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The Jewish Floridian ( April 1, 1960 )

UFJUD

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"Oewish Floridian Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY {Volume 33 — Number 14 Miami, Florida, Friday, April 1, 1960 Four Sections — Price 204 Ike Vowed Assist If Israel Attacked President Stipulates U.S. I'No Provocation' Condition; [Premier Reported Satisfied CHOWDS CKltT KtTUKNING PRIM MINISTU PACt 9< TEL AVIV—(JTA>—The left-wing labor newspaper Lamerhav said iday that during the recent Eisenhower-Ben-Gurion meeting in Washiwi President Eisenhower reiterated his promise that the United ts would come to the assistance of Israel in the event the Jewish was attacked. + -— %  Btnitr Ben-Gurion, the paper ported. The report emphasized Hed. conveyed this informathat Stalin Mark III and T-54 tanks [to the Cabinet at its meeting were obtained by the UAR from ly. The paper said that the the Soviet Union. lent had made American aid tioral on "no provocation" [Israel's side. According to the newspaper, Continued en Peg* 1S-A Vr. 1 this promise is not new been given on different s by the State Department clarations that the United wculd oppose any attempts the status in the Middle force, the paper said that j fck-Gurion seemed to have' considerable importance act that the promise was fairectly by Mr. Eisenhower Jly to the Israeli Prime mm MINISTtK JMACMIUAN reject! uii pita 'A GREAT INJUSTICE' %  New York Times reportHanday from Cairo that the MM Union offered last week stect the United Arab Re's borders in case of an atbut that President Nasser UAR declined the offer ground that ran contrary policy of not joining alii"It was understood that vjection of the Soviet offer Bt mean Mr. Nasser was iling to accept more arms Moscow," the Times report ited.) 1 wants Britain to furnish Centurian tanks which, in of Israel's defense forces,' ble of counter balancing the United Arab Republic, ly Telegraph meanwhile reMacmillan Evasive About Discussion With Ben-Gurion LONDON—(JTA)—Prime Minister Harold Macmillan evaded going into details in the House of Commons this week on his talk with Israel's Premier David Ben-Gurlon. The British Prime Minister limited himself to telling the members of the House of Commons that Mr.+ Ben-Gurion was spending a few CROSS BURNINGS FLARE IN SOUTH Gadsden Community Returning to Normal As Bomber is Arrested GADSDEN, Ala. — (JTA) — The Temple Beth Israel here, at which a fire bomb was thrown last Friday night by a 16-year-old youth, Sunday conducted its activities on a normal basis, with its Sunday school enjoying full attend-j ance. The attack was condemned | here in sermons preached in a number of churches by Christian "tted throwing the fire bomb at ministers. I tne synagogue and shooting at con,. Tk „„ ._. -rt i„,„ ir K ,i:„' gregants, was under arrest today in TSL-n" R.hhi £„, Zh n tWO C0UntS 0f 3SSaU,t aDd ESS in Gadsden, Rabbi Saul Rubin, _„_j__ „_ ,„,. ,. ,. t spiritual leader of the Reform ,£ T.^^^ E5 .H* Temple, told the Jewish Tele-p P assion eiy hated Jews, graphic Agency. "There is abso-. Two members of the congregalutely no panic whatever among tion were injured, one critically, our people, or, for that matter, in in the hit-and-run attack at the synthe entire community. There is \ agogue where 180 congregants only watchfulness against any were present. Alvin Lowi was shot possible recurrance of such a in the hand, and Alan Cohen was been deeply shocked by this occurrence. Public officials, press and the Christian Churches hero have assured us of their sympathy and of their determination that nothing like this shall ever happen here again." The 16-year-old youth, who adshameful manifestation. "We have had marvelous relationships with the entire community," the rabbi declared, "end the general community, as the Jewish community here, has ol days in England on a private visit. "He called on me, at his request, and we discussed problems of the Middle East and the world," Mr. Macmillan stated. Laborite Dingle Foot demand| ed to know whether the question of British supply of arms to Israel had been discussed, and whether n assurance of such a supply had been given to Mr. Ben-Gurion. In reply, Mr. Macmillan said be, was standing on the answer to a similar question Continued on Page 2-A House Unit Amends Foreign Aid Bill to Check Arab Blockade -G Reports to Cabinet Fruitful Results of Trip riculture Trade and Assistance Act, the principles shall be applied as the President may determine. The measure calls upon the President to report on measures taken to implement the Continued on Page 7-A hit in the leg and chest Cohen was operated on and listed as in 'fair condition." ( Police and FBI agents moved quickly after the attack, in which it was at first reported that three youths were involved. However, Hubert Jackson, jr., alias Jerry Hunt, the confessed attacker, said he had been alone. Circuit Solicitor Charles Wright said that Jackson, a high school junior, would bbe charged with murder if Cohen died. The youth was an immediate suspect because I he had been telling friends he j planned just such an attack be. cause Jewish youth at the high I school had been complaining about Continued on Page 6-A of their parley, the official communique said A complete blackout has been imposed on t h o subjects to be discussed at the m # n9 j "wage economic warfare against Meanwhile, Mr. Ben-Gurion, ad-;other nations assisted under this dressing the Mapei Party conven-|Act, including such procedures as tion last weekend, told the memboycotts, blockades, or the restricbers of his party: "I can say with tion of the use of international wa IUSALEM — (JTA) — Prime ster David Ben Gurion Sunfreported to the Cabinet on his in Washington and London, [replied to questions by mem| of the Cabinet. the same time, the Defense Istry issued an official an acement disclosing that its ssentatives in f iye Western: tne utmost satisfaction that I met terways." ntries have been summoned to participate in a four-day ference and consultations on Defense Ministry's activities Dad. Prime Minister Ben Gurion, o is also Defense Minister, i Deputy Defense Minister imon Peres, who also returnrecently from an urgent mism in Europe, will meet with e representatives in the course WASHINGTON — (JTA) — The House Foreign Affairs Committee adopted this week an amendment | to the Foreign Aid Bill, calling ; upon the President to ensure that 1 no foreign aid given by the United : States endangers the principle of freedom of navigation. In the form of a Joint Resolution, the amend ment would express outright United United States opposition to Arab blockade and economic restrictions in the Suez Canal and elsewhere. Declaring that America's "traditional" policy of freedom of the seas "is presently being violated," and stating that the United States "deplores such violations." the WASHINGTON—(JTA>—Details of a massive flow of Soviet arms amendment declared it the senses into Arab states were revealed this week on a Senate speech by Sen. of Congress that the purposes of j j aco b R. Javits, New York Republican. He told the Senate he had obthe Mutual Security Act would be ained Administrations statistics revealing that about three-fourths of world"endangered iTnations re*! aU Soviet bloc miUtary ssistance to non-Communist states-S580.000.000 ceiving assistance' under the Act out a total of $780,000,000 went to the United Arab Republic. Iraq, and Yemen, from 1955 to 1959. The largest recipient of Soviet* %  Javits Lists Vast Soviet Arms Sales in Middle East with a considerable area of agreement on the part of all men with whom I talked on world problems, as well as on most political analyses of various political blocs in our own area. I also met with great sympathy and understanding for our postions and needs." The Premier stressed that, while Continued on Page 3-A The amendment specifies further that "in all negotiations between the United States and t*r foreign State, arising as a result of funds appropriated under the Act or arising under the Agarms is the UAR in the amount Mutual Security program for fisof $443,000,000. Iraq received $120,C al year 1961. 000.000 in arms, while Yemen got $17,000,000 worth. New advanced planes, tanks, and other modern' weapons are pouring into Egypt in %  "huge Soviet build-up" said Sen. Javits. He stressed that "these alarming statistics" were disclosed to him by the Administration in its summary presentation of the He else called attention to Soviet economic penetration of the Arab countries through aid totaling $696,000,00e. Of this sum $515,000,000 wont to the United Arab Republic. He warned that the UAR wes adopting a more Continued on Page ISA Ollenhauer Speaks Mind... Pg. 10C



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Page 2-A Jewish FhrkHan Friday, April 1. I960 Macmillan Evasive On Talks With B-G Continued from Page 1-A given in Parliament last week by the Joint Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs Robert Allan, Allan had told the House that it w as not in the public interest to disclose whether or not anus had been received from foreign governments. He had also added that the government would not give the assurance that an arms request from Israel would be denied before l opinions had had the opportunity 01" discussing such a request. "I did observe," the Premier added, "that, in an interview, Mr. Ben-Gurion said he favored complete disarmament in the Middle For meritorious services rendered as trusts* of the National Jewish Hospital in Denver. Colo., current Miami Beach visitor ES th-muS WSJrS Louis OppJnheimer (center) is given a key to jh. Gold Coast fore world disarmament begins. I city by Mayor D. Lee Powell. Oppenheimer. honorary presi An embargo in the present posident of the Albert Krause chapter of B nai B nth in Chicago, tion. when a great power is send, s sojourning at the San Marino hotel through April. Looking ing arms to one country, would be on is f orme r Miami Beach mayor and long-time friend of Opa great injustice." penheimer, Harold Turk. The former mayor is a co-owner of In another statement to the the San Marino and a local attorney. House. Mr. Macmillan rejected a Labor request that a Royal torn_ _. |%— ii-l-Tmn&nnmw mission be named to investigate 5CnOOl POSTS Ke-KGglSTraTIOn Re registration for the fall seleader of the congelation, will mester of the nursery-kindersai conduct the service for children. ;ious school nullan stated, were CUSCUSsea i f An r t o 8 Abrah n J. ittel"'" : "'. m ,„?, „„J P„U.ent a, the lime Ol ,ho 1*. *&££ £22. announced {Jjjp^—J and campaign, and subsequently, for Wednesday. schitx win officiate. that reason, he declared, he raw IU inc | icat ed that "a large enroll' PTA o( the religious school unno reason for further inquiry. | mont ls expected in vim of the der the chairmanship of Mrs Je ', „.~_\ j 77TT '?"'•'"'•""" of construction of ronu Cavell will again prepare the the new and improved facilities for tables with Passover delicacies the school and synagogue." |and set the special symbolic foods The school Offers a complete „ n the Passover plates. More than readiness program, as well as ex450 students will participate. periences of Jewish living. 15 Join New Vanguardian Body Jack Katzman. Miami Israel j Bond Guardian chairman and last j [wcok named chairman of the newi Vanguardians program launched] by the Israel Bond Organization, announced that 15 Miamians have already joined him in the new program. Pointing out that the new Van-, guardian program is designed to increase the enrollment of Guardians of Israel through the sale of a larger number of $1,000 State of Israel Bonds in 1960, Katzman explained that each V.-.nguardian enrolls as a Guardian himself by subscribing to a minimum S1.000| Israel Bond purchase and under-, i takes to enroll ten other persons | as Guardians of Israel, thus qualifying for the title of "Vanguardjian of Israel's Progress" (V.I.P.). Katzman announced the following as charter members of the Miami Vanguardians: William Agranove, Meyer Baskin. Henry Gilbert. Bernard Kata. Sheldon Kay, Sam Lachman. Milton Lubarr, Samuel Oritt. Jack S. Popick, Sam Reinhard, Jack Rifkm. Louis Rudnick. and Jack Toppell. the record of British, French and Israel Government consultations Supervised by Orthodox Beth Din Community Vad Hakashruth Grabers Kosher Meat Market 44TSW17Ave. FR 9-6266 bonalest, trimmed POT ROAST 79* lb fresh killed BABY PUiLETS 59* lb. freth lean Grnd. Beef 2 lbs. $1.09 long boi^ft FLANKEN 39* lb. LAMB STEW 19* lb TENDERLOIN 79* lb Baby Beef Liver 69* lb. farm fresh JUMBO EGGS 69*doz. eARBKRIES WADE TO ORDER STORE HOURS: 0 : ty 8 UK • a p.m. Fri. S .m.-3 p.m. Sun. S e.m -12 Men PASSOVER ORDERS FILLED FREE DEUVIRV itraei UVVUIIIUEUI nnumwuvu. mester of the nurserv kinrtergai conduct tne fervite ior t ....-.-.millan stated, were discussed in a w 'J J A Sm J. G-tleljUI hoi d their annual mode1 Scj' ivflfl^* C *C(^ P„U.nt n, tha time 0 Je Suez *Af££ JrSS announced JjJ^Y-dTlffi 5 W^LiZ^ ewtee *9\ O3'N yi ma Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky 945 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH Phene JE 1-3595 Nursery school will hold if* model Seder on Apr. 8, when Rabbi Max Lipschiti, spiritual Cantata on Television % % % • i i i % > t I i > > % { I i i I h>. DAILY PICKUPS TO NEW YORK M. LIEBERMAN & SONS Rabbi Alexander Gross, principal of the Hebrew Academy, will present a cantata. "New Look," on ^| the Rabbinical Assn. television pro gram, "Still Small Voice." The program will be seen Sunday, 10 a.m.. over ch. 7 WCRT. Participating will be four narrators, a 50voice choir, and two dancers. Prescription Specialists NOW IN TWO MODERN AIK-COND TIONtD, ENLASGfD BEACH LOCATIONS MORE PtRKIir, SPMl CONVENIENT TO BUSH 350 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 8-7425 Enfr. Washington Ave. Menoninr 728 LINCOLN ROAD Phone JE 8-0749 OCUliSTS' PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED CONTACT LENSES PLYING ANTS j^ MAT BE J k TERMITES *%* CALL NE 3-3421 WORLD'S LARGEST GIVING TO THE CJA IS GIVING TO YOURSELF! 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"Miami's Leading Memorial Dealers" Sereisfl MM Jewish Cemmunify Sine* l2e At/AAW'S ONE AA OAUY JEWISH MONUMENT BUILDERS CATERiNO nausrvar TO TJU JEWJSN ClAittTCtf GUARANTIED FINEST DUALITY MONUMENTS AT LOWEST PRICES IN MIAMI I CRAVE MARKERS HEADSTONES FOOTSTONES Only $35.00 Why Pay Mara? Buy for less at Palmer's and Sate I AN Monuments Custom Mstfe in Owr Own SJMJM within 9 Owys I 3277-79-11 SOUTHWEST 8th STREET Next to Corner at 33re" Awenv* PHONES : HI 4-0921 HI 4-0922 RIVERSIDE MEMORIAL CHAPEL FUNERAL DIRECTORS Phone JE 1-115. MIAMI MACH 1250 Normwviy Drive 1236 Wutunoto" Avwiwe 1850 Anon Rod MIAMI Wett Fla^W tnd 20th Avenue HI 3 2221 24-Hr. Ambulance Servics Irvmg 5I.U.r, Al Ei M nbr a Iwrie $ tletherf. F 0 Nw York76!h Sr & A-nirdm Ave.



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Friday. April 1, I960 +Je*rs*rfcridnan Page 3-A Mapai Opens Gate to Non-Labor JERUSALEM — (JTA) — After urged, in another Mapai resoluthe Soviet Union "would enable a stormy debate, the annual contion, to intensify emigration to Isany Jew who desires to do so to vention of the dominant Mapai rael. The hope was expressed that emigrate to Israel." Party for the first time threw ^— open its membership rolls to IsfflP Surprise presentation took place recently at the annual banquet of the Community Vaad Hakashruth at the Royal Hungaricn restaurant. Henry Groudan, president of the Vaad, presented Philip Weiss with a plaque for his "dedicated service to the Vaad." Weiss is proprietor of the Royal Hungarian. Gurion Reports On Trip Abroad : Continued from Pag* 1-A it is premature, as yet, to reach conclusions regarding the practical results of his talks in Washing-1 ton and London, "the practical aim of these discussions, though not all, of course, lay in the discussions themselves." 1 If the political conversations have been "of some use,'* he added, "and if practical expectations are fulfilled, it is only due to the lundamenttal preparatory work of Israeli representatives in Washington." He credited also "our deShow Homed Manager Eugene A. Shaw has been named manager of the Appraisal Department of W. S. Brenza and 'Assoc. Inc., mortgage bankers. According to William Brenza, president, the addition of the Appraisal Department, providing complete professional real estate appraisal service for all purposes, including estate tax. condemnation and closed corporations, is being made to offer a more comprehensive service to the firm's clientele. voted friends in American and British Jewry, whether they are railed Zionist or whether they do not lay claim to that title." I riwlie whoare not—members of llistradrut, the Federation of La! bor. Until now, membership in a I trade union affiliated with Histai drut was required of all Mapai Party members. The new move was adopted only, | after Prime Minister David Ben-* I Gurion himself spoke in its favor, i as titular head of the party. Mr. Ben-Gurion pleaded for broadening' of party membership to include certain artisans who, while ineligi-i ble to Histadrut membership be-; cause they are employers, would nevertheless strengthen they party. This "creative group," be stressed, "has the right to join the party. In another address, the Prim* Minister urged again his longstanding insistence upon the amalgamation of all labor parties in Israel. He proposed that the Mapai Central Committee be instructed to draw a basic set of principles for 'the labor movement, and to submit those prinj ciples to every worker in Israel. Those who accept the principles, he proposed, would be summon' ed to a nationwide "workers unity" convention. The convention adopted a series of political resolutions calling for: support of the government's ef-j forts for peace in the Middle East \ area; backing moves for total. world disarmament! and support-' ing Mr. Ben-Gurion's proposal for' total disarmament in the Middle East, backed by international control. In another resolution, Mapai expressed its "profound disappoint1 ment" with the fact that the United Nations and the maritime nations of the world have not yet succeeded in ending United Arab Republic "piracy" through blockade of the Suez Canal. The convention also condemned the antiIsrael boycott by the Arab states. Jews throughout the world were yto/diStoftltottej A'* l >JNU|I *<>*** O Beach ortNi i s DQWSDAY & %  FttAJBt *> DAISIES Hfl •*—" • • CO 01 iJNIO Colony Off*. WHY WERE His VICTIMS ALWAYS LADIES OF THE NIGHT? GOLFERS IMPROVE YOUR GAME HANDMADE GOIF ClUBS fuMonei fe fit Yamr Build, Swing end Capabilities FINEST WORKMANSHIP feu are cordially Invited to come in and see hew these fine clubs are made. GOW^ 1423 P0MCE Wrrj CORAI GABLES THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED needs for our THRIFT SHOP All your furniture, clothing, linens, dirties, drapes, etc. All proceeds go lo va*ch support of the Horn*. You may contribute, toko a lax deduction or wo will pay cash for tamo. Remember wo ara NOT a profit malting organisation Wo ar* harping your communty to kaep its dignity. By help ng othort you ara helping yourself! Manufacturers and jobbers remember— we can use all your outcasts or misfits. Q Pease call us for early pick-up. THE JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED frfltlFT SHOP 5737 N.E. 27th Avenue NE 3-2338 Closed Saturdays — -meaM^a 1 MJGUST BROS r> v •* %  i ^ ........ \. r IS thv &t S/ i 0 STAR PASTRY SHOPS 1677 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH 1075 95th STREET, BAY HARBOR ISLAND Largest Selection of Traditional Passover Cakes, Cookies and all Pesach Baked Products STAR PASTRY SHOP'S NAME PROTECTS YOU YHTH THE MUST PfSAtH YffcWDrttlTS PLEASE PUCE YOUR ORDER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE FREE DELIVERY MIAMI and MIAMI BEACH TELEPHONE %  JE 8-7530 UN 5-0004 VYOMETCO THEATRES CAR1E AAIAMi IMiKAUi OfiN '0 41A.M. 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' Page 4-A *Jewisti ncr/dUan Friday. April I, I960 (Jewish Flor idlan OFFICE and PLANT — 120 N.E. Sixth Street Telephone FR 3-4605 Teletype Communications Miami TWX ^__^ MM 39 6 FRED K. SHOCHET E ditor and Publisher LEO MINDLIN Executive Editor Published every Friday since 1927 by The 7*wlh Florldlan at 120 N.B. Sixth Street, Miami l, Florida Entered %  > %  econd-claM matter July 4. IMO, at ) t of .Miami. Florida, under the Act of Match 3. 1879. The Jewith Florldlan has absorbed the Jewish Unity ana the Jewish Weekl/. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Assn., American Assn. ot English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn. The Jewlrh Florldlan doe* not guarantee the Kavhtuth of the merchandise advertised in lis columns. SUBSCRIPTION One Year 5.00 RATES: Three Years J10.OO ISRAEL BUREAU 202 Ben Yehuda — Tel Aviv, Israel RAY U. BINDER Correspondent Volume 33 Number 14 Friday. April 1. 1960 4 Nisan 5720 'Solution' to the Bombing The shocking bombing of the Gadsden, Ala., synagogue once again proves a by now well-known fact — the role of youth in the rising level of racial and religious terror and harrassment throughout the nation. We can no longer speak intelligently about juvenile delinguency. The Gadsden bombing and the recent rash of swastika smearings, in which teen-agers 18 and under took such a prominent part, are not examples of delinquency. They are manifestations of dangerous antisocial behavior patterns that threaten the foundationstone of American democracy. The Gadsden incident repeats previous occurrences of successful arrests with almost frightening accuracy: the pathetic denial of culpability on the part of the teen-agers' parents and their insistence on the innocence of their %  children. But among synagogue bombings, unique for its solution, the Gadsden incident is also unusual in that two people were wounded by gunfire. This is no longer a question of naive protestations of innocence, in which the youths ore represented as having been "pleasurebent" ir I manner that just got out of hand. S an protestations are on their face absurd to begin with. When a raw teen-ager wears a swcstika armband and spouts poisonous antiSemitic propaganda with the kind of frequent facility that enabled the FBI to seize the Gadsden culprit almost immediately, his parents can hardly claim immunity for themselves. The lesson to be learned here is that parental responsibility goes beyond the narrow confines of home surveillance in the important business of teaching the nation's young the meaning of democracy and the sanctity of the individual, whatever his race or religion. Alabama authorities and the FBI are to be congratulated for their rapid "solution" to the Gadsden bombing. But it is no solution to the larger problem, which can only be eradicated when each of us bears the responsibility of living the free way of life by example. ^ Lest the majority take comfort in the ''safety" of numbers, feeling shock for the incident, but expressing not enough actual concern to do anything about it because, after all, "only a synagogue" is involved, let them recall the trend of all totalitarian movements. Freedom is best undermined when the majority fails to protect the rights of the minority, or to respect its differences. This is the best proof to the tyrant that democracy is ripe for rape. %  %  ''^-~~1 • %  > SMOKE SIGNALS Putting the Power to Use The Jewish Labor Committee has come up with an interesting interpretation of the purview of President Eisenhower's Committee on Government Employment Policy. Function of the committee is to police federal hiring practices, thus assuring freedom from discrimination for reasons of race or religion. The JLC is now urging the government to use the powers of the committee against the State Department, whose shocking collusion with the Arab nations has resulted in the screening of Jewish applicants for government employment overseas. The Jewish Labor Committee is right in calling the State Department collusion a "sordid fact." Here indeed is a clear case where the powers of President Eisenhower's committee can be put to good use. Home for the Aged Scores Once again, the Jewish Home for the Aged of Greater Miami has taken the lead in innovations involving our senior citizens. The Home's new day care program is the first in Dade county. The institution deserves the congratulations of the entire community. Much is said these days about our senior citizens. Statistics are cited more and more frequently to demonstrate their rising numbers in the nation's general population. Senior citizens have become a favorite source of investigation for Congressional committees; one is at times hard put to determine how much of the verbiage in their behalf, both printed and spoken, is honestly intended and how much of ft will ultimately become political grist. r The Jewish Home for the Aged's new day cere program has flown by the nets of talk to make a solid contribution in behalf of Greater Miami's older citizenry. The Home has a glowing reputation nationally and locally for its fine geriatric organiaztion. The affiliation last year between the University of Miami medical school and the Home is the most eloquent proof possible for the substance of this reputation. But whatever the level of its achievement, the demand on the Home's facilities has naturally and understandably exceeded its physical ability to meet them. In 1958. as a result of a precedent-making $450,000 FHA expansion program, the Jewish Home for the Aged enlarged its bed capacity from 75 to 112. Long waiting lists requesting admission nevertheless continue to exist, as increasing numbers of Dade county senior citizens seek entry into Douglas Gardens. The new day care program constitutes a praiseworthy step in the direction of meeting a long-felt need: a method by which the Home can offer qualified older Miamians the carefully-guided geriatric regimen that is its hallmark lor regular residents, while making no further demand on the Home's bed capacity. Through the program, senior citizens will be able to spend the day at Douglas Gardens and be returned to their places of private residence in the evening. The Home's aim of providing incentive for our aged — fruitful and productive activity in their later years — is thus immeasurably expanded. This is a genuine service to the community at large and a humanitarian step in the direction of intelligent handling of the problems posed by our increasing senior citizen populace. *^ r during (he week ... as i see it by LEO MINDLIN I SEE THAT my good friend, Nathan Ziprin, of the Seven Arts Feature Syndicate takes out against Commentary in a column soon to appear in this newspaper. Commentary is the magazine sponsored by the American Jewish Committee. It is a literary publication of high calibre, presumably based on Jewish content, and reflecting the unquestionable aesthetic taste of what writers call the "little magazine." Ziprin's thesis is that Commentary has reduced its Jewish quality to the vanishing point, and wonders about the value of its sponsorship by the AJC. Further to discuss the problem from his view would be to encroach on a fellow-columnist's claim. But it raises some interesting speculations beyond the Immediate and very pertinent charge. Publications certainly have the right to change without being subject to opprobrium—unless the change is as spectacular, for example, as the Mercury's. Even in the case of a supposedly Jewish magazine, it would seem that a deemphasis of Jewish content is an editorial decision to be accepted or rejected on the basis of personal taste alone. However absurd such a decision may be, the American Jewish Committee could argue, perhaps with some success, that non-sectarian quality magazines are in the decided minority and that^iiublishing one can redound to the glory of the organization particularly and Jews generally — indeed more so than a sectarian literary effort ever would. I doubt that even so spurious a defense as this is the motive behind Commentary's vanishing Jewish exterior — it never was very Jewish otherwise. More to the point here is a revolting kind of antiSemitism particularly prevalent among the literati — and actually not excluded to Jews, themeselves. THE JEWISH THEME is a central and ponderous one in modern %  art — especially in the novel. The works of Joyce, Proust, and Mann, undoubtedly the three titans of twentieth century literature, all feature Jews as protagonists. Leopold Bloom, Swann. and Naphta have beccine as sacred to the contemporary critic as are Donatello and Michelangelo to the Renaissance specialist The reasons for (bis popularity abound. But most prevalent among them is that the Jew symbolizes the exile; while man himself, these artists speculate, today suffers the ineluctable loneliness common to the state of exile. Perhaps the two profoundest literary critics to emerge in our time are T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. Both poets of international stature, men who concur in the validity of this symbolic isolation, their impact on contemporary thought blanketed painting, literature and even music as far back as 1910 to shape the aesthetic world in which we now live. It is all the more curious that while the Jew has been employed as an artistic symbol ot exile, he is also in their view the source of the ills afflicting humanity. In the dual role of principal cause and principal effect of the disease, the Jew has played a variety of literary roles, of which Bloom, Swann, and Naphta are merely a sympathetic" if bizarre handful. Thus, Eliot's poetry abounds in anti-Semitic elements. Anf while bla later critical works look more kindly upon Jews, his earlier efforts in this genre are far less sympathetic. Pound, contranly. whose poetry is largely devoid of anti-Semitism, makes up for it in his criticism, as well as in his •polities'' and "economics." Pound's international reputation as a Jew hater needs no elucidation here — a reputation which, in a quaint schizophrenic way, he would vociferously deny. It is in I his wild and ill-defined world of Jew-consciousness that so much twentieth century quality literature wallows. There is small wonder that magazines speaking for the literature should reflect its character. What Eliot. Pound and their disciples have spoken, let not be unspoken — not even by the young, bright Jewish edit.irs' and writers religiously following in their paths. So, too, with Commentary magazine. THIS KIND OF literarily fashionable anti-Semitism is even more revolting than the commoner non-Jewish variety. It is a self-hatred fawning upon the noble if highly inaccurate thestl that art lies beyond the petty principles and allegiances of ordinary men. Some of the world's greatest philosophers, musicians, novelists and essayists have been profoundly resourceful haters of Jews. Wagner, Belloc, Chesterton, and St. Thomas Aquinas are cases in point. A more current and cogent one is in the March issue of Esquire magazine, where critic Dwight MacDonald reviews the motion picture "Ben-IIur." I do not place Mr. MacDonald in the same category of achievement as these illustrious gentlemen — although his lofty sentiments, marked by much self-esteem, are of such a dashing character as to leave one feeling he has long before done so himself. Nevertheless, in the typically omniscient way critics have about them, Mr. MacDonald laces into '•Ben-Hur" its supra-realism to the point of vulgarity, its cheap sensationalism. Employing the crisp phrases of the Ivy League aesthete gone "simple man," Mr. MacDonald calls the chariot race "long on gore and short on excitement" charges that "Instead of sex. 'Ben-Hur' gives us sadism;" reflects on the producers of the film ,who) can reduce a thousand to a confused cocktail party;" deplores "our mass culture (which) compensates for its prudery about sex by portraying violence." H l M CS n 7/ ,t tlcIsms whlch m 'K h t otherwise be to his credit, Mr. MacDonald shakes well into a cocktail party of his own to produce this piece of inevitable ant.-Semit.sm: "Here is. finally a blasphemous falsification of the Bible ... in which not the Jews but S!Hh 0nU T\ are 7 s t po l nS blc for Christ', martyrdom. According to Matthew, Luke and John, it wasn't that way at all." £ONTINUES CRITIC MacDonald; "There is a brief shot of some high TPriests looking on at the Crucifixion they look sad r„iZl ,h?„ jubilant there are no ancient Romans .round and there are man To iinTT? ( :\ cost of thc fi,m) lSoS5? i. !, ?LT he URly b,g0,ry hcre would b o belabor the obvious such .iterary refuse "would be nice to fee. there is 76SSSJ; r it. But in the realm of art one can hardlv exneel around to answer "' "V. "• Ul '" w,e rc im of art one can hardlv exneel SO unworthy a thing as a defense of the Jew when it is fashionable to slander him not even in Commentary, which more and more aligns itself with the unbridled aesthetes, and less andT7s with mo e rhe„Z U J d nf d a b a,,,e against ,he ,yrann y words they Lbb e n the name of a strange artistic heritage. oaooie in



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Friday„April i, I960 *Jenist> fUridlikin Page 5-A ENTER GENERAL DEVELOPMENT'S GREAT W CONTEST FEBRUARY 14, Hirtvfh APRIL 17, H%9 WALK INTO A WHOLE NEW LIFE Just like walking from one room to another ... a brand new Mackle-built house and lot in your choice of five General Development Corporation communities ... completely furnished, ready to move in, plus a guaranteed job for one year at $100 a week. *m >m m ff >m *0 : ************ GRAND PRIZE A NEW HOME A beautiful new two-bedroom, onebath home, the Floridian, valued at $10,980, including lot, will be especially built for you in your choice of five General Development communities, Port Charlotte, Port St. Lucie, Port Malabar, Vero Beach Highlands, or Sebastian Highlands. NEW FURNITURE The home will be completely furnished and decorated to your taste with furniture valued at $2,500 NEW JOB General Development Corporation will guarantee you a job at $100 a week for one year. The exact nature of the position will be governed by your past experience and ability. SECOND PRIZE A $995 homesite in Port Charlotte or Port St. Lucie A beautiful 80' x 125' lot that you can build on now, or hold for the futur*. 20 THIRD PRIZES: Frigidaire Mobile Dishwashers Requires no plumbing or costly installation. Fully automatic. Pre-wash flushes, scrub washes, pre-rinse flushes,-double rinses, and dries. ^ U l t l l i n %  %  IT'S EASY! NOTHING TO BUYI ENTER NOW! All you do is go to a General Development Corporation branch office or home community, get an Official Entry Blank, and complete the phrase, "I would like to live in a Mackle-built home in Florida because ..." in 25 words or less. Visit any of the General Development Branch offices or Florida Communities and get complete information that will help you write your entry. See photographs ana floor plans of Mackle-built homes. Find out about their quality construction and many attractive features. > > %  > +-4 GET YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK AND CONTEST RULES at these Branch Offices and Home Communities 10 CONVENIENT OFFICES IN FLORIDA MIAMI BEACH 7143 Collins Avenue HOLLYWOOD BEACH 300-A Johnson Street FT. LAUDERDALF, 1744 E. Sunrise Blvd. WEST PALM BEACH 205 Clematis Street SILVER SPRINGS Silver Springs Boulevard DAYTONA BEACH 149 Volusia Avenue JACKSONVILLE 226 West Forsythe St. TAMPA 3804 Neptune St. ORLANDO Chtrr\ Plaza Hotel 419 East Central Ave. MIAMI—Home Office 2828 Coral Way r0T CHAA10TT l FORT MAI ASA* kSCBASTIAN MIGMtANDJ ACM HMMIAHBS 4. VIM IMOMS Vo*r ST. LUCII POMPAN0 MACN HIGHLAND* 7 OUTSTANDING FLORIDA COMMUNITIES PORT CHARLOTTE between Saraeota and Ft. Myers on the lovely Southwest Coast PORT ST. LUCIE on the East Coast, between Fort Pierce and Stuart PORT MALABAR •t Palm Bay, on the East Coast, 3 miles south of Melbourne SEBASTIAN HIGHLANDS • unique Yactit Club community on the East Coast, 14 miles north of Vero Beach VERO BEACH HIGHLANDS on the East Coast. 5H miles south of Vero Beach VERO SHORES an exclusive waterfront community, • 6H miles south of Vero Beach POMPANO BEACH HIGHLANDS on the lower East Coast, four miles north of Pompano Beach Builders of better communities for finer Florida living THI MACKLE COMPANY AND GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION



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Page 6 A *Jt*istncrk0a*i Friday. April 1. 1960 A Talk With U Nu By MAX LERNES Gadsden Community Back to Normal New Delhi On Apr 1 the new Burmese Parliament will meet, and I) N'u will cnce again become Prime Minister. I had a talk with him here on the occasion of his two-day visit. He was sitting in the bedroom of a modest guest suite at Nehru's house, and during the half-hour of our talk he sipped a glass of cold water and talked of a wide range of things, his face .• %  •ill almost boyish smooth and unflawed. his eyes gentle and laughing despite his quarter-century of political struggle Later that afternoon, at a Burmese Indian Friendship Society tea. I' Nu denied that he had come to India to confer with Nehru and Krushcnev when all three met at Calcutta. It was sheer chance, he said, that brought him there on the same day that Nehru was to meet Krushchev en hireturn from Indonesia. He himself had come to India only to Nehru and visit the great Buddhist shrines at Ajanta and Ellora. If any other governmental head had insisted that only accident brought him to the right place and the right persons at the right time. there would have been broad smiles of disbelief. But U Nu's angelically rure smile almost melts your disbelief. Everything he does seems to partake of the ceremony of innocence. That is probably why his political opponents have found him a difficult man to beat. I ASKED U NU HOW HE FELT about the U.S. now. and the future relation of the Asian states with the American government. They would be good, he said, provided the US. follows a policy of non interference in their internal affairs. Again he refused to be more specific, but he didn't need to. Burma is clearly another case where the Eisenhower Administration picked the wrong horse, guessing that U Nu was through rand putting its bets on the 'Stable" faction and the army This led me to the question of aid. The U.S. gave a grant to N* Win's government, for a motor road and for some university buildings. I asked U Nu whether he would continue this policy of accepting ecoromic aid. He answered that he would go through with the projects that e Win had started, and honor the commitment. But as a broad policy he still stuck with his old position, which we had discussed when I was in Rangoon five years ago—loans, yes; aid. no. Behind this, I should guess is the old fear that to take aid is to be-' come vulnerable to American pressures, and to swerve from the nonalignment position which U Nu holds along with his good friend Nehru. Perhaps there is also the fear that it would invite reprisals from the Communist powers. It is worth noting, however, that the Chinese Communists offered to settle their boundary' dispute with Ne Win. and made the deal with him even though he had shown his leaning toward the U.S. SOMETIMES IN WORLD HISTORY there is a local or national, struggle which also has meaning for the larger world scene. This happened when Gandhi led the movement for Indian independence and developed a technique and philosophy of global scope. Is it happening ;..o be broadened into the language of humanity, lest the democracy for which we strive in life become the democracy of death. (TMe i* a Copyright Column) Continued from Pa#e 1-A his wearing a Naai armband and a red-painted Nazi helmet. The youth fled from the scene after he threw one of two fire bombs at the synagogue. He told police that, when congregants came running out. he started shooting in their general direction. Talter Hunt, his step father, helped police and FBI agents find the youth. The youth told police he had been interested in the Nazi movement since he was in the seventh grade He said he had had an argument with a Jewish boy. He also admitted painting a swastika on a Gad-den store several months ago. The Circuit solicitor said that the youth told of approaching tne synagogue with two bombs. He In one and threw it. When it failed to go through the window, he dropped the other one and started to flee to a cab he had parked nearby. It was at this point that congregants began to pour out and the youth kept shooting until his rifle jammed. The cab was found abandoned later. In it wore a Nazi helmet, a semi-automatic 21-caliber rifle, a hunting knife, a can of gasoline and a bundle of rags. The Circuit Solicitor said Hunt "tooii right proud of what ho did." Ho also said there wore no immediate plan* to give the youth a psychiatric examination and that he would bo held in the county jail for 8M time being. Earlier. Gov. John Patterson of Alabama had issued a statement declaring he was "shocked" by the "outrageous" act and that he want%  ed it -clearly understood that this state will not tolerate lawless Prts and mob violence in any form." The guest speaker at Temple Beth Israel here Friday night was Rabbi Alfred Goodman, spiritual leader of Temple Israel at Columbus. Ga.. which was painted with swastikas last year. A teen ager was later found guilty of the vandalism. Meanwhile more than 100 crosses were burned along road sides in another section of Alabama and dozens of crosses were burned across South Carolina. A hooded man told Highway Patrolman Roy Jemison here that the cross-burntags were originally scheduled for Friday night, the night a boy threw a Molotov cocktail at a synagogue and shot two members of the Gadsden congregation. Here, as well aa throughout South Carolina, hooded members of the Ku Klux Klan circulated freely in many towns the last two nights. Calhoun County Sheriff Roy Snead, here, reported he haa questioned about 12 men. There have been no arrest* in connection with the burning of the crosses. The I CoagrtgafJOMol Sedtr Temple Zamora will hold a congregational Seder Tuesday evening, Apr. 12. at the Temple. Officiating will be Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitz and Cantor Meyer Gisser. ISRAEL HISTADRUT COMMITTEE of GREATER MIAMI invites you to attend The THIRD SEDER CELEBRATION Fontainebleau Hotel SATURDAY, APRIL 16 6:30 P.M. Dinner Strictly Kosher THE DISTINGUISHED RABBI YAAKOV G. ROSENBERG CHAIRMAN OF THE THIRD SEDER CELEBRATION Proudly presents The HONORABLE YAACOV MORRIS CONSUL OF ISRAEL as the GUEST SPEAKER and CANTOR CHARLES S. KODNER to chant the inspirational services PLEASE PHONE RESERVATIONS CHAIRMAN Mrs. Harriet Green HI 3-2984 or Histadrut Office JE 8-8037 NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS | DR. CHARLES H. INSLER DENTIST Announces the Opening of His Office for the Practice of GENERAL DENTISTRY 444 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD MIAMI BEACH 40, FLORIDA Telephone JE 8-7798 DISTRIBUTED IV PALM IIISI mill TOIIS. IXC. 373 NE. 61st STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA



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Friday. April 1, 1960 *Jewist fk>ridt/an Page 7-A 1 $500 Million Bonn Credit for Israel? JERUSALEM—(JTA)—A special Israel delegation will soon leave for West Germany to open negotiations in connection with the $500 million credit promised to Prime Minister Ben-Gurion by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, according to reports by Israeli correspondents who accompanied the Premier on his trip to United. StaLei-aixl Britain. Premier Ben Gurion's private ??***> ****" P^ *LM1 culture. de~l.pm.nt pr^ct,. not return to Israel with the Premier was to fly to Cologne to brief Ambassador Eliezer Shinar, head of Israel's Mission in West Germany, on the outcome of the BenInchMling large scale develop n>*nt plans for the Negev, rbe corrw^p^fiBwtvTs reported. The bank of the West German Gurion-Adenauer meeting in New trade unions and cooperative plans Planning a Young Judea pageant, "From Slavery to Freedom," are (left to right) Mrs. Allied Karg, co-chairman, Zionist Youth Commisssion, I. Dickman, representative of the Zionist Organization of America; Rabbi David Herson, coordinator, Zionist Youth Commission, and Reuben Guberman, pageant director. Some 750 members of Young Judea will take part in the production scheduled here for the first week in June. 7 W. Germans Sentenced For Anti-Semitic Actions York last week. The WOO,000,000 credits wovld be made available to Israel, at the annual rat* of $9 < M0,fl0, as long-term loans and direct investments for maritime and agrito invest funds in housing construction in Israel, David Tanne. director of the Labor Ministry's housing division, meanwhile revealed here this week. I Tanne recently returned from the United States, where he headed a delegation of Israeli contractors negotiating American investment potentials, reported details of the commitment to principle received by the delegation from a group of American businessmen and contractors. As a result of that commitment, the Israeli contractors will receive a loan of $2,500,000 for private housing while the government will get $9,500,000 for government housing schemes and commercial centers. The American investors will lend the money at nine percent to a special mortgage bank now being formed here, Tanne said BONN—(JTA)—Six men and a woman received jail sentences and heavy fines for anti-Semitic acts in West Germany during the last weekend, according to reports received at Government headquarters here. In two other instances, both in the State of Schleswig-Holstein, the State Minittry of Education has received complaints from parents who accused teachers and courts of being too harsh against pupils charged with anti-Semitic acts. Among these convicted of elanderizing Jews were Anton Piass, a 47 year-old watchmaker, of Minden, sentenced to four monthts in jail plus a fine; a 84-year-old truck driver in Manhcim, sentenced for three months; a carpenter at Bad Nauheim, sentenced to eight months' imprisonment; a laborer and a forester, at Bad Nauheim, sentenced to two months and four months, respectively; and a housewife at Steinheim, fined 0 marks. In Heneu, a 4.Vy*r-e4d l aborer was sentenced to two months in jail for yelling at a Jewish bar owner that "since Hitler forgot to kill yov, I wHI do It new." Tha laborer, Ernest Krebs, before the Hanao Jury Court that he had been intoxicated, but Judge A. Gatitche said "severe punishment" was needed as a deterrent to others. At Launburg, in Schleswig-Holstein, parents complained that a high school principal 'unjustly" caused the arrest of a 15-year-old boy caught painting the swastika on the walls of the school building. At Wetalar, in the same State, a 12 year old boy was sentenced in juvenile court to detention, after being caught scribbling on a shop window the words "8S is Fine." The boy's parents claimed the letter SS stood for the name of his girl friend, Susanna Schmidt, and not for the initials of the Hitler security police. However, the court threw out the complaints, after ascertaining that the boy's mother had been a schoolmate of the late Josef Goebbels. Temple Sinai Stdw Temple Sinai of North Miami will hold a Seder for the first time Monday evening, Apr. 11. Traditional dinner will be served at the 6:30 p.m. function. House Amends Foreign Aid Bill Continued from Page 1-A principles. Reference to the Agriculture Act indicated that the committee had in mind Arab anti-Israeli discrtmi-j nations like the one requiring that] ships bringing the United States! agricultural surpluses to Arab ports must be vessels that do not trade in Israeli ports. The amendment had been originally submitted by Rep. Leonard Farbstein of New York. The measure was co-sponsored in the committee by another member of the Foreign Affairs group. Rep. Wayne Hays, of Ohio. Both are Democrats. GOLFERS OOtF CLUBS HeMWBPrT9d RVe"*PPVef Kttlwt SeUtT rest Service fartery OeatBy OOtF SMOiS Special Purchase $19 95 MerTs Qluv elk, fully feather lilted. '•lack A White — Brt>wn, Black. Sites 7-12. Compare With finest 135.00 Golf Shoes. e o e MM todies' evr ttees-SUJO Red and whit*, blue and white, brown and white. e • e Large assortment of bags, head covers, golf sorts, gelt clubs, gadgets, wearing apparel, stc. "tVfWHINe MR TNC 09UUT f> nccc 1423 P0NCE wrra CORAL GARUS Immediate attention given clubs mailed In for repairs. ^^ f^BBBBaj 'THE POT*r, nf COOV *IPIT ( VimJih rttNEiV CLU1 41 j LIOUOR DEPARTMENT STORES Largest .Selection of Kosher Goods For Passover ASK FOR YOUR FREE HAGGADAHS E9EE DELIVERY A BOTTLt OR A CASE HAGGADAH THIS PASSOVER SERVE ISRAEL WINES Abe Available at Seme Prise AlQUri HAUT-SAUTERNES UAKMCL SACRAMENTAL GRAPE -MAleAGA Ko.h.r BURGUNDY HOCK CONCORD s GRAPE ProaWd WINE •net Bottled in Israel 13.95 case of 12 SHAPIRO'S MEHD (HRirRyWirte) 99 FIFTH MAMSaitWITZ and M0GEN DAVID KOSHER PASSOVER WINE $129 FIFTH KOSHER FOR PASSOVER UNDER SUPERVISION OF The Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth of Florida RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR White Rock Beverages BOTTLED BY SOUTHERN BEVERAGES, INC. 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Page 8-A vJewisii ihrUkun Friday. April 1, I960 At PTA meeting of the seven branches of the Hebrew High School of the Bureau of Jewish Education. Left to right are Herbert Berger, principal and assistant director of the Bureau; Conner Views Prime Importance Of Agriculture Post Probably no post in the Governor's cabinet has such wide day-today impact upon the daily life and well-being of the public in Florida as that of the Commissioner of Agriculture, whom the voters will soon be asked to select because of the retirement of Nathan Mayo, the incumbent, according to Doyle Conner, candidate for the vacated post. "The powers, duties and functions of this office, which pays $17,500 annually and is filled for a D0YU CONNflt four-year term, reaches not only, into Florida's ranching, farming,''^ such issueg „ regulating agridairying, citrus-raising and other __„_ agricultural pursuits, but into far**• •* t0 ,h fff flung corners of everybody's life, assuring the fanner he is getting Whether it's the car you drive, the i proper ingredients in feed and ferlipstick you use, the quality and t uu^r, regulation of weights and price of the food you eat, the welmeasuresregu alion of. ga seune fare of the school children, the •"! ,. taxes you pay. your health or even content, inspection of gasoline the economic stability of your job, f pumps for accuracy, surveillance the Commissioner of Agriculture l 0 f pure foods—''the general assurMenachem Roth, instructor; Barbara Toback, Mrs. Frank Toback, Louis Toback, and Dr. Heizl Klepfisz, instructor. 12 Organizations Cleared To Raise Funds for Israel NEW YORK — (JTA) — A list funds for Israel's immigration abUf organizations authorized to con-] sorption and colonization product public fund raising camgrams: paigns for the benefit of Israel in| American Committee for the the 1960*1 campaign year was reWeizmann Institute of Science, leased this week by the Jewish American Friends of the Hebrew Agency's committee on control. University, America Israel Culand authorization of campaigns, tural Foundation, American Red The committee, which coordinates Mogcn David for Israel (memberfund-raising for Israel in this counsn ip campaign only), American Iry, was established in 1949 under Technion Society, Federated Counthc auspices of the Jewish agency c j| 0 f Israel Institution. Hidassah, and includes representatives of the Jewish National Fund (traditionUnited Jewish Appeal and of the a i collections), Mizracht Women's Council of Jewish Federations organization. National Committee and Welfare Funds. | for Labor Israel, Pioneer Women Since its inception, the commitand Women's League for Israel tee has served as a clearing house'(New York area). Authorization of for information and clarification! a campaign does not imply its enabout appeals addressed to Amerdorsement by the Jewish Agency, ican Jews by charitable or educa-1 tional institutions in Israel either directly or through their American representatives. Over the years, communities, American Jewish organizations and individuals have looked to the committee for guid, ance in dealing with these reM. Tony Sherman, architect, has q ues t s announced that J. Samuel Garrison Architect Names Administrator will be associated as business administrator for M. Tony Sherman & Associates, architectural and engineering firm. Garrison resigned from the Sottile Banking Group as director of public relations and advertising of the seven banks, handling all of the community and overall public relations programs for the corporation's diversified holdings. Prior to his association with the Sottile Group, Garrison was assistant vice president of the Central Bank and Trust Co. of Miami. Before coming to the Miami area, he resided in Philadelphia, and In releasing its list of authored agencies for tho 196041 campaign year, based on a review and analysis of financial statements and promotional activities of those organisations, the committee emphasized that the backlog of unmet immigrant needs in Israel makes it more imperative than ever to assure priority for the United Jewish Appeal and for community welfare funds raising funds on its behalf and to coordinate fundraising for Israel throughout tho United States. The following 12 organizations received authorization contingent Marger Names Campaign Mgr. Edwin Marger, of Miami Beach, has named Irving Schatzman, president of Miami Beach chapter of B'nai B'rith and past president of the Miami Beach Apartment House Assn., as his campaign manager. Marger, an attorney, is a candidate for Justice of tho Peace, Fifth District, an oifice which he describes as the "Court of First Resort for many of our citizens." Marger, a 1953 graduate of the I University of Miami law school, j is married and has three children. At present, he is conducting his political campaign from his law offices at 763 Arthur Godfrey rd. Community Seder Scheduled was 'associated with" Rad^SUtTo'n* | o n ,h ir PW** to 8 v Parity to at C T Xeth t Israel'cerder on MonWPEN as sales and commercial I the United Jewish Appeal as the day nig^at, Apr. 11, starting at • manager. I major source, of philanthropic p.m. ance," Conners clarified, "that the public is getting a dollar's worth for his dollar." i The 31-year-old candidate's tenure as Speaker of the House in 1957 saw the expansion of tho Florida junior college program and public school system, alleviation of some double sessions, and the introduction of the teacher incentive plan. In 1959, Conner was appointed a has a hand in it," Conner ex-., plained. Conner was recently honored at a breakfast meeting here, where he was greeted by former Mayor of Miami Beach Kenneth Oka, Councilman Wolfie Cohen, and Miami Beach attorney Lloyd L. Ruskin, who is also his campaign manager. Conner, a past national president of the Future Farmers of America, and who is active in farming and ranching in Starke. maintains; member of the seven-man race rean insurance office in Miami. AI lations committee of the Florida former Speaker of the Florida Legislature, which voted down the House of Representatives, Conner i last resort bill and moved to keep < is presently a representative of the state's school system functionBradford county, having served ten >ngyears in the State Legislature. Conner was aIso jnv0 ved in eg "It must be understood,' Cona[ ners said, "that as a member of the Governors cabinet, the Com-1 restricted hotels. During the last missioner of Agriculture also last session, he introduced a bill votes on issues affecting penal, imposing penalties on persons mental and educational institu-! p aying telephone hoaxes in the lions, as well as a whole gamut of business issues coming before the ^nam-ting or attemp lng dyna cabinet." miting of public institutions and And, within his own jurisdiction, houses of worship. AN ANNOUNCEMENT TO OUR FRIENDS AND POLICYHOLDERS It is a pleasure to announce the appointment of Harold A. levin as an Agency Associate in the Waller M. Pierca Agency of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company in Miami. His past experience includes public accounting and six years with WTVJ, Channel 4 as an account executive. HAROLD A. LEVIN Wilh (he exlen ive utming which Mr. levin has undergone, together with the complete facilities of the WAITER M. PIERCE AGENCY in estate planning, pension trust and profit sharing plans and all I types of group insurance he will be qualified to provide competent service I for all your life insurance needs. SOUTH MIAMI BRANCH OFFICE: Suite No. 203 5940 S.W. 73rd St. Phone MO 6-8575 WALTER M. PIERCE AOENCY of the MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 2445 West Flegler Street Miami 35, Florida Phone NEwton 3 9511 5 &4 JZittU fS/ace.. on tlie


