The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01628

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"eJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWIiH UNITY and THE JEWISH WE EK IY
Volume 33 Number 16
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 15, 1960
Two Sections Price 20*
New Body to Handle Funds for Israel
EXECUTIVE IN FIRST REPORT
Community Warned
Of Financial Straits;
Broad Reforms Urged
Arthur Rosichan, executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, declared here that "our energies have been expended in try-
ing to catch up to our rapidly-growing Jewish community," but "we
haven't kept up. We haven't gotten ahead."
He aJto charged that "we are in a precarious financial situation,
with very little cash on hand" and "borrowing from hand-to-mouth,"
that "we must raise double the amount of money we are raising, because
without a strong Federation, this can become a very sick community.".
offered these views ,
21-Member Board Formed
To Control Budget of U.S.
Jewish Philanthropy Abroad
NEW YORK(JTA)Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of the Jew-
ish Agency for Israel, and Dewey D. Stone, national chairman of the
United Israel Appeal, issued a joint statement this week announcing
that a plan has been agreed upon for active participation of American
Jewish leaders in the handling of funds raised by the United Jewish
Appeal for the United Israel Appeal programs in Israel.
The plan has been evolved from +
discussions in recent months be-
ARTHUR ROSICHAN
. sense of frustration
Rosichan
in no-holds barred address last
week te members of the execu-
tive committee of Federation at
the Algiers hotel.
The executive director, who as-
turned hit post in January, said
at his report came after three
lonths of observation. "For the
Irst six months you keep your ears
en and your mouth shut" in a
sew job, he indicated.
Said Rcsichan: "This is a pro-
ram I would have wanted to fol-
w. but a series of events and cir-
imstances has made it necessary
shorter; the period from six
three months." The events, he
labeled as (1) the results of his
irisits with the Miami agencies of
federatior, (2) meetings with the
Jnited Jewish Appeal to determine
JJA's 1960 allocation, (3) multiple
ippeals, and (4) developments fol-
lowing the recent United Fund ad-
iress by Sen. Harry P. Cain, pres-
ent.
Referring to his visits with
executives of Federation agen-
cies hero, Rosichan declared that
he found "a real sense of frus-
tration resulting from their in-
ability to serve the community
and its reeds properlyof their
fooling of a job half-done."
In a candid explanation, Rosi-
fchan explained that "we are spend-
ing on local services less than one-
half of what the average commun-
ity of our size spendsnot because
|he people don't need the service,
bin because we are not raising the
Confirm Report B-G Asked
For Meeting With Nikita
JERUSALEM(JTA)The fact that Prime Minister David Ben-
Gurion did request a meeting in Moscow with Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev was finally confirmed officially in Parliament this week.
Mr. Khrushchev had told newsmen in Paris, before leaving the
French capital, that there had been no request for a meeting with Ben-'
------------------"------------------------+urion. Israeli circles here ex-
Aramco Defends
Hiring Practices
In Appeal Brief
By Special Report
NEW YORK The Arabian-
American Oil Company was ac-
I cused this week of using question-
i naires "that would make the Nur-
I emberg laws look like the Boy
I Scout Manual" to weed out Jews
I from among employment applU
This board of 21 directors will cants,
each year coquet its ,wn bud This e wag ma(Je jn ^
gC rt !llJ?L{LP^mmi APRel'ate Division of the State Su-
actmt.es and programs of um -: b gh d p ,.
- gration, absorption, resettlement, ?___,. ;..."___.___
pressed surprise. Finance Minister education and o,her philanthropic resenting
Lev, Eshkol appearing in the Knes- activities conducted by the Jewish Congress.
set on behalf of Mr. Ben-Gunon- A for ,srael which it desires I
1 1\ I.- .1 .1 > .-# Mil ill*. .Ill ^^ .
to support and to what extent.
In advance of each budgetary
year, the Jewish Agency for Israel,
will submit to the board of direc-
tors a survey of needs and an item-
ized statement of funds required
in order to meet the needs of as-
tween leaders of the United Jewish
Appeal, the United Israel Appeal
: and the Jewish Agency for Israel.
The board of directors of the
[ Jewish Agency for Israel, an
American philanthropic body
; with headquarters in New York,
i which will handle these funds,
will consist of 21 members, of
whom 14 are active leaders in
fund-raising in their respective
communities and in the United
Jewish Appeal, to be designated
by the United Israel Appeal, and
seven to bo designated by the
executive of the Jewish Agency
for Israel.
who is on vacationset all unoffi
cial reports straight.
Prime Minister Ben-Gurion,
said Mr. Eshkol, made a "for-
mal" request to visit Moscow
about four, months ago in a con-
versation with Michael Bodrov,
Continued on Page 7-A
Continued on Page 16-A
Nazi Pressured
To Quit Position
BONN (JTA) Amid press
reports that Dr. Theodor Ober-
laender would soon take a lengthy
leave from his duties as West Ger-
maJ) Minister for Refugees, the'
Minister said thii week he had
asked for an early meeting with
| Chancellor Konrad Adenauer.
Pressure within Chancellor Ade-J
' nauer's Christian Democratic par- >
ty, of which Dr. Oberlaender is a
member, for his resignation con-1
tinued to grow. The German Soc-
ialist party demanded a Parliamen-j
tary investigation of the Minister's1
Nazi past. He has been accused of JOHANNESBURG(JTA)Jewish organizations here are having
participation in the wartime mas- no trouble in getting police permission for public meetings as required
sacrc of Jews in Lemberg. in what under existing South African emergency regulations. Communal life
was then Nazi-occupied Poland. | js proCeeding normally. Prayers for peace and security in South Africa
Dr. Oberlaender became a Nazi were offered in all synagogues. +------------------------------------------
nonev to lurnish it." I 'n 132 and was a leading expon- Many local rabbis were reported requesting that prayers be recited
With respect to staff members of Ient of ,ne ,neorv i German's to be in disagreement with the call both for the security of the Union
the American Jewish
Jewish Life in S. Africa
Normal as Prayer Offered
The five-man court, headed by
presiding Justice Bernard Bo
tein, was hearing an appeal by
Aramco from a ruling last July
15 by Supremo Court Justice
Henry Epstein t h a t the com-
pany's employment practices
violated the state's law against
discrimination. The court hoard
arguments and accepted briefs
from both sides. It will give its
findings later,
Chester Bordeau, counsel for
Continued on Page 6-A
Continued on Page 3-A
I "mission to
I rope.
civilize" Eastern Eu- of Chief Rabbi Louis Rabinowitz
WV Calls for Firm Stand on Racism
By Special Report
WASHINGTON JWV National
Commander Bernard Abrams, of
Jersey City, N. J., Wednesday
harply criticized the Administra-
tion for its "lack of initiative in
failing to protest to the Govern-
ment of the Union of South Africa
?n its callous and inhuman efforts'
maintain virtual slavery of its
native population through fear,
bloodshed and tyranny."
"If we stand for human rights,"
Commander Abrams said, "then
we must stand for it all the way,
both at home and abroad. When
we fail to pass adequate civil
rights legislation, when we fail to
protest inhuman treatment abroad,
when we allow ourselves to wal-
i low in smugness and self-decep-
I tion, we seriously weaken every ef-
fort we make in our own defense
! and in the pursuit of our mutual
aid and information effort through-
out the world.
"We make a mockery of our
alleged leadership of t h e free
Continued on Page 11-A
of South Africa du.-ing the current
racial crisis and for "political pris-
oners."
Rabbi A. Kossowxky declared
from the pulpit of Johannesburg's
Central Orthodox Synagogue that
the Chief Rabbi spoke only for
himself and not for the Jewish
ecclesiastical authorities of the
South African Jewish community.
Rabbi Kossowsky said that those
authorities had always taken the
view that the synagogue should
not be involved in issues having
a political character.
Lay Jewish leaders were report-
Continued on Pago 10 A
lax Lerner Reports to You from Calcutta ... Page 8-A
Dewey D. Stone issued joint
statement with Dr. Nahum
Goldmann this week, announ-
cing plan for establishment
of 21-member body to dis-
pense American Jewish phil-
anthropic funds to Israeli
beneficiaries. (See story
above.)


Pcqe 2-A
Friday. April 15. I960
ty Central Committee o( the Dem-
ocratic Party, aad an Illinois Dem-
ocratic national commiUeemaa
smce I960. A close hrtend of for-
mer PresKienl Trumaa. Cot Anrey
was lastrumeafal ia heiaovg estab-
Bsh the Harry S Truman Chair m
Amertcaa CYrOaatioa at Brandeis
IB ISM
Senrma a* cochairawa for the
%antver;i-> are Sam Black. Jack
Danmaky, Dr. Frehliag. Charles
Fruchtman. Jennie Grossiager. Na
han Gumeoick. Seymour Heller.
_iel Kann. Jar I. Kisiak. Bmg
At Jack Leonard. Joseph M.
Upton. David Phillips John V Ser
bin. William D. Stager. HaroU
Thurmaa. HaroU Turk, aad Carl
TilaWi
Dinner committee
ard Abe*s.
Bertmaa. Fred
aa
JDC Chief Denies
Agadir Victims
Fend for Selves
NEW YORKCharle* If Jordan.
overseas director general of the
Joint Distribution Committee, latl
week denied reports that 900 Jew-
ish snrvivors of the Agadir earth-
quake had been left to fend for
themselves after being turned out
of the Moroccan army barracks at
La Jonaasere near Casablanca.
ey's office in Casablanca since the
disaster He indicated that jr>j
will continue to supply food, cloth
ina. medical car* and other assis-
tance to those refugees still need
ing them, with funds provided by
the United Jewish Appeal.
""**?>
Um
George
nilham
Broaston
Paul R. Gcrcioa (left) and Era*** lanis (right) receive warm coo-
gratulatiaas bom Dr. Stanley Frebimg. president of the Bran-
deis University Chib of Greater Miami. Both men will be fcx-
marfy mancted by Dr. Abeam L Sacbar as members oc the
Diumleu University Presidents Council at a black tie 12th
enniversary dinner Sunday. Apr. 24. at the Diplomat hoteL
They are the only naricbons ever to recere* such honors,
which have been bestowed oo a Umited group of leaders
tbrcmgttont the nation. Jams is a vice president and chairman
of ban numbers for the local Biniwwi Chib. while Gordon is
a member of :ts board of directors and co-chairman of its
scholarship division.
Frietfland, Anrey Head Committee
For Brandeis Univ. 12th Anniversary
i. Joseph
Fraak
Jack Career. Leo Chai
Cohen Jack
Fraakei. Bea Gai
Gmjbg. Charles
rw Goblin. Sam A Gotdsteat. Ales
S Gordoa. Max E Gottlieb, lob-
ert Greea. Simml J. tUSpena
Amort I Jacobs Walter Jj
Senford H. Keaa. Bentaeal
Walter C Kovner
Nathaa Kwshin. Sam C Lerea
*n. Samuel Upton. Ales Maim.
Solomon B Mar^ohs. Morris Mar
Jack Poptck David Prow**. Jack
W. Rabmoviica. S A. R.vkind. Dan
B Ruskm. Sidney Schwartz. Sal C
Shaye. Jacob Slier. Harry Simon
off. EBub Smith. Bernard Troub.
Sidney Vastermaa. aad Harry
Zukeraack.
Jordan reported th?t 330 of tho
Jewish refugees are being she!
ed in private homes in Catablanca
and other cities, under plans work-
ed oetby JDC and the Jewish com-
mnsity of Casablanca. The other
170 refugees hare returned to their
homes ia the vilage of fnezgane.
several miles from Agadir. which
rait lined little damage ia the
earthau ire.
Jordan, who direct* the overseas
refaef and welfare operatioas of the
JDC. major Aaserican agency aid
mg dutitawd Jews abroad, has
bee* m came tenth with the ages-
Termites
Swarming?
ORKJH
-
WORLD S LARGEST
Two nationally pronuaeet Jew
i-h leader- aad phnaathroptsts will onuoc
mad the eoarnwttee for the 12th
anniversary diaaer ot Brandets
.rrsjty on Sunday Apr ?*. at
the Diplomat hotel.
Ian m>
*f Food Fair Stares.
tr^c. and a faitww of tho un-ver-
siry. Friadtawd mad* aossaa**
rho cwnsJrwctMw of tho Friodtand
Cot Jacob M. Arvey will serve Law Scimcas Rasaarcai Cetwwr
M caairmaa, aad Samaot Frvd- aVanaW. Mo*w tat unit mil
land aa honorary oxhairmaa of rosmweo* of the latest dmcev
the Mack tie affair lae aanoance- arms m chwaiito,
meat was made by Dr stanwy wllt **"*
F realm;, president of the Bran-
deis Lnrversitv Cub of Greater Mi
Raman JwSCpn C. RftckOVStty
45 nafMMI avT_ MUM] KACIt
X 1-35*5
other vital
A native of Chicago. Col. Arvey
began his law practice there in
1918. and was assistant state at-
torney of Cook county from ISIS
to 1920 He is a member of the
firm of Arvey. Hodes. aad Manttn-
oaad chairman of the Cook Coua-
&?***
ewtce
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rn7nUr? li/falm
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Phone JE 1-1151
Hr-vart rt*kl
*..


Friday. April 15. I960
JenistHerMian
Page 3-A
Community Warned of Dire Financial Straits
Dr. Irving Lehrman will be
guest speaker at the inaugu-
ral banquet of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund Foundation on
Thursday evening, Apr. 21,
at the Fontainebleau hotel.
The "by invitation only"
inaction will launch the Foun-
dation in Greater Miami. Pur-
pose of the organization is to
secure funds through wills,
bequests and the assignment
of insurance policies to fur-
ther the work of JNF in its
program of soil reclamation
in Israel.
Continued from Pag* 1 A
the agencies, which include the
|Greater Miami Jewish Community
Center, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Jewish
Family and Children's Service, Bu-
reau of Jewish Education, Jewish
Home for the Aged, Jewish Voca-
tional Service, and Service for New
Americans, the executive director
indicated:
"They are provided with few of
the personal benefits which are the
accepted rights of professional staff
of other agencies throughout the
country. We make allocations to
national agencies which protect
their staffs by giving them retire-
ment, group insurance and disabil-
ity benefitsbut we do nothing of
that sort for the people whom we
expect to work for the community
here.
"It is no wonder," Rosichan
charged, 'that we are having diffi-
culty in attracting professional per-
sonnel. They are interested in
something more than just the cli-
mate alone."
Turning to his meetings with
Morris Berirtstein, national gen-
eral chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, Rosichan reported
that Berinstein "indicated openly
the poor repute in which Miami
is held by the UJAboth for its
fund-raising performance and for
its payment record to UJA."
Apartment Group Names Chairmen
Four members of the board of
directors of the Miami Beach
Apartment Assti. were named by
president Eugene Weiss to head
vital committees for the coming
year.
Newspapermen, more
than most of us, know all
the political candidates
... their public records,
experience and programs.
They are quick to
recognize such qualities
OS capability, dedication,
integrity and courage.
It is significant that the
candidate for Governor
that leads all others in
endorsements by
Florida's newspapers is
Doyle E. Carlton, Jr.
In accordance with a plan pre-
sented to the board at its last
meeting, Weiss named Frances
White to head a special committee
to seek a redistribution and equal-
ization of taxes for (he apartment
industry.
Isidore Ruppert was named to
chair the committee in charge of
enlarging the "free rental bu-
reau" of the association, while
board chairman Sidney Rabino-
witz was selected to spearhead the
group in seeking additional city,
county and member funds for in-
creased promotional activities.
Weiss will head-the. special com-
mittee formed to seek the estab-
lishment of a Dady County Tourist
Commission and to seek the relo-
cation of the Florida Development
and Tourist Commission to South
Florida.
/atone
CARLTON
GOVERNOR
PAID POLITICAL nvi fti wr nT
V CARLTON to- OOV. HT| HOQft*.
^
BREAK THE
TRAFFIC
BOTTLENECK
VOTE
YES
EXPRESSWAYS
MAY 3
paid oy vole rei tor
Epiessvavs Committee
Declaring that "some of his fig-
ures were wrong." Rosichan said
that this did not alleviate the funda-
mental problem, nor the fact that
' subsequent events have indicated
that the same attitude towards us
is held by other national and over-
seas agencies."
Declared Rosichan: "As a result
of the conference, we were faced
not only with the amount of money
we owed to the UJA, but also with
the problem we have ourselves in
j collections, and the attitude of some
.people in this community toward
[the sanctity of commitments, a sit-
uation to which I am not accustom-
ed because I had never seen it any-
where else."
Warned the Federation execu-
tive: "We are ina precarious fi-
nancial situation, with very little
cash on hand, borrowing from
hand-to-mouth, no reserves, no
endowments, no capital fundsa
situation which does not exist in
any other community our size
in the United States."
In the matter of multiple appeal
fund-raising beneficiaries of Fed-
eration's Combined Jewish Appeal,
las well as independent organiza-
tions, which launch supplementary
jand unauthorized drives for money
[during the CJA campaign Rosi-
ichan said that "every community
,has multiple appeals."
But. he declared, in Miami "it is
| concentrated during the time the
i winter residents are here, and na-
tional agencies descend like beasts
in a jungle."
Charged Rosichan: "They have
created in Miami a fund-raising
jungle. The difference between
ourselves and the other commun-
ities is that in other communities
there is a very strict process of
clearance. Here, the CJA does not
have priority. Here there is de-
fiance and disregard, and the only
cause to which I can attribute this
is the fact that the prestige of Fed-
eration as the central agency of the
community is not what it must
have been at some time in the
past."
As to the United Fund, the Fed-
eration executive said that "our lot
and the lot of the United Fund are
inseparable. Our United Fund
should be raising $5 million, and
we should be sharing to the extent
I of at least 10 percent of it. This
will take the whole-hearted partici-
pation of the Jewish community to
I make the United Fund successful.
Without our participation on an or-
| ganized basis, it cannot be success-
ful."
Calling for a strengthening of
Federation as the over-all fund-
raising end community planning
agency of Greater Miami Jewry,
Rosichan said that.today "we are
living with a constitution and by-
laws which were written for a
Jewish population of 7,500, and
which are completely unusable
for a Jewish community of 75,000.
1 They must be redone in order to
give Federation the attributes
not only of democracy, but the
ability to get things done."
"1
In a final "count down." Rosi-
chan warned: "We are living a
hand-to-mouth existence. We have ',
neither reserves nor resources to
, meet an emergency. The United
Fund, which should be a source of,
| strong financial support locally, is
tottering. The participation of
.givers in this community is limit-
ed, and more must be secured.
"But this will not have the de-
sired effect unless the standard of,
giving throughout the CJA is in-
creased commensurately with need.
Our by-laws and constitution are
not framed for our present day ap-
proach. We need a large delegate
assembly, a smaller board, and a
small executive committee."
Nor, warned Rosichan, "rm
we meeting the needs of the-peo-
ple who have come to live in Mi-
ami, and whose needs are gener-
ated by our present-day pres-
sures." 1
Said Rosichan: "We are face-to-
face with insolvency. We are face-
to-face with disaster. We are deal-
ing with crises rather than building
for the future. We suffer from a
condition in which too few com-
munal leaders and not enough big-
givers are personally involved in
the planning and budgeting activ-
ities of Federation."
Variety Show Sunday
Variety show in honor of Yiddish
. radio and theater stars Ida Karp
and Florence Weiss will be held
; Sunday evening at Hibiscus Audi-
torium.
*?.
VJGUST BROS R>:
J Is thvflr.SJ '
3
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Pace 4-A
+JmUtincr*Mam
Friday. April 15. 1960
~ Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-46C5
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
__________________MM 396__________________
FRED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MTNDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
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202 Ben Yehuda Tel Aviv. Israel
RAY U. BINDER_______________Correspondent
Published *r*ry Frl'lar rtnp 1*17 by Tb Jw1h FVrldlan
at 110 X E. -sixth Slr*t. MUrol '.. Florida. Enirnl as
s*o.mi-c!assi matter July 4, :-" at Ppi Office of Miami.
Florida, under the Act of March S. ISM.
The Jewish Fleridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity ana
the Jewish Week!/. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service, National Editorial Assn.. American Assn. of
EnglishiJewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
The Jewish Floridian doe not guarantee the Kaiiutb
of the merchandise advertised in its column-
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year S5.00
RATES:
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Volume 33
Number 16
Friday. April 15. 1960
18 Nisan 5720
The Community's Single Choice Seems Clear
In his first report to the executive LP* ^fc
committee, Arthur Rosichan. execu- W. X>_______E* ^d
rive director ol the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, has sounded a
note of great solemnity.
The report, the result of his obser-
vation of the community since his
assumption of Federation's director-
ship three months ago, does not
mean to be alarming or deliberately
sensational. It is a sober assessment
of our financial affairs, as well as of
our Jewish civic and philanthropic
capabilities in the immediate future.
It is indeed true that we have ar-
rived at a crossroad in the life of
Greater Miami Jewrythat we must
determine now whether we shall
move ahead, retreat, or wander in
aimless circles.
Part of the answer lies in the
extent to which both our leadership
and the community at large can hon-
estly assess the extent of their re-
sponsibility in the dilemma portray-
ed by the report to Federation's exec-
utive committee.
This means shoring up the holes
in our battleline for an integrated
Greater Miami Jewry one marked
by intelligent planning for the over- fc
all good, as well as by a cooperative, control-
led central fund-raising process.
Part of the answer also lies in our maturity
the degree to which we are capable of meet-
ing the challenge posed by the report, with an
eye toward looking ahead rather than behind,
and with a capacity for honest and even un-
comfortable self-criticism.
The report, we feel, has been rendered in
the belief that both our leadership and our com-
munity are endowed with these capacities. It
is now up to us to act upon the report. We can
not stand at a crossroad too long. A choice
must be made. The single choice for usone
based on progress for the best interest of an
expanding Greater Miami Jewryseems clear.
Aramco in Court Again
The Aramco case in New York continues
unabated. The Arabian American Oil Com-
pany is still determined to defend the "right-
r.ess of its hiring practices, which bar Jews.
Last July 15. Supreme Court Justice Henry
Epstein told Aramco that it had to abide by
New York State's fair employment lawsthat
the Arab countries were not going to reach into
the internal affairs of this country in order to
govern the destiny of its Jewish citizens.
Aramco is now in the New York State Ap-
pellate Division to argue in favor of its policy
as a "practical necessity." Its able opponent
is the American Jewish Congress, which de-
serves the commendation of all decent-thinking
persons who find Aramco's position repugnant
to the highest principles of this nation's tradi-
tioncl democratic freedoms.
Haifa's Story Corrected
Nikita Khrushchev's game of rhrmntss
with French journalists once again proves this
man's political opportunism. Evasive about
questions pertaining to Soviet Jewry, be was
firm on one point: Israel Prime Minister David
Ben-Gurion had not asked him tor a toce-to-toce
meeting, and he therefore couldn't comment on
whether he would accept a roggesnou for one.
Mr. Ben-Gurion has now politely put the
lie to Nildto. A request for a montimj between
the two leaden was made as iar back as four
months ago.
This is the man and the nation with
whom Western leaders will meet at a summit
cantorence in May. In the name of peace, the
KEEPING A CLOSE WATCH
The New UJA Organization
The reorganization of the United Jewish
Appeal fund-raising structure is the result of
many things. Among others, it is the acquies-
cense to several pressures.
For many years, Arab propagandists have
insisted that the UJA should be denied tax-
exempt status because it is not a "purely phil-
anthropic" organization. A good deal of Uni-
ted Jewish Appeal money, they have alleged,
is used for purposes other than ingathering and
resettlementtwo programs which, more than
any other, the Arabs would like to undermine.
Joining them in their allegation have been
the highly vocal if numerically few members
of the American Council for Judaism, whose
distaste for identification with Israel is more
than matched by the overwhelming amount of
time they spend fulminating against her.
The result has been an Internal Revenue
Department overhaul of the UJA fund-raising
structure, with special emphasis on the actually
small amount of money dispensed to political
parties in Israel as a means of keeping them
from launching campaigns here on their own.
This has also inevitably meant a reorgan-
ization of Jewish Agency status, with Zionist
groups henceforth to take an increasing share
of responsibility in the picture vis-a-vis Amer-
ican Jewish and Israeli affairs.
The Internal Revenue Department's curios-
ity has been, at least for the time being, allay-
ed. But the probe coincidentally succeeded in
bringing to the fore previously underlying prob
terns with respect to the relationships among:
1) the Jewish Agency; Z) the Zionists; 3) the
Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds overall body of Jewish Federations,
such as Miami's, throughout the United States
and Canada; 4) the United Jewish Appeal.
Announced this week is a new 21-member
onyinimtiou intended to reconstitute these re-
lationships. (See Page 1-A) Whether it will be
successful or not remains to be seen. For the
foct is that the full story has yet to be told with
respect to the problems among them prob-
lems principally centering around control over
budgeting and the philosophy behind fund-
raising for Israel in the American Jewish com-
munity.
^^^ during (he week
s^V^-rfssW ... as i see it 1
by LEO MINDLIN
THIS IS THE Passover season. It is a time that speaks to us of
freedoma status of humanity for which Jews, particular!y. have
longed throughout the centuries because it was denied them so wil-
fully It would seem that in twentieth century America a psychic
change should certainly have taken place among us. No one expects
the impossible; sensitivity toward anti-Semitic expression is w>t easily
excisedespecially not when such expression continues to exist in
varving forms and in equally varying degrees of intensity or passivity.
As a matter of fact, it is the passive kind of anti-Serr itism that
suggests we remain vigilant. The active presumably shocks even our
non-Jewish neighborsespecially when we prod them into making
statements about it. and gingerly invite them to our pulpItj to tell
us how unGodly it all is.
Nevertheless, we are emancipated. In historical perspective,
modern society the mid-nineteenth century to the prese-' has
brought the Jew to hi- highest level of integration in Europe and
America. The martyrdom of the Six Million may have served to re-
mind us of the artificiality of this recently-acquired status; but it is
one which we can hardly deny.
Why. then, do so many of us play the subservient footman's role?
It is one thing to be on guard; indeed, it is a sorry truth thit all men
interested in freedom and the priceless value of personal liberty must
be vigilant today against the manifold forces within this very nation
eager to crush them. By joining the guard. Jews render perhaps the
highest service in the restricted battle against anti-Semitism, as well.
-:
WINK Of CONfOtaUST PtfSSUIfS
world hopes for the success of Ha
But how optimistic can we be when untrust-
worthy lint semen are mvotolly involved?
BUT SHOULD WE play the toady? I have here in mind the psycbol-
** ogy of the ghetto Jew. who often quoted a Hebrew expression to
rationalize his contemptibly mild conduct in a case where rrore mili-
tant action would be the mark of the true man. Freely translated, the
expression asks: "What will the Gentile say?" Unfortunate'y. it is
not only a rationalization, it also betrays the extent of the qu -aoner's
fear for the world in which be lives.
If this kind of subservience was confined to the Jew in years gone
by. it is sadly common to contemporary America. In nauseatingly
typical suburban fashion, aren't we all concerned with'what oar neigh-
bors will say about us. and how it will reflect upon our status? Thi-
shift from the anti-Semitic particular to the anti individual.s: eeneral
suggests the need for an interesting sociologic study that would em-
brace the attack, to which I previously referred, of confornism upon
personal liberty.
Nevertheless, burdened with conformist pressures that are in a
sense protective coloration against anti-Semitism, so trta-.y of us
genuflect before our non-Jewish colleagues as a generous means of
showing our decency. Many of our Jewish community leaders, spirit-
ual and o'heruisr. are a case in point. When the Rt. Rev. William
Barry, pastor of St. Patrick's Church of Miami Beach, recently marken
the fiftieth year of his ordination and the thirty-fourth in h.s present
pulpit, a whole host of Jewi turned out in a flock to sing hosanna tfl
the Monsignor with a kind of enthusiasm and numerical strength that
left little room for his own parishioners.
TMf MAMftSTAriON Of Mint
IN A VERY real sense, this was a laudable community-minded ex-
pression that even rose above the merit displayed by many of the-e
men who several years ago banded together in a gesture of
to name 41st Street after that great if talentless, aggressive if boring,
and child-faced if dictatorial personality. Arthur Godfrey.
Indeed, it would require no comment here at all were these leaders
of ours as enthusiastic about their own affairswere they, as an ex-
ample of the sublime compared with their subliminal, to be as moved
by Jewish Book Month as they seemed by the Moosignor's celebration.
What the Rev Father has on our leaders. I confess, will ever re-
main a .mystery. But it certainly must be a powerfully attractive
force. When the Greater Miami Jewish community recen:!v rose to
the occasion to support the construction of a new $10 million M:. Sinai
Hospital, the St Patrick s pastor was called upon to invoke the hos-
pitalwhich he promptly, and properly did. so far as be was concerned,
in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost.
Mt. Sinai is a beautiful medical institution, one of which we may
be justly proud. I tenderly submit that its Jewish sponsors m.-ht
have manifested some of that pride.
Nor is it ended. The Hebrew Academy, after years of fruitless
March to find a construction site for modern and much larger quarters
on Miami Beach, is currently petitioning the City Council for the right
to build on a plot near St. Patrick's. I do not here enter into the
controversy over the Academy's last effortone which involved zoning
laws and their interpretation by the courts. In this case, however,
I have been told that two of the City Couarilmea last week m-tructed
Academ> officials first "to check with Ft. Barry."
r Mtwn mass cowctm
QNE OF THE City Councilmen has sinceand perhaps with some
w justificationdenied the allegation What had been meant, be
declared, was that a preliminary conference could facilitate the pro-
l*'s*,B* ^ th* p*,uion *n tentative to staking the process, itself,
a battle arena. The other Councilman, incidentally, did not avail him-
self of the opportunity to comment on the allegation
It is to be hoped that, in this case at least, our leaders will show
more concern for Jewish Book Month than they have is the past Mtef
we.still, in this age. wonder What will the Gentile say." and bow
before him to temper his possible wrath? It merely stakes us all the
more ludicrous as we join in the newer aaass taauii over "What
will our neighbor say?"


Friday. April 15, 1960
+Jenisi fkrh tr
Page 5-A
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II
Page 6-A
*.Jewisti fhcridicuri
Friday. April 15, I960
Hebrew Academy and its affiliate groups bid a Bon Voyage
to Mr. and Mrs. B. I. Binder last week at a reception at the
Fontainebleau hotel. Binder (left seated), president of the
Academy, hears Rabbi Alexander Gross (left), principal, and
Samuel Reinhard, vice president, offer the couple best wishes
for their trip abroad. Other speakers included Harry Genet,
chairman of the executive committee; Louis Merwitzer, first
vice president; Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, president, Hebrew Acad-
emy Women; and Mrs. Jonah Caplan. president, PTA.
Only GUEST Flies to EUROPE Directly
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Aramco Defends Policy in Appeal
Continued from Page 1 A
AramcoTargucd that being Jewish
or having Jewish connections was
"a bona fide disqualification" for
employment. The Saudi Arabian
Government will not admit such
persons in its territory, in which
Aramco carries on its field opera-
tions.
Polier. a national vice president
of the American Jewish Congress,
said:
"We are not complaining that
they do not hire Jews and send
Jews to Saudi Arabia, since even
the United States Government can-
not send Jews there in the armed;
services."
Ho said the AJCongress ob-
jection was to the questioning
of applicants on whether they
were Jews or married to Jews.
Comparing this process to the
Naiis' infamous anti Jewish
Nuremberg code, he charged
that the company asked ques-
tions even about "remote rela-
tions" who might be Jewish.
These questions, he said, should
Rabbi Rosenberg
Chairs 3rd Seder
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, spiri-
tual leader of Beth David Congre-
gation, was this week named chair-
man of the Third Seder to be spon-
sored by the Israel Histadrut Com-
mittee of Greater Miami on Sat-
urday evening at the Fontaine-
bleau hotel.
Cantor Charles hneiaon Kodner,
of Temple Beth Am, will conduct
the musical program.
In accepting chairmanship of
the affair. Rabbi Rosenberg de-
clared that "Histadrut, repre-
senting one orgeniied labor
movement of Israel, has been
one of the most positive forces
responsible for the growth and
development of the Jewish
State, not only since 1948, but
also prior to that."
Confirming his acceptance of the
appointment, the Beth David spir-
itual leader added "there isn't a
single visitor to Medinat Yisrael
who does not return tremendously
impressed with the achievement of
Histadrut."
Rabbi Rosenberg is a member
of the executive board of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, member of the board of the
Jewish Home for the aged, chair-
man of the South Florida Council
of the American Jewish Congress,
and is on the board of the Dade
'ounty Council of Community Re-
lations and the American Civil
Liberties Union.
be left for the Saudi Arabian Gov-,
eminent to ask if t h e occasion
arose.
The battle over Aramco employ-
ment policies has gone on for ten
years. Justice Epstein's ruling con-
tradicted the findings of Nov. 10, |
1958. by Elmer A. Carter, now
chairman of the State Commission
Against Discrimination (SCAD), i
who was then the investigating;
commissioner.
Justice Epstein decided that the 1
AJCongress was entitled to the
status of a "person claiming to be
aggrieved" under the antidiscrim-
ination law. and that the oil com-
pany was guilty of discrimination.
He referred the AJCongress com-
plaint back to the commission for
appropriate action. The commis-
sion did not appeal from his de-
ciMon. but Aramco did.
If the Appellate Division upholds
Justice Epstein, legal observers
said, it will probably mean full re-
consideration of the matter by
SCAD.
Bordeau, of the lew firm of
White and Case, argued that the
AJCongress complaints were un-
founded both because discrimi-
nation wes a practical necessity
and because the AJCongress was
not qualified as an "aggrieved
person" under the law.
The AJCongress brief said that
it recognized that Aramco could
not overcome the Saudi Arabian
refusal of visas to Jews and so
could claim a "bona fide qualifi-
cation" exemption from hiring
them for work that would require
them to travel there.
But it said the company should
"stop assisting Saudi Arabia m
discriminating against Jews."
It asserted that there were more
than 400 employes in Aramco's
New York office whose work
would not require travel abroad.
&J0L SEABOARD
Dinner Donee Saturday
Reshone B'nai B'nth Girls will
hold a dinner dance in the Charle-
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Friday. April 15. 1960
*Jewisii Fhrktian
Page 7-A
Cristol Awning For School Board
A. Jay Cristoi is a candidate for ter of AZA, boys' junior order of
Dadc County School Board in B'nai B'rith.
Group 1 at large
Cristol is also a graduate of the
A rormer Special Assistant At- U.S. Naval Justice School and ser-
orney General in the 1959 Florida ved as part-time legal officer in the
Legislature, he is an active naval Navy at the same time as he did
reserve officer. night duty during the Korean War.
Cristol lives at 1011 Euclid ave.. A mimTfter Miami Beach, attended So u t h Assn. and Florida Bar. he also be-
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- each Elementary and Miami longs to the Florida Bar commit-
1 j -. n WM WU MM mm e?cn >** Schols. and was Bar tees corporation law, Florida
-^W-'Tfc-aMrl_______ MM tlaB____M& _Mt1________________I ??"zvah at Betn Jacob Congrega- constitution, and tax section.
if elected, Cristol pledges to help
He is a graduate of the Univer- "extend adult and vocational edu*
=ity of Miami and U of M law cation, educational television, fight
school, where he was a member of for a junior college in Dade county,
Wig and Robe Honor Society and and press for an aviation school
research editor of the Law Quar- locally.''
its young occupants. There is also erly. ___________
a large, fully-equipped and fenced
Temple Emanu-EI branch reli*. Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual ^i'Tl ""ll ^T? slnhoo'was ****L?!2V .*? .**
us school and Youth Center ded- leader of the congregation, will deM*ncd by tne Jules P Chan" ?*?* ** **f> *?
Temple Emanu-El's newly-completed bra ich school incorporates unique facilities.
Emanu-EI Branch School Dedication
Assn.. and Miami Beach Mayor D.
Lee Powell.
JGrossbergs Set
mcert Saturday
Immediately after the formal
Cantor Ben Grossberg and his
fife, Teresa Grossberg, will be
,>r*sented in duo-concert on Sat-' ceremonies, a special Passover
ucday evening at Temple B'nai dedication luncheon will be held
Bholom, 16800 N W 22nd ave. j at the Deauville hotel. Advance
Cantor Grossberg is a dramatic! ?<>" required.
ior: Mrs. Grossberg, well-known i .The "ew facility includes 11
flwmatic soprano, is with the Mi.: "'conditioned and heated class-
m. Opera Guild, where for the I !"o,0ms' an all-steel, fully-equipped
181 two seasons she has been un- k,tchen- auditorium. Sisterhood
lerstudy for the -Masked Ball"Lounge' Yuth Loung,e' !utorin
room, board room, adult education
rnd "La Gioconda.'' She is now
room, library and offices.
jerking on "Andrea Chenier" for!
W season, when she will be un- lhA^. ,ne unM}ue fea,u,res of
rstudy for Renata Tebaldi. Ithe buUding are an unusual open-
air roof pavillion complete with
I Saturday night, they will present i flood lights and snack bar where
lvery diversified program, includ-! youth services social and special
_--------,------------------------------------, _,._.,... ,.^, fc... living J.J I1IIII.UI, .1|'ll It llcll
ious school and Youth Center ded- leader of the congregation, will
ication will take place Sunday j dedicate the building. Joseph M. ning Asso- and was constructed
morning at 11:30 a.m I Rose is chairman of the building by the Giller and Fryd Construe-
Greetings will be extended by; committee, and co-chairman is tion Co.
Rabbi Alfred Waxman. president i Max Boderman.
i of the Greater Miami Rabbinical
The building committee in-
cludes Morris Cohen. Judge and
Mrs. Milton Feller, Jack S. Po-
P:ck, and Alfred Stone. Chair-
man of the building fund and
dedication committee are Leo
Robinson and Mrs. Louis Glas-
ser.
traub, he belongs to Phi Alpha
Delta legal fraternity and the Air
Hialeah Model Seder
Sisterhood of Hialeah Reform
Jewish Congregation held a model
Seder Sunday for students of I lie
Training Corps. Cristol is a life I religious school. Rabbi Nathan
member of the Royal Palm chap- Zwitman officiated.
DOCTORS! DENTISTS! OPTICIANS! ARCHITECTS!
INSURANCE AGENCY! LOAN CO.! LAW OFFICE!
MENS WEAR! LADIES DRESSES! BEAUTY SALON!
LINGERIE SHOP! PIECE GOODS! KNITTING!
CHILDREN'S WEAR! GIFT SHOP!
secular and liturgical opera,
ni-classics, Broadway tunes and
paeli and Yiddish songs. They
be accompanied by Edward
at the organ.
functions will be held; and the
specially designed nursery and
kindergarten departments where
the furnishings are sealed to suit
the comfort and requirements of
B-Q Asked for Meet With K.
Continued from Page 1 A
Soviet Ambassador here. Mr.
Jen-Gurion had told the Russian
rwoy ho was willing to moat
rith the Soviet leader at the lat-
? r's convenience.
L'hen Mr. Ben-Gurlon returned
m his trip to Washington and
idon, the Finance Minister con-
sued, he was told by Mr. Bodrov
that there was as yet no answer to
the request. According to Eshkol's
official statement, Bodrov said he
would visit Moscow soon, and
would inquire into the status of the
Ben-Gurion request.
Subsequently, the Israel Foreign
Ministry disclosed it had instructed
Dr. Arieh Harel, the Israel Ambas-
sador to Moscow, to inquire offi-
cially for a reply.
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Page 8-A
vJewisti fhrkfinn
Friday. April 15. I960
Nasser
And Nehru
By MAX LERNER
Calcutta
President Nasser, who covets little strips of real estate belonging
lo his Arab neighbors, is now traversing the VMt stretches of an India
that makes his own domain seem puny.
After the standard Delhi airport greeting, the standard ride between
lanes of people transported by government buses, the standard civic re-
ception with flowery compliment.--, the standard speech before a joint
meeiing of parliament, he is now being given the standard grandeur
cuit treatment at steel mills, factories, hydro-electric dams, shrines.
His reception has been friendly and warm if not always fervent. He
rot a degree from Algarh University, a Moslem institution currently
racked by an unsavory scandal of corruption. A special performance of
Ihe Indian classic Shakuntula was given for him, but the theater was
only half full. Having suffered defeats, he is no longer the glamorous
rising figure he was after Bandung. He is only another of a list of
foldier dictators struggling with internal economic problems while they
talk big on diplomacy.
He got a few headlines and a scattering of editorials. Compared
with the men of power streaming steadily through Delhi, his power is
Jess than middling. Besides, the seemingly tireless cohorts of Delhi
freeters were tiredjust tired. (

ONE AMUSING EPISODE HAPPENED at the joint parliament
session. The irrepressible House speaker, who has chronic foot in-mouth
disease, made an eloquent oration.
When Nasser came last time, he said, he was the head of Egypt
Now he came as the head of Egypt and Syria. On his next trip he would
be the head of all the Arab world. There was dark talk that Iraq and
Saudi Arabia would formally protest, provided they could take the
speaker seriously enough.
Mostly Nasser's pronouncements were on safe topics like peace and
Afro-asian unity. The South African massacre came in for timely and
indigant comment. In his speeches he continued to milk the Aswan
Dam and Suez issues, reviving his martyrdom at the hands of Dulles
nd Eden and thanking India for standing by him.
When he was shown a big hydro-electric power turbine built by-
Indian engineers, he commented that it would not take India long to beat
the Western nations. No one pointed out that India's development race
fa not with the West but with China.
-
THE FACT IS THAT SINCE the Bandung Conference Nehru has
drawn closer to the West while Nasser still beats the old anti-imperialist
rag. Nehru in the intervening years has stuck correctly and formidably
lo his policy of noncommitment to either camp but Nasser's positive
neutrality is ironic for a nation bristling with Russian tanks and jets.
Nehru has preached and practiced non-aggression but Nasser keeps
his Arab neighbors. Kassem of Iraq and Hussein of Jordan, constantly
on guard against assassination. Nehru recoils from any concept of racist
aggressiveness or of political communalism while Nasser still tries to
keep alive the tired battle cries of Pan-Arab unity.
Nehru would be horrified at the idea of absorbing the neighboring
I'ltle countries of Nepal or Ceylon, but since Nasser's last visit he has
dined royally on his sister Arab country of Syria, although he has still
not managed to digest it fully. In fact he postponed his Indian visit
because of proconsul trouble in his Syrian satrapy.
- -
I HAVE CITED ENOUGH DIFFERENCES between the two men
to suggest why the Nehru-Nasser axis is no longer what it was. 1 might
add that Nasser, who has hated Eisenhower ever since the Sixth Fleet
landing at Beirut deprived him of I-ebanon as an easv prey, could not
have been happy at Eisenhower's triumph in New Delhi last December,
nor could Nehru have been wholly happy when Nasser broke his promise
to Hammarskjold about Israeli shipping in the Suez.
Why then the continuing partnership between two leaders so diverse
in personality and outlookthe unlettered soldier with a quick talent for
diplomatic maneuver dreaming of a Pan-Arab empire and up to his
armpits in intrigue, and the intellectual, aristocrat veteran of freedom
battles, mentor of new nationalist regimes, ambitious to be known in
history as the man who led a cold war world to peace.
I got a clue to the answer from an irreverent Indian newspaper car-
toon showing Nehru and Nasser, each dreaming of himself as an Atlas
I holding the Afro-Asian world, with the caption, "Two Minds with a
Single Though'." The kernel of insight here is that each man has built
his world standing on his claim to a leadership extending beyond his own
domain. Nehru and Nasser are like two gjrls after the same man. con-
stantly together because neither dares leave the other out of her sight.
- -
AS FOR ISRAEL, Nasser warily refrained from using his Indian
visit as a lever for attack. But despite a courageous editorial in the
'"Indian Express" by Frank Moraes asking how Nehru could square hi-
rnoral pretensions with his continued policy of refusing any diplomatic
exchange with Israel, Nehru's strange silence on Israel continues. For
a man who so consistently exalts moral courage it is hard to see why
Nehru would allow his fear of Nasser's anger to abate his own courage.
The better guess is that Nehru still dreams of leading the Afro-Asian
wcrid and Israel seems alien to his dream.
(This it a Copyright Column)
JWV Commander
83 Years Young
New commander of Norman
Bruce Brown Post 174, Jewish War
| Veterans, is 83-year old Maurice
Tobias.
Possibly the oldest commander
-W any veteran's organisation in
the nation, he was installed in;
I ceremonies Saturday evening at
: the Alcazar hotel.
Tobias is a past commander of
the Spanish War Veterans and of
the Army-Navy Union. He WM
twin commander of the Jewish
War Veterans Post of St. Peters-
burg Fla.
Other offleen installed Saturday
included Alex Klein, senior vice;
commander, and Bill Kutner, jun-(
ior vice commander.
President of the Auxiliary is
Mrs. Kenneth Braidman, a magna'
cum laude graduate in February
of the University of Miami's school
if education. Senior vice president
s Mrs. V. Roscnthal. Mrs. L. Sim-
monds is junior vice president.
Florida State Department com-
mander Irving Steinberg and Aux-
Jiary president Mrs. Max Kern in
stalled the officers.
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DENTIST
Announces the Opening of His Office
for the Practice of
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of ret Dribbling Difficult urination All add up to PROSTATE GLAND
Involvement. When these symptom* appear early treatment usually is effective.
For gentle treatment of Hie PROSTATE GLAND consult
Dr. Walter D. Reynold*, Sr. D.C.
No Orugi No Surgery
All treatments by appointment
Call Highland 3 6121
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IN THE 163rd STREET SHOPPING CENTER
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CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP ONE
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* Resident of Dede County fifty years.
Married Evelyn Pottmyer. Fefher of
four children, three of which are mar.
ried, and it now the proud grandfather
of fen grandchildren,
* Law Degree from University of Miami.
Member of Oade County. Florida, and
American Bar Association.
* Dade County Representative State
Legislature ten years. Former Miami
City Attorney.
* Wrote and pasted the complete revi-
sion of the Florida Corporation Code.
Member of Governor's Committee for
revision of the State Constitution and
of Charter Board for Metro Charter.
Member of Florida Lagisletlve Council
that prepared the revision of the State
Road Department Code Welfare Pro-
gram, and Minimum Foundation Pro-
gram for Schools.
* Member of Elks, Moose. Mesons,
Shrine. Knights of Pythias. Odd Fel-
lows and Oade County Chamber of
Commerce.
MMak


Friday, April
Jmisi) fkrkf&tr)
Pag 9-A
Gl's Around World Mark Passover
Mrs. Naomi Brandeis, head teacher at the Temple Emanu-El
branch religious school nursery, explains the Passover sym-
bols to a delighted audience in the persons of Alice Leeds,
Debbie Firtel and Bobby Weinkle. The beautifully-set table
was prepared for the model Seder in which the entire nursery
class participated last week. All of the objects displayed on
the table, with the exception of fhe Haggadahs, silverware and
candlesticks, were made by the children.
NEW YORK From a bleak
U.S. station on an ice island in the
Arctic, to the Navy radar-guided
missile sites in the Leeward Is-
lands in the Caribbean, U.S. Jew-
ish GIs were able to mark the
Festival of Passover Monday night
thanks to arrangements made by
the National Jewish Welfare
Board.
The single Jewish Gl on the ice
land Bravo T-3 celebrated along!
with some Passover boxes sent by i
the Jewish chaplain in Alaska,)
while the 30 men from the missile
j sites were guests at the Seder for j
200 servicemen in San Juan, P.R., |
set up by the local JWB Armed
Services Committee.
In Korea tern* 400 GIs and a !
number of Gl and civilian fanv
ilies gathered at a Seder set up
by. the two Jewish chaplains in
the area and marked the festi-
val just 13Vi hours before their
co-religionists in the U.S. be- i
cause of the International Date
Line. The Seder in Korea, like
those held Monday night in the
U.S. and in 72 overseas areas,
was arranged by JWB, organizer
of global "Operation Passover"
for the military. This is JWB's
43rd "Operation Passover."
[Center Planning Annual Dinner
Plans are now being made for j Stanley Orshan. Guest arrange-
ninth annual dinner meeting of j ments are being handled by Harry
Greater Miami Jewish Com-1 Wahlberg, with Mrs. Dorothy Fink
ounity Center, it was announced
By Clemen J. Ehrlich, chairman.
lmittees have been appointed
Dr the event, which is scheduled
or Sunday night, May 1, in the
ky room of the Dupont Plaza ho-
U.
| George A. Simon and Marshall
puer are in charge of arrange-
ment?. The reception and hospital-
ity committee is headed by Mrs.
nward Dunn, assisted by Mrs.
pilliam Sussman, Mrs. Leon Ep-
rin, and Mrs. Herschel Rosen-
il.
i Mrs. Walter Feltman is chair-
ban of the reservations commit-
fee. She is being assisted by Mrs.
lorman Gladsden, Mrs. Ray Ber-
In, Mrs. Philip Samet, and Mrs.
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and Mrs. Seymour Wang as as-
sistants.
Emergency arrangements ac-
counted for the Seders and hospi-
tality Monday night in Formosa,
Saigon, Thailand, and Vietnam
all of which were visited by the
Jewish chaplain in the Philippines
before the holiday to see to the
Passover needs of the military and
civilian peersonnel at these sta-
tions and at other U.S. military
missions in south east Asia.
The Seder services in these re
mote places were in addition to
those organized by Jewish chap-
lains and local JWB Armed Serv-
ices Committees, USO-JWB staf-
fers in Japan, the I'hilippine*>Ha-
waii. North Africa, Europe, Ice-
land, Panama and Korea. In Ko-
rea, the Jewish chaplains provided
Passover food boxes for GIs in
remote places unable to reach the
Seder held at the Passover relig-
ious retreat in Ascom City. These
"solo Seder" packages, furnished
by JWB's Women's Organizations'
Division, came in handy at a U.S.
station atop a mountain in Alaska,
at Nike sites in the Arctic, on ma-
neuvers, and on ships at sea.
Thanks to emergency arrange-
ments made by USO-JWB staf-
fers on the west coast, Gl on
the USNS Sultan end Jewish
officer on the USS Shangri-La
were eble to celebrate Passover
at sea. When the Shangri-La
docks this week in Rio de Ja-
neiro, home hospitality will be
provided for the Jewish officer
because of the efforts of JWB,
the World Federation of YMHAs
and Jewish Community Centers
and the director of the Jewish
Community Center in Rio the
Associacao Religiosa Israelite.
Forces. JWB is authorized by the
U.S. government to serve the re-
ligious and morale needs of IS.
GIs and hospitalized veterans.
1 The Four Questions were asked
by GIs, or their children, Monday
night in strange and exotic places,
where rabbis and Jewish chap-
lains who had flown thousands of
miles for services, officiated.
Jewish chaplains, USO JWB
staff and JWB Armed Services
Committees met the Passover
needs of men at over 660 military
posts in the U.S. JWB committees
worked for months in advance to
assure Seders for men at lonely
Nike sites, as well as for those at
large bases like Ft. Dix and Mc-
Guire Air force Base, in New Jer-
sey.
Taking part in JWB's global
"Operation Passover" were 370
full-and part-time Jewish chap-
lains, the entire USO-JWB field
staff and 10,000 volunteers on lo-
cal JWB Armed Services Commit-
tees. As a member agency of USO,
I JWB, in its 'Operation Passover,"
is carrying out one of USO's basic
objectives in ministering to the
needs of Jews in the Armed
Senior Citizens
In Model Seder
Over 100 senior ciitizens have al-
ready made reservations for a spe-
cial Third Seder program to be
held by the Golden Age Friendship
Club of the Miami Beach YMHA
Branch on Sunday at 1:15 p.m.
Included will be the reading of
many sections of the Hagaddah
and eating of symbolic Passover
foods.
The Miami Beach YMHA, a
Branch of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Community Center, is a bene-
ficiary agency of the United Fund
and Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation.
In charge of information is Rob-
ert Chazin. Harry Levin is pres-
ident.
At the conclusion of the Seder
... the thoughtful hostess
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A hint of mint...the soothing coolness of
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Page 10-A
fJmist fhridHar
Friday, April 15, I960
Monticello Pupils
At Home's Seder
The Four Questions were posed,
the Seder table was set, and the
Passover melodies were chanted
when more than 25 students of the ;
religious school of the Congrega-
tion of Monticello Park conducted
a imicferSi-derTor residents at the
Jewish Home for the Aged just
before Passover.
Under the direction of Cantor
Ben Zion Kirschenbaum and edu-
cation director Abraham J. Gittel-
son, the children presented a com-
plete Seder, with Rev. Lazarus
Lerer, a member of the Home and
a former member of the congrega
tion, acting as grandfather *t the
table.
The program was arranged by
Marvin Schreiber, program direc-
tor of the Home.
Collection Goes to Brondeis
WALTHAM, Mass A private
collection of material on Leonardo
Da Vinci, considered by many ex-
perts to be among the most out-
standing in the world, has been
presented to the Brandeis Univer-
sity Library by Bern Dibner, Wil-
ton..Conn., bibliophile and engi-
neer. Almost 800 books, pamphlets,
manuscripts, incunabula, and
prints by and about Da Vinci are
included in this collection, which
has been consulted and used reg-
ularly by art historians and spe-
cialists in Da Vinci's life and
times.
CRHTINGS TO AIL
Harry Zuckerman
Construction of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital is
scheduled to begin this week with the signing
of the contract between Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital and William A. Berbusse, jr., builders.
The hospital, when completed, will contain 282
beds and cost $4.50fl,000. Witnessing the sign-
ing standing (left to right) are Harry Markowilz,
member of hospital board; Sidney M. Aron-^
ovitz. attorney for Cedars of Lebanon Hospital;
Dr. Stanley MargoShes, secretary of the hos-
pital; Leon Black, jr.. of Kelly. Paige and Black,
attorneys for the builders; Samuel J. Spector,
trustee of the hospital. Seated (left to right)
are Dr. Morton M. Halpem, hospital president,
and Andrew H. Warner, vice president of Wil-
liam A. Berbusse, jr.. Inc. _____
Jewish Life Normal in South Africa
ADL Exec Will
Speak Wednesday
Arthur Spiegel, assistant direc-
1 tor of the Florida regional office,
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, will be guest speaker at a
regular meeting of Beth Israel Sis-
terhood on Wednesday, noon, at
the synagogue, 711 W. 40th st. His
topic will be "Anti-Semitism: The
i Current Scene."
Personal films of various mem-
! hers taken while on trips to Israel
will also be shown. The monthly
birthday party honoring Sisterhood
members whose birthdays fall dur-
ing the month of April will be cele- j
brated under the direction of Mrs.
Murray Berkowitz, hospitality
chairman.
Continued from Pse 1-A
ed to share Rabbi Kossowsky's
views and were understood to re-
sent the action of some Jewish
groups in other countries "pre-
cipitately passing" resolutions criti-
cizing the actions of the South
African Government in handling
non-whites.
The Jewish rabbinical and lay
leaders have stressed that the dis-
turbances were a South African
question and not a "Jewish issue"
and that Jews abroad, like the Jews
in South Africa, are not entitled to
speak collectively as Jewish
groups on such questions although
they are entitled to have personal
opinions on the issues.
Meanwhile, the first official com-
ment of the Israel Government on
the South African disturbances was
I made by Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's
'Foreign Minister.
*WWWA SPECTACULAR OPENING NIGHT
I960 SEASON
MIAMI MARLINS
vs.
BUFFALO
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20
at 8 o'clock
PRE-GAME SHOW 7:30 P.M.
FIRST
She s*id in Jerusalem that "the
opposition of the Israel Govern-
ment to racial persecution in any
form and its insistence on human
rights everywhere have been ex-
pressed on all occasions when
this problem came up before the
United Nations."
Mrs. Meir made the statement in
the Knesset, Israel's Parliament, in
reply to a question from Mapai
Deputy Herzl Berger, who asked
whether the Israel delegation at
the UN had been invited to join
the Afro-Asian delegations in re-
questing a debate on the South
African events. She replied that
Israel had not been invited, and
that the Government of Israel
"hopes with all its heart that a
just solution will soon be found in
this tragic problem."
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*Jewist> fkritu,
Pag* 11-A
Adath Yeshurun
Elects Officers
Jerome Linet has been elected!
president of Temple Adath Yeshu-
run. ""*" "
Other officers elected at a re-
cent meeting include the follow-
ing:
Norman Goldstein, first vice
president; Jerry Katz, second vice
president; Marvin Dollin, financi-
al secretary; Abe Stein, treasurer;
i Nelda Golden, recording secre-
tary; Freddie Sandell, correspond-
ing secretatry.
Board of directors include Mar-
shall Comis, Ike Dorf, Joe Schmi-
er, Miriam Gerstein, Jack Schaen-
feld, Paul Sedrish, Larry Diskin,
Lawrence Plotkin, and Joe Miller.
aft to right are Samuel Kaplan and George Lebowitz as they
resent an American and an Israeli flag to Kneseth Israel
'ongregation.
JWV Urges Firmer Stand
>rld," Abrams said, "whan wa
to taka the positive and dy-
lie reins of leadership. The
rribla events in South Africa
landed immediate steps on
r part, without qualms, vacil-
lation cr rationalization.
B^s of this moment, we have
I our ears to the clarion of
jom that rumbles out of South
Africa. We have shut our eyes to
the misery and subjugation of the
darker peoples of Africa and their
will to freedom.
"The steps taken in the United
Nations Security Council by U.S.
representative Henry Cabot Lodge
are, of course, commendable. But
they are dwarfed by what we could
have done, if we acted with swift
and unwavering determination,"
Commander Abrams added.
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Academy Alumni
Plan Review
The more than 75 graduates of
the Hebrew Academy will hold a
reunion meeting during a special
Sabbath on Apr. 23 at the Acad-
emy.
Jerry Rubinowitz, president of
the Alumni Assn., said that the
Sabbath of the 23rd was chosen
in order to give an opportunity for
the out-of-town students to take
part in the reunion.
Some 30 Academy graduates
ara now attending Yashiva high
schools and colleges in Cleve-
land, Baltimore, Chicago, and
New York. Spacial arrangements
if being made to have the
Alumni Assn. spend the entire
Sabbath in the vicinity of the
Acadamy at 918 6th St., Miami
Beach.
Nathaniel Zemel, chairman of
the Alumni Sabbath, said that
members will conduct the entire
Sabbath services. Friday night din-
ner and Sabbath luncheon will be
held at the Royal Hungarian rest-
aurant.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, prin-
cipal of the Academy, will speak
to the group Saturday morning.
His topic will be "Effects of an
Academy Education in the Life of
its Students."
Rabbi Morris L. Horovitz, as-
sistant principal, Hebrew Depart-
ment, will address the Alumni at
the Shabbos Seuda.
A sympasium is being planned
for 4 p.m., Saturday, in the Acad-
emy Auditorium. The committee
members in charge of arrange-
ments are Melvin Ciment, Doro-
thy Naness, Leon Firtel, Sean
Kaufman, and Stuart Kimmel.
'roofing CO.
II i.or. I. Miami
Mean D..oblllty
He-roofing & Repairs
All Type Roofs Since If20
ASI FOR FREE ESTIMATES
ON ROOFING
Phone FR 3-6244

