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The Jewish Floridian ( May 13, 1960 )

UFJUD

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"cJewish Floxadian Combining THi JEWISH UNITY and TMt JEWISH WEUVt Volume 33 — Number 20 Miami. Florida. Friday. May 13. 1960 Two Sections — Price 20# %  Longshoremen Unload Cleopatra; Nasser Firm on Blockade of Suez IAUL KATZ NEW YORK—(JTA>—The unloading of the Egyptian vessel Cleopatra—which has been under 22 days of picketing by maritime labor here—started Tuesday, as a result of a new State Department commitment given to organized American labor during the weekend, promising that fresh steps will be taken by the United States government to halt the blacklisting of American ships stopping at Israeli ports. + The 22 days of picketing, conducted by the Seafarers' International Union and supported by the Internatib n al Longshoremen's Assn., whose members refused to cross the picket line, started with the arrival of the Cleopatra in New York harbor on Ar. 13. It was estimated here that the picketing has cost the Egyptian owners of the vessel $44,000. Label Katz Elected Head Of Presidents Conference JTA—By Dlret Teletype Wire NEW YORK—Label A. Katz, of New Orleans, president of B'nai frith, was elected Tuesday chairman of the Conference of Presidents major American Jewish organizations. He succeeds Philip M. Klutz;k, former president of B'nai B'rith. The Conference is a group of 17 + esidents of national organiza S0B0LEV SEES NO SIGNIFICANCE IN DATE Soviet Chief at UN Mum as Colleagues Toast Israel Birthday By SAUL CARSON United Nations JTA Correspondent I that concern themselves with uerican Israel affairs. was established six years ago in informal assembly, with Dr. |um Goldmann, chairman of Jewish Agency for Israel, as head. Prelimina ry steps t o nallre the group* irere trWTJnrp|ed last year, at wh'lch time itiznick, then president of B'nai frith, was elected Conference %  airman. in en acceptance statement, Catz commended the "voluntary iture" of the Presidents Conrence. He said the Conference id in past years "demonstrated value where divergent ortnizational loyalties committo common goals can coordinate their efforts and strength, ind thereby achieve the highest cgree of Jewish unity in keepwith the voluntary character f the American Jewish comlunity." The 17 constituent organizations the President's Conference are: American Israel Public Affairs ammittee, American Jewish Confess, American Trade Union Council for Labor Israel, Amercan Zionist Council, B'nai B'rith, ladassah, Jewish Agency for Ishel, Jewish Labor Committee, Jewish War Veterans, Labor Zionlt Assembly, Mizrachi-Hapoel Halizrachi. National Community Beat ions Advisory Council, National Council of Jewish Women. Union American Hebrew Congregations, Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, United Synagogue of America, and the Bionist Organization of America. Herzog Named Canada Envoy; Aranne Resigns JTA By Direct Teletype Wire JERUSALEM—The appointment of Yaacog Herzog as Israel Ambassador to Canada was formally announced Tuesday by the Israel Foreign Ministry. Mr. Herzog, 32, is the youngest of Israel's diplomats. He was born in Dublin, where his father, the late Israel Chief Rabbi Isaac Halevi Herzog, was then rabbi. Currently a minister in Washington; Mr. Herzog previously headed the Foreign Ministry's American desk. He is author of an English commentary on the Mishna. Prime Minister David BenGurion meanwhile Tuesday formally announced the resignation of Minister of Eduaction Zalman Aranne. Aranne quit his post two months ago when he was overruled by other members of the cabinet after he sought to recognize the dissident High School Teachers Union in a wage dispute. Ben-Gurion also announced the appointment of Ami Aassaf, Mapai Knesset member, as Deputy MinTho formula to end the picketing was worked out in talks between Acting Secretary of State C. Douglas Dillon, Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell, and Arthur Goldberg, general counsel of the AFL CIO. The formal statement by Mr. Dillon of a declaration of principles "which actuate United States 'oreign policy affecting the American merchant marine" was largely a re-statement of American opposition to Arab blacklisting and restrictions on freedom of the seas and freedom of access to foreign ports. There was one specific new commitment, however, to the effect that the State Department would consult with the AFL-CIO and its maritime unions, the SIU and the ILA, on developments "affecting Continued on Page 7 A UNITED NATIONS—Arkady A. Sobolev, the Soviet Union's highlyarticulate delegation chairman here, suddenly lost his tongue this week. It happened in the Delegates' dining room the night Israel was holding its annual cocktail party, celebrating the State's achievement of independence. It happened to be, too, the very day Sobolev's big boss in Kremlin, Nikita Krushchev, had+— given a resounding "nyet" to Premier David Ben-Gurion's offer to i come to Moscow to continue discussing the Middle East situation about which the Israeli leader had | already talked to President .Eisenhower and to Britain's Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. lach year, at Israel's anniversary celebration — which, punctiliously, he never fairs to attend — Mr. Sobolev has some message that he is willing to speak. Usually, his words consist of polite, hacknied wishes for peace and stability in the Middle East. But, customarily, he .does Continued on Page S-A 'METHODS MUST BE POLITICAL' Dag Denies Pact Egypt on Israeli Shipping UNITED NATIONS——Secpurchased F.O.B. Haifa, retary General Dag Hammarskjold asserted flatly here this week that; he never made an "agreement" with United Arab Republic President Nasser about Egyptian per-1 mission for passage through the Suez Canal of ships carrying IsIsraol circles had asserted that MM Astypalea case fell into the category of on agreement purportedly made between Hammarskjold and Nasser to allow canal passage for foreign ships carrying cargoes to or from Israel when those cargoes were actualNoted Actor Schwartz, 72, Heart Victim lag, this week renewed their de raeli cargoes. He was asked at a news confer-1 jy'o'wned by"non Israelis, ister of Education. "Ae Premier lence whether he could reveal "the I has assumed -the Education Portfacts" behind the attempt of a I The secretary general replied folio in addition to his serving as, Greek freighter, the Astypalea, to,that "there has never been any Minister of Defense and Acting transit the Suez Canal last Decemagreement, and that is well known Minister of Posts 'ber carrying a cargo that had been to both parties." In response to another question referring to the picketing of Egyptian ships and embracing the principle of freedom of navigation through the Suez Canal, Hammarskjold said that he considered trade union action on this issue as a method that touched only the symptoms of the problem and does not go to the roots. • "The methods for reaching a solution." he said, "must be political. This problem is linked up with others — if not legally, then certainly politically. Counter-actions concerned with symptoms do not offer the most effective solution." JTA—By Direct Teletype Wire TEL AVIV —Maurice Schwartz, one of the giants of the Yiddish theater, died here Tuesday in Beilinson Hospital after a month-long illness from heart ailment. He was 72. I In accordance with his last wish, his body will be flown to New York Friday. He became ill during a brief visit to Israel. Born in the Ukraine, ho was the founder and director of the Yiddish Art Theater. He produced more than 150 plays, including the works of Sholom Aleichem, Shaw, Shakespeare, Leivick, Sackler, Hershbein, David Pinsky, Abraham Goldfaden, Tolstoy, Wilde, Gorsky, and many others. An actor, producer, and director, he was the leading personality of the Yiddish theater in Lower Manhattan during the heyday of (that theater in the 20's and 30's. He was a member of the Screen Actors Guild and Actors Equity. Urge Extension of Nazi Trials Halt RfiNTN flTAl —Leaders of the lconstitutional grounds," no extento and including manslaughter, nnosition Social Democratic Par-!sion of the limitations statute is while murder charges may be ? ana the heai s of other liberal feasible. Under German law. the filed within an additional five-year p'position groups in the Buhdesstatute of limitations expires in period. .. !_ J.1 D .;>!ol. inno this Ulpplf anil I The spokesman for the Social statute of limitations expires in;period. the British zone this week and, LdTL^ns^ oMheltatute in the American zone July 1. The Democratic Party hero stated limitations which forbids ffUrjdates^were bxedon ^fJ^^P^^^ j that/while ho agrees with the Cabinet's decision forbidding retroactive prosecutions, the Socialists fool that the expiration ler prosecution of persons acof a 15-year penod from th* date used of major crimes committed in 1945.when the Nazi regime nder the Nazi regime. came officially to an end in the The cabinet voted at a meeting i respective zones. The limitation apfriday evening that, "on legal and.:plies to various major crimes up Continued on Pago 3-A MAURICE SCHWARTZ



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Page 2-A *knist> fhrkMam Frid qyMay 13. iggn Leaders Mobilize to Plan Meir Affair; Foreign Minister Due in Miami Jane 9 Gnlda Meir. Minister of Foreign J man Pacesetter chairman; Jack Affair* for the State of Israel. isf*CaVneT.~Trll5RW chairman: Mrs : expected to deliver a major address in Miami on June. 9. Max Weitz, chairman of the Worn, en's Division; and Mrs. Anna Bren Mrs. Meir is coming to Miami to ner Meyers, honorary chairman of present Israel's "Decade City" | the Women's Division, award to the Jewish community as ; .Mrs Mejr was chosen ,,. a token of Israels appreciation of ^.^ Minister for Foreign Affairs in June, 1956, she became one of |the highest women cabinet officer? in the world. Even prior to her appointment as Minister for Foreign Affairs, few women had attained such heights of international fame as Mrs. Meir. For his "outstanding service" to Senior Citizens, Isidore B. Simkowitz. president ol the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center (left), receives a scroll from A. Budd Cutler, vice president and chairman of the Senior Citizens department. The scroll was signed by the president of each of the four Senior Citizen Clubs sponsored by GMJCC in recognition of the role Simkowitz played in leading the way to the formation of a county-wide department of service to Senior Citizens in the Agency. rael Bonds. Sam Oritt and Jack A. Can tor, general chairmen of the Greater Miami Israel Bend committee, who announced Mrs. Meir's visit, said that the community will be one of only four cities in the entire world to re-. ceive the "Decade City" award. A committee of distinguished citizens, representing all areas of the community, is preparing an elaborate welcome for Israel's leading woman citizen. A dinner in her honor will be held at the Fontainebleau hotel on Thursday evening, June 9, at which Mrs. Rabbi Rosenberg on TV Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, spiritual leader of Beth David Congregation, will appear on "The Still Small Voice." television program sponsored by the Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn. The program, to be dedicated to Teacher's Day, is seen over WCKT ch. 7 at 10 ajn. Cantor William Lipson and Hy Fried, organist, are also scheduled. LONG-DISTANCI MOVERS DAILY PICK-UPS New York, New Jer sey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash %  ngten. Bostea all ether points. DIAL JE 8 8353 M. Lieberman 4 Sons *55 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH RETURN LOAIJ RATES Order of West To Convene Here The Progressive Order of the West will hold its 41st biennial coni vention at the Lucerne hotel FriI day through the weekend, with Sol Goldman, of Miami Beach, as chairman. The Progressive Order of the West is a national Jewish fraternal organization founded in 1896. Chartered in Missouri and maintaining a lodge system, operating in 15 states, the Order has been a leader among Jewish fraternal groups, i contributing to philanthropic and civic endeavors. In St. Louis, the Order helped build the Jewish Orthodox Old Folks Home. In Chicago it is a leading supporter of the Fox River Sanitarium. It is a contributor to! the Combined Jewish Appeal in all cities, where its Lodges are located. The Order has supported the State of Israel. In 1940, it erected two homes in Israel to house refugees there. In addition, a large X-Ray clinic in Tel Aviv, recently completed, bears the name of the Order. Farm worker, author, diplomat, executive, government leader, school teacher, mother and crusader for peace and freedom. Go Id a Meir has become one of Israel's most eloquent and forceful spokesmen, and a symbol of Israel's moral stature in the international arena. Prior to her assumption of her as Minister of Labor, and before Meir will present \he "becade l^^^ J?^ ^ ^^ City" award. Heading the welcoming committee, in addition to Cantor and Oritt, are Samuel Friedland. chairman of the board of governors of the Israel Bond committee; Jacob Sher, honorary chairman: Sam Blank. Max Orovitz and Carl Weinkle, vice chairmen of the board of governors: Marcie LiberGoodwill Group Meeting Thursday Goodwill Group will install officers at a meeting Thursday noon. May 19. at Toby's restaurant, SW 27th ave. and the Trail. Mrs. Frank Hoffman is president. Others to be installed include Mrs. Sam Geltner, vice president. Also, Mrs. Leah Kripple. financial secretary; Mrs. Laura High, corresponding secretary: and Rubin Hyatt, treasurer. that as Israels first Minister to the Soviet Union. For 35 y ear 7 her name has been sy nonymo with Israel s growth and deveW ment. ^ Mrs. Meir left her school teach lni^pusitiofl .in JUilu.-:..ii,., ln m to settle on a kibbutz in PaTesfV Her first job in the new land w a raising poultry. Three years lafe. she joined Solel Boneh, the build! ing and construction cooperative of Histadrulh, the Labor Federation. In 1930. she became director of Avrion, Ltd., the early pre-State branch of the Israel Air Force, and shortly thereafter was elected as the only woman member of the five-man secretariat of the Labor Federation Her unique career o( public service has included wartime membership on both the Palestine Govern ment Economic Council and the National Council of Palestine Jews (Vaad Leumii Prescription Specialists NOW IN TWO MODERN 411-COMMTfOMD, ENLARGED BEACH LOCATIONS MOfff PAKKING SPACE CONVENIENT TO MUS 350 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 8-7425 Intr. 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"ART" • "RIAORr" "NAT" TOUR TOCACO BOTS Coral Way t S.W. 27th Ave. 840 S.W. 8th Si. PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO. "Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" Servieo tea It with Cmmunit, Since I24 MIAMI'S one AND ONLY JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS cei ixciuuvur TO TNCMWMN CUHfTIU GUARANTEED FINEST QUALITY MONUMENTS AT LOWEST PRICES Hi MIAMI I CRAVE MARKERS HEADSTONES FOOTSTONES Only $3540 Why Pay More? Ruy for less at Palmer's and Save! aeaY aaa^aeaftaaa jse^aasa 8 e hi 0*r OMTM Shays wit him 3 D* r i I 3277-79-11 SOUTHWEST 8th STREET Meat re Career ef 33rd Aveeoe PHONES -I HI 4-0921 HI 4-0922 1 RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAl DWECTORS Phone JE 1-1151 MIAMI BRACH 1250 Normandy Drive 1236 Washington Avenue 1850 Alton Road Wet Flaglor and 20rh Avenue Ml 3-1*21 34-Hr. Ambulance Servieo •"iesM-kaa. Aft* lrta.be,, Urri. S. U*^ t r JO. New York 7*th St. t Amsterdam Ave. e 'ft



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%  M Friday, May 13, 1960 +JewislinorKtiam Page 3-A Report Action Against Nazi Youths NEW YORK-,-(JTA)-The Afl>er-_ *-j£Jlr Fnnrth Rxjrtilin faint'-ran , Oeripttos. That to, Amaeia n a t a to a Bet Jost eae hot o asai H aa W ss ei not logical. It must be expected that many names of suspects are not yet known to the authorities." Meanwhile, Tuesday, the Ministry of Justice announced it has rejected the "convictions" of 593 West Germans found guilty of war crimes in East Germany. The Communist regime has notified the ministry here that the 593 "convicted" persons had been found guilty of war crimes charges in courts under the East German jurisdiction. The, charges against these persons, the ministry stated, are "propagandistic." The ministry also rejected the East German notification that Dr. Theodor Oberlaender, resigned Minister for Refugee Affairs, had been convicted of war crimes and sentenced to life imprisonment after a trial in absentia. On the basis of that conviction. East Germany has demanded Dr. Oberlaender's extradition. youths involved were in the 13 to 18 age group. The committee emphasized that it is concerned with seeking "the basic causes which lead youthful offenders to choose neoNazi symbols for their "hate syndrome" and expressions of criminality. To bo explored are the backgrounds and general social history of these offenders, including: the community situation, the cultural and familial framework, the individual's psychological makeup, his education, end related environmental and personal factors. The committee plans to enlist the aid of clinical psychologists, social workers, university r e searchers, law enforcement and voluntary agencies who will work together as teams in specified communities. These teams will carry on studies in depth of the youths who are apprehended as members of these_ neo-Nazi groups. The studies will seek to formulate explanations for patterns of behavior, and propose positive community action—in the educational and human relations fields—to combat these tendencies. Some of the neo-Nazi groups cited in the report were: 1. "Tho Nazi Regime of America"—had among its paraphernalia a homemade bomb, a gun, I swastika insignia, and handprinted literature. Tho group wos discovered in Wayne, N. J. S. "The Nox-Coms" wore discovered in Levittown, L. I., following the defacement of • church, a Baptist cemetery and high school. They said that their group incorporated the features of both Nazism and Communism. 7. In New York Citr the "Xtttional American Renaissance Party" was discovered while in the process of formation. A large stock of Nazi paraphernalia, literature and membership cards were confiscated. CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE rrl*i -" imuouiomm ptefto *> %  # see ttn aeah ateeeg ya> aataa aaXe aaUaf ea Aeeefca TaMaea, CANTOR, CHOIR LEADER & BAR MITZVAH TEACHER Seeks HIGH HOLIDAYS or YEARLY f ioait.ofi. Hald prominent position* n New York. NOW RESIDENT of Miami Baach. Excellent in all branches. Extraordinary cultured Tener-voice. Outetandinp reference!. 15 years experience. Reasonable aalfiry. 'Write P.O. Bex 173S, Miami Beach, Pla or phone JE 4-O01. Ext: 306. Mind/in to be Speaker Leo Mindlin, executive editor of The Jewish Floridian, will speak at the noon meeting of Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith on Tuesday at the DiLido hotel. Gershon S. Miller is luncheon chairman. eoeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeei. I WE WK.I MM! VMM CAR LMK • NCW AUII WITH M.UE eORAL SIMONIZ ^''•$095 fl AT SAM TINDUR'S a AUTO WARM** STATIO* • Car. IMA N.I. MA •fJfTRGeTt MSft m • tVad rlaaap a BeSVery eoeee fkoso R 4-117* eeei Complete and Dependable Title Servk* M IAMI TITLE A Qkttact Co. 94 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICE IN DAD8 COUNTY ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE Title h a w rae t i Policies el teases City Title Issereace Co. Capital, Serpfos A Reserves teeed tsjmm IM


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Page 4-A Friday, May 13. I960 OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street TelephoneTR 3-4&S Teletype Coauntuucations Miami TWX MM 336 FRH) K. SHOCHET Editor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor PabOaM **wy PTMay ate lT! ar T* Imlafc FlorWUaa at J* JL_iilh J(nt. Miami 1. FWMa l") • tm-xtrj jl> : at P Jewish Tctagraphic A#an cr Sawan Arta Feature Syndicate. Waridwide Newa Sarv.cs. National Editorial Aaan.. American Aaan. of Cmjliah.Jewiah Nawaaanara. and the Florida Preee Aaan. The Jeniah rlvridtaa does not guarantee the Kajhruia of the rr-rcnan4lae adrrrtiaed in Ka columna. SUBSCRIPTION One Year SS-SO RATES: Throe Years 110.09 ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Mr, Israel RAY U BINDER CoTespendent Volume 33 Friday. May 13. 1960 16 Iyar 5720 Number 20 Personal Diplomacy Backfires frmS UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold made at least two trips to Egypt during 1959 ior the sole purpose of discussing with President Nasser his illegal blockade of the Suez Canal against Israeli shipping. The Inge Toft case created a maritime no less than a political furor around the world. Its implications were profound, for it drew in unmistakable terms the broader significance of Nasser's recalcitrant action. When the Greek freighter Astypalea more recently met the the same fate as the Inge Toft. the fat was really in the fire. This boat had sought entry through the Suez Canal on the basis of a presumable agreement worked out between Nasser and Hammarskjold on one of Dag's trips to Egypt Under the terms of the agreement, cargoes bought and paid for in Israel by nations abroad could be shipped home via Suez since they were no longer Israeli property. Many observers at the time of the agreement, including these columns, deplored the UN official's decision to do business with Nasser on such a disjointed basis. This was not a circumvention of international law with respect to Suez Canal access, but rather a total distortion of it To accept these terms from Nasser could only encourage him further in his flouting of maritime agreements. It is by now past history that Egypt barred the Astypalea's way just as it did the Inge Toft's. Some of the most distinguished newspapers throughout the world, in reporting the story, editorialized sharply on Nasser's treachery. This was many months ago. Only last week, in discussing his view of the longshoremen's boycott against the Egyptian freighter Cleopatra. Dag Hammarskjold declared that he had never made an agreement with Nasser for access of f.o.b. Israeli shipping through the Suez Canal Clearly, the UN official was aware of the circulation of details relating to the by now alleged agreement Why did he not make his denials in the very beginning? Why did Dag permit world opinion to believe he had achieved some sort of rapprochment with Nasser in the first place? Why did it suit him to let everyone think that the rap prochment was violated almost from the start? Dag's sort of personal diplomacy can never lead to anything but disaster. It gives him more prestige than the United Nations secretary general's post in fact has, and it implies that some member nations are above international law—that the more they flout the law the more they are entitled to special handling. Isn't this carrying personal diplomacy just a little bit too far? The Passing of an Era The death of renowned Yiddish actor Maurice .Schwartz brings to a sad close another era of Jewish history in America. Apart from his dramatic abilities, which earned him great praise throughout the world and beyond the horizons of Yiddish theater, he was a man intimately identified with the large wave of i mm i g ration here ai the beginning of the twentieth century. The name of Maurice Schwartz spelled magic for a Jewish culture which has just about disappeared. Even in the last decades of his own lifetime, Schwartz found it increasingly difficult going in America. The men and women who understood his language and his message had slowly begun to pass on. So, too. has Maurice Schwartz now passed on. The exciting hub of New York's world of Yiddish theater, the intellectual stimulation of Jewish thought found in discussion over the tables of the Cafe Royale on Second Avenue— these are all gone. We must now look hopefully to new intellectual horizons that are indigenous to the world of second and third generation American Jews. Symbol of Enlightenment As a school, the Hebrew Academy should conduct its affairs with the utmost dignity. Any educational institution ought to live by this rule. This is particularly true of the Hebrew Academy, which has earned the respect and admiration of many people. The Academy's current rezoning petition has been marked by incidents that do anything but redound to the school's dignity. Purposeless picketing, the intemperate use of invective by some of its supporters—these do not. in fact, advance the Academy's cause. The Academy should, contrarily, stand above these as a symbol of enlightenment to the community. If the Academy resorts to the kind of tactics of which it is currently alleging to be a victim, the public will find it difficult to tell right from wrong without a program. Attainment of Ambitions The election of Label Katz to head the Conference of Presidents brings to mind the scattered condition in which the American Jewish comm unify finds itself today. Mr. Katz is an able and astute leader. He succeeds Philip Hutznick. one of the wisest and most experienced captains of Jewish affairs here and throughout the world. If the Conference of Presidents boasts smaller accomplishments than its goals had envisioned, it will not be for lack of proper leadership. It will merely emphasize the problems of a broadly segmented Jewish community — of a community boasting almost as many organizations as constituents, of the quest for power rather than for effective expression. The Cart Before the Horse The haste many groups are showing to extend the time limit for bringing to trial former Nazis charged with criminal behavior betrays the prevalent feeling that racism is not dead in Germany. The trials have served their obvious purpose. Continuing them only plays into the hands of Germany's new Nazi groups, who see them as an extension of the "Jewish power'' they apparently failed to root out. We are not suggesting that playing down the trials would have a salutary effect on these groups. But it is worth noting that if the "victorious powers failed in Germany the fault hardly lies with an ineffective trial system. It lies rather in Germany's educational institutions, where inert parents and teachers during the week 777aTi see it by LEO MINDLIN WHIN THOU Jewish at torneys recently stepped forward to defend one of Lincoln Rockwell's henchmen thy were i— %  is.s < | jriq. ciples of a free society to the* point of self-cancellation Liberty is the heritage of democratic government; it is meant to be enjoyed by men. Where the dictator-minded, like the Rockwells among os, challenge our liberty, they put to question our right to survival. If. in the name of the very philosophy we cherish, there emerges the practice that places little restraint on those who would destroy it. then we are also inviting our own destruction. And of what value is freedom unless there are men to enjoy it? The consideration that arises here is one of degree. To what extent do we insist on the right of others to speak their thoughts and. practice their beliefs even if they urge our enslavement—or murder in a gas chamber? This was precisely the issue in the case involving Rockwell's henchman, who stood on a street corner in Washington and distributed handbills suggesting that Americans adopt the Hitleriaa "solution to the Jewish problem." The Jewish attorneys who defended Robert Morgan, following his scuffle with a passerby, did so on the basis of their ardent belief in freedom of the press. The consideration of decree in this instance becomes most pertinent. Is it to be assumed that, in another age and another time, they would also have defended Josef Goebbles. wh> subsequently became Minister of Propaganda of the Third Reich, and one of the architects of the master plan that ultimately sent six million Jews to their graves? <• -;• -:•:KKOUKTIO* Of A ticMl ifww IN A RECENT column. I discussed a D wight Mac Dona Id review of %  "Ben-Hur." which appeared in the March issee of Esquire Magazine. I agreed wholeheartedly with Mr. MacDooald's attitude toward the film, which he characterized as \ulgar. I found delightful h.comment concerning "our mass culture .' (which) compensates for its prudery about sex by portraying violence." Beyond this, we parted company. In a slashing charge, the Esquire reviewer declared: "Here .finally, a blasphemous falsification of the Bible ... in which sot the Jews but the Romans are responsible for Christ's martyrdom. According to Matthew. Luke and John, it wasn't that way at alL" Continued MacDonald: "There is a brief shot of some high priests looking on at the crucifixion they look sad rather than jubilant there are no ancient Romans around, and there are many Jews, and $15,000.000 (the cost of the film) is $15.000.000." These observations, I categorically labeled anti-Semitic. To begin with, the crucifixion is a New Testament story which has served as the basis for and justification of the slaughter of untold million-, upon millions of Jews over the past 2.000 years. It is indeed true, as MacDonald indicates, that the story comes to us according to Matthew. Luke, and John; the prosecutor, judge and executioner are one and the same. To avoid suggesting that the New Testament incorporates some of the most provocative anti-Semitic material ever written is to be ignorant of Christian theology and obsequious in the name of cowardly community relations pundits. The entire spirit of the MacDonald charge—however accurate it may be with respect to the failure of "Ben-Hur" to hew the line so far as Matthew, Luke and John are concerned—breathes anti-Semitism. The reference to "$15,000,000 is S15.000.000 can not be mii taken for anything less than the monetary acumen with which the Christian world has characterized its Jewish victims these many centuries. •:• •:• -:• TrK HIHISHU PKOTtSTS MOT IN0UCH TO THE DEFENSE of seemingly defenseless Dwight MacDonald rushed William Zukerman. who publishes a bi-weekly "Jewish Newsletter" in New York City. Zukerman s pamphlet reflects the American Council for Judaism line, looks wild-eyed at Zionism—and schizophrenically devotes the majority of its columns to Israel In Vol. XVI No. 8 of the •Newsletter," dated Apr. 18. Jewish editor Zukerman rakes me over the coals for my conclusions about MacDonald's review of "Ben Hur." This is achieved by conveniently dn missing my major premise as an afterthought. Weasel-words Zukertnan: "Whether or not one agrees with MacDonald about a detail of an historic trial which occurred nearly two thousand years ago it is fantastic to see in the mere mention of such an opinion a siga of anti-Semitism ." But the 'historic detail" should be preciselv the issue here for Jewish liberal Zukerman. who finds my own reputation across the nation as a Jewish liberal a "curious thing." It is this historic detail on which we have been hung since the start of the Christian calendar, and for which many are still biding their time. If Zukerman rushs in to fill the breach, Arnold Gingrich, publisher or Esquire Magazine, does not. To those who queried him on the matter. Gingneh replied: "Yours is by no means the only voice raised is protest against Dwight MacDonalds review of Ben Hur.' As a matter of fact. I was ahead of you in protesting myself ." •:-:• -:-:• s r OMUENCf ro om SURVIVAL TH** IS CERTAINLY an opposite view from the one in the "Jewish hsne n* e Uer T b ? rrow Zukermans own terminology, it is oernln-M K Un0US th !" 8 that he should *"* o defend Dwight MacSI £ ~ n \' en,en,l >-turns out to be a member of his editorial nnnM y 'J 4 Inc,den, aU >this hardly, of necessity, makes Maeman i nahu ^ ne L ,Ca S greM Critics and truth-seekers," as Zukerman so nobly characterizes him attorne!, W !r, at ,h Pri n e *i* If'!* 1 7 lX is ,he same that paid by the who e?„ h R ^ kwe henchman case and by Gingrich, himself, ^hel P ? rX h,s ,Uraat !" > !" to publish the "Ben Hur" critique, the rSh.!i?."? • is 0ne tbe duties ** %  one of expression LJ *? Cf-' l permU tbe wk,est P~ ib,e freedora written u. 2 v ''?tions of the written laws of libel and the unSion." m 0rder to give its •*•* %  fuU ltltude of MSCDZIST Gingrich: While *e happened not to agree with Mr. MacDonalds opin.on we are obliged to defend his right to express lein^tntTeo't Vo,r, l ire ,he ^ !" ~ "•* "" the n-L'a h s "I e l n r ti0n J th 1 ,hose who harangue us about freedom of acted ?n the L f democrat **"ty do so only when they have 'merest Ovpr?v T'"' 0 1 the P*oP>--nd thus in their own best than their S w'T hhtnl *' in these **>* "<* •>' more .."truism TW fant e y e to realize the prevalence of this S wT.h ,h • ,. ey PracUce what man > ot 'he press merely preaeh defend of n^ n K a ,w n e ^ S And wi,h Zukerman, whose crossfire of the critiaur 8 ^ MacD n' d U canceled by Gingrich" publication A J !!-'" que The P r,ce? Our own right to •urviv.l-perhaBs aoma



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Friday. May 13, 1960 Jen is*-nrrXUann Page 5-A Turning in completed pledges and checks lo general CJA chairman Harold Thurman (seated) are (left to right) Theodore J. Goldstein, Abe Gurevitt, and Joseph Rose, shown at the oneday "Trades Blitz." UTTER TO THE EDITOR Stand Praised on Rezoning For Miami Beach Academy The following are A few of the dozens of letters received by The Jewish Floridian concerning the Hebrew Academy rezoning issue. The letters overwhelmingly expressed the Acadmy's viewpoint. Space limitation* preclude publishing .ill of them. EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: On behalf of the Executive Committee, I wish to commend Leo Mindlin for his most brilliant and analytical article regarding the He: brew Academy rezoning, which appeared in last week's Jewish Horidian. He has indeed performed an in[ valuable service to our community by revealing the plight of a sevenI year struggle to find a decent home lor our more than 300 children Leo Mind) in's enlightening coverage of the entire matter will surely awaken the community leadership to our needs in acquiring a "place in the sun" of Miami Beach. A g HARRY GENET Chairman, Executive Committee The Hebrew Academy EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: As I see it, Leo Mindlin eloquently champions the cause of the underdog. His recent May 6 column sltows what an erudite vocabulary can do to call a spade a spade. Congratulations to him. DONALD Miami SWARTZ EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: I am unable to let Leo Mindlin's column in last Friday's Jewish Floridian pass without comment. I must say that he has done the Jewish people a great service in bringing forth the true issue as to the problem of the Hebrew Academy, What has recently happened and is happening in Miami Beach, as brought out in his column, is another illustration of the unfortunate slave mentality in which Jews find themselves, ^hich is a vestige of their European ancestry. In this country, where democracy rules, the Jew has developed an independent view where he can think freely, talk freely and be treated freely, together with all the citizens of all faiths. I am, therefore, surprised that in this community where Jews are of a preponderant majority we, nevertheless, still find slave mentality always willing to submit. Mindlin's column brought this issue out into the open. It is about time the Jew takes his rightful place and becomes mature enough to be independent in his thinking. I, as an American born Jew, should like to think that any problem and issue that arises in this community can and will be decided on its merits and only by the Soviet Bigwig Mum as Israel Marks Birthday Continued from Page 1-A say something. This time, however, he played shy. "What shall I say?" he retorted" :o a request for a statement. "This is Israel's Independence Day!" he was told. "You always jive us a statement on this day. .Vould you give us a message now?" "Ah, but this is not a day of ^articular note," he replied. "If his were the fifth anniversary— or the 25th—some special anniversary, I would say something. Please, excuse me." He did have a conversation with Tel Aviv's Mayor Mordecftai Namir, who happened to be present. Mr. Namir had served two years as Israel's Ambassador in Moscow. He speaks Russian fluently, and the two men used Russian in their brief talk. After congratulating Mr. Namir on his excellent Russian, Mr. Sobolev went his way. Soon, he left the party. The party was brilliant. America's delegation chairman, Henry Cabot Lodge, was there, and so were the delegation chairmen of at least 60 other United Nations member states. The Afro-Asian bloc — except, of cour.se, for the Arabs — were out en masse. From the Iron Curtain countries, also, not a single delegation was absent. But they, of course, were net talking. They were watching for the word from Big Brother Sobolev. But Sobolev wasn't saying a word. He had received his hint— direct from the Kremlin. duly-elected representatives of the people. IRVING FIRTEL Miami Beach -#EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: I just finished reading the article by Milton Freidman, "He Rocked Fights of Nazism, in Their Graves." This brings back bad memories to me, in Berlin in January, 1933, when my family and I were coming back from a trip to Rumania. As we walked, we saw a curious parade of Hitler troops, surrounded by special police and guns. When we asked, in astonishment. what it was all about, we were told (and I will never forget it) that "they are revolutionaries." Five days later, when we arrived in the United States, Hitler took over. I hope it. does not happen here. But never let such a party as Rockwell's go on to get strong. No one is immune to going bad. MRS. MINNIE SOLOMON Miami Beach GREYHOUND RACING TONIGHT M POST TIME 8:00 PM i Poddock Room Rettauront i Air-Condilioned Club Houte| i Cocktoil lounge > Volel Parking RESERVATIONS: HI 8-1711 WYLLY'S BUSES from Miami Beach Tin Notion. Cuybuwl Stoujpkfc FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB 37th AVENUE and 7th STREET, Northwest • MIAMI I



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Page 6-A *Jmtslk**KMn Friday. May 13. I960 Florida State Federation Elects Nieberg; Mrs. Lewis in New Term for Women SAMUtL NIUHC Samuel Nieberg, of Miami, was elected president of the Florida State Federation of B'nai B'rith Lodges at the Federation's annual convention here at the Lucerne hotel. Also elected were David Gorman, St. Petersburg, presidentelect; Charles Seiavitch. Miami. Milton Levinson, Pensacola, Morris Zimmerman, Tampa, Norman Friedman, Jacksonville, Sam Schutzer, West Palm Beach, and Ansel Wittenstein, vice presidents. Jack Wilson, of Miami Beach, was elected treasurer, and Lucas Goldwyn, Sarasota. is secretary. Outgoing president is Jerome Greene, of Miami. A native of St. Louis. Nieberg^ who resides at 3942 SW 5th St.. came to Miami in 1950. He and his wife, Ida, have one son, Marvin, who lives in St. Louis, and twin daughters, Mrs. Phyllis Erblich. outgoing president of the Flamingo chapter of B'nai B'rith Women, Hialeah, and Mrs. Evelyn Schwarzman. incoming president of Flamingo. Mrs. Nieberg is past president of the Coral Gables chapter and current service officer of District 5. A graduate of the University i of Illinois, Mieborg taught bookkeeping and rapid calculation at Brown's Business College in JEet St. Louis, IN. Mo is a past president of the St. Louis Club of Greater' Miami, a ttnd tie vie* Mason, and a Shriner. He is past president of Coral Gables Lodge, B'nai B'rith, and was Distridl 5 leader in memberJewish League Urges Zionist Unity NEW YORK —(JTA)-A resolution calling for the unification of all Zionist and pro-Israel groups in the United States info one body was adopted at the closing session here recently of the convention of the American Jewish League for Israel. Samuel Daroff, of Philadelphia, was elected president of the organization, succeeding Ezra Shapiro. The convention pledged support to the Assn. of Americans and Canadians in Israel, and urged all League members to participate in the United Jewish Appeal, in the Israel Bond Organization, and other programs in support of Israel. Other resolutions felicitated Israel on the country's 12th anniUM Teacher In Art Talk Prof. Clayton Charles, of the art department at the University of Miami, addressed the second in a series of Fine Arts Lectures on Thursday evening at Temple Beth Sholom. The series is under the sponsor.•hip of the Greater Miami chapter. American Friends of the Hebrew University. Chairman of the committee in charge is Mrs. Arnold Greenfield. Others are Mesdames Benjamin Gindy, Solomon Goldman, Daniel O. Hammond, A. Victor Huber, Herbert S. Shapiro and Richard Wolf son. Miami Beach Councilmcn Kenneth Oka launched the series recently with an address on music entitled Theme and Variation." Presiding was Leo Robinson. Prof. Charles' address Thursday was 'Wanted—Part-Time Genius." versary, called upon the new executive of the organization to prepare to hold a youth pilgrimage in Israel in the summer of 1961 and to launch an intensive membership drive in those Jewish communities where the League has not established itself. Samuel Rothstein, of Brooklyn, was elected chairman of the League's executive committee, and Samuel Rothberg, of Peoria, III., was reelected chairman of the League's board of directors. A call for increased private investment* by Americans in Israel's economy was made at the assembly by Pinhas Sapir, Israel's Minister of Comme rc e and Industry. Sapir explained the recent change* in Israeli law which provide liberal terms for foreign investments in that country. He praised such efforts by American* as the Israel Investors Corporation which, in its first year of existence, invested $4 million in Israeli government enterprises. The corporation is headed by Rotbberg. Avraham Harman. Israel's Ambassador to the United Slates, delivered a speech on the 12th anniversary of the State of Israel. He noted that Israel has made great improvements in this time and referred to the great policies which have enabled her to do so. Ambassador Harman said that Israel's [development and accomplishments in the years ahead will be influenced more by one factory than by many resolutions. Louis Lipsky, founder of the American Zionist movement, spoke on the occasion of the' 100th anniversary of the birth of Theodor Herzl, founder of the world Zionist movement. Lipsky, honorary president of the League, outlined the forces and circumstances which had brought Herzl to Zionism and of the fulfillment of the Herzlian vision and prophecy in the emergence of the State of Israel. Other speakers included Dr. Israel Goldstein, Judge Louis Levintbal and Ezra Shapiro, who opened the two-day national assembly. Mrs. Rose Halprin, acting chairman of the American section of I the Jewish Agency, greeted the delegates on behalf of the Agency. 'Shapiro stated that promulgation I of the Zionist unification plan %  would be extremely important at this time when all Zionist and proIsrael groups in this country are I faced with problems of readjustment as a result of the changes in the method of operation announced by the Jewish Agency for Israel in New York three weeks ago. ship in 1958. Nieberg is a member of-The District Service Fund Cabinet, District Membership Cabinet, Hillel chairman for the South Florida Council, and Service Fund chairman for the Florida statt 1 Federation. I Mrs. Shephard Lewis, of West P *'.S? Be £^ %  *-JgJ cted P"* %  Idem of the Florida Sate Federation of Women's* Councils. Others are Mrs. Jack Hosid, secretary, Orlando, and Mrs. David Green* berg, treasurer, Miami. YOUNG ISRAEL KOSHER TOURS TO !*£* icq 15-DAY FIESTA AIR TOUR TO MEXICO •OOM ISRAEL TOURS iHiw ,e t. nJwJN tbrilHtf keai.tr o* aevtatart •I Nance — wit* the ceaeaaM ceav askia •( i Taunt Israel freap. DIFFERENT DEPAtTUtE DATES TINS SUMMEt -AJuly 3rd fr July 10th "£August 7th T*T August 21st YOUR COST ONLY $297 ,. i*,*.ra. Uffl %  til EnjgiL SEABOARD I Luxury and Courtesy I when you travel ^C NORTH! RELAX in the gay holiday setting of a Seaboard Streamliner. See how tense nerves loosen up a> you .view the lovely countryside through the windows of roomy lounges—the tavern observation cor, modern center-lounge coaches, the Pullman-travel Sun lounge on the Silver Meteor. Mealtime is a delicious, thrifty treot, the exclusive "Hospitality Hour" a refreshing interlude. Taking the children? There's a REGISTERED NURSE aboard, as well os o Passenger Service Agent. Let the miles slide by swiftly and safely, with nothing to mor your peace of mind ond everything to gain from Seaboard's cheerful, courteous service I GREATLY REDUCED ROUND-TRIP FARJS IN COACHES OR PULLMANS NOW to NOV. 15 Btektfit/kitimBmywkmf Chool* your d.tlmofion. .1.1 your Ttov.l A9.n1 or iwaiitf Seaboard '•P'MOMolivo do the mil THIATai TOURS ta naw Toaac CITY ... Wt* OKHESTIA MATS to top Broadway hits, hotel occemmodaliopi, lightseeimj. f^ TYPICAL M-DAY ROUNO TRIP COACH FARES New to ate*. 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Friday. May 13. 1960 +Je*isi>ncrk0iar) Page 7-A Rabbi Abramowitz New Rabbinical Assn. Head as Body Vows Continued Service D.kk; u. i__ ... Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz has been elected president of the Greater Miami Rabbinical Assn. Spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Center*-**, succeeds Rabbi Alfred Waxman, of Temple Zion. Other officers named at an election meeting of the organization last week include Rabbi Morton Malavsky,Israelite Center, executive vice president; Rabbi Jonah Caplan, Adath Yeshuruq, secretary; and Rabbi Benno Wallach, Temple Sinai of North Miami, treasurer. In addition to Rabbi Waxman, Beth Israel Fetes Outgoing PrexyCocktail party and buffet dinner will be tendered by the Beth Israel Congregation at the home of Its newly-elected president, Alexander Muscovites, and Mrs. Moscovits, 3054 N. Bay rd., on Sunday evening.. The occasion will serve as a tribute to outgoing president Isadore Friedman and Mrs. Friedman, who herself served as first president of the congregation's Sisterhood. A iowrnal marking the sixth anniversary of th* institution is being published in conjunction with rtw occasion. Some 200 persons are expected to attend. Entertainment features will include Ronald Sweetz, noted accordionist, who recently won the world's championship when he represented the United States against the leading accordionists of Europe. He has been featured by Ed j Sullivan. Bernie Berns, master of ceremonies, comedian and singer, will be a co-feature on the program. He has just completed an engagement at the Chez Paree in Chicago. Chairman of the event is Henry Groudan. Harry Schwartz is chairman of the souvenir journal. outgoing officers include Rabbi Abramowitz, vice president; Rabbi Henry Okolica, North Dado Jewish Center, secretary treasurer; and Rabbi Malavsky, executive secretary. In accepting the presidency of the organization. Rabbi Abramowitz declared that "it shall be our endeavor in the ensuing year to continue to render a service to our community and to Israel. "Our body oT rabbis will extend itself in an organized fashion to sponsor, in addition to their communal services, seminars of re, ligious and cultural importance to Mhe spiritual leaders and their re-i spective congregations. The Asso-j ciation is also identified with the I promotion of close cooperation I among various local associations of clergy of other faiths." %  \U L^Lf Ji r.' t:i ^^_PT '--T^^B L '1 ^H %  W/f • %  i LONG DISTANCE MOVING fo all points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE ACE • K.ll. VAN LINES, rare. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue Mi S-eet* MIAMI Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz (left), spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Center, is congratulated by George Jessel. guest speaker, at a dinner honoring the rabbi last Saturday night in the Fontainebleau hotel. Joining in the congratulations is (right) Maurice Revitz, chairman of the dinner and the congregation's new president. Nasser Firm as Cleopatra Unloaded 500 Honor North Shore's Leader A capacity gathering of more than 500 persons honored Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, of North Shore Jewi.-h Center, at a dinner Saturday evening in the Fontainebleau hotel. Responding to an appeal by Rabbi Leon Kronish, of Temple Beth Sholom, friends of Rabbi Abramowitz demonstrated their regard for him by purchasing $116,000 in Israel Bonds. They heard guest speaker of the evening, George Jessel, describe Israel's progress in its 12 years of statehood as he himself had seen it in a series of periodic visits. Rabbi Abramowitz, who was honlored for "outstanding service to the State of Israel and Israel Bonds," was presented with a giftcheck to cover a round-trip to Israel for himself and his family. Rabbi Abramowitz is a native of Jerusalem, and has a large family residing in Israel. Dinner chairman was Maurice Revitz, president of North Shore Jewish Center. Continued from Page 1-A i American vessels and seamen" in the Middle East. (Press dispatches from Cairo reported Monday that United Arab Republic President Nasser has! stated publicly that he has no inteatlon of lifting Jhe anti-Israeli blockade of the Suez Canal. He also denounced American senators who had voted f or a clause in the Mutual Security Bill, giving the President discretion to withhold foreign aid from countries that practice boycotts. In his address, Nasser spoke of American aid as help given "in the style of Cohen.") Paul Hall, president of the SIU, has warned that picketing of Egyptian ships would be resumed if the State Department failed to produce "practical implementation" of its promises to investigate the union's complaints about abuse of its members in Arab ports. Hall said his union would also hold the State Department to its promise to intensify diplomatic efforts to project American ships and seamen against Arab discrimination. For the first time in me longsimmering dispute over Arab blacklisting and boycotts against American shipping involved in trade or other contact with Israel, the State Department conceded publicly that American seamen had been harrassed in Arab ports. The Dillon statement said that the State Department had "renewed" its standing orders to consular official* to be on the alert to help in settling grievances of seamen and Other American citizens. The statement also promised that it would continue to "do what it can" to end Arab-imposed restrictions on movements o r ships carrying American foreign-aid cargo, and it pledged that the State Department would do everything possible to protect American interests in foreign trade. The key point of the declaration was the statement that the State Department would "undertake to investigate fully the grievances of the Seafarers' International Union and, through appropriate diplomatic action with the foreign countries involved, to renew its efforts to assure freedom of the sea and to protect the interests of our shipping and seamen now being discriminated against by the Arab boycott and blacklisting policy." In a telegram to Mr. Hall asking that the pickets be withdrawn. George Meany, president of the AFL-CIO, said he felt. that the "good trade union purposes" for which the picketing had been organized had been achieved. He urged the pickets be withdrawn on the strength of the "good faith assurance" given by the Administration. The State Department declaration was not released until it was discussed with President Eisenhower. It had been discussed in j general terms 'or two weeks by j State Department officials and AFL-CIO representatives. Other 'points made In the State Department statement were: 1. The United States has said repeatedly, and again at the United Nations in September, that it favors freedom of transit through the Suez Canal for all nations; 2. it is government policy to protest discriminatory actions against American firms, vessels and citizens, and the State Department "will continue to pursue, by all appropriate and effective means, every avenue whereby private American interests in international trade may be fully safeguarded and restored." 3. The United States government will not recognize or condone the Arab boycott; 4. since February, the United States Navy has discontinued a ban against tankers which were, or might be, on the Arab blacklist, forcharters to carry oil to naval bases. JWB Convention on Beach The 1962 biennial national convention of the National Jewish Welfare Board will be held at the Deauville hotel Apr. 4 to 8, 1962. BEST QUALIFIED BY FAR BEST FOR ALL FLORIDA! Pd. Pol. Adv. 1 MJGVJST BROS ft>7 lb th, flf.sr' 0 FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE Doyle CONNER AS A 10-YEAR VITMAN STATE UftlStATOR INTRODUCED end Meed BOM tee bill to reereoebe the Deportment of Aerkartrre. INTRODUCED one helped pew the hill thet iee'reesed trackers' sotorin. INTRODUCED and helped POM the hill thet protects syeoeeeees. cberche* one schools egeiost bambino eed the public ogaiast hoes telephone colls. PROVEN PEnFORMANCI ELECT DOYLE CONNER COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE fo. rei. AV Words of thanks are inadequate Your continued support on May 24th will give me the opportunity to say "thank you" in the form of service to you and the community. MORTON LEE PERRY Candidate for Judge of the Small Claims Court Pd. Pol Adv. CASA INTERAMERICANA —. 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Page 8-A Jew 1st flcricfiain Friday. May 13. I960 160 to be Graduated at Community Exercises in Temple Israel Tuesday Community graduation exercises i Ei; Morris A. Skop, Temple Judea: will be held for 160 graduates from | David Shapiro, Temple Sinai of the Hebrew departments of 13 ele-1 Hollywood; Leo Heim, Temple mentary schools and from the CenTifereth Jacob; Alfred Waxman, *# >; tral Hebrew High School of the Bureau of Jewish Education on Tuesday, 7:45 p.m., at Temple Israel. Program of the graduation will be a tribute to the Hebrew poet laureate, Hayim Nachman Bialik, observing the 25th anniversary of his death. Greetings from the Bureau of Jewish Education will be extended to the graduates by Leo Robinson, vice president. Highlight of the exercises will be the presentation of "Our Bialik." based on a cantata of a similar name by Ira and Judith Eisenstein, and adapted and directed by I-ouis Schwartzman, executive director of the Bureau. TeiffpTr^ion.-*^" %  ——^— The annual Jacob and Adele Kaplan prize awarded by the Rabbinical Assn. of Greater Miami will be presented by Rabbi Waxman, president, to the two outstanding students of the Hebrew High School. The annual Israel Shspoff Memorial Award and the Ratner Family Award will be presented to the two elementary graduates who gained the highest mark in the graduation examinations. ri. %  if Gradutes of Monticello Park and Temple Sinai ofHollywood will read from Bialik's prose writings. The prayer and benediction will be offered by graduates of North ,jDade Jewish Center and Temple Narration for the cantata wil i Tifereth Jacob be given by the 13 graduates of the Hebrew High School. Songs and lyrics will be sung by two mass choirs of graduates of the Beth David Congregation, Israelite Center, Temple Judea, Temple Zion. Kneseth Israel, North Shore Jewish Center, Temple Emanu-Bl, and Temple Beth Shalom. The choirs are under the direction of Cantor Herman Gottlieb, of Temple Judea, and Cantor David Conviser, of Temple Beth Sholom. The charge to the graduates will be given by Herbert Ber ger, assistant director of the Bureau and pri n cipal of the Central Hebrew High School. Architect's sketch of proposed Temple Adath Beach's newest congregation. The site is i Yeshurun, which will become North Miami the Greynold's Park area. in Beth David Honors Teachers, Students The salutatory, welcoming new graduates into the Central Hebrew High School, will be given by graduates of Temple Beth Sholem of Hollywood. The graduates-include the following: Beth David: Mark Bayer, Philip C Delict. Susan UoMberc, Melvin Laskin, Ells* Leffler, Stuart Hi we. St.-v.-n Rosenblatt, Benjamin Rosoff, Syiiii Hernaker Daniel SI.I1M.IN. Jay Wag%  "MII. Richard Welnkle ami .hi.liih •Teles. Israelite Center: Sli-v.-n Kirsner, BHen Weiss and Ronald Winston. Keneseth Israel: Kenneth Bach, Jack Ki aiiiiyiciii. Metvia Klein and Riihard Weln.r. Monticello Park: Jeffrey AugenMeln. Robert lllau. William Diamond, | IJnda Kdelman. Marvin Uaa, Mm tun Schwab and Michael Slegel. Pr. t n .,ii. n r ,i;.,i„„.„ „~A North Dade Jewish Center: Klllot presentation of diplomas and Upof, Pen? Rablnowlu, Mark Reasgifts will be made by the spiritual lor. Cathy Sandier and Carol Viman. Ipadcrs of the erarliiafino rlas., North 8hOT Jewish Center: Robert icaners 01 me graduating classes. Kn ,,,.,. Krllmall sjm K <.; r un..ff, Rabbis Yaakov Rosenberg, Beth Uall Greenhouse, Ivan Jacobs, iienr.v DavidMorton M.ilavskv Urar-litc %  '•"" l """ 1 Marsha Krnnnvet. Alan ,..• !" rl0 C la 'fy s ?i' i! rael "? Kurswell, Jerry Ueberman, Charles Center; David Lehrneld, Kneseth Llndenbaum, Candj Morse, .lu.iiih Israel; Max I.ipshitz. Monticello \', ] '\\ ki ". ..' ';''", ";"/" %  "• Seyojoor T> i ii m ii ••. i% Roth, Michael Saffon. and Marc Park; Henry Okolica, North Dade white. Jewish Center-Popiel School; May. T emp,e Be,h shoiem (Hollywood):, er Abramowitz, North Shore Jew$£& $£&*&*%! Be"e*5 aSSt ish Center: Samuel Lerer, Temple jj-** ,e IJelafuente, Jesse Diner. Jlmir.) Rplh Sholem n( HnllvumnHloon h ,"'''"1 "der. Jill Ootelner, Joel Handcein snoiem oi Hollywood. Leon sh „ Hteven Randshu, Rit-hai-.i Bar: Kronish, Temple Beth Sholom; 'i. Bonnie House, Allan Kaufman, Irving Lehrman. Temple .Emanuf^u5%% !" M &% m £ Grossman, Sam l>aviii Harris, Rrr> I. Loss. Sieve Matia, I'ella M. Newmurk, Max W. NiHKon, SIIS.IN A. Hchmerer. Larry M. Sinclair, Stephen Sliavln. Kllle Weinberger, Anne ayle Handshu. Beverly Jacobean, Alan K.ini.-n. Sean Kaufman. Cayle l.fbman. lH>rothy Nanens. Jack Itahln. Jo Ann Rubel. Stanford Reinlurd. Susan Bchwartaman, Arlene Shiibow and Carolyn Steinberg. ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE ALL HtBKtW SUPPLIES FO SYNAGOGUtS I JEWISH HOMES jWe Carry Bar Mltzvah Records 1357 WASHINGTON AVE. JE 1-7722 LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK 'The South's most beautiful Jewish cemetery" 30 Minutes from the Beach Via The New 36th St. Causeway JE 1-5369 n.\ Rubinstein, Mike Rchectman, Mia Shulman, Hare Solomon, LfOUise bVolman, Richard Strauss, and Marjorlc Uncer. Temple Beth Sholom: Vanne I Niks', n. Hart) Kng.ls. Sanfi.nl |. i i, ,|rl. h. Joan Goldman, Steven Kramn, Kenneth Lewis. Abbey Morris, Albert Badowsky, i.imia Bhaobrun and Arlene silver. Temple Emanu-El: Jon Becker, Ktanle) Bernstein, Manuel Diner, David Kpsi.-ln, Helena Km. liter, Michael llalper, Steven Kaplan, Marrj Katten, Henr) Pohl, Barrj Reich, Binnette Soramer, Mas oteliuraul ami Sum Bteiacart. Temple Judea: George Gelb, l'aul Klein, Cheryl Kronowlnt, Don Robins, Lancer, Steven Newmark, ii. ii.Rosenberg, Michael bfcbulner, Wayne Silver, Adena Skop, Irene stem and Joel Vvotpe. Temple Sinai (Hollywood): Richard rvutsch, Arlene s. Oalnea, Abble Greene, Charles Harris, Harry lx>ninn. iiiu... Mann. Patricia roaster; Richard Beliaaon and Jayne Sherman. Temple Tifereth Jacob: Frederick liiixl.anni. Hairy llanillii. Saul SllVer%  nan. Shan..n Silv.rnian and Kdna Stein. Temple Zion: Michael Abrama, Sheldon K. Ba.l.r. Mare Berkowlts, Steve H Berlin. Steve Jay lironis. Jerry Cantor, Harold U fvress, VicREPHUN'S HEBREW BOOK STORE Greater Miami's Largest A Oldest Supplier for Synagogues, Hebrew & Sunday Schools. Wholesale I Retail ISKAUI eifJS AND NOVflTICS 417 Washington Ave. JE 1-9017 enblatt; Benjamin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Rosoff. Sybil, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Sernaker; Dan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Stokols; Jay. son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wagman; Richard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Weinkle; Judith, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Simon Weiss. %  Graduates of the Hebrew High School under the supervision of the Bureau of Jewish Education are: Dale, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Handshu; Alan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kamen; Sean, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kaufman; Jack, son of Mr. and Mrs. Saul Rabin; Sanford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Reinhard; Susan, GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FRanklin 9-1436 710 S.W. 12th Avenue Miami, Fla. HARRY GORDON PRESIDENT IKE GORDON FUNERAL DIRECTOR daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louig Schwartzman. Formal graduation will be held on Tuesday evening at Temple Israel. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg will distribute the diplomas to graduates. Siege! Unveiling The dedicdlion of a monument lo (he memory of (he late NATHAN SIEGEl formerly of 6-15 Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach uill tii^e place Sunday, May 15, at 1:30 p.m. at Mt. Sinai Memorial Purl; Cemetery, it'ith Rabbi Leon Kronish officiating. Mr. Sieccl i-urvived by hi.wife. Rose; daughters, M'< Edward Dok.'on. of Miami Beach. Mrs. Bernard Rose, of New York. Mrs. Meyer Schachnovsky. of New York: and .. Mrs. Anna Hutter, of Miami Beach. Relsd't'e.s. friends and members of the Knights of Pythias are asked to attend. NZWMZN FUNERAL HOME 1333 DADE BOULEVARD MIAMI BEACH JEfferson 1-7677 Edward T. Newman Funeral Director Miami Hebrew Book Store 1585 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beech — JE 8-3840 Hebrew Relipiou* Supplies for Synagogues. Schools a\ Private Use ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS There is,' ; j fight way and a. wrong wa; ay GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS Tour MEMORIAL CONSULTANTS "Serving the Jewish Community Exclusively" STUDIO and OFFICE 3249 S.W. 8th Street HI 4-2157 Al I1I.1ATE OF THt RMOVD ST CO. i %  \ Certainly you would not wait for sn emergency to rorce you into tsking out lire insurance this is something you consider calmly, and decide on after thorough investigation. Doesn't selection of .your fam.ly Memorial Plot merit the same judicious concern? Of course.Jhal's why you'll want to find out about Miami's finest ami %  oldest Jewish cemetery todsy. Mount Nrbo's Perpe.ual Care Fund (largest of any local J, cemefery), already exceeds $100,000. Serenity and loveliness is its keynote ... a place emr1 T! ^ ""P'"'' 0 '' you .. %  lender memorial of love for those departed. Details will be / \ 8'M'y given, in your home or by mail. \ / t I Mount Ne^o Cemetery, 5505 N.W. 3rd St., Miomi, Ho. Please send me ,„ lhe ul obUgation, full informalion on Family Buruil EsUUs in Mount Kebo. Nsme Address. ..... Jlwm Jl0o (!///// %  >/ SBOS Northwest 3rd Street %  G,y Zone. .State Phone MOhswk 1-7693 .—.-*



