ahon Rood MIAMI BEACH T. All ... A Mart ftaeay *•• Tsar •van MAUTT AM mci mmRutki* Interior Decorators surcovns Murauis COtNKIS onioisnuM amMStwM 41M N.W. 17* AVL CAUttS-iMI TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS RED COACH GRILL 1455 Biscayne Blvd. Phone FR 94008 HOLIDAY GREETINGS TO ALL ( WILSON BATTERIES. INC. Featuring — SOUTHWAY BATTERIES "MORE POWER TO YQU" MARINE WESa AUTOMOTIVE 2940 N.W. 71tr S*Mf Phoiwi OX 1-4443 I jpsr I Happy Holiday* • • IE. SAMUEL Inc. DEX-O-TEX NEOPRENE |T TERRAZZO FLOORING \\ 1675 N.E. 49th Street NE 4-6737 c':l TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS "RICHARD "DICK" BERENSOK And Associate. Miami Joi Alai Fronton NE 3-3201 w GREETINGS TO ALL U. S. PLASTERING COMPANY Plastering Lathing Stucco — To Please Yoa % ) No Job Too Small or Too Big V\ 1736 S.W. 6th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA Phone FR 4-8115 i TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS SOB EL ft WEI N BERG imiroii 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Baaeh Mien* JE TO ALL NEW YEAR GREETINGS WERNER KAHN PHOTOGRAPHER 2511 Collins Ave. Miami Beach JE M872 (iiiriMCf SETTLE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY, INC. Mir WITH CONNMNC! 2348 Nats B* UM IW. IK COt A I CAKES SMCf 194* Free BsHvery Ml 1-2407 LILY AN C0RTEZ WALLPAPER MSTRIWTORS 9800 N. Miami AYWU. Phone PL 8-8791. PL 8-8786 WALL-TEX SCRUBBABLK WALL CANVAS—Well-Tox i* honsstly scrubbabl*. Smudgn, fingerprints, grass* spots wash off with soap and watsr. WALL-TEX is wondsrful for steamy bathrooms. Psrfsct for kitchens, too, anal far any ream In a home where there are aetlve youngsters. "WALL-TEX Lasts for Years." 7* Ail Greetings BROOKS



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    ?r^.+! Friday. 23 1880 %  0UD4f wtftTMCS TO Oft PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK Part-Time Chaplain for Welfare Board %  Mi 94O0E5 =-.: AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK Dbrie •,;;-<. %  %  =: at H NATIONAL IANK OF COMMERCE. MIAMI I N.W. 79* 33rd Ai GREETINGS: T. J. James Const. Company, Inc. MU t-tttl IOCS —FILL — SAJCD "WE MOVE THE EABTH" 1730 H.W. 113th SL The part vanety to tieaai and ether rimmnaeM activities Far the past H years he hat ben part-txaae renal am at Part Ga.. serving alone aad naaidrl sheet half thereat < the time with a rrfnlarlr taaawarx He's alas the Jewish at Learn end VA law pal %  I Aagasta. Ga. aad the Forest BiSs Aamex. which he has covered for 11 aad six years, respectively. Far faar rears he was also the part-txaae f*Trltin at the p.arthe Aab-Aircraft AruUery of the C River Project. Aikea. SC. On the latter traveled almost aa hoar each way aa a weekly vast. Tm* A-A-A installation, he always said, ri m n d t J him of a military nai|aii1 ia a small peat as Orefoa daring World War H days "I didn't have a they seed ase there— a letters. GHEZT^rGS Lehnhard-Burgess Corporation Imormace Adjusters Ai. USES w rm COMUMMS 1433 N W 30fh ST*tKT, Sv*. 211 Ph. HE 3-9541 I 'Juak he was exaggeratiag: he lakes to do that. A: any rate. TH answer f x the fact that he had few few men of the Jewish faith at the AAA. see. He coatdet riidrt regular services. Nevertheless, he had regular coafereaces with the boys He made arrangements for Sabbath aad hobday aarucaaataaa ia Aikea aad in Angwsta. He worked with the top brass oa the personal problem* which come to the fare ia any aa rtary or VA assignment He enjoyed ant contacts with the From tune to time, at AA_A_. as at other av stauaLonhe attended a Mass or Protestant serr** law Catholic chaplain gave him a beantifal Una — with English translation — aad the Kabbi like.; :o sit in a back row of the chapel translating Baabca! passages from Lat-n to Hebrew. He always complained that the chaplain u, • darewng" too fast. Jewish chnp s nin in Hawaii shows a nan and bin family the h*>T which will uahnr in tho new Jewish Year 5721. Tnroach oat die year, in all pars of the world, lewash Gls guarding America's freedom observe the holidays and %  %  'ivnla of the Jewish calendar, led by lewieh chaplains recruited, en tice e n d and eorvod by (he National Jewish Welfare Board. Bighto' He wonld aad he did. fating ante the old military roatine once again. Sometiaees. he writes a letter te enarters in New York, asking for a lain to be assigned to Fort Gordon. read case. I ought to know. I write the "Came on. now, Aryan ; Rabat Aryeh Lev. of JWB's Cirmirnia oa Jewish can't handle this all by myself. Yea a co n gre g ation of my own. Send as a laiE The part-time chaplains, like those en a falltime duty in all the branches of the Armed Forces, are recrmted. endorsed aad served by JWB's Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy, and together with JWB's Armed Services Committees and USOJWB wo r ke r s cover more than COO mdatary installations and hospitals in every earner of the rieatii When Rabbi Lev answers aad avoids the S64 ouestasa by teshng the Rabbi ef the goad reports they are getting from Fort Cords*, from the Post chaplain and from the CO, he purrs lake a maIan, -Wellhe says in that sanayiag uugrammati cal way — -They ain't a seadaag a chaplain to Gordon. I reckon HI have to fa right an ^lTf-i it all by myself. Hona" X, I i rot chapTO ALL GDI FRIENDS AND PATRONS A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR g ALBERT HAVE?. — JACOB L LEVLNE AIIU \IK.O BROKERAGE CO. Custom Hc-se Brokers and Forwarders **&k Bwisdina PWoe FX 1-4S78 The close M ea cialiun with the chaplains resetted ia an ittmsnal assignment which the Rabbi said •look ban back to the days of his Army chaplaincy." The two resident chaplains were scheduled to be away from the post for a period of two months. CathoLc boys were directed to go to Aikea for religions services The Protestants had a service scheduled every Suriay morning aa Post, under the direction of a sergeant-assistant aiiiiiii The JewLh boys, of course, had their weekly meetings with the Rabbi "Would the Rabbi come over on alternate Senday mornings and preach at the Protestant service*" Certainly, he would, and he did. Fine, but would the Chapiam come over earlier on Wednesday* and giTe the -characterguidance" lectures? Yes. it takes considerable tune — but he's got it down to the rrarntisli He pr eaches eat there two Fricay evenings at 7 o'clock. That's aa hour and fifteen mmates before bis awn senat e s ia town. He goes oat during the week far hasn't il calls and consahations. Tomilimu. an mangim j calls him to the Fort for a wand time enrriag the week. Sometimes, when he is m a harry, he asks for aad gets a ''Military Pouce escort.-* Yoad think the top brass was ridiag in from Washington when this takes place. ••Oser'" It's the -fc pi~ en a flying visit, sandwiching in an extra hoar between two non-military engagements His camiagatiaail religious school is open to Army iirnanH and be CawHnwed an Pane 10-O !• All. Greetifs Tharpe's Iron Works WROUGHT IRON RATINGS — ORNAMENTAL DOORS. Dc 3155 N.W. Swwti River DrtVt NE 54713 BEST WISHES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON WILLIAM "BILL" WISNESKY EXCAVATING CONTRACTORS Barber-Green Dttchera — Iwaaaaawaaal — Septic Tanks Dry Wells — Barkhoo Excavanha 7140 S.W. 42hm Street GSET NGS J. F. STEWAIT NIORTGAGE C0„ IHC MORTGAGE LOAN DEPARTME3TT Room 300 1st National Bank Buildin* CORAL GABLES. FLORIDA MO 6-2523 SEASON'S GREETINGS TO AU OUR FRIENDS Adams Glass Service 1919 Purdy Acenue. Miami lEMtSl NEW YEAR GREETINGS JOHN B. ORR. INC M HMM. rOVSTITf Qmmrrtf K+n*t€*nr 415 IV.W. .>flh Swi-eBOBt TOAU... A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR MILTON WHSS 1



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    Pag 2-H +Jewlsti FhrkU&r Friday, September 23. I960 == GREETINGS: May v/e take this opportunity of extending Very Best' Wishes for the New Year to each and every one of you! On behalf of the Israel Bond Committee of Greater Miami, we want to express our gratitude for the support given in this area to the State of Israel Bond Program during the past year. The New Year. 5721 offers Miami's Jewry an appropriate opportunity to rededicate itself towards the historic task of helping to make Israel's second decade one of unparallea progress and development, through the purchase of Israel Bonds. May Good Health and Prosperity be your reward in the New Year. JACK A. CANTOR SAMUEL ORITT Genera] Chairmen SAMUEL FRIEDLANO, Chairman Board of Governors GREATER MIAMI COMMITTEE STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS The Southwest Jewish Center AND ITS SISTERHOOD 6438 S.W. 8th STREET Extend to the Entire Jewish Community Best Wishes for a Very Happy Mew Year Wishing a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year to the Officers and Members of our Lodge and their families; and to our Brethren who will join our Lodge to help us carry out the good work of B'nai B'rith HERBERT L. HEIKEN. Preslent IRVING SCHATZMAN. Past President President-Elect MIAMI BEACH LODGE OF B'NAI B'RITH BSkur Cholem Kosher Convalescent Home of Greater Miami 310 COLLINS AVENUE 0 MRS. EDWARD ELKIN. President, and OFFICERS Extend Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year to All Their Members and Friends THE SPINOZA OUTDOOR FORUM 124 • lit* STMfT, MIAMI tCACH ML ABRAHAM W01FS0N, Chsirew fassess ft* All A M A P P T N I W T I A I HIGH HOLIDAY GREETINGS %  ** Wish** for a Healthy, Joyful and Religious New Ycer BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION H. Lewis Rottman, Rabbi N. LOWS I0TTMAN, ta*< ALEXANDER C. MOKOVITZ, PretieW TNI OFFICERS Mid DIRECTORS •! The Sisterhood •t Congregation Beth Tfilah EXTEND TO ITS FRIENDS AND THEIR FAMILIES BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR Mrs. Rachel Katz, President Programs of Jewish Vocational Service By LLOYD L. RUSKIN Presided, Jewish Vocational Service AS the New Year 5721 approaches, the Jewish ** Vocational Service prepares to celebrate its second anniversary. Just a little less than two ycar> aso. this agency became a full-fledged member of the family of organizations under the sponsorship and auspices of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. In the life of a community, two years are but a brief moment. Nevertheless, JVS has been making its presence known in a variety of i not only with regard to the Jewish segment of our population, but to the community as a whole. During the past year, it was estimated that better "than 1,020 people were served by JVS. Of this number, more than 530 men and women sought help with job placement and vocational adjustment problems. Not all of these were seeking jobs, but 105 job placements were effected by JVS. Over 40 youngsters of high school and college age received guidance and counseling services through the functioning of our career counseling program. A> an aid in this latter program, approximately 190 different tests were administered as part of our psychological testing program. Through our facilities for group guidance, over 360 youngsters of high school and college age and their parents were served. The Jewish Vocational Service Workshop employed 84 handicapped and elderly clients who earned $23.516 37 while working 29.254 man hours. The amount of money received from the completion of contract work in the JVS workshop totaled $23,898.18, which means that for the first time in the history of this program more money has been received as income from contracts than was paid out in wages to clients employed at the workshop. Aims of the Agency Since the Jewish Vocational Service is still a comparatively new agency a word about its services appears to be in order. The agency was organized to help people solve problems arising in the area of their vocational adjustment. As an agency created by the Jewish community, it is particularly concerned with such problems as they arise Employee at Jewish Vocational Service Workshop drills holes in a starfish later to be made into a shell novelty. LLoro MUKJN in the Jewish population. The intent of the overall program is to provide services which make available professional skills of the highest order controlled by professional ethics. As a testimony to the efficiency and proficiency of the professional staff of JVS. the agency has been certified and approved by the two major accrediting agencies in the field of vocational services — the American Board on Professional Standard.in Vocational Counseling, and the American Board of Psychological Services. Approval by these boards is based upon a continuing evaluation of toe JVS program, and since such approval is not automatic, the agency must maintain the highest of standards to receive continuing approval. JVS makes its unique contribution to the community through emphasis on individualization in practice, the nature of the service being based upon meeting the needs of each individual served. At the present time, the major emphasis of the agency is focused on job placement and sheltered workshop services. Csreer counseling and group guidance, both vitally needed by the youth of the Miami community, are also offered, but in lesser degree, than job placement and sheltered workshop services because of a lack of staff. JVS recognizes the fact that the agency must keep abreast of new developments in the area of vocational adjustment. Because of this, staff and board have become active in local and national organizations and committees. The staff holds membership in such organizations as the National Conference of Jewish Communal Workers, American Psychological Assn., the American Personel and Guidance Assn., the National Vocational Guidance Assn.. the National Rehabilitation Assn., and ine Florida Assn. of Sheltered Workshops and Homebound Programs. In addition to membership in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the agency, whose parent was Jewish Family and Children's Service, as such is an accredited member of the associations above plus the Jewish Occupational Council, and the Welfare Planning Council of Dade County. Our workshop director is the treasurer of the Florida Assn. of Sheltered Workshops and Homebound Programs. Our executive director and the president both sit on the board of directors of the Jewish Occupational Council. The executive director is chairman of the committee on retarded CorrtinuedonP.gellH We Wish All Our Relatives and Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year MILTON and MIRIAM, WCK, RUTH and JOSH SIICK1V Holiday Greetings to All B'NAI B'RITH AZA MIAMI 322 TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM The liberal CM, raffsties •> th. leech" Affiliated with the liaise el Aeaerkea Hebrew CeenregstUei CHASE AVENUE at 41st STREET MIAMI BEACH Wf PtAT THAT OfcW NEW NOW Of PfACf Will MAl A Nrw f t A of pud rot mmjumv MR. and MRS. MEYER A. BASKIN EXTEND THER BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY, HEALTHFUL AMD CONSTRUCTIVE NEW YEAR To Vie Officers. Directors and Staff of the BUREAU OF JEWISH EDUCATION and fht GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION; To the Rabbis and Jewish Teachers and to the many Meads of Jewish Education throughout Greater Miami %  %  an