Private Pool
Beach and
Cabana Colony
HOTEL
At 24th ST., MIAMI REACH
Miller Electric Co.
of Miami, Inc.
QUALITY CONTRACTING 1 SUVICl
3905 N.W. 37th Ct.
Ph. NE 3 2686
formation
JE 1-0331
Air-Conditioned Room*
Private Beach and Pool
Parking on Premise*
Cocktail Lounge
Dining Room
Entertainment
$5
Daily
Per Pare.
Dble. Occ.
Special
Holiday
Rota
To Serve You is
Our Pleasure
Ed. J. Vischi
Real Estate in All
its tranches
1240* N.I. 7th AVENUE
hone PL 4-4661


Page 12-A
Jewlst> Meridian
Friday. April 15, I960

Dade Property Owners Eye $46 Million
Bond Issue Up for Vote Here on May 3
On May 3^ Dade property own-
i is will be asked to approve a
$46 million bond issue (or the con-
si ruction of a leg of the North
South expressway and other road
improvements. Broken down, the
construction will include:
A $40 million section of the eight
lane divided expressway extend-
ing from SW 32nd rd.. near the
Yizcaya Art Museum on the south,
to NW 2nd st. on the north. In-
cluded are the twin fixed sp;.
eight lanes over the Miami River
and the central district inter
changes and connectors.
The $40 million is an advance
to the Stata Road Department to
be utilized for providing the
above section of the, approved
interstate system years ahead
of schedule, according to Wil-
liam Singer of the Stata Road
Board. These monies will be re-
turned to the county when avail-
available from the Federal aid
allocations, Singer said.
The existing Flagler st. bridge
over the Miami River will be re-
placed with a higher, four lane
one. costing about $2 million.
Metro also will repave and wid-
en NW 7th st.. from 42nd ave. to
57th ave., to four lanes at a cost
of $1,500,000.
On Miami Beach, right of way
on Collins ave. between 56th and
60th its. will be purchased for the
City of Miami Beach and the stale
to widen the roadway. Purchase
COM is $500,000.
Itight of way also will be ob-
tained in Miami from SE 2nd ave.
to Biscayne blvd., along SE 3rd
st., to connect into the expressway.
Cost $5Ou.60d.
Another important link will be
a four-lane and two-lane con-
nection at NW 12th st. between
the Palmetto By-Pass and the
Miami International Airport
terminal. The $400,000 allocation
will provide four lanes of di-
vided highway from Palmetto
expressway to Milam Dairy rd.,
then two lanes to the terminal.
An estimated $225,000 will be
needed for extending Tamiami Ca-
nal rd. from Flagler st. to NW 7th
st.
Still another improvement will
be NW 6th ave. from 29th st. south
to 20th st., which will become a
two-lane one-way street to accom-
modate North South Expressway
traffic. This will cost $225,000.
An additional $775,000 will be
spent to repair existing streets
throughout Dade county.
Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami
member Jack Leonard, chairman of the club's
associate membership division, and Gus R.
Roberts, newly-elected member of the board
of directors, lunch with (left) Miami attorney
Donald S. Rosenberg, Seaboard Life Insurance
agent Elliott R. Rose, and Norman Brown, of
the Continental Coffee Company of Florida.
With Roberts (wearing glasses) are Alfred M.
Band, of the Lion Match Company; Bernard
Fow, of Airko Air Conditioning; and Jack Leon-
ard's son, Lou, partner with him in the oper-
ation of the La Pena Cocktail Lounge and
Restaurant. Also part of the group, but not
shown, is Jan Janis of the real estate firm of
Jay Janis and Associates. Jay is the son of Er-
nest Janis, chairman of the club's life member-
ship division.
Manners Adds New Campaign Quarters
Miami Hebrew Book S
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 8 MM
Hebrew Religious Supplies for
Synaaoflues. Schools A. Private Use
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC OFTS
Lakeside
MEMORIAL
PARK
"The South's most beautiful
Jewish cemetery"
30 Minutes from the Beach Via
The New 36th St. Causeway
JE 1-5369
Two more campaign headquar-
ters were opened last week for
Joseph P. Manners, candidate for
the State Legislature. Group 2.
Dade county.
Manners announced the opening
of offices at Miami Beach and Hia-
leah.
The Miami Beach office will
he ur.der tha direction of Miami
Beach co chairman Leonard
Colaman and Shelley Schleoing-
or. It i located at 704 71st ft.
Located at 3068 Palm ave., the
Hialtah headquarters will be man-
aged by Mrs. Helen Pryima. well-
known Hialeah civic leader.
Central headquarters are lo-
cated at 911 Ainslcy bldg.. in down-
town Miami. Ty Tarby, Florida
Jnycee, is county campaign mana-
ger.
Manners, a crime busting at-
torney for the U.S. Justice Depart-
ment, gave two basic reasons why
he is running in his first political
race.
Manners said. "Five years ago,
as Florida Assistant Attorney
General under Richard Ervin. I
began a fight against pork chop
legislators to unfreeze from banks
and insurance companies an esti-
mated $100,000 in escheat funds
which the Florida Constitution has
allocated to schools, but which
banks and insurance companies
have hung onto, with pork chop
aid."
Manners said he will continue
his fight for these school funris.
"These million* of dollar*
must, during tha coming session,
ba claimed for the people."
Manners gave as his second ma-
jor reason for running the fact
that "Dade county is in desperate
need of an effective urban renew-
al program for the elimination of
our blighted slum areas. In my
capacity as a law enforcement
agent. I saw first-hand how crime
breeds in slums."
Manners said he would fight for
immediate slum clearance legisla-
tion.
The 36year-old attorney said he
would also "work for fair reappor-
tionment and for better legislation
that will protect our children from
indecent literature."
Manners, who graduated cum
JOSEPH MANMMS
laude from the University of I
ami law school, served as A
ant Attorney General of Flcriilj.
Assistant U.S. District Attorne> o!
the Northern Florida District, and
as a U.S. Justice Department at-
torney, helped convict 20 crime
overlords.
Schwarz Elected
To Board Here
Herbert N. Schwartz, of Miami,
Monday was elected to the board
of Seaboard Life Insurance com-
pany of America.
The announcement was made by
Albert B. Myers, president of the
Miami-based company, following
the annual meeting held at the
Dupont Plaza hotel.
Schwartz formerly was secre-
tary and a member of the board
of Lefcourt Realty Corp.
Myers also announced growth
figures for the company, whic'i
was organized here in 1958. He re-
vealed that insurance in force in-
creased from $16,472,716.27 n
to more than $56 million at I >
time.
KSAEL! RELIGIOUS STORE
All MSUFW SVPrHKS FOR
MIAGOGt-lS A ItWISH HOW.
We Carry Bar Mitzvah Records
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
_____ JE 1 7722
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. T 2th Avenue
Miami, Ma.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAl DIRECTOR
Students Attend
Passover Service
More than 150 children will at-
tend services at Congregation
Monticello Park on Monday and
Tuesday, the final days of the.
Passover holiday.
Services will be conducted by:
student Rabbis Steven Wemfinger
and Jeffrey Breslaw, assisted by
Cantors Marvin Lass, Billy Leff.l
Stephen Leb and Michael Segall. I
In addition, the alef congrega-
tion of the school, which consists
of studentts age 5 to 8, will hold*
service on the same days from 10
to 11 a.m. Elaine Edelman con-!
ducts these services, assisted by
Harriet Klion.
Water Safety Courses
Venetian Aquatic Club is start-
ing a drive for new members to
help in the swimming program at
Venetian Pool during the summer,
which includes courses in Junior
Lifesaving. Each course runs for
two weeks. A water safety aide
course for prospective teachers
will be launched May 3 at the pool.
i
I
i
I
I
l
I
I
I
l
I
t
i

'%,
^UA\^
ions require time
Surely it it only good sense lo devote as much
attention to selecting a family burial estate
as you would to malting your will. Yet so often
one tends lo postpone this important derision
until an emergency arises. Isn't today the
best time to start planning? Why not find out
about Mount Nebo now. Here, in Miami's finest
and oldest faariafa rrmelery, a Perpetual Care
fund exceeding S 100.000, guarantees .he
permanent beauty and care of Mount Nebo. You
never pay for maintenance taxes and
srssiDents cannot be levied And
Mount Nebo is to lerrnely Imrh ... so
acmtihU ... so nrll etloiiiJtnl it ha* already
been the choice of over 4.000 Jewish families.
Why not secure lull details?
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERY
URGENTLY NEEDED
ladies stress and sportswear, Sises 16J
te 14. Also men's suits, slacks, shirts,,
fete. Must be clean.
I MIAMI BEACH CLOTHING EXCHANGE)
311 23rd St. MB. JE 8191
e^/-*V
l$*l
a\JGUST BROS HYl
N*EWM7iN
FUNERAL HOME
133 3 DADE BOULFVARD
MIAMI BEACH
JEfferson 1-7677
Edward T. Newman
Funerol Director
IS thf bt S /
Mount Nebo Cemetery
5505 NW. 3rd Street, M.ami.
Pirate tend me, utthout obh
lion on t'amil) Burial Etlalrs lit
Florida
full minima-
Mo-nl .Veto.
Name
A'l iri --
Cm-
Zone State
J!w// jtffa dm///?/
SSOS Northwoat 3rd Streot
.'Lor.* MOhowfc 1-7J
mmm
IMH


riday, April 15, 1960
TALES OF MORALS
So many question why Judaism
I T./uire.( regular daily worship. The
\ constant daybyday contact with
\:he words of the prayer-boo\, with
other men at prayer and with our
Father m Hcdt en, even if we. our-
lelvcs, are not moved to prayu
evtrfSay, teacrTes^tKai ~wl learn to
pray through prayer itself.
There it a story about a small
own. far off from the main roads
of the land. In the town were all the
tecemvry municipal institutions: a
bathhouse, a cemetery, a hospital
and a law court. And there were all
sorts of craftsmen: tailors, shoe- I
makers, carpenters and masons. One
trade, however, was lacking, there
uas no watchmaker. In the course
of years, many of the clocks became
owners decided to ignore them alto- I
gether.
Others, however, maintained that
i long as the clock* ran they
Mould not be abandoned. So they I
wound their clocks, even though
they knew that they were not accu- -
rate. One day. when the neuts
I spread through the town that a -
I u'diditmi^r hud arrived, everyone .
rushed to him with his clock- But
the only clocks he could repair were
those that had been k't>t running.
1 The abandoned clocks had grown -
I loo rusty.
' i : i:U I' ... i"....., ., ,' i '!< IMt
+Jewisti rh,,1nr
Page 13-A
3n iami s
rCeliaious Dissatisfaction Often Gives
Best Impetus for Progress
By RABBI ELIJAH PALNICK
Assistant Rabbi, Tempi* Israel
s
e r v i c e s
*GUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle avc
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Iwr
Friday (:M p.m. Saturday x:3fl a.m.
Paaaover Sunday 1:46 p.m. Mundav
<:3n a.m. Harmon: "A Spiritual Factor
In thf Wi.il.l~ Civilization." Tuesday
9:3" a.m. Yizkor. Sermon: "In a Featl-
val of LibertyPaaaover."
2533 SW 19th ave
Maxwell Silberman
KABBI UIJAH PALNICK
. Toynbee rieftf
Icrrcw C^om ertation
b xin owpa ^x wbx
-xn mm .rutf ontos 1 nxa
T : t i : v I r
pa t^j oxi;?!3 vt^x
>t?xn niia'pi tR
p? ,nrnfra 13 xin .1956
ns*i T"1?? ay? ntfin
p ns-ix 878$ orna .njj?
i1^ irana xsr ntrflfl*
ft ipx? nnx ??&}
)*? niTnari ava s-axn1?
hn 'xn ac?r nna'pa .no
bria x-iipi nca? avn "
jo nx xiip Wii i^ya -
"Fruslration" is, in our society,
i word much used and abused. We,
j today, worry too much about frus-
' (rations, pessimisms, disappoint-
; ments. We fail to realize that these
! are the challenges that provide the
response. Unless there is dissatis-
faction with the status quo, there
is no need to push on and try to
find something better. "Discon-
tent," said Auerbach, "is the
source of trouble, but also of pro-
gress."
This emboldening lesson has long
been pumped through the Jewish
heart. Indeed for centuries now,
in the best educational forum there
could be, the family circle, have
we responded to the four questions
asked by our children with the vig-
orous answer of tradition.
Unlike the "nouveaux riches"
who try to hide their previous impecuniousness and would have you
i believe that from the very first they wore only diapers of mink, the Jew
has traditionally looked at his son and said "Slaves were we to Pharaoh
in Egypt."
It was this experience that led to our giving the world the magnifi-
cent concept of freedom. Because we were slaves in Egypt did our
law givers say "Proclaim throughout the land, unto all the inhabitants
thereof."
Because Moses was time and time again turned away unjustly by ..
the tyrant Pharaoh, did our people originate fair and equitable laws, 'tint of the Oonerattoiia."
did they legislate equality before the law for both the powerful and the | beth israeLTwio Prairie a
weak.
The Zohar is perhaps not very wrong when it teaches, 'There is no
true good except it proceed from evil."
In the early days, American Judaism, living in freedom, couldn't
understand Zionism based on dissatisfaction with living conditions:
events throughout the world caused them, too, to be dissatisfied not
with the conditions under which they lived, but Moses-like, with (ho.se
in which their brothers suffered. We therefore became the backers of
our brothers' Aliyah.
Yet, there are some in America who once again speak with dis-
appointmentwho are dissatisfied that in the land of the Jews, of the
people who suffered most from intolerance, Israelthere is no separa-
tion of church and state and therefore a lack of religious freedom.
But this too shall pass. It must pass as we raise our voices not in
moans but in constructive protest. Perhaps Toynbee is right, and chal-
lenge is necessary for response. Dissatisfaction is thus not an unmixed
course. Indeed it often provides the impetus for development.
KNOW YOUR HERITAGE -
Final days of Passover will be marked in Greater Miami following
Choi llamoed Sabbath weekend with services beginning on Sunday eve-
ning. Passover services follow Monday and Tuesday morning, as well
as on both evenings. Tuesday morning services will include the tradi-
tional Yizkor memorial for the departed. Liberal and Reform congrega-
tions will observe the conclusion of Passover at only one service on
Monday.
VNSHE EMES.
Conservative.
president.
BETH DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con
aervative. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg
Cantor William W. Lioion
Friday sundown. Saturday 9 a.m. Ba.i
Mltzvah: Hernia, daughter of Mr. and
Mra. I.oui-. Hne. I'nssover BlUldaj |
Ii.m. Monday 9 a.m. Tueaday 9 a.m.
Ylxkor memorial.
ifth EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox
Rabbi Solomcr *rhlff.
Friday ti::io p.m. Saturday x:30 a.m.
S e i m o n : "intermediary Sabbalh."
Paaaover Sunday 8:30 p.m. Monday
8:30 a.m. Sermon; "'Joins Porth I'nder
Divine Protection," Tueaday 8:36 a.m.
Sermon: 'MemoryThe Most Nerea-
aary Ingredient of Judaism." Yizkor
memorial.
BETH EMETH. 12250 NW 2nd avc
Conservative. Rabbi David W. Her
eon. Cantor Hymin Fein.
Friday K:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Bong
Of Bonga." Samuel Crayson to haul.
Saturday I a.m. Harmon: "Holl-
daya and Holy Dtaya." itoaaover Sundaj
:M p in Honda,) I a.m. Tueadaj i
a.m. Vixkor memorial. Sermon: ''The
.D^nn
\NSLATI0N -
Some Modern Jewish Aspects
Of Our Time-Proven Traditions
The Oldest Man in Israel
fcliahu Eli Makuas is one hundred
twenty years old and is the
pst man living today in Israel.
fcliahu Makuas was born in a
ill and distant village in the At-
, Mountains and came to Israel
Morocco in the year 1956. He
in Sderot, a new town in the
kev, close to the Gaza Strip.
m the day he came to the coun-
and settled in Sderot, he was
his home only once when
vent to vote on Polling Day for
Knesset. Except for this, the
man sits all day in bed read-
ying the Bible; he reads the
of Psaims especially.
iiblisbed by Brit Ivrit Olamit)
The desecration of the Sabbath
an emergency is not delegated
strangers, minors, servanti or
I'omrn but u done by promi-
nc.it Jews and sages.
----MAIMONIDES.
Nor pursuing your business, nor
(hraa;ine; thereof your business is
forbicWeit, not the business of
leaven. ISAIAH.
e
More than Israel k't1' '"< Sotv
t. the Sobbuth has, kept Israel.
AHAD HAAM.
ve. Or
thodox. Rabbi H. l.oui Rottman.
P*r|da) l:M p.m. Saturday t:*S a.m
"Weekly Portion," PMaovar Monday
B:4S a.m. Sermon: "The Jowlah Lay-
man aa a Torah IVr^onnlity." Tues-
day 8:15 a.m. Tlakor.
SETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamchee.
--------
BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Levitan,
----
BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
--------
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 40B
16th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim
Karlinsky.
---- ----
;ORAI_ WAV JEWISH CENTER
756 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi Sam-
uel April.
Prldas p.m Harmon, "Plral Praa-
dom." Ones Shabbtri hosts: Coral Way
.leu ish Center taen-ajia olub membere,
as irall as membem of Invited church
croups. Saturday B am. Sermon:
"Sonjj "f Sonaa." Paaaover Bunday
k :in p.in Monday and Tut Ida
a.m. Vlzkor Tuaaday.
------e------
JADE HEIGHTS CENTER. 18160 NW
2nd ave. Conservative. Cantor Eman-
uel Mandel.
-LAGLER-GRANADA 50 NW 51st
pi. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard
Shoter. Cantor Fred Bernstein.
Friday ::: p.m. Saturday B a m. Mar
Mllavah: Jerold; won ..r Mr :iil Mra
ai Roth. Paaaover Monday 8 a.m.
Sermon: "Then Sana: Moaea and the
i 'hlldren "i WMi i TueaAaj B :i m.
Y'/.k" 10:36 -i "i Sermon: "A Memor-
ial Prayer,"
----
HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th St. Or-
thodox. RaUbi Alexander Grosa.
1'iiil.iy 6:30 pin Saturday >-:l"i a.m.
Paaaover Sunday 6:36 p.m. Monday
v > a.m. Tueada< v '." n. Vhtkor
Llw:M a in Mathantel Lauer, BTadnate
of the lu-ln-ew Aoademi and sniii.ni
;ii w .'it in Reaerve Colleae and K.ii>-
blnlcal Colleaje of Telahe, Cleveland,
jtt., will offer the sermons both daya
-
HIAIFlM BFFOIM JEWISH CON-
QREGATION. 1150 W. Sth St.. Hla-
leah. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman.
PVIday B:1S pin. Sermon: *'8baa] of
Honca." Onaa Snabbai hosts: Mr and
'Mrs. Seymour Soafcal, in honor of th<'
namlnf of thelt dauahter, Kol>in Lola.
Paaaover 8.....i"\ x.r. p,m. Sermon:
n- for Survival." Tla%or Mon-
* day 16:30 a.m. Sermon: "What i'om-
.night that inspired the author of ,,,r, rjoe, uberal Judalam Offer the
herd heard that Touro was brought iour national anthem, included, to H.....nei
down by a shot, Shepherd ran out' mention but a few, such names as
into the range of fire, in defiance Samuel Konig, Solomon Myers, Lt.
of explicit orders, and rescued his; Jacob Barnist, Martin Hirsh, David
friend. 'Commodore,'' he declared I Kauffman Mjchael Wolf ,srael
later, when reprimanded for hjs ... ._ .
Phillips and Samuel Solomon. Most
What was Israel Zangwill's com-
ment on the effect of the Pass-
over melodies on the Jewish
heart?
The master novelist in his
"Dreamers of the Ghetto" states
"that, if the Jewish heart no longer
warms on hearing the old Jewish
melody on Passover eve, it runs the
danger of ending the life of the Jew
on earth, of committing spiritual
suicide."
e
What is the story about Toure and
Shepherd in connection with
the defense of New Orleans?
Touro, son of the Newport rabbi,
and Shepherd, a noble young Chris-1
tian, were both enlisted men in An-1
drew Jackson's army. When Shep-1
I ltin.1'1'i.'iflit'H,1 i:li,luri;iTu;ii|i*r
tf
| :;;if"
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
18 Nisctn 629 p.m.
uiwi'juiiwm mi in I ui;:;iii
Were there any Jews in the engage-
ment during the defense of
Fort McHenry, when Francis
Scott Key wrote the Star
Spangled Banner?
Yes, indeed. The list of Jews who
stood in "the rockets' glare" the
HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 2030
Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David
Shapiro. Cantor Vehudah Heilbraun.
action, "you can hang or shoot me,
and it would be all right, but my
best friend needed my assistance,
and nothing on earth could have in-
duced me to neglect him."
e
Who called America the "New Is-
rael?"
Rev. Ezra Stiles, president, in
his dy, of Yale College. Those
were the colonial days when Bibli-
cal quotations and analogies were
part of the normal vocabulary.
Hence, the Liberty Bell, which in
1776 rang out the announcement of
the signing of the Declaration of
Independence, had emblazoned on
it the inscription from the Old Test-
ament: "Proclaim Liberty to all the
land and to all the inhabitants
thereof."
of these Jews were of Sephardic
descent.
qaaaaHMBsaaaaaaaxaiKaxnaaMaMiiifiHiiiNesiiiiiBaaai
This page is prepared in co-
| operation unth the Spiritual Lead-
I ers of the Greater Miami Rabbin-
I icdl Assn.
Rabbi Yaalov G. Rosenberg
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Hcron
Tales and Gems of Wisdcnn
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwits
Know Tour Heritage
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
tee. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
KrMay ':l"i p.m. Saliinlay .v:ti> a.m.
.. r Sundaj sundown, Mondai
X:.10 a.m. Sermon: "Paanrh'a Drawtna
to a Close." Tueaday 8:36 a.m. Ylxkor.
Sermon: "Our Departed Onsus.*'
KNCSETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self.
Friday '. ;n pm. Saturday s.-so a.m.
Sermon: "The Slsalflcanoa of Choi
llamoed." Paaaover Sunday ::10 p.m.
Monday S.M a.m. Sermon: '"The Re-
demption of Israel." Tueaday 8:30 a.m.
Ylxkor memorial.
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION
1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Herschetl Saville. Cantor Joseph
Salzman.
t-1 i.I..> r.:20 p.m. Saturdai a.m. Ser-
mon: The Bom of Soims Paj
Sunday ;:.!(! p.m. Monday <:4', a.m.
Kermon: "Understanding the Miracle."
Tueaday 8t4B a.m. Sermon: "l.lvlnsr
with Our Memories." Ylxkor memorial.
MONTICELLO
NE 11th ave.
PARK. 164th it. and
Conservative. Rabbi
Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zien
Kirschenbaum.
Filday 5:tt and X:ir, p.m. Sermon: "If
I had to l>o It Over Attain." Saiui-
of Mr and Mrs. Kdwin Hlaum. l'ass-
Ovaa" Sunday 6:1S p.m. Monilay B:4."
a.m. Tueada) B:M a.m. Ylxkor memor-
ial.
NORTH DADE CENTER. 13630 W.
Dixie hvy. Conservative. Rabbi
Henry Okolic'a.
Krlilay s: I r, p.m. Sermon: "Nothlna
l*lke th' l-'amlly." Passover Sunday 7
p.m. Monday a.m. Tuesday 9 a.m.
Ylxkor memorial.
e
NORTH SHORE CENTER. 630 76th st.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
owitz. Cantor Edward Klein.
Friday BclB p.m. Sermon: "The l-'oiir
Cups of Wine." Saturday a.m. Bat -
man: "Weekly Portion.". 1'aasovei-
Sunday 0:ir, p.m. Monday and Tuea-
day S:4", a.m. Tlakor memorial Tues-
day 16:36 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6436 SW 8th
st. Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
Filday *:l"i p.m. Sermon: "The Rona]
of Love." Saturday 9 a.m. Sermon:
"Dry Hones Passover .Monday 9 a.m.
Sermon: "Ho is ihe Key word." Tues-
day 10 a.m. Yizkor. Sermon: "The
Beder of Parting."
-- e------.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. Rabbi
Jonah Caplan.
Friday I p.aB. at Unified bldK.. ItM
NK 171at st. Sermon: "Making Every
Da) Count." Saturday 9 a.m. Paaaover
Tueaday 1:.'I0 a.m. Yizkor. Sermon:
"The Immortal Dead."
TEMPLE BETH AM, '950 N. Kendall
dr., S. Miami. Reform Ra0b< Herbert
Baumflard. Cantor Charlea Kodner.
------e------
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1645 Polk at.,
Hollywood. Reform. Rabbi Samuel
Jarre.
Friday B:1S p.m. Passover family wor-
ship -ei vice Sermon: "The Man Who
Was Not There." Paaaover Monday
10:45 a.m. Yizkor.
------e------
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM of Holly-
wood. 1725 Monroe st Conservative.
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cantor Ernest
Schreiber.
Priday >> p.m. Baa Mitzvah: Judith
Roalyn daughter of Mr. Fred Patt.
hMurday 9 a.m. Bar viiiz\ah: ltd
son of Mr. and Mra Fred Bneteln.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase
ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisb
Cantor Oavlo Conviaer.
-----e------
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Sheldon Edwards. Cantor Ben Gross-
berg.
------e>
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washino-
ton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor inrael Reich.
Friday sundown. Saturday 8 a.m.
Sermon: Weekly Portion." Bar Mlta-
vah: James Gordon, son of Mrs. Pearl
Roth: David Harria Kaye, son of Mr.
and Mra. Jack Bernard. Paaaover Sun-
day 6:30 p.m Mondaj B am. Tueaday
*i rf.in. z*talioi memorial 10:30 a.m.
------e------
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th at.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot.
Cantor Jacob Bernstein.
PYlday s:l* p.m. sermon: "Wkal
Wrong with our I'ommunity?" Paaa-
ovei Mondaj !) a.m. Yizkor memorial,
TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave.
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor
Herman Gottlieb.
Friday :IS pin Candle Bleanln*: Mra,
Loula Haffner, in honor of her L'r.th
wedding anniversary; Mra. Dorothy
Weinei. Saturday Mlnyonalrea 9-a.m.
Temple aervloe 16:36 m. paaaover
Mondaj 16:36 :i m. Tlakor 11 a.m.
------e------
TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Modern Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel Oomberg.
|.iid:i\ 5:36 ami 8:18 l> > Sermon:
\l. 1.1., rshlp Thriniirh Life." Satur-
day v r, ,1.111. Passover Sunday ri::'.o
p.m. Mondaj >*:1" a.m. Tueaday 8:45
.i in Yizkor.
------e------
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
M. Wallach.
Im id.i \ B)t5 p.m. Sermon: "Ordained
I., bt -i lew." Naming: Dauahter of
Mr. and lira. Stanley I'red. Paaaover
Monday 11 a.m.
------e------
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 051
Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi
Leo Heim.
Friday nion: "A PeeaMm -lew or a Matxoh
.lev.?" Paaaover Sunday 6:30 p.m.
Monday a.m. Sermon: "Klijah
Speaks to Modi in Man." Tueaday S
a.m. Yizkor. Sermon: "Our Beloved
Dead OH TllN FaMtlVal of rVeedolll."
------e------
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 SW 17th at.
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Wax-
man. Cantor Jacob Goldfarb.
Friday B:Sfi pm. Sermon: "The Or-
cllo.iix Davs Saturday 9 a.m. Bar
Mflzvali: Jnaeph, Mon of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Kaplan. Passover Sunday
evenlnK ii:30 p.m. Monday and Tues-
day 9 a.m. Ylxkor Tueaday 10:30 a.m.
------e------
TIFERETH ISRAEL. 6800 N. Miami
ave Conservative. Rabbi Harry L.
I awrene* Cantor Albert Giant*.
Friday S:30 p.m. Sermon: "The Seven-
teenth Yahrxelt Saturday 9 a.m. Tla-
kor on s.....nd day of Pasaover, Tues-
d.i \ I a.m.
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER. 44 Za-
mo.i ave. Conservative. Rabbi 81.
Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Meyer Qleaer.


Page 14-A
fJewist ricrfdKar?
Friday, April 15. 1960

Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDtIN
Trio of Books Offering a Wide Variety of Interest
THE WORLD OF WONDERFUL DIFFERENCE. Written
and Illustrated by Harts Guggenheim. 64 pp. New
Ycrk: Friendly House Publishers. (Anti-Defamation
League, 330 Seybold bldg., Miami.) $2.50.
PRIMARILY A BOOK for young people (7-11 and up, the
publishers say), "The World of Wonderful Difference-
is a light blend of rhyme and illustration, both done by
artist Hans Guggenheim. The main descriptive word for
the book seems to be whimsicalodd but charming. Or
perhaps it should be charmingbut odd.
The book is divided into five sections, each of them
teaching a lesson in tolerance, or in appreciation of differ-
ences. One upholds the law of gravitation as something
which we all Have in common; another points up America's
racial diversity in positive ways; another, on the freedom-
loving amoeba, was too subtle for me. The illustrations
(in color) are creative* imaginative and marvelous.
But the book as a whole seems strangely unintegrated.
The verse skips around from one age level to another, even
within the same section. One of the major difficulties. 1
think, is that the child who is old enough to appreciate the
pictures is too adult for the text, while those who go for
the text are confused by the drawings. And while the book
can be fun to read, as a teaching tool its logic is much too
vague to be really effective for a child's literal, steel-trap
mind.

v.....m'ih.......m
l.r:: T .,:- I I
United Nations Listening Post: By SAUL CARSON
Critical Factors in Future of West Germany
TO ATTEMPT to find an answer|
to the question about the fu-
ture for the Jew in Germany, aj
future free of anti-Semitism and!
not threatened by hatred, one musij
take into consideration several fac-
to
For example the cold war ir.l
general, including the knotty prob _
lems of German reunification and the status of Wl -r
Bcrim: There is peal fear in Germany that the West
. become "Oft >o the Soviet Union and agree on
token surrender in regard to reunification of
German* especially fear that Britain is
more willing than the United Stales is to otler up the
\
led < irvey
Jews there :.i :!< Context "' Mil
...!; of anti-Semitism. This in another ii
Capital Spotlight:
By MILTON FRIEDMAN
Arab Power in Cuba
Washington
PENETRATION OF CUBA by the Uni-
ted Arab Republic and charges of
anti-Semitism against the Fidel Castro
regime are causing concern in Jewish
circles here.
An outright allegation of anti-Sem-
itism was made by Cmdr. Miguel F. G
Pons Guizueta, naval attache of Cuba's
Washington Embassy until his recent resignation. He
charged that the Castro regime was "under the most ab-
solute influence of international Communism.''
The Cuban government in Havana immediately coun-
ter-charged that Guizueta unlawfully withdrew funds from
a Washington bank. But the naval commander said he
had only made one withdrawal from the Cuban account, in
the amount of $63,000, to pay the New York export firm
of Eugene Strauss.
He said he especially wanted to pay this bill, for sup-
plies to Castro's navy, because he been told by Cuban navy
official- that the Castro government planned to refuse pay-
ment to Mr. Strauss.
"They were not going to pay him because he is a
Jew. and they Mid Jew* neve enough mooes
Washington is deeply concerned over Cuba's grown
anti-Americanism and leftist tendencies. Government
sources said the Jewish community in Cuba, residing main-
ly in Havana, has suffered only anxiety and the general
economic damage inflicted on all Cubans in business Many
Havana Jews maintain small shops dependent on the tour-
ist trade from Miami.
Last January, the Cuban Foreign Minister was the
official guest of President Nasser of the United Arab
Republic in Cairo. He was fully informed of the UAR atti-
tude toward Israel and "international Zionism."
Subsequently, Cuba was the first port of call for a
Cairo mission headed by UAR Deputy Foreign Minister
Hussein Sabry. This mission toured Latin America in
quest of Latin support for the UAR cause.
President Nasser concluded a deal with Castro on
Feb. 17 for 10.000 tons of sugar. This followed on the heeli
of Soviet Deputy Premier Mikoyan's visit to Cuba. Cairo
broadcasts have followed the Moscow line in backing Cas-
tro against the United States.
Increased UAR activity in Havana has caused concern
lest the pattern emerging in Panama develop in Cuba.
Nasser's agents in Panama have promoted anti-Semitism
through subsidies to the Panamanian nationalist press and
radio.
A week after Castro seized power, a development wor-
ried Cuban Jewry. A Havana daily, glorifying Castro,
likened him to Egypt's Nasser. An immediate call was
made on the editor by a Jewish delegation which pointed
out that Castro stands for religious and racial equality,
according to his statements, while Nasser is guilty of anti
Jewish and even anti-Christian discrimination. The editor
apologized.
Jews, like other Americans, are observing the drama-
tic developments in Cuban-American relations. The issue
is whether that volatile island, only 90 miles from Florida.
will remain in the free world.
dream of German reunification on the altar of peace
between East and West.
West Berlin feels that it must not be sacrificed.
Of one thing, thi.s correspondent is certain: Should
the West be so short-sighted as to agree to let Ger-
many swallow West BerlinWest Berlin would never
accept such a solution. West berlin, to a man. would
fight. Without the protection of the West, such a
fight would be suicidal. But West Berlin would fight.
In the process, the Jew would suffer. Many dis-
illusioned West BeiUnert, hurt by a Western "sell-
out." would turn a-ainst the 6.000 odd Jews in their
midst, against the orders and entreaties of their own
democratic leaders. Fast Germans and their Russian
military supporters would "take it out" on the Jews
who are consideredand arepro-West.
Throughout the Federal Republic of Germany,
Western softness to the Soviet viewpoint, either on
West Berlin specifically or on reunification of Ger-
many, could touch off a wave of anti-Semitism.
Another factor is the situation in France: If
President Charles de Gaulle should fall, the consen-
iK of most experienced political observers is that
Fascism would succeed the present regime in
France. If Fascism should gain the ascendancy in
France, it would cross the borders very quickly into
two countries: Italy and Germany. A new Fascist
regime in Germany would mean the end of the Jew
in Germany.
Then there are two internal problems that must
be dealt with in the effort to foresee the Jew's future
in Germany.
First: The national elections to be held in 1961.
As noted earlier in this series, the "rightists" in West
Germany are few. disorganized, without unified lead-
ership. Will the "rightists" be able to form a uni-
ted front for the 1961 elections? If so, who would
lead them? What would be their program? What
kind of campaign would they conduct? Would their
electioneering take on a racist. anti-Semitic charac-
ter? Would they, united, be able to elect candidates
to Parliament? How many? Of what character?
Second. The educational system. This is the one
point on which some positive answers can be given.
There is no doubt that there are many ex-Nazis
among the school teachers throughout West Ger-
many. How could it be otherwise? Heinrich Lan-
dahl, Minister for Education in Hamburg, told this
correspondent that, after the fall of the Nazi regime,
two-thirds of all German school teachers were aged
over 55. That means that two-thirds of the German
school teachers had been, to be most charitable, at
least "infected" by Nazism.
Now, the statistics showaccording to Dr. Lan-
dahlonly one-third of the school teachers are over
50; one-third are between 35 and 50; one third are
between the ages of 25 and 35.
Pondering those statistics leads to hope. The
third of the teachers over 50 will be retiring very
soon. Those between 35 and 50 include a great many
teachers who were thoroughly indoctrinated with
anti-Nazism during the early, enthusiastically anti-
Fascist days of the present republic. This cor-
respondent was assured by people who should be
able to judge that this generation of school teachers
especially the age group of 34-45 is "clean" of Nazi
tendencies, on the whole.
HIGH WINDOWS. By Louis A. Falk. 145 pp. New York:
Whittier Books, 31 Union Square West. $3.50.
_Louis Falk js a member of; the World Executive of the
World Zionist movement; he organized the ZOA in New
Jersey, and became a national vice president; he was a
member of the national executive committee of Jewish
War Veterans. He's also been editor-in-chief of "The Jew-
ish Veteran" and co-author of a book, "Jews in American
Wars'' This is his autobiography.
There is no doubt that Mr. Falk is a good man. pro-
ductive, useful and kind. He has had his triumphs as well
as his hard timeslike nearly everyone else. A writer he
is not. It seems to me that if one must give in to the com-
pulsion to write an autobiography, a sense of perspective
alone would dictate that the resultant product be kept for
private circulation among one's friends and familj. For
the rest of us, it just has no point.
*
LAUGHING WITH TEARS. Compiled and edited by Martin
Rywell. 222 pp. Harriman, Tenn.; Pioneer Press. $2.10.
Self styled "Tennessee hill-billy" Martin Rywell is the
editor of "Listen," a "personal journal of observations on
the American scene," and author of a slew of other books,
most of them on guns and cookery. This soft-cover book
is a collection of Jewish humorjokes, proverbs, anecdotes
and parables. It includes many that are well-known and
many which will, I think, be new, plus some of the wonder-
ful old ones which come straight out of Jewish folklore.
Panorama:
OH the Record
By NATHAN ZIPRIN
A Magazine's Future
ULfHITHER COMMENTARY? is a
r......'^HBL
: ** troublesome question in Jewish cir-
cles which cannot comprehend why a
publication sponsored by a Jewish or-
ganization, the American Jewish Com-
mittee, is showing what appears to be a
condescending attitude toward Jewish
material. This writer is not of the opin-
I ion that a serious Jewish magazine
should be devoted exclusively or even overwhelmingly to
Jewish material. But when one has to scan the pages of
a Jewish publication to find a Jewish item, the publication
ceases to carry a Jewish character.
If that policy is puisued much longer, Commentary
must surrender ail pretensions to being a journal of Jewish
cultural content. There was a time when one could always
count on getting a Jewish cultural piece in the section
called 'Cedars of Lebanon." Now it has been abandoned to
make room for material that only secondarily belongs in
a Jewish journal.
A case in point is Sidney Hook's article in the March
issue raising the now old-fashioned and outmoded question
whether there is a God and whether his existence can be
demonstrated by logic or science. In blurred semantics
and hackneyed phraseology Hook takes up several valu-
able pages to prove (a) that there is no God and (b) that
if there is one you can't prove it. Another case in point
is the plethora of reviews of books, often in the form of
articles, that are not related to Jewish content.
I am not unmindful of the rationalization that can be
summoned to justify that path, but whatever the ration-
alization it is not a Jewish path for a Jewish magazine for
a Jewish public by a Jewish organization. This writer has
been an avid reader of Commentary ever since its first is-
sue, considering it together with Midstream and Judaism
am ng the major publications in the country, and that is
why he is genuinely pained by its new look, a look that is
decidedly new, interesting, instructive, informational but
not necessarily Jewish.
There is room for a high class Jewish publication such
as was envisaged for Commentary at its inception. I hope
the targets of this criticism will not consider me impudent
for suggesting that their error is still retrievable.

Leigh was born some six years ago with such a love
for color that he spent his beginning years almost exclu-
sively on easel and paint. Now he talks a lot but not with-
out sense or purpose. When his San Francisco grandmother,
Bea. came to New York last summer. Leigh was apparent-
ly disturbed over the prospect of his mother having a baby,
and he grew progressively morose as the day of deliver-
ance was drawing close. Leigh just didn't relish the idea
of having a competitor for filial affection.
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
The Art of Knowing When You've Said Enough
LJENRY MORGENTHAU, JR., was re
" cently in Israel and was being inter
viewed. The reporter kept on asking
questions and finally Mr. Morgenthau
said he had enough. "1 will tell you a
story about my father," said Mr. Morgen-
thau. "Once, he was arguing a case in
court at some length. The judge stopped
him. 'Mr. Morgenthau,' said the court,
"as of now you have won the case. You had better stop
now. If you keep on, you might lose if."
Not only lawyers, but preachers and other public
speakers defeat themselves by excessive speaking. I once
heard the eloquent Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver quote a cler-
ical adage to the effect that "no souls are saved after the
first 30 minutes." Everybody knows the story of Mark
Twain at the church. The preacher spoke eloquently in
the beginning and Mark decided to put a dollar in the plate,
but when it was passed around, he took out a dollar front
the plate because the preacher had spoken so long and
wearying! y.
No age has been exposed to so much weary public
speaking as the present. It is the day of the loudspeaker j
and the microphone.
I am not saying that when you fall asleep, it is a'**^? I
the fault of the speaker. I remember once when the noted .
Labor Zionist leader, Dr. Nahum Syrkin was speaking. All
of a sudden, the sound of snoring penetrated the hall. Syr-;
kin stopped his speech, approached the man, shook him j
and said, "Why didn't you bring your pajamas?" *


'
riday, April 15, 1960
+Jelstrk>rklkM
Page 15- A
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
-NOTICE IH HEREBY GIVEN that
Ihe mid- rslgned, M.-sl, ,u engag.. In
T.','I1."'';:,",'.';,' "'" r"......"" name ol
ftOOER LEEDH l.TI al (3 Bast F.a-
,'''""'' -11...... Florlds Intend. ...
I!'K /.'.' .Si? "'"" "''"' "" Clerk of
I lit- E- I -r i.'.
R LEEDS LTD., INC.
1 Louts l:luin. I'lcsldcnt
iai;i;v 7.1 KERNIok
Utorm y for i m nei
10 I.in.- -in Ro
ilian.i Beech, I
____________________________4/1-1 II
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY
No 60C3142
Ji-i.iawe van BERKEL
I'l.i ntlff,
JOHN VAN hkrkkl.
l '.-i. ndanti
ORDER TO APPEAR
TOU. JOHN VAN BERKEL 116521
Culver Blvd., I. Angeles, Calir., ere
hereby required to nerve m copy of
your answer to r .....ivIMnt for divorce
on plaintiff's attorney ('laud.- M
Kline*. M N.K. :;rl| Avenue. Miami
Ha., on .r before the !th dav of
May, 10, and file the original in the
office of the rierk of the Circuit
< DUM, otherwise a default will he en
telerl against you.
Dated 'his 4th day of April, 196<|
!:. B. LEATHERMAN,
dark of circuit Court
(seal) B) K. M I.VMAN,
Deputy Clerk
4/8-15-22-29
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HEREBY OIVEN that
the uinl. rsigiieil. desiring to engage in
business under the Fictitious name of
A SHoWER OF STARS HOTEL at
UlLldo Hotel. 12.", Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach, Florida Intends to register mi id
n.uiie i:h the Clerk of the Circuit
| Court of Dade Count', I-1 or Ida
DI l.Mm HOTEL. INC.
Bj : Charles A. Kramer
4/8-lt'tS-M
PMCM
BY HENRY LEONARD
,..1
"And instead of an author, news analyst or
movie star our next Sabbath service will
bo devoted exclusively to prayer."
Copr IMO. L*onai4 Prittkin
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Jthe undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
[CONTINENTAL PUBLICATIONS at
101 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Flor-
nlda Intends to register said name with
the Clerk or the Circuit Court of Dad*
County, Florida.
INTERNATIONAL ItiitiK
DISTRIBUTORS. INC.
n Florida coloration
1609 owner
4/8-1-'.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
^NOTICE 18 HEREBT fllVBN thai
undersigned, desiring to engage in
Ineat under the fictitious name of
IOWER OF STARS........Ido Hotel.
Lincoln Road, Miami liem-h. Kloi-
Na intends to register said name with
lit- Clerk of the Circuit Court of Hade
Coiino, Florida.
I>l I ll. Mi iTEL. INC.
By: diaries A. Kramer
__________ 4/8-16-82-29
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
[NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
undersign.-.I. desiring to engage In
bslneea under the fictitious name of
IBLV1LLE OFFICE SI I'I'LIES at
TV", s.w. Mli St.. Miami. Ha.. Intends
register said name with the clerk
the Cfreiilt Court of Dade County.
forma,
MEL OHEENBKRO OFFICE
SUPPLIES, INC a Kin. Corp.
RVIXE c. sI'E.u:
[florae) for Applicant
Bfi Lincoln ltd.
4/1-l'.-22-2'i
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
.EVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN ANO FO*| DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANC.-RY
No. 60C3I43
(A MM IE 1.WM-: WILLIAMS,
Plaintiff,
\ s.
IONALD B5DMOND
I let. II.Ill lit.
ORDER TO
TO!', RONALD
IAMN, Rout.- I, i:
II. K.-iiiueky. are lu-rehv required I"
erve eopj of your Answet to a com
plaint for divorce on plaintiff! attor-
ney eland.. l. Barnea. in N.E. :i Ave..
Kiiaoii. Pla on or before the Ith day
U Ma) IMO, Kill file the orialnnl In
(he office of Ihe Clerk of this Court,
otherwise n default will he entered
Iteainst you.
i .1 this Ith da) of April. l6n.
K. i: leviiiekman.
Cleek of Circuit Curt
Kaenl) Bj I K. M. I.VMAN.
Depntv Clerk
4/8-15-22-29
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIHCUIT IN ANO
FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY
No. 80C 2710
RETER A MA To
I'laintlff,
Vs.
liAIHIAItA .IK AX A MA TO,
i i. i|.ia nl
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, BARBARA JEAN AMATO,
188 Aiden Avenue. Valley sire.un. New
York, ure notified to serve a copy of
your Answer to ihe I dvorce Com-
plaint on Plalntlff'a Attorney, GEO-
RGE NH IK.I.AS, MS Biscayne Build-
ing, Miami. Florida, and Hie original
with Clerk of this Court on or before
I Ik- 2'.th day of April, A.D., 1M0.
otherwise Complain! will be Confessed
by you.
DATED. March 22, A.D., I9U0.
K. B. leat HERMAN. Clerk,
Circuit Court, hade County, Florida
tseal) By: WM. W STOCKING,
Deputy Clerk
3/2.'.. I- 1-8-IS
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desii ins to engage In
business under the flctitloua name of
mums MI'I'l-LEft SHOP -it N.E.
167th St. & 3rd Ave.. Dade County
Inieiids to i.-glstcr said name willi the
ci.rk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
MIIM'i >. INC.
HERBERT E. KAUFMAN
Attorney for applicant
I62H diil'ont Blot-.
I/5. 4/1-8-18
WILLIAMS
APPEAR
BDMOND WIL-
.\ ||-A, Burllng-
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
|he undersigned, desiring to eneeee In
Uuxtness under the Fictitious name of
l.'S shoe RKBIII.DKRS at 254
E. 1st Ave.. Miami intends to ree-
mer said name with the Clerk of the
Irrult Court of Dade County, Florida.
mio > MAM Mol.TZ
MI'XKV EFBONBON
lttorna) for Applicant
Security Truwt BIiIk.
4/S-I..-22-2!'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN CHANCERY
No. tOC 2620
HAROLD FRKXCK.
Plaintiff,
v*.
MAR.IOKiE FRKNCK,
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: MARJORIE KRENCK
:::: North Avenue
Syracuse, New York
YOl' ARE HEREBY KOTIFIEO
thai a Complain! for Divorce has been
filed axainst you In the above entitled
cans.- and you are hereb) required t"
aerve a cop) of your Answer to the
complaint for Divorce on the Plain-
tiffs attornej and file the original In
the office of the Clark of the Circuit
Court on oi before the 2.MII da) Ol
April, i!";". otherwise. Decree Pro
lollte-so will be .-III. red aKlill^t Voll
Tills notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In The Jewish Eloiiilian.
Dated al Miami, Dade County, Flor-
al, i, this 18th da> of March, IMO.
E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida
(s.al) By. K. M I.VMAN.
Deputy Clerk
MERVVN I. AMES
Attorney for Plaintiff
Ills s W. l-li-t Street
Miami M. Florid. ,/25. 4/1.s.ls
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVEN that
e undersigned, deslrln* to ena buslnesB under the fictitious mme
, ALLIED IMTTSBIR.III WARE
IOU8E *- VAX C" al *13 N.W. 24th
Lvenue. Miami. Fla.. Intenda to rec-
ster aald name with Hie Clerk of the
hlrcult Court of Dad. County, Florida.
ESTHER FLICKER .
J/25. 4/l-S-l.
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERFIBY GIVEN that
-he undersign......leslrlne to enxase In
| :,.|, |hi U. lltloUH 11 I"' Ill
rilllD LIFE PHOTOORAPHBRB at
2".l S.W Mb sh...... Intends to rey-
h'er aald name with Ihe Clerk of the
llrcult Court of Dad. Count v. H...i .<
I' 11 f I. I I' A I M I'.K
Sole i >wner
iENRY Nl IRTi ,N-
I
, Building
NOTICK BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN CHANCERY
Nl. 0C 251
MATILDA I.EMIX,
I'laintlff.
STANDBY I.EMIX.
Defendant. .___
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: STANLEY LF.MIX
p. O. Bo* '-''
Bompton i ..kes. x.w Jersey
Yon STANLEY LBMIN are hereby
notified that a Bill nl Complaint r..r
Divorce has been filed against you.
and you are rei|Uirl to serve
t lour Answer oi Pleading to the Bill
of Complaint on the plaint Iff* At-
Eocney, GOLDMAN A- and file the original Anawer or Plead-
Inv In the office of the Clerk oi the
Circuit Court on or before the -'.Hi
taj ol April, IsM. If >"u fall to do
so." Judgment by default will lie taken
asains. con for the relief demanded in
the Bill of Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four roneecullve weeks
In THE .IEWISII Fl.oRIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED al Miami.
Florida, tin- "n.i day, of March A.D.
: B LEATHERMAN. Cleric,
art. Dade c.unlv. Florida
i Mh P\ M i 's \ alarla.
" D.-pntv fierk
GOLDMAN OOT.DSTEIN
i Fla.
"""" 3/20.4/1-8-1*
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES- COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47897 -C
In Re: ESTATE OF
ALEX .1. MERMAN, a/k/a
ALKC J. HERMAN, a k/a
ABRAHAM .1. HERMAN,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You. and each Of you are hereby no-
tified and required m preaenl any
claims and demands which yon. or
either of you, may have against the
.state of ALEX .1. HERMAN, a k ...
ALEC .1. MERMAN, a/k/a ABRA-
HAM .1. Herman deceased late ..f
Dade County, Florida, to the Honor-
able County .ImlKes of Dad.- Oountv.
and file the sain.- in their offices in
the County CotirthoHs.- in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, within sight calendar
months from me data of the first pubs
licatlon hereof. Said claims or de-
mands to contain the b-Kal address "i
itu- rlaimant and to he sworn to and
Iiresented as aforesaid, or sain.- will
..- barred. See Seclioll 781.11 of the
IMS Probate Act.
Date March U, ad. ihiso.
KITH HERMAN. As Executrix
of the l-ast Will and Testament of
Alex .1. Herman, a'k/a Ale. J,
Herman, a/fc/a Abraham .1. Mer-
man, Deceased.
KOVXER ,v MANXHKIMER
Attorneys for Executrix
S/ti, i/l-s-ir.
NOTICE BY" PUBLICATION"
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 1921 A
DORIS FBINBERG
I'laintlff
HARRY FfiUTBERG
1 ii'i.-ndaut
AMENDED COMPLAINT
FOR ANNULMENT
TO: HARRY FBINBERG
Residence and Address Unknown
You are hereby notified thai a Bill
of Complain! for Annulment hai baon
filed aaainsi yon. and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your Answer or
Pleading lo the Bill of Complaint on
the plaintiffs Attorney, JOSEPH W.
MAI.EK, HIT Lincoln Road. .Miami
Beach, Florida and file the original
Answer oi Pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Courl on or
before the 23th di.i of April. IMO. H
..... fail to fault will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Bill of Com-
plaint.
This nolle- shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH EI.oridiaX.
DONE AND ORDERED u Miami,
Florida, this 13rd da) of March. A.D.
I960.
E. B. LEATHERMAN. Clerk.
circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
laenl) By: R H RICE, JR.,
Deputy Clerk
JOSEPH W MAI.EK
4f>7 I In.oln Road
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for 1'laintjff
3/23. 4/1-8-1S
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLOR'flA IN PROBATE
NO. 49047-C
111 RI-:: F:state of
JOHANNA WOLF,
Dece'i s- --. I
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed, to present any claims and demands
which v.ni rav hive iinlnst the es-
tate of JOHANNA Wol.F deceased
lute of Dade County, Florida, to the
County Judxe* of Dade County, and
file the sume In theli offices in the
county Courthouse iii Dade County;
FMnrlda, within eight calendar months
from the date of ihe first publication
hereof. '" barred.
CAROL W. LEVITT
dJ> i-.\>- illrix.
MARX M l-ADII:
Attorne)
1812 congress Building
Miami 81, Florida
V18-2".. t/1-8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to Bttgagu l!l
business under Hi.- rictltlous name of
DOWNTOWN REAL EWTATE al SOg
Langford Building Intends to register |
said, name Hlth the Clerk of the Cir-
nit Courl of Dad.- CoiinM'. Florida-!
FRANKLIN E PHIPPB
Sole fiwner
4 R-15-IJ-29
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HEREBY GIVEN thai
th.- undersigned, desiring lo engage In
business under ihe fictitious name of
87th WEME LAUNDROMAT at 77
N.W. L'Tlli Awn.,.. Miami. Florida m-
tends i<> reglstet said name with iin-
clerk oi the cin nit Court of Dade
County, Florida
LEONARD B LINCOLN,
Partner
DOROTHY BARRETT.
"."'. Partner
i;ol.D.MAX A: I it ILDSTEI.N
Attorneys for Registranta
2:l Miami. Florida
i n-n-tt-u
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
solicits yottr legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage) and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
BUri Fit .l-MM.?
ior messemger service
LEGAL NOTICK
IN
NOTICE UNDgR
FICTITiOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY OIVEN that
ih- undersigned, deidrint to engage In
THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT Ibusiness nob i the Hetltlous name of
N AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, IN PROBATE
No 49208-C
IX RE: Estate of
BERTHA RAYVIS
I... eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors anil Ail i .-son. Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to preaenl any claims an.i demands
which you may have attains! Ihe es-
tate of BERTHA RAYVIS deceased
late Of DADE County. Florida, to the
County indues of Dad.- County, and
file the same In their offices in the
County Courthouse in Dade County,
\ li Ti ill's BARBER SHI >P al I i
Fifteenth Street, Miami Reach, Flor-
ida Intend to r.-Kisier said n ime with
the Clerk of the Circuit Courl of Dade
County, l-'iorirta.
ANTHONY BELI.l.XO
THERESA BELI.INO
< PREDRIC BROWN
SilT DO Pom BMg., Miami, l-'la
Attorney for Anihony tJMMRO
and Theresa Belliiio.
F/1-V.22-29. :./8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HErtKCV UIVEN that
the undersigned, detdrlsfe to emmae in
business under the fb-titioin* n im> of
Florida, within client calendar moflthhs CORAL WAV CRF.aTIoNS at 8881
from the d:ii. of the first publication Coral Way. Miami. Florida, Intends to
hereof, or the same will he barred.
/a/ A. DAVID RAYVIS
ROBERT V. SHEA
Attorney for Petitioner
888 Miracle Mil-
Coral Qables, Florida
_______________________________4/3-1.-.-22-2*
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 49093-C
IX RE: Estate of
ADOLPH ABRAHAM BPIERER
11,-, eased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
!:.-lai. :
You are hereby notified ami requir-
ed to iM.-s.-nt an.\ claims .not demands
which you may have against th. .--
tal..... ADOLPH ABRAHAM bTPIER-
Elt deceased late of DADE County,
F'lorbla. to iin- County Judges >.f Dade
County, and file the same in tli.ii of-
fices In the Count) Courthouse in
Dude County, Florida, within eight
calendar months from the dale of the
first publication hereof, or th.- same
will lie barred.
HENRY SPIERKR
ARLYNE A 0OCRTNEY
Attorney
M X.W First Street
Miami :::'. Florida
i '8-is-ts-n
register aaUl name vsilh ilie cUrk of
the ClrcuH Court of Dade County,
Florida.
EDITH B.wis
Sole Owner
DONALD I-'. FTtosT
Attornej for Applicant
In.':: .ml-.-Ill Bull.Iin-.:
Miami, Florida
I/I.-.-2J-89, t 1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERICBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, dealring to engage In
bnslTH-ss nnd MACic isi E MOTEL al 18875 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach intends to reg-
ister i cid name wiih ill- <'lerk of the
Circuit Court of Dad.- Connl.v, PI
SARAX ENTERPRISES, INC.
Sole Owner
m \i:x m. PABBR
Al lot ii.-\
1418 Congress BtdsT.
4'l-S-ir.-22
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
METRol'OI.ITAX CREDIT BIREAC
at number ;'"-" Washington Avenue In
the City of Miami Bench, Florida in-
tends to register the an id name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Da led al Miami Reach. Florida this
88th daj of March 1880,
HENRY V'OHL, Owner
I i--.-ir.-22
NOTICE UNoEJi
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
th.- undersigned, desiring to engage i-i
business under the ii. I if i.mie 'miene of
CABLE8-BILTMOBE ACTS, ,i 711
Biiimoi,. Wa.. Coral Oaset's Intends
to register said name with III.- Cl.-rk
of 1 lie iln-uit Curt of I "ade County,
Florida.
Lots i. LOTS. IXC
.1 Fla. I orp.
morris COHEN
Attorne) for Applicant
I C. Mm,1 la Ave,
Coral Gables
I .-C.-22-tf
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN thai
the undersigned, dealrlm: to .-nuai;.- in
k under the fictitious name of
CMIPRINT CO.. at 1841 We-t Avi .
h Intends to register mid
11.mi., with the Clerk of Ins Circuit
Court 0
Cll \KI.ES H HAXSEX
4 i
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN ANO FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE.
No. 48881-C
IX RE: Estate of
MARTHA ill.I.EX BAKER,
I.....a-- .1
N0T.CE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
'inic Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You arc hereb) notified and requir-
ed to pies,-nl :in> claims ami demands
which you mas havs against the es-
tate of MARTHA ill LEX BAKER.
I., eased late of Dade County. Florida,
IN THe COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN PROBATE.
No. 49003-C
IX RE: Estate of
SAM PEL L. HABERMAN, at/a
S. L< ills HABERMAN. ft k a
HAMI'EL l.ol'IS HABERMAN,
a It a HAMI'EL HABERMAN
11-< .-a aed.
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
To All Credilors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Agalnsl Said
i:.-iai.
re herenj notified and requir-
ed to preaenl an> claims and demands
wbii-h von may have agalnsl the es-
tate of SAMUEL I. HABERMAN,
a k .1 s Em is 11 \r.i:i:\i \s u k *
KAMCEL l.ol'IS HABF:RMA.N, s I.
SAMl'EL HABERMAN deceased late
of Dade County, Florida, to the i'oun-
ty .Indues of Dad.- Count)-, and file
tin- same In tnelr offices in Ihe County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
10 the Count) Judges of Dad.. County, "'"",", ">", :'u"';1 '" |1;""'1'- /f""'
and fib- the Mi...- In their offices iii Ibe date of the first publication here-
the Count)- Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty, F'loihia. within eight calendar
months from tiie date of the first
publications hereof, or the same will
in- barred.
ADBLE BAKER ROBIRON,
Administratrix of the Bstate of
Martha Ciill.n Baker, deceased
OOLDMAN & Col.DSTEIN
Attorn.-v
W I1.i..-I.r Sireet
Miami, Florida
4/l-S-i:.-2f!
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREHY GIVEN thst
the undersigned, desiring to envatce in
business under the flctitioua names of
BEAUX ARTS HOTEL and BEAUX'
ARTS APARTMENTS at number S0O0
West Drive in the City of North Bay
Village, Florida Intends to register the
sal.l name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
ORANOE I.IFF: COM*., Fla. oorp,
by: William Prav.r. ITesldenl
4/l-8-i:.-22
if. or the same a III '.- bs i red.
KATE HABERMAN
Administratrix
Nil \l-n:o and FRIED, Bsqo.
Attorne) s
188 Lincoln RoadSuite SIS
Miami Beach 88, Florida
4/1-8-15-88
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVI'.X thst
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the flctltl.iu- name Of
BINDER'S AUTOMATIC TRANSMIS-
SION SERVIOK CENTER al l:::::'.-:::.
North W.st I'Mli Street. Miami. Flor-
ida Intend to renister said name with
the Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ROBERT CHERRNAY,
."." I'artner
PAULINE BINOER,
:.n* partner
nOLDM \X nOI.DBTEIN
Attorn.) s frn- Reglatmnt
JSdg West FTagler Street
Mia nil, Florida
4 s-15-22-89
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
ronfOHtriov orriits
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
II 3-4695