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* ^day. Merf 13, I960 keeping Beauty* It Academy First grade students of the Hebw Academy will present "Sleepi Beauty" on Friday in the Bool's auditorium. Translated into Hebrew by Mrs. UshanDah Spector Greenberg, ^t grade Hebrew' instructor, and Bpted for bi-tingual usuage by Is. Sarah Beckman, first grade glish instructor, the operetta ll be presented into the two lanJges by the students. he music is under the superIon of Mrs. Jack Dorrnerstag, ^ic director of {he Academy. bi Alexander S. Gross, princiwill introduce the program, kudents participating in the pro|m will be Mark Feit, Craig krr, David Abramowitz, Ellen ||uit, Judd Zisquit, Sherry Gert, Jay Ehrlich. Marc Rosenblum, Md Berger, Neal Wittels, Toya [ovitz, Shaul Shraga Gross, hey Berk, Marc Silverberg, Ralie Spitzer, Henry Bloch, Phyl^utstein, li Oster, Alan Kuczynski,' Jdha\ Nelson, Marcia Pozin, Robin kowitz, David Sternshein, Ira I, Arthur Belsky, Wendy Ehrlich, Martin Wasserman, Ranli Kout, Russell Galbut, Paul ^rrnan, Harry Silnicki, Mel Adrtichael Wolland, Sheldon DelMilton Schachter, Kenneth fcnstein, Irwin Brandwein and Auerbach. +Jewlsti IhrUUaai imi Youths Top Awards Injbers of the Hillel Alefs who I awards in the competitive |arship contests held throughhe Miami area include: ^n Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Miller, a $1,000 scholarship ly college in the United States, le Oratory Contest sponsored %  e Riverside Exchange Club. lompeted for this award with tstants from Miami and neighkg high schools, pchael Gorchov, son of Mr. and Sidney Gorchov, the Silver |ht Award in Mathematics, [second place in the Mathematscience Fair. ^thur Lazarus, son of Mr. and Murray Lazarus, chosen to Ibit his "Self-Planned Florida Be" at the Florida State Teachconvention and the Dupont ka hotel. Following this exIt. his display will be sent to I Ford Motor contest to compete J the $10,000 scholarship. pi three boys are students at imi High School. Page 9-A Temple Emanu-ETs Foundation School students present a special program in honor of Israel's "Bos Mitzvah." The presentation, offered last week, was written by Mrs. Howard Romer, Foundation School teacher. Dr. Irving Lehrman here expresses his approval of the perform ances given by the 3 to 5-year-olds. Left to right are Mrs. Helen Taylor, Dr. Lehrman, Rabbi Bernard A. Mussman, director of education at the religious school, Mrs. Miriam P. Anisfeld, head Fbundation School teacher, Mrs. Lilly Tamen, Mrs. Howard Romer, and Miss Judith Saville. Report Jews Vote by Special Interest NEW YORK (JTA) Jews, as other ethnic and religious groups in the United States, are influenced in their voting by special group interests, according^ to a study published this week by the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, formerly the Fund for the Republic. The study, by Dr. Moses Rischin, a member of the reasearch staff of the American Jewish Committee, found that the Jews in the 1956 election were influenced in their voting by policies on Israel. The study also concluded that by and large the Jews inclined to the Temple School Sets Registration Temple Judea nursery and kindergarten school office is now open for registration lor the fall term beginning Sept. 6. Enrollment is limited, and parents are requested to register between 9 a.m. and 12 noon weekdays in the school office. Individual classes will be held for each age level from three through kindergarten age, staffed ,by qualified personnel. Program includes music, arts, and crafts, science, indoor and outdoor play, a Jewish orientation program centered around the holidays, and a well planned first grade readiness program for the kindergarten. Democratic Party as the liberal party of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The report, bated on a study of the 1956 election, supported its contention that Israel was a major factor with Jewish voters by analyzing the Jewish vote in the Javits Wagner senatorial contest in New York. Although Jacob K. Javita i* Jewish, the study noted, "the 'Jewish vote' stuck to (Mayor Robert F.) Wagner, as expected though a number of Jewish Democrats and a handful of Liberals crossed party lines to vote for Javits." In New York, the study found, "Jewish voters Opposed the presffil^g* From BRAHMS to BARTOK You'll Hear the World's Finest Music 16 Hours a Day on FM 88 93.1 100 104 108 MC /Ny .... W A F [Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers From Soft Drinks to Savings Institutions MIAMI BEACH FEDERALj SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION ence of (Secretary of State John Foster) Dulles and (Vice President Richard) Nixon on the EisenMewer team." In summarizing the position of the Jewish voter in the 1956 election, Dr. Rischin declared: "Jews felt strongly about a Middle East crisis which, more than the Iron Curtain problem, might have been managed better by those Americans who were responsible for for-' eign policy. In essence theirs was a protest vote. Yet perhaps, more fundamentally, Jewish voting was' rooted in a strong emotional attachment to FDR, the liberal, the j enemy and nemesis of Hitler. For the second time most Jews Full Day Camp Sessions Added Camp Emanu-El summer day camp for children between the ag% of four and 12, announces that a special full-day session for four and five-year-olds has been inaugurated due to special request. The choice of full or half-day is optional, and the camp also provides the regular half-day program for youngsters. Registration for the eight-week program, beginning on June 20 and ending Aug. if, is now in progress at the Temple office and is presently open to children of Temple members. Registration for non Temple members will be accepted as of May 11, and the entire registration is limited to 100 campers. Transportation is provided .to and from the camp, which is held five days per week, Monday through Friday. The camp will be conducted at the Temple's recently completed branch school building at 77th st and Dickens ave. In addition to these facilities, the camp will utilize the playground area of the Biscayne Elementary School and the Biscayne Point and Normandy Isle swimming pools. voted for Stevenson, the man they saw as wearing Roosevelt's mantle. As the Javits Wagner contest showed, Jews did not care much whether or not a candidate was Jewish — especially in New York State, where they had occupied important offices for over a generation." the study pointed out. GIVE BETTER Be sure to see all that's new in. gifts electrical. The choice is endless... you can please everyone. Strikingly beautiful gifts for home, entertaining, and personal enjoyment. Big thrills in small packages! Selections are bright — prices are light. Nice to give rwonderful to get... for happier living, electrically. Right now—and for every gift occasion—see your electrical dealer first.. ELECTRICAL GIFTS for: yiKowv


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Pane 8-A Page 10-A *Jenist rttrkJi&n Friday. May 13. I960 Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINPilW We Couldn't Save Them-But Let's Not Forget Them COMMANDANT OF AUSCHWITZ. The Autobiography of Rudolf Hoot*. Illustrated. 285 pp. Introduction by Lord Russell of Liverpool. Translated from the Gorman by Corttantin* FitiGtbbon. Cleveland and Now York: The World Publishing Company, 2231 W. 110th tt., Cleveland. $4.50. ^THIS IS THE autobiography of an administrator, cool, efficient, devoted to duty. He was a man of unquestioned obedience and loyalty. He worked hard at his job —the building of Auschwitz, its administration, and at one of his most technically difficult tasks, the "gassing of two million persons between June July 1941 and the end of 1943." What was he like, this man whose name shall toll in the halls of hell as one of the greatest monsters mankind has ever known? His autobiography, written while he was in prison awaiting his execution, is revealing in many Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN directions. Even an armchair psychologist will have no difficulty picking out the elements of a bad childhood—the harsh father, the fanatical but superficial religious zeal (quickly shattered later on), the loneliness, the preference for animals as companions rather than people, the rigid-' ities and compulsive behavior already apparent. His self-portrait is rich in information about the totalitarian mind, an uncreative, unintellectual mind, good in practice, bad at theory, which finds its greatest virtue in obeying orders. In his own words, "Whether this mass extermination of the Jews was necessary or not was something on which I Could not allow myself to form an opinion, for I lacked the necessary breadth of view." It never occurred to Hoess to refuse to carry out the orders of Hitler and Himmler; the occasional misgivings he felt (sometimes he felt "uncomfortable," once he "shuddered") came to him not as an ethical problem, but as an administrative one—he was disturbed lest he communicate The Shadow of Bigotry in the 1960 Election Washington A RAB BOYCOTT and blockade tactics.^ ** affecting Americans as well as Israelis, may emerge as a national election issue. In 1956 both Republicans and Democrats pledged themselves to oppose foreign bias against American citizens. A Mutual Security amendment was subsequently adopted by Congress. It termed' foreign bigotry "repugnant" to American principles and called on the President to use his discretion in combatting prejudice. But the State Department continued appeasing the Arab states, surrendering to various anti-Jewish and antiIsrael pressures. It is likely that new commitments will be sought from UN Listening Post: I I:...;..: .v. Ml %  %  <*.* By SAUL CARSON Page from a Diary United Nations f CATURDAY: The United Nations • "beat" embraces an area much I broader than the East River enclave dominated by the 38-story I United Nations Secretariat' bldg. |0n this beautiful spring day. you ho down to see a picket line at J Pier 16. Men wun windswept faces walk in front of the shed where an Egyptian ship, the passenger-cargo vessel Cleopatra, rides the gentle tide of New York harbor. These are members of the Seafarers' International Union, protesting against the United Arab Republic's violation of the principle of freedom of shipping by blockading the Suez Canal against Israeli shipping and goods, by blacklisting foreign ships that trade with Israel. These men know what they are doing. They are protesting against 3 foreign government's action that has resulted in the blacklisting of more than 100 American ships. The jobs of upward of 1.000 American sailors are endangered. This is breadand-butter diplomacy. A short distance from the UN headquarters, the United States Court bldg.. Judge Thomas F. Murphy rules on a motion for a preliminary injunction that would make the picketing illegal. The judge rules the picketing is legal. He holds that it is a labor action, pure and simple. Sunday: Via television, you are in Cairo. You watch President Gamal Abdel Nasser. On the CBSTV program, "Face the Nation," he enacts his anger against the picketing in the New York harbor. There is no surprise in his attitude. But Nasser is asked also about another point. He is asked whether in fart he ever made an agreement with Dag Hammarskjold to permit shipping to go through the Suez Canal, carrying goods to or from Israel, when such goods are in fact owned by non-Israelis. He denies he ever made such an agreement. Monday: The Israeli Foreign Ministry reacts. At the UN, you read the answer to Nasser's statement from Israel. In effect, the statement declares, Nasser is lying. Israel virtually challenges Hammarskjold to say openly whether there ever was such an agreement with Nasser. Golda Meir says there was an agreement. Dag isn't talking. Meanwhile, at the U.S. Court bldg., in the dignified chambers of the Circuit Court of Appeals, oral argument is in progress. The Egyptian firm which claims that it owns the Cleopatra (there is good reason to believe that the real owner of the ship is the UAR government itself) wants the appellate court to issue a "show cause" order that would bar the picketing of the Cleopatra. Seymour W. Miller, attorney for one of the maritime unions, argues against the motion. The judge agrees with Miller. He declines to issue the "show cause" order. It is the third victory won in the Federal courts by the union attorney*. candidates of both parties. The picketing of the "Cleopatra" in New York harbor has dramatized the Arab boycott. The Arabs dogmatically refuse to permit American ships in their seaports if the ships had the audacity to have entered an Israeli port. There will be plenty of campaign talk about religious discrimination. All candidates are now busily deploring and disclaiming anti-Catholic and anti-Protestant bigotry. Yet the fact remains that Arab governments, with the complicity of the State Department, continue discriminating against Americans of Jewish faith. This issue will be argued at platform hearings of both parties. However, some Washington insiders question the value of such campaign promises: In 1956, Republicans and Democrats alike solemnly pledged to fill Israel's military needs. Israel is still waiting. Soviet Russian arms continue to pour into the United Arab Republic. The Democratic Party has appointed Rep. Chester Bowles, of Connecticut, to be chairman of its platform committee. Philip Perlman, U.S. Solicitor General in the Truman Administration, will be vice chairman. Both are supporters of civil rights and are strong advocates of Israel-American friendship. Vice President Nixon, whose influence at the Republican convention will be great, ha,s already assured Israelis of his sympathetic understanding. Premier BenGurion. luncheon guest at the Nixon home in Washington, was impressed. Mr. Nixon has also indicated to American Jewish leaders that he is making a detailed study of the impact on Americans of Arab boycott and blockade tactics. The leading Democratic Presidential contenders are all on record in strong support of Israel. Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, of Minnesota, is probably best-informed on the Arab-Israel issue, having served as chairman of the Near East Subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Another, issue to figure in election controversy is the civil rights bill adopted by this Congress. It has been pointed out that an anti-bombing provision., designed to protect synagogues from bigots, possesses a glaring weakness. The FBI is authorized to apprehend fugitives who flee across state lines to avoid prosecution. But the fugitive is then returned to local authorities for "prosecution" that could be a farce. A report to the Center for Study of Democratic Institutions, an activity of the Fund for the Republic, Inc., maintained recently that both parties believe in a "Jewish vote." The report cited the 1956 campaign. It said that "American electioneering has always given special attention to the ethnic and religious interests of the voters. History demonstrates that Americans bring to the polls their special backgrounds and pull down the levers congenial to their national origins and religious ties." Jews felt strongly about a Middle East crisis in 1956. the report said. By DAVID SCHWARTZ any of these feelings by his expression to his workers, and thns impair their efficiency. It is obvious from Hoess' itory that he managed to muster a detached kind of guilt for what he had done ft is the sort of guilt, which, had he lived, be would hav gotten over very quickly, for the book is filled with d* fenses of every kind. At one point he insists that it really the low caliber of the SS men which made the camps so bestial, that it was they who were sadistic and brutal, and that much of what went on "ostensibly in my name, under my authority and on my orders, I neither knew about nor sanctioned." At another point he accused the Capos, who were themselves prisoners, of cruelties! greater than those of the guards. Again, he complainj that, had he had the proper materials, the camps would! have been models of cleanliness and health. As you see, he was essentially an administrator—"a little bureaucrat," Lord Liverpool calls him in his excellent introduction arid sums up his character in one sentence: "although eventually he appears to have realized the enormity of what he did, he nevertheless took pride in doing it well I would urge you to read this book, as I alwavurge you to read every book which appears on this subjec. (or the same reason: if we could not gave them, we shall at least not forget them. But fhere is a second reason this time: it is that all royalties from this translation go to the Comite International D'Auschwitz, a charitable organic tion setup to help the pitifully few survivors of the Auschwitz camp. There can be no retribution on earth for six million Jewish souls; this is as close as we can get to justice—poetic or otherwise. Between You and Me: BORIS SM0LAR The AJCongress Rift %  HE AMERICAN Jewish Con gress is now facing a serious j internal rift which will have its reverberations at its biennial convention scheduled at the end of this month. There is a sharp division of opinion in its top leadership I with regard to the basic policy of I the organization. The conflict centers around an issue which has deeply troubled :he American Jewish Congress movement for the past years. The issue is: Should the AJCongress be more Jewish in its activities, or should the organization consider its civil rights activities as the backbone of its overall program. Dr. Joachim Prinz. president, insists on having the AJCongress expand its work in the direction of Jewish communal affairs. In this, he is opposed by a group led by Justice Justine Wise Polier—daughter of the late Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, founder of'the organization. Mrs. Wise, who is chairman of the executive committee, insists that the AJCongress must primarily devote itself to fighting racial bigotry. The verbal duel between both sides was brought to a head by a sharp letter addressed by Mrs. Polier to oficers of the organization. Dr. Prinz, infuriated by the contents of the letter, made it formally known to top leaders of the AJCongress that he would no longer be available for any position of leadership in the organization. He actually asked not to be nominated for a second term, although it was certain that he would be reelected president at the forthcoming convention. His letter of his intention not to seek reelection created quite a stir among his backers. At a special meeting of a subcommittee of AJCongress officers. he was asked to withdraw the letter and to stand for reelection. He agreed to comply with this request only after securing acceptance of hit condition that the AJCongress is to establish a Commission on Jewish Communal Affairs. • %  • % %  Walking Serves to Improve Two Constitutions A LADY IS walking all the way from ^ San Francisco to New York. By the time she reaches Times Square, she should have a good appetitie. The papers are giving the story of the lady walker a good deal of play, and[ I wonder why they missed the recent Israel walkathon, in which 5.000 people I walked 60 miles in two days. The oldest of the Israel walkers was a 93-year-old youngster, Joel Doron. To what does Mr. Doron attribute his longevity? He says he stays as far away as possible from doctors doesn t smoke, but he does like a little schnapps He spends a good deal of time in the synagogue, but still works every day at his craft which is leather working Asked if he would participate in next year's walk£!?'.J* tT*' .7" be „ w lkin te >rs from now when all of these others will be too tired to walk That's a real walker. The old fashioned kind Very rare today. Pedple years back used to speak of walking be good for the constitution — the personal constitutim that is. However, it's good for the constitution of f state, too. Consider Mr. Ben-Gurion, who, I am told, tak a brisk five-mile hike every morning. I am sure it M benefited the state's constitution, as well as bis privil constitution. Walking helped clarify the problems of sttl facing him. Another great statesman of former days. Thomj Jefferson, was a great believer in walking. He deplo the excessive horseback riding in his day. Jefferson a good horseman himself, but he thought walking better exercise. In bis day. Virginians were as crt about horses as people today are about their cars. A recent survey showed that in London the collec of fares on the city's buses had leas heart disease and cer than the drivers of the buses. The collector wl about, the driver is pinned to his seat all day. The parity of course might also be explained by the fact I driving a bus is more attended with tension. But I tt-, everyone will concede that walking, If not a cure-alU of of II,. 1. to Bo Re II,. of riH of fee I: MM fee pai I I vo leai m Bio eor e<\ IPul Plu [ m# lh, Mat)



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[Friday, May 13. 1960 +Jewlst fhrktlan Page 11-A -h LEGAL NOTICE 5= NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that i Inundersigned, desiring to engage In business under the rictitlous name of \.B.(". OFFICE MACHINE CO at .!'" s.W. I.MI Street, Miami, Fla., Intitrtf to register said name with the piM .*•( fii.uir c.TTin,,r -phc* '(iiini\, ilorfda, STANLEY BINE Suitowner 4/29. r i/-13-20 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVE.N that the undersigned, desiring to engage In Islness under the fictitious nan f MONA LISA / HANDBAQfc' nt 1216 >..rih .Miami Avenue. Miami. Florida Intend* (o rental?!' -—;t id mini.with Clerk -if the Circuit Court of I'.nilCounty, Florida M'PNA LISA. INC.. u Pla. corn. HEN SI" i|,AN, President FNYDBR VIM 'N-i Utorneya for Mua Uin. Inc. 4'2!i, .-./6-13-M IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLOR DA. IN PROBATE No. 44437-B IN REs Estate of ABRAHAM Tl RETSKY I <• • %  ased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS fo All Creditor,, and All Persons Havlu; I'lnir.iy or DemuBiln Against Said Estate: 1 You a"hereby nntifieil and requlrto present any -'innand demands ,.iich you may have against the esite of Abraham Turetsky deceased lie of liade County, Florida, to the Vint.v Judges of I mile County, and le the aame In their office* In the sunly Courthouse in I Hide County. Wldn. wtthln'elght calendar-muntha Jm the date of the first publication lii-"i'. or the aame M-III be barred. ROSE TCP.ETSKY, MURRAY TI'RETSKY, LEONARD I'.A Kit. Executor* 111,1,11' A. NEIWIP.TH Itonioy Daiie Federal Rid*. i: l-l.iKl'-i' St.. Miami, l-'hi 4/2H, :./6-n-20 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE LEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF [FLORIDA IN AND,FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. IOC 3934 lAYT. IN B. COWAN. Plaintiff HUE E. COWAN, Defendant SUIT FOR DIVORCE |: CARRIE E. COWAN n Enoch Watson 412 Wilton Street I'uliimhus. ftenrgla JU. I-ARKIK E. COWAN, are heretioil.fied that a Bill of Complaint Dtvice has been fll.d against anil you are required to serve a R of \oiir Answer or Pleading to Hill of Complaint on the plalnA Homey a, HiniMoND AND I" '-SON. Es.|s.. One Lincoln Road kildlng. Miami lleach M, Florida |<) file the original Answer or PleadIn III.office of the Clerk of the mil Court -on or before the 31st |y of May, 160. If you fall to do judgment by default will be taken |alnt von for the relief demanded the mil of Complaint. frills notice Shall be published once |< h week for four consecutive weeks TIII: .M:\VISII FI.ORII HAN. IlioNI-; AND ORDERED :il Miami, loii'la. this 27tli day of April. A.D. In E. H. l.EATIIEi:.MAN. ( eric. Ici-cnli Court. Dude County. Florida leal) I, KNEBDBN, 11. lUlty Clerk. ||ill.\lifND Win I'ScTN. Esqs. ne Lincoln Road I'.uilding Reach M. Florida. III.u-ii. v tot Plaintiff i t>, i/e-U-SO NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY lilVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In I-,,,sun.-.-i.n.ici the fictitious name of BEACH TOWER AQl'ATIC (1,1'B at 6061 Collhi* Aye.. M.M.-vtn, Flu., inJgnds L'*> register said kilne wij.lL the I'rk* T>f (he the nolnt of beginning: ALSO FORMERLY KNOWN AS: Lot l. leva the west 6 feet thereof. Lot 16 and the west 111 feet of Lot 17, (Block 1, ORATKiSY LAWNS, aciHiMint to the plat thereof, reconl1 ed In Plat Book 22 at Page 74 of the Public Records of Pade County. %  Florida, together with all Improvements situated thereon, ba boon filed against you, and ran je required 1 f"" v ur Answer with Fie Clerk of the Coirt and to serve a pps thereof unon the Plaintiffs' slfirnevs, BERNSTEIN MILLER, ISQS.. 1414 Congress Building. MlInl. Florida, on or before May IL Pl. If vow fall "> do so, Judgment h default will be taken against you % r the relief demanded In the Comlalnt. I: April 26. I960. 1 K B. I,EATMERTWA!, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dole Coiiniv peal) By: WH. W. BT.g'KINC. Deputv Clerk. 4/29, B/6-1S-20 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUO.CIAL CIRCUIT OF PLORIOA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. SOC 37341 JOHN T. SAVOR, Plaintiff, vs. ISABEL M SAVOR, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ISABEL M. SAVOR ADORERS UNKNOWN You. Isabel M. Savor, are hereby notified that a HiU of Complaint for DivofO* has been filed against you, ind you are ici|tilred to serve a copy oi MiniAnswer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attorney. C. FBEDKR1C BROWN, H07 dtiPont Hldg.. Miami. Fir. Ida and file the original Answer or Pleading In the office of the Clerk of Hie Circuit Court on or before the :tlst day of M:i;. liisu. If you fall to do so. Judgment by default will be taken against Vade County. Florida, (seal) By: E. II. LANWAY. Denut) Clerk. '•. FREDERIC BROWN iiT dirPoiit Huildins Miami 3, Ma. —FR 3-0602 Htorney r.ir PUilntiff. t IS, r,/6-n-2fl LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE BY PUBLICATION N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. WC 3SS6 MALTHA KI.VI Plaintiff MBLVIN A KINO Def< n Innl SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: MELTIN \ KINO 12184 Mitchell Avenue Los Angel.s KC, California You .II.herebj notified (li.it a BUI .f i 'ompl.iiiit lor Divorce has li.-ci. filed agi I, and you are required to serve H copy of your An>\\ci in pleading to Hi* Hill of Complnlnl %  n the pliilntlflAttorney. .loSIM'.ll \\ MALEK, 107 Lincoln Road, Mlam' Reach, l-'loii'lii ;i ti > I fil.the origina' Vnsw'.r or Pleading In the office of tin clerk of the Circuit Court on O' before the .list day of May, ii'Oo. if trot] fall lo do so. Judgment by default -vill locikcn aL-aliisi \ on for th*reHef demandetl In the Bill of Comilnlnt. Tills notice shall be published one. each week tor four consecutive weeks In THE JEWISH FLORIP1AN. DONE AND HONORED at Miami. Morlda. this 26th day "f April. A.P. 1!60. E ft LEATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit Court, Pade County. Morlda (seair By: R. H. RICK. JR., Deputy Clerk. JOSEPH W. MALEK 407 Lincoln Road Miami Beach. Morlda Attoine> for Plaintiff 4'2!i. :./S-13-2ft NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN h*t the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of Hill Kl'ILOINO at 1140 N.K. lK'.rtl St.. Norili Miami Beach, Florida, Intend to register sal.I name with Ute Clerk of the Circuit Court of I>ale County. Morlda. LOO KCPPER. CO* Owner HARTMAL. INC.. a Ma. corp., *.> Owner JACK I'OPICK. S f /' Owner 4/g. fi/tl-13-20 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HERHBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of KINt; MID AH PLATING I'll "Everything We Touch Tunis to Gold" at 24th Street, Hlaleah intends to register said name with th* Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. LONDON PLATERS, INC. a Fla. Corp BERNSTEIN .v MILLER Attorneys for Applicant*, Congress I'.uilding 4/29. 5/6-13-20 IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. NO. 49457.C In Re: ESTATE OF HARRY WEXI.EK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDTORS To All Creditors .ind All Person* Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You. and each of yon •!*• hereh.v notified and required to present an) claims and demands which you. or either of you, may have agutnsl th. ,-stai< of Harry v'siei deceased late of Pade County, Florida, to the Honorable County Judges of Dad.County, and file the same In their oftices in tinCount) Courthouse In Dade County, Klorida. within cluht calendar months from the date of the first nulilication hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the leaal gddresg Of the claimant and to lie sworn to and presented as aforesaid, or same will lie hailed See BeCtUm 713.14 of the 1S45 Probate Act. Paled May -. A I >. I960 HANNAH S. BLORTEIX o/o Klry Stone. 1010 Congress Rldg., Miami Florida. As Executrix of the Ijsl will and Testament of HatT) \\'e\|el lie, iSeJ i:i.itv STUM-: Attorney for Hannah W. Itlosteln. i;\.-i utrix oi Estate of lai r\ Wexler, de. east d I 1-20-2: NOTICE BY PUBLICATION N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 3979 PERRY V STEARNS. Plaintiff, vs. %  IJ.SIE (CATHERINE STEAItNS. Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE in ELSIE KATIIEIilNi: BTEARNS i i. Ralph Stearns Center Street LiidhnN. Mass. Vou i:i.SII-: (CATHERINE STEARNS in.hereby notified thai a HIII of Com •iliilut for Divorce lias been filed against you, and you are required to Judges of Pade County, and file th. same In their offices in the Count!) Courthouse In Pade County. Florida within eight calendar months from the date of the first puhlicat ion hereof, or lie same will be barred 1.' iCIS KCl'll l.ol"ls nicii. us Executor ol tile IfiStat* Ol BVH i'.llch, dci easel) MYERH, HE!MAN A KAPLAN \ttoi n.-\ ^ fi.r E\ci utoi II .II H W Fit si Street Miami, Morlda 4 |B.g, NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai he undersigned, desli Ing l business under the fictitious name o PAHTIME I'linl.S ai I 1140 West DUI. Highway. North Miami. Florida lif %  eniN to register said name uith thClerk of th* Circuit Coul'l of Dad. County, Florida. PASTIME PI II ii.s ,\ CONSTRl'CTION C< MPANY a Mot-Ida corporation 4/l2j-a, r./6-i: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Or FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 3607 CONSTANCE McCH'NE. Plaintiff, vs. IH'CH MARVIN McCLlNi:. 1 tefendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: HI'CH M MtVIN McCt.i.NF. ADDRESS INKNOXV'N PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that you are required to file an Answer to a Complaint for Divorce commenced against you with the Clesk >f the ourt and serve a copy thereof 4ipon Herman T. Isle. Attorney for Plaintiff. ISS Madeira Avenue. Coral Gables :r4. Morlda. before or on the 23rd day of May, I960, otherwise the allegations .f th, complaint will be taken as confessed by vou. Dated this ISth day of April. I960. Circuit Court. Pade County. Morlda E. B. LEATHERMAN. (lerk. (seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING, Peputv Clerk 4/22-29". 57B-13 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! solicits your legal notices. We appreciate your patronage and guarantee accurate service at legal rates Dial FR 3-4605 ior messenger service LEGAL NOTICE IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DApE COUNTY, FLOR.DA. IN PROBATE No. 4944H-C IN RE: Estate of HELEN SISSEI.M \N, I >• %  • % %  -a.s.-d. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having claims oi liem.indr Against bluid Estate: *" You are hereby notified and required to present any. claims ami d.-man i. which you may have aaint the estate ..r HELEN s'iSSRl.MAN deceased late of Pade County. Morlda, to the c.unjj Judges of Pade County, anil file the same in their offices In the County Courthouse In fiade County. Florida, within eight calendar mouths ironi the date of the first puliTication hereof, or the same will be barred, HARRY 8ISSKLMAN. Executor of the Estate of Helen Sisselman. Deceased. WILLIAM I BRICNNEi: Attorney 4211 Lincoln Road Miami Beach. Fla l/tf, :./6-13-2l> IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE Ne. 49545-C IN RE Estate of ABRAHAM lii.RIMiN, u/k-a ABRAHAM S. OORP44M. a/ls/a SAM OOKLajN I deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Prison Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified and required to present any claim.and demands which you may have against the estate of ABRAHAM OoltPON. a/k/a ABRAHAM S. (lORDOX. a/k/a SAM f IOR PON deceased late of I>ad County, Florida, lo the County Juil^en of Pad*County, and file the same in their officein the Count) Courthouse in lade County. Florida, within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same frill be barred. YETTA Cult DUN. Adminlsti atrig LEONARD .1. KATJ8H Attorney for Administratrix Ifi-'l' dul'ont BMg. Miami. Florida 6/6-l::--o-'.'7 NOTICE UNQER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVBN that the iindrrsigiieil. desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RI-'.ilAL MA.N'dll in 1.121 Pennsylvania AVe., Miami Beat'h int.let to r*| st.-r -aid name with the Clerk of tlie Circuit Court of Pade County. Florida. PAVIP KRATMAN I.OIIS KRATMAN HANIEI. KRATMAN WILLIAM I ItBKNNEK Attorney fin Applicant IL'n Llmoln Road o' B-11-20-27 NOTICE, UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business undet the fictitious name of PHOTO I-:NCIIANI;I: SERvncE at T N \V L'Tth Avenue. Miami. Florida intends to register said name with th. Clerk ol the Clraelt Court at I Vule i 'niint y, rToi Ida. CHABLEfl l: RODCER8, Sol.(iwner MARTIN OENET 420 Lincoln ltd.. Miami Beai h Attoraej toi Photo Exchange Bervlce 8'6-11-20-27 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY UIVEN that the undereuTned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of HALE PISVol'NT OFFICE SUPPLY at 262 Qlralda Avenue. Coral Cables intend to register said name with the Clerk of th.cinuit Com i of I>ad County, friorida. PAVIP OOLDMAN Wll.IJAM SCHANTZ 6/6-11-20-27 NOTICE UNOtR FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS'ITERERY CIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of PlTtPT LITNCHKONKTTE nt 1424 20th Street. Miami Beach intends to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ill.\PYf KNAPP LEONARD KALIRH Attorney for Applicant 1629 cTuPont Rldg. 5/6-tS-- ATTENTION AH0RNEYS! I OHE*On.\TIO\ OUTFtTS Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Ccdl THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at FR 3-4605



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Page 12-A +Jewist>ncr*flan Friday. May 13. ]& Syngman Rhee's Tigers of Wrath By MAX LERNER New Delhi The resignation of Syngman Rhee is one of the stirring events of a .-luring time. Consider what happened. The Koreans struggled hard to achieve their nationhood. Then they struggled again to preserve their freedom against the Communist attack from the North. They emerged from a bloody, drawn-out war to find themselves saddled with a government under an embittered, tyrannical old man who made a farce out of parliamentary democracy. He gagged the press, hounded the opposition leaders, rigged elections. Me branded all opposition as Communistinspired and sought to exploit the old battle cries of an earlier nationalism, using his services in the past as a way of shackling the present. The result, especially after the last rigged elections, was student riots moved by a courage born of despair. Rhee met them with bloody lepresslon. A hundred of the student demonstrators are dead, hundreds of others wounded and the jails filled with still others. But Syngman Rhee discovered that not even a strong man can continue to rule a people if they refuse any longer to be ruled. One recalls Jefferson's classic sentence: "The tree of liberty is watered by the blood of patriots." a- s-€ a- A NUMBER OF QUESTIONS COME TO MIND in assessing the meaning of what has happened. How about the role of the American government, both in keeping Rhee in power so long and now in his ouster from power? The Republic of Korea could not have survived the Communist attack without American and UN help, nor could it have turvived economically without what the American economy pumps into it. The American government tried to keep out of the internal affairs of Korea, yet one must say that American officials were too complacent ;.l>oui the shockingly arbitrary acts of Syngman Rhee and his regime. This was another instance where they made the mistake of caring more about the anti-Communist stance of the regime than about its honestly or its democratic fiber. It is not hard to guess that as soon as the riots and shootings took place the American leaders moved swiftly and decisively to withdraw their support from the Rhee government. That, at least, must be said for them. They acted late but they did act. We cannot know what Secretary Herter told the Korean ambassador but we may be certain that it was not gentle. We may also be certain that President Eisenhower would have found it impossible to pay his visit in June to a regime which had shot down demonstrators against it in cold blood. LHI S*l VdJ THERE ARE TWO GROUNDS ON WHICH, and on which alone, Caryl Chessman's death would make any sense. One is that the mills of the law grind slowly but majestically, and that the law must be allowed implacably to take its course regardless of what purposes it may serve. On this basis the question of how much reasonable doubt there is about Chessman's crime is of no moment or relevance. Questions of doubt have to do with justice, not with law. In fact (so goes this reasoning) once you allow all this balderdash about justice and humanity to enter, they are cracks which will undermine and destroy the law as an instituteion. That is what counts—the law as an institution, massive, unheeding, impermeable. The second is a related ground, but can be taken on its own merits. 1. is that a society sure of its motives and merits should not yield to any campaign of sentimentality, which can become a kind of blackmail of the emotions. On this count the tender-hearted, liberal-minded doeooders are a danger to any self-respecting society, since in their softheartedness they dissolve the stern cement of sanction and penalty vc THERE ARE THREE MEN IN INDIA today who get the greatest attention and publicity. Two are well loved although they have their caemies and detractors. The third is well-hated and feared although he las his defenders and partisans. They are Nehru, Rajogapalachan (Rajaji). and Krishna Menon. For the Indian intellectuals and common people these three have become symbols in one way or another of national greatness or of danger. An observer nearing the end of his period or residence in which he has come to feel a deep affection for the country and the culture may say that much of India's future politically hangs on what happens to these three men and the world views for which they stand. After Chou-en-lai's visit the problem of India may be summed up ir. two words— unity and growth. This would get general assent but the question is how India is to achieve them, if it is to meet the continuing threat from China which Nehru foresees for perhaps the next two or three generations. In responding to China's negotiation offensive, Nehru proved himself again a master political tactician—a skill for which lie may have little respect but in which he is far better than as an analyst of history, on which he prides himself? "(Thie la a Copyright Column) One-Day Campaign 'Blitz' Bolsters CJA As Volunteers Press for New Pledges Mew Young Adult Group New Young Adult Group has been established at the Coral Way j age. The Center is at 217S SW 78th Jewish Center under the aegis of j pi. Joel Kaye and Michael Breslau. The group is open to young persons between 18 and 25 year* of TT?AWLQRE Private Pool •each and Cabana Colony I0TEL At 24tfc ST. MIAMI MACS Writ* ror Information •nd Reservations JE 1-0331 Air-Conditioned Rooms Private. Beach and Pool Parking on Premiaea Cocktail Lounge Dining Room Entertainment Oaily Per Pero. Odle. Oec A successful one-day campaign •Witi" conducted last week by a corps of local business and professional men brought increased optimism to leaders of the 1960 Combined Jewish Appeal. According to general campaign chairmen Harold Thurman and Sajn Blank, incomplete returns indicate that the concentrated single day effort was instrumental in adding hundreds of sizable pledges to the campaign total, which now stands well over the $1,400,000 mark, it was reported. Seer** of volunHers parfieipaled in the "Businessmen's j Blitz," who reported to Tempi* Israel to pick up their assign| monts and then visited business associates in the area. Representatives of torn* 30 trades and I professions took part in the fastmoving program, returning aft, erwards with CJA checks and completed pledges. In commenting upon the general progress of Uiis year's drive which suports 57 local, national and overseas causes, Thurman said: "Our campaign is now approaching a crucial stage. We're past mid-point and in the home stretch. At this time there might be a tendency to lag. and slow up. This may well jeopardize all that has be e n achieved up to now and, worse of all. may sharply affect the future of Miami's Jewish community. A let-down now will cut short the flow of badly-needed funds to our health and welfare agencies." Meanwhile, plans went swiftly ahead to complete solicitations in the business prospects not yet covered in early phases of the campaign. Julian Weinkle. campaign cochairman heading the Trades and Professions, announced the Advertising Division annual luncheon meeting last Friday noon in the Everglades hotel. Jack Sandier and Lee Ruwitch are heading group. At the tame time, resident* t] Miami and outlying suburban I areas are being visited by B'aejf B'rrth volunteers, member* ej| the Jewish War Veterans ports, and workers from adjacent lym .l gogues and temples. The Women's Division. head by Mrs. Anna Brenner MeyersjJ continuing to receive assistance! from members of ORT, Hadassjkl Pioneer Women, and various terhoods. These groups are active in M liciting pledges from former coil tributers living in all parts Dade county. Robbins Pushed For Presidency The New England Zionist region recently honored Dr Morton J. Robbins, of Nashua, N. H and Miami Beach, physician and leader in national and international Zionist affairs, by naming him its "favorite son" candidate for the national presidency of the ZOA, according to an annnouncement by Lawrence S. Wolk, president of the region. Unanimous endorsement was given to Dr. Robbins, who spends six months each year in Miami. The resoultion. which was passed by the regional executive committee of the New England Zionist j region, emphasized that Dr. Robbins "has the distinction of holding | one of the highest national offices in the ZOA as one of the four na| tional administrative vice presidents in the country, and national ZOA chairman of the American Zionist Fund," and cited "his constant devoted service and guidance in the promotion of Zionism." THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs for our THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, I linens, dishes, drapes, etc AH proceeds go teerer ds topper) el •he Heme You may contribute, taki I a tax deduction or we wiN p.y cadi for IIIW. Remember... we are NOT a profit making oe ga ei i a ti ee ... We I ere bi k aaig yew n aw m i i t i. bay n. .V**' iy bet** ether, „. are bibjing yewreel H Manufacturer! I anal ja b ber s —laeaaoabei we can ON I ad yew oetcaat s er aalefiti. Pease call us for early pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.E. 27th Avenue NE 3-2338 Closed Saturdays FOR THE THINGS WORTH SAVING FOR Some things are especially worth saving for... a college education, a home, vacations, retirement. For the things you want, set aside a definite part of your income each payday. FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS will help by adding to your savings at the current rate of 4% per year. FREE TRANSFER OF FUNDS from anywhere in the Umted Slates. Juat bring in or mail your passbook. 8avtn# Accounts cneaa j through the 10th at the (Booth earn from tbslat. SfMsUBf-MOt DOWNTOWN 100 ME, 2nd AVENUE 1 BRANCH WSCAYNE SHOPPING PLAZA FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI EACI ACCOUNT | R S.| t 0 ff TO SIMM IT TIE FEPEIAl SWISS 4 LOAN IHSIIAMCE COIfOIAI.OI



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... u n j the lAJc ovnan s "World Lovely party at the Roney Plaza in honor of Mrs. Mildred Becker, who is off for a tour of the U.S. Guests included Mrs. Lillian Hershman, Mrs. Pauline Levy. Mrs. Lillian Rothschild, Mrs. Helen Getlitz, Mrs. Harry Kalodin, Mrs. Jen Corman, Mrs. Sam Greenfield, Mrs. Richard Bergman, and Mrs. Leo Lappin From Darmstadt, Germany, came Theodore R. Simmons, his jvife, Judi, and son, Tom, to visit his father, Mr. H. Simmons, and two sisters, Mrs. Theodore (Laurette) Sandier and Mrs. Leo (Bobbtte) Ackerman The travelers are scheduling a short tour of the U.S., and then back on June 6 to Darmstadt, where he is a contptroller for Stars and Stripes ... Estelle and Bill Brenner busy receiving congratulations on the Engagement of their son, William, jr., to Catherine Lake, of Albany, ".'.Y., with the wedding scheduled in the near future The young couple will live in Cincinnati. ci It was a Bon Voyage bruncheon Sunday noon at the Deauville hotel for Mr. and Mrs. Sol Pine and family, who are leaving Miami Jeach to live in Los Angeles Hostess at the fond adieu was Irs. Samuel Oritt, of 810 Lakeview dr. Also wished Bon Voyage: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis, who will cruising through the Mediterranean on the Corinia, and Mr. d Mrs. Victor Dorf. shortly to fly to Europe and return on the lauretania Hosts were members of the Deborah group of the liami Beach chapter of Hadassah. Lindy and Candy Lappin stayed at home in Quincy, Mass., fith their daddy. Dr. Leo Lappin, and sent their pretty red-haired nother, Roberta, to Miami to spend Mother's Day with her mom, Irs. Richard A. Bergman The girls declared that Roberta iras their present to Grandma ... Excitement aplenty among noted clubwomen here joining Jean Jprain Wilson, of The Miami News, for that tour of the Soviet Jnion as a result of Mrs. Nikita Khrushchev's invitation to U.S. (dies to come over and exchange visits with their Russian counsr parts What with the hubub of the last few days, and frantic ^lephone calls to the State Department in Washington, nothing's bsolutely sure, as yet But joining the group as the latest addiis Mrs. Louis (Bess) Glasser Others going—and the list seps growing—include Mrs. Sydney (Claire) Weinstein, Mrs. Leon (Hen) Kay, and Mrs. Ruth Gidney. %  >* Attention Ben Novack: Ruth Guthmann asked friends to meet \r for lunch the other day "in the basement of the Fontainepan hotel" It'll be a Jewish luau—lox and bagles Far Eastern style—at i home of the Buddy Logues, 500 SW 69th ave., on Saturday eveHg Guests will be seated on pillows at a long low table Hcense will burn, and Oriental music will be played Hawaiian Leis are being flown in for the occasion by Alfred haheen, Hawaii's largest manufacturer of women's wear jddy's his representative here Guests will include Kenneth Braidman and his May, Jack and ita Malamud. Burton and Patricia Streit, Mr. and Mrs. Bob land i Weinstein, and Al Ziegler and his Eleanor. > > Mrs. Howard (Isabelle) Grove was proudly introducing Ceil frossman around at the recent installation of the National Council Jewish Women Ceil's the wife of Howard's nephew She |nd her Edmund have just moved here from Biloxi, Miss., where recently completed a tour of duty with the Air Corps Ed's w associated with Burdine's of Miami Mr. and Mrs. David A. Hess, 2190 SW 10th st., hosts at a (other's Day dinner party at the Reef restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale honor of her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel K'oolf, of Fifth ave.. New York, who are vacationing at the Eden toe Other guests included the Hess children. Jay and Louise, tudents at the University of Miami, Edward and Florence Rud^ick, of Coral Gables, and Mr. and Mrs. Abe Katz. Michael Aaron Lieberman, a 1958 winner of the coveted National Merit Scholarship, has done it again Son of Mr. and Irs. Jerome Lieberman, 69 NW 40th ct., he is currently an all-A Student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Bell Telephone Laboratories recently spied Michael's work at MIT, and pave now accepted him in t heir highly exclusive cooperative plan Friends will be shouting "Happy Birthday!" to Morris Spiselnan, who celebrates his 90th at Temple Ner Tamid during Saturlay morning services Mrs. Murray A. Shaw lunching with her houseguests, her two ^isters, Mrs. Olga Frye and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Mannes, all of Jothajn Town. Mrs. Rose Farr off to Chicago to divide her time between her Ions and their families While there, she will attend the graduations of her three grandchildren—Philip and Beverly Coleman, rom high school, and brother. Seymour, from grammar school Speaking of the Farrs, when Aaron Farr went to pick up wife lyra at Mt. Sinai Hospital, after her successful seige with bronchial pneumonia, he was so busy putting flowers and cards |nto the car, that he nearly drove off leaving her at the door Reunion at the Richard A. Bergmans for those who accompanied them on the B'nai B'rith trip to Europe Motion pictures color brought a host of oh's and ah's from Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Greenfield. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hirsch, Jacob Labovitz. who took he pictures, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Falk, Mr. and Mrs. Charles BranDn, and the Allen Kauffmans. Birthdaze: Isidore and Beatrice Spolter, of 4260 Chase ave., Ire the proud parents of a new son born May 5 at Mt. Sinai fhe tot joins his brothers, Seymour, 18, and Arthur, 16. both students at Yeshiva University in New York Grandparents are Ir. and Mrs. Morris Stein, of Gotham Town And—Bris Tuesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack (BarIra) Gordon on Palm Island for Jonathan Henry Gordon born last reek—Election Day—at Jackson Memorial Hospital Jack's in he May 24 runoff "for School Board Adorable announcement of Arlene and Herbert Krensky's new lie Lou. J \ Ijewjisjh Floridian Miami, Florida, Friday, May 13, 1960 Section B Leading Miami Clubwomen Will Bring Executive Skills to Council's Sessions MKS. STANLEY C. MYUS MRS. JEAN C. UNMAN Heading the local committee on arrangements for the President's Institute is Mrs. Jean C. Lehman, founder president of Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations, a past president of Greater Miami Section. National Council of Jewish Women, and recently appointed one of five judges of the Miami Herald's seventh annual "Club of the Year" contest. On Mrs. Lehman's committee, bringing to the institute their knowledge of Council affairs, are several other women who have served as president on Section or division level. Mrs. Aaron Farr, past president of the Southern Interstate Region, now serving on the national board, will be chairman of the reception to be given Wednesday night. May 25, at the Seville hotel. Mrs. Dorothy Stone and Mrs. Nat Kempner will take care of the invitations to the reception. Mrs. Samuel Gertman. immediate past president of Greater Miami Section, will be in charge of hostesses; Mrs. Raymond Rubin, immediate past president of Shores Division, will supervise transportation from the airport to Miami Beach on Sunday, May 22; Miss Minnie Feinberg, Section's executive secretary, will coordinate all clerical needs and Mrs. Howard Grove will be in charge of publicity. Mrs. Sidney Lewis, recently-installed president of Greater Miami Section, announces that free orange juice will be served to all members of the Institute day and night. Council of Jewish Women Plans Institute For Presidents on Beach May 22-26 National Council of Jewish Women will hold a President's Institute at the Seville hotel from May 22 through 26. This is the first gathering of its kind in the 66-year history of the National Council of Jewish Women, an educational and welfare service organization with 110,000 members in 240 Sections throughout the country. The NCJW's last biennial convention, held in Los Angeles in March. 1959. decided that the Institute was needed. The reason: the job of heading a local Section of a women's membership organization with a diversified and farflung program has come to require an enormous amount of managerial skill. Whether the presidency of Council Section falls on a housewife and mother who never held a job before — or on a former lawyer or secretary or scientist — the post carries with it problems that go beyond her experience. The Council decided that the modern technique of "group dynamics" — applying methods learned from psychiatry, business management and other disciplines to the leadership of women — would enable the Section presidents to do a more effective job. At the Institute on Miami Beach, the local leader will receive four days of intensive training in how to strengthen her organizational structure, methods of group leadership, principles of supervision, and methods of organizational and program planning. The women will have to face such questions as "How do you train your possible successors?" "How do you encourage participation by different women, and hold down the 'overparticipants'?" "How do you handle past leaders who don't want to let go of responsibility?" "Personality conflicts in the board of directors." Competition from other organizations," "How do you set a goal, and maintain morale while working for it?" At the Institute, most of the presidents' time will be spent practicing the principles being taught. In morning and afternoon work group sessions, each local leader will be faced with typical problems and asked to show how she would resolve them, will pose such problems to others, and will be a detached observer while others engage in this role-playing. Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, of Coral Gables, a vice president of the National Council of Jewish Wornen, a member of its national executive committee and of its national board of directors, will also take an active part in the President's Institute. Mrs. Myers has gained prominence for her leadership in civic, communal, education and welfare activities. Prior to her first election as a Council vice president in 1955. a post to which she has subsequently been reelected. Mrs. Myers served for five years as chairman of the national overseas committee. She is past president of Council's Southern Interstate Region and of its Miami Section. Mrs. Myers has held positions of leadership in service areas affecting the State of Florida. She is a member of the District Board of the Florida Department of Public Welfare, and served as board chairman from 1949 to 1951. She is a member of the Florida State advisory committee for recruitment of social workers. Among her numerous activities at the present time, Mrs. Myers is a vice president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and chairman of its community planning committee. She also serves as a member of the national social planning committee of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, a national organization with headquarters in New York. Significant among her other activities. Mrs. Myers has been chairman of volunteer training for the American Red Cross, vice chairman of the study committee on family and child care needs of the Dade County Welfare Planning Council, president of the Jewish Family and Children's Service o£ Miami, a member of Florida region of National Conference of Christians and Jews, and co-chairman of its women's group. In January, 1958, Mrs. Myers was the recipient of the "Community Hcadliner Award" presented by the Greater Miami Alumnae chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, a journalists' society. She is an honorary member of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. Alph Eta chapter, o£ the University of Miami. Mrs. Myers' latest reelection to office as vice president of the Na' tional Council of Jewish Women took place at the 23rd national biennial convention of the organization, held in Los Angeles in February, 1959. Helping to "build" houses in Israel during the sale of Israel Bonds at a dinner honoring Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz last Saturday night are Oeft) Miss Janice Revitz, teen-age daughter of dinner chairman Maurice Revitz, and Mrs. Mayer Abramowitz, wife of the spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Center. Members of the gathering helped to build nearly 39 houses in Israel by purchasing $116,000 in Israel Bonds in honor of Rabbi Abramowitz.



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Page 2-B *• Jewisi) ncrkfian Friday, May 13. I960 'Harmony 1 Theme Of Installation Harmony" is the theme of the eight chapters and coordinating council of the Jewish National Home for Asthmatic Children when they meet in a joint installation on Sunday evening at the Everglades hotel. Harmony in mtg will be the contribution of the eight presidents ju.-t completing their tenure in office In true barber shop fashion, they will harmonize a medley of •0O9, written by installation chairman Mrs. Irvin Goldstein. Harmony in work and spirit will be the keynote of the installation •ceremony conducted by John B. Orr. jr., former representative in the Florida Legislature. Taking over their "conductor" assignments are these new presidents: Mrs. A. Dayan. Miami Council of Presidents; Mrs. Bernard Greenstein. Breath of Life chapter: Mrs. Murry Jay. Greater Miami chapter; Mrs. Lee Poliner. Lorber chapter: Mrs. Milton Koch. Miami Beach chapter; Mrs. Albert Botway. North Dade chapter: Mrs. Anthony Gecbele. South Broward chapter; Mrs. Julius Kranzdorf. Peshkin chapter: and Mrs. Albert Kramer. Harmony chapter. A combined "purse" to the "tune" of over $20,000 is expected to be sent to the Jewish National Home at Denver. Funds will help the seven Miami children now at the Home, as well a> the research for millions of asthma sufferers throughout the world. Miss Virginia Doran will be guest soloist of the evening. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Goldstein and co-chairman. Mrs J. William Baros. Shortcut to Shortcake Made Possible With Dromedary Delicious Date-Nut Roll With your favorite frozenfresh fruits and berrw-s available throughout the year, there'* no longer any reason to go by the season in planning welcome treats su< h as shortcake. And vrtth vacuum-packed Dromedary Date-Nut Roll waiting fresh and flavorful on your pantry aiielf. there's no reason to bother with baking, when this dark, dellcioua desjert cake can provide an instant, ready-toserve shortcake base with no fuss or bother. M nie with crisp, chunkv walnuts and the world's choicest .<. Dromedary Date-Nut Roll adds new delight and taste dini-iision to this popular dessert, providing rii h, lua inns ft.ivor -.rust to the fluffy delicacy .;' whipped IT a:n and the tang of berries or fruit. Ease of preparation makes Dromedary Date-Nut Bhortrake the happy r to the problem of entertaining guests or providing family with a truly un1 1.1! dessert one that is sure tn evoke a chorus of compliments for you whenever you serve it. What's more, thia is only one of literally dozens of w.ivs to UM versatile Dromedary DateNut Roll for everything from simple, wholesome anacki to elaborate party treats, Youll find it particularly welcome as a satisfying appetite appeaser when your youngsters need a quick pick-up in energy after school or after play: you'll find it a tempting standby, as well, for toasted teatime sandwiches, palate-pleasing parfails and a host of othr RMatttme and bet ween-meals favorites that you can depend on to liven up your family menu. Of particular importance ii many households is the fact that Dromedary Date-Nut Roll, as well as Dromedary Orange-Nut and Chocolate-Nut Roll, are all strictly kosher, displaying the OU seal of kashmth on the label that tells you they're made under the supervision of th? t'nion of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of Ameri'-a. Yaul find these popular products at leading food stores everywhere, and since they keep fresh and ous indefinitely in their \ u uum-sealed tins, it's a good idea to put in a good supply and keep them handy on your kitchen shelf. DATE-NIT SIIORTf\KE 1 tin Dromedary Date-Nut it,.11 1 cup heavy sweet cream 2 tablespoon* confectioner-.' sugar I teaspoon lemon juice 1 pavka;r fro/en-frrsli whole strawberries (or equivalent in fre4i berries) 2 bananas, sliced Chill dale-nut roll In refrigerator to facilitate si %  • remove roll from tin and cut into eight equal slices. Add sugar and 1-mon juice to cream and whip till cream holds soit I. v one slice of date-Ill t roll on each of four •* rvill • plates, top with berries, sliceil banana and whipped ire add another layer of date-nut roll, fruits and cream and eft I until readv to I Pioneer Women In Events Here Pioneer Women. Club 1. held its Independence Day Mother's Day celebratlOrfWednesday-'evening at Kncseth Israel Congregation. Mrs. Louis Beckerman was in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Joseph Krantz is president. • • • Farewell luncheon will be held Sunday noon at the Raleirh hotel by members of Pioneer Women. Club II. according to Mrs. Irving Liftman, president. The luncheon will honor Mr. and Mr* Hyman Arent. of Miami Beach. He is director of the Ninth Street Singers. Mrs. Sarah Singer is chairman, and Mrs. Nathan Bookspan is in charge of arrangements. Announced will be a scholarship for an outstanding Israeli student in honor of Rahel Ben-Zvi. The scholarship will be in the name of Mr. I mil Mrs. Arent. Program of enterainment will include Mrs. Sonya \ Weiss, folksinger. During her recent stay in Miami. Mrs. Sidney Leff. national president of Pioneer Women. awarded a citation to Mrs. Miriam Wolfson in appreciation of her many years of dedicated service to Jewish National Fund." Mrs. Wolfson is one of the seven founders of Club II. • • • Mrs. Milton Green, reinstalled president of the Greater Miami Council, has called an open meeting for Tuesday. 1 p.m.. at Miami Cedars of lebanon Auxiliary Erich Fromm's ":Jhe Art of Uv-I ing" will be reviewed by Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg on Tuesday I I noon at Beth David Auditorium'. The function is being sponsored by Cedars of Lebanon Hospital Auxiliary. In charge of tickets art Mrs. M. E. Glasser and Mrs. Jerrj Weiss. Beth Sholom Honors Teachers Teachers of Temple Beth Sho-1 lorn religious school will be guests of honor at Friday evening serv ices, according to an announce-1 ment by Rabbi Leon Kronish, spir-1 itual leader of the congregation. The temple youth group, Beshty, will read the service in honor gfl the teachers who taught them when they were students at the Beth Sholom religious school Mrs. Herbert C "Bloom, director of the Temple's nursery school, will I kindle the Sabbath lights, and Her bert C. Bloom, the Temple's edu-l cation director, will read a special! prayer. The board of education and PTAI jointly proclaimed Friday u| "Yom Hamoreh.*' Teachers Da?| at Beth Sholom. This observant! is part of a nation-wide tribute pn>| posed by the American Assn. for| Jewish Education. Beach Federal Savings and Assn.. 401 Lincoln rd. Chairmei for the coming year will be nounced. Social Club Installs Officers Mrs. Milton Weiss was installed last week as president of the Dade County Council of PTA's at ceremonies in Bayfront Park Auditorium. David Kleiman was elected pres ident of the recently formed Tolna Social Club. The organization, numbering some loo members, i.s composed WH-rv -evwv A TRADITION IN JEWISH HOMES SINCE 1837 Served in a glass or a cup... There's Yom Tov spirit in this famous tea... "flavor crushed" for fullest strength and stimulation ... richer taste and pleasure with your fleishigs and milchigs and between meal refreshment. TETLEY TEA Certifu'd KmJier under ttnet Rabbinical Supervision -w** -**of persons who formerly lived in Tolna. Kiev. Russia, and their descendant.-. Other officers elected are Sara Rappaport. vice president: Nathan Badat. treasurer; and Mrs. A. Otchet. secretary Appointed co chairman of the -octal committee are Mrs. Abraham Orlick Mrs Charles Collins, and Mrs Nathan Badat. Hospitality chairman 1David Prebluda. and program chairmen are Charles Steurman and Charles Collins. Officers will be installed Sunday afternoon at the home of Mrs Abraham Orlick. 2146 Prairie ave. In charge of information iNathan Ba. J at. 710 Lenox ave. Installing officer will be Charles Steurman Cream Cheese And Lox ... the truly Jewish delicacy! And your lox (or anything else, for that matter!) tastes even better when it's served with WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE TempTee has the traditional quality and taste you expect. Light and delicate, with rich, freshcream flavor—so downright delicious any and every way it's served! And TempTee is so spreadable, it's incredible! Spreads instantly, even when ice-cold! Never tears bread, never breaks crackers! Handy 4-ounce and economical Bounce "flip-lid" containers |Uit flip, dip, ond spread I /6*y>7ee \prfR XREAM €• %  %  -tn* In Miami it's FLORIDA-FOREMOST DAIRIES tot Htrne Delivery Phone FR 4-2621 The great name in dai'y products FRANK J. HOLT, Manaoer Card Party Tuesday Eve The Anna Miller Circle. whose project is helping Crippled Children at the Harry Anna Home. I matilda. Fla will have a card party on Tuesday evening at the Miami Beach Elks Lodge. Mrs. Robert Lew. is president. Another Fin* 'SteaAfifondi Product AtM rafrashini catena free Sugarine SWHTII TMAN SUGU m MO fOOt VMM I iRMWdM ky *OCt*M to dUbftOT. MNMlfMl *i K Ut wit *tt. (It* IM botum, ,i>t Part Com •tatti konton. lL-lfc .UUMNHfC NOIIiniKihi AT rooo ITOMI IVUrrWNCM