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Friday. April 1, 1960 JetvlsliFkxMian Page 9-A Mrs. Louis Cole, president of the Junior Auxiliary of the Jewish Home for the Aged, and Judge Irving Cypen, president of the Home, congratulate each other at dedication last week of the new Junior Auxiliary Day Care Center at Douglas Gardens, which was made possible by funds from the Auxiliary. In the day care program, applicants on the approved waiting list and others will be able to spend all or part of the day at the Home, having their meals and participating in all phases of the Home's varied program for its residents. Aged Home Slates Annual Meeting Judge Irving Cypen, president of the Jewish Home for the Aged, announced this week that the home will hold its 15th annual membership meeting on Sunday, Apr. 10, 2:30 p.m., at Douglas Gardens. The public is invited. In addition to major reports describing the progress, needs and future plans of the Home, the program will feature the premiere showing of a new sound movie of the history of the Home made by the staff of WTJV-TV. Miami, and the; dedication of the Tanya Simon Memorial Rose Garden. The late Mr*. Simon bequeathed $40,000 to the; Home. The Home is a major beneficiary agency of the Greater Miami Jewish' Federation and the United Fund of Dade County. Donor Affair Scheduled Donor affair of Tifereth Israel Sisterhood will be held at the Deauville hotel on Saturday evening, Apr. 9. Dr. Wolf son in Talk Dr. Abraham Wolfson will dis! cuss Israel Prime Minister BenGurion's address at Brandeis Unii versity before a meeting of the j Spinoza Outdoor Forum on Wed] nesday evening at 11th st. and Ocean ct. The Forum will be repeated on Friday evening at the Blackstone hotel. LONG DISTANCE MOVING to all points in the country ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE \rKMI.II.VA.\ LINES, I \ 2136 N.W. 24th Avenue NE 5-44M MIAMI Civic Orchestra Concert Sunday Barbara. Rostron will play the Grieg Piano Concerto at. the Sunday concert to be presented by the Miami Beach Civic Orchestra in Miami Beach Auditorium. The 19-year-old, formerly of St. Louis, Mo., was a piano' prodigy at seven, and has been playing concerts ever since.. This is her second appearance with the Civic Orchestra. The concert begins at 8:15 p.m., is the seventh in the 1950-00 series of eight monthly presentations October through May under the direction of Barnett Breeskin. Program will also include Overture to Semiramide, Rossini; Tales of the Vienna Woods, J o h a n Strauss; and 1812 Overture, Tschai kowsky. Miami Beach Councilman Kenneth Oka, orchestra president, will be commentator. GOLDEN PRESS BUSINESS FORAAS GENERAL PRINTING OFFSET SALES BOOKS Laundry Lists Our Specialty 2918 S.W. 8th STREET Phone HI 6-2020 Complete and Dependable Title Service IAMI TITLE & Qkttact Co. 84 YIARS OP TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY M ESCROWS ABSTRACTS TITLE INSURANCE TIM* taMrwK* PalkiM • EMM* CMy THIt towraace Ca. Capita/, Smpim* I ft ficMd ss.eoe.eee 124 eJ 12* SNtMUND AKADf TEUTHO* J* MW (AUo Known As 114 and 1 Seurlty Trut Company %  log.) Harrison Reveals Candidacy Here M. R. "Moe" Harrison, sr., pioneer Miamian and board chairman of the M. R. Harrison Construction Corporation which he founded, is a candidate for the Metro Commission of Dade County in District 3. All Dade county residents will vote for this and four other commission posts in the May 3 election. Harrison moved here from Dot Moines, la., in 1925. His company helped build Biscayne blvd. and scores of streets here. He is a member of the board of deacons of Westminister Presby-i terian Church, is vice president of the Greater Miami YMCA, and vice president of the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind. He is a mem-, ber of the Miami Rotary Club and' of the Miami-Dade County Cham-1 ber of Commerce. Formerly, he served as director of Disaster Relief for the Dade chapter of the American Red' Cross and was, for many years, | Scout Master of Troop 47. He is past president of the local chapter of the Associated General Contractors of America and of the Miami Builders' Exchange. Harrison holds a BS degree in mechanical engineering from Iowa State Colleoe, is a mambar of Tau Beta' Pi, honorary engineering fraternity, and Phi Kappa Phi honorary scholastic fraternity. During World War I, he was a captain, commanding Battery F, 17th Field Artillery, and was decorated with the Purple Heart, Silver Star, French Croix de Guerre, M. K. HARRISON and War Service Medal, with four battle clasps. Later he qualified as a naval aviator, and was a captain, commanding the first Marine Reserve squadron to be established at Opa-locka. Harrison and his wife, Helen, live at 640 Sebal Palm rd., Bay Point. Thty have two sons, M. R. Harrison, jr., now president of the M. R. Harrison Construction Corporation and John C. Harrison, vice president and chief engineer with the family firm. Book Review To Aid Students Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae Assn. of Greater Miami will present a book review Saturday to raise funds for the Alpha Epsilon Phi book scholarship fund. Mrs. I. M. Weinstein,_ patron' s of Alpha Eta chapter, will be (he reviewer, and the affair will take place in the sorority room of the local chapter at the Pan-Hellenic House on the University of Miami campus. Proceeds will be used to provide books for needy university students. Last year, the association provided six such scholarships. Tickets may be obtained from Mrs. Bart Cohen and Mrs. David Rifas. Sholom Aleichem Volume NEW YORK—A centennial volume of writings by Sholom Aleichem, containing 19 stories and a one-act play, has been translated into English for the first time by Curt Leviant, son of the proprietors of the New Ambassador hotel, Lakewood, N.J. It is being published by Thomas Yoseloff, Inc., 11 E. 36th st., New York. joel meyer, ARCHITECT AND ray e. molina, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER WISH TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF OFFICES Suite 210, 1090 N.E. 79th Street MIAMI, FLORIDA phone PL 4-0811 for a purpose BUILD FUTURE SECURITY The quickest way to a new home, car, moat, frftirtifnm and family security is through a Dade Federal Special Purpoee Sonnet Account Al Dame Federal there's a specially designed savings account to reach your goal in record time. Your record—your Dade Federal Savings passbook. The time—whatever limits you set. And—to kelp your account along— Dade Federal currendy adds a generous four percent dividend annually to your savings dollar. Saw a* muck as you like and as often as you like. So. speed your way to a special goal of your own m* a Dade Federal Special Purpose Savings Account FREE TRANSFER OF YOUR FUNDS FROM ANY POINT IN THE U. S. A. .. Dade Federal Makes No Charge For This Service. Open Or AM To Your D.d. Fdral Savings Account By April 11th and lor. Dfvidoodt from T r < kfll ANNUM % %  DtVIOtNO t*I Dade Federal t/AviNcs and LOAN ASSOCIATION oi MIAMI lOSIPH M UPTQN. President 5 CONVtNIINT OfFIC€S TO SMVt YOU •Mi nm— avMuatt SOURCES EXCEEO 147 MILLION DOLLARS



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Page 10-A fJewisti narkMatJ Friday, April 1. I960 Center Day Camps Now Registering Boys and girls of elementary school age may now enroll for cither of the four summer day camps sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Community Center in various sections of Dade county, it was announced by Emanuel Tropp, assistant director. More than 500 children between the ages of 5'^ and 11 were served last summer. At least one parent must accompany the children for an individual interview at either of the branch locations. Day camp programs will be conducted this summer at the following branches: Miami Branch, 450 SW 16th ave., Miami Beach Branch, 1536 Bay rd., North County Branch. 1436 NE 6th ave.. Southwest Branch, 7215 Coral Way. All four camp* will open on Monday, June 20th, and will continue for eight weeks until Aug. 12. The program i* eonducted Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parents may enroll their children for the entire season or for each of two four-week ported*. At the Miami and Miami Beach Branches, a preschool group i* available for children from 4>/j to 5Vi yoar* of age. All campers are assigned to Becently-installed officers of Men's Club of Kneseth Israel Congregation. Rear (left to right) are Walter Lebowitz, president, and David Eisenstein, vice president. Front (left to right) are Max Hecht, secretary; and Israel Teitch, treasurer. Economist to Talk Here "A Spotlight on the EconomyToday and Tomorrow," will be the subject of an address by Dr. G. Rowland Collins, of New York City, here Apr. 6 at a luncheon hosted by the J. 1. Kislak Mortgage Corporation of Florida. More than 300 business and financial leaders have been invited to hear Collins' talk. He is dean emeritus of the Graduate School of Business Administration at NYU, and a public governor of the American Stock Exchange. The noted economist spoke before a similar luncheon group hosted by Kislak here last year. JOHNNY SEZ: Don't throw your money away by giving away your good USED CLOTHING and SHOES (men's, women's, e hU dee n ). The same for your TV's radio*, electrical appliances, eUehes, pots, pans, rugs, linens, drapes, bedspreads, blankets, etc. "Johnny pays highest prices in. Miami!" — REMEMBER ALL CLOTHING AND SHOES MUST BE IN 1st CLASS CONDITION, AND OP THE LATEST STYLES ONLY — NOTHING TORN, FADED. DISCOLORED OR OUT OF TODAY'S STYLE — SOME OF OUR PRICES: Men's Suits $1.00 up to S* 00 Men's Pants 25c up to ta.00 Men's Shoes 75c up to Si.50 Men's Shirts 15c up to 35c FOR THE HOME Blankets. Quilts 25c to $2 00 Drapes. Bedspreads 50c to $3.00 LADIES LATE STYLE (onlv) Ladies' Dresses 26c up to $3.00 Ladies' Skirts 25c up to $1.00 Ladies' Sheet CSc up to $1.00 KIDDIES & Q.RLS Cotton Dresaes 10c to 50c Girls & Boys Shoes 10c to 75c We also pay for "non-playing" radios $1.00; 17" 21" table TV's. $3.00 to $5.00; 3 speed phonographs $2.00 to $3.00. In abort we pay good prices for everything else including "good" TV's, radios, irons, toasters, refrigerators, washing machines, ranges, etc. MING YOUR GOODS TO JOHNNY MILLIONAIRE 5327 N.W. 36th Ave. Miami NE 4-9275 Corner N.W. 54th Street OPEN 7 Days, 9 to 6, Weekly P.S. — We buy all "RUMMAGE and BAZAAR SALES" — with free pickup we pay 2Vic per lb. — You bring it to us, we pay 4c per lb. ATTENTION MANUFACTURERS WHOLESALERS & STOREKEEPERS WE BUY ANY LEFT OVER GARMENTS, CUT GOODS & PIECE GOODS Hialeah Officers installed Sunday Joseph Tepper was installed as chairman of the board and first vice president of Hialeah Reform Jewish Congregation by Rabbi Nathan Zwitman in ceremonies Sunday evening. Others installed were Murray Lipkowitz, second vice president; William Schwarzman, third vice president; Harriet Mann, recording secretary; Sunny Lever, corresponding secretary; David Goldberg, financial secretary; Murray Berger, treasurer. Board of directors includes Joseph Horowitz, Irwin Abrams, Robert Marshall, David Hirsch, Robert Lourie, and Arthur Horn.: Harry Berney was master of ceremonies at the function held at the congregation, 1150 W. 66th St., Hialeah. Monticello Opens Cash Campaign Congregation Monticello Park this week announced a $75,000 cash campaign to complete the building project now in progress for the erection of a new temple and religious school. "Present cash and mortgage eommiUnents are insufficient to complete the project," congregation officials declared, in announcing the new campaign. The drive will be ended May 8 at special cornerstone ceremonies. Construction commencement ceremonies are scheduled for Apr. 10 at the building site. Drew Pearson to Speak Drew Pearson, one of America's foremost news analysts, will make his second appearance in three years at the University of Miami on Friday with a lecture from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at 720 Dorm. The 62-yearold syndicated columnist will speak on "Is the United States Becoming a Second Rate Power?" His talk is part of the first annual Undergraduate Student Government Week ceremonies. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I KOSHER ZI0N m% n*t9m*mvtos e PEPPERED BEEF e LIVER SAUSAGE e FRANKFURTERS e CORNED BEEF e PASTRAMI • B0L06NA e SALAMI AT LEADING DELICATESSENS, SUPUMARKETS KOSHER ZI0N SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO 159 South Water Market, Chitege 8, Mlieeit EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR FLOR DA COASTLINE PROVISION CO., INC. 855 B.SCAYNE STREET. MIAMI BEACH PHONES: JE 8-6232, JE 8 6231 HERMAN PEARL PAT OEARR Adath Yeshurun Model Seder Temple Adath Yeshurun will hold a model Seder Sunday morning, Apr. 10, at the Unified bldg., 2300 NE 171st St., No. Miami Beach. : groups of their own age level, with I 12 to 15 campers in each group, i supervised by a senior counselor of college age or older, with the assistance of a junior counselor. A waterfront program ia conducted daily at various swimming pools, under the direction of Red %  Cross waterfront safety instructors. Each camp also has a full. time"Trrfs and crafts IftstflWrOTr j Other activities include athletics, l arts and crafts, nature lore, dramatics, singing, and games. The Center is an agency rece ving fi! nancial support from the Combined j Jewish Appeal and the United I Fund. South Florida District of The Zionist Organisation of America presents MISCHA ELMAN one o/ The World's Foremost Violinists nd LICIA ALBANESE Metropolitan Opera Prima Donna Soprano IN %+ CONCERT OHi Miami Beach Mium Trxts„ April 14, I960,8:38 P.M. Tickets: S280-$3.80-$4.80-$5.80 OB Salt At Srra-s Tkktt AfMy UII frsate* An.. Ml. ASSMM Waste C. lit sMnWa. C 1780 W Av*. CerMta's 1*W. KOSHER FOR PASSOVER UNDER SUPERVISION OF The Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth of Florida RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR MIDTOWN ^CLUB TRU-PRUIT BEVERAGES AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES Matter's Sunshine Kosher Market 436 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI SEACH IS UNDER THE STRICT SUPERVISION OF THE COMMUNITY VAAD HAKASHRUTH AND THE BETH DIN OF GREATER MIAMI Consisting of The Following Rabbis and Their Congregations Rabbi Louis lehrfield Rabbi Solomon Schiff Rabbi Tibor Stern Rabbi Louis Rottman Rabbi Herschell Savillo



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Friday. April 1. 1960 fJenisfi f/cridfian Page. 11-A Rabbis Flay Billy Rose Garden JERUSALEM — (JTA) — The nicipality by American theatrical Chief Rabbinate announced thisI producer Billy Rose, week its opposition to the projected Jerusalem sculpture garden de-l Following a meeting of the Chief signed to house the million-dollar; Rabbinate Council, a spokesman collection presented to the Mu-' for the body told the press that the project was "contrary to the spirit of Judaism and constitutes profanation of the name and character of the Holy City." The Chief Rabbinate called on the Jerusalem Municipality to frustrate the plan "before it is too late." The Municipality, which is the licensing authority for all construction in the city, has already an; proved the plan for the garden at the projected site. This was not i related, however, to the subsequent plan of the American proI ducer" to"~donate his Tatnous "coC lection of sculpture. Mill MOMS SKOP ribute to Rabbi ikop SoW Out l A complete sell-out of res,erva:>ns for the Temple Judea dinner tribute to honor Rabbi Morris Skop Sunday evening at the Unit Plaza hotel was announced [Meyer A. (Mike) Baskin, dinner lirman. Raskin said that no additional ervations are being accepted. said that "this enthusiastic rese on the part of hundreds of pie who wish to join in the ute to Rabbi Skop is truly gratisIbhi Skop will be honored for ko years as spiritual leader of Iplc Judea and for "ten years luts'.anding service to the con|ation, the community, and the of Israel." lest speaker will be Harry len, author of "Only in Amer' and "For 2c Plain." Entermmeut will be provided by Arik vie, popular Israeli singer and tor. wee-Touch-Nee [Tea a Favorite To those of us who can go back fond recollection to Seder night n grandfather's house, with all its varmth and eager excitement, its nelange of tastes and sounds and i r o m a s intimately associated lilh Passover in days gone by, here is one thing that still has he capacity to evoke nostalgic emories — the rich aroma of Bwee tcuch nee Tea flooding the oom with its fragrance. The holiday scene was never omplete without it. The little red in treasure chest nestled beside he gleaming brass Passover samvar. buffed to mirror brightness n honor of the holiday, and bubbing with the delicious brew that ivas a holiday tradition in the lome. Though for the most part the aulk tea that was so popular with lygone generations has given way n great measure to the teabag, Swee touch nee Tea still brews quick and full-bodied, flooding the cup or glass with hearty flavor. Swee touch nee Tea, strictly Kosher for Passover, is featured at all supermarkets, chains and independent food stores which carry a holiday line. Also available this Passover for the first time is Swee touch nee Instant offee, a dark and delicious brew hat brings roaster-fresh flavor. —S. T. tuto Officials : eted at Dinner A small dinner party was given y Nat Potamkin. vice president f the Vic Potamkin Chevrolet orp. of Miami Beach, to former; ssociates and their wives at the Beaux Arts apts. on 79th st. causeway on Saturday. Present at the party were Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Portman, manager of the Philadelphia branch; Mr. and Mrs. David Gutterlait, dealer in charge of the Newark branch; and Mr. and Mrs. David Bernstein, general manager of the Newark, N. I., branch. %  • %  %  • %  •>• FLY EL AL VIA GOODMAN'S MATZO (by entering Goodman's Passover Contest now!) Was ever a contest easier? To win that trip to Israel, tell us why you want to take it! Just finish the following statement in 25 words or less; "I want to visit Israel this year because..." Then send it to us with the little E! Al plane cut out from our Passover Matzo package. And, could be, the marvelous first prize in Goodman's Passover Matzo Contest is yours! A flying trip to Israel via El Al Airlines—two wonderful weeks for two, all expenses paid (there arc even stopover privileges in London and Paris! X Who ham't dreamed about it? How it would be to be in Tel Aviv. A glamorous city a little like Paris. With jts music and theater and kiosks and sidewalk cafes. Or to spend dazzling days in brilliant white Haifa. Or to wander through Jerusalem where even the stones are alive with history. Or how it would feel to spend a day at a kibbutz. Or visit Capernaum and the synagogue that has stood since Biblical days. Or watch the Israeli cowboys round up cattle, singing trail songs in Hebrew! From the Bible to Exodnt, people have been writing.about Israel for centuries. And now, just the few simple words you write could actually get you there! Don't wait. The rules are easy; the rewards are great. Second Prize is $1000; Third Prize, $500; 100 prizes of $10 each. In all. 103 good reasons why you should enter today! OVER 1Q0 BIG CASH PRIZES! Details on GOODMAN'S PASSOVER MATZO PACKAGES



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Pag* 12-A *Jeisti Flcrid&r Friday. April 1. I960 'i/mmmmm/mm IMWKK AND Mr sic By tk Singing String* KIM. All I III It S COIRT Tht TIP TOPPERS in tht CARRIAGE ClUB lliimii Springs Villas TU 8-4521 Art Brans, co-owner Qflie finest Snoods g'de finest SeMce FRIDAY NIGHT DINNERS OF TRADITIONAL EXCELLENCE! Served with Sacramental Wines and All the Trimmings, with Special Emphasis on Courtesy, for which the Monte Carlo is famous! MO* ^WEENSTEIN, Catering Mg. PHONE: UN 6-8721 ON THI OCEAN AT 63TH T. MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA Monte (oJifo RESORT HOTEL Coffee—And None Better NEW ELITE RESTAURANT Now Under New Management 203 N.E. 1 st Avenue Air-Conditioned "Where Friends Meet" HOME COOKING A SPECIALTY ""SPAGHETTI" mm Largest family Trait in Florida ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY Pearly Gait by Haf Pearl Student Body Elects Officers Spring elections of the student congregation of MontieeHo Park were recently completed, and a new slate has tak#n office. NAMES MAKE .NEWS: The popular and highly talented singer is repaying an old debt when he brings his "Evening With Harry Belafonte" into the Fojitainebleau on Apr. 10 at a benefit dinner foe the University of Miami medical school Eye Institute and Eye Bank. Its a return favor from Belafonte for the assistance he received from the Eye Institue after suffering a detached retina. Those are clever souvenirs Miami tenders visiting celebrities who are given keys to the city. In addition to the over-sized key, each male celeb receives a matching key tie clip. Forgot to ask what the gals get. Sheldon J. Schlessinger and Leonard Coleman working overtime for their candidate for State Legislature, Joe Manners. Sheldon and Leonard are co-chairmen for the Miami Beach campaign. Robert Grossman, Nautilus Junior High School ninth grader, recently received a trophy from Philip Brooks, head of the Nor-Isle Optimist Club, for winning an oratorical contest sponsored by that group. Young Grossman will represent his zone in the All-Optimist contest on Apr. 14 at Washington Federal Savings Auditorium on Normandy Isle. High school girls between 14 and 18 are invited to join the newlyformed Jaycee-Ette Debs, sponsored by Miami Beach Jaycees. Mrs. Esther Zavaloff is advisor and organizer, and to date the group, which was formed Jan. 8, has been most helpful with projects for the Jewish War Vets, Cerebral Palsy Telethon, and coming up, Kendall Home for Orphans. Hear that the new .!IM> room motel in the heart of Atlanta in which Beachite Seymour Siegel has a substantial interest, is doing the kind of turnaway business that most Miami Beach hotelmen would yearn to enjoy. Jerry Greene will moderate a program of state and local political candidates sponsored by North Shore B'nai B'rith Lodge on Apr. 4. Jack Wilson, prexy, is helping Greene. George Lefcoe. who soon gets a law degree at the U. of Miami, is slated to "clerk" in the office of E. Albert Pallot this summer. Assistant State's Attorney Sy Gelber busy as a beaver campaigning for "boss" Dick Gerstein's reelection and Doyle Carlton for governor. Joining the mothers-to-be "club" here is Joanne Lawrence, secretary in B'nai B'rith Youth office. -fc MOVIE CHIT-CHAT: Delighted to hear from Florida State Theatre's publicity and advertising chief, Howard Pettingill, that "Can-Can" is breaking records at the Sheridan Theatre, running far ahead of "Porgy and Bess" and equalling the figures of "Around the World in 80 Days." It all proves that critics don't have the final word. Most of the reviews in national publications did not treat the movie too kindly, although local reviewers had nothing but praise for the cast, topped by Frank Sinatra, Shirley MacLaine and Maurice Chevalier. Word-of-mouth is most praiseworthy, and the picture is light, frivolous and provides a field day for the accomplished talents of the sttars and supporting cast. What more can you expect from a musical that provides pure enjoyment from beginning to end? •* <* BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Glad to hear that even though George Engle will relnquish the Coconut Grove Playhouse, the delightful theatre will not be shuttered too long. Owen Phillips, the able director, hopes to have an announcement on a reopening date after "Two for the Seesaw" ends itts smash run. Our favorite supper club funnyman, Joe E. Lewis, is back at the Eden Roc. with co-star Georgia Gibbs. Tommy Sands is booked for the holiday there. Desi Arnai really had himself a ball when he stayed at the Lucerne. He was in the Club Chalet practically every night for a "walk on" part in "Havana Mardi Gras" with his long-time show biz pal, Diosa Costello. Local TV stations boasting about all the "new" films they've recently bought for their late shows. So far. with few exceptions, most of them are real "stinkers." For those they had to spend money??? TIPS ON TABLES: New "round the world" menu at Green Mansions Motel provides for enjoyable dining. Take the family. Prices are exceptionally moderate. Glad to hear that Maxim's is staying open all summer. Nice to have such a classy dining room catering to summer tourist trade, plus the many locals who don't have the time (they're so busy making a buck) during the regular season. Almost any night during the dinner rush you'll find a celebrity or) two enjoying the Cantonese cuisine at Fu Manchu. Just look at all those | famous names decorating the "celebrity chairs" there. Next time you take Junior to dinner at the Bonfire, don't miss the display of old and new-type firearms, including replicas of most of the rifles and pistols used by well-known frontier heroes. Kon Tiki off to a flying start under the management of able Huey Young. Its Polynesian cuisine has been evoking real raves from both visitors and local folk. The menu is "loaded" with mouth watering dishes, and even though you can't consume such a huge array at one sitting, you're sure to return again and again, to go from top to bottom. Try some of those exotic coconut and pineapple drinks, too. Ideal to accompany the South Seas style dining! semester will be Jeffrey Breslaw and Steven Weininger. Cantors are Billy Leff, Marvin Uss and Leonard Michael Segall. Gabbais are Ronna Lehman and Mark Haddad; shamash, Bart Levy, Andrew Ross. Jeffrey Sachs. Steven Shantzis. Lay leaders are president, Diane Keshlansky; vice president, Toby Cavell; secretaries, Michael Siegel and Marilyn Haddad; treasurer, Eli Levine; and hostesses, Judy SerriBg as f^MlTor the C W Wnig %  *! %  *••, SNwWtr M*dk -*-err y Lehman, and RooheHe Sachs. m\ m e l—mil ROVAL Piiim Mora Junior Ballet Group Rehearsing Thomas Armour, director of the Miami Ballet, has announced that the recently-revived Junior Com! pany will be directed by Renee Zintgraff. Miss Zintgratt has studied with Thalia Mara, Margaret Craske, Arthur Mahony and Charles Weidman. as well as local instructors George Milenoff and Armour. The Junior Company is now rehearsing for its spring performance Apr. 30 at Dado County Auditorium. "Pastorale" is the title of the ballet in four movements which Armour has choreographed for the young dancers. Robert Strasshurg, who conducts the Miami Youth Symphony, composed original music. The Youth Symphony will play for the Apr. 30 performance. STAR Dairy, V* & Fish Restaurant For the Holiday Season SERVING STRICTLY PASSOVER MEALS Breakfast Lunch & Dinners 841 Washington Ave. JE 1-9182 Open fo the Public A banquet every night. Served from 5:30 to 8:30 For Reservations Phone Norman N. Arrow JEfferson 1-7381 Collint Ave. off Lincoln Rd. i •* S 1. — OUR SPECIALTY — NICE, THICK, JUICY PRIME RIBS OF BEEF *3.95 -AND THI VfRY BEST IN TOWN! BANQUIT naurm Candlelight Inn till Commodore Pluxe Coconut Grove HENRY LEITSON, Mgr. •' THI BE! TIN mmn wow NOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS fOR PASSOVER SEDER SERVICES CONDUCTED BY CANTOR JULIUS ROSENSTEIN $15 Par Person for Both S.d.r Niflhti 1141 Washington Ave. Beautifully Catered Affairs Call JE 4 2655 MmM* 9ncomparab!e Trench Cuisine" 9516 HARDING AVE. > MIAMI BEACH UN 6 -1654 AT THE PIANO RAJR DAVID LEROUX OPEN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m. "THE ARISTOCRAT Of KOSHER RESTAURANTS" CATERING FOR ALL OCCASION* Air-Cond. UN 6-6043 'reefer* Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth The Royal Hungarian RESTAURANT "^.l & CATERERS fOR THE fINEST IN KOSHER CUISINE 731 Washington Avenue, Telephone JE 8-5401 HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON GORDON and PONT *£ &f •* K0SHIR CATERERS le#W free* sen d'ee.vr., fe e cempfef 170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR f-799* Undtr Supervision of United Kashrus Association of Greater Miami OPEN HOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTION* YOU'RE CORDIALLY INVITED TODAY TO NICK & ANTOINETTE'S RESTAURANT Cucina Casalinga "Itoal Italian Horn* looking" • WINE and BEER # FREE PARKING 1624 N.E. 1st Court Phone FR 1-9375 (Between N.E. lt Ave. & 2nd Ave., North el 16th St.) I Serving Daily from 6 p.m.—Sun. from 4 p.m. |



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iFriday. April 1, 1960 Jenis* rkridfii&n Page 13-A —* Archaeologists to Dig for Scrolls Leaders of the Brandeis University Club of Greater Miami respond with enthusiasm to ihe announcement of their president. Dr. Stanley Frehling (seated second from left), that a 12th anniversary dinner celebration for Brandeis will be held Sunday, Apr. 24, at the Diplomat. Sharing the speaker's table with Dr. Frehling are (left) first vice president Harold Turk, life membership chairman Ernest Janis, and scholarship chairman Paul R. Gordon. Looking on are Morris J. Goldin, Robert Green, Jack Leonard, Bernard Traub, Sidney Schwartz, Harold Thurman, Harry Zukernick, Albert I. Jacobs, Sidney Wasserman. Jack W. Rabinovitch. Sol C. Shaye, Elkin Smith, Gus R. Roberts, and Nathan Kushin. The group will serve as a steering committee to implement plans for the milestone anniversary. Monthly Rummage Sale 27,h ave an
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 1, 1960

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01626

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 1, 1960

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:01626

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
"Oewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
{Volume 33 Number 14
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 1, 1960
Four Sections Price 204
Ike Vowed Assist If Israel Attacked
President Stipulates U.S.
I'No Provocation' Condition;
[Premier Reported Satisfied
CHOWDS CKltT KtTUKNING PRIM MINISTU PACt 9<
TEL AVIV(JTA>The left-wing labor newspaper Lamerhav said
iday that during the recent Eisenhower-Ben-Gurion meeting in Wash-
iwi President Eisenhower reiterated his promise that the United
ts would come to the assistance of Israel in the event the Jewish
! was attacked. + -----------------------------------------
Btnitr Ben-Gurion, the paper ported. The report emphasized
Hed. conveyed this informa- that Stalin Mark III and T-54 tanks
[to the Cabinet at its meeting were obtained by the UAR from
ly. The paper said that the the Soviet Union.
lent had made American aid
tioral on "no provocation"
[Israel's side.
According to the newspaper,
Continued en Peg* 1S-A
Vr.
1
this promise is not new
been given on different
s by the State Department
clarations that the United
wculd oppose any attempts
the status in the Middle
force, the paper said that j
fck-Gurion seemed to have'
considerable importance
act that the promise was
fairectly by Mr. Eisenhower
Jly to the Israeli Prime
mm MINISTtK JMACMIUAN
. reject! uii pita
'A GREAT INJUSTICE'
New York Times report-
Handay from Cairo that the
MM Union offered last week
stect the United Arab Re-
's borders in case of an at-
but that President Nasser
UAR declined the offer
ground that ran contrary
policy of not joining alii-
"It was understood that
vjection of the Soviet offer
Bt mean Mr. Nasser was
iling to accept more arms
Moscow," the Times report
ited.)
1 wants Britain to furnish
Centurian tanks which, in
* of Israel's defense forces,'
ble of counter balancing
the United Arab Republic,
ly Telegraph meanwhile re-
Macmillan Evasive About
Discussion With Ben-Gurion
LONDON(JTA)Prime Minister Harold Macmillan evaded going
into details in the House of Commons this week on his talk with Israel's
Premier David Ben-Gurlon.
The British Prime Minister limited himself to telling the members
of the House of Commons that Mr.+ -
Ben-Gurion was spending a few
CROSS BURNINGS FLARE IN SOUTH
Gadsden Community
Returning to Normal
As Bomber is Arrested
GADSDEN, Ala. (JTA)
The Temple Beth Israel here, at
which a fire bomb was thrown last
Friday night by a 16-year-old
youth, Sunday conducted its activ-
ities on a normal basis, with its
Sunday school enjoying full attend-j
ance. The attack was condemned |
here in sermons preached in a
number of churches by Christian "tted throwing the fire bomb at
ministers. I tne synagogue and shooting at con-
,.Tk ._. -rt i,irK ,__,i:' gregants, was under arrest today
in TSL-n" R.hhi Zh n tWO C0UntS 0f 3SSaU,t aDd ESS
in Gadsden, Rabbi Saul Rubin, __j__ ,,. ,. ,. t
spiritual leader of the Reform T.^^^ E5 .H*
Temple, told the Jewish Tele-p Passioneiy hated Jews,
graphic Agency. "There is abso-. Two members of the congrega-
lutely no panic whatever among tion were injured, one critically,
our people, or, for that matter, in in the hit-and-run attack at the syn-
the entire community. There is \ agogue where 180 congregants
only watchfulness against any were present. Alvin Lowi was shot
possible recurrance of such a in the hand, and Alan Cohen was
been deeply shocked by this oc-
currence. Public officials, press
and the Christian Churches hero
have assured us of their sym-
pathy and of their determina-
tion that nothing like this shall
ever happen here again."
The 16-year-old youth, who ad-
shameful manifestation.
"We have had marvelous re-
lationships with the entire com-
munity," the rabbi declared,
"end the general community, as
the Jewish community here, has
ol
days in England on a private vis-
it. "He called on me, at his re-
quest, and we discussed problems
of the Middle East and the world,"
Mr. Macmillan stated.
Laborite Dingle Foot demand- |
ed to know whether the question
of British supply of arms to Is-
rael had been discussed, and
whether n assurance of such a
supply had been given to Mr.
Ben-Gurion. In reply, Mr. Mac-
millan said be, was standing on
the answer to a similar question
Continued on Page 2-A
House Unit Amends Foreign
Aid Bill to Check Arab Blockade
-G Reports to Cabinet
Fruitful Results of Trip
riculture Trade and Assistance
Act, the principles shall be ap-
plied as the President may de-
termine. The measure calls upon
the President to report on mea-
sures taken to implement the
Continued on Page 7-A
hit in the leg and chest Cohen was
operated on and listed as in 'fair
condition." (
Police and FBI agents moved
quickly after the attack, in which
it was at first reported that
three youths were involved.
However, Hubert Jackson, jr.,
alias Jerry Hunt, the confessed
attacker, said he had been alone.
Circuit Solicitor Charles Wright
said that Jackson, a high school
junior, would bbe charged with
murder if Cohen died. The youth
was an immediate suspect because
I he had been telling friends he
j planned just such an attack be-
. cause Jewish youth at the high
I school had been complaining about
Continued on Page 6-A
of their parley, the official com-
munique said A complete black-
out has been imposed on t h o
subjects to be discussed at the
m*#"n9' j "wage economic warfare against
Meanwhile, Mr. Ben-Gurion, ad-;other nations assisted under this
dressing the Mapei Party conven-|Act, including such procedures as
tion last weekend, told the mem- boycotts, blockades, or the restric-
bers of his party: "I can say with tion of the use of international wa
IUSALEM (JTA) Prime
ster David Ben Gurion Sun-
freported to the Cabinet on his
in Washington and London,
[replied to questions by mem-
| of the Cabinet.
the same time, the Defense
Istry issued an official an
acement disclosing that its
ssentatives in f iye Western:tne utmost satisfaction that I met terways."
ntries have been summoned
to participate in a four-day
ference and consultations on
Defense Ministry's activities
Dad.
Prime Minister Ben Gurion,
o is also Defense Minister,
i Deputy Defense Minister
imon Peres, who also return-
recently from an urgent mis-
m in Europe, will meet with
e representatives in the course
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
House Foreign Affairs Committee
adopted this week an amendment
| to the Foreign Aid Bill, calling
; upon the President to ensure that
1 no foreign aid given by the United
: States endangers the principle of
freedom of navigation. In the form
of a Joint Resolution, the amend
ment would express outright Uni-
ted United States opposition to
Arab blockade and economic re-
strictions in the Suez Canal and
elsewhere.
Declaring that America's "tra-
ditional" policy of freedom of the
seas "is presently being violated,"
and stating that the United States
"deplores such violations." the WASHINGTON(JTA>Details of a massive flow of Soviet arms
amendment declared it the senses into Arab states were revealed this week on a Senate speech by Sen.
of Congress that the purposes of j jacob r. Javits, New York Republican. He told the Senate he had ob-
the Mutual Security Act would be ,ained Administrations statistics revealing that about three-fourths of
world"endangered iTnations re*! aU Soviet bloc miUtary "ssistance to non-Communist states-S580.000.000
ceiving assistance' under the Act out a total of $780,000,000 went to the United Arab Republic. Iraq,
and Yemen, from 1955 to 1959.
The largest recipient of Soviet*-------------------------------------------
Javits Lists Vast Soviet
Arms Sales in Middle East
with a considerable area of agree-
ment on the part of all men with
whom I talked on world problems,
as well as on most political analy-
ses of various political blocs in our
own area. I also met with great
sympathy and understanding for
our postions and needs."
The Premier stressed that, while
Continued on Page 3-A
The amendment specifies fur-
ther that "in all negotiations be-
tween the United States and t*r
foreign State, arising as a re-
sult of funds appropriated under
the Act or arising under the Ag-
arms is the UAR in the amount Mutual Security program for fis-
of $443,000,000. Iraq received $120,- Cal year 1961.
000.000 in arms, while Yemen got
$17,000,000 worth. New advanced
planes, tanks, and other modern'
weapons are pouring into Egypt in
"huge Soviet build-up" said Sen.
Javits. He stressed that "these
alarming statistics" were disclosed
to him by the Administration in
its summary presentation of the
He else called attention to So-
viet economic penetration of the
Arab countries through aid to-
taling $696,000,00e. Of this sum
$515,000,000 wont to the United
Arab Republic. He warned that
the UAR wes adopting a more
Continued on Page ISA
Ollenhauer Speaks Mind... Pg. 10C


Page 2-A
* Jewish FhrkHan
Friday, April 1. I960
Macmillan Evasive
On Talks With B-G
Continued from Page 1-A
given in Parliament last week by
the Joint Undersecretary for
Foreign Affairs Robert Allan,
Allan had told the House that it
w as not in the public interest to
disclose whether or not anus had
been received from foreign gov-
ernments. He had also added that
the government would not give the
assurance that an arms request
from Israel would be denied before
l opinions had had the opportunity
01" discussing such a request.
"I did observe," the Premier
added, "that, in an interview, Mr.
Ben-Gurion said he favored com-
plete disarmament in the Middle
For meritorious services rendered as trusts* of the National
Jewish Hospital in Denver. Colo., current Miami Beach visitor
ES th-muS WSJrS Louis OppJnheimer (center) is given a key to jh. Gold Coast
fore world disarmament begins. I city by Mayor D. Lee Powell. Oppenheimer. honorary presi
An embargo in the present posi- dent of the Albert Krause chapter of B nai B nth in Chicago,
tion. when a great power is send- ,s sojourning at the San Marino hotel through April. Looking
ing arms to one country, would be on is former Miami Beach mayor and long-time friend of Op-
a great injustice." penheimer, Harold Turk. The former mayor is a co-owner of
In another statement to the the San Marino and a local attorney.
House. Mr. Macmillan rejected a
Labor request that a Royal torn- _. |% ii-l-Tmn&nnmw
mission be named to investigate 5CnOOl POSTS Ke-KGglSTraTIOn
Re registration for the fall se- leader of the congelation, will
mester of the nursery-kindersai conduct the service for children.
;ious school
nullan stated, were CUSCUSsea i _f Anr t o 8 Abrah n J. ittel- "'" :------"'. m,?, j
PU.ent a, the lime Ol ,ho 1*. *& 22. announced {- Jjjp^J and
campaign, and subsequently, for Wednesday. schitx win officiate.
that reason, he declared, he raw IU. inc|icated that "a large enroll- PTA o( the religious school un-
no reason for further inquiry. | mont ls expected in vim of the der the chairmanship of Mrs Je
', __.~_\ j__________77TT '?"''"'""" of construction of ronu Cavell will again prepare the
the new and improved facilities for tables with Passover delicacies
the school and synagogue." |and set the special symbolic foods
The school Offers a complete n the Passover plates. More than
readiness program, as well as ex- 450 students will participate.
periences of Jewish living.
15 Join New
Vanguardian Body
Jack Katzman. Miami Israel j
Bond Guardian chairman and last j
[wcok named chairman of the newi
' Vanguardians program launched]
by the Israel Bond Organization,
announced that 15 Miamians have
already joined him in the new pro-
gram.
Pointing out that the new Van-,
guardian program is designed to
increase the enrollment of Guard-
ians of Israel through the sale of
a larger number of $1,000 State of
Israel Bonds in 1960, Katzman ex-
plained that each V.-.nguardian en-
rolls as a Guardian himself by
subscribing to a minimum S1.000|
Israel Bond purchase and under-,
i takes to enroll ten other persons |
as Guardians of Israel, thus quali-
fying for the title of "Vanguard-
jian of Israel's Progress" (V.I.P.).
Katzman announced the follow-
ing as charter members of the Mi-
ami Vanguardians: William Agra-
nove, Meyer Baskin. Henry Gil-
bert. Bernard Kata. Sheldon Kay,
Sam Lachman. Milton Lubarr,
Samuel Oritt. Jack S. Popick, Sam
Reinhard, Jack Rifkm. Louis Rud-
nick. and Jack Toppell.
the record of British, French and
Israel Government consultations
Supervised by Orthodox Beth Din
Community Vad Hakashruth
Grabers Kosher
Meat Market
44TSW17Ave. FR 9-6266
bonalest, trimmed
POT ROAST 79* lb
fresh killed
BABY PUiLETS 59* lb.
freth lean
Grnd. Beef 2 lbs. $1.09
long boi^ft
FLANKEN 39* lb.
LAMB STEW 19* lb
TENDERLOIN 79* lb
Baby Beef Liver 69* lb.
farm fresh
JUMBO EGGS 69*doz.
eARBKRIES WADE TO ORDER
STORE HOURS: 0:ty 8 UK a p.m.
Fri. S .m.-3 p.m. Sun. S e.m -12 Men
PASSOVER ORDERS FILLED
FREE DEUVIRV
itraei uvvuiiiueui nnumwuvu. mester of the nurserv kinrtergai conduct tne fervite ior t....-.-.-
millan stated, were discussed in 'a w'J J ,A Sm J. G-tlel- jUI hoi d their annual mode1 Sc- j' ivflfl^* "C*C(^
PU.nt n, tha time 0 Je Suez *Af JrSS announced Jj- J^Y-dTlffi 5 W^LiZ^
ewtee
*9\ ,o3'n yi ma
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
945 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
Phene JE 1-3595
Nursery school will hold if*
model Seder on Apr. 8, when
Rabbi Max Lipschiti, spiritual
Cantata on Television

?
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?


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>
t
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>
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{
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DAILY PICKUPS TO NEW YORK
M. LIEBERMAN & SONS
Rabbi Alexander Gross, princi-
pal of the Hebrew Academy, will
present a cantata. "New Look," on
^| the Rabbinical Assn. television pro
gram, "Still Small Voice." The
program will be seen Sunday, 10
a.m.. over ch. 7 WCRT. Participat-
ing will be four narrators, a 50-
voice choir, and two dancers.
Prescription Specialists
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Friday. April 1, I960
+Je*rs*rfcridnan
Page 3-A
Mapai Opens Gate to Non-Labor
JERUSALEM (JTA) After urged, in another Mapai resolu- the Soviet Union "would enable
a stormy debate, the annual con- tion, to intensify emigration to Is- any Jew who desires to do so to
vention of the dominant Mapai rael. The hope was expressed that emigrate to Israel."
Party for the first time threw ^
open its membership rolls to Is-
fflP

Surprise presentation took place recently at the annual ban-
quet of the Community Vaad Hakashruth at the Royal Hun-
garicn restaurant. Henry Groudan, president of the Vaad,
presented Philip Weiss with a plaque for his "dedicated ser-
vice to the Vaad." Weiss is proprietor of the Royal Hungarian.
Gurion Reports
On Trip Abroad :
Continued from Pag* 1-A
it is premature, as yet, to reach
conclusions regarding the practi-
cal results of his talks in Washing-1
ton and London, "the practical aim
of these discussions, though not
all, of course, lay in the discussions
themselves." 1
If the political conversations
have been "of some use,'* he add-
ed, "and if practical expectations
are fulfilled, it is only due to the
lundamenttal preparatory work of
Israeli representatives in Washing-
ton." He credited also "our de-
Show Homed Manager
Eugene A. Shaw has been
, named manager of the Appraisal
Department of W. S. Brenza and
'Assoc. Inc., mortgage bankers.
According to William Brenza, pres-
ident, the addition of the Appraisal
Department, providing complete
' professional real estate appraisal
service for all purposes, including
estate tax. condemnation and closed
corporations, is being made to of-
fer a more comprehensive service
to the firm's clientele.
voted friends in American and
British Jewry, whether they are
railed Zionist or whether they do
not lay claim to that title."
I riwlie who- are notmembers of
llistradrut, the Federation of La-
! bor. Until now, membership in a
I trade union affiliated with Hista-
i drut was required of all Mapai
Party members.
The new move was adopted only,
| after Prime Minister David Ben-*
I Gurion himself spoke in its favor,
i as titular head of the party. Mr.
Ben-Gurion pleaded for broadening'
of party membership to include
certain artisans who, while ineligi-i
ble to Histadrut membership be-;
cause they are employers, would
nevertheless strengthen they par-
ty. This "creative group," be
stressed, "has the right to join the
party.
In another address, the Prim*
Minister urged again his long-
standing insistence upon the
amalgamation of all labor par-
ties in Israel. He proposed that
the Mapai Central Committee
be instructed to draw a basic set
of principles for 'the labor move-
ment, and to submit those prin- j
ciples to every worker in Israel.
Those who accept the principles,
he proposed, would be summon- '
ed to a nationwide "workers un-
ity" convention.
The convention adopted a series
of political resolutions calling for:
support of the government's ef-j
forts for peace in the Middle East \
area; backing moves for total.
world disarmament! and support-'
ing Mr. Ben-Gurion's proposal for'
total disarmament in the Middle
East, backed by international con-
trol.
In another resolution, Mapai ex-
pressed its "profound disappoint-1
ment" with the fact that the United
Nations and the maritime nations
of the world have not yet suc-
ceeded in ending United Arab
Republic "piracy" through bloc-
kade of the Suez Canal. The con-
vention also condemned the anti-
Israel boycott by the Arab states.
Jews throughout the world were
yto/diStoftltottej
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All proceeds go lo va*ch support of
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coco*


' Page 4-A
*Jewisti ncr/dUan
Friday. April I, I960
(Jewish Flor idlan
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.E. Sixth Street
Telephone FR 3-4605
Teletype Communications Miami TWX
^__^___________MM 396
FRED K. SHOCHET..........Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDLIN ........................ Executive Editor
Published every Friday since 1927 by The 7*wlh Florldlan
at 120 N.B. Sixth Street, Miami l, Florida Entered >
econd-claM matter July 4. IMO, at ) t of .Miami.
Florida, under the Act of Match 3. 1879.
The Jewith Florldlan has absorbed the Jewish Unity ana
the Jewish Weekl/. Member of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worldwide News
Service, National Editorial Assn., American Assn. ot
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assn.
The Jewlrh Florldlan doe* not guarantee the Kavhtuth
of the merchandise advertised in lis columns.
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year 5.00
RATES:
Three Years J10.OO
ISRAEL BUREAU
202 Ben Yehuda Tel Aviv, Israel
RAY U. BINDER .......................... Correspondent
Volume 33
Number 14
Friday. April 1. 1960
4 Nisan 5720
'Solution' to the Bombing
The shocking bombing of the Gadsden,
Ala., synagogue once again proves a by now
well-known fact the role of youth in the ris-
ing level of racial and religious terror and har-
rassment throughout the nation.
We can no longer speak intelligently about
juvenile delinguency. The Gadsden bombing
and the recent rash of swastika smearings, in
which teen-agers 18 and under took such a
prominent part, are not examples of delin-
quency.
They are manifestations of dangerous anti-
social behavior patterns that threaten the foun-
dationstone of American democracy.
The Gadsden incident repeats previous oc-
currences of successful arrests with almost
frightening accuracy: the pathetic denial of
culpability on the part of the teen-agers' parents
and their insistence on the innocence of their
children.
But among synagogue bombings, unique
for its solution, the Gadsden incident is also
unusual in that two people were wounded by
gunfire. This is no longer a question of naive
protestations of innocence, in which the youths
ore represented as having been "pleasure-
bent" ir i manner that just got out of hand.
S an protestations are on their face absurd
to begin with. When a raw teen-ager wears a
swcstika armband and spouts poisonous anti-
Semitic propaganda with the kind of frequent
facility that enabled the FBI to seize the
Gadsden culprit almost immediately, his par-
ents can hardly claim immunity for themselves.
The lesson to be learned here is that par-
ental responsibility goes beyond the narrow
confines of home surveillance in the important
business of teaching the nation's young the
meaning of democracy and the sanctity of the
individual, whatever his race or religion.
Alabama authorities and the FBI are to be
congratulated for their rapid "solution" to the
Gadsden bombing. But it is no solution to the
larger problem, which can only be eradicated
when each of us bears the responsibility of
living the free way of life by example.
^ Lest the majority take comfort in the
''safety" of numbers, feeling shock for the inci-
dent, but expressing not enough actual concern
to do anything about it because, after all, "only
a synagogue" is involved, let them recall the
trend of all totalitarian movements. Freedom
is best undermined when the majority fails to
protect the rights of the minority, or to respect
its differences. This is the best proof to the
tyrant that democracy is ripe for rape.
.." ''^-~~1
> .
SMOKE SIGNALS
Putting the Power to Use
The Jewish Labor Committee has come up
with an interesting interpretation of the purview
of President Eisenhower's Committee on Gov-
ernment Employment Policy.
Function of the committee is to police
federal hiring practices, thus assuring freedom
from discrimination for reasons of race or
religion.
The JLC is now urging the government to
use the powers of the committee against the
State Department, whose shocking collusion
with the Arab nations has resulted in the
screening of Jewish applicants for government
employment overseas.
The Jewish Labor Committee is right in
calling the State Department collusion a "sor-
did fact." Here indeed is a clear case where
the powers of President Eisenhower's commit-
tee can be put to good use.
Home for the Aged Scores
Once again, the Jewish Home for the Aged
of Greater Miami has taken the lead in innova-
tions involving our senior citizens.
The Home's new day care program is the
first in Dade county. The institution deserves
the congratulations of the entire community.
Much is said these days about our senior
citizens. Statistics are cited more and more fre-
quently to demonstrate their rising numbers in
the nation's general population.
Senior citizens have become a favorite
source of investigation for Congressional com-
mittees; one is at times hard put to determine
how much of the verbiage in their behalf, both
printed and spoken, is honestly intended and
how much of ft will ultimately become political
grist. r
The Jewish Home for the Aged's new day
cere program has flown by the nets of talk to
make a solid contribution in behalf of Greater
Miami's older citizenry. The Home has a glow-
ing reputation nationally and locally for its fine
geriatric organiaztion. The affiliation last year
between the University of Miami medical
school and the Home is the most eloquent proof
possible for the substance of this reputation.
But whatever the level of its achievement,
the demand on the Home's facilities has
naturally and understandably exceeded its
physical ability to meet them. In 1958. as a re-
sult of a precedent-making $450,000 FHA ex-
pansion program, the Jewish Home for the
Aged enlarged its bed capacity from 75 to 112.
Long waiting lists requesting admission
nevertheless continue to exist, as increasing
numbers of Dade county senior citizens seek
entry into Douglas Gardens.
The new day care program constitutes a
praiseworthy step in the direction of meeting a
long-felt need: a method by which the Home
can offer qualified older Miamians the care-
fully-guided geriatric regimen that is its hall-
mark lor regular residents, while making no fur-
ther demand on the Home's bed capacity.
Through the program, senior citizens will
be able to spend the day at Douglas Gardens
and be returned to their places of private resi-
dence in the evening.
The Home's aim of providing incentive for
our aged fruitful and productive activity in
their later years is thus immeasurably ex-
panded. This is a genuine service to the com-
munity at large and a humanitarian step in the
direction of intelligent handling of the problems
posed by our increasing senior citizen popu-
lace. *^r
during (he week
... as i see it
by LEO MINDLIN
I SEE THAT my good friend, Nathan Ziprin, of the Seven Arts Fea-
ture Syndicate takes out against Commentary in a column soon
to appear in this newspaper. Commentary is the magazine sponsored
by the American Jewish Committee. It is a literary publication of
high calibre, presumably based on Jewish content, and reflecting the
unquestionable aesthetic taste of what writers call the "little mag-
azine." Ziprin's thesis is that Commentary has reduced its Jewish
quality to the vanishing point, and wonders about the value of its
sponsorship by the AJC.
Further to discuss the problem from his view would be to en-
croach on a fellow-columnist's claim. But it raises some interesting
speculations beyond the Immediate and very pertinent charge. Pub-
lications certainly have the right to change without being subject
to opprobriumunless the change is as spectacular, for example, as
the Mercury's. Even in the case of a supposedly Jewish magazine,
it would seem that a deemphasis of Jewish content is an editorial
decision to be accepted or rejected on the basis of personal taste alone.
However absurd such a decision may be, the American Jewish
Committee could argue, perhaps with some success, that non-sectarian
quality magazines are in the decided minority and that^iiublishing
one can redound to the glory of the organization particularly and Jews
generally indeed more so than a sectarian literary effort ever
would.
I doubt that even so spurious a defense as this is the motive be-
hind Commentary's vanishing Jewish exterior it never was very
Jewish otherwise. More to the point here is a revolting kind of anti-
Semitism particularly prevalent among the literati and actually
not excluded to Jews, themeselves.
THE JEWISH THEME is a central and ponderous one in modern
art especially in the novel. The works of Joyce, Proust, and
Mann, undoubtedly the three titans of twentieth century literature,
all feature Jews as protagonists. Leopold Bloom, Swann. and Naphta
have beccine as sacred to the contemporary critic as are Donatello and
Michelangelo to the Renaissance specialist The reasons for (bis popu-
larity abound. But most prevalent among them is that the Jew sym-
bolizes the exile; while man himself, these artists speculate, today
suffers the ineluctable loneliness common to the state of exile.
Perhaps the two profoundest literary critics to emerge in our
time are T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. Both poets of international
stature, men who concur in the validity of this symbolic isolation,
their impact on contemporary thought blanketed painting, literature
and even music as far back as 1910 to shape the aesthetic world in
which we now live.
It is all the more curious that while the Jew has been employed
as an artistic symbol ot exile, he is also in their view the source of
the ills afflicting humanity. In the dual role of principal cause and
principal effect of the disease, the Jew has played a variety of lit-
erary roles, of which Bloom, Swann, and Naphta are merely a sym-
pathetic" if bizarre handful.
Thus, Eliot's poetry abounds in anti-Semitic elements. Anf while
bla later critical works look more kindly upon Jews, his earlier ef-
forts in this genre are far less sympathetic. Pound, contranly. whose
poetry is largely devoid of anti-Semitism, makes up for it in his
criticism, as well as in his polities'' and "economics." Pound's in-
ternational reputation as a Jew hater needs no elucidation here a
reputation which, in a quaint schizophrenic way, he would vocifer-
ously deny.
It is in I his wild and ill-defined world of Jew-consciousness that
so much twentieth century quality literature wallows. There is small
wonder that magazines speaking for the literature should reflect its
character. What Eliot. Pound and their disciples have spoken, let
not be unspoken not even by the young, bright Jewish edit.irs' and
writers religiously following in their paths. So, too, with Commentary
magazine.
THIS KIND OF literarily fashionable anti-Semitism is even more
revolting than the commoner non-Jewish variety. It is a self-hatred
fawning upon the noble if highly inaccurate thestl that art lies
beyond the petty principles and allegiances of ordinary men. Some
of the world's greatest philosophers, musicians, novelists and essay-
ists have been profoundly resourceful haters of Jews. Wagner, Belloc,
Chesterton, and St. Thomas Aquinas are cases in point.
A more current and cogent one is in the March issue of Esquire
magazine, where critic Dwight MacDonald reviews the motion pic-
ture "Ben-IIur." I do not place Mr. MacDonald in the same category
of achievement as these illustrious gentlemen although his lofty
sentiments, marked by much self-esteem, are of such a dashing char-
acter as to leave one feeling he has long before done so himself.
Nevertheless, in the typically omniscient way critics have about
them, Mr. MacDonald laces into 'Ben-Hur" its supra-realism to
the point of vulgarity, its cheap sensationalism. Employing the crisp
phrases of the Ivy League aesthete gone "simple man," Mr. Mac-
Donald calls the chariot race "long on gore and short on excitement"
charges that "Instead of sex. 'Ben-Hur' gives us sadism;" reflects
on the producers of the film ,who) can reduce a thousand to
a confused cocktail party;" deplores "our mass culture (which)
compensates for its prudery about sex by portraying violence."
H l MCSn 7/ *,t,tlcIsms- whlch m'Kht otherwise be to his cred-
it, Mr. MacDonald shakes well into a cocktail party of his own to
produce this piece of inevitable ant.-Semit.sm: "Here is. finally a
blasphemous falsification of the Bible ... in which not the Jews but
S!Hh0nUT\are 7stpolnS'blc for Christ', martyrdom. According to
Matthew, Luke and John, it wasn't that way at all."
ONTINUES CRITIC MacDonald; "There is a brief shot of some high
TPriests looking on at the Crucifixion they look sad riZl ,h?
jubilant there are no ancient Romans .round and there are
manTo iinTT? (:\cost of thc fi,m) lSoS5?
i. !, ?LT 'he URly b,g0,ry hcre would b o belabor the obvious
such .iterary refuse "would be nice to fee. there is 76SSSJ;
r it. But in the realm of art one can hardlv exneel
around to answer
.....- "' "V. "Ul '" w,e rcim of art one can hardlv exneel
SO unworthy a thing as a defense of the Jew when it is fashionable
to slander him not even in Commentary, which more and more
aligns itself with the unbridled aesthetes, and less andT7s with mo e
rheZUJdnfda b,a,,,e against. ,he ,yranny words they Lbb e n
the name of a strange artistic heritage. oaooie in