P +Jmist)thr**Mi
Friday. April 15. 1
21-Man Body to Control UJA Funds
frsjea Pa
1 A
Dedication ceremonies for the Tonya Simon Memorial Garden
were held at the 15th annual meeting of the Jewish Home for
the Aged on Sunday. Left to right are Judge Irving Cypen.
president of the Home, and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Resr.ick. Some
400 persons attended the meeting.
Free Ride for Parochials
ALBANY. N Y. 'JTA> A
bill to provide free bus transporta-
tion for private and parochial
FOSTER ELECTRIC
COMPANY, INC
Electrical Contractors
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS
MAINTENANCE
PAUL FOSTEt, aresiWeaf
AIR CONDITIONING and
ADEQUATE WIRING
2244 W. FLAGlf.lt ST. HI S 2471
Night*. Sundays A Holidays Dial
Nl 3-0*22
fOt BITTft HI ALT H VISIT TMF
MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE
Physical Therapy Body Ceatfitieniaa,
General Diaf aosis ana X Jay
Celank Irrif otient
I Cs'mri and Massage
Ultra Senic Therapy
7235 Biscayne Blvd.
PHONE PI 7-7234
vhool pupils in Ne* York State, j
I hich v. ould benefit Jewish pa-
rochial schools, has been passed j
by the State Senate.
The bill provides that the free;
bus service must be furnished by
local school boards for alt pupil-
living within a ten-mile distance
from parochial and private schools, i
Until now, the local school
boards hava not been required to
furnish such free traval for pu-
pils beyond a limit of eight miles.
The bill was passod by a veto
of l5- with all negative votes
cast by Republicans.
Under present legislation, a lo-
cal school board may provide such
free bus service. But. where the
local board refuses to do so. the
board may be overruled by the
State Commissioner of Education
who. it is known, frequently does
so.
One of the questions involved is
whether the bill might infringe on
the constitutional guarantee of sep-
aration of church and state. In the
Senate debate on the bill, however,
that issue was not raised. The op-
ponents criticized the measure only
on the grounds that it would in-
crease educational costs in New
York State by about $3,000,000.
distance to immigrants already in
Israel and iee such new immigrants
as can be anticipated.
The board of directors will enter
detailed agreement with the Jewish
Agency for Israel in Jerusalem and
will designate the latter as its agent
to perform the necessary services
:o implement :he programs and
ictmties approved and specified
in the budget by the board.
With the aid of funds received
from Jewish communities of the
free world, principally through
the UJA. the Jewish Agency for
Israel has borne the responsibil-
ity of bringing to, caring for, and
resettling in Israel nearly one
million Jewish refugees since
World War II.
Dr Dov Joseph, treasurer of the
lewish Agency for Israel, came es-
pecially from Jerusalem to attend
,n a!l^a> meeting of the 21 board
members-designate convened by
i Stone, national chairman of the
1171.1 He p .sented a detailed analy-
is of the budget and program of
work of the Jewish Agency in Is-
rael for the year 196061.
The following have been invited
o serve as members of the board
>f direc'ors: Morris W. Berinstein.
New York City: Rabbi I-idore
Breslau. Washington. DC; Samuel
EL Daroff. Philadelphia: Melvin
Dubinsky. St. Louis; Max M Ki-h
er. Detroit: Dr. Israel Goldstein.
New York City: Dr. Nahum GoM-
mann. New York City: Abraham
Goodman. New York City; Dr. Dov
Joseph. Jerusalem: Mrs Rose I.
Halprin. New York City
Also, Rabbi Mordecai Kirshbium.
Brooklyn. Philip M Klutrruck, Chi-
cago: Albert A. Levin. Cleveland:
Joseph M Mazer. New York City:
Joseph Myerboff Baltimore: Dr.
Emar.u?! Neumann. New York
City: Louis Segal. New York City:
Philip Stollman. Detroit: Dewey D.
Stone. Brockton. Mass : Ralph
Wtchsler. Newark. N.J Jack D.
Wetter, New York City.
All tho>e invited lo serve as di-
rectors, except Dr Joseph, are citi-
zens and residents of the United
Stales. An early meeting of the
board of directors of the CIA is
being convened shortly to take the
necessary formal action to imple-
ment this agreement. The Jewish
Ager.cy for Israel has already ap-
pro\eJ the agreement.
Woman Attorney
Named to Board
Dons E. Weinstein. attorney and
member of the Miami Beach and
St. Augustine law firm of Wein-
stein and Weinstein. has been ap-
pointed to the City of Miami Beach
public relations advisory board, it
was announced last week at a City
Council meeting.
Miss Weinstein. listed in "Who's
Who of American Women." is a
graduate of Sophie Newcomb Col-
lege and the University of Miami
law school. She is secretary' of the
Miami Beach Bar Assn.. secretary
of the Miami Beach Democratic
executive committee, attorney for
and member of the Dade County
Democratic executive committee,
member of the Florida Bar and
Florida Assn. of Women Lawyer-.
jnd the League of Women Voter-
ENJOY PURE JET
SERVICE FROM MIAMI
TO TEL AVIV
Finest, list tessfarlahli way is
travel! Fly 707 Insertontinswul
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l.SOCMLIIE
01
the
ovnan s
'World
It was a fiftieth birthday party in honor of
John Bitter at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
DuBois, 6915 Camaron ave., Coral Gables.. Mr.
Bitter is dean of the music school at the Uni-
versity of Miami Mr. DuBois is concertmas-
ter for the university's symphony orchestra and
a noted violinist Guests included Bitters
lovely wife, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Fisher, Dr. and Mrs. Joel Belov,
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Bush, and Dr. and Mrs. William Spielberg...
A sugar-coated "Happy Birthday" decorated the lovely cake ...
The Bernard R. Firestones said goodbye to daughter Esther
and pi)' her on the plane to join her husband, Martin, in Caracas ..
She tock Jaker along, their Italian Grayhound Martin heads
the foi'ign department of Anuncia Publicida, a press service ... In
the fiv e weeks he's been there. Martin has managed to find an
apartment That's pretty good hunting tor those who know
the area .
Marvin and Barbara Brown off for New York to attend the
Bar Mitzvah of their nephew, Jeffrey Brenner, with eleven days
of family parties and exciting events planned ... On arrival, Bar-
bara.1 sister sadly announced the Bar Mitzvah had been post-
poned until September Jeffrey came down with the measles.

Boa Voyage Sunday at a cocktail party and buffet dinner host-
ed b> Mrs. Jennie Grossinger at her home in honor of Mrs. Mar-
garet Newman Steam, Mrs. Harry Rosenblatt, Mrs. Florence Kup-
perrr.an, and Miss Reba Gershman, all members of ORT, who are
leaving for Europe to visit ORT schools throughout the continent...
Leslie Gross. 15-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard C. Gross,
6080 BW 62nd ter., recently won his fourth consecutive Miami Her-
ald-spirsored spelling bee championship ... A junior at Coral
Gable: High, he was presented with a trophy in ceremonies at the
Colurrtus hotel Leslie is president of the National Honor So-
ciety at Gables High and secretary of Hillel AZA Completing
the proud family are Michael, 12, and Nicki, 6V4 .
Frank M. (Cassie) Fulton, 3624 Collins ave., popular host-
ess about town, tendered a luncheon for 200 friends at the Algiers
[hotel Guests included those from Ft. Lauderdale, Hollywood,
Coral Gables. Miami, and Miami Beach High Cassie is founder
president of the Women's Ideal Club of Chicago, her former rei-
I dent i.
>
Erica Morini, internationally-renowned violinist, guest of honor
. a party at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Sanel (Lisl) Beer, following
Jlisi Morini's recital at Dade County Auditorium Guests in-
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Gannon he's president of the
ammii'Hty Concerts Assn. Dr. and Mrs. Mark Cirlin, Mrs. Dor-
;hy Alpert. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mandell, Mrs. Albert Pick, Bob
risk in, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Whitehouse he's honorary Consul
J Aubiria here Ernest Silverman, Mrs. Helene Wolfe, Herman
Jindi-r. Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, and Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cassel.. .
}r. Beer recalls the days when he saw Miss Morini as a child living
cross the street from him in Vienna .
Homing friends from New York and Hollywood at Maxim s
were Anita Priest Satter, 833 W. 39th st.. and Anne P. Reiser. 820
15th st. The group also caught shows at the Eden Roc and
Fontainebleau ... ,
The George Bachers, of Bay Heights, and their three young
[sters making July plans, including a flying trip to California and
land Disneyland .
Mr and Mrs. Eugene Austrach. of New York, houseguests of
IMr. and Mrs. Irving Kossoff, 4444 N. Meridian ave The ladies
I are sisters .
Charles "Chuck" Goldberg, managing director of the Delano
hotel 1 rst person to hold down these two important posts at the
same time: chairmanship of the public relations advisory board
of the City of Miami Beach and chairmanship of the hotel division
I of the Chamber of Commerce.

P-erre Mande, noted violinist and music teacher, of 2485 Trapp
ave Coconut Grove, off for an extended visit with his brothers
in Israel ... He hasn't seen them in 23 years Pierre will
[visit Paris on the way, to attend a reunion of teachers from the
Iworld renowned Paris Conservatory of Music ...
Pre-nuptial luncheon tendered by Mrs. Norman Hesser of
IChicago, at the "Algiers-hotel on Apr. 9 for Miss Fran Topf, 3925
[Riviera dr.. Coral Gables, and her fiance. Barry Hesser. son of
the hostess and Mr. Hesser Both are U of M students, where
[they met .Planned is a June 18 wedding .
Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Roscnthai, of Venetian Way in New
[York, where Gertrude is confined as a patient at Mt. Sinai Hos-
Vfiiree-month visit going into its fifth month for Mrs. Aranka
Cemenv of San Diago, Chile She's visiting her son Emery,
l.ndTue Cete and having the best time with her grandchildren,
Sot and Nina for the first time Another ^.^* "ftJJ
[whom she hasn't seen in 13 years, came from M.Ian. Italy, to say
Ihello.
K
One day the temperature was 80 the next 38 Mrs^ Sol-
pmon Margol.s glad to be back from Philadelphia ^e" she at-
C1_jj ii... Ran Miirvnh of her cousin s son, Mavne J. Lustman .
fe Mahrego." a" oTaVa Yamf.y reunion with her brother Albert
"ho drove down from Boston with his wife. Phyliss. and the.r six
children ... ,,
Card from Mrs Robert (Helene) Lewin postmarked Venice
tomplaning about "no time to sleep" And. Mrs. Sara Holland
Eds home to Neponsit, L.I.. after spending a quiet three months
hprp
Mr' and Mrs. Philip B. Padawer were in Israel when they dis-
Covered they were going to be parents for the first time The
KivaJ of their son made Mrs. Anne Padawer a grandmother and
*/r mother Mrs Sarah Starr, a great-grandmother ... The baby
; named Ari El.
, **
Lvnne Margolies sweet sixteen Apr. 9 and honored at lunch-
^ artv t the Aleiers by her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Sol Mar-
tS.S.% cX^l W- friend. Abby Rosofsky. U of M
Student, was among the 20 guests ...
It was a 25th wedding anniversary celebration for Mr. and
Jr.. Jack Katzman at the Deauville on Apr. 9 ... Mr. and Mrs.
Continued on Po 13-
"cJewisli Floridian
Miami. Florida, Friday. April 15, 1960
Section B
Mrs. Lillian Holofcener (left), membership vice to right are Mesdames Mannie Mintus. Ste-
president of Miami Beach chapter of Hadas- phen S. Wise group; David Davis, Emma Laz-
sah, present awards for largest percentage in- arus group; and Max Cohen, new South Gate
creases at a membership award luncheon of Group. J
the chapter recently at the Algiers hotel. Left
Brandeis Women
Join in Plans
For 12th Anniv.
Greater Miami chapter of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, is taking a
leading role in spearheading prep-
arations for the 12th anniversary
dinner of the university on Sun-
day evening, Apr. 24, at the Diplo-
mat hotel.
Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs, president,
has been joined by past presidents
Mrs. Sidney Schwartz and Mrs.
Harold Turk in making plans for
the black tie affair.
Co-sponsor is the Brandeis Vn-
iversity Club of Greater Miami,
with Dr. Stanley Frehling as pres-
ident.
Serving on the hostesses commit-
tee, headed by Mrs. Jerome Rado,
are the Mesdames Abe L. Cassett,
Joseph Duntov, Robert Ellis, Jack
Esformes, Stanley Frehling, Ben
Zion Ginsburg, Charles Goldberg,
Paul R. Gordon, Max E. Gottlieb,
Nathan Gumenick, Samuel Hal-
perin, Seymour Heller, Leon Ja-
cobs, Ernest Janis, Solomon Mar-
golis, Wm. Maxwell, David Phil-
lips, Jack W. Rabinovitch, Sidney
Schwartz, Morris Summer, Harold
Thurman, Harold Turk, Carl Wein-
kle. and Maurice Zimmerman.
In charge of arrangements for
the affair are Mesdames Ellis Am-
dur, Rudy Baum, Cecilia Elliott,
Aaron Farr, Leo Fishbein, Benja-
min Gladwin, Robert Green, Rob-
ert Grossman, Samuel Kling,
George Levenson, Betty Oberstew,
Harry Orleans, Max Resnick, Wil-
liam Rubenstein. Donald Rubin,
Rebecca F. Snetman, Herbert So-
bel, Max Stadler, and Bernard
Troub.
The Miami chapter of Brandeis
Women has over 800 members,
while the National Women's Com-
mittee has a membership of more
than 70.000.
t
the chapter's fund raising chair-
men, Mrs. Sidney Finger, Bis-
cayne chapter; Mrs. Eva Blum,
Louise Wise chapter; and Mrs.
Russell Winer, Miami chapter.
g _.'*<*"
Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs (center), president of the Greater Miami
chapter, Brandeis University National Women's Committee,
joins hands with two past president of the chapter, Mrs. Sidney
Schwartz (left) and Mrs. Harold Turk, in spearheading prepara-
tions for the women's participation in the university's 12th
anniversary dinner.
To /nsfolf Mrs. Eflcia
Mrs. Edward Elkin will be in-
stalled as president of Bikur Cho-
lim Kosher Convalescent Home
Wednesday noon at t h e Algiers
hotel. Installing Mrs. Elkin for her
third term in ofice will be Mrs.
Victoria Roe. director of the home.
TV Stars Due
At Beth Emeth
Once again. Beth Emeth Sister-
hood is sponsoring its annual "Fun
Day" on Sunday, Apr. 24, for the
children of Beth Emeth School.
Television stars Mary Jane and
Melvin, and Herb Bass, of WCKT.
will be featured on the program.
Also present will be Mr. McVey
(Chips and Salty) of the Popeye
Playhouse on WTJV. along with
Richard Leone, known as Mr.
Clown.
The program wilT in addition in-
clude George Gates, Tumbler and
Miss Janice Carron, puppeteer.
Spring Donor
Lunch Wednesday
Annual spring donor lunch of the
Florida Women's Division of the
American Jewish Congress will
take place at noon Wednesday in
the Rosewood room of the Fon-
tainebleau hotel. Highlight of the
day will be the awarding of a
United States Government Bond.
Ben Essen, local attorney and
featured guest, will present an il-
lustrated discussion on the works
of Sholom Aleichem.
A fashion show by the House of
Paul Freed will have, in addition
to professional models, the parti-
cipants of members of Congress.
Mrs. Willian Nelson will be ac-
companist. Mrs. Anna White, for-
merly of Boston, will sing. Mrs.
Benjamin Kamen, national Wom-
en's Division vice president, will
be chairman of the day.
Mrs. Harold Jaffer, Program
Chairman, is in charge of arrange-
ment*. Guestt of honor will be


Page 2-B
-Jemist Heritor
Friday. April 15. i960
'Bond Voyage'
For Pioneer
Women Workers
Two Pioneer Women members
and workers will be banneed at a
Bond Voyage" and sapper snack
oa Saturday Apr 30. in the B -
carne Terrace hotel-
Mr. Ida Bookpaa aad Mr*
1 E Geadmaa will receive Wo
en o: Valor Awards. Guest speak-
er will be the aaUooai president
of the Pioneer Women Organ.zt
t.on. Mrs. CTara Left.
The occasion will also mark the
departure for Israel of Mrs Book-
spaa Mr- Bookpan was the
award winner of a free tnp to Is-
rael at a French Israel fashion
show last October sponsored by
the Waif's Division for State of
Israel Bonds. The round tnp to Is-
rael mil be via Air France to Par-
hen via El Al Air Lines to Tel
Aviv
Members oi the Labor Zionist
Organization ib Greater Miami are
expected to turn oat in force to
pay 'nbute to Mr- Bookspan and
Mrs Goldman on the occasion of
their award- as Women of Valor.
The Woman of Valor Award is
the highest presentation which the
Women's Division for State of Is-
rael Bonds can present to a work-
er It is given to women who have
bought or sold a minimum of
$100 00* in Israel Bonds.
Co-chairman of the supper snack
and "Bond Voyage" will be Mrv
Harriet Green and Dr Simon Wil
en.-ky.
In addition to the presentation
oi Women of Valor Awards to Mr-
Book-pan and Mrs. Goldman,
members of the Pioneer Women's
"realization who have earned
(hen Awards will also be h->n-
o.ed
The present it.on of awards to
Ma. Bookspan and Mrs. Goldman
will be in recognition of their "un
tinng and selfless efforts on behalf
of Israel and the Israel Bond cam
paign." Since the inception of the
Urael Bond program ten years
Representatives Named to Ch. 10
Mrs. Larry Fnedland and Mrs. sentation each week on WPST
Gerald Soft! have been named rep- Mrs. Fnedland and Mrs. Solti
resentative* to the WPST. ch 10 are active with Federation and ia j
Community Council, it has been an-' the Combined Jewish Appeal
nownced by Mrs Jean C. Lehman,
president of the Federation of Jew-
ish Women's Organizations.
They will confer with represent-
atives of other women's service
groups on tb* select-on of com-
mumty serrice program- for pre-
New and delicious!
Mrs. Ida Bookspan icenier, is seen with hostesses of Air France
and ? Al Air Lines when she received the award of a free
round trip to Paris and Israel.
Pioneer Women Set Jerusalem Conclave
UUlLNO
KOSHER
NEW YORK The annual na-
tional board meet.ng of Pioneer
Women the Women's Labor Zion-
ist Organization of America, has
called upon its 3S.O0O members in
all sections of the United States
to attend a special conclave to be
ponored by the Organization in
Jerusalem next October.
At the closing session of the two-
day meeting in the Sutler Hilton
hotel, the national board of Pio-
neer Women summoned the Jerus-
alem conclave for the double pur-
\j- -f 111 enabling our member-
ship to evaluate the accomplish
men:- of our social welfare and
educational projects in Israel in
the past and to blueprint program
readjustment for the future, and
<2> to launch the worldwide cele-
FREE
A stimulating guide
for youngiteri and
sdulison the custom*,
tradi- ions and obterv*
of Judaism. '
ago Mrs Bookspan and Mrs. Gold-
man have been at the forefront of
activitieN on behalf of bonds in
Greater Miami.
'YOU* JEWISH
HERITAGE
b primed ia Fnrjidi-an
inspiring booklet for
every home aad every-
one it.
fOt ntli COPY. Mad rt-
quesi lo: Ray Keafor.
Krifi Food* Coapan). *
Park Atcoue, New Vodt
1W.N.V.
oration of the 3Sth anniversary of
Pioneer Women."
Founded in October. 1325. Pio-
neer Women spends more than
Si Quo 000 annually en a many fac
eted program of health, education
and vocational training for women
and children in Israel.
Mrs. Clara Lelf. of Brooklyn.
V V national president of Pio-
neer Women, announced that ar
rangements were near completion
to transport members of the or-
ganization to the Israel confer
ence next Fail She estimated that
upwards of 1.000 members would
make the trip.
The board voted al-o to author
ize an immediate transmission of
$100,000 In Pioneer Women in-ti
unions in I-rael to assure a hap
p:er and more meaningful Pass-
over observance for the m a n >
thousands of women and children
who benefit from our program "
SLICED
PASTRAMI
: k to* watch TV enje* the
> natty flaw of Sams for*
cheese Great *er snacks ma aackers
and trait 6 haadyrii open' mtHfo.
TM( OMCMUi
Swiss
..Knight*
FRESHLY SLICED
r.KCLIM PACKED!
BEIDY TO SERVE

m Suganne
Ask for All
VVILNO Kosher PRODUCTS
Corned Beef, Pastrami,
Salami, Bologna,
Krispir Frankfurters
t rooe stows
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
t
I
I
I
I
I
0-
KOSHER ZI0N
*% KHU 9Uf n$997S
nrnntt tar
IrVEl SAUSSCE
nUMFNTOtt
PUTMUM
mi ecu
A
1TIUMM KUCaTBSKS. StntMUtm I ItsTMVMn
KOSHER ZI0N
SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
159 See* Water Market, Chicsf. t, Hliaeit
Kahaner Women
Plan Carnival
Apr. 23 is the date of the an-
nual Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood
carnival, with all funds going to
the building fund campaign of
Congregation Monticello Park.
There will be games, auctions,
refreshments, and booths. This is
Sisterhood's largest fund raising
affair of the year.
The congregation is now en-
caged in Ms final campaign to raise
$70,000 in 70 days, enabling it to
complete a new synagogue and
.school building. The sanctuary i
now under construction and will be
completed by Sep. 1.
STEVENS
MARKETS
FEATURES
WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicoeo)
MIAMI MAMCM
2111 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Fhone Ft 1-6551
wuowHrrETUW
7 Ox.
CAN
39
/
ry
1F*19
exciuSive oisreisutots roe hcmuoa
COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. INC.
ess a scayne street Miami *cach
PHONES JS Jf S-4231
4CRMAN PEARL AT
OEAMM
e
In Miami it's
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
ft Home Deliterf
Phone- FR 4-2*21
Tho freer naaae in da*>y preen
FRANK J. HOLT, Manage*
CHICKEN Of THE SEA REFRIGERATOR SALAD
report a small package of lemon or hme flavored geUtin
atfda Family Sue can of Chicken of the Sea brand tuna and'
P*em> of chopped nuts and eatery for crunch. Its fancy
eoufhfoir luncheon guests and thrifty as can be! Serve with
hot buttered biscuits, for a supper surprise tonight'
C A*-*** of Ik* Sea, P.O. Box 2111. Long Brock 1.1Wi/ernie.
X
TUNA COSTS
so urne...
it ntrs
to buy me
aesT-me aw/ate
nuer tuma.' wnr
ssrne rox ussf


Friday. April 15, 1960
'Jewlstif/crkttann
Page 3-B
Book Review
Series Closes
To celebrate his 97th birthday,
Barnett Hart, father of Moss Hart,
famous playwright and director of
the AmericanTheatre, will be
guest of honor at the closing lunch-
eon of the book review scries spon-
sored by the Miami Hyath chapter
of Hadassah.
Mrs. I. M. Weinstcin will review
his son's best seller, "Act I."
After spending his winters here
for the past 25 years, the senior
Hart became a permanent Miami
Beach resident six years ago.
Mrs. Philip F. Thau is general
chairman of the book review se-
ries. The concluding function will
be Wednesday noon at the Algiers
hotel.
Mrs. Charles Gertler (right), president of Deborah group of
Hadassah, and Mrs. Milton Steinhardt at a recent "Eye Bank"
parly, at which Mrs. Steinhardt acted as hostess. "Gay Spring
and Good Health" highlighted the affair as theme.
Dade PTA Will Elect Officers
Election of officers will be held
[ at the PTA county-wide meeting
I of the Dade County Council ot Par-
lent Teacher Assns. on Wednes-
day at Miami Springs Junior High
iSchool, 150 S. Royal Poincianna
|blvd., Miami Springs.
The meeting will begin at 10
la m., and will be the last County
|Ceuncil meeting before installation
new officers. Mrs. William P.
jCooke. Council president, will con-
duct the business portion of the
netting.
Mrs. Alfred D. Barbieri, chair-
ia:i of the nominatin" committee,
fill present the new slate of offi-
rs to be elected.
In keeping with Council's theme
this month, 'The ChilJ and-Cul-
tural Opportunities," there will be
an art display of the works of stu-
duents under the direction of Wil-
liam B. Duncan, Council's art ed-
ucation chairman. Southwest Mi-'
ami Senior High School, under the
direction of English teacher, Mrs.
J. Riley Staats, will display poe-
try and creative writing by the
journalism class.
Dr. Kenneth Williams, who was
appointed by the school board as
president of Dade county's new
Junior College to open in Septem-
ber, will talk about the organiza-
tion and program of the new Dade
school
m&MM Candidates lor scnooi noard will be introduced. They have been invited to mingle with PTA mem-
SHOCPNG> bers socially during the viewing

Ljlwayslook for thr of the art works.
z^"7 (y) Principals and PTA presidents of Area 13 and 14, the Southwest sections, will be recognized.
Beth Sholom Sets
Spring Luncheon
Sisterhood and PTA of Temple
Beth Sholom of Miami Beach will
join forces to sponsor a spring
luncheon and fashion show
Wednesday noon in the Sisterhood
Lounge of the Temple, according
to a joint announcement by Mrs.
Howard H. Miller, Sisterhood pres-
ident, and Mrs. Samuel Hirsch,
PTA president.
In charge of arrangements are
program chairmen, Mrs. Murray
Gilden and Mrs. Charles P. Fein-
berg; chairmen of thte day, Mrs.
Inez M. Krensky and Mrs. Robert
Goodman; ticket chairmen, Mrs.
Leon J. Ell, Mrs. Irving Rothman
and Mrs. Marvin Cooper.
The fashion show is being pro-
vided by Burdine's, and spring,
and summer fashions will be mod-
eled. The luncheon is in charge of
a committee headed by Mrs. Hy-
man Goldstein, Mrs. Morris Lipp
and Mrs. Eugene Weine. Proceeds
will be used for the subsidy fund
of the Beth Sholom religious
school. The new slate of Sister-
hood's officers and directors for
the coming year will also be pre-
sented at this function.
4\
FAVORED in DADE
Outstanding in all Florida!
&>
M*

\*

i Repo'ttd By Rollins
Coitcn Poll For Ptriod
(nomg Much Jl


"
,<>

(1

' &2SV&


Holiday Greetings .
JEFFERSON
STORES
MIAMI
FT. LAUDERDAIE
WEST PALM BEACH
Consult Your Phone
Directory for the
Store Nearest You
ll*-C
FOR AN EVEN BETTER FLORIDA
joHNificCARTYGovernor
Governor
IM. I-ill. Adv.
i noa) ini3
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
Certified by Rabbi Jacob Cohan
'-* -----------------
TITIEY TEA
IN A GLASS
That's the fine old Jewish way to
enjoy tea at its finest...Tetley Tea...
richer in taste... served in a glass or cup
1837
COUNTY
COMMISSION
DISTRICT 4
LEVER 7-H
vofe for
WYNNE
Ror.xn TRIP
TICKET
TO I AHi:-I UFK
sr>f>ii:e( liviu
12.95
ulMoriutxctisji
Summer white with the print of fresh
flowers. Our Shelton Stroller is light as
a floating cloud in Du Pont* nylon jersey,
never shows a wrinkle, feels cool, travels
smoothly. Washable, it drip-dries, needs
no ironing. Blue, mint, grey and brown;
10-18, 12V2-22V2. Daytime Casuals, sec-
ond floor miami. At all five Burdine's
stores. EASY AS ABC ... to shop on our
Adjustable Burdine's Credit plan. Call
Telephone Ordering Service, FR 3-1111
and s*y, "charge itl"
BTJ'FUDTTnITS'S

" ........


Page 4-B
vJewisti rhrktian
Friday. April 15. 1960
JtwUk Floridian Exclusive
Yorni M
C
ARRIAGE COUNSELOR
. ttf t^antiiel \~y. K^J\.lin^
Miami's 'Nation ally Famol's MXRttAdtr'CoLN-i i 'n and"Aliho
A second criterion of emotional maturity in mar-
riage is the ability to be independent.
Stilted another way. a husband or wife is depen-
dent when he or she is unable to arrive at decisions
without the help or support of another.
The husband who must consult a doien friends
before arriving at a decision as to whether he >hould
remain in his job or open a new business venture is
obviously as dependent on outside help as a child is
on its mother. He has not yet arrived at that state
of grace where he has freed himself from childish
feelings of dependency.
Tied to his mother's apron strings, he has
merely displaced or transferred his feelings of de-
pendency to others. His thinking is not his own. Nor
is his behavior. Whatever he does or says is a carry-
over from childhood, when he was encouraged to be
dependent on others, especially his parents, for what-
ever decisions he made.
The husband who is dependent on others is
plainly immature. His approach to life is timid and
hesitant. He lacks boldness and imagination, virility
and aggressiveness, and he tends to be endlessly
confused and in conflict wth himself and with society
Because he is dependent, he tends to be insecure and
to feel inferior. He lacks confidnce and faith in him-
self and in his judgement, and his prowess both as
a man and as a father leaves a great deal to be de-
sired.
Making Decisions
He is forever consulting his mother or his wife
or his friends about even the most trivial decisions.
If he takes one tentative step forward, he is likely
to take two timid steps backward. He is a-follower,
not a leader, and his ranks are to be found in the
armed forces and wherever else men do not have to
make decisions for themselves. Such husbands make
perfect Caspar Milquetoasts, for they are as depen-
dent on their wives as they once were dependent on
their mothers.
Stated positively, to be independent means the
ability to make decisions without the help of others.
It means that the husband is not dominated or ruled
by another, whether it is his mother or his wife. It
means that the individual is "free" psychologically
and emotionally.
This doesn't mean that the independent individ-
ml never seeks advice from others. He does. Faced
with a momentous business decision, the independent
minded person obtains all the facts bearing on his
special problem. But once having those facts, he
arrives at his own, independent decision. He may (
and often does consult "experts" for their views. But
having consulted them, he uses his own sound judg-
ment to arrive at conclusions basically his own.
If he is married, he does not run home to mother ,
whenever he is faced with a domestic crisis. Instead,
he faces up to reality by trying to solve, as best he
can. whatever problems he is confronted with. Ob-
viously he will not be able to solve all problems sue- >
fWilfully, whether in business or in marriage. But!
he will do the best he can. relying on his own intelli-
gence and judgment of others.
Sens* of Responsibility
To be independent means to be unfettered and
unlrammeled And it is one of the most difficult
thinps in life to achieve.
Indeed, most of u> from childhood on are trained
to be dependent on our mothers and fathers for our
every which, and immature parents often encourage i
such feelings of helplessness. The spoiled child is a ,
classic example of this. Because he is spoiled and
babied and pampered he soon gets the panicy feeling
that whenever he li helpless someone is going to
come to his rescue. He loses a sense of responsibil-
ity, and comes to rely more and more on others for
guidance.
If he marries, his wife becomes a crutch upon
whom he leans; or if he is adult and unmarried,
there is an abnormal attachment to his mother who
encouraged such feelings in the first place. He is,
in abort, the perpetual baby who has never grown
up and he remains, unless he gets expert help, a
perpetual trial to his wife, friends and relatives.
Mr. Klinm. h nailabl far frit air marrimgt counie/iitf
fht Hu*timatm medical mldg., in Miami
Sugarine Sweeter Than Sugar
The new spring and summer
fashions are in, and every one of
the^ designers stresses the pencil-
slim, slender line. Don't be dis-
couraged when you try on these
new styles.
Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood
Temple Adath Yeshurun Sister-
hood will hold its monthly meeting
Wednesday evening at Howard
Johnsons Motor Lodge. 16500 NW
2nd ave. Mrs. C. Leibel. handwrit-
ing analyst, will be guest speaker.
Helping fight the "battle of the
bulge" is Sugarine, a no calorie
liquid sweetener. It's actually
sweeter than sugar, comes in a
concentrated form, yet without
any crtificial taste. Best of all, it
has absolutely no food value.
Its thrifty, too. when a 4 oz.
bottle will sweeten more than 700
cups of coffee or tea. It takes only
one teaspoon to equal l' of sug-
ar, and a tablespoon is the equiv-
alent of a cupful of sugar. You can
measure it by the drop from a
handy shaker top bottle.
On cereal or fruit, in desserts
and for cooking, it gives you
sweetness nothing more. Sug-
arine is recommended by doctors
for diabetics, overweights, and
low calorie diets. It is perfectly
harmless safe for children or
grown-ups.
So stop taking the "calorie
count" when your sweet tooth
gets the best of you. Your life can
be tweeter and your figure neater
when you use this new concen-
trated sweetener. Sugarine i-
available at food and drug si
everywhere. S. T.
Karl Shapiro Heads List
NEW YORKPulitzer-prize win-
ner Karl Shapiro heads a distin-
'ied list of American writers
whose contributions will appear in
the forthcoming Passover issue of
I the national magazine of American
'Judaism, official publication of the
liiion of American Hebrew Congre-
1 HaUon* Jiyjiro .mill he. W**4P'
ted by "The Jewish Writer in
America," a special articl exam-
ining the attitudes of Jewish au-
thors in this country to their iden-
! tity as Jews and as Americans.
Morris N. Broad, executive
vice president and director of
American Savings and Loan
Assn., was elected to the
board of directors of the Flor-
ida National Bank at Belle
Glade. Broad, in addition to
his posts at American Sav-
ings, is president of Best In-
surance Agency and Amer-
ican Mortgage and Safe De-
posit Co., both of Miami
Beach.
Re-Elect |
JUDGE |
BEN C. WILIARD ?
To Tke ?
, Criminal Court of Record X
Where Justice ?
Is Never Blind" ?
PULL LEVER 42-C
Pld Politic*! AdT
Have that
Business Meeting.
Banquet, or
Special Occ
f
#
f
|
slon j
You'll find complete
facilities to exoctly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it fcr a
wedding or a private party!
It th
tor llormtlont
HAZEL ALLISON
CaMrlng Dircto-
JE 1-6061
eanti St. s, coiiins <*.
CATERING...IN THE ROYAL MANNER
FOB
THAT VERT
SPECIAL FUNCTION
LEAVE IT TO
C* UN 6-7792
HOTIl POOL
BALMORAL'
:.-. ciui
KvJ fcw ^
Wm BBBW^^BBI
OCEAN AT 9Btb STREET BAL HARBOUR MIAMI BEACH
LJour v/Miji/i'ry is *_/rioW C_^ or /u>//y
\JitvileJ with reqards
to
WEDDINGS BANQUETS
CONFIRMATIONS
and all Social Functions
HOTEL
R.S.V P.: Mr Henri Groen
JE 8-0811 criiu...M
400 Ft. Oceanfront at Lincoln Rd. ~SZ.


Friday. April 15. 1960
+Jew 1st meridian
Page 5-B
[ 1
1 1 SI
^
Sinai Auxiliary Plans Tours Through Hospital
"The hostess with the mostest," Mrs. Irving Miller (right) re-
ceives award as the most fashionably dressed person at the
fur ond diamond show held last week under the auspices of
the Women's Division for State of Israel Bonds. The show was
held at Mrs. Miller's home on Sunset Isle 3. A panel of judges,
consisting of the leading fashion authorities in Greater Miami,
selected Mrs. Miller as the person most fashionably dressed at
the event. Judges included Mr. Wyatt, (above) who served as
chairman, and Miss Edith Applebaum, fashion editor of The
Jewish Floridian.
Pioneer Women Honors Member
Mrs. Ida Jacob Liftman, pres-
ident of Pioneer Women's Club II,
announced this week that the club
will honor Mrs. Louis Marcus at
the home of Mrs. Abraham Shed-
roff, 520 16th St., on Thursday
evening, Apr. 21.
Mrs. Marcus, a Pioneer Woman
tor mary years, is known in the
Greater Miami area for her work
with the Child Rescue project.
Mrs. Sarah Singer, chairman of
Music Workshop Session
Hilda Steuerman will discuss the
life and music of Robert Schumann
at the Music Workshop class Apr.
13 in the Miami Public Library
Auditorium. Music harmony in-
struction and blackboard drills will
also continue that evening.
the evening, reports that a musi-
I cal program has been arranged
| by Mrs. Sonya Weiss. Mrs. Louis
, Yelson will give a talk on Moetzet-
! Hapoalot, sister organization of
: Pioneer Women in Israel.

Kadimah chapter is holding its
annual Child Rescue party on
Thursday evening, Apr. 21, at Beth
El Congregation. Mrs. Marvin Cop-
enhagen, president, and Mrs. Lou-
is Silver, chairman, said that Mrs.
Harold Shapiro wiii conduct a
unique quiz to be followed by com-
munity singing. Mrs. Leo Gold-
man, who has just returned from
a national executive board meet-
ing in New York City, will report.
The affair benefits the chapter's
Child Rescue drive under the
chairmanship of Mrs. David Mclt-
zer.
Women's Auxiliary of the Mt.
Sinai Hospital will conduct guided j
tours of groups throughout the hos-i
pital on a specific day and by ap-1
pointment. Availability of these'
tours will be made to the public. |
The project has been taken on
by the Women's Auxiliary because I
of the interest shown by the com-1
munity, individual organizations, i
educational groups, University of I
Miami officials, and high schools.
Requests have also been made;
by visiting doctors, women's aux-|
iliary members and employees
from hospitals throughout the
country, as well as from people
visiting from other cities. They all
want to know "How can I be shown
around your new hospital?"
I. Maislin, assistant director of!
administration, assisted in train-
ing several volunteers of the Worn-!
en's Auxiliary to guide groups of,
people on a scheduled basis.
The tours are to be conducted
every Tuesday at 10 a.m., and if
necessary, at 1 p.m. on the same
day. Reservations may be made
with Mrs. Maurice Yalman, of the
Auxiliary office.
The public will be shown the
various phases of the workings of
the hospital, from the first floor
through the eighth. The tour Will
consist of showing a typical pa-
tient floor, nurses station, patient's (
room, as well as the administrative,
portion of the hospital.
The groups will also be guided
throughout the professional depart-
ments. X-ray, diagnostic and Fluor-
oscopy rooms. Blood Bank and the
en;ire labratory will be Included.
They will see the Cobalt Unit re-1
cently installed. Nurseries from
the corridor may be seen, as well
as the various clinics.
After the tour, all questions will
be answered in a 15 to 20-mmute
question and answer period.
Two guides will accompany 10
visitors. Heading the volunteer
guides is Mrs. Lawrence Singer,
member of the auxiliary and chair-
man of this project. Volunteers
from the Auxiliary who will con-
duct the tours are Mrs. Arthur
Burrell. Mrs. Leo Chaikin. Mrs.
Rose Kaplan, Mrs. Dennis Quittner,
Mrs. Arnold Seeder, Mrs. Marvin
Silvers, Mrs. Harold Stone, and
Mrs. Carl Susskind.
Visitors who will attend the
American Medical Assor* and
American Nurses Assn. conven-
tions during the forthcoming Na-
tional Hospital Week will be taken
through the hospital by a tour
committee.
3-DAY CRUISES to NASSAU
and GRAND BAHAMA
LOWEST FARES... All Outside Staterooms!
Featirinj Mth Daylight ni Starligkt Cruising in Bahamian Waters!
Low cruise fares include all meals served in the
air-conditioned dining room. Cocktail Lounge,
Calypso Band, entertainment, dancing, compli-
mentary cocktail parties; Cruise Director and
Hostess; Continental Breakfasts served in your
stateroom! Ship is your "floating hotel" plenty
of time to enjoy both ports of call.
Sailing Tuesdays 11:00 AM Fridays 5:00 PM
Far ItsinratiMS sea any Travel Agent m
tiO STEAMSHIP COMPANY
The Low 3-day
Cruise Fares Start at
CtHpvttiiijn'll
f#-HG
Biscayne Blvd. & 10th St.,
Pier No. 2, Miami
FRanklin 9-3836
r
VA Changing
Pension Law
&L,
Lunchtan*, T, Rcptlon, Bnqutt, Partloe,
Oln nre .. from QO to 2000 ctrd In th
manner of the Diplomat... on unhurried,
vr-ttntiv, soft-Dokn rvlc* that makat)
n avant of your occasion.
Veterans who have been ineligi-
ble for pensions because their an-
nual income was above limits pre-
scribed by the present law may
become eligible under the new
pension system effective July 1,
C. W. Boggs, of the Miami VA
office, said Wednesday.
The present law requires that
a single veteran's income must
not exceed $1,400, while a veteran
with dependants may have an an-
nual income of $2,700 and still be
eligible for pension payments.
Boggs point out.
Under the new law a single vet-
eran's income limit is increased to
$1,800, and a veteran with depend-
ents may have an income up to
$3,000.
THE DIPLOMAT
HOIEl AND COUNTIY QU1
IJOO '' of Ocman PWMMT
Mll,-^<-fc-ll.M, Hwld*
Flying lawyers to Nassau
Fifty members of the Lawyer-
Pilot Assn., a national organization
of flying attorneys, will make a
two-day junket to Nassau on Apr.
23, according to Edwin Marger, of
Miami Beach, vice president of the
group. Marger, who flies a 1959
Cessna Skylan, was recently hon-
ored by the association for making
a 12.000-mile flight from Miami to
Fairbanks, Alas., and return, in
connection with the opening of the
'49crs Skyway.
THE RECORD
SPEAKS FOR ITSELF
RE-ELECT JUDGE
HAROLD R. VANN
YOUR CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP 10
YOU MUST HAVE CONFIDENCE IN THE
JUDGMENT INTEGRITY HONESTY
OF YOUR CIRCUIT JUDGE .
QUAUFIFD BY EXPERIENCE
PULL LEVER 20-A MAY 3
Pd. Pol. Adv.
RE-ELECT
THELMA R.
HARDISON
YOUR CONSTABLE
DISTRICT 3
Qualified Nine Years Experience
PULL LEVER 49-A MAY 3
IVI. Pol. Adv.
VOTE FOR
A. JAY CRISTOL
FOR
1
^A A A A A A A A A A A. A.
Dade County School Board
GROUP 1 AT LARGE COUNTY WIDE
LIFE MEMBER ROYAL PALM CHAPTER AZA
Attorney Former Special Asst. Attorney
General of Florida Naval Rererve Officer
U-vvorsitv of Miami Honor Graduate
PULL LEVER 44-A
I Adv.
<



Page 6-B
+Jewish Fk>rkUari
Friday, April 15. I960
J$irfh
M,
Mrs.
Mrs.
Seder table display was prepared this week by Temple Ner
Tamid Sisterhood for the gift department of Jordan Marsh.
Putting the proper finishing touches to the table are (from left)
Mrs. Fannie Sklar. Mrs. Louis Cohen, president, and Mrs. Dan
Piver. A second Seder table for display in the department
store's linen and china section was prepared by Temple Israel
Sisterhood.
Stadnik Runs
For Commission
John Stadnik, Miami Springs
business executive and civic lead-
er, is a candidate for the Dade
County Commission in the May 3
primary election.
Though Stadnik qualified in Dis-
trict 3. the vote will be county-wide
with nearly one million Dade coun-
ty citizens qualified to vote.
Stadnik, 43-yar-o4d native
of New Hampshire and grad-
uate of the Rhode Island Col-
leg* of Pharmacy, settled in Mi-
ami Springs after World War II
service in the Army Medical
Corps, coming out with the rank
of major.
In 1946. he opened a pharmacy
on the "Circle" in Miami Springs,
which he still operates in its orig-
inal location.
Married to a former army nurse
and the father of five children,
Stadnik resides with his family at
485 Deer Run in Miami Springs.
He is a member of the Miami
Springs Methodist Church, the Ma-
sons. Shrine, Lions Club, Ameri-
can Legion and is past president
of the Miami Springs and Hialeah
Chambers of Commerce. He has
been an active member of t h e
Dade County Miami Chamber of.
Commerce.
Additionally, he has found time
to be a Civil Defense zone war-;
den and a Boy Scout Merit Badge
counselor.
Gov. Collins appointed Stadnik
to the Florida Board of Pharmacy.
He has served as president of the
board and still serves as a mem-
ber. He also served as president
ol the Southeast Florida Pharma-
ceutical Assn. and is now a direc-
Miami Springs, which he helped
to organize.
During his war service, Stad-
nik was on* of the Medical Corps
Recent births at Mtt. Sinai Hos-
pital include the following:
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Sheinbein Mar. 28.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
win Vann Mar 27.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Jules
'Cohen Mar. 25
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Sam-
j uel Ltidwick Mar. 24.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles
! Schlakman Mar. 24.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Steven Schulman Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin Baumcl Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and
Fred Feigenbaum Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and
Alan Marsh Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Bronston Mar. 22.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey
Lazik Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Lazik Mar. 22.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Roth Mar. 21.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Maggoles Mar. 21.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Orin
Albin Mar. 21.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank-
lin Buckner Mar. 19.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Jack1
Bostwick Mar. 18.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Jerome Newman Mar. 17.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Freedman Mar. 15.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Leon-
ard Roth Mar. 12.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Morryj
Kronzek Mar. 12.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.,
Hank Meyer Mar. 11.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Birns Mar. 10.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Gene
Weiss Mar. 10.
Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs.
Bruce Cache Mar. 9.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Reibel Mar. 8.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Archie
Comen Mar. 8.
Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Mel-
vin Lewis Mar. 7.
JOHN STADNIK
officers charged with responsi-
bility for construction and op-
eration and many service hospi-
tals throughout Iceland, Eng-
land and Prance.
Since returning to civilian life
and the practice of pharmacy in
Dade County, Stadnik's support-
ers say "he has spearheaded ef-
forts to protect the public health
and welfare by fighting for curbs
to control unethical pharmeceuti-
cal practices throughout the State.
He was instrumental in gaining
a Board of Pharmacy regulation to
stop improper drug advertising
and led a drive to curb mail order
peddling of dangerous drugs."
On Mar. 17, Stadnik's "15 years
of devotion to and work, for many
important community projects in
Miami Springs" were cited by a
proclamation of "John Stadnik
Day."
THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE TO* EXPERIENCE!
RE-ELECT JUDGE
HUGH F. DuVAL Jr.
JUSTICE OF PEACE, DISTRICT 1
PULL LEVER 48-A MAY 3
Pd. Pol Adr.
Shah's Sister
Sees ORT School
NEW YORK The twin sister
of the Shah of Iran, Princess Ach-
raf Pahlavi, visited ORT vocation-1
al schools in Teheran, it was an- j
nounced by Mrs. Joseph C. Gayl,
national president of Women's;
American ORT. here recently.
Her Royal Highness was accom-'
panied on the visit by high offi-
cials of the Iranian Ministries of
State and Education. A ceremony,
attended by prominent members j
of the Jewish community, marked j
the occasion, which was filmed
and telecast on Iranian TV. Iran-
ian press and radio reported the
event at length.
This is the first time a member
of the royal family has visited a
Jewish institution in Teheran. In
leaving, the Princess expressed
her satisfaction with what she had
seen and added her hope that ORT
schools in Iran, which are consid-
ered pilot-schools in vocational ed-
ucation, will continue to develop
for the good of the country.
Coral Way Ladies
To Elect Officers
Coral Way Jewish Center Sister-
hood will hold an election meeting
Thursday evening, Apr. 22. at the
Center's new building. 8755 SW 18th
st. White elephant sale is also
scheduled.
Mrs. Herbert Green, president,
this week announced a kitchen
shower due Apr. 27. In charge of
reservations are Mrs. Martin
Hirsch and Mrs. Irwin Block.
Installation of Sisterhood's new
officers will be May 1. Handling
reservations are Mrs. Robert Kem-
per, Mrs. Murray Mandell. and
Mrs. Robert Bender.
Final Meeting of Season
B'nai B'rith Women of West Mi-
I ami will hold the group's final
! meeting of the present administra-
tion on Wednesday. 8:30 p.m., at
Town Hall. 901 SW 62nd ave. Mrs.
jFred Scherer will turn her gavel
lover to the new president.
Attorney Daniel Satin presents Mrs. Rose Weiss (center) with
an Oscar Award as one oi the first active members of a PTA
on the Beach at a farewell function to the old Miami Beach
High School building. Looking on is Mrs. Malvina Weiss Lieb-
man. Beach High alumna and director of elementary educa-
tion of the Dade County School Board.
Mrs. Chastain
Rushes Campaign
Mrs. R. B. (Dixie Herlong)
Chastain this week continued her
campaigning for Judge of the Ju-
venile and Domestic Relations
Court in Group I.
Mrs. Chastain has been an in-
vestitgating attorney for this court
since September, 1956, also hear-
ing cases and a referee there. She
has attended weekly in-service
training sessions with the proba-
tion staff since Mar., 1958, featur-
ing discussion leaders prominent
in the fields of psychology, sociol-
ogy, and psychiatry.
Mrs. Chastain is a member of
the Internal Assn. of Children's
Court Judges, and attended a meet-
ing of the organization in Belgium
in July, 1958.
She holds a magna cum laude
degree from the University of Mi-
ami, and has studied sociology and
government at Duke University..
She is a member of the American,
Florida, and Dade County Bar
Assns.
She has served on the adoption,
civic affairs, courts, crime and de-
linquency, family law, juvenile
court, and juvenile law and pro-
cedure committee of these organi-
zations.
She has served on the citizens
committee on adoptions since 1951,
Mayor Aronovitz' committee on
juvenile delinquency in 1954, Little
White House conference on educa-
tion, and President's committee
for traffic safety.
The candidate is married to
R. B. Chastain. and they are the
parents of three children.
IUS. I. CM AST AIM
Burns Supporters
Point To Record
Supporters of Jacksonville May-
or Haydon Burns, candidate for
governor in the May 3 primary,
Wednesday pointed out in Miami
that "after conducting an investi-
gation of the Middle East and Is-
rael in behalf of the American
Christian Palestine Committee,
Burns made 86 speeches for Is-
rael."
More recently, they declared, "m
appreciation of his tireless efforts,
the Jewish National Fund named
a grove of trees in Burns' honor
in Israel's Freedom Forest."
His supporters also indicated that
"when the FBI had no jurisdiction
to prevent the bombings of syna-
gogues and schools. Burns formed
the Southern Bombing Confer-
ence."
''WWV.
ELECT
JUDGE FRANCIS J. CHRISTIE
CIRCUIT JUDGE. GROUP ONE
mm ability, mmr, mtRitNct
PULL LEVER 11-A MAY 3
RE-ELECT
RUTH L SUTTON
YOUR JUSTICE OF PEACE
DISTRICT 3
PULL LEVER 48-1 MAY 3
"Thoro Is No Substitute for Exporionce"
Pd. Pol Adv.


Friday, April 15, 1960
+Jewisti fhrid fan
Hawaiian Theme
At Donor Lunch
Seated at the Golden Table at a
donor luncheon of Temple Sinai
Sisterhood at the Eden Roc hotel
on Wednesday noon will be 15
members who have earned $100
c r mote tax Jawtcrboud during the
year 1959-60.
Included in the group are three
sister teams, Mrs. Nat Kempner
and Mrs. Dorothy Stone (twins),
Mrs. Benno Wallach and Mrs.
Kurt Wallach. Mrs. Edwin Weiss
and Mrs. Sanford Weiss, as well as
Mrs. Edward Auerback, Mrs. Mor-
ris Cohen, Mrs. David Crowell,
Mrs. Harry Goldberg, Mrs. George
Leader, Mrs. Sam Lubell, Mrs. Al-
len Oster. Mrs. Fred Pearlman,
and Mrs. Russell Verga.
Mrs. Sam Scurran, donor lunch-
eon chairman, announced a Ha-
waiian theme will be used as the
setting, with members given leis
as they arrive. Moana, noted Poly-
resian dancer, is one of the enter-
tainers.
Proceeds are for kitchen equip-
ment at Temple Sinai.
Page 7-B
Summer Pops
Season Listed;
Tenth Year Due
Tfie tenth season of the now
firmly-established Miartii Beach
Pop} Concerts will open on Sunday.
Jurje 19th. and run for 10 consecu-
tive Sunday evenings to Aug. 21 at
the air conditioned Miami Beach
Auditorium.
Fabien Sevitzky, winter Sym
phony Series conductor, has ac-
cepted to open the season with an
all-Tchaikovsky program of famil-
iar numbers, including the Piano
j Coqcerto.
Hugo Fiorato, who established
[himself last year as one of the best
[young American conductors, will
Dave two concerts with the same
two great dancers, Melissa Hayden
ind Andre Eglevsky, of the New
fork City Ballet Company, who
lade such a great success at their
Appearance here last summer. Two
different ballet programs will be
esented.
Raymond Paige. popular p*r-
(nallry known by thousands of
Now Yorkers a* the conductor
Of the Radio City Music Hall
orchostra, will feature an eve
ntng of Radio City Music Hall
highlights with soloists.
Howard Barlow has arranged his
usy schedule to appear here and
[onduct two concerts in his always
veil-chosen programs. One of his
(oloists will be Kenneth Smith, who
appeared with great success last
vinter in the Wagner program, the
Ring of the Nibelungen.
Fsanz Allers, who won the ap-
proval of summer patrons for his
fine operatic performances, will
tome here direct from his Russian
jour of "My Fair Lady" to conduct
Gershwin program and a "Vien-
nese Night" His soloists will in-
clude Kenneth Smith and Beverly
Lower.
Arthur Fiedler, the conductor
Iwho received the most votes as to
[popularity last season on a "Pops
Julia Grace stars in "Car-
men" on May 7. The produc-
tion at Dade County Auditor-
ium will feature artists of the
Opera Guild Workshop of
the University of Miami un-
der the auspices of the Opera
Guild of Greater Miami. Di-
rector is Arturo di Filippi.
Dick Clark stars in "Because
They're Young" at the Colony
Theatre on Miami Beach.
Miss Sanders Appointed
Miss Shirley Sanders has been
appointed head of the ballet de-
partment at the Fine Arts Conser-
vatory, 5770 NW 15th ave. Miss
Sanders is one of the principle
dancers in the Miami Ballet Com-
pany. Mrs. Ruth Wolkowsky
Greenfield is director of the con-
servatory.
Questionnaire," cannot possibly
give two dates this year. He will
come here especially for one con-
cert on Aug. 14 and return imme-
diately to San Francisco and the
west coast.
D'Artega, who has appeared at
these concerts each summer since
1956, will end the season on Aug.
21 with an all-Rodgers and Ham-
merstein program.
Among leading Zionists of the Greater Miami area honored at
a dinner of tribute last week at the Fontainebleau hotel
were (left to right) Morris Simon, Louis Rudnick and lacob C.
Fishman. They were cited for "outstanding service to the State
of Israel and Israel Bonds."
An Endorsement...
From Noted Civic. Leader
SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
31 SHORE DRIVE NORTH
MIAMI, FLA.
March 22, 1960
DEAR LOUIE:
I want to congratulate you upon your decision
to run for the Circuit Court and assure you that I will
do all I can to insure your election.
You wrll bring to this post your qualifications
based upon experience, knowledge of humanity and
public affairs and the accumulation of years of
legal training.
Sincerely,
ninn
LOUIE BANDEL AFFILIATIONS
BETH DAVID: Member from 1925 to 1955
BETH EL: Member ISRAELITE CENTER: Member
LET'S ELECT
CIRCUIT JUDGE
QUALIFIED BY JUDICIAL EXPERIENCE
PULL LEVER 21-A
c//lllH
you very nine
L
1M Pol. A'lv.