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Friday. May 13. 1960 Jen is* tkrkUan Page 3-B Cardiac Tribute To Women's Auxiliaries Here At the annual installation luncheon of the Women's Auxiliary of Mt. Sinai Hospital last Friday at the Fontainebleau hotel, Mrs. A. Herbert Mathes was elected and installed as new president. Mrs. Mathes accepts the gavel from Mrs. Philip Lefkowitz. immediate past president. Samuel Gertner, executive director of the hospital, was installing officer. Brandeis Women Installation Set Brandeis University National j Women's Committee, Greater Miami chapter, will official launch its [new year in an installation cere|mony at a luncheon at the Algiers [hotel on Friday noon. Rabbi Leon Kronish will install CHARLES S. LAVIN ANNOUNCES NEW ORGANIZATION PLANS [CHARLES S. LAVIN, whose ieas have been editorialized in header's Digest, announces the addition of the famous Palm teach Hotel at Palm Beach, Florida. This is a truly luxurious jlace for retirement; the average ate being $86.50 per month per ersou, double occupancy which Deludes three meals a day. Single rooms are also available, special dietary kitchen and dinroom available at $1.00 per [day extra charge. [Reservations are now being accepted for our new Garden | Wing. Rentals start at $86.50 per month per person, which includes a lovely private room with running water, and three well-prepared meals a day. Also these guests may enjoy the same social activities as those in the main building. Regardless of your age, you can now join The Charles S. Lavin Retirement Organization, the dues being one dollar ($1.00) per year. This entitles you to a monthly bulletin and should a member come to one of our hotels as a permanent guest, he or she will receive a discount of $100.00 the end of the first year. the new slate of officers. They include: Honorary president, Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs; honorary vice presidents, Mesdames Harold Turk, Ben Zion Ginsburg, Sidney M. Schwartz; president, Mrs. Solomon B. Margolis; vice presidents, Mesdames Joseph Duntov, Max Smeller. George Stearn; treasurer, Mr. Robert Green; recording secretary, Mrs. Jerome Rado. Corresponding secretaries, Mrs. Sam A. Goldstein, Mrs. Rebecca Snetman; financial secretaries, Mrs. Louis Easton, Mrs. Joel Meyer; auditor, Mrs. George Levenson; chaplains, Mrs. Yaakov Rosenberg and Mrs. Morris Graff. Mrs. Sidney M. Schwartz, chairman of the day, has announced that the program will include a skit by the Brandeis study group under the leadership of its chairman, Mrs. William Maxwell. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Robert Green, Mrs. Robert D. Grossman and Mrs. Jerome Rado. For specific information regarding the numerous Lavin Retirement Hotels throughout the country, please write Charles S. Lavin as noted below. There is no obligation. Charles S. Lavin Lavin Palm Beach Hotel 235 Sunrise Avenue Palm Beach, Florida DEAR MR. LAVIN. Enclosed is my $1.00 membership fee. Please send membership card and monthly bulletins. Name ............•••••••••• Address < CHy .....••••• 3KIW •••••• %  MKS. SOLOMON MAKGOUS Tribute to the role the women's auxiliaries play in supporting NaI tional Children's Caruiac Hospital I will be given to workers by the I hospital's board of governors on Tuesday at the annual installation of officers of the various chapters at the Edeir-Roc-ttotel. General chairman is Bob Rubinstein, a member of the board of governors, as is Sol Goldstrom. | who will deliver the invocation. Main address at the installation ; will be by hospital president Richard I. Berenson. Presidents of the chapters who, will be installed by Judge Milton Friedman include Mrs. Edward | Fernstein, reelected by the Miami Beach chapter; Mrs. Philip Ben-1 dell, Miami chapter; Mrs. Sol Goldberg, North Dade chapter; and Mrs. Roger Grant, Flamingo chapter. Outgoing presidents, who will receive pins from Paul Rimmeir of the board of governors, are Mrs. Faye Weintraub, of Miami, Mrs. Jacques Assael, of North Dade, and Mrs. William Schmerer of Flamingo. Berenson pointed out that t h e chapters will be called upon to an even greater extent with the buildtag of the proposed new $2,500,000 hospital in the Medical Center. Assisting Miami Beach chapter] president Mrs. Edward Feinstein during the coming year will be ', vice presidents Mesdames Clementine Kemp, Benjamin Sharps, Nor-. man Kravis and Jack L. Dunne. I | Other Miami Beach officers will be Mesdames Julie Miller, Nathan ; Glass, Nat'Conn, Milton D. Dreyi fus, Henry L. Greene, Pauline Seitleman, and Gertrude Lachs. I Shoshana Group Installation Set Shoshana chapter of B'nai B'rith Women will hold its third annual 1 installation of officers on Tuesday 1 evening. May 24, in the Theatre. | room of the Diplomat hotel. Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz, president I B'nai B'rith Women, District 5, j will install as president Mrs. Newton Hofstadter, and the following officers: Vice presidents, Mrs. Milton Fandler, Mrs. Buddy Aronson, Mrs. Eugene Tannenbaum, and Mrs. Irving Finn; treasurer, Mrs. Joel Ribler; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Stanley Lambert; recording secretary, Mrs. Howard Sprechman; financial secretary, Mrs. Herbert Brautman. Guardian, Mrs. Walter H. Cohn, jr.; sentinal, Mrs. Harold Monuse; historian, Mrs. Herbert Katz; counselor, Mrs. Murray Skup; trustee, Mrs. Stanley Goldberg. In addition, honored guests for the evening will include Mrs. Frank Brandt, chapter service officer and Mrs. Alvin Wank, president of the Broward North Dade Council. The evening's entertainment will be a surprise revue directed by Mrs. Roy Garret and Mrs. Burt Greenberg. In charge of reserva: tions is Mrs. Buddy Aronson. Mrs. Philip Bendell, cf the Miami chapter, will have the help of vice presidents Mesdames Michael Blank, Martin Rubinstein, Henry Jacobson, Fred Bauer, and Jack Stone. Additional Miami chapter officers are Mesdames Ed Freed, Sam' Sctmrwolf, William Groner, Julius Propp, Jess Glance, Jack Apte, Bart Cohen, Faye Weintraub, and Joseph Socolof. The North Dade chapter, headed by Mrs. Sol Goldberg, w.ll have as vice presidents Mesdames Jacob Levitor, David Kurilz. Roy Amara. Jack Hodus, and Max Homier. Other officers will be Mesdames Mort Kargen, Rudolph Eigner, Mary Clark, Mary Mernagh, Herbert Comm, and Jacques Assael. At the Flamingo chapter, vice presidents working with Mrs. Roger Grant will be Mesdames Irving Whitman, S. Katzif, Ann Denmark, and C. Cornelias. Also filling officer roles will be Mesdames Sidney Katz, Diamond, C. Pont, E. Kaler, A. Simka, and William Schmerer. — DECORATION DAY WEEKEND GALA Reserve for Shevuoth June 1-2 Cantor Abraham Wolkin & Choir • Dietary Laws Observed CkA&l B *m s IT'S FABULOUS-IT'S NEW U* •*•*•. Hew Ve* BROWN'S LEAVES YOU BREATHLESS! Glamorous New Jerry lewis Theatre-Club Magnificent Now Catolina Indoor Pool • Free Golf -All Sport* • Deluxe Accommodations + Supervised Day Camp Nile Patrol • 0tti—i Tttl • rebate lata • Skr Tf Tumi M4 Marha) • NMlft CM • IlMM lN • ftwt StaaU • [tenter Stnka • km N*r Kite (tek II II I I + Star-Studded Entertainment + Air-Conditionecl Comfort JERRY LEWIS TEENAGE FAN CLUB Mask & EaterUltiottat NlteM BUDGET SPRING RATES FOR RESERVATIONS callDIRECT WIRE: WAiklne 4-7470 m w wmm m %  %  > %  %  RDINE'S Shop MoncUy and Friday NiohN, Miami, Miami Baacti 'til 9:00 163rd St. Store, Ft laudardala, W. Palm Baach 'til 9:30 IIHTII AiiiJ<:n.\r*i Proudly Announces Her Affiliation with CAMP umiiiai OXFORD, FLORIDA BOYS and GIRLS 5 -15 AM Charm & Modi'ling IWwfor JUNE 21 through AUGUST 15 FOR BROCHURE WRITE OR PHONE Edith Applebaum 2220 S.W. 27tti Tarraca Miami, Florida HI 8-9454 Peggy and Mac Mermetl OR 1*00 S.W. 3rd Avamra Miami, Florida FR 4-5115 or FR 9-6883 I INVITATIONS WEDDINGS Bar BAS MITZAHS PERSONALIZED STATIONERY, MATCHES. NAPKINS, ETC. GRADUATION and CONFIRMATION Suggestions HANIVAH sen EM ALL YOU PRINTING NEEDS ENGRAVING, EMBOSSING PRINTING SOCIAL l COMMERCIAL Phone FR 1-7195 1600 S.W. First Avenue ..-• W V LOW COST HOME LOANS To Buy, Build or Refinance Inquiries Invited • No Obfigation 'Oni • H Net pade Federal (SAVINGS r, nc \ IOAN A^SOCI^TI^^ >r MIAMI aMHel JOSEPH M UPTON Pipsidi'i.t 5 6 Convnitnt Officti So/ve Dad* County J RESOURCES EXCEED 190 MILLION DOLLARS %  I HI •< %  %  T II %  HI %  %  %  •*< % 



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%  !" !" Pcge 4-B •JewlsHTcrkZian Friday. h Flcndujn Excluine YOUR M c ARRIAGE COUNSELOR ty i^atnueL.K^. t^Jiliny -• MIAMI'S NATIONALLY FAMOUS MARRIAGE COUNSELOR AND AUTHOR Divorce, though often necessary, is rarely pleasant. I know. For many years I have observed men and women go through the legal formalities of having the marriage terminated, and almost invariably one or both parties are left dejected and depressed. All this is understandable. The severance of the marriage ties — no matter how corrosive — leaves permanent emotional scars. There is loss of status and prestige. There is loneliness. And there is often financial insecurity. To matters worse, there is the depressing feeling that inocent children will suffer as a result of the home's being broken up. Yet in the vast majority of cases the marriage was emotionally dissolved long before legal proceedings were instituted. The law merely formalized an existing, intolerable situation. Dooming the marriage from the very start was a neurotic choice of mate. Too frequently the girl sought a substitute for a father, and the boy a replacement for his mother. In other cases the couple had nothing in common but an intense physical attraction. In still other cases, either the boy or girl, or both, had married with all sorts of romantic illusions, many of which were soon shattered by the more intimate realities of wedlock. The point is that all such marriages failed. Indeed, both husband and wife recognized that there had been a complete breakdown in communication, that they were no longer of one flesh and spirit. Tendency Toward Self-Blame Yet when it came to actually dissolving the legal tie. the parties were often filled with doubts and fears. Many verged on panic. They were reluctant to let go even though they knew the marriage was a hopeless failure and that they had reached the point of no return. Viewed logically, it was very much like a person's refusing to give up an active, corroding ulcer, or an infected, impacted wisdom tooth. It just didn't make sense. Finally there was a tendency to cling to a worthless husband or a neurotic wife because getting rid of them was a confession of failure, and no one likes to admit failure. More often than not there was a strong tendency toward self-blame. This was apt to be true of the person least responsible for the break-up. This may have been because of a heavier sense of responsibility, or a greater intelligence or sensitivity, or a heavier burden of guilt. Ironically, it was usually the individual more responsible for the emotional divorce who had fewer qualms about obtaining the legal one. One woman I know was burdened by a severe sense of guilt about her forthcoming divorce. "What had she done wrong?" she persisted in asking. "In what way had she failed her husband?" As the day of her divorce approached, she became increasingly apprehensive, her feelings of guilt more intense. Perhaps she hadn't bolstered up her husband's ego sufficiently? Perhaps she had paid more attention to the children than to him? The Wife Who Suffers Actually, this woman was blaming herself need!(••-]>. for it was her husband who was unable to sever the cord which bound him so tightly to his mother. It was he who drank excessively; it was he who made impossibly childish demands, and it was he. finally, who insisted on a divorce even though he knew or should have known that it would have a tragic impact on the children. Nevertheless, it is the wife who really suffers. She was ready to sacrifice her personal happiness for the sake of keeping the family together. But fate decreed otherwise. Because her husband lacked a conscience, because he was unwilling to make the necessary sacrifices and compromises to keep the home together, the couple are now divorced. There is a strong possibility that in time this long suffering wife may remarry and that the children will find a father who will give them the love and understanding they never had. There is an even stronger possibility that the husband will remarry someday too. If he does, he may again bring tragedy to his second wife and whatever children the impulsive union produces. Mr. Ilfef It miailoble fer %  rhrefe marriaf* ceeatefief •i file M#iffe Mtdical MV, im Miami Temple Ner Tamid and Monticello Park religious schools hold joint celebration in honor of Israel's 12th anniversary oi independence. Program included religious prayers, an Israeli movie, and a talk by Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. spiritual leader of Ner Tamid. Serving committee of the Temple PTA included (left to right) Mesdames Stanley Stein. Joseph Sherbill, Seymour Horowitz, and Phillip Du Beshter. Emanu-EI Will Graduate Pupils Temple Emanu-EI will hold 4ts annual graduation ceremonies for students of the daily religious school at late Friday evening service this week. Having completed five years of study in Hebrew and related subjects, the following graduates will be charged by Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader of the congregation: Jon Albert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Becker: Stanley Joel, son Men's Club Names Regent Men's Club of Monticello Park v..'.i sponsor a picnic at Greynolds Park on Sunday at 1 p.m. of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Bernstein; Manual Michel, son of Mrs. Regina Diner: David Mark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Epstein; Helena. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fruchter: Michael Irving, son of Judge and Mrs. William Halper. Steven Robert, son of Dr. and Mrs. Sherman R. Kaplan: BarryMartin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Katzen: Henry Sidney, son of Mr. and Mrs Julius Pohl. Bar ry Stephen, son of Cantor and Mrs. Israel Reich; Binnette Jane, daughter of Mrs. Edythe Sommer; Max Bernard and Samuel Arthur, sons


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Friday. May 13, 1960 ^JmlstncridHan Page 5 B Gov. Collins Cites High Schocl Student For National Honor She Brings to Florida A Miami high school student has received a letter of commendation from Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins. Gov. Collins early this week cited Miss Martha Alice Alpert, recent winner of a 1960 National Merit Scholarship. Wrote the Governor: "I wish to commend you, your parents, and your teachers on your selection for "One of the 1960 National Merit Scholarships. The hard work and ability which won you this outstanding national honor reflects great credit on our entire state." Gov. Collins added: "I am proud of you and wish you all success in the future." Martha is a senior at Miami Beth Israel Will Install Ladies Installation of officers of the Beth Israel Sisterhood will take place at a buffet luncheon party at the home of Mrs. Harry Schwartz, 3606 Flamingo dr., on Tuesday noon. To be installed by Rabbi H. Louis Rottman, spiritual leader of the congregation, are president, Mrs. George Hechter; vice presidents, Mrs. Harry -Schwartz, Mrs. Alexlander Moscovites, Mrs. Maurice H. Goldring; treasurer, Mrs. Henry [Groudan. Financial secretary, Mrs. David lermon; recording secretary, Mrs. II. H. Mellman; corresponding secretaries, Mrs. Louis Pollack and [Mrs. David Cohen; chaplain, Mrs. 1. Louis Rottman. A fashion skit satire will be enicted by members of the Sisterhood. Beach High School, and will atI tend Smith College in the fall. She and one other Dade countian were two of the 1,000 nation' %  wide winners of the scholarship, %  which pays up. to $1,500. depending upon need. Martha is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Alpert, 1345 N. Venetian Way, Miami. Her father is a noted attorney and authority on ] Florida accident law, whose book in this field is considered a standard source of reference. Her mother is a social casework expert and active in the National Council of Jewish Women. At Miami Beach High, Martha is a member of National Honor Society, Quill arid Scroll. National Forensic League, and copy editor of 'Typhoon," the school's yearbook. „ She also belongs to Beta Club, and was a member of the Future j Teachers of America and Latin 'Club. "I plan to major in languages j iat Smith," Martha said, quietly! proud of Gov. Collins' citation. Her j field of special emphasis will prob> ably be Russian—an area in which I he State Department and the fedi eral government are in sore need j of experts. An avid reader, Martha's main likes include Dostoyevsky, Baude-' laire, Oscar Wilde, and Swinburne. Her brother, Jonathan, is a stu'. dent at Nautilus. Seniors throughout the nation | are eligible for the National Merit! Scholarship competition. Some high schools make the competition a requirement. Students from 14,000 schools across the country took the examination last year. Architects Talk Convention Picks PR Firm At Art Lecture .Jorge A rail go and A.^ Herbert Mathes were to discuss contemporary architecture in the third program of a first annual Fine Arts I Series sponsored by the Greater Miami chapter of the American | Friends of the Hebrew University j on Thursday evening at Temple Beth Sholom. Arango is a well-known architect from Bogota, Calumhia. former I president of the Colombian NationI al Society of Architects, and was to discuss "The Architect and the ] Community." Mathes has just returned from a trip to Israel, and was to preview Woody Kepner Associates hag been retained to handle the publicity and public %  relation s for the 1960 American Leglfm "'WTional convention which will be held on Miami Beach Oct. 15 to 20. Announcement of the appointment was made this week by Lawrence E. Hoffman, president of the American Legion 1960 Convention CorpI oration of Florida, whose head| quarters have been set up in the Delano hotel. '* "Achitectural Developments in the Jewish State." Mrs. Laura Goldstein was to preside. Mrs. Emil Friedlander is program chairman for the entire series. MISS MARTHA AlPtRT Chapter Has Fond-Raiser Eleanor Roosevelt chapter of J'nai B'rith Women held a fundraising function Sunday evening it the Deauville hotel. Mrs. Gerrude Davidson and Mrs. Chester Jromley were in charge of reservations. Featured was Larry ISteele's "Smart Affairs of 1960." Miami Chapter In Donor Dance Mrs. Homer S. Rievman, president of the Miami chapter of Hadassah, reported this week on the I donor supper dance held by the chapter Saturday at the Carillon hotel. A cocktail hour was followed by I supper in the Cafe Le Can Can and a midnight performance of Lou Walter's "Folies Francaise." Mrs. Harold Abbott, fund raisi ing vice president, was chairman of the event sponsored by Hadah| sa.h's program of healing, teaching [ and research. Also on the committee were: Mrs. Arthur Willens, donor coor| dinator, Mrs. Max Handshu, Mrs. Frank Rose, Mrs. Herman Mintlicr, Mrs. Irving Denmark, and Mrs. Raymond Wolf. Cancer League To Close Season Mrs. Micky Kraus, president of the Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach, will preside at the first meeting since her installation as president for the second term when the group meets for luncheon Friday at the Seville hotel. The first project of the Women's Cancer League of Miami Beach was to purchase a $50,000 cobalt machine, the latest device for x-ray therapy in cancer treatment. The machine is now in operation at Mt. Sinai Hospital. The group's second project will be to provide four beds for terminal cancer patients at the hospital at a cost of $10,000 a bed yearly. Highlight of the last meeting until the fall will be the presentation of Samuel G. Kling, whose' topic will be "What's Happening to American Marriages?" Kling, an attorney, specializing in domestice relations, is a marriage counselor and regular Jewish Flondian columnist. S&t l0G\JST BROS Ry E ** %  Is the BEST' A, &, Lunchiont, Toaa. Reptlon, Banquota, Parti**, Dinner* ... from 20 to 2000 e*t*r*d In th* manner of th* Diplomat... an unhurrUd, var-attntlv, *ott-*DOk*n **rvlc* that makoa an *v*nt of your occasion. Best Fictional Work Awarded By Special Report NEW YORK The year's best American book of short stories has also been selected as the best American work of Jewish interest in the fiction field by the Jewish Book Council of the National Jewish Welfare Board. Philip Roth, whose collection of short stories, "Good-by Columbus," won the National Book Committee prize of $1,000, was the recipient of the $250 Harry and Ethel Daroff Memorial Fiction Award for the most outstanding work of fiction of Jewish interest written and published in the U.S. in 1959. Announcement of the award was made last week at the annual meeting of the Council held here. Samuel H. Daroff, of Philadelphia, presented the award. On the committee of judges were David Boroff, New York; Dr. Mortimer J. Cohen, Philadelphia; Dr. Judd L Teller, New York; and Dr. Trude Weiss Rosmarin, New York. The award to Roth was one of five literary awards carrying cash prizes totalling $800 for 1959's best works of Jewish interest in the fiction, poetry and juvenile fields made last night at the Council meeting. Q/oir Snauirxf is


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^Mfttm New Emphasis, No Rih~AK Leader 9m "V -r..i UH %  %  11 awetec £ tknr ifciMhas — tar :•'" %  ••< %  •::::.• .:.. % %  %  I '".••7 -:>•• %  ,t -.i,. ISSSSfl ao i^wah. Congress. *he n tan mvil 1 writ-usa fcssrssaa. State of Israel Bonds; *•"*• %  fcisjan, president of the MSar Miami Jewish Federation; e trrmg Cypen, Jewish Home fcr the Aged president; and others. M.-> Louis Glasser is chairman •--•-: and her co-chairman Mr* Harry Rogers. The occasion eonincides with the annual % % %  i-'t-.v., : -.he Florida Branch nal Women's League, of which is Mrs. Harry Conference chairman is Unhto Goodman. M*S. SARAH CZECH Miami Women Join 'Caravan' %  s* participants in the %  •** %  American ORT "cars** %  >*** May 1 from NM Ymk r:h Africa and the East JI a comhination tour RT vocational instal%  unno %  tnese areas. —tMSsati in the ORT caravan n the Greater Miami area UBM Rosenblatt. • N %  -. Mi Mrs. Florence tapper%  on. Miaau Beach. groop dl spend 33 davs m if. Tunuia. Morocco. S*iu*riand. ud Italv sang toss QRT "Je. inehnhng tie Syngalowt JSStsri 1 Av,v r %  fri sad best equipp. *-ai tromn* school in the enCouncil Officers To be Installed Mrs Alvin Wank will be installed president of Broward Nora Dade Council of B'nai B'nth Wornen on Sunday evening at the Chefs Steak House in Hollywood. Others to be installed by Mr.-. Gerald P. Soltz. president of B'nai B'nth Women. District 5. are Mesdames Stanley Goldberg and Paul Harrold. vice presidents; Elliot Herring, correspondinc secretary; Murray Skup. recording secretary; Albert Gordon, treasurer; and Frank Brandt, counselor. B'nai B'rith's Broward North 'Hade Cornell i> the coordinating ""it of five chapters, three in North Dade. one in Hollywood, .mil one in Ft. Lauderdale. In charge of reservations f" the Suiuiav function are Mrs. Elli>t Herring and Mrs. Stanley Goldberg. tire Middle East and built by Women s American ORT during the last few years. Mare than 3 000 persons i % % % %  %  %  1 the first are deft, Mrs. W3rkxm Lehman, sfcn %  s_ ournoJ Art Eriubittoo of Temple Israel snenv side her ~SoIl LSe.~ oasdttdMTlSSiS bers at the Temple last weekend. The show Daniel Lerme. with "Back Tors7J^~ led pa a rntna s. scuipturo and crafts by 50 lemtnn Two first prise VOTE YOUR CONSCIENCE VOTE W.R. HANCOCK Pal Lever 7-B. May 24 Endorsed by Herald, News. Sun



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Friday, May 13, 1960 +JewUtfk>ridlian Irs. Volpe Feted* tor Service Here L'M's dynamic "First Lady of Jusic," symphony orchestra manger Marie Volpe, last week was ftnored by Chi Omega as the kurth woman to will rfCQgnftinn the sorority's "Gallery of Worn-' at the university. [Mrs. Volpe. cited for her "dispguished service to the univer|y and the community," has been waging the symphony for 33 |ars. Her late husband, composernductor Arnold Volpe, founded orchestra in 1926. photo-portrait of Mrs. Volpe, pnted by Elmer Wilson, of DawGa., was presented to the un^rsity at dual ceremonies durthe symphony programs of 10 and 11. Irs. Albert Houck, president of Miami chapter of Chi Omega Jimnae, made the presentation |Dr. Charles Doren Tharp, vice sident and dean of faculties, accepted the portrait on beof president Jay F. W. Pearand the university. Mrs. Ford ichfield was master of ceretnies. Irs. Volpe joins three other llery" women who have refd similar recognition since They are Miss Mary B. Mer^t, dean of women, emeritus; Dr. ertha Foster, dean emeritus of school of music; and Dr. Mel; Rosborough. professor of Geran and chairman of the UM comjttee on religious activities. Page 7-B 'Genie 1 Awards Offered Here First annual "Genie Awards" .-program, to recognize and encourage achievement in the fine arts i among Miami Beach junior and senior., higi -si-'iool students* .was ; to be held Thursday, 8 p.m., in the Miami Beach Auditorium. "Genie" trophies, symbolic of outstanding performance, were to be awarded winners in several categories. "By giving youth an opportunity to display ability in the arts, we hope to encourage continued interest in amateur performances, and give recognition early in life to (hose seeking professional careers." explained Leo Eisenstem, president of the Exchange Club, sponsor of the program. 'rue Sisters ick Mrs. Perls Irs. Edmund Perls will be in-! Jed as president of United Or-i i of True Sisters, Miami 43, on i ^day at Hibiscus Temple. Br mother in-law, Mrs. Samuel' Istein. who is a past president odge Immanuel 1 in New York, be installing officer. rs. Sanford Emerman will be president of Miami 43. fie Lodge will be open at 11:30 and the meeting starts at IB. >th Tfilah lans Celebration Seth Tfilah Congregation, 935 ave., will mark Israel's 12th liversary of independence at a fcial celebration on Sunday eveOg. ^hairman of the function will be tv. Joseph Krantz, president of Mizrachi Branch of Miami ;ach. Mrs. Marie Volpe (right) is honored for 33 president of Chi Omega Alumnae,'made the years of distinguished service to the Univerpresentation. Dr. Melanie Rosborough (left) sity of Miami and the community at cereand Mrs. Ford Denchfield (second from left), monies during the symphony concerts Apr. "10 master of ceremonies, look on. and 11. Mrs. Albert Houck, second from right. City of Hope Director Here Greater Miami chapters of the ICity of Hope will honor Dr. Alfred Goldman at a luncheon on Satur. day noon at the Saxony hotel. Dr. Goldman, director of the hosipital for heart disease at the City of Hope National Medical Center : near Los Angeles, is in Miami Beach for this week's meeting of 1 the American Assn. for Thoracic Surgery. Dr. Goldman, acting in behalf of the City of Hope's board of directors, will present an award to Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, of 7834 Abbott ave., president of the Miami Beach chapter, one of five local groups throughout the nation to lead all others in membership expansion. The nearly 400 City of Hope I chapters across the country provide major suport to the free and non-sectarian hospital at Duarte, Calif. Another highlight of the program Saturday will be the appearance of Victor Marchesi, dramatic tenor and recording artist, and Olga Pavlova, lyric soprano, both of whom \\;11 be accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Harry Gli -landscape contest as "very discouraging," said the two month j kl^m.^!*.. lActrt The "Make Miami Beautiful" extension was decided upon by the nOVeiiy fUCO contest, originally schednled to Miami beautification committee in p^j. Q^gp^f y N. Shore Posts Registration Registration and re-registration at North Shore Jewish Center opened in all three departments this week. The nursery school accepts children between 3 and 5. Kindergarten enrollment is open for children from 5 to 6. Both nursery and kindergarten schools are in session from 9 to 12 noon. Monday through Friday, with bus transportation and supervision provided to and from school. Rita Fearnley, nursey school 1 teacher, is director of the school, j supported by a staff of trained personnel. Sunday and Hebrew school have completed their re-registration and are now open daily from 9 to 5 for registration of new pupils. At the fourth annual birthday dinner dance of the Coral Way Jewish Center are (left to right) Morris Fox, outgoing president of the Center; Leonard Putterman, incoming president; Mrs. Seymour Goldstein, president of the Sisterhood; and Roy Miller, reelected Men's Club president. This was the Center's first installation function in its new facilities at 2175 SW 78th pi. Contest Deadline Extended Ner Tamid Hears Building Bids Dr. Ben L. Fabric, president of I Temple Ner Tamid, conducted the formal opening of the bids for the building of Temple Ner Tamid this week. Among the final bidders were i Arkin Construction Co., Stobbs Bros. Construction Co., and Giller and Fryd. Groundbreaking ceremonies will I be announced in the near future. Present at the bid openings were Louis Cohen, building chairman, Marshall Berkson, Ezra Feingold, William Harris Sam Jacobs, Nathan Rottenberg and Maurice Zarctsky. !" ..in Ko *nii,„H end June 18, has been extended to the hope of encouraging additional |The celebration will be followed Ayg 2Q contest chairman Mrs E entries. "Interest picked up conA red plastic card, engraved in a i .fJ^lJl !" 8 !" !? J-SL !" "l Arthur Evans has announced. Mrs. siderably after it was revealed last I ffld letters with the inscription "5 Lag B'Omer. The entire funcan will be launched with Maariv Evans, who recently described i week that prizes outnumbered con! public response to the city wide testants." she said. ervices. W My Sheerest THANKS to YOU — the VOTERS Friends and Supporters of DISTRICT 2 (Precincts 117 thru 147 and 106& 107) For Your VOTE of CONFIDENCE in the First Primary. I Humbly Solicit Your Continued Support MAY 24 MARVIN "Red" CHRISTMAS FOR CONSTABLE, DISTRICT 2 Courtesy -Consideration Dignity P.I P..1 Adv. More." is now being produced and distributed here by the Krel Company. The card is inserted in a standard canasta deck to indicate that there are only five more cards to go. Behind the novelty idea are two noted Miami Beach clubwomen, Mrs. Inez Krensky and Mrs. Leon El. Mrs. Krensky is a past president of Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood, past president of Mt. Sinai Women's Auxiliary, and currently serves as national Alpha Epsilon Phi Mother's Club chairman. Mrs. El is a past president of Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood, and has been identified with many other civic and charitable causes. The company's officials indicated that all funds raised through the sale of the unique plastic cards will go to a charity designated by the Krel Co. Film Available Gratis A Brandeis University film in color and running approximately 30 minutes is available without cost to organizations and interested groups, Dr. Stanley Frehling, president of the Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami, has announced. The film, entitled "The Challenge of Brandeis," portrays <>uth and future of the first non sectarian Jewish sponsored university in the western hemisphere. PACE" MOTORS NOW IN HOMESTEAD BERNIE BLOOM General Manager PACE MOTORS PLYMOUTH VALIANT DESOTO CHRYSLER 523 No. Krome Ave. HOMESTEAD MIAMI Exchange FR 1-0489 HOMESTEAD Exchange Cl 7-3127 'TOGUST BROS > I I... HI V I IS t>


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Page 8-B *-JmistTkrkfiar Friday, May 13. l960 <2fn the r^cab ealnt o >f *^ocietu Miss Subin Now Mrs. Harold Barr vows were exchanged between Miss Paula Subin and :!d Barr in 6 p.m. ceremonies or SUMU", May l. at the Algiers hv.ei Rabbis Irving Lehnnan and L-. a Kr %  ;-.:sh officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mrs Frieda Subin and the late Mr. Benjamin Subin. 5900 Pine Tree dr. The groom is the son of the Leonard Barrs. 4400 Sheridan ave. Maid of honor was Man Rosalie ; German. Jerry I'dwtn acted as man. and Dr. Robert LtebesV -' and Mike Segal were ushers. The bride attended Miami Beach H -h School and the University of Miami. The groom attended Miami Beach High. Northwestern I'niverI'-.;• and :s connected with Jackson-Byron Dept. Stores. Reception and dinner followed at the Algiers hotel. The couple are on a honeymoon tour of Europe. Silvers, Cuttler Exchange Vows %  hi Marilyn Natalie Cuttler became Mrs. Jerome Louis Silvers in 7 I rr.. ceremonies Saturday. May 7, at the Fontaieebleau hotel. Rabbi Leon Kronisfa officiated. The bride is the daughter of Mr ard Mrs. Frank Cuttler. 1576 Dayfi":a rd. The groom's parents are Mr and Mrs, Charles Silvers. 6500 M Bay rd. Maid of honor was Miss Phyllis S brers. T;?r: Ellen Silvers was flowergirl. Mickey Gottlieb served Ml man. The bride chose a silk organza gt*D featuring a scoop neck outHaad wMk appliques and threeqcirter -cf-t he-valley over a Bible. Newh-wed Mrs Silvers attended the I r.:..r-,ry of Alabama and Ina. *here she belonged to Alpha Epsiion Phi sorority The groom is a graduate of the .-?:a Institute of Technology-. and %  jn engineer. Dinner and reception followed at the Fomainebleau The couple are y mooning in the midwest, and will live in Detroit. Mich. Bossaks Reveal Sandra's Troth Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bossak. 3894 NW 2nd ter.. Miami, announce the engagement of their daughter. Sandra Helen, to Bert Seth Adler. son of Mrs. Morris Adler and the late Morris Adler. Raleigh. N. C. Mia Bo>ak is a graduate of Miami Senior High School. She was graduated magna cum laude fp>m the University of Miami in 1958. where she belonged to Alpha Lambda Delta. Kappa Delta Pi. and Phi Kappa Phi She presently teaches third grade at Palm Springs Elementary. Mr. Adler is a graduate of Hargrave Military Academy and Mars Hill Junior College. He attended the University of North Carolina and the University of Miami where his fraternity was Tau Delta Phi He is a Mason and a member of Bnai Brith. The couple will be married June 19 in Temple Israel. They, will make their borne in Raleigh, where Mr Adler is in business. jfeH^B w W \" HL_ ^H MflT i^pr* j^jU fy K 1 I i I W* mas. MAUKICt WAlDOtf Gifts Offered At B'nai Sholom W-rner-Kafcn IS. H 4*010 BAM Club Tikvah Slates Party Tikvah of Pioneer Women will hold a Mothers Day party M Stadajr, 2 ?m.. at the home of M.'< Ruth lli-s Wagner, president. SW uth st.. M.ami. An Is movie will be shown. Special Fete Due at Academy Prospective Kindergarten and first grade students with their parents are invited to visit the Hebrew Academy during "Get to Know Us Week" slated for May 16 through 20. During this period, students and their parents will have an opportunity to experience a full >chool day in the kindergarten and the primary grades. Guests and tors during the week will have lunch with the Academy students. Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principaL said that a special orientation meeting will be scheduled daily for parents, at which time the Academy's bilingual program of education will be described in detail. MR. ON THE PREMISES Zionists Slate Officer Election Election of officers and board members for the new year was slated as the business agenda Thursday evening of the MiamiGables Zionist District. The meeting, chaired by president J. David Liebman. was to be held at Zamora Jewish Center. In addition to the election, the district forthcoming annual ko>her barbeque June 19 at the home of Mr and Mrs. Murray Levine. 6161 Miller rd.. was to be discussed. Two recent Israel films were to be shown after the busine>> por tion of the meeting. ^FUR STORAGE i o4 eat t*r,, c /*€ 6o*j d. enr • L;-^.. ortvoflmq r oM Phone JE 2-2387 % ORGAN MUSIC FOR YOUR WEDDING CEREMONYfty JOSEPH SCHIEIB.MAN "* •• ParlaW. Org M FR 1-6387 MIAMI WHOLESALE CORPORATION 127 N.E. 9th St. FR 3-S737 rARKIMfi • ff.LL^ ^V "' % %  %  l*D REHOCEtlNI fl/Vu \ '-' z WW£ "* T lit L -.CCS IOA0 MIAMI |£ACn • RONALASWirrZ. MTOttrs ACfOMfON CKAMHOM NOW AVAILABLE For Parties, Luncheons, ate. CALL 10 AJK. 1| p.* ONLY MA 1-AS1J. SAL THE HANDYMAN pa*MMies, cmrpnt try, •Wctik. etc can mm l—. r^irs. m MI$ CORAL GABLES COHVALESCENT HOME DAY CARE AVAILABLE %  A I^Art ( ; fnri AtmM ^ for Thost TOM Lovt I ^J^\ %  tCUtflEO NU.S.HC scavKi • SFfCIAl DIETS OBSEIVED %  '" • AU ROOMS ON OaOOMO HOO "MVATI aATH^SNV^ ROOt •XSST22S•*WNO KKX SPACIOUS GtOUNOS SC.EENEO PATO j I 7060SW Brh ST., MIAMI. FLORIDA M0 6-M26



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Friday, May 13. 1960 rjewisti fkrHlan Pag 9-B %  THE room was full of welldressed women, with so many of them wearing attractive hats. It was impossible to see them all, but perhaps you can recognize yourself or your neighbor by a description of the hat. There was an iridescent red b-traw with a wide flat brim, trimmed with red roses and nylon tulle. Another was composed of white flower petals in a pixie style complete to the pixie point. This hat had a band of green foliage. Another was a pink straw with a wide contoured brim completely covered with rows of ruffles in soft pink straw. One small hat looked 1 i k e a tight nosegay of small spring flowers, and another small hat was a tight turban of white with red polka dots. One was a black velvet bow with a bit of glamorous veiling, and still another in the small group was a white lace pillbox. To match the dress was a crown of fabric loops, and another in beige silk organza roses with one large orange colored rose. At the other extreme was a high white spiraled turban, which continued low over the face. It was trimmed with a white flower and veiling. Then there was the oversized cloche of oyster white "fishnet." Gold and orange silk organza print was draped over a narrowbrimmed sailor styled hat, and there was a small pink lace straw encircled in silk organza roses. In whites was a floral wig; a deep straw cloche with a huge orange flower and orange veiling; a straw brim on a crown of violet clusters; a draped cap of Hilk organza with a single matching fabric flower; and a turban pillbox pleated into a spiraling effect with a small red rose on the side. There were many other lovely hats of various shapes and colors, and it seems clear that women are "dressing up" more this season, than we recall in the past. • • • THE Greater Miami Section, Na%  tional Council of Jewish Women, held its annual Installation luncheon last week at the Everglades hotel. Music was the theme of the afternoon with paper "instruments and notes" used for the table decor. Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, who installed the officers, wove a musical theme into her installation speech by comparing harmony in music and club work. For the occasion, Mrs. Perlstein chose a black silk linen sheath with a wide V neckline. Under the collar of her dress was a wide, double tiered ruffle of white organdy that fell into a cape effect. Her hat was mushroom shaped and draped in white organdy. Chairman of the day was Mrs. Ben Zion Ginsburg. She wore a two-piece ensemble composed of a brown and white scroll print sheath and a matching coat. Her accessories were in orange, and her hat was of small orange flowers. Mrs. Stanley C. Myers gave the Invocation in a linen sheath with a silk organza jabot insert. Her hat was in white straw. Presentation was given by Mrs. Jean C. Lehman in a yellow and white stripe shirtwaist style bordered at the hem in a deep band of white organdy. Newly elected Section president. Mrs. Sidney L. Lewis, chose an orange and white linen sheath with a bateau neckline. Her pichire hat was in white, with its J wide brim of stiff white organdy.' Also at the head table were; Miss Minnie Fcinberg, executive secretary, wearing a yellow and white Cloony lace dress, and Mrs. Nathaniel Levin, an honorary director, in a soft blue two piece Italian knit ensemble. Making a gift to the Combined Jewish Appeal, Eleanor Youdelman (left) presents a check for the proceeds of the annual President's Ball conducted by the Young Adult Jewish Council of South Florida to Isidore B. Simkowitz, president of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, which sponsors the Council. 0 Summer Tour Nearly Filled David Goodwin, tourism chair-1 Silver and Askelon, and receptions man for the Southeast region, | at the ZOA House. The two-week Zionist Organization of America, tour of Europe at an additional National Women's League Conference Opening at Eden Roc Hotel Sunday Mrs. Albert Fried, of Brooklyn, N. Y., of the National Women's j League, United Synagogue of I America, is coming to the Eden j Roc hotel Sunday, Monday and j Tuesday for the conference of the Florida Branch to serve as guest speaker and conference consultant. Mrs. Fried attended the NYU School of Commerce, received her 1 B CS and MA degrees in second1 ary education, and has completed i her studies toward a PHD, while i pursuing courses in Jewish adult studies. She has taught bookkeeping and commercial law for eight years, taught as sisterhood president in Marine Park Jewish Center of i Brooklyn, is a former corresponding secretary, membership chair"SUIL and JJOL* SUMMER CAMP JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST • DAY CAMPERS • BOARDING CAMPERS • BOYS and GIRLS Psnal t s rt s i Air CesMHeaea Limited teejlitrotio. JI i-3271 Jl %  -10M OXFORD ON THI IAY 1204 WMt Av*, MIMI t*acfc Cgjppina Al Un Bast" mmmml ^^ mmmmmmmm .^ announced Wednesday that the $525 summer trip to Israel and Europe being arranged by the organization is nearly filled. The trip, which is being sponsored by the ZOA region at low cost via chartered airline, "is being promoted as part of a drive by the ZOA to bring tourism to Israel and to assist in the country's economy." Goodwin said. The group will leave on June 20 and return July 28. It will spend three and a half weeks in Israel %  and two weeks in Europe. Included, in the $525 fee will be a sightseeing tour of TelAviv, a day in Kiar Rabbi Narot In Book Review Rabbi Joseph Narot will review 'Hawaii," by James Michener, at the last in a series of book reviews under the aegis of Temple Israel Sisterhood. The function is due Monday, 11 a.m., at the Temple, preceded by a coffee hour. Mrs. George A. Graham has been in charge of the Sisterhood project. $175 will include Rome, Florence, Venice. Lucerne, Zurich and Paris. I peslace aestaatf) CM 1st C 2nd ClfeMM #T COMff* • Mack wrHiGotd Print • Royal BkM wW. C*M • Own with CM • Rod with Cold • White witkCoM Your contribution will bo donated to various charities BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT — NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hahashruth of Florida Rabbi Dr. Isaac H. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSING — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS MOOERN [QUIPMNT I fUKNISHINGS HtEWOOf BUILDIHS 310 Collins Ave. Ph. JE 2-3571 Miami Beach personalized service at the blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money ... un 6-1233 24-hour service except tosh hashono and yom kippur man. and leadership training chairman, t Mrs. Harold Levitt, president of Florida Branch In Training, has announced the following chairmen for the conference affiliated Conservative Sisterhoo'ds: Conference chairman, Miss Lillian Goodman; co-chairman, Mrs. Harold Berney and Mrs. Ralph It Hanlcin: program, Mrs. Jack Sher| man; arrangements, Mrs. Harold Hirschfield; arrangements cochairman, Mrs. Mary Morse; decorations, Mrs. Ben Shapiro; hospitality, Mrs. D. Spiegelman; hostesses and pages, Mrs. Norman Leif. Gift shop, Mrs. Milton Feller; I nominations, Mrs. Al Mechlowitz; publicity, Mrs. Milton Weinstein; secretaries, Mrs. Al Schwartz and Mrs. Libby B. Rosen; services, Mrs. Harold Reinhard; timekeeper, Mrs. Fred Blank; reservations. Mrs. Irwin Becker; registration, Mrs. William Dickson. Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El will be hostess and tender a reception at the opening of conference Sunday evening. Mrs. Alexander Kogan will be chairman of reception hostesses. Mrs. Ben Zion Ginsburg' is in charge of arrangements, and Mrs. H. Protzel is in charge of refreshments. MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME 24-Hour Nursing Service • Special Dieta Strictly Observed • All Rooms on Ground Floor "Centrally Located" 1st. 1951 Jewish Style Cooking > Spacioua Grounds • Reasonable Rates • Specializing in Core fo the Elderly and Chronically III 335 S.W. 1 2th AVE. Ph. FR 4-5437 & FR 9-0278 LEO ALLEN, Director A-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 94401



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MM Page 10-B +Jewisti Flcrid/lan Friday. May 13, I960 GMJCC Plans Sunday Sessions to Highlight Senior Citizen Programs Here MARSHALL WISE Marshall Wise, district manager, Social Security Administration, will be keynote speaker at the first annual Senior Citizens conference of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center on Sunday at the Miami YMHA. 450 SW 16th ave. Theme of the conference, "The Changmg Role of Senior Citizens," will focus on what older adults can do to help themselves in today's society. Following the main speaker, there will be seven workshops, which will allow over 300 senior citizens who are members of the Center to discuss, in small groups, matters of vital interest to them, it was announced by A. Budd Cutler, chairman of Ihe Department of Service to Senior Citizens. The seven workshop* with their consultants include Health, Dr. Samuel Gertman, section chief. Division of Gerontology, University of Miami medical school; Leisure Time Activities, Efram H. Gale, executive director. Greater Miami Jewish Community; Housing, Haley Sofge, executive director. Housing Authority of the City of Miami; Employment and Social Security, Dr. Michaei Goodman, executive director, Jewish Vocational Service; Family Relationship*, Arthur Kalish, assistant director, Jewish Home for the Aged; Religion, Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, Temple Adath Yeshurun. In keec Left lo right are Sen. Spessard L. Holland, of Florida, Congressman Paul Rogers. Port Everglades Disfrict, Congressman Dante Fascell, Miami District, I. Paul Pedraza, executive director, Florida Ports and Foreign Trade Council, Adm. John M. Will, USN (ret.), president, American Export Lines, inspecting scale model of 18,100-ton passenger liner SS Atlantic. the first liner ever to sail from there on a Mediterranean cruise. Characterizing the departure as an important forward step in maritime progress of the South. U.S. Seaboard Offers Reduced Fare Package Trips While late lingering wintor visitors to Florida are reluctantly .starting their northward trip home aboard the Silver Meteor and Silv;r Star. Seaboard Railroad is offering reduced round-trip fares and "In keeping with the theme of selfSenators George Srnathers and Florida "package vacations" to direction, all arrangements durSpessard L. Holland of Florida, appeal to vacationers coming to in K ,ne conference will be handled this week hailed the sailing of the the Sunshine State during spring. b >' club members themselves. Spe18,100-ton. all-airconditioned econimer and autumn, when hotel cial entertainment by a senior citomy class liner from Port Everrates are the most advantageous izens choral group and a folk and glades, about 25 miles from Miami, l( budget conscious holiday seeksquare dance group is being planers. ned. The low 30-day roundtrip fares, The program is being coordinatBcaled to coach or Pullman traved by Charles Plotkin, director of cl, are in ellect between May 1 ,he Department of Service to Senand Nov. 15. and are also availior Citizens, as a culmination of atle from Florida points to norththe year-round program for older :rn cities, too — a fact which VV.J. adults sponsored by the Greater Ficht, general passenger agent of Miami Jewish Community Center, .nil in Miami, is quick to a beneficiary Agency of the Unit' out will help make Floridefl I '* und of Dade County and the ians' vacations to New York. New Greater Miami Jewish Federation. England, Canada and the West cimc well within the scope of bargain travel, too. Atlantic to Sail Oct. 16 from Port Everglades in First Ocean Crossing Here American Export Lines' new AtOct. 16 on a 35-day cruise to 11 lantic will be the first U.S. flag eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean passenger ship to sail from Florports, ida on a transatlantic voyage, and "This voyage is important in more ways than one," the Florida Senators declared in a joint statement. "Besides being the first transatlantic American flag sailing from Florida, it points up the growing importance of the South as a tourist source, and underscores our State's awareness of the benefits accruing from up-to-date port facilities. gers from New York nine hours to iisee in Miami or swim in Flnrida sunshine, before the ship leaves During the cruise there will be a busy program of shipboard entertainment with dancing to the strains of Meyer Davis' celebrated music. In addition, an extensive schedule of shore tours operated by Thos. Cook A Son will be avoilable. "Travel agents as well as our own offices have a wide choice of inclusive tours, combining our reduced rail fares with hotel and sigr.tseeing facilities, at Washington, Philadelphia, New York and Boston. Canada's Sagicnay River cruises and extended tours to the Far West are also available," he said. tain There is much of scenic and historic interest to be enjoyed along the Seaboard route — in Finn,la itself, and through Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia." he added. "Seaboards coach facilities include the latest-type center lounge coaches, which have comfortable lounge accommodations adjacent to the passengers' reserved, reclining seats, other relaxing lounges include the tavern "Becoming more popular each observation car where beverages and snacks are available. year are Seaboard's theater tours in New York City, which include silver streamliner transportation to and from Manhattan, hotel accommodations, orchestra tickets to four outstanding Broadway hits, and sightseeing. Group tours are available on certain dates, but in ROBERT BLOCH "Seaboard d : n : ng cars art also noted for delicious food, including several regional specialties, and a genuinely 'Old South' N, Shore Men Install Bloch brand of hospitality. Robert Bloch was installed prcs"Both the Silver Meteor and Silideal of the Men's Club of North dlviduals may leave on exciting ver s,ar have a registered nurse Shore Jewish Center during Fritheatre tours whenever they aboard at all times — a service day evening services last week, choose. particularly appreciated by mothB U 1 er and dad who take the young-1 Rabbl Mayer Abramowitz. spiriThe 20-knot Atlantic is now undergoing a $2 million improvement program at the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pa. It will sail on its maiden voyage on May 16 in American Export Lines' express and cruise service between New York, Spain, Italy, "We are happy, too, that an Greece and Israel. American liner will be the first The improvement program inpassenger ship to make a Meditereludes the installation on the Upranean cruise from a Florida port. per Deck of one of the largest outThe trip offers an excellent chance door pools on any transatlantic for the double barreled pleasure liner, as well as a steel and glass combining a Florida vacation and solarium on the Sun Deck fitted Mediterranean cruise." I for various recreational pastimes. Cruise calls by the 880-passcnHie vessel provides a variety of ger, 20-knot vessel will include tastefully appointed public rooms Santa Cruz, Teneriffe. Canary Isfor 'he passengers' traveling pleaslands; Gibraltar; Palermo, Sicily; ure Comfort, convenience and Piraeus. Greece; Haifa, Israel; -afety have been stressed in equipMessina, Sicily; Naples and LegPng the ship, which will be ophorn, Italy; Cannes, France; Barerated by a crew of veteran marcelona, Spain; and Funchal. the > nc >" s a nd staffed by experts in port of Medeira. a Portuguese is culalne and service, land in the eastern Atlantic. The The liner will operate as the only Atlantic returns to Porl EverEconomy class ship designed, conglades on Nov. 20. itrticted and staffed to offer the The voyage will originate in New manv advantages of modern AmerYork on Oct. 13 and end there lcan l,vln at sea Ever >' state Now. 23, a 41-day Mediterranean room u has P" vat f facilities inel.Klcruise. The Atlantic sails from '" 8 showPr %  basln and tollet New York at 12 midnight, Oct. 13, ^ any are t|U,ckly convertible from and arrives in Port Everglades on bt drooms I( > spacious living rooms. A number have sofa-berths that Oct. 16 at 8 a.m. It will be there convcr illU) until 5 p.m., thus offering passensize beds large three-quarter •Seaboard streamliner travel to sters with hem the north and back, in itself, is a definate part of the relaxation which every vacation should contails. on a northern va tual leader, also installed David cation. A passenger assists passengers with travel deservice agent, Mi,,er and Irving Greenberg. vice ith ir.>,.t A*. Presidents; Martin Kurzweil. trcasTHANKS to the VOTERS of District 2 FOR YOUR VOTE OF MAY 3 PRIMARY. I SINCERELY SOLICIT YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT MAY 24. GEORGE F. ROGERS YOUR CONSTABLE, DISTRICT 2 11 YEARS OF KNOW-HOW Pd. Pol. Adv. urer; Alex Friedman, secretary; and Leo Sonnenbhck, financial secretary. Board of directors are Fred Beckman; Sol Weiss, I. Granoff, Hyman Cohen. Jack Burstein, Archie Levine, Sam Schiffman, Sol Brager, Ben Ledwitz, Al Mechlowitz, Sam Hohauser, Harry Hoffman, Al Sherman, Sam Pearlman. Louis Reinstein, Jack Fisch, Ed Stern, and Nat Cohen. Chairman of the board is Ben Alter. Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood Temple Adath Yeshurun Sister hood will hold a general membership meeting at Arthur Maisel's restaurant, 18288 Collins ave., on Wednesday evening. Elections will | take place. Mrs. Burt Smokier is program chairman. Guest speaker will be a beauty expert, Miss NatIII" of the Colonial Inn BeautySalon. "QUALIFIED BY EXPERIENCE" Re-Elect JUDGE Sidney L SEGALL DADE COUNTY SMALL CLAIMS COURT I. Adv.



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Friday, May 13. 1960 ***/#> R*rlHl*ir< Page 11-B People Shape Leaders, But HerzfShaped Them Tim (i the last in a two-part series by Dr. Afahum Goldman*, president of the World Zionist Organization, who offers his view of Dr. Theodor Herzl. founder of the Zionist movement. Last week marked the launching throughout the world of the 100th anniversary celebration of Dr. Herzl s birth. The Jews possessed an unfortunate gift of complicating the simplest matters, and Herzl taught them instead to see great problems in large perspective. His adversaries, in their polemics, enumerated a thousand difficultiees and pinpointed multitudinous doubts concerning the practical application of his design. Herzl was contemptuous of details. He lived in a rarefied atmosphere and the realistic arguments of the opposition, it seemed to him, were quite unrelated to his understanding and concept of the Jewish problem. Only by properly understanding the motivations of Herzlian Zionism are we able to understand the man Herzl, and the strange spell he cast upon his generation, and upon the spirit and imagination of the Jewish people generally. Fiercely Proud Man What brought Herzl to Zionism was primarely not so much compassion for the persecuted Jewish masses and concern over the future of Jewish culture, both of which were alien to him, or consciousness of the historical continuity of the Jewish people, which preoccupied Anad Ha'am and Pinsker, and others like them who had emerged from the depths of the Jewish past. What motivated Herzl was his hurt pride. The plight of the Jews of France, integrated into its vigorous culture, fully emancipated, and yet imperiled by the Dreyfus affair, made him suddenly and desperattely aware of the indignity and futility of the Jewish condition, the Jew being nowhere master of his fate, everywhere a guest at the inn. A fiercely proud man, he could not surrender to this indignity. His only alternative was revolt. His Zionism was revolution. Pride was new as a primary motivation in Jewish life. Herzl's predecessors in search of a solution were impelled by concern over Jewry's physical insecurity and spiritual future, over the denial of emancipation, as well as the assimilation resulting from emancipation. They were impelled by Jewry's collective experience. Herzl was wholly detached from the collective destiny; he was an acclaimed dramatist, a celebrated writer, a social lion, integrated in his environment, enjoying its material comforts. Nonetheless, precisely because he was a proud man, he felt personally dishonored whenever the Jews were dishonored. He experienced the disgrace of Dreyfus as his private disgrace. Thus his personal problem and the Jewish problem became inmeshed. The identification was completr. If his own pride was to be restored, the pride of his people had to be restored, too; if his own hurt was to be assuaged, the hurt of his people had to assuaged; his personal self-fulfillment required the Jews national self-fulfillment. Royal Phenomenon He was a royal phenomenon in modern Jewry -*of noble appearance, poise and speech, a born aristocrat. All who met him remarked on the overwhelming impact of this first Jew in generations to address kings, ministers of state, exercisers of power on equal footing, not as a petitioner, but as a spokesman for his people. The world was familiar with wise Jews, successful Jews and even powerful Jews; but not until Herxl appeared had the modern world met the proud Jew. That is why his personality held both Jews and non-Jews enthralled. His bearing and conduct by defiant example undid 2,000 years of exile and ghetto exist-1 ence. He demonstrated, in his' own person, the transformations the Jew would undergo after the' Zionist solution had been achievS ed. He spoke as though the Jews were already a normal people,! and addressed the word, not as j the leader of a Utopian Don Quixotic movement which, objectively speaking, is what Zionism was in his day, but with the mature confidence of the political chief of an established state. Thus his behavior transformed the behavior and status of all Jewry, a peo-' pie without rights, without a I homeland. He spoke and acted as though there no longer existed j Jewish homelessness and indignity. This, too, was a sign of his genius. Genius is not, as is generally suposed, expressed wholly in intellectual endeavor. It also is revealed in the character and psychological composition of a man. It may assert itself in the impression he makes on his environment. This transformation of the Jewish condition, which Herzl proposed conceptually, and his anticipation of the future image of the Jew, which he demonstrated in his own person, were the boldest assertion of his genius, and explain his great power over the Jewish masses of his day. Ghetto Jewry possessed a nobility of the spirit — rabbis, philosophers, poets. But it possessed none in the social and political sphere — no men who could move freely, and as equals those wielders of power and shapers of the destiny of nations. His impact upon Jewish communities was in inverse ratio to their status in society. The more oppressed the community, the greater his impact upon it. He was all the more effective because he was fundamentally so alien. The aristocratic personality always maintains some aloofness, never identifies itself fully with the masses. Psychological Release The Jewish people experienced Herzl like an awesome natural phenemenon. His legend spread quickly; it had been hong since a Jewish leader enjoyed such fathomless adulation. Only a child then, I still recall my mother's convulsive sobbing on hearing the news of his passing — although she had never seen hinv He provided Jewry with an opportunity for psychological release. The Jews had great spokes men before him — men like Sir Moses Montefiore and Baron Ginsburg, the so-called "ahtadlanim," affluent, respected, sin cere people, who used their con nections in high places to allev iate the plight of their brethren. With an infallible instinct, the Jewish masses felt somehow that while these men spoke on behalf of the Jews, they did not really speak for the Jews. Herzl, poised, proud, impelling and confident even in the presence of potentates, inspired selfconfidence in the Jewish people, a quality lacking even in the emancipated Jews of Central and Western Europe. Just as his. conduct anticipated the Jew of the future, so the conduct of the masses that followed him anticipated the future image of the Jewish people. A people always shapes its leaders. It is not always that a leader shapes his people. Jewry as a political entity, a militant collectivity, reacting, demanding, urging, pressing, did not exist beNewly-elected officers of the Biscayne chapter of the American Medical Center at Denver were inducted at the organization's first annual installation last week at the Carillon hotel. Pictured at the luncheon, which featured a juvenile fashion show, are (left to right) Mrs. Jules Cohen, Mrs. Allen Winner, and Mrs. Jerome Goodman, vice presidents; Mrs. Ben Pascal, recording secretary; Mrs. Stanley Kaplan) corresponding secretary; Mrs. Jonas Katz, financial secretary; Mrs. Charles Berman, treasurer; Mrs. Marvin Haven, trustee; and Mrs. Donald Levinson, chaplain. On the dais (left to right) are Mrs. Barry Bockman, chairman; Mrs. David Kramer, president; and guest of honor Ruth Rosenberg, who formed the group. Over 150 members attended the affair. Nursery and kindergarten of Temple Judea will hold its eighth annual closing graduation exercises on Friday, May 27. Lous Schwartzman, executive director of the Bureau of Jewish Education, will be principal speaker. Top row (left to right) are Benjamin Udoff, education director; Mrs. Helen D. Cohen, secretary; Rabbi Morris Skop, spiritual leader; Mrs. Nathan Selditch, teacher; and Cantor Herman Gottlieb. Middle row are Jackie Koblenz, Leonard Genet, Cyndy Sutta, Paul Kaminsky. Linda Meyer, Scott Bearman. Joyce Rosenthal, Deborah Whitcup, Frank Lipson, Iris Reiter, Ruth Ann Nielson, and Ronald Green. Front are Mitchell Deutsch, Barry Stein, Mark Skapinker, Babette Sommer, Denise Arbetman, Sheila Markowitz. Lisa Schaechter, Ann Kornfeld, David Katz, and Michael Cease. Hurwitz Elected BBYO Board Head Ben-Gurion Branch Meeting Ben-Gurion Branch of Farband will meet Thursday evening. May 19, at Beth El Auditorium. Irving M. Sachs, president, will conduct the meeting, which is dedicated to a discussion of "Israel | and its Immediate Achievements." Two Israeli films will be shown. Mrs. Miriam Halperin will be hostess at the social hour following. Election of Eli Hurwitz to the presidency of the Greater Miami board of directors of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization was an nounced this week. Active in communal affairs and a long-time resident of Dade county, Hurwitz is a certified public accountant, who resides in Coral Gables with his wife, Sylvia, and two children. Martin and Marilyn. President-elect of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith, a past president of Temple Judea, and a past vice president of the Bureau of Jewish Education, Hurwitz succeeds attorney Jack Fink, who held the position for two years. The newly elected head of the BBYO brings to the office a varied background, wnich includes experience in accounting, welfare work and education. Originally from .New York City, Hurwiti was assistant Borough Chief, Manhattan, Public Works Emergency Division, and he was also with the United States Citizens Defense Corp. Hurwitz is an active participant in professional circles, ana" in hi* favorite hobby, rifling and marksmanship. He is a member of the American Institute of CPA's, the Florida Institute, the Dade county chapter of the latter agency, and) a member of the New York State Society of CPA's. He is a member of the Palmetto Pistol Club and the National Rifle Assn. State Dep't. Exec Specks Friday Culver E. Gidden, of the U. S. State Department, will address the Luncheon Club of Sholem Lodge of B'nai B'rith on Friday noon at the Poo] and Cabana Club of the Robert Clay hotel. Gidden is director of the Miami Reception Center of the State Department, where foreign dignitaries visiting this area are officially greeted. Eli Hurwitz and Alfred Kroislep are co-chairmen of the Luncheoo Club weekly meetings. fore Herzl. He not only envisioned the Jewish State but he created and shaped the Jewish people. A leader need achieve no more than this — make his people conscious of its peoplehood and of its ability to act in unison — and he has discharged his destiny. Such is Herzl as seen in the perspective of a half century. Posthumous judgments can only reflect the attitude of his judges towards him. They canot add to or diminish from the man who is no longer among us, and hence beyond alteration. THANKS TO THE VOTERS OF DISTRICT 1 FOR YOUR OVERWHELMING VOTE OF CONFIDENCE in the First Primary. I sincerely solicit your continued support in the May 24th Primary. JUDGE F. DUVAL Jr. Your Justice of Peace, District 1 "THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR EXPERIENCE" IM POJ A.lv