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    3S5 1 a* %  Hi 3 2 lai 4. Kg. U 4 "a %  a a a* %  %  j %  Boptembor 23. I960 +Jeistifk*i(iia*i Peg 5-A -| i Special Rosh Hashona gift to school in Israel ... A Safer Torah. jift from the Temple Youth Camp of the Bradford Hebrew Conegation, Bradford, Pa., to the Leo Baeck School in Haifa, is on le way to Israel aboard the SS Zion of the Zim Lines to be used the school's High Holiday observance. The Torah was iced in the care of the ship's rabbi for the two-week voyage Israel. Shown here in the Zion's synagogue on sailing day re (left to right) Joseph Rubin, representing the Bradford Herew Congregation; Miss Louise Danny, the Temple Youth, rho donated the gift; Erwin Frankel, member of the congregation who will present the Torah to tne Leo Baeck School; Rabbi Yaacov Levy, of the SS Zion; Rabbi Allen Levine, of the %  rodford Hebrew Congregation; and Raboi Joseph Goldman, assistant director of the National Federaticn of Temple Youth. New Programs m Southwest Y" New programs are being instituted along with the old as the South %  ^st YMHA, 7215 Coral Way, press to begin its new program ir oc Monday. A full course of instruction in •udo beginning with the third grade, for boys and girls, will commence on Monday. The course will •Jso be held for junior and senior kigh divisions, for boys and girls, K evening a week, the date to be Renounced in the near future. In addition to activities for chilen, an adult sculpting class is beplanned at the "Y." Classes will held on Tuesday evening. [The Southwest "Y," as a branch the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, also sponsors a Sen|r Citizens Club. The club will ive its first open house and birthparty on Wednesday afternoon Dm 2 to 4:30 p.m. Miamian featured Speaker Henry Gherman, of 1761 NW 10th ct., No. Miami, was honored as featured speaker of the General Agency School of the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company in Boston last week. Associated with John Hancock since Nov., 1968, Gherman is a member ef the Hans O. Clawson General Agency in Miami. loly Days Will le Observed High Holiday services will be Bonducted by Rabbi Joseph H. Marholies at Mt. Sinai Hospital Friday, |:30 p.m., acording to an announcencnt by hospital executive direc%  or Samuel Gertner. Patients who wish to attend and Fare given permission by their phyjsirians, will he p^isted bv the [nursing staff in the second floor conference room. Nursing staff | members will be in attendance during services. Services have been arranged by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the Rabbinical Assn. of Greater Miami, and the hospital. Rabbi Margolies is hospital chaplain. • 10NG DISTANCE Miami Awards Major Winners E. Albert Pallot, civic leader and chairman of the City of Mi ami beautification committee, awarded prizes last week to 14 major winners in the "Make Miami Beautiful" contest. Pallot singled out Helen Alpert for a special plaque in honor of her leadership as contest chairman. Miss Alpert is vice chairman of First Retirement Foundation. The public dinner in the Biscayne Terrace hotel was attended by Miami City Manager Melvin Reese, Mayor Robert King High, City Commissioners George DuBreuil and Henry L. Balaban, and Metro Commissioner Joseph Boyd. Also present was a large group from the Women's Division, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce. MOVING to all points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE ACE • It.B. VAN LI.XFS. INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue For Information Call MR. ROSS ME 5-444* MIAMI tZSTL J2*>t ;\3GUST BROS R> 7 Club Formed at Temple Zamora Newly formed Young Married Couples Club of Temple Zamora met last week to plan future activities. Elected officers of the club were president. Dr. Edward Tescher; vice president, Calvin Sokol; secretary, Carol Lechowitz; treasurer, Myron Abramowitz; historian, Marion Silverman; program chairman, Joy Abramowitz; publicity chairman, Yaffa Tescher. The club will meet twice a month for business and cultural functions, and will have one social event each month. A member-bring-a-member party has been planned for October. The club will stress social, cultural and community service activities. RETIREMENT LIVING In An Oceanfront Hotel on MIAMI BEACH $14A per month, per person l/.U 4bl. tt., yorly hmth INCIUD'N 3 Will BALANCED MEALS OAILY 50 ef 130 R.em Private Pool • Ocean B-ach SALT FREE D ET OPTIONAL Phone JE 1-6691 W0FF0RD BEACH HOTEL ON the Ocean at 24th Street MIAMI KACH Israel Fails to Nip Ceylon 'Break' AN ASSOCIATION <>' MIAMI s" UPIUN Pies-den' 5 COMVEN/ENT OFUCES TO SERVE YOU • 45 M E 1H AVMUO • 1400 N. W. 36th Str—1 O 12370 N.W. 7th Avnva • 1901 5. W. 8th Srroof • 5800 N. W. 7th Avmnua RESOURCES EXCEED 1SS MILLION DOLLARS



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    1 "Jewish Flor idian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY Volume 33 — Number 39 Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960 Nine Sections — Price 52.00 fwrwSB Mi Fm-, Wt:i St # w & ^w m %  J M* NT %  • < \ • KVS* ,>..>. rO k • &f '• <* &k. 4 i m m. -H**. %  •' -•• "*v*r~ 1* *<•••• I VflBtSi HH I j^e %  ^^^H I %  1V'_#'a£-^!* J ^1r Efefegf# y"-•*t&sS? 11 ffiii .^f .'"•* m *>.*• %  *• •ScroIU o/ the Law." umtien on l


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    Friday. September 23. 1960 +Jewish nerkUati Page 13-A Mrs. Kramarsky Heads Hadassah; Convention Adopts $9,875,000 Budget By Special R*jx>rt Hadassah, the NEW YORK — Women'* Zionist America tional president to head than 318,000 members its in more 1,320 Kramarsky told the convention: "It is one of Hadassah's greatest Oritanieatwm fc4ribatr*tffarWr!'f#nhe world has elected a new na:„ .„„.. „ in terms of successive generations of a timeless people. When so many chapters and groups throughout the have so lew roots in the past, we United States and Puerto Rico. Elected to head the largest Zionist organization in the world was Mrs. Siegfried Kramarsky, of New York City, a national vice president of Hadassah for the last four years and a member of Hadassah's national board since 1944. Mrs. Kramarsky has Jieid the national find anchorage in the eternal truths of our Jewish tradition. Although we, too, discard the outmoded, and look for today's paths to tomorrow's goals, we find our purpose and our sense of direction in the vision bequeathed to us by the ancient Prophets of Israel. "We realize that the historic vice presidency of Hadassah for wonder of the re-establishment of Israel as a modern, democratic state, generates new problems, demanding new action on the part of the Jewish people. We are a Zionist organization whose labors and thoughts have been, are and will continue to be concentrated on realizing the Zionist dream of Is-, The election wound up the four-irael reborn, and of a regenerated, day 48th national convention of unified Jewish people, with Israel Hadassah at the Waldorf Astoria j as its cultural and spiritual center, i hotel, attended by more than 2,500 To reinforce the whole Jewish peosix one-year terms since 1948. Mrs. Kramarsky succeeds Dr. Miriam K. Freund, also of New York City, who has held the national presidency of Hadassah for the last lour consecutive one-year terms. delegates and guests. The convention also adopted a budget of $9,875,000 for its 1960-61 programs in Israel and the United States and a series of resolutions on the pie with a unifying sense of a common past and a common destiny requires hard thinking and hard work. Hadassah is no stranger to either. And our rewards are far suspension of nuclear tests, and beyond what is given to most peoAmerican technical assistance. The' pie." convention approved a statement | Born in Ham burg. Germany, Mrs. defining the responsibilities of the Kramarsky left her native country ? L on,St .. m v 5 inen t !" i ne J'*? 1 £ l after a bitter encounter with antiSemitism in 1923, and settled in Holland. In 1939, just before the Nazis invaded the Netherlands, she and her family went to Canada and two years later settled in the United States. Mrs. Kramarsky became active in Hadassah immediately upon her arrival in New York and has held such major portfolios as national chairman of Hadassah's the establishment of the State ol Israel. Of the $9,875,000 budgeted for Hadassah activities. $8,440,000 was earmarked for Hadassah's operations in Israel. The quotas set for Hadassah's projects in Israel were $3,740,000 for the Hadassah Medical Organization; $2,300,000 for Youth Aliyah, international agency Seek Volunteers For Beach UF Claude Pepper, Miami Beach Member Affair Scheduled Paid-up membership affair will be sponsored by the Miami Women's United of United Cerebral Palchairman of the United Fund's sv on Nov. 3. Mrs. Bess Schoen1961 campaign, Wednesday issued!berg, membership chairman, said a call for volunteers to aid in maltthe affair is scheduled for the Tering thisyeai^s,aruA^^drive 4 a .suc-l raC9 r<) om b the BiscaynufTerrace cessful one. [hotel. "Last year, 17,185 residents of for the relief and rehabilitation of Youth Aliyah committee, chairmanhomeless Jewish children in Is-|of Hadassah's management comrael; $1,000,000 for continued construction of the $25 million Hadassah • Hebrew University Medical Center, now being completed at Kiryat Hadassah (Hadassah Town), on the western outskirts of Jerusalem, Israel; $700,000 for the Jewish National Fund; and $600,000 for Hadassah's vocational education program in Israel. mittee. national treasurer of Hadassah, and chairman of Hadassah's Wills and Bequests committee. Mrs. Kramarsky was a delegate to several World Zionist Congresses, including the 1951 and 1956 congresses held in Jerusalem, In July 1957 and May, 1959, she participated in the Israel meetings In her acceptance aldress, Mrs. of the Zionist General Council. YOUR FUTURE IS HIS BUSINESS! MM. S/cCft'fD KKAMAMSKf Slave Laborers Should Register, Committee Urges By Special Report NEW YORK — Former Jewish inmates of Nazi concentration camps, who toiled as slave laborers for private German firms, are requested to register with the Committee of Former Jewish Slave Laborers in Germany, which was set up in cooperation with leading national and world Jewish organizations. The committee has its principal office in New York. The committee is seeking to gain compensation from German firms for the benefit of their surviving Jewish slave laborers, along the same lines as are provided by the agreements reached with the I. G. Farben and the Friedrich Krupp companies. It is in the claimants' own interest, the committee emphasised, to give th* matter their immediate attention, end to register by Dec. 31, 1960. The committee makes no charge for its services, nor does it act es a legal representative of individual claimants. Communications should be addressed to the Compensation Treu hand GmbH, Straufenstrasse 29a, Frankfurt a-Main, Germany, and should contain the following information: Full name, address, datej and place of birth, name of Ger-i man firm, and the place and dates where the slave labor was perform-; ed. The Compensation Treuhand' GmbH is a special trust set up to administer the funds to be paid, out under the I. G. Farben and the Krupp agreements. Former slave laborers at the I. G. Farben and the Friedrich Krupp companies, who have already registered with the Compensation Treuhand, are requested not to register again, as their claims, are already on file. Slave laborers at other companies, who were in previous correspondence with the Committee of Former Jewish Slave] Laborers at its New York office, need not register again at this time. Miami Beach received some form of help or service from a United Fund agency," Pepper pointed out. That's approximately one out of every three persons who received a helping hand in time of need," the volunteer chairman said. "United Funds' services are many," he continuod. "TSere rt 54 affiliated agencies offering over 400 health and welfare services. "Youth services, family and child care, health services, and services to the aged and handicapped encompass every misfortune or health problem that might befall an average person or family," Pepper said. "In order to continue this fine work and keep up with the rapid growth of our area, we need the help of all Miami Beach residents," Pepper said. Oscar Leonard Honored by 6B Author and lecturer Oscar Leonard, annual winter visitor of Miami Beach, was recently honored by Cortlandt Lodge of B'nai B'rith in Ossining, N.Y. The event celebrated Leonard's 150th anniversary as a member of B'nai B'rith. Leonard founded Cortlandt Lodge 20 years ago. He is author of "Americans All," joined the staff of the St. Louis Post Dispatch after his graduation from Leclaire College, and later did graduate work in the School of Social Work at Washington University. For ten years, Leonard was director of the Jewish Welfare Federation in St. Louis and he has also served as president of the Missouri State Conference of Social Work. Proceeds tor Dystrophy at the Miami Spring Villas Playhouse on Saturday evening, Oct. 1. Irving Levin, president of the Muscular Dystrophy Society of j Proceeds will go to the Society to South Florida, announced this week j augments needs of dystrophy pathat a dinner dance will be held tients. LIGHTS ON! FRIDAYS 6 to 8 evening hours FOR YOUR SPECIAL CONVENIENCE ALL BANKING SERVICES DRIVE-IN WINDOWS • FREE PARKING MERCHANTS BANK OF MIAMI 950 RED ROAD (S.W. 57th Ave. near the Trail) Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation %  i He solves TODAY'S anxieties by solving tomorrow's problems today! What becomes of your family if you're not there? Can you afford college for your son? Do you d.-re look forward to retirement? Anxieties like these can be solved today by Living Insurance. And the man to help you is the Man from Equitable. He can bring you a program well suited to your needs-a program to relieve your anxieties. Today. For details call Tha Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. SIDNEY S. KRAEMER FR 1-5691 245 S.E. 1st Stret • HdYouth to Assist At Services For the first time in the history of Temple B'nai Sholom, junior congregation officers will take part in High Holy Day services at the Temple. Post Bar Mitzvah students will read the Haftorah, with younger pupils reciting the Haftorah blessings and leading the congregation in responsive readings. Taking part are Rodney M a x. president of the Junior Congregation; Bruce Greenfield, chairman of the board of trustees; Robert Cowan, rabbi; Michael Horowitz, vice president; Martin Kaplan, vice president; Jay Kalinsky, treasurer; Arlene Mornick, secretary; Ann Porges, assistant rabbi; James Lewis, cantor. Jack Kinsell. Michael Kurtz. Mark Miller, Jeffrey Yohay, Sammy Zucker, directors; Marshall Fitter, trustee; Alan Goldberg, gabbai; Bradley Eagerman, Richard Wolf, and Robert Zitrin, sextons. NOW!* V *, A Small Air Conditioner 4 4 w ith 30% More Moisture .< Removal... Longer Life YORK POWERFUL-QUIET ROOM AIR CONDITIONER MAKE US PROVE IT See.O"-The-5pol Presentation That Erases All Doubt?! See how York'g exclusive Cooling Maze coils remove 30% more humidity from the air. Find out how York delivers extra cooling BTU's per kilowatt to give you the greatest total comfort at lowest operating cost. See how York's DualThrust Compressor cuts operating sounds to a whisper. Come to eye-opening YORK DEMONSTRATION CENTER1 ALL YORK UNITS ARE RACKED RY WRITTEN PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE HILL-YORK CORPORATION 1225 S.W. 8th Street FR 1-1411



