The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01646

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T eJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and TNI JfW/JH WEEKLY
Volume 33 Number 34
Miami, Florida. Friday. August 19, 1960
Two Sections Price 20*
THEY BOUGHT ONIY TWO CARS
Renault Bows -- So Do UAR Sales
JERUSALEM (JTA) Regie
Renault, the French automotive
concern that cancelled a contract
for assembly of its vehicles in Is-
rael as a result of Arab boycott
pressure, has succeeded in selling
only two Renault cars in the Unit-
f.l Arab Republic in the nine
Cairo authorities had promised
Renault that in consideration of
cancellation of the Renault, con-
tract with Kaiser-Frazer of Haifa,
they would build a plant in Egypt
for assembly of the Renault car.
i They have not done so and, in
months since if stopped do i ng( stead, have entered into a contract
business in Israel. with Renault's rival, the Simca
Javits Urges State Dep't.
to Halt Arab Boycott
Company.
Since last November, the Re-
nault company has sold only 430
cars throughout the entire Middle
East considerably less than the
Israel market alone absorbed, and
less than the export of Renaults
assembled in Haifa for sale in
other countries.
WASHINGTON-(JTA)-Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York Republi-
can. proposed this week a five-point program of action by the State
Department to combat Arab intervention in American affairs to enforce
lhe Arab League economic blockade of Israel.
The New Yorker took particular*----------'---------------------;------------
exception to attempts by the Arabs, ;Washin^on as an unfriendl and
especially by the sultanate of Ku unwarranted interference
wait, to blackmail American firms internal affairs*
into refusing to do business with 3) Has the"u.S. specifically re
Israel. He indicated dissatisfac quested Kuwait to cease and de-
t.on with the public position taken sis, from the practice of threaten-
by the State Department on this ing American business firms'
in VS.
Adolf Warrant
Extension Set;
Judges Invited
TEL
mann.
AVIV(JTA)Adolf Eich- a particular country would be en-
tile captured Nazi leader | "Wed to "end on that basis.
of
UN. JACOB JAVITS
issue and called this Week on Sec-
retary of State Christian A. Herter
for definite answers to five specific
questions.
Sen. Javits referred to ultinva-
himi received In recent weeks
by some 500 American firms
from the Arab boycott offices in
Kuwait and Damascus threaten-
ing to blacklist tfvem if thoy did
business with Israel. Ha asked.
Secretary Herter:
who directed the annihilation
6.000.000 Jews in Europe, was
Monday brought again before a
magistrate for another extension
of his detention warrant. These
have been extended every two
weeks.
Minister of Justice Pinhas Rosen
was reported here as seating that
Eichmann will be entitled to de-
mand a preliminary hearing before
the actual trial takes place. He in-
dicated that the Israel government
Attorney General Gideon Hiuv
ntr confirmed a report that tho
Ministry of Justice has invited a
prominent American Jewish law-
yer who was a special adviser
to the U.S. Attorney General at
the Nuremberg war crimes trials,
to assist him in the prosecution
of Eichmann. However, he de-
clined to furnish tho nam* of
that lawyer sine* the latter has
net vt officially accepted the in-
vitation.
(In New York, it was believed
would announce that foreign judges that (he iawyer invited to assist the
could be present at the trial if they israeij Attorney General was Dr.
so desired. However, they would
attend only as observers. Any
judge who would submit creden-
tials showing that he represented
4) Has the government speci-
fied, for its own consideration,
the measures which 'could be
taken to meet this kind of situs- ;
tienspecifically the use of U.S. -i
mail for propaganda and threats
by a non-registered foreign agent? .
B-G Tells Science Conference
Emerging Nations Need Assist
5) Doees the U.S. recognize exis-
; tence of a state of war between
Israel and the Arab states, as
claimed by the government of Ku
wait in its boycott letter?
,, The State Department has re-
has protested to the government of ^.^ly declared that the U.S.
Kuwalt- does not condone the boycott but
2) Whether the U.S.. in its pro-' has often indicated that there was
lest, has informed Kuwait that the not much the Department could do
boycott pressures are regarded by about it.
1) Whether the U.S. government
REHOVOT, Israel (JTA) The I nels of the human racepolitical
liberation of peoples and the clos- and intellectual." Mr. Ben-Gurion
ing of the economic and spiritual J said that "gaining independence
?aps between them with the aid of
science and technical know-how
will ensure world peace and raise
l
Bonn Flayed for Bungling
Capture of Ludwtg
the family of nations to the peak
of material propserity and spiritual
advancement. Prime Minister Da-
vid Ben-Gurion declared here Mon
day at the opening session of th't
is not the end of redemption" but
its beginning.
The material and cultural gap
between nations should be closed Israe, .
the Prem/*'erteirJmaidtt;n ment had asked several East Eur-
h1 wtTh l? Zrlti he L opean countries if they were will-
only be liberated, but must be more 7** .________. ..:,.; ,.
Jacob Robinson, one of the world's
outstanding experts on internation-
al law who served as special assis-
tant to Robert H. Jackson, Associ-
ate Justice of the U.S. Supreme
Court during the Nuremberg trials.
Dr. Robinson, who came to the Uni-
ted States from Lithuania in 1940,
after the outbreak of World War
II, declined to comment on the re-
port.)
Mr. Hausner said also that, when
Eichmann is brought to trial, his
chief defense counsel. Robert Ser-
vatius, a German lawyer, will be
assisted by several other foreign at-
torneys.
In the meantime it was empha-
sized here that two months have
only
or less on the same level in status
ing to cooperate in providing ma-
uuj mc "c^""* .,.-.,.- ---- r||- ics.s on uic same icvci in siatus __. c;_i.____ ,_:_i xr
International Conference on the and in thcir ma.erial and spiri,ual. "/". ^^VJ^L .
BONN(JTA)The West German government came under heavy-
fire this week from the Social Democratic opposition which accused it
of failure to make a real effort to obtain extradition from Italy of Lud-
wig Zind, the Nazi school teacher convicted here two years ago for anti-
Semitic utterances, and, generally, of having bungled the entire case.
Zind was arrested earlier thii*-------------------------------------
month in Naples as he was about, Ministry of Justice officials here
to board an Egyptian steamer for|said tnere ..ig a slignt hope" that
Role of Science in New States.
Scientists and statesmen from 29
countries, as well as hundreds ol
juests from Israel and abroad, an
attending the conference which is
being held in the Chnim Wcizmanr.
Memorial Amphitheatre of the
Weizmann Institute of Science
Prominent among the guests are
Prime Minister B. f. Koirala of
Nepal. Deputy Premier Gabriel
Lisette of Chad and ministers and
government officials from It Asian
and African states.
Libya, after he was spotted by
four Israeli seamen on shore leave.
He is presently under detention in
Italy.
What stirred the opposition ire
was the disclosure that Zind, who
escaped from the police after
ha viral been sentenced in 1958
by an Offenberg court to a year
in prison, had twice returned to
West Germany on visits, travel-
ing en a "stateless" passport
bearing his own name.
The news service of the Social
Democratic Party complained this
week that "the world is beginning
to believe that we are not really in-
terested in bringing Zind to jus-
tice.".
Social Democratic deputies stated
they were considering a parliamen-
tary debate on the Zind issue, to
be held when Parliament recon
venes after the summer recess.
Italian authorities may agree to ex-
tradite Zind. Meanwhile, they de
dared, they had asked Italian po-
lice to keep Zind jailed until a de-
cision is reached on his extradition.
Defining the gathering as "a
historic event of inestimable im-
portance." the Premier said that
the conference was closely re-
lated with "the two most mo-
mentous revolutions in the an-
countries that Eichmann must be
Continued on Page 2-A
'judged and severely punished.
UN Crime Parley Warned
Bias, Delinquency
Berlin Kids to Learn About Nazism
By S. MALINS
JTA Staff Correspondent
LONDONA United Nations conference on crime was told this week
that there was an "evident relationship" between racial prejudice and
juvenile delinquency particularly in countries of high living standards
like the United States, Britain and West-Germany.
+ Dr. Maurice L. Perlzwelg, of the
| World Jewish Congress, told the
UN Congress on Prevention of
(Crime and the Treatment of Of-
{fenders here that the relationship
i had become apparent in the swas-
WEST BERLIN (JTA) Chil-iplan. 'attempt to get down to the. Later, the history of persecutions j tika epidemic and wave of anti-
dren attending West Berlin ele-jvery roots of Hitlerism, show up against Jews will be led back teise,,^^ incidents that broke out
mentary schools, from the age >f anti-Semitism and other persecu- Roman times and forward again ,ast winter. -The growth of juven-
10 up. will be taught the dangers | Uong an{J ,ear down the falfe giorJto the anti-Jewish atrocities com jie delinquency in the most highly
of Nazism and anti-Semitism, and | i(ication of Hitler and his regime." ml,lfd by ,h,e N"lsu In h'g *e industrialized societies.' he told the
will be given a complete history | grades, pupils will be told about, congress ."carries with it a serious
of the Hitler atrocities against: On the 10-year-old level, teach- I the Nuremberg Laws, the events I threat of the growth of racial prej-
ers will explain to the children of Crystal Night of 1938 when ev- udice am0ng the youth."
the meaning of various symbols | ery synagogue in Germany was
like the Star of David, the Soviet attacked by the N aii-s, and the
ttar, the swastika and the Red campaign for systematic exterrm-
Cross. They will be told of the I nation of all Jews, first in Ger-
mas* murder of Jewish children

Jews, according to a new school
curriculum announced here this
week by the city's Ministry of Ed-
ucation.
The curriculum, which enters
into effect with the next school
year, will, according to the official
He noted that one aspect of
this relationship had been appar-
ent in the large American cities.
in Nasi concentration camps.
Continued on Page *-A
Continued on Page 3-A


Page 2-A
Jen1st ncrkiiar
Friday, August 19, iggg
t-
B-G Tells Science Conference
Emerging Nations Need Assist
Continued FromPeee VA ...
tftul .ill material and spiritual as
sislance to wipe out regrettable
and ilaneernus differences between
economic and cultural ttandu li
Referring to the integrity of hu
mainly in our days nlivn rial ions
are M i-lo.-i-ly COOMCLod throimh
Advanced types of commuaicatlons,
the Premier call oe all highly
developed nations to MSlsl thin-
fellows whose rights. statUl and
educational opportunities have
been restricted for decades and
centuries by history
"They should offer this aid not
as charity, but as an cbligation
of fellow members of the same
human family out of equality,
comradeship and universal hu-
man solidarity to rectify historic
wrongs," Mr. Ben Gurion said.
Referring to American aid to the
European countries crushed in the
Second World War. Mr. Ben Gurion
fcaid that such aid had achieved
wonders. He noted, nowevor. that
the center of gravity had passed to
Asia and Africa, the homo of the
great majority of the human race.
This aid. the Premier declared,
that should give them agriculture
nd idustrial--dovelopment. better
education, housing and health serv-
ices material and spiritual pro-
i gress which these countries need-
should be founded on mutual confi-
dence and respect and the utiliza-
tion of all achievements of human
ity and its scientific tod techno-
kkfteal dincoveriei in sincere co-
operation
(.reeling the participants repre-
eatiag tb 14 Asian and African
states, as well as those from Fur
ope. Australia, the Philippines and
North and South America, the Pre
l mier expressed the fervent hope
that the deliberations would contri-
bute to the unity of all mankind I
and speed up progress benefittingj
every man. woman and child.
> throughout the world without dis-1
tinction of race, color, class or re-
ligion.
The more than 100 Kientiatl par
ticipating in the conference will
discuss subjects relating to atomic
energy for peaceful purposes, solar
energy, water development in arid
lands, health problems and train
'. ing of scientific personnel for new
and underdeveloped countries The
conference, which will last until
Aug 26. is taking place under the
auspices of the VYeizmann Institute
of Science
Jewish War Veterans End Convention;
Elect I. L. Feuer National Commander
The Jewish War Veterans of the The new national commander li
United States closed-it* 65ih sjfcvfpre^enUii MUUMOl ewjm*a nual national convention on Miami' JWV's Fifth Region.
Beach last Sunday with the election j peuer has been a member *
of I L Feuer. of V'mgstown. O.. jwVs national executive commit
as national commander. tee. and currently serves on th
Feuer. who succeeus cternard Ab-1 organization's national policy cmi
rams, attorney of New Jersey, mlttee. national personnel commit
thus dashed the hopes of Florida ;ee. national evaluations commit
Department JWV members for a I tee. and is on the board of trustee
first time election of a national; tff the National Shrine.
commander from this area.
I. I. FFUlf
DAILY PICKUPS TO NEW YORK
M. 1IEBERMAN & SONS
LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING TO AND FROM
NEW JBtSfT PHILADELPHIA OALTlMOtS
ALBANY WASHINGTON tOSTON
PROVIDENCE <. all ether aointt Weekly Service
f'w Proof Constructed Storage Warehouse
455 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Dial JE 8 8353
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INSURANCE
&
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JEWELRYPUtS MISCIUANIOUS FLOATERS
AUIOMOIILI IIAIILITY PHYSICAL 0AMA6I
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The Afeacy that CAN to. TISf
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ACKERMAN INSURANCE AGENCY. INC.
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FR I -2611 Fl I
Nasser Mission
Off To Ghana
LONDON (JTA) The Unit
ed Arab Republic is sending this
week a military mission to Ghana
for the purpose of discussing the
formation of a joint high command.
it was reported here today from
Ghana. The talks would also in
elude the possibility "of forming
an all-African army.
Five hundred United Arab Re-
public troops flew from Cairo to
Leopoldville. in the Congo. Tues-
day. United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Dag Hammarskjold cabled
President Nasser several days ago
requesting the dispatch of the
troops to help him implement the
Security Council's resolution on the
Congo.
Opposing Fewer in a three-man
race for the post were Daniel
Neal Heller, of Miami Beach,
and Joseph Solomonow, of Los
Angeles.
I :
Sholem Lodge
Picnic Sunday
Sholem l-odge of B'nai B'rith will
[hold a picnic on Sunday, beginning
10 a.m.. at Coconut Grove Park
Morton W. Palmer, lodee secre-
tary, said the affair will benefit
Sholem's Handicapped Boy Scout
Troop, and is open to all B'nai
B'rith members in Greaer Miami
The program will include refresh-
ments and games for all age
groups.
Coconut Grove Park is two blocks
south of Dinner Key Auditorium
at the end of So. Bayshore dr.
COMPLETE
PEST
CONTROL
An Army veteran. Feuer serred
m France in 1917. He is presently
lirector of the' Mahoning County
Welfare Department in Ohio, and
a recognized authority on public
welfare and welfare legislation.
He is married, and has two sot*
and seven grandchildren.
Young Adult Club Dance
Temple Judea Young Adult Club
held a "dance-aroma" on Sunday
evening at the Temple. 320 Paler-
mo ave.
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OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FtUJO
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New York: 76th St 1 Amnrdim Ava.


Friday. August 19. 1960
^Jmlsiifhrtdfan
Page 3-A
President of Israel Itzhak Ben-Zvi (left) greets William Peskoff
(right), of 728 Pennsylvania ave., Miami Beach, during Peskoff's
recent fourth visit there. Introducing Peskoff to the President
at the latter s home in Jerusalem is Isaac Hamlin, director of
the Histadrut Center in Tel Aviv. A member of the board of
directors of Histadrut, Peskoff is also a long-time active mem-
ber of Workmen's Circle in Miami and New York, and an Israel
Bond committee volunteer.
UN Crime Parley Warned
Bias, Delinquency Linked
Continued from Pago 1 -A
notably New York, in'me fight-
ing among youthful gang* based
on race. Ho said that much fight-
ing might bo regarded a* almost
inevitable where racial groups of
widely differing cultural tradi-
tions came together.
"But what is more disturbing."
he declared, "is the evident rela-
tionship between racial prejudice
and juvenile delinquency which
has become apparent in the recent
wave of swastika and anti-Semitic
incidents, which has been particu-
larly marked in countries with high
standards of living like West Ger-
many, the United Kingdom and the
I nited States."
Dr. Perlzweig pointed out that
these incidents had often taken
place where there were few or no
Jews and were among the more
striking examples of "offenses
committed by groups without any
apparent motive-." They indicated,
he asserted, that there was a "spir-
itual vacuum in the lives of count-
less young people" which could be
filled easily by any subversive
ideas carried through the channels
of mass communications.
To remedy "this, he urged gov
ernments to take seriously their
obligation under the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights to
make education a means of pro-
moting understanding between dif-
ferent races, nations and religions.
Earlier. Yehuda Prag, chief of
the investigation branch of Israeli
police, told the congress that the
"true, new" contribution of this
age to criminality was "gang be
havior through which crimes are
committed "for the fun of if and
not for material gain."
Soviet Official
Booted for Ties
With US Nazi
WA^HINGTON^rfTl^tontact
maintained by- an important mem-
ber of the Soviet Embassy here
with a member of the American
Nazi Party and watched by the
F.B.I.led to an order by the State
Department last weekend expelling
the Soviet official from this coun-
try.
The expelled Soviet diplomat is
Valentin M. Ivanov, First Secre-
: tary of the Soviet Embassy. He
was ordered to leave the country
on the ground that he had paid
I Roger C. Foss, who described him-
, self as a member of the American
Nazi Party, a "substantial amount
of money" urging him to get a job
with the Federal government.
Foss, 32 years old, said he re-
ported his contacts with Ivanov
a few weeks ago to the F.B.I.
However, the F.B.I, was reported
to have boon watching Ivanov in-
dependently of the information
from Foss.
The Washington Post reported
that Foss stated be decided about
9 year ago to get information on
emigrating to Russia. He said
that, after visiting the Soviet Em-
bassy, Ivanov contacted him and
suggested that he apply for an
American government job. On thi.'
occasion, Foss said, Ivanov ad
vanced him $500.
While waiting for results of ;
Civil service examination, Foss, ac-
cording to his story, kept contact
with Ivanov and from time.to timt
received additional sums of money
totaling $500. In the meantime
Foss added, he had heard of th<
American Nazi Party, and joined it
David Pinski folk School
David Pinski Folk School will re-
open on Tuesday, Sept. 6. Regi-
stration is now being taken at the
school at 1534 Washington ave.
M. B. Astor is president. Cultural
director is M. Chomitz.
Senior Citizens Invited
Senior Citizens of America club
affiliates in Greater Miami were
this week invited to a general meet-
ing scheduled for Thursday. 6 p.m.,
at Bayfront Park Band Shell.

ww
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Pag 4-A
+JewlstincrM**ri
Friday, August 19,
I960
^Jewish Floridian
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LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
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Volume 33 Number 34
Friday. August 19. 1960
26 Ab 5720
Dictator Nasser's Tragedy
The tragedy of the dictator is that he must
constantly win victories abroad. He is com-
mitted to them far beyond any progress to
which he has pledged himself at home.
It is in the area of foreign prestige that a
nation experiences its greatest sensitivities.
Poverty, illiteracy, disease these are prob-
lems people have time and again reduced to
second place in priority as they shouted the
praise of a dictator offering them greater glones
abroad.
Egypt's President Nasser fits this classical
prescription for a strongman to a tee. whose
reform programs at home are far behind his
more ambitious vision of a pan-Arab world
under his personal domination.
Nasser's diplomatic sanctions against Mo-
hamed Riza Pahlevi. the Shah of Iran, for the
latter's recent reaffirmation of de facto recogni-
tion of Israel are a case in point. After three
.weeks of attempting to turn the Arab nations
against him. Nasser must now cope with his
complete failure.
But he can not stand still even for a mo-
ment. Hence Nasser's decision this week to
send a military mission to Ghana lor the pur-
pose of discussing the formation of a joint high
command and the possibility of organizing an
all-Africa army.
But Ghana maintains the closest political
and economic ties with Israel. 'The two are
mutual owners of a maritime shipping line.
Ghana students fill 'sraeli schools, and many
aie the Israeli technical experts in Ghana today
advising the new African republic on agricul-
ture and industry.
How can Nasser rationalize his latest move
toward Ghana with the existence of a strong
Israel-Ghana accord? Obviously, he can not
although it is clear he would like to undermine
it.
This is merely another in a growing num-
ber of bitter lessons for dictator Nasser, who
must increasingly recognise that his war of
attrition aqainst Israel hurts his own ambitions
in the Middle East far more than they ever hin-
dered the Jewish State- another in a growing
number of chilling assertions that his failures
abroad are beginning to match his failures at
home.
THINGS TO 00 IN THE FAIL
Actions Speak Eloquently
Scientists and statesmen from 29 countries
are currently attending sessions of the Inter-
national Conference on the Role of Science in
New States.
It is not strange that the conference has
gathered in Israel. Prime Minister Ben-Gurion's
opening message to the delegates amply justi-
fies the honor accorded the Jewish republic.
The material and cultural gap between na-
tions must be closed, Ben-Gurion declared,
warning that "gaining independence is not the
end of redemption." The wisdom of this pro-
nouncement is borne out by the events attend-
ing the birth of the Congo.
Israel's Prime Minister also called upon
more highly developed nations to assist their
fellow-human beings in countries where educa-
tional opportunities have been restricted.
Mr. Ben-Gurion's words are idealistic and
filled with far-seeing moral impulse usually
the signs of impracticality. But it is a fact that
he could speak them proudly, for Israel has
acted forthnghtiy to make of these principles
an enviable reality.
Israel's growing relationships with the
newly-emerging nations of Africa in a host of
frontseducational, industrial, and economic
- are glowing examples of the altruistic ties
among peoples for which Ben-Gurion called "as
an obligation of fellow-members of the same
human family ... to rectify historic wrongs."
Little Israel, herself still fragile, still depen-
dent, but nevertheless proud and intellectually
vibrant, is coming to the assistance of the less
fortunate todayven as others have not for-
gotten her.
Proud Space Age Moment
The launching of Echo I was a proud mo-
ment in America's increasingly sturdy effort to
seize and maintain the lead in space age pro-
gress.
Dr. Abe Silverstein. director of space flight
programs for the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration, is a proud figure in that
moment.
The heretofore predominant role the So-
viet Union has played in satellite launchings
and other activities dedicated toward man's
conquest of outer space disheartened a world
concerned by the encroachments qi Commun-
ism.
America's ever-advancing strides in this
field, which appear to be catapulting the nation
into the ascendancy, are now quieting the
anxieties emerging from past Soviet successes.
Dr. Silverstein's latest Echo I contribution
once again gives cause for Americans to be
proud of their natural abilities both in science
and democracy with each dedicated toward
the advancement of the other.
Speaking About Agriculture
A report from overseas this week guotes
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson
as being "impressed" with Israel's agricultural
development following a four-day visit in the
Jewish State.
We don't quite know what Mr. Benson's
evaluation means. For a long time a principal
target of Democratic Party snipers, and now a
sure victim of Mr. Nixon's ax in the event of a
GOP victory next November, the Secretary's
knowledge of things agricultural appears uni-
versally to be suspect.
If Mr. Benson found it gratifying to observe
the concentration of Israel's technical know-
how, which he said brings excellent results in
yielding greater and better crops, perhaps it
had best be left there. In this respect, we should
like so much to feel he knows what he is talking
about -even if America's fanners don't think
so.
daring the week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
T"!
They Aren't Fooling Anybody
The ousting of a Soviet Embassy official in
Washington for consorting with an American
Nazi Party member in the laiter's ambition to
become a spy puts the lie to the Powers trial
opening in Moscow this week. Communist spy-
ing is notorious. Whom do the Russians think
they are kidding especially when they're
caught scheming with second-rate Nazi hang-
ers-on? This is espionage at its crudest level.
JiWISH W.r Veteran,
came to Miami Beach tZ
armed with a battery 0f im
resolutions. The list is an Z
posing one. Issues ranging ,
broadly a, "Know Your*"^
ica Week" (Resolution No M
and Dhahran Alrbase fN7
83>, ;Use of Surplus F.nerni
m Property" (No. 2fj) and "SJ
ted Nation Day" "Constitutional Amendments Restricting the President's Treaty Pn-I
ei- (No. 31) and "Religion and Contests for Public Office" (No m
represent only a fractional part of the great arena of debate in -J2
the JWV engaged here. In *"*
There were, of course, others specifically relating to veteran."
affairs: "Opposing the Basic Conception of the Bradley Conuni^ul
Report" (No. 2). "increased Funds for VA Hospitals" (No. 9)nZ
patient Treatment and Hospitalization for Peacetime Veterans <*!"
11). among a list of some 30 in this particular area of consideration
Similarly, in just and proper acknowledgement of its sectaries
makeup, the organization dealt with Jewish and Israeli question- ^
interest like "Suez Canal" (No. 68). "Anti-Semitic Literature' ,nv
78). "Arab Propaganda" (No. 89). "Jews in Eastern Europe" (No en
and moretoo abundant even to mention.
Together, the very respectable list of resolutions significantly
characterizes the JWV as a body deeply identifed with todays turbu
lent world, and anxious to submit its thinking on a variety of prol>
lems perplexing some of our most mature intelligencesif sli >h'!v
less seasoned leaders-hcre and abroad. The resulting picture re-
affirms the view of a serious-minded Jewish veterans' organization
that has since its inception successfully and easily avoided the water
pistols and noise-makers calling to mind for other veterans' groups
the camaraderie and boom-boom of war.
: :- :
commomisiHG A kwism communirr
IN ALL, THE healthy and hopeful feeling is that some of this serious-
minded enthusiasm for the achievement of workable solution* to
the afflictions ailing human society may very well filter down to the
Florida Department JWV scene, where bowling and cards are fre-
quently king.
But an otherwise sound listing of considerations tended to lengthen
to 127 during the course of the convention here; while, in the final days
of the gathering, one particular resolution enjerged for passage that
might, more profitably, have died behind the scene. The move ap-
plauding the Catholic Church condemnation in Cuba of the increasng
Communist affiliations of Fidel Castro appears in retrospect impet-
uous and ill-advised- Pressed for study by Bernard Abrams. outgoing
national commander, it Will be among the many items of unfinished
convention business before the JWV national executive committee
meeting next November in Detroit.
There is no question about the direction of the Castro regime or
of Fidel's dangerous challenge to Western Hemispheric solidarity.
Neither is this to be construed as criticism of JWV's concern for the
continuing encroachments of world Communism. The list of resolo-
tions JWV brought, to the convention include a number of laudable
ones in the same and related areas: "Nuclear Tests" (No. 33). "People
to People Program" (No. 36). "Crusade for Freedom" (No. 39). and
a pithy one. entitled simply. "Communism" (No. 53). among others
equally commendable.
But the resolution on Castro followed in the heat of Cuba's Cath-
olic Church action and, to be blunt about it. compromises unnecessarily
and to a dangerous degree the position of an increasingly vulnerable
Jewish community there. What was the precedent for this proposed
resolution? Has the JWV in the past condemned Batista Trujillo or
other Latin dictators' Did it take a stand on the attempted Commun-
ist coup in Nicaragua six years ago' Has it been equally vocal in the
seesaw political arena that is Argentina?
: :- si.
PAtAUH SnilATKHIS IM OTHIK AAtAS -\
gVEN ASSUMING SUCH action previously, the critical factor that
should have made an exception of Cuba did not obtain elsewhere in
the Caribbean or South America. For in no other recent revolutionary
movement has there been such hysterical national unanimity and. at
that poised against the greatest power in the Western Hemisphere-
the Lnited States.
The proposed Jewish War Veterans resolution thus makes a sitting
duck of Cuba s Jewish community which, for the Castro devout, must
inevitably become identified with "Yankee imperialism." In deducing
this probability. I anticipate no further need here for the millionth
time to prove the prevalence of the anti-Semitic canard that one Jew
sneaks for all Jews in the mind of the non-Jew. or that one Jewish
body represents all.
Even if Communism is a subordinate issue, the resolution was a
poor adjunct to "Threat of Unrest in South and Central America and
the Caribbean" (No. 79). which demonstrates a more proiound under-
standing of the problems germaine to Latin America and a keener -
r less sensational disposition to intelligent counteraction than the
hastily-composed and purposeless condemnation.
Parallel situations abound, where discretion is not compromise
but a genuine consideration relating to the welfare of another Jewish
community. Perhaps the most cogent in recent days may be found
in South Africa, where Jews occupy respected status in industry, pol-
itics, and commerce. Apartheid, an even more violent equivalent
there of our own racial segregation, has been a smouldering issue for
years The recent attempted assassination of Prime Minister Voer-
werd. who vows to live or die on the principle of white supremacy, sub-
sequently catapulted South Africa Jewry into the tenderest of positions.
It is far from similar to the tenderness experienced by Jews who
live in our own Southland, where traditional values come into conflict
with a clear understanding of the absurdity of racial discriminant
in the hearts of men themselves discriminated against since antiquity,
and where an increasing number of Jews from the North bring a fre-
quently mythical but nevertheless propagandrsticalty effective Yankee
contempt for anti-Negroism.
-:- : .;.
MOM WIICMTT AMO WOwTNT MSMtfTfONS
pOR THE incontrovertible fact is that far more unity on segregation
exists among South African Jewry than among Jews of the United
Mates: To a larger extent, the Jewish community there is apartheid.
What. then, is the nature of the sensitivity? How has the Prime Min-
isters near-assassination aggravated it?
In a word. South Africa's racial conflict has stimulated the criti-
cal civil libertarian reaction of Jews elsewhere Recently, a number
of major Jewish organizations seriously discussed the possibility of
boycott and other forms of economic sanction as a means of voicing
their protest. Most of it. however, has been abandoned not out of
CentWwsw sst Patje 4-A


Friday. August 19. 1960
I
+Jmlsti rhrkfian
Page 5-A
Sn t/to JWail
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I want to commend Leo Mindlin
upon the series of articles that he,
has written editorially with regard' Afrlca satarl
to the current litigation again.-t
religious practices in the schools
of Dade county.
I quite agree with his conclusion
that what is involved here is thV
propriety of the action, rather than
:he determination of the principles
which are asserted.
Africa Safari His Topic
Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will
; m e e t Tuesday evening. Isidore
Hankin will be guest speaker and
show films and slides taken on his
Making plans to honor the memory of the late
Abe Aronovitz are (left to riqht) Herman Mah-
ler, Sam Weiss, Leon de Hersh, and membsr-
nhip co-chairmen Milton Hahn and A. David
Fay vis, of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith. The
ledge is currently preparing to initiate the Abe
Aronovitz Class, the largest single group of
new members in Sholem's history, "in recog-
nition of the many years of unselfish service
Mr. Aronovitz rendered to the community as
the champion of Mr. Average Man.' both be-
fore and after becoming Mayor of Miami."
I am also disturbed at whit
on* group soaks to proclaim in
the name of an entire commu j
nlty.
.
"Going it alone" is not proper in
this type of suit, and it is patently
unfair to the rest of the Jewish
community for one organization to
take the, responsibility for all or-
ganizations and the affected peo-
ple.
SIDNEY M. ARONOVITZ
Miami
Seienrr Shrink*
PILES
NEW WAY
W. Germany, ADL in Exchange Program
By Special Report
N EW YORK An exchange pro-:
gram between West Germany and
.,; American Jewish organization
- the first of its kind was initi-
;iii(i here this week as a ten-man
;> from B'nai B'rith and the
Defamation League left Idle
v, Airport for Bonn.
'I he group of human rights ex-
pi its and youth leaders will tour
r West German cities as guests
ol the Bonn government to study
human relations problems at the
- roots levels. They will par-
i pate in. seminars and meet with
eminent and civic officials and
ji uth and community leaders in
I'.i nn. Dusseldorf. Hamburg, Mu-
ii i h and other cities. German com-
ii unal and youth leaders will come
It the United States at a later date.
e visits will set the pattern for
urther exchanges.
Alexander F. Miller, of New
Rochello, N.Y., ADL national di-
rector of community services,
headed the American group. He
was joined by four regional di-
rectors of the League, Milton A.
Senn, of Los Angeles; Sol Kolack,
of Boston; A. Abbot Rosen, Chi-
cago; and Saul Sorrin, Spring-
field, III.
The B'nai B'rith youth leaders
in the group include Dr. Max Baer,
of Washington. DC. national di-
rector of B'nai B'rith Youth Serv-
ices; Harold Mondschein. of Los
Angeles. Southern California reg-
ional director of the youth services;
Sherwin M. Goldman. Fort Worth.
Tex., past international secretary
of AZA. B'nai B'rith teen-age or-
ganization; Rabbi Harry Kaplan,
director of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation, student service group
at Ohio State University; and Rab-
bi Maurice Pekarsky. director of
the Hillel Foundation at. the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
Before taking off. the group par-
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ticipated in a two-day seminar on
current German political, social
and human relations problems led
by West German Consul General
Dr. Federer and Benjamin R. Ep-
stein, national director of the Anti-
Defamation League.
The program was announced last
month', following prior consulta-
tions with American State Depart-
ment officials, by Label A. Katz.
president of B'nai B'rith, and Hen-
ry Edward Schultz, national chair-
man of the Anti Defamation
League. They pointed out that
"this is the first time an American
Jewish agency has embarked on
an exchange program with West
Germany.
"The program is to be unpre-
dented in scope, involving an
exchange of trained Jewish com-
! munity relations leaders and
I B'nai B'rith youth workers con-
cerned not only with education
itself but with all aspects of civic
affairs, citizenship, and demo-
i cratic attitudes," they added.
The exchange was first proposed
I by Benjamin R. Epstein, ADL na-,
.tional director, and Nathan C.
', Belth. ADL public relations direc-
tor. They visited Germany last Jan-
1 uary to study German attitudes to-
I wards democracy. One of their
recommendations called for the ex-
pansion of "a fruitful, informal
.cultural exchange of civic leaders
to reinforce democratic growth."
The West German foreign office
accepted the idea as- one means of
facilitating understanding and de-
veloping mutual attitudes in the
United States and Germany.
Epstein ascribed "unique advan-
tages" to this type of exchange
program between Germany and a
| non-government American organi-
zation. He said "the German youth
here will be able to see first-hand
the American system of voluntary
association.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I read Rabbi Rosenberg's letter
in The Jewish Floridian (Aug. 12,;
Page 5-A ed.).
I feel that instead of criticism
Leo Mindlin is to be congratulated
and praised for the stand he is tak-
ing in order not to jeopardize the
friendly feelings between the Jews,
and the Christian citizens of Dade
county.
The American Jewish Congress
should have refrained from asso-
ciating itself with Jewish agnostics
' and start a court action, since
there are other peaceful means it
could use to attain the desired re-
sults.
PHILLIP ADAMS
Miami Beach
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FR 1-1411


Page 6-A
-JeHtstirkridtetn
Friday, August 19,
AJCong. to Contest Legality of Religious Tests
By Special Report "it srems clear that under our.ert Jackson was eminently right
.Constitution disbelief in a Supreme when, in his opinion in the Zorach
b belief in God a valid require i Keiagi and tnp d(.niai OI any morai I n. Clauson case, he predicted that
ment for public office? accountability for conduct, not only 'the day this country ceases to be
Yes. the Maryland Court of Ap- renders a person incompetent to (free for irreligion it will cease to
peals has ruled in refusing* to *- hold public office, but to give testi- 'be free for religion" excPpT fof-the
mony. or to serve as a juror. isect that can win political power.
"The historical record makes it
clear that religious toleration, in
which this state has taken prick.
Ci n will not take an oath that he be-
lieves in God.
But in a statement asserting
that religious tests for public office
are an unconstitutional violation of *" nfv" .,.hou*h, ,0 ">>"**
religious freedom and separation
of church and state, the American
Jewish Congress announced this
the ungodly."
The role of the American Jewish
Congress in serving as counsel to
week that it would appeal the Torcaso in the Maryland courts and
Maryland decision to the United in deciding to take an appeal to
States Supreme Court.
The opinion, which was handed
down Juno 30, is a precedent
making one because the case
mark* the first time the issue of
belief in Cod as a qualification
for public office has ever come
up before a State or Federal
court. In its unanimous ruling,
the court upheld a lower court
decision that Roy R. Torcaso, a
4*-yer-old avowed atheist, coo Id
rot bo certified as a notary pub-
lic because he declined to sign a
statement in the oath of office
declaring "that I believe in the
existence of Cod."
one for those who believe in God
Wrote Maryland Court of Appeals and one for those who do not. The
Justice Henderson:_________________|Late Supreme Court Justice Rob-
Monticello Lists New Teachers
Mr. Pfeffer, who served as
counsel for Mr. Torcaso, added:
"The decision of the Maryland
Court of Appeals means that n
atheist can be elected President
of the United States but cannot
hold the position of notary pub-
lic in Maryland. The American
Jewish Congress believes the
U.S. Supreme Court will strike
down this indefensibleand un-
constitutionalanomaly."
The American Jewish Congress
the I'nited States Supreme Court
was described by Leo Pfeffer. as
sociate general counsel of the
American Jewish Congress and au
thor of "Church. State and Free
dom."" One of the country's lead- "PP**1 t0 ,he U.S. Supreme Court
ing authorities on religious free :,n Torcaso s behalf will argue that
-lorn and church state relations Article 37 of the Maryland State,
Mr. Pfeffer declared: Constitution the legal basis for
denying certification to Mr. Tor-
The same Bill of Rights that raso violates the U.S. Const it u<
protects Catholics. Jews and other (ion.
Article 37 reads:
religious minorities from discrim-
ination in the holding of public of-
fice by reason of their beliefs also
protects the non-theist and the non-
believer. Our Constitution does
not have two First Amendments.
". that no religious test ought i
ever to be required as a qualifi '
cation for any office of profit or'
trust in this State, other than a j
declaration in the existence of'
God..."
Pfeffer will advance two main ,
arguments challenging the require-
ment of a belief in God as a condi
tion of holding public office:
The appointment of Menachim Israel, where he taught in the pub- :. inlmrtarmnM ^,K '
Roth and MlH Sandra Levy to the He high schools ,n a number of ,. '' ^'"'fZnS I'
Hebrew school faculty of the Con- communities. guaranteed by
grrgation of- Monticello Park was
posit a belief in God) over other
religions (those which are non-
theist ic. such as Buddhism i. Also,
the requirement places the author
ity of the state in support of relig-
1 ion over non religion' Freedom of
! religion under the Constitution,
however, includes freedom not to
believe as well as freedom to be-
lieve.
The history of the Maryland
law requiring belief in God as a
test for public office, according
to Pfeffer, indicates that the
statute originally required) "... a
declaration of belief in the Chris-
tian religion ." In 1151, the
so-called "Jew*' law" wh passed
by the legislature, changing the
provision to include "....* de-
claration of belief in the Chris-
tian religion or the existence of
Cod." The addition of the last
five words in the law permitted
Jews to qualify for public office.
The lew in its present form was
enacted in 1147.
In the argument bi lore the Mary-
land Court of Appeals, Torcaso was
represented by Joseph Sickles, a
Maryland lawyer, as well as by Mr.
Pfeffer, acting for the American
Jewish Congress. A "friend-of-the
court" brief supporting Mr. Tor-
caso was submitted by the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union. Mary-
land was represented by the Dep-
uty Attorney General, Stedman
Prescott. jr.
Torcaso lives in Wheaton, Md., a
suburb of Washington, D.C.
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the First Amendment to the U.S.
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La n con-
Last year, he taught at the He- Const.tut.on. which prohibits enact
rtw Academy and in the High ment of iaws r.B.rri,ni, ,h.,
Seidel. education committee chair- School Department of the Bureau JS* ef^n-X*Hm2
mar of Jewl>h Education. \9ldm thereof If a state can i
Roth is a veteran teacher with
more than 20 yean experience in
Change in Posts Listed
Joseph M. Lipton, president of
Pade Savings and Loan Assn. of .
Miami, announced Wednesday the
election of Wilford G. Meyer as
ariatant vice president and tabu-
lating supervisor of the associa-
Miss Levy is a gradute of Stern
College in New York, where she
majored in elementary educa-
tion, and received a Bachelors
degree in religious education. A
native of Miami, she taught in
a number of schools during her
studies in Now York, and last
year was a member of the staff
of Temple Emanu-EI.
stitutionally bar from public effice
those who refuse to profess a be-
lief in God. it can require them to
define what they mean by "God" i
and can bar those whose definition
does not correspond with the be-
liefs of the public official pas'injj
upon the qualifications. To assure
, religious liberty for all. civil gov
em ment cannot be given the power
to pass on religious beliefs.
It violates the Constiutioral
HELP WANTED FEMALE
Nursery School Teachers
College Degree Required.
Morning Work in SW Area.
Contact Ethel Grossman
FR 1-2786
Greater Miami Jewish
Community Center
They will join Mrs. Jack Dia-
tion. Paul R. Gibson was named mond. Mrs. Samuel Mendelowitz; reqoiremenr of the separation' of i
assistant controller, and a change | and Mrs. Irving Seidel. together' church and state, since it places
in posts was announced for Frank with Abraham J. Gittelson. educa-' the authority of the state in sup-'
Kavulia from assistant secretary! tional director, as the Hebrew; port of some religions (those which
to assistant treasurer and chief school staff.
acountant. Meyer, Gibson and Ka-j Opening date for school will be
vulia have been associated with I Sept. 6 in the new 16 room building I
the thrift institution for the past. just being completed on the Tern-
several years. | pie grounds.
Experienced Hebrew Teacher
America* 4 Israel BeckaroeiNl,
Able te Ttech All Green. I.rtit,
B'hrrit Ivrit B'Anqlit, Ucl. Telmefl.
Available Sept. 1,
Write. Re*. K., tea 2973, Meimi 1
Information Urgently
WANTED
concerning whereabouts of
HARRY SIIVERMAN
OR NEXT OF KIN
Born in Russia 1876
Emigrated to U.S. 1904
Occupation Furrier
Last Known Address
Essex, 176th St., N.Y., NY.
Metned to Gold*, who returned to
Itteel. Son living Itteel wxnei find (ether or intormetion about hun
MAX SIIVERMAN
Rehoue Hess, 3
Tel Aviv, Israel
THE WEEK... US I SEE II
Continued from Page 4-A
compromise of principle, but following careful consideration of the
potential impact of such action on the safety, no less than on the
continuing status, of South African Jewry.
Se State of Israel, in its own condemnation of apartheid several
ago. tempered a series of critical pronouncements, designed
to show recognition and repudiation of the condition, with a minimal
threat of reprisal.
These considerations should have governed the Jewish War Vet-
erans when the anti Castro policy statement was framed in the fever-
ish wake of Cuba's Catholic Church a condemnation, incidentally
better left to the Catholic War Veterans if there be truth to the proud
claim of veterans' groups, generally, that they work in close and har-
monious cooperation. Armed as it was with far more weighty and
worthy resolutions in this regard, the JWV might well have let this
one go by the boards.
Whatever damage may have already been done, it will accrue
to the organization's diplomatic skills if this resolution is struck down
in Detroit next November.
5721
1960-61
New Year Greetings
ROSH HASHONA
SEPTEMBER 22-23
$
YOM KIPPUR
OCTOBER 1
Devoted to Serving
ALL Hialeah
ELECT Milt E.
THOMPSON
*-4
/
/

Hialeeh's
Independent
Candidate
YOUR FIRST COUNTY COMMISSIONER
__________ ^"'^ 1"! Pw Adv.
RUPTURE
PILES,
RECTAL DIS. \
EFFECTIVE NON-SURGICAL PAINLESS OFFICI TREATMENT i
APPROVEDSAFE-LOW COST-FREE EXAMINATION.
DR. LONG'S CLINIC, 1545 S.W. 1st ST. Ph. FR 3 2748 j
THE High Holy Day issue of THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN offers an appropriate, convenient
and inexpensive means of extending your
NEW YEAR Greetings to ALL your relatives and
friends without neglecting or offending anyone.
ORDER TO INSERT NEW YEAR GREETINGS
SEND COPY FOR YOUR GREETINGS NOW. USE CONVENIENT ORDER FORM.
THf JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. Box 2973
Miami 1, Florida
Attached is my check for $2.50.
Pleate ,n%er1 in Vur N* Y' iue the following greeting:
Mr. and Mrs.
and family
all their relatives and friends
A Happy Now Year
PLEASE PRINT NAME AND ADDRESS CLEARLY TO AVOID ERROR.


Lday. Augurf 19. 1960
+3ewistfk*k*an
Pa^7-A
Lining up for registration for the fall semester at Temple
nanu-El religious school are Gary Friedland, Reenah Sam-
berg and Mickey Feller. Religious school secretary Miss loan
Rosenthal takes down the vital statistics, while Rabbi Bernard
\. Mussman. director of education, looks on.
oung Pianist Wins New Award
Uanice Feld, 14-yesr-old Miami pt-
list, won the piano concerto audi-
Dns at Transylvania Music Camp
Brivard, N.C.
Ijanice, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
lax P. Feld, 5120 SW 87th ave.,
been winning piano awards
nee the age of eight. At Brevard,
she led a field of 40 competitors to
win an appearance with the Brevard
Music Center Orchestra under the
direction of Dr. James Christian
Pfohl.
Janice played a movement of the
C minor Concerto No. 2 by Serge
Rachmaninoff. She played the
flute in the Hilltopper Band.
EARN 10%
EXCELLENT FIRST
MORTGAGES
AVAILABLE
Monthly Payments
Completely Serviced
Title Insured
CAPITAL INVESTMENT CO.
2303 W. Flagler Street Miami
420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach
SUITE 602
MEMBER DADE COUNTY and MIAMI BEACH
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER
BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
PHONE
MUrray 5-2544
Dr. Silverstein
Hailed for Space
Age Contribution
WASHINGTON' (JTA) dr.
Abe Silverstein, National Aero-
nautics and Space Administration
director of space flight programs,
is being flooded with messages of
congratulations from all parts of
the country in connection with the
successful launching last week-
end of Echo I, the 100-foot-diame-
ter satellite as tall as a ten-story
building, which heralds a new com-
munications era.
Dr. Silverstein. a 52-year-old
American-bom scientist and expert
on aeronautics, has a key role in
implementation of the N.A.S.A.
time-table for space exploration.
This includes the scheduled initial
orbiting of an astronaut next year
and the landing of a man on the
moon within the next decade.
Dr. Silverstein was born in Indi-
ana and received his early scien-
tific training at the Rose Polytech-
nic Institute in Terre Haute, his
home city. He represented the VS.
at international meetings on aero-
nautical sciences and contributed
scientific papers on aerodynamics,
engine cooling and power plant in-
stallations.
CANTO* StYMOUK HINKES
New Cantor Due
At B'nai Sholom
Rev. Seymour Hinkes has been
appointed cantor of Temple B'nai
Sholom, Gerald Greenfield, presi-
dent announced Wednesday.
A Miamian for the past 25 years,
Cantor Hinkes graduated from Mi-
ami-Senior High School and the
University of Miami.
He received his Hebrew education
at Beth David Congregation, whose
religious schools he attended for
more than ten years, and where he
was Bar Mitzvah and confirmed.
His ambition to bcom a carv
j tor dvelopd when, at tKe *g* of
I 13, h* rendered the musical por
i tions of rh liturgy for th*> junior
j congregation at Bath David.
Cantor Hinkes is married. He and
his wife, Maxine, have two sons. He
has served as vice president of Ma-
sada and Tropical Lodge of B'nai
B'rith.
Cantor Hinkes will be introduced
to Temple B'nai Sholom during Fri-
day evening services this weekend,
with Rabbi Sheldon Edwards of-
ficatin^.
He succeeds Cantor Ben Gross-
berg.
Green Stamps
For School Bus
Students and women of Congre-
gation of Monticello Park. 1009 NE
163rd st., are engaged in a unique
project trading Green Stamps
for a new school bus.
With the cooperation of Sam
Slossberg, of Merchants Green
Stamps, arrangements have been
made for the redemption of 1,500
green stamp books to obtain th;
36-passenger bus needed for the
congregation's school.
TIRE CO
B i-Ooodrit h
SINCt 1924
pSmibage
OPEN 24 HOURS
and All-Day Sunday
5300 N.W. 27th Avenue
1* <**
UFE-SBUER
Siluertatun
SEALS
PUNCTURES PERMANENTLY
B^RaBBBBBBBBJ
RF.Goodrich
.. NAIL IN OB OUT. A patented sealant inside the I.U'K-
SAVER grips a nail as it punches through the tire will.
When the nail is removed, the sealant follows it into the
bole making an air-tight repair.
, NYLON CONSTRUCTION for the maximum In bruit*
blowout protection. The Premium Tire designed to run
? cooler, provide that extra measure of mileage and
give sure-tired traction for quicker, safer stops.
SPECIAL PURCHASE SALE!
PRINCETON
Premium Nylon Tubeless Tires
MAOf IT ONI Of THE WORLD'S LAR&iST TIRI MFRS.
llockwoN
ood Whirewall
BRAND NEW PREMIUM GRADE
Lew Prices For All Con
".: uasst imMui
750x14 ., 670x15........... 10.95
800x14.710x15............ 12.95
850x14.760x15............ 13.95
900x14.800x15............ 14.95
950x14.820x15 14.95
n:
tax
1.91
2.04
2.21
2.40
2.40
Flu In rMtatli tin n U) it*
12.95
14.95
15.95
17.95
17.95
BRAKES RELINED
ALL FOUR WHEELS
ir STAR LOCATIONS ONLY
WHILE YOU WAIT
GUARANTEED
15.000 Ml. OR
1 FULL YEAR
$Q95
8
MOST
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CAtS
EASY CREDIT
TOM NAMfl TMI TItMS
ir GETS YOU R0LLIH6
NORTON
V TIRE *
r CO. ,
MIAMI
-* 5300 N.W. I7fh Av.
4*00 N.W. lad Av*.
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1KB MA*
MIS IM
WIST MIAMI
urn s.w. in st.
SOUTH MIAMI
MM SMtfc Dot*
* MIAMI MACK
I0M AM* Baa*}
* NORTH MIAMI
IUM M.W. 7tb Av*.
HALLANDALE
M Warm Phi* Hoy.
FOOT LAUDEROAU
MJj w. Invar*] u*.
HOMESTEAD
IM S. Kraata A.*.
KIT WIST
St
RMM