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Page 12-B Grayson to Head Beth Emeth Cong. Samuel Grayson was elected presidot of-Beth Emeth Congregation at an annual meeting last week. Grayson has been active at Beth Kmet.h since its inception. He will be installed at regular Friday night service this week. Along with Grayson. the follow ing will be installed: Philip Schulman. first vice president; Merle Michaels, second vice president; Selma Hollender. treas-j urer; Julius Klein, financial sec-' retary; Mrs. Rhoda Willis, recording secretary; Jack Goodman, cor-j responding secretary. Board 01 airectors are Dr. Albert Cohen, Mrs. Joseph J. Foos, Mrs. : Kuth Glatter, Max Greenberg, Herbert Lelchuk. David Levine, Maxwell Lubin. Jack Massin, Benjamin Newmark, Maxwell Weisblatt. fJenist fhrkjian Friday. May 13, 1390 Pearly Gait by Hal Pearl TV Sisterhood officers, headed by hardship of an older generation. )*C (li, VI.ID'I I ,.l,.l,,.|. ...Ill ..I.... I.. %  TV SPONSOR MAKES NEWS: Much criticism has been heaped on and for good reason. But with all its faults, we are sure many members of the local video audience are ready to admit that TV has its redeeming features. None is more worthy than the "Play of the WeekAfter its local kickoff drama. "Medea." starring Judith Anderson, two Sundays ago, the new Sunday night feature on ch. 10 again proved its worthiness with the scintillating presentation of "The World of Sholem Aleichem." last Sunday. I believe that this was the introduction of Aleichem's work to the vast audiences of TV. Direction, casting and adaptation were worthy of this humane story-teller. His tales of Jewish folk of the old country belong to the great fiction of the world. Thanks to TV, the younger generation has had the opportunily to enjoy the shining humanity and truisms of Aleichem. which have lightened the load of oppression and Mrs. Herbert Lelchuk. will also be .installed Friday evening. SAMML GRAYSON Annual Membership Affair Annual membership affair will be held at Southwest Jewish Center on Sunday evening, 7 p.m. DINNERS from '1.35 Choice of 17 Main Courses Free Wine, Seltzer A Knishes WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN 1141 Washington Ave. Beautifully Catered Affairs Call JE 4-2655 — OUR SPECIALTY — NICE, THICK, JUICY PRIME RIBS OF BEEF *3.r -AND THE VtKY BUT IN TOWN! BANQUIT fACIUTIfS Candlelight Inn S1S1 Commodore Plow Coconut Grove HENRY LEITSON, Mqr. i mm 1 Lmrgtti family Trait in flaridu ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY .: ..-I l*p VI Oil UIUCI KCIICiailUII. This community owes a vote of thanks to Jack Gordon, of Washington Federal Savings and I.oan Assn., for sponsoring the "Plav of the Week." TV comes of age with such worthy offerings. But it also needs sponsors who cherish intelligent, stimulating entertainment, and will "..mlilc on TViewers feeling the same way. NAMES THAT MAKE NEWS: Wonder how many Miami Beachites are aware of the impeccable landscaping talents of John Poulos. of the city's park department. The flowering beauty along Alton rd.. Washington ave., the entrances to i the Auditorium and Convention Hall, and Lummus Park are just a few I of the sites that bear the unmistakable stamp of Poulos' magic green thumb, Nat and Rosalind Cohn all set to take off for their Parisian vacation in early September, via Air France. The Bayshore golf course starter and his wife earned the all-expense trip as a prize in a contest sponsored by the National Cardiac Hospital. Lucky people. Benny Cooper now a Sunday golfer only, since his brokerage job keeps him busy the rest of the week. Spotted him, brother Jack, Wolfie Cohen and Ben Karn in a weekend foursome at Bayshore. On of Ihe better players at the same course: Seymour Berkowitz. of Fun Fair. Shoots in the 70's, and sharp in every department of the game. Three old-timers who have the golfing gusto of men half their age (and can beat most of 'em too), are Jack Kaufman, Harrv Relkin. and j J Ben Rachlm. Hit the ball steadily over two hundred yards. Otto Fenias doing a phenomenal job introducing the good game of golf to the younger generation on the Beach. It's just wonderful to see the little lads, some of them smaller than the carts they pull along ; A the fairway, play as well as their dads, and some even better. There ,sn 't a fi nw game for boys and girls, and none more healthful or better for developing their sportsmanship. Look for some great players to come out of Fenias' troupe. On the way are John Alpert i Chuck Warren. Chuck Cans, Tommy Eisenberg, Andy Penzell Mike I Kaplan and Don Sayet, the smallest, but real good. Tri Ki Levin, our spies report, is doing a keen job directing I Miami Made," the musical comedy adapted from the Broadway hit, Pajama Game," and being enacted by Temple Emanu-EI Players at the auditorium of the new Miami Beach High School on June 4. Mrs. Leonard Glickman is ticket chairman. The Jacob Shers and his two sisters, Mrs. Rae Jacobstein and Mrs. Bertha Silverman. back from Louisville where they saw Venetian Way, a horse belonging to their friend, Isaac Blumberg. lead the way in the Run for the Roses. They wished they had some of Miami's respondent sunshine that gloomy day of the Derby filled with rain and cold. Dr. David Nathan and his handsome offspring joining the fatherand-son coterie on Bayshore fairways. Attorney LaVona Zukerman. of Miami, elected president of the norida Assn. of Women Lawyers, an affiliate of the Florida Bar Architect Leonard Glasser is the new commander of Miami Beach I ost 85 of the American Legion. Baron de Hirsch Meyer, we are told, is interested in taking over the controlling interests in an Orlando hotel, the San Juan. Deal may be closed by the time you read this. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: The Milenoff outdoor theatre in Coral Gables is the scene of a Srp rn 9 nH r o SS r P r T 1 r Cti0n f *' JuliUS Caesar '" wi,h a Latin-American .locale and a revolutionary government forming the theme "ThJ wS" ?nTV f Mi3mi J preSents Gilberl and Sullivan's! 1 J?w S L h M 6 C Unty Auditoriu 'n tonight and tomorrow night, including a children's matinee tomorrow Dorothy Sarnoff, whose dad, Dr. Jacob S.rnoff, reside, here and 2i:ir '•^•*' h """"• to the American. B.I Ma.eE l r •" &f •rt..nment-se.ker. with her talented vocal offerings. On I the bill also are comic Rlcki Dunn and dancing L.Maes Extravaganza Latina" continues at the La Ronde attraction in the |Fnta.neble.u Lenny Dawson and his grand assemb age 0 mu ic makers back the fast-moving show of Latin stars i„n C „ harley Fm f l l l l oW u" 0ver through Ma >' at lh •. MIAMI BEACH UN6-1654 AT THE PIANO IAA DAVID LEftOUX ABE GEFTER ,rom\vell *#50 '6 formerly with the Marseilles Hotel j PRESENTS THE NEW KOSHER rnfu ?c E N c' NG AT -*y '•' Nm De.ll. Occupancy KOSHER MEALS INClUDED-25 of 10S Rooms-Other RatesTy. .„, "0 ATE INC *" DURING JOIY AND AUGUSTSTEAKS, CHOPS. ROASTS at no extra charge. And all .hi. FREE: 21" TV & u^'l 'u*^^ ^T, 0 ^'*" Lou S"' •'• !" p'e Free Self-Perking Adjo.n.ng Hotel. Moves, N.ghtly Entertainment, and 15 other feetur... D.el.ry law, A Sabbath Observed Ma.hei.ch A Jorvk.. en Premiss ..,„.,_ *•'* •"'' *9r Free Diets WRITE OR CALL DIRECT: ABE GEFTER JE 8-1206 On the Ocean Front at 20th Street, Miami Beach, Florida SUMMER POLICY OPEN from 4 to 9 p.m. FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS ond ALL HOLIDAYS ONLY CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS Air<—4. UN 6 6043 'ret Port Under Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAK5 — PARTIES iher Catering at Reasonable Price* By ungariainu>9 Caterers Telephone JE 8-5401 o—Or Your Favorite Tempi, or Synagogue HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT ^f^ ROSNII CATERERS m *• ••'• •Teeevrei I, a nmphH *•* m u H 1 "WM ,AMI *H ON FR *•"" Under SueorWi... or Ualfi Katkrmt Astecletiee of Oreerer Mtaerf Of IN NOUSI WEDDINGS IAR MITIVAMJ IICIPTIONS



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friday. May 13. 1960 Educators Plan Annual Meeting By Special Report ATLANTIC CITY, N..T. — National Council for Jewish Education, which comprises the leading Jewish educators of all Jewish ideological groupings in the United States, Canada and Mexico, will meet in annual conference beginning May 19 at the Ambassador hotel here, it was announced by Harry L. Woll, president of the National Council for Jewish Education. Dr. Elijah Bortniker, executive director of the Jewish Education Assn. of Essex County, N.J., is chairman of the program committee. This will be the 34th annual conference since the Council was formed. Central theme of the conference is "The National Study on Jewish Education conducted by the American Assn. for Jewish EducationIts Implications for Action Towards Improvement in Jewish Education During the Next Decade." Four phases of the study will be dealt with: the "Jewish School and Present Day Society," "Communal Responsibility for Jewish Education," "Curriculum Development" and "Pupil Achievement and Teacher Education." fJenist ncridliairi Page 13-B MMTIM RICHARD miCHAU MARVIN ROBERT MICHAH ItffRll Seashore Products Have Years of Solid Know-How Retiree Group To Aid Oldsters Two Miami experts in the aging I field are making headlines with Itheir civic-type organization, First ] Retirement Foundation, and its [nationwide work in bringing new I help to oldsters. First Retirement Foundation, Ifrom offices in the Langford bldg., %  Miami, provides medicines, vitaImins, sickroom supplies service on [doctor's prescriptions and health [insurance group tours including IsIrael, and retirement housing |among other needs to its members. Spotlighted rm rock bottom costs far below usual. The Foundation oven pays all mailing and shipping charges, according to the group's spokesmen. Also available is membership in I the Golden Age Movie Clubs. These clubs, pioneered in New York, Washington, D. C, and the Midwest, are being brought to Metroi politan Miami. They allow oldsters [to attend movies at half-price anywhere in the country. Foundation president is Donald M. Early, consultant and longtime executive of "Journal of Lifetime Living," who was in touch with 200,000 senior citizens for the Foundation. Vice president is Helen Alpert, newswriter on health and medicine, Overseas Press Club member, and co-author with Dr. Sam Gertman of a soon-due book on inspirational aging. New Musical Comedy Due "Mimi," a new and original musical comedy, will be presented at the Lucerne hotel starting May 29. Written and produced by Dan Carlin in association with Monticello Park Congregation, the show is based on "La Boheme," by Puccini. George Blackwood is directing the production. Seashore Food and Pickle Products, Inc., is now in its new processing plant in Opa-locka. On two and a half acres, the plant is one of the most modern and sanitary food processing organizations in the South. Seashore has some 45,000 sq. ft. of CBS structure and steel building, with paving to take the roughest abuse from vinegars and other pickling agents. The company's new loading platform offers space for 35 trailers to load and unload at the same time. Equipped with its own water cooling system, softeners and purifiers. Seashore has ten pickle vats, and piano to install 30 moro as quickly as possible. One of the first companies to explore the pliofilm pickle, and kraut pouch. Seashore will shortly come out with four new items packed in bright containers for supermarket consumption. Seashore's current complement of products includes pickles, sauerkraut, pepers, tomatoes, horseradish relish, cocktail sauce, tartar sauce, and a sweet pickle line is now being processed daily. New products due this spring include borscht, schav, mayonnaise, and gefilte fish. With its new Opa-locka plant making expanded production possible, Seashore will soon be canvassing supermarkets across the country. How did it all begin? The firm is the business of Marty and Harry Kapchuk. But they are the present generation of Kapchuk know-how, which began 201 years ago in Kishenev, Russia, where great-great great grandpa Kapchuk established his Pickle Emporium after being praised by the local populace for his kraut, tomatoes and horseradish flavors. Marty's and Harry's dad came to the United States in 1905, took his pickle products to the pushcart arena of Rivington and Forsythe sts., and hustled his delicious condiments. His four daughters and two sons born, he handed down to them the knowledge that had been his heritage in the manufacture of pickled foods. Harry first took over when his father became ill. With World War II on, Harry joined the Army, went to France and Germany, and joined the staff of Stars and Stripes. The Air Force claimed Marty. Both served for over five years. When Hitler and Tojo had their scores settled, Marty came home, and rejoined his father in the pickle business. But Harry remembered Miami Beach as it was on a short vacation here before the war. Bucking his family's wishes, he drove to South Florida in an old Pierce Arrow—with the pickle business the furthest thing from J^ctr JSUI. -< m uiurun wnpw, •.



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Page 14-B fJewist flcrldllan Friday. May 13. I960 GEMS OF WISDOM Teachers and Nchool children are • MOM beautiful ornaments'. HI OMAN. Revere your teacher as you ret vere Heaven. 1 I AtAR B. SHAM Ml \ To oppose a teacher is to oppose •I.. Shcl(ina. SANHEDRTN. Sn OL WeaL OfJHi^s Religious Xife The aiiurdiam of a city are the | teachers of the young and the m; -tructors of the old. —Jl' • • • Conscientious teachers of small 2 children are destined to III on the | right hand of God. PI SIKTA KAHANA. There are three teachers: parents instructors, and comrades. 8BFEB HAS1DIM. If you see cities uprooted l;in>u .i :t came about because.they did Snot maintain teachers' salaries. i>. OH M : 0: ; % %  %  :. %  !.: .'; s^ftcerew L^onvcrfd/ion Thought for Today's Youth: Unripe Grapes Still Tender S e r v i c e s J h i s VL e e h e n A By RABBI B. LEON HURWITZ Temple Zamora RABBI B. UON HURWITZ spiritual Uasts i i nn;ynn;g ran rutf rntortr^ -ID 1 ? .tE&i %  oiirra ,rmi 1-20 T T : • T ••: : %  • :v: •ma frs*\ HTI rni! "i""1 ? "ippxtf JSD xm ,a*0fii ns T-ipn 1 ? nun? xsp? -I#B fffKp D^n—aa rfpan I T • -: : T • : • T : %  n"Tl3S? Vtf ni3i D*?U nnx ny^B nx pini inn Pin D^rutf -jp 1 ?! >x-wr n'jtfaa .D^BD niaroaa "rnrin > • T ~: • TT: rnan ^ o^ruan ^xntr 1 ? ^nan-nisixa isa rni-n .-f n*iT no-"3 nrisnn -itfx TR4 NSLATION Jewish tradition requires us to read the six chapters of the "Jewsh Ethics" — or "Avoth" — durng our summer Sabbath days at Ihe rate of a chapter per Sabbath. During the Sabbath hours this weekend, traditionally observant Jews throughout the world will read Chapter Four. They will hold communion with no less than 27 ancient sages, each offering one or two maxims worthy of a place in our treasure of religious thinking and spiritual living. Their pithy sayings warm our hearts, enliven our minds and make us contemporaries and intimate companions of the great. Their reflections and observations leal with all varieties of life's values. While the opening paragraph, authored by Rabbi Ben Zomo. is %  evoted to a series of brief definitions of sort themes as wisdom, heroism and wealth, the rest of the ollection of sayings deals with themes such as grades of Mitzvah, life's 'hree crowns, and immortality. For the immediate moment I should like our generation to pause for serious reflection on the maxim of Rabbi Jose (163 C.E.). who opines that "He who learns from the young, to what is he like? To one who eats unripe grapes ." I wonder if the good Rabbi Jose did not anticipate our own day, he "teen-age day." when the teen-ager draws his directives from his "teen-age organization," as if it were "Torah Misinai"—the unchallenged authority which comes directly from heaven. Gone are the days when our children would wait with anxiety and (eagerness for the adult visitors to their home, so that they might glean j wisdom from the "ripe grapes," from the informal, socially-inspired family conversations perhaps offering them a maxim, a quotation, or 1 an adult evaluation of life's problems. "The club is my shepherd, and I have no time for other communions," is youth's slogan of the day. The parents are perplexed, the rabbis are critic.:!, and the youth agencies admit their helplessness. All agree that the home must be restored to its central position if 'we are not to become a fragmented, lonely, rootless generation. When God revisited Himself to Moses. He identified Himself as a God of families, the families of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Perhaps Rabbi Jose's maxim should become a required memorygem for every teen-ager of today. They must know how to budget their time, so as not to snuff out of their lives the warm sentiments and maj ture guidance of their parents. They must once again make it fashionable to fill family pews in the Houses of Worship, to have family meals with guests of mixed ages, and to bring the ripe grapes of mature experience and wisdom into their spiritual feasts of life. Sweet Water from the Sea Twelve years ago Dr. Alexander Zarchin a poor and modest engineer, came to Israel from Russia. Dr. Zarchin had a great and important idea. He held that a method cnuld be found to isolate the salt from seawater simply and cheaply (by a simple and cheap system), and thus to obtain good water for drinking, industry and agriculture. After many years of work Dr. Zarchin secured the assistance of the Government of Israel and two years ago embarked upon practical experiments. Some months ago the directors of a large corporation in the United States, which was interested in the Zarchin Process, came to Israel. (Published by Brit Ivrit Olamit) Cora/ Way Sisterhood Sisterhood of the Coral Way Jewish Center will meet Thursday evening, May 19, at the Center's new building, 8755 SW 16th st. The program for the evening will be "It Could be You." Mrs. Leo Winstein hes been appointed program chairman. I* It true that one of the ancient nbbis was a gladiator? True. It was Rabbi Simon Lakish, of the third century, better known as Resh Lakish. The Talmud tells us that he was married to the sister of Rabbi Yochanan. She married him on condition that he give up his hazardous occupation and turn to the study of Torah. He attained prominence rapidly. • • Who is "Lilith," the name mentioned on Jewish amulets? The name "Lileth" (a nocturnal demon) belongs to the area of Jewish superstition. She is reputed to be a female demon, flying about in the form of a night owl, and stealing children. Infant mortality was often blamed on her. To protect mothers and newly-born children from her, both mother and child were provided with amulets. These amulets appear on printed sheets known as "childhood tablets." and are still hung on the walls of the lying-in-rooms in many Jewish families. • Is it true that a convert to Judaism, the son of a pagan, became a leading rabbi? True. His name was Onkulos, of the first century, C. E. He became a close friend of the patriarch, Rabbi Gamaliel II. His translation of the Hebrew Bible into Aramaic still appears on the margin of every traditional Jewish Bible copy. The observant Jew who reviews the weekly scriptural portion (Sidrob.) each weeks adheres to the CANDUUGHTING lltYlt 16 Iyar — 6:40 p.m. mmmmmmm wmmmmm i custom of intoning each Hebrewverse twice, followed by reading the Onkelos. Targum translation once. • Who is Frani Kafka? Kafka is a great and remarkable figure in world literature. He was an Austrian born Jew (Prague, 18831924), whose influence became international. His writing is largely symbolic He is known as a "master stylist ... an inexorable moulder and interpreter of our time." I ... "I""*. TTI.' ... it. r\ m"if % % %  :/*"""'t %  %  This page is prepared in cog j operation with the Spiritual Leadj x. Rabbi Tibor Stern. Cantor Maurice Mamches. --e— 3FTH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Levitan. a 3ETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or. thodox. Rabbi Joseph E Rackovaky. — a— T.RAL WAY JEWISH CENTER. 8755 SW 18th St., Miami. Rabbi Samul Aoril. i da 8:19 p.m. Bar m eni "No Room ii the Ton." Saturday ( a.m. Sermon: Weekly Portion." a JADE HEIGHTS CENTER. 18160 NW 2nd ave. Conservative. Cantor Emanuei Mandel. a ff LAOLERGRANADA. 50 NW 51st pi. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard r Hotee Cantor r rert P3rnst-in. FVtdiiy ti :io p.m. Saturday v:io a.m. —— e ST. LAUDERD4LE fcMANU-EL. ISO* E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi Marius Ranaon. Cantor Sherwin Levine. a — HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. a — HIALFAH RCFOOM .IF'""*H CON. GREGATION. 1150 W. Wth St., Hialeah. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman. Friday X:i. p.m. Sermon: "T^iit i:c uner — Scho'ai's Festival." Ones Shabbat hosts: Mr. and Mrs. Joeepn Horowitx, In honor of the sixteenth birthday of their dHiiutil.r. HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 203C Polk at. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. ISRAELITE CENTER. S1T5 SW 25th ter. Conservative. Rahb* Morton Malavakv. Cantor Louis Cohen. Friday :30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m Sermon: "Weekly Portion." KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield Cantor Abraham Self Friday C.-xn p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. u'eimun: "The call to Everyone." a MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION. 1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Herschell Saville. Cantor Joseph Salzman. Friday 630 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. S. vmon: "The Heoaa;i of lj\te B'Om, r. Har Mitzvah: Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joaap h Baunders. e MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st. and NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion Kl-schenbaum. Friday 5:30 and B:li p.m. Teacher'a Pay to be observed. Baturdaj I liar Mitzvah. Jeffrey, son of Mr. and MiHarold \v.,ik: Jeffrey, m a of Mr, ami Mrs. Philip 11. Mai k MORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabb' Henry Okollca. 1 '"* %  !-•> I II p.m. Sermon: "Rabbi Akii.a." eteturday I a.m. — e— •YORTH SHORE CENTER 620 75th st Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram —-It*. r*ntor Fdwsr* K'-'n Prtdai 18 P.m. Sermon: "The American Rabbi Baturdaj a ., m s. rro< n weakly Portion." fOUTHWEST CENTER. 64M SW 8th st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice *ieln. Friday R:30 p.m. Sermon: How Bti-Mmllned' should Our ReliRinn Becom**? TALES OF MORALS A little bird, after flying man\ hours in search of water, finally located a flowing stream. Eager!) the bird descended and drank o| the water and in gratitude lifted up his I'oice and thanked God for having provided this h/e-giting ingredient called water. The fishes in the stream heard the bird's u'ords of gratitude and turned to all the other fishes and said. ] "What it this thing called u'ater' All the fish were eager to locate this wonderful life-giving ingredient by the name of water. They searched everywhere, but could not find it. They called upon all of the mighty fishes to search in greater depths and to lool{ in further distances fur the Unknown ingredient. After many lengthy seurihes, the fish gathered in counsel, dejected at the thought that their search had failed. It was then unanimously decided by all the fish, great and small alike, that they must \ccp their' eyes open and report as soon as %  their individual attempts would be successful. MORAL: We are ofttimes too I close to a situation to appreciate i:s value, and we ofttimes fail to see the blessings that surround everyone of us. wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest Schreiber. Friday s p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar Mltsvah: Bennett <'ohn. son of -Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Kent. — • — TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish Cantor Oavlo Convlser. Friday 1:11 p.m. Sermon: "Tlsroel Means Jewiah Peopl.hood — Hou ho We Teach This to Our Children?" Second In a aerlea of sermons durlnK ilo Hebrew month of lyar dedicated to Israel's l^th anniversary of Independence. Ones Snabbat hosts: M. n hers of ITA, In honor of Teaeher'a Day. Saturday 10:4S a,m. Bar Milivah: Richard, aon of Mr. and Mr*. Robert Krlnzman. — a TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi •heldefi Edwards. Cantor Ban Gro berg. Friday 8:16 p.m. Acceptance of sifts to the comjre K atlon. Sermon. "The • ireater Gift." fe&turday 10 a.m. TEMPLE EMANU-IL. 1701 Washington sve. Conservative. Rabb irv.ng Lehrman. Cantor larael Reich. Friday 6:30 and :30 p.m. Annual graduation service. Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon: "Weekly Portion." Bat Mitzvah: Mark K., son of Mrs. Belma [l.ehan: Marvin Ira. Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin I.anKsam. TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. Cantor Jacob Bornsteln. Friday 8:15 p m. Sermon: "Relliclon in the National Campaign — A Second Look." TEMPLE JtJDEA. 320 Palermo avs. Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb. TEMPLE NER TAMID. SOth St. and Tstum Waterway. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Samuel Oomberg. Friday 6:15 an.l 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "A Tribute to our Teachers." Saturday v • a in Bar Mltsvah: Alan, aon nf Mrs. Rose Goldfarb. TE MP t E „ ADATH YESHURUN. Rabbi •'onah Caplan. v p.m. at Pnlfled hMft.. 23"fi ,. Ui"^"JSfrmnn: "Foundation of Our Faith." Saturday I a.m. T MP i" E ..? ETH *•* %  sso N Kendall .s Miam.. Ferorm staobi Herbert waomnaeo'. CantoCharlea "~d-r ih! i T Mi 5 ." m Srmon: "What la the I.ink Between Parents and T.achwLmJt^lSFJ &" %  n,r Xltavah: Kenneth, son of Mr. and Mra. Norman Green. r L MPLE 5 ET H CL 184 "oik It Jarfe""' "•*<>'•"• Rsbbl Samue' J!!'. 1 o„ S : J r S" r '"*" -Peaker: Burutl .i r'w""" 1 !" 1 commlasloner of R-rK n,l "!r* r '. m *V* ,n L *e of nnai Hrlth. Topic: "Oor Present Social Climate in the South.' • —— TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of HollyTEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12'00 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno M. Wallach. Fr!dav 8:ii i,. m Sermou: "Brndltloa or Fmotion?" • —— TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. W1 Flaminno Way. Conservative. RabOl Leo Heim. Friday 8:15 p.m. Guest speak.: Mrs. A. Arthur Pekelner. region.il vice "resident nf Hadafssh One* Shabbat hosts: Members of Hadassah. Saturday 9 a.m. Teacher's Day to be marked. TEMPLE 2ION. 5710 8W 17th st. Conservstlvs. Rsbbi Alfred Waxman. Cantor Jacob Ooldtsrb. Friday 8:30 p,m. Sermon: "The Roll of the Teacher In larael > n'day 9 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Michael Jan. son of Mr and Mrs Murray Trautman: Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fiank M. %  •'olivllle. TIFERETH ISRAEL. 8500 N. Miami sve. Conservstivs. Rsbbl Hsrry L. Lswrenoe. Cantor Alh.rt Qtantz. Friday :30 p.m. Nathan Rosenberg to officiate In the absence of Rabbi Lawrence. Saturday 9 a.m. TORAH TEMPLE. 1J54 West avs. Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Casssl. YOUNO ISRAEL. 890 NE 171st st. Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber Friday 8M5 p i ay s.m. Sermon: "Pride in Our Herftace. ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Zamora ave. Conservstlvs. Rsbbl %  • Leon HurwhU. Cantor Meyer Oisssr. i me Gourmet magazine-award. V



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Friday. May 13. 1960 'Jewish Meridian Pago 15-B %  is itnaries HYMAN OOLD5TEIN •:.'., ..f :!;:. SW 24lh si., died May 6. Surviving arc his wife. Eve: two sons. and Daniel; a daughter. MrB. Kst.-ll.Chiokansk.v three sisters, Including "Mrs. FtflHIle Melstc fight grandchildren. Services were ai Riverside Memorial Chapel, W. Flagler si. Jane Fonda, making hr film debut, and Anthony Perkina star in Joshua Logan's 'Tall Story," a Mansfield Production for Warner Bros. The film version of the bright Broadway comedy also stars Ray Walston, Marc Connely, Anne Jackson and Murray Hamilton, and is now playing at the Olympic Beach and Gables Theatres through May 24. Jane Fonda is the daughter of filmdom's renowned Henry Fonda. Brandeis Film Will be Shown "The Challenge of Brandeis," a film on Brandeis University, is part of the program planned for the first formal meeting of the I newly formed Men's Social Group of the South gate Towers Apts., Joseph L. Goodman, president, has [announced. The meeting is scheduled for [Wednesday evening in the Cotillion I room of the DiLido hotel. Speakers include Jack Gordon, [president of Washington Federal (Savings and Loan Assn., and school 1 board candidate in the May 24 run[off, and Milton f. Heller, regional -director of Brandeis University. Teachers to be Honored Teacher's Day, annually celebrated throughout the country, will be observed at Temple Tifereth Jacob during Saturday services at 9 a.m. The entire faculty will be honored. The Education committee, in conjunction with Sisterhood, will sponsor a luncheon following the services. Wholesale Firm (Open to Public Following 34 years of selling to the retail trade in Florida, the Miami Wholesale Corporation, 127 NE 9th st.. has.announced that the public is invited to shop at the premises, "where nationally advertised, famous-name brand merchandise may be purchased at prices as low or lower than wholesale." According to the company, only now, first-quality items are stocked. In addition to continuing with their complete line of bed linens, table linens, towels, shower sheets and other household goods, both for personal use and boxed for gifts, the Miami Wholesale Corporation is now offering complete outfitting for infants and children, carrying up to size 14. The company also features a complete stock of infants' and children's furniture, including swings, cribs, carseats, walkers, mattresses, play yards, bassinettes, and strollers. Complete layettes are a specialty, as are baby shower items boxed for giving. Local residents who Charm Expert Joins Camp Staff Mr. and Mrs. Mac Mermell, directors of Camp Universe, Oxford, announce the affiliation of Miss Edith Applebaum with their camp program. Miss Applebaum, who is women's editor of The Jewish Floridian. will direct the camp's charm and modeling program. She owned and operated her own charm and modeling school in this area for several years. Miss Applebaum is also a graduate of the University of Miami, and taught in the public schools in Dade county. The charm and modeling course will be included in the regular Camp Universe activities schedule. Ok LEGAL NOTICE I LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 83C 434* ACE INVESTMENT!!, INC. a Florida (!urporntion, „ ntirrr MRS. HAZEL BAUER ST, of rMM PJH ISth ave., died Mai S. Bhc came here II rear* ago from New fork, surviving la her husband, Hern Services were May '.' at Riverawe Memorial Chapel, Nonuaudy iHie. JULIUS APPLEBAUM 4. ,.f IC24S rvilna aye., died May i An attorney, he enme here six yearn ago from New York Surviving are two brothers, including Herman; four sistets. InefudJna lin Edith Fa fir: and two daughters. Bervleei were "i> S '• R'<-rsld Memorial Chapel, Normandy Isle. MRS. EVA SEPLER M. of r-no K.lh at., died Mav 4. She came here 25 yearn ago from New York, ""d *"•* %  member o/ Hndas"ah. Surviving are three sons. Including Panlcl; four daughters, in,hiding Mra. Oertrude Wolff: 16 erondchiidren. and IS great-grandchildren. Service! were Maj I Bl Riverside Msmorinl Chapel, Washington ave. SAMUEL M. BERNSTEIN 16, of 6W10 Hyron ave., died May :i. He i survived by his wife. Ida; a son, Merwln: and a daughter, Mr*. PIOTIs '•ohen. He wag a member of the Elks. ffisrvkiea were May 4 at Newman Funeral Home. HYMAN BLOOM '•2. of 17330 NE loth ct., No. Miami Beach, died Apr. 2S In Mexico City, "e came here nlx years ago from Mt. Vernon, N.Y.. and a ai a certified nubile accountant. Surviving are his wife. Violet; daughter. Mrs. Judy Orayson: and two sons, Richard and Harry; two brothers and a slater. Services were May '. at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Normandy Isle. CHARLES SAIBISH 47, of 33.'. W. 28th St.. died May 2. He Is survived by his wife. Rr*ha: three eon'. Arthur. Russell and Douglass; %  daughter. Mrs. i.enore Bur' %  V; two brother* nnd n yisr--. Services were May 3 at Newman Funeral Home. Plai GERALD AI.FA.NO and JOHNNIE LOL'E&E ALFANO, his wife, et al. Defendants. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: CHARLES M. SMITH and HELANOI \ SMITH, his wife: 1 Central Ave., Newburgh. New Vork; (Jl'Y C. MOON and AY.N F l.ic.ox. I,is Wife, ISII Inn. Chatham, New York: you are hereby notified that a complaint for the foreclosure of a mortgage on the following described property situate. In Dade County, Florida, towit: Lot 3* FIRST ADDITION Tt • PINS TKKK LAKE, according to the Phl thereof recorded In Plat Book 62, al Peae II o( the Public Records of Hade County. Florida, has been filed against you and others in the above atyled cause, and you and each of you are hereby required %  o serve a ropy of your anawer or other pleading to the Complaint upon Plaintiff's attornev Claude M Barm-H. 302 Calumet Bid*.. Miami It, Florida. ind file the original In the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court in and 'or Dude bounty, Florida, on or before the 16th day of June. 1960. If you 'all to do no judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated thin 10th dav of May. I!•! %  K. B. I.EATHERMAN. Clerk. Circuit CoiTt, Oade Countv. Florida (aeal) By: K. M. LYMAN, Deputy Clerk. 5/13-20-27. /3 MRS. BERTHA GOLDBERG SI. of New York Cpv. die'' M-v 7 Survivors Include William Friedman, of 233 I'honetla ave.. Coral Cables. JAMES KRASSIN :..",. ,.r p. NE Mth st.. died Apr :in. He came here 20 years ago from New York, and was a real estate broker. i Surviving Is .his wife Sophie. Service* were Mav l at Riverside Mentor. lal Chapel. Normnndv lale. MRS LORA F. PACK |'-f 4120 Bine Tree dr.. died Apr 2*>. Hhe cam,, here II yeara ago from Detroit. Surviving are (lire.slaters. Ini eluding Mrs. Lee I'nvly. and wo brothers, ggrvluee were May 1 at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Normandy Isle. have experienced difficulty in securing gift items to send to northern friends and relatives will now be able to choose from a large variety of pram suits, snow suits, sleeping bags, car suits, ski slacks, headwear, bunting and robe sets, mittens and gloves. The Miami Wholesale Corp., states that it is a one-stop shopping center for children, both for school and dress-up occasions, and including complete sports attire for boys and girls. Shopping hours are from 8:30 to 5 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. The establishment is entirely airconditioned, and free parking is available. MORRIS SLOTNICK r.6, of T.640 SW 78th St.. died Apr. 2s IIcam.lure seven > ears ami from ITtlca, NY. Surviving are his wife. Sylvia: son. Michael: brother and sister. Services were May l at Gordon Funeral Home. JOSEPH MATENKY 7H. of 146 Jefferson ave.. died AprM H leave* a daughter, of W Calm R h Services were In Chicago. which he left to live here IS years •>-,,. In chtrge of arrangements was Riverside Memorial chapel, w clavier st. LEONARD GROSS ".::. of 711 Lake View dr.. died 27. He came lore II .wars ago N,\v York, and was an iuvesl counselor. Surviving are his Harriett: son, Robert: dam V n Kloch; brother, Maurice; sister, Mrs Jeanette AMerhuler. vies were Apr. 2S at Riverside mortal Chapel, Norina nilv |s]e. Apr from merit wife, Mis and S.-rMeINSURED SAVINGS^ EARN % PER ANNUM (CURRENT RATB) "One of thf Nation'< Oldest end Largest j0ade Federal SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MIAMI JOStPH M UPTON, President 6 Convenient Offices Serve D*de County RESOURCES EXCEED ISO MILLION DOLLARS MORRIS LANDES 71, of 145 Meridian ave.. died Apt II.. come her" f i v • \eais aao from New York. Surviving are his wife Ida: three %  ona, Leon, Philip, and David: brother, two alatera, ami four .. \ : .-i .t %  !-.A I-• at Gordon Funeral Home. ARTHUR L UNGERLEIDER -.-.. of 2SSS Pin,Tree dr died Apr. vv He cam.her, fiv,yean a*o from New York, ami was an a,-, -mutant. S ••! \ iv 'n r* Ids wife Edith mother. M's Pauline Inserletder: three sons. Including 1'iiaiicbrother, Harold: ami sister. Services were Apr. M in Newman Funeral Horn.DAVID H. REISER :. of I'd NE S'.'nd st.. died Apr "I M. c here II veam aew front I'hiiadelphla Burvlvlnf are idwife, soldi 1 rin-.. sons, jessie. i>r. Raymond ami Charles: three sisters. th"ee meat-ii a "''children. Service. wen Apt M al Rh w -id.Memo: lal i hap. I. W I-1 uler et. MRS. ESTHER SEROTKIN ; %  !. of L-I7I SW 17th st.. wRe came here it yeara am. from Dover, N.i.. dierl Apr. 25. She la survived b) her hi>l'aii'l. Abraham: one son. I.ouis; b/er, Mrs Anna link; and broj tiler. HalTI I'can S'ie Blm leaves two vrniidc'dldrcn. Benrloea were Apr '-'i alOordon Funeral Home. JOSEPH I. GERBER M,. oi 182 ( mini-, ave., died Apr. 21. M, i, ..i been n winter revident for P*wn i> inn is his wife. Inie Ben ;lyn. with local arrantrernentit bj Rlveraide Mercrial cii %  HARRY DFweiiTJ 66. of IN Alton rd.. died A|.r. M. He l:i I r-ur.l aKo ri'Oiu I'lint, Mich and BUS a retire i plan Surviving are all daurhter, Mr*. Dorothi Vofelfai'v '''Ii • ilk. Rnrh Son, r.in Hei >r. ^i at NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OP/EN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in buelneai under the fictitious name •> CUPPERSHIP I'ltllSKS al P.O Cox IS1 in the Clt) of Miami, 1'iorida intends to register the said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of |i. i County. Florida. Dated al Miami. Florida this 10th daj of May, i!i6o. <; w CfORADT Sol,Owoer B/1J-20-I7, t/% NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN than the iindcisitii.ii, iiesiring to ensast M iMi.-iness under the fictitious name of LEEWARD INTERNATIONAL at 1000 N.B. 79th Btreet, Miami, Dade County, Florida intend to reglstei i name with the Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade Countv*. Florida. JERKY BoiiOKAl" ARTHUR BHRHARDT STANLEY EPSTEIN Attorney for Jerry Hogorad and Arthur Ehrhardt 5/13-20-27. 6/8 CERTIFICATE OF CORPORATE DISSOLUTION •N TWe NAME AND BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME. OREETIN'IS: Whereaa. CELIA D. COMMONS. MIAMI. FLORIDA: BETTY M. 'IREENBLATT. MIAMI. FLORIDA; BETTY II O FFB A P K R. MIAMI, FLORIDA dill on the 2:trd day of Ma] A 1'. 1MI cause to be Incorporated inder the provisions of Chapter 60S, Florida Statutes, SOCTH DADE AIR CONDITIONINO. INC., a corporation, with Its principal place of business at MIAMI. DADE COUNTY, in the State of Florida, and whereas the stock Judders of such corporation did on the 2nd dav of May. A.I). 16. cause to be filed in the office of the Secretary ,f Btata of the state of Florida, a I'lirs.nt of nil the stockholders under the provisions of said Cbapte Florida S'tat'ites. showing the dissolution of such corporation Now. therefor.-, the Secieturv of State does hereby certify to the foregoing and that he Is eatisfled that ill,requirements of law have bees complied with. IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have hereunto set my hand and have affixed the Great Seal ol the State of Florida, at TaRnhassee. the Capital, this the Second day of Mav. AH. 196" R. A. GRAY. Secretary of M J-./I.V60 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 34M ORACE MARTINI. I'laintllf. ANTHONY MARTINI, Defendant. SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: ANTIIoNY MARTTN1 i o Arnold Martini •:IL' Tenth Avenue, San Mateo, California You. ANTIIoNY MARTINI, are herehv notified that a Bill of Complnint for Divorce has been filed against you. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the •dnintiff's Attornev. LAWRENCE I HOI.l ANDEK. Suite L'i::i. 1090 North• th Street. Miami :1K, Iand file the original Answer or Plead Ing in the offl f the Clerk ol the Circuit Court on or before the 13th lav of June, 1MB if you fall to do so. Inilgm.nl by default will be taken gainst rod for the relief demanded In 'he Bill of Complaint. This notice shall i published once each week for four consecutive waeki in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. DONE \N"l> ORDERED al %  t o-ida. this 9th da) "f May, A.D I MO, B i: LEATHERMAN .Clerk. -,,. HI i -nir t, l lade county, Morida laeall B) WM W STOCKING, Deputy rierh i.A\Vltl N"'i: I Hi >l LANDER Suite 80S, v %  ~''o >;i Miami 3S, Fla — I'Laxa 7*3491 Mtornes for Plaintiff ", 11-Ua-". NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name of MEL'S FL'RNITi'RE RE I-1NISH I N<: at 23."i0 N.W. 7th Place, Miami intend* to register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Trade County, Florida. MELVIN (ilPs'o.N, Sole Owner MARX FAUr.R Attornev f.* Applicant Congress Bldg. f./l3-20-27. 8/ NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the fictitious name off ALA.Mo SINCLAIR SERVICE STATION at 1901 N.E. 2nd Ave.. intends to reJfTXW a1W name wrth the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROSE ENTERPRISES', INC., a Fla. oorp LEI IN A. EPSTEIN Attorney for Applicant 420 Lincoln Rd. 12'.'. :. li-13-2 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN 'hat the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious names of GRANADA HOMES. COC.EN BITLDINi: CO. tnot Inc.) at I711i> N.E. nth Court, North Miami 62, Florida, 'Intends to register said names with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. JOSEPH COC.EN. Bole Owner t %  !'.-. s t-n-ai IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 47850-B IN RE: Estate of BERNARD HEACNEY I i.-i ,-ased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons flavin" claims or Demands Again.-i Said Estate: You are hereby notified and required to pi esent miy c'aims and demands which uiu mav have against the eatate % %  : BERNARD HEAONEY de> c.ased late of Dsde County. Florida, to the Cnnnty .Itnfce* of Dade County, anil file the same in their offices In the County Courthouse in Dade Conn t.v, Morida. within eight calendar months from the date of the first publication hereof, or the same will be bar red. s MAX R. SILVER MAN It. SILVER Attorney Mt S. vl.old Building Miami 32. Florida 4 1-. -,'6-U NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the i.ndei signed, desirimr to engage In business under the flc'itiims name of CAMELOT REALTY al 1102 Congress Bldg Miami. Fla.. Intend to register sal I name with the Clerk of the circuit Court of Ii,d. Countv. Florida ALBERT If, COHEN IRVINC WA1.T.MAN Role ow i B/U-20-27. 8/3 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage la business under the fictitious nam. of FRENCH EMBROIDERY CO. tnot Inc. I at J441 N.W 77th Terra... Ml ami. Fla.. Intends to register said name with the clerk of the Circuit Court of I'ade Countv Florida HBNRY BLANSKY, Sol.Owner 13-20 Riverside Memorial Chapel. Washingion ave. JACOB KAHN of |M7 NE Isi n \:>r. 22. i from \iwere Apr M al Mr Sinai '' • ,. Memorial Chapel, W. Flagler st. NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious nam,if PAR-PANTS al I4JS NE Miami Place, Miami. Fla.. intends to legist, i name with the clerk of th.cii. nt Court of Dads County, Flo rida. Al. GOTTLIEB, INC. By: Alfred O. Gottlieb •| \I.I winI-' AWALLER Attoi 120 I. union Rd., Miami Bl :.-H-13-20-27 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in buslneai undei the fictitious name >' \I,I I we;-: HEN'r'C PPOSTHETICS at 115 Normandy Drive. Miami Bt I-I.I Intends to register said n i with Ho i '!•"'. ol the Circuit Court of Had. Countv. Florida. LARRY WIB1 I|-:KM \ N • Sole owner MITCHELL IIALI BR Attornev for Applicant ,tr; S. v Sold Bldg. 5/K-I3-20-2T ; IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THS ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY. No. (DC 3312 MARION IONA W. LENT/.. Plaintiff. JOHN F. I.KNTZ. Defendant NOTICE TO APPEAR TO: JOHN F LENTS 212 East Rosalie Str. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania YOI ABE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a complaint to set aside a fraudulent dlvo I ri fiei agalaae you. and sou ai>reaulred to wrve m cop) of votrr Answei r Pleading to the Complain! on the I'N'ntiffs attorn,-v DANIEL NEAI. HKLI^ER, 81t> lev Pirilillng. Mi mil 32. Florida, and file the original in the offl. Icrk of the circuit Court, on or before the Bth day of June, I wise the allegations of saidC plaJnl "ill be taken as confessed by DATED this E9th dav of April, lR i; B LEATHERMAN, Clerk. Circuit i 'ourt i u>de ( %  • intj. Florid* By: K M I.Y.M w DefMKj cierk S'6-12-20-27



PAGE 1

Page 16-B *Jenisi>fk>ricf#*r7 Friday. May 13,19J UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR avANrmr tlGHTS RfSflVCO WE SELL U.S. CHOICE and U.S. PRIME MEATS ONLY Throughout the Year Your FOOD FAIR KOSHER Markets Bring You the FINEST QUALITY Kosher U.S. Gov't. Inspected Western PRIME and CHOICE Meats. For QUALITY. SAVINGS AND GUARANTEED SATISFACTION Take Advantage of these Low, Low Prices! SPECIAL FOR MON., TUES., & WED. ONLY! BREAST FIRST CUT LB. OF BEEF SECOND CUT LB. 69 C 2 11 I P n tl c 5 V a 2 1) y t. o t< tl r BONELESS TRIMMED SHOULDER STEAKS LB. PETITE J MINUTE STEAK LB 1.39 NECK MEAT < BEEF CUBES BONELESS LB. 79c FRESH KOSHER MADE GROUND CHUCK LB. 69< STORE HOURS: Mon. thru Wed. 8 to 6 Thurs. 8 to 9 Fri. 8 tn 3 NOW FOUR FINE KOSHER MARKE TS T O SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER 163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER I I 19th ST. AT ALTON ROAD I 2091 CORAL WAY NOJMIAMI BEACH I | MIAMI BEACH MIAMI CORAL WAY AT S.W. 87tfi AVE. Wtttchsr Shopping Plait MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD TX.R


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 13, 1960

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01632

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 13, 1960

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01632

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
"cJewish Floxadian
Combining THi JEWISH UNITY and TMt JEWISH WEUVt
Volume 33 Number 20
Miami. Florida. Friday. May 13. 1960
Two Sections Price 20#

Longshoremen Unload Cleopatra;
Nasser Firm on Blockade of Suez
IAUL KATZ
NEW YORK(JTA>The unloading of the Egyptian vessel Cleo-
patrawhich has been under 22 days of picketing by maritime labor
herestarted Tuesday, as a result of a new State Department com-
mitment given to organized American labor during the weekend,
promising that fresh steps will be taken by the United States govern-
ment to halt the blacklisting of American ships stopping at Israeli ports.
-----------+ The 22 days of picketing, con-
ducted by the Seafarers' Interna-
tional Union and supported by the
Internatibnal Longshoremen's
Assn., whose members refused to
cross the picket line, started with
the arrival of the Cleopatra in
New York harbor on Ar. 13. It
was estimated here that the pic-
keting has cost the Egyptian own-
ers of the vessel $44,000.
Label Katz Elected Head
Of Presidents Conference
JTABy Dlret Teletype Wire
NEW YORKLabel A. Katz, of New Orleans, president of B'nai
frith, was elected Tuesday chairman of the Conference of Presidents
major American Jewish organizations. He succeeds Philip M. Klutz-
;k, former president of B'nai B'rith.
The Conference is a group of 17 +---------------
esidents of national organiza
S0B0LEV SEES NO SIGNIFICANCE IN DATE
Soviet Chief at UN
Mum as Colleagues
Toast Israel Birthday
By SAUL CARSON
United Nations JTA Correspondent
I
that concern themselves with
uerican Israel affairs.
was established six years ago
in informal assembly, with Dr.
|um Goldmann, chairman of
* Jewish Agency for Israel, as
head. Preliminary steps to
nallre the group* irere trWTJnrp-
|ed last year, at wh'lch time
itiznick, then president of B'nai
frith, was elected Conference
airman.
in en acceptance statement,
Catz commended the "voluntary
iture" of the Presidents Con-
rence. He said the Conference
id in past years "demonstrated
value where divergent or-
tnizational loyalties commit-
to common goals can coordin-
ate their efforts and strength,
ind thereby achieve the highest
cgree of Jewish unity in keep-
with the voluntary character
f the American Jewish com-
lunity."
The 17 constituent organizations
the President's Conference are:
American Israel Public Affairs
ammittee, American Jewish Con-
fess, American Trade Union
Council for Labor Israel, Amer-
can Zionist Council, B'nai B'rith,
ladassah, Jewish Agency for Is-
hel, Jewish Labor Committee,
Jewish War Veterans, Labor Zion-
lt Assembly, Mizrachi-Hapoel Ha-
lizrachi. National Community Be-
at ions Advisory Council, National
Council of Jewish Women. Union
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America, United
Synagogue of America, and the
Bionist Organization of America.
Herzog Named
Canada Envoy;
Aranne Resigns
JTA By Direct Teletype Wire
JERUSALEMThe appointment
of Yaacog Herzog as Israel Am-
bassador to Canada was formally
announced Tuesday by the Israel
Foreign Ministry.
Mr. Herzog, 32, is the youngest
of Israel's diplomats. He was born
in Dublin, where his father, the
late Israel Chief Rabbi Isaac Hal-
evi Herzog, was then rabbi.
Currently a minister in Wash-
ington; Mr. Herzog previously
headed the Foreign Ministry's
American desk. He is author of
an English commentary on the
Mishna.
Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurion meanwhile Tuesday for-
mally announced the resignation of
Minister of Eduaction Zalman
Aranne.
Aranne quit his post two months
ago when he was overruled by
other members of the cabinet after
he sought to recognize the dissi-
dent High School Teachers Union
in a wage dispute.
Ben-Gurion also announced the
appointment of Ami Aassaf, Mapai
Knesset member, as Deputy Min-
Tho formula to end the picket-
ing was worked out in talks be-
tween Acting Secretary of State
C. Douglas Dillon, Secretary of
Labor James P. Mitchell, and
Arthur Goldberg, general coun-
sel of the AFL CIO. The formal
statement by Mr. Dillon of a
declaration of principles "which
actuate United States 'oreign
policy affecting the American
merchant marine" was largely
a re-statement of American op-
position to Arab blacklisting and
restrictions on freedom of the
seas and freedom of access to
foreign ports.
There was one specific new com-
mitment, however, to the effect
that the State Department would
consult with the AFL-CIO and its
maritime unions, the SIU and the
ILA, on developments "affecting
Continued on Page 7 A
UNITED NATIONSArkady A. Sobolev, the Soviet Union's highly-
articulate delegation chairman here, suddenly lost his tongue this week.
It happened in the Delegates' dining room the night Israel was holding
its annual cocktail party, celebrating the State's achievement of inde-
pendence. It happened to be, too, the very day Sobolev's big boss in
Kremlin, Nikita Krushchev, had+
given a resounding "nyet" to Pre-
mier David Ben-Gurion's offer to
i come to Moscow to continue dis-
cussing the Middle East situation
about which the Israeli leader had
| already talked to President .Eisen-
hower and to Britain's Prime Min-
ister Harold Macmillan.
lach year, at Israel's anni-
versary celebration which,
punctiliously, he never fairs to
attend Mr. Sobolev has some
message that he is willing to
speak. Usually, his words con-
sist of polite, hacknied wishes for
peace and stability in the Middle
East. But, customarily, he .does
Continued on Page S-A
'METHODS MUST BE POLITICAL'
Dag Denies Pact
Egypt on Israeli Shipping
UNITED NATIONSSec- purchased F.O.B. Haifa,
retary General Dag Hammarskjold
asserted flatly here this week that;
he never made an "agreement"
with United Arab Republic Presi-
dent Nasser about Egyptian per-1
mission for passage through the
Suez Canal of ships carrying Is-
Israol circles had asserted that
Mm Astypalea case fell into the
category of on agreement pur-
portedly made between Hammar-
skjold and Nasser to allow canal
passage for foreign ships carry-
ing cargoes to or from Israel
when those cargoes were actual-
Noted Actor
Schwartz, 72,
Heart Victim
lag, this week renewed their de
raeli cargoes.
He was asked at a news confer-1 jy'o'wned by"non Israelis,
ister of Education. "Ae Premier lence whether he could reveal "the I
has assumed -the Education Port- facts" behind the attempt of a I The secretary general replied
folio in addition to his serving as,Greek freighter, the Astypalea, to,that "there has never been any
Minister of Defense and Acting transit the Suez Canal last Decem- agreement, and that is well known
Minister of Posts 'ber carrying a cargo that had been to both parties." In response to
another question referring to the
picketing of Egyptian ships and
embracing the principle of free-
dom of navigation through the
Suez Canal, Hammarskjold said
that he considered trade union ac-
tion on this issue as a method that
touched only the symptoms of the
problem and does not go to the
roots.
"The methods for reaching a
solution." he said, "must be polit-
ical. This problem is linked up
with others if not legally, then
certainly politically. Counter-ac-
tions concerned with symptoms do
not offer the most effective solu-
tion."
JTABy Direct Teletype Wire
TEL AVIV Maurice Schwartz,
one of the giants of the Yiddish
theater, died here Tuesday in Beil-
inson Hospital after a month-long
illness from heart ailment. He
was 72. I
In accordance with his last wish,
his body will be flown to New York
Friday. He became ill during a
brief visit to Israel.
Born in the Ukraine, ho was
the founder and director of the
Yiddish Art Theater. He pro-
duced more than 150 plays, in-
cluding the works of Sholom
Aleichem, Shaw, Shakespeare,
Leivick, Sackler, Hershbein, Da-
vid Pinsky, Abraham Goldfaden,
Tolstoy, Wilde, Gorsky, and
many others.
An actor, producer, and direc-
tor, he was the leading personality
of the Yiddish theater in Lower
Manhattan during the heyday of
(that theater in the 20's and 30's.
He was a member of the Screen
Actors Guild and Actors Equity.
Urge Extension of Nazi Trials Halt
RfiNTN flTAl Leaders of the lconstitutional grounds," no exten- to and including manslaughter,
nnosition Social Democratic Par-!sion of the limitations statute is while murder charges may be
? ana the heais of other liberal feasible. Under German law. the filed within an additional five-year
p'position groups in the Buhdes- statute of limitations expires in period.
.. !_ J- .1___D.;>!ol. inno this Ulpplf anil I .
The spokesman for the Social
statute of limitations expires in;period.
the British zone this week and,
LdTL^ns^ oMheltatute in the American zone July 1. The
Democratic Party hero stated
limitations which forbids ffUr- jdates^were bxedon ^fJ^^P^^^ j that/while ho agrees with the
Cabinet's decision forbidding
retroactive prosecutions, the So-
cialists fool that the expiration
ler prosecution of persons ac- of a 15-year penod from th* date
used of major crimes committed in 1945.when the Nazi regime
nder the Nazi regime. came officially to an end in the
The cabinet voted at a meeting i respective zones. The limitation ap-
friday evening that, "on legal and.:plies to various major crimes up
Continued on Pago 3-A
MAURICE SCHWARTZ


Page 2-A
*knist> fhrkMam
Fridqy- May 13. iggn

Leaders Mobilize to Plan Meir Affair;
Foreign Minister Due in Miami Jane 9
Gnlda Meir. Minister of ForeignJman Pacesetter chairman; Jack
Affair* for the State of Israel. isf*CaVneT.~Trll5RW chairman: Mrs
: expected to deliver a major ad-
dress in Miami on June. 9.
Max Weitz, chairman of the Worn,
en's Division; and Mrs. Anna Bren
Mrs. Meir is coming to Miami to ner Meyers, honorary chairman of
present Israel's "Decade City" | the Women's Division,
award to the Jewish community as ; .- Mrs Mejr was chosen ,,.
a token of Israels appreciation of ^.^ Minister for Foreign Affairs
" in June, 1956, she became one of
|the highest women cabinet officer?
in the world. Even prior to her
appointment as Minister for For-
eign Affairs, few women had at-
tained such heights of internation-
al fame as Mrs. Meir.
For his "outstanding service" to Senior Citizens, Isidore B.
Simkowitz. president ol the Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center (left), receives a scroll from A. Budd Cutler, vice pres-
ident and chairman of the Senior Citizens department. The
scroll was signed by the president of each of the four Senior
Citizen Clubs sponsored by GMJCC in recognition of the role
Simkowitz played in leading the way to the formation of a
county-wide department of service to Senior Citizens in the
Agency.
rael Bonds.
Sam Oritt and Jack A. Can
tor, general chairmen of the
Greater Miami Israel Bend com-
mittee, who announced Mrs.
Meir's visit, said that the com-
munity will be one of only four
cities in the entire world to re-.
ceive the "Decade City" award.
A committee of distinguished
citizens, representing all areas of
the community, is preparing an
elaborate welcome for Israel's
leading woman citizen. A dinner
in her honor will be held at the
Fontainebleau hotel on Thursday
evening, June 9, at which Mrs.
Rabbi Rosenberg on TV
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, spiri-
tual leader of Beth David Congre-
gation, will appear on "The Still
Small Voice." television program
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Assn. The program, to
be dedicated to Teacher's Day, is
seen over WCKT ch. 7 at 10 ajn.
Cantor William Lipson and Hy
Fried, organist, are also scheduled.
LONG-DISTANCI
MOVERS
DAILY PICK-UPS New York, New Jer
sey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash
ngten. Bostea all ether points.
DIAL JE 8 8353
M. Lieberman 4 Sons
*55 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH
RETURN LOAIJ RATES
Order of West
To Convene Here
The Progressive Order of the
. West will hold its 41st biennial con-
i vention at the Lucerne hotel Fri-
I day through the weekend, with Sol
Goldman, of Miami Beach, as
chairman.
The Progressive Order of the
West is a national Jewish fraternal
organization founded in 1896. Char-
tered in Missouri and maintaining
a lodge system, operating in 15
states, the Order has been a lead-
er among Jewish fraternal groups, i
contributing to philanthropic and
civic endeavors.
In St. Louis, the Order helped
build the Jewish Orthodox Old
Folks Home. In Chicago it is a
leading supporter of the Fox River
Sanitarium. It is a contributor to!
the Combined Jewish Appeal in all
cities, where its Lodges are lo-
cated.
The Order has supported the
State of Israel. In 1940, it erected
two homes in Israel to house refu-
gees there. In addition, a large
X-Ray clinic in Tel Aviv, recently
completed, bears the name of the
Order.
Farm worker, author, diplo-
mat, executive, government
leader, school teacher, mother
and crusader for peace and free-
dom. Go Id a Meir has become
one of Israel's most eloquent and
forceful spokesmen, and a sym-
bol of Israel's moral stature in
the international arena.
Prior to her assumption of her
as Minister of Labor, and before
Meir will present \he "becade l^^^ J?- ^ ^ ^^
City" award.
Heading the welcoming commit-
tee, in addition to Cantor and Oritt,
are Samuel Friedland. chairman
of the board of governors of the
Israel Bond committee; Jacob
Sher, honorary chairman: Sam
Blank. Max Orovitz and Carl
Weinkle, vice chairmen of the
board of governors: Marcie Liber-
Goodwill Group
Meeting Thursday
Goodwill Group will install offi-
cers at a meeting Thursday noon.
May 19. at Toby's restaurant, SW
27th ave. and the Trail.
Mrs. Frank Hoffman is presi-
dent. Others to be installed include
Mrs. Sam Geltner, vice president.
Also, Mrs. Leah Kripple. finan-
cial secretary; Mrs. Laura High,
corresponding secretary: and Ru-
bin Hyatt, treasurer.
that as Israels first Minister to
the Soviet Union. For 35 year7
her name has been synonymo '
with Israel s growth and deveW
ment. ^
Mrs. Meir left her school teach
lni^pusitiofl .in JUilu.-:..ii,., ln m
to settle on a kibbutz in PaTesfV
Her first job in the new land wa
raising poultry. Three years lafe.
she joined Solel Boneh, the build!
ing and construction cooperative
of Histadrulh, the Labor Federa-
tion. In 1930. she became director
of Avrion, Ltd., the early pre-State
branch of the Israel Air Force, and
shortly thereafter was elected as
the only woman member of the
five-man secretariat of the Labor
Federation Her unique career o(
public service has included war-
time membership on both the Pal-
estine Govern ment Economic
Council and the National Council
of Palestine Jews (Vaad Leumii