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    "WW Poqe 10-1 Friday. September 23. i960 A HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM COMMUNITY FEDERAL Savings and Loan Association of Hialeah 461 HIALEAH DRIVE IN ESSEX VILLAGE HIALEAH. FLORIDA Phone TU 7-5591 MSMBEK FEDBtA. HOME LOAN BANK MEMBEt FEOA: SAV.NGS ANO IOAN INSURANCE cow "O ALL GREETINGS TALLOW MASTERS TALLOW ^| MEAT SCRAPS ~ YELLOW GREASE P.O. BOX 211 f %  *? MIAMI SPRINGS 66, FLORIDA TO ALL GREETTNG5 F. A. PAULY CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION (Hialeah a*d NMA 760 DUAL 140* TO AH MOST HAPPY HOLIDAYS i MKZK TOOL 4 Off \ EXTRUSION DIE SPECIALISTS | 12425 N.E. 13th Avtmw, PI 7-8331 TO AU. ... A. MOST HAPPY NEW YEA£ KAMPONG, IMC DELUXE GIFT BOXES "CHUTNEYS" MA* ORDERS P. O. BOX 423 SOUTH MIAMI 32, FLORIDA To All Most Happy Holidays [ MAJESTIC BAKERY [ Baked Goods & Catering 7911 NX 2nd Avenue PI 1.7853 Volunteer Services of Mt. Sinai Women By MRS. A. HERBERT MATHES Mt. Swi Heaawtal WMMR'I Ausiliacy AS president of Ipt jrozaea-i^Aiixiliary of Mt. ** Sinai Hospital. I feel privileged to bead this wonderful organization of women who constantly strive to serve the progress of the hospital. Although providing volunteer services in many departments of the hospital, the Women's Auxiliary has realized, from the beginning, that the need for good nursing car* is the most vital in their work It was through the Women's Auxiliary that the Mt. Sinai School of Pactical Nursing was formed. The entire financial support of the school is the responsibility ot the Auxiliary members whose interest in it cannot be meaMired in and cents. The school is supported by the Snack Bar and the Gift Shop, run by volunteers of the Auxiliary. A great feature is the provision of scholarships to the School of Nursing by the Auxiliary. The school has achieved an outstanding reputation, based in large measure on the high standards set by the a g e n cie s winch have given tt accreditation. Early in its operation, the school received its first national recognition and still reremains the only school in the State of Florida accredited by the National Assn. for Practical Nurse Education and Service. In addition, the school has been accredited by the Florida State Board of Nursing, as well as the Veterans Adrmnist ration. When the first class in Practical Nursing was formed on September 17. 1951. there were six students enrolled. This fall, the school accepted 70 students The first class had four graduates. Thu year almost 40 will be graduated. Today, the course offers a full year program of combined instruction and hospital experience. Mrs. Carmen F. Ross. R.N.. MA. director of Nursing and Nursing Education, has been head of the school for the past seven years. During thu time she has seen over 200 students graduated. women's Cefwriweeions With our new building, the graduates now am working under the beat condsUons with the. meat modern facilities. In this atmosphere, the beat p os s ibl e patient-care can be given. From a report issued at the time of the 1MB Capping C e re man y this quan t ise explains th AnK. A. Nfltttr MAIMS son for the many devoted hoars of service to the School of Practical Nursing given by the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai: "The Women's Auxiliary feels that its support has made possible one of the finest practical nursing programs in the c—ntry, that it he In s safeguard the patient and nursing care not only at Mt. Sinai Hospital, but throughout the country, since many of the graduates return to their home commumFies or find their fields of employment in public heauh, private duty work, or in other community hospitals." As stated already, the Snack Bar and Gift Shop are run by volunteers of the Auxiliary. Votun teers know as the Pink Ladles also serve in many other branches of the hospital: the Information Desk, the Pharmacy, the Blood Bank. Library, as nures' aides, nursing clerks, servettes. and in the Out Patient and Emergency Clinic. They have given man)hours of devoted service and look forward to their continued work in the new Mt. 9mai Hospital. On behalf of the satise We an a s Auxiliary membership. I wish you a New Year blessed with peace, health and p r os peirt y Activities of B'nai B'rith Women Here By MRS. GERALD P. SOLTZ '. B'nai B'rMi wewten. District S % *** activities, as west as the membership^ of the 1* arani aVrith Women's chapters in South Floeida have increased tresneadonsly dursng the past several years. The chapters now rrmaaiili activities under the aegis of the Miami. Miami Beaahv and Breward W aHh Dade Councils, chapters, together with the remaining 38 • %  %  %  %  *. Georgia. Seat* Careima. NorthCare lina. Virginia. Maryland, and the District of Columbia, comprise the B'nai BYith Women of Distinct five. The B'nai B'rith Women of the Miami area concentrate heavily an set phases of youth actiw The AZA Boys and BBG Girls groups now number over 1.000. with chapter members as adiisoii and acting m Tirinui rapacilm at tne annaal winter caa c ln n held M Canea Owassa Bauer during the Chanuka vacation parsed Our woasca are presently busy wash an alt-day B'nai B'rith Youth Organization day to he held on Seat. 25 at the Dunoot Plaza hotel, when the as well as their advisers, will be Activities at our Hillel House on the campus of the University of Miami have also been height ened with the redecorating and refurbishing of the budding for the beginning of the school semester. Oar women are likewise taking an active pact m tesnrhribing the HtUrJ House at tan Than III a1j of Florida. The B'nai B nth Women hi this area will again sponsor Oagei Sbebbet aa the tarns* religious festivals during the year, culminating with DADE METAL FABRICATIONS, IIYV. MISCELLANEOUS MCTAL MANUFACTURERS Of THE GREETINGS FROM CHANTICLEER IMC ICED FRYERS and FOWL CALIFORNIA TURKEYS I. I. OUOCS CORNISH GAME HENS 1071 N.W. 21st UrtKm FR 1-4758 BOAT TRAEER 47WL IttlUaW HIAlfAH Ml 84411 GREETINGS THE DAWSONS MARTIN DOUGLAS DONALD INDUSTRIAL PLASTIC MOLDERS. INC INJECTION MOULDING MOLD MAKING 680 W. 18th St., Hi*!*** HJ 7.7428



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    Friday, September 23, 1960 *Jewlsti ftcridliar 1 Page 5-E Best Books Since Last Rosli Hashona By HAROLD U. RIBALOW THIS has been a good year in Jewish books. As usual, it is impossible to Ust them all, or to call attention to books which are of peripheral Jewish Interest. And many of the useful Jewish volumes are for specialists only, or will be remembered for a brief period. Nonetheless, any year is a good one which has produced as many worthy books as this one has. Let us, then, take them by category and see what bas been published. The year in fiction has been rather mediocre, the weakest list of a few seasons, although even here some titles stand out. I shall pass over the transient volumes and pay some attention only to those worth our time and effort. Meyer Levin's "Eva" (Simon and Schuster) is a fine evocation of the Hitler years and how a .young Jewess not only survives but manages, throughout, to retain her sense of identification with her people. Based on an actual case, "Eva" made the best-seller lists and further enhanced Mr. Levin's reputation as one of the best living American novelists, and one who always keeps closely in mind his own Jewish heritage. "Shalom" by Dean Brelis, published by Little, Brown, is a novel about Israel which did not come off as well as Leon Uris' "Exodus" of an earlier season, bat it nevertheless contained some moving passages and Mr. Brelis' heart is on the right side. His narrative served to remind readers once more of the miracle of Israel and the difficulties under which the Jew labored in order to come to Israel to help build a new State. Other Jewish novels had less impact, but have enriched American Jewish fiction. Arthur Granit's "The Time of the Peaches" (Abelhard-Schuman) was a curiously-neglected novel, not reviewed wide' ly and. apparently, not bought by many readers, either. But it is a vivid re-creation of Jewish life in Brooklyn 30 years ago. Written in poetic prose, full of sharp insights, and with shrewd comments about the Jewish sense of security in a ghetto atmosphere, "The Time of the Peaches" heralds the debut of an important Jewish writer. Yaal Dayan'a First More will be heard from If r. Granit, but do go out of your way to read his first novel, which is in many respects more than promising. On the other hand, Peter Martin's second novel, "The Building," (Little. Brown) is less impressive than his first book, "The Landsmen." The later book follows the lives of members of a family first introduced in "The Landsmen." But it is less successful, even if it deals with a more contemporary era. Still, Mr. Martin is engaged in an ambitious series of novels and he is worth following both for his scope and his ability, in patches, to suggest problems in Jewish life untouched upon by others. Much already has been written about Yael Dayan's "New Face in the Mirror" (World), a slight novel about an Israel girl and her experiences in her country's army. At the outset, there were wails of discontent because Miss Dayan, the daughter of a noted Israeli general, found that her fellow Israelis are not entirely idealistic. But the perspective of time has, I am sure, led us to see that hers was a minor but sensitive portrayal of one girl's development and maturity. It is a rather impressive little novel. Marjorie Fischer won a Lippincott Award for her novel "Mrs. Sherman's Summer," a carefully-written novel about a Jewish matriarch in Long Island some 80 years ago. The lives of the members of a wellto-do Jewish clan are lovingly traced and the novel A r %  %  • f. MOUOti.AI KAflA/4 ... religious analysis HERMAN WOW ... itery IN itself makes for pleasant reading. Not too well received by the critics, it remains a good book, one worth dipping into, if only because it is concerned with a level of Jewish life not frequently treated, and written by a skillful novelist. There remain two more good novels, both translated from the Yiddish, one an old classic, the other bound to be a new one. Mendele Mocher Seforim's "Fishke the Lame" (Yoseloff) has been made available in a smooth translation by Gerald Stillman and continues to impress us as a humorous and sad picture of the poverty-stricken Jews of a European of long ago. Isaac Bashevis Singer's "The Magician of Lublin" (Noonday Press) is a novel by the contemporary Yiddish novelist who is perhaps the finest Jewish writer in the world, regardless of the language in which he writes. This is a novel about a magician who is lusty, something of a fraud and a man who believes in practically nothing. How he finds purpose in life, after helping to destroy the lives of many of the people he knows, is the crux of Mr. Singer's tale. It is a remarkable story, told by a masterful yarn-spinner. It is a book that will live. Roth Book Aa in Another novel which will live is one that is now in its second incarnation. It is titled "Call it Sleep" (Pageant Book Co.) and was written in 1934 by Henry Roth. Long out of print, it has been reissued with critical introductions by Maxwell Geismar, Meyer Levin and this writer. "Call it Sleep" is about a little Jewish boy in the jungles of a Brooklyn ghetto and his relationships with his mother, Continued from Page 10-E Holiday Greetings to All Our Friends and Patfons GARI.ES WKK WASH IT 2S01 S.W. 37th Ave. Coral Gables Phone HI 6-1217 TO All GKUTINCS IRVING RATHER ARTHUR SCHAFFEL LEATHERCRAFT UPHOLSTERERS Manufacturers Deiignen Bars—Booths—Soloes Cushions—Walls—Kitchen NooJn REPAIRS 1425 N.W. Miami Court Phone Ft 3-504e, FR 3-5311 Nata's Yacht Basin 1184 N. W. North RiTec Drire Ni S4231 EDISON ELECTRICAL FIXTURE CO. Wholesale Distributors ELECTRIC SUPPLIES and UGHTING FIXTURES CALL FR 3-3114 1009 S. W. 8th STREET (Tamiami Trail) A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL Sol Mcgftoll REALTOR 605 LINCOLN ROAD Phone IE 8-8551 „ Compliments of MR. AND MRS. SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR 12& WONDER WORLD RESTAURANTS ) PANCAKES J ENJOYED 1,000 WAYS 1 1999-71st Street Normandy Isle To Our Clients and Friends and to the Entire Jewish Community We Extend Our Best Wishes for the New Year Holidays BOULEVARD NATIONAL BANK of MIAMI 5000 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI Member f J>J.C. — Forforal Reserve System THE PARAKEET SHOP BIRD HOSPITAL • BIRDS BOARDED Complete Line of Bird Supplies — Cages — Equipment 4401 N.W. 7th Avenue PL 4-3402 .1 HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL LEN COLEMAN and JACK KAMTN "Fiair of Miami" 1454 N.W. Sid AVENUf MIAMI Peeee FRkl 3.5054 70 All ... WfW VfAt CIEETMKS RUTH L. SUTT0N Jmtko of Peace, District N.. 3 100 MiracU Mil* Corel leekt I TITLE INSURANCE A definite insurance contract instead of an OPINION as to the condition of title. LANGFORD BUILDING, MIAMI — FR 1-5618 ESCROWS — ABSTRACTS FIDELITY TITLE COMPANY — TOM BLAKE SEASON'S GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS 4w-j| BRANT ORCHID SUPPLY "Complete Orchids Service and Storage" 2970 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 3-5544 To AH Season's Greetings MR. and AIRS. ALFRED STONE 6370 S.W. 107th Street South Miami "THE BEST BAffBEQUE SAUCE IN TOWN" HARRIS FOOD PRODUCTS U Manufacturers and Distributor* % %  ; Mayonnaise) • Pickles • Condiments • Spices 7340 N.W. 35th Ave. Miami, He. Phone OX 1-4250