Page 8-A
+Jewlsti fhrkUar
Friday, August 19,
Cantor Gisser
At Coral Way
Leonard Putterman, president
of (oral Way Jewial) Center, this
week announced the appointment
of Cantor Meyer Gisser to the stall
ol the Center.
Putterman said he will serve as
full time cantor and Hebrew teach-
er beginning Sept. 1.
The appointment of Cantor Gis-
ser followed the "tireless efforts
of the steering committee and Dr.
Joseph Redstone, chairman. Put-
terman revealed.
The dramatic tenor will join
Rabbi Samuel April at High Holy
Day services, again scheduled
for Dade County Auditorium this
season.
Born in Warsaw and the son of
a cantor, he and three brothers
: to survive priapnmenl at
Auschwitz and Btichenwald. Prior!
to the war years, Cantor Gisser
studied in the Yeshiva of Lodz.
Pi.lund. Mis voice training was a) C*iV****l lO n i
the Hochschule in Heidelburg, Ger- OCIIOOI V/pening
many.
" An earl) opening for Temple la
He ha- ran, in the choirs of.ra,.r> religious ichool was an
Sirota and Knsevitsky. lounced this week by David Plte-
Beth David Opens Registration Here
tion. students serve as rant
,Torah readers ,n the mam 8
Beth David religious school will All Hebrew teachers have "Musical program* n* ;
Ik open for registration to new stu- censes from the Bureau of Jewish under the direction ol
dents on Sunday Aug 28. 9 a.m. Educ;iIlon which certifies gradu- Ham W. Lipson.
' schS'
antor Wit
ito 12 noon, and Monday through i .
Thursdav. Aug. 26 through Sept. -"'on from a Hebrew Teachers Col- fcsjj IsJJt ,, education dire
. 1. 9 am to 5 p.m Max Silver, lege and several years of teaching \
{chairman of the board of educa- experience.
tion. -aid this week
Members of the staff are
Hersch Barman, Harry Brooks,
Louis Gadon, Mrs. Philip Kaplan,
Zvi Rosenkraru, and Mrs. An
9| Ross.
The Sunday Department of Beth
David is open lo students from kin-
dergarten age through and includ-
ing the second grade of public
sch'M>l. and meets once a week on
Sunday morning A special Hebrew
IF YOU ARE A
it mwii wiiihiiidl. ttil
?
t
you art incited lo aiimd .
r'iue
Mumc plays a major part in Jew-
"Him |'i,< n m inajvj |'.,,i in avw |^
preparatory class is offered Ai lsh education at Beth David. Sil I
Inn in the second Rrade. on a vol- v(,r revealed and students are|>
untary basis, which will meet for ta(Jgn( how ,0 sing praycrs and t0 ?
conduct their own junior congrega- f
one hour during the week.
The daily religious school will
acept children from third grade
of public school and above. These
classes meat twice during the
week and on Sunday morning
with a rich and intensive Jewish
education curriculum.
All teachers at Beth David re
ligious school are "qualified and
licensed by the Bureau of Jewish
Education," Silver said. A Sunday
school teacher license qualifies the
richer in the field of Jewish his-
In 1952. he came to Montreal ,lnl chairman of The" religious '"rv. c us t o m s and ceremonies.
chuol committee.
' ada with his brothers, who also
are cantors.
Cantor Gisser has attained a
reputation as an artist in oils. Some
of his paintings have been exhibit
ed in Montreal.
Classes from kindergarten to
lew ish music, the Bible, and a
reading ability and familiarity
with Hebrew Prayer Books and
ninth grade will get under way on H,.b language '
Saturday Sept 18, while a similar H,Dre* nn*""**-
u 1..1 ,.l. Sundav Denartm
Eban Appointed
Education Chief
JERUSALEM iJTA) The
Cabinet has named Abha S.
Eban as Minister of Education.
Mr Eban, who has been a Mm
i Without Portfolio since the
formation of the current cabinet.
had s, rved as Israel's Ambassador
to tb< i ited Nations and to Wash-
before his election to the
Kn< -.-et last November.
schedule, with the addition of a
complete high -chool department
will begin on Sundaj Sept. 11.
One of the largest Jewish re-
ligious schools in the South, Tem-
ple Israel offers a complete high
school curriculum. Administra-
tion of the school is under the
supervision of Cantor Jacob
Bornstein, a graduate of Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion.
partment staff in-
cludes Mi-s Jo-Ann Feld. Mrs
John D u n d b I a d. Mrs. David
I'arnes. Dan Schrager, Marvin
Schreibcr. Mrs. Bose Schreidell.
Mrs. Alex Steibel. Max Sussman.
and Bernard Welkind.
The Hebrew Department curnc
iilum follows the recommendation
of the United Synagogue of Amer-
ica and the Bureau of Jewish Ed-
ucation, and stresses understand-
ing and appreciation of Hebrew
praters, language, way of life, and
Added to the large staff of high Hebrew Bible.
1> trained religious school teach-,-------------------------------------------------------______
era this year are Mrs Linda Le-
The Cabinet deferred action on _*"! H*' WlUard ^ODW ZW.tnKll.
a proposal to postpone elections ^"""^;- Alfred Boas. B.chard .. y|f Afc ----------
. I hie! Rabbinate pending a S,"l,r aml Isi"lore D'<*">an. AT I ITeretfl ISTOel
ruling of the
pei
Supreme
mg a
Court
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Greater Miami's largest & Oldest
Supplier for Synogoques,
Hebrew t Sunday Schools.
Wholesale I *Hail
ISRAELI GinS AND NOVCLTIfS
417 Washington Ave. JE 1 -9017
Adult courses Wii| aiso begin on Isador Schlissel. president of Ti-
Saturday and Sunday. Sept. 10 and fereth Israel Northside Center,
11. with Rabbis Joseph H Narot this week announced the appoint-
tnd Morns u (Jraff and Prof Sid- ment of Rabbi Nathan H. ZwitmanJ
Bey Besvinick conducting the as the Center's new spiritual lead-
I las-es ,.r
------------------------- Rabbi Zwitman assumes the pul-
Sholem lodge Annual Picnic pit followin hl* 'enure at Hiaieah
Reform Jewish Congregation. He
sinih m Lodge of B'nai B'nth succeeds Rabbi Harry L. Law
will hold its annual picnic on Sun- ranee, who recently moved to Tern-'
day. 10 a.m., at Coconut drove I'1*' H1-'" Anm in West Hollywood.
Park.
Lakeside
MEMORIAL
PARK
"The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minutes 'torn the Beach Via
The New 36'h St. Causeway
JE 1-5369
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools a Private Use
ISRAELI a DOMESTIC O.FT5
Fla.
Rabbi Zwitman studied at New-
ark University, and also spent four
years as a student in Jerusalem.
He has taught at the Free Syna-'
gogue religioni school, and occu-
pied his first pulpit in Lakeland,
Fla.
Prior to his duties in Hiaieah,
he was spiritual leader of Dade
Heights Jewish Center.
Shaloma Hadassah Party
Shaloma group of Hadassah will 11
hold a noon card party Aug. 24 at
the Sea Gull hotel. Chairman is
Mrs. Mary Friedman.
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
Ail NfMfW MH.ltS f0
SYNAGOGUES A HVtlSH HOMIS
Wa Carry Bar Mitiveh Records |
1357 WASHINGTON AVI.
JE 1-7722
GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS
Tour
MEMORIAL CONSULTANTS
Srrrmg (he fewnh
Community Exclusively"
STUDIO end OFFICE
3249 S.W. th Street HI 4-2157
AFFILIATE OF THURMOND MONUMENT CO.
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
____ PRESIDENT ^^
IKE GORDON ^"
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
To Live in Hmrti We Leave
Behind Is to Live Forever'
PALMER'S
MEMORIALS
"Miami's Only
Jewish
Monument
Bui'leW
.a
Scheduled Unveilings
SUNDAY, AUGUST 21, 1960
Mf. Nebe Cemetery
SUSAN D. EVANS, 11 a.m.
Ruhbi T WILLIAM SCNNEI0MAN, 11 a.m.
Kui>rSi lau^in Kiisriihrra
JACOB BARON, 11 a.m.
Rabn Bcnno Walladi
SAMUEL K. BER6EN, 11:30 a.m.
Rabbi Ya.il;iM Rosenberg
Ml. Simmi Memorial Park
ANNIE STEIN, 10 a.m.
K..bb. T&at II Stem
MORRIS HOROWITZ, 1 a.m.
Kabbi 7aal^iM Rosenberg
"May Their Souls Repose
in Eternal Pru. r
ARRANGEMENTS BT
PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
TEMPLE
BETH SHOLOM
"The Liberal Com
on ihf Bcvuh
Affiliate* with the Unien of Ami,
Hebrew Congrtgn onl
4144 Chase Avanue
WIAMI BEACH. flCR:DA
Friday Evenings, 1:15 P.M
Saturday Me.mr.gt. 10 tS AM
SABBATH EVE SERVICES
Evary Friday Night
8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19th St.
A Reform Synagogue
OK JOSEPH R NAROT.
Rabbi
LATE SERVICES
Resume at
Temple NerTemid
Friday Evening
August 19, 8:15 P.M.
Located at
80th & Carlyle Ave.
Miami Beach
EUGENE LABOVITZ
BAaai
SAMUEL GOMBERG
TOA
The ('ommnnitv li
I liu.'lv In-
s
\
Here, memory
is forever
enshrined in beauty
MaimI Nebo, MiaatT* oUeal and
din-i Irtish retnetrt) can br jour
enl) lionr Jii-i ^- n ha
tread) beea f"r avet t.iiOO other
hsghl) eateemea lewieh famibet.
A rerpetnal I'arr Funsl exi .Img
k Iihi ihhi i- \our ,i--in.iii. uf
il- iit-M-r lunging tw-july And
llirrr drr no i,i\,-.. iasfaimcnll
or ntauitessanre reels, Yoi|i muul
> o-t need br youi onl) osw.
Details ill l- -l.i,IK fiimish.'d, in
)our limn.-, b) nuil CM I'honr.
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERr
/
76m Jim fmttink
S'jOS Northw-at 3rd St.
tUM MOhaark 1-74*3
........." *OP DETAILS WRITE TO. ..........'
Mouol Nebo Cemetery 5J0J N.W. 3ra Street, Miom., florKio
Nmh BBtst me, ,ihoul obhgano*. lull details on f'mmily Burial
t.Uatff in Mount \rbo.
Nansa ........ ....
\,i,ii
I UN
Zor
Slate


key, August Id. I960
*-JeistncrkMtr
Page 9-A
Your CJA Leaders: 1960-61
MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY
JUDGE IRVING CYPEN: No. 3 a Series
Judge Irving Cypen. who
[js named a campaign vice
chairman of the 1961 Com
t.ned Jewish Appeal by chair-
i an Joii'ph M. Lipton, can
look 03ck upon 13 lucky
>f service in Feder-
Parting in 1947.
The magna cum laude
I p-a-luate of the University of
F ( 11 has been a comniun-
j;y-minded young man since
val in Miami in 1946.
irted as a CJA cam-
in the Metropolitan
i and worked each
;. ar In 1959, he was Miami
(nairman of the Attor-
| : >'- Division.
The quiet-spoken CJA lead-
ft mention it often,
. used to tough cam-
He recalls a few skir-
. luring World War II,
served as a gunnery
alongside former Gov.
Warren.
{e Cypen was appointed
the bench by Gov. LeRoy
JUDGE IRVING OWN
... a ftw skirmishes
Collins, and was returned to
office without opposition for
a six-year term in March.
1960. continuing a distin-
guished legal career
For 12 years, he has been
a member of Federation's
executive committee, budget
committee, board of govern-
ors, and now holds the office
of secretary.
He is currently serving as
president of the Jewish Home
for the Aged, and has been a
director and chairman of the
budget and finance commit-
tee of that agency
He was a director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, president of
Temple Emanu-El Mens Club,
and treasurer of Pi Lambda
Phi Alumni Assn. Judge Cy-
pen was first president of
Tropical Lodge. B'nai B'rith.
and secretary of the Florida
State Federation of B'nai
Brith Lodges. He belongs to
Miami Beach Civic League.
Elks, and the Miami Beach
and Dade County Bar Assns.
Judge Cypen's wife. Hazel.
is active in the CJA Women's
Division. Their children are
Stephen Hale. 16; Bonnie
Gaye, 13; Wayne Alan, 9;
Tad Richard, 7; and Myles
Gary. 5.
Beduins Itch to Sell Scrolls

LONDON(JTA)Some E250,
, 000 ($700,000) is urgently needed
to enable the Jordan government
\ to purchase five Dead Sea scrolls
.jfronj^edjjin tribesmen, according;
to the London Sunday Times. Un-1
! less the money is found soon, ar-
j chaeologists fear they be sold to;
' private collectors or torn up to be!
sold as fragments to tourists.
Archaeologists are anxious that
the Jordan government should pur
.' cha*e the scrolls but the Depart-
ment of Antiquities in Jordan is
already on the verge of bankruptcy
over the recent decision to retail
all the scrolls still in the country
a/id compensate their original buy-
ers.
John Allegro, lecturer In the?
Semitic languages at Manchester
University, who led a scroll-seeking
expedition this spring, said here
that "the Beduins are getting rest-
less and want to sell: they know the
price of these scrolls by now."
[hied Values Mark Jewish Writing-Grayzei
)LAKB
y>oo ACRES
fotot
IN THE
' WHITE MOUNTAINS
PIKE NEW HAMPSHIRE
: IMUU Golf Cmw Furring Ctmnm
Tenoi Boauag Swiaaiof VCmttr Sluiaf
IARLES S. LAVIM
IN0UNCES NEW
tGANIZATION PUNS
IARLES S. LAVIN, wboM
as have been editorialized in
Brier's Digest, announces dm
dition of the famous Pain
ach Hotel at Palm Beach,
brick. This is a truly luxurious
i for retirement; the average
being $86.50 per month p**
hon, double occupancy which
sliules three meals a day.
kple rooms are also available.
letial dietary kitchen and din-
room available at $1.00 par
iv extra charge. >
penab'ons are now being ao
bted for our new Garden
Inc. Rentals start at $86.50 per
Inth per person, which in-
I s a lovely private room
[h running water, and three
"prepared meals a day. Also
ise guests' may enjoy die same
rial activities as those-in the
lin building.
gardless of your sge, you can
; join The Charles S. Lavin
kirement Organization, the
es being one dollar ($1.00)
' year. This entitles you to a
bnthly bulletin and should a
tmber come to one of our
Ms as a permanent guest, ho
she will receive a discount of
3.00 the end of the first year.
>r specific Information
yarding tho numerous
win Retirement Hotels
voughout tho country,
pease writ* Chariot I.
javin at noted below.
[hero is no obligation.
By Special Report
STARLIGHT. Pa. Must Jewish
literature deal only with Jewish
themes to be so considered?
Not in the view of one of the na-
tion's leading Jewish historians
;and authors Dr. Solomon Gray-
zel, of Philadelphia, editor of the
Jewish Publication Society of
America.
"The sole criterion of Jewish lit-
lerature and its basic character-
istic is its purposefulness." Dr.
Grayzel told teen-age regional of-
ficers of the B'nai Brith Youth Or-
ganization attending an annual
leadership training institute here.
"The genuinely Jewish literary
product has for its objective the
molding of character, the develop-
ment of personality, to warn, to
urge, to advise." Said Dr. Grayzel:
"Jewish literature is essentially
ethical in nature."
This same concern for ethics" also
characterizes the Jewish reader.
Dr. Grayzel declared.
The ethical approach to Jewish
literature. Dr. Grayiel asserted,
began with the Bible and the Tal-
mud. "And, to this day, you can
almost identify the Jewishness of
an author by the extent to which
he seeks to criticize and to
guide, to mold and to fashion a
better society by the depth, in
other words, of his ethical val-
ues."
This same yardstick can be used
to measure a reader's Jewishness,
in Dr. Grayzel's opinion.
"Since we are part of our envir-
onment, we read for every conceiv-
able reason which the environment
encourages. But to the extent to
which we are not content with only
the entertaining, or only the de-
scriptive, we display the reading
hungers of a Jew. The Jewish read-
er looks for ethical approach."
Some 100 top teen-age leaders of
the B'nai B'rith Y'outh Organiza-
tion met -here to learn how to cap-
italize on their talents and become
leaders in the North American Jew-
ish adult community too.
The carefully selected partici-
pant all regional officers of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization's
two teen-age constituent divisions.
Aleph Zadik Aleph for boys, end
B'nai B'rith Girls for'girls par-
ticipated in an intensive 19-day
Leadership Training Conference.
Home of the Famous
WHITE MOUNTAINS*
FESTIVAL of the 7 ARTS
JDflU MOSTS ? THE family AftfiW
TO MIAMIANS .
WHO ARE EXPERTS IN THE ART OF RELAXATION .
Berlin Kids Will
tharlos S. Lavin
kin Palm Beach Hotel
35 Sunrise Avenue
aim Beach. Florida
CAR MR. LAVINi
'doted Is my $1.00 membership
- Please send membership sard
,nd monthly bulletins.
..Learn Of Nazis
ante
Continued from Page 1-A
, many then in Europe.
In higher grades, teachers will
i ?o into today's laws in West Ger-
, many calling for restitution, in-
demnification and compensation to
[Jewish victims of Nazi persecu-
tions. '
The children will be taught to
realize," said an Education Min-
istry official, "that there is a new
order now which condemns the past
atrocities and injustices, puts an
end to the Nazi cruelties, and
strives for the equal treatment of
all men."
GALEN HALL IS PRIVILEGED TO BE THE HOST TO SO MANY
GLOBE TROTTING folks from the South. Whether you plan
an extended vacation or as part of a trip abroad, you'll
always remember your GALEN stay as a new adventure in
luxurious relaxation. Inquire for details of complimentary
limousine transfer service direct from Philadelphia airport
DISTINGUISHED FACILITIES
Superb air-condifioned accommodations, spacious suites,
private cottages.
Golf 18-hole championship course, John Yocum, Pro.
Headline Entertainmentthroughout Season.
Dancing nightly under the stars; American and
Latin orchestras.
Aquatic shows and moonlight barbecues at
Forest Glades Pool.
Summer stock theatre parties; Penny Davis Dance Troupe.
CONVENTIONS Completely equipped rooms have been
designed for large and small groups.
SPECIAL CONVENTION RATES on request.
Galen Hall
COMING STARS
at Galan Showt
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* Jackie Milai
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HOTEL ANO
COUNTRY CLUB
YERNERSVIUI. PENNA.
Daniel Burack, Owner-Director
See Your Travel Agent
Galen is Only 17 Miles from Reading Airport Write for Color Brochures & Information


Pagn 10-A
*-Jenincr*tt*n
Browsing With Books: By HI1ARY MINDUN
A Simple Thread Woven With Intricate Craftsmanshk
THE INSPECTOR. By Jan d* Hartofl. 312 pp. N.w
York: AMts-neum Publishers. $4.00.
IJOW AGAIN FROM Holland has come another exquis
" itely quiet, tender book to anguish the heart Much
in the manner of "The Diary of Anne Frank." it is a book
in whose quietude move the most poignant passions, whose
tenderness carries within it for the reader the seeds of a
most pure and perfect hatred.
The story begins in the liberated Holland of 1946.
when a middle-aged Dutch Criminal Investigation Inspector
finds himself impelled to help a young Jewish girl get to
Palestine. For the Inspector, it becomes a matter of per
sonal morality, a way of restoring his war-shredded integ-
rity, even of recovering his soul if one may put it so
tritely Not that Jan de Hartog has put it so. nor will you
tind the Inspector standing in whole sou led splendor on
the last pages of the book: Mr. de Hartog is too fine a
writer to end up in those waters But there is much con-
GOD ON THE BEACH
'SpilMtiMCI f am !<-ili>Ui of their (JoJ .
Edi'h njii hej Qod But ourt M far to high .
1 i'ii \er tkost tun' We are m hi* garden the ita*
are hn flowm But the Jew*' Their God U not
tBOn| tht tUm i:e U M tht beadl waiting fot them
The\ are i.mMimrJ u'lth lo*fftl| IM U'lth lenr.'inrti
- in I IMtfl 'TOR.
cern with motives in this book, and there is an unrelenting
irony which seeps into every cranny of this story, wetting
down the idealism at every possible poinl Where there
is irony, there can never be an absolute. The Inspector is
sacrificing much for his mission; he must give up his wife
and family,* his job. and his pension. But in a very' real
Capitol Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Some Religious Insights into the Coming Election
Washington
RESPITE THE recent emei
" "neo-Nazi" youth groups and a -was
uka fad m various American cities, teen
gen are apparently less prejudiced than
adults about the religious aflUistioni oi
political candidates.
This is indicated by a comparison of
results between a poll of students con-
ducted by the Institute of Student Opinion and a Gallup
poll of adults.
Some 12.8 percent of all students said they would op
'
Overseas Newsletter: By ELIAHU SALPETER
The Cat and His Tail
f-VER SINCE the Second World
War. wages in Palestine, and
since 1948 in Israel, have been
linked to the cost of living index.
This system provides at least par-
tial protection for the wage earners
against the constant increase in
prices which seemed to be unavoid-
able in times of war. crisis, or even
of economic expansion However, the big disadvan-
tage of the swtem is that it is somewhat similar to
the cat running around in circles trying to catch his
own tail since the price of commodities is calculated
on a basis of production costs, an increase of cost-
ol living allowances increases wages, which increases
production costs and before the worker or official
realizes it. the addition to his salary has already qcen
eaten up by the higher prices on the market.
In an economy where the trade unions have as
strong a position as the Histadrnt in Israel, it is
quite impossible to break this ring by putting an
end to the cost-of-living allowance system. However.
as the overall economic situation of the country be-
gan to improve, on one hand, and the Histadrnt lead-
ers began to realize somewhat more clearly their
responsibility for the overall national welfare, on
the other, a method of slowing down of the chain
reaction was devised.
Instead of paying increased allowances every
month, it was decided to adjust wjtc- only once in >
three months I^ter. it was decided that the revis-
ion should be made only once in six months and only
if during that six month period the consumer price
index had gone up more than two points or by more
than three points since the last time an increase in
the allowance was made.
This system provided a built-in delaying action
towards the increase of the cost of production.
While it may not be exactly to the heel advantage
of the wage earner*, aetuaUs the lyatom probably
contributed greatly to the (act that the Index rose
only a wry few points since its new basis w
m January, 1H5
The Ministers of Finance and Commerce argue
that the relative economic stability trhJen thia fact
represent! is certainly more important for the wage
earners than any small increase or decrease in their
incomes But. while the allowance- have practically
not increased for a year and a half, wages of pro
fesaionai* and of many skilled workers have been
icod bj various special agreement-. provkUnf
basic salary Increases. Thus some met aim af Ail
ferentiation haa been reeatabliabed between the in-
come of the unskilled laborer and the university pro-
i whOM vagi era] years ago. were almost
equal since the cost of living allowance was at that
time the dominant part of everybody's salary, and
the allowance was the same for everybody.
While the renewed differentiation between the
wages and salaries is considered an important factor
for the country's economic development, it is seen
with much less than enthusiasm by the unskilled
workers and others in low-income brackets whose
wages have not changed.
pose the election of a Catholic for President: 16*7 percent
would opixise a Jew: and 38.5 percent would oppose the
election of a man who was "not a member of any estab-
lished religious tailh." Three percent of the students
would oppose the election of a Protestant
A 1758, Gallup poll showed 25 percent of adults opposed
to the election of a Catholic. 28 percent to a Jew. 75 per-
cent to an "atheist," and 3 percent to a Protestant. Gallup
subsequently announced a drop in opposition to a Catholic
candidate to 20 percent. According to current research,
it appears to have been further reduced.
Boys generally proved more prejudiced on religious
grounds than girls. The oMeY the boy. the higher the
prejudice. The younger the girl, the lower the prejudice.
Among high school senior boys. 1.3 percent opposed the
election of a Protestant; 14.9 percent the election of a
Catholic: 19.1 percent the election of a Jew; and 37.8 per-
cent the election of a "non-affiliated" candidate.
Junior high school girls indicated that 1.9 percent of
their number opposed a Protestant: 9.5 percent a Catholic;
13 percent opposed a Jew; and 32.5 percent a "non-affili-
ated" candidate.
Of the 10.763 students polled by the Institute. 5.3 per-
cent favored a Jewish President: 78 percent said it made
"no difference;" 16.7 percent expressed open opposition.
Twenty eight percent of the 3.144 adults polled by
Gallup said "no" to a Jewish President. Ten percent
said they "dont know."
The most extreme right-wing youth elements at the
Chicago Republican convention zealously supported a con-
servative. Sen. Barry M Coldwater. of Arizona. He be-
came the idol of youthful reactionaries desipte the fact that
his father was a Jew. Sen. Goldwater holds membership in
the Episcopal Church.
Sen. Goldwater's enormous popularity arose from an
image of him as an articulate individual, the standard bear-
er of conservatism His partially Jewish origin was ignored.
It is also instructive that Sen. Jacob K. Javits. a New
York liberal Republican, received serious consideration
for the Vice Presidential nomination. Politicians figured
it would carry' New York State. Pennsylvania mentioned
Sen. Javits at the convention. The nomination, of course,
went to Henry Cabot lx>dge.
But it was nevertheless interesting that a Jew. even
temporarily, was considered as a possibility. Especially,
a personage like Sen. Javits, who openly identifies with
Jewish causes
In Democratic circles, a highly placed and emerging
figure is Gov. Abraham Ribicoff. of Connecticut. He has
a leading role in the Kennedy campaign. He has been
mentioned as a possibility for a Cabinet post or a future
Vic* Presidency
The candidacy of Sen. Kennedy, a Catholic, for the
White House may be helping to break down stereotyped
thinking about the chances of religious minority members
in politics.
Between You and Me:
BORIS SMOLAR
way. he is also escaping much that dissatisfies hini
h.s life His very journey is an attempt at a retam1'
As" for the girl, she is thin and dying, she
vivor of a Nazi medical-experiment camp an/LI
homeless and utterly alone. The image of Palest, J
tains her; yet even this simple obsession is mixed"*
her mind with the memory of the tank the saw
moment of her liberation with a Star of David on it
the only Israeli tank in the Allied Army. The decisL*
becomes faced with, whether to use her death t0
or to forgive her murderers, is given a diminished my,
the reader cannot be sure whether it has been made i
conviction or out of illness. '
Whichever way one turns on this pivotal point
sorrow-struck. If her decision is made through com
tion. there is the terrible irony of the use which isT
of it by others, a use which is itself equivocal: if her th *
was the thought of sickness, it is the Inspector hn
been betrayed. And there is God. who dip, and
through the lives of these people, so that it is never i
where He is involved, and where He is not.
Much of the single exodus takes place on boat
wonderfully strange and dreamy sequence on a barge t
the canals between Holland and France, and a gait
filthy trawler plowing from Tangier to the PA
beaches Mr de Hartog. who divides his life between)
sea and writing, lives on the Dutch ship "Rival."'cm
ly anchored off Fort Myers. Born in Haarlem, lloll.
he is the son of a Dutch theologian, and the author of I
previous novel*, and three plays, including the Broads
hit. "The Fourposter."
' The Inspector" is a beautiful and moving novel!
simple thread woven with intricate craftsman.hip il
a book which will continue to haunt you. and a story
will never cease to hurt you.
Panorama:___________By DAVID SCHWARTI
A Protestant Rabbi
CHORTLY AFTER hi, arrival 111
^ this country, the great Yidditk]
Viaggid. Masliansky. made a to
Visited Rabbi Isaac M Wise.
doyen" of Reform Judaism
"I suppose you do not like
ype of Judaism." said Rabbi Wis
"Oh. it's all right. I tup)
said Masliansky, "but I think in some of your Ten
pies you have gone too far."
"Mr. Masliansky. will you get up and walk tol
the wall?" said Rabbi Wise.
Masliansky was puzzled, but he did as directed!
He walked, then stopped.
"Why don't you walk further?" asked Rabbil
Wise
"I can't." replied Masliansky. "There i> the|
wall in front of me.'
"That's the way it will be with us. Some of tbel
Temples are going too far. but the wall of life wil|
stop them, and they will have to go back."

One day it was announced in the papers that il
meeting of city clergymen would be held Rabhj
Wise decided to attend.
At the meeting a resolution was proposed whichl
Rabbi Wise did not like. He arose to speak on tst|
resolution.
The chairman called the Rabbi to order "Thill
meeting was called for Protestant clergymen" the]
chairman said.
"Well." said Rabbi Wise, "I am a cler.yman.l
and I protest against this, so I am a ProtefUoaj
clergyman."
.... aaeHnaavm mm
Diplomatic Washington Has Eye on Shah of Ik
THE FIGHT which the Kgyptian dicta-
tor Nasser started against the Shah
of Iran for his maintaining de facto
recognition of Israel is being closely
watched in Washington. The general
opinion is that Nasser went out on an
awkward limb in his personal quarrel
with the Shah Da facto recognition had I
bean accordexrby Iran to Israel long ago1
and Nasser never challenged it tonal made him go into
a frenzy now over a situation which has been in cxi~:
for ten years
And why did he not consult other Arab countries be-
fore his sudden outbursts against the Shah and his breaking
off of diplomatic relations with Iran0 Why did he not go
into a frenzy over the recognition of Israel by Turkey
which, like Iran, is also a Moslem country? Is he not ex-
posing himself to being isolated from other Arab countries
in his stand against Iran? Is it not a fact that some of the
Arab League countries which he is trying to dominate, are
now questioning the wisdom of his action against the
Shah?
Did he not realize thai Iran is an indepe:.
which will not tolerate his interference in her afl
Would he tolerate the interference of any (
in the attain Of the United Arab Republic ol winch 1*1
>'IV".....nt? Theaa anil similar questions arc lieing "
in Washington where there is great regard for the Si
of Iran and admiration for his courage. There "^|
tion that the Tinted State- i- not indifferent to an) ,ftl
which Naaaer may contemplate with a view te iinn>rffl"f
the position of the Shah. '
In this country, the Shah of Iran is considered a lifcH
minded person who strives to achieve the best for the P
pie of his country. Unlike Nasser, the Shah is not
to making reckless and demagogic statements. H"
ment that he will continue the existing de facto rec
of Israelwhich so strongly infuriated Nasser-w
corned as a step toward cementing stability in the
East Nasser's artificial fury againat the Shah
statement is interpreted in Washington as indiratii,
be. like the Soviet Union, wants no such stability '"
area.


today, August 19. 1960
+Jmi$*ncr*&f7
Page 11-A
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
voti': |S h-:ki:hy oiven that
signed, desiring to i n.
i,,..- un it the fVtltloui i
K i n.DlNG COMPANY ., i., I.
,.. |-;..11 I I to re. later said
nllh l"" Clerk of lh Clrcull
11., ..- 4 .osi v
MILTONH FRKRERG
SIDNEY RASKIN
I VK I:I s 11
lUI, ,i |i si RUMP*
i i HI Hants
[.. BMgl
T.-i:.i-j
|,N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
lllTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
I FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOW OA.
IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 6890
,- fVI /. hi VI' 'A,
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
|,i JI'NI 7. iBaWfIC \
, i .1 \'..
M i hi can
IV.il \Ki: HEREBY n.' fled tht a
Hi; :. I lOI Yim ll : llil
. has been filed agatn-t you
-luired lo art v
DAyCHQ
BY HENRY LEONARD
DIM
II .
\n-Mt- of bthei pleading "ii
. t !'>. HILTON A
MIKI'MAN, llll Mn-I" Building.
I i'...rlda. and flit- the ..iiginal
fith th. Clerk of the Court on
I '>. of August. 1 I
Wni.ni D> default will I'- taken
Kin.
fpATI I' this 2l*t day c.f July, IMO,
\l i ia le fount) Florida
' k r IEATHERMAN
il. i V. nf the Clrrnlt <-..urt
. i ount] Florida
B) : K M. I.TMAN
Deputy < "lei a
IlLT-'N V FRIEDM AN
1,1,.. i. fu I'la In tiff
|1! \ i:-!.- I! Hiding
I I ~FR 1-W64
tin, l-U-ll
"And don'l forget, Mac,... for your lunch today
in the garment district, it's a kosher corned beef
sandwich on rye!"
LEGAL. NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
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NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN ih..i
| the unde- i *ir~mr to engage In
' l>u -mew unler th.- fi< 'illou* name of
CHEZ BOM BON BEAITT SALON
at MM Biscay ne Boulevard. Miami.
rl'Tida intend* to register said name
1he clerk .- IBM Clrcull
I I hide County. Florida
VAII>A OUARANTO
NOTICE UNDER
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N-iTI-'E IS HEREBT GIVEN
gned. dei -ngagc in
business unilT h- name of
Rl'AERO INTERNATIONAL at M7I
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PRECIS!' IN PRODUCTS CORP
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NOTICE UNDER
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NOTR'K IS HEREBY GIVEN
I be indi rwcajee in
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DIXIE : \NY
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at Miami
In THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
fllTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANO
1 FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOR.OA.
IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 6972
EZ IiiNI .-
I'lain!
VI
( .-i i\i:.\
I --ml.int.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
I Y"i i I.YSXES JUNKS, addi ess un-
hereby notified that a
Divorce has been fild
you. ami yuu arc required '"
ipj ,.f your Answer Ul the
t.inplaint on the Plaintiff a Attorney.
[akki Hot'SRN. IBB Btecayne Kulid-
Ml.nt! Florida, and to file the
I, the office Of 0m Clerk of
f.'O .rt on or before tha -''<
nf August. 19*0; In default "'
li.i h lie Complaint will Is- taken aa
Lnfi : .,4 ins) tou
[DATED July 22. 1>".
i.i: vriiKUMAN
C|. ik .f the Circuit Court
I-hIi By: C P C.U'KI.ANK.
Iieput> clerk
f/S. t/S-lt-lf
Iin the circuit court of the
fllTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY. No. SOC 6*43
|ARY KNNR C. WKKCHJa.
i miff,
r. MIKKiil.A,
iaiit
NOTICE BV RUBLICATION
JAI.MF.R T. MIKKOI.A. C-rn
.....r.it on, t'erro de Banco.
i .il- re.(uired to file your anawei
mplalnl for oTeoroc with the
ii, ,i the above Cowl asai "e^ve a
n 'h. i apoS |llc.rne\, !'-11 ConaTew Bulldlna
|laml, Florida, on or before Aumi.t
or elae oniplalnt will be
nfeaaeS. Iated thia- Hat
of .1 lit
II r:\TIIKHM\N
l.-rk of the Circuit Court
C I. AI.KXANI'F.R.
Deputy Clerk
7 U, I -ll-l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N'iTIck is HEREBT GIVEN (hat
the onderaiaved, dealrlns to easase In
lrti*in > unil^r th^ flctltloUa name of
CaU'MKW'AY INN at |.-,:.u North East
L'ird Street, North Miami. Florida ln-
tenda I name with the
Clerk of the Clrcull Court of Dade
i 'ount\ Klo
J J .1 (NC
B) PeVr) F .I.i in wi. Prea.
cl.YDF. i: FOSTER, .IK.
Attorney for J .1 J In.
IBS N.K I2".th St., N Ml unl. FTa.
t ,.' :". I I
i THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
No. 49082-C
RE EataU of
i:MANIT.I. iKH.IiSTKIN. all
known ? MANNY Il M.l'l N.
i -- !
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
. VII Cred'ton and All PrWa Hav-
x eniands Afalnal Bald
M He
> r hereby notified nnd requlf-
prem nl an) nlalmi and demand*
huh you mm have aitaln-t the e*
D- of kmani il. OOITDSTEIN. alao
"n ax MANNY c.ol.HKN de.eaaed
> of Imde County. Florida, to thr
unity Judxe, ,f l>ade County, anil
|l>- the aame In their offices In the
unity Courthouae In Dade County,
nrlda, within eiht calendar months
m th date of the first publication
I- .f, ,ir ih name will be barred.
ANNA Cdl.DSTEIN
Executrix
HVINij NATHANSDN
Morney
:' M< rldian Avenue
"'in Beach, Florida
7/2i. H/5-11-19
NOTICE
NuTICi: IS HEREBY ffTVEN that
fJBRALD JOSEPH I.A DERM AN. who
mmi I.-I in the Criminal Court ol
Record in and for Dade County. Flor-
ida at the June term thereof. A.D..
IMO, of th.- off.-nse of Grand Larceny,
for which a entence of II aaonthi lm-
priaonnieiit in the state Peifttentlarj
via, Impoaed "ill BDpl) 'or clemency
to the feat* Board of Pardona, Talia-
haaaee. Florida, at Its next reeular
meeting, throuah and by hi* unoar-
-luneil allot ne> of record
aiNO P nk.',i!i:tti
'12-1-M. -:--l-23-J. 1" T-U
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN ANO FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 6371
i.i:\vis EDWIN nixiKiiri/rz.
Plaintiff,
ItTDITH ANN BOOKHUIVPE,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
T<>: JCDITH ANN H< M iKHCI.TZ
tC.fl BETTZ, Route J.
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
IN THE NAME ANDBYTHE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATH
OF FLORIDA
TO AH. T'i WHi.M THESE PRE-
SENTS SHALL COME. GREETINGS
Wherea.-. CKI.IA D COMMONS.
Miami. PLORllA; KSTHt-.it Ai-i.i -
NKK. MIAMI. FI-.illll'A liKi'i M
GREENBUATT. MIAMI. FLORIDA
did on th. Bad day o: July. A..- U-V.
i In- Incorporated under the
provtaiona of Chapter *o>. Florida
Statutes. TAPBCRAFT CORPORA-
TION, corporation with Its prln-
ci-.-.i place of bualaee* at Miami
DADE COUNTY, In the State of Fl..i -
10... .mo arnereaa the atockholdera il
such corporation did on the Sth day "t
oiaru"1 ad. t .ins. to he filed In
the office of the Secretary of State of
the. Btate of FVarlda. I onaonl
kboMera under the provialona
of aald Chapter BM FlorMM Statute*.
showinx the dissolution of au on
Now. therefore, the Secretary of State
.1... ... Il .-..:,..
and that he is satisfied that the re-
qulraaaonta nf lav havo been oompllef
with
IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have
hereunto act my hunu. an.l nun
affixed the Great Seal of the Stale
of Florida, al Tall ihi.-sec. th
Capital, thia the SIXTH duv o:
AICI'ST. A.D. 190
R. A. GRAY.
Heal) Becretary of st.it.
-> 1 :
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.it
the undersljrned del lujaai
l.u-in--- under :h- flctitloua nani.
KENT PRODUCTS at *:* W Flaxlei
St la., intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida
ANN AVRACB
le Owner
l/H-r-3a. I I
NOTICE UNDER
FICT TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
hualneea under the fictitious name of
BUSY BEAVERS T V SALES A
SERVICE at 10113 N W 7th Avenue.
Miami. Florida intend* to register aald
name with th- Clerk of th* Circuit
Court of Dade Couatr, Florida.
ROBERT D KEN r
ETV? M-.n !i TERRY
Attome) for Petitioner
: n 1 .-ir;-i*
Punsautan ney, Pennaylvanla
You. JCDITH ANN IKK.KHCLT
,re hei.-l.v notified thai I Bill of Cor,
TZ.
m-
.laml for Divorce and Amendment
has been filed afauMl you. and you
IM required to orve I copy
Vnswei or I'l.idlng
to the BUI of
omplalol on the !',;1,n,,'!"\.A..IOT,.>,;
HOWARD S REISS. 1140 N 'Urri
Itreet. North Miami Beach. Florida
n.l file tike original Answer or Head-
ing In the office of the Clerk of the
"rcuit Court on OT I'-forr the '.".th day
,f August. I-S0. If you fail to do *o.
,,d'gment lo def.....- will be laken
aialnxl vim for the relief demanded in
h,- Bill of Complaint.
Tn no| 1 ihall be publlahod once
week for four conaecutlve weeka
- cnjiRIDIAN
laml.
A I 1
IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 4766*
t PATE OF
RERNARD FL1AKHNICK
NOTICE OF* INTENTION TO MAKI
APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE
NoTICR la hriebv given that we
' 1 I'd our final report and t>
' nial Diicharaa aa Executors of
1. of BERNARD F1IASH
" I\ de, eased, and that on the lt
of September, I960, we will apply
"-'- Hnnorab'e OBOROE T ci.ark
ludge .,f Dade Coun' Florida.
"r final diacharae aa Executirt-a of the
of IIKKNARD I I.IASHNICK
lnlv. I960
DoltA PLIASHNICK
i-iin.re fi.i vsiinick;
l"\ NER A MANNHBIMER
''J Walter C Kovner
"..1 ney, for Kxeciitora
T/SS.i/S-ll-W
>li-il Ul'fK I'M li'llr iim.-f'uo.....
, TIE JEWISH PLORIDIAN
DONE and ORDERED at Mil
-lorlda. this Hth day of July.
' 1: 1: I EATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit curt. Dade County. Florida
aeal) 1U K M LTIfAN.
"ea" Dap lU < lerk
HOWAItD B KEISS
in N 1: lSrd Btraot
North Ml-imi Beach, Honda
Vttorney/or Plalatiff ,
7'J9 '
HE
OF
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF T
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FLORIDA IN ANO FOR WOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. COC 7082
\Rl.ENE KRAMER LANZKTTA.
Plaintiff,
IGNATIFH A I.ANZKTTA.
""'.Sit for o-vorce
TO IGNATIUS A. I-ANZETTA
71* Eaat Grand Boulevard
Detroit. Michigan ,____. a
You. IGNATHS A >-ANTTA^r
hereby notified that a Bill of Com-
..laint for Divorce has been filed
agaln.t you, and you are reouiredto
serve a copy of your Anawer or I'lead-
STV STWUJ of Comp^nt on the
... hofore the 29th day of AUgTJai.
IBM If you f II to do *o. Jo*-*
esttll e taken agaln.^ you for
th* relief demanded In the nan
''Th'.'.'nouce .hall be BBMh*^OJO.
,.-.,h week for four coeaecutlv* weexa
' FliORUMAN.
M- ORDERED .t"""!.
la :th day of July. ad.
IME R 1.EATHEKMAN. Clerk
-wv'tSg^BT.......
WEINSTEIN A WEINSTEIN
430 I jncnln Road
Attorney, for Plaintiff ?/J8 |/5.,2..,
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY.
No. COC 7724
PHYLLIS" R. HOYER
Plaintiff.
Ira
JOHN Al'OUST HOYER.
Defendant.
SU.T FOR DIVORCE
TO: JOHN Al'c.iST HOYER
Address: Unknown .
You JOHN AUGUST HolKR ar.
hereby notified that a BUI of 1 om-
plaint for Divorce h.s been file
against you. and you are required t
serve a copy of your Answec or I'lead-
lns to the Bill of Complaint on th-
.laintiffs Attorney. HYMAN V CM-
BUT ".'l" Fifth Street. Miami Beach
Fla.'and file th* original An-.r 01
Pleading in the office of the Clerk ol
the Circuit Court on or before th.
lth dav of September. 11>0. If yoc
fall to do so. judgment by default llVP
.e taken against vou for the relief
demanded In the Hill of Complaint.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
this 11th day of August. A D .
1980 E B I.EATHEUMAN Clerk
circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
(seal! By: C P COPkLaND
rtput] Clerk
HYMAN P GAIJ3UT
240 Fifth St. I h JE R-fMI..
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff ,..; ,;.n
A
Ml-
the
the
lerve a copv of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the'BUI of COWBtatat: JJj1 tt*
.Dintiffs Attorney. MAC MERM .1 L.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ciEVFNTH JUDICIAL C RCUIT OF
" FLOR'OA IN ANO FOR OAOE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. tOC 7640
VIRGINIA i'EKS. IN,
Plaintiff.
unnerV i'i:ii>"N
DefendinV
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO aCNNF.RD PERSON
117 Harbor View Avenue
Bridgeport. Connecticut
Tou are hereby notifle I that a BIT
of Complaint for Divorce haa been filed
against you. and you are required to
or*
In
19X1 SW Third Avenue.
Elorida and f"' 'h%.?rl* "J"L*"^
or Pleading in the offl e of the Cl-rk
f the Circuit Court on orheforo he
th day of September. I960 If >o
'all to do w>. Judgment by default will
be taken aainst vou for the relief de-
manded In the Bill of Comnktlnt.
Thia notice shall be publish.
each eek for four ,- .nsecutlve ,-ek-
|.. THE JEWISH EfRIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 9th day of Aucuat. A D
"WE R IJCATHERMAN. Clerk.
Deputy Clerk
M \C MERMEI.L
1900 S.W Third Avenue
Miami .16. Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff ^.....^ f/1
NOT CE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
.FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 7477
ELIZABETH TARS
Plaintiff.
vs.
NAT TARE.
Ivfendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
T. NAT TAKE
;:h Street
Ijikewood. New Jersey
You are hereby no:if:d that a Bill"
..f Complaint for Divorce has i--.n
filed against you. and you are required
to eerve a BOSS of \our Answer or
Pleading: to the Bill of Complaint on
he plaintiff's Attorney RICHMOND
A- PARSER, one Uncoln Road Buil.l-
na\ Miami BOAch, Florida and file the
rlginal Answer or Pleading In the
ifYice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
n or before the 10th day of Septem-
ber. 1960. if you fail to do so. Judg-
nent by default wlH be taken again.t
vuu for the relief demanded In the
Kill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
ach week for four consecutive weeks
n THK JEWISH PUMI4MAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami
l.rida. this 4th day of August. A D.
1960.
E. B I.EATHF.HMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida
seal) By: R. H. RICE. JR
I 1- putj C'erk
_______________________ i;-i >-?i. >?
NOT.CE BY PUBLICATION
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY IN CHANCERY.
No. SOC 7S4S
DOROTHY P M.i.Ai'iiili.iN.
PI 1I1
EDWARD F M, 1.AC HILIN.
Defendant
SU.T FOR DIVORCE
TO: EDWARD F. M. I.Al'GHLIN.
174 South Mountain A"venue
Moatclalr, N.n Jernj
v..,, edward f Mclaughlin
ir_ hereby notified that a Bill of
Complaint for Divoroe has tieen filed
-igains! > .u. and you are required U>
serve a COpJ of VOW At'wer or Head-
ing to the BUI of Complaint on the
plaintiffs Attorney. NORMAN S
PALI.OT. 7.06 Ingraham Building. Mi-
ami 33. Ha., and fi'e the original
Answer or Pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on ..r
before the I2th dav of September. I960.
If vou fiil to do so. Judgment by de
fault will be taken against you for the
relief demanded In the Bl'.l of Com-
plaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four ron-'vutive week*
In THE JEWISH FY.ORlDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami
Florida, thl* Gth day of August. A.D..
* E. B LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
(seal) Bv WM. W. STOCKING.
Deputv Clerk
NORMAN 8 PALI^OT
H06 Incraham Building
Miami 32. Florida
Attorney for Plaintiff
S/13-19-J6. 9/1
NOTICE BV PLBL.CATION
IN THE C:CUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. .N CHANCERY.
No COC 6462
1'.'LIE!: TATE RoltEKTS
P ..r.tlff.
ELIZABETH C FACI P.. .P.ERTS
IWendan!
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
T' ELIZABETH C PACI ROBERTS
36T: SouU Went Eighth street
Mam. V
Tou are hereby notified that 1 Rill
mplaint for Divorce has beer.
1.led Bjsjatant you. an | ;jii-
. r. ir Answer or
Pleading to the. Hill of Comp aim on
the plalntlir. Attorney. PoPFER ft
SCHIESS "-'! South W I St.,
'i Miami 43. Florida and file the
original Answer or Pleading in the
- of the Clerk of the Circuit Com t
on or l~-f..r. the lith day of September,
I960 If rail fail to do ". Judgment by
default will 1- taken against you for
the relief demanded in the Bill of
This n-'ti.e shall be punttahfd one*
each week for four t n.-. utlve weeks
in THE JEWISH H.ORID1AN
DONE AND ORDERED al Miami,
Florida, thl. i.t eaj of Aug-uot, ad.
1: B LEATHERMAN, lerk.
ourt, lade County. Florida
I seal. B) WM W. ST'x-K NO,
I "eputy Clerk
popPEl: i. sen
Atturneys for plaintiff
US* s..uth West 7.:rd St.
M ami 4:;. l-l.-rida
~-i:-ii-2<
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF PARTNERSHIP
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the partnership heret..f..-e extstiac be-
tween l-m.'THY R SCHMELZ and
RICHAKD K IMPEL!., under the
flclili and style of STUDIO
ul CERAMICS lo.ated at 339S Coral
Way, Miami. Florida, waa dissolved
.) mutual iiin.l. on the tsth day of
June. 196 I
DOROTHY K BCHMELE has with-
drawn from and has ceased to be as-
sociated in the carrying on of said
business ..1 .1 RICHARD K. POPBLL
a ill hereafter carry on said business.
and he 1- entitled to all of the assets,
including all debt* due to said part-
nership, and has assumed and will
pay all outstanding buslaese obliga-
tions of STUDIO OF CERAMICS
heretofore and hereafter Incurred.
DOROTHY R .tCUMKIi
RICHARD K PttpKLL.
r,-i2-i-2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business un ler the fi. tlttuu* num.* of
1: B ASSOCIATES at ill* 8.W 5th
Street, Miami. Floritla inteit-U reg-
Nter sail name with r|ie Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
EARL BORNON
WBINKLE A KKSSI.KI:
Attorney* for Earl B-.bson
M 1 Scvbold Building
Miami 32. Florida
I/6-1I-UVM
Miami 36.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
MACDONELL. PATIO HARDENS at
Nunibe- fSTl S W 77th Avenue, In
the city of Miami. Florida Intend to
register the said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florid .
DATED at Miami. Florida, this 30th
dav of July. 1*60.
GBOBjGEN MacIHiNELL III
LILLIAN L. MacDONELL
H--12-19
NOTICE UNDER
FICT,TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring tq engage In
ss under the fictitious name of
WEBER THOMPSON ft LEFcoCRT
at 117.0 S.W. 1 Street. Miami 3. Flor-
ida Intend to register said name with
the Clerk nf the Circuit Court of Dade
Count\, Florida.
OTTO F WEBER
EDGAR B. THOMPSON
SIDNEY LEMMCRT
STANLEY B LEVITCH
R WARREN DAVIS
GEORGE M SIM UN-
RALPH M WEISBARD
MYERS, HEIMAN ft KAPLAN
Attornevs for Partner.
11 ."'> S W 1 Street
Miami M. Florida
7/e. s/5-ij-i
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
rORPOH ATIOX OM TUTS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR :i-f5


Page 12-A
+klshFk)rkte*n
Friday. August lg, J


Knock-Off
U.S.A.
y MAX LERNER
ZOA Region Maps Convention
We ought to find a better word for 1t than "vacation." which gives
the feeling of emptiness. Many vacations, alas, are empty enough of
both meaning and joy. usually because the daily work and life from
which we take a vacation are also empty But happily there are vaca-
tions which are genuinely replenishments, for every organism needs at
times to knock off and lie fallow, and find somewherefrom without or
withinthe fuel to re-stoke itself.
There won't be any vacation this year for the hungry- "'" all ovet
the world who are lucky if they can find work to keep their lives going
and to whom the idea of a civilization able to afford mass leisure would
be a dream fantasy. There won't be any vacation this year for a couple
of other hungry men as wellthe hungry candidates for the American
Presidency, who have to keep plugging away at the extra Congressional
session for the next four weeks to show the right stance for the election.
** S- M
EVERY YEAR ABOUT THIS TIME the big circulation magazines
do layouts on American vacationers in Europe, usually showing an
attractive and intelligent young couple coping with the strangeness of
foreign scenes and ideas. Four million Americans go abroad in any one
year, most of them for vacation pleasure and fun.
Harlan Cleveland, who heads the Maxwell Graduate School of Cit-
izenship at Syracuse University, tells of a questionnaire given to a
thousand of these tourists on ships sailing for Europe. More than five
hundred of them, filled out by young people of university level and com-
ing from families of above average income, were studied intensively.
The results were depressing. Three out of four failed to name a
single Italian novelist, poet or painter of the past 150 years. Half o('
them couldn't name a single German writer. One out of three couldn't
name an important novelist of our century, and half couldn't name an
American playwright. Two out of three made wildly wrong gMeWM
about the number of Catholics. Jews, and Negroes in America.
>- m
I WONDER WHY THESE YOUNGSTERS went to Europe at all. it
they were so incurious about either European culture or their own. I
suspect that a European vacation, like a college education, has now
become a mark of social status and a badge pf belonging*. It is a good
way to pick up a number of added attitudes and poses. But if you have I
resisted learning much from the people around you. the chances are
strong that you will resist learning much even when you have been
transported a few thousands miles with your camera and have changed
your locale.
What I am suggesting is that intellectual curiosity begins at home,
and knowledge of the world should start with knowledge of your culture.
Stuart Gerry Brown has written a 50-page pamphlet. "Memo for Over
seas Americans." for the Syracuse'University Press, addressed both to
tourists and to Americans working and living abroad. He discusses in
it "the many meanings of American civilization" and makes the point
that Americans abroad cannot be ambassadors for their country unless
they knowMimthing about it.
I should add that this applies to a number of our foreign service
officers as well. A recent evaluation test, given by the State Depart-
ment, revealed a disastrous number who failed in general intelligence
and in the broad specific skills needed for their tasks These are re
ported to have included the chief information officers in a number of
important Asian. African, and European capitals where the kind of
image America projects is crucial for our world standing and survival.
What many Americans need, in addition to travel vacations, is one
in which they will read a few seminal books.
- -
I MUST ADD IN FAIRNESS THAT A NUMBER of voungs'ers in
the rising generation have a new and revolutionary' attitude about sum-
mer vacations. A recent issue of Time ran a good round-up of cities in
which a large number of high school students are spending most of their
holiday in study groups, where they can gallop through j whole year's
work in some subject in a six or eight-week stretch.
This may not be "fun" in the sense in which that word is generally
applied to vacations. But it can be a replenishing experience 1 sus-
pect that many of the youngsters lolling through a summer holiday are
netting bored with the vacancy of it and fed up with what w supposed
to be "fun."
What they want is something that will stretch themmind and body
togetherand send them back to their work with a new fire
fun
W IN
FLORIDA
*
CONGRESS
AIRPORT INN
ALL BRAND NEW
AT ENTRANCE TO MIAMI INT'L. AlBPORT
AIR CONDITIONED AND HEATED
TV. RADIOS. PHONES
BOATING ANO GOLF OPPOSITE
SWIM POOL. CABANAS
COFFEE SHOP. DINING ROOM.
COCKTAIL LOUNGE
CREDIT CARDS HONORED
1850 N.W. 42nd
MIAMI
Ave.
FREE!
Writo far III**** mi M. TRAVR. GUIDE
lb** Fin* aoMli fnm mat f Mt, iiupac-
mi and oyi^ fey CMtnm of Motor Mo>l>.
Michael Adilman. of Savannah.
jGa.. president of the Southeast re-
gion of the Zionist Organization of
America, has announced the 23rd
annual conference of the organiza
tion at Camp Blue Star. Hender-
sonville. N (". on the Labor Day-
weekend. Sept. 2 to 5.
Acording to Jacob Corkland, of
Knoxville. Tenn.. co-chairman of
the conference, this will be the first
time that the region has held a
camp conference.
This year's conference will stress
forums, seminars, panel discus-
sions, and workshops on aspects
of Judaism and Zionism. Seymour
B. LJebman. of Miami Beach, is
program chairman. In addition to
national speakers, political figures,
and members of the Christian
Zionist Organization, several noted
regional Zionist leaders will take
part in the forums and panels.
Included among them are Ben
Winick. o Knoxville, Term., na-
tional vice president of the South-
east region, Liebman, regional
Late Services Will
Open Celebration
First late services of the season
Sept. 9 will commence a weekend
of celebration marking the open
ing of the new synagogue building
at Congregation Monticello Park.
On Saturday evening. Sept. 10.
officers and directors of all Monti
cello affiliates will be installed for
the new season.
Climaxing the celebration will be
a cornerstone ceremony Sept. 11 at
4 p.m. School is scheduled to open
Sept 6.
program and education*! chair-
men; Loo ft. Bvreon, of Mem-
phi*, honorary president of the
Southeast region; Sam Shank-
man, Momnhoi, honorary trustee
of the region; Rebbi Harold
Friedman, of Mobile, Ala., re-
gional vice president; Dr. lev
Vegan, of Miami Beech, tevthorn
representative of the Zionist
Youth Commission; and Mervyn
Berrin, of Atlanta, director of
the southern Zionist Youth Com-
mission, who together with Her-
man Pepfcin, former youth direc-
tor end presently a regional vice
president, will present a unique
youth workshop.
Keynote speaker at the opening
session of the conference on Sat-
urday evening. Sept. 3. will be
Mortimer May. past national presi-
dent of the ZOA and honorary
president of the Southeast region.
| May has Just returned from I
14th trip to Israel and from
tensive study tour of the jT
communities of Russia andofs.
America. May will discuss -SJ
'Jewish Community and its
tionship to Israel."
Quest speaker at the Sun*
I luncheon, which will be deoW
to "Israel Projects," is Ham iJ
fe. past president of the Southed
region of the ZOA and an honoraH
| regional president, who has
, returned from his second sta
[ tour of Israel.
Openings Still Avail-bit
Registration for the school te
of 1960-61 at Temple Sinai of N<,
Miami. 12100 NE 15th ave.,
now being accepted. Herbert
ran is director of education.
ings are also available in the
sery-kindergarten school, ace
ing to an announerm-nt Wedn
day.
NOW TWO BEST SELLING PAPERBACKS
J he JL^eaal Cl^ncucic-peJia /<
)usiness
AND