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*
M
Friday, May 13, 1960
+JewislinorKtiam
Page 3-A
Report Action Against Nazi Youths
NEW YORK-,-(JTA)-The Afl>er-_ *-jJlr Fnnrth Rxjrtilin faint'-ran , ican Jewish Committee made pub-jland, O., stated that its avowed: Mo., led to the apprehension of 15
lie this week a report on neo-Nazi objective was "to get rid of Jews {high school youths, although some
youth groups in the United States' and Communists." The leader ad-: evidence had indicated that there
and disclosed plans for community dressed as "Fuehrer" has a genius! were allegedly 80. Two of the
action to deal with them. JIQ. He had prepared a "death! leaders have confessed to deface-
- The report listed some 11 Ameri-jlist" which included President | ment of synagogues,
can communities where these] Eisenhower.
groups were discovered prior to, 3. "Nazism Club" Twenty-five
and following the recent rash of j teen-agers in Visalia, Calif., were
swastika incidents. The report) f0Und to be members of the group,
stated that in virtuaUy all instan- wnose officers used German mili-
tary titles and state that some
members comprised as S.S. Corps
in case rough stuff was needed."
4. "The Nazi Storm Troops"
Students at the Hebrew Academy pool their personal contri-
butions to the 1960 Combined Jewish Appeal and come up
with a $250 eheck for the all-important campaign. Arthur Rosi-
chan, executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion (left), accepts the check from Henry Mannheimer (center)
and Toby Firtel, noting that in Greater Miami alone more than
55,000 people are helped by CJA-supported health and wel-
fare agencies each year.
ces "these groups were found to
be manifestations of juvenile de-
linquency and expressions of the
herd instinct cast in Nazi format."
It stressed that there was "little I came to light after the home'of
evidence of adult instigation in the Vice Mayor in Alexandria, Va.,
these groups.' The majority of the had been fire bombed. Anti-Se-
mitic slogans were part- of the
group's literature.
5. "The Nordic Reich," which
Urge Extension of Date
For War Criminals' Trials
Continued from Page 1-A
date of 15 years should bo datod
from the time tho German courts
actually rook over jurisdiction.
That jurisdiction was not as-
sumed until 1949. Tho opposi-
tion parties hold, therefore, tho
the statute of limitations does hot
expire until 1964.
"The government's contention,"
the Social Democratic spokesman
stated, 'that extension of the
statute was unnecessary, because
the Central War Crimes Commis-
sion and provincial offices of pros-
ecution have already formally in-
itiated action against suspects, is
TENSE NERVOUS
ill for
fTRONGER Yet SAFER
ANacih
Won't Upeet The Ofell
oalr gives at refers
liMia* Mt oalj
Krtar relief free)
pot la else mf*.
Sola of header, be
mftr. Won't aaost the
i aad kas m had atVals. Tea
oa, Asaaia la Hke 4eet*Ca bio>
Oeripttos. That to, Amaeia natatoa
Bet Jost eae hot o asaiHaaWss ei
not logical. It must be expected
that many names of suspects are
not yet known to the authorities."
Meanwhile, Tuesday, the Minis-
try of Justice announced it has re-
jected the "convictions" of 593
West Germans found guilty of war
crimes in East Germany. The
Communist regime has notified
the ministry here that the 593
"convicted" persons had been
found guilty of war crimes charges
in courts under the East German
jurisdiction. The, charges against
these persons, the ministry stated,
are "propagandistic."
The ministry also rejected the
East German notification that Dr.
Theodor Oberlaender, resigned
Minister for Refugee Affairs, had
been convicted of war crimes and
sentenced to life imprisonment
after a trial in absentia. On the
basis of that conviction. East Ger-
many has demanded Dr. Ober-
laender's extradition.
youths involved were in the 13 to
18 age group.
The committee emphasized
that it is concerned with seeking
"the basic causes which lead
youthful offenders to choose neo-
Nazi symbols for their "hate
syndrome" and expressions of
criminality. To bo explored are
the backgrounds and general so-
cial history of these offenders,
including: the community situa-
tion, the cultural and familial
framework, the individual's psy-
chological makeup, his educa-
tion, end related environmental
and personal factors.
The committee plans to enlist
the aid of clinical psychologists,
social workers, university r e -
searchers, law enforcement and
voluntary agencies who will work
together as teams in specified
communities.
These teams will carry on stud-
ies in depth of the youths who are
apprehended as members of these_
neo-Nazi groups. The studies will
seek to formulate explanations for
patterns of behavior, and propose
positive community actionin the
educational and human relations
fieldsto combat these tendencies.
Some of the neo-Nazi groups
cited in the report were:
1. "Tho Nazi Regime of Amer-
ica"had among its parapher-
nalia a homemade bomb, a gun,
I swastika insignia, and hand-
printed literature. Tho group
wos discovered in Wayne, N. J.
S. "The Nox-Coms" wore dis-
covered in Levittown, L. I., fol-
lowing the defacement of
church, a Baptist cemetery and
high school. They said that their
group incorporated the features
of both Nazism and Communism.
7. In New York Citr the "Xtt-
tional American Renaissance Par-
ty" was discovered while in the
process of formation. A large
stock of Nazi paraphernalia, liter-
ature and membership cards were
confiscated.
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Mind/in to be Speaker
Leo Mindlin, executive editor of
The Jewish Floridian, will speak
at the noon meeting of Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith on
Tuesday at the DiLido hotel. Ger-
shon S. Miller is luncheon chair-
man.
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Page 4-A
Friday, May 13. I960
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
TelephoneTR 3-4&S "
Teletype Coauntuucations Miami TWX
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FRH) K. SHOCHET......... Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
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at J* JL_iilh J(nt. Miami 1. FWMa l")
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Tha Jawiaft Floritfian haa tturtrt Um Jew.n Unity ana
taw Jawtan Watki/. Member of tt> Jewish Tctagraphic
A#ancr. Sawan Arta Feature Syndicate. Waridwide Newa
Sarv.cs. National Editorial Aaan.. American Aaan. of
Cmjliah.Jewiah Nawaaanara. and the Florida Preee Aaan.
The Jeniah rlvridtaa does not guarantee the Kajhruia
of the rr-rcnan4lae adrrrtiaed in Ka columna.
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Volume 33
Friday. May 13. 1960
16 Iyar 5720
Number 20
Personal Diplomacy Backfires frmS
UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold
made at least two trips to Egypt during 1959 ior
the sole purpose of discussing with President
Nasser his illegal blockade of the Suez Canal
against Israeli shipping.
The Inge Toft case created a maritime
no less than a political furor around the world.
Its implications were profound, for it drew in
unmistakable terms the broader significance of
Nasser's recalcitrant action.
When the Greek freighter Astypalea more
recently met the the same fate as the Inge Toft.
the fat was really in the fire. This boat had
sought entry through the Suez Canal on the
basis of a presumable agreement worked out
between Nasser and Hammarskjold on one of
Dag's trips to Egypt
Under the terms of the agreement, cargoes
bought and paid for in Israel by nations
abroad could be shipped home via Suez since
they were no longer Israeli property.
Many observers at the time of the agree-
ment, including these columns, deplored the
UN official's decision to do business with Nas-
ser on such a disjointed basis. This was not
a circumvention of international law with re-
spect to Suez Canal access, but rather a total
distortion of it To accept these terms from
Nasser could only encourage him further in
his flouting of maritime agreements.
It is by now past history that Egypt barred
the Astypalea's way just as it did the Inge
Toft's. Some of the most distinguished news-
papers throughout the world, in reporting the
story, editorialized sharply on Nasser's treach-
ery. This was many months ago.
Only last week, in discussing his view of
the longshoremen's boycott against the Egyp-
tian freighter Cleopatra. Dag Hammarskjold
declared that he had never made an agree-
ment with Nasser for access of f.o.b. Israeli
shipping through the Suez Canal Clearly, the
UN official was aware of the circulation of de-
tails relating to the by now alleged agreement
Why did he not make his denials in the very
beginning?
Why did Dag permit world opinion to be-
lieve he had achieved some sort of rapproch-
ment with Nasser in the first place? Why did it
suit him to let everyone think that the rap
prochment was violated almost from the start?
Dag's sort of personal diplomacy can
never lead to anything but disaster. It gives
him more prestige than the United Nations sec-
retary general's post in fact has, and it implies
that some member nations are above inter-
national lawthat the more they flout the law
the more they are entitled to special handling.
Isn't this carrying personal diplomacy just
a little bit too far?
The Passing of an Era
The death of renowned Yiddish actor
Maurice .Schwartz brings to a sad close another
era of Jewish history in America.
Apart from his dramatic abilities, which
earned him great praise throughout the world
and beyond the horizons of Yiddish theater, he
was a man intimately identified with the large
wave of immigration here ai the beginning of
the twentieth century.
The name of Maurice Schwartz spelled
magic for a Jewish culture which has just about
disappeared. Even in the last decades of his
own lifetime, Schwartz found it increasingly
difficult going in America. The men and
women who understood his language and his
message had slowly begun to pass on.
So, too. has Maurice Schwartz now passed
on. The exciting hub of New York's world of
Yiddish theater, the intellectual stimulation of
Jewish thought found in discussion over the
tables of the Cafe Royale on Second Avenue
these are all gone.
We must now look hopefully to new intel-
lectual horizons that are indigenous to the
world of second and third generation Amer-
ican Jews.
Symbol of Enlightenment
As a school, the Hebrew Academy should
conduct its affairs with the utmost dignity.
Any educational institution ought to live by
this rule.
This is particularly true of the Hebrew
Academy, which has earned the respect and
admiration of many people.
The Academy's current rezoning petition
has been marked by incidents that do any-
thing but redound to the school's dignity. Pur-
poseless picketing, the intemperate use of in-
vective by some of its supportersthese do
not. in fact, advance the Academy's cause.
The Academy should, contrarily, stand
above these as a symbol of enlightenment to
the community. If the Academy resorts to the
kind of tactics of which it is currently alleging
to be a victim, the public will find it difficult
to tell right from wrong without a program.
Attainment of Ambitions
The election of Label Katz to head the Con-
ference of Presidents brings to mind the scat-
tered condition in which the American Jewish
comm unify finds itself today.
Mr. Katz is an able and astute leader. He
succeeds Philip Hutznick. one of the wisest and
most experienced captains of Jewish affairs
here and throughout the world.
If the Conference of Presidents boasts
smaller accomplishments than its goals had
envisioned, it will not be for lack of proper
leadership.
It will merely emphasize the problems of a
broadly segmented Jewish community of a
community boasting almost as many organ-
izations as constituents, of the quest for power
rather than for effective expression.
The Cart Before the Horse
The haste many groups are showing to ex-
tend the time limit for bringing to trial former
Nazis charged with criminal behavior betrays
the prevalent feeling that racism is not dead
in Germany.
The trials have served their obvious pur-
pose. Continuing them only plays into the
hands of Germany's new Nazi groups, who
see them as an extension of the "Jewish power''
they apparently failed to root out.
We are not suggesting that playing down
the trials would have a salutary effect on these
groups. But it is worth noting that if the "vic-
torious powers failed in Germany the fault
hardly lies with an ineffective trial system.
It lies rather in Germany's educational in-
stitutions, where inert parents and teachers
during the week
777aTi see it
by LEO MINDLIN
WHIN THOU Jewish at.
" torneys recently stepped
forward to defend one of Lin-
coln Rockwell's henchmen
thy were iis.s<|, jriq.
ciples of a free society to the*
point of self-cancellation Lib-
erty is the heritage of demo-
cratic government; it is meant
to be enjoyed by men. Where
the dictator-minded, like the
Rockwells among os, chal-
lenge our liberty, they put to question our right to survival. If. in the
name of the very philosophy we cherish, there emerges the practice
that places little restraint on those who would destroy it. then we are
also inviting our own destruction. And of what value is freedom un-
less there are men to enjoy it?
The consideration that arises here is one of degree. To what ex-
tent do we insist on the right of others to speak their thoughts and.
practice their beliefs even if they urge our enslavementor murder
in a gas chamber? This was precisely the issue in the case involving
Rockwell's henchman, who stood on a street corner in Washington and
distributed handbills suggesting that Americans adopt the Hitleriaa
"solution to the Jewish problem."
The Jewish attorneys who defended Robert Morgan, following
his scuffle with a passerby, did so on the basis of their ardent belief
in freedom of the press. The consideration of decree in this instance
becomes most pertinent. Is it to be assumed that, in another age and
another time, they would also have defended Josef Goebbles. wh>
subsequently became Minister of Propaganda of the Third Reich, and
one of the architects of the master plan that ultimately sent six million
Jews to their graves?
< -; -:- :-
KKOUKTIO* Of A ticMl ifww
IN A RECENT column. I discussed a D wight Mac Dona Id review of
"Ben-Hur." which appeared in the March issee of Esquire Maga-
zine. I agreed wholeheartedly with Mr. MacDooald's attitude toward
the film, which he characterized as \ulgar. I found delightful h.-
comment concerning "our mass culture .' (which) compensates for
its prudery about sex by portraying violence." Beyond this, we
parted company.
In a slashing charge, the Esquire reviewer declared: "Here .-
finally, a blasphemous falsification of the Bible ... in which sot the
Jews but the Romans are responsible for Christ's martyrdom. Ac-
cording to Matthew. Luke and John, it wasn't that way at alL" Con-
tinued MacDonald: "There is a brief shot of some high priests looking
on at the crucifixion they look sad rather than jubilant there
are no ancient Romans around, and there are many Jews, and $15,-
000.000 (the cost of the film) is $15.000.000."
These observations, I categorically labeled anti-Semitic. To be-
gin with, the crucifixion is a New Testament story which has served
as the basis for and justification of the slaughter of untold million-,
upon millions of Jews over the past 2.000 years. It is indeed true, as
MacDonald indicates, that the story comes to us according to Matthew.
Luke, and John; the prosecutor, judge and executioner are one and
the same. To avoid suggesting that the New Testament incorporates
some of the most provocative anti-Semitic material ever written is
to be ignorant of Christian theology and obsequious in the name of
cowardly community relations pundits.
The entire spirit of the MacDonald chargehowever accurate it
may be with respect to the failure of "Ben-Hur" to hew the line so
far as Matthew, Luke and John are concernedbreathes anti-Semi-
tism. The reference to "$15,000,000 is S15.000.000 can not be mii
taken for anything less than the monetary acumen with which the
Christian world has characterized its Jewish victims these many
centuries.
: : -:
TrK HIHISHU PKOTtSTS MOT IN0UCH
TO THE DEFENSE of seemingly defenseless Dwight MacDonald
rushed William Zukerman. who publishes a bi-weekly "Jewish
Newsletter" in New York City. Zukerman s pamphlet reflects the
American Council for Judaism line, looks wild-eyed at Zionismand
schizophrenically devotes the majority of its columns to Israel
In Vol. XVI No. 8 of the Newsletter," dated Apr. 18. Jewish ed-
itor Zukerman rakes me over the coals for my conclusions about Mac-
Donald's review of "Ben Hur." This is achieved by conveniently dn
missing my major premise as an afterthought. Weasel-words Zuker-
tnan: "Whether or not one agrees with MacDonald about a detail of an
historic trial which occurred nearly two thousand years ago it is
fantastic to see in the mere mention of such an opinion a siga
of anti-Semitism ."
But the 'historic detail" should be preciselv the issue here for
Jewish liberal Zukerman. who finds my own reputation across the
nation as a Jewish liberal a "curious thing." It is this historic detail
on which we have been hung since the start of the Christian calendar,
and for which many are still biding their time.
If Zukerman rushs in to fill the breach, Arnold Gingrich, publisher
or Esquire Magazine, does not. To those who queried him on the
matter. Gingneh replied: "Yours is by no means the only voice raised
is protest against Dwight MacDonalds review of Ben Hur.' As a
matter of fact. I was ahead of you in protesting myself ."
:- -: -:- -: -s.
r OMUENCf ro om survival
TH** IS CERTAINLY an opposite view from the one in the "Jewish
hsne n*eUer T b?rrow Zukermans own terminology, it is oer-
nln-M KUn0US th!"8 that he should *"* o defend Dwight Mac-
SI ~n\'en,en,l>-turns out to be a member of his editorial
nnnMy'J 4Inc,den,,aU>- this hardly, of necessity, makes Mae-
mani nahu ^neL,Ca S greM Critics and truth-seekers," as Zuker-
man so nobly characterizes him
attorne!,W!r,at,hPrine *i* If'!*1*7 lX is ,he same that paid by the
who e? h R^kwe" henchman case and by Gingrich, himself,
^helP?rX h,s ",Uraat* *> to publish the "Ben Hur" critique,
the rSh.!i?."? is 0ne tbe duties- ** one of
expression LJ *? Cf-' l permU tbe wk,est P~ib,e freedora *
written u. 2 v''?tions of the written laws of libel and the un-
Sion." m 0rder to give its ** fuU ltltude of
MscdZiST Gingrich: "While *e happened not to agree with Mr.
MacDonalds opin.on we are obliged to defend his right to express
lein^tntTeo't Vo,r,lire,he ^ ~ "* ""
the n-L'ahs"Ie "lnrti0nJth*1 ,hose who harangue us about freedom of
acted ?n the L f democrat **"ty do so only when they have
'merest Ovpr?v T'"'01 the P*oP>--nd thus in their own best
than their S w'T hhtnl*' in these **>* "<* >' more
.."truism TW "fant-eye- to realize the prevalence of this
S wT.h ,h ,.ey PracUce what man> ot 'he press merely preaeh
defend of n^nKa,wne^S And wi,h Zukerman, whose crossfire
of the critiaur8^ MacDn'd U canceled by Gingrich" publication
a J !!-'"que- The Pr,ce? Our own right to urviv.l-perhaBs aoma-


Friday. May 13, 1960
Jen is*-nrrXUann
Page 5-A
Turning in completed pledges and checks lo general CJA
chairman Harold Thurman (seated) are (left to right) Theodore
J. Goldstein, Abe Gurevitt, and Joseph Rose, shown at the one-
day "Trades Blitz."
UTTER TO THE EDITOR
Stand Praised on Rezoning
For Miami Beach Academy
The following are a few of the dozens of letters received by The
Jewish Floridian concerning the Hebrew Academy rezoning issue. The
letters overwhelmingly expressed the Acadmy's viewpoint. Space limita-
tion* preclude publishing .ill of them.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
On behalf of the Executive Com-
mittee, I wish to commend Leo
Mindlin for his most brilliant and
analytical article regarding the He-
: brew Academy rezoning, which
appeared in last week's Jewish
Horidian.
He has indeed performed an in-
[ valuable service to our community
by revealing the plight of a seven-
I year struggle to find a decent home
lor our more than 300 children
Leo Mind)in's enlightening cov-
erage of the entire matter will
surely awaken the community
leadership to our needs in acquir-
ing a "place in the sun" of Miami
Beach. A g
HARRY GENET
Chairman, Executive Committee
The Hebrew Academy
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
As I see it, Leo Mindlin eloquent-
ly champions the cause of the un-
derdog.
His recent May 6 column sltows
what an erudite vocabulary can
do to call a spade a spade.
Congratulations to him.
DONALD
Miami
SWARTZ
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I am unable to let Leo Mindlin's
column in last Friday's Jewish
Floridian pass without comment.
I must say that he has done the
Jewish people a great service in
bringing forth the true issue as to
the problem of the Hebrew Acad-
emy, What has recently happened
and is happening in Miami Beach,
as brought out in his column, is
another illustration of the unfortu-
nate slave mentality in which Jews
find themselves, ^hich is a ves-
tige of their European ancestry.
In this country, where democ-
racy rules, the Jew has developed
an independent view where he can
think freely, talk freely and be
treated freely, together with all the
citizens of all faiths. I am, there-
fore, surprised that in this com-
munity where Jews are of a pre-
ponderant majority we, neverthe-
less, still find slave mentality al-
ways willing to submit.
Mindlin's column brought this is-
sue out into the open. It is about
time the Jew takes his rightful
place and becomes mature enough
to be independent in his thinking.
I, as an American born Jew,
should like to think that any prob-
lem and issue that arises in this
community can and will be decid-
ed on its merits and only by the
Soviet Bigwig
Mum as Israel
Marks Birthday
Continued from Page 1-A
say something. This time, how-
ever, he played shy.
"What shall I say?" he retorted"
:o a request for a statement.
"This is Israel's Independence
Day!" he was told. "You always
jive us a statement on this day.
.Vould you give us a message
now?"
"Ah, but this is not a day of
^articular note," he replied. "If
his were the fifth anniversary
or the 25thsome special anniver-
sary, I would say something.
Please, excuse me."
He did have a conversation with
Tel Aviv's Mayor Mordecftai Na-
mir, who happened to be present.
Mr. Namir had served two years
as Israel's Ambassador in Moscow.
He speaks Russian fluently, and
the two men used Russian in their
brief talk.
After congratulating Mr. Na-
mir on his excellent Russian,
Mr. Sobolev went his way. Soon,
he left the party.
The party was brilliant. Amer-
ica's delegation chairman, Henry
Cabot Lodge, was there, and so
were the delegation chairmen of
at least 60 other United Nations
member states. The Afro-Asian
bloc except, of cour.se, for the
Arabs were out en masse. From
the Iron Curtain countries, also,
not a single delegation was absent.
But they, of course, were net
talking. They were watching for
the word from Big Brother Sobo-
lev. But Sobolev wasn't saying a
word. He had received his hint
direct from the Kremlin.
duly-elected representatives of the
people.
IRVING FIRTEL
Miami Beach
-#-
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I just finished reading the arti-
cle by Milton Freidman, "He Rock-
ed Fights of Nazism, in Their
Graves."
This brings back bad memories
to me, in Berlin in January, 1933,
when my family and I were com-
ing back from a trip to Rumania.
As we walked, we saw a curious
parade of Hitler troops, surround-
ed by special police and guns.
When we asked, in astonishment.
what it was all about, we were
told (and I will never forget it)
that "they are revolutionaries."
Five days later, when we ar-
rived in the United States, Hitler
took over. I hope it. does not hap-
pen here. But never let such a
party as Rockwell's go on to get
strong. No one is immune to going
bad.
MRS. MINNIE SOLOMON
Miami Beach
GREYHOUND RACING
TONIGHT
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FLAGLER KENNEL CLUB
37th AVENUE and 7th STREET, Northwest MIAMI

I




Page 6-A
*Jmtslk**KMn
Friday. May 13. I960
Florida State Federation Elects Nieberg;
Mrs. Lewis in New Term for Women
SAMUtL NIUHC
Samuel Nieberg, of Miami, was
elected president of the Florida
State Federation of B'nai B'rith
Lodges at the Federation's annual
convention here at the Lucerne
hotel.
Also elected were David Gor-
man, St. Petersburg, president-
elect; Charles Seiavitch. Miami.
Milton Levinson, Pensacola, Mor-
ris Zimmerman, Tampa, Norman
Friedman, Jacksonville, Sam
Schutzer, West Palm Beach, and
Ansel Wittenstein, vice presidents.
Jack Wilson, of Miami Beach,
was elected treasurer, and Lucas
Goldwyn, Sarasota. is secretary.
Outgoing president is Jerome
Greene, of Miami.
A native of St. Louis. Nieberg^
who resides at 3942 SW 5th St..
came to Miami in 1950. He and
his wife, Ida, have one son, Mar-
vin, who lives in St. Louis, and
twin daughters, Mrs. Phyllis Erb-
lich. outgoing president of the Fla-
mingo chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women, Hialeah, and Mrs. Evelyn
Schwarzman. incoming president
of Flamingo.
Mrs. Nieberg is past president
of the Coral Gables chapter and
current service officer of District
5.
A graduate of the University
i of Illinois, Mieborg taught book-
keeping and rapid calculation at
Brown's Business College in JEet
St. Louis, IN. Mo is a past pres-
ident of the St. Louis Club of
Greater' Miami, a ttnd tie vie* "
Mason, and a Shriner.
He is past president of Coral
Gables Lodge, B'nai B'rith, and
was Distridl 5 leader in member-
Jewish League Urges Zionist Unity
NEW YORK (JTA)-A resolu-
tion calling for the unification of
all Zionist and pro-Israel groups in
the United States info one body
was adopted at the closing session
here recently of the convention of
the American Jewish League for
Israel. Samuel Daroff, of Phila-
delphia, was elected president of
the organization, succeeding Ezra
Shapiro.
The convention pledged support
to the Assn. of Americans and Ca-
nadians in Israel, and urged all
League members to participate in
the United Jewish Appeal, in the
Israel Bond Organization, and
other programs in support of Is-
rael. Other resolutions felicitated
Israel on the country's 12th anni-
UM Teacher
In Art Talk
Prof. Clayton Charles, of the art
department at the University of
Miami, addressed the second
in a series of Fine Arts Lectures
on Thursday evening at Temple
Beth Sholom.
The series is under the sponsor-
.hip of the Greater Miami chap-
ter. American Friends of the He-
brew University.
Chairman of the committee in
charge is Mrs. Arnold Green-
field. Others are Mesdames Ben-
jamin Gindy, Solomon Goldman,
Daniel O. Hammond, A. Victor
Huber, Herbert S. Shapiro and
Richard Wolf son.
Miami Beach Councilmcn Ken-
neth Oka launched the series re-
cently with an address on music
entitled Theme and Variation."
Presiding was Leo Robinson.
Prof. Charles' address Thursday
was 'WantedPart-Time Genius."
versary, called upon the new exec-
utive of the organization to pre-
pare to hold a youth pilgrimage in
Israel in the summer of 1961 and
to launch an intensive member-
ship drive in those Jewish com-
munities where the League has not
established itself. Samuel Roth-
stein, of Brooklyn, was elected
chairman of the League's execu-
tive committee, and Samuel Roth-
berg, of Peoria, III., was reelected
chairman of the League's board
of directors.
A call for increased private
investment* by Americans in Is-
rael's economy was made at the
assembly by Pinhas Sapir, Is-
rael's Minister of Commerce and
Industry. Sapir explained the
recent change* in Israeli law
which provide liberal terms for
foreign investments in that coun-
try. He praised such efforts by
American* as the Israel Inves-
tors Corporation which, in its
first year of existence, invested
$4 million in Israeli government
enterprises. The corporation is
headed by Rotbberg.
Avraham Harman. Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Slates, de-
livered a speech on the 12th anni-
versary of the State of Israel. He
noted that Israel has made great
improvements in this time and re-
ferred to the great policies which
have enabled her to do so. Ambas-
sador Harman said that Israel's
[development and accomplishments
in the years ahead will be influen-
ced more by one factory than by
many resolutions.
Louis Lipsky, founder of the
American Zionist movement, spoke
on the occasion of the' 100th anni-
versary of the birth of Theodor
Herzl, founder of the world Zionist
movement. Lipsky, honorary pres-
ident of the League, outlined the
forces and circumstances which
had brought Herzl to Zionism and
of the fulfillment of the Herzlian
vision and prophecy in the emer-
gence of the State of Israel.
Other speakers included Dr. Is-
rael Goldstein, Judge Louis Levin-
tbal and Ezra Shapiro, who opened
the two-day national assembly.
Mrs. Rose Halprin, acting chair-
man of the American section of
I the Jewish Agency, greeted the
delegates on behalf of the Agency.
'Shapiro stated that promulgation
I of the Zionist unification plan
would be extremely important at
this time when all Zionist and pro-
Israel groups in this country are
I faced with problems of readjust-
ment as a result of the changes in
the method of operation announ-
ced by the Jewish Agency for Is-
rael in New York three weeks ago.
ship in 1958. Nieberg is a mem-
ber of-The District Service Fund
Cabinet, District Membership Cab-
inet, Hillel chairman for the South
Florida Council, and Service Fund
chairman for the Florida statt
1 Federation.
I
Mrs. Shephard Lewis, of West
P*'.S? Be^ *-JgJcted P"*
"Idem of the Florida-Sate Feder-
ation of Women's* Councils. Others
are Mrs. Jack Hosid, secretary,
Orlando, and Mrs. David Green*
berg, treasurer, Miami.
YOUNG ISRAEL
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Friday. May 13. 1960
+Je*isi>ncrk0iar)
Page 7-A
Rabbi Abramowitz New Rabbinical Assn.
Head as Body Vows Continued Service
D.kk; u._____ i__ ...
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz has
been elected president of the Great-
er Miami Rabbinical Assn. Spiri-
tual leader of North Shore Jewish
Center*-**, succeeds Rabbi Alfred
Waxman, of Temple Zion.
Other officers named at an elec-
tion meeting of the organization
last week include Rabbi Morton
Malavsky,- Israelite Center, exec-
utive vice president; Rabbi Jonah
Caplan, Adath Yeshuruq, secre-
tary; and Rabbi Benno Wallach,
Temple Sinai of North Miami,
treasurer.
In addition to Rabbi Waxman,
Beth Israel Fetes
Outgoing Prexy-
Cocktail party and buffet dinner
will be tendered by the Beth Is-
rael Congregation at the home of
Its newly-elected president, Alex-
ander Muscovites, and Mrs. Mosco-
vits, 3054 N. Bay rd., on Sunday
evening..
The occasion will serve as a
tribute to outgoing president Isa-
dore Friedman and Mrs. Fried-
man, who herself served as first
president of the congregation's Sis-
terhood.
A iowrnal marking the sixth
anniversary of th* institution is
being published in conjunction
with rtw occasion. Some 200 per-
sons are expected to attend.
Entertainment features will in-
clude Ronald Sweetz, noted accord-
ionist, who recently won the
world's championship when he rep-
resented the United States against
the leading accordionists of Eur-
ope. He has been featured by Ed
j Sullivan.
Bernie Berns, master of cere-
monies, comedian and singer, will
be a co-feature on the program. He
has just completed an engagement
at the Chez Paree in Chicago.
Chairman of the event is Henry
Groudan. Harry Schwartz is chair-
man of the souvenir journal.
outgoing officers include Rabbi
Abramowitz, vice president;
Rabbi Henry Okolica, North
Dado Jewish Center, secretary
treasurer; and Rabbi Malavsky,
executive secretary.
In accepting the presidency of
the organization. Rabbi Abramo-
witz declared that "it shall be our
endeavor in the ensuing year to
continue to render a service to
our community and to Israel.
"Our body oT rabbis will extend
itself in an organized fashion to
sponsor, in addition to their com-
munal services, seminars of re-
, ligious and cultural importance to
Mhe spiritual leaders and their re-i
spective congregations. The Asso-j
ciation is also identified with the I
promotion of close cooperation I
among various local associations
of clergy of other faiths."
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Mi S-eet* MIAMI
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz (left), spiritual leader of North Shore
Jewish Center, is congratulated by George Jessel. guest speak-
er, at a dinner honoring the rabbi last Saturday night in the
Fontainebleau hotel. Joining in the congratulations is (right)
Maurice Revitz, chairman of the dinner and the congregation's
new president.
Nasser Firm as Cleopatra Unloaded
500 Honor North
Shore's Leader
A capacity gathering of more
than 500 persons honored Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, of North Shore
Jewi.-h Center, at a dinner Satur-
day evening in the Fontainebleau
hotel.
Responding to an appeal by Rab-
bi Leon Kronish, of Temple Beth
Sholom, friends of Rabbi Abram-
owitz demonstrated their regard
for him by purchasing $116,000 in
Israel Bonds.
They heard guest speaker of the
evening, George Jessel, describe
Israel's progress in its 12 years of
statehood as he himself had seen
it in a series of periodic visits.
Rabbi Abramowitz, who was hon-
lored for "outstanding service to
the State of Israel and Israel
Bonds," was presented with a gift-
check to cover a round-trip to Is-
rael for himself and his family.
Rabbi Abramowitz is a native of
Jerusalem, and has a large family
residing in Israel.
Dinner chairman was Maurice
Revitz, president of North Shore
Jewish Center.
Continued from Page 1-A i
American vessels and seamen" in
the Middle East.
(Press dispatches from Cairo re-
ported Monday that United Arab
Republic President Nasser has!
stated publicly that he has no in-
teatlon of lifting Jhe anti-Israeli
blockade of the Suez Canal. He
also denounced American senators
who had voted for a clause in the
Mutual Security Bill, giving the
President discretion to withhold
foreign aid from countries that
practice boycotts. In his address,
Nasser spoke of American aid as
help given "in the style of Cohen.")
Paul Hall, president of the SIU,
has warned that picketing of Egyp-
tian ships would be resumed if the
State Department failed to pro-
duce "practical implementation"
of its promises to investigate the
union's complaints about abuse of
its members in Arab ports. Hall
said his union would also hold the
State Department to its promise to
intensify diplomatic efforts to pro-
ject American ships and seamen
against Arab discrimination.
For the first time in me long-
simmering dispute over Arab
blacklisting and boycotts against
American shipping involved in
trade or other contact with Is-
rael, the State Department con-
ceded publicly that American
seamen had been harrassed in
Arab ports. The Dillon state-
ment said that the State Depart-
ment had "renewed" its stand-
ing orders to consular official*
to be on the alert to help in set-
tling grievances of seamen and
Other American citizens.
The statement also promised
that it would continue to "do what
it can" to end Arab-imposed re-
strictions on movements or ships
carrying American foreign-aid car-
go, and it pledged that the State
Department would do everything
possible to protect American inter-
ests in foreign trade.
The key point of the declaration
was the statement that the State
Department would "undertake to
investigate fully the grievances of
the Seafarers' International Union
and, through appropriate diploma-
tic action with the foreign coun-
tries involved, to renew its efforts
to assure freedom of the sea and
to protect the interests of our ship-
ping and seamen now being dis-
criminated against by the Arab
boycott and blacklisting policy."
In a telegram to Mr. Hall asking
that the pickets be withdrawn.
George Meany, president of the
AFL-CIO, said he felt. that the
"good trade union purposes" for
which the picketing had been or-
ganized had been achieved. He
urged the pickets be withdrawn
on the strength of the "good faith
assurance" given by the Admin-
istration.
The State Department declara-
tion was not released until it was
discussed with President Eisen-
hower. It had been discussed in
j general terms 'or two weeks by
j State Department officials and
AFL-CIO representatives. Other
'points made In the State Depart-
ment statement were:
1. The United States has said
repeatedly, and again at the Uni-
ted Nations in September, that it
favors freedom of transit through
the Suez Canal for all nations; 2.
it is government policy to protest
discriminatory actions against
American firms, vessels and citi-
zens, and the State Department
"will continue to pursue, by all
appropriate and effective means,
every avenue whereby private
American interests in internation-
al trade may be fully safeguarded
and restored."
3. The United States govern-
ment will not recognize or con-
done the Arab boycott; 4. since
February, the United States Navy
has discontinued a ban against
tankers which were, or might be,
on the Arab blacklist, for- charters
to carry oil to naval bases.
JWB Convention on Beach
The 1962 biennial national con-
vention of the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board will be held at the
Deauville hotel Apr. 4 to 8, 1962.
BEST QUALIFIED BY FAR .
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Pd. Pol. Adv.
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AS A 10-YEAR VITMAN STATE UftlStATOR
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in the form of service to you and the
community.
MORTON LEE PERRY
Candidate for Judge of the
Small Claims Court
Pd. Pol Adv.

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Page 8-A
* Jew 1st flcricfiain
Friday. May 13. I960
160 to be Graduated at Community
Exercises in Temple Israel Tuesday
Community graduation exercises i Ei; Morris A. Skop, Temple Judea:
will be held for 160 graduates from | David Shapiro, Temple Sinai of
the Hebrew departments of 13 ele-1 Hollywood; Leo Heim, Temple
mentary schools and from the Cen- Tifereth Jacob; Alfred Waxman,

*# >;
tral Hebrew High School of the
Bureau of Jewish Education on
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m., at Temple Is-
rael.
Program of the graduation will
be a tribute to the Hebrew poet
laureate, Hayim Nachman Bialik,
observing the 25th anniversary of
his death.
Greetings from the Bureau of
Jewish Education will be ex-
tended to the graduates by Leo
Robinson, vice president.
Highlight of the exercises will
be the presentation of "Our Bia-
lik." based on a cantata of a sim-
ilar name by Ira and Judith Eisen-
stein, and adapted and directed by
I-ouis Schwartzman, executive di-
rector of the Bureau.
TeiffpTr^ion.-*^" ^
The annual Jacob and Adele
Kaplan prize awarded by the Rab-
binical Assn. of Greater Miami
will be presented by Rabbi Wax-
man, president, to the two out-
standing students of the Hebrew
High School. .
The annual Israel Shspoff Me-
morial Award and the Ratner
Family Award will be presented
to the two elementary graduates
who gained the highest mark in
the graduation examinations.
ri.

if -
Gradutes of Monticello Park and
Temple Sinai of- Hollywood will
read from Bialik's prose writings.
The prayer and benediction will
be offered by graduates of North
,jDade Jewish Center and Temple
Narration for the cantata wil iTifereth Jacob.
be given by the 13 graduates of
the Hebrew High School. Songs
and lyrics will be sung by two
mass choirs of graduates of the
Beth David Congregation, Israel-
ite Center, Temple Judea, Temple
Zion. Kneseth Israel, North Shore
Jewish Center, Temple Emanu-Bl,
and Temple Beth Shalom.
The choirs are under the direc-
tion of Cantor Herman Gottlieb, of
Temple Judea, and Cantor David
Conviser, of Temple Beth Sholom.
The charge to the graduates
will be given by Herbert Ber
ger, assistant director of the Bu-
reau and principal of the Cen-
tral Hebrew High School.
Architect's sketch of proposed Temple Adath Beach's newest congregation. The site is i
Yeshurun, which will become North Miami the Greynold's Park area.
in
Beth David Honors Teachers, Students
The salutatory, welcoming new
graduates into the Central Hebrew
High School, will be given by grad-
uates of Temple Beth Sholem of
Hollywood.
The graduates-include the fol-
lowing:
Beth David: Mark Bayer, Philip C
Delict. Susan UoMberc, Melvin Las-
kin, Ells* Leffler, Stuart Hi we. St.-v.-n
Rosenblatt, Benjamin Rosoff, Syiiii
Hernaker Daniel si.i1m.In. Jay Wag-
"mii. Richard Welnkle ami .hi.liih
Teles.
Israelite Center: Sli-v.-n Kirsner,
BHen Weiss and Ronald Winston.
Keneseth Israel: Kenneth Bach,
Jack Ki aiiiiyiciii. Metvia Klein and
Riihard Weln.r.
Monticello Park: Jeffrey Augen-
Meln. Robert lllau. William Diamond, |
IJnda Kdelman. Marvin Uaa, Mm tun
Schwab and Michael Slegel.
Pr.t.n.,ii. nr ,i;.,i. ~a North Dade Jewish Center: Klllot
presentation of diplomas and Upof, Pen? Rablnowlu, Mark Reas-
gifts will be made by the spiritual lor. Cathy Sandier and Carol Viman.
Ipadcrs of the erarliiafino rlas- .,North 8hOT Jewish Center: Robert
icaners 01 me graduating classes. Kn ,,,.,. Krllmall sjm K <.;run..ff,
Rabbis Yaakov Rosenberg, Beth Uall Greenhouse, Ivan Jacobs, iienr.v
David- Morton M.ilavskv Urar-litc '""l"""1. Marsha Krnnnvet. Alan
,.. rl0" Cla'fys?i' i!rael"? Kurswell, Jerry Ueberman, Charles
Center; David Lehrneld, Kneseth Llndenbaum, Candj Morse, .lu.iiih
Israel; Max I.ipshitz. Monticello \',]'\\ki"-...' ';''", ";"/"" Seyojoor
t> i ii m i- i i% Roth, Michael Saffon. and Marc
Park; Henry Okolica, North Dade white.
Jewish Center-Popiel School; May- T,emp,e, Be,h shoiem (Hollywood):,
er Abramowitz, North Shore Jew- $& $&*&*%! Be"e*5 aSSt
ish Center: Samuel Lerer, Temple jj-**,e, IJelafuente, Jesse Diner. Jlmir.)
Rplh Sholem n( HnllvumnH- loon h,"'''"-1 "der. Jill Ootelner, Joel Hand-
cein snoiem oi Hollywood. Leon sh Hteven Randshu, Rit-hai-.i Bar- :
Kronish, Temple Beth Sholom; 'i. Bonnie House, Allan Kaufman, "
Irving Lehrman. Temple .Emanu- f^u5%%M&%m Beth David Congregation will
lonor its Hebrew teachers and
jraduates at Friday night services.
Hebrew teachers are Hcrsch Ber-
nan, Harry Brooks, Louis Gadon,
Mrs. Phillip Kaplan. Zvi Rosen-,
Graduates of the Elementary i
Hebrew Department arc Mark, son:
of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Bayer; Phil-1
ip, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Ge-
net; Suzan, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Goldberg; Melvin,
-on of Mr. and Mrs. George Las-
kin; Elise. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gernard Leffler; Stuart, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rose; Stev-
en, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ros-
tor Petit.-hman, Robert 8. Fried. Mark
Goldberg, Sherry II. Crant, Terr>
Grossman, Sam l>aviii Harris, Rrr>
I. Loss. Sieve Matia, I'ella M. New-
murk, Max W. NiHKon, Siis.in A.
Hchmerer. Larry M. Sinclair, Stephen
Sliavln. Kllle Weinberger, Anne Weill, Hairy Weiss. Itae Susan Weiss
and Jack B. Yesner.
Hebrew High School: Jerome Bass.
I>ayle Handshu. Beverly Jacobean,
Alan K.ini.-n. Sean Kaufman. Cayle
l.fbman. lH>rothy Nanens. Jack Itahln.
Jo Ann Rubel. Stanford Reinlurd.
Susan Bchwartaman, Arlene Shiibow
and Carolyn Steinberg.
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
ALL HtBKtW SUPPLIES FO
SYNAGOGUtS I JEWISH HOMES
jWe Carry Bar Mltzvah Records
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JE 1-7722
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PARK .
'The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minutes from the Beach Via
The New 36th St. Causeway
JE 1-5369
n.\ Rubinstein, Mike Rchectman, Mia
Shulman, Hare Solomon, LfOUise bVol-
man, Richard Strauss, and Marjorlc
Uncer.
Temple Beth Sholom: Vanne I Nik-
s', n. Hart) Kng.ls. Sanfi.nl |. i i, ,|rl. h.
Joan Goldman, Steven Kramn, Ken-
neth Lewis. Abbey Morris, Albert
Badowsky, i.imia Bhaobrun and Ar-
lene silver.
Temple Emanu-El: Jon Becker,
Ktanle) Bernstein, Manuel Diner, Da-
vid Kpsi.-ln, Helena Km. liter, Michael
llalper, Steven Kaplan, Marrj Kat-
ten, Henr) Pohl, Barrj Reich, Bin-
nette Soramer, Mas oteliuraul ami
Sum Bteiacart.
Temple Judea: George Gelb, l'aul
Klein, Cheryl Kronowlnt, Don Robins,
Lancer, Steven Newmark,
ii. ii.- Rosenberg, Michael bfcbulner,
Wayne Silver, Adena Skop, Irene
stem and Joel Vvotpe.
Temple Sinai (Hollywood): Richard
rvutsch, Arlene s. Oalnea, Abble
Greene, Charles Harris, Harry lx>n-
inn. iiiu... Mann. Patricia roaster;
Richard Beliaaon and Jayne Sherman.
Temple Tifereth Jacob: Frederick
liiixl.anni. Hairy llanillii. Saul SllVer-
nan. Shan..n Silv.rnian and Kdna
Stein.
Temple Zion: Michael Abrama,
Sheldon K. Ba.l.r. Mare Berkowlts,
Steve H Berlin. Steve Jay lironis.
Jerry Cantor, Harold U fvress, Vic-
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
Greater Miami's Largest A Oldest
Supplier for Synagogues,
Hebrew & Sunday Schools.
Wholesale I Retail
ISKAUI eifJS AND NOVflTICS
417 Washington Ave. JE 1-9017
enblatt; Benjamin, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Rosoff.
Sybil, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
David Sernaker; Dan, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Sol Stokols; Jay. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wagman; Rich-
ard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin
Weinkle; Judith, daughter of Mr
and Mrs. Simon Weiss.
Graduates of the Hebrew High
School under the supervision of the
Bureau of Jewish Education are:
Dale, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Handshu; Alan, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Henry Kamen; Sean, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kaufman;
Jack, son of Mr. and Mrs. Saul
Rabin; Sanford, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Reinhard; Susan,
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louig
Schwartzman.
Formal graduation will be held
on Tuesday evening at Temple Is-
rael. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg will
distribute the diplomas to gradu-
ates. .
Siege! Unveiling
The dedicdlion of a monument
lo (he memory of (he late
NATHAN SIEGEl
formerly of 6-15 Lenox Avenue,
Miami Beach
uill tii^e place
Sunday, May 15, at 1:30 p.m.
at Mt. Sinai Memorial Purl;
Cemetery, it'ith Rabbi Leon
Kronish officiating.
Mr. Sieccl i- -urvived by hi.-
wife. Rose; daughters, M'< Ed-
ward Dok.'on. of Miami Beach.
Mrs. Bernard Rose, of New
York. Mrs. Meyer Schachnov-
sky. of New York: and ..
Mrs. Anna Hutter, of Miami
Beach.
Relsd't'e.s. friends and mem-
bers of the Knights of Pythias
are asked to attend.
NZWMZN
FUNERAL HOME
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
MIAMI BEACH
JEfferson 1-7677
Edward T. Newman
Funeral Director
Miami Hebrew Book Store
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beech JE 8-3840
Hebrew Relipiou* Supplies for
Synagogues. Schools a\ Private Use
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
There is,'


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is something you consider calmly, and ,
decide on after thorough investigation. Doesn't
selection of .your fam.ly Memorial Plot merit the same
judicious concern? Of course.Jhal's why you'll
want to find out about Miami's finest ami
oldest Jewish cemetery todsy. Mount Nrbo's
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memorial of love for those departed. Details will be /
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..-*


*
^day. Merf 13, I960
keeping Beauty*
It Academy
First grade students of the He-
bw Academy will present "Sleep-
i Beauty" on Friday in the
Bool's auditorium.
Translated into Hebrew by Mrs.
UshanDah Spector Greenberg,
^t grade Hebrew' instructor, and
Bpted for bi-tingual usuage by
Is. Sarah Beckman, first grade
glish instructor, the operetta
ll be presented into the two lan-
Jges by the students.
he music is under the super-
Ion of Mrs. Jack Dorrnerstag,
^ic director of {he Academy.
bi Alexander S. Gross, princi-
will introduce the program,
kudents participating in the pro-
|m will be Mark Feit, Craig
krr, David Abramowitz, Ellen
||uit, Judd Zisquit, Sherry Gert-
, Jay Ehrlich. Marc Rosenblum,
Md Berger, Neal Wittels, Toya
[ovitz, Shaul Shraga Gross,
hey Berk, Marc Silverberg, Ra-
lie Spitzer, Henry Bloch, Phyl-
^utstein,
li Oster, Alan Kuczynski,' Jdha-
\ Nelson, Marcia Pozin, Robin
kowitz, David Sternshein, Ira
I, Arthur Belsky, Wendy Ehr-
lich, Martin Wasserman, Ran-
li Kout, Russell Galbut, Paul
^rrnan, Harry Silnicki, Mel Ad-
rtichael Wolland, Sheldon Del-
Milton Schachter, Kenneth
fcnstein, Irwin Brandwein and
Auerbach.
+Jewlsti IhrUUaai
imi Youths
Top Awards
Injbers of the Hillel Alefs who
I awards in the competitive
|arship contests held through-
he Miami area include:
^n Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Miller, a $1,000 scholarship
ly college in the United States,
le Oratory Contest sponsored
e Riverside Exchange Club.
lompeted for this award with
tstants from Miami and neigh-
kg high schools,
pchael Gorchov, son of Mr. and
Sidney Gorchov, the Silver
|ht Award in Mathematics,
[second place in the Mathemat-
science Fair.
^thur Lazarus, son of Mr. and
Murray Lazarus, chosen to
Ibit his "Self-Planned Florida
Be" at the Florida State Teach-
convention and the Dupont
ka hotel. Following this ex-
It. his display will be sent to
I Ford Motor contest to compete
J the $10,000 scholarship.
pi three boys are students at
imi High School.
Page 9-A
Temple Emanu-ETs Foundation School stu-
dents present a special program in honor of
Israel's "Bos Mitzvah." The presentation, of-
fered last week, was written by Mrs. Howard
Romer, Foundation School teacher. Dr. Irv-
ing Lehrman here expresses his approval of
the performances given by the 3 to 5-year-olds.
Left to right are Mrs. Helen Taylor, Dr. Lehr-
man, Rabbi Bernard A. Mussman, director of
education at the religious school, Mrs. Miriam
P. Anisfeld, head Fbundation School teacher,
Mrs. Lilly Tamen, Mrs. Howard Romer, and
Miss Judith Saville.
Report Jews Vote by Special Interest
NEW YORK (JTA) Jews,
as other ethnic and religious
groups in the United States, are
influenced in their voting by spe-
cial group interests, according^ to
a study published this week by the
Center for the Study of Democratic
Institutions, formerly the Fund for
the Republic.
The study, by Dr. Moses Ris-
chin, a member of the reasearch
staff of the American Jewish Com-
mittee, found that the Jews in the
1956 election were influenced in
their voting by policies on Israel.
The study also concluded that by
and large the Jews inclined to the
Temple School
Sets Registration
Temple Judea nursery and kin-
dergarten school office is now open
for registration lor the fall term
beginning Sept. 6.
Enrollment is limited, and par-
ents are requested to register be-
tween 9 a.m. and 12 noon week-
days in the school office.
Individual classes will be held
for each age level from three
through kindergarten age, staffed
,by qualified personnel.
Program includes music, arts,
and crafts, science, indoor and out-
door play, a Jewish orientation
program centered around the holi-
days, and a well planned first
grade readiness program for the
kindergarten.
Democratic Party as the liberal
party of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The report, bated on a study
of the 1956 election, supported its
contention that Israel was a ma-
jor factor with Jewish voters by
analyzing the Jewish vote in the
Javits Wagner senatorial con-
test in New York. Although Ja-
cob K. Javita i* Jewish, the study
noted, "the 'Jewish vote' stuck
to (Mayor Robert F.) Wagner,
as expected though a number of
Jewish Democrats and a hand-
ful of Liberals crossed party
lines to vote for Javits."
In New York, the study found,
"Jewish voters Opposed the pres-
ffil^g*
From
BRAHMS
to
BARTOK
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MIAMI BEACH
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ence of (Secretary of State John
Foster) Dulles and (Vice President
Richard) Nixon on the EisenMewer
team."
In summarizing the position of
the Jewish voter in the 1956 elec-
tion, Dr. Rischin declared: "Jews
felt strongly about a Middle East
crisis which, more than the Iron
Curtain problem, might have been
managed better by those Ameri-
cans who were responsible for for-'
eign policy. In essence theirs was
a protest vote. Yet perhaps, more
fundamentally, Jewish voting was'
rooted in a strong emotional at-
tachment to FDR, the liberal, the j
enemy and nemesis of Hitler.
For the second time most Jews
Full Day Camp
Sessions Added
Camp Emanu-El summer day
camp for children between the ag%
of four and 12, announces that a
special full-day session for four
and five-year-olds has been inaug-
urated due to special request.
The choice of full or half-day is
optional, and the camp also pro-
vides the regular half-day pro-
gram for youngsters.
Registration for the eight-week
program, beginning on June 20
and ending Aug. if, is now in
progress at the Temple office
and is presently open to children
of Temple members.
Registration for non Temple
members will be accepted as of
May 11, and the entire registration
is limited to 100 campers. Trans-
portation is provided .to and from
the camp, which is held five days
per week, Monday through Friday.
The camp will be conducted at
the Temple's recently completed
branch school building at 77th st
and Dickens ave. In addition to
these facilities, the camp will util-
ize the playground area of the
Biscayne Elementary School and
the Biscayne Point and Normandy
Isle swimming pools.
voted for Stevenson, the man they
saw as wearing Roosevelt's man-
tle. As the Javits Wagner contest
showed, Jews did not care much
whether or not a candidate was
Jewish especially in New York
State, where they had occupied
important offices for over a gen-
eration." the study pointed out.
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ecm**