Page 8-B
*Jenisti fhrtdiain
Friday. April 15, I960
<2fn the r^cah
m o
j *^5ocitof
Dietz. Pollock
In Pa. Wedding
In setting of dogwood, cedar
trees and ribotium fern, Gail Orcn-
sten Pollock became the bride of
Carl Michael Dietz recently in
Iforcy UK) Truth SynafOglM, Potts-
town. Pa.
I be bride ll daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Sidney Pollock, Pott*
town. Mr. ud Mrs. Simon Diets.
Cynwyd, Pa., are parent! of the
bridegroom.
Prior to the double ring cere-
BOO]. I half hour recital of organ
mode was presented. Dr. Bmil
Schorsch officiated at the nuptials
at 7 30 p m Be wai assisted by
Cantor Mano BngaL
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride wore an old fashioned
shirtwaist dress of white silk or-
a. Tucks ed(ed in Val lace
trimmed the front and back of the
bodice. Peter Pan collar and cuffs
on the long, tight sleeves were of
the same lace. The softly-gathered,
floor length skirt ended in a chapel
train.
Her chapel veil of silk illusion
eta draped to a headpiece of lilies-
of-thc-valley and silk organza. Sho
carried a bouquet of white stcphan-
Otla and deep purple violets.
Mrs Solis Tolhn. sister of the
bridegroom, Ardmore, Pa., and
Mrs. Robert Coison. sister of the
bride. New York City, attended as
matrons of honor.
Mr Dietz was served by his bro-
ther. Robert, as best man. Ushers
were Solis Tolhn. Robert Corson,
and Eugene Jacobs, Gilbert Zitin.
Samuel Needleman and Jerome
Brodsky, all of Philadelphia.
Mr. and Mrs. Ktlgar Orensten.
Miami Beach, grandparents of the
bride, and Mr and Mrs. Charles.
Wapner, Philadelphia, grandpar-
ents of the bridegroom, also were
in the wedding party.
When the bride left for a 10-day
honeymoon in Mexico, she was
wearing a dark blue two-piece wool
suit with a red top coat.
Upon their return. Mr. and Mrs.
Dietz will reside in Pottstown. At
the end of the spring vacation. Mrs.
Dietz will return to teaching at
Plymouth Meeting Friends School.
The bride is a graduate of Potts-
town High School and the I'niver-
mi> ot Pennvylvania. She is a mem-
ber of Delta Phi Kpsilon sorority.
Mr Dietz is associated with
Mayer Pollock Company. He is an
alumnus of the University of, Penn-
s\ 1\ ania.
rn mis. srnrcN f atvucf*
Pawligers Off
On Nassau Trip
Ethel Rolhcnberg is now Mrs.
Steven M. Pawliger. The couple
exchanged wedding vows Sunday
noon. Apr. 10. at the Seville hotel.
Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg offici-
ated.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Rothenberg.
1361 NE 157lh st. The groom is the
son of Mr. Arthur Pawliger, 105
N. Shore dr., and the late Mrs.
Pawliger.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Dan-
iel Franco. Miss Brenda Bernstein
was maid of honor. Bridesmaids
included Mrs. Gary Stnfttan and
fctisi Sari Kotlikoff.
Richard Pawliger acted as best
man. and ushers were Dr. Daniel
Franco. Michael Hajck, and Wil-
liam Rothenberg.
The bride attended the Medical
Technology Training School, St.
Luke's Hospital, Philadelphia, and
is now a medical technologist at
Mercy Hospital here.
The groom attended the Univer-
sity of Miami, served in the U.S.
Army, is a member of Integrity
Lodge, A. & A. M., and is a sales
representative for a local firm.
Reception followed at the Se-
ville. After a honeymoon in Nas-
sau, the couple will be at home
at 2108 NE 167th st., No. Miami
Beach.
W/arnw Kaim
MIS. AUtN ROTH
Miss Miller Now
Mrs. Allen Roth
Hazel Carmi Miller and Allen
Richard Roth went to the Smokey
mountains after their marriage in
noon ceremonies on Sunday, ^pr
10, at the Algiers hotel. Raboi Her'
bert Baumgard officiated.
The bride is the daughter jf Mr
and Mrs. Robert Miller, C551 Cry!
stal View ct. The groom h the son
of Mr and Mrs. Samuel Rotn 3541
SW 16th ter.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Allen
Westin. Miss Carol Meyer and
Miss Ruth Gitomcr were brides-
maids.
Richard Steinberg acted as ush-
er. and Jack Stotsky and Charlej
W'inick were ushers.
The bride chose a full length
gown of embroidered nylon net
with chapel train, crown :if seed
pearls, and illusion veiling
She graduated from Miami High,
and is a junior in the ichool of
education at the University of Mi-
ami.
Mr. Roth also graduatoj from
Miami High. He is a senior in en-
gineering at the University of Mi-
ami. On campus, he is engineering
representative to the undergradu-
ate student government, and a
member of the Eneineenii; Hon-
or Society and Pi Mu Ep inn. na-
tional honor society for mathema-
tics.
Dnner and reception followed
the ceremony at the Algie ; hotel.
MIS. KONA10 SNANf
"Sun, and, Jun,"
SUMMER CAMP
JUNE. JULY AND AUGUST
DAY CAMPERS
BOARDING CAMPERS
BOYS and GIRLS
Dmitenes Aw Ciilitlwes
limits tegistretioa
Jl 1-3271 Jl S105I
OXFORD
ON THI BAT
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Campiaa At Its le.r ______^_
CORAL GABLES CONVALESCENT HOME
"A fritmih mmi 6-flc Afn*s***rt to rh*se T* !*"
A NEW NOAM DOWNED TO CAKE HM EUMAIT. OMONKAUT lil
AND CONVALESCENTS 24-MOtft tECBTEIED NUtSMC SEIVKE
Special Diets !J' ctly Observed. Pr.vate Bi'Jifo:n. Air Ccndu on.
Spoci'us Ground*. Pat.o. Swimming Pool. Planned Actn
ALL ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR
Reasonable Rate* Brochure on Request
Ferdinand H. RoeenthaL Director-Owner
Fvmrtn'l Di> "
Cleveland. Ohio
7OS0 S.W. 8th Street
ess tal Director. Jew.--. Hem* er t* Aged
e -rgh. Pj.
Miami, Fla. Phono MO 6-8826
Kaplan, Shane
Exchange Vows
Miss Dorlene Verna Kaplan be-
came the bride of Dr. Ronald Wil-
liam Shane in a double ring cere-
mony at the Deauville hotel on i
Sunday noon. Apr. 10.
The new Mrs. Shane is the
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Saul H. i
Kaplan, of 3724 Pine Tree dr. The
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.;
Isadore Shane, 1015 13th St., Miami
Beach.
The bride was given in marriage 1
by her father. Officiating at the'
ceremony was Dr. Irving Lehr-
man. The bride wore a white silk
organza gown. The chantilly lace;
bodice featured a modified sa-
brina neckline enhanched with *>
quins and long lace pointed'
sleeves. The bell-shaped skirt with
appliques of chantilly lace, seed
pearls and sequins terminated in
a chapel train. Her veil of illusion
was attached to a crown of match-
ing lace and seed pearls. She car-
ried her confirmation Bible cov-
ered with white orchids and lily-
of-the-valley.
Miss Ellyn Jayne Kaplan, sis-
| ter of the bride was maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Miss Henrietta
Goodman, Miss Carol Sackheim
and Miss Penny Pieck.
Norman Shane was best man for
his brother. Uffcen were Marvin
Shane, brother of the groom. Dr.
Pierre Putter and Dr. Joseph Van
Der Pol.
The bride is a graduate of Mi
ami Beach High School and re-
ceived her Bachelor of Science de-
( in chemistry from the Univer-
sity of Miami in February. Dr.
Shane was graduated cum laeda
from Muhlenberg College. He at-
tended Temple University school
] of medicine on a four year >ena-
tonal scholarship. He was presi-
dent of bis class and vice president
el l'hi Beta Pi medical fraicrnr.v
Dr Shane interned at Duval Coon
ty Medical Center in Jacksonville.
and is now resident physician in
internal medicine at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital here.
A champagne recption and seat-
ed luncheon followed t h e cere
mom The new Dr. and Mrs. Shane
are honeymooning in Mexico City
and Acapulco. On their return.
they will reside on Miami Beach.
Miss Zernmel
Plans For August
Estelle Lee Zemmel and Dr.
Gerald Davis are planning for |
August wedding.
The couple's engagement is an-
nounced by the
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Zemmel,
1620 Pennsylvania ave.
The groom-to-be is the son of Mr
and Mrs. Earl Davis, 4771 SW 6th
st.
The bride is a cum laude grad-
uate of the University of Miami,
where she belonged to Nu Kappa
Tau. women's honorary; Phi Kap-
pa Pi, scholastic honorary; Kap
pa Delt Pi, education honorary;
and was listed in "Who's Who in
American Colleges and Universi-
ties."
Miss Zemmel it currently a
teacher in the Dade county school
system.
Dr. Davis graduated from the
was a
member of Pi Mu pre-mc cil Ira-
, ternity. He is al.-o a gradate ol
s P^V Temple University school of thiro-
pody, where he belonged io Phi
Alpha Pi, honorary anatomical so-
ciety, as well as to several other
science honoraries.
Dr. Davis served two years in
the U. S. Armed Force-. He is
presently practicing clulr ,. > i> in
Miami.
-'w-'www
r'WWW-'WWW'V.
YOUNGISH WIDOW
IN THE SIXTIES. College Educa-
tor!. Athletic Interests, with homo of
her own in Miami, would like to
meat gentleman of good background
A similar interests References ex-
changed Write Mrs. X. Box 2973.
Miami I, Fla.
Dr. Jack Amazon
ANNOUNCES REMOVAl
OF HIS DENIAL OFFICES
To
510 Hwatingtoa Medic.il Bldg
168 S.E. First Street
Florida
Telephone FR 7-4029
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
needs For our
THRIFT SHOP
All your furniture, clothing,
linens, dishes, drapes, etc.
AH proceeds towarats svpoort of
the Homo. Yaw May contribute, taka
a tax deduction or wo wiR pay nil
for um aemimaur ...* iro NOT
a profit mafcmaj ergeaixatioa ... Wi
ars helping, yew community to keep
its dignity Sy helping ethe.v you
re helping yourself' Maaufecturers
and jobbersremsmher we can use
all your oetcaats or misfits.
Pease call us for early
piCK-up.
THE JEWISH HOME
FOR THE AGED
THRIFT SHOP
5737 N.E. 27th Avenue
NE 3-2338
Closed Satjrdays
MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME
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Ucefed"
1st.
mi
84-Hour Nursing Service
Special Diets Strictly Observed
" All Rooms on Ground Floor
Jewish Style Cook'ig
Spaces Grojnds a
Reason*!.'e Rates
Jpecio/iiing in Core to the fIderly ami Chronically III
335 S.W. 12th AVE. Ph. FR 4-5437 & FH 9-0278
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A-l EMPLOYMENT
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Ph. FR 91401
personalized service of file
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
24-fcoor service except rose he,,oaw eaW yen. kippor


Friday, April 15. I960
'tctrntini
vJenistincridiann
Page 9-B
A combination of elegant furs
** and diamonds, and the lovely
waterfront home of Mrs. Irving
Miller, were the ingredients that
made for an exciting afternoon
when the Women's Division of Is-
rael Bonds treated the 1.069
Sponsors who purchased at least
a $1,000 Israel Bond to this
unique fashion show last week.
Among the audience was Mrs.
Robert Z. Greene in a black silk
jersey sheath. Her matching
stole was reversible to a golden
yellow. She was chatting with
Mrs. Frank Frankel, who selec-
ted for the afternoon a sheer im-
ported cotton featuring a small
floral print with inserts of val
lace. The white lace was in a
large checkerboard pattern, and
the flamingo pink, coral and
white blended into a perfect
springtime dress. Her accessories
were of the same matching colors.
Welcome address was by Mrs.
Max Weiti, who heads the Wom-
en's Division of Bonds. She wore
a pink-tiered lace sheath, with a
square neckline. Chairman of the
day was Mrs. Jack Katzman. She
i chose a white silk pesante sheath.
I with the bodice appliqued in pink
land red roses, and with a scooped
(neckline. Her hat was a floral
decorated white straw.
Mrs. Jennie Grossinger was in
white French knit sheath band-
in royal blue silk around the
neckline, down the front, and
across the hips, giving a short
jacket effect. Also in a French
knit ensemble was Mrs. Marvin
Koslow who's husband supplied
the diamonds from their Fon-
tai.neblcau shop. Mrs. Koslow's
.'heath was an ice porcelain blue
Bilk knit. Over it she wore a
white hand-knit sweater reem-
broidered in silver lurex.
* '
|U|RS. Sheldon Kaye chose a
white linen ensemble. Her
waist-length jacket featured the
tiered cape sleeve. The bodice of
her dress was a green foliage silk
print. Her accessories were white,
and her large straw hat was soft-
ly contoured around the brim.
Also in white was Mrs. Anna
Brenner Myers. Her sheath was
silk pesante, worn with a blush
pink silk jacket.
Mother of the hostess, Mrs. Jos-
eph Levine, selected a white silk
sheath with a royal blue cabbage
rose print. Her dress featured a
lEPHUN'S HEBREW!
BOOK STORE
Largest and Oldeet Hebrew
Supply Home In Greater Miami
VmOUSAU and RETAIL
Complete Line of Hebrew Supplier
for Synagogue*, Hebrew and
Sunday School*
Israeli gifts and noveuties ^

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
<
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
A
JUN10K
jkwish
high neckline, with the softness of
radiating lines away from the
Peter Pan collar.
Mrs. Jack Toppell was in a
striking navy and white ensemble.
Her dress was silk organza with
three-quarter sleeves and a full
skirt. The dress featured an over-
sized white piqued bib that came
to a V almost to the waistline.
She wore a navy blue pill box,
and the rest of her accessories
were also in navy.
In gold brocade was Mrs. Jos-
eph Friedman. Her ensemble had
the controlled fullness in the skirt
and a waist-length fitted jacket.
Mr. Stuart Bernstein chose a
two-piece, honey beige damask
suit. The short jacket was fitted,
and her sleeves were bracelel-
Iength.
* a
THE furs modeled by members
were from the collection by
Mr. Herman. Commentator of
show was Mrs. Bernard Kaplan.
She selected a silk print of deep
red roses on black, with a sheer
black silk organza bodice. Her
shoes were made of the same
print fabric, and her hat was one
of her own original creations.
While Arik Lavie, the "Frank
Sinatra" of Israel was singing,
the judges adjourned to select tho
"Best Dressed Woman" in the
audience. The winner was Mrs.
Miller. She wore a black silk
sheath with a sheer illusion
bodice. Her neckline was a ba-
teau in the front, which dipped
in the back. Her shore sleeves
were cuffed in white organdy, and
were trimmed in jet black but-
tons. Keeping the dress to an
afternoon feeling, was the black
patent leather belt.
Nancy Paskow
Is Bride-Elect
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Paskow, of
900 West ave., Miami Beach, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Nancy Ellen, to Harvey
Asher, of Passaic N. J.
Miss Paskow, a graduate of Mi-
ami Beach High School, is now a
freshman at the University of Ala-
bama and a member of Alpha Ep-
silon Phi sorority.
Mr. Asher, a graduate of Passaic
High School, is now a prc-med stu-
dent in his junior year at the Uni-
versity of Alabama and a a mem-
ber of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity.
MRS. MICH AH GORDON
Significance of Passover
"The Significance of Passover"
will be the title of a lecture by Dr.
Abraham Wolfson at the Spinoza
Outdoor Forum, 11th st. and Ocean
ct., Miami Beach, on Wednesday
at 8 p.m. The lecture will be re-
peated at Blackstone hotel on Fri-
day at 6:30 p.m. Mrs. Miriam Nel-
son will recite. Mrs. Sonia Weiss
will be heard in folk songs.
Gordons to Live
In New York
Miss Pamela Lynne Lichter be-
came the bride of Michael Stuart
Gordon in a double ring ceremony
at Temple Beth Sbolom on Sunday,
Apr. 3. Rabbi Leon Kronish and
Cantor David Conviser officiated
at the noon rites.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Solomon Lichter, 1020 N.
Shore dr.. Miami Beach. The
groom is the son of Mrs. Sadye
Gordon and the late Mr. Louis Gor-
don, of Mosholu Parkway, N. Y.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride wore a designer's gown
of white peau satin embroidered
with fine alencon lace and featur-
ed a large butterfly bouffant at
back which gave way to a long ca-
thedral train. Her crown was of
pearls and crystals with bouffant
illusion veil. She carried a Bible
with white roses and stephanotis.
Matron of honor was Mrs. Irving
Lichter, aunt of the bride. Maid of
honor was Miss Carol Sackheim.
Miss Michelle Lichter, cousin of
the bride, was bridesmaid.
Ringbearer was David Lichter,
brother of the bride, and flower
girl was Risa Dranow. Best man
was Joseph Gordon, uncle of the
groom. Ushers were Irving Lich-
ter, Russell Herman' and Michael
Chcrnoff.
The bride was graduated from
Miami Beach High School, and at-
tended Florida State University.
She is now at Hunter College,
where she will complete her work
in fashion and art designing. The
groom graduated from the Uni-
versity of Arizona and is associ-
ated with Charles I. Goodman,
Bearings, New York.
After a honeymoon in Arizona
and Las Vegas, the couple will re-
side in Riverdale, N. Y.
is
Z?^
AUGUST BROS ftw
IS thx BtM '
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17 Washington Ave. Miami Beach
JEffcrson 1-9017
AVON
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Hv* you thought of rning extra
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Avon. For full information,
call Mrs. Sadie Flaxman,
FR 1-6408
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth of Florida
Ribbl Dr. Isaac H. Ever, Director
24-HOUR NURSING DOCTORS ON CALL
ALL DIETS OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
MOURN taUIPMCNT A FURNISHINGS HRfPROOf BUILDING
310 Collins Ave.
Ph. JE 2-3571
Miami Beach
Gelernters Tell
Leslie's Troth
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Gelernter,
3406 Granada blvd., Coral Gables,
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Leslie Ann, to Fred Sil-
verman, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.
Silverman, Jamaica, N.Y.
Miss Gelernter received the
Bachelor's degree in education
from the University of Miami, \
and is now affiliated with Hearst!
Publications in New York.
Mr. Silverman received his Bach-1
elor of Science degree from Cityj
College of New York, and will I
. take a Master's degree in indus-:
trial engineering from Columbia!
; University. He h a s entered the
field of hospital administration andi
is associated with Montefiore Hos-|
: pital in New York.
A September wedding is planned.
MAY 1st TO NOVEMBER 1st
from JVV 6 MONTHS of Pleasure 6 Persons
Thrill to all the wonderful pleasure* of this
$10,000,000 resort world you get everything
our regular guests enjoyincluding stars-a-
poppin, a whole new world of entertainment
pleasure! Supervised play area for children,
teenage rumpus room, health club, (team
rooms, solaria, poolsid* bar.
eviLLe
fOR INFORMATION
CALL MR. DON
JE 2-2511
lull HOCK 01 nniNIRON' ?-k Id V'k will's IN IM( ><(ll' 01 M'iMi 3
WHAT MIAMI NEEDED!
GOOD. FAST DRY CLEANING
AT MODERATE PRICES
FRIEDMAN'S CLEANERS
2922 CORAL WAY
171 8-79th ST.
FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST"
Miracle Massage Salon
"STREAMLINE YOUR FIGURE"
SPECIALIZING IN BODY MASSAGING
NOW OPEN
Monday through Friday 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Saturday, Sunday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.
2373 CORAL WAY HI 4-1186
Levine Names
Campaign Head
Miami attorney Victor Levine,
candidate for Judge of the Juve-
nile and Domestic Court, an-
nounced Wednesday that he has
appointed Al Nason, Miami Beach
furniture dealer, as his campaign
manager.
Campaign headquarters will be
opened within a few days.
Levine has been a Miami resi-
dent for 30 years, and has been an
instructor at the University of Mi-
ami, and the St. Theresa Catholic
School in Coral Gables. He has
been active in juvenile and child
guidance work for many years.
SAL THE HANDYMAN
> Repairs jalousies, carpentry, J
? plumbing, painting, altctik, etc.
? lamp repairs. Call after 6
Wl 7-1015
*-*****-^a>a>a>a>a>****-*a>f*faj,-


Page 10-B
fjewisl) fh>r/dfia>jn
Friday/April 15, I960
Awards to city councilmen and other outstanding citizens were
made at the "Let's Get Acquainted with the PTAward Win-
ners'' extravaganza presented by Miami Beach Senior High
School PTA in the school auditorium as a farewell to the old
building which will be vacated by the seniors in May. Left
to right are Mrs. John Owen, Paul Bruun, Mrs. Sol Pine, Arthur

FRANK 0. PIIMTT
Celebrities Visit
Gulf stream Park
At a luncheon held at the Eden Roc hotel by the Coral chapter,
Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. American Medical Center at Den-
ver, are (left to right) Mrs. I. Rubinstein, chairman of the lunch-
eon and vice president; Mrs. ]. Schaffer. president; Mrs. S.
Schwartz, co-chairman; and Mrs. Milton Ross, program chair-
man.
Pruitt Launches
Commission Drive
Frank O. Pruitt launched his
campaign for District 2 county
commissioner last week with a
pledge "to work for better metro-
politan government in Dade coun-
ty"
"I will do everything in my pow-
er to make Metro work as the char-
ter intended it to work,"' Pruitt
said.
Pruitt added "I relieve the
Metro Commission should sit as a
policy-making board, ana leave ad-
ministration details to the county
manager and his administrative
itafl."
A business and civic leader in
Dade county since 1W5, Proitt
also said Metre should be oper-
ated with as "austere an econ-
omy as is consistent with the dy-
namic growth of our commun-
ity." He stressed the importance
of creating a favorable atmos-
phere to attract the proper type
of industry to Dade county.
Prur.t was the first mayor of
Miami Shores, and served as mayor
fivi' years and as a councilman ten
years at no salary When the State
tad the Dade Coun-
ts nmiaakin in i35.
Pruitt was appointed a* one of the
members jnd served ai ill
first, chairman. He resigned in
I to enter the Annad Forces
during World War 11. and was re-
appointed upon his discharge in
1946.
A resident of Dade county since
1925. Pruitt helped organize the
Dade County Grand Jury Assn. in
1947. and served as its second pres-
ident. He served as foreman of two
grand juries.
Founder of Frank 0. Pruitt and
Sons. Miami insurance agency.
Pruitt was one of the organizes of
the Miami Junior Chamber of
Commerce, and served as Jaycee
president in 1928 He hair-
Courshon. John Serbin, Leonard Glasser, Mrs. Anna Brenner
Meyers, Dr. Joe Hall, Councilman Melvin I. Richard. Hank
Meyer, Dan Taradash, who made the presentations, and Coun-
cilman Bernard A. Frank. Also present were Councilmen Ken-
neth Oka and Wolfie Cohen.
Beckwith Presses
For Metro Seat
Jack 11. Beckwith opened his
campaign for a seat on the Metro
Commission last weekend with a
pledge to "make sure that Dade
county taxpayers get the most serv-
ice- for their medical dollars."
An oral surgeon, Dr. Beckwith
pointed out that more than 40 per-
cent of the tax money administered
by Metro goes to hospitalization,
health and welfare."
"It seems to me." he said, "that
it is vitally important that a man
with professional medical experi-
ence should be on the commission
to see that Dade county gets the
best and the most hospital, health
and welfare services for its money."
A Dade county resident for 35
years, Dr. Beckwith also said
that "we will be hard-pressed
over the years to come to pro-
vide adequate hospital facilities
to meet the needs of our expand-
ing population. An experienced
medical man should have a voice
in the planning of these facil-
ities."
A candidate in District 1, Dr.
Beckwith, a University of Florida
graduate, is chief of oral surgery
at Mercy Hospital, and will hold a
Prince Philip
Speaks to Board
LONDON (JTA) The Duke
of Edhrbtirgh warned here this
week that, if anti-Semiti.im should
gain the upper hand in Britain,
"the jungle would be-epon Hq
made the statement in an address
lief ore 1.3000 Jewish leaders cele-
brating the bicentennary of the
Board of Deputies of Brit.sh Jews
which was founded in 1760.
Calling for deepening of the
"democratic attitude," Prince
Philip recalled "the terrible per-
seditions suffered by the Jewish
people under the Nazis." and as-
serted: "It is terribly easy to get
| ;hc worst out of people. But con-
i slant work to needed to bring out
she best."
The Duke recalled the Jewish
community's services to Britain,
particularly in the fields of sci-
ences, art, education and enter-
ta:nment, and pointed o-jt that
"thousands of Jewish soldiers
gave their lives toward t+ie de-
fense of Great Britain." He paid
high tribute to the work of the
Board of Deputies.
Gratitude for Britain's welcome
of the Jewish people was express-
ed by Barnett Janncr. praal lent of
the Board, and by Chief Rabbi Is-
rael Brodie, Janner thanking Bri-
tain for the "important part it
played in the establishment of Is-
rael," and for the Balfour Declara-
tion.
M. JACK KCKWITH
similar post at the new Baptist Hos-
. pital. He is past chief of service
at Jackson Memorial Hospital,
president-elect of the Miami Den-
tal Society, and past president of
i the East Coast Dental Society.
He is a former president of the
Miami Rotary Club and was a
member of the board of directors,
Miami-Dade County Chamber of
Commerce.
Judae Yann EveS tmotm4\ Donor luncheon
a *"""# Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-EI
NeW Bead! Term ul" nold a donor luncheon Wednes-
day, noon at the Fontainebleau
Judge Harold R. Vann is running hQte| according to Mrs. Mnton
for reelection to the Dade County SmiU) sisterhood president. Pro-i
Circuit Court in the May pri- ceeds wi g0 toward re.furnishing;
maru's ,. and refurbishing of the Temple's'
The 44-year old candidate was maJn reljglous schoo, at 17th 8t.
' and James ave. Mrs. Harry Lecht-
ner is chairman, and Mrs. Sam!
Collins in January, 1956. He won
a four year term later that year
when he was elected without oppo-
sition.
Vmo was an Army Air Force
pilot during World War II. He
graduated from Stetson Univer-
, slty, where he was known as t*
Going into the final stretch of its > atn|#t^
1960 meet. Gulfstream Park is |
chalking up another victory in at-1 Judge Vann has lived here 31
tendance, and in wagering. One of; years. He makes his home at 1534
the best seasons in the history of Blue rd., Coral Gables, with his
the track is the current meet,, w ife and two sons.
which concludes Apr. 23. Ha is a former director of the
Celebrities of cinema, stage, and Dade County Bar Assn., former
TV' have added glamor to the rac- member of the Junior Chamber of
nit- i\ents and vied with some of Commerce, and is active in t h e
the nation's outstanding race' Lions Club, as well as in other
horses for attention and headlines, civic and fraternal organizations.
Joe E. Lewis is a frequent vis-
itor to Gulfstream Park, and Ed
Sullivan has made several appear
at this track, the home of
ihe Florida Derby Mickey Rooney
viewed the races at Gulfstream.
as did Perry Como, when he vis-
ited South Florida.
From Palm Beach have
Men's Club Body
Confab Slated
NEW YORK The 31st annual
convention of the National Federa-
tion of Jewish Men's Clubs will be
come held at the Concord hotel. Kiame-
such personalities as Ambassador sha Lake, from May 8 to 11. The
Joseph Kennedy and Russell Fire- theme of this year's convenuon
stone, jr.. whose horses have been will be "Living by Spiritual Val-
racing at the Hallandale track, and ues "
the Stephen (Laddie) Sanfords, A total of 321 Men's Clubs in
who own a stable of race horses, the United States and Canada af-
as well as the Amory Haskells. jr.. fihated with the National Federa
Sirkin to Head
Cariton's Miami
Beach Campaign
Milton Sirkin, Miami Beach civic
leader and businessman, has ac-
cepted a district leader's post in
Miami Beach in the campaign to
elect Sen. Doyal E. Carlton, jr.,
candidate for governor, according
o Dade chairman William F. Byrd.
Sirkin, a resident of Miami
Beach for 22 years, is a prominent
civic worker. He is president of
the Lincoln Road Assn., vice pres-
ident of the Miami Beacii Better
Business Bureau, memer of the
boards of the Miami Beach Tax-
oayers Assn. and Temple Emanu-
EI.
He is also a member of the
Miami Beach President's Coun-
cil, the City's Convention and
Auditorium committee, and the
Miami Beach Kiwanis Club.
He is past president of the Miami
Beach Civic League and YMHA
and past chairman of the Miami
Beach United Fund campaign.
Sirkin is in the realty investment
business and lives with his wife,
Miriam, at 2024 N. Bay rd. The
Jewish Congregation held a model Sirkins have two grown sons. Dick,
Seder Sunday for students of the who lives in California, and Josh,
religious school. Rabbi Nathan who attends the University of North
Zwitman officiated. 'Carolina.
Weisen
tions.
is in charge of reserva-
Hialeah Model Seder
Sisterhood of Hialeah Reform
and senior, the Michael Guarinos.
Mrs. Truman Talley. Bernard Gim-
ble. and the E. P. Taylors.
Beach Chapter Meeting
tion are expected to attend the
convention. The member clubs
have an estimated membership in
excels of 50,000.
Arthur S. Bruckman, of New
York City, is chairman of the con-
vention committee, and Bernard
Rackmil. of Cedarhurst. L.I., is
Miami Beach chapter of Jewish
National Home lor Asthmatic Chil
man of the Peering committee of dren will meet Wednesday evening president of the national body,
the Greater Miami Manufacturers at the Miami Beach Federal Bank The National Federation of Jew-
Exposition, and has been a mem- Mdg.. 407 Lincoln rd. Election of ish Men's Clubs is affiliated with
ber of the Miami Chamber of Com- officers will take place, with Mrs. the United Synagogues of Ameri-
merce since 1925. Milton Koch presiding. ca.
A scroll honoring the United Jewiah Appeal for its rescue, re-
settlement and rehabilitation work on behalf of survivors of
the Nazi tenor is presented by Norbert Wollheim (left) to Rabbi
Herbert A. Friedman, UJA executive vice chairman, at the first
Auschwitz Memorial Dinner in New York last Sundav. Look-
ing on is Ernest W. Michel, chairman of the dinner. wh.ch was
attended by 800 survivors of the Auschwitz-Buna extermination
camp now living in the United States. Canada and Mexico.
They were among the few thousand who managed to outlive
the infamous camp, where hundreds of thousanda ot Jews
perished. Wollheim is chairman of the Auschwitz-Buna Me-
morial Scholarship Fund, established on behalf of the children
of survivors.


Friday, April 15, 1960
+Jewish nor kiian
Page 1 IB
Town restaurant executives donate this lus-
cious 150-pound cake to the Miami Police
Benevolent Assn., which held its annual Police
Ball on Saturday evening at Bayfront Park
Auditorium. Left to right are E. W. Hall, pres-
ident; Leon Hall, chairman of the function;
Jack Goldstein, of the Town restaurant; Judge
Milton A. Friedman; Ray Larson, executive
president; Sgt. L A. Shelton, first vice pres-
ident; Officer W. S. Gillespie, executive com-
mittee member; Vincent J. McCale, baker of
the cake; Larry Gilbert, of the Town restaurant;
and Judge Pat Cannon, a former policeman.
Some 800 persons attended the affair. Gold-
stein personally sold over $800 in tickets, top-
ping his previous record of $500 last year
more than any other single person in Miami.
Flagler Plans
[Summer Camp
Flagler-Granada Jewish Commun-
jity Center summer day camp is
|planning to give children "a sum-
ler to remember."
Erwin B. Marshall has been
flamed director of the camp, which
fill serve boys and girls from five
13, a well as pre-schoolers from
tiree to five.
The camp will be divided into
ro four-week periods. The first
frill be from June 20 to July 15,
ponday through Friday, 9 a.m. to
).m. The second period will be
}m July 18 to Aug. 12. Hours
pre-schoolers are from 9 a.m.
(noon.
Marshall has had ten years of
paching experience in the Dad*
jnty school system, having
ught t the Dade Demonstra-
tion School and West Laboratory
School of the University of
iami.
(The first principal in Florida to
srate an integrated elementary
Jhool, Orchard Villa, Marshall is
esently principal of Scott Lake
|ementary School in No. Miami.
has been principal of Flagler-
franada Jewish Community Cen-
religious school for the past
ree years, also serving as leisure
Itivities director at the Center.
5"or two years, Marshall was
lad counselor at Camp OsceOla in
frrth Carolina. He has degrees in
tmentary education and a Mas-
k's degree in administration and
ervision of elementary schools.
raffic Brisk1 at
lorton Towers
TTraffic has been brisk and in-
jrest high." These are the views
1 Emil Morton as he reviews the
rst five weeks activity at the
to Morton Towers rental offices,
hey are located at 532 Lincoln
I. and 9583 Harding ave.
IMorton says much of the apart-
lent house's popularity directly
lems from its easy access to both
bwntown Miami and the heart of
liami Beach.
[Morton Towers, a 14-story, 588-
tiit structure, is under construe-1
on at Miami Beach on Biscayne
ay at 15th st. It is two blocks
buth of Lincoln rd. and ten mm-
les from the center of Miami via
he MacArthur and Venetian j
auseways.
| A typical two-bedroom, two-bath
artment, has a 13x19 living
om. a large dining area, and a.
illy equipped unusually roomy |
ptchen. Its master bedroom is
xl6 and another 11x14.7. There,
pe spacious closets and all-tile.
ith rooms in all the units.
Mackle Home
Deadline Nears
Deadline is nearing on the big
I General Development "Walk into
a Whole New Life" contest in
which first prize is a completely
furnished Mackle built home plus
a job guaranteed at $100 a week
for one year.
Contestants have only the week-
end to fill out blanks telling why
they would like to live in a Mackle-
built home in one of the home com-
munities Mackle is building for
General Development on both
Florida coasts.
When the contest closes at
midnight, entries will be for-
warded to the Reuben H. Don-
nelley Corporation, of New York
and Chicago, for final process-
ing. The winners will be an-
nounced several weeks later.
Second prize is a large homesite
at Port Charlotte or Port St.
Lucie. In addition, automatic
dishwashers will be awarded to
runners-up.
With the contest nearing a close,
General Development offices
throughout Florida report a sharp
increase in the number of Florida
visitors and residents entering the
offices to obtain their contest
blanks. Contest blanks also may
be obtained at any of the job sites
such as Port Charlotte, Port St.
Lucie, Port Malabar, Vero Beach
Highlands, Pompano Beach High-
lands and Sebastian Highlands, all
General Development home com-
munities.
Offices are located at Miami,
Miami Beach, Daytona Beach,
Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Jack-
sonville, Orlando, Silver Springs,
Tampa and West Palm Beach.
Hurst Running
In District 2
North Miami City Councilman
Harry Hurst this week announced
his candidacy for the office of
Metro Commissioner at large in
District 2.
A former teacher in the Dade
county system and now operator
of the Hurst Insurance Agency in
North Miami, the candidate has
held office in North Miami for the
past two years, having been elect-
ed vice mayor.
Originally from Kentucky, Hurst
spent four years in the U.S. Marine
Corps, after which he attended
Stetson University in Deland, Fla.,
where he was awarded a Bachelor
of Arts degree in education. He
also attended Stetson's law school
for a year.
A member of the board of stew-
ards of St. Paul Methodist Church,
Hurst also teaches a church Sun-
day school class.
"With my background in local
government, I will be able to bring
about better understanding be-
tween the voters of Dade county
and Metropolitan Government,"
says Hurst.
The candidate lives with his
wife, Peggy, and their three chil-
dren on Griffing blvd., North Mi-
ami.
S. Florida Body
Welcomes New
Director Sunday
The StirrrhFlorida mmcil oT
t h e Union of American Hebrew
Congregations will welcome its
new Southeast regional director at
.is annual spring meeting Sunday
at the Seville hotel.
Rabbi William Sajnwitz. w h o
takes over his duties officially in
Tune, will participa'e with the lo-
cal Council in its deliberations dur-
'.nj the day. and will be introduced
to the delegates during the busi-
ness session in the morning. Sam
A. Goldstein will preside at the
morning business meeting.
As director of the Southeast
region, which includes Florida,
Georgia, Alabama, Socth Caro-
lina and eastern Tennessee, Rab-
bi Sajowitz will make his head-
quarters in Miami. Previous di-
rectors had headquarters in
Alabama or Georgia, and the
shift to Miami has been made in
recognition of its rapid growth
within the Reform Jewish move-
ment.
A graduate of the Hebrew Un-
ion College in Cincinnati in 1945.
Rabbi Sajowitz has been serving
in the pulpit of Temple Beth El,
Flint, Mich., for the past five
years. Prior to that, he held pul-
pits in San Antonio, Stockton,
Calif., Wilmington, and Gastonia,
N. C, and was Hillel director at
the University of California. He
is married to the former Ruth
Dresner, of Chicago, and is the
father of two daughters.
Lunch will follow the morning
business, and three workshops are
scheduled for the afternoon. The
first will deal with 'Judaism and
Social Issues." and is scheduled
for 12:45 p.m.
At 2 p.m. delegates will partici-
pate in discussions on "Is the
Price of Religion too High?" and
"Our Responsibilities Toward the
Winter Visitor."
El Al Chooses
Boeing 707 Jets
NEW YORKManagement of El
Al Israel Airlines has announced
its intention to purchase two Boe-_j
ing 707/420 jets for delivery in
May and June, 1961, with an op-
tion to purchase a third aircraft
at a later date. Negotiations have
begun for the purchase contract
subject to financing arrangements
being finalized in the U.S. The
proposal has been submitted to the
Israel government which is giving
it its immediate consideration.
The Boeing 707/420. powered by
Rolls Royce Conway engines, has
KA8BI WILUAM SAJOWIU
Recruits in Novel
Army Ceremony
REHOVOTH Over 150 girl re-
emits in the Defense Army of Is-
rael, who have completed their
basic training, took part in a
swearing-in ceremony at the grave
of Dr. Chaim Weizmann in the
grounds of his home Monday night.
Among those who watched the
ceremony were Mrs. Chaim Weiz-
mann, widow of the first Presi-
dent; the Executive Council chair-
man of the Weizman Institute,
Meyer W. Weisgal; relatives of the
new soldier-girls, and overseas vis-
itors.
The gins were grouped around
Dr. Weizmann's last resting-place,
with the grave itself completing
the hollow square. The only illum-
ination was provided by flame-
pots.
It was the 100th course which
had been completed by girls of
Chen, the Women's Army Corps,
since the founding of the State.
a capacity of 144 passengers and a
cruising speed exceeding 600 miles
per hour.
El Al plans to commence com-
mercial operations on July 1, 1961,
on the New York to Tel Aviv route,
with stops at London or Paris,
Rome or Athens.
Jet-powered Britannia service
will be continued on the Atlantic
until introduction of pure jet ser-
vice, at which time it is planned
to offer Britannia service on Euro-
pean and local routes.
CARPET LAYING and REPAIRING
RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED
26 S.W. South River Drive Phones FR 9-1155 & FR 1-2007
ACE RUG CLEANERS
FURNITURE CLEANING
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
WOODV'S TEXACO SERVICE
Lubrication Specialists Got Oil* latteries Tires
'Service with Smile"
470 R.W. 5th STRUT
PHONE FR 3-9533
DRIVE WITH CARE USE SINCLAIR
VENETIAN SERVICE STATION
1
SINCLAIR GASOLINE GOODYEAR TIRES
370 N.I. 15th Street Phene FR 4-9457 Miami, Florida <
S. Benson Berger, candidate
for Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, is a practicing attorney,
resident of Surfside. and for-
mer West Virginia farm boy.
The post he seeks spends $7
million a year and controls
the citrus, cattle and agricul-
ture industries, as well as de-
partments of weights and
measures, state penal sys-
tem, pure food and drug act,
and leasing of some 22 mil-
lion acres of state-owned
land.
^H.
MjGUST BROS HY.
** c thi 31 sr'
Furnishers A Installers
Inlaid Linoleum Asphalt Tlk
Rubber Tile
"EVEHY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED"
Phone PL 9-22M
Phon* for Free Eitimatei
4256 N.W. 7th Avenue
" rampi fey ewd Nifftr Service"
McCORMICK-ROYETT
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
FOR SALES, SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE PI 7-0606
443 PARKWAY DRIVE MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA
NEED ROOFING? Specializing in Re-Roofing
BENTONE ROOFING COMPANY
"YOU'VE TRIED THE REST, NOW TRY THE BEST" "BfHNY CUUEUA"
4045 S.W. 113th Court Phone CA 1-6136


Page 12-B
+Je*isli ncrktlan
Friday, April 15. I960
m \ > i-:k
KIM.
ARTHIK'S
COIRT
By the
Singing Strings
JOHN LA SALLE
QUARTET
in the
CARRIAGE ClUB
Miami Springs
Villas
TU 8-4521 ArlBr
7i
Sflie xjcnest
tJooci
9h finest
Sewce
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNERS
OF TRADITIONAL
EXCELLENCE!
Served with Sai ra-
ttle tit ai Wines and All
the Trimmings, with
Special Emphasis on
Courtesy, for which the
Monte Carlo is famous!
VOC ftREENSTEIN, Catering Mg>
PHONE: UN 64721
On Th OCEAN AT IItk ST.
MIAMI 1IACH, FLORIDA
lltmklaX
iKiour HOIIL
STAR Dairy, Veg.
& Fish Restaurant
FOR PASSOVER WEEK
SERVING STRICTLY
PASSOVER MEALS
Breakfast Lunch & Dinners
Ml Washington Ave.
JE 1-9182
OUR SPECIALTY
NICE, THICK, JUICY
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
-AND THC VERY BIST IN TOWN!
BANQUIT fiCILITIfS
Candlelight Inn
till Commodore Plaza
Coconut Grova
HENRY LEITSON. Mn.r.
bonfire"
Largest Family Trade in Florida
ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY
Pearly Gait
by Hal Pearl
I Novinson Back from Seminar
Herman B. Novinson, an asso-
ciate of the Walter M. Pierce Ag-
ency for the Massachusetts Mutual
Life Insurance Co. in Miami, has
|" imi returned from Springfield.
Mass.. where he was a member of!
his company's thisd business in-1
surance seminar for career under-
writers. Novinson was among 44'
field representatives from 30 ag-j
encies in 18 different states who
attended. The seminar dealt with
the problems of business owners
and the place that life insurance
plays in helping business achieve
maximum stability, with emphasis
on rocent developments and-Uands
in the business insurance market.
A review of current- tax matters
was also on the agenda.
POLITICKING: The straws are getting an awful mauling in the
political wind. With May 3 primary voting time, the county and state
campaigns are heading down the homestretch in a blaze of ballyhoo
lor voters.
On the gubernatorial front, with so many candidates, and at least
four of exceptional calibre, it looks like a neckand-neck race to wire
among others Doyle Carlton. Karris Bryant. John McCarty and Bud
Dickinson.
And if you think there's confusion anent a final selection for the
State's highest electoral seat, that's nothing compared to the county
commission competition, with five seats open in the five districts, and
26 candidates eyeing 'em.
The Miami Beach Elks Lodge had the SRO sign up for its annual
installation dinner at the Seville, at which insurance exec Jimmy Lev
enson was seated as Exalted ruler, taking over from another insurance
man. Murray Sheldon, who did yoeman's work in the blood bank drive!
for his organization, with a great assist from chairman Eddie Newman.
It's a promise we won't mention again he's a look-alike for Stevcrino
of TV.
William D. Singer State Road Board chairman, has done a big job
in pushing the program for sorely needed expressways and causeways
in the South Florida area.
Add names to the sartorial honor roll on the Beach: realtor Allen
Goldberg and PR ace Hank Meyer.
Hal Herman, the publisher's rep, just awarded the ad and display
space concession at the Airport. Amazing thing about this industrious
lad. the harder he works, the more weight he gains!
At tht "celebrity table" fronting the dais at the Elks installa-
tion dinner, we spotted Judgo Milton Feller and his ever popular
Dena, Dr. Stanley Coltune, newly-elected five-year trustee, and prob-
ably on* of the best-known organizational men on the Beach, and his
chic wife Bunny. Also seated am on* Hve "celebs," the fashionable Al
Zablos. the young inheert Al Finkelsteins, with their daughter and
son-in-law.
Attorney Shirley Woof among the lucky localites to receive, and
accept, an invitation to the wedding of "Frenchy" and Marty Allen
at the bride's "headquarters," the Concord, in New York.
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: George Jessel. who s done quite a lot
of guesting on network TV shows, is making one of his infrequent but
always welcome in-person appearances at the Fontainebleau La Ronde.
He's the story-teller supreme! Jackie Wilson, whose "Night" recording
is on the national hit parade, shares billing with Jessel.
Bobby "Mack the Knife" Dorrin is back at the Deauville Casanova
Room, and the young set is having a grand time applauding one of i
their top recording favorites.
Sammy Davis continues through Sunday at the Eden Roc Pompeii.'
Tommy Sands, Frank Sinatra's son-in-law to-be, follows.
It's good news to know that the Coconut Grove Playhouse is due
for a reopening sometime in June if Owen Phillips is able to ne-
gotiate a suitable leasing arrangement with George S. Engle, too busy
with another gigantic project to continue at the helm of the smart
theatre.
Phillips has musical comedy in mind for the summer season.
FILM FARE: Miami Beach's own movie star, and stage and TV
comedy personality. Dick Shawn, is back in town via CinemaSropc at
the t'arib, Miami and Miracle. He's co-starring in the comedy of Army
doings, "Wake Me Up When it's Over," with Ernie Kovacs and Mar-
got Moore.
Dick Clark has his first screen role in "Because They're Young,"
with the TV teener minx Tuesday Weld, Michael Callen and Victoria
Shaw. Ifs at the Paramount, Coral and Colony starting today.
"Ben Hur.' which almost made a clean sweep of the Academy
Awards, holds on at the Lincoln. "Can-Can." a busy and light musical
with the activitated Shirley MacLaine. plus Frank Sinatra and Maurice
Chevalier, breezes along, color and all. on a two-a-day schedule at the
Sheridan.
(fltol
S fin.
MOTEL
Kosher Dining Room y>
Open to the Public **
A banquet every ^
night. Served from ^
530 to 8:30
For Reservations Phone ^
Norman N. Arrow
JEfferson 1-7381
THI WST, ]f* KOSHE FOODS
DINNERS from51.:tr,
Choice of 17 Main Courses
Free Wine, Seltzer A Knishes
WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN
1141 Washington Ave.
Beautifu'lv Catered
Affairs Call
JE 4-2655
ft*im*#
yncomparoHc
French Cuisine*
9516 HARDING AVE. ,
L*- MIAMI BEACH UN 6-1654
AT THE PIANO BAR DAVID LEROUX
ON THIS HOLIDAY, SUNDAY.
APRIL 17th. DINNER SERVICE
WILL BEGftf AT ONE P.M.
o
A NEW SUMMER MENU
WILL BE INTRODUCED
Of IN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m.
"THE ARISTOCRAT OF
KOSHER RESTAURANTS"
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Air-Coed. (JN 6-6043 Free Park
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth
N^A^V^V^Vrf'V^'U^^^A^^^V^S^rfVrf^-^^V^U^V^'\^^^XVrf^-^\~^U
"WE CATER TO PARTIES" Phone HI 3-4505
NEW SORRENTO RESTAURANT I COCKTAIL LOUNGE
3059 S.W. 8th STREET (on the Trail) Miami, Florida
Itelien Cuisine I fine Air Conditioned 260 Seating Capacity
"Plenty of Parking Room"
TIPS ON TABLES: The Passover holidays should give everyone
a good opportunity to reflect on the significance of the occasion and
the meaning of this wonderful period to one's self as an individual, to
one's famiy and to one's community.
Traditionally. Jews have always utilized the dinner table to philo-
sophize somewhat. What better place to do this in unpressuicd manner
than in one of the many fine dining spots in Dade county?
The Royal Palm is attracting guests who enjoy the tastiness of
meals that mother used to cook; the Revlin continues to be popular
lor that real "Jewish" taste.
The Slrath Haven |l fully set up to catch the atmosphere that goes'
with the traditional gourmet's delight, and so is the Rama* hotel.
I So mam of our tourist- ami home town folk have "discovered" the
* ami the C'oi It i runnly they deserve their
reputation.
i The Royal Hungarian, the Coronet and the reknown
are also Reared to tickle the salivary glands of jIih mot! particular
diner on the holn. DO,
Finally, the well-established EUrfenlal D tauranl Is a par-
ticular delight to the ou* who is looking for something different
Why not make the restaurant route your o -over
week? We're sure you will rediscover the holiday spun with some good
, Jewish eating.
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON
GORDON and PONT
^W^ ROSHI0 CATIRIIS
IsoW from hers sreevvres re e complete fcoffef
170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR 97996
Under Supervision of United' Kaihrut Association of Creator Minim
OPIR HOUSE WEDDINGS IAI MlfZVAHS RKIPTIONS
FAMOUS NUMIIR
MEAT PRODUCTS
m"
p&lO*
\^fe V- QUALITY
SINAI KOSHER SIAf C

Distributed by HI GRADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 29th Avenue poo "J^ ox ,.9.1


friday. April 15. 1960
vJewisti noridUan
Page 13-B
\^J o it 14 a r i
e s
NORMAN A. ROSSMAN
JJ, of i l.i. Proii hi ., jidi \,,, 11
here -1 n from Xh
\ orK, inul wilf ........,!., ,,j Temple
Israel und ihi \-.,, ,i, sur-
viylnK an hi- wife, .-a.lv. daughter,
MIhh Bally RimHman; -..m. Norman
and a brothi i and two grandchildren
Bervlces were Apr. 13 .,
M< mortal ''h.....i. utolTM.** *
MEYER GROSKIN
i7. of '"i" Weal ave., died Apr. II. He
'!l""' '"" even years n from At-
anta, and waa .. n tired real i (tale
iroki sin viviiii- are in* wife, FUn-
nle, and .1 daughter. Mr*. Hannah Bwote*. .-'. 1 \ i. u were Apr. 14 at
Riverside Memorial Chattel, Alton ni.
'I Burvlvlng ar< hie wife, Am. Ma:
'"" n nr .....I Jacob; two
ne Ktonkln and
'harlotte w .1 n< and sevei
di lllldri n. aMT r i.r. r M- .i I
1 hlldrcn s.
Memorial 1 ... k under tho
direction ol Gordon Kuneral 11..me.
MRS. EVA BUCH
-J. of 849 Venetian way, died Mar. is.
Mi. came here ten yearn mk<> from Bt.
awls, and waa member ..f Templi
Ki'i.niii-i-:i Burvlvlng are her hus-
band, Louis; eon. Milton; daughter,
Mri Mildred Goldberg: and hIx sisters
.111.1 iiv. grandchildren. Bervlcea ware
in st. lamia, with local arrangement*
by Gordon funeral Hume.
Miami Beach Home and Training School for
Jewish Retarded Children holds recent lunch-
eon here. Seated are (left to right) Mrs. Dora
Bialolenla vice president; Mrs. Ann TamaroH
corresponding secretary; Mrs. Irving Cvpen
life member; Mrs. Nathan Nash, board rnem-
ber. Mrs. H. L. Barber, third vice president;
Mrs. Ida Pinock. first vice president; Mrs. Fran-
ces Levy, board member. Standing (left to
KS? ?! ^nKatz. principal of Miami Beach
High School; Miami Beach Councilman Ken-
neth Oka; Mrs. Ella Wallman. founder and
president; Circuit Court Judge Irving Cvpen;
Jordan Davidson; and Israel Silverman
"'gjgL.i
o *1
SOLOMON LAZARUS
U, ..r ;omi h'W sth st., retired owner
of a MportniK goodi store, died Apr
II. He came here nine yaara ago from
Brooklyn, N.V He la, survived by a
daughter. Mm. Ethel AgM, a eon and
later. Bervlcea and l.urlal wen in
NOW York, with local arninx.in.nl-.
by Kiveralne Memorial Chape!.
MRS. MARGARET PHILIPS
" Ol ISM Pennsylvania ave., died
Ayr. 11. She oa..... hare six yaara hk.
from ("hlcago. Surviving are her h.is-
iiand. Eugene; a son, Andrew; daugh-
ter, Mra. tlllra Cole; three alatera and
four :;> .null ii: 1.1 11 Services were
A|ir. 14 at liurdon Kiin.ral Home.
DAVID BRENNER
a, ..r :;n|| Nw (th at., died Apr. it. He
am. here -'". years am. from Brook-
lyn, N.Y., and was a fellow Cab diiv-
er. Surviving are hie mother: Minnie;
brother, Nathan: and slater, Mra.
Kuth Bchrager Kervlces were
U at Hold.hi Funeral Home.
MORRIS ROTHSTEIN
It, of ISM Coral Way, died Mar. 17.
ii.- ...in. here ten yean ago from Jer-
ej City, N..I.. and "as a retired nian-
nfiimi. 1 of woman's clothes. Burvlv-
Ing are his wife, Baaaye; two sons.
I lav id and Irwln; five daughters, Mm.
Belle Hermann, Mrs. Itae Goldberg,
Mra. Lillian Helmowlut, Mrs. Bydell
Harding, and Miss Bogle Kothsteln: a
brother, slater and ten grandchlMri n
Services were Mar, 20 at Cordon
Funeral Home.
Apr.
R
iward-wining women at a Temple Ner Tamid Fannie Sklar. Ira Rosenfeld Ann Bernstein
2^^JUnCte,a' ,he.Eden RoC "d J^Ph Kahn. Mrs. Louis Cohen S-StoS'
ko el. Left to right are Mesdames Sam Green- presented the awards president.
Bid. Lather Carrey, Murray Shaw, Louis Gold.
"V
byi # K^ocialite
and Mrs. Abraham
mkel. of Miami Beach,
3rd American President
^es' SS President Cleveland
3r to its recent sailing from
Francisco. The President
eland calls at Honolulu,
kkohama, Manila, Hong
|ng and Kobe during its six-
kek cruise of the Orient. Mr.
\d Mrs. Frankel are on a
easure trip to Yokohama.
Continued from Pago 1-B
.lack Kratish, 8911 Carlyle ave., were hosts at the function in honor
cl their parents .
Steve Brenner, home for the weekend from Georgia Tech, planning
on another weekend for the wedding this Sunday of Dick Lapidus
P,res!?e"f of *'AFM radi0 stationand Paula Chertok His parents
lite William Brenners, entertained the couple with a dinner at their
home, the bride-to-be receiving a wedding handkerchief from Mrs. B. .
Mrs. William (Molly) Altman back from Texas, where she visited
her son, Paul, who is a captain in the U. S. Medical Corps, and his wife
Judith Making it a double round of parties for the Lapidus-Chertok
couple, Molly entertained at a party for guests including Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. William I. Brenner, Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Zeeman, parents of the bride and groom-to-be, and Miss Rose Perlman
aunt of the groom ...
Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Soroffhe's consultant to the Bureau of
Jewish Educationoff on a trip to Israel They'll be living in Tel
Aviv through August.
JACOB DUNN
ti'i. of 1100 Collins ave.. retired oil com-
pflny executive, died Apr. 1". Kurvlv-
Inu are his wif. Mary. ., -,,,, and two
daughters. Bervlces wen In Mew
York rity, with local arrangements b>
Rlveralde Memorial Chapel.
MRS. HANNAH GREENWALD
v.. '' *** "= i 1 i. av,-. aiad Apr. '.'.
She came here K years ago from At-
lanta;. Surviving are har husband,
Jonas; two daughters, Mrs. Bflsabeth
Rosner and Mrs. nian.he Slotnlck;
four grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren. Servlcea were Apr. 13
nt Rlveralde Memorial Chapel, Nor-
mandy lsl.\ The late Mra. ureenwaJd
and her hiistiaiid were the operators
of the ci-teii.1 hotel, Atlantic city, mi-
ni they retired and th.-tr children are
operators of the Sterling I.....I ..n
Miami Beach,
MRS. REBECCA STEIN
71, of 4L'x:i Prairie ave., died Mar. 17.
She 1 une here 12 yaara ai?o from
\.ark. N..I. surviving are three
win*. inelii.lin;: Martin: and three
daughters, Including Mra. Lillian Sta-
' In, both of Miami Beach B- 1
were Mar. N at Rlveralde Memorial
I'liaptl. Alton id.
ABRAHAM GOLDMAN
Ml. Of ITT". SW lth ave.. died Mar HI.
".....ne her-,, it years ago from
"'level,,ml. ami was a member of Tom-
ael. Surviving are a son. Sam-
uel, and three daughters, Lillian and
Jennie Goldman ami Mrs. it.is.- Ewlck.
Hi atoo leavei four grandchildren and
aat-grandc'hlldren. Servlcea were
Alar. IS at i;..rd..n Funeral Home.
MRS. ESTHER KAT2IN
7. ..I 7J". Nth t.. Hurfalde, died Apr
9, she came heri five years ago from
Jacksonville, N.C.. and Is survived by
rive sons. Including Ell and <:.....ge,
Miami, a daughter, 11 grandchildren
and I., great-grandchildren. Si
i'' re in itai. inh, S.C., with local ar-
rangements by Riverside Memorial
1 "ha pel.
SIDNEY ACKNER
IS, of lv>7 NIC 177th st.. died Apr. B.
11. came from Flint, Mich., 1 ghl yeara
'-" Surviving :ir.- his wife. Savin:
daughter, Mrs. Martha fJeller; two
.1 bi otha 1. and two gt and
children. Servlcei were Apr 7 st
Rlveralde Memorial Chapel, Normandj
Isle,
MRS. ETHEL CUTLER
71, .11 tall SW .17th ave, died Mar. 1.
she lame here -i\ v.ars ago from M
lantie City N.| Surviving are h. r
huhband, Borla: a daughter, Mrs.
Sfi|ihle Fadir; three sister, ami two
grandchildren, Servlcea were Mar. is
at Gordon Funeral Home.
MRS. MARY KAPLAN
7''. troNK 173rd t.r. No. Miami Hea.h.
died Mar. IS. She .am.- h.n* IS yeara
ago from New York. Burvlvlng are
daughter. Mrs. Sam .Wins, three
grandchildren, and rive great-grand-
chltdren Servlcea were Mar. 17 at
niveiside .Memorial 1'hapel, Normandy
Isle.