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...s cuiue
#*
the
icv<
oman s
"World
It was a 38th wedding anniversary celebra-
tion for Mr. and Mrs. William Singer on Monday
evening The occasion also marked Bill and
Esther's birthdays Dinner 'music made the
festivities even gayer for the 55 guests, mostly
including family and a few close friends Four
generations were represented, among them Bill's
faiher. David Singer, and Esther's mother, Mrs. Lily Goldberg .
The couple were married in Cleveland. O.. and came to Miami in
1934 The big success story of the Royal Castle executive is
known to everyone, particularly because of Bill's great contribu-
tions to Florida through his membership on the State Road Board
. Originally scheduled at the home of. the couple's children. Mr.
and Mrs. Lawrence (Harriet) Singer, in Miami, the party was moved
to their Granada blvd. mansion in Coral Gables, when the guest
list burgeoned Also present, were their other two children.
Mr- Marvin (Dorothy) Jacobs, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard (Mar
lene Stone The fourth generation includes six lovely grand-
children.
b- a-e -
Champagne Dance at Westview Country Club was the last
word, with waitresses dressed as French Follies Galsshort skirt -
and long black hose The young-marrieds predominated Satur-
day night, including the Larry Potters. Marshal and Harriet Lipton.
and Larry and Harriet Singer, who dance divinely Incidentally.
it was a ffrst-time-out for Jackie Hochberg, and David took mighty
good care of her The Harold Rands, just home from Europe.
at the affair with the David Catsmans. and Ann Jaffee squired by her
Ml) husband Mr. and Mrs. Leopold Schwartz had Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Bromberg and Sid and Rose Weinstock as guests Sid just
back from Europe with daughter Sandy, who flew over to join him
when school was out.
s >
Mrs. Meyer (Eva) Don and daughter Deedee have a nice vaca-
tion ahead of them: Mexico. Port-au-Prince and then on to Cali-
fornia Mike and Ronald will keep house at home together .
Nat and Bess Hankoff taking their vacation together in small
doses They're touring the State of Florida Driving stops
at 3 in the afternoon, when they go swimming and see the sights .
From Nashville. Tenn.. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Carr and daugh-
ter. Maureen, are visitors again The attraction is their elder
daughter. Mrs. Howard Fisher, and Myrtle's sister. Mrs. Sidney
(Florence) Lewis Florence entertained at dinner Saturday
night... S.
After all those marvelous plans Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Fair made for their lovely cruise together.
Myra and Aaron had to go alone Martha has been ill. is re-
covering now. but was not all better by departure time.
. **
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Waldman. 6265 SW 28th st.. Miami, enjoyed
a joyous reunion with their family at their son's wedding. Sheldon
Waldman to Janet Weinman, of 7325 Byron ave.. Miami Beach, on
Aug. 7 at the Balmoral Attending were their son and daughter-
in-law. Col. and Mrs. H. Waldman. and granddaughter. Linda, of
Washington, D.C. Also, their daughter and son-in-law. Mr. and
Mrs Henry G. Abrahams, of Red Hook. NY., who brought along
their moppets, Barbara. Rich-Diane, and Toby ... The newlyweds
are just back from St. Thomas and the Vi/gin Islands, and will be
In ing at 540 NW 66th ave., W. Hollywood. Fla.\ .
Mrs. A. Herbert (Lois) Mathes back from seeing that her Rob-
hie had a lovely 13th birthday at Camp Nebagmon ... In his cabin
alter taps, the lucky campers had a big birthday cake .
An adorable postcard from Hi and Juliet Luber: "We're not
on erweight, everyone else is underweight."
MM S*
Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Soroff writing friends from Israel that
I 'iev expect to be home early in September ...
Off to Gotham Town for a few weeks together: Mary Ann Kauf-
man. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Murray K. Kaufman, and Phyllis
Silvers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Silvers ...
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Simon, of Coral Gables. al the Big City before embarking on the Queen Elizabeth Aug. 24 for
ten weeks in Europe and Israel Itinerary includes England.
Netherlands, France. Italy, and three weeks in Israel .
Mr. and Mrs Jack Deutchman celebrated their 25th wedding
anniversary Aug. 11 with a cruise to Nassau. Bahamas Jacks
president of Temple Zion, with his wife doing the honors as philan-
thropy chairman of Sisterhood The couple live with sons Vic-
tor and Richard at 6060 SW 16th ter.
a* a*
Dr Laurence Mamlet and his Barbara, both formerly of Miami
Beach, import their babysitters Both grandmothers. Lillian
Mamlet and Ruth Rothman, left for Detroifso that the young couple
might take off to attend the Tanglewood Music Festival
The Ira Rosenfetds happy about their new home at 1795 Calais
dr. Shirlee. of course, doing her own interior decorating
she's Shirlee Adrian Interiors ...
Proud parents of a new arrival: Dr. and Mrs. Robert (Pat)
(.ciderkind Maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Martin
(F.velyn)Rokow...
Dr and Mrs. Judd (Trudy) Breakstone back after vacationing
in the Carolines ... On the way home, they stopped at Gainesville
to iee their daughter. Barbara.
. W
Off this week for Europe via KLM are Mr. and Mrs. Harry
(Jennie) Gordon Cities on the way include Amsterdam. Zurich.
Rome, Munich, Paris and London ... The couple wiN be spending
two weeks in Israel, with Harry's main interest being Histadrut
he's president of the Business and Professional chapter here .
Family dinner party Monday night in the Private Diningroom o(
the Rosedale was the occasion of a Bon Voyage .
Mr. and Mrs Martin Loss, of 5949 SW 16th ter.. back after
a month in Israel. Switzerland. France and Italy ... In Israel, tnev
visited Rabbi Morton M. Berman. with the Jewish Agency u Jeru-
salem, formerly of Chicago. Mrs. L.s brother In Beer Shew,
the couple coincidentaUy met Rabbi and Mrs. Mayer Abramowitz.
of Temple Menorah ... The couples children were dj problem
Joan. 18,-is a counselor at Camp Blue Star in Hendersonvdle. Har-
old, 15. a counselor -in training, and Barry. 12. a camper
If Al Goldman, of Fu Man Chu, was not on hand Sunday to
greet you when you arrived to have dinner at his popular restaurant,
it was only because he'd been busy making last-minute preparations
CenMiwed on Page **
T cJewish Floridian
Miami. Florida. Friday. August 19. 1960
Section B
IMS. MtNAtD SUPWMTN
Women Plan
Member Drive
Twenty-five thousand women and
50 new chapters is the goal ot
B'nai B'rtfh Women's 1960-61 "New
Horizons" membership campaign.
Plans for the coast-to-coast driv
were set last week by the organi-
zation's membership committee at
its late summer meeting held in
Washington. D.C.
Attending from Greater Miami
was Mrs. Bernard Supworth. 719
paradiso. Coral Gabless. chairman
of the "Anti-Defamation League
Council here.
"In line wna two important na-
tional trends, we plan to emphasize
recruitment of employed women
and development of new chapters
in burgeoning suburbia," said Mrs.
Arthur Rosenbluth. of Hewlett.
N.Y., BBW national membership
chairman.
The Jewish women's service or-
ganization currently includes 137,-
000 women in 870 chapters in the
United States and Canada with 45
affiliated chapters in 17 countries
of the Free World.
Why Not Take a Tip from the Cardiac;
Run Your Kitchen the Lazy Man's Way
BB Women
Plan Programs
North Dade chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will participate in
an evening of entertainment at the
Cafe Can-Can of the Carillon ho-
tel on Saturday evening. Aug. 27.
In charge of reservations are Mrs.
Stanley Chaney. Mrs. Howard
Schwartz, and Mrs. Bert Simon.
The chapter will also assist Mac-
cabee Lodge. Knights of Pythias,
in a visual screening project spon-
sored by the Dade County Opto-
metric Assn.
This will take place on Satur-
day. Aug. 20. 5 p.m.. at the Car-
penters' Union Hall. 631 NE 131st
I In charge of information are
Max Smiley and Bernard Chaney.
who. said that all school children
between the ages of seven and 17
are eligible to take the free eye
check with permission of their par-
ents.

Sunshine chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will hold a summer luau
fiesta membership tea at the home
of Mrs. Sidney Levin. 18951 NE
20th ave.. on Thursday afternoon.
Aug. 25.
. Mrs. Jacob Wolosin. chairman,
will introduce Mcs. Murray Sum-
mers, who is scheduled to discuss
the activities of the Anti-Defama-
tion League.
In c h a r g e~ of information are
Mrs. Samuel Samuels. 1201 NE
161st St.; Mrs Richard Siff. 17201
NE 23rd ave.; and Mrs. Albert
Levin. 400 NE 159th st.
Why not run your house the lazy
way" Especially since it's not only
the most healthful way but the
most efficient.
The fact is. despite the conglom
eration of labor saving gadgets
available to housewives, most of
them are working too hard. Sci-
ence in homemaking is too often
confined to the modern tools in the
home, when hours and backache
could be reduced if the approach
to the job were better organized.
Heart Assn. programs originally
conceived for the cardiac home-
maker have been acclaimed by
thousands of women in excellent
health as offering useful, time and
labor-saving shortcuts.
Begin w ith your posture. Sit.
stand and walk with a straight
back; this keeps your body in prop-
er balance. Unbalanced, the body
uses extra energy.
Plan the work schedule to be as
painless as possible, by outlining
roughly a week's work at a time.
Note first the daily jobs, those to
be done on specific days of the
week, and those which must be
done about once a week but at no
specific time. Alternate light and
heavy jobs, and enjoyable ones
with those you consider drudgery.
And be sure to allow enough time
for frequent short rests.
Your kitchen is primarily a work
shop and in any well-ordered
workshop organization is a must.
Try creating a mixing center in
your kitchen, considering conven-
ience rather than convention. Keep
dishes, cooking utensils and sup-
plies, used most frequently there
in art area, within easy reach. Log-
ical items for mixing-center stor-
age include prepared mixes, bread
crumbs, flour sifter, spices, waxed
paper and foil, measuring utensils,
mixing bowls, beaters, graters,
choppers, knives, baking pans, ca--
seroles, sugar and flour canisters.
You'll find yourself taking fewer
steps, working more rapidly and
easily.
Your sink should be as centrally
situated as possible: half of all a
homemaker's kitchen trips are to
and from the sink. Many sinks are
too low and women do not work
with straight backs, which ir,
fatigue. A wooden slatted rack un-
Another way to save time and
energy is to have vertical shelf
dividers for the storage of pot-lids
and shallow baking pans. You can
double shelf areas by installing
half shelves for cups and glasses.
Kitchen items are best managed
when grouped like this:
At the range: Canned vege-
tables, stews, sauces, frying fats
and oils, spices, rice, spaghetti,
noodles, salt and pepper, measur-
ing spoons, can opener, skillets,
potholders. pots. pans, ladle, turn-
er, fork, slotted spoons, serving
bowls.
At the sink: Potatoes, onions,
canned soups, dried soups, dried
fruits, cocoa, dried vegeables,
saucepans, measuring cups, paring
knives, vegetable brush, scouring
powder and detergents. (Get the
soaps up from under the sink
keep them in easy reach!)
Heart Assn. of Greater Miami,
253 SW 8th St.. has additional in
formation in booklet form on this
vital subject
Miami Tourist
Sees ZOA House
A Miami tourist was this week
guest Of the ZOA House in Tel
Aviv, where she was shown through
the cultural center's facilities and
explained its program aimed at
fostering closer ties between the
Jewish communities of the United
States and Israel.
She is Mrs. Florence S i e g e 1
Granville. of 1637 SW 5th St.
Mrs. Granville spent a full hour
meeting with ZOA House officials
and touring the center, which was
established in 1953 by the Zionist
Organiation of America.
The ultra modern, two story
structure maintains an intensive
educational program, including
seminars, recitals, and exhibitions
of American art, music and litera-
ture.
Ner Tamid Ladies
Opening Season
^Registration is being taken daily
at the office of Temple Ner Tamid,
80th st and Carlyle ave.. for Its
fall term religious school.
Registration for all departments,
nursery, high school and Sunday
school, may be made by contact-
ing the synagogue office from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m., dally.
A special registration will be
held on Sunday morning. Aug. 21,
and Sunday morning. Aug. 28, from
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Joseph Schudkraut, of stage, screen and television fame,
shown here with Mrs. Clara Lett, national president, at a con-
ference of the West Coast area of Pioneer Women in Los
Angeles, Calif. With them is Max Band (far left), renowed
artist, whose oil painting of Schildkraut in his role as Otto
Frank in "The Diary of Anne Frank," was presented to Queen
Wilhelmina, of Holland, at the official opening of the Ann*
Frank'Museum in Amsterdam. Pioneer Women conducts a
comprehensive social work and educational program in Israel.


Page 2-B
+Jmlst> Tkrkiian
Friday. August 19,
1360




I
'New Wrinkles' for Men of Family
tand in the refrigerator while mayonnaise dressing for a milder
>craping the kernels from corn, blend). I'aefc the pepper halves
We delight yi. passing a'on^UiiJ|at shortening in a frying pan uith this mixtOre and m
our readers new wrinkles we over moderate heat and saute the a bed of salad greens. Garnish with
try out and find specially pleasing cut corn |n |t for 1 mmute stirring' tomato wedges, parsley sprigs.
t.. themale members^ of the^ fain- cjnstant|v to prevent sticking. Let and/or Maslinas. stuffed green
cool before stirring into the chop- olives, small pickles, etc. Serve
ped meat preparation, along with chilled if time permits. Tasty as
wrell as nourishing! Pass the rolls,
Form into patties as thick as "r- arrange them around a mound
charcoal heat and served piping each in the crumbs of potato salad on a large platter.
fliit t*"*rftrt* iim.i nnlv a toil'
By LEAH LEONARD
l> The latest on the theme of
"hamburger is a happy combina-
tion of chopped lean beef with fhe mince>j paVsley.
fresh corn kernels, grilled over
, Preparation time only a few
i .w ,u ,j oh on both sides. Arrange in wire hold-
nunutes longer than the old fash- "
_..........i... ,_ ., er and grill over charcoal fire.
ioned variety, but what a laste
thrill' Besides, its a combination
specially suited to August weather
Here's the recipe
CORN HAMBURGER SPECIAL
grill
just long enough to brown nicely
on one side before turning to brown
With peaches, plums, apples and
apricots plentiful, how about mak-
ing the following special frosty
the other side of hamburgers sherbet fm ja, .., r e a r?
total time about 15 minutes Serve
hot with stewed tomatoes, apple-
sauce or just plain on cut rolls.
Ma> bej!r,'iel U1der vaS,HbTf ^'"c^lorie-packed
or in electric broiler fields 6 to
1 pound lean chopped beef
1 tablespoon grated raw onion
1 egg and 2 tablespoons cold 8 hamburgers.
water, blended with fork
6 ears of corn I scraped from Heres> another hot tip" for any
cobs) ,ot jay in August. We resorted to
1 tablespoon vegetable shorten ,t recently when we had impromptu
'n8 guests for luncheon and know
2 tablespoons minced parsley vou. want to try it one of these
4 tablespoons fine cracker Jays too & course tna, implies
crumbs i.Matzo Meal will do) ,fcat you keep j^ of Gefle fish
Combine chopped beef, grated ,n ,he refrigerator for just such
onion, egg and water mixture. Let emergencies
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER
Youngsters of all age> will prefer
it to the customary ice cream any
afternoon or evening Besides, it's
We call it
a sleighride for the tongue."
Dode Heights
Women Elect
Mrs. Seug Miller has been elect-
ed president of the Sisterhood of
Dade Heights Jewish Congrega
tion.
Other officers name-: at a recent
meeting are Mesdames LeRoy Per-
lowin. Joseph Bass. Harold Simon
and Murray Kay. vice president-.
FROSTY FRUIT SHERBET
2 cups stewed and mashed fruit
(any of the above fruits)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons grated lemond rind
4 cup orange juice
1/3 cup confectioners' sugar (or
to taste)
1 can evaporated milk 1 14'j oz.
size)
A few grains salt
Boarding the SS Santa Rosa are Dr. and Mrs. Harry Rimer of
930 S. Shore dr.. Miami Beach, for a Caribbean cruise via New
York, leaving from Port Everglades.
22 UJA Women's Division Leaders Will
Visit Israel on Special Survey Mission
By Special Report grants. They will visit one of U
I remaining ma'aborot in Israel
NEW YORK-Twenty-two mem-: where almost 46.000 immifra*
bers of United States Jewish Ap-iof pt years rtlU uve jh_
BOATS ______ ... ,. Pesl Women* Division will leave and wooden huti. ^ wj|, JJ
Combine stewed fruit that has on Sept 7 from New York via vuit teenaee trainine center* .
8 well formed fresh green pep been chilled for half an hour with El Al Airlines for a three-week | youth Ally ah village vocatmn.1
pers (bell shaped or elon the lemon juice, grated lemon survey of UJA-financed migration, spools ind other ediicationil 1
gated) rind, orange juice, sugar to sweet- welfare and resettlement programs.st,tut,on9 for different aee itmm
1 large jar of G e f i 11 e Fish en to taste and stir till sugar is in Europe and Israel, as members s s i.
(about 2 pounds) dissolved. Add the evaporated milk of the sixth annual UJA Women's The Survey Group will tour new
3 tablespoons prepared horse I and salt, stirring well. Turn into Division Overseas Survey Group. ] developments in the Negev Desert
radish, optional freezing trays of refrigerator and The group is composed of worn- are.a "nd visit farms *ypil of the
Salad greens, tomato wedges, set cold control to point indicated en leaders of community cam-:W5 immigrant farm settlement!
parsley sprigs, etc. for gar- for freezing ice cream. Freeze to paigns across the United States wmch ar* s,i" economically u
nish mush consistency. Turn mush into which allocate the main part of derdeveloped and need irrigatna,
Mash and pat dry the green pep- a chilled mixing bowl and beat their campaign proceeds to the na- farm macnin*rv, livestock and otb-
Mesdames Michael Levy, treas- P*rs tut into halves lengthwise with electric or hand rotary beater tionwide United Jewish Appeal er forms of *id to become self-saf.
urer Jerry Cole, financial secre through stems and remove seeds till fluffy. Return to freezer trays Eacn ieader pays her own expenses fic,ent 3000 ""migrant
tary. Herbert Elk
retary; and Jen-
corresponding secretary.
[in. recording sec- Drain the liquid from Gelfilte Fish and freeze till firm, stirring once' on the trip The UJA is the major 'farmers ar* struggling to make
y Sommenschein. nd reserve same Mash with a or twice during the freezing tune American agency aiding immi- ends meet on these ,armsteads
fork and add the horseradish, mix for smoother texture. Yields 8 to
ing thoroughly (or. substitute: 10 servings
NeW and deliciOUS! Women tO Hear Dade Heights Registration
u
KCiHl*
*S'A*II
gency aiding
grants to Israel, distressed Jews
overseas, and refugees to the Unit-
ed States.
Making its first stop in Geneva.
Switzerland, the Survey Group will
Registration for Hebrew and Sun- attend a briefing session with leau
; day school at Dade Heights Jewish' ers of the Joint Distribution Com
A political satire based on the Congregation Is now in progress mittee. a constituent agency of'
nominations and campaigns for the through Aug. 28. Hours are Mon- the United Jewish Appeal. At that!
United States presidency, the|day through Friday and Sunday, time, the Survey Group will be
Broadway hit play. -The Best 19 am. to 12 noon. Evening hours given full reports on-various
Man- will be reviewed by Dr. Jo-lare mooday through Thursday. 7 to phases of the JOC welfare pro-
Narot. of Temple Israel.| 9 p m Registration is at 1401 NW, grams in Israel and 24 other coun-
After a stop-over in Rome to ve-
il JDC installations, the Survey
Group will return to the Unites
States on Sept.
Review of Play
ILNO
KOSHER
1183rd st. No. Miami.
on Monday evening
Temple Israel Sisterhood is spon-j
soring a dinner preceding the play I Cd1l*Gr Worl(f*P
SLICED
PASTRAMI
FRESHLY SLICED: j
neutm packed?,
BEADYTOSEKVEtl
Ask tor AH
WILN0 Kosher PRODUCTS
Corned Beef, Pastrami,
Salami, Bologna,
Krispit Frankfurters
Kashruth
Quality
Flavor
WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicago)
MIAMI MANCH
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Phono FR 16551
tries throughout the world
On Sept. 11. the Survey Group
will arrive in Israel for a 14-day
stay, which will include the Jew
ish New Year holiday. Members of
the group will visit every section
Mill Judith Goldstein, a mem- of the country in order to study
Now at U of M
review, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in
Uollson Auditorium
Written by Gore Vidal. the play-
describes the backstage maneuver
ings at political party conventions, i ber of the professional staff of the various aspects of the UJA support
Kabbi Narot will describe his im Greater Miami Jewish Communi- ed programs, which aid some 690.
prts~ion- of the roles played by > Center for the past three years. 000 unabsorbed immigrants, young
Melvyn Douglas. Frank Love joy. *'' leaving the Center this fall people and aged, chronically ill
and Lee Tracy m the Boardway, accept a full assistantship in and handicapped newcomers
version now appearing in New -he Department of Psychology at The Survey Group which is head-
York ^n'Ve,y "fKM,"mi *". C,an ed by Mrs Jack A. Goodman, of
Proceeds of the evenings enter | 1,da,e fo' l,he Ph,D deree.ln clln; Indianapolis, nataonaj UJA Worn
tainment and hospitalitv will b^.,'! psychology. Miss Golistein will en\ Division chairman, will meet
donated to the Hebrew Union Col *" teac,h'n* and 0,her resPn with top government officials and
lege Scholarsh.p Fund. Chairman "D,"'es ln lh,s new position leaders of the Jewish Agency for
of the dinner is Mrs. Jean Reichek ; In her capacity as youth activi- Israel and of the Joint Distribution
Mrs. Harry L Levinson is chair-j ties supervisor with the Center. Committee, which administer UJA-
man of arrangements, and Mrs Miss Goldstein was responsible for: financed aid programs for new-
Ann Polasky is chairman of prizes. | the development of a program for cmers to Israel. %
Mrs Joseph Ruffner is Sisterhood een-agers and elementary school Members of the group will go to
children at the Miami YMHA-various immigrant settlements
Branch. During the past year, she jnd will have an opportunity to
coordinated the annual teen age alk with many of the persons aid-
onclave. | ed through UJA funds.
Prior to this position, she re- A special study will be made by
Btfared her Master's degree in psy-;tne Survey Group of family and
.hology from the New School for;<^ldc*re problems among imnu-
Social Research, and a Bachelor's
degree from the Carnegie Institute
if Technology.'
president
Crockett Reelected
William M. Crockett, jr.. execu
live director of the Miami Beach
Taxpayer's assn has been re-
elected president of the Biscayne
chapter. Florida Public Relations
I
*THE TINY
LITTLE
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five fullest strength
and flavor!
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under strict supervision ot
Rabbi Jacob Cohen.__
In Miami it's
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Phone FR 4-2621
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division of NEW YORK BAKERIES, INC. .
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La
H


Friday. Auguatf 19, 1960
-Jentsf HcrkUar
Enrollment Peak
Nearing at Center
Registration for the Early Child-.
hood I'f. elopment Program is rap-,
,tfv reaching the maximum num-
ber at each of the four branches:
of the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center, it was announced'
fedoesdav by Efraim Gale, exec-
utive director.
The program is designed to give
the kind of experience which will
achieve the fullest development of
each child as an individual in his.
physical and mental growth, emo-
tional adjustment, and social yel-
fare.
The program provides opportu-,
nities fcr living and learning in
small groups -of about ten children I
of the -ame age level, observing,
ewperirnenting with and exploring
their environment, self-expression
and independence, under profes-
I guidance, insuring favorable
adjustment to the society in which
thej live, participating in positive
experiences in Jewish living at
th''ir own level, encouraging each
child to develop at his own rate
and ability, psychiatric consulta
lion and guidance to assist the
leacher is reaching her objectives.
Page) 3-B
Greater Miami leaders of the American Friends of the Hebrew
University at a dinner in New York initiating a SI2.000.000
development program for completion of the new campus of the
university in Jerusalem. Shown (left to right) are Philip M,
Klutznick. national president of the organization; Mrs. Oida C.
Rubin, immediate past president. Greater Miami Friends of the
Hebrew University; former Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, who pre-
sided; Mrs. Herbert Shapiro, president of the Greater Miami
Friends; and Mrs. Louis S. Gimbel, jr.. national president of
the Women's Division of the organization.
Hadassah Group
In Games Night
south^ate group of Hadassah will.
hold a card party and games night
in the recreation room of South-
gate Towers on Thursday evening,
Aug. 23.
Uesdames Lea Udell and Clara
f'.oldenberg will chair the event.!
Committee includes Mesdames
Hannah Cohen, Ethel Harrow. Le-!
nor* Hauer, Toni Harris, Dolly',
Hersh, Mary Gustman. Mary Mor-;
| genroth. and Ruth Steigel.
Mrs. Henry Wernick is president
of the i-roup.
Rabbi Kronish
Visiting in Israel
Rabbi and Mrs. Leon Kronish
will return next week after a
month in Israel as guests of sev-
eral friends of the Israel Bond or-
ganization.
For the past several years, the
Temple Beth S h o I o m spiritual
leader has served as chairman of
special projects for the Greater
Miami Israel Bond committee.
In Israel. Rabbi and Mrs. Kro-
nish joined Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Oritt and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Sip-
ser on a tour of economic and in-
dustrial programs which received
suport from Israel Bond funds.
Oritt is general co-chairman with
Jack A. Cantor of the Greater Mi-
ami Israel Bond committee. Sip
-er is Israel Bond city manager
here.
Yehudah Moshe Registration
Kindergarten registration is cur-
rently taking place at Congregation
, Yehudah Moshe, formely North
Dade Jewish Center, according to
! Mrs. Jack August, administrator.
Also under way is registration for
Popiel religious school. Mrs. Tcrri
j Grossberg.'director, has announced
ihat choir rehearsal will be held
each Monday and Thursday eve-
ning at the Temple, and is open to
all interested persons.
Tgajjr
From
BRAHMS
to
BARTOK
You'll Hear the World's Finest Music
16 Hours a Day on
FM 83 93.1-100 KM 108 NC
y\ ....
W A F
Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers
From
Soft Drinks
to
Savings Institutions
DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Registration Set
At Ner Tamid
Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid
will hold a card party on Saturday
evening in Sklar Auditorium of the
Temple. Mrs. Murray A. Shaw is
chairman. Co-chairmen are Mrs.
Henrietta Elne. Mrs. Seymour Hor-
owitz, and Mrs. Leonard Paul.
The Sisterhood will hold its first
meeting of the season on Wednees-
day evening at the Auditorium,
with Mrs. Louis Cohen, president,
conducting the session.
A member-bring-a member lunch-
eon is planned by the Sisterhood
for Thursday noon. Aug. 25, at the
home of Mrs. Fannie Sklar. 1641
S. Treasure dr. Mrs. Monia Leshin
will be hostess. Mrs. Carlton Blake
is vice president of membership,
and Mrs. Yvette Silberger is co-
chairman.
Beach Student
Wins Trophy
A Miami Beach High School soph-
omore carried away a trophy as
"outstanding debator" in a special
summer course at Ohio State Uni-
versity.
He is Allan E. Goodman, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Goodman,
900 West ave.
Allan's public speaking teacher
suggested he enroll in the summer
public speaking and debating
course at Ohio State along with
some 50 other youthful students
from throughout the United States.
The five-week course was con-
ducted by Robert J. Kibler. direc-
tor of the Summer Center of Com-
municative Arts at Columbus, O..
who cho.se Allan top debator. He
is not quite 16.
Distributed by HI GRADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 29th Avenue 0X ,-H1
Hebrew-English
Calendar Appears
. Wilno Kosher Sausage Co. of
Chicago, pioneers in manufactur-
ing "Pure Beef" kosher delicates-
sen products, has published a new
Hebrew-English calendar for the
year 5721. 1960-61, which is now
being distributed by Wilno dealers,
la addition to all dates of Jew-
ish and legal holidays, the almanac
has many other important and use-
ful information and prayers. Rad-
ish. Yizkor, blessings of the Torah
and dates of Sfiroh, Lag B'Omer,
Tishn B'Av, when weddings are for-
bidden, and others are all listed
for your convenience and informa-
tion.
The calendar is also available
at the offices of The Jewish Flor-
idian. -S.T.
Dlllll I LINE
Mi '
1+1-2
SMART SISTERS
in "new look mal hint; fashion*

Quite pretty enough to repeat, these full-skirted
cottons in sugary shades done in a young
mood of romantic charm. Big Sisters jumper-effect
dress, with quaint Tyrolean touches, solid skirt,
checked waist, printed suspender straps with
ric-rac trim, plum, sizes 7 to 12 7.9i
Little Sister's dress, 3 to 6x
598
Young People's World, fourth floor miami.
At all five Burdine's stores.
J


^^
Page 4-B
+Jeit ncrkttan
Friday, Auguet 19,
Jeuish Fl-jndun Exclusive
Your M
c
ARRIAGE COUNSELOR
*
. by *^am$4l C-/. sjiilnm,
Miami's Nationallt Famous Marriage Counselor and Author
The decline of modern marriage began with the
French Revolution of 1789 with it- Mxesi on liberty,
equality and fraternity.
Before the Revolution. France was ruled by its
privileged classes, the nobility and the clergy
Though both were largely non-producti\e and para-
sitic, they had between them no! only a monopoly
of the nation's wealth but of its political power as
well.
Both classes were corrupt More important,
both had outlived their usefulne-s in the economic
and political scheme of things Though they did not
realize it. the transference of power from one class
to another was taking place under their very mm
Below the privileged two was the entirely new
class of industrial employers for whom there Hi
no place at all under the old regime. This was the
emerging middle class, the while they owned and controlled the means of pro
ductionthat is. the factories, farms and commer
cial enterprises of Francehad none of the political
power to match their new economic strength
Lastly were the peasantsabused, exploited and
wretched in their squalor and misery
Age of Reason
The Ancien Regime, economically outdated, was
ready to topple. All it needed was a push. This was
supplied by the apostles of the Age of Reason, per-
haps the most brilliant group of men ever produced
by France.
Voltaire, the greatest wit and writer of bis age.
and one of its most brilliant and effective cntio.
hurled his magnificent thunderbolts at the Church,
as well as at the doctrine of the divine right of kings,
by which the monarchs of France and Turope had
entrenched-themselves.
Diderot enlisted nearly all the most famous
writers of his time to produce the "Encyclopedia.''
the Bible of the Age of Reason, propogating science
as the new religion.
Locke and Montesquieu introduced and made
popular the Eneli>h principles of representative gov-
ernment Condorcet preached the doctrine of pro-
gress for all. Jean Jacques Rousseau, perhaps the
most influential of all the intellectual forerunners of
the Revolution, spread the gospel of political and
social democracy
Once the ideas of democracy catch on. there is
no stopping the conflagration. Democracy ii MM
tially a process of education in which people, under
the guidance of their betters, begin the painful pro-
cess of thinking. All ideas come upder scrutiny and
analysis Authority, previously unquestioned, is
hauled before the court of reason and dethroned.
The French Kcvolution undermined marnaye
in (hat it planted the seed of critical thought A dis-
belief, in an avenmng personal God and in the im-
mortality of the soul became fashionable. The very
foundations of religion were undermined, especially
its theological superstructure. People were no
longer too concerned or disturbed about the conse-
quences of sin. of punishment for earthly misdeeds.
They were interested in the "now" instead of the
hereafter, in the immediate and in the present.
Industrial Revolution
Sweptup by the feverish ideas of freedom and
equality, women began critically to examine the old
ideas under which they were kept in social and eco-
nomic bondage. They began to question such hoary
concepts as woman's basic inferiority or that she was
responsible for man's original fall from grace.
Equally important, the Re\olution helped dis
engage them from the priestly doctrine that women
were essentially second class citizens, and that she
musi bear her marital lot with equanimity and
fortitude no matter how depressing it was.
Finally, because the Revolution questioned all
conventional and traditional ideas, enlightened men
and women began seriously to question the very
foundations on which marriage rested.
If the decline of modern marriage began with
the French Revolution, it was hastened by the Indus
trial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries This
was the period in English history, roughly 1750-1850.
which saw a stable agricultural and commercial so-
ciety transformed into the colossus of modern indus-
trialism. It was the era of transition from handi-
crafts in the home to steam power operations in mas-
sive factories belching forth black smoke
Before the emergence of modern capitalism,
only a few adventurous women had engaged in busi-
ness enterprise The vast bulk of them remained
at home, occupied by domestic tasks and helping
their husbands in handicraft production.
The rise of the factory system profoundly altered
all this Sheer economic necessity, as well as the
demand for unskilled labor, forced thousands of
wive* out of their homes into the new mines, mills
and factories
Home as Family Center
With them often went their children, as well as
their men folk. For one of the few times in the
history of civilization, the home had lost its para-
mount importance.
Previously, the home had been the center of the
family's education and activities. It had been the
place where youngsters had been taught to read,
write, add and subtract, where they were first intro-
duced to the delights of great books, and taught
various trades and handicraft skills.
The mother inevitably was the chief educator
since the father, then, as now. was preoccupied with
earning a living.
It was a challenge she met with zeal and pride
'It was the mother, in fact, who was the very' heart
of the home's various activities. She was useful and
she was important. Both gave her a feeling of se-
curity she has rarely had since.
The home in those halcyon days was also the
focus for the family's recreation. There was con-
versation, now, alas, a lost art, readings from the
family Bible, as well as from other great literature,
and there were song fests around the piano.
Today, with the single dubious exception of tele-
vision, the family obtains much of its recreation out-
side the home. Diversion of a sort is sought in movie
theaters, bowling alleys, night clubs, taverns, race
tracks, baseball and football games, and in philan-
dering.
The unhappy truth is that the American husband
and wife have become bored with each other, with
the home being merely a house from which each
seeks escape. To avoid the increasing monotony of
having to face each other for more than a few hours,
both husband and wife have become almost obsessive
"joiners." On the theory that misery loves com-
pany, the American male licks his wounds at the
Elks. Masons. Odd Fellows, Kiwanis, Lions, Opti-
mists B'nai B'rith. and a host of other organizations
Not to be outdone, his wife is compulsively driven to
attending luncheons, organizations, drives and ac-
quiring "culture" by attending book reviews of un-
important books. Both sexes are pathetically un-
happy.
Emotional Significance Lost
The husband is unhappy because he is no longer
the mam focus of his wife's interest. He must not
only compete with his children for his wife's atten-
tion and affection, but with her various clubs and
organizations, as well. And in at least one case out
of four, he must compete with her lover, too.
Thus, for many American husbands the home
has lost its warmth and emotional significance. In
altogether too many cases it is no longer a home at
all but merely a place where the struggle for power
is continued ad infinitum. ad nauseam. He does not
find peace there nor rest, but screaming children
clamoring for his attention. His wife is neither lov-
ing, affectionate nor understanding; usually, in fact,
she is completely indifferent both to him and to his
problems. She is tired, weary and exhausted too
tired to plan a warm, nourishing dinner, too weary
to be stimulating mentally, and too exhausted to be
more than an indifferent lover.
The wife is unhappy because she is confused and
uncertain as to the part she should play in marriage,
and because she is profoundly dissatisfied with her
historic role of homemaker and mother. She feels
she is more an exploited servant than a mistress, and
is humiliated that she is dependent on her husband
for her very' existence.
She tends to think of the home not as a place
of warmth and comfort, but as a monster who can
never be vanquished. The endless, drab, dreary-
domestic chores fill her with dread and apprehension.
while the confining, restricting walls of the house
pervade her with a panicy feeling of claustrophobia
If she has any skill or talent, she feels that life has
cheated her. and that marriage and children have
deprived her of ever finding intellectual and emo-
tional fulfillment. If she lacks such skill she feels
she is simply being exploited. In a word, she is
completely and thoroughly miserable, a burden to
herself and a millstone to her husband.
Beach League Sponsors Panel
Seven leading businessmen from
Miami Beach will comprise a pan-
el discussion on the need for a Mi-
ami Beach Tourist Commission at
a meeting of the Civic League of
Miami Beach on Monday evening
t the DiLido hotel.
The panelists will be Ted Green-
field, merchant; Hank Meyers. Mi-
ami Beach publicity director: Ken-
neth Oka. city councilman and for-
mer mayor; Sidney Raff el, hotels;
Eugene Weiss, apartments; Ed
Yarnell. Eastern Airlines; and
Paul Brunn, of the Miami Beach
Sun.
The program will be under the
direction of Jack Freitag. and the
moderator will be Harry Smith,
former president of the League.
Ed Melniker. vice president of
the Mercantile National Bank, and
president of the Civic League, said
that some of the other subjectss to
be discussed include an advertis-
Herfi to Discuss Mefl
Hal Hertz will discuss "The Mall'
at a meeting of Miami Beach Lodge
of B'nai B'rith on Tuesday noon at
the DiLido hotel.
Zamora Adds Noted Teacher
Nathan Davidow. president.
Wednesday announced the addition
of Benjamin Kaminetsky to the
religious school staff of Temple
Zamora.
The appointment of Kammetsky
came concurrently with affiliation
of the school's curriculum with the
Bureau of Jewish Education.
Kaminetsky, well-known here
a teacher of Hebrew, was previa
ly a member of the Beth El Cos?
gregation staff for three years ttf
of Knesseta Israel-Tor a slmiT
period.
ing program to compete with near-
by resorts, the establishment of in-
formation offices in all major cit-
ies of the U.S.. a year-round events
program, fend subsidies for bona
fide travel agents and carriers who
initiate promotion toward this,
area.
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fun for a complete itinerary of everything
this unbeatable tour has to offer contact
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But don't miss out do it nowl
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p^ <* mo lutt details of 7-0* "


Friday, August 19.
1960
+ Anist fhriaBan
Page 5-B
Mexico City Holds fashion Festival on Monday
Own as Leading
L. America Center
Back-to-school fashion show (or
:ot^ through teens is planned by
he Emma Lazarus group of Ha-
dassah on Monday from 2 to 4
p.m al the home of Mrs. Peter
Dreisen. 9172 Froude ave. < '<>-
chairmen are Mrs. Dreisen and
Mrs David Daris Mtt. When* Ber-
man is president of the group.
Or. WoHson in Talk
This unique octagdn-shaped building will
grcce the campus of the University of Miami
w thin the next year, and is being hailed as the
forerunner of a new era in educational build-
ing design. Architect Robert Fitch Smith, of
Miami, and university officials conferred for
several months on the structure, which is in-
ter.r'ed specifically for teaching by use of tele-
vision and other visual aids. The square
building at the right is a complete TV produc-
tion studio from which programs will be wired
in closed circuits to classrooms in the main
building. Capacity of the structure is 2.064
students, in 16 classrooms varying in individ-
ual capacity from 56 to 304. Estimated cost is
$600,000.
Results of the 1960 census will
indicate that Mexico City is not
only holding her lead as Latin
America's most populous city, but
may show that she's running reck-
and-neck with Chicago for place as
the second largest city in all the
Americas. Fourteen Errors in Diet" was
The cosmopolitan capital is the to be the topic of a lecture by Dr.
gateway for Florida's onlv direct i Abraham Wolfson. Thursday morn-
service to Mexico. Guest Airways' 1 ing. 8.30 a.m.. before the Athletic
non-stop flights from Miami. Like Group, sponsored by the Miami
.all large cities, it has its full com- Beach Recreation Department,
plement of urban attractionsfine This marks Dr. Wolf son's sixth
food, modem hotels, excellent talk in the new series on "The
shopping and headliner night club Good Life."
acts In addition, it provides those
things uniquelv Mexicanmanachi
bands, native markets and archi once independent towns or. in some
tectural and other reminders of the cases kingdoms, warring for or
country's colonial and Indian civil
izations.
Continue?* from Page 1-B
li r the party Gypsy Rose Lee ten-
dered her "Auntie Mame" cast at
lU Grove Playhouse.

iking of Gypsy, spotted at
.nee: Mrs. Fred Atlas. Mrs,
ltd Goldstrich. Mrs. D. Don-
ah. Mrs. James Abramson.
d Mrs. Daniel Wax By the
way, Mrs. Wax is a newcomer
fom Chicago by way of Hol-
j like ... *
Mrs. Leonard (Lucille) Bursten
off to Milwaukee and. Apple"on to
her mother, Mrs. Helen
Blink, and sister. Mrs. Fred Mar
while the twins are Maying
li me to baby-sit with their little
ster. Sunny .. .
Tuesday Nfte Men's Bridge Club
East Traveler Halt
mi and wife Mildred got
I a< k Monday night Over cards
I ..esday, fellow-members thank-
ed Herb for the cards from Saigon
tw +^}ocialite
everyone received that morning
. The William Epsteins and
daughter. Donna, home from a
ad Indiana This
was their first trip back in 12
yean..
Friends of Clara (Mrs Philip
dehshtcd .-he's better and on
the road to recovery
Postcard to remember: "We
found Tahiti very primitive, very
French. arxl very naughty" .
,'.. Jack and Marion Rabin
ovitch
French cooking in Mexico City
intrigued Henry and Shirley
Barak Shirley said she ate
duck with craipe sauce five times
in a row at live different restau-
rants.

An eventful weekend for Betty
Me Leopold* Schwartz She
gave greetings from the National
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods
to the 33rd annual convention of
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans at the Deauville
hotel Then she dashed off to
win the Gold Assn. tourney at the
Miami Shores Golf Club .
Back to Miami Beach from
The Mexican capital is several
towns in one. There are the
"colonias" Lomis and Hipo-
dromo, for examplenamed for
the foothills and nearby race
track. Many foreign residents of
the city live in these attractive
suburbs, sharing the cost of their
private police force and other
services.
Such
communities as
against the powerful Aztec empire.
. Even the most taciturn visitor
finds extravagant adjectives to de-
scribe the capital and its environs.
But nowhere do they flow more
easily than in the city beyond the
city University City.
The university rises from a once
desolate lava rock region at the
south edge of town.
During September. 1960, Mexico
will observe the 150th anniversary
of her independence. Everyone
may confidently, expect this event
KLM Offers
Israeli Tours
Opinions on the Air
WCKR Radio in Miami is put-
ting the people of Dade county on
the air through the station's "Min-
- -"^iasiareTSBiPs
|1'a\el privately than in groups.
M Royal Dutch Airlines is offer-
Hi i six tours to Israel and Europe.
The Dutch airline, in conjunction
jyith American Travel Abroad.
T (., which is responsible for all
and arrangements, has provided
lie r hotels, sightseeing trips, sur-
pace transportation, meals, trans-
fers to airports and tips on these
pit varied 'tineraries.
The 37-day itinerary has the
same 15-day tour of Israel, plus
visits to Istanbul, Athens, Vien-
na, Lucerne, Paris, London and
Amsterdam. A 45-day tour, has
the seme itinerary In Israel, how-
ever it includes Rome, FJorence,
Venice, Lucerne, Interlaken, Ge-
neva, London, Brussels and Am-
sterdam.
An IB-day tour visits Paris and
tome before devoting 10 days to
ll'rael. A 31-day tour, which in-
|eludes 15 days in Israel, also visits
Rome, Lucerne, Paris, London and
Amsterdam.
as
"short, candid opinions from the
people, themselves, on important
news developments." WCKR news
reporters obtain the tape-recorded
statements at various locations in
Dade county. On-air presentation
usually features two opposing view-
points.
,. suburban .
Canada and Providence are Sam Xochimilco. San Angel. Tacubaya. ito be wildly and widely celebrated.
and Libby Rost to catch their Tacuba and Atzcapotzalco were I ST.
breath only Because they
leave Friday for London on the
SS Rotterdam, meander around
Europe and return here in No-
vember .
It was a first trip to Florida for
Miss Minerva Komenarski, of
Philadelphia The Solomon
Margolis family, whom she was
visiting, got a kick out-of showing
her the sights ... But what Min-
erva liked most was swimming in
the pool and sitting on the dock
just plain fishin' She's a
former concert olalet
Betty Trapne'iF expected to re
turn home Friday from Jackson
Memorial Hospital, where she's
been confined since July 29. fol-
lowing an automobile accident
... On the way to recovery,
Betty, a Jewish Floridian staffer,
will be back at her desk in a few
weeks.

Mass exodus at the Howard
Miller home the minute school
was out Ronnie went to Col-
umbus to take a special course in
debating for a d ,-. n c e d high
school students who've been rec-
ommended -i'hen on to New
York to visit Steve Pine, son of
Sol and Dubby Pine Mean-
while. Mike is out at the U of
Miami, and Marcy and Gary are
at Pinewood Camp .. .
Milton Balsam and his Marcia
back from a cruise to the Baha-
mas aboard the SS Bahama Star.
EASTERN SHIPPING CORPORATION Gen I nqenl
.<,3<0 Bo.tlJ'Mom.1 "- "'" ',' '"Y~" '"'<>'-
On** rfo.iv i io c Sundays lO o.m o i p.m
|Toking Gome Seriously
World champion Baltimore Colts.
[who will appear here in Miami in
[tie second annual United Fund pro
|Rame against the Pittsburgh Steel-
in the Orange Bowl on Sept. 2.
pie taking their preseason foot-
Iball seriously, Coach Weeb Ew-
banks said. Working his high
[Towered offense in training camp
early drills. Ewbanks boasts An
| in the air and on the ground. "Pre-
tialpn timing, usually a problem in
early, drills and the key to a
|c I' ure to the club already," Ew
tanks said.
n
t/tane
the of Mete Steee b eadlets e simple poeel
er oa entire well oees distinction te year home. A moterio.
ef tasting eeneeeeeet. the colors trill neter tode, texture
will never deteriorate, almost eliminating maintenance W"
wait to improve year home wit* the heoery one permanence
el Mas* Stone?
* Magnificent nn the hearse
* ffvervantlngly ageless
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it Natural looking
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MESA-STO
118 W. 25th St. HIALEAH TU 5-2181


--""
Page 6-B
-Jtmi&ncrkMaun
Friday, August 19.
<^fn the r^ealnt or *^ocieiu
I960
Levinson, Mills
Exchange Vows
In a double ring candlelight ce-
remony on Sunday. Aug. 14. Miss
li-bie Ann Mills became the bride
of Edward Ellis Levinson. Rabbi
Joseph Narot officated at the 6 30
p.m. rites in the Diplomat Country
Club.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Jermome B. Mills. 1650
Paylonia rd. The groom's parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Newton Levin-
son. 125 Shore dr. W.. Bay Heights.
The bride selected a traditional
wedding gown of white silk peau
de soie with scooped neckline, fit-
ted bodice edged with alencon lace,
reembroidered seed pearls, and
bouffant skirt. Her five tier
French illusion veil fell from a
cloche of matching lace and seed
pearls.
Maid of honor was Roxy Hirsch.
Linda Goldberg and Vicki Levin-
son were junior bridesmaids. In
charge of the guest book was Vicki
Kay Hirsch.
Ellis Hirsch was best man. Us-
hers included Mickey Mills and
Moms Futernick. Lee Mills was
junior usher.
The bride is a graduate of Miami
Beach High School, and attended
the University of Miami Mr.
Levinson received his degree in
Business Administration from the
I'mversity of Miami. He is pres-
ently a student at the U of M law
school.
Mr and Mrs. Nathan Goldberg,
of Baltimore. Md., the bride's pa-
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MRS. EWOAR0 UVINSON
ternal grandparents, attended the
wedding, as well as Mr. and Mrs.
Mannic Sheldon of Miami, the
groom's maternal grandparents.
Reception followed the cermony
at the Diplomat The couple are
honeymooning in Jamaica, and
will live in Miami Beach on their
return
FUR RE STYLING
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FT. IAUDE*DAIE
An imported silk organza gown
with lily-of the valley applique de-
sign and matching headpiece of
french illusion was the ensemble
Miss Rachel Harriet Feldan chose
for her marriage to David Edward
Goodman on Sunday. Aug. 14. at
the Deauville hotel. A bouquet of
lily-of-the-valley. white roses and
orchids completed her outfit.
Rabbi Samuel April officiated at
the 6:30 p.m. ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Mfs.
Herbert Feldan. 1444 SW 17th ter..
and the late Mr. Herbert Feldan.
The grooms parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Alexander Goodman, of St.
Louis. Mo
Given in marriage by the broth-
er, the bride was attended by her
sister-in-law. Mrs. Albert Feldan,
of New York, as matron of honor.
Miss Miriam Lox. Newark. N.J..
Miss Joan Cremer. Columbia, S.C.,
Miss Patty Pearlman. Mits Sondra
Barchan. and Mrs. Sidney lodgin,
all of Miami, were bridesmaids.
Miss "Florence Friedman, Hillside,
N.J.. was junior bridesmaid.
Morris Cremer, of St. Louis, un-
cle of the groom, acted as best
man. Ushers were Richard Brein-
ler, St. Louis; Ivan Deen. Macon.
Ga.; Lawrence Goldberg, Chicago;
Howard Friedman. Summit. N.J.;
and brother of the groom. George
J. W. Goodman, New York.
The bride is a graduate of Mi-
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth of Florida
Rabbi Dr. Isaac M. Ever, Director
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ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
MODIKN IQUIfmiNT I FVRNISNfNCS HtnOOf MIIIMNC
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Miami Beach
W.I Del Krlllll
MMS. lAUMtNCl KATZ
Miss Cohen Bride
Of Laurence Katz
Miss Sandra Louise Cohen is now
Mrs. Laurence M Katz. The couple
were married on Sunday, Aug. 14,
at the Sterling hotel. Rabbi H
Louis Rottman officiated at the
3 p.m. ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. David Max Cohen. 3726
Prairie ave. The groom's parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Henry Katz, 900
W. 47th st.
Maid of honor for her sister was
Miss Hallie Cohen. Barry Katz
acted as best man for his brother.
The bride attended the Univer-
sity of Miami and University of
Maryland. The groom attended the
same schools.
Reception followed the ceremony
at the Sterling. After a motor trip
up the East Coast, the couple will
be at home at 3700 Belle ave.. Bait-
more. Md.
short
ARC SHORTHAND, GREGG, PITMAN
Campfsiiln. MX. MM. NCR. ate.
For other courses plea** consult
YftlOW P AGE 620. PHONE BOOK
A D E L P H I TUTORINO SCHOOt
Attendance accepted by Dad* County
Board of Public Instruction.
500-526 N.I. Tftfc Street
Near Biaceyn. Blvd.
PL 7 7423 MU 1-1544
Werner-Kahn
RUTS. DAVID COODM4N
ami High School and Stephens Col-
lege, Columbia. Mo. She is a mem-
ber of Pi Phi Rho, retailing honor-
ary, and a former assistant buyer
of a New York firm.
The groom is a graduate of the
University of Missouri, and now at-
tends law school there. He was a
member of Zeta Beta Tau fratern-
ity, of which he was vice president
and treasurer. Phi Sigma Alpha,
political science honorary, and Phi
Delta Phi. law fraternity.
Reception and dinner followed
the ceremony at the Deauville. The
couple will live in Columbia, Mo.,
on their return from a Nassau hon-
eymoon and motor trip to Colum-
bia.
Zcrias, Weinstein
Vows on Beach
In a double ring ceremony on
Saturday evening. Aug. 6, Miss Bar.
bara Marion Weinstein became the
bride of Dr. Nardo Zaias.
Matron of honor was Mrs Ray
Belkov. Miss Marcia Zalmanef,
acted as maid of honor. Jane Bel-
kov and Zena Kreps were junior
bridesmaids. Debbie Belkov and
Marsha Zaiac were flower girls.
Boris Kozolchik, of Havana, was
best man with Isaac Kreps Ushers
include Emanuel Zaiac, brother of
the groom, and Joseph Friedman.
The bride selected a traditional
floor-length wedding gown of iy.
ory Italian silk, scoop neckline em-
broidered with alencon lace, mted
bodice, cap sleeves, and oouffant
skirt extending into a chapel train.
Her four-tier French illusion veil
fell from a tiara of seed pearls She
carried an arrangement of white
orchids, stephanot's. lily-of thi val-
ley. For something, the bride car-
ried an heirloom sixpence, used
by all the women in her family.
Newly wed Mrs. Zaias is a grad-
uate of Miami Senior High School,
attended Bryn Mawr College in
Pennsylvania, and will continue
her studies at the University of
Miami.
Dr. Zaias is a graduate of the
University of Miami and U of M
medical school. He is a resident in
dermatology at Jackson Memorial
Hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hodor. of
Miami Beach, were amonu quests
' attending their granddaughter's
: wedding.
Couple are honeymooning n
'Mexico. On their return, they will
live in Miami Beach!
Shaloma Hadassah Affair
Shaloma group of Hada- -;iii will
hold a card games affair or
Wednesday, 12:30 p.m.. at the Sea
Gull hotel. Mrs. Max M Fried-
man is chairman.
CORAL GABLES
COHVALESCEHT HOME
DAY CARE AVAILABLE
A Friendly and (Jenilc Atmosphere
tor Thu\e You Loxe"
M HOUR REGISTERED NURSING SERVICE
SPECIAL DIETS OBSERVED
All BOOMS ON GROUND FIOOR
PRIVATE BATHROOMS
AIR CONDITIONED SWIMMING POOl
SPACIOUS GROUNDS t SCREENED PATIO
Ferdinand H. Ptosenthal, Director-Owner
Form, i Aaal Dar Ml sinui 'loan nualana *
I'll- JeWtafe Home, for And, PUtSburaD
7060 SW. 8th ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA
M0 6-8826
DAN SEROTT ANNOUNCES
The Opening of
P.Y. CORP,
Wholesalers & Exporters
OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED LINES
I Complete lino of SHEETS, BLANKETS, SPREADS, TOWELS,
BATH MATS mad* by Cannon, Dundee A Peppered for
Hotds, Motels, Apt. Houses, Home**
p Complete lino of INFANTS WEAR A FURNITURE including
Layettos, Swings, Cribs, Mattresses, Bassinettes, Strollers.
Complete lino of CHILDREN'S I BOYS' B GIRLS' APPAREL
TO SIZE 14. Sport Tops, School Clothes and Dross Attire.
AIR CONDITIONED AMPLE PARKING
8 30 to S P.M. Mondays thro Fridays
Wo Invite All Our Friends to Visit Our Showrooms at
127 N.E. 9th ST. Phone FR 3-8737
person*,iitd service of f Be
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
***k except rosft JmsWm bW ye* kipp*