Pane 8-A
Page 10-A
*Jenist rttrkJi&n
Friday. May 13. I960
Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINPilW
We Couldn't Save Them-But Let's Not Forget Them
COMMANDANT OF AUSCHWITZ. The Autobiography
of Rudolf Hoot*. Illustrated. 285 pp. Introduction by
Lord Russell of Liverpool. Translated from the Gor-
man by Corttantin* FitiGtbbon. Cleveland and Now
York: The World Publishing Company, 2231 W. 110th
tt., Cleveland. $4.50.
^THIS IS THE autobiography of an administrator, cool,
" efficient, devoted to duty. He was a man of unques-
tioned obedience and loyalty. He worked hard at his job
the building of Auschwitz, its administration, and at one
of his most technically difficult tasks, the "gassing of two
million persons between June July 1941 and the end of
1943."
What was he like, this man whose name shall toll in
the halls of hell as one of the greatest monsters mankind
has ever known? His autobiography, written while he was
in prison awaiting his execution, is revealing in many
Capitol Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN
directions. Even an armchair psychologist will have no
difficulty picking out the elements of a bad childhoodthe
harsh father, the fanatical but superficial religious zeal
(quickly shattered later on), the loneliness, the preference
for animals as companions rather than people, the rigid-'
ities and compulsive behavior already apparent.
His self-portrait is rich in information about the
totalitarian mind, an uncreative, unintellectual mind,
good in practice, bad at theory, which finds its greatest
virtue in obeying orders. In his own words, "Whether this
mass extermination of the Jews was necessary or not was
something on which I Could not allow myself to form an
opinion, for I lacked the necessary breadth of view." It
never occurred to Hoess to refuse to carry out the orders
of Hitler and Himmler; the occasional misgivings he felt
(sometimes he felt "uncomfortable," once he "shud-
dered") came to him not as an ethical problem, but as an
administrative onehe was disturbed lest he communicate
The Shadow of Bigotry in the 1960 Election
Washington
A RAB BOYCOTT and blockade tactics.^
** affecting Americans as well as Is-
raelis, may emerge as a national elec-
tion issue.
In 1956 both Republicans and Demo-
crats pledged themselves to oppose for-
eign bias against American citizens. A
Mutual Security amendment was subse-
quently adopted by Congress. It termed' foreign bigotry
"repugnant" to American principles and called on the
President to use his discretion in combatting prejudice.
But the State Department continued appeasing the
Arab states, surrendering to various anti-Jewish and anti-
Israel pressures.
It is likely that new commitments will be sought from
UN Listening Post:
I I:...;..: .v. Ml <*.*
By SAUL CARSON
Page from a Diary
United Nations
f CATURDAY: The United Nations
"beat" embraces an area much
I broader than the East River en-
clave dominated by the 38-story
I United Nations Secretariat' bldg.
|0n this beautiful spring day. you
ho down to see a picket line at
J Pier 16.
Men wun windswept faces walk in front of the
shed where an Egyptian ship, the passenger-cargo
vessel Cleopatra, rides the gentle tide of New York
harbor. These are members of the Seafarers' In-
ternational Union, protesting against the United
Arab Republic's violation of the principle of freedom
of shipping by blockading the Suez Canal against
Israeli shipping and goods, by blacklisting foreign
ships that trade with Israel.
These men know what they are doing. They are
protesting against 3 foreign government's action
that has resulted in the blacklisting of more than
100 American ships. The jobs of upward of 1.000
American sailors are endangered. This is bread-
and-butter diplomacy.
A short distance from the UN headquarters, the
United States Court bldg.. Judge Thomas F. Murphy
rules on a motion for a preliminary injunction that
would make the picketing illegal. The judge rules
the picketing is legal. He holds that it is a labor
action, pure and simple.
Sunday: Via television, you are in Cairo. You
watch President Gamal Abdel Nasser. On the CBS-
TV program, "Face the Nation," he enacts his anger
against the picketing in the New York harbor. There
is no surprise in his attitude.
But Nasser is asked also about another point.
He is asked whether in fart he ever made an agree-
ment with Dag Hammarskjold to permit shipping to
go through the Suez Canal, carrying goods to or
from Israel, when such goods are in fact owned by
non-Israelis. He denies he ever made such an agree-
ment.
Monday: The Israeli Foreign Ministry reacts.
At the UN, you read the answer to Nasser's state-
ment from Israel. In effect, the statement declares,
Nasser is lying. Israel virtually challenges Ham-
marskjold to say openly whether there ever was
such an agreement with Nasser. Golda Meir says
there was an agreement. Dag isn't talking.
Meanwhile, at the U.S. Court bldg., in the dig-
nified chambers of the Circuit Court of Appeals, oral
argument is in progress. The Egyptian firm which
claims that it owns the Cleopatra (there is good rea-
son to believe that the real owner of the ship is the
UAR government itself) wants the appellate court to
issue a "show cause" order that would bar the
picketing of the Cleopatra.
Seymour W. Miller, attorney for one of the
maritime unions, argues against the motion. The
judge agrees with Miller. He declines to issue the
"show cause" order. It is the third victory won in
the Federal courts by the union attorney*.
candidates of both parties. The picketing of the "Cleo-
patra" in New York harbor has dramatized the Arab boy-
cott. The Arabs dogmatically refuse to permit American
ships in their seaports if the ships had the audacity to
have entered an Israeli port.
There will be plenty of campaign talk about religious
discrimination. All candidates are now busily deploring
and disclaiming anti-Catholic and anti-Protestant bigotry.
Yet the fact remains that Arab governments, with the
complicity of the State Department, continue discrimin-
ating against Americans of Jewish faith.
This issue will be argued at platform hearings of both
parties. However, some Washington insiders question the
value of such campaign promises:
In 1956, Republicans and Democrats alike solemnly
pledged to fill Israel's military needs. Israel is still wait-
ing. Soviet Russian arms continue to pour into the United
Arab Republic.
The Democratic Party has appointed Rep. Chester
Bowles, of Connecticut, to be chairman of its platform
committee. Philip Perlman, U.S. Solicitor General in the
Truman Administration, will be vice chairman. Both are
supporters of civil rights and are strong advocates of
Israel-American friendship.
Vice President Nixon, whose influence at the Repub-
lican convention will be great, ha,s already assured Is-
raelis of his sympathetic understanding. Premier Ben-
Gurion. luncheon guest at the Nixon home in Washington,
was impressed. Mr. Nixon has also indicated to Amer-
ican Jewish leaders that he is making a detailed study of
the impact on Americans of Arab boycott and blockade
tactics.
The leading Democratic Presidential contenders are
all on record in strong support of Israel. Sen. Hubert H.
Humphrey, of Minnesota, is probably best-informed on the
Arab-Israel issue, having served as chairman of the Near
East Subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee.
Another, issue to figure in election controversy is the
civil rights bill adopted by this Congress. It has been
pointed out that an anti-bombing provision., designed to
protect synagogues from bigots, possesses a glaring weak-
ness. The FBI is authorized to apprehend fugitives who
flee across state lines to avoid prosecution. But the
fugitive is then returned to local authorities for "prosecu-
tion" that could be a farce.
A report to the Center for Study of Democratic Insti-
tutions, an activity of the Fund for the Republic, Inc.,
maintained recently that both parties believe in a "Jewish
vote."
The report cited the 1956 campaign. It said that
"American electioneering has always given special atten-
tion to the ethnic and religious interests of the voters.
History demonstrates that Americans bring to the polls
their special backgrounds and pull down the levers con-
genial to their national origins and religious ties."
Jews felt strongly about a Middle East crisis in 1956.
the report said.
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
any of these feelings by his expression to his workers, and
thns impair their efficiency.
It is obvious from Hoess' itory that he managed to
muster a detached kind of guilt for what he had done ft
is the sort of guilt, which, had he lived, be would hav
gotten over very quickly, for the book is filled with d*
fenses of every kind. At one point he insists that it
really the low caliber of the SS men which made the
camps so bestial, that it was they who were sadistic and
brutal, and that much of what went on "ostensibly in my
name, under my authority and on my orders, I neither
knew about nor sanctioned." At another point he accused
the Capos, who were themselves prisoners, of cruelties!
greater than those of the guards. Again, he complainj
that, had he had the proper materials, the camps would!
have been models of cleanliness and health. As you see,
he was essentially an administrator"a little bureaucrat,"
Lord Liverpool calls him in his excellent introduction arid
sums up his character in one sentence: "although eventu-
ally he appears to have realized the enormity of what
he did, he nevertheless took pride in doing it well "
I would urge you to read this book, as I alwav- urge
you to read every book which appears on this subjec. (or
the same reason: if we could not gave them, we shall at
least not forget them. But fhere is a second reason this
time: it is that all royalties from this translation go to the
Comite International D'Auschwitz, a charitable organic
tion set- up to help the pitifully few survivors of the Ausch-
witz camp. There can be no retribution on earth for six
million Jewish souls; this is as close as we can get to
justicepoetic or otherwise.
Between You and Me:
BORIS SM0LAR
The AJCongress Rift
HE AMERICAN Jewish Con
gress is now facing a serious
j internal rift which will have its
reverberations at its biennial con-
vention scheduled at the end of
this month. There is a sharp divis-
ion of opinion in its top leadership
I with regard to the basic policy of
I the organization. The conflict cen-
ters around an issue which has deeply troubled :he
American Jewish Congress movement for the past
years.
The issue is: Should the AJCongress be more
Jewish in its activities, or should the organization
consider its civil rights activities as the backbone
of its overall program. Dr. Joachim Prinz. presi-
dent, insists on having the AJCongress expand its
work in the direction of Jewish communal affairs.
In this, he is opposed by a group led by Justice Jus-
tine Wise Polierdaughter of the late Rabbi Stephen
S. Wise, founder of'the organization. Mrs. Wise, who
is chairman of the executive committee, insists that
the AJCongress must primarily devote itself to fight-
ing racial bigotry.
The verbal duel between both sides was brought
to a head by a sharp letter addressed by Mrs. Polier
to oficers of the organization. Dr. Prinz, infuriated
by the contents of the letter, made it formally known
to top leaders of the AJCongress that he would no
longer be available for any position of leadership in
the organization. He actually asked not to be nom-
inated for a second term, although it was certain
that he would be reelected president at the forth-
coming convention.
His letter of his intention not to seek reelection
created quite a stir among his backers. At a special
meeting of a subcommittee of AJCongress officers.
he was asked to withdraw the letter and to stand for
reelection. He agreed to comply with this request
only after securing acceptance of hit condition that
the AJCongress is to establish a Commission on
Jewish Communal Affairs.
- ...........
Walking Serves to Improve Two Constitutions
A LADY IS walking all the way from
^ San Francisco to New York. By
the time she reaches Times Square, she
should have a good appetitie.
The papers are giving the story of
the lady walker a good deal of play, and[
I wonder why they missed the recent Is-
rael walkathon, in which 5.000 people I
walked 60 miles in two days.
The oldest of the Israel walkers was a 93-year-old
youngster, Joel Doron. To what does Mr. Doron attribute
his longevity?
He says he stays as far away as possible from doc-
tors doesn t smoke, but he does like a little schnapps He
spends a good deal of time in the synagogue, but still
works every day at his craft which is leather working
Asked if he would participate in next year's walk-
!?'.J* tT*' .7" bewlkin* te >rs from now
when all of these others will be too tired to walk "
That's a real walker. The old fashioned kind Very
rare today. Pedple years back used to speak of walking
be good for the constitution the personal constitutim
that is. However, it's good for the constitution of f
state, too. Consider Mr. Ben-Gurion, who, I am told, tak
a brisk five-mile hike every morning. I am sure it M
benefited the state's constitution, as well as bis privil
constitution. Walking helped clarify the problems of sttl
facing him.
Another great statesman of former days. Thomj
Jefferson, was a great believer in walking. He deplo
the excessive horseback riding in his day. Jefferson
a good horseman himself, but he thought walking
better exercise. In bis day. Virginians were as crt
about horses as people today are about their cars.
A recent survey showed that in London the collec
of fares on the city's buses had leas heart disease and
cer than the drivers of the buses. The collector wl
about, the driver is pinned to his seat all day. The
parity of course might also be explained by the fact I
driving a bus is more attended with tension. But I tt-,
everyone will concede that walking, If not a cure-alU
of
of
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of
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[Friday, May 13. 1960
+Jewlst fhrktlan
Page 11-A
-h
LEGAL NOTICE
5=
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
i In- undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the rictitlous name of
\.B.(". OFFICE MACHINE CO at
.!'" s.W. I.mI Street, Miami, Fla., In-
titrtf to register said name with the
piM .*( fii.uir c.TTin,,r -phc*
'(iiini\, i- lorfda,
STANLEY BINE
Suit- owner
4/29. ,ri/-13-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVE.N that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
Islness under the fictitious nan.....f
MONA LISA / HANDBAQfc' nt 1216
>..rih .Miami Avenue. Miami. Florida
Intend* (o rental?!' -;t id mini.- with
Clerk -if the Circuit Court of
I'.nil- County, Florida
M'pNA LISA. INC.. u Pla. corn.
HEN SI" i|,AN, President
FNYDBR VIM 'N-i
Utorneya for Mua Uin. Inc.
4'2!i, .-./6-13-M
In THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLOR DA. IN PROBATE
No. 44437-B
In REs Estate of
ABRAHAM Tl RETSKY
I < ased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
fo All Creditor,, and All Persons Hav-
lu; I'lnir.iy or DemuBiln Against Said
Estate:
1 You a"- hereby nntifieil and requlr-
to present any -'inn- and demands
,.iich you may have against the es-
ite of Abraham Turetsky deceased
lie of liade County, Florida, to the
Vint.v Judges of I mile County, and
le the aame In their office* In the
sunly Courthouse in I Hide County.
Wldn. wtthln'elght calendar-muntha
Jm the date of the first publication
lii-"i'. or the aame m-III be barred.
ROSE TCP.ETSKY,
MURRAY TI'RETSKY,
LEONARD I'.A Kit. Executor*
111,1,11' A. NEIWIP.TH
Itonioy
Daiie Federal Rid*.
i: l-l.iKl'-i' St.. Miami, l-'hi
4/2H, :./6-n-20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
lEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT of
[FLORIDA IN AND,FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. IOC 3934
lAYT. IN B. COWAN.
Plaintiff
HUE E. COWAN,
Defendant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
|: CARRIE E. COWAN
n Enoch Watson
412 Wilton Street
I'uliimhus. ftenrgla
ju. i-arkik E. COWAN, are here-
tioil.fied that a Bill of Complaint
Dtvice has been fll.d against
anil you are required to serve a
R of \oiir Answer or Pleading to
Hill of Complaint on the plaln-
A Homey a, HiniMoND AND
I" '-SON. Es.|s.. One Lincoln Road
kildlng. Miami lleach M, Florida
|<) file the original Answer or Plead-
In III.- office of the Clerk of the
mil Court -on or before the 31st
|y of May, 160. If you fall to do
judgment by default will be taken
|alnt von for the relief demanded
the mil of Complaint.
frills notice Shall be published once
|< h week for four consecutive weeks
tiii: .m:\visii fi.orii han.
IlioNI-; AND ORDERED :il Miami,
loii'la. this 27tli day of April. A.D.
In
E. H. l.EATIIEi:.MAN. ( eric.
Ici-cnli Court. Dude County. Florida
leal) I, KNEBDBN,
11. lUlty Clerk.
||ill.\lifND Win I'ScTN. Esqs.
ne Lincoln Road I'.uilding
Reach M. Florida.
III.u-ii. v tot Plaintiff
i t>, i/e-U-SO
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY lilVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
I-,,,sun.-.-- i.n.ici the fictitious name of
BEACH TOWER AQl'ATIC (1,1'B at
6061 Collhi* Aye.. M.M.-vtn, Flu., in-
Jgnds L'*> register said kilne wij.lL the
I'rk* T>f (he County, Florida.
CHAKI.KS WII.Si IN
/ Sole 11\\ ner
SAMI'EI. SIIERAHSKY
kttorney lor Applicant
10 Industrial Natl. Hunk Bid*.
-_:, 5/8-11
"S*S wants to know what Maw to light
5nabbos Condles tonrjjht. \
Conr. mo. i
LCGAL NOTICE
., THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ILFVFNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C29S1
I.WASHA FEI DSTHI-N and
,i; ii i.i-i I,STEIN, his Wife.
Plaintiff*,
i vs-
-AI.PH S. Hl'S'SELI. and
LI'PEEN E Rl'SSJffJ,, his wife,
I i -. miauls.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
rO: IT.W.P1I S lll'SSM I. and
I ii,i-|.;v I- RIWRhU his wife
Address Unknown
. roc XK1-; hereby notified thai
foiiMilalnt to Foredone a Mortgage
\n the following thMcrlbed properly,
Beam at a point on the north line
of Tract 1. Hesiilsllvlslon of flRA-
THLNY LAWNS, according to the
Plat Do reof. recorded in Plat Hook
"1 at page .'.. of the Public Records
of Dude County. Florida: said point
of beginning- being ~or. feet east of
the northeast corner "f Lot 2. Block
1. ORATIfiNY LVW'NS. sccordinK
to the Plat thereof, recorded In Plat
Book 22. Btpnge 74. of the l*uWlc
Records of Pade County. Floil4a:
thence run east along- the north line
of Hld Tract I for SI feet: thence
run soiXh parallel to the east line
of said Lot 2 to a point that Is 139
, feet north of the south line of Tract
1; thence run w*s onrillel to the
south line of *rfld Tract 1. for 61
feet to a point: thence run north
parallel to the east line of aald Lot
2 f> the nolnt of beginning: ALSO
FORMERLY KNOWN AS: Lot l.
leva the west 6 feet thereof. Lot 16
and the west 111 feet of Lot 17,
(Block 1, ORATKiSY LAWNS, ac-
iHiMint to the plat thereof, reconl-
1 ed In Plat Book 22 at Page 74 of the
Public Records of Pade County.
Florida, together with all Improve-
ments situated thereon,
ba boon filed against you, and ran
je required 1 f"" v"ur Answer with
Fie Clerk of the Coirt and to serve a
pps thereof unon the Plaintiffs' sl-
firnevs, BERNSTEIN MILLER,
ISQS.. 1414 Congress Building. Ml-
Inl. Florida, on or before May IL
Pl. If vow fall "> do so, Judgment
h default will be taken against you
?r the relief demanded In the Com-
lalnt.
I: April 26. I960.
1 K B. I,EATMERTWA!, Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dole Coiiniv
peal) By: WH. W. BT.g'KINC.
Deputv Clerk.
4/29, B/6-1S-20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUO.CIAL CIRCUIT OF
PLORIOA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. SOC 37341
JOHN T. SAVOR,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ISABEL M SAVOR,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ISABEL M. SAVOR
ADORERS UNKNOWN
You. Isabel M. Savor, are hereby
notified that a HiU of Complaint for
DivofO* has been filed against you,
ind you are ici|tilred to serve a copy
oi Mini- Answer or Pleading to the Bill
of Complaint on the plaintiff's Attor-
ney. C. FBEDKR1C BROWN, H07 dti-
Pont Hldg.. Miami. Fir. Ida and file
the original Answer or Pleading In
the office of the Clerk of Hie Circuit
Court on or before the :tlst day of
M:i;. liisu. If you fall to do so. Judg-
ment by default will be taken against
v Bill of. Complaint.
Tin-, notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH Fl.oRIPIAN.
BONE AND ORDERED at Miami,
'"lorida. this 21st day of April, A.D.
I960.
E B. LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit Court, I >ade County. Florida,
(seal) By: E. II. LANWAY.
Denut) Clerk.
'. FREDERIC BROWN
iiT dirPoiit Huildins
Miami 3, Ma. FR 3-0602
Htorney r.ir PUilntiff.
t IS, r,/6-n-2fl
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. WC 3SS6
MALTHA KI.VI
Plaintiff
MBLVIN A KINO
Def< n Innl
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: MELTIN \ KINO
12184 Mitchell Avenue
Los Angel.s KC, California
You .ii.- herebj notified (li.it a BUI
.f i 'ompl.iiiit lor Divorce has li.-ci.
filed agi I, and you are requir-
ed to serve h copy of your An>\\ci
in pleading to Hi* Hill of Complnlnl
n the pliilntlfl- Attorney. .loSIM'.ll
\\ MALEK, 107 Lincoln Road, Mlam'
Reach, l-'loii'lii ;i ti > I fil.- the origina'
Vnsw'.r or Pleading In the office of
tin clerk of the Circuit Court on O'
before the .list day of May, ii'Oo. if
trot] fall lo do so. Judgment by default
-vill lo- cikcn aL-aliisi \ on for th*- re-
Hef demandetl In the Bill of Com-
ilnlnt.
Tills notice shall be published one.
each week tor four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIP1AN.
DONE AND HONORED at Miami.
Morlda. this 26th day "f April. A.P.
1!60.
E ft LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit Court, Pade County. Morlda
(seair By: R. H. rick. JR.,
Deputy Clerk.
JOSEPH W. MALEK
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Morlda
Attoine> for Plaintiff
4'2!i. :./S-13-2ft
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN h*t
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
Hill Kl'ILOINO at 1140 N.K. lK'.rtl St..
Norili Miami Beach, Florida, Intend to
register sal.I name with Ute Clerk of
the Circuit Court of I>ale County.
Morlda.
LOO KCPPER. CO* Owner
HARTMAL. INC..
a Ma. corp., *.> Owner
JACK I'OPICK. Sf/' Owner
___________________4/g. fi/tl-13-20
NOTICE UNDER
fictitious NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERHBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
KINt; MID AH PLATING I'll "Every-
thing We Touch Tunis to Gold" at
24th Street, Hlaleah intends
to register said name with th* Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
LONDON PLATERS, INC.
a Fla. Corp
BERNSTEIN .v MILLER
Attorneys for Applicant*,
Congress I'.uilding
4/29. 5/6-13-20
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
NO. 49457.C
In Re: ESTATE OF
HARRY WEXI.EK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDTORS
To All Creditors .ind All Person* Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You. and each of yon !* hereh.v
notified and required to present an)
claims and demands which you. or
either of you, may have agutnsl th.
,-stai< of Harry v'siei deceased late
of Pade County, Florida, to the Hon-
orable County Judges of Dad.- County,
and file the same In their oftices in
tin- Count) Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Klorida. within cluht calendar
months from the date of the first
nulilication hereof. Said claims or de-
mands to contain the leaal gddresg Of
the claimant and to lie sworn to and
presented as aforesaid, or same will
lie hailed See BeCtUm 713.14 of the
1S45 Probate Act.
Paled May -. A I >. I960
HANNAH S. BLORTEIX o/o Klry
Stone. 1010 Congress Rldg., Miami
Florida. As Executrix of the Ijsl
will and Testament of HatT)
\\'e\|el lie, iSeJ
i:i.itv STUM-:
Attorney for Hannah W. Itlosteln.
i;\.-i utrix oi Estate of
lai r\ Wexler, de. east d
I 1-20-2:
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 3979 .
PERRY V STEARNS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
'IJ.SIE (CATHERINE STEAItNS.
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
in ELSIE KATIIEIilNi: BTEARNS
i i. Ralph Stearns
Center Street
LiidhnN. Mass.
Vou i:i.SII-: (CATHERINE STEARNS
in.- hereby notified thai a hiii of Com
iliilut for Divorce lias been filed
against you, and you are required to
ing to the Hill of Complain) on tl
ilaintiff- Attorneys, RICHMOND f
v\i il.ESI IN. One Lincoln Load liuihl
inii Miami Beach, Florida and file
the original Answer or Pleading In
he office of th* Clerk of the Chilli
Court on in hei..... the til h day o
June. 19KH. If you fail to do so, Jude
ment by default will be taken acaliu
vou for the relief demanded In th
Hill of Complaint
Tills notloe shall he published one-
each week for (our consecutive w.-.-k-
In THE JEWISH KLORIPIAN
DONE AND ORPERED nt Miami
Morlda, this 2sth day of April, A.P.
I MO.
E. II. LEATHERMAN. clerk.
Circuit C.....t. Dade County, Florida
(seal) By: R. H. RICE, JR.,
I l.-IUlt v I 'lei k
RICHMOND & WOLFSon
One Lincoln Road Huil.llii-
Mlanii Reach 39. Morlda
l!y: Donal.l L. FarlM-r
Attorneys for Plaintiff
, 5/6-13-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
th* undersigned, desiring to engage In
business imdei the fictitious name of
MIAMI COI'RT APARTMENTS at
1315 NE. Miami Court. Miami. Flor-
ida, Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Pade
rviinty. Florida.
LOVELL. INC.. a
Florida Corporation
BEIOEL, TEITELMAN A ALBERT
By Eugene M. Alnert
tOI Hlscayne Building
Miami. Morlda
Attorneys for Lovetl. Inc.
:i Morlda Corporation
4'22-39. 5/6-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
163 Bt'H.PINC. WEST at 1120 NE
163rd Street. North Miami Beach.
Morlda Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Pade County. I-lorlda.
HARTMAL. I
a II i nvner
IEo Kl Owner
JACK POPICK. 15* Owner
4 X, ii-13-ii)
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice IS HEREBY GIVEN tint
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name .,
VMER1CAN PLAN SERVICE at 4744
." \S' ted Avenue, -Miami, Morlda in-
tends to leeister said name with the
leik of the ilicii'it Court of Pade
County, Florida.
A.P.S.. INC., a Fla. Corp.
Sole Owror
I'allot, Silver, Pallot. Stein .H Mlntz
Mto.iieys !ui APS. Inc.
4/22-'-". 5 8-11
NOTICE BY-PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE
COUNTY, IN CHANCERY.
No- 60C 371S
IRAi'i: VIRGINIA lll'FI'MAN.
Plaintiff.
v.
HAROLP W. HCrEMAN,
11,-fendaiit.
UIT FOR DIVORCE
I'O: HAROLP W. Hl'EI'MAN
117-03 97th Avenue
Rh imoiiii Hill ID, New York
You HAROLD W. lit FI-'MA.N are
hereby notirled that a Hill of C'm-
ilalnt for Divorce has been filed
m.iiiiM you. and you are r i n ir.-.l to
serve a copy of your Answer or I'l.-ad-
ng to the Bill of Complaint on tlie
plaintiffs Attorney*, goi.dman a
GOLDSTEIN, 2J03 \V. Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the office of
tin- Clerk of the circuit Court on o
before the 2:'.rrl day of May, IPSo. I
you fall to ilo so, judgment by default
ilil be taken against you for the re-
lief demanded in the Hill of Complaint
This notice shall b.- pulillshed onci
each week for four conaectiUve \\.-(-it
in THE JEWISH 1-l.oltlDIAN.
PONE AND ORPERED at Miami
Florida, tins 20th da) "t April. A.I
'mil
E. is. LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade County, Morid*
(seal) Bj : I-:. II. LANWAY.
T'ciuiO Clerk
liOI.D.MAN & Oi'l.DSTEIN
23ns W. Flagler Street
Miami. Mori.la
attorneys for Plaintiff
4/22-29. ."./6-l:
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 49387-C
IN RH; Estate of
EVA I'-CCII -
1 -ceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Pet sons llav
Ing Claims or Demands Against Sai
Batata:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any ctatnjts and demand
which you may have against the es-
tate of EVA isrcil deceased late o'
Dade County, Florida, to the Count>
Judges of Pade County, and file th.
same In their offices in the Count!)
Courthouse In Pade County. Florida
within eight calendar months from the
date of the first puhlicat ion hereof, or
lie same will be barred
1.' iCIS KCl'll
l.ol"ls nicii. us Executor ol
tile IfiStat* Ol BVH i'.llch, dci easel)
MYERH, HE!MAN A KAPLAN
\ttoi n.-\ ^ fi.r E\ci utoi
II .ii H W Fit si Street
Miami, Morlda
4 |B.g,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
he undersigned, desli Ing l
business under the fictitious name o
PAHTIME I'linl.S ai I 1140 West DUI.
Highway. North Miami. Florida lif
eniN to register said name uith th-
Clerk of th* Circuit Coul'l of Dad.
County, Florida.
PASTIME PI ii ii.s ,\
CONSTRl'CTION C< MPANY
a Mot-Ida corporation
__________ ___ 4/l2j-a, r./6-i:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Or
FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 3607
CONSTANCE McCH'NE.
Plaintiff,
vs.
IH'CH MARVIN McCLlNi:.
1 tefendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: HI'CH M MtVIN McCt.i.NF.
ADDRESS INKNOXV'N
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that you
are required to file an Answer to a
Complaint for Divorce commenced
against you with the Clesk >f the
ourt and serve a copy thereof 4ipon
Herman T. Isle. Attorney for Plain-
tiff. ISS Madeira Avenue. Coral Gables
:r4. Morlda. before or on the 23rd day
of May, I960, otherwise the allegations
.f th, complaint will be taken as con-
fessed by vou.
Dated this ISth day of April. I960.
Circuit Court. Pade County. Morlda
E. B. LEATHERMAN. (lerk.
(seal) By: WM. W. STOCKING,
. Peputv Clerk
4/22-29". 57B-13
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial FR 3-4605
ior messenger service
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DApE COUNTY,
FLOR.DA. IN PROBATE
No. 4944H-C
IN RE: Estate of
HELEN SISSEI.M \N, -
I > -a.s.-d.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims oi liem.indr Against bluid
Estate: *"
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any. claims ami d.-man i.
which you may have aaint the es-
tate ..r HELEN s'iSSRl.MAN de-
ceased late of Pade County. Morlda,
to the c.unjj Judges of Pade County,
anil file the same in their offices In
the County Courthouse In fiade Coun-
ty. Florida, within eight calendar
mouths ironi the date of the first
puliTication hereof, or the same will
be barred,
HARRY 8ISSKLMAN. Executor
of the Estate of Helen Sisselman.
Deceased.
WILLIAM I BRICNNEi:
Attorney
4211 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla
l/tf, :./6-13-2l>
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
Ne. 49545-C
IN RE Estate of ABRAHAM
lii.RIMiN, u/k-a ABRAHAM S.
OORP44M. a/ls/a SAM OOKLajN
I deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Prison Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claim.- and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of ABRAHAM OoltPON.
a/k/a ABRAHAM S. (lORDOX. a/k/a
SAM f IOR PON deceased late of I>ad
County, Florida, lo the County Juil^en
of Pad*- County, and file the same in
their office- in the Count) Court-
house in lade County. Florida, within
eight calendar months from the date
of the first publication hereof, or the
same frill be barred.
YETTA Cult DUN. Adminlsti atrig
LEONARD .1. KATJ8H
Attorney for Administratrix
Ifi-'l' dul'ont BMg.
Miami. Florida
6/6-l::--o-'.'7
NOTICE UNQER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVBN that
the iindrrsigiieil. desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
RI-'.ilAL MA.N'dll in 1.121 Pennsylvania
AVe., Miami Beat'h int.let to r*| st.-r
-aid name with the Clerk of tlie Cir-
cuit Court of Pade County. Florida.
PAVIP KRATMAN
I.OIIS KRATMAN
HANIEI. KRATMAN
WILLIAM I ItBKNNEK
Attorney fin Applicant
IL'n Llmoln Road
________________o'B-11-20-27
NOTICE, UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business undet the fictitious name of
photo i-:nciiani;i: SERvncE at
T...... N \V L'Tth Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida intends to register said name
with th. Clerk ol the Clraelt Court
at I Vule i 'niint y, rToi Ida.
CHABLEfl l: RODCER8,
Sol.- (iwner
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Page 12-A
+Jewist>ncr*flan
Friday. May 13. ]&
Syngman Rhee's
Tigers of Wrath
By MAX LERNER
New Delhi
The resignation of Syngman Rhee is one of the stirring events of a
.-luring time.
Consider what happened. The Koreans struggled hard to achieve
their nationhood. Then they struggled again to preserve their freedom
against the Communist attack from the North. They emerged from a
bloody, drawn-out war to find themselves saddled with a government
under an embittered, tyrannical old man who made a farce out of par-
liamentary democracy. He gagged the press, hounded the opposition
leaders, rigged elections. Me branded all opposition as Communist-
inspired and sought to exploit the old battle cries of an earlier national-
ism, using his services in the past as a way of shackling the present.
The result, especially after the last rigged elections, was student
riots moved by a courage born of despair. Rhee met them with bloody
lepresslon. A hundred of the student demonstrators are dead, hundreds
of others wounded and the jails filled with still others. But Syngman
Rhee discovered that not even a strong man can continue to rule a
people if they refuse any longer to be ruled.
One recalls Jefferson's classic sentence: "The tree of liberty is
watered by the blood of patriots."
a- s- a-
A NUMBER OF QUESTIONS COME TO MIND in assessing the
meaning of what has happened. How about the role of the American
government, both in keeping Rhee in power so long and now in his
ouster from power? The Republic of Korea could not have survived
the Communist attack without American and UN help, nor could it have
turvived economically without what the American economy pumps
into it.
The American government tried to keep out of the internal affairs
of Korea, yet one must say that American officials were too complacent
;.l>oui the shockingly arbitrary acts of Syngman Rhee and his regime.
This was another instance where they made the mistake of caring
more about the anti-Communist stance of the regime than about its
honestly or its democratic fiber.
It is not hard to guess that as soon as the riots and shootings took
place the American leaders moved swiftly and decisively to withdraw
their support from the Rhee government. That, at least, must be said
for them. They acted late but they did act. We cannot know what
Secretary Herter told the Korean ambassador but we may be certain
that it was not gentle. We may also be certain that President Eisen-
hower would have found it impossible to pay his visit in June to a
regime which had shot down demonstrators against it in cold blood.
LHI S*l VdJ
THERE ARE TWO GROUNDS ON WHICH, and on which alone,
Caryl Chessman's death would make any sense. One is that the mills
of the law grind slowly but majestically, and that the law must be
allowed implacably to take its course regardless of what purposes it
may serve.
On this basis the question of how much reasonable doubt there is
about Chessman's crime is of no moment or relevance. Questions of
doubt have to do with justice, not with law. In fact (so goes this reason-
ing) once you allow all this balderdash about justice and humanity to
enter, they are cracks which will undermine and destroy the law as
an instituteion. That is what countsthe law as an institution, massive,
unheeding, impermeable.
The second is a related ground, but can be taken on its own merits.
1. is that a society sure of its motives and merits should not yield to
any campaign of sentimentality, which can become a kind of blackmail
of the emotions. On this count the tender-hearted, liberal-minded do-
eooders are a danger to any self-respecting society, since in their soft-
heartedness they dissolve the stern cement of sanction and penalty
v I suspect that thisand not the much mooted "deterrence" theory
is what is behind the retention of capital punishment long after it has
been established that its barbarism prevents few crimes, restores no
lost life, serves no ends other than toughness in itself.
a>c
THERE ARE THREE MEN IN INDIA today who get the greatest
attention and publicity. Two are well loved although they have their
caemies and detractors. The third is well-hated and feared although he
las his defenders and partisans. They are Nehru, Rajogapalachan
(Rajaji). and Krishna Menon.
For the Indian intellectuals and common people these three have
become symbols in one way or another of national greatness or of
danger. An observer nearing the end of his period or residence in
which he has come to feel a deep affection for the country and the cul-
ture may say that much of India's future politically hangs on what hap-
pens to these three men and the world views for which they stand.
After Chou-en-lai's visit the problem of India may be summed up
ir. two words unity and growth. This would get general assent but the
question is how India is to achieve them, if it is to meet the continuing
threat from China which Nehru foresees for perhaps the next two or
three generations. In responding to China's negotiation offensive, Nehru
proved himself again a master political tacticiana skill for which
lie may have little respect but in which he is far better than as an
analyst of history, on which he prides himself?
"(Thie la a Copyright Column)
One-Day Campaign 'Blitz' Bolsters CJA
As Volunteers Press for New Pledges
Mew Young Adult Group
New Young Adult Group has
been established at the Coral Way j age. The Center is at 217S SW 78th
Jewish Center under the aegis of j pi.
Joel Kaye and Michael Breslau.
The group is open to young per-
sons between 18 and 25 year* of
TT?AWLQRE
Private Pool
each and
Cabana Colony
I0TEL
At 24tfc ST. MIAMI MACS
Writ*
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Information
nd
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Private. Beach and Pool
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Entertainment
Oaily
Per Pero.
Odle. Oec
A successful one-day campaign
Witi" conducted last week by
a corps of local business and pro-
fessional men brought increased
optimism to leaders of the 1960
Combined Jewish Appeal.
According to general campaign
chairmen Harold Thurman and
Sajn Blank, incomplete returns in-
dicate that the concentrated single
day effort was instrumental in
adding hundreds of sizable pledges
to the campaign total, which now
stands well over the $1,400,000
mark, it was reported.
Seer** of volunHers parfiei-
paled in the "Businessmen's j
Blitz," who reported to Tempi* '
Israel to pick up their assign- |
monts and then visited business
associates in the area. Repre-
sentatives of torn* 30 trades and I
professions took part in the fast-
moving program, returning aft- ,
erwards with CJA checks and
completed pledges.
In commenting upon the general
progress of Uiis year's drive which
suports 57 local, national and over-
seas causes, Thurman said: "Our
campaign is now approaching a
crucial stage. We're past mid-point
and in the home stretch. At this
time there might be a tendency to
lag. and slow up. This may well
jeopardize all that has be e n
achieved up to now and, worse of
all. may sharply affect the future
of Miami's Jewish community. A
let-down now will cut short the
flow of badly-needed funds to our
health and welfare agencies."
Meanwhile, plans went swiftly
ahead to complete solicitations in
the business prospects not yet cov-
ered in early phases of the cam-
paign.
Julian Weinkle. campaign co-
chairman heading the Trades and
Professions, announced the Adver-
tising Division annual luncheon
meeting last Friday noon in the
Everglades hotel. Jack Sandier
and Lee Ruwitch are heading
group.
At the tame time, resident* t]
Miami and outlying suburban I
areas are being visited by B'aejf
B'rrth volunteers, member* ej|
the Jewish War Veterans ports,
and workers from adjacent lym.l
gogues and temples.
The Women's Division. head
by Mrs. Anna Brenner MeyersjJ
continuing to receive assistance!
from members of ORT, Hadassjkl
Pioneer Women, and various
terhoods.
These groups are active in m
liciting pledges from former coil
tributers living in all parts
Dade county.
Robbins Pushed For Presidency
The New England Zionist region
recently honored Dr Morton J.
Robbins, of Nashua, N. H and
Miami Beach, physician and lead-
er in national and international
Zionist affairs, by naming him its
"favorite son" candidate for the
national presidency of the ZOA,
according to an annnouncement
by Lawrence S. Wolk, president of
the region.
Unanimous endorsement was
given to Dr. Robbins, who spends
six months each year in Miami.
The resoultion. which was passed
. by the regional executive commit-
tee of the New England Zionist
j region, emphasized that Dr. Rob-
bins "has the distinction of holding
| one of the highest national offices
in the ZOA as one of the four na-
| tional administrative vice presi-
dents in the country, and national
ZOA chairman of the American
Zionist Fund," and cited "his con-
stant devoted service and guid-
ance in the promotion of Zionism."
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... u
n
j
the lAJc
ovnan s
"World
Lovely party at the Roney Plaza in honor of
Mrs. Mildred Becker, who is off for a tour of the
U.S. Guests included Mrs. Lillian Hershman,
Mrs. Pauline Levy. Mrs. Lillian Rothschild, Mrs.
Helen Getlitz, Mrs. Harry Kalodin, Mrs. Jen
Corman, Mrs. Sam Greenfield, Mrs. Richard
Bergman, and Mrs. Leo Lappin .
From Darmstadt, Germany, came Theodore R. Simmons, his
jvife, Judi, and son, Tom, to visit his father, Mr. H. Simmons, and
two sisters, Mrs. Theodore (Laurette) Sandier and Mrs. Leo (Bob-
btte) Ackerman The travelers are scheduling a short tour of
the U.S., and then back on June 6 to Darmstadt, where he is a
contptroller for Stars and Stripes ...
Estelle and Bill Brenner busy receiving congratulations on the
Engagement of their son, William, jr., to Catherine Lake, of Albany,
".'.Y., with the wedding scheduled in the near future The young
couple will live in Cincinnati.
ci
It was a Bon Voyage bruncheon Sunday noon at the Deauville
hotel for Mr. and Mrs. Sol Pine and family, who are leaving Miami
Jeach to live in Los Angeles Hostess at the fond adieu was
Irs. Samuel Oritt, of 810 Lakeview dr. .
Also wished Bon Voyage: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis, who will
cruising through the Mediterranean on the Corinia, and Mr.
d Mrs. Victor Dorf. shortly to fly to Europe and return on the
lauretania Hosts were members of the Deborah group of the
liami Beach chapter of Hadassah.

Lindy and Candy Lappin stayed at home in Quincy, Mass.,
fith their daddy. Dr. Leo Lappin, and sent their pretty red-haired
nother, Roberta, to Miami to spend Mother's Day with her mom,
Irs. Richard A. Bergman The girls declared that Roberta
iras their present to Grandma ...
Excitement aplenty among noted clubwomen here joining Jean
Jprain Wilson, of The Miami News, for that tour of the Soviet
Jnion as a result of Mrs. Nikita Khrushchev's invitation to U.S.
(dies to come over and exchange visits with their Russian coun-
sr parts What with the hubub of the last few days, and frantic
^lephone calls to the State Department in Washington, nothing's
bsolutely sure, as yet But joining the group as the latest addi-
is Mrs. Louis (Bess) Glasser Others goingand the list
seps growinginclude Mrs. Sydney (Claire) Weinstein, Mrs. Leon
(Hen) Kay, and Mrs. Ruth Gidney.
>*
Attention Ben Novack: Ruth Guthmann asked friends to meet
\r for lunch the other day "in the basement of the Fontaine-
pan hotel" .
It'll be a Jewish luaulox and bagles Far Eastern styleat
i home of the Buddy Logues, 500 SW 69th ave., on Saturday eve-
Hg Guests will be seated on pillows at a long low table .
Hcense will burn, and Oriental music will be played .
Hawaiian Leis are being flown in for the occasion by Alfred
haheen, Hawaii's largest manufacturer of women's wear .
jddy's his representative here .
Guests will include Kenneth Braidman and his May, Jack and
ita Malamud. Burton and Patricia Streit, Mr. and Mrs. Bob
land i Weinstein, and Al Ziegler and his Eleanor.
> >
Mrs. Howard (Isabelle) Grove was proudly introducing Ceil
frossman around at the recent installation of the National Council
' Jewish Women Ceil's the wife of Howard's nephew She
|nd her Edmund have just moved here from Biloxi, Miss., where
recently completed a tour of duty with the Air Corps Ed's
w associated with Burdine's of Miami .
Mr. and Mrs. David A. Hess, 2190 SW 10th st., hosts at a
(other's Day dinner party at the Reef restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale
honor of her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel
K'oolf, of Fifth ave.. New York, who are vacationing at the Eden
toe Other guests included the Hess children. Jay and Louise,
tudents at the University of Miami, Edward and Florence Rud-
^ick, of Coral Gables, and Mr. and Mrs. Abe Katz.

Michael Aaron Lieberman, a 1958 winner of the coveted
National Merit Scholarship, has done it again Son of Mr. and
Irs. Jerome Lieberman, 69 NW 40th ct., he is currently an all-A
Student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Bell Tele-
phone Laboratories recently spied Michael's work at MIT, and
pave now accepted him in t heir highly exclusive cooperative
plan .
Friends will be shouting "Happy Birthday!" to Morris Spisel-
nan, who celebrates his 90th at Temple Ner Tamid during Satur-
lay morning services .
Mrs. Murray A. Shaw lunching with her houseguests, her two
^isters, Mrs. Olga Frye and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Mannes, all of
Jothajn Town.

Mrs. Rose Farr off to Chicago to divide her time between her
Ions and their families While there, she will attend the grad-
uations of her three grandchildrenPhilip and Beverly Coleman,
rom high school, and brother. Seymour, from grammar school .
Speaking of the Farrs, when Aaron Farr went to pick up wife
lyra at Mt. Sinai Hospital, after her successful seige with
bronchial pneumonia, he was so busy putting flowers and cards
|nto the car, that he nearly drove off leaving her at the door .
Reunion at the Richard A. Bergmans for those who accomp-
anied them on the B'nai B'rith trip to Europe Motion pictures
color brought a host of oh's and ah's from Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Greenfield. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hirsch, Jacob Labovitz. who took
he pictures, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Falk, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bran-
Dn, and the Allen Kauffmans.

Birthdaze: Isidore and Beatrice Spolter, of 4260 Chase ave.,
Ire the proud parents of a new son born May 5 at Mt. Sinai .
fhe tot joins his brothers, Seymour, 18, and Arthur, 16. both stu-
dents at Yeshiva University in New York Grandparents are
Ir. and Mrs. Morris Stein, of Gotham Town .
AndBris Tuesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack (Bar-
Ira) Gordon on Palm Island for Jonathan Henry Gordon born last
reekElection Dayat Jackson Memorial Hospital Jack's in
he May 24 runoff "for School Board .
Adorable announcement of Arlene and Herbert Krensky's new
lie Lou.
J
\
Ijewjisjh Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, May 13, 1960
Section B
Leading Miami Clubwomen Will Bring
Executive Skills to Council's Sessions
MKS. STANLEY C. MYUS
MRS. JEAN C. UNMAN
Heading the local committee on
arrangements for the President's
Institute is Mrs. Jean C. Lehman,
founder president of Federation
of Jewish Women's Organizations,
a past president of Greater Miami
Section. National Council of Jewish
Women, and recently appointed
one of five judges of the Miami
Herald's seventh annual "Club of
the Year" contest.
On Mrs. Lehman's committee,
bringing to the institute their
knowledge of Council affairs, are
several other women who have
served as president on Section or
division level.
Mrs. Aaron Farr, past president
of the Southern Interstate Region,
now serving on the national board,
will be chairman of the reception
to be given Wednesday night. May
25, at the Seville hotel. Mrs. Dor-
othy Stone and Mrs. Nat Kemp-
ner will take care of the invita-
tions to the reception.
Mrs. Samuel Gertman. immedi-
ate past president of Greater Mi-
ami Section, will be in charge of
hostesses; Mrs. Raymond Rubin,
immediate past president of Shores
Division, will supervise transpor-
tation from the airport to Miami
Beach on Sunday, May 22; Miss
Minnie Feinberg, Section's execu-
tive secretary, will coordinate all
clerical needs and Mrs. Howard
Grove will be in charge of publi-
city.
Mrs. Sidney Lewis, recently-in-
stalled president of Greater Miami
Section, announces that free
orange juice will be served to all
members of the Institute day and
night.
Council of Jewish Women Plans Institute
For Presidents on Beach May 22-26
National Council of Jewish Wom-
en will hold a President's Institute
at the Seville hotel from May 22
through 26. This is the first gather-
ing of its kind in the 66-year his-
tory of the National Council of
Jewish Women, an educational
and welfare service organization
with 110,000 members in 240 Sec-
tions throughout the country.
The NCJW's last biennial con-
vention, held in Los Angeles in
March. 1959. decided that the In-
stitute was needed. The reason:
the job of heading a local Section
of a women's membership organi-
zation with a diversified and far-
flung program has come to require
an enormous amount of manager-
ial skill.
Whether the presidency of Coun-
cil Section falls on a housewife and
mother who never held a job be-
fore or on a former lawyer or
secretary or scientist the post
carries with it problems that go
beyond her experience.
The Council decided that the
modern technique of "group dy-
namics" applying methods
learned from psychiatry, business
management and other disciplines
to the leadership of women
would enable the Section presi-
dents to do a more effective job.
At the Institute on Miami Beach,
the local leader will receive four
days of intensive training in how
to strengthen her organizational
structure, methods of group lead-
ership, principles of supervision,
and methods of organizational and
program planning.
The women will have to face
such questions as "How do you
train your possible successors?"
"How do you encourage participa-
tion by different women, and hold
down the 'overparticipants'?"
"How do you handle past leaders
who don't want to let go of respon-
sibility?" "Personality conflicts in
the board of directors." Competi-
tion from other organizations,"
"How do you set a goal, and main-
tain morale while working for it?"
At the Institute, most of the pres-
idents' time will be spent practic-
ing the principles being taught. In
morning and afternoon work group
sessions, each local leader will be
faced with typical problems and
asked to show how she would re-
solve them, will pose such prob-
lems to others, and will be a de-
tached observer while others en-
gage in this role-playing.
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers, of Coral
Gables, a vice president of the
National Council of Jewish Worn-
en, a member of its national ex-
ecutive committee and of its na-
tional board of directors, will also
take an active part in the Presi-
dent's Institute.
Mrs. Myers has gained promi-
nence for her leadership in civic,
communal, education and welfare
activities.
Prior to her first election as a
Council vice president in 1955. a
post to which she has subsequently
been reelected. Mrs. Myers served
for five years as chairman of the
national overseas committee. She
is past president of Council's
Southern Interstate Region and of
its Miami Section.
Mrs. Myers has held positions
of leadership in service areas af-
fecting the State of Florida. She
is a member of the District Board
of the Florida Department of Pub-
lic Welfare, and served as board
chairman from 1949 to 1951. She
is a member of the Florida State
advisory committee for recruit-
ment of social workers.
Among her numerous activities
at the present time, Mrs. Myers
is a vice president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
chairman of its community plan-
ning committee. She also serves
as a member of the national social
planning committee of the Council
of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds, a national organization with
headquarters in New York.
Significant among her other ac-
tivities. Mrs. Myers has been chair-
man of volunteer training for the
American Red Cross, vice chair-
man of the study committee on
family and child care needs of the
Dade County Welfare Planning
Council, president of the Jewish
Family and Children's Service o
Miami, a member of Florida region
of National Conference of Christ-
ians and Jews, and co-chairman of
its women's group.
In January, 1958, Mrs. Myers
was the recipient of the "Commu-
nity Hcadliner Award" presented
by the Greater Miami Alumnae
chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, a
journalists' society. She is an hon-
orary member of Alpha Epsilon
Phi sorority. Alph Eta chapter, o
the University of Miami.
Mrs. Myers' latest reelection to
office as vice president of the Na-
' tional Council of Jewish Women
took place at the 23rd national bi-
ennial convention of the organiza-
tion, held in Los Angeles in Feb-
ruary, 1959.
Helping to "build" houses in Israel during the sale of Israel
Bonds at a dinner honoring Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz last
Saturday night are Oeft) Miss Janice Revitz, teen-age daughter
of dinner chairman Maurice Revitz, and Mrs. Mayer Abram-
owitz, wife of the spiritual leader of North Shore Jewish Cen-
ter. Members of the gathering helped to build nearly 39
houses in Israel by purchasing $116,000 in Israel Bonds in
honor of Rabbi Abramowitz.


Page 2-B
* Jewisi) ncrkfian
Friday, May 13. I960
'Harmony1 Theme
Of Installation
Harmony" is the theme of the
eight chapters and coordinating
council of the Jewish National
Home for Asthmatic Children
when they meet in a joint installa-
tion on Sunday evening at the Ev-
erglades hotel.
Harmony in mtg will be the con-
tribution of the eight presidents
ju.-t completing their tenure in of-
fice In true barber shop fashion,
they will harmonize a medley of
0O9, written by installation chair-
man Mrs. Irvin Goldstein.
Harmony in work and spirit will
be the keynote of the installation
ceremony conducted by John B.
Orr. jr., former representative in
the Florida Legislature.
Taking over their "conductor"
assignments are these new presi-
dents: Mrs. A. Dayan. Miami
Council of Presidents; Mrs. Ber-
nard Greenstein. Breath of Life
chapter: Mrs. Murry Jay. Greater
Miami chapter; Mrs. Lee Poliner.
Lorber chapter: Mrs. Milton Koch.
Miami Beach chapter; Mrs. Albert
Botway. North Dade chapter: Mrs.
Anthony Gecbele. South Broward
chapter; Mrs. Julius Kranzdorf.
Peshkin chapter: and Mrs. Albert
Kramer. Harmony chapter.
A combined "purse" to the
"tune" of over $20,000 is expected
to be sent to the Jewish National
Home at Denver. Funds will help
the seven Miami children now at
the Home, as well a> the research
for millions of asthma sufferers
throughout the world.
Miss Virginia Doran will be
guest soloist of the evening. In
charge of reservations are Mrs.
Goldstein and co-chairman. Mrs
J. William Baros.
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What's more, thia is only one
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um versatile Dromedary Date-
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school or after play: you'll find
it a tempting standby, as well,
for toasted teatime sandwiches,
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Of particular importance ii
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under the supervision of th?
t'nion of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of Ameri'-a. Yaul
find these popular products at
leading food stores everywhere,
and since they keep fresh and
ous indefinitely in their
\ u uum-sealed tins, it's a good
idea to put in a good supply
and keep them handy on your
kitchen shelf.
DATE-NIT SIIORTf\KE
1 tin Dromedary Date-Nut it,.11
1 cup heavy sweet cream
2 tablespoon* confectioner-.'
sugar
I teaspoon lemon juice
1 pavka;r fro/en-frrsli whole
strawberries (or equivalent
in fre4i berries)
2 bananas, sliced
Chill dale-nut roll In re-
frigerator to facilitate si
remove roll from tin and cut
into eight equal slices. Add
sugar and 1-mon juice to cream
and whip till cream holds soit
I. v one slice of date-Ill t
roll on each of four rvill
plates, top with berries, sliceil
banana and whipped ire
add another layer of date-nut
roll, fruits and cream and eft I
until readv to I
Pioneer Women
In Events Here
Pioneer Women. Club 1. held its
Independence Day Mother's Day
celebratlOrfWednesday-'evening at
Kncseth Israel Congregation. Mrs.
Louis Beckerman was in charge
of arrangements. Mrs. Joseph
Krantz is president.

Farewell luncheon will be held
Sunday noon at the Raleirh hotel
by members of Pioneer Women.
Club II. according to Mrs. Irving
Liftman, president.
The luncheon will honor Mr. and
Mr* Hyman Arent. of Miami
Beach. He is director of the Ninth
Street Singers.
Mrs. Sarah Singer is chairman,
and Mrs. Nathan Bookspan is in
charge of arrangements. Announc-
ed will be a scholarship for an
outstanding Israeli student in hon-
or of Rahel Ben-Zvi. The scholar-
ship will be in the name of Mr.
I mil Mrs. Arent. Program of enter-
ainment will include Mrs. Sonya
\ Weiss, folksinger.
During her recent stay in Mi-
ami. Mrs. Sidney Leff. national
president of Pioneer Women.
awarded a citation to Mrs. Miriam
' Wolfson in appreciation of her
many years of dedicated service
to Jewish National Fund." Mrs.
Wolfson is one of the seven found-
ers of Club II.

Mrs. Milton Green, reinstalled
president of the Greater Miami
Council, has called an open meet-
ing for Tuesday. 1 p.m.. at Miami
Cedars of lebanon Auxiliary
Erich Fromm's ":Jhe Art of Uv-I
ing" will be reviewed by Rabbi
Yaakov Rosenberg on Tuesday I
I noon at Beth David Auditorium'.
The function is being sponsored
by Cedars of Lebanon Hospital
Auxiliary. In charge of tickets art
Mrs. M. E. Glasser and Mrs. Jerrj
Weiss.
Beth Sholom
Honors Teachers
Teachers of Temple Beth Sho-1
lorn religious school will be guests
of honor at Friday evening serv
ices, according to an announce-1
ment by Rabbi Leon Kronish, spir-1
itual leader of the congregation.
The temple youth group, Beshty,
will read the service in honor gfl
the teachers who taught them
when they were students at the
Beth Sholom religious school Mrs.
Herbert C "Bloom, director of the
Temple's nursery school, will I
kindle the Sabbath lights, and Her
bert C. Bloom, the Temple's edu-l
cation director, will read a special!
prayer.
The board of education and PTaI
jointly proclaimed Friday u|
"Yom Hamoreh.*' Teachers Da?|
at Beth Sholom. This observant!
is part of a nation-wide tribute pn>|
posed by the American Assn. for|
Jewish Education.
Beach Federal Savings and
Assn.. 401 Lincoln rd. Chairmei
for the coming year will be
nounced.
Social Club Installs Officers
Mrs. Milton Weiss was in-
stalled last week as presi-
dent of the Dade County
Council of PTA's at cere-
monies in Bayfront Park Aud-
itorium.
David Kleiman was elected pres
ident of the recently formed Tol-
na Social Club.
The organization, numbering
some loo members, i.s composed
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SINCE 1837
Served in a glass or a cup...
There's Yom Tov spirit in this
famous tea... "flavor crushed"
for fullest strength and stimu-
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ure with your fleishigs and
milchigs and between meal
refreshment.
TETLEY TEA
Certifu'd KmJier under ttnet Rabbinical Supervision
-w**
-**-
of persons who formerly lived in
Tolna. Kiev. Russia, and their de-
scendant.-.
Other officers elected are Sara
Rappaport. vice president: Na-
than Badat. treasurer; and Mrs.
A. Otchet. secretary
Appointed co chairman of the
-octal committee are Mrs. Abra-
ham Orlick Mrs Charles Collins,
and Mrs Nathan Badat. Hospital-
ity chairman 1- David Prebluda.
and program chairmen are Charles
Steurman and Charles Collins.
Officers will be installed Sunday
afternoon at the home of Mrs Ab-
raham Orlick. 2146 Prairie ave. In
charge of information i- Nathan
Ba.Jat. 710 Lenox ave. Installing
officer will be Charles Steurman
Cream Cheese
And Lox
... the truly Jewish delicacy!
And your lox (or any-
thing else, for that
matter!) tastes even
better when it's served
with
WHIPPED
CREAM CHEESE
TempTee has the traditional quality and taste
you expect. Light and delicate, with rich, fresh-
cream flavorso downright delicious any and
every way it's served! And TempTee is so
spreadable, it's incredible! Spreads instantly, even
when ice-cold! Never tears bread, never breaks
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Handy 4-ounce and
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tot Htrne Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
The great name in dai'y products
FRANK J. HOLT, Manaoer
Card Party Tuesday Eve
The Anna Miller Circle. whose
project is helping Crippled Chil-
dren at the Harry Anna Home.
I matilda. Fla will have a card
party on Tuesday evening at the
Miami Beach Elks Lodge. Mrs.
Robert Lew. is president.
Another Fin* 'SteaAfifondi Product
AtM
rafrashini catena free
Sugarine
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AT rooo ITOMI IVUrrWNCM


Friday. May 13. 1960
* Jen is* tkrkUan
Page 3-B
Cardiac Tribute To Women's Auxiliaries Here
At the annual installation luncheon of the Women's Auxiliary
of Mt. Sinai Hospital last Friday at the Fontainebleau hotel,
Mrs. A. Herbert Mathes was elected and installed as new
president. Mrs. Mathes accepts the gavel from Mrs. Philip
Lefkowitz. immediate past president. Samuel Gertner, exec-
utive director of the hospital, was installing officer.
Brandeis Women Installation Set
Brandeis University National
j Women's Committee, Greater Mi-
ami chapter, will official launch its
[new year in an installation cere-
|mony at a luncheon at the Algiers
[hotel on Friday noon.
Rabbi Leon Kronish will install
CHARLES S. LAVIN
ANNOUNCES NEW
ORGANIZATION PLANS
[CHARLES S. LAVIN, whose
ieas have been editorialized in
header's Digest, announces the
addition of the famous Palm
teach Hotel at Palm Beach,
Florida. This is a truly luxurious
jlace for retirement; the average
ate being $86.50 per month per
ersou, double occupancy which
Deludes three meals a day.
Single rooms are also available,
special dietary kitchen and din-
room available at $1.00 per
[day extra charge.
[Reservations are now being ac-
cepted for our new Garden
| Wing. Rentals start at $86.50 per
month per person, which in-
cludes a lovely private room
with running water, and three
well-prepared meals a day. Also
these guests may enjoy the same
social activities as those in the
main building.
Regardless of your age, you can
now join The Charles S. Lavin
Retirement Organization, the
dues being one dollar ($1.00)
per year. This entitles you to a
monthly bulletin and should a
member come to one of our
hotels as a permanent guest, he
or she will receive a discount of
$100.00 the end of the first year.
the new slate of officers. They in-
clude:
Honorary president, Mrs. Albert
I. Jacobs; honorary vice presi-
dents, Mesdames Harold Turk,
Ben Zion Ginsburg, Sidney M.
Schwartz; president, Mrs. Solomon
B. Margolis; vice presidents, Mes-
dames Joseph Duntov, Max Smel-
ler. George Stearn; treasurer, Mr.
Robert Green; recording secre-
tary, Mrs. Jerome Rado.
Corresponding secretaries, Mrs.
Sam A. Goldstein, Mrs. Rebecca
Snetman; financial secretaries,
Mrs. Louis Easton, Mrs. Joel Mey-
er; auditor, Mrs. George Leven-
son; chaplains, Mrs. Yaakov Ros-
enberg and Mrs. Morris Graff.
Mrs. Sidney M. Schwartz, chair-
man of the day, has announced
that the program will include a
skit by the Brandeis study group
under the leadership of its chair-
man, Mrs. William Maxwell. In
charge of reservations are Mrs.
Robert Green, Mrs. Robert D.
Grossman and Mrs. Jerome Rado.
For specific information
regarding the numerous
Lavin Retirement Hotels
throughout the country,
please write Charles S.
Lavin as noted below.
There is no obligation.
Charles S. Lavin
Lavin Palm Beach Hotel
235 Sunrise Avenue
Palm Beach, Florida
DEAR MR. LAVIN.
Enclosed is my $1.00 membership
fee. Please send membership card
and monthly bulletins.
Name ............
Address ..........-........<
CHy ..... 3kiw
MKS. SOLOMON MAKGOUS
Tribute to the role the women's
auxiliaries play in supporting Na- I
tional Children's Caruiac Hospital I
will be given to workers by the I
hospital's board of governors on
Tuesday at the annual installation
of officers of the various chapters
at the Edeir-Roc-ttotel.
General chairman is Bob Rubin-
stein, a member of the board of
governors, as is Sol Goldstrom. |
who will deliver the invocation.
Main address at the installation ;
will be by hospital president Rich-
ard I. Berenson.
Presidents of the chapters who,
will be installed by Judge Milton
Friedman include Mrs. Edward |
Fernstein, reelected by the Miami
Beach chapter; Mrs. Philip Ben-1
dell, Miami chapter; Mrs. Sol Gold-
berg, North Dade chapter; and
Mrs. Roger Grant, Flamingo chap-
ter.
Outgoing presidents, who will re-
ceive pins from Paul Rimmeir of
the board of governors, are Mrs.
Faye Weintraub, of Miami, Mrs.
Jacques Assael, of North Dade, and
Mrs. William Schmerer of Fla-
mingo.
Berenson pointed out that t h e
chapters will be called upon to an
even greater extent with the build-
tag of the proposed new $2,500,000
hospital in the Medical Center.
Assisting Miami Beach chapter]
president Mrs. Edward Feinstein
during the coming year will be ',
vice presidents Mesdames Clemen-
tine Kemp, Benjamin Sharps, Nor-.
, man Kravis and Jack L. Dunne. I
| Other Miami Beach officers will
' be Mesdames Julie Miller, Nathan
; Glass, Nat'Conn, Milton D. Drey-
i fus, Henry L. Greene, Pauline
' Seitleman, and Gertrude Lachs.
I--------------------------
Shoshana Group
Installation Set
Shoshana chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will hold its third annual
1 installation of officers on Tuesday
1 evening. May 24, in the Theatre.
| room of the Diplomat hotel.
Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz, president
I B'nai B'rith Women, District 5,
j will install as president Mrs. New-
ton Hofstadter, and the following
officers:
Vice presidents, Mrs. Milton
Fandler, Mrs. Buddy Aronson,
Mrs. Eugene Tannenbaum, and
Mrs. Irving Finn; treasurer, Mrs.
Joel Ribler; corresponding secre-
tary, Mrs. Stanley Lambert; re-
cording secretary, Mrs. Howard
Sprechman; financial secretary,
Mrs. Herbert Brautman.
Guardian, Mrs. Walter H. Cohn,
jr.; sentinal, Mrs. Harold Monuse;
historian, Mrs. Herbert Katz; coun-
selor, Mrs. Murray Skup; trustee,
Mrs. Stanley Goldberg.
In addition, honored guests for
the evening will include Mrs.
Frank Brandt, chapter service of-
ficer and Mrs. Alvin Wank, pres-
ident of the Broward North Dade
Council.
The evening's entertainment will
be a surprise revue directed by
Mrs. Roy Garret and Mrs. Burt
Greenberg. In charge of reserva-
: tions is Mrs. Buddy Aronson.
Mrs. Philip Bendell, cf the Miami
chapter, will have the help of vice
presidents Mesdames Michael
Blank, Martin Rubinstein, Henry
Jacobson, Fred Bauer, and Jack
Stone. Additional Miami chapter
officers are Mesdames Ed Freed,
Sam' Sctmrwolf, William Groner,
Julius Propp, Jess Glance, Jack
Apte, Bart Cohen, Faye Wein-
traub, and Joseph Socolof.
The North Dade chapter, headed
by Mrs. Sol Goldberg, w.ll have
as vice presidents Mesdames Ja-
cob Levitor, David Kurilz. Roy
Amara. Jack Hodus, and Max Hom-
ier. Other officers will be Mes-
dames Mort Kargen, Rudolph Eig-
ner, Mary Clark, Mary Mernagh,
Herbert Comm, and Jacques As-
sael.
At the Flamingo chapter, vice
presidents working with Mrs. Rog-
er Grant will be Mesdames Irving
Whitman, S. Katzif, Ann Denmark,
and C. Cornelias. Also filling of-
ficer roles will be Mesdames Sid-
ney Katz, Diamond, C. Pont, E.
Kaler, A. Simka, and William
Schmerer.