FridayApril i, I960
*Jenist> fUridlikin
Page 5-A
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Page 6 A
*Jt*istncrk0a*i
Friday. April 1. 1960
A Talk
With U Nu
By MAX LERNES
Gadsden Community Back to Normal
New Delhi
On Apr 1 the new Burmese Parliament will meet, and I) N'u will
cnce again become Prime Minister. I had a talk with him here on the
occasion of his two-day visit. He was sitting in the bedroom of a modest
guest suite at Nehru's house, and during the half-hour of our talk he sip-
ped a glass of cold water and talked of a wide range of things, his face
.ill almost boyish smooth and unflawed. his eyes gentle and laughing
despite his quarter-century of political struggle
Later that afternoon, at a Burmese Indian Friendship Society tea.
I' Nu denied that he had come to India to confer with Nehru and Krush-
cnev when all three met at Calcutta. It was sheer chance, he said, that
brought him there on the same day that Nehru was to meet Krushchev
en hi- return from Indonesia. He himself had come to India only to
Nehru and visit the great Buddhist shrines at Ajanta and Ellora.
If any other governmental head had insisted that only accident
brought him to the right place and the right persons at the right time.
there would have been broad smiles of disbelief. But U Nu's angelically
rure smile almost melts your disbelief. Everything he does seems to
partake of the ceremony of innocence. That is probably why his polit-
ical opponents have found him a difficult man to beat.
- -
I ASKED U NU HOW HE FELT about the U.S. now. and the future
relation of the Asian states with the American government. They would
be good, he said, provided the US. follows a policy of non interference
in their internal affairs. Again he refused to be more specific, but he
didn't need to. Burma is clearly another case where the Eisenhower
Administration picked the wrong horse, guessing that U Nu was through
rand putting its bets on the 'Stable" faction and the army
This led me to the question of aid. The U.S. gave a grant to N*
Win's government, for a motor road and for some university buildings.
I asked U Nu whether he would continue this policy of accepting eco-
romic aid. He answered that he would go through with the projects that
" e Win had started, and honor the commitment. But as a broad policy
he still stuck with his old position, which we had discussed when I was
in Rangoon five years agoloans, yes; aid. no.
Behind this, I should guess is the old fear that to take aid is to be-'
come vulnerable to American pressures, and to swerve from the non-
alignment position which U Nu holds along with his good friend Nehru.
Perhaps there is also the fear that it would invite reprisals from the
Communist powers.
It is worth noting, however, that the Chinese Communists offered
to settle their boundary' dispute with Ne Win. and made the deal with
him even though he had shown his leaning toward the U.S.
SOMETIMES IN WORLD HISTORY there is a local or national,
struggle which also has meaning for the larger world scene. This hap-
pened when Gandhi led the movement for Indian independence and
developed a technique and philosophy of global scope. Is it happening
;.. I wrote an earlier column on "Gandhi and the Sitdowns" in which ',
1 traced the link between Gandhi's salt-tax march to the sea and the i
touch counter sitdowns of Negro students in Virginia and the Carolinas. I
The link, of course, is stubborn, principled, non-violent resistance to
i'-cal 'aw and custom by an appeal to moral law.
The column evoked some letters from readers, raising far-reaching
questions that prod me to write this sequel.
One question is about the prior claim of Thoreau's "Essay on Civil
ri.sobedience" as the bible of non-violent resistance. Everyone knows,
of course, of Gandhi's indebtedness to both Tolstoy and Thoreau. But
neither the American nor the Russian had to confront an army and
police force, nor hold together 300.000.000 diverse people in a struggle
for freedom.
The que-tion is not whether Gandhi was an original social thinker,
but whether he was the first to pull together into a pattern the various
Biradi of disobedience, passive resistance, non-violence, truth-force,
ind a scrupulous concern about the means in pursuit of the end. I think
he was.
K sX m
A LETTER FROM A. J. MUSTE, a doughty champion of non-violent
r. -.stance, takes me to task for saying that the Gandhi method could not
have been effective against the Nazis in Germany or the Russians in
Hungary or the Chinese in Tibet It was never really tried, he says.
rtematieaDy and on a large scale" in Germany and Tibet."
I might ask what chance the Jews in Germany would have had
if the. had tried to use nonviolence, "systematically and on a large
.< ale m the Warsaw ghetto. It would, of course, have been different if
German people as a whole, recoiling from the Nazi treatment of the
vs. had used systematic non-violence to save them. Or if the Chinese
people today, recoiling from the rape to Tibet, were to do the same.
The victims of a non humanist totalitarian regime cannot appeal to
sense of humanity. And the people in such a regime, who might rise
i p to ave the victims, are too deeply infected with the poison of fear
and apathy to act against it.
As for using systematic non-violent resistance to save us from world
Mclear suicide, there are still many difficulties to explore. One is how
tfl reach the people in totalitarian societies.
Bui we know what will be involved. The language of equality trill
have >o be broadened into the language of humanity, lest the democracy
for which we strive in life become the democracy of death.
(TMe i* a Copyright Column)
Continued from Pa#e 1-A
his wearing a Naai armband and
a red-painted Nazi helmet.
The youth fled from the scene
after he threw one of two fire
bombs at the synagogue. He told
police that, when congregants
came running out. he started shoot-
ing in their general direction. Tal-
ter Hunt, his step father, helped
police and FBI agents find the
youth.
The youth told police he had
been interested in the Nazi move-
ment since he was in the seventh
grade He said he had had an ar-
gument with a Jewish boy. He
also admitted painting a swastika
on a Gad-den store several
months ago.
The Circuit solicitor said that the
youth told of approaching tne syna-
gogue with two bombs. He In
one and threw it. When it failed
to go through the window, he drop-
ped the other one and started to
flee to a cab he had parked near-
by. It was at this point that con-
gregants began to pour out and
the youth kept shooting until his
rifle jammed.
The cab was found abandoned
later. In it wore a Nazi helmet,
a semi-automatic 21-caliber rifle,
a hunting knife, a can of gaso-
line and a bundle of rags. The
Circuit Solicitor said Hunt
"tooii right proud of what ho
did." Ho also said there wore no
immediate plan* to give the
youth a psychiatric examination
and that he would bo held in the
county jail for 8m time being.
Earlier. Gov. John Patterson of
Alabama had issued a statement
declaring he was "shocked" by the
"outrageous" act and that he want-
ed it -clearly understood that this
state will not tolerate lawless Prts
and mob violence in any form."
The guest speaker at Temple
Beth Israel here Friday night was
Rabbi Alfred Goodman, spiritual
leader of Temple Israel at Colum-
bus. Ga.. which was painted with
swastikas last year. A teen ager
was later found guilty of the van-
dalism.
Meanwhile more than 100 cross-
es were burned along road sides
in another section of Alabama and
dozens of crosses were burned
across South Carolina. A hooded
man told Highway Patrolman Roy
Jemison here that the cross-burn-
tags were originally scheduled for
Friday night, the night a boy
threw a Molotov cocktail at a syn-
agogue and shot two members
of the Gadsden congregation.
Here, as well aa throughout
South Carolina, hooded members
of the Ku Klux Klan circulated
freely in many towns the last two
nights. Calhoun County Sheriff
Roy Snead, here, reported he haa
questioned about 12 men. There
have been no arrest* in connec-
tion with the burning of the
crosses.
The
'
I
CoagrtgafJOMol Sedtr
Temple Zamora will hold a con-
gregational Seder Tuesday eve-
ning, Apr. 12. at the Temple. Of-
ficiating will be Rabbi B. Leon
Hurwitz and Cantor Meyer Gisser.
ISRAEL HISTADRUT COMMITTEE
of GREATER MIAMI
invites you to attend
The THIRD SEDER CELEBRATION
Fontainebleau Hotel
SATURDAY, APRIL 16 6:30 P.M.
Dinner Strictly Kosher
THE DISTINGUISHED
RABBI YAAKOV G. ROSENBERG
CHAIRMAN OF THE THIRD SEDER CELEBRATION
Proudly presents
The HONORABLE YAACOV MORRIS
CONSUL OF ISRAEL
as the
GUEST SPEAKER
and
CANTOR CHARLES S. KODNER
to chant the inspirational services
PLEASE PHONE RESERVATIONS CHAIRMAN
Mrs. Harriet Green HI 3-2984 or Histadrut Office JE 8-8037
NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS
|
DR. CHARLES H. INSLER
DENTIST
Announces the Opening of His Office
for the Practice of
GENERAL DENTISTRY
444 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD
MIAMI BEACH 40, FLORIDA
Telephone JE 8-7798
DISTRIBUTED IV
PALM IIISImill TOIIS. IXC.
373 NE. 61st STREET

MIAMI, FLORIDA


Friday. April 1, 1960
*Jewist fk>ridt/an
Page 7-A
1
$500 Million Bonn Credit for Israel?
JERUSALEM(JTA)A special Israel delegation will soon leave
for West Germany to open negotiations in connection with the $500 mil-
lion credit promised to Prime Minister Ben-Gurion by Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer, according to reports by Israeli correspondents who ac-
companied the Premier on his trip to United. StaLei-aixl Britain.
Premier Ben Gurion's private ------- ----------------
??***> ****" P^ *LM1 culture. de~l.pm.nt pr^ct,.
not return to Israel with the Pre-
mier was to fly to Cologne to brief
Ambassador Eliezer Shinar, head
of Israel's Mission in West Ger-
many, on the outcome of the Ben-
InchMling large scale develop
n>*nt plans for the Negev, rbe
corrw^p^fiBwtvTs reported.
The bank of the West German
Gurion-Adenauer meeting in New trade unions and cooperative plans
Planning a Young Judea pageant, "From Slavery to Freedom,"
are (left to right) Mrs. Allied Karg, co-chairman, Zionist Youth
Commisssion, I. Dickman, representative of the Zionist Organ-
ization of America; Rabbi David Herson, coordinator, Zionist
Youth Commission, and Reuben Guberman, pageant director.
Some 750 members of Young Judea will take part in the pro-
duction scheduled here for the first week in June.
7 W. Germans Sentenced
For Anti-Semitic Actions
York last week.
The WOO,000,000 credits wovld
be made available to Israel, at
the annual rat* of $9 long-term loans and direct in-
vestments for maritime and agri-
to invest funds in housing con-
struction in Israel, David Tanne.
director of the Labor Ministry's
housing division, meanwhile re-
vealed here this week.
I
Tanne recently returned from
the United States, where he head-
ed a delegation of Israeli contrac-
tors negotiating American invest-
ment potentials, reported details
of the commitment to principle re-
ceived by the delegation from a
group of American businessmen
and contractors.
As a result of that commitment,
the Israeli contractors will receive
a loan of $2,500,000 for private
housing while the government will
get $9,500,000 for government hous-
ing schemes and commercial cen-
ters. The American investors will
lend the money at nine percent to
a special mortgage bank now be-
ing formed here, Tanne said .
BONN(JTA)Six men and a
woman received jail sentences and
heavy fines for anti-Semitic acts
in West Germany during the last
weekend, according to reports re-
ceived at Government headquar-
ters here. In two other instances,
both in the State of Schleswig-Hol-
stein, the State Minittry of Educa-
tion has received complaints from
parents who accused teachers and
courts of being too harsh against
pupils charged with anti-Semitic
acts.
Among these convicted of elan-
derizing Jews were Anton Piass,
a 47 year-old watchmaker, of Min-
den, sentenced to four monthts in
jail plus a fine; a 84-year-old truck
driver in Manhcim, sentenced for
three months; a carpenter at Bad
Nauheim, sentenced to eight
months' imprisonment; a laborer
and a forester, at Bad Nauheim,
sentenced to two months and four
months, respectively; and a house-
wife at Steinheim, fined 0 marks.
In Heneu, a 4.Vy*r-e4d laborer
was sentenced to two months in
jail for yelling at a Jewish bar
owner that "since Hitler forgot
to kill yov, I wHI do It new." Tha
laborer, Ernest Krebs,
before the Hanao Jury Court
that he had been intoxicated,
but Judge A. Gatitche said "se-
vere punishment" was needed as
a deterrent to others.
At Launburg, in Schleswig-Hol-
stein, parents complained that a
high school principal 'unjustly"
caused the arrest of a 15-year-old
boy caught painting the swastika
on the walls of the school building.
At Wetalar, in the same State, a
12 year old boy was sentenced in
juvenile court to detention, after
being caught scribbling on a shop
window the words "8S is Fine."
The boy's parents claimed the let-
ter SS stood for the name of his
girl friend, Susanna Schmidt, and
not for the initials of the Hitler
security police. However, the court
threw out the complaints, after
ascertaining that the boy's mother
had been a schoolmate of the late
Josef Goebbels.
Temple Sinai Stdw
Temple Sinai of North Miami
will hold a Seder for the first time
Monday evening, Apr. 11. Tradi-
tional dinner will be served at the
6:30 p.m. function.
House Amends
Foreign Aid Bill
Continued from Page 1-A
principles.
Reference to the Agriculture Act
indicated that the committee had
in mind Arab anti-Israeli discrtmi-j
nations like the one requiring that]
ships bringing the United States!
agricultural surpluses to Arab
ports must be vessels that do not
trade in Israeli ports.
The amendment had been orig-
inally submitted by Rep. Leonard
Farbstein of New York. The mea-
sure was co-sponsored in the com-
mittee by another member of the
Foreign Affairs group. Rep. Wayne
Hays, of Ohio. Both are Demo-
crats.
GOLFERS
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e o e
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Red and whit*, blue and white,
brown and white.
e e
Large assortment of bags, head
covers, golf sorts, gelt clubs, gad-
gets, wearing apparel, stc.
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f> nccc 1423 P0NCE'
wrra coral garus
Immediate attention given clubs
mailed In for repairs.
^^ f^BBBBaj 'THE POT*r, nf COOV *IPIT('
VimJih
rttNEiV CLU1
41
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Largest .Selection of Kosher Goods For Passover
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RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR

White Rock
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FREE DELIVERY A BOTTLE OR A CASE


Page 8-A
vJewisii ihrUkun
Friday. April 1, I960
At PTA meeting of the seven branches of the
Hebrew High School of the Bureau of Jewish
Education. Left to right are Herbert Berger,
principal and assistant director of the Bureau;
Conner Views
Prime Importance
Of Agriculture Post
Probably no post in the Gover-
nor's cabinet has such wide day-to-
day impact upon the daily life and
well-being of the public in Florida
as that of the Commissioner of
Agriculture, whom the voters will
soon be asked to select because of
the retirement of Nathan Mayo,
the incumbent, according to Doyle
Conner, candidate for the vacated
post.
"The powers, duties and func-
tions of this office, which pays $17,-
500 annually and is filled for a D0YU CONNflt
four-year term, reaches not only,
into Florida's ranching, farming,''^ such issueg regulating agri-
dairying, citrus-raising and other __ ___
agricultural pursuits, but into far- ** t0 ,h fff'
flung corners of everybody's life, assuring the fanner he is getting
Whether it's the car you drive, the i proper ingredients in feed and fer-
lipstick you use, the quality and t uu^r, regulation of weights and
price of the food you eat, the wel- measures- regu,alion of. gaseune
fare of the school children, the' "! ,.
taxes you pay. your health or even content, inspection of gasoline
the economic stability of your job, f pumps for accuracy, surveillance
the Commissioner of Agriculturel0f pure foods''the general assur-
Menachem Roth, instructor; Barbara Toback,
Mrs. Frank Toback, Louis Toback, and Dr.
Heizl Klepfisz, instructor.
12 Organizations Cleared
To Raise Funds for Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) A list funds for Israel's immigration ab-
Uf organizations authorized to con-] sorption and colonization pro-
duct public fund raising cam- grams:
paigns for the benefit of Israel in| American Committee for the
the 1960*1 campaign year was re- Weizmann Institute of Science,
leased this week by the Jewish American Friends of the Hebrew
Agency's committee on control. University, America Israel Cul-
and authorization of campaigns, tural Foundation, American Red
The committee, which coordinates Mogcn David for Israel (member-
fund-raising for Israel in this coun- snip campaign only), American
Iry, was established in 1949 under Technion Society, Federated Coun-
thc auspices of the Jewish agency cj| 0f Israel Institution. Hidassah,
and includes representatives of the Jewish National Fund (tradition-
United Jewish Appeal and of the ai collections), Mizracht Women's
Council of Jewish Federations organization. National Committee
and Welfare Funds. | for Labor Israel, Pioneer Women
Since its inception, the commit- and Women's League for Israel
tee has served as a clearing house'(New York area). Authorization of
for information and clarification! a campaign does not imply its en-
about appeals addressed to Amer- dorsement by the Jewish Agency,
ican Jews by charitable or educa-1
tional institutions in Israel either
directly or through their American
' representatives. Over the years,
communities, American Jewish or-
ganizations and individuals have
! looked to the committee for guid-
, ance in dealing with these re-
M. Tony Sherman, architect, has quests.
announced that J. Samuel Garrison
Architect Names
Administrator
will be associated as business ad-
ministrator for M. Tony Sherman
& Associates, architectural and
engineering firm.
Garrison resigned from the Sot-
tile Banking Group as director of
public relations and advertising of
the seven banks, handling all of
the community and overall public
relations programs for the corpo-
ration's diversified holdings.
Prior to his association with the
Sottile Group, Garrison was as-
sistant vice president of the Cen-
tral Bank and Trust Co. of Miami.
Before coming to the Miami area,
he resided in Philadelphia, and
In releasing its list of author-
ed agencies for tho 196041
campaign year, based on a re-
view and analysis of financial
statements and promotional ac-
tivities of those organisations,
the committee emphasized that
the backlog of unmet immigrant
needs in Israel makes it more
imperative than ever to assure
priority for the United Jewish
Appeal and for community wel-
fare funds raising funds on its
behalf and to coordinate fund-
raising for Israel throughout tho
United States.
The following 12 organizations
received authorization contingent
Marger Names
Campaign Mgr.
Edwin Marger, of Miami Beach,
has named Irving Schatzman, pres-
ident of Miami Beach chapter of
B'nai B'rith and past president of
the Miami Beach Apartment
House Assn., as his campaign
manager.
Marger, an attorney, is a candi-
date for Justice of tho Peace,
Fifth District, an oifice which he
describes as the "Court of First
Resort for many of our citizens."
Marger, a 1953 graduate of the
I University of Miami law school,
j is married and has three children.
At present, he is conducting his
political campaign from his law
offices at 763 Arthur Godfrey rd.
Community Seder Scheduled
was 'associated with" Rad^SUtTo'n* |on ,hir PW** to 8v Parity to atCTXethtIsrael'cerder on Mon-
WPEN as sales and commercial I the United Jewish Appeal as the day nig^at, Apr. 11, starting at
manager. I major source, of philanthropic p.m.
ance," Conners clarified, "that the
public is getting a dollar's worth
for his dollar." i
The 31-year-old candidate's ten-
ure as Speaker of the House in
1957 saw the expansion of tho
Florida junior college program
and public school system, allevi-
ation of some double sessions,
and the introduction of the
teacher incentive plan.
In 1959, Conner was appointed a
has a hand in it," Conner ex-.,
plained.
Conner was recently honored
at a breakfast meeting here,
where he was greeted by former
Mayor of Miami Beach Kenneth
Oka, Councilman Wolfie Cohen,
and Miami Beach attorney Lloyd
L. Ruskin, who is also his cam-
paign manager.
Conner, a past national president
of the Future Farmers of Ameri-
ca, and who is active in farming
and ranching in Starke. maintains; member of the seven-man race re-
an insurance office in Miami. AI lations committee of the Florida
former Speaker of the Florida Legislature, which voted down the
House of Representatives, Conner i last resort bill and moved to keep <
is presently a representative of the state's school system function-
Bradford county, having served ten >ng-
years in the State Legislature. Conner was aIso jnv0,ved in ,eg.
"It must be understood,' Con- a[
ners said, "that as a member of ,
the Governors cabinet, the Com-1 restricted hotels. During the last
missioner of Agriculture also last session, he introduced a bill
votes on issues affecting penal, imposing penalties on persons
mental and educational institu-! p,aying telephone hoaxes in the
lions, as well as a whole gamut of .
business issues coming before the ^nam-ting or attemp,lng dyna.
cabinet." miting of public institutions and
And, within his own jurisdiction, houses of worship.
AN ANNOUNCEMENT
TO OUR FRIENDS
AND POLICYHOLDERS
It is a pleasure to announce the appointment of
Harold A. levin as an Agency Associate in the Waller M.
Pierca Agency of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Company in Miami.
His past experience includes public accounting and
six years with WTVJ, Channel 4 as an account executive.
HAROLD A. LEVIN Wilh (he exlen,ive utming which Mr. levin has
undergone, together with the complete facilities of the WAITER M. PIERCE
AGENCY in estate planning, pension trust and profit sharing plans and all
I types of group insurance he will be qualified to provide competent service
I for all your life insurance needs.
SOUTH MIAMI BRANCH OFFICE:
Suite No. 203 5940 S.W. 73rd St. Phone MO 6-8575
WALTER M. PIERCE AOENCY
of the
MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
2445 West Flegler Street Miami 35, Florida
Phone NEwton 3 9511
5
&4 JZittU fS/ace.. on tlie eifs
, ..
Compact, but with room for everything, is this little place on the Keys you've
been dreaming about a vacation home or week-end hideaway.
IT IS LARGE ENOUGH FOR EVERY COMFORT, SMALL ENOUGH TO MAKE ITS CARE JUST PLAY.
LOCATED ON THE BEAUTIFUL FlORIDAGULFrMODERN IN ITS~DESIGN~AND~C0NSTRUCTI0N;
THIS BRAND-NEW DUPLEX COTTAGE WILL EARN ITS UPKEEP!
AND ONLY 63 MILES SOUTH Of MIAMI AT
HIGH POINT PLANTATION KEY
Owning this cottage, or a choice lot for future building, automatically makes you a sharer in the
complete swimming, boating and fishing facilities already provided for you.
A LITTLE MORE LEISURE MEANS A LOT LONGER AND HAPPIER LIFE AND
ITS YOURS AT LOW COST $9800 per unit, terms at HIGH POINT.
High Point Development Co., Inc.
Nathaniel and Sylvia Levin
1431 NO. BAYSHORE DRIVE MIAMI
FR 9-3117
t


Friday. April 1, 1960
*JetvlsliFkxMian
Page 9-A
Mrs. Louis Cole, president of the Junior Auxiliary of the Jewish
Home for the Aged, and Judge Irving Cypen, president of the
Home, congratulate each other at dedication last week of the
new Junior Auxiliary Day Care Center at Douglas Gardens,
which was made possible by funds from the Auxiliary. In the
day care program, applicants on the approved waiting list
and others will be able to spend all or part of the day at the
Home, having their meals and participating in all phases of
the Home's varied program for its residents.
Aged Home Slates
Annual Meeting
Judge Irving Cypen, president of
the Jewish Home for the Aged,
announced this week that the
home will hold its 15th annual
membership meeting on Sunday,
Apr. 10, 2:30 p.m., at Douglas Gar-
dens. The public is invited.
In addition to major reports de-
scribing the progress, needs and
future plans of the Home, the pro-
gram will feature the premiere
showing of a new sound movie of
the history of the Home made by
the staff of WTJV-TV. Miami, and
the; dedication of the Tanya Simon
Memorial Rose Garden. The late
Mr*. Simon bequeathed $40,000 to
the; Home.
. The Home is a major benefici-
ary agency of the Greater Miami
Jewish' Federation and the United
Fund of Dade County.
Donor Affair Scheduled
Donor affair of Tifereth Israel
Sisterhood will be held at the
Deauville hotel on Saturday eve-
ning, Apr. 9.
Dr. Wolf son in Talk
Dr. Abraham Wolfson will dis-
! cuss Israel Prime Minister Ben-
Gurion's address at Brandeis Uni-
i versity before a meeting of the
j Spinoza Outdoor Forum on Wed-
] nesday evening at 11th st. and
Ocean ct. The Forum will be re-
peated on Friday evening at the
Blackstone hotel.
LONG DISTANCE
MOVING
to all points in the country
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVEN WITHOUT CHARGE
\rKMI.II.VA.\
LINES, I \ .
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue
NE 5-44M MIAMI
Civic Orchestra
Concert Sunday
Barbara. Rostron will play the
Grieg Piano Concerto at. the Sun-
day concert to be presented by the
Miami Beach Civic Orchestra in
Miami Beach Auditorium.
The 19-year-old, formerly of St.
Louis, Mo., was a piano' prodigy
at seven, and has been playing
concerts ever since.. This is her
second appearance with the Civic
Orchestra.
The concert begins at 8:15 p.m.,
is the seventh in the 1950-00 series
of eight monthly presentations Oc-
tober through May under the direc-
tion of Barnett Breeskin.
Program will also include Over-
ture to Semiramide, Rossini; Tales
of the Vienna Woods, J o h a n
Strauss; and 1812 Overture, Tschai
kowsky. Miami Beach Councilman
Kenneth Oka, orchestra president,
will be commentator.
GOLDEN PRESS
BUSINESS FORAAS
GENERAL PRINTING OFFSET
SALES BOOKS
Laundry Lists Our Specialty
2918 S.W. 8th STREET
Phone HI 6-2020
Complete and Dependable Title Service
IAMI TITLE
& Qkttact Co.
84 YIARS OP TITLE SERVICE IN DADE COUNTY
M
ESCROWS
ABSTRACTS
TITLE INSURANCE
TIM* taMrwK* PalkiM
Emm* CMy THIt towraace Ca.
Capita/, Smpim* I ft
ficMd ss.eoe.eee
124 eJ 12* SNtMUND AKADf TeUTHO* J* MW
(AUo Known As 114 and 1 Seurlty Trut Company log.)
Harrison Reveals
Candidacy Here
M. R. "Moe" Harrison, sr., pio-
neer Miamian and board chair-
man of the M. R. Harrison Con-
struction Corporation which he
founded, is a candidate for the
Metro Commission of Dade Coun-
ty in District 3.
All Dade county residents will
vote for this and four other com-
mission posts in the May 3 elec-
tion.
Harrison moved here from Dot
Moines, la., in 1925. His company
helped build Biscayne blvd. and
scores of streets here.
He is a member of the board of
deacons of Westminister Presby-i
terian Church, is vice president of
the Greater Miami YMCA, and
vice president of the Miami Light-
house for the Blind. He is a mem-,
ber of the Miami Rotary Club and'
of the Miami-Dade County Cham-1
ber of Commerce.
Formerly, he served as director
of Disaster Relief for the Dade
chapter of the American Red'
Cross and was, for many years, |
Scout Master of Troop 47.
He is past president of the local
chapter of the Associated General
Contractors of America and of the
Miami Builders' Exchange.
Harrison holds a BS degree in
mechanical engineering from
Iowa State Colleoe, is a mam-
bar of Tau Beta' Pi, honorary en-
gineering fraternity, and Phi
Kappa Phi honorary scholastic
fraternity.
During World War I, he was a
captain, commanding Battery F,
17th Field Artillery, and was dec-
orated with the Purple Heart, Sil-
ver Star, French Croix de Guerre,
M. K. HARRISON
and War Service Medal, with four
battle clasps. Later he qualified as
a naval aviator, and was a cap-
tain, commanding the first Marine
Reserve squadron to be established
at Opa-locka.
Harrison and his wife, Helen,
live at 640 Sebal Palm rd., Bay
Point. Thty have two sons, M. R.
Harrison, jr., now president of the
M. R. Harrison Construction Corp-
oration and John C. Harrison, vice
president and chief engineer with
the family firm.
Book Review
To Aid Students
Alpha Epsilon Phi Alumnae
Assn. of Greater Miami will pre-
sent a book review Saturday to
raise funds for the Alpha Epsilon
Phi book scholarship fund.
Mrs. I. M. Weinstein,_ patron' s
of Alpha Eta chapter, will be (he
reviewer, and the affair will take
place in the sorority room of the
local chapter at the Pan-Hellenic
House on the University of Miami
campus.
Proceeds will be used to provide
books for needy university stu-
dents. Last year, the association
provided six such scholarships.
Tickets may be obtained from
Mrs. Bart Cohen and Mrs. David
Rifas.
Sholom Aleichem Volume
NEW YORKA centennial vol-
ume of writings by Sholom Alei-
chem, containing 19 stories and a
one-act play, has been translated
into English for the first time by
Curt Leviant, son of the proprietors
of the New Ambassador hotel,
Lakewood, N.J. It is being pub-
lished by Thomas Yoseloff, Inc., 11
E. 36th st., New York.
joel meyer, ARCHITECT
AND
ray e. molina, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER
WISH TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING
OF OFFICES
Suite 210, 1090 N.E. 79th Street
MIAMI, FLORIDA
phone PL 4-0811

for a purpose
BUILD
FUTURE SECURITY
The quickest way to a new home, car, moat, frftirtifnm
and family security is through a Dade Federal
Special Purpoee Sonnet Account
Al Dame Federal there's a specially designed savings account
to reach your goal in record time. Your recordyour
Dade Federal Savings passbook. The timewhatever limits
you set. Andto kelp your account along
Dade Federal currendy adds a generous four percent
dividend annually to your savings dollar. Saw a* muck
as you like and as often as you like.
So. speed your way to a special goal of your own
m* a Dade Federal Special Purpose Savings Account
FREE TRANSFER OF YOUR FUNDS
FROM ANY POINT IN THE U. S. A.
.. Dade Federal Makes No Charge For
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Open Or AM To Your D.d.
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April 11th
and lor. Dfvidoodt from T
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<
kfll ANNUM
DtVIOtNO t*I

Dade Federal
t/AviNcs and Loan Association oi Miami
lOSIPH M UPTQN. President
5 CONVtNIINT OfFICS TO SMVt YOU
Mi nm avMuatt
SOURCES EXCEEO 147 MILLION DOLLARS


Page 10-A
fJewisti narkMatJ
Friday, April 1. I960
Center Day Camps Now Registering
Boys and girls of elementary
school age may now enroll for ci-
ther of the four summer day
camps sponsored by the Greater
Miami Jewish Community Center
in various sections of Dade county,
it was announced by Emanuel
Tropp, assistant director. More
than 500 children between the ages
of 5'^ and 11 were served last sum-
mer.
At least one parent must accom-
pany the children for an individual
interview at either of the branch
locations. Day camp programs
will be conducted this summer at
the following branches: Miami
Branch, 450 SW 16th ave., Miami
Beach Branch, 1536 Bay rd., North
County Branch. 1436 NE 6th ave..
Southwest Branch, 7215 Coral
Way.
All four camp* will open on
Monday, June 20th, and will
continue for eight weeks until
Aug. 12. The program i* eon-
ducted Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parents
may enroll their children for the
entire season or for each of two
four-week ported*. At the Miami
and Miami Beach Branches, a
preschool group i* available for
children from 4>/j to 5Vi yoar* of
age.
All campers are assigned to
Becently-installed officers of Men's Club of Kneseth Israel Con-
gregation. Rear (left to right) are Walter Lebowitz, president,
and David Eisenstein, vice president. Front (left to right) are
Max Hecht, secretary; and Israel Teitch, treasurer.
Economist to Talk Here
"A Spotlight on the Economy-
Today and Tomorrow," will be the
subject of an address by Dr. G.
Rowland Collins, of New York
City, here Apr. 6 at a luncheon
hosted by the J. 1. Kislak Mort-
gage Corporation of Florida. More
than 300 business and financial
leaders have been invited to hear
Collins' talk. He is dean emeritus
of the Graduate School of Business
Administration at NYU, and a pub-
lic governor of the American Stock
Exchange. The noted economist
spoke before a similar luncheon
group hosted by Kislak here last
year.
JOHNNY SEZ:
Don't throw your money away by giving away your good
USED CLOTHING and SHOES (men's, women's, ehUdeen*). The
same for your TV's radio*, electrical appliances, eUehes, pots,
pans, rugs, linens, drapes, bedspreads, blankets, etc. "Johnny
pays highest prices in. Miami!" REMEMBER ALL CLOTHING
AND SHOES MUST BE IN 1st CLASS CONDITION, AND OP THE
LATEST STYLES ONLY NOTHING TORN, FADED. DIS-
COLORED OR OUT OF TODAY'S STYLE
SOME OF OUR PRICES:
Men's Suits $1.00 up to S* 00
Men's Pants 25c up to ta.00
Men's Shoes 75c up to Si.50
Men's Shirts 15c up to 35c
FOR THE HOME
Blankets. Quilts 25c to $2 00
Drapes. Bedspreads 50c to $3.00
LADIES LATE STYLE (onlv)
Ladies' Dresses 26c up to $3.00
Ladies' Skirts 25c up to $1.00
Ladies' Sheet CSc up to $1.00
KIDDIES & Q.RLS
Cotton Dresaes 10c to 50c
Girls & Boys Shoes 10c to 75c
We also pay for "non-playing" radios $1.00; 17" 21" table TV's.
$3.00 to $5.00; 3 speed phonographs $2.00 to $3.00. In abort we
pay good prices for everything else including "good" TV's, radios,
irons, toasters, refrigerators, washing machines, ranges, etc.
MING YOUR GOODS TO
JOHNNY MILLIONAIRE
5327 N.W. 36th Ave. Miami NE 4-9275
Corner N.W. 54th Street OPEN 7 Days, 9 to 6, Weekly
P.S. We buy all "RUMMAGE and BAZAAR SALES"
with free pickup we pay 2Vic per lb.
You bring it to us, we pay 4c per lb.
ATTENTION MANUFACTURERS WHOLESALERS &
STOREKEEPERS WE BUY ANY LEFT OVER
GARMENTS, CUT GOODS & PIECE GOODS
Hialeah Officers
installed Sunday
Joseph Tepper was installed as
chairman of the board and first
vice president of Hialeah Reform
Jewish Congregation by Rabbi Na-
than Zwitman in ceremonies Sun-
day evening.
Others installed were Murray
Lipkowitz, second vice president;
William Schwarzman, third vice
president; Harriet Mann, record-
ing secretary; Sunny Lever, corre-
sponding secretary; David Gold-
berg, financial secretary; Murray
Berger, treasurer.
Board of directors includes Jo-
seph Horowitz, Irwin Abrams,
Robert Marshall, David Hirsch,
Robert Lourie, and Arthur Horn.:
Harry Berney was master of
ceremonies at the function held at
the congregation, 1150 W. 66th St.,
Hialeah.
Monticello Opens
Cash Campaign
Congregation Monticello Park
this week announced a $75,000 cash
campaign to complete the building
project now in progress for the
erection of a new temple and re-
ligious school.
"Present cash and mortgage
eommiUnents are insufficient to
complete the project," congrega-
tion officials declared, in announc-
ing the new campaign.
The drive will be ended May 8
at special cornerstone ceremonies.
Construction commencement cer-
emonies are scheduled for Apr. 10
at the building site.
Drew Pearson to Speak
Drew Pearson, one of America's
foremost news analysts, will make
his second appearance in three
years at the University of Miami
on Friday with a lecture from 3:30
to 5 p.m. at 720 Dorm. The 62-year-
old syndicated columnist will speak
on "Is the United States Becom-
ing a Second Rate Power?" His
talk is part of the first annual Un-
dergraduate Student Government
Week ceremonies.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
KOSHER ZI0N
m% n*t9m*mvtos
e PEPPERED BEEF
e LIVER SAUSAGE
e FRANKFURTERS
e CORNED BEEF
e PASTRAMI
B0L06NA
e SALAMI
AT LEADING DELICATESSENS, SUPUMARKETS
KOSHER ZI0N
SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
159 South Water Market, Chitege 8, Mlieeit
EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS FOR FLOR DA
COASTLINE PROVISION CO., INC.
855 B.SCAYNE STREET. MIAMI BEACH
PHONES: JE 8-6232, JE 8 6231
HERMAN PEARL PAT OEARR
Adath Yeshurun Model Seder
Temple Adath Yeshurun will
hold a model Seder Sunday morn-
ing, Apr. 10, at the Unified bldg.,
2300 NE 171st St., No. Miami
Beach.
: groups of their own age level, with
I 12 to 15 campers in each group,
i supervised by a senior counselor
, of college age or older, with the
assistance of a junior counselor.
A waterfront program ia con-
ducted daily at various swimming
pools, under the direction of Red
Cross waterfront safety instruc-
tors. Each camp also has a full-
. time"Trrfs and crafts IftstflWrOTr
j Other activities include athletics,
l arts and crafts, nature lore, dra-
matics, singing, and games. The
Center is an agency rece ving fi-
! nancial support from the Combined
j Jewish Appeal and the United
I Fund.
South Florida District of The
Zionist Organisation of America
presents
MISCHA
ELMAN
one o/ The World's
Foremost Violinists
nd
LICIA
ALBANESE
Metropolitan Opera
Prima Donna Soprano
IN %+
CONCERT OHi
Miami Beach Mium Trxts April 14, I960,8:38 P.M.
Tickets: S280-$3.80-$4.80-$5.80 Ob Salt At
Srra-s Tkktt AfMy
UII frsate* An.. Ml.
AssMm Waste C.
lit sMnWa. C .
1780 W
Av*.
CerMta's
1*W.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
UNDER SUPERVISION OF
The Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth of Florida
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
MIDTOWN ^CLUB
TRU-PRUIT BEVERAGES
AT ALL
FOOD FAIR STORES
Matter's Sunshine Kosher Market
436 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI SEACH
IS UNDER THE STRICT SUPERVISION OF THE
COMMUNITY VAAD HAKASHRUTH
AND THE
BETH DIN OF GREATER MIAMI
Consisting of The Following Rabbis and Their Congregations
Rabbi Louis lehrfield Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Tibor Stern Rabbi Louis Rottman
Rabbi Herschell Savillo


Friday. April 1. 1960
fJenisfi f/cridfian
Page. 11-A
Rabbis Flay Billy Rose Garden
JERUSALEM (JTA) The nicipality by American theatrical
Chief Rabbinate announced thisI producer Billy Rose,
week its opposition to the projected
Jerusalem sculpture garden de-l Following a meeting of the Chief
signed to house the million-dollar; Rabbinate Council, a spokesman
collection presented to the Mu-' for the body told the press that
the project was "contrary to the
spirit of Judaism and constitutes
profanation of the name and char-
acter of the Holy City." The Chief
Rabbinate called on the Jerusalem
Municipality to frustrate the plan
"before it is too late."
The Municipality, which is the
licensing authority for all construc-
tion in the city, has already an-
; proved the plan for the garden at
! the projected site. This was not
i related, however, to the subse-
quent plan of the American pro-
I ducer" to"~donate his Tatnous "coC
lection of sculpture.
Mill MOMS SKOP
ribute to Rabbi
ikop SoW Out
l A complete sell-out of res,erva-
:>ns for the Temple Judea dinner
tribute to honor Rabbi Morris
Skop Sunday evening at the Un-
it Plaza hotel was announced
[Meyer A. (Mike) Baskin, dinner
lirman.
Raskin said that no additional
ervations are being accepted.
! said that "this enthusiastic re-
se on the part of hundreds of
pie who wish to join in the
ute to Rabbi Skop is truly grat-
is-
Ibhi Skop will be honored for
ko years as spiritual leader of
Iplc Judea and for "ten years
luts'.anding service to the con-
|ation, the community, and the
of Israel."
lest speaker will be Harry
len, author of "Only in Amer-
' and "For 2c Plain." Enter-
mmeut will be provided by Arik
vie, popular Israeli singer and
tor.
wee-Touch-Nee
[Tea a Favorite
To those of us who can go back
fond recollection to Seder night
n grandfather's house, with all its
varmth and eager excitement, its
nelange of tastes and sounds and
i r o m a s intimately associated
lilh Passover in days gone by,
here is one thing that still has
he capacity to evoke nostalgic
emories the rich aroma of
Bwee tcuch nee Tea flooding the
oom with its fragrance.
The holiday scene was never
omplete without it. The little red
in treasure chest nestled beside
he gleaming brass Passover sam-
var. buffed to mirror brightness
n honor of the holiday, and bubb-
ing with the delicious brew that
ivas a holiday tradition in the
lome.
Though for the most part the
aulk tea that was so popular with
lygone generations has given way
n great measure to the teabag,
Swee touch nee Tea still brews
quick and full-bodied, flooding the
cup or glass with hearty flavor.
Swee touch nee Tea, strictly
Kosher for Passover, is featured
at all supermarkets, chains and
independent food stores which
carry a holiday line. Also avail-
able this Passover for the first
time is Swee touch nee Instant
offee, a dark and delicious brew
hat brings roaster-fresh flavor.
S. T.
tuto Officials
:eted at Dinner
A small dinner party was given
y Nat Potamkin. vice president
f the Vic Potamkin Chevrolet
orp. of Miami Beach, to former;
ssociates and their wives at the
Beaux Arts apts. on 79th st. cause-
way on Saturday.
Present at the party were Mr.
and Mrs. Sonny Portman, mana-
ger of the Philadelphia branch;
Mr. and Mrs. David Gutterlait,
dealer in charge of the Newark
branch; and Mr. and Mrs. David
Bernstein, general manager of the
Newark, N. I., branch.
-* >
.
FLY EL AL VIA GOODMAN'S MATZO
(by entering Goodman's Passover Contest now!)
Was ever a contest easier? To win that trip to
Israel, tell us why you want to take it! Just finish
the following statement in 25 words or less; "I
want to visit Israel this year because..." Then
send it to us with the little E! Al plane cut out
from our Passover Matzo package. And,
could be, the marvelous first prize in
Goodman's Passover Matzo Contest is
yours! A flying trip to Israel via El Al
Airlinestwo wonderful weeks for two,
all expenses paid (there arc even stop-
over privileges in London and Paris! X
Who ham't dreamed about it? How
it would be to be in Tel Aviv. A glam-
orous city a little like Paris. With
jts music and theater and kiosks
and sidewalk cafes. Or to spend dazzling days in
brilliant white Haifa. Or to wander through
Jerusalem where even the stones are alive with
history. Or how it would feel to spend a day at a
kibbutz. Or visit Capernaum and the synagogue
that has stood since Biblical days. Or watch the
Israeli cowboys round up cattle, singing trail
songs in Hebrew! From the Bible to Exodnt,
people have been writing.about Israel for
centuries. And now, just the few simple words
you write could actually get you there! Don't
wait. The rules are easy; the rewards are
great. Second Prize is $1000; Third Prize,
$500; 100 prizes of $10 each. In
all. 103 good reasons why you
should enter today!
OVER 1Q0
BIG CASH
PRIZES!
Details on
GOODMAN'S
PASSOVER
MATZO
PACKAGES


Pag* 12-A
*Jeisti Flcrid&r
Friday. April 1. I960
'i/mmmmm/mm
IMWKK
AND
Mr sic
By tk
Singing String*
KIM.
All I III It S
COIRT
Tht
TIP TOPPERS
in tht
CARRIAGE ClUB
lliimii Springs
Villas
TU 8-4521 Art Brans, co-owner
Qflie finest
Snoods
g'de finest
SeMce
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNERS
OF TRADITIONAL
EXCELLENCE!
Served with Sacra-
mental Wines and All
the Trimmings, with
Special Emphasis on
Courtesy, for which the
Monte Carlo is famous!
MO* ^WEENSTEIN, Catering Mg.
PHONE: UN 6-8721
On ThI OCEAN AT 63th t.
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
Monte (oJifo
RESORT HOTEL
CoffeeAnd
None Better
NEW ELITE
RESTAURANT
Now Under
New Management
203 N.E. 1 st Avenue
Air-Conditioned
"Where Friends Meet"
HOME COOKING
A SPECIALTY
""SPAGHETTI"
mm
Largest family Trait in Florida
ON 79th ST. CAUSEWAY
Pearly Gait
by Haf Pearl
Student Body Elects Officers
Spring elections of the student
congregation of MontieeHo Park
were recently completed, and a
new slate has tak#n office.
NAMES MAKE .NEWS: The popular and highly talented singer is
repaying an old debt when he brings his "Evening With Harry Bela-
fonte" into the Fojitainebleau on Apr. 10 at a benefit dinner foe the
University of Miami medical school Eye Institute and Eye Bank. Its
a return favor from Belafonte for the assistance he received from the
Eye Institue after suffering a detached retina.
Those are clever souvenirs Miami tenders visiting celebrities who
are given keys to the city. In addition to the over-sized key, each male
celeb receives a matching key tie clip. Forgot to ask what the gals get.
Sheldon J. Schlessinger and Leonard Coleman working overtime
for their candidate for State Legislature, Joe Manners. Sheldon and
Leonard are co-chairmen for the Miami Beach campaign.
Robert Grossman, Nautilus Junior High School ninth grader, re-
cently received a trophy from Philip Brooks, head of the Nor-Isle Op-
timist Club, for winning an oratorical contest sponsored by that group.
Young Grossman will represent his zone in the All-Optimist contest on
Apr. 14 at Washington Federal Savings Auditorium on Normandy Isle.
High school girls between 14 and 18 are invited to join the newly-
formed Jaycee-Ette Debs, sponsored by Miami Beach Jaycees. Mrs.
Esther Zavaloff is advisor and organizer, and to date the group, which
was formed Jan. 8, has been most helpful with projects for the Jewish
War Vets, Cerebral Palsy Telethon, and coming up, Kendall Home for
Orphans.
Hear that the new .!im> room motel in the heart of Atlanta in which
Beachite Seymour Siegel has a substantial interest, is doing the kind
of turnaway business that most Miami Beach hotelmen would yearn
to enjoy.
Jerry Greene will moderate a program of state and local political
candidates sponsored by North Shore B'nai B'rith Lodge on Apr. 4. Jack
Wilson, prexy, is helping Greene.
George Lefcoe. who soon gets a law degree at the U. of Miami, is
slated to "clerk" in the office of E. Albert Pallot this summer.
Assistant State's Attorney Sy Gelber busy as a beaver campaign-
ing for "boss" Dick Gerstein's reelection and Doyle Carlton for gov-
ernor.
Joining the mothers-to-be "club" here is Joanne Lawrence, secre-
tary in B'nai B'rith Youth office.
-fc *
MOVIE CHIT-CHAT: Delighted to hear from Florida State Theatre's
publicity and advertising chief, Howard Pettingill, that "Can-Can" is
breaking records at the Sheridan Theatre, running far ahead of "Porgy
and Bess" and equalling the figures of "Around the World in 80 Days."
It all proves that critics don't have the final word. Most of the reviews
in national publications did not treat the movie too kindly, although
local reviewers had nothing but praise for the cast, topped by Frank
Sinatra, Shirley MacLaine and Maurice Chevalier. Word-of-mouth is
most praiseworthy, and the picture is light, frivolous and provides a
field day for the accomplished talents of the sttars and supporting cast.
What more can you expect from a musical that provides pure enjoyment
from beginning to end?
* <*
BOTH SIDES OF THE BAY: Glad to hear that even though George
Engle will relnquish the Coconut Grove Playhouse, the delightful the-
atre will not be shuttered too long. Owen Phillips, the able director,
hopes to have an announcement on a reopening date after "Two for
the Seesaw" ends itts smash run.
Our favorite supper club funnyman, Joe E. Lewis, is back at the
Eden Roc. with co-star Georgia Gibbs. Tommy Sands is booked for the
holiday there.
Desi Arnai really had himself a ball when he stayed at the Lu-
cerne. He was in the Club Chalet practically every night for a "walk
on" part in "Havana Mardi Gras" with his long-time show biz pal,
Diosa Costello.
Local TV stations boasting about all the "new" films they've re-
cently bought for their late shows. So far. with few exceptions, most of
them are real "stinkers." For those they had to spend money???
* *
TIPS ON TABLES: New "round the world" menu at Green Man-
sions Motel provides for enjoyable dining. Take the family. Prices are
exceptionally moderate.
Glad to hear that Maxim's is staying open all summer. Nice to
have such a classy dining room catering to summer tourist trade,
plus the many locals who don't have the time (they're so busy mak-
ing a buck) during the regular season.
Almost any night during the dinner rush you'll find a celebrity or)
two enjoying the Cantonese cuisine at Fu Manchu. Just look at all those |
famous names decorating the "celebrity chairs" there.
Next time you take Junior to dinner at the Bonfire, don't miss the
display of old and new-type firearms, including replicas of most of the
rifles and pistols used by well-known frontier heroes.
Kon Tiki off to a flying start under the management of able Huey
Young. Its Polynesian cuisine has been evoking real raves from both
visitors and local folk. The menu is "loaded" with mouth watering
dishes, and even though you can't consume such a huge array at one
sitting, you're sure to return again and again, to go from top to bot-
tom. Try some of those exotic coconut and pineapple drinks, too. Ideal
to accompany the South Seas style dining!
semester will be Jeffrey Breslaw
and Steven Weininger. Cantors are
Billy Leff, Marvin Uss and Leon-
ard Michael Segall.
Gabbais are Ronna Lehman and
Mark Haddad; shamash, Bart
Levy, Andrew Ross. Jeffrey
Sachs. Steven Shantzis.
Lay leaders are president, Diane
Keshlansky; vice president, Toby
Cavell; secretaries, Michael Sie-
gel and Marilyn Haddad; treasur-
er, Eli Levine; and hostesses, Judy
SerriBg as f^MlTor the CWWnig *!*, SNwWtr M*dk -*-erry
Lehman, and RooheHe Sachs.
m\ m elmil
Roval Piiim
Mora
Junior Ballet Group Rehearsing
Thomas Armour, director of the
Miami Ballet, has announced that
the recently-revived Junior Com-
! pany will be directed by Renee
Zintgraff.
Miss Zintgratt has studied with
Thalia Mara, Margaret Craske,
Arthur Mahony and Charles Weid-
man. as well as local instructors
George Milenoff and Armour.
The Junior Company is now re-
hearsing for its spring perform-
ance Apr. 30 at Dado County Aud-
itorium.
"Pastorale" is the title of the
ballet in four movements which
Armour has choreographed for the
young dancers. Robert Strasshurg,
who conducts the Miami Youth
Symphony, composed original mu-
sic. The Youth Symphony will play
for the Apr. 30 performance.
STAR Dairy, V*
& Fish Restaurant
For the Holiday Season
SERVING STRICTLY
PASSOVER MEALS
Breakfast Lunch & Dinners
841 Washington Ave.
JE 1-9182
Open fo the Public
A banquet every
night. Served from
5:30 to 8:30
For Reservations Phone
Norman N. Arrow
JEfferson 1-7381
Collint Ave. off Lincoln Rd.
i
*
S
1.
OUR SPECIALTY
NICE, THICK, JUICY
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF
*3.95
-AND THI VfRY BEST IN TOWN!
banquit naurm
Candlelight Inn
till Commodore Pluxe
Coconut Grove
HENRY LEITSON, Mgr.
'
THI BE!
tin mmn wow
NOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS
fOR PASSOVER
SEDER SERVICES CONDUCTED BY
CANTOR JULIUS ROSENSTEIN
$15 Par Person for Both S.d.r Niflhti
1141 Washington Ave.
Beautifully Catered
Affairs Call
JE 4 2655
MmM*
9ncomparab!e
Trench Cuisine"
9516 harding ave. >
Miami beach un6-1654
AT THE PIANO RAJR DAVID LEROUX
OPEN DAILY from 4 to 9 p.m.
"THE ARISTOCRAT Of
KOSHER RESTAURANTS"
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASION*
Air-Cond. UN 6-6043 'reefer*
Under Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth
The Royal Hungarian
RESTAURANT
"^.l & CATERERS
fOR THE fINEST IN KOSHER CUISINE
731 Washington Avenue, Telephone JE 8-5401
HAROLD PONT and IRVIN GORDON
GORDON and PONT
*?* K0SHIR CATERERS
le#W free* sen d'ee.vr., fe e cempfef
170 N. W. 5th ST., MIAMI PHONE FR f-799*
Undtr Supervision of United Kashrus Association of Greater Miami
OPEN HOUSE WEDDINGS BAR MITZVAHS RECEPTION*
YOU'RE CORDIALLY INVITED TODAY TO
NICK & ANTOINETTE'S
RESTAURANT
Cucina Casalinga
"Itoal Italian Horn* looking"
WINE and BEER # FREE PARKING
1624 N.E. 1st Court Phone FR 1-9375
(Between N.E. lt Ave. & 2nd Ave., North el 16th St.)
I Serving Daily from 6 p.m.Sun. from 4 p.m. |


iFriday. April 1, 1960
*Jenis* rkridfii&n
Page 13-A
*
Archaeologists to Dig for Scrolls
Leaders of the Brandeis University Club of
Greater Miami respond with enthusiasm to
ihe announcement of their president. Dr. Stan-
ley Frehling (seated second from left), that a
12th anniversary dinner celebration for Bran-
deis will be held Sunday, Apr. 24, at the Dip-
lomat. Sharing the speaker's table with Dr.
Frehling are (left) first vice president Harold
Turk, life membership chairman Ernest Janis,
and scholarship chairman Paul R. Gordon.
Looking on are Morris J. Goldin, Robert Green,
Jack Leonard, Bernard Traub, Sidney Sch-
wartz, Harold Thurman, Harry Zukernick, Al-
bert I. Jacobs, Sidney Wasserman. Jack W.
Rabinovitch. Sol C. Shaye, Elkin Smith, Gus
R. Roberts, and Nathan Kushin. The group
will serve as a steering committee to imple-
ment plans for the milestone anniversary.
Monthly Rummage Sale 27,h ave- an Temple Tifereth Jacon Sister-; Monday be8'nn'n8 at 8 a.m. Mrs.
lood will hold its regular monthly J Ma* Goldman is in charge of in-
jmmage sale at Steven's Market,' formation.