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    Friday. September 23. I960 -JewlstFlcrMiann Page *-E tt II they had come to understand some very basic things: They began to recognize their enduring responsibility, on a global basis, to their fellow Jews: not to permit a single day's unnecessary suffering and privation, even at a time when that suffering w#s not translated into bold, blazing headlines. They tJegm to face their eternal obligation to contribute to and preserve the vision of an ageless and creative people, devoted to the highest concepts of moral responsibility. Integration Necessary They began to see themselves not as dispensers of year-to-year charity, but as members of a world fdlow&hip actively willing to help their needful brethren attain the living dignity and security they must have to make their own contribution to this historic continuity of the Jewish people. And, perhaps most importantly, they began to understand the contrality of the State of Israel in world Jewish life. They had come to realize it was not enough to have rescued and transported a million people to Israel in the last twelve years and to have helped to absorb two-thirds of them productively into the young republic's life and economy. They knew that they must help complete the process of integration for all immigrants they have helped resettle in Israel — and that they must be prepared for many years to come to help the thousands of other immigrants who will follow. In other words, the Jews of America have come to understand — and have embraced — the longrange nature of the global work of the United Jewish Appeal. This represents a great turning point in UJA history. What is perhaps most gratifying about this development is the active participation in this pivotal campaign of so many of the younger Jewish leaders throughout the country. This newer generation, which did not take part in the tragic events of two decades ago that gave the UJA its initial momentum, shows every sign of being a driving force behind future campaigns. The potential for growth is high and great. It was that image of American Jewish maturity Beginning the New Year 5721 with hope, these ma'abarot dwellers in Israel will soon leave their squalid shanties for new apartments, seen nearing completion in the background. Last Rosh Hashona. some 60,000 were living in the ma'abarot. With the help of United Jewish Appeal funds, these numbers have been reduced by some 20,000 during the last 12-month period. r—•*— %  "* The New Year 5721 starts off right for these recently-arrived immigrant youngsters in Israel, who are learning a useful trade in a school established by American Jews through the United Jewish Appeal. During 5720, some 38,000 young people in Israel learned trades, acquired secondary and higher education, and received vocational guidance. They are among 185,000 young in 25 other countries who depend upon UJA assistance. and its great future potential that I brought with me to Israel this summer — and found that the image of the State of Israel more than matched it. This double image was an exhilarating fact of Jewish life in the last months of the Hebrew year 5720. Now, as the New Year 5721 begins and thoughts turn to the next year's campaigning, I know there are some who may be uneasy. Their caution tells them that one challenge squarely and maturely met does not necessarily prove continuing maturity. It tells them that one successful campaign may not guarantee another, that the image may prove illusory — and that the follow-up year to come will tell the story. Ongoing Needs I agree. The coming campaign, which will occupy most of the year 5721, will indeed be the test of the new maturity I have sensed among the Jews of this country. It will establish it either as a oneyear phenomenon or as an enduring part of American Jewish life. The needs to be met by the next UJA campaign will once again be the onging daily needs of more than half a million Jewish men, women and children. In Israel, they will be struggling to rise to a level of living on which they can meet the great future on equal terms with their fellow Israelis. In the other countries in which the program of the UJA's agencies operate through the JDC, they will still be struggl'ng against age-old conditions of poverty, disease and backwardness so that they may begin to participate with dignity in the Jewish future. Meeting these ongoing daily needs is imperative, to clear the way for greater tasks in the future. For the time will come, as it must, when thousands of Jews will be able to leave lands from which they cannot now emigrate and go to Israel. And the time is almost at hand for the people of Israel to penetrate the Negev desert in depth and finish the job of making that whole vast barren area fruitful. The Jews of America must be prepared to help make these future breakthroughs smooth and successful. The men and women who will work in the camContiuned on Page 13-E ALL WOMK CUABAHTtLD Spolter Electrical Supplies, Inc. Distributors of Electrical Supplies, Lamps & Accessories lighting Fixtures 6700 N.W. 7th Avenue Phone PL 4-2738 IARNES Cast SttM Shop CUT ITfJspfWOft* TO OtMt MANTIIS •MIB PUB niene PL •4914 r. M> MM. 544* *nWT THt NATIONAL HOTEL end the KORETZKY FAMILY Wish All Their Friends and Guests A Very Happy New Year TO OUR MANY VALUED JEWISH FRIENDS OUR SINCERE GOOD WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS Affiliate Thurmond Monument Co. BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR NAT ROTH MARTIN SPILKA Sinccrest Holiday Greetings Al the Jewish Community ushers in the New Year Season, It is the privilege of HOME MILK to extend cordial greetings that the year aheod be filled with HEALTH, happiness and peace. HOMO Milk will continue to serve its many patrons with the finest of Dairy Products so that the year 5720 will be the Healthiest and Happiest Drink Daily Fresh and Taste the Difference GLASS Owned and Operated by Local Dairymen Serving South Florida for 21 Years with %  allty Dairy Products. May Wo Serve Yon? Miami, FRonklin 4-7696 Homestead, late; Sort lauderdato. JA 2-3475, Woof Palm i.och, Tl 3-1104 2431 N.W. 7th AVI. PAPER SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERGLADES LUMBER and BUILDING SUPPLY, INC. 6991 S.W. 8th Street Phone M0 5-3595 MONDAY SATURDAY 7:30 AM. 5:30 PJ*. 11 SUNDAY 8:30 AM. 12:30 P.M. ^ itsf Wishes horn CLAUGHTON THEATRES CIRCLE • NORMANDY • TRAH ] O HOLLYWOOD THEATRE, Hollywood 1 A Happy New Year to All Oar Friends and Patrons Hoyden Cleaners f 43 NX 384 STREET Phone PL 7-1278 Mr. H. J. Hoyden ] Holiday Croatwaj o. fe All j DOUGHERTY'S CLEANERS %  •] "SPECIALIZING IN LADIES' DRESSES" 1 1918 W. Flagler Street Phone FR 9-2393



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    *-7 MC 5505 NORTHWEST 3rd STREET MO 1-7693 Miami s oldest and finest exclusively Jewish Cemetery ami Mausoleum Too many people intend to select a family burial site "someday," bat never fet around to it until they *r* faced with an emergency. Tbie near** making a kasty decision under great emotional strew and hasty decisions are seldom the best ones. That'* why you'll be so wise to join the thousands of other esteemed Jewish families who have already made the decision that wfll Momd Nebo** Perpetual Care Fund NOW EXCEEDS S150.000 i*-. ru. F^; 'Mi lighten the burden so much, when loved ones *n lei Their selection of Mount Nebo. Miami's oldest and finest Jewish Cemetery, has been made after the same con-j sidered investigation and thought that you would devote to selecting insurance or making a will. Like them, you too will find so many reasons why beautiful Mount Nebo can be your only choice. IfctlV **iBm*4Mmm.i.i6rh t* a* M f r wu t. tfex* miMj t m mmm% fwmi w the IITJBM M m kimi *mm4 fcv tm% W4 Owvn M r~n£*. txr% ml m *^oc*4 to iW npfciLp MUlemmtmtmmm m" Ummt .VW • anwaS*. T. mm Am mtmm fee % %  i n nl Mk p-riU* WM* mU frtUrrmm MXVT >EB0 IS y> >\\ENIEVTLY LOCATED WWikcr \ttm B*C


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    PttC^B **-B >Jfm$*tfbrir*&r Trf& TS*P*mb ex Ji w si C( br te W m m P re th ti. to at ti. to in th s S ii b il i' p w s t. ic ( / c Your Menu for the High Holy Days Sv LEAH LSCHMHO Well planni fbr 'be fig}! Buima' ae *>sr-entiiii is the iinaad nm lefkire —a g f par centimes nr w-opie %  iBtSer i* jllSPNiie seetfiin.s doae tngetlie-.%  thai n.HliT: |u.sf*ri ; -ned mil ree 'it sesame I in fcal I HTMJBhlr >*d '. aoei ir tanahed nm n i % %  aril prha1 rounds of rye oread armintt. P!aee ..in ian %  • in ~ T*-*• ratrg serving when aiiirt aroumt ten. Wine mnev wrtn iHffrrt apples *——-s •<* ._ __*__ ... .. "^ sized ^cooped our pineannie you. ScatUmtm* Cnra.ouow ne* Site fish. Thicken. :sm Us and its varfations. l cfcarb i honey cake and-ir a .'ooked. 1 laegn onion diced and lightly hrowne-t :i S tablespoons if a schmaltz. Broil the liver am: fte ? 0i tt,rtDre c J* Cn Up and umn aJtanmuin bul-uned" coekae tbeet y special rands to prepare 'S^jJlL^ chopp r w,rtl h a: will fit nm the meat pan at refrigerator Allow -'nuugh 'if Bte "lining" "a come sides of tile pan so raey can be tided Allow a I I H I'II a"ii 11aa n cktekv To enver lie tilling nngs. *r* nil %  tenu -tar tieir liil.ann g_!___/ wrt W" *wei. t UgftHy wilfc *• cantalmipes. waller meann •w 4o .nclude rn ralln^na. rwtaeM "%  ^T"' 1 ff,mr nr flfc !* *• TOlnn 'O*** -^ and a few special aajesakau ^""bw. place sain-(e rfown on an aam tlis pr^lwliitoiv -ram Can alumnwn linnd aftaBaw van and P aanlBr broiler flame turned op t n Tjzqs. .uiteiidy abowtog at the Ccrifc. ICcnu and Ifind! Opft-Mrs. Names New CtMirmea plums, ami "iierter-e^ eitlter 5e*li or well-drained canned mad. Top with a spi-j{ of fresh mini or mu* favorite fruit saakd "ft n.iaing jtmt before servniij tune Caoirven af me Tajrfk Skeee Harry Ope*r were appamted at tae er Matt, efiaaai an% Sankay Saaamar af Lair.'wtta. %  J* 5-w>cp. yeflwr segctaale nkf. Jig. if desared %  d wan ; — —, ^uwu Plums Sic rwauu ay jiacing ai ...„ %  -.„ „„„,„* h *" Cut <1 eurter ( -nbuie Oetb a coaaoncr oser baifing aur water aS w-tn anZSS knifeman '^^ *" MOU,?l1 caU —' fc r a*T ftr wbfl. ms^rag ewneers ^BWS a lilf !" gB r "" "It a taam and bnng the rest of tie aigreflients as bedside nm. Dice the pineapple* *"** *^" |*JJ ^J J-Jtrnfat rm.Ttfl tST r!?"** T*tl ^ raUa fc C fc T mo mu beat for 3P combined i -ogetber tne try aUons and use witu the Cantalonpe minutes, add peuncs tltat ftae aecir'.—gieiUa Vkcn A arad-^ ui Ceak aver low heat n a weU Wended. Duet rate phimpe* flanr aal leng watb Pkc dry eereaa. adaaan be cacaenut btu Last a uttle at a '•a tap %  -me. Dvep fraau a an (increased eoaaae foii-uaed raakie skeet tf yeu prefer Bane C *c 15 mantes at JT5 F or -.11 Lgfctrj appraaaaadaely X %  Hawk aaVaaTl oBakaV kdfl nan. if asec. aw | I wei l k a a l in egg -srap weU-drauied t a a a e d auaawea at 4BS F er oB apkl| aato eaeb self of pin mg I ip as aigh aa %  n i M l i i at 4BS F er till apt* fwrnPnen, Let anal before weaj nfteg agaun {between kayers af akiianan w %  raiiani Ynate Be Bring the genius fA. ^cal Jewish cnokiiig to your table! MANISCHEWITZ Whitefish & Pike H r or FR£E Rccfrx Boo., s*^ today to: THE & -tAMSCHCWITZ CO.Bod M. rtpnark I. N J UttiKllB' 1