Guest Airways In
The South's only direct air serv-
ice to Europe, through the Miami
gateway, inaugurated Super Con-
stellation equipment on its sys-
lem last week.
Announcement of the new serv-
ice comes one year and more than
a million flying miles after Guest
Airways' first Miami Lisbon Ma-
drid Paris flight last March.
These new planes will fly the
mid-Atlantic on a plan which al-
lows travelers to visit as many as
12 additional cities and countries
at no additional cost, including
London, Glasgow, Brussels, Am-
sterdam. Frankfurt, Munich, Nice,
Rome, Vienna, Barcelona, Athens
and others.
ThJ novel plan allows Guest
pastengors to board Scandmav-
New Service
ian Airlines planes at either Lis-
bon, Madrid or Paris and visit
these extra places free. The
trips provide the choice of fly-
ing the mid-Atlantic from Miami
both ways, a return via New
York, or by the transpolar
through California.
"It's a big step toward making
the South, and especially Florida,
a major gateway to Europe," said i
Anker Palvig, Miami division man-
ager for Guest. An additional
flight was also scheduled for Aug.
1, giving eight direct flights week-
ly between Miami and Europe.
The majority of Florida cities
have been common rated by Guest
so that air fare on any leg of a
trip is the same as directly from
Miami.
DAVID THtERFIELD
''''' Of MM Itli si died Apr. *. He
came here 11 j ears ago from Ni w
York. Burvlvlng .....laughter, Mi-.
Roslyn Oaoler, and four slaters Kerv-
lces were \pr 7 at Riverside Memorial
Chapel, Washington ave.
PHILIP PECULLAN
'".. of ifMi nk isisi st., Mo. Miami
lie.1. h, died Mar |(. He
right years ago from Saw York, ami
"'- own.....r a gift shop, Bun vlng
- wife Blat hi : son, Henry:
danrhti r, I she; 1 ri .. nlstei and in 0
brothi Bet \ |i \i.,, ffl ., 1
Ide Memorial Chapel. Nor-
mandj tale.
DAVF SNETMAN
7", of in;, w ::,] ,,; ; .n,.,, M.,r M(, |
rame here U years ago from Mi
In., and was a member of Temple ls-
SAM MALLEN
".. of It 13 Meridian ave died Mar l.
He rump here seven yaara ago from
I-hlcago. Burvlvlng are his wife,
Tohie; two sons. Max and Flyman;
two daughters, ineiuiiing Mrs. Qladya
Laser; and seven gran.lehlldren. He
also leaves throe great-grandchildren.
* 1 1 Iocs were Mar. 1 < at lti>
Memorial Chapel, Washington ave.
JULIUS MAYER
74. i.f IS7H.I NW liith id. No. Miami
Reai h. died Mar. in. He .ame here
lien years ago from New York, and
was own.r or several resort hotels In
the Cutskllls Surviving are his wtfo,
rielen; eon, Phllto and two daughters.
m hiding Mra, Bat Hard Hart, Ml in I
Reach. Bervlees were in New York,
with loenl arrangements by Riverside
Memorial Chapel.
IRVING NEWMAN
M, <.r MOT Sheridan ave. died Mar.
1 :. He came lore seven years ago
from Brona. NY. and
He waa paal 1 omroand. r ..r
American Legion Post 1214 In New
.mi member of the 411 and 8.
Set t i. were Mar IS at Ith 1
Memorial Chapel, Washington ave.
MRS. HARRIET SOHMER
73, of 4:10 21st st.. died hare, She enme
I.. Miami \-^ \,.,i- ago from Forest
HiiN. N.Y. Burvlvlng are her Imsliand,
m.i 11-: daughter. Mrs. Florence Man-
hi mi and a sister. Bel
Mar. IS at Itlversii.. Memorial ChapeL
Alt.,11 ,.l.
laude Thomhill, one of the
kuntry'8 top bandleaders,
jd his orchestra are now
Jying a special engage-
ent in the Carriage Club of
Sami Springs Villas.
SCHWEBKE & ASSOCIATES, INC.
LAND PLANNERS ENGINEERS LAND SURVEYORS
"We Cover Greater Miami"
REASONABLE RATES PROMPT SERVICE
4841 NW. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI
PI 1-2592
3521 W. Broward Blvd. Ft. Uuderdale
LUdlow 14600
VOTE FOR
AND
ELECT
JOE RARES
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 4
PULL LEVER 7-G MAY 3
IM. Pol. Adv.


Page 18-B
+JeistncrkMan
Friday. April 15. IS
I
4
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASMNITH OF FLORIDA
RABBI OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR
I
M
^OOFAtR KOSHER MARKETS ARE
-h EDGED TO OIVE THE REST OUALITY
at Lowest price or your money back
the
meat and^PQuLtrv
h
1845 Alton Rd Miami Beach
163rd St. Shopping Center
2091 Coral Way
Coral Way at S.W. 87th Ave.
ra.
Uth DAY
APRIL
HOL HAMOED
17th DAY
NISAN
For your shoppmo. convenience we wi^be open
C Thursday.AH ^ **
For The Lore Shopper Your FoodIF*^Kosher MorKe*
ALL FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY AND TUESDAY. APR.L 18-19
Th. man,g.n,e, .nd empLyees ex,end ,o you ,nd your t.n
A JOYOUS AND
FESJIVEJ^M"
KASHRUTH SUPERVISION
REV. OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, W"^ ^^
REV. JACOB B. KATZ
families
STORE MANAGERS
caiii SIEGEL PHILLIP KATZ
MORRIS GROCER **"1 S,EGB
SIDNEY SUGARMAN


Full Text

PAGE 1

Page 10-A fJmist fhridHar Friday, April 15, I960 Monticello Pupils At Home's Seder The Four Questions were posed, the Seder table was set, and the Passover melodies were chanted when more than 25 students of the ; religious school of the Congregation of Monticello Park conducted a imicferSi-derTor residents at the Jewish Home for the Aged just before Passover. Under the direction of Cantor Ben Zion Kirschenbaum and education director Abraham J. Gittelson, the children presented a complete Seder, with Rev. Lazarus Lerer, a member of the Home and a former member of the congrega tion, acting as grandfather *t the table. The program was arranged by Marvin Schreiber, program director of the Home. Collection Goes to Brondeis WALTHAM, Mass — A private collection of material on Leonardo Da Vinci, considered by many experts to be among the most outstanding in the world, has been presented to the Brandeis University Library by Bern Dibner, Wilton..Conn., bibliophile and engineer. Almost 800 books, pamphlets, manuscripts, incunabula, and prints by and about Da Vinci are included in this collection, which has been consulted and used regularly by art historians and specialists in Da Vinci's life and times. CRHTINGS TO AIL Harry Zuckerman Construction of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital is scheduled to begin this week with the signing of the contract between Cedars of Lebanon Hospital and William A. Berbusse, jr., builders. The hospital, when completed, will contain 282 beds and cost $4.50fl,000. Witnessing the signing standing (left to right) are Harry Markowilz, member of hospital board; Sidney M. Aron-^ ovitz. attorney for Cedars of Lebanon Hospital; Dr. Stanley MargoShes, secretary of the hospital; Leon Black, jr.. of Kelly. Paige and Black, attorneys for the builders; Samuel J. Spector, trustee of the hospital. Seated (left to right) are Dr. Morton M. Halpem, hospital president, and Andrew H. Warner, vice president of William A. Berbusse, jr.. Inc. Jewish Life Normal in South Africa ADL Exec Will Speak Wednesday Arthur Spiegel, assistant direc1 tor of the Florida regional office, Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, will be guest speaker at a regular meeting of Beth Israel Sisterhood on Wednesday, noon, at the synagogue, 711 W. 40th st. His topic will be "Anti-Semitism: The i Current Scene." Personal films of various mem! hers taken while on trips to Israel will also be shown. The monthly birthday party honoring Sisterhood members whose birthdays fall during the month of April will be celej brated under the direction of Mrs. Murray Berkowitz, hospitality chairman. Continued from Pse 1-A ed to share Rabbi Kossowsky's views and were understood to resent the action of some Jewish groups in other countries "precipitately passing" resolutions criticizing the actions of the South African Government in handling non-whites. The Jewish rabbinical and lay leaders have stressed that the disturbances were a South African question and not a "Jewish issue" and that Jews abroad, like the Jews in South Africa, are not entitled to speak collectively as Jewish groups on such questions although they are entitled to have personal opinions on the issues. Meanwhile, the first official comment of the Israel Government on the South African disturbances was I made by Mrs. Golda Meir, Israel's 'Foreign Minister. *WWWAmM. I cof ^g jG&LFSTREAM J HAU-ANOALS, PLOniOA TOM DUPREE and SONS, INC. REAL ESTATE 1800 Bay Road fheee JE I 5224 MIAMI BEACH GffEETINGS BLY'S GARAGE General Repairs All Models 232 S.W. 2nd AY*. Phone FR 1-6804 TRANE AIR CONDITIONING ENGINEERS 261 N.W. 26th Street Miami, Florida Phone FR 3-7681 IN A HURRY CALL KIMBALL %  MURRAY THE LUXURY DRY CLEANERS 5705 N.W. 2nd Avenue Phone PL 8 5521 6220 N.W. 2nd Avenue GREETINGS I £v)OUST BROS K> '* la l. ft V r LATTA RADIO & T.Y. SERVIt To Have Your TV. or Radio "Correctly Repair Honestly Priced" Call LATTA i : r-i77i We Sell the Best and Service the Rest 11333 So. Dixie Highway Perrine, F / % r %  'tt s l



PAGE 1

P — A bill to provide free bus transportation for private and parochial FOSTER ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC Electrical Contractors RESIDENTIAL %  COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL ALTERATIONS MAINTENANCE PAUL FOSTEt, aresiWeaf AIR CONDITIONING and ADEQUATE WIRING 2244 W. FLAGlf.lt ST. HI S 2471 Night*. Sundays A Holidays Dial Nl 3-0*22 fOt BITTft HI ALT H VISIT TMF MIAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE Physical Therapy Body Ceatfitieniaa, General Diaf aosis ana X Jay Celank Irrif otient I Cs 'm ri and Massage Ultra Senic Therapy 7235 Biscayne Blvd. PHONE PI 7-7234 vhool pupils in Ne* York State, j I hich v. ould benefit Jewish parochial schools, has been passed j by the State Senate. The bill provides that the free; bus service must be furnished by local school boards for alt pupilliving within a ten-mile distance from parochial and private schools, i Until now, the local school boards hava not been required to furnish such free traval for pupils beyond a limit of eight miles. The bill was passod by a veto of l5- with all negative votes cast by Republicans. Under present legislation, a local school board may provide such free bus service. But. where the local board refuses to do so. the board may be overruled by the State Commissioner of Education who. it is known, frequently does so. One of the questions involved is whether the bill might infringe on the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state. In the Senate debate on the bill, however, that issue was not raised. The opponents criticized the measure only on the grounds that it would increase educational costs in New York State by about $3,000,000. distance to immigrants already in Israel and iee such new immigrants as can be anticipated. The board of directors will enter detailed agreement with the Jewish Agency for Israel in Jerusalem and will designate the latter as its agent to perform the necessary services :o implement :he programs and ictmties approved and specified in the budget by the board. With the aid of funds received from Jewish communities of the free world, principally through the UJA. the Jewish Agency for Israel has borne the responsibility of bringing to, caring for, and resettling in Israel nearly one million Jewish refugees since World War II. Dr Dov Joseph, treasurer of the lewish Agency for Israel, came especially from Jerusalem to attend ,n a!l^a> meeting of the 21 board members-designate convened by i Stone, national chairman of the 1171.1 He p .sented a detailed analyis of the budget and program of work of the Jewish Agency in Israel for the year 196061. The following have been invited %  o serve as members of the board >f direc'ors: Morris W. Berinstein. New York City: Rabbi I-idore Breslau. Washington. DC; Samuel EL Daroff. Philadelphia: Melvin Dubinsky. St. Louis; Max M Ki-h er. Detroit: Dr. Israel Goldstein. New York City: Dr. Nahum GoMmann. New York City: Abraham Goodman. New York City; Dr. Dov Joseph. Jerusalem: Mrs Rose I. Halprin. New York City Also, Rabbi Mordecai Kirshbium. Brooklyn. Philip M Klutrruck, Chicago: Albert A. Levin. Cleveland: Joseph M Mazer. New York City: Joseph Myerboff Baltimore: Dr. Emar.u?! Neumann. New York City: Louis Segal. New York City: Philip Stollman. Detroit: Dewey D. Stone. Brockton. Mass : Ralph Wtchsler. Newark. N.J Jack D. Wetter, New York City. All tho>e invited lo serve as directors, except Dr Joseph, are citizens and residents of the United Stales. An early meeting of the board of directors of the CIA is being convened shortly to take the necessary formal action to implement this agreement. The Jewish Ager.cy for Israel has already appro\eJ the agreement. Woman Attorney Named to Board Dons E. Weinstein. attorney and member of the Miami Beach and St. Augustine law firm of Weinstein and Weinstein. has been appointed to the City of Miami Beach public relations advisory board, it was announced last week at a City Council meeting. Miss Weinstein. listed in "Who's Who of American Women." is a graduate of Sophie Newcomb College and the University of Miami law school. She is secretary' of the Miami Beach Bar Assn.. secretary of the Miami Beach Democratic executive committee, attorney for and member of the Dade County Democratic executive committee, member of the Florida Bar and Florida Assn. of Women Lawyer-. jnd the League of Women VoterENJOY PURE JET SERVICE FROM MIAMI TO TEL AVIV Finest, li s t t ess f arl a hli way is travel! Fly 707 In s er t ont i nswul Jet eWect te I srael from Miami. Sispenst in Paris at no extra celt where yen connect srnn twirt Car a vans Jess In Tel Aviv. French fil ial* an tests, t ssss ins) tcssimy Fere only StnH. See yevr Travel An e nt or call A • France. Ft 4-2424. AIR FRANCE rDLmr ijt.:: .;•:• Lt.*i/aoa.rj asr •.: ia OPEN ALL NIGHT COMPLETE HALLMARK GREETING CARD DEPARTMENT AND CHOCOLATE SHOPPE SUNDRIES C0SMITKS PATENT rnfOICINES FfJtlODiCArt HOWARD JOHNSON'S ICE CREAM Phone JE 8-5538 1664 ALTON ROAD MIAMI BEACH NOW TWO BEST SELLING PAPERBACKS Jlte JL^eaal Encyclopedia ft, *^J~iotne and K £j$isinesS AMD •


PAGE 1

"eJewish Floridian Combining THE JEWIiH UNITY and THE JEWISH WE EK IY Volume 33 — Number 16 Miami, Florida, Friday, April 15, 1960 Two Sections — Price 20* New Body to Handle Funds for Israel EXECUTIVE IN FIRST REPORT Community Warned Of Financial Straits; Broad Reforms Urged Arthur Rosichan, executive director of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, declared here that "our energies have been expended in trying to catch up to our rapidly-growing Jewish community," but "we haven't kept up. We haven't gotten ahead." He aJto charged that "we are in a precarious financial situation, with very little cash on hand" and "borrowing from hand-to-mouth," that "we must raise double the amount of money we are raising, because without a strong Federation, this can become a very sick community.". offered these views 21-Member Board Formed To Control Budget of U.S. Jewish Philanthropy Abroad NEW YORK—(JTA)—Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of the Jewish Agency for Israel, and Dewey D. Stone, national chairman of the United Israel Appeal, issued a joint statement this week announcing that a plan has been agreed upon for active participation of American Jewish leaders in the handling of funds raised by the United Jewish Appeal for the United Israel Appeal programs in Israel. The plan has been evolved from + — discussions in recent months beARTHUR ROSICHAN sense of frustration Rosichan in • no-holds barred address last week te members of the executive committee of Federation at the Algiers hotel. The executive director, who asturned hit post in January, said at his report came after three lonths of observation. "For the Irst six months you keep your ears en and your mouth shut" in a sew job, he indicated. Said Rcsichan: "This is a proram I would have wanted to folw. but a series of events and cirimstances has made it necessary shorter; the period from six three months." The events, he labeled as (1) the results of his irisits with the Miami agencies of federatior, (2) meetings with the Jnited Jewish Appeal to determine JJA's 1960 allocation, (3) multiple ippeals, and (4) developments following the recent United Fund adiress by Sen. Harry P. Cain, present. Referring to his visits with executives of Federation agencies hero, Rosichan declared that he found "a real sense of frustration resulting from their inability to serve the community and its reeds properly—of their fooling of a job half-done." In a candid explanation, Rosifchan explained that "we are spending on local services less than onehalf of what the average community of our size spends—not because |he people don't need the service, bin because we are not raising the Confirm Report B-G Asked For Meeting With Nikita JERUSALEM—(JTA)—The fact that Prime Minister David BenGurion did request a meeting in Moscow with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was finally confirmed officially in Parliament this week. Mr. Khrushchev had told newsmen in Paris, before leaving the French capital, that there had been no request for a meeting with Ben' +€urion. Israeli circles here exAramco Defends Hiring Practices In Appeal Brief By Special Report NEW YORK — The ArabianAmerican Oil Company was acI cused this week of using questioni naires "that would make the NurI emberg laws look like the Boy I Scout Manual" to weed out Jews I from among employment applU This board of 21 directors will cants, each year coquet its ,wn bud This e wag ma(Je jn ^ gC rt !llJ?L{L P ^ mmi APRel'ate Division of the State Suactmt.es and programs of UM : ££ b gh d p ,. gration, absorption, resettlement, ? ,. ;..." pressed surprise. Finance Minister education and o, her philanthropic resenting Lev, Eshkol appearing in the Knesactivities conducted b y the Jewish Congress. set on behalf of Mr. Ben-GunonA for srael which it desires I 1 %  • 1\ I..1 .1 %  %  %  > .% %  # Mil ill*. .Ill ^^ to support and to what extent. In advance of each budgetary year, the Jewish Agency for Israel, will submit to the board of directors a survey of needs and an itemized statement of funds required in order to meet the needs of astween leaders of the United Jewish Appeal, the United Israel Appeal : and the Jewish Agency for Israel. The board of directors of the [ Jewish Agency for Israel, an American philanthropic body ; with headquarters in New York, i which will handle these funds, will consist of 21 members, of whom 14 are active leaders in fund-raising in their respective communities and in the United Jewish Appeal, to be designated by the United Israel Appeal, and seven to bo designated by the executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel. who is on vacation—set all unoffi cial reports straight. Prime Minister Ben-Gurion, said Mr. Eshkol, made a "formal" request to visit Moscow about four, months ago in a conversation with Michael Bodrov, Continued on Page 7-A Continued on Page 16-A Nazi Pressured To Quit Position BONN — (JTA) — Amid press reports that Dr. Theodor Oberlaender would soon take a lengthy leave from his duties as West GermaJ) Minister for Refugees, the' Minister said thii week he had asked for an early meeting with | Chancellor Konrad Adenauer. Pressure within Chancellor Ade-J nauer's Christian Democratic par> ty, of which Dr. Oberlaender is a member, for his resignation con-1 tinued to grow. The German Socialist party demanded a Parliamen-j tary investigation of the Minister's 1 Nazi past. He has been accused of JOHANNESBURG—(JTA)—Jewish organizations here are having participation in the wartime masno trouble in getting police permission for public meetings as required sacrc of Jews in Lemberg. in what under existing South African emergency regulations. Communal life was then Nazi-occupied Poland. | js proC eeding normally. Prayers for peace and security in South Africa Dr. Oberlaender became a Nazi were offered in all synagogues. + nonev to lurnish it." I 'n 132 and was a leading exponMany local rabbis were reported requesting that prayers be recited With respect to staff members of I ent of ,ne ,neorv i German's to be in disagreement with the call both for the security of the Union the American Jewish Jewish Life in S. Africa Normal as Prayer Offered The five-man court, headed by presiding Justice Bernard Bo tein, was hearing an appeal by Aramco from a ruling last July 15 by Supremo Court Justice Henry Epstein t h a t the company's employment practices violated the state's law against discrimination. The court hoard arguments and accepted briefs from both sides. It will give its findings later, Chester Bordeau, counsel for Continued on Page 6-A Continued on Page 3-A I "mission to I rope. civilize" Eastern Euof Chief Rabbi Louis Rabinowitz WV Calls for Firm Stand on Racism By Special Report WASHINGTON — JWV National Commander Bernard Abrams, of Jersey City, N. J., Wednesday harply criticized the Administration for its "lack of initiative in failing to protest to the Government of the Union of South Africa % n its callous and inhuman efforts' maintain virtual slavery of its native population through fear, bloodshed and tyranny." "If we stand for human rights," Commander Abrams said, "then we must stand for it all the way, both at home and abroad. When we fail to pass adequate civil rights legislation, when we fail to protest inhuman treatment abroad, when we allow ourselves to wali low in smugness and self-decepI tion, we seriously weaken every effort we make in our own defense and in the pursuit of our mutual aid and information effort throughout the world. "We make a mockery of our alleged leadership of t h e free Continued on Page 11-A of South Africa du.-ing the current racial crisis and for "political prisoners." Rabbi A. Kossowxky declared from the pulpit of Johannesburg's Central Orthodox Synagogue that the Chief Rabbi spoke only for himself and not for the Jewish ecclesiastical authorities of the South African Jewish community. Rabbi Kossowsky said that those authorities had always taken the view that the synagogue should not be involved in issues having a political character. Lay Jewish leaders were reportContinued on Pago 10 A lax Lerner Reports to You from Calcutta ... Page 8-A Dewey D. Stone issued joint statement with Dr. Nahum Goldmann this week, announcing plan for establishment of 21-member body to dispense American Jewish philanthropic funds to Israeli beneficiaries. (See story above.)



PAGE 1

Friday, April Jmisi) fkrkf&tr) Pag 9-A Gl's Around World Mark Passover Mrs. Naomi Brandeis, head teacher at the Temple Emanu-El branch religious school nursery, explains the Passover symbols to a delighted audience in the persons of Alice Leeds, Debbie Firtel and Bobby Weinkle. The beautifully-set table was prepared for the model Seder in which the entire nursery class participated last week. All of the objects displayed on the table, with the exception of fhe Haggadahs, silverware and candlesticks, were made by the children. NEW YORK — From a bleak U.S. station on an ice island in the Arctic, to the Navy radar-guided missile sites in the Leeward Islands in the Caribbean, U.S. Jewish GIs were able to mark the Festival of Passover Monday night thanks to arrangements made by the National Jewish Welfare Board. The single Jewish Gl on the ice land Bravo T-3 celebrated along! with some Passover boxes sent by i the Jewish chaplain in Alaska,) while the 30 men from the missile j sites were guests at the Seder for j 200 servicemen in San Juan, P.R., | set up by the local JWB Armed Services Committee. In Korea tern* 400 GIs and a number of Gl and civilian fanv ilies gathered at a Seder set up by. the two Jewish chaplains in the area and marked the festival just 13Vi hours before their co-religionists in the U.S. bei cause of the International Date Line. The Seder in Korea, like those held Monday night in the U.S. and in 72 overseas areas, was arranged by JWB, organizer of global "Operation Passover" for the military. This is JWB's 43rd "Operation Passover." [Center Planning Annual Dinner Plans are now being made for j Stanley Orshan. Guest arrangeninth annual dinner meeting of j ments are being handled by Harry Greater Miami Jewish Com-1 Wahlberg, with Mrs. Dorothy Fink ounity Center, it was announced By Clemen J. Ehrlich, chairman. lmittees have been appointed Dr the event, which is scheduled or Sunday night, May 1, in the ky room of the Dupont Plaza hoU. | George A. Simon and Marshall puer are in charge of arrangement?. The reception and hospitality committee is headed by Mrs. nward Dunn, assisted by Mrs. pilliam Sussman, Mrs. Leon Eprin, and Mrs. Herschel Rosenil. i Mrs. Walter Feltman is chairban of the reservations commitfee. She is being assisted by Mrs. lorman Gladsden, Mrs. Ray BerIn, Mrs. Philip Samet, and Mrs. 10NG DISTANCE MOVING to ail points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE ACE • n.B. VAN LINES. INC. 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue NE 5-6496 MIAMI 3HARM For Your WINDOWS' lALL TYPES OF CORNICES COVERED OR PAINTED SLIP COVERS and REUPH0LSTERY King Company "On the Trail" 3473 S. W. 8th STREET Phone HI 6-6872 TOPS IN CORNICES CUSTOM MADl OUAPIS .GRF^JGS *BILL TINDER GOLF PROFESSIONAL Biltmore Course essens by Apeoinfmtiil line ef SoHlne feeJement Blltimr* HI 6-0649 10 ANASTASIA AVE. j* and Mrs. Seymour Wang as assistants. Emergency arrangements accounted for the Seders and hospitality Monday night in Formosa, Saigon, Thailand, and Vietnam — all of which were visited by the Jewish chaplain in the Philippines before the holiday to see to the Passover needs of the military and civilian peersonnel at these stations and at other U.S. military missions in south east Asia. The Seder services in these re mote places were in addition to those organized by Jewish chaplains and local JWB Armed Services Committees, USO-JWB staffers in Japan, the I'hilippine*>Hawaii. North Africa, Europe, Iceland, Panama and Korea. In Korea, the Jewish chaplains provided Passover food boxes for GIs in remote places unable to reach the Seder held at the Passover religious retreat in Ascom City. These "solo Seder" packages, furnished by JWB's Women's Organizations' Division, came in handy at a U.S. station atop a mountain in Alaska, at Nike sites in the Arctic, on maneuvers, and on ships at sea. Thanks to emergency arrangements made by USO-JWB staffers on the west coast, • Gl on the USNS Sultan end • Jewish officer on the USS Shangri-La were eble to celebrate Passover at sea. When the Shangri-La docks this week in Rio de Janeiro, home hospitality will be provided for the Jewish officer because of the efforts of JWB, the World Federation of YMHAs and Jewish Community Centers and the director of the Jewish Community Center in Rio — the Associacao Religiosa Israelite. Forces. JWB is authorized by the U.S. government to serve the religious and morale needs of IS. GIs and hospitalized veterans. 1 The Four Questions were asked by GIs, or their children, Monday night in strange and exotic places, where rabbis and Jewish chaplains who had flown thousands of miles for services, officiated. Jewish chaplains, USO JWB staff and JWB Armed Services Committees met the Passover needs of men at over 660 military posts in the U.S. JWB committees worked for months in advance to assure Seders for men at lonely Nike sites, as well as for those at large bases like Ft. Dix and McGuire Air force Base, in New Jersey. Taking part in JWB's global "Operation Passover" were 370 full-and part-time Jewish chaplains, the entire USO-JWB field staff and 10,000 volunteers on local JWB Armed Services Committees. As a member agency of USO, I JWB, in its 'Operation Passover," is carrying out one of USO's basic objectives in ministering to the needs of Jews in the Armed Senior Citizens In Model Seder Over 100 senior ciitizens have already made reservations for a special Third Seder program to be held by the Golden Age Friendship Club of the Miami Beach YMHA Branch on Sunday at 1:15 p.m. Included will be the reading of many sections of the Hagaddah and eating of symbolic Passover foods. The Miami Beach YMHA, a Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, is a beneficiary agency of the United Fund and Greater Miami Jewish Federation. In charge of information is Robert Chazin. Harry Levin is president. At the conclusion of the Seder ... the thoughtful hostess provides Newport Filter Cigarettes. A hint of mint...the soothing coolness of menthol... in a blend of the world's finest quality tobaccos. Newport refreshes while you smoLc like no other cigarette! FIRST WITH THE FINIST CIGARETTES-THROUGH LORIllARD RESEARCH M'ffonl-200* //tttw aia'/ /%() > TWO HUNDRED YEARS OF TOBACCO EXPERIENCC OlM.MrBWri0a.



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Friday. April 15. 1960 +Jew 1st meridian Page 5-B • [ 1 1 1 %  SI ^ Sinai Auxiliary Plans Tours Through Hospital "The hostess with the mostest," Mrs. Irving Miller (right) receives award as the most fashionably dressed person at the fur ond diamond show held last week under the auspices of the Women's Division for State of Israel Bonds. The show was held at Mrs. Miller's home on Sunset Isle 3. A panel of judges, consisting of the leading fashion authorities in Greater Miami, selected Mrs. Miller as the person most fashionably dressed at the event. Judges included Mr. Wyatt, (above) who served as chairman, and Miss Edith Applebaum, fashion editor of The Jewish Floridian. Pioneer Women Honors Member Mrs. Ida Jacob Liftman, president of Pioneer Women's Club II, announced this week that the club will honor Mrs. Louis Marcus at the home of Mrs. Abraham Shedroff, 520 16th St., on Thursday evening, Apr. 21. Mrs. Marcus, a Pioneer Woman tor mary years, is known in the Greater Miami area for her work with the Child Rescue project. Mrs. Sarah Singer, chairman of Music Workshop Session Hilda Steuerman will discuss the life and music of Robert Schumann at the Music Workshop class Apr. 13 in the Miami Public Library Auditorium. Music harmony instruction and blackboard drills will also continue that evening. the evening, reports that a musiI cal program has been arranged | by Mrs. Sonya Weiss. Mrs. Louis Yelson will give a talk on Moetzet! Hapoalot, sister organization of : Pioneer Women in Israel. • • • Kadimah chapter is holding its annual Child Rescue party on Thursday evening, Apr. 21, at Beth El Congregation. Mrs. Marvin Copenhagen, president, and Mrs. Louis Silver, chairman, said that Mrs. Harold Shapiro wiii conduct a unique quiz to be followed by community singing. Mrs. Leo Goldman, who has just returned from a national executive board meeting in New York City, will report. The affair benefits the chapter's Child Rescue drive under the chairmanship of Mrs. David Mcltzer. Women's Auxiliary of the Mt. Sinai Hospital will conduct guided j tours of groups throughout the hos-i pital on a specific day and by ap-1 pointment. Availability of these' tours will be made to the public. | The project has been taken on by the Women's Auxiliary because I of the interest shown by the com-1 munity, individual organizations, i educational groups, University of I Miami officials, and high schools. Requests have also been made ; by visiting doctors, women's aux-| iliary members and employees from hospitals throughout the country, as well as from people visiting from other cities. They all want to know "How can I be shown around your new hospital?" I. Maislin, assistant director of! administration, assisted in training several volunteers of the Worn-! en's Auxiliary to guide groups of, people on a scheduled basis. The tours are to be conducted every Tuesday at 10 a.m., and if necessary, at 1 p.m. on the same day. Reservations may be made with Mrs. Maurice Yalman, of the Auxiliary office. The public will be shown the various phases of the workings of the hospital, from the first floor through the eighth. The tour Will consist of showing a typical patient floor, nurses station, patient's ( room, as well as the administrative, portion of the hospital. The groups will also be guided throughout the professional departments. X-ray, diagnostic and Fluoroscopy rooms. Blood Bank and the en;ire labratory will be Included. They will see the Cobalt Unit re-1 cently installed. Nurseries from the corridor may be seen, as well as the various clinics. After the tour, all questions will be answered in a 15 to 20-mmute question and answer period. Two guides will accompany 10 visitors. Heading the volunteer guides is Mrs. Lawrence Singer, member of the auxiliary and chairman of this project. Volunteers from the Auxiliary who will conduct the tours are Mrs. Arthur Burrell. Mrs. Leo Chaikin. Mrs. Rose Kaplan, Mrs. Dennis Quittner, Mrs. Arnold Seeder, Mrs. Marvin Silvers, Mrs. Harold Stone, and Mrs. Carl Susskind. Visitors who will attend the American Medical Assor* and American Nurses Assn. conventions during the forthcoming National Hospital Week will be taken through the hospital by a tour committee. 3-DAY CRUISES to NASSAU and GRAND BAHAMA LOWEST FARES... All Outside Staterooms! Featirinj Mth Daylight ni Starligkt Cruising in Bahamian Waters! Low cruise fares include all meals served in the air-conditioned dining room. Cocktail Lounge, Calypso Band, entertainment, dancing, complimentary cocktail parties; Cruise Director and Hostess; Continental Breakfasts served in your stateroom! Ship is your "floating hotel"— plenty of time to enjoy both ports of call. Sailing Tuesdays 11:00 AM • Fridays 5:00 PM Far ItsinratiMS sea any Travel Agent m tiO STEAMSHIP COMPANY The Low 3-day Cruise Fares Start at CtHpvttiiijn'll f#-HG Biscayne Blvd. & 10th St., Pier No. 2, Miami FRanklin 9-3836 r VA Changing Pension Law &L, Lunchtan*, T, Rcptlon, Bnqutt, Partloe, Oln nre .. from QO to 2000 ctrd In th manner of the Diplomat... on unhurried, •vr-ttntiv, soft-Dokn ••rvlc* that makat) •n avant of your occasion. Veterans who have been ineligible for pensions because their annual income was above limits prescribed by the present law may become eligible under the new pension system effective July 1, C. W. Boggs, of the Miami VA office, said Wednesday. The present law requires that a single veteran's income must not exceed $1,400, while a veteran with dependants may have an annual income of $2,700 and still be eligible for pension payments. Boggs point out. Under the new law a single veteran's income limit is increased to $1,800, and a veteran with dependents may have an income up to $3,000. THE DIPLOMAT HOIEl AND COUNTIY QU1 IJOO '••' of Ocman PWMMT Mll,-^<-fc-ll.M, Hwld* Flying lawyers to Nassau Fifty members of the LawyerPilot Assn., a national organization of flying attorneys, will make a two-day junket to Nassau on Apr. 23, according to Edwin Marger, of Miami Beach, vice president of the group. Marger, who flies a 1959 Cessna Skylan, was recently honored by the association for making a 12.000-mile flight from Miami to Fairbanks, Alas., and return, in connection with the opening of the '49crs Skyway. THE RECORD SPEAKS FOR ITSELF RE-ELECT JUDGE HAROLD R. VANN YOUR CIRCUIT JUDGE GROUP 10 YOU MUST HAVE CONFIDENCE IN THE JUDGMENT • INTEGRITY • HONESTY OF YOUR CIRCUIT JUDGE • QUAUFIFD BY EXPERIENCE • PULL LEVER 20-A MAY 3 Pd. Pol. Adv. RE-ELECT THELMA R. HARDISON YOUR CONSTABLE DISTRICT 3 Qualified Nine Years Experience PULL LEVER 49-A MAY 3 IVI. Pol. Adv. VOTE FOR A. JAY CRISTOL FOR 1 !" ^A A A A A A A A A A A. A. Dade County School Board GROUP 1 AT LARGE COUNTY WIDE LIFE MEMBER ROYAL PALM CHAPTER AZA Attorney • Former Special Asst. Attorney General of Florida • Naval Rererve Officer U-vvorsitv of Miami Honor Graduate PULL LEVER 44-A I Adv. <



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Friday. April 15. I960 JenistHerMian Page 3-A Community Warned of Dire Financial Straits Dr. Irving Lehrman will be guest speaker at the inaugural banquet of the Jewish National Fund Foundation on Thursday evening, Apr. 21, at the Fontainebleau hotel. The "by invitation only" inaction will launch the Foundation in Greater Miami. Purpose of the organization is to secure funds through wills, bequests and the assignment of insurance policies to further the work of JNF in its program of soil reclamation in Israel. Continued from Pag* 1 A the agencies, which include the |Greater Miami Jewish Community Center, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Jewish Family and Children's Service, Bureau of Jewish Education, Jewish Home for the Aged, Jewish Vocational Service, and Service for New Americans, the executive director indicated: "They are provided with few of the personal benefits which are the accepted rights of professional staff of other agencies throughout the country. We make allocations to national agencies which protect their staffs by giving them retirement, group insurance and disability benefits—but we do nothing of that sort for the people whom we expect to work for the community here. "It is no wonder," Rosichan charged, 'that we are having difficulty in attracting professional personnel. They are interested in something more than just the climate alone." Turning to his meetings with Morris Berirtstein, national general chairman of the United Jewish Appeal, Rosichan reported that Berinstein "indicated openly the poor repute in which Miami is held by the UJA—both for its fund-raising performance and for its payment record to UJA." Apartment Group Names Chairmen Four members of the board of directors of the Miami Beach Apartment Assti. were named by president Eugene Weiss to head vital committees for the coming year. Newspapermen, more than most of us, know all the political candidates their public records, experience and programs. They are quick to recognize such qualities OS capability, dedication, integrity and courage. It is significant that the candidate for Governor that leads all others in endorsements by Florida's newspapers is Doyle E. Carlton, Jr. In accordance with a plan presented to the board at its last meeting, Weiss named Frances White to head a special committee to seek a redistribution and equalization of taxes for (he apartment industry. Isidore Ruppert was named to chair the committee in charge of enlarging the "free rental bureau" of the association, while board chairman Sidney Rabinowitz was selected to spearhead the group in seeking additional city, county and member funds for increased promotional activities. Weiss will head-the. special committee formed to seek the establishment of a Dady County Tourist Commission and to seek the relocation of the Florida Development and Tourist Commission to South Florida. /atone CARLTON GOVERNOR PAID POLITICAL nvi FTI wr NT • V CARLTON toOOV. HT| HOQft*. ^ BREAK THE TRAFFIC BOTTLENECK VOTE YES EXPRESSWAYS MAY 3 paid oy vole rei tor Epiessvavs Committee Declaring that "some of his figures were wrong." Rosichan said that this did not alleviate the fundamental problem, nor the fact that subsequent events have indicated that the same attitude towards us is held by other national and overseas agencies." Declared Rosichan: "As a result of the conference, we were faced not only with the amount of money we owed to the UJA, but also with the problem we have ourselves in j collections, and the attitude of some .people in this community toward [the sanctity of commitments, a situation to which I am not accustomed because I had never seen it anywhere else." Warned the Federation executive: "We are ina precarious financial situation, with very little cash on hand, borrowing from hand-to-mouth, no reserves, no endowments, no capital funds—a situation which does not exist in any other community our size in the United States." In the matter of multiple appeal fund-raising — beneficiaries of Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal, las well as independent organizations, which launch supplementary jand unauthorized drives for money [during the CJA campaign — Rosiichan said that "every community ,has multiple appeals." But. he declared, in Miami "it is | concentrated during the time the i winter residents are here, and national agencies descend like beasts in a jungle." Charged Rosichan: "They have created in Miami a fund-raising jungle. The difference between ourselves and the other communities is that in other communities there is a very strict process of clearance. Here, the CJA does not have priority. Here there is defiance and disregard, and the only cause to which I can attribute this is the fact that the prestige of Federation as the central agency of the community is not what it must have been at some time in the past." As to the United Fund, the Federation executive said that "our lot and the lot of the United Fund are inseparable. Our United Fund should be raising $5 million, and we should be sharing to the extent I of at least 10 percent of it. This will take the whole-hearted participation of the Jewish community to I make the United Fund successful. Without our participation on an or| ganized basis, it cannot be successful." Calling for a strengthening of Federation as the over-all fundraising end community planning agency of Greater Miami Jewry, Rosichan said that.today "we are living with a constitution and bylaws which were written for a Jewish population of 7,500, and which are completely unusable for a Jewish community of 75,000. 1 They must be redone in order to give Federation the attributes not only of democracy, but the ability to get things done." "1 In a final "count down." Rosichan warned: "We are living a hand-to-mouth existence. We have ', neither reserves nor resources to meet an emergency. The United Fund, which should be a source of, | strong financial support locally, is tottering. The participation of .givers in this community is limited, and more must be secured. "But this will not have the desired effect unless the standard of giving throughout the CJA is increased commensurately with need. Our by-laws and constitution are not framed for our present day approach. We need a large delegate assembly, a smaller board, and a small executive committee." Nor, warned Rosichan, "rm we meeting the needs of the-people who have come to live in Miami, and whose needs are generated by our present-day pressures." 1 Said Rosichan: "We are face-toface with insolvency. We are faceto-face with disaster. We are dealing with crises rather than building for the future. We suffer from a condition in which too few communal leaders and not enough biggivers are personally involved in the planning and budgeting activities of Federation." Variety Show Sunday Variety show in honor of Yiddish radio and theater stars Ida Karp and Florence Weiss will be held ; Sunday evening at Hibiscus Auditorium. *•?. VJGUST BROS R>: £ J Is thv f lr.SJ 3 • CHECK THE JOB ... • CHECK THE MAN... THEY GO TOGETHER/ ELECT DOYLE MODERN WOOD INDUSTRIES, Inc. MANUFACTURERS OF + KITCHEN CABINETS OFFICE FURNITURE ALL MICA COVERED "Service and Merchandise Is Our Busineii" 1029 East 28th Street Phone OX 6-0771 commissioner FARMER • BUSINESSMAN CONNER AGRICULTURE of LEGISLATOR %  at*•• *• GORDON ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORKS INC. 7148 N.W. 10th Ava. Ft 3-7180 Have your roof repaired now; you will aave on a new roof later. "Satiafactory Work by Experienced Men" FIRST JOB? We can help you to make yourself Independent. A-k about our Ivife lntii ;tit.-f plan for younr men. \ A I IA\S 3200 S.W. 3rd Avenue. Miami Phane. ft 3-46H er HI e-9fS1 Ss|§ TODAY TA^^^T^P^] "~ ^~\~. ror anyone -A new tranquil who ^^ A real l"9" P |WF go od laugher PAttWY THOHA8 eaye: | A dream of a comedyP \xm m MARCO f)'( K KDVACSMOOftfSHAWN L. i-.t MASCOPG eo.o*iv a us*f CARIB MIAMI MIRACLE m UHTOIN iOAD MIAMI KACH OKN i PM. MS I FLASH $T7 DOWNTOWN OTtN 10*5 KM. MAClt MIU COIAL CAKES Off N 11 45 A.M. RAW Al .< HOW at POPULAR PUCES and emmmms PERFORMMCES! TKHERMKN M /AISPIKINO ree#Micoto* TODAY %  jfaflflfeg jgfc S&tfL .yjaaaaaaa^aaa^^ TV JO*t>*# **& *-"•*• '* SOUTH &*** loSulfe-sl-^Bpgi jirniE-mpr I'JWW HJWf.MflTHCISMS ^tefotitZfotclfoafte) Beach 420 I NiOU



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Pace 4-A +JmUtincr*Mam Friday. April 15. 1960 ~ Jewish Floridian OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-46C5 Teletype Communications Miami TWX MM 396 FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MTNDLIN Executive Editor ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Aviv. Israel RAY U. BINDER C orrespondent Published *r*ry Frl'lar rtnp 1*17 by Tb Jw1h FVrldlan at 110 X E. -sixth Slr*t. MUrol '.. Florida. Enirnl as s*o.mi-c!assi matter July 4, :-" •. at PPI Office of Miami. Florida, under the Act of March S. ISM. The Jewish Fleridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity ana the Jewish Week!/. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Assn.. American Assn. of Englis h iJewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn. The Jewish Floridian doe not guarantee the Kaiiutb of the merchandise advertised in its columnSUBSCRIPTION One Year S5.00 RATES: Three Years S10.00 Volume 33 Number 16 Friday. April 15. 1960 18 Nisan 5720 The Community's Single Choice Seems Clear In his first report to the executive % % %  LP* ^fc committee, Arthur Rosichan. execuW. X> E* ^d rive director ol the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, has sounded a note of great solemnity. The report, the result of his observation of the community since his assumption of Federation's directorship three months ago, does not mean to be alarming or deliberately sensational. It is a sober assessment of our financial affairs, as well as of our Jewish civic and philanthropic capabilities in the immediate future. It is indeed true that we have arrived at a crossroad in the life of Greater Miami Jewry—that we must determine now whether we shall move ahead, retreat, or wander in aimless circles. Part of the answer lies in the extent to which both our leadership and the community at large can honestly assess the extent of their responsibility in the dilemma portrayed by the report to Federation's executive committee. This means shoring up the holes in our battleline for an integrated Greater Miami Jewry — one marked by intelligent planning for the overfc all good, as well as by a cooperative, controlled central fund-raising process. Part of the answer also lies in our maturity %  —the degree to which we are capable of meeting the challenge posed by the report, with an eye toward looking ahead rather than behind, and with a capacity for honest and even uncomfortable self-criticism. The report, we feel, has been rendered in the belief that both our leadership and our community are endowed with these capacities. It is now up to us to act upon the report. We can not stand at a crossroad too long. A choice must be made. The single choice for us—one based on progress for the best interest of an expanding Greater Miami Jewry—seems clear. Aramco in Court Again The Aramco case in New York continues unabated. The Arabian American Oil Company is still determined to defend the "rightr.ess of its hiring practices, which bar Jews. Last July 15. Supreme Court Justice Henry Epstein told Aramco that it had to abide by New York State's fair employment laws—that the Arab countries were not going to reach into the internal affairs of this country in order to govern the destiny of its Jewish citizens. Aramco is now in the New York State Appellate Division to argue in favor of its policy as a "practical necessity." Its able opponent is the American Jewish Congress, which deserves the commendation of all decent-thinking persons who find Aramco's position repugnant to the highest principles of this nation's traditioncl democratic freedoms. Haifa's Story Corrected Nikita Khrushchev's game of rhrmntss with French journalists once again proves this man's political opportunism. Evasive about questions pertaining to Soviet Jewry, be was firm on one point: Israel Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion had not asked him tor a toce-to-toce meeting, and he therefore couldn't comment on whether he would accept a roggesnou for one. Mr. Ben-Gurion has now politely put the lie to Nildto. A request for a montimj between the two leaden was made as iar back as four months ago. This is the man — and the nation —with whom Western leaders will m e et at a summit cantorence in May. In the name of peace, the KEEPING A CLOSE WATCH The New UJA Organization The reorganization of the United Jewish Appeal fund-raising structure is the result of many things. Among others, it is the acquiescense to several pressures. For many years, Arab propagandists have insisted that the UJA should be denied taxexempt status because it is not a "purely philanthropic" organization. A good deal of United Jewish Appeal money, they have alleged, is used for purposes other than ingathering and resettlement—two programs which, more than any other, the Arabs would like to undermine. Joining them in their allegation have been the highly vocal if numerically few members of the American Council for Judaism, whose distaste for identification with Israel is more than matched by the overwhelming amount of time they spend fulminating against her. The result has been an Internal Revenue Department overhaul of the UJA fund-raising structure, with special emphasis on the actually small amount of money dispensed to political parties in Israel as a means of keeping them from launching campaigns here on their own. This has also inevitably meant a reorganization of Jewish Agency status, with Zionist groups henceforth to take an increasing share of responsibility in the picture vis-a-vis American Jewish and Israeli affairs. The Internal Revenue Department's curiosity has been, at least for the time being, allayed. But the probe coincidentally succeeded in bringing to the fore previously underlying prob terns with respect to the relationships among: 1) the Jewish Agency; Z) the Zionists; 3) the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds — overall body of Jewish Federations, such as Miami's, throughout the United States and Canada; 4) the United Jewish Appeal. Ann o un ced this week is a new 21-member ony in imtiou intended to reconstitute these relationships. (See Page 1-A) Whether it will be successful or not remains to be seen. For the foct is that the full story has yet to be told with respect to the problems among them — problems principally centering around control over budgeting and the philosophy behind fundraising for Israel in the A m eric an Jewish community. ^^^ during (he week s^V^-rfssW ... as i see it 1 by LEO MINDLIN T HIS IS THE Passover season. It is a time that speaks to us of freedom—a status of humanity for which Jews, particular!y. have longed throughout the centuries because it was denied them so wilfully It would seem that in twentieth century America a psychic change should certainly have taken place among us. No one expects the impossible; sensitivity toward anti-Semitic expression is w>t easily excised—especially not when such expression continues to exist in varving forms and in equally varying degrees of intensity or passivity. As a matter of fact, it is the passive kind of anti-Serr itism that suggests we remain vigilant. The active presumably shocks even our non-Jewish neighbors—especially when we prod them into making statements about it. and gingerly invite them to our pulpItj to tell us how unGodly it all is. Nevertheless, we are emancipated. In historical perspective, modern society — the mid-nineteenth century to the prese-' — has brought the Jew to hihighest level of integration in Europe and America. The martyrdom of the Six Million may have served to remind us of the artificiality of this recently-acquired status; but it is one which we can hardly deny. Why. then, do so many of us play the subservient footman's role? It is one thing to be on guard; indeed, it is a sorry truth thit all men interested in freedom and the priceless value of personal liberty must be vigilant today against the manifold forces within this very nation eager to crush them. By joining the guard. Jews render perhaps the highest service in the restricted battle against anti-Semitism, as well. -:• WINK Of CONfOtaUST PtfSSUIfS world hopes for the success of Ha But how optimistic can we be when untrustworthy l int se m e n are mvotolly involved? BUT SHOULD WE play the toady? I have here in mind the psycbol** ogy of the ghetto Jew. who often quoted a Hebrew expression to rationalize his contemptibly mild conduct in a case where rrore militant action would be the mark of the true man. Freely translated, the expression asks: "What will the Gentile say?" Unfortunate'y. it is not only a rationalization, it also betrays the extent of the qu -aoner's fear for the world in which be lives. If this kind of subservience was confined to the Jew in years gone by. it is sadly common to contemporary America. In nauseatingly typical suburban fashion, aren't we all concerned with'what oar neighbors will say about us. and how it will reflect upon our status? Thishift from the anti-Semitic particular to the anti individual.s: eeneral suggests the need for an interesting sociologic study that would embrace the attack, to which I previously referred, of confornism upon personal liberty. Nevertheless, burdened with conformist pressures that are in a sense protective coloration against anti-Semitism, so trta-.y of us genuflect before our non-Jewish colleagues as a generous means of showing our decency. Many of our Jewish community leaders, spiritual and o'heruisr. are a case in point. When the Rt. Rev. William Barry, pastor of St. Patrick's Church of Miami Beach, recently marken the fiftieth year of his ordination and the thirty-fourth in h.s present pulpit, a whole host of Jewi turned out in a flock to sing hosanna tfl the Monsignor with a kind of enthusiasm and numerical strength that left little room for his own parishioners. TMf MAMftSTAriON Of Mint IN A VERY real sense, this was a laudable community-minded expression that even rose above the merit displayed by many of the-e men who several years ago banded together in a gesture of to name 41st Street after that great if talentless, aggressive if boring, and child-faced if dictatorial personality. Arthur Godfrey. Indeed, it would require no comment here at all were these leaders of ours as enthusiastic about their own affairs—were they, as an example of the sublime compared with their subliminal, to be as moved by Jewish Book Month as they seemed by the Moosignor's celebration. What the Rev Father has on our leaders. I confess, will ever remain a .mystery. But it certainly must be a powerfully attractive force. When the Greater Miami Jewish community recen:!v rose to the occasion to support the construction of a new $10 million M:. Sinai Hospital, the St Patrick s pastor was called upon to invoke the hospital—which he promptly, and properly did. so far as be was concerned, in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost. Mt. Sinai is a beautiful medical institution, one of which we may be justly proud. I tenderly submit that its Jewish sponsors m.-ht have manifested some of that pride. Nor is it ended. The Hebrew Academy, after years of fruitless March to find a construction site for modern and much larger quarters on Miami Beach, is currently petitioning the City Council for the right to build on a plot near St. Patrick's. I do not here enter into the controversy over the Academy's last effort—one which involved zoning laws and their interpretation by the courts. In this case, however, I have been told that two of the City Couarilmea last week m-tructed Academ> officials first "to check with FT. Barry." r Mtwn MASS cowctm QNE OF THE City Councilmen has since—and perhaps with some w justification—denied the allegation What had been meant, be declared, was that a preliminary conference could facilitate the prol *' s ,B ^ th p ,uion % %  n %  •tentative to staking the process, itself, a battle arena. The other Councilman, incidentally, did not avail himself of the opportunity to comment on the allegation It is to be hoped that, in this case at least, our leaders will show more concern for Jewish Book Month than they have is the past Mtef we.still, in this age. wonder What will the Gentile say." and bow before him to temper his possible wrath? It merely stakes us all the more ludicrous as we join in the newer aaass taauii over "What will our neighbor say?"