Friday. August 19. I960
1
"if/*inrrkUtr
Pag. 7-W
EDITH APPLEBAUM IS ON VACATION.
mS. DAVID KUBIM
Wsrner-Kalin
Miss Wagman,
Student Married
Mr. and Mrs. David Rubin will
live at 7005 Fieldcrest rd.. Balti-
more, Md., when they return from
their Jamaica honeymoon.
The couple were married in 2
' p.m.* ceremonies at the Algiers
hotel on Sunday, Aug. 14. Rabbi
Yaakov Rosenberg officiated.
The bride is the former Miss Ju-
I dith Ellen Wagman. Her parents
I are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wagman,
1540 SW 20th ave., Miami. The
I groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
I Edward Rubin, 826 SW 13th ave.
Maid of honor was Miss Barbara
Masur. Bridesmaids included Re-
nee Geyer, Verna Sodikoff. Susan
Freedman, and Diane Berk.
Best man for his brother was
Martin Rubin. Ushers were Martin
Kline, Richard Sachs, Harry Gni-
en. and Steven Millison.
The bride chose a wedding gown
featuring peau de soie and alencon
lace.
She attended the University of
Florida, where she a member ol
Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority.
The groom is a student in his
junior year at the University of
Man land dental school. He belongs
to Alpha Omega fraternity.
Goldmans Will
Live in New York
Miss Frances Ina Lazarus and
Allen Stephen Goldman exchanged
wedding vows on Sunday, August
14, in New York, City.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Murray Lazarus. 1630 SW
13th ave.. Miami. The groom is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Gold-
man, Scarsdale. N Y.
Maid of honor for her sister was
Nancy Lazarus. Best man was Dr.
Howard Goldman.
Groomsmen were Arthur Laza
rus and Eugtne Goldman. Brides-
maid was Harriet Goldman.
Given in marriage by her par-
ents, the bride selected a floor-
| length wedding gown of bouquet
; taffeta. Designed along princess
j lines, the molded bodice featured
a scoop neckline of reembroidered
alencon lace enhanced with tiny
i seed pearls. The sleeves were long
I with pointon-hand. Her aisle-wide
! skirt was adorned with alencon lace
medallions and pearls, and the
back interest was a flowing sash
above a chapel train.
She carried an orchid bouquet
on a Bible belonging to her aunt,
, Mrs. Harold Pulver, of Elmont,
;l.i.
The bride is a graduate of Miami,
Senior High School. She was
I sweetheart of Hillel AZA. and pres-
ident of District 5 B'nai B nth
! Girls.
After two years at Sophie New-
jcorab College, where she joined
| Sigma Delta Tau sorority, the bride
' transferred to the University of Mi-
ami, and graduated with a Bacbe-
| lor's degree in elementary educa-
tion. Mrs Goldman will be teach-
ing a second grade class in Scars-
dale this fall.
A graduate of Tulane Univer-
-lty. the groom has recently com-
pleted six months of basic training
with the Army at Fort Dix, N. J.
He is presently associated with
Nathan Goldman and Company in
New York.
Following a 12-day honeymoon
in Jamaica, the newlyweds will be
at home at the Ridgecrest Apart-
ments, 1 Uakridge pi., Eastchester,
N. Y.
I\JGLTST BROS Ry,
ii t >> at si'
Barbora Golden's Betrothal Told
Mrs. Lillian Golden announces
lilt engagement of her daughter.
B< rbara, to Karl Louis Kaplan.
The couple was feted at a cock-
Itail reception and dance Sunday
lb) Mrs. Golden, banquet manager
' : be Carillon, in the Baroque
Ik m of the hotel.
rbara, who resides with her
I mother and sister at 6817 SW 10th
f! West Hollywood, is a graduate
Id Broward High.
Her fiance, the son of Mr. and
i Mrs. Ezra Kaplan. 1071 NE 178th
jler., No. Miami, is employed by
he Miami Post Office Annex. He
j graduated from Miami Beach High.
! is majoring in industrial engineer-
| ing at Miami University, and is a
| member of Tau Delta Phi fratern
. ity.
The couple plan to be married
Mar. 12.
Sefft Am Breakfast
Prospective members of Temple
Beth Am were this week invited to
a traditional breakfast Sunday
morning. 10 a.m.. at the Temple.
5950 No. Kendall dr. Chairman is
Morton Orbach.
Beach Lodge Party
Have thai
Business Meeting,
Banquet, or
Special Occasion

You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for o
wedding or a private party f
Ot ttl<
Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
i B'rith held a social and games
party Wednesday evening at the
Algiers hotel. Herbert Heiken,
president, and Irving Schatzman.
presidentelect, were chairmen.

lor Information!
HAZEL ALLISON
CaMring Director,
JE 1-6061
Ith St. m Collins Avo.
tl III < it 111111 *! <
ORDER YOU* NEW YEAR S CARDS NOW!
INVITATIONS PEWONAIIZED STATIONERY,
WEDDINGS MATCHES,
kr-BAS MITZAHS NAPKINS, ETC
HANNAH H. SCHER
ALL YOU* MINTING NEEDS T"
ENGRAVING. EMBOSSING,
PRINTING
SOCIAL lb
COMMERCIAL
Phone F* 1-7195 1600 S.W. first Avtnw


Page &B
+Jmist> fttr/rfiar
Friday. August 19, iggg
^Tjcur A corsage is yours free for the asking, and will be presented
by The Jewish Floridian to each mother cf a Bar or Bas Mitzvah
if The request is addressed to Corsage for You," P.O. Box 2973,
Miami 1, Fla one month in advance. Requests may be made on
a postcard, and should include the name of the Bar Mitzvah and
date and place of the ceremony. The corsage will be forwarded
to you courtesy of Blackstone Flower Shops in time for the Bar
Mitzvah occasion.
OBHT
F-HUUF1
ARTHUR
Temple Emanu-EI
Registration
Temple Emanu El relifkmi
-t'hiH.l thi> week announced reg-
istration in all departments for
the fall semester.
Nursery school is a half-day pro-
gram from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Foun-
dation school features a Hebrew-
English all-day program for chil-
dren (rom five through seven years
of age. and meets from 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m.
Daily religious. Sunday, and He-
brew High School registration will
be taken on Monday and Tuesday,
Aug. 29 and 30. 7 to 9 p.m.. at
Sirkin Hall. Registration is also
scheduled at the NorlH Branch
building. 77th st. *and Dickens
ave.. 7 to 3 p.m.. on Wednesday.
Aug. 31.
Rabbi Bernard A. Mussman is
director of education. Principal of
the foundation school is Mrs. Mir-
i iam P. Anisfield, and Mrs. Naomi
' Brandeis is head nursey teacher.
P e a r ly G a i t

_. by Hal Pearl |
J
HAL PEARL IS ON VACATION THIS WEEK.
Robert Galbut
Bar Mitzvah of Robert Nathan
Galbut will be celebrated at Beth
Jacob Congregation during Satur-
day morning services, Aug 20.
Robert i> the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Hyman P. Galbut. 4630 Roy
al Palm ave He is a student at
the Hebrew Academy, and will
read from the Torah and Mattir
;ir.d deliver the Sabbath sermon
He trill also chant the Mu-af MTV-
Id
Guesl -primal i< tadtt will be
I all Miller, of Kansas
( ii'il- of the Bar Mitz-
who arrived bere for the qc
casion \\:\h hi< wife. Leah, and
children. Felice and hrnrst. He
Will be intr i M CO)
d I) Rabbi Tlbor stern, ol
Bch Jacob.
The Bar Milzvuh Charge sermon
v ; i > h .. b b i Label DulMx,
ag spiritual leader of Tea*
N .1 and instructor at Ve-
st...., i Diversity Be la also an un-
< I" of Richard.
Rahbi Alexander Gross, princi-
pal of the Hebrew Academy, will
speak in behalf of the Academy.
0:her gueffta will include the Bar
M tzvah's grandparents. Mr. and
mm
a largest family Trait in fIonia J
ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY }
Mrs Morris Dulitz; and uncles and
lunts. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wash
Sky. Mr and Mrs Hyman Tentes.
and Mr and Mrs. Sherman Rapa-
hel. New Orleans. La., and Mr
and Mrs. Bennie Friedlander. Mo-
bile. Ala.
The Bar Mitzvah's father is fi-
nancial secretary of Beth Jacob
regation. president of the
Greater Miami Cemetery Assn.,
and chairman of the Miami Dim
JOB of the I'nion of Orthodox Con-
: America.
Philip Schwartx
Temple Sinai of North Miami
I Um llU i the Bar Mit/vah of
Philip Si.hu artz on Saturday morn-
ing'. Aug. 13. with Rabbi Benno
\\ allacta officiating.
Philip is the son of Mr and Mrs
Bernhard Schwartz. 17730 NW 14th
pi He atti ndi Norland Jonior High
and :hc religious school of Temple
Sinai.
Luncheon reception in his honor
followed it UM Algiers hotel.

Artttur Kurtz
Rabbi Solomon Schiff will offi-
ciate at the Bar Mitzvah of Arthur
Kurtz on Saturday morning,' Aug.
20. at Beth El Congregation.
Arthur is the son of Mr. and Mrs '
Alex Kurtz. 1630 SW 20th St.
He is a student in the eighth
grade at the Hebrew Academy,
where he belongs to the Science
Club.
Raphael Skop
Wins Scholarship
A University of Miami junior has
been awarded a health scholarship
by the NaUonal Foundation for
Medical Scientific Research.
He is Raphael Stephen Skop. son
of Rabbi and Mrs Morris A. Skop.
3511 Riviera dr.. Coral Gables.
Raphael will continue his studies
at the University of Miami for the
next two years. The balance of his
scholarship will be used for two
years of post graduate work in So-
cio psychological studies.
Cracker Barrel
Chats Continue
By Special Report
NEW VORK The Cracker Bar-
rel chats, which makes up the sec-
ond segment of the White Mount-
ains Festival of the Seven Arts,
got under way at the Lake Tarle
ton Club. Pike. N.H., on Aug. 14.
The two week daily outdoor sym-
posium will end on Aug. 29.
During this period, each day
I after lunch. Tarleton's 450 guests
gather under a spread of maples
on a corner of the lawn to hear
40-minute informal talks by lead-
ing personalities in the worlds of
art. books, the theatre and politics.
Held annually for the past 11
years under the direction of Jack
Colbert, Chatauqua type sessions
have heard from every field of
artistry, including such luminaries
as David Susskind. Eli Wallach. Je-
rome Weidman. John Chapman. Ar-
thur Miller. Kim Hunter. Regina
Resnik. Norman Scott. Earl Wil-
Demos Launch Campaign
son, Hy Gradner, Mike Wallace
Lawrence S p i v a k. Barry Gray,
j Leon Pearson and many others.
Let's Be
Realistic____
There's no sects thing as tap quality
food served cheap No amount of
garnishing, flavoring anal tenderiung at
applied by mim of tko "enperts" mako an inferior product lotto lido first
top quality Wo at Candlelight In*
first purchase iho bed meats procurable
thee our chefs prepare them to please
the laite of the moil emoting gourmet.
Candlelight Inn hat long boon the
gathering piece fet sportsmen, artists,
professional people end theatrical
groups who enfoy such specialties M
Aged Steaks. rVsttse lib) of Beef, and
many other delightful entries.
Exollent service, king site drinks, and
realistic prices guarantee for you, dollar
for dollar, the best in dining pleasure.
Open deity for lunch and serving die>
nert from 5 p m to midnight you will
find Candlelight Inn. under manage-
ment of Henry leitsen, combines infor-
mality with relaxation. 1st the eyes of
tourists and Floidant alike a dining
ettablithment second to none. Candle-
light Inn is located one block North of
the Oreve Playhouse theatre
OPEN FRIDAY. SATURDAY t SUNDAY
FROM 4 to 9 p.m.
FINEST -:r DINING
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Air-Coatf. (JN 6-6043 '"<,*
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakaihruth
940 71st Street
ROYAL HUNGARIAN'S CATERERS
731 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH JE 8-5401
FOWL Si 1*1 Kit < \TERi\1,
WEDDINGS # BAR MITZVAHS BANQUETS
PUB MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR eEST RET EREN.
An intensive registration cam- umn this election, we must work
paiyn to net out a strong Demo- at it." said Harry Levy, executive
cratic vote In the national elections member of the organization.
sToVt inaugurated here by the Dem-
ocratic Club of Miami Beach at a
special meeting of officers at the
Delano hotel "If we are going to
put Florida in the Democratic col-
SINCE 1949 04 RESTAURANT 79th St. CouMwoy PL 4-6656 Magnificently Re-Decorated
PLANKED STEAKS ROAST BEEF SEAFOOD FLAMING SHISH KEBAB BEEF STROGANOFF CHICKEN DIVAN
BANQUET FACILITIES CREDIT CARDS HONORED e> 1
A RINDIZV0US fOK PARTICULAR Pf0ft[
DIH1HG AI
'D RFSTAi|RANT & LOUNGE
110 N.E. 79th STREET
DINNERS from* I. 35
Choice of 17 Main Courses
Free Win*, Saltier A Krtishes
WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN
1141 Washington Avt.
Beautifully Catered
Affairs Call
JE 4 2655
RIVIERA TW RESTAURANT
DELICATESSEN and CATERERS
FULL COURSE DINNERS SERVED IN OUR DINING ROOM
Friday thru Sunday 4:30 to 9 P.M
Yaratiom Spvrtal
SMORGASBORD All You Can Eat-$1.B9
Monday thru Thursday 5 F.M. to 8:30 F.M.
1830 Ponco do Loon, Corner Majorca, Coral Gables
For Reservations call HI 8-5441 Closed Saturdays
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN CORDON
GORDON and PONT
BkBhdafkBfc
TED
I0SNIR,(aTIIIII
toot fears sf eeerref fa O caaiaeiH MM
170 N. W. 5th ST.. MIAMI PNONI FR *-79*e
ftaaW Se-ferviiiee) at Umitti Kasarei Aiseciefiea ef Crtafer AJmmnI
RABBI CHAIM KARLIN8KV. Rav Hamaehehir. Chief et Kashrjth
Of IN HOUSE WRWttMS BAR MITZVAHS RKEPTI0NS
NEW KOSHER
ROMWELL
ABE
GEFTER'S
HOTEL
bietarv laws a sabbath bbsenveo
rUll TIBIC MASHSIACN e PR causes
RILICIOUS SCMVICU BAILV
special salt sucan raw airrs
STEAKS. CHBI>S a RBASTS MB EXTRA
CHARCC WIT* HI!S MAir NATE.
European Plan Available
__.**' eta ftesN
ffaa DOUBLE 0CC.
fAaf SIBSLE BCC.
^ SB'S HICNtN
KBSNER MEALS INCIUOLB
2* ar ioi aaarn
BTNER NATES AVAILABLE
CANTS*. YAR0EIBI
'N'rRTA,NM8NT NiGHUT AMPU HARKING
BANQUET "OOW FOR PRIVAT1 PfPUl^
PHOtif Plo/o I 794?
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING INDIVIDUALLY CONTROLLID
RRIVATI REACH east POOL CARANA CLUR __ JE 4-2141
lAMt BLACH.
Plat
ON THE OCEAN FRONT AT 20tt> STREET
WILL OFFICIATE FOR THE
NIGH HOLIDAYS
ARB All TBCSE EfATBOES f0
a CBAISE L6UNCCS *ATS ,_
e 7i" t BAOia la jaea "J"
a TREE SELE fANRINS *"*-
O SVEINEN NBAST SBCIAl SABO
O DAY CABS< BISBT PATBBL___
a COCKTAIL PaaYTY BNWIB3
O INtCRTAINHLNT BISKTLY


Friday. Augu* 19. 1960
+Jeitfrltrkt&r
Pag* 9-B
"The Lot World." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's gripping story of
a trip to a prehistoric land, filmed in color, starring Jill St. John
and David Hedison, with Claude Rains and Fernando Lamas,
now ot the Miami and Miracle. At the Carib is "Expresso
Bongo," an entertaining satire on the entertainment world, with
Laurence Harvey and Sylvia Syms.
Cantor Bock
From Institutes
Cantor David Conviser, of Tem-
ple Beth Sholora. has returned
from a month's vacation as music
director of two national Federation
Temple Youth Institutes, one in In-
dianapolis and the other in Great
Barrington, Mass.
Cantor Conviser met with lead
rs of youth groups in Reform con-
gregations from all parts of the
I'nited States, and joined with
prominent rabbis in teaching the
coming leaders of the Reform-Lib-
rral-Progressive movement in Ju-
daism.
He is new engaged in prepar-
ing the choirs of Temple Bath
Sholom for the High Holy Days.
The children's groups from the
fourth grade through junior high
ft rehearsing to sing at serv-
ices with the regular choir.
Cantor Conviser has just been
appointed a member of the national
committM on music curriculum of
the Commission on Jewish Educa-
tion, which functions under the
joint auspices of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
and the Central Conference of
American Rabbis.
Rabbi Leon Kronish. spiritual
leader of Beth Sholom. is also a
member of the commission.
Con/or Strasifeld Named
For the fourth consecutive year.
Cantor Abraham Strassfeld was
this week named by Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute to render the mu-
sical portions of the liturgy during
the High Holy Days. Herman Wein-
traub, president of Agudath Israel,
said Cantor Strassfeld will join
Rabbi Isaac Ever, who officiates,
in conducting the Rosh Hashona
and Yom Kippur services.
Nursery School
Sessions to Open
Beth David daily nursery and
; kindergarten is now open for regi-
stration to children three and four
yeaTs of age. and meets every
week-day morning from 9 a.m. to
, 12 noon. In addition to regular
nursery programs, the children are
oriented in religious holidays and
the Jewish way of life.
Eligible are children who will
enter the first grade of public
school in September. 1961. A
reading readiness program is of-
fered Trasportation to and from
school may be arranged.
Members of the staff are Mrs.
Hersch. Mrs. Sidney Richman.
and Mrs. Lester Saal.
Congregation
Yehudah Moshe
Formerly North Dade
Jewish Center
AHHOUNCIS
REGISTRATION FOR
HEBREW SCHOOL &
SUNDAY SCHOOL
from Aug. 21 to Sept. 4
Kcgisfrefiea at #b
epieJ School Offke
13630 W. Dixie Hwy.
PL 1-0283
Eichmann Story
To be on TV
NEW YORK-UTA>-The Arm-!
1 strong Circle Theatre will produce
a one-hour television show on the
CBS network on Sept 28 dealing
with the life of Adolf Eichmann.
murderer of six million European
Jews.
According to producer Robert E.
Costello. the presentation will
chronicle the history of the SS of
ficer from the time he first joined
the Nazi party and became ob
sessed with the idea of completely
annihilating Jewish populations in
German-occupied territory to his
capture in Argentina.
The story, being written by Dale
Wasserman. will be presented in
documentary fashion, and will util
ize actual films, still photos and
- dramatic sequences._____________
India Observes Israeli Agriculture
By T. Nerain
New Delhi
Progress of Israel in the field
of cooperative farming, and the
establishment of society on a true
socialise pattern, has created
interest in India in the Israeli de-
velopment programs India and
Lrael have many values in com-
mon, which include a desire to
develop a cooperative economy
on a voluntary basis. There is in-
creasing interest in India to know
more about Israel, its people, its
culture and its international and
social problems.
In the past, many Indian journ-
alists and Socialist leaders have
visited Israel. They in their own
way presented the true picture of
Israel. But very recently the "In-
dian Express" assigned its spe-
cial correspondent. Sylvain Man-
goet. to make a study tour of
Israel. The "Portrait of Israel"
that he wrote in the column of
his paper analyzed the "economic
trends" and the efforts being
made toward political and social
progress of Israel. It spoke of a
"stagnating Arab world" of Nas-
serism as "too little pre-occupied
with the problems of raising liv-
ing standards -at home and
throughout the Arab masses."
The correspondent had to faco
tho wrath of tho press attache of
tho UAR Minion in Now Dtlhi.
Tho press attach* wreto to tho
editor of tho "Indian Express"
that "Arabs consider tho appeer-
enco of a portrait like this in a
leading Indian newspaper as
somewhat puzzling, especially be-
cause India is one of those coun-
tries associated with the Pales-
tine question from the very be-
ginning."
Even the CAR press attache
had to concede that Israel was
making progress and that the
Arab world was divided. He wrote
in his letter: "Israel may have
made greater progress than some
other countries in certain fields,
but that is always possible for a
country' which begins with a
break with its long and rooted
past ."
It is true that the Arab house,
according to this spokesman, "is
still not what the Arabs would
like it to be. and it is possible for
Israel to try to play off one Arab
country against another." The
press attache derived consolation
from the claim that "for the first
time in the last decade. Israel has
failed to persuade the United
States not to grant a big interna-
tional loan to the UAR. The very
fact that the loan (from the World *
Bank) is for the Suez Canal;
which Israel cannot use because
of the belligerency between it and
the Arab countries, was a great
diplomatic defeat for Israel."
In his "Portrait of Israel." Mr.
Mangeot drew the picture of a
poor little land inspired by noth-
ing but the highest ideals and
surrounded by a sea of Arab hos-
tility with a huge angry alien pop-
ulation impatient to push it into
the sea. We get the picture of a
gallant people who are building
up'a haven for the world's perse-
cuted Jews, who are conducting
a great experiment in the labora-
tory' of land management, and
who are leaping from strength to
strength in contrast with their
weak, howling, divided and stag-
nant Arab neighbors.
In Israel, Mr. Mangeot report-
ed, every successful development
of trade with the East is regard-
ed as a defeat for tho Arab
League policy of preventing any
expansion of Israel's trad* by
military and economic blockade.
The policy makers at the top in
Israel, who are sober realists, be-
lieve that "circumstances have
made Israel en interesting lab-
oratory where large, under-de-
veloped countries can profitably
study many of their own prob-
lems as if it were under a micro-
scope," the writer told the read-
ers of his paper.
Israel" be wrote, "believes
more than ever that, in the long
run. -olid relations with Asia and
Africa win prove the most ef-
fective lever for forcing the Arab
world to accept the reality that
the State of Israel has come to
stay and that her neighbors must
one day come to terms with this
reality. India is so obviously a
key country in this process, and
Israel makes no attempt to de-
lude herself about it. But since
the Sinai campaign she has ac-
quired a new self-confidence
which enables her to take a more
patient and philosophical attitude
towards India's hesitation to es-
tablish diplomatic relations with
Israel-
Mr. Mangeot termed "very
flimsy reasons" all Indian argu-
ments that Pakistan would take
advantage to launch a rumor
campaign against India through-
out the Middle East if India es-
tablished diplomatic ties with Is-
rael. The Indian writer does not
believe that such establishment
of diplomatic ties with I s r a e 1
would weaken India's chance at
becoming a mediator or the fact
that the "Indian Government has
been discouraged in the past be-
cause every time Delhi was ready
to take an initiative some inci-
dent between Israel'and the Arab
world made the timing inoppor-
tune."
"Indeed," he wrote, "Israel's
efforts in the past to secure more
official recognition from New Del-
hi were certainly partly due to a
conviction that, once the two
countries come into contact, they
would discover, for all their dif-
ferences in size, that they had
many problems in common which
would give practical substance
to any formal relations."
Reporting on the economic
trends in Israel. Mr. Mangeot
said that in eleven snort years
both society and the conception
of the State have changed at a
"bewildering pace." sometimes
leaving the pioneers more be-
wildered by the changes than the
more recent immigrants, who too
have been caught up in the daily
problems of survival and assimi-
lation to ponder their implica-
tions.
"There can be little doubt that
the Arab threat has so far bene-
fited the State of Israel more than
it has harmed it." Mr. Mangeot
wrote. "In terms of time it has
meant the difference between the
operation of pressure cooker and
an old-fashioned stewpan. In
terms of national consciousness
it has. paradoxically, gjven Is-
raelis a self-confidence, in world-
ly as well as in spirtual terms,
which might otherwise have tak-
en generations to acquire.
VOTERS!
si's nrr.?=5 ?PjX sw
REPUoUCAN FINANCE COMMITTEE Of DADE COUNTY
The) tint* is short!
Senel your help
NOW!
S/ JAMES W. DICICfY, Cheirmen
eph..e Cow"*"
ef Dd Ceeety. Merie*
111? OePONT SUIIDING
MIAMI 1% noeioA
M. I'ol. Adv.
New Addition to Staff
By Special Report
NEW YORK The appointment
of A. Ray Levin as Northwestern
area representative of the Ameri-
can Zionist Council was announced
here by Rabbi Irving Miller, chair-
man of the American Zionist Coun-
cil. With headquarters in San
Francisco. Levin will represent the
organization in northern Californ-
ia. Oregon. Washington. Wyoming,
Colorado. Montana. Utah, Idaho
and Nevada.
Gtftsf to be Speaker
Emil Moskowitz will be a guest
speaker at the Sterling hotel on
Saturday. 5 p.m. Moskowitz is j
founder of the Jersey Carpet Corp.
Skitxh Henderson
To Close Pop
Concert Season
Composer conductor pianist
Skitch Henderson, one of the coun-
try's most popular orchestra lead-
ers, will be guest conductor for Mi-
ami's tenth and last Pop concert
of the season on Sunday evening.
Henderson has been engaged by
the University of Miami Summer
Symphony to replace D'Artega.
who is ill in a London hospital.
He will conduct the originally-
scheduled program of the "Great-
est Melodies" composed by Rod ti-
ers and Hammerstein. Jerome
Kern. Cole Porter, and Sigmund
Rom berg.
Two Miami soloists, Lyrme Cru-
san, mezzo-soprano, and Patrick
Matthews, bdritene, also will bo
featured on the program at the
air-conditioned Miami Beech Au-
ditorium.
Selections include "Sweethearts."
from Maytime: "Wanting You."
from New Moon: "Smoke Gets in
Your Eyes.' "Slaughter on Tenth
Avenue." "Night and Day." and
"Can-Can.'
Skitch Henderson, though born
in England, spent most of his boy-
hood days in the United States.
He lived in Minnesota. Kansas and
Oklahoma until he was 15. at
time he moved to Chicago. His ear-
ly musical training came from a
variety of teachers, and it was not
until he reached Chicago that he
seriously considered a musical ca-
reer
In 1938 he went on a tour with
Judy Garland which ended in Hol-
lywood Calif. He later worked for
NBC in Hollywood and studied'
conducting under Albert Coates.'
Henderson also studied theory and
harmony under Arnold Schonberg
He was an accompanist for Frank
Sinatra and Bing Crosby an num
erous radio programs.
He later became music director
of the National Broadcasting Com-
pany and appeared on the weekly
"Steve Allen Show," and earlier
with Allen on the "Tonight" show.
He recently appeared as a guest
star on the "Kate Smith Show." He
also has been a guest conductor
with the major symphony orches-
tra's in the U.S.. including the New
SKITCH HCMwEISOM
York Philharmonic and the Na-
tional Symphony in Washington,
D. C. and last yeax with the Lon-
don Philharmonic.
Patrick Matthews, 25. is a
music education instructor and
choral director at Miami Edison
Junior High School. He appeared
last season in the Symphony's
concert production of Berlioz*
"Damnation of Faust." The hand-
some baritone also appeared in
the' Opera Guild's Workshop pres-
entation of "Carmen" last May-
Miss Crusan, 20. a mezzo-so-
prano, recently won a coveted
"Jeannie" award in vocal competi-
tion at the Stephen Foster Memor-
ial in White Springs. Fla and last
season performed in UM's First
Festival of American Music under
the direction of Fabien Sevitzky.
tfeWm
JEWISH HOUSEKEEPER
take car* tm4 cetk for wMiwit
MM TW# ffMf ChlMrMU
MO 7-2731 4327 S.W. loth St.
I LOT IN HAIFA, ISRAEL
I O. CnwL CX. Vie., to* lecanea. \
i *> Mid Hotel. J Dwm I*W
* 24 aota. $7,500, ierofuiti Hindi.
HI 3-O042
^aweha^dbdba4fcAa1eAa.Adb,e^Adb,e1


Page 10-B
+Jelst fhrkh^r
Friday, August 19, ja
GEMS OF WISDOM
The heart of fools if in their
mouth but tht mouth of the u-ie
M in their heart. MM MM
*
All i* mv.w. hit he is a
uho will not druggie to penetrate!
the dart; i (tl. i>|s m i :

Plra.*H"e pr.de dominion and
>uprrsfitu>n. these are the /out
flictions u'hu'h corrupt the ebil
a nation The eWCNCC c< -
aliiy u the euenct of a people I
spiritlldlltv KROCHMAL

To be distressed Jt a nece>dr\
condition of Ii/e u j6-u',I
IBN KIK.AR.

1 Ml* friend lids a friend and hi*
<5fn tanti s
Tveft
Holiness and
\gious JZif*
in Truth &.* CTi/ 1V**L.nj
Of the Torah Go Together
.QUOATH ISRAEL. 7S01 Carlyla ivi
Orthodox. Rabbi Imc Evar
Pi da.) tj M p i" Hal I a-m
I in "Th l.lsh l.it Mon'h ci
ih' Tear- Klul.
By RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN
Tempio Adath Yeshurun
friend has a friend, be discreet.
rAKMUD n,^ hm MRA.
[.> him
HASDAI
Pedigree il of >i I al Ji
uho is nol himself iii'h/f

\.. u J'i BStft and "Ttl i> J'-
oj(h rALMUO SHI I

I rnt uho is not belie?
u'n appeal :-mnrd
-reads. |l >-i PHI
ANSHE EMES.
Conaarvativa.
president
2M3 SW 1h ivi
Maxwell Silborman
BETH OAVIO. 2438 SW 3rd awa. Con
aarvativa. Rabbi Yaakov Roaanboro
Cantor William W Lioson
Naturda] "in llur Mtttvah Mit-h
I bob "f Mr nn RODOTt, "ii "f Mr. .n.l M i i. .<
r \ ;n-
K-fTebrew L*oiti ertation
?Kntra n-iiyaen -ids
i ;
If t ; : T ; v f
tai .D'TaK. io?# "IDS
X)-\j) irn ntfra? ,trrp*0|f
.D'aiDi D^sna D^n1?
-ite ntVB nn^x^w^a
Are the Jewish people the chosen
people of God? At one time, this
was universally accepted. Even in
times of severe harassment and per
secution. the Jew was never hesi-
tant in his belief thai he was a
member of the chosen people. His
knowledge of his faith and his deep
runted conviction in hi> Torah for-
tified him in this belief.
i
In our own times, the truth of I
hi> statement has been challenged j
by some Jewish people in high *
places. The most recent of fliTTl
was the Premier of Israel. David )
Ben-Gurion. during his but visit.to l
the railed States lie said he did
not believe that the Jewish people
were more "chosen" than any
other. One sect in Jewish life to .
I i\ still prays from a prayer book
which ha\l deleted any reference to
the "chosen" quality of the Jew
ish people.
It appears that some Jews are
embarrassed by the claim that the Jews are the chosen people of God
They are worried about "What will the Goyim say?" After all. isn't it
chauvinistic to claim in the 20th century that the Jewish people arc
chosen by God above all other people?
This sensitivity as to what the Goyim will say has blinded many
of our thinking Jews to the actual meannig the Bible attaches to the
chosen" quality of the Jewish people. Let us look at Verse 2. Chapter oade heights'center 1*01 nw
14. of this week's portion. "For thou art a holv people unto the Lord 1g3rd at Conaarvativa Rabbi Max
thy God. and the Lord hath chosen thee to be His own treasure from | Kn,h!". ?*"*,r "SErfon M"n.2rs I.
KASBl JONAH CAPIAN
...if ofheri
BETH EL. MO SW 17th ava. Orthodox
Rabbi Solomcn ftchiff.
! i.i v | Jo Hal da
Rermon "Martina th- ChaJhna;' "-
the K'llnr. l'..ir MltSVaB Arthur.
s'.n ..f Mr anil Mra W\ K urta
BETH EMETH 12250 NW 2nd ava
Conaarvativa Rabbi r>vid W. Hir
aon. Cantor Hyman Fain.
l-ii'iHi s i.. ii ii .- rmun i'
hi I fTiai Ity. HaMurd n ; m Shri-
ll ii < :;< Ikln. hluilcnfm Bath BSmatli
I'-hKlolls s ho 'I. v\ ill i li.iir
''(*onuniin.il Raaponatbllll} "
IETH ISRAEL. 4000 Pralri* ava. Or
thodox. Rabbi H. Louia Rottman.
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Waahmgton
ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Starn.
Cantor Maurica Mamchaa.
-
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ava.
Orthodox. Jutiua Saparo, praaidant.
-------a-------
BETH TFILAH. 35 Euclid ave. Or
thodox. Rabbi Joaaph E Rackovaky
--------
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 40t
16th it Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim
Karhnaky.
CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER
755 SW 18th it. Miami Rabbi Sam-
uel April. Cantor Mayar Oiaaar.
TALES OF MORALS
Once upon a
a I
f I..
itas i* a.m.
all the people that are upon the face of the earth." U i-"'
The Jew has never doubted the capacities of other peoples to make flaolergranaoa
their contribution to the well-being of all mankind. Every people has
been endowed with basic attributes that have distinguished it from other
peoples We have borrowed from the wisdom of other peoples. How-
ever, we proclaim, together with the sages of the Talmud. '"If they say
that there is wisdom among the nations, you shall believe it. If they
,0"pim nlOipaO IKatf .irinS sa-v ther* Torah among the nations, don't believe it."
What is unique about the Jewish people is their absolute acceptance
BTN ,00300 T\XX\T37S T1J3 of the Torah. The character and nature of the Torah is holinessholi-
: *.'__M__ '. ne;%;' that comes from the Torah way of life. This, in essence, is what
~E?Q jmaaiD-ia nB??3mirWKl the passage in Deuteronomy points up.
a.* rmam-iin "iwiaBM nnn No 0,her I*0^ is a^^ed or is expected to live by the teachings of
I-] f1 V J^'-' 'U?WJ i-iV nwb\m inE?x dh 'ana Torah way of li,e u is in lhis sense-and lhis se,-se on,y-thal we pn*t*!> MaiavakyTca'nu; l*"" cohlnorto"
to be the chosen" people of God. Any other interpretation is false and _.._,. ,~ .. _
arrogant, and admittedly chauvinistic. j '^d '".^ SSlSTS&JSi
Where there is taith in the truth of the Torah. there you will find | CanUr Abraham Salt,
acceptance of holiness as the criteria for tbf ""chosen" quality of the
Jewish people.
50 NW tiat
pi Conaarvativa. Rum. tiiru.c
Shotar. Cantor Fred Barnataln.
---
FT. LAUOEROALE EMANU-EL. 1B01
E Andrew ava. Reform Rabbi
Mariua Ranaon. Cantor Sherwir
Lavina.
-------a
HIALCAM REFORM JEW^H C1N
OREOATiON. 11J0 W. Btth at.. Hia-
leah Rabbi Nathan Zwitman.
---- ----
HEBREW ACADEMY fit 6th at Or
thodox. Rabbi Al'uanQtr Groaa.
an ^x .DTI?? roa#' '/'V?
D'ht on LTTDKa onann
i .... ......
.^Kiftr -aenn
-mm ,o,l?in mp vn o-ai^
- H T -
niiap by d'tj1? na9
cms; on LTfTn .^jinoxi
.D-I-tHTM DTI3
TRANSLATION -
Th* Naturaliils Vill
In Israel
What is the mminint of "ahulklap-
It was the official who in former
days aroused the worshippers for
early morning service at the ajrna-
oguge by knocking (klappen) at
In Central Galilee in Israel there the door.
is a village whose name is Amirim, % m .u t _.
in which live naturalists and vega- HM"rt f^n thfl tafk*as Perform
tarians who believe that this to SJj ,he 8eX,0n <^hamash> *
the way to a good and healthy life. *"ld use a spec,al hammer for
' that purpose.
Among the people of Amirim are
families who have come from dis Who was Abraham MaauT
taut places, such as a family from
Texas.a man and his wife and He was the author of the first
live sons and daughters; a family Hebrew novel. "Ahavas Tzion"
from British Guiana; and also a|(Love <* Zion> He was one of the
first modern Hebrew writers to de-
pict love for nature and love be-
tween man and woman. He was
born in Lithuania in 1806 and died
Thu page it prepared in co-
operation with the Spiritual Lead-
en of the Greater Miami Rdbbtn-
urJ Ann.
Rabbi David Hr-r*on
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Herson
Tal and Gem* of Wudoaa
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitx
Knnu> Tout Heritage
MIAMI HEBREW CONQREOATION.
1101 SW 12th ava. Orthodox. Rabbi
Harachall Savilla. Cantor Joaaph
Saliman.

negro, with his wife and three
children, who have Hebrew names.
But most of the members of Ami-
rim are Jews, residents of Israel.
Many of them were previously
invalids and after they took up na-
turalism and vegetarianism, they
fe--l themselves healthy and happy.
(Published by Brit tvrlt Olamit)
such an approval may be neces-
sary.
monticello FARK. 1S*th at. and
NE 11th ava. Conaarvativa. Rabbi
Max Lipachita. Cantor Ban-Zion
Klrachanbaum.
1'iil iy s.:iii p.m. Hatiinlav :?". a m.
Mar afltsrafc: William, mw of Mr. and
Mra. Martin B. kernmn Shrldnn. aon
nf Mr iind Mm. Irvlna; Wmufrnmn
SOUTHWEST CENTER S4SS SW St*
t. Conaarvativa- Rabbi Maurioa
Klaln.
Kiirtu I II |. m Baftnoa: "The I'rlv-
lln* of Ckolo*." Saturday J a.m. Ser-
mon. "Weekly Portion.'"
__ # -----
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. 232S
NE 171at at. Rabbi Jonah CapUn
rVlduv k p in OuaM hpirliual laailai
t" Bftleiate in iii aaiarnrif at Kai>bi
I plan fines Slutbliat howta Mr. and
Mr Joreiili Cerxleln; Mr and Mra.
Im l.e\ln Sntnrdnv 9 am IVir Mlta-
vah: M.iia.-\. son of Mr Melon Ir-
vine.
TEMPLE BETH AM. 5M0 N. Kandall
dr.. S Miami. Reform Rabbi Harbari
Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodnar.
TEMPLE BETH L. 1S45 Folk at.
Mollywoaa). Raform. Rabbi Samua
Jaffa.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Molly
ood 1725 Monroe at Conaarvativa
Rabbi Samuel Larer. Cantor Ernea'
Schreibar
n p.m flueal avaajiar: Sldne>
Si- bv| Sutiiidat !< a in
earch of food, entered a to** ini
<'' """ '"* -f > Unable t,
-xtncatr hrniwlf. he decided to t(t
dead He lay dou-n on h,, (,Jcv
aised hx, four l kk tytt, and opened hu moudi
i Jrdfhly gr,n. The nt mnrn.n.
upon hu ducovfrv bv tl,r ,,,,
'ie u>u remoeed fr,>m the ut C3.
nrd our of tou'n and dumprd mt
i dif.-h. As toon as the man d,.
parted the ,ac>\al aro,e a-.i ,
MM M\f formt He gUnced at hu
new mdico rout and deter*
r ,,/i.r on hi new appear**)
The tailtal called togethe- all d
kind and told them thai he had
'->ecn selected to rule ox er ,he all
the animalA. Hit new indigo ceiti
lir claimrd. u'd.. a gift
rlftMfa him above all Tht
ntrd their new l^xng and
lim faithfully. The other ;iml,
IB t'le forest, seeing the regt
J
    ^Wlg also submitted t.. hit
    'M.
    The indigo yac\a\ u
    I bv the attention fit en I m that
    ie began to beliet e hir.-
    I 'ouuded him.elf w.tl;
    tnd lions, at befitting l aajal
    ' itatut.
    Hu fellow \t\t\ts\t lei
    >ei; e\ relegated to tecond .
    xzenshxp in the forest relented tfct
    neu' ain of their master and
    BOl downfall Accordmi^
    met one nxght. and the glau
    lull moon fhev rai.ed a hou'l in tht
    true character of >ac;alj Tht kactjai
    king surrounded by hi. neu' COB;
    nanums insiinctivelv retp -nied m
    vharacterutu manner and hou'lci
    lx\e a iacx\al
    The lioru and tige" hi xhtrtt
    ind anger at being fooleA bv tht
    indigo sacral fell upon hm and
    're him to pieces.
    MORAL: Success, no nutter hoar
    we attain it should neie' rtmow
    Be front our true laJVaa
    TEMPLE NER TAMIO. BOth It. sM |
    Tatum Waterway. Modern Trial-
    tional Rabbi Eugene Labovits. Caa-
    tor Samuel Qomberg
    r*r|ila> S:4.' pm Mulurdus a n
    Krlday N:l."i pin BBntton "lin,'?l
    'I'liouiehU from Kthic* of the l'jtheB\ |
    hermon ^'eaal
    Siilurday :4i
    I'ortlon."
    f?a6bis on Television
    in 1867.
    Who wil Gluckul of Hamolin?
    She was a German memoir writ
    it, Irving mainly in Hamburg. Her'
    memoirs, written in Yiddish, were
    translated inlo English in 1932
    They are charmingly written and
    shed great light on the status of
    women of that period, the life of
    Ih<' court .lews and the history of
    What U .h. 1 TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 4144 Ch.e.
    wnat is the ha-motil? ava Liberal. Rabbi Leon Keania*
    It is the blessing on the bread. c"' Oavo_Coe.viaor.
    called after its first distinctive
    rd (PS. 104:141. It is recited
    irrespective of the amount eaten.
    The concluding benediction, how
    ever, is only required if bread at
    least equivalent in size to an olive ''Riirht i .Miat"t '
    . Iflex Mi I.IkiI fol
    has been < im sinned.
    TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI UNI
    NC 15th ave. Raform. Rabm Baaaa |
    St. Wallaeh.
    rVldsiy :i; p.m. Sermon kn..wle and 1 "ml. i-HUiiduiu liar Mitftak:
    Rlrhaid. M-ii of Mr. and Mi> Irving]
    \junit.
    TEMPLE TIFKRCTH JACOB. !
    Flamingo Way. Conaarvative RaM |
    Loo Halm.
    h"iiila> :!.". p.m. Sernum "The *?<* I
    i.r Klul BoafclnB rommlUii.nl- "[ .
    ted Syna*5oaiie Youth offn-eie U> I
    iiiMall.d Marlon Uord'.n. |.rr-idrnl,
    i niil> Halnen. vice- pre-ld.nt M*
    >i.in rooordlaaT BBCritah Hope sej")
    v\ ii. i ..rr. *i>nnilliiK Bfcretar). J]"'
    dim afcheoter, iroasurer xituraay|
    .. in
    TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora vj-
    Conaarvativa. Rabbi B. Laon Huraiits-
    TEMPLE ZIOnT \m SW 17th *
    Conaarvativa Rabbi Alfred *
    man. Cantor Jacob Ooldfare.
    TIFKRETH la^BL"~BM0N Mis"'
    ava. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman C'"
    tor Albert GlanU ,
    Kridav SKI p.m. fUM'l 7
    preach fliKt M-rim.n aa aplrltu
    r t..|.i. rii.- Power of i "" ,
    .....** t"*i
    TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM 1SBO0 NW
    22na ave Conaarvativa Rabbi Shel.
    don Edwarda. Cantor Seymour'
    H nkea
    I |. in It. S.vm.,ur UlttttM
    i in- Templo'a ne
    ' > I'"- III. |MM.| ..ffi.'iallv
    urdoy a.m.
    Tll.need )
    Sei mi.II
    t
    TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West-
    Rabbi Abraham Cs-
    TEMPLE EMANU-BL. 1701 Watnin,
    ton ave. Conaarvativa Rabbi Irvini
    Lahrman. Cantor larael Reich.
    ,nt
    "till Small Voice." television pro-
    gram sponsored weekly by the Grea yjjjj-,
    ter Miami Rabbinical Assn.. will be
    seen Sunday, 10 am. over W( KT ^ "haak.ma*?"
    ch 7. Rabbi Herschell Saville, of
    Miami Hebrew Congregation, will tl bj the Hebrew word for "ap-
    be host. Guest will be Rabbi Eu proval*' or "authorrzation." The
    :: m Labovitz. of Temple Ner Ta^word is now used for the "endorse-1 sidic and opposition were recon- T.....' '"' Kiain*
    mi.l The spiritual leaders will dis- menf of an authors book, or forlciled. though the term "mithnag-i tbmfle mknorah- bbo nth
    MBi "ElulMonth of Preparation, the approval-of one's action where:dim" remained. .{- Conaarvativa. Rabbi Mayor Abeam-
    l owlte. Canter Edward Klam.
    What it the meaning of "mithnag
    dim?" e -
    The word means -opponents" 'WE!, 'n^^jo^V^H.r^
    and refers to the opponents of the c4nor Jacob Bornetein.
    Hassidic movement. The name templb JUoeT*"jjo Paiarmo bm
    comes into being after the issu- J-.berai. Raw.. Mom, %uot,. canto
    ranee of a ban against the Hbsm .T*? l,7.M*" ,Ul,,^ .,..
    dim by the Vilna X;aon in 1772.
    During the 19th century, the Has- .^ '!
    Tradltiona
    VEHUDAH MOSHE. 1SS30 W
    hwy. Conaarvativa
    Berger
    I", p in
    nl to l ..inli.i I
    O'l.S
    Canter Mo'nt
    ,. tumf
    VOUNO ISRAEL.
    Ortnodox. Rabbi
    t0 NE
    ShervKin
    171lf t
    8tsu'-
    CANDUIMTMG Tim
    28 Ab 6:37 pjn-


    Friday. Augu* 19. 1960
    +Jeitfk*rtk>r
    Pogo 11-*
    Memo to You from the Desk of Max Lerner
    Her Eight Years, Back to Wilderness
    (Ty MAX LERNER
    New York
    For week* I Have been drown-
    In. m a sea of talk about smart
    politics and smart politicians, and
    s of it. Most of the political smart-
    n, 1 have witnessed has usually
    out>marted itself in the end. In
    the governing and self-governing
    ol men, smartness is a terribly
    transitory thing. It is wisdom that
    counts.
    Take the episode of the intelli-
    gence liaison between the Admin
    ,-;.ition and the new candidates,
    which turned into a contest of
    smartness on both sides. After
    the Johnson nomination. Kennedy
    uas so anxious to appease the
    liberals that he couldn't wait for
    the Eisenhower offer to be made
    formally. Jumping the gun. he
    picked Stevenson and Bowles as
    his liaison with the CIA briefers.
    Hagerty (with Nixon doubtless
    behind him) was also terribly
    smart, seeing no reason why Ei-
    senhower should help Kennedy
    in the hot box his convention
    smartness had created, and turn-
    ed his face stonily against any
    liaison men. Outcome: no hits.
    no runs, no assists.
    But Kennedy's problem is still
    there: what to do about the mil-
    lions of Democrats and independ-
    ents for whom Stevenson was a
    symbol and Kennedy is not. The
    politicians who had written Stev-
    enson off beforehand (including
    Stevenson himself) were not so
    terribly smart after all. My ex
    p.nence is that the political pros
    are the last men in the world to
    know what the seething, if silent.
    forces are in a convention, just as
    they are the last to know what
    are the fears and tumults in the
    human heart. Like all journey-
    man technicians, they only know
    how to count, weigh, and balance.
    but they are dumb about intangi-
    bles. There isn't one of them to
    whom I would tip my hat when
    it comes in intangibles, yet it is
    always on intangibles that elec-
    tions like battles and wars
    are won and lost.
    -seme. From "the standpoint of-the
    Republican Party and its politi
    cal fortunes it may prove dis-
    astrous.
    The Democrats have left them-
    selves wide open and vulnerable
    to the right kind of Republican
    attack. But it should be clear to
    any detached observer that Nixon,
    with all his political smartness,
    will be the wrong man to exploit
    these weaknesses.