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    Tradition of the People of the Book "Jewish Flor idian Miami. Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960 Section D Extract from "Boo\ of E-w*r^jraa^:^^ nr i-rwnwavaa^a; .^.'f*rJWT^|3Kwnr iwa {w** "• ra'f**"* 1 a' •9*8* iwrotnon "*a "Wrfhw *•***•* vmrvfoh fife** wn njrwKrt: o: <*yxip^9^'V-* w v or hi? an 'im** i3rrvatw*T-*jra acr pno xjtra tnn ygr K WWW H^ %  a -arym f^Trtyr^ Syra^c^VaVya i3Sor* wn n t wtMt3 t yf^'3^'?y | '>a"*ym faan '3rt^ a^tranVaVrfiarran-vnicro rrwrwi^nr'J^Saa-'tvs'raJ'n Tim J* •WBA ^r t l > l i ir^ ^r na r3Wa^ n^f<^30li*ar^r ->•* *** *-j ?mp "tfnaKxrttprwrro rBOi^w '• vtw* r3CJS**ar'a*w.Mra^S' I ^w-s BOOKS ENABLE US TO MASTER THE COMPLEX ART OF LIVING Libraries Indispensable to Civilization of Jews Everywhere By MARVIN LOWENTHAL lAfHENEVER a Jewish community opens for gen" eral use a roomful of pertinent books, it constitutes the latest link in the long chain of Jewish libraries, public and private, which stretches back to a misty and dateless antiquity. No one any longer knows the nature or the precise origin of the first Jewish or, better said, Hebrew library. Ancient Israel aroe in a highly civilized region; and libraries are indispensable to civilization. Vast collections of books, written to be sure on clay rather than paper, have survived from the royal libraries of Nineveh and Babylon — collections whose earliest material, whose first editions, date from nearly five thousand years ago. Of Israel itself, only hints are left us. There was a city in the territory of Judah, originally a Canaanite city, which Joshua calLs Kiriat-Sefer, that is. Book-Town—a name later changed to Debir. itself perhaps related to the Hebrew term for •word." When the prophet Samuel wrote a book on the character of the kingdom which the Israelites insisted upon adopting, he "laid" the book "up before the Lord"—that is to say, he put it into the safekeeping of a sacred, priestly library-possibly at Shiloh. To put a book in a sacred shrine was a way of preserving not only the document itself but the integrity of its text. The Greeks often employed the same safeguards; it was the ancient equivalent of taking out a copyright. There must have been a library, a collection of archives at least, in the celebrated First Temple at Jerusalem. It was not any loo well run-or so circumstantial evidence would imply. During the 18th year of his reign (621 B.C.E.) King Josiah ordered the Temple to undergo necessary' repairs. While the repairs wore in progress, probably in the slackroom. a book was discovered which had long been lot to sight and mind. Tradition holds that i; was the Book of the Law. or the Torah; modern scholarship identifies it as the presumably newlywrittcn Book of Deuteronomy. The first individual Jew credited with the creation of a public library was Ncheiniah, one of the happy few who led in the restoration of Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian captivity. The Second Book of the Maccabees tells how Nehemiah. %  l ounding a library, gathered together the acts of the kings and the prophets, and of David, and the epistles of the kings concerning the holy gifts" (2:13. Certainly the compilers of the two Books of Chronicles, the last historical writings included in the canonical Hebrew Scriptures, had at their disposal a rather extensive library—possibly the one founded by Nehemiah. The contents included all nl the books now contained in the Hebrew Bible, except of course for such miscellaneous works as were not yet written. It also included a goodly number of books cited and sometimes tantalizingly described in Kings and Chronicles, but which are lost forever. 1 count 21 of these vanished treasures. Talking <"* No doubt somebody at some time or another must have borrowed these fascinating books, and as borrowers will, disappeared with them into oblivion. What says Ben Sirach? 'Many persons, when a thing is lent them, reckon it to be something they found." Yet, despite the depredations of borrowers, books multiplied and libraries grew. Koheleth has an immortal word on this proliferation: "Of making many books there is no end." Probably the speediest and most copious output in the annals of the ancient publication trade is recorded in the Second Book of Esdras (14:44); in lorty days five men under the dictation of Ezra wrote down 204 different books composed on the spot. The last seventy of them, incidentally, were placed under what librarians today call restricted circulation: in this instance they were issued only to such readers "as be wise among the people." But the account smacks more of Talmudic midrash than of fact. When the Talmud was in the process of composition—during the first two centuries before and after the start of the Common Era—the rabbinical schools had at their command, among more conventional material, what might be termed a talking book. For a long while the rabbis were loath to commit to writing their prime source material, the Mishnah or Oral I-aw, which was the basic subject oi their studies, commentaries, opinions, and arguments. Writing down the Oral Law, they felt, might impair the authoritative quality which came lrom its being par excellence the "unwritten" law. They were also afraid that scribes, who could not be checked up on the spot and at once, might be led into making editorial changes or else what we know today as typographical errors. So they trained a band of young men, usually not bright enough to think of anything divergent to learn the Mishnah by heart; and when an assembly of scholars wished to refer to this or that original Mishnah text, about which there might be some dispute as to how it ran, one of these young men would reel Continued nl.o* 12 D



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    Page 10-G +Jeisti ncridfor Friday, September 23. I960 Uhe


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    Page 14-G vJewisii Flcrkliain Friday. September 23. 1960 New Year Greetings to our Friends and Relatives DOROTHY AND HENRY ROSENGARTEN Best Wishes for the Holidays MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER Mr. & Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz Mr. 1A> IOHII COSTUMES Made to Order Costume*—Since 1925—"Truman Lord" 1741 W. FLAGLER STREET Phone FR 1-2011 TO ALL GREETINGS ROME MATTRESS CO~ IMC. Meaetecrerers-Weeletele •ail "San eatf Deaf Direct" Max Saelx Mac leiaer mi N. MIAMI AVI. Fl MOM % %  USE BLUE FLAME GAS % %  University Enters its 13th Year Continued from Page 9-G from "India and Southeast Asia" to the American South after the Civil War Continuing programs at Bwrndei* wMi ee intensified work on cancer and heart research plus basic research in other vital problem areas under more than $2,000,000 in research grants from government and private agencies A steady flow of faculty publications has come from the major publishing houses of the United States. Great Britain. France and the Vatican Work has already begun on the selection of outstanding American artists who will receive the Brandeis University Creative Arts Awards in 1961 And the University's growing alumni body, now almost 2.000 members, has launched its second Alumni Fund campaign, a reaffirmation of faith and respect for the young institution Every September there is a bit more than the usual interest on the Brandeis campus because, in addition to the hundreds of new and interesting people in the freshman class, the University gets to meet its incoming Wein Scholars from nations throughout the free world This year 80 of the most capable young men and women from 36 different countries have enrolled at Brandeis under this Wien International Scholarship Program Victor Reuther, one of the distinguished list of outstanding Americans whose informal talks with members of the senior class at Brandeis University form the core of the General Education S program. Guests have included Danny Kaye, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, Robert Hutchins, Mark Van Doren, and Charles Wysanski, jr. Yeshiva Univ/s Albert Einstein School Continued from Page 7-G Einstein College, are a number of Florida residents. Prominent among these Floridians are Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Wolfson. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Chester, the late Day Apte. Mrs. Moses Ginsberg and the late Mr. Ginsberg. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Levenson. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Cantor. Mr. and Mrs. George Frankel. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Z. Greene, Mr. and Mrs. R. Williams Apte, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Marden, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fruchtman. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mazer, Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Rosenhaus, Jay. Anne and Sue Berkowitz. Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Goldfarb, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kipnis. Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Leviton and Mr. Morris Sugarman. Mr. and Mrs. Abraham L. Mailman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smolian. Mr. and Mrs Nathan J. Sonnenblick. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Green. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Maid man. Jerome Herbert (Hollywood), Mrs. M. L. Annenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin S. Chanin. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Edison, Mr. and Mrs. George Farkas, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fischbach. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Frost. Mrs. O. Roy Chalk, Mr. and Mrs. Isador Hammer. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Paley, Mr. Simon S. Neuman. Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Seley. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Spatt, Mr. and Mrs. David S. Stern. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel I'ngerleider. Jr.. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Maslow, Mr. and Mrs. Max Kassover. and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Hornstem (Palm Beach). Proud Tradition As Rosh Hashona dawns once again, it ushers in an era of unprecedented progress and promiseone that could well be the most exciting period in medical history. The Jewish people have traditionally been in the forefront in medical healing and learning. The Einstein College of Medicine seeks to preserve and enrich that unbroken tradition. In this spirit, all those who are associated with this institution rededicate themselves to building a healthier, happier tomorrow for all. Jane Addams Continued from Page 10-G of American women and the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago. Wrote Dr. Seman: "The Jewish People's Institute, which she knew so well, which from its very inception was her neighbor, and which at all times she treated in the neighborly fashion that only she was capable of. pays tribute to the nobility of her character and for the privilege of its close association with her during the last 39 years, which represent the life of the Institute, and probably the most fruitful years of her life One of the few survivors of the Jane Addams era of social reform and social service is Mrs. Alfred D. Kohn, an octogenerian lady, who enlisted under Miss Addams' banner some 50 years ago. For nearly 30 years. Mrs. Kohn lived and worked at Hull House, helping immigrants and victims of persecution, whether they were Jewish or Irish, Italian or Polish. All found help at Hull House and an opportunity for self-expression and appreciation for their worth as human beings. These were, and are, the basic appeals of Jewish Community Centers in Chicago as elsewhere in the country. It was no accident therefore that the Golden Age Hall of Fame, established by the Golden Age Department of the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago, chose to honor in the Jane Addams centennial year Mrs. Kohn "in recognition of her many years of devoted service to the welfare of our Jewish and general community by which she has inspired our city's elder citizens." MR. AND MRS. HARRY MARKOWITZ and Family Thomas Robert — Jtrry WISH THEIR FRIENDS AND RELATIVES A HAPPY NEW YEAR SEASONS GREETINGS Sommers HVr&tort Ine. WOMEN'S APPAtft 145S M. PI 1 347? A. 1. iOMMUS CttlTINGS TO OUR MANY HHMOS HIALEAH MIAMI SPRINGS BANK 101 HIALEAH DRIVE HIALEAH. FLORIDA IMember oi F J> J.CJ "A M iadfr



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    Hassidism and the Yearning for Zion (Jewish FlondliUwi Miami, Florida, Friday, September 23, 1960 Section E : %  HMnmnmriirMii **r -jmarm fryomyo -#t^ii wvi>w^H >r t nnvro awtowmi %  ^., ....... % %  ._,_.. ; Tfifnyan {W mrwj Tnn&n ?f*^y *w WP* VqraS*ew T&sfn ;w^rt' ;'T|ph^ r-pa8f m# t JMt 'wtotim rffttrgs VS^H i _Ta"\ "prt "ft viS^Tjsjn ^s* -trapes* ;*& wn • .. t • — *wn*iiVflW9 *Kl) 'Wwn*yiv99ii" SWW tt"!S WttW* "acwt* wsi 5SSP P* -; r? 5 a t^.u ^T^ggWwy *^w#^mtt>w n> "Circumcwion," Rothschild MS24, 1475. BezuieJ Muwum, /eruialem. 'W 4^i N N^ THE HOLY LAND AS THE OBJECT OF DEEPEST SPIRITUAL LONGING. Israel Molds the Nature of the Followers of Sacred Writings By RABBI JACOB SHACHTER THE 7th of Sivan 5720 marked the 200th anniver' sary of the death of Rabbi Israel Baal Sbem Tov, generally known as the Besht, founder of the Hasaidic Movement. This landmark has evoked a renewed and intensified Interest in the various aspects of this extraordinarily romantic-religious movement that has left so deep an imprint on the acnala of our history. Little, if anything, has ao far been written of the deep yearning of the Has%  idism for Zion. Yet Eretz Yisrael has been the center of Hassidic thought not only because it is the site of the early glories of our people but because it is the land destined by its unique qualities and virtues to mould the character of those chosen people on the lines of our sacred teachings. It is this idea that the Hassidim imbibed from the Kabbalistic school of Rabbi Isaac Luria and Rabbi Haim Vital which flourished in Safed two centuries before the rise of the Movement. Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov and his disciples who were inspired by Kabbalistic teachings were stimulated to undertake pilgrimages to the Holy Land which began sporadically in the early beginnings of the 18th century. The Besht as a follower of the Lurian mystical philosophy maintained that the redemption of the Shechina from exile is a preContinued en Page 12-E