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Page 18-B +JeistncrkMan Friday. April 15. IS I 4 UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASMNITH OF FLORIDA RABBI OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER. DIRECTOR I M ^OOFAtR KOSHER MARKETS ARE -h EDGED TO OIVE THE REST OUALITY AT LOWEST PRICE OR YOUR MONEY BACK THE meat and^PQuLtrv h 1845 Alton Rd Miami Beach 163rd St. Shopping Center 2091 Coral Way Coral Way at S.W. 87th Ave. ra. Uth DAY APRIL HOL HAMOED 17th DAY NISAN For your shoppmo. convenience we wi^be open C Thursday.AH ^ ** F or The Lore Shopper Your FoodIF*^Kosher MorKe* ALL FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY AND TUESDAY. APR.L 18-19 Th m an, g .n,e„, .nd empLyees ex,end ,o you ,nd your t.n A JOYOUS AND FESJIVEJ^M" KASHRUTH SUPERVISION REV. OR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, W" !" ^ ^^ REV. JACOB B. KATZ families STORE MANAGERS CAIII SIEGEL PHILLIP KATZ MORRIS GROCER **" 1 S,EGB SIDNEY SUGARMAN



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Page 2-B -Jemist Heritor Friday. April 15. i960 'Bond Voyage' For Pioneer Women Workers Two Pioneer Women members and workers will be banneed at a Bond Voyage" and sapper snack oa Saturday Apr 30. in the B carne Terrace hotelMr. Ida Bookpaa aad Mr* 1 E Geadmaa will receive Wo en o: Valor Awards. Guest speaker will be the aaUooai president of the Pioneer Women Organ. zt t.on. Mrs. CTara Left. The occasion will also mark the departure for Israel of Mrs Bookspaa MrBookpan was the award winner of a free tnp to Israel at a French Israel fashion show last October spo ns ored by the Wa if 's Division for State of Israel Bonds. The round tnp to Israel mil be via Air France to Parhen via El Al Air Lines to Tel Aviv Members oi the Labor Zionist Organization IB Greater Miami are expected to turn oat in force to pay 'nbute to MrBookspan and Mrs Goldman on the occasion of their awardas Women of Valor. The Woman of Valor Award is the highest presentation which the Women's Division for State of Israel Bonds can present to a worker It is given to women who have bought or sold a minimum of $100 00* in Israel Bonds. Co-chairman of the supper snack and "Bond Voyage" will be Mrv Harriet Green and Dr Simon Wil en.-ky. In addition to the presentation oi Women of Valor Awards to MrBook-pan and Mrs. Goldman, members of the Pioneer Women's "realization who have earned (hen Awards will also be h->no.ed The present it.on of awards to MA. Bookspan and Mrs. Goldman will be in recognition of their "un tinng and selfless efforts on behalf of Israel and the Israel Bond cam paign." Since the inception of the Urael Bond program ten years Representatives Named to Ch. 10 Mrs. Larry Fnedland and Mrs. sentation each week on WPST Gerald Soft! have been named repMrs. Fnedland and Mrs. Solti resentative* to the WPST. ch 10 are active with Federation and ia j Community Council, it has been an-' the Combined Jewish Appeal n ownc e d by Mrs Jean C. Lehman, pre si dent of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations. They will confer with representatives of other women's service groups on tb* select-on of commumty serrice programfor preNew and delicious! Mrs. Ida Bookspan icenier, is seen with hostesses of Air France and %¡ Al Air Lines when she received the award of a free round trip to Paris and Israel. Pioneer Women Set Jerusalem Conclave UUlLNO KOSHER NEW YORK — The annual national board meet.ng of Pioneer Women the Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America, has called upon its 3S.O0O members in all sections of the United States to attend a special conclave to be ponored by the Organization in Jerusalem next October. At the closing session of the twoday meeting in the Sutler Hilton hotel, the national board of Pioneer Women summoned the Jerusalem conclave for the double pur\J -• -f 111 enabling our membership to evaluate the accomplish men:of our social welfare and educational projects in Israel in the past and to blueprint program readjustment for the future, and <2> to launch the worldwide celeFREE A stimulating guide for youngiteri and sdulison the custom*, tradiions and obterv* of Judaism. ago Mrs Bookspan and Mrs. Goldman have been at the forefront of activitieN on behalf of bonds in Greater Miami. 'YOU* JEWISH HERITAGE b primed ia Fnrjidi-an inspiring booklet for every home aad everyone %  • it. fOt ntli COPY. Mad rtquesi lo: Ray Keafor. Krifi Food* Coapan). Park Atcoue, New Vodt 1W.N.V. oration of the 3Sth anniversary of Pioneer Women." Founded in October. 1325. Pioneer Women spends more than Si Quo 000 annually en a many fac eted program of health, education and vocational training for women and children in Israel. Mrs. Clara Lelf. of Brooklyn. V V national president of Pioneer Women, announced that ar rangements were near completion to transport members of the organization to the Israel confer ence next Fail She estimated that upwards of 1.000 members would make the trip. The board voted al-o to author ize an immediate transmission of $100,000 In Pioneer Women in-ti unions in I-rael to assure a hap p:er and more meaningful Passover observance for the m a n > thousands of women and children who benefit from our program SLICED PASTRAMI : K to* watch TV enje* the > natty flaw of Sams for* cheese Great *er snacks ma aackers and trait 6 haadyrii open' mtHfo. TM( OMCMUi Swiss ..KNIGHT* FRESHLY SLICED r.KCLIM PACKED! BEIDY TO SERVE %  m Suganne Ask for All VVILNO Kosher PRODUCTS Corned Beef, Pastrami, Salami, Bologna, Krispir Frankfurters T rooe STOWS I I I I I I I I t I I I I I 0KOSHER ZI0N *•% KHU 9Uf n$99€7S • nrnntt tar • IrVEl SAUSSCE • nUMFNTOtt • PUTMUM • MI ecu A 1TIUMM KUCaTBSKS. StntMUtm I ItsTMVMn KOSHER ZI0N SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO 159 See* Water Market, Chicsf. t, Hliaeit Kahaner Women Plan Carnival Apr. 23 is the date of the annual Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood carnival, with all funds going to the building fund campaign of Congregation Monticello Park. There will be games, auctions, refreshments, and booths. This is Sisterhood's largest fund • raising affair of the year. The congregation is now encaged in Ms final campaign to raise $70,000 in 70 days, enabling it to complete a new synagogue and .school building. The sanctuary i now under construction and will be completed by Sep. 1. STEVENS MARKETS FEATURES WILNO KOSHER SAUSAGE CO. (of Chicoeo) MIAMI MAMCM 2111 N.W. 10th AVENUE Fhone Ft 1-6551 wuowHrrETUW 7 Ox. CAN 39 / ry 1F*19 EXCIUSIVE oisreisutots roe HCMUOA COASTLINE PROVISION CO.. INC. ess a SCAYNE STREET MIAMI *CACH PHONES JS • %  Jf S-4231 4CRMAN PEARL AT OEAMM e In Miami it's FLORIDA-FOREMOST DAIRIES ft Home Deliterf PhoneFR 4-2*21 Tho freer naaae in da*>y preen FRANK J. HOLT, Manage* CHICKEN Of THE SEA REFRIGERATOR SALAD •report a small package of lemon or hme flavored geUtin atfda Family Sue can of Chicken of the Sea brand tuna and' P*em> of chopped nuts and eatery for crunch. Its fancy eoufhfoir luncheon guests and thrifty as can be! Serve with hot buttered biscuits, for a supper surprise tonight' C A*-*** of Ik* Sea, P.O. Box 2111. Long Brock 1.1 Wi/ernie. X TUNA COSTS so urne... IT ntrs TO BUY me aesT-me aw/ate nuer TUMA.' wnr ssrne rox ussf


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II Page 6-A •*.Jewisti fhcridicuri Friday. April 15, I960 Hebrew Academy and its affiliate groups bid a Bon Voyage to Mr. and Mrs. B. I. Binder last week at a reception at the Fontainebleau hotel. Binder (left seated), president of the Academy, hears Rabbi Alexander Gross (left), principal, and Samuel Reinhard, vice president, offer the couple best wishes for their trip abroad. Other speakers included Harry Genet, chairman of the executive committee; Louis Merwitzer, first vice president; Mrs. Joseph Shapiro, president, Hebrew Academy Women; and Mrs. Jonah Caplan. president, PTA. Only GUEST Flies to EUROPE Directly from Miami. Visit Europe's Most Interesting and Exciting Cities on GUEST Extra Giles Bonus Plan. Fly to TEL AVIV via GUEST "Route of the Sun" for Only $934.20 Y ECONOMY CLASS ROUND TRIP PLUS Guest Extra Cities Bonus. See as many as 20 Extra Cities at no additional cost. Uuest AtrovMS Meua, 301 S.L Stand St., Miami. FU. FREE Pleas*. Mnd mt folders on your Sun jnd-Fun Holidays. Mr./Mrs./MiS. Address City _SUti_ Aramco Defends Policy in Appeal Continued from Page 1 A AramcoTargucd that being Jewish or having Jewish connections was "a bona fide disqualification" for employment. The Saudi Arabian Government will not admit such persons in its territory, in which Aramco carries on its field operations. Polier. a national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, said: "We are not complaining that they do not hire Jews and send Jews to Saudi Arabia, since even the United States Government cannot send Jews there in the armed; services." Ho said the AJCongress objection was to the questioning of applicants on whether they were Jews or married to Jews. Comparing this process to the Naiis' infamous anti Jewish Nuremberg code, he charged that the company asked questions even about "remote relations" who might be Jewish. These questions, he said, should Rabbi Rosenberg Chairs 3rd Seder Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, spiritual leader of Beth David Congregation, was this week named chairman of the Third Seder to be sponsored by the Israel Histadrut Committee of Greater Miami on Saturday evening at the Fontainebleau hotel. Cantor Charles hneiaon Kodner, of Temple Beth Am, will conduct the musical program. In accepting chairmanship of the affair. Rabbi Rosenberg declared that "Histadrut, representing one orgeniied labor movement of Israel, has been one of the most positive forces responsible for the growth and development of the Jewish State, not only since 1948, but also prior to that." Confirming his acceptance of the appointment, the Beth David spiritual leader added "there isn't a single visitor to Medinat Yisrael who does not return tremendously impressed with the achievement of Histadrut." Rabbi Rosenberg is a member of the executive board of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, member of the board of the Jewish Home for the aged, chairman of the South Florida Council of the American Jewish Congress, and is on the board of the Dade • 'ounty Council of Community Relations and the American Civil Liberties Union. be left for the Saudi Arabian Gov-, eminent to ask if t h e occasion arose. The battle over Aramco employment policies has gone on for ten years. Justice Epstein's ruling contradicted the findings of Nov. 10, | 1958. by Elmer A. Carter, now chairman of the State Commission Against Discrimination (SCAD), i who was then the investigating; commissioner. Justice Epstein decided that the 1 AJCongress was entitled to the status of a "person claiming to be aggrieved" under the antidiscrimination law. and that the oil company was guilty of discrimination. He referred the AJCongress complaint back to the commission for appropriate action. The commission did not appeal from his deciMon. but Aramco did. If the Appellate Division upholds Justice Epstein, legal observers said, it will probably mean full reconsideration of the matter by SCAD. Bordeau, of the lew firm of White and Case, argued that the AJCongress complaints were unfounded both because discrimination wes a practical necessity and because the AJCongress was not qualified as an "aggrieved person" under the law. The AJCongress brief said that it recognized that Aramco could not overcome the Saudi Arabian refusal of visas to Jews and so could claim a "bona fide qualification" exemption from hiring them for work that would require them to travel there. But it said the company should "stop assisting Saudi Arabia m discriminating against Jews." It asserted that there were more than 400 employes in Aramco's New York office whose work would not require travel abroad. &J0L SEABOARD Dinner Donee Saturday Reshone B'nai B'nth Girls will hold a dinner dance in the Charlemagne room of the Deauville hottel on Saturday at 8 p.m. Miss Barbara Levinson is in charge of information. Best Qualified -By Far My travel agent l$_ IW, f iiiilii In Afcft Snbm to, Caasnl Sate Aajoa Wsfttstos i Luxury and Courtesy when you travel ^ NORTH! RELAX in the gay holiday setting of a Seaboard Streamliner. See how tense nerves loosen up as you view the lovely countryside through the windows of roomy lounges—the tovern observation car, modern center-lounge coaches, the Pullman-travel Sun lounge on the Silver Meteor. Mealtime is o delicious, thrifty treat, the exclusive "Hospitality Hour" o refreshing interlude. Taking the children? There's a REGISTERED NURSE aboard, as well as a Passenger Service Agent, let the miles slide by swiftly and safely, with nothing to mar your peace of mind ond everything to gain from Seaboard's cheerful, courteous servicel & GREATLY REDUCED ROUND-TRIP FARES IN COACHES OR PULLMANS MAY 1-NOV. 15 ftehftlfcitimsEimywtm! Chee s e your d.t linotion ... let your Trovel Agent or nearest Ssobeord r*prttntali* do rile reill THf ATM TOUM la NfW VOM CITY ... with OtCHESTIA SEATS to lop Sroodwor hill, ho'.l occommodotions. sightseeing. • i*r ui r.i.,,. on ouiomobif* fV you a' your destination. 2 STREAMLINER DEPARTURES DAILY mmmmMtm* we SILVERSTA* lv. MIAMI ly M | AMI TYPICAL 30 DAY ROUND TRIP COACH FARES May 1-Nov IS from MIAMI NtWVOtK $e*.7* WASHINGTON 51 35 PITTSBURGH .... 44 15 MM ton owd reserved coach seat charge. •00 AM 1ST. Per complete information and reservations, please phone FRanklin l-ooll or coll in person: 173 t Flagler St.. J206 N.W. 7th Ave.. Miami; 1553 Washington Ave., Miomi Beach; 1240 S.E. Eleventh Ave., Hialeah; West Hollywood •Ivd., Hollywood. W. J. FICHT G.P.A. 1 4:40 P.M. I.S.T. THE ROUTE OF ABROAD BY SHIP TO NASSAU! OVERNIGHT Mondays and Fridays (5 PM) (FQUMERLY 10,000 TON TRANSATLANTIC AROSA STARJ 3-DAY, AU-IXPENSi CRUISI > eights, • meets aboard ship *• %  *54 pies tee Ship il your hotel tOUNO-TBIP IXCUISION 1 eights, 4 meals aboard ship from '39 plus lo IMLI^SI TZ?*' ; %  tnm het of MlMBl to tin heart of N.eaae at larnou. Bay Street Large*, moat luxurious p....n ( .r accommoo. r? !" T Fin ,ood "e. three cocktail loungeo. Shoppiof eooiln.t>o. m Na^u mean yog ca. era a. —eh o—ixbaeoo aa CoVe^i^^M Eastern Shippini <&fauUicn ftse S Miami. Herleo e Ph.,,, „ ,.„,, ..^^ ,,^1 mwMt Ope weekdays entil 5:30 PM Sundays 10 AM • 5 PM Hurry I Makm your rmtorvmtlon* Now I 1



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Page 6-B +Jewish Fk>rkUari Friday, April 15. I960 J$irfh M, Mrs. Mrs. Seder table display was prepared this week by Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood for the gift department of Jordan Marsh. Putting the proper finishing touches to the table are (from left) Mrs. Fannie Sklar. Mrs. Louis Cohen, president, and Mrs. Dan Piver. A second Seder table for display in the department store's linen and china section was prepared by Temple Israel Sisterhood. Stadnik Runs For Commission John Stadnik, Miami Springs business executive and civic leader, is a candidate for the Dade County Commission in the May 3 primary election. Though Stadnik qualified in District 3. the vote will be county-wide with nearly one million Dade county citizens qualified to vote. Stadnik, • 43-yar-o4d native of New Hampshire and • graduate of the Rhode Island Colleg* of Pharmacy, settled in Miami Springs after World War II service in the Army Medical Corps, coming out with the rank of major. In 1946. he opened a pharmacy on the "Circle" in Miami Springs, which he still operates in its original location. Married to a former army nurse and the father of five children, Stadnik resides with his family at 485 Deer Run in Miami Springs. He is a member of the Miami Springs Methodist Church, the Masons. Shrine, Lions Club, American Legion and is past president of the Miami Springs and Hialeah Chambers of Commerce. He has been an active member of t h e Dade County Miami Chamber of. Commerce. Additionally, he has found time to be a Civil Defense zone war-; den and a Boy Scout Merit Badge counselor. Gov. Collins appointed Stadnik to the Florida Board of Pharmacy. He has served as president of the board and still serves as a member. He also served as president ol the Southeast Florida Pharmaceutical Assn. and is now a direcMiami Springs, which he helped to organize. During his war service, Stadnik was on* of the Medical Corps Recent births at Mtt. Sinai Hospital include the following: Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sheinbein Mar. 28. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Vann Mar 27. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Jules 'Cohen Mar. 25 Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Samj uel Ltidwick Mar. 24. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schlakman Mar. 24. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Steven Schulman Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Baumcl Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Fred Feigenbaum Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Alan Marsh Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bronston Mar. 22. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Lazik Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Lazik Mar. 22. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Roth Mar. 21. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Maggoles Mar. 21. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Orin Albin Mar. 21. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Buckner Mar. 19. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Jack 1 Bostwick Mar. 18. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Newman Mar. 17. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Herman Freedman Mar. 15. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Roth Mar. 12. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Morryj Kronzek Mar. 12. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs., Hank Meyer Mar. 11. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Birns Mar. 10. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Gene Weiss Mar. 10. Daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Cache Mar. 9. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Reibel Mar. 8. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Archie Comen Mar. 8. Son born to Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Lewis Mar. 7. JOHN STADNIK officers charged with responsibility for construction and operation and many service hospitals throughout Iceland, England and Prance. Since returning to civilian life and the practice of pharmacy in Dade County, Stadnik's supporters say "he has spearheaded efforts to protect the public health and welfare by fighting for curbs to control unethical pharmeceutical practices throughout the State. He was instrumental in gaining a Board of Pharmacy regulation to stop improper drug advertising and led a drive to curb mail order peddling of dangerous drugs." On Mar. 17, Stadnik's "15 years of devotion to and work, for many important community projects in Miami Springs" were cited by a proclamation of "John Stadnik Day." THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE TO* EXPERIENCE! RE-ELECT JUDGE HUGH F. DuVAL Jr. JUSTICE OF PEACE, DISTRICT 1 PULL LEVER 48-A MAY 3 Pd. Pol Adr. Shah's Sister Sees ORT School NEW YORK — The twin sister of the Shah of Iran, Princess Achraf Pahlavi, visited ORT vocation-1 al schools in Teheran, it was anj nounced by Mrs. Joseph C. Gayl, national president of Women's; American ORT. here recently. Her Royal Highness was accom-' panied on the visit by high officials of the Iranian Ministries of State and Education. A ceremony, attended by prominent members j of the Jewish community, marked j the occasion, which was filmed and telecast on Iranian TV. Iranian press and radio reported the event at length. This is the first time a member of the royal family has visited a Jewish institution in Teheran. In leaving, the Princess expressed her satisfaction with what she had seen and added her hope that ORT schools in Iran, which are considered pilot-schools in vocational education, will continue to develop for the good of the country. Coral Way Ladies To Elect Officers Coral Way Jewish Center Sisterhood will hold an election meeting Thursday evening, Apr. 22. at the Center's new building. 8755 SW 18th st. White elephant sale is also scheduled. Mrs. Herbert Green, president, this week announced a kitchen shower due Apr. 27. In charge of reservations are Mrs. Martin Hirsch and Mrs. Irwin Block. Installation of Sisterhood's new officers will be May 1. Handling reservations are Mrs. Robert Kemper, Mrs. Murray Mandell. and Mrs. Robert Bender. Final Meeting of Season B'nai B'rith Women of West MiI ami will hold the group's final meeting of the present administration on Wednesday. 8:30 p.m., at Town Hall. 901 SW 62nd ave. Mrs. jFred Scherer will turn her gavel lover to the new president. Attorney Daniel Satin presents Mrs. Rose Weiss (center) with an Oscar Award as one oi the first active members of a PTA on the Beach at a farewell function to the old Miami Beach High School building. Looking on is Mrs. Malvina Weiss Liebman. Beach High alumna and director of elementary education of the Dade County School Board. Mrs. Chastain Rushes Campaign Mrs. R. B. (Dixie Herlong) Chastain this week continued her campaigning for Judge of the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court in Group I. Mrs. Chastain has been an investitgating attorney for this court since September, 1956, also hearing cases and a referee there. She has attended weekly in-service training sessions with the probation staff since Mar., 1958, featuring discussion leaders prominent in the fields of psychology, sociology, and psychiatry. Mrs. Chastain is a member of the Internal Assn. of Children's Court Judges, and attended a meeting of the organization in Belgium in July, 1958. She holds a magna cum laude degree from the University of Miami, and has studied sociology and government at Duke University.. She is a member of the American, Florida, and Dade County Bar Assns. She has served on the adoption, civic affairs, courts, crime and delinquency, family law, juvenile court, and juvenile law and procedure committee of these organizations. She has served on the citizens committee on adoptions since 1951, Mayor Aronovitz' committee on juvenile delinquency in 1954, Little White House conference on education, and President's committee for traffic safety. The candidate is married to R. B. Chastain. and they are the parents of three children. IUS. I. CM AST AIM Burns Supporters Point To Record Supporters of Jacksonville Mayor Haydon Burns, candidate for governor in the May 3 primary, Wednesday pointed out in Miami that "after conducting an investigation of the Middle East and Israel in behalf of the American Christian Palestine Committee, Burns made 86 speeches for Israel." More recently, they declared, "m appreciation of his tireless efforts, the Jewish National Fund named a grove of trees in Burns' honor in Israel's Freedom Forest." His supporters also indicated that "when the FBI had no jurisdiction to prevent the bombings of synagogues and schools. Burns formed the Southern Bombing Conference." ''WWV. ELECT JUDGE FRANCIS J. CHRISTIE CIRCUIT JUDGE. GROUP ONE mm ABILITY, mmr, mtRitNct PULL LEVER 11-A MAY 3 RE-ELECT RUTH L SUTTON YOUR JUSTICE OF PEACE DISTRICT 3 PULL LEVER 48-1 MAY 3 "Thoro Is No Substitute for Exporionce" Pd. Pol Adv.



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' riday, April 15, 1960 +Jelstrk>rklkM Page 15A LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW -NOTICE IH HEREBY GIVEN that Ihe midrslgned, M.-sl, ,„ u ,„ engag.. In T.','I 1 ."'';:,",'.';•,•'• "'" r "" name ol ftOOER LEEDH l.TI %  al (3 Bast F.a,'•'•'""•'' 1 1 Florlds Intend. ... I!' K /.'.' .Si? "'""•• "''"' "" Clerk of I litl I ll. Mi iTEL. INC. By: diaries A. Kramer 4/8-16-82-29 NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW [NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that undersign.-.I. desiring to engage In bslneea under the fictitious name of IBLV1LLE OFFICE SI I'I'LIES at TV", s.w. Mli St.. Miami. Ha.. Intends register said name with the clerk the Cfreiilt Court of Dade County. forma, MEL OHEENBKRO OFFICE SUPPLIES, INC a Kin. Corp. RVIXE c. sI'E.u: [florae) for Applicant Bfi Lincoln ltd. 4/1-l'.-22-2'i THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE .EVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN ANO FO*| DADE COUNTY. IN CHANC.-RY No. 60C3I43 (A MM IE 1.WM-: WILLIAMS, Plaintiff, \ s. IONALD B5DMOND I let. II.Ill lit. ORDER TO TO!', RONALD •IAMN, Rout.I, i: %  II. K.-iiiueky. are lu-rehv required I" %  erve %  eopj of your Answet to a com plaint for divorce on plaintiff! attorney eland.. l. Barnea. in N.E. :i Ave.. Kiiaoii. Pla„ on or before the Ith day U Ma) IMO, Kill file the orialnnl In (he office of Ihe Clerk of this Court, otherwise n default will he entered Iteainst you. i .1 this Ith da) of April. l6n. K. i: LEVIIIEKMAN. Cleek of Circuit Curt Kaenl) Bj I K. M. I.VMAN. Depntv Clerk 4/8-1 5-22-29 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIHCUIT IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA. IN CHANCERY No. 80C 2710 RETER A MA To I'laintlff, Vs. liAIHIAItA .IK AX A MA TO, i i. i|.ia nl NOTICE BY PUBLICATION YOU, BARBARA JEAN AMATO, 188 Aiden Avenue. Valley sire.un. New York, ure notified to serve a copy of your Answer to ihe I dvorce Complaint on Plalntlff'a Attorney, GEORGE NH IK.I.AS, MS Biscayne Building, Miami. Florida, and Hie original with Clerk of this Court on or before I IK2'.th day of April, A.D., 1M0. otherwise Complain! will be Confessed by you. DATED. March 22, A.D., I9U0. K. B. LEAT HERMAN. Clerk, Circuit Court, hade County, Florida tseal) By: WM. W STOCKING, Deputy Clerk 3/2.'.. I1-8-IS NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that the undersigned, desii ins to engage In business under the flctitloua name of MUMS MI'I'l-LEft SHOP -it N.E. 167th St. & 3rd Ave.. Dade County Inieiids to i.-glstcr said name willi the ci.rk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida MIIM'i >. INC. HERBERT E. KAUFMAN Attorney for applicant I62H diil'ont Blot-. I/5. 4/1-8-18 WILLIAMS APPEAR BDMOND WIL.\ ||-A, BurllngNOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that |he undersigned, desiring to eneeee In Uuxtness under the Fictitious name of l.'S SHOE RKBIII.DKRS at 254 E. 1st Ave.. Miami intends to reemer said name with the Clerk of the Irrult Court of Dade County, Florida. MIO > MAM Mol.TZ MI'XKV EFBONBON lttorna) for Applicant Security Truwt BIIIK. 4/S-I..-22-2!' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IN CHANCERY No. tOC 2620 HAROLD FRKXCK. Plaintiff, v*. MAR.IOKiE FRKNCK, Defendant. NOTICE BY PUBLICATION TO: MARJORIE KRENCK %  :: %  :: North Avenue Syracuse, New York YOl' ARE HEREBY KOTIFIEO thai a Complain! for Divorce has been filed axainst you In the above entitled cans.and you are hereb) required t" aerve a cop) of your Answer to the complaint for Divorce on the Plaintiffs attornej and file the original In the office of the Clark of the Circuit Court on oi before the 2.MII da) Ol April, i!" ; ". otherwise. %  Decree Pro lollte-so will be .-III. red aKlill^t Voll Tills notice shall be published once each week for four consecutive weeks In The Jewish Eloiiilian. Dated al Miami, Dade County, Floral, i, this 18th da> of March, IMO. E. B LEATHERMAN, Clerk, Circuit Court. Dade County. Florida (s.al) By. K. M I.VMAN. Deputy Clerk MERVVN I. AMES Attorney for Plaintiff Ills s W. l-li-t Street Miami M. Florid. /25 4/1 s ls NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVEN that e undersigned, deslrln* to enawner iENRY Nl IRTI ,N I Building NOTICK BY PUBLICATION IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN CHANCERY Nl. 0C 251 MATILDA I.EMIX, I'laintlff. STANDBY I.EMIX. Defendant. .___ SUIT FOR DIVORCE TO: STANLEY LF.MIX p. O. Bo* '-''• Bompton i ..kes. x.w Jersey Yon STANLEY LBMIN are hereby notified that a Bill nl Complaint r..r Divorce has been filed against you. and you are rei|Uirl to serve „t lour Answer oi Pleading to the Bill of Complaint on the plaint Iff* AtEocney, GOLDMAN A"u fall to do so." Judgment by default will lie taken asains. con for the relief demanded in the Bill of Complaint. This notice shall be published once each week for four roneecullve weeks In THE .IEWISII Fl.oRIDIAN DONE AND ORDERED al Miami. Florida, tin"n.i day, of March A.D. : B LEATHERMAN. Cleric, art. Dade c.unlv. Florida i M h P\ M i 's \ alarla. D.-pntv fierk GOLDMAN OOT.DSTEIN i Fla. """" 3/20.4/1-8-1* IN THE COUNTY JUDGESCOURT IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 47897 -C In Re: ESTATE OF ALEX .1. MERMAN, a/k/a ALKC J. HERMAN, a k/a ABRAHAM .1. HERMAN, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persona Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You. and each Of you are hereby notified and required m preaenl any claims and demands which yon. or either of you, may have against the .state of ALEX .1. HERMAN, a k ... ALEC .1. MERMAN, a/k/a ABRAHAM .1. HERMAN deceased late ..f Dade County, Florida, to the Honorable County .ImlKes of Dad.Oountv. and file the sain.in their offices in the County CotirthoHs.in Dade County. Florida, within sight calendar months from me data of the first pubs licatlon hereof. Said claims or demands to contain the b-Kal address "i iturlaimant and to he sworn to and I iresented as aforesaid, or sain.will ..barred. See Seclioll 781.11 of the IMS Probate Act. Date March U, AD. IHISO. KITH HERMAN. As Executrix of the l-ast Will and Testament of Alex .1. Herman, a'k/a Ale. J, Herman, a/fc/a Abraham .1. Merman, Deceased. KOVXER ,v MANXHKIMER Attorneys for Executrix S/ti, i/l-s-ir. NOTICE BY" PUBLICATION" IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR OADE COUNTY. IN CHANCERY, No. 60C 1921 A DORIS FBINBERG I'laintlff HARRY FfiUTBERG 1 ii'i.-ndaut AMENDED COMPLAINT FOR ANNULMENT TO: HARRY FBINBERG Residence and Address Unknown You are hereby notified thai a Bill of Complain! for Annulment hai baon filed aaainsi yon. and you are required to serve a copy of your Answer or Pleading lo the Bill of Complaint on the plaintiffs Attorney, JOSEPH W. MAI.EK, HIT Lincoln Road. .Miami Beach, Florida and file the original Answer oi Pleading in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Courl on or before the 23th di.i of April. IMO. H fail to 7 I In.oln Road Miami Beach. Florida Attorney for 1'laintjff 3/23. 4/1-8-1S IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLOR'flA IN PROBATE NO. 49047-C 111 RI-:: F:state of JOHANNA WOLF, Dece'i s--. I NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said Estate: You are hereby notified and required, to prese n t any claims and demands which v.ni rav hive iinlnst the estate of JOHANNA Wol.F deceased lute of Dade County, Florida, to the County Judxe* of Dade County, and file the sume In theli offices in the county Courthouse iii Dade County; FMnrlda, within eight calendar months from the date of ihe first publication hereof. '" barred. CAROL W. LEVITT dJ> i-.\>- illrix. MARX M l-ADII: Attorne) 1812 congress Building Miami 81, Florida V18-2".. t/1-8 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai the undersigned, desiring to Bttgagu l!l business under Hi.rictltlous name of DOWNTOWN REAL EWTATE al SOg Langford Building Intends to register | said, name Hlth the Clerk of the Cir• nit Courl of Dad.CoiinM'. Florida FRANKLIN E PHIPPB Sole fiwner 4 R-15-IJ-29 NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IH HEREBY GIVEN thai th.undersigned, desiring lo engage In business under ihe fictitious name of 87th WEME LAUNDROMAT at 77 N.W. L'Tlli Awn.,.. Miami. Florida mtends i<> reglstet said name with iinclerk oi the cin nit Court of Dade County, Florida LEONARD B LINCOLN, Partner DOROTHY BARRETT. •"."'. Partner i;ol.D.MAX A: I it ILDSTEI.N Attorneys for Registranta 2:lP al I i Fifteenth Street, Miami Reach, Florida Intend to r.-Kisier said n ime with the Clerk of the Circuit Courl of Dade County, l-'iorirta. ANTHONY BELI.l.XO THERESA BELI.INO <• PREDRIC BROWN SilT DO Pom BMg., Miami, l-'la Attorney for Anihony tJMMRO and Theresa Belliiio. F/1-V.22-29. :./8 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE is HErtKCV UIVEN that the undersigned, detdrlsfe to emmae in business under the fb-titioin* n im> of Florida, within client calendar moflthhs CORAL WAV CRF.ATIONS at 8881 from the d:ii. of the first publication Coral Way. Miami. Florida, Intends to hereof, or the same will he barred. /a/ A. DAVID RAYVIS ROBERT V. SHEA Attorney for Petitioner 888 Miracle MilCoral Qables, Florida 4/3-1.-.-22-2* IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN PROBATE No. 49093-C IX RE: Estate of ADOLPH ABRAHAM BPIERER 11,-, eased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Creditors and All Persons Having Claims or Demands Against Said !•:.-lai. : You are hereby notified ami required to iM.-s.-nt an.\ claims .not demands which you may have against th. .-tal ADOLPH ABRAHAM BTPIERElt deceased late of DADE County, F'lorbla. to iinCounty Judges >.f Dade County, and file the same in tli.ii offices In the Count) Courthouse in Dude County, Florida, within eight calendar months from the dale of the first publication hereof, or th.same will lie barred. HENRY SPIERKR ARLYNE A 0OCRTNEY Attorney M X.W First Street Miami :::'. Florida i '8-is-ts-n register aaUl name vsilh ilie cUrk of the ClrcuH Court of Dade County, Florida. EDITH B.wis Sole Owner DONALD I-'. FTtosT Attornej for Applicant In.':: .ml-.-Ill Bull.Iin-.: Miami, Florida I/I.-.-2J-89, t 1 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HERICBY OIVEN that the undersigned, dealring to engage In bnslTH-ss nnd claims ami demands which you mas havs against the estate of MARTHA ill LEX BAKER. I., eased late of Dade County. Florida, IN THe COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA IN PROBATE. No. 49003-C IX RE: Estate of SAM PEL L. HABERMAN, at/a S. L< ills HABERMAN. ft k a HAMI'EL l.ol'IS HABERMAN, a It a HAMI'EL HABERMAN 11-< .-a aed. NOT.CE TO CREDITORS To All Credilors and All Persons Having claims or Demands Agalnsl Said i:.-iai. re herenj notified and required to preaenl an> claims and demands wbii-h von may have agalnsl the estate of SAMUEL I. HABERMAN, a k .1 s Em is 11 \r.i:i:\i \s u k KAMCEL l.ol'IS HABF:RMA.N, S I. %  SAMl'EL HABERMAN deceased late of Dade County, Florida, to the i'ounty .Indues of Dad.Count)-, and file tinsame In tnelr offices in Ihe County Courthouse in Dade County, Florida, 10 the Count) Judges of Dad.. County, "'"",", • %  ">", : u "'; 1 •'" | 1 ;""' 1 '/f""' and fibthe Mi...In their offices iii Ibe date of the first publication herethe Count)Courthouse in Dade County, F'loihia. within eight calendar months from tiie date of the first publications hereof, or the same will inbarred. ADBLE BAKER ROBIRON, Administratrix of the Bstate of Martha Ciill.n Baker, deceased OOLDMAN & Col.DSTEIN Attorn.-v W I1.i..-I.r Sireet Miami, Florida 4/l-S-i:.-2f! NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREHY GIVEN thst the undersigned, desiring to envatce in business under the flctitioua names of BEAUX ARTS HOTEL and BEAUX' ARTS APARTMENTS at number S0O0 West Drive in the City of North Bay Village, Florida Intends to register the sal.l name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida. ORANOE I.IFF: COM*., %  Fla. oorp, by: William Prav.r. ITesldenl 4/l-8-i:.-22 if. or the same a III '.bs i red. KATE HABERMAN Administratrix Nil \l-n:o AND FRIED, Bsqo. Attorne) s 188 Lincoln Road—Suite SIS Miami Beach 88, Florida 4/1-8-15-88 NOTICE UNOER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVI'.X thst the undersigned, desiring to engage In business under the flctltl.iuname Of BINDER'S AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVIOK CENTER al l:::::'.-:::. North W.st I'Mli Street. Miami. Florida Intend to renister said name with the Clerk of the circuit Court of Dade County, Florida. ROBERT CHERRNAY, ."." I'artner PAULINE BINOER, :.n* partner nOLDM \X nOI.DBTEIN Attorn.) s frnReglatmnt JSdg West FTagler Street Mia nil, Florida 4 s-15-22-89 ATTENTION ATTORNEYS! ronfOHtriov orri I T S Lowest Prices — Quickest Delivery in South Florida Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at %  II 3-4695



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Page 4-B vJewisti rhrktian Friday. April 15. 1960 JtwUk Floridian Exclusive Yorni M C ARRIAGE COUNSELOR ttf t^antiiel \~y. K^J\.lin^ MIAMI'S 'NATION ALLY FAMOL'S MXRttAdtr'CoLN-i i 'n AND"ALIHO A second criterion of emotional maturity in marriage is the ability to be independent. Stilted another way. a husband or wife is dependent when he or she is unable to arrive at decisions without the help or support of another. The husband who must consult a doien friends before arriving at a decision as to whether he >hould remain in his job or open a new business venture is obviously as dependent on outside help as a child is on its mother. He has not yet arrived at that state of grace where he has freed himself from childish feelings of dependency. Tied to his mother's apron strings, he has merely displaced or transferred his feelings of dependency to others. His thinking is not his own. Nor is his behavior. Whatever he does or says is a carryover from childhood, when he was encouraged to be dependent on others, especially his parents, for whatever decisions he made. The husband who is dependent on others is plainly immature. His approach to life is timid and hesitant. He lacks boldness and imagination, virility and aggressiveness, and he tends to be endlessly confused and in conflict wth himself and with society Because he is dependent, he tends to be insecure and to feel inferior. He lacks confidnce and faith in himself and in his judgement, and his prowess both as a man and as a father leaves a great deal to be desired. Making Decisions He is forever consulting his mother or his wife or his friends about even the most trivial decisions. If he takes one tentative step forward, he is likely to take two timid steps backward. He is a-follower, not a leader, and his ranks are to be found in the armed forces and wherever else men do not have to make decisions for themselves. Such husbands make perfect Caspar Milquetoasts, for they are as dependent on their wives as they once were dependent on their mothers. Stated positively, to be independent means the ability to make decisions without the help of others. It means that the husband is not dominated or ruled by another, whether it is his mother or his wife. It means that the individual is "free" psychologically and emotionally. This doesn't mean that the independent individml never seeks advice from others. He does. Faced with a momentous business decision, the independent minded person obtains all the facts bearing on his special problem. But once having those facts, he arrives at his own, independent decision. He may ( and often does consult "experts" for their views. But having consulted them, he uses his own sound judgment to arrive at conclusions basically his own. If he is married, he does not run home to mother whenever he is faced with a domestic crisis. Instead, • he faces up to reality by trying to solve, as best he can. whatever problems he is confronted with. Obviously he will not be able to solve all problems sue> fWilfully, whether in business or in marriage. But! he will do the best he can. relying on his own intelligence and judgment of others. Sens* of Responsibility To be independent means to be unfettered and unlrammeled And it is one of the most difficult thinps in life to achieve. Indeed, most of u> from childhood on are trained to be dependent on our mothers and fathers for our every which, and immature parents often encourage i such feelings of helplessness. The spoiled child is a classic example of this. Because he is spoiled and babied and pampered he soon gets the panicy feeling that whenever he li helpless someone is going to come to his rescue. He loses a sense of responsibility, and comes to rely more and more on others for guidance. If he marries, his wife becomes a crutch upon whom he leans; or if he is adult and unmarried, there is an abnormal attachment to his mother who encouraged such feelings in the first place. He is, in abort, the perpetual baby who has never grown up and he remains, unless he gets expert help, a perpetual trial to his wife, friends and relatives. Mr. Klinm. h nailabl§ far frit air marrimgt counie/iitf • fht Hu*timatm medical mldg., in Miami Sugarine Sweeter Than Sugar The new spring and summer fashions are in, and every one of the^ designers stresses the pencilslim, slender line. Don't be discouraged when you try on these new styles. Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood Temple Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood will hold its monthly meeting Wednesday evening at Howard Johnsons Motor Lodge. 16500 NW 2nd ave. Mrs. C. Leibel. handwriting analyst, will be guest speaker. Helping fight the "battle of the bulge" is Sugarine, a no calorie liquid sweetener. It's actually sweeter than sugar, comes in a concentrated form, yet without any crtificial taste. Best of all, it has absolutely no food value. Its thrifty, too. when a 4 oz. bottle will sweeten more than 700 cups of coffee or tea. It takes only one teaspoon to equal l' of sugar, and a tablespoon is the equivalent of a cupful of sugar. You can measure it by the drop from a handy shaker top bottle. On cereal or fruit, in desserts and for cooking, it gives you sweetness — nothing more. Sugarine is recommended by doctors for diabetics, overweights, and low calorie diets. It is perfectly harmless — safe for children or grown-ups. So stop taking the "calorie count" when your sweet tooth gets the best of you. Your life can be tweeter and your figure neater when you use this new concentrated sweetener. Sugarine iavailable at food and drug si everywhere. —S. T. Karl Shapiro Heads List NEW YORK—Pulitzer-prize winner Karl Shapiro heads a distin'ied list of American writers whose contributions will appear in the forthcoming Passover issue of I the national magazine of American 'Judaism, official publication of the liiion of American Hebrew Congre1 HaUon* Jiyjiro .mill he. W**4P' ted by "The Jewish Writer in America," a special articl examining the attitudes of Jewish authors in this country to their iden! tity as Jews and as Americans. Morris N. Broad, executive vice president and director of American Savings and Loan Assn., was elected to the board of directors of the Florida National Bank at Belle Glade. Broad, in addition to his posts at American Savings, is president of Best Insurance Agency and American Mortgage and Safe Deposit Co., both of Miami Beach. Re-Elect | JUDGE | BEN C. WILIARD &f To Tke &f Criminal Court of Record X Where Justice &f Is Never Blind" &f PULL LEVER 42-C Pld Politic*! AdT Have that Business Meeting. Banquet, or Special Occ f # f | slon J You'll find complete facilities to exoctly satisfy your needs in the Kismet, Aladdin, Scheherazade and Rubaiyat Rooms, be it fcr a wedding or a private party! It th tor llormtlont HAZEL ALLISON CaMrlng DirctoJE 1-6061 eanti St. s, coiiins < •*. CATERING...IN THE ROYAL MANNER FOB THAT VERT SPECIAL FUNCTION LEAVE IT TO C*//y \JitvileJ with reqards to WEDDINGS • BANQUETS CONFIRMATIONS and all Social Functions HOTEL R.S.V P.: Mr Henri Groen JE 8-0811 criiu... M 400 Ft. Oceanfront at Lincoln Rd. ~£SZ.



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Page 8-A vJewisti fhrkfinn Friday. April 15. I960 Nasser And Nehru By MAX LERNER Calcutta President Nasser, who covets little strips of real estate belonging lo his Arab neighbors, is now traversing the VMt stretches of an India that makes his own domain seem puny. After the standard Delhi airport greeting, the standard ride between lanes of people transported by government buses, the standard civic reception with flowery compliment.--, the standard speech before a joint meeiing of parliament, he is now being given the standard grandeur cuit treatment at steel mills, factories, hydro-electric dams, shrines. His reception has been friendly and warm if not always fervent. He rot a degree from Algarh University, a Moslem institution currently racked by an unsavory scandal of corruption. A special performance of Ihe Indian classic Shakuntula was given for him, but the theater was only half full. Having suffered defeats, he is no longer the glamorous rising figure he was after Bandung. He is only another of a list of foldier dictators struggling with internal economic problems while they talk big on diplomacy. He got a few headlines and a scattering of editorials. Compared with the men of power streaming steadily through Delhi, his power is Jess than middling. Besides, the seemingly tireless cohorts of Delhi freeters were tired—just tired. ( • • ONE AMUSING EPISODE HAPPENED at the joint parliament session. The irrepressible House speaker, who has chronic foot in-mouth disease, made an eloquent oration. When Nasser came last time, he said, he was the head of Egypt Now he came as the head of Egypt and Syria. On his next trip he would be the head of all the Arab world. There was dark talk that Iraq and Saudi Arabia would formally protest, provided they could take the speaker seriously enough. Mostly Nasser's pronouncements were on safe topics like peace and Afro-asian unity. The South African massacre came in for timely and indigant comment. In his speeches he continued to milk the Aswan Dam and Suez issues, reviving his martyrdom at the hands of Dulles nd Eden and thanking India for standing by him. When he was shown a big hydro-electric power turbine built byIndian engineers, he commented that it would not take India long to beat the Western nations. No one pointed out that India's development race fa not with the West but with China. • THE FACT IS THAT SINCE the Bandung Conference Nehru has drawn closer to the West while Nasser still beats the old anti-imperialist rag. Nehru in the intervening years has stuck correctly and formidably lo his policy of noncommitment to either camp but Nasser's positive neutrality is ironic for a nation bristling with Russian tanks and jets. Nehru has preached and practiced non-aggression but Nasser keeps his Arab neighbors. Kassem of Iraq and Hussein of Jordan, constantly on guard against assassination. Nehru recoils from any concept of racist aggressiveness or of political communalism while Nasser still tries to keep alive the tired battle cries of Pan-Arab unity. Nehru would be horrified at the idea of absorbing the neighboring I'ltle countries of Nepal or Ceylon, but since Nasser's last visit he has dined royally on his sister Arab country of Syria, although he has still not managed to digest it fully. In fact he postponed his Indian visit because of proconsul trouble in his Syrian satrapy. I HAVE CITED ENOUGH DIFFERENCES between the two men to suggest why the Nehru-Nasser axis is no longer what it was. 1 might add that Nasser, who has hated Eisenhower ever since the Sixth Fleet landing at Beirut deprived him of I-ebanon as an easv prey, could not have been happy at Eisenhower's triumph in New Delhi last December, nor could Nehru have been wholly happy when Nasser broke his promise to Hammarskjold about Israeli shipping in the Suez. Why then the continuing partnership between two leaders so diverse in personality and outlook—the unlettered soldier with a quick talent for diplomatic maneuver dreaming of a Pan-Arab empire and up to his armpits in intrigue, and the intellectual, aristocrat veteran of freedom battles, mentor of new nationalist regimes, ambitious to be known in history as the man who led a cold war world to peace. I got a clue to the answer from an irreverent Indian newspaper cartoon showing Nehru and Nasser, each dreaming of himself as an Atlas I holding the Afro-Asian world, with the caption, "Two Minds with a Single Though'." The kernel of insight here is that each man has built his world standing on his claim to a leadership extending beyond his own domain. Nehru and Nasser are like two gjrls after the same man. constantly together because neither dares leave the other out of her sight. AS FOR ISRAEL, Nasser warily refrained from using his Indian visit as a lever for attack. But despite a courageous editorial in the '"Indian Express" by Frank Moraes asking how Nehru could square hirnoral pretensions with his continued policy of refusing any diplomatic exchange with Israel, Nehru's strange silence on Israel continues. For a man who so consistently exalts moral courage it is hard to see why Nehru would allow his fear of Nasser's anger to abate his own courage. The better guess is that Nehru still dreams of leading the Afro-Asian wcrid and Israel seems alien to his dream. (This it a Copyright Column) JWV Commander 83 Years Young New commander of Norman Bruce Brown Post 174, Jewish War | Veterans, is 83-year old Maurice Tobias. Possibly the oldest commander -W any veteran's organisation in the nation, he was installed in; I ceremonies Saturday evening at : the Alcazar hotel. Tobias is a past commander of the Spanish War Veterans and of the Army-Navy Union. He WM twin commander of the Jewish War Veterans Post of St. Petersburg Fla. Other offleen installed Saturday included Alex Klein, senior vice; commander, and Bill Kutner, jun( ior vice commander. President of the Auxiliary is %  Mrs. Kenneth Braidman, a magna' cum laude graduate in February of the University of Miami's school if education. Senior vice president s Mrs. V. Roscnthal. Mrs. L. Simmonds is junior vice president. Florida State Department commander Irving Steinberg and AuxJiary president Mrs. Max Kern in stalled the officers. DR. CHARLES H. INSLER DENTIST Announces the Opening of His Office for the Practice of GENERAL DENTISTRY 444 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD MIAMI BEACH 40, FLORIDA Telephone JE 8-7798 Re-Elect CIRCUIT JUDGE CANNON THE McCUNE COMPANY APPRAISERS • COUNSELORS ADRIAN McCUNE, M.A.I. MARION C McCUNE, M.A.I. 151 N.E THIRD STREET MIAMI Established IBM BOBBINS Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. ROOFING OF ALL TYPES "THE RESPONSIBLE ROOFERS" Established 191* A. H. BECKER, int. ROOfING and ROOFING SUPPUtS RETAIL CONTRACTING • REPAIRING "WRITTEN GUARANTEE ON ALL WORK" — ""„.Phone FR 4-3705 222 N.W. 26th H !•: V OVER FIFTF-^^^ URINARY FREQUENCY. BIADDER FULLNESS • low back achet • Lo vitality • Mental dullness • Tire Ml ly • Lou of ret • Dribbling • Difficult urination • All add up to PROSTATE GLAND Involvement. When these symptom* appear early treatment usually is effective. For gentle treatment of Hie PROSTATE GLAND consult Dr. Walter D. Reynold*, Sr. D.C. No Orugi • No Surgery All treatments by appointment Call Highland 3 6121 74 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, Florida Send a tour cent atimp to cover postage for an interesting Free Booklet "WHY MEN AtE OLD AT FOtTT" ^V^W^WA^^w r'W^-^'WA-^'WW •The People's Judge' GROUP 5 He's 4bJe ond Well Qualified U. S. CONGRESSMAN 4 Terms CIRCUIT JUDGE 8th Year J Visit Campaign Hdqfts \ 44 W. Flagler Street FR 3-5147 PULL LEYER 15-A SOMETHING NEW 6eperate •ntranc* for our Installment Loan Department. A new Walk-Up Window... Tha most convenient Driva-Up Window in town ... OPEN DAILY9 to 4 Remember regular banking hours, as always Monday th-u Friday 9:30 to 2; Open Friday evenings 5 to 8. Member Federal Deposit Intureaee CorporaUee BANK OF DADE COUNTY IN THE 163rd STREET SHOPPING CENTER I ELECT GEORGE S. OKELL CIRCUIT JUDGE GROUP ONE RECORD Resident of Dede County fifty years. Married Evelyn Pottmyer. Fefher of four children, three of which are mar. ried, and it now the proud grandfather of fen grandchildren, Law Degree from University of Miami. Member of Oade County. Florida, and American Bar Association. Dade County Representative State Legislature ten years. Former Miami City Attorney. Wrote and pasted the complete revision of the Florida Corporation Code. Member of Governor's Committee for revision of the State Constitution and of Charter Board for Metro Charter. Member of Florida Lagisletlve Council that prepared the revision of the State Road Department Code Welfare Program, and Minimum Foundation Program for Schools. Member of Elks, Moose. Mesons, Shrine. Knights of Pythias. Odd Fellows and Oade County Chamber of Commerce. MMak



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Page 12-B +Je*isli ncrktlan Friday, April 15. I960 %  M \ > I-:K KIM. ARTHIK'S COIRT By the Singing Strings JOHN LA SALLE QUARTET in the CARRIAGE ClUB Miami Springs Villas TU 8-4521 ArlBr 7i Sflie xjcnest TJOOCI 9h finest Sewce FRIDAY NIGHT DINNERS OF TRADITIONAL EXCELLENCE! Served with Sai rattle tit ai Wines and All the Trimmings, with Special Emphasis on Courtesy, for which the Monte Carlo is famous! VOC ftREENSTEIN, Catering Mg> PHONE: UN 64721 ON TH OCEAN AT IITK ST. MIAMI 1IACH, FLORIDA lltmklaX iKiour HOIIL STAR Dairy, Veg. & Fish Restaurant FOR PASSOVER WEEK SERVING STRICTLY PASSOVER MEALS Breakfast Lunch & Dinners Ml Washington Ave. JE 1-9182 — OUR SPECIALTY — NICE, THICK, JUICY PRIME RIBS OF BEEF -AND THC VERY BIST IN TOWN! BANQUIT fiCILITIfS Candlelight Inn till Commodore Plaza Coconut Grova HENRY LEITSON. Mn.r. BONFIRE" Largest Family Trade in Florida ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY Pearly Gait by Hal Pearl I Novinson Back from Seminar Herman B. Novinson, an associate of the Walter M. Pierce Agency for the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. in Miami, has |" imi returned from Springfield. Mass.. where he was a member of! his company's thisd business in-1 surance seminar for career underwriters. Novinson was among 44' field representatives from 30 ag-j encies in 18 different states who attended. The seminar dealt with the problems of business owners and the place that life insurance plays in helping business achieve maximum stability, with emphasis on rocent developments and-Uands in the business insurance market. A review of currenttax matters was also on the agenda. POLITICKING: The straws are getting an awful mauling in the political wind. With May 3 primary voting time, the county and state campaigns are heading down the homestretch in a blaze of ballyhoo lor voters. On the gubernatorial front, with so many candidates, and at least four of exceptional calibre, it looks like a neckand-neck race to wire among others Doyle Carlton. Karris Bryant. John McCarty and Bud Dickinson. And if you think there's confusion anent a final selection for the State's highest electoral seat, that's nothing compared to the county commission competition, with five seats open in the five districts, and 26 candidates eyeing 'em. The Miami Beach Elks Lodge had the SRO sign up for its annual installation dinner at the Seville, at which insurance exec Jimmy Lev enson was seated as Exalted ruler, taking over from another insurance man. Murray Sheldon, who did yoeman's work in the blood bank drive! for his organization, with a great assist from chairman Eddie Newman. It's a promise we won't mention again he's a look-alike for Stevcrino of TV. William D. Singer State Road Board chairman, has done a big job in pushing the program for sorely needed expressways and causeways in the South Florida area. Add names to the sartorial honor roll on the Beach: realtor Allen Goldberg and PR ace Hank Meyer. Hal Herman, the publisher's rep, just awarded the ad and display space concession at the Airport. Amazing thing about this industrious lad. the harder he works, the more weight he gains! At tht "celebrity table" fronting the dais at the Elks installation dinner, we spotted Judgo Milton Feller and his ever • popular Dena, Dr. Stanley Coltune, newly-elected five-year trustee, and probably on* of the best-known organizational men on the Beach, and his chic wife Bunny. Also seated am on* Hve "celebs," the fashionable Al Zablos. the young inheert Al Finkelsteins, with their daughter and son-in-law. Attorney Shirley Woof among the lucky localites to receive, and accept, an invitation to the wedding of "Frenchy" and Marty Allen at the bride's "headquarters," the Concord, in New York. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: George Jessel. who s done quite a lot of guesting on network TV shows, is making one of his infrequent but always welcome in-person appearances at the Fontainebleau La Ronde. He's the story-teller supreme! Jackie Wilson, whose "Night" recording is on the national hit parade, shares billing with Jessel. Bobby "Mack the Knife" Dorrin is back at the Deauville Casanova Room, and the young set is having a grand time applauding one of i their top recording favorites. Sammy Davis continues through Sunday at the Eden Roc Pompeii.' Tommy Sands, Frank Sinatra's son-in-law to-be, follows. It's good news to know that the Coconut Grove Playhouse is due for a reopening sometime in June — if Owen Phillips is able to negotiate a suitable leasing arrangement with George S. Engle, too busy with another gigantic project to continue at the helm of the smart theatre. Phillips has musical comedy in mind for the summer season. FILM FARE: Miami Beach's own movie star, and stage and TV comedy personality. Dick Shawn, is back in town via CinemaSropc at the t'arib, Miami and Miracle. He's co-starring in the comedy of Army doings, "Wake Me Up When it's Over," with Ernie Kovacs and Margot Moore. Dick Clark has his first screen role in "Because They're Young," with the TV teener minx Tuesday Weld, Michael Callen and Victoria Shaw. Ifs at the Paramount, Coral and Colony starting today. "Ben Hur.' which almost made a clean sweep of the Academy Awards, holds on at the Lincoln. "Can-Can." a busy and light musical with the activitated Shirley MacLaine. plus Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier, breezes along, color and all. on a two-a-day schedule at the Sheridan. (fltol S fin. MOTEL Kosher Dining Room y> Open to the Public ** A banquet every ^ night. Served from ^ 530 to 8:30 £ For Reservations Phone ^ Norman N. Arrow JEfferson 1-7381 THI WST, ]f* KOSHE FOODS DINNERS from 5 1 :tr, Choice of 17 Main Courses Free Wine, Seltzer A Knishes WE RETAIL DELICATESSEN 1141 Washington Ave. Beautifu'lv Catered Affairs Call JE 4-2655 ft*im*# yncomparoHc French Cuisine* 9516 HARDING AVE. L*MIAMI BEACH UN 6-1654 AT THE PIANO BAR DAVID LEROUX ON THIS HOLIDAY, SUNDAY. APRIL 17th. DINNER SERVICE WILL BEGftf AT ONE P.M. o A NEW SUMMER MENU WILL BE INTRODUCED Of IN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m. "THE ARISTOCRAT OF KOSHER RESTAURANTS" CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS Air-Coed. (JN 6-6043 Free Park Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth N^A^V^V^Vrf'V^'U^^^A^^^V^S^rfVrf^-^^V^U^V^'\^^^XVrf^-^\~^U "WE CATER TO PARTIES" Phone HI 3-4505 NEW SORRENTO RESTAURANT I COCKTAIL LOUNGE 3059 S.W. 8th STREET (on the Trail) Miami, Florida Itelien Cuisine I fine Air Conditioned 260 Seating Capacity "Plenty of Parking Room" TIPS ON TABLES: The Passover holidays should give everyone a good opportunity to reflect on the significance of the occasion and the meaning of this wonderful period to one's self as an individual, to one's famiy and to one's community. Traditionally. Jews have always utilized the dinner table to philosophize somewhat. What better place to do this in unpressuicd manner than in one of the many fine dining spots in Dade county? The Royal Palm is attracting guests who enjoy the tastiness of meals that mother used to cook; the Revlin continues to be popular lor that real "Jewish" taste. The Slrath Haven |l fully set up to catch the atmosphere that goes' with the traditional gourmet's delight, and so is the Rama* hotel. I So mam of our touristami home town folk have "discovered" the ami the C'oi It i •runnly they deserve their reputation. %  i The Royal Hungarian, the Coronet and the reknown are also Reared to tickle the salivary glands of JIIH mot! particular diner on the holn. DO, Finally, the well-established EUrfenlal D tauranl Is a particular delight to the ou* who is looking for something different Why not make the restaurant route your o -over week? We're sure you will rediscover the holiday spun with some good Jewish eating. HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT ^W^ ROSHI0 CATIRIIS IsoW from hers sreevvres re e complete fcoffef 170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR 97996 Under Supervision of United' Kaihrut Association of Creator Minim OPIR HOUSE WEDDINGS IAI MlfZVAHS RKIPTIONS FAMOUS NUMIIR MEAT PRODUCTS m" p&lO* \^fe VQUALITY SINAI KOSHER SIAf C %  Distributed by HI GRADE FOOD CO. 7200 N.W. 29th Avenue %  POO "J^ OX ,.9.1