    THE nomination of Kennedy
    and the acceptance of the most
    liberal platform the Democrat-
    have ever framed sets the prob-
    lem for the Republicans: how
    can they get a candidate and plat-
    form which can meet this chal-
    lenge and make inroads into the
    labor, liberal, and Negro voting
    groups which are normally Dem-
    ocratic" The Democratic choice
    of Johnson for second place, and
    the disgruntlement of the Steven-
    son wing of the party, give the
    Republicans an opening to ex-
    ploit. Kennedys youth gives them
    another opening.
    I wonder whether the Republi-
    can strategy group, made up of
    their smartest politicians, knows
    these rather obvious facts. Do
    they know that Rockefeller, in
    his persistent and continuous ad-
    vocacy of a fighting liberal plat-
    form, is the only Republican who
    could nullify the impact of the
    Democratic platform?
    Do they know that those who
    consider Kennedy too young
    in'dv-s#arce!> he se *af fTP-lif
    Nixon on this score, but would
    feel confidence in Rockefeller's
    Berman, 54
    Passes Away
    LEGAL NOTICE
    Allen Berman. 54. passed away
    maturity- Do they know finally bere Wednesday. He had been a
    that the current Castro crisis, in- resident of Miami for the past 16
    volving our relations with the years.
    whole of Latin America, deeply Mr Berman was head of the Hi
    involves Nixon in the Admiwstra- Grade Food Compara-
    tion's failures, but that Rockefel-
    ler's wide and deep knowledge of He is survived by his wife. S>1-
    Latin America would win him sup- Vla: daughter. Mrs Morris Levitt.
    port? ad granddaughter. Micheie.
    Services will be Friday. 10 a.m..
    at the Edward Newman Funeral
    Chapel
    I suppose it is foolish and futile
    even to ask these questions. The
    answer to all of them is that
    whether the Republican strate-
    gists know these facts or not then*
    minds are made up and will not
    change. Long ago they decided
    that Nixon was their man that chapter of the American Jewish
    he is a smart politician, that he t"gf*SL "* a member
    AJComa. Cord Party
    Mrs. Samuel Rosenstein. mem-
    bership chairman of the Miami
    ship luncheon and card party at the
    home of Mrs. Edward Goldstein,
    6615 Nervia. Coral Cables, on Aug
    24 at noon.
    knows how to handle himself in
    the clinches, that they can count
    on his policies and decisions.
    Rockefeller? They regard him as
    an outsider who is trying to up-
    set their decisions by appealing {mares' AwxU'mj MtCfMf
    to the people, many of whom are
    Democrats anyway. As if that
    were not exactly the point of
    Rockefeller's strength.
    NOT.Ce UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE IS HEREBY hat
    th- un MTvijn^l d*-*i naa^:* in
    'i-* unrf-r th- i. rr.e f
    NORTHERN MORI ST.
    In. t ,nrl
    Miam.. Florida. n'--il
    said1 name wiUV th* '".$
    'in. j;r nur.
    Florida
    MAN PI
    KARAH F- >X
    ____________________________________________________________________' --
    IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
    I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
    FOR DADE COUNTY FLORDA.
    IN CHANCERY.
    n aoc mi
    I BENJAMIN TOPOL,
    Plaintiff.
    ANNA T >P< >l..
    NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
    TO: ANNA T- >Pl '.
    * Av*nu*
    Ma-.--*i*r*|ua. N- >
    rot" ARE HEREBY N'rTIKIFT' '
    lad
    acainst >ou. and vou *-.-- y>
    1 M a i-i '. a/T
    Inc to the Complaint un the plain'
    n-\ an.l ill.- the orlataaJ Amir
    or Ple^dinc in th- -0:
    - &-'*
    September 1. 1>* if default r. the I'omuiairit will be taken a_? COA-
    I acainr: >
    IAT -I IT l**i
    E B LEATHER*? \v
    ' 1-r h < ir.
    Bj K H RJCE J<.
    Tep'j:) <"e-k
    ORUEJ. ALBOIM
    lit. '.. nthfl
    . 4 UiM-oin Road
    Miami Bea. h. Florida
    After 20 years in the wilder-
    ness, from 1932 to 1962. the Re-
    publicans had eight years of pow-
    Ladie' Auxiliary of Miami Beach
    Post 330. Jewish War Veterans,
    was to meet Thursday evening at
    American Legion Hall. 1828 Alton
    rd. Mrs. Benjamin Packer is pres-'
    ident. Invited were out-of-town
    guests at the JWV national con-
    NOT.CE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE 1> HEREBY ; 'Vi N that
    th-- undersign-d de- MUM' ir'
    6u-ine e ef
    HAH TRAM. INN at f.TOu W Xh
    .-' r.-t. Miami. Fla intends to -e.atZr
    aaid name kh I jerk of the <3r-
    Mirt of Dade i''.un'
    HFI F\ RI-FPi *<" I"
    er with a war hero. It looks now vention which concluded bere Sun- Ma owi
    as if they were determined to go day.
    back to the wilderness. _____________
    Which is where political smart-
    ness often ends up.
    (Cerrrif** 1M0)
    [ Attorneis for Appl't-ant
    ISM B.W. lt Ktreet
    OL-
    HARRY FIERSTAT
    V.. of Ml Mrndian ave.. retired rner-
    i-hunt. died Aug. 14 He lived here t*
    Kaara. Surviving are hi> artte. Ida. a
    son. Theodore. anJ d.odhler. Mr-
    iairraine 4 *.olitsmith He als-> leave*
    hi* father, two brothers, an i three
    sister*. Services were Au* U SI
    ;. .rdon Fun*r-il Home
    Ballet Aaditiaas Here
    Franklin Yeier. member of the
    Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo Com-
    pany, and Miss Barbara Rassel.
    dancer with the Ballet Russe de
    Monte Carlo concert group, held
    auditions for scholarships in ba!
    prth im>. i tnli ., *** training for the Dade Civic Bal-
    ferth AraDOf. > J and wa> a mem- ^T .^. -,.- t
    ber of Miami Beach LIka Lodge aaa let On Tuesday at 1501 NW 28th St.
    Temple Emiau-EL | ar- h r------------------------------------------
    wife. Eatalle. a brother and *iate< :
    Bcrriea* mere in New York Cit... -.1
    loral arrangement> by Blwatatoa Me-
    nural Caaneia.
    1*-** *,?
    si
    t u a r i e s
    LEGAL NOTICE
    atOT.CC UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    NOTICE I* HERER1 JIVFS that
    rh^ inderrtrn-'* d*->lrinc ?< *nzajt
    NuMf>-*> jn-i^r th* fi> -
    A l: < COSTt'ME SHOP A B
    MOt'KE OP PORMALR BN-
    cavne B'\d Miami. Fla in-'-r > u>
    reclvter >aid nirni-. with tK.- "i-rk ff
    the Circuit Court of Daje To.nl/.
    ^ Ma
    H r r\t
    KKSM.KC GARStt RoTH
    ^ttoajie\ foi Anpl'caJit
    \fS S W !- ST.
    * l^< to
    MRS SOPHIE JAFFE
    t:. or 2911 SW ilrd te- dird Au| 14
    She lived here l:\e Faara. tiur\l\1rut
    are her huaband. SaTijel a fun. Ber-
    and daughter. Mr. Ruth A.
    Skulnl'k. tihe al.-o leaves four bro-
    ther-, includ.nc Max Blonder. Miami.
    .ii,-i nfanJar. Hillandale. and
    . iter> Barrlcwa ere Aua;. lt>
    I KIerWe Memorial Chapel. W
    ALL this by way of introduction Kianier t __________
    to the assembling of the Repub- joseph robinson
    lican clans at Chicago. '' >:* ista t^r. d.^i Aa> u
    . u < ... k.._ kilH me here from Newark Si J IS
    Nixon has for years been nanea if> agi) mn(l ua, 0.m,ri. ,!h -h.
    a- the kleagle of the clan of smart inuraal i>^...e B^rrka BwiH
    Pliticians. long before Kennedy :| *^!f352S
    came to join him in that role.
    When Nelson Rockefeller made a
    bid for recognition as a Republi
    can candidate, in his >wing across
    the continent. Nixon and Leonard
    Hall had him smothered in a
    blanket of hostility in every state
    in which he turned up.
    The Democrats had a host of
    Presidential candidates, even if
    only one was dominant. The Nix-
    on forces didn't dare let Rocke-
    feller's campaign even reach the
    convention floor, with some equal
    chance to make a fight of it. From
    Nixon's standpoint this made
    LOUIS SCHWARTZ
    *^. resident here for nin- year*. di-d
    Aox. In Linden. N H whara a<-
    moed lai-t A; linlllai a-e tw .
    aao. mcjdirur Irvina A., of Miami, a
    aaushter. and tao Kran-St hllreo-
    MKS. MARY WIENER
    She came here. 2 .. ear azo
    IM THE COUNTY JUDGE S COURT
    IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
    FLOR.DA IN PROBATE
    Na. 4J0S
    IN RE. I>tat of
    MARK .-MAIN
    Daeawaaw.
    NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
    APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
    AND F.NAL DISCHARGE
    NOTICE h aereoy iven that I have
    NOT CC UNDfeR
    FICTrTlOUS NAMff LAW
    Ni'TU'C IS HEREBY StVl N that
    the f*n*tentiCBed de*.f-inc t *-r. !ice (a
    bu-inevw .irtd'-*- ,v- ':'ow wa* af
    t>ADE AIVERTfS!SO ptFTK-'BII-
    T>RJ nt til N W h .- Urdr. mtenle t- raciat-r aai* rarae
    with the Oerk of tl ourt f
    Oade '"i.unt FVarida
    S'.V ANO'L
    . '" file-1 m> Mnal Report and Petition for o|.HVKI> A' TSHn.r-:
    ibution and Fl-al !tacbare *r Altornev for Honn Ai
    of the eetate of MARK vat S->-.l.i HMc
    deceased, and that or the Miami S3. Florida
    i.,b two da iitee* a bro- **tn *>' <* >*1>tember. 1W. will ^ IS-aa, S^M
    ther. two i*ter. a-d even crand- to the Honorable Couat) Jodsaa ff ,---------------------------------------------------------------
    MMren Ser\icee w*re Au II a; I*de Cooaty. Florida, for apurvval ofj MOT CC UNDER
    '.ordon Funeral H-r aaad Final Report an i 1 ,r d:atnbatiOB| FICTITIOUS MAJXE LAW
    ! and final dlcharar a Kx*cutrj of \oTK~F IS HERJSHY GrV'FN that
    Piltabarsh. aad was a member of Belh !>>_,.,.,
    n S>nar.^jf Surviiini are her h-J.-- '"Jv? J.
    band. Samuel: two sons, lai laalita ""
    He waa a veteran Of World War II
    lltd a ni-ml.--
    Aumliar> .-.. Ins are h-- -
    >\A-ia .-..n. Ifc.naM ^r*.
    He al* leavea tw
    nc Mr- 1 na Stera-
    bern. Miami, and a br .ther
    were Au li at Option Funeral Home
    JACOB A. BANOeS
    of SIS ltth at di~l Aae II H.
    la h^r- II .-- *!>
    ran a m*Tibe- aa Ma-
    laMlice an.l r, .V
    ivnter S riniri ar b *-
    a nor 'A Mr-
    Iv.. .;ab-.r and Mr-
    and aeven a
    n-r Au l: -'' Maiinal
    UhapaL Vi'a-hmc- -
    re IT >eara ajjlo fr'rr New Yv>rk. waa. rt. >ii. r.rt
    here are no local aur\i3T. *'?"'*"'' ,, ....__
    : H-me > ia charae of irave- [-- -.-t-.ldRjild.fia:
    .ie aerrirea Aur. 10 at Mt. fcina Miami .. H.rtda
    !-:

    HENRY MEITFINGER the e*'-at^ "t the iMf-DUMd '
    7. of 13i NE Ravahore dr retire.1 <*l Thi iTth da> of Auuat. 1*.
    him<:nx clerk, di-d Atnj H- ca-* .__' ','I-.^RlA
    lere IT >ear ao fr-rr Nem Txrk MAX
    Th.
    Funeral
    ai -
    -- ^T--\
    JOSEPH A. RUTI
    To. retired owner of
    stare, died Aua T He cam- k
    k- -> ; rm Brdc-y.r-.. C n-. ar.d
    l-red a: JIM Collm- av- _
    te, l-e- a E :
    clowns Norman K M aosL and a
    taach >.- B.-ial was in Rrlda-.-.-t
    - al arraaaerr-
    Menoral Chanel. Vt ir.ftoa tie.
    IN CIRCUIT COURT EwEvENTh
    . .v. JUDICIAL CIRCU T DADE COUNTY :4 s-vlrnM Bldr
    thiiut FLORlOA IN CHANCERV
    the aaaeraian. d dtrfnaw --.-J. in
    hailfs nd-r the fn itiiaaa ansn* of
    KI-^iNEl'T FI'RNITI at K3a K.W *Tth A-i I **.
    FVirian inteitde t.. '^ttate' aajd -ajfi*.
    with the CVrk -'. ol
    lade Count.. Fi
    Vt II I 1AM I.KV E>
    WKINKLK* K
    r\ w-
    FLORlOA
    Na. sac 7*r
    Ri'BKRT W H \ N.N
    USABETH IKAN BAJjfHAJl
    T" >n Himi
    fUe >our an--r I it>lea
    nit for divorce -'
    M.ami Z-. Florida
    :-. J/l-
    N THE CIRCU'T COURT OP THE
    ,,- ELEVENTH JLDCIAL CIRCUIT. IN
    t.. AND FOR DADC COl'NTV. FLORIDA
    rA IN CHANCFPY
    No aoc sn
    SAMUEL H
    - Shore
    He iim here me<
    RAPK N
    lot i;
    - ... from
    MRS. LIBBie weiNRlT
    i. of -* ave di-1 Autt *
    ii- l^-re eeven >ear> ai
    N- ^ -.inx a-- hr husaand.
    Ma\ a daughter. Mr-
    man. Mi.iml: brother
    siervicea aere A-- 1 *' Ravilatil
    Mriior.a' Ch-ipe: W-* --
    Court an **
    Wood '' S W ?- SI M:ami r ia .
    E B IJ5ATHERMAN
    I-
    s
    S COST ^
    HOME LOANS
    To Buy, Build or Refinance j
    Inquiries Invited No
    A'J

    Oldi
    j0ade Federal
    jZ/iNd and Loan Association M ami

    6 Convn.ent Offict 5sw 0-- County
    MSOUtCfS fXCitO ISS MMAIOM OOUAtS
    IN THE COUNTY JUDGE S COURT
    IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
    FLORIDA IN PROBATE
    %a S0CM-C
    In RE
    rVHEMEr
    Deoaaaed
    NOTICE TO CREDITORS
    To I faind A Hav-
    Miami Beach Taxpayers' Assn. "< cuim. or Demands Asainsf said
    board of directors Wednesday ap- Yam am wereby miflail aad requir-
    oroved the foUowrng for member- ei I demand-
    _ u^r! /,. s_ wh oh ioo ma ha\e attains the es-
    Dr. Michael A Cogan. Mrs ... M j,(H..v:lu schksCBe*'h
    Sley. Nat Weiss. Amoid i er deceased u-
    i. .>h.... to the > l*-e* of Hade
    ity and file the bum In their
    - in the Cooats Courthouse In
    _ ^ Hade Coaatr Plo-lda. within lehr
    Allen Goldberg, chairman of tne ^.,. .m the rtm. 0r lhe!
    membership comrr-ttee. has an- rrt BuhMeaUaa h-reor. or the same;
    Taxpayers Add
    To Membership
    ship:
    Harry
    Levy. Leonard Tobia. Fred
    der. and Ben Is
    nounced that 14
    bers
    .IUS.K.r-1.
    fifYlRilK iR.
    Plai-
    DOROTHA ri <.<'HTEAR.
    Defend 'Bt
    NHTTE TO ao=ap
    T" l'RnTHA I" fXKMJTBAIl
    ?aftl At..nad..n rVi.
    Charlotte N -----
    You are reouired to serr* a cc*v of
    enrve on da'ntlff's atto-^- FS|I-
    V K K <-' !'.' -
    ia*.: M'aaii K FV>ri' t*-e
    h. 0-< --oee
    Court oa or of
    s.te-"lr ISS* '- "oa-
    reev wil' be ente-ed aca'nat
    |ta'd at Mi.i. Plortda this lath
    dav of t-T"*' 1*a
    B fEATKVRM.N rierk
    cirri' -""oesaa
    wall Bv WM W rrv-V
    Daouti "'
    IN THE COUNTY Jl_ OG== COURT
    IN AND FOR OAre CL'N--Y.
    FLORlOA N PROBATC
    No. S3JT5-a
    In RF Ent:.
    I .IIS V R'P.MAN'.
    5 2-
    MABEL ?HEMP
    nave been attained thus far tlu* An ; an k-
    year, exclusive of corporate mem
    berships. ?.! Ab-sle* Bulldins-
    President Simon E Rubm said >* "**-
    at a recent board meeung that ------------------------------
    NOTICE UNDER
    FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
    HEREBY lives that
    'the underlined, deslrtnc to erfae la
    .jir.- alr '.*' nc'.Itloas na-re i>f
    R>M at tJloS Btsrayne Boule-
    Irard niteads to reflater said name
    'Terk of tao Clrcjlt Court of
    Israeli group of Hadassah will :^j, cojp -
    hold a card part, Monday eweni-. QmmK
    H
    ris-sc. t-
    membership in the association has
    ' now reached a new high.
    Israeli Hadassah Meefiaf
    at the Barcelaea hoteL with Mrs m
    M. S. SedatOB. 90 So. Shore dr..
    ,officiatia.
    NOTlCe TO CcO'"<
    ' Cradl'w- Hat-
    ->- .-l.im. or !>e-raa-I A*a:r- Sjaid
    Bswate
    Tou are her.> led -"<
    present an- I -"-"naTi^s
    haa es-
    tate of imii M rrpi'iv ^^-a,n
    jNte of Da He ..-."--- i- the
    -rv jaAres of r*1. ->d
    he snme In in rhe
    . ?.< W-r.
    is-o-iAs w-hln eieht len-t- -oattba
    'mm 'he de 'be
    hereof or f -" '" K barred.
    a f) n.
    BR fc-'RM A V
    Mmw-t r;,; kf.ss;
    Miami Si. Florida

    l'1S-M..1-t



    Page 12-B
    +Jeist> ftcrktistr
    Friday. August 19,
    UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
    THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAXASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
    RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSN EVER, DIRECTOR
    QUANTITY
    KIGHTS
    RfSEtVID

    WESEU
    U.S. CHOICE
    and U.S. PftiMEl
    MEATS ONLY
    i THIS SPECIAL FOR MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY
    FANCY ARBOR ACRES
    ROASTERS
    BROILERS
    SPRINGERS "'
    THESE FEATURES EFFECTIVE ALL WEEK
    GENUINE SPRING LAMB SALE!
    (
    BABY LAMB CHOPS........ ,89
    Shoulder Lamb Chops........ lb 69c
    BONELESS TRIMMED
    CROSS RIB OR
    SHOULDER
    ROAST
    opehJm
    soom
    f^/air Kosher
    1 Market on
    BREAST OF VEAL........... lb. 39<
    LEAN TRIMMED FLANKEN...... lb. 49c
    BABY STEER LIVER......... lb. 49c
    GROUND BEEFFREmJST......2lbs. 9&
    Store hours Mon. thru Wed. 8 to 6 Thurs. 8 to 9 Fri. 8 to 3
    19th St. at Alton Road on Miami Beach
    163rd St. Shopping Center, North Miami Beach
    2091 Coral Way in Miami
    Coral Way at S.W. 87th Ave., Westchester Shopping Plaza
    MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR


Full Text

PAGE 1

Page 8-A +Jewlsti fhrkUar Friday, August 19, Cantor Gisser At Coral Way Leonard Putterman, president of (oral Way Jewial) Center, this week announced the appointment of Cantor Meyer Gisser to the stall ol the Center. Putterman said he will serve as full time cantor and Hebrew teacher beginning Sept. 1. The appointment of Cantor Gisser followed the "tireless efforts of the steering committee and Dr. Joseph Redstone, chairman. Putterman revealed. The dramatic tenor will join Rabbi Samuel April at High Holy Day services, again scheduled for Dade County Auditorium this season. Born in Warsaw and the son of a cantor, he and three brothers : to survive priapnmenl at Auschwitz and Btichenwald. Prior! to the war years, Cantor Gisser studied in the Yeshiva of Lodz. Pi.lund. Mis voice training was a) C*iV****l lO %  n %  i %  • %  the Hochschule in Heidelburg, GerOCIIOOI V/pening many. • !" An earl) opening for Temple la He haran, in the choirs of. r a ,. r> religious ichool was an Sirota and Knsevitsky. lounced this week by David PlteBeth David Opens Registration Here tion. students serve as rant ,Torah readers ,n the mam 8 Beth David religious school will All Hebrew teachers have "Musical program* n* ; IK open for registration to new stucenses from the Bureau of Jewish under the direction ol dents on Sunday Aug 28. 9 a.m. Educ;iIlon which cer tifies graduHam W. Lipson. schS' antor Wit ito 12 noon, and Monday through i „ Thursdav. Aug. 26 through Sept. -"' on from a Hebrew Teachers Colfcsjj IsJJt ,, education dire 1. 9 am to 5 p.m Max Silver, lege and several years of teaching \ {chairman of the board of educaexperience. tion. -aid this week Members of the staff are Hersch Barman, Harry Brooks, Louis Gadon, Mrs. Philip Kaplan, Zvi Rosenkraru, and Mrs. An 9| Ross. The Sunday Department of Beth David is open lo students from kindergarten age through and including the second grade of public sch'M>l. and meets once a week on Sunday morning A special Hebrew IF YOU ARE A it— mwii WIIIHIIIDL. ttil % t you art incited lo aiimd r 'iue MUMC plays a major part in Jew"Him |'i,< n m inajvj |'.,,i in avw |^ preparatory class is offered Ai lsh education at Beth David. Sil I Inn in the second R rade. on a volv( r revealed and stude nts are|> untary basis, which will meet for ta(Jgn( how 0 sing praycrs and t0 % conduct their own junior congregaf one hour during the week. The daily religious school will acept children from third grade of public school and above. These classes meat twice during the week and on Sunday morning with a rich and intensive Jewish education curriculum. All teachers at Beth David re ligious school are "qualified and licensed by the Bureau of Jewish Education," Silver said. A Sunday school teacher license qualifies the richer in the field of Jewish hisIn 1952. he came to Montreal lnl chairman of The" religious '"rv. c us t o m s and ceremonies. chuol committee. • ada with his brothers, who also are cantors. Cantor Gisser has attained a reputation as an artist in oils. Some of his paintings have been exhibit ed in Montreal. Classes from kindergarten to lew ish music, the Bible, and a reading ability and familiarity with Hebrew Prayer Books and ninth grade will get under way on H ,. b language Saturday Sept 18, while a similar H,Dre nn*""**u 1..1 ,.L. Sundav Denartm Eban Appointed Education Chief JERUSALEM iJTA) — The Cabinet has named Abha S. Eban as Minister of Education. Mr Eban, who has been a Mm i %  • Without Portfolio since the formation of the current cabinet. had s, rved as Israel's Ambassador to tb< i ited Nations and to Wash• before his election to the Kn< -.-et last November. schedule, with the addition of a complete high -chool department will begin on Sundaj Sept. 11. One of the largest Jewish religious schools in the South, Temple Israel offers a complete high school curriculum. Administration of the school is under the supervision of Cantor Jacob Bornstein, a graduate of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. partment staff includes Mi-s Jo-Ann Feld. Mrs John D u n d b I a d. Mrs. David I'arnes. Dan Schrager, Marvin Schreibcr. Mrs. Bose Schreidell. Mrs. Alex Steibel. Max Sussman. and Bernard Welkind. The Hebrew Department curnc iilum follows the recommendation of the United Synagogue of America and the Bureau of Jewish Education, and stresses understanding and appreciation of Hebrew praters, language, way of life, and Added to the large staff of high Hebrew Bible. 1> trained religious school teach-, %  era this year are Mrs Linda LeThe Cabinet deferred action on _*"! !" £" H !" *' WlUard ^ OD W ZW.tnKll. a proposal to postpone elections ^"""^;Alfred Boas. B.chard .. y|f Afc I hie! Rabbinate pending a S, l,r aml Isi lore D '<*">an. AT I ITeretfl ISTOel ruling of the pei Supreme mg a Court REPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Greater Miami's largest & Oldest Supplier for Synogoques, Hebrew t Sunday Schools. Wholesale I *Hail ISRAELI GinS AND NOVCLTIfS 417 Washington Ave. JE 1 -9017 Adult courses W ii| a i so begin on Isador Schlissel. president of TiSaturday and Sunday. Sept. 10 and fereth Israel Northside Center, 11. with Rabbis Joseph H Narot this week announced the appointtnd Morns u (Jraff and Prof Sidment of Rabbi Nathan H. ZwitmanJ Bey Besvinick conducting the as the Center's new spiritual leadI las-es ,. r Rabbi Zwitman assumes the pulSholem lodge Annual Picnic pit followin hl 'enure at Hiaieah Reform Jewish Congregation. He sinih m Lodge of B'nai B'nth succeeds Rabbi Harry L. Law will hold its annual picnic on Sunranee, who recently moved to Tern-' day. 10 a.m., at Coconut drove I' 1 *' H 1'" Anm in West Hollywood. Park. LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK "The South's most beautiful Jewish cemetery" 30 Minutes 'torn the Beach Via The New 36'h St. Causeway JE 1-5369 Miami Hebrew Book Store 1585 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach JE 8-3840 Hebrew Religious Supplies for Synagogues. Schools a Private Use ISRAELI a DOMESTIC O.FT5 Fla. Rabbi Zwitman studied at Newark University, and also spent four years as a student in Jerusalem. He has taught at the Free Syna-' gogue religioni school, and occupied his first pulpit in Lakeland, Fla. Prior to his duties in Hiaieah, he was spiritual leader of Dade Heights Jewish Center. Shaloma Hadassah Party Shaloma group of Hadassah will 11 hold a noon card party Aug. 24 at the Sea Gull hotel. Chairman is Mrs. Mary Friedman. ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE Ail NfMfW MH.lt S f0 SYNAGOGUES A HVtlSH HOMIS Wa Carry Bar Mitiveh Records | 1357 WASHINGTON AVI. JE 1-7722 GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS Tour MEMORIAL CONSULTANTS Srrrmg (he fewnh Community Exclusively" STUDIO end OFFICE 3249 S.W. th Street HI 4-2157 AFFILIATE OF THURMOND MONUMENT CO. GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FRanklin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Avenue Miami, Fla. HARRY GORDON ____ PRESIDENT ^^ IKE GORDON ^ !" FUNERAL DIRECTOR To Live in Hmrti We Leave Behind Is to Live Forever' PALMER'S MEMORIALS "Miami's Only Jewish Monument Bui'leW .a Scheduled Unveilings SUNDAY, AUGUST 21, 1960 Mf. Nebe Cemetery SUSAN D. EVANS, 11 a.m. Ruhbi TrSi lau^in Kiisriihrra JACOB BARON, 11 a.m. Rabn Bcnno Walladi SAMUEL K. BER6EN, 11:30 a.m. Rabbi Ya.il;iM Rosenberg Ml. Simmi Memorial Park ANNIE STEIN, 10 a.m. K..bb. T&at II Stem MORRIS HOROWITZ, 1 a.m. Kabbi 7aal^iM Rosenberg "May Their Souls Repose in Eternal Pru. r ARRANGEMENTS BT PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM "The Liberal Com on ihf Bcvuh Affiliate* with the Unien of Am„i, Hebrew Congrtgn onl 4144 Chase Avanue WIAMI BEACH. flCR:DA Friday Evenings, 1:15 P.M Saturday Me.mr.gt. 10 tS AM SABBATH EVE SERVICES Evary Friday Night 8:15 p.m. TEMPLE ISRAEL of Greater Miami 137 N.E. 19th St. A Reform Synagogue OK JOSEPH R NAROT. Rabbi LATE SERVICES Resume at Temple NerTemid Friday Evening August 19, 8:15 P.M. Located at 80th & Carlyle Ave. Miami Beach EUGENE LABOVITZ BAaai SAMUEL GOMBERG • TOA The ('ommnnitv li I liu.'lv Ins \ Here, memory is forever enshrined in beauty MAIMI Nebo, MiaatT* oUeal and din-i Irtish retnetrt) can br jour enl) %  lionr JII-I ^n ha %  tread) beea f"r avet t.iiOO other hsghl) eateemea lewieh famibet. A rerpetnal I'arr Funsl exi • • %  .Img k IIHI IHHI i\our ,i--in.iii. •• uf iliit-M-r lunging tw-july And llirrr drr no i,i\,-.. iasfaimcnll or ntauitessanre reels, Yoi|i muul > o-t need br youi onl) osw. Details ill l-l.i,IK fiimish.'d, in )our limn.-, b) nuil CM I'honr. MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERr / 76m Jim fmttink S'JOS Northw-at 3rd St. tUM MOhaark 1-74*3 "•• *OP DETAILS WRITE TO. — Mouol Nebo Cemetery 5J0J N.W. 3ra Street, Miom., florKio NMH BBtst me, „,ihoul obhgano*. lull details on f'mmily Burial • t.Uatff in Mount \rbo. Nansa ........ .... \,i,ii I UN Zor Slate



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Pagn 10-A *-Jenincr*tt*n Browsing With Books: By HI1ARY MINDUN A Simple Thread Woven With Intricate Craftsmanshk THE INSPECTOR. By Jan d* Hartofl. 312 pp. N.w York: AMts-neum Publishers. $4.00. IJOW AGAIN FROM Holland has come another exquis itely quiet, tender book to anguish the heart Much in the manner of "The Diary of Anne Frank." it is a book in whose quietude move the most poignant passions, whose tenderness carries within it for the reader the seeds of a most pure and perfect hatred. The story begins in the liberated Holland of 1946. when a middle-aged Dutch Criminal Investigation Inspector finds himself impelled to help a young Jewish girl get to Palestine. For the Inspector, it becomes a matter of per sonal morality, a way of restoring his war-shredded integrity, even of recovering his soul — if one may put it so tritely Not that Jan de Hartog has put it so. nor will you tind the Inspector standing in whole sou led splendor on the last pages of the book: Mr. de Hartog is too fine a writer to end up in those waters But there is much conGOD ON THE BEACH 'SpilMtiMCI f am !<-ili>Ui of their (JoJ Edi'h njii hej Qod But ourt M far to high 1 i'ii \er tkost tun' We are m hi* garden the ita* are hn flowm But the Jew*' Their God U not tBOn| tht tUm i:e U M tht beadl waiting fot them The\ are i.mMimrJ u'lth lo*fftl| IM U'lth lenr.'inrti in I IMtfl 'TOR. cern with motives in this book, and there is an unrelenting irony which seeps into every cranny of this story, wetting down the idealism at every possible poinl Where there is irony, there can never be an absolute. The Inspector is sacrificing much for his mission; he must give up his wife and family,* his job. and his pension. But in a very' real Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN Some Religious Insights into the Coming Election Washington RESPITE THE recent emei "neo-Nazi" youth groups and a -was uka fad m various American cities, teen •gen are apparently less prejudiced than adults about the religious aflUistioni oi political candidates. This is indicated by a comparison of results between a poll of students conducted by the Institute of Student Opinion and a Gallup poll of adults. Some 12.8 percent of all students said they would op Overseas Newsletter: B y ELIAHU SALPETER The Cat and His Tail f-VER SINCE the Second World !" War. wages in Palestine, and since 1948 in Israel, have been linked to the cost of living index. This system provides at least partial protection for the wage earners against the constant increase in prices which seemed to be unavoidable in times of war. crisis, or even of economic expansion However, the big disadvantage of the swtem is that it is somewhat similar to the cat running around in circles trying to catch his own tail since the price of commodities is calculated on a basis of production costs, an increase of costol living allowances increases wages, which increases production costs and before the worker or official realizes it. the addition to his salary has already qcen eaten up by the higher prices on the market. In an economy where the trade unions have as strong a position as the Histadrnt in Israel, it is quite impossible to break this ring by putting an end to the cost-of-living allowance system. However. as the overall economic situation of the country began to improve, on one hand, and the Histadrnt leaders began to realize somewhat more clearly their responsibility for the overall national welfare, on the other, a method of slowing down of the chain reaction was devised. Instead of paying increased allowances every month, it was decided to adjust wjtconly once in > three months I^ter. it was decided that the revision should be made only once in six months and only if during that six month period the consumer price index had gone up more than two points or by more than three points since the last time an increase in the allowance was made. This system provided a built-in delaying action towards the increase of the cost of production. While it may not be exactly to the heel advantage of the wage earner*, aetuaUs the lyatom probably contributed greatly to the (act that the Index rose only a wry few points since its new basis w m January, 1H5 The Ministers of Finance and Commerce argue that the relative economic stability trhJen thia fact represent! is certainly more important for the wage earners than any small increase or decrease in their incomes But. while the allowancehave practically not increased for a year and a half, wages of pro fesaionai* and of many skilled workers have been icod bj various special agreement-. provkUnf basic salary Increases. Thus some met aim af Ail ferentiation haa been reeatabliabed between the income of the unskilled laborer and the university proi whOM vagi era] years ago. were almost equal since the cost of living allowance was at that time the dominant part of everybody's salary, and the allowance was the same for everybody. While the renewed differentiation between the wages and salaries is considered an important factor for the country's economic development, it is seen with much less than enthusiasm by the unskilled workers and others in low-income brackets whose wages have not changed. pose the election of a Catholic for President: 16*7 percent would opixise a Jew: and 38.5 percent would oppose the election of a man who was "not a member of any established religious tailh." Three percent of the students would oppose the election of a Protestant A 1758, Gallup poll showed 25 percent of adults opposed to the election of a Catholic. 28 percent to a Jew. 75 percent to an "atheist," and 3 percent to a Protestant. Gallup subsequently announced a drop in opposition to a Catholic candidate to 20 percent. According to current research, it appears to have been further reduced. Boys generally proved more prejudiced on religious grounds than girls. The oMeY the boy. the higher the prejudice. The younger the girl, the lower the prejudice. Among high school senior boys. 1.3 percent opposed the election of a Protestant; 14.9 percent the election of a Catholic: 19.1 percent the election of a Jew; and 37.8 percent the election of a "non-affiliated" candidate. Junior high school girls indicated that 1.9 percent of their number opposed a Protestant: 9.5 percent a Catholic; 13 percent opposed a Jew; and 32.5 percent a "non-affiliated" candidate. Of the 10.763 students polled by the Institute. 5.3 percent favored a Jewish President: 78 percent said it made "no difference;" 16.7 percent expressed open opposition. Twenty eight percent of the 3.144 adults polled by Gallup said "no" to a Jewish President. Ten percent said they "dont know." The most extreme right-wing youth elements at the Chicago Republican convention zealously supported a conservative. Sen. Barry M Coldwater. of Arizona. He became the idol of youthful reactionaries desipte the fact that his father was a Jew. Sen. Goldwater holds membership in the Episcopal Church. Sen. Goldwater's enormous popularity arose from an image of him as an articulate individual, the standard bearer of conservatism His partially Jewish origin was ignored. It is also instructive that Sen. Jacob K. Javits. a New York liberal Republican, received serious • consideration for the Vice Presidential nomination. Politicians figured it would carry' New York State. Pennsylvania mentioned Sen. Javits at the convention. The nomination, of course, went to Henry Cabot lx>dge. But it was nevertheless interesting that a Jew. even temporarily, was considered as a possibility. Especially, a personage like Sen. Javits, who openly identifies with Jewish causes In Democratic circles, a highly placed and emerging figure is Gov. Abraham Ribicoff. of Connecticut. He has a leading role in the Kennedy campaign. He has been mentioned as a possibility for a Cabinet post or a future Vic* Presidency The candidacy of Sen. Kennedy, a Catholic, for the White House may be helping to break down stereotyped thinking about the chances of religious minority members in politics. Between You and Me: BORIS SMOLAR way. he is also escaping much that dissatisfies hini h.s life His very journey is an attempt at a retam 1 As" for the girl, she is thin and dying, she vivor of a Nazi medical-experiment camp an/LI homeless and utterly alone. The image of Palest, J tains her; yet even this simple obsession is mixed"* her mind with the memory of the tank the saw moment of her liberation with a Star of David on it the only Israeli tank in the Allied Army. The decisL* becomes faced with, whether to use her death t 0 or to forgive her murderers, is given a diminished m y, the reader cannot be sure whether it has been made i conviction or out of illness. Whichever way one turns on this pivotal point sorrow-struck. If her decision is made through com tion. there is the terrible irony of the use which isT of it by others, a use which is itself equivocal: if her th was the thought of sickness, it is the Inspector hn been betrayed. And there is God. who dip, and through the lives of these people, so that it is never i where He is involved, and where He is not. Much of the single exodus takes place on boat wonderfully strange and dreamy sequence on a barge t the canals between Holland and France, and a gait filthy trawler plowing from Tangier to the PA beaches Mr de Hartog. who divides his life between) sea and writing, lives on the Dutch ship "Rival."'cm ly anchored off Fort Myers. Born in Haarlem, lloll. he is the son of a Dutch theologian, and the author of I previous novel*, and three plays, including the Broads hit. "The Fourposter." The Inspector" is a beautiful and moving novel! simple thread woven with intricate craftsman.hip il a book which will continue to haunt you. and a story will never cease to hurt you. Panorama: By DAVID SCHWARTI A Protestant Rabbi CHORTLY AFTER hi, arrival 111 ^ this country, the great Yidditk] Viaggid. Masliansky. made a to the| wall in front of me.' "That's the way it will be with us. Some of tbel Temples are going too far. but the wall of life wil| stop them, and they will have to go back." • • • One day it was announced in the papers that il meeting of city clergymen would be held Rabhj Wise decided to attend. At the meeting a resolution was proposed whichl Rabbi Wise did not like. He arose to speak on tst| resolution. The chairman called the Rabbi to order "Thill meeting was called for Protestant clergymen" the] chairman said. "Well." said Rabbi Wise, "I am a cler.yman.l and I protest against this, so I am a ProtefUoaj clergyman." .... %  aaeHnaavm MM Diplomatic Washington Has Eye on Shah of IK THE FIGHT which the Kgyptian dictator Nasser started against the Shah of Iran for his maintaining de facto recognition of Israel is being closely watched in Washington. The general opinion is that Nasser went out on an awkward limb in his personal quarrel with the Shah Da facto recognition had I bean accordexrby Iran to Israel long ago 1 and Nasser never challenged it tonal made him go into a frenzy now over a situation which has been in cxi~: for ten years And why did he not consult other Arab countries before his sudden outbursts against the Shah and his breaking off of diplomatic relations with Iran 0 Why did he not go into a frenzy over the recognition of Israel by Turkey which, like Iran, is also a Moslem country? Is he not exposing himself to being isolated from other Arab countries in his stand against Iran? Is it not a fact that some of the Arab League countries which he is trying to dominate, are now questioning the wisdom of his action against the Shah? Did he not realize thai Iran is an indepe:. which will not tolerate his interference in her afl Would he tolerate the interference of any (• %  in the attain Of the United Arab Republic ol winch 1*1 >' IV nt? Theaa anil similar questions arc lieing in Washington where there is great regard for the Si of Iran and admiration for his courage. There %  "^| tion that the Tinted Stateinot indifferent to an) ,ft l which Naaaer may contemplate with a view te iinn>rffl"f the position of the Shah. In this country, the Shah of Iran is considered a lifcH minded person who strives to achieve the best for the P pie of his country. Unlike Nasser, the Shah is not to making reckless and demagogic statements. H" ment that he will continue the existing de facto rec of Israel—which so strongly infuriated Nasser-w corned as a step toward cementing stability in the East Nasser's artificial fury againat the Shah statement is interpreted in Washington as indiratii, be. like the Soviet Union, wants no such stability '" area.



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Page 10-B +Jelst fhrkh^r Friday, August 19, ja GEMS OF WISDOM The heart of fools if in their mouth but tht mouth of the u-ie M in their heart. MM MM • • All i* mv.w. hit he is a • uho will not druggie to penetrate! the dart; i (tl. i>|s M i : • • • Plra.*H"e pr.de dominion and >uprrsfitu>n. these are the /OUT flictions u'hu'h corrupt the ebil a nation The eWCNCC c< aliiy u the euenct of a people I spiritlldlltv KROCHMAL • • • To be distressed Jt a nece>dr\ condition of Ii/e u J6-U',I IBN KIK.AR. • • • 1 Ml* friend lids a friend and hi* <5fn him HASDAI Pedigree il of >i I al Ji uho is nol himself iii'h/f • • • \.. u J'i BStft and "Ttl i> J'oj(h rALMUO SHI I • • I rnt uho is not belie? %  u'n appeal :-mnrd -reads. |l >-i PHI • ANSHE EMES. Conaarvativa. president 2M3 SW 1h IVI Maxwell Silborman BETH OAVIO. 2438 SW 3rd awa. Con aarvativa. Rabbi Yaakov Roaanboro Cantor William W Lioson Naturda] '• "in llur Mtttvah Mit-h • I BOB "f Mr nn Torah fortified him in this belief. i In our own times, the truth of I hi> statement has been challenged j by some Jewish people in high places. The most recent of fliTTl was the Premier of Israel. David ) Ben-Gurion. during his but visit. to l the railed States lie said he did not believe that the Jewish people were more "chosen" than any other. One sect in Jewish life to I i\ still prays from a prayer book which ha\l deleted any reference to the "chosen" quality of the Jew ish people. It appears that some Jews are embarrassed by the claim that the Jews are the chosen people of God They are worried about "What will the Goyim say?" After all. isn't it chauvinistic to claim in the 20th century that the Jewish people arc chosen by God above all other people? This sensitivity as to what the Goyim will say has blinded many of our thinking Jews to the actual meannig the Bible attaches to the chosen" quality of the Jewish people. Let us look at Verse 2. Chapter OADE HEIGHTS'CENTER 1*01 NW 14. of this week's portion. "For thou art a holv people unto the Lord 1g 3rd at Conaarvativa Rabbi Max thy God. and the Lord hath chosen thee to be His own treasure from | K n,h!". ?*"*, r "SErfon M n .2rs I. KASBl JONAH C APIAN ...if ofheri BETH EL. MO SW 17th ava. Orthodox Rabbi Solomcn ftchiff. !••• i.i v | Jo Hal da Rermon "Martina thChaJhna;' "the K'llnr. %  l'..ir MltSVaB Arthur. s'.n ..f Mr anil Mra W\ K urta BETH EMETH 12250 NW 2nd ava Conaarvativa Rabbi r>vid W. Hir aon. Cantor Hyman Fain. l-ii'iHi s i.. ii ii .-• rmun i' % %  HI I fTiai Ity. HaMurd n • ;• m Shrill II < :;< Ikln. hluilcnfm Bath BSmatli I'-hKlolls s ho 'I. v\ ill i li.iir ''(*onuniin.il Raaponatbllll} IETH ISRAEL. 4000 Pralri* ava. Or thodox. Rabbi H. Louia Rottman. BETH JACOB. 301-311 Waahmgton ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Starn. Cantor Maurica Mamchaa. • — BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ava. Orthodox. Jutiua Saparo, praaidant. a BETH TFILAH. 35 Euclid ave. Or thodox. Rabbi Joaaph E Rackovaky • CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 40t 16th it Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim Karhnaky. CORAL WAY JEWISH CENTER • 755 SW 18th it. Miami Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor Mayar Oiaaar. TALES OF MORALS Once upon a a I • f I.. itas i* a.m. all the people that are upon the face of the earth." • U i-"' The Jew has never doubted the capacities of other peoples to make FLAOLERGRANAOA their contribution to the well-being of all mankind. Every people has been endowed with basic attributes that have distinguished it from other peoples We have borrowed from the wisdom of other peoples. However, we proclaim, together with the sages of the Talmud. '"If they say that there is wisdom among the nations, you shall believe it. If they ,0"pim nlOipaO IKatf .irinS sa v ther Torah among the nations, don't believe it." What is unique about the Jewish people is their absolute acceptance BTN ,00300 T\XX§\T37S T1J3 of the Torah. The character and nature of the Torah is holiness—holi: *.' M %  '. ne;%; that comes from the Torah way of life. This, in essence, is what ~E?Q jmaaiD-ia nB??3mirWKl the passage in Deuteronomy points up. •a.* rmam-iin "iwiaBM nnn No 0,her I* 0 ^ is a^^ed or is expected to live by the teachings of I-] f1 V J^'-' 'U? W J < u r 'i the Torah. Only the Jewish people have been chosen by God to live the ISRAELITE CENIER. 3175 sw 25th i-iV nwb\m inE?x DH 'ana Torah way of li,e u is in lhis sense a nd lhis se, se on,y t hal we pn*t*!> MaiavakyTca'nu; L*"" cohln orto to be the chosen" people of God. Any other interpretation is false and „_.._,.„ ,~• —.. arrogant, and admittedly chauvinistic. j '^d !" '".^ SSlSTS&JSi Where there is taith in the truth of the Torah. there you will find | CanUr Abraham Salt, acceptance of holiness as the criteria for tbf ""chosen" quality of the Jewish people. 50 NW tiat pi Conaarvativa. Rum. tiiru.c Shotar. Cantor Fred Barnataln. • — FT. LAUOEROALE EMANU-EL. 1B01 E Andrew ava. Reform Rabbi Mariua Ranaon. Cantor Sherwir Lavina. a —— HIALCAM REFORM JEW^H C1N OREOATiON. 11J0 W. Btth at.. Hialeah Rabbi Nathan Zwitman. • HEBREW ACADEMY fit 6th at Or thodox. Rabbi Al'uanQtr Groaa. an ^x .DTI?? ro a #' '/'V? D'HT on LTTDKa onann • i •• .... ...... .^Kiftr -aenn -mm ,o ,l ?in mp vn o-ai^ H T niiap by D'TJ 1 ? na9 cms; on LTfTn .^jinoxi .D-I-THTM DTI3 TRANSLATION *• the way to a good and healthy life. *" ld use a spec,al hammer for • that purpose. Among the people of Amirim are • • • families who have come from dis Who was Abraham MaauT taut places, such as a family from Texas.—a man and his wife and He was the author of the first live sons and daughters; a family Hebrew novel. "Ahavas Tzion" from British Guiana; and also a| ( Love <* Zion > He was one of the first modern Hebrew writers to depict love for nature and love between man and woman. He was born in Lithuania in 1806 and died Thu page it prepared in cooperation with the Spiritual Leaden of the Greater Miami RdbbtnurJ Ann. Rabbi David Hr-r*on Coordinator CONTRIBUTORS Rabbi David Herson Tal and Gem* of Wudoaa Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitx Knnu> TOUT Heritage MIAMI HEBREW CONQREOATION. 1101 SW 12th ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Harachall Savilla. Cantor Joaaph Saliman. • negro, with his wife and three children, who have Hebrew names. But most of the members of Amirim are Jews, residents of Israel. Many of them were previously invalids and after they took up naturalism and vegetarianism, they fe--l themselves healthy and happy. (Published by Brit tvrlt Olamit) such an approval may be necessary. MONTICELLO FARK. 1S*th at. and NE 11th ava. Conaarvativa. Rabbi Max Lipachita. Cantor Ban-Zion Klrachanbaum. 1'iil iy S.:III p.m. Hatiinlav : &f ". a m. Mar afltsrafc: William, MW of Mr. and Mra. Martin B. • kernmn Shrldnn. aon nf Mr II nd Mm. Irvlna; Wmufrnmn SOUTHWEST CENTER S4SS SW St* •t. ConaarvativaRabbi Maurioa Klaln. Kiirtu I II |. m Baftnoa: "The I'rlvlln* of Ckolo*." Saturday J a.m. Sermon. "Weekly Portion.'" __ # TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. 232S NE 171at at. Rabbi Jonah CapUn rVlduv k p in OuaM hpirliual laailai t" Bftleiate in iii aaiarnrif at Kai>bi I plan fines Slutbliat howta Mr. and Mr Joreiili Cerxleln; Mr and Mra. Im l.e\ln Sntnrdnv 9 am IVir Mltavah: M.IIA.-\. son of Mr Melon Irvine. TEMPLE BETH AM. 5M0 N. Kandall dr.. S Miami. Reform Rabbi Harbari Baumgard. Cantor Charles Kodnar. TEMPLE BETH L. 1S45 Folk at. Mollywoaa). Raform. Rabbi Samua Jaffa. TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Molly ood 1725 Monroe at Conaarvativa Rabbi Samuel Larer. Cantor Ernea' Schreibar n p.m flueal avaajiar: Sldne> SiBV| Sutiiidat !< a in earch of food, entered a to** ini < %  '' """ '"* -f •> Unable t, -xtncatr hrniwlf. he decided to t(t dead He lay dou-n on h,, (, Jc v %  aised hx, four l u remoeed fr,> m the ut C3 nrd our of tou'n and dumprd mt i dif.-h. As toon as the man d,. parted the ,ac>\al aro,e a -.i ,„ MM M\f formt He gUnced at h u new mdico rout and deter* r ,,/i.r on hi new appear**) The tailtal called togetheall d„ kind and told them thai he had '->ecn selected to rule ox er ,he all the animalA. Hit new indigo ceiti lir claimrd. u'd.. a gift • rlftMfa him above all Tht ntrd their new l^xng and %  lim faithfully. The other „;iml, IB t'le forest, seeing the regt J
    ei; e\ relegated to tecond xzenshxp in the forest relented tfct neu' ain of their master and BOl downfall Accordmi^ met one nxght. and the glau lull moon fhev rai.ed a hou'l in tht true character of >ac;alj Tht kactjai king surrounded by hi. neu' COB; nanums insiinctivelv retp -nied m vharacterutu manner and hou'lci lx\e a iacx\al The lioru and tige" HI xhtrtt ind anger at being fooleA bv tht indigo sacral fell upon hm and %  %  re him to pieces. MORAL: Success, no nutter hoar we attain it should neie' rtmow Be front our true laJVaa TEMPLE NER TAMIO. BOth It. sM | Tatum Waterway. Modern Trialtional Rabbi Eugene Labovits. Caator Samuel Qomberg r*r|ila> S:4.' pm Mulurdus a n Krlday N:l."i pin BBntton •" lin, '?€l 'I'liouiehU from Kthic* of the l'jtheB\ | hermon ^'eaal Siilurday :4i I'ortlon." f?a6bis on Television in 1867. Who wil Gluckul of Hamolin? She was a German memoir writ IT, Irving mainly in Hamburg. Her' memoirs, written in Yiddish, were translated inlo English in 1932 They are charmingly written and shed great light on the status of • women of that period, the life of Ih<' court .lews and the history of What U .h. -— 1 TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 4144 Ch.e. wnat is the ha-motil? ava Liberal. Rabbi Leon Keania* It is the blessing on the bread. c "' Oavo_Coe.viaor. called after its first distinctive rd (PS. 104:141. It is recited irrespective of the amount eaten. The concluding benediction, how ever, is only required if bread at least equivalent in size to an olive ''Riirht i .Miat"t Iflex Mi I.IKII fol has been < im sinned. TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI UNI NC 15th ave. Raform. Rabm Baaaa | St. Wallaeh. rVldsiy :i; p.m. Sermon kn..wle Irving] \junit. TEMPLE TIFKRCTH JACOB. Flamingo Way. Conaarvative RaM | Loo Halm. h"iiila> :!.". p.m. Sernum "The *?<* I i.r Klul Boa fc lnB rommlUii.nl' "•[ ted Syna*5oaiie Youth offn-eie U> I iiiMall.d Marlon Uord'.n. |.rr-idrnl, i niil> Halnen. vicepre-ld.nt M* >i.in rooordlaaT BBCritah Hope sej") v\ ii. i ..rr. *i>nnilliiK Bfcretar). J]"' dim afcheoter, iroasurer xituraay| .. in TEMPLE ZAMORA. 44 Zamora vjConaarvativa. Rabbi B. Laon HuraiitsTEMPLE ZIONT \m SW 17th Conaarvativa Rabbi Alfred %  man. Cantor Jacob Ooldfare. TIFKRETH la^BL"~BM0N Mis"' ava. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman C'" tor Albert GlanU „ Kridav SKI p.m. fUM'l 7 preach fliKt M-rim.n aa aplrltu %  r T..|.I. rii.Power of i .• %  •"" ** t"*i TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM 1SBO0 NW 22na ave Conaarvativa Rabbi Shel. don Edwarda. Cantor Seymour' H nkea • I |. in It. S.vm.,ur UlttttM i inTemplo'a ne > I'"III. |MM.| ..ffi.'iallv urdoy a.m. Tll.need %  ) Sei mi.II t TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 WestRabbi Abraham CsTEMPLE EMANU-BL. 1701 Watnin, ton ave. Conaarvativa Rabbi Irvini Lahrman. Cantor larael Reich. ,nt %  till Small Voice." television program sponsored weekly by the Grea yjjjj-, ter Miami Rabbinical Assn.. will be seen Sunday, 10 am. over W( KT ^ "haak.ma*?" ch 7. Rabbi Herschell Saville, of Miami Hebrew Congregation, will tl bj the Hebrew word for "apbe host. Guest will be Rabbi Eu proval*' or "authorrzation." The :: M Labovitz. of Temple Ner Ta^word is now used for the "endorse-1 sidic and opposition were reconT %  • '"' "• %  Kiain* mi.l The spiritual leaders will dismenf of an authors book, or forlciled. though the term "mithnag-i TBMFLE MKNORAH BBO nth MBi "Elul—Month of Preparation, the approval-of one's action where:dim" remained. .{Conaarvativa. Rabbi Mayor Abeaml owlte. Canter Edward Klam. What it the meaning of "mithnag dim?" e The word means -opponents" 'WE!, 'n^^jo^V^H.r^ and refers to the opponents of the c 4 n o r Jacob Bornetein. Hassidic movement. The name TEMPLB JUoeT*"jjo Paiarmo BM comes into being after the issuJ-.berai. Raw.. Mom, %uot,. canto ranee of a ban against the HBSM .T*? l 7. M *" Ul ,,^ „„.,.„.„ dim by the Vilna X;aon in 1772. During the 19th century, the Has.^ '! Tradltiona VEHUDAH MOSHE. 1SS30 W hwy. Conaarvativa Berger • I", p in nl to l ..inli.i I O'l.S Canter Mo'nt ,. tumf VOUNO ISRAEL. Ortnodox. Rabbi t0 NE ShervKin 171lf t 8tsu'CANDUIMTMG Tim 28 Ab — 6:37 pjn


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    Friday. August 19. 1960 %  I +Jmlsti rhrkfian Page 5-A Sn t/to JWail EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: I want to commend Leo Mindlin upon the series of articles that he, has written editorially with regard' Afrlca satarl to the current litigation again.-t religious practices in the schools of Dade county. I quite agree with his conclusion that what is involved here is thV propriety of the action, rather than :he determination of the principles which are asserted. Africa Safari His Topic Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will ; m e e t Tuesday evening. Isidore Hankin will be guest speaker and show films and slides taken on his Making plans to honor the memory of the late Abe Aronovitz are (left to riqht) Herman Mahler, Sam Weiss, Leon de Hersh, and membsrnhip co-chairmen Milton Hahn and A. David Fay vis, of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith. The ledge is currently preparing to initiate the Abe Aronovitz Class, the largest single group of new members in Sholem's history, "in recognition of the many years of unselfish service Mr. Aronovitz rendered to the community as the champion of Mr. Average Man.' both before and after becoming Mayor of Miami." I am also disturbed at whit on* group soaks to proclaim in the name of an entire commu j nlty. "Going it alone" is not proper in this type of suit, and it is patently unfair to the rest of the Jewish community for one organization to take the, responsibility for all organizations and the affected people. SIDNEY M. ARONOVITZ Miami Seienrr Shrink* PILES NEW WAY W. Germany, ADL in Exchange Program By Special Report N EW YORK — An exchange pro-: gram between West Germany and .,; American Jewish organization the first of its kind — was initi;iii(i here this week as a ten-man ;> from B'nai B'rith and the Defamation League left Idle v, Airport for Bonn. 'I he group of human rights expi its and youth leaders will tour r West German cities as guests ol the Bonn government to study human relations problems at the roots levels. They will pari pate in. seminars and meet with eminent and civic officials and ji uth and community leaders in I'.i nn. Dusseldorf. Hamburg, Muii i h and other cities. German comii unal and youth leaders will come It the United States at a later date. e visits will set the pattern for urther exchanges. Alexander F. Miller, of New Rochello, N.Y., ADL national director of community services, headed the American group. He was joined by four regional directors of the League, Milton A. Senn, of Los Angeles; Sol Kolack, of Boston; A. Abbot Rosen, Chicago; and Saul Sorrin, Springfield, III. The B'nai B'rith youth leaders in the group include Dr. Max Baer, of Washington. DC. national director of B'nai B'rith Youth Services; Harold Mondschein. of Los Angeles. Southern California regional director of the youth services; Sherwin M. Goldman. Fort Worth. Tex., past international secretary of AZA. B'nai B'rith teen-age organization; Rabbi Harry Kaplan, director of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, student service group at Ohio State University; and Rabbi Maurice Pekarsky. director of the Hillel Foundation at. the University of Chicago. Before taking off. the group parINSURED SAVINGSP\ EARN % PER ANNUM (CURRENT RATE) Plagler at First "One of the Nation's Oldest and targ Bade Federal RAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION ol MIAMI V> (USh'H W i 6 Convnlint Office Serve Dade County RESOURCES EXCEED 15S MILLION DOHA US ticipated in a two-day seminar on current German political, social and human relations problems led by West German Consul General Dr. Federer and Benjamin R. Epstein, national director of the AntiDefamation League. The program was announced last month', following prior consultations with American State Department officials, by Label A. Katz. president of B'nai B'rith, and Henry Edward Schultz, national chairman of the Anti Defamation League. They pointed out that "this is the first time an American Jewish agency has embarked on an exchange program with West Germany. "The program is to be unpredented in scope, involving an exchange of trained Jewish com! munity relations leaders and I B'nai B'rith youth workers concerned not only with education itself but with all aspects of civic affairs, citizenship, and demoi cratic attitudes," they added. The exchange was first proposed I by Benjamin R. Epstein, ADL na-, .tional director, and Nathan C. ', Belth. ADL public relations director. They visited Germany last Jan1 uary to study German attitudes toI wards democracy. One of their recommendations called for the expansion of "a fruitful, informal .cultural exchange of civic leaders to reinforce democratic growth." The West German foreign office accepted the idea as one means of facilitating understanding and developing mutual attitudes in the United States and Germany. Epstein ascribed "unique advantages" to this type of exchange program between Germany and a | non-government American organization. He said "the German youth here will be able to see first-hand the American system of voluntary association. EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: I read Rabbi Rosenberg's letter in The Jewish Floridian (Aug. 12,; Page 5-A — ed.). I feel that instead of criticism Leo Mindlin is to be congratulated and praised for the stand he is taking in order not to jeopardize the friendly feelings between the Jews, and the Christian citizens of Dade county. The American Jewish Congress should have refrained from associating itself with Jewish agnostics and start a court action, since there are other peaceful means it could use to attain the desired results. PHILLIP ADAMS Miami Beach Without Surgery HEALING SUBSTAMCl HtLltVtS PAIH -SHRINKS HEMORRHOIDS For the ttrst time science has found a new healing substance with the astonishing ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve pain without surgery. In case after case, while gently relieving the. pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took place. Most amazing of all — results were so thorough that sufferers made astonishing statements like -Piles have ceased to be a problem!" The secret is a new healing substance (Bio-Dyne*) discovery of a world-famous research institute. This substance is now available in SUPPOSITORY or OINTMENT FORM under the name PREPARATION H • Ask for it at all drug counters money back guarantee. *(R) LONG DISTANCE MOVING to all points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE A€KR.B.VA! LINKS. INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue For Information Call MR. ROSS NE 5-6496 MIAMI Complete and Dependable Title Service M IAMI TITL€ & Qkttact Co. 34 YEARS OF TtTLI SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY ABSTRACTS TI1TI INSURAMCI ESCROWS Till* lntaror.ee Felicias of Kansas City Tltte taMraaca Ce. Capital, Sare/es S Reserves ficeed ssjeeejm 1X4 SECURITY TRUST IUI10INS 13* NX FIRST STRUT TElEPHONf FRtMklie 34432 %  THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs for its THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, linens, dishes, drape)*, etc. AM proceeds go towards support of the Horn. You may contribute, take a tax deduction or we will pay cash fee same. Remember ,. .we are NOT a profit-making organisation We are helping your tommunrty to keep IN dignity By helping others yew are helping yourself! Manufacturer. and jobbers—rsmsmesr— we can use all your sutcasH' er misfits. Pease call us for eerly pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.W. 27th Avenue NE 3-2338 Closed Saturdays NOW!* V 4 A Small Air Conditioner •with 30% More Moisture &f R emoval... Longer Life YORK POWERFUL-QUIET ROOM AIR CONDITIONER MAKE US PROVE !T See On-The-Spot Preipntotinn See how York's exclusive Cooling Maze coils remove 30% more humidity from the air. Find out how York delivers extra cooling BTU's pee kilowatt to give you the greatest total comfort •t lowest operating cost. See how York's DualThrust Compressor cuts operating sounds to a whisper. Come to eye-opening YORK DEMONSTRATION CENTER! AIL YORK UNITS AM BACKED BY WRITTEN PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE I HILL-YORK CORPORATION 1225 S.W. 8th Street FR 1-1411