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    Page 14-D +Jewish Hcrkttan Friday, September 23. iggg THAT ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS MAY ENJOY A HAPPY NEW YEAR IS THE SINCERE WISH OF THE AlCil ST FAMILY and AtTOI ST BROS. BAKERY 3S1 S.W. Eighth Street Phone FR 4-2792 SOUTH HllWrs 3MOST BEAMTill 'X CEMETERY FOB THOSE Of THE JEWISH FAITH STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL PARK 5900 S.W. 77th AVENUE MO 7-3669 3"M .-V.r-3 r-K -• -y C*roti n_.N. FIANKFUtTEtS SAIAMI • SOlOGNA PASTRAMI • CQINED Ittt TONGUES AMERICAN KOSHER PROVISIONS !>C wfw roiK n^wr notiOA fiANr W No>cr m i 1075 N.W. 21t Terrace Miami, Florida FR 9-0933 FR 14511 l-ootiv" 77. N T CV J50 (V 9 1117 To All Our Friends, Patrons and Acquaintances New Year Holiday Greetings Ted's Broadway Battery & Ignition %  ATTiRICS GENERATORS STARTERS 2731 N.W. 36th Street Miami Phone NE 4-1331 GREETINGS... KREMSER RADIATOR COMPANY 1237 NE .lit AVENUE rheee FR 3-7493 Serviced — lepeired — fle— 1 I u-t*t4 BETTER TO SERVE YOU MIAMI JACK SERVICE Greenlee Equipment — Part Cable Cutter — Hydraulic Jacks, Steam Jennys — Pick Up and Delivery All Work Guaranteed — Factory Specifications 3077 N.W. 54rh Street Phone NE 4-2226 A MOST HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL BANCROFT HOTEL AND MOTEL APTS. 1501 Collins Avenue Miami Beach TO ALL HOLIDAY GREETINGS COMMUNITY BARBER SHOP 1688 ALTON ROAD Air Conditioned — Phone IE 1-9402 No Waiting %  JfOURAT CRHTINCS frees JAR. CARllON-J. C< eft** CABLTON VAULTS MNC. NEW YEAR GREETINGS TO ALL SARBEY ELECTRONICS 2s7S5 S.W. 27th AVENUE Phone HI 4-3341 The Legal Aspects of the Eichmann Trial Continued from Peso 3-D to Israel as restitution for Nazism's crimes against the Jews. No other state more genuinely represents the interest ot those millions put to death by Eichmann. for Israel is the successor in interest to Eichmann's victims not only for pecuniary' purples but as principal custodian of their memory and to insure retributive justice in their name.'' The argument that Eichmann's trial under a 1950 Israeli law would be ex post facto — that is, under a law passed after an act has been committed — has no validity, the report asserts. Noting that there is no prohibition in international law against ex post facto, the study points out that the law of nations is not based on any particular laws or statutes but takes cognizance only of crimes against humanity, "acts presumed to have been perennially criminal." The American Jewish Congress document adds: "To argue that the Israeli law of 1950 is ex post facto as applied to Eichmann is to say in effect that Eichmann had no reason to suspect the criminal implication of his acts at the time he performed them, and that he could genuinely have believed his conduct in planning and programming the mass extermination ot Europe's Jews to have been lawful. "The fact is. however, that indiscriminate murder is not the kind of act whose moral quality vanes from administration to administration. It remains a constant of evil, forever abhorrent to society. No country could ever make it legal. All claims of ex post facto culpability in Eichmann's case must therefore be rejected as groundless both in inter national law and in the conscience of civilization." On the possibility of an international tribunal to arraign Eichmann. the report notes that the principal nations that would be expected to make up such a body have indicated "not the slightest willingness" to participate. Moreover, the report says. even if it were possible to create such a tribunal, the danger that Soviet Russia would subvert it into an anti-Western propaganda vehicle makes such an international court both practically and politically unfeasible. To hold an international trial without Soviet Russia and the Eastern European Soviet bloc raises additional procedural and administrative difficulties that would render such a trial, and its eventual judgment, meaningless, it is stated. Discussing various proposals that West Germany try Eichmann. the report points out that West •R. J0ACMIM MtMZ "eeprepriete eed fiftiee" Seafaring sabra Capt. Sholem Dulitzky Master of the Ghanaian frieighter, Tano River converses with H. E. William Q. M. Halm! Ghana's Ambassador to the United States! at a reception aboard the vessel in New York when she inaugurated a new carqo service between West Africa and the U.S.A. during outgoing Hebrew Year 5720. Ghana's Black Star Line, owners of the vessel, is managed by the Zim Israel Navigation Co. of Haifa. "... a country that rose on the ashes of millions of innocent men and women and children..." Germany has not asked that Eichmann be transferred to its custody and that the Federal Republic "has given indications that it does not want to assume responsibility for his trial." Appropriate and Fitting The study also notes that the behavior of Ger man courts "has operated to promote sympathy for those accused of war crimes as often as it has to inspire a profound and sober reflection upon national guilt." Discussing the ultimate purposes of the Eichman trial, the American Jewish Congress study asserts: "The recitation of his monstrous crimes against European Jewry must be allowed to remind mankind of the bestiality to which not only one man but an entire nation once sank. It is not unlikely that a German court would tend to separate the defendant Eichmann from the broad masses of the German people under Hitler. There is no moral or practical consideration supporting Eichmann's trial in Germany which could not be invoked with equal force to support bis trial in Israel." The American Jewish Congress report concludes with a statement by Dr. Joachim Prinz, the national president of the American Jewish Congress: "It is appropriate and fitting that Eichmann be brought to trial in Israel—a sovereign nation created by the Jewish people whom Eichmann sought to destroy; a country that rose on the ashes of millions of innocent men and women and children whom Eichmann put to death: a land recognized by the United Nations as the haven and refuge for hundreds of thousands of survivors of Eichmann's concentration camps." The American Jewish Congress document was prepared by the agency's Commission on International Affairs, directed by Phil Baum. Will Maslow is acting executive director of the American Jewish Congress. GREETINGS FROM J. R. SPRADLEY & CO. FOOD BROIERS 7240 N.W. 30th COURT OX 1-5300 Best Wishes far fae MaMay S^mMa ... 1 BEUTEL'S SOLAR-HEATER CO. TANKS — BOOSTERS — COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS 1527 N. Mkoni Avenue Phone Fl 1-1 MIITIIII Sel Keeke, Free. SUNOCO STATION ROYAL PALM SRVKE fV#arVCtfl — f JC^#rf art^aWMMj 7*03 M.I. M t Fl 8-91II TO ML muimi L D.KHFK 888 UNC0U4 8888 Jf 4-1*1*



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    Friday. September 23. 1960 -Jmlsii HcrkJlan Page 3-H Historic Milestone at Mt. Sinai Hospital •y J. GERALD LEWIS President, Mt. Sinai Hospital TODAY we are on the threshold of a new year in Mt. Sinai Hospital. A histwfrc milestone has been achieved. The new hospital, which was the dream of our founders a short 14 years ago, already has proved its purpose through service to more than ten thousand patients. But we approach the new year neither complacently nor wth the sense that our work is completed. The forces which brought the new Mt. Sinai into being are dynamic, not temporary. Tremendous gains in population have underlain our goals since 1946. Were (here no developments in patient care for this decade and a half, the new hospital would still have been a necessity. Faced, however, with giant strides in medical research, our growth has been made doubly imperative. The way has been shown to improved care through new medical techniques, and we must be alert to their adaptation. This accomplishment is the measure of every hospital in every time. For us, the new year signifies the onset of a period in which our quest must be for higher education and higher standards. Two-Fold Duty Mt. Sinai is a voluntary non-profit hospital. It derives its support from the community of interest which first brought it into being. Acountable in a very real sense to the community's needs, it must prove itself by service. So long as this remains a healing institution, directed in its daily operation by the humanitarian will it is meant to reflect, it will continue to grow. The duty is clearly two-fold: for the hospital to serve the community, and for the community to respond to hospital needs. We talk glibly of 'the hospital," as if it were motivated by one mind, reacting automatically to known ideals, guided by a single accomplished hand. Essentially, a splendid goal. But we know the care of humans is in the %  jssjsj The hospital's third floor nursery is the first home ol more than 1.000 new-borns annually. Here, one ol the department nurses gives nourishment to a premature baby. hands of humans, altruistic and personal, far-seeing and fallible. For a hospital, from its board of trustees to its orderlies, progress must be made with the sweep of a glacier, the orderliness of a laboratory, at the pace of a leader. The past year has seen a growing participation in hospital direction by my colleagues, the members of the board of trustees. This group of dedicated citizens, shown that its leadership can create a new Mt. Sinai while the memories of our hospital on Alton rd. remain fresh, has made its guidance felt in increasing scope. Its service, man by man, on the committees which oversee our performance, has been a gratifying measure of the hospital's growing diversity of service. Important Credits Here as elsewhere, there remains much to be done. Yet the monolithic being of our new hospital has proved that inspiration to serve, not only from the pocketbook but from the heart as well, may be drawn from it For the administration today there is a great challenge, one, clearly established after seven months, as capable of evolving fulfillment. Our administration might still only be catching its breath. There was no time for reflecting on the achievement of long-sought goals when we moved. And yet, immediately afterward, the administration met its duties as if long familiar with its new surroundings. That the transition was made without a single disturbance is to the great credit of Samuel Gertner, executive director, and his staff. But now, as for the past seven months, there are less dramatic but equally important credits to be achieved. There is the daily integration of hosptial activities with its own goal of every department functioning with an awareness of every other. There is also the continuing responsibility to manage this great institution so that economies may serve the public through efficiency and prompt care. It remains, too; the daily responsibility of the administration to educate the public in the terms of hospital purpose. It has the task of answering constantly the rhetorical question, "Yes, but what have you done for me today?" Its efforts may be gauged by an expanded proContintMd on Paoa 12-H THE RABBI. OFFICERS, and MEMBERS Of The Israelite Center 3175 S.W. 25th Street and All Its Auxiliaries and Committees Extend Their Greetings to All Their Friends far a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year HYMANKmSNER MORTON MALAVSKY President Rabbi ---——-—RABBI SHIMON AZULAY, PRESIDENT, OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE HEBREW EDUCATORS ALLIANCE OF GREATER MIAMI Extend Best Wishes to the entire Jewish Community for a Happy New Year and to the Hebrew Teachers throughout Greater Miami we wish far you a most successful year in your chosen field of Hebrew education. FLA. WOMEN'S DIVISION American Jewish Congress Wisaes if J A Happy, Hearts* mi Propsereas New Yasr LOUISE IRANDEIS CHAPTER MIAMI CHAPTER BISCAYNE CHAPTER The Sisterhood •f Temple Beth Sholom fxfases test With** fa Ms hmhh CaaMseiftr far Me year The Rabbi, Cantor, Officers, Members t Sisterhood of KNESETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION 1415 Euclid Avenue Miami Beach j f xf end BeH Wishes for A HAPPY AMD HEALTHFUL NEW YEAR %  AMI DAVID LEHRFIEID CANTOR ABRAHAM SIIF LOUIS eWLIM, PrasHfast MRS. I. B. EISENSTEIN, Sisttrhoed President REGISTER YOUI CHILD NOW IN OUR HEBREW SCHOOL NEW YEAR'S GRHTINGS from the OFFICERS and MEMBERS OF THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS MRS. MILTON SIRKIN. President Dedicated to the Service of Our Co mm u ni ty V "I %  ~m~* THE BfAUK BRANCH 290 FARBAND LABOR ZIONIST ORDER Wish All Members and Friends a Happy and Prasparawi New Year B. MORRISON, President AARON UEBMAN. Secretary Sincere New Ytat Greetings fa The Jewis* Meridian and Me Entire Cemwenify BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE GREATER MIAMI CHAPTER MRS. SOLOMON I. MARGOUS, President Branch 692 Workmen's Circle of Miami Beach extending its best wishes to its members, friends and all Jewry—a Happy. Healthy and Prosperous New Year. %  lajwn raid ruts5 THE SISTERHOOD OF TEMPLE BETH AM | Extends Best Wishes for the New Year to Alt GREATER MIAMI COUNCIL OF PIONEER WOMEN EXTENDS GREETINGS TO ALL GREATER MIAMI JEWRY i MRS. MILTON GREEN. President ] Club I Mrs. Jos. Krantx, president Club II M rs. Irving Liftman, president I, Golda Myerson Club Mrs. William Beck, president Kadimah Chapter Mrs. Marvin Copenhagen, pre*. Coral Gables Chapter M rs. Pawl Berlin, president | TLkvah Club Mrs. Ruth Wagner, president Beba Idelson Club Mrs. D. Qifenhenden. president Club EUat MILTON WEINER, PRESIDENT, THE OFFICERS, AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS ef ffce MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION Extend to All test Wishes for a Happy New roar