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*Jewist> fkritu, Pag* 11-A Adath Yeshurun Elects Officers Jerome Linet has been elected! president of Temple Adath Yeshurun. — %  ""*"• Other officers elected at a recent meeting include the following: Norman Goldstein, first vice president; Jerry Katz, second vice president; Marvin Dollin, financial secretary; Abe Stein, treasurer; i Nelda Golden, recording secretary; Freddie Sandell, corresponding secretatry. Board of directors include Marshall Comis, Ike Dorf, Joe Schmier, Miriam Gerstein, Jack Schaenfeld, Paul Sedrish, Larry Diskin, Lawrence Plotkin, and Joe Miller. aft to right are Samuel Kaplan and George Lebowitz as they resent an American and an Israeli flag to Kneseth Israel 'ongregation. JWV Urges Firmer Stand >rld," Abrams said, "whan wa to taka the positive and dylie reins of leadership. The rribla events in South Africa landed immediate steps on r part, without qualms, vacillation cr rationalization. B^s of this moment, we have I our ears to the clarion of jom that rumbles out of South Africa. We have shut our eyes to the misery and subjugation of the darker peoples of Africa and their will to freedom. "The steps taken in the United Nations Security Council by U.S. representative Henry Cabot Lodge are, of course, commendable. But they are dwarfed by what we could have done, if we acted with swift and unwavering determination," Commander Abrams added. he Candlelight Inn in Coconut Grove RELAXING ATMOSPHERE EXCELLENT DRINKS BEST STEAKS and SEAFOOD in MIAMI You'll Hear the World's Finest Music 16 Hours a Day on FM 88 93 I • 100 104 108 MC Z^ W A F Brought to you by Miami's Finest Advertisers Colonial Mortgage 19 West Flagler Street, Miami Where your investments can earn 8-10% on properties with good equities. Academy Alumni Plan Review The more than 75 graduates of the Hebrew Academy will hold a reunion meeting during a special Sabbath on Apr. 23 at the Academy. Jerry Rubinowitz, president of the Alumni Assn., said that the Sabbath of the 23rd was chosen in order to give an opportunity for the out-of-town students to take part in the reunion. Some 30 Academy graduates ara now attending Yashiva high schools and colleges in Cleveland, Baltimore, Chicago, and New York. Spacial arrangements if being made to have the Alumni Assn. spend the entire Sabbath in the vicinity of the Acadamy at 918 6th St., Miami Beach. Nathaniel Zemel, chairman of the Alumni Sabbath, said that members will conduct the entire Sabbath services. Friday night dinner and Sabbath luncheon will be held at the Royal Hungarian restaurant. Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principal of the Academy, will speak to the group Saturday morning. His topic will be "Effects of an Academy Education in the Life of its Students." Rabbi Morris L. Horovitz, assistant principal, Hebrew Department, will address the Alumni at the Shabbos Seuda. A sympasium is being planned for 4 p.m., Saturday, in the Academy Auditorium. The committee members in charge of arrangements are Melvin Ciment, Dorothy Naness, Leon Firtel, Sean Kaufman, and Stuart Kimmel. 'ROOFING CO. II i.or. I. Miami Mean D..oblllty He-roofing & Repairs All Type Roofs — Since If20 ASI FOR FREE ESTIMATES ON ROOFING Phone FR 3-6244 Private Pool Beach and Cabana Colony HOTEL At 24th ST., MIAMI REACH Miller Electric Co. of Miami, Inc. QUALITY CONTRACTING 1 SUVICl 3905 N.W. 37th Ct. Ph. NE 3 2686 formation JE 1-0331 Air-Conditioned Room* Private Beach and Pool Parking on Premise* Cocktail Lounge Dining Room Entertainment $5 Daily Per Pare. Dble. Occ. Special Holiday Rota To Serve You is Our Pleasure Ed. J. Vischi Real Estate in All its tranches 1240* N.I. 7th AVENUE %  hone PL 4-4661



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Friday, April 15. I960 'tctrntini vJenistincridiann Page 9-B A combination of elegant furs ** and diamonds, and the lovely waterfront home of Mrs. Irving Miller, were the ingredients that made for an exciting afternoon when the Women's Division of Israel Bonds treated the 1.069 Sponsors who purchased at least a $1,000 Israel Bond to this unique fashion show last week. Among the audience was Mrs. Robert Z. Greene in a black silk jersey sheath. Her matching stole was reversible to a golden yellow. She was chatting with Mrs. Frank Frankel, who selected for the afternoon a sheer imported cotton featuring a small floral print with inserts of val lace. The white lace was in a large checkerboard pattern, and the flamingo pink, coral and white blended into a perfect springtime dress. Her accessories were of the same matching colors. Welcome address was by Mrs. Max Weiti, who heads the Women's Division of Bonds. She wore a pink-tiered lace sheath, with a square neckline. Chairman of the day was Mrs. Jack Katzman. She i chose a white silk pesante sheath. I with the bodice appliqued in pink land red roses, and with a scooped (neckline. Her hat was a floral decorated white straw. Mrs. Jennie Grossinger was in white French knit sheath bandin royal blue silk around the neckline, down the front, and across the hips, giving a short jacket effect. Also in a French knit ensemble was Mrs. Marvin Koslow who's husband supplied the diamonds from their Fontai.neblcau shop. Mrs. Koslow's .'heath was an ice porcelain blue Bilk knit. Over it she wore a white hand-knit sweater reembroidered in silver lurex. • |U|RS. Sheldon Kaye chose a white linen ensemble. Her waist-length jacket featured the tiered cape sleeve. The bodice of her dress was a green foliage silk print. Her accessories were white, and her large straw hat was softly contoured around the brim. Also in white was Mrs. Anna Brenner Myers. Her sheath was silk pesante, worn with a blush pink silk jacket. Mother of the hostess, Mrs. Joseph Levine, selected a white silk sheath with a royal blue cabbage rose print. Her dress featured a lEPHUN'S HEBREW! BOOK STORE Largest and Oldeet Hebrew Supply Home In Greater Miami VmOUSAU and RETAIL Complete Line of Hebrew Supplier for Synagogue*, Hebrew and Sunday School* ISRAELI GIFTS and NOVEUTIES ^ 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 < 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 A JUN10K JKWISH high neckline, with the softness of radiating lines away from the Peter Pan collar. Mrs. Jack Toppell was in a striking navy and white ensemble. Her dress was silk organza with three-quarter sleeves and a full skirt. The dress featured an oversized white piqued bib that came to a V almost to the waistline. She wore a navy blue pill box, and the rest of her accessories were also in navy. In gold brocade was Mrs. Joseph Friedman. Her ensemble had the controlled fullness in the skirt and a waist-length fitted jacket. Mr. Stuart Bernstein chose a two-piece, honey beige damask suit. The short jacket was fitted, and her sleeves were bracelelIength. • a THE furs modeled by members were from the collection by Mr. Herman. Commentator of show was Mrs. Bernard Kaplan. She selected a silk print of deep red roses on black, with a sheer black silk organza bodice. Her shoes were made of the same print fabric, and her hat was one of her own original creations. While Arik Lavie, the "Frank Sinatra" of Israel was singing, the judges adjourned to select tho "Best Dressed Woman" in the audience. The winner was Mrs. Miller. She wore a black silk sheath with a sheer illusion bodice. Her neckline was a bateau in the front, which dipped in the back. Her shore sleeves were cuffed in white organdy, and were trimmed in jet black buttons. Keeping the dress to an afternoon feeling, was the black patent leather belt. Nancy Paskow Is Bride-Elect Mr. and Mrs. Harry Paskow, of 900 West ave., Miami Beach, announce the engagement of their daughter, Nancy Ellen, to Harvey Asher, of Passaic N. J. Miss Paskow, a graduate of Miami Beach High School, is now a freshman at the University of Alabama and a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority. Mr. Asher, a graduate of Passaic High School, is now a prc-med student in his junior year at the University of Alabama and a a member of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity. MRS. MICH AH GORDON Significance of Passover "The Significance of Passover" will be the title of a lecture by Dr. Abraham Wolfson at the Spinoza Outdoor Forum, 11th st. and Ocean ct., Miami Beach, on Wednesday at 8 p.m. The lecture will be repeated at Blackstone hotel on Friday at 6:30 p.m. Mrs. Miriam Nelson will recite. Mrs. Sonia Weiss will be heard in folk songs. Gordons to Live In New York Miss Pamela Lynne Lichter became the bride of Michael Stuart Gordon in a double ring ceremony at Temple Beth Sbolom on Sunday, Apr. 3. Rabbi Leon Kronish and •Cantor David Conviser officiated at the noon rites. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Lichter, 1020 N. Shore dr.. Miami Beach. The groom is the son of Mrs. Sadye Gordon and the late Mr. Louis Gordon, of Mosholu Parkway, N. Y. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a designer's gown of white peau satin embroidered with fine alencon lace and featured a large butterfly bouffant at back which gave way to a long cathedral train. Her crown was of pearls and crystals with bouffant illusion veil. She carried a Bible with white roses and stephanotis. Matron of honor was Mrs. Irving Lichter, aunt of the bride. Maid of honor was Miss Carol Sackheim. Miss Michelle Lichter, cousin of the bride, was bridesmaid. Ringbearer was David Lichter, brother of the bride, and flower girl was Risa Dranow. Best man was Joseph Gordon, uncle of the groom. Ushers were Irving Lichter, Russell Herman' and Michael Chcrnoff. The bride was graduated from Miami Beach High School, and attended Florida State University. She is now at Hunter College, where she will complete her work in fashion and art designing. The groom graduated from the University of Arizona and is associated with Charles I. Goodman, Bearings, New York. After a honeymoon in Arizona and Las Vegas, the couple will reside in Riverdale, N. Y. is Z?^ AUGUST BROS ftw IS thx BtM a DE LUXE CABANAS J 500 6 17 Washington Ave. Miami Beach JEffcrson 1-9017 AVON COSMETICS Hv* you thought of ••rning extra money in your spare hours? A wonderful opportunity awaits you with Avon. For full information, call Mrs. Sadie Flaxman, FR 1-6408 BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER CONVALESCENT HOME NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY Under Strict Supervision of the Orthodox Vaad Hakaahruth of Florida Ribbl Dr. Isaac H. Ever, Director 24-HOUR NURSING — DOCTORS ON CALL ALL DIETS OBSERVED — CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS MOURN taUIPMCNT A FURNISHINGS HRfPROOf BUILDING 310 Collins Ave. Ph. JE 2-3571 Miami Beach Gelernters Tell Leslie's Troth Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Gelernter, 3406 Granada blvd., Coral Gables, announce the engagement of their daughter, Leslie Ann, to Fred Silverman, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Silverman, Jamaica, N.Y. Miss Gelernter received the Bachelor's degree in education from the University of Miami, \ and is now affiliated with Hearst! Publications in New York. Mr. Silverman received his Bach-1 elor of Science degree from Cityj College of New York, and will I take a Master's degree in indus-: trial engineering from Columbia! ; University. He h a s entered the field of hospital administration andi is associated with Montefiore Hos-| : pital in New York. A September wedding is planned. MAY 1st TO NOVEMBER 1st from JVV 6 MONTHS of Pleasure • 6 Persons Thrill to all the wonderful pleasure* of this $10,000,000 resort world you get everything our regular guests enjoy—including stars-apoppin, a whole new world of entertainment pleasure! Supervised play area for children, teenage rumpus room, health club, (team rooms, solaria, poolsid* bar. eviLLe fOR INFORMATION CALL MR. DON JE 2-2511 lull HOCK 01 nniNIRON' ?-k Id V'k will's IN IM( ><(ll' 01 M'iMi 3 WHAT MIAMI NEEDED! GOOD. FAST DRY CLEANING AT MODERATE PRICES FRIEDMAN'S CLEANERS 2922 CORAL WAY 171 8-79th ST. FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST" Miracle Massage Salon "STREAMLINE YOUR FIGURE" SPECIALIZING IN BODY MASSAGING NOW OPEN Monday through Friday 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. Saturday, Sunday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. 2373 CORAL WAY HI 4-1186 Levine Names Campaign Head Miami attorney Victor Levine, candidate for Judge of the Juvenile and Domestic Court, announced Wednesday that he has appointed Al Nason, Miami Beach furniture dealer, as his campaign manager. Campaign headquarters will be opened within a few days. Levine has been a Miami resident for 30 years, and has been an instructor at the University of Miami, and the St. Theresa Catholic School in Coral Gables. He has been active in juvenile and child guidance work for many years. SAL THE HANDYMAN > Repairs jalousies, carpentry, J % plumbing, painting, altctik, etc. % lamp repairs. Call after 6 • Wl 7-1015 %  *-*****-^a>a>a>a>a>** **-* a>f* f aj,



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Friday. April 15, 1960 'Jewlstif/crkttann Page 3-B Book Review Series Closes To celebrate his 97th birthday, Barnett Hart, father of Moss Hart, famous playwright and director of the American—Theatre, will be guest of honor at the closing luncheon of the book review scries sponsored by the Miami Hyath chapter of Hadassah. Mrs. I. M. Weinstcin will review his son's best seller, "Act I." After spending his winters here for the past 25 years, the senior Hart became a permanent Miami Beach resident six years ago. Mrs. Philip F. Thau is general chairman of the book review series. The concluding function will be Wednesday noon at the Algiers hotel. Mrs. Charles Gertler (right), president of Deborah group of Hadassah, and Mrs. Milton Steinhardt at a recent "Eye Bank" parly, at which Mrs. Steinhardt acted as hostess. "Gay Spring and Good Health" highlighted the affair as theme. Dade PTA Will Elect Officers Election of officers will be held [ at the PTA county-wide meeting I of the Dade County Council ot Parlent Teacher Assns. on Wednesday at Miami Springs Junior High iSchool, 150 S. Royal Poincianna |blvd., Miami Springs. The meeting will begin at 10 la m., and will be the last County |Ceuncil meeting before installation new officers. Mrs. William P. jCooke. Council president, will conduct the business portion of the netting. Mrs. Alfred D. Barbieri, chairia:i of the nominatin" committee, fill present the new slate of offirs to be elected. In keeping with Council's theme this month, 'The ChilJ and-Cultural Opportunities," there will be an art display of the works of studuents under the direction of William B. Duncan, Council's art education chairman. Southwest Mi-' ami Senior High School, under the direction of English teacher, Mrs. J. Riley Staats, will display poetry and creative writing by the journalism class. Dr. Kenneth Williams, who was appointed by the school board as president of Dade county's new Junior College to open in September, will talk about the organization and program of the new Dade school m&MM Candidates lor scnooi noard will be introduced. They have been invited to mingle with PTA memSHOCPNG > bers socially during the viewing Ljlwayslook for thr of the art works. z^" 7 (y) Principals and PTA presidents of Area 13 and 14, the Southwest sections, will be recognized. Beth Sholom Sets Spring Luncheon Sisterhood and PTA of Temple Beth Sholom of Miami Beach will join forces to sponsor a spring luncheon and fashion show Wednesday noon in the Sisterhood Lounge of the Temple, according to a joint announcement by Mrs. Howard H. Miller, Sisterhood president, and Mrs. Samuel Hirsch, PTA president. In charge of arrangements are program chairmen, Mrs. Murray Gilden and Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg; chairmen of thte day, Mrs. Inez M. Krensky and Mrs. Robert Goodman; ticket chairmen, Mrs. Leon J. Ell, Mrs. Irving Rothman and Mrs. Marvin Cooper. The fashion show is being provided by Burdine's, and spring, and summer fashions will be modeled. The luncheon is in charge of a committee headed by Mrs. Hyman Goldstein, Mrs. Morris Lipp and Mrs. Eugene Weine. Proceeds will be used for the subsidy fund of the Beth Sholom religious school. The new slate of Sisterhood's officers and directors for the coming year will also be presented at this function. 4\ FAVORED in DADE Outstanding in all Florida! &> M* \* •i Repo'ttd By Rollins Coitcn Poll For Ptriod (nomg Much Jl ,•<> (1 &2SV& Holiday Greetings JEFFERSON STORES MIAMI FT. LAUDERDAIE WEST PALM BEACH Consult Your Phone Directory for the Store Nearest You ll*C FOR AN EVEN BETTER FLORIDA joHNificCARTY Governor Governor IM. I-ill. Adv. i£ noa) ini3 KOSHER FOR PASSOVER Certified by Rabbi Jacob Cohan %  %  '-* % %  TITIEY TEA IN A GLASS That's the fine old Jewish way to enjoy tea at its finest...Tetley Tea... richer in taste... served in a glass or cup 1837 COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 4 LEVER 7-H vofe for WYNNE Ror.xn TRIP TICKET TO I AHi:-I UFK sr>f > II:E( LIVIU 12.95 ulMoriutxctisji Summer white with the print of fresh flowers. Our Shelton Stroller is light as a floating cloud in Du Pont* nylon jersey, never shows a wrinkle, feels cool, travels smoothly. Washable, it drip-dries, needs no ironing. Blue, mint, grey and brown; 10-18, 12V2-22V2. Daytime Casuals, second floor miami. At all five Burdine's stores. EASY AS ABC ... to shop on our Adjustable Burdine's Credit plan. Call Telephone Ordering Service, FR 3-1111 and s*y, "charge itl" BTJ'FUDTTNITS'S %  % 



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friday. April 15. 1960 vJewisti noridUan Page 13-B \^J o it 14 a r i e s NORMAN A. ROSSMAN JJ, of i l.i. Proii % %  HI ., jidi \,,, 11 %  here -1 n from XH \ orK, inul wilf ,!„., %  ,,j Temple Israel und ihi \-.,,„ •, %  • ,i, surviylnK an hiwife, .-a.lv. daughter, MIHH Bally RimHman; -..M. Norman and a brothi i and two grandchildren Bervlces were Apr. 13 ., M< mortal ''h i utolTM.** MEYER GROSKIN i7. of '"i" Weal ave., died Apr. II. He l ""' '"" even years n from Atanta, and waa .. n tired real i (tale iroki sin viviiiiare in* wife, FUnnle, and .1 daughter. Mr*. Hannah from Bt. %  awls, and waa %  member ..f Templi Ki'i.niiiI-:I Burvlvlng are her husband, Louis; eon. Milton; daughter, Mri Mildred Goldberg: and HIX sisters .111.1 iiv. grandchildren. Bervlcea ware in st. lamia, with local arrangement* by Gordon funeral Hume. Miami Beach Home and Training School for Jewish Retarded Children holds recent luncheon here. Seated are (left to right) Mrs. Dora Bialolenla vice president; Mrs. Ann TamaroH corresponding secretary; Mrs. Irving Cvpe n life member; Mrs. Nathan Nash, board rnember. Mrs. H. L. Barber, third vice president; Mrs. Ida Pinock. first vice president; Mrs. Frances Levy, board member. Standing (left to KS? ?! ^nKatz. principal of Miami Beach High School; Miami Beach Councilman Kenneth Oka; Mrs. Ella Wallman. founder and president; Circuit Court Judge Irving Cvpen; Jordan Davidson; and Israel Silverman "' %  gjgL.i •o *1 SOLOMON LAZARUS U, ..r ;omi h'W sth st., retired owner of a MportniK goodi store, died Apr II. He came here nine yaara ago from Brooklyn, N.V He la, survived by a daughter. Mm. Ethel AgM, a eon and %  later. Bervlcea and l.urlal wen in NOW York, with local arninx.in.nl-. by Kiveralne Memorial Chape!. MRS. MARGARET PHILIPS %  %  Ol ISM Pennsylvania ave., died Ayr. 11. She oa hare six yaara HK. from ("hlcago. Surviving are her h.isiiand. Eugene; a son, Andrew; daughter, Mra. tlllra Cole; three alatera and four :;> .null %  ii: 1.1 %  11 Services were A|ir. 14 at liurdon Kiin.ral Home. DAVID BRENNER a, ..r :;n|| Nw (th at., died Apr. it. He • am. here -'". years am. from Brooklyn, N.Y., and was a fellow Cab diiver. Surviving are hie mother: Minnie; brother, Nathan: and slater, Mra. Kuth Bchrager Kervlces were U at Hold. HI Funeral Home. MORRIS ROTHSTEIN It, of ISM Coral Way, died Mar. 17. ii....in. here ten yean ago from Jer•ej City, N..I.. and "as a retired niannfiimi. 1 of woman's clothes. BurvlvIng are his wife, Baaaye; two sons. I lav id and Irwln; five daughters, Mm. Belle Hermann, Mrs. Itae Goldberg, Mra. Lillian Helmowlut, Mrs. Bydell Harding, and Miss Bogle Kothsteln: a brother, slater and ten grandchlMri n Services were Mar, 20 at Cordon Funeral Home. Apr. R iward-wining women at a Temple Ner Tamid Fannie Sklar. Ira Rosenfeld Ann Bernstein £2^^J UnC te, a ,he E den RoC "d J^Ph Kahn. Mrs. Louis Cohen S-StoS' ko el. Left to right are Mesdames Sam Greenpresented the awards president. Bid. Lather Carrey, Murray Shaw, Louis Gold. "V byi # K^ocialite and Mrs. Abraham mkel. of Miami Beach, 3rd American President ^es' SS President Cleveland 3r to its recent sailing from Francisco. The President eland calls at Honolulu, kkohama, Manila, Hong |ng and Kobe during its sixkek cruise of the Orient. Mr. \d Mrs. Frankel are on a easure trip to Yokohama. Continued from Pago 1-B .lack Kratish, 8911 Carlyle ave., were hosts at the function in honor cl their parents Steve Brenner, home for the weekend from Georgia Tech, planning on another weekend for the wedding this Sunday of Dick Lapidus— P, res !? e "f of *' AFM radi0 station—and Paula Chertok His parents lite William Brenners, entertained the couple with a dinner at their home, the bride-to-be receiving a wedding handkerchief from Mrs. B. Mrs. William (Molly) Altman back from Texas, where she visited her son, Paul, who is a captain in the U. S. Medical Corps, and his wife Judith Making it a double round of parties for the Lapidus-Chertok couple, Molly entertained at a party for guests including Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. William I. Brenner, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Zeeman, parents of the bride and groom-to-be, and Miss Rose Perlman aunt of the groom ... Dr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Soroff—he's consultant to the Bureau of Jewish Education—off on a trip to Israel They'll be living in Tel Aviv through August. JACOB DUNN TI'I. of 1100 Collins ave.. retired oil compflny executive, died Apr. 1". KurvlvInu are his wif. Mary. ., -,,,, and two daughters. Bervlces wen In Mew York rity, with local arrangements b> Rlveralde Memorial Chapel. MRS. HANNAH GREENWALD v.. %  %  ** %  "= %  i 1 i. av,-. aiad Apr. '.'. She came here K years ago from Atlanta;. Surviving are har husband, Jonas; two daughters, Mrs. Bflsabeth Rosner and Mrs. nian.he Slotnlck; four grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Servlcea were Apr. 13 nt Rlveralde Memorial Chapel, Normandy lsl.\ The late Mra. ureenwaJd and her hiistiaiid were the operators of the ci-teii. 1 hotel, Atlantic city, mini they retired and th.-tr children are operators of the Sterling I I ..n Miami Beach, MRS. REBECCA STEIN 71, of 4L'x:i Prairie ave., died Mar. 17. She 1 une here 12 yaara ai?o from \.ark. N..I. surviving are three win*. inelii.lin;: Martin: and three daughters, Including Mra. Lillian Sta' In, both of Miami Beach B1 were Mar. N at Rlveralde Memorial I'liaptl. Alton id. ABRAHAM GOLDMAN Ml. Of ITT". SW lth ave.. died Mar HI. %  ne her-,, it years ago from "'level,,ml. ami was a member of Tomael. Surviving are a son. Samuel, and three daughters, Lillian and Jennie Goldman ami Mrs. it.is.Ewlck. Hi atoo leavei four grandchildren and aat-grandc'hlldren. Servlcea were Alar. IS at i;..rd..n Funeral Home. MRS. ESTHER KAT2IN %  •7. ..I 7J". Nth t.. Hurfalde, died Apr 9, she came heri five years ago from Jacksonville, N.C.. and Is survived by rive sons. Including Ell and <: ge, Miami, a daughter, 11 grandchildren and I., great-grandchildren. Si i' re in itai. inh, S.C., with local arrangements by Riverside Memorial 1 "ha pel. SIDNEY ACKNER IS, of lv>7 NIC 177th st.. died Apr. B. 11. came from Flint, Mich., 1 ghl yeara %  '-" %  Surviving :ir.his wife. Savin: daughter, Mrs. Martha fJeller; two .1 bi otha 1. and two gt and children. Servlcei were Apr 7 st Rlveralde Memorial Chapel, Normandj Isle, MRS. ETHEL CUTLER 71, .11 tall SW .17th ave, died Mar. 1. she lame here -i\ v.ars ago from M lantie City N.| Surviving are h. r huhband, Borla: a daughter, Mrs. Sfi|ihle Fadir; three sister, ami two grandchildren, Servlcea were Mar. is at Gordon Funeral Home. MRS. MARY KAPLAN 7''. troNK 173rd t.r. No. Miami Hea.h. died Mar. IS. She .am.h.n IS yeara ago from New York. Burvlvlng are %  daughter. Mrs. Sam .Wins, three grandchildren, and rive great-grandchltdren Servlcea were Mar. 17 at niveiside .Memorial 1'hapel, Normandy Isle. Guest Airways In The South's only direct air service to Europe, through the Miami gateway, inaugurated Super Constellation equipment on its syslem last week. Announcement of the new service comes one year and more than a million flying miles after Guest Airways' first Miami Lisbon Madrid Paris flight last March. These new planes will fly the mid-Atlantic on a plan which allows travelers to visit as many as 12 additional cities and countries at no additional cost, including London, Glasgow, Brussels, Amsterdam. Frankfurt, Munich, Nice, Rome, Vienna, Barcelona, Athens and others. ThJ novel plan allows Guest pastengors to board ScandmavNew Service ian Airlines planes at either Lisbon, Madrid or Paris and visit these extra places free. The trips provide the choice of flying the mid-Atlantic from Miami both ways, a return via New York, or by the transpolar through California. "It's a big step toward making the South, and especially Florida, a major gateway to Europe," said i Anker Palvig, Miami division manager for Guest. An additional flight was also scheduled for Aug. 1, giving eight direct flights weekly between Miami and Europe. The majority of Florida cities have been common rated by Guest so that air fare on any leg of a trip is the same as directly from Miami. DAVID THtERFIELD '''''• Of MM Itli si died Apr. *. He came here 11 j ears ago from Ni w York. Burvlvlng %  laughter, Mi-. Roslyn Oaoler, and four slaters Kervlces were \pr 7 at Riverside Memorial Chapel, Washington ave. PHILIP PECULLAN '".. of ifMi NK isisi st., Mo. Miami lie.1. h, died Mar |(. He right years ago from Saw York, ami %  'own r a gift shop, Bun vlng wife Blat %  hi : son, Henry: danrhti r, I • she; 1 ri .. nlstei and in 0 brothi Bet \ |i %  \i.,, ffl ., 1 Ide Memorial Chapel. Normandj tale. DAVF SNETMAN 7", of in;, w :: %  „,] ,,; ; .n,.,, M ., r ,„ M( | rame here U years ago from Mi •In., and was a member of Temple lsSAM MALLEN ".. of It 13 Meridian ave died Mar l. He rump here seven yaara ago from I-hlcago. Burvlvlng are his wife, Tohie; two sons. Max and Flyman; two daughters, ineiuiiing Mrs. Qladya Laser; and seven gran.lehlldren. He also leaves throe great-grandchildren. 1 1 Iocs were Mar. 1 •< at lti> Memorial Chapel, Washington ave. JULIUS MAYER 74. i.f IS7H.I NW liith id. No. Miami Reai h. died Mar. in. He .ame here lien years ago from New York, and was own.r or several resort hotels In the Cutskllls Surviving are his wtfo, rielen; eon, Phllto and two daughters. m hiding Mra, Bat Hard Hart, Ml in I Reach. Bervlees were in New York, with loenl arrangements by Riverside Memorial Chapel. IRVING NEWMAN M, <.r MOT Sheridan ave. died Mar. 1 :. He came lore seven years ago from Brona. NY. and He waa paal 1 omroand. r ..r American Legion Post 1214 In New .mi %  member of the 411 and 8. Set t i. • were Mar IS at Ith 1 Memorial Chapel, Washington ave. MRS. HARRIET SOHMER 73, of 4:10 21st st.. died hare, She enme I.. Miami \-^ \,.,iago from Forest HiiN. N.Y. Burvlvlng are her Imsliand, M.I 11-: daughter. Mrs. Florence Manhi mi and a sister. Bel Mar. IS at Itlversii.. Memorial ChapeL Alt.,11 ,.l. laude Thomhill, one of the kuntry'8 top bandleaders, jd his orchestra are now Jying a special engageent in the Carriage Club of Sami Springs Villas. SCHWEBKE & ASSOCIATES, INC. LAND PLANNERS ENGINEERS LAND SURVEYORS "We Cover Greater Miami" REASONABLE RATES PROMPT SERVICE 4841 NW. 2nd AVENUE MIAMI PI 1-2592 3521 W. Broward Blvd. Ft. Uuderdale LUdlow 14600 VOTE FOR AND ELECT JOE RARES COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4 PULL LEVER 7-G MAY 3 IM. Pol. Adv.



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%  L S O C M L I I E 01 the Mrs. Jennie Grossinger at her home in honor of Mrs. Margaret Newman Steam, Mrs. Harry Rosenblatt, Mrs. Florence Kupperrr.an, and Miss Reba Gershman, all members of ORT, who are leaving for Europe to visit ORT schools throughout the continent... Leslie Gross. 15-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard C. Gross, 6080 BW 62nd ter., recently won his fourth consecutive Miami Herald-spirsored spelling bee championship ... A junior at Coral Gable: High, he was presented with a trophy in ceremonies at the Colurrtus hotel Leslie is president of the National Honor Society at Gables High and secretary of Hillel AZA Completing the proud family are Michael, 12, and Nicki, 6V4 Frank M. (Cassie) Fulton, 3624 Collins ave., popular hostess about town, tendered a luncheon for 200 friends at the Algiers [hotel Guests included those from Ft. Lauderdale, Hollywood, Coral Gables. Miami, and Miami Beach High Cassie is founder president of the Women's Ideal Club of Chicago, her former reiI dent i. > Erica Morini, internationally-renowned violinist, guest of honor a party at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Sanel (Lisl) Beer, following Jlisi Morini's recital at Dade County Auditorium Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Gannon — he's president of the ammii'Hty Concerts Assn. —Dr. and Mrs. Mark Cirlin, Mrs. Dor;hy Alpert. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mandell, Mrs. Albert Pick, Bob risk in, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Whitehouse — he's honorary Consul J Aubiria here — Ernest Silverman, Mrs. Helene Wolfe, Herman Jindi-r. Mrs. Jennie Grossinger, and Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cassel.. }r. Beer recalls the days when he saw Miss Morini as a child living cross the street from him in Vienna Homing friends from New York and Hollywood at Maxim s were Anita Priest Satter, 833 W. 39th st.. and Anne P. Reiser. 820 15th st. The group also caught shows at the Eden Roc and Fontainebleau ... The George Bachers, of Bay Heights, and their three young [sters making July plans, including a flying trip to California and land Disneyland Mr and Mrs. Eugene Austrach. of New York, houseguests of IMr. and Mrs. Irving Kossoff, 4444 N. Meridian ave The ladies I are sisters Charles "Chuck" Goldberg, managing director of the Delano hotel 1 rst person to hold down these two important posts at the same time: chairmanship of the public relations advisory board of the City of Miami Beach and chairmanship of the hotel division I of the Chamber of Commerce. %  P-erre Mande, noted violinist and music teacher, of 2485 Trapp ave Coconut Grove, off for an extended visit with his brothers in Israel ... He hasn't seen them in 23 years Pierre will [visit Paris on the way, to attend a reunion of teachers from the Iworld renowned Paris Conservatory of Music ... Pre-nuptial luncheon tendered by Mrs. Norman Hesser of IChicago, at the "Algiers-hotel on Apr. 9 for Miss Fran Topf, 3925 [Riviera dr.. Coral Gables, and her fiance. Barry Hesser. son of the hostess and Mr. Hesser Both are U of M students, where [they met .Planned is a June 18 wedding Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Roscnthai, of Venetian Way in New [York, where Gertrude is confined as a patient at Mt. Sinai HosVfiiree-month visit going into its fifth month for Mrs. Aranka Cemenv of San Diago, Chile She's visiting her son Emery, l.ndTue Cete and having the best time with her grandchildren, Sot and Nina for the first time Another ^.^* ft JJ [whom she hasn't seen in 13 years, came from M.Ian. Italy, to say Ihello. K • One day the temperature was 80 the next 38 Mrs^ Solpmon Margol.s glad to be back from Philadelphia ^e" she atC1_JJ ii... Ran Miirvnh of her cousin s son, Mavne J. Lustman fe Ma h r e go." a" oTaVa Yamf.y reunion with her brother Albert "ho drove down from Boston with his wife. Phyliss. and the.r six children ... ,, Card from Mrs Robert (Helene) Lewin postmarked Venice tomplaning about "no time to sleep" And. Mrs. Sara Holland Eds home to Neponsit, L.I.. after spending a quiet three months hprp Mr' and Mrs. Philip B. Padawer were in Israel when they disCovered they were going to be parents for the first time The KivaJ of their son made Mrs. Anne Padawer a grandmother and */r mother Mrs Sarah Starr, a great-grandmother ... The baby ; named Ari El. ** Lvnne Margolies sweet sixteen Apr. 9 and honored at %  l unch^ „artv t the Aleiers by her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Sol MartS.S.% cX^l Wfriend. Abby Rosofsky. U of M Student, was among the 20 guests ... It was a 25th wedding anniversary celebration for Mr. and Jr.. Jack Katzman at the Deauville on Apr. 9 ... Mr. and Mrs. Continued on Po 13- "cJewisli Floridian Miami. Florida, Friday. April 15, 1960 Section B Mrs. Lillian Holofcener (left), membership vice to right are Mesdames Mannie Mintus. Stepresident of Miami Beach chapter of Hadasphen S. Wise group; David Davis, Emma Lazsah, present awards for largest percentage inarus group; and Max Cohen, new South Gate creases at a membership award luncheon of Group. J the chapter recently at the Algiers hotel. Left Brandeis Women Join in Plans For 12th Anniv. Greater Miami chapter of the Brandeis University National Women's Committee, is taking a leading role in spearheading preparations for the 12th anniversary dinner of the university on Sunday evening, Apr. 24, at the Diplomat hotel. Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs, president, has been joined by past presidents Mrs. Sidney Schwartz and Mrs. Harold Turk in making plans for the black tie affair. Co-sponsor is the Brandeis Vniversity Club of Greater Miami, with Dr. Stanley Frehling as president. Serving on the hostesses committee, headed by Mrs. Jerome Rado, are the Mesdames Abe L. Cassett, Joseph Duntov, Robert Ellis, Jack Esformes, Stanley Frehling, Ben Zion Ginsburg, Charles Goldberg, Paul R. Gordon, Max E. Gottlieb, Nathan Gumenick, Samuel Halperin, Seymour Heller, Leon Jacobs, Ernest Janis, Solomon Margolis, Wm. Maxwell, David Phillips, Jack W. Rabinovitch, Sidney Schwartz, Morris Summer, Harold Thurman, Harold Turk, Carl Weinkle. and Maurice Zimmerman. In charge of arrangements for the affair are Mesdames Ellis Amdur, Rudy Baum, Cecilia Elliott, Aaron Farr, Leo Fishbein, Benjamin Gladwin, Robert Green, Robert Grossman, Samuel Kling, George Levenson, Betty Oberstew, Harry Orleans, Max Resnick, William Rubenstein. Donald Rubin, Rebecca F. Snetman, Herbert Sobel, Max Stadler, and Bernard Troub. The Miami chapter of Brandeis Women has over 800 members, while the National Women's Committee has a membership of more than 70.000. t the chapter's fund raising chairmen, Mrs. Sidney Finger, Biscayne chapter; Mrs. Eva Blum, Louise Wise chapter; and Mrs. Russell Winer, Miami chapter. g _.'*<*" Mrs. Albert I. Jacobs (center), president of the Greater Miami chapter, Brandeis University National Women's Committee, joins hands with two past president of the chapter, Mrs. Sidney Schwartz (left) and Mrs. Harold Turk, in spearheading preparations for the women's participation in the university's 12th anniversary dinner. To /nsfolf Mrs. Eflcia Mrs. Edward Elkin will be installed as president of Bikur Cholim Kosher Convalescent Home Wednesday noon at t h e Algiers hotel. Installing Mrs. Elkin for her third term in ofice will be Mrs. Victoria Roe. director of the home. TV Stars Due At Beth Emeth Once again. Beth Emeth Sisterhood is sponsoring its annual "Fun Day" on Sunday, Apr. 24, for the children of Beth Emeth School. Television stars Mary Jane and Melvin, and Herb Bass, of WCKT. will be featured on the program. Also present will be Mr. McVey (Chips and Salty) of the Popeye Playhouse on WTJV. along with Richard Leone, known as Mr. Clown. The program wilT in addition include George Gates, Tumbler and Miss Janice Carron, puppeteer. Spring Donor Lunch Wednesday Annual spring donor lunch of the Florida Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress will take place at noon Wednesday in the Rosewood room of the Fontainebleau hotel. Highlight of the day will be the awarding of a United States Government Bond. Ben Essen, local attorney and featured guest, will present an illustrated discussion on the works of Sholom Aleichem. A fashion show by the House of Paul Freed will have, in addition to professional models, the participants of members of Congress. Mrs. Willian Nelson will be accompanist. Mrs. Anna White, formerly of Boston, will sing. Mrs. Benjamin Kamen, national Women's Division vice president, will be chairman of the day. Mrs. Harold Jaffer, Program Chairman, is in charge of arrangement*. Guestt of honor will be



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Pcqe 2-A Friday. April 15. I960 ty Central Committee o( the Democratic Party, aad an Illinois Democratic national commiUeemaa smce I960. A close hrtend of former PresKienl Trumaa. Cot Anrey was lastrumeafal ia heiaovg estabBsh the Harry S Truman Chair m Amertcaa CYrOaatioa at Brandeis IB ISM Senrma a* cochairawa for the %antver;i-> are Sam Black. Jack Danmaky, Dr. Frehliag. Charles Fruchtman. Jennie Grossiager. Na han Gumeoick. Seymour Heller. _iel Kann. Jar I. Kisiak. Bmg At Jack Leonard. Joseph M. Upton. David Phillips John V Ser bin. William D. Stager. HaroU Thurmaa. HaroU Turk, aad Carl %  TilaWi Dinner committee ard Abe*s. Bertmaa. Fred %  aa JDC Chief Denies Agadir Victims Fend for Selves NEW YORK—Charle* If Jordan. overseas director general of the Joint Distribution Committee, latl week denied reports that 900 Jewish snrvivors of the Agadir earthquake had been left to fend for themselves after being turned out of the Moroccan army barracks at La Jonaasere near Casablanca. ey's office in Casablanca since the disaster He indicated that jr>j will continue to supply food, cloth ina. medical car* and other assistance to those refugees still need ing them, with funds provided by the United Jewish Appeal. "" %  **?> UM George nilham Broas t o n Paul R. Gcrcioa (left) and Era*** lanis (right) receive warm coogratulatiaas bom Dr. Stanley Frebimg. president of the Brandeis University Chib of Greater Miami. Both men will be fcxmarfy mancted by Dr. Abeam L Sacbar as members oc the D i uml e u University Presidents Council at a black tie 12th enniversary dinner Sunday. Apr. 24. at the Diplomat hoteL They are the only naricbons ever to recere* such honors, which have been bestowed oo a Umited group of leaders tbrcmgttont the nation. Jams is a vice president and chairman of ban numbers for the local Biniwwi Chib. while Gordon is a member of :ts board of directors and co-chairman of its scholarship division. Frietfland, Anrey Head Committee For Brandeis Univ. 12th Anniversary i. Joseph Fraak Jack Career. Leo Chai Cohen Jack Fraakei. Bea Gai Gmjb—g. Charles rw Goblin. Sam A Gotdsteat. Ales S Gordoa. Max E Gottlieb, lobert Greea. Simml J. tUSpena Amort I Jacobs Walter JJ Senford H. Keaa. Bentaeal Walter C Kovner Nathaa Kwshin. Sam C Lerea *n. Samuel Upton. Ales Maim. Solomon B Mar^ohs. Morris Mar Jack Poptck David Prow**. Jack W. Rabmoviica. S A. R.vkind. Dan B Ruskm. Sidney Schwartz. Sal C Shaye. Jacob Slier. Harry Simon %  •off. EBUB Smith. Bernard Troub. Sidney Vastermaa. aad Harry Zukeraack. Jordan reported th?t 330 of tho Jewish refu g ee s are being she! ed in private homes in Catablanca and other cities, under plans worked oetby JDC and the Jewish commnsity of Casablanca. The other 170 refugees hare returned to their homes ia the vilage of fnezgane. several miles from Agadir. which rait lined little damage ia the earthau ire. Jordan, who direct* the overseas refaef and welfare operatioas of the JDC. major Aaserican agency aid mg d utitaw d Jews abroad, has bee* m came tenth with the agesTermites Swarming? ORKJH WORLD S LARGEST Two nationally pronuaeet Jew i-h leaderaad phnaathroptsts will onuoc mad the eoarnwttee for the 12th anniversary diaaer ot Brandets .rrsjty on Sunday Apr ?*. at the Diplomat hotel. Ian m> *f Food Fair Stares. tr^c. and a fa itww of tho un-versiry. F ri adtawd mad* aossaa** rho cwnsJrwctMw of tho Friodtand Cot Jacob M. Arvey will serve Law Scimcas Rasaarcai Cetwwr M caairmaa, aad Sa ma ot Frvd— aVanaW. Mo*w tat unit mil land aa honorary oxhairmaa of rosmweo* of the latest dmcev the Mack tie affair lae aanoancearms m chwaiito, meat was made by Dr stanwy %  wl l t "• **•"* F realm;, president of the Brandeis Lnrversitv Cub of Greater Mi Raman JwSCpn C. RftckOVStty •45 na fMM I avT_ MUM] KACIt X 1-35*5 other vital A native of Chicago. Col. Arvey began his law practice there in 1918. and was assistant state attorney of Cook county from ISIS to 1920 He is a member of the firm of Arvey. Hodes. aad Manttnoaad chairman of the Cook Coua&£?*** ewtce PMnmajtfMm SfWCMTfaTl IN 350 UNC01N ROAD Phorw it t-75 r. n*mm**m Avo. 721 LINCOLN ROAD JC t-074v %  mapaympm* DAIIY PICKUPS TO NEW YORK M. LIEBERMAN & SONS LOCAL AND L0\'G DISTANCT MOVING TO AND FROM sO5T0Jf 655 Ptml i MWm Sttt 0ntJEw4353 WE .USTAL. GLASS FOR EVERY MRM0SE warn CONTACT imSO L I 6. CLASS AND 13* S.W7. t* ST. •hme PI 1-13U I INSURANCE tananm n> mt ~!TOIJpi4 Oar Many COULTON BROS %  Ar1 S.W. 271. A**, t40S.ve.fmSl PALMWS MIAMI MOMUMENT CO. i's Ltwwiwf Mem*riwl Octlers" rn7nUr? li/falm %  RIVERSIDE AAEAAORIAL CHAPEL Phone JE 1-1151 Hr-vart rt*kl *..



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riday, April 15, 1960 TALES OF MORALS So many question why Judaism I T./uire.( regular daily worship. The \ constant daybyday contact with \:he words of the prayer-boo\, with other men at prayer and with our Father m Hcdt en, even if we. ourlelvcs, are not moved to prayu evtrfSay, teacrTes^tKai ~wl learn to pray through prayer itself. There it a story about a small %  own. far off from the main roads of the land. In the town were all the tecemvry municipal institutions: a bathhouse, a cemetery, a hospital and a law court. And there were all sorts of craftsmen: tailors, shoeI makers, carpenters and masons. One trade, however, was lacking, there uas no watchmaker. In the course of years, many of the clocks became t running. 1 The abandoned clocks had grown I loo rusty. i : i:U I' ... i" ., ,' „i %  !< IM t +Jewisti rh,,1nr Page 13-A 3n t?xn niia'pi !" TR p? ,nrnfra 13 xin .1956 ns*i T" 1 ?? ay? ntfin p ns-ix 878$ orna .njj? i 1 ^ irana xsr ntrflfl* ft IPX? nnx %¡ ?&} )*? niTnari ava s-axn 1 ? hn 'xn ac?r nna'pa .no bria x-iipi nca? avn jo nx xiip Wii i^ya "Fruslration" is, in our society, i word much used and abused. We, j today, worry too much about frus' (rations, pessimisms, disappoint; ments. We fail to realize that these are the challenges that provide the response. Unless there is dissatisfaction with the status quo, there is no need to push on and try to find something better. "Discontent," said Auerbach, "is the source of trouble, but also of progress." This emboldening lesson has long been pumped through the Jewish heart. Indeed for centuries now, in the best educational forum there could be, the family circle, have we responded to the four questions asked by our children with the vigorous answer of tradition. Unlike the "nouveaux riches" who try to hide their previous impecuniousness and would have you i believe that from the very first they wore only diapers of mink, the Jew has traditionally looked at his son and said "Slaves were we to Pharaoh in Egypt." It was this experience that led to our giving the world the magnificent concept of freedom. Because we were slaves in Egypt did our law givers say "Proclaim throughout the land, unto all the inhabitants thereof." Because Moses was time and time again turned away unjustly by .. the tyrant Pharaoh, did our people originate fair and equitable laws, %  '••tint of the Oon eratt oiia." did they legislate equality before the law for both the powerful and the | BETH ISRAELTWIO Prairie a weak. The Zohar is perhaps not very wrong when it teaches, 'There is no true good except it proceed from evil." In the early days, American Judaism, living in freedom, couldn't understand Zionism based on dissatisfaction with living conditions: events throughout the world caused them, too, to be dissatisfied not with the conditions under which they lived, but Moses-like, with (ho.se in which their brothers suffered. We therefore became the backers of our brothers' Aliyah. Yet, there are some in America who once again speak with disappointment—who are dissatisfied that in the land of the Jews, of the people who suffered most from intolerance, Israel—there is no separation of church and state and therefore a lack of religious freedom. But this too shall pass. It must pass as we raise our voices not in moans but in constructive protest. Perhaps Toynbee is right, and challenge is necessary for response. Dissatisfaction is thus not an unmixed course. Indeed it often provides the impetus for development. KNOW YOUR HERITAGE Final days of Passover will be marked in Greater Miami following Choi llamoed Sabbath weekend with services beginning on Sunday evening. Passover services follow Monday and Tuesday morning, as well as on both evenings. Tuesday morning services will include the traditional Yizkor memorial for the departed. Liberal and Reform congregations will observe the conclusion of Passover at only one service on Monday. VNSHE EMES. Conservative. president. BETH DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ave. Con aervative. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg Cantor William W. Lioion Friday sundown. Saturday 9 a.m. Ba.i Mltzvah: Hernia, daughter of Mr. and Mra. I.oui-. Hne. I'nssover BlUldaj | Ii.m. Monday 9 a.m. Tueaday 9 a.m. Ylxkor memorial. IFTH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox Rabbi Solomcr *rhlff. Friday ti::io p.m. Saturday x:30 a.m. S e i m o n : "intermediary Sabbalh." Paaaover Sunday 8:30 p.m. Monday 8:30 a.m. Sermon; "'Joins Porth I'nder Divine Protection," Tueaday 8:36 a.m. Sermon: 'Memory—The Most Nereaaary Ingredient of Judaism." Yizkor memorial. BETH EMETH. 12250 NW 2nd avc Conservative. Rabbi David W. Her eon. Cantor Hymin Fein. Friday K:15 p.m. Sermon: "The Bong Of Bonga." Samuel Crayson to ••haul. Saturday I a.m. Harmon: "Holldaya and Holy Dtaya." itoaaover Sundaj •:M p in Honda,) I a.m. Tueadaj i a.m. Vixkor memorial. Sermon: ''The .D^nn \NSLATI0N Some Modern Jewish Aspects Of Our Time-Proven Traditions The Oldest Man in Israel fcliahu Eli Makuas is one hundred twenty years old and is the pst man living today in Israel. fcliahu Makuas was born in a ill and distant village in the At, Mountains and came to Israel Morocco in the year 1956. He in Sderot, a new town in the kev, close to the Gaza Strip. £m the day he came to the counand settled in Sderot, he was his home only once — when vent to vote on Polling Day for Knesset. Except for this, the man sits all day in bed readying the Bible; he reads the of Psaims especially. iiblisbed by Brit Ivrit Olamit) The desecration of the Sabbath an emergency is not delegated strangers, minors, servanti or I'omrn but u done by prominc.it Jews and sages. MAIMONIDES. Nor pursuing your business, nor (hraa;ine; thereof your business is forbicWeit, not the business of leaven. —ISAIAH. • e • More than Israel k't 1 '"< Sotv t. the Sobbuth has, kept Israel. —AHAD HAAM. ve. Or thodox. Rabbi H. l.oui Rottman. P*r|da) l:M p.m. Saturday t:*S a.m "Weekly Portion," PMaovar Monday B:4S a.m. Sermon: "The Jowlah Layman aa a Torah IVr^onnlity." Tuesday 8:15 a.m. Tlakor. SETH JACOB. 301-311 Washington ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern. Cantor Maurice Mamchee. • BETH RAPHAEL. 139 NW 3rd ave Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Levitan, • —— BETH TFILAH. 935 Euclid ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky • CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 40B 16th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky. • ;ORAI_ WAV JEWISH CENTER •756 SW 16th St., Miami. Rabbi Samuel April. Prldas § p.m Harmon, "Plral Praadom." Ones Shabbtri hosts: Coral Way .leu ish Center taen-ajia olub membere, as irall as membem of Invited church croups. Saturday B am. Sermon: "Sonjj "f Sonaa." Paaaover Bunday K :in p.in Monday and Tut Ida a.m. Vlzkor Tuaaday. e JADE HEIGHTS CENTER. 18160 NW 2nd ave. Conservative. Cantor Emanuel Mandel. -LAGLER-GRANADA 50 NW 51st pi. Conservative. Rabbi Bernard Shoter. Cantor Fred Bernstein. Friday ::: p.m. Saturday B a m. Mar Mllavah: Jerold; won ..r Mr :iil Mra AI Roth. Paaaover Monday 8 a.m. Sermon: "Then Sana: Moaea and the i 'hlldren "i WMi i TueaAaj B :i m. Y'/.k" 10:36 -i "i Sermon: "A Memorial Prayer," • — HEBREW ACADEMY. 918 6th St. Orthodox. RaUbi Alexander Grosa. 1'iiil.iy 6:30 pin Saturday >-:l"i a.m. Paaaover Sunday 6:36 p.m. Monday v > a.m. Tueada< v '." %  • n. Vhtkor Llw:M a in Mathantel Lauer, BTadnate of the lu-ln-ew Aoademi and sniii.ni ;ii w .'it in Reaerve Colleae and K.ii>blnlcal Colleaje of Telahe, Cleveland, jtt., will offer the sermons both daya -— • — HIAIFlM BFFOIM JEWISH CONQREGATION. 1150 W. Sth St.. Hlaleah. Rabbi Nathan Zwitman. PVIday B:1S pin. Sermon: *'8baa] of Honca." Onaa Snabbai hosts: Mr and 'Mrs. Seymour Soafcal, in honor of th<' namlnf of thelt dauahter, Kol>in Lola. Paaaover 8 i"\ x.r. p,m. Sermon: nfor Survival." Tla%or Mon* day 16:30 a.m. Sermon: "What i'om. night that inspired the author of ,,, r rjoe, uberal Judalam Offer the herd heard that Touro was brought iour national anthem, included, to H n ei ••• down by a shot, Shepherd ran out' mention but a few, such names as into the range of fire, in defiance Samuel Konig, Solomon Myers, Lt. of explicit orders, and rescued his; Jacob Barnist, Martin Hirsh, David friend. 'Commodore,'' he declared I Kauffman Mjchael Wolf srael later, when reprimanded for hjs „..„. ._ ,„ Phillips and Samuel Solomon. Most What was Israel Zangwill's comment on the effect of the Passover melodies on the Jewish heart? The master novelist in his "Dreamers of the Ghetto" states "that, if the Jewish heart no longer warms on hearing the old Jewish melody on Passover eve, it runs the danger of ending the life of the Jew on earth, of committing spiritual suicide." • e • What is the story about Toure and Shepherd in connection with the defense of New Orleans? Touro, son of the Newport rabbi, and Shepherd, a noble young Chris-1 tian, were both enlisted men in An-1 drew Jackson's army. When Shep-1 I ltin.1'1'i.'iflit'H, 1 i:li,luri;iTu;ii|i*r tf | :;;if" CANDLEUGHTING TIME 18 Nisctn — 629 p.m. uiwi'juiiwm mi in %  I ui;:;iii %  Were there any Jews in the engagement during the defense of Fort McHenry, when Francis Scott Key wrote the Star Spangled Banner? Yes, indeed. The list of Jews who stood in "the rockets' glare" the HOLLYWOOD TEMPLE SINAI. 2030 Polk st. Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro. Cantor Vehudah Heilbraun. action, "you can hang or shoot me, and it would be all right, but my best friend needed my assistance, and nothing on earth could have induced me to neglect him." • e • Who called America the "New Israel?" Rev. Ezra Stiles, president, in his dy, of Yale College. Those were the colonial days when Biblical quotations and analogies were part of the normal vocabulary. Hence, the Liberty Bell, which in 1776 rang out the announcement of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, had emblazoned on it the inscription from the Old Testament: "Proclaim Liberty to all the land and to all the inhabitants thereof." of these Jews were of Sephardic descent. %  qaaaaHMBsaaaaaaaxaiKaxnaaMaMiiifiHiiiNesiiiiiBaaai This page is prepared in co| operation unth the Spiritual LeadI ers of the Greater Miami RabbinI icdl Assn. Rabbi Yaalov G. Rosenberg Coordinator CONTRIBUTORS Rabbi David Hcron Tales and Gems of Wisdcnn Rabbi B. Leon Hurwits Know Tour Heritage ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th tee. Conservative. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen. KrMay ':l"i p.m. Saliinlay .v:ti> a.m. .. r Sundaj sundown, Mondai X:.10 a.m. Sermon: "Paanrh'a Drawtna TO a Close." Tueaday 8:36 a.m. Ylxkor. Sermon: "Our Departed Onsus.*' KNCSETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid ave Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield. Cantor Abraham Self. Friday •'. ;n pm. Saturday s.-so a.m. Sermon: "The Slsalflcanoa of Choi llamoed." Paaaover Sunday ::10 p.m. Monday S.M a.m. Sermon: '"The Redemption of Israel." Tueaday 8:30 a.m. Ylxkor memorial. MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION 1101 SW 12th ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Herschetl Saville. Cantor Joseph Salzman. t-1 i.I..> r.:20 p.m. Saturdai a.m. Sermon: The Bom of Soims Paj Sunday •;:.!(! p.m. Monday <:4', a.m. Kermon: "Understanding the Miracle." Tueaday 8t4B a.m. Sermon: "l.lvlnsr with Our Memories." Ylxkor memorial. MONTICELLO NE 11th ave. PARK. 164th it. and Conservative. Rabbi Max Lipshitz. Cantor Ben-Zien Kirschenbaum. Filday 5:tt and X:ir, p.m. Sermon: "If I had to l>o It Over Attain." Saiui> p.m. Baa Mitzvah: Judith Roalyn daughter of Mr. Fred Patt. hMurday 9 a.m. Bar viiiz\ah: ltd son of Mr. and Mra Fred Bneteln. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM. 4144 Chase ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronisb Cantor Oavlo Conviaer. e TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 16800 NW 22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi Sheldon Edwards. Cantor Ben Grossberg. e—>— TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washinoton ave. Conservative. Rabbi Irving Lehrman. Cantor inrael Reich. Friday sundown. Saturday 8 a.m. Sermon: Weekly Portion." Bar Mltavah: James Gordon, son of Mrs. Pearl Roth: David Harria Kaye, son of Mr. and Mra. Jack Bernard. P aaaover Sunday 6:30 p.m Mondaj B am. Tueaday *i rf.in. z*talioi memorial 10:30 a.m. e TEMPLE ISRAEL. 137 NE 19th at. Reform. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. Cantor Jacob Bernstein. PYlday s:l* p.m. sermon: "Wkal Wrong with our I'ommunity?" Paaaovei Mondaj !) a.m. Yizkor memorial, TEMPLE JUDEA. 320 Palermo ave. Liberal. Rabbi Morris Skop. Cantor Herman Gottlieb. Friday :IS pin Candle Bleanln*: Mra, Loula Haffner, in honor of her L'r.th wedding anniversary; Mra. Dorothy Weinei. Saturday Mlnyonalrea 9-a.m. Temple aervloe 16:36 %  m. paaaover Mondaj 16:36 :i m. Tlakor 11 a.m. e TEMPLE NER TAMID. 80th St. and Tatum Waterway. Modern Traditional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Samuel Oomberg. |.iid:i\ 5:36 ami 8:18 l> > Sermon: • \l. 1.1., rshlp Thriniirh Life." Saturday v r, ,1.111. Passover Sunday ri::'.o p.m. Mondaj >*:1" a.m. Tueaday 8:45 .i in Yizkor. e TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100 NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno M. Wallach. IM id.i \ B)t5 p.m. Sermon: "Ordained I., bt -i lew." Naming: Dauahter of Mr. and lira. Stanley I'red. Paaaover Monday 11 a.m. e TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB. 051 Flamingo Way. Conservative. Rabbi Leo Heim. Friday


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Page 10-B •fjewisl) fh>r/dfia>jn Friday/April 15, I960 Awards to city councilmen and other outstanding citizens were made at the "Let's Get Acquainted with the PTAward Winners'' extravaganza presented by Miami Beach Senior High School PTA in the school auditorium as a farewell to the old building which will be vacated by the seniors in May. Left to right are Mrs. John Owen, Paul Bruun, Mrs. Sol Pine, Arthur FRANK 0. PIIMTT Celebrities Visit Gulf stream Park At a luncheon held at the Eden Roc hotel by the Coral chapter, Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. American Medical Center at Denver, are (left to right) Mrs. I. Rubinstein, chairman of the luncheon and vice president; Mrs. ]. Schaffer. president; Mrs. S. Schwartz, co-chairman; and Mrs. Milton Ross, program chairman. Pruitt Launches Commission Drive Frank O. Pruitt launched his campaign for District 2 county commissioner last week with a pledge "to work for better metropolitan government in Dade county" "I will do everything in my power to make Metro work as the charter intended it to work,"' Pruitt said. Pruitt added "I relieve the Metro Commission should sit as a policy-making board, ana leave administration details to the county manager and his administrative itafl." A business and civic leader in Dade county since 1W5, Proitt also said Metre should be operated with as "austere an economy as is consistent with the dynamic growth of our community." He stressed the importance of creating a favorable atmosphere to attract the proper type of industry to Dade county. Prur.t was the first mayor of Miami Shores, and served as mayor fivi' years and as a councilman ten years at no salary When the State tad the Dade Counts nmiaakin in i35. Pruitt was appointed a* one of the members jnd served ai ill first, chairman. He resigned in I to enter the Annad Forces during World War 11. and was reappointed upon his discharge in 1946. A resident of Dade county since 1925. Pruitt helped organize the Dade County Grand Jury Assn. in 1947. and served as its second president. He served as foreman of two grand juries. Founder of Frank 0. Pruitt and Sons. Miami insurance agency. Pruitt was one of the organizes of the Miami Junior Chamber of Commerce, and served as Jaycee president in 1928 He hairCourshon. John Serbin, Leonard Glasser, Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers, Dr. Joe Hall, Councilman Melvin I. Richard. Hank Meyer, Dan Taradash, who made the presentations, and Councilman Bernard A. Frank. Also present were Councilmen Kenneth Oka and Wolfie Cohen. Beckwith Presses For Metro Seat Jack 11. Beckwith opened his campaign for a seat on the Metro Commission last weekend with a pledge to "make sure that Dade county taxpayers get the most servicefor their medical dollars." An oral surgeon, Dr. Beckwith pointed out that •more than 40 percent of the tax money administered by Metro goes to hospitalization, health and welfare." "It seems to me." he said, "that it is vitally important that a man with professional medical experience should be on the commission to see that Dade county gets the best and the most hospital, health and welfare services for its money." A Dade county resident for 35 years, Dr. Beckwith also said that "we will be hard-pressed over the years to come to provide adequate hospital facilities to meet the needs of our expanding population. An experienced medical man should have a voice in the planning of these facilities." A candidate in District 1, Dr. Beckwith, a University of Florida graduate, is chief of oral surgery at Mercy Hospital, and will hold a Prince Philip Speaks to Board LONDON (JTA) The Duke of Edhrbtirgh warned here this week that, if anti-Semiti.im should gain the upper hand in Britain, "the jungle would be-epon — HQ made the statement in an address lief ore 1.3000 Jewish leaders celebrating the bicentennary of the Board of Deputies of Brit.sh Jews which was founded in 1760. Calling for deepening of the "democratic attitude," Prince Philip recalled "the terrible perseditions suffered by the Jewish people under the Nazis." and asserted: "It is terribly easy to get | ;hc worst out of people. But coni slant work to needed to bring out she best." The Duke recalled the Jewish community's services to Britain, particularly in the fields of sciences, art, education and enterta : nment, and pointed o-jt that "thousands of Jewish soldiers gave their lives toward t+ie defense of Great Britain." He paid high tribute to the work of the Board of Deputies. Gratitude for Britain's welcome of the Jewish people was expressed by Barnett Janncr. praal lent of the Board, and by Chief Rabbi Israel Brodie, Janner thanking Britain for the "important part it played in the establishment of Israel," and for the Balfour Declaration. M. JACK KCKWITH similar post at the new Baptist Hos. pital. He is past chief of service at Jackson Memorial Hospital, president-elect of the Miami Dental Society, and past president of i the East Coast Dental Society. He is a former president of the Miami Rotary Club and was a member of the board of directors, Miami-Dade County Chamber of Commerce. Judae Yann EveS tmotm4\ Donor luncheon %  a *" %  ""# Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-EI NeW Bead! Term ul nold a donor luncheon Wednesday, noon at the Fontainebleau Judge Harold R. Vann is running hQte| according to Mrs M nton for reelection to the Dade County SmiU) sisterhood president. Pro-i Circuit Court in the May priceeds wi „ g0 toward re .f u rnishing; maru s ,. and refurbishing of the Temple's' The 44-year old candidate was maJn reljglous schoo at 17th 8t *£ and James ave. Mrs. Harry Lechtner is chairman, and Mrs. Sam! Collins in January, 1956. He won a four year term later that year when he was elected without opposition. VMO was an Army Air Force pilot during World War II. He graduated from Stetson Univer, slty, where he was known as t* Going into the final stretch of its > atn | #t ^ 1960 meet. Gulfstream Park is | chalking up another victory in at-1 Judge Vann has lived here 31 tendance, and in wagering. One of ; years. He makes his home at 1534 the best seasons in the history of Blue rd., Coral Gables, with his the track is the current meet,, w ife and two sons. which concludes Apr. 23. Ha is a former director of the Celebrities of cinema, stage, and %  Dade County Bar Assn., former TV' have added glamor to the racmember of the Junior Chamber of niti\ents and vied with some of Commerce, and is active in t h e the nation's outstanding race' Lions Club, as well as in other horses for attention and headlines, civic and fraternal organizations. Joe E. Lewis is a frequent visitor to Gulfstream Park, and Ed Sullivan has made several appear at this track, the home of ihe Florida Derby Mickey Rooney viewed the races at Gulfstream. as did Perry Como, when he visited South Florida. From Palm Beach have Men's Club Body Confab Slated NEW YORK — The 31st annual convention of the National Federation of Jewish Men's Clubs will be come held at the Concord hotel. Kiamesuch personalities as Ambassador sha Lake, from May 8 to 11. The Joseph Kennedy and Russell Firetheme of this year's convenuon stone, jr.. whose horses have been will be "Living by Spiritual Valracing at the Hallandale track, and ues the Stephen (Laddie) Sanfords, A total of 321 Men's Clubs in who own a stable of race horses, the United States and Canada afas well as the Amory Haskells. jr.. fihated with the National Federa Sirkin to Head Cariton's Miami Beach Campaign Milton Sirkin, Miami Beach civic leader and businessman, has accepted a district leader's post in Miami Beach in the campaign to elect Sen. Doyal E. Carlton, jr., candidate for governor, according o Dade chairman William F. Byrd. Sirkin, a resident of Miami Beach for 22 years, is a prominent civic worker. He is president of the Lincoln Road Assn., vice president of the Miami Beacii Better Business Bureau, memer of the boards of the Miami Beach Taxoayers Assn. and Temple EmanuEI. He is also a member of the Miami Beach President's Council, the City's Convention and Auditorium committee, and the Miami Beach Kiwanis Club. He is past president of the Miami Beach Civic League and YMHA and past chairman of the Miami Beach United Fund campaign. Sirkin is in the realty investment business and lives with his wife, Miriam, at 2024 N. Bay rd. The Jewish Congregation held a model Sirkins have two grown sons. Dick, Seder Sunday for students of the who lives in California, and Josh, religious school. Rabbi Nathan who attends the University of North Zwitman officiated. 'Carolina. Weisen tions. is in charge of reservaHialeah Model Seder Sisterhood of Hialeah Reform and senior, the Michael Guarinos. Mrs. Truman Talley. Bernard Gimble. and the E. P. Taylors. Beach Chapter Meeting tion are expected to attend the convention. The member clubs have an estimated membership in excels of 50,000. Arthur S. Bruckman, of New York City, is chairman of the convention committee, and Bernard Rackmil. of Cedarhurst. L.I., is Miami Beach chapter of Jewish National Home lor Asthmatic Chil man of the Peering committee of dren will meet Wednesday evening president of the national body, the Greater Miami Manufacturers at the Miami Beach Federal Bank The National Federation of JewExposition, and has been a memMdg.. 407 Lincoln rd. Election of ish Men's Clubs is affiliated with ber of the Miami Chamber of Comofficers will take place, with Mrs. the United Synagogues of Amerimerce since 1925. Milton Koch presiding. ca. A scroll honoring the United Jewiah Appeal for its rescue, resettlement and rehabilitation work on behalf of survivors of the Nazi tenor is presented by Norbert Wollheim (left) to Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman, UJA executive vice chairman, at the first Auschwitz Memorial Dinner in New York last Sundav. Looking on is Ernest W. Michel, chairman of the dinner. wh.ch was attended by 800 survivors of the Auschwitz-Buna extermination camp now living in the United States. Canada and Mexico. They were among the few thousand who managed to outlive the infamous camp, where hundreds of thousanda ot Jews perished. Wollheim is chairman of the Auschwitz-Buna Memorial Scholarship Fund, established on behalf of the children of survivors.