DECORATION DAY WEEKEND GALA
Reserve for Shevuoth June 1-2
Cantor Abraham Wolkin & Choir Dietary Laws Observed
CkA&l
B*ms
IT'S FABULOUS-IT'S NEW U* **. Hew Ve*
BROWN'S
LEAVES YOU BREATHLESS!
Glamorous New Jerry lewis Theatre-Club
Magnificent Now Catolina Indoor Pool
Free Golf -All Sport*
Deluxe Accommodations
+ Supervised Day Camp
Nile Patrol
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ftwt StaaU [tenter Stnka
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+ Star-Studded Entertainment
+ Air-Conditionecl Comfort
* JERRY LEWIS TEENAGE
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BUDGET SPRING RATES
FOR RESERVATIONS call-
DIRECT WIRE: WAiklne 4-7470
mwwmmm' .....>'
RDINE'S
Shop MoncUy and Friday NiohN, Miami, Miami Baacti 'til 9:00
163rd St. Store, Ft laudardala, W. Palm Baach 'til 9:30

iihtii AiiiJ<:n.\r*i
Proudly Announces Her Affiliation with
camp umiiiai
OXFORD, FLORIDA
BOYS and GIRLS 5 -15
Am Charm & Modi'ling IWwfor
JUNE 21 through AUGUST 15
FOR BROCHURE WRITE OR PHONE
Edith Applebaum
2220 S.W. 27tti Tarraca
Miami, Florida
HI 8-9454
Peggy and Mac Mermetl
OR 1*00 S.W. 3rd Avamra
Miami, Florida
FR 4-5115 or FR 9-6883
I
INVITATIONS
WEDDINGS
Bar BAS MITZAHS
PERSONALIZED STATIONERY,
. MATCHES.
NAPKINS, ETC.
GRADUATION and CONFIRMATION Suggestions
hanivah sen em
ALL YOU PRINTING NEEDS
ENGRAVING, EMBOSSING
PRINTING
SOCIAL l
COMMERCIAL
Phone FR 1-7195 1600 S.W. First Avenue
..-
W
V
LOW
COST
HOME LOANS
To Buy, Build or Refinance
Inquiries Invited No Obfigation
'Oni H Net
pade Federal
(Savings r,nc\ Ioan a^soci^ti^^ >r Miami
- aMHel
JOSEPH M UPTON Pipsidi'i.t
5

6 Convnitnt Officti So/ve Dad* County ___ J
RESOURCES EXCEED 190 MILLION DOLLARS
I HI <* T II HI !*! *<



Pcge 4-B
JewlsHTcrkZian
Friday.
h Flcndujn Excluine
Your M
c
ARRIAGE COUNSELOR
. ty i^atnueL.K^. t^Jiliny -
Miami's Nationally Famous Marriage Counselor and Author
Divorce, though often necessary, is rarely pleas-
ant. I know. For many years I have observed men
and women go through the legal formalities of hav-
ing the marriage terminated, and almost invariably
one or both parties are left dejected and depressed.
All this is understandable. The severance of the
marriage ties no matter how corrosive leaves
permanent emotional scars. There is loss of status
and prestige. There is loneliness. And there is often
financial insecurity. To matters worse, there is the
depressing feeling that inocent children will suffer
as a result of the home's being broken up.
Yet in the vast majority of cases the marriage
was emotionally dissolved long before legal proceed-
ings were instituted. The law merely formalized an
existing, intolerable situation.
Dooming the marriage from the very start was
a neurotic choice of mate. Too frequently the girl
sought a substitute for a father, and the boy a re-
placement for his mother.
In other cases the couple had nothing in com-
mon but an intense physical attraction.
In still other cases, either the boy or girl, or
both, had married with all sorts of romantic illu-
sions, many of which were soon shattered by the
more intimate realities of wedlock.
The point is that all such marriages failed. In-
deed, both husband and wife recognized that there
had been a complete breakdown in communication,
that they were no longer of one flesh and spirit.
Tendency Toward Self-Blame
Yet when it came to actually dissolving the le-
gal tie. the parties were often filled with doubts
and fears. Many verged on panic. They were re-
luctant to let go even though they knew the mar-
riage was a hopeless failure and that they had
reached the point of no return.
Viewed logically, it was very much like a per-
son's refusing to give up an active, corroding ul-
cer, or an infected, impacted wisdom tooth. It just
didn't make sense. Finally there was a tendency to
cling to a worthless husband or a neurotic wife be-
cause getting rid of them was a confession of fail-
ure, and no one likes to admit failure.
More often than not there was a strong tendency
toward self-blame. This was apt to be true of the
person least responsible for the break-up. This may
have been because of a heavier sense of responsi-
bility, or a greater intelligence or sensitivity, or
a heavier burden of guilt. Ironically, it was usually
the individual more responsible for the emotional
divorce who had fewer qualms about obtaining the
legal one.
One woman I know was burdened by a severe
sense of guilt about her forthcoming divorce. "What
had she done wrong?" she persisted in asking. "In
what way had she failed her husband?"
As the day of her divorce approached, she be-
came increasingly apprehensive, her feelings of
guilt more intense. Perhaps she hadn't bolstered up
her husband's ego sufficiently? Perhaps she had
paid more attention to the children than to him?
The Wife Who Suffers
Actually, this woman was blaming herself need-
!(-]>. for it was her husband who was unable to
sever the cord which bound him so tightly to his
mother. It was he who drank excessively; it was he
who made impossibly childish demands, and it was
he. finally, who insisted on a divorce even though
he knew or should have known that it would have
a tragic impact on the children.
Nevertheless, it is the wife who really suffers.
She was ready to sacrifice her personal happiness
for the sake of keeping the family together. But
fate decreed otherwise. Because her husband lack-
ed a conscience, because he was unwilling to make
the necessary sacrifices and compromises to keep
the home together, the couple are now divorced.
There is a strong possibility that in time this long
suffering wife may remarry and that the children
will find a father who will give them the love and
understanding they never had.
There is an even stronger possibility that the
husband will remarry someday too. If he does, he
may again bring tragedy to his second wife and
whatever children the impulsive union produces.
Mr. Ilfef It miailoble fer rhrefe marriaf* ceeatefief
i file M#iffe Mtdical MV, im Miami
Temple Ner Tamid and Monticello Park religious schools hold
joint celebration in honor of Israel's 12th anniversary oi inde-
pendence. Program included religious prayers, an Israeli
movie, and a talk by Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. spiritual leader
of Ner Tamid. Serving committee of the Temple PTA in-
cluded (left to right) Mesdames Stanley Stein. Joseph Sher-
bill, Seymour Horowitz, and Phillip Du Beshter.
Emanu-EI Will Graduate Pupils
Temple Emanu-EI will hold 4ts
annual graduation ceremonies for
students of the daily religious
school at late Friday evening serv-
ice this week. Having completed
five years of study in Hebrew and
related subjects, the following
graduates will be charged by Dr.
Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader
of the congregation:
Jon Albert, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Solomon Becker: Stanley Joel, son
Men's Club Names Regent
Men's Club of Monticello Park
v..'.i sponsor a picnic at Greynolds
Park on Sunday at 1 p.m.
of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Bern-
stein; Manual Michel, son of Mrs.
Regina Diner: David Mark, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Epstein;
Helena. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Fruchter: Michael Irving,
son of Judge and Mrs. William Hal-
per.
Steven Robert, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Sherman R. Kaplan: Barry-
Martin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben-
jamin Katzen: Henry Sidney, son
of Mr. and Mrs Julius Pohl. Bar
ry Stephen, son of Cantor and Mrs.
! Israel Reich; Binnette Jane,
daughter of Mrs. Edythe Sommer;
Max Bernard and Samuel Arthur,
sons The 1960 class Hebrew valedic-
torian is Henry Pohl, and Stanley
Bernstein is the English valedic-
torian. A specially prepared pro-
gram centered on the theme, 'The
Torah Basis for Judaism." will,
be presented by the graduates, j
Hanoi Bernard A. Mussman. di-
rector of education at the Temple
Emanu-EI religious schools, will
extend greetings, and diplomas
will be presented to students by
Samuel Friedland. president of the
congregation, and Dr. Herman R.
Mechlowitz. chairman of the board
of education.
Dr. Lehrman will preach in hon-
or of the occasion, and Cantor Is-
rael Reich will chant. A reception
honoring the graduates will take
place immediately after the serv-
ice.
Beachites Tour
Israeli Facility
A Miami Beach couple were re-
cent guests of ZOA House in Tel
Aviv, where they inspected the
center's facilities and were briefed
on its program aimed at fostering
closer ties of understanding be-
tween the people of the United
States and Israel.
The couple, still touring Israel,
are Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Epstein,
of 200 76th st.. Miami Beach.
The visitors spent a full hour
meeting with ZOA House officials
and touring the center established
there in 1953 by the Zionist Organ-
ization of America to serve as a
youngest and oldest democracies,
cultural bridge linking the world's
The ultra modern, twin story-
structure serves as a community
center for Israel's largest city, Tel
Aviv, at the same time maintain-
ing an intensive educational pro-
gram aimed at fostering better
understanding of America among
Israelis.
Guided Tours at Jackson
Dade county citizens got i
chance to see first-hand how
some of their tax dollars have been
spent when Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital held Open House on Sun-
day in observance of National Hos-
pital Week. Guided tours were
conducted from 1 to 4 p.m. through
four of the most recent additions
to the booming Metro medical cen-
ter. Main attraction was South
Wing, new eight-story structure
adjoining the centra] building.
Built at a cost of $2,000,000. the
ultra-modern 205-bed facility raises
the hospital's total capacity to
11,384 beds.
You're Rich
When You're Healthy!
i
i
r-
1
I
I
I
I
I
,
#
7
Beth Am Ladies
Meet Monday
Temple Beth Am Sisterhood will
hold its monthly meeting on Mon-
day evening at Temple Auditorium.
Elections for the. coming year will
take place.
Mrs. Rose Feldman. program
chairman, will present Charlotte
Liebel. graphologist, who will
speak on "Handwriting and Whai
it Reveals."
The new Beth Am Sisterhood
Bowling League will meet on the
same evening at 7:30 p.m. immedi-
ately prior to the Sisterhood gath-
ering. Elections of officers will
take place for the league, which
will start regular bowling sessions
in the fall.
SPOON
YOUR WAY
TO HEALTH
with
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Make hot potato salad (you needn t wait for the potatoes to
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Swim-Card Party Due
Mr-. Sheila Weinstock. of Tifer
eth Israel Sisterhood, is sponsor-
ing a dessert and swim-card party
at her home. 874 NE 82nd St., from
1 to 4 30 p.m. on Tuesday.
THE PR'WE
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Friday. May 13, 1960
^JmlstncridHan
Page 5 B
Gov. Collins Cites High Schocl Student
For National Honor She Brings to Florida
A Miami high school student has
received a letter of commendation
from Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins.
Gov. Collins early this week
cited Miss Martha Alice Alpert, re-
cent winner of a 1960 National
Merit Scholarship. Wrote the Gov-
ernor:
"I wish to commend you, your
parents, and your teachers on your
selection for "One of the 1960 Na-
tional Merit Scholarships. The
hard work and ability which won
you this outstanding national honor
reflects great credit on our entire
state."
Gov. Collins added: "I am proud
of you and wish you all success in
the future."
Martha is a senior at Miami
Beth Israel Will
Install Ladies
Installation of officers of the
Beth Israel Sisterhood will take
place at a buffet luncheon party
at the home of Mrs. Harry
Schwartz, 3606 Flamingo dr., on
Tuesday noon.
To be installed by Rabbi H. Lou-
is Rottman, spiritual leader of the
congregation, are president, Mrs.
George Hechter; vice presidents,
Mrs. Harry -Schwartz, Mrs. Alex-
lander Moscovites, Mrs. Maurice H.
Goldring; treasurer, Mrs. Henry
[Groudan.
Financial secretary, Mrs. David
lermon; recording secretary, Mrs.
II. H. Mellman; corresponding sec-
retaries, Mrs. Louis Pollack and
[Mrs. David Cohen; chaplain, Mrs.
1. Louis Rottman.
A fashion skit satire will be en-
icted by members of the Sister-
hood.
Beach High School, and will at-
I tend Smith College in the fall.
She and one other Dade coun-
tian were two of the 1,000 nation-
' wide winners of the scholarship,
which pays up. to $1,500. depend-
ing upon need.
Martha is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Alpert, 1345 N. Vene-
tian Way, Miami. Her father is a
noted attorney and authority on
] Florida accident law, whose book
in this field is considered a stand-
ard source of reference.
Her mother is a social casework
expert and active in the National
Council of Jewish Women.
At Miami Beach High, Martha is
a member of National Honor So-
ciety, Quill arid Scroll. National
Forensic League, and copy editor
of 'Typhoon," the school's year-
book.
She also belongs to Beta Club,
and was a member of the Future
j Teachers of America and Latin
'Club.
"I plan to major in languages j
iat Smith," Martha said, quietly!
proud of Gov. Collins' citation. Her j
field of special emphasis will prob- >
ably be Russianan area in which
I he State Department and the fed- i
eral government are in sore need j
of experts.
An avid reader, Martha's main
likes include Dostoyevsky, Baude-'
laire, Oscar Wilde, and Swinburne.
Her brother, Jonathan, is a stu- '.
dent at Nautilus.
Seniors throughout the nation |
are eligible for the National Merit!
Scholarship competition. Some
high schools make the competition
a requirement. Students from
14,000 schools across the country
took the examination last year.
Architects Talk Convention Picks PR Firm
At Art Lecture
.Jorge A rail go and A.^ Herbert
Mathes were to discuss contempor-
ary architecture in the third pro-
gram of a first annual Fine Arts
I Series sponsored by the Greater
Miami chapter of the American
| Friends of the Hebrew University
j on Thursday evening at Temple
Beth Sholom.
Arango is a well-known architect
from Bogota, Calumhia. former
I president of the Colombian Nation-
I al Society of Architects, and was
! to discuss "The Architect and the
] Community."
Mathes has just returned from
a trip to Israel, and was to preview
Woody Kepner Associates hag
been retained to handle the publi-
city and public relations for the
1960 American Leglfm "'WTional
convention which will be held on
Miami Beach Oct. 15 to 20. An-
nouncement of the appointment
was made this week by Lawrence
E. Hoffman, president of the Amer-
ican Legion 1960 Convention Corp-
I oration of Florida, whose head-
| quarters have been set up in the
Delano hotel.

'*
"Achitectural Developments in
the Jewish State."
Mrs. Laura Goldstein was to pre-
side. Mrs. Emil Friedlander is pro-
gram chairman for the entire se-
ries.
MISS MARTHA AlPtRT
Chapter Has Fond-Raiser
Eleanor Roosevelt chapter of
J'nai B'rith Women held a fund-
raising function Sunday evening
it the Deauville hotel. Mrs. Ger-
rude Davidson and Mrs. Chester
Jromley were in charge of reser-
vations. Featured was Larry
ISteele's "Smart Affairs of 1960."
Miami Chapter
In Donor Dance
Mrs. Homer S. Rievman, presi-
dent of the Miami chapter of Ha-
dassah, reported this week on the
I donor supper dance held by the
chapter Saturday at the Carillon
hotel.
A cocktail hour was followed by
I supper in the Cafe Le Can Can and
a midnight performance of Lou
Walter's "Folies Francaise."
Mrs. Harold Abbott, fund rais-
i ing vice president, was chairman
of the event sponsored by Hadah-
| sa.h's program of healing, teaching
[ and research.
Also on the committee were:
Mrs. Arthur Willens, donor coor-
| dinator, Mrs. Max Handshu, Mrs.
Frank Rose, Mrs. Herman Mint-
licr, Mrs. Irving Denmark, and
Mrs. Raymond Wolf.
Cancer League
To Close Season
Mrs. Micky Kraus, president of
the Women's Cancer League of Mi-
ami Beach, will preside at the first
meeting since her installation as
president for the second term
when the group meets for luncheon
Friday at the Seville hotel.
The first project of the Wom-
en's Cancer League of Miami
Beach was to purchase a $50,000
cobalt machine, the latest device
for x-ray therapy in cancer treat-
ment. The machine is now in op-
eration at Mt. Sinai Hospital. The
group's second project will be to
provide four beds for terminal can-
cer patients at the hospital at a
cost of $10,000 a bed yearly.
Highlight of the last meeting un-
til the fall will be the presentation
of Samuel G. Kling, whose' topic
will be "What's Happening
to American Marriages?" Kling,
an attorney, specializing in domes-
tice relations, is a marriage coun-
selor and regular Jewish Flondian
columnist.
S&t
l0G\JST BROS RyE
** Is the BEST'
A,
&,
Lunchiont, Toaa. Reptlon, Banquota, Parti**,
Dinner* ... from 20 to 2000 e*t*r*d In th*
manner of th* Diplomat... an unhurrUd,
var-attntlv, *ott-*DOk*n **rvlc* that makoa
an *v*nt of your occasion.
Best Fictional
Work Awarded
By Special Report
NEW YORK The year's best
American book of short stories has
also been selected as the best
American work of Jewish interest
in the fiction field by the Jewish
Book Council of the National Jew-
ish Welfare Board.
Philip Roth, whose collection of
short stories, "Good-by Columbus,"
won the National Book Commit-
tee prize of $1,000, was the recipi-
ent of the $250 Harry and Ethel
Daroff Memorial Fiction Award
for the most outstanding work of
fiction of Jewish interest written
and published in the U.S. in 1959.
Announcement of the award was
made last week at the annual
meeting of the Council held here.
Samuel H. Daroff, of Philadelphia,
presented the award.
On the committee of judges were
David Boroff, New York; Dr.
Mortimer J. Cohen, Philadelphia;
Dr. Judd L Teller, New York; and
Dr. Trude Weiss Rosmarin, New
York.
The award to Roth was one of
five literary awards carrying cash
prizes totalling $800 for 1959's best
works of Jewish interest in the
fiction, poetry and juvenile fields
made last night at the Council
meeting.
Q/oir Snauirxf is sjnvited with regards to
WEDDINGS BANQUETS
CONFIRMATIONS
and all Social Functions -
R.S.V.P.: Mr. Arthur Budoff
JE 8-0811 during Manager
400 Ft. Oceanfront at Lincoln Rd.
Specia
i
i
i
I Occasion ^
Have that
is Meeting,
lanquet, or
You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
for Information!
HAZEL ALLISON
Calaring Dlroctor,
I
1


^Mfttm
New Emphasis, No Rih~AK Leader
9m "V -r..i Uh 11
awetec tknr ifciMhas tar
:'" < ::::. .:..

* I '".- 7 -:> ,t -.i,. ISSSSfl
ao i^wah. Congress. *he n tan
mvil 1 writ-usa -
Mrs. Hnlnnsa
mamu\ vui
Pa ms*. i i"1'-
ie lu-
ll BUM BSSI Hi
rnkc&v nglwi^riit- ex
hn. of 4400 Royal Palm ave.. displays to her
:.-.- ?-..-,.:. -.'.e picture preserved to her bj.
sj Hrtfa Sboiom -'or the Year 1%0." at a special
serr-.ce at the Temple last weekend. Honor
Scoiom is chosen each year by a committee oi
r Mothers. Beth Sholom's education director,
oder on the basis of greatest service rendered
of the religious school. Mrs. Cohen is chair-
als committee of the PTA.
fc Ms* 1
a5 Sarah Czech to Receive Seminary's
Eternal Light Award Here cm Sunday
BJ _?
* I'
n

Teacher's
:o pay tribute will
of the community rep-
esse of the more than
i national organizations
Mrs. Czech is affiliated
ember. Among them
he Gerald Lewis, president of
tal: Samuel Oritt,
o>fcssrssaa. State of Israel Bonds;
*"*' fcisjan, president of the
MSar Miami Jewish Federation;
e trrmg Cypen, Jewish Home
fcr the Aged president; and others.
M.-> Louis Glasser is chairman
- ---: and her co-chairman
Mr* Harry Rogers. The occa-
sion eonincides with the annual
- i-'t-.v., : -.he Florida Branch
nal Women's League,
of which is Mrs. Harry
Conference chairman is
Unhto Goodman.
M*S. SARAH CZECH
Miami Women
Join 'Caravan'
s* participants in the
**' American ORT "cars-
**" >*** May 1 from Nm Ymk
r:h Africa and the
East ji a comhination tour
RT vocational instal-
unno tnese areas.
tMSsati in the ORT caravan
n the Greater Miami area
UBm Rosenblatt. -
N -. Mi
Mrs. Florence tapper-
on. Miaau Beach.
groop dl spend 33 davs m
if. Tunuia. Morocco.
S*iu*riand. ud Italv
sang toss* qrt
"Je. inehnhng tie Syngalow-
t JSStsri1 Av,v-,r
fri sad best equipp.
*-ai tromn* school in the en-
Council Officers
To be Installed
Mrs Alvin Wank will be install-
ed president of Broward Nora
Dade Council of B'nai B'nth Worn-
en on Sunday evening at the Chefs
Steak House in Hollywood.
Others to be installed by Mr.-.
Gerald P. Soltz. president of B'nai
B'nth Women. District 5. are Mes-
dames Stanley Goldberg and Paul
Harrold. vice presidents; Elliot
Herring, correspondinc secretary;
Murray Skup. recording secre-
tary; Albert Gordon, treasurer;
and Frank Brandt, counselor.
B'nai B'rith's Broward North
'Hade Cornell i> the coordinating
""it of five chapters, three in
North Dade. one in Hollywood,
.mil one in Ft. Lauderdale.
In charge of reservations f"-
the Suiuiav function are Mrs. Elli-
>t Herring and Mrs. Stanley Gold-
berg.
tire Middle East and built by Wom-
en s American ORT during the last
few years.
Mare than 3 000 persons i 1 the first are deft, Mrs. W3rkxm Lehman, sfcn s_
ournoJ Art Eriubittoo of Temple Israel snenv side her ~SoIl LSe.~ oasdttdMTlSSiS
bers at the Temple last weekend. The show Daniel Lerme. with "Back Tors7J^~
led paarntnas. scuipturo and crafts by *
50 lemtnn Two first prise
VOTE YOUR CONSCIENCE
VOTE
W.R. HANCOCK
Pal Lever 7-B. May 24
Endorsed by
Herald, News. Sun


Friday, May 13, 1960
+JewUtfk>ridlian
Irs. Volpe Feted*
tor Service Here
L'M's dynamic "First Lady of
Jusic," symphony orchestra man-
ger Marie Volpe, last week was
ftnored by Chi Omega as the
kurth woman to will rfCQgnftinn
the sorority's "Gallery of Worn-'
at the university.
[Mrs. Volpe. cited for her "dis-
pguished service to the univer-
|y and the community," has been
waging the symphony for 33
|ars. Her late husband, composer-
nductor Arnold Volpe, founded
orchestra in 1926.
photo-portrait of Mrs. Volpe,
pnted by Elmer Wilson, of Daw-
Ga., was presented to the un-
^rsity at dual ceremonies dur-
the symphony programs of
10 and 11.
Irs. Albert Houck, president of
Miami chapter of Chi Omega
Jimnae, made the presentation
|Dr. Charles Doren Tharp, vice
sident and dean of faculties,
accepted the portrait on be-
of president Jay F. W. Pear-
and the university. Mrs. Ford
ichfield was master of cere-
tnies.
Irs. Volpe joins three other
llery" women who have re-
fd similar recognition since
They are Miss Mary B. Mer-
^t, dean of women, emeritus; Dr.
ertha Foster, dean emeritus of
school of music; and Dr. Mel-
; Rosborough. professor of Ger-
an and chairman of the UM com-
jttee on religious activities.
Page 7-B
'Genie1 Awards
Offered Here
First annual "Genie Awards"
.-program, to recognize and encour-
age achievement in the fine arts
i among Miami Beach junior and
senior., higi -si-'iool students* .was
; to be held Thursday, 8 p.m., in the
Miami Beach Auditorium.
"Genie" trophies, symbolic of
outstanding performance, were to
be awarded winners in several
categories.
"By giving youth an opportunity
to display ability in the arts, we
hope to encourage continued inter-
est in amateur performances, and
give recognition early in life to
(hose seeking professional ca-
reers." explained Leo Eisenstem,
president of the Exchange Club,
sponsor of the program.
'rue Sisters
ick Mrs. Perls
Irs. Edmund Perls will be in-!
Jed as president of United Or-i
i of True Sisters, Miami 43, on i
^day at Hibiscus Temple.
Br mother in-law, Mrs. Samuel'
Istein. who is a past president
odge Immanuel 1 in New York,
be installing officer.
rs. Sanford Emerman will be
president of Miami 43.
fie Lodge will be open at 11:30
and the meeting starts at
IB.
>th Tfilah
lans Celebration
Seth Tfilah Congregation, 935
ave., will mark Israel's 12th
liversary of independence at a
fcial celebration on Sunday eve-
Og.
^hairman of the function will be
tv. Joseph Krantz, president of
Mizrachi Branch of Miami
;ach.
Mrs. Marie Volpe (right) is honored for 33 president of Chi Omega Alumnae,'made the
years of distinguished service to the Univer- presentation. Dr. Melanie Rosborough (left)
sity of Miami and the community at cere- and Mrs. Ford Denchfield (second from left),
monies during the symphony concerts Apr. "10 master of ceremonies, look on.
and 11. Mrs. Albert Houck, second from right.
City of Hope
Director Here
Greater Miami chapters of the
ICity of Hope will honor Dr. Alfred
! Goldman at a luncheon on Satur-
. day noon at the Saxony hotel.
Dr. Goldman, director of the hos-
ipital for heart disease at the City
! of Hope National Medical Center
: near Los Angeles, is in Miami
Beach for this week's meeting of
1 the American Assn. for Thoracic
Surgery.
Dr. Goldman, acting in behalf of
the City of Hope's board of direc-
tors, will present an award to Mrs.
Bernard Hoffman, of 7834 Abbott
ave., president of the Miami Beach
chapter, one of five local groups
throughout the nation to lead all
others in membership expansion.
The nearly 400 City of Hope
I chapters across the country pro-
vide major suport to the free and
non-sectarian hospital at Duarte,
Calif.
Another highlight of the pro-
gram Saturday will be the appear-
ance of Victor Marchesi, dramatic
tenor and recording artist, and
Olga Pavlova, lyric soprano, both
of whom \\;11 be accompanied at
the piano by Mrs. Harry Gli --
landscape contest as "very dis-
couraging," said the two month j kl^m.^!*.. lActrt
The "Make Miami Beautiful" extension was decided upon by the nOVeiiy fUCO
contest, originally schednled to Miami beautification committee in p^j. Q^gp^f y
N. Shore Posts
Registration
Registration and re-registration
at North Shore Jewish Center op-
ened in all three departments this
week.
The nursery school accepts chil-
dren between 3 and 5. Kindergar-
ten enrollment is open for children
from 5 to 6. Both nursery and kin-
dergarten schools are in session
from 9 to 12 noon. Monday through
Friday, with bus transportation
and supervision provided to and
from school.
Rita Fearnley, nursey school
1 teacher, is director of the school,
j supported by a staff of trained per-
sonnel.
Sunday and Hebrew school have
completed their re-registration and
are now open daily from 9 to 5 for
registration of new pupils.
At the fourth annual birthday dinner dance of the Coral Way
Jewish Center are (left to right) Morris Fox, outgoing president
of the Center; Leonard Putterman, incoming president; Mrs.
Seymour Goldstein, president of the Sisterhood; and Roy Mil-
ler, reelected Men's Club president. This was the Center's
first installation function in its new facilities at 2175 SW
78th pi.
Contest Deadline Extended
Ner Tamid Hears
Building Bids
Dr. Ben L. Fabric, president of
I Temple Ner Tamid, conducted the
' formal opening of the bids for the
! building of Temple Ner Tamid this
week.
Among the final bidders were
i Arkin Construction Co., Stobbs
Bros. Construction Co., and Giller
and Fryd.
Groundbreaking ceremonies will
I be announced in the near future.
Present at the bid openings were
Louis Cohen, building chairman,
Marshall Berkson, Ezra Feingold,
William Harris Sam Jacobs, Na-
than Rottenberg and Maurice Zar-
ctsky.
..in Ko *nii,H end June 18, has been extended to the hope of encouraging additional
|The celebration will be followed Ayg 2Q contest chairman Mrs. E entries. "Interest picked up con- A red plastic card, engraved in
ai .fJ^lJl8!? J-SL"l Arthur Evans has announced. Mrs. siderably after it was revealed last I ffld letters with the inscription "5
Lag B'Omer. The entire func-
an will be launched with Maariv Evans, who recently described i week that prizes outnumbered con-
! public response to the city wide testants." she said.
ervices.
W
My Sheerest THANKS .
to YOU the VOTERS
Friends and Supporters of
DISTRICT 2
(Precincts 117 thru 147 and 106& 107)
For Your VOTE of CONFIDENCE
in the First Primary.
I Humbly Solicit Your Continued Support
MAY 24
MARVIN "Red" CHRISTMAS
FOR CONSTABLE, DISTRICT 2
Courtesy -- Consideration Dignity
P.I P..1 Adv.
More." is now being produced and
distributed here by the Krel Com-
pany.
The card is inserted in a stand-
ard canasta deck to indicate that
there are only five more cards to
go.
Behind the novelty idea are two
noted Miami Beach clubwomen,
Mrs. Inez Krensky and Mrs. Leon
El.
Mrs. Krensky is a past president
of Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood,
past president of Mt. Sinai Wom-
en's Auxiliary, and currently
serves as national Alpha Epsilon
Phi Mother's Club chairman.
Mrs. El is a past president of
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood,
and has been identified with many
other civic and charitable causes.
The company's officials indicated
that all funds raised through the
sale of the unique plastic cards
will go to a charity designated by
the Krel Co.
Film Available Gratis
A Brandeis University film in
color and running approximately
30 minutes is available without
cost to organizations and interest-
ed groups, Dr. Stanley Frehling,
president of the Brandeis Univer-
sity Club of Greater Miami, has
announced. The film, entitled "The
Challenge of Brandeis," portrays
<>uth and future of the first
non sectarian Jewish sponsored
university in the western hemis-
phere.
PACE" MOTORS
NOW IN
HOMESTEAD
BERNIE BLOOM
General Manager
PACE MOTORS
PLYMOUTH VALIANT
DESOTO CHRYSLER
523 No. Krome Ave.
HOMESTEAD
MIAMI Exchange
FR 1-0489
HOMESTEAD Exchange
Cl 7-3127
'TOGUST BROS >
' I I... HI V I '
IS t>

Page 8-B
*-JmistTkrkfiar
Friday, May 13. l960

<2fn the r^cab
ealnt o
>f *^ocietu
Miss Subin Now
Mrs. Harold Barr
vows were exchanged
between Miss Paula Subin and
:!d Barr in 6 p.m. ceremonies
or SumU", May l. at the Algiers
hv.ei Rabbis Irving Lehnnan and
L-. a Kr;-.:sh officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Mrs Frieda Subin and the late
Mr. Benjamin Subin. 5900 Pine
Tree dr. The groom is the son of
the Leonard Barrs. 4400 Sheridan
ave.
Maid of honor was Man Rosalie
; German. Jerry I'dwtn acted as
man. and Dr. Robert Ltebes-
V -' and Mike Segal were ushers.
The bride attended Miami Beach
H -h School and the University of
Miami.
The groom attended Miami
Beach High. Northwestern I'niver-
I'-.; and :s connected with Jack-
son-Byron Dept. Stores.
Reception and dinner followed at
the Algiers hotel. The couple are
on a honeymoon tour of Europe.
Silvers, Cuttler
Exchange Vows
hi Marilyn Natalie Cuttler be-
came Mrs. Jerome Louis Silvers in
7 I rr.. ceremonies Saturday. May
7, at the Fontaieebleau hotel. Rab-
bi Leon Kronisfa officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr
ard Mrs. Frank Cuttler. 1576 Day-
fi":a rd. The groom's parents are
Mr and Mrs, Charles Silvers. 6500
M Bay rd.
Maid of honor was Miss Phyllis
S brers. T;?r: Ellen Silvers was
flowergirl. Mickey Gottlieb served
Ml man.
The bride chose a silk organza
gt*D featuring a scoop neck out-
Haad wMk appliques and three-
qcirter d in a chapel train. She car-
ried a bouquet of white ro*es and
h"> -cf-t he-valley over a Bible.
Newh-wed Mrs Silvers attended
the I r.:..r-,ry of Alabama and In-
a. *here she be-
longed to Alpha Epsiion Phi soror-
ity
The groom is a graduate of the
.-?:a Institute of Technology-.
and jn engineer.
Dinner and reception followed at
the Fomainebleau The couple are
y mooning in the midwest, and
will live in Detroit. Mich.
Bossaks Reveal
Sandra's Troth
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bossak.
3894 NW 2nd ter.. Miami, announce
the engagement of their daughter.
Sandra Helen, to Bert Seth Adler.
son of Mrs. Morris Adler and the
late Morris Adler. Raleigh. N. C.
Mia Bo>ak is a graduate of Mi-
ami Senior High School. She was
graduated magna cum laude fp>m
the University of Miami in 1958.
where she belonged to Alpha
Lambda Delta. Kappa Delta Pi.
and Phi Kappa Phi She presently
teaches third grade at Palm
Springs Elementary.
Mr. Adler is a graduate of Har-
grave Military Academy and Mars
Hill Junior College. He attended
the University of North Carolina
and the University of Miami where
his fraternity was Tau Delta Phi
He is a Mason and a member of
Bnai Brith.
The couple will be married June
19 in Temple Israel. They, will
make their borne in Raleigh,
where Mr Adler is in business.
jfeH^B
w
W \"


HL_ ^H
MflT
i^pr* j^jU
fy K
1 I i I W*
mas. MAUKICt WAlDOtf
Gifts Offered
At B'nai Sholom
W-rner-Kafcn
IS. H 4*010 BAM
Club Tikvah Slates Party
' Tikvah of Pioneer Women
will hold a Mothers Day party
M Stadajr, 2 ?m.. at the home of
M.'< Ruth lli-s Wagner, president.
SW uth st.. M.ami. An Is
movie will be shown.
Special Fete
Due at Academy
Prospective Kindergarten and
first grade students with their par-
ents are invited to visit the He-
brew Academy during "Get to
Know Us Week" slated for May
16 through 20.
During this period, students and
their parents will have an oppor-
tunity to experience a full >chool
day in the kindergarten and the
primary grades. Guests and
tors during the week will have
lunch with the Academy students.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, prin-
cipaL said that a special orienta-
tion meeting will be scheduled
daily for parents, at which time
the Academy's bilingual program
of education will be described in
detail.
MR.
ON THE PREMISES
Zionists Slate
Officer Election
Election of officers and board
members for the new year was
slated as the business agenda
Thursday evening of the Miami-
Gables Zionist District.
The meeting, chaired by presi-
dent J. David Liebman. was to be
held at Zamora Jewish Center. In
addition to the election, the dis-
trict forthcoming annual ko>her
barbeque June 19 at the home of
Mr and Mrs. Murray Levine. 6161
Miller rd.. was to be discussed.
Two recent Israel films were to
be shown after the busine>> por
tion of the meeting.
^FUR STORAGE
i o4 eat t*r,,c* /* 6 **- "l** 1 /-.__
/ DR. ARTHUR E. SWENS0N
ANNOUNCES
t ohhihc or am omci row
m raAaKi or cmonAjK.
OffKl NOCNK t CONSULTATIOM
IT tfPOIHlMlHl.
Phona Pt 9-3761
9808 NW. 7Hi An,
Judea Sisterhood
Elects Officers
,M.rl. "522 WWorf has be*.
elected president of Temple JuS2
Sisterhood. w*
Ot*!er officers ehoaen al a recem
election meeting include ihe f(?
lowing: *
Mesdames Jack Sombera execu.
tive vice president; Tllden c0Wn.
blum. Milton Katz and David Ste n
berg, vice presidents; Henry Ham
ersmith. treasurer; Howard'LeJrn
cr. financial secretary; Benjamin
Schwartz, recording secretary
Mesdames Helen D. Cohen cor
responding secretary; Benjamin
Issenberg, assistant corresponding
secretary; Harold Barkoitz his
torian; Ben Kazan, parliamentar-
ian and counselor: and Alfred
Reich, trustee and chaplain.
Installation will be May 29 at
a dinner dance in the Dupont Plaza
hotel. Installing officer will be
Judge Sam Silver, past president
J of Temple Judea, and Mrs. Alfred
1 Reich, past president of Sister-
hood and director of the Southeast
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods,
Gifts will be accepted at special D,s,nct 13
services of Temple Bnai Sholom Function will also include the in-
on Fridav evening. stallation of officers of the Tern-
tv______ P'e. Brotherhood and PTA.
The congregation will receive a_____________
Talis and Yarmulke rack from Mr.
and Mrs. Max Marcus, an altar. VA CXIMCilliS
chair from Mr. and Mrs. Howard' j .
Max. a second altar chair from Mr. N6W I enSIOfl LOW
and Mrs Aaron Krav.tzand Mr. Veterans with working wives
and Mrs. William A. Weintraub. should ^ aware that J ^
Junior congregation Ark and i of their spouses in excess of $1,200
Lestem will be a gift from Mr. and is considered to be available to
Mrs. Judd Merl. and junior congre- ,ne veteran by the new pension
gation Menorahs from Mr. and 'aw that goes into effect July 1.
Mrs. Harry Moldoff. Thus the income of a veterans
Only the Marcus gift will be ded- SD0U!* in excess of the exempted
icated Friday evening. Other gifts J1-200 must reported as part
will be dedicated at subsequent of the ve,ern's income,
services. Rabbi Sheldon Edwards C W. Boggs, officer in charge of
will officiate, with Cantor Ben the VA office at 9*4 W. Flagler st,
Grosberg rendering the musical said VA personnel are fully pre-
portions of the liturgy. pared to explain this point and
other questions that may arise
concerning choice of the new pen-
, sion law.
Nursery school of Congregation Veterans and dependents now re-
Monticello Park is again partici- ceiving pensions may continue to
pating in a "Learn to Swim" pro- receive them as at present or, in-
gram, with more than 60 young- stead, may choose to come under
*sters from the ages of 3 to 6 tak- the new pension law. Once this
ing lessons during the next two choice is made, Boggs said, the
weeks at the Hallandale Municipal 'aw provides no way that they may
Pool. Lnder the direction of Mrs. return to the present system of
Sidney Kay. nursery school direc- pension payments,
tor. and Mrs. Jack Borenstein. qual- The VA office at 984 W. Flagler
ified Red Cross instructor, the stu- st- 's P*n five days a week from
dents will spend eight davs learn- 8 ,0 4:3 D m- aad menibers of the
.ng how to swim and the rudiments SS5?,?5 T? *,"" "'H"
Jf water safptv dU"ng ,heSe DOUrs to Plain W
tar safety. parl o{ the ^^^ program
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M0 6-M26


Friday, May 13. 1960
rjewisti fkrHlan
Pag 9-B
THE room was full of well-
dressed women, with so
many of them wearing attractive
hats. It was impossible to see
them all, but perhaps you can
recognize yourself or your neigh-
bor by a description of the hat.
There was an iridescent red
b-traw with a wide flat brim,
trimmed with red roses and ny-
lon tulle. Another was composed
of white flower petals in a pixie
style complete to the pixie point.
This hat had a band of green
foliage. Another was a pink straw
with a wide contoured brim com-
pletely covered with rows of ruf-
fles in soft pink straw.
One small hat looked 1 i k e a
tight nosegay of small spring
flowers, and another small hat
was a tight turban of white with
red polka dots. One was a black
velvet bow with a bit of glamor-
ous veiling, and still another in
the small group was a white lace
pillbox. To match the dress was
a crown of fabric loops, and an-
other in beige silk organza roses
with one large orange colored
rose.
At the other extreme was a
high white spiraled turban, which
continued low over the face. It
was trimmed with a white flow-
er and veiling. Then there was
the oversized cloche of oyster
white "fishnet."
Gold and orange silk organza
print was draped over a narrow-
brimmed sailor styled hat, and
there was a small pink lace straw
encircled in silk organza roses.
In whites was a floral wig; a
deep straw cloche with a huge
orange flower and orange veil-
ing; a straw brim on a crown of
violet clusters; a draped cap of
Hilk organza with a single match-
ing fabric flower; and a turban
pillbox pleated into a spiraling
effect with a small red rose on
the side.
There were many other lovely
hats of various shapes and col-
ors, and it seems clear that wom-
en are "dressing up" more this
season, than we recall in the past.

THE Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish
Women, held its annual Installa-
tion luncheon last week at the
Everglades hotel. Music was the
theme of the afternoon with pa-
per "instruments and notes"
used for the table decor.
Mrs. Arnold Perlstein, who in-
stalled the officers, wove a mus-
ical theme into her installation
speech by comparing harmony in
music and club work.
For the occasion, Mrs. Perl-
stein chose a black silk linen
sheath with a wide V neckline.
Under the collar of her dress
was a wide, double tiered ruf-
fle of white organdy that fell into
a cape effect. Her hat was mush-
room shaped and draped in
white organdy.
Chairman of the day was Mrs.
Ben Zion Ginsburg. She wore a
two-piece ensemble composed of
a brown and white scroll print
sheath and a matching coat. Her
accessories were in orange, and
her hat was of small orange flow-
ers.
Mrs. Stanley C. Myers gave the
Invocation in a linen sheath with
a silk organza jabot insert. Her
hat was in white straw. Presen-
tation was given by Mrs. Jean C.
Lehman in a yellow and white
stripe shirtwaist style bordered
at the hem in a deep band of
white organdy.
Newly elected Section presi-
dent. Mrs. Sidney L. Lewis, chose
an orange and white linen sheath
with a bateau neckline. Her pic-
hire hat was in white, with its J
wide brim of stiff white organdy.'
Also at the head table were;
Miss Minnie Fcinberg, executive
secretary, wearing a yellow and
white Cloony lace dress, and Mrs.
Nathaniel Levin, an honorary di-
rector, in a soft blue two piece
Italian knit ensemble.
Making a gift to the Combined Jewish Appeal, Eleanor You-
delman (left) presents a check for the proceeds of the annual
President's Ball conducted by the Young Adult Jewish Council
of South Florida to Isidore B. Simkowitz, president of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Community Center, which sponsors the
Council.
0
Summer Tour Nearly Filled
David Goodwin, tourism chair-1 Silver and Askelon, and receptions
man for the Southeast region, | at the ZOA House. The two-week
Zionist Organization of America, tour of Europe at an additional
National Women's League Conference
Opening at Eden Roc Hotel Sunday
Mrs. Albert Fried, of Brooklyn,
, N. Y., of the National Women's
j League, United Synagogue of
I America, is coming to the Eden
j Roc hotel Sunday, Monday and
j Tuesday for the conference of the
Florida Branch to serve as guest
! speaker and conference consultant.
Mrs. Fried attended the NYU
, School of Commerce, received her
1BCS and MA degrees in second-
1 ary education, and has completed
i her studies toward a PHD, while
i pursuing courses in Jewish adult
! studies.
She has taught bookkeeping and
! commercial law for eight years,
taught as sisterhood president in
' Marine Park Jewish Center of
i Brooklyn, is a former correspond-
ing secretary, membership chair-
"Suil and Jjol*
SUMMER CAMP
JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST
DAY CAMPERS
BOARDING CAMPERS
BOYS and GIRLS
Psnaltsrtsi Air CesMHeaea
Limited teejlitrotio.
JI i-3271
Jl -10M
OXFORD
ON THI IAY
1204 WMt Av*, MImI t*acfc
Cgjppina Al Un Bast" mmmml^^mmmmmmmm.^
announced Wednesday that the
$525 summer trip to Israel and
Europe being arranged by the or-
ganization is nearly filled.
The trip, which is being sponsor-
ed by the ZOA region at low cost
via chartered airline, "is being
promoted as part of a drive by the
ZOA to bring tourism to Israel and
to assist in the country's economy."
Goodwin said.
The group will leave on June 20
and return July 28. It will spend
three and a half weeks in Israel
and two weeks in Europe. Included,
in the $525 fee will be a sightsee-
ing tour of TelAviv, a day in Kiar
Rabbi Narot
In Book Review
Rabbi Joseph Narot will review
'Hawaii," by James Michener, at
the last in a series of book re-
views under the aegis of Temple
Israel Sisterhood.
The function is due Monday, 11
a.m., at the Temple, preceded by
a coffee hour.
Mrs. George A. Graham has been
in charge of the Sisterhood project.
$175 will include Rome, Florence,
Venice. Lucerne, Zurich and Paris.

I
peslace
aestaatf)
Cm 1st C 2nd
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Mack wrHiGotd Print
Royal BkM wW. C*M
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Your contribution
will bo donated to
various charities
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hahashruth of Florida
Rabbi Dr. Isaac H. Ever, Director
24-HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL
ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
MOOERN [QUIPMNT I fUKNISHINGS HtEWOOf BUILDIHS
310 Collins Ave. Ph. JE 2-3571 Miami Beach
personalized service at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
24-hour service except tosh hashono and yom kippur
man. and leadership training chair-
man, t
Mrs. Harold Levitt, president of
Florida Branch In Training, has
announced the following chairmen
for the conference affiliated Con-
servative Sisterhoo'ds:
Conference chairman, Miss Lil-
lian Goodman; co-chairman, Mrs.
Harold Berney and Mrs. Ralph
It Hanlcin: program, Mrs. Jack Sher-
| man; arrangements, Mrs. Harold
Hirschfield; arrangements co-
chairman, Mrs. Mary Morse; dec-
orations, Mrs. Ben Shapiro; hos-
pitality, Mrs. D. Spiegelman; host-
esses and pages, Mrs. Norman
Leif.
Gift shop, Mrs. Milton Feller;
I nominations, Mrs. Al Mechlowitz;
publicity, Mrs. Milton Weinstein;
secretaries, Mrs. Al Schwartz and
Mrs. Libby B. Rosen; services,
Mrs. Harold Reinhard; timekeep-
er, Mrs. Fred Blank; reservations.
Mrs. Irwin Becker; registration,
Mrs. William Dickson.
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El
will be hostess and tender a re-
ception at the opening of confer-
ence Sunday evening. Mrs. Alex-
ander Kogan will be chairman of
reception hostesses. Mrs. Ben Zion
Ginsburg' is in charge of arrange-
ments, and Mrs. H. Protzel is in
charge of refreshments.
MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME
24-Hour Nursing Service
Special Dieta Strictly Observed
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DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 94401


MM
Page 10-B
+Jewisti Flcrid/lan
Friday. May 13, I960
GMJCC Plans Sunday Sessions to
Highlight Senior Citizen Programs Here
MARSHALL WISE
Marshall Wise, district manager,
Social Security Administration,
will be keynote speaker at the first
annual Senior Citizens conference
of the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity Center on Sunday at the
Miami YMHA. 450 SW 16th ave.
Theme of the conference, "The
Changmg Role of Senior Citizens,"
will focus on what older adults
can do to help themselves in to-
day's society.
Following the main speaker,
there will be seven workshops,
which will allow over 300 senior
citizens who are members of the
Center to discuss, in small groups,
matters of vital interest to them,
it was announced by A. Budd Cut-
ler, chairman of Ihe Department of
Service to Senior Citizens.
The seven workshop* with
their consultants include Health,
Dr. Samuel Gertman, section
chief. Division of Gerontology,
University of Miami medical
school; Leisure Time Activities,
Efram H. Gale, executive direc-
tor. Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity; Housing, Haley Sofge,
executive director. Housing Au-
thority of the City of Miami;
Employment and Social Secur-
ity, Dr. Michaei Goodman, execu-
tive director, Jewish Vocational
Service; Family Relationship*,
Arthur Kalish, assistant director,
Jewish Home for the Aged; Re-
ligion, Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan,
Temple Adath Yeshurun.
In keec
Left lo right are Sen. Spessard L. Holland, of
Florida, Congressman Paul Rogers. Port Ever-
glades Disfrict, Congressman Dante Fascell,
Miami District, I. Paul Pedraza, executive di-
rector, Florida Ports and Foreign Trade Coun-
cil, Adm. John M. Will, USN (ret.), president,
American Export Lines, inspecting scale model
of 18,100-ton passenger liner SS Atlantic.
the first liner ever to sail from
there on a Mediterranean cruise.
Characterizing the departure as
an important forward step in mari-
time progress of the South. U.S.
Seaboard Offers
Reduced Fare
Package Trips
While late lingering wintor vis-
itors to Florida are reluctantly
.starting their northward trip home
aboard the Silver Meteor and Sil-
v;r Star. Seaboard Railroad is of-
fering reduced round-trip fares and "In keeping with the theme of self- Senators George Srnathers and
Florida "package vacations" to direction, all arrangements dur- Spessard L. Holland of Florida,
appeal to vacationers coming to inK ,ne conference will be handled this week hailed the sailing of the
the Sunshine State during spring. b>' club members themselves. Spe- 18,100-ton. all-airconditioned econ-
imer and autumn, when hotel cial entertainment by a senior cit- omy class liner from Port Ever-
rates are the most advantageous izens choral group and a folk and glades, about 25 miles from Miami,
l( budget conscious holiday seek- square dance group is being plan-
ers. ned.
The low 30-day roundtrip fares, The program is being coordinat-
Bcaled to coach or Pullman trav- ed by Charles Plotkin, director of
cl, are in ellect between May 1 ,he Department of Service to Sen-
and Nov. 15. and are also avail- ior Citizens, as a culmination of
atle from Florida points to north- the year-round program for older
:rn cities, too a fact which VV.J. adults sponsored by the Greater
Ficht, general passenger agent of Miami Jewish Community Center,
.nil in Miami, is quick to a beneficiary Agency of the Unit-
' out will help make Florid- efl I'*und of Dade County and the
ians' vacations to New York. New Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
England, Canada and the West
cimc well within the scope of bar-
gain travel, too.
Atlantic to Sail Oct. 16 from Port
Everglades in First Ocean Crossing Here
American Export Lines' new At- Oct. 16 on a 35-day cruise to 11
lantic will be the first U.S. flag eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean
passenger ship to sail from Flor- ports,
ida on a transatlantic voyage, and
"This voyage is important in
more ways than one," the Flori-
da Senators declared in a joint
statement. "Besides being the
first transatlantic American flag
sailing from Florida, it points up
the growing importance of the
South as a tourist source, and
underscores our State's aware-
ness of the benefits accruing
from up-to-date port facilities.
gers from New York nine hours to
iisee in Miami or swim in Flnr-
ida sunshine, before the ship
leaves
During the cruise there will be
a busy program of shipboard
entertainment with dancing to
the strains of Meyer Davis' cele-
brated music. In addition, an ex-
tensive schedule of shore tours
operated by Thos. Cook A Son
will be avoilable.
"Travel agents as well as our
own offices have a wide choice
of inclusive tours, combining
our reduced rail fares with ho-
tel and sigr.tseeing facilities, at
Washington, Philadelphia, New
York and Boston. Canada's Sag-
icnay River cruises and extend-
ed tours to the Far West are also
available," he said.
tain There is much of scenic and
historic interest to be enjoyed
along the Seaboard route in
Finn,la itself, and through Geor-
gia, the Carolinas and Virginia."
he added. "Seaboards coach fa-
cilities include the latest-type cen-
ter lounge coaches, which have
comfortable lounge accommoda-
tions adjacent to the passengers'
reserved, reclining seats, other re-
laxing lounges include the tavern
"Becoming more popular each observation car where beverages
and snacks are available.
year are Seaboard's theater tours
in New York City, which include
silver streamliner transportation
to and from Manhattan, hotel ac-
commodations, orchestra tickets to
four outstanding Broadway hits,
and sightseeing. Group tours are
available on certain dates, but in
ROBERT BLOCH
"Seaboard d:n:ng cars art also
noted for delicious food, includ-
ing several regional specialties,
and a genuinely 'Old South'
N, Shore Men
Install Bloch
brand of hospitality.
Robert Bloch was installed prcs-
"Both the Silver Meteor and Sil- ideal of the Men's Club of North
dlviduals may leave on exciting ver s,ar have a registered nurse Shore Jewish Center during Fri-
theatre tours whenever they aboard at all times a service day evening services last week,
choose. particularly appreciated by moth- B.U1.
er and dad who take the young-1 Rabbl Mayer Abramowitz. spiri-
The 20-knot Atlantic is now un-
dergoing a $2 million improvement
program at the Sun Shipbuilding
and Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pa. It
will sail on its maiden voyage on
May 16 in American Export Lines'
express and cruise service be-
tween New York, Spain, Italy,
"We are happy, too, that an Greece and Israel.
American liner will be the first The improvement program in-
passenger ship to make a Mediter- eludes the installation on the Up-
ranean cruise from a Florida port. per Deck of one of the largest out-
The trip offers an excellent chance door pools on any transatlantic
for the double barreled pleasure liner, as well as a steel and glass
combining a Florida vacation and solarium on the Sun Deck fitted
Mediterranean cruise." I for various recreational pastimes.
Cruise calls by the 880-passcn- Hie vessel provides a variety of
ger, 20-knot vessel will include tastefully appointed public rooms
Santa Cruz, Teneriffe. Canary Is- for 'he passengers' traveling pleas-
lands; Gibraltar; Palermo, Sicily; ure- Comfort, convenience and
Piraeus. Greece; Haifa, Israel; -afety have been stressed in equip-
Messina, Sicily; Naples and Leg- Png the ship, which will be op-
horn, Italy; Cannes, France; Bar- erated by a crew of veteran mar-
celona, Spain; and Funchal. the >nc>"s and staffed by experts in
port of Medeira. a Portuguese is culalne and service,
land in the eastern Atlantic. The The liner will operate as the only
Atlantic returns to Porl Ever- Economy class ship designed, con-
glades on Nov. 20. itrticted and staffed to offer the
The voyage will originate in New manv advantages of modern Amer-
York on Oct. 13 and end there lcan l,vln*! at sea Ever>' state'
Now. 23, a 41-day Mediterranean roomuhas P"vatf facilities inel.Kl-
cruise. The Atlantic sails from '"8 showPr' ** basln and tollet-
New York at 12 midnight, Oct. 13, ^any are t|U,ckly. convertible from
and arrives in Port Everglades on bt'drooms I(> spacious living rooms.
A number have sofa-berths that
Oct. 16 at 8 a.m. It will be there convcr, illU)
until 5 p.m., thus offering passen- size beds
large three-quarter
Seaboard streamliner travel to sters with ,hem
the north and back, in itself, is a
definate part of the relaxation
which every vacation should con- tails.
on a northern va
tual leader, also installed David
cation. A passenger
assists passengers with travel de-
service agent, Mi,,er and Irving Greenberg. vice
ith ir.>,.t a*. Presidents; Martin Kurzweil. trcas-
THANKS to the VOTERS
of District 2
FOR YOUR VOTE OF MAY 3 PRIMARY.
I SINCERELY SOLICIT YOUR CONTINUED
SUPPORT MAY 24.
GEORGE F. ROGERS
YOUR CONSTABLE, DISTRICT 2
11 YEARS OF KNOW-HOW
Pd. Pol. Adv.
urer; Alex Friedman, secretary;
and Leo Sonnenbhck, financial sec-
retary.
Board of directors are Fred
Beckman; Sol Weiss, I. Granoff,
Hyman Cohen. Jack Burstein,
Archie Levine, Sam Schiffman,
Sol Brager, Ben Ledwitz, Al Mech-
lowitz, Sam Hohauser, Harry Hoff-
man, Al Sherman, Sam Pearlman.
Louis Reinstein, Jack Fisch, Ed
Stern, and Nat Cohen. Chairman of
the board is Ben Alter.
Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood
Temple Adath Yeshurun Sister
hood will hold a general member-
ship meeting at Arthur Maisel's
restaurant, 18288 Collins ave., on
Wednesday evening. Elections will |
take place. Mrs. Burt Smokier is
program chairman. Guest speaker
will be a beauty expert, Miss Nat-
III" of the Colonial Inn Beauty-
Salon.
"QUALIFIED
BY
EXPERIENCE"
Re-Elect
JUDGE
Sidney L
SEGALL
DADE COUNTY
SMALL CLAIMS COURT
I. Adv.


Friday, May 13. 1960
, ***/#> R*rlHl*ir<
Page 11-B
People Shape Leaders,
But HerzfShaped Them
Tim (i the last in a two-part series by Dr. Afahum Goldman*,
president of the World Zionist Organization, who offers his view of
Dr. Theodor Herzl. founder of the Zionist movement. Last week
marked the launching throughout the world of the 100th anniversary
celebration of Dr. Herzl s birth.
The Jews possessed an unfor-
tunate gift of complicating the
simplest matters, and Herzl
taught them instead to see great
problems in large perspective.
His adversaries, in their polemics,
enumerated a thousand difficul-
tiees and pinpointed multitudi-
nous doubts concerning the prac-
tical application of his design.
Herzl was contemptuous of de-
tails. He lived in a rarefied at-
mosphere and the realistic argu-
ments of the opposition, it seem-
ed to him, were quite unrelated
to his understanding and concept
of the Jewish problem. Only by
properly understanding the moti-
vations of Herzlian Zionism are
we able to understand the man
Herzl, and the strange spell he
cast upon his generation, and up-
on the spirit and imagination of
the Jewish people generally.
Fiercely Proud Man
What brought Herzl to Zionism
was primarely not so much com-
passion for the persecuted Jew-
ish masses and concern over the
future of Jewish culture, both of
which were alien to him, or con-
sciousness of the historical con-
tinuity of the Jewish people,
which preoccupied Anad Ha'am
and Pinsker, and others like them
who had emerged from the
depths of the Jewish past. What
motivated Herzl was his hurt
pride. The plight of the Jews of
France, integrated into its vig-
orous culture, fully emancipated,
and yet imperiled by the Drey-
fus affair, made him suddenly
and desperattely aware of the in-
dignity and futility of the Jewish
condition, the Jew being nowhere
master of his fate, everywhere a
guest at the inn. A fiercely proud
man, he could not surrender to
this indignity. His only alterna-
tive was revolt. His Zionism was
revolution.
Pride was new as a primary
motivation in Jewish life. Herzl's
predecessors in search of a solu-
tion were impelled by concern
over Jewry's physical insecurity
and spiritual future, over the de-
nial of emancipation, as well as
the assimilation resulting from
emancipation. They were impell-
ed by Jewry's collective experi-
ence. Herzl was wholly detached
from the collective destiny; he
was an acclaimed dramatist, a
celebrated writer, a social lion,
integrated in his environment, en-
joying its material comforts.
Nonetheless, precisely because
he was a proud man, he felt per-
sonally dishonored whenever the
Jews were dishonored. He expe-
rienced the disgrace of Dreyfus
as his private disgrace. Thus his
personal problem and the Jew-
ish problem became inmeshed.
The identification was completr.
If his own pride was to be re-
stored, the pride of his people
had to be restored, too; if his
own hurt was to be assuaged, the
hurt of his people had to as-
suaged; his personal self-fulfill-
ment required the Jews national
self-fulfillment.
Royal Phenomenon
He was a royal phenomenon in
modern Jewry -*- of noble appear-
ance, poise and speech, a born
aristocrat. All who met him re-
marked on the overwhelming im-
pact of this first Jew in genera-
tions to address kings, ministers
of state, exercisers of power on
equal footing, not as a petition-
er, but as a spokesman for his
people. The world was familiar
with wise Jews, successful Jews
and even powerful Jews; but not
until Herxl appeared had the
modern world met the proud
Jew. That is why his personality
held both Jews and non-Jews en-
thralled. His bearing and conduct
by defiant example undid 2,000
years of exile and ghetto exist-1
ence. He demonstrated, in his'
own person, the transformations
the Jew would undergo after the'
Zionist solution had been achiev- S
ed. He spoke as though the Jews
were already a normal people,!
and addressed the word, not as j
the leader of a Utopian Don Quix-
otic movement which, objective-
ly speaking, is what Zionism was
in his day, but with the mature
confidence of the political chief
of an established state. Thus his
behavior transformed the behav-
ior and status of all Jewry, a peo-'
pie without rights, without a I
homeland. He spoke and acted
as though there no longer existed j
Jewish homelessness and indig-
nity.
This, too, was a sign of his gen-
ius. Genius is not, as is generally
suposed, expressed wholly in in-
tellectual endeavor. It also is re-
vealed in the character and psy-
chological composition of a man.
It may assert itself in the im-
pression he makes on his envir-
onment. This transformation of
the Jewish condition, which Herzl
proposed conceptually, and his
anticipation of the future image
of the Jew, which he demon-
strated in his own person, were
the boldest assertion of his gen-
ius, and explain his great power
over the Jewish masses of his
day.
Ghetto Jewry possessed a no-
bility of the spirit rabbis, phi-
losophers, poets. But it possessed
none in the social and political
sphere no men who could
move freely, and as equals those
wielders of power and shapers of
the destiny of nations. His im-
pact upon Jewish communities
was in inverse ratio to their sta-
tus in society. The more oppress-
ed the community, the greater
his impact upon it. He was all the
more effective because he was
fundamentally so alien. The aris-
tocratic personality always main-
tains some aloofness, never iden-
tifies itself fully with the masses.
Psychological Release
The Jewish people experienced
Herzl like an awesome natural
phenemenon. His legend spread
quickly; it had been hong since
a Jewish leader enjoyed such
fathomless adulation. Only a
child then, I still recall my moth-
er's convulsive sobbing on hear-
ing the news of his passing al-
though she had never seen hinv
He provided Jewry with an op-
portunity for psychological re-
lease. The Jews had great spokes
men before him men like Sir
Moses Montefiore and Baron
Ginsburg, the so-called "ahtad-
lanim," affluent, respected, sin
cere people, who used their con
nections in high places to allev
iate the plight of their brethren.
With an infallible instinct, the
Jewish masses felt somehow that
while these men spoke on behalf
of the Jews, they did not really
speak for the Jews.
Herzl, poised, proud, impelling
and confident even in the pres-
ence of potentates, inspired self-
confidence in the Jewish people,
a quality lacking even in the
emancipated Jews of Central and
Western Europe. Just as his. con-
duct anticipated the Jew of the
future, so the conduct of the
masses that followed him antici-
pated the future image of the
Jewish people.
A people always shapes its
leaders. It is not always that a
leader shapes his people. Jewry
as a political entity, a militant
collectivity, reacting, demanding,
urging, pressing, did not exist be-
Newly-elected officers of the Biscayne chapter
of the American Medical Center at Denver
were inducted at the organization's first an-
nual installation last week at the Carillon ho-
tel. Pictured at the luncheon, which featured
a juvenile fashion show, are (left to right) Mrs.
Jules Cohen, Mrs. Allen Winner, and Mrs.
Jerome Goodman, vice presidents; Mrs. Ben
Pascal, recording secretary; Mrs. Stanley Kap-
lan) corresponding secretary; Mrs. Jonas Katz,
financial secretary; Mrs. Charles Berman,
treasurer; Mrs. Marvin Haven, trustee; and
Mrs. Donald Levinson, chaplain. On the dais
(left to right) are Mrs. Barry Bockman, chair-
man; Mrs. David Kramer, president; and guest
of honor Ruth Rosenberg, who formed the
group. Over 150 members attended the affair.
Nursery and kindergarten of Temple Judea
will hold its eighth annual closing graduation
exercises on Friday, May 27. Lous Schwartz-
man, executive director of the Bureau of Jew-
ish Education, will be principal speaker. Top
row (left to right) are Benjamin Udoff, educa-
tion director; Mrs. Helen D. Cohen, secretary;
Rabbi Morris Skop, spiritual leader; Mrs. Na-
than Selditch, teacher; and Cantor Herman
Gottlieb. Middle row are Jackie Koblenz,
Leonard Genet, Cyndy Sutta, Paul Kaminsky.
Linda Meyer, Scott Bearman. Joyce Rosenthal,
Deborah Whitcup, Frank Lipson, Iris Reiter,
Ruth Ann Nielson, and Ronald Green. Front
are Mitchell Deutsch, Barry Stein, Mark Ska-
pinker, Babette Sommer, Denise Arbetman,
Sheila Markowitz. Lisa Schaechter, Ann Korn-
feld, David Katz, and Michael Cease.
Hurwitz Elected BBYO Board Head
Ben-Gurion Branch Meeting
Ben-Gurion Branch of Farband
will meet Thursday evening. May
19, at Beth El Auditorium.
Irving M. Sachs, president, will
conduct the meeting, which is ded-
icated to a discussion of "Israel |
and its Immediate Achievements."
Two Israeli films will be shown.
Mrs. Miriam Halperin will be host-
ess at the social hour following.
Election of Eli Hurwitz to the
presidency of the Greater Miami
board of directors of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization was an
nounced this week.
Active in communal affairs and
a long-time resident of Dade coun-
ty, Hurwitz is a certified public
accountant, who resides in Coral
Gables with his wife, Sylvia, and
two children. Martin and Marilyn.
President-elect of Sholem Lodge,
B'nai B'rith, a past president of
Temple Judea, and a past vice
president of the Bureau of Jewish
Education, Hurwitz succeeds at-
torney Jack Fink, who held the po-
sition for two years.
The newly elected head of the
BBYO brings to the office a var-
ied background, wnich includes
experience in accounting, wel-
fare work and education. Orig-
inally from .New York City, Hur-
witi was assistant Borough
Chief, Manhattan, Public Works
Emergency Division, and he was
also with the United States Cit-
izens Defense Corp.
Hurwitz is an active participant
in professional circles, ana" in hi*
favorite hobby, rifling and marks-
manship. He is a member of the
American Institute of CPA's, the
Florida Institute, the Dade county
chapter of the latter agency, and)
a member of the New York State
Society of CPA's.
He is a member of the Palmetto
Pistol Club and the National Rifle
Assn.
State Dep't. Exec
Specks Friday
Culver E. Gidden, of the U. S.
State Department, will address the
Luncheon Club of Sholem Lodge
of B'nai B'rith on Friday noon at
the Poo] and Cabana Club of the
Robert Clay hotel.
Gidden is director of the Miami
Reception Center of the State De-
partment, where foreign dignitar-
ies visiting this area are officially
greeted.
Eli Hurwitz and Alfred Kroislep
are co-chairmen of the Luncheoo
Club weekly meetings.
fore Herzl. He not only envisioned
the Jewish State but he created
and shaped the Jewish people. A
leader need achieve no more
than this make his people con-
scious of its peoplehood and of
its ability to act in unison and
he has discharged his destiny.
Such is Herzl as seen in the
perspective of a half century.
Posthumous judgments can only
reflect the attitude of his judges
towards him. They canot add to
or diminish from the man who
is no longer among us, and hence
beyond alteration.
THANKS____
TO THE VOTERS OF DISTRICT 1
FOR YOUR OVERWHELMING VOTE OF CONFIDENCE in the
First Primary. I sincerely solicit your continued support in
the May 24th Primary.
JUDGE F. DUVAL Jr.
Your Justice of Peace, District 1
"THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR EXPERIENCE"
IM POJ A.lv