eville
' CfWtaMy , MIAMI BEACH'S MOST BEAUTIFUL
PASSOVER FAMILY SEDER
conducted bij
CANTOR
Herman K. Gottlieb

Temple Judea
desisted" by
A Professional Choir
of eight voice*
IN THE ALHAMBRA GRAND BALLROOM
Seville
6 30 PM
Monday. April 11 Ih 1960
$10 per person incl. tax
loth Fomily will be
onioned their own table
Oieenfrenl et 29tti Street. M.om. Beech
HESfF.V .TIONS
litelle Polak. Cr g Mgr
/ 2-2511
Zrtat yourself and your loved ones
to a rich experience...
l7^e^/J
A PASSOVER SEDER
PRESENTED IN
THI TRADITIONAL MANNER
in the Pompeii Room
A msgnificsnt festival
In Floral Tempi* Garden salting
footuiing
CANTOR HERBERT RICHARD BROWN
of 'A* Htbrtw Union Colltg* of Soctod Music
and hit NATIONALLY FAMED CHOIR
APRIL II, I960
$11.00 par parson
$10.00 children (under 12)
For Rnnvoliont:
Catering Office JE 2-2561
Rubin Seeks
Court Position
Miami attorney Ellis Rubin
promised to make his office "one
of consultation and correction" if
elected as Judge of the Juvenile
and Domestic Relations Court in
the May 3 primary.
"I believe juvenile courts can be
compared to a hospital." the candi-
date declared here this week. "A
hospital attempts to cure bodily
disease and prevent a patient from
becoming an invalid.
Rubin, a veteran of World War
II, currently serves at legal of-
ficer of a Naval A i r Reserve
Squadron in Jacksonville. He
served as a special assistant
state attorney for Dade County.
In 1954, he was selected as one
of "five outstanding young men
in Florida" by the Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce, and was later
nominated as one of "ten out-
standing young men in the
United States."
He is a past member of the
American Legion, Optimists,
Kniphts of Pythias. Parents Club
of No. Miami Beach, First Pre-
cinct Democratic Club, and No. Mi-
ami Beach Property Owners Assn.
He is a graduate of Holy Cross
College and University of Miami
law school.
The 34-year-old candidate lives
with his wife, Irene, and their two
children at 1820 NE 177th st., No.
Miami Beach.
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
largest Israeli archaeological ex-
pedition ever organized will soon
start systematic searches for an-
cient scrolls belivfjj^-still hidden
in caves in the .lurjean Desert, it
was announced he-ffc by^Dj. Ben-
jamin Mazar, president oTthe He-
brew University, who is also chair-
man of the Israel Exploration So-
ciety.
Scrolls, and other relics are be-
lieved hidden in the caves where,
recently archaeological diggings
have discovered many fragments
and artifacts hidden by Jewish;
rebels in their revolt against the
Romans, after the destruction of |
the second Temple.
While there was no official
statement to that effect, it is be- ",
lieved that many scroll scraps .
and other antiquities have been
stolen from those caves by roam-
ing Bedouins who later sold the
valuable jn^te/jals in Jordan, ,
The area is near the Jordanian
border.
The new expedition, according
to Prof. Mazar, will include mem-
bers of the Exploration Society,
members of the Hebrew Univer-
sity faculty, students, and staff
members of the government's An-
tiquities Department. The expedi-
tion will receive full support from
the Israeli Army.
PASSOVER SEDERS
and Ma'ariv Service
CONDUCTED BY
JAN PEERCE
Famous Metropolitan Opera Star,
with magnificent 12-voice choir
1
TRICES: IOTH SEDERS
FIRST SEDER ONLY
SECOND SEDER ONLV
MONDAY AND
TUESDAY.
APRIL 11.12
k Strict Dietary
Supervision
* Traditional
10-Course Dinner
"k Sacramental Wines
ALL SEATS RESERVED
TICKETS
NOW ON SALE
$30 $35 $40
$27 $30
$17 $20
HOTEL
V OCEAN AT o8th STREET. MIAMI BEACH
Phone: UNion 5-7561, "Seder Office'
\
you ARe
invited
to
m
at the
PASSOV6R
sedeRs
stmctly kosheR
MONDAY EVENING APRIL 11
TUESDAY EVENING APRIL 12
AT 7 PM
CD E All VI LIE
under the auspices of
NORTH SHORE JEWISH CENTER
sp'vicps conducted by
RABBI MAYER ABROMOWITZ CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN
Temple Choir under Direction of ELI SAMUELS
(or first
tor secona
night
For Reservation* call THE CENTER
UN 6-0221
OR DfAUVIU. MOTH, CATERING DEPARTMENT UN S-851 1


Page 14-A
*Jewish fktrMkMn
Friday. April 1, I960
Browsing With Books: By IHURY MHNPUN
His Papa Spoke Yiddish With an Arkansas Attent
PREPOSTEROUS PAPA. By Lewi* Meyer. 214 pp. Cleve-
land and New York: The World Publishing Company,
119 W. 57th St., New York. $3.95.
IT'S A RARE family story which can survive exposure to
' the cold, cruel world. Most of them, once removed from
the warmth of their own hearths, pale instantly and d;e.
Devotees of authors Kimbrough Skinner. Kathertne
Brush, Jean Kerr and other successful translators of fam-
ily humor will be quick to admit that their talcs are well-
bundled in layers of good, thick hyperbole. Perhaps one
United Nations tisfewfwo *W- By SAUL CARSON
of the difficulties with Lewis Meyer's book the one
which keeps it out of.-.the.Jront ranks of this type of
humor is that it's all supposed to be absolutely unem-
bcllished.
Not that his Papa is not a lovable, eccentric extrovert
with a penchant for the extravagant and the bizarre. As
a young man, he descended on Sapulpa. Indian Territory,
in 1906 the year before Oklahoma became a state
opened a clothing store, and promptly nailed signs all
over Creek County: "Who Is Max Meyer?" When he
wasn't arguing customers into shirts without collars and
Why Did Anti-Semitism Engulf Germany Anew?
EVERYBODY WHO should know-frorr I
the head of the German equivalent!
(f (he F.B.I, to the topmost leaders of the |
Jewish community agrees that there-
are, at most, between 40.000 and 50.000^
adult "rightists" in West Germany now. I
There is some disagreement on the
number of youthful adherents of rightist
philosophy. The FBI man is sure that i__
only one of the organized youth groups, numbering 2,300,
is really contaminated with Nazism. As for upward of
40,000 other youths belonging to what he calls "radical"
troops, he feels that they are more "traditionalist" or
'militaristic" rather than neo-Nazi. "If they are Nazis in
their hearts. I cannot tell." tie insists: but. he's sure, they
prcfess. openly at least, loyalty to the German Republic's
democratic constitution.
Annadora Leber. one of the new Germany's most pro-
lific writers, is certain there are no more than 20.000
jouthlul rightists. Furthermore, she say-, the) have no
i Jewish Telegraphic Agency a tspondeia nt
the United V. : ;.-.: i
the Jews f thu un IKM oil | .:nti-
Semi;.

CfeiV Rockwell Speculation
Washington
IS GEORGE LINCOLN Rockwell's
"American Nazi Party" to be-
come a permanent fixture on the
national scene?
Israelis in Prime Minister Ben-
Gurion's "official party were
amazed to see American Nazis
openly picketing the White House
when Ben Gurion was meeting with President Eisen-
hower.
The Israelis could understand the lawful picket-
ing by Arabs. But they gaped in disbelief at the
swastika armbands of Rockwell's Nazis and the flam-
boyant signs denouncing "Jewish treason." One Is-
raeli said the spectacle reminded him of Berlin in
the earlj 1080's.
Even the Arabs eemed a little bewildered at
the immunity of their fellow pickets, the Nazis, The
mainly students, wai mixed.
I winked at the Nazis Others ap-
peai Irak demonstration i
'd v :" N zism.
Homed to pii'. -ts foi
can. I 5 But the
bei
in peed tei tioi re publfi
con scions. Rockv ell ned that t
of a tw istika i ews.
Sob .-ui community elemei h i
pre-.' an;! tell quarantine." Efforts proved in-
effectual. 11 wai the same Jewish elements that
championed Rockwell's "free speech" and tacitly
encouraged District of Columbia auth"1 no
nothing.
An application was recently filed by Rockwell
for a Department of Interior permit to hold a mass
anti-9eMitii rally. It would be Stag I al the Wash-
ington Hoi umen) in early April, during the Cherry
Blossom festivities. The application for use of the
Monument grounds was rejected. But Rockwell was
referred by the authorities to another central loca-
tion, equally convenient and perhaps even more
accessible to tourists.
The "free speech" section of local Jewish lead-
ership supported the alternative location. Ii wes
held that Rockwell's rights required that he be al-
lowed use of some public place.
Other Washington Jews felt that Rockwell should
be jailed for disturbing the peace rather than pro-
vided with a site where he might advocate a pogrom.
This view is much the philosophy of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith.
The ADL hss emerged as the most effective and
militant anti-Rockwell force on the Washington
scene.
The ADL was "extremely disappointed" by the
decision of Pisrict of Columbia authorities to defend
anti-Jewish agitation by the Nazis on the local
streets.
tight organization; are formed for the greater part in very
-mall, splinter groups' have no unified leadership What-
ever. Mrs. Leber's evaluation must be respected. She is
the widow of a famous. pre-Nazi German editor, Julius
Leber. He was in and out of Hitler's prisons for eleven
years, from 1933 to 1944.
His 1944 incarceration was the last. A member of the
"July 20" group which attempted to assassinate Hitler in
1944. Leber's name was on the list of the provisional gov-
ernment formed by the anti-Hitlerites to govern the coun-
try after their coup. The coup failed. Leber was one of
the men executed after that abortive revolution. His
widow, with her pen and lecturer's voice, is now one of
the country's outstanding fighters against a possible resur-
gence of Nazism.
One obtains similar assurances from many others in
the country who should know. A Jewish leader tells the
JTA correspondent: "There are about 30,000 Nazis in the
country, and the Jews number about 30,000. It's a balance
of Sorts. But the country contains 53 million people
Germany is not Nazi."
A studentnot a Jewat the Free University of Ber-
lin warns the correspondent: "You'll be told that most of
the 'rightist' youth groups are 'innocent' fencing clubs in
the universities. But these so-called innocents are the sons
of the innocents' who formed Hitler's Storm Troops and
Elite Guard. Don't believe the hogwash. We have far
too many Nazis, and we may have to fight them openly
in the streets some day."
Where is the truth? A visitor trying to be fair^and
objective is lost. The question concerning the present-day
strength of Nazism in Germany remains unanswered.
When you come to Hamburg, a prominent German
educator tells you that there were more anti-Semitic inci-
dents around the country, during December and January,
than the government's "White Book" on that subject re-
ported. The report mentioned 50 incidents in Hamburg,
;.r.d this loyal son of the "Free and Hanseatic City of Ham-
burg" is angry about the "White Book" statistics.
One possible measure of the strength of Nazism is the
reac'ion of the German public to the recent wave of anti-
Semitism. A public opinion poll shows that 80 percent of
.he German population "disliked" the outbreaks.
Germany's outstanding newspaper and magazine pub-
lisher. Axel Springer (he is called the "Henry Luce of Ger-
many"), tells you that every one of his publications fea-
tured all the anti-Semitic incidents, and condemned them
roundlyand received virtually no kicks about this anti-
Nazism from millions of readers of Springer publications.
The same assurance was voiced by Erich ETgelin'*.
the editor-in-chief of the Deutsche Press Agentur, the
agency th; I supplies domestic and international news to
virtually every newspaper and every radio and television
station In Germany.
The "new" Germans a-c nd of the fact that
Nazism can only be propagated by the press and other
communications media-and also find '.hat stand end i
bj rttelming mass of German readers and listen-
But then other, contradictory, opinions arc expres I
arri some Questions s'il! remain without answer.
For instance, not one of the many eknerts Inter' ;
by his Correspondentnon-Jewish and Jewishcould as-
n why the wave of anti-Semitism engulfed Germany
i .. couple of it N. / ted the cu.nliagrat.on with
that match at Cologne on Christmai Eve.
Whywhywhy? No one could explain.
Overseas Newsletter:
By ELIAHU SALPETER
caring for Indians, he was out soothing either of his two
yliiesiion*. buying land^apd building things, ^liijj. -i"
cial fondness for bathrooms, fireplaces and a 150-foot flag.
pole.
The funniest parts of the book inevitably center
around Papa's "building binges ." Upstairs in his ranch
house was a huge, magnificent bathroom, mirrored, tiled,
marble-topped and mosaicked and totally without water.
Behind the barn he built three towering red silos, the
only drawback being that they were too high to get the
grain into them. He also built a schul which looked ex-
actly like a small home, complete with chintz curtains
and a living room. Papa, incidentally, spoke Yiddish with
an Arkansas accent, besides which, says his son, "his
Yiddish was to Yiddish what Yiddish is to German."
Other episodes abound, and many of them are amus-
ing enough, but there are long arid stretches when a little
exaggeration would have been a welcome thing. In a book
of this kind, it seems to me, one cannot afford to drop the
pace; one incident must hit as high a point as another.
If this sounds like a critic's traditional carping, it is per-
haps a measure of my disappointment. Mr. Meyer has
written a light, gay, affectionate book about a highly en-
tertaining man, and it might have been even better
there's the rub it might so easily have been much,
much better.

PVMWma:
By DAVID SCMWAITZ
Pretty Good Blood
M'
IAZEL TOV. Princess Marg-
aret's chassan has some J-'w-
=h blood in him. His grandfather,
, appears, was Jew.sh
I s\ispcct that Jewish blood is
o different from other blood, but
;ill it's good. Some day maybe in
ondon, he may be passing a schul
vhere they haven't got a Minyan,
so icy may call him in.
There is a sect in England which claims that
all the British are Jews, that the term British is
really Ish-Brith or much the same as B'nai B'rith.
It's nothing new for nobility to intermarry with
Jews. 'I he Mountbattens, it is well known, are inter-
married with Jewsas are a number of other fam-
ilies of British nobility.
It doesn't always help the Jews. There is
the story of the King of Portagal during the In'iuis-
i.ion Days. When he issued the decree that every
ore having Jewish blood must wear a vellcw hat. Iiis
Prime Minister said to him, "Your Majesty, I will
have to get one for you and one for myself."
* *
Did you ever hear the story of the non-Jew who
married a Jewish girl? In advance of the reception,
he was told that many would probably extend their
hands to him and say Shalom Aleichem and he was
told that all he would have to do was to reverse the
words. Someone said Maze) Tov. He replied Tough
Maze!.

Billy Rose has been many things song writer,
show man. art collector, shorthand champion. In
Israel, where he has been recently in connection with
h'.s sculpture collection gift, he recalled a story of the
days when he was a shorthand artist. Bernard
B*ruch ^.ad sent him on some errand to the White
here President Wilson told him that he had
II the rational stenographic champion,
ki ow." said President Wilson. write rl
I would like to see how fast you are."
on started dictating and Billy Rose then
read ': back to the President.
"Now," mid Billy Rose smiling, "how fast are
': lit?"
< said President Wilson, taking" a pencil,
yen dictate to me."

Is Israel Aid Spreading Her Economy too Thin?
,i.. iru
.
Jerusalem
JL LARGE DELEGATION of farm to
** operative experts has just arrived
from India to sudy agricultural techni
ques in Israel. They were followed a
few days later by a special study mission
from Senegal, the newly independent
African republic in the French Comma,,
ity of Nations. Israeli experts were work
ing in about 20 Asian and African countries, and Israeli
companies have established local partnerships in seven
African and Asian countries.
As the tide of independence moves over Africa, the
volume of requests for Israeli technical aid increases. The
new nations realize that Israel's experience in pushing
development of industries, and her unique formulas for co-
operative enterprises in agriculture, banking and transpor-
tation, as well as the particular type of trade unionism
represented by Histadrut all offer possibilities of adapta-
tion for attempts to solve the problems of Asian and Afri-
can countries.
However, some Israeli observers recently began to
ask the question whether Israel is not "spreading herself
too thinly" in her effort to provide technical assistance to
Asia and Africa.
Israel] officials reply to this question in the negative.
They point out that, in Africa, for example, the countries
where Israel provides aid or where Israel companies are
in partnerships, represent only 15 percent of the territory
of the vast Black Continent. They say that the growing
volume of requests for Israeli experts shows that Israel
has proven herself in Africa and Asia. They also stress
that know-how is becoming one of the most valuable export
items of most modern countries, and is also becoming a
quite noticeable item for Israel, even from the economic
point of view.
The problem itself is of two parts, one political and
one material As the newly independent countries emerge,
one after the other, it become* more and there evident
that speaking of the Black Continent as one political en-,
tity is rather unrealistic.


Friday, April 1, 1960
*Jewisl> ftorktian
Page 15-A
JLC Urges World Heat on Commies
BHSOTRY IN GOVERNMENT
PACE 12-C
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (JTA)
' A resolution demanding that the
United Nations investigate the
condition of the Jews in the So-
viet Union was adopted here at
.the closing session of the three-
day convention of the Jewish La-
bor Committee. More than 500 dele-
gates attended the parley. The
resolution urued the free world
"not to remain silent in the face
of the usurpation of the element-
| ary rights of Jews" in Communist
lands.
David L. Slann (right), of Atlanta and Miami Beach, contributes
$25,000 toward a quarter of a million dollar fund to establish
a professorship at the Jewish Theological Seminary of Amer-
ica in the name of former President Harry S. Truman (center).
Left is Dr. Louis Finkelstein, chancellor of the Seminary. Slann's
contribution was revealed at a recent convocation here at
which Mr. Truman was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor
of Laws.
Beach Elks
Elect Levenson
James D. Lcvenson, Miami in-
surance executive, was named ex-!
;i"ed ruler of t h e Miami Beach
Elks Lodge last week.
Levenson is a former post com-'
mander. state commander and na-
tional officer of the American Vet-
erans of World War II, past pres-
ident of the Breakfast Optimists
Club, former chairman-of the Mi
ami Beach Chamber of Commerce I
safety committee. 1959 chairman
of the Miami Beach Small Busi-1
nuss Division of the United Fund,
former director of the Civic
League of Miami Beach, and a for-
mer chairman of the Greater Mi-
ami B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion.
Levenson is vice president of the
Miller Levenson Insurance Agen-
cy, in addition to holding director-
ships in other Greater Miami busi-
nesses.
He lives with his wife and two
children at 795 84th St., Miami
Beach.

JAMtS LtVtNSOH
To live in Hejris We Leavt
Behind It to Live Forever!
MEMORIALS
PALMER'S
"Miami'* Only
Jewish
Monument
Builders"
Scheduled Unveiling*
SUNDAY, APRIL 3
Mt. Neee Cemetery
CEUA SIECEL, 12:30 p.m.
K.:bbi Aorjiiam Waxman
Alt. Sinai Memnrial Park
Cemetery
ALEXANDER RfSNICK, 1 p.m.
"May Their Soulj Repose
in Eternal Peace!"
ARRANGEMENTS BY
PALMER'S MIAMI MONUMENT CO.
fell
I&<
^UGUST BROS fty7
1 r >< lit s 7 '
it!
Report Ike Vow
To Assist Israel
In Case Of War
Continued from Page 1-A
Prime Minister Ben-Gurion told
President Eisenhower and British
Premier Harold Macmillan that
Israel does not expect to be arm-
ed "tank for tank" against t h e
I All. The Israeli Premier is said
to have told the American and
British statesmen he would be
satisfied if the UAR had no more
than a two-to-one lead in tanks and
jet planes. "Israel's superior fight-
ing morale would be relied upon
to make up the difference," the
Telegraph states.
The newspaper states further
that "there is little chance" of Is-
rael obtaining from Britain any
ground-to-air missiles, since "Hiere
are no known missiles of any ori-
gin in the Middle East now, and it
would be a grave step for Israel
to take the lead in that respect."
Javits Lists Vast
Red Arms Sales
Continued from Page 1-A
9re*ive policy against Is-
rael, and threatening peace. He
urged that the United State* as-
sist Israel to maintain a balance
of power.
Senator Javits called for a re-
affirmation of the 1950 Anglo-
French-American Triapartite Dec-
laration, and a decision by t h e
Three Powers on action if t h e
declaration has to be invoked for
agression. The alternative, he said,
is to give Israel the military equip-
ment to maintain its own defenses.
He said the Soviet Union applies
pressure in the Near East when-
ever such pressure seems attrac-
tive to its global strategy 'It
oupht to made clear that such
moves will not be profitable," he
stated.
The Senator asserted that the
UAR now has 12 modern Sovie
submarines in operation, threaten
ing the Eastern Mediterranean
He said intelligence reports indi
cated crews of the UAR subma
rines include Soviet-bloc naval per-
sonnel.
Another resolution appealed to
the free world to protect Israel
morally and militarily "from 'con-
tinued attempts by the Soviets to
gain spheres of influence in the
Middle East." The convention also
took cognizance of the continued
employment in high government
positions in West Germany of per-
sons with Nazi backgrounds. It
urged the Bonn Government "to
keep alive in the German mind
the crimes committed a'-'ainst
Jews and humanity" by the Nazi
regime.
Principal speakers at the con-
vention included George Meany,
president of the AFL-CIO; David
Dubinsky, president of the Inter-
national Ladies Garment Work-
ers Union; Adolph Held, nation-
al chairman of rhe JLC; Alex-
ander Kahn, general manager of
the Jewish Daily Forward; Na-
than Chanin, secretary general
of the Workmen's Circle; and
others.
Mr. Kahn told t h e convention
that the attempt to create an anti-
Semitic movement in America is
a failure "because we have an in-
formed public opinion, a free press
and a united Jewish community,
which is on guard fighting against
prejudice and discrimination and
for justice."
In this united effort, he declared,
"the Jewish Labor Committee
plays an important part. Jewish
labor and Jewish industry in the
United States disprove the anti-
Semitic lie that Jews are not pro-
'duStive.' The people Tn Israel dis-
prove the other anti-Semitic great
lie that Jews cannot be workers
and farmers and cannot govern
themselves."
Mr. Kahn asked that American
Jews "forget all former misgiv-
ings about a Jewish state in Is-
rael and give all possible help to
make Israel safe." He told the dele-
gates that there were still hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews who
had no place to go and who were
welcome in Israel. "We must do
everything to save them," he de-
clared.
Benjamin Tabachinsky, na-
tional director, told the delegates
that unconditional survival of
the Jewish people must be th*>
answer to those who preach
the unconditional surrender of
Jewish communities to assimila-
tionism. He said that within the
past 25 years the JLC had
raised nearly $13,000,000 in order
to maintain Jewish cultural life
both here and abroad.
Jacob Pat, executive secretary
of the JLC. reported that 15.000
families have been reunited
through JLC's efforts. He said the
families disunited by war or Iron
Curtain enslavement had sought
families in the United States. Can-
ada. Mexico, Israel and Europe.
The relocation network aft up by
the JLC had enabled these families
to be reunited.
INSURANCE
ONE STOP AGENCY
JEWELRYFURSMISCELLANEOUS FLOATERS
AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY A PHYSICAL DAMAGE
Limits to meet youi need!
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ELECT
JUSTICE
OF THE
PEACE
5th
DISTRICT
DOYLE
commissioner of
FARMER BUSINESS
CONNER
AGRICULTURE
LEGISLATOR
pi. a*l. m*i.
Dear Voters:
I am your candidate for Justice of the
Peace, 5th District, th Court of First Resort to
many of our citizens.
For almost four years, the incumbent has
time and time again shown his lack of under-
standing the needs and basic rights of the indi-
vidual. This was brought to light when the
Court's Committee of the Bar Association ex-
pressed their opinion that the incumbent was
not qualified to hold judicial office. The Bar
Association ogoin announced this not too long
ogo.
As o member of the community for more
thon 20 years, I con no longer remain mute; I
must bring the facts before you the public.
I am certain that upon being apprised of the
facts you will support ond vote Edwin AAorger
to restore competence and dignity ond your con-
fidence in our Justice of the Peace Court.
* Tke.uk yew,
EDWIN MARGE*
MARGER


Page 16-A
vJewistncrkUan
Friday, April 1. I960
I
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OL.G
J
[
0*
the
Spring is here ... At least spring vacation
is here Gail Pohn, junior at Syracuse, and
brother, Jack, freshman at Miami University at
Oxford, O., home for the holidays .
Miss Ruth Stone, who is doing graduate work
at the U. of Chicago, in town visiting Grandmoth-
er Fischer, of the Indian Creek hotel .
Elizabeth Brenner, senior writer on the Con-
gressional Quarterly in Washington, came to see her parents. Mr.
and Mrs William Brenner, and enjoy a few days of rest
Miniature Smith College at the Dr. Meyer Eggnatz home on
XV. Shore dr. Joan is home from Smith, where she is a junior
' ', Twi of her classmates, en route to Key West, stopped for the
weekend-Christine Pathy, New York City, and Merbie Robinson,
Denver, Colo. Then came Joans roommate, Elizabeth Baum-
garten, cf North Amherst, Mass. .
, lLFr,om,Highland Park, 0., came red-haired Hope Brown, editor
of the Little Giant Year Book, of Highland Park High, to spend ten
days with her aunt. Mrs. Sidney Schwartz ... She flew down with
ner friend, Ellen Server, who is spending part of her vacation with
her grandparents, the Servers, of Bagdad on the Bay.
**
To celebrate the 35th wedding anniversary of their parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Nelson, their children, Mr. and Mrs. David
ijUi .r> lge and Mrs- Theo ald Nelson, hosted a surprise dinner party at the Coconut Grove
Playhouse restaurant, after which the gathering saw "Two for the
oPt'SSw ...
Out-of-town guests included Mrs. Sigmund Drucker and Stanley
Papo, owner of the Avalon School in Great Barrington Mass .
Mrs. Irving Nelson sported a lovely pink rose corsage on her im-
ported white and fuchsia crepe dress Mrs. Nelson and her
daughter, Judy Drucker, are frequently heard in song at Israel
Bond functions.

Deborah gals of Hadassah will be guests at an Eye Bank luncheon
to be given by Mrs. Milton Steinhardt on Apr. 6 at her lovely home
on Stillwaler dr. Nick, of Nick and Arthur fame, will person-
ally supervise the epicurean buffet .
n,r' a"d Mrs- Max Berman, 2390 Coral Way, leaving to attend
the Bar Mitzvah of their nephew in Brooklyn, and expect to spend
the entire summer up North, visiting relatives and friends in Phila-
delphia, Atlantic City and New Haven .
Six-year-old Roy Firestone went to the movies with his daddy,
Bernard W. Firestone Then he came home and told his mother,
Kegina. that he had been to see "Sam and Lila" .
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peretzman, of 4044 N. Meridian ave.,
celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary at a function hosted by
their children at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Cohen, 1811
SW 24th ter. The Peretzmans were married in Atlanta, Ga.,
and came to Miami in 1925 .They are the grandparents of 21
grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren ... All live in Miami
except one daughter, of Gloversville, N. Y. .
If you have to spend your vacation in the hospital, what can be
more glamorous than Mt. Sinai? Lillian Neiman, sister of
Mrs. Charles (Ruth) Jacobson, is doing just that Daily confer-
ence held with husband, Dr. Benjamin Neiman, of Oak Park .
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Apte, 435 SW 31st rd., leaving June or July
on a trip around the world It'll be a two-meoth quickie, to
consist of stops in Colombia, Venezuela, Panama. San Francisco
jet to Tokyo, Hong Kong, Bankok, Guam, Manilla, Hawaii, Mexico,
and back to Miami, flying all the way.
Mt
Ruth Lieberford recently in town to visit her mother, Mrs. Viola
Grubman .
Bert Michaels. Miami Beach youngster who scored a hit at the
Americana several years ago, being auditioned for "West Side
Story," now on location in New York, with Jerome Roberts as pro-
ducer .
Mrs. Joseph Gardner, Belle Tower apts., 16 Island ave.. enter-
tained at a recent brurfch at the Algiers hotel Mrs. Anne Hand,
of Bay Point, L. I., among out-of-town guests Function was a
Bon Voyage for Mrs. Ann Ginsberg and Mrs. Sol Wolf .
Paul and Martha Marks will preside as hosts at a cocktail party
in their Miami Shores home, 671 NE 105th st., on Monday evening
. The social is in behalf of Combined Jewish Appeal, with Spen-
cer Rudnick, Henry Gilbert, and Murray Greene assisting.

Elinore and Sidney Aronovitz off to attend a Florida Bankers'
convention Sid's chairman of the board of the Bank of Dade
County .
Sam Winer, of the Bonfire restaurant, host to a beautiful birth-
day party in honor of his mother, at the Banfire for 14 guests .
Dinner party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Julian Kurlander.
2064 Prairie ave., honoring their Cleveland cousins. Arnold and
Helen Kurlander. on the occasion of their 35th wedding anniversary
. Among guests: Miss Irene Lerner, Mrs. Anna Jacobson, of
New York, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Kurlander, and Mr. and Mrs. M. J.
(Dorothy) Kopelowitz .
Ronnie Gail, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Rudnick. to mark
her sweet sixteenth with a reception and dance Saturday evening
at the Singapore hotel Among the 30 invited guests will be
Sharon Dunayer. Sonny Taylor. Mike Lieberman. Jay Greenstein,
and Jeff Fallick Ronnie's an honor student at No. Miami Sen-
ior High Ronnie's brother, Jay, 19. is a U. of Miami student
. Brother Marty will be celebrating his Bar Mitzvah in May.

Al.-o home for vacation: Susan and Linda Phillips, entertained
by their mom, Jewish Floridian staffer Lee Phillips, at a party at
home on Saturday eve Guests included the Louis Rosenbergs,
the girls' grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Rosenberg. Mr. and
Mrs. Gene Troop, Sam and Sidney Lee, all of Miami Beach .
From Providence, R. I.. Al Rosenberg and the Lou Garfinkles were
also present to greet the girls, who are Phi Sigma Sigma so-
rority .
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gradsky, 873 N. Shore dr.. will be hosts
at a brunch Sunday morning at the Deauville hotel .
Dorothy Krieger Fink happy to be entertaining her sister, Mrs.
Gertrude Metz. of Washington, D. C, whose husband was the late
distinguished Rabbi S. II. Metz.

Quite a party: Patrons committee of the Museum of Science
and Natural History, with Mitch Miller at the Fontainebleau .
Also there, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Weintraub, the Richard Hechts,
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wolfson, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rubin, Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Kling, Solomon Margolis and son Michael, the Jean C.
Lehmans and the Martin Spectors .
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Katzif, 2401 SW 16th st.. back from Ma
trona, Pa., where last rites were held for Ruth's mother, Mrs. Ger-
trude Ehrenreich They also visited Mr. and Mrs. Victor Katz,
of Uniontown, Pa., and Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ehrenreich, of Brack-
enridge, Pa. .
Allen B. Shevach here from pre-med studies at Johns Hopkins
visiting his parents. Dr. and Mrs. Randolph Shevach House-
guesting with him: Peter Tuteur. of Chicago .
Milton and Miriam Sirkin hurried to Chapel Hill where soji..
Josh attends the University of North Carolina ... It was Josh's
21st birthday He's prexy of Pi Lambda Phi there.
nu
oman s
1UoM
"t)ewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 1, 1960
Section B
At a Youth Aliyah luncheon sponsored by Barth, president. Mrs. Harry P. Cohen (center)
Stephen S. Wise group of Hadassah last week is luncheon chairman. Youth Aliyah chairman
in the Deauville hotel. Left front is Mrs. Nathan is Mrs. Sam Dorfman (right front).
Miami Beach Hadassah Launches Jewish
Floridian Month with Free Trip to Israel
Miami Beach chapter of Hadas-
sah this week moved to proclaim
April as Beach Hadassah-Jewish
Floridian Month.
Mrs. Lillian Perlman, ways and
means chairman, announced the
executive board's decision Wed-
nesday. _
During the month of April, all
chapter members who become
new subscribers, or who get new
subscriptions to The Jewish Florid-
ian, will be eligible for a free trip
to Israel, Mexico, or the West In-
dies.
"The Jewish Floridian is offer-
ing these prizes as part of the
April observance," Mrs. Perlman
explained. "While this Hadassah,
project will serve as an excellent
fund-raising device for us, we are
sponsoring the month-long observ-
ance in the belief that every Jew-
ish home in Greater Miami should
receive The Jewish Floridian.
"Through the Floridian, the
community is made aware of im-
portant events in Jewish life. By
reading the Floridian. we achieve
a more meaningful understanding
of our Jewish role today."
Left to right are Mrs. Howard H. Miller, president of Sisterhood
of Temple Beth Sholom, Mrs. Murray Gilden and Mrs. Robert
Goodman, vice presidents of the PTA, and Mrs. Inez M. Kren-
sky, honorary director of Sisterhood, discussing plans for the
forthcoming luncheon and fashion show sponsored by the PTA
and Sisterhood on Apr. 20. The show will be provided by
Burdine's in the Sisterhood Lounge of Beth Sholom.
Joint Installation
For JWV Bodies
Mrs. Stanley Gold will be install-
ed president of the Jewish War
Veterans, West Miami Post 223,
on Sunday evening at Hillel House.
William Avirom will be installed
commander of the post in joint
ceremonies.
Other auxiliary officers include
the Mesdames Joseph Cox, senior
vice president: Norman Beil, jun-
ior vice president; Arnold Gordon,
chaplain; Samuel Rosenblum,
conductress; Louis Farkas, patri-
otic instructor.
Mesdames Joseph Achtman. his-
torian; Fred Tandlich, guard; and
Michael Marks, Maurice Katz and
Jack Silverman, trustees.
Other post officers are Murray
Dronsky, senior vice commander;
Norman Beil. first junior vice
commander; Bernhard Cohen, sec-
ond junior vice commander; Wil-
liam Jacobs, adjutant; James
Stern, quartermaster; Mx Rubin,
Joseph Achtman and Albert Blen,
trustees.
Henry Greenfield and his orches-
tra will entertain. The function be-
gins at 8 p.m.
Mrs. Manny Burstein Qeft) is coordinator of General Solicitation
in Miami for the Combined Jewish Appeal Women's Division.
Shown with her, planning a breakfast at the Jewish Home for
the Aged on Wednesday, 10 a.m., are (left to right) Mrs. Irving
Ginsberg and Mrs. William Sperling.
Hostess to Tuesday /Meeting
Mrs. Solomon Goldman, chair-
man of the Women's Auxiliary of
the Jewish Physicians Committee
of the Hebrew University at Jerus-
alem, will be nostess at her Pine-
tree dr. home Tuesday for an elec-
tion meeting. Plans will also be
discussed for participation in the
coming series of cultural events
to be launched by the organization
Apr. 28 at Temple Beth Sholom.
The series will include talks on
music, art, and architecture.


Page 2 B
vjmistncridliar)
Friday, April 1, I960
Experts
Tops
Several of the models who will take part in
the fur and diamond show on Tuesday at the
home of Mrs. Irving Miller look forward with
pleasure to wearing a million dollars worth of
gems and furs. Here, discussing plans for the
show, which will be sponsored by the Wom-
en's Division for Israel Bonds, are Mrs. Stuart
Bernstein, Mrs. David Ponve, at whose home
the planning session took place last week,
Mrs. Irving Miller, Mrs. Samuel Graubart, Mrs.
Tana de Gamez Gres, nationally-known art
and fashion authority, and Mrs. William Felt.
Farewell Tribute To Old Beach High School Tues.
Miami Beach Senior High School
PTA will hold its las! meeting in
11 ichool on Tuesdaj evening
A farewell tribute to the past and
H .11 be in the form of a
cal rxtravaganza for the pro-
turn with a cas| ol over 25 par-
tmpantv
All Miami Beach High School
alumni are invited. This will be the
first allalumni reunion in the
school :;:: year history.
Let s (let Acquainted With the
PT Awards Winners" will be the
theme of the program. Alumni
horn 1928 to the present, parents
ind faoulty will star in the musi-
cal, which will be patterned after
he Oscar Award winner- Norm
nations and awards will be given
in such categories as outstanding
leadership in the days when Miami
Beach was a small community and
the fir-t graduating class consist-
ed of five students.
Among nominees for awards will
be those leaders of the community
w ho worked to obtain a new senior
high school building.
A musical sequence involving 25
past carnival queens will add to
he. glamor of the evening, and
comedy will be provided by PTA
fathers.
Author of the program is an
alumni. Mrs. Albert Pollak. Mrs.
Murray Sonnett is assisting with
the direction. Choreography and
production numbers are staged by
Mr- Roslyn Sakrais.
This will be the first alumni re-'
union at the high school for all
clMBM from 1928 through 1959.
Mrs. Enid Firestone (D. Donald)
Smith is PTA president, and the
first alumnae to become president
at Miami Beach High School.
Sinai Women To Honor Hawaii
Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
honor Hawaii at its fourth annual
donor luncheon. The affair will be
held in the Pompeii room of the
Kden Roc hotel on Wednesday
noon. April 20.
Kntertainment will include the
Richie Brothers, of musical com-
edy fame, and the exotic Poly-
nesian dancer, Moano.
Mrs. Sam Scurran. donor com-
mittee chairman, announces a
Golden Circle table will be set for
members who have earned over
$100 for Sisterhood during the
year.
Members of the committee in-
clude Mrs. Adrian Kaufman, co-
chairman. Mrs. Ralph Robin, donor
pool chairman, Mrs. Gene Soros-.
k> coordinator of records, Mrs.
Al Sherman. Mrs. Milton Janis.
Mrs. Charles Steingold, Mrs. Ju-
lian Brown, Mrs. Bernard Chaney,
Mrs. Harold Shipmaker. Mrs.
Mannie Finkelstein and Mrs. Fred
Pearlman.
Sisterhood's fund raising projects
are primarily for kitchen equip
ment in the new Temple building.
The next monthly meeting will
be held at the Temple. 12100 NE
15lh ave.. on Wednesday evening,
Apr. 13.
CtlOOSe your favorite style of
i HOROWITZ-MARGARETEN
: GEFILTE FISH
Tops-in-iasre
Quatitv!
For Delicious
Passover Meals
USE KOSHER L'PESACH
PLANTERS
PREMIUM QUALITY All
100% r\JK PEANUT Wifc
REGULAR ... in howd
brolh or jelled iauce
. jumbo or
tnoclttize portions
DE LUXE made with
aritlocratic PIKE and
WHITE FISH exclusively .
with homey thick,
shimmering jelled iauce.
'efJ.-^-V,
ALL KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
DISTRIBUTED BY
PALM IMSTIIIUI'TOKS 1X4'.
373 N.E. 61st STREET MIAMI FLORIDA
CD EC SEND YOUR NAME
AND ADDRESS
FOR A SPECIAL KOSHER
I'PESACH RECIPE BOOK
Write "PUntert"
c/e The Jtwith Flo> dim
PO. Io, 2973. Miimi I, FU.
to Choose
in Fashions
Leading fashion authorities of
the Greater Miami area will serve
iijudges^aT ttW fur^rrfl"Titantond
show to be sponsored by the Wom-
en's Divisions, for Israel Bonds at
the home of Mrs. Irving Miller on
Sunset Island No. 3 Tuesday, it was
announced by Mrs. Bernard Kap-
lan, coordinator of the show.
Kaplan, who is special;
events chairman for the Women's
Division, said that an unusual twill
will be given to the selection of
outstanding fashions at the show.
Instead of judging the fashions in
fi:r- and diamonds to be displayed
at ihe show, the judges will select
the most fashionably-dressed indi-
vidual from among the guests.
Mis. Kaplan announced that the
following will take part in the fur
and diamond show as judges:
Mister Wyatt, chairman; Mrs
Jacques Turner, wife of the
French Counsel in Miami; Mist
Edilh Applebaum. fashion editoi
of The Jewish Floridian; Miss
Beverly Wilson, fashion editor of
The Miami Herald; Miss Martha
Gardner, fashion editor of the Mi-
ami News; Miss Maude Massen-
gale. fashion editor of The Miami
Beach Sun; Miss Gracias, fashion
coordinator of Saks Fifth Avenue;
Miss Betty Sherwin. fashion coor-
dinator of Burdines; and Miss
Gumby, fashion coordinator of
Jordan Marsh.
Admission to the event will b
Editor Speaks on Beach
Leo Mindlin, executive editor of
The Jewish Floridian, last week
addressed the executive board of
the Miami Beach chapter of Ha-
dassah on "The Need to be In-
formed." The- meeting was aT the
Algiers hotel.
Cancer Corps
Unit to Meet
Philip Ayre Unit of the Woman's
Corps of the Cancer Institute at
Miami will meet under its newly
elected slate of officers on Mon
day. 9:15 am, at Pinerama rest-
aurant, 15950 W. Dixie hwy.
Mrs William Goodman has been
reelected president!. Mrs. Arthur
Vitch is first vice president; Mrs.
Morton Reiss. second vice presi
dent; Mrs. Harold Lichter, thin!
vice president; Mrs. Irving Dick
ler, fourth vice president; Mrs.
Sydney Schechter, recording sec
retary; Mrs. Arthur Selevan. fi
najicial secretary; Mrs. Harry
King, corrsponding secretary; and
Mrs. Saul Bell, treasurer.
Membership chairman is Mrs.
Harold Lichter.
limited to Israel Bond Sponsors,
minimum purchase of a $1,000
Bond.
Furs to be shown will be from
the collection of Mr. Hennan of
Lincoln rd., and diamonds will be
by Koslow of the Fontainebleau.

Foremost
Florida
Dairies
PASSOVER
MILK
UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD
HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSCH EVER,
DIRECTOR
BE SURE IT'S
Foremost
Florida Dairies
RETAIL DIVISION
For Home Delivery Ph. FR 4-2621
PLACE YOUR PASSOVER ORDER NOW
OR TELL YOUR DRIVER
Look for the Passover Emblem on All Products
"/W>~'W*W-/V
'W\-'W '^V'WWWWWWV-


Friday. April 1, 1960
k-iit rhMtJ, >r
Page 3-B
Hosts and honorary guests at champagne reception in prepa-
ration for Temple Judea dinner to be held Sunday evening at
the Dupont Plaza hotel. From left are Max Deakter, at whose
home reception was held last Thursday; Mrs. Tana de Gamez
Gres. noted author and editor; Rabbi Morris A. Skop, in whose
honor the dinner will be given and Mrs. Deakter.
Miami Delegate Off to Confab
Executive board of national Pio-
neer Women will meet in New
York City on Sunday through Tues-
day at the Statler-Hilton hotel.
Mrs. Leo Goldman, organization-
? QQ
ENJOY PURE JET
SERVICE FROM MIAMI
TO TEL AVIV
Finast, most comfortable way to
trvl! Fly 707 Intercontinental
Jt direct (o I wrap, from Miami.
Stopavtr in Paris at no extra tost
whara you connect with iwift
Car.v.II. J.I. to T.I Aviv French
cunuae)* an rout* Round trip
economy fara only S964.96 S.a
yeur Traval Aoent or call Air
France, FR 4-242*
al chairman of Greater Miami
Council, is the first local represent-
ative on the board, and will attend
the meeting.
Ort Sunday, the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
will honor all board members at
a cocktail party. The first session
will be devoted to an American
Zionist Council conference on edu-
cation and culture in the Zionist
movement.
Monday is set aside for discus-
sions, reports, resolutions and a
farewell to Simcha Pratt, as well
as planning of Pioneer Women's
35th anniversary special events,
pilgrimage to Israel, publications,
Moetzet. Hapoalot, scholarships,
wills, bequests and special Israel
tours.
Tuesday, the agenda covers or-
ganization, membership, dues, pub-
lic relations, education depart-
ment, journal and literature as well
as a review of the Shekel drive
and planning of the 1961 national
convention.
a *
Greater Miami Council's newest
venture, the This and That Shop,
6150 NW 22nd ave., is open daily
and urgently in need of members
to relieve present staff and rum-
mage.
O O 0
Cultural group of Kadimah chap-
ter is meeting regularly. The next
session will be held Monday. 8
p.m., at the home of Mrs. Lillian
Cohen, 3111 SW 11th st.
City-Wide Drive
Slated for Miami
A city-wide drive to secure life-
saving funds from women of
Greater Miami has been announc-
ed ly Mrs. Anna Brenner Meyers,
chairman of the Combined Jewish
Appeal Women's Division.
"The intensified effort will serve
to remind us of the many grave
problems affecting hundreds of
thousands of Jews overseas and at
home, whose lives are not fulfilled
because of poverty, oppression or
lack of freedom," said Mrs. Mey-
ers.
To usher in the General Solici-
tation phase of the women's cam-
paign in Miami, a workers' break-
fast will be held on Wednesday
morning, 10 a.m., at the Jewish
Home for the Aged.
Mrs. Meyer Eggnatz and Mrs.
Richard Hecht, chairmen of Gen-
eral Solicitation in the Women's
Division, have announced the ap-
pointment of Mrs. Manny Burstein
as coordinator of the Miami cam-
paign.
Working with Mrs. Burstein will
be the women of ORT, American
Jewish Congress, B'nai B'rith, Sis-
terhoods, Pioneer Women, and Ha-
dassah. The CJA effort at Beth
David Synagogue wil be coordi-
nated by Mrs. Gerald Soltz and
Mrs. Yaakov Rosenberg.
FRANCE
XM1IS .UCfSIMllM/MUI'S HOST PIISMI1 StMCt
luncheon Meeting Tuesday
Weekly luncheon meeting of Mi-
ami Beach Loage ot B'nai B'rith
will be held Tuesday noon at the
DiLido hotel. Gershon S. Miller,
chairman, said that guest speaker
will be Dr. Joseph Narot, of Tem-
ple Israel.
I! GALA FIFTH SEASON i
COCONUT GROVE PLAYHOUSE
3500 MAIN HIGHWAY
Evenings Except Monday at 8:30 p.m.
Matinees Wednesday & Saturday at 1:30 p.m.
VOW THRU APRIL 3
BEN GAZZARA
SHEILA COPELAN
in
i
TWO FOR THE SEESAW"
THE 1958 BROADWAY SMASH HIT
William Gibson
"A FUESH AND AMUSING COMEDY ... A CHARMING PLAY"
ATKINSON. N.Y. TIMES
Directed by Owen Phillips
P.P.P. BOOKS VOID AFTER APRIL 3
HAYH0USE RESTAURANT AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE
ioncheons wmie surras cocktails
la TK. leu-.ee AT CHOZIH Al The Plm
Mrs. John Serbin (left) and Mrs. A. J. Molasky were among
the hostesses at the Combined Jewish Appeal leadership din-
ner at Westview Country Club on Wednesday evening.
I T S A
II A P P Y IIOII RAY
when you bring home*
Konhor Pamovpr
A X D Y
r
K~

PAKSOYKR TREATS MIMATIKIS
2.25
Big 1 lb., 2 oz., box of tempting chocolate goodness all Kosher
for Passover. Dark assortment of bite-size pieces are sure
to melt in your mouth and make a hit with the whole family]
SI I. VIM II FRIJT SLICKS, 1 Ub.
1.23
The Loft's Candy Kitchens are famous for delicious candy and
they live up to the last letter of the word with these candied
fruit slices .... try them during the Passover Holidays.
Passover Coffee beans .......... 1.00
Seder Book filled with miniature chocolate matzos ......_.. i.25
Moist-Pak fruits, delicious prunes, figs, kumquats and compote,
come in 1 lb. tub j.jj each
Candy, street floor miami. Also at miami beach and 163rd st.
BTT JR.ID I NETS


Page 4-B
fJewisti Meridian
Friday, April 1. 1960

Miami Beach Hadassah Groups Will
Close Season at Meetings Next Week
Participtating in the feeding of Cox Oral Polio Vaccine by the
Dade County Health Department are members of the Coral
Gables chapter of B'nai B'rith Women. Voluntary service is a
project of the citizenship and civic affairs committee, with Mrs.
David J. Sachs (right) as chairman. Assisting here at a session
for public school students at television station WCKT, the
chapter will also be on hand as aides to doctors and nurses
Apr. 3 to 10 at the Home Show in Dinner Key Auditorium.
Miami Beach groups of Hadas-
sah plan interesting closing meet-
ings throughout the city next week.
Brandeis group will hold its
meeting on Monday. 11:30 a.m., at
the Fontainebleau hotel. Refresh-
ments will be followed by election
of officers.

Deborah group will have its
meeting on Wednesday noon at the
home of Mrs. M. Steinhardt. 1580
Stillwater dr. The program will
take the form of an Eye Bank
party, with members asked to
bring filled Eye Banks.
4
Emma Lazarus group will hold
its meeting on Monday noon at
Washington Federal on Normandy
Isle. Refreshments will be follow-
ed by a program on floral arrange-
ments. Mrs. Harry Moscoe, and on
gardens. Mrs. Harold Hirschfield.

Esther group will meet at the
Fontainebleau hotel on Monday.
Refreshments will he followed by
a program under direction of Mrs.
Eugene Roscnfeld on "Passover in
Israel."
I. R. Goodman group will meet
at the Barcelona hotel on Wednes-
day evening at 8 p.m. Program will
be recorded excerpts of talks and
music by local dignitaries who par-
ticipated in memorial services for
the late I. R. Goodman, after whom
the group is named.

Horxl group will meet at the
Eden Roc hotel on Monday at 12:30
and the program will be a drama-
tic interpretation by Mrs. Gershon
Miller, entitled "Lost Children."
On Apr. 8. a Youth Aliyah tea will
be held at the home of Mrs. Jack
Courshon, 1430 W. 23rd St., at 1
p.m.

Israet group will meet Monday
at the Algiers hotel at 12 noon.

Hannah Sonosch group will have
its Founders Day and Installation
at a brunch on Monday, 11:30 a.m.,
at the Saxony hotel. Chairman of
the day is Mrs. Ruth Rudine. In-
stalling officer will be Dr. Irving
Lehrman, of Temple Emanu-El.
*
Shaloma group will hold a board
meeting on Monday, 10 a.m.. at the
Hibiscus Lodge, followed by an
auction sale for funds to Hadassah
Supplies.

Henrietta Siold group will have
their meeting on Monday noon at
the Algiers hotel.

Stephen S. Wise group will meet
at the Deauville hotel on Monday
at 12:30. The program will be a
skit, "We've Hit the Top." and a
discussion of the Passover holi-
day.
In fond /Memory of
SARAH FRANKEL
Past President of
Henrietta Szold Group
of Hadassah
Former Editor of
Miami Beach Chapter
Hadassah Bulletin
Deceased March 17, 1960
God Rest Her Soul
By the Henrietta Szold
Group of Hadassah
Histadrut Bids
Couple Farewell
Israel Histadrut Committee of
Greater Miami this week bid Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Nash Bon Voy-
age on the occasion of their forth-
coming trip to Israel.
Mr. and Mrs. Nash will visit
vith family and friends in New-
York prior to their departure.
In Israel, they will be introduced
to leaders of Histadrut and mem-
bers of Parliament by Isaac Ham-
lln, of the Histadrut executive
The COUpIe'l extended tour
of Israel through the Passovei hoi-
1 include a \i-it t" nuniei-
kibbutzim, as well as a n
,n Tiberius
tuple will 10 be present
at dedication cen
Holim med-
e v. which will
ima
.\
*
.**.#*
CP Unit Plans
Fashion Show
i Dade Unit ol United Ce-
i will hold a luncheon
and fa-inon show Tuesday noon
at the Caatat ay motel.
if ch. 10 TV
Morning" ihow, will crown t h <
queen ol the afternoon, which will
ire Hawaiian and Oriental
clothir.s.'.
Doing the commentary will be
Buddy Logue, representative of
Alfred Shaheen. Hawaii manufac-
turer ni women's wear.
In charge of information is lira
Smiley (Zm) Nelson. Proceeds
arc for the Miami Rehabilitation
Center of the United Cerebral
Palsy Assn.
. os traditional (or Passover
as matzohs and wine!
The Holiday is incomplete without
Breakstone's Passover foods. Perk
up your dairy meals with

. the uhip; m cheese with rich, fresh-cream
flavorso spreadable, it's incredible! Spri untly
n when ice-c Id never breaks matzoi
SOUR CREAM
. makes borscht even more delicious .
grand in salads and blintzes! Truly festive!
COTTAGE CHEESE
,.. so creamy, so flavorful, it transforms an
ordinary meal into a feast!
You'll find that ALL Breakstone's
Passover Products help toward a happier Holiday!
Singles Limited Meeting
"Your European Vacation This
Summer" will be discussed by-
Charles Hayden McLoon. of the
American Express Company at the
Singles Limited meeting Sunday
at 8:45 p.m. at the Alcazar hotel. I
Color movies will be shown.
The meeting, which will include
a social hour with dancing, is open
1o all single Jewish men and'
women between 25 and 45.
Kosher Poultry
For Passover
BUY and SEE LIVE POULTRY slauohtar
ed on promiaos, under strict Rabbinical
Supervision.
Do not be misled-BERMAN
oparatts tha only liva poultry markat
on tha booth. Tata Barman Rullatv
Turkeys, Ducki, Fat Yaarlingi. Capons
and Broilora-THERE IS A DIFFERENCE.
Shochot will bo or promises until
noon, April Bth-IOth; otharwiao ovary
day until 3 .M.
320 Collins Ave. JE 8-1839
FAMILY OF FINE FOODS
COTTAGE CHEESE SOUR CREAM
CREAM CHEESE FARMER CHEESE
PPT CHEESE BUT TER (wr,ipp.d or m ,;,)
+ A*0 75e WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
g33
CBIAMID COIICI
'StcaA,^
CHEESE
s t u a i >
All certified "KOSHER LTESACH" by Rabbi Jacob Cohen, Spring Valley, N. Y


Friday, April 1. 1960
*Jenisti Meridian
Page 5-B
ii i H .
cfida/rt llta)uk
-i 4IIH Irtl r i .MTU A HA,
eonte to jm for tint' food ft that are
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER

hopper's fine ehoeolates
Special Seder assortment, 3 lb. ................................ 6.25
Chocolate Matzohs, 12 oz. box....................._......... 1.65
Matzoh balls, 12 oz. box......................................... 1.65
I
Luxury assortment, 1 lb........................................... 1.98
Luxury assortment, 2 lb........................................... 3.75
Fruit & nut assortment, 2 lb......._............................ 4.59
All nut assortment, 10 oz. box -.....................I 1.95
French style chocolates, 12 oz. box ........................ 1.65
Selected Chocolates, 12 oz. box ____..................... 1.65
vhristo poulos famoun fruit*
California pitted prunes, 1 lb........_____.................. 1.25
Florida candied kumquats, 1 lb. ____________....._ 1.19
Turkish figs, 1 lb.......________________............... 1.V9
Fruit Compote, 1 lb........___........................._......... 1.19
and innnif other
FINE CANDIES. FIRST FIOOR
FINE FOODS, FOURTH FLOOR
Passover favorites
Segal's cashew brittle, 15 oz. tin ...
Segal's almond nut crunch, 14 oz. box
Segal's pecan nut crunch, 14 oz. box ...
Chocolate egg AAatzohs, 6'/a oz...........
1.19
1.39
1.39
99*
Chocolate flavored macaroons, 15 oz. box.............. 99*
Coconut maceroons, 15 oz. box...................._______ 99*
Chocolate dipped macaroons, 13 Oz. box................ 99*
"Star of David" tray of glace fruits by Laura Lee ...... 2.75
"Palm Leaf" tray of glace fruits by Laura Lee............ 3.50
other Passover needs
Matzoh meal, 1 lb. box............ ......t...
Egg noodles, 8 oz. box ___
Potato pancake mix, 8 oz. box ......____
Matzoh Farfel, 1 lb.............................
45*
35*
19c
45*
items not listed
Mail and phona ord.r. filled for 3.01 or moral Call FR 4-7251
Sorry, Pataovar foods ara nol raiumabla
1501 BISCAYNE BLVD., PARK FREE! FR 4-7251
SHOP TODAY 10 TIL 9:30
jm has every need for your
Passover table ... everything
for a more festive holiday,
eome see our vast selection!
Passover trays, wine cups, Seder trays,
nutcrackers, candlesticks, coasters, Gifts, 1st fl.
Stainess steel flatware, service for 8,
gay colored enamel cookware, Housewares, 4th fl.
English earthenware dinnerware sets, China, 4th fl.
Damask dinner sets, Linen Shop, 4th fl.
and many, many other items!
I


Page 8-B
*Jewistfk>rMiain
Friday. April 1, I960
Werner Kahn
IMS. AILIN SUM*
Werner Kshn
MKS. CUffOfD FKANK
Cook, Schulman To Live Here
The marriage of Miss Beatrice
Vera Schulman to Jimmy Eli
Cook, both of Miami, took place
Auxiliary Making Plans
Mrs. Harold Turk, program chair-
man of the Women's Auxiliary of
Mt. Sinai Hospital, has met with
Mr>. Philip Lefkouitz. president.
Mrs. A. Herbert Mathes, vice
president, and committee mem-
bers to make plans for the Wom-
en s Auxiliary anual meeting and
installation due May 6 at the Fon-
tainebleau hotel.
Saturday evening, Mar. 26. at
Temple Israel, with Rabbi Morris
Graff officiating.
The bride's dress was a street-
length white bridal lace over
satin, and she carried an orchid on
her Bible.
Mrs. Selma Kenner was matron
of honor, and Miss Margaret Schul-
man was maid of honor. Both are
sisters of the bride.
Alan Kenner, the bride's brother-
in-law, was best man.
A reception followed at Betty's
restaurant. After a tour of Florida
the couple will live in Miami.
Miss Kravitz Now
Mrs. Allen Supler
Miss Helene Loretta Kravitz be-
came the bride of Allen M. Supler
in 7:30 p.m. ceremonies on Sunday
evening. Mar. 27, at the Fontaine-
bleau hotel.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Kravitz. of
2336 SW 4th st., Miami. The bride-
groom is the son of the late Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Supovitz, Pitts-
burgh, Pa. Rabbi Yaakov Rosen-
berg performed the candlelight
ceremony in the French room. A
reception and dinner for 200 rela-;
tives and friends followed.
The brides' gown was of elabor-
ate white chantilly lace and peau
de miii' A Queen Anne collar
framed the long-sleeved torso-1
length bodice entirely beaded with |
pearls and opalescent sequins,
which flared into a bouffant peau
de soie skirt edged at the hemline
with a massive flounced pouff ap-
pltqued with large peau de soie
roses and further enhanced by a
sweeping three-yard train.
Maid of honor was Miss Linda
Brown. Bridesmaids were Mrs.'
Gerald Miller and Miss Hope Co-
hen. Paula Weintraub was junior
bridesmaid. Best man was Mack,
Taylor, brother of the groom, and;
ringeearer was Adner Weintraub.;
Ushers were Steven Kravitz, broth-1
er of the bride. Joseph Fineberg,,
and Arnold Siegal.
Newly wed Mrs. Supler gradu-
ated from Miami Senior High
School and attended the Univer-
sity of Miami.
Her husband is a graduate of
the University of Pittsburgh law
school. He is a member of the Bar |
of the Supreme Court of Pennsyl-
vania specializing in taxation. He
i is at present an officer and direc-
, tor of Background Music Inc., of
Pittsburgh.
Art more Photo
MIS. HOKUM IASK0
Zuckermcms Tell
Judith's Betrothed
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zuckerman,
2601 SW 2nd ave.. announce the
engagement of their daughter, Ju-
dith Barbara, to Lawrence M.
Winkler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Winkler, 3431 SW 10th st
Miss Zuckerman will receive a
Bachelor of Science degree in June
from the University of Michigan.
Mr. Winkler attended Ohio Uni-
versity and graduated from the
University of Miami He is a prac-
ticing Certified Public Accountant.
A late August wedding is plan-
ned.
Lasko, Dieleman
Exchange Vows
Miss Pauline Dieleman became
the bride of Norman Lasko in dou-
ble ring candlelight rites Saturday
' .evening, Mar.A at Tempje Judea
Rabbi Morris Skop officiated at
the 7 p.m. ceremony
The bride is the daughter of Mr
and Mrs. Henry Dieleman. of
Drum bo. Ontario, Canada. The
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Isidor Lasko, 560 NE 170th St., No!
Miami Beach.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose a custom gown of
imported Brussels lace over bridal
satin in the high-waisted Empire
design. The floor-length sheath
featured long sleeves to a wrist
point with cathedral tram. Her
fingertip-length veil of imported
Brussels lace was draped about
her head. She carried the same
bouquet her mother carried on her
wedding day, consisting of white
lilies around a large white orchid.
Her cultured pears were a gift
from the mother of the groom.
Maid of honor for her sister was
Catherine Dieleman. Another sis-
ter, Carolyn, was flower girl. Mar-
I lene Wenk was bndemaid.
Best man for his brother was
Jules Lasko, of Chicago. Barry
Lieberman acted as usher.
The bride attended Calvin Col-
lege in Grand Rapids, Mich., and
received her AB degree from the
University of Miami. She is a
teacher at Southwest Country Day
School.
Mr. Lasko attended the Univer-
sity of Illinois, and received the
BBA degree from the University
of Miami. His fraternity is Phi Ep-
silon PL
Dinner and reception followed at
the Carillon hotel. The couple will
live in Miami.
JABIL1 s 1460A WASHINGTON AVENUE JE 1-1496 Miami Beach
Strictly ~iVZ Kosher RESTAURANT & DELICATESSEN
flKST CLASS CATtRING AT LOWEST PKICtS
Under Strictest Orthodox Supervision Closed on Sabbath
Seeing is Believing
BARGAINS GALORE
New and Used Clothes and Things
New Furs and Fur Trimmed Sweaters
FANTASTIC LOW PRICES!
Entre nous
1154 Normandy Dr.
woman's apparel
Miami Beach
Frank, Gerstein
I Vows at Algiers
Joan Carol Gerstein and Clif-
ford Stuart Frank exchanged wed
I ding vows before Rabbi Isaac Ever i
I Saturday evening. Mar. 26, rites at j
I the Algiers hotel.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Al Gerstein, 526 Je-
ronimo dr.. Coral Gables. The
I groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
'Alfred Frank. 1782 Cleveland rd..
Miami Beach.
Maid of honor for her sister was
Ellen Gerstein. Donald Frank
served as best man for his broth-1
jer, Gilbert Schrank and Jerome
I Weisberg were ushers.
The bride graduated from Nor-1
mandy School, and attended the
i University of Miami.
Reception followed the cere-
i mony at the Algiers hotel.
HOROWITZ -MARGARETEN
ASSOVER
fGAKE mix
Donor Luncheon Scheduled
Sisterhood of Temple Judea will
hold a donor luncheon at the Se-
ville hotel on Apr. 20. Luncheon
will include a program entitled
"The Price is Right." Donor com-
mittee is headed by Mrs. Edward
A. Holly and Mrs. Norm Kutner
Mrs. Al Reich will be commenta-
tor and coordinator.
:asa interamericana
Import Export Wholesale
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From furniture, housewares and apparel to counselling in the buvlna
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cTin!'m? yU at th* a'rp0rt "nd arr*"9in9 lod9in9 orienting
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n nooms on Ground Floor
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LEO AUEN, Oirecfer


Friday, April 1, 19BU
fJewisti IFhridian
Page 7-B
THE
SOUTH SHORE
RIGHTS
RESERVED

W -.GTC AVtNUl
THURSDAY thru SUNDAY
PRESERVES
HOROWITZ-
MARGARETEN
ROKEACH
MAN4SCHEWITZ
GRAPE
STRAWBERRY
RASPBERRY
CHERRY
BLACKBERRY
Orange Marmalade
CANNED FRUITS
MANISCHEWITZ
ROKEACH
SHAPIRO
KOSHER
GRAPE
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
YOUR PASSOVER NEEDS
We Have A Full Selection of Any
Name Brands You Mfay Desire
To Grace Yoar Holiday Table .
HOROWITZ JARGARETEN...
MANISCHEWITZ... GOODMAN'S
STREIT'S...
IN MATZOHS:
MATZOH MEAL
FARFELCAKE
MEAL
EGG MATZOH
WHOLE WHEAT
MATZOH
POTATO STARCH
SHMURAH MATZOH
FRUIT COCKTAIL
PEACHES
PRUNES
' PEARS
CRANBERRY SAUCE
COMPOTE
candTes
SOUR BALLS
MARMA JELLS
FRUIT SLICES
RASPBERRY FILLED
CHOCOLATE COVERED
JELLS
TOASTED
MARSWMALLOWS
ISRAEL CANDIES
mm*mm*amm
FULL FIFTH BOTTLE
C
HOROWITZ MARGARETEN
INSTANT
COFFEE
2-OZ.
JAR
HELLER CANDIES

WINES by
MANISCHEWITZ
MOGEN DAVID
CARMEL ISRAEL
Jn Evry Flavor
And Size
MACAROONS
HOROWITZ-
MARGARETEN
COCONUT
CHOCOLATE
95
16-OX. pkg.
MANISCHEWITZ, STREIT'S
ALMOND
CHOCOLATE
COCONUT
15-oz. can
98
HOROWITZ M ARGARETEN
GRAPE JAM
e
12-OZ.
JAR
29
MATZOHS
L'KOVED
KOSHER for PASSOVER
GRAPE WINE
FULL
FIFTH
BOTTLE
79
i/2 GALLON
si 99
1
1 GALLON
>375
CHOCOLATE
COVERED
PKG.
69
HOROWITZ-
MARGARETEN
PARAVE FAT
J-LB. 3-OZ. JAR
69
HOROWITZ MARGARtTEH
COFFEE
e
I Li.
CAN
PLANTER'S
PEANUT OIL
IN A BEAUTIFUL
1/2 GAL. DECANTER
99
mm


Pag 8-B
rJenitf fkrkMar
Friday. April 1. I960
\\ rncr-Kahri
/HIS. STANIET ffSTKN
Cord Parfy Sunday Evening
Beth El Congregalion Sisterhood
Will hold a card party Sunday
* veiling, 8 p.m., at Dora August
Memorial Hall. 500 SW 17th ave.
ephuns hebrew:
book store
Largest and Oldeet Hebrew
Supply Houae in Greater Miami
WNOU SAIE MTAN.
Complete Line of Hebrew 6upplie
for Synagogues. Hebrew and
- Sunday School.
HAIL
Couple to Live
On Miami Beach
Mm Ann Silverrtein is now Mrs.
Stanley Epstein. The couple were
married Sunday afternoon. Mar.
27. at the home of Rabbi David
Lehrfield.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mis Lewis Silverstein.
4850 NW 176th st. The groom is the
-on of Mr and Mrs. Archie Ep-
stein. 1321 15th st.. Miami Beach.
Matron of honor was Mrs Mar-
garita Silverrtein. George Kasten-
baum acted as best man.
The groom is a graduate of the
University of Miami law school,
and is a practicing attorney here.
Reception followed at the Bar-
celona hotel After a Puerto Rico
honeymoon, the couple will be at
home at 8045 Crespi blvd Miami
Beach.
ORT Region Cites
Mrs. Grossinger
Mrs Jennie Grossinger, long
noted for her philanthropic activi-
ties, received the third annual
Jennie" award sponsored by the
Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training at ORTs annual
Southeastern Florida region cham
pagne luncheon last week at the
Diplomat hotel in Hollywood.
Lillie Rubin, fashion designer,
was given an award for being "the
outstanding women's fashion per-
sonality in the Miami Beach area."
The regional ORT chapter simul-
taneously celebrated the 80th an-
niversary of the international or-
ganization. ORT has 631 installa-
tions in 20 countries, and its work,
helps displaced persons through
vocational training. The organiza-
tion gets its major subsidy from
the United Jewish, Appeal.
More than 800 women attended
the luncheon, which was held in
the new Grand ballroom of the
Diplomat. Entertainment com-
prised Ricky Lane, the ventrilo-
quist, with his dummy "Velvel,"
plus Harvey and Jody Bell, the
father and son singing pair. A
. fashion show presented by Lillie
: Rubin was also a highlight feature.
ORTs Greater Miami chapter
.'president, Mrs. Irving Tillis, made
| the presentation to Mrs. Grossing-
er. Mrs. Margaret Newman Steam,
the program's coordinator and
commentator, presented the award
to Lillie Rubin. Mrs. Estelle Tisch-
ler. president of the Southeastern
Florida regional chapter of ORT,
spoke on the work of the organiza-
tion.
Chairman of the day was Mrs.
Joseph Wilkes, while others prom-
WIDOWER, 50 Years Old,
withet le meet congenial woman, object
matimony. Plumber by trade, good
provider No objection to child.
Mr. At., tea 2f73. Miami 1, Fla.
C-*lt arm ingty
yours,
h
ami Beach Auxiliary of Jewish
War Veterans to be held at the
Seville hotel. This annual donor
luncheon will find the members
modeling from the Rena Gross
collection, of Normandy Isle.
Tuesday morning finds u.s with
a Mary Norton collection at Viz-
caya for the Coral Way PTA.
Tuesday evening is a show open
to the public at the Miracle .The-
atrte sponsored by the Coral Ga*
bles Chamber of Commerce. The
finale of this show will be the
display of a million dollars worth
of diamonds shown by Carroll's
Jewelers.
rOK a bu-man's holiday last
week while in Nassau, and
went to see a fashion show at the
Royal Victoria hotel. It was a
swim suit preview by Rose Ma-
rie Reid. and was sponsored by
Jordan Marsh in cooperation with
Eagle Airways Ltd.
There are some beautiful new
high fashion jewel tone colors
used in her collection this year
both in solids and prints. For
the sun worshipper, there are
the suits with no backs right
down to the waist line kept up
by engineering principles. Then
there are the bikinis. One style
was convertible to a standard
two-piece swim suit for the more
conservative, and by simply ad-
justing a few strategic strings be-
came the most daring of bikinis.
Robert Macht. president of Jor-
dan Marsh, was there at the pool-
side show. Flowers floated in the
pool, a runway was erected
across it, and our United States
models gave it the professional
touch.
e a
BLACK and white were used
effectively in some swimsuits.
The finale was all white, with
jersey being draped over the las-
tex to create a Grecian effect.
The last model wore a rhine-
stone-studded suit, with an eve-
ning ball-gown skirt over it.
The entire new Rose Marie
Reid collection is now available
at Jordan Marsh's for you to
view at your leisure. However,
we must admit it was nice sit-
ting under the trees at the Royal
Victoria hotel in Nassau, seeing
this collection for the first time.
Torah chapter of Hadassah
held its annual Eye Bank
bruncheon Thursday, Mar. 24, at
the home of Mrs. Moe Feingold,
who greeted her guests in a two-
piece silk print in a misty rose
color of roses on a white back-
ground. Her skirt was a sheath,
and her bodice was the casual
overblouse style.
In a striking spring print was
Mrs. Emma Abrams, featuring a
cotton satin sheath with a low
neckline. A soft cowl tvpe of
drape was inserted under the bust
line and on up to the neckline.
Mrs. Max Swartz chose a roy-
al blue denim with interesting
white detail. Her collar dropped
almost to the waistline in back
in a deep V, and was outlined in
white pearl buttons. The collar
continued into an unusual treat-
ment in front, and the white but-
tons continued down to the hem-
line. She filled in the neckline
with multi hued blue pearls.
Mrs. Ann Goldberg selected a
white moygashel linen sheath
with a scooped neckline. Her
dress featured pastel floral appli-
ques recmbroidered in white cav-
iar beads.
President of the chapter, Mrs.
Henry Gilman, wore a sheer im-
ported cotton print with a dainty
floral pattern. Her dress featured
smocking across the bodice,
which continued into an unbroken
line across her puffed sleeves.
In yellow was Mrs. Milton Ad-
ler. Her sheath featured inserts
of silk organza at the bodice and
sleeves, which was embroidered
with.yellow roses. Mrs. Sherwin
Givel wore an aquamarine print
of roses in cotton satin.. Her wide
cummerbund was in a solid aqua-
marine, and her shoes were dyed
to match.
e e o
QUR fashion show calander is
^ heavy this week. Sunday
afternoon is a show for the Mi-
1 i -----------
For Your Winter
Clothing and lonkofs
Hi Only CltMtsf Charges
and Imbtbscs
MINIMUM MY
CLEANING CHARGE S.tS
KENT
Florida's Lsreesr .
Cltantrt and Lmuiutty
CALL ,
FR 9-6547
FOR OUR STORf 3
NiAUST YOU
IN IHOWAIO COUNTY
CALL JA 4-Ste*
CORAL GABLES CONVALESCENT HOME
"A frhmdly end Gentle Atmosphere for Those Toe love"
A NEW HOME DESIGNED TO CARE FOR ELDERLY, CHRONICALLY III
AND CONVALESCENTS 24-MOUR REGISTERED NURSING SERVICE
Special Dlete Strictly Obaerved. Private Bathroome. Air-Conditioned
Spacl'.ua Grounda. Patio, Swimming Pool, Planned Activities
ALL ROOMS ON GROUND FLOOR
Reasonable Rates Brochure on Request
Ferdinand H. Rosenthal. Director-Owner
Former Aee't Dir. mi Sinai Hoepital Director. Jewish Home for the Ao.d
Cleveland. Ohio Pittsburgh. Pa.
7060 S.W. 8th Street Miami. Fla. Phone MO 6-8826
inent in the programming of the
affair were Mrs. Jacob Glassman,
president of the Miami Beach
afternoon chapter; Mrs. Irving
Sussman, regional honorary presi-
dent; Mrs. Florence Kupperman,
chairman of the publicity com-
mittee; in charge of tickets, Mrs.
Evelyn Perlman, Mrs. Jennie
Kramer and Mrs. Louis Kostench.
Mrs. Michael Fields and Mrs. AI
Portman were hostesses, and Mrs.
Louis Baron headed up the decora-
tions committee.
Rabbi Samuel S. Lerer, of Tem-
ple Beth Sholem, Hollywood, deliv-
ered the invocation.
A-l EMPLOYMENT
DOMESTIC HELP
DAY WORKERS
Ph. FR 9 8401
ALTERATIONS and
DRESSMAKING
ESSIE ABRAMS
EXPERT REASONABLE
2814 COLLIN8 AVE
Phone JE 1-7870
Announcing...
The Opening of Our Beach Location

personalized service at the
blackstone flower shops
where you get more for
your money ... un 6-1233
24-hour service except rosh hashono and yom kippur
ADELPHI
BUSINESS AND
TUTORING
SCHOOL
"Miami's finul finishing School"
S.. Vellew Page 420, Phono Booh
Attendance accepted bv Dado County
Board of Public Instruction
500 526 N.f. 79th STtfET
Jutt Wot of Biicayn. Blvd.
PI 1-7944 VA APPROVED
WE USE YOUR TEXT BOOKS
'PAY AS YOUEAHN PLAN
Showing MARBLE and MOSAIC TABUS, LAMPS*
WALL DECOR, WROUGHT IRON and
UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE.
FEATURING MOSAIC DO-IT-YOURSELF CLASSES.
MARBLE DECOR, Inc.
IN MIAMI
749 N.E. 79th St. PL 7-5261
IN SOUTH MIAMI
Suniland T^T CE 5-8272
IN MIAMI BEACH
466 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
[!$
25&I
August bros nyj
ii
BIKUR CHOLIM KOSHER
CONVALESCENT HOME
NON PROFIT NON-SECTARIAN
SUPPORTED BY YOUR COMMUNITY
Under Strut up.rvl.i,n of the Orthod. V..d H.k.ahru.r. .f Florid.
Rabbi Dr. Itaac H. Ev.r. Oir.ctor
a. rUR NURS,NG ~ DOCTORS ON CALL
**Plffr> OBSERVED CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS
M0DUM IMlfmtHl I fWNHNWes HKMtOOf BUIIDIHG
310 Collins Ave. Ph. ji 2-3571 Miami Beach


Friday, April 1, I960
vJewistincrktiar)
Page 9-B
This Year As in Years Past, STEVENS Is Happy
To Be of SERVICE for ALL of YOUR PASSOVER
NEEDS with GREATER QUALITY, GREATER
VARIETY and GREATER VALUE in.....
FAMOUS BRANDS MATZOS & MATZ0 PRODUCTS

GOODMAN'S *
STREIT'S '
* MANISCHEWITZ -
EGG MATZOS
FARFEL
TEA MATZOS WHOLE WHEAT REG. MATZOS
MATZO MEAL MATZO BALL SOUP
YOUR STEVENS MARKET CHECK LIST
STEVENS COMPLETE PASSOVER DEPARTMENT FEATURES
USE THIS CHECK LIST FOR MONEY-SAVING VALUES
'ALL Items Shown Are Certified For Passover Use
POTATO STARCH - JUICES_____ CANDLES_____
POTATO PANCAKES SPICES ... - GELATIN
HORSE RADISH . CANDV______ SUGAR......
CONDIMENTS .____ CEREALS------ HONEY.....
CAKE MEAL...... SOUPS..... NUTS
GEFILTE FISH_____ SCHAV..... 0 SALT.......
SOUR SALT...... WINES.....
MACAROONS...... NYAFAT------- RORSCHT-..
SOUP NUTS ------ CAKES..... SCHMALTZ -
PRESERVES...... FRUITS-------- KICHEL.....
PASSOVER OILS____ SOAP-..... POLISH.....
TEA & TEA DAGS... COFFEE-------- VINEGAR-------
BARTON'S PASSOVER APPROVED
SODAS
GINGER ALE CLUH SODA
III. UK CHERRY HLACK RASPRERRY ORANGE
MIAMI
SOUTH MIAMI
N.W. MIAMI
WILTON MANORS


Page 10-B
*Jenisti ncr/diiar?
Friday, April 1, i960


Ben Essen (right), leading character in the JVS Jean C. Lehman, Eugene Heiman, Mrs. Lillian
play. The Day They Gave Me the Gold M. Berns. Jean C. Lehman, Arthur Sass, and
Watch," with cast members (left to right) Mrs. Mrs. Eugene Heiman.
JVS Meet Stresses Vocational Services
Proper career counseling for
the youth of the community, ex-
tended efforts to place the older
person needing work, and job op-
portunities for handicapped people
were stressed Wednesday by Dr.
Michael Goodman, executive di-
rector. Jewish Vocational Servico,
at the first JVS Open meeting at
the Deauville hotel.
JVS president Lloyd L. Ruskin
announced the inauguration of a
new program under which JVS
will process applications for loans
for the Baron De Hirsh Loan Fund
agency, whose president is Leo
Eisenstein.
Dr. Jess Spirer, director of the
University of Miami Guidance
Center, was program chairman of
the evening. Greetings were ex
Weather Bureau Chief Talks
Gordon Dunn, director of the
Miami Weather Bureau, will speak
on "What is Weather" before the
Junior Audubon Society at the Mi-
ami Public Library on Friday eve-
ning.
tended on behalf of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation by Arthur Ros-
ichan. executive director. Ben Es-
sen, local attorney, porttrayed the
part of Henry Johnson in a play
entitled. The Day They Gave Me
the Gold Watch," which highlight-
ed the experience of a man over
65 who is unable to get along on
Social Security payments and
needs work in order to sustain him-
self.
Others in the cast included Mr.
and Mrs. Jean Lehman, Mr. and
Mrs. Euyene Heiman, Mrs. Lil-
lian Berns, and Arthur Sass. The
play was directed by Cordon
Bennett of the Drama Depart-
ment at the University of Miami.
Donald S. Block, director, Jew-
ish Vocational Workshop, dem-
onstrated the workings of a shel-
tered workshop which hires only
handicapped people.
Participating in the demonstra-
tion were Clara Auslander, Robert
Becker, Sansone Boccara, Violet
Nussman and George Silverman. i
In a portrayal of the kinds of
RESERVE NOW FOR PASSOVER
KOSHER HOTEL OPEN ALL YEAR
3 Meals Daily Special Diets
Schul en premises Air Conditioned filtered Swimming fool
ROOMS WITH PRIVATE BATH & SHOWERS & TELEPHONE
Garden Patio Solarium 24-Hr. Elevator t Telephone Service Free Parting
RABBI AND CANTOR DOV ROSENSWEIO
Will Conduct Pauover Services
Keshruth and Sabbath Strictly Observed
REASONABLE RATESweekly, monthly, seasonal, yearly
RESERVATIONS-Writo for Information-JOSEPH HOFFMAN
The Strath-Haven Hotel
411 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach
JE 4-4691

"W^^WA^W^-^W
KATZ's PARADISE RESTAURANT
1451 COLLINS AVENUE
Phone JE 2-1671

HOB* "ICO
RESERVATIONS NOW ACCEPTED
FOR THE PASSOVER SEDERS
$15 Per Person Both Nights
Services to be Conducted by Cantor Emanuel Mandel
KASHRUS FOR PESACH UNDER SUPERVISION OF RABBI MENOEL MIllER
'WW\_*W^\_r'W\_^W^-- Enjoy a Yvru Happy Patutover at
cweiotALDEN HOTEL
2925 INDIAN CREEK DRIVE
Kashrerh Strictly Observe*!
FAMILY COHEN (CANTOR) WILL OFFICIATE AT SERVICES
Very Reasonable Rates For Reservations Call
of*: i-m>77
EHRENREICH & STURMAN (Owners)
problems junior high and high
school youngsters have selecting
an occupation, a live counseling
session was held with Dr. Good-
man as counselor and Howard Ros-
enberg as the high school'student
.seeking help with his vocational
planning.
Mrs. Charles P. Feinberg was
program chairman of the open
meeting, and members of her
committee were William Goldnng,
Marshall Harris. Mrs. Eugene Hei-
man and Mrs. Gerald P. Soltz.
Senesch Group
Installs Officers
Hannah Senesch group of Hadas-
sah will install Mrs. Arthur A.
Applebaum as president for the
second year.
Installation ceremonies will be
Monday, 11:30 a.m., at the Saxony
hotel.
Installing officer will be Dr. Irv-
ing Lehrman, of Temple Emanu-
El.
The program, written and pro-
duced by Mrs. Philip Rudine. will
include a play called "Founders
Day."
Rabbi Machtei in N.Y.
Rabbi and Mrs. S. M. Machtei
were in Yonkers, N. Y., this week
attending the funeral services of
his father, Rabbi Solomon Mach-
tei. The funeral was held Sunday,
Mar. 27. The late Rabbi Machtei,
who died at 84. visited Miami sev-
eral times as houseguest of his
son and daughter-in-law. After sit-
ting Shivah. Rabbi and Mrs. Mach-
tei will return to Miami on Fri-
day.
The Bett at tht Right Price
^^ MOTft
SPECIAL
FOR PASSOVER
IH Per Week
*aeP Per Perion
Dble. Occ. Beg. Apr. 4
Including Strictly
KOSHER MEALS
iEDERS CONOUCTEC
BY WELL KNOWN
CANTOR
Rates On Requtat
For Sedera & Meals
Near Synagogue
Air Conditioned
Phone JE 1-1103
EUCLID AVf AT 9th ST MIAMI BFACH
PASSOVER
HOLIDAYS
Cantor Officiating
2 Meals Daily
A(\ s fuu
2 SEDERS *11 per person
ENTERTAINMENT
Your Host Leon
DORCHESTER
$
>The RE VLIN HOTEL
KOSHER DINING ROOM
DELUXE DINNERS from $1.65
Under Kobbinical Supervision of tht Orthodox Vaad Hmkeikruth
Rabbi Dr. I. M. tin
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW FOR A
TRULY TRADITIONAL PASSOVER HOLIDAY
Collins Ave. at 13th Street Ph. JE 1-7688
RESERVE NOW FOR
PASSOVER SEDERS April 11 & 12
MASHGIACH ON PREMISES
Ties'? "ICO
HARFENIST Dairy RESTAURANT
1381 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
TWO SEDORIM (DAIRY) $12 per person BOTH NIGHTS
10COURSE DINNER
Prominent Cantor For Reservations JE 8-2058
DILIDO HOTEL
Collins Ave. at Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach
Under HARFENIST Supervision
FULL 10-COURSE SEDER (MEAT)
$20 per person BOTH NIGHTS
CANTOR WILHELM SILBER
Officiating
For Reservations JE 8-2058
*S *-<
rcp'ico ico
Ramaz Hotel
146 WASHINGTON AVENUE MIAMI BEACH
Mr. and Mrs. Gewirtz are happy to announce that the
Hotel will be OPEN FOR PASSOVER and the whole year.
Our Hotel is well known for its Kashruth which is
under the supervision of a well known Rabbi.
%tr for the entire 8 Days
Q3 <2 in reem i 3 Meals Daily
including Room
*55
ferthe
entire S dJeys
Meals Only
For Reservations Call JE 8-0266 JE 1-9217
Our kitchen is under personal supervision of Mrs. B. Gewirtz
^WWA**AH
for Leisurely dining
At Its Best .. .
RONNIE'S
STEAK
HOUSE
FAMOUS FOR
PRIME STEAKS CHOPS SEAFOOD
COCKTAIL LOUNGE KIP and GEORGE at the BAR
I
>
\
>
I1
f
Open Daily 11 A.M. to 1 A.M. Sundays from S PJW.
6521 Bird Road (S.W. 40th St.) Phone M0 7-3331
THE ALOHA
A glamorous introduction to a mag-
nificent Polynesian feast, ie ro-
mantic candlelight setting)
MUIY VOONS-i
ollins Ave.
or. 19th St.
JE 1-5745
Ron Tiki
POLYNESIAN RESTAURANT
22nd S. and Perk Ave.. M.I.
Reie.veM.ne Jl 4-441*


<
I Mriday, April 1, 1960
vJewish fk>rid/Haw
Page 11-B
\
PASSOVER GREETINGS
DADE COUNTY DAIRIES, INC
THE FINEST MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS
UNDER THE STRICT SUPERVISION OF
m. # toe? 183 $
wopyn ."tyns "3 pnr am
KOSHIR FOR PASSOVER I960
THI OBTHOBOX VAAD HAKASHKUTH 0 FLOHIDA
KAMI D*. IJAAC H. BVIR, DtaW
AND
n-ntson tyi 'duvdkp
]n r,*3 DpKiKon jik
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER 1960
COMMUNITY VAAD HAKASHRUTH
AND THE ORTHODOX BETH DIN
n"i
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING INDEPENDENT GROCERIES AND BAKERIES
HEALTH and ENERGY
IN EVERY GLASS

DADE COUNTY DAIRIES
OtYice: 7350 N.W. 30th Avenue, Miami 47. Fla.
Ph. OX 1-3620


Page 12-B
vJewlsti thrkUar
Friday. April 1, 1960
Final Meetings of Council Year
As Elections, Speakers Scheduled
Members of the Greater Miami
Section. National Council of Jew-
ish Women, will meet with their
own divisions for the last time
this club year on Wednesday.
Slate of officers for 1960-1961 for
the Greater Miami Section and for
each division will be presented at
a joint meeting in May.
*
Sunset Division will have a "Pop
Concert" party at 12:30 p.m. at Hil
lei House on the University of Mi-
ami campus. The concert will fea-
ture a review of the club year in
song.
*
Evening Division, meeting at
7:30 p.m at the Park Lane Cafe-
teria, will hear Dominic Koo, who
won nation-wide fame as a con-
testant on the $64,000 Question pro-
gram. Koo will relate serious and
humorous anecdotes involved in
transition from the Oriental way
of life to becoming an American
citizen.

Shores Division will meet at the
Westview Country Club at noon for
muncheon. Ralph Renick. vice
president of news at WTVJ, will
speak on "Assignment Democ-
racy."
JWVA Fashion Show
Miami Beach Ladies' Auxiliary,
Jewish War Veterans, will hold a
donor lunch and fashion show at
the Seville hotel on Sunday noon.
Sponsors are Mrs. Irene Cooper-
man, president, and Mrs. Herman
Sokolow, donor chairman. Fash-
ions will be by Rena Gross Dress
Shop. Miss Edith Applebaum, Jew-
ish Floridian women's editor, will
be commentator.
Writing Class Opening
Mildred Jordan Brooks, short
story-writer, will be assistant in-
structor in the class of creative
writing at Miami Senior High
School. Evening Division, begin-
ning Monday at 7 p.m. Criticism
of original material will be con-
ducted by Lucius Daniel, regular
instructor, aided by Mrs. Brooks
and members of the class.
Indian Crook Division, meeting
at the Eden Roc hotel at 12:30 p.m.,
will hear a panel discussion on
"Which Way America?" Kenneth
Oka, Miami Beach Councilman,;
will be moderator of a panel in
eluding Dr. Gerritt Schipper, head
of the Philosophy Department at.
the University of Miami.
*
Lincoln Division will meet at the;
Seville hotel at 1 p.m. Speaking,
on the "Importance of the Vote"
will be William Crockett, executive
director of the Miami Beach Tax-^
payers Assn.
.
Bay Division will meet at the
Washington Federal Savings and
Loan bldg. with a discussion group
preceding the general meeting at
10:30 a.m. The discussion will cen-
ter on Presidential candidates,
with Mrs. Edward Caller as lead-
er.
William C. Baggs, editor of the
Miami News, will be guest speak-
er.

Islands Division is meeting at
1 p.m. at the Venetian Isle motel.
Mrs. Richard M. Fleming will lec-
ture and demonstrate "Fun With
Flowers." Mrs. Fleming was or-
ganizer of the Mt. Sinai Hospital
Garden Club.

Biscayno Division will be served
refreshments at Coral Gables
Lodge No. 26 at 12 noon. Maj. Earl
D. Walden, jr., of the U. S. Army
Reserve and a local attorney, will
discuss "Status of Forces Treaty"
and the problems arising from the
power it gives foreign countries
to try American soliders overseas.

The Councilottos, a group of
teen-age girls who recently formed
the newest division of the Greater
Miami Section, will have their
material purchased with donated
Lane Cafeteria at 2:30 p.m. With
matrial purchased with donated
funds, they will pack a box includ-
ing clay, finger paints, crayons,
jump ropes and balls which will
be sent to Israel's kindergarten
children through Council's Ship-A-
Box program.
To Mark Jewish (
Child's Day Here
World Jewish Child's Day is
designated to celebrate the unique
achievement of rescuing 92.000
children from all over the world
through Youth Aliyah, an organi-
zation dedicated to the rehabilita-
tion of children in Israel.
On Monday. World Jewish
Child's Day will be marked by Ha*
dassah groups affiliated with the
Miami chapter. Members plan to
visit day hospitals and children's
homes in the area, to bring the
youngsters refreshments and en-
tertainment.
Mrs. Bernard Kramarsky, Youth
| Aliyah chairman, said that the
following institutions will be visit-
ed Monday:
A viva group, Haven School for
Retarded Children: Chai group,
Jackson Memorial' Hospital; Al-
bert Einstein group, American
Children's Home; Hannah Sen-
esch group. Variety Children's
Hospital.
Mt. Scopus group. Rehabilitation
Center for Crippled Children; Men-
orah group. Cerebral Palsy Assn.
jof Miami; Naomi group, Children's
Cardiac Home; Tikvah group,
I Hope School for Retarded Chil-
Metro Commissioner Charles Xhuck" Hall purchases his :dren; Torah group, Dade County
fifth $1,000 Israel Bond from Mrs. Lena Mintzes. chairman, j children's Home; and Weizmann
Pioneer Women Club 2. Hall accepts Mrs. Mintzes' congrat- | group, St. Joseph's Villas Orphan-
ulations in behalf of the organization._________________________"g*-_____________________________H
First Rummage Sale
Sisterhood of Hialeah Reform
Jewish Congregation will hold its
first rummage sale at Steven's
Market, corner of 27th ave. and
62nd st., Miami, on Apr. 14. Use-
able clothing or household items
will be picked up. Deliveries may
be made to Mrs. June Lackenback,
255 W. 62nd St., Hialeah.
HOtf? 1BD
STEVENS
MARKETS
FEATURES
KOSHER for PASSOVER
Under Rabbinical Supervision
Serve
CmQZ
at home
During The Holiday Season
DRINK AND ENJOY
Delicious
TO ALL .
HAITI HOI III AYS
Miami Coca-Colo
Bottling Company
301 N.W. 29th St., Miami
1
#
7
Serve Wines in the Great Tradition
You'll be proud to serve Manischevtitz Wine, at this time
of solemn thankfulness. For they are in the great tradition
bringing you the.taste enjoyed at Seder* long gone by.
Manischewitz Wines offer a wide, delicious choice. All are
certified Kosher for Passover by the Manischevtitz Board
of Rabbinical Supervisionheaded by Rabbi Eliezer Silver,
Chairman of the Presidium of the Union of Orthodox
Rabbis of the t'nited States and Canada; and by the emi-
nent Rabbis I. Siegal, N. Riff and P. (Jutinan.
MANISCHEWITZ WINES
PrClALLV tWCCTFNCO CONCORD. f*T*A MfAVV AMERICA* MALAGA. 100% PURE LACK if BRV. CHCftRY AN*
luGANLrW, WiHU. H. 1. *IAI ftAUIUtNt 4 BURQuNOr. MCDIUM OfU COttCGAO. HANlXftCNJI WIN* CO, M. *
CHICKEN OF THE SEA HOT POTATO SALAD
Make hot potato salad (you needn't wait for the potatoes to
cool). Add a Family Size can of Chicken of the Sea brand tuna.
Heat through in the oven for a hot potato salad that's some-
thing! Serve with a green vegetable.
FREE: "Creative Cookery," 20 Tuna Tips A recipe: Write
Chick** of the Sea, P.O. Box 2111, Long Beach 1, California.
v..
6UARANTEED
PERFECT IF YOU USS
THE PRIME
FILLET TUNA.
PRESSURE-BAKED
OUR OWN SPECIAL
WAY TO PROTECT THE
DELICATE FLAVOR
i^yflrU!
n 1-6423 |


[riday, April 1, 1960
t'Jen'isti norldiam
Page 13 B
<[jctr "Corsage for You" is a new feature of The Jewish Floridian.
A corsage is free for the asking, and will be presented to each
mother of a Bar.or Bas.Mitavah if requested a month in advana*~
Michael Robinowitz
Bar Mitzvah of Michael Robino-
witz will be celebrated on Satur-
!ay morning, Apr. 2, at Congre-
gation Monticello Park. Rabbi Max
ipschitz, his uncle, will officiate.
Michael is the son of Mr. and
Ktrs. Nathan Robinowitz, 8501 Col-
ins ave. He is a student at the He-
>rew Academy.
Michael will read the Torah and
hant the complete Shacharit and
lusaf services.

Jay Ginsburg
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate at the Bar Mitzvah of
Michael Paul Ginsburg on Satur-
day morning, Apr. 2, at North
fhore Jewish Center.
Jay is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
haul Ginsburg, 2069 NE 196th ter.
]> is a student in the religious
rhool of the Center, and attends
liami Norland Junior High.

Stephen Mufson
| Temple Km aim Kl will be the
te of the Bar Mitzvah of Stephen
Mufson on Saturday morning,
9T. 2. Rabbi Irving Lehrman will
ficiate.
Stephen attends seventh grade
Nautilus School, and is a stu-
|nt fmple Emanu El.
deception and luncheon in his
nor will be held Saturday after-
on at the Eden Roc hotel. A din
Ir reception, also at the Eden
pc, is scheduled for Apr. 10.
*
Arnold Rtinhard
Arnold Tippy Reinhard, son of
Ir. and Mrs. Norman Reinhard.
121 SW 2nd ave., will become Bar
limah on Saturday morning,
pr. 2, at Beth David Congrega-
te. Rabbi Vaakov Rosenberg will
liciate.
Arnold has attended the Hebrew
Academy for the past nine years.
He is currently a student in the
Academy's junior high school de-
partment.
Luncheon in his honor will fol-
low at the Syrian Lebanon Amer-
ican Club. Guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Seymour Reinhard and
son, Michael, the Bar Mitzvah's
aunt, uncle and cousin, of New
York.

Eliaa Haim
Beth El Congregation will be
the site of the Bar Mitzvah of Elias
Heim on Saturday morning, Apr.
2. Rabbi Solomon Schiff will offi-
ciate.
Elias is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Savas Haim, 2126 SW 7th st.
He attends sixth grade at Shen-
andoah, and is a student in the
Beth El religious school.

Ivan Jacob*
Saturday morning services, Apr.
2, at North Shore Jewish Center
will include the Bar Mitzvah of
Ivan L. Jacobs, with Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz officiating.
Ivan is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Jacobs, 75 S. Shore dr. He
is in the graduating class of the
Center, and attends Nautilus Jun-
ior High.
Out-of-town guests will include
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Jacobs, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Greenman, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Margolis, and William
Schwartz.
AKHOLD
STEPHEN
JAY
MKHAU
IVAH
Pre-Passover
Seder at Home
Children of the junior congrega-
tion of Monticello Park Jewish
Center will present a pre-Passover
Seder service for residents of
Douglas Gardens, Jewish Home for
the Aged, in the Home's new Jun-
ior Auxiliary Day Care Room on
Sunday at 2 p.m.
Rev. and Mrs. Lazarus Lehrer,
residents of the Home, will be hosts
to the children by presiding as
grandparents at the Seder. Rabbi
Max Lipschitz, Monticello Park's
spiritual leader, will deliver a spe-
cial Passover message.
As part of the afternoon's pro-
gram, an Israeli dance group, rep-
resenting the congregation's youth,
will present a series of native Is-
raeli folk dances. Cantor Ben-Zion
Kirschenbaum will chant tradi-
tional Seder melodies. Abe Gittel-
son, education director of the con-
gregation, has arranged for the
event in cooperation with the
Group Work Department of the
Home.
Gilbert Balkin Chapter
Gilbert Balkin chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will meet Tuesday,
8:30 p.m., at Everglades Elemen-
tary School. Program will feature
a discussion of "Hair-styling,
Makeup and Personal Appear-
ance." Mrs. Gerald Soltz, presi-
dent of District 5, B'nai B'rith
Women, will be guest of honor.
Fefh Sholom Annual Seder,
Tom: h Sholom will con-
Idnct .
|d< r on Monday morning, Apr. 11,
,a Lhe Ti mi l( Banquet

I iberg. Temple president,
y Dinnerstein, i member oi
inr.j, is chairman of
I inctSi, aBiith is open to Beth
phojorn numbers and the general
public?-"

~
CAREY
Elect
CAREY
MATTHEWS
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
"Mo Stranger to the
fight for People's Rights"
GROUP 3
I'd. I*ol. Adv.
Robyn Tubin Chapter
Card and game party was held
by Robyn Tubin chapter of the City
of Hope Wednesday evening at
American Legion Hall, 15900 NE
21st ave., No. Miami Beach. Co-
chairmen were Mrs. M. Blumen-
thal and Mrs. A. Matz.
Youth Aliyah Program
Herzl group of Hadassah will
hold its Youth Aliyah luncheon
Friday, Apr. 8, at the home of Mrs.
Jack Courshon, 1440 W. 23rd st.,
Sunset Island 3. The program be-
gins at 1 p.m.
Program to advance the development of Florida's economy is
outlined by Sen. Doyle E. Carlton, jr., candidate for governoi,
in an address to leaders of the state's home building industry.
Carlton Heft) is greeted by Vincent DeMeo, president of the
Florida Home Builders Assn., at the group's recent meeting at
the Angebilt hotel in Orlando.
MANISCHEWITZ


Page 14-B
*Jknist fkrkMairi
Friday, April 1, i960
A JComm. Hails Collins Move
LEGAL NOTICE
Support and praise for Gov. Col-
lins' intergroup relations views
wire pledged Wednesday by the
Greater Miami chapter of the
American Jewish Committee. Na-
than B. Rood, chapter president,
commended the Governor for his
estaHIisHnTent of"a stale bi-raciaT
committee to consider intergroup
tensions in Florida and offered the
facilities of AJC to assist in this
end.
"In a period of stress it is often
difficult to find statesmen who will
take leadership in giving direction
to the positive forces in our com-
munities. This has been particu-
larly true in the South during the
past few years when emotions rath-
er than intellect have tended to
sway the minds of men," Rood de-
clared.
they desire to use public accom-
modations during their stay here."
LEGAL NOTICE
"South Pacific," Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical with Ros-
sano Brazzi end Mitzi Gaynor, is now showing for the first time
at regular admission prices at Wometco's Carib, Miami and
Miracle Theatres.
Retired Merchant ** Grewbtrg Branch
Dead at 87
Abraham Goldman, retired pro-
duce commission merchant, died
in Naranja. Fla.. on Mar. 16. He
would have been
17 in May.
Mr. Goldman,
who came to the
United States
M from Russia i|^
^1885. when he
I a as 12 years old,
| established him-
I -elf in the furni-
ure, and then
'the livery busi-
MR. GOLDMAN nesscs. Then he
retired to Miami 14 years ago
from Cleveland. O., he had been
in the grocery business for many
years.
Goldman became a 32nd degree
Mason, Scottish Rite, over 50 years
ago.
Besides a son, Samuel H. Gold-
man, president of the Gulf Whole-
sale Drug Co., of Miami, he is sur-
vived by three daughters, Mrs.
Rose Zwick, of Miami, and Misses
Jennie and Lillian Goldman, of
Wooster, O.; and four grandchil-
dren, Marvin Goldman, Mrs. Eli-
nor Simon, and Mrs. Fay Wilpon,
all of Miami, and Herbert Zwick,
of Chicago. He also leaves 10 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were conducted
by Rabbi Morris W. Graff at Gor-
don Funeral Home Apr. 18, with
burial at Graceland Cemetary.
C.haim Greenberg Branch of the
Labor Zionist Organization will
meet Monday evening at the Se-
ville hotel. Dr. Simon Wilensky,
president, will conduct the meet-
ing. Bernard Furman will lead a
disinsMon of current events. Ef-
raim Yaffe. cultural chairman,
will introduce the speaker.
Herman Stern
Passes Away
Herman J. Stern. 62, of 1080 99th
St., Bay Harbor Island, died Tues-
day. Mar. 22.
Mr. Stern came to Miami 11
years ago from New York City,
where he was a wholesale mer-
chant of ladies' wear. He was a
member of North Shore Jewish
Center and Miami Beach Elks
Lodge.
Mr. Stern is survived by his wife,
Celia; one son, Arnold J".. of No.
Miami Beach: four brothers. Har-
old. Hollywood, Calif., Murray,
Louis and Ralph, New York City;
two sisters. Mrs. Sophie Seidern
and Mrs. Tillie Mogel, New York;
and three grandchildren. Jo-Anne,
Barbara Lynn and Michel Stern,
No. Miami Beach.
Services were Mar. 23 at River-
side Memorial Chapel, Normandy
Isle, with burial at Lakeside Me-
morial Park.
_______1*
Insurance Exec Dies at Age 50
Leon Lieberman. 50. of 450 San- ami Jewish Community Center,
sovino. Coral Gables, died Mon- Surviving are a daughter, Miss
day. Mar. 28. Adele Lieberman; and six broth
Mr. Lieberman came here 25 ers. Irving. Mitchell, Meyer. Jack,
years ago from Long Branch, N.J., enrv and Samue, all of Miami
and was an insurance agent.
He wjfs one of the founders of Services were Wednesday. Mar.
the YMHA. now the Greater Mi- 30, at Gordon Funeral Horne.
"In the effort to retotve inter-
group conflict, observers of these
pheromena have invariably no-
ted that a major eeuae of fric-
tion was lack of adequate com-
munication among the affected
parties. Wo wort thorofort par-
ticularly pleased at your recent
address to the citizens of this
state urging that bi-racial com-
mittees be established to consid-
er the nature and possible solu-
tions of current racial tensions
in Florida. Your announcement
of the establishment of a state
committee to consider these mat-
ters was particularly encourag-
ing.
"Our studies here convince us
'hat it is to Florida's best interests
o deal with these issues honestly,
lirectly. and now. As participants
n the business and professional life
of this area we believe that our fu-
ture well-being depends in great
part on the wisdom we show in re-
solving these problems."
Rood said: "We agree with your
previously stated views that indus-
trialization of Florida is related to
our abilty to show investors that
we have a labor market free from
the interracial discords that destroy
productivity. We believe that the
national political conventions as
well as many other conventions
passed Florida by because of the
concern that local racial bigotry
might have harmful national reper-
cussions.
"The situation in Cuba has help-
ed to make it very clear that tour-
ists will not flock to an area where
tension and discord make relaxa
tion impossible. Looking south-
ward again we realize that Latins
will not welcome our bids for their
commerce as long as their nation-
als, who may be people of color,
take the risk of being offended if
REV SOLOMON MACHTEY
i -i Mai h in n. ^"ik city, iii
.- ? ii v i\ ed b ii-. Rabbi H. At
Machtel ami Nathan Machtel, Miami
itey; :h oauffhtera
1 k :.-. HI .. an
Anna Men'lelaoiT; and several Frand-
were Mi -7 in New York.
make U ZadieA UwL rnbbUV t K
./w^ROKEACH
Jle*&<^coHve*t^X\Wk LIST"
? CLEANING AIDS
? SOUPS & SAUCES
? FISH
? OILS & SHORTENING
? FRUITS
? PRESERVES
? JUICES
? CONDIMENTS
? PICKLED PRODUCTS

TOMATO
SAUCE
'MSHR00M
Quality Kosher Products Since 1870
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE.
H, Ial-C__
''N l:l': r-
MARTH i I.I.KN HAkl-.R.
I I. ;i-,mI
NOT.CE TO CREDITORS
I",, \|1 i i, ,i \h l.i -"H~ llav-
ilma or Demand* Agalnal Bun
K -i.it.
Vou are herebj notified and requir-
ed in preaenl ..". lalme aud .i.-mandH
which viiu ma) havt agalnal the --
.ate ..i MARTHA il'I.I.KN BAKKK,
i lade Count) Horlda,
;,. hi* County Judge* "f Hade County,
,,l rii. thi n* in ili-lr office* in
he County Courthouee in Dade t'oun-
\, F.nilda. within .tain calendar
inoatha from the date "f th<- iii-t
inhllcatlona he eot, or th.- mat* will
.. barred
ADBL.R BAKKK ROBIHON,
xiin x ui ihi' Batata "f
Martha Cullen Baker, deceased
;i il.l i.MAN A >i< 'I.I 'STKIN
MI..I ll.-y
W. Flakier Street
Miami, Kim nla
l/l-*-1'.-"
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE D.SSOLUTION
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA
ro ALL TO WHOM THEHK l'RKS-
ENTS SHALL COME, I1RKKTINUS:
Whereaa, SMI. HKRNSTKIN. Ml
\MI M.ORIDA: MILTON .MM.I.Kit.
.MIAMI. H.oi'.lliA Mll.DKKD BERN
I'KIN. MIAMI. I-I.i iKIHA 'lnl mi iln
j.ini day "' December, A 11 IHI
bum to be eeorporateid under the
iniTuTliinn >f t'hapter '",ns, Florida
-latut.s. A. V. '". CORP., ii "-
oratlnn, wlt'i I'm |>rmrl|Ml ntaci
,( mialne al Miami. DADE COl'N-
rv. In th.- siate of Horlda, and
hereaa in.- MtuckhoHlerM of sin h i -i -
oration did on the flat day of March,
\ li IMO, '-ii- in b* filed In th,
'lire of 111. Set eterj of Slate nl
he Sin', >< I- "li'la. a i'inl-1-.....f '!
he utoelfhotderf under the proVlntonp
r ..aid I'hapur M8, Florida Statute*
a>iiiii<'ii if wen aoc"
H 'I .11 11.11
Mow, therefore, the Keceetary of
1.1.. doei herebs pertlfj lo the fore
i'llng and that In i- aatMled that tin
r died with.
IN WITNK8B WHKREOK, I havi
hereiintn N'-l niv hand and hv
affixed 1 he flreat Seal of thi
Side nf Klorlda, at Tallali.i
t lit- Capital, thla the TWENTT-
I HIST .la> ..I MARCH, A l>. 19*
1- .ill R. A. ORAY.
S. .1. 1 iry ..f Stale.
______________________!/!/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
M.IHK IS HEREBY OrVBN thai
the iiinleiMliriwil. denlrlna to enaaffe In
hualneaa under ilie fletltimia name of
mack- isi.i: MOTEL a't lK7.'. Oonini
\venue. Miami Reai'h Intend* to re-
i-ter *ald name with the Clerk of the
circuit Court of liade County, Plot-Ida.
HARAN ENTERPRIRBBr INC.
Sole 1 m 11. 1
MARX M. FABKR
\ 1 toi nay
1411 I'linKiea* HMr.
l/l.t-ll-tJ
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
MilKK IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I he iiudel'sluneil, d. -iiuiK to enKaK' in
l>u.-.iii,->v under tin- flelltioufl n.iui, ^ of
IIEAI X ARTS IKiTKI, and IIKAI'X
ARTS APARTMENTS at number soon
W.-i Driv.- In the < "its of Ninth Bay
Village, Florida intendi* In ratjleter the
nald name with Ih. I'l.ik ,,f ih. in
eull Court of Dade County, Florida.
ORA.NOE LIFE CORP., a Ma. corp.
hi William Prayer, Preeldenl
1 I-4J-15-3J
CERTIFICATE OF
CORPORATE D.SSOLUTION
IN THE NAME AND BY THE
AUTHORITY OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA
T'i ALL 'I'n WHOM THERE PRKH-
KNTS SMAI.I. 1 ii.MI.. i 1111 IKTINt !S-
Whereaa, S.M I. lii-IHNS IKIN. \i i.
AMI. M.OItlliA. MILTON \'II.I.Ki:
MIAMI. I.OKIIl \ MIUUtKII I
.- [KIN' Ml VMI, I'l.' HtlDA II ..n Hi.
'2*1 II ilnys- p., ,s
1a1l.se In l- InOorpol \-r Hi,
|.UA lalon* ..f I 'h.l|il. 1- Bus, I
VN CO., INC.,
1 1 ..1 porn limi. with It m 111 in \ |jl:ui
nf bualnem at Miami, hank COL'N-
1 v, in ilu- State ..1 i-,
. the -ti.i'khnlder- nf .ih cor-
.oration did ..11 th< Jl*t dai
\ H lC0, 111-1 In lie rile.I In the
f the .-' 1.11 > of State of
tin state of Florida, a fonaeal
In- Mi..i'Kli..ld. 1 ...., the iirovlwlonM
of aald Chapter ii"S. Florida Statutes,
ihowfng ih.- di--. j-.itii.ii of atfea oor-
poralkm.
Now. therefore, the Kecrelary of
Slate doe* hereby certify to the fore-
totaa and lhat he In aatfafled thai the
I'llitlremenlM tit law iiave l.eeu ...in-
i.li. d with.
IN WITNESS WHERBOr. I have
hereunto *el mv hand 11 I have
affixed lln Hi. at S. al of the
siate ..r Florida, al Tallaha
ih.- Capital, this the TWENTY-
FIRST da\ .,r MARCH, A (1 I960.
in.ali R. A. GRAY
S......i.n-y nf >
^^^_______^^ I l/'>
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IH HEREBY OIVBN that
the underalaned, ualneae under the llctltloui name of
RtXIBR LEEDS LTD. at fi:i Ea*l Plag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida IntenOa to
said name with the Clerk of
he Circuit Court ol Dade County,
l-'lnrlda. v
ROQBR l.i:KI>S LTD., IMC.
it' 1 i.iiIb iii-.m. Prealdent
HARRY Zt'KERNTCK
Mlnrney for own.r
120 Llnoola 1!.....1
Miami Reach. Fla.
i/M-lS-22
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Ni.TH'i: IS HEREBY OIVBN thai
the undersigned, deairlnc to i-mraae in
malneai under the 1'< lltlnue name nl
METROPOLITAN CRKHIT Bt'REAl
at number IM Wa-hinRton Avenue In
the City Of Miami Beach. Florida In-
tend* to register the aald nain. With
the Clerk of the i'ln nit Court Of Dade
County, Florida.
Haled at Miami Beach, Florida thiv
Ilith day of Mar. h MttW.
HENRY \iilll.. Oan-r
4/I.I.IS-22
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE.
No. 49003-C
IN RE: K-tate of
SAMl'KI. L. HARKRMAN a/k/a
S. LOCIS IIABKRMAN, a k a
SAMCEL LOtTIB HABERMAN.
a/k/a SAMI'EL NABBRMAN
De<'ea*ed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor* and All Permne Hav-
ing Claim* or lieHiand* Apalnet Said
Batata:
You are hereto] notified and requir-
ed to present any I'lnlin* and demand-
which you may have against the es-
tate of SAMl'KI. I. HABERMAN,
a/k/a S. LOIIS HAIIICKMAN. a k
SAMCEL LOIIS IIABKRMAN. B'k .1
SAMl'KI, HABERMAN deceaeed late
of Dade County, Florida, to the Coui
ly .lodges of Dade County, and file
the aame In their office* In the Countv
Courthouae In Dade County, Florida,
within eight .-alendar month* from
the date of the flr.-t iitilillcatl'-n li'-i
of, or the name will 'he barred.
KATK HA HERMAN
Adminlstratri*
SHAPIRO ANH Fi:li:i' I
Altorneis
IM Lincoln Road--Suite 31S
Miami Beauh 19, Horlda 0)
4 ] s -1 i -
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
UNDER SUPERVISION OF
The Orthodox Vaad Hakashruth of Florida
RABEI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
BARTON'S BEVERAGES
BOTTLED EXCLUSIVELY FOR
STEVENS MARKETS, INC.
GREETINGS...
WHEEL BRAKE SERVICE
OF MIAMI
BRAKES RELINED-Any US. Car $7.95
2701 N.W. 36th Street ME 5-3315
Victor Quint, President
JONES MIAMI BEACH MOVING t STORAGE
Et. 1119 Milo W. Bennett
PIONEER MOVERS OF MIAMI BEACH
1828 WEST AVE. JE 1-3707


Friday, April 1, 1960
* Jewish Hark/ton
Page 15-B
GRAND
WAY
MIAMI
N.W. 7(4, AVENUE
AT N.W. 111th STREET
MIAMI
N.W. Mth STREET
AT N.W. 12th AVENUE
FT. LAUDERDALE
STATE RD. 7 AT
W. BROWARD BLVD.
W. HOLLYWOOD
S. STATE RD. 7 AT
WASHINGTON ST.
HOME AND
TABLE NEEDS!
TABLE CHINA
GLASSWARE
W00DENWARE
FLATWARE
C00KWARE
MAKE GRAND-WAY
HEADQUARTERS FOR AIL
YOUR PASSOVER NEEDS!

PASSOVER
WINES
9 MANISCHEWITZ
L'KOVED
* MOGEN DAVID
. ALWAYS
LOW LOW
DISCOUNT
PRICES!
PASSOVER NEEDS!
GRAND-WAY
SERVES YOU BETTER...
FIRST QUALITY, VARIETY, DEPENDABILITY .
_________^_________________________ ____________________^_^____________
THE FINEST... THE FRESHEST ...
GREAT LAKES FISH
WHITE FISH
CARP
* YELLOW PIKE
* BUFFALO CARP
WE PREPARE AND GRIND YOUR ORDER FREE!
'. Available from Monday, April 4th
SAVE ON ALL YOUR NEEDS AT
GRAND-WAY'S | COMPLETE PASSOVER DEPT.!
? JUICES
? SPICES
? CANDY
? SOUPS
? SCHAV
? WINES
? NYAFAT
? CAKES
? SOAP
? CANDLES
? SUGAR
? NUTS
? BORSCHT
D
? POTATO STARCH
? POTATO PANCAKES
? HORSERADISH
? CONDIMENTS
? CAKE MEAL
? GEFILTE FISH
? SOUR SALT
? MACAROONS
? SOUP NUTS
? PRESERVES
? PASSOVER OILS
? TEABAGS
? KICHEL
SCHMALTZ
/ CHECK YOUR NEEDS RIGHT NOW!
ALL ITEMS ARE CERTIFIED FOR
PASSOVER USE!
FAMOUS BRAND MATZO AND MATZO PRODUCTS'
GOODMAN'S + STREirS + MANISCHEWITC
EGG MATZOS TEA MATZOS
PLAIN MATZOS FARFEL MATZO MEAL
WHOLE WHEAT
MATZO BALL SOUP

10NDAV
FRIDAY 9 A.M. 10 P.M. SATURDAY 8 A.M. 0 10 P.M. SUNDAY 8 A.M. 1 P.M.


Page 16-B
*JewistncrkMain
Friday. April 1. 1960
UNDER THE STRICT AND CONSTANT SUPERVISION OF
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC HIRSH EVER, DIRECTOR
QUANTITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED
SPECIALS EFFECTIVE APRIL 4th THRU 11th. May we suggest that your Holiday shop-
ping be done early ... to insure faster service and the maximum in savings! You can
be sure we carry only the finest Kosher Meats and Poultry! YOU MUST BE SATISFIED
OR YOUR MONEY BACK.
GENUINE WHITE ROCK
KOSHER MADE
PAN READY
CAPONS
PULLETS
OR
YEARLINGS
-nDS^IWS SPECIALS------------------
The Finest Fresh Killed Kosher Chickens
Delivered to Our Markets 5 Times Daily!
FAMOUS ARBOR ACRES
ROASTERS, BROILERS
OR SPRINGERS
- mm
;i-
&k
t*>5
v
KOSHER-BEST OR
LADY ESTHER
TURKEYS
DUCKS
OR ROCK
2iNISHHENS
STORE HOURS: Mon. thru Wed. 8 to 6 Thurs. 8 to 9 ... Fri. 8 to 3
NOW FOUR FINE KOSHER MARKETS TO SERVE YOU EVEN BETTER
163rd ST. SHOPPING CENTER 1 I 19th ST. AT ALTON ROAD I 2091 CORAL WAY
NO. MIAMI BEACH | | MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI
CORAL WAY
AT S.W. 87th AVE.
WMtdMttor Shopping Pl.i.
MERCHANTS GREEN STAMPS YOUR EXTRA BONUS AT FOOD VaIR


Preparing Your Home for Passover
This authoritative guide has
been prepared in the form of ques-
tions and answers, plus a sched-
ule of time for various aspects of
the Bassover preparation ritual,
by the rabbinical authorities of
the Kosher Certification Service of
the Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America. It is offer-
ed with a caution and a sugges-
tion. The caution is that your rab-
bi should be consulted on any
problems which may arise in your
using these regulations. The sug-
gestion ife that you clip this guide
and keep it handy.

What is Chametz?
Chametz is a general term for
all leavened foods. Food and
drinks made from wheat, rye, bar-
lej, oats, millet and derivatives of I
these grains are subject to the!
laws of Chametz Rice, corn, peas'
and all types of beans are also for-
bidden for Passover use.
*
How much Chametz in a particu-
lar food miktj it unfit for piss-
over use?
Any amouat. One must not oat
or have any Chametz during the
entire Passover period, whether
in natural state, processed form
or mixture.

To what timo may Chametz be
eaten this year?
Chametz may not be eaten after
9:30 a.m.. Erev Pesach, which this
year is Monday, Apr. 11.

Are fresh fruits and vegetables
Kosher for passover, other than
legumes beans, corn, peas,
etc?
Fresh fruits and vegetables are
kosher at all times. Food which is
processed in any way may not be j
Kosher for Passover. The only
guarantee that packaged, process-
ed products you buy are Kosher
for Passover is certification by
recognized rabbinic authority, in-
dicated by a label or emblem of
such rabbinic certification. Such
Kosher L'Pesach certification.
should be clearly and unmistak-
ably an authentic part of the labelI
Helpful Guide to Making
The Pre-Holiday Program
Simple and Ritually Correct
printed by the manufacturer on
the container or wrapper of the
product.
*
What it matzah's historic and sym-
bolic significance?
When the children of Israel fi-
nally were able to flee from slav-
ery in ancient Egypt, they were
forced, for lack of time, to bake
their bread before the dough be-
came leavened. As they began
their long journey, under the lead-
ership of Moses, to the Promised
Land, they ate matzah unleav-
ened bread. In the annual observ-
ance of Passover, Jews every-
where commemorate this Divine
act of deliverance from slavery.

Should dishes, utensils and other
kitchen and eating implements
be bought specifically for pass-
over use?
This is the best assurance of
complete compliance with Pass-
over regulations. Under specified
conditions, some utensils used dur-
ing the rest of the year may be
used during Passover. IF they are
properly kashered. Your rabbi
will be glad to give you the nee
essary information.

What about plastic tableclothes?
l]re\wis]li Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, April 1, 1960
Section C
The traditional way to make a Seder J
i
CAND1IS are
lighted by the
mother of the
house le usher in
thr festival of Pass-
ever. The henedte-
lien which she pro-
nouncea over the
candles gives a re-
ligious meaning to
this simple act. An
abundance ol light
symbolizes joy and
festivity, and the
soft candle-glow
adds an aura of
spirituality to the
Seder table.
2
A CUP Of WIN!
is placed at eaeh
table setting. The
eanctification of
the Holiday is pro-
aeenced ever the
first cup. Three ad-
diiional caps are
drunk during the
course of the
Seder, making a
total of four, to
symbolize the four
expressions of the
Lord's premise to
redeem the chil-
dren of Israel anil
deliver them from
bondage.
3
THI HAOCADAH
I literally "the tell-
ing") contains the
complete Seder
ceremonies in their
prescribed order
(Mtdtr). The first
part of the book,
concerned mainly
with the atory of
the Jews' deliver-
ance from Egypt,
is read before the
meal. After dinner
follows the second
portion consisting
of prayers of praise
and thanks to the
Almighty.
4
MATZON repre-
sents the "bread of
affliction" eaten by
the Jews in Egypt,
and also the bread
that had to be baked
during their hasty
flight when there
was no time for
leavening. Three
maiiot Mir placed
in the Seder tray.
Half the middle
matioh, saved for
the Ajikomon I des-
sert), i. piny felly
"stolen" by a child
and ransomed for a
prise.
5
THI Z'lOAH,
a roasted shank
bone, is placed on
the Seder tray. It
reprearnls the an-
cient sacrifice of
the Paschal iamb
(Peiachl which
had to be eaten
roasted. PcMrA.tht-
Hebrew name for
Passover, also re-
fers to the Lord's
passing over fpoj.
achI the Jewish
homes during the
plague visited upon
the Egyptian first-
born.
6
THI illTZAH,
a roasted egg
pieced left of the
ZVosA, symbolises
the required offer-
ing brought en all
festivals la the
Temple. The egg.
while not itself sac-
rificed, is seed in
the Seder as It is
rise Jewish aymkJ
I mearniag tin
tnia case for the
lees of the Temple
where the sac
rlflees were
it.
7
*THI MAROB
or "hitler herbs"
I usually horserad-
ish I is placed ia
the middle of the
tray and symbol'
iaes the Jews' bat-
ter safferlng nader
the Egyptian yoke.
Diresdy below ia
the Oeeerem. an-
other pieoe of a*V
ter kerbs, earn-
memeraliag the
eeetem ef
8
THI CHAIOJIT,
placed beneath the
Z'rtmh, ia a mix-
ture ef chopped
apple, nuts, clans-
9
the mortar used by
(he Jews in hmllei
famed labor, le.
mre she Wars* fc>
eo^h-mpp-d
turn ZZ
THI KARPAS,
a piece of parsley
or lettuce placed to
the left ef the
Churtut, symbol-
ises the meager
diet ef the Jews ia
Egyptian bondage.
It is dipped ia*
salt water in re*
ef the
theyehsd in
their misery. The
JCarpas asm signi-
fies Springtime.
ihesoeseaef
10
THI CUf OF III-
JAH, filled with
wine, is kept en
the table through-
out the Seder ia
-.the hope that the
Prophet Elijah
asay appear as a
messenger of the
Almighty and an-
nounce the coming
f the Messiah.
Thus, ia the midst
f their memories
of the past, the
Jews leek forward
to the day of aai-
aad bretberhoed.
Courtesy Barton's Bonbonnler*. New Tor* City
Plastic tableclothes are permis-
sible for Passover use.

Does the oven need special clean-
ing?
Your oven is used throughout
the year and it must be cleaned,
scraped and burned out. A fitting
metal lining for the interior is
recommended. Special metal
plates should be placed over the
top of the range to prevent con-
tact with Passover utensils. Ask
your rabbi for details on how to
kasher a stove.

What is done with chametz which
is not used cp or disposed of be-
for Passover?
Passover regulations require
transfer of ownership of such
Chametz to a non-Jew via an in-
strument known as "Shtar Mecbi-
rah" which should be completed
by 10 a.m., Apr. 11.

How is this done?
All leftover Chametz should be
placed in a spare room, closet or
trunk which is then locked. No
real Chametz, such as cookies,
cereals, etc., should be kept over
Passible if possible. AH Chametz
dishes and utensils, after thorough
cleaning, also must be placed ia
a special locked place. You then
authorize your rabbi to prepare a
bill of sale and negotiate transfer
of ownership of your Chametz tki
a non-Jew.

When is ownership returned?
After Passover, the rabbi, act-
ing as your agent, may re-pur-
chase the Chametz and you may
then use it again. Give your rabbi
a reasonable time aftetr Passover
before using the Chametz, so that
your rabbi will have enough time
to complete the second part of the
transaction.

Is there any other special cere*
mony connected with the dispos-
el of Chametz?
A search for Chametz is re-
quired in a formal ceremony call-
ed "Bedikat Chametz." This be-
gins with a final check of your
home at nightfall Sunday. Apr. 10,
to make sure all Chametz has been,
removed. Don't forget to examine
pockets of clothing to be worn
during Passover. The "Bedikat
Chametz" should be performed
this year immediately after night-
fall on Apr. 10.
o
How is Bedikat Chametz perform-
ed?
Since your home is presumed to
be Chametz-free by that time,
crumbs of bread are placed ia
each room so that the search is
not in vain. The Head of the House,
his way lighted by a candle car-
ried by a member of the house-
h o 1 d, goes from room to room,
with a feather, gathering any
Chametz with a wooden spoon.
Chametz, spoon, feather and can-
dle are wrapped in a cloth and
tied with a string. (This Chametz
is to be burned the following
morning, the morning of Apr. 11.)
The Head of the House then for-
mally renounces ownership of any
undiscovered Chametz. The form-
ula, "Kol Chamira," appears at
the beginning of the Haggadah, as
does the brocha to be recited ia
the evening only.

Is there a cermony far the burning
of the Chametz?
The ceremony is called "Biur
Chametz" and takes place no later
than 10 a.m. on Erev Pesach. The
Chametz, as well as any bread left
over from breakfast, is burned and
the "Kol Chamira" is again re-
cited.
s
What is the iwk* step?
All Passover kitchen and eating
implements and foods are placed
in the proper places. Your home
is now free of all Chametz and
ritually ready for Passover and
for the first Seder Monday eve-
ning, Apr. 11.


Page 2-C
* Jewish ncrktian
Friday, April 1. 1960
Postmen's Group
Reelects Dooley
Phil Dooley. president of Local
172. National. Fsilejation of,Post;
"* Office Clerks, for the past twoj
j years, has been reelected to the
presidency for another term.
Dooley. who is wholesale stamp!
clerk at Buena Vista Station, was!
unopposed and received the unani-
. mous endorsement of Local 172s
750 members.
Other officers elected were ex-i
ecutive vice president, Les Mot-j
felt; vice president membership.
Les Holmes; vice president, publi-
city. Art Nielsen; vice president,(
personal relations. Paul Gioia; re-
. cordins secretary. David Mather;!
finanicial secretary, Mike Bourke;
| treasurer, Larry Rosenbaum ; edi
tor. Clerics Mail Newspaper, Ted
Beskind; legislative represent*
'tive, Erv Gayle.
&
Mb*
MHBIB
mr
rtfrMhini, catorie-frat
Sugarme
swans THAN SU6Al
YIT no r000 VAIUI
Recommended by doctors fee
I ebetic*. overweights end to at-
' one diets Use for bever*|es.
desserts, cooking. Pure Com
pletety h*rmte$t. 4 M. Tfc
6URN'Ur NOI'Ml'MNS
AT FOOD STORKS IVERYWMfRI
m
Members ol the Miami cimmittee, who have
joined with committees from all other areas
of Greater Miami in planning dinner of tribute
to honor Seymour B. Liebman and 25 other
leading Zionists of the area Saturday evening,
Apr. 2, at the Fontainebleau hotel are seated
(Irom left) Morris Simon, Joseph Mechlow, Louis
Rudnick, chairman of the Miami commitee.
and Abe Kasow. Standing (from left) are Dr.
Nathaniel Saroff, Meyer Fine, Seymour Samet,
director of the American Jewish Committee,
and Irwin Block. Guest speaker at the dinner,
to be held under auspices of the Greater Mi-
ami Districts of the Zionist Organization of
America, will be Hon. James G. McDonald,
first U.S. Ambassador to Israel.
Leading Zionists To be Honored
Twenty-five leading Zionists of
Greater Miami will be honored
"for distinguished service to the
Slate of Israel" at a dinner of
tribute Saturday evening. Apr. 2.
at the Fontainebleau hotel under
the auspices of the Greater Miami
District of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America.
Special tribute will be paid to
Seymour B. Liebman "for his out-
standing service on behalf of Is-
rael and Israel Bonds" by James
G. McDonald, first United States
Ambassador to Israel.
A leading Zionist for many
years, Liebman is honorary presi-
dent of the Southeast region of the
Zionist Organization of America,
and serves on the national board
of governors of the Israel Bond
organization.
Leading Zionists to be honored
with Liebman r David Con-
visor, David S. Denner, Ezra
Finegold, Jacob Fishman, Mar-
tin Genet, Meyer Greenberg,
Abraham Grunhut, Maurice Hy-
men. Manuel Joseloff, Abraham
Kasow, Max Kolker, Samuel
Lachman. Oscar Lelchuk, Shel-
don Lelchufc, Bernard H. Liber-
man, Dr. Milton Lubarr, Oscar
Member, Louis Merwitzer, Aaron
Newman, Benjamin Rimer, Ja-
cob Schathler, Lou Shapiro, Hy
Sootin and Philip Weiss.
Dinner chairman is S. E.
Schwartz. Dinner committee in
eludes Dr. Milton Lubarr. general
chairman; Sam Levine. testimon-
ial committee chairman; and Ezra
Finegold. James David Liebman.
Al Ossip. Louis Rudnick. Jack
Fishman. Herman Weintraub, Al
Sherman, David Provus, Raymond
Rubin and Jack S. Popick, vice
chairmen.
Entertainment program will fea-
ture the noted Israeli actor and
singer. Ank Lavie, who starred in
the international award-winning
film, "Hill 24 Doesn't Answer."
Handwriting Expert in Talk
"Handwriting What it Re
veals" was discussed by Mrs.
Charlotte Leibel at the Miami Pub-
| lie Library Thursday evening.
Mar. 24. Mrs. Leibel. who has been
a professional graphologist for 15
: years. spoke on handwrit-
ing analysis and illustrate analysis
techniques on the blackboard.
INSIST ON
MARGULIS
STRICTLY KOSHER LPESACH
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Available at the Best Stores
The Aristocrat of Teas
MUStTEJ-j.'
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lOCAl DISTRIBUTOR FOR SWEE TOUCH NEE PRODUCTS:
IEVINSON FOOD SPECIALTIES, 1050 E 17th ST.. HIAIEAH. FLA
TO SERVE OUR JEWISH CUSTOMERS
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Will Provide KOSHER Products
MILK CREAM SOUR CREAM COTTAGE CHEESE
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Daily wholesale deliveries made to restaurants,
coffee shops, cafeterias, schools, etc.
Ph. FR 3-7447 for immediate delivery 2700 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Member Florida Restaurant Assn.
DISTRIBUTED BY
PALM imstiiiiu roils, ixc
373 N.E. 61 st STREET


Friday, ftpril 1, 1960
-Jewish thx-Mlan
Pag* 3-C
KTTER TO THE EDITOR -
What are Bounds of Free Speech?
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
This is in reply to the recent let
ter published in The Jewish Flori
dian over the name of Tobias Si-
mon, general counsel, Florida
Civil Liberties Union.
Mr. Simon unequivocally states
that "the law" gives Rockwell the
right to distribute leaflets advocat-
ing the destruction of American
Jewry, and also that Rockwell has
the right to advocate the elimina-
tion of American Jews. With these
flat assertions, Mr. Simon, of
course, prejudges the entire mat-
ter and its issues, and thereby runs
counter to his own subsequently-
expressed better-thinking that the
matter is a "judicial question to be
determined by a judge and the
weight of the law."
It it difficult to comprehend
how an organization such as
the Civil Liberties Union can
routinely classify this as simply
another case which must meet
tho requirements expressed in
tho "clear and present danger"
doctrine of Mr. Justice Holmes.
As the Supreme Court has point-
ed out, one can make a "seman-
tic straight jiu-ki't" out of the
phrase "clear and present dan-
ger." The very enormity, inhu ;
manity and horror of the crimes
advocated by Rockwell set apart
such advocacy from those which
in the past have been held to be
protected by the First Amendment.
Thus, in the Chaplinsky case, the
Supreme Court states: "There are
certain well defined and narrowly
limited classes of speech, the pre-
vention and punishment of which
have never been thought to raise
any constitutional problem. These
include the insulting or 'fight-
ing' words those which by their
very utterance tend to incite
an immediate breach of the
peace."
Not only was such a breach in
cited by Rockwell, but if insulting
or "fighting" words are not pro-
tected, bow can words be protect-
ed which advocate the cold-blood-
ed murder of Millions of innocent
Americans?
If Mr. Justice Holmes is to be
Hollywood A Ft. Lauderdale
WA 3-1511
; quoted as an authority for the po-
i sition taken by the Civil Liberties
j Union, it would seem more appro-
priate to quote Mr. Justice Holmes
I in a case much more to the point,
Frohwerk vs. United States: "The
First Amendment obviously
was not intended to give immunity
for every possible use of language
... We venture to believe that
j neither Hamilton nor Madison nor
any other competent person then
or later ever supposed that to
make criminal the counseling of
a murder would be an uncon-
jstitutional interference with free
' speech."
We must recognize that the free
doms of speech and press original-
ly were guaranteed by the Bill of
Rights to allow free expression of
I ideas, according to the Supreme
i Court "for the bringing about of
< political and social changes de-
sired by the people." Can the Civil
Liberties Union seriously contend
that the gassing of millions of
American Jews is such an "idea"
to be constitutionally protected?
Even obscenity has been held not
to be such an idea. Can mass ex-
termination be treated differently?
As the Chaplinsky case point-
ed out, insulting and inciting ut-
tering* "are n essential part or
any exposition of ideas and
any benefit that may be derived
from them is clearly outweigh-
ed by the social interest in or-
der and morality."
Even if one were to apply the
"clear and present danger" doc-
trine, can it be realistically main-
tained by Mr. Simon that its ex-
istence in the Rockwell case is
"problematical" in view of recent
anti-Semitic outbursts and stretch
ing three quarters around t h e
globe, and viewed with great
alarm by responsible leaders in
all democratic countries?
It may be "comforting" (Mr.
Simon's word) to know that both
principals in the controversy were
legally represented although to
me it is misdirected zealousness on
the part of the Civil Liberties Un-
ion to appoint two Jewish lawyers
to defend Rockwell and self-abne-
gation on their part to accept the
appointment. It must, however, be
something less comforting to mil-
lions of United States Jews, and
non-Jews alike, that the Civil Lib-
erties Union, and its spokesmen
of the Jewish faith, can become so
entranced by* a fundamental con-
cept of American liberty that they
are unable to perceive those very
exceptions inherent in the concept
which render it meaningful, judi-
cially acceptable, and morally de-
fensible.
Considering the foregoing, and
the enormous price paid by this
nation in World War II to oppose!
and defeat the Nazi menace the
Civil Liberties Union would do
well to reverse the offending, un-
realistic, and legally untenable po-
sition it has taken in this matter.
It should remind itself that Mr.
Justice Cardozo once pointed out
that freedom can be pushed to a
point where freedom itself may be
destroyed.
LOUIS POLLACK
Miami Beach
nu.- aM* ttmtm Moei / Houmooo. mm* m*i / *
sub / auansuu tut
so.
4T
flFSTREAM
HALLANOALB, PLOMIOA
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Congratulations to you on the
acquisition of Max Lerner for the
pages of The Jewish Floridian.
Your editorial pages have long
since emerged from the paroch-
ialism of a special interest cate-
gory, and this is an added evi-
dence of The Jewish Flondian's
leadership in stimulating and
provocative journalism.
And while commenting on some-
thing new, permit me also to com-
ment on something old. I found
Leo Mindlin's column in your last]
issue on the reckless foolishness of
school censors an incisive pricking'
of dangerous pomposity.
NATHAN PERLMUTTER
Executive Director
Florida Regional Office
Anti-Defamation League
ELECT
W. R. (BUSTER)
HANCOCK
The Only fully qualified
candidate for
COMMISSIONER
AGRICULTURE
Successful former
Business me*
Educated" in Florid* Schools
B. S. Degree in Agriculture
U. ef Fie.
Minns vote rest
Family Me*
Long record of telflen service
to Florid* Agriculture
w*Vd.,&
_________Campaign Treasurer
MODERN WOOD
INDUSTRIES, Inc.
MANUFACTURERS OF
* KITCHEN CABINETS
* OFFICE FURNITURE
ALL MICA COVERED
"Service end Merchandise
Is Our Business"
1029 East 28th Street
Phone OX 6-0771
GORDON ROOFING AND
SHEET METAL WORKS INC.
?14 N.W. lOlh Ave. Fl I 7180
Have your root repaired now; you
will save en a new roof later. .
"atiefaetory Work by
Experienced Men"
l*UA^A^A*^AiO^ PREPARE YOUR BOY
FOR THE BETTER JOB
tilth rwhiMil Ht l*ut. Co'les-r If pun
eible. With our plan you ran help
arrant^ It.
!VAT GANS
3M0 S.W. M Avenue, Miami
Hones FR 3-441* or Hi t-tftl


Page 4-C
+Je*ist> ncrkMatn
Friday. April 1, 1960
Mutual Security Amendment Hailed
NEW
DAIRY MEAL
Left to right are Mrs. Julian Lehman, chairman. Bob Ruben-
stein, of the board of governors, and Mrs. Edward Feinstein.
president of the Miami Beach chapter, National Children's
Cardiac Hospital. They're discussing the results of last week's
annual fund-raising luncheon at the Eden Roc hotel attended
by some 700 women. Mrs. Nat Cohen was awarded a trip
to Paris via Air France, with the luncheon under the direction
oi Chef Alix Humbert, of Maxim's in Paris.
Ben-Zvi Proposes Change
In Memorial Prayer Text
JERUSALEM(JTA) Varying
interpretations given in the Israel
press to a proposal from Presi
dent Ben Zvi for a change in the
proposed standard prayer for the
dead in behalf of the victims of
Nazism prompted the President to
send this week another letter to
Rabbi Jacob Tolcdano. Minister of
Religious Affairs, to clarify the
proposal.
In his first letter, the President
asked ihat the words "German
nmr.ii ir-' be replaced with the
words "Nazi murderers." In mak-
ing the request, the President Mid
the proposed change would ex'.end
the prayer to unhide the Nasii of
other countries who had partici-
pated in the killing of Jews.
He said also that the phrase
"German murderers" ignored
the fact there had been anti-
Nazis among the Germans and
that it indicted the whole Ger-
man people.
In his second letter, the Presi-
dent explained that the original
text did not specify the identity of
"the murderers of our brethren"
and that, in his first proposal, he
had meant to assure that the pray-
ers would "'make express mention
of German Nazis, enemies of Is-
rael"' and also that the prayer
would "not ignore those who did
ot belong to the German nation
but who also shed the blood of our
brethren."
The President added, in his sec-
ond letter, that to clarify the ques-
tion, he was now proposing that
the German Nazis, their allies and
the phrase in question read: "by
satellites."
NKW YORK The Anv
Jewish Congress said weinendaj
it welcomed an anumlmont to the
.Mutual Security Act b> ihe House
Foreign Affairs. Committee that
would* free thes4V5*.-f*regn aid
program from the effects of the
Arab boycott of Israel.
But an organization spokesman
' warned that unless the measure
were vigorously enforced by Pres-
ident Eisenhower, it would have
as little practical effect" as an
amendment to the Mutual Secur-
ity Appropriations Act passed last
year and a 1956 Senate resolution,
"both of which aimed without suc-
cess at halting Arab discrimination
against U. S. citizens of Jewish
faith."
Ira Guilden. chairman of the
Commission on International Af-
fairs of the American Jewish
Congress, said his agency was
"gratified" at recognition by the
House group that "boycotts and
blockades by nations receiving
United States aid negate the
purposes of the mutual security
program."
The amendment, sponsored by
Wayne L. Hays, (Dem.0.) and
Leonard Fargstein (Dem.N.Y.),
also states that the U. S. favors
freedom of navigation in interna-
tional warterways and improved
' economic cooperation between na-
tions.
"However." Guilden declared,
"the measure is qualified by a pro-
vision that it shall be applied 'as
the Presidentt may determine."
"Unless the President determ
that countries benefiting from
U. S. foreign aid programs may
not practice discrimination against
American citizens in their right to
trade freely with all friendly na-
tions, the new amendment will be
reduced to a mere formal declara-
tion as were the Morse Amend-
ment to the 1959 Mutual Security
Appropriations Act and Senate
Resolution 323 of 1956," Guilden
asserted.
The American Jewish Congress
leader said he was ''especially
pi, snttT to note that the measure
d b] the House Committee
went beyond the Mutual Security
PT ni-4o eoww .!*'Aaffieeiltural
rradn, Development and Accept-
ance Act as well.
Last month, Guilden recalled,
the American Jewish Conjress
disclosed that U. S. flag-ships
trading with Israel were barred
from carrying United States sur-
plus food gifts sent to Arab
countries under Public Law 480.
In answer to AJCongress pro-
tests, n Agriculture Depart-
ment spokesman said these prac-
tices were "of no concern" to
the Department.
The action of the House Foreign'
Affairs Committee is welcome
proof," Guilden declared, "that
Congress has no intention of so
casually dismissing Arab interfer-
ence with the freedom of Ameri-
can citizens to engage in interna-1
tional commerce.
"By the same token, it indicates
rejection of any Administration
policy which gives foreign coun-
tries the right to determine which
vessels shall carry the free gifts
of food we send abroad."
TREAT
JUST HEAT "N" EAT
Cheese
Ravioli
IN
SAOCB
Miamians Named
To Committee
The 1960 convention of the Na- i
tional Assn. of Temple Administra-;
tors has been set for New Or-
leans from Nov. 1 to 5.
Henry S. Jacobs and David,
Cohn, of the host city, have been |
named co-chairmen by Nathan
Emanuel, New Rochejle. N. Y.,
president of the assn. of Reform
Jewish synagogue professional ex-
ecutives.
Among those named to the con-
vention committee are Mrs. Betty
Malakoff, Temple Beth Sholom,
and Mrs. Janet Zeientz and Ed-
ward Cohen, Temple Israel.
&V'#^
NVEAT
LESS
Hear family, guests, chase far
that real Italian flavor created
by famed Chef Boy-Ar-Dee.
Tender little macaroni pies...
filled with tangy Italian Chaos*
...lavished with savory tomato
sauce... simmered with mush-
rooms and cheese...seasoned
the real Italian way. Thrifty,
too. About 15< a serving. Each
can serves two. lay several
cans todayl
1
Tonight as you watch TV enjoy the
distinctive nutty flavor of Swiss Knight
cheese. Great for snacks with crackers
and fruit. 6 handy "zip open'' wedges.
THE OftlGHMI
Swiss
Knight.
OCISS G*UH CMCISt
Kotther
tor
PaHHover
nDB5TtW
Under Supervition of
THE OaTMOOOX
VAAU HAKASMKUTH
or noeiDA
Rtbb. Dr. Isaac
Mirsth Ever, Director
MAKES PASSOVER
A REAL YOM TOY !
Check These Items on Your Next Shopping List:
LOOK FOR I II KM- I TIMS:
Cucumber Delight Horseradish
Cooking Borscht Sauerkraut
De Luxe Kosher Pickles
Plum Tomatoes Horseradish & Beets
SEASHORE FOOD and
PICKLE PRODUCTS
Phnnv Mil l-541
^eomo^ie


Friday. April 1. 1960
*,Je*>lst> fk>ridfiaiin
Page 5-G
JWB Shipping Passover
Packages to Gl's Abroad
DAIRY
AvTaham Harman. Israel Ambassador to the United States
(left), and Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion (center) are greet-
ed at the gate of the Jewish Theological Sminary of America
by Di. Louis Finkelstein, Seminary chancellor, during the
Prime Minister's recent visit to the United States. Ben-
Gurion spoke to the Seminary faculty and students in a tour of
the rcbbinic school.
Winners Receive 'Bee1 Awards
Loaif Schwartzman, director of
the Bureau of Jewish Education,
awarded Lewis Shilane, student at
the reJjgioua school of Tifereth Is-
rael, first prize in the- Vocabulary
Bee conducted at the inter-school
conclave of seven North Dade and
South Broward schools. Presenta-
tion was at Temple B'nai Sbolom
Sunday.
Participating in the "Bee" which
was ba:.*d on the word list adopt-
ed by the Bureau for the Hebrew
schools of Greater Miami, were
Michael Horowitz, of B'nai Stao-
lom, second prize winner; Joyce
Miller, Beth Emeth, third prize;
and Emily Silverstein, Beth El,
Jonathan Shamres. Congregation
of Monticello Park, Melvin Gold-
berg, Beth Sholem, Hollywood,
and Oren Haran, Temple Sinai,
Hollywood, all of whom won hon-
orable mention.
Th first two prizes war* cop-
ies of "Th Sabbath," by Abra-
ham Si*9*l, and the remaining
prizes, "Step by Step in Juda-
ism," by Abraham Epstein.
Gerald Greenfield, president,
and Rabbi Sheldon Edwards, spir-
itual leader of B'nai Sbolom, wel-
comed the more than 150 students
to services which were conducted
by B'nai Sholom students.
Winners of athletic events which
included basketball, baseball, vol-
leyball, and field and track events,
were Temple Beth Sholem of Hol-
lywood, first winner; Monticello
Park, second; B'nai Sholom, third.
Prizes included two Israeli Seder
plates and a decorated matzah
cloth.
Name Attorney to Committee
M. Jay Berliner, local attorney
and chairman of the committee on
family law of the Florida Bar, has
been named to represent the Flor-
ida Bar on a statewide, advisory
committee to the State Deparfc-
NEW YORK Some 3,000 Pass-, More than 370 full and part-time' ment f Public Welfare. DurlBJ!
over food boxes have been shipped; Jewish chaplains, the USO-JWB ,he lirsl meeting in Jacksonville
to remotest overseas U.S. bases in field staff, and 10,000 volunteers on Mar 18- committee members.
Iceland, Alaska, Greenland and i will be involved in "Operation! voted unanimously to recommend
i other areas by women volunteers! Passover." A member of USO,itnat tne department extend its
< affiliated with the Women's Organ-1 JWB is the agency authorized by; services to include child adoption
I izations' Division of the National! the U. S. Government to serve the: placement. Berliner was elected
Jewish Welfare Board (JWB). religious and morale needs of j vice chairman of the committee,
The packages, containing all the! Jewish GIs and hospitalized vet-: which will have another meeting
holiday culinary basics, will come erans. I in the next few months.
in handy at Arctic Dew Line sta-1---------------------------------------------'---------
I Hons and radar and missile sites
where there will be no Jewish
chaplains present. The packages,
each containing a little greeting
card from the local JWB commit-
tees sending them, include Matzo,
canned chicken and soup, gefilte,
and Passover sweets.
Passover, commemorating the
liberation of the Hebrews from
Egyptian bondage, begins Monday
evening, Apr. 11 with the first Se-
der.
In a number of instances rab-
bis and Jewish chaplains flying
from the U. S. to Arctic bases on
Passover missions will be carrying
in their packs a number of Pass-
over food packages. A large sup-
ply of food packages has also
been sent to Korea by JWB for
use at the Passover religious re
treat to be conducted there by
two Jewish chaplains.
Shipment of the "solo Seders"
is but one aspect of JWB's total
global "Operation Passover" for
Jewish servicemen and their fam-
iles at over 600 military stations in
the U. S. and in 72 overseas areas.
JWB's months-long preparations
wll make possble "mass Seders"
for as many as 500 men at services
conducted by Jewish chaplains in
Korea, Japan, Alaska, Greenland,
Hawaii, the Philippines, Europe,
North Africa and the Canal Zone.
extends
Holiday Greetings
and
MMMMI tkat only the products fearing the following endorsement:
Gail Borden Signature Quality Milk
NOW!
Bring the genius of real Jewish Cooking to your table!
MANISGHEWITZ
Whitefish & Pike
Passover Gefilte Fish
Homogenized Milk
Pasteurized Milk
Fortified Skimmed Milk
Butter Eggs
Heavy Cream
Light Cream
Sour Cream
Cottage Cheese
s"cn
n"a
CORNED BEEF
for delicious
magic-easy meals I
Ask for All
WIIN0 Kosher PRODUCTS
KOSHER L'PESACH

Corned Beef, Pastrami,
Salami, Bologna,
Krispit Frankfurters
.i i' 11*1 /nx'j.1 is? opmno-K
irbpv" l .-Tn "21 pnr rn
KOSHER KM PASSOVER 1960
TMf ORTHODOX VAAD HAKAtHRUTH Of FLORIDA
RABBI DR. ISAAC H. IVBR, inn
AM SUPCRVISID AMD ENDORSED Bf
THE ORTHODOX VAAD HAKASHRUTH OF FLORIDA
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
Moshgichim ore taking cart of Kashruth tit the forms and
the pasteurizing, and bottling plants.
Tell Your Driver or Piece Your Order Now'.
Ask for Borden's at Your Neighborhood Store.
Phone PL 4-8661
KAAlttrlfWIlZ
Togeilier in one superb blendwhite-as-snow whiirfish and lake-
fresh pike! The most delicious gefilte fish blend ever lerved-
the perfect holiday dish. MANISCHEWITZ WTlftitfish Pike is
real, old-fashioned gefilte fish: finest ingredients pltu the itiperb
^j^MKJSCHLU'I 17. cooking skill' Fresh holiday shipments now
*"T,,ff y-'our favorite stoie!
THE B. MAN1SCHEWITZ CO.. NEWARK I. NEW JERSEY
WILNO KOSHER
SAUSAGE CO.
(of Chicago)
MIAMI BRANCH
2181 N.W. 10th AVENUE
Phone FR 1-6551
\ PEPSI-COLA......
Announces with Pride and Pleasure
KOSHER for PASSOVER


Page 6-C
+Jewi<*narkK>r
Friday. April 1. 1980
Jewish Floridian Exclusive
Yoir M
C
ARRIAGE COUNSELOR
. by t^amntl Q-f, Miami's Nationally Famous Marriage Counselor and Author
To paraphrase Voltaire, if marriage did not
exist it would be necessary to invent it. Despite all
tta obvious imperfections and limitations marriage,
is still a necessary and inevitable part of Western
civilization. In deed we have come to recognize that
it is in the best interests of all concernedthe com-
munity, the parties to a marriage and their children
^that marriage should be monogamous and that it
should last for life.
That the community gains by a stable family life
is certainly not open to dispute. Most of us would
also agree that for the physical and emotional well-
being of children a settled, happy family life is of
first importance.
But it should come as no shock that men and
women do not get married or stay married, for that
matter, merely to further the well-being of the com-
munity. Neither are they prompted by intellectual
ideas about children. Why then, it may be asked, is
it in the best interests of the parties that a marriage
should be monogamous and should last for life? What
satisfactions do people really get out of marriage?
Emotional Satisfaction
The advantages, it seems to me, are rather ob-
vious. Enhanced prestige, contentment at conform-
ity with social custom, financial and material bene-
fits, sexual satisfaction, companionship, state-recog-
nized and community approved parenthood: some or
all of these may be enjoyed, and there are others as
well. These may be regarded as advantages satis-
fying more or less conscious needs. However, there
are lesser conscious needsemotional oneswhich
may also be satisfied by marriage.
AJ1 of us. for example, have a need to be loved
and a need to be approved. In infancy and early
childhood, if we were fortunate, this need was met
by our parents. It was a continuing love which was
sustained, however unworthy of it we sometimes
may have been. One of the unconscious satisfactions
sought in marriage is a continuous, secure form of
love which can replace that of our parents.
But even parental love nas its imperfections.
The love of one's mother has to be shared with
one's father and with brothers and sisters, if any.
Most young children, in fact, at one time or another
have a decided yearning to have their mother or
their father entirely to themselves. This usually
cannot be fulfilled. However in marriage, love to
some extent one does have one's loved object to
oneself and thus the childhood wish is met at last.
Co-existing with a need to be loved is a need to
love. In loving we feel that the good within us is
preponderant over the bad, and that we have love
inside us sufficient to fulfill the needs of a partner,
as well as our own. Marriage is thus a great reas-
surance regarding the good within us; it is proof of
our inner store of love.
Dependence and Responsibility
Sexual relations in marriage are an added re-
assurance. Many people carry within them childish
fantasies that the fulfillment of their-sexual needs
involves damage and destruction. A happy marital
sexual relationship is proof to the partners that their
sexual desire is in fact a good and loving thing, in

that it fulfills and satisfies the other. If children re-
sult from the union, then this is further proof that
their sexual urge is creative and worthwhile.
In our relationship with our parents we learn the
satisfactions of dependence. We also, in normal
development, wish to be like them and to support and
guide others.
Both these needs of dependence and respon-
sibility are met in marriage. The differing de-
grees to which each partner enjoys them will depend
to a great extent upon his or her childhood experi-
ences.
The feelings that a man has for a woman are
inevitably conditioned by his early relationship with
his mother. It is the feelings he had for her which
he will attempt to re-experience in his marriage.
A woman's choice of a husband will similarly
be influenced by her childhood emotions about her
father. She may unconsciously look for another
father. Such women often seek love from a much
older man.
At the opposite extreme, she may seek to re-
experience the protective feelings she had for her
father and marry a man she can mother. Her desire
to imitate her mother's relationship with her father
or with herself may be other influencing factors, as
will be her attachments to brothers or other impor-
tant figures in her life.
It will be apparent from what I have said that
however conscious the choice of marriage partners
appears to be, there will always be unconscious ele-
ments involved, that is, feelings we are completely
unaware of. The happiest marriages are probably
those in which the unconscious minds of the part-
ners complement or fulfill each other, so that each
finds in the other satisfaction of unconscious needs.
Ambivalence of Love
Moreover, we draw from our experiences with
our parents our ideas which seem so obvious as sel-
dom to be fully consciousof what is masculine and
what is feminine behavior, of how people should
fulfill their roles as men and women. Obviously if
the partners hold conflicting unconscious ideas re-
garding their roles, one may be a sourca of anger
or irritation to the other for reasons which are never
really understood.
Another fact worth remembering is that just as
our conscious feelings vary in intensity and in direc-
tion, so do our unconscious feelings. This sometimes
looks like wanting to have something and its opposite
both at the same time.
Some young married men, for example, want to
keep their bachelor freedom to "go out with the
boys" and to enjoy all the privileges of marriage,
as well.
Adolescents often want simultaneous depen-
dence and independence. The wife both loves and
hates her husband at the same time. This feeling
of ambivalence may have its origin in the love
and hate we all feel as infants for our our mothers,
who at one moment seem to satisfy our every need
and the next appear to irritate and frustrate us.
Mr. Klimg h mailaUi for prhrmlt mmrriogt cooasoffef
t f Hoafinatoa AWdfcal U4+. fa Waari
Tziona Chapter Dinner Party
Tziona chapter of Mizrachi,
Women's Organization of America
held a dinner party Sunday
evening at Temple Ner Tamid.
Proceeds are for Mizrachi Wom-
en's Villages in Israel. Mrs. Eu-j
gene Labovitz was chairman. On|
Wednesday, the chapter h2e212d;
its regular monthly meeting at the
home of Rabbi and Mrs. Herschell
Saville. 339 SW 30th rd. Mrs. Mor-
ris Waldman is president.
Pension Rates
For Widows
Old pension rates for widows
versus new? Here's a quick com-
parison supplied by^Hu^ Veterans
Administration:
Under the present pension law,
an eligible widow received $50.40
if she has no children and if her
income is not over $1,400 a year.
A widow with a child will re-
ceive $63 and is allowed to earn
as much as $2,700 a year before
becoming ineligible. This $2,700 fig-
ure is not changed, but the sum
of $7.56 a month for each addition-
al child may be added to the basic
$63.
Under the new law, the amount
of pension a widow will receive is
tied in more closely with her an-
nual income, C. W. Boggs, officer
in charge of the VA office at 984
W. Plagler st., Miami, pointed out
Wednesday.
A widow without dependents
may receive $60 a month if her
income is not greater than $600.
She can have income as high as
Sl.200 and still receive $45 a month
or as high as $1,800. and still re-
ceive $25. But at the $1300 figure,
the pension payments cease.
A widow with one child will re-
ceive a pension payment of $75 a
month if her annual income is not
over $1,000. She will receive $60
a month if her income is $2,000 or
under, and $40 a month if her in-
come is $3,000 or under. Income
above $3,000 puts an end to pen-
sion payments.
To Discuss Schubert
The music workshop class con-
ducted by Mrs. Hilda-Steuerman
in the auditorium of t h e Miami
Public Library, 1 Biscayne Wvd.,
Will meat at 7:30 p.m on Wednes-
day. Mrs. Steuerman will discuss
the life and works of Franz Schu-
bertt.
You're Rich
When You're Healthy!
TASTE
COUNTS, TOO!
Tantalizing flavor,
custard-smooth
Miamian Offers
Youth Resolution
Florida delegation to the White
House Conference on Youth last
week unanimously adopted a res-
olution calling for a National Bill
of Rights Week.
The proposal to press for such
action at the White House confer-
ence which opened this week in
[Washington, D. C, was made by
I James Katzman. a member of the
| Greater Miami chapter of the
( American Jewish Committee.
I Appointed by Gov. LeRoy Col-
lins as one of Florida's represent-
atives to t h e national conclave,
Katzman left Sunday to take part
, in the conference.
Cox Polio Vaccine feeding
A community clinic was held
at Gesu School on Monday from 3
to 8 p.m. for a feeding of the new
Cox polio vaccine free of charge.
Preschool children to adults un-
der 40 were treated, according to
Mrs. Randolph Shevach. of the
D a d e County Public Health De-
partment, in charge of the feed-
ing.
STRAWBERRY
YOGURT
is the perfect food perfect
between-meals snack that never
interferes with regular meals.
Breakstone's traditional quality
... so nutritious ... so easy to
digest! Also enjoy Breakstone's
other delightful flavors
Prune Whip, Pineapple, Vanilla
or tangy Plain.
Another Finn
Product
G
^ ALL-WHITEFISH
A de luxe GEFILTE FISH
Traditionally right for the holidays
Vita prepares the true holiday Gefilte Fish entirely
from delicately-flavored imported Canadian white-
fish in golden aspic, garnished with carrots. Ready
to serve. Pareve and strictly Kosher for Passover.
PACK!D r INTfRNANONAUY FAMOUS VITA fOOO MOOUCM. INC
FrM H.cp. BooV Writ* VITA. 443 Cra.nwkh Slre.l, N.w York 14, New York
GORDON
FUNERAL
HOME
FR 3-3431
FRanklin 9-1436
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Fla.
HARRY GORDON
PRESIDENT
IKE GORDON
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
In Miami it's
FLORIDA-FOREMOST
DAIRIES
foe Home Delivery
Phone FR 4-2621
The great name in dairy products
FRANK J. HOLT, M.n.y.r
alfiels
zpfi
*q
August bros rYi
OPEN ALL NIGHT
COMPLETE SUNDRIES
HALLMARK COSMETICS
GREETING CARD PATENT MEDICINES
DEPARTMENT KMOOKALS
AM HOWARD
CHOCOLATE JOHNSON'S
SHOPPE ICE CREAM
Hr
Phone JE 8-5538 1664 ALTON ROAD
__^_ MIAMI BEACH


Friday. April 1, I960
*Je*ist> FlerM/an
Page 7-C
South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges presents prayer
books to personnel at Homestead Air Force Base. Left to right
are Charles Seiavitch, District 5 veterans chairman; Irving
Schatzman, president of Miami Beach Lodge; Mrs. Louis Glas-
er, chairman of the Jewish Welfare Board committee; and
Jack Fink, president of the South Florida Council.
Support Gathered for Bill
To Prohibit Racial Insult
LONDON(JTA)The represen
tative body of British Jewry called
on the Anglo-Jewish community
this week to muster all its support
behind a bill pending in the House
of Commons to make racial or re-
ligious insults or incitement an
offense punishable by fine or im-
prisonment or both.
The bill introduced by Sir Les-
lie Plummer, a Laborite, failed to
receive Government support and
is being pressed as a private mem-
ber's bill. R. A. Butler, the Home
Secretary, told the House that ex-
isting legislation was sufficient to
deal with such situations as the
recent swastika epidemic.
Tho Beard of Deputies of Brit-
ish Jaws, th Anglo-Jewish rep-
rnnitiv( body, differed with
Mr. Buffo- on this point anal
stressed tho need for legislation
specifically outlawing racial and
religious incitement.
In a statement to the communi-
ty, it referred to its efforts to ob-
tain approval for such measures
and called on the community to
support the Plummer bill.
The Plummer Bill comes up for
its second reading in the House
soon. The bill would make it an
offense for a person to publicly in-
sult by speech, writing or illustra-
tion, a person because of his race
or religion or to incite others to
commit such offenses. Penalties
on conviction of up to six months
imprisonment and fines up to 100
pounds ($280) or both are provided
in the bill.
Cancer Institute
Elects Council
Five internationally famous re-
! search and clinical scientists will
I direct the newly organized Ad-
visory Council of the Cancer In-
stitute at Miami. The Council will
plan and direcf te's'earcn programs',
and review the general medical
and scientific activities of the In-
stitute.
Dr. Henry J. Klaunberg, admin-
istrative director of the Institute,
said that "because of the support
of these world famous scientists,
and especially in view of their
contributions to cytology and can-
cer research, I believe the re-
search program to be launched j
this year at the Cancer Institute!
will focus the attention of the med-!
ical world and the general pub-
lic on our Miami Institute."
Dr. Ralph W. Jack and Dr. Mar-1
vin G. Flannery, of Miami, were
elected chairman and vice chair-
man, respectively, at a meeting of
the medical advisory board of the
Cancer Institute at Miami.
Other members of the board are
Drs. W. A. D. Anderson, Meredith
Campbell, DeWitt C. Daughtry,
Victor Dembrow, H. Hoffman
Groskloss, Nathaniel Levin, Frank
Meleney, Leo Z. Zuckerman.
Ptssover Products Directory
NEW YORK The i960 (5720)
edition of the Kosher for Passover
Products Directory of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America has been published, it|
has been announced by Nathan K. |
Gross, of New York, UOJCA na j
tional vice president and chairman'
o** *>int JCoDUttissioh. for Kosher |
Certification. Copies are available
without charge from the Orthodox
Union, 305 Broadway, New York
7, N. Y.
KOSHER FOR
PASSOVER
Roth Appointed
ADL Chairman
Burnett Roth, of Miami Beach,
has been appointed national chair-
man of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith's discrimination
committee, and will also serve as
vice chairman of the League's na-
tional civil rights committee
Roth, a veteran of the ADL in
Florida, was elected to the execu-
tive committee of the National
Commission of the ADL at its 1959
meeting.
A former Vice Mayor of Miami
Beach, he is also a former presi-
dent of the United Cerebral Palsy
Assn. of Greater Miami. Locally,
Roth is chairman of the executive
committee of the Florida regional
board of the Anti-Defamation
League.
I \ H \< I ( I \ I
Chocolates
Dclfehtfululactlomof
mtllo-dark or milk chocolate
miniatures; or Parvt
Fruit, and NuU.
Appropriate anortment*
(or adult* and children -
for every Jewiah holiday.
Write for holiday brochures.
FOR INFORMATION
on our Fund-Raiaiae
Plr. writ* Us:
Dept. rj-M
Barrlriai Candle*
22-l41atAra-
Lone laland City l.N Y
BARRICINI
CERTIFIED
Kosher and Parve for Passover
under strict supervision of Rabbi Dr. J. H. Ralbag

*-?***-..
D/U But Dum 0W
URIHEL
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In Danud tRlJton-U-2.ion
IN A WIDE VARIETY
TO 1UIT
VERY TASTE
FlNI WiNia, Bkino'H,
SLIVOWITZ. WiaHNIAK.,
vooka. chamraoni
Sparklino Burgundy,.
Vermouth
CONCORD and MALAOA
now alao In callona
and half arallona
-tstfifioJ tMetty Koshor by
?Chief Rabbinate of Israel
Available if Your
local Liquor Store
Imported by
CAJMIL WINE CO., INC.
*0 HM> Ara.. N.Y. 36, NY.
.***' f

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.J


Page fcVC
+Jewlsi>ncrlcHairi
Friday, April 1, I960
Ehrlkh Named Chairman
Clemen J. Ehrlich has been ap-
pointed chairman of the ninth an-
nual dinner meeting of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Community Cen-
ter due May 1 in the Sky room of
the Dupont Plaza hotel. Officers
and board of directors will be
elected for the coming year.
Gen. Moshe Dayan (right). Minister of Agriculture in the new
government of Israel, is shown in Jerusalem conferring with
Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, vice president of the Israel Bond Or-
ganization. Gen. Dayan, who as Chief of Staff led Israel's
army to its extraordinary victory in the Sinai campaign in the
winter of 1956, made his first visit to the United States as
Minister of Agriculture last month to participate in the 1960
Israel Bond drive. He was guest of honor at the 1960 inaug-
ural conference for Israel Bonds in Miami Beach on Feb. 26 to
28.
SHOPPING AROUND
WITH
|ZuI^jtJJEl#?4
AjexFabVel
There is an old English proverb
that cleanliness is next to Godli-
ness. Translating this into the Jew-
ish idiom, we would say that kash-
ruth is cleanliness. For the ancient
laws of kashruth essentially aimed
at cleanliness and sanitation.
So when Jewish housewives are
busy as beavers in the weeks be-
fore Passover to make their home
Kosher for Passover, it simply
means that they are making an ex-
tra-special effort to clean their
home thoroughly.
And this can be most effectively
done with three fine products of
the Colgate Palmolive Company
that have for many years been fa-
mous in Jewish homes, three pro-
ducts that are kosher and parve
for Passover and produced under
strict rabbinical supervision.
These are Ajax, Fab and Vel.
Ajax in the shiny blue can hat
a new, smoother and finer tex- ,
tore, a new Instant Chlorine
Bleach. New Ajax bleaches sinks
so shiny white you need no ex-
tra bleach. And new Ajax rinses
away guickly, completely, leaves
no gritty film behind. Ajax ac-
tually disinfect* at it cleans.
New Fab Duratex wishes clothes
clean clear through, and whiter,
brighter, too. That's a Fab wash.
New Fab contains miracle Dura-
tex to get fabrics clean, clear
through whiter, brighter too, not
just the surface clean but really
clean.
Vel is kosher and parve for all
your washing. It gets dishes,
glassware and silverware spark-
ling clean and bright without wip-
ing. It is gentle for stockings, lin-
gerie, woolens, and also kind to
your hands.
Get these three fine products for
your Passover cleaning at your
grocers and make your cleaning
easier and pleasanter for Pass
over.

Duffy Mott
A thing of great importance to j
every Jewish housewife before'
PatfOvw is the kosher certifica-
tion of products she will Ret for
her home and for her holiday ta- \
ble. The products of the famous ;
Duffy-Mott Company, popular and
kosher in Jewish homes through-!
out the year, are certified kosher
for Passover.
They are under strict rabbinical
supervision all year around, and
have special Passover certification
so that Jewish households through-
out the land can use them with
complete confidence in the kash-
ruth.
Jewish housewives will welcome !
the news, and will avail them- ;
selves of the opportunity to shop
for these Passover favorites.
Mott't apple juice it a pure
natural apple juice, no sugar
added, made of the finest ap-
plet, and a wonderful before
dinner appetizer. Suntweet
prune juice it rich, natural prune
juice, no sugar added, the per-
fect breakfatt juice for health
and vigor, at an aid to natural
regularity.
Other products of Duff-Mott are
Mott's apple cranberry sauce, a
delightful combination of the
sauces from the finest apples, and ',
red. ripe cranberries, packed with
luscious, t a n g y tartness. And |
here's .something new: Try Mott's
apple raspberry sauce, made with
the usual delicious apple sauce
plus rich, juicy raspberries. Also
try Mott's apple sauce and Sun-
\ sweet cooked prunes. Both are
tasty and rich in minerals, won-
derful for or with desserts.
Still other products of Duff-Mott
' are Clapp's baby and junior apple
| sauce, prunes, apriots and apple.
! A1 s o apple, orange apple and
| prune orange apple juices. They
are all Kosher for Passover and
wonderful for baby.
So enjoy your Passover and keep |
on enjoying these famous Duffy-
Mott products during Passover as i
you have throughout the year.
Tiny tots of the North Shore Jewish Center nursery and kinder-
garten participate in a recent Purim celebration. Left to right
are Terry Davis, Niki Stone and Jodi Ellis. Their teachers are
Mrs. Montague Fearnley and Mrs. George Siegel.
order now
for the HOLIDAY SEASON.
FLOWERS
MEAN MORE
from
.a from ^b. \
txatfe 6arilms
MIAMI BEACH MIAMI CORAL GABIES FT. IAUD39DAIE
ONE MOTHER TILLS ANOTHER.
,*
I
y
"I prefer pure whitefish...
AC Will lOOe And no wonder! Only
precious whitefish has such an irresistibly delicate flavor.
It's so tender...so tasty...so incredibly
delicious! Share its tantalizing goodness
with your family and guests. pakeve
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
/Mother^
ALL WHITEFISH
SEAITEST FOODS DIVISION OF NATIONAL DAIRY PRODUCTS CORP.
SERVES ITS MANY JEWISH PATRONS EVERY YEAR THE TRADITIONAL
KOMI I IK FOR PASSOVER
DELUXE GEFILTE FISH
Wrom the tpotleit kltchent of Mothef a Food Product*. Inc. Newark 6, N. J.
HOMOGENIZED
VITAMIN D
GRADE A
MILK
ionm .Til "a fr th
KOSHIR FOR PASSOVER
OBTMOOOX VAAO ll'UWIlIHni >IOIOA
aui e> n*c ivu. d~.
Certified for Softest
SWEET
AND
CREAM
CREAMED and DRY COTTAGE CHEESE
SPRING GARDEN SALAD COTTAGE CHEESE
TASTE our NEW SOUR CREAM
ALL DAIRY PRODUCTS MADE FRESHLY AT OUR PLANT
Ash your DRIVER or Phone I It JMJ50I for SERVICE


Friday, April 1. I960
+Je*istincriaHann
Page 9-C
Ben-Gurion Satisfied With Trip Here
TEL AVIV-(JTA)-Prime Min-
ister David Ben-Gurion returned
to Israel after a 16-day visit to the
United States and Britain with the
observation that he had good rea-
son to feeUiis journey had not been
'in vain."
He cited his talks with President
Eisenhower, Secretary of State
Christian Herter, leading Senators
and other political leaders, as well
as his controversial meeting with
West Germany's Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer. His summary of the
Washington conversations was that
"there were almost no differences
of opinion between the United
States administration and myself."
He emerged from an El Al air-
liner at Lydda Airport to step in-
to a pouring rain and a greeting
from nearly 200 dignitarians.
After greeting each member of
the welcoming group, he read m
brief statement in which he said
that in his talks in Washington
he had discussed world prob-
lems, African, Asian and Middle
East questions and, "above all,"
the consolidation of peace in the
Middle East.
He said he had "good reason" to
believe his talks with Chancellor
Adenauer would be beneficial to
Israel, a remark which political
sources interpreted to be a refer-
ence to reported negotiations for
multi-million dollar credits from
West Germany.
Addressing a conference of Ma-
j pai later, Mr. Ben-Gurion stressed
| that he sees two great possibilities
lor Israel in American Jewry: one
j is immigration to Israel of profes-
sional men, intellectuals and skill-
led workers; the second involves
I attracting American private capi-
tal for investments in Israel un-
dertakings.
The Prime Minister said that
from now on Israel must pay at-
pntion to the younger generation
American Jewry quite apart j
am appeals for funds and from!
'material matters," but on the 1
sis of spiritual values.
I On his departure from London,
ir. Ben-Gurion said: "I am leav-
| ing this country with a deep sense I
of gratitude for the kind hospitality
extended to me. I was glad to
meet the Prime Minister and
members of his Cabinet, as well as
Contest Winners Revealed Here
Winners of the first annual Claremont F. Carter, ninth grade
Brotherhood Week Essay Contest student at Miami Edison Junior
for high school students were an- High School. Second prize goes to
inounced recently by Lewis Ser- Betle Goldfarb, of Miami Senior
bin, senior at Miami Beach High High, and third prize has been won
School, chairman of t h e Inter- by Karen Joy Singer, of Miami
group Youtli Council which is Senior High.
sponsored-by the Florida chapter The contest was sponsored by
of the National Conference of the Inlergroup Youth Council in
Christians and Jews. j cooperation with the Dade Heights
First prize was awarded to Jewish Congregation. Paul Mi'.ch-
------------------------------------------ ell. chairman of the religious ac-
:--------------------------------------------' tivitics committee there, took part.
bable economic difficulties" that Judges lor the contest were
may face Israel in the next few Jack Bell, Miami Herald column-
years, The Times editorial con ist, Dade County Commissioner
eluded: "It is small wonder, there Charles Hall. Mrs. Anna Brenner
fore, that the Israelis are endeav- Meyers, member of the Dade Ct>un-
oring to encourage investment and ty School Board. Charles Williams,
to expand exports, in particular principal of Booker T. Wash'ng-
the products of light industry, and ton High School, and Jean Sprain
that they view with concern the Wilson, women's editor of the Mi-
mounting costs of defense." ami News.
Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion in high spirits and all smiles
as he returns to Israel aboard his jet-powered El Al airliner
following a visit of some two weeks in the United States and
Europe. With him are Mrs. Ben-Gurion and Brig. Gen. E. Ben
Arzi, president of El Al.
Be RfghLl.with Streftl
many old friends, at the luncheon
given to me by the Prime Minister
on the first day of my arrival in
London for the first time since the
1 reestablishment of our State.
in an editorial that Mr. Ben-Gur-
ion "seems well satisfied" with his
talks in Washington and London.
The editorial stated:
"In mo conversations t held
the same evening, at 10 Down-
ing Strtot, with the Prime Minis-
ter and the Foreign Secretary,
we discussed the situation in the
Middle East and the world at
large. I met also Mr. and Mrs.
Hugh Gaitskell, whom I had met
before in Israel, as well as many
of our Jewish friends from the
Zionist Organizations and from
the Board of Deputies of British
Jews." Gaitskell is the British
Labor party leader.
The Times of London
"Presumably, he now believes
that an East-West detente, after
the summit conference, will not
include a Middle East agreement,
arranged without consultation "with
Israel, at her expense. This he was
said to have feared. Presumably,
also, he now considers Israel can
count on support if attacked and
upon assistance over defensive
weaponsjet aircraft or anti-air-
craft missiles for instanceif the
armament of her Arab neighbors;
is sizeably increased."
Referring to Israel's "concern"
lover the mounting costs of de-
declared j fense, especially in view of "pro-
Distributed by HI-GRADE FOOD CO.
7200 N.W. 2vth Avenue Phono OX 1-0961
ORDER YOUR


Page 10-C
fJmisti fhrkUati
Friday, April 1. I960
Germany's Opposition Leader Speaks Mind on Anti-Semitism
By DR. ERICH OLLENHAUER
The recent anti-Semitic out-
bursts have once again focused
attention on the Federal Republic
of Germany. The occurrences
wtye anti-Semitic injonn.'bill di-
rected against the democratic or-
der as such. The Social Demo-
cratic Party of Germany has re-
Dr. Erich Olloilidutr is chairman
of the So(tal Democratic Party n\ the
federal Republic of Germany West
Getman\'s leading opposition parfv.
Hii vituu on the recent resurgence
of enti-Srimtmn in hii country are
tXpTttttd in th(l exclusive Jewish
Telegraphic Agency arlide.
peatedly in the past pointed to
such dangers. It believes that no
useful purpose is being served by
spreading the cloak of silence over
the past or present anti-democra-
tic activities. On the contrary, it
believes that such matters should
be fully exposed whenever they
arise. The conspiracy of silence
must be broken, and complacency
would be deadly to the weak roots
of our democracy.
Anti-Semitism is, of course, no
purely German phenomenon. It is
part of an anti-democratic and
nationalist attitude, both political
and social. Yet though non-Get
man hooligans, because of con-
tamination, conviction or ignoi-
ance, commit such acts outside
Germany too. nobody can take
away the responsibility from the
democratic elements in Get-
many. The past history of our
country must compel everybody
to give special consideration to
the atrocities committed by the
Nazi regime, and there can be
therefore no escape for apologists
in pointing to bad examples or
imitations to German examples
in foreign countries.
The outbursts which- began with
the smearing of the Cologne syna-
gogue may have had several un-
derlying motives. As yet there is
no certainty as to whether they
were wholly or partly organized.
and whether the initiators are to
he found in Germany alone or
elsewhere. It is even improbable
that they wore organized. They
should, however, be recognized
as extremely serious, whatever
the result of the examinations
may be.
_In Q^^pjriior^tfiere are a num-
ber of factors contributing to the
present state of affairs. The de-
feat of the Nazi regime in 1945
was followed by a quick economic
recovery which, in turn, was con-
nected with the cold war situa-
tion. The East-West conflict, find-
ing expression in a negative and
cheap anti-Communism, super-
seded the need for dealing polit-
ically and spiritually with the
National-Socialist past in Ger-
many. The building up of military
forces in a divided country fur-
thermore fostered the feeling that
past misdeeds, commited behind
the wall of the German military
machine and its Nazi rulers, have
been condoned.
Unfortunately, the Allied gov-
ernments, being interested in
such a German military contribu-
tion for reasons of their own, and
anxious not to embarrass the Ger-
man government, contributed to
this development.
Democratic forces were unfor-
tunately not strong enough in
Germany to carry the day. The
democratic order came about in
Germany only after the defeat in
war. The fact, however, that
democracy this time has been
coupled with prosperity has so far
prevented a spread of Fascist
sentiments. Many people who
have served the Third Reich will-
ingly and are now again in safe
economic positions will not easily
risk their jobs and thus their se-
curity as long as this state of af-
fairs continues. For this reason,
we can only speak of a potential
danger which as yet has not found
a manifest expression on a big
scale. The danger may become
acute ony in rime of an economic
crisis, i.e. when it comes to the
first test of our young democracy.
Government Pereonrrel Policies
There exist a variety of right-
wing organizations in the Federal
Republic. They have tried many
times during the last 15 years to
6*tM*t
HAS DONE WITH WHITEFISH!
RINGS OWHITEFISrl
dZZMrflM ^ ***** r h att
/ePASSOVER
Traditional for Passover!
Koteach Gefillte fish .
flavor sealed within its
own rich, redi-ielled broth.
Prepared the old-fashioned
way ... or with whitefish
and pike, only.
Grace your table with other
Rokeach Passover Products
find a common denominator, and
one "Fuehrer." They have failed.
In our opinion it would be wrong
\o attribute sole importance to
people who openly confess to a
neo-Nazi ideology. It is just as
important ttf realize' (rfat there
exists an atmosphere conducive
to nationalist tendencies, which
has been furthered by a person-
nel policy of State and Federal
governments, and. serves as bad
examples. Certain authoritarian
measures by the Federal govern-
ment must also be regarded as
an encouragement of people rear-
ed in a Nazi spirit.
The way in which even highest
government officials have spoken
on the restitution to former vic-
tims of the Nazi regime made it!
appear as if these payments
would endanger the German cur-
rency. This has led to most ex-
aggerated notions among the pub-
lic on the size of payments to the
recipients and, in its train, nour-
ished unjustified feelings of per-
sonal envy.
Mere Alibi*
Before a final judgment on the
present anti-Semitic manifesta-
tions can be given, it is necessary
to know the relevant facts. There-
fore it is our first demand that
the government of the Federal
Republic should present a survey
of right-wing activities on all
levels in connection with their
present examinations. The pro-
posal to ban right-wing parties
should be carefully considered. In
our opinion this is, however, a
dubious course; no ban can by
itself protect a community from
outbursts of a nature we have re-
cently witnessed. Another ques-
tion would be to try to cut off the
financial resources of right-wing
groups. To these sources belong
a number of publishing houses
which, besides ordinary publica-
tions, have become notorious for
the production of neo-Nazi litera-.
ture.
The Federal government has
proposed as a first measure to
pass a special law to protect ra-
cial minorities. In agreement
with all Jewish organizations in
Western Germany, the Social
Democratic Party has from the
very beginning rejected such a
course. We consider it as an ex-
pression of thinking on authori-
tarian lines. We fear, moreover,
that such a procedure is designed
as a mere alibi for international
public opinion. The legal code of
the Federal Republic of Germany
provides sufficient clauses to pun-
ish any offenders. The task is to
apply them and not to pride one's
self with the existence of new
laws when there is a lack of will-
ingness to use present legislation.
Any offenders against the present
democratic order will find pun-
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Fifd Monthly Returns Include
Interest and Principal
YOUR INVESTMENT
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MASON
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MASON INVESTMENT
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My travel ijeni It
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As-keei Sftttm. lot. Central Met Ages*


iday. April 1. I960
*Je*isi> thrid ton
shment only by judges willing to
pply the law firmly and quickly.
tTiere should be no great interval
>etween the arrest of delinquents
ind the verdict. .
Education for democracy must
be strengthened. Already suffi-
ient good literature is available
nd should be used extensively in
chools and other educational in-
stitutions. Our children must
c acquainted with the crimes
ommitted in the name of the
Jerman people. Here again it
vould be the task of the educa-
ional authorities to come for-
ward quickly with suggestions in
irder to stop the process of gloss-
ng over the barbarian atrocities
ommitted by the Nazis. Teach-
ers must be placed- in a position
execute this task by appropri-
ate training. On the upbringing
and education of German youth in
the spirit of humanity and toler-
ance against racial and other mi-
norities will largely depend the
uture political life of Germany.
Finally, double morality must
e overcome. As long as small
ffenders infected by the Nazi
reed or merely because of juven-
e ignorance, who were given
rd punishments, can point to
rsons who have served the Nazi
gime in leading positions and
e still being employed today in
ually leading positions, no solu-
m to our problem can be found.
is discrepancy must be over-
me; in dealing with it we must
t stop before persons in whal-
er high ranks. Our criterion
ist be that, whoever played a
ding part in the maintenance
the Nazi Reich, even though he
s not committed any acts pun-
able under present legislation,
nnot now hold positions of in-
ence in our young democracy.
he feeling of abhorrence about
resurgence of Fascist senti-
erit.s should not make us lose
sense of proportions. There
at the moment no immediate
reat cither to our democratic
ler or to any section of our
pulation. It is even correct to
that the publicity accorded to
recent events had the posi-
result of rousing individuals,
Pag. 11-C
institutions, parties and govern-
ments out of apathy, and forcing
them to a greater alertness vis-a-
vis the problems involved. A
great part of the population gave
a spontaneous and active expres-
sion to their determination to tol-
erate such excesses no longer.
The political and moral attitude
of large sections of the people and
of the press contrast favorably to
the times before 1933.
The Social Democratic Party,
together with all men of good will
in other democratic parties and
institutions, will, as ever, combat
all activities detrimental to the
democratic basis of our State.
We hope for the support and un-
derstanding of our friends abroad.
lllUIIIViillilLLIVNIV
SERGEANT
SIDNEY GUMPERTZ
QN$cPTEM&ERlZ)6,1918AT
BOIS de FQKGES.THE 132ml INF-
ANTRY WAS KING RAKED FROM
A GERMAN MACHINE -GUN NEST-
SERGEANT GUMPERTZ AND TWO
MEN Of HIS COMPANY WENT OUT
AMID A HEAVY &ARRAGE TO SILENCE
THE GUM-THE BURSTING SHELLS TDOt^
ONE.THEN THE OTHER OF GUMrHTrt
COMrWilONS. ALONE.HE COMTWLIET)
HIS WVMKE WWIE THE MACHINE-
GUN 6LA1EP AT H1NI.HE SUCCEEP-
EV IN JUMPING INTO THE MACW1C-
&UN NEST, SILENCING THE GUN AND
SINGLEHANPETJ, TOOK THE CREW
OF NINE. FOR HIS VALOR,HE WAS
M9W THE CONGRESSIONAL
MEWL OF HONOR.
Lfour Kjfntfiu'ry it s^/fJogt C__ orctia//,/
s-fnvited with reaarag to
WEDDINGS BANQUETS
CONFIRMATIONS
and all Social Functions
R.S.V.P.: Mr. Henri Groen
JE 8-08 1 1 Catering Manjg.r
400 Ft. Oceanfrent at Lincoln Rd. "S55
HOTEL
HAXU **
v of
Hetoe s '
National Shrine
FOB. THf
xTemsh War Pead
WASHINGrTON t P.C.
A Youth Orchestra To be Heard
All-Miami Youth Symphony Or-
chestra, Robert Strassburg con-
ductor, will be heard in a concert
Apr. 2 in the Gardens of the Roney
Have that
Special
b Meeting.
mquel, or
Occasion

You'll find complete
facilities to exactly satisfy
your needs in the Kismet,
Aladdin, Scheherazade and
Rubaiyat Rooms, be it for a
wedding or a private party I
Plaza hotel.
The Miami Beach Music and Arts
League is sponsor of the Saturday
night concert.
Appearing as soloist will be vio-
lin virtuoso Eliot Chapo. He will
perform Concerto No. 2 in D mi-
nor, by Henri Wieniawsky.
Also on the program are Fin-
landia, Sibelius; Eine Kleine
Nachtmusik, Mozart; first move-
ment of the Symphony No. 7 in C
major, Schubert.

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SIX ACRfS ON IHI OCIAN AI 98th STRUT MIAMI BfACH


Pag 12-C
* Jen is* fhrldUaw
Friday, April 1. 1960
Ike Committee Urged to Hit Bigotry
ATLANTIC CITY(JTA)A de-
mand that President Eisenhower's
Committee on Government Em-
ployment Policy should enforce its
regulations by insisting that the
State Department and other fed-
eral agencies cease and desist from
discriminating against potential
employees of the Jewish faith, was
voiced here this week by Adolf
Held, national chairman of the
Jewish Labor Committee, at the
opening session of the JLC con-
vention held at the Ritz-Carlton
ho: el. More than 500 delegates from
all parts of the United States and
Canada attended the four-day par-
k's
Americans seeking employ-
ment, for example." Mr. Held said,
"in the State Department, are
carefully screened not only as to
their political loyaltywhich we
believe to be correctbut as to
their religious affinities, which we
believe to be reprehensible." He
stressed that both the Republican
and Democratic platforms of 1956
guaranteed that imposition by for-
eign governments of discrimina-
tion against United States citizens
based on tbeir religion or race was
contrary to American policy.
"The sordid fact remains," Mr.
Held outlined, "that our govern
ment while publicly condemning
FP?. such action on the part of the
Arab states, has privately con-
doned such actions. The time to
redeem pledges cannot be mea-
sured by clocks or days. Pledges
must be redeemed upon demand.
And that demand has been made
ever since the Arabs intensified
their discrimination a g a i nit
Americans because of their re-
ligion or ancestral beliefs."
"The Arabs can demand that no
Jew be employed in a foreign le-
gation on their soil. Certainly not
in the legation of the United
States! The State Department will
bow the knee Yet. would the State
Department bow the knee to the
Kremlin should a demand be made
that only American communists be
employed at the United States Em-
bassy in Moscow?" the JLC leader
asked. "The time has come for a
full-scale investigation by the re-
sponsible agencies of government
into the implementation of the
President's Committee on Govern-
ment Employment Policy which
was oreated so that no American
would be denied federal employ-
ment because of race, religion or
national origin.
"We must have an immediate
order instructing all agencies of
government to desist from screen-
ing qualified American citisens
from military, diplomatic or
other sevvfceHfrB fonlgw cww-
try solely because of objections
by that country to the religion or
race of the** American citi-
zens," Mr. Held demanded.
He asked for such provisos in all
treaties and executive agreements.
He also called upon the United
States Chamber of Commerce to
"vigorously oppose policies which
condone boycotts against Ameri-
can business firms which employ
Jews or which have Jewish stock-
holders or directors."
The investigation by the Depart-
ment of Justice of Arab propa-
gandists in this country and their
alliances with native American
bigots was also urged by the JLC
chairman. He said that the ques-
tion of discrimination has nothing
to do with Israel, that American
Catholics were likewise discrimi-
nated against by Arab nations. He
urged that "American prestige at
home and abroad be buttressed by
a clear, unequivocal policy against
further bias."
Elath, Israel's port on the Gulf of Aqaba, is the scene of ex-
tensive housing construction as part of Israel's immigrant ab-
sorption program, which concentrates on the Negev region
and other areas of development. Some 32,000 housing units
must be built each year during the next five years with the aid
of Israel Bonds. Since statehood was achieved. Israel has built
more than 250,000 permanent dwellings, utilizing Israel Bond
funds. Shown above is a workman completing the roof frame
of an apartment house in Elath. In the background are the Gulf
of Aqaba and the hills of Jordan._____ .__________________
S:xteen graduates of the 10th El Al course for stewards and
stewardesses received their wings at a ceremony at the train-
ing school at Lod Airport, Tel Aviv. Eleven stewardesses and
five stewards passed the course, which includes kashruth,
fiist aid, IATA regulations, emergency procedures, principles
o'. flight, knowledge of routes, intricacies of the plane, and the
individual role and duties in their new profession. Wings were
pinned on and diplomas distributed by Gen. Ben Arzi, man-
aging director of El Al. Of 300 applicants, only 21 were ac-
cepted, five of whom did not complete the course.
"FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST" .
Miracle Massage Salon
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SPECIALIZING IN BODY MASSAGING
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Monday through Friday 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Saturday, Sunday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.
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Arsonists Burn Up Jewish Agency Office
PARIS-UTA) The offices of
the Jewish Agency in Marseilles
were severely damaged by fire this
week and local police authorities
said they were "certain the fire
' had been purposely set."
It was the second time In six
months that a Jewish Agency of-
fice in France had been damaged,
by arsonists. The previous effort,
six months ago, was made at the!
Agency offices in this city, but
gasoline-soaked newspapers failed (
i to catch fire.
In Jerusalem, an Israeli radio
I commentary expressed the be-
I lief that the Marseilles blase, j
, like the one attempted earlier in
' Paris, was the work of Algerian
, rebels, members of the Algerian
I National Liberation Front.
Reports from Marseilles indi-
cated that the Jewish Agency of-
1 ficcs there were still being used,
1 despite the damage. Files, other
, furniture and typewriters were
Herzl Contest Announced
NEW YORK Sponsorship of a
contest for teen-agers has been
announced by Barricini Candies as
i its contribution to the Theodor
I Herzl anniversary celebration this
year. In making the announce-
ment, Ira Barricini, president of
the candy chain, said the nation-
wide contest will be "a vehicle
designed to better acquaint Amer-
ican youth of Jewish ancestry with
the founder of the Zionist move-
ment.
destroyed by the flames on the*
second floor of the Agency office.
Marseilles police believed that the,
culprits had entered the offices
during the night with passkeys.
Anti-Israel propaganda, emanat-|
ing from Cairo has been circulated
frequently of late, chiefly among
Moslems, in this country. The I
propaganda materials have sin-
gled out the Jewish Agency as the
organization which directs the im-|
migration of Jews to Israel, charg-
ing that the Agency uses the Port|
of Marseilles as the point of de-
parture.
BOAT CUSHION BARGAIN!!
TO JEWISH FLORIDIAN READERS
Large selection of custom made boat cushions
below manufactured cost Cushions originally made
ior boats which are now no longer in production
You pick out color and filling desired
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B. C. LaPOINTE, JR., President
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Available at Miami factory only
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Corporate Offices Due Here
Pic-Quik, Inc., bantam super-
market chain launched in Minnea-
polis 15 months ago, will establish
the firm's Florida operating head-
quarters at its West Palm Beach
offices. Corporate offices will be
in both Minneapolis and West
Palm Beach, the chain announced;
here. ,
Private Pool
Beach and
Cabana Colony
HOTEL
1OTM0RE
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At 24th ST., MIAMI BEACH
Write
for
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and
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JE 1-0331
O Air-Conditioned Rooms
O Private Beach and Pool
e Parking on Premises
0 Cocktail Lounge
e Dining Room
e Entertainment
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[day, April 1, 1960
+Jenisli rhridHan
Page 13-C
ilute to Theater
matures Anti-Bias
fEW YORK In response to
ilic demand from all parts of
country, "A Salute to the
i rican Theatre," the special
In long, star studded program
poted to the theme of freedom
anti-discrimination featuring
berpts from 12 outstanding dra-
stic and musical plays with
anchot Tone as narrator will
rebroadcast on the CBS Tele-
lion Network Friday Apr. 8, 9
110 p.m. (WTJV ch. 4, Miami).
|i was originally presented as a
ytime broadcast last Dec. 6 in
nnection with the Anti-Defama-
In League of B'nai B'rith's 11th
Inual Democratic Legacy Award,
hieh last year was given by the
[ague to the American theatre.
|The program is produced by the
ublic ATfairs Department of CBS
lews in cooperation with the Anti-
lefamation League. Following are
le dramatic and musical shows
Joni which excerpts are present-
and the stars who appear in
lem:
"Insid* U.S.A.," with David
^tkinson of the original cast, ac-
tmpaniad by singers and darte-
rs; "Octoroon," by Dion Bouci-
ult, tho MrfftMl (1859) nwlo-
rama dealing with an anti-dis-
riminatory theme, with Richard
laston and Phyllis Newman;
|lifford Odets' "Waiting for
tfty," with Eli Wallach, "Tho
|ale Animal," with Tom Pos-
and Robert Sherwood's
rhere Shall Bo No Night."
Iso, Lillian Hellman's "Watch
the Rhine;" the famous "Red
|ll Express" number from "Call
Mister," with noted baritone
Jliam Warfield; "Home of the
ave," by Arthur Laurents, with
lliam ShatneT; the memorable
fou've Got to be Taught" num-
from "South Pacific," with
|iliam Tabbert of the original
st; "Raisin in the Sun," by Lor-
ne Hansbury, with Caludia Mi-
ll. Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee and
na Sands of the original cast;
\be Lincoln in Illinois," by Rob-
Sherwood; "The Crucible," by
Ihur Miller.
Additional features include Di-
Corto singing the ballad,
kmewhere," from "West Side
ry," the Gene Lowell Singers,
Anna Sokolow Dancers, and
fedo Antoiuni and the CBS Con-
Orchestra.
Synagogue Body Gathering Sunday
Dan B. Ruskin of Miami Beach,
will tender a cocklail party on be-
half of the Synagogue Council of
America in the Americana hotel
on Sunday at 3:30 p.m.
Ruskin assumed sponsorship of
the reception at the invitation of
Sen. Herheit" H: "Lehman ~afld
Louis E. Wolfson, members of the
National Advisory Council of the
organization.
He announced that Benjamin
Lazrus, chairman of the Council,
and Rabbi Marc. H. Tanenbaum,
executive director of the Syna-
gogue Council of America, will dis-
cuss the Council's work with na-
tional Catholic and Protest a in
church agencies, the White House,
the State Department, United Na-
tions, and other national and inter-
nuti'-nal bin
The Byntgogne Council of Amer-
ica coordinates the joint activities
of the Reform. Conservative and
Or'hodox Jewish communities in
tha United ..Stairs It reprRs*nls
American Jewry as one of the
three major taiths in interreligious
and foreign affairs.
Miami Hebrew Book Stor
1585 WASHINGTON AVE.
Miami Beach JE 8-3840
Hebrew Religious Supplie* *or
Synagogue!. Schools a\ Private Use
ISRAELI A DOMESTIC GIFTS
Eli Wallach, Franchot Tone, Tom Poston and Robert Preston
are four of the stars in "A Salute to the American Theatre" to
be seen on the CBS network nationally Friday, Apr. 8. The
special hour-long dramatic and musical program, which mark-
ed presentation of the America's Legacy Awards by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, covers a century of the
American theatre's contributions to decomcracy.
NEWMAN
FUNERAL HOME
1333 Dade Boulevard
Miami Beach
Edward T. Newman
Funeral Director
JEfferson 1-7677
Noted Musicians
To Perform Here
Two of the nation's outstanding
performers in the classical field,
violinist Mischa Elman and opera
star Licia Albanese, will share the
stage at a concert for the benefit
of the Greater Miami District of
the Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica on Apr. 14 at the Miami Beach
Auditorium.
Leo Robinson, Miaim financier
and long active in numerous civ-
ic, Philenthropic, educational and
religious affairs, has been named
chairman of the event.
This will be the second such un-
dertaking for the ZOA which in
December, 1958, presented the Ed
Sullivan Israel Cavalcade of Stars
here.
Proceeds of the concert are ear-
marked for Kfar Silver, the agricul-
tural training school maintained by
the ZOA'in Ashkelon, Israel, and
for the local youth work of the or-
ganization.
Although Mr. Elman is known
primarily for his work in the con-
cert field, his co-star has garnered
her reputation as a performer with
the Metropolitan and San Francis-
co Opera Companies. Recently,
Miss Albanese has also performed
in concerts throughout the country.
Tickets for the concert may be
obtained at the Miami Beach Audi-
torium and Sherman's ticket office
on the Beach, at Amidon's in Mi-
asi, and at Cordelia's in Coral Ga-
bles.
Gerstein to be Speaker
State Attorney Richard Gerstein
will be principal speaker and
guest of honor at a luncheon meet-
ing of the Greater Miami Accident
and Health Underwriters. The
meeting will be held at the Chesa-
peake Sea Food restaurant at noon
on Apr. 7.
Unique Show on Exhibit
Art works resulting from a
unique hobby will be on display in
the 71st st. branch of Miami Beach
Federal Savings and Loan Assn.
beginning Friday.
The works of art are mosaics
created from egg shells. Julius
Kohn, a retired jeweler of the New
York area, is the creator of the
works, as well as of the system he
uses in producing portraits, lan-
scapes and figures.
ISRAELI RELIGIOUS STORE
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MIAMI BEACH
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SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
UM Professor to Talk
Dr. Joseph Hurwitz, University
of Miami language professor, was
'. guest speaker at a luncheon
meeting of Miami Beach Lodge of
, B'nai B'rith on Tuesday at the Di-
, Lido hotel.
tfooSb /
Donor Games Nighf
Donor game night was to be held
at the Hialeah Reform Jewish Con-
gregation for the benefit of the
congregation on Thursday. Mar. 31,
at 8:30 p.m. Donors are Mrs. Rose
Ayres, Mrs. Ruthanne Lever, Mrs.
Pearl Ames and Mrs. Arthur Horn.
There its.' i1 fight way and a. wrong way
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GRANITE MEMORIAL ARTS
Tour
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Certainly you would not wait for an emergency
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decide on after thorough investigation. D<"-n'l
selection of jour family Memorial Plot merit the same
judicious concern? Of course..That's why you'll
want lo find out about Miami's fino-i and
oltlrst Jewish cemetery today. Mount Nebo's
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Please send me, without obligation, full informa-
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Pa*** MOhowk 1-7693
a_^


Page 14-C
+Jrmisl>fhrXHan
Friday. April 1. 1960
GEMS OF WISDOM
People are more easily led than
driven. pink.

As the generation, so the leader.
IOM- II. MAON.
JJo fananc .can be a leader in. K-
rael. Ml HOI I 01 KOTZK
a
A leaden miul not thmlt that
iod cilOtt him because lie is d ({feat
num. Does a peg in the mall, on
which the )(i>ig hangs his crou'ii.
boast thai iu beaut> attracted ilie
Ring's attention?
MOSI I nr kOBRYN.
.
A leader mutt alavayi iromi re-
: (pert /or (lie lommuiniv
N All MAN B. JACOB.
*
The pilot of a ship is worth as
much 01 all the crew. riui.o.
*
A gifted leader ii ont who it
capable of touching your heart.
POTOraKY.

We ha\e leaden, bm wt hare
not yet learned hou' follow.
V -. Wl-l.
1 a
Th<' Sabbath :> the hub of the
U in > universe; to protract it ii a
virture; i<> love it ii a liberal rdu-
ZANGWII i .
T.i s.r-- ..- life disregard a Sab
hut the endangered may 00
bbatfcf. (ONATHAN.
n -1 z ;* n :;sn
virfi <7we ifVfttmf v^y ^yVli
tami s
rCeligioMs u,.
.-1\ <
- *m sn
itfsv ran --".*? pfrt??
"lrva "n'eisiBrj cnteorj
tniDon "enr?1? c"X3 n'tfiK
nnnaig .rTirri niH3i>;ri
-r| D'p'n-r-'pa nDnniyo
on o^Hntrn D'JpTnfrn
tniy sin in ncrs ,V?ifa
-tr-1? yjn ":]?] "is1? ~i*5
O^-tri ina c"D n;n
VTJM,' ,npa ;>a o^Vmh
-ainn rnnajn "?^ $Kni
TRArVSLAT.ON -
Talmudic Wisdom Stresses | .s
Importance of Faith in God
e r v i c e s
J ft i 8 (A/ e c h c 11 d
KABBI HINRY OKOUKA
. divine measurements
By RABBI HENRY OKOLICA
North Oade Jewish Center
There is not a single bird more
persecuted than a dove; yet God
has chosen her to be offered up on
the altar. The bull is hunted by
the lion, the sheep by the wolf, the
goat by the tiger. And God said:
"Bring me a sacrifice, not from
them thai persecute, but from them
that are persecuted."
The wisdom of this Talmudical
quotation emphasizes the import-
lance of faith and trust in God's
| mercy. In our days when material-
ism rules supreme, we must find
I refuge in the holy places to restore
our confidence in spiritual values.
I We must make certain that we ac-
cept the belief in the ultimate jus-
tice. Often we are asked: "Why
do the good Buffer and the wicker
.prosper?" The answer lies in the
philosophy of relative experiecne.
Often punishment becomes a bless-
ing in dispguise, and praise a bur-
den.
Health and sickness, poverty and
riches are generally accepted as abstract case-, of happiness or mis-
fortune. This is only partially true. If man can raise himself to a true
spiritual lew no longer reacts to the generally-accepted patterns
i i wants and wishi s. He can take suffering, as well as well-being, more
or leas in an unaffected way. To be sure, this takes training and con-
stunt exercise in spiritual matters. The mind can be strengthened
through thought processes creating a personality that reacts more and
more in a spiritual manner.
"The Dove is the symbol of Peace."
"'I ne Lion the symbol ot Strength.'"
Both symbolize tha contrast in a world of strusele and attainment.
it is also a study of hope and despair. However, let it be understood
that Cods thoughts are not our thoughts and his measurements not
ours. May the time not be too distant, we pray, when divine mca.-airt'-
n.enis shall become the human yardstick of ultimate achievement.
WOW YOUR HERITAGE -
Hymn of Glory Affirms Man's
'Sweet' View of Worldly Life
XJUDATH ISRAEL. *801 Cartyle ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Isaac Fv
Frlda) 8:80 p.m. Raturday 1:80 a.m.
Bermon: "Vanltj and ArroaaAoe."
AN8HE EMES. 2SS3 SW Itth ave.
Conservative. Maxwoll Silbermjn,
president.
BETH DAVID. 2435 SW 3rd ava. Con-
servativs. Rabbi Vaafcov Rosenberg.
Cantor William W uio*on
FiIiIhv R:tS p.m. Bermon: "MmtoM tou
w.ini ,,n Bai" Raltalon?" MatHrtny B
a.m. I In r Mltzviih: ArnnUl, win nf Mr.
mill Mia. Norman Itclnharil.
---.---
BETH EL. 500 SW 17th ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Solomcr "Wet.
Krlrlay B:3" p.m. SaluKlav '.:.".< a.m.
Sermon: "The rhalli-nne .if Our tiny"
liar Mllxvahf Klla.. win of Mr. anil
Mr*. Savus Halm.
BETH EMETH. 12250 NW 2nd ave.
Conservative. Rabbi David W. Her-
son. Cantor Hyman Fln.
l-rl'ia\ S:13 p.m. Bermon: "Aspect* In
Jewish T'i."lt.y-Ki trlliiitain." Ram-
n. i Orayaon to ehanl Raturfay 9 a.m.
Bel ni- ri S.i. i ii. i
IETH ISRAEL. 4000 Prairie sve. Or-
thodox. Rabbi H. Louis Rottman.
------
BETH JACOB. 301-311 Washin0ton
ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor Stern.
Cantor Maurice Mamehes.
-------
3FTH RAPHAEL 13 NW 3rrl ve.
Orthodox. Rabbi Abraham Levitan.
Killa\ < 1 ."> p in s.iii.i.lax :i' in
Sermon: "Trie DesJnnlnB o( lln-pilan
1 lionflane."
---
BETH TFILAH. 35 Euclid ave. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Joseph E Rackovsky.
a-------
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 40B
16th st. Orthodox. Rabbi Chaim
Karlinsky.
-----a --
;ORAL WAV jKWiew "NTCB
8755 SW 16th St.. Miami. Rabbi Sam-
-i April.
lr.i.i> R:)0 p.m. Sermon: "Mental
jTeleiuithy ann Men < V'lalon." Batur-
B ; hi S. : n \\ I '.. lion.'"
>ADF HEIGHTS CENTER 18180 NW
2nd ave. Conservative. Cantor Eman
uel Mandel.
. -LAGLFR-GRANADA. 50 NW 51st
pi Conservative Pahbi **rt\mr6
Shoter. Cantor Peed Bernstein.
Kriiia> :.:". ami ^.i"i p.m. Bermon:
', lb. > mi II. ,ii i
ICnouah?*' i iiiMi: Bhabbnl hoats 111
and Mr- I >u \ tint araar) Mr ann" Mra. Bdwln it.
M.n-ii;i'l. weiWInf ii'ilv rs.ii v ; Mr.
aaci Mra. Joeeoh k i ifman, enastare*
meltl of i"'n. Rrlward, to HVanolne
BfoeWa .la.'ii.' ..i ,\|i .in.I \lri*. Max
ll.i.lt--. 10 a.m. Hai MltS-
;.ii i '. <:. p.m.; Martin, n..n ot Mr.
an.l Mrs Vim. i I- i-.li. r.
Football in Israel
The game of (ootoall is today
the most popular sport in Israel.
Many thousands of people come
to the sports grounds to watch the
games nf the various teams. Is
rael's national football team takes
part in various international
games.
Israeli players are amateurs.
Every player has his own occupa-
tion, in which he works throughout
the week.
But some time ago a famous
trainer, a Jew from Hungary, by
the name of Manciy. came to Is-
rael, At one time he was one of the
greatest players in Hungary and
the instructor and trainer of the
Hungarian team.
(Published by Brit Ivnt Olamit)
He who BMiflleriM peace at home
helps to main!a;n it in Israel .
Everyone is k,nR in his home.
HMBON B. 1.AMALIEI-.
What is the Jewish Hymn of Glory?
It is a Hebrew liturgical hymn
chanted in the synagogue alter-
nately by the cantor and the wor-
shipped on Sabbath mornings. It
is known in Hebrew as '"Shir
Hakovod," or by the opening words
of the hymn "AfllOl Zemiros," "I
rill sing sweet songs.'*
The author. Judah the Pious
(died 1217i. was at once philoso-
pher and poet, saint and mystic
The poet seeks to vindicate what-
ever i- highest in Israel's aspira-
tions. It now have a beautiful Eng-
lish translation. "I have not seen
Thee, yet. I te'l thy praise: nor
known Thee, yet I image forth
the ways." is one of its impressive
lines.
* m
Who were the Karaites?
A sect within Juadism which re-
Jected the authority of the Talmud.
II u ib origil Btod among the Baby-
lonian Jews ii 767 by those who
found rabbinic law too burdensome.
The founder VII Anan ben Da-
vid, who based his Judaism on the
liiemlness of the Bible. He reject-
ed any interpretation, even his own.
In 1853, they ceased being called
lews. There numbers dwindled to
several thousand Most of them
live in the Crimea.
What was the Pale cf Settlement?
It was the territory comprising
. :-
CANDLWGHTING TIMt
4 Nisan 6:22 p.m.
SBssasnassan eeaa

asBnsssassjsjsji
This rage it prepared in co-
operation with the Snritual Lead-
ers of trie Greater Miami Rabbin-
irul A.tsn.
Rabbi Yaalcov G. Rosenberg
Coordinator
CONTRIBUTORS
Rabbi David Herson
Tales and Gems uf Wi.sdom
Rabbi B. Leon Hurwitt
Knou' Totir Heritage
I,..t......i i .
those districts of Russia to which
Jewish rights or residence were
'onfincd, during the Claris! re
gime.
The object of the Pale was to re-
move Jewish influence over Rus-
sians. Jews were also prohibited
from residing within 50 versls of
the frontier. Exceptions were made
for Jewi-h physicians, engineers
and skilled artists. The result of
the Pale was the impoverishment
of the Jews and the undeveloped
jconomy of Russia.
Does Judaism provide for a death-
bed co.-.fessioiel?
Yes it is called "Vidu." The tra-
ditional Jew would recite it twice
in his life-time. Once, before his
marriage, and la'er in life during
his closing moments on earth. It
is usually done in the presence of
a witness, but the witness need not
be a rabbi-. It is an outpouring of
the heart directly to God,
However, if the confessional in-
cludes a reference to a sin com-
mitted against a human being, then
the confessional has no validity un-
less the wrong committed is right-
ed, and atonement is procured
from the man wronged

Where is the Dead Sea?
The Dead Sea. known in Hebrew
as Yom Hamelach (Salt Sea), is a
kidney-shaped lake of considerable
size located in the southeast of the
Holy Land in a basin 1300 feet be-
low sea level. It is called the
"Dead Sea" on account of the ab-
sence in it of all life, vegetable or
animal.
KMFSETH ISPiL M15 Euclid ave
Orth^fe* Ratbi nvi 'in-"- ^>-im .i
Piidaj "i I ... m -.-, r.
man s C liin I l:r MIU-
vah: .Vlmtln. son ( Mr, and Mra, Ben
:.....Imsii.
MIAMI HEBREW CONGREGATION
1101 SW 12ts "-. O -**
Mareehell Saviile. Cantor Joseph
c-i-m.*
i-'i Ida | I 10 n "i Ba lurdi I a Mi Ber-
mon nil H.....! I'ullint."
-------e-
MONTICELLO PARK. 164th st. and
NE 11th ave Conservative. Rabbi
M" Llnsh'tr. Cantor Ben-Zion
"'-"fl-.-Sjlpn.
Kiiiiay r,:.io ami 1:15 p.m. Sermon:
Katui. -|i my. i "
Saturday l i". a.m. Bar Mltavan:
Nli- l.-. win of iir. ami Mrs Vallmn
i--i.il.. its, ii. |ihen nf Rabbi Mat
l.i|is.h!ll
NORTH OADE CENTER 13830 W.
Dixie hwy. Conservative. Rsbbl
Hnrv Okolica.
Fi Idaj ". |. m. srmon: "Rabbi and
Layman." Batur'tay v am Bar Mita-
v iii Bryan, ..n ..f Mr. and Mra. Mar-
iu Ruwee
MORTH SHORE CENTER 620 7Sth st
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abram-
o*iti Cantor Edward Ki*in
Kililay I:1S p.m. Baturdav I ,i m Ba/
Mltavah: Jay, son ..f Mr ami Mm
'.'.'"' ;".'."''''"- '" -"" "' Mr anil
Mrs Mllti.n Jacobs. Sermon: "Week-
i> Portion '
SOUTHWEST CENTER. 6438 SW 8th
M Conservative. Rabbi Maurice
Klein.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN. Rabbi
Jonah Capian.
PHdBj 8 p.m. at Llalfted bid*., JS00
NE l.l-i St Kern.....: s... i ,
I'Hiiein f.,r Jestlali Uvinc." Halurdav
S a.m.
TEMPLE CETr, ^.. J|| N. Kendall
ssasa asirnraammii u:iSrnnw mMr
TALES OF MORALS
The wind and die sun had an
I arxumrnt. The u'ind claimed thai it
HMl more powerful than the sun.
I Bolh b_v sound, fury and force, it
Icatsld mrea^ de.>iriurion. The (tin
I ctiniendrd thai u BMj fCT m0Ie
powerful than the wind: for it
. could accomplish everything the
I mind cnuld do. only more
At about this time, thfy saw a
I man ical^mx on the street and |he
tu.i turned to the wind end said:
"Behold that man. can you remove
his coat.''' And the temd BlllUIUItJ.
"By all means yes." It began to
blow with fury and howl with rage
and roncentrated Us full force iipnii
fa the hapless individual. The man rr-
spmidcd by drau'ini; his ce: around
him more and more, and buttoning
and hugged himtelf m order to rr-
. Mtte the powerful gale.
The sun then said to the [find:
"Alloto me." And uuth Its benign
rays, it gazed upon the man. The
man was amazed ji the c-unge o)
climate He U'iped the psTffpiratton
off his brou1. unbuttoned his coal
and as the heat of the sun pene-
trated, he was compelled to remove
it.
MORAL: There is more t'l.it can
be accomplished with friendship
than with sound and fury.
rT. LAUOERD*LE Fvaa-'U-EL 'BO"
f. iiHr.w. o. St'irm. Rabbi
V-: Ranaon. Cartor Sherwir
Levins.
H"CW sr.SD'MV, ^8 ^h st. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross.
HIAl'Su Dcc-noM ir"-HH CN.
GREGAT:ON 1150 W. 68th St., Hla-
leah Rabbi Nathan Zwitman.
PYlilay B:1S n.m Bermon. "Hnrlnsi
l -!' I Hi !' I". -'I\.,l Of I'l ii"III "
Raturday ^:4"i a.m.
HOI LVWOOO TEMPLE S'NAI. 2030
Polk at. Conservative. Rabbi Oavld
Shapiro. Cantor Vehudah Heilbraun.
-------a-------
ISRAEL TE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
tr. Conservve. O-hh- Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Louis Cohen.
Friday ; and l.-lo p m, hWrmon: "Pre-
narlna for Paaaover." ()ne| Hhahbal
boats Mr ami Mrs Will am Upalck.
dr., S Miami. Reform Rabbi Herbert
Baumoard. Cantor Charle* Kodner.
i-'iiii.i\ 7 B0 pin. Bermon: -* i ti In
Hi.- rii s.iiin'i.i.. :" a.m. .1 Mlis-
vah: l-ri-ii. s.iu f Mr. and
ii Wnlk. ISl SW s:!ril a\.-
-------
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1845 Polk St.,
Hollywood. Reform. Rabb> Samuel
lafte
Friday B:18 p.m. tTHakuu: "The Wl.
iln'ii of th.- Wl"."
e-------
TEMPLE BETH SHOLEM nf Holly.
wood. 1725 Monroe st Conservstivi.
Rabbi Samuel Lerer. Cant.ir Ernest
Irhre'her.
I Krlilay 8 p.m. S.-ini.-n: "Mur ...1 l)l'.|-i
inn" Saturday B a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SNOLui.;. 414J Chile,
ave. Liberal Rabbi Leon Kronisk
Cantor Oavlo Convieer.
e-------
TEMPLE B'NAI SHOLOM. 15800 NW '
22nd ave. Conservative. Rabbi
"'"on Edwards. Cantor Ben Qrois- |
berg.
-------
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 1701 Washing-
ton ava. Conservative. Rabbi Irving
l.ehrman Cantor lsrl Rich
^rlllH^ '. ami k .10 p.m. Satuirl:.> a in.
Bermon "Weekly Portion." Bar MUs-
vah: Hteuhen, -hi of Mr. nl Mr*.
Harry Mufaon
TFMPLE ISRAEL '37 NE '9th it.
Reform. Rabbi Joseph R Narot.
r'anto' larob B'nsteln
i-riii>\ s:!-. I..in Bermon: ''laaues "t
th.- Ttmea Thai Try Mea'a Bnuhi "
TFMoi g jiiDEA. 320 Vsisrmo sve.
Liberal. Rabbi Morris Shop Cantor
_ Herman Gottlieb.
r-.-'rla- v;|-, n.m i in. _- sinl.'r.i ho^l>:
Mr and Ml a. s|.| -. \ w i. inaer. n
h nor < ib.- sard blrthda; of t! r
i on, Jack, s iturds) 9 a m illnyi -
Bur Mltavah: Henry, son of Mr. snd
Mrs. WIIIIhiii Uoodfrk ml.
TFMPLE NFR TAMID. BOth st. snd
Tatum Waterway. Morfarn Tradi-
tional. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz. Can-
tor Samuel Gomberg.
TEMPLE SINAI NO. MIAMI. 12100
NE 15th ave. Reform. Rabbi Benno
v Wallaeh.
Friday B:1B p.m. Sermon "Chrlatlan
Mlsainna lo the Ji vs> An '
Ba Mltavah: Irlene rlaochter of Mr.
and Mrs Harold barnlh r.
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB 1
Fiaminao Way. Conservative. Rsbbl
Leo Heim.
PVIday B:18 p.m. Byrmon: "wii.-n Man
la WillliiK I" 8hi i 'ii.-k Shah-
Inn hoata: Ml ami Mrs. Morri- Moi*
.- iturday I a.m.
TEMPLE ZION. 5720 W 17th
Conservative. Rabbi Alfred Ws*!
man. Cantor Jacob Oold'b. I
Friday *:?,<> p.m. Herman: "1 I I
That la Answe i Baturdaj I
Bar Mltavah: harrj son el Mr a"" 1
Mis Phillip Sin lali
TIPERBTH ISRACL. 8500 N. MiSl|
ave Conservative. Rabbi Harry LI
I Cantne Albert oiantJ;
Friday ^ ::c i. m nermon: "What "
This-" iinex Hhahbal hnala: Memberi|
of siat. ib.....i Bai irday B a.m.
TORAH TEMPLE. 1254 West srsl
Traditional. Rabbi Abraham Csss*l
------
YOUNG ISRAEL. 880 NE 171st *-\
Orthodox. Rabbi Sherwin Staubsr-
ZAMORA JEWISH CENTER 'j|
mora ave. Conservative. Rabbi sj
Leon Hurwitz. Cantor Msyer Oiasr^
I'iiiav |l p.ni Qraeat: Dr, Beyra*__
llbinienthnl Topi.-: "Hi.w i" 1
the. War of Nerves." Saturday |
a.m. Bermoa: "The 'Jraetcat H>
K
a
ii -. ,
jooi
I ^ '."::
lAltc


960
April 1, 1960
*Jenisti fknhn
LEGAL NOTICE
I-
..:
it
n
ii
in
re
K
! j
>.|
:l
Vt
1:
In i
I
,1 |
in
P
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKRKBY (1IVEN that
e uimI'i sinned, desiring to enguge In
islness under t! fictitious name of
EWHEROER PAPER PRODUCTS
177:: N.W. 7th Avenue, Miami In- |
nds I.....Ulster said name with the
.rk '.I in.' 'in nil Court of Hade
unty, Floridu.
MAX s. nkwp.kp.ckh
BON .\ KPHTEIN
torne) for applicant
ii Lincoln Kii.. Miami Beach, PTa
S/25. 4/1-s-C
'1
iih
ng.
ing
m
Hi-
Ir.
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
VENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
LORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C 1921 A
INBERU
'laintlff
liV PBiNBERO
tefer lant
AMENDED COMPLAINT
FOR Ai>tNu>.i>iti .
;V PTBINBERU
It.-, -ii..- aiii Address I'nkmiwn
mi in- hereb) n it I fled thai a Bill
"mi Ii "i foi Annulment baa i.....n
I on, an i )ou are requlr-
i oom ol >..ii Anawer or
adlna to tin Bill ..i Complalnl on
plaintiffs Attorney, JOSEPH VV.
LEK, 41)7 Lincoln l:..ad. Miami
Hi.. Florida ,,n,i rile Mi.- original
-.I- l'leading in the offti
i :. i ,.i i he i' i, nil i 'inn i mi i,r
fore ii'- 8Seh -i of April, I MO, if
i.i i -, ult will ,. i.-ii.i n against you for the
i.i mandril in tin- Mill of fum-
ainl.
This notloe snail be published ones
Ii Wei I f.,i i......naec .in, -,-. ks
THK JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
HONK \.\|i ORDERED al Miami,
l*lorlda, ihlM tSrd da) ol March, A.D.
980.
i: :. r.KATHRRMAN, Clerk.
Clrcull Court, Bade County, Florida
seal) B) : It. II. RICE, II: .
Hrpuly Clerk
nSKI'll W MALKK
7 I.in, .,ln Itoail
iaml Beach, Florida
ttorne] foi riauuiif
3/23. 4/1-8-15
Page 15-C
LEGAL NOTICE
'There goes Beryl, the weightlifter,
showing off again!"
LfeGAL NCflCE
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
LEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN CHANCERY
No. 60C 2620
AROLD FHKNCK.
PuiBtirr,
\ s.
ARJOR1E FRENCK.
Defendant.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
): MARJOItIK FRENCK
2.VI North Avcnur
Syracuse, Nen York
tOV ARE HEREB* NOTIFIED
at a Complaint for Dtvoroe hat been
ed asaliist you In the above entitled
iet une and you ar.- hereby required to
ve a oopj of your Answer to the
plaint for Hiv.c.c on the Plaln-
attorney and file the original In
office of the Oerk of the Circuit
iirt on or Isefore the 25th day of
i*ll. IMo, otherwise Decree, Pro
life.-*,, win i..- entered ajralnal von
hla notice shall be published once
h week foi four consecutive weeks
'III.- .1. wish l-'loi idlan
ai.fi ai .Miami. Bade County, Plor*
. this Kth day of March, 1N-60.
E. F! LEATHERMAN, Clerk.
"Ircult Court. Bade County, Horlda
al) By: K. M. I.YMAN.
I leputy clerk
BBVTN r, amks
i.iiii v for Plaintiff
ii 8 \V. First Street
mi 36. Florida
I/H, 4 1 ** -1 -.
rot.
ivt.
itor
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
rTOTICK is HEREBY QIVKN that
mull" -ntned. desiring to etiKBSi- In
trinesa undei the flrtltloua name of
MAS MIFFLKK SHOP at N 11
lib st. & :iiii Ave., Bade Count)
lend* to register sai.l name with the
}rk of the Clrcull CoUli Ol Made
MIDCO, INC,
KRBERT K KAUFMAN
for iM.plli- ml
dul'.illl I'.l.h;
8/85.4/1-8-15
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY Q1VBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the flctiilous name oi
STANLEY and/or STANI.KY JEWEL-
ERS, al MM Hauling Avenue. Surf-
M.l.-. Miami Iteaeh. Horlda intends to
Students Will
Be Consecrated
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
lTK'K IS HUKKBY U1VHN that
th. undersigned. di-slriiiK to engage '
in hiisin. -.- under the fictitious name I
of ALLIED PITTSBURGH WARE
HOUBE ft VAN en al 8186 1%W. 24th.
Avenue, Miami; Fla., intends to re*-
later said name u-itn the cierk of the
Circuit Court .if Bade County, F'l.u-ida.
ESTHER FLICKER
3/25, 4/1 -"<-l
THE CuotNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 49063-C
UK: Estate of
JACK MlWENTHAL, a/k/a
JACOB LOWENTH ai,
I '<< > .1
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
Clalmi or Demands Ag-glnsl Bali
Estate:
feu are hereby notlflad and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which \.,u may have against the es-
tate ..I JACK l."\\ KNI'll Al.. a/k/a
JaCIIB LOWENTHAL, deceased late
..f 11 \ 11)-, i'., inty. Florida, to the
Count) Judges ,,r Dads County, and
file Hi.- same in their offlci in the
County Courthouse In Dad* County.
Florida, within i-iRlit calendar months
from the date ol the first publication
hereof, or the same will be ba
BIROIK LOWENTHAL
.lll.lls' API'LEBAL'M
II'I.IIS APPLEBAl'M
Attoi nay
1604 Alfred l duPont lildg.
Miami :::'. Kia.
3'18-25. 4/l-S
7
ATTENTION
ATTORNEYS!
"pJewisi) r/vridfi&jn
solicits your legal notices.
We appreciate your
patronage and guarantee
accurate service at legal
rates .
Dial I IS .l-ltm?
for messenger service
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY tilVEN that
i he null. signed, eiuja -- In
iii 1.1 he fi. ililous name of
TltAll, Ml >Ti ii:>' al i 74MI s \\
Miami Intend to reslster said name
wi h the Clerk of the Ircull Court of
Dade County, Florida
l.i:<. A S1CKI.KR
RICHARD -\l HAUL
: '- J I'I-8
Consecration services for more
than 65 first grade students of
regiHter said name with the (Merk of 'Congregation Monticello Park will
Bade County. take ,ace t F w plait fr I)lv ,.,.
. asainst you. an,I y<
Florida
HERBERT K COHEN, Sole Owner
MBRVTN I.. AME8
Attorney for Herbert B. Cohen
5/11-18-25. 4/1
nd
di-
jn-
'100
mo
it.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
kfOTICE IS HEREBY tilVEN that
undersigned, deslrlns t" eintage in
slnesa .....i.i lbs fictitious names of
il'ltA LEE CANBIEH and DELI-
iH'S CANDY CO. at 8800 N W. Mth
set, MlamL Florida Intends to ret!-
-r said name willi the Clerk of the
Ircult Court of Bade County, Florida
LAURA LEK CANDIES, INC
By: Joseph ARschuller, President
DVNER A MANNHEIMBR
ltorne\s f..r Appli.-ant
1/25. I l-8-ll
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES' COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE
No. 47897-C
In Re: ESTATE <>F
ALEX .1. HERMAN, a'k/.t
ALEC J. HERMAN, a/k/a
ABRAHAM .1. HERMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demanda Against Said
Batate:
You. and eat-h of you are hereby no-
lifi.-d an.I required to present any
elalniH and demands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
eatste of ALEX J. HKKM.tX, a/k/a
ALEC .1. IIKIIMAX, a k a AMRA-
iia.m .1. HERMAN deceased late of
Dade County. Fl.n Ida. to the Honor-
able County Judges of Hade County,
and file the name In their oflli.s iii
iin County Courthouse in Hade Coun-
ty. Florida, within eixht calendar
months from the date id tlo- first pub-
lication hereof Said claims or de-
mands lo contain the legal addreas of
the claimant anil to l>e sworn to and
prcseliteil as aforesaid, i.r same will
lie barred. Sec Section 733.11 of the
IMS Probate Act.
Date March 88, A.l>, lUfiti.
RCTH HERMAN, As Executrix
of the Last win and Testament ol
Alex .1. Herman, a/k/a Alec .1.
Herman, a/k'a Abraham .1. Her-
man. Deceased
KOVNER MANNHEIMBR
Attorneys for Executrix
IS, 1/1-8-15
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY,
No. 60C2414
JAMES liAMiuLfil,
I'lalatlff.
vs.
iMiItfiTIIY AN.V RANDOLPH.
I vf.-ndant.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: HoitiiTHY ANN RANDOLPH,
I i.-iendant
81 West A ski en St.
I'nioiii.iH p. Pennsj iv anla
You IM ifti I'l'll Y ANN RANIKil.PII
ar.- hereby notified that a Bill Oom-
has been filed
required to
ning.
She will receive certificates of
consecration and be awarded their
classroom prayer book.
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz. spiritual
leader, will charge the students.
Jack Diamond, president, Harold
Wolk, chairman of the board, and
i-j.. o .. ,, tach week for four Consecutive weeks
Irving Seidel. chairman of the ed-,in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
ucation committee, will award the""NK AN" ORDERED at Miami.
nerve a cop) of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Hill ,,f Complaint on the
plaintiff's attorney, NEAL J. DUNN,
llll Ainsley llulldlng. Miami 52. Hi.,
and file the original Answer or Plead-
ing In II.....Hi......f the Clerk of the
circuit Courl on or before the 15th
day of April. IMO. If you fail to do
so, judgment by default will be taken
agalnal you for the relief demanded in
Hi.- inn .,r Complaint.
This nolle- shall be pubtisbed once
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 49116
In RE: Eatati
ABRAHAM N LERNER,
I keeenaed
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To aii Creditor! and All Peri >na Hav-
ing claim- hi Demands Aealnat Said
You hi.- hereb) notified and requir-
ed to present any claims ami demands
which you ni.i have against the es-
tate of ABRAHAM N LERNER de-
cease.! late of Dad- County Florida,
to the County Judges of Hade County.
and file lb.- same In their offices in
the County Courthouse In Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, within slgfcl calendar
months from the dale of the first
publication hereof, or t lit- same will
be barred.
HELENE I-: LERNER,
Administratrix of Instate
LEON A. EPSTEIN
Attorney
42" Uncoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla.
8/18-85. I'1-8
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
LEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA IN CHANCERY
No. SOC 2*51
IIAT11.HA LEMIN.
Plaintiff.
I -
ITANLET LEMIN.
I 'el,mlant
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
I": STANI.KY I CMI\
P. o. Bex 881
Pompton Likes. New Jersey
You stani.ky i.kmin are hereby
.titled that a Hill ..i Complaint for
Ivorae haa been filed against you.
nil you are required lo seixe a copx
if your Answer or PL-adlne to the Hill
'f Complaint on the plaintiff's At-
irney, GOLDMAN \ OOLDBTEIN,
mil file ihe original Answer or Plead-
ing In th. offl.....I Ho Clerk of the
'irCUll Court OH o- I., l,,r, ihe 25th
of April. IH*n. |f you fall t
COUNTY JUDGES COURT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
No. 41708-B
In re: Katate of
EVERETT RATMOND LEWARK,
I l,-c, a s,-,l
CITATION BV PUR' If.ATION
THK STATE OF FLORIDA to:
\n\ ami all persons win. may claim
an Interest In the above Batate.
vm ARK HERKBT NOTIFIED
thai a I'etiiion has been filed In nsld
conn praying for determination of
hciieflciai lea.
Vim are h.rei.y required to file your
written defenses thereto within forty
in after the first publication or
posting beieor. Should you fail there-
in, Decree will be entered In due
i.....rse upon said petition.
WITNESS mi hand ami seal of said
Court at Miami. Florida, March 21st.
FRANK H DOWLiNU
County JmUte
(s.ali Bj MKI.I-.A C DICK,
Cl. I.
SIDNEY EF'RONSON, Atty.
Ml s.-ciiiiu Trust P.ldg.
Mia mi .!2. Florida
3/85, 4/1-8-1.
consecration certificates.
Teachers of the respective class-
es are Mrs. Irving Seidel, Mrs.
Michal Criicn and Mrs. Jack Dia-
mond.
Ftorkts, this Mth day of March, A.I)
1-oiO
i: l: LRATHBRMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court. Hub- County, Floi Ida
(Meal)
B) K
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA.
IN OHANCERY
No. O0C 2710
PETER AMATO
Plaintiff.
vs.
BARBARA JEAN AMATO.
Hefendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
rou, BARBARA JEAN AMATO,
188 Alowl Avenue, Valley Stream. N.-h
York, are notified to serve a copy of
your Answer t,. th, Divorce Com-
plaint on Plaintiff! Attorney, GEO-
RGE NICHOLAS. 80S Hlscay ne Ruild-
Ing. Miami. Florida, and file o
with Clerk of this Court on or before
Hi.- L' ",ih day of April. A.D., 1(80.
otherwise Complaint will i. confeaaod
l.y you.
DATED. March 22, A.I>. ISM,
K H LEATHERMAN, Clerk,
Circuit Court, Dade County, Florida
(seal) l.y \v.\i \v STUCK INC.
Deputv clerk
1 IS, 4/1-8-15
NKAI. I liCNN
llll Aii,-l.-i Klilg.
Miami 88, Fla.FR
\l I.YMAN'
Deputy clerk
I-SM4
8/14-25. 4/l-S
.luiluineni l.v I, I mil will be taken
kgalnal you f.u- (he rIU)l demanded in
Ihe DIM ,,f Comph
This notice Snan be published oni
i-ai-h week for four ronsecutlve w.-.-k:
| THK JEWISH FI.ORIHIAN.
DONE y\n ORDERED st Miami,
'rida. this 2nd day, of March AH.
!i
i: r. LEATHERM w cl, rk
circuit Com i. Dade County, Florida
f(seal) .ris.
lerk
I i 'MAN i;. .1 IHTRIN
\v Flash ml. Ha.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
8/25,4/1-8-15 I
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 4(031-B
In RE: Estate of
ARAH ci'I.hstkin.
i, ..i
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing claims in Demand! Against said
Estate:
You aie herein notified a ml requir-
ed in preaeni an) claims an-i demands
i-l.-h ii ......a' ......."1 .be es-
tate of SARAH QOLD8TEIN, de-
ceased Nil,, ni DA Dai County, Florida
to the Honorable Coanu Judges of
n,,H, i ,i hi. the ima In
do their offices in the County Courthouse
IN THE COUNTY JUDGES COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 48403-C
IN RE: Estate of
SAM POZIN,
1', eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons li.iv-
Ing claims oi Demands Against BaM
Batate
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed lo present any claims and demands
which you maj have against the es-
tate of SAM POZIN deceased late of
DAI E Count). Florida, lo the Coun-
ty Judges of I >ade County, and file the
same In their offices In the County
Courthouse In Hs.le c,.unty. Florida,
within eight calendar months from
Hie dale of the first publication here-
of, or the same will h.- barras*
NATHAN" POZIN 1 ve.uu.r
LENA FINKEL Co-Executor
HAMll. NEAL HELLER
Attorney
810 Ainsley- Mulldlim
Miami 88, Floi Ida
S'll-lS-25. 4/1
m Bade County, Florida, within elghl
calendar months from the date of Hie
first publication hereof Said claims
,r demands i" contain the legal ad-
dress of the claimant and to I I
to ami presented .....I. or s ime
will be barred Bee 13.18 ol
the KM Probati
paie March II. A D
ESTHER W M.l VCK As
Bxet uii iv of the Lasl win and
lament of Sarah Qoldsteln, Da-
CHERBN ,v GOLDEN
fin; Olympla iinlldlng
3/18-85.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREIIY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to *ngi
busines! uinl.-i lb. (lot It Ions name of
HAROLD'S RAH al 4(40 W. Flaglei
St Miami intend l" i.t;isl.-i sn,l
name with th- clerk of the Circuit
Court oi Hade County. Florida.
ROBERT Mt'I.I.BN
I.i:fc: PITCHER
KESSI.ER, c.ACs a Ri nil
Attornay*! for appllcunt!
|(M B.W. 1st Street
31S, 4'1-i-r.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 4S047-C
In ItK: Estate of
JOHANNA WOLF-.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said ,
,>tate:
Ymi ar,- hereby notified and re ed lo present any claims and demands '
which you may have against the es- I
late of JOHANNA WOLF deceased '
i.i it- of Had.- County, Florida, to the ;
County Judges of Hade County, and
file the same in tlt.-ll offices in the I
County Courthouse m Dade County,
Florida, within Sight calendar month.;
from the dale of the first publication ;
h.-icof. or the same will be barred.
CAROL W LEVITT
Aa Executrix.
M M:\ M FABBR
Attorney
Hii2 Consres! Building
Miami .12. Floilda
3/18-8R. 4 l-x
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
No. 60C 2490
TO: IRVING KAPLAN
21* Washington Avenue
Cedarhurst. I.I New York
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
You are hereby notified that a BUI
of Complaint for Dixorce has been
filed against you. and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the HIM of Complaint on
the plaintiff's Attorneys, SHAPIRO
AND FRIED, F>qs 12" Lincoln Road.
Miami Peach 88. Florida and file the
original Answer or Pleading; In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the IMh day of April,
I'"," If tun fail to do so. judement
l.v default will be taken agtatnet you
for the relief demanded in the Hill of
Complaint.
This notice shall lie published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THK JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
HONK ANIi ORDERED at Miami,
Florida, this lSth of March. All IMO.
B B. LEATHERMAM. Clerk.
Circuit Court. Hade County. Florida
is.all B) : R. H RICK. JR..
I leputy Clerk
SHAPIRO AND FRIKH. Bsqs
420 Lincoln RoadSuite 818
Miami Beat ii S(, Florida
Attorneys for Plaintiff
8/18-86, 4/1-8
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN ano for nnt county,
FLORIDA IN PROBATE
No. 49004
IN I'K: Estate of
JENNIE I' JORDON,
V I SI i K \'i .UN AS
JENNIE JORDON,
|i,-,, ,..i
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and ah Persons Hav-
ing claims or Demands Assinai said
Estate:
Y.>ii ar.- lieieby notified and requir-
ed to proseot any claims and demands
whl<'h you ma) have aieainat the es-
tate of JENNIE F\ JORDON, also
known as JENNIE JORDON, deceas
ed bile of Bronx Ci'linlv. New York.
to the Count) JudEes of Hade County.
and file the am in their offk
the '' .....,, --I'-'iise In t>ade Coun-
ty, Florida, within eight calendar
month! from the date of the first pub-
lication here, or the same will be bar-
i.il
DOROTHY V. FASSltERO Ancil-
lary Executrix of the Estate of
""**"' "-don also known as
Jennie Jordon.
Sll a i .... .\ i ,.., :i i
Allorne)!
, i i,,, I. i'.,, i
Miami Beach. Florida
3/I1-1S-25. 4/1
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EL^VFNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR DADE
COUNT" I" ~-"^NCERY.
No. 60C 2487
RICHARD s UOYU,
Plaintiff,
\ s
ELSIE BOTD,
I icfcndani.
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
TO: ELSIE BOYD
Route Ni
N'.-niii.i. i Melanoma
You are hereb) notified that a Bill
of Complaint for Divorce bai I.....n
filed against you. and you are requlr-
.-i i,, serve a cop) of your Answer or
Pleading to the Hill of Complaint on
the plaintiff's Attorneys. WALTKRS.
MOORE a COBTANZO, 100S Ainsley
Kiilldinc. Miami 88, Florida and file
the original Answer or Ptesdtnt In the
office o* the Cl.ik of the Clriiilt Court
on or before the Klh day of April.
IMO, If you full to do so. Judgment
by default lll taken asalnsi roll
foi the relief demanded In the Bill of
c.....i,lain!
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In "" ii'irisii i.-t ilt'Ol AN
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this IMh of March A.D 180.
K. I: LEATHERM \N" clerk.
clrcull Court, ii-,'!.- County. F'lorlda
(seal) By: WM. W STiiCKINi:.
Deputy Clerk
WALTERS MOORE 4 COSTANZO
B) Edgai Miller
Attorneys for Plaiulllt
3/18-15. 4'1-8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY fHVEN that
the undersigned, desiring i,, engase in
business iiii.1i i ihe flCtltloU! n
CURRY'S ai Miami Beat h, FTot I
tend! io raglatei said si..... nrtth the
Clerk of roe Clrt all Coui i i di
i 'Mum -. i- lot Ida
IVEN R RTRAWDERMAN
BRi 'W N ,\ ROLLER
Attorneys for Iven R Strawdermon
1/1-8
ATTENTION ATTORNEYS!
# OtrPOff ATI O V OITFITS
Lowest Prices Quickest Delivery
in South Florida
Call THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN at
FR :.-ir.


Page 16-C
*Jeist Meridian
Friday. April I. IS
_ b^s^.a. EJ.. --, I the Act require student applicants cational institutions around the
BrCindeiS Ke|eCTS taUCavlOn LOailS to sign a controversial loyalty dis- nation who have withdrawn from
. .1 .... claimer and affidavit. [tB- NDEA student loan program
WALTHAM. Mass.-The board of week to reject student loan funds j" BU" "uae SC
trustees of Brandeis University, by under the National Defense Educa 1 In talcing this action, Brandeis because of taw required affidavit,
unanimous vote, resolved last tion Act as long as provisions of I joins a growing list of leading edu- Included in thia list are Harvard.
Yale, Princeton and approximate!
20 other outstanding colleges at
universities.
The Brandeis board took the ac
tion at a meeting in New York.
SAVE AS THOUSANDS SAVE, SAY AS
THOUSANDS SAY. FOR MY MONEY ITS
CHASE
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
1100 LINCOLN ROAD AT LENOX AVENUE / JE 8-7411 Reaches all office*
fOKTY-FMMT STREET 4B AT SHERWAN AVCNUC COLLINS AVCNUC AT Mk STREET
SURESIDE MM HARDING AVCNUC NORTH MIAMI BEACH MM STREET SHOPPING CENTER
FUNDS TRANSFERRED
FROM ANYWHERE IN
THE UNITED STATES
NO CHARGE


CAMPAIGN NEWS
NEWS AND PICTURES OF YOUR
IM1M
SPONSORED BY THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
No. 7
A SUPPLEMENT OF 3*e jtemlU 'PbvUdi**
APRIL 1, 1960
Business Leaders Spark New CJA Divisions
Left to right: Alfred H. Daniels, Alex Schneidman,
John Serbin, John Temple, and Robert Macht at
the Mercantile Division luncheon in the Dupont
hotel.
". -< V-;'---
Three prominent business executives are re-
sponsible for inaugurating new CJA Trades Divisions
which have sparked the 1960 campaign.
Alfred H. Daniels, president of Burdine's, and
Robert Macht, president of Jordan Marsh, became
the guiding forces behind the new Department Stores
and Mercantile Division, which last week turned out
50 leaders of these industries at a CJA luncheon in
the Dupont Plaza hotel. The luncheon committee in-
cluded Alex Schneidman. John Serbin. Jack Dia-
mond, Leonard Grossman, Herman Rubin, Morris
Rabinowitz. A. J. Alexander, Theodore Goldstein.
John Temple. Henry D. Rosengarten, and Louis
Reinstein. ( t
The Hialeah Industrial Division, conceived with
the aid of chairman Paul Rimmeir. held their cam-
paign kick-off at a dinner in the Skyways motel.
Highlighted by the enthusiastic response of many
new Trades workers, Rimmeir announced that his
group had scored large increases over last year. ^

Left to right: Victor Reiter, co-chairman, Peul Rim- and Leo Gelvan are seen at the division dinner at
meir, chairman of the Hialeah Industrial Division, the Skyways motel.
Left to right: Harold Grenoff and Maurice Abelson
were among business leaders at the Hialeah Indus-
trial Division luncheon.
IN THIS ISSUE
HIALEAH ........ page 2
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
CORAL GABLES AND
SURFSIDE pge 3
"LES GIRLS" page 4
BETH DAVID AND
HISTADRUT page 5
B'NAI B'RITH page 6
TEMPLES WORK
FOR CJA! page 7
^^^l ? 1 i
^L ^m Wg
Hk' "^m Tn ' w **i
*Jf ^ ^^^t 4 tW! \ m. y^ \A ';^
Aff A m | jfe -1
b9 ^m. Mr wL j
Left to right-. Ted Goldstein, Martin Palmer, Morris at the Mercantile and Department Stores Division
RabinowiU, and Alex Schneidman check assignments I unchegn,________________________________________^^^^rt


PAGE TWO
CJA CAMPAIGN NEWS
APRIL 1
I960
GAINS REGISTERED BY TRADES DIVISION
The Food Division, expecting a banner year,
held its fund-raising luncheon Thursday at the Mi-
ami Springs Villas.
Co-chairmen' of the division are Jerry Blank.
Harold Friedland and Charles E. Gottlieb. Associate
chairman is Emanuel J. Smith.
The Food Division has long been one of the most
active and successful groups of the Combined Jew-
ish Appeal.
This year, with outstanding leaders of the Food
Industry working for the campaign, it is expected
that 1960 will show substantial increases.
Results of the meeting will be reported in the
next issue of the Campaign News.
The Drugs and Sundries Division, under the
leadership of chairman Sam Goldman, held one of
CJA's most successful fund-raising functions Feb 281
at Mt. Sinai Hospital. Over 45 prominent business.
men were on hand to raise over 30 percent more than
last year.
Ernest
Co-chairmen of the division are Jerome AnapoL
ist L Lieberman. GU Press. Sidney Simlcowih
Jerome Stern and Walter Waxman.
Left to right: Sam Stark and Sam Danels |oined the big turn-out of
business leaders at the Hialeah Industrial Division dinner meeting.
Left to right: Yale Ogron, Robert Sussman, and Samuel Alpert are seen at the Hialeah
Industrial dinner meeting.
Left to right: Russell Foust, Robert Somerstein, and Jack Carmel are seenj
accepting work assignments at the successful Hialeah Industrial meeting.!
Left to right: Maurice Kelner, Irving Stern and Philip Bell attended the Hialeah
Industrial Division dinner meeting opening the CJA campaign among business
firms in that area. .
' :". ri?ht LH,rry Auqust, Murray Mat es, and Phil Kent, planning the Foods
Division luncheon at Miami Springs Villas.
Left to right: George A. Simon, Stuart Gordon, Julian Weinkle and Jerry
Blank attend a Campaign Cabinet meeting at the Dupont hotel.

NEW MIAMIANS? Help the CJA learn about newly
arrived AAiam-ans who will give to our campaign if
asked. Phone names to CJA Headquarters, JE 8-4331.
Standing v,etr ij ngh
Lev, Arthur Salomon,
are

Edward Weiss, Ted Malkoff, Marvin Goldman, Alfred
Vv.i',r"R.Uyr to! 6 d Ercne*t Lieb"""- Seated (left to right) are Mrs. Edward
.w*?''..R'y,**lr,n' J"ome Stern, Harry Star, and Jacob PulveY. They attended


forth
Bay Village, Coral Gables, and Surfside Residents
Sponsor Tund-Raisers' for Combined Jewish Appeal
n


I L_
Left to right: Clemen Ehrlich, chairman of North Bay
Village Division, is seen with Morris Sanders, Alfred
Fochs, Leonard Wolfe, Max Roth, and Julius E. Weiner
at their annual CJA dinner.
m
North Bay Village Division of the Combined
Jewish Appeal, headed by Mayor Clemen J.
Ehrlich and Leonard Wolfe, held' Tts annual
fund-raising dinner Sunday evening. Mar. 20,
at the Chariot restaurant on Harbor Island, with
many new residents in attendance.
All three islands, Harbor, North Bay, and
Treasure, were well represented and responded
generously to a stimulating plea for funds by
Sam J. Heiman, president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Pledges totaled 25 percent
more than last year.
Members of the committee who volunteer-
ed to obtain gifts from those who could not at-
tend were Lee Cardozo, Abraham Edelman. Al-
fred Fuchs, Paul Press, Al Richman, Max Roth.
Morris Sanders, and Julian E. Weiner.
In Coral Gables, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Segal
were gracious hosts at a CJA party in their
home. Segal set the tone of the evening by
announcing his own increased gift. Campaign
chairman Harold Thurman addressed the Coral
Gables residents.
Surfside Division held a breakfast at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Howard on Mar. 27.
Dynamic campaign leader Leonard Rosen de-
scribed CJA needs in 1960, and the group of
Surfside residents responded, raising more than
last year. Sidney King was breakfast chair-
man, and Max Kolker was honorary chairman.
r;
^B
[to right: Murray Horowitz, Sam Cohen, Morris Marder, and
Burton attend the North Bay Village dinner for CJA.
Left to right: Nat Maizler, Albert Richman, Paul were on hand at the North Bay Village dinner
Press, Joseph Maskol, and Abraham Edelman held at the Chariot restaurant.
Left to right: Irving Richman, Martin Berger, A.
H. Boyer, Joseph Weil, and A. R. Wolkoff were
at the North Bay Village Division dinner at the
Chariot restaurant.



Left to right: Sam Graubart, Lee Howard, John I. Leibowitz
(standing) and Jack Bernstein are shown planning the
Surfside Division breakfast held Mar. 27 at the Howard
home.
Left to right: Mrs. Joshua Segal, CJA general chairman Har-
old Thurman, Joshua Segal and Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
are seen at a social in their home given by the Segals for
residents of Coral Gables.
Left to right: Paul School, William Brody, and
Seymour Keith were among the many guests at
the North Bay Village Division dinner for CJA.
Left to right: Solomon Siegel, Benjamin Beidner, and Sid-
ney King plan coverage of Surfside prospects King was
chairman of the breakfast held Mar. 27 at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Howard.


PAGE FOUR
CJA CAMPAIGN NEWS
I
les Girls' and 'Coffees' Deliver Needed Pledge Increases
Women's Division CJA Drive
To Inspired Greater Miami
"Les Girl*." a group oi young Miami matrons dedicated to the
cause oi CJA, made the community "tit up and take notice" by com-
ing up with an exciting 138 percent increase over 1959 at its annual
atiair Mar. 22 at the Everglades Rool.
Helping to attain this increase was the unprecedented amount
of 74 new gifts to the Combined Jewish Appeal.
The Les Girls" committee is still hard at work covering the re-
mainder of the cards in the division.
The Women's Division held its first worker's cofJee at the home
of Mrs. Meyer Eggnal*. attended by 35 Miami Beach women,
who will cover over 400 cards.
A series of worker's coffees will follow in other areas of Greater
Miami. The next will be held Apr. 4 at the home of Mrs. William
Weintraub. 9290 N. Bayshore dr.. Miami Shores.
left to ngH- Mr*. Leonard Friedland, Miriam are seen at the br.lliant "Les Girls" luncheon
HUr. and Mrs. Harry Smith held at the Everglades Roof Top.
Left to right: Mrs. Stanley Tare, Mrs. Harold Friadland, and Mrs.
Benedict Silverman attend the successful "Les Girls" luncheon.
Mrs. William Weintraeb *.ll host the sec-
ond C A ,s a vers coffee at net ho~^e on
Apr <
Left to right Mrs. Dan HeHer (seated). Mrs.
Michael Fields, a-a Mrs. Harry Rosenblatt scan
Mss4i prospects at a recent worker's coffee.
left to r.ght Mrs. Ella Wolf, Mrs. Louis Rose, and Mrs. David
S. Denner were at the first worker's coffee for CJA Wome-i.
Miami OtT Women {left to r.ght\
Mrs Sony a
OMftas man. and
Tisst. pa.gr. tor CJA.
-_____ l*f "ght Mrs. Harold Gerrish, Mrs. Isnhmiw Myers, and Mrs.
Prater pUn the* cam- JwKm, Mswfcavor cheerfully s.gn the.r pledges .t the Women's
D

CJA CAMPAIGN NEWS
PAGE FIVE
BETH DAVID AND HISTADRUT TO AID CITY-WIDE
GENERAL SOLICITATION FOR COMBINED APPEAL
Members of Beth David Synagogue Men's
Club and the Ben-Gurion Branch and Ben-Zvi
Branch of Farband will play an active role in the
city-wide General Solicitation for CJA. The Lebe-
diker Branch No. 342 has also accepted cards for
coverage, and looks for 100 percent participation
of their members in this year's campaign.
Co-chairmen of General Solicitation, Paul
Seiderman and Judge Milton A. Friedman, stress-
ed the paramount importance of the CJA cam-
paign in their meetings with officers of religious
and fraternal organizations. "CJA must have top
priority and full support through giving and volun-
teer effort," they urged.
Left to right: Irving Sachs, Andre Bialolenki, and Abe Wernow are Israel Histadrut leaders who will be
working in the CJA campaign.
Left to right: Dr. M. A. Kleiman, George J. Rachlin, and
Alfred M. Lichtblau are among the Beth David members
enrolled in CJA General Solicitation.
Left to right: William Berson, Gut Shaw, and Max Jacobson, members of Beth David, gladly
accept their CJA assignments.
Left to right: M. Forer, Herman Mirowitz, and Mrs. M. Forer are
Histadrut members shown receiving their CJA Worker's Kits.
Left to right: Mrs. Dan Wax and Mrs. Sam Taran sign pledges at the worker's cof-
fee held at the home of Mrs. Meyer Eggnatz.
Left to right: Mrs. Max Oier, Mrs. Murray A. Shaw, and Miss Edna Heller are
seen at the worker's coffee of the CJA Women's Division.
MMMM


PAGE SIX
CJA CAMPATBR
T^"
^
B'NAI B'RITH LODGES AND WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
STEP UP ENTHUSIASTIC PACE OF CARD COVERAGE
B'nai B'rith Lodges kicked off a big card-coverage cam-
paign last week, with North Shore, Coral Gables, Sholem, Mi-
ami Beach and Balkin Lodges spearheading the effort.
According to Paid Seiderman and Judge Milton A. Fried-
man, the ambitious project will involve hundreds of B'na; B'rith
volunteers. "We'll need over 1.000 volunteers to reach all the
prospects who are waiting for a worker to call," they said.
A huge work force was also shaping up this week among
members of the Workmen's Circle at Miami Bead!, "where the
volunteers first made their own contributions to CJA and then
accepted assignments on the Beach.
Left to right: Alfred Aden, Isidore Ruppert,
Max Friedman, Dan Broad, Irving Schatz-
man, Morris Spector, and Jacob Labovitz
are B'nai B'rith members who have enroll-
ed as CJA volunteers.
I
Left to right: Morris Rossein, Jerome Robinson, (seated) Paul Seiderman,
Edward Stern, and Martin Budnick organize their B'nai B'rith Lodges to
cover prospects throughout Dade county.
Left to right: David Silver, Isidore R. Ruppert, Max Hecht, and Jack Adeff
are members of Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai B'rith, working for CJA.
left to right Mrs. Naomi Silverman, Mao-
rice Hyman, Mrs. M. Dobschultz, Mr. M.
Dobschultz, and Arthur Stein, will work in
the Southwest Miami area for CJA.
< OOPERATiOX .
The Jewish National Fund has postponed Ma annual dinner, originally
scheduled in March, out of deference to the Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign. Their meeting will be held on Apr. 21 instead. "Ti.c officers
of the Combined Jewish Appeal campaign appreciate this cooperation on
the part of .INK. and their understanding of the top priority nature of the
Combined Jewish Appeal in the Greater Miami community." stated Sam
Blank and Harold Thurman. general chairman of the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
r.,lC | ",.!.....| i: .4 f h^- .
i
5*m
Sorr^'

Members of Workmen's Circle enrolled in the ranks
for CJA are standing (left to right) Mr. Isadore Co-
ken, Mrs. Anna Goor, Mrs. Evelyn Wiener, Mr. H.
Bernstein, Mr. Shuldiwar. Mr. Greenberg, Mr. Pas-
koff, Mr. Geller, Max Gluberman, Nathan Goon,
Mrs. Ben Swire. Mr. Ben Swire, and Jacob Fisch.
Seated (left to right) are Mrs. Elkin, Mrs. Kate Tlseh-
lor, Mrs. Sarah Levin*, Miss Poster, Mrs. Sarah
Wiener, Mrs. Isadora Cohen, and Mrs. Jacob Pisch.
Li
N
C
Standing (left to right) are Julius Nachman and Irving
Schenker, a CJA co-chairman. Seated are Morris Yoched-
son and Israel Cohen, new CJA volunteers on Miami
Beach com.ng from the B'nai B'rith Lodge.


APRIL 1, 1960
CJA CAMPAIGN NEWS
PAGE SEVEN
Congregations Enlist Their Members for Combined Appeal..
Monticello, Temple Israel, Judea, Tifereth Jacob Working
CJA chairman at Temple Tifereth Jacob of
Hialeah, Mrs. Morris Zatlyn. this week announced
that Temple members would spearhead the CJA
campaign in Hialeah and Miami Springs. The
Sisterhood will receive volunteer support from
Jewish War Veterans Post 681, Flamingo Lodge,
B'nai B'rith, and other organizations. Tifereth
Jacob committee members include Mrs. Sonny
Lever, Mrs. William Schwartzman, and Mrs.
Charles Kirsch.
Other temples and synagogues hard at work
in the county-wide General Solicitation include
Monticello Park Jewish Center, Temple Judea in
Coral Gables, and Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami. Judea's CJA chairman, Max Temchin. heads
a "Minyonaires for CJA" group which will give
manpower to the drive.
Seen at a worker's organization meeting in
Temple Tifereth Jacob are seated (left to right)
Eugene Alexander and Mr*. Nat Becker, past
president, Sisterhood, Temple Tifereth Jacob.
Standing (left to right) are Mrs. Morris Zatlyn,
chairman of CJA, Temple Tifereth Jacob; Leon
Silverman, JWV Post 681, Mrs. Max Stein
and Mrs. Rom Brower, president. Sisterhood
Temple Tifereth Jacob.
Left to right: Sidney Gersh, Mrs. Gersh, Judy Weinstein, and Jacob
Gersh (standing right) are among the many Temple Israel volun-
teers helping the CJA campaign.
Left to right: Miss Pat Weiner, Miss Ann Kaufman, Miss Celia Ickovitz, and
Miss Rom Meyers are some of the Temple Israel younger set to -become
CJA workers.
Seen at a Temple Judea meeting of the "M inyonaires" are (left to right) H. Stern,
Philip Rice, Rev. George Goldberg, Max Temchin, CJA chairman, Rev. Isadore Pearl-
man, and Samuel Wernick.
Left to right Cantor Ben-Zion Kirshenbaum, Herb Heiken, pres- Nat Ostrov, CJA co-chairman, and Mrs. Frank Berg, meet at
ident, Miami Beach Lodge, B'nai B'rith, Jack Diamond, president, Monticello Park Jewish Center to plan their neighborhood CJA
c
JVe
lews
Published by the
Combined Jewish Appeal
OF THE GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION
AN< a-d HAROLD THURMAN
General Chairman
I960 Combined Jew.jh Appeal
SAM J HE'MAN
Pretldt-t
ARTHUR S ROS'CHAN
Executive Di-ector
ROBERT H. GOLDEN
Campaign Director
CHARGES R JACOaSON
P0 [ -, OilMOf


^
PAGE EIGHT
CJA CAMPAIGN NEWS
APRIL 1, I960
I
An Open Letter
TO THOSE WHO CARE
By HERBERT H. LEHMAN
I RAVB accepted a major responsibility in the 1960 campaign of
the United Jewish Appeal. I did so because I am convinced that an
extraordinary effort is needed to meet an extraordinary situation.
For more than two decades we have engaged in a vast struggle
to assure the survival of the Jewish victims of war and persecution.
Our efforts have met with almost miraculous success.
Great Needs Continue
We have helped more than two and one half million people along
the road to dignity and self-respect. Almost a million of these have
gone to Israel, which stands as a beacon of democracy among the
world's new nations. Today, no Jew with the chance to build a new
life for himself by resettlement need lose it for want of a country to
which to go.
Yet, there is the gravest danger that this very success may blind
many to the fact that lives still depend on us.
There are thousands who must be resettled in lands where they
can live in security and dignity as Jews.
Thousands Live in Shacks
There are tens of thousands, even among those who have gone to
Israel, who exist unJer indescribable conditions in the tin and tar--
paper shacks of immigrant camps.
There are the ill, the aged, the blind, the broken remnants of the
Nazi holocaust. All still look to us for help.
Their stories may no longer make the headlines but their netd
and their suffering are great indeed. The test we face today is whether
we are mature enough to recognize this fact and to act upon it.
We Must Show We Still Care
There are hundreds of thousands throughout the world waiting and
wondering whether we will meet that testwhether we still care.
// has never been more important for us to prove that we do.
That is why I have agreed to serve as Honorary General Chair-
man of the United Jewish Appeal. And that is why I call upon my
fellow Americans to join me in rededication to this vital effort for
the salvation of thousands of unfortunate human beings who depend
on us for their chance at life.
IN 1960, UJA MUST EXTINO THIS VITAL AID:
In Israel: Speed integration of 345,000 unabsorbed immigrants by:
Rehousing 60,000 living in disgraceful immigrant shanties; replac-
ing substandard housing for 30,000 others;
Providing 130,000 patient pioneers on farm settlements with
needed machinery, water, tools and livestock;
Providing vital services to 38,000 immigrant youth; expanding
welfare services to thousands or' ill and aged;
Supplying transportation and resettlement for the steady flow of
new immigrants. In addition, meet continuing welfare needs of
45,000 immigrants aided by JDC-Malben programs.
In Europe, Moslem lands: Step up welfare and other aid for 205,000.
In the United States: Help 5,000 refugees seeking to build new lives.
To Aid 600,000 ... Including Israel's Unabsorbed Immigrants
United Jewish Appeal
On behalf of
UNITED ISRAEL APPEAL-JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE-N. Y. ASSN. FOR NEW AMERICANS-UNITED HIAS SERVICE (through the UJA Special Fund).
IN GREATER MIAMI, THE UJA RECEIVES SUPPORT
FROM YOUR COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL CAMPAIGI