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    today, August 19. 1960 +Jmi$*ncr*&f7 Page 11-A LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW VOTI %  ••: |S H-:KI:HY OIVEN that signed, desiring to i n. i,,..un IT the fVtltloui • i K i n.DlNG COMPANY .,• i., I. %  •,„.. |-;.. 11 I I to re. later said nllh l"" Clerk of lh Clrcull 11., ..4 .osi v MILTONH FRKRERG SIDNEY RASKIN I VK I:I • s 11 l UI ,i |i si RUMP* i i HI Hants [.. BMgl T.-i:.i-j |,N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE lllTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND I FOR DADE COUNTY. FLOW OA. IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 6890 ,-. HILTON A MIKI'MAN, llll Mn-I" Building. I i'...rlda. and flitthe ..iiginal fith th. Clerk of the Court on %  I '>•. of August. 1 I Wni.ni D > default will I'taken Kin. fpATI I' this 2l*t day c.f July, IMO, \l i ia le fount) Florida K r IEATHERMAN il. i V. nf the Clrrnlt < ..urt i ount] Florida B) : K M. I.TMAN Deputy < "lei A IlLT-'N V FRIEDM AN 1,1,.. i. fu I'la In tiff |1! \ i :-!.- I! Hiding I I ~FR 1-W64 tin, l-U-ll "And don'l forget, Mac, for your lunch today in the garment district, it's a kosher corned beef sandwich on rye!" LEGAL. NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN ih..i | the undei *ir~mr to engage In l>u -mew unler th.fi< 'illou* name of CHEZ BOM BON BEAITT SALON at MM Biscay ne Boulevard. Miami. %  rl'Tida intend* to register said name 1he clerk .IBM Clrcull I I hide County. Florida VAII>A OUARANTO NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW N-iTI-'E IS HEREBT GIVEN %  gned. dei -ngagc in business unilT hname of Rl'AERO INTERNATIONAL at M7I N.W Mth Street M ". I.I: vriiKUMAN C|. ik .f the Circuit Court I-HII By: C P C.U'KI.ANK. Iieput> clerk f/S. t/S-lt-lf IIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE fllTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY. No. SOC 6*43 |ARY KNNR C. WKKCHJa. i miff, r. MIKKiil.A, iaiit NOTICE BV RUBLICATION JAI.MF.R T. MIKKOI.A. C-rn r.it on, t'erro de Banco. i .ilre. ( uired to file your anawei mplalnl for oTeoroc with the ii, ,i the above Cowl asai "e^ve a n 'h. i apoS %  • unil^r th^ flctltloUa name of CaU'MKW'AY INN at |.-,:.u North East L'ird Street, North Miami. Florida lntenda • I name with the Clerk of the Clrcull Court of Dade i 'ount\ Klo J J .1 (NC B) PeVr) F .I.i in wi. Prea. cl.YDF. i: FOSTER, .IK. Attorney for J .1 J In. IBS N.K I2".th St., N Ml unl. FTa. • t ,.' :•". I I i THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. No. 49082-C RE EataU of i:M ANIT.I. iKH.IiSTKIN. all— known • % MANNY Il M.l'l N. • i -! NOTICE TO CREDITORS VII Cred'ton and All P r —Wa Havx eniands Afalnal Bald M He > r hereby notified nnd requlfprem nl an) nlalmi and demand* huh you mm have aitaln-t the e* Dof KMANI il. OOITDSTEIN. alao "n ax MANNY c.ol.HKN de.eaaed > of Imde County. Florida, to thr unity Judxe, ,f l>ade County, anil |l>the aame In their offices In the unity Courthouae In Dade County, nrlda, within eiht calendar months •m th date of the first publication •I.f, ir ih name will be barred. ANNA Cdl.DSTEIN Executrix HVINIJ NATHANSDN Morney : M< rldian Avenue "'in Beach, Florida 7/2i. H/5-11-19 NOTICE NuTICi: IS HEREBY ffTVEN that fJBRALD JOSEPH I.A DERM AN. who MMI I.-I in the Criminal Court ol Record in and for Dade County. Florida at the June term thereof. A.D.. IMO, of th.off.-nse of Grand Larceny, for which a %  entence of II aaonthi lmpriaonnieiit in the state Peifttentlarj via, Impoaed "ill BDpl) 'or clemency to the feat* Board of Pardona, Taliahaaaee. Florida, at Its next reeular meeting, throuah and by hi* unoar-luneil allot ne> of record aiNO P NK.',I!I:TTI '12-1-M. -:--l-23-J. 1" T-U NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. 60C 6371 i. I:\VIS EDWIN nixiKiiri/rz. Plaintiff, ItTDITH ANN BOOKHUIVPE, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE T<>: JCDITH ANN H< M iKHCI.TZ tC.fl BETTZ, Route J. CERTIFICATE OF CORPORATE DISSOLUTION IN THE NAME ANDBYTHE AUTHORITY OF THE STATH OF FLORIDA TO AH. T'i WHi.M THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME. GREETINGS Wherea.-. CKI.IA D COMMONS. MIAMI. PLORllA; KSTHt-.it AI-I.I NKK. MIAMI. FI-.illll'A liKi'i •' M GREENBUATT. MIAMI. FLORIDA did on th. Bad day o: July. A..U-V. • i INIncorporated under the provtaiona of Chapter *o>. Florida Statutes. TAPBCRAFT CORPORATION, %  corporation with Its prlnci-.-.i place of bualaee* at MIAMI DADE COUNTY, In the State of Fl..i 10... .mo arnereaa the atockholdera il such corporation did on the Sth day "t oiaru" 1 AD. t .ins. to he filed In the office of the Secretary of State of the. Btate of FVarlda. %  I onaonl kboMera under the provialona of aald Chapter BM FlorMM Statute*. showinx the dissolution of au 1 :• NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.it the undersljrned del lujaai l.u-in--under :hflctitloua nani. KENT PRODUCTS at *:* W Flaxlei St la., intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida ANN AVRACB %  le Owner l/H-r-3a. I I NOTICE UNDER FICT TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In hualneea under the fictitious name of BUSY BEAVERS T V SALES A SERVICE at 10113 N W 7th Avenue. Miami. Florida intend* to register aald name with thClerk of th* Circuit Court of Dade Couatr, Florida. ROBERT D KEN r ETV? M-.n !i TERRY Attome) for Petitioner : n 1 .-ir;-i* Punsautan ney, Pennaylvanla You. JCDITH ANN IKK.KHCLT ,re hei.-l.v notified thai I Bill of Cor, TZ. m.laml for Divorce and Amendment has been filed afauMl you. and you IM required to orve I copy Vnswei or I'l.idlng to the BUI of •omplalol on the !' ,;1,n,, '!"\. A .. IO !" T,. > ,; HOWARD S REISS. 1140 N •" %  'Urri •Itreet. North Miami Beach. Florida • n.l file tike original Answer or Heading In the office of the Clerk of the "rcuit Court on OT I'-forr the '.".th day ,f August. I-S0. If you fail to do *o. ,,d'gment lo def will be laken aialnxl vim for the relief demanded in h,Bill of Complaint. Tn n o| 1 %  • ihall be publlahod once week for four conaecutlve weeka cnjiRIDIAN laml. A I 1 IN COUNTY JUDGES' COURT DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA No. 4766* t PATE OF RERNARD FL1AKHNICK NOTICE OF* INTENTION TO MAKI APPLICATION FOR FINAL DISCHARGE NoTICR la hriebv given that we %  1 I'd our final report and t> nial Diicharaa aa Executors of 1. of BERNARD F1IASH I\ de, eased, and that on the lt of September, I960, we will apply "-'Hnnorab'e OBOROE T CI.ARK ludge .,f Dade Coun' Florida. li-il Ul'fK I'M li'llr iim.-f'uo TIE JEWISH PLORIDIAN DONE AND ORDERED at Mil -lorlda. this Hth day of July. 1: 1: I EATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit curt. Dade County. Florida aeal) 1U K M LTIfAN. ea Dap lU < lerk HOWAItD B KEISS •in N 1: lSrd Btraot North Ml-imi Beach, Honda Vttorney/or Plalatiff 7'J9 HE OF NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF T ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FLORIDA IN ANO FOR WOE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. COC 7082 \Rl.ENE KRAMER LANZKTTA. Plaintiff, IGNATIFH A I.ANZKTTA. ""'.SIT FOR O-VORCE TO IGNATIUS A. I-ANZETTA 71* Eaat Grand Boulevard Detroit. Michigan ,„____. a „ You. IGNATHS A >-ANTTA^r hereby notified that a Bill of Com..laint for Divorce has been filed agaln.t you, and you are reouiredto serve a copy of your Anawer or I'leadSTV STWUJ of Comp^nt on the „ ... hofore the 29th day of AUgTJai. IBM If you f II to do *o. Jo*-* esttll e taken agaln.^ you for th* relief demanded In the nan ''Th'.'.'nouce .hall be BBMh*^OJO. ,.-.,h week for four coeaecutlv* weexa % %  FliORUMAN. MORDERED .t"""!. la :th day of July. AD. IM E R 1.EATHEKMAN. Clerk -wv'tSg^BT WEINSTEIN A WEINSTEIN 430 I jncnln Road Attorney, for Plaintiff ?/J8 |/5 ., 2 .., NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY. No. COC 7724 PHYLLIS" R. HOYER Plaintiff. Ira JOHN Al'OUST HOYER. Defendant. SU.T FOR DIVORCE TO: JOHN Al'c.iST HOYER Address: Unknown .• You JOHN AUGUST HolKR ar. hereby notified that a BUI of 1 omplaint for Divorce h.s been file against you. and you are required t serve a copy of your Answec or I'leadlns to the Bill of Complaint on th.laintiffs Attorney. HYMAN V CMBUT ".'l" Fifth Street. Miami Beach Fla.'and file th* original An-.r 01 Pleading in the office of the Clerk ol the Circuit Court on or before th. lth dav of September. 11>0. If yoc fall to do so. judgment by default llVP .e taken against vou for the relief demanded In the Hill of Complaint. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami, this 11th day of August. A D 1980 E B I.EATHEUMAN Clerk circuit Court. Dade County. Florida (seal! By: C P COPKLAND rtput] Clerk HYMAN P GAIJ3UT 240 Fifth St. —. I h JE R-fMI.. Miami Beach. Florida Attorney for Plaintiff ,„..; ,;.n A Mlthe the lerve a copv of your Answer or Pleading to the'BUI of COWBtatat: JJj1 tt* .Dintiffs Attorney. MAC MERM .1 L. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION •N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ciEVFNTH JUDICIAL C RCUIT OF FLOR'OA IN ANO FOR OAOE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. tOC 7640 VIRGINIA i'EKS. IN, Plaintiff. UNNERV i'i:ii>"N DefendinV SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO aCNNF.RD PERSON 117 Harbor View Avenue Bridgeport. Connecticut Tou are hereby notifle I that a BIT of Complaint for Divorce haa been filed against you. and you are •required to %  or* In 19X1 SW Third Avenue. Elorida and f"' h %. ? rl "J"L*"^ or Pleading in the offl e of the Cl-rk „f the Circuit Court on orheforo he th day of September. I960 If >o 'all to do w>. Judgment by default will be taken aainst vou for the relief demanded In the Bill of Comnktlnt. Thia notice shall be publish. each eek for four ,.nsecutlve ,-ek|.. THE JEWISH EfRIDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami. Florida, this 9th day of Aucuat. A D W E R IJCATHERMAN. Clerk. Deputy Clerk M \C MERMEI.L 1900 S.W Third Avenue Miami .16. Florida Attorney for Plaintiff ^.....^ f/1 NOT CE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF .FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 7477 ELIZABETH TARS Plaintiff. vs. NAT TARE. Ivfendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE T. • NAT TAKE ;:h Street Ijikewood. New Jersey You are hereby no:if:d that a Bill" ..f Complaint for Divorce has i--.n filed against you. and you are required to eerve a BOSS of \our Answer or Pleading: to the Bill of Complaint on he plaintiff's Attorney RICHMOND APARSER, one Uncoln Road Buil.lna\ Miami BOAch, Florida and file the %  rlginal Answer or Pleading In the ifYice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court •n or before the 10th day of September. 1960. if you fail to do so. Judgnent by default wlH be taken again.t vuu for the relief demanded In the Kill of Complaint. This notice shall be published once %  ach week for four consecutive weeks n THK JEWISH PUMI4MAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami •l.rida. this 4th day of August. A D. 1960. E. B I.EATHF.HMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade County, Florida %  seal) By: R. H. RICE. JR I 1putj C'erk I;-I >-?i. %  > %  ? NOT.CE BY PUBLICATION %  N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY IN CHANCERY. No. SOC 7S4S DOROTHY P M. %  i.Ai'iiili.iN. PI 1I1 EDWARD F M, 1.AC HILIN. Defendant SU.T FOR DIVORCE TO: EDWARD F. M. I.Al'GHLIN. 174 South Mountain A"venue Moatclalr, N.n Jernj v..,, EDWARD F MCLAUGHLIN ir hereby notified that a Bill of Complaint for Divoroe has tieen filed -igains! > .u. and you are required U> serve a COpJ of VOW At'wer or Heading to the BUI of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney. NORMAN S PALI.OT. 7.06 Ingraham Building. Miami 33. Ha., and fi'e the original Answer or Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on ..r before the I2th dav of September. I960. If vou fiil to do so. Judgment by de fault will be taken against you for the relief demanded In the Bl'.l of Complaint. This notice shall be published once each week for four ron-'vutive week* In THE JEWISH FY.ORlDIAN. DONE AND ORDERED at Miami Florida, thl* Gth day of August. A.D.. E. B LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida (seal) Bv WM. W. STOCKING. Deputv Clerk NORMAN 8 PALI^OT H06 Incraham Building Miami 32. Florida Attorney for Plaintiff S/13-19-J6. 9/1 NOTICE BV PLBL.CATION IN THE C:CUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. .N CHANCERY. No COC 6462 1'.'LIE!: TATE RoltEKTS P ..r.tlff. ELIZABETH C FACI P.. .P.ERTS IWendan! SUIT FOR DIVORCE T' ELIZABETH C PACI ROBERTS 36T: SOUU Went Eighth street Mam. V Tou are hereby notified that 1 Rill •mplaint for Divorce has beer. 1.led Bjsjatant you. an | ;jii. r. • ir Answer or Pleading to the. Hill of Comp aim on the plalntlir. Attorney. PoPFER ft SCHIESS "•-'! South W I St., 'i Miami 43. Florida and file the original Answer or Pleading in the of the Clerk of the Circuit Com t on or l~-f..r. the lith day of September, I960 If rail fail to do ". Judgment by default will 1taken against you for the relief demanded in the Bill of This n-'ti.e shall be punttahfd one* each week for four t n.-. utlve weeks in THE JEWISH H.ORID1AN DONE AND ORDERED al Miami, Florida, thl. i.t eaj of Aug-uot, AD. 1: B LEATHERMAN, %  lerk. ourt, lade County. Florida I seal. B) WM W. ST'x-K NO, I "eputy Clerk popPEl: i. sen Atturneys for plaintiff US* s..uth West 7.:rd St. M ami 4:;. l-l.-rida ~-i:-ii-2< NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the partnership heret..f..-e extstiac between l-m.'THY R SCHMELZ and RICHAKD K IMPEL!., under the flclili and style of STUDIO ul CERAMICS lo.ated at 339S Coral Way, Miami. Florida, waa dissolved .) mutual iiin.—l. on the tsth day of June. 196 I DOROTHY K BCHMELE has withdrawn from and has ceased to be associated in the carrying on of said business ..1 .1 RICHARD K. POPBLL a ill hereafter carry on said business. and he 1entitled to all of the assets, including all debt* due to said partnership, and has assumed and will pay all outstanding buslaese obligations of STUDIO OF CERAMICS heretofore and hereafter Incurred. DOROTHY R .tCUMKIi RICHARD K PttpKLL. r,-i2-i-2 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business un ler the fi. tlttuu* num.* of 1: B ASSOCIATES at ill* 8.W 5th Street, Miami. Floritla inteit-U • regNter sail name with r|ie Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. EARL BORNON WBINKLE A KKSSI.KI: Attorney* for Earl B-.bson M 1 Scvbold Building Miami 32. Florida I/6-1I-UVM Miami 36. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of MACDONELL. PATIO HARDENS at NunibefSTl S W 77th Avenue, In the city of Miami. Florida Intend to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florid DATED at Miami. Florida, this 30th dav of July. 1*60. GBOBjGEN MacIHiNELL III LILLIAN L. MacDONELL H--12-19 NOTICE UNDER FICT,TIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring tq engage In %  • ss under the fictitious name of WEBER THOMPSON ft LEFcoCRT at 117.0 S.W. 1 Street. Miami 3. Florida Intend to register said name with the Clerk nf the Circuit Court of Dade Count\, Florida. OTTO F WEBER EDGAR B. THOMPSON SIDNEY LEMMCRT STANLEY B LEVITCH R WARREN DAVIS GEORGE M SIM UNRALPH M WEISBARD MYERS, HEIMAN ft KAPLAN Attornevs for Partner. 11 ." %  '> S W 1 Street Miami M. Florida 7/e. s/5-ij-i ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! rORPOH ATIOX OM TUTS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at FR :i-f§5



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    ^^ Page 4-B +Jei§t ncrkttan Friday, Auguet 19, Jeuish Fl-jndun Exclusive YOUR M c ARRIAGE COUNSELOR • by *^am$4€l C-/. sjiilnm, MIAMI'S NATIONALLT FAMOUS MARRIAGE COUNSELOR AND AUTHOR The decline of modern marriage began with the French Revolution of 1789 with itMxesi on liberty, equality and fraternity. Before the Revolution. France was ruled by its privileged classes, the nobility and the clergy Though both were largely non-producti\e and parasitic, they had between them no! only a monopoly of the nation's wealth but of its political power as well. Both classes were corrupt More important, both had outlived their usefulne-s in the economic and political scheme of things Though they did not realize it. the transference of power from one class to another was taking place under their very MM Below the privileged two was the entirely new class of industrial employers for whom there Hi no place at all under the old regime. This was the emerging middle class, the h principles of representative government Condorcet preached the doctrine of progress for all. Jean Jacques Rousseau, perhaps the most influential of all the intellectual forerunners of the Revolution, spread the gospel of political and social democracy Once the ideas of democracy catch on. there is no stopping the conflagration. Democracy ii MM tially a process of education in which people, under the guidance of their betters, begin the painful process of thinking. All ideas come upder scrutiny and analysis Authority, previously unquestioned, is hauled before the court of reason and dethroned. The French Kcvolution undermined marnaye in (hat it planted the seed of critical thought A disbelief, in an avenmng personal God and in the immortality of the soul became fashionable. The very foundations of religion were undermined, especially its theological superstructure. People were no longer too concerned or disturbed about the consequences of sin. of punishment for earthly misdeeds. They were interested in the "now" instead of the hereafter, in the immediate and in the present. Industrial Revolution Sweptup by the feverish ideas of freedom and equality, women began critically to examine the old ideas under which they were kept in social and economic bondage. They began to question such hoary concepts as woman's basic inferiority or that she was responsible for man's original fall from grace. Equally important, the Re\olution helped dis engage them from the priestly doctrine that women were essentially second class citizens, and that she musi bear her marital lot with equanimity and fortitude no matter how depressing it was. Finally, because the Revolution questioned all conventional and traditional ideas, enlightened men and women began seriously to question the very foundations on which marriage rested. If the decline of modern marriage began with the French Revolution, it was hastened by the Indus trial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries This was the period in English history, roughly 1750-1850. which saw a stable agricultural and commercial society transformed into the colossus of modern industrialism. It was the era of transition from handicrafts in the home to steam power operations in massive factories belching forth black smoke Before the emergence of modern capitalism, only a few adventurous women had engaged in business enterprise The vast bulk of them remained at home, occupied by domestic tasks and helping their husbands in handicraft production. The rise of the factory system profoundly altered all this Sheer economic necessity, as well as the demand for unskilled labor, forced thousands of wive* out of their homes into the new mines, mills and factories Home as Family Center With them often went their children, as well as their men folk. For one of the few times in the history of civilization, the home had lost its paramount importance. Previously, the home had been the center of the family's education and activities. It had been the place where youngsters had been taught to read, write, add and subtract, where they were first introduced to the delights of great books, and taught various trades and handicraft skills. The mother inevitably was the chief educator since the father, then, as now. was preoccupied with earning a living. It was a challenge she met with zeal and pride 'It was the mother, in fact, who was the very' heart of the home's various activities. She was useful and she was important. Both gave her a feeling of security she has rarely had since. The home in those halcyon days was also the focus for the family's recreation. There was conversation, now, alas, a lost art, readings from the family Bible, as well as from other great literature, and there were song fests around the piano. Today, with the single dubious exception of television, the family obtains much of its recreation outside the home. Diversion of a sort is sought in movie theaters, bowling alleys, night clubs, taverns, race tracks, baseball and football games, and in philandering. The unhappy truth is that the American husband and wife have become bored with each other, with the home being merely a house from which each seeks escape. To avoid the increasing monotony of having to face each other for more than a few hours, both husband and wife have become almost obsessive "joiners." On the theory that misery loves company, the American male licks his wounds at the Elks. Masons. Odd Fellows, Kiwanis, Lions, Optimists B'nai B'rith. and a host of other organizations Not to be outdone, his wife is compulsively driven to attending luncheons, organizations, drives and acquiring "culture" by attending book reviews of unimportant books. Both sexes are pathetically unhappy. Emotional Significance Lost The husband is unhappy because he is no longer the mam focus of his wife's interest. He must not only compete with his children for his wife's attention and affection, but with her various clubs and organizations, as well. And in at least one case out of four, he must compete with her lover, too. Thus, for many American husbands the home has lost its warmth and emotional significance. In altogether too many cases it is no longer a home at all but merely a place where the struggle for power is continued ad infinitum. ad nauseam. He does not find peace there nor rest, but screaming children clamoring for his attention. His wife is neither loving, affectionate nor understanding; usually, in fact, she is completely indifferent both to him and to his problems. She is tired, weary and exhausted — too tired to plan a warm, nourishing dinner, too weary to be stimulating mentally, and too exhausted to be more than an indifferent lover. The wife is unhappy because she is confused and uncertain as to the part she should play in marriage, and because she is profoundly dissatisfied with her historic role of homemaker and mother. She feels she is more an exploited servant than a mistress, and is humiliated that she is dependent on her husband for her very' existence. She tends to think of the home not as a place of warmth and comfort, but as a monster who can never be vanquished. The endless, drab, drearydomestic chores fill her with dread and apprehension. while the confining, restricting walls of the house pervade her with a panicy feeling of claustrophobia If she has any skill or talent, she feels that life has cheated her. and that marriage and children have deprived her of ever finding intellectual and emotional fulfillment. If she lacks such skill she feels she is simply being exploited. In a word, she is completely and thoroughly miserable, a burden to herself and a millstone to her husband. Beach League Sponsors Panel Seven leading businessmen from Miami Beach will comprise a panel discussion on the need for a Miami Beach Tourist Commission at a meeting of the Civic League of Miami Beach on Monday evening t the DiLido hotel. The panelists will be Ted Greenfield, merchant; Hank Meyers. Miami Beach publicity director: Kenneth Oka. city councilman and former mayor; Sidney Raff el, hotels; Eugene Weiss, apartments; Ed Yarnell. Eastern Airlines; and Paul Brunn, of the Miami Beach Sun. The program will be under the direction of Jack Freitag. and the moderator will be Harry Smith, former president of the League. Ed Melniker. vice president of the Mercantile National Bank, and president of the Civic League, said that some of the other subjectss to be discussed include an advertisHerf i to Discuss Mefl Hal Hertz will discuss "The Mall' at a meeting of Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith on Tuesday noon at the DiLido hotel. Zamora Adds Noted Teacher Nathan Davidow. president. Wednesday announced the addition of Benjamin Kaminetsky to the religious school staff of Temple Zamora. The ap poin tment of Kammetsky came concurrently with affiliation of the school's curriculum with the Bureau of Jewish Education. Kaminetsky, well-known here a teacher of Hebrew, was previa ly a member of the Beth El Cos? gregation staff for three years ttf of Knesseta Israel-Tor a slmiT period. ing program to compete with nearby resorts, the establishment of information offices in all major cities of the U.S.. a year-round events program, fend subsidies for bona fide travel agents and carriers who initiate promotion toward this, area. NEW! Popular Special Tours • m AVIV ISRAEL • JERUSALEM • GAUUI, etc AND EUROPE :KS* • tOME HY AMR 17 Days All Expense Holiday WUKir FROM OCT. 1, IN* I Other Sure** $AAK Teers Freas "H3 Oaea Omilf I Son. • AM.10 •JN.-JMIMM ar Write fM %  GETAWAY TOURS. INC. 1638 Collins Ave Ml, Fla. JE 2-3334 NO TAX round-trip tourist fare included tfo uuest^^ Visit glamorous, summer-cool Mexico via Guest Airways — famed for passenger-pampering service. But the Guest flight is only half the fun — for a complete itinerary of everything this unbeatable tour has to offer contact your travel agent or send the coupon below to us. In addition to Mexico City, you'll visit Cuemavaca, Taxco and see so much more. But don't miss out — do it nowl 0*^1 Airways, 101 SX ToU r p^ „<* mo lutt details of 7-0* •"



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    Friday, August 19. 1960 + Anist fhriaBan Page 5-B Mexico City Holds fashion Festival ON Monday Own as Leading L. America Center Back-to-school fashion show (or :ot^ through teens is planned by he Emma Lazarus group of Hadassah on Monday from 2 to 4 p.m al the home of Mrs. Peter Dreisen. 9172 Froude ave. < '<>chairmen are Mrs. Dreisen and Mrs David Daris MTT. When* Berman is president of the group. Or. WoHson in Talk This unique octagdn-shaped building will grcce the campus of the University of Miami w thin the next year, and is being hailed as the forerunner of a new era in educational building design. Architect Robert Fitch Smith, of Miami, and university officials conferred for several months on the structure, which is inter.r'ed specifically for teaching by use of television and other visual aids. The square building at the right is a complete TV production studio from which programs will be wired in closed circuits to classrooms in the main building. Capacity of the structure is 2.064 students, in 16 classrooms varying in individual capacity from 56 to 304. Estimated cost is $600,000. Results of the 1960 census will indicate that Mexico City is not only holding her lead as Latin America's most populous city, but may show that she's running reckand-neck with Chicago for place as the second largest city in all the Americas. Fourteen Errors in Diet" was The cosmopolitan capital is the to be the topic of a lecture by Dr. gateway for Florida's onlv direct i Abraham Wolfson. Thursday mornservice to Mexico. Guest Airways' 1 ing. 8.30 a.m.. before the Athletic non-stop flights from Miami. Like Group, sponsored by the Miami .all large cities, it has its full comBeach Recreation Department, plement of urban attractions—fine This marks Dr. Wolf son's sixth food, modem hotels, excellent talk in the new series on "The shopping and headliner night club Good Life." acts In addition, it provides those —— things uniquelv Mexican—manachi bands, native markets and archi once independent towns or. in some tectural and other reminders of the cases kingdoms, warring for or country's colonial and Indian civil izations. Continue?* from Page 1-B li r the party Gypsy Rose Lee tendered her "Auntie Mame" cast at lU Grove Playhouse. %  iking of Gypsy, spotted at .nee: Mrs. Fred Atlas. Mrs, ltd Goldstrich. Mrs. D. Donah. Mrs. James Abramson. d Mrs. Daniel Wax By the way, Mrs. Wax is a newcomer fom Chicago by way of Holj like ... Mrs. Leonard (Lucille) Bursten off to Milwaukee and. Apple"on to her mother, Mrs. Helen Blink, and sister. Mrs. Fred Mar while the twins are Maying li me to baby-sit with their little ster. Sunny .. Tuesday Nfte Men's Bridge Club East Traveler Halt mi and wife Mildred got I a< k Monday night Over cards I ..esday, fellow-members thanked Herb for the cards from Saigon tw • +^}ocialite everyone received that morning The William Epsteins and daughter. Donna, home from a ad Indiana This was their first trip back in 12 yean.. Friends of Clara (Mrs Philip dehshtcd .-he's better and on the road to recovery Postcard to remember: "We found Tahiti very primitive, very French. arxl very naughty" ,'.. Jack and Marion Rabin ovitch French cooking in Mexico City intrigued Henry and Shirley Barak Shirley said she ate duck with craipe sauce five times in a row at live different restaurants. An eventful weekend for Betty Me Leopold* Schwartz She gave greetings from the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods to the 33rd annual convention of Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish War Veterans at the Deauville hotel Then she dashed off to win the Gold Assn. tourney at the Miami Shores Golf Club Back to Miami Beach from The Mexican capital is several towns in one. There are the "colonias" — Lomis and Hipodromo, for example—named for the foothills and nearby race track. Many foreign residents of the city live in these attractive suburbs, sharing the cost of their private police force and other services. Such communities as against the powerful Aztec empire. Even the most taciturn visitor finds extravagant adjectives to describe the capital and its environs. But nowhere do they flow more easily than in the city beyond the city — University City. The university rises from a once desolate lava rock region at the south edge of town. During September. 1960, Mexico will observe the 150th anniversary of her independence. Everyone may confidently, expect this event KLM Offers Israeli Tours Opinions on the Air WCKR Radio in Miami is putting the people of Dade county on the air through the station's "Min%  *• -"^iasiareTSBiPs |1'a\el privately than in groups. M Royal Dutch Airlines is offerHi i six tours to Israel and Europe. The Dutch airline, in conjunction jyith American Travel Abroad. %  T (., which is responsible for all and arrangements, has provided lie r hotels, sightseeing trips, surpace transportation, meals, transfers to airports and tips on these pit varied 'tineraries. The 37-day itinerary has the same 15-day tour of Israel, plus visits to Istanbul, Athens, Vienna, Lucerne, Paris, London and Amsterdam. A 45-day tour, has the seme itinerary In Israel, however it includes Rome, FJorence, Venice, Lucerne, Interlaken, Geneva, London, Brussels and Amsterdam. An IB-day tour visits Paris and tome before devoting 10 days to ll'rael. A 31-day tour, which in|eludes 15 days in Israel, also visits Rome, Lucerne, Paris, London and %  Amsterdam. as •"short, candid opinions from the people, themselves, on important news developments." WCKR news reporters obtain the tape-recorded statements at various locations in Dade county. On-air presentation usually features two opposing viewpoints. ,. suburban Canada and Providence are Sam Xochimilco. San Angel. Tacubaya. ito be wildly and widely celebrated. and Libby Rost to catch their Tacu b a and Atzcapotzalco were I —ST. breath only Because they leave Friday for London on the SS Rotterdam, meander around Europe and return here in November It was a first trip to Florida for Miss Minerva Komenarski, of Philadelphia The Solomon Margolis family, whom she was visiting, got a kick out-of showing her the sights ... But what Minerva liked most was swimming in the pool and sitting on the dock —just plain fishin' She's a former concert %  olalet • • Betty Trapne'iF expected to re turn home Friday from Jackson Memorial Hospital, where she's been confined since July 29. following an automobile accident ... On the way to recovery, Betty, a Jewish Floridian staffer, will be back at her desk in a few weeks. Mass exodus at the Howard Miller home the minute school was out Ronnie went to Columbus to take a special course in debating for a d ,-. n c e d high school students who've been recommended -i'hen on to New York to visit Steve Pine, son of Sol and Dubby Pine Meanwhile. Mike is out at the U of Miami, and Marcy and Gary are at Pinewood Camp .. Milton Balsam and his Marcia back from a cruise to the Bahamas aboard the SS Bahama Star. EASTERN SHIPPING CORPORATION Gen I nqenl .<,3<0 Bo.tlJ'Mom.1 ""'" ', %  '• '"Y~" '••"'<>'On** rfo.iv i io %  c £ • Sundays lO o.m o i p.m |Toking Gome Seriously World champion Baltimore Colts. [who will appear here in Miami in [tie second annual United Fund pro |Rame against the Pittsburgh Steel• in the Orange Bowl on Sept. 2. pie taking their preseason footIball seriously, Coach Weeb Ewbanks said. Working his high [Towered offense in training camp early drills. Ewbanks boasts An |


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    Pag 4-A +JewlstincrM**ri Friday, August 19, I960 ^Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Strewt Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 FREb K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Aviv. Israel RAY U. BINDER __ C orrespondent Published every PVlday elnoa If tt by The Tawleh nortdUn at 12tf N.E. Sixth Str#*t. Miami 1. Florida Knterrd aa aecond-claas matter July 4. 1930. at Pout Office of Miami. Florida, under the Act of March S. II7J. The Jewish Florldlan has Bsorbed the Jewish Unity an the Jewish Weekly. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Assn.. American Assn of English-Jewish Nswsoapers. and the Florida Press Aean. The Jewish Klnrldlan does n.>t s;u*rantee the Knshruth of th m^rchandl^r advrtled In Its rnlumm SUBSCRIPTION One Year f4 00 RATES: Three Veare '0OO Volume 33 Number 34 Friday. August 19. 1960 26 Ab 5720 Dictator Nasser's Tragedy The tragedy of the dictator is that he must constantly win victories abroad. He is committed to them far beyond any progress to which he has pledged himself at home. It is in the area of foreign prestige that a nation experiences its greatest sensitivities. Poverty, illiteracy, disease — these are problems people have time and again reduced to second place in priority as they shouted the praise of a dictator offering them greater glones abroad. Egypt's President Nasser fits this classical prescription for a strongman to a tee. whose reform programs at home are far behind his more ambitious vision of a pan-Arab world under his personal domination. Nasser's diplomatic sanctions against Mohamed Riza Pahlevi. the Shah of Iran, for the latter's recent reaffirmation of de facto recognition of Israel are a case in point. After three .weeks of attempting to turn the Arab nations against him. Nasser must now cope with his complete failure. But he can not stand still even for a moment. Hence Nasser's decision this week to send a military mission to Ghana lor the purpose of discussing the formation of a joint high command and the possibility of organizing an all-Africa army. But Ghana maintains the closest political and economic ties with Israel. 'The two are mutual owners of a maritime shipping line. Ghana students fill 'sraeli schools, and many aie the Israeli technical experts in Ghana today advising the new African republic on agriculture and industry. How can Nasser rationalize his latest move toward Ghana with the existence of a strong Israel-Ghana accord? Obviously, he can not— although it is clear he would like to undermine it. This is merely another in a growing number of bitter lessons for dictator Nasser, who must increasingly recognise that his war of attrition aqainst Israel hurts his own ambitions in the Middle East far more than they ever hindered the Jewish Stateanother in a growing number of chilling assertions that his failures abroad are beginning to match his failures at home. THINGS TO 00 IN THE FAIL Actions Speak Eloquently Scientists and statesmen from 29 countries are currently attending sessions of the International Conference on the Role of Science in New States. It is not strange that the conference has gathered in Israel. Prime Minister Ben-Gurion's opening message to the delegates amply justifies the honor accorded the Jewish republic. The material and cultural gap between nations must be closed, Ben-Gurion declared, warning that "gaining independence is not the end of redemption." The wisdom of this pronouncement is borne out by the events attending the birth of the Congo. Israel's Prime Minister also called upon more highly developed nations to assist their fellow-human beings in countries where educational opportunities have been restricted. Mr. Ben-Gurion's words are idealistic and filled with far-seeing moral impulse usually the signs of impracticality. But it is a fact that he could speak them proudly, for Israel has acted forthnghtiy to make of these principles an enviable reality. Israel's growing relationships with the newly-emerging nations of Africa in a host of fronts—educational, industrial, and economic are glowing examples of the altruistic ties among peoples for which Ben-Gurion called "as an obligation of fellow-members of the same human family ... to rectify historic wrongs." Little Israel, herself still fragile, still dependent, but nevertheless proud and intellectually vibrant, is coming to the assistance of the less fortunate today—ven as others have not forgotten her. Proud Space Age Moment The launching of Echo I was a proud moment in America's increasingly sturdy effort to seize and maintain the lead in space age progress. Dr. Abe Silverstein. director of space flight programs for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is a proud figure in that moment. The heretofore predominant role the Soviet Union has played in satellite launchings and other activities dedicated toward man's conquest of outer space disheartened a world concerned by the encroachments qi Communism. America's ever-advancing strides in this field, which appear to be catapulting the nation into the ascendancy, are now quieting the anxieties emerging from past Soviet successes. Dr. Silverstein's latest Echo I contribution once again gives cause for Americans to be proud of their natural abilities both in science and democracy —with each dedicated toward the advancement of the other. Speaking About Agriculture A report from overseas this week guotes U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson as being "impressed" with Israel's agricultural development following a four-day visit in the Jewish State. We don't quite know what Mr. Benson's evaluation means. For a long time a principal target of Democratic Party snipers, and now a sure victim of Mr. Nixon's ax in the event of a GOP victory next November, the Secretary's knowledge of things agricultural appears universally to be suspect. If Mr. Benson found it gratifying to observe the concentration of Israel's technical knowhow, which he said brings excellent results in yielding greater and better crops, perhaps it had best be left there. In this respect, we should like so much to feel he knows what he is talking about -even if America's fanners don't think so. daring the week ... as i see it by LEO MINDLIN T"! They Aren't Fooling Anybody The ousting of a Soviet Embassy official in Washington for consorting with an American Nazi Party member in the laiter's ambition to become a spy puts the lie to the Powers trial opening in Moscow this week. Communist spying is notorious. Whom do the Russians think they are kidding — especially when they're caught scheming with second-rate Nazi hangers-on? This is espionage at its crudest level. JiWISH W.r Veteran, came to Miami Beach tZ armed with a battery 0 f IM resolutions. The list is an Z posing one. Issues ranging broadly a, "Know Your*"^ ica Week" (Resolution No M and Dhahran Alrbase fN 7 83>, ;Use of Surplus F.nerni m Property" (No. 2fj) and "SJ ted Nation Day" lems perplexing some of our most mature intelligences—if sli >h'!v less seasoned leaders-hcre and abroad. The resulting picture reaffirms the view of a serious-minded Jewish veterans' organization that has since its inception successfully and easily avoided the water pistols and noise-makers calling to mind for other veterans' groups the camaraderie and boom-boom of war. •:• •:•:• commomisiHG A KWISM communirr IN ALL, THE healthy and hopeful feeling is that some of this seriousminded enthusiasm for the achievement of workable solution* to the afflictions ailing human society may very well filter down to the Florida Department JWV scene, where bowling and cards are frequently king. But an otherwise sound listing of considerations tended to lengthen to 127 during the course of the convention here; while, in the final days of the gathering, one particular resolution enjerged for passage that might, more profitably, have died behind the scene. The move applauding the Catholic Church condemnation in Cuba of the increasng Communist affiliations of Fidel Castro appears in retrospect impetuous and ill-advisedPressed for study by Bernard Abrams. outgoing national commander, it Will be among the many items of unfinished convention business before the JWV national executive committee meeting next November in Detroit. There is no question about the direction of the Castro regime or of Fidel's dangerous challenge to Western Hemispheric solidarity. Neither is this to be construed as criticism of JWV's concern for the continuing encroachments of world Communism. The list of resolotions JWV brought, to the convention include a number of laudable ones in the same and related areas: "Nuclear Tests" (No. 33). "People to People Program" (No. 36). "Crusade for Freedom" (No. 39). and a pithy one. entitled simply. "Communism" (No. 53). among others equally commendable. But the resolution on Castro followed in the heat of Cuba's Catholic Church action and, to be blunt about it. compromises unnecessarily and to a dangerous degree the position of an increasingly vulnerable Jewish community there. What was the precedent for this proposed resolution? Has the JWV in the past condemned Batista Trujillo or other Latin dictators' Did it take a stand on the attempted Communist coup in Nicaragua six years ago' Has it been equally vocal in the seesaw political arena that is Argentina? •:• •:si. PAtAUH SnilATKHIS IM OTHIK AAtAS -\ gVEN ASSUMING SUCH action previously, the critical factor that should have made an exception of Cuba did not obtain elsewhere in the Caribbean or South America. For in no other recent revolutionary movement has there been such hysterical national unanimity and. at that poised against the greatest power in the Western Hemispherethe Lnited States. The proposed Jewish War Veterans resolution thus makes a sitting duck of Cuba s Jewish community which, for the Castro devout, must inevitably become identified with "Yankee imperialism." In deducing this probability. I anticipate no further need here for the millionth time to prove the prevalence of the anti-Semitic canard that one Jew sneaks for all Jews in the mind of the non-Jew. or that one Jewish body represents all. Even if Communism is a subordinate issue, the resolution was a poor adjunct to "Threat of Unrest in South and Central America and the Caribbean" (No. 79). which demonstrates a more proiound understanding of the problems germaine to Latin America and a keener r less sensational — disposition to intelligent counteraction than the hastily-composed and purposeless condemnation. Parallel situations abound, where discretion is not compromise but a genuine consideration relating to the welfare of another Jewish community. Perhaps the most cogent in recent days may be found in South Africa, where Jews occupy respected status in industry, politics, and commerce. Apartheid, an even more violent equivalent there of our own racial segregation, has been a smouldering issue for years The recent attempted assassination of Prime Minister Voerwerd. who vows to live or die on the principle of white supremacy, subsequently catapulted South Africa Jewry into the tenderest of positions. It is far from similar to the tenderness experienced by Jews who live in our own Southland, where traditional values come into conflict with a clear understanding of the absurdity of racial discriminant in the hearts of men themselves discriminated against since antiquity, and where an increasing number of Jew s from the North bring a frequently mythical but nevertheless propagandrsticalty effective Yankee contempt for anti-Negroism. -:•:• .;. MOM WIICMTT AMO WOwTNT MSMtfTfONS pOR THE incontrovertible fact is that far more unity on segregation exists among South African Jewry than among Jews of the United Mates: To a larger extent, the Jewish community there is apartheid. What. then, is the nature of the sensitivity? How has the Prime Ministers near-assassination aggravated it? In a word. South Africa's racial conflict has stimulated the critical civil libertarian reaction of Jews elsewhere Recently, a number of major Jewish organizations seriously discussed the possibility of boycott and other forms of economic sanction as a means of voicing their protest. Most of it. however, has been abandoned — not out of CentWwsw sst Patje 4-A



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    Friday. Auguatf 19, 1960 -Jentsf HcrkUar Enrollment Peak Nearing at Center Registration for the Early Child-. hood I'f. elopment Program is rap-, ,tfv reaching the maximum number at each of the four branches: of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, it was announced' fedoesdav by Efraim Gale, executive director. The program is designed to give the kind of experience which will achieve the fullest development of each child as an individual in his. physical and mental growth, emotional adjustment, and social yelfare. The program provides opportu-, nities fcr living and learning in small groups -of about ten children I of the -ame age level, observing, ewperirnenting with and exploring their environment, self-expression and independence, under profesI guidance, insuring favorable adjustment to the society in which thej live, participating in positive experiences in Jewish living at th''ir own level, encouraging each child to develop at his own rate and ability, psychiatric consulta lion and guidance to assist the leacher is reaching her objectives. Page) 3-B Greater Miami leaders of the American Friends of the Hebrew University at a dinner in New York initiating a SI2.000.000 development program for completion of the new campus of the university in Jerusalem. Shown (left to right) are Philip M, Klutznick. national president of the organization; Mrs. Oida C. Rubin, immediate past president. Greater Miami Friends of the Hebrew University; former Sen. Herbert H. Lehman, who presided; Mrs. Herbert Shapiro, president of the Greater Miami Friends; and Mrs. Louis S. Gimbel, jr.. national president of the Women's Division of the organization. Hadassah Group In Games Night south^ate group of Hadassah will. hold a card party and games night in the recreation room of Southgate Towers on Thursday evening, Aug. 23. Uesdames Lea Udell and Clara f'.oldenberg will chair the event.! Committee includes Mesdames Hannah Cohen, Ethel Harrow. Le-! nor* Hauer, Toni Harris, Dolly Hersh, Mary Gustman. Mary Mor-; | genroth. and Ruth Steigel. Mrs. Henry Wernick is president of the i-roup. Rabbi Kronish Visiting in Israel Rabbi and Mrs. Leon Kronish will return next week after a month in Israel as guests of several friends of the Israel Bond organization. For the past several years, the Temple Beth S h o I o m spiritual leader has served as chairman of special projects for the Greater Miami Israel Bond committee. In Israel. Rabbi and Mrs. Kronish joined Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Oritt and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Sipser on a tour of economic and industrial programs which received suport from Israel Bond funds. Oritt is general co-chairman with Jack A. Cantor of the Greater Miami Israel Bond committee. Sip -er is Israel Bond city manager here. Yehudah Moshe Registration Kindergarten registration is currently taking place at Congregation Yehudah Moshe, formely North Dade Jewish Center, according to Mrs. Jack August, administrator. Also under way is registration for Popiel religious school. Mrs. Tcrri j Grossberg.'director, has announced ihat choir rehearsal will be held each Monday and Thursday evening at the Temple, and is open to all interested persons. Tgajjr From BRAHMS to BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music 16 Hours a Day on FM 83 93.1-100 KM 108 NC y\ .... W A F Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers From Soft Drinks to Savings Institutions DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Registration Set At Ner Tamid Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid will hold a card party on Saturday evening in Sklar Auditorium of the Temple. Mrs. Murray A. Shaw is chairman. Co-chairmen are Mrs. Henrietta Elne. Mrs. Seymour Horowitz, and Mrs. Leonard Paul. The Sisterhood will hold its first meeting of the season on Wedneesday evening at the Auditorium, with Mrs. Louis Cohen, president, conducting the session. A member-bring-a member luncheon is planned by the Sisterhood for Thursday noon. Aug. 25, at the home of Mrs. Fannie Sklar. 1641 S. Treasure dr. Mrs. Monia Leshin will be hostess. Mrs. Carlton Blake is vice president of membership, and Mrs. Yvette Silberger is cochairman. Beach Student Wins Trophy A Miami Beach High School sophomore carried away a trophy as "outstanding debator" in a special summer course at Ohio State University. He is Allan E. Goodman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Goodman, 900 West ave. Allan's public speaking teacher suggested he enroll in the summer public speaking and debating course at Ohio State along with some 50 other youthful students from throughout the United States. The five-week course was conducted by Robert J. Kibler. director of the Summer Center of Communicative Arts at Columbus, O.. who cho.se Allan top debator. He is not quite 16. Distributed by HI GRADE FOOD CO. 7200 N.W. 29th Avenue ••"• 0X H1 Hebrew-English Calendar Appears Wilno Kosher Sausage Co. of Chicago, pioneers in manufacturing "Pure Beef" kosher delicatessen products, has published a new Hebrew-English calendar for the year 5721. 1960-61, which is now being distributed by Wilno dealers, la addition to all dates of Jewish and legal holidays, the almanac has many other important and useful information and prayers. Radish. Yizkor, blessings of the Torah and dates of Sfiroh, Lag B'Omer, Tishn B'Av, when weddings are forbidden, and others are all listed for your convenience and information. The calendar is also available at the offices of The Jewish Floridian. -S.T. Dlllll I LINE Mi %  • 1+1-2 SMART SISTERS in "new look mal hint; fashion* • Quite pretty enough to repeat, these full-skirted cottons in sugary shades done in a young mood of romantic charm. Big Sisters jumper-effect dress, with quaint Tyrolean touches, solid skirt, checked waist, printed suspender straps with ric-rac trim, plum, sizes 7 to 12 7.9i Little Sister's dress, 3 to 6x 598 Young People's World, fourth floor miami. At all five Burdine's stores. J