Page 12-B

Grayson to Head
Beth Emeth Cong.
Samuel Grayson was elected
presidot of-Beth Emeth Congre-
gation at an annual meeting last
week.
Grayson has been active at Beth
Kmet.h since its inception. He will
be installed at regular Friday
night service this week.
Along with Grayson. the follow
ing will be installed:
Philip Schulman. first vice pres-
ident; Merle Michaels, second vice
president; Selma Hollender. treas-j
urer; Julius Klein, financial sec-'
retary; Mrs. Rhoda Willis, record-
ing secretary; Jack Goodman, cor-j
responding secretary.
Board 01 airectors are Dr. Albert
Cohen, Mrs. Joseph J. Foos, Mrs.:
Kuth Glatter, Max Greenberg, Her-
bert Lelchuk. David Levine, Max-
well Lubin. Jack Massin, Benja-
min Newmark, Maxwell Weisblatt.
fJenist fhrkjian
Friday. May 13, 1390
Pearly Gait
by Hal Pearl
TV
Sisterhood officers, headed by hardship of an older generation.
)*C (li, vI.id'I I ,.l,.l,,.|. ...Ill ..I.... I..
TV SPONSOR MAKES NEWS: Much criticism has been heaped on
and for good reason. But with all its faults, we are sure many
members of the local video audience are ready to admit that TV has
its redeeming features. None is more worthy than the "Play of the
Week-
After its local kickoff drama. "Medea." starring Judith Anderson,
two Sundays ago, the new Sunday night feature on ch. 10 again proved
its worthiness with the scintillating presentation of "The World of
Sholem Aleichem." last Sunday.
I believe that this was the introduction of Aleichem's work to the
vast audiences of TV. Direction, casting and adaptation were worthy
of this humane story-teller. His tales of Jewish folk of the old coun-
try belong to the great fiction of the world. Thanks to TV, the younger
generation has had the opportunily to enjoy the shining humanity and
truisms of Aleichem. which have lightened the load of oppression and
Mrs. Herbert Lelchuk. will also be
.installed Friday evening.
SAMML GRAYSON
Annual Membership Affair
Annual membership affair will
be held at Southwest Jewish Cen-
ter on Sunday evening, 7 p.m.
DINNERS from '1.35
Choice of 17 Main Courses
Free Wine, Seltzer A Knishes
WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN
1141 Washington Ave.
Beautifully Catered
Affairs Call
JE 4-2655
OUR SPECIALTY
NICE, THICK, JUICY
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
*3.r
-AND THE VtKY BUT IN TOWN!
BANQUIT fACIUTIfS
Candlelight Inn
S1S1 Commodore Plow
Coconut Grove
HENRY LEITSON, Mqr.
i mm
1............
Lmrgtti family Trait in flaridu
ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY
.:
..-I l*p VI Oil UIUCI KCIICiailUII.
This community owes a vote of thanks to Jack Gordon, of Wash-
ington Federal Savings and I.oan Assn., for sponsoring the "Plav of
the Week."
TV comes of age with such worthy offerings. But it also needs
sponsors who cherish intelligent, stimulating entertainment, and will
"..mlilc on TViewers feeling the same way.
* *
NAMES THAT MAKE NEWS:
Wonder how many Miami Beachites are aware of the impeccable
landscaping talents of John Poulos. of the city's park department. The
flowering beauty along Alton rd.. Washington ave., the entrances to
i the Auditorium and Convention Hall, and Lummus Park are just a few
I of the sites that bear the unmistakable stamp of Poulos' magic green
thumb,
Nat and Rosalind Cohn all set to take off for their Parisian vaca-
tion in early September, via Air France. The Bayshore golf course
starter and his wife earned the all-expense trip as a prize in a contest
sponsored by the National Cardiac Hospital. Lucky people.
Benny Cooper now a Sunday golfer only, since his brokerage job
keeps him busy the rest of the week. Spotted him, brother Jack,
Wolfie Cohen and Ben Karn in a weekend foursome at Bayshore.
On of Ihe better players at the same course: Seymour Berkowitz.
of Fun Fair. Shoots in the 70's, and sharp in every department of
the game.
Three old-timers who have the golfing gusto of men half their age
(and can beat most of 'em too), are Jack Kaufman, Harrv Relkin. and j
J Ben Rachlm. Hit the ball steadily over two hundred yards.
Otto Fenias doing a phenomenal job introducing the good game of
golf to the younger generation on the Beach. It's just wonderful to see
the little lads, some of them smaller than the carts they pull along ;
A the fairway, play as well as their dads, and some even better.
There ,sn't a finw game for boys and girls, and none more health-
ful or better for developing their sportsmanship. Look for some great
players to come out of Fenias' troupe. On the way are John Alpert i
Chuck Warren. Chuck Cans, Tommy Eisenberg, Andy Penzell Mike
I Kaplan and Don Sayet, the smallest, but real good.
, Tri.Ki* Levin, our spies report, is doing a keen job directing
I Miami Made," the musical comedy adapted from the Broadway hit,
Pajama Game," and being enacted by Temple Emanu-EI Players at
the auditorium of the new Miami Beach High School on June 4. Mrs.
Leonard Glickman is ticket chairman.
The Jacob Shers and his two sisters, Mrs. Rae Jacobstein and
Mrs. Bertha Silverman. back from Louisville where they saw Venetian
Way, a horse belonging to their friend, Isaac Blumberg. lead the way
in the Run for the Roses. They wished they had some of Miami's re-
spondent sunshine that gloomy day of the Derby filled with rain and
cold.
Dr. David Nathan and his handsome offspring joining the father-
and-son coterie on Bayshore fairways.
Attorney LaVona Zukerman. of Miami, elected president of the
norida Assn. of Women Lawyers, an affiliate of the Florida Bar
Architect Leonard Glasser is the new commander of Miami Beach
I ost 85 of the American Legion.
Baron de Hirsch Meyer, we are told, is interested in taking over
the controlling interests in an Orlando hotel, the San Juan. Deal may
be closed by the time you read this.
* *
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY:
The Milenoff outdoor theatre in Coral Gables is the scene of a
Srprn9nHroSSrPrT1rCti0n f *'JuliUS Caesar'" wi,h a Latin-American
.locale and a revolutionary government forming the theme
"ThJ wS" ?nTVf Mi3mi JpreSents Gilberl and Sullivan's!
1 J?w S L h m6 .CUnty Auditoriu'n tonight and tomorrow
night, including a children's matinee tomorrow '
Dorothy Sarnoff, whose dad, Dr. Jacob S.rnoff, reside, here and
2i:ir '^*'h """" to the American. B.I Ma.eE
,l!r "?rt..nment-se.ker. with her talented vocal offerings. On
I the bill also are comic Rlcki Dunn and dancing L.Maes
Extravaganza Latina" continues at the La Ronde attraction in the
|Fnta.neble.u Lenny Dawson and his grand assemb age 0 mu ic
makers back the fast-moving show of Latin stars
. inCharley Fmfll lloWu" 0ver through Ma>' at lh<- Balmoral, and it's
a long-run record he's been chalking up there
*
f .F'.V,M F,A*E 'Pictures around town exceptiinallv good this week
I First "Black Orpheus." at the Mayfair, winner of many foreign mt
awards and magnet of much praise from American reviewers ?or Us
I unusual plot and cast of unknowns who act so well. ,ewers Ior ,ts
Then there's "Crack in the Mirror," at the Crib '" .^.
0! solely9"1 V r M ln ,HU 0n,Ual *t0ry *""* """
i,J.nArihryKPerkinS a7d ;!ane Fonda- the son a"d daughter of highly-
talented fathers, reveal they've inherited top acting abilitv n "tIii
S,ory." a comedy of college football, at the O.yVpia, Beacand Gablei
**-*
^t?zf^z^ -- -- BSttrtS
Many of the victorious campaigners in the recent primary election '
celebrating with dinner parties at the Bonfire. Among Ksfc At
torney and Mrs. Richard Gerstein. te At"
the ^met^g^^rd0^ Wi ^'^ '""""* *
JVS Posts First
Annual Meeting
"'first annual meeting of the Jew.
Lsh Vocational Service will be held
Thursday evening, June 16. in the
Junior Auxiliary Day Care Room
of the Jewish Home of the Aged.
j Lloyd L. Ruskin. Jewish Voca-
I tional Service president, in an-
nouncing the meeting, stated that
members are invited.
Major business of the evening
will be to elect a board of direc-
tors and officers of the organiza.
tion.
Katz Elected
Group President
Elected as the new president of
the Dade County Administrators
Assn is Irvin Katz. principal of Mi-
ami Beach High School.
Katz, Dr. Joe Hall, superintend-,
ent of schools, and Alan Stratton,
president of the Dade County Class-!
room Teachers Assn., were install-
ed last week as members-at-large
t the Dade County Council of
Parent Teacher Assn. installa-
tion banquet.
The election of Katz took place
the day before the banquet.
FOI
DINNER
KIM,
ARTHUR'S
COIRT
MUSIC
By til
Singing Strings
JOHN LA SALLE
QUARTET
in the
CARRIAGE CLUB
Miami Springs
Villas
TU 8 4521 Art Brunt, co-owner
yncomparoHe
Trench Cuisine*
9516 HARDING AVE.
-'.>. MIAMI BEACH UN6-1654
AT THE PIANO IAA DAVID LEftOUX
ABE GEFTER
,rom\vell
*#50
'6
formerly with the Marseilles Hotel j
PRESENTS
THE NEW KOSHER_____________________
rnfu ?cE.Nc'NG "AT-*y '' Nm De.ll. Occupancy
KOSHER MEALS INClUDED-25 of 10S Rooms-Other RatesTy.
., "-0 "ATE INC*" DURING JOIY AND AUGUST-
STEAKS, CHOPS. ROASTS at no extra charge. And all .hi. FREE: 21" TV &
u^'l 'u*^^ ^T,0^'*" LouS"' *p'e Free Self-Perking Adjo.n.ng
Hotel. Moves, N.ghtly Entertainment, and 15 other feetur...
D.el.ry law, A Sabbath Observed Ma.hei.ch A Jorvk.. en Premiss
..,.,_ *'* "'' *9r Free Diets
WRITE OR CALL DIRECT: ABE GEFTER JE 8-1206
On the Ocean Front at 20th Street, Miami Beach, Florida
SUMMER POLICY -
OPEN from 4 to 9 p.m.
FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS
ond ALL HOLIDAYS ONLY
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Air<4. UN 6 6043 'ret Port
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth
WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAK5 PARTIES
iher Catering at Reasonable Price* By
ungariainu>9 Caterers
Telephone JE 8-5401
oOr Your Favorite Tempi, or Synagogue
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON
GORDON and PONT
^f^ ROSNII CATERERS
m" Teeevrei I, a nmphH **
muH 1 "W-M ,AMI *hon FR *""
Under SueorWi... or Ualfi Katkrmt Astecletiee of Oreerer Mtaerf
Of IN NOUSI WEDDINGS IAR MITIVAMJ IICIPTIONS


friday. May 13. 1960
Educators Plan
Annual Meeting
By Special Report
ATLANTIC CITY, N..T. Na-
tional Council for Jewish Educa-
tion, which comprises the leading
Jewish educators of all Jewish
ideological groupings in the United
States, Canada and Mexico, will
meet in annual conference begin-
ning May 19 at the Ambassador
hotel here, it was announced by
Harry L. Woll, president of the Na-
tional Council for Jewish Educa-
tion.
Dr. Elijah Bortniker, executive
director of the Jewish Education
Assn. of Essex County, N.J., is
chairman of the program commit-
tee. This will be the 34th annual
conference since the Council was
formed.
Central theme of the conference
is "The National Study on Jewish
Education conducted by the Amer-
ican Assn. for Jewish Education-
Its Implications for Action To-
wards Improvement in Jewish Ed-
ucation During the Next Decade."
Four phases of the study will be
dealt with: the "Jewish School
and Present Day Society," "Com-
munal Responsibility for Jewish
Education," "Curriculum Devel-
opment" and "Pupil Achievement
and Teacher Education."
fJenist ncridliairi
Page 13-B
MMTIM
RICHARD
miCHAU
MARVIN
ROBERT
MICHAH
ItffRll
Seashore Products Have
Years of Solid Know-How
Retiree Group
To Aid Oldsters
Two Miami experts in the aging
I field are making headlines with
Itheir civic-type organization, First
] Retirement Foundation, and its
[nationwide work in bringing new
I help to oldsters.
First Retirement Foundation,
Ifrom offices in the Langford bldg.,
Miami, provides medicines, vita-
Imins, sickroom supplies service on
[doctor's prescriptions and health
[insurance group tours including Is-
Irael, and retirement housing
|among other needs to its members.
Spotlighted rm rock bottom
costs far below usual. The Foun-
dation oven pays all mailing and
shipping charges, according to
the group's spokesmen.
Also available is membership in
I the Golden Age Movie Clubs. These
clubs, pioneered in New York,
Washington, D. C, and the Mid-
west, are being brought to Metro-
i politan Miami. They allow oldsters
[to attend movies at half-price any-
where in the country.
Foundation president is Donald
M. Early, consultant and longtime
executive of "Journal of Lifetime
Living," who was in touch with
200,000 senior citizens for the Foun-
dation. Vice president is Helen Al-
pert, newswriter on health and
medicine, Overseas Press Club
member, and co-author with Dr.
Sam Gertman of a soon-due book
on inspirational aging.
New Musical Comedy Due
"Mimi," a new and original mus-
ical comedy, will be presented at
the Lucerne hotel starting May 29.
Written and produced by Dan Car-
lin in association with Monticello
Park Congregation, the show is
based on "La Boheme," by Pu-
ccini. George Blackwood is direct-
ing the production.
Seashore Food and Pickle Prod-
ucts, Inc., is now in its new pro-
cessing plant in Opa-locka. On two
and a half acres, the plant is one
of the most modern and sanitary
food processing organizations in
the South.
Seashore has some 45,000 sq. ft.
of CBS structure and steel build-
ing, with paving to take the rough-
est abuse from vinegars and other
pickling agents. The company's
new loading platform offers space
for 35 trailers to load and unload
at the same time.
Equipped with its own water
cooling system, softeners and
purifiers. Seashore has ten pickle
vats, and piano to install 30 moro
as quickly as possible.
One of the first companies to
explore the pliofilm pickle, and
kraut pouch. Seashore will shortly
come out with four new items pack-
ed in bright containers for super-
market consumption.
Seashore's current complement
of products includes pickles, sauer-
kraut, pepers, tomatoes, horserad-
ish relish, cocktail sauce, tartar
sauce, and a sweet pickle line is
now being processed daily.
New products due this spring in-
clude borscht, schav, mayonnaise,
and gefilte fish.
With its new Opa-locka plant
making expanded production pos-
sible, Seashore will soon be can-
vassing supermarkets across the
country.
How did it all begin? The firm
is the business of Marty and
Harry Kapchuk. But they are
the present generation of Kap-
chuk know-how, which began 201
years ago in Kishenev, Russia,
where great-great great grand-
pa Kapchuk established his Pic-
kle Emporium after being prais-
ed by the local populace for his
kraut, tomatoes and horseradish
flavors.
Marty's and Harry's dad came
to the United States in 1905, took
his pickle products to the push-
cart arena of Rivington and For-
sythe sts., and hustled his delicious
condiments. His four daughters
and two sons born, he handed down
to them the knowledge that had
been his heritage in the manufac-
ture of pickled foods.
Harry first took over when his
father became ill. With World War
II on, Harry joined the Army, went
to France and Germany, and join-
ed the staff of Stars and Stripes.
The Air Force claimed Marty.
Both served for over five years.
When Hitler and Tojo had their
scores settled, Marty came home,
and rejoined his father in the pic-
kle business. But Harry remem-
bered Miami Beach as it was on
a short vacation here before the
war. Bucking his family's wishes,
he drove to South Florida in an
old Pierce Arrowwith the pickle
business the furthest thing from
J^ctr "Corsage for You" is a new feature of The Jewish Floridian.
A corsage is free for the asking, and will be presented to eacn
mother of a Bar or Bas Mitzvah if requested a month in advance.
THf KAPCHUKS
. Harry Marty
his mind. Association with Stars
and Stripes had given him some
knowledge of advertising, copy and
layout. He had also had a try at
selling shoes.
But, in 195*. behind a whole-
' sale fish market on Biscayne
st., across from the Dog Track,
Harry opened a pickle enter-
prise with one barrel, six pounds
of garlic, and a few pounds of
spices. "Kappy's Pickled Prod-
ucts" was born in 26 foot of
space.
Growing pains set in when his
products attracted orders from as
far away as the Pompano State
Market 60 miles up the line.
Moved to a huge warehouse of
l 3,000 sq. ft. on Jefferson ave., Kap-
j py's business grew with resi-
dents of the neighborhood dis-
turbed by the ever increasing
aroma of pickled products.
"The courts finally ruled I could
I stay in business there," he recalls,
; "provided the pickling end of it
[ moved away. So, my enemies chip-
I ped in nickles and dimes, and off
II went to a warehouse in Opa-
locka."
It was at this point that Sea-
shore Food and Pickle Products
was born, and brother Marty
joined the firm. In 1955, the
Kapchuk boys started packing
for retail stores the many items
that have since made them fa-
mous.
But fame meant more than their
pickling know-how, which they
learned so early in their lives. It
meant study of pasteurization and
I fermentation techniques at the Uni-
jversity of Chicago and consultation
'with glass industries experts for
the design of their containers.
With the array of their products
Marvin Langsam
Bar Mitzvah of Marvin Ira Lang-
sam, jr., will be celebrated on Sat-
urday morning, May 14, at Tem-
ple Emanu-El, with Rabbi Irving
| Lehrman officiating.
- Son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Langsam, sr., he Is in seventh
grade at Nautilus Junior High, and
attends Temple Emanu-El relig-
ious school.
Marvin is an American Red
Cross junior life guard, and was
the recipient of a journalism award
at Camp Lear.
Reception will be held in his
honor Saturday evening at the
Fontainebleau hotel.

Martin Rosenthai
Beth Emeth Congregation will
be the site of the Bar Mitzvah of
Martin Albert Rosenthai on Sat-
urday morning, May 14.
Martin is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Lester Rosenthai, .12910 NE
Miami ct. He attends seventh
grade at North Miami Junior High
and Beth Emeth religious school.
Martin is a member of Boy
Scout Troop 408, and is interested
in science.
Reception in his honor will be
held Saturday evening at Michael's
restaurant on Normandy Isle.
The Rosenthals are directors of
the Adelphi Business and Tutor-
ing School of Miami.

Michael Von Zamft
Rabbi Joseph Narot officiated at
the Bar Mitzvah of Michael L. Von
Zamft on Saturday morning. May
7, at Temple Israel. Cantor Jacob
Bornstein rendered the musical
portions of the liturgy.
Michael is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Martin D. Von Zamft, 1501
W. 24th St.. Sunselt Island 3. He
is in seventh grade at Nautilus
Junior High School and a member
of the 1962 confirmation class of
Temple Israel.
Dinner and reception was held
Saturday evening at the Von
Zamft home. Out-of-town guests in-
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kra-
vitz and Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Dvorin, of Atlantic City, N. J.

Richard Krinzman
Saturday morning services at
growing, it also meant the launch-
ing of a planting program involv-
ing the Isle of Pines, Artemisa,
Pinar de Rio, Candeleria and Her-
radurra, all in Cuba, as well as
Homestead, Delray Beach, Plant
City and Immokalee, Madison and
Pinetta, all in Florida.
Growing further still, it extend-
ed as far north as Georgia, the
Caroiinas, New Jersey and Mich-
igan.
All the planning and all the
skills in food processingall these
qualities have gone into Seashore's
latest move to its new plant in Opa-
locka.
Temple Beth Sholom on May 14
will include the Bar Mitzvah of
Richard Krinzman, with Rabbi
Leon Kronish officiating.
Richard is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Krinzman, 1142 99th
st. He is a member of the Beth
Sholom confirmation class of 5722.
e e
Jeffrey Wolk
Bar Mitzvah of Jeffrey Wolk will
take place at Monticello Park Con-
gregation on Saturday morning,
May 14. with Rabbi Max Lipschitz
officiating.
Jeffrey is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Wolk. His father is
chairman of the congregation's
board of directors.

Robert Schwartz
Robert Schwartz will become
Bar Mizvah during Saturday morn-
ing services, May 14, at Temple
Judea.
Robert is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Schwartz. He is a seventh
grade student at Ponce de Leon
f Junior High, and attends Temple
! Judea religious school.
Out-of-town guests will include
, his maternal grandmother, Mrs.
M. Weinberg, of New York, and
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Har-
1 ry Schwartz, of Charlotte, N. C.
Rabbi Morris Skop and Cantor
, Herman Gottlieb will officiate.
{ Kiddush of sanctification will fol-
'low the service.

Mark Leban
Rabbi Irving Lehrman will offi-
ciate at the Bar Mitzvah of Mark
K. Leban on Saturday morning,
May 14, at Temple Emanu-El.
Mark is the son of Mrs. Selma Le-
ban.
A seventh grade honor student
at Nautilus Junior High, he attends
Temple Emanu-El religious school.
He designs and constructs ultra-
modern scale model homes at a
hobby.
Reception will follow Saturday
afternoon at the Algiers hotel. Out-
of-town guests will include his
aunt, Mrs. Molly Cohen, of Phila-
delphia, Pa.

Michael Trautman
Bar Mitzvah of Michael Jean
Trautman will be celebrated at
Temple Zion during Saturday
morning services. May 14. Rabbi
Alfred Waxman will officiate.
Michael is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Trautman. He is a
student at South Miami Junior
High.

Alan Goldfarb
Temple Ner Tamid will be the
site of the Bar Mitzvah of Alan
Goldfarb on Saturday morning,
May 14. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
and Gantor Samuel Gomberg will
officiate.
Alan is a student at Nautilus
Junior High, and attends religious
school at Temple Ner Tamid.
New Seashore Food and Pickle Product* plant Established in 1950, Seashore manufactures
in Opa-locka features 45,000 sq. ft. on two and some 15 food products. This new site permits
a half acres of land, and is one of the most 35 trailers to load and unload simultaneously,
modern food processing plants in the South. Harry and Marty Kapchuk are owners.
Thank You ....
To The 11,542 Voters and Friends Who Supported My
Candidacy for Metro Commission from District 5
Our joint efforts have not been in vn. Although
we did not win, we together with all Dade
County voters did not lose. Our purpose and
our efforts will bear fruit and benefit all of us
. Again I thank you.
Cordially and Sincerely,.
JULIUS JAY PERLMUTTEt
Pd Pol Adv.
,-Miu.i:m. Berviues > jsui. -< m uiurun wnpw, .


Page 14-B
fJewist flcrldllan
Friday. May 13. I960


GEMS OF WISDOM
Teachers and Nchool children are
. MOM beautiful ornaments'.
HI OMAN.
Revere your teacher as you re-
t vere Heaven.
! 1 I AtAR B. SHAM Ml \
To oppose a teacher is to oppose
I.. Shcl(ina. SANHEDRTN.
Sn OL WeaL OfJHi^s Religious Xife

The aiiurdiam of a city are the
| teachers of the young and the m-
; -tructors of the old. Jl'

Conscientious teachers of small
2 children are destined to III on the
| right hand of God.
PI SIKTA KAHANA.
There are three teachers: par-
ents instructors, and comrades.
8BFEB HAS1DIM.
If you see cities uprooted l;in>u
.i :t came about because.they did
Snot maintain teachers' salaries.
. i>. OH M :
0: ;!:. !.: .';
s^ftcerew L^onvcrfd/ion
Thought for Today's Youth:
Unripe Grapes Still Tender
S
e r v i c e s
J h i s VL e e h e n A
By RABBI B. LEON HURWITZ
Temple Zamora
rabbi b. UON HURWITZ
. spiritual Uasts
i i
nn;ynn;g
ran rutf rntortr^ -id1?
.tE&i oiirra ,rmi 1-20
t t : t : : :- v: -
ma frs*\ hti rni! "i""-1?
"ippxtf jsd xm ,a*0fii
ns T-ipn1? nun? xsp?
-i#b fffKp D^naa rfpan
I t -: : t :
t :
n"Tl3S? Vtf ni3i d*?u nnx
ny^B nx pini inn Pin
D^rutf -jp1?! >x-wr n'jtfaa
.d^bd niaroaa "rnrin
> t ~: tt:
rnan ^ o^ruan ^xntr1?
^nan-nisixa isa rni-n
.-f n*iT no-"3 nrisnn -itfx
TR4NSLATION -
Jewish tradition requires us to
read the six chapters of the "Jew-
sh Ethics" or "Avoth" dur-
ng our summer Sabbath days at
Ihe rate of a chapter per Sabbath.
During the Sabbath hours this
weekend, traditionally observant
Jews throughout the world will
read Chapter Four. They will hold
communion with no less than 27
ancient sages, each offering one or
two maxims worthy of a place in
our treasure of religious thinking
and spiritual living.
Their pithy sayings warm our
hearts, enliven our minds and
make us contemporaries and inti-
mate companions of the great.
Their reflections and observations
leal with all varieties of life's val-
ues. While the opening paragraph,
authored by Rabbi Ben Zomo. is
evoted to a series of brief defini-
tions of sort themes as wisdom,
heroism and wealth, the rest of the
' ollection of sayings deals with themes such as grades of Mitzvah, life's
'hree crowns, and immortality.
For the immediate moment I should like our generation to pause
for serious reflection on the maxim of Rabbi Jose (163 C.E.). who
opines that "He who learns from the young, to what is he like? To one
who eats unripe grapes ."
I wonder if the good Rabbi Jose did not anticipate our own day,
he "teen-age day." when the teen-ager draws his directives from his
"teen-age organization," as if it were "Torah Misinai"the unchal-
lenged authority which comes directly from heaven.
Gone are the days when our children would wait with anxiety and
(eagerness for the adult visitors to their home, so that they might glean
j wisdom from the "ripe grapes," from the informal, socially-inspired
family conversations perhaps offering them a maxim, a quotation, or
1 an adult evaluation of life's problems.
"The club is my shepherd, and I have no time for other com-
munions," is youth's slogan of the day. The parents are perplexed, the
rabbis are critic.:!, and the youth agencies admit their helplessness.
All agree that the home must be restored to its central position if
'we are not to become a fragmented, lonely, rootless generation.
When God revisited Himself to Moses. He identified Himself as a
God of families, the families of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
Perhaps Rabbi Jose's maxim should become a required memory-
gem for every teen-ager of today. They must know how to budget their
time, so as not to snuff out of their lives the warm sentiments and ma-
j ture guidance of their parents. They must once again make it fashion-
able to fill family pews in the Houses of Worship, to have family meals
with guests of mixed ages, and to bring the ripe grapes of mature ex-
perience and wisdom into their spiritual feasts of life.
Sweet Water from the Sea
Twelve years ago Dr. Alexander
Zarchin a poor and modest engi-
neer, came to Israel from Russia.
Dr. Zarchin had a great and im-
portant idea. He held that a
method cnuld be found to isolate
the salt from seawater simply and
cheaply (by a simple and cheap
system), and thus to obtain good
water for drinking, industry and
agriculture.
After many years of work Dr.
Zarchin secured the assistance of
the Government of Israel and two
years ago embarked upon prac-
tical experiments.
Some months ago the directors
of a large corporation in the Uni-
ted States, which was interested in
the Zarchin Process, came to Is-
rael.
(Published by Brit Ivrit Olamit)
Cora/ Way Sisterhood
Sisterhood of the Coral Way Jew-
ish Center will meet Thursday eve-
ning, May 19, at the Center's new
building, 8755 SW 16th st. The pro-
gram for the evening will be "It
Could be You." Mrs. Leo Winstein
hes been appointed program chair-
man.
I* It true that one of the ancient
nbbis was a gladiator?
True. It was Rabbi Simon Lak-
ish, of the third century, better
known as Resh Lakish. The Talmud
tells us that he was married to the
sister of Rabbi Yochanan. She
married him on condition that he
give up his hazardous occupation
and turn to the study of Torah. He
attained prominence rapidly.

Who is "Lilith," the name mention-
ed on Jewish amulets?
The name "Lileth" (a nocturnal
demon) belongs to the area of Jew-
ish superstition. She is reputed to
be a female demon, flying about
in the form of a night owl, and
stealing children. Infant mortality
was often blamed on her. To pro-
tect mothers and newly-born chil-
dren from her, both mother and
child were provided with amulets.
These amulets appear on printed
sheets known as "childhood tab-
lets." and are still hung on the
walls of the lying-in-rooms in many
Jewish families.
*
Is it true that a convert to Juda-
ism, the son of a pagan, became
a leading rabbi?
True. His name was Onkulos, of
the first century, C. E. He became
a close friend of the patriarch,
Rabbi Gamaliel II. His translation
of the Hebrew Bible into Aramaic
still appears on the margin of ev-
ery traditional Jewish Bible copy.
The observant Jew who reviews
the weekly scriptural portion (Sid-
rob.) each weeks adheres to the
*
CANDUUGHTING lltYlt
16 Iyar 6:40 p.m.
*
mmmmmmm wmmmmm i
custom of intoning each Hebrew-
verse twice, followed by reading
the Onkelos. Targum translation
once.
* *
Who is Frani Kafka?
Kafka is a great and remarkable
figure in world literature. He was
an Austrian born Jew (Prague,
18831924), whose influence became
international. His writing is large-
ly symbolic He is known as a "mas-
ter stylist ... an inexorable moul-
der and interpreter of our time."
I. ... "I""*. tti.' ... it. r\ m"if :/*"""'t '"
This page is prepared in co- g
j operation with the Spiritual Lead-
j ical /\jsn.
Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Herson
Tales and Gemj of Wisdom
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitx
Knom Tour Heritage
AOUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyls avs
OrthodWrTWebbl Isaac Ever.
Frlda) 8:48 p.m, Saturday I m. Bar-
111..11: "The spoil of Sacrifice."
.NSHE EMES7 2533 SW- 19th ave.
Conservative. Maxwell Silberman,
president.
3ETH DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con
aervative. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg
Cantor William W cioon.
Prtdav 8:13 p.m. Gue*1 speafcer: i.onis
Bcnwartsman, executive director, Hu-
rnau "f Jewish Education. Topic:
"Surveys in Blfhta." Graduates of re-
Uatoua school to be I.......reo. reacnera
Dgy win be observed. Ph! tuipants:
Harsh Bet-man, of 'he faculty, ami
Dale llamlfhii ami Benjamin Rww'ff.
tudenta Saturday 9 a.m. H;t MKa-
v.ili: Barry, eon "f -Mr. nnd Mrs. MM
Kun.ti Stephen, son "t Mr sasa Mrs.
Murray Ron.
IFTH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Solomcr "Iff.
KVIdm fi:4". p.m. Saturday BtSO a.m.
Sermon: "Values Must learned.'
-
ar-rw empTH. flBSfl NW 2nd ave.
Conaervatlve. Rabbi David W. Har-
mon Cantor Hyman Fel*.
Friday 8:16 p.m. New officers lo be
.nstiiiied Baturda; a.m Bar Hits-
I ili Martin, mm of Mr. and Mrs. I^-s-
i.i- Roaenthal.
------e------
1ETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie ave. Or-
thodox Rabbi H. l.nin Rolti-m
rilday :4."i p.m. Saturday B:5 a.m.
Sermon: "Werttlj Portion."
e
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
v OrthO('->x. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamches.
--e
3FTH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Levitan.
------a------
3ETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or.
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E Rackovaky.
a
T.RAL WAY JEWISH CENTER.
8755 SW 18th St., Miami. Rabbi Sam-
ul Aoril.
i da 8:19 p.m. Barmeni "No Room
ii the Ton." Saturday ( a.m. Sermon:
Weekly Portion."
------a------
JADE HEIGHTS CENTER. 18160 NW
2nd ave. Conservative. Cantor Eman-
uei Mandel.
------a------
ffLAOLER- GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
pi. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard
rHotee Cantor rrert P3rnst-in.
FVtdiiy ti :io p.m. Saturday v:io a.m.
e-----
ST. LAUDERD4LE fcMANU-EL. ISO*
E. Andrews ave. Reform. Rabbi
Marius Ranaon. Cantor Sherwin
Levine.
-----a
HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th st. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross.
-----a
HIALFAH RCFOOM .IF'""*H CON.
GREGATION. 1150 W. Wth St., Hia-
leah. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman.
Friday X:i. p.m. Sermon: "T^iit
i:c uner Scho'ai's Festival." Ones
Shabbat hosts: Mr. and Mrs. Joeepn
Horowitx, In honor of the sixteenth
birthday of their dHiiutil.r.
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 203C
Polk at. Conservative. Rabbi David
Shapiro. Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun.
ISRAELITE CENTER. S1T5 SW 25th
ter. Conservative. Rahb* Morton
Malavakv. Cantor Louis Cohen.
Friday :30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m
Sermon: "Weekly Portion."
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield
Cantor Abraham Self
Friday C.-xn p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.
u'eimun: "The call to Everyone."
------a------
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Herschell Saville. Cantor Joseph
Salzman.
Friday 630 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. S. v-
mon: "The Heoaa;i of lj\te B'Om, r. '
Har Mitzvah: Michael, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joaaph Baunders.
------e------
MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st. and
NE 11th ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zion
Kl-schenbaum.
Friday 5:30 and B:li p.m. Teacher'a
Pay to be observed. Baturdaj I
liar Mitzvah. Jeffrey, son of Mr. and
Mi- Harold \v.,ik: Jeffrey, m a of Mr,
ami Mrs. Philip 11. Mai k
MORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W
Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rabb'
_ Henry Okollca.
1 '"* !!-> I II p.m. Sermon: "Rabbi
Akii.a." eteturday I a.m.
e
YORTH SHORE CENTER 620 75th st
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram
-It*. r*ntor Fdwsr* K'-'n
Prtdai 18 P.m. Sermon: "The Amer-
ican Rabbi Baturdaj a ., m s. rro< n
weakly Portion."
fOUTHWEST CENTER. 64M SW 8th
st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
*ieln.
Friday R:30 p.m. Sermon: How
Bti-Mmllned' should Our ReliRinn Be-
com**?
TALES OF MORALS
A little bird, after flying man\
hours in search of water, finally
located a flowing stream. Eager!)
the bird descended and drank o|
the water and in gratitude lifted up
his I'oice and thanked God for
having provided this h/e-giting in-
gredient called water. The fishes
in the stream heard the bird's
u'ords of gratitude and turned to
all the other fishes and said. ]
"What it this thing called u'ater'
All the fish were eager to locate
this wonderful life-giving ingredi-
ent by the name of water. They
searched everywhere, but could not
find it. They called upon all of
the mighty fishes to search in great-
er depths and to lool{ in further
distances fur the Unknown ingre-
dient. After many lengthy seurih-
es, the fish gathered in counsel, de-
jected at the thought that their
search had failed.
It was then unanimously decided
by all the fish, great and small
alike, that they must \ccp their'
eyes open and report as soon as
their individual attempts would be
successful.
MORAL: We are ofttimes too I
close to a situation to appreciate i:s
value, and we ofttimes fail to see
the blessings that surround every-
one of us.
wood. 1725 Monroe at. Conservative
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
Schreiber.
Friday s p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mltsvah: Bennett <'ohn. son of -Mr.
and Mrs. Eugene Kent.

TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish
Cantor Oavlo Convlser.
Friday 1:11 p.m. Sermon: "Tlsroel
Means Jewiah Peopl.hood Hou ho
We Teach This to Our Children?"
Second In a aerlea of sermons durlnK
ilo Hebrew month of lyar dedicated
to Israel's l^th anniversary of Inde-
pendence. Ones Snabbat hosts: M. n
hers of ITA, In honor of Teaeher'a
Day. Saturday 10:4S a,m. Bar Mili-
vah: Richard, aon of Mr. and Mr*.
Robert Krlnzman.
a------
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi
heldefi Edwards. Cantor Ban Gro
berg.
Friday 8:16 p.m. Acceptance of sifts
to the comjreKatlon. Sermon. "The
ireater Gift." fe&turday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-IL. 1701 Washing-
ton sve. Conservative. Rabb irv.ng
Lehrman. Cantor larael Reich.
Friday 6:30 and :30 p.m. Annual
, graduation service. Saturday 9 a.m.
Sermon: "Weekly Portion." Bat
Mitzvah: Mark K., son of Mrs. Belma
[l.ehan: Marvin Ira. Jr., son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin I.anKsam.
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th St.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot.
Cantor Jacob Bornsteln.
Friday 8:15 p m. Sermon: "Relliclon in
the National Campaign A Second
Look."
TEMPLE JtJDEA. 320 Palermo avs.
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor
Herman Gottlieb.
TEMPLE NER TAMID. SOth St. and
Tstum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel Oomberg.
Friday 6:15 an.l 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "A
Tribute to our Teachers." Saturday
v a in Bar Mltsvah: Alan, aon nf
Mrs. Rose Goldfarb.
TE,MPtEADATH YESHURUN. Rabbi
'onah Caplan.
v p.m. at Pnlfled hMft.. 23"fi
,. Ui"^"J- Sfrmnn: "Foundation of
Our Faith." Saturday I a.m.
T-MPi"E..?ETH ** 'sso N- Kendall
.- s Miam.. Ferorm staobi Herbert
waomnaeo'. Canto- Charlea "~d-r
ih! i T Mi5 ." m' Srmon: "What la
the I.ink Between Parents and T.ach-
wLmJt^lSFJ &" n,r Xltavah:
Kenneth, son of Mr. and Mra. Nor-
man Green.
rLMPLE 5ET-H CL- 184 "oik It
Jarfe""' "*<>'" Rsbbl Samue'
J!!'.1' oS,:Jr' S" r'"*" -Peaker: Bur-
utl .i r'w"""1!"1 commlasloner of
R-rKn,l"!r*r'.m*V*,n L*e of nnai
Hrlth. Topic: "Oor Present Social
Climate in the South.'
----
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of
Holly-
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12'00
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
M. Wallach.
Fr!dav 8:ii i,.m. Sermou: "Brndltloa
or Fmotion?"
----
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. W1
Flaminno Way. Conservative. RabOl
Leo Heim.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Guest speak.: Mrs.
A. Arthur Pekelner. region.il vice
"resident nf Hadafssh One* Shabbat
hosts: Members of Hadassah. Satur-
day 9 a.m. Teacher's Day to be mark-
ed.
TEMPLE 2ION. 5710 8W 17th st.
Conservstlvs. Rsbbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Jacob Ooldtsrb.
Friday 8:30 p,m. Sermon: "The Roll
of the Teacher In larael > n'day
9 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Michael Jan. son
of Mr and Mrs Murray Trautman:
Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fiank
M. 'olivllle.
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 8500 N. Miami
sve. Conservstivs. Rsbbl Hsrry L.
Lswrenoe. Cantor Alh.rt Qtantz.
Friday :30 p.m. Nathan Rosenberg to
officiate In the absence of Rabbi
Lawrence. Saturday 9 a.m.
TORAH TEMPLE. 1J54 West avs.
Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Casssl.
YOUNO ISRAEL. 890 NE 171st st.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Stauber
Friday 8M5 p i ay s.m. Ser-
mon: "Pride in Our Herftace. '
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za-
mora ave. Conservstlvs. Rsbbl
Leon HurwhU. Cantor Meyer Oisssr.
i me Gourmet magazine-award.
V


Friday. May 13. 1960
*'Jewish Meridian
Pago 15-B
is
itnaries
HYMAN OOLD5TEIN
:.'., ..f :!;:. SW 24lh si., died May 6.
Surviving arc his wife. Eve: two sons.
and Daniel; a daughter. MrB.
Kst.-ll.- Chiokansk.v three sisters, In-
cluding "Mrs. FtflHIle Melstc
fight grandchildren. Services were
ai Riverside Memorial Chapel, W.
Flagler si.
Jane Fonda, making hr film debut, and Anthony Perkina
star in Joshua Logan's 'Tall Story," a Mansfield Production
for Warner Bros. The film version of the bright Broadway
comedy also stars Ray Walston, Marc Connely, Anne Jack-
son and Murray Hamilton, and is now playing at the Olympic
Beach and Gables Theatres through May 24. Jane Fonda is
the daughter of filmdom's renowned Henry Fonda.
Brandeis Film
Will be Shown
"The Challenge of Brandeis," a
film on Brandeis University, is
part of the program planned for
! the first formal meeting of the
I newly formed Men's Social Group
of the South gate Towers Apts.,
Joseph L. Goodman, president, has
[announced.
The meeting is scheduled for
[Wednesday evening in the Cotillion
I room of the DiLido hotel.
Speakers include Jack Gordon,
[president of Washington Federal
(Savings and Loan Assn., and school
1 board candidate in the May 24 run-
[off, and Milton f. Heller, regional
-director of Brandeis University.
Teachers to be Honored
Teacher's Day, annually cele-
brated throughout the country,
will be observed at Temple Tifer-
eth Jacob during Saturday serv-
ices at 9 a.m. The entire faculty
will be honored. The Education
committee, in conjunction with Sis-
terhood, will sponsor a luncheon
following the services.
Wholesale Firm
(Open to Public
Following 34 years of selling to
the retail trade in Florida, the
Miami Wholesale Corporation, 127
NE 9th st.. has.announced that the
public is invited to shop at the
premises, "where nationally adver-
tised, famous-name brand mer-
chandise may be purchased at
prices as low or lower than whole-
sale."
According to the company, only
now, first-quality items are stock-
ed. In addition to continuing with
their complete line of bed linens,
table linens, towels, shower sheets
and other household goods, both
for personal use and boxed for
gifts, the Miami Wholesale Corp-
oration is now offering complete
outfitting for infants and children,
carrying up to size 14.
The company also features a
complete stock of infants' and
children's furniture, including
swings, cribs, carseats, walkers,
mattresses, play yards, bassin-
ettes, and strollers.
Complete layettes are a special-
ty, as are baby shower items box-
ed for giving. Local residents who
Charm Expert
Joins Camp Staff
Mr. and Mrs. Mac Mermell, di-
rectors of Camp Universe, Oxford,
announce the affiliation of Miss
Edith Applebaum with their camp
program.
Miss Applebaum, who is wom-
en's editor of The Jewish Florid-
ian. will direct the camp's charm
and modeling program. She owned
and operated her own charm and
modeling school in this area for
several years.
Miss Applebaum is also a grad-
uate of the University of Miami,
and taught in the public schools
in Dade county.
The charm and modeling course
will be included in the regular
Camp Universe activities sched-
ule.
Ok
LEGAL NOTICE
I
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 83C 434*
ACE INVESTMENT!!, INC.
a Florida (!urporntion, _
ntirrr
MRS. HAZEL BAUER
ST, of rMM PJH ISth ave., died Mai S.
Bhc came here II rear* ago from New
fork, surviving la her husband,
Hern Services were May '.' at River-
awe Memorial Chapel, Nonuaudy iHie.
JULIUS APPLEBAUM
4. ,.f IC24S rvilna aye., died May i
An attorney, he enme here six yearn
ago from New York Surviving are
two brothers, including Herman; four
sistets. InefudJna lin Edith Fa fir:
and two daughters. Bervleei were
"i> S R'<-rsld Memorial Chapel,
Normandy Isle.
MRS. EVA SEPLER
M. of r-no K.lh at., died Mav 4. She
came here 25 yearn ago from New
York, ""d *"* member o/ Hndas-
"ah. Surviving are three sons. Includ-
ing Panlcl; four daughters, in,hiding
Mra. Oertrude Wolff: 16 erondchii-
dren. and IS great-grandchildren. Ser-
vice! were Maj I Bl Riverside Ms-
morinl Chapel, Washington ave.
SAMUEL M. BERNSTEIN
16, of 6W10 Hyron ave., died May :i. He
i survived by his wife. Ida; a son,
Merwln: and a daughter, Mr*. PIOTIs
'ohen. He wag a member of the Elks.
ffisrvkiea were May 4 at Newman
Funeral Home.
HYMAN BLOOM
'2. of 17330 NE loth ct., No. Miami
Beach, died Apr. 2S In Mexico City,
"e came here nlx years ago from Mt.
Vernon, N.Y.. and a ai a certified
nubile accountant. Surviving are his
wife. Violet; daughter. Mrs. Judy
Orayson: and two sons, Richard and
Harry; two brothers and a slater.
Services were May '. at Riverside Me-
morial Chapel, Normandy Isle.
CHARLES SAIBISH
47, of 33.'. W. 28th St.. died May 2.
He Is survived by his wife. Rr*ha:
three eon'. Arthur. Russell and Doug-
lass; daughter. Mrs. i.enore Bur-
' V; two brother* nnd n yisr--. Serv-
ices were May 3 at Newman Funeral
Home.
Plai
GERALD ai.fa.no and JOHNNIE
LOL'E&E ALFANO, his wife, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: CHARLES M. SMITH and
HELANOI \ SMITH, his wife: 1 Cen-
tral Ave., Newburgh. New Vork; (Jl'Y
C. MOON and AY.N F l.ic.ox. I,is
Wife, ISII Inn. Chatham, New York:
you are hereby notified that a com-
plaint for the foreclosure of a mort-
gage on the following described prop-
erty situate. In Dade County, Florida,
to-wit:
Lot 3* FIRST ADDITION Tt PINS
TKKK LAKE, according to the Phl
thereof recorded In Plat Book 62,
al Peae II o( the Public Records of
Hade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and others
in the above atyled cause, and you
and each of you are hereby required
o serve a ropy of your anawer or
other pleading to the Complaint upon
Plaintiff's attornev Claude M Barm-H.
302 Calumet Bid*.. Miami It, Florida.
ind file the original In the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court in and
'or Dude bounty, Florida, on or be-
fore the 16th day of June. 1960. If you
'all to do no judgment by default will
be taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
Dated thin 10th dav of May. I!!.
K. B. I.EATHERMAN. Clerk.
Circuit CoiTt, Oade Countv. Florida
(aeal) By: K. M. LYMAN,
Deputy Clerk.
5/13-20-27. /3
MRS. BERTHA GOLDBERG
SI. of New York Cpv. die'' M-v 7
Survivors Include William Friedman,
of 233 I'honetla ave.. Coral Cables.
JAMES KRASSIN
:..",. ,.r p. NE Mth st.. died Apr :in. He
came here 20 years ago from New
York, and was a real estate broker.
i Surviving Is .his wife Sophie. Serv-
ice* were Mav l at Riverside Mentor-
. lal Chapel. Normnndv lale.
MRS LORA F. PACK
|'-f 4120 Bine Tree dr.. died Apr 2*>.
Hhe cam,, here II yeara ago from De-
troit. Surviving are (lire.- slaters. In-
i eluding Mrs. Lee I'nvly. and wo
brothers, ggrvluee were May 1 at Riv-
erside Memorial Chapel, Normandy
Isle.
have experienced difficulty in se-
curing gift items to send to north-
ern friends and relatives will now
be able to choose from a large
variety of pram suits, snow suits,
sleeping bags, car suits, ski slacks,
headwear, bunting and robe sets,
mittens and gloves.
The Miami Wholesale Corp.,
states that it is a one-stop shopping
center for children, both for school
and dress-up occasions, and in-
cluding complete sports attire for
boys and girls.
Shopping hours are from 8:30 to
5 p.m., Mondays through Fridays.
The establishment is entirely air-
conditioned, and free parking is
available.
MORRIS SLOTNICK
r.6, of T.640 SW 78th St.. died Apr. 2s
II- cam.- lure seven > ears ami from
ITtlca, NY. Surviving are his wife.
Sylvia: son. Michael: brother and sis-
ter. Services were May l at Gordon
Funeral Home.
JOSEPH MATENKY
7H. of 146 Jefferson ave.. died Apr- M
H leave* a daughter, of W Calm
R.....h Services were In Chicago.
which he left to live here IS years
>-,,. In chtrge of arrangements was
Riverside Memorial chapel, w clav-
ier st.
LEONARD GROSS
".::. of 711 Lake View dr.. died
27. He came lore II .wars ago
N,\v York, and was an iuvesl
counselor. Surviving are his
Harriett: son, Robert: dam
V n Kloch; brother, Maurice;
sister, Mrs Jeanette AMerhuler.
vies were Apr. 2S at Riverside
mortal Chapel, Norina nilv |s]e.
Apr
from
merit
wife,
Mis
and
S.-r-
Me-
INSURED SAVINGS^
EARN
%
PER ANNUM
(CURRENT RATB)
"One of thf Nation'<
Oldest end Largest
j0ade Federal
Savings and Loan Association of Miami
JOStPH M UPTON, President
6 Convenient Offices Serve D*de County
RESOURCES EXCEED ISO MILLION DOLLARS
MORRIS LANDES
71, of 145 Meridian ave.. died Apt
II.. come her" f i v \eais aao from
New York. Surviving are his wife
Ida: three ona, Leon, Philip, and
David: brother, two alatera, ami four
.- \ :.-i .- t !-.- A I- -
at Gordon Funeral Home.
ARTHUR L UNGERLEIDER
-.-.. of 2SSS Pin,- Tree dr died Apr. vv
He cam.- her, fiv,- yean a*o from
New York, ami was an a,-, -mutant.
. S \ iv 'n r* Ids wife Edith mo-
ther. M's Pauline Inserletder: three
sons. Including 1'iiaiic- brother, Har-
old: ami sister. Services were Apr.
M in Newman Funeral Horn.-
DAVID H. REISER
:. of I'd NE S'.'nd st.. died Apr "I
m. c...... here II veam aew front I'hii-
adelphla Burvlvlnf are id- wife,
soldi1,, rin-.. sons, jessie. i>r. Ray-
mond ami Charles: three sisters.
th"ee meat-ii a "''children. Service.
wen Apt M al Rh w -id.- Memo: lal
i hap. I. W I-1 uler et.
MRS. ESTHER SEROTKIN
;!. of L-I7I SW 17th st.. wRe came
here it yeara am. from Dover, N.i..
dierl Apr. 25. She la survived b) her
hi>l'aii'l. Abraham: one son. I.ouis;
b/er, Mrs Anna link; and bro-
j tiler. HalTI I'can S'ie Blm leaves
two vrniidc'dldrcn. Benrloea were
! Apr '-'i alOordon Funeral Home.
JOSEPH I. GERBER
m,. oi 182 ( mini-, ave., died Apr. 21.
M, i, ..i been n winter revident for
P*wn i> inn is his wife. I-
nie Ben ;lyn. with
local arrantrernentit bj Rlveraide Me-
rcrial cii .
HARRY DFweiiTJ
66. of IN Alton rd.. died A|.r. M. He
l:i I r-ur.l aKo ri'Oiu I'lint,
Mich and bus a retire i plan
Surviving are all
daurhter, Mr*. Dorothi Vofel-
fai'v '''Ii
ilk.
Rnrh
Son, r.in Hei >r. ^i at
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OP/EN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
buelneai under the fictitious name >
CUPPERSHIP I'ltllSKS al P.O Cox
IS1 in the Clt) of Miami, 1'iorida
intends to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of |i. i
County. Florida.
Dated al Miami. Florida this 10th
daj of May, i!i6o.
<; w CfORADT
Sol,- Owoer
B/1J-20-I7, t/%
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN than
the iindcisitii.ii, iiesiring to ensast M
iMi.-iness under the fictitious name of
LEEWARD INTERNATIONAL at
1000 N.B. 79th Btreet, Miami, Dade
County, Florida intend to reglstei i
name with the Clerk of the circuit
Court of Dade Countv*. Florida.
JERKY BoiiOKAl"
ARTHUR BHRHARDT
STANLEY EPSTEIN
Attorney for Jerry Hogorad
and Arthur Ehrhardt
5/13-20-27. 6/8
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE DISSOLUTION
N TWe NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA
TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRES-
ENTS SHALL COME. OREETIN'IS:
Whereaa. CELIA D. COMMONS.
MIAMI. FLORIDA: BETTY M.
'IREENBLATT. MIAMI. FLORIDA;
BETTY II O FFB A P K R. MIAMI,
FLORIDA dill on the 2:trd day of Ma]
A 1'. 1MI cause to be Incorporated
inder the provisions of Chapter 60S,
Florida Statutes, SOCTH DADE AIR
CONDITIONINO. INC., a corporation,
with Its principal place of business at
MIAMI. DADE COUNTY, in the State
of Florida, and whereas the stock -
Judders of such corporation did on the
2nd dav of May. A.I). 16. cause to
be filed in the office of the Secretary
,f Btata of the state of Florida, a
I'lirs.nt of nil the stockholders under
the provisions of said Cbapte
Florida S'tat'ites. showing the disso-
lution of such corporation
Now. therefor.-, the Secieturv of
State does hereby certify to the fore-
going and that he Is eatisfled that
ill,- requirements of law have bees
complied with.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF. I have
hereunto set my hand and have
affixed the Great Seal ol the State
of Florida, at TaRnhassee. the
Capital, this the Second day of
Mav. AH. 196"
R. A. GRAY.
Secretary of M
J-./I.V60
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 34M
ORACE MARTINI.
I'laintllf.
ANTHONY MARTINI,
Defendant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ANTIIoNY MARTTN1
i o Arnold Martini
:IL' Tenth Avenue,
San Mateo, California
You. ANTIIoNY MARTINI, are
herehv notified that a Bill of Com-
plnint for Divorce has been filed
against you. and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Bill of Complaint on the
dnintiff's Attornev. LAWRENCE I
HOI.l ANDEK. Suite L'i::i. 1090 North-
th Street. Miami :1K, I-
and file the original Answer or Plead
Ing in the offl.....f the Clerk ol the
Circuit Court on or before the 13th
lav of June, 1MB if you fall to do
so. Inilgm.nl by default will be taken
gainst rod for the relief demanded
In 'he Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall i published once
each week for four consecutive waeki
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE \N"l> ORDERED al
to-ida. this 9th da) "f May, A.D
I MO,
B i: LEATHERMAN .Clerk.
. -,,. hi i -nir t, l lade county, Morida
laeall B) WM W STOCKING,
Deputy rierh
i.A\Vltl-N"'i: I Hi >l LANDER
Suite 80S, '...... v '" ~''o >;i
Miami 3S, Fla I'Laxa 7*3491
Mtornes for Plaintiff
", 11-Ua-".
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MEL'S FL'RNITi'RE RE I-1NISH I N<:
at 23."i0 N.W. 7th Place, Miami intend*
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Trade County,
Florida.
MELVIN (ilPs'o.N, Sole Owner
MARX FAUr.R
Attornev f.* Applicant
Congress Bldg.
f./l3-20-27. 8/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name off
ALA.Mo SINCLAIR SERVICE STA-
TION at 1901 N.E. 2nd Ave.. intends
to reJfTXW a1W name wrth the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ROSE ENTERPRISES', INC.,
a Fla. oorp
LEI IN A. EPSTEIN
Attorney for Applicant
420 Lincoln Rd.
12'.'. :. li-13-2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN 'hat
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names of
GRANADA HOMES. COC.EN BITLD-
INi: CO. tnot Inc.) at I711i> N.E. nth
Court, North Miami 62, Florida,
'Intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
JOSEPH COC.EN.
Bole Owner
t !'.-. s t-n-ai
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47850-B
IN RE: Estate of
BERNARD HEACNEY
I i.-i ,-ased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons flav-
in" claims or Demands Again.-i Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to pi esent miy c'aims and demands
which uiu mav have against the ea-
tate : BERNARD HEAONEY de>
c.ased late of Dsde County. Florida,
to the Cnnnty .Itnfce* of Dade County,
anil file the same in their offices In
the County Courthouse in Dade Conn
t.v, Morida. within eight calendar
months from the date of the first pub-
lication hereof, or the same will be
bar red.
s MAX R. SILVER
MAN It. SILVER
Attorney
Mt S. vl.old Building
Miami 32. Florida
4 1-. -,'6-U
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the i.ndei signed, desirimr to engage In
business under the flc'itiims name of
CAMELOT REALTY al 1102 Congress
Bldg Miami. Fla.. Intend to register
sal I name with the Clerk of the cir-
cuit Court of Ii,d. Countv. Florida
ALBERT If, COHEN
IRVINC WA1.T.MAN
Role ow i
_______ B/U-20-27. 8/3
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage la
business under the fictitious nam. of
FRENCH EMBROIDERY CO. tnot
Inc. I at J441 N.W 77th Terra... Ml
ami. Fla.. Intends to register said
name with the clerk of the Circuit
Court of I'ade Countv Florida
HBNRY BLANSKY,
Sol.- Owner
13-20
Riverside Memorial Chapel. Washing-
ion ave.
JACOB KAHN
. of |M7 NE Isi n \:>r. 22.
i from \i-
were Apr M al Mr Sinai ''
,. Me-
morial Chapel, W. Flagler st.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious nam,- if
PAR-PANTS al I4JS NE Miami Place,
Miami. Fla.. intends to legist, i
name with the clerk of th.- cii. nt
Court of Dads County, Florida.
Al. GOTTLIEB, INC.
By: Alfred O. Gottlieb
| \i.i win- I-' a- WALLER
Attoi
120 I.union Rd., Miami Bl
____________:.-H-13-20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
buslneai undei the fictitious name >'
\I,I I we;-: HEN'r'C PPOSTHETICS
at 115 Normandy Drive. Miami Bt
i-i.i Intends to register said n
i with Ho i '!"'. ol the Circuit Court of
Had. Countv. Florida.
LARRY WIB1 i|-:KM \ N
Sole owner
MITCHELL IIALI BR *
Attornev for Applicant
,tr; S. v Sold Bldg.
__________5/K-I3-20-2T
; IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THS
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. (DC 3312
MARION IONA W. LENT/..
Plaintiff.
JOHN F. I.KNTZ.
Defendant
NOTICE TO APPEAR
TO: JOHN F LENTS
212 East Rosalie Str.
Philadelphia. Pennsylvania
YOI ABE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a complaint to set aside a fraud-
ulent dlvo I.....ri fiei agalaae
you. and sou ai>- reaulred to wrve m
cop) of votrr Answei r Pleading to
the Complain! on the I'N'ntiffs at-
torn,-v DANIEL NEAI. HKLI^ER, 81t>
lev Pirilillng. Mi mil 32. Florida,
and file the original in the offl.
Icrk of the circuit Court, on or
before the Bth day of June, I
wise the allegations of saidC
plaJnl "ill be taken as confessed by
DATED this E9th dav of April, lR
i; B LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
Circuit i 'ourt i u>de (' intj. Florid*
By: K M i.y.m w
DefMKj cierk
S'6-12-20-27


Page 16-B
*Jenisi>fk>ricf#*r7
Friday. May 13,19J
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR
avANrmr
tlGHTS
RfSflVCO
WE SELL
U.S. CHOICE
and U.S. PRIME
MEATS ONLY
Throughout the Year Your FOOD FAIR KOSHER Markets Bring You the FINEST
QUALITY Kosher U.S. Gov't. Inspected Western PRIME and CHOICE Meats. For
QUALITY. SAVINGS AND GUARANTEED SATISFACTION .
Take Advantage of these Low, Low Prices!
SPECIAL FOR MON., TUES., & WED. ONLY!
BREAST
FIRST
CUT .
LB.
OF
BEEF
SECOND
CUT .
LB.
69
C
2
11
I
P
n
tl
c
5
V
a
2
1)
y
t.
o
t<
tl
r
BONELESS TRIMMED
SHOULDER
STEAKS
LB.
PETITE J
MINUTE STEAK lb
1.39
NECK MEAT <
BEEF CUBES boneless lb.
79c
FRESH KOSHER MADE
GROUND CHUCK
LB.
69<
STORE HOURS: Mon. thru Wed. 8 to 6 Thurs. 8 to 9 Fri. 8 tn 3
NOW FOUR FINE KOSHER MARKE TS TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER
163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER I I 19th ST. AT ALTON ROAD I 2091 CORAL WAY
NOJMIAMI BEACH____I |____ MIAMI BEACH MIAMI
CORAL WAY
AT S.W. 87tfi AVE.
Wtttchsr Shopping Plait
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD TX.R