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    \ Friday, September 23, 1960 +JewlsliFk>ridUan Page 3-D The Legal Aspects of the Eichmann Trial By RICHARD COHEN ISRAEL'S right to try Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann rests on firm legal as well as moral gtpund*, according to a study made by the American Jewish Congress. The analysis cites precedents in international law ana in American jurisprudence supporting Israel's claim to jurisdiction in the case. The study points oul, for example, that international law has no provifcions governing jurisdiction by individual nations ir. criminal cases. In certain crimes, such as piracy, all nations are considered to be equally affronted and any state acquiring physical custody of the accused may try him, it is noted. "The genocidal acts of which Eichmann is accused would seem to comprise no less universal a crime under international law than piracy," the report asserts. The American Jewish Congress document cites the unanimous adoption by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1946 of a resolution affirming the principles of international law as laid down at the Nuremberg trial—among them, the outlawing of ma.-s murder. The study comments: "If the Nuremberg principles have been incorporated into the common law of mankind, then any nation—including Israel—that succeeds in obtaining custody of the person of Eichmann would have the right to conduct his trial." No Bar to Jurisdiction The fact that Eichmann may have been forcibly abducted Irom Argentina has no bearing either in international law or in American legal practice on Israel's jurisdiction in the case, the analysis finds. According to the study, the basis in international law for criminal jurisdiction varies widely from nation to nation, but is never affected by the way in which the prisoner may have been apprehended and brought to trial. Similarly, it is noted, the United States Supreme Court has consistently maintained that the manner in which physical custody of a prisoner has been obtained in no way affects his trial or impairs the competency of the trial court—even in cases of prisoners brought forcibly from abroad to U.S. courts. The report cites numerous legal precedents to this effect, going back to the 1886 case of Ker vs. Illinois, in which the jurisdiction of an Illinois court was challenged on the ground that the accused had been seized in Peru in violation of the law, forcibly brought against his will into the United States and delivered to Illinois authorities. The U.S. Supreme Court held that although this was an instance of "kidnapping within the Dominion of Peru without any pretense of authority," it in no way disabled the criminal courts of the U.S. from proceeding against the accused. Territorial and Nationality Grounds The rule of the Ker case reflects the attitude not only of the U.S. Supreme Court but of the Executive branch as well, the AJCongress reports. The study notes the rejection by the United States Attorney-General in 1935 of a claim by the Mexican embassy that one of its nationals had been abducted from Mexico "in a manner which constitutes an invasion of jurisdiction by American officials committed in Mexican territory." While recognizing the irregular recovery of the Mexican national, the Attorney-General insisted that the trial of the acTraditional silver Torah Pointer being made by an Israeli silversmith. Many of these pointers will be presented to synagogues throughout the United States this Rosh Hashona in recognition of their Israel Bond effort. "Nowhere in the world (than in Israel) are there more witnesses who can testify to Eichmann's activities." cused and his subsequent imprisonment on a narcotics charge were v alid and lawful. The analysis discusses two customarily acknowledged grounds for jurisdiction in criminal cases—one based on the territory in which the alleged acts were committed; the other determined by the nationality of the persons affected by these acts. The rationale of the terrritorial basis for jurisdiction, according to the AJCongress document, is the assumption that evidence, witnesses and other elements necessary for a finding of fact in the case are likely to be found most readily where the act occurred. But it is precisely these considerations that argue for Israeli jurisdiction in the Eichmann case, the study declares, adding: "Nowhere in the world are there more witnesses who can testify to Eichmann's activities. Nowhere in the world has there been as systematic and careful an attempt to collect and retain information relating to his operations. For reason of trial convenience alone, therefore, Israel's claim to jurisdiction is based on solid legal and practical grounds." The report observes that Israel came into being after the conclusion of World War II and therefore cannot conventionally qualify as the place of nationality of Eichmann's victims. But the intention of this jurisdictional principle is "to allow that community most directly injured and aggrieved to participate in the determination of responsibility," the study asserts, adding: "Adolf Eichmann's crimes were directed specifically against the Jewish people. As the internationally-recognized heir and representative of the Jewish victims of Nazism, Israel is the logical and legitimate instrument to try the man responsible for decimating the Jewish community of Europe. West Germany itself has recognized Israel's unique sovereignty in agreeing to pay some $822,000,000 Continued on Ptgt 14-D GREETINGS TO ALL FRANK GARCIA BEACH TYPEWRITER CO., INC. Erry*hin foe Your Office Sales Service Rentals Supplies \ Wl-A ALTON ROAD Phone IE 8-6272 MAM BEACH, FLORIDA A NAPPY AND PftOSPffOVS HI W ft At TO alt OOf WINDS AM PATRONS MODERN AWNING SHUTTERS 8851 N.W. 37 th COURT Phone OX 1-6851 TO ALL Gutnmes DIRJTS GOLD SEAL MEATS INC 5010 AT TOUR MVOftfTE STOW 1177 NJ. list Straot P1M5W IT IS OUR PLEASURE TO EXTEND GREETINGS FOR THE NEW YEAR CITY of NORTH MIAMI ] ED. G. VISCHI Mayor E. MAY AVIL 1 City Clerk j J. HOUSTON GRIBBLE Tax Collector WOODWARD M. HAMPTON City Manager 9BE* 9P Councilmen THOMAS SASSO HARRY K. HURST JOHN B. BOUDROT JAMES G. MILLER naiQ nn-nn ID: Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mindlin -*! BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR SER0TA PLUMBING COMPANY PUmaina t Hatting Contractors *ifol/afio*s IWittMMt laoaJrs 1728 Alton Rtaa MMM JI 8-2S85 Miami Rtach JE 8^*54 Hancock Refrigeration Co., Inc. "FRIGIDAIRE DEALER" Salts % % %  Strvict 1524 N.W. So* STREET PHONE NE 5-4521 USED DEPT. — 2196 N.W. 7th AVENUE GREETINGS DIXIE FARMS PRODUCTS J WHOLESALE MEATS and PROVISIONS 519 N.W. 23rd Street Phone FR 14494 • Iff T I N C S M0NSALVATGE & CO. of MIAMI, INC WHOUSAU OCAIS mmd CANDIES M 5.W. FIRST STREET PHONE Ft 4-515* GREETINGS TO OUR MANY JEWISH FRIENDS | EARL V. WILSON COMPANY fi MERCHANDISE BROKERS Miami Jacksonville Tampa TO OUR MANY FRIENDS and PATRONS GREETINGS CLARK & LEWIS CO. WHOLESALE GROCERS 34N.E. llthStr^t Phon FR 3-310S I TO ALL GREETINGS THE MIAMI INSURANCE AGENCY. INC GENERAL INSURANCE H. JHL WOO DSMAIX. J JO, #02 N.E. 114th St. North MUml Fhona t>L 44*15 TO ALL GREETINGS llixie l.jut < rp>rsU!4R MooJpMp 405 So. Dixio Hhjhwoy Cord GOJHOJ



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    Friday. September 23, 1960 +JmisMlt**matn Page 5-D r 80 Years of Technical Assistance By DR. WILLIAM HABER M EXT month in London,-4alegAtec from Jewish communities in 25 countries will assemble to celebrate the 80th anniversary of ORT, Organization for Rehabilitation through Training, one of the oldest welfare agencies in Jewish life. The year of ORT's founding in 1880 in Czarist Russia seems located in the far distant past. But it is not so much a matter of the length of the time span that gives its remoteness, as of the fullness of events which have effectively transformed the world during these intervening decades. Yet, eight decades ago, the antecedents of the great majority of today's American Jews lived in Eastern Europe. Nor was the size of this population much less than that of the present American community. But the conditions of life differed drastically. All but a few select categories of Jews were restricted to the crowded towns and villages of the Pale of Settlement. Nor were they free to live as they chose within this vast ghetto. In a predominantly agricultural society, they were barred from land ownership. In what was still a handicraft society, they were excluded from many trades. The world celebrated by Sholom Aleichem and I. L. Peretz was a place of destitution. Jewish economic activity was burdened by legal oppression and discrimination. Jews were forced into marginal occupations. A few were artisans. Most, like Tuvye the Dairyman, were "luftmenschen," peddlers, innkeepers, petty tradesmen. Large numbers were paupers on the edge of chronic hunger. But if the material side was bleak, the spiritual existence of the "shtetl" was often vivid and creative. Toward the latter half of the century a fresh spirit was abroad within the ghetto confines. The movement known as the Haskala. or Enlightenment, stirred a new ferment of intellectual excitement, stimulating a desire to action for equal rights and Jewish emancipation. Modernization Proctst At the same time, the traditional economy, poor as it was, was being battered by powerful forces of economic modernization, as the industrial revolution spread eastward. The small-town pattern of Jewish hfe was undergoing the dislocation of change. The times called for new approaches to the social problems of age. Youngsters at ORT Vocational High School in Nathanya, Israel. "ORT today is providing training to some 40,000 persons annually in 19 countries." John Daniel Aboagyeh, 17. of the Santi Nyankumasi tribe oi Ghana, and grandson of a tribal chisf related to Prime Minister Kwame Nkrumah. is shown with fellowstudents at an ORT Vocational School in Israel. The Council of Elders oi the tribe selected John to go to Israel to study electromechanics. The idea of ameliorating the extremes of Jewish poverty through rendering more people economically productive had long been propagated by a few leaders of the community. In 1880, a group of Jewish industrialists and intellectuals of St. Petersburg petitioned the Czar lor the privilege of establishing a fund for the purpose of "developing artisanal and agricultural occupations among the mass of our co-religionists," which became known as ORT. Creation of a vocational training agency for the Jewish people was part of the modernization process of Eastern European Jewry. By undertaking a task that is customarily the function of governments, the community was expressing, in this as in so many other welfare areas, the principle of self-help'which has such profound and creative roots in the Jewish past. While that world of 80 years ago has vanished, the need for vocational aid, for trade schools and training in technical skills, has acquired heightened relevance. Through two world wars and their aftermaths, such programs have proven to be powerful aids for human reconstruction, for rekindling hope and the ability to work, learn and be productive once more. But it is the continuing technological revolution of our age that has given particular immediacy to this program. In Israel vocational training has obvious significance for the economic integration of its newcomers, the majority of them from underdeveloped societies. Equally, the formation of skilled manpower to operate the emerging industries of Israel, calls for an expanding program of trade and technical schools. And so, ORT has had its most extensive development in Israel. Technical training centers are operated in 22 localities throughout the land, with an annual enrollment of almost 10,000. In the Moslem lands of North Africa and Iran, a half-million Jews live today under conditions that are, if anything, even more wretched than prevailed 80 years ago in Eastern Europe. These areas are no longer outside the range of modern influence and the trade schools have opened new Continued on Pag* 15-D To All Happy New Year and Season's Greetings Auerbach Paint Co. 1871 ALTON ROAD A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS Bonfire Restaurant HICKORY ROASTED FOOD OVER OPEN BONFIRE GREETINGS AIRLINE BRAKE & WHEEL ALIGNING CO. Ovar 12 *•'> Ixptritnct MAKES M* FIONT ENDS WfcMl AKflMMMt C*i %  •iMCMfl hiM eae Asia Sarviet -K TN Cm"t SNe-tW %  •" 3701 N.W. 36th Street NE 4-3311 BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR Hoover Awning & Mfg. Co. 6921 N.W. 7tfi Avenut • AwateflS • SslsHeM • Bsech C PIMM PI 4-2667 • Impmttmt • Canvas trntf — Met W atwyr—t -Wt •*• Aaytfctaf at C rCotM >'W\rf\^4^>A^>^^^^W^^\tf'W^A^W\>W'W'U BEST WISHES TO ALL FOR HAPPY HOLIDAYS KAMMER & WOOD Electrical Contractors i I 297 N.W. 54th Street Phone PL 1-3621 TO ALL SEASON'S BEST WISHES •BOH X V. AULASOK Pain Island of Miami TW UNNMM FAMAT 1M NX St* STMfT G*Ef T/NGS I IHNOX TIRE & SUPPLY CO. THIS ri TUBfS IECAMMNC ACCESSOtMES •ATTFIKS III Of CONSNOMOCHfN TIMS 5590 N.W. 7th AVE. PI 1-9669 3300 S.W. tth ST. llliriRIi MmreeUu M'phl*tering Shop H—4kmm4 W H m WMftwt Owr M w H r M S19S S.W. Ittfc STWIT NMM M S-7SM