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    Fri day. Augu* 19. 1960 +Jeitf r ltrkt&r Pag* 9-B "The Lot World." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's gripping story of a trip to a prehistoric land, filmed in color, starring Jill St. John and David Hedison, with Claude Rains and Fernando Lamas, now ot the Miami and Miracle. At the Carib is "Expresso Bongo," an entertaining satire on the entertainment world, with Laurence Harvey and Sylvia Syms. Cantor Bock From Institutes Cantor David Conviser, of Temple Beth Sholora. has returned from a month's vacation as music director of two national Federation Temple Youth Institutes, one in Indianapolis and the other in Great Barrington, Mass. Cantor Conviser met with lead •rs of youth groups in Reform congregations from all parts of the I'nited States, and joined with prominent rabbis in teaching the coming leaders of the Reform-Librral-Progressive movement in Judaism. He is new engaged in preparing the choirs of Temple Bath Sholom for the High Holy Days. The children's groups from the fourth grade through junior high ft rehearsing to sing at services with the regular choir. Cantor Conviser has just been appointed a member of the national committM on music curriculum of the Commission on Jewish Education, which functions under the joint auspices of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations and the Central Conference of American Rabbis. Rabbi Leon Kronish. spiritual leader of Beth Sholom. is also a member of the commission. Con/or Strasifeld Named For the fourth consecutive year. Cantor Abraham Strassfeld was this week named by Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute to render the musical portions of the liturgy during the High Holy Days. Herman Weintraub, president of Agudath Israel, said Cantor Strassfeld will join Rabbi Isaac Ever, who officiates, in conducting the Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur services. Nursery School Sessions to Open Beth David daily nursery and ; kindergarten is now open for registration to children three and four yeaTs of age. and meets every week-day morning from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. In addition to regular nursery programs, the children are oriented in religious holidays and the Jewish way of life. Eligible are children who will enter the first grade of public school in September. 1961. A reading readiness program is offered Trasportation to and from school may be arranged. Members of the staff are Mrs. Hersch. Mrs. Sidney Richman. and Mrs. Lester Saal. Congregation Yehudah Moshe Formerly North Dade Jewish Center AHHOUNCIS REGISTRATION FOR HEBREW SCHOOL & SUNDAY SCHOOL from Aug. 21 to Sept. 4 Kcgisfrefiea at #b •epieJ School Offke 13630 W. Dixie Hwy. PL 1-0283 Eichmann Story To be on TV NEW YORK-UTA>-The Arm-! 1 strong Circle Theatre will produce a one-hour television show on the CBS network on Sept 28 dealing with the life of Adolf Eichmann. murderer of six million European Jews. According to producer Robert E. Costello. the presentation will chronicle the history of the SS of ficer from the time he first joined the Nazi party and became ob sessed with the idea of completely annihilating Jewish populations in German-occupied territory to his capture in Argentina. The story, being written by Dale Wasserman. will be presented in documentary fashion, and will util ize actual films, still photos and dramatic sequences. India Observes Israeli Agriculture By T. Nerain New Delhi Progress of Israel in the field of cooperative farming, and the establishment of society on a true socialise pattern, has created interest in India in the Israeli development programs India and Lrael have many values in common, which include a desire to develop a cooperative economy on a voluntary basis. There is increasing interest in India to know more about Israel, its people, its culture and its international and social problems. In the past, many Indian journalists and Socialist leaders have visited Israel. They in their own way presented the true picture of Israel. But very recently the "Indian Express" assigned its special correspondent. Sylvain Mangoet. to make a study tour of Israel. The "Portrait of Israel" that he wrote in the column of his paper analyzed the "economic trends" and the efforts being made toward political and social progress of Israel. It spoke of a "stagnating Arab world" of Nasserism as "too little pre-occupied with the problems of raising living standards -at home and throughout the Arab masses." The correspondent had to faco tho wrath of tho press attache of tho UAR Minion in Now Dtlhi. Tho press attach* wreto to tho editor of tho "Indian Express" that "Arabs consider tho appeerenco of a portrait like this in a leading Indian newspaper as somewhat puzzling, especially because India is one of those countries associated with the Palestine question from the very beginning." Even the CAR press attache had to concede that Israel was making progress and that the Arab world was divided. He wrote in his letter: "Israel may have made greater progress than some other countries in certain fields, but that is always possible for a country' which begins with a break with its long and rooted past ." It is true that the Arab house, according to this spokesman, "is still not what the Arabs would like it to be. and it is possible for Israel to try to play off one Arab country against another." The press attache derived consolation from the claim that "for the first time in the last decade. Israel has failed to persuade the United States not to grant a big international loan to the UAR. The very fact that the loan (from the World Bank) is for the Suez Canal; which Israel cannot use because of the belligerency between it and the Arab countries, was a great diplomatic defeat for Israel." In his "Portrait of Israel." Mr. Mangeot drew the picture of a poor little land inspired by nothing but the highest ideals and surrounded by a sea of Arab hostility with a huge angry alien population impatient to push it into the sea. We get the picture of a gallant people who are building up'a haven for the world's persecuted Jews, who are conducting a great experiment in the laboratory' of land management, and who are leaping from strength to strength — in contrast with their weak, howling, divided and stagnant Arab neighbors. In Israel, Mr. Mangeot reported, every successful development of trade with the East is regarded as a defeat for tho Arab League policy of preventing any expansion of Israel's trad* by military and economic blockade. The policy makers at the top in Israel, who are sober realists, believe that "circumstances have made Israel en interesting laboratory where large, under-developed countries can profitably study many of their own problems as if it were under a microscope," the writer told the readers of his paper. Israel" be wrote, "believes more than ever that, in the long run. -olid relations with Asia and Africa win prove the most effective lever for forcing the Arab world to accept the reality that the State of Israel has come to stay and that her neighbors must one day come to terms with this reality. India is so obviously a key country in this process, and Israel makes no attempt to delude herself about it. But since the Sinai campaign she has acquired a new self-confidence which enables her to take a more patient and philosophical attitude towards India's hesitation to establish diplomatic relations with IsraelMr. Mangeot termed "very flimsy reasons" all Indian arguments that Pakistan would take advantage to launch a rumor campaign against India throughout the Middle East if India established diplomatic ties with Israel. The Indian writer does not believe that such establishment of diplomatic ties with I s r a e 1 would weaken India's chance at becoming a mediator or the fact that the "Indian Government has been discouraged in the past because every time Delhi was ready to take an initiative some incident between Israel'and the Arab world made the timing inopportune." "Indeed," he wrote, "Israel's efforts in the past to secure more official recognition from New Delhi were certainly partly due to a conviction that, once the two countries come into contact, they would discover, for all their differences in size, that they had many problems in common which would give practical substance to any formal relations." Reporting on the economic trends in Israel. Mr. Mangeot said that in eleven snort years both society and the conception of the State have changed at a "bewildering pace." sometimes leaving the pioneers more bewildered by the changes than the more recent immigrants, who too have been caught up in the daily problems of survival and assimilation to ponder their implications. "There can be little doubt that the Arab threat has so far benefited the State of Israel more than it has harmed it." Mr. Mangeot wrote. "In terms of time it has meant the difference between the operation of pressure cooker and an old-fashioned stewpan. In terms of national consciousness it has. paradoxically, gjven Israelis a self-confidence, in worldly as well as in spirtual terms, which might otherwise have taken generations to acquire. VOTERS! si's nrr.?=5 ?PJX£ sw REPUoUCAN FINANCE COMMITTEE Of DADE COUNTY The) tint* is short! Senel your help NOW! S/ JAMES W. DICICfY, Cheirmen eph .. e •••€• Co w" ef Dd Ceeety. Merie* 111? OePONT SUIIDING MIAMI 1% noeioA M. I'ol. Adv. New Addition to Staff By Special Report NEW YORK — The appointment of A. Ray Levin as Northwestern area representative of the American Zionist Council was announced here by Rabbi Irving Miller, chairman of the American Zionist Council. With headquarters in San Francisco. Levin will represent the organization in northern California. Oregon. Washington. Wyoming, Colorado. Montana. Utah, Idaho and Nevada. Gtftsf to be Speaker Emil Moskowitz will be a guest speaker at the Sterling hotel on Saturday. 5 p.m. Moskowitz is j founder of the Jersey Carpet Corp. Skitxh Henderson To Close Pop Concert Season Composer conductor pianist Skitch Henderson, one of the country's most popular orchestra leaders, will be guest conductor for Miami's tenth and last Pop concert of the season on Sunday evening. Henderson has been engaged by the University of Miami Summer Symphony to replace D'Artega. who is ill in a London hospital. He will conduct the originallyscheduled program of the "Greatest Melodies" composed by Rod tiers and Hammerstein. Jerome Kern. Cole Porter, and Sigmund Rom berg. Two Miami soloists, Lyrme Crusan, mezzo-soprano, and Patrick Matthews, bdritene, also will bo featured on the program at the air-conditioned Miami Beech Auditorium. Selections include "Sweethearts." from Maytime: "Wanting You." from New Moon: "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes.' "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue." "Night and Day." and "Can-Can.' %  Skitch Henderson, though born in England, spent most of his boyhood days in the United States. He lived in Minnesota. Kansas and Oklahoma until he was 15. at time he moved to Chicago. His ear%  ly musical training came from a variety of teachers, and it was not until he reached Chicago that he seriously considered a musical career In 1938 he went on a tour with Judy Garland which ended in Hollywood Calif. He later worked for NBC in Hollywood and studied' conducting under Albert Coates.' Henderson also studied theory and harmony under Arnold Schonberg He was an accompanist for Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby an num erous radio programs. He later became music director of the National Broadcasting Company and appeared on the weekly "Steve Allen Show," and earlier with Allen on the "Tonight" show. He recently appeared as a guest star on the "Kate Smith Show." He also has been a guest conductor with the major symphony orchestra's in the U.S.. including the New SKITCH HCMwEISOM York Philharmonic and the National Symphony in Washington, D. C. and last yeax with the London Philharmonic. Patrick Matthews, 25. is a music education instructor and choral director at Miami Edison Junior High School. He appeared last season in the Symphony's concert production of Berlioz* "Damnation of Faust." The handsome baritone also appeared in the' Opera Guild's Workshop presentation of "Carmen" last MayMiss Crusan, 20. a mezzo-soprano, recently won a coveted "Jeannie" award in vocal competition at the Stephen Foster Memorial in White Springs. Fla and last season performed in UM's First Festival of American Music under the direction of Fabien Sevitzky. tfeWm JEWISH HOUSEKEEPER take car* tm4 cetk for WM I WI T MM TW# ffMf ChlMrMU MO 7-2731 4327 S.W. loth St. I LOT IN HAIFA, ISRAEL I O. CnwL CX. Vie., to* lecanea. \ i *•>• Mid Hotel. J DWM I*W 24 aota. $7,500, ierof u iti— Hindi. HI 3-O042 ^aweha^dbdba4fcAa1eAa.Adb,e^Adb,e1



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    Friday. Augu* 19. 1960 +Jei§tfk*rtk>r Pogo 11-* Memo to You from the Desk of Max Lerner Her Eight Years, Back to Wilderness (Ty MAX LERNER New York For week* I Have been drownIn. m a sea of talk about smart politics and smart politicians, and smarted itself in the end. In the governing and self-governing ol men, smartness is a terribly transitory thing. It is wisdom that counts. Take the episode of the intelligence liaison between the Admin ,%  ; %  ition and the new candidates, which turned into a contest of smartness on both sides. After the Johnson nomination. Kennedy uas so anxious to appease the liberals that he couldn't wait for the Eisenhower offer to be made formally. Jumping the gun. he picked Stevenson and Bowles as his liaison with the CIA briefers. Hagerty (with Nixon doubtless behind him) was also terribly smart, seeing no reason why Eisenhower should help Kennedy in the hot box his convention smartness had created, and turned his face stonily against any liaison men. Outcome: no hits. no runs, no assists. But Kennedy's problem is still there: what to do about the millions of Democrats and independents for whom Stevenson was a symbol and Kennedy is not. The politicians who had written Stevenson off beforehand (including Stevenson himself) were not so terribly smart after all. My ex p.nence is that the political pros are the last men in the world to know what the seething, if silent. forces are in a convention, just as they are the last to know what are the fears and tumults in the human heart. Like all journeyman technicians, they only know how to count, weigh, and balance. but they are dumb about intangibles. There isn't one of them to whom I would tip my hat when it comes in intangibles, yet it is always on intangibles that elections — like battles and wars — are won and lost. -seme. From "the standpoint of-the Republican Party and its politi cal fortunes it may prove disastrous. The Democrats have left themselves wide open and vulnerable to the right kind of Republican attack. But it should be clear to any detached observer that Nixon, with all his political smartness, will be the wrong man to exploit these weaknesses. • • • THE nomination of Kennedy and the acceptance of the most liberal platform the Democrathave ever framed sets the problem for the Republicans: how can they get a candidate and platform which can meet this challenge and make inroads into the labor, liberal, and Negro voting groups which are normally Democratic" The Democratic choice of Johnson for second place, and the disgruntlement of the Stevenson wing of the party, give the Republicans an opening to exploit. Kennedys youth gives them another opening. I wonder whether the Republican strategy group, made up of their smartest politicians, knows these rather obvious facts. Do they know that Rockefeller, in his persistent and continuous advocacy of a fighting liberal platform, is the only Republican who could nullify the impact of the Democratic platform? Do they know that those who consider Kennedy too young in'd v -s#arce!>•• he se *af fTP-lif Nixon on this score, but would feel confidence in Rockefeller's Berman, 54 Passes Away LEGAL NOTICE Allen Berman. 54. passed away maturityDo they know finally bere Wednesday. He had been a that the current Castro crisis, inresident of Miami for the past 16 volving our relations with the years. whole of Latin America, deeply Mr Berman was head of the Hi involves Nixon in the AdmiwstraGrade Food Comparation's failures, but that Rockefeller's wide and deep knowledge of He is survived by his wife. S>1Latin America would win him supVla: daughter. Mrs Morris Levitt. port? a d granddaughter. Micheie. • • • Services will be Friday. 10 a.m.. at the Edward Newman Funeral Chapel I suppose it is foolish and futile even to ask these questions. The answer to all of them is that whether the Republican strategists know these facts or not then* minds are made up and will not change. Long ago they decided that Nixon was their man that chapter of the American Jewish he is a smart politician, that he t £" g f* S L "•* a member AJComa. Cord Party Mrs. Samuel Rosenstein. membership chairman of the Miami ship luncheon and card party at the home of Mrs. Edward Goldstein, 6615 Nervia. Coral Cables, on Aug 24 at noon. knows how to handle himself in the clinches, that they can count on his policies and decisions. Rockefeller? They regard him as an outsider who is trying to upset their decisions by appealing {mares' AwxU'mj MtCfMf to the people, many of whom are Democrats anyway. As if that were not exactly the point of Rockefeller's strength. NOT.Ce UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY hat thun MTvijn^l d*-*i naa^:* in 'i-* unrf-r thi. rr.e f NORTHERN MORI ST. In. t ,nrl Miam.. Florida. n'--il said 1 name wiUV th* '".$ %  'in. j;r %  nur. Florida MAN PI KARAH F>X %  %  • %  •%  IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY FLORDA. IN CHANCERY. N aoc mi I BENJAMIN TOPOL, Plaintiff. ANNA T >P< >l.. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: ANNA T>Pl •'. Av*nu* Ma-.--*i*r*|ua. N- > rot" ARE HEREBY N'rTIKIFT' • lad acainst >ou. and vou *-.-• y> 1 M a i-i % %  '. a/T Inc to the Complaint un the plain' • n-\ an.l ill.the orlataaJ Amir or Ple^dinc in th-0: &-'•* September 1. 1>* if default %  r. IAT -I IT l**i E B LEATHER*? \v 1-r h •! < ir. Bj K H RJCE J<. Tep'j:) <"e-k ORUEJ. ALBOIM lit. •'.. %  nthfl 4 UiM-oin Road Miami Bea. h. Florida After 20 years in the wilderness, from 1932 to 1962. the Republicans had eight years of powLadie' Auxiliary of Miami Beach Post 330. Jewish War Veterans, was to meet Thursday evening at American Legion Hall. 1828 Alton rd. Mrs. Benjamin Packer is pres-' ident. Invited were out-of-town guests at the JWV national conNOT.CE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 1> HEREBY %  ; 'Vi N that th-undersign-d deMUM' i r 6u-ine— — e ef HAH TRAM. INN at f.TOu *• W Xh .-' r.-t. Miami. Fla intends to -e.atZr aaid name kh I jerk of the <3rMirt of Dade i''.un' HFI F\ RI-FPi *<" I" er with a war hero. It looks now vention which concluded bere SunMa owi as if they were determined to go day. back to the wilderness. Which is where political smartness often ends up. (Cerrrif** 1M0) [ Attorneis for Appl't-ant ISM B.W. lt Ktreet OLHARRY FIERSTAT V.. of Ml Mrndian ave.. retired rneri-hunt. died Aug. 14 He lived here t* Kaara. Surviving are hi> artte. Ida. a son. Theodore. anJ d.odhler. Mriairraine 4 *.olitsmith He als-> leave* hi* father, two brothers, an i three sister*. Services were Au* U SI ;. .rdon Fun*r-il Home Ballet Aaditiaas Here Franklin Yeier. member of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo Company, and Miss Barbara Rassel. dancer with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo concert group, held auditions for scholarships in ba! prth im>. %  i tnl i „. „.„, *** training for the Dade Civic Balferth AraDOf. > J and wa> a mem. ^T .^. •-,.* t ber of Miami Beach LIka Lodge aaa let On Tuesday at 1501 NW 28th St. Temple Emiau-EL | arh r wife. Eatalle. a brother and *iate< : Bcrriea* mere in New York Cit... -.1 loral arrangement > by Blwat atoa Menural Caaneia. 1*-** • *, &f si t u a r i e s LEGAL NOTICE atOT.CC UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE I* HERER1 JIVFS that rh^ •inderrtrn-'* d*->lrinc ?< *nzajt NuMf>-*> jn-i^r th* fi> A l: < %  COSTt'ME SHOP A B MOt'KE OP PORMALR BNcavne B'\d Miami. Fla in-'-r > u> reclvter >aid nirni-. with t K ."i-rk ff the Circuit Court of Daje To.nl/. ^ .• Ma H r r\t KKSM.KC GARStt RoTH ^ttoajie\ foi Anpl'caJit \fS S W !-• ST. • l^< to MRS SOPHIE JAFFE t:. or 2911 SW ilrd te. dird Au| 14 She lived here l:\e Faara. tiur\l\1rut are her huaband. SaTijel a fun. Berand daughter. Mr. Ruth A. Skulnl'k. tihe al.-o leaves four brother-, includ.nc Max Blonder. Miami. %  ii,-i nfanJar. Hillandale. and iter> Barrlcwa ere Aua;. lt> • I KIerWe Memorial Chapel. W ALL this by way of introduction Kianier t to the assembling of the RepubJOSEPH ROBINSON lican clans at Chicago. %  •>:* ista t^r. d.^i Aa> u u < ... k.._ kilH '•• %  • %  me here from Newark Si J IS Nixon has for years been nanea „ i f> agi) mn(l ua 0 m ,ri. !h -h. athe kleagle of the clan of smart inuraal i>^...e B^rrka BwiH P„liticians. long before Kennedy :| *•£ ^!f3£52S came to join him in that role. When Nelson Rockefeller made a bid for recognition as a Republi can candidate, in his >wing across the continent. Nixon and Leonard Hall had him smothered in a blanket of hostility in every state in which he turned up. The Democrats had a host of Presidential candidates, even if only one was dominant. The Nixon forces didn't dare let Rockefeller's campaign even reach the convention floor, with some equal chance to make a fight of it. From Nixon's standpoint this made LOUIS SCHWARTZ *^. resident here for ninyear*. di-d Aox. • In Linden. N H whara atat of MARK .-MAIN Daeawaaw. NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION AND F.NAL DISCHARGE NOTICE h aereoy iven that I have NOT CC UNDfeR FICTrTlOUS NAMff LAW Ni'TU'C IS HEREBY StVl N that the f*n*tentiCBed de*.f-inc t *-r. !ice (a bu-inevw •.irtd'-*,v ':'ow wa* af t>ADE AIVERTfS!SO ptFTK-'BIIT>RJ nt til N W h .- Mnal Report and Petition for o|.HVKI> A' TSHn.r-: ibution and Fl-al !tacbare *r Altornev for Honn Ai of the eetate of MARK vat S->-.l.i HMc deceased, and that or the Miami S3. Florida I.,B two da iitee* a bro** tn *>' <* >*1>tember. 1W. will ^ IS-aa, S^M ther. two i*ter. a-d even crandto the Honorable Couat) Jodsaa ff %  %  MMren Ser\icee w*re Au II a; I*de Cooaty. Florida, for apurvval ofj MOT CC UNDER '.ordon Funeral H-r aaad Final Report an i 1 ,r d:atnbatiOB| FICTITIOUS MAJXE LAW and final dlcharar a Kx*cutrj of \oTK~F IS HERJSHY GrV'FN that Piltabarsh. aad was a member of Belh !>>_„,.,.£, n S>nar.^jf Surviiini are her h-J.-'"Jv? J. band. Samuel: two sons, lai laalita %  %  He waa a veteran Of World War II lltd a ni-ml.-Aumliar> .-•.. Ins are h- %  >\A-ia .-..n. Ifc.naM ^r*. He al* leavea tw nc Mr1 —na Sterabern. Miami, and a br .ther were Au li at Option Funeral Home JACOB A. BANOeS of SIS ltth at di~l Aae II H. la h^rII %  •••.-••*!>• %  ran a m*Tibe— aa MalaMlice an.l •" r, .V ivnter S riniri ar b •*a nor 'A MrIv.. .;ab-.r and Mrand aeven a n-r Au l: -'' Maii n al UhapaL Vi'a-hmc•re IT >eara ajjlo fr'rr New Yv>rk. WAA. rt. >II. r.rt here are no local aur\i3T. • *'?"'*"'' ,, „ .... : H-me •> ia charae of irave[--.-t-.ldRjild.fia: .ie aerrirea Aur. 10 at Mt. fcina Miami .. H.rtda !-: HENRY MEITFINGER the e*'-at^ "t the iMf-DUMd %  %  7. of 13i NE Ravahore dr retire.1 <*l Thi iTth da> of Auuat. 1*. • him<:nx clerk, di-d Atnj Hca-* „.__' %  I -.^ RlA lere IT >ear ao fr-rr Nem Txrk MAX Th. Funeral ai •%  -• ^T--\ JOSEPH A. RUTI To. retired owner of stare, died Aua T He camk K-> %  ; rm Brdc-y.r-.. C n-. ar.d l-red a: JIM Collmav %  te, l-ea E : %  clowns Norman K M aosL and a taach >.B.-ial was in Rrlda-.-.-t al arraaaerr• Menoral Chanel. Vt • ir.ftoa tie. IN CIRCUIT COURT EWEVENTH .v. JUDICIAL CIRCU T DADE COUNTY :4 s-vlrnM Bldr thiiut FLORlOA IN CHANCERV the aa aera i an d dtrfnaw •--.-J. in hailfs nd-r the fn itiiaaa ansn* of KI-^iNEl'T FI'RNITI WKINKLK* K r\ wFLORlOA Na. sac 7*r Ri'BKRT W H \ N.N %  USABETH IKAN BAJjfHAJl T" • >n HIMI • fUe >our an--r I it>lea %  nit for divorce • -' M.ami Z-. Florida %  :-. J/l- • N THE CIRCU'T COURT OP THE ,,ELEVENTH JLDCIAL CIRCUIT. IN t.. AND FOR DAD C COl'NTV. FLORIDA rA IN CHANCFPY No aoc sn SAMUEL H Shore He IIM here me< RAPK N lot i; ... from MRS. LIBBie weiNRlT i. of -* ave di-1 Autt •iil^-re eeven >ear> ai N- ^ -.inx a-hr husaand. Ma\ a daughter. Mrman. Mi.iml: brother siervicea aere A-1 *'• Ravilatil Mriior.a' Ch-ipe : W-* -Court an ** Wood '•' •• S W ?•SI M:ami r ia E B IJ5ATHERMAN Is S COST ^ HOME LOANS To Buy, Build or Refinance j Inquiries Invited • No A'J %  %  Oldi j0ade Federal jZ/iNd and LOAN ASSOCIATION .• M AMI 6 Convn.ent Offict 5sw 0-County MSOUtCfS fXCitO ISS MMAIOM OOUAtS IN THE COUNTY JUDGE S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE %a S0CM-C In RE rVHEMEr Deoaaaed NOTICE TO CREDITORS To I faind A HavMiami Beach Taxpayers' Assn. "< cuim. or Demands Asainsf said board of directors Wednesday apYam am wereby %  miflail aad requiroroved the foUowrng for memberei I demand_ u ^ „r! /•„,. s_ wh oh ioo ma ha\e attains the esDr. Michael A Cogan. Mrs ... M J, (H ..V :LU SCHKSCBE*'H Sley. Nat Weiss. Amoid i ER deceased ui. .>h.... to the > l*-e* of Hade ity and file the BUM In their in the Cooats Courthouse In ^ Hade Coaatr Plo-lda. within lehr Allen Goldberg, chairman of tne ^.,. m the rtm 0 r lh e! membership comrr-ttee. has anrrt BuhMeaUaa h-reor. or the same; Taxpayers Add To Membership ship: Harry Levy. Leonard Tobia. Fred der. and Ben Is nounced that 14 •bers .IUS.K.r-1. fifYlRilK iR. PlaiDOROTHA ri <.<'HTEAR. Defend 'Bt NHTTE TO ao=ap T" l'RnTHA I" fXKMJTBAIl &f aftl At..nad..n rVi. Charlotte N You are reouired to serr* a cc*v of enrve on •da'ntlff's atto-^ FS|IV K K • <-' !'.'• • %  • ia*.: M'aaii K FV>ri' t*-e •h. 0-< --oee Court oa or of s—.te-"l—r ISS* ••' • '•' "oareev wil' be ente-ed aca'nat |ta'd at Mi.—i. Plortda this lath dav of t-T"*' 1*a %  B fEATKVRM.N rierk %  cirri' -""oesaa • wall Bv WM W rrv-V Daouti %  "' IN THE COUNTY Jl_ OG== COURT IN AND FOR OAr e CL'N--Y. FLORlOA N PROBATC No. S3JT5-a In RF Ent:. • I • .IIS V R'P.MAN'. 5 2- MABEL ?HEMP nave been attained thus far tlu* An %  ; an Kyear, exclusive of corporate mem berships. &f •.! Ab-sle* BulldinsPresident Simon E Rubm said >*• • "**at a recent board meeung that NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW HEREBY lives that 'the underlined, deslrtnc to erfae la .jir.- alr '.* %  nc'.Itloas na-re i>f R—>M at tJloS Btsrayne BouleIrard niteads to reflater said name „ „ 'Terk of tao Clrcjlt Court of Israeli group of Hadassah will : ^j, COJP hold a card part, Monday eweni-. QmmK H ris-sc. t- membership in the association has now reached a new high. Israeli Hadassah Meefiaf at the Barcelaea hoteL with Mrs m M. S. SedatOB. 90 So. Shore dr.. ,officiatia. NOTlCe TO C c O'"< Cradl'wHAT->.-l.im. or !>e-raa-I A*a : rSjaid Bswate Tou are her.> %  led •' -"< % %  present an• I -"-"naTi^s haa estate of IMII M rrpi'iv ^^-a,n jNte of Da He .•.-."--ithe -rv jaAres of r*1. ->d •he snme In • in rhe —— % .< W-r. is-o-iAs w-hln eieht len-t-oattba 'mm 'he de % %  'be -• • hereof or f ••-" —'" K barred. a f) n. BR fc-'RM A V Mmw-t r;,; KF.SS; Miami Si. Florida l'1S-M..1-t



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    key, August Id. I960 *-JeistncrkMtr Page 9-A Your CJA Leaders: 1960-61 MEN OF OUR COMMUNITY JUDGE IRVING CYPEN: No. 3 a Series Judge Irving Cypen. who [js named a campaign vice chairman of the 1961 Com t.ned Jewish Appeal by chairi an Joii'ph M. Lipton, can look 03ck upon 13 lucky >f service in FederParting in 1947. The magna cum laude I p-a-luate of the University of F ( 11 has been a comniunj;y-minded young man since val in Miami in 1946. irted as a CJA camin the Metropolitan i and worked each ;. ar In 1959, he was Miami (nairman of the Attor| : %  >'Division. The quiet-spoken CJA leadft mention it often, used to tough camHe recalls a few skir. luring World War II, %  served as a gunnery alongside former Gov. Warren. {e Cypen was appointed the bench by Gov. LeRoy JUDGE IRVING OWN ... a ftw skirmishes Collins, and was returned to office without opposition for a six-year term in March. 1960. continuing a distinguished legal career For 12 years, he has been a member of Federation's executive committee, budget committee, board of governors, and now holds the office of secretary. He is currently serving as president of the Jewish Home for the Aged, and has been a director and chairman of the budget and finance committee of that agency He was a director of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, president of Temple Emanu-El Mens Club, and treasurer of Pi Lambda Phi Alumni Assn. Judge Cypen was first president of Tropical Lodge. B'nai B'rith. and secretary of the Florida State Federation of B'nai Brith Lodges. He belongs to Miami Beach Civic League. Elks, and the Miami Beach and Dade County Bar Assns. Judge Cypen's wife. Hazel. is active in the CJA Women's Division. Their children are Stephen Hale. 16; Bonnie Gaye, 13; Wayne Alan, 9; Tad Richard, 7; and Myles Gary. 5. Beduins Itch to Sell Scrolls LONDON—(JTA)—Some E£250, 000 ($700,000) is urgently needed to enable the Jordan government \ to purchase five Dead Sea scrolls .jfronj^edjjin tribesmen, according ; to the London Sunday Times. Un-1 less the money is found soon, ar• j chaeologists fear they be sold to; private collectors or torn up to be! sold as fragments to tourists. Archaeologists are anxious that the Jordan government should pur .' cha*e the scrolls but the Department of Antiquities in Jordan is already on the verge of bankruptcy over the recent decision to retail all the scrolls still in the country a/id compensate their original buyers. John Allegro, lecturer In the? Semitic languages at Manchester University, who led a scroll-seeking expedition this spring, said here that "the Beduins are getting restless and want to sell: they know the price of these scrolls by now." [hied Values Mark Jewish Writing-Grayzei )LAKB y>oo ACRES fotot IN THE WHITE MOUNTAINS PIKE • NEW HAMPSHIRE : I MUU Golf CMW • Furring Ctmnm Tenoi • Boauag • Swiaaiof • VCmttr Sluiaf • IARLES S. LAVIM IN0UNCES NEW tGANIZATION PUNS IARLES S. LAVIN, wboM as have been editorialized in Brier's Digest, announces dm dition of the famous Pain ach Hotel at Palm Beach, brick. This is a truly luxurious i for retirement; the average being $86.50 per month p** hon, double occupancy which sliules three meals a day. kple rooms are also available. letial dietary kitchen and dinroom available at $1.00 par iv extra charge. > penab'ons are now being ao bted for our new Garden Inc. Rentals start at $86.50 per Inth per person, which inI s a lovely private room [h running water, and three "prepared meals a day. Also ise guests' may enjoy die same rial activities as those-in the lin building. gardless of your sge, you can %  ; join The Charles S. Lavin kirement Organization, the es being one dollar ($1.00) year. This entitles you to a bnthly bulletin and should a tmber come to one of our Ms as a permanent guest, ho %  she will receive a discount of 3.00 the end of the first year. >r specific Information yarding tho numerous win Retirement Hotels voughout tho country, pease writ* Char i ot I. javin at noted below. [hero is no obligation. By Special Report STARLIGHT. Pa. — Must Jewish literature deal only with Jewish themes to be so considered? Not in the view of one of the nation's leading Jewish historians ;and authors — Dr. Solomon Grayzel, of Philadelphia, editor of the Jewish Publication Society of America. "The sole criterion of Jewish litlerature — and its basic characteristic — is its purposefulness." Dr. Grayzel told teen-age regional officers of the B'nai Brith Youth Organization attending an annual leadership training institute here. "The genuinely Jewish literary product has for its objective the molding of character, the development of personality, to warn, to urge, to advise." Said Dr. Grayzel: "Jewish literature is essentially ethical in nature." This same concern for ethics" also characterizes the Jewish reader. Dr. Grayzel declared. The ethical approach to Jewish literature. Dr. Grayiel asserted, began with the Bible and the Talmud. "And, to this day, you can almost identify the Jewishness of an author by the extent to which he seeks to criticize and to guide, to mold and to fashion a better society — by the depth, in other words, of his ethical values." This same yardstick can be used to measure a reader's Jewishness, in Dr. Grayzel's opinion. "Since we are part of our environment, we read for every conceivable reason which the environment encourages. But to the extent to which we are not content with only the entertaining, or only the descriptive, we display the reading hungers of a Jew. The Jewish reader looks for ethical approach." Some 100 top teen-age leaders of the B'nai B'rith Y'outh Organization met -here to learn how to capitalize on their talents and become leaders in the North American Jewish adult community too. The carefully selected participant — all regional officers of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization's two teen-age constituent divisions. Aleph Zadik Aleph for boys, end B'nai B'rith Girls for'girls — participated in an intensive 19-day Leadership Training Conference. Home of the Famous WHITE MOUNTAINS* FESTIVAL of the 7 ARTS JDflU M OSTS &f THE FAMILY AftfiW TO MIAMIANS WHO ARE EXPERTS IN THE ART OF RELAXATION Berlin Kids Will tharlos S. Lavin kin Palm Beach Hotel 35 Sunrise Avenue aim Beach. Florida CAR MR. LAVINi 'doted Is my $1.00 membership Please send membership sard nd monthly bulletins. ..Learn Of Nazis %  ante Continued from Page 1-A many then in Europe. In higher grades, teachers will i ?o into today's laws in West Ger, many calling for restitution, indemnification and compensation to [Jewish victims of Nazi persecutions. ••The children will be taught to realize," said an Education Ministry official, "that there is a new order now which condemns the past atrocities and injustices, puts an end to the Nazi cruelties, and strives for the equal treatment of all men." GALEN HALL IS PRIVILEGED TO BE THE HOST TO SO MANY GLOBE TROTTING folks from the South. Whether you plan an extended vacation or as part of a trip abroad, you'll always remember your GALEN stay as a new adventure in luxurious relaxation. Inquire for details of complimentary limousine transfer service direct from Philadelphia airport DISTINGUISHED FACILITIES • Superb air-condifioned accommodations, spacious suites, private cottages. • Golf— 18-hole championship course, John Yocum, Pro. • Headline Entertainment—throughout Season. • Dancing nightly under the stars; American and Latin orchestras. • Aquatic shows and moonlight barbecues at Forest Glades Pool. • Summer stock theatre parties; Penny Davis Dance Troupe. CONVENTIONS — Completely equipped rooms have been designed for large and small groups. SPECIAL CONVENTION RATES on request. Galen Hall COMING STARS at Galan Showt &f t Alan Kinf Moray Amterdam -# Henny Youngman PHil Folia. Jackie Milai Jaania Raynoldt Harvay Sioni %  Salty Blair HOTEL ANO COUNTRY CLUB •YERNERSVIUI. PENNA. Daniel Burack, Owner-Director See Your Travel Agent Galen is Only 17 Miles from Reading Airport Write for Color Brochures & Information % % 



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    Page 2-B +Jmlst> Tkrkiian Friday. August 19, 1360 I 'New Wrinkles' for Men of Family tand in the refrigerator while mayonnaise dressing for a milder >craping the kernels from corn, blend). I'aefc the pepper halves We delight yi. passing a'on^Ui iJ | €at shortening in a frying pan uith this mixtOre and m our readers new wrinkles we over moderate heat and saute the a bed of salad greens. Garnish with try out and find specially pleasing cut corn |n |t for 1 mmute stirring' tomato wedges, parsley sprigs. t.. themale members^ of the^ faincjnstant | v to prevent sticking. Let and/or Maslinas. stuffed green cool before stirring into the chopolives, small pickles, etc. Serve ped meat preparation, along with chilled if time permits. Tasty as wrell as nourishing! Pass the rolls, Form into patties as thick as r arrange them around a mound charcoal heat and served piping each in the crumbs of potato salad on a large platter. fliit t*"*rftrt* iim.i nnlv a toil' By LEAH LEONARD l> The latest on the theme of "hamburger is a happy combination of chopped lean beef with f he mince >j paVsley. fresh corn kernels, grilled over Preparation time only a few i .w ,u „,J „ oh on both sides. Arrange in wire holdnunutes longer than the old fash" _.... i ... ,_ .,„ er and grill over charcoal fire. ioned variety, but what a laste thrill' Besides, its a combination specially suited to August weather Here's the recipe CORN HAMBURGER SPECIAL grill just long enough to brown nicely on one side before turning to brown With peaches, plums, apples and apricots plentiful, how about making the following special frosty the other side of hamburgers sherbet fm ja .., r e a r? total time about 15 minutes Serve hot with stewed tomatoes, applesauce or just plain on cut rolls. Ma> be j!r ie l U 1 der v aS ,H b Tf ^'"c^lorie-packed or in electric broiler fields 6 to 1 pound lean chopped beef 1 tablespoon grated raw onion 1 egg and 2 tablespoons cold 8 hamburgers. water, blended with fork • • • 6 ears of corn I scraped from Heres> another hot tip" for any cobs) ot jay in August. We resorted to 1 tablespoon vegetable shorten ,t recently when we had impromptu n 8 guests for luncheon and know 2 tablespoons minced parsley vou .„ want to try it one of thes e 4 tablespoons fine cracker Jays too & course tna implies crumbs i.Matzo Meal will do) fcat you keep j^ of Gefl „ e fish Combine chopped beef, grated ,n ,he refrigerator for just such onion, egg and water mixture. Let emergencies STUFFED GREEN PEPPER Youngsters of all age> will prefer it to the customary ice cream any afternoon or evening Besides, it's We call it a sleighride for the tongue." Dode Heights Women Elect Mrs. Seug Miller has been elected president of the Sisterhood of Dade Heights Jewish Congrega tion. Other officers name-: at a recent meeting are Mesdames LeRoy Perlowin. Joseph Bass. Harold Simon and Murray Kay. vice president-. FROSTY FRUIT SHERBET 2 cups stewed and mashed fruit (any of the above fruits) 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons grated lemond rind %  4 cup orange juice 1/3 cup confectioners' sugar (or to taste) 1 can evaporated milk 1 14' J oz. size) A few grains salt Boarding the SS Santa Rosa are Dr. and Mrs. Harry Rimer of 930 S. Shore dr.. Miami Beach, for a Caribbean cruise via New York, leaving from Port Everglades. 22 UJA Women's Division Leaders Will Visit Israel on Special Survey Mission By Special Report grants. They will visit one of U I remaining ma'aborot in Israel NEW YORK-Twenty-two mem-: where almost 46.000 immifra* bers of United States Jewish Api of p „ t years rtlU uve ,„ „„ jh BOATS ... ,. Pesl Women* Division will leave and wooden huti ^ wj| JJ Combine stewed fruit that has on Sept 7 from New York via vuit teenaee trainine center* 8 well formed fresh green pep been chilled for half an hour with El Al Airlines for a three-week | youth Ally ah village vocatmn.1 pers (bell shaped or elon the lemon juice, grated lemon survey of UJA-financed migration, spools in d other ediicationil 1 gated) rind, orange juice, sugar to sweetwelfare and resettlement programs. st ,t ut on9 f or different aee ITMM 1 large jar of G e f i 11 e Fish en to taste and stir till sugar is in Europe and Israel, as members s s i. (about 2 pounds) dissolved. Add the evaporated milk of the sixth annual UJA Women's The Survey Group will tour new 3 tablespoons prepared horse I and salt, stirring well. Turn into Division Overseas Survey Group. ] developments in the Negev Desert radish, optional freezing trays of refrigerator and The group is composed of wornare a nd visit farms *ypil of the Salad greens, tomato wedges, set cold control to point indicated e n leaders of community cam: W 5 immigrant farm settlement! parsley sprigs, etc. for garfor freezing ice cream. Freeze to paigns across the United States wmch ar s,i economically u nish mush consistency. Turn mush into which allocate the main part of de rdeveloped and need irrigatna, Mash and pat dry the green pepa chilled mixing bowl and beat their campaign proceeds to the nafarm macnin rv livestock and otbMesdames Michael Levy, treasP*rs tut into halves lengthwise with electric or hand rotary beater tionwide United Jewish Appeal er forms of id to become self-saf. urer Jerry Cole, financial secre through stems and remove seeds till fluffy. Return to freezer trays Eacn i ea der pays her own expenses fic,ent 3000 ""migrant tary. Herbert Elk retary; and Jencorresponding secretary. [in. recording secDrain the liquid from Gelfilte Fish and freeze till firm, stirring once' on the trip The UJA is the major farmers ar struggling to make y Sommenschein. nd reserve same Mash with a or twice during the freezing tune American agency aiding immiends meet on these ,armsteads fork and add the horseradish, mix for smoother texture. Yields 8 to ing thoroughly (or. substitute: 10 servings NeW and deliciOUS! Women tO Hear Dade Heights Registration u KCiHl* *S'A*II — gency aiding grants to Israel, distressed Jews overseas, and refugees to the United States. Making its first stop in Geneva. Switzerland, the Survey Group will Registration for Hebrew and Sunattend a briefing session with leau ; day school at Dade Heights Jewish' ers of the Joint Distribution Com A political satire based on the Congregation Is now in progress mittee. a constituent agency of' nominations and campaigns for the through Aug. 28. Hours are Monthe United Jewish Appeal. At that! United States presidency, the|day through Friday and Sunday, time, the Survey Group will be Broadway hit play. -The Best 19 am to 12 noon. Evening hours given full reports onv arious Manwill be reviewed by Dr. Jo-l are mo oday through Thursday. 7 to phases of the JOC welfare proNarot. of Temple Israel.| 9 p m Registration is at 1401 NW, grams in Israel and 24 other counAfter a stop-over in Rome to veil JDC installations, the Survey Group will return to the Unites States on Sept. Review of Play ILNO KOSHER 1183rd st. No. Miami. on Monday evening Temple Israel Sisterhood is spon-j soring a dinner preceding the play I Cd1l*Gr Worl(f*P SLICED PASTRAMI FRESHLY SLICED: j neutm PACKED?, BEADYTOSEKVEtl Ask tor AH WILN0 Kosher PRODUCTS Corned Beef, Pastrami, Salami, Bologna, Krispit Frankfurters Kashruth Quality Flavor WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO. (of Chicago) MIAMI MANCH 2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE Phono FR 16551 tries throughout the world On Sept. 11. the Survey Group will arrive in Israel for a 14-day stay, which will include the Jew ish New Year holiday. Members of the group will visit every section Mill Judith Goldstein, a memof the country in order to study Now at U of M review, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in Uollson Auditorium Written by Gore Vidal. the playdescribes the backstage maneuver ings at political party conventions, i ber of the professional staff of the various aspects of the UJA support Kabbi Narot will describe his im Greater Miami Jewish Communied programs, which aid some 690. prts~ionof the roles played by > Center for the past three years. 000 unabsorbed immigrants, young Melvyn Douglas. Frank Love joy. *'•'• leaving the Center this fall people and aged, chronically ill and Lee Tracy m the Boardway, accept a full assistantship in and handicapped newcomers version now appearing in New -he Department of Psychology at The Survey Group which is headYork £" ^ n Ve !" ,y f K M mi *". C an ed by Mrs Jack A. Goodman, of Proceeds of the evenings enter | 1,da,e fo l he Ph D de ree ln clln ; Indianapolis, nataonaj UJA Worn tainment and hospitalitv will b^.,'! psychology. Miss Golistein will en \ Division chairman, will meet donated to the Hebrew Union Col %  %  %  • teac h n and 0,her res P n with top government officials and lege Scholarsh.p Fund. Chairman D, "' es ln lh,s new position leaders of the Jewish Agency for of the dinner is Mrs. Jean Reichek ; In her capacity as youth activiIsrael and of the Joint Distribution Mrs. Harry L Levinson is chair-j ties supervisor with the Center. Committee, which administer UJAman of arrangements, and Mrs Miss Goldstein was responsible for: financed aid programs for newAnn Polasky is chairman of prizes. | the development of a program for c mers to Israel. % Mrs Joseph Ruffner is Sisterhood een-agers and elementary school Members of the group will go to children at the Miami YMHA-various immigrant settlements Branch. During the past year, she jnd will have an opportunity to coordinated the annual teen age alk with many of the persons aid•onclave. | ed through UJA funds. Prior to this position, she reA special study will be made by Btfared her Master's degree in psy-; t ne Survey Group of family and .hology from the New School for; < ^ ldc r e problems among imnuSocial Research, and a Bachelor's degree from the Carnegie Institute if Technology.' president Crockett Reelected William M. Crockett, jr.. execu live director of the Miami Beach Taxpayer's assn has been reelected president of the Biscayne chapter. Florida Public Relations I *THE TINY LITTLE TEA LEAVES* five fullest strength and flavor! Certified Kosher and Parvtj under strict supervision ot Rabbi Jacob Cohen. In Miami it's FLORIDA-FOREMOST DAIRIES for Home Delivery Phone FR 4-2621 The great name in dai'v products FRANK 4. HOLT, Manager VISIT BAKERY ASK FOR THE BEST IN YOUR FAVORITE FOOD MARKET BUTTERFLAKE NEW YORK RYE PUMPERNICKEL CHALAH ROLLS BAGELS division of NEW YORK BAKERIES, INC. JE 1-7117 %  La H



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    %  ...s CUIUE #* the icv< oman s "World It was a 38th wedding anniversary celebration for Mr. and Mrs. William Singer on Monday evening The occasion also marked Bill and Esther's birthdays Dinner 'music made the festivities even gayer for the 55 guests, mostly including family and a few close friends Four generations were represented, among them Bill's faiher. David Singer, and Esther's mother, Mrs. Lily Goldberg The couple were married in Cleveland. O.. and came to Miami in 1934 The big success story of the Royal Castle executive is known to everyone, particularly because of Bill's great contributions to Florida through his membership on the State Road Board Originally scheduled at the home of. the couple's children. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence (Harriet) Singer, in Miami, the party was moved to their Granada blvd. mansion in Coral Gables, when the guest list burgeoned Also present, were their other two children. MrMarvin (Dorothy) Jacobs, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard (Mar lene Stone The fourth generation includes six lovely grandchildren. B- a-e Champagne Dance at Westview Country Club was the last word, with waitresses dressed as French Follies Gals—short skirt and long black hose The young-marrieds predominated Saturday night, including the Larry Potters. Marshal and Harriet Lipton. and Larry and Harriet Singer, who dance divinely Incidentally. it was a ffrst-time-out for Jackie Hochberg, and David took mighty good care of her The Harold Rands, just home from Europe. at the affair with the David Catsmans. and Ann Jaffee squired by her Ml) husband Mr. and Mrs. Leopold Schwartz had Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bromberg and Sid and Rose Weinstock as guests Sid just back from Europe with daughter Sandy, who flew over to join him when school was out. s > Mrs. Meyer (Eva) Don and daughter Deedee have a nice vacation ahead of them: Mexico. Port-au-Prince and then on to California Mike and Ronald will keep house at home together Nat and Bess Hankoff taking their vacation together in small doses They're touring the State of Florida Driving stops at 3 in the afternoon, when they go swimming and see the sights From Nashville. Tenn.. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Carr and daughter. Maureen, are visitors again The attraction is their elder daughter. Mrs. Howard Fisher, and Myrtle's sister. Mrs. Sidney (Florence) Lewis • • Florence entertained at dinner Saturday night... S. After all those marvelous plans Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Fair made for their lovely cruise together. Myra and Aaron had to go alone Martha has been ill. is recovering now. but was not all better by departure time. — ** Mr. and Mrs. Abe Waldman. 6265 SW 28th st.. Miami, enjoyed a joyous reunion with their family at their son's wedding. Sheldon Waldman to Janet Weinman, of 7325 Byron ave.. Miami Beach, on Aug. 7 at the Balmoral Attending were their son and daughterin-law. Col. and Mrs. H. Waldman. and granddaughter. Linda, of Washington, D.C. Also, their daughter and son-in-law. Mr. and Mrs Henry G. Abrahams, of Red Hook. NY., who brought along their moppets, Barbara. Rich-Diane, and Toby ... The newlyweds are just back from St. Thomas and the Vi/gin Islands, and will be In ing at 540 NW 66th ave., W. Hollywood. Fla.\ Mrs. A. Herbert (Lois) Mathes back from seeing that her Robhie had a lovely 13th birthday at Camp Nebagmon ... In his cabin alter taps, the lucky campers had a big birthday cake An adorable postcard from Hi and Juliet Luber: "We're not ON erweight, everyone else is underweight." MM € S* Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Soroff writing friends from Israel that I 'iev expect to be home early in September ... Off to Gotham Town for a few weeks together: Mary Ann Kaufman. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Murray K. Kaufman, and Phyllis Silvers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Silvers ... Mr. and Mrs. Morris Simon, of Coral Gables. al


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    T eJewish Floridian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and TNI JfW/JH WEEKLY Volume 33 — Number 34 Miami, Florida. Friday. August 19, 1960 Two Sections — Price 20* THEY BOUGHT ONIY TWO CARS Renault Bows -So Do UAR Sales JERUSALEM — (JTA) — Regie Renault, the French automotive concern that cancelled a contract for assembly of its vehicles in Israel as a result of Arab boycott pressure, has succeeded in selling only two Renault cars in the Unitf.l Arab Republic in the nine Cairo authorities had promised Renault that in consideration of cancellation of the Renault, contract with Kaiser-Frazer of Haifa, they would build a plant in Egypt for assembly of the Renault car. i They have not done so and, in months since if stopped do i ng ( stead, have entered into a contract business in Israel. with Renault's rival, the Simca Javits Urges State Dep't. to Halt Arab Boycott Company. Since last November, the Renault company has sold only 430 cars throughout the entire Middle East — considerably less than the Israel market alone absorbed, and less than the export of Renaults assembled in Haifa for sale in other countries. WASHINGTON-(JTA)-Sen. Jacob K. Javits. New York Republican. proposed this week a five-point program of action by the State Department to combat Arab intervention in American affairs to enforce lhe Arab League economic blockade of Israel. The New Yorker took particular* ; exception to attempts by the Arabs, ; W ashin ^ on as an unfriendl and especially by the sultanate of Ku unwarrante d interference wait, to blackmail American firms internal affairs* into refusing to do business with 3) Has t he"u.S. specifically re Israel. He indicated dissatisfac ques ted Kuwait to cease and det.on with the public position taken sis from the practice of threatenby the State Department on this ing Ame rican business firms' in VS. Adolf Warrant Extension Set; Judges Invited TEL mann. AVIV—(JTA)—Adolf Eicha particular country would be entile captured Nazi leader | "Wed to "end on that basis. of UN. JACOB JAVITS issue and called this Week on Secretary of State Christian A. Herter for definite answers to five specific questions. Sen. Javits referred to ultinvahimi r e c eived In recent weeks by some 500 American firms from the Arab boy c ott offices in Kuwait and Damascus threatening to blacklist tfvem if thoy did business with Israel. Ha asked. Secretary Herter: who directed the annihilation 6.000.000 Jews in Europe, was Monday brought again before a magistrate for another extension of his detention warrant. These have been extended every two weeks. Minister of Justice Pinhas Rosen was reported here as seating that Eichmann will be entitled to demand a preliminary hearing before the actual trial takes place. He indicated that the Israel government Attorney General Gideon Hiuv ntr confirmed a report that tho Ministry of Justice has invited a prominent American Jewish lawyer who was a special adviser to the U.S. Attorney General at the Nuremberg war crimes trials, to assist him in the prosecution of Eichmann. However, he declined to furnish tho nam* of that lawyer sine* the latter has net vt officially accepted the invitation. „ (In New York, it was believed would announce that foreign judges that (he i awyer invited to assist the could be present at the trial if they i srae ij Attorney General was Dr. so desired. However, they would attend only as observers. Any judge who would submit credentials showing that he represented 4) Has the government specified, for its own consideration, the measures which 'could be taken to meet this kind of situs; tien—specifically the use of U.S. -i mail for propaganda and threats by a non-registered foreign agent? B-G Tells Science Conference Emerging Nations Need Assist 5) Doees the U.S. recognize exis; tence of a state of war between Israel and the Arab states, as claimed by the government of Ku wait in its boycott letter? ,, The State Department has rehas protested to the government of ^.^ly declared that the U.S. Kuwalt does not condone the boycott but 2) Whether the U.S.. in its pro-' has often indicated that there was lest, has informed Kuwait that the not much the Department could do boycott pressures are regarded by about it. 1) Whether the U.S. government REHOVOT, Israel — (JTA) — The I nels of the human race—political liberation of peoples and the closand intellectual." Mr. Ben-Gurion ing of the economic and spiritual J said that "gaining independence ?aps between them with the aid of science and technical know-how will ensure world peace and raise l Bonn Flayed for Bungling Capture of Ludwtg the family of nations to the peak of material propserity and spiritual advancement. Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion declared here Mon day at the opening session of th't is not the end of redemption" but its beginning. The material and cultural gap between nations should be closed Israe „. the Prem /*' erte i r J m a i d t t ; n ment had asked several East Eurh 1 wtTh l ? Zrlti he L opean countries if they were willonly be liberated, but must be more 7** —..:,.;„„ „,„. Jacob Robinson, one of the world's outstanding experts on international law who served as special assistant to Robert H. Jackson, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court during the Nuremberg trials. Dr. Robinson, who came to the United States from Lithuania in 1940, after the outbreak of World War II, declined to comment on the report.) Mr. Hausner said also that, when Eichmann is brought to trial, his chief defense counsel. Robert Servatius, a German lawyer, will be assisted by several other foreign attorneys. In the meantime it was emphasized here that two months have only or less on the same level in status ing to cooperate in providing mauuj mc "c^""* .,.-.,.— r||ics.s on uic same icvci in siatus c;_i.____ ,_:_i xr International Conference on the and in thcir ma erial and spiri ual £" %  /". ^^VJ^L BONN—(JTA)—The West German government came under heavyfire this week from the Social Democratic opposition which accused it of failure to make a real effort to obtain extradition from Italy of Ludwig Zind, the Nazi school teacher convicted here two years ago for antiSemitic utterances, and, generally, of having bungled the entire case. Zind was arrested earlier thii* —— %  month in Naples as he was about, Ministry of Justice officials here to board an Egyptian steamer for| s aid tnere .. ig a slignt hope" that Role of Science in New States. Scientists and statesmen from 29 countries, as well as hundreds ol juests from Israel and abroad, an attending the conference which is being held in the Chnim Wcizmanr. Memorial Amphitheatre of the Weizmann Institute of Science Prominent among the guests are Prime Minister B. f. Koirala of Nepal. Deputy Premier Gabriel Lisette of Chad and ministers and government officials from It Asian and African states. Libya, after he was spotted by four Israeli seamen on shore leave. He is presently under detention in Italy. What stirred the opposition ire was the disclosure that Zind, who escaped from the police after ha viral been sentenced in 1958 by an Offenberg court to a year in prison, had twice returned to West Germany on visits, traveling en a "stateless" passport bearing his own name. The news service of the Social Democratic Party complained this week that "the world is beginning to believe that we are not really interested in bringing Zind to justice.". Social Democratic deputies stated they were considering a parliamentary debate on the Zind issue, to be held when Parliament recon venes after the summer recess. Italian authorities may agree to extradite Zind. Meanwhile, they de dared, they had asked Italian police to keep Zind jailed until a decision is reached on his extradition. Defining the gathering as "a historic event of inestimable importance." the Premier said that the conference was closely related with "the two most momentous revolutions in the ancountries that Eichmann must be Continued on Page 2-A 'judged and severely punished. UN Crime Parley Warned Bias, Delinquency Berlin Kids to Learn About Nazism By S. MALINS JTA Staff Correspondent LONDON—A United Nations conference on crime was told this week that there was an "evident relationship" between racial prejudice and juvenile delinquency particularly in countries of high living standards like the United States, Britain and West-Germany. + Dr. Maurice L. Perlzwelg, of the | World Jewish Congress, told the UN Congress on Prevention of (Crime and the Treatment of Of{ f enders here that the relationship i had become apparent in the swasWEST BERLIN — (JTA) — Chil-iplan. 'attempt to get down to the. Later, the history of persecutions j tika epidemic and wave of antidren attending West Berlin ele-j v e ry roots of Hitlerism, show up against Jews will be led back teise,,^^ incidents that broke out mentary schools, from the age > f anti-Semitism and other persecuRoman times and forward again ast winter -The growth of juven10 up. will be taught the dangers | Uong an{J ear down the falfe g i or Jto the anti-Jewish atrocities com• ji e delinquency in the most highly of Nazism and anti-Semitism, and | i(ication of H itler and his regime." ml,l f d by ,h e N ls u In h g e industrialized societies.' he told the will be given a complete history | grades, pupils will be told about, congress ."carries with it a serious of the Hitler atrocities against: On the 10-year-old level, teachI the Nuremberg Laws, the events I threat of the growth of racial prejers will explain to the children of Crystal Night of 1938 when evudice am0 ng the youth." the meaning of various symbols | ery synagogue in Germany was like the Star of David, the Soviet attacked by the N aii-s, and the ttar, the swastika and the Red campaign for systematic exterrmCross. They will be told of the I nation of all Jews, first in Germas* murder of Jewish children Jews, according to a new school curriculum announced here this week by the city's Ministry of Education. The curriculum, which enters into effect with the next school year, will, according to the official He noted that one aspect of this relationship had been apparent in the large American cities. in Nasi concentration camps. Continued on Page *-A Continued on Page 3-A