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Page 14-A fJewist ricrfdKar? Friday, April 15. 1960 Browsing With Books: By HILARY MINDtIN Trio of Books Offering a Wide Variety of Interest THE WORLD OF WONDERFUL DIFFERENCE. Written and Illustrated by Harts Guggenheim. 64 pp. New Ycrk: Friendly House Publishers. (Anti-Defamation League, 330 Seybold bldg., Miami.) $2.50. P RIMARILY A BOOK for young people (7-11 and up, the publishers say), "The World of Wonderful Differenceis a light blend of rhyme and illustration, both done by artist Hans Guggenheim. The main descriptive word for the book seems to be whimsical—odd but charming. Or perhaps it should be charming—but odd. The book is divided into five sections, each of them teaching a lesson in tolerance, or in appreciation of differences. One upholds the law of gravitation as something which we all Have in common; another points up America's racial diversity in positive ways; another, on the freedomloving amoeba, was too subtle for me. The illustrations (in color) are creative* i m aginative and marvelous. But the book as a whole seems strangely unintegrated. The verse skips around from one age level to another, even within the same section. One of the major difficulties. 1 think, is that the child who is old enough to appreciate the pictures is too adult for the text, while those who go for the text are confused by the drawings. And while the book can be fun to read, as a teaching tool its logic is much too vague to be really effective for a child's literal, steel-trap mind. % %  v M'IH m l.r:: T .,:I I United Nations Listening Post: By SAUL CARSON Critical Factors in Future of West Germany T O ATTEMPT to find an answer| to the question about the future for the Jew in Germany, aj future free of anti-Semitism and! not threatened by hatred, one musij take into consideration several facto % % %  For example the cold war ir.l general, including the knotty prob lems of German reunification and the status of Wl r Bcrim: There is peal f ear in Germany that the West become "•Oft >o the Soviet Union and agree on • token surrender in regard to reunification of German* especially fear that Britain is more willing than the United Stales is to otler up the \ led < irvey Jews there :.i :!•<• Context "' Mil ...!; of anti-Semitism. This IN another ii Capital Spotlight: By MILTON FRIEDMAN Arab Power in Cuba Washington P ENETRATION OF CUBA by the United Arab Republic and charges of anti-Semitism against the Fidel Castro regime are causing concern in Jewish circles here. An outright allegation of anti-Semitism was made by Cmdr. Miguel F. G Pons Guizueta, naval attache of Cuba's Washington Embassy until his recent resignation. He charged that the Castro regime was "under the most absolute influence of international Communism.'' The Cuban government in Havana immediately counter-charged that Guizueta unlawfully withdrew funds from a Washington bank. But the naval commander said he had only made one withdrawal from the Cuban account, in the amount of $63,000, to pay the New York export firm of Eugene Strauss. He said he especially wanted to pay this bill, for supplies to Castro's navy, because he been told by Cuban navy officialthat the Castro government planned to refuse payment to Mr. Strauss. "They were not going to pay him because he is a Jew. and they Mid Jew* neve enough mooes Washington is deeply concerned over Cuba's grown anti-Americanism and leftist tendencies. Government sources said the Jewish community in Cuba, residing mainly in Havana, has suffered only anxiety and the general economic damage inflicted on all Cubans in business Many Havana Jews maintain small shops dependent on the tourist trade from Miami. Last January, the Cuban Foreign Minister was the official guest of President Nasser of the United Arab Republic in Cairo. He was fully informed of the UAR attitude toward Israel and "international Zionism." Subsequently, Cuba was the first port of call for a Cairo mission headed by UAR Deputy Foreign Minister Hussein Sabry. This mission toured Latin America in quest of Latin support for the UAR cause. President Nasser concluded a deal with Castro on Feb. 17 for 10.000 tons of sugar. This followed on the heeli of Soviet Deputy Premier Mikoyan's visit to Cuba. Cairo broadcasts have followed the Moscow line in backing Castro against the United States. Increased UAR activity in Havana has caused concern lest the pattern emerging in Panama develop in Cuba. Nasser's agents in Panama have promoted anti-Semitism through subsidies to the Panamanian nationalist press and radio. A week after Castro seized power, a development worried Cuban Jewry. A Havana daily, glorifying Castro, likened him to Egypt's Nasser. An immediate call was made on the editor by a Jewish delegation which pointed out that Castro stands for religious and racial equality, according to his statements, while Nasser is guilty of anti Jewish and even anti-Christian discrimination. The editor apologized. Jews, like other Americans, are observing the dramatic developments in Cuban-American relations. The issue is whether that volatile island, only 90 miles from Florida. will remain in the free world. dream of German reunification on the altar of peace between East and West. West Berlin feels that it must not be sacrificed. Of one thing, thi.s correspondent is certain: Should the West be so short-sighted as to agree to let Germany swallow West Berlin—West Berlin would never accept such a solution. West berlin, to a man. would fight. Without the protection of the West, such a fight would be suicidal. But West Berlin would fight. In the process, the Jew would suffer. Many disillusioned West BeiUnert, hurt by a Western "sellout." would turn a-ainst the 6.000 odd Jews in their midst, against the orders and entreaties of their own democratic leaders. Fast Germans and their Russian military supporters would "take it out" on the Jews who are considered—and are—pro-West. Throughout the Federal Republic of Germany, Western softness to the Soviet viewpoint, either on West Berlin specifically or on reunification of Germany, could touch off a wave of anti-Semitism. Another factor is the situation in France: If President Charles de Gaulle should fall, the consen• iK of most experienced political observers is that Fascism would succeed the present regime in France. If Fascism should gain the ascendancy in France, it would cross the borders very quickly into two countries: Italy and Germany. A new Fascist regime in Germany would mean the end of the Jew in Germany. Then there are two internal problems that must be dealt with in the effort to foresee the Jew's future in Germany. First: The national elections to be held in 1961. As noted earlier in this series, the "rightists" in West Germany are few. disorganized, without unified leadership. Will the "rightists" be able to form a united front for the 1961 elections? If so, who would lead them? What would be their program? What kind of campaign would they conduct? Would their electioneering take on a racist. anti-Semitic character? Would they, united, be able to elect candidates to Parliament? How many? Of what character? Second. The educational system. This is the one point on which some positive answers can be given. There is no doubt that there are many ex-Nazis among the school teachers throughout West Germany. How could it be otherwise? Heinrich Landahl, Minister for Education in Hamburg, told this correspondent that, after the fall of the Nazi regime, two-thirds of all German school teachers were aged over 55. That means that two-thirds of the German school teachers had been, to be most charitable, at least "infected" by Nazism. Now, the statistics show—according to Dr. Landahl—only one-third of the school teachers are over 50; one-third are between 35 and 50; one third are between the ages of 25 and 35. Pondering those statistics leads to hope. The third of the teachers over 50 will be retiring very soon. Those between 35 and 50 include a great many teachers who were thoroughly indoctrinated with anti-Nazism during the early, enthusiastically antiFascist days of the present republic. This correspondent was assured by people who should be able to judge that this generation of school teachers —especially the age group of 34-45 is "clean" of Nazi tendencies, on the whole. HIGH WINDOWS. By Louis A. Falk. 145 pp. New York: Whittier Books, 31 Union Square West. $3.50. _Louis Falk js a member of; the World Executive of the World Zionist movement; he organized the ZOA in New Jersey, and became a national vice president; he was a member of the national executive committee of Jewish War Veterans. He's also been editor-in-chief of "The Jewish Veteran" and co-author of a book, "Jews in American Wars'' This is his autobiography. There is no doubt that Mr. Falk is a good man. productive, useful and kind. He has had his triumphs as well as his hard times—like nearly everyone else. A writer he is not. It seems to me that if one must give in to the compulsion to write an autobiography, a sense of perspective alone would dictate that the resultant product be kept for private circulation among one's friends and familj. For the rest of us, it just has no point. • • LAUGHING WITH TEARS. Compiled and edited by Martin Rywell. 222 pp. Harriman, Tenn.; Pioneer Press. $2.10. Self styled "Tennessee hill-billy" Martin Rywell is the editor of "Listen," a "personal journal of observations on the American scene," and author of a slew of other books, most of them on guns and cookery. This soft-cover book is a collection of Jewish humor—jokes, proverbs, anecdotes and parables. It includes many that are well-known and many which will, I think, be new, plus some of the wonderful old ones which come straight out of Jewish folklore. Panorama: OH the Record By NATHAN ZIPRIN A Magazine's Future ULfHITHER COMMENTARY? i s a r '^HBL : ** troublesome question in Jewish circles which cannot comprehend why a publication sponsored by a Jewish organization, the American Jewish Committee, is showing what appears to be a condescending attitude toward Jewish material. This writer is not of the opinI ion that a serious Jewish magazine should be devoted exclusively or even overwhelmingly to Jewish material. But when one has to scan the pages of a Jewish publication to find a Jewish item, the publication ceases to carry a Jewish character. If that policy is puisued much longer, Commentary must surrender ail pretensions to being a journal of Jewish cultural content. There was a time when one could always count on getting a Jewish cultural piece in the section called 'Cedars of Lebanon." Now it has been abandoned to make room for material that only secondarily belongs in a Jewish journal. A case in point is Sidney Hook's article in the March issue raising the now old-fashioned and outmoded question whether there is a God and whether his existence can be demonstrated by logic or science. In blurred semantics and hackneyed phraseology Hook takes up several valuable pages to prove (a) that there is no God and (b) that if there is one you can't prove it. Another case in point is the plethora of reviews of books, often in the form of articles, that are not related to Jewish content. I am not unmindful of the rationalization that can be summoned to justify that path, but whatever the rationalization it is not a Jewish path for a Jewish magazine for a Jewish public by a Jewish organization. This writer has been an avid reader of Commentary ever since its first issue, considering it together with Midstream and Judaism am ng the major publications in the country, and that is why he is genuinely pained by its new look, a look that is decidedly new, interesting, instructive, informational but not necessarily Jewish. There is room for a high class Jewish publication such as was envisaged for Commentary at its inception. I hope the targets of this criticism will not consider me impudent for suggesting that their error is still retrievable. • • Leigh was born some six years ago with such a love for color that he spent his beginning years almost exclusively on easel and paint. Now he talks a lot but not without sense or purpose. When his San Francisco grandmother, Bea. came to New York last summer. Leigh was apparently disturbed over the prospect of his mother having a baby, and he grew progressively morose as the day of deliverance was drawing close. Leigh just didn't relish the idea of having a competitor for filial affection. By DAVID SCHWARTZ The Art of Knowing When You've Said Enough LJENRY MORGENTHAU, JR., was re %  cently in Israel and was being inter viewed. The reporter kept on asking questions and finally Mr. Morgenthau said he had enough. "1 will tell you a story about my father," said Mr. Morgenthau. "Once, he was arguing a case in court at some length. The judge stopped him. 'Mr. Morgenthau,' said the court, "as of now you have won the case. You had better stop now. If you keep on, you might lose if." Not only lawyers, but preachers and other public speakers defeat themselves by excessive speaking. I once heard the eloquent Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver quote a clerical adage to the effect that "no souls are saved after the first 30 minutes." Everybody knows the story of Mark Twain at the church. The preacher spoke eloquently in the beginning and Mark decided to put a dollar in the plate, but when it was passed around, he took out a dollar front the plate because the preacher had spoken so long and wearying! y. No age has been exposed to so much weary public speaking as the present. It is the day of the loudspeaker j and the microphone. I am not saying that when you fall asleep, it is a'**^? I the fault of the speaker. I remember once when the noted Labor Zionist leader, Dr. Nahum Syrkin was speaking. All of a sudden, the sound of snoring penetrated the hall. Syr-; kin stopped his speech, approached the man, shook him j and said, "Why didn't you bring your pajamas?"



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Page 12-A Jewlst> Meridian Friday. April 15, I960 Dade Property Owners Eye $46 Million Bond Issue Up for Vote Here on May 3 On May 3^ Dade property owni is will be asked to approve a $46 million bond issue (or the consi ruction of a leg of the North South expressway and other road improvements. Broken down, the construction will include: A $40 million section of the eight lane divided expressway extending from SW 32nd rd.. near the Yizcaya Art Museum on the south, to NW 2nd st. on the north. Included are the twin fixed sp;. eight lanes over the Miami River and the central district inter changes and connectors. The $40 million is an advance to the Stata Road Department to be utilized for providing the above section of the, approved interstate system years ahead of schedule, according to William Singer of the Stata Road Board. These monies will be returned to the county when availavailable from the Federal aid allocations, Singer said. The existing Flagler st. bridge over the Miami River will be replaced with a higher, four lane one. costing about $2 million. Metro also will repave and widen NW 7th st.. from 42nd ave. to 57th ave., to four lanes at a cost of $1,500,000. On Miami Beach, right of way on Collins ave. between 56th and 60th its. will be purchased for the City of Miami Beach and the stale to widen the roadway. Purchase COM is $500,000. Itight of way also will be obtained in Miami from SE 2nd ave. to Biscayne blvd., along SE 3rd st., to connect into the expressway. Cost $5Ou.60d. Another important link will be a four-lane and two-lane connection at NW 12th st. between the Palmetto By-Pass and the Miami International Airport terminal. The $400,000 allocation will provide four lanes of divided highway from Palmetto expressway to Milam Dairy rd., then two lanes to the terminal. An estimated $225,000 will be needed for extending Tamiami Canal rd. from Flagler st. to NW 7th st. Still another improvement will be NW 6th ave. from 29th st. south to 20th st., which will become a two-lane one-way street to accommodate North • South Expressway traffic. This will cost $225,000. An additional $775,000 will be spent to repair existing streets throughout Dade county. Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami member Jack Leonard, chairman of the club's associate membership division, and Gus R. Roberts, newly-elected member of the board of directors, lunch with (left) Miami attorney Donald S. Rosenberg, Seaboard Life Insurance agent Elliott R. Rose, and Norman Brown, of the Continental Coffee Company of Florida. With Roberts (wearing glasses) are Alfred M. Band, of the Lion Match Company; Bernard Fow, of Airko Air Conditioning; and Jack Leonard's son, Lou, partner with him in the operation of the La Pena Cocktail Lounge and Restaurant. Also part of the group, but not shown, is Jan Janis of the real estate firm of Jay Janis and Associates. Jay is the son of Ernest Janis, chairman of the club's life membership division. Manners Adds New Campaign Quarters Miami Hebrew Book S 1585 WASHINGTON AVE. Miami Beach — JE 8 MM Hebrew Religious Supplies for Synaaoflues. Schools A. Private Use ISRAELI A DOMESTIC OFTS LAKESIDE MEMORIAL PARK "The South's most beautiful Jewish cemetery" 30 Minutes from the Beach Via The New 36th St. Causeway JE 1-5369 Two more campaign headquarters were opened last week for Joseph P. Manners, candidate for the State Legislature. Group 2. Dade county. Manners announced the opening of offices at Miami Beach and Hialeah. The Miami Beach office will he ur.der tha direction of Miami Beach co • chairman Leonard Colaman and Shelley Schleoingor. It i located at 704 71st ft. Located at 3068 Palm ave., the Hialtah headquarters will be managed by Mrs. Helen Pryima. wellknown Hialeah civic leader. Central headquarters are located at 911 Ainslcy bldg.. in downtown Miami. Ty Tarby, Florida Jnycee, is county campaign manager. Manners, a crime busting attorney for the U.S. Justice Department, gave two basic reasons why he is running in his first political race. Manners said. "Five years ago, as Florida Assistant Attorney General under Richard Ervin. I began a fight against pork chop legislators to unfreeze from banks and insurance companies an estimated $100,000 in escheat funds which the Florida Constitution has allocated to schools, but which banks and insurance companies have hung onto, with pork chop aid." Manners said he will continue his fight for these school funris. "These million* of dollar* must, during tha coming session, ba claimed for the people." Manners gave as his second major reason for running the fact that "Dade county is in desperate need of an effective urban renewal program for the elimination of our blighted slum areas. In my capacity as a law enforcement agent. I saw first-hand how crime breeds in slums." Manners said he would fight for immediate slum clearance legislation. The 36year-old attorney said he would also "work for fair reapportionment and for better legislation that will protect our children from indecent literature." Manners, who graduated cum JOSEPH MANMMS laude from the University of I ami law school, served as A ant Attorney General of Flcriilj. Assistant U.S. District Attorne> o! the Northern Florida District, and as a U.S. Justice Department attorney, helped convict 20 crime overlords. Schwarz Elected To Board Here Herbert N. Schwartz, of Miami, Monday was elected to the board of Seaboard Life Insurance company of America. The announcement was made by Albert B. Myers, president of the Miami-based company, following the annual meeting held at the Dupont Plaza hotel. Schwartz formerly was secretary and a member of the board of Lefcourt Realty Corp. Myers also announced growth figures for the company, whic'i was organized here in 1958. He revealed that insurance in force increased from $16,472,716.27 n to more than $56 million at I > time. KSAEL! RELIGIOUS STORE All MSUFW SVPrHKS FOR MIAGOGt-lS A ItWISH HOW. We Carry Bar Mitzvah Records 1357 WASHINGTON AVE. JE 1 7722 GORDON FUNERAL HOME FR 3-3431 FRanklin 9-1436 710 S.W. T 2th Avenue Miami, Ma. HARRY GORDON PRESIDENT IKE GORDON FUNERAl DIRECTOR Students Attend Passover Service More than 150 children will attend services at Congregation Monticello Park on Monday and Tuesday, the final days of the. Passover holiday. Services will be conducted by: student Rabbis Steven Wemfinger and Jeffrey Breslaw, assisted by Cantors Marvin Lass, Billy Leff.l Stephen Leb and Michael Segall. I In addition, the alef congregation of the school, which consists of studentts age 5 to 8, will hold* service on the same days from 10 to 11 a.m. Elaine Edelman con-! ducts these services, assisted by Harriet Klion. Water Safety Courses Venetian Aquatic Club is starting a drive for new members to help in the swimming program at Venetian Pool during the summer, which includes courses in Junior Lifesaving. Each course runs for two weeks. A water safety aide course for prospective teachers will be launched May 3 at the pool. i I i I I l I I I l I t i '%, ^UA\^ ions require time Surely it it only good sense lo devote as much attention to selecting a family burial estate as you would to malting your will. Yet so often one tends lo postpone this important derision until an emergency arises. Isn't today the best time to start planning? Why not find out about Mount Nebo now. Here, in Miami's finest and oldest faariafa rrmelery, a Perpetual Care fund exceeding S 100.000, guarantees .he permanent beauty and care of Mount Nebo. You never pay for maintenance taxes and %  •srssiDents cannot be levied And Mount Nebo is to lerrnely Imrh ... so acmtihU ... so nrll etloiiiJtnl it ha* already been the choice of over 4.000 Jewish families. Why not secure lull details? I I I I I I I MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CEMETERY URGENTLY NEEDED ladies stress and sportswear, Sises 16J te 14. Also men's suits, slacks, shirts,, fete. Must be clean. I MIAMI BEACH CLOTHING EXCHANGE) 311 23rd St. MB. JE 8191 e^/-*V l$*l A\JGUST BROS H Yl N*EWM7iN FUNERAL HOME 133 3 DADE BOULFVARD MIAMI BEACH JEfferson 1-7677 Edward T. Newman Funerol Director IS thf bt S / Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 NW. 3rd Street, M.ami. Pirate tend me, utthout obh lion on t'amil) Burial Etlalrs lit Florida full minimaMo-nl .Veto. Name A'l iri -CmZone State J!w// jtffa dm///?/ SSOS Northwoat 3rd Streot .'Lor.* MOhowfc 1-7J mmm IMH



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Friday. April 15, 1960 +Jenis§i fkrh tr Page 5-A .. ..*., ENTER GENERAL DEVELOPMENT'S GREAT NEW CONTEST FEBRUARY 14, through APRIL 17, 1960 WALK INTO A WHOLE NEW LIFE Just like walking from one room to another ... a brand new Mackle-built house and lot in your choice of five General Development Corporation communities ... completely furnished, ready to move in, plus a guaranteed job for one year at $100 a week. %  GRAND PRIZE A NEW HOME A beautiful new two-bedroom, one* bath home, the Florid ian, valued at $10,980, including lot, will be especially built for you in your choice of five General Development communities. Port Charlotte, Port St. Lucie, Port Malabar, Vero Beach Highlands, or Sebastian Highlands. NEW FURNITURE The home will be completely furnished and decorated to your taste with furniture valued at $2,500 NEW JOB General Development Corporation will guarantee you a job at $100 a week for one year. The exact nature of the position will be governed by your past experience and ability. SECOND PRIZE A $995 homesite in Port Charlotte or Port St. Lucie A beautiful 80' x 125' lot that you can build on now, or hold for the future. 20 THIRD PRIZES: Frigidaire Mobile Dishwashers Requires no plumbing or costly installation. Fully automatic. Pre-wash flushes, scrub washes, pre-rinse flushes, double rinses, and dries. £* .* IT'S EASY! NOTHING TO BUY! ENTER NOW! All you do it go to a General Development Corporation branch office or home community, get an Official Entry Blank, and complete the phrase, "I would like to live in a Mackle-built home in Florida because ..." in 25 words or less. Visit any of the General Development Branch offices or Florida Communities and get complete information that will help you write your entry. See photographs and floor plans of Mackle-built homes. Find out about their quality construction aud many attractive features. ***** +„J GET YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK AND CONTEST RULES at these Branch Offices and Home Communities 10 CONVENIENT OFFICES IN FLORIDA MIAMI BEACH 7143 Collins Avenue HOLLYWOOD BEACH 300-A Johnson Street FT. LAUDERDALE 1744 E. Sunrise Blvd. WEST PALM BEACH 205 Clematis Street SILVER SPRINGS Silver Springs Boulevard *r* DAYTONA BEACH 149 Volusia Avenue JACKSONVILLE 226 West Forsythe St. TAMPA 3804 Neptune St. ORLANDO Cherrv Plaza Hotel 419 East Central Ave. MIAMI—Home Office 2828 Coral Way R0RT CMARIOTT PORT MAtAIA* SEIASIIAN HIGHLANDS HIGHLANDS \nno SHORES MM IT. LUCII ROMRAN0 HACK HICHIANM 7 OUTSTANDING FLORIDA COMMUNITIES PORT CHARLOTTE between Sarasota and Ft. Myers on the lovely Southwest Coast PORT ST. LUCIE •n the East Coast, between Fort Pierce and Stuart PORT MALABAR at Palm Bay, on the East Coast, 3 mile* south of Melbourne SEBASTIAN HIGHLANDS • unique) Yacht Club community on the East Coast. 14 mile* north of Vero Beach VERO BEACH HIGHLANDS en the East Coast, 5 'A miles south of Vero Beach VERO SHORES •n exclusive waterfront community, 5 i miles south of Vero Beach POMPANO BEACH HIGHLANDS on the lower East Coast, four mile* north of Pompano Beach Builder* of better communities for finer Florida living ST.J>* !" E MACKLE COMPANY AND GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION •Mi



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Friday, April 15, 1960 +Jewish nor kiian Page 1 IB Town restaurant executives donate this luscious 150-pound cake to the Miami Police Benevolent Assn., which held its annual Police Ball on Saturday evening at Bayfront Park Auditorium. Left to right are E. W. Hall, president; Leon Hall, chairman of the function; Jack Goldstein, of the Town restaurant; Judge Milton A. Friedman; Ray Larson, executive president; Sgt. L A. Shelton, first vice president; Officer W. S. Gillespie, executive committee member; Vincent J. McCale, baker of the cake; Larry Gilbert, of the Town restaurant; and Judge Pat Cannon, a former policeman. Some 800 persons attended the affair. Goldstein personally sold over $800 in tickets, topping his previous record of $500 last year— more than any other single person in Miami. Flagler Plans [Summer Camp Flagler-Granada Jewish Communjity Center summer day camp is |planning to give children "a sumler to remember." Erwin B. Marshall has been flamed director of the camp, which fill serve boys and girls from five 13, a well as pre-schoolers from tiree to five. The camp will be divided into ro four-week periods. The first frill be from June 20 to July 15, ponday through Friday, 9 a.m. to ).m. The second period will be }m July 18 to Aug. 12. Hours pre-schoolers are from 9 a.m. (noon. Marshall has had ten years of paching experience in the Dad* jnty school system, having •ught t the Dade Demonstration School and West Laboratory School of the University of iami. (The first principal in Florida to srate an integrated elementary Jhool, Orchard Villa, Marshall is esently principal of Scott Lake |ementary School in No. Miami. has been principal of Flaglerfranada Jewish Community Cenreligious school for the past ree years, also serving as leisure Itivities director at the Center. 5"or two years, Marshall was lad counselor at Camp OsceOla in frrth Carolina. He has degrees in tmentary education and a Mask's degree in administration and ervision of elementary schools. raffic Brisk 1 at lorton Towers TTraffic has been brisk and injrest high." These are the views 1 Emil Morton as he reviews the rst five weeks activity at the to Morton Towers rental offices, hey are located at 532 Lincoln I. and 9583 Harding ave. IMorton says much of the apartlent house's popularity directly lems from its easy access to both bwntown Miami and the heart of liami Beach. [Morton Towers, a 14-story, 588tiit structure, is under construe-1 on at Miami Beach on Biscayne ay at 15th st. It is two blocks buth of Lincoln rd. and ten mmles from the center of Miami via he MacArthur and Venetian j auseways. | A typical two-bedroom, two-bath artment, has a 13x19 living om. a large dining area, and a. illy equipped unusually roomy | ptchen. Its master bedroom is xl6 and another 11x14.7. There, pe spacious closets and all-tile. ith rooms in all the units. Mackle Home Deadline Nears Deadline is nearing on the big I General Development "Walk into a Whole New Life" contest in which first prize is a completely furnished Mackle built home plus a job guaranteed at $100 a week for one year. Contestants have only the weekend to fill out blanks telling why they would like to live in a Macklebuilt home in one of the home communities Mackle is building for General Development on both Florida coasts. When the contest closes at midnight, entries will be forwarded to the Reuben H. Donnelley Corporation, of New York and Chicago, for final processing. The winners will be announced several weeks later. Second prize is a large homesite at Port Charlotte or Port St. Lucie. In addition, automatic dishwashers will be awarded to runners-up. With the contest nearing a close, General Development offices throughout Florida report a sharp increase in the number of Florida visitors and residents entering the offices to obtain their contest blanks. Contest blanks also may be obtained at any of the job sites such as Port Charlotte, Port St. Lucie, Port Malabar, Vero Beach Highlands, Pompano Beach Highlands and Sebastian Highlands, all General Development home communities. Offices are located at Miami, Miami Beach, Daytona Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Jacksonville, Orlando, Silver Springs, Tampa and West Palm Beach. Hurst Running In District 2 North Miami City Councilman Harry Hurst this week announced his candidacy for the office of Metro Commissioner at large in District 2. A former teacher in the Dade county system and now operator of the Hurst Insurance Agency in North Miami, the candidate has held office in North Miami for the past two years, having been elected vice mayor. Originally from Kentucky, Hurst spent four years in the U.S. Marine Corps, after which he attended Stetson University in Deland, Fla., where he was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree in education. He also attended Stetson's law school for a year. A member of the board of stewards of St. Paul Methodist Church, Hurst also teaches a church Sunday school class. "With my background in local government, I will be able to bring about better understanding between the voters of Dade county and Metropolitan Government," says Hurst. The candidate lives with his wife, Peggy, and their three children on Griffing blvd., North Miami. S. Florida Body Welcomes New Director Sunday The Stirrrh—F l orid a €mmcil oT t h e Union of American Hebrew Congregations will welcome its new Southeast regional director at .is annual spring meeting Sunday at the Seville hotel. Rabbi William Sajnwitz. w h o takes over his duties officially in Tune, will participa'e with the local Council in its deliberations dur'.nj the day. and will be introduced to the delegates during the business session in the morning. Sam A. Goldstein will preside at the morning business meeting. As director of the Southeast region, which includes Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Socth Carolina and eastern Tennessee, Rabbi Sajowitz will make his headquarters in Miami. Previous directors had headquarters in Alabama or Georgia, and the shift to Miami has been made in recognition of its rapid growth within the Reform Jewish movement. A graduate of the Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati in 1945. Rabbi Sajowitz has been serving in the pulpit of Temple Beth El, Flint, Mich., for the past five years. Prior to that, he held pulpits in San Antonio, Stockton, Calif., Wilmington, and Gastonia, N. C, and was Hillel director at the University of California. He is married to the former Ruth Dresner, of Chicago, and is the father of two daughters. Lunch will follow the morning business, and three workshops are scheduled for the afternoon. The first will deal with 'Judaism and Social Issues." and is scheduled for 12:45 p.m. At 2 p.m. delegates will participate in discussions on "Is the Price of Religion too High?" and "Our Responsibilities Toward the Winter Visitor." El Al Chooses Boeing 707 Jets NEW YORK—Management of El Al Israel Airlines has announced its intention to purchase two Boe-_j ing 707/420 jets for delivery in May and June, 1961, with an option to purchase a third aircraft at a later date. Negotiations have begun for the purchase contract subject to financing arrangements being finalized in the U.S. The proposal has been submitted to the Israel government which is giving it its immediate consideration. The Boeing 707/420. powered by Rolls Royce Conway engines, has KA8BI WILUAM SAJOWIU Recruits in Novel Army Ceremony REHOVOTH — Over 150 girl reemits in the Defense Army of Israel, who have completed their basic training, took part in a swearing-in ceremony at the grave of Dr. Chaim Weizmann in the grounds of his home Monday night. Among those who watched the ceremony were Mrs. Chaim Weizmann, widow of the first President; the Executive Council chairman of the Weizman Institute, Meyer W. Weisgal; relatives of the new soldier-girls, and overseas visitors. The gins were grouped around Dr. Weizmann's last resting-place, with the grave itself completing the hollow square. The only illumination was provided by flamepots. It was the 100th course which had been completed by girls of Chen, the Women's Army Corps, since the founding of the State. a capacity of 144 passengers and a cruising speed exceeding 600 miles per hour. El Al plans to commence commercial operations on July 1, 1961, on the New York to Tel Aviv route, with stops at London or Paris, Rome or Athens. Jet-powered Britannia service will be continued on the Atlantic until introduction of pure jet service, at which time it is planned to offer Britannia service on European and local routes. CARPET LAYING and REPAIRING RUGS CLEANED, DYED and DEMOTHED 26 S.W. South River Drive Phones FR 9-1155 & FR 1-2007 ACE RUG CLEANERS FURNITURE CLEANING GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS WOODV'S TEXACO SERVICE Lubrication Specialists — Got Oil* latteries • Tires 'Service with %  Smile" 470 R.W. 5th STRUT PHONE FR 3-9533 DRIVE WITH CARE USE SINCLAIR VENETIAN SERVICE STATION 1 SINCLAIR GASOLINE — GOODYEAR TIRES 370 N.I. 15th Street Phene FR 4-9457 Miami, Florida < S. Benson Berger, candidate for Commissioner of Agriculture, is a practicing attorney, resident of Surfside. and former West Virginia farm boy. The post he seeks spends $7 million a year and controls the citrus, cattle and agriculture industries, as well as departments of weights and measures, state penal system, pure food and drug act, and leasing of some 22 million acres of state-owned land. ^H. MjGUST BROS H Y .£ ** %  c thi 31 sr' Furnishers A Installers Inlaid Linoleum — Asphalt Tlk Rubber Tile "EVEHY INSTALLATION GUARANTEED" Phone PL 9-22M Phon* for Free Eitimatei 4256 N.W. 7th Avenue "• rampi fey ewd Nifftr Service" McCORMICK-ROYETT PLUMBING CONTRACTORS FOR SALES, SERVICE OR REPAIRS PHONE PI 7-0606 •443 PARKWAY DRIVE MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA NEED ROOFING? Specializing in Re-Roofing BENTONE ROOFING COMPANY "YOU'VE TRIED THE REST, NOW TRY THE BEST" "BfHNY CUUEUA" 4045 S.W. 113th Court Phone CA 1-6136



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Page 8-B *Jenisti fhrtdiain Friday. April 15, I960 <2fn the r^cah m o j *^5oci€tof Dietz. Pollock In Pa. Wedding In %  setting of dogwood, cedar trees and ribotium fern, Gail Orcnsten Pollock became the bride of Carl Michael Dietz recently in Iforcy UK) Truth SynafOglM, Pottstown. Pa. I be bride ll • daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Pollock, Pott* town. Mr. ud Mrs. Simon Diets. Cynwyd, Pa., are parent! of the bridegroom. Prior to the double ring cereBOO]. I half hour recital of organ mode was presented. Dr. Bmil Schorsch officiated at the nuptials at 7 30 p m Be wai assisted by Cantor Mano BngaL Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore an old fashioned shirtwaist dress of white silk or%  a. Tucks ed(ed in Val lace trimmed the front and back of the bodice. Peter Pan collar and cuffs on the long, tight sleeves were of the same lace. The softly-gathered, floor length skirt ended in a chapel train. Her chapel veil of silk illusion eta draped to a headpiece of liliesof-thc-valley and silk organza. Sho carried a bouquet of white stcphanOtla and deep purple violets. Mrs Solis Tolhn. sister of the bridegroom, Ardmore, Pa., and Mrs. Robert Coison. sister of the bride. New York City, attended as matrons of honor. Mr Dietz was served by his brother. Robert, as best man. Ushers were Solis Tolhn. Robert Corson, and Eugene Jacobs, Gilbert Zitin. Samuel Needleman and Jerome Brodsky, all of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Ktlgar Orensten. Miami Beach, grandparents of the bride, and Mr and Mrs. Charles. Wapner, Philadelphia, grandparents of the bridegroom, also were in the wedding party. When the bride left for a 10-day honeymoon in Mexico, she was wearing a dark blue two-piece wool suit with a red top coat. Upon their return. Mr. and Mrs. Dietz will reside in Pottstown. At the end of the spring vacation. Mrs. Dietz will return to teaching at Plymouth Meeting Friends School. The bride is a graduate of Pottstown High School and the I'niverMI> ot Pennvylvania. She is a member of Delta Phi Kpsilon sorority. Mr Dietz is associated with Mayer Pollock Company. He is an alumnus of the University of, Penns\ 1\ ania. rn Cleveland. Ohio 7OS0 S.W. 8th Street ess tal Director. Jew.--. Hem* er t* Aged e -rgh. Pj. Miami, Fla. Phono MO 6-8826 Kaplan, Shane Exchange Vows Miss Dorlene Verna Kaplan became the bride of Dr. Ronald William Shane in a double ring ceremony at the Deauville hotel on i Sunday noon. Apr. 10. The new Mrs. Shane is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Saul H. i Kaplan, of 3724 Pine Tree dr. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.; Isadore Shane, 1015 13th St., Miami Beach. The bride was given in marriage 1 by her father. Officiating at the' ceremony was Dr. Irving Lehrman. The bride wore a white silk organza gown. The chantilly lace; bodice featured a modified sabrina neckline enhanched with %  *> quins and long lace pointed' sleeves. The bell-shaped skirt with appliques of chantilly lace, seed pearls and sequins terminated in a chapel train. Her veil of illusion was attached to a crown of matching lace and seed pearls. She carried her confirmation Bible covered with white orchids and lilyof-the-valley. Miss Ellyn Jayne Kaplan, sis| ter of the bride was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Miss Henrietta Goodman, Miss Carol Sackheim and Miss Penny Pieck. Norman Shane was best man for his brother. Uffcen were Marvin Shane, brother of the groom. Dr. Pierre Putter and Dr. Joseph Van Der Pol. The bride is a graduate of Mi ami Beach High School and received her Bachelor of Science de( in chemistry from the University of Miami in February. Dr. Shane was graduated cum laeda from Muhlenberg College. He attended Temple University school ] of medicine on a four year >enatonal scholarship. He was president of bis class and vice president el l'hi Beta Pi medical fraicrnr.v Dr Shane interned at Duval Coon ty Medical Center in Jacksonville. and is now resident physician in internal medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital here. A champagne recption and seated luncheon followed t h e cere mom The new Dr. and Mrs. Shane are honeymooning in Mexico City and Acapulco. On their return. they will reside on Miami Beach. Miss Zernmel Plans For August Estelle Lee Zemmel and Dr. Gerald Davis are planning for | August wedding. The couple's engagement is announced by the ents. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Zemmel, 1620 Pennsylvania ave. The groom-to-be is the son of Mr and Mrs. Earl Davis, 4771 SW 6th st. The bride is a cum laude graduate of the University of Miami, where she belonged to Nu Kappa Tau. women's honorary; Phi Kappa Pi, scholastic honorary; Kap pa Delt Pi, education honorary; and was listed in "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities." Miss Zemmel it currently a teacher in the Dade county school system. Dr. Davis graduated from the was a member of Pi Mu pre-mc cil Ira, ternity. He is al.-o a gradate ol s P^V Temple University school of thiropody, where he belonged io Phi Alpha Pi, honorary anatomical society, as well as to several other science honoraries. Dr. Davis served two years in the U. S. Armed Force-. He is presently practicing clulr %  ,. > i> in Miami. -'w-'www r'WWW-'WWW'V. YOUNGISH WIDOW IN THE SIXTIES. College Educator!. Athletic Interests, with homo of her own in Miami, would like to meat gentleman of good background A similar interests References exchanged Write Mrs. X. Box 2973. Miami I, Fla. Dr. Jack Amazon ANNOUNCES REMOVAl OF HIS DENIAL OFFICES To 510 Hwatingtoa Medic.il Bldg 168 S.E. First Street Florida Telephone FR 7-4029 THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs For our THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, linens, dishes, drapes, etc. AH proceeds • towarats svpoort of the Homo. Yaw May contribute, taka a tax deduction or wo wiR pay nil for um aemima u r ...*• iro NOT a pro f it ma fc maj ergeaixatioa ... Wi ars helping, yew community to keep its dignity Sy helping ethe.v you •re helping yourself' Maaufecturers and jobbers—rem s mher we can use all your oetca a t s or misfits. Pease call us for early piCK-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED THRIFT SHOP 5737 N.E. 27th Avenue NE 3-2338 Closed Satjrdays MIAMI CONVALESCENT HOME -eterfrolly Ucefed" 1st. mi • 84-Hour Nursing Service • Special Diets Strictly Observed All Rooms on Ground Floor Jewish Style Cook'ig • Spaces Grojnds a Reason*!.'e Rates • Jpecio/iiing in Core to the f Iderly ami Chronically III 335 S.W. 12th AVE. Ph. FR 4-5437 & FH 9-0278 HO AtlEN. Mrecfer A-l EMPLOYMENT DOMESTIC HELP DAY WORKERS Ph. FR 91401 personalized service of file blackstone flower shops where you get more for your money ... un 6-1233 24-fcoor service except rose he,,oaw eaW yen. kippor



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Friday. April 15. 1960 *Jewisii Fhrktian Page 7-A Cristol Awning For School Board A. Jay Cristoi is a candidate for ter of AZA, boys' junior order of Dadc County School Board in B'nai B'rith. Group 1 at large Cristol is also a graduate of the A rormer Special Assistant AtU.S. Naval Justice School and serorney General in the 1959 Florida ved as part-time legal officer in the Legislature, he is an active naval Navy at the same time as he did reserve officer. night duty during the Korean War. Cristol lives at 1011 Euclid ave.. A mimTfter ** Schols. and was Bar tees corporation law, Florida •-^•W' T fc-aMrl M M tlaB M & _MT1 I ??" zvah at Betn Jacob Congregaconstitution, and tax section. if elected, Cristol pledges to help He is a graduate of the Univer"extend adult and vocational edu* =ity of Miami and U of M law cation, educational television, fight school, where he was a member of for a junior college in Dade county, Wig and Robe Honor Society and and press for an aviation school research editor of the Law Quarlocally.'' its young occupants. There is also erly. a large, fully-equipped and fenced Temple Emanu-EI branch reli*. Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual ^i'Tl ""ll ^T? sl n hoo w as ** !" **L?!2V .* %  ? .** us school and Youth Center dedleader of the congregation, will deM ncd by tne Jules P Chan ?*?* ** **f> £* % Temple Emanu-El's newly-completed bra ich school incorporates unique facilities. Emanu-EI Branch School Dedication Assn.. and Miami Beach Mayor D. Lee Powell. JGrossbergs Set mcert Saturday Immediately after the formal Cantor Ben Grossberg and his fife, Teresa Grossberg, will be • ,>r*sented in duo-concert on Sat-' ceremonies, a special Passover ucday evening at Temple B'nai dedication luncheon will be held Bholom, 16800 N W 22nd ave. j at the Deauville hotel. Advance Cantor Grossberg is a dramatic! ?•<>" required. ior: Mrs. Grossberg, well-known i The ew facility includes 11 flwmatic soprano, is with the Mi .: %  "' %  conditioned and heated class• m. Opera Guild, where for the I !" o 0ms an all-steel, fully-equipped 181 two seasons she has been unk,tchen • auditorium. Sisterhood lerstudy for the -Masked Ball" L ounge Y uth Loung e utorin room, board room, adult education r nd "La Gioconda.'' She is now room, library and offices. jerking on "Andrea Chenier" for! W season, when she will be unlh A ^. ,ne unM}ue fea,u res of rstudy for Renata Tebaldi. I t he buUdin g are an unusual open%  air roof pavillion complete with I Saturday night, they will present i flood lights and snack bar where lvery diversified program, includ-! youth services social and special _,._.,... ,.^, fc... living J.J I1IIII.UI, .1|'ll It llcll ious school and Youth Center dedleader of the congregation, will ication will take place Sunday j dedicate the building. Joseph M. ning Asso and was constructed morning at 11:30 a.m I Rose is chairman of the building by the Giller and Fryd ConstrueGreetings will be extended by; committee, and co-chairman is tion Co. Rabbi Alfred Waxman. president i Max Boderman. i of the Greater Miami Rabbinical The building committee includes Morris Cohen. Judge and Mrs. Milton Feller, Jack S. PoP : ck, and Alfred Stone. Chairman of the building fund and dedication committee are Leo Robinson and Mrs. Louis Glasser. traub, he belongs to Phi Alpha Delta legal fraternity and the Air Hialeah Model Seder Sisterhood of Hialeah Reform Jewish Congregation held a model Seder Sunday for students of I lie Training Corps. Cristol is a life I religious school. Rabbi Nathan member of the Royal Palm chapZwitman officiated. DOCTORS! DENTISTS! OPTICIANS! ARCHITECTS! INSURANCE AGENCY! LOAN CO.! LAW OFFICE! MENS WEAR! LADIES DRESSES! BEAUTY SALON! LINGERIE SHOP! PIECE GOODS! KNITTING! CHILDREN'S WEAR! GIFT SHOP! secular and liturgical opera, ni-classics, Broadway tunes and paeli and Yiddish songs. They be accompanied by Edward at the organ. functions will be held; and the specially designed nursery and kindergarten departments where the furnishings are sealed to suit the comfort and requirements of B-Q Asked for Meet With K. Continued from Page 1 A Soviet Ambassador here. Mr. Jen-Gurion had told the Russian rwoy ho was willing to moat rith the Soviet leader at the lat% r's convenience. L'hen Mr. Ben-Gurlon returned m his trip to Washington and idon, the Finance Minister consued, he was told by Mr. Bodrov that there was as yet no answer to the request. According to Eshkol's official statement, Bodrov said he would visit Moscow soon, and would inquire into the status of the Ben-Gurion request. Subsequently, the Israel Foreign Ministry disclosed it had instructed Dr. Arieh Harel, the Israel Ambassador to Moscow, to inquire officially for a reply. BOAT CUSHION BARGAIN!! TO JEWISH FLORIDIAN READERS Large selection of custom made boat cushions bolow raanuiactused cost — Cushions originally made for boats which are now no longer in production — You pick out color and filling desired AMERICAN CANVAS PAOHICTS B. C. LaPOINTE, JR., President 450 N.W. North River Drive Available at Miami factory only PR 7-2026 Complete and Dependable Title Service I AM I TITLE A Qkttact Co. 34 YEARS OF TITLE SERVICB IN DADE COUNTY M ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE Tide iMWSJUe Policies of Kansas City Title lasuraact Co. Capital, Surplui & Reserves Cxceed $5,0004100 124 sad 12* SHMELAND ARCADE TUIPH0MI Ft • 11 ,AIIO Known At 124 and 129 Security Truit Company Bldg.) I HAVE AN IDEAL AIR CONDITIONED STORE TO RENT FOR ANY OF THESE BUSINESSES; CENTRALLY LOCATED BETWEEN JORDAN MARSH and SEARS AT BISCAYNE BLVD.; CLOSE TO TWO BEACH CAUSEWAYS; FINE TRAFFIC FLOW; MODERN INTERIOR & FRONT. BERNARD WALL Phone FR 1-1541



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Friday, April 15, 1960 +Jewisti fhrid fan Hawaiian Theme At Donor Lunch Seated at the Golden Table at a donor luncheon of Temple Sinai Sisterhood at the Eden Roc hotel on Wednesday noon will be 15 members who have earned $100 c r mote tax Jawtcrboud during the year 1959-60. Included in the group are three sister teams, Mrs. Nat Kempner and Mrs. Dorothy Stone (twins), Mrs. Benno Wallach and Mrs. Kurt Wallach. Mrs. Edwin Weiss and Mrs. Sanford Weiss, as well as Mrs. Edward Auerback, Mrs. Morris Cohen, Mrs. David Crowell, Mrs. Harry Goldberg, Mrs. George Leader, Mrs. Sam Lubell, Mrs. Allen Oster. Mrs. Fred Pearlman, and Mrs. Russell Verga. Mrs. Sam Scurran, donor luncheon chairman, announced a Hawaiian theme will be used as the setting, with members given leis as they arrive. Moana, noted Polyresian dancer, is one of the entertainers. Proceeds are for kitchen equipment at Temple Sinai. Page 7-B Summer Pops Season Listed; Tenth Year Due Tfie tenth season of the now firmly-established Miartii Beach Pop} Concerts will open on Sunday. Jurje 19th. and run for 10 consecutive Sunday evenings to Aug. 21 at the air conditioned Miami Beach Auditorium. Fabien Sevitzky, winter Sym phony Series conductor, has accepted to open the season with an all-Tchaikovsky program of familiar numbers, including the Piano j Coqcerto. Hugo Fiorato, who established [himself last year as one of the best [young American conductors, will Dave two concerts with the same two great dancers, Melissa Hayden ind Andre Eglevsky, of the New fork City Ballet Company, who lade such a great success at their Appearance here last summer. Two different ballet programs will be esented. Raymond Paige. • popular p*r(•nallry known by thousands of Now Yorkers a* the conductor Of the Radio City Music Hall orchostra, will feature an eve ntng of Radio City Music Hall highlights with soloists. Howard Barlow has arranged his usy schedule to appear here and [onduct two concerts in his always veil-chosen programs. One of his (oloists will be Kenneth Smith, who appeared with great success last vinter in the Wagner program, the Ring of the Nibelungen. Fsanz Allers, who won the approval of summer patrons for his fine operatic performances, will tome here direct from his Russian jour of "My Fair Lady" to conduct Gershwin program and a "Viennese Night" His soloists will include Kenneth Smith and Beverly Lower. Arthur Fiedler, the conductor Iwho received the most votes as to [popularity last season on a "Pops Julia Grace stars in "Carmen" on May 7. The production at Dade County Auditorium will feature artists of the Opera Guild Workshop of the University of Miami under the auspices of the Opera Guild of Greater Miami. Director is Arturo di Filippi. Dick Clark stars in "Because They're Young" at the Colony Theatre on Miami Beach. Miss Sanders Appointed Miss Shirley Sanders has been appointed head of the ballet department at the Fine Arts Conservatory, 5770 NW 15th ave. Miss Sanders is one of the principle dancers in the Miami Ballet Company. Mrs. Ruth Wolkowsky Greenfield is director of the conservatory. Questionnaire," cannot possibly give two dates this year. He will come here especially for one concert on Aug. 14 and return immediately to San Francisco and the west coast. D'Artega, who has appeared at these concerts each summer since 1956, will end the season on Aug. 21 with an all-Rodgers and Hammerstein program. Among leading Zionists of the Greater Miami area honored at a dinner of tribute last week at the Fontainebleau hotel were (left to right) Morris Simon, Louis Rudnick and lacob C. Fishman. They were cited for "outstanding service to the State of Israel and Israel Bonds." An Endorsement... From Noted Civic. Leader SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN 31 SHORE DRIVE NORTH MIAMI, FLA. March 22, 1960 DEAR LOUIE: I want to congratulate you upon your decision to run for the Circuit Court and assure you that I will do all I can to insure your election. You wrll bring to this post your qualifications based upon experience, knowledge of humanity and public affairs and the accumulation of years of legal training. Sincerely, ninn LOUIE BANDEL AFFILIATIONS BETH DAVID: Member from 1925 to 1955 BETH EL: Member ISRAELITE CENTER: Member LET'S ELECT CIRCUIT JUDGE QUALIFIED BY JUDICIAL EXPERIENCE PULL LEVER 21-A c//lllH you very nine L 1M Pol. A'lv.