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    Friday, September 23, 1960 +Je*tat>lk**Kam n-r Status of Jewish Education in America Continued from Page 2F represent an awakening and not a finish. It is only after Bar Mitzvah, during adolescence, that Jewish culture and religion can begin to have real meaning and influence. Skillful educators could transform the powerful mystique of Bar Matzvah into a personal Jewish awakening. As everywhere, there is the problem of entrenched interests holding back progress. Philosophies and Jewish education are vague and conflicting. Many texts are mediocre and uninspiring. Consider the teachers' side of the story. The teacher complains about low salaries; lack of interest and cooperation on the part of parents; lack of community respect; unclear goals, insufficient time; lack of good texts and aids, and lack of discipline among the children. Of the 3,300 Jewish schools in America, only slightly more than 1,000 receive central supervision. Jewish teaching is a part-time occupation. This is true not only in one-day schools but also to a considerable extent in weekday schools. The general incompetence of Sunday School teachers is confirmed statistically. A recent study revealed that only 40 per cent received pedagogic training. Turnover of teachers is constant and: rapid. Twenty per cent of teachers stay less than one year, the majority less than three years. lneas are being discussed about consolidation and improvement* of small, inadequate congregational weekday schools. National programs have been advocated to develop standards, curricular mater als, school forms and tests Jev, ;sh day schools have increased dramatically in the last three decades. There is sufficient interest tc warrant co/nmunity support of these sschools for H.jse who want them. There is a striking similarity in the fundamental principles of the educational objectives of the three groups. Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform — al.hough they are implemented differently. Moving from Periphery The three groups agree that in Jewish education the aim is to foster a sense of belonging and identification; impart knowledge; engender beliefs and values, attitudes, appreciations, and inculate participation, ritual and communal. There is agreeKey to Leah and Joseph Rubin Residence Hall at Yeshiva University in New York is presented to 93-year-old philanthropist, Joseph Rubin, by his great-grandson, Leiqh Rubin Weiner. "The dignity of Jewish life cannot be realized without a deeper understanding of the substance of Jewish values ..." Discussing future of Brandeis University's new Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare are Dean Charles I. Schottland (left), Mrs. Florence G. Heller. Chicago, whose endowment created the school, and Dr. Abram L. Sachar, president oi Brandeis. "Slowly, Jewish education is moving from the periphery to the center of communal responsibility and interest" ment that teaching must be skillfully linked, in pursuit of Jewish knowledge. Over $60,000,000 is spent annually in the United States for Jewish education. This is about $110 per pupil per year or about $11.40 for every Jewish person in America, exclusive of capital outlay for schools. About half of the total budget is paid by parents. About 7 or 8 per cent comes from the organized Jewish community. The remainder is supplied by donors who feel there can be no Jews without Judaism. Slowly, Jewish education is moving from the periphery to the center of communal responsibility and interest. Some cities are far ahead of others. There is a constant, general trend toward more intensive Jewish education for increased numbers of children. In a previous generation, Jewish children and parents lived in America — but in different worlds. The home atmosphere was then more "Jewish." But lines of communication within the family were obstructed. Today, communication lines are open. Parents and children dwell in the same American atmosphere. Guidance is more likely to be accepted. The first requirement of education is education to the need for education. The children are willing to learn. But parental ignorance and indifference are widespread. Underscored is the great task of adult Jewish education. Moses commanded, the children of Israel to take pure olive oil and make a light that would shine continuously. This is the traditional ideal of the Jewish parent and teacher: to light up the heart and mind of the child in such a way that the flame will burn by itself, out of its own substance. The task of Jewish education is to stimulate individual development through a chain reaction of expanding growth involving self-discovery as a Jew. The dignity of Jewish life, Jewish contributions to civilization, the fullest expression of Jewish ideals cannot be realized without a deeper understanding of the substance of Jewish values and ethics. This is the view of American Jewish leadership. But the problem of implementation remains as Jewry enters a new year. DAVID ROSNER & FAMILY of the Stirling Hotel Pool Cabana* Wish for all Jewry L'SHONA TOVA TIKESEVU •znzn naio r\iv? TO *U BAPPY W f* FANNETHARMS APARTMENTS 7SH Abbott Ave. Uimmi Bosch Mr. and Mrs. David Brown and Family WISH ALL THEIR RELATIVES AND FRIENDS A HAPPY NEW YEAR Dr. and Mrs. A. 1Roeenthal and Family Extend to All Their Relatives and Friends Sincere Wishes For A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAB GREETINGS TOM Of REE and SONS. INC. REAL ESTATE 1800 Bay Road PfcwM Jl 5224 MIAMI BEACF Auto Seat Covers Custom Convertible Tops 2160 N.W. 27th AT.. NE 4-1432 %  CITY ICE 101 I-V4RY COOLING MEED PLUS THE FINEST IN AIR-CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION PORTABLE BEVERAGE COOLERS ICE REFRIGERATORS PRODUCE DISPLAY CASES WATER COOLERS 24 HOUR SERV| C E BLOCKS CUBES FISH & POULTRY DISPLAY CASES Also Hollywood and Ft. Lauderdale CITY PRODUCTS CORPORATION FLORIDA DIVISION 931 S.W. 1st Street, Miami Phone FR 3-2191 M(fTIN5 TO All CVS AUTO TRIM SCHWEBKE & ASSOCIATES, INC. LAND PLANNERS iNGINtm LAND SURVEYORS ^ 'We Cover Greater Miami" REASONABLE RATES PROMPT SERVICE 4841 N.W. 2nd AVttlUI MIAMI PL 1-2592 3521 W. Brow a id Blvd. LUdlow 1-4600 Ft. Lauderdale GREETINGS TO ALL Alexander Orr & Associates. Inc. PLUMBING — HEATING Residential — Commercial — Industrial StrWsf foe Cr—fr Mimml Area Slmt* 115 70 N.E. 39th Street Phone PI 4-6671 To All Greetings CAPT. S. HAMWAY BOAT POPEYE TOO Haulover Beach Dock Phone Wl 7-3525 ENJOY A DAY FISHING — Pier 2 — lOsOO COLLINS AVE. Licensed Bid & Completion Bonds Insured %  DAAC ROOF REPA,RS ROOFING IWUr METAL WORK 4 i4 y W HERE — APPLICATORS OF BONDED COVERINGS RESIDENTIAL — COMWERC'AL ASPHALT e ASBESTOS • CEMENT • SHINGLES GRAVEL • TILE-9LATB • ROLL ROOFING, ETC. NYSTRAND LLOYD CORP. 230 S.W. 17th Avenue FR 4-4128 Roofs Applied in Any City of S.E. Florida MEMBER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Best Wishes for the Holiday Season RUDY'S PAINT & BODY SHOP SEAT COVERS and SPORT TOPS 3665 N.W. 48th Street Phone NE 4-7771 MIAMI BEST WISHES FORTHE NEW YEAR KEYSTONE POINT MEDICAL PHARMACY 12400 BBCAYNE BLVD. PL t-glSQ



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    Friday. September 23, 1980 +Jmisti ncrkttati Page 13-H Greater • •# s Contribution to Histadrut By ABRAHAM FOX Chairman, Greater Miami Histadrut Committee v HIS is the 40th anniversary of Histadrut and life begins at forty. Hisfadrut faces its fifth decade fully conscious that the military defense of Israel is still a prior obligation and the expansion of its economy equally urgent. The Israel Histadrut Commission of Greater Miami is strongly committed 10 make the Negev blossom as a rose and to ring ihe border areas with strong fortresses of working settlements. It is here that the Business and Projessional Council of Histadrut, Harry Gordon, chairman, has undertaken a Medical Center which will house the most modern medical equipment to serve the pioneer settler and immigrant alike. Throughout the world, including the United States, local committees for the Histadrut campaign are functioning year-round to raise the funds to maintain and increase the work of Kupat Holim. It is the Greater Miami committee which assumes the responsibility through its members and friends to build, equip and maintain as many Kupat Holim projects as possible and to meet the constant and • rising needs of medical care for the pioneer settlers and immigrants throughout the State of Israel. The tremendous task in the training period within Israel and the sending forth of Israel-trained technicians to its far-reaching borders is the fulfillment of the program for scholarship funds for vocational training assumed by the local Histadrut committee. The fund assures the youthful immigrant and the pioneer settler, alike, of absorption into the economic picture of productivity as a useful citizen of Israel. %> *K* .rrVirai art •MM %  I %  Mr. and Mrs. Abram Fox shown at the dedication ceremony in Israel of their individually-sponsored Medical Clinic, one of a number of such clinics launched by members of Histadrut through Kupat Holim. Histadrut has enlightened the community at large by its film showings in the hotels and meeting halls of countless groups. During the winter season, the public is invited to attend Histadrut bi-monthly study groups and symposiums at which noted guests appear. The Israel Histadrut committee of Greater Miami wishes the Jewish community a Healthy and Happy New Year. Significant Year for Antiion League Continued from Page 944 cumulating evidence that while progress is being made in resort discrimination and in the acceptance programming, there appears to be reason for apprehension in the area of housing discrimination. Evidence that a major corporation in its housing developments on Florida's east and west coasts is practicing discrimination against Jews, is in the possession of the League. Evidence, too, that the cooperative apartment market in a major South Florida community is run through with anti-Jewish restrictions, has been turned up. There is reason to be concerned here on two counts. As Florida (cntinues to grow, these policies and their built-in snob appeal may be emulated by new housing developments. Also, it is in an adolescent's immediate environment, his neighborhood so to speak, that his early values are formed. If there is propriety in having a restricted neighborhood, then it is no less improper to have a restricted fraternity or sorority, hotel or club. The area of discrimination in housing will receive the concerted attention of the Florida ADL in the year 5721. No discussion of the League's activities and plans would be complete without discussing the educational programs in which it is involved. During the past year, the ADL has co-sponsored week-long workshops for educators and students, with Jacksonville University, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami. A total number of 1,600 persons have been involved. Co-sponsors have included United Church Women, University Religious Assn., and Florida Council on Human Relations. So that the reader might get a working insight into the character of these workshops, I am citing a sample of precisely what is involved in human relations programming: Monday, Theme — "Which Way for Human Rights?" Tuesday, Theme — "Problems of Democracy," Wednesday, Theme — "What Makes a Bigot?" Thursday, Theme — "Barriers to an Open Society." Friday, Theme — "Building Bridges of Understanding." I should have liked to discuss the significance of the ADL's educational endeavors with the police departments of Miami and other cities in Metropolitan Dade County, as well as Sarasota, Hollywood, Ft. Lauderdale, Deerfield Beach, Orlando, Palm Beach, all of which are using its publication -With Justice for All" in their training courses. I should have liked to discuss the prevalence of discrimination la service clubs right here in Miami, of the delicate, sensitive nuances in combatting intelligently religious practices in the schools. Be that as it may, our regular community reports will continue, and readers of The Jewish Floridian will be kept apprised of ADL's activities. Best wishes for a very happy New Year to the readers of The Jewish Floridian, to their families, and to the many, many friends and supporters of our Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS MR. AND MRS. ABRAM FOX 141 S.W. 23rd Road BEST* WISHES FOR A HEALTHY, HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR MR. & MRS. EUGENE J. WEISS AND FAMILY 1650 S. W. 21*1 STREET REV. and MRS. ABRAHAM SEIF Seas MOWAID ana ALAN Deeeettrs DHOtAM ead SMIRA WISH All THtIK mtMOS A TOY MAW new rut RABBI JACOB H. KAPLAN Extends to all Jewry and particularly the members of TEMPLE ISRAEL Sincere Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous NEW YEAR DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH R. NAROT and FamilyExtend to all Jewry and purticularly^tbe members of TEMPLE ISRAEL of GREATER MIAMI Sincere Wishes for A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR RABBI DR. and MRS. ISAAC H. EVER AND FAMILY Wish for the Members of Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute, its Auxiliary and the Entire Jewish Community a Year of Peace and Joy SINCERE WISHES FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL JEWRY RABBI and MRS. MARIUS RANSON TEMPLE EMANU-EL FORT LAUDERDALE DR. and MRS. IRVING LEHRMAN and their children Extend Best Wishes for a JOYOUS NEW YEAR To All Their Friends of the Greater Miami Community RABBI AND MRS. MORRIS A. SKOP AND FAMILY Extend Best Wishes to the Members and Officers of TEMPLE JUDEA Its Sisterhood and the Greater Miami Jewish Community for a Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. SHELDON STEINMETZ and Family extend best wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to the Officers and Members of Yehudah Moshe Congregation and to the Jewish Community at large RABBI and MRS. JOSEPH E. RACKOVSKY and FAMILY extend Best Wishes for a Ksivah Vachasimo Tovah to the Officers, Members, Worshippers and Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Tfilah and to Klal Yisroel Bo-oretz U-Bagole. RABBI and MRS. ALEXANDER S. GROSS and Family MIAMI BEACH Extend Best Wishes for A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS N E W Y E A R to the officers, directors and members of the Hebrew Academy and all its affiliated organisations and to all Jewry. RABBI DAVID W. HERSON Wishes CONGREGATION BETH EMETH its affiliate organizations and Greater Miami Jewry A Happy New Year RABBI and MRS. i MAYER ABRAMOWITZ and Family | Extend Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR I to the members of Temple Menorah and to All Jewry RABBI and MRS. ALFRED WAXMAN and Daughters Wish for all Jewry, and particularly the Members and Officers of Temple Zion A Happy and Prosperous New Year RABBI and MRS. DAVID LEHRFIELD and Familygreet the Jewish community and membership of Kneseth Israel Congregation on the occasion of the NEW riAI RABBI and MRS. MAX LIPSCHITZ and Family ox Temple Beth Torah Extend Best Wishes for the New Year to the entire Jewish Community RABBI and MRS. HARRY L LAWRENCE Extend Best Wishes For \ HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR to the officers, directors and members of Temple Beth Ahm of West Hollywood and to Greater Miami Jewry RABBI and MRS. DAVID SHAPIRO Extend Best Wishes for a HAPPY NEW YEAR to the members of TEMPLE SINAI rhe Jewish Community Center Hollywood. Florida and to All Jewry RABBI and MRS. BENNO M. WALLACH joim fee membership ef Temple Sinai of North Miami in ereetief the Jewish community •a ffce ecces l ee ef the new riAi % 



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    Page 6-F +Jmlst> fkrkUam Friday. September 23, 1960 HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL MR. and MRS. BERT SHER KENNY and ARTHUR 76 SHORE DRIVE WEST, MIAMI Nappy New Year Greetings to All LARRY PASKOW'S HARBOR ISLAND SPA Harbor Island, on the 79th St. Causeway, Miami Beach • PERSONALIZED DIET • EXClUSfVE .'N FLORIDA IMPORTED FAMOUS CARLSBAD MINiRAL BATHS For Reservations Phone PLaza 1-7561 t write tor rates and color brochure 100% AIR CONDITIONED AND HEATED MtMBW OF DINERS' CLUB TO ALL A MOST HAPPY HOLIDAY ZARET BUILDING CORP. 924 Lincoln Road Miami Beach Best Wishes for the Holiday Season FIRESTONE STORES 1569 ALTON ROAD Miami Beach 39. Florida Phone IE '8-2747 TO ALL SEASON'S GREETINGS I Seymour and Dorothy Schaefer Dorothy Schaefer i EXCLUSIVE CASUAL WEAR 369 Miracle Mile Coral Gables, Fla. SMALL'S WOMEN'S APPAREL Eden Roc Hotel 4525 Collins Ave. EXTENDS TO ALL ITS FRIENDS AND PATRONS SEASON'S GREETINGS HAPPY NEW YEAR II % \ M >\ PLUMBING CO. 729 S. W. 12th Avenue •NONES Ft 3-1611 and FR 1-5312 MAM> 1 HtW YtAK TO All THE WAX Ml M I >l Opoa Daily 9:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. Historical KIHI with Lift SIZt Wax fiaorts in frrmendoos iiormmmt. %  ifcayne Baalevord at 139th Street P