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    -• %  %  "" Page 6-B -Jtmi&ncrkMaun Friday, August 19. <^fn the r^ealnt or *^ocieiu I960 Levinson, Mills Exchange Vows In a double ring candlelight ceremony on Sunday. Aug. 14. Miss li-bie Ann Mills became the bride of Edward Ellis Levinson. Rabbi Joseph Narot officated at the 6 30 p.m. rites in the Diplomat Country Club. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jermome B. Mills. 1650 Paylonia rd. The groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Newton Levinson. 125 Shore dr. W.. Bay Heights. The bride selected a traditional wedding gown of white silk peau de soie with scooped neckline, fitted bodice edged with alencon lace, reembroidered seed pearls, and bouffant skirt. Her five tier French illusion veil fell from a cloche of matching lace and seed pearls. Maid of honor was Roxy Hirsch. Linda Goldberg and Vicki Levinson were junior bridesmaids. In charge of the guest book was Vicki Kay Hirsch. Ellis Hirsch was best man. Ushers included Mickey Mills and Moms Futernick. Lee Mills was junior usher. The bride is a graduate of Miami Beach High School, and attended the University of Miami Mr. Levinson received his degree in Business Administration from the I'mversity of Miami. He is presently a student at the U of M law school. Mr and Mrs. Nathan Goldberg, of Baltimore. Md., the bride's paA-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 94401 Sil^ Organza For Miss Feld eldan House Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES MOUSt OPfNfNGS I CLOSINGS Terran. • Marble • Wood Floor* Vinyl and Rubber Floors CLEANING and SEALING RUG SHAMPOOING AA and J FLOOR WAXING A PORTIR SERVICE 215 N.E. 59th Street PL 9-2921 7 0'. DISCOUNT WI1H THIS 40 Ardmore MRS. EWOAR0 UVINSON ternal grandparents, attended the wedding, as well as Mr. and Mrs. Mannic Sheldon of Miami, the groom's maternal grandparents. Reception followed the cermony at the Diplomat The couple are honeymooning in Jamaica, and will live in Miami Beach on their return FUR RE STYLING IN 0U TRADiT/ON Of FINEST WORKMANSHIP WE CAN CONVERT YCUS OUTMODED FUKS TO THE SMART f ASH IONS Of TOMORROW From $39 martin FLORIDA FURS & CLINIC 2296 Coral Way HI 4-0544 MIAMI 1117 La. Ola* Blvd. JA 4-7697 FT. IAUDE*DAIE An imported silk organza gown with lily-of the valley applique design and matching headpiece of french illusion was the ensemble Miss Rachel Harriet Feldan chose for her marriage to David Edward Goodman on Sunday. Aug. 14. at the Deauville hotel. A bouquet of lily-of-the-valley. white roses and orchids completed her outfit. Rabbi Samuel April officiated at the 6:30 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mfs. Herbert Feldan. 1444 SW 17th ter.. and the late Mr. Herbert Feldan. The grooms parents are Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Goodman, of St. Louis. Mo Given in marriage by the brother, the bride was attended by her sister-in-law. Mrs. Albert Feldan, of New York, as matron of honor. Miss Miriam Lox. Newark. N.J.. Miss Joan Cremer. Columbia, S.C., Miss Patty Pearlman. Mits Sondra Barchan. and Mrs. Sidney lodgin, all of Miami, were bridesmaids. Miss "Florence Friedman, Hillside, N.J.. was junior bridesmaid. Morris Cremer, of St. Louis, uncle of the groom, acted as best man. Ushers were Richard Breinler, St. Louis; Ivan Deen. Macon. Ga.; Lawrence Goldberg, Chicago; Howard Friedman. Summit. N.J.; and brother of the groom. George J. W. Goodman, New York. The bride is a graduate of MiBIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT — NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth of Florida Rabbi Dr. Isaac M. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSING — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS MODIKN IQUIfmiNT I FVRNISNfNCS HtnOOf MIIIMNC 310 Collins Ave. Ph. JE 2-3571 Miami Beach W.I Del Krlllll MMS. lAUMtNCl KATZ Miss Cohen Bride Of Laurence Katz Miss Sandra Louise Cohen is now Mrs. Laurence M Katz. The couple were married on Sunday, Aug. 14, at the Sterling hotel. Rabbi H Louis Rottman officiated at the 3 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Max Cohen. 3726 Prairie ave. The groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Henry Katz, 900 W. 47th st. Maid of honor for her sister was Miss Hallie Cohen. Barry Katz acted as best man for his brother. The bride attended the University of Miami and University of Maryland. The groom attended the same schools. Reception followed the ceremony at the Sterling. After a motor trip up the East Coast, the couple will be at home at 3700 Belle ave.. Baitmore. Md. SHORT ARC SHORTHAND, GREGG, PITMAN Campfsiil n MX. MM. NCR. ate. For other courses plea** consult YftlOW P AGE 620. PHONE BOOK A D E L P H I TUTORINO SCHOOt Attendance accepted by Dad* County Board of Public Instruction. 500-526 N.I. Tftfc Street Near Biaceyn. Blvd. PL 7 7423 MU 1-1544 Werner-Kahn RUTS. DAVID COODM4N ami High School and Stephens College, Columbia. Mo. She is a member of Pi Phi Rho, retailing honorary, and a former assistant buyer of a New York firm. The groom is a graduate of the University of Missouri, and now attends law school there. He was a member of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, of which he was vice president and treasurer. Phi Sigma Alpha, political science honorary, and Phi Delta Phi. law fraternity. Reception and dinner followed the ceremony at the Deauville. The couple will live in Columbia, Mo., on their return from a Nassau honeymoon and motor trip to Columbia. Zcrias, Weinstein Vows on Beach In a double ring ceremony on Saturday evening. Aug. 6, Miss Bar. bara Marion Weinstein became the bride of Dr. Nardo Zaias. Matron of honor was Mrs Ray Belkov. Miss Marcia Zalmanef, acted as maid of honor. Jane Belkov and Zena Kreps were junior bridesmaids. Debbie Belkov and Marsha Zaiac were flower girls. Boris Kozolchik, of Havana, was best man with Isaac Kreps Ushers include Emanuel Zaiac, brother of the groom, and Joseph Friedman. The bride selected a traditional floor-length wedding gown of iy. ory Italian silk, scoop neckline embroidered with alencon lace, mted bodice, cap sleeves, and oouffant skirt extending into a chapel train. Her four-tier French illusion veil fell from a tiara of seed pearls She carried an arrangement of white orchids, stephanot's. lily-of thi valley. For something, the bride carried an heirloom sixpence, used by all the women in her family. Newly wed Mrs. Zaias is a graduate of Miami Senior High School, attended Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, and will continue her studies at the University of Miami. Dr. Zaias is a graduate of the University of Miami and U of M medical school. He is a resident in dermatology at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hodor. of Miami Beach, were amonu quests attending their granddaughter's : wedding. Couple are honeymooning n 'Mexico. On their return, they will live in Miami Beach! Shaloma Hadassah Affair Shaloma group of Hada-;iii will hold a card games affair OR Wednesday, 12:30 p.m.. at the Sea Gull hotel. Mrs. Max M Friedman is chairman. CORAL GABLES COHVALESCEHT HOME DAY CARE AVAILABLE A Friendly and (Jenilc Atmosphere tor Thu\e You Loxe • M HOUR REGISTERED NURSING SERVICE • SPECIAL DIETS OBSERVED • All BOOMS ON GROUND FIOOR • PRIVATE BATHROOMS • AIR CONDITIONED • SWIMMING POOl • SPACIOUS GROUNDS t SCREENED PATIO Ferdinand H. Ptosenthal, Director-Owner Form, i Aaal Dar Ml sinui 'loan nualana I'llJeWtafe Home, for And, PUtSburaD 7060 SW. 8th ST., MIAMI, FLORIDA M0 6-8826 DAN SEROTT ANNOUNCES The Opening of P.Y. CORP, — Wholesalers & Exporters OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED LINES I Complete lino of SHEETS, BLANKETS, SPREADS, TOWELS, BATH MATS mad* by Cannon, Dundee A Peppered for Hotds, Motels, Apt. Houses, Home** p Complete lino of INFANTS WEAR A FURNITURE including Layettos, Swings, Cribs, Mattresses, Bassinettes, Strollers. Complete lino of CHILDREN'S I BOYS' B GIRLS' APPAREL TO SIZE 14. Sport Tops, School Clothes and Dross Attire. AIR CONDITIONED AMPLE PARKING 8 30 to S P.M. Mondays thro Fridays Wo Invite All Our Friends to Visit Our Showrooms at 127 N.E. 9th ST. Phone FR 3-8737 person*, iitd service of f Be blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money ... un 6-1233 ***k§ except rosft JMSWM BW ye* kipp*



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    Page 12-B +Jeist> ftcrktistr Friday. August 19, UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAXASHRUTH OF FLORIDA RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSN EVER, DIRECTOR QUANTITY KIGHTS RfSEtVID WESEU U.S. CHOICE and U.S. PftiMEl MEATS ONLY i THIS SPECIAL FOR MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY FANCY ARBOR ACRES ROASTERS BROILERS SPRINGERS "' THESE FEATURES EFFECTIVE ALL WEEK GENUINE SPRING LAMB SALE! ( BABY LAMB CHOPS ,89 Shoulder Lamb Chops LB 69c BONELESS TRIMMED CROSS RIB OR SHOULDER ROAST OPEHJM soom f^/air Kosher 1 Market on BREAST OF VEAL LB. 39< LEAN TRIMMED FLANKEN LB. 49C BABY STEER LIVER LB. 49c GROUND BEEF F RE m JST 2 L BS. 9& Store hours Mon. thru Wed. 8 to 6 T hurs. 8 to 9 Fri. 8 to 3 • 19th St. at Alton Road on Miami Beach • 163rd St. Shopping Center, North Miami Beach • 2091 Coral Way in Miami • Coral Way at S.W. 87th Ave., Westchester Shopping Plaza MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD FAIR —



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    Page 12-A +klshFk)rkte*n Friday. August lg, J Knock-Off U.S.A. •y MAX LERNER ZOA Region Maps Convention We ought to find a better word for 1t than "vacation." which gives the feeling of emptiness. Many vacations, alas, are empty enough of both meaning and joy. usually because the daily work and life from which we take a vacation are also empty But happily there are vacations which are genuinely replenishments, for every organism needs at times to knock off and lie fallow, and find somewhere—from without or within—the fuel to re-stoke itself. There won't be any vacation this year for the hungry "'" all ovet the world who are lucky if they can find work to keep their lives going and to whom the idea of a civilization able to afford mass leisure would be a dream fantasy. There won't be any vacation this year for a couple of other hungry men as well—the hungry candidates for the American Presidency, who have to keep plugging away at the extra Congressional session for the next four weeks to show the right stance for the election. %  S-€ M EVERY YEAR ABOUT THIS TIME the big circulation magazines do layouts on American vacationers in Europe, usually showing an attractive and intelligent young couple coping with the strangeness of foreign scenes and ideas. Four million Americans go abroad in any one year, most of them for vacation pleasure and fun. Harlan Cleveland, who heads the Maxwell Graduate School of Citizenship at Syracuse University, tells of a questionnaire given to a thousand of these tourists on ships sailing for Europe. More than five hundred of them, filled out by young people of university level and coming from families of above average income, were studied intensively. The results were depressing. Three out of four failed to name a single Italian novelist, poet or painter of the past 150 years. Half o(' them couldn't name a single German writer. One out of three couldn't name an important novelist of our century, and half couldn't name an American playwright. Two out of three made wildly wrong gMeWM about the number of Catholics. Jews, and Negroes in America. >-€ M I WONDER WHY THESE YOUNGSTERS went to Europe at all. it they were so incurious about either European culture or their own. I suspect that a European vacation, like a college education, has now become a mark of social status and a badge pf belonging*. It is a good way to pick up a number of added attitudes and poses. But if you have I resisted learning much from the people around you. the chances are strong that you will resist learning much even when you have been transported a few thousands miles with your camera and have changed your locale. What I am suggesting is that intellectual curiosity begins at home, and knowledge of the world should start with knowledge of your culture. Stuart Gerry Brown has written a 50-page pamphlet. "Memo for Over seas Americans." for the Syracuse'University Press, addressed both to tourists and to Americans working and living abroad. He discusses in it "the many meanings of American civilization" and makes the point that Americans abroad cannot be ambassadors for their country unless they knowMimthing about it. I should add that this applies to a number of our foreign service officers as well. A recent evaluation test, given by the State Department, revealed a disastrous number who failed in general intelligence and in the broad specific skills needed for their tasks These are re ported to have included the chief information officers in a number of important Asian. African, and European capitals where the kind of image America projects is crucial for our world standing and survival. What many Americans need, in addition to travel vacations, is one in which they will read a few seminal books. I MUST ADD IN FAIRNESS THAT A NUMBER of voungs'ers in the rising generation have a new and revolutionary' attitude about summer vacations. A recent issue of Time ran a good round-up of cities in which a large number of high school students are spending most of their holiday in study groups, where they can gallop through j whole year's work in some subject in a six or eight-week stretch. This may not be "fun" in the sense in which that word is generally applied to vacations. But it can be a replenishing experience 1 suspect that many of the youngsters lolling through a summer holiday are netting bored with the vacancy of it and fed up with what w supposed to be "fun." What they want is something that will stretch them—mind and body together—and send them back to their work with a new fire •fun W IN FLORIDA CONGRESS AIRPORT INN ALL BRAND NEW AT ENTRANCE TO MIAMI INT'L. AlBPORT AIR CONDITIONED AND HEATED TV. RADIOS. PHONES BOATING ANO GOLF OPPOSITE SWIM POOL. CABANAS COFFEE SHOP. DINING ROOM. COCKTAIL LOUNGE CREDIT CARDS HONORED 1850 N.W. 42nd MIAMI Ave. FREE! Writo far III**** mi M. TRAVR. GUIDE lb** Fin* aoMli fnm mat f Mt, iiupac•mi and oyi^ fey CMtnm of Motor Mo>l>. Michael Adilman. of Savannah. jGa.. president of the Southeast region of the Zionist Organization of America, has announced the 23rd annual conference of the organiza tion at Camp Blue Star. Hendersonville. N (". on the Labor Dayweekend. Sept. 2 to 5. Acording to Jacob Corkland, of Knoxville. Tenn.. co-chairman of the conference, this will be the first time that the region has held a camp conference. This year's conference will stress forums, seminars, panel discussions, and workshops on aspects of Judaism and Zionism. Seymour B. LJebman. of Miami Beach, is program chairman. In addition to national speakers, political figures, and members of the Christian Zionist Organization, several noted regional Zionist leaders will take part in the forums and panels. Included among them are Ben Winick. o Knoxville, Term., national vice president of the Southeast region, Liebman, r egional Late Services Will Open Celebration First late services of the season Sept. 9 will commence a weekend of celebration marking the open ing of the new synagogue building at Congregation Monticello Park. On Saturday evening. Sept. 10. officers and directors of all Monti cello affiliates will be installed for the new season. Climaxing the celebration will be a cornerstone ceremony Sept. 11 at 4 p.m. School is scheduled to open Sept 6. program and education*! chairmen; Loo ft. Bvreon, of Memphi*, honorary president of the Southeast region; Sam Shankman, Momnh o i, honorary trustee of the region; Rebbi Harold Friedman, of Mobile, Ala., regional vice president; Dr. lev Vegan, of Miami Beech, tevthorn representative of the Zionist Youth Commission; and Mervyn Berrin, of Atlanta, director of the southern Zionist Youth Commission, who together with Herman Pepfcin, former youth director end presently a regional vice president, will present a unique youth workshop. Keynote speaker at the opening session of the conference on Saturday evening. Sept. 3. will be Mortimer May. past national president of the ZOA and honorary president of the Southeast region. | May has Just returned from I 14th trip to Israel and from tensive study tour of the jT communities of Russia andofs. America. May will discuss -SJ 'Jewish Community and its tionship to Israel." Quest speaker at the Sun* I luncheon, which will be deoW to "Israel Projects," is Ham iJ fe. past president of the Southed region of the ZOA and an honoraH | regional president, who has returned from his second sta [ tour of Israel. Openings Still Avail-bit Registration for the school te of 1960-61 at Temple Sinai of N<, Miami. 12100 NE 15th ave., now being accepted. Herbert ran is director of education. ings are also available in the sery-kindergarten school, ace ing to an announerm-nt Wedn day. NOW TWO BEST SELLING PAPERBACKS J he JL^eaal Cl^ncucic-peJia /< an Insurance Corporation an agency of the U. S. Government. FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS from anywhere in too United Slates. Juel bring in or mail your passbook. Savinea A m —te 'rough ofth* rn froaa M etioiiorl throu fJJ tin* lOlh of t w /y% Buoih Mm ft JQ UM lot. M Ma eta KreJKH DOWNTOWN 100 N.L 2nd AVSNUf BRANCH USCAYNE SHOPPING PLAZA ranm FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI EACH ACCOUNT INStftEl IP TO $10,911 IT TIE FEDERAL SAVINGS I LOAN INSNIANCE COIPOIAIION



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    Page &B +Jmist> fttr/rfiar Friday. August 19, iggg ^Tjcur week announced registration in all departments for the fall semester. Nursery school is a half-day program from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Foundation school features a HebrewEnglish all-day program for children (rom five through seven years of age. and meets from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Daily religious. Sunday, and Hebrew High School registration will be taken on Monday and Tuesday, Aug. 29 and 30. 7 to 9 p.m.. at Sirkin Hall. Registration is also scheduled at the NorlH Branch building. 77th st. *and Dickens ave.. 7 to 3 p.m.. on Wednesday. Aug. 31. Rabbi Bernard A. Mussman is director of education. Principal of the foundation school is Mrs. Miri iam P. Anisfield, and Mrs. Naomi Brandeis is head nursey teacher. P e a r ly G a i t _. by Hal Pearl | J HAL PEARL IS ON VACATION THIS WEEK. Robert Galbut Bar Mitzvah of Robert Nathan Galbut will be celebrated at Beth Jacob Congregation during Saturday morning services, Aug 20. Robert i> the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hyman P. Galbut. 4630 Roy al Palm ave He is a student at the Hebrew Academy, and will read from the Torah and Mattir ;ir.d deliver the Sabbath sermon He trill also chant the Mu-af MTVId Guesl -primal i< tadtt will be I all Miller, of Kansas ( ii'ilof the Bar Mitzwho arrived bere for the QC casion \\:\h hi< wife. Leah, and children. Felice and hrnrst. He Will be intr i M CO) D I ) Rabbi Tlbor stern, ol Bch Jacob. The Bar Milzvuh Charge sermon v ; • i > H .. b b i Label DulMx, ag spiritual leader of Tea* N .1 and instructor at Vest...., i Diversity Be la also an un< I" of Richard. Rahbi Alexander Gross, principal of the Hebrew Academy, will speak in behalf of the Academy. 0:her gueffta will include the Bar M tzvah's grandparents. Mr. and mm A largest family Trait in fIonia J ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY } Mrs Morris Dulitz; and uncles and lunts. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wash %  Sky. Mr and Mrs Hyman Tentes. and Mr and Mrs. Sherman Rapahel. New Orleans. La., and Mr and Mrs. Bennie Friedlander. Mobile. Ala. The Bar Mitzvah's father is financial secretary of Beth Jacob regation. president of the Greater Miami Cemetery Assn., and chairman of the Miami DIM %  JOB of the I'nion of Orthodox Con: America. Philip Schwartx Temple Sinai of North Miami %  I UM llU i the Bar Mit/vah of Philip Si.hu artz on Saturday morning'. Aug. 13. with Rabbi Benno \\ allacta officiating. Philip is the son of Mr and Mrs Bernhard Schwartz. 17730 NW 14th pi He atti ndi Norland Jonior High and :hc religious school of Temple Sinai. Luncheon reception in his honor followed it UM Algiers hotel. • • • Artttur Kurtz Rabbi Solomon Schiff will officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of Arthur Kurtz on Saturday morning,' Aug. 20. at Beth El Congregation. Arthur is the son of Mr. and Mrs Alex Kurtz. 1630 SW 20th St. He is a student in the eighth grade at the Hebrew Academy, where he belongs to the Science Club. Raphael Skop Wins Scholarship A University of Miami junior has been awarded a health scholarship by the NaUonal Foundation for Medical Scientific Research. He is Raphael Stephen Skop. son of Rabbi and Mrs Morris A. Skop. 3511 Riviera dr.. Coral Gables. Raphael will continue his studies at the University of Miami for the next two years. The balance of his scholarship will be used for two years of post graduate work in Socio psychological studies. Cracker Barrel Chats Continue By Special Report NEW VORK — The Cracker Barrel chats, which makes up the second segment of the White Mountains Festival of the Seven Arts, got under way at the Lake Tarle ton Club. Pike. N.H., on Aug. 14. The two week daily outdoor symposium will end on Aug. 29. During this period, each day I after lunch. Tarleton's 450 guests gather under a spread of maples on a corner of the lawn to hear 40-minute informal talks by leading personalities in the worlds of art. books, the theatre and politics. Held annually for the past 11 years under the direction of Jack Colbert, Chatauqua type sessions have heard from every field of artistry, including such luminaries as David Susskind. Eli Wallach. Jerome Weidman. John Chapman. Arthur Miller. Kim Hunter. Regina Resnik. Norman Scott. Earl WilDemos Launch Campaign son, Hy Gradner, Mike Wallace Lawrence S p i v a k. Barry Gray, j Leon Pearson and many others. Let's Be Realistic There's no sects thing as tap quality food served cheap No amount of garnishing, flavoring anal tenderiung at applied by MIM of tko "enperts" < M mako an inferior product lotto lido first top quality Wo at Candlelight In* first purchase iho bed meats procurable thee our chefs prepare them to please the laite of the moil emoting gourmet. Candlelight Inn hat long boon the gathering piece fet sportsmen, artists, professional people end theatrical groups who enfoy such specialties M Aged Steaks. rVsttse lib) of Beef, and many other delightful entries. Exollent service, king site drinks, and realistic prices guarantee for you, dollar for dollar, the best in dining pleasure. Open deity for lunch and serving die> nert from 5 p m to midnight you will find Candlelight Inn. under management of Henry leitsen, combines informality with relaxation. 1st the eyes of tourists and Floidant alike a dining ettablithment second to none. Candlelight Inn is located one block North of the Oreve Playhouse theatre OPEN FRIDAY. SATURDAY t SUNDAY FROM 4 to 9 p.m. FINEST -:r DINING CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS Air-Coatf. (JN 6-6043 '"•< %  ,* Under Orthodox Vaad Hakaihruth 940 71st Street ROYAL HUNGARIAN'S CATERERS 731 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH JE 8-5401 FOWL Si 1*1 Kit < \TERi\1, WEDDINGS # BAR MITZVAHS • BANQUETS PUB MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR eEST RET EREN. An intensive registration camumn this election, we must work paiyn to net out a strong Demoat it." said Harry Levy, executive cratic vote In the national elections member of the organization. sToVt inaugurated here by the Democratic Club of Miami Beach at a special meeting of officers at the Delano hotel "If we are going to put Florida in the Democratic colSINCE 1949 04 RESTAURANT 79th St. CouMwoy PL 4-6656 Magnificently Re-Decorated • PLANKED STEAKS • ROAST BEEF • SEAFOOD FLAMING SHISH KEBAB • BEEF STROGANOFF • • CHICKEN DIVAN • • BANQUET FACILITIES • CREDIT CARDS HONORED e> 1 A RINDIZV0US fOK PARTICULAR Pf0ft[ DIH1HG AI 'DS a RBASTS — MB EXTRA CHARCC — STREET — WILL OFFICIATE FOR THE NIGH HOLIDAYS ARB All TBCSE EfATBOES f0 a CBAISE L6UNCCS *ATS — ,_ e 7i" T • BAOia la jaea "J" a TREE SELE fANRINS *•"*- O SVEINEN NBAST • SBCIAl SABO O DAY CABS< • BISBT PA TBBL_ __ a COCKTAIL PaaYTY • BNWIB3 O INtCRTAINHLNT BISKTLY



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    Lday. Augurf 19. 1960 +3ewistfk*k*an Pa^7-A Lining up for registration for the fall semester at Temple nanu-El religious school are Gary Friedland, Reenah Samberg and Mickey Feller. Religious school secretary Miss loan Rosenthal takes down the vital statistics, while Rabbi Bernard \. Mussman. director of education, looks on. oung Pianist Wins New Award Uanice Feld, 14-yesr-old Miami ptlist, won the piano concerto audiDns at Transylvania Music Camp Brivard, N.C. Ijanice, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. lax P. Feld, 5120 SW 87th ave., been winning piano awards nee the age of eight. At Brevard, she led a field of 40 competitors to win an appearance with the Brevard Music Center Orchestra under the direction of Dr. James Christian Pfohl. Janice played a movement of the C minor Concerto No. 2 by Serge Rachmaninoff. She played the flute in the Hilltopper Band. EARN 10% EXCELLENT FIRST MORTGAGES AVAILABLE • Monthly Payments • Completely Serviced • Title Insured CAPITAL INVESTMENT CO. 2303 W. Flagler Street Miami 420 Lincoln Road Miami Beach SUITE 602 MEMBER DADE COUNTY and MIAMI BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA BY APPOINTMENT ONLY PHONE MUrray 5-2544 Dr. Silverstein Hailed for Space Age Contribution WASHINGTON' — (JTA) dr. Abe Silverstein, National Aeronautics and Space Administration director of space flight programs, is being flooded with messages of congratulations from all parts of the country in connection with the successful launching last weekend of Echo I, the 100-foot-diameter satellite as tall as a ten-story building, which heralds a new communications era. Dr. Silverstein. a 52-year-old American-bom scientist and expert on aeronautics, has a key role in implementation of the N.A.S.A. time-table for space exploration. This includes the scheduled initial orbiting of an astronaut next year and the landing of a man on the moon within the next decade. Dr. Silverstein was born in Indiana and received his early scientific training at the Rose Polytechnic Institute in Terre Haute, his home city. He represented the VS. at international meetings on aeronautical sciences and contributed scientific papers on aerodynamics, engine cooling and power plant installations. CANTO* StYMOUK HINKES New Cantor Due At B'nai Sholom Rev. Seymour Hinkes has been appointed cantor of Temple B'nai Sholom, Gerald Greenfield, president announced Wednesday. A Miamian for the past 25 years, Cantor Hinkes graduated from Miami-Senior High School and the University of Miami. He received his Hebrew education at Beth David Congregation, whose religious schools he attended for more than ten years, and where he was Bar Mitzvah and confirmed. His ambition to bcom a carv j tor dvelopd when, at tKe *g* of I 13, h* rendered the musical por i tions of rh liturgy for th*> junior j congregation at Bath David. Cantor Hinkes is married. He and his wife, Maxine, have two sons. He has served as vice president of Masada and Tropical Lodge of B'nai B'rith. Cantor Hinkes will be introduced to Temple B'nai Sholom during Friday evening services this weekend, with Rabbi Sheldon Edwards officatin^. He succeeds Cantor Ben Grossberg. Green Stamps For School Bus Students and women of Congregation of Monticello Park. 1009 NE 163rd st., are engaged in a unique project — trading Green Stamps for a new school bus. With the cooperation of Sam Slossberg, of Merchants Green Stamps, arrangements have been made for the redemption of 1,500 green stamp books to obtain th; 36-passenger bus needed for the congregation's school. TIRE CO B i-Ooodrit h SINCt 1924 pSmibage OPEN 24 HOURS and All-Day Sunday 5300 N.W. 27th Avenue 1* <** UFE-SBUER Siluertatun SEALS PUNCTURES PERMANENTLY B^RaBBBBBBBBJ RF.Goodrich .. NAIL IN OB OUT. A patented sealant inside the I.U'KSAVER grips a nail as it punches through the tire will. When the nail is removed, the sealant follows it into the bole making an air-tight repair. NYLON CONSTRUCTION for the maximum In bruit* blowout protection. The Premium Tire designed to run % cooler, provide that extra measure of mileage and give sure-tired traction for quicker, safer stops. SPECIAL PURCHASE SALE! PRINCETON Premium Nylon Tubeless Tires MAOf IT ONI Of THE WORLD'S LAR&iST TIRI MFRS. llockwoN ood Whirewall BRAND NEW — PREMIUM GRADE Lew Prices For All Con ".: UASST i mMu i 750x14 ., 670x15 10.95 800x14.710x15 12.95 850x14.760x15 13.95 900x14.800x15 14.95 950x14.820x15 14.95 n: tax 1.91 2.04 2.21 2.40 2.40 •Flu In • • rMtatli tin n U) it* 12.95 14.95 15.95 17.95 17.95 BRAKES RELINED ALL FOUR WHEELS ir STAR LOCATIONS ONLY WHILE YOU WAIT GUARANTEED 15.000 Ml. OR 1 FULL YEAR $Q95 8 MOST AMERICAN CAtS EASY CREDIT TOM NAMfl TMI TItMS ir GETS YOU R0LLIH6 NORTON V TIRE r CO. MIAMI -* 5300 N.W. 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    Page 6-A -JeHtstirkridtetn Friday, August 19, AJCong. to Contest Legality of Religious Tests By Special Report "it srems clear that under our.ert Jackson was eminently right .Constitution disbelief in a Supreme when, in his opinion in the Zorach b belief in God a valid require i Keiagi and tnp d( nia i OI any mora i I n Clauson case, he predicted that ment for public office? accountability for conduct, not only 'the day this country ceases to be Yes. the Maryland Court of Aprenders a person incompetent to (free for irreligion it will cease to peals has ruled in refusing* to •*hold public office, but to give testi'be free for religion"— excPpT fof-the mony. or to serve as a juror. isect that can win political power. "The historical record makes it clear that religious toleration, in which this state has taken prick. Ci n>"** religious freedom and separation of church and state, the American Jewish Congress announced this the ungodly." The role of the American Jewish Congress in serving as counsel to week that it would appeal the Torcaso in the Maryland courts and Maryland decision to the United in deciding to take an appeal to States Supreme Court. The opinion, which was handed down Juno 30, is a precedent making one because the case mark* the first time the issue of belief in Cod as a qualification for public office has ever come up before a State or Federal court. In its unanimous ruling, the court upheld a lower court decision that Roy R. Torcaso, a 4*-yer-old avowed atheist, coo Id rot bo certified as a notary public because he declined to sign a statement in the oath of office declaring "that I believe in the existence of Cod." one for those who believe in God Wrote Maryland Court of Appeals and one for those who do not. The Justice Henderson: |Late Supreme Court Justice RobMonticello Lists New Teachers Mr. Pfeffer, who served as counsel for Mr. Torcaso, added: "The decision of the Maryland Court of Appeals means that n atheist can be elected President of the United States but cannot hold the position of notary public in Maryland. The American Jewish Congress believes the U.S. Supreme Court will strike down this indefensible—and unconstitutional—anomaly." The American Jewish Congress the I'nited States Supreme Court was described by Leo Pfeffer. as sociate general counsel of the American Jewish Congress and au thor of "Church. State and Free dom."" One of the country's lead"PP** 1 t0 ,he U.S. Supreme Court ing authorities on religious free : n Torcaso s behalf will argue that -lorn and church state relations Article 37 of the Maryland State, Mr. Pfeffer declared: Constitution — the legal basis for denying certification to Mr. TorThe same Bill of Rights that raso violates the U.S. Const it u< protects Catholics. Jews and other (ion. Article 37 reads: religious minorities from discrimination in the holding of public office by reason of their beliefs also protects the non-theist and the nonbeliever. Our Constitution does not have two First Amendments. ". that no religious test ought i ever to be required as a qualifi cation for any office of profit or' trust in this State, other than a j declaration in the existence of' God..." Pfeffer will advance two main arguments challenging the requirement of a belief in God as a condi tion of holding public office: The appointment of Menachim Israel, where he taught in the pub. „ :. inlmrtarmnM ^, K Roth and MlH Sandra Levy to the He high schools ,n a number of ,. '' ^'"'fZnS I' Hebrew school faculty of the Concommunities. guaranteed by grrgation ofMonticello Park was posit a belief in God) over other religions (those which are nontheist ic. such as Buddhism i. Also, the requirement places the author ity of the state in support of relig1 ion over non religion' Freedom of religion under the Constitution, however, includes freedom not to believe as well as freedom to believe. The history of the Maryland law requiring belief in God as a test for public office, according to Pfeffer, indicates that the statute originally required) "... a declaration of belief in the Christian religion ." In 1151, the so-called "Jew*' law" WH passed by the legislature, changing the provision to include "....* declaration of belief in the Christian religion or the existence of Cod." The addition of the last five words in the law permitted Jews to qualify for public office. The lew in its present form was enacted in 1147. In the argument bi lore the Maryland Court of Appeals, Torcaso was represented by Joseph Sickles, a Maryland lawyer, as well as by Mr. Pfeffer, acting for the American Jewish Congress. A "friend-of-the court" brief supporting Mr. Torcaso was submitted by the American Civil Liberties Union. Maryland was represented by the Deputy Attorney General, Stedman Prescott. jr. Torcaso lives in Wheaton, Md., a suburb of Washington, D.C. Male* it a Happy New Year for someone in ISRAEL Send through UNITED HIAS SERVICE a Rosh Hashonah CARE Kosher food parcel e Meo-eVeM • etfcer AND • tevermneat Aeareved • ***** Tea free $10oo AND Z $1825 Contain! AAeats, Sugar, Shortening, Cocoa, Chocolate, Assorted Dried Fruits For delivers bv Roh Hashi-nali place your order now with UNITED HIAS SERVICE 425 LAFAYETTE STREET New York 3, N. Y. the First Amendment to the U.S. le nethe High ment of Iaws reRard „ th ,. esUb/ free exLa n conLast year, he taught at the HeConst.tut.on. which prohibits enact rtw Academy and in the High ment of i aws r B rri ni h ., „ Seidel. education committee chairSchool Department of the Bureau JS* ef^n-X*Hm2 mar of Jewl>h Education. \9ldm thereof If a state can i Roth is a veteran teacher with more than 20 yean experience in Change in Posts Listed Joseph M. Lipton, president of Pade Savings and Loan Assn. of Miami, announced Wednesday the election of Wilford G. Meyer as %  ariatant vice president and tabulating supervisor of the associaMiss Levy is a gradute of Stern College in New York, where she majored in elementary education, and received a Bachelors degree in religious education. A native of Miami, she taught in a number of schools during her studies in Now York, and last year was a member of the staff of Temple Emanu-EI. stitutionally bar from public effice those who refuse to profess a belief in God. it can require them to define what they mean by "God" i and can bar those whose definition does not correspond with the beliefs of the public official pas'injj upon the qualifications. To assure religious liberty for all. civil gov em ment cannot be given the power to pass on religious beliefs. It violates the Constiutioral HELP WANTED FEMALE Nursery School Teachers College Degree Required. Morning Work in SW Area. Contact Ethel Grossman FR 1-2786 Greater Miami Jewish Community Center They will join Mrs. Jack Diation. Paul R. Gibson was named mond. Mrs. Samuel Mendelowitz ; reqoiremenr of the separation' of i assistant controller, and a change | and Mrs. Irving Seidel. together church and state, since it places in posts was announced for Frank with Abraham J. Gittelson. educa-' the authority of the state in sup-' Kavulia from assistant secretary! tional director, as the Hebrew; port of some religions (those which to assistant treasurer and chief school staff. acountant. Meyer, Gibson and Ka-j Opening date for school will be vulia have been associated with I Sept. 6 in the new 16 room building I the thrift institution for the past. just being completed on the Ternseveral years. | pie grounds. Experienced Hebrew Teacher America* 4 Israel BeckaroeiNl, Able te Ttech All Green. I.rtit, B'hrrit Ivrit B'Anqlit, Ucl. Telmefl. Available Sept. 1, Write. Re*. K., tea 2973, Meimi 1 Information Urgently WANTED concerning whereabouts of HARRY SIIVERMAN OR NEXT OF KIN Born in Russia 1876 Emigrated to U.S. 1904 Occupation Furrier Last Known Address Essex, 176th St., N.Y., NY. Metned to Gold*, who returned to Itteel. Son living Itteel wxnei


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    Friday. August 19. 1960 ^Jmlsiifhrtdfan Page 3-A President of Israel Itzhak Ben-Zvi (left) greets William Peskoff (right), of 728 Pennsylvania ave., Miami Beach, during Peskoff's recent fourth visit there. Introducing Peskoff to the President at the latter s home in Jerusalem is Isaac Hamlin, director of the Histadrut Center in Tel Aviv. A member of the board of directors of Histadrut, Peskoff is also a long-time active member of Workmen's Circle in Miami and New York, and an Israel Bond committee volunteer. UN Crime Parley Warned Bias, Delinquency Linked Continued from Pago 1 -A notably New York, in'me fighting among youthful gang* based on race. Ho said that much fighting might bo regarded a* almost inevitable where racial groups of widely differing cultural traditions came together. "But what is more disturbing." he declared, "is the evident relationship between racial prejudice and juvenile delinquency which has become apparent in the recent wave of swastika and anti-Semitic incidents, which has been particularly marked in countries with high standards of living like West Germany, the United Kingdom and the I nited States." Dr. Perlzweig pointed out that these incidents had often taken place where there were few or no Jews and were among the more striking examples of "offenses committed by groups without any apparent motive-." They indicated, he asserted, that there was a "spiritual vacuum in the lives of countless young people" which could be filled easily by any subversive ideas carried through the channels of mass communications. To remedy "this, he urged gov ernments to take seriously their obligation under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to make education a means of promoting understanding between different races, nations and religions. Earlier. Yehuda Prag, chief of the investigation branch of Israeli police, told the congress that the "true, new" contribution of this age to criminality was "gang be havior through which crimes are committed "for the fun of if and not for material gain." Soviet Official Booted for Ties With US Nazi WA^HINGTON^rfTl^tontact maintained byan important member of the Soviet Embassy here with a member of the American Nazi Party — and watched by the F.B.I.—led to an order by the State Department last weekend expelling the Soviet official from this country. The expelled Soviet diplomat is Valentin M. Ivanov, First Secre: tary of the Soviet Embassy. He was ordered to leave the country on the ground that he had paid I Roger C. Foss, who described him, self as a member of the American Nazi Party, a "substantial amount of money" urging him to get a job with the Federal government. Foss, 32 years old, said he reported his contacts with Ivanov a few weeks ago to the F.B.I. However, the F.B.I, was reported to have boon watching Ivanov independently of the information from Foss. The Washington Post reported that Foss stated be decided about 9 year ago to get information on emigrating to Russia. He said that, after visiting the Soviet Embassy, Ivanov contacted him and suggested that he apply for an American government job. On thi.' occasion, Foss said, Ivanov ad vanced him $500. While waiting for results of ; Civil service examination, Foss, according to his story, kept contact with Ivanov and from time.to timt received additional sums of money totaling $500. In the meantime Foss added, he had heard of th< American Nazi Party, and joined it David Pinski folk School David Pinski Folk School will reopen on Tuesday, Sept. 6. Registration is now being taken at the school at 1534 Washington ave. M. B. Astor is president. Cultural director is M. Chomitz. Senior Citizens Invited Senior Citizens of America club affiliates in Greater Miami were this week invited to a general meeting scheduled for Thursday. 6 p.m., at Bayfront Park Band Shell. ww 11 Jo TERMITES? \ ROACHES? ANTS? Safe. Positive Control With Every Other Week Service For The Home TRULY NOLEH "The Sign of Good Housekeeping' COSTS LESS THAN YOU THINK ^ CALL F R 7-1411 a/eater Miami's Largest iKtermlaaror *wwwwwww* LAST CONCERT! Sunday Evening, Aug. 21. at 8:30 PJA. SKITCH HENDERSON RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN. KERN. PORTER, ROMBERG PROGRAM Lynne Crusan, Meize-seprae Patrick Matthews, Baritone RESERVED TABU CHAIRS $2.50. 2.00; MUZ. S2.00; IALCONT $1.25 UM Symphony Office, MO 1-4960; Miami Beach Auditorium, JE 1-0477 Cordelias, Ft 3-5123 Amidens, HI 6-2070 TT?AVM0RE Private Pool •each and Cabana Colony magnificent FIRST RACE 8:15 EM. SSaX MIAMI Kennel Club LAST 2 DAYS Starfiae Saturday Clark Gable Sophia Loren "It Storied in Naples" DOG RACING HOTEL At 24th ST.. MIAMI tlACM Write For Information an* piaaervatlont JK1-0M1 O Air Conditioned Rooms O Private Beach and Pool O Parking on Promiaoe O Cocktail Lounge O Dining Room Entertainment Daily I pr Pore, i Dbl. Occ METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE CO. 1 Madison Ave.. New York 10. NY. ,i good fnrnd in time ol need. IjfAT CANS 3200 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami Pltnnei Ft 3-4*1 A o r HI 6-11 GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC 1144 PJ.W. 10* Ae. Ft 3-Tlie Have your roof repaired now: you will aavo on a new roof later. "•atlefactory Work by Experienced Men" • • Gloat Enclosed Grandstand • AM-Weather Pt aooOhwi o Ak-CondHionod Ctubhoueo • Terraced Dining • 5.500 tadrvidual Seats • Reie'rtatio'ns phont I! 0348 MIAMI BEACH Kennel Club X)l III I \l) < il COLLINS \\ I M I MIAMI BJAC.H i



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    Friday. August 19. I960 1 "if/*i n rrkUtr Pag. 7-W EDITH APPLEBAUM IS ON VACATION. mS. DAVID KUBIM Wsrner-Kalin Miss Wagman, Student Married Mr. and Mrs. David Rubin will live at 7005 Fieldcrest rd.. Baltimore, Md., when they return from their Jamaica honeymoon. The couple were married in 2 p.m.* ceremonies at the Algiers hotel on Sunday, Aug. 14. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg officiated. The bride is the former Miss JuI dith Ellen Wagman. Her parents I are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wagman, 1540 SW 20th ave., Miami. The I groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. I Edward Rubin, 826 SW 13th ave. Maid of honor was Miss Barbara Masur. Bridesmaids included Renee Geyer, Verna Sodikoff. Susan Freedman, and Diane Berk. Best man for his brother was Martin Rubin. Ushers were Martin Kline, Richard Sachs, Harry Gnien. and Steven Millison. The bride chose a wedding gown featuring peau de soie and alencon lace. She attended the University of Florida, where she a member ol Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. The groom is a student in his junior year at the University of Man land dental school. He belongs to Alpha Omega fraternity. Goldmans Will Live in New York Miss Frances Ina Lazarus and Allen Stephen Goldman exchanged wedding vows on Sunday, August 14, in New York, City. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Lazarus. 1630 SW 13th ave.. Miami. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Goldman, Scarsdale. N Y. Maid of honor for her sister was Nancy Lazarus. Best man was Dr. Howard Goldman. Groomsmen were Arthur Laza rus and Eugtne Goldman. Bridesmaid was Harriet Goldman. Given in marriage by her parents, the bride selected a floor| length wedding gown of bouquet ; taffeta. Designed along princess j lines, the molded bodice featured a scoop neckline of reembroidered alencon lace enhanced with tiny i seed pearls. The sleeves were long I with pointon-hand. Her aisle-wide skirt was adorned with alencon lace medallions and pearls, and the back interest was a flowing sash above a chapel train. She carried an orchid bouquet on a Bible belonging to her aunt, Mrs. Harold Pulver, of Elmont, ;L.I. The bride is a graduate of Miami, Senior High School. She was I sweetheart of Hillel AZA. and president of District 5 B'nai B nth Girls. After two years at Sophie Newjcorab College, where she joined | Sigma Delta Tau sorority, the bride transferred to the University of Miami, and graduated with a Bacbe| lor's degree in elementary education. Mrs Goldman will be teaching a second grade class in Scarsdale this fall. A graduate of Tulane Univer-lty. the groom has recently completed six months of basic training with the Army at Fort Dix, N. J. He is presently associated with Nathan Goldman and Company in New York. Following a 12-day honeymoon in Jamaica, the newlyweds will be at home at the Ridgecrest Apartments, 1 Uakridge pi., Eastchester, N. Y. I\JGL T ST BROS Ry, ii t >> at si' Barbora Golden's Betrothal Told Mrs. Lillian Golden announces lilt engagement of her daughter. B< rbara, to Karl Louis Kaplan. The couple was feted at a cockI tail reception and dance Sunday lb) Mrs. Golden, banquet manager : be Carillon, in the Baroque IK m of the hotel. rbara, who resides with her I mother and sister at 6817 SW 10th f! West Hollywood, is a graduate Id Broward High. Her fiance, the son of Mr. and i Mrs. Ezra Kaplan. 1071 NE 178th jler., No. Miami, is employed by %  he Miami Post Office Annex. He j graduated from Miami Beach High. is majoring in industrial engineer| ing at Miami University, and is a | member of Tau Delta Phi fratern ity. The couple plan to be married Mar. 12. Sefft Am Breakfast Prospective members of Temple Beth Am were this week invited to a traditional breakfast Sunday morning. 10 a.m.. at the Temple. 5950 No. Kendall dr. Chairman is Morton Orbach. Beach Lodge Party Have thai Business Meeting, Banquet, or Special Occasion You'll find complete facilities to exactly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for o wedding or a private party f Ot ttl< Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai i B'rith held a social and games party Wednesday evening at the Algiers hotel. Herbert Heiken, president, and Irving Schatzman. presidentelect, were chairmen. lor Information! HAZEL ALLISON CaMring Director, JE 1-6061 Ith St. m Collins Avo. tl III • < %  • %  it .• %  111111 %  %  %  • %  < %  ORDER YOU* NEW YEAR S CARDS NOW! INVITATIONS PEWONAIIZED STATIONERY, WEDDINGS MATCHES, kr-BAS MITZAHS NAPKINS, ETC HANNAH H. SCHER ALL YOU* MINTING NEEDS T" ENGRAVING. EMBOSSING, PRINTING SOCIAL lb COMMERCIAL Phone F* 1-7195 1600 S.W. first Avtnw



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    Page 2-A • Jen1st ncrkiiar Friday, August 19, iggg tB-G Tells Science Conference Emerging Nations Need Assist Continued FromPeee VA ... tftul .ill material and spiritual as sislance to wipe out regrettable and ilaneernus differences between economic and cultural ttandu li Referring to the integrity of hu mainly in our days nlivn rial ions are M i-lo.-i-ly COOMCLod throimh Advanced types of commuaicatlons, the Premier call %  •! oe all highly developed nations to MSlsl thinfellows whose rights. statUl and educational opportunities have been restricted for decades and centuries by history "They should offer this aid not as charity, but as an cbligation of fellow members of the same human family out of equality, comradeship and universal human solidarity to rectify historic wrongs," Mr. Ben Gurion said. Referring to American aid to the European countries crushed in the Second World War. Mr. Ben Gurion fcaid that such aid had achieved wonders. He noted, nowevor. that the center of gravity had passed to Asia and Africa, the homo of the great majority of the human race. This aid. the Premier declared, that should give them agriculture •nd idustrial--dovelopment. better education, housing and health services — material and spiritual proi gress which these countries needshould be founded on mutual confidence and respect and the utilization of all achievements of human ity and its scientific tod technokkfteal dincov eriei in sincere cooperation (.reeling the participants repre•eatiag tb 14 Asian and African states, as well as those from Fur ope. Australia, the Philippines and North and South America, the Pre l mier expressed the fervent hope that the deliberations would contribute to the unity of all mankind I and speed up progress benefittingj every man. woman and child. > throughout the world without dis-1 tinction of race, color, class or religion. The more than 100 Kientiatl par ticipating in the conference will discuss subjects relating to atomic energy for peaceful purposes, solar energy, water development in arid lands, health problems and train '. ing of scientific personnel for new and underdeveloped countries The conference, which will last until Aug 26. is taking place under the auspices of the VYeizmann Institute of Science Jewish War Veterans End Convention; Elect I. L. Feuer National Commander The Jewish War Veterans of the The new national commander li United States closed-it* 65ih sjfcvfpre^enUii MUUMOl ewjm*aAa,a,a,a,a.a,Aa>a,AAa,a.Aa.a,a.a,A a.a> 4l 4 4 .1 4i 4 4 ( 4 i l I 4 I • > INSURANCE & ONE STOP AGENCY JEWELRY—PUtS— MISCIUANIOUS FLOATERS AUIOMOIILI IIAIILITY PHYSICAL 0AMA6I Limin te ajeet ei aeaell The Afeacy that CAN to. TISf Dea't let veer oeeet sey "It Coat le Deae" ACKERMAN INSURANCE AGENCY. INC. II RE 1st AVE. FR I -2611 • Fl I Nasser Mission Off To Ghana LONDON — (JTA) — The Unit ed Arab Republic is sending this week a military mission to Ghana for the purpose of discussing the formation of a joint high command. it was reported here today from Ghana. The talks would also in elude the possibility "of forming an all-African army. Five hundred United Arab Republic troops flew from Cairo to Leopoldville. in the Congo. Tuesday. United Nations Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold cabled President Nasser several days ago requesting the dispatch of the troops to help him implement the Security Council's resolution on the Congo. Opposing Fewer in a three-man race for the post were Daniel Neal Heller, of Miami Beach, and Joseph Solomonow, of Los Angeles. I : Sholem Lodge Picnic Sunday Sholem l-odge of B'nai B'rith will [hold a picnic on Sunday, beginning 10 a.m.. at Coconut Grove Park Morton W. Palmer, lodee secretary, said the affair will benefit Sholem's Handicapped Boy Scout Troop, and is open to all B'nai B'rith members in Greaer Miami The program will include refreshments and games for all age groups. Coconut Grove Park is two blocks south of Dinner Key Auditorium at the end of So. Bayshore dr. COMPLETE PEST CONTROL An Army veteran. Feuer serred m France in 1917. He is presently lirector of the' Mahoning County Welfare Department in Ohio, and a recognized authority on public welfare and welfare legislation. He is married, and has two sot* and seven grandchildren. Young Adult Club Dance Temple Judea Young Adult Club held a "dance-aroma" on Sunday evening at the Temple. 320 Palermo ave. WORLD'S LARGEST S^^S? eWiCt Proscription Specialists NOW IN TWO MODERN Alt COHDmOMD, Mueece OUCH LOCATIONS eiOM PARKINS SPACI CONVIMMNT TO ItfSES 350 LINCOLN ROAD Pheoe Jf 0-7415 tetr. Weshiaetea A... NUueate. 728 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 00749 OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FtUJO CONTACT IBISES Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky MS MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI MACS M 1-35*5 PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" SerWee the Jewish Cam m .ait. iimc, 1920 MIAMI'S ONE AMD omr JEWISH MONUMENT SUHOfRS CArruwc fxcttfsnrur ro res JEWISN CLIENTELE GUARANTIED FINEST OH Aim MONUMENTS AT LOWEST POKES m MIAMI! GRAVE MARKERS NCAOSTOMES rOOISTONES Only $35.00 Why Pay More? Ray for less at Palmer's and Save I All Mtmimtmt i Caste* Ma4t I* Our Oww Seeef wHhim 3 Days I 3777-79-01 SOUTHWEST Olh STREET MtMt le Career at 33r 4 Aveeee Nl 4-0921 HI 4-0922 Janitor Service FREE ESTIMATES 24 HOUR SERVICE • Oesiaess • Office • Neese LKENSEO 0ON0E0 INSV0E0 AA and J FLOOR WAXING A PO0TEI SEIVKE 21S N.E. S9th Street PL 9-2921 10*. OfSCOONT WITN TNIS A0 WE INSTALL CLASS FOR EYERY fHJktPOSE STOtS FIONT PUn ANO WOOJOOJ OUSS r 9f 9tt9f9 tmf RMWlM mmtflft ttmm eesifveriaf Oar S pii te **, L t 6. GLASS ANO MIRROR WORKS *—. OS? 134 S.W. fh ST. Merrti Orlim PI 1-13*1 "Procjt easing with Our Many g^-f+d C ANOT1KI LOCATION FOR TOM CONVENIENCE C0ULT0N BROS "ART• -mjmv -BATroot Coral Way I S.W. 27th Ate. TEXACO 0OTS S40 S.W. Iti St RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS Phone JE 1-1151 MIAMI tCACM 